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» flC HOSS TH E COr^TI|^E|^T 

Leaving Boston September 7 and October 15, 1891. 






INCIDENTAL VISIT TO THE YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK. 



W. RAYMOND, I. A. WHITCOMLB, 

" ' 296 WasUiiig-ton Street (opposite School Street), Boston, Mass. 

\ 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/grandexcursionof45raym 



SEASON OF^ 1801=Q3. 



GRAND EXCURSION OF SIXTY-ONE DAYS, 

INCLUDING A VISIT TO THE 

YEIiLOWSTOIlE llATIOpL PflHK 

WITH AN ADDED TOUR 

A.CltOSS THE CONTINENT 

AND TO THE 

SCENIC POINTS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST AND CALIFORNIA. 



A Week in Wonderland, Incidental Visits to the Chief Cities of Washington, Oregon, and British Coium* 
bia, the Cascade Mountains, Puget Sound Country, Mount Shasta Region, Sacramento Valley, San 
Francisco, Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Jose, Mount Hannilton, San Rafael, Santa Barbara, Los 
Angeles, San Gabriel, Pasadena, Redondo Beach, San Diego, Coronado Beach, River- 
side, Redlands, Las Vegas Hot Springs, Chicago, Niagara Falls, Etc. 



Date of Leaving Boston, Monday, September 7. 

The Sojourn in California to be Extended at Pleasure. 



Price of Tickets (All Traveling Expenses Included), $525.00. 
w. rayniond, i. a. whitcomb, 

296 Washington St. (opp. School St.), Boston, Mass. 

AMERICAN PRINTING & ENGRAVING CO., 60 ARCH ST., BOSTON. 



Suggestions in Regard to Joining a Party. 

Persons desiring to join any one of our parties should send their names to be regis- 
tered at as early a date as convenient. A name is registered as soon as there is an 
intention of going, and this registration secures a place in the cars, at hotels where 
sojourns may be made, and in every way insures membership in the party. No pay- 
ment of money is required in this connection, and no responsibility is incurred. If 
circumstances prevent the person from going, early notice of the fact should be sent to 
us, and the name will be taken from the list, the next applicant being permitted to fill 
the vacancy. Tickets can be taken and paid for at the convenience of the passenger 
any time to within three or four days of the date of departure, and, should the passen- 
ger then be prevented from going, the money will be refunded. The advantage of 
sending in names early is readily seen. In all cases the parties are limited in numbers 
and it frequently occurs that the lists are filled long before the dates of departure. 
Persons are not compelled to come to Boston for the purpose of joining an excursion, 
but may connect with the train at any convenient point along the route. 



THE YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK 

AND 

THE Pacific Coast. 



September 7 to November 6. 



WE shall supplement our regular trips to the Yellowstone National Park and 
the Pacific Northwest with a tour of the same scope and extent through 
those wonderful regions, and a farther excursion to the most picturesque 
sections of California. The entire length of two of the longest transcontinental railways 
will be traversed — the Northern Pacific, which lies along the northern frontier of our 
country, and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, which extends through the southern 
border-land; while the intermediate journeys on the Pacific Coast lie over another 
great railway line — the Southern Pacific Company's — for over 1,500 miles. Our 
journey along the Pacific Coast includes the great stretch of country lying between 
Victoria, the capital of British Columbia, and San Diego, which is situated on the 
extreme southern border line of California. The route of the excursion combines in 
its constant succession of grand features the most diversified and picturesque scenery 
upon the continent. 

The western journey will be broken in several pleasant places, and there will be 
short but restful sojourns at cities on the way. A week will be passed in the Yellow- 
stone National Park, a region full of natural wonders, of which explorers and travelers 

3 



have told us something, but which nevertheless demand a personal inspection to aid 
the mind in comprehending the marvels the best writers can but feebly describe. This 
period is much longer than is usually taken by tourists in making a round of the park ; 
and the possibilities thus afforded, both in the way of sight-seeing and in an easy and 
restful journey, will be appreciated. The farther trip westward over the Northern 
Pacific Railway discloses the grand scenery of the Rocky Mountains, Lake Pend 
d'Oreille, and the Cascade Mountains. There will be an excursion on Puget Sound, 
with visits to Victoria, the capital of British Columbia, Seattle, and Tacoma. An 
inspection of Portland and a steamer trip on the Columbia River will be other features 
of interest before the party will turn southward towards California. The journey 
from Portland to San Francisco will be made by the magnificent overland route, which 
brings into view the beautiful mountain scenery of Southern Oregon and Northern 
California. Near the^lieadwaters of the Sacramento is glorious Mount Shasta, one of 
the grandest mountain forms on the American continent. The time to be passed in 
San Francisco will be sufficient to afford the tourist a leisurely inspection of that inter- 
esting city and its picturesque surroundings. There will be side trips to San Rafael, 
San Jose, Mount Hamilton, Santa Cruz, and the beautiful Hotel del Monte at Mon- 
terey, and a later journey to Southern California, with ample time for visits to the 
Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees. This trip is easily made in a 
side excursion from Berenda via Raymond. From all points in Central and Southern 
California the return tickets are good for six months, so that persons can prolong 
their stay through the winter at their own option. Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San 
Gabriel, Pasadena, Redondo Beach, San Diego, Coronado Beach, Riverside, and Red- 
lands, are the places in Southern California to which special visits are to be made, 
either with the party or on any subsequent dates that may suit individual preferences. 

4 



The homeward route will be over the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe line, which ex- 
tends through Arizona and New Mexico (the border-land of the South), Colorado, and 
Kansas. From Kansas City we proceed over the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 
Railway to Chicago, and thence via the Chicago & Grand Trunk and its eastern con- 
nections, paying a visit of inspection to Niagara Falls on the way. 

From Boston to Chicago. 

The party will leave Boston Monday, September 7, at 3.00 p. M., via the Hoosac 
Tunnel line, from the Fitchburg Railroad station. The West Shore Railroad will 
be traversed from Rotterdam Junction to Suspension Bridge, and the Southern Di- 
vision of the Grand Trunk and the Chicago & Grand Trunk lines from that point 
westward to Chicago. 

Chicago will be reached Wednesday morning, and there will be a transfer to the 
popular Sherman House, where there will be a sojourn until Thursday afternoon. 

From Chicago to St. Paul and Minneapolis. 

Leaving Chicago Thursday afternoon by the Wisconsin Central line (station at the 
corner of Harrison street and Fifth avenue), the party will proceed through Wiscon- 
sin to St. Paul. On arrival in that city, Friday morning, the passengers will be trans- 
ferred to the Hotel Ryan, and in the course of the day there will be a carriage ride 
with visits to the chief business and residence sections of the town, the Capitol, Sum- 
mit avenue, Observatory, Fort Snelling, etc. 

Saturday morning the party will proceed to the neighboring city of Minneapolis, 
where Sunday will be passed at the elegant West Hotel. There will be a carriage ride 
Saturday afternoon with visits to the chief points of interest in Minneapolis and its 
charming suburbs, including Minnehaha Falls. 

5 



Westward on the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

Monday morning the westward journey will be resumed, the route lying over the 
main line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. The train will leave Minneapolis at 9.35 

A. M. 

We are to traverse, in two nearly equal stages, the entire length of the Northern 
Pacific Railroad, which stretches along our northern border from the Mississippi to 
Puget Sound, and through those coming empires. North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, and 
Washington. The great transcontinental line has brought within access of the tourist 
some of the most wonderful scenery on the face of the globe, and for its entire distance 
a country that is remarkably attractive. 

The first stage of this magnificent railway trip will take us to the Yellowstone 
National Park. We first ascend the Mississippi Valley, passing through a rich and 
fruitful section of Minnesota. Then we traverse the new State of North Dakota. 
For a time we are in the great wheat belt of the Northwest, and actually upon some 
of the famous bonanza wheat farms. The Red River and the Missouri are both 
crossed by the railway line, and upon the banks of the latter stream is situated the 
thriving capital of the State — Bismarck. On the western bank of the Missouri, oppo- 
site Bismarck, is the flourishing railway city of Mandan. Near the western border of 
North Dakota, and a little over 600 miles from St. Paul, we pass through the northerly 
section of the famous " Bad Lands." A mile west of the station of Sentinel Butte, the 
train crosses the State line and enters the new State of Montana, which possesses the 
princely domain of 143,776 square miles. At Glendive we reach the Yellowstone 
Valley, which we traverse the remainder of the way to the Yellowstone National 
Park. 

6 



Through the Upper Yellowstone Valley. 

Leaving the main line of the Northern Pacific Railroad at Livingston we shall turn 
southward and ascend the Yellowstone Valley fifty-one miles farther to Cinnabar, 
which lies only a short distance from the northern border of the National Park. We 
are now fairly in the mountain region, and the scenery of the upper valley is certainly 
magnificent, a fitting prelude to the wonders of the park. 

Conveyance is had from Cinnabar to Mammoth Hot Springs, a distance of seven 
miles, by Wakefield's stage line, and the hotel will be reached about 12.00 M. 

The Mammoth Hot Springs. 

The afternoon of Wednesday can be devoted to the rare sights of this wonderful 
region. The springs have built up a series of remarkable terraces on the west side of 
a little plateau, or basin, 1,000 feet above the Gardiner River, into which their waters 
flow. On the opposite side of the river rises the long, rugged mass of Mount Evarts, 
which has an elevation of 7,600 feet, or 1,213 feet higher than the plateau. The whole 
plateau and the steep slopes extending down to the river are mainly composed of 
calcareous deposits, resulting from springs and geysers now extinct. There are no 
active geysers at the ]^d resent time in this basin ; but two large cones of extinct geysers, 
stand at no great distance from the hotel, and are almost the first objects to attract 
attention. These are " Liberty Cap," an isolated shaft forty-five feet in height and 
twenty feet in diameter at its base, and '* Giant's Thumb," or "Liberty Cap No. 2," 
about 100 yards distant, and smaller. Both show signs of considerable age, and are 
gradually crumbling away. All around are a number of shallow basins ; and in other 
parts of the plateau are cavities and caverns, from which hot springs probably flowed 
at some period more or less remote. The beautiful terraces now in process of forma- 

7 



tion below the active springs are the most interesting objects to be seen, however. 
The recent deposits, on which the springs are at present situated, occupy about 170 
acres. 

On the Road into the Park. 

I.eaving the hotel at Mammoth Hot Springs Thursday morning, the party will pro- 
ceed to the Yellowstone Falls and Caiion via the Norris Geyser Basin. This journey 
and the subsequent trips about the park will be made in comfortable wagons. The early 
part of the ride lies over a road which ascends the banks of Glen Creek to the Golden 
Gate and Rustic Falls, near which is Kingman's Pass, 7,300 feet above the sea. 
On the plateau above, from which a grand view is had of Electric Peak, Quadrant 
Mountain, Bell's Peak and Mount Holmes, Swan Lake is situated. Willow Park is 
the name given to a little region which has often served as a camping-piace, and 
which is a noted resort for elk. Nor far beyond are the famous Obsidian Cliffs and 
Beaver Lake. There is a ridge 1,000 feet in length, and from 150 to 250 feet in 
height, rising in almost vertical columns from the eastern shore of the little lake. 
This mass is composed of volcanic glass. Later on we come to the Norris or Gibbon 
Geyser Basin. 

The Norris or Gibbon Geyser Basin. 

This is the highest geyser basin in the park, its elevation being 7,530 feet above the 
ocean level, and it covers an area of about six square miles. There are numerous 
springs of water and mud, and a few veritable geysers from which water or mud 
gushes forth. One of these, the " Monarch," ejects a column of water to the height 
of 100 feet. The mud geysers are strange objects. Mud of various tints and states 
of consistency is thrown out or seen continually seething and bubbling. Dr. Peale 



enumerates ninety-seven springs of various kinds within this basin. The peculiari- 
ties here noticed are the absence of any very great accumulation of deposits, the 
newness of some of the important geysers, and the abundance of iron and sulphur. 

The Yellowstone Falls. 

From the Norris Geyser Basin we proceed to the Grand Cafion Hotel. This estab- 
lishment, erected in 1890, is situated upon an elevated plateau west of the Grand 
Cafion of the Yellowstone, and about half a mile from the Lower Fall. It is one of 
the best appointed hotels in the park, and has good accommodations for a much larger 
number of guests than the old house. At the head of the upper fall the river has a 
width of about eighty feet, and the waters plunge over a shelf between walls that are 
from 200 to 300 feet in height, upon a partially submerged reef 112 feet below. Dense 
clouds of spray and mist veil fully one-third of the cataract from view. 

Half a mile below is the Lower or Great Fall, which is grander and more impressive 
than the other, though not more picturesque. Here the waters pour into the fearful 
abyss of the Grand Cafion, the sheer descent being 300 feet. The wooded slopes of 
the gorge tower far above the flood, and one has to descend a steep incline to reach a 
platform which serves as a good view-point at the verge of the fall. The best views, 
however, are had farther down the trail, where many jutting points afford an outlook 
into the wonderful canon. Clouds of mist ascend from the foot of the falls, and the 
walls are covered with a rank growth of mosses and algce. Midway between the two 
falls the road crosses Cascade Creek, which flows down to the Yellowstone from the 
slopes of Mount Washburne. There are here three beautiful little falls known as the 
Crystal Cascades, 129 feet in height; and directly beneath the bridge is the "Grotto 
Pool." 

9 



The Grand Canon of the Yellowstone. 
The canon may be well considered the greatest of the park marvels. The height of 
the plateau at the falls is about 7,800 feet. It increases slightly northeastward, until, 
in passing the mountains, it has an elevation of about 8,000 feet. Thence northward 
it decreases in height rapidly, and at the mouth of Tower Creek it reaches but 7,200 
feet. At the head of the Upper Fall the river level is but a few feet below the top of 
the plateau. This fall adds 112 and the Lower Fall 300 feet to the depth of the chasm. 
From the foot of this fall to the mouth of East Fork the total descent is 1,304 feet in 
a distance of twenty-four miles, being an average of 54.3 per mile. As far as the 
extremity of the Washburne Mountains, a distance of twelve miles, the canon continues 
to increase in depth, both by the fall of the stream and the rise of the plateau ; and the 
extreme depth, 1,200 feet, is attained at this point. Thence the depth decreases 
rapidly, and at the mouth of Tower Creek it is but 500 or 600 feet deep on the west 
side, and about 1,000 feet on the east side. Cold topographical facts and figures are 
quickly forgotten when the beholder gazes down into the gigantic rift. Neither pen 
nor pencil can do justice to its stupendous grandeur or its marvelous coloring, wherein 
it differs essentially from any similar scenic feature of the world's diversified surface. 

Yellowstone Lake. 

From the Falls and Canon we proceed to Yellowstone Lake. On the road some 
remarkable mud geysers are passed. 

Yellowstone Lake, the largest body of water in North America at this altitude (7,740 
feet), and one of the largest in the world at so high an elevation above sea-level, pre- 
sents a superficial area of 139 square miles and a shore line of nearly 100 miles. It is 
shaped roughly, like an outspread hand, with a clearly defined though overgrown 



thumb, but with hardly the regulation number of fingers. The outlet is at the wrist, 
and the new hotel is pleasantly situated a short distance therefrom. It occupies a bold 
bluff upon the shores of the lake, and overlooks a wide expanse of its fair surface and 
the beautiful mountains beyond. The lofty summits in the southward extension of the 
Absorakas, culminating in Mounts Doane, Langford, Stevenson, Silver Tip, Chitten- 
den, and Cathedral Peak, all over 10,000 feet high, and Eagle Peak, which rises 
to the still greater height of 11,100 feet, occupy the southeast corner of the park 
reservation beyond the lake. Between two and three miles from the hotel is the Nat- 
ural Bridge, which has been worn out by a little stream which descends from the moun- 
tains to the lake ; and at the " Thumb," seventeen miles distant, is another group of 
geysers. 

From the Lake to Upper Geyser Basin. 

On leaving the lake we retrace our way down the Yellowstone Valley about nine 
miles, and then crossing the Hayden Valley, reach Trout Creek, where we dine. We 
then cross the mountains, reaching an elevation of 8,336 feet at Mary's Lake, and 
descend the west slope to Nez Perces Creek, which we follow about ten miles to the 
Lower Geyser Basin. From this point the road ascends the valley of the Firehole 
River to the Upper Geyser Basin. 

The Upper Geyser Basin and its Wonders. 

The Upper Geyser Basin is a nearly level tract inclosed by low hills, with the Fire- 
hole River flowing through it, and mainly upon the east side are found the chief geysers 
of this marvelous region. The basin has an area of about four square miles and a 
general elevation of 7,372 feet. Dr. A. C. Peale (in Hayden's Report) enumerates 440 
springs and geysers within this territory, including twenty-six distinct geysers. There 
had been discovered within the park previous to 1878, according to the same authority. 



2,195 springs and geysers, including seventy-one active geysers. These figures resulted 
from only a partial survey of the region. The Upper Basin group includes, with others, 
the following : *' Old Faithful," " Castle," " Bee Hive," " Giant,', " Giantess," 
" Grotto," " Grand," "Oblong," "Splendid," "Comet," "Fan," "Riverside," "Tur- 
ban," " Saw Mill," " Lion," and " Lioness." These are scattered over the surface of 
the basin, chiefly along the river-bank, " Old Faithful " being at the southern extremity, 
and the " Fan " and " Riverside " at the northern end, near where the wagon road 
enters the basin. The " Grotto," " Giant," " Oblong," and " Castle " are near the road. 
The " Bee Hive," with its handsome cone, from which the geyser takes its name, 
together with the " Giantess " and " Lion " group, is upon the opposite side of the 
river from the hotel. Many beautiful springs are in proximity to the gey- 
sers, forming objects of interest second only to the mammoth fountains of hot 
water. The springs have generally great depth and clearness, and the beholder can 
examine minutely the delicate formations far beneath the surface. The edges are in 
many cases scalloped and variously tinted, causing the deep blue spring and its exquis- 
itely colored border to resemble a mammoth flower. One spring bears the appro- 
priate name of the "Morning Glory." Another very beautiful spring is situated quite 
near the " Castle " Geyser. There is no hour when the subterranean forces are inact- 
ive, and the Upper Geyser Basin at all times presents a strikingly weird scene. 
Strange sights and sounds greet the stranger on every side. Clouds of steam arise 
from a dozen different localities, some of the springs being hidden in the timber which 
covers the neighboring mountain-sides. 

The ^'Excelsior" Geyser, and "Prismatic" Lake. 
Leaving the hotel in the Upper Geyser Basin Monday morning, the party will pro- 
ceed to the Fountain Geyser Hotel, in the Lower Geyser Basin. A halt will be made 



on the way for the purpose of inspecting the great " Excelsior " Geyser, " Turquoise " 
Spring, and " Prismatic" Lake, all of which lie on the west bank of the river. The 
" Excelsior," the largest geyser known in the world, burst forth into great activity three 
years ago, after a period of inaction lasting about six years. The eruptions continued 
until the early part of 1889, when they again ceased. A great dome of water, often 
accompanied by lavatic stones, was thrown into the air to the height of between 200 
and 300 feet, while the accompanying column of steam rose 1,000 feet or more. The 
crater is an immense pit 330 feet in length and 200 feet in width at the widest part, the 
cliff-like and treacherous walls being from fifteen to twenty feet high from the boiling 
waters to the surrounding level. Since that time this powerful geyser has again been 
in operation, and its displays naturally constitute one of the truly great sights in the 
Park. The name of " Cliff Cauldron " was given to it by the Hayden Survey in 187 1, 
and it was not until some years later that it was discovered to be a true geyser. 
" Hell's Half Acre " is another expressive name bestowed upon this terrible pit. Two 
rivulets pour forth from this cauldron and from the neighboring springs, and the de- 
posits along their channels are very brilliantly colored. 

The " Turquoise " Spring, near the " Excelsior," is beautiful in its rich tints of blue ; 
and " Prismatic " Lake, also near at hand, is another wonderful display of color. The 
latter is said to be the largest body of hot water in the world. 

