Skip to main content

Full text of "Jewelers' Circular and Horological Review, 1895-1896, Vol. 31 (Part 2)"

See other formats


Staatliche  Uhrmacherschule 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2016 


https://archive.org/details/jewelerscircular00unse_27 


Index  to  advertisements.  largest  Circulation  of  all  the  vewelry  Publications.  The  Connoisseur 

PAGE  30.  Oldest  of  all  the  Jewelry  publications.  2sth  year.  page  45. 


Copyright  by  The  Jewelers’  Circular  Pub.  Co.  189  Broadway.  New  York.  Entered  at  the  Post  Office  in  N.  Y as  second<lass  matter 


VOL.  XXXI.  NEW  YORK,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  6,  1895.  NO.  14. 


FINE  DUPLICATION  OK  A YACHT 


IN  SILVER. 


The  handsomest  piece  of  work,  without 
doubt,  ever  turned  out  by  the  Meriden 
Britannia  Co.  is  now  on  exhibition  at  the 
New  York  store  of  the  company,  208 
Fifth  Ave.  It  is  an  exact  copy  of  the  yacht 
Defender.  Everything  about  the  model  is 
metal,  from  the  sea 
that  curls  away  at 
the  bow  to  the  fine 
rope  in  the  rigging. 

The  workmanship  is 
among  the  finestand 
most  skilful  of  its 
kind  that  has  been 
seen  in  New  York  in 
many  years.  Every 
detail  of  the  boat  is 
carried  out  with  ex- 
actness and  skill. 

The  lines  of  the  hull 
are  preserved,  as  far 
as  they  may  be  seen 
above  the  water  line, 
and  the  sail  plan  is 
exactly  that  of  the 
big  sloop,  but  in  pro- 
portion, of  course,  to 
the  hull  of  the  min- 
iature boat. 

The  miniature 
craft  rests  on  a base 
two  by  four  feet. 

This  base  is  made  to 
represent  a “chop- 
py" sea,  and  the 
effect  is  quite  re- 
markable. Around 
the  base  is  a border 
of  anchors  and 
chains,  set  off  by 
unique  cornerpieces. 

The  hull  of  Defender 

rests  in  the  center  of  the  silver  sea,  and 
seems  to  be  sailing  under  great  headway. 
The  hull  is  of  silver,  the  metal  being  the 
original  color  as  it  comes  out,  lacquered  to 
preserve  the  white  finish  and  leave  the  hull 
white  just  as  the  original  appeared.  The 
ength  of  the  hull  is  30 inches.  The  decks 


are  gold  plated,  and  a guard  rail  of  copper 
runs  all  the  way  around  it.  Upon  the  deck 
are  seen  all  the  hatches  and  all  the  equip- 
ment for  sailing  the  boat,  even  to  a minia- 
ture binnacle  and  compass.  The  steering 
apparatus  is  an  exact  counterpart  of  that 


The  sails  are  of  silver  and  they  are  cut  in 
that  peculiar  style  noticed  on  Defender. 
The  sails  spread  are  as  follows : Mainsail, 
working  topsail,  jib,  jib  staysail  and  jib 
topsail.  The  rigging  is  exactly  the  same 
as  that  on  the  original  sloop. 

The  miniature  was 
built  from  photo- 
graphs and  a wooden 
model  that  was  fur- 
nished by  the  Her- 
r e s h o ff  s . It  was 
constructed  under 
the  direction  of 
Walter  Wilkinson, 
and  the  men  in  the 
factory  were  over 
a month  in  build- 
ing it.  The  model 
as  it  stands  is 
valued  at  about 
$1,000. 


Spoons  in  a 
Museum. 


THE  “ DEFENDER  IN  SILVER.  MERIDEM  BRITANNIA  CO. 


on  the  big  sloop  and  the  wheels  on  it  move 
very  easily. 

The  mast  and  topmast  measure  36  inches 
from  the  deck  to  the  top,  and  the  boom  is 
24  inches  long.  The  mast,  the  boom,  the 
gaff  and  the  bowsprit  are  all  gold  plated, 
while  the  tackle  and  ropes  are  of  silver. 


AC  O L LEC- 
TION of 
spoons  has  been  be- 
queathed  to  the 
Boston  Museum  of 
Fine  Arts  by  J.  W. 
Paige,  and  has  been 
placed  on  exhibition 
in  the  coin  room. 
They  are  of  silver, 
iron,  brass  and  other 
metals,  and  of  wood, 
glass,  horn,  shell, 
coral,  bone,  ivory, 
etc.  All  periods 
from  the  16th  century  to  the  present  day  are 
represented,  and  all  nationalities  as  well, 
comprising  the  German,  French,  English, 
Dutch,  American,  Italian,  Danish,  Persian, 
Polish,  Russian,  Scandinavian,  Arabian, 
Finnish  or  Laplandish,  Venetian,  and 
Oriental  countries,  as  Japan,  India,  etc. 


2 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6 , 1895. 


J 


P0LL©« 

1 


Heigfht,  J6X  ins.  Dial,4^ins.  Width, 8^  ins. 
Eij^ht  Day  Gong  Strike. 

List  Price  - $22.50. 


m 

m 


CHICAGO, 

133  & t35  WABASH  AVE . 


LONDON, 

23  FORE  ST.  E.C. 


THE 

ANSOJVIA  CLOCK  COMPANY, 

11  CI.IFF  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 


CABLE  ADDRESS  "AIMS  ONIA':  P.  O.  B O X 2 3 O 4. 


Nov.  6,  1895 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


3 


Our  is  A Guaranty  of  Quality. 

TRftOE  MARK  ^ OUR  SILVER  IS  925/1000  FINE.  I ^ TRADE  MARK 


Our  Trilby  Hearts  are  Trumps.  Our  Trilby  Chains  Sell  Well  for  Lockets,  Fans  and  Vinaigrettes. 

Our  400  Patterns  of  Silver  Articles  are  useful  for  Wedding  and  Birthday  Gifts  and  Whist  Prizes. 

Our  Hanicure  Sets  and  ITahicure  Goods  are  beautiful,  of  fine  quality  and  low  in  price. 

Our  Toilet  Sets  of  Brushes,  Combs  and  Mirrors  are  fine. 

Our  Bracelets  with  Padlocks,  Sterling  Silver  and  Gold  Plate  sell  well. 

Our  Lockets,  Charms,  Lace  Pins,  Hair  Chain  Mounts,  Vest  Chains,  Link  Buttons,  Mount  Hope  Sleeve  Buttons,  Ear- 
rings,  and  everything  we  make  is  manufactured  expressly  for  you  to  make  some  money  on.  If  you  fail  to  find  our  goods  with  your  jobber 
write  and  we  will  give  you  the  names  of  wholesale  dealers  who  carry  our  goods. 


No.  306.  Desk  Knife  and  Letter  Opener. 

FOSTER  & BAILEY, 

SILVERSMITHS, 

100  Richmond  Street,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  I 


New  York  Office,  Samples  Only 

178  BROADWAY. 


4 


IHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


No'’.  6.  [395. 


Bear  in  mind 


That  WAITE,  THRESHER  COMPANY’S  GOODS  SELL. 

ENOUGH  SAID. 


Regina  Husic  Boxes. 


Having  the  general  agency  for  the 
Regina  Music  Boxes,  I am  in  a position 
to  offer  special  inducements  to  dealers. 

Remember  that  there  is  no  Music  Box 
on  the  market  that  can  compare  with 
the  Regina  in  quality  and  volume  of 
tone,  and  durability  of  construction. 

SEND  FOR  ILLUSTRATED  CATALOGUE  TO 

A.  WOLFF,  General  Agt., 

LINCOLN  BUILDING, 

Cor.  I4th  Street  and  Union  Square,  W.,  N.  Y. 


Jules  Jurgensen 

OP  COPENHAGEN. 

The  reputation  these  watches  have  maintained 
Fifty  Years  has  never  been  equalled^  being  madt 
on  strictly  scientific  principles  and  no  expense  sparedto^ 
rive  the  Best  results  in  mechanism  and  timekeeping 
qualities, 

VOLK  AGENTS. 

fohtt  llydc’s 

No  99  MAIRCN  U«NC. 

- - EMMONS  - - 
ASSOCIATED  LAW  OFFICES. 

PORTl,A!V»,  SEATT1.E,  TACOiWA* 

Oreg-oii.  Wa.Mli.  WaMlt. 

Foreign  Business  a Specialty. 


AIKIN-LAMBERT  JEWELRY  CO..  ” 


IMPORTERS  OF 


DIAMONDS. 


JOBBERS  IN 

Watches,  Jewelry,  Chains, 

NOVELTIES,  ETC. 

Latest  Designs.  Lowest  Prices. 


NEW  YORK. 


AGENTS  FOR 

1 1 ROCKFORD 

'watch  CO, 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


and  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


ii 


GRAPE  VINE. 


) 5 


rH  E S E illus- 
trations show 
,e  Tea,  Dessert 
id  Table  Spoons, 

>essert  and  Table  Forks  and 
so  the  designs  upon  the  back  ^ 
f handles.  f 


Goods  of  this  Pattern  now  ready  for 
delivery. 


This  pattern  cannot  be 
made  in  light  weights. 

The  minimum  being 
1 2 oz.  for  Tea  Spoons. 

18  oz.  for  Dessert  Spoons, 
and  Forks. 

30  oz.  for  Table  Spoons. 

28  oz.  for  Table  Forks. 


A Full  Line  of  Fancy 
Pieces  in  good  weights 

♦ only,  is  made  in  both  plain  and  enameled  finish. 

¥ 


.rw»«iMir'iz  e H A CC  MAKERS  OF  WARES  IN  STERLING  SILVER. 

lOMINICK  & HArr,  for  the  trade  only. 

Broidway  and  SeventeGiith  Street,  Union  Square,  N.  Y. 


MESTABLISHED  1821. 


6 


THE  JEWELERS'  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  i8c,5. 


OUR  LATEST  PATTERN 

Cra?c  /IRarR. 


New  York  — 226  Fifth  Avenue. 
Chicago  — 109=111  Wabash  Avenue. 

San  Francisco — 120  sutter  street. 


R.  Wallace  & Sons  M’F’Q  Co., 

SILVERSMITHS. 


Nov.  6.  1805. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


7 


In  the  same  part  of  the  museum  with  the 
Paige  collection  is  displayed  the  fine  collec- 
tion of  spoons  loaned  by  Miss  Sarah  M 
Spooner,  of  Philadelphia.  In  the  collection 
of  Miss  Spooner  there  is  about  a score  of 
magnificent  modern  enameled  Russian 
spoons,  some  of  which  have  engravings  on 
the  outside  of  the  bowls,  either  with  pictor- 
ial designs  or  arabesques  of  vines,  birds, 
etc.  There  are  numerous  designs  of  Dutch 
and  German  origin,  with  figures  of  human 
beings,  animals,  ships,  etc.,  at  the  end  of 
the  handles,  besides  the  well  known  apostle 
spoons,  without  which  no  collection  is  com- 
plete. 

Who  Was  the  First  Exporter  of  American 
Clocks  to  Europe? 

S.  Bryan  Jerome,  son  of  the  famous  clock 
manufacturer,  Ex-Mayor  Chauncey  Jerome, 
of  New  Haven,  Conn.,  who  died  years  ago, 
writes  to  the  New  Haven  Register  as  fol- 
lows : 

The  story  published  in  your  paper  of  the 
7th  inst.,  giving  a brief  outline  of  the  career 
of  Rocky  Goodrich,  who  recently  died  at 
the  New  Haven  Alms  House,  contained  a 
modicum  of  fact  with  a large  percentage  of 
myth.  It  is  true  that  he  was  a native  of 
Rocky  Hill,  that  he  lived  in  Bristol  and 
Plainville,  also  in  his  later  years  at  New 
Haven.  About  1850  he  became  interested 
in  the  clock  business  at  Forestville,  as  a 
manufacturer,  but  he  was  not  the  first  man 
to  introduce  American  clocks  to  foreign 
parts,  neither  did  he  ever  export  clocks  to 
Europe.  If  the  matter  is  of  any  conse- 
quence, it  is  well  enough  to  give  a correct 
statement  in  regard  to  it.  The  late 
Chauncey  Jerome,  of  New  Haven,  was  the 
first  exporter  of  American  clocks  to  Europe, 
and  to  China.  In  the  year  1842,  he  sent  C. 
Jerome,  Jr.,  and  Epaphroditus  Peck,  of 
Bristol,  to  England  and  James  Hazard  and 
Marcus  Dewitt  Loomis,  of  Sufifield,  to  China 
to  establish  a trade  in  these  markets. 

It  was  about  as  difficult  an  undertaking 
to  accomplish  as  it  was  for  Napoleon  to 
cross  the  Alps,  but  after  years  of  effort,  and 
the  expenditure  of  many  thousands  of  dol- 
lars he  was  successful,  and  laid  the  founda- 
tion for  an  immense  foreign  trade  in  clocks. 
“He  shook  the  bush  ” and  later  manufac- 
turers have  reaped  the  benefit.  Mr.  Jerome 
purchased  clocks  of  -Smith  & Goodrich  of 
Forestville,  and  of  other  manufacturers, and 
exported  them  with  the  goods  made  at  his 
New  Haven  factory.  At  this  time  named 
(1842)  Rocky  Goodrich  was  a young  fellow 
of  27  or  28  years  of  age,  working  at  the 
Birge  clock  factory  in  Bristol.  He  was  a 
“ jolly  good  fellow,”  popular  always  and 
everywhere,  attractive  in  appearance,  a 
good  story  teller,  much  given  to  Mun- 
chausenisms.  The  plausible  tales  in  regard 
to  his  former  wealth, his  enterprise  and  busi- 
ness experience  in  years  long  gone,  told  to 
the  officials  and  the  inmates  of  the  Town 
House,  no  doubt  gained  for  him  among 
them,  a glamour  and  a prominence  im- 
mensely enjoyed  by  him,  but  somewhat 
unusual  amid  such  surroundings. 

S.  B.  Jerome. 


An  Interesting  and  Important  Customs 
Question. 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Oct.  30. — A question 
of  importance  has  arisen  in  the  Treasury 
Department  under  section  6 of  the  tariff 
act  of  1894,  which  provides  “ that  no  article 
'of  imported  merchandise  which  shall  copy 
or  simulate  the  name  or  trademark  of  any 
domestic  manufacture  or  manufacturer  shall 
be  admitted  to  entry  at  any  custom  house 
of  the  United  States.  And  in  order  to  aid 
the  officers  of  the  customs  in  enforcing  this 
prohibition,  any  domestic  manufacturer 
who  has  adopted  trademarks,  may  require 
his  name  and  residence  and  a description  of 
his  trademarks  to  be  recorded  in  books 
which  shall  be  kept  for  that  purpose  in  the 
Department  of  the  Treasury,  under  such 
regulations  as  the  Secretary  of  the  Treasury 
may  prescribe,  and  may  furnish  to  the 
Department  facsimiles  of  such  trademarks; 
and  thereupon  the  Secretary  of  the  Treas- 
ury shall  cause  one  or  more  copies  of  the 
same  to  be  transmitted  to  each  collector  or 
other  proper  officer  of  the  customs.” 

Some  weeks  ago  the  “ Ilgen  Watch  Com- 
pany ” filed  their  trademark  ui  der  the 
provisions  of  the  above  section,  and  three 
days  later  the  “Elgin  Watch  Company” 
filed  a protest  against  allowing  the  first 
named  company  to  register  their  trade- 
mark, on  the  ground  that  the  trademark, 
“Ilgen  Watch  Company,”  is  a simulation 
of  that  of  the  “ Elgin  Watch  Company,” 
and  therefore  is  contrary  to  law.  No  action 
has  yet  been  taken  on  the  subject,  but  it 
seems  probable  that  the  matter  will  be  sent 
to  the  courts  for  determination. 


The  Wind  up  of  the  Rickenbacherjewelry 
Robbery. 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Oct.  30. — James  Ray. 
a saloon  keeper,  has  been  found  guilty  of 
receiving  stolen  property.  On  July  iith 
last  Williams,  alias  “ Blood”  Jones,  a no- 
torious local  colored  crook,  robbed  the  jew- 
elry store  of  Dominick  Rickenbacher,  G 
St.,  between  12th  and  13th  Sts.,  of  a tray 
containing  19  gold  watches.  According  to 
the  testimony  of  Jones,  he  having  some 
time  ago  pleaded  guilty  to  the  charge,  the 
robbery  was  committed  about  noon.  From 
the  store,  he  said,  he  went  at  once  to  Ray’s 


saloon,  and  sold  two  of  the  watches  to  Ray 
for  $5.  With  the  money  he  went  to  Balti- 
more, where  he  met  one  Poindexter,  colored. 

From  Baltimore  the  pair  expressed  the 
remaining  watches  to  New  York,  where 
Poindexter  was  arrested  when  he  called  for 
them.  Subsequently  he  was  turned  over 
to  the  Baltimore  authorities,  who  sent  him 
to  the  penitentiary  for  three  years,  for  dis- 
posing of  stolen  property.  Later  Jones  re 
turned  to  Washington,  surrendered  himself, 
and  has  been  in  jail  since.  Ray  was  ad- 
mitted to  bail  in  the  sum  of  $2,000  and  was 
released  to  await  sentence.  The  penalty 
provided  for  the  offence  is  imprisonment  in 
the  penitentiary  for  not  less  than  one  nor 
more  than  three  years. 

Important  Sale  of  jewelry  to  Take  Place. 

Philadelphia,  Pa.,  Oct.  31. — On  Nov.  19, 
a sale  of  the  magnificent  collection  of  jewels, 
the  property  of  Mrs.  Sarah  A.  Smith,  of  this 
city,  will  take  place  in  New  York.  The 
collection  is  valued  at  $300,000.  The  largest 
piece  is  a corsage  ornament  containing 
about  a hundred  small  diamonds,  and  six  of 
larger  size.  It  is  said  to  have  cost  $50,000. 
There  is  a pair  of  remarkable  pigeon ’s  blood 
ruby  earrings,  set  with  diamonds.  The 
rubies  weigh  between  ii  and  12  karats,  and 
are  surrounded  by  16  white  brilliants,  weigh- 
ing 18  karats.  The  value  is  estimated  at 
$25,000.  A brown  diamond  weighs  seven 
karats.  A table-cut  diamond,  under  which 
is  a portrait,  weighs  44*/^  karats,  and  is 
surrounded  by  20  white  brilliants,  weighing 
15  karats.  A pair  of  large  emeralds,  in  ear- 
rings, weigh  14  karats.  The  weight  of  the 
sapphires  in  another  pair  of  earrings  is  17 
karats.  Still  another  pair  of  sapphire  ear- 
rings weigh  14  karats.  Two  solitaire  dia- 
mond rings  weigh  respectively  eleven  and 
seven  karats. 

There  are  over  a hundred  pieces  of  jew- 
elry, the  more  notable  of  which  are  a bow- 
knot  brooch,  with  large  and  small  dia- 
monds ; a bar  pin  and  earrings,  composed 
of  sapphires  and  diamonds,  and  a massive 
pair  of  dull  gold  bracelets,  made  from 
Hungarian  coin  and  of  Hungarian  manu- 
facture. There  are  a number  of  finger 
rings  of  turquoise,  emerald,  black  and 
white  pearls,  sapphire,  and  diamond,  all  of 
extraordinary  size  and  quality. 


Id  JOHN  S’  NEWYORK’ 


> 

3 ^ 

3’  3* 

0 0 

n JL 

C/3 

.“2 

0 

n 

go 

os 

0 

1 

1 

^ 0. 
0 

r> 

os 

■n 

1 

so 

= 3 

3 3 

“t 

B 

! 

1 

0.  <-K 

3* 

g- 

0 

0 

3 

C/3 

fb 

OS  3 

3 >3 

3* 

■t 

CfQ 

§ 2. 

C/3 

3* 

0.  0 

8 


IHF  jHWni.  Rk,'  (;!kCU!AK 


Nriv.  6.  1805. 


No  80.  Fine  Nickel  Movement,  17  Ruby 
Jewels  in  Gold  settings,  Safety  Pinion, 
Hardened  and  Tempered  Breguet  Hair- 
Spring,  Compensation  Balance,  Adjusted 
to  heat,  cold  and  positions;  Patent  Regu- 
lator, Double  Sunk  Dial. 


No.  58.  Nickel,  ii  Jewels,  “afety  Pinion, 
Compensation  Balance,  Top  Plate 
Jeweled  in  Settings. 


No.  40.  Fine  Nickel  Movement,  17  Ruby 
Jewels  in  Gold  settings.  Safety  Pinion, 
Hardened  and  Tempered  Breguet  Hair- 
Spring,  Compensation  Balance.  Adjusted 
to  heat,  cold  and  positions.  Patent  Regu- 
lator, Double  Sunk  Dial. 


No. 53.  Nickel  Movement.  15  Jewels  in  Gold 
settings,  Safetv  Pinion,  Hardened  and 
Tempered  Breguet  Hair-Spring,Compen- 
sation.  Balance  Patent  Regulator, 
Double  Sunk  Dial. 

No.  60. 
First 
Q u al  ity 
N i c k e 1 
M o V e - 
ment.  17 
Ruby 
Jewels  in 
Gold  set- 
tings. 
Safety 
P i n i on, 
C ompen- 
s a t i o n 
B alance, 
H a rden- 

ed  and  Tempered  Breguet  Hair-Spring, 
Fully  Adjustrf,  Double  Sunk  Dial. 


THE  PRESIDENT 


THE  PEERLESS  RAILROAD  WATCH 

18  Size,  Double  Roller  Escapement,  17  Jewels,  Lever  Setting,  Matheson’s 
Patent  Regulator,  Fully  Adjusted,  and  Finely  Finished 
in  all  its  Parts. 


United  States  Watch  Co., 
Waltham,  Mass. 

New  York  Office,  Chicago  Office, 

46  Maiden  Lane.  Venetian  Building. 

To  the  Watch  Jobber  tsB  Retailer 


We  invite  your  examination  of  the  merits  of  I'NI'l'Kl> 
ST.A'I'KS  ICVrs,  their  design,  finish  and  time-keeping 

qualities.  These  movements  have,  on  merit  alone,  won  a firm  place, 
their  sale  having  steadily  increased  each  year  since  1883,  until  even  in 
these  times  of  slow  trade,  steps  are  being  taken  to  materially  increase 
our  factory  at  Waltham.  Mass.,  U-  S.  A.  How  has  this  been 
achieved  ? Simply  by  building  a watch  on  honor,  a watch  that 
makes  good  the  warranty  of  the  Retailer,  by  its  accurate  performance 
in  the  pockets  of  the  consumer.  How  can  watches  made  by  the  cart- 
load, as  it  were,  where  machinery  is  expected  to  do  the  work  of  man’s 
brain,  reasonably  be  expected  to  epitomize  essential  results  Recog- 
nizing as  just  the  criticism  that  too  much  “ labor  saving  machinery  ’ 
is  a greater  evil  than  too  little,  we  have  studiously  observed  the  line 
where  the  use  of  machinery  properly  ends  and  human  judgment  and 
responsibility  begins.  As  a consequence  UXITED  STA'I'llsi 
WA  l’CtlES  embody  all  the  advantages  derived  from  the  employ- 
ment of  the  most  modern  automatic  devices,  supplemented  by  the 
supervision  and  labor  of  the  most  skilled  and  conscientious  working 
people  Result—"  The  best  watch,  grade  for  grade,  on  the  market.” 
Our  movements  comprise  complete  lines  of  18  Size 
and  Open  Face  and  H and  16  Size  lliiniing^  in  all  grades 
from  7 to  17  Jewels,  both  Nickel  and  Gilded. 

Our  Spec  al  Itailroad  Vl<»venieiit.  “ 'I'lie  Pr€‘»idenl," 

has  already  taken  rank  at  the  forefront  of  Perfecily  KeliRble 
'I'iniepieceR.  No  movement  on  the  market  excells  it  in  finish  of  all 
its  parts ; it  is  made  for  r>ine,  not  merely  to  catch  the  eye,  yet  it  se- 
cures both. 

New  lb'  Size  Thin  Model  Now  Ready  for  Delivery. 

OUR  FACTORY  AT  WALTHAM,  MASS.,  IS  THE  BEST 
EQUIPPED  AND  MOST  MODERN  WATCH  MANU- 
FACTURING PLANT  IN  AMERICA. 


No.  63.  Gilded,  it  Jewels  in  Gold 
Settings,  Safety  Pinion,  Compen- 
sation Balance,  Sunk  Second  Dial. 


No.  69.  Nickeled,  Damaskeened  7 
Jewels,  Safety  Pinion,  Compen- 
sation Balance. 


No.  79.  First  Quality  Nickel  Movement, 
17  Ruby  Jewels  in  Gold  Settings,  Safety 
Pinion,  Hardened  and  Tempered  Breguet 
Hair-Spring.Compensation  Balance,  Ad- 
justed to  Heat,  t old.  Positions  and 
Isochronism.  Patent  Regulator.  Double 
Sunk  Dial.  This  movement  is  specially 
adapted  fur  Railway  Servic**. 


No.  57.  Gilded,  15  Jewels  in  settings. 
Safety  Pinion.  Compensation  Balance, 
Plain  Regulator,  Hardened  and  Tem- 
pered Hair  Spring. 


No.  52.  Fine  Nickel  Movement,  17  Jewels 
in  Gold  settings.  Double  Roller  Escape- 
ment, Nickel  Train  Wheels,  Safety 
Pinion,  Hardened  and  Tempered  Bre- 
guet Hair-Spring,  Compensation  Bal- 
ance. Adjusted.  Patent  Regulator, 
Double  Sunk  Dial. 


No.  104.  16  Size.  Nickel.  17  Jewels  (5  pairs 
in  settingsi,  Breguet  Hair-Spring,  Mi- 
crometer Regulator,  Double  Sunk  Dial. 


No.  64. 
Nickel,  II 
Jewels, 
Safety 
Pinion, 
Compen- 
sation 
Balance. 
Top  Plate 
Teweled 
in  settings. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


9 


The  Suit  of  Stein  & Ellbogen  Co.  vs.  W.  H. 

Thompson. 

Des  Moines,  la.,  Oct.  31. — Prior  to  June  i 
1891,  W.  H.  Thompson  was  the  owner  of  a 
stock  of  jewelry  in  Cedar  Rapids.  On  that 
day  he  borrowed  of  the  City  National  Bank 
$1,000  for  which  he  gave  a note  with 
surety,  and  Thompson  at  the  same 
time  made  to  plaintiff  a mortgage  on 
the  stock  of  jewelry  to  indemnify  him 
against  loss.  This  mortgage  was  not  placed 
on  record  until  May  5,  1893.  The  note  to 
the  bank  was,  from  time  to  time,  renewed, 
with  plaintiff  as  surety,  the  mortgage  re- 
maining for  his  protection. 

While  the  mortgage  was  so  held,  and 
before  it  was  placed  on  record,  Stein  & 
Ellbogen  Co.,  Chicago,  without  knowledge 
of  the  mortgage,  sold  to  Thompson  goods  on 
credit,  for  which,  about  May  5,  1893,  there 
was  a balance  due  of  $169.28.  On  May  9, 
1893,  by  a written  bill  of  sale,  Thompson  as- 
signed to  the  bank  his  entire  stock  of 
goods  for  the  averred  consideration  of  hav- 
ing paid  the  bank  note  and  assumed  the 
payment  of  some  $780  of  rent  secured 
by  a landlord’s  lien  on  the  stock  of  goods. 
About  May  20,  1893,  Stein  & Ellbogen  Co. 
commenced  a suit,  aided  by  attachment, 
and  seized  the  stock  of  goods  through  the 
defendant  sheriff.  Their  action  was  to 
recover  the  possession  or  value  of  the  goods 
by  the  plaintiff  as  owner  under  his  pur- 
chase. 

The  defendant  answered,  setting  up  the 


fact  as  to  the  mortgage  and  its  being  with- 
held from  record;  the  extending  of  credit 
without  knowledge  of  the  mortgagee,  aver- 
ring the  transaction  to  have  been  fraudu- 
lent, and  that  if  a sale  was  made  the  con- 
sideration therefor  was  the  same  as  that 
for  the  mortgage,  and  that  the  bill  of  sale 
was  made  in  payment  of  or  in  lieu  of  the 
chattel  mortgage,  and  with  the  intent  to 
hinder  and  delay  the  creditors  of  Thomp- 
son. Issues  were  tried  to  a jury  that  re- 
turned a verdict  for  defendant,  and  the 
plaintiff  appealed. 

The  Supreme  Court  now  affirms  the  de- 
cision of  the  District  Court. 


Death  of  Joseph  Charles  Whitehouse. 

Joseph  Charles  Whitehouse.  who  since 
his  arrival  in  America,  from  Birmingham, 
England,  nearly  30  years  ago, has  been  con- 
nected with  Tiffany  & Co.,  New  York,  died 
on  Wednesday  evening  last,  after  an  illness 
extending  over  10  months.  Deceased  was 
born  in  Handsworth,  Staffordshire, England, 
Dec.  13,  1838.  He  learned  the  watchmak- 
ing trade  with  Wood  & Son,  the  well-known 
old  Birmingham  firm  of  watchmakers,  and 
soon  became  very  proficient  in  his  craft. 
At  the  age  of  27  years  he  came  to  this 
country,  and  immediately  accepted  an  en- 
gagement with  Tiffany  & Co.,  whose  estab- 
lishment at  that  time,  1866,  was  located  at 
550-552  Broadway.  His  position  at  Tiffany’s 
brought  him  in  touch  with  most  of  the 


patrons  of  the  house  of  the  last  quarter 
century,  among  whom  his  amiability  was  as 
warmly  appreciated  as  it  was  among  his 
late  associates  in  business. 

Mr.  Whitehouse  was  a man  of  diversified 
interests.  Robust  himself,  he  was  a lover 
of  all  athletic  sports,  and  his  sunny,  poetic 
temperament  frequently  found  expression 
in  verses  contributed  to  the  daily  and 
periodical  press.  The  day  after  Christmas 
last  year,  he  caught  cold  ; an  attack  of 
grip  followed ; and  after  many  months’ 
suffering,  leakage  of  the  heart  and  other 
complications  set  in,  which  terminated 
fatally  on  Wednesday  evening. 

The  deceased  was  a brother  of  James  H. 
Whitehouse,  the  well-known  artist  of 
Tiffany  & Co.  He  leaves  a wife  and  one 
daughter.  The  funeral  services  were  held 
at  his  late  residence,  631  Lafayette  Ave., 
Brooklyn,  Friday  evening.  The  interment 
at  Greenwood  Cemetery  on  Saturday  was 
private. 


Furnishing  Silver  Plated  Ware  to  The 
New  York  Navy  Yard. 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Oct.  31. — Bids  were 
opened  at  the  Bureau  of  Supplies  and  Ac- 
counts, Navy  Department,  Oct.  29th,  for 
furnishing  the  New  York  Navy  Yard  with 
plated  ware.  The  bidders  were  as  follows  : 
Gorham  Mfg.  Co.,  New  York,  $620.88; 
Wilcox  Silver  Plate  Co.,  Meriden,  Conn., 
$572  81;  Manhattan  Supply  Co.,  New  York, 
$546.84. 


Leon  J.  Qlaenzer  & Co., 


80  & 82  Chambers 


Clocks  and  Regulators, 
Bronzes, 

Lamps  and  Globes, 
Fine 

Austrian 

Glassware, 
Fine  Teplitz  Vases, 


New  York* 

Onyx  Pedestals, 

Fine  Porcelains, 
Delft  Pottery, 

Bric-a-Brac, 
Sevres  Goods, 

Cabinets,  Etc. 


FALL  NOVELTIES. 


0 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6.  1895. 


“(lABOON”  “KONGO”  “NASSAU” 


USED  EXCLUSIVELY  IN  OUR  PRODUCTIONS. 


MANUrAGTURERS 


Nov.  6,  1895.  AND  HORQLOGICAL  REVIEW. 

DETT SCH  BROS.  7 E.  17th  ST.,  N. 


#Our  productions  for  the  present  sea= 
son  embrace  many  articles  original  in 
conception,  unique  in  design,  and  exclu= 
sive  in  the  character  of  the  Leather  and  the 
Silver  ornamentations. 


[[uiEii  tim 


12 


TUC  irwrlHRS’  circular 


Nov.  6,  18^5. 


SEND  BUSINESS  CARD 

FOR  OUR 


Jewelry  and  Silver  Fashions  oF 
the  Fall  Season. 


New  Illustrated 


REDUCED  FAC-SIMILE  OF  COVER. 

Catalogue  and  Price  List 

OF 

Intercliangealile  Cyliniler  Musical  Boxes 

JUST  ISSUED. 

JACOT  & SON, 

39  UNION  SQUARE.  NEW  YORK. 


A LADY'S  RAMBLES  AMONG  THE  JEWELERS. 

Miniatures  painted  on  ivory  are  hand- 
somely framed  for  standing  about  in  boudoir 
and  parlor. 

* 

Silver  deposit  on  glass  continues  to  find 
favor  with  a numerous  class  of  patrons. 

* 

Chatelaine  bags  made  of  uncut  velvet  and 
mounted  with  silver,  gilded  and  enameled, 
are  decidedly  elegant  in  appearance. 

* 

Hatpins  grow  in  elaborateness.  A round 
ball  is  one  of  the  favorite  conceits  in  this- 
line. 

* 

Watch  chains  of  colored  enamel  are  migrat- 
ing here  from  Paris. 

* 

A satisfactory  and  up-to-date  finger  ring: 
is  the  hoop  with  three  or  five  stones. 

