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PLAN OF THE PRINCIPAL FLOOR OF OUR DESIGN FOR ILLINOIS STATE CAPITOL. 
2. GRAND ROTUNDA. 3. HALL OF REPRESENTATIVES, 4. SENATE CHAMBER. 



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HOBBS'S ARCHITECTURE: 

CONTAINING 

DESIGNS AND GROUND PLANS 

FOR 

^illas, ^ottafles, anil a\\m ^difttes, 
BOTH SUBURBAN AND RURAL, 

ADAPTED TO THE UNITED STAl ES. 

WITH RULES FOR CRITICISM, AND INTRODUCTION. 

BY 

ISAAC H. HOBBS AND SON, 

ARCHITECTS. 
ILLUSTRATED WITH ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO ENGRAVINGS. 

SECOND EDITION-REVISED AND ENLARGED. 



J. B. 



PHILADELPHIA: 

LIPPINCOTT & 
1876. 



CO. 



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1876, by 

J. B. LIPPINCOTT & CO., 
in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 



Lippincott's Press, 

Ph I LA DELPHI A. 



TO THE MANY 

LADIES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES 

WHO HAVE FOR YEARS AIDED US BY THEIR SUGGESTIONS IN 
PREPARING MANY OF THE MOST PRACTICAL AND BEAU- 
TIFUL GROUND PLANS FOUND IN THIS VOLUME, 

IT IS RESPECTFULLY AND AFFECTIONATELY 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Introduction . . . 9 

HoBBs's Rules for Criticism ' 19 

Preface 21 

DESIGNS. 

I. A Model Residence 22 

II. Suburban Residence ......... 24 

III. Suburban Residence ......... 26 

IV. Suburban Residence . . 28 

V. Suburban Residence 30 ^ 

VI. Suburban Residence ......... 32 

VII. Anglo-French Villa . . . 34 

VIII. French Villa 36 

IX. Anglo-French Villa 38 

X. French Country Residence 40 

XI. Romanesque Villa ......... 42 

XII. Suburban Residence ......... 44 

XIII. Ornamental Cottage 46 

XIV. Country Residence 48 

XV. Suburban Residence 50 

XVI. Village or Suburban Residence ...... 52 

XVII. Village or Suburban Residence . . . . . '54 

XVIII. Village or Suburban Residence 56 

XIX. Suburban Residence 58 

XX. Suburban Residence ......... 60 

XXI. Suburban Residence 62 

XXII. Italian Villa 64 

XXIII. Suburban Villa 66 ■ 

XXIV. Suburban Residence ......... 68 

XXV. Model Residence 70 

(ix) 



X CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

XXVI. Suburban Residence 72 

XX\'II. A Model Residence 74 

XXVIII. Suburban Residence 76 

XXIX. A Model Residence 78 

XXX. Suburban or River-side Residence ..... 80 

XXXI. Ornamental French Villa ....... 82 

XXXII. Suburban Residence ........ 84 

XXXIII. English-Gothic Residence 86 

XXXIV. Small Cottage 88 

XXXV. A Small Cottage 90 

XXXVI. Suburban Residence . 92 

XXXVII. Cottage in the Pointed Style 94 

""JvXXVIII. Suburban Residence 96 

XXXIX. Picturesque Villa 98 

XL. Suburban Residence 100 

XLI. Ornamental Cottage 102 

XLII. Suburban Residence ........ 104 

XLIII. Suburban Residence . 106 

XLIV. Ornamental Cottage . . 108 

XLV. Model Residence . .110 

XLVI. Suburban Residence .112 

XLVII. Model Residence . . . . . . . .114 

XLVIII. A Model Residence 116 

XLIX. An Elizabethan Villa 118 

L. Suburban Residence . . . . . . . .120 

LI. Italian Villa 122 

LII. Suburban Residence, Grecian Style 124 

LIII. Suburban Residence .126 

LIV. Suburban Residence 128 

LV. An American Cottage .130 

LVI. Suburban Residence . 1 32 

LVII. Italian Villa 134 

LVIII. Italian Villa 136 

LIX. Suburban Residence, Italian Style 138 

LX. Suburban Villa 140 

LXI. Village or Suburban Residence ...... 142 

LXII. Residence in the Italian Style ...... 144 

LXIII. Suburban Residence 146 

LXIV. Italian Villa 148 



CONTENTS. xi 

PAGE 

LXV. Italian Villa 150 

LXVI. Suburban Residence . . . . . . .152 

LXVII. Suburban Residence . . . . . . .154 

LXVIII. Suburban Residence . 156 

LXIX. Suburljan Residence . . . . . . .158 

LXX. Mansion in the Elizabethan Style ..... 160 

LXXI. Italian Villa 162 

LXXII. American Bracketed Villa 164 

LXXIII. Italian Villa 166 

LXXIV. School-House 168 

LXXV. Gothic Church 170 

LXXVI. Episcopalian Church 172 

LXXVII. Plain French Villa 174 

LXXVIII. Suburban Residence 176 

LXXIX. Country Residence 178 

LXXX. Ornamental Residence . . . . . . .180 

LXXXI. Gothic Suburban Residence . . . . . .182 

LXXXII. Southern Cottage 184 

LXXXIII. Country Residence 186 

LXXXI V. Suburban Residence 188 

LXXXV. Suburban Residence ....... 190 

LXXXVI. Suburban Residence 192 

LXXXVII. Suburban Mansion 194 

LXXXVIII. American Cottage Villa 196 

LXXXIX. American Cottage 198 

XC. American Suburban Residence ..... 200 

XCI. Suburban Residence ....... 202 

XCII. An American Cottage ....... 204 

XCIII. Suburban Residence 206 

XCIV. American Ornamental Villa ...... 208 

XCV. An American Cottage ....... 210 

XCVI. Model Residence 212 

XCVII. Rural Model Residence 214 

XCVIII. Ornamental Cottage 216 

XCIX. Structural Park Residence 218 

C. Park Picturesque Villa ....... 220 

CI. American Suburban Residence ..... 222 

CII. Suburban Residence ....... 224 

CIII. French Suburban Residence 226 



xJJ CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

CIV. Suburban Residence 228 

CV. Model Residence 230 

CVI. Model Residence 232 

CVII. Model Residence 234 

CVIII. Suburban Residence ........ 236 

CIX. Suburban Residence 238 

ex. French Suburban Residence 240 

CXI. Italian Villa 242 

CXII. Suburban or Country Residence 244 

CXIII. Suburban Residence 246 

CXIV. Swiss Cottage 248 

CXV. American Cottage 250 

CXVI. Suburban Residence 252 

CXVII. Model Cottage 254 

CXVIII. Suburban Residence ........ 256 

CXIX. Children's Home 258 

CXX. Carriage-House and Stable ....... 260 

CXXI. Cemetery Entrance 262 

CXXII. Memorial Architecture 264 



INTRODUCTION. 



I SHALL commence my remarks by asking the question, What is 
architecture? and endeavor to answer the same. According to 
Webster, it is ''building according to the science or the art of 
building, performed by the architect or master-builder:" simply 
this, and nothing more. A builder, therefore, who designs at all, 
is an architect, and any building that is erected is architecture. 
So much for authority. 

Good architecture consists in three things: Fitness, Design, and 
Mechanism. If any one of these particulars is faulty, the architect 
is responsible; holding, as he does, the position of umpire, it is 
possible for him to obtain them, and impossible for any other 
person connected with a building. 

By Fitness, is meant that the building or work has the quality 
of subserving in the best manner according to the positive knowl- 
edge of its needs possible to obtain when built, or, in other words, 
arranging the various parts in such a manner that the least possible 
amount of labor to fulfill the various offices needed in the working 
of the structure, in such a manner that the building may be fully 
adapted to perform all that it is intended for. 

The requirements of a theatre, for instance, are, that all the 
audience shall see and be able to hear with distinctness ; that it 
shall be properly heated in winter, cooled in summer, and ven- 
tilated properly and thoroughly in all seasons; direct and easy 
means of ingress and exit should be provided ; the stage also 
should be so arranged that all the working parts should be the 
most convenient possible ; the building should be fitted to the 
size and wants of the town, and be adapted to the climate and 
habits of the people. All these and many more facts must be 
taken into consideration, weighed, and, in a word, governed by 
good sense. 

2 (9) 



10 



INTRODUCTION. 



Fitness must be considered as a general common sense that 
must pervade the work in order that every part may be balanced, 
and not, as is frequently the case, one part be over-large and 
another meanly small. The only means of acquiring this branch 
of architecture is by observation and learning to think clearly, I 
might say, mechanically. Endeavor to avoid that general view 
which most people take of that which surrounds them. A head 
full of half-understood matter, for an architect, is no head at all. 
In order that an individual may discover to what amount he 
comprehends what he sees, let him look at any object for some 
time until he thinks he understands it ; then as a test let him shut 
his eyes, bring upon his imagination the image, and contemplate 
it in this manner for a time, until he examines thoroughly all his 
understanding has received ; then, upon opening his eyes and 
looking again upon the object, he will begin correctly to estimate 
his powers of perception, and, if they are defective, try to im- 
prove them by practice, examination, study of principles, and 
gathering of details, day after day, and so improve a dull under- 
standing that in a short time, by a mental gymnastic process of 
this kind, the eyes will be able to afford architectural abilities 
rapidly to the student. I often think that good judgment is as 
capable of being taught as mathematics, philosophy, or anything 
else. Yet how often do we meet gentlemen possessed of excel- 
lent education, with miserably cultivated judgment ; it will, in 
most cases, be traceable to the want of a cultivated perception 
founded upon a correct understanding. I do not know of any- 
thing more capable of cultivating the mind than drawing from 
sketches made from nature by the person drawing, — a practice I 
cannot too strongly recommend to every student of architecture, 
as nothing will more rapidly test your understanding than drawing 
it from memory. 

Proportion — I mean in an artistic sense of the word — is play- 
ing, as it were, tunes with angles, curves, and lines in such a 
manner that they will at once impress the eye and judgment of 
the beholder with the sentiment you wish awakened, be it grave 
or sad, loveliness, gayety, or frivolity, grand or beautiful, be it in 
harmony with the surging cataract, or the peaceful lawn and 
sylvan retreat; is devotion to speak in its lines, or the empty 
laugh of a clown. Tunes can be played with lines as well as 
sounds; harmony and discord are alike with both.: the only 



INTRODUCTION. 



II 



difference is that music demands the memory to link the note 
sounded with what was sounded before. With lines, all is before 
you. Madame De Stael defines architecture to be frozen 
music." It is crystallized sentiment; and where its keys are 
touched by master-hands like the Greeks, its tone is chaste 
solemnity ; by the Gothic fathers, reverential devotion ; by the 
Egyptian, awful grandeur. 

In designs there are four principal lines: the horizontal, the ver- 
tical, the diagonal, and the curved. The horizontal is the grand 
and strong line ; the vertical, the sublime line ; the diagonal, the 
rustic or indefinite line, changing towards the character of the 
two lines horizontal and vertical. When nearly horizontal, as in 
the Greek pediment, it becomes somewhat grand; and when 
bearing towards the perpendicular, as in the Gothic, it is on the 
track to the sublime, as attested by the Gothic spires and lofty 
gables of the early English architecture. 

These four lines should be studied carefully. Ample oppor- 
tunity for study of the horizontal is afforded in the Egyptian and < 
Grecian, and in bridges ; the vertical in the Gothic, as the sub- 
lime predominates in that style. There is character in forms. 
The ovoid or egg form is the most beautiful and varied of all 
forms, the circle for grace, the polygon for plainness. 

In further illustration of these principles, permit me to direct 
you, for the first, to the human face. The nearer it approximates 
to the ovoid, the more beautiful and rounded it becomes; the 
more angular, the plainer, as is fully demonstrated by Harding 
in his beautiful work on art. 

Now with the three lines described, and the three forms, by an 
harmonious evolution of them, tunes can be played, and are played 
by the Great Controller of things. The human countenance at- 
tests. The frown, the smile, the hope, the fear, the cunning, and 
the craft are all displayed upon so small a work as the human 
face, and so plainly are they written there that the child sees and 
feels them. I would therefore advise the student of architecture 
to look for his models of style and character to the human form. 
There he will find scope for all the genius he has or possibly can 
attain. The outlines of a beautiful human form are so exquisitely 
fine that nothing can excel them : the tapering of a finger, the 
beautiful curves of the various muscles, the refined balance of 
quantities throughout, the delicate but beautiful contrasts, every 



12 



INTRODUCTION. 



part uniting with others by a beautiful evolution of lines and quan- 
tities. Being thoroughly schooled by such a master, like the 
Grecians, you too may defy the criticism of ages, and stand 
proudly forward, admired and imitated. The statue of an Apollo, 
or a Venus, or a Hercules, etc., Avill be of great aid to the student 
of architecture. Learn to appreciate their beauties, and obtain a 
feeling for the slight but beautiful varying curves ; see the effect 
that one part has upon another, and learn the great truth, that 
harmony is the cause of beauty. Contrasts are to be used simply 
as accessories, in order to make them felt. How many miss in 
this principle ! Artists, architects, and others who fritter away all 
the beauty by disjointed contrasts, rendering weak and puerile 
that which should be whole and grand. Do not imagine that I 
want a humdrum style. No ; I desire variety. Variety of form, 
in quantity, in appliances of every kind to produce it. Let the 
lightning flash, the thunder roll, the waves heave. Let them all 
co-operate, and for a while be as one, until the strongest force 
becomes master and leads the whole, aiding, by the murmurs of 
the others, the positive voice of the leading spirit. 

There are many persons who are so constituted that they do 
not care for music ; there are those also who have no eye for the 
appreciation of beautiful forms. There is no excuse for ugly 
features to build up architectural subjects but bad proportion. 
Place a statue upon your architecture, as did 'the Greeks; if it 
harmonizes, the architecture is good, but if the grotesque alone 
can harmonize with your work, you have not reached the highest 
refinement. It is like placing fine cloth alongside of that which 
is coarse — you see at once the fineness of the one and the coarse- 
ness of the other. Two blacks may, to the untutored eye, appear 
the same ; but take an equal quantity of white lead and mix with 
each, and you immediately see a marked difference in the dif- 
ferent lead-colors produced. Place a well-proportioned building 
in a row of guessed-at ones, and you will see a marked defect in 
what you previously deemed good architecture. They are too 
frequently made up by the hard blows and long rubbings of the 
artisans. A piece of white marble, a perfect cube, — the worst 
possible shape to be regular, — will be beautiful if finely polished, 
with smooth faces and square sides. Yet how often do we pass 
buildings of that material without noticing them ! What has be- 
come of the artistic skill, the fine material ? It has been sacrificed 



INTRODUCTION. 



13 



to bad proportion ; its solidity and enduring grandeur have been 
sacrificed. How much carving is thrown away, having no force 
at all, simply for want of good proportion. Every one appreci- 
ates a beautiful horse, dog, or other animal ; and it is the same 
with architecture : you have not the beauty, or you would gaze 
upon the silent music with emotions of delight. We want archi- 
tecture to appear what it costs ; if expensive material, you must 
have graceful forms, properly adjusted ; if the beauty of the ma- 
terials exceeds the genius of the design, then it is lost, and the 
whole sinks into monotonous contempt. The purer the materials, 
the more exact must be the pro}!)ortion, or the one will neutralize 
the other and spoil the effect. Architects should be chosen by 
their merit, and not by favor, which is mostly done ; those who 
will succeed in getting them must buy the job. It is a disgrace 
to the age that large, important, modern buildings have so little 
architectural merit ; the good taste of the age is slandered to 
build the outrageous trash that is constantly being thrown up in 
Philadelphia and other cities, without proportion or good judg- 
ment. I could enumerate hundreds of absolute failures in design 
and effect, when contrasted with their cost, — works of such pro- 
portion that their size alone should make them grand. 

As I have found so much fault with bad proportion, perhaps it 
will be expected of me to enlighten the community upon the sub- 
ject, — which was not the intention of this work, but merely to give 
a reprint of my designs published in Godey's Ladies^ Book, with a 
few others prepared especially for the present volume. We have 
a law of architectural proportion, discovered by us ten years ago, 
which I have found unfailing in designing and executing work; 
giving our buildings, wherever carried out, a fullness and beauty 
of proportion found nowhere save among the Greek examples. 
With it, the Mansard-roof ceases to be boxlike in appearance, 
and houses have the appearance of being worth twice or three 
times their cost. 

I am fully impressed with the idea that the Greeks who built 
the Parthenon had the same law to guide them that we pursue, 
instead of the law given by Vitruvius having governed them, 
which in truth is no law at all, but the results of measurements 
made by a rule formed from the diameter of the columns at their 
bases, called modules, — a happy process for copying, but nothing 
more ; like an artist, who, when he wishes to copy a picture, fills 



14 



INTRODUCTION. 



it with a number of squares of equal size, and makes the same 
number upon the sheet on which he is to copy. If he wishes to 
enlarge it, he makes the squares larger ; if he wishes it smaller, he 
makes the squares less. A law, if I understand the term aright, 
must be something which, by an evolution of its principles, 
obtains a positive result, or a mathematical reality. 

The more I examine the works of Greece in the ruins of Athens 
and other places, the more do I find that all buildings, though 
different in proportion of parts, are in their evolutions traceable 
to a decided law : every stone has a length and breadth founded 
upon the same principle as the diameter of the columns, height 
of pediment, intercolumniations, and every other part of the 
building. 

A general principle must run throughout every design, to be 
good ; if not, it will be like an artist's picture without an at- 
mosphere. It may be a laborious assembly of details, but have a 
mechanical stiffness, a cold barrenness, admired by no person of 
cultivation and taste. 

The proportion of a doorway will afford an example of the 
means I make use of. Now, as a doorway is for man to walk 
through, its best proportion will be found in a well-developed 
man. We will take a man as six feet high, and eighteen inches 
broad across the shoulders ; if we make the door three feet wide, 
it will be just double his width, — that is, standing in the middle, 
he will have just nine inches of clear space on each side of him. 
If the same is given for the top, above the head, it will be six feet 
nine inches, making the opening three feet by six feet nine inches, 
— a very usual and beautiful size for doors. Now, if we find that 
this measurement neither looks high nor low, but right, we have 
a standard to work from. When we wish to increase the ap- 
parent width of a room, we increase the height of doors, or make 
them narrower ; if we wish to increase the height, we make them 
wider. Just as a painter works with his pigments : if he wishes a 
tone to look blue, he brings orange in contrast ; if red, he brings 
green. The effects in architecture are the same. It is not the 
colors you see in a picture that render it beautiful, but the effect 
produced upon the eye and senses. It is so with the proportions 
of houses, rooms, etc. : we do not let you see yellow, lake, and 
gamboge, but effects of air, water, trees, etc. Conventionalities 
may compel certain sizes, but genius by accessories can make 



INTRODUCTION. 



15 



them appear what it desires ; the low can be thrown aloft, the 
high brought down, the wide narrowed, and all can have, by 
artistic arrangement, a mysterious effect pervading the whole, 
and thus with quiet eloquence speak with the soul of architecture. 
The Greeks understood this law, and gave their columns their 
entasis or swelling form in the centre, the effect that would be in 
nature as a person stands and looks upon a column or shaft : the 
lower part, as high as the level of the eye, the nearest point ; the 
next foot up the shaft will be a little farther off ; the higher you 
look up the column, the distance increases in greater ratio ; and, 
by applying the law of perspective, that objects decrease in size 
according to the square of the distance, you have the parabolic 
curve of the Grecian entasis. 

Yet this must be gently done, to give apparent height to the 
pillars. If overdone, as abundant samples will testify all over 
the land where they have been used, their effect of height is 
gone, and down comes their height ; as the sham is obvious, the 
effect is entirely reversed. This is also true in painting : for 
instance, a blue will recede until it becomes noticeable as blue, 
then it comes forward in your picture. All effects, properly made, 
tell with force and energy ; overdone, they show their poverty by 
utterly destroying, and are worse than nothing. 

Ignorant people often think that they can collect beautiful 
parts of one building and transfer them to others, and have the 
same effect. So they could, if they knew how to balance their 
proportion and adapt them to the new situation thoroughly; but 
if not, they will fail, as can be seen everywhere in town and 
country. A handsome cornice upon one house may be an ex- 
travagant abortion upon another. I would therefore advise the 
study of proportion by all. 

I would advise all to look to the human face and form, where 
character dwells, and study it : the smiling face, with all the 
muscles curling up; the saddened countenance, tending down, 
like the weeping willow and every drooping thing in nature. 
Study that, the fountain wherefrom all things start ; it will lead 
to higher thoughts, and you will obtain a more noble future than 
by copying. 

What I have said has been upon the soul of architecture, — that 
part which lives forever, and has immortal life. 

Let me now descend to the mechanical part, — that which takes 



i6 



INTRODUCTION, 



upon itself to so balance quantities that they produce strong, 
enduring, and rational edifices, with constructions fully adequate 
to their wants. In the first place, we take into consideration the 
materials of which they are made ; for instance, if we take the 
subject of roofs, shingles, slates, tin, copper, tile, felt, and com- 
position, all have their medium pitch, or angle of inclination, 
that is most suited to the material : for instance, the gravel, or 
felt and composition covered with gravel, should always have an 
inclination of not more than half an inch to the foot, or the 
force of the water will wash away the gravel and leave bare the 
composition, and the felt will speedily be in a leaky condition. 
Slate and shingles should never be placed flatter than twenty- 
eiglit degrees of inclination ; lap shingles should have no less 
slope than thirty-five degrees. Tin always looks badly when 
steeper than twenty-six degrees; the same with copper, lead, and 
zinc, when placed upon inclined planes, but where curves are used 
tin looks well, wherever slate and shingles cannot be used to advan- 
tage. Tiles should never be placed upon a roof with pitch above 
thirty degrees, as they would be in danger of sliding off by their 
own gravity. What I have said will be sufficient to illustrate my 
position. Suppose a person of mechanical mind, one balanced 
by practice of thought, views a building; he sees a roof of slate 
or shingles, of a pitch of twenty-three or twenty-four degrees in- 
clination ; at once his attention is arrested in the contemplation 
of the building. "Why," he asks himself, "is this roof so flat? 
It will surely leak, the shingles rot, and the storm blow in snow 
and water." All the low, leaky roofs stored in his memory will 
come forth, and take away from his mind much of the beauty of 
the building. If it had been tin, no thoughts of the kind would 
intrude, but the eyes and attention would go to examining other 
details of the work. Tin roofs, I have said, always look ill 
when placed upon steep-pitched roofs, unless a mechanical ad- 
vantage in their use is obvious, as I have explained. Slates are 
more lasting and durable than tin, and of as little or less cost 
primarily, and much less, when the successive coats of paint, 
which must be placed upon tin in order to make it last, are con- 
sidered. So a wise or foolish selection of materials can be made ; 
and the beholder viewing a structure, balances the good and bad 
sense of its construction in the work, and estimates its merits 
accordingly. 



INTRODUCTION. 



17 



Slates may be objected to as making the rooms too warm within, 
therefore shingles cannot have this objection. Tin, which is 
generally painted red or brown, has the same objection. It has 
been stated to me by a friend that to whitewash the roof-boards 
upon the top before slating will render the rooms much cooler. 
We always advise and provide in our drawings for air to pass 
between the rafters from apertures made in the planciers, which 
render French roofs very comfortable, they always having false 
ceilings, which leave space for ventilation above. 

Chimneys are very picturesque if well treated ; but one thing 
is necessary : as roofs should never leak, neither should chimneys 
ever smoke. They must be carried up above the house in order 
that no eddies of air blowing from any direction shall destroy 
their efficiency. I always send them up out of danger, and 
depend upon their treatment for the part they are to play in the 
design. All sensible persons see at a glance the necessity of their 
height, and approve the daring spirit that, instead of spoiling the 
house by smoky chimneys, does the best that can be done with 
the masonry thus thrown aloft. 

I might go thus through the whole details of a building ; but 
let me for a moment dwell upon the barren geniuses who, to 
make their work attractive, put in false windows, empty parapets, 
and unnecessary appliances for the mere effect of duplication, 
ignorant of the fact that to duplicate ugly forms but increases 
the deformity. Yet certain balances in some styles are really 
necessary. Let your composition be such that it will be formed 
by an evolution of parts necessary, and part of the design. 

If the few remarks I have here thrown out are duly considered, 
the beginner cannot fail to start in the right direction of thought 
to become an architect. If, however, he wishes to be merely 
the slavish copyist of the works of others, he can never be more 
than a draughtsman. 



HOBBS'S RULES FOR CRITICISM. 



As the whole is more important than any separate part, and 
equals all the parts, it demands the first and last consideration. 

All architecture must be practical, and should be mechanical ; 
and errors in this department are unbearable ignorance, and sink 
the architect below the artisan, who could do better. 

All work, when practical and mechanical, should be beautiful, 
or the architect has no genius or merit. 

All ugly things should be dropped as soon as possible ; and all 
beautiful parts be made use of to the greatest extent admissible 
with propriety. 

No part should chop up the whole unless it be worthless. There 
should be some master line throughout the whole work like the 
three colors, red, blue, and yellow, which, when balanced, pro- 
duce a neutral gray or black; and so an equal balance of these 
three lines will produce a neutral, or as near nothing as possible. 

Central ornaments, pediments, etc., must be of sufficient power 
to master the sides or the sides master them. If equal, the effect 
is neutral and the labor lost. 

Make the parts which have the most important offices to per- 
form the purest, and ornamentally attractive. 

Never attract attention by ornamenting unpleasant things, as it 
makes them conspicuous. 

Do all things with strict regard to economy. 

Never use labor and material unless it pays in the design. 

All false things, as string courses, false windows, chimneys, and 
other parts not wanted, but necessary to make a design accept- 
able, show lack of good architecture. 

He that can use the least labor and material, and produce the 
most beautiful effect, is the best architect. 

(19) 



20 



HO BBS'S RULES FOR CRITICISM. 



It is not the knowing a fact that makes men wise, but their 
estimation of its true value. 