The Lower Geyser Basin. 

This basin is a wide valley, with an area of between thirty and forty square miles, 
having an average elevation of 7,236 feet, or about 150 less than the Upper Geyser 
Basin, from six to ten miles distant. Above this the surrounding plateau rises from 
400 to 800 feet, the slopes being heavily timbered. In this section Dr. Hayden's party 



found 693 springs, including the Egeria Springs of the Midway Basin, among which 
the '' Excelsior " Geyser and " Prismatic " Lake are counted. The " Great Fount- 
ain," which ejects a stream of water to the height of 150 feet or more, is the most im- 
portant geyser in this vicinity, with the exception of the " Excelsior," already men- 
tioned. There is a smaller " Fountain " Geyser that is seen by tourists, the " Great 
Fountain " not being readily accessible. This plays several times daily and makes a 
beautiful display. One of the greatest wonders of this region is known as the " Mam- 
moth Paint Pots." In a crater forty feet or more in diameter there are numerous 
mud springs, in which the material cast forth has the appearance of paint of different 
colors. The pasty material is exceedingly fine to the touch, and, as it bubbles up, 
generally assumes for a moment some floral form. 

At the Mammoth Hot Springs Again. 
Tuesday will be devoted in part to the journey from the Fountain Geyser Hotel to 
the Mammoth Hot Springs. The route is via the Norris Geyser Basin Hotel, where 
dinner will be provided. The beautiful Gibbon Falls are passed on the way. The 
party will reach the hotel at Mammoth Hot Springs in the afternoon. The night and 
the succeeding forenoon will be passed at the Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel. 

From the National Park Westward. 

After the tour through the Yellowstone National Park, the party will leave 
Mammoth Hot Springs on the afternoon of Wednesday, September 23, returning to 
Cinnabar by stage, and from that place to Livingston by rail. At the latter point we 
resume our western journey on the main line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 
Climbing the picturesque Belt Mountains, we go through a tunnel 3,500 feet in length, 
at an elevation of 5,572 feet, and upon the west side of the range come first to Fort 

14 



Ellis and then to Bozeman, one of Montana's most flourishing cities. Ninety-eight 
miles west of Bozeman is Helena, the capital of the State and a city of nearly 
2g,ooo inhabitants. Not far west of Helena we begin the ascent of the main range of 
the Rocky Mountains, and twenty-one miles distant from that city pass through the 
Mullan Tunnel, at an elevation of 5,548 feet above the sea, emerging upon the Pacific 
slope. The region lying west of the mountains and south of the railroad is very rich 
in minerals, and there are many productive gold mines in the tributary country. We 
descend Hell Gate River to Missoula, and at no great distance west of that place the 
road crosses several deep defiles. One of these, Marent Gulch, is crossed by a trestle 
bridge 866 feet long and 226 feet high. Surmounting the Bitter Root Mountains, we 
leave the State of Montana and enter the new State of Idaho. Idaho comprises 86,294 
square miles, and its population is nearly 50,000, exclusive of 5,000 Indians. The 
road follows down Clark's Fork, a swift and turbulent stream, for a considerable 
distance, passing through a number of bold rock gorges, where road building was both 
difficult and costly. Turning northwest, the road rounds the lovely Lake Pend 
d'Oreille. This is a beautiful sheet of water amid the mountains. The railroad 
traverses only a narrow strip of Idaho, the distance from the eastern to the 
western border being about seventy-eight miles only. Entering Washington, we 
traverse a broad plain, and nineteen miles west of the State line reach Spokane Falls? 
one of the oldest as well as one of the most flourishing inland cities of the Pacific 
Northwest. The falls themselves are in the city, and furnish water-power for flouring 
mills and other extensive manufacturing interests. 

The Cascade Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 
The Cascade Mountains divide the State of Washington into two unequal divisions, 
about two-thirds of its area of 69,994 square miles being upon the east side of the 

15 



range. Washington and Oregon are practically alike, and the great Columbia River 
basin embraces a part of both. Within the limits of this section, which maybe roughly 
estimated as being 150 miles wide and nearly 500 miles long, there are a score of val- 
leys, some of which are larger than certain European principalities. The conditions 
are, in a large part of the tract, excellent for cereal crops, and wheat is a leading 
product. The Cascade Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad leaves the old line 
at Pasco, three miles from Ainsworth, and opens more direct communication with the 
tide waters of the Pacific Ocean, and also establishes a through line over the company's 
own roadway. 

At an elevation of 2,809 ^^^^ we pass through the Stampede Tunnel, which has an 
extent of 9,850 feet, and is lighted by electricity. In the descent on the west slopes 
the views down into the ravines and across to the summits of the mountains are varied 
and grand. The great snow-covered dome of Mount^Tacoma (elevation 14,444 feet) is 
the dominant feature, and there are many glorious glimpses of this beautiful mountain 
form. The Green River, a pure mountain stream, with here and there in its lower 
reaches deep, green pools, is followed for a considerable distance down the west side, 
and later the more peaceful Puyallup is reached. The road runs in proximity to the 
great coal fields on both sides of the mountains, and also through the great hop-grow- 
ing district of Washington. 

Puget Sound. 

We shall spend several days upon and near Puget Sound, sailing through its entire 
extent and visiting its important ports. The sound has an area of 2,000 square miles, 
with an irregular shore line of 1,800 miles. The shores are generally densely wooded 
with gigantic fir trees, and at several points are immense saw mills. There are many 
islands, and for the most part they are covered with timber like the mainland. There 

16 



is deep water everywhere, and at hundreds of places large ships could be loaded di- 
rectly from the shore if necessary. The lumber and coal trade of the sound is very 
great and constantly increasing. The shores are in many places abrupt, and high 
mountains seem to environ this beautiful body of water. 

Seattle. 

We first visit Seattle, which is situated on the east coast of Eliot Bay. A terrible 
conflagration destroyed nearly the entire business section of the place June 6, 1889- 
but the new Seattle is more substantial and handsomer than the old, and in many 
ways a gratifying indication of the pluck, energy, and business enterprise of her citi- 
zens. With a population of 43,914, according to the last census, an increase of 39,381 
in ten years, the city has assumed a foremost place among the busy marts of the Pa- 
cific Northwest. During our stay in Seattle The Rainier will be our headquarters. 

Port Townsend. 

We shall leave Seattle by steamer for Victoria early Saturday afternoon, going via 
Port Townsend. This latter city stands at the head of the Strait of Juan de Fuca, 
and is the chief American town on the west side of the sound. It is beautifully situ- 
ated upon a series of bluffs and commands a noble outlook upon the mountains. It 
has commercial advantages which are being rapidly developed. 

Victoria, the Capital of British Columbia. 

We shall reach Victoria in the afternoon, and the famous Driard House will be our 
resting-place through Sunday. The city presents many interesting features to the 
stranger, and the walks and drives in the vicinity are charming. The government 
buildings, which are in the Swiss style, are across St. James's Bay. The English 
government has a well-equipped naval station at Esquimalt. There is a populous 

17 



''Chinatown " within the city, and a reservation of the Songhish Indians just across 
the inner harbor. 

Tacoma. 

We shall return up the sound by steamer, and pass Monday at Tacoma, a stirring 
American city, which has grown from a population of 1,098 in 18S0 to 35,858 in 1890. 
The Tacoma, a large first-class hotel, will be our headquarters here. Like Seattle, 
Tacoma looks out upon the waters of the sound, and the mountains, the dominating 
feature of the view being Mount Tacoma. The streets are lined with commodious 
and stately business blocks, and the wharves with ships and steamers from all climes. 

Portland, Oregon. 

After viewing the chief cities of Washington, we shall visit Oregon, journeying by 
the Northern Pacific Railroad from Tacoma to Portland. 

Portland is the northwestern metropolis, and it is enjoying a steady and substantial 
growth. It has recently absorbed some of the neighboring municipalities, and at 
present includes a population of nearly 75,000. The business thoroughfares are lined 
with fine edifices, and some of the residences on the upper streets are very tasteful, as 
well as elegant and costly. The Chinese form a large element in the population, and 
have numerous shops on Second street. From the slopes in rear of the city there are 
superb views of the Willamette Valley and of the two beautiful mountains. Mount 
Hood and Mount St. Helen's. During our visit the new and magnificent hotel, The 
Portland, will be made our headquarters. This establishment has been erected by a 
company of citizens at a cost of about $750,000, and is one of the finest hotels on the 
Pacific Coast. It occupies a whole square in one of the pleasantest and healthiest 
sections of the city, and has been furnished in a lavish manner. Its manager is Mr. 

18 



Charles E. Leland, a member of a famous hotel-keeping family, and personally popular 
through his connection with well-known Eastern hotels. A carriage ride will aid the 
visitors in gaining a comprehensive idea of the handsome city. 

The Columbia River. 

We shall leave Portland Wednesday evening and ascend the shores of the Columbia 
River by railway as far as Dalles City. Here we shall pass the night, sleeping on our 
Pullman train, and the succeeding day, Thursday, October i, will be devoted to the 
steamer trip back to Portland. The scenery upon the Columbia is unlike anything 
seen in our previous travels. It is unique and picturesque, often sublime. The great 
river breaks through the gigantic barrier of the Cascade Mountains, and for fifty miles 
is guarded by huge walls of stone or lonely, forest-clad slopes. There are few settle- 
ments, and the beholder looks upon Nature in her wildest and grandest aspects. There 
are many fine views of Mount Hood to be had from the steamer. As the river at the 
cascades is unnavigable, there is a transfer by a narrow-gauge railway ; and at a land- 
ing six miles below the point of departure we take a second steamer. The scenery on 
the lower river is grandly picturesque. Castle Rock, the Pillars of Hercules, and 
Rooster Rock are strange rock forms near the shore. 

Cape Horn is a tongue of forest-clad mountain that projects into the river from the 
north bank, and forms, just above it, a picturesque little bay. On the Oregon shore are 
several cascades which almost rival in loftiness those in the Yosemite Valley. Multno- 
mah Fall makes two great plunges before it reaches the river, 800 feet in all; and 
Oneonta is another beautiful fall nearly as high. Latourelle and Bridal Veil are the 
names of two others. Flashes of foam, high amid the trees of the mountain-side, 
mark the presence of many unnamed and unvisited cascades. Vancouver, a handsome 

19 



town, occupying the site of old Fort Vancouver and still an important military post, is 
passed a few miles above the junction of the Columbia and the Willamette. On the 
Willamette River, three miles from its mouth and nine miles below Portland, there is a 
glorious mountain view — five giant peaks being seen at once. Fifty miles east is the 
beautiful white cone of Mount Hood, 11,025 ^^^t high, one of the most stately and 
impressive peaks in America; sixty miles northeasterly, Mount St. Helen's, 9,750 feet 
high; seventy-five miles distant and a little farther eastward. Mount Adams, 9,570 
feet; seventy-five miles southeasterly, and peering over the low ranges, Mount Jeffer- 
son, 9,020 feet; and one hundred miles north, with its superior height dwarfed by the 
distance. Mount Tacoma, 14,444 f^^t above the sea. 

From Portland to San Francisco. 

Returning to Portland late Thursday afternoon, we shall dine at The Portland, and 
at 7.00 the same evening take the cars on the Southern Pacific Company's Mount 
Shasta route tor San Francisco. We first ascend the broad and fruitful Willamette 
Valley, passing through Oregon City, Salem, Albany, and other towns of importance. 
At Oregon City the falls of the Willamette are seen. Salem is the capital of the 
State. Crossing from the Willamette Valley to that of the Rogue River, the road 
ascends the latter through several pretty towns, and not far beyond Ashland reaches 
the great wall of the vSiskiyou Mountains. There are two long tunnels through which 
the railroad runs. The old stage road passed over the mountains at an elevation of 
4,300 feet. The California State line is crossed not far from Cole's, which was for- 
merly a fanious stage station. The road descends to the Klamath Valley, and at many 
points the outlook is grand in the extreme. The gigantic snow-covered mass of Mount 
Shasta stands out boldly in the northern approach, especially when seen from the 

20 



Shasta Valley or from Strawberry Valley. Mount Pitt (9,500 feet), Goose Nest (8,500 
feet), Muir's Peak, or Black Butte (6,i5ofeet high), and the Scott Mountains (9,000 feet)^ 
as well as the Siskiyou range, through which we have passed (from 6,000 to 8,000 feet), 
are also prominent objects ; but the magnificent presence of Shasta dwarfs them all. 
For many hours the train is near this lofty peak, passing, in fact, upon three sides of 
the mountain. Viewed from the north, it appears to rise almost from a level plain ; 
and at Sisson's, where the traveler is only eight miles distant, the mountain also 
assumes gigantic proportions. There are two summits, one of which is 14,442 feet, 
and the other 12,940 feet high. At Acme the railroad has an elevation of 3,902 feet. 
The scenery along the upper Sacramento is very picturesque. There are numerous 
cascades amid the forest-clad slopes, and looking backward many grand glimpses are 
caught of the noble mountain peak. Mossbrae Falls are among the prettiest of the 
cascades bordering the Sacramento. The Klamath, the second largest river in Cali- 
fornia, was crossed not far south of the Oregon line ; and the Pitt River empties into 
the Sacramento near Redding. Descending the broadening valley of the Sacramento, 
the road passes through a dozen or more large towns, including Red Bluff, Tehama, 
Chico, and Marysville before it joins the Southern Pacific Company's main line near 
Sacramento The route takes the traveler thence through Sacramento, Elmira, Suisun 
and Benecia, across the Straits of Carquinez on the huge ferry-boat '' Solano," from 
Port Costa along the shores of the bay to Oakland, and then by a steam ferry across 
San Francisco Bay to his destination. 

) The Palace Hotel. 
The gigantic and magnificent Palace Plotel will be our headquarters during the stay 
in San Francisco. This is not only one of the largest hotels in the world, but one of 
the costliest and most elegant in its interior finish. In one edifice it covers the block 



bounded by New Montgomery, Market, Annie, and Jessie streets, occupying an area of 
96,250 feet; and the distance around its outer wall is exactly one-quarter of a mile. In 
addition, the. Grand Hotel on the opposite corner of Market and New Montgomery 
streets has been absorbed in this colossal hostelry. Compared even with the largest 
hotels in Eastern cities The Palace seems of vast proportions. There is a promenade 
on the roof of a third of a mile. The visitor is first ushered into the grand central 
court. This is a noble enclosure 144 by eighty-four feet, seven stories high, and roofed 
with glass, into which carriages are driven. Ornamental balconies run around the 
four sides at each floor, and choice tropical plants relieve the glaring white of the 
marble fabric. About the ground promenade are grouped the office, reception-parlors, 
reading-rooms, breakfast arid dining-rooms, etc., with spacious communicating hall- 
ways; the chief parlors being upon the second floor. The rooms are very large, and 
all of them are handsomely furnished. The building having cost six millions of dol- 
lars, another half million was expended for furniture and carpets, and recently over 
one hundred thousand dollars have been put out in alterations and improvements. 
The lowest story has a height of over twenty-seven feet, and the topmost sixteen. 
The hotel is under the management of Mr. C. Percy Smith. 

San Francisco. 

The metropolis of the Pacific Coast is a handsome city, and naturally of a cosmo- 
politan character. With a population of 297,990, according to the recent census, it 
stands eighth in the list of American cities — next after Baltimore and ahead of Cin- 
cinnati. In some particulars, and notably in its street-car service, which consists 
mainly of "cable roads," it is in advance of the older cities of the country, while the 
beautiful Golden Gate Park is deservedly an object of pride to the citizens. The 



greatest curiosity in the city is the Chinese quarter, a rectangular block, seven squares 
in length by three and four in breadth. It is near the business centre, and only a few 
blocks away from the palaces of the railway millionaires. The houses are nearly all 
tall, decayed buildings, swarming with tenants. The blocks are cut up into sections 
by narrow alleys, and filled with squalid, underground dens, and attics whose over- 
hanging dormer windows shut out all but a slender patch of sky. The cellars are oc- 
cupied by shops, factories, or opium dens. The main streets are lined by the stores 
of the large Chinese merchants. You find yourself in a populous corner of China. 
Even the fronts of the houses have assumed a Celestial aspect, not only in the signs 
and placards at the windows and shop-fronts, but in the altered architecture and deco- 
rations. An interesting experience is to spend a half-hour in watching the perform- 
ances at a Chinese theatre, and listen to the ear-piercing, mournful music, and then 
adjourn to a neighboring restaurant, drink genuine Chinese tea in Celestial style, and 
taste the cakes, preserved watermelon, and sweetmeats. In all the stores and other 
portions of the Chinese quarter, Eastern visitors are received with the greatest court- 
esy. The members of the party will have a carriage ride to the Golden Gate Park, 
the Cliff House, etc. 

San Rafael. 

There will be ample time for inspection of San Francisco, and also for excursions to 
some of the celebrated resorts in the vicinity. . The earliest of these will be a visit to 
the new and elegant Hotel Rafael, in San Rafael, fifteen miles north of the city. In 
going thence the party will take the San Francisco & North Pacific Railroad, crossing 
the beautiful. bay to Tiburon by ferry, and going thence by rail. The town of San 
Rafael is situated in a picturesque vale at the foot of Mount Tamalpais, one of the 

23 



loftiest of the Coast range of mountains. The party will remain at San Rafael from 
Tuesday until Wednesday, when it will return to San Francisco, only to start upon 
another out-of-town trip. 

Santa Cruz. 
Taking the Alameda ferry at the foot of Market street, we shall proceed over the 
Southern Pacific Company's narrow-gauge railway to Santa Cruz, passing through 
Santa Clara, San Jose, Los Gatos, and the celebrated grove of big trees near Santa 
Cruz. This route is bordered by characteristic California valley and mountain scenery 
of surpassing beauty. The " Big Trees " form a grove of considerable extent, and the 
road runs within a few rods of the largest of them. They are gigantic redwoods, and 
in some cases actually rival, both in girth and height, the famous Sequoia Giga7itea of 
the Mariposa forests. The Pope House, or the Pacific Ocean House, will be made a 
sojourning-place until the succeeding day. One feature of the stay will be a carriage 
ride along the romantic cliffs, and to other points of interest. 

Monterey and the Elegant Hotel del Monte. 
Leaving Santa Cruz Friday afternoon, we shall proceed by the way of Pajaro to 
Monterey, arriving at the famous Hotel del Monte in the early evening. Five days 
are assigned to this beautiful resort, and the sojourn here is sure to prove one of the 
most delightful features of the whole trip. The Hotel del Monte is situated in a pic- 
turesque grove of ancient trees, and nature has supplemented art in providing every 
appointment and surrounding that contributes to the health, comfort, and pleasure of 
the guest. A great expanse of grove and garden, considerably over loo acres in extent, 
has been beautified in every fascinating way known to the art of the landscape gar- 
dener ; and the visitor may wander for hours amid flowers and under the green man- 

24 



tling of nature's choicest foilage. A little walk farther brings one to the matchless 
beach and the great bathing-house, where the sea-water, tempered by artificial heat to 
a comfortable degree, is introduced into vast swimming tanks, forming a paradise for 
the bather. Outward, the eye gazes upon a bay of matchless beauty, bordered by 
sloping hills of green, with far-away mountains. 

The hotel is a model of elegance, comfort, and neatness. Everything is scrupulously 
clean, as if the house were opened yesterday. The new hotel is much larger than the 
old one, and there was no money spared in making it complete to the minutest detail. 
The public rooms, comprising the dining-room, parlors, ball-room, etc., are large and 
airy, and the roomy verandas are also of wide extent. The guest-rooms are likewise 
commodious and finely appointed. The house has less an air of the American water- 
ing place hotel than travelers encounter at large caravansaries in general, and one 
might almost imagine that he is a guest at some palatial English home, with its sur- 
roundings of park and flowers. There are, nevertheless, 430 rooms in this grand estab- 
lishment, and the dining-room will seat 500 persons with comfort. The Hotel del 
Monte is under the experienced management of Mr. Geo. Schonewald. 