•Si- 

Beautiful  effects  are  gained  on  some  of 
the  new  silver  pitchers  and  chocolate  jugs, 
by  the  employment  of  etching. 

* 

A galvanic  coating  of  silver  appears  on, 
articles  of  fine  china  for  the  toilet. 

♦ 

Diamond  earrings  with  pearl  drops  are- 
included  [among  the  new  things  of  the 
season. 

* 

There  is  a demand  for  letter  seals,  whicb 
is’ supplied  with  gold  and  silver  affairs- 
that  add  decorative  effect  to  milady’s 
writing  desk. 

* 

There  is  no  attempt  at  disguising  the 
employment  of  substitutes  for  real  gems. 
There  is  every  variety  of  repetition  of  prec- 
ious stones  in  popular  priced  imitations. 

Among  attractions  for  the  boudoir  |are 
Dresden  china  atomizers  on  silver  mounts, 
and  bearing  the  familiar  miniature  on  their 
bowls. 

* 

Novelty  at  a comparatively  modest  cost 
is  achieved  in  a score  of  captivating  ways 
in  jewelry  that  employs  small  olivines  and 
brilliants. 

c- 


— (O'j  i auiiKTjS  €2^ — 


As  the  holiday  season  approaches,  in- 
creased attention  is  given  to  toilet  sets  and 
fancy  knick-knacks  in  French  and  Dresden 
china,  and  in  crystal  with  rich  gold  deco- 
rations. 

•» 

Silver  mounted  morocco  bags,  in  club 
style,  vie  with  the  cabin  bag  for  the  patron- 
age of  globe  trotters. 

The  “ cabin-bag  ” is  just  now  the  swag- 
ger thing  for  travelers.  It  has  a great 
capacity  for  holding  things,  and  is  brought 
out  in  all  sizes  and  leathers.  Many  of  these 
bags  are  mounted  in  silver  and  are  fitted 
with  compartments  for  holding  silver 
mounted  toilet  articles. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


13 


WE  CARRV  A FULL  LINE. 


1 ^ 

HIS  STYLE 
OF  DECORATION 
HAS  A MARVELOUS 
SUCCESS. 


lal  i al>^otfegy,  - 


Pro(i\  pei\ou/t\^  n\dl^eK5  at 

riorence,Ba55ai\o  ^Naples, 

Comprisirv^  tfve\i/apes  f^oVe^, 
Qii\oPi  ,l/pbii\o , Isparvei-'Areibo  M 


FOR  JEWELERS 


WE  DISPLAY  THE  LATEST  STYLES  IN  POTTERY. 

endless  variety.  Cloisonne  Enamel  Writing  Sets 
Y V and  Card  Receivers. 

BRONZES,  Choice  Selections. 

■p\ O p?  C pr XT  Statuettes  and  Figures  in  Old  Dresden, Vienna  and  Dresden  Vases, 

Dresden  Central  Draft  and  other  Lamps,  an  Immense  Assortment. 


BAWO  (So  DOTTER, 

Importers,  Manufacturers  and  Commission  Merchants, 

26,  28,  30  and  32  Barclay  Street,  p.  o.  box  is72.  NEW  YORK. 


OUR  MOTTO  : QUALITY  AND  PRICE  SPEAK  LOUDER  THAN  WORDS. 


14 


THb  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


Since  the  Duchess  of  York  set  the  fash- 
ion, the  bracelet  has  become  a favorite  be- 
trothal gift  among  Anglomaniacs. 

* 

A style  of  chasing  quite  distinctive  from 
the  conventional  repousse  decoration,  is 
represented  in  a new  toilet  ware  pattern. 

* 

As  the  hair  creeps  down  into  the  nape  of 
the  neck,  there  comes  into  use  a narrow  ban- 
deaux with  feathery  aigrettes  that  rise  from 
the  forehead  and  obviate  the  flat  appear* 
ance  of  the  crown. 

* 

Special  pieces  in  silver,  such  as  loving 
cups  and  vases,  are  rendered  specially  at- 
tractive this  season  with  a decoration  that 
employs  different  colored  gilding,  enamels, 
jewels  and  etching.  These  novelties  must 
be  seen  to  be  appreciated. 

Earrings  are  in  again,  not  only  the  single 
stones  but  the  long  drops  of  our  grand- 
mothers. These  latter  are  being  made 
abroad  in  emeralds,  with  diamond  tops, 
often  intermingled  with  pearls. 

Elsie  Bee. 


Details  of  the  Failure  of  Richards  & 
Rutishauser. 

Chicago,  111.,  Nov.  i. — Richards  & Ru- 
tishauser, a catalogue  and  circular  house, 
confessed  judgment  Oct.  25th,  to  Mary  E. 
Rutishauser,  mother  of  the  junior  partner, 
for  $5,090  74.  The  day  following  an  assign- 
ment was  made.  They  had  but  small 
capital  and  were  being  carried  by  money 
furnished  by  Mrs.  Rutishauser.  The  firm 
at  one  time  did  a local  retail  business,  en- 
tering the  catalogue  business  about  five 
years  ago. 

An  inventory  of  stock  was  completed 
Thursday  but  the  result  has  not  been  an- 
nounced. It  is  thought  the  assets  will  be 
about  $10,000;  liabilities  not  known.  It 
would  seem  that  there  is  little  for  unsecured 
creditors.  Light  sales  for  some  time  past 
caused  the  failure. 

The  sheriff  is  in  possession  by  virtue  of  a 
writ  of  execution  in  favor  of  Mrs.  Rutis- 
hauser and  sale  is  set  for  Nov.  4th,  10  o’clock 
A.  M.,  at  601  Columbus  building. 


Palmiter  & Smith  have  succeeded  C.  E. 
Palmiter,  Watertown,  N.  Y.  Fred  Smith  is 
a watchmaker,  jeweler  and  diamond  setter. 


Capture  of  a New  York  Jewelry  Thief  in 
Colon. 

A dispatch  to  New  York  from  Colon, 
Colombia,  dated  Oct.  29th,  stated  that  the 
United  States  Consul  of  that  city  had 
arrested  Joseph  Reiss,  who  arrived  their 
from  New  York  on  board  the  Allianga. 
The  arrest  was  made  upon  the  authority 
of  a telegram  from  the  Police  Department 
of  New  York,  charging  Reiss  with  grand 
larceny. 

Reiss  is  wanted  for  stealing  $i,goo  worth 
of  jewelry  from  L.  S.  Friedberger,  484 
Broadway.  Mr.  Friedberger  went  to  Police 
Headquarters  on  Oct.  21  and  reported  that 
Reiss  had  called  on  him  the  previous  day 
and  obtained  $1,900  worth  of  watches,  dia- 
monds and  other  articles  of  jewelry  on 
memorandum.  He  was  to  return  the  jewelry 
or  pay  for  it  within  an  hour.  He  was  not 
seen  again  and  detectives  discovered  that 
he  had  sailed  for  Aspinwall  and  word  was 
telegraphed  to  the  United  States  Consul. 


Rothstein  & Lippman  Bros.,  Bradford, 
Pa.,  opened  their  elegant  new  jewelry  store 
on  Nov.  ist  and  2d.  They  donated  10  per 
cent,  of  the  sales  of  those  two  days  to  the 
Bradford  hospital. 


For  Christmas  ^ « Gorham  Santa  Claus  Spoon 


For  sale  by  all  the  better  class  of  Jewelers, 


Too  good  for  Dry  Goods  Stores — 
Jewelers  only. 


Sterling  Silver,  -----  $1.00 

Sterling  Silver,  Gilt  bowl,  - - 1.25 

Sterling  Silver.  Gilt  all  over,  1.50 


Never  a question  ot 
quality  if  this  trade- 
mark is  stamped  on 
Silverware, 


Gorham  Manufacturing  Company,  Broadway  and  19th  street,  Mew  York. 


The  above  is  an  imprint  of  an  advertisement  which  is  to  appear  in  the  DECEMBER 

issues  of  the  following  publications : 


DEMOREST’S, 

CENTURY, 

CHAUTAUQUAN, 

LIPPINCOTT’S, 


COSMOPOLITAN, 
McCLURE’S 
ST,  NICHOLAS, 
MUNSEY’S, 


ILLUSTRATED  AMERICAN^ 
YOUTH’S  COMPANION, 
LADIES’  HOME  JOURNAL, 
SCRIBNER’S, 


Which  have  a combined  circulation  of 


3,058,000  Copies. 

PRICES  TO  THE  TRADE  ON  APPLICATION. 

GORHAM  MANUFACTURING  COiTPANY, 

SILVERSniTHS, 

Broadway  and  Nineteenth  St.,  New  York  City. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW 


15 


A.  WITTNAUER, 

SUCCESSOR  TO  J.  EUGENE  ROBERT  & CO. 

IMPORTER  AND  MANUFACTURER  OF  WATCHES. 

19  HAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

EXTENSIVE  LINES  IN 

New  and  attractive  designs  of  small  size  watches  at 

various  prices. 


Enameled  in  all  suitable  colors, 
with  and  without  handsome 
diamond  or  pearl  decorations. 

ACTUAL  SIZE. 


WotGlunan's  Irapioued  Time  Detector 

12  and  24  Different  Keys  with 
Safety  Lock  Attachments. 


l^.S.  Patents  1875-6  and  7.  Reissued,  1880 
This  Watchman’s 
Time  Detector  con- 
tains all  latest  im 
provements.  The 
only  perfect  instru- 
ment in  the  market. 
It  cannot  be  tamp- 
ered with  success- 
fully. Warranted 
in  every  way 


Send  for  circular 


E.  IMHAUSER, 


STERN  BROS.  & CO., 

CUTTERS  AND 

IRPORTEKS  OF 

DWnONDS. 

CUTTING  WORKS:  29  to  43  Gold  St. 

LONDON  OFFICE:  29  Ely  Place. 


Cor.  John  and  Nassau  Sts. 
NEW  YORK. 


r\ELI5HEK  &r  FETTER. 

128  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

WALL  AND  COUNTER  CASES, 

FOR  JEWELRY,  SILVER- 
WARE, ETC. 


WE  make  to  order  only,  and  guarantee  our  work  to  be 
Dust  Proof  and  First-Class  in  all  its  details,  and  to 
have  all  the  Latest  Improvements  as  regards  Shelf 
Artrtngements,  Electric  Lights,  Etc.  We  will  cheerfully 
furnish  Estimates  and  Sketches  for  any  store  free  of  charge. 

CALL  AND  GEE  US. 


OUR  NEW  CATALOGUE 


HANDSOMELY  ILLUSTRATED,  SHOWING 
300  NEW  PATTERNS  OF 


6313 


SOLID  GOLD, 
GOLD  FILLED 
SILVER 
CASES. 

WILL  BE 

SENT  FREE 

TO  ANY  LEGITIMATE 
. JEWELER. 


b uO 


COURVOISIER,  WILCOX  MFQ.  CO., 

21  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 


16 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


KfflDT  FOR  T6UR  inSFECTIQn  !l 

. . THE  LINE  OF  - - 

Art  Furniture 

AND 

Hall  Clock  Cases. 

especially  adapted  for  the 

JEWELRY  and  art  TRADES. 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

Geo.  W.  Smith  & Co., 

MAKERS  OF 

ART  FURNITURE. 

Factory:  ^907-iq  POWELTON  AVE., 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 

NEW  YORK  OFFICE  818  BROADWAY, 

AND  H.  P.  VOLLMER, 

SALESROOMS.  Manager. 


THE  QUESTION  V 

WILL  IT  TARNISH  • Need 
not  De  asked  if  your  Tissue  Paper  bears 
this  'abel. 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

C.  H.  Dexter  Sons, 

W/NDSOR  LOCKS,  CONN. 

< BE  SURE  YOU  GET  THIS  BRAND  I> 

It  has  been  adopted  and  is  now  used  by  the  leading 
manufacturers  of  this  country. 


AIKLIINT,  CO., 

"x^7r"7s“  o"® Fine  Gold  Pens,  = Holders,  = Pencils,  = Picks 

AND  NOVELTIES  IN  GOLD,  SILVER  AND  PLATE. 

Having  increased  ttie  size  of  our  factory  we  are  prepared  to  make  larger  quantities  of  goods  than  ever.  Every  pen  carefully  tested  and  fully  warranted. 


CHICAGO  BRANCH:  103  State  Street, 
S.  N.  JENKINS,  Manager. 


GENERAL  AGENTS  FOR 
PAUL  E.  WIRT  FOUNTAIN  PENS. 


19  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


i6-a 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


Trial  of  the  Sensational  Libel  Case  in 
Canada. 

Toronto,  Can.,  Oct.  31. — The  suit  of  the 
American  Watch  Case  Co.,  Toronto,  vs.  W. 
F.  Doll,  for  libel  in  which  damages  of 
$5,000  are  claimed  has  been  on  trial  this 
week  at  the  Assize  Court,  before  Judge 
Rose  and  a special  jury  of  business  men. 
The  trial  commenced  on  Monday.  Wm. 
Lount,  Q.  C.,  and  J.  R.  Roaf  appeared  as 
counsel  for  the  plaintiffs  and  the  defendant 
Doll  conducted  his  own  case.  The  case  is 
one  of  long  standing,  the  cause  of  action 
having  originated  in  1893.  On  the  previous 
trial  which  lasted  for  eight  days,  the  jury 
disagreed. 

Mr.  Lount  in  opening  the  case  read  ex- 
tracts to  the  jury  from  a pamphlet  published 
by  the  defendant  entitled  “ Karats,”  which 
he  pointed  out  charged  the  company  with 
putting  upon  the  market  goods  represented 
to  be  of  a quality  superior  to  what  they 
actually  were.  It  was  also  part  of  the  com- 
plaint that  Doll  petitioned  Parliament  to 
the  effect  that  the  manufactures  of  the 
company  are  similar  in  everything  but 
quality  to  those  of  the  American  Waltham 
Watch  Co.,  of  Waltham,  and  that  he  dis- 
played statements  reflecting  on  the  plain- 
tiffs, together  with  specimens  of  their 
goods  in  a store  window  in  the  Ro  sin 
House  block.  The  placards  containing 
these  statements  were  exhibited  in  court. 

W.  F.  McLean,  M.  P.,  and  proprietor  of 
the  Toronto  World  testified  that  he  had  re- 
fused to  publish  some  of  Doll’s  communica- 
tions on  the  ground  that  they  might  lay 
him  open  to  a charge  of  libel. 

T.  W.  Dyas,  of  the  Mail,  testified  to  the 
publication  in  that  paper  of  police  court 
proceedings  when  Mr.  Doll  had  W.  K.  Mc- 
Naught,  of  the  American  Watch  Case  Co., 
up  on  a charge  of  false  pretenses. 

Edwin  Pearson,  insurance  agent,  swore 
ihat  after  the  fire  at  the  company ’s  works, 
Doll  warned  him  that  he  might  be  imposed 
■on  in  the  adjustment. 

Mr.  Doll  said  he  was  prepared  to  justify 
all  the  charges  he  had  made. 

W.  K.  McNaught,  of  the  American  Watch 
Case  Co.,  was  called  and  requested  to  read 
a number  of  articles  from  his  paper,  the 
Trader,  with  the  object  of  showing  that 
the  company  made  certain  representations 
as  to  the  quality  of  their  goods.  A large 
number  of  watches  were  put  in  as  exhibits. 
Mr.  McNaught  was  subjected  to  a long  and 
close  examination  by  Mr.  Doll,  to  show 
that  the  goods  were  not  as  represented,  be- 
ing in  the  box  all  Tuesday.  With  regard 
to  the  “ J^Iohawk  ” case  he  said  on  cross- 
e.xamination  that  it  was  a brass  case  gilded 
and  sold  for  $2  So,  which  price  he  claimed 
should  be  sufficient  to  show  to  anyone  that 
it  was  not  gold. 

G.  R.  Wellings,  manufacturing  jeweler, 
testified  for  the  defence  that  he  had  assayed 
one  of  the  plaintiffs’  watch  cases  stamped 
14 karats.  If  it  were  melted  all  together, 
that  is  the  springs,  crown  and  center  which 
are  not  solid  gold,  the  case  would  assay 
about  7 karats. 


Sells 


SILVER  PLATE  AND  DECORATED  PORCELAIN  BACK  MIRROR  AND  BRUSH. 


at  sight 

at  retail  for  $5  for  the  set. 


LEVY,  DREYFUS  & CO., 


Clocks,  Art  Bric=a-Brac  and  Novelties  for  Jewelers. 

9 & II  MAIDEN  LANE,  N.  Y. 


FOR  WANT  OF  SPACE  ALL  OUR  CUT  CLASS  WILL  BE  SOLD  IN 
ASSORTMENTS  OF  $50  AND  UPWARDS  AT 

VAKIETY  SUFFICIENT  TO  SUIT  ALL  CLASSES  OF  TRADE. 


COST. 


A,  J.  HEDGES  & CO., 

MANUF'ACXUI^ERS  OF 


♦ ♦ ♦ 

Black  and  White  Enameled 
Goods  a Specialty'. 

VEIL  PINS,  SCARF  PINS,  HAT  PINS,  LACE 
PINS  AND  BROOCHES. 

GOLD  AND  SILVER  GARTER  BUCKLES. 
CHATELAINES,  SIDE  COMBS,  LINK  BUTTONS. 

6 MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

FACTORY: 


VEIL.  PIN 


00  MECHANIC  ST.. 


NEWAT^K,  N J. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


\6-i 


Nov.  6,  1395. 


No.  2051.  Tea  Set. 


No.  2054.  Coffee  Set. 


- SILVER 
PLATE 


THAT  LOOKS  AND 
WEARS  LIKE 


STERLING 

SILVER.’' 


THE 

Homnn 


Silver  Plele  Co„ 


FACTORY:  CINCINNATI,  O. 


Chicago:  New  York: 

J55  STATE  STREET.  304  FOURTH  AVENUE.. 


Nov.  6 1S95. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


17 


Chas.  Cameghan,  jeweler,  was  handed  a 
“Lion”  caseandasked  what  grade  it  was.  He 
said  he  believed  it  w'as  less  than  10  karats, 
and  the  springs,  bow  and  crown  were  not 
solid  gold.  On  cross-examination  he  was 
handed  a jobber’s  list  representing  the 
“ Lion  ” case  at  8.10  karats,  and  asked  if  it 
was  a fair  representation.  He  replied  that 
it  was.  A “ filled  ” crown  was  known  as  a 
gold  crown  in  the  trade.  In  re-examination, 
he  said  in  regard  to  another  price  list  which 
described  this  case  as  having  a gold  bow  and 
solid  crown,  that  if  purchasing  from  it,  he 
would  expect  to  get  a solid  gold  bow  and 
filled  crown. 

J.  Benfield,  New  York,  was  called  in  re- 
buttal. On  being  shown  some  of  the  cases 
manufactured  by  the  American  Watch  Case 
Co.  and  others  of  the  same  grade  manufac- 
tured in  the  United  States,  he  said  the 
former  compared  favorably  with  those 
made  across  the  border.  On  cross  examin- 
ation witness  said  that  if  he  bought  a case 
stamped  as  gold  he  would  expect  to  find  it 
all  gold  with  the  exception  of  the  springs 
and  crown.  If  he  stamped  a case  14  karat, 
the  center  would  be  solid  gold.  The  center 
of  the  case  produced  was  not  solid  gold. 
A case  of  United  States  manufacture  was 
handed  him  and  he  was  asked  if  the  center 
was  solid  gold.  After  testing  it  with  acid 
he  replied:  “Yes.” 

It  is  expected  that  the  case  will  be  con- 
cluded this  week. 


Henry  A.  Williams’  Store  Closed  by  the 
Sheriff. 

Syracuse,  N.  Y.,  Nov.  i. — Deputy  sheriff 
P.  F.  Cahill  closed  the  jewelry  store  of 
Henry  A.  Williams,  at  348  S.  Salina  St.,  late 
Monday  afternoon  on  three  executions 
issued  upon  as  many  judgments  that  were 
filed  in  the  County  Clerk's  office  just  before. 
Mr.  Williams  came  here  last  Spring  from 
Camden,  N.  Y.,  and  occupied  a part  of  the 
store  with  Warren  D.  Tallman,  a drug- 
gist, who  recently  failed. 

The  judgments  were  all  on  promissory 
notes,  and  were  taken  on  compromise. 
One  was  in  favor  of  Adellia  P.  Williams 
for  $1,041. 73  recovered  upon  a note  given 
on  demand  and  dated  July  5,  1895.  An- 
other of  the  judgments  was  in  favor  of  Bet- 
sey C.  Russell  for  $279,59  on  a note  dated 
Oct.  14  last,  and  made  payable  one  day 
after  date.  The  other  judgment  was  in 
favor  of  Sarah  M Crumb  for  $827.43,  on  a 
note  dated  Aug.  29  last,  and  payable  one 
day  after  date. 


= = THE  = = 

C.  R.  Smith  Plating  Co. 

21  Eddy  Street,  = Providence,  R.  I. 

MAKERS  OF  GOLD  AND  SILVER  PLATED 

Seamless  Wire  and  Tubing^, 

BY  OUR  OWN  ORIGINAL  PATENTED  PROCESS. 

PROMPT  ATTENTION  GIVEN  TO  SPECIAL  SIZES. 

This  \Vire  has  created  a eomplete  revolution  in  the  business 
of  manufacturing  Jewelry,  and  especially  in  the  manufaeture  of 
Chains.  It  is  acknowledged  by  experts  to  be  the  best  wire  ever 
produeed  for  several  reasons. 

First ; Because  being  made  entirely  without  solder,  the 

links  can  be  soldered  with  gold  or  any  other  hard -running  solder 
without  roughening  the  surface  of  the  gold  in  the  least,  there  being 
no  solder  between  the  gold  and  metal. 

Second  : This  wire  can  be  drawn  without  annealing  to 

No.  5 B.  & S.  gauge,  while  all  other  so-called  seamless  wire  made 
by  eompetitors  requires  annealing  from  eight  to  ten  times  to  reaeh 
the  above  point.  Practical  Jewelers  know  that  whenever  plated 
wire  is  annealed  it  is  injured ; consequently,  this  wire,  requiring  no 
annealing  to  be  drawn  to  No.  5 gauge,  is  superior  to  any  other  in 
existenee. 

Third : The  Gold  is  uniformly  fused  upon  the  composition 

by  our  patent  automatic  fusing  machine,  a feature  found  in  no  other 
wire.  This  also  guarantees  the  strictest  uniformity  in  Grade  and 
Color. 


Proceedings  of  The  Jewelers’  League. 

The  regular  monthly  meeting  of  the 
executive  committee  of  the  Jewelers’ 
League  was  held  on  Nov.  ist.  There  were 
present  President  Hayes,  Vice-Presidents 
Bowden,  Snow  and  Bardel,  Chairman  Van 
Deventer,  Messrs.  Beacham,  Fessenden, 
Untermeyer  and  Jeannot  and  L.  Stevens, 
Jr.,  secretary 

The  minutes  of  the  previous  meeting 
were  read  and  approved.  Eleven  requests 


We  can  furnish  any  size  desired  to  such  Jewelers  as  do  not 
care  to  reduce  it  themselves,  and  for  a price  cheaper  than  they  could 
do  it  for. 

Ask  for  chains  made  from  The  C.  R.  Smith  Seamless 
Wire  and  you  will  get  goods  equal  to  Solid  Gold  in  finish  and 
appearance.  Many  of  the  leading  manufacturers  are  using  it  and 
all  pronounce  it  perfect. 


18 


'IHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


Alfred  H.  Smith  & Co 


IMPORTERS 


DIAMONDS 


AND 


PRECIOUS  STONES, 


182  BROADWAY,  COR.  JOHN  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 

34  & 36  Washington  St. 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


D.  RONEX, 

ESTABLISHED  1866. 

CAMEO 

PORTRAITS 

Works  of  Art, 
Precious  Stones.’ 

9*7  BROAmVAY. 

New  YORK, 


DON’T  FORGET  THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S  BOOK  LIST  when  in  want  of  any  tech- 
nical book  in  the  Jewelry  or  Kindred  Trades. 


HENRY  FERA, 

Importer  and  Cutter  of 

DIAMONDS 

PRESCOTT  BUILDING, 

65  Nassau  St.  cor.  John  NEW  YORK. 
FACTORY 

60  Fulton  St.,  NEW  YORK. 


Cutting  for  the  Trade  a Specialty, 


Purchasers 

. . OF  . . 

RARE  OEMS, 

PRECIOUS  STONES 
AND  ALL  GOODS  FOR 
JEWELRY. 

ADDRESS 

R.  A.  Kipling,  Paris, 

19  Rue  Drouot,  France. 


for  change  of  beneficiary  were  received  and 
granted.  Drs.  W.  C.  and  W.  M.  Dake 
were  appointed  medical  examiners  for  the 
League,  in  Nashville,  Tenn.  The  fol- 
lowing applicants  were  admitted  to  mem- 
bership: 

Sec.  B. — Ernst  Deuring,  Saginaw,  Mich., 
recommended  by  F.  F.  Marshall  and  A.  H. 
Snyder;  Walter  C.  Kern,  Pawnee  City,  by 
O.  G.  Fessenden  and  H.  H.  Butts;  Paul  E. 
Villeminot,  Donaldsonville,  La.,  by  J.  S. 
and  F.  L.  Trepagnier. 


H.  Keck  Mfg.  Co.  Robbed  of  $2,000 
Worth  of  Diamonds. 

Cincinnati,  O.,  Nov.  2. — About  10  o’clock 
yesterday  morning  two  neatly  dressed  men 
walked  into  the  office  in  the  establishment 
of  H.  Keck  Mfg.  Co.,  18  E.  4th  St.  They 
asked  to  be  shown  some  loose  diamonds. 
Mr.  Keck  himself  was  behind  the  counter 
at  the  time,  and  he  went  to  the  safe  and 
produced  a package  of  loose  diamonds 
ranging  from  one-half  to  three  karats. 

Mr.  Keck’s  attention  was  attracted  to  a 
rear  room.  When  he  returned  a few 
seconds  later  the  strangers  had  gone.  A 
hasty  examination  of  the  tray  revealed  the 
fact  that  more  than  half  of  the  diamonds 
were  missing.  Mr.  Keck  and  several  clerks, 
whom  he  had  called,  ran  down  stairs  into 
the  street,  but  no  sign  of  the  strangers  could 
be  seen.  Mr.  Keck  then  searched  the  city 
for  them  until  noon,  when  he  notified  police 
headquarters. 

Mr.  Keck  cannot  tell  exactly  how  many 
diamonds  were  taken,  but  he  is  sure  that 
the  loss  will  not  come  below  $2,000. 


Death  of  a Promising  Young  Jeweler. 

New  Haven,  Conn.,  Nov.  i. — Stiles  C. 
Bartram,  jeweler  and  optician,  son  of  Stiles 
C.  Bartram,  the  gold  and  silver  refiner 
and  manufacturer  of  jewelry  on  Center  St., 
this  city,  died  this  evening  after  a lingering 
illness  with  Bright’s  disease.  He  was  about 
25  years  of  age.  He  had  been  associated 
with  his  father  in  business  for  several 
years,  but  for  the  last  year  or  two  had  been 
doing  a successful  business  as  an  optician, 
traveling  from  place  to  place.  He  was  a 
graduate  of  the  Spencer  Optical  Institute. 
Deceased  leaves  a wife  and  one  child. 


E.  L.  Cuendet,  importer  of  music  boxes, 
21  John  St.,  New  York,  has  introduced  a 
new  box  especially  for  the  jewelry  trade. 
It  is  called  the  Star  and  comes  in  three 
sizes.  Among  the  many  improvements 
which  the  trade  will  appreciate  in  this 
music  box,  are  the  automatic  speed  regula- 
tor, the  silent  wind,  the  self  locking  cylinder 
attachment  which  makes  the  cylinder  drop 
naturally  into  its  proper  position,  and  the 
new  tune  skipper,  an  arrangement  by  which 
any  of  the  tunes  on  the  cylinder  may  be 
played  without  waiting  for  the  airs  which 
precede  it.  The  Star  has  a long  running 
attachment,  which  plays  from  22  minutes 
to  half  an  hour. 


The  Bowden  Rings 

ARE  COMPLETE  IN  VARIETY,  CORRECT 
IN  QUALITY  AND  PERFECT  IN  FINISH. 
WE  MAKE  EVERY  VARIETY  OF  FINGER 
RTNa.q 


J.  B.  Bowden  & Co., 

3 MAIDEN  LANE, 

Branch  Office  : 

206  Kearny  STREET,  <^NEW  YORK. 

San  Francisco  Cal. 


DIAMONDS. 

Wm.  S.  Hedges  & Co., 

IMPORTERS  OF 

Diamonds  and  Precious  Stones. 

DIAMOND  JEWELRY. 

170  Broadway,  New  York. 

22  Holborn  Viaduct,  London. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


19 


The  Right  to  Use  The  Word  “Rogers”  in 
A Plated  Ware  Trademark. 

The  appeals  of  Wm.  A.  Rogers  and  the  R. 
W.  Rogers  Co.,  of  New  York,  from  pre- 
liminary injunctions  issued  to  retrain  them 
from  using  their  names  on  silver  plated  flat- 
ware,  which  were  obtained  last  Spring  by 
the  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.,  Hartford, Conn., 
were  heard  Thursday  and  Friday,  by 
Judges  Wallace,  Lacombe  and  Shipman, 
sitting  in  the  United  States  Circuit  Court  of 
Appeals. 

The  first  appeal  was  that  of  Wm.  A. 
Rogers,  a dealer  in  silver  plated  ware,  in 
Vesey  St.,  against  whom  Judge  Benedict 
issued  an  injunction  on  the  claim  of  the  Wm. 
Rogers  Mfg.  Co.  to  the  effect  that  the  de- 
fendant had  conspired  with  other  persons 
to  sell  the  use  of  his  name  on  plated  ware, 
thereby  infringing  upon  the  trademark  of 
the  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.  and  injuring 
their  business.  The  second  appeal  was  that 
of  the  R.  W.  Rogers  Co.,  Chambers  St., 
from  the  injunction  issued  by  Judge  La- 
combe, March  ist,  restraining  them  from 
stamping  their  corporate  name  as  a dis- 
tinctive mark  on  plated  flat  ware.  The 
opinion  of  Judge  Lacombe  was  published 
in  full  in  The  Circular  of  March  6th. 

The  arguments  before  the  Circuit  Couat 
of  Appeals  were  almost  the  same  as  those 
used  when  the  preliminary  injunctions 
were  obtained,  the  main  contention  of  the 
Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.  being  that  they  had 
an  adjudicated  title  to  certain  trademarks 
in  which  the  word  “ Rogers  ” was  an  essen- 
tial feature,  and  that  they  should  have 
protection  from  the  defendants  who,  they 
claimed,  had  chosen  the  name  “Rogers” 
for  the  purpose  of  trading  on  the  reputation 
established  by  the  plaintiff  company.  The 
main  decision  on  which  they  relied  was  that 
of  the  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.  vs.  Rogers  & 
Spurr  Co.  11  Fed.  Rep.  495. 

The  defendants  claimed  that  they  had  an 
absolute  right  to  the  use  of  their  personal 
name  in  their  trademark  and  that  the  only 
case  in  which  a corporate  name  can  be 
enjoined  is  where  fraud  and  confusion  are 
shown  to  have  thereby  resulted.  There 
were  no  allegations,  the}’  claimed,  as  to  any 
such  fraud  and  confusion.  The  defendants 
also  questioned  the  right  of  the  Wm. 
Rogers  Mfg.  Co.  to  apply  for  the  injunction 
unless  the  latter  could  show  that  they  had 
an  exclusive  right  to  use  the  name 
“ Rogers.” 

Chief  Justice  Wallace  several  times  cate- 
chised the  counsel  for  the  Wm.  Rogers 
Mfg.  Co.  as  to  the  grounds  on  which  the 
application  for  these  injunctions  were  based, 
and  showed  plainly  that  he  was  not  con- 
vinced that  they  should  be  continued. 

Wm.  C.  Beecher  argued  for  the  de- 
fendant, Wm.  A.  Rogers,  and  Chas.  H. 
Duell,  of  Syracuse,  for  the  defendants, 
R.  W.  Rogers  Co.  The  plaintiffs  were 
represented  by  C.  E.  Mitchell  and  H.  R. 
Mills.  Decision  was  reserved. 

L.  Neuburg,  Random  Lake,  Wis.,  has 
sold  out  to  D.  Dunn. 


ESTABLISHED  50  YEARS. 

RAHDEL,  BAREMORE  & BILLINSS, 

IMPORTERS  OF 

DIAMONDS, 

And  Other  Precious  Stones. 

FINE  PEARLS  A SPECIALTY. 

MANUFACTURERSJOF 

DIAMOND  JEWELRY 

IH  THE  LATEST  DESIGNS. 


Diamonds  Recut  in  Modern  Styles  or  Repaired  on  Premises. 


58  Nassau  Street, 

I St.  Andrews  St. 

29  Maiden  Lane, 

I Tulp  Straat, 

Holbom  Circus, 

NEW  YORK. 

AMSTERDAM! 

'LONDON  E,  C. 

ESTABLISHED  1841. 


TRADE  MARK. 


CARTER,  SLOAN  S C0„ 


MANUFAGIURERS 


OF  GOLD  JEWELRY, 


Ho.  15  AAIDEH  LANE, 
HEW  YORK. 


A.  CARTER,  jR. 

A.  K.  SLOAN. 

C.  E.  HASTINGS. 


GEO.  R.  HOWE. 
WM.  T.  CARTER. 
WM.  T.  GOUGH. 


FACTORY,  NEWARK,  N.  J. 


HERMAN  KOHLBUSCH,  SR. 