Learn to see the beautiful in all things; but if they have ugli- 
ness about them, never see it without condemning it. 

Guard the avenues to the senses by good judgment, and let 
nothing foul or unsightly enter without being accompanied by 
an idea that will reform it ; then it will lie quietly in the mind, 
and not come forward to disturb the good. 



PREFACE. 



The majority of these designs have appeared monthly in Godef s 
Ladies' Book, from the latter part of 1863 until the present time ; 
a few in The Farmer, an agricultural magazine published in 
Richmond, Virginia ; the remainder have never before appeared 
in print. Induced by the flattering reception they have met with, 
and by constant appeals, the author has been led to offer them to 
the public in book form. 

Original designs from the author will be continued each month 
in Godefs Ladies' Book. A noticeable feature connected with 
them is the fact that the greater portion of them have been 
executed, and, without an exception, give entire satisfaction; a 
more practical test of their value could not be given. 

The chapters preceding the designs give practical hints in re- 
gard to the cultivation of artistic taste, choice of situation, style, 
construction, heating, ventilation, etc. Each design is described. 

The intent of this work is not only to assist those who may be 
about to build, but, like the many works of the same character 
which have been published, to aid its readers in the cultivation 
of taste and the love of the beautiful, that they, too, may read 

sermons in stones." 

ISAAC H. HOBBS & SON, Architects, 

OJice, Nos. 809 and 8ii Chestnut Stree:. 
Address to Residence, 804 North Eighth Street, Philadelphia. 



(21) 



DESIGN I. 



A MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This building was designed and built for Colonel 
Walter W. Price, of New York City, upon the west 
bank of Lake George, one and a half miles above the 
Fort William Henry Hotel, upon one of the most 
commanding situations on the lake. It is surrounded 
by a large plantation, which is one of the most ex- 
tensive and beautiful parks in the northern part of 
the State of New York. Fish-ponds, groves, and all 
the adornments and conveniences indulged in by 
Europeans, are here supplied. The building is 
superb and grand, and its proportions are adapted 
to the situation. 

Height of Stories. — First story, 14 feet in clear; 
second story, 13 feet; upper story, 12 feet. Cost, 
$35'000. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule, 9 by 10 feet; B, hall, 
10 feet wide; C, drawing-room, 16 feet 9 inches by 
29 feet 6 inches; D, parlor, t6 feet 6 inches by 24 
feet; E, sitting-room, 26 feet 9 inches by 16 feet; 
F, staircase-hall; G, dining-room, 22 by 17 feet 9 
inches; H, breakfast-room, 17 by 18 feet; I, kitchen, 
14 by 19 feet 6 inches; J, kitchen, 14 by 12 feet 6 
inches ; K, pantry ; L, servants' stair hall ; M, car- 
riage-porch. 

Second Floor. — N, dressing-room, 10 feet 9 inches 
by 10 feet 9 inches; O, hall, 10 feet 6 inches wide; 
P, principal chamber, 16 feet 6 inches by 29 feet; Q, 
chamber, 17 by 22 feet; R, chamber, 16 by 27 feet 6 
inches; S, bath-room, 13 feet 9 inches by 9 feet; T, 
chamber, 18 by 18 feet; U, chamber, 15 feet 6 inches 
by 1 5 feet 6 inches ; V, chamber, 1 6 feet 6 inches by 

1 4 feet ; W, bath-room, 4 by 8 feet. 

f 22) 



DESIGN I. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(23) 



DESIGN II. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is a beautiful type of suburban resi- 
dence, with a Mansard-roof. It was constructed in 
Elmira, N. Y. It was built for Mr. Reynolds, of 
Elmira, and its cost, when completed, was $50,000 ; 
and it will compare favorably, for internal beauty 
and external grandeur, with any of those princely 
residences built in the city of New York. It is built 
of brick, with Ohio sandstone finish. As will be 
observed, the dimensions of all its parts are upon a 
grand scale. The stairway is of the most superb 
kind. The newel-post contains a bronze figure, 
holding a globe. The opening of the stair above 
passes half-way over the hall, and the wainscoting 
and railing are of a carved pattern of a very grand 
kind. The dining-room is also extremely grand and 
effective, having a conservatory for flowers in the 
manner of a bay, with a fountain in the centre. The 
lower lights of glass, being made of mirrors, reflect 
the plants most beautifully. The floor is made of 
ornamental iron-work, with places between the pat- 
terns for planting the flowers. The wood-work is of 
a new style of finish invented by ourselves. 

First Floor, — A, parlor, 28 by 16 feet; B, sitting- 
room, 23 by 16 feet; C, library, 20 feet 10 inches by 
16 feet ; D, dining-room, 1 5 feet 9 inches by 26 feet ; 
E, conservatory, 9 by 14 feet; F, hall, 11 by 38 feet 
6 inches ; G, vestibule, 8 by 11 feet ; H, butler's pan- 
try, 1 2 feet 6 inches by 8 feet ; I, store-closet, 8 by 5 
feet 3 inches; J, kitchen, 18 by 18 feet; K, nursery, 
22 by 18 feet; L, lavatory, 6 by 5 feet; M, back 
porch ; N, front porch. 
(24) 



DESIGN II. 




DESIGN III. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This suburban residence is in the Italian style, with 
Mansard-roof and octagonal corner tower. It will 
have a grand effect, if built in the spirit of the design. 
It contains a very complete set of apartments, large 
and commodious, and would make an admirable river- 
side residence, with ample grounds, sloping gradually 
forward. Terrace-walks and fine finish of lawns are 
requisite ; smooth and well-kept walks, and well- 
graded and closely- shaved slopes, are necessary to 
carry out and give full effect to the design. It has a 
character of rich and grand effect : nothing grotesque 
will be in harmony ; everything must be in the highest 
type of refinement, vases with plants edging the 
walks, and the shrubbery must be grouped on the 
lawn in the best manner, to carry out the desired 
effect. It can be built for $25,000. It is intended to 
be built of brick, with the dressings in wood ; the 
whole to be painted and sanded, in imitation of a 
warm-colored sandstone. 

First Floor. — A, hall, 10 feet wide; B, reception- 
room, 14 by 14 feet ; C, sitting-room, 14 by 21 feet ; 
D, drawing-room, 20 by 30 feet; E, dining-room, 15 
by 32 feet ; F, conservatory, 1 6 by 25 feet ; G, kitchen, 
16 by 20 feet; H, servants' hall, 12 by 16 feet. 

Second Floor. — L, bath- and dressing-room ; M, 
chambers ; N, billiard-room. 



(26) 



DESIGN IV. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is in the Ovo order of architecture. 
Each detail part has its proportion, extracted without 
deviation or change, from the very first Hne to the 
consummation of the design. This building is designed 
to suit a situation upon the side of one of the ranges 
of the Alleghany Mountains, at Tyrone, Pa. The 
ground rising so rapidly demands an evolution pecu- 
liar to the situation, which is obtained by shortening the 
depth and increasing the length of the front. Where 
houses are backed by ranges of high hills, they appear 
very diminutive by contrast, and it is necessary to 
bring to our aid some stratagem by which this can be 
overcome. This building will be nearly one hundred 
and twenty-five feet front, yet have no more space in 
it than many first-class residences we are continually 
designing. The cost of the erection of this building 
will be about ^35,000, and it is intended for the resi- 
dence of Mr. Caldwell, of the firm of Caldwell & 
Loyd, Bankers, Tyrone. 

First Floor. — A, porch ; B, vestibule, 1 2 by 13 feet ; 
C, library and reception-room, 13 by 16 feet; D, 
sitting-room, 23 feet 3 inches by 34 feet 6 inches ; E, 
hall, 12 feet wide; F, parlor, 18 by 46 feet; G, scul- 
lery, 12 by II feet 6 inches; H, kitchen, 16 by- 18 
feet; I, stairs; J, dining-room, 16 by 33 feet; K, 
porch. 

Height of first floor, 15 feet; second floor, 12 feet 
and 13 feet 6 inches; third floor, 10 feet and 12 feet 

6 inches. 

(28) 



DESIGN IV, 




" KIRST FLOUR, 

(29) 



DESIGN V. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design, with a Mansard-roof, is intended for a 
town or suburban residence. It needs the association 
of other houses, with small plantations between, and 
set some sixty feet back from the road, but should 
always take a position on a line with others adjoining. 
In such a position, with well-trained grass, nicely-kept 
walks, with a few terra-cotta ''jardinieres," furnished 
with flowering plants, a small fountain, with a few 
well-chosen bushes in the rear, forming clumps im- 
penetrable to the eye, set in such a manner as to 
form small vistas, but closing up the view before the 
rear of the lot is exposed, properly treated in this 
manner, a degree of refinement will be thrown over 
the whole that even the largest, most pretentious, or 
costly houses may lack. The building cost, where it 
is situated, on the bank of the Raritan River, at New 
Brunswick, N. J., ^7000. It was built with the addition 
of a fine porch extending from bay end in the front 
to the left-hand side, making an improved effect. 
The design was made for Dr. Robbins, of the above 
place, and was executed to his full satisfaction. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule, 4 by 6 feet ; B, stair-hall, 

12 by 14 feet 9 inches ; C, parlor, 16 by 18 feet, with 
bay-window, 8 by 12 feet; D, dining-room, 14 by 16 
feet, with bay-window, 4 by 9 feet ; E, library, 1 2 by 

1 3 feet, with bay-window, 4 by 9 feet ; F, kitchen, 1 1 
by 22 feet; G, store-room, 6 by 8 feet. 

Second Floor. — Four chambers, marked M, all of 
sizes as rooms below ; H, bath-room, 9 by 1 2 feet. 

Third Floor contains an equal number of well- 
■ventilated chambers ; high stories. 

(30) 



DESIGN V. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(3O 



DESIGN VI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design of a suburban residence contains 
large and ample accommodations. By reference to 
the plans, the rooms will be seen to be of very good 
proportions, and all differing in size and shape. The 
house is of brick, painted, with slate roof. The upper 
stories contain ample rooms for servants, tank- and 
store-room. It is finished with the base course, 
window dressings, corner-steps, and chimney-tops of 
sandstone, smoothly cut. Ample provision is made 
for heating, ventilation, and all modern appliances, 
as verandas, bays, porches, etc. The design was 
first made and built of frame, for Albert Dilworth, 
Esq., East Liberty, near Pittsburg, Pa., and is quite 
successful. 

The sizes of rooms, etc., are marked upon the 
plans. The stories are 1 2 feet for the first ; 1 1 feet, 
second story, in the clear between floors and the 
ceilings. Cost, $8000. 



(32) 



DESIGN VI. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(33) 



DESIGN VII. 



ANGLO-FRENCH VILLA. 

Tins desiofn will make a beautiful and convenient 
residence, harmonizing well with a rolling country. 
It can be built of stone, or brick, painted ; or, with 
some slight modifications, it can be altered to frame, 
if desired. It will cost about ^9000. 

The great beauty of such a building is in the pro- 
portion of its parts, and its adaptation to the site for 
its erection, whether it is to be seen at a long or short 
distance, as upon this a great deal will depend. 

First Floor. — A, hall, 8 by 2 1 feet 6 inches ; B, 
parlor, 14 feet 9 inches by 16 feet; C, library, 15 by 
15 feet; D, living-room, 21 feet 5 inches by 14 feet 

6 inches ; E, back parlor, 14 feet 9 inches by 13 feet ; 
F, rear hall; G, porch, 9 by 19 feet 9 inches; H, 
dining-room, 13 by 16 feet 3 inches; I, kitchen, 12 
feet 9 inches by 1 3 feet 5 inches ; K, porch, 1 3 feet 
4 inches by 6 feet 8 inches. 

Second Floor. — L, dressing-room; M, chamber, 14 
by 15 feet; N, chamber, 15 by 13 feet 9 inches; O, 
chamber, 36 feet 8 inches by 14 feet 6 inches; P, 
chamber, 1 5 by i 2 feet 5 inches ; R, hall, 8 by 1 1 feet ; 
S, chamber, 1 6 feet 3 inches by 1 3 feet ; T, bath- 
room, 5 feet 9 inches by 8 feet 3 inches ; U, bed-room, 

7 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 9 inches; V, stair-hall. 



(34) 



DESIGN VII. 




DESIGN VIII. 



FRENCH VILLA. 

This house is suited to the wants of a good-sized 
family, and furnishes Hberal accommodations. The 
roofs are to be slated, in two tints, cut to ornamental 
shapes. The superstructure is to be of stone, and 
the verandas of wood or iron, as may be preferred. 
Entrance is effected through the vestibule to the main 
hall, which communicates with the parlor, dining- 
room, and stair-hall ; and access to the library and 
kitchen is had from the rear hall. 

Upon the chamber plan are five spacious chambers 
and the bath-room. 

From the third floor a short flight of stairs leads 
to the tower. Cost, $8000. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule, 12 by 12 feet ; B, stair- 
hall, 12 by 12 feet; C, dining-room, 14 feet 6 inches 
by 29 feet 6 inches; D, kitchen, 18 by 20 feet; E, 
library, 18 by 20 feet; F, parlor, 20 by 28 feet 6 
inches; G, main hall, 12 feet ; H, rear hall, 6 feet; I, 
porch. 

Second Floor, — K, porch-roof; L, tower- room, 12 
by 1 2 feet ; M, stair-hall ; N, five chambers ; O, bath- 
room, 12 by 12 feet ; P, hall ; R, back stairs. 



(36) 



DESIGN VIII. 
irciicf] tiill,i. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(37) 



DESIGN IX. 



ANGLO-FRENCH VILLA. 

This desigri is in the Anglo-French style. In this 
specimen, the Grecian classic finish is harmonized, 
and presents to the eye the chaste elegance peculiar 
to Italian architecture. It will be seen at once that 
the building is intended to be erected of stone, with a 
roof of slate cut to ornamental forms. The chamber 
plan is arranged to meet the wants of a large family, 
with due regard to rooms for guests. This house 
would make a most desirable residence for a gentle- 
man of means and liberal modern views. At present 
prices of materials and labor, it could be built in the 
vicinity of Philadelphia for ^15,000. 

The first floor contains a vestibule, two halls, a 
library, dining-room, drawing-room, and billiard-room. 
The main hall connects with the drawing-room, library, 
dining-room, and main staircase. 

The domestic offices, such as kitchen, wash-room, 
etc., are placed below. 

The second floor contains fine, spacious chambers, 
as bath-room, dressing-room, and five fine closets. 

First Floor. — i, vestibule, 10 by 8 feet; 2, hall, 12 
by 35 feet ; 3, drawing-room, 20 by 35 feet ; 4, library, 

20 by 21 feet; 5, hall, 4 feet; 6, stair-hall, 10 by 14 
feet; 7, 8, closets; 9, dining-room, 16 by 28 feet; 10, 
billiard-room, 15 by 18 feet; 11, back stair-hall, 6 by 
1 2 feet ; 1 2, 13, porch. 

Second Floor. — 14, 15, chambers, 17 by 20 feet; 16, 
bath-room, 8 by 10 feet; 17, chamber, 16 by 21 feet; 
18, chamber, 15 by 18 feet; 19, 20, 21, closets; 22, 
passage, 4 feet; 23, hall; 24, closet; 25, dressing- 
room, 8 by 12 feet; 26, closet; 27, chamber, 20 by 

21 feet; 28, 29, verandas. 

(38) 



DESIGN IX. 




DESIGN X. 



FRENCH COUNTRY RESIDENCE. 

This design is drawn in die French style, widi 
American wants supplied. For a small family, it is 
very compact in its plan, and conveniently arranged, 
so that quite a stylish parlor and living-room are ob- 
tained. The kitchen is small, but when the parlor is 
used as a living-room, it will be found ample. This 
is a design which will afford real and substantial com- 
fort to its occupants ; being small, and servants not 
to be had at all times, the necessity of doing your 
own work for a few days will not be so difficult a task. 
It is one that will appear larger than it really is. The 
interior has been carefully designed with due regard 
to economy of both space and expense, making it a 
most desirable residence for a family of moderate 
size. 

The cost of building^ this house has been estimated 
by a builder at $2700, complete, in the vicinity of 
Philadelphia. 

First Floor, — i, front porch, 6 by 8 feet; 2, hall, 7 
feet 6 inches by 1 1 feet 9 inches ; 3, library, 6 feet 1 1 
inches by 7 feet 6 inches; 4, living-room, 15 by 19 
feet I inch; 5, dining-room, 18 by 14 feet 2 inches; 
6, kitchen, 12 by 10 feet 2 inches; 7, pump-shed ; 8, 
rear porch, on river front, 14 by 8 feet. 

Second Floor. — 9, hall; 10, sewing- room, 5 feet i 
inch by 5 feet 6 inches ; 11, chamber, 10 feet 9 inches 
by 14 feet 3 inches; 12, chamber, 8 by 12 feet 7 
inches; 13, chamber, 14 feet 2 inches by 11 feet 3 
inches; 14, passage; 15, bath-room, 6 feet 10 inches 
by 6 feet 6 inches ; 16, veranda. 

(40) 



DESIGN XI. 

ROMANESQUE VILLA. 

This villa is in the Oriental -Romanesque style, 
a blending of the two feelings, with the arch and 
dome of the Roman. 

The accommodations offered by this plan are both 
spacious and sumptuous, making it a magnificent 
mansion. It should be in its surroundings assisted 
by fountains, statues, and other accessories, to pro- 
duce the highest finished appearance. 

Upon the principal floor there is a grand hall, 
which traverses the length of the whole building. 
To preclude any possibility of its having a bare ap- 
pearance, the hall should be appropriately decorated 
with pictures. The main hall gives access to the 
parlor, sitting-room, ladies' retiring-room, dining- 
room, billiard-room, and main staircase. The dumb- 
waiter communicates with the kitchen. The building 
is intended to be erected of cut stone, or brick and 
stucco, with a roof of tin, ribbed. 

First Floo7\ — i, front porch ; 2, vestibule ; 3, grand 
hall, 12 by 65 feet 6 inches ; 4, sitting-room, 20 by 40 
feet; 5, parlor, 20 by 40 feet; 6, alcoves; 7, stair- 
hall, 12 by 14 feet; 8, back stairs; 9, closet; 10, 
dumb-waiter; 1 1, ladies' retiring-room, 14 by 19 feet ; 
12, water-closets; 13, dining-room, 17 feet 9 inches 
by 28 feet 3 inches; 14, billiard-room, 17 feet 9 
inches by 28 feet 3 inches ; 15, side porches ; 1 6, car- 
riage-porch ; 17, summer-house; 18, rear porch. 

This plan is not necessarily an expensive one. 
With these dimensions it will cost, as drawn, $40,000: 
finely hammer-dressed stone walls ; walnut finish in 
first and second floors ; yet, by reducing the size of 
rooms to moderate size, stones, etc., it can be built 
as cheap as most other designs. The rear grounds 
are supposed to be lower than front, terraced down. 
The kitchen, laundry, etc., to be in the basement. 
It can be built at a range from $15,000 up. 
(42) 



DESIGN XI. 




FIRST FLOOR. 

(43) 



DESIGN XII. 

SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was built for Mr. Dick, Esq., of Mead- 
ville, Pennsylvania. It is built of stone, with a roof 
of slate ; the interior has been completed in the best 
manner, with marble mantels, low-down grates, etc. 
It is sumptuous without ostentation, and an elegant 
home, much admired. The entire work was contracted 
for and finished at a cost of $40,000. The plans for 
the interior were designed with reference to conveni- 
ence and comfort. The arrangements for heating and 
ventilating are admirable, and give entire satisfaction. 

First Floor. — A, porch, 2 i feet 6 inches by i i feet 
4 inches ; B, hall, 21 feet 6 inches by 1 1 feet 4 inches ; 

C, sitting-room, i 7 feet 8 inches by i 7 feet 10 inches ; 

D, conservatory, 13 feet 8 inches by 10 feet 1 1 inches ; 

E, chamber, 14 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 4 inches ; F, 
bath-room, 7 feet 2 inches by 5 feet ; G, water-closet ; 
H, closet; I, dining-room, 22 feet 7 inches by i 4 feet 
6 inches ; J, rear porch ; K, waiting-hall ; L, pantry, 
II feet 9 inches by 6 feet; M, kitchen, 15 feet 11 
inches by 16 feet inches; N, scullery, 18 feet 10 
inches by i 7 feet 1 1 inches ; O, sewing-room, 1 7 feet 
II inches by 10 feet; P, porch. 

Second Floor. — i, veranda ; 2, hall, 1 1 feet 3 inches ; 
3, library, 1 7 feet 8 inches by 1 7 feet 8 inches ; 4, 
conservatory, 13 feet 8 inches by 10 feet 11 inches; 
5, chamber, 14 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 2 inches; 6, 
bath-room, 6 feet 6 inches by 5 feet ; 7, dressing- 
room, 5 by 1 1 feet ; 8, closet ; 9, chamber, 1 7 feet 1 1 
inches by 14 feet 7 inches ; 10, parlor, 22 feet 6 inches 
by 15 feet 11 inches; 11, bath-room, 1 1 by 9 feet 6 
inches; 12, bed-room, 10 feet 11 inches by 8. feet 9 
inches; 13, bed-room, 17 feet 11 inches by 10 feet; 
14, 15, verandas. 

Those who have seen this house pronounce it very 
beautiful. It is certainly a house that will arrest your 
attention in passing it. 

(44) 



DESIGN XII. 





FIRST FLOOR SECOND FLOOR, 



(45) 



DESIGN XIII. 



ORNAMENTAL COTTAGE. 

This design was built by Mr. Bless, a gentleman 
in Newark, New Jersey, and was erected of stone, 
with a French roof covered with slate, cut to orna- 
mental forms ; the chimneys are finished with terra- 
cotta tops, thereby obtaining a light and graceful 
finish. The accommodations are ample, and the 
house is larger than one would think, at a casual 
glance. A plan for the laying out and embellish- 
ment of the grounds has also been designed, which 
harmonizes and accords well with the character of 
the house. It is a great success, gives full satisfac- 
tion, and cost J9000. 

I, front porch; 2, hall, 7 feet 6 inches; 3, sitting- 
room, 15 by 20 feet; 4, parlor, 15 by 28 feet; 5, 
stair-hall ; 6, dining-room, 15 by 20 feet ; 7, china 
closet ; 8, kitchen, 1 5 feet 6 inches by 1 6 feet 6 inches ; 
9, bed- room, 14 by 17 feet; 10, bath-room, 5 by 16 
feet; 1 1 , wash-house, 10 by 10 feet; 12, coal-shed, 
1 1 feet 6 inches by 10 feet; 13, 14, side porches. 

A, summer-house; B, carriage-house; C, cow-shed ; 
D, stalls ; E, harmess-room ; F, kitchen-garden. 

While satisfactory as to beauty and compactness, 
yet it i'S situated in an unhealthy situation, with bad 
water, and Is not at all desirable upon these points. 
Persons should use every care possible in selecting 
sites for buildings, as no architecture can compensate 
for the want of health in a family. 



(46) 





GROUND PLAN, WITH LAWN PLAT. 



(47) 



DESIGN XIV. 



COUNTRY RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn as a residence for a family 
of moderate size. It is intended to be executed in 
frame, with a roof of slate. The plans are quite 
simple, and will explain themselves. At present 
range of prices it could be well built for $^ooo. 

First Floor. — i, front porch ; 2, side porch ; 3, hall ; 
4, parlor, 13 feet 6 inches by 16 feet; 5, library, 8 
feet 6 inches by 9 feet 9 inches; 6, dining-room, 13 
by 17 feet; 7, 8, closets; 9, kitchen, 12 by 12 feet 6 
inches ; 10, porch. 

Secojtd Floor. — 11, 12, verandas; 13, hall; 14, 
chamber, 13 by 13 feet 6 inches; 15, closet; 16, 
bath-room, 7 by 8 feet. 



(4«) 



DESIGN XIV. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(49) 



DESIGN XV. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn for John W. Thomas, Esq., 
of Chelten Hills, near Philadelphia. The work was 
contracted for by George Watson, Esq., builder, for 
a little less than $50,000, and was built of Falls of 
Schuylkill granite : the base being range-work, and 
the whole superstructure of rubble-work, pointed 
with white mortar, and lined by a neat black line, 
and all the wood-work outside painted and sanded 

to the color of Pictou stone. The buildine is con- 

<_> 

sidered a very beautiful one, and has a grand and 
imposing appearance. The details were all drawn 
with care and executed in a superior manner. The 
interior is grand, and executed chiefly in black 
walnut, finished without gloss. 

First Floor, — i, vestibule, 7 feet 6 inches by 10 
feet; 2, parlor, 17 feet 10 inches by 33 feet; 3, hall, 
10 by 30 feet 10 inches; 4, sitting-room, 17 feet 10 
inches by 20 feet; 5, dining-room, 17 feet 10 inches 
by 30 feet 10 inches; 6, servants' dining-room, 10 
feet 9 inches by 18 feet 9 inches ; 7, butler's pantry, 
4 feet 9 inches by 6 feet 4 inches ; 8, kitchen, 1 6 feet 
3 inches by 1 S feet 9 inches ; 9, library, 1 2 by 1 2 feet ; 
10, summer kitchen, 12 by 12 feet; 11, front porch; 
1 2, side porch. 

Second Floor. — 13, hall, 10 by 22 feet 10 inches; 
14, dressing-room, 10 by 15 feet; 15, bath-room, 6 
feet 3 inches by 8 feet 6 inches ; 1 6, closet ; 1 7, 
chamber, 11 feet 4 inches by 10 feet 9 inches; 18, 
chamber, 17 feet 10 inches by 20 feet; 19, chamber, 
18 feet 10 inches by 15 feet i inch; 20, chamber, 17 
feet 10 inches by 14 feet 6 inches; 21, chamber, 17 
feet 10 inches by 17 feet; 22, sewing-room, 14 by 18 
feet 10 inches; 23, kitchen-roof. 
(50) 



DESIGN XV. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(50 



DESIGN XV 1. 



VILLAGE OR SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design will be very appropriate for a village 
or suburban residence. The interior contains all the 
accommodations necessary for a first-class modern 
residence. It will cost J8000. The superstructure 
will be of brick, rubbed down and painted. 