A mile away is the old historic town of Monterey, the first capital of California, and 
still containing many relics of Spanish, Mexican, and early American occupation. Four 
miles distant, and reached either by railway or carriage road, is Pacific Grove, and 
below that point lie Moss Beach, Cypress Point, Pebble Beach, and other delightful 
bits of shore scenery. Good roads abound, and a splendidly equipped stable is among 
the appointments of the hotel. The famous "eighteen-mile drive *' includes the places 
we have mentioned and other picturesque points. Carmel Mission, established by 
Father Junipcro Serra in 1770 and the second oldest of the Franciscan religious sta- 
tions established in California, is about eight miles from the Hotel del Monte. As the 

25 



tickets returning from California eastward are good for six months, persons will be 
able to prolong their stay at Monterey if they desire, without sacrificing any part of 
the same. 

San Jose and Mount Hamilton. 

Returning from Monterey by the Southern Pacific Company's road on Wednesday, 
October 14, a visit will be paid to the handsome and flourishing city of San Jose. 
The Hotel Vendome, which was completed several seasons ago, will be made the hicad- 
quarters of the party. Thursday will be devoted to an excursion by stage to the Lick 
Observatory, on the summit of Mount Hamilton, and return. The trip will be made 
in the roomy and comfortable Vehicles owned by the Mount Hamilton stage company. 
The stage road is one of the most remarkable in America. The elevation of the 
observatory is 4,209 feet, and San Jose stands eighty feet above the sea-level. The 
air-line distance between the two points is only thirteen miles, but the road is twenty- 
six miles in length. The gradient is in all places kept less than six and a half feet in 
the hundred' (343 feet to the mile), this being maintained through a series of turns no 
less than 367 in number. The observatory, which was founded by Mr. Lick, was 
erected and fitted up at an expense of nearly $1,000,000. It is one of the most com- 
plete in the world, and contains, with other treasures of science, the world's greatest 
telescope. The remains of the princely donor rest in'the foundation pier of this great 
instrument. The observatory is under the direction of Professor Edward S. Holden, 
as President of the University of California. ^ 

Friday afternoon, October 16, the party will proceed from San Jose by the Southern 
Pacific Company's line, via Niles, to Oakland Pier, where Pullman cars will be taken 
for the southern section of the State. 

26 



Southern California. 

Leaving Oakland on the Southern Pacific Company's main line of railway, in 
Pullman palace cars, we retrace our way as far as Port Costa, and then turn southward 
via Tracy, Lathrop, etc. The route takes us the whole length of the San Joaquin 
Valley, the counterpart and southerly extension of the Sacramento Valley, through 
which we have entered the State. At a distance of 352 miles from San Francisco and 
130 miles from Los Angeles, the famous Loop of Tehachapi is reached. At this point 
the railroad, in making its way over the mountains, actually crosses its own line. 

The Yosemite Valley passengers leave the direct Southern route at Berenda, 178 
miles from San Francisco, going thence over a branch railway line to Raymond, and 
from the latter place by stage via Grant's White Sulphur Springs and the Wahwonah 
Hotel (formerly Clarke's, or Big Tree station), to the valley. • 

In Southern California there are practically but two seasons — spring and summer. 
There is a remarkable equability in the temperature, the Kurosiwo, or Japan current 
of the Pacific Ocean, tending to cool the shores of California in the summer months, 
and to exert a warming mfluence in winter. There have arisen in various places — 
notably at Pasadena, Santa Barbara, Coronado Beach, Redondo Beach, and San 
Gabriel — large hotels of the best class, and the demands of Eastern tourists who are 
annually flocking to the Pacific Coast in great numbers are now fully met. 

Santa Barbara. 

We shall diverge from the direct southern line at Saugus, in order to visit Santa 
Barbara, one of the oldest and best known health and pleasure resorts on the Pacific 
Coast. This town, or city, rather, is beautifully situated on the lower slopes of the 
Santa Ynez Mountains, with a magnificent beach for its ocean front. The best pre- 

27 



served of the old mission churches (established December 4, 1786) is a picturesque 
feature. The party will make its headquarters at The Arlmgton, of which Mr. C. C. 
Wheeler is manager. This hotel is a large and admirably appointed establishment, 
and has long sustained a high reputation. 

Los Angeles. 
On leaving Santa Barbara we shall proceed to Los Angeles. This is the metropo- 
lis of Southern California, and a handsome city, which has more than quadrupled its 
population within the past few years. It is in the centre of a region abounding in vine- 
yards and orange groves, and the city itself is richly adorned with gardens. There is 
much in Los Angeles and its neighborhood to see besides the busy streets of the city 
itself, which, however, illustrate significantly the remarkable growth and progress of 
this favored section. 

Pasedena and San Gabriel. 

Pasadena will be inspected in the course of a carriage ride, which will take in all 
the principal points of that city of groves and gardens. The Raymond, which occu- 
pies a noble site in East Pasadena, will not be opened until the middle of December, 
and consequently we shall be unable to include it in our regular round of stopping- 
places. As the return tickets are good for use at any time and upon any train within six 
months, it is anticipated that many of the members of the party will desire to remain 
in California for a longer period than the itinerary contemplates, in which case a more 
intimate knowledge of The Raymond and its many delightful features may be gained. 
In the course of the carriage ride we shall pay a visit to the Raymond hill, so as to 
obtain the incomparable view. 

San Gabriel with its old mission, orange groves, and vineyards, will also be visited 
in the course of the ride. The Hotel San Gabriel, which is large and elegantly 

28 



appointed, is situated in the midst of an oak grove, and only half a mile from, the 
celebrated mission. 

Redondo Beach. 

Twenty-three miles from Los Angeles by a branch line of the Southern California 
Railway lies Redondo Beach, one of the loveliest shore resorts in California, and a 
magnificent hotel has lately been built in a commanding position overlooking the beach, 
the mountains, and the far-reaching sea. The Redondo Hotel is arranged with a view 
to making every room attractive, and it has been furnished in an elegant and costly 
manner. The surroundings are delightful, and art has supplemented nature in adorn- 
ing the commodious grounds belonging to the hotel. The party will make a visit to 
Redondo Beach, remaining there from Wednesday until Saturday. 

San Diego and the Hotel del Coronado at Coronado Beach. 

San Diego County, with its 14,969 square miles, a larger area than any of the New 
England States, except Maine, and nearly twice the size of Massachusetts, is the 
southernmost county of California, and adjoins Mexico. The city of San Diego, 
situated upon its southern seacoast and only a few miles from the national boundary 
line, is the oldest of the California mission towns, the first of the mission churches 
having been planted there in 1769; but, like Los Angeles, it owes its present importance 
to recent growth. The development of this region has followed the building of the 
California Southern Railroad, which forms a part of the Santa Fe system. Four 
years since, a magnificent establishment for the entertainment of tourists, the Hotel 
del Coronado, which fronts the ocean across San Diego Bay, was thrown open. The 
party will remain at this hotel from Saturday until Tuesday. The building of this 

29 



mammoth hotel marks a new era for this section, since it provides the tourist with new 
comforts and luxuries. The house is under the management of Mr. E S. Babcock, 
to whose sagacity, energy, and enterprise, chiefly^ Coronado Beach owes its wonder- 
ful progress We shall journey southward to San Diego over the Coast Division of 
the Southern Califoinia Railway Company's line, which leads directly from Los An- 
geles down the coast via San Juan Capistrano. 

Riverside. 

On leaving San Diego we shall proceed by the way of Orange to Riverside, one of the 
most beautiful towns in Southern California, and the centre of the orange culture of 
San Bernardino County. Magnolia avenue, with its double driveways, and its borders 
of villas, gardens, and orange groves for miles of its extent, is one of the most beauti- 
ful thoroughfares in America. During our visit we shall sojourn at the leading hotel, 
The Glenwood. 

Redlands. 

We shall also pay a visit to Redlands, another important centre of the orange and 
grape culture. Redlands is situated on the Mentone Division of the Southern Cali- 
fornia Railway Company's line, nine miles east of San Bernardino, and, although dating 
back no longer ago than October, 1886, is now the third city of San Bernardino County 
in both wealth and population. It is charmingly environed by grand mountain scenery, 
and, although a valley town, has an elevation of 1,352 feet above the sea. The famous 
Bear Valley Lake, which lies hidden in the mountains, furnishes an inexhaustible 
water supply. We shall proceed from Riverside to Redlands Wednesday afternoon, 
and remam over night at the Terrace Villa. 

30 



The Homeward Journey. 

Leaving Redlands early Thursday afternoon, October 29, the party will proceed first 
to San Bernardino, and thence eastward over the main railway line. The route lies 
over the Southern California and the Atlantic & Pacific Railroads, which form import- 
ant links in the Santa Fe system, and later over the main line of railway belonging to 
this company. This will take the tourist through interesting parts of Southern Cali- 
fornia, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas. As already explained, the excur- 
sion tickets are good to return on subsequent dates. There will be a later returning 
party under special escort, and the tickets are also valid on any train. After cross- 
ing the San Bernardino Mountains by the Cajon Pass, the road traverses the easterly 
part of the Mojave Desert. The Colorado River is crossed at the Needles, and the 
traveler passes from California into the Territory of Arizona. 

Arizona comprises 113,916 square miles, and is three times the size of ^he great 
State of New York. The Atlantic & Pacific Railroad, over which we pass, crosses an 
interesting section of the Territory, and one which contains many evidences, in the 
form of ruined cities, of an ancient civilization. There are groups of both cliff dwell- 
ings and cave dwellings at no great distance from Flagstaff, and there are also several 
remarkable Indian villages, ox pueblos^ near the line. The road passes through one of 
these quaint towns — that of Laguna. The San Francisco Mountains, situated near 
Flagstaff, are very picturesque, and about sixty-five miles distant is the deepest part of 
the Grand Canon of the Colorado. At Peach Springs, 122 miles west of Flagstaff, 
we are still nearer another section of the Grand Canon, or within twenty-three miles. 
Thirty two miles east of Flagstaff the road crosses the Canon Diablo, an immense 
zigzag, yawning chasm in the white and yellow magnesium limestone. The bridge is 541 
feet long and 222% feet high. The famous petrified forests of Arizona are east of 

31 



Holbrook, and about ten miles from the railroad. The eastern terminus of the Atlantic 
& Pacific Railroad is at Albuquerque, N. M., but the train continues without change. 
The line between Arizona and New Mexico is crossed between the stations of Allan- 
town and Manuelito, about i8o miles west of Albuquerque, and the continental divide 
(elevation 7,257 feet) just east of Coolidge, 130 miles from the same city. The Rio 
Grande is crossed near Isleta, thirteen miles below Albuquerque. On reaching the 
main line of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, we ascend the valley of the 
Rio Grande for about fifty miles. The road then passes over the mountains in an 
easterly direction. 

Las Vegas Hot Springs. 

The Hot Springs of Las Vegas, where we shall remain through Saturday and Sun- 
day, are situated six miles from the town of the same name, and are reached by a 
branch line of railway. The springs are renowned for their medicinal qualities, and 
the baths are largely patronized. The springs are found upon the banks of Rio 
Gallinas, which flows down through a picturesque canon from the Spanish range of the 
Rocky Mountains. A commanding elevation, that rises above the plateau where the 
springs are situated, has been selected as the site of the new and handsome hotel. 
The Montezuma. 

From Las Vegas Eastward. 

Returning from the springs to Las Vegas, we resume our journey over the main line 
of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. The Raton Mountains, which form a 
lateral spur of the Rockies and separate New Mexico from Colorado, are crossed at 
an elevation of 7,622 feet, 113 miles from Las Vegas. We traverse Colorado for 181 
miles, and then enter Kansas, which we cross from west to east, a distance of 486 
miles. 

32 



Kansas City, where we make a brief halt before proceeding over the Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railway, is one of the busiest and most thriving cities of the West 
and one of the most important railway centres in the country. 

Journeying over the Southwestern Division of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 
Railway, we proceed through portions of Missouri, Iowa, and Illinois, and reach 
Chicago Wednesday morning, November 4. We shall remain in this city until after- 
noon, taking breakfast and dinner at the Sherman House, and at 3.00 p. m. take a 
train at the Dearborn station on the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway, over which we 
continue our journey eastward. From Port Huron to Suspension Bridge our route 
lies over the Great Western Division of the Grand Trunk Railway. 

Niagara Falls. 

The party will arrive at Niagara Falls shortly after 8.00 A. M. (Eastern standard 
time), Thursday, and will proceed to the Spencer House, where breakfast and din- 
ner will be had. The stay here will be sufficiently long to permit the visitor to make 
a round of all the chief points of interest. The cars will depart in the afternoon at 
5.26 from the station of the New York Central Railroad, and the homeward route is 
over the West Shore and Fitchburg Railroads. Boston will be reached Friday, No- 
vember 6, at 9,50 A. M. 

Cost of the Tour. 

,The price of tickets for the excursion, as described in the foregoing pages, will be 
FIVE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE DOLLARS. This sum will cover first-class travel 
over all railway routes going and returning, with double berth in Pullman or Wagner 
sleeping-cars; fares on all steamer and stage lines; hotel accommodations according 
to the itinerary, for the period of the regular tour (sixty-one days), with sojourns at 

33 



Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, Mammoth Hot Springs, the Canon of the Yellowstone, 
Yellowstone Lake, Upper Geyser Basin, Lower Geyser Basin, Seattle, Victoria, B. C, 
Tacoma, Portland, Or., San Francisco, San Rafael, Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Jose, 
Santa Barb?.ra, Los Angeles, Redondo Beach, Coronado Beach, Riverside, Redlands, 
and Las Vegas Hot Springs ; meals while traveling in dining-cars, on steamers, and at 
hotels or dining stations e7i route ; omnibus or carriage transfers from railway stations 
to hotels, and vice versa, or from one station to another, wherever needed (in Chicago, 
St. Paul, Minneapolis, Seattle, Victoria, Tacoma, Portland, San Francisco, San Rafael, 
Santa Cruz, San Jose, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San Diego, Riverside, and Red- 
lands); special carriage rides in Victoria, Portland, San Francisco, Santa Cruz, Santa 
Barbara, and Pasadena; the stage excursion from San Jose to Mount Hamilton and 
return ; all expenses for transportation, transfer, and care of baggage (to the extent of 
i5opoundsfor each full ticket, and seventy-five pounds for each child's ticket, all excess 
of said amounts being liable to extra charge at customary rates) ; and services of the con- 
ductors — in short, every needed expense of the entire round trip from Boston back 
to Boston. 

Price of tickets for the Yosemite trip, thirty-five dollars, in addition to cost of 
ticket for the regular excursion. (See pages following itinerary.) 

The cost of an extra double berth (giving an entire section to one person) from 
Boston to San Francisco is $28; drawing-room for one occupant, ^76; drawing-room 
for two occupants, $48 — ^24 for each passenger; drawing-room for three occupaiUs, 
entire extra charge, $20. The side trip from Dalles City to Portland, with sleeping-car 
accommodations for one night, is included in these rates. 

The charges for extra sleeping-car accommodations between San Francisco and Santa 
Barbara are as follows: Extra double berth, $2.50; drawing-room for one occupant, 

34 



^6.50; drawing-room for two occupants, $4, or $2 each ; drawing-room for three occu- 
pants, entire extra charge, $1.50. 

The cost of an extra double berth for the journey between Los Angeles or San Ber- 
nardino and Boston is $21. Drawing-room for one occupant, ^58; for two occupants, 
$27 — $18.50 for each passenger; for three occupants, entire extra charge, $16. 

ITINERARY. 

Monday, Sept. 7. I*'irsi Day. — Leave Boston, from the station of the Fitchburg Railroad, Cause- 
way street, at 3.00 p. m., and proceed westward, via the Hoosac Tunnel line, in a train of magnificent 
vestibuled palace cars. On arrival at the station members of the party should check their baggage to 
Chicago. The checks will be taken up by the baggage master of the party, who will attend to the 
delivery, collection, and transportation of the baggage during the trip. Tags are supplied with the 
excursion tickets, and these, with the owner's name and home address plainly inscribed thereon, should 
be attached to every trunk, valise, or other piece of baggage, to serve as a ready means of identification. 
Supper at station dining-rooms, Athol, Mass. From Rotterdam Junction, N. Y., westward on "West 
Shore Railroad. 

Tuesday, Sept. 8. Second Day. — On the West Shore Railroad, arriving at Buffalo in the morning, 
and at Suspension Bridge about i.oo a. m., thus crossing the Niagara River by daylight ; from that point 
westward on Great Western Division of Grand Trunk Railway; from Port Huron, Mich., westward on 
Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway. Breakfast at station dining-rooms, Buffalo ; dinner at station dining- 
rooms, London, Ont., and supper at station dining-rooms, Point Edward, Ont. 

Note. — Railway time changes at Port Huron from Eastern standard, or 75th meridian, to Central 
standard, or 90th meridian — one hour slower. 

Wednesday, Sept. 9. Third Day. — Arrive in Chicago 8.10 a. m. ; transfer by Parmelee's omni- 
bus line from the Dearborn station to the Sherman House, J. Irving Pearce, proprietor. 

Thursday, Sept. 10. Fourth Day. — In Chicago. Omnibus transfer from the Sherman House to 
station of the Wisconsin Central Division of the Northern Pacific Railroad, corner of Harrison street and 
Fifth avenue, and leave Chicago by said line at 5.00 p. m., in Pullman palace sleeping-cars ; supper on 
Wisconsin Central dining-car. 

35 



Friday, Sept. ii. Fifth Day. — Arrive in St. Paul at 7.50 a.m.; transfer by J. B. Cook & Son's 
omnibus line from the Union station to the Hotel Ryan, Eugene Mehl, proprietor; carriage ride, witli 
visits to the chief business and residence portions of the city, the Capitol, Summit avenue, the Observatory 
(midway between St. Paul and Minneapolis, and affording a view of both cities), Fort Snelling, etc. 

Saturday, Sept. 12. Sixth Day, — Omnibus transfer from the Hotel Ryan to the Union station, 
and leave St. Paul via Northern Pacific Railroad at 8.15 a. m. ; arrive in Minneapolis at 8.45 a. m. ; 
transfer by Mattison's omnibus line from the Union station to the West Hotel, John T. West, proprietor; 
carriage ride, with visits to Minnehaha Falls, the finest business and residence portions of the city, the 
great flour mills (the largest in the world), the bridge below St. Anthony's Falls (affording the best view 
of the Falls), the new Exposition Building, the Suspension Bridge, etc. 

Sunday, Sept. 13. Seventh Day. — In Minneapolis. 

Monday, Sept. 14. Eighth Day, — Omnibus transfer from the West Hotel to the Union station, 
and leave Minneapolis at 9.35 a. M.^via Northern Pacific Railroad, in vestibuled Pullman palace sleeping- 
cars. Dinner and supper in Northern Pacific dining-cars. 

Note. — Railway time changes at Mandan, N. D., from Central standard, or 90th meridian, to Mount- 
ain standard, or 105th meridian — one hour slower. 

Tuesday, Sept. 15. Ninth Day. — On Northern Pacific Railroad en route through the western 
section of North Dakota and Montana. Breakfast, dinner, and supper on Northern Pacific dining-car. 
Arrive at Livingston, Mon.. at 8.40 p. m.; the cars will be placed upon a side track, and there remain 
until morning. 

Wednesday, Sept. 16. Tenth Day. — Breakfast at the Albemarle Hotel ; leave Livingston, via the 
National Park Branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad, 8.30 a. m.; arrive at Cinnabar 10.18 a. m. ; 
leave Cinnabar by George W. Wakefield's stage line at 10.30 a. m.; arrive at Mammoth Hot Springs 
Hotel 12.00 M. 