Xitftblilheg  1S5I 
M^afftotorer 
Fi>b 

AXD  TVdohtb  for 
ererj  p u 
where  accx; 
required, 

•an  Stre 
llaideo  Li 
Repairs  (anj  make) 


SECURITY  PIN  GUARD  h 

PATb  DEC.25, 1894 


Security  Mfg  Co 


25^ 


7 ASTOR  mouse:  (BROADWAY)  N.Y 


85c.  doz.  Net  Cash,  Discount  to  Jobbers. 


20 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  iSge. 


F.  M.  WHITING  COMPANY, 

SILVERSMITHS. 


Factory  and  Main  Office, 

North  Attleboro,  Mass. 


New  York  Office, 

1128  Broadway 

ADDRESS  ALL  COMMUNICATIONS  10  FACTORY. 


TRAOtMARK 


Our  new  NEAPOLITAN  pattern  is  now  ready.  Dealers  will  do  well  to  withhold  all  orders  until  the) 
have  inspected  this  new  and  artistic  design  in  flatware. 


OUR 

APOLLO 

CONTINUES  THE 
LEADING  PAT- 
TERN ON  THE 
MARKET. 


TRAOt  MARK 

STERLING  925  1000  FINE 


J.  B.  & S.  M.  Knowles  Co., 

SlLVERSniTHS, 

nain  Office  and  Shops : 

PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 

Nail  Polishers 

AND  OTHER 

HOICK  SELLERS 

ARE  MADE  BY 

COUDING  BROS.  & UEILBOR.Y 

North  Attleboro,  Mass. 
WOOD  & HUGHES. 

STERLINB  SILTEKWAKE  MANUFACTEEERS 

New  Yoik  Agents  for  the  Derby  Silver  Co., 

FINE  QUADRUPLE  PLATED  WARE, 

No.  16  JOHN  STREET,  - . NEW  YORK, 

206  Kearney  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal.j 

HASKELL  & MUEGGE,  Agents. 


These  well-known  Razors,  the  quality  of  which  is  w'arranted, 
possess  this  great  adv’antage,  that  they  may  be  used  for  ten 
years  before  they  require  actual  sharpening.  Before  using  them, 
it  is  necessary  to  rub  them  on  guod  leather  strop.  Lecoultre’s 
Strops  (to  be  had  with  the  Razors),  should  be  used  in  preference 
to  others. 


MATHEY  BROS..  MATHEZ  & CO. 


SEND  FOR 

PRI  E LIST. 


P 

SOLE  AGENTS. 


21  & 23  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y. 


H.  L.  SMITH, 


4 Maiden  Lane, 
NhW  YORK. 

Ifipbals 

AND 

Babgfs 

OF  EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 

♦ 

Jewel  y Repairing 

OF  ALL  KINDS 
AT  LOWEST  PRICES. 


EN/inELER5 


Of  GOLD,  SILVER  AND  PLATED  JEWELRY, 

Enameled,  Plain  and  in  Colors 

ALSO  OF 

SOQIETT  EMBLEMS, 

Y4CHT  AND  QOLLEtiE  FLflQS. 

All  Varieties  of  Painted  Enamel  Work. 

5.  5.  WILD6r50N, 

179  Eddy  Street,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 

Correspondence  Solicited^ 

Telephone  P~T~rr~'*r~"  m ^ 


MARINE  CHRONOMETERS, 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

John  Bliss  & Co.,  <29  Front  St„  New  York. 

We  have  on  hand  a number  of  Chronometers,  by  various  good  makers,  not  new 
which  have  been  in  service  for  purposes  of  navigation,  ..nd  are  excellent  instruments 
They  have  been  put  in  perfect  repair  and  will  give  satisfactory  results  as  to  perfo  m 
ance.  We  will  sell  these  Chronometers  at  low  prices,  either  for  cash,  or  on  accom 
modating  terms  to  suit  special  cases,  or  will  hire  them  at  moderate  rates  and  allow  ttic 
hin  to  apply  on  purchase. 

SEND  FOR  CIRCULAR  GIVING  PRICES  AND  TERMS. 


TIC-AL  INSTITUTE 

^CHOOLFOR  BUSINESSMEN 

SSES  convene:  tues.  eachmonth 

SPENCEP  OPTICAL  MAMU  FAC  T U R INC  CO,  I5MAIDEN  LANE.N.Y. 


OUR STUDENTS 
ARE  THE 
SUCCESSFUL 
OPTICANS 

'1^ 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


./^ND  HOROLOGICAL  REVitW. 


21 


The  Proposed  New  Building  of  the 
Tilden-Thurber  Co. 

Providence,  R.  L,  Nov.  2 — Some  time 
ago  the  announcement  was  made  that  a 
new  business  building  was  to  be  erected  on 
the  corner  of  Mathew.«on  and  Westminster 
Sts.,  to  be  occupied  wholly  by  the  Tilden- 
Thurber  Co.  The  arrangements  for  the 
building  have  just  been  completed  and 
work  is  to  be  begun  at  once.  This  property 
is  known  as  the  Lamed  estate,  the  lot 
having  been  purchased  by  Asa  Lamed  in 
1802  for  $730. 

The  new  building,  which  is  designed  by 
Shepley,  Rutan  & Coolidge,  the  famous 
architects  of  Boston,  is  to  be  40 feet  on 
Westminster  St.  and  93  feet  on  Mathewson 
St.  and  four  stories  high.  The  front  of  the 
first  two  floors  will  be  largely  of  glass,  pro- 
viding ample  opportunity  for  display.  The 
design  will  be  carved  out  in  terra  cotta 
richly  ornamented.  When  completed  the 
first  floor,  which  will  be  furnished  in  ma- 
hogany, with  a mosaic  floor,  will  be  de- 
voted to  silverware,  diamonds,  jewelry  and 
watches.  One-half  of  this  floor  will  be 
utilized  for  the  display  of  silverware  of  the 
(iorham  Mfg.  Co.,  the  exhibit  being  larger 
than  that  of  any  other  retail  house  in  the 
country  outside  of  the  company’s  New 
York  store. 

The  second  floor  will  be  occupied  by  the 
the  china  and  glassware  departments,  the 
fixtures  being  elaborate  and  especially 
adapted  for  this  particular  purpose.  The 
art  department,  which  has  grown  to  large 


proportions,  will  occupy  the  entire  third 
floor  and  art  rooms  and  the  workshops  will 
be  on  the  fourth  floor. 


equaled  by  any  house  in  New  England  and 
unsurpassed  by  any  in  the  country.  Freight 
and  passenger  elevators  will  be  provided - 


THE  I’ROrOSED  NEW  BUILDING  OF  TILDEN-THURBER  CO. 


The  entire  building  w'as  designed  espec- 
ially for  the  business  of  the  Tilden-Thurber 
Co.,  and  the  facilities  provided  will  be  un- 


the building  will  be  lighted  by  electricity 
and  all  conveniences  will  be  of  the  latest 
and  most  approved  design. 


CUTTERS  OF  DIAMONDS. 


OPPENHEIMER  BROS.  & VEITH, 


DEALERS  IN  WATCHES. 


THE  DIAMOND  DIGGER. 


65  NASSAU  ST., 

PRESCOTT  BUILDING, 

JOHN  AND  NASSAU  STS., 

NEW  YOr^K. 


THE  DIAMOND  CUTTER. 


LONDON : 

10  Hatton  Garden. 

AMSTERDAM  : 

Tulp  Straat  No.  2. 


THE  DIAMOND  WEARER. 


^2 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


o 

> 

UJ 

z 

u 

UJ 

u 

H 

C/3 

D 

< 

< 

Z 

00 

•o 

c 

(N 

00 


YOU  CAN  AFFORD  TO 

GIVE 


AWAY 


OUR  MOROCCINE 


Important  Case  in  Relat  on  to  Trade- 
Marks. 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Nov.  i. — The  subject 
of  trademarks  is  receiving  a great  deal  of 
attention  from  the  Treasury  Department 
at  the  present  time,  and  the  following  de- 
cision of  Assistant  Secretary  Wike  in  rela- 
tion to  the  same  will  be  of  great  interest  to 
The  Circular  readers  : 

Treasury  Department,  ) 
Office  of  the  Secretary,  f 
Washington,  D.  C.,  Oct.  30,  1895. 
Messrs.  Prindle  & Russell, 

Washington,  D.  C. 

Ge7itlemen  : Referring  to  your  letter  of 

the  i8th  inst.,  regarding  the  trademark  of 
your  clients,  “ Elgin  Watch  Company,”  the 
Department  desires  to  be  advised  whether 
you  claim  protection  against  the  importa- 
tion of  watches  marked  “ Ilgin  Watch  Com- 
pany,” or  whether  you  are  simply  desirous 
of  seeking  to  protect  yourselves  from  loss 
through  the  recording  of  a trademark  of 
the  “ Ilgin  Watch  Company.”  If  the  latter 
be  your  motive  in  the  case  your  communi- 
cation has  arrived  too  late,  because  the  ap- 
plication of  the  “ Ilgin  Watch  Company” 
preceded  yours  and  record  was  duly  made. 

Your  trademark  will  also  be  recorded  in 
accordance  with  your  request,  but  the  ques- 
tion of  the  legitimacy  of  the  trade  mark 
“ Ilgin  Watch  Company,”  is  not  one  for 
this  Department  to  decide  ; its  function 
under  the  law  being  limited  to  a denial  of 
the  right  of  entry  to  articles  which  shall 
simulate  or  copy  trademarks  recorded  in 
this  Department.  Respectfully  yours, 

S.  Wire, 

Assistant  Secretary. 

Some  of  the  facts  in  the  case,  as  well  as 
the  opinion  of  Solicitor  Reeve,  regarding 
the  CDurse  of  the  Secretary  of  the  Treasury, 
are  set  forth  in  the  following  portions  of 
the  Solicitor's  letter  to  the  Secretary: 

“The  enforcement  of  the  statute  pre- 
supposes that  the  Secretary  is  therein 


BAUM  & OPPENHEIM, 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

MOUNTINGS, 
41  & 43  MAIDEN  LANE, 

NEW  YORK. 


authorized  to  decide  questions  primarily  as 
to  the  validity  of  trademarks  when  they 
are  presented  in  the  manner  contemplated 
by  law,  for  he  is  to  determine  whether  the 
Liademark  of  the  imported  article  is  an  in- 
fringement and  furnish  copies  of  the 
recorded  trademark  to  each  Collector  or 
other  proper  officer  of  the  customs.  I do 
not  understand,  however,  that  the  authority 
conferred  on  the  Secretary  by  the  statute 
supersedes  or  interferes  with  the  jurisdic- 
tion of  the  Court  touching  questions  of  in- 
fringement. For,  while  it  is  the  duty  of 
the  Secretary  to  decide  the  question  in 
limine  when  properly  arising  before  him, 
yet  he  would  be  bound  by  the  decision  of 
the  Court. 

“The  present  question  is  involved  in 
some  difficulty.  While  it  is  prima facie  that 
the  trade  mark,  ‘the  Ilgen  Watch  Com- 
pany,’ is  a simulation  of  the  trade  mark, 

‘ the  Eldin  National  Watch  Company,’ 
yet  the  latter  company  neglected  to 
avail  itself  of  the  privilege  of  the  statute 
until  its  more  diligent  rival  had  recorded  its 
name  in  the  books  of  the  Department.  That 
is  to  say,  the  Ilgen  Company  filed  its  appli- 
cation on  the  16  inst.,  while  the  Elgin  Com- 
pany did  not  file  its  application  until  three 
days  later.  So,  when  the  attorneys  for  the 
latter  company  wrote  their  protest  dated 
the  1 8th  inst.,  the  Ilgen  trademark  had 
been  recorded  two  days. 

“ I think,  however,  that  if  you  should  be 
satisfied  that  the  Ilgen  Company’s  trade 
mark  is  an  infringement  of  the  trademark 
of  the  Elgin  Company,  you  would  have  the 
authority  to  revoke  the  instructions  given 
to  the  Collectors,  in  behalf  of  the  Ilgen 
Company,  and  cancel  the  record  made  in 
the  Department.  Or  you  might  with 
propriety  under  the  circumstances  (espe- 
cially if  you  should  entertain  any  doubt 
about  the  claim  of  the  Elgin  Company) 
leave  the  question  to  be  determined 
judicially.” 

[A  previous  report  on  this  matter,  giving 
some  details  additional  to  those  herewith,  is 
published  on  page  7 of  this  issue  of  The 
Circular.  Ed  ] 


JEWELRY 

CASES 

BECAUSE  THEY  ARE  CHEAPER 
THAN  ANYTHING  YOU 
CAN  BUY. 

Moroccine  Ring  Cases, 

Velv.  Lined,  72.50  a Dozen. 


Would  You?  ? ? 


YOU 

AND 

WE 


KNOW 


Why  then  sell 


1 HAT  YOU  WOULD  NOT  BUY 
PATCHED  TROUSERS  FOR  NEW  ONES. 


PATCHED  EYE-CLASS  CUARDS 


ONES? 


WHY  NOT  BUY 
THE 


WHEN  JUST  AS 
CHEAP? 


SEND  FOR  PRICES  TO 


E.  KIRSTEIN’S  SONS  CO., 


ROCHESTER, 

NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


23 


Providence. 

All  communications  for  this  column,  addressed  to 
P.  O.  Box  1093,  Providence,  R.I.,  will  receive  prompt 
attention. 


Harry  C.  Lindol  has  mortgaged  real 
estate  in  Cranston  to  Nathan  B.  Horton 
for  $5,000. 

Mr.  Killick,  of  L.  H.  Keller  & Co.,  New 
York,  was  in  town  last  week  calling  upon 
the  trade. 

Jesse  Metcalf  is  preparing  to  erect  a five 
story  brick  building  for  manufacturing  and 
business  purposes  measuring  200  feet  on 
Pine  St.,  85  feet  on  Page  St.,  and  120  feet 
on  Richmond  St.,  height  70  feet. 

Frank  W.  Pettee  who  started  in  the 
manufacturing  jewelry  business  at  224 
Eddy  St.,  about  a month  ago,  has  given  a 
chattel  mortgage  to  S.  & B.  Lederer,  for 
$1,000,  covering  tools,  stock,  machinery  and 
fixtures. 

The  Industrial  Trust  Co.,  of  this  city, 
have  attached  the  property  of  the  Anchor 
Pearl  Co.,  as  well  as  the  individual  mem- 
bers, Geo.  W.  Prentice  and  Franklin  A. 
Smith,  Jr.,  of  this  city,  and  George  E.  Par- 
ker, of  Boston,  for  $15,000. 

At  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Rhode 
Island  Business  Men’s  Association  held  last 
week.  Leander  C.  Belcher  and  Charles  H. 
George  were  elected  vice-presidents  and 
John  Shepard,  Jr.,  as  a member  of  the 
executive  committee. 

Municipal  pMitics  have  been  all  the  talk 
in  this  city  the  past  week,  and  many  of 
the  local  jewelers  are  very  prominent 
therein.  The  following  were  elected  by 
the  Republican  party  as  delegates  to  the 
City  Convention;  From  Ward  i,  Herbert  W. 
Ladd;  7th  ward,  William  N.  Otis;  gth  ward, 
Walter  S.  Hough;  Supervisors,  Repub- 
lican : ist  ward,  Pitts  S.  Bliven;  4th  ward, 
John  C.  Harrington;  5th  ward,  Louis  D, 
Schmidt;  8th  ward,  Telesford  Stahl. 

Last  Tuesday  deputy  sheriff  O.  C.  Good- 
ell,  at  the  instance  of  Isaac  Hahn,  placed  a 
keeper  in  possession  of  the  premises  of 
Julian  Rathborn,  refiner,  Sabin  St.  This 
attachment  was  satisfied  on  Saturday. 
There  is,  however,  another  writ  of  sum- 
mons for  $390  balance  on  book  account 
pending  against  this  concern  at  the  instance 
of  R.  Wallace  & Sons  Mfg.  Co.,  Walling 
ford.  Conn.  It  was  brought  Aug.  22d  last, 
and  continued  from  time  to  time  until  Oct. 
17  when  it  was  continued  to  such  a time 
as  it  should  be  called  by  the  attorneys. 


The  Altleboros. 

George  W.  Livsey,  formerly  of  the  manu- 
facturing firm  of  Ellis,  Livsey  & Brown, 
has  opened  a commercial  school  in  this 
place. 

Edward  D.  Sturtevant,  of  S.  E.  Fisher  & 
Co.,  has  been  nominated  by  the  Repub- 
licans for  selectman.  Ihe  Democratic 
nominee  has  declined  to  run  against  Mr. 
Sturtevant,  who  will  have  no  opposition. 


Arthur  H.  Paul,  who  was  formerly  em- 
ployed as  foreman  by  W.  D.  Wilmarth  & 
Co.,  will  soon  start  in  business  for  himself 
in  the  manufacture  of  metal  whip  sockets. 

Petitions  for  changing  the  name  of  the 
town  of  North  Attleboro  are  being  circu- 
lated very  industriously,  some  advocating 
one  name  and  some  another.  This  differ- 
ence of  opinion  will  probably  result  in 
neither  of  the  names  being  adopted. 

At  the  13th  annual  meeting  of  Company 
C Association  last  week,  Frank  W.  Weaver 
was  re-elected  as  president  but  declined  to 
serve.  Mark  O.  Wheaton  was  elected  first 
vice-president,  Charles  T.  Draper,  assist- 
ant secretary,  O.  P.  Richardson  and  E.  B. 
Richards  as  auditors  and  Frank  W.  Weaver, 
Sydney  O.  Bigney  and  Willis  H.  Streeter 
on  the  executive  committee. 


Philadelphia. 

A magnificent  cut  glass  department  has 
been  added  to  the  establishment  of  L.  A. 
Scherr  & Co. 

Opticians  Ferguson  & Weston  and  Wall 
& Ochs  are  having  a lively  rivalry  in  the 
way  of  street  car  advertising.  Ferguson  & 
Weston’s  artistic  fancy  runs  to  “noses,” 
and  Wall  & Och’s  to  “ poses.” 

The  Jewelers’  Club  will  give  the  second 
“ Smoker  ” of  the  season  on  the  evening  of 
Nov.  19th.  An  excellent  entertainment  is 
being  arranged  by  a committee  consisting 
of  Wm.  H.  Long,  Louis  P.  White,  Jas.  H. 
Kelley,  Wm.  Linker,  Jas.  W.  Barry,  Wm. 
S.  Quinn  and  Wm.  G.  Earle,  chairman. 

It  is  stated  that  Joseph  C.  Gigon,  1010 
Chestnut  St.,  is  keeping  out  of  the  way  cf 
his  creditors  and  that  there  are  various 
warrants  out  for  his  arrest.  Mr.  Gigon  has 
not  been  seen  around  the  establishment 


since  the  early  part  of  last  week,  but  it  is 
understood  that  Chas.  Powers,  of  Ludeke  & 
Powers,  New  York,  is  in  charge  of  the 
place. 

Among  the  out-of-town  jewelers  here  the 
past  week  were:  John  H.  Fritz,  Cashtown, 
Pa  ; F.  Rudolph,  Wilmington,  Del.;  C.  S. 
Hunsburger,  Soudertown,  Pa.;  W.  Funk, 
of  Hall  & Funk,  Lebanon,  Pa.;  John  Dewar 
Bryn  Mawr,  Pa.;  B.  F.  Cramer,  Pember- 
ton, N.  J.;  Jacob  Thurer,  Clifton,  Pa. ; R. 
S.  Porter,  Woodbury,  N.  J.;  Geo.  T.  Press, 
Oxford,  Pa.,  and  B.  C.  Foster,  Bristol,  Pa. 

Jeweler  Herman  F.  Wolff,  909  Vine  St., 
has  been  covering  himself  with  glory  again. 
Mr.  Wolff  has  achieved  distinction  as  the 
champion  light  weight  amatetrr  wrestler. 
Last  week  he  took  rank  as  a life  saver. 
The  clothes  of  an  old  woman  named  Sarah 
Cullen  who  keeps  a fruit  stand  close  to  the 
store  caught  fire  from  a peanut  roaster, 
and  she  would  probably  have  been  burned 
to  death  had  it  not  been  for  Mr.  Wolff’s 
active  and  heroic  help.  Mr.  Wolff  is  still 
nursing  a pair  of  badly  singed  hands. 

Orders  were  booked  in  Philadelphia  last 
week  by  L.  S.  Lewis,  Randel,  Baremore  & 
Billings;  Frank  Locklin,  Unger  JBros.;  N. 
B.  Elting,  Jung,  Staiger  <&  Klitz  ; M.  Hut- 
ton, W.  S.  Hedges  & Co.;  John  Welsh,  Geo. 
E.  Street  & Sons  ; Edward  Dingee,  Gorham 
Mfg.  Co.;  W.  Hall,  Mayhew  & Carrington  ; 
Chas.  Powers,  Ludeke  & Powers  ; William 
Kirkland,  Howard  & Cockshaw ; Otto 
Wolff,  Ailing  & Co.;  H.  G.  Rutherford, 
Kirby,  Mowry  & Co.;  J.  E.  Kingman,  Ostby 
& Barton  Co.;  Harry  Dougherty,  E.  How- 
ary  Watch  & Clock  Co.,  J.  Simonson,  A.  J. 
Hedges  & Co.;  S.  Posner,  Wallach  & 
Schiele,  and  J.  H.  Thompson,  Elgin  Na- 
tional Watch  Co. 


NO  I'V  time  to  act  in  fitting  up  your  store  for 

the  Fall  trade.  The  advantages  of  the 
FLETCHER  PATENT  SYSTEM  of  trays,  in  saving  of 
room,  speed  and  attractiveness,  also  their  various 
appliances  in  store  fittings  made  to  facil- 
itate business  should  be  borne  in  mind  NO  JV 


24 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


THE  genuine  ROGERS 

ELECTRO  SILVER  PLATE. 

Spoons,  Forks,  Knives,  «&c. 

IS  STAMPED 

'A^ROGERS  & BRO.,  A.  I. 


FLEMISH. 


A Large  Line 
in  Electro 
Sterling 
able  for  the 
Holiday 


of  Novelties 
Silver  Plate 
Silver  suit= 
Fall  and 
Seasons. 


HALCYON 

BERRY 

SPOON 


SAVOY 


BREAD 


FORK. 


BON  BON  SPOON. 

THE  ORIGINAL  AND  GENUINE 

STAR  ★ BRAND 

manufactured  continuously  for 
HALF  A CENTURY  and  which 
has  made  the  name  of  ROGERS 
celebrated. 

IMANUFACTURED  BY 


ROGERS  & BROTHER, 


WATERBURY,  CONN. 


16  CORTLANDT  8T„  NEW  YORK. 


m 


Nov.  6,  i8gs. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


25 


TheJewelers’Circular 

AND 

HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


PUBLISHED  EVERY  WEDNESDAY  BY 

THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB’G  CO.. 

189  Broadway,  New  York  City. 


A JOURNAL  DEVOTED  TO  IHE  INTERESTS  OF 
JEWELERS  WATCHMAKERS,  SILVERSMITHS, 
ELECTRO-PLATE  MANUFACTURERS,  AND  ALL 
ENGAGED  IN  KINDRFD  BRANCHES  OF  INDUSTRY. 


Our  Editorial  columns  will  contain  our  own  opinions 
only,  and  we  shall  present  in  other  columns  only  what 
we  consider  of  interest  or  value  to  our  readers  Adver- 
tising matter  will  not  be  printed  as  news. 

Advertising  rates  in  The  Circular  are  lower, 
considering  the  number  of  tradesmen  reached  by  its 
large  circulation,  than  in  any  other  jewelry  journal. 

Notices  of  changes  in  standing  advertisements 
must  be  received  one  week  in  advance ; new  matter 
can  be  received  up  to  Monday. 


INFORMATION  FOR  SUBSCRIBERS. 


Terms  of  Subscription,  Postage  Prepaid. 

PER  ANNUM. 

United  States  and  Canada,  - - - $2.00 

Foreign  Countries  in  Postal  Union,  • - 3.00 

Single  Copies, .10 

New  subscribers  can  commence  at  any  time. 

Payments  for  The  Circular  when  sent  by  mail, 
should  be  made  in  a Post-Office  Money  Order,  Bank 
Check  or  Draft,  or  an  Express  Money  Order  or  Reg- 
istered Letter.  All  postmasters  are  required  to  regis- 
ter letters  whenever  requested  to  do  so. 

Pay  money  only  to  authorized  collectors  having 
proper  credentials. 

Returning  your  paper  will  not  enable  us  to  discon- 
tinue it,  as  we  cannot  find  your  name  on  our  books 
unless  your  address  is  given. 

In  changing  address  always  give  the  old  as  well  as 
the  new  one.  Your  name  cannot  be  found  on  our 
books  unless  this  is  done. 

We  will  continue  to  send  papers  until  there  is  a 
specific  order  to  stop,  in  connection  with  which  all 
arrearages  must  be  paid : but  such  an  order  can  be 
given  at  any  time,  to  take  effect  at  or  after  the  ex- 
piration of  the  subscription  All  such  orders  will  be 
promptly  acknowledged  by  mail. 

The  Courts  have  decided  that  all  subscribers  to 
Journals  are  responsible  until  arrearages  are  paid  in 
full  and  an  order  to  discontinue  has  b^n  received  by 
the  publisher. 


Member  of  the 

American  Trade  Press  Association. 

Vol.  XXXI. 

Nov.  6,  1895.  No.  I.,. 

Everv  Ime  of  reading  matter  hi  The 
Jewelers’  Circular,  with  the  exception  of 
the  few  brief  extracts  from  exchanges 
always  properly  credited,  is  written  ex- 
clusively for  this  journal.  Each  issue 
of  The  Jewelers’  Circular  is  copy- 
righted. 


FEATURES  OF  THIS  NUMBER. 


Page  42 — Workshop  Notes. 

Page  42 — Technical  Articles. 

Page  29 — Our  Traveling  Representatives. 

Page  37 — Art  Stationery  for  Jewelers. 

Page  28 — Queries  by  Circular  Readers. 

Frontispiece — The  “ Defender  ” in  Silver. 

Page  38 — Matters  in  Jewelry  Storekeep- 
ing. 

Page  45 — The  Connoisseur  — Rambler’s 
Notes. 

Page  39 — Page  of  Effective  Retail  Jewel- 
ers’ Ads. 

Page  12 — Fall  Fashions  in  Jewelry  and 
Silverware. 


A decision  interesting  to  the  trade  gen- 
erally and  medal  makers  particularly, 
was  handed  down  by  the  courts  in  St. 
Louis,  Mo.,  afewdaysago.  Judge  Vailliant 
decided  that  the  badge  of  the  Order  of 
Ladies  of  the  Sacred  Heart  cannot  be  protec- 
tively trademarked,  as  a trademark  does 
not  give  its  proprietor  exclusive  right  to 
make  the  goods  to  which  it  is  applied.  The 
only  use  of  the  mark  is  to  indicate  that 
goods  to  which  it  is  applied  were  made  by 
the  order.  The  decision  strikes  us  as  per- 
fectly sound.  We  think  the  suit  should 
have  been  brought  under  the  design  patent 
obtained  by  the  originator  of  the  badge, 
with  whom  the  plaintiff  had,  doubtless, 
arranged  for  its  manufacture. 


Art  Stationery  as 


an  Advertisement 


of  a jewelry  Store. 


A WRITER  on 
the  corres- 
ponding staff  of 
The  Circular 
makes  some  apt 
remarks  in  refer- 
ence to  the  establishing  of  an  art  stationery 
department  in  a jewelry  store.  Aside  from 
the  harmony  of  art  stationery  with  the 
general  character  of  a jeweler’s  stock  and 
its  individual  profitableness,  it  is  a far 
reaching  and  effective  advertising  medium 
of  the  jeweler’s  business.  It  is  pointed  out 
that  as  the  papers  are  sold  generally  in 
small  quantities  and  as  the  boxes  contain- 
ing them  may  bear  the  imprint  of  the  jew- 
elry firm,  the  entire  business  is  advertised 
among  the  finest  class  of  trade.  This  ad- 
vertisement, effective  in  itself,  is  greatly  in- 
creased by  the  imprint  of  the  firm  on  the 
individual  envelopes.  Again  fine  station- 
ery lends  itself  admirably  to  artistic  window 
display  which  is  one  of  the  most  effective 
modes  of  advertising  at  the  present  day. 


SEVERAL  intri- 
cate questions 
Trademarks  on  have  been  raised  by 
the  protest  of  the 

Imported  Mer- 

National  Watch 
chandise.  Co.  against  the  right 
of  the  “ Ilgen  Watch 
Co.”  to  import  watches  bearing  the  name  of 
the  latter  concern.  The  protest  was  set  up  on 
section  6 of  the  present  tariff  that  provides 
“ that  no  article  of  imported  merchandise 
which  shall  copy  or  simulate  the  name  or 
trademark  of  any  domestic  manufacture  or 
manufacturer  shall  be  admitted  to  entry  at 
any  Custom  House  of  the  United  States.” 
A supplementary  provision  of  the  same 
section,  however,  states  that  “ any  domestic 
manufacturer  who  has  adopted  trademarks 
may  require  his  name  and  residence  and  a 
description  of  his  trademarks  to  be  recorded 
in  books  which  shall  be  kept  for  that  pur- 
pose in  the  Department  of  the  Treasury 
under  such  regulations  as  the  Secretary  of 
the  Treasury  shall  prescribe,  and  may  fur- 
nish to  the  Department  fac-similes  of  such 
trademarks.” 

With  this  provision,  it  appears,  the  Elgin 
National  Watch  Co.  were  late  in  complying. 
Thus  arise  the  complications  as  elsewhere 
reported  in  this  issue  of  The  Circular. 


In  another  case  under  the  same  head  a 
decision  handed  down  last  week  is  pertinent 
and  interesting,  as  settling  conclusively 
the  first  provision  of  the  section.  It  is  as 
follows; 

Tre.asury  Dep.artment,  I 
Office  of  the  Secretary,  j 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Oct.  28,  1895. 
Messrs.  T.  S.  Todd  Co., 

II  William  St.,  New  York,  N.  Y. 

Gentlemen — The  Department  is  In  receipt  of  your 
letter  of  the  21st  inst.,  in  regard  to  the  importation  at 
New  York  ot  certain  goods,  in  violation  to  the  pro- 
visions of  section  6,  of  the  act  of  August  28.  1894,  and 
you  state  that  as  the  same  are  intended  only  for  trans- 
shipment to  Central  America,  application  is  made  for 
permission  to  allow  the  goods  to  go  forward  in  that 
manner. 

In  reply,  I have  to  state  that  the  section  of  law 
cited  prohibits  the  entry  at  the  Custom  House  of  any 
goods  which,  as  in  this  case,  simulate  the  name  or 
trademark  of  any  domestic  manufacture  or  manufac- 
turer, and  the  Department  is,  therefore,  unable  to 
grant  permission  for  entry  of  these  goods  for  the  pur- 
pose of  transit  through  the  United  .States. 

In  order,  however,  to  close  this  matter,  it  is  sug- 
gested that  you  make  application  for  permission  to 
return  the  goods  to  the  country  whence  exported. 
Respectfully  yours, 

S.  Wire, 

Assistant  Secretary. 

This  decision,  which  is  of  great  import- 
ance, to  the  trade  at  large,  is  a just  one,  and 
the  law  should  be  strictly  enforced.  How- 
ever, incases  like  that  of  the  Elgin  National 
Watch  Co.  against  the  “ Ilgen  Watch  Co.,” 
are  embarrassing  feature  lies  in  the  duty 
they  impose  upon  the  Secretary  of  the 
Treasury  to  sit  as  a judge  of  the  validity 
of  trade  marks.  The  Solicitor  of  the  Treas- 
ury, as  reported  from  Washington  in  another 
column,  appears  to  think  that  a preliminary 
power  of  determination  is  vested,  by  sec- 
tion 6 of  the  tariff  Act,  in  the  Secretary  of 
the  Treasury,  and  he  would  not  perhaps 
venture  to  raise  the  question  of  constitution- 
ality against  such  a statute  even  if  he  be- 
lieved it  could  be  raised.  But  the  questions 
involved  in  the  case  are  considered  of  such 
importance  that  the  papers  have  been  sent 
to  the  Attorney-General  and  his  opinion 
has  been  asked  upon  all  its  aspects. 


Receiver  of  the  E.  N.  Welch  Mfg.  Co. 

Dismissed. 

Bristol,  Conn.,  Nov.  3. — Another  move 
has  been  made  in  the  reorganization  of  the 
E.  N.  Welch  Mfg.  Co.,  Forestville.  Appli 
cation  was  made  by  attorney  Charles  E. 
Gross,  of  Hartford,  yesterday,  representing 
the  Bristol  Brass  & Clock  Co.  and  others 
to  have  the  receiver  of  the  E.  N.  Welch 
Mfg.  Co.  dismissed. 

Judge  Ralph  Wheeler,  of  the  Superior 
Court,  granted  the  application  as  there  was 
no  opposition. 


The  jewelry  robber  who  robbed  Gerlach’s 
store,  Columbus,  O.,  of  $500  worth  of  dia- 
mond rings  turns  out  to  be  a woman.  She 
was  arrested  last  week  and  gave  her  name 
as  Effie  Wilson,  though  the  name  with 
which  she  signed  the  check  in  payment  for 
her  purchases  was  Bertha  Crum.  She  con- 
fessed and  turned  over  the  jewelry. 


26 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


New  York  Notes. 

C.  G.  Malliet  & Co.  have  filed  a judgment 
for  $350.79  against  Geo.  Freyman  & Co. 

Montague  F.  Harris,  president  of  the 
Chas.  Jacques  Clock  Co.,  sailed  for 
Europe  Wednesday  on  the  Teutonic. 