The kitchen and culinary departments are placed 
below, and will be very well adapted, if the situation 
slopes to the rear. 

The height of first floor is 1 2 feet, and second floor, 
10 feet in the clear. 

First Floor. — P, porch, 18 by 1 2 feet; L, library, 
14 by 14 feet; H, hall, 8 feet; S R, sitting-room, 16 
by 16 feet; D, dining-room, 15 feet 6 inches by 19 
feet; D R, drawing-room, 25 by 16 feet; OP, out- 
side porch, 10 feet. 

Second Floor. — H, stair-hall, 1 2 feet ; B R, bath- 
room, 16 by 16 feet; N C, nursery-chamber, 14 by 
14 feet; C, chamber over porch, 16 by 18 feet; C, 
chamber over drawing-room, 16 by 25 feet; C, 
chamber over dining-room, 15 feet 6 inches by 19 
feet ; P R, porch-roof 



(52) 



DESIGN XVII. 



VILLAGE OR SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This suburban or village mansion is truly Amer- 
ican in spirit and in accommodations. It is arranged 
with economy, both in view of building it and in the 
grandeur of its interior. At a glance, the wide and 
long hall, or vestibule, with its elliptical staircase, 
must be acknowledged as a grand feature, in enter- 
ing from the porch in front. 

The office in the lower wing is sufficiently large 
for a physician, or it may be used as a boudoir. The 
parlor, it will be seen, is of magnificent proportions, 
as well as of pleasing form, capable of ceiling deco- 
rations of the most tasty kind. The piano can be 
placed in the bay communicating with the rear hall. 
It is not necessary to pass into the parlor when 
practicing or receiving tuition. 

The dining-room will be found ample, and also 
beautiful, with an alcove at its end. 

The kitchen apartments are conveniently placed. 
The establishment can be worked in first-class style 
with comparatively few servants. If carried out in 
full, it will cost $20,000. The same design can be 
carried out at a much less cost, if desirable. 

First Floor. — i, front porch; 2, hall, 9 feet; 3, 
office, 13 by 13 feet; 4, parlor, 18 feet 6 inches by 
34 feet; 5, sitting-room, 14 feet 6 inches by 19 feet; 
6, dining-room, 15 by 25 feet; 7, kitchen, 14 feet 6 
inches by 19 feet; 8, scullery, 12 by 15 feet; 9, rear 
porch; 10, side porch. 

Second Floor. — 1 1 , hall ; 1 2, boudoir, 13 by 13 feet ; 
13, bath-room, 7 by 11 feet; 14, nursery, 15 by 15 
feet; 15, chamber, 22 by 19 feet; 16, chamber, 18 by 
18 feet 9 inches; 17, chamber, 22 by 15 feet; 18, 19, 
verandas. 

(54) 



DESIGN XVII. 





DESIGN XVIII. 

VILLAGE OR SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This building was designed for a gendeman in the 
western part of this State, and has a very extensive 
terrace, with a pavilion, level with the porch-floor. 
It is drawn for stone, to be laid rubble, and pointed 
with dark mortar. The plan of the building is very 
commodious ; all of the rooms, halls, etc., are large, 
the ceiling being thirteen feet high. The arrange- 
ment for the stairs is such that very easy ones can 
be built. The general character of the building is 
spreading and large. It cost, at the time, ^20,000, 
and is a durable mansion, fully up to the advanced 
thought of the age. Buildings of the same kind 
vary in their cost when differently situated; the cost 
of materials and labor doubles in many parts, and is 
less in others. 

First Floor. — i, front porch; 2, vestibule, 8 by 16 
feet; 3, sitting-room, 16 by 33 feet; 4, parlor, 16 by 
33 feet; 5, dining-room, 14 by 24 feet; 6, hall, 10 by 
40 feet; 7, bed-room, 12 by 14 feet; 8, bath-room, 
10 by 12 feet; 9, kitchen, 14 by 18 feet; 10, scullery, 
12 by 14 feet; 11, rear porch; 12, carriage-house. 



( 56 ) 



DESIGN XVIII. 




DESIGN XIX. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This building was designed to meet the views of a 
gentleman residing in the suburbs of New York, and 
was intended to be erected on the banks of a river. 
To be built of stone, pointed, with a Mansard-roof, 
of slate. 

It has all the modern appliances for a first-class 
residence, with fine porches, bay-windows, tower, and 
all the appendages requisite for an elegant home. 
With a good finish, it will cost Ji 5,000. 

First Floor. — i, front porch ; 2, vestibule ; 3, library, 
20 feet 6 inches by 17 feet 5 inches; 4, parlor, 16 
feet 6 inches by 39 feet 9 inches; 5, dining-room, 17 
feet 3 inches by 30 feet 6 inches ; 6, hall, 40 feet 6 
inches by 10 feet; 7, sitting-room, 27 feet 6 inches 
by 16 feet 4 inches ; 8, rear porch. 

Second Floor. — 9, chamber, 21 feet 2 inches by 16 
feet 6 inches; 10, boudoir, 13 feet 4 inches by 24 
feet 3 inches; 11, chamber, 21 feet 3 inches by 17 
feet 3 inches; 12, chamber, 17 feet 3 inches by 19 
feet 3 inches ; 13, hall ; 14, chamber, 21 feet 8 inches 
by 15 feet 4 inches; 15, bath-room, 6 feet 6 inches 
by 12 feet 10 inches; 16, veranda. 



(58.) 



DESIGN XIX. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(59) 



DESIGN XX. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This building was designed for Captain Spear, 
of Boston, Mass. It is of a style in which pure 
proportion of parts is necessary. To be successful, 
all details must be skillfully and tastefully made. 
It can be built of stone, or brick tinted in light color. 
To painty such a building of a dark and gloomy 
character would be barbarous. The warmth or 
chilliness of the tone must be decided by the sur- 
roundings, but the intensity of color must be correct, 
or the design will be spoiled, in which perfection is 
by no means common. This design will cost $20,000. 

The roof is designed for slate, cut to ornamental 
shapes. The verandas, cornices, etc., should be 
painted and sanded to correspond with the color of 
the superstructure. 

First Flooi^, — i, den, 12 by 16 feet; 2, library, 16 
by 16 feet; 3, porcfi ; 4, vestibule, 9 feet 6 inches by 
10 feet ; 5, hall, 27 feet 6 inches by 10 feet ; 6, parlor, 
28 feet 6 inches by 18 feet 6 inches; 7, living-room, 
21 feet by 16 feet 8 inches ; 8, dining-room, 15 feet 6 
inches by 23 feet 6 inches; 9, kitchen, 16 by 22 feet; 
10, porch. 

Second Floor. — 11, 12, chambers, 14 by 16 feet; 
13, 14, chambers, 1 8 feet 6 inches by 1 4 feet ; 15, hall ; 
16, dressing-room, 13 feet 6 inches by 9 feet; 17, 18, 
verandas; 19, chamber, 16 feet 6 inches by 12 feet 6 
inches; 20, chamber, 18 by 17 feet; 21, bath-room, 
8 feet 3 inches by 9 feet; 22, bed-room, 10 feet 3 
inches by 12 feet 6 inches; 23, bed-room, 11 by 16 
feet. 

(60) 



DESIGN XXI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

In presenting this design of the residence of C. F. 
Morse, Esq., Haverhill, Mass., I do not hesitate to 
say that it is both beautiful and convenient. It could 
be built of either stone or brick, painted. 

The color the building is to be painted should 
always be known before the same is proportioned, 
as the size of an object will be very different in its 
proportion when painted white, from that which is 
painted brown, or any other broken color. In fact, 
so many considerations must be entered into to secure 
a successful house, that they are rarely obtained. If 
successful, each part should, when viewed, appear 
quiet and beautiful ; no part should intrude itself 
upon the mind so decidedly as to occupy more atten- 
tion than is justly due to its office and importance, 
nor in any event be allowed to " chop up" the design 
as a whole. This is imperative, as largeness of effect 
and grandeur are absolutely dependent upon the 
principle. The cost of the house is ^15,000. 

First Floor. — A, portico ; B, stair-hall, 15 by 17 
feet; C, drawing-room, 18 by 33 feet; D, hall; E, 
library, 18 by 18 feet; F, winter-parlor, 16 by 21 
feet; G, dining-room, 15 by 30 feet; H, breakfast- 
room, 16 by 18 feet; I, waiting-hall; J, porch. 

Second Floor. — K, veranda ; L, hall ; M, chamber, 
18 by 33 feet ; N, chamber, 18 by 18 feet; O, chamber ; 
P, dressing-room, 8 by 1 1 feet ; R, chamber, 16 by 21 
feet; S, back-stairs; T, chamber, 16 by 18 feet; U, 
bath-room, 7 by 10 feet. 



(62) 



DESIGN XXL 




FIRST FLOOR, SECOND FLOOR. 

(63) 



DESIGN XXII. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

This design, which is in the Italian style, was 
executed for Mr. D. W. C. Bidwell, Pittsburg, Pa. 
The greatest care has been taken with the design, 
both from a practical and economical point of view. 
Inhere has been no unnecessary waste of room ; 
neither was there a desire to reduce anything down 
to the smallest possible size. It was built of brick- 
hollow walls, and painted. A vestibule, carried up 
in the form of a tower, was thrown out in order to 
give additional length to the hall, and thus produce 
a grand effect upon entering. Three stained glass 
windows throw their light upon the stairway and into 
the hall below. A conservatory was placed over 
the wash-room, in connection with the nursery. The 
building cost ^25,000, with first-quality plumbing, 
heating, marble mantels, etc. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule, 10 by 10 feet ; B, parlor, 
16 by 25 feet; C, library, 22 feet i inch by 18 feet; 
D, hall, 10 feet wide; E, dining-room, 22 by 16 feet; 
F, lavatory, 5 by 3 feet 6 inches ; G, kitchen, 19 feet 
3 inches by 15 feet 6 inches; H, wash-room, 20 by 

14 feet; I, pantry, 5 by 8 feet; J, china-closet, 5 by 
8 feet. 

Second Floor. — K, chamber, 18 feet i inch by 20 
feet 5 inches ; L, chamber, 9 feet 6 inches by 1 3 feet 
10 inches; M, chamber, 22 by 17 feet 9 inches; N, 
hall, 9 feet 6 inches wide; O, chamber, 22 feet 2 
inches by 16 feet 2 inches; P, bath-room, 8 feet 6 
inches by 7 feet 6 inches ; O, bath-room, 8 feet 6 
inches by 6 feet ; R, ante-chamber, 1 1 feet 8 inches 
by 10 feet 3 inches; S, nursery, 19 feet 2 inches by 

15 feet 6 inches; T, conservatory. 

(64) 



DESIGN XXIII. 



SUBURBAN VILLA. 

This is a French-Italian suburban villa, with a 
Mansard-roof. It was built in New Castle, Pa., for 
Mr. William Patterson, a banker. Its situation is 
upon the side of the hill. It is of brick, painted, laid 
with flush joints and rubbed down. The house cost 
about ^22,000, elegantly finished, with all the modern 
improvements, and is ample for a large family. The 
roof is of slate and tin ; the porches of wood. All 
of the wood-work outside is sanded. The bricks are 
painted, but not sanded. They are of the same color 
as the wood-work. The sash and doors, being made 
of walnut, are oiled. The inside shutters are hung 
and made according to an invention of ours. House 
perfecdy satisfactory. 

First Floor. — A, hall, 8 feet 6 inches wide ; B, par- 
lor, 15 by 21 feet 8 inches; C, library, 16 feet 6 
inches by 13 feet 9 inches ; D, dining-room, 23 by 15 
feet 10 inches; E, sitting-room, 18 by 12 feet 3 
inches; F, kitchen, 19 by 13 feet 8 inches; G, scul- 
lery, 1 2 feet 5 inches by 8 feet 6 inches ; H, store- 
room, 8 feet 6 inches by 6 feet. 

Second Floor, — I, chamber, 9 feet 9 inches by 15 
feet I inch; J, chamber, 16 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 3 
inches; K, chamber, 15 feet 4 inches by 21 feet 7 
inches; L, chamber, 18 feet 4 inches by 12 feet 8 
inches; M, chamber, 19 feet 7 inches by 15 feet 10 
inches; N, chamber, 16 feet i inch by 10 feet 9 
inches; O, bed-room, 16 feet i inch by 8 feet 8 
inches ; P, bath-room, 6 by 8 feet. 



(66) 



DESIGN XXIII. 

^ulttttHtt "fillet* 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(67) 



DESIGN XXIV. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn for Mrs. Haldeman, of 
Harrisburg, Pa., and the building is erected on the 
river-bank. It is set back from the house-Hne thirty 
feet. The parlor, dining-room, and sitting-rooms 
are of large proportions, and every part of the 
house has an air of grandeur upon entering. There 
is a conservatory at the rear^ and an octangular 
bay is thrown back from it at the termination of the 
hall, leaving room to place a fountain. 

The hall terminates with glass doors, which give 
a most cheerful effect to the approach to the main 
stairway, which is composed of walnut, with heavy 
double rail and carved work of ornamental design in 
place of balusters. The newel stands in the centre 
of the hall, and supports a bronze statue, forming a 
candelabrum. At the landing, directly in front of the 
hall, is a circular window of ornamental stained glass, 
throwing a varied tint over the stairway and entrance. 

It cost $23,000, but has the appearance of and 
would sell for more than hundreds that are built, 
costing over $50,000. 

First Floor, — A, vestibule, 6 feet 6 inches by 10 
feet; B, hall, 10 feet wide; C, parlor, 17 by 43 feet; 
D, sitting-room, 16 by 20 feet 6 inches; E, back- 
stairway; F, dining-room, 16 by 23 feet; G, dumb- 
waiter ; H, china closet ; I, conservatory. 

Second Floor, — K, sitting-room ; L, alcove ; M, 
chambers ; N, bath-room ; O, closets ; P, hall ; R, 
balcony. 

Height of first floor from pavement, 5 feet ; first 
story in clear, 14 feet; second, 13 feet; third, 13 feet. 

(68) 



DESIGN XXIV, 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(69) 



DESIGN XXV. 



MODEL RESIDENCE. 

Tins representation of a twin dwelling, as built for 
Mr. H. S. Bollman, of Pittsburg, Pa., clearly demon- 
strates to what an extent the architecture of this 
country could be improved by this mode of building. 

Instead of erecting small and insignificant-looking 
houses, and scattering them around here and there, 
without adaptability of location, why not, by some 
mutual arrangement, let parties work together, and, 
selecting some pretty and convenient site, there erect 
a building an ornament to the neighborhood ? By 
this mode you can secure better accommodations 
inside, and tenfold the beauty of exterior effect, with 
much less expense than by building separately. The 
rooms are all large and well lighted, with all the 
modern conveniences, — bay-windows, bath-rooms, 
etc. The third story can contain three chambers, 
with all necessary closet room, etc. The building, as 
here represented, is intended for stone, but could 
readily be altered to either brick or wood. It would 
cost, of stone, between J9000 and J 10,000. 

First Floor, — A, parlors, 16 feet 6 inches by 18 
feet; B, halls; C, sitting-rooms, 14 feet 3 inches by 
10 feet; D, dining-rooms, 21 feet 6 inches by 12 feet; 
E, kitchens, 14 feet 3 inches by 14 feet; F, sculleries, 
10 by 13 feet; G, porches. 

Second Floor. — H, chambers ; I, bath-rooms ; J, 
closets ; K, balconies. 

(70) 



DESIGN XXV. 




FIRST FLOOF. SECOND FLOOR. 



(71) 



DESIGN XXVI. 

SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was built by Mr. C. S. Kauffman, of 
Columbia, Pa. He had the building nearly completed, 
when it was burned down, but rebuilt by the same 
plans, without alteration, showing clearly that it was 
fully satisfactory to the owner. We can further say, 
that no case has yet occurred where, when our designs 
have been burnt, that the building has not been re- 
produced upon the same plan, unaltered. 

Ground Plan. — A, front porch ; B, vestibule, 8 by 
8 feet; C, hall, 8 feet wide; D, parlor, i6 by 31 feet; 
E, sitting-room, 16 by 18 feet; F, library, 15 by 28 
feet; G, dining-room, 14 by 29 feet; H, kitchen, 16 
by 20 feet; I, pantry; K, wash-room, 12 by 14 feet; 
L, porches ; M, balconies. 



(72i 



DESIGN XXVT. 




DESIGN XXVII. 

A MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This design is a one-story and French-roof build- 
ing-, suitable for the Southern country. It is provided 
with sufficient height to admit of an air-space between 
the roof and second story. The design can be built 
in wood for about $3000, and be very comfortable 
and convenient. All of these designs are beautiful, 
because they are well-proportioned, and not merely 
on account of the style or order of architecture to 
which they belong. 

We have made several modifications of this de- 
sign for California, Nevada, Colorado, and other 
points in the United States ; and they have proved 
satisfactory with all. Of a necessity, their propor- 
tions are all altered somewhat to suit situations ; also 
to meet the wants of the family in regard to sizes of 
rooms, extent of porches, closets, etc. Hardly two 
persons want exactly the same house — perfectly 
similar inside and outside. The grounds and por- 
tions of view are apt to be different ; one may face 
north, others south, etc., and demand different atten- 
tion. 

Fii'st Floor. — A, hall, 8 feet wide ; B, parlor, 18 by 
20 feet; C, library, 14 by 16 feet; D, dining-room, 
14 by 16 feet; E, chamber, 12 by 14 feet; F, kitchen, 
16 by 17 feet; G, china-closet; H, porch. 

Second Floor. — K, chambers ; L, bath-room ; M, 
veranda. 



(74) 



DESIGN XXVIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was built for Mr. J. McCormick, and 
is situated upon the corner of Locust Street and the 
river-bank, in the city of Harrisburg, and is consid- 
ered a successful building for proportion and grand 
appearance. It maintains a solid, mansion-like effect. 
The windows are large, ceilings lofty, and the mate- 
rial, cut limestone, laid broken range and pointed. The 
cost, finished, was about ^20,000. Some consider- 
able beauty rests in the material, which, with good 
architecture, should always be left so that it strikes 
the beholder with full force. We have invented a new 
order of architecture, ''The American-Ovo order of 
architecture," for church buildings and large public 
edifices. It is far superior to the most elaborate 
styles of the highest type of flowered Gothic or Me- 
diaeval architecture. 

First Floor. — A, porch ; B, hall, 9 feet wide ; C, 
parlor, 1 7 by 30 feet ; D, sitting-room, 1 5 by 16 feet ; 
E, library, 15 by 1 8 feet ; F, dining-room, 1 7 feet 6 
inches by 22 feet; G, kitchen, 16 by 18 feet; H, 
china-closet ; J, pantry ; K, porch. 

Second Floor, — L, chamber, 17 by 22 feet; M, 
chamber, 19 by 17 feet 4 inches ; N, chamber, 16 feet 
3 inches by 1 5 feet ; O, chamber, 1 7 feet 8 inches by 
16 feet 9 inches ; P, chamber, 14 feet 9 inches by 18 
feet; R, chamber, 14 by 18 feet; S, bath-room. 



(76), 



DESIGN XXVIII. 




DESIGN XXIX. 



A MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This residence is being built for Mr. John Bowers, 
of New Castle, Pa. It contains many interesting 
features, and was prepared for an elevated position. 
The roof is of the Mansard pattern, adjusted per- 
spectively to the elevation of the site. Great econ- 
omy has been used in the design, and the whole 
building is ornamental. Its plain surfaces are made 
to give to the beholder great beauty, every size hav- 
ing been strictly calculated by the Ovo law of archi- 
tectural proportion. The musical ratios are perfectly 
adhered to, varied by perspective position, which 
pleases those beholding the structure. 

The building is being built of brick, and painted, 
and will cost, nicely finished, about ^8000, with all 
modern conveniences. 

First Floor, — A, vestibule, 7 feet 6 inches by 6 
feet; B, hall, 7 feet 6 inches wide; C, parlor, 23 feet 
6 inches by 18 feet; D, library, 15 by 21 feet; E, sit- 
ting-room, 15 by 15 feet; F, dining-room, 14 by 23 
feet 9 inches; G, kitchen, 14 by 15 feet 9 inches; H, 
pantry under stairway ; I, china-closet ; K, porch. 

Second Floor. — L, chamber, 9 feet 3 inches by ^2 
feet; M, chamber, 17 by 23 feet 6 inches; N, cham- 
ber, 15 by 21 feet; O, chamber, 15 by 15 feet; P, 
bath-room, 5 by 8 feet; O, chamber, 14 by 23 feet 9 
inches ; R, servants'-room, 1 2 feet 9 inches by 8 feet 
9 inches ; S, hall ; T, store-closet ; U, balcony. 

(78) 



DESIGN XXIX. 




DESIGN XXX. 



SUBURBAN OR RIVER-SIDE RESIDENCE. 

The plan of this residence was carefully prepared 
for economy and airy effect, and the same care has 
been taken to s^ive it the appearance of being quite 
commodious. The cost of its erection will not exceed 
$4000, with all the modern improvements, such as 
heater, water, etc. This plan is peculiarly adapted 
to a situation where the ground rises rapidly behind 
the house, or upon the slope of a hill. 

First Floor. — A, parlor, 1 1 feet 9 inches by 19 feet 
6 inches ; B, sitting-room, 1 2 feet 6 inches by 1 2 feet 
9 inches ; C, dining-room, 20 feet 3 inches by 13 feet 
3 inches; D, kitchen, 8 feet 3 inches by 13 feet 3 
inches ; E, pantry, 6 feet 3 inches by 8 feet 3 inches. 

Second Floor. — C, chambers, 1 1 feet 9 inches by 1 9 
feet 6 inches ; 1 2 feet 6 inches by 1 2 feet 9 inches ; 
20 feet 3 inches by 13 feet 3 inches; D, bath-room, 
8 feet 3 inches by 9 feet ; E, closets. 



(80) 



DESIGN XXXI. 



ORNAMENTAL FRENCH VILLA. 

This villa is intended to be constructed of rub- 
ble-pointed masonry. The building is quite commo- 
dious, and of strictly suburban design. The plans are 
well arranged, and allow large and free apartments. 
The roof should have ornamental slates upon it. 
The porch is wide, and the roof projects consider- 
ably beyond the columns. It is drawn in simple ele- 
vation, but when viewed in perspective would have 
a much better effect. 

The stories are as follows : first story, 1 1 feet ; 
second, lo feet; third, 9 feet; fourth, 9 feet. The 
building will cost about J 10,000, and be placed 48 
feet back from the street. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule, 9 by 9 feet ; B, sitting- 
room, 16 by 32 feet; C, parlor, 16 by 32 feet; D, 
drawing-room, 16 by 24 feet; E, dining-room, 16 by 
24 feet; F, kitchen, 18 by 20 feet; G, hall, 9 by 39 
feet ; H, porches. 

The vestibule is made to communicate with main 
and rear halls. 

Second Floor. — I, roofs of porches and bay-win- 
dows ; K, chambers : those over parlor and sitting- 
room, 16 by 26 feet, and those over drawing-room 
and dining-room, 16 by 24 feet; L, dressing-room, 
9 by 15 feet. 



(82) 



DESIGN XXXI. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(83) 



DESIGN XXXII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is in the Gothic style. It is well- 
adapted for a parsonage, and makes a very airy 
house. Built in a proper situation, it will present a 
good effect, and add beauty to the scenery. The 
above was built of frame weather-boards, nicely 
finished inside, at a cost of about $7000. It contains 
inside shutters, and all the modern conveniences. 

We have recently received a patent for a new 
mode of hanging " pivot blinds," doing away with the 
bar that moves the slats by the substitution of a 
small brass rod that runs up the stiles. The whole 
is moved by a lever upon a master slat. They look 
very beautiful, and are free to look through, and can 
be cleaned as easily as tight shutters. When properly 
made, they close so tight that all air and dust are 
excluded. 

First Floor. — A, main hall, 9 feet wide ; B, parlor, 
15 by 20 feet; C, sitting-room, 13 by 21 feet; D, 
dining-room, 14 by 14 feet; E, kitchen, 11 by 14 feet; 
F, front porch. 

Second Floor. — G, study, 9 by 12 feet ; H, cham- 
bers ; I, bath-room, 7 by 8 feet. 



(84) 



DESIGN XXXIII. 



ENGLISH-GOTHIC RESIDENCE. 

This design is in the style of English-Gothic, 
drawn in the proportions of the Ovo order, which 
gives it a degree of refinement that suits the ideas of 
the American people. The principal floor contains 
a fine parlor, dining-room, sitting-room, kitchen, stair- 
hall, and vestibule, with one inclosed hall under the 
tower. There is a rear porch or veranda, entered 
from the hall by a door, and by windows reaching to 
the floor on the parlor. The second floor has four 
fine apartments, lighted by dormer- and gable-win- 
dows. The cost of the building, erected in the spirit 
of the design, will be ^6500. 

First Floor, — A, vestibule ; B, inclosed hall, 8 by 8 
feet; C, stair-hall, 8 feet wide; D, parlor, 15 by 25 
feet ; E, sitting-room, 1 2 feet 6 inches by 1 2 feet 6 
inches ; F, dining-room, i 2 feet 6 inches by 20 leet ; 
G, kitchen, 12 feet 6 inches by 12 feet 6 inches; H, 
porch. 

Second Floor, — I, bed-room, 15 by 25 feet; J, stair- 
hall ; K, bath-room ; L, bed-room, 12 feet 6 inches by 
12 feet 6 inches ; M, bed-room, 12 feet 6 inches by 20 
feet; N, bed- room, 12 feet 6 inches by 12 feet 6 
inches. 



(86) 



DESIGN XXXIII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(87) 



DESIGN XXXIV. 



SMALL COTTAGE. 