Thursday, Sept. 17. Eleventh Day. — Leave Mammoth Hot Springs in George W. Wakefield's 
stages at 8.00 a. m. for the tour through the park. Arrive at Norris Geyser Basin 12.30 p. m. ; dinner 
there; leave Norris Geyser Basin 1.30 p. m. ; arrive at Grand Canon Hotel 4.00 p. m. 

36 



Friday, Sept. i8. Twelfth Day, — At Yellowstone Falls and Canon. Leave Grand Canon Hotel at 
LOG p. M. : arrive at Yellowstone Lake Hotel 5.00 p. m. 

Saturday, Sept, 19. Thirteenth Day. — Leave Yellowstone Lake 8.00 a. m. ; arrive at Trout Creek 
12.00 M. ; dinner there; leave Trout Creek i.oo p. m. ; arrive Upper Geyser Basin Hotel 6.00 p. m. The 
hotel is situated near Old Faithful, the Bee Hive, Giantess, Castle, and others of the great geysers. 

Sunday, Sept. 20. Fourteenth Day.— Ai Upper Geyser Basin. 

Monday, Sept. 21. Fifteenth Day. — Leave Upper Geyser Basin 8.00 a.m. and visit "Excelsior" 
Geyser ("Hell's Half Acre"), "Turquois" Spring, "Prismatic" Lake, and other objects of interest 
between the Upper and Lower Basins ; arrive at Fountain Geyser Hotel about ii.oo a. m. This hotel 
is situated near the '* Fountain " Geyser and the Mammoth ** Paint Pots." 

Tuesday, Sept. 22. Sixteenth Day. — Leave Fountain Geyser Hotel 8.00 a.m.; pass by Gibbon 
Falls, and also near the ** Monarch." " Hurricane," " New Crater," and other geysers ; arrive at Norris 
Geyser Basin Hotel i.oo p. m. ; leave Norris Geyser Basin Hotel 2.00 p. m.; arrive at Mammoth Hot 
Springs Hotel 6.00 p. m. 

Wednesday, Sept. 23. Seventeenth Day, — Leave Mammoth Hot Springs 2.00 p. m,; arrive at 
Cinnabar 3.45 p. m. ; leave Cinnabar, via National Park Branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad, 4.00 
p. m. ; arrive at Livingston 6.02 p. m. ; supper at Albemarle Hotel; leave Livingston 8.40 p. m. on main 
line of Northern Pacific Railroad in vestibuled Pullman palace sleeping-cars. 

Thursday, Sept. 24. Eighteenth Day. — En route westward through Montana, Idaho, and Wash- 
ington on the Northern Pacific Railroad. Meals in Northern Pacific dining-car. 

Note.— Railway time changes at Hope, Id., fiom Mountain standard, or 105th meridian, to Pacific 
standard, or 120th meridian — one hour slower. 

Friday, Sept. 25. Nineteenth Day. — En route through Washington on the Northern Pacific Rail- 
road. Breakfast in Northern Pacific dining-car. Arrive in Seattle 12.00 m. ; omnibus transfer to The 
Rainier, F. D. Ray, manager. 

Saturday, Sept. 26. Twentieth Day. — In Seattle. Transfer from The Rainier to the wharf, and 
leave Seattle at 10.15 a.m. on the Puget Sound & Alaska Steamship Company's steamer "City of 
Kingston;" lunch on board steamer; arrive at Victoria 4.30 p. m. ; transfer to The Driard, Messrs. 

37 



Redon & Hartnegel, proprietors ; carriage ride, visiting various parts of the city, including Beacon Hill, 
Government House, the Government buildings, etc., and also Esquimalt (the British naval station) and 
the Gorge. 

Sunday, Sept. 27. Twe7ity -first Day.— In Victoria. Leave Victoria on steamer " City of Kingston " 
at 8.30 p. M. ; stateroom berths furnished. 

Monday, Sept. 28. TweJity-second Day. — Arrive at Tacoma 5.15 a. m. ; at 6.00 a. m. omnibus 
transfer to The Tacoma, Fred L. Presbr^y, manager. 

Tuesday, Sept. 29. Twenty-third Day. — Omnibus transfer to the Pacific avenue station of the 
Northern Pacific Railroad, and at 8.45 a. m. leave Tacoma; dinner on Northern Pacific dining-car; 
arrive at Portland 3.15 p. m. ; omnibus transfer to The Portland, Charles E. Leland, manager. 

Wednesday, Sept. 30. Twenty-fonrth Day. — In ^Portland. Carriage ride through the finest 
residence and business sections of the city and to the park, which affords a grand view of Portland and 
its surroundings, with Mount Hood, Mount St. Helen's, etc. ; omnibus transfer to the Union station, and 
at 8.45 p. M. leave Portland via the Union Pacific Railroad. 

Thursday, Oct. i. Twenty-fifth Day. — Arrive at Dalles City at 12.25 a. m. ; the train will be placed 
upon a side track to remain until morning ; leave Dalles City by steamer of the Union Pacific Railway 
line. River Division, at 7.00 A. M. for a descent of the most picturesque part of the Columbia River; 
breakfast onboftrd the boat; arrive at the Upper Cascades 11.30 a. m. ; transfer by narrow-gauge railway 
to the Lower Cascades (six miles), and leave thereat 12.15 p. m. by steamer ; dinner on board the boat; 
arrive at Portland 4.30 p. m. ; omnibus transfer from the Ash street wharf to The Portland, where supper 
will be provided ; omnibus transfer from the hotel to the Union station, and at 7.00 p. m. leave Portland 
via the Southern Pacific Company's Mount Shasta line. 

Friday, Oct. 2. Twenty-sixth Day. — ^« r<??//^ southward through Oregon and California on the 
Southern Pacific Company's Mount Shasta route, crossing the Siskiyou Mountains, and passing near 
Mount Shasta and through the Canon of the Upper Sacramento by daylight ; breakfast and lunch on the 
cars; dinner at Sisson, Cal. 

Saturday, Oct. 3. T%venty-seventh Day. — Breakfast on the cars ; arrive at Oakland Pier 9.40 a. m., 
and in San Francisco 10.15 a. m. ; coach transfer to the Palace Hotel, C Percy Smith, manager. 



Sunday, Oct. 4. Twenty-eighth Day. — In San Francisco. In the course of the stay in this city 
there will be a carriage ride, the route being to Golden Gate Park, and thence to the Cliff House, return- 
ing -ilia Point Lobos road, which overlooks the Presidio, with P'ort Point and the Golden Gate in the 
distance. 

Monday, Oct. 5. Twenty-ninth Day. — In San Francisco. 

Tuesday, Oct. 6. Thirtieth Day. — In San Francisco. 

Wednesday, Oct. 7. Thirty-first Day. — In San Francisco. Transfer in the coaches of the United 
Carriage Company from the Palace Hotel to the Tiburon ferry, foot of Market street, and at 11.20 a. m. 
leave San Francisco by San Francisco & North Pacific Railroad line; from Tiburon at 11.55 a. m, by 
railway, and arrive at San Rafael 12.20 p. m. ; carriage transfer from the station to the Hotel Rafael, 
O. M. Brennan, manager. 

Thursday, Oct. 8. Thirty-second Day.— K\.'$i2ivs.^2^.2^€\.. Carriage transfer from the Hotel Rafael 
to the station of the San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad, and leave San Rafae' at 12.45 p* '^- » 
arrive in San Francisco (Tiburon ferry) 1.45 p. m. ; leave San Francisco (Alameda ferry) at 2.45 p. m. by 
Southern Pacific Company's narrow-gauge line, the South Pacific Coast Railway ; leave Alameda Mole 
3.00 p. M. ; stop to view the '' Big Trees," six miles from Santa Cruz ; arrive at Santa Cruz about 7.00 
p. M. ; omnibus transfer to the Pope House, J. B. Peakes, proprietor, or the Pacific Ocean House, W. J. 
McCollum, proprietor. 

Friday, Oct. 9. Thirty-third Day. — At Santa Cruz. Carriage ride, visiting the beach, cliff, etc. 
Leave Santa Cruz 4.45 p. m. via Southern Pacific Company's broad-gauge line ; arrive at Hotel del 
Monte, Monterey, Geo. Schbnewald, manager, 7.25 p. m. 

Saturday, Oct. 10. Thirty-fourth Day. — At Hotel del Monte, Monterey. 

Sunday, Oct. 11. Thirty fifth Day.— At Hotel del Monte, Monterey. 

Monday, Oct. 12. Thirty-sixth Day. — At Hotel del Monte, Monterey. 

Tuesday, Oct. 13. Thirty-seventh Day. — At Hotel del Monte, Monterey. 

Wednesday, Oct. 14. Thirty-eighth Day.— At Hotel del Monte, Monterey. Leave Monterey at 
1.49 p. M. via. Southern Pacific Company^s line ; arrive at San Jose 4.37 p. m. ; omnibus transfer to the 
Hotel Vendome. 

39 



Thursday, Oct. 15. Thirty-ninth Day. — Excursion to the Lick Observatory, on the summit of 
Mount Hamilton, by stage (the vehicles of the Mount Hamilton Stage Company being used for the trip), 
the party leaving the Hotel Vendome in the morning and returning late in the afternoon ; dinner at 
Smith's Creek. 

Friday, Oct. 16. Fortieth Day. — At San Jose. Omnibus transfer from the Hotel Vendome to the 
Southern Pacific Company's broad-gauge station, and leave San Jose at 1.50 p. m. ; arrive at Oakland 
Pier 4.20 p. M. ; leave Oakland Pier 4.28 p. m. -via Southern Pacific Company's Nev^r Orleans line, in 
Pullman palace cars ; supper at Lathrop. 

Saturday, Oct, 17. Forty-first Day. — Cross the Tehachapi Pass and "Loop" by daylight; 
arrive at Mojave 9.10 a. m. ; breakfast at the station dining-rooms; arrive at Saugus i.oo p. m. ; dinner 
cit the station dining-rooms; arrive at Santa Barbara 6.40 p. m.; omnibus transfer to The Arlington, 
C. C. Wheeler, proprietor. 

Sunday, Oct, 18. Forty-second Day. — At Santa P>arbara, 

Monday, Oct. 19. Forty -third Day. — At Santa Barbara. Omnibus transfer from The Arlington to 
the State street station, and at 9,55 a. m. leave Santa Barbara by the Southern Pacific Company's line ; 
arrive at Los Angeles 2.55 p. m, ; omnibus transfer to The Westminster, O. T. Johnson, proprietor, and 
M. M. Potter, manager, The Nadeau, Bennett & Burns Brothers, proprietors, or The Hollenbeck, 
Cowley & Baker^roprietors. 

Tuesday, Oct. 20. Forty-fourth Day. — At Los Angeles. 

Wednesday, Oct. 21. Forty-fifth Day. — At Los Angeles, Omnibus transfer to the Santa Fe 
station, and at 10.25 a, m. leave Los Angeles via Southern California Railway Company's line; arrive at 
Pasadena 11.00 a. m. ; carriage ride, with visits to the most picturesque sections of San Gabriel, Pasadena, 
and Santa Anita, including The Raymond Hill, Orange Grove avenue, Colorado street, the Old Mission, 
Baldwin's Ranch, etc.; lunch at the Hotel Oakwood, Santa Anita; leave Pasadena via Southern 
California Railway Company's line 4,06 p. M. ; arrive at Los Angeles 4.40 p. m. ; leave Los Angeles 5,25 
p. M. via Southern California Railway Company's Redondo Beach line; arrive at Redondo Beach 6.18 
p. M.; to Redondo Beach Hotel, E. W. Root, manager. 

Thursday, Oct. 22. Forty-sixth Day. — At Redondo Beach. 

40 



Friday, Oct. 23. Forty-seventh Day.— At Redondo Beach. 

Saturday, Oct. 24. Forty-eighth Day.— At Redondo Beach. Leave Redondo Beach 7.35 a. m. ; 
arrive at Ballona Junction 8.22 a. m., and from thence to San Diego, arriving at 12.50 p. m. ; omnibus 
transfer from the San Diego station to the Hotel del Coronado, E. S. Babcock, manager, Coronado 
Beach, 

Sunday, Oct. 25. Forty-ninth Day.— At Hotel del Coronado, Coronado Beach. 

Monday, Oct. 26. Fiftieth Day.— At Hotel del Coronado, Coronado Beach. 

Tuesday, Oct. 27. Fi/ty-yirst Day.— Ommhns transfer from the Hotel del Coronado to the sta- 
tion of the Southern California Railway Company's line, and leave San Diego at 7.40 a. m. ; arrive at 
Riverside 12.38 p. m. ; omnibus transfer to The Glenwood, Frank A. Miller, proprietor, and F. W. 
Richardson, manager. 

Wednesday, Oct. 28. Fifty-second Day.— At Riverside. Omnibus transfer from The Glen- 
wood to the station, and at 3.25 p. m. leave Riverside via Southern California Railway Company^s line; 
arrive at San Bernardino 3.55 p. m.; leave San Bernardino, viaMtntorie Branch of the same line, at 4.05 
p M. ; arrive at Redlands4.28 p. m. ; omnibus transfer to the Terrace Villa, William M. Tisdale, propri- 
etor. 

Thursday, Oct. 29. Fifty-third Day.— At Redlands. Omnibus transfer from the hotel to the 
station, and leave Redlands at 1.45 p. m. ; arrive at San Bernardino 2.07 p. m.; leave. San Bernardino at 
3.00 p. M., via Southern California Company's line, in Pullman palace cars; supper af Barstow. 

Note. — Railway time changes at Barstow from Pacific standard, or 120th meridian, to Mountain 
standard, or 105th meridian, one hour faster. 

Friday, Oct. 30. Fifty-fourth Day . — On Atlantic & Pacific and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa 
Fe main line ; meals at station dining-rooms e7i route through Arizona and New Mexico. 

Saturday, Oct. 31. Fifty-fifth Day. — From Albuquerque eastward via Atchison, Topeka & Santa 
Fe Railroad. Arrive at Las Vegas in the morning; breakfast there ; thence by branch line to Las Vegas 
Hot Springs; to Montezuma Hotel. 

Sunday, Nov. i. Fifty-sixth Day.— At Las Vegas Hot Springs. Leave at night by the Santa Fe 
route. 

41 



Monday, Nov. 2. Fifty-seventh Day. — En route eastward through Colorado and Kansas on the 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. Meals at stations en rmiie. 

Note.— Railway time changes at Dodge City from Mountain standard, or 105th meridian, to Central 
standard, or 90th meridian, one hour faster. 

Tuesday, Nov. 3. Fifty-eighth Day. — kxx'w^ at Kansas City 7.00 a. m. ; breakfast and dinner 
at Union station dining-rooms; leave Kansas City 5.35 p. m. via Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway; 
supper on dining-car belonging to said line. 

Wednesday, Nov. 4. Fifty-?iinth Z>^^. — Breakfast on dining-car; arrive in Chicago 9.50 a. m.; 
omnibus transfer to the Sherman House, where dinner will be provided; omnibus transfer from the hotel 
to the Dearborn station, and at 3.00 p. m. leave Chicago via the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway, in 
Wagner palace cars ; supper on Chicago & Grand Trunk dining-car. 

Notes. — Members of the party who return independently from Chicago will be required to exchange 
their passage and sleeping-car coupons at the station ticket-offices of the Chicago & Grand Trunk Rail- 
way, either at Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway Crossing, Blue Island, or the new Dearborn station 
(Polk street and Fourth avenue), Chicago, or at the city ticket-office of the Chicago & Grand Trunk Rail- 
way, 103 South Clark street, Chicago, E. H. Hughes, agent, to whom all applications in advance for 
sleeping-berths should be addressed. The regular trains leave Chicago at 3.00 p.m. and 8. 15 p.m. 
Persons desirous of availing themselves of the " stop-over" privilege at Niagara Falls can take the train 
leaving Chicago at 3.00 p. m., and, arriving at Niagara Falls the next morning, await there the departure of 
the Atlantic express by the West Shore line in the afternoon. Niagara Falls is the only point east of 
Chicago or Blue Island Junction where "stop-offs" can be permitted. 

Railway time changes at Port Huron from Central standard, or 90th meridian, to Eastern standard, or 
7Sth meridian, one hour faster. 

Thursday, Nov. 5. Sixtieth Day. — From Port Huron eastward via Southern Division of 
Grand Trunk Railway; arrive at Niagara Falls, Clifton, P. O., 7.30 a. m. ; arrive at Niagara Falls, 
N. Y., 8.06 A. M. ; breakfast and dinner at the Spencer House, Alva H. Cluck, proprietor; leave 
Niagara Falls, via the West Shore Railroad, at 5.26 p. m. 

42 



Friday, Nov. 6. Sixty-first Day. —Yroxn Rotterdam Junction eastward z//a Fitchburg Railroad; 
arrive at Athol, Mass., 6.57 a. m. ; breakfast at station dining-rooms, W. E. Wood, proprietor; arrive 
in Boston (Fitchburg Railroad station) 9.50 a. m. 

The return tickets from San Francisco, Monterey, Santa Barbara, San Gabriel, Los 
Angeles, Pasadena, San Diego, or any other point in Central or Southern California 
(inclusive of coupons for incidental accommodations and meals) will h^good on any train 
for six months, so that persons who desire to remain a longer time in California than 
is contemplated by the foregoing itinerary, may do so without sacrificing any part of 
their ticket. There will be a subsequent opportunity to join a party under special 
escort. 

Distance Table. 

l^ILES. 

From Boston to Rotterdam Junction, N. Y., Fitchburg Railroad 212 

" Rotterdam Junction to Suspension Bridge, West Shore Railroad 292 

*' Suspension Bridge to Port Huron, Mich., Southern Division of the Grand Trunk Railway... 181 

*' Port Huron to Chicago, Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway 335 

"' Chicago to St. Paul, Wisconsin Central Division of Northern Pacific Railroad 462 

** St. Paul to Minneapolis, and MinneapoHs to Livingston, Mon., Northern Pacific Railroad.. 1,007 

" Livingston to Cinnabar, Yellowstone Park Branch of Northern Pacific Railroad 51 

*' Cinnabar to Mammoth Hot Springs, stage 7 

** Mammoth Hot Springs to Grand Canon Hotel, stage 33 

" Grand Canon Hotel to Yellowstone Lake, stage 18 

** Yellowstone Lake to Upper Geyser Basin, stage 39 

** Upper Geyser Basin to Fountain Geyser Hotel, Lower Geyser Basin, stage 8 

*' Fountain Geyser Hotel to Mammoth Hot Springs, stage 42 

** Mammoth Hot Springs to Cinnabar, stage 7 

Distances carried forward 2,694 

43 



Miles. 

Distances brought forward 2,694 

From Cinnabar to Livingston, Yellowstone Park Branch of Northern Pacific Railroad 51 

** Livingston to Seattle, Wash., Northern Pacific Railroad 93 1 

" Seattle to Victoria, B. C. , steamer 85 

** Victoria to Tacoma, Wash. , steamer no 

** Tacoma to Portland, Or. , Northern Pacific Railroad 145 

** Portland to Dalles City, Union Pacific Railroad 88 

** Dalles City to Upper Cascades, Union Pacific steamer 45 

** Upper Cascades to Lower Cascades, Portage Railway 6 

** Lower Cascades to Portland, Union Pacific steamer 62 

** Portland to San Francisco, Southern Pacific Company's Mt. Shasta line 772 

*' San Francisco to San Rafael and return, San Francisco and North Pacific Railway line 30 

*' San Francisco to Santa Cruz, Southern Pacific Company's Santa Cruz line 80 

** Santa Cruz to Monterey, Southern Pacific Company's broad-gauge line 47 

" Monterey to San Jose, Southern Pacific Company's Railway, Coast Division 74 

" San Jose to summit of Mount Hamilton and return, by stage 52 

** San Jose to Oakland Pier, Southern Pacific Company's Livermore line 48 

" San Francisco to Santa Barbara, Southern Pacific Company's Railway 527 

" Santa Barbara to Los Angeles, Southern Pacific Company's Railway no 

** Los Angeles to Pasadena and return, Southern California Railway Company's line 20 

** Los Angeles to Redondo Beach, Southern California Railway Company's line 23 

" Redondo Beach to Ballona Junction (21 miles) and from Ballona Junction to San Diego (124 

miles), Southern California Railway Company's line 145 

" San Diego to Riverside, Southern California Railway Company's line 132 

" Riverside to San Francisco, thence to Redlands and return to San Bernardino,^ Southern 

California Company's Railway 27 

** San Bernardino to Barstow, Southern California Railway 81 

*' Barstow to Albuquerque , Atlantic & Pacific Railroad 747 

Distances carried forward 7> ^32 

44 



Miles. 