Thieves  last  week  broke  the  show  window 
of  Henry  Wortie’s  jewelry  store,  254  Grand 
St.,  Brooklyn,  and  stole  jewelry  valued  at 
about  $150. 

Geo.  C.  Cragg.  dealer  in  antiques,  bric-a- 
brac  and  curios,  19  E.  14th  St.,  assigned 
Wednesday  to  Richard  M.  Bent,  giving  pre- 
ferences for  $800. 

Aaron  Morris,  assignee  of  Eugene  B. 
Schiller,  formerly  of  415  Broadway,  is  ad- 
vertising for  creditors  of  the  insolvent  to 
present  their  verified  claims  at  his  office, 
234  Broadway,  on  or  before  Jan.  24,  1896. 

Philip  Wertheimer,  50  years  old,  who 
claims  to  be  a jeweler,  of  317  E.  74th  St.,  was 
indicted  Thursday  on  the  charge  of  register- 
ing illegally.  He  pleaded  not  guilty  before 
Judge  Allison,  in  the  General  Sessions,  and 
was  held  in  $500  bail.  He  claims  to  have 
lived  in  the  district  three  years. 

An  order  of  Judge  Me  Adam  of  the  Su- 
perior Court  last  week  authorized  B.  Ger- 
son  Oppenheimer,  receiver  of  the  defunct 
firm  of  Hagan,  White  & Co.,  to  pay  out  the 
sum  of  $325  15.  The  receiver,  who  was  ap- 
pointed March  13th,  reports  that  he  now 
holds  about  $2,400  for  dispersement  among 
the  creditors. 

One  of  the  charges  against  John  Johnson 
accused  of  burglary,  in  the  Jefferson 
Market  Police  Court,  Wednesday,  was  that 
he  had  attempted  the  night  before  to  rob  the 
jewelry  store  of  OttoKlemmpt,  199  Seventh 
Ave.  The  jeweler  appeared  upon  the  scene 
and  Johnson  fled.  Johnson  was  held  for 
trial  in  $1,500  bail. 

Abe  ut  $600  worth  of  jewelry  and  pawn 
tickets  for  a much  larger  amount  were 
found  in  the  possession  of  two  professional 
shoplifters  arrested  recently  by  the  police. 
The  prisoners  said  they  were  Mary  Busby 
and  Edward  Miller.  They  were  held  on 
the  specific  charge  of  stealing  a cape.  No 
clue  as  to  whom  the  jewelry  belonged  was 
discovered. 

Margaret  Fox  was  a prisoner  in  the  Lee 
Avenue  Police  Court,  Brooklyn,  last  week, 
charged  by  Max  Jaffe,  jeweler,  412  Bedford 
Ave.,  Williamsburg,  with  keeping  a dia- 
mond ring  which  had  been  sold  to  Captain 
Tharrington  on  the  instalment  plan  for  $85. 
Tharrington  had  paid  $35  on  the  ring  when 
he  left  the  city  and  went  to  Baltimore. 
Before  going  away  he  presented  the  ring  to 
Miss  Fox,  who  refused  to  give  it  up.  She 
was  held  in  $300  bail. 

The  action  of  Allan  C Dalzell  to  recover 
$75,000  from  the  Fahys  Watch  Case  Co., 
which,  as  told  in  The  Circular,  Oct.  16th, 
was  sent  to  a referee  by  Judge  Me  Adam 
after  it  had  come  up  for  trial  in  the  Super- 
ior Court,  was  continued  before  the  referee, 
Hamilton  Odell,  Oct.  29th  and  30th.  The 
amount  sued  for  is  claimed  to  be  due  as 


Dalzell’s  share  of  the  profits  on  corrugated 
watch  crowns  made  under  patents  which  he 
assigned  to  the  Fahys  Watch  Case  Co.  The 
examination  of  Henry  F.  Cook,  secretary 
of  the  defendant  company,  was  continued 
Wednesday  before  the  referee.  The  case 
was  then  adjourned  until  Nov.  12th. 

Herman  E.  Kleber,  receiver  of  the  F. 
Grote  Co.,  formerly  manufacturers  of  ivory 
goods,  in  E.  14th  St.,  applied  to  the  Superior 
Court,  Wednesday,  for  the  appointment  of 
a referee  to  take  and  state  his  final  ac 
counts.  Mr.  Kleber  was  appointed  receiver 
at  the  voluntary  dissolution  of  the  F.  Grote 
Co.,  in  November,  1893.  The  capital  stock 
of  the  corporation  was  $200,000,  divided  into 
2,000  shares.  Of  these  shares  the  receiver 
has  received  1,717,  and  paid  to  their  holders 
$41,160  50.  He  still  has  $1,839.50  to  be  paid 
on  the  remaining  283  shares.  Judge  Gilder- 
sleeve,  Thursday  appointed  Quincy  W. 
Boese  referee  to  take  the  receiver’s  ac- 
counts, and  the  time  to  file  objections  to  the 
accounting  was  extended  until  Nov.  15th. 

The  schedules  of  E.  R.  Stockwell,  manu- 
facturing jeweler,  19  John  St.,  who  assigned 
Oct.  8th  to  Herbert  M.  Condit,  were  filed 
last  week  in  the  Court  of  Common  Pleas. 
They  show  the  debts  and  liabilities  to 
amount  to  $1,895.56  with  nominal  assets  of 
$923.28,  actually  worth  $616.15.  The  mer- 
chandise on  hand  is  given  as  nominally 
worth  $527.49,  and  actually  $253.50.  The 
remainder  of  the  assets  consists  of  accounts 
due.  The  merchandise  creditors  are : 
J.  F.  Newman,  $1,014.35;  R.  A.  Breiden- 
bach,  $300  ; A.  Wittnauer,  $25;  Waterman 
& Lehmann,  $26;  Hodenpyl  & Sons,  $73; 
N.  H.  White  & Co.,  $88;  J.  W.  Richardson 
& Co.,  $33  ; Hurd  Bros.,  $8,  and  T.  W. 
Adams  & Co.,  $7.  The  remaining  liabilities 
are  advertising  accounts. 

The  first  of  the  replevin  suits  brought  by 
Isaac  Silverman  against  pawnbrokers  Mar- 
tin, Freel,  Harris,  Mentz,  Bruckheimer, 
Behrens,  and  Goodwin,  as  told  in  The 
Circular  last  week,  came  up  for  trial 
before  Judge  Lawrence,  of  the  Supreme 
Court  Circuit,  ended  Oct.  29th.  The  jury 
brought  in  a verdict  against  pawnbroker 
Martin  for  $153.  The  other  suits  were  not 
tried  owing  to  an  agreement  between  the 
litigants  to  let  the  result  of  the  first  action 
decide  the  offiers.  The  actions  as  already 
stated  are  brought  to  recover  watches  which 
are  claimed  to  have  been  stolen  from  Silver- 
man  during  the  Summer  of  1891  by  J. 
Newman,  who  pawned  them  with  the  de- 
fendants. Geo.  C.  Comstock  appeared  for 
Silverman  and  J.  Wernberg  for  the  pawn- 
brokers. 


A.  S.  Mermod  Honored  on  the  50th  An- 
niversary of  His  Business  Career. 

St.  Louis,  Mo.,  Nov.  i. — Augustus  S. 
Mermod,  president  of  the  Mermod  & Jac 
card  Jewelry  Co.,  celebrated  the  50th  anni- 
versary of  his  arrival  in  St.  Louis  Monday. 
The  occasion  was  made  a half  holiday  for 
the  managers  and  employes  of  the  firm. 

The  big  store  on  Broadway  and  Locust 


St.  was  handsomely  and  tastefully  dec- 
orated when  Mr.  Mermod  arrived  in  the 
morning.  He  was  met  at  the  entrance  by 
D.  C.  Jaccard,  who  escorted  him  into  the 
midst  of  200  employes  and  friends  who 
were  assembled  around  the  beautiful 
golden  receptacle  which  contained  the  testi- 
monial to  be  presented  to  Mr.  Mermod. 
Goodman  King,  secretary  of  the  firm,  ad- 
dressed Mr.  Mermod  after  quiet  was  re- 
stored. He  then  presented  him  with  the 
testimonial  in  the  form  of  a book  16x20 
inches,  enclosed  in  a Louis  Quinze  table, 
solidly  gilded,  the  upper  part  being  of  glass 
with  a lid.  It  is  beautifully  lined  with  silk 
plush  and  resting  inside  exposed  to  view 
was  the  testimonial. 

The  exterior  of  the  book  is  made  of  white 
Levantine  kid,  on  the  center  of  which  is 
placed  in  solid  gold  letters  the  initials 
A.  S.  M.  On  either  side  of  the  letters,  em- 
bossed in  gold,  is  placed  ‘ 1845-1895,”  and 
beneath  the  monogram  are  the  words, 
“ October  28th,  St.  Louis.”  On  the  second 
leaf,  in  illuminated  text  appears  the  follow- 
ing inscription; 

“ Dedicated  to  Augustus  S.  Mermod, 
Esq..  President  of  the  Mermod  & Jaccard 
Jewelry  Company,  commemorating  the 
Golden  Anniversary  of  his  arrival  in  the 
City  of  St.  Louis,  1845 — October —1895.” 

An  address  to  Mr.  Mermod  is  inscribed 
on  the  next  page,  opposite  to  which  are 
placed  portraits  of  D.  C.  Jaccard,  C.  F. 
Mathey  and  Goodman  King,  with  their 
signatures  attached,  surmounted  by  the  in- 
scription; 

“ An  honest  man  is  the  noblest  work  of 
God.”  Your  Lifetime  Associates. 

The  names  of  the  mem’oers  of  the  estab- 
lishment and  the  employes  in  the  various 
branches  of  the  manufacturing  department 
of  the  firm  then  follow.  On  the  next 
leaf  is  shown  a picture  of  St.  Louis  in  1845, 
and  of  St.  Louis  in  1895,  with  a cut  of  the 
present  Mermod  & Jaccard  building. 

As  the  golden  anniversary  also  celebrated 
Mr.  Mermod’s  crystal  wedding,  he  was  pre- 
sented at  the  same  time  with  a magnifi- 
cent cut  glass,  gold  inlaid  vase,  filled  with 
fifty  roses. 

Mr.  Mermod  came  here  50  years  ago 
direct  from  the  mountains  of  Switzerland 
and  opened  a small  jewelry  store  on  Main 
St.  between  Locust  and  Vine  Sts.,  then  an 
important  center  of  the  retail  trade.  For 
two  years  he  conducted  this  small  store 
alone,  making  a name  for  honest  and  fair 
dealing.  He  was  a bachelor  then  and  lived 
in  a room  next  door  to  his  store. 

In  1847  he  was  joined  by  his  old  school- 
boy friend  and  associate  D.  C.  Jaccard,  and 
the  two  then  formed  the  partnership  and 
started  the  firm  that  has  grown  to  be  the 
largest  west  of  New  York. 

During  the  50  years  of  Mr.  Mermod’s 
life  in  St.  Louis  he  has  been  known  as  a 
progressive,  liberal,  broad  minded  citizen, 
always  ready  to  assist  in  any  public  enter- 
prise, and  the  kindest  of  employers.  He  is 
held  in  the  highest  esteem  by  his  associates 
and  employes. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


^ND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


27 


Last  Week’s  Arrivals. 


THE  CIRCUEAR  has  perfected  ar- 
rangements lor  obtaining  the  names 
and  hotel  addresses  of  all  the  latest 
buyers  visiting  New  York,  and  each 
day  posts  in  its  office,  i8g  Broadway, 
a bulletin  which  every  member  oi 
the  trade  is  cordially  invited  to  copy. 

The  following  out-of-town  dealers  were 
registered  in  New  York  during  the  past 
week;  W.  H.  Frost,  Elmira,  N.  Y.,  Gilsey 
H.;  C.  Du  Bois,  Walton,  N.  Y.,  St.  Denis 
H.;  G.  F.  Durgin,  Concord,  N.  H.,  Holland 
H.;  R.  S.  Gardiner,  Derby,  Conn.,  Park 
Ave.  H.;  W.  H.  Durfee,  Providence,  R.  I., 
Imperial  H.;  S.  K.  Zook,  Lancaster,  Pa., 
Coleman  H.;  M.  L.  Carter,  Danbury,  Conn., 
St.  Denis  H.;  S.  J.  Son,  Chicago,  111., 
Astor  H.;  D.  R.  Brown,  Stroudsburg,  Pa., 
Sturtevant  H ; C.  S.  Sherwood,  Ports- 
mouth, Va.,  Marlborough  H.;  Chas.  F. 
Stark,  Calicoon  Depot,  N.  Y.;  J.  R.  Nutt, 
Akron,  O.,  Imperial  H.;  C.  J.  Giering, 
' Middletown,  N.  Y.,  Sturtevant  H.;  F. 
Rolshoven,  Detroit,  Mich.,  Union  Square  H. ; 
E.  P.  Durango,  Chattanooga,  Tenn.,  St. 
Denis  H.;  C.  A.  McAllister,  Philadelphia, 
Pa.,  Astor  H.;  H.  Hendelman,  Towanda, 
Pa.,  Broadway  Central  H.;  D.  R.  Ding- 
wall. Winnipeg,  Man.,  Imperial  H. 


L.  B.  Coe,  Springfield,  Mass.,  has  taken 
temporary  quarters  at  320  Main  St. 


Boston. 

E.  H.  Saxton  has  been  confined  to  his 
home  by  illness  the  past  week. 

Aaron  Crocker,  with  John  W.  .“^'anborn  & 
Co.,  will  go  to  Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  about  Nov. 
10,  to  open  a branch  house  there. 

C.  S.  Cook,  of  A.  Stowell  & Co.,  has  been 
seriously  ill  in  Montreal,  with  an  attack  of 
appendicitis,  but  at  last  accounts  was  pro- 
gressing toward  recovery. 

George  H.  Lloyd  has  resigned  the  treas- 
urership  of  the  New  England  Association 
of  Opticians  and  will  go  south  this  Winter 
for  the  benefit  of  his  health. 

Eugene  H.  Richards  was  elected  grand 
commander  of  the  Grand  Commandery, 
Knights  Templar  of  Massachusetts  and 
Rhode  Island,  last  Thursday  evening. 

Dame,  Stoddard  & Kendall,  who  handle 
table  cutlery,  are  to  occupy  the  premises  at 
370  Washington  St  , formerly  leased  by 
Henry  T.  Spear  & Son,  and  the  floor  above, 
thereby  largely  increasing  their  floor  area. 

The  marriage  took  place  Oct.  29th  of 
Miss  Louise  Tower  Wallace  and  Everett 
Mifflin  Dickinson,  at  the  home  of  the  bride’s 
parents,  ii  Atlantic  St.,  South  Boston.  Mr. 
Dickinson  is  ajeweler  of  North  Adams,  Mass. 

Smith,  Patterson  & Co.  have  walled  up 
their  Arch  St.  entrance  and  the  private 
offices  of  the  partners  occupy  the  space 
thus  made  available.  The  remodeling  of 
the  store  is  now  completed  and  the  beauty 
and  size  of  the  interior  evoke  expressions  of 


admiration  from  all  visitors  to  the  estab- 
lishment. 

The  furniture  dealers  of  Boston  are  en- 
croaching upon  the  domain  of  the  jewelers, 
especially  noteworthy  being  the  recent 
action  of  the  Paine  Furniture  Co.,  in  add- 
ing a very  large  assortment  of  hall  clocks 
to  their  stock  and  announcing  their  purpose 
to  undersell  the  trade  $25  to  $75  on  their 
timepieces. 

J.  E.  Thompson,  who  has  recently 
changed  his  location  from  1390  Tremont 
St.,  to  Columbus  Ave.  extension,  Roxbury 
district,  was  given  a “ housewarming  call” 
at  his  store  last  Monday  night  by  a num- 
ber of  friends,  who  brought  with  them  as  a 
present  suitable  to  the  occasion,  a handsome 
gas  radiator. 

Buyers  in  town  the  past  week  included : 
G.  A Bailey,  West  Brookfield;  C.  B.  Duck- 
worth, E.  J.  Elliott,  Pawtucket,  R.  I.;  J.  E. 
Chickering,  Suncook,  N.  H.;  O.  F.  Hall, 
South  Norridgewock,  Me.;  Burr  Bros.,  Fox- 
boro;  E.  Huntley,  Northfield,  Vt. ; F.  L. 
Willoby,  Brookline,  N.  H.;  G.  H.  Willoby, 
Franklin;  W.  J.  Tracy,  Burrillville,  R.  L; 
Perley  Chandler,  Barre,  Vt. ; E.  G.  Wright, 
Putnam,  Conn. ; A.  W.  Livingston,  of  Kelly 
& Livingston,  North  Troy,  Vt. 

There  was  a $75,000  fire  at  Miller’s  Falls, 
Mass.,  Wednesday,  and  amDng  the  losses 
were  E.  M.  Partridge,  drugs  and  jewelry, 
'loss  $3,500,  insurance,  $2,500;  and  W.  F. 
Everett,  jewelers’  tools,  loss,  $300,  uninsured. 


JEWMI^MRS  ARE  INVITED  TO  INSPECT  OUR 


IN  OUR 


AT 

915  BROADWAY,  NEAR  21st  STREET. 


THE  DISPLAY  COVERS 


THE  WHOLE  LINE  OF 


Cut  Glass 


IF  YOU  CANNOT  CALL,  SEND  FOR  A CATALOGUE. 


C.  Dorflinqer  & Sons, 


36  MURRAY  STREET, 


NEW  YORK. 


28 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


Profit,  Certain: 


Queries  by  Circular  Readers. 


Trade  Gossip. 


Satisfaction,  Sure! 


.>IOTE. — QuestioDs  under  this  departmeut  will  be  answered  as 
promptly  as  possible.  Some  queries  require  careful  investigation  be 
fore  a satisfactory  answer  can  be  given ; hence  such  answers  are 
often  seemingly  delayed.  Thb  Cieculab  desire.s  every  jeweler  to 
take  advantage  of  this  department. 


We  propose  that  Retail  Jewelers  shall  havt 
unusual  advantage  in  pushing  the  sale  of  the 
New  York  Standard  Watch.  Therefore 

“ Any  product  of  this  Company  in  the  hands 
of  any  Reguiar  Jeweier.  whether  found  in  his 
own  stock  or  returned  to  him  by  a customer^ 
which  is  not  entirely  satisfactory  from  any 
cause  whatever,  may  be  sent  by  mail  to  the 
New  York  office  of  this  Company  ( No.  11 
John  Street),  and  avV/i/n  one  day  (or  two,  at 
farthest)  it  will  be  returned  to  him  repaired,  or 
a new  Watch  sent  in  exchange;  and  in  the 
large  majority  of  instances  there  will  be  no 
charges  whatever.”  No  bothering  to  know  the 
why  for  its  return  ; nogrumbling  or  hesitating; 
no  delay ; no  questioning  the  sender’s  state- 
ment; just  a straight-forward  doing  ai  what  we 
say  we  will  do,  and  liberal  methods  in  our 
doing  it. 

Such  a guarantee  has  never  before  been 
ventured  by  any  Watch  Manufacturer  in  the 
World.  We  submit  it  as  the  earnest  of  our 
faith  in  our  “works,”  and  in  token  of  our 
desire  to  increase  the  profit  and  satisfaction 
of  the  Jeweler  in  handling  the  line. 

The  New  York  Standard  Watch  Cq. 


DIES 

AND 

HEDALS. 


VICTOR  D."^BRENNER, 

mr  ME  cwTEi 

mh  nEEiaLLEyiir 

108  FULTON  ST.,  N.  Y. 

Cuts  Dies  and  Hubs  for  all  kinds  of 
Medals,  Badges,  Portraits,  Crests,  Coats 
of  Arms,  Buttons,  Silverware  and 
Jewelry. 

Embossing  Dies  for 
Fancy  Stationery 
and  Leather. 

FINE  FIGURE 
WORK  A 
SPECIALTY. 


OAMPBELL-METOALF  SILVEE  00., 

SILVERSIVIITHS, 


ALL  GOODS  925/1009  FINE. 

Factory,  Offices. 

Frovidence,  R.  f.  New  York  ami  San  Franrisco. 


Chic.5(;o,  ill.,  Oct.  30. 
Editor  0/ The  Jewelers’  Circular: 

Will  you  kindly  inform  us  of  the  name  ot  the  silver 
manufacturer  who  uses  a trademark  with  the  letter 
M combined  with  a hyppogriff  and  the  word  “ ster- 
ling.” We  know  it  is  not  the  Mauser  Mfg-  Co. 
mark.  Towle  Mfg.  Co. 

Answer:  — We  find  that  the  Mal’by, 
Stevens  & Curtiss  Co.,  Wallingford,  Conn., 
stamp  their  silverware  with  the  letter  M, 
the  word  sterling,  and  the  representation 
of  a fabulous  animal,  which  we  take  to  be  a 
hyppogriff. 


Trov.  N.  Y.,  Oct.  31. 
Editor  ^The  Jewelers’  Circular  : 

I am  under  the  impression  that  some  time  ago  1 saw 
an  ad.  in  your  paper  for  a small  attachment  to  apply  to 
the  ring  after  it  is  on  the  finger  to  keep  it  from  slipping 
or  turning.  Can  you  give  me  the  name  of  the  manu- 
facturer ? Tappin’s  Diamond  Palace. 

Answer:  — A holdfast  guard  ring  manu- 
factured by  J.  B.  Bowden  & Co.,  3 Maiden 
Lane,  New  York,  is  the  only  article  to  our 
knowledge  of  the  sort  to  which  you  refer. 
This  ring  consists  of  a fine  gold  band  made 
to  fit  close  to  the  ring  to  be  protected,  with 
a small  projection  which  enters  under  the 
setting  of  the  latter  ring,  thereby  prevent- 
ing it  from  turning  or  slipping. 


Wilmington,  Del.,  Oct.  30. 
Editor  of  The  Jewelers’  Circular: 

Would  you  please  let  me  known  which  is  the  best 
way  to  wash  a red  chamois  skin  ? 

Wilmington  Jeweler. 

Answer: — For  cleaning  soiled  chamois 
skin  make  a solution  of  weak  soda  and 
warm  water,  rub  plenty  of  soft  soap  into 
the  leather  and  allow  it  to  remain  in  soak 
for  two  hours;  then  rub  it  well  until  quite 
clean.  Afterward,  rinse  it  well  in  a weak 
solution  composed  of  warm  water,  soda  and 
yellow  soap.  It  must  not  be  rinsed  in 
water  only,  for  then  it  would  become  so 
hard,  when  dry,  as  to  be  unfit  for  use.  It 
is  the  small  quantity  of  soap  left  in  the 
leather  that  allows  the  finest  particles  of  the 
latter  to  separate  and  become  soft  like 
silk.  After  rinsing,  wring  it  well  in  a rough 
towel  and  dry  quickly,  then  pull  it  about 
and  brush  it  well,  and  it  will  become  softer 
and  better  than  most  new  leathers.  Some 
workmen  pull  it  constantly  from  the  time 
that  it  is  still  somewhat  moist  until  fully 
dry. 

In  using  a rouge  leather  to  touch  up 
highly  polished  surfaces,  it  is  frequently 
observed  to  scratch  the  work;  this  is  caused 
bv  particles  of  dust  and  even  hard  rouge 
that  was  left  in  the  skin,  and  if  removed 
with  a clean  brush  containing  rouge,  it  will 
then  give  the  brightest  and  best  finish, 
which  all  good  workmen  like  to  see  on  their 
work. 


Baum  & Oppenheim,  41  and  43  Maiden 
Lane,  New  York,  are  manufacturers  of 
a tasty  and  handsome  line  of  ring  mount- 
ings and  the  fact  that  they  are  kept  con- 
stantly busy  is  evidence  that  their  goods 
are  appreciated  by  the  trade. 

It  is  a natural  expectation  that  the  great 
vogue  of  the  hair  comb  would  urge  design- 
ers to  endeavor  to  conceive  devices  that 
would  be  improvements  upon  the  standard 
article.  With  the  novelty  produced  by 
Thos.  W.  Adams  & Co.,  14  John  St.,  New 
York  and  illustrated  in  another  part  of 
this  issue,  these  manufacturers  have  been 
eminently  successful  in  attaining  the  end 
desired.  It  is  a unique  and  beautiful  orna- 
ment for  the  hair,  and  is  bound  to  win  for 
itself  a large  sale.  It  is  practically  three 
combs  in  one,  and  its  construction  is  bound 
to  secure  symmetry  which  is  not  sure  of  be- 
ing obtained  with  the  separated  combs. 

A fine  volume  is  the  1896  illustrated 
catalogue  of  the  “ Busiest  House  in 
America,”  Lapp  & Flershem,  Chicago,  111. 
It  comprises  640  pages,  12x10  inches,  bound 
in  heavy  cloth  covers.  It  is  the  20th  an- 
nual publication  of  the  house,  and  contains 
illustrations  and  prices  of  the  choicest 
articles  selected  from  their  immense  stock, 
consisting  of  silver  plated  ware,  table 
cutlery,  sterling  silver  table  ware  and 
novelties,  clocks,  canes,  gold  pens,  optical 
goods,  compasses,  watches  of  the  best 
makes,  fine  diamond  jewelry,  and  solid  gold, 
sterling  silver  and  rolled  gold  jewelry. 
The  firm  give  assurance  that  every  article 
shown  in  this  catalogue  has  been  selected 
with  great  care  as  to  value,  quality,  style 
and  durability,  so  that  purchasers  can  rely 
upon  getting  the  best  value  for  the  price. 
A specification  of  the  lines  would  prove 
a practically  impossible  task  and 
would  occupy  more  space  than  this 
journal  could  spare.  Suffice  to  say  that 
silver  plated  hollow  ware,  novelties,  etc., 
occupy  140  pages;  aluminium  hollow  ware, 
oak  boxes,  cut  glass,  10  pages;  flatware,  55 
pages;  sterling  silver  flatware  and  novelties, 
55  pages;  leather  goods,  spectacle  cases, 
etc..  8 pages;  optical  goods,  barometers, 
etc  , 23  pages;  trays  and  boxes,  2 pages; 
canes,  gold  and  silver  heads,  umbrellas, 
gold  pens,  pencils,  etc.,  40  pages;  clocks, 
50  pages;  watches,  cases  and  movements, 
63  pages;  diamond  jewelry  and  14k.  jewelry, 
32  pages;  other  jewelry,  thimbles,  etc., 
about  200  pages.  A page  is  given  to  bicycle 
cyclometers.  The  lines  of  plated  ware  in- 
clude the  products  of  the  members  of  the 
Silver  Plated  Ware  Manufacturers’  Asso- 
ciation as  well  as  other  manufacturers. 
The  volume  is  a remarkable  production, 
complete  in  every  essential  looked  for  in  a 
jewelers’  catalogue. 


Ex-president  Robert  H.  Cole,  of  the 
American  Optical  Co.,  Southbridge,  Mass., 
was  in  Boston  visiting  his  friends  in  the 
trade  the  past  week. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


29 


urpjivelinj 

p^prc^ei^fji|:iv« 


CP.  D UNGAN 
• traveler  for 
Meriden  Britannia  Co., 
Chicago,  returned 
from  a satisfactory 
visit  to  Missouri  and 
Kansas  jewelers  and 
left  early  last  week 
to  renew  acquaintances  in  Michigan. 


Traveling  representative*  maj 
consider  cdese  columns  open  for 
the  pnblioation  of  any  news  or 
times  of  interest  regarding  them- 
selves or  their  confreres. 


R.  A.  Boyer,  representing  A.  C.  Becker, 
Chicago,  has  come  in  from  the  “ copper 
range  ” and  says  he  found  fair  business- 
Mr.  Boyer  has  left  for  the  west,  to  return 
by  the  northern  route. 

The  mid-Winter  banquet  of  the  New 
England  Jewelry  Travelers’  Association 
will  take  place  on  the  20th  or  23  d of  next 
month.  At  this  meeting  the  annual  busi- 
ness session  of  the  association  will  take 
place.  The  committee  in  charge  are  plan- 
ning for  a very  enjoyable  occasion. 

Jewelry  travelers  visiting  the  Boston 
dealers  the  past  week  included  ; Chris. 
Morgan,  Rogers  & Brother;  (jeo.  B.  Evans, 
Trenton  Watch  Co.;  E.  F.  Skinner,  J. 
Muhr  & Bro.;  C.  C.  Munn,  C.  Rogers  & 
Bros.;  W.  H.  Tarlton,  Wightman  & Hough 
Co.;  John  A.  Abel  and  H.  A.  Friese,  Lewis, 


Kaiser  &•  Luthy. 

Traveling  men  in  New  Haven,  Conn., 
last  week  were:  J.  C.  Cook,  Bergstein  & Son; 
Mr.  Angell,  Link,  Angell  & Weiss;  W.  C. 
Nellis,  Enos  Richardson  & Co.;  Mr.  Cog- 


gins, Towle  Mfg.  Co.;  Mr.  Payne,  Dominick 
& Haff;  M Adler;  S.  Arnstein,  Arnstein 
Bros.  & Co  ; Mr.  Frank,  Herzog,  Goldsmith 
& Frank;  E.  Harris;  Mr.  Bleecker,  Bassett 
Jewelry  Co.;  Mr.  Pecxham,  Palmer  & Peck- 
ham;  Mr.  Harman,  M.  B.  Bryant  & Co. 


Traveling  salesmen  calling  on  Davenport, 
la.,  jewelers  the  past  week  were:  Delancey 
Stone.  Shafer  & Douglas;  John  Lunn,  Snow 
& Westcott;  V.  L.  Burgesser,  Krementz  & 
Co.;  C.  F.  Livermore,  Middletown  Plate 
Co.;  Charles  B.  Byron,  Whiting  Mfg.  Co.; 
Mr.  Terrill,  E.  Ira  Richards  & Co.;  E.  B. 
Frank,  Pairpoint  Mfg.  Co.;  L.  Newhouse, 
Glickauf  & Newhouse;  S.  Greenfield,  Man- 
hattan Silver  Plate  Co.;  H.  G.  Nye,  C. 
Rogers  & Bros  ; Mr.  Potter,  Acme  Silver 
Plate  Co.;  Leo  Henle,  Sussfeld,  Lorsch  & 
Co.;  L G.  Nuelsen,  Trier  Bros.;  Frank 
Thompson,  Derby  Silver  Co.;  and  William 
Seckels. 


Traveling  representatives  who  inter- 
viewed Indianapolis,  Ind.,  dealers  last  week 
included:  H.  E.  Vincent,  Simpson,  Hall, 
Miller  & Co.;  N.  F.  Swift,  for  G.  K.  Web- 
ster; H.  Hukill,  New  Haven  Clock  Co.; 
H C.  Rowbotham,  J.  Muhr  & Bro.;  Mr 
Wilson,  Crescent  Watch  Case  Co.;  M.  E. 


O’Donald,  Courvoisier-Wilcox  Mfg.  Co.;  F. 
B.  Lawton,  S.  B.  Champlin  & Son;  W.  J‘ 
Miller,  Seth  Thomas  Clock  Co.;  Mr.  Gold- 
smith, Adolph  Goldsmith  & Son;  S.  H. 
Brower,  R.  L.  Griffith  & Son;  L.  B.  Eaton, 

D.  Wilcox  & Co.;  Mr.  Marsh,  Chas.  A. 
Marsh  & Co.;  and  a representative  of  W. 
H.  Bell  & Co. 

The  following  traveling  salesmen  passed 
through  Detroit,  Mich.,  last  week  : Frank 

E.  Wiske,  the  Rogers  Silver  Plate  Co.; 
Mr.  Bristol,  C.  Rogers  & Bros ; E.  B. 
Richards,  G.  A.  Dean  & Co.;  Mr.  Heffron, 
Riley,  French  & Heffron  ; Mr.  Bliss,  Gor- 
ham Mfg.  Co.;  Sol.  Veit,  Marx,  Veit  & 
Co.;  Max  Arnstein,  Arnstein  Bros.  & Co.; 
A.  Adler,  L.  & J.  Adler  & Co.;  J.  N.  Beck- 
with, Joseph  H.  Fink  & Co.;  W.  H.  Har- 
rison, Harrison  & Groeshel  ; A.  M.  Shieder, 
William  Demuth  & Co.;  L.  F.  Clark,  W. 

F.  Corey  & Bro.;  W.  A.  Lamb,  George 
H.  Fuller  & Son  ; Frank  Fuller,  Braillard 
& Rosenberg  ; O.  C.  Lane,  Reed&  Barton  ; 
W.  I.  Shaw,  Geoff roy  & Co.;  W.  T.  Gough, 
Carter,  Sloan  & Co.;  Henry  Frank,  Max 
Freund  & Co.;  and  a representative  of  the 
Geneva  Optical  Co. 

The  following  salesmen  called  on  Syra- 
cuse, N.  Y.,  jewelers  the  past  week:  Albert 
Holzinger,  for  Fred.  Kaufman  ; John  W. 
Sherwood  ; S.  Cohn,  Oppenheimer  Bros.  & 
Veith  ; W.  S.  Campbell,  Day,  Clark  & Co.; 
Mr.  Gregory,  Strobell  & Crane  ; N.  F.  Dur- 
lach,  Durlach  Bros.;  James  Pantons  Mabie, 
Todd  & Bard ; H.  D.  Mix,  Wightman  & 
Hough  Co.;  Edwin  Beckwith,  New  York 


Mutual  Optical  Co.;  W.  H.  Browne,  Wilcox 
Silver  Plate  Co. ; J.  R.  Goodwin,  Carter, 
Sloan  & Co.;  Edw.  B.  Rogers,  Jules  Laur- 
engot  & Co.;  Mr.  Rosenbaum,  B.  H.  Davis 
& Co.;  F.  D.  Smith,  Riker  Bros.;  Harry  C. 
Larter,  Larter,  Elcox  & Co.;  J.  J.  Hawkes, 
Hayden  W.  Wheeler  & Co.;  George  Osborne, 
Wm.  Smith  & Co.;  Mr.  Lawrence,  Spencer 
Optical  Mfg.  Co.;  Milton  S.  Rodenberg,  S. 
& B.  Lederer ; E.  W.  Wagner,  Leon  J. 
Glaenzer  & Co. 