This is a design for a small cottage. It is plain 
and simple in construction, and is suitable for a gar- 
dener's cottage or a gate-house to a mansion, and will 
also make a very beautiful house for a mechanic. It 
is situated a short distance from the road, with a 
garden in front. It can be erected of frame for about 
^1200. The cottage will make a very beautiful home 
for a small family, and, with well-trimmed shrubbery, 
will be very attractive. It can also be built of plank, 
which will make it very warm and durable, and cost 
less. 

First Floor. — A, parlor, 12 by 18 feet ; B, porch, 9 
feet 6 inches by 14 feet; C, hall ; D, dining-room, 10 
by 14 feet; E, chamber, 10 by 13 feet 6 inches; F, 
kitchen, 10 feet 6 inches by 12 feet; G, china-closet; 
I, closets. 

The second story contains three chambers, H, with 
closets, stairs, hall, etc. 



(88) 



DESIGN XXXI V. 





DESIGN XXXV. 



A SMALL COTTAGE. 

This design is for a cheap small cottage. It can be 
built for about $1500, and, in some secluded situation, 
it would be very appropriate and beautiful. The 
plans themselves explain the size of the rooms. 

Cheap cottages are seldom built from architects' 
designs and drawings, which, I think, is a great error. 
Why should we not have beautiful designs for the 
small as well as the large? The time is surely coming 
when the persons desiring fine homes will build their 
dwellings from more matured designs than they do 
at the present day. To have them beautiful, conve- 
nient, and adapted to situations, costs no more than 
abortions of taste, many of which are miserable copies 
of sometimes good, but ofttimes of deformed, orig- 
inals. 

First Floor, — A, living-room, 10 by 14 feet; B, 
porch, 6 feet 6 inches ; C, hall, 9 feet 6 inches by 5 
feet 6 inches; D, kitchen, 10 by 12 feet. 

Second Floor. — H, principal chamber, 10 by 14 
feet ; I, hall, 9 feet 6 inches by 5 feet 6 inches ; P, P, 
chambers, 10 by 7 feet. 



(90) 



DESIGN 



XXXV. 




DESIGN XXXVI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

Tins design is in the decorated suburban style, 
and, when carried out in detail, will form a very de- 
sirable residence : one possessing fine accommoda- 
tions and comfort, with great economy of internal 
arrangement. It will be found, by a close examina- 
tion of the plans, that all the working parts of the 
house are private, commodious, and convenient. It 
is capable of being an ornament to any locality if the 
proportions of its parts are properly balanced, and the 
building made to harmonize with its surroundings. 
This can only be done by those who have the true 
key to proportion and adaptation. Cost, $10,000. 
Superstructure is of bricks, painted, with all the im- 
provements, water, gas, etc. 

First Floor, — A, parlor, 16 by 23 feet; B, sitting- 
room, 16 by 15 feet 8 inches ; C, dining-room, 19 feet 
6 inches by 15 feet; D, kitchen, 14 by 18 feet; E, 
wash-room, 1 1 feet 4 inches by 1 1 feet 6 inches ; F, 
pantry, 4 by 6 feet ; G, lavatory, 4 by 4 feet ; H, hall, 
10 feet wide; 1, front porch; 2, side porch; 3, rear 
porch. 

Second Floor. — I, chamber, 14 feet 5 inches by 23 
feet; J, hall, 10- feet wide; K, dressing-room, 8 by 12 
feet ; L, chamber,, 1 6 feet 5 inches square ; M, cham- 
ber, 19 feet 4 inches by 14 feet 10 inches; N, bath- 
room, 6 by 7 feet ; O, lavatory, 4 feet 6 inches by 3 
feet 10 inches; P, chamber, 17 feet 8 inches by 13 
feet 10 inches; Q, chamber, 14 feet 6 inches by 14 
feet 1 1 inches ; 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, verandas. 



(92) 



DESIGN XXXVI. 
Suburban "fyt^iitwtt. 




DESIGN XXXVII. 



COTTAGE IN THE POINTED STYLE. 

This cottage was designed for a gentleman in 
Salem, 111. The superstructure is of brick, and the 
roof of slate, cut in ornamental shapes. It contains 
ample accommodations for a small family, and pos- 
sesses conveniences, such as bath-room, water-closet, 
low-down grates, etc. The exterior is very pleasing, 
and is capable of a much higher degree of ornamen- 
tation than is shown in the engraving. The house 
can be built for $5000. It can be modified to pre- 
serve the external appearance ; yet, by leaving out 
such conveniences as bath-room, etc., which can be 
added to the house at any time in the future, it can 
be built for $3000, if built of frame. 

First Floor, — A, hall ; B, sitting-room, 16 by 16 
feet ; C, parlor, 16 by 20 feet ; D, dining-room, 1 3 
feet II inches by 20 feet; E, kitchen, 13 feet 11 
inches by 1 2 feet ; F, scullery, 8 feet 5 inches by 6 
feet 4 inches; G, china-closet; H, sewing-room, 10 
by 6 feet 4 inches. 

Second Floor. — I, bath-room, 5 feet 2 inches by 8 
feet; J, bed-room, 8 feet 6 inches by 10 feet; K, cham- 
ber, 1 3 feet 4 inches by 1 5 feet 2 inches ; L, chamber, 
13 feet 4 inches by 12 feet; M, chamber, 13 feet 8 
inches by 15 feet 11 inches; N, chamber, 18 feet 9 
inches by 1 5 feet ; O, hall ; P, balcony. 



(90 



DESIGN XXXVII. 





DESIGN XXXVIII. 

SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 



/ 



This design was erected for A. A. Carrier, Esq., 
Bellfield, diree miles above Pittsburg. It is beauti- 
fully situated, removed from the smoke of the city, 
and only a few minutes' drive from it. It is sur- 
rounded with ample grounds, and finished in the most 
workmanlike manner. It cost about $14,000, and is 
now finished ; and we are enabled to say, without hes- 
itation, that there are few that are superior in the 
country as to external beauty or internal comfort. 
We have seven dwellings and one church within view 
of this building, which makes it one of the most 
attractive spots about Pittsburg. They are all varied 
in design, no two of them being alike, yet a thread 
of harmony runs through them, and, when viewed 
separately, a something is seen in each peculiar only 
to itself 

Mrs^ Floor. — i, vestibule ; 2, hall, 9 feet ; 3, parlor, 
^1^2 by 2 2 feet; 4, sitting-room, 15 by 18 feet; 5, 
dining-room, 171^ by 20 feet; 6, library, 14 by 193/^ 
feet; 7, kitchen, 15^ by 19 feet; 8, scullery, 14 by 
19 feet; porches, 6 by 9 feet. 

Second Floor, — 10, principal chamber, 17^^ by 22 
feet; 11, chamber, 15 by 18 feet; 12, chamber, 17^ 
by 20 feet; 13, bell-room, 14 by 15^^ feet; 14, bell- 
room, 14 by 19 feet; 15, dressing-room, 14 by 15 
feet; 16, hall, 9 feet; 17, 19, verandas. 



(96) 



DESIGN XXXIX. 



PICTURESQUE VILLA. 

This picturesque villa was erected at Bellfield, near 
Pittsburg, for S. S. Carrier, Esq., and is universally 
admired for its beauty. It stands back from the road 
nearly one hundred feet. The road bends a little in 
its approach to the house, which brings its sides into 
full view. It stands upon a slight elevation of about 
a half-inch to a foot, which is a very good grade. 
The roof is very fine. It turns up, like Chinese 
roofs, at the eaves, which gives to it an exceedingly 
graceful appearance. Being elaborately and beauti- 
fully finished, its cost is ^14,000; but its appearance 
would lead one to expect it cost upwards of ^^40,000. 
Great care has been taken with its proportions, as 
well as with the convenience of its plans, as will be 
apparent upon examination. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule ; B, sitting-room, 1 6 by 
15 feet 8 inches; C, parlor, 16 by 23 feet; D, dining- 
room, 19 feet 6 inches by 13 feet; E, kitchen, 18 by 
14 feet; F, scullery, 11 feet 5 inches by 11 feet 6 
inches ; H, porches ; I, K, L, closets. 

Second Floor, — M, chamber, 1 6 feet 5 inches square ; 
N, chamber, 14 feet 5 inches by 23 feet; O, chamber, 
19 feet 4 inches by 14 feet 10 inches; P, another 
chamber ; Q, chamber, 1 1 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 1 1 
inches ; R, balcony ; S, dressing-room, 8 feet 8 inches 
by 1 2 feet ; T, hall ; U, closets. 



(98) 



DESIGN XXXIX. 
|}icturt5que ''^illa. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(99) 



DESIGN XL. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is a plain and ordinary kind of build- 
ing, simply having those necessary parts common to 
all houses, with a porch, bay-, and projecting window, 
with a hood projecting over a twin window in the 
front. The plan is so arranged as to give it the ap- 
pearance of largeness. People who are not versed 
in the true principle of design think every part should 
be of equal beauty. If so, the design would be 
meagre. Some feature must be predominant and 
strong, and something must be weak, or such a re- 
sult cannot be obtained. This house, built of frame, 
in very good style, will cost betweea $3000 and 
$4000, with marble mantels, heaters, bath, and closets. 
We have had many orders for full drawings and 
specifications, etc., for this house. They have all 
proved satisfactory. In some localities they cost 
much more than we here state — some as high as 
$8000, others at prices stated. All depends upon 
the elaborate work desired and the cost of materials 
constructed with. 

First Floor. — A, hall, 6 feet wide ; B, parlor, 1 5 by 
23 feet 9 inches; C, sitting-room, 13 by 13 feet; D, 
dining-room, 15 by 2 1 feet ; E, kitchen, 1 3 by 1 1 feet 
9 inches ; F, G, porches. 

Second Floor. — H, chamber, 15 by 23 feet 9 inches; 
I, chamber, 13 by 13 feet; J, chamber, 15 by 21 feet; 
K, chamber, 13 by 14 feet 9 inches ; L, hall, 6 feet 
wide. 

( 100) 



DESIGN XL I. 



ORNAMENTAL COTTAGE. 

This cottage was designed and built for Mr. E. S. 
Mayes, of Lebanon, Ky. The plan is arranged for 
comfort and convenience, and its form produces a 
beautiful variety in the outlines of the building. It 
will also be noticed that no waste room occurs. The 
three principal rooms — sitting-, dining-room, and 
parlor — open direcdy into the front hall, which, being 
of large dimensions and of a room-like shape, de- 
notes an amplitude of space on entering. There 
is also a beautiful staircase on one side of it. At- 
tached to the kitchen, there is a large store-room 
and pantry. The second story contains four large 
chambers, each having a fireplace and clothes-press 
in them. They are all free and private. The house 
being of a compact and convenient form, great econ- 
omy of construction is obtained. No back stairs 
were desired by this party, but such can easily be 
placed between the dining-room and the kitchen. It 
is constructed of bricks, laid with flush joints, and 
painted, as the red color of the bricks would too 
severely contrast with foliage. This building will 
cost between $4000 and $5000, with bath, tank, hot 
and cold water, and heater. 

Description, — A, front porch; B, hall, 12 by 18 
feet ; C, parlor, 16 by 20 feet 7 inches ; D, sitting- 
room, 13 feet 10 inches by 19 feet; E, dining-room, 
18 by 18 feet; F, kitchen, 16 by 18 feet; G, store- 
room, 9 by 9 feet ; H, side porch. 
(102) 



DESIGN XLI. 




FIRST FLOOR. 

( ) 



DESIGN XLII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This ornamental suburban residence was desio-ned 
for Mrs. Fahnstock, who was about building it when 
she died, and the work was abandoned. Since we 
have published it in Godey's Ladies' Book," the 
design has met with much favor, and we have made 
numerous evolutions of the same idea, arranged, of 
course, in each case to meet the wants of the parties 
ordering the drawings. It is always best for us to 
make the full detail drawings for these designs, as 
our experience with them is very great. There is no 
risk of ugliness when we make the detail drawings 
for our designs, as almost every locality over this 
vast country fully proves ; and the amount of patron- 
age we receive fully attests their merits. It can be 
built for ^7000. 

Description. — A, vestibule ; B, hall, 8 feet wide ; C, 
parlor, 14 by 22 feet ; D, dining-room, 14 by 20 feet; 
E, sitting-room, 14 by 16 feet; F, china-closet, 7 by 
10 feet; G, pantry, 7 by 10 feet; H, kitchen, 14 by 
14 feet; I, back porch; J, wash-house, 10 feet 6 
inches by 10 feet 5 inches. 



( 104) 



DESIGN XLII. 




GROUND PLAN. 

8 ( 105 ) 



DESIGN XLIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This beautiful cottage was designed and built for 
Mr. Wm. Jackson, near Pittsburg, Pa., and is a very 
commodious and comfortable residence. It is built 
on the slope of a hill, and entirely surrounded by 
large forest-trees. Its peculiar plan affords the great- 
est possible capacity, as the hall, dining-room, sitting- 
room, and parlor can be thrown into one grand 
room, which, being connected with back and front 
porches by windows running to the floor, contains 
a very large area, so that thirty sets of cotillions have 
danced at one time. The kitchen apartments are en- 
tirely separate. It has been occupied for four years, 
and the owner has remarked that if he were to build 
another house he would not alter, in a single par- 
ticular, any portion of it. The house cost the owner 
;g 1 5,000, but we will place it by the side of many 
costing ^30,000, for capacity and grand interior, as 
well as largeness of external appearance. 

First Floor, — A, stair hall, 16 by 22 feet ; B, parlor, 
18 by 30 feet; C, sitting-room, 16 by 22 feet; D, 
dining-room, 18 by 18 feet; E, kitchen, 13 by 18 feet; 
F, scullery, 6 by 10 feet 6 inches ; G, pantry, 6 by 7 
feet ; H, porches. 

Second Floor. — K, chambers ; L, bath-room ; M, 
linen-closet. 



(106) 



DESIGN XLIIL 





firmt floor. sf.cond floor.. 



1 107 ^ 



DESIGN XLIV. 



ORNAMENTAL COTTAGE. 



Before us is a cheap and ornamental cottage, 
of small pretensions as to classical style, but of a 
class largely built by those wishing the comforts of 
a home upon a small capital. The cost of its erec- 
tion will not exceed $1500. It contains three rooms, 
parlor, dining-room, and kitchen, on the first floor, 
and three chambers on the second. The roof is so 
constructed as to admit of the circulation of air 
between the cornice and the roof as high as the ceil- 
ing : the upper part above the ceiling-joists, or collar- 
beam, affording a sufficient air-chamber, with a ven- 
tilator at each gable ; one going down to within a 
few inches of the collar-beams, and passing but a 
small distance above the roof ; the other being sev- 
eral feet higher, and terminating immediately below 
the roof, will act as a constant ventilator, owing to 
the difference in the pressure of the air, and render 
the upper stories very pleasant. 



First Flooi^. — i, vestibule, 3^ feet wide by 4^^ 
feet long ; 2, back porch, 8 feet wide by 15 feet long ; 
3, living-room, 12 by 18 feet in clear; 4, kitchen, 15 
by 18 feet; 5, parlor, 12 by 18 feet; 6, a small entry, 
affording entrance to the living-room and parlor, and 
the stairway leading to the cellar, which should be 
under the front wing. 

In the second floor the rooms are private, and all 
entered from the passage at the top of the stairs. 
No waste room occurs in this plan; therefore it is 
cheap and convenient. 

It was designed to be built of frame, with shingle 
roof. 



(108) 



DESIGN XLIV. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



( 109) 



DESIGN XLV. 



MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This building was designed for Charles Towne, 
Esq., Moorestown, N. J. He had been reading Mrs. 
Stowe's admirable work on House Economy," and 
had taken advantage of many of her valuable sug- 
gestions that aid materially in the adjustment of the 
various parts, although they were intended by the 
author for cheapness. 

This cottage is very beautiful in the exterior, and 
handy in the interior arrangement. By reference to 
the plans, it will be observed that the house is com- 
modious, and contains everything usual in good 
buildings. The whole cost, when finished, $7000, 
built of frame. Its beauty will depend upon its pro- 
portion. All of the various parts can only be shown 
upon the drawings, where full details are made. 
More than two-thirds of buildings being built, and 
having a cheap, commonplace appearance, is in not 
supplying the builders with lull and matured details 
of different parts, although the small scale drawings 
were gotten up by a good and competent architect. 

First Floor. — A, entrance porch ; B, hall, 9 feet 
wide; C, parlor, 13 by 18 feet 6 inches; D, sitting- 
room, 13 by 18 feet 6 inches; E, dining-room, 14 
feet 3 inches by 18 feet; F, kitchen, 12 by 13 feet 6 
inches ; G, china-closet, 3 feet 6 inches by 6 feet ; H, 
retiring-room, 7 by 10 feet; J, porches; K, stair-hall. 

Second Floor. — M, chambers ; N, servants' room ; 
C bath-room ; P, hall ; R, veranda ; S, alcove. 



(no) 



DESIGN XLV. 




DESIGN XLVL 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn for Mr. S. G. Coffin, Alle- 
ghany City, and was built at Edgewater, on the Alle- 
ghany Valley Railroad. The building was designed 
to suit a sloping situation, upon the side of a high hill. 
It has given great satisfaction, and those who have 
seen it think it the finest in the vicinity. It cost, com- 
plete, $9000. 

The inner accommodations can be seen by the 
plans ; being convenient, commodious, and admirably 
adapted to the position. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule, 5 by 8 feet ; B, hall, 8 
feet wide ; C, parlor, 1 2 by 24 feet ; D, sitdng-room, 
14 by 14 feet; E, kitchen, 12 by 14 feet; F, dining- 
room, 14 by 18 feet; G, porches. 

Second Floor. — H, stair-hall ; I, bath-room ; K, 
chambers. 

This building has given great satisfaction, and has 
resulted in orders for two other buildings within 
sight of this, which are now being erected. 



(112) 



DESIGN XLVI. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



("3) 



DESIGN XLVII. 



MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This design is a good specimen of architecture, in 
the pointed American style of house architecture. 
The plan is convenient and commodious, and can be 
built for about $7000. The general effect of this 
building is of a lofty character, — having the vertical 
line predominating throughout. It will be beautiful 
if placed in a grove of forest-trees, trained high up, 
forming a canopy above by the joining of the branches 
at the top, and leaving a clear view beneath. Thus 
located, the effect of this architecture would be very 
much admired. 

First Flooi\ — A, vestibule, 6 by 6 feet ; B, parlor, 
14 by 21 feet; C, sitting-room, 14 by 14 feet; D, 
dining-room, 14 by 14 feet; E, kitchen, 15 feet 6 
inches by 17 feet 6 inches ; F, china-closet; G, porch 
floor; H, back porch. 

Second Floor. — J, bath-room, 6 by 10 feet; K, 
dressing-room, 6 by 6 feet ; L, L, L, L, chambers : 14 
by 21 feet; 14 by 18 feet 6 inches; 14 by 14 feet; 
II feet 6 inches by 15 feet 6 inches. 



( IH) 



DESIGN XLVII. 





DESIGN XLVIII. 



A MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This is a design for a cheap building: almost 
square, yet broken in such a manner as will add to 
its apparent size, with trifling expense over a square 
house. The exterior has but little ornament, yet it 
is made pretty by the use of proper proportion of 
its straight lines, showing that beauty is not entirely 
dependent on ornament, but on the relation of sizes 
one to the other. The plan contains four fine rooms 
on each floor, and without the loss of space in form- 
ing irregular shapes, as all of the rooms are square, 
and provided with the same requirements for com- 
fort as larger and more expensive houses. The 
rooms are all well lighted by large French sash, and 
they can be thoroughly heated and ventilated. The 
porch across the front, and bay at the side, are indis- 
pensable for comfort and convenience. It can be 
built for between $3000 and ^4000. 

First Floor. — A, front porch ; B, hall, 6 feet ; C, 
parlor, 12 by 16 feet 7 inches; D, sitting-room, 12 
by 12 feet; E, dining-room, 12 by 13 feet; F, kitchen, 
12 by 12 feet. 

Second Floor. — H, chamber, 12 by 1 1 feet 6 inches; 
I, chamber, 12 by 11 feet 6 inches ; K, chamber, 1 2 
by 1 1 feet 6 inches ; L, chamber, 13 by 12 feet 9 
inches ; N, hall, 6 feet ; O, roof. 



(116) 



DESIGN XLVIIl. 




FIRST FLOOR. 



SECOND FLOOR. 



("7) 



DESIGN XLIX. 



AN ELIZABETHAN VILLA. 

This design is suitable for a suburban residence. 
Built of bricks, and pointed, or of rubble stone, it 
would present a grand effect. The cost would be 
about $27,000. Good proportion is absolutely re- 
quired for this style of building. It must be self- 
evident to most persons that to attempt to build a 
house of the pretensions of this design without the 
aid of a competent architect would be a madness, as 
it would evidently result in disappointment and mate- 
rially detract from its beauty. 

First Floor. — A, front porch ; B, vestibule ; C, hall, 
12 feet wide; D, parlor, 18 by 38 feet; E, library, 19 
by 19 feet; F, dining-room, 16 by 31 feet; G, con- 
servatory; H, kitchen, 16 by 18 feet; I, scullery, 10 
by 16 feet; J, back stairway; K, pantry; L, china- 
closet ; M, porch. 

Second Floor. — P, bath-room; Q, dressing-room; 
R, chambers. 



(118) 



DESIGN XLIX. 




FIRST Fi.tu.K. SECOND FLOOR. 



( 119) 



DESIGN L. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCr. 

This design is intended to meet the wants of many 
who are anxious to build a square, compact house. 
It can be built of either wood, brick, or stone. The 
kitchen wing is intended to be only two stories high, 
with a flat roof. 

The entrance doors are on each side, by a hall 
running across the whole, which leaves the parlor 
and sitting-room occupy the whole. The entrances 
are by the side porches. The plan works admirably 
well, and the whole is quite a success. It was built 
in the vicinity of Pittsburg. 

It contains : B, a parlor, 15 by 25 feet ; C, a library, 
15 by 18 feet; D, sitting-room, 15 by 25 feet; E, 
dining-room, 15 by 23 feet; kitchen, 12 by 18 feet; 
with large pantry, and back stairway. The cham- 
bers in second story correspond in size to the rooms 
below. The buildine will cost for its erection from 
$7000 to $10,000, according to the style of finish and 
expensive character of materials. 



( 120) 



DESIGN LI. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

This building is in the Italian style of architecture, 
and will be found to possess many desirable features. 
The plan is compact, airy, and easy of access to all 
its parts. For a physician, lawyer, or gentleman 
doing business at his residence, it will be found very 
convenient. If built of pointed stone-work, suitable 
to its pretensions, it will cost, at Philadelphia, ^7500, 
The porches upon each side, in consequence of the 
arched heads to openings, look low, and spoil the 
general effect. By a proper adjustment of them the 
design will be quite desirable. 

First Floor. — A, porch ; B, vestibule ; C, office ; D, 
stair-hall ; E, dining-room ; F, parlor ; G, kitchen ; H, 
scullery ; I, pantry ; J, porch. 

Second Floor. — N, roofs ; L, chambers ; M, bath- 
room ; Q, stair-landing. 



( 122) 



DESIGN LI. 

tetaliatt "^^illa. 





FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(123) 



DESIGN LII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE, GRECIAN STYLE. 

This design is in the Grecian style of architecture, 
and will make a very comfortable and pretty resi- 
dence. The building is drawn for frame, and, in 
adapting it to stone, it would have to be made larger. 
It contains on the first floor a suite of three rooms, 
water-closet, shed, and pantry. The second story 
contains four bed-rooms. It is of a style of archi- 
tecture that needs to be carefully proportioned, to 
obtain much beauty. It has breadth in its propor- 
tions, and the form and size of its details will either 
make it beautiful or hideous. This house will cost 
32000, if built of frame; $2500, of bricks. 

First Floor. — A, kitchen, 15 by 16 feet ; B, living- 
room, 20 by 16 feet; C, bed-room, 15 by 15 feet; D, 
wood-shed, 8 by 16 feet ; E, water-closet, 4 by 4 feet; 
F, passage to cellar and wood shed; H, front porch, 
5 by 10 feet. 

Second Floor. — K, bed-room, 9 by 14 feet ; L, bed- 
room, 9 by 16 feet; M, bed- room, 8 by 9 feet; N, 
bed-room, 9 by 11 feet. 



(124) 



DESIGN LII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SF.CONI) FLOOR. 

( ) 



DESIGN LI 1 1. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This is a design for a mansion with first-class 
accommodations. It can be made a grand building, 
of an imposing character. It was designed to be 
finished with stucco upon the outside, but this is liable 
to crack and fall off in a few years ; it being impos- 
sible to make it stand all the changes of our climate. 
We would advise bricks, laid with flush joints, rubbed 
down and painted ; or stone, laid in courses, with 
vertical joints. It will admirably suit a situation 
where the grounds are low in the rear, as the kitchen, 
scullery, etc., are in the basement story. Dumb- 
waiters and free servant-ways must be provided for 
in such a buildingf. Should we make the detail draw- 
ings, it can be built for ^10,000, and will have an air 
of refinement and style. Peculiarly adapted to an 
old-established family of refinement and ease. High 
stories, ample doors and windows, but plain, and in 
true proportion. 

The first floor has : A, grand hall, 12 by 36 feet ; 
B, parlor, 1 5 by 30 feet, with a circular bay, 14 by 8 
feet; C, dining-room, 15 by 23 feet; D, sitting-room, 
II by 15 feet; E, reception-room, 8 by 12 feet; F, 
small office, 8 by 12 feet. 

The second floor has seven chambers marked M ; 
bath- and bed-rooms, K ; L, stair-landing. 

First floor, 15 feet high; second, 14 feet. The 
roof of boiled iron, patent seams, with cornice of 
galvanized iron ; the top balcony of wood, painted 

and sanded. 

(126) 



DESIGN LI II. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(127) 



DESIGN LIV. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This style of a house contains the spirit of a Phila- 
delphia building. The plans are similar to those put 
up in solid phalanx, miles of which are built with little 
deviation. The grounds should be little broken as 
possible. Level grade, smooth grass, fine, wide, red 
walks, and all kept cleanly and prim around, it will 
not be hard to guess the disposition and religious 
feelings of the owner. It is intended for two houses, 
— so built that they will form in appearance one large 
building. They are conveniently arranged, and have 
a very agreeable appearance. They will cost about 
$6000 or $8000 each, and are suitable for villages or 
for suburban residences where width of lot does not 
exceed fifty feet. 