Distances brought forward 7, 132 

From Albuquerque to Las Vegas Hot Springs (140 miles), and Las Vegas Hot Springs to Kansas 

City (786 miles), Atchison , Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad 926 

" Kansas City to Chicago, Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway 518 

" Chicago to Port Huron, Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway 335 

" Point Edward to Suspension Bridge, Southern Division of Grand Trunk Railway 181 

" Suspension Bridge to Rotterdam Junction, N. Y., West Shore Railroad 292 

" Rotterdam Junction to Boston, Fitchburg Railroad 21a 

Total 9,596 

It will be seen that none of the incidental carriage rides are included in the forego- 
ing enumeration, only the regular journeys by railway, steamer, and stage being taken 
into consideration. 

In the course of the tour the party will pass through the following States and Terri- 
tories: States — Massachusetts, Vermont, New York, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, 
Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Cali- 
fornia, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, and Iowa (18) ; Te7'7'itory — Arizona (i) ; and also 
the Provinces of Ontario and British Columbia in the Dominion of Canada. 

The Excursion to the Big Tree Groves and the Yosemite Valley. 
It has been deemed advisable to make the visit to the Yosemite Valley and the Big 
Trees a side or supplementary trip, at a slight additional expense, the same as in pre- 
vious years, rather than include it in the regular round. This course is taken in order 
that every person may exercise his or her own preference in the matter, not only in 
reference to making the trip, but also in regard to the time to be occupied in connec- 
tion therewith. Six days or a longer period, if desired, may readily be taken from the 

45 



time afforded in the regular itinerary. Six days' absence will give three days within 
the valley, and also encompass a visit to the Mariposa Grove of Big Trees. Special and 
very advantageous arrangements have been made for the accommodation of the mem- 
bers of our parties, and the expense of the trip will be comparatively light. A branch 
railway line extends from Berenda (178 miles from San Francisco and 304 miles from 
Los Angeles), a distance of twenty-two miles, to the station of Raymond, and stage 
transportation from that point to the Wahwonah Hotel (formerly Clarke's, or Big 
Tree station), and thence into the valley, will be furnished by the Yosemite Valley 
Stage & Turnpike Company. The extension of the railroad towards the valley has 
materially decreased the stage journey. The whole distance to be traveled by stage 
is now only sixty miles — thirty-four from Raymond to Clarke's, and twenty-six from 
Clarke's to the valley. The cost of the railway and stage trip from Berenda into the 
valley and return, and including the side trip from the Wahwonah Hotel to the Big 
Trees and back, for members of the party only, will be $35. This sum does 
not include hotel accommodations, incidental meals, nor excursions in or about 
the valley. The entire cost of the trip, including all these items, after deducting 
the value of unused hotel coupons in the regular excursion ticket book, will be 
less than $50. Coupon books for hotel board and meals may be obtained 
at reduced rates from the stage company's agents. Board coupons remaining 
unused on account of taking the Yosemite Valley trip will be redeemed by the con- 
ductor of the party, or at any of our eastern offices. 

Other Side Trips. 

Members of the party who remain in California beyond the period of time covered 
by the itinerary can make many excursions to distant points. An attractive 

46 



excursion to the Sandwich Islands in the early spring is contemplated. The round 
of travel will include a visit to the Island of Hawaii and an ascent of the volcano of 
Kilauea. 

A voyage to Japan, China, or Australia, and return, may be made before the expira- 
tion of the ticket limitation. 

Many little trips may be taken in connection with our itinerary, and without pro. 
longing the stay. A trip to the Geysers, in Sonoma County, will occupy two davs. 
There are two routes — one %)ia Cloverdale and the other via Calistoga — and the best 
way is to go by the former and return by the latter. 

There are many places of resort in Southern California which are easily reached 
from Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Pasadena, or San Diego. 

Subsequent Date when a Party will Return Eastward from Southern 

California. 

Persons who remain in California longer than the itinerary contemplates will have 
one subsequent opportunity to return homeward under special escort, and the 
tickets are good to return independently and on afiy ti-ain. The itinerary of the 
party eastward from Los Angeles and The Raymond in April is as follows : — 

Friday, March 25. — Leave Los Angeles at 12.20 p. m., The Raymond at 12.46 p. m., Pasadena at 
12.50 p. M., and San Bernardino at 3 p. m,, and proceed over the Santa Fe line. 
Saturday, March 26. — E71 route through Arizona and New Mexico. 
Sunday, March 27. — At Las Vegas Hot Springs. 

Monday, March 28. — At Las Vegas Hot Springs. Leave Las Vegas Hot Springs at night. 
Tuesday, March 29. —^« rotde through Colorado and Kansas. 

47 



Wednesday, March 30. — Arrive at Kansas City 7.00 a. m. ; leave Kansas City, via Chicago, Rock 
Island & Pacific Railway, at 5.35 p. m. 

Thursday, March 31. — Arrive in Chicago 9.50 a. m. ; leave Chicago, via Chicago & Grand Trunk 
Railway, at 3.00 p. m. 

Friday, April i. — Arrive at Niagara Falls 8.06 a. m. ; leave Niagara Falls, via West Shore Rail- 
road, at 5.36 p. M. 

Saturday, April 2. — Arrive in Boston (Fitchburg Railroad station, Causeway street) at 9.50 a. m. 

Owing to the limited accommodations to be furnished on certain parts of the route, 
the party will necessarily be restricted in numbers. Tickets must be taken on or 
before Thursday, September 3, four days previous to the date of departure (Monday, 
September 7). 

W. RAYMOND. 

I. A. WHITCOMB. 



'Tickets for the excursion, additional copies of this circular, and all needed 
information can be obtained of 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB, 296 Washington St. (opposite School St.), Boston, Mass. 



SKASON OF^ 1891-02. 



AN AUTUMN TRIP 

TO 

SeaTHERN»GALIF0RNIA. 

BY A DIKECT AND EXPEDITIOUS ROUTE, 

With Visits to Redlands, Riverside, San Diego, Coronado Beach, Los Angeles, 

Pasadena, Redondo Beach, Santa Barbara, San Francisco, Monterey, 

Santa Cruz, San Jose, the Summit of Mount Hamilton, San 

Rafael, and other leading Pacific Coast Resorts. 



The Return Tickets good during the Winter, Spring, or early Summer. A choic3 of Four 
Routes Returning, with Nine Different Parties under Special Escort. 



Date of Ivcaving Boston, Xtiursday, October 15. 



PRICE OF TICKETS (All Traveling Expenses Tncluded) : 

Returning via Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Line, for Adults, $285.00; for Children under the 

age of 12 years, $202.00; or without separate sleeping-car berth, $155.00. 
Returning via Denver & Rio Grande Line or the Union Pacific Line, for Adults, $315.00; for 

Children under the age of 12 years, $204.50; or without separate sleeping-car berth, 

$165.00. 
Returning via Northern Pacific Railroad, for Adults, $385.00 ; for Children under the age of 

12 years, $256.50 ; or without separate sleeping-car berth, $205.00. 



W. R^VYNIOND, I. A. WHITCOIVIB, 

296 Washington St. (opp. School St.), Boston, Mass. 
49 



AN AUTUMN TRIP 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, 

Leaving Boston Thursday, October 15, 1891. 



With the growing popularity of California as a winter resort there comes a demand 
on the part of many persons for an early trip to the Pacific Coast, in order that the 
entire season may be spent in that favored region, and the delights of autumn as well 
as the mild and genial climate of winter be enjoyed. There are many also who desire 
to make the transcontinental journey by the shortest and most direct routes and as 
expeditiously as may be consistent with perfect comfort. This trip has been arranged 
for the express accommodation of this class. The halts by the way are intended for 
rest, and will comprise a stay at Chicago from Saturday morning until Monday morn- 
ing, and brief sojourns at Las Vegas Hot Springs and Santa Fe. Pasadena, Los 
Angeles, Riverside, Redlands, San Diego, and other points in Southern California will be 
reached on the tenth day, and Santa Barbara, San Francisco, or San Rafael the day 
following. San Jose, Monterey, and Santa Cruz can be reached via San Francisco. 
The tickets, which provide every comfort while traveling, and cover all expenses during 
the transcontinental journeys both going ar.d returning, give the holder entire freedom of 

50 



action during his stay upon the Pacific Coast, and also in selecting his route and time of 
return, the only condition being that the return route must be made known at the time 
of taking the ticket. He can journey homeward in any of nine different parties under 
personal escort, or start upon any date he pleases and travel independently, without sac- 
rificing any incidental part of his ticket. The tickets are good throughout the winter, 
spring, and early summer, and may be used on any tram. A choice of four different 
routes eastward from California is presented for selection, each of which has its own 
special attractions ; and whatever homeward route maybe chosen, leading resorts in all 
parts of California may be visited without extra expense. The excursion ticket there- 
fore covers something more than merely the passage to California and return. It per- 
mits the holder to make a comprehensive tour of the leading cities and health resorts on 
the Pacific Coast, with his own option of time, so that his movements may be guided 
wholly by circumstances and personal inclination. In this connection we wish to call 
attention to the fact that we have greatly enlarged the scope of our excursions on the 
Pacific Coast, by including in the long list of places to be visited Redlands, San Diego, 
Coronado Beach, Redondo Beach, Santa Barbara, Monterey, San Jose, Mount Hamil- 
ton, and San Rafael. Every part of California is now accessible to the holders of our 
excursion tickets. All the advantages possessed by our later winter tourists will be 
had by the members of the October party. 

Hotel coupons, which supply board at the leading hotels at reduced rates, may be 
availed of for the whole or a part of the time of sojourn, if desired ; and our excursions 
to Mexico, the Sandwich Islands, Alaska, and elsewhere, which are to take place in 
the course of the season, may also be included. Our hotel coupons provide the best 
accommodations in all cases, and are of different classes, the cost of board being $3. 50, 
$3, ^2.50, and $2 per day. 

51 



In the journeys to and from California, all incidental expenses are included, the 
coupons providing, in addition to first-class passage, a double berth in the Pullman or 
Wagner palace sleeping-cars, board at hotels where sojourns are made, meals in dining- 
cars, or at dining-stations and hotels, and transfers between railway stations and hotels. 

The Outward Journey. 

Leaving Boston from the station of the Fitchburg Railroad, on Causeway street, 
at 3.00 p. M., Thursday, October 15, in elegant Wagner sleeping-cars, the party will 
proceed westward over the Hoosac Tunnel and West Shore lines. Niagara Falls and 
Suspension Bridge will be reached Friday morning, and the great cataract will be in 
view from the cars. The river will be crossed just above the fearful Whirlpool Rapids. 
Continuing westward over the Southern Division of the Grand Trunk Railway, 
we pass through portions of the Province of Ontario and the States of Michigan and 
Indiana. 

The train will reach Chicago Saturday morning, and there will be an omnibus trans- 
fer to the Sherman House, where the party will remain until Monday morning. There 
will be an omnibus transfer from the hotel to the station of the Chicago, Rock Island 
8s Pacific Railway, and at 9.00 A. M. the party will resume its westward journey in 
Pullman palace cars. Kansas City will be reached Tuesday. The farther westward 
journey will be made over the popular Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad, which 
stretches westward to the Pacific Coast, and southward to Texas and Old Mexico^ 
Tuesday will be occupied in the journey through Kansas, and Wednesday will take 
the traveler through parts of Colorado and New Mexico, the train reaching Las Vegas 
Hot Springs in the afternoon. The train will remain here several hours and then pro- 
ceed to Santa Fe, the Capital of New Mexico, where the succeeding forenoon will be 



passed. Resuming the westward journey Thursday noon, the party will proceed to 
Albuquerque, from which point westward our route lies over the Atlantic & Pacific 
Railroad, which with its Pacific extensions, the lines of the Southern California Rail- 
way Company, forms an important part of the Santa Fe system. Friday will be 
occupied in the journey through Arizona, and early Saturday morning the party will 
cross the Colorado River at the Needles, and enter the great State of California, there- 
after traversing the eastern section of the Mojave Desert. From Barstow onward we 
are on the lines of the Southern California Railway Company. At San Bernardino 
connections are made for Redlands, Pasadena, Los Angeles, and other points. The 
train will continue from San Bernardino over the Southern California Railway to 
Riverside, Santa Ana, and San Diego, arriving in the latter city at 8.20 P. M. 
The excursion will be carried out in accordance with the following 

ITINERARY. 

Thursday, October 15. — Leave Boston at 3.00 p. m., from the station of the Fitchburg Railroad, 
Causeway street, via the Hoosac Tunnel line. On arrival at the station members of the party should 
check their baggage to Chicago. The checks will be taken up on the train, and the baggage will be deliv- 
ered at the rooms of the owners in the hotel. Tags are supplied with the excursion tickets, and these, 
with the owner's name and home address plainly inscribed thereon, should be attached to every trunk, 
valise, or other piece of baggage, to serve as a ready means of identification. From Rotterdam Junc- 
tion westward on West Shore Railroad. 

Friday, October 16. — From Suspension Bridge westward, via Southern Division of Grand Trunk 
Railway ; and from Port Huron westward via Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway. 

Note.— Railway time changes at Port Huron, Mich., from Eastern standard, or 75th meridian, to 
Central standard, or 90th meridian — one hour slower. 

Saturday, October 17. — Arrive at Chicago 8.10 a. m. ; transfer by Parmelee's omnibus line to the 
Sherman House. 

53 



Sunday, October i8. — In Chicago. 

Monday, October ig. — Omnibus transfer from the hotel to the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Rail- 
way depot, and leave at 9.00 a. m. in Pullman palace cars. 

Tuesday, October 20. — Arrive at Kansas City, Mo., 8.00 a. m. ; leave Kansas City 8.45 a. m. via 
Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. 

Note. — Railway time changes at Dodge City, Kan., from Central standard, or 90th meridian, to 
Mountain standard, or 105th meridian — one hour slower, 

Wednesday, October 21. — On the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad ^« r<?«/^ through Colorado 
and New Mexico ; arrive at Las Vegas, N. M., in the afternoon, and proceed to Las Vegas Hot Springs 
over branch line, remaining there until evening and leaving at 8.00 p. m. 

Thursday, October 22. — Arrive at Santa Fe, N. M., at an early hour, the cars remaining upon a side 
track ; leave Santa Fe at 12.30 p. m. : arrive at Albuquerque, N. M., 4.00 p. m. ; leave Albuquerque 5.00 
p. M., and proceed westward on Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. 

Friday, October 23.— On the Atlantic & Pacific Railroad e7t route through Arizona. 

Saturday, October 24.— From Barstow, Cal., southward via Southern California Railway Com- 
pany's line to San Bernardino, arriving at 11.00 a. m., and thence by same line to San Diego via Colton, 
Riverside, Orange, Santa Ana, and Oceanside, arriving at San Diego at 8.20 p. m. ; transfer from San 
Diego to the Hotel del Coronado, Coronado Beach. 

Notes. — Passengers for other points can take connecting trains at San Bernardino, reaching Red- 
lands at 11.30 A. M., Pasadena at 2.15 p. m., and Los Angeles at 2.45. p. m. Santa Barbara and San Fran- 
cisco can be reached the ensuing day. 

Railway time changes at Barstow from Mountain standard, or 105th meridian, to Pacific standard, or 
i2oth meridian — one hour slower. 

The Sojourn in Cklifornia. 

As we have already pointed out, the time and place of sojourn in California can be 
made wholly a matter of personal selection. The ticket-holder is not restricted to 
traveling with a party, but can move about in accordance with his own preferences. 

54 



In the journey homeward certain advantages are secured by the parties traveling 
under personal escort, these including, among other features, special trains, a complete 
dining-car service, and special facilities for sight-seeing; but the tickets are equally 
good for use on any train. 

In every excursion ticket there are coupons for three days' board, which may be used 
on first arriving in California, or at the option of the holder. These coupons will be 
accepted at any of the hotels in our list. 

In every excursion ticket there are also coupons for first-class passage from Los 
Angeles to San Diego and return ; from Los Angeles to Redondo Beach and return ; 
from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara and return; from Los Angeles to San Francisco ; 
from San Francisco to San Jose, Monterey, and Santa Cruz and return; from San 
Francisco to San Rafael and return; and from San Jose to the summit of Mount Hamil- 
ton and return. Persons returning eastward by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 
route will also have a return passage ticket and sleeping-car accommodations from 
San Francisco to Los Angeles, good also via Mojave and Barstow, in case parties 
wish to return direct without revisiting Los Angeles. These tickets may be used at 
any time and in any order desired. At every important point on the Pacific Coast 
there are hotels at which our hotel coupons will be valid, the list including such ele- 
gant and popular establishments as The Raymond (to be opened for the season 
Thursday, December 17), at East Pasadena, the Hotel del Coronado, at Coronado 
Beach, near San Diego, the new Redondo Beach Hotel, The Arlington, at Santa Bar- 
bara, the Hotel del Monte, at Monterey, The Vendome, at San Jose, the Hotel Rafael, 
at San Rafael, and the Palace Hotel, in San Francisco. 

It will readily be seen that the excursion allows the widest possible liberty to the 
individual tourist. The objection that is sometimes made to excursion parties on the 

55 



score that the traveler is thereby shut off from the privilege of going where he pleases 
and when he pleases, of remaining as long as circumstances and inclination may lead 
him, and of returning when he chooses, cannot in any sense apply to this tour. 
These privileges are precisely what the excursion does secure. The " programme " 
feature is wholly the outward trip, and extends no farther than the arrival in Cali- 
fornia. 

Extra Sleeping-Car Accommodations. 

Every excursion ticket includes a double berth (half a section) from Boston to Los 
Angeles, thence to San Francisco, and homeward from that point. The following 
are the rates for additional sleeping-car accommodations on the outward trip : For 
extra double berth (a whole section for one person), from Boston to Los Angeles 
or San Diego, $21; for drawing-room with two occupants, $27 — ^18.50 for each 
person. 

Persons desiring additional sleeping-car accommodations on any of the homeward 
trips can arrange for the same with our Pacific Coast agents, Mr. Charles C. Harding, 
No. 138 South Spring street, Los Angeles, previous to December 17, and at The Ray- 
mond, East Pasadena, on and after that date ; or Mr. Carroll Hutchins, at 26 
Montgomery street, Room 6, San Francisco. 

Our System of Hotel Coupons. 

As already mentioned, three days' board at hotels in California is included in every 
excursion ticket. Persons desiring board for a longer period can purchase at our 
offices in Boston, Philadelphia, or New York, or of our agents in California, coupons, 
good for a dav's board each at the leading hotels in California or on the routes home- 
ward. 

56 



These single-day coupons may be had singly or in any number desired, so that holders 
of our excursion tickets can avail themselves of their advantages, either for long or 
short periods. In all cases unused board coupons will be redeemed at the same price 
at which they are purchased. These coupons are of three different classes, viz. : Form 
A, $3.50 per day ; Form B, $3 per day ; Form C, $2,50 per day. At certain hotels the 
rate will be made $2 per day for holders of our coupons, a rebate of 50 cents on each 
coupon of Form C being paid to the ticket-holder at the hotel when settlement is 
made. 