Canada  and  the  Provinces. 

J.  Miller,  Port  Hope,  Ont.,  was  in 
Toronto,  last  week. 

J.  E.  McIntosh,  Port  Elgin,  Ont.,  has 
sold  out  his  stock  to  Miss  McIntosh. 

J.  D.  Brokenshire,  Halifax,  N.  S.,  has 
been  succeeded  by  W.  E.  Brokenshire. 

A.  J.  Gabel,  Toronto,  Ont.,  is  closing  up 
his  store  there  and  moving  to  Berlin,  Ont. 

Burglars  visited  Alexandria,  Ont.,  on 
Tuesday  last  and  secured  a quantity  of 
jewelry  from  the  store  of  John  McMillan. 

C.  H.  Clarke,  representing  J.  F.  Sturdy’s 
Sons,  Attleboro  Falls,  Mass.,  at  present  on 
a business  trip  through  Canada  was 
registered  at  the  Rossin  House,  Toronto, 
last  week.  He  said  he  had  met  with  en- 
couraging success. 

J.  Benfield,  watch  case  manufacturer. 
New  York,  and  Alex.  Milne,  watch  crown 
manufacturer,  Newark,  N J.,  have  been  in 
Toronto  some  two  weeks  with  the  object  of 
purchasing  a gold  mine  in  the  eastern  por- 
■ tion  of  the  Province. 


■QACRIFICE  .QALE. 

To  clear  our  enormous  stock  we  have  made  sweeping 
reductions  in  prices ; and  until  December  first  will  offer 
large  lines  of 

CO  ALPORT, 

ROYAL  WORCESTER, 

CROWN  DERBY, 

DOULTON, 

MINTON, 

POINTON, 

WEDGWOOD, 

FRENCH  BRONZES, 

GILT  REGULATORS, 

ENAMELED  AND  CUT  GLASS 

PEDESTALS, 

MEISSEN  ; 

at  from  5 to  15  per  cent,  less  than  the  goods  can  be  imported  at  to-day. 
The  goods  are  marked  in  plain  figures  and  we  think  this  is  the  best  and 
cheapest  line  ever  offered  to  the  trade. 

GOOD  GOODS  AND  GOOD  VALUES. 


LE  BOUTILLIER  & CO., 

860  BROADWAY, 

Northeast  corner  of  Seventeenth  Street,  ■ NEW  YORK. 


30 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6 1895. 


CLASSIF'iED  INDEX  TO  ADVERTISEMENTS. 


All  Advertisements  are  entitled  to  one  Insertion  under  proper  heading.  Extra  Insertions,  $6.00  per  annum. 

Extra  Headings,  ^13.00  per  annum. 


Page 


Art  Furniture. 

Smith,  Geo.  VV.,  & Co.,  818  Broadway,  N.  Y..  16 

Art  Pottery,  Brie-a-brae,  etc. 

Bawo  & Dotter,  26-32  Barclay  St.,  N.  V 13-48 

Bloom  & Philips,  228  W.  4th  St.,  Cincinnati, 

0 34 

Bradley  & Hubbard  Mfg.  Co..  Meriden,  Conn.  40 
Dwenger,  Chas  L.,  35-37  Park  Place,  N.  V — 47 
Glaenzer,  L6on  J.  & Co.,  80  & 82  Chambers 

St.,  N.  Y 9 

Hinrichs  & Co.,  29-31  Park  Place,  N.  Y 47 

Lazarus,  Rosenfeld  & Lehmann,  60-62  Murray 

St.,  N.  Y 47 

Le  Boutillier  & Co.,  860  Broadway,  N.  Y 29 

Leonard,  P.  H.,  76  Reade  St.,  New  York 46 

Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co.,  ii  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y . i6-a 

Assayers  & Befiners. 

Goldsmith  Bros.,  63  & 65  Washington  St., 

Chicago,  111 33 

Auctioneers. 

Boyle,  S.  A.  & Co.,  14  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 40 

Comrie,  A.  J.,  22  John  St.,  N.  Y.  35 

Rich,  H.  M.  & Co..  21  School  St„  Boston, 

Mass 36 

Badges,  Medals,  Ftc. 

Braxmar,  C.  G.,  10  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 43 

Brenner,  Victor  U.,  108  Fulton  St , N.  Y 28 

Smith,  H.  L.,  4 Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 20 

Cameo  Portraits. 

Bonnet,  L.,  927  B’way,  N Y 18 

Chronometers,  Marine. 

Bliss,  John  & Co.,  129  Front  St. . N.  Y 20 

Clocks,  French,  English  and  American. 

Ansonia  Clock  Co.,  11  Cliff  St.,  N.  Y 2 

Evans,  W.  F.  & Sons,  Hendsworth,  Birming- 
ham, England  40 

Jacques,  Chas.,  Clock  Co.,  22  Cortlandt  St., 


Joliet  Electric  Clock  Co..  Joliet,  111 35 

Self-Winding  Clock  Co.,  626  Broadway,  N.Y..  48 

Cut  Glass. 

Dorflinger,  C.  & Sons,  36  Murray  St.,  N.  V...  27 
Empire  Cut  Glass  Co.,  35  Warren  St.,  NY....  32 
Straus,  L.  & Sons,  42-48  Warren  St.,  N.  Y 44 

Diamond  & Precious  Stone  Importers. 
Falkenau,  Oppenheimer  & Co.,  40  M.  L.,  N.Y  48 
Hedges,  Wm.  S.  & Co  , 170  Broadway,  N.  Y...  18 

Kahn,  L.  & M.  & Co.,  172  Broadway,  N.  Y 48 

Kipling,  R.  A.,  Hays  Bldg.,  N.  Y 18 

Nissen,  Ludwig  & Co.,  18  John  St.,  N.Y 7 

Randel,  Baremore  & Billings,  29  Maiden  Lane, 

N.Y 19 

Rich  & Allen,  State  and  Madison  Sts.,  Chicago  33 
Smith,  Alfred  H.  & Co.,  182  Broadway,  N.  Y..  18 
Stern  Bros.  & Co. , John  and  Nassau  Sts.,  N.Y  15 


Diamond  Cutters. 

Fera,  Henry,  Prescott  Bldg.,  N.  Y 18 

Oppenheimer  Bros.  & Veith,  Prescott  Bldg., 

N.Y 21 

Randel,  Baremore  & Billings,  29  Maiden  Lane  19 

Diamond  Jewelry. 

Sauter,  L.,  & Co.,  194  Broadway,  N.  Y 32 

Waterman  & Lehmann,  20  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  12 

Diamond  Mountings. 

Bachem,  Chas.,  355  Mulberry  St.,  Newark, N.J.  41 
Oppenheimer,  H.  E.  & Co.,  14  Maiden  Lane, 


N.  Y 48 

Spies  & Co.,  126  State  St.,  Chicago.  Ill 33 

Ebony  Goods. 

Deitsch  Bros.,  7 E.  17th  St.,  N.  Y lo-ii 


Page. 

Enamelers. 

Wild,  S.  S.  & Son,  179  Eddy  St.,  Providence, 

R.  1 20 

Pine  Engraving. 

The  Stationers’  Engraving  Co.,  98-102  Nassau 
St.,N.  Y 36 

Pine  Stationary. 

Hurd,  Geo.  B , & Co.,  425  Broome  St.,  N.  Y..  37 
Parsons  it  Greene  Co.,  is  Murray  St.,  N.Y...  36 
Gold  Jewelry. 

Adams,  T.  W.,  & Co.,  14  John  St.,  N.  Y 32  a 

Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.  19  Maiden  Lane 4-16 

Carter,  Sloan  & Co.,  15  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y ..  19 
Hedges,  A.  J.,  & Co.,  6 Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  i6-a 
Richardson,  Enos.,  & Co.,  23  Maiden  Lane, 
N.Y 43 

Gold  and  Rolled  Plate  Jewelry. 

Waite,  Thresher  Co.,  Providence,  R.  I 4 

Horologieal  Schools. 

Bowman,  Ezra  F.,  Technical  School,  Lan- 
caster, Pa 32 

Parson’s  School  for  Watchmakers,  Peoria,  111.  35 

Ivory  Goods. 

Deitsch  Bros.,  7 E.  17th  St.,  N.Y lo-ii 

Jewelry,  Silverware  and  Optical  Cases. 

Borgzinner,  S.  & A.,  82-84  Nassau  St.,  N.Y...  22 

Jobbers,  Watches,  Diamonds,  Etc. 

Albert  Bros.,  Cincinnati,  O 35 

Aikin-Lambert  Jewelry  Co.,  19  Maiden  Lane  4-16 
Friedberger,  L.  S.,  & Co  , 484  Broadway,  N.  Y 40 
Friedlander,  R.,  L.  & M.,  Ltd.  30  Maiden  Lane, 

N.Y 43 

Lapp  & Flershem,  92  98  State  St.,  Chicago 33 

Myers,  S.  F.  & Co.,  48  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 48 

Scott,  J.  T.,  & Co.,  4 Maiden  Lane.,  N.  Y..  32  a 

Lawyers. 

Emmons  Associated  Law  Offices,  Portland, 

Ore 4 

Leather  Goods. 

Deitsch  Bros.,  7 E.  17th  St.,  N.  Y lo-ii 

Musical  Boxes. 

Jacot  & Son,  39  Union  Square,  N.  Y 12 

Wolff,  A.  & Co.,  14th  St.  & Union  Square,  W. 
N.Y 4 

Muslin  Buffs. 

Williamsville  Mfg.  Co.,  18  S.  Water  St.,  Provi- 


dence, R.  1 40 

Optical  Goods. 

Geneva  Optical  Co.,  Chicago,  Ills 33 

Kirstein’s,  E.,  Sons  Co.,  Rochester,  N.  Y 26 

Optical  Schools. 

Chicago  Ophthalmic  College,  Chicago,  111 33 

Knowles,  Dr., 36 


Spencer  Optical  Mfg.  Co..  15  Maiden  L.,  N.Y.  20 

Pens,  Pencils,  etc. 

Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.,  iq  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y..  4-16 


Mabie,  Todd  & Bard,  New  York 31 

Razors. 

Mathey  Bros.,  Mathez  & Co.,  21-23  Maiden 
Lane,  N.  Y 20 

Ring  Makers. 

Baum  & Oppenheim,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y. ..  22 
Bowden,  J.  B.  & Co.,  192  Broadway,  N.  Y ...  18 

Knapp,  Chas.,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 40 

Wood,  J.  R.  & Sons.,  21  23  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  48 

Safes. 

Marvin  Safe  Co.,  12  Park  Place,  N,  Y 36 


Sample  Trunks, 

Crouch  & Fitzgerald,  161  Broadway,  N.  Y...  43 

Seamless  Wire, 

C.  R.  Smith  Plating  Co.,  21  Eddy  St.,  Provi- 


dence, R.  1 17 

Security  Pin  Guard. 

Security  Mfg.  Co.,  7 Astor  House,  N.  Y 19 

Scales. 


Kohlbusch,  Herman.  Sr.,  59  Nassau  St.,  N.  Y.  19 

Show  Cases. 

Melishek  & Petter,  128  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y...  15 

Show  Trays. 


Fletcher  Mfg.  Co.,  259  W.  27th  St.  N.  Y 23 

Silver  Plated  Ware. 

Homan  Silver  Plate  Co.,  Cincinnati,  O ....  i6b 

Rogers  & Bro.,  16  Cortland  St.,  N.  Y 24 

The  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.,  Hartford,  Conn...  32 

Skeletons  and  Steel  Goods. 

Schulder  Bros.,  545  Pearl  St.,  N.  Y 48 

Sterling  Silver  Novelties. 

Codding  Bros.  & Heilborn,  North  Attleboro 

Mass 20 

Foster  & Bailey,  Providence,  R.1 3 

Sterling  Silverware. 

Campbell-Metcalf  Silver  Co.,  Providence,  R.  I.  28 

Dominick  & Haff,  Union  Square,  N.  Y 5 

Fuchs,  Ferd.  & Bros.,  808-810  Greenwich  St., 

N.Y 32 

Gorham  Mfg.  Co.,  B’way  & 19th  St.,  N.  Y 14 

Knowles,  J.  B.  & S.  M.  Co.,  Providence,  R.  I.  20 

Towle  Mfg.  Co.,  Newburyport,  Mass 36 

Wallace,  R„  & Sons  M’f’g  Co.,  Wallingford, 

Conn 6 

Whiting,  F.  M.,  Co.,  North  Attleboro,  Mass..  20 
Wood  & Hughes,  16  John  St.,  N.  Y 20 


Tissue  Paper. 

Dexter,  C.  H.,  & Sons,  Windsor  Locks,Conn.  16 

Tool  Manufacturers  and  Dealers. 


American  Watch  Tool  Co.,  Waltham,  Mass  ..  43 

Tortoise  Shell  Goods. 

Deitsch  Bros  , 7 E.  17th  St.,  N.  Y lo  -ii 

Trunks  and  Traveling  Bags. 

Crouch  & Fitzgerald,  161  Broadway,  N.  Y....  43 

Watch  Case  Manufacturers. 

Courvoisier-Wilcox  Mfg.,  Co.,  21  Maiden  Lane, 

N.Y ,5 

Dueber  Hampden  Co.,  Canton,  O 15 

Fahys,  Jos.,  & Co.,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  ..  38 
Jacobson,  F.  H.  & Co.,  96  State  St.,  Chicago  . 33 
Queen  City  Watch  Case  Co. , Cincinnati,  O. . . 34 
Roy  Watch  Case  Co.,21  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y...  48 

Watch  Case  Repairers. 

Felix,  N.  J.,  17  John  St.,  N.  Y 48 

Watch  Importers. 

Hyde’s,  J.  E.,  Sons,  22  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y ..  4 

Loveland,  R.  A.,  177  Broadway,  N.  Y 43 

Wittnauer,  A.,  19  Maiden  Lane.  N.  Y 15 

Robert,  E.  E.,  3 Maiden  Lane,  N.Y 36 

Watch  Manufacturers. 

Dueber  Hampden  Co.,  Canton,  O... 15 

New  York  Standard  Watch  Co.,  ii  John  St., 

N.Y 28 

United  States  Watch  Co  , Waltham,  Mass....  8 

Watchmen’s  Time  Detectors. 

Imhaaser,  E.,  206  Broadway,  N.  Y 15 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


31 


Special  Notices. 


Rates  75c.  per  Insertion  for  notices  not  exceeding 
3 lines (25  words);  additional  words  2 cents  each. 
If  answers  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  stamps 
must  be  enclosed.  Two  insertions,  i5  per  cent,  off; 
three  insertions,  20  per  cent  off ; four  insertions  or 
more,  25  per  cent.  off.  Payable  strictly  in  advance. 
Display  cards  on  this  page  will  be  charged  at  $2.00 
per  inch  for  first  insertion,  subject  to  same  discount 
as  above  for  subsequent  insertions. 

Under  the  heading  of  Situations  Wanted 
on  this  page  advertisements  will  be  inserted  for 
One  Cent  a Word  each  insertion,  no  discount.  This 
offer  refers  to  Situations  Wanted  only. 
Payable  strictly  in  advance.  It  answers  are  to  be 
forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


Situations  \^anted. 


Notices  under  this  heading  ONL  Y are  charged  at 
one  cent  a word,  payable  strictly  in  advance.  If 
answer  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


TT'OUNG  MAN  would  like  an  opportunity  to  work 
* for  a reliable  jewelry  house  ; best  of  references. 
Address  Energetic,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


POSITION  WANTED  by  watchmaker  and  en- 
^ graver,  19  years’  experience ; 3 years  with 
present  employer ; first-class  references.  American, 
care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


A LAD,  16  years  of  age,  with  a good  school  educa- 
tion,  would  like  a position  in  a wholesale  or 
manufacturing  house-  Address  Albion,  care  The 
Jewelers’  Circular. 


VVI  ANTED  — Position  by  salesman  of  experience 
’ ' thoroughly  acquainted  with  the  jobbing  trade 
east  and  west ; satisfactory  references.  Address  J.  L. 
Lehwess,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


■pY  A YOUNG  MAN,  several  years’  experience, 
^ complete  set  of  tools  ; watch,  clock  and  jewelry 
repairer ; can  give  reference ; correspondence  solic- 
ited. Address  A.  A.  Wood,  Kingsley,  Iowa. 


WANT  A HUSTLING  TRAVELER  for  the 
' ’ South  ? Practical  all  around  man,  18  years’  ex- 
perience ; know  how  to  sell,  get  the  good  will  of  trade 
and  hold  it.  S.  E.  L.,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


ATCHMAKER— A practical  man  desires  a 
’’  steady  position  as  watchmak;r,  accustomed  to 
receiving  and  delivering  work  ; also  as  salesman  ; city 
references;  14  years’ experience.  W.  care  Jewelers’ 
Circular. 


pY  JANUARY  1ST.,  position  wanted  by  a first- 
^ class  jeweler,  fine  clock  repairer,  good  engraver 
and  salesman,  10  years’  experience,  Ai  references; 
west  preferred.  Address  Charles  W.  Stegman,  Lock- 
port,  N.  Y. 


WATCHMAKER  OR  TRAVELING  SALES- 
^ ' man  would  like  position  with  reliable  house ; Ai 
references  and  well  known  through  New  York  and 
Pennsylvania.  Address  B 86,  317  Arch  bt.,  Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 


CITUATION  WANTED  by  first-class  watchmaker, 
good  iewelery  jobber  and  engraver,  used  to  fine 
American  and  complicated  Swiss  watches  ; sober  and 
reliable  j first-class  references  ; 16  years  at  the  bench  ; 
have  a fine  set  of  tools  ; am  not  a cheap  man.  Address 
Dan  Lawrence  Rome,  Ga. 


ANTED. — By  a first  class  watch  and  clock 
' • maker,  a permanent  situation  ; can  do  all  kind 
of  difficult  work  such  as  chronometers,  chronographs, 
minute  repeaters,  has  full  set  of  modern  tools;  can 
speak  French,  German  and  English,  first-class  ref- 
erences. Address  R.,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


^elp  V\^anted. 


YVJANTED,  in  New  Yoik  City,  letter  engraver  on 
’ silverware.  Permanent  position  for  good  man. 
Address  F.  A.  C.,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


/~)PTICAL  LENS  GRINDER  and  general  repairer 
wanted.  Must  be  capable  of  doing  the  best 
work;  good  position  for  the  right  man.  Address 
Optician,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


CPRINGFIELD,  M ASS.— Wanted  at  once,  a first- 
class  watchmaker  and  salesman  ; must  be  compe- 
tent workman  ; permanent  position  ; state  salary  ex- 
pected. F,  A.  Hubbard,  Springfield,  Mass. 


Settlement  of  the  Failure  of  Kasper  & 
Barnes  Co. 

The  New  York  creditors  of  Kasper  & 
Barnes  Co.,  Chicago,  accepted  the  proposi- 
tion of  that  firm  for  an  extension,  at  a meet- 
ing held  in  the  rooms  of  the  New  York  Jew- 
elers’ Board  of  Trade,  Oct.  28th.  About  35 
creditors  were  present,  representing  over 
$50,000  merchandise  indebtedness.  David 
Untermeyer,  of  Keller  & Untermeyer  Mfg. 
Co.,  acted  as  chairman,  and  H.  M.  Condit, 
as  secretary. 

President  Kasper,  of  the  debtor  company, 
who  had  called  the  meeting,  stated  that 
the  firm’s  embarrassment  was  due  to  dull 
business  and  to  creditors  pressing  for  pay- 
ment which  they  were  unable  to  meet.  He 
gave  the  liabilities  at  about  $98,000,  open 
accounts  being  about  $91,000,  and  notes 
about  $7,000.  The  assets  amounted  to 
nearly  $130,000,  $121,000  being  in  stock  and 
$3,000  in  open  accounts. 

The  proposition  which  the  creditors 
agreed  to  was  an  extension  for  two  years 
on  the  following  basis:  10  per  cent,  payable 
on  the  15th  of  January,  April,  July  and 
October,  1896;  15  per  cent.  Jan.  15th,  1897; 
10  per  cent,  on  the  15th  of  April,  July  and 
October,  1897,  and  15  per  cent.  Jan.  15, 
1898.  This  was  modified  in  regard  to 
claims  for  less  than  $200,  which  were  to  be 
paid  Jan.  ist,  1896. 


lousiness  Opportunities. 


QLDEST  JEWELRY  STORE  in  city  of  2^,000, 
near  Boston,  Mass.;  established  30  years;  inven- 
tory about  $5,000 ; good  paying  business : can  reduce 
stock ; will  sell  cheap  if  sold  immediately.  Address 
W.  1298,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


pOR  SALE  OR  TRADE— Jewelry  store  in  one  of 
^ the  best  county  seat  towns  in  central  Indiana  ; 
best  location  in  town ; nice  clean  stock,  and  in  connec- 
tion we  have  the  only  news  stand  in  town,  which  pays 
a profit  above  all  store  expenses ; 3,500  inhabitants. 
Address  B.  E.  A.,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


r \NE  OF  THE  BEST  paying  jewelry,  silverware 
and  bric-a-brac  stores  in  Philadelphia  is  for  sale, 
the  whole  thing,  stock,  fixtures  and  lease  ; fine  store 
and  in  the  best  location  ; ill  health  the  sole  reason  for 
selling ; established  1855.  Geo.  Eakins  & Son,  930 
Chestnut  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


ptFFICE  TO  LET  in  the  Hays  Building.  21  and  23 
Maiden  Lane,  New  York;  rent  $50  per  month. 
Apply  to  janitor. 


”pO  LET— A good  office  at  moderate  price  in  the 
^ Diamond  Exchange  building,  14  Maiden  Lane, 
New  York.  Apply  to  Janitor. 


TWiscellaneous 


VV  ANTED  you  to  know  that  the  genuine  “Moseley 
''  Lathe”  equals  the  best  of  the  very  best.  When 
interested  write  your  jobber  for  new  price  list,  or  to 
the  manufacturers,  Moseley  & Co.,  Elgin,  111. 


Y\7  anted.— R.  H.  Knowles,  M.  D..  desires  to  enter 
’ ' upon  a business  engagement  with  a reliable  op- 
tical house  opening  parlors  on  Fifth  Ave.,  between 
23d  and  34th  Sts^  with  a view  of  teaching  refraction 
and  retailing  first-class  opticals.  Address  Dr. 
Knowles,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


CTOLEN— Ladies’  solid  18  k.  hunting  case.  Lady 
Washington  No  27.526,  gold  watch.  Baldwin  <S 
Co.,  St.  Joseph,  Mo.,  written  on  face.  Also  long  14  k. 
link  chain  with  cameo  slide.  Return  of  property 
liberally  rewarded  and  no  questions  asked.  Miss 
Georgiene  Scott,  Severance,  Doniphen  Co.,  Kansas. 


The  capital  stock  of  the  company  is  $40,- 
000,  of  -which  $30,000  is  paid  in.  This 
stock,  it  was  agreed,  was  to  be  turned  over 
to  Louis  Kahn,  of  L.  & M.  Kahn  & Co.,  as 
trustee  for  the  creditors.  Mr.  Kahn  accom- 
panied Mr.  Kasper,  who  returned  to  Chi- 
cago Saturday. 

It  is  reported  that  creditors  representing 
over  95  per  cent,  of  the  liabilities  have 
signed  the  extension  agreement. 


Chicago,  111.,  Nov.  4. — The  affairs  of  the 
firm  of  Kasper  & Barnes  make  a very  favor- 
able showing.  The  figures  for  assets  and 
liabilities  are  practically  unchanged  from 
those  previously  given — assets  $130,000  and 
liabilities  $90,000  to  $100,000.  Under 
assignee  Alfred  H.  Wittstein,  the  business 
is  in  capable  hands  and  daily  sales  are 
to-day  fully  up  to  the  average  ; if  anything, 
a slight  increase  in  the  number  of  shoppers 
is  noticed.  The  assignee’s  report  of  assets 
and  liabilities  will  be  filed  the  middle  of  the 
present  week.  Every  one  in  the  trade  here 
feels  very  kindly  toward  Mr.  Kasper  and 
expresses  a desire  to  see  the  business  goon, 
confident  in  his  ability  to  conduct  it  safely 
to  a successful  issue. 


TO  RENT: 

Factory  formerly  occupied 
by  the  Alvin  Mfg.  Co.,  at 
Irvington,  N.  J.  3 story 
brick,  40x120,  with  annex 
and  out-buildings.  16,000 
square  feet.  Ample  yard 
room,  100x200  ft. 

Fire  proof  vaults  with  Mar- 
vin safe  doors  on  each  floor. 
♦ 

Address,  Alvin  Mfg.  Co.,  4 Maiden 
Lane,  N.  Y.  Or  apply  on  premises 
to  Pierce  & Noble,  Enterprise  Hill. 


The  Swan  Fountain  Pen. 

Made  on  Distinct  Principles,  Patented. 

3 SIZES  OF  SWAN  “SAFETIES.”  CAN  BE 
CARRIED  ANYHOW  OR  ANYWHERE. 

Three  sizes  of  “ Self-Filling  ” Swans,  the 
wonder  of  the  day,  illustrating  the  improve- 
ment between  the  first  fountain  pen  on 
record,  patented  150  years  ago, 

“ A Quill  Covered  With  Sheepsgut.” 
An  English  patent  in  those  days  cost  a 
fortune,  thus  the  advance  from  the  past  to 
the  present  is  sharply  defined. 

W.  W.  Stewart,  Inventor  & Patentee 


Mabie,  Todd  & Bard, 

MANUFACTURERS. 

New  York  & London. 


32 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


SPECIAL 

NOTICE. 


THE  = = = = 


MANUFACTURERS  OF 
RICH  AMERICAN 
CUT  GLASS, 

OFFERS  SPLENDID 
VALUES  AND  CHOICE 
CUTTINGS  AT 
ATTRACTIVE  PRICES. 


TRY  OUR  $100.00 
ASSORTMENT 
OF  OUR  BEST 
SELLING 
PATTERNS. 

ANYTHING  NOT 
SATISFACTORY  IN  THE 
ASSORTMENT 
MAY  BE  RETURNED. 


35  WARREN  STREET, 


NEW  YORK. 


FLATWARE 
HOLLOW  WARE 

STAMPED 

I t^ob  ' 


^IS  THE  GENUINE.-^ 

SIciiKiifactnrcd  b7 

WM.  ROGERS  M’F’Q  CO., 

HARTFORD.  CONN. 


JL\\/  ^ijil.Xit>  j 

MARK 

FERD.  FUCHS  & BROS. 

SILVERSMITHS, 

MAKERS  OF  STERLING  SILVERWARE, 

808-810  Greenwich  St.,  - New  York. 


New  Jewelry  Stores. 

Mr.  Hopkinson,  Rock  Falls,  111. 

Leopold  Kabis,  Rawlins,  Wyom. 

W.  P.  Armstrong,  Dyersburg,  Tenn. 

L.  L.  Cross,  Mechanicsville,  Tenn. 

J.  C.  Goskings,  Clinton,  Mo.  Mr.  Gos- 
kings  was  10  years  in  the  finishing  rooms  of 
the  Rockford  Watch  Co.,  Rockford,  111. 

Application  for  a char. er  for  A.  Graves,  Co., 
Memphis,  Tenn.,  has  been  filed.  The  com- 
pany propose  to  carry  on  a trade  in  jewelry. 
The  incorporators  are  W.  E.  Fannet,  G. 
and  Gertrude  Graves,  J.  S.  Moody  and 
Nels  Nelson. 

Wm.  Hollenback  & Son  is  the  name  of  a 
new  firm  in  Marion,  la.,  which  purchased 
its  “ first  stock”  in  Chicago  last  week.  C. 
B.  Hollenback  (Bert),  the  son,  has  been 
working  at  the  bench  in  Dysart,  la.,  and 
is  a practical  jeweler.  The  father  is  a re- 
tired farmer  who  desires  the  success  of  his 
son  in  mercantile  life. 


Syracuse. 

Jeweler  W.  W.  Hawes,  Clayton,  spent 
three  days  in  Syracuse  last  week  replenish- 
ing stock. 

Jos.  Honig,  of  A.  Lewis  & Co.,  kept  store 
for  W.  H.  Thorpe,  Clayton,  while  the 
latter  indulged  in  a two  weeks’  vacation. 

L.  W.  Aldridge,  who  has  been  in  the 
employ  of  jeweler  F.  B.  Nourse,  Cortland, 
for  six  years,  has  gone  into  the  optical  busi- 
ness in  Springfield,  N.  Y. 

It  is  rumored  that  Liberman  & Bradley, 
207  E.  Fayette  St.,  are  to  sell  out,  and  that 
Mr.  Liberman  will  then  engage  in  the  whole- 
sale jewelry  business  in  this  city. 

After  a corporation  receives  benefits 
under  a contract,  it  cannot  set  up  as  a 
defense  to  an  action  on  such  contract,  that 
it  had  no  right  to  do  business  in  the  State 
in  which  the  contract  was  made. 


News  Gleanings. 


Painters  and  paper  hangers  are  at  work 
in  Mac  Keller’s  jewelry  store,  Lockhaven, 
Pa.  The  store  room  is  to  be  beautified. 

In  a destructive  fire  in  Springfield,  O., 
Oct.  30,  the  jewelry  store  of  Aug.  F. 
Margileth,  245  E.  High  St.,  was  burned 
out,  the  loss  being  estimated  at  $20,000. 
The  fire  originated  in  the  kitchen  oi  the 
hotel,  under  which  the  jewelry  store  is  lo- 
cated. 

Richard  Seidel,  jeweler,  Milwaukee, 
Wis.,  is  one  of  the  possibilities  as  a suc- 
cessor to  Henry  Hase,  as  trustee  of  the 
county  insane  asylum.  Mr.  Hase’s  term 
expires  in  December,  and  it  is  reported 
that  Gov.  Upham  has  determined  to  ap- 
Mr.  Seidel,  who  is  one  of  the  most  popular 
bu.siness  men  on  the  south  side. 

I.  T.  Boyd,  Fall  River,  Mass.,  found  in  a 
recent  morning’s  mail  a neatly  wrapped 
package  containing  22  plain  gold  rings  sim- 
ilar to  rings  stolen  from  his  store  in  Sep- 
tember, 1894.  The  rings  were  taken  from 
a tray  in  the  show  window  and  were 
reached  by  breaking  the  window.  The  re- 
turned package  is  valued  at  something  over 
$100. 

In  the  case  of  Laura  W.  Patton,  insolvent 
debtor.  North  Adams,  Mass.,  the  creditors 
are  notified  that  said  debtor  filed  Oct. 
29th  the  following  proposal  for  composition 
with  her  creditors : To  pay  in  full  all  her 

debts  and  charges  entitled  by  law  to  prior- 
ity, and  all  costs  and  expenses  of  the  pro- 
ceedings in  said  Court,  and  to  all  other 
creditors  fifteen  cents  on  each  dollar  of 
their  just  claims,  in  cash,  to  be  paid  upon 
confirmation  by  the  Court  of  said  proposal 
of  composition.  A hearing  upon  said  pro- 
posal for  composition  will  be  had  at  a 
Court  of  Insolvency,  to  be  held  at  the  Pro- 
bate Court  room,  Pittsfield,  Mass.,  on  Nov. 
6*h. 


THE  EZRA  F.  BOWMAN  TECHNICAL  SCHOOL 

Of  Watchmaking,  Engraving,  Jewelry  Manufacturing  and  Repairing. 


This  school  has  been  open  but  a few  months  and  the  number  of  scholars  already  en- 
rolled is  convincing  proof  of  the  merits  of  the  institution,  which  we  mean  to 
maintain. 

Our  quarters  are  spacious  and  well  lighted,  and  the  instructors  are  men  of  experience 
in  their  several  branches. 

Our  school  is  under  special  management,  governed  by  reasonable  rules,  with  rigid 
discipline,  but  not  too  much  so  for  those  who  come  to  learn. 

We  have  but  one  price  to  students  for  tuition,  and  give  all  the  same  discount  on  tools.^ 

It  will  pay  you  to  investigate  our  school  and  make  comparison  of  our  methods,  equip- 
ment and  abilities  right  through  with  other  schools  before  deciding  where  to  go. 
Soliciting  correspondence,  we  are  Yours  respectfully, 

THE  EZRA  F.  BOWMAN  TECHNICAL  SCHOOL, 

Lancaster,  Pa. 


L Sauter  & Co., 

DEALERS  IN  DIAMONDS 

. . . AND  . . . 

MAKERS  OF  FINE  JEWELRY, 

194  BROADWAY,  NEW  YORK. 

Selection  Packages  Sent  on  Request.  Mounting  of  Diamonps  and 


OTHER  PRECIOUS  STONES  IN  NEW  AND  ORICINAI-  DESIGNS  A SPECIALTY.  ^ 


Nov.  6,  iSgs- 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


32-fl 


W.  A.  Kirkham’s  store,  Leavenworth 
Kan.,  will  be  beautifully  remodeled. 

A.  E.  Lee,  Holyoke,  Mass.,  will  move 
into  one  of  the  stores  in  a new  building  on 
High  St. 

An  assignee's  sale  of  the  jewelry,  etc.,  of 
I.  D.  Achim,  Mechanic  St.,  Spencer,  Mass., 
is  announced  by  the  court. 