First Floor, — A, parlor, 13 by 26 feet; B, hall, 3 
feet 6 inches wide ; C, dining-room, 12 by 20 feet ; 
D, kitchen, 12 by 14 feet. 

There are four comfortable chambers on second 
-Story, with closets, etc. 



.(12S) 



DESIGN LI V. 

Suburban "^t^iitntt. 




DESIGN LV. 



AN AMERICAN COTTAGE. 

This design is intended to be built of stone. The 
peculiar shape of the plan renders it extremely fine 
for a summer seat, as the wings catch the winds, and 
render it very airy and comfortable. The propor- 
tions of the rooms are large, making a very beautiful 
and comfortable summer residence. The roof is of 
shingles or slate, and the superstructure rubble ma- 
sonry, pointed. It can be built for $yooo, frame; 
$8000, brick ; $9000, stone. It ranks high for the 
style of its architecture and proportion. It would 
require a large lot if used as a suburban design. 
One hundred feet would not be crowded, but if less 
than that, other evolutions will be advisable. The 
accommodations are quite large ; much less will be 
found advisable, unless the families are proportional. 

A, parlor, 16 by 30 feet; B, porch; C, main hall; 
16 by 16 feet ; sitting-room, 16 by 16 feet ; E, 
dining-room, 13 by 16 feet; F, kitchen, 16 by 18 feet. 

The second floor contains four fine chambers ; the 
third floor, two attic rooms. 



(130) 



DESIGN LV. 

MI 




FIRST FLOOK. SECOND FLOOR. 

^131) 



DESIGN LVI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This house was designed for the authoress, Mrs. 
Randolph, with careful attention to detail and finish. 
We have no hesitation in saying that it is a most de- 
sirable residence. A noticeable feature in the design 
is the carriage-porch, which is obviously of impor- 
tance, as it affords shelter, while, by the addition of a 
railing, the roof is converted into a neat veranda, 
and communicates with the front chambers of the 
second story. 

Entering the first floor through the carriage-porch, 
one passes through the tower hall into the main hall, 
which gives access to the parlor, dining-room, and 
main staircase. The library communicates with the 
conservatory ; the breakfast- and dining-rooms, as 
also kitchen, pantry, and wash-house, being likewise 
upon this floor. 

This house is intended to be erected of brick, with 
stone window-dressings ; the roofs of slate or tin. 
It could be built for $18,000. 

First Floor. — P, parlor ; B, library ; F, tower hall ; 
H, main hall ; C, conservatory ; I, breakfast-room ; 

D, dining-room ; G, porch; V, veranda ; K, kitchen; 

E, pantry ; W, wash-room ; A, carriage-porch. 
Second Floor, — V, veranda ; U, principal chamber 

and bath-room ; X, chamber ; S, closet ; O, main hall ; 
Y, boudoir ; H, veranda ; A, roof of porch ; Z, cham- 
ber ; N, back chamber ; M, F, J, bed-rooms. 
(132) 



DESIGN LVI. 





FIRST FLOOR SECOND FLOOR. 



(133) 



DESIGN LVII. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

This villa is designed for a large family, and will 
be found to contain ample arid superior accommoda- 
tions. It was constructed of stone ; the cornices, 
brackets, porches, and all external wood-work painted 
and sanded in color, harmonious with that of the 
building. The porch roofs are to be covered with 
tin. The main hall, which is of fine proportions, 
gives access to the parlor, reception-room, dining- 
room, and stair-hall ; in the parlor is a piano recess. 
The breakfast-room opens by means of doors into 
both dining-room and kitchen : access being also had 
to it from the stair-hall. Two water-closets adjoin 
the kitchen. 

Upon the second floor the main hall gives access 
to the four principal chambers and stair-hall. The 
sitting-room communicates with the bath-room and 
water-closets. Cost, $10,000. To parties desiring 
to build a design similar to this, we will state that we 
can make such changes in it that will much improve 
the whole effect. The brackets are bad and clumsy ; 
the circular-headed windows spoil their proportion. 
Aside from this, the design is acceptable and the plans 
are good. For those who desire the kitchen so 
placed, a back stair can be introduced by adding three 
feet greater depth. 

First Floor, — P, parlor, 30 by 15 feet; H, main 
hall, 10 feet; R, reception-room, 15 by 15 feet; D, 
dining-room, 15 by 15 feet; B, breakfast-room, 12 by 

14 feet; K, kitchen, 12 by 14 feet; S, stair-hall, 10 
by 12 feet; C, piano recess, 10 by 12 feet; F, porch, 
10 feet; A, back porch, 10 feet; W C, water-closet. 

Second Floor, — C, four principal chambers, 15 by 

15 feet ; H, main hall, 10 feet; G, stair-hall, 10 by 12 
feet; M, roof of porch, 11 feet; N, roof of porch, 
back, 1 1 feet ; B, sitting-room, 10 by 13 feet ; T, bath- 
room, 7 by 7 feet 6 inches. 

( 134) 



DESIGN LVII. 




DESIGN LVIII. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

Italian mansion, two stories, and an attic story for 
servants. The building is intended to be built of 
bricks, painted. It has a conservatory, a bay in library, 
fine porches, first-class accommodations throughout. 
It can be built for about $8oco. Tin roofs ; well 
finished interiorly. 

First Floor. — A, porch, 8 feet wide : B, main hall, 
9 feet; C, parlor, 14 feet 6 inches by 21 feet; D, 
library, 14 feet 6 inches by 13 feet 6 inches; E, con- 
servatory ; F, back porch, 6 feet ; G, kitchen, 1 3 feet 
6 inches by 18 feet; H, dining-room, 25 by 14 feet 6 
inches; I, sitting-room, 15 by 17 feet 6 inches; K, 
side porch. 

Secojid Floor. — L, chamber, 14 feet 6 inches by 17 
feet 6 inches; M, dressing-room, 9 by 8 feet 6 inches; 
N, chamber, 14 feet 6 inches by 15 feet 6 inches ; O, 
chamber, i 7 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 6 inches ; P, hall, 
9 feet; R, chamber, 20 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 6 
inches ; S, bath-room ; T, bed- room, 13 feet 6 inches 
by 10 feet; U, veranda; V, veranda. 



DESIGN LVIII. 




DESIGN LIX. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE, ITALIAN STYLE. 

This house was built for Dr. J. K. Lee, Chestnut 
Street, West Philadelphia, and is very generally ad- 
mired. The house is built of brown stone, with roof 
of tin, and is not less attractive than comfortable. 

The accommodations provided for, by the plan of 
the principal floor, consist of a fine projecting ve- 
randa porch, which gives access to the hall, office, 
drawing-room, dining-room, and stair -hall. The 
dining-room and parlor have each a bay-window, 
decorated with stained glass. The accommodations 
for the culinary department are ample, there being 
both a kitchen and an out-kitchen. There is also a 
spacious pantry upon this floor. 

This house was built in 1866, and cost, when com- 
pleted, between $6000 and $8000. 

First Floor — i, reception-hall, 8 by 10 feet; 2, 
office, 10 by 12 feet; 3, stair-hall, 7 feet; 4, parlor, 
16 by 22 feet; 5, dining-room, 15 by 20 feet 6 inches ; 
6, kitchen, 1 6 by 16 feet 6 inches ; 7, pantry, 7 feet 6 
inches by 4 feet 6 inches ; 8, out-kitchen, 9 feet 6 
inches by 7 feet 6 inches ; 9, 10, porch. 

Second Floor. — 11, dressing-room, 10 by 9 feet 6 
inches; 12, bath-room, 10 by 11 feet; 13, entry; 14, 
closet; 16, chamber, 16 by 22 feet; 17, chamber, 10 
by 13 feet; 18, hall; 19, chamber, 10 by 14 feet; 
20, closet; 21, nursery, 16 feet 6 inches by 16 feet; 
22, 23, veranda. 



(138) 



DESIGN LX. 



SUBURBAN VILLA. 

Tins design is in the Italian style, Americanized. 
That it cannot be otherwise will appear from the 
following reasons : it is not Roman, as most of its 
details are Greek ; neither is it Athenian, for some of 
its windows have arched heads. It is covered with a 
Tuscan roof, which is Roman. An Italian composi- 
tion adapts it to the climate, wants, and customs of 
the United States, to which all the internal arrange- 
ments can be made to suit. 

The building is of a character that demands an 
elevated situation, as it will appear to better advan- 
tage, and harmonize well with cultivated lawns and 
moderately varied grounds. A wide terrace will be 
necessary for a base, as shown in the perspective. 
The accommodations are extensive ; the chambers 
are sufficiently numerous, spacious, airy, and con- 
veniently arranged. The verandas make abundant 
provision for shade. It will cost ^12,000, if well 
built, at present range of prices. The stairway must 
be lighted from above. 

First Floor. — A, portico, 10 feet; B, lobby, 12 by 
15 feet; C, library, 12 by 21 feet; D, kitchen, 15 by 
18 feet; E, drawing-room, 16 by 25 feet; F, back 
parlor, 16 by 26 feet; G, hall, 15 feet; H, dining- 
room, 16 by 27 feet; I, billiard-room, 15 by 22 feet; 
K, porch, 8 feet. 

Second Floor. — L, veranda ; M, dressing-room, 1 5 
by 22 feet; N, hall, 15 feet; O, chamber, 16 by 25 
feet; P, chamber, 12 by 21 feet; R, chamber, 16 by 
27 feet; S, chamber, 16 by 26 feet; T, chamber, 15 
by 22 feet; U, veranda. 



(,140), 



DESIGN LXL 



VILLAGE OR SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design can be built of either stone or frame, 
and covered with slate or shingles. It contains three 
floors, and has four rooms on each floor. It is capa- 
ble of making a very beautiful building if carried out 
according to the particular feeling and proportion 
embodied therein. There is a front and a rear porch, 
and two side porches, whose roofs are to be covered 
with tin. The chimneys are to be finished with terra- 
cotta tops, and ample provision is made for ventila- 
tion. Upon the first floor the front porch gives 
access to the vestibule and hall ; the hall communi- 
cates with the parlor and library ; the dining-room 
and kitchen are conveniently arranged with reference 
to access from the one to the other ; the side porches 
extend the whole depth of the house. Upon the 
second and third floors are four chambers to the 
floor, — spacious and well ventilated. The cost of 
the building is ^6000. 

First Floor. — i, front porch ; 2, vestibule ; 3, hall ; 
4, library ; 5, dining-room ; 6, parlor ; 7, kitchen ; 8, 
rear porch ; 9, side porch. 

Second Floor. — 10, veranda; 11, 11, closets; 12, 
boudoir; 13, 14, 15, 16, chambers. 



( 142) 



DESIGN LXI. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



( H3) 



DESIGN LXII. 



RESIDENCE IN THE ITALIAN STYLE. 

This design has a commodious and well-arranged 
interior. The roofs are intended for tin, and the 
superstructure of stone. It has a fine porch, project- 
ing and bay-windows, with a look-out or cupola. 
These designs can be modified by the architect, to 
suit the means of persons wishing to build. Porches 
are the most expensive kind of ornament, but even 
they must be very expensive to materially alter the 
cost of a eood buildine. Porches cost at this time 
about ^lo for each running foot, measured along the 
frieze. Bay-windows cost about the same over the 
plain wall and its windows. It is the internal accom- 
modation that produces this ; plumbing is a very 
heavy item, if fully performed up to the fashion and 
improvements of the day ; heating also is a matter 
of considerable expense, together with marble, stucco 
work, and stairways. It will cost $20,000. 

First Floor. — i, parlor, 18 by 36 feet; 2, porch; 
3, vesdbule, 12 by 12 feet ; 4, conservatory, 1 2 by i 2 
feet; 5, library, 12 by 16 feet; 6, hall, 12 feet; 7, 
dining-room, 16 by 27 feet; 8, breakfast-room, 15 by 
15 feet; 9, kitchen, 18 by 12 feet; 10, scullery, 18 by 
1 2 feet ; 11, porch. 

Second Floor. — 12, principal chamber, 18 by 36 
feet; 13, hall; 14, chamber, 1 6 by 1 6 feet ; 15, dress- 
ing-room, 8 by I 2 feet; 16. chamber, 16 by 16 feet; 
17, chamber, 15 by 15 feet ; 18, 19, bed-rooms, 10 by 
18 feet; 20, bath room, 9 by 14 feet; 21, linen-closet, 
8 by 8 feet; 22, veranda. 
( 144) 



DESIGN LXII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(145) 



DESIGN LXIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is quite perfect in its plan, and con- 
tains all the requirements for internal comforts, as 
well as considerable exterior attraction. It is of a 
style which is much used, and its beauty will depend 
upon the proportion of its parts, and the correctness 
of its details. Cost, with all improvements, J8000. 

Many mechanics throughout the country imagine 
that they can adopt what appears to them as beauti- 
ful in one house, and by transferring (or rather ap- 
parently transferring) it to their own, produce the 
same effect. Persons are continually sacrificing style, 
finish, and proportion in their buildings, in order to 
save architects' fees. We have buildings adjacent 
to Philadelphia that will sell for three times their 
cost ; and there are many which have been built with- 
out the aid of an architect that will not realize their 
cost. 

First Floor. — A, parlor, 13 by 30 feet 3 inches; 
B, hall, 13 by 13 feet; C, sitting-room, 13 by 16 feet 
9 inches; D, dining-room, 12 by 24 feet 6 inches; 
E, kitchen, 1 1 feet 6 inches by 16 feet ; F, scullery, 8 
feet 9 inches by 14 feet; G, H, porches. 

Second Floor, — I, chamber, 15 feet 10 inches by 1 1 
feet 8 inches; J, chamber, 16 feet 10 inches by 13 
feet; K, chamber, 13 feet 8 inches by 13 feet; L, 
chamber, 12 by 20 feet; M, chamber, 11 feet 3 inches 
by 1 6 feet 8 inches. 



( 146 ) 



DESIGN LXIII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(H7) 



DESIGN LXIV. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

This design, which is in the ItaHan style, is both 
commodious and well-arranged internally. The roofs 
are of tin, with a superstructure of stone. The 
building will cost, at the present price of materials 
and labor, from ^20,000 to $25,000. 

The first floor contains a large vestibule, hall, 
spacious drawing-room, dining-room, sitting-room, 
library, and music-room. The kitchen departments 
are placed below. 

The second floor contains four commodious cham- 
bers, a boudoir, bath-room, and dressing-room. 

The height of the floors is 14 feet and i 2 feet. 

First Floor. — i, front porch; 2, vestibule, 12 by 12 
feet; 3, hall; 4, drawing-room, 23 feet 3 inches by 
29 feet; 5, library, 15 by 15 feet; 6, dining-room, 26 
feet 6 inches by 16 feet; 7, sitting-room, 15 feet 9 
inches by 22 feet; 8, rear porch; 9, music-room, 18 
feet 9 inches by 12 feet; 10, area. 

Second Floor. — 11, veranda; 12, boudoir, 15 by 15 
feet; 13, chamber, 23 feet 3 inches by 24 feet; 14, 
dressing-room, 12 by 12 feet; 15, hall; 16, chamber, 
26 feet 6 inches by 16 feet; 17, chamber, 15 feet 9 
inches by 17 feet; 18, chamber, 18 feet 9 inches by 
17 feet; 19, bath-room, 7 by 7 feet. 



(148) 



DESIGN L.X1V. 
jftaltait ^illa. 





( 149 i 



DESIGN LXV. 

ITALIAN VILLA. 

This design is one of those imposing buildings 
which are fully up to the advanced tastes of the age. 
It would suit well upon a headland, looking out upon 
a bay, with gentle sloping surroundings. Much 
money is wasted yearly in ineffective ornament and 
badly-proportioned buildings, ill adapted to the situ- 
ation and surrounding scenery. Buildings should 
always be proportioned according to the open or 
close character of the view, as well as the distance to 
be seen from. In designing a building two things 
must be borne in mind : one, that it is to be looked 
at ; the other, that it is to be looked from. The side 
exposed to the principal approach should have the 
greatest attention. Many parts of buildings it would 
be utter ignorance to ornament highly, as it draws 
attention to them more particularly. Too much 
poverty in such places calls the attention, and makes 
them prominent. The only correct mode is to treat 
them subjectly. Designing a building is like a battle 
upon canvas of color, each part striving for suprem- 
acy. This is truthful in material nature, as it is in 
man and animals — all a strife for life. 

The architect, like all others, should make an 
honest distribution of his forces, or he starves one 
part and overloads with fatness the others. Give 
each its just due, and they will all be quiet ; no 
wrangling; but one beautiful, peaceful, harmonious 
assemblage, all coming forward with their little gifts, 
giving them quiedy and freely. Such is harmony. 

First Floor. — A, conservatory, i6 feet 6 inches 
by 21 feet; B, parlor, i6 by 31 feet 6 inches; C, 
vestibule, 12 by 12 feet ; D, hall, 1 2 feet wide ; E, 
sitting-room, 25 feet 6 inches by 16 feet 3 inches ; F, 
library, 11 by 6 feet ; G, dining-room, 14 feet 9 inches 
by 28 feet ; H, store-room, 10 by 10 feet; I, kitchen, 
18 by 18 feet; J, scullery, 11 by 18 feet; K, L, 
porches ; M, N, side porches. 
(150) 



DESIGN LXV. 




FIRST FLOOR. 



' 15' ) 



DESIGN LXVI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn for the Hon. Andrew G. 
Curtin, at Bellefonte, Pa. It is of mountain freestone, 
laid in rubble-work, pointed with white mortar, with 
a neat black line ; the wood-work outside painted 
and sanded the color of the stone ; the interior ar- 
ranged with regard to comfort as well as elegance. 
The plumbing is very complete, and mirror-back 
washstands and other improvements are placed in 
the house. Heating is accomplished b)' means of an 
improved heater, low-down grates, etc. Preferring 
inside finish of best quality and workmanship to 
outside show, the building is but two stories high, in 
order to obtain this result without exceeding the 
desired amount. This house cost ^27,000. 

First Floo7\ — i, front porch ; 2, vestibule, 6 feet 8 
inches by 9 feet ; 3, parlor, 26 feet 2 inches by 22 feet 
10 inches ; 4, hall ; 5, reception-room, 15 feet 7 inches 
by 15 feet 10 inches ; 6, dining-room, 18 feet 4 inches 
by 23 feet 6 inches; 7, library, 16 by 26 feet; 8, 
china-clpset, 4 feet 3 inches by 4 feet 5 inches ; 9, 
pantry, 4 feet 3 inches by 8 feet 4 inches; lo, store- 
room, 3 feet 9 inches by 5 feet; 11, kitchen, 16 by 
17 feet; 12, scullery; 13, porch. 

Second Floor. — 14, balcony; 15, boudoir, 9 feet 6 
inches by 11 feet 6 inches; 16, chamber, 15 feet 8 
inches by 15 feet 11 inches; 17, chamber, 21 by 23 
feet; 18, dressing-room, 5 feet 5 inches by 9 feet; 
19, chamber, 26 feet 4 inches by i6 feet; 20, cham- 
ber, 18 feet 6 inches by 24 feet; 21, bath-room, 5 
feet 6 inches by 12 feet; 22, chamber, 12 feet 10 
inches by 16 feet 4 inches; 23, nursery, 19 feet 6 
inches by 15 feet 10 inches. 
( 152) 



DESIGN LXVI. 




DESIGN LXVII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was intended for a gendeman in 
Alleghany City, and possesses a grandeur rarely 
obtained. It is intended to be of brick, painted ; and 
its particular feature is the glass-domed hall, with a 
double elliptical stairway, lighted by stained glass. 
The library is, according to desire, one of the best 
rooms in the house, delightfully situated, and, when 
furnished with book-cases, statuary, and other appro- 
priate ornaments, it will have great attractions. The 
ground upon which the house is to stand was such 
that it is very desirable in this instance to place the 
scullery, wash-rooms, etc., in the basement story. 
The house is heated by means of large heater, low- 
down grates, etc. 

First Floor. — A. main hall, i 2 feet wide ; B, parlor, 
16 by 26 feet; C, dining-room, 16 by 26 feet 3 
inches; D, music-room, 12 feet 10 inches by 11 feet 
3 inches; E, office, 12 feet 3 inches by 11 feet 10 
inches; F, library, 20 feet 3 inches by 21 feet 3 
inches; G, kitchen, 17 feet 10 inches by 18 feet 9 
inches ; H, servants' hall ; I, pantry ; J, closet ; K, 
stair hall. 

Second Floor. — L, chamber, 16 feet 3 inches by 18 
feet 10 inches; M, chamber, 15 feet 6 inches by 19 
feet 5 inches; N, chamber, 17 feet 6 inches by 19 
feet 5 inches ; O, bath-room, 6 feet 9 inches by 9 feet 
10 inches; P, chamber, 14 feet 2 inches by 16 feet 3 
inches: Q, chamber, 16 feet 3 inches by 20 feet 6 
inches; R, chamber, 13 feet 3 inches by 19 feet 10 
inches ; S, stair-hall. 



( 154) 



DESIGN LXVII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SKCOND Fl.OOK. 



DESIGN LXVIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This house possesses a noble appearance, with- 
out having an excess of ornament. It could be 
built for J8000, plainly finished in the interior. It 
is drawn from a point eighty feet distant. Being in 
a diagonal course from the house, it would place the 
house about sixty feet from the front of the lot. 
The lot should be about seventy-five feet front. 
Placed in such a position, on raised ground, about 
six feet above the road, it would have the appear- 
ance as shown here. 

Fij'st Floor. — i, vestibule, 9 by 9 feet; 2, hall, 12 
by 8 feet; 3, parlor, 16 by 22 feet, 4-foot bay- 
window; 4, library, 15 by 15 feet; 5, dining-room, 
16 by 22 feet; 6, sitting-room, 12 by 16 feet; 7, kit- 
chen, 15 by 15 feet; 8, out-kitchen, 10 by 15 feet; 
9, front porch, 10 feet; 10, side porch, 10 feet. 

Second Floor. — 11, boudoir, 9 by 9 feet ; 1 2, cham- 
ber, 16 by 22 feet; 13, chamber, 15 by 15 feet; 14, 
chamber, 16 by 22 feet; 15, chamber, 12 by 16 feet; 
16, hall, 8 and 12 feet; 17, bath-room, 8 by 12 feet; 
18, bed-room, 15 by 16 feet 6 inches. 



(156) 



DESIGN LXVIII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(157) 



DESIGN LXIX. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was made for a gendeman in Belle- 
fonte, a thriving town in Centre Co., Pa., where we 
have a number of first-class residences, costing from 
^5000 to ^30,000 each ; and we refer to all of them 
as being beautiful, whilst differing in their propor- 
tions and styles. This house will cost between 
^20,000 and $30,000. 

First Floor. — A, vestibule ; B, hall, 1 2 feet 3 
inches ; C, parlor, 27 feet 3 inches by 38 feet 9 
inches; D, library, 17 feet 9 inches by 19 feet 7 
inches; E, dining-room, 31 feet 6 inches by 16 feet; 

H, butler's pantry, 9 feet 4 inches by 5 feet 7 inches ; 

I, china-closet, 9 feet 3 inches by 6 feet 4 inches ; J, 
front porch ; K, porch ; kitchen, 1 6 by 18 feet ; scul- 
lery, 16 by 12 feet. 

Second Floor. — L, chamber, 19 feet 7 inches by i 7 
feet 9 inches; M, chamber, 18 feet 6 inches by 19 
feet ; M, balcony ; N, chamber, 18 feet 6 inches by 19 
feet; O, chamber, 20 feet 6 inches by 16 feet; P, 
chamber, 1 6 feet 6 inches by 1 6 feet ; Q, bath-room, 
9 feet 9 inches by 6 feet ; S, observatory ; other 
bath-room, 9 feet 9 inches by 4 feet 9 inches. 



158) 



DESIGN LXIX. 




FIRST FLOOR SECOND FLOOR. 

(159 



DESIGN LXX. 



MANSION IN THE ELIZABETHAN STYLE. 

This design is drawn in the Elizabedian style of 
architecture, ItaHanized. It is presented with a view 
to show what amount of beauty should be visible in 
the piling up of a quantity of material and labor. 
It can be executed in fine style for J 150,000, and 
might vie with many of the castles in Europe that 
cost as many pounds. Here we have a blending of 
a number of fine architectural effects, obtaining large- 
ness and importance of appearance, without the alms- 
house architecture that we see displayed in many of 
equal size and cost all over the country. The design, 
with modifications, would make a very fine ladies' 
seminary. 

Dimensions. — A, principal hall, 1 5 feet 6 inches ; 
A, stair-hall, i 7 feet wide ; B, parlor, 19 feet 6 inches 
by 35 feet; C, drawing-room, 43 by 26 feet; D, 
dining-room, 37 by 40 feet; E, sitting-room, 19 feet 
6 inches by 35 feet; L, library, 25 by 26 feet; G, 
ladies' room, 25 by 13 feet; H, hothouse, 12 by 24 
feet; I, billiard-room, 15 by 32 feet; J, rotunda, 24 
by 24 feet; K, smoking-room, 17 by 22 feet; L, 
servants' room, 16 by 22 feet; M, breakfast- room, 16 
by 29 feet 6 inches ; N, kitchen, 25 feet by 29 feet 6 
inches; O, wash-house and scullery, 18 by 34 feet; 
P, tower, 1 1 by II feet ; Q, porches, i 7 and 1 1 feet ; 
R, tower ; S, pavilion ; T, arcade ; U, hall passages. 



f 160) 



DESIGN LXX. 




FIRST FLOOR. 

{ i6i ^ 



DESIGN LXXI. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

This design is in the Italian style, and its situation 
is ninety feet back, and viewed from a point six feet 
above the ground and one hundred and five feet 
from its nearest part. 