The following is a list of the hotels at which the several classes of coupons will be 
valid: — 

/^as^ Pasadena^ Cal. — The Raymond^ W. Raymond, proprietor ; C. H. Merrill, man- 
ager. This hotel will open for the season December 17. Form A will isntitle the 
holders to rooms on the first, second, or third floor when two persons occupy the same 
apartment. When an apartment on those floors is occupied by one person, there will 
be an additional charge of 50 cents per day. When a room on the fourth floor is 
occupied by one person, there will be no additional charge; and when a room on the 
fourth floor is occupied by two persons, Form B coupons will be accepted, making 
the rate $3 per day. 

Monterey^ Cal. — Hotel del Monte, George Schonewald, manager. Form A coupons 
will ^entitle the holder to a room in either annex with connecting bath-room, or to a 
bed-room and parlor in the main building when apartments are occupied singly. When 
two persons occupy one room, Form B coupons will be accepted for the foregoing. 
Form B coupons will also be accepted, with one person in a room, for a room in either 
annex without bath-room. 

Hotel del Coronado, Coronado Beach, E. S. Babcock, Jr., manager. Form A coupons 

57 



will entitle holders to rooms on the parlor, first, or second floors if two persons occupy 
one room. If such rooms have only one occupant, 50 cents additional will be charged. 
Two persons occupying ocean front rooms will be charged 50 cents each extra, and 
when the room is occupied by one person, $1 extra. Form A is also good for 
rooms on the third floor with one occupant. Form B will entitle the holders to rooms 
on the third floor with two persons in a room, and if there is only one occupant 50 
cents extra will be charged ; also good for rooms on the fourth floor when occupied by 
one or more persons. 

Redondo Beach^ Cal. — Redo7tdo Beach Hotel, E. W. Root, manager. Form A coupons 
will entitle the holders to rooms with connecting bath-rooms ; Form B coupons to 
rooms on the first or second floors, without bath-rooms ; P'orm C coupons to rooms on 
the third floor. 

San Francisco, Cal. — Palace Hotel, C. Percy Smith, manager. Form A will entitle the 
holders, when two persons occupy one apartment, to an outside room, with a bath-room 
connecting ; and with one person in a room, to a light court-room, with a bath-room 
connecting. 

Santa Barbara, Cal. — The Arlington, Q. C. Wheeler, manager. Form A coupons 
will be accepted at this house with one person in a room. When two persons occupy 
the same apartment. Form B will be taken. 

Santa Barbara, Cal. — The San Marcos, F. A. Shepard, manager. Form C. 

San Jose, Cal. — Hotel Vendome, Geo. P. Snell, manager. Form A coupons for rooms 
with bath-room connecting. Form B coupons for rooms on the first, second, and third 
floors without bath-room. Form C coupons for rooms on the fourth floor. 

San Rafael, Cal. — Hotel Rafael, O. M. Brennan, manager. Form B coupons for 
front rooms. Form C coupons for rooms on the north side of house. 

58 



East Sail Gabriel, CaL— Hotel San Gabriel, H. R. Warner, manager. Form C. 

Los Angeles, CaL— The Nadeau, Bennett & Burns Brothers, proprietors. Form A—- 
accommodations with parlor, bed-room, and bath. Form B— accommodations with 
parlor and bed-room, without bath. Form C — accommodations with parlor and bed- 
room, without bath, when room has two occupants. At The lVestf?mtster, O. T. 
Johnson, proprietor, and M. M. Potter, manager. Form B coupons will be accepted 
for front rooms when occupied by two persons ; with only one occupant, 50 cents extra 
will be charged. At The Hollenback, Cowley, Baker & Co., proprietors. Form A 
coupons will be accepted for rooms with connecting baths ; form B for rooms without 
baths. 

Ojai Valley {Ventura Cotmty), CaL— Oak Glen Cottages, B. W. Gaily, proprietor. 
Form C, with a rebate of 50 cents per day. 

Pasadena, CaL— The Painter, J. H. Painter & Sons, proprietors. Form C. 

Pomona, CaL — Hotel Palomares, F. B. Dashiel, manager. Form C. 

Redlands, CaL — Terrace Villa, William M. Tisdale, proprietor. Form C, with a 
rebate of 50 cents per day. 

Riverside, CaL — The Glenwood, Frank A. Miller, proprietor, and F. W. Richardson, 
manager. Form C. 

Sacramento, CaL — Golden Eagle Hotel, W. O. Bowers, proprietor. Form C. 

San Luis Obispo, CaL — Hotel Ramona. Form C. 

Santa Crtiz, CaL — Pope House, J. B. Peakes, proprietor; Pacific Ocean House, W. 
H. McCollum, proprietor; and Riverside House and Cottages, Fred Barson, proprietor. 
Form C will be accepted at all these houses, and a rebate will be made of 50 cents 
per day. 

59 



Las Vegas Hot Springs^ New Mexico. — The Montezuma^ S. H. Brown, manager. 
Form C. 

Portland^ Ore, — The Portland^ Charles E. Leland, manager. Form A. 

Salt Lake City, Utah. — The Knutsford, G. S. Holmes, proprietor. Form B. 

Glenwood Springs^ Col. — Hotel Glenwood, Gelder & Enzensperger, proprietors. 
Form B. 

Manitoii Springs^ Col. — Cliff House ^ E. E. Nichols, proprietor, and Barker House^ 
C. W. Barker, proprietor. Form C. 

Denver, Col. — The Glenarm, A. M. Bailey, proprietor. Form B. 

Niagara Falls, N. Y. — Cataract House, J. E. Devereux, manager, and Lnternational 
Hotel, Uriah Welch, manager. Form B. 

Our hotel coupons cannot be obtained or used except by members of our excursion 
parties. 

The Return from California. 

A choice of four different routes is presented for the return trip, over all of which 
parties will travel under personal escort. Purchasers of tickets will be required to 
select their return route when they take their tickets. This course is necessary, as each 
ticket is complete in itself, and a different price is established for the respective routes, 
on account of a variance in distance, time occupied in the journey, sojourns by the way, 
side trips, etc. A brief description of the several routes will be found on this and the 
succeeding pages. 

Return Route A — Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Line. 

This route is the same that is followed in the outward journey. There will be three 
returning parties under personal escort, the trains leaving Los Angeles and Pasadena, 

60 



and going eastward over the Southern California Railway Company's line, the Atlantic 
& Pacific, and Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroads. Sunday will be passed at Las 
Vegas Hot Springs. Eastward from Kansas City the route will lie over the Chicago, 
Rock Island & Pacific, the Chicago & Grand Trunk, the Southern Division of the 
Grand Trunk, the West Shore, and Fitchburg lines. 

Itinerary of Returning Excursions by Route A — Santa Fe Line. 

Friday, March 25, 1892. — Leave Los Angeles at 12.20 p. m., The Raymdnd at 12.46 p. m., Pasa- 
dena at 12.50 p. M., and San Bernardino at 3.00 p. m., via Southern California Railway Company's line 
(the Santa Fe route) ; from Barstow eastward via Atlantic & Pacific Railroad. 

Saturday, March 26. — En route through Arizona and New Mexico. From Albuquerque eastward 
on main line of Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad. 

Sunday, March 27.— At Las Vegas Hot Springs. 

Monday, March 28.— At Las Vegas Hot Springs. Leave via Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Rail- 
road at night. 

Tuesday, March 29. — On Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad en route through Colorado and 
Kansas. 

Wednesday, March 30. — Arrive at Kansas City 7.00 a. m.; leave Kansas City at 5.35 p. m. via 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway. 

Thursday, March 31. — Arrive in Chicago 9.50 a. m. ; leave Chicago via Chicago & Grand Trunk 
Railway 3.00 p. m. 

Friday, April i. — Arrive at Niagara Falls 8.06 a. m.; leave Niagara Falls z^/a West Shore Rail- 
road at 5.36 p. M. 

Saturday, April 2.— Arrive in Boston (Fitchburg Railroad station, Causeway street) 9.50 a. m. 

Return Route B — Union Pacific Line. 
This route is formed by the Southern Pacific Company's line, from San Francisco to 
Ogden, the Union Pacific Railway thence to Council Bluffs, the Chicago, Rock Island 

61 



& Pacific Railway from Council Bluffs to Chicago, etc. One party will leave San 
Francisco and proceed eastward direct by this route without making any side trips. 
Members of these parties will not require their transfer and hotel coupons at Manitou 
Springs, and, owing to the more expeditious itinerary, a less number of meal coupons 
will be needed. All such unused coupons will be redeemed. 

Itinerary of Returning Excursions by Route B — Union Pacific Line. 

Monday, May 9, — Leave San Francisco g.oo a. m. by ferry, and Oakland Pier, in Pullman palace 
cars, at 9.30 a. m., via the Southern Pacific Company's Ogden line; cross the most picturesque sections 
of the Sierra Nevada by daylight. 

Tuesday, May 10, — On the Southern Pacific Company's Ogden line en route through Nevada. 

Wednesday, May II. — Arrive at Ogden at an early morning hour (Pacific time); leave Ogden, t^z^ 
Union Pacific Railway, at 9.00 a. m. (Mountain time). 

Thursday, May 12. — On the Union Pacific Railway en route through Wyoming and Nebraska; 
arrive at Council Bluffs, la., 4.30 p, m. ; leave Council Bluffs, via Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Rail- 
way, at 5.00 p. M. 

Friday, May 13. — On the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway eJi route through Iowa and Illi- 
nois; from Blue Island Junction eastward via Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway. 

Saturday, May 14. — From Port Huron eastward z>ia Southern Division of Grand Trunk 
Railway ; from Suspension Bridge eastward via West Shore Railroad ; from Rotterdam Junction east- 
ward via Fitchburg Railroad (Hoosac Tunnel line) ; arrive in Boston (Fitchburg station, Causeway street) 
at 9.25 P. M. 

Return Route D — Denver & Rio Grande Line. 

This is a favorite route eastward, and we shall have no less than five excursions, 
under personal escort, over the same during the spring and early summer. All the 

62 



roads forming the route across the mountains, from Ogdcn and Salt Lake City to 
Manitou Springs and Denver, have been made standard gauge, and there is no longer 
any necessity for changing to narrow-gauge cars. Leaving San Francisco by the 
Southern Pacific Company's Ogden line, the parties will journey across California 
and Nevada, passing over the picturesque Sierra Nevada by daylight. At Ogden 
connection is made with the Rio Grande Western Railway, over which line we pro- 
ceed to Salt Lake City, where we shall remain through Wednesday. Resuming the 
journey, over the Rio Grande Western Railway, Wednesday afternoon, the parties 
will traverse the great scenic sections of that road and its continuation, the Denver 
& Rio Grande Railway. It has been arranged that the special trains shall be run 
over the most interesting parts of the line by daylight, and among the grand features 
thus to be seen are the passes and canons lying upon the newly built sections of 
the line, the famous Marshall Pass, to which a side trip will be made, and the 
stupendous Royal Gorge. The parties will reach Manitou Springs Saturday, and . 
there will be sojourns at the Cliff or Barker Houses until Monday evening, when 
the trains will depart for Denver. Tuesday will be passed at Denver, and leaving 
that city Tuesday evening, the homeward journey will be continued through Colo- 
rado and Nebraska to Omaha and Council Bluffs, and from the latter city over the 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway through Iowa and Illinois. Blue Island 
Junction (seventeen miles from Chicago) will be reached Thursday noon, and there 
will be a transfer to the tracks of the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway for the far- 
ther journey eastward. Passengers who desire to visit Chicago arrive in that city an 
hour later than the arrival at Blue Island Junction. Friday will be passed at Niagara 
Falls, and Boston will be reached Saturday morning via the West Shore and Fitch- 
burg Railroads. 

63 



Itinerary of Returning Excursion by Route D — Denver & Rio Grande Line. 



Monday, March 14. 
Monday, April 4. 
Monday, April 18. 
Monday, May 9. 
Monday, June 13. 

Tuesday, March 15. 
Tuesday, April 5. 
Tuesday, April 19. 
Tuesday, May 10. 
Tuesday, June 14. 

Wednesday, March 16. 
Wednesday, April 6. 
Wednesday, April 20. 
Wednesday, May 11. 
Wednesday, June 11;. 

Thursday, March 17. 
Thursday, April 7. 
Thursday, April 21. 
Thursday, May 12. 
Thursday, June 16. 

Friday, March 18. 
Friday, April 8. 
Friday, April 22. 
Friday, May 13. 
Friday, June 17. 



1 Leave San Francisco at 9.00 a. m. (transfer by coaches of the United 

I Carriage Company from the Palace Hotel to the Oakland Ferry), 

f- taking a train of Pullman palace sleeping-cars at Oakland Pier, andpro- 

I ceeding eastward via the Southern Pacific Company's Ogden line ; 

J cross the Sierra Nevada by daylight. 

1 

I On the Southern Pacific Company's Ogden line en route through 

I Nevada and Utah. 



1 

I From Ogden via Rio Grande Western Railway ; arrive at Salt Lake 
r' City at an early morning hour ; remain at Salt Lake City during the 
forenoon ; leave, via Rio Grande Western Railway, at i.oo p. m. 



En route during the day through the magnificent scenic sections of 
Eastern Utah and Colorado. From Grand Junction eastward via the 
Denver & Rio Grande Railway ; arrive at Salida, Col., at a late hour. 



Excursion from Salida over the elevated Marshall Pass (10,858 feet 
high) on the narrow-gauge division of the Denver & Rio Grande Rail- 
way ; leave Salida at 9.00 a. m. ; lunch at Marshall Pass, and then 
return to Salida. 



64 



Saturday, March 19. 
Saturday, April 9. 
Saturday, April 23. 
Saturday, May 14. 
Saturday, June 18. 
Sunday, March 20. 
Sunday, April 10. 
Sunday, April 24. 
Sunday, May 15, 
Sunday, June 19. 
Monday, March 21. 
IV(oNDAY, April II. 
Monday, April 25. 
Monday, May 16. 
Monday, June 20. 
Tuesday, March 22. 
Tuesday, April 12. 
Tuesday, April 26. 
Tuesday, May 17. 
Tuesday, June 21. 
Wednesday, March 23. 
Wednesday, April 13. 
Wednesday, April 27. 
Wednesday, May 18. 
Wednesday, June 22. 
Thursday, March 24. 
Thursday, April 14. 
Thursday, April 28. 
Thursday, May 19. 
Thursday, June 23. 



] On the Denver & Rio Grande Railway en route through the Royal 

I Gorge and other fine scenic sections of the line. Observation cars will 

[^ be used. Arrive at Manitou Springs 3.00 p. m. ; stay at the Cliff 

I House, E. E. Nichols, proprietor, and the Barker House, C. W. Bar- 

-' ker, proprietor. 

1 
I 

I At Manitou Springs. 



At Manitou Springs. Go on board sleeping-cars at night, and leave 
Manitou Springs at 10.00 p. m. 



Arrive in Denver at an early morning hour. The cars will be placed 
upon a side track, and remain during the day, affordmg ample oppor- 
tunity for the visitors to see the city ; meals will be furnished at the 
station dining-rooms. Leave Denver at 5.00 p. m. 

On Union Pacific Railway en route through Nebraska ; arrive at Omaha 
4.00 p. M. (Central standard time) and at Council Bluffs 4.20 p. m. ; 
leave Council Bluffs at 5.00 p. m. via Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 
Railway. 

On Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway en route through Iowa 
and Illinois; arrive at Blue Island Junction about 1.30 p. m, ; thence 
east on the Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway. 

65 



Friday, March 25. 1 

Friday, April 15. j Arrive at Niagara Falls, N. Y., 8.06 a. m. (Eastern standard time), 

Friday, April 29. )■ remain here until afternoon; leave Niagara Falls, via West Shore 

Friday, May 20. | Railroad (from New York Central Railroad station), at 5.36 p. m. 



Friday, June 24. 
Saturday, March 26. 



J 



Saturday, April 16. ^ ^ , ,. . ,._.,, t^ ., , • . 

... I From Rotterdam Junction eastward r/z^ Fitchburg Railroad ; arrive in 

Saturday, April 30. r ^ - ,^. , , -r^ ., -. • ^ n 

,, Boston (Fitchburg Railroad station. Causeway street) Q. 50 a. M. 

Saturday, May 21. j ^ ^ ' .r / v 3 

Saturday, June 25. -^ 

Return Route E — Northern Pacific Line. 
Two of the returning excursions in the spring and early summer will lie through 
Oregon, Washington, the Puget Sound region, and eastward over the entire length of 
the Northern Pacific Railroad. In connection with the June trip a visit maybe made 
to the Yellowstone National Park. Leaving San Francisco by the Southern Pacific 
Company's Mount Shasta line, the parties will proceed over that magnificent scenic 
route to Portland, Or. After a visit to Pcfrtland, with the new and elegant hotel. The 
Portland, as a sojourning-place, there will be a side trip up the Columbia River to 
Dalles City, the railway being taken one way and a steamer the other. Then will fol- 
low a railway ride to Seattle, and a trip by steamer from the latter place across Puget 
Sound to Victoria, B. C, and back to Tacoma. The passengers will resume their 
eastward journey over the Northern Pacific Railroad at the latter point, passing first 
over the picturesque Cascade Division of this line. Leaving Seattle and Tacoma 
Monday afternoon, the train will be due at Livingston at an early hour Wednesday 
morning, and at Minneapolis and St. Paul Thursday afternoon. In connection with 
the last excursion there will be a divergence at Livingston for the purpose of visiting 

66 



the Yellowstone National Park. Sojourns will be made in both St. Paul and Minne- 
apolis, and the eastward journey will be resumed over the Albert Lea and Rock Island 
route. A day will be passed at Niagara Falls, and the eastern cities will be reached 
the day ensuing. The dates of departure from San Francisco are Thursday, April 7, 
and Thursday, June 2, and of arrival in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, Thurs- 
day, April 28, and Thursday, June 30. 

Itinerary of Returning Excursions by Route E — Northern Pacific Line. 

Thursday, April 7. ) Transfer by the United Carriage Company from the Palace Hotel to 

Thursday, June 9. ^ the Oakland Ferry, and leave San Francisco at 9.00 v. m. v/a the 
Southern Pacific Company's Mount Shasta route ; leave Oakland Pier at 9.30 p. m. in Pullman palace cars. 

Friday, April 8. ) On the Southern Pacific Company's line en route through the upper 

Friday, June 10. ' valley of the Sacramento, through the Mount Shasta region, over the 
Siskiyou Mountains, and down through the valleys of the Rogue and Umpqua Rivers. 

Saturday, April 9. ) On the Southern Pacific Company's line en route through the valley of 

Saturday, June 11. ^ the Willamette ; arrive in Portland 9.35 a. m. ; om.nibus transfer to The 
Portland. 

Sunday, April 10. 

Sunday, June 12. 

Monday, April 11. i -^^ Portland. Omnibus transfer to the Union station, and leave Port- 

Monday, June 13. ' landz/Z^: Union Pacific Railroad 8.45 p. m. 

Tuesday, April 12. ) Arrive at Dalles City 12.25 a. m. ; remain upon the cars until morning; 

Tuesday, June 14. ^ leave Dalles City on Union Pacific steamer 7.00 a. m. for the trip 

down the Columbia River; breakfast and dinner on board the boat; on arrival at Upper Cascades trans- 
fer by Portage Railway to Lower Cascades; leave there by steamer; arrive at Portland 4.30 p. m. ; omni- 
bus transfer to the Portland, and after supper transfer from the hotel to the Union station ; leave Port- 
land via Northern Pacific Railroad at 10.00 p. m. 

67 



In Portland. 



Wednesday, April 13. 
Wednesday, June 15. 
Thursday, April 14. 
Thursday, June 16. 
Friday, April 15. 
Friday, June 17. 
Saturday, April 16. 
Saturday, June 18. 
Sunday, April 17. 
Sunday, June 19. 
Monday, April 18. 
Monday, June 20. 



Arrive at Seattle 8.40 a. m. ; omnibus transfer to The Rainier. 