Joseph  Beale  and  August  Eggler,  Rock- 
ford, 111.,  are  figuring  on  entering  into  part- 
nership in  the  jewelry  business. 

F.  S.  Reick,  jeweler,  Ashley,  Pa.,  was 
united  in  marriage  with  Miss  Elizabeth  H, 
Dirby,  Germantown,  Pa.,  on  Oct.  30. 

W.  Bergman,  manager  at  W.  J.  Larchar’s 
jewelry  store,  Webster,  Mass.,  is  contem- 
plating a removal  from  Webster  soon. 

In  a fire  in  Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  last  week,  the 
jewelry  store  of  J.  M.  Balmaine,  108  Ni- 
agara St.,  suffered  a total  loss.  Insurance, 
$2,000. 

Charles  F.  Cross,  Gadsden,  Ala.,  has  pur- 
chased the  stock  of  jewelry  belonging  to 
R.  O.  Randall,  and  has  moved  to  the  latter’s 
old  stand. 

Armstrong  Bros.,  Brown  wood  Tex.,  have 
filed  a deed  of  trust  with  preferred  creditors, 
with  W.  H.  Thompson,  as  trustee.  Liabil- 
ities, $6,000. 

G.  H.  Pond,  of  Waltham,  Mass.,  has 
bought  out  the  jewelry  business  of  C.  O. 
Hunter,  Westboro,  Mass.  Mr.  Hunter  will 
continue  his  bicycle  business. 

B.  J.  Feldman’s  jewelry  store.  Liberty 
St.,  Oil  City,  Pa.,  has  recently  been  en- 
larged, and  a number  of  improvements  have 
been  added  giving  to  the  interior  a general 
air  of  neatness. 

The  jewelry  store  of  J.  Richmond  Smith, 
154  Northampton  St.,  Easton,  Pa.,  was 
closed  by  the  sheriff,  Oct.  28.  The  stock 
will  be  sold  to  satisfy  an  execution  for  $605, 
issued  by  Emily  Smith,  wife  of  the  defend- 
ant. 

A proposed  bicycle  factory  in  Springfield, 
111.,  has  been  abandoned  on  account  of  the 
parties  interested  not  being  able  to  come  to 
an  agreement  with  Mr.  Bunn,  of  the  Illinois 
Watch  factory.  That  gentleman  states  that 
the  Illinois  Watch  Co.  have  all  the  business 
they  can  attend  to  without  going  into  the 
manufacturing  of  bicycles. 

Joseph  F.  Comeford,  a jeweler,  was  ar- 
rested a few  nights  ago  in  Buffalo,  N.  Y., 
on  a charge  of  grand  larceny  in  the  second 
degree.  He  is  accused  of  stealing  a dia- 
mond valued  at  $32  from  A.  E.  Sipe,  jew- 
eler, corner  of  Main  and  Seneca  Sts.  Mr. 
Sipe  entrusted  him  with  the  stone  to  sell, 
but  he  is  said  to  have  appropriated  it  to  his 
own  use. 

The  body  of  a suicide  found  in  the  clump 
of  bushes  two  miles  from  Somerville,  N.  J., 
last  week,  was  last  Wednesday  identified 
as  that  of  Philip  Ryan,  a jeweler  of  East 
Orange,  N.  J.  The  body  was  identified  by 
the  man’s  wife  and  child.  Mrs.  Ryan  says 
her  husband  went  to  bed  on  the  previous 
Friday  night  at  the  usual  hour  and  that  was 
the  last  seen  of  him. 


ANNOUNCEMENT. 


Our  Annual  Catalogue  is  now  ready.  It  con- 
tains a large  variety  of  the  newest  and  very 
latest  patterns  in  Diamond  Goods,  Silver  Novel- 
ties, Watches  and  Jewelry,  We  have  very 
carefully  selected  the  best  and  most  salable  goods 
in  the  market  at  the  present  time  for  illustration, 
and  think  that  we  can  truthfully  say  that  no 
catalogue  issued,  representing  similar  lines,  can 
show  so  large  a proportion  of  new  things  in  novel- 
ties and  staples.  It  is  yours  for  the  asking. 


J.  T.  SCOTT  & CO., 

4 riAIDEN  LANE,  N.  Y. 

SENT  TO  WATCHMAKERS  AND  JEWELERS  ONLY 


“Trefoil”  Comb. 

/ PATENT  APPLIE0\ 

\ FOR  wm-  J 

MADE  IN 

GOLD 

AND 

SILVER, 

EITHER 

CELLULOID 

OR 

SHELL 
PRONGS. 

LW.  Adams  5 Co,, 

14  JOHN  ST., 

NEW  YORK. 


Ctalcaico  OfBce:  Room  517,  Inter-Ocean  Bnlldlnte. 


VOL.  XXXI. 


CHICAGO,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  6,  1895. 


Chicago  Notes. 

H.  F.  Hahn  and  wife  are  sojourning  in 
Colorado. 

Henry  Laser,  a silversmith,  126  W.  Tay- 
lor St.,  was  fined  $3  add  the  costs  upon 
conviction  of  operating  a sweat  shop. 

George  Smith  Rice,  of  New  York,  greeted 
many  warm  friends  the  past  week  at  the 
Gorham  Mfg.  Co.’s  salesrooms  here. 

The  Field  Jewelry  Co.,  of  Chicago,  have 
incorporated  with  a capital  stock  of  $25,000. 
James  E.  Moore,  W.  D.  Field  and  George 
R.  Frankland  are  the  incorporators. 

Miss  Partridge,  for  years  bookkeeper  for 
the  Weber  Co.,  and  later  with  O.  L.  Rosen - 
krans,  was  recently  married  to  a Buffa'o 
gentleman  and  will  reside  in  that  city. 

S.  C.  Thalls,  recently  with  J.  H.  Purdy 
•&  Co.  and  formerly  with  A.  G.  Schwab  & 
Bro.,  Cincinnati,  O.,  has  opened  a store  in 
Red  Key,  Ind.,  and  made  his  maiden  pur- 
chases of  Chicago  houses  last  week. 

“Outside  of  July,”  said  A.  Serewicz,  the 
Dueber-Hampden  Co.’s  Chicago  man,  “ in 
the  past  two  weeks  I have  taken  the  larg- 
est orders  of  the  year.  We  can’t  get  enough 
of  our  ‘400  ’ ladies’  watch,  000  size.” 

Theo.  Schrader  & Co.  will  remove  to  the 
5th  floor.  Reliance  building,  southwest 
corner  State  and  Washington  Sts.,  about 
Nov.  15,  thus  bringing  this  large  manufac- 
turing house  into  the  center  of  the  wholesale 
district. 

Buyers  in  Chicago  included:  Theo.  Dieck- 
mann,  Sheboygan,  Wis.;  J.  D.  Sitts, 
Franklin  Grove,  111.;  W.  J.  Welch,  Iowa 
City,  la.;  Andrew  Jackson,  Eau  Claire, 
Wis. ; J.  M.  Bigwood  and  wife,  Terre  Haute, 
Ind.;  Wm.  Hollenback  & Son,  Marion,  la.; 
S.  C.  Thalls.  Red  Key,  Ind. 

On  Oct.  28  the  C.  F.  Happel  Co.  received 
their  certificate  of  incorporation  to  manu- 
facture and  deal  in  jewelry  and  other 
merchandise.  The  names  of  the  promoters 
are  given  as  Gardner  C.  Willard,  Wm.  W. 
Evans  ard  Andrew  Hummelund.  The 
capital  stoc’tc  is  $65,000  in  single  shares  of 
$100. 

James  A.  Todd  met  with  a sad  bereave- 
ment while  visiting  the  Towle  Mfg.  Co.’s 
factory,  in  the  death  of  his  father,  Robert 
C.  Todd,  of  Wolcott,  Conn.  Mr.  Todd,  Sr., 
arose  Friday,  Oct.  18  in  his  usual  health, but 


was  stricken  down  a few  hours  later,  pass- 
ing away  the  morning  of  the  19th  after  an 
illness  of  less  than  24  hours,  J.  A,  Todd 
was  in  Newburvport  and  arrived  at  his  old 
home  Sunday  in  time  for  the  funeral, 

Ostrander  & Buehl,  retail  opticians,  have 
opened  at  165  Dearborn  St.,  street  floor. 
Mr.  Ostrander  is  a graduate  of  the  Chicago 
School  of  Optics,  class  ’89,  and  was  demon- 
strator of  ophthalmic  refraction  at  the 
World’s  Fair  for  F.  A.  Hardy  & Co.  For 
the  past  18  months  he  had  been  located  in 
San  Ant<^nio,  Tex.  W.  A.  Buehl  is  a well 
known  jeweler  of  Sycamore,  111  , and  will 
continue  his  jewelry  business  in  that  city. 

The  Chicago  Chain  Co.,  Sam  Josephs 
president,  has  bought  the  Harry  Leon 
stock  and  opened  a sale  Friday  in  the  Leon 
store,  Hartford  building.  Dearborn  and 
Madison  Sts.  Mr.  Josephs  says  the  stock  is 
a nicely  assorted  one  and  was  “ bought 
right”  and  looks  for  a good  profit  from  his 
investment.  As  to  continuing  the  store 
permanently  Mr.  Josephs  was  non-com- 
mittal. 


Minneapolis  and  St.  Paul. 

R.  G.  Winter,  Minneapolis,  has  closed  bis 
auction  sale  and  is  selling  the  remainder  of 
his  stock  at  private  sale. 

L.  P.  Sandberg,  Redwing,  Minn.,  was  in 
Minneapolis  the  past  week  purchasing  Fall 
stock. 

Gus.  Ortman,  St.  Paul,  last  week  returned 
from  a visit  to  Germany,  being  absent 
about  a year. 

F.  W.  Spaulding,  Minneapolis,  has  given 
up  his  repair  shop  and  will  go  to  New  York 
the  15th  inst.,  where  he  has  accepted  a 
position  with  H.  H.  Ka^ton. 

Elmer  Fiske,  of  Fiske  Bros.,  Minneapolis, 
has  returned  from  a trip  to  Waterville, 
Minn.,  where  the  firm  conduct  a branch 
store. 

A writ  of  attachment  was  served  by  the 
sheriff  Oct.  25th  on  the  stock  of  the  Weber 
Jewelry  Co.,  Minneapolis,  or  what  of  it 
could  be  found  at  312  Nicollet  Ave,  It  was 
found  necessary  to  kick  in  the  front  door  to 
gain  admittance.  By  that  time  all  the  jew- 
elry had  been  packed  in  boxes  ready  for 
shipment,  and  nothing  but  a show  case, 
safe  and  store  fixtures  remained.  S.  Mar- 
tin, auctioneer,  said  that  the  stock  belonged 


NO.  14. 


to  one  Goldstein,  of  Milwaukee.  The  writ 
was  secured  by  the  London  and  North- 
western American  Mortgage  Co.,  and  was 
to  secure  $200  rent.  The  value  of  the  safe 
and  fixtures  dirl  not,  however,  cover  the 
amount  c aimed  and  the  sheriff  and  propri- 
etor remained  in  joint  possession.  The 
Weber  Jewelry  Co.  were  the  concern  that 
came  to  MinneajK>lis  about  eight  weeks  ago 
to  auction  off  a stock  of  watches,  clocks, 
jewelry  and  silverware. 

Pittsburgh 

Charles  T.  Ahlborn  has  gone  on  a two 
weeks’  hunting  trip. 

M.  J.  Smit  will  open  a jewelry  auction 
house  at  437  Smithfield  St. 

William  Hoffman,  of  Heeren  Bros.  &Co., 
will  go  to  Atlanta  this  week. 

The  new  firm  of  Samuel  F.  Prager  & Co., 
are  instaled  in  their  new  quarters  on. 
Fourth  Ave. 

George  C.  Schairer,  optician  for  Heeren 
Bros.  & Co.,  is  recovering  from  a severe- 
illness  of  four  weeks’  duration. 

S.  L.  Ginsberg  has  removed  from  Wal- 
nut St.,  McKeesport,  to  Fifth  Ave.,  same 
town. 

Wallace  & Dawson,  Smith’s  Ferry,  who 
have  been  robbed  three  times  recently, 
have  had  the  thieves  caught  and  jailed. 

Visiting  jewelers  last  week  were:  Bert 

Neville,  Dawson;  D.  F.  Rosen,  McKees- 
port; A Johnston,  Evans  City;  M.  Samuels, 
Youngstown,©.;  J.  C.  Rhodes,  Homestead; 
H.  J.  Linderman,  Kittanning. 

Travelers  in  Pittsburgh  last  week  were  ; 
E.  A.  Reed,  Reed  & Barton;  L.  H.  Bos- 
worth.  Potter  & Buffinton  ;.  P.  O.  Stutzman. 
Heller  & Bardel  ; S.  L.  Barbour,  Bar- 
bour Silver  Co,;  A.  Brad->haw  Meriden 
Britannia  Co. ; Geo.  C Booth,  Hutchison  & 
Huestis ; J.  M.  Morrow,  American  Watch 
Case  Co  ; Air.  Lamb,  T.  I.  Smith  & Co.; 
J.  L.  Cobb.  Cobb,  Evans  & Cobb;  H.  A. 
Bless,  Krementz  & Co.;  R A.  Rutter,  John 
Russell  Cutlery  Co.;  E.  H.  PeHetreau, 
Shafer  & Douglas  ; Mr.  Stephenson,  J.  J. 
Sommer  & Co.;  Matthias  Stratton,  Jr.,  John 
W.  Reddall  & Co.;  J.  S.  Roberts,  Water- 
bury  Watch  Co.;  Louis  E.  Fay,  Kirby, 
Mowry  6c  Co.;  Chailes  E.  Dorr,  Gorham 
Mfg.  Co.;  G.  D.  Munson,  Wm.  Rogers 
Mfg.  Co. ; Daniel  Earle. 


Nov.  6,  1895 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR — Western  Supplement, 


33 


Pacific  Coast  Notes. 

E.  T.  Stoddard  has  opened  a repair  shop 
in  Whittier,  Cal. 

J.  P.  Schade,  Portland,  Ore.,  has  removed 
to  4th  St.  near  6th  St. 

Simon  Banks  has  opened  a new  store  in 
Butte,  Mon. 

Mrs.  Ida  E.  Naher  has  been  granted  a 
•divorce  from  her  husband,  the  Fresno,  Cal., 
jeweler. 

E.  M.  Stanton,  Riverside,  Cal.,  has  re- 
turned from  San  Francisco,  where  he  pur- 
chased his  stock  of  holiday  goods. 

L.  Feibush,  who  for  many  years  con- 
ducted a store  in  Weaverville,  Cal.,  has 
opened  a store  in  French  Gulch,  Cal. 

Richard  Vaeth,  Tacoma,  Wash.,  has  just 
moved  into  an  elegant  new  store,  a few 
doors  above  his  old  stand.  He  now  has 
one  of  the  finest  stores  in  the  northwest. 

D.  M.  Ryan,  Carson  City,  Nev. ; E Zober- 
bier,  Nevada  City,  Cal.,  and  Frank  Golden 
have  incorporated  the  businesses  of  the  two 


former  under  the  name  of  Frank  Golden 
& Co.  They  will  continue  the  stores  at 
both  places. 

H.  J.  Kuechler  has  opened  a new  jewelry 
store  at  42  N.  Eldorado  St.,  Stockton,  Cal. 
He  was  for  a long  time  with  Lange  & Co., 
Dresden,  Germany.  He  will  carry  a fine 
line  of  watches,  diamonds  and  silverware. 

In  San  Jose,  Cal.,  Marie  Wilson  is  still 
pressing  a breach  of  promise  suit  against 
P.  J.  Burroughs,  jewelry  auctioneer,  for 
$50,000.  So  far  she  has  failed  to  make  a 
case  and  it  is  believed  that  her  efforts 
will  result  in  failure. 

C.  B.  Colles,  a jeweler  of  Florence,  Ore., 
has  in  his  possession  a Spanish  dollar  bear- 
ing the  date  1117  in  plain  letters.  Mr. 
Colles  says  he  obtained  the  coin  in  1885, 
while  in  Canada,  during  the  Indian  out- 
break of  that  year,  led  by  Riel.  The  coin 
was  found  fastened  to  the  hair  of  the  head 
of  the  first  Indian  killed  in  the  first  skirmish 
fought.  The  soldier  who  took  it  from  the 
brave’s  head  gave  it  to  Mr.  Colles  for  repair 
work  done  on  a watch. 


San  Francisco. 

A.  M.  Armer,  of  Armer  & Weinshenk,  has 
returned  from  a successful  business  trip  to 
the  northwest. 

The  following  eastern  representatives 
were  in  town  recently  : Geo.  L.  Paine,  E. 
I.  Franklin  & Co.;  E.  Block,  W.  &S.  Black- 
inton;  D.  E.  Mowry,  Kirby,  Mowry  & Co. 

From  nearby  towns  the  following  mer- 
chants were  here  recently:  B.  C.  Corvin, 

Stockton,  Cal.;  Chas.  Daunt,  Modesto,  Cal.; 
Fred.  Daunt,  Merced,  Cal.;  Wm.  Frank, 
Colusa,  Cal. ; G.  A.  Thiel,  Redwood  City, 
Cal  ; A.  E.  Bocks,  Woodland,  Cal.;  A.  F. 
Winkler,  Healdsburg,  Cal.;  and  Joseph  E. 
Ryan,  Woodland,  Cal. 

A.  D.  Quillet,  a 23d  Ave.  jeweler,  in  Oak- 
land, paid  a fine  of  $30  recently  for  the 
privilege  of  firing  two  shots  in  proximity  to 
Miss  Grace  Wetherell  and  a young  gentle- 
man escort.  Quillet  said  he  fired  the  sh^ts 
in  the  air.  The  young  couple  were  equally 
positive  that  the  shots  were  fired  in  their 
direction.  Behind  the  incident  is  a story 


REPRESENTATIVE  CHICAGO  HOUSES. 


ELMER  A.  RICH,  Pres. 


HERBERT  W.  ALLEN,  Treas. 


Old  in  the 

BUSINESS. 


126  STATE  ST.,  CHICAGO,  ILL. 

DIAMONDS  AND  PRECIOUS  STONES. 

US  ON  THAT  NEXT  MEMOI?ANDUM  ORDEI?. 


JOHN  H.  MERTZ,  Sec’y 


•9 

New  in  firm 

NAME  ONLY. 


oiPTici^Jsrs’  sc:e3:ooxj. 

If  you  want  a GOOD  ROOF  over  your  head,  come  to  our  school.  We  wac4 
EARNEST  STUDENTS,  leave  the  rest  ts  us,  we  do  not  want  diploma  hunters 

The  Chicago  Ophthalmic  College  and  Hospital, 

H.  M.  MARTIN  M.  D.,  PRESIDENT.  607  VAN  BUEEN  ST.,  OHIOAGO 

Being  the  oldest  and  most  favorably  known  College  of  Theoretical  and  Appliec 
Ophthalmic  Optics  in  America,  having  more  thoroughly  qualified  opticians  n the  field  than 
all  other  so-called  schools  combined* 


SRIES  & CO., 

JEWELRY  MANOFACTURERS, 

DIAMOND  MOUNTING, 
REPAIRING. 

126  STATE  ST.,  - CHICAGO,  ILL. 


Watch  Case  Manufacturers 

F.  H.  JACOBSON  & CO. 

96  STATE  ST.,  CHICAGO. 


REPAIRING. 


READ 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 

Ana  keep  informed  on  the  latest  Trade  events,  y 


GENEVA  OPTICAL  CO. 

67  and  69  Washington  St., 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


Geneva  Grip  Eyeglasses. 

The  construction  is  such  as  can  be  seen  from  the 
accompanying  illustrations,  that  they  can  be  adjusted 
to  perfectly  conform  to  the  anatomy  of  any  nose,  no 
matter  what  the  shape. 


SEND  FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICE  LIST. 


PRESOKIPTION  Made  with  Promptness 
WOKE  and  Accuracy. 


BULLETIN,  NOV.,  1895. 


Wholesale  Jewelers.  Chicago. 


•‘Busiest  House  in  America”  1896  Catalogue  ready. 
The  largest,  finest  and  best  arranged  catalogue  in 
the  jewelry  business.  Sent  to  Jewelers  on 
application. 


GOLDSniTH  BROS.  y REFINERS  “5  SSSflTERS 

63  & 66  WASHINGTON  STREET,  CHICAGO,  ILL. 

“ESTIMATES  GIVEN  ON  GOLD  AND  SILVER.  IT  NOT  SATfSFAOTOBf  WE  WILL  BETIIRN  SHIPMENT  INTACT  AND  PAY  ALL  OHAEGES.”  


34 


THE  JEWELERS'  CIRCULAR — Western  Supplement. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


of  long  continued  persecution  of  the  young 
woman,  who  has  on  more  than  one  occasion 
in  the  past  been  compeled  to  seek  the  pro- 
tection of  the  police. 


Detroit. 

Anthony  Kaiser,  213  Gratiot  Ave.,  last 
week  lost  his  wife  by  death. 

Fred  Pitcher,  Benton  Harbor,  Mich.,  will 
shortly  close  out  his  business  on  Pipestone 
St. 

D.  E.  Holland,  Lapeer,  Mich.,  will 
shortly  occupy  new  quarters  in  the  Hart- 
Lincoln  block. 

Frank  Matthauer,  representing  H.  Koes- 
ter  & Co.,  returned  last  week  from  a trip 
through  Ohio.  He  had  a fair  trade. 

Morgan  Beach,  jeweler,  46  Clifford  St., 
has  renewed  a chattel  mortgage  on  his  stock 
for  $750,  to  Joseph  Ridgely. 

Smith,  Sturgeon  & Co.  have  removed 
their  repair  department  to  the  rear  of  the 
store,  where  Thomas  Brennan  has  been 
placed  in  charge. 

R.  H.  Bedford  & Son’s  jewelry  store, 
Ionia,  Mich.,  was  last  week  furnished  with 
a handsome  wall  case  which  is  said  to  be 
the  finest  in  the  city. 

Robert  Beattie,  jeweler,  548  Baker  St., 
last  week  narrowly  escaped  death  in  a street 
car  accident  near  this  city.  He  was  badly 
bruised  about  the  head. 

Luke  Madden  and  John  Shaw,  who  are 
charged  with  burglarizing  Homer  D. 
Parker’s  jewelry  store,  Lansing,  Mich., 
have  been  bound  over  to  the  Circuit  Court 
for  trial. 

Among  the  Michigan  country  buyers  who 
were  here  last  week  were:  George 

Chambers,  Mt.  Clemens;  W.  L.  Backen- 


stose,  Pontiac,  and  Eugene  Campbell, 
Pinckney. 

The  large  Howard  clock  and  tower  with 
a monument  of  “Little  Jake”  Seligman 
will  be  removed  from  Saginaw,  where  it  is 
at  present  located,  on  the  Tower  block, 
to  Detroit  and  placed  on  top  of  the  new  14 
story  Mabley  & Co.  block,  at  the  corner  of 
Woodward  and  Grand  River  Aves. 

An  ordinance  is  being  prepared  by  which 
the  business  of  second-hand  jewelry  dealers 
in  this  city  will  be  regulated  the  same  as 
that  of  pawnbrokers.  It  is  alleged  these 
dealers  buy  much  stolen  stuff.  It  is  pro- 
posed to  have  them  make  a report  of  every 
article  and  a description  of  every  person 
selling  the  same. 


Indianapolis. 

F.  M.  Herron  returned  last  week  from  a 
purchasing  trip  to  New  York. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fred.  P.  Herron  are  back 
from  their  wedding  trip  south. 

A recent  fire  in  Princeton,  Ind.,  burned 
out  the  jewelry  store  of  A.  J.  Dallas. 

H.  A.  Comstock  is  conducting  a “chal- 
lenge sale  ” with  low  prices  in  plain 
figures. 

Gus  Craft,  of  Craft  & Koehler,  made  a 
successful  trip  through  the  Indiana  gas 
belt  last  week.  He  reports  the  manufac- 
turing business  very  good. 

At  a recent  meeting  of  the  battle  ship 
committee  appointed  by  Gov.  Mathews,  it 
was  agreed  to  leave  the  purchase  of  a silver 
service  and  library  to  an  executive  com- 
mittee which  the  Governor  will  appoint^ 
The  Governor  as  ex-officio  chairman  of  the 
whole  committee  and  John  H.  Holliday, 
custodian  of  the  funds  and  treasurer  of  the 


whole  committee,  will  be  members  of  this- 
committee.  The  members  of  the  general 
committee  believe  that  with  the  amount  of 
money  on  hand,  the  ship  Indiana  can  be 
presented  with  the  finest  silver  service  that 
has  ever  been  presented  to  an  American 
battleship. 


Kansas  City. 

Chas.  Tiche  has  given  up  his  position  as 
traveler  for  J.  A.  Norton  & Sons. 

H.  O.  Bailey,  Smith  Center,  Kan.,  will 
soon  open  a new  store  in  Emporia,  Kan. 

The  Jaccard  Watch  & Jewelry  Co.  have 
just  completed  a very  large  order  for  Sigma 
Mi  fraternity  pins.  They  are  the  official 
jewelers  for  this  society. 

F.  W.  Meyer  has  just  completed  a mag- 
nificent ring  of  an  original  design  ; it  has  a 
butterfly  effect  in  the  center  of  which  are 
emeralds  grouped,  while  diamonds  compose 
the  wings. 

The  following  out-of-town  buyers  were  in 
town  last  week:  G.  M.  Howe,  Wichita, 

Kan.;  J.  W.  Schnandt,  Holden,  Mo.;  B. 
Hoffman,  Leavenworth,  Kan.;  W.  W. 
Whitesides,  Liberty,  Mo.;  J.  R.  Grady. 
Slater,  Mo. 

Geo.  H.  Thamer,  formerly  of  the  Omaha. 
Optical  Co.,  has  accepted  a position  with, 
the  Jaccard  Watch  & Jewelry  Co.  and  will 
have  full  charge  of  their  optical  depart- 
ment. The  company  are  having  a room 
fitted  up  especially  for  this  department,  and 
intend  to  make  it  one  of  the  leading  feat- 
ures of  their  business. 

The  travelers  in  Kansas  City,  last 
week  were:  Otto  Schneider,  Hammel,  Rig- 
lander  & Co.;  Chas.  Altschul,  Oppenheimer 
Bros.  »&  Veith;  F.  R.  Horton,  Carter,  Sloan. 


Too  Many  Samples 

Our  Fall  line  of  Samples,  received  from  our  various  factories,  is  so  large  we  find  it 
would  be  impossible  to  carry  them  in  trunks  on  the  road,  therefore  we  have  been  compelled 
to  display  them  at  our 

Western  Sample  Rooms,  No.  228  West  Fourth  Street,  Cincinnati,  Ohio, 

where  we  cordially  invite  you  to  call  and  inspect 


Rich  American  Cut  Glass,  Fine  Imported  China  and  Fancy  Brioa-Brac, 

Tortoise  Shell  Combs,  Leather  Novelties, 

Wares  in  Sterling  Silver,  Rookwood  Pottery  (Sole  Agents). 


WE  ARE  NOT  JOBBERS,  BUT 
MANUFACTURERS’  SELLING  AGENTS. 


Bloom  & Phillips. 


L.  BLESCH,  Secretary. 


C.  A.  REMME,  Manager. 


THE  QUEEN  CITY 


H.  DUNWOODIE,  Treasurer. 

WATCH  CASE 

MANUFACTURING  COMPANY, 
Manufacturers  of  Fine  Gold  and  Silver  WATCH  CASES. 


Special  Attention  Given  to  Repairing. 
Altering  English  and  Swiss  to  Ameriean. 
Gold  Plating. 

ESTIMATES  CHEERFULLY  GIVEN. 


New  No.  i2g  East  Fourth  Street  (Keck  Bui'ding), 

Cincinnati,  Ohio. 

SEND  FOR  PRICE  LIST. 


Nov.  6, 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR — Western  Supplement. 


35 


& Co.;  C.  A.  Reed,  Reed  & Barton;  Sol.  H. 
Veit,  Marx,  Veit  & Co.;  Matthias  Stratton, 
Jno.  W.  Reddall  & Co.;  Geo.  W.  Bleecker, 
Bassett  Jewelry  Co.;  C.  M.  Davis,  New 
Haven  Clock  Co.;  Mr.  Loeb,  Wadsworth 
Watch  Case  Co.;  Ed.  Baumgartner,  Pair- 
point  Mfg.  Co. 


Cincinnati. 


Samuel  Turner,  Salina,  O.,  was  here  last 
week  buying  goods. 

The  Oskamp,  Nolting  & Co.  Fall  cata- 
logue will  be  ready  for  mailing  early  in 
November. 

E.  & J.  Swigart  are  very  busy.  Regu- 
lators and  boxes  and  trays  have  been 
selling  very  fast  the  past  several  days. 

Chas.  Stern,  of  Stern  & Co.,  reports  busi- 
ness very  good.  The  travelers  of  the  firm 
are  sending  in  good  orders, 

D.  H.  Nuzunhas  opened  anew  store  at 
706  Race  St.,  above  7th  St.  He  is  to  carry 
a general  line  and  has  opened  up  in  modern 
style. 

C.  Hellebush  is  making  a fine  display  of 
imported  vases  in  Dresden  effects.  Joe 
Hellebush  will  go  out  this  week  for  a short 
trip. 

Adolph  Muehllmat  has  been  busy  the 
past  month  on  special  orders  for  jewelers’ 
tools.  The  Monarch  engraving  block  has 
had  quite  a revival. 


nOLLOW'WflKE. 

We  have  added  to  our  stock  07te  of  the  most  complete  li7ies  of  HOfl^OW  WARE 
ever  offered  to  the  TRADE.  All  our  patterns  are  tnade  SPECIALLY  for  us  and  can 
only  be  obtained  from  us. 

Don't  buy  this  li7ie  of  goods  tmtil  you  have  see7i  07crs. 

SEND  FOR  ILLUSTRATIONS  AND  PRICE  LIST. 


Many  out-of-town  jewelers  have  called  on 
Bloom  & Phillips,  and  selected  from  a fine 
line  of  novelties  which  they  are  closing  out 
at  low  prices. 

Jonas  Wise,  of  Frohman,  Wise  & New- 
man, has  returned  from  a trip  of  several 
weeks’  duration.  He  will  go  out  again 
this  week. 

J.  Phillips,  of  Bloom  & Phillips,  selling 
agents,  is  home  from  an  extended  trip.  He 
will  make  one  more  trip  before  the  holiday 
season 

The  Wadsworth  Watch  Case  Co.  are 
turning  out  the  most  exquisite  cases  they 
have  ever  produced.  They  are  of  raised 
gold,  diamond  ornamented,  and  colored 
gold  designs. 

Chas.  Jacobs,  western  manager  of  the 
Homan  Silver  Plate  Co.,  was  here  from 
Chicago  last  week  looking  over  the  new 
productions  the  factory  is  now  turning 
out. 

Fox  Bros.  & Co.’s  diamond  cutting  plant 
is  still  running  full  force.  The  travelers 
are  home  but  will  go  on  the  road  again  this 
week  with  a beautiful  line  of  mounted 
goods,  as  well  as  loose  diamonds. 


L.  Gutman  has  been  entertaining  some 
profitable  guests  the  past  few  days,  Geo. 
Garrettson,  Russellville,  Ky. ; H.  Diehl, 
Newark,  O.;  Chas.  McDonald,  of  W.  W. 
Howe,  Carlisle,  Ky.  He  sold  more  goods 
the  past  five  days  than  in  the  whole 
previous  month  . 


SILVER-PLATED 


ALBERT  BROS  • y Wholesale  Jewelers, 

Pike  Building,  Cincinnati,  Ohio. 


A.  J.  ConRiE, 

AUCTIONEER,. 


22  John  St.,  N.  Y. 


Special  Salesman  of  WATCHES,  DIAMONDS, 
BRIC-A-BRAC,  FOR  ESTABLISHED  JEWELERS. 

-WRITE  FOR  PARTICULARS 


R ARSONS  1 School 

FOR 

WflTQHnflKERS, 

PEOI^IA,  ILL 

Send  for  Circular  and  Terms. 

PARSONS  & CO. 


PRICE,  from  $40.00  up. 

Correspondence  Solicited. 

Joliet  Electric 
Mfg.  Co.,-^ 


JOLIET,  ILL. 


To  successfully  advertise  your  place 
of  business  you  must  cater  to  the  con 
venience  as  well  as  the  aesthetic  eye  of 
the  public.  Examine  the  accompany- 
ing fac-simile  of  our  Bracket  Clocks. 

Did  you  ever  see  any  dummy  so  per- 
fectly proportioned.  We  make  this 
Clock  for  either  Bracket  or  Post.  It 
measures  four  feet  from  top  of  ring  to 
bottom  of  ornament ; is  30  inches  in 
diameter  and  10  inches  thick.  It  is  water  and  dust  proof, 
and  the  dials  are  protected  by  Glass  Bezels.  Power  is  fur- 
nished by  a small  Battery.  The  circuit  is  opened  and  closed 
every  30  seconds  by  a small  contact-wheel  and  spring  placed 
on  your  regulator,  thus  moving  the  hands  ahead  every  half 
minute. 

The  case  is  made  of  cast  iron  and  the  mechanism  is 
simple.  This  clock  is  no  experiment  but  a positive  success 
and  will  last  you  a life  time. 