It contains beautiful and ample apartments, and 
possesses externally a noble appearance. There is 
an abundance of veranda accommodation, which ren- 
ders it a very desirable residence for the summer 
season. 

It should have a broad, unbroken lawn in front, 
and in the rear some stately trees should be found, 
forming a grove, and making a background suitable 
for the character of the villa. It can be built of 
earthen bricks, or of stone, laid broken range and 
pointed : in which case it will look more noble than 
if of bricks painted. The building can be completely 
finished with bath, heaters, marble mantels, and fine 
stucco centre-pieces and cornices, for $i 2,000, around 
Philadelphia. The roof is intended to be covered 
with slates. 

/^'r^-/ Floor, — A, vestibule, 11 by 11 feet ; B, parlor, 
15 by 2 1 feet ; C, library, 1 5 by 11 feet ; D, dining- 
room, 17 by 26 feet; E, kitchen, 15 by 22 feet; F, 
pantry; G, scullery, 15 by 15 feet; H, china-closet; 
I, front porch ; J, side porch ; K, back shed ; hall, 
1 1 feet wide. 



(162) 



DESIGN LXXI. 




FIRST FLOOR. 



(163) 



DESIGN LXXIT. 



AMERICAN BRACKETED VILLA. 

This buildinof is of so beautiful and attractive a 
kind as to require no further embellishments. The 
arrangement of the front porch, and the perfect 
proportion of the various parts, afford as grand an 
outline as could be obtained by the more costly style 
of projecting wings. The plan contains all the re- 
quirements of the times, and is capable of being 
added to, or reduced, without materially altering the 
appearance of the whole. The back stairway and 
conservatory might, for instance, be dispensed with; 
or a kitchen might be added in the rear of back 
stairs, and the space now marked kitchen taken for 
a bed-room. The buildine would look well of either 
wood or brick ; if of the latter, it should be rubbed 
down and painted. It would cost about $8000. 

First Floor. — A, entrance-porch; B, hall, 8 feet 
wide ; C, parlor, 14 feet 3 inches by 20 feet; D, sit- 
ting-room, 14 by 14 feet; E, dining-room, 16 by 24 
feet; F, kitchen, 16 by 16 feet; H, porches; J, con- 
servatory. 

Second Floor. — K, chamber, 14 by 20 feet; L, 
chamber, 14 by 14 feet; M, chamber, 16 by 24 feet; 
N, chamber, 9 by 14 feet; O, hall, 8 feet wide; P, 
sewing-room, 8 by 8 feet; R, bath-room, 5 feet 2 
inches by 10 feet. 



(164) 



DESIGN LXXIII. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

Tins design, which is in the Italian style, is in- 
tended for, and admirably adapted to, the wants of a 
gentleman of a large family. The accommodations 
are ample, and the interior arrangements exceedingly 
simple, as will readily be seen by reference to the 
plans of first and second stories. The exterior, 
which is intended to be executed in stone, presents 
a beautiful and chaste appearance, and is capable of 
a high tone of architectural beauty. 

The carriage-porch gives access to the vestibule, 
which communicates with the parlors and stair-hall. 
The piano-room and conservatory adjoin the parlors. 

The general entrance gives access to the parlor 
and stair-hall. The rear entrance gives access to the 
dining-room, breakfast-room, servants' room, and 
stair-hall. The domestic offices are placed below. 

Upon the second floor are four spacious chambers, 
a dressing-room, and nursery. All the apartments 
throughout the house are arranged with reference to 
convenience of access. Cost, $30,000. 

Fu'st Floor. — A, music-room ; B, parlor ; C, vesti- 
bule ; D, parlor ; E, conservatory (it will be observed 
that these rooms are all separated by drapery, which 
being withdrawn, one magnificent parlor is formed) ; 
F, sitting-room ; G, dining-room ; H, stair-hall ; I, 
breakfast-room ; J, dumb-waiter ; K, china-closet ; L, 
servants' room ; M, carriage-porch ; N, general en- 
trance ; O, rear entrance ; P, porticos. 

Second Floor. — A, roof ; B, nursery ; C, chambers ; 

D, dressing-room. 

(166) 



DESIGN LXXIII. 




Li J I I 

FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(167) 



DESIGN LXXIV. 



SCHOOL-HOUSE. 

This design represents a school-house adapted 
to a situation in the suburbs of Philadelphia. It is 
intended to be built of stone, and will furnish ample 
accommodation for a large number of pupils. 

The five rooms marked C on the plan are class- 
rooms, — 23 feet 4 inches by 35 feet in the clear. 
The remaining space of the two wings is devoted to 
book-closets and stairways. 



( 16S 



DESIGN LXXIV. 




DESIGN LXXV. 



GOTHIC CHURCH. 

This church is situated upon the East Liberty 
road, and is about three miles from Pittsburg. It is 
built of frame, boarded vertically, and battened. The 
inside is finished with ornamented principal rafters, 
wrought to a beautiful design, the spaces between 
them being plastered, and colored azure-blue. 

The buildinor contains in its rear wine a lecture- 
room and school-room, w^ith the walls laid off, and 
colored in imitation of stone. They have fine high 
ceilings, and a beautiful bay runs out to the rear, 
producing an effect which is seldom obtained, — and 
never in basements. The outside is in full Gothic, 
the ornaments carved in wood. It is covered with 
the best quality of slate, and is painted and sanded 
thoroughly. The whole cost is a little over $15,000. 
The pews and pulpit are black walnut. This church 
may be considered a successful attempt at wooden 
Gothic architecture. It was burned down, but rebuilt 
as before. 

Dimensions. — Church, 52 feet by 37 feet 9 inches; 
I, vestibule, 13 feet 3 inches by 12 feet 6 inches ; 2, 
aisles, 4 feet wide; 3, pulpit; 4, lecture-room, 38 feet 
6 inches by 36 feet; 5, infants' school-room, 14 feet 8 
inches by 10 feet 6 inches; 6, centre pews, 16 feet 
long, — accommodating nine persons each; side pews 
will accommodate four each. 



(170) 



DESIGN LXXVI. 



EPISCOPALIAN CHURCH. 

This is a very neat and beautiful design, which 
would be suitable for an Episcopalian church. 

It is drawn in plain elevation, and when viewed 
from the ground will be much shortened in height. 
The design is adapted for execution in brown or 
dark-colored stone ; or the wall surface may be built 
of small, neatly-pointed rough stones, and the window- 
dressings, angles, etc., may be of hard stone, fairly 
worked. 

The spire and the roof are intended to be covered 
with two tints of ornamental slates. In any locality 
this edifice would prove highly ornamental. The 
carriage-porch is very desirable for rural churches. 

The ground plan provides for one hundred and 
twenty-four pews. On the right of the chancel, and 
with an entrance from both the chancel and south 
transept, is a library, which may be used to contain 
the books belonging to the rector and Sunday- 
school, and as a study. On the left of the chancel, 
with an entrance from the chancel and north transept, 
is a room for the accommodation of the vestry. The 
chancel is of ample size. Cost of construction, 
$30,000. 

Description. — A, side entrance; B, vestibule; C, 
aisle ; D, entrance-porch ; E, nave ; F, vestry ; G, 
chancel; H, library; I, I, side aisles; J, north transept; 
K, south transept. 



(172) 



DESIGN LXXVI. 



DESIGN LXXVII. 



PLAIN FRENCH VILLA. 

This plain French villa was built of bricks, painted. 
By the addition of dormers upon the tower, and a 
railing with a few telling lines, it can be made a 
beautiful house ; and the ground plan is commo- 
dious, though needing some changes to render it first- 
class. The kitchen does not communicate with the 
dining-room, as we would desire; but as there are 
many valuable points in the design, we insert it. 
The cost of construction is $9000. 

The height of the first floor is 1 2 feet ; of the 
second, 1 1 feet ; with good rooms above. 

First Floor. — i, porch, 8 by 11 feet; 2, hall, 8 by 
12 feet ; 3, living-room, 15 by 25 feet ; 4, sitting-room, 
15 by 19 feet; 5, dining-room, 16 by 26 feet; 6, 
library, 12 by 15 feet; 7, porch, 6 feet; 8, kitchen, 22 
by 13 feet; 9, china-closet, 6 by 6 feet; 10, scullery, 
6 by 6 feet. 

Second Floor. — 15, 1 6, bed-rooms ; 1 7, chamber, 1 2 
by 15 feet; 18, chamber, 16 by 20 feet; 19, hall; 20, 
chamber, 15 by 21 feet; 21, chamber, 8 by 8 feet; 
22, chamber, 15 by 19 feet; 23, balcony; 24, ser- 
vants' stairs. 



( 174 



DESIGN LXXVIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is in the Italian style, and. will recom- 
mend itself. The accommodations are most ample ; 
and the building has the latest improvements, being 
erected of rubble-work, pointed, with stone dressings 
to the windows and at the angles. The roof can be 
of tin. Upon the principal floor a projecting veranda 
gives access to main hall, parlor, sitting-room, dining- 
room, office and chamber, with a bath-room. The 
conservatory adjoins the parlor ; and the butler's 
pantry, of sufficient size, adjoins the dining-room ; 
the kitchen and wash-room are very conveniently 
'arranged. The cost would be ^30,000, being very 
large. 

First Floor. — i, front porch ; 2, grand hall, 14 feet; 
3, parlor, 20 feet by 15 feet; 4, conservatory, 10 feet 

6 inches by 12 feet; 5, sitting-room, 22 feet by 18 
feet; 6, chamber, 16 feet by 18 feet; 7, bath-room, 
8 feet 9 inches by 4 feet 6 inches ; 8, office, 9 feet by 

7 feet; 9, dining-room, 19 by 13 feet 11 inches; 10, 
butler's pantry, 6 feet by 6 feet 10 inches ; 1 1, kitchen, 
15 by 16 feet 11 inches ; 1 2, wash-room, 10 feet 6 
inches by 16 feet 11 inches; 13, closet; 14, back 
porch. 

Second Floor. — 15, veranda ; 16, principal chamber, 
20 feet by 15 feet; 17, dressing-room, 11 feet 10 
inches by 16 feet; 18, bath-room, 8 feet by 6 feet 8 
inches ; 19, chamber, 16 feet by 18 feet ; 20, chamber, 
15 feet by 8 feet 9 inches; 21, chamber, 16 feet by 8 
feet 7 inches ; 22, closet ; 23, chamber, 13 feet by 12 
feet; 24, chamber, 13 feet by 14 feet; 25, closet, 3 
feet by 7 feet; 26, closet, 3 feet by 7 feet; 27, 
chamber, 1 5 feet by 1 3 feet. 
(176) 



DESIGN LXXIX. 



COUNTRY RESIDENCE. 

The plan of this building was designed according 
to a ground plan by Mr. Huber, conveyancer, and is 
arranged with reference to economy and comfort. It 
contains fine halls in the first and second stories, 
with two comfortable rooms in the third stor}^ and 
four rooms on the second and first stories, so ar- 
ranged that they are placed conveniently with each 
other. It will make a roomy and cheap house, which 
would cost, if built of pointed-rubble masonry, in 
Philadelphia or vicinity, $7500. 

The roof will be covered by ornamental-formed 
slates, with a flat tin roof on top, which answers as an 
observatory. Included in the estimate are the baths, 
water-closets, gas pipes throughout, low-down grates, 
marbelized-slate mantels in two rooms, sink, range, 
and a heater in the cellar ; also, all modern improve- 
ments, — speaking-tubes, bells, etc. 

Fu^st Floor. — I, front porch ; 2, sitting-room, 15 by 
18 feet; 3, hall, 7 feet; 4, parlor, 17 by 18 feet; 5, 
pantry, 6 by 8 feet 6 inches; 6, dining-room, 13 by 
20 feet ; 7, kitchen, 13 by 1 5 feet ; 8, 9, closets. 

Second Floor. — 10, hall, 7 feet; 11, chamber, 15 by 
18 feet; 12, chamber, 17 by 18 feet; 13, chamber, 13 
by 20 feet ; 14, chamber, 13 by 15 feet ; 1 5, bath-room, 
7 feet 6 inches by 8 feet 6 inches; 16, 17, 18, 19, 
closets. 



(178) 



DESIGN LXXIX. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(179) 



DESIGN LXXX. 



ORNAMENTAL RESIDENCE. 

This design is in the American style of architec- 
ture. All our buildings we aim to make light and 
airy. We continue to introduce turret-, bay-, and 
oriel-windows ; and are not afraid to use whatever is 
beautiful, and in harmony with good taste and com- 
mon sense. We would not decorate a pavilion with 
hanging men or beheaded women ; neither would we 
embellish a dining-room with mummies, to carry out 
Egyptian or any other kind of architecture ; nor 
would we place the most delicate of Grecian pedi- 
ments in front of a jail or police station, skull-bones 
or buzzard-looking animals we consider more appro- 
priate. This house will cost $10,000. 

First Floor, — H, hall, 8 feet; L, library, 13 by 16 
feet; P, dining-room, 25 by 16 feet; D, parlor, 22 by 
16 feet; K, kitchen, 14 by 15 feet; P, P, porches. 

Second Floor, — P C, principal chamber, 22 by 16 
feet; C, chamber, 21 by 16 feet ; C, chamber, 14 by 
1 5 feet ; C, chamber, 13 by 16 feet ; D, hall ; B R, 
bath-room, 8 by 5 feet 4 inches. 



(180) 



DESIGN 

rnamcittal 



LXXX. 





FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(i8i) 



DESIGN LXXXI. 

GOTHIC SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This building was designed and built for Richard 
Brown, Esq., Youngstown, Ohio. It cost $33,000. 
The superstructure is of bricks, rubbed down, painted 
and sanded. The dressings, cornice, and base of 
house, is of cream-colored Ohio stone, finely cut, 
with rubbed heads. The interior is of a new style 
of finish, of our invention. The inside blinds are of 
''Hobbs' patent brass rod, double pivot." They 
are very superior, and capable of being cleaned, — 
having no rod in the centre, — which is a great im- 
provement; over the old process. The inside work 
is of fine quality, — walnut, rubbed down, French 
polish. The elevation is four feet high. First floor, 

14 feet; second f^oor, 13 feet; with fine rooms on 
the third fioor. The whole is well ventilated, and the 
roof of ornamental slates. 

First Floor. — A, front and side porch ; B, hall, 9 
feet wide ; C, parlor, 15 by 30 feet ; D, sitting-room, 

15 by 16 feet 9 inches; E, dining-room, 16 by 26 
feet; F, kitchen, 13 by 20 feet; G, chamber, 14 feet 
9 inches by 18 feet; H, bath-room, 8 feet 6 inches by 
1 1 feet ; vestibule, 7 by 9 feet. 

Second Floor. — J, chamber, 15 by 30 feet; K, 
chamber, 15 by 16 feet 9 inches ; L, chamber, 14 feet 
9 inches by 18 feet; M, chamber, 16 by 26 feet; N, 
chamber, 13 by 20 feet; O, hall; S, dressing-room, 
6 by 9 feet ; P, bath-room, 8 feet 6 inches by 1 1 feet. 



(182) 



DESIGN LXXXL 

^0tlnc ^utr urban '^^jc side it a. 




DESIGN LXXXII. 



SOUTHERN COTTAGE. 

This design is intended to be built of frame, and 
the roof to be shingled. It should stand at such a 
distance from the road as to afford sufficient space 
for ornamental shrubbery, walks, etc. The cost of 
the building should fall within the limits of four or 
five thousand dollars. 

Upon the principal floor the porch gives access to 
the hall, which opens into the parlor and dining- 
room ; the kitchen is well placed, and ample in size. 
The second floor contains a hall and three liberal- 
sized chambers. 

First Floor. — i, porch; 2, hall, 10 feet 6 inches by 
15 feet; 3, parlor, 12 feet 6 inches by 20 feet; 4, 
dining-room, 15 by 18 feet; 5, kitchen, 12 by 12 
feet ; 6, back porch. 

Second Floor. — 7, hall, 10 feet 6 inches by 15 feet; 
8, chamber, 1 2 feet 6 inches by 20 feet ; 9, chamber, 
15 by 18 feet; 10, chamber, 12 by 12 feet. 



(184) 





FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



13 



(i8s) 



DESIGN LXXXIII. 



COUNTRY RESIDENCE. 

This box-design by some means got among ours. 
It is a fair example of designs published all over 
the country. Its errors are as follows : the roof is 
too low, — the dormer-windows ugly, and of a bad 
shape ; the top cornice is too heavy, and the main 
cornice too light ; the brackets are unsightly, and 
wrong placed ; the second-floor windows are good, 
except their heads, which are coarse, and of no de- 
sign ; the porch is too low, and its posts too thin, 
and its cornice of no account ; the brackets upon it 
are worse than none, and the lower windows are too 
short ; the bay is too small and meagre, and the back 
building not decent for a carpenter's design. It has 
no more desiofn in it than a wood-shed ouorht to 
have, and the perspective is not true. We publish it 
subject to our criticism. It is set too low, and has no 
cellar windows, or ventilation under porch ; no chim- 
neys on main roof that you can see ; and it would 
require ladders to look out of the dormer-windows 
in the third floor. Such miserable, deceptive things 
as this are published every year by the hundred, and 
are the means of disappointment and waste of money, 
besides exerting a corrupt influence. We could 
without doubt make this design a very beautiful 
building, by correcting its proportion, and giving 
balance and weight to the whole ; yet when so or- 
ganized it would look as much like the picture as 
a finely dressed person would to a shabby one. 



(186) 



DESIGN LXXXIII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



DESIGN LXXXIV. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

Ovo Gamber American design, of great economy 
in comparison to apparent size. It has a frontage of 
56 feet. By examining the size and number of rooms 
it will be found not large or unwieldy ; no wide rooms 
throughout. The front vestibule can be tiled; the 
hall and stairways are so located that they are handy 
and economical in situation. In executine this desio^n, 
although much broken in appearance, all are of such 
form as to make no more work than square projec- 
tions. The porch terminates against the house at 
each end, saving return cornice, etc. The whole 
can be constructed for between $6000 and J7000, 
fully supplied with the best quality heater, marble 
mantels, and gas throughout, cellar under the whole, 
and most thoroughly ventilated. The stories are 1 2 
feet first floor, 11 second, and 10 the French roof. 
Numerous evolutions of this plan can be readily 
organized by us to suit locality, and also to be in 
harmony with surrounding buildings. It can be built 
of stone, brick, or wood, at pleasure. It suits a broad 
front lot, not exposed to rear view. If built as the 
plan shown, the design can be readily arranged to 
suit any situation and direction of view. 

First Floo7\ — P, parlor, 16 by 22 feet 9 inches ; S, 
sitting-room, 16 by 16 feet 9 inches ; D, dining-room, 
15 by 16 feet; K, kitchen, 11 feet 6 inches by 15 
feet ; O, hat-closet. 

Second Floor, — E, store-room, 1 1 feet 6 inches by 

5 feet; B, bath-room, 7 feet 3 inches by 10 feet 3 

inches; C, chamber, 15 by 16 feet; C, chamber, 16 

by 16 feet 9 inches; C, chamber, 16 by 22 feet 9 

inches ; F, sewing-room, 7 by 1 3 feet 6 inches. 
(188) 



DESIGN LXXXIV. 





(lS9^ 



DESIGN LXXXV. 

SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

The above design is a plain, square house, but it 
is so constructed that the dining-room and kitchen 
have each a window looking to the front; their pro- 
jections are dropped in the second story, which makes 
a less complicated roof. This building can be readily 
built for $4000, with the conveniences of gas, water, 
etc., introduced in the house. There is a fine cellar 
under the whole, built of bricks, hollow walls, 15 
inches thick. A very compact and beautiful house 
for a village or suburban retreat, and can be placed 
upon a sixty-feet front lot. 

We can organize any of these designs so that they 
will meet the wants of different persons, and arrange 
them without materially changing the appearance 
and character of the design ; as musical notes, they 
can be in discord or harmonious, liquid or sharp. 
Character refers in design to the feeling that is pro- 
duced by the predominance of lines, having within 
them certain fixed natural principles, co-ordinated 
with the human mind through the progress from 
youth to maturity ; the smiles, frowns, or melancholy 
feelings are all shown by lines in the face, and they 
cast upon the beholder a corresponding thought. 

First Floor. — P, parlor, 13 feet 8 inches by 20 feet ; 
S R, sitting-room, 13 feet 8 inches by 13 feet 9 inches ; 
13, chamber, 13 feet 8 inches by 12 feet; D, dining- 
room,,22 feet 3 inches by 13 feet 9 inches; K, kitchen, 
13 feet 9 inches by 16 feet 8 inches. 

Second Floor, — C, chamber, 13 feet 8 inches by 20 
feet ; C, chamber, 13 feet 8 inches by 13 feet 9 inches ; 
C, chamber, 12 feet by 13 feet 8 inches ; C, chamber, 
13 feet 9 inches by 18 feet; R, bath-room, 8 feet 2 
inches by 10 feet 4 inches; M, sewing- room, 8 feet 
2 inches by 1 3 feet 9 inches ; C L, china-closet ; O, 
closets. 
1190) 



DESIGN LXXXVI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is a gabled cottage, French roof house, 
placed in company with pointed roofs, of cottage 
architecture; this will be in keeping, a too sudden 
change that often does take place in neighborhoods 
rendering buildings that would be beautiful look as 
though they were out of proportion. It is intended 
to be built of brick, rubbed down when laid, and 
then painted some appropriate stone-color. The 
roofs are of slate, cut ornamental pattern. It is a 
showy design ; the plans are compact and handy, and 
all is well lighted ; and can be built for ^5000, first- 
class. 

First Floor. — P, parlor, 15 feet 10 inches by 20 
feet; L, library, 10 feet by 18 feet 6 inches; D R, 
dining-room, 15 by 15 leet ; K, kitchen, 12 feet by 12 
feet ; H, hall ; C C, china-closet, 5 feet 6 inches by 
3 feet 6 inches ; W C, water-closet. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 15 by 20 feet ; C, 
chamber, 10 by 14 feet; C, chamber, 15 by 15 feet; 
C, chamber, 12 by 8 feet 3 inches ; O, closets ; W C, 
water-closets ; L C, linen-closets. 



( 192) 



DESIGN LXXXVII. 

SUBURBAN MANSION, 

This design is an evolution of the Ovo laws of 
proportion, with a Mansard roof. It was erected 
for William M. Weigley, in Shafferstown, Lebanon 
County, Pennsylvania, of brown stone, from the quarry 
of Wm. M. Weigley. There is a ridge of brown stone 
running through his lands, of a peculiar rich reddish- 
brown color. The work was rock-face ran^e work, 
with draughted base course, and other dressings of 
picked centres. The building was finely finished in- 
teriorly with hard natural wood. The situation of the 
house rendered it of an advantage to have a broad 
front, and not very deep. Much depends upon the 
lay and shape of the grounds, for the plan of a house 
to be effective, and original designs become necessary 
to successful operations. The building cost ^22,000. 
The interior arrangements are as follows : 

First Floor. — V, vestibule, 6 by 1 2 feet ; H, stair- 
hall, 10 feet wide, connecting main hall 10 feet, 
separated by an ornamental arch connection ; P, 
parlor, 15 feet wide by 30 feet long; L, library and 
sitting-room, 15 by 1 5 feet wide ; an octagonal corner 
room, 10 feet in diameter, forming an alcove of beau- 
tiful proportions ; A is a conservatory ; D R, dining- 
room, 15 by 26 feet long; K, kitchen, 15 by 17 feet ; 
S, scullery, 15 by 16 feet. 

Second Floor contains four fine chambers, marked 
C, all of which are 1 5 feet wide and of the following 
lengths : — one with octagonal projecting tower alcove, 
15 by 15 feet, alcove 10 feet; two 15 by 25 feet; one 
15 by 17 feet 4 inches. This story also contains a 
dressing-room or boudoir, 11 by 13 feet; a bath- 
room, 10 by II feet, \vith ample linen and other 
closets. 

(^94) 



DESIGN 



LXXXVII. 




( J95 ) 



DESIGN LXXXVIII. 



AMERICAN COTTAGE VILLA. 

It is a good sample of modern buildings now being 
built through the Southern States ; it will cost to 
construct, of frame, about $4000 to $5000 ; it has a 
large frontage, and, suitably situated, will produce a 
fine effect. All of these designs are organized to meet 
the wants of our customers, and many times we are 
even held by existing foundations. We are very 
often furnished by ladies the general disposition of 
halls, rooms, etc., so that we have merely to make 
the same practical, so that they can be built, making 
as few alterations as possible to obtain that result. 
We rarely, if ever, fail to meet the full wants of families 
by the adoption of such a course, and know of no 
buildings failing to please the owner when built, except 
the price is sometimes above their wants. When so, 
we alter to suit them. 

First Floor. — H, hall, 8 feet ; P, parlor, 18 feet by 19 
feet 6 inches ; C, chamber, 1 6 by 1 6 feet ; C, chamber, 
1 4 by 1 8 feet ; C, chamber, 1 4 by 1 8 feet ; D-R, dining- 
room, 16 by 18 feet; K, kitchen, 16 by 18 feet. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 18 feet by 19 feet 6 
inches; C, chamber, 14 by 18 feet; C, chamber, 14 
by 18 feet; S R, sitting-room, 16 by 18 feet; B R, 
bed-room, 16 by 18 feet. 



(196) 



DESIGN LXXXVIIT. 





( '97) 



DESIGN LXXXIX. 



AMERICAN COTTAGE. 

This design was drawn by us for the Rev. John 
D. McClintock, Huntingdon, West Va. It is one of 
those American cottages containing very Hberal ac- 
commodations for a small family. Its cost, finely 
finished, of bricks, painted neat, with porches and 
well-finished interior, was $3446.25 ; built of frame, 
would cost J3000. It is slated with slates from the 
True Blue Quarry, Pennsylvania. These slates come 
very regular in color, are durable and strong ; orna- 
mentally laid, they cost 12 cents per square foot. 
The hall and parlor are finished in chestnut and other 
natural woods, oiled and rubbed down. Care has 
been taken with the proportions. The windows are 
large, and the interior is finished with heaters, slate 
mantels, and range complete for this sum. Such 
buildings are needed, and we design numbers of them 
for various persons all over the country. They sell 
at good price and give universal satisfaction. Every 
situation demands different treatment, and the ar- 
rangements of the rooms can be suited to any locality 
and the taste of the owner. 