Omnibus transfer to the wharf, and leave Seattle by steamer 10.15 
a. m. ; arrive at Victoria, B. C, 4.30 p. m. ; transfer to The Driard. 
In Victoria. Transfer to steamer in the evening and leave Victoria at 
8.30 p. M. 

Arrive at Tacoma 5.15 a. m. ; at 6.00 a. m., omnibus transfer from the 
wharf to The Tacoma. 

In Tacoma. 



) In Tacoma. Omnibus transfer to the Northern Pacific Railroad sta- 
' tion, and leave Tacoma at 2.40 p. m. in Pullman palace cars ; meals 
will be furnished by the Northern Pacific dining-cars during the trip ; cross the Cascade range by day- 
light. 

) On the Northern Pacific Railroad eti rmde through eastern Washing- 
S ton, Idaho, and Montana, passing Lake Pend d'Oreille by daylight. 



Tuesday, April 19. 
Tuesday, June 21. 
Wednesday, April 20. 
Wednesday, June 22. 

Note. — In connection with the last excursion (arriving at Livingston Wednesday, June 22) there 
A^ill be a side trip of a week through the Yellowstone National Park. (See special itinerary.) 



On Northern Pacific Railroad en route through Montana. 



Thursday, April 21. 
Thursday, June 23. 
station to the Hotel Ryan. 
Friday, April 22. 
Friday, June 24. 
Saturday, April 23. 
Saturday, June 25. 



On Northern Pacific Railroad en route through North Dakota and 
Minnesota ; arrive in St. Paul 6.05 p. m. ; omnibus transfer from the 



In St. Paul. 

In St. Paul. Omnibus transfer from the hotel to the Minneapolis & 
St. Louis Railway station, and at 9.55 leave St. Paul ; arrive at Minne- 



apolis 10.40 a. m. ; omnibus transfer to the West Hotel. 



Sunday, April 24. 
Sunday, June 26. 



In Minneapolis. 



Monday, April 25. ) Omnibus transfer from the hotel to the Minneapolis & St. Louis Rail- 

MoNDAY, June 27. ' way station, and at 7.07 p. m. leave Minneapolis by the Albert Lea 

route. 

Tuesday, April 26. ) On Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway (Albert Lea route) en 

Tuesday, June 28. ' route through Iowa and Illinois; from Blue Island Junction eastward 

on Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway. Persons desiring to go through to Chicago can do so, the train 

arriving in that city at 1.15 p. m. 

Wednesday, April 27. I Arrive at Niagara Falls, N. Y., 8.06 a. m. (Eastern standard time); 
Wednesday, June 29. ' remain here until afternoon ; leave Niagara Falls, via West Shore Rail- 
road from New York Central Railroad station, at 5.26 p. m. 

Thursday, April 28. ) From Rotterdam Junction eastward via Fitchburg Railroad ; arrive in 

Thursday, June 30. ' Boston (Fitchburg Railroad station, Causeway street) 9.50 a. m. 

Note. — The foregoing itinerary is subject to slight changes. 

The Side Trip Through the Yellowstone National Park. 

The excursion through the Yellowstone National Park will occupy a week, the party 
arriving at Livingston Wednesday, June 22. The round of the park will be very thor- 
ough, and a longer time will be allotted to the various places of interest than ordinary 
tourists are accustomed to take. The Mammoth Hot Springs, Norris, Lower, Midway, 
and Upper Geyser Basins, the Grand Cafion of the Yellowstone and Yellowstone Lake 
will be visited, extra time being given in order that the round may be made leisurely 
and comfortably. The itinerary of the Yellowstone National Park party east of Living- 
ston will differ slightly from the one followed by the direct parties. 

69 



Itinerary of the Yellowstone National Park Trip. 

Wednesday, June 22. — Arrive at Livingston, Mon., 4.05 a. m., and remain on the sleeping-cars 
undisturbed until morning; breakfast at the Albemarle Hotel"; leave Liyingston at 8.15 a. m. 7^/^ the 
National Park Branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad ; arrive at Cinnabar 10.18 a. m. ; leave Cinnabar 
by George W. Wakefield's stage line at 10.30 a. m. ; arrive at Mammoth Hot Springs Hotel 12.00 m. 

Thursday, June 23. — Leave Mammoth Hot Springs in George W. Wakefield's stages at 8.00 A. m., 
for the tour through the park; arrive at Norris Geyser Basin 12.30 p. m. ; dinner there ; leave Norris 
Geyser Basin 1.30 p. m. ; arrive at Grand Canon Hotel 4.00 p. m. 

Friday, June 24. — At Grand Canon of the Yellowstone. Leave at i.oo p. m. ; arrive at Yellowstone 
Lake 5.00 p. m. 

Saturday, June 25. — Leave Yellowstone Lake 8.00 a. m. ; arrive Trout Creek 12.00 m. ; dinner 
there; leave Trout Creek i.oo p. m. ; arrive at Upper Geyser Basin 6.00 p. m. 

Sunday, June 26. — At Upper Geyser Basin. 

Monday, June 27. — Leave Upper Geyser Basin 8.00 a. m. ; visit ** Excelsior" Geyser, " Prismatic" 
Spring, etc., and arrive at Fountain Geyser Hotel, Lower Geyser Basin, about 11.00 a. m. 

Tuesday, June 28. — Leave Fountain Geyser Hotel 8.00 a. m., and proceed to Norris Geyser Basin, 
passing Gibbon Falls and the principal geysers in the Norris Basin, including the " Monarch," " Minute 
Man," etc.; arrive at Norris Geyser Basin i.oo p. m.; dinner there; leave Norris Geyser Basin 2.00 p. m.; 
arrive at Mammoth Hot Springs 6.00 p. m. 

Wednesday, June 29. — Leave Mammoth Hot Springs 2.15 p. m.; arrive at Cinnabar 3.45 p. m. ; leave 
Cinnabar, via National Park Branch of the Northern Pacific Railroad, 4.00 p. m.; arrive at Livingston 
6.45 p. M. ; supper at Albemarle Hotel; leave Livingston 10.10 p. m., and proceed eastward over the main 
line of the Northern Pacific Railroad. 

Thursday, June 30. — On the Northern Pacific Railroad en r^z//^ through Montana and North 
Dakota. 

Friday, July i. — On the Northern Pacific Railroad e7t route through North Dakota and Minnesota. 
Arrive in St. Paul 12.40 p. m. ; omnibus transfer to the Hotel Ryan. 

70 



Saturday, July 2. — Omnibus transfer from the Hotel Ryan to the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway 
station, and leave St. Paul at 9.55; arrive in Minneapolis 10.40 a. m. ; omnibus transfer to the 
West Hotel. 

Sunday, July 3.— In Minneapolis.' 

Monday, July 4. — In Minneapolis. Omnibus transfer from the West Hotel to the Minneapolis & 
St. Louis Railway station, and leave Minneapolis by the Albert Lea route at 7.07 p. m. 

Tuesday, July 5. —On Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railway (Albert Lea route), passing through 
Iowa and Illinois ; from Blue Island Junction eastward on Chicago & Grand Trunk Railway. Passengers 
desiring to go through to Chicago can do so, the train arriving in that city at 1. 15 p. m. 

Wednesday, July 6. — Arrive at Niagara Falls, N. Y., 8.06 a. m. (Eastern standard time); remain 
here until afternoon ; leave Niagara Falls, via West Shore Railroad (from New York Central Railroad 
station), at 5.26 p. m. 

Thursday, July 7. — From Rotterdam Junction eastward via Fitchburg Railroad; arrive in Boston 
(Fitchburg Railroad station, Causeway street) at 9.50 a. m. 

Other Excursions. 

There will be an excursion in February and March to the Sandwich Islands, under 
special escort, with a visit to the Volcano of Kilauea and other novel features. This 
trip will enable the participants to gain something more than a casual glimpse of the 
Hawaiian Islands, as several weeks will be passed in Honolulu and in excursions 
therefrom. 

In the early summer there will be one or more excursions to the wonderful scenic 
points on the coast of British Columbia and Alaska. 

The Yosemite Valley and Big Tree Groves. 

The October party will reach California in ample time to make an autumn trip to 
the Yosemite Valley and Big Tree Groves. Persons who desire to visit the valley can 

71 



do so to the best advantage in a side trip, while making the journey one way or the 
other between Los Angeles and San Francisco. A branch railway line extends from 
Berenda (304 miles from Los Angeles and 178 miles from San Francisco) a distance of 
twenty-two miles to the station of Raymond ; and stage transportation from that point 
to the Wahwonah Hotel (formerly Clarke's or Big Tree station), and thence^into the 
valley, will be furnished by the Yosemite Valley Stage & Turnpike Company. The 
extension of the railroad towards the valley has materially decreased the stage journey. 
The whole distance to be traveled by stage is now only sixty miles — thirty-four from 
Raymond to Clarke's, and twenty-six from Clarke's to the valley. The cost of the 
trip from Berenda into the valley and return, and including the side trip from the 
Wahwonah Hotel to the Big Trees and back, is ^35. These tickets, which cover 
everything except board and meals, are at reduced rates, and will be sold only to 
members of our excursion parties. 

PRIC£ OF TICKETS. 

Returning by Route A (Santa Fe Line). — For adults, $285. This sum covers 
first-class passage, all traveling expenses included, from Boston, via Suspension 
Bridge, Chicago, Kansas City, Albuquerque, Barstow, and San Barnardino, to Pasa- 
dena and Los Angeles, thence to San Francisco, from San Francisco back to Los 
Angeles, and returning over the same route traversed in the outward journey; all in- 
cidental meals while in transit to and from California, and between Los Angeles and 
San Francisco ; double berth (half a section) on all sleeping-cars during the round 
trip; round-trip tickets from Los Angeles or San Bernardino to San Diego and return 
to Los Angeles, from San Bernardino to Redlands and return, from Los Angeles to 
Redondo Beach and return, from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara and return, from San 

72 



Francisco to San Jose, Monterey, and Santa Cruz and return, from San Jose to the 
summit of Mount Hamilton and return, from San Francisco to San Rafael and 
return, and the side trips to Las Vegas Hot Springs and Santa Fe ; hotel accom- 
modations at Las Vegas Hot Springs ; transfers in Chicago and San Francisco, and 
also hotel accommodations in California for three days (good at any time). Tickets 
for children under the age of twelve years, including sleeping-car accommodations, 
$202. Where no separate sleeping-car accommodations are required, the price for 
children under the age of twelve years will be $155. 

Returning by Route B (Union Pacific Line). — For adults, $315. This sum 
covers first-class passage, all traveling expenses included from Boston, via Suspension 
Bridge, Chicago, Kansas City, Albuquerque, Barstow, and San Bernardino, to Pasadena 
and Los Angeles, thence to San Francisco, and east via Sacramento, Ogden, Cheyenne, 
Council Bluffs, Blue Island Junction or Chicago, Suspension Bridge, and Niagara 
Falls, to Boston ; all incidental meals while making the round trip; double berth (half 
a section) on all sleeping-cars during the round trip; round-trip tickets from Los 
Angeles or San Bernardino to San Diego and return to Los Angeles, from San Ber- 
nardino to Redlands and return, from Los Angeles to Redondo Beach and return, 
from Los- Angeles to Santa Barbara and return, from San Francisco to San Jose, 
Monterey, and Santa Cruz and return, from San Jose to the summit of Mount Hamil- 
ton and return, and from San Francisco to San Rafael and return ; side trij^s to Las 
Vegas Hot Springs and Santa Fe on the outward journey, and to Salt Lake City and 
Manitou Springs on the homeward journey; hotel accommodations in Chicago and 
Manitou Springs ; transfers in Chicago, San Francisco, and Manitou Springs, and also 
hotel accommodations in California for three days (good at any time). Tickets for 
children, including separate sleeping-car berth, $204.50. Where no separate sleeping- 



car accommodations are required, the rate for children under the age of twelve years 
will be $165. 

Returning by Route D (Denver & Rio Grande Line). — For adults, ^315. 
This sum covers first-class passage, all traveling expenses included, from Boston, via 
Suspension Bridge, Chicago, Kansas City, Albuquerque, Barstow, and San Bernardino, 
to Pasadena and Los Angeles, thence to San Francisco, and east via Sacramento, Ogden, 
Salt Lake City, Pueblo, Manitou Springs, Denver, Council Bluffs, Blue Island Junc- 
tion or Chicago, Suspension Bridge, and Niagara Falls to Boston; all incidental meals 
while making the round trip ; double berth (half a section) on all sleeping-cars during 
the round trip ; round-trip tickets from Los Angeles or San Bernardino to San Diego 
and return to Los Angeles, from San Bernardino to Redlands and retun> from Los 
Angeles to Redondo Beach and return, from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara and return, 
from San Francisco to San Jose, Monterey, and Santa Cruz and return, from San Jose 
to the summit of Mount Hamilton and return, from San Francisco to San Rafael and 
return ; side trips to Las Vegas Hot Springs and Santa Fe on the outward journey 
and over the Marshall Pass and to Manitou Springs on the homeward journey; hotel 
accommodations in Chicago and Manitou Springs; transfers in Chicago, San Fran- 
cisco, and Manitou Springs, and also hotel accommodations in California for three 
days (good at any time).* Tickets for children under the age of twelve years, including 
separate sleeping-car berth, $204.50. Where no separate sleeping-car accommodations 
are required, the rate for children under the age of twelve years will be $165. 

Returning by Route E (Northern Pacific Line). — For adults, $385. This sum 
covers first-class passage, all traveling expenses included, from Boston, via Suspension 
Bridge, Chicago, Kansas City, Albuquerque, Barstow, and San Bernardino, to 

74 



Pasadena and Los Angeles, thence to San Francisco, and east via overland railway 
line to Portland (Or.), Columbia River, Tacgma, Victoria (returning to Tacoma), St. 
Paul, Blue Island Junction or Chicago, Suspension Bridge, and Niagara Falls, to Bos- 
ton ; all incidental meals while making the round trip ; double berth (half a section) on 
all sleeping-cars during the round trip; round-trip tickets from Los Angeles or San 
Bernardino to San Diego and return to Los Angeles, from San Bernardino to Redlands 
and return, from Los Angeles to Redondo Beach and return, from Los^ Angeles to 
Santa Barbara and return, San Francisco to San Jose, Monterey, and Santa Cruz and 
return, San Jose to the summit of Mount Hamilton and return, and San Francisco to 
San Rafael and return ; side trips to Las Vegas Hot Springs and Santa Fe on the out- 
ward journey, and to Dalles City, on the Columbia River, and on Puget Sound returning ; 
hotel accommodations in Chicago, Portland, Seattle, Victoria, Tacoma, St. Paul, and 
Minneapolis ; and transfers in Chicago, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Victoria, 
Tacoma, St. Paul, and Minneapolis; and also hotel accommodations in California for 
three days (good at any time). Tickets for children under the age of twelve years, 
including separate sleeping-car berth, $256.50. Where no separate sleeping-car 
accommodations are required, the rate for children under the age of twelve years will 
be $205. 

Tickets for side trip of one week through the Yellowstone National Park, including 
all stage fares, hotel accommodations, and incidental meals, $56. 

In all cases the return tickets from either Los Angeles or San Francisco, and for the 
various side trips on the Pacific Coast, are good for six months, so that the passenger 
can make the sojourn at any point either long or short, as individual preference may 
dictate. This privilege, with the added fact that the passage coupons are good on any 
first-class train, renders the tickets especially desirable. The holder, after reaching 

75 



California, can travel independently, and his homeward journey may be made also at 
his own option as to time, as well as in C9mpany with a tourist party. 



Tickets for the excursion must be taken on or before Monday, October 12, three 
days previous to the date of departure. 

* W. RAYMOND. 

I. A. WHITCOMB. 



Tickets for the excursion, additional copies of this circular, and all needed informa- 
tion can be obtained of 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB, 296 Washington St. (opposite Scliool St.), Boston, Mass. 



76 



New York Office, 
INo. 357" Broad AT ay, 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB. 

Chicago Office, 

103 SOUTH CLARK STREET, cor. Washington Street, 

E. H. HUGHES, Agent. 



Philadelphia Office, 

111 SOUTH NINTH STREET, under Continental Hotel, 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB. 

London Office, 142 Strand, W. C, 
HENRY GAZE & SON, 

European Agents for Raymond's American Excursions. 



FOR SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA, 

CHARLES C. HARDING, Agent, 

138 SOUTH SPRING STREET, 

Previous to Dec. 17. 

THE RAYMOND, EAST PASADENA, CAL, 

After Dec. 17. 



Agents on the Pacific Coast. 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICES, 

26 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

ROOM 6, 
CARROLL HUTCHINS, Agent. 



LOS ANGELES OFFICE, 

138 SOUTH SF>RIIS[0 ST., 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB, 

F. W. THOMPSON, Agent. 

PORTLAND (Or.) OFFICE, 
83 KIRST STRKET 
CHARLES KENNEDY, Agent. 
77 



And also 36 MONTGOMERY STREET 

(corner SUTTER STREET), 

CLINTON JONES, Agent. 



A MAGNIFICENT TOUR ACROSS THE CONTINENT, 

WITH A 

Week in the Yellowstone jNTational Park. 

The Westward Journey over the Northern Pacific Route, and the Home- 
ward one via the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

THIRTY-SIX DAYS AMID THE MOST PICTURESQUE SCENES ON THE CONTINENT. 

Date of Leaving Boston, Monday, September 7. 
Price of Tickets (all Trayeling Expenses Included), . . $375.00. 



An autumn tour of unusual attractiveness, to include a week's round of the Yellow- 
stone National Park, with a visit to the Pacific Coast of the Northwest, and a return 
journey over the picturesque Canadian Pacific Railway, has been arranged, with Mon- 
day, September 7, as the date of departure. The first halt will be made in Chicago, 
the visitors making the Sherman House, in that city, their headquarters from Wednes- 
day morning until Thursday afternoon, when the westward journey will be resumed 

78 



^. 



z//<2 the Wisconsin Central line, which extends to St. Paul and Minneapolis in connection 
with the Northern Pacific system. A day will be passed at the Motel Ryan, St. Paul, 
and Saturday will find the parties at the West Hotel, Minneapolis, where Sunday will 
be spent. The journey thence over the Northern Pacific Railroad from Minneapolis 
to Cinnabar, and thence by stage to Mammoth Hot Springs, the first halting-place 
within the Park, will occupy from Monday morning until Wednesday noon. Then 
will follow a week's excursion by stage to the Norris Geyser Basin, Lower Geyser 
Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone Lake, the Yellowstone Falls and Canon, and 
back to Mammoth Hot Springs. The time devoted to the Park permits not only a 
leisurely inspection of all the places visited, but also time for rest and recuperation. 

Leaving the Park Wednesday, September 23, the travelers will proceed westward 
over the Northern Pacific line, through Montana, Idaho, and Washington to the shores 
of Puget Sound, and then southward into Oregon. This journey will take one over 
the Rocky Mountains and the Cascade range, and through some of the newly devel- 
oped cities of the Northwest, including Helena, Spokane Falls, and Tacoma. From 
Portland, Or., the party will proceed to Dalles City by rail, and the return trip will 
be made by steamer down the noble Columbia River. There will then be a season of 
sojourn and rest at the splendid new Portland Hotel, and subsequent visits to Tacoma, 
Seattle, Port Townsend, Victoria, and Vancouver, before the homeward journey over 
the Canadian. Pacific Railway is entered upon. 

The party will leave Vancouver Friday, October 2. The first day out will carry us 
through the stupendous caiion scenery of the Fraser. The second day's journey lies 
over the great mountain ranges. The Gold range, the lofty Selkirks, and the Rocky 
Mountains proper are successively passed, and for the whole distance the traveler is 
amid the grandest scenes the continent affords. The Banff Springs Hotel, located in 

79 



the beautiful Canadian National Park, will be reached Saturday night, and the parties 
will remain here until Monday night. Several days will now be occupied in the inter- 
esting journey through Alberta, Assinboia, and Manitoba, the coming empires of the 
Canadian West, and the older eastern provinces of Ontario and Quebec. A part of 
the journey lies along the north shore of Lake Superior, and through the region of lesser 
lakes which borders the almost unknown country of the farther north. The parties will 
reach Montreal Saturday morning, and remain over Sunday at the palatial Windsor 
Hotel. Leaving Montreal from the Windsor street station of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway Monday morning, October 12, the party will reach Boston the same evening. 
The return tickets from Victoria and Vancouver are good for six months, so that 
persons desiring to visit Alaska, California, Japan, or China, or to devote more time 
to the Pacific Northwest regions, will be enabled to do so. 