TIME  KEEPING 


36 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6 loys- 


We  sell  to  the  legitimate  Jewelry  and  Stationery 

trade  only. 


cnoicc  PAPERS 

MAKERS  OF 


ESTABLISHED  HALF  A CENTURY. 


HAVE  '^'wrENjffp^QVEMENlg 

Not  FOUND  IN  ^ 


THAT  Will  WELL  REPAY 

INVESTIGATION 

BY  THOSE  WHOg  TO  secure 

THE  BEST  SAFE 

MARVIN  SAFE  DO. 

12  PARK  PLACE,  NEW  YORK. 


FINE  STATIONERY 

For  Correspondence,  Wedding  and  Business  Use,  handsomely 
boxed,  specially  suited  to  the  Jewelry  Trade 
18  MURRAY  STREET.  NEW  YORK. 


THE  STATIONERS’  ENGRAVING  CO., 

98,  100,  102  NASSAU  ST.,  NEW  YORK, 

MAKERS  OF 

WEDDING  INVITATIONS,  RECEPTION  AND  VISITING  CARDS 

of  the  Best  Quality,  which  are  offered  to  Stationers  of  recognized  standing  and  reputation  only 
Avoid  Dry-goods  Store  Competition  by  always  ordering  those  bearing  our  registered  trade  mark  “ SILVER  WHIT  E 


Y/1CHER0N  6^  CONSTfll^TiN, 


■"ArsfAit''’ 


GENEVA,  SWITZERLAND. 


FINEST  QUALITY  OF  WATCH  MOVE* 
MENTS,  FITTING  ALL  SIZES  OF 
AMERICAN  CASES. 


EDMOND  E.  ROBERT, 

Agent  for  the  United  States  and  Canada- 


REMOVED  TO  3 MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 


H.  M.  RICH  & CO., 

Jewelry 

Auctioneers, 

21  SCHOOL  ST.,  BOSTON,  MASS. 


SALES  MADE  FOR  RETAIL  JEW- 
ELERS ONLY  IN  THEIR  ESTAB- 
LISHED PLACES  OF  BUSINESS. 


WE  CONDUCT  MORE  AUCTIONS 
THAN  ANY  OTHER  FIR.M  IN  OUR 
LINE  AND  WITH  BETTER  RE 
SULTS  AND  GUARANTEE  YOU 
AGAINST  LOSS. 


SEND  FOR  PAMPHLET  COXTAIMNG  OUR 
METHODS  AXD  REFERENCES  FROM 
NEARLY  100  RETAIL  JEWELERS  FOR 
WHOM  WE  HAVE  CONDUCTED  SALES  IN 
THE  LAST  12  MONTHS. 


ALL  CORRESPONDENCE  CONFIDENTIAL, 


TERLING  SILVER  .... 

TABLE  WARE 

Manufactured  at 

Newburyport,  Mass. 


TOWLE 

MANUFACTURING  (^OMPANY. 
Chicago  Office:  149-151  STATE  STREET. 


DR,  KNOWLES’ 

PRIVATE  COURSE 
IN  OPTICS. 

Lectures  with  Dipioma  $25.00 

Those  who  desire  to  study  with  the  Doc- 
tor will  send  in  their  application. 

Students  received  at  any  time. 

The  Key  to  the  Study  of  Refraction. 
50c.  per  copy. 

For  Sale  by 

R.  H.  KNOWLES,  M.  D., 

189  Broadway,  NEW  YORK. 
Care  of  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR. 


Nov.  6.  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


37 


JEWELERS’  ART  STATIONERY. 


NOTES  ON  AND  FASHIONS  IN  FINE  CORRESPONDENCE  AND  INVITATION 
PAPERS,  WEDDING  AND  VISITING  CARDS,  NOVELTIES,  ETC. 


The  Jewelers’  Stationery  Departments  in 
Cleveland,  0. 


*^WO  jewelry  stores  in  Cleveland,  O., 
^ have  appreciated  the  value  of  a fine 
stationery  department  in  connection  with 
their  business.  It  is  easy  for  even  a casual 
observer  to  see  that  a stationery  depart- 
ment in  a jewelry  store  has  many  advan- 
tages over  an  exclusive  stationery  house,  as 
very  many  articles  sold  by  jewelers  work  in 
naturally  with  stationery.  Articles  of 
Dresden  china,  sterling  silver,  bronze  and 
fine  leather,  displayed  with  stationery  are 
not  only  enhanced  in  beauty  but  each  arti- 
cle aids  the  sale  of  the  other. 

In  the  case  of  the  Cowell  & Hubbard  Co., 
their  papers  are  purchased  in  bulk  from  the 
mills,  and  packed  in  pure  white  boxes, 
made  up  in  about  100  different  sizes,  includ- 
ing many  odd  shapes  seldom  if  ever  seen 
outside  of  a jeweler’s  stationery  depart- 
ment. Papers  for  the  most  part  being  sold 
in  small  quantities  and  a large  number  of 
these  boxes  being  used,  this  item  alone  is  a 
fine  advertisement,  as  each  box  bears  the 
imprint  of  the  Cowell  & Hubbard  Co., 


Cleveland.  All  their  envelopes  also  have 
their  imprint,  and  as  they  have  a force  of 
artists  for  the  executing  of  steel  and  copper  1 
plate  engraving,  and  have  their  own  print- 
ing and  embossing  plant  for  the  production 
of  wedding  and  society  invitations,  visiting 
cards,  crests,  coats  of  arms,  menus  and 
guest  cards,  etc.,  this  imprint  is  constantly 
circulated  among  the  best  class  of  trade, 
advertising  not  only  their  stationery  depart- 
ment but  the  entire  store.  While  a depart- 
ment of  this  kind  requires,  if  developed 
properly,  a large  amount  of  attention  in 
detail,  it  is  usually  a paying  one  in  itself. 

Brunner  Bros,  have  a stationery  depart- 
ment, but  have  not  yet  been  able  to  push  it 
to  its  greatest  capabilities.  They,  however, 
feel  satisfied  as  to  the  value  of  the  depart- 
ment. 

A stationery  window  display  makes  a very 
attractive  advertisment,  and  it  is  possible 
to  show  a great  deal  of  taste  in  arranging 
an  exhibit  for  so  critical  a public  as  we  have 
these  days. 


Art  Stationery  Gossip. 

For  those  who  prefer  a pure  white  paper 


the  Royal  White,  a dead  perfect  white  in 
rough  and  smooth  finish  is  particularly 
adapted.  It  is  used  for  both  correspondence 
and  wedding  purposes. 

* * * 

Bond  papers,  for  those  who  like  to  write 
on  their  cracklely  surfaces,  are  shown  in 
three  tints,  azure,  white  and  rose,  in  a 
paper  called  Old  Style  Bond.  The  surface 
of  these  papers  has  a peculiar  mottled 
effect  given  it  by  a special  process  in  the 
manufacture. 

* * * 

Three  decided  tints  in  papers  which  have 
retained  popularity  among  all  the  new  as- 
pirants for  favor  are:  Highland  Heather, 

Russian  blue  and  Royal  purple,  the  last 
a specially  admired  tint. 


SCOTCH  ACUTENESS. 

The  window  display  made  by  a Glasgow 
newspaper  in  connection  with  the  Valkyrie- 
Defender  yacht  race  included  a dial  to  in- 
dicate American  time. 

“ That  clock’s  clean  wrang,”  said  a man, 
as  he  pushed  his  way  into  the  thick  of  the 
enormous  crowd  that  had  assembled.  “ It’s 
a gweed  five  boors  ahint.” 

“ Hoot,  min  ! ” answered  a wag  ; “ if  they 
hadna  pitten  back  the  time,  the  race  wid 
hae  been  encroachin’  on  the  Sabbath  day.” 
‘‘  Losh,  freen,  I never  thocht  o’  that.  Nae- 
body  can  beat  thae  Yankees  for  cute 
dodges.” — \Vest7ninster  Gazette. 


Self-Selling  Stationery 

IS  A TERM  THAT  JUST  FITS  OUR  LINE  OF 
HIGH  GRADE  PAPERS  FOR  FASHIONABLE  CORRESPONDENCE. 
JEWELERS  WHO  CARRY  A STOCK  OF  OUR  GOODS  WILL  FIND 
NO  DIFFICULTY  IN  GETTING  AND  KEEPING  THE  VERY  BEST 
CLASS  OF  THIS  TRADE. 

WE  WILL  BE  PLEASED  TO  MAIL  YOU  SAMPLES. 


GEO.  B.  HURD  & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

FINE  STATIONERY, 

425=427  Broome  St.,  N.  Y. 


HURD’S  NAME  ON  THE  BOX.”- 

ENOUGH  SAID. 


THE  JEWELERS'  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


MATTERS  IN 

JEWELRY  STOREKEEPINQ. 

That  this  department  shall  prove  mutually  beneficial  to  our  readers,  it  is  desirable  that  the  members  of 
the  trade  generally  communicate  with  The  Circular  regarding  any  advantageous  device  or  plan  that  they  are 
utilizing  in  connection  with  their  business. 


Conneclicul. 

H.  C.  Goodwin  has  opened  a repair  shop 
in  Swet’s  block,  Winsted. 

N.  L.  Bradley,  of  the  Bradley  & Hubbard 
Mfg.  Co.,  Meriden,  left  Oct.  28  on  a busi- 
ness trip  to  Chicago. 

Samuel  Lincoln,  of  Newton  & Lincoln, 
jewelers,  Winsted,  has  returned  from  a busi- 
ness trip  to  eastern  Massachusetts. 

P.  H.  Stevens  & Co.,  of  Bristol,  have 
nearly  doubled  their  floor  space  in  their 
store  on  N.  Main  St.  Their  stock  has  been 
brought  up  to  a corresponding  variety  and 
extent.  . 

The  Meriden  Britannia  Co.’s  shop  con- 
tinues to  run  until  6 o’clock  every  Saturday 
night,  a state  of  affairs  which  has  not  ex- 
isted at  the  factory  for  years.  The  German 
silver  department  is  running  until  9 o’clock 
five  evenings  a week  and  the  other  depart- 
ments are  correspondingly  busy. 

Jeweler  L.  V.  R.  Hubbard,  Birmingham, 
writes  home  from  Atlanta,  Ga.,  of  his  visit 
to  famous  southern  battle  grounds,  espec- 
ially speaking  of  Decatur,  eight  miles  from 
Atlanta,  where  Gen.  McPherson  was  killed. 
Mr.  Hubbard  in  that  fight  was  on  the  skir- 
mish line  and  had  a close  call,  a bullet  lodg- 
ing in  his  cartridge  box.  He  also  visited 
Kenesaw  Mountain  and  Marietta. 


New  Bedford,  Mass. 

At  a recent  annual  meeting  of  the  Onset 
St.  R.  R.  Co.,  Joseph  K.  Nye  was  elected 
president.  Anderson  W.  Kelly,  bookkeeper 
for  Wm.  F.  Nye,  was  elected  treasurer. 

The  Frederick  Douglass  souvenir  spoons 
are  the  latest  things  in  souvenirdom.  The 
Pairpoint  Mfg.  Co.  have  just  commenced 
turning  them  out  for  an  enterprising  colored 
man  of  Chicago,  who  is  finding  a ready  sale 
for  them  at  the  Atlanta  Exposition.  The 
bowl  contains  an  excellent  relief  portrait  of 
the  eminent  colored  statesman,  while  under 
it  is  a scroll  with  the  words  “ Born  1817, 
Maryland.”  The  handle  of  the  spoon  com- 
prises six  links  of  a chain  and  a shackle, 
representing  the  seven  great  chains  in 
Douglass’  career  of  emancipation.  The  last 
link  is  represented  as  broken.  The  edges 
of  the  handle  and  the  back  are  of  inter- 
twined olive  leaves  while  in  a wreath  on 
the  back,  on  a frosted  ground  appear  the 
words  “ Frederick  Douglass.”  The  whole 
spoon  is  artistic  and  is  finished  in  oxydized 
silver. 


C.  M.  Willis,  Oakland  City,  Ind.,  has  sold 
his  jewelry  business  to  Frank  & Hearing, 
composed  of  F.  R.  Frank,  of  Petersburg, 
and  A.  J.  Heuring,  of  Winslow. 


Law  Points. 

{Compiled from  the  latest  decisions  of  the 
highest  courts.) 

Parol  evidence  is  not  admissible  to  vary 
the  terms  of  a note. 

The  insolvency  of  a bank  to  which  a check 
is  indorsed  “ for  collection  ” revokes  its 
agency. 

The  holders  of  a draft  before  maturity 
are  not  bound  by  the  acts  of  indorsers  after 
transfer. 

The  giving  of  a negotiable  note  is  as 
effectual  as  a payment  in  cash  to  show  a 
purchase  for  value. 

The  giving  of  an  absolute  deed  merely  as 
security  is  a badge  of  fraud  as  against  the 
creditors  of  the  grantor. 

A corporation  that  is  unable  to  pay  its 
debts  as  they  become  due  in  the  usual 
course  of  business  is  insolvent. 

When  property  is  insured  “while”  in  a 
certain  building,  the  insured  cannot  recover 
in  case  it  is  destroyed  at  another  place. 

The  written  promise  to  pay  the  debt  of 
another  is  invalid  without  evidence  of  a 
consideration  outside  of  the  promise 
itself. 

Statements  in  a catalogue  as  to  the 
capacity  of  machinery,  if  relied  on  by  the 
purchaser,  will  constitute  an  express  war- 
ranty. 

Where  a contract  of  service  is  proved,  it 
is  not  necessary  to  show  a fixed  price  for 
such  services,  but  recovery  may  be  based 
on  the  value  of  them. 

An  indorsement  on  a check  “ for  collec- 
tion and  credit,”  is  notice  to  every  subse- 
quent custodian  of  the  check  that  it  is  the 
property  of  the  indorser. 

An  offer  to  purchase  goods  may  be  with- 
drawn at  any  time  before  acceptance,  but 
the  withdrawal  must  be  brought  to  the 
knowledge  of  the  other  party. 

One  who  refuses  to  perform  the  conditions 
imposed  upon  him  by  the  terms  of  a con- 
tract cannot  recover  for  a breach  of  such 
contract  by  the  other  party. 

In  an  action  by  a creditor  to  set  aside  a 
voluntary  conveyance  made  after  his  debt 
arose,  the  burden  of  proof  is  on  the  grantee 
to  show  a consideration. 

Where  the  contract  of  a carrier  for  a spe- 
cial rate  of  freight  is  void  because  in  viola- 
tion of  the  inter-State  commerce  act,  the 
carrier  may  collect  the  usual  rate. 

An  employe  who  knowingly  engages  in 
dangerous  work  because  he  is  told  that  he 
will  lose  his  place  if  he  refuses  to  do  so, 
assumes  the  risk  of  injury  from  such  work. 

The  assignee  of  an  insolvent  corporation, 
under  an  assignment  for  the  benefit  of  its 
creditors,  takes  the  property  subject  to  what- 
ever equities  existed  against  the  corporation. 


A Unique  Advertising  Scheme. 


FL.  PARKHURST,  jeweler,  Everett, 
• Mass.,  advertises  the  following 
scheme  to  attract  trade  ; 

SOMETHING  FOR  NOTHING  ! 


NO  LOTTERY  ABOUT  THIS  ! 


IVe  will  give  the  choice  of 
A 16  size,  Elgin  or  Waltham  Watch  in  a 
"fas.  Boss"  filled  case, 

6 size,  Elgin  or  Waltham  Watch,  in 
a "fas.  Boss  ” filled  case  ; 

Or  a real  Onyx  case  Mantel  Clock, 
to  the  person  who  estimates  nearest  the 
correct  number  of  persons  entering  our 
store  between  the  hours  of  8 a.  m.  and  ii 
p.  December  24th,  r8gj. 

Please  Remember : We  do  not  ask  you 

to  spend  a cent  for  the  privilege  of  esti- 
?nating  or  guessing  once  or  a dozen  times, 
and  the  contest  is  subject  only  to  the  fol- 
lowing conditions  : 

The  estimate  shall  be  deposited  by  the 
contestant  in  person  before  10  o'clock 
a.  m.,  December  24th.,  i8gy,  who  must  be  a 
resident  of  Everett,  over  /j  years  of  age 
and  not  in  our  employ  either  at  present  or 
in  the  past,  or  any  relative  of  such  em- 
ploye. 

The  Prizes  are  now  on  exhibition  in  our 
window.  Fill  out  this  blank,  and  write 
plainly,  printing  preferred. 

The  coupon  attached  is  as  follows; 


/ Estimate  that Persons  will 

Enter  the  Store  of 

PARKHURST,  THE  JEWELER, 

450  BROADWAY, 

Opp.  Masonic  Building,  EVERETT,  MASS. 

Between  the  hours  of  8 a.  m.  and  11 
p.  nt.,  December  24th,  i8gy. 

Name No St 


A Poetic  Window  Display. 


IN  a Terre  Haute,  Ind.,  jeweler’s  window, 
among  rings  set  with  diamonds,  pearls 
and  rubies  are  a few  shaggy  hulls  which 
show  that  the  time  for  the  opening  of  the 
chestnut  burr  has  come.  The  empty  green 
burrs  from  which  the  warm  brown  nuts 
have  fallen  look  strange  among  the  gauds 
and  yet  this  touch  of  nature  will  attract 
attention  for  a day  or  two  and  will  recall  to 
many  the  pleasant  nutting  under  the  most 
beautiful  of  trees  in  the  rich  Autumn  wood- 
lands long  ago. 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW, 


39 


SOME  EFFECTIVE  RETAIL  JEWELERS’  ADS. 


Salad  Dishes 

ill 

Orange  Spoons 

Tea  Sets 

Salad  Forks 

Nut  Bowls 

Cracker  Scoops 

Water  Sets 

m 

Sardine  Forks 

Bread  Trays 

D 

Salad  Spoons 

Coffee  Sets 

D 

\ Berry  Spoons 

Cake  Baskets 

z 

0 

Oyster  Ladles 

Hair  Brushes 

1 Cracker  Jars 

Hand  Mirrors 

Pie  Knives 

ClothesJBrushes 

PRESENT 

Vegetable  Forks 

Carving  Sets 

Fruit  Knives 

Berry  Dishes 
Mirror  Trays 
Mirror  Plateaux 

! Pearl  Handle 
Knives 

j Porcelain  Clocks 

Baking  Dishes 
Tea  Spoons 

Rich  Cut  Glass 
Bronze  Clocks 
Etc.,  Etc. 

5 o’clock 

CTJ 

Tea  Spoons 

• 

See  our  goods 

Etc.,  Etc. 

mil 

and  prices  be- 

I 

fore  buying. 

D.  K.  RISING,  West  Side  Square, 

LAFAYETTE,  IND. 


Beautiful  Wedding  Presents 
are  here  at  reduced  prices. 


Autumn 
Wedding  Bells 


* * 
* * 


* * 
* * 


* * 
» * 


— are  ringing  out  quite  merrily. 
Buying  presen  ts  is  a great  pleasure 
if  one  has  a full  purse.  Otherwise 
it’s  usually  irksome.  To  tell  you 
of  desirable  articles  that  come 

* * within  the  range  of  THE  LEAN- 
EST PURSE  is  our  pleasure  to- 
day. Additional  stock  is  coming 
in.  We  must  have  room.  So  down 

* * go  the  prices  ! EVERYTHING 

* * has  been  reduced  ! Watches, 

* * Clocks,  Diamonds,  Jewelry.  Sterl- 

* * ing  Silver,  &c.,  &c.  No  one  who 

* * has  to  purchase  a wedding  present 

* * can  afford  to  buy  without  visiting 

* * this  store. 

* * Lots  of  Beautiful  Gifts  at  $1, 

* * $2  and  $3. 

S.  Desio, 

MANUFACTURING  JEWELER, 

1012  F St. 

0pp.  Boston  House,  Washingrton,  D.  C. 


Time!.. 


Some  people  are  peculiar  in  the 
matter  of  buying  a Watch.  A 
silver  Watch  is  good  enough  for 
one  man  so  long  as  it  keeps 
good  . TIME.  Another  one 
wants  something  a little  more 
showy — a gold  one — but  it, 
too,  must  keep  good  TIME. 
Some  want  a high  priced  watch ; 
others  a cheaper  one — but  after 
all,  everybody  wants  a correct 
TIME  piece.  We  selected  our 
stock  with  TIME  in  view  and 
can  sell  you  a high,  low  or 
medium  priced  watch — and  any 
of  them  will  keep  TIME — the 
essential  point. 

Full  Line  of  all  Kinds  of 
Jewelry  Goods. 


HARLEY  OGLE, 

Leading  Jeweler, 

Centralia, 


STERLING 

SILVER 


Make  very  acceptable 
Birthday  presents  and 
souvenirs.  Wehaveavery 
'T'ice  collection  of  the 

INLIV  tiL  1 Its  newest  things  in  this  line. 


H.  S.  FRANCIS, 
JEWELER. 

NEW  BEDFORD,  MASS. 


Are  easy  to  select  from  the  WEDDING 
large  stock  of  solid  Silver- 
ware which  we  carry,  ranging  GIFTS 
from  the  modest  and  inexpensive 
article  to  the  handsomest  and  most  expen- 
sive. We  can  suit  every  one’s  purse. 


Some  Jewelers  deceive 
their  friends  and  count  it 
wit. 

Carried  to  any  extent, 
and  it’s  business  suicide. 

What  we  recommend 
is  recommendable. 

What  we  sell  is  sold 
exactly  for  what  it’s 
worth 

lUDSON  S.  NEWING, 


138  Court  Street, 
Binghamton,  . . N.  Y. 


l|You 
Select 
Your 
Watch 

From  seventy-five  different  pat- 
terns we  have  in  stock — get  one 
that  suits  you — solid  gold — gold- 
filled  or  silver  case. 

Our  $20  Watch — fine  Elgin  move- 
ment in  gold-filled  case.  Will 
last  a lifetime. 

Breckbill  & Benedict, 

511  Main  Street, 


m 


You 

Can’t 

Run 

Your 

house,  store,  farm  or  any  business 
successfully  without  correct  time. 
If  “Time  is  money,”  right  time 
is  good  money.  Buy  a clock — An 
8 day  Walnut  case — Cathedral 
gong  — half  hour  strike- — alarm 
— price  S4.50. 

Breckbill  & Benedict, 

511  Main  Street, 


Just  above  Golden  Hill,  Ipg”  Just  above  Golden  Hill, 

BRIDGEPORX,  CO?CV. 

!!!■!*!!!!!!!■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■•*■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 


m 


40 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6 1895. 


BRADLEY  & HUBBARD  MFQ.  CO., 

INVITE  THE  ATTENTION  OF 


Jewelers  and  Fancy  Goods  Dealers, 

TO  THEIR  SUPERIOR  LINE  OF  GOODS. 


B ii  M.”  Banquet  Lamps. 


Most  Artistic  Designs  and 
Finishes  Ever  Shown. 


Art  Metal  Goods. 


Onyx  Top  Tables,  Candelabras,  Vases, 
Pitchers,  Urns,  Five  O’Clock  Teas,  Mirrors, 
Jewel  Cases,  Etc. 


NEW  YORK:  BOSTON.  CHICAGO:  PHILADELPHIA: 

76  PARK  PLACE,  160  CONGRESS  ST.  204  MASONIC  TEMPLE.  7 1 O Bft2  BUIL DING. 

71  Barclay  St.  factories  and  offices:  Meriden,  Conn. 


S.  A.  BOYLE  & CO., 


AUCTIONEERS 


FOR  THE  LEGITIMATE 
JEWELRY  TRADE  ONLY 


WE  GUARANTEE  YOU  AGAINST  LOSS, 

WE  PAY  ALL  OUR  OWN  EXPENSES. 

Make  no  contracts  with  others  before  consulting  us 


Write  for  Particulars. 


OFFICES  : 

14  MAIDEN  LANE.  N Y. 

61  1 PENN  AVE..  WASHINGTON,  D.  C. 


BAND  RINQ  nOUNTINQ 


3351. 


Design 

Patented 

Sept.  24, 
1895. 


3350. 


CHARLES  KNAPP. 


MANUFACTURING  JEWELER, 

41  & 43  Maiden  hane,  New  York, 


SPECIALTY:  SUPERIOR  LADIES’  and  CHILDREN’S  RINGS 


BUFF  AND  BLUE 

Were  the  Victorious  Colors  of  the  American  Revolutionists. 

THE  A1  WlLLIAMSVILLE  BUFF 


has  been  equall'Y  victorious  in  revolutionizing  the 
market  in  Buffs. 

ONLY  ONE  OEALITV.-TUE  BEiT. 

Prepaid  Samples  if  you  want  them. 

WlLLIAMSVILLE  MFQ.  CO., 

18  South  Water  St.,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  1. 

MILLS  AT  -WlLLIAMSVILLE,  KILLINGLY,  CONN. 


W.  F.  Evans  & Sons 


SOHO  CLOCK  FACTORY, 


HANDSWORTH, 

BIRMINGHAM, 

ENGLAND. 


rianufacturers  of 

CHURCH, 
CHIME  & 
QUARTER 

CLOCKS, 

SCHOOL  AND 
HOUSE  GLOCKS 


With  arch  brass  dials  to  chime  upon 
Bells,  Gongs,  and  Harrington’s 
Patent  Tubes. 


ESTABLISHED  1S05. 


OVEF>^  HALF  A THOUSAND  SOLD  DAILY! 
OF  W H AT  ? WHY 


THE  IDOL. 

L SAMPLE  SENT  POST  PAID  TO  ANY  JEWELER  FOR  $1.50. 

STEM  WINDING.  CYLINDER  MOVEMENT,  HIGHLY  FINISHED, 

NICKEL  MOVEMENT,  NICKEL  CASES  EXCELLENT  TIME  KEEPER, 
HANDSOME  APPEARANCE,  CONVENIENT  SIZE, 

ABSOLUTELY  THE  BEST  LOW  PRICED  WATCH  EVER  MADE. 

LIBERAL  DISCOUNT  FOR  QUANTITIES.  ORDER  EARLY  IF  YOU  WANT  THEM. 

L.  S.  FRIEDBERCER  3b  CO., 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


>=iND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


41 


The  Latest  Patents. 


ISSUE  OF  OCTOBER  29,  I S95. 


d48.(>4:i.  STUD.  Frank  H.  Kramer,  Cleve. 
land,  Ohio.— Filed  July  5,1895.  Serial  No.  554,- 
954.  (No  model.) 


The  combination  with  the  head  and  stem  or  shank 
■of  a device  of  the  character  indicated,  which  shank  or 
stem  at  its  rear  end,  is  provided  with  a spiral  or  coiled 
member,  of  a dog  or  keeper  suitably  supported  from 
the  device  at  a suitable  point  and  adapted  to  prevent 
self  unscrewing  of  the  spiral  or  coiled  member  of  the 
device  from  the  object  to  which  the  device  is  attached. 

548.749.  SHIRT-STUD.  Charles  A.  Fautz, 
Newark.  N.  J — Filed  June  10,  1S95.  Serial  No. 
552.224.  (No  model.) 


An  article  of  jewelry  or  the  like,  comprising  therein, 
an  ornamental  portion,  a pin  or  tine,  a tubular  post 
extending  therefrom,  and  having  a slit  therein,  and  a 
shank  rotatively  arranged  in  said  post,  and  means  on 
said  shank  adapted  to  engage  with  said  slit  in  said 
post  to  hold  the  shank  in  certain  positions,  and  said 
shank  being  secured  at  one  end  to  said  ornamental 
portion  and  having  an  arm  at  its  opposite  end,  pro- 
jecting at  a right  angle  therefrom,  or  approximately 
so. 

548,7.50.  SHIRT-STUD.  Charles  A.  Fautz, 
Newark,  N.  J. — Filed  March  19  1895.  Serial  No 
542,301.  (No  model.) 


Leon  H.  Watters,  Media,  Pa.— Filed  Nov.  30 
1891.  Serial  No.  413,623.  (No  model.) 

Design  24,789.  SHANK  FOR  LINK  CUFF- 
BUTTONS.  James  A.  Flomerfelt,  New 


York,  N.  Y.— Filed  June  24,  1895.  Serial  No. 
553.921.  Term  of  patent  14  years. 

Design  24.790.  BUTTON.  Edward  G. 
Niklaus,  Madison,  Ind  —Filed  Aug.  8,  1895. 


Serial  No.  558,683.  Term  of  patent  3!^  years. 

Design  24,791.  POCKET-BOX  Paul  L.  V. 
Thiery,  Newark,  N.  J.,  assignor  to  Wm.  B.  Kerr 


& Co.— Filed  Oct.  16,  1894.  Serial  No.  526,104. 
Term  of  patent  3)4  years. 


New  Game  on  the  Jeweler. 


A FEW  days  ago  a well  dressed  young 
man  entered  a Grand  St.  jewelry 
store  and  professed  a desire  to  buy  a dia- 
mond ring.  The  stock  was  exhibited  and 
overhauled  and  he  finally  fixed  upon  a $100 
stone,  which  he  directed  the  jeweler  to  hold 
apart  for  him  until  he  passed  later  in  the 
day. 

In  bending  over  the  counter  to  give 


these  directions  the  young  man  leaned  too 
heavily  upon  the  showcase  and  his  elbow 
went  through  the  top  g lass  with  a crash.  He 
was  fairly  overcome  with  annoyance  and  re- 
gretand  assured  the  jeweler  that  he  would 
settle  for  the  damage  when  he  called  for 
the  ring.  The  jeweler  plainly  stated  that 
he  would  like  to  have  his  loss,  which  was 
only  a matter  of  $3,  made  good  on  the 
spot. 

“ But  I have  no  money  with  me,”  pro- 
tested the  customer. 

“ Pardon  me  if  I call  your  attention  to 
the  fact  that  you  have,”  replied  the  shop- 
man, and,  reaching  over  the  counter,  he 
drew  from  the  young  man’s  pocket  a $20 
bill,  the  corner  of  which  had  been  plainly 
in  sight. 

The  young  man’s  confusion  was  painful. 
He  vowed  upon  his  honor  that  he  was  not 
aware  that  he  had  the  money  with  him, 
and  he  most  cheerfully  consented  that  the 
jeweler  should  take  out  the  amount  of  his 
loss.  This  was  done,  and,  receiving  $17 
change,  the  young  man  left,  promising  to 
return  and  complete  his  purchase. 

He  never  came  back,  and  when  the  jew- 
eler made  his  deposit  at  the  bank  that  even- 
ing he  was  shocked  to  have  the  bill  thrown 
back  to  him  as  counterfeit. 

He  complained  to  the  police,  and  there  it 
rests  up  to  date. — New  York  Journal. 


KNOWN  TO  FAME. 

Actress. — My  room  has  been  burglarized 
during  my  absence  and  twenty  thousand 
dollars  worth  of  diamonds  stolen. 

Hotel  Proprietor. — Ha,  ha!  thai’sgood 
and  season.Tble.  I’ll  telephone  for  the  re- 
porters at  once. 

Actress.-  -And  my  husband  lost  six  pairs 
of  new  trousers  at  the  same  time. 

Hotel  Proprietor. — Great  Jehoshaphat ! 
don’t  spring  that  on  ’em.  The  boys  know 
him  too  well. — fudge. 


An  article  of  jewelry,  or  the  like,  comprising  therein, 
an  ornamental  portion,  a pin  or  tine  t‘,  having  a flat- 
tened portion  c-  and  an  upwardly  inclined  pait 
forming  a stop,  a tubular  post  at  the  upper  pait  of 
said  pin  or  tine  c'  and  a shank  rotatively  arranged  in 
said  post,  said  shank  being  secured  at  one  end  to  said 
ornamental  portion,  and  having  at  its  opposite  end  an 
arm  projecting  therefrom  at  a right  angle  or  approx- 
imately so,  having  a flattened  surface  b^.  and  a down- 
wardly-inclined part  b'  adapted  to  be  brought  against 
said  upwardly  inclining  part  c’. 

548,791.  WATCHCASE.  Theodore  B.  Wil- 
cox, Newark,  N.  J,— Filed  Jan.  17,  1895.  Serial 
No.  535,198.  (No  model.) 


A watch-case  of  precious  metal  having  such  a thick- 
ness that  it  would  be  liable  to  collapse  in  common  use, 
the  same  being  provided  with  integral  interna- 
strengthening  ribs  separated  by  spaces  greater  than 
the  width  of  the  said  ribs  at  their  base. 

549,0:t8.  ELECTRIC  PROGRAM  - CLOCK. 


Superior  to  Anything  Ever  Shown. 
Apply  for  Catalogue  to 


:$')")  IHULIIERRY  ST., 
NEW.tRK,  A.  .1. 


CHAS.  BACHEM. 

MiiniifHcturor  of 
Miiniiiise  Heads,  Clusters,  Ring  Shanks,  Rypsy  ^Riiigs,  Etc. 


42 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


Relation  of  Escapement  to 
Balance  Spring. 

The  relation  of  the  lever  escapement 
to  the  balance  spring  is  quite  an  im- 
portant matter.  Most  workmen  imagine  that 
adjusting  is  a great  mystery,  and  that  the 
man  who  masters  this  portion  of  the  watch- 
maker’s art  must  necessarily  stand  at  the 
head  of  the  profession.  The  word  “pro- 
fession ” is  used  advisedly,  and  it  is  to  be 
hoped  that  the  different  horological  schools 
will  sooner  or  later  bestow  degrees  as  do 
schools  of  law  and  medicine. 