First Flooi\ — P, parlor, 15 by 16 feet; F R, family- 
room, 15 by 16 feet; O, office, 15 by 16 feet; D R, 
dining-room, 12 by 14 feet ; K, kitchen, 10 by 11 feet ; 
B R, bath-room, 6 by 7 feet ; P, pantry ; H, hall, 6 
feet. 

Second Floor, — C, chamber, 15 by 16 feet; C, 
chamber, 15 by 16 feet. 



(198) 



DESIGN LXXXIX. 




FIRST FLOOR. 



SECOND FLOOR. 

( 199) 



DESIGN 



XC 



AMERICAN SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was erected from our drawing, by 
William P. Debott, Union county, Indiana. It has a 
sandstone base, with window-sills and heads of the 
same material. The superstructure is of bricks, 
shingle roof, covered with fire-proof paint, and its 
cost when fully finished was about ^8oco. We are 
constantly making for parties designs similar to the 
above, with varied evolutions, interior and external, 
in various parts of the United States, no two of which 
are ever precisely alike. Persons ordering such 
houses should be very careful to have every part 
fully understood before commencing, and any thing 
short of full drawings will be found dangerous and 
expensive. 

First Floor. — P, parlor, 1 6 by 23 feet ; S R, sitting- 
room, 15 by 1 6 feet; L, library, 14 by 14 feet; D R, 
dining-room, 15 by 19 feet; C, chamber, 12 by 14 
feet; K, kitchen, 14 by 16 feet; S, scullery, 11 by 14 
feet. 

Second Floor, — P C, principal chamber, 16 by 23 
feet; C, chamber over sitting-room, 15 by 16 feet; 
C, chamber over dining-room, 15 by 19 feet; C, 
chamber over library, 14 by 14 feet; C, chamber 
over chamber, 12 by 14 feet. 



( 200 ) 



DESIGN XC. 





DESIGN XCI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was built for John W. Stoddard, Esq., 
on a very commanding situation overlooking the city 
of Dayton, Ohio. The base of the building, as high 
as the first floor, is of white limestone ; the trimmings 
around the windows, doors, cornices, etc., are of Ohio 
sandstone, finely cut and rubbed. The roof is slate, 
the top of flat roof is tin. In the erection of the build- 
ing no pains were spared to render it one of the finest 
finished residences of the city. The superstructure 
is of brick, laid flush joints, and rubbed down for 
painting. By a reference to the plans, it will be 
found compact and commodious ; it is finished inside 
with black and white walnut. The richness of this 
latter wood is peculiarly fine around Dayton. The 
grain is capable of being matched in fine figures ; it is 
of a lighter color than the other walnut, darker than 
chestnut, and when rubbed down in oil polish its 
effects are fine. It will cost $25,000. 

We are willing to contrast it for beauty or elegance 
of effect, or costly appearance, with any other build- 
ing in the vicinity. 

First Floor. — P, parlor, 16 by 26 feet; S R, sitting- 
room, 16 by 20 feet; R P, reception parlor, 12 feet 
6 inches by 16 feet; D R, dining-room, 15 by 20 feet 
10 inches; B R, breakfast-room, 12 by 13 feet; K, 
kitchen, 16 by 16 feet 3 inches; L, lavatory, 4 feet 
8 inches by 7 feet 6 inches ; V, vestibule, 6 by 11 

feet 3 inches ;, H, hall ; C, china-closet ; C C, closets. 

( 202) 



DESIGN XCL 




FIRST FLOOR. 



( 203.) 



DESIGN XCII. 



AN AMERICAN COTTAGE. 

This desio^n is of a Franco-American cottage. It 
is one of those kind of designs possible with any 
person building a home, and desiring the conveni- 
ences and capacity afforded here. It can be built 
upon a fifty-feet front lot, and not crowd the grounds, 
is capable of being set back some distance from the 
front of the lot, and could be placed to good effect 
from sixteen to thirty-five feet back. The French 
roof is so constructed that a sufficient loft of attic 
will be above the second-story rooms, which, by the 
system of ventilation we adopt, renders them cool 
and comfortable in summer. French roofs require 
architectural proportions more than any other struc- 
ture we know of. Hence the reason of thousands 
of failures in this style of architecture; but if properly 
proportioned they are very beautiful. 

First Floor. — H, hall ; P, parlor, 14 feet 6 inches 
by 15 feet 6 inches; L R, living-room, 14 feet 6 inches 
by 17 feet; B R, bed-room, 7 feet 6 inches by 15 
feet; D R, dining-room, 13 by 16 feet; K, kitchen, 
13 by 13 feet. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 14 feet 6 inches by 16 
feet ; C, chamber, 1 4 feet 6 inches by 1 7 feet ; C, 
chamber, 13 by 16 feet; B R, bed-room, 13 by 13 
feet; B R, bath-room, 7 feet 6 inches by 11 feet. 



( 204) 



DESIGN XCIII. 

SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

Tins suburban residence was built, under our su- 
perintendence, upon a very commanding site upon 
the heights north of the Falls of the Schuylkill, Phila- 
delphia, upon ten acres of ground. The building 
overlooks the Park, and can be seen from almost all 
the drives to Germantown and Falls of Schuylkill, 
and many drives in the Park. It was built for James 
Dobson, Esq., an extensive manufacturer of this city. 
The superstructure is built of Falls of Schuylkill 
stone, laid rubble and pointed with white mortar ; the 
roof is of slates. By reference to the plans, it will 
be observed that it is very commodious inside, and 
is finished in the most elaborate manner with black 
walnut, finely polished, throughout the first and second 
floors. The building has fine porch accommodations, 
a conservatory, and all modern improvements, to 
render it one of the most complete rural residences 
about the city. Its cost was about ^40,000 when 
completed in every part. We have also erected upon 
the plantation a fine, commodious carriage-house, in 
keeping with the architecture of the house. It is 
built by the Ovo law of proportion, and we consider 
it a successful example. 

First Floor. — V, vestibule, 7 feet 6 inches by 1 2 
feet; H, hall, 12 feet wide ; P, parlor, 17 by 55 feet; 
C, conservatory, 13 by i 7 feet; L, library, 17 by 20 
feet ; D R, dining-room, 16 feet 6 inches by 26 feet; 
K, kitchen, 14 feet 6 inches by 17 feet 6 inches; S, 
scullery, 1 1 feet by 1 7 feet 6 inches. 

Second Floor, — H, hall, 1 2 feet wide ; P C, principal 
chamber, 1 7 feet by 36 feet 6 inches ; C, chamber, 1 7 
by 18 feet ; C, chamber, 1 7 by 1 8 feet ; C, chamber, 1 6 
feet 6 inches by 26 feet ; B, bath-room, 11 by 1 2 feet; 
C, chamber, 14 by 15 feet; C, chamber, 10 feet 6 

inches by 1 1 feet 6 inches. 

( 206 ) 



DESIGN XCIV. 

AMERICAN ORNAMENTAL VILLA. 

This ornamental villa was designed for and built 
by A. D. Gyger, Esq., at Bird-in-Hand, a station on 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, about six miles east of 
Lancaster. It has given great satisfaction, both in 
appearance externally and inside arrangements. It 
is commodious, free, and capable of being furnished 
with elegance. The windows are fitted with our 
patent blinds, and the architraves are of a new de- 
sign, used extensively by our firm. The heavy part 
is placed next to the door or window, and the wash- 
board moulding sweeps around them by having a 
small ring turned of their shape, and cut in four 
quarters, each quarter being placed in the corners 
of each top, and one on the bottom, so that by an 
easy sweep the mouldings pass from the wash-board 
around the door. 

This building is of brick, laid flush, joints rubbed 
down, and painted. Its cost was about ^20,000 with 
all conveniences. We have recently invented a new 
mode of making sash requiring no putty, also a 
window-frame, with an improved pulley-stile, requir- 
ing no parting-strips or sash-beads ; the pulleys and 
sash-cords are hidden from view. The sash can be 
taken out and placed back without disfiguring the 
paint. 

First Floor. — V, vestibule, 7 feet 3 inches by 7 
feet 3 inches ; P, parlor, 20 feet by 27 feet 10 inches ; 
L, library, 14 by 14 feet; D R, dining-room, 14 by 
22 feet; K, kitchen, 15 by 17 feet; S R, store-room, 

4 feet 3 inches by 10 feet; S, scullery, 10 feet by u 
feet 6 inches ; H, hall, 8 feet wide. 

Second Floor. — D R, dressing-room, 7 feet 3 inches 
by 10 feet 9 inches ; P C, principal chamber, 20 feet 
by 27 feet 10 inches; C, chamber, 14 by 15 feet 3 
inches; C, chamber, 12 feet 9 inches by 18 feet 9 
inches; C, chamber, 15 by 17 feet, with a bath-room 

5 feet by 10 feet 4 inches. 

(208) 



DESIGN XCIV. 

^tit ^ ri r a u ^ r n a nu « t a I tl i 1 1 a. 





FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

( 209 ) 



DESIGN XCV. 



AN AMERICAN COTTAGE. 

This design is a beautiful type of an American 
liome. We have many orders for drawings of such 
styles of houses. Some people persist in filling their 
houses with closets, and, when in excess, they become 
hiding-places. There should be a commodious closet 
and clothes-press in every chamber. The kitchen 
should have ample places for its necessary articles ; 
the store-room, butler's pantry, are all needed. 
This building can be built for $2500 very complete, 
by good superintendence on the part of the owner 
in purchasing materials, and seeing that they are used 
economically. The house is of frame, covered with felt 
and weather-boardine • this felt is now manufactured 
quite thick, and nailed upon the studding. The roof 
may be shingles or slate ; there is an air-space or loft 
above the second floor. An open communication 
from below the cornice must be made to communicate 
with it all around, and there must be two flues, one 
open at the bottom of this loft, and passing through 
the roof, and the other open at the top of loft, and 
opening out high above. This insures a constant 
change of air in the vault, and renders the upper 
rooms cool and comfortable at all times. 

First Floor. — H, hall, 10 feet wide; P, parlor, 16 
by 22 feet; S R, sitting-room, 16 by 18 feet; D R, 
dining-room, 14 by 22 feet; C, chamber, 14 by 18 
feet; K, kitchen, 14 by 18 feet. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 16 by 22 feet; C, 

chamber, 10 by 10 feet; C, chamber, 16 by 18 feet; 

C, chamber, 14 by 18 feet; C, chamber, 14 by 22 

feet; C, chamber, 14 by 18 feet. 
(210) 



DESIGN XCVI. 



MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This building was designed for P. K. Boyd, Esq , 
of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and is built opposite 
the front entrance of the State Capitol. 

The base of the building and the window and door 
dressings are of Berea stone, from Ohio, and the 
superstructure is of brick ; the porches, cornices, etc., 
are of wood, with the roof of slates and tin. The in- 
terior is finely finished in polished walnut. The inside 
shutters and finish are of Hobbs's improved style, 
giving massive and artistic effect upon entering. The 
house is very commodious and supplied with all the 
new improvements, at a cost of about $20,000. It 
was built under a system of giving each mechanic 
an opportunity to estimate for his own work, making 
the brick-layer, carpenter, and plasterer, etc., each 
responsible to the owner, and also supplying each 
branch of mechanics with an opportunity of receiving 
the merit of his particular branch of work, — a mode 
which is rapidly gaining favor. It insures the owner 
against liens, by having every cent paid, and saves 
all the trouble and vexation in obtaining releases, as 
all who have had contract work done can appreciate. 

First Floor— vestibule, 6 by 8 feet; H, hall, 8 
feet wide ; P, parlor, 1 5 by 30 feet ; L, library, 1 5 by 
26 feet 5 inches; D R, dining-room, 15 by 24 feet; 
K, kitchen, 13 feet 9 inches by 18 feet 4 inches ; C, 
china-closet, 5 feet 2 inches by 8 feet 6 inches ; P, 
pantry, 5 feet 2 inches by 8 feet 6 inches. 

Second Floor. — D, dressing-room, 8 feet by 9 feet 
6 inches; C, chamber, 15 feet 4 inches by 23 feet 8 
inches; C, chamber, 15 feet 4 inches by 23 feet i 
inch; B, bath-room, 6 by 10 feet 2 inches; C, cham- 
ber, 15 by 24 feet; C, chamber, 10 feet 5 inches by 
24 feet. 
( 212 ) 



DESIGN XCVI. 





DESIGN XCVII. 

RURAL MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn and built for Mr. O. S. 
Hubbel, die well-known druggist of this city, at 
Riverciiffe, near Norwalk, Connecticut. He is the 
owner of the celebrated bird Ariel, the carrier-pigeon 
that has taken the premium as the best bird in the 
world. This building has met with his entire appro- 
bation, and he stated to us, that all who see it do not 
differ from the Daily Graphic s account of it as the 
handsomest house in the United States, of equal cost. 
It is plain and beautiful, and cost about $15,000 with 
interior well finished. We have recendy made an 
invention of an entirely new style of finish for the 
inside of a house, that possesses the advantage of 
enabling persons to use walnut and other hard woods 
in the entire finish, with comparadvely little or no 
addition in the cost over painted wood-work of the 
best quality white pine. We give our patrons the 
advantages of our invention. Those who are build- 
ing under other architects, desiring to save money, 
obtain rich and beautiful apartments, can be supplied 
with details and drawings of the same at the rate of 
one per cent, upon the cost as per agreement. 

First Floor. — H, hall, 8 feet wide ; P, parlor, 1 6 by 
16 feet ; L, library, 12 by 20 feet ; D R, dining-room, 
16 by 16 feet; D R, drawing-room, 16 by 16 feet; 
K, kitchen, 13 by 19 feet 9 inches, with a larder 8 by 
10 feet, and a store-closet 5 feet 6 inches by 8 feet 3 
inches. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 16 by 16 feet; C, 
chamber, 8 feet 4 inches by 12 feet; C, chamber, 16 
by 1 6 feet ; C, chamber, 1 2 feet 6 inches by i 2 feet 
6 inches ; B R, bath-room, 5 feet 6 inches by 16 feet; 
D R, dressing-room, 5 by 8 feet 6 inches ; C, cham- 
ber, 1 5 by 1 6 feet ; C, chamber, 1 3 by 1 6 feet ; D R, 
dressing-room, 5 by 8 feet, with a linen-closet 5 feet 
6 inches by 7 feet. 
(214) 



DESIGN XCVIII. 

ORNAMENTAL COTTAGE. 

This design is an organization between the French 
and cottage style of treatment. It can be built for 
$6000 in frame, and in brick for $7000, the second 
story almost containing a full perpendicular one, a 
small angular slope near the ceiling caused by the 
roof, which makes a very fine internal effect. The 
roof is of slate, with the top of tin. 

These designs are all original, and well considered. 
We are making great improvements in internal finish 
in houses, that renders them more beautiful and 
cheaper. We finish most of them without stucco 
cornices, plain straight walls, which are painted one 
coat with oil and white lead, and two coats of oil and 
turpentine, the third and fourth coat with encaustic 
varnish, tinted to any desired color. This encaustic 
varnish costs $2.50 per gallon, and two gallons will 
paint a parlor two coats, 15 by 30 feet, walls and 
ceilings. It becomes very hard and can be washed. 
Any turpentine, or other material, will cause lead to 
turn yellow in a darkened room with great rapidity, 
and you of necessity must use French zinc, which has 
not the solidity or durability of the best lead, and if 
pure is very expensive, and so the imitation article is 
resorted to. This mode of finish makes the ceilings 
look higher than they do with plaster cornices. 

Fi)'st Floor. — H, hall, 7 feet 6 inches wide ; P, 
parlor, 15 by 17 feet 6 inches; S R, sitting-room, 12 
by 15 feet; D R, dining-room, 13 by 14 feet; C, 
chamber, 9 by 15 feet ; K, kitchen, 10 by 13 feet; L, 
library, 9 by 1 3 feet. 

Second Floor. — H, hall; C, chamber, 14 feet 6 

inches by 1 5 feet 6 inches ; C, chamber, 1 1 feet 6 

inches by 15 feet; C, chamber, 10 by 15 feet, with a 

large number of closets. 
(216) 



DESIGN XCVIII. 




DESIGN XCIX. 



STRUCTURAL PARK RESIDENCE. 

This design is a cheap Park residence of simple 
character. The kitchen wing is one story high. The 
house has four rooms on the first floor, three on the 
second, and three on the third. The stories are 
eleven, ten, and nine feet respectively, built in good 
style. Its cost of frame, weather-boarded, was $3000, 
and of bricks, painted, $3500. Persons approving of 
this style of architecture cannot fail to like this sam- 
ple, as its proportions are well adjusted. 

First Floo7\ — H, hall, 8 feet wide ; P, parlor, 1 2 by 
1 6 feet ; D R, dining-room, 1 5 by 1 6 feet ; L, library, 
1 5 by 1 5 feet ; K, kitchen, 15 by 16 feet. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 12 by 16 feet ; C, 
chamber, 15 by 15 feet; C, chamber, 10 by 16 feet; 
H, hall ; and a number of closets. 



(218) 



DESIGN XCIX. 




(219) 



DESIGN C. 



PARK PICTURESQUE VILLA. 

This design is intended as a country house. Its 
detail parts are simple and direct. It is not the 
kind of a house to build in prim uniform lines, as is 
common in villages. It will harmonize well with 
natural scenery, and can be constructed of frame, 
weather-boarded, at a cost of about J4000. 

It has four fine porches, but no mouldings must be 
used in the design. The roof is covered with iron 
or tin. As we are continually receiving letters from 
persons who have attempted to build without an 
architect, and often those who have no experience 
get into difficulty, sometimes placing the house too 
high, at others too low, we will state to those per- 
sons that we are willing, at all times, to give them 
the advantages of our experience for a small fee, 
and it is rarely ever impossible to remedy the evil to 
a great extent. 

Many hundreds of houses are spoiled by the painter 
alone, and we always advise to paint a house of 
one simple color, avoiding the color of dust and dirt 
of the vicinity, but if of the same tone it must be 
brighter, and have a cleanlier appearance. 

First Floor. — H, hall; P, parlor, 12 by 14 feet 
6 inches; D R, dining-room, 11 by 12 feet; K, 
kitchen, 1 2 by 1 2 feet ; S, sink-room, 4 by 6 feet ; C, 
conservatory, 7 by 1 2 feet ; and a store-room, 4 by 6 
feet. 

Second Floor. — H, hall ; P C, principal chamber, 12 

by 14 feet; C, chamber, 11 by 12 feet; B, bed-room, 

6 by 9 feet ; R, bed-room, 6 by 9 feet ; C C, closets. 
' (^20 ) 



DESIGN C. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(221 ) 



DESIGN CI. 



AMERICAN SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn and designed by us for 
George M. Hambright, Esq., of Lancaster, Pa., and 
has four rooms on the first floor, four chambers on 
the second, and four on the third floor. The building 
can readily be placed upon a fifty-feet front lot. The 
proportions are good, and conveniently arranged. 
The house can be built of bricks, for J6000, and of 
frame, for $5000. It will be found to contain elegance 
and convenience, adaptable to many situations. 

First Floor. — H, hall, 6 feet wide ; P, parlor, 1 3 
by 21 feet 6 inches; S, sitting-room, 12 by 12 feet 
6 inches, with a bay-window 4 feet 6 inches by 9 
feet; D R, dining-room, 13 by 17 feet; K, kitchen, 
II by 12 feet. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 13 by 21 feet 6 inches ; 
C, chamber. 12 by 12 feet ; C, chamber, 13 by 1 7 
feet; B, bed-room, 11 by 12 feet. 



( 222 ) 



DESIGN CI. 
^m^ri^tUt ^ulrutltan "fyt^xiltiitt. 




DESIGN CI I. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This suburban residence was drawn for B. C. 
Taylor, Esq., of die B. C. Taylor Manufacturing 
Company, of Dayton, Ohio, and is built on one of the 
fine avenues of that beautiful city. It is constructed 
of brick, with Berea stone trimmings, and contains all 
the modern improvements, viz., our new style of 
finish, a vast improvement over the old style. This 
new style of moulding entirely reverses the old 
method ; the heavy side is next the door, and the 
wash-board moulding is located around them ; also 
Hobbs's double-pivot blinds, which do away with the 
clumsy stick down the centre by the substitution of 
a silver-plated strip alongside of the stiles. They are 
adjustable up and down, and close perfectly tight, 
and are not moved by the wind. Care and new in- 
vention is brought to bear in every part of this struc- 
ture. Its whole cost did not exceed ^20,000, elegantly 
finished with butternut wood rubbed down in oil. 

First Floor. — V, vestibule, 6 feet by 7 feet 6 inches ; 
H, hall, 7 feet 6 inches wide ; P, parlor, 15 by 20 feet; 

5 R, sitting-rooms, 14 by 14 feet 6 inches; D R, 
dining-room, 14 feet 6 inches by 16 feet 3 inches; B 
R, bath-room, 5 feet 6 inches by 8 feet 6 inches ; C, 
chamber, 10 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 6 inches; K, 
kitchen, 1 5 feet 8 inches by 1 7 feet ; P R, pump-room, 
7 by 7 feet ; a pantry, 5 feet 6 inches by 1 1 feet 6 
inches ; and a large number of closets. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 1 5 by 20 feet; C, cham- 
ber, 1 3 feet 6 inches by 1 4 feet ; C, chamber, 1 3 feet 
9 inches by 14 feet; C, chamber, 14 by 14 feet 6 
inches ; B R, bath-room, 5 feet 6 inches by 8 feet 

6 inches; C, chamber, 10 feet 6 inches by 14 feet 
6 inches; S R, bed-rooms, 10 by 14 feet; and a 
dressing-room, 7 feet 6 inches by 7 feet 6 inches. 

(224) 



DESIGN CI I. 




FLOOR. 



SECOND FLOOR. 

(225) 



DESIGN cm. 



FRENCH SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is a cheap French suburban residence. 
The interior is well arranged for comfort and conve- 
nience, and can be built in the vicinity of Philadelphia 
for J4000. Everywhere, in the United States and 
Canada, residents are availing themselves of our ser- 
vices. Any person ordering drawings for a house 
should always fully describe the location and size of 
the lot, the distance back from the road, width of its 
front, and the kind of building that will be in associ- 
ation with it, also, the grade of the grounds. We 
know this is troublesome, but it will be found to pay. 
When grounds are to be placed in artistic association, 
we must have the grades marked distinctly, and a 
map sent to us showing the plantation," which can 
always be executed by a surveyor. This saves money 
in grading and forming the same into fine effect, as 
many persons have fine plantations requiring but 
little to render them truly picturesque, with very little 
outlay, yet for want of practical knowledge, only ob- 
tained by experience and culture, they fail to obtain 
the same, and often destroy what would be their 
greatest beauty. 

First Floor. — H, hall, 8 feet wide ; P, parlor, 1 2 by 
1 6 feet ; D R, dining-room, 12 by 1 8 feet ; K, kitchen, 
12 by 16 feet ; S, shed, 8 by 1 2 feet ; C, conservatory. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 12 by 16 feet; C, 
chamber, 12 by 18 feet; C, chamber, 10 by 16 feet; 

H, hall. 

(226) 



DESIGN CIII. 




FIRST FLOOR. 



SECOND FLOOR. 
(227) 



♦ 



DESIGN CIV. 

SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This is a design of a Gothic villa, Americanized. 
It contains all the requisites of a first-class home. 
As a suburban residence, or country mansion, it has 
a refined, dignified, and substantial appearance, the 
plan having all the nobleness of the effect required. 
The parlor is commodious and elegant, of the finest 
decorations, and lighted, as it is, by bay-windows, 
the Hght will be thrown upon the walls, that paintings 
and statuary may have full effect. By the use of 
sliding doors, the main hall becomes a part of the 
parlor. It is intended to have a dumb-waiter in the 
rear, so as to render the kitchen apartment perfect, 
as they are in the rear of the house and in basement. 
The slope of the grounds at the back of the building 
affords fine ventilation and light. 

First Floor. — A, porch; P, parlor, 19 by 29 feet; 
L, library, 15 by 17 feet ; H, hall, 10 feet wide ; S H, 
stair-hall; D, dining-room, 15 by 24 feet 6 inches; 
S, sitting-room, 15 by 15 feet ; C P, carriage-porch. 

Second Floor, — D R, dressing-room, 10 by 13 feet; 
P C, principal chamber, 16 by 25 feet; C, chamber, 
15 by 1 5 feet; H, hall; A, conservatory; C, cham- 
ber, 15 feet by 24 feet 6 inches; C, chamber, 15 by 
15 feet. 



(228) 



DESIGN CIV. 

Suburban ^^t^id^me. 





FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



{ 229 ) 



DESIGN CV. 



MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This design is in the Ovo order of architecture. 
There is nothing guessed at in its proportions, but 
all is evolved in a positive law regulating the whole. 
All of the members, brackets, and cornices, have a 
relative character of parts, as well as a decided quan- 
tity of plain to ornamental surface. The building 
was designed for and built by Mr. Garrettson, of 
Pottsville, at a cost of $18,000. It has given great 
satisfaction, and is very ornamental. The interior is 
well arranged to suit a peculiar situation, standing 
on a wall at its rear that separates the lot from the 
railroad, of some twenty feet high, the principal street 
being at an elevation of thirty feet above. The lot 
being shallow, every inch of room had to be arranged 
in the most economical manner, and we say it is a 
great success. The first story is twelve feet, the 
second, eleven feet, third, eleven feet high. 

Fij^st Floor. — A, porch ; V, vestibule, 6 by 8 feet ; 
P, parlor, 16 by 23 feet; L, library, 16 by 9 feet; I, 
hall; S R, sitting-room, 16 by 19 feet; D R, dining- 
room, 21 by 26 feet; K, kitchen, 16 by 20 feet; S, 
scullery, 16 by 8 feet; C, conservatory; C H, car- 
riage-house ; H R, harness-room. 