W. RAYMOND. 
L A. WHITCOMB. 

2!:^=" Tickets for this excursion and all required information may be obtained of 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB, 296 Washington St. (opposite School St.), Boston, Mass. 



80 



EIQHT ORAND WINXE^R TRIPS 

TO 

CAL IFOR NIA. 

A Choice of Two Different Outward Routes and Four Different Routes Returning. 
Elegant Palace Sleeping-Cars and Palace Dining-Cars. 

ALSO SOJOURNS AT 

The Raymond, at East Pasadena; the Hotel del Monte, at Monterey; the Hotel 

del Coronado, at San Diego; the Hotel Kedondo, at Kedondo Beach; the 

Palace Hotel, at San Francisco; the Hotel Vendouie, at San 

Jose ; the Hotel Rafael, at San Rafael ; the Arlington, at 

Santa Barbara; Santa Cruz, and other Famous 

Pacific Coast Resorts. 



NINE RETURNING PARTIES FROM CALIFORNIA. 
Return Tickets good on any Train, and on any Date independent of the parties, if desired. 



Our annual series of winter trips to California for the season of 1891-92 will be 
unusually attractive. There will be eight different trips in addition to the September 
and October excursions, elsewhere referred to. These tours admit the widest possible 

• . 81 



liberty to the individual tourist, with a choice of two routes on the outward journey, 
and four different returning routes, with nine dates when parties will return under 
special escort. In all our trains the best available accommodations in the line of 
sleeping-car and dining-car service will be brought into requisition. The dates of 
departure from the East extend through the late autumn, winter, and early spring. 

Outward by Route A — Santa Fe Line. 

There will be five excursions over the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe route, with a 
sojourn over Sunday in Chicago and visits to both Las Vegas Hot Springs and Santa 
Fe, these trips being in addition to the autumn tour, October 15. The several dates 
of departure from Boston, and of arrival at Pasadena, Los Angeles and San Diego, 
are as follows : — 

ARRIVE AT THE RAYMOND, 
LEAVE BOSTON. LOS ANGELES, AND SAN DIEGO. 

Thursday, Nov. 12, 1891. Excursion No. i. Saturday, Nov. 21. 

Thursday, Dec. 10, 1891. Excursion No. 2. Saturday, Dec. 19. 

Thursday, Jan. 14, 1892. Excursion No, 4. Saturday, Jan, 23. 

Thursday, Feb. 11, 1892. Excursion No. 6. Saturday, Feb. 20. 

Thursday, March 10, 1892. Excursion No. 8. Saturday, March 19. 

Outward by Route C — via New Orleans. 

There will be three outward trips through the South and westward from New 
Orleans by the Southern Pacific Company's " Sunset Route." One of these, No. 7, 
will include a sojourn in New Orleans during the Mardi Gras carnival (Tuesday, 

82 



March i). The dates of departure from Boston and of arrival at Los Angeles, 
Pasadena, and San Diego will be as follows : — 

ARRIVE AT LOS ANGELES, 
LEAVE BOSTON. THE RAYMOND, AND SAN DIEGO. 

Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1892. Excursion No. 3. Tuesday, Jan. 26. 

Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1892. Excursion No. 5. Tuesday, Feb. 16. 

Tuesday, Feb. 23, 1S92. Excursion No. 7. Tuesday, March 8. 

All the excursion tickets include visits to Redlands, Riverside, San Diego, Pasa- 
dena, Los Angeles, Redondo Beach, Santa Barbara, San Francisco, Monterey, Santa 
Cruz, San Jose, the summit of Mount Hamilton, San Rafael, and other points of 
interest on the Pacific Coast. 

RETURNING EXCURSIONS. 

There will be nine returning excursions under personal escort over four different 
routes. In all cases the tickets will be good for use independently on the several 
routes, the holders being entitled to first-class accommodations on any train. 

The dates of return from Los Angeles by Route A (the Santa Fe line) are as 
follows : — 

leave LOS ANGELES AND THE RAYMOND. ARRIVE IN BOSTON. 

Friday, March 25, 1892. Returning Excursion No. 2. Saturday, April 2. 

The date of return from San Francisco by Route B (Union Pacific line) is as 
follows : — 

leave SAN FRANCISCO. ARRIVE IN BOSTON. 

Monday, May 9. Returning Excursion No. 6. Saturday, May 14. 

83 



The five dates of return from San Francisco by Route D (Denver & Rio Grande 
line) are as follows : — 

LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO. ARRIVE IN BOSTON. 

Monday, March 14. Returning Excursion No. i. Saturday, March 26. 

Monday, April 4. Returning Excursion No. 3. Saturday, April 16. 

Monday, April 18. Returning Excursion No. 5. Saturday, April 30. 

Monday, May 9. Returning Excursion No. 7. Saturday, May 21. 

Monday, June 13. Returning Excursion No. 9. Saturday, June 25. 

There are tvi^o dates of return from San Francisco over Route E (Mount Shasta line 
to Portland, and thence over the Northern Pacific Railroad), as follows : — 

LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO. ARRIVE IN BOSTON. 

Thursday, April 7. Returning Excursion No. 4. Thursday, April 28. 

Thursday, June 9. Returning Excursion No. 8. Thursday, June 30. 



PRICE OF TICKETS. 

In the following list of prices all traveling expenses are included, viz. : Railway pas- 
sage and a double sleeping-car berth (half a section) to and from California; incidental 
meals; board at hotels when the same is necessitated in the stops by the way; trans- 
fers ; side trips to Redlands, Riverside, Pasadena, Redondo Beach, San Diego, Santa 
Barbara, San Rafael, Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Jose, the summit of Mount Hamilton, 
and all other points mentioned in the different itineraries ; and three days' board after 
arrival in California. 



Outward by Route A — Santa Fe Line. 

Leaving Boston Nov. 12 and Dec. 10, 1891, and Jan. 14, Feb. 14, and March 10, 1892. 

Children 
Adults. under 12. 

Returning by Route A $285.00 $202.00 

^ o^ -D 3 15.00 204.50 

E 385.00 260.50 

Note.— When no separate sleeping-car accommodations are required, the rates for children's tickets 
will be as follows : Returning by Route A, $155 ; Routes B or D, JI165 ; Route E, $205. 

Outward by Route C — Southern Pacific Co.'s Line, via New Orleans. 

Leaving Boston Jan. 12, Feb. 2, and Feb. 23, 1892. 

Children 
Adults. under 12. 

Returning by Route A $330.00 $219.00 

** *' *' B or D 360.00 241.50 

i^ 430.00 283 .50 

Notes. — When no separate sleeping-car accommodations are required, the rates for children's tickets 
will be as follows : Returning by Route A, $170 ; Routes B or D, $200 ; Route E, $230. 

In connection with returning excursion No. 8 over Route E there will be a side trip of a week, under 
special escort, through the Yellowstone National Park. Price of tickets, $56. 

W. RAYMOND. 
I. A. WHITCOMB. 

A full descriptive circular, tickets, and all required information can be obtained of 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB, 296 Washington St. (opposite School St.), Boston, Mass. 



TWO ORAND TOURS 



THROUGH THE 



Southern States, Mexico, and California, 

With Visits to the principal cities of the South ; an extended Round of Travel 
through Mexico, with Sojourns at its chief cities and places of historic 
and picturesque interest, and a subsequent Trip through the 
most delightful regions of the Pacific Coast, and home- 
ward through Utah, Colorado, etc. 



A GRAND EXCURSION OF SEVENTY-FIVE DAYS. 

Dates of Leaving Boston, Tuesday, Jan. 12, and Tuesday, Feb. 2. 



Arrangements have been made for two grand excursions through the Southern 
States, Mexico, and California, each of which will extend through a period of seventy- 
five days. The dates of departure from Boston are Tuesday, January 12, and Tuesday, 

86 



February 2, and the early part of the trip will include Cincinnati, Louisville, Ky., Birming- 
ham, Ala., Montgomery,Ala., New Orleans, Houston, Galveston, San Antonio, and other 
southern points. The round of travel through Mexico includes visits to Zacatecas, 
Aguascalientes, Leon, Silao, Guanajuato, Queretaro, the City of Mexico, Orizaba, 
Cordoba, the Falls of Atoyac, Puebla, the Pyramids of Cholula, Tlaxcala, the beauti- 
ful and interesting city of Guadalajara, Chihuahua, and the City of Juarez (formerly 
Paso del Norte). In the course of the California part of the trip there will be sojourns 
at San Diego, Los Angeles, Pasadena, San Gabriel, Redondo Beach, Santa Barbara, 
San Rafael, Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Jose, the summit of Mount Hamilton, San 
Francisco, etc. Leaving San Francisco Monday, March 14, and Monday, April 4, the 
parties will journey eastward via the Southern Pacific Company's Ogden line to 
Ogden, and thence over the Rio Grande Western Railway and -the Denver & Rio 
Grande Railway through the most picturesque canons, gorges, and passes of the 
Rocky Mountains. Visits will be paid to Salt Lake City, Marshall Pass, the Royal 
Gorge, Manitou Springs, and Denver. The dates of returning to Boston are Saturday, 
March 26, and Saturday, April 16. 

It will be seen that the tour will be very comprehensive both in Mexico and Cali- 
fornia. In Mexico the round of travel includes visits to a score of interesting places 
that the individual tourist seldom sees. The train is literally a " hotel on wheels,'* and 
the visitors can stop at many points that might otherwise be lost to inspection. A 
special train service, with most of the travel by daylight, is another feature. 

The sojourn in California can be prolonged at the pleasure of the ticket-holder; and 
hotel coupons, which supply board at the leading Pacific Coast resorts at reduced 
rates, may be had for the extra time if desired. The tickets are good for returning 
independently on any train. 

87 



Prices of Tickets. 
For the regular tour (January 12 to March 26, or February 2 to April 16), all travel- 
ing expenses included, ^685. 

For the tour through the South, Mexico, and California, then returning via Oregon, 
Washington, Puget Sound, and eastward over the Northern Pacific Railroad, all trav- 
eling expenses included, $755. 

For the same tour, with the addition of an excursion of one week through the Yel- 
lowstone National Park, all traveling expenses included, ^810. 

W. RAYMOND. 
I. A. WHITCOMB. 

Descriptive circulars, tickets, and all required information regarding the Mexican 
excursions can be obtained of 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB, 296 Washington St. (opposite School St.), Boston, Mass. 



Three Grand Tours of 40 Days, 



-THROUGH THE- 



SOUTHERN STATES AND MEXICO. 

(OMITTING CALIFORNIA.) 

Leaving Boston January 12^ February 2, and February 23. 



Price of Tickets (all Traveling* Expenses included), - - $475.00. 



In addition to the two excursions through Mexico and California, referred to on the 
preceding pages, there will be three trips over the same routes through the Southern 
States and Mexico, but omitting California. Two of these, with January 12 and Feb- 
ruary 2 as the dates of departure, will be in conjunction with the excursions already- 
mentioned, the parties traveling together until reaching El Paso, on the return from 
Mexico. The third tour has been arranged independently of the longer trips. The 
route through the Southern States is precisely the same as in the other excursions, 
but there will be a slight change in the itinerary to enable the party to remain in New- 
Orleans until after the brilliant Mardi Gras festivities (Tuesday, March i). These 
affairs have been remarkably attractive for several years past, and the parades of 
the different organizations planned for 1892 are expected to surpass all previous 



efforts. The same cities and places of interest will be visited in Mexico that have 
been enumerated in connection with the two longer excursions. Journeying from 
El Paso northward via Albuquerque and Las Vegas, the famous Las Vegas Hot 
Springs will be visited. There will be a sojourn over Sunday at this delightful resort, 
and from thence the party will return eastward via La Junta, Kansas City, Chicago, 
and Niagara Falls. The round of travel through Mexico will be complete, and every 
facility will be afforded not only for comfortable and luxurious transit, but also for an 
extended and intelligent study of the country. No more comprehensive tour through 
Mexico has ever been planned. 

An early registration for these excursions (and also for the previous ones) is advisable, 
as only a limited number of passengers will be taken. W. RAYMOND. 

L A. WHITCOMB. 



Copies of the full descriptive circular, together with all needed information, can be 
obtained of 

RAYMOND & WHITCOMB, 296 Washington St. (opposite School St.), Boston, Mass. 



90 



Autumn Trips to Popular Eastern Resorts. 



During the months of September and October there will be a series of excursions 
to the leading mountain, river, lake, seashore, and spring resorts of New England, 
Canada, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia, with visits to the White 
Mountains of New Hampshire, Adirondack Mountains, and the Catskill Mountains of 
New York, Blue Ridge of Maryland, Hudson River, St. Lawrence River and Rapids, 
Saguenay River, Montreal, Quebec, Saratoga, Lake George, Lake Champlain, Lake 
Placid, Lake Otsego, Lake Memphremagog, Moosehead Lake, Mauch Chunk, Wat- 
kins Glen, Niagara Falls, Trenton Falls, Cooperstown, The Thousand Islands, Ausable 
Chasm, Isles of Shoals, Mount Desert, Old Orchard Beach, the Battlefield of Gettys- 
burg, Blue Mountain House, Old Point Comfort, Natural Bridge of Virginia, the 
Grottoes of the Shenandoah, Luray Caverns, Harper's Ferry, Richmond, Washington, 
etc. 

Descriptive circulars, tickets, and all required information can be obtained of 

RAYMOND & WHITGOMB, 296 Washington St. (opposite School St.), Boston, Mass. 



91 



HOW OUR PARTIES TRAVEL. 



There are several thousand ladies and gentlemen residing in various parts of the 
country to whom any special explanation under this head will appear superfluous 
These comprise the many who have accompanied us on excursions to California, 
Mexico, the Yellowstone Park, Washington, Richmond, Saratoga, Niagara Falls, the 
White Mountains, through Canada, etc. For the benefit of persons who may not have 
had this experience, a description of our methods is herewith given ; — 

In the first place care and judgment are used in the formation of a party. It is 
always our endeavor to bring together tourists of a refined and cultivated class, and 
to make up our traveling parties of persons of congenial tastes, so that the social 
element, as well as that of travel and sight-seeing, shall constitute a source of enjoy- 
ment. Our success in these particulars has always been very gratifying, and the 
incidental pleasures of the various trips have been in no small degree enhanced by 
select and agreeable companionship. Our California parties, and also some of our 
summer bands of excursionists, have held reunions, and in some instances formed 
themselves into associations for such purposes. In connection with many excursions, 
musical and literary entertainments of a high order have been given by artists of 
acknowledged talent. While these and many other special pleasures are enjoyed in 
common, a little family group, or party of friends, may be as much by itself, and even 



more than in ordinary traveling. Rooming at hotels and on steamers, the arrange- 
ment of carriage drives and other details are matters of previous adjustment, so that 
the wishes of those who are desirous of being placed together or^n contiguity are 
regarded to as great an extent as possible. In long journeys, where sleeping-cars or 
drawing-room cars are employed, persons are ensured the same places in a manner 
that would be simply impossible in ordinary traveling. A little party thus secures 
accommodations collectively, or together, without encroaching in any way upon the 
rights of others, and without any special effort of its own. No tourist who has had 
experience in crowded railway cars, steamers, and hotels can fail to see the advantage 
of having the interests and welfare of himself and companions carefully looked after 
by another ; while those who are benefited by such watchfulness are left to the full 
enjoyment of their time, untroubled by anxiety as to their ability to secure rooms at 
their next halting-place, or seats and berths at the next change of train. With our 
excursion parties these changes of cars are more frequently avoided than in any 
other way, since through trains are sometimes run for their sole accommodation, and 
troublesome transfers are often prevented by establishing connections not attainable 
in the ordinary train service. 

One or more experienced conductors accompany every party, and the travelers are 
relieved of all personal care and responsibility. Arrangements have been made in 
advance, and there need be no anxiety as to transportation facilities, meals en route, 
hotel accommodations, carriages, transfer and care of baggage, etc. All these things, 
and many others, are attended to by the conductor and his assistants • and every 
incidental item of the excursion, as well as the railway travel, is covered by the book 
of coupons, each separate coupon indicating precisely what the holder is entitled to in 
return therefor. While other travelers are hurrying to and fro in the endeavor to 



secure seats, sleeping-berths, conveyances, or rooms, putting forth every effort to 
outstrip and outdo his neighbor, a member of a " Raymond Party " rests serenely, 
knowing that all Requisite accommodations are reserved for him. The hotel rooming 
is done in advance, and a little card handed him in the cars informs him where he is 
domiciled ; while his trunk follows him, or perhaps precedes him, to his apart- 
ment. Registering one's name in an ordinary manner is not a necessity, the card 
serving as all the introduction necessary and as an immediate passport to the room. 
Special cars and often special trains are at the service of the party to facilitate the 
comfort, seclusion, and convenience of its members. Special excursions are made to 
important points, and thus time, as well as money, is saved, since independent or 
ordinary travelers could not command such facilities or attention. With old tourists, 
as well as with inexperienced ones, this mode of travel finds favor, for they are left 
free and untrammeled to the enjoyment of their journey and sight-seeing. Ladies 
journey by this method easier than by any other, inasmuch as they are relieved of 
many petty cares and annoyances inseparable from ordinary travel. They are enabled, 
not only to travel without special escorts, but also without becoming dependent on 
other travelers. Arrangements are made in advance, not only for the comfort of the 
party as a whole, but for each individual member. Having paid for the entire 
excursion, a member of one of our parties has no need to make any further expendi- 
tures of money, except for the gratification of individual tastes in the purchase of 
souvenirs, gifts, etc.; all travel and hotel accommodations, with transfers and 
incidental meals, being covered by the purchased ticket. 

A feature of our excursion system which must especially commend itself is this : 
While the traveler secures many little comforts and attentions that could not otherwise 
be had, he does not subject himself to any special or ostentatious display, which 



would naturally be obnoxious to persons of quiet tastes. Members of our parties 
move from place to place as private travelers, and are received at hotels as private 
guests, with the added advantage of having their special wants studied and provided 
for in advance. In the cars they form a select company, and are relieved of the 
annoyance of being placed in proximity to strangers, and, as it often happens in the 
common way of traveling, undesirable people. At the hotels they are welcomed as 
expected guests, for whom special preparations have been made. If carriage drives 
are had, the best and most fashionable vehicles are sought, and all semblance to a 
parade is avoided, little parties going out in precisely the same quiet way they would 
go if traveling by themselves. By traveling together in the cars, the members of an 
excursion party gain many special comforts, but it is not at the cost of becoming 
unpleasantly prominent. 

Travelers of experience are perhaps the warmest in praise of our excursions, for the 
reason that many special comforts are provided, while the objectionable features just 
alluded to are avoided. Of the ordinary cares and petty annoyances of travel, the 
** Raymond excursionists " know nothing. All these details are in the hands of the 
conductor of the party and his assistants, while the traveler himself may rest in the 
certainty that his interests are well guarded. It is the luxury of sight-seeing without 
the disturbing element of being compelled to fight one's way to the front at every hotel 
and at each new point visited. 

The adoption of vestibuled trains of Pullman palace cars, and a dining-car service 
in connection with our California and Mexico excursions, provide special comforts and 
luxuries not otherwise attainable by the transcontinental traveler. 

It should be said further that first-class accommodations are invariably- 
engaged for our parties, both en route and at hotels. 




J^oti^I Del [l\OT)t(i 

AND ITS SURROUNDINGS,