(230) 



DESIGN CV. 




FIRST FLOOR. 

(231) 



DESIGN CVI. 



MODEL RESIDENCE. 

. This design was drawn for and built by Mrs. 
Eshleman. It is situated on Duke street, Lancaster, 
Pa., and has given entire satisfaction. It is the most 
attractive house in the city, and has a carriage-house 
in the rear which is in good character with the dwell- 
ing. The house and dwelling cost about $24,000, 
with finely laid-out grounds. The house is painted 
in imitation of the Berea stone, of Ohio, with no 
change of color between the cornices and walls ; 
when such change is made, in almost all cases it is 
done in a vulgar manner, and destroys the rays of 
light that good proportion throws upon the surface, 
when not marred by discordant colors. No one is 
willing to put a brown-stone cornice upon a white 
marble building, for the taste of all would decide 
for a white marble cornice to a marble house. The 
garden in front is all grass and walks, except flowers 
placed in vases. The stories of the house are twelve 
feet first story, eleven feet second, and twelve feet 
third or French roof. 

Fi7'st Floor. — V, vestibule, 6 by 8 feet wide; H, hall, 
8 feet wide; P, parlor, 29 by 19 feet; L, library, 15 
by 31 feet; D R, dining-room, 14 by 21 feet; K, 
kitchen, i 2 by 1 7 feet. 

Second Floor. — H, hall, 8 feet; P C, principal 
chamber, 19 by 23 feet; C, chamber, 15 by 15 feet; 
C, chamber, 12 by 1 5 feet; C, chamber, 14 by 17 
feet ; C, chamber, 12 by 21 feet 6 inches. 



(232) 



DESIGN CVI. 




DESIGN CVII. 



MODEL RESIDENCE. 

This design in the American-Gothic style was built 
for Wm. M. Loyd, banker, at Altoona, Pa., a flourish- 
ing town on the line of the Central Railroad. The 
building is well situated, with a large plantation upon 
a sloping hill, the lawn in the front of the house being 
nearly six hundred feet, and when built it was one 
of princely effect. It is finished in black walnut in 
the finest style. The elevation is of pointed rubble 
masonry of mountain freestone, of a light color. 
The dressings are of Berea stone, of Ohio. Its cost 
was between $35,000 and $40,000. We have many 
other buildings in Altoona, as well as many of the 
other towns along the line of this road. 

First Floor. — V, vestibule, 5 feet 4 inches by 10 
feet; L, library, 12 by 14 feet 6 inches; P, parlor, 15 
feet by 26 feet 6 inches ; D R, dining-room, 15 by 19 
feet; C, conservatory, 8 feet 6 inches by 10 feet 6 
inches ; P, pantry, 6 feet by 10 feet 6 inches ; L, lav- 
atory, 4 feet 6 inches by 6 feet 4 inches; K, kitchen, 
14 by 14 feet ; S R, store-room, 3 feet 9 inches by 10 
feet 2 inches ; S, scullery, 1 5 feet by 1 1 feet 6 inches ; 
H, hall, 10 feet wide. 

Second Floor. — D R, dressing-room, 7 feet 3 inches 
by 10 feet 4 inches ; C, chamber, 12 feet 4 inches by 
14 feet 6 inches; C, chamber, 15 feet by 20 feet 10 
inches; C, chamber, 15 feet 7 inches by 17 feet 8 
inches ; B R, bath-room, 7 feet 4 inches by 10 feet; 
D R, dressing-room, 5 feet 3 inches by 9 feet 7 
inches ; C, chamber, 9 by 1 2 feet ; C, chamber, 8 feet 
by 1 1 feet 7 inches ; C, closets. 

( 234 ) 



DESIGN CVII. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

(235) 



DESIGN CVIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design was drawn to be built in Norwalk, 
Conn., where a number of our designs have been 
erected. This is drawn in simple elevation, a plain 
geometrical drawing supposing a person had a thou- 
sand eyes, and looking direct upon each separate 
part. 

Persons can obtain no real information by this how 
the building will look when viewed perspectively. 
This is the process by which almost all architects get 
up their designs, which when finished often prove 
great failures. To design right we design in per- 
spective, where the proportion, slopes of roof, height 
and size of objects are changed to the person.viewing. 
The geometrical drawings are with us merely modes 
whereby the workman can have a guide and scale to 
get out his work from. As a rule this truth must be 
acknowledged, that if a line or geometrical drawing 
is beautiful, the structure when built will be ugly and 
all out of proportion, and without feeling, as they are 
not what they appear to be. 

Fi7^st Floor. — A, vestibule ; B, hall, lo feet wide ; 
C, parlor, i6 by 30 feet; D, library, 15 by 18 feet; 
E, dining-room, 16 by 21 feet; G, china-closet; H, 
pantry; I, kitchen, 14 by 16 feet; J, scullery, 11 by 
16 feet ; K, carriage-porch ; L, front porch. 

Second Flooi\ — M, chambers ; N, dressing-room ; 
0,Jiall ; P, bath-room. 
(236) 



DESIGN CVIIl. 




DESIGN CIX. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This suburban residence is in the Franco-Italian 
style of architecture. Its proportions are extracted 
by the Ovo law of proportion, a law governing forms, 
character, and quantity. From a knowledge of the 
law above alluded to, there is a possibility of evolving 
combinations infinite in number, and beautiful in their 
type. We have always contended that beauty is not 
necessarily attendant upon high ornamentation or 
costly combinations, as we see many large and costly 
buildings entirely destitute of it, and many others, 
very simple, possessing it to a great degree. 

First Floor. — V, vestibule ; H, hall, 1 2 feet wide ; 
P, parlor, 15 by 20 feet ; D R, drawing-room, 1 5 by 
20 feet ; D R, dining-room, 15 by 25 feet ; K, kitchen, 
10 by 18 feet; S, study, 8 feet by 12 feet 6 inches ; 
C, conservatory. 

Second Floo7^. — C, chamber, 1 5 by 20 feet ; C, cham- 
ber, 15 by 20 feet; C, chamber, 15 by 20 feet; D R, 
dressing-room, 8 by 10 feet ; B R, bath-room. 



(238) 



DESIGN C 1 X. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOiND FLOOR. 

( ) 



DESIGN ex. 



FRENCH SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is made to meet the wants of a large 
number of persons wishing to construct a small resi- 
dence of taste. This design can be readily built 
for between ^4000 and J5000, different localities 
making considerable difference in their cost. It is 
intended to be built of frame, weather-boarded. The 
steep roof of ornamental cut slates, in two patterns, 
square and angular. It is best to cover the whole 
frame and roof with felt before putting on the weather- 
boards and slate roof, as it secures a warm and com- 
fortable house. By reference to the plans, it will be 
observed to contain comfortable and free rooms. 
They are of sizes that render them beautiful. A 
number of these houses, situated upon some avenue 
in a town, would create a beautiful neighborhood. 
The first story is twelve feet high, the second and 
third, eleven feet in the clear. 

First Floor. — A, porch ; P, parlor, 12 by 1 5 feet ; 
D, dining-room, 12 by 22 feet 8 inches; K, kitchen, 
12 by 12 feet; S, scullery, 10 by 12 feet. 

Second Floor, — P C, principal chamber, 12 by 15 
feet ; H, hall ; C, C, chambers, 1 1 feet 4 inches by 1 2 
feet ; B P, bath-room, 7 feet 6 inches by 1 2 feet ; S 
R, store-room, 4 by 1 2 feet. 



240) 



DESIGN ex. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(241) 



DESIGN CXI. 



ITALIAN VILLA. 

This Italian villa, constructed of brick, rubbed down 
and painted, will cost between $4500 and $5000, and 
if built of frame considerably less. The roof is of 
tin. The arrangement of steps to the principal floor 
has a good effect. The basement should be rubble 
masonry, pointed ; the design shows the garden front, 
the principal front not being seen. The arrangement 
of the terraces, with flowering borders, will be 
most beautiful and unique. The situation of the 
fountain, both in front and rear, has a good effect. 
The terrace steps can be made of wood. This design 
is most admirably adapted to a summer seat. 

The placing of vases and statues in front will be 
in beautiful harmony with the building. The front 
lawn should be kept broad, and not chopped up by 
foliage, and with very few plants in the ground. A 
line of jardinieres on each side of the principal 
walks, with a few solitary evergreens, properly situ- 
ated, would carry out the effect. 

Fii'st Floo7\ — H, hall; P, parlor, 14 by 20 feet; L, 
library, 15 by 15 feet; D R, dining-room, 12 by 18 
feet; S R, sitting-room, 12 by 14 feet; D W, dumb- 
waiter ; C, china-closet. 

Second Floor. — H, hall ; P C, principal chamber, 14 
by 20 feet ; C, chamber, 15 by 1 5 feet ; C, chamber, 
12 by 18 feet; N, nursery, 12 by 14 feet. 



(242) 



DESIGN CXI. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 



(243) 



DESIGN CXI I. 



SUBURBAN OR COUNTRY RESIDENCE. 

This design is for a cheap and commodious country 
or suburban residence. It is built of frame, with 
horizontal, narrow weather-boards. The window- 
frames have plank faces cut to the shape shown. It 
should have inside shutters throughout, and can be 
built with shingle or slate roof The attic may con- 
tain servants' and store room, and provision is made 
for a cellar under the whole. Where it is possible 
to have houses in accordance with the nature of the 
ground, they are much more healthy and durable, 
and always repay their cost. This house can either 
be set with the broad side to the front, or the left- 
hand side can be front where the lot is narrower than 
sixty feet in front. The design has a plain, substantial 
appearance, but all its beauty will rest in the due 
weight and the proportion of its parts, and it must 
be treated to suit the location and its surroundings. 
It will make a very comfortable country or river-side 
house, but if the latter, the broad side should face the 
river. The plans are fully explained by their separate 
descriptions. The first story is twelve feet in the clear, 
the second ten feet, but they can be made higher. 
The house will cost to erect in die neighborhood of 
Philadelphia $8000 at this time. 

First Floo7^. — V, porch; P, parlor, 14 by 20 feet; 
S, sitting-room, 12 by 12 feet ; D, dining-room, 1 2 
by 22 feet; K, kitchen, 12 by 12 feet; H, hall. 

Second Floor, — C, chamber, 14 by 20 feet; B R, 
bath-room, 6 by 8 feet ; B C, chamber, 1 2 by 20 feet ; 
B, B, bed-rooms, 12 by 12 feet. 
( 244 ) 




(245) 



DESIGN CXIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This was designed and built for Robert F. Lee, 
Esq., Pottsville, Pa., and has given much satisfac- 
tion. It is esteemed by many as being the most 
beautiful house in the city, and is situated upon high 
ground and set some distance back from the street. 
The grounds are nicely arranged, and the building 
is what may be called a plain square house with a 
.kitchen wing thrown out on its rear. A bay end 
gives a beautiful effect upon entering the parlor. The 
chimney being in the bay, with the aid of a large 
mantel-glass causes the doors of the parlor to be seen 
upon entering, as well as a beautiful chandelier, which 
gives the appearance of double the extent. The 
music-room, attached by sliding doors, can be thrown 
into one room, and the wide folding doors in the 
hall utilize the space and render the whole quite 
commodious and compact when closed. Much beauty, 
convenience, and comfort are sacrificed continually 
by persons building without securing these most 
important considerations. 

First Floor. — P, porch ; V, vestibule ; H, hall, 8 
feet wide ; P, parlor, 19 by 24 feet ; S R, sitting-room, 
16 by 19 feet; D R, dining-room, 14 by 18 feet; M 
R, music-room, 10 by 14 feet; H R, rear hall, 6 feet 
wide; K, kitchen, 14 by 18 feet; S, scullery, 10 by 
1 1 feet ; P, pantry ; C, closet, boiler inclosed. 

Second Floor. — D R, dressing-room, 8 by 9 feet; 
P C, principal chamber, 19 by 19 feet; C, chamber, 
14 by 19 feet; C, chamber, 14 by 15 feet; C, chamber, 
14 by 17 feet; B R, bath-room, 7 by 8 feet; N, 
nursery, 12 by 18 feet; B R, bed-room, 10 by 13 

feet ; S R, store-room ; C, C, clothes-presses. 

(246) 



DESIGN CXllI. 




FIRST FLOOR. SECOND FLOOR. 

( ) 



DESIGN CXIV. 



SWISS COTTAGE. 

This design of a Swiss cottage is organized to suit 
the American needs in some of our mountain glens 
and canons of California. In such a situation it will 
have a very picturesque effect. It is one of those 
kinds of designs that are capable of being built of 
unplaned lumber, simply planed on the edges and cut 
to definite shapes, according to the design, and cov- 
ered with shingles. It has a balcony half-way around 
the building, which screens the first story from sun 
and rain and renders the rooms comfortable, and acts 
as a wind sail, inducing air through the rooms in 
summer time. It is designed to be built of stone for 
first story, and brick for the second, with stone dress- 
ings, and will cost about ^5000. It is necessary that 
full drawings should be secured with all parts clearly 
specified, that no more material shall be secured than 
the amount required, as the transportation in some 
localities costs more than the material. Terra-cotta 
chimney can be substituted for brick, as the weight 
is less and the cost less than bricks. A rough house 
built in this manner can have all the comforts, and 
in these situations be more beautiful than smooth- 
finished structures, and suit the taste of those who 
inhabit these localities. Porches, bays, etc., can be 
added to such a structure, and the whole building 
be ornamental in its shapes; the best architecture 
is possible. This building will cost about $3000, 
well built, in most sections of the country. 

First Floor. — H, hall, 8 feet; P, parlor, 14 by 18 
feet ; S R, sitting-room, 11 by 14 feet ; D R, dining- 
room, 20 by 14 feet; L, library, 11 by 14 feet; K, 
kitchen, 11 by 14 feet; W, wood-shed, 9 by 14 feet. 

Second Floor. — C, chamber, 16 feet 6 inches by 14 
feet; C, chamber, 11 by 14 feet; C, chamber, 12 by 
14 feet ; C, chamber, 8 by 14 feet ; C, chamber, 1 1 by 
14 feet; C, chamber, 10 feet 6 inches by 11 feet; with 

a bath-room 6 by 8 feet, and a large number of closets. 

(248) 



DESIGN CXIV. 




DESIGN CXV. 



AMERICAN COTTAGE. 

This design was organized for Mrs. Stabler, of 
Lynchburg, Va. It contains many desirable points, 
architecturally, and when constructed will be a bright 
and beautiful home, containing internally all modern 
improvements. It is designed to be built of bricks, 
hollow walls ; the sash frames will have our new 
method of hanging them. They are so superior to the 
old method that our customers order them to be in 
their buildings. All the rattling of sash, and cold 
and dusty windows are prevented by the introduction 
of them. Parties building without the aid of an 
architect, and desiring detail drawings with the priv- 
ilege of using this sash, would do well to obtain 
the same, whxh are furnished at a small figure. The 
building will cost, when finished, between $5000 and 
$6000. 

First Floor, — A, parlor, 18 by 18 feet ; B, hall ; C, 
chamber, 18 by 20 feet; D, dining-room, 18 by 18 
feet; E, smoking-room, 13 by 13 feet; F, nursery, 
16 feet 6 inches by 23 feet; G, kitchen, 14 feet 6 
inches by 14 feet ; H, bath-room, 6 by 6 feet ; I, store- 
room, 10 feet by 4 feet 3 inches; J, china-closet, 4 
feet by 4 feet 3 inches. 

Second Floor, — L, chambers ; M, sewing- room. 



(250) 



DESIGN CXV. 




FIRST FLOOR. 



SECOND FLOOR. 

(251) 



DESIGN CXVI. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is one of those that meet with more 
admirers in this country than any other class of 
buildings. We send throughout the North, South, 
East and West, perhaps twenty similar designed build- 
ings in a year, of this type, varied in their evolutions 
to suit different grounds and surroundings ; also dif- 
ferent plans, the number of rooms, closets, etc., are 
made to suit circumstances ; also changes for different 
kinds of materials to be used in the construction, some 
of wood, as the above, others pointed stone, others 
brick, painted. The beauty rests in the proportions 
and treatment. The house can be built, completely 
finished, with all the modern improvements, hot and 
cold water, heater, and gas pipes throughout, for 
from $4000 to $7000, according to the expensive 
character of the materials used. 

First Floor. — A, parlor, 12 by 18 feet; B, porch; 
D, office, 1 5 by 1 5 feet ; R, kitchen, 1 2 by 1 3 feet 
6 inches ; F, dining-room, 15 by 12 feet. 

Seco7id Floor. — C, principal chamber, 12 by 18 
feet; H, chamber, 15 by 12 feet; P, chamber, 10 by 
1 2 feet ; N, chamber, 15 by 1 5 feet. 



(252) 




( 253 ) 



DESIGN CXVII. 



MODEL COTTAGE. 

This model cottage, treated in the French chateau 
style, is one of those styles that will make a beautiful 
lone house admirably adapted to some situations. 
The house is intended to be built of stone, as high 
as the principal floor; above that of bricks, rubbed 
down and painted. The kitchen department and 
dining-room are in the basement. There are situa- 
tions where such a house could be so placed that the 
approaches to the basement could be above or level 
with the grounds, and, by terraces, form beautiful 
broken grounds. This house will also stand a con- 
siderable amount of shrubbery. The design can be 
built, fully carried out with all its details complete, for 
^5000. But to make its ornaments thin and cheap, 
and make a pasteboard show of it, and finish it 
throughout in the same spirit, would require about 
$2500, with heater, gas, and water accommodations. 
In the article of plumbing alone it may cost ^600 or 
^200. The mantels may cost $400 or $75. Heaters 
may cost $600 or $200. So throughout a house, 
good work and materials always cost more. We 
find in some localities that contractors differ very 
largely in their estimates. The following are the 
dimensions : 

First Floor. — D R, dining-room, 1 8 feet 6 inches by 
21 feet; K, kitchen, 12 by 13 feet; C C, china-closets, 

5 by 6 feet ; A, coal cellar, 1 1 by 12 feet ; D, pantry, 

6 feet 6 inches by 5 feet 6 inches ; E, conservatory, 
8 feet 6 inches by 10 feet. 

Second Floor. — P, parlor, 18 feet 6 inches by 21 
feet ; C, chamber, 1 3 feet 6 inches by 1 1 feet 1 2 
inches ; B, bath-room, 5 feet 6 inches by 8 feet 6 
inches; G, principal chamber, 12 by 13 feet. 
(254) 



DESIGN CXVIII. 



SUBURBAN RESIDENCE. 

This design is intended for a residence in Kansas 
City, Mo. It is to be constructed of bricks, laid flush, 
joints rubbed down and painted. The trimmings 
around the windows, as sills and heads, are to be 
made of sandstone ; also the elevation, as high as the 
principal floor. The porches and cornices are to be 
made of wood or galvanized iron ; the roof of orna- 
mental laid slates, but of one color. The glass used 
in the windows is of the first quality, double thick 
American. The interior is to be finished on the first 
and second floors in chestnut and walnut, with mantels, 
heaters, range, hot and cold water tank, lift pump, 
etc., as is usual in such houses. It will be complete 
in all its parts, and will cost, if built of brick, J8082, 
if built of frame, $6735, at the present cost of mate- 
rials. The first story is twelve feet, and the second 
ten feet in the clear. 

First Floor. — V, vestibule, 4 by 7 feet ; H, stair- 
hall, 27 feet 6 inches by 20 feet 6 inches; P, parlor, 
15 feet 6 inches by 25 feet, full length, including pro- 
jecting window; D R, dining-room, 19 feet 6 inches 
by 1 5 feet 6 inches ; S R, sitting-room, 12 by 1 7 feet ; 
K, kitchen, 14 by 17 feet; Pan, pantry and store-room, 
6 by 6 feet ; it has also a china-closet from back stair- 
Jiall ; the kitchen has a sink, circulating boiler, and 
range with fire-back, also a fine dresser; porches 
and cellar-doors outside, etc. 

Second Floor has four chambers of the following 
(dimensions : — the front chamber is 23 feet by 15 feet ; 
the one over the kitchen is 15 feet 6 inches by 10 feet 
6 inches; the one over the dining-room, 19 feet 6 
inches by 1 5 feet 6 inches ; a small room in the tower, 
8 feet 6 inches by 6 feet. 
(256) 



DESIGN CXIX. 



CHILDREN'S HOME. 

This design is of French Gamber, and was drawn 
for and the building is being erected by the Com- 
missioners of Scioto County, Ohio. Such designs 
are organized entirely for utility and usefulness. No 
extraneous appendages are added but what become 
necessary. The building is treated in the highest 
art of proportion by suitable ornamental shapes ; by 
this process, which is entirely American in spirit, 
parties have given us the credit of introducing sim- 
plicity and common sense in architectural structures. 
The practice of ancient and some modern architects, 
of adding string-courses, colonnades, false windows, 
chimneys, projecting piers, balustrades, etc., for 
simple ornament, without a particle of use, appears 
cowardly, expensive, and frivolous, when viewed by 
intelli^rence of the highest order, for whatever is seen 
in any building that does but deceive the person in 
regard to utility in its structure is a deficiency in 
sense and a lack of the highest principles in art, 
except in monumental work, which, like poetry, con- 
forms to rules not admissible in prose. The engrav- 
ing gives a fair representation of the building, but 
lacks that elegance and breadth that the finished /^^t? 
structure will have. It will cost $25,000. 

Ground Plan. — A, servants' sitting-room, 15 feet 
6 inches by 24 feet ; B, B, play-rooms, 15 feet 6 inches 
by 24 feet, 16 by 23 feet 6 inches; C, laundry, 18 by 
18 feet ; D, drying- room, 8 by 18 feet; E, bake-house, 
20 by 20 feet ; F, pantry, 9 by 1 5 feet 6 inches ; G, 
kitchen, 20 by 24 feet ; H, dining-room, 1 6 by 40 feet; 
a lavatory, 9 feet 6 inches by 16 feet; one water-closet. 

First Floor. — K, parlor, 16 by 24 feet ; L, matron's 
parlor, 16 by 24 feet; M, M, school-rooms, 18 by 24 
feet, 20 feet 6 inches by 30 feet ; N, N, sitting-rooms, 
16 by 25 feet, 16 by 24 feet; O, sewing- room, 16 by 
25 feet; P, chapel, 20 feet 6 inches by 24 feet; Q, 
matron's room, 8 feet 6 inches by 17 feet. 
(258) 



DESIGN CXX. 



CARRIAGE-HOUSE AND STABLE. 

This was designed and built for Mr. Robbins, of 
Merchantville, N. J., — distant three miles from 
Camden. It is very successful and beautiful. 

Description of Diagram, — D, E, H, and K, box 
stalls, II by 14 feet 6 inches ; F and G, open stalls, 
5 by 8 feet 6 inches ; C, harness-room ; A, covered 
shed ; B, open space. 

This design, together with the one on page 98 
(No. XXXIX.), will produce a beautiful combination. 
The plan, as will be seen by the diagram, is a first- 
class arrangement, — the stalls being of that particular 
kind known to horsemen as " box-stalls." They are 
four in number ; and there are also two open stalls, 
with ample room for carriages. 



( 260) 



DESIGN 



cxx. 




(261) 



DESIGN CXXI. 



CEMETERY ENTRANCE. 

This design is an evolution of the Ovo law of 
architecture. It was designed and built for a ceme- 
tery entrance in Lancaster City, Pennsylvania. The 
building is of brick, with rubbed sandstone dress- 
ings. The design was fully carried out in front, but 
was left plain in rear for economy. Professionally, 
we must say that, for its clear proportion, quiet, and 
unobtrusive beauty and fitness for its purpose, we 
have never seen so small a piece of architecture, 
costing so little money, contain half of its quiet, silent, 
reverential beauty. 

This order possesses greater scope and is more in 
feeling with that which Christianity, through the devel- 
opment of the present human mind, is understood to 
teach, — a high morality, a refined and rounded culture, 
a quiet and temperate feeling, with a love for all that 
is pure and good. Lines discordant, harsh, and severe, 
are not in harmony with its rounded sentiments. 

The basement consists of a central carriage-drive, 
15 feet wide, on one side an office, 10 feet 5 inches 
by 18 feet; a stair- hall and stairway, 10 feet 6 inches 
by 12 feet; a receiving- vault, 10 feet 5 inches by 13 
feet 9 inches, properly ventilated ; upon the opposite 
side is a flagged paved passage, 10 feet 5 inches wide, 
with a stairway leading to the chapel, which is 36 
feet by 48 feet 9 inches deep, fitted with plain, neat 
pews. The whole structure cost ^10,000, and is a 
highly ornamental object. This must be considered 
quite a plain evolution of the order, which is capable 
of being made more ornate than any other existing 

style or order of architecture. 

(262) 



DESIGN CXXI. 




( 263 ) 



DESIGN CXXII. 



MEMORIAL ARCHITECTURE. 

This is the Centennial order of architecture. The 
base or platform upon which the columns rest is to 
be sculptured with Indian devices, the Landing of 
Columbus, etc. C, the base of columns, or plinth, 
represents the nations holding possession of portions 
of the Continent, and represented by their coat of 
arms, upon which rests a star-pointed shaft with 
thirteen points, representing the thirteen original 
States which formed the confederacy, each point 
capped with a star above. This is a shaft of thirty- 
seven points, representing the growth of the country. 

The capital is ornamented with leaves and flowers 
of the century-plant, marking by its bloom the one 
hundred years, with the head of the Goddess of 
Liberty in bas-relief ; above this is the entablature, 
ornamented with cannon-balls in bas-relief ; with 
leaves and bloom of the century-plant. The whole 
capped with century-plants in full bloom, the stock 
answering for a flag-pole, from which waves the 
Star-Spangled Banner. The drawing is shown one- 
half in section, the other in elevation ; the distance 
between is the intercolumniation of the order. The 
proportion is extracted from a well-informed Ameri- 
can man. 



(264) 



DESIGN CXXII. 




i8 



(265)