It  is  well  known  that  a balance  spring 
adjusted  to  isochronal  vibrations  in  a 
duplex  or  chronometer  watch  would  not 
possess  this  property  if  placed  in  a detached 
lever.  To  make  this  proposition  better 
understood,  suppose  we  were  to  make  two 
movements,  one  of  which  was  provided  with 
a detached  lever  escapement  of  the  most 
perfect  construction,  the  other  a detent  or 
so-called  chronometer  escapement,  the 
trains  of  each  watch  as  far  as  the  scape 
wheel  being  precisely  alike ; for  these 
movements  we  made  but  one  balance  staff 
and  balance  spring.  In  other  words,  the 
balance  staff  and  balance  spring  were  inter- 
changeable after  we  changed  the  rollers  on 
the  staff  to  adapt  it  to  the  escapement  of 
the  particular  movement  to  be  experi- 
mented with.  The  balance  and  its  spring 
were  perfectly  adjusted  to  isochronism  with 
the  lever  escapement. 

Now,  if  we  changed  the  balance  with  its 
spring  to  the  chronometer  movement  we 
would  find  the  general  rate  of  the  watch 
about  the  same;  that  is,  if  the  weights  of  the 
rollers  were  alike;  but  the  spring,  which 
was  perfectly  isochronal  with  the  lever  es- 
capement, was  badly  out  with  the  chrono- 
meter. What  does  this  tell  us?  Simply, 
that  the  escapement  is  a great  factor  in 
isochronal  adjustments.  This  influence 
does  not  exist  in  an  abstract  sense,  because 
one  is  a lever  escapement  and  the  other  a 
chronometer  escapement,  and  that  if  the 
balance  had  been  changed  to  another  lever 
escapement  that  was  adapted  to  receive  it, 
it  would  have  been  perfectly  isochronal,  as 
it  was  with  the  first  movement.  One  fault 
in  watch  manufacture  should  be  remedied, 
viz:  the  watch  constructor  and  watch  ad- 
juster should  be  one  person,  because  the 
adjuster  is  constantly  trying  to  remedy  the 
defects  of  the  constructor.  If  the  maker 
did  the  adjusting  also,  he  would  be  able  to 
correct  the  fault  and  remedy  it  instead  of 
trying  to  make  one  error  correct  another, 
which  is  much  like  the  doctrine  of  doing 
evil  that  good  may  come  of  it.  Much  of 
the  adjusting,  especially  of  the  more  deli- 
cate methods  relating  to  position,  consists 
of  remedying  downright  mechanical  defects. 

Adjusting  is  divided  into  three  depart- 
ments, viz.:  heat  and  cold,  isochronism, 
and  position,  and  it  is  the  adjustor’s  prov- 
ince to  treat  his  balance  and  balance 
spring  in  such  a way  that  they  are  rendered 
proof  against  any  alterations  occurring  in 
the  latter,  jointly  or  severallj'.  The  sub- 


ject of  adjusting  has  often  been  debated  in 
the  columns  of  The  Circular,  and  would 
require  too  much  space  to  exhaustively  go 
over  the  whole  ground  again.  The  reader 
is  therefore  referred  to  them  for  full  infor- 
mation. 


A Well  Arranged  Technical 
School. 


During  a recent  visit  to  Lancaster,  Pa., 
the  writer  was  afforded  the  privilege 
to  inspect  the  Manufacturing  and  Technical 
School  Departments  of  Ezra  F.  Bowman  & 
Co. 

The  manufacturing  department  occupies 
the  entire  second  floor  of  the  Non-Retailing 
Co.’s  place  of  business  and  is  divided  into 
different  branches.  The  watchmakers 
(who  work  for  the  trade)  use  a large 
part  of  the  front  room.  Next  is  the 
handsome  office,  fitted  up  for  the 
manager’s  use;  in  this  office  the  calcu- 
lations and  estimates  are  furnished  for  all 
kinds  of  emblem  work.  Adjoining  this  office 
is  the  receiving  room,  presided  over  by  two 
clerks;  in  this  room  the  work  is  entered 
and  sent  into  the  different  departments, 
and  when  finished  is  checked  off  and  sent 
to  its  destination ; work  has  been  received 
from  II  different  States  in  a single  day. 
Next  is  a large,  commodious  room  for 
manufacturing  jewelers  and  case  makers. 
The  power  for  doing  this  work  is 
furnished  by  a three  horse-power  motor. 
Large  rolls,  drop  presses  and  punches  are 
well  arranged  with  two  rows  of  benches  the 
entire  width  of  the  room,  occupied  by  skilled 
workmen.  In  this  shop  are  made  the  dia- 
mond mountings  and  plain  rings,  and  em- 
blem goods  for  all  societies  to  order,  while 
here  also  is  done  repairing  of  all  kinds  of 
jewelry,  etc.  Alterations  are  just  being 
made  in  the  case  shop.  A master  case 
maker  will  hereafter  have  charge  of  the 
work,  and  all  manner  of  case  alterations 
and  repairs  will  be  made. 

From  the  second  floor  by  an  easy  flight 
of  stairs,  we  reach  a room  as  large  as  the 
entire  second  floor.  This  is  where  the  Ezra 
F.  Bowman  Technical  School  of  Watch- 
making and  Engraving  is  located.  This 
room  is  under  the  same  manager  as  the 
others.  The  head  instructor,  as  well  as  his 
assistants,  is  a man  of  large  experience  in 
the  repairing  of  watches  and  clocks,  and 
possesses  the  rare  faculty  of  imparting  his 
knowledge  in  an  intelligent  manner.  The 
pupils  are  doing  excellent  work  on  screw 
making,  balance  staff  turning,  pivoting, 
jeweling,  springing,  bridge  work,  changing 
key  wind  to  stem  wind,  etc.  At  the  rear  of 
the  room,  engraving  is  taught  and  some  of 
the  work  done  by  the  pupils  is  very  clever 
and  artistic. 

One  thing  conspicuous  for  its  absence 
was  tool  making.  The  manager  said  the 
young  men  come  to  learn  watchmaking  and 
engraving,  and  that  they  can  buy  more  tools 
for  $100  than  they  could  produce  in  a week. 
The  room  has  a seating  capacity  of  50. 


Workshop  Notes. 

Cutting  Down  Jewels.  — To  cut  down 
balance  jewels  to  fit  smaller  sinks,  shellac 
the  setting  and  jewel  on  the  point  of  a stiff 
wire  held  in  the  lathe  and  turned  down  to  a 
perfect  point  to  enter  the  jewel  hole.  Cut 
with  the  point  of  a very  sharp  graver  to  the 
size  required. 

Hardening  Punches.  — Punches  are 
pickled  by  dropping  upon  their  surface  a 
drop  of  muriatic  acid  ; they  are  then  rubbed 
off  with  a brush,  washed  and  anointed  with 
fat.  When  fairly  clean  and  without  flaws, 
they  are  annealed  pale  yellow,  and  they 
then  possess  sufficient  hardness  to  be  driven 
cold  into  softened  steel. 

Replace  Broken  Foot  Jewel.  — Remove 
the  broken  jewel  from  the  collet  or  setting; 
place  the  collet  or  setting  in  one  of  your 
lathe  chucks,  large  enough  to  hold  the  same; 
start  in  motion,  and  with  a fine  pointed 
burnisher  raise  the  bezel  sufficient  to  re- 
ceive a new  jewel;  select  a jewel  to  fit  both 
pivot  and  setting,  replace  in  chuck,  and 
with  a little  larger  burnisher  close  down  the 
bezel  on  pivot  and  your  job  is  complete. 

Poising  Pallets,  Etc. — A correspondent 
desires  to  know  how  to  poise  pallets  and 
balance.  In  the  first  place,  pallets  are  not 
poised  without  the  lever,  and  then  only 
approximately,  as  they  cannot  be  so 
weighted  with  the  ordinary  construction 
that  they  will  not  gravitate  in  some  posi- 
tions. The  balance  cannot  be  poised  in  any 
quick  and  easy  method,  but  this  can  only 
be  done  by  a rather  long  and  tedious  mani- 
pulation, too  lengthy  to  be  described  in  a 
short  Workshop  Note. 

The  Mainspring. — Pay  particular  atten- 
tion to  the  mainspring.  There  are  lots  of 
theories  why  a spring  will  break  just  after 
cleaning,  but  I only  know  that  since  I have 
adopted  the  method  of  never  taking  out  the 
spring,  except  when,  after  taking  off  the 
cap  of  the  barrel,  I find  it  is  all  gummed  up 
with  bad  oil,  and  then  of  course  I clean  it. 

I have  found  that  a spring  does  not  break 
any  oftener  than  is  common,  even  if  the 
watch  is  not  cleaned;  but  I invariably  re- 
move the  barrel  arbor  and  clean  out  the 
holes  and  the  barrel  itself. 

Elastic  Lacquer. — A lacquer  said  to  be 
of  great  elasticity,  perfectly  supple  and  not 
liable  to  peel  off,  is  made  in  the  following 
manner  (all  parts  are  by  weight):  About 

120  parts  of  oil  varnish  are  heated  in  one- 
vessel,  and  23  parts  of  quick  lime  are  put 
into  22  parts  of  water,  in  another.  As  soon 
as  the  lime  causes  an  effervescence,  55  parts 
of  melted  india-rubber  are  added,  the  mix- 
ture is  stirred  and  then  poured  into  the 
vessel  of  hot  varnish.  The  whole  is  then 
stirred  so  as  to  be  thoroughly  mixed,  and 
then  strained,  allowed  to  cool,  when  it  has 
the  appearance  of  lead.  When  required  for 
use,  it  is  thinned  with  varnish  and  applied 
with  the  brush,  hot  or  cold,  preferably  the 
former.  This  lacquer  is  useful  for  wood, 
iron  or  for  walls;  it  will  also  render  cloth, 
paper,  etc.,  waterproof. 


Nov.  6.  i8ys. 


and  horological  review. 


43 


FROM 


47  Cortlandt  St., 
to  10  Maiden  Lane. 


NEW  QUARTERS. 

Come  and  see  us. 


n 


MERICAN 


ESTABLISHED  1S7S. 
INCORPORATED  IS94. 


WATCH  TOOL  CO. 


ebster= 


GROWS  IN  POPULARITY. 


PRICES  AS  LOW  AS  CONSISTENT  WITH  QUALITY. 

Ask  your  Jobber  for  Price  List  of  1895,  or  write  to  us  at 


Stoney  - Batter  Works,  Chymistry  Dist.,  Waltham,  Mass. 


CROUCH  & FITZGERALD. 

Jewelry  Trunks 
and  Cases, 

I6I 

Broadway, 

Bet.  Cortlandt  and 
Liberty  Sts., 

6llllB’wai|, 
/m  Bill  Aiie 

NEW  YORK. 


1895-WINNERS-1895 

..WATCHES. 


PAILLARD  NON=MAQNETIC 
CHARMILLES  .... 
PRINCETON 


ORDER  OF  YOUR  JOBBER  OR  DIRECT. 

R.  A.  LOVELAND, 

177  Broadway,  = = = = New  York. 


‘^The  Benedict.” 

(TRADE  MARK.) 

The  Perfect 

Collar  Button. 


6I0C  VIEW. 


MADE  IN  GOLD,  STERLING  SILVER 
and  ROLLED  PLATE. 

Enos  Richardson  & Co., 

2s  riaiden  Lane, 

New  York, 

Sole  n.anufacturera. 


44 


IHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1805. 


American  Cut  Glass. 

NEW 

EXCELLENT 

SHAPES, 

quality 

0E  CRYSTAL, 

NEW 

CUTTINGS,  ^ 

HIGHEST 

POPULAR 

PERFECT 

PRICES. 

WORKMANSHIP. 

SALAD  ELMWOOD.” 

L.  STRAU5  & SONS, 


42-44-46-48  Warren 

AND 

1 16  Chambers 
NEW  YORK. 


FACTORY : 


HOBOKEN,  N.  J. 


Streets, 


PUFF  BOX. 


STERLING  TOP. 


INKSTAND. 
STERLING  TOP 


Artistic  Plaques  Being  Closed 
Out 


PLAQUES  of  all  descriptions  from  the 
small  miniature  sizes  to  the  large 
panel  pieces,  are  among  the  samples  now 
being  closed  out  by  Geo.  Borgfeldt  & Co.. 
18-22  Washington  Place,  New  York.  The 
paintings  which  decorate  this  line  are  prin- 


cipally reproductions 
masterpi  e c e s 
in  the  Europ- 
ean galleries, 
and  are  among 
the  most  artis- 
tic which  the 
market  af- 
fords.  The 
large  assort- 
ment and  the 
low  prices  at 
which  these 
samples  are 
being  cleared 
out,  make  this 
line  one  which 
the  jewelers 
would  do  well 
to  inspect. 


from  the  famous 


A MONO  the 
lines  most 
suitable  for 
holiday  pres- 
ents displayed 
in  the  ware- 
rooms  of  Laz- 
arus, Rosen- 
feld  & L e h- 
mann,  60  Mur- 
ray St.,  New 
York,  is  a collection  of  a.  d.  coffee  and  after- 
noon tea  sets  put  up  in  satin  lined  leather  and 
leatherette  cases.  The  majority  are  dec- 
orated a la  Vienna  with  solid  color  and 
figure  panels  and  come  six  or  twelve  in  a 
case.  In  the  same  style  of  decoration  is  a 
large  number  of  pretty  princess  lamps 
which  are  also  proving  a popular  line  for 
the  holiday  trade.  The  lamps  are  nearly 
all  in  cobalt  blue,  with  the  usual  cupid  and 
other  figure  panels. 


The  Rambler’s  Notes. 


WHAT  THE  RAMBLER  SAW  AND  HEARD  AMONG  THE 
DEALERS  IN  ART  POTTERY.  CUT  GLASS. 
BRONZES,  ETC. 


The  three  small 
eight  day  clocks, 
“ Yale,”  “ Harvard”  and  “ Cornell,”  intro- 


ANEW cutting  of 
a high  grade  has 
OLYMPIA  CUTTING.  introduced  by 

L.  Straus  & Sons,  and  is  now  displayed  in 
their  cutglass  ware  rooms,  44  Warren  St., 
New  York.  It  is  called  “ Olympia,”  and  is 
one  of  the  most  brilliant  patterns  ever  pro- 
duced by  this  firm.  A large  four  pointed' 
star  outlined  in  clear  crystal  bands  is  sur- 
rounded by  a mass  of  fine  cutting,  which 
gives  the  effect  of  dazzling  brilliants.  The 
• Olympia”  is  at  present  shown  only  in 
fine  bowls  and  other  expensive  pieces,  but 
will  subsequently  be  cut  upon  any  articles- 
which  the  trade  may  desire. 


duced  in  Porcelene  by  the  F.  Kroeber  Clock 
Co.,  360  Broadway,  New  York,  are  very 
pretty,  though  at  the  same  time  quite  inex- 
pensive. The  new  large  eight  day  style 
named  “ Moliere  ” is  most  striking  in  ap- 
pearance. The  shape  is  graceful  and  looks 
beautiful  in  each  of  the  eight  different 
shades  in  which  it  is  made.  The  clocks  are 
heavily  ornamented  with  gold,  and  are  es- 
pecially intended  for  the  holiday  season, 
now  near  at  hand, 


SAMPLES  OK  PLAQUES. 

GEO.  BORGFELDT  & CO. 


TWO  |new”' floral 
decorat[i[ons 
FRENCH  CHINA.  have  been  intro- 
duced in  the  French  china  novelties  of  the 
Royal  China  Decorating  Co.,  which  will 

shortly  be 
shown  in  their 
warerooms,  35 
Murray  St., 
New  York. 
They  consist 
'■  of  a variation 
of  the  violet 
and  buttercup 
designs  not 
heretofore 
seen  on  fine 
china,  and  be- 
in  g painted 
by  American 
artists  em- 
ployed in  this 
company ’s 
factory,  have 
the  distinc 

character  noted  in  their  former  productst 
A feature  of  this  line  is  the  popular  prices 
at  which  they  can  be  sold. 


A MONG 
goods 


the  new 
received 

CLOCKS.  Chas.  Jacques 

Clock  Co.,  22  Cortlandt  St.,  New  York,  is  an 
assortment  of  cuckoo  clocks  and  some  rich 
gilt  and  porcelain  sets.  The  cuckoo  clocks 
are  in  oak,  walnut  and  combinations  o 


46 


FHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  6,  1895. 


©onnoisBcxiv. 

{Conttmied  from  page  4^.) 

these  woods  and  are  in  several  sizes.  An 
entirely  new  design  in  Empire  real  bronze 
sets  is  shown  ornamented  with  inlaid  porce- 
lain panels.  A handsome  new  Renaissance 
porcelain  set  is  also  displayed.  The  pieces 
are  large  and  vase  shaped,  and  are  decor, 
ated  with  exquisite  paintings. 


THE  EMPIRE  CUT  GLASS 


CO.’S  WARES. 


The  notable  suc- 
cess with  which 
the  Empire  Cut  Glass 
Co.,  35  Warren  St,,  New  York,  are  meeting 
is  largely  due  to  the  superior  finish  of  their 
glass.  Leading  jewelers  unite  in  their 
praises  of  the  workmanship  displayed  in 
this  company’s  products,  and  therefore  the 
constantly  increasing  demand  for  these  cut 
glass  wares  is  not  surprising. 

* 

SOME  exception- 
ally large  and 
BANQUET  LAMPS.  j-jch  banquet  lamps 
may  be  seen  in  the  window  of 

the  salesrooms  of  the  Phoenix  Glass 
Co.,  42  Murray  St.,  New  York.  One 
lamp  is  over  three  feet  high  and  is  covered 
on  both  body  and  globe  with  an  effective 
Byzantine  decoration,  consisting  of  involved 
scroll  work  in  yellow,  green  and  gold. 
Another  equally  large  lamp  of  opal  glass 
shows  a fine  floral  decoration. 


[ N the  illustration  is 


NEW  CUT  GLASS 


PRINCESS  LAMPS.  princess  lamp  in  the 
rich  cut  glass  of  C.  Dorflinger  & Sons,  36 


Murray  St,,  New  York.  This  lamp  is  made 
on  the  order  of  their  banquet  lamp,  but 
small  and  very  dainty.  It  is  produced  in 
several  cuttings,  \rhich  may  be  seen  in  the 
firm’s  beautiful  new  store  at  915  Broadway, 


AND  GILT  LAMPS. 

be  seen  in  the 
Craighead  & Haas 
way.  New  York, 
in  banquet 
in  addition 


^OME  pretty 
bronze,  silver 
and  gilt  lamps  may 
warerooms  of  the 
Co.,  56  W.  Broad- 
A large  assortment 
and  princess  sizes  contains, 
to  the  new  styles,  all  the 


most  popular  lamps  formerly  manufactured 
by  the  Craighead  Mfg.  Co. 

The  Rambler. 


Her  Empire  Relic. 

ONE  of  Mr.  Edmund  Russell’s  choicest 
treasures  is  a beautiful  comb  of  tor- 
toise shell  inlaid  with  gold,  a comb  which 
once  belonged  to  Marie  Antoinette.  When 
the  teacher  of  correct  art  in  life,  costume 
and  environment  was  on  a western  tour  he 
encountered  a very  rich  and  portly  society 
dame. 

“Oh,”  she  exclaimed,  “you  must  pardon 
my  emotion,  but  I am  a hero  worshipper. 
Nothing  moves  me  so  much  as  the  sight  of 
these  thrilling  relics  of  the  past.  My  own 
ideal  is  Josephine,  and  I possess  a comb  be- 
longing to  her  which  is  the  most  sacred 
thing  I own.  I must  show  it  to  you.” 
Then  the  portly  lady  sighed,  turned  the 
Marie  Antoinette  comb  over  again  in  her 
jeweled  hand  and  said  in  a regretful  tone  : 
“ My  comb  is  not  so  perfect  as  yours  ; my 
maid  broke  three  teeth  out  one  day  when 
she  was  combing  Mopsa,  my  poodle.  ’ — 
New  York  World. 


76  & 78  READE  STREET.  NEW  YORK. 

IMPORTER  AND  MANUFACTURER 

Choice  Pottery, 

Limoges  and  Vienna 
. . . Porcelain 

FOR  THE  JEWELRY  TRADE. 


LINE  IS  NOW  COMPLETE.  VISITING  JEWELERS  ARE 
INVITED  TO  CALL  ON  US  AND  EXAMINE  OUR  STOCK. 

LIIVIOOES  AND  VIENNA  CHINA 

IN  ALL  KINDS  OF 

Rich  and  Elegant  Fancy  Articles  for  FALL  and  HOLIDAY  SEASON. 
DECORATIVE  893  JASPER,  THE  BEST  LINE  IN  THE  MARKET  FOR  THE  PRICE. 

SEND  F'OR  ILLUSTRATION  AND  PRICE  LIST. 


FINE  GLASSWARE  T'HE  GOODS  FOR  1895. 

For  the  convenience  of  those  who  will  not  visit  the  market  we  make  up  choice  assortments,  ranging  from  $50  to  $125, 
of  the  Creme  de  la  Creme  of  our  stock.  SEND  FOR  ONE  OF  THEM. 


P.  H.  LEONARD,  76  and  78  READE  ST.,  NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  6,  1895  . 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW 


47 


FERNERIES  IN  GLASS  AND  CHINA. 


HINRICHS  & 

29  & 31  Park  Place,  N.  Y. 
Useful  and  Art  Goods  for  Jewelers 


CHINA  LAMPS,  all  sizes  and  prices,  FINE  FRENCH 
CHINA.  CHOCOLATE  POTS,  CRACKER  JARS, 
BOWLS,  FANCY  TRAYS,  and  an  enormous 
assortment  of  A.  D.’S,  CHOCOLATES, 

TEAS,  ETC. 

Brush  and  Comb  Trays,  Pen  Trays,  Pin  Trays,  Boxes, 
Toilet  Sets  and  Fancy  Knick=Knacks 

In  French  and  Dresden  China. 

SEND  FOR  CATALOGUES  AND  PRICE  LISTS. 

Bric=a=Brac  and  Art  Pottery. 


•5 


Oil  Bottle,  3 Lip. 
Can  be  retailed  at  $1.00. 


WRITE  FOR  OUR  ILLUSTRATED  CATALOGUE  OF 

CUT  GUASS  “ CH0A  SPECIAUTIUS. 

GOODS  PARTICULARLY  SUITABLE  FOR  JEWELERS. 


Lazarus,  Rosenfeld  & Lehmann, 

60  & 62  MURRAY  STREET, 


NEW  YORK. 

Chicago  Office  and  Sample  Rooms,  45  and  47  East  Lake  Street. 


FRENCH 


CHINA, 


IS  PRODUCED  IN  THE  NEWEST 
SHAPES  AND  DECORATIONS. 


BEAUTIFUL 

GLASS 

ROSE 

FLOWER 

HOLDERS. 

IN  CRYSTAL  AND 
GRFEN  WITH 
GOLD 

DECORATIONS. 


FOR  THE  JEWELRY  TRADE. 


CHOICE 

BRIC= 

A=BRAC. 

NEW  GOODS 
BY  EVERY 
STEAMER. 


A CALL  IS 
EXTENDED 
TO  VISITING 
BUYERS. 


SUCCESSOR  TO 

A.'  KLINGENBERG 


CHAS.  L.  DWENQER, 


LIMOGES.  IMPOl^TER, 


36  and  37  PARK  PLACE,  NEW  YORK. 


FALKEflAUFPENHEIIIER Si I^A  M p N D g 


I 


S)5bF  Winding  Plock  Po.  chas.  jacques 

New  YouK-cHicaoo.  , , CLOCK 

HALL  CLOCKS, 

OFFICE  CLOCKS, 

Synchronized  Time  Plants. 

No  Winding.  Corrected  Houriy 

BY  TELEGRAPH  SIGNALS  OVER  WESTERN  UNION  TEL.  GO. 

Wires  from  U,  S.  Naval  Observatory,  Washington,  D.  C. 


General  Office  i 

26  BROADWAY,  N.  Y. 


^ranch  Office  i 

Columbus  IVIemorial  Bldg,  Chicago 


i:; 


& DOTTER, 

Importers, 
rianufacturers 
and  Commission 
Merchants. 

26=32  BARCLAY  ST., 

NEW  YORK. 

P.  O.  Box  1872. 

English  Hall  Clocks, 
French  Traveling 
Clocks, 

Chiming  Mantel 
Clocks, 

PARIS  NOVELTIES, 
BRONZES. 
Largest  Variety  of 

Art  Pottery  and 

Bric*a=Brac. 


s 


ALL  KINDS  OF 

KELETON 

FOR 

ILVERSMITH 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

CHULDER  BRO 


S 


FACTORY  AT  SOLINGEN,  GERMANY.  FOUNDED  1850 
546  A.  647  PEARL  ST.,  near  Broadway  NEW  YORK 


CO., 

22  CortlandtSt. 

NEW  YORK. 

Hall  Clocks, 
Traveling  Clocks, 
Gilt  Clocks, 
Porcelain  Clocks, 
Delft  Clocks, 
riantel  Chime 
Clocks, 

Bronzes, 

Sevres  Vases.’ 


are  the  firm  of  S.  F.  Myers  & Co.,  of  fhe  Myers  Buildings,  48  & 50 
Maiden  Lane,  New  York,  selling  more  goods  and  doing  a larger  business 
than  any  other  wholesale  jewelry  house  in  the  world  ? 


BECAUSE 


they  are  the  only  firm  in  the  Empire  City  who  are  bona  fide  manufacturers, 
importers,  exporters,  and  wholesale  dealers  in  all  lines  of  goods  that 
pertain  to  the  jewelry  trade.  Their  twenty-three  departments  require 
seven  double  floors.  With  one  firm  expense  (instead  of  23),  and  minimum 
rental,  they  are  in  a position  to  quote  prices  and  sell  goods  on  a margin 
ordinarily  asked  by  Legitimate  commission  houses. 


WATCHES,  Diamonds,  Jewelry,  Optical  Goods,  flaterials,  Clocks,  Silverware, 
Lamps,  Husical  flerchandise.  Cut  Glass,  Bicycles,  Fire  Arms,  Safes,  Etc. 

ARE  YOU  ON  THEIR  HAILING  LIST?  Have  you  their  great  800-page 
annual  catalogue?  Do  you  receive  and  inspect  Myers’  Monthly  Jeweler? 


AI^XISXIC 

SOLID  GOLD  CASES 

Warranted  Absolutely  as  to  Quality. 

Trade  Mark  REGisTEREn.  Sold  to  Legitimate  Jobbers  only. 

NEW  YORK.  BROOKLYN.  CHICAGO.  SAN  FRANCISCO. 


JOB  SPRING  FOR  AMERICAN  CASES 


£STAB1L,1SHE1>  1S65. 

N.  J.  FELIX, 


Patented  U83. 

Adjusted  While  You  Walk  25  Cents. 


fl®*This  Spring  is 
made  from  0 to  18  size. 
Sl.OO  per  dozen. 


Watch  Case  Repairing, 


17  JOHN  STRHMT,  NHW  YORK. 


J,  R.  W00D6^50N5, 

21  & 23  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 


Manufacturer 

OF 


PLAIN  SOLID  GOLD  RINGS. 
SEAMLESS  PLAIN  SOLID  GOLD  RINGS 
ENGRAVED  AND  CHILD’S  RINGS. 

No  Ring  Stamped  Different  from  Quality. 
Send  for  Catalogue  and  Price  List.  ^ 

Old  Gold  and  Stiver  received  and  estimated  on  : ff  amonnt  allowed 
does  not  givp  sattsfactinn,  notify  at  once  and  will  return  at  oor  ex 
In  nonHWInn  R»  received. 


WHAT  IS  the  h.  E.  O. 
ROYAL  CLUSTER? 


FOR  THE  ANSWER 
WRITE  TO 

lI.E.OPPENHEIMER&CO., 

14  MAIDEN  LANE, 

NEW  YORK. 


Diamonds  and  Cutters.  L.  & M.  Kahn  & Co 


Index  TO  ADVERTISEMENTS,  largest  CIRCULATION  OF  ALL  THE  veWELRY  PUBLICATIONS  THE  CONNOISSEUR  49, 

Page  30.  Oldest  of  all  the  Jewelry  Publications.  2sth  year.  f^ACE  45. 


Copyright  by  The  Jewelers’ Circular  Pub.  Co.  189  Broadway,  New  Vorb.  Entered  at  the  Post  Office  in  N.  Y as  second-class  matter 


VOL.  XXXI.  NEW  YORK,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  13.  1895.  No.  15. 


CHARACTERISTIC  FRENCH  ART  WORK  IN  METAL. 


The  cardelabra  shown  here,  a very  pic- 
turesque work  of  art,  was  modeled 
by  Guillemin,  of  Paris,  and  cast  in  bronze 
by  Christofle  & Co.  The  designer  reflects 
the  demand  for  things  Japanese,  in  his 
inspiration,  and  has  succeeded  in  produc- 
ing an  ingenious  and  graceful  piece  of 
work. 

The  Louis  XV.  mirror,  illustrated  on 
page  4,  was  exhibited  by  Boucheron  in 
i88g.  It  is  of  chased  gold.  In  this  work, 
the  artistic  temperament  of  Boucheron  was 
given  full  play,  and  he  thus  succeeded  in 
producing  a bibolet  of  the  highest  taste,  of 
graceful  outlines,  and  with  miniature  orna- 
ments possessing  exquisite  charm.  The 
engravings  are  reproduced  from  Le  Metal. 


The  Duke’s  Bride’s  Wedding 
Presents. 

ISS  CONSUELO  VANDERBILT  re- 
ceived on  the  occasion  of  her  mar- 
riage with  the  Duke  of  Marlborough,  pres- 
ents valued  at  over  §350,000,  among  them 
being  many  fine  specimens  of  the  gold  and 
silversmiths’  arts.  One  of  the  rarest  of  her 
gifts  was  a pearl  necklace  given  to  her  by 
her  mother.  It  consists  of  one  string, 
nearly  a yard  in  length.  The  pearls  are 
perfectly  matched  and  unusually  large. 
The  necklace  is  reputed  to  have  been  once 
the  property  of  Catharina,  Czarina  of  Rus- 
sia. Another  gift  from  Mrs.  Vanderbilt  is 
a shorter  necklace,  or  collier  of  pearls,  al- 
ternating with  diamonds.  The  bride’s  aunt. 
Miss  Armida  Smith,  gave  her  another  dia- 
mond and  pearl  necklace,  the  diamonds  set 
in  antique  gold,  enameled  in  blue.  From 
her  brother,  W.  K.  Vanderbilt,  Jr.,  the 
Duchess  received  a diamond  crescent  with 
a pendent  star. 

Among  the  presents  from  the  Duke  of 
Marlborough  are  a gold  girdle,  set  solidly 
with  diamonds,  none  of  them  less  than  a 
karat  in  weight,  with  here  and  t ere  a ruby, 
and  a brooch  made  of  one  large  ruby,  the 
favorite  jewel  of  the  Duke,  surrounded  by 
diamonds.  Some  of  the  other  presents 
were  the  following  : 


A beautiful  square  cut  emerald  set  in  a 
ring  with  a diamond  on  either  side,  from 


CANDELABRA,  BY  GUILLEMIN. 


I Mrs.  W.  K.  Vanderbilt;  a turquoise  and  dia- 
1 mond  marquise  ring;  a blue  enamel  watch. 


I set  with  diamonds  and  pendent  to  a true 
I lovers’  knot;  a pendent  heart,  encrusted 
with  diamonds;  a unique  pearl  brooch;  a 
ring  set  with  a superb  square  cut  sapphire 
and  two  diamonds,  and  a pair  of  side  combs 
set  with  small  pearls,  from  various  persons. 
From  Mrs.  William  Astor  came  a purse  of 
golden  mesh,  the  fastening  being  circular 
in  shape  and  set  with  turquoise  and  dia- 
monds. Mrs.  R.  T.  Wilson,  Jr.,  sent  an 
exquisit  vinaigrette  of  engraved  crystal, the 
stopper  set  with  a Large  aquamarine,  sur- 
rounded with  small  diamonds.  Mrs.  R.  T. 
Wilson’s  gift  is  a pair  of  solid  gold  vases 
about  six  inches  in  height,  of  Louis  XVI 
design. 

Conspicuous  among  the  gifts  were  a num- 
ber ot  costly  and  beautiful  fans.  Miss 
Morton,  who  was  one  of  Miss  Vanderbilt’s 
bridesmaids,  sent  a fine  old  Spanish  fan; 
Mrs.  John  H.  Davis,  a tiny  one  of  First  Em- 
pire style  of  white  moire,  with  a design  in 
silver  spangles  and  medallion  portrait 
heads;  3Ir.  and  Mrs.  William  A.  Duer,  a 
more  modern  one  of  exquisite  point  lace 
and  pearl  sticks,  wdth  Watteau  medallions 
set  in  the  lace.  Another  present  to  the 
bride  from  her  mother  is  a splendid  travel- 
ing toilet  case,  which  contains  many  pieces, 
each  set  in  dull  gold,  each  receptacle  for 
toilet  articles,  whether  brushes,  combs,  or 
pins,  being  of  gold.  A circlet  of  diamonds 
surmounted  by  a small  crescent  of  diamonds 
and  pearls  was  given  by  Harold  Vanderbilt. 

Among  the  other  gifts  were  a beautiful 
silver  repousse  tray  from  the  household 
servants  ; a silver  bonbon  box  ; a crystal 
flask  set  in  gold ; a Louis  XVI.  table 
clock,  of  dark  blue  enamel,  ornamented 
with  Roman  garlands  and  rhinestones ; 
a mirror  set  in  silver  gilt ; a rococco 
inkstand,  pen  and  tray;  a Sevres  cup; 
a silver  loving  cup ; a silver  repousse 
plate  ; a silver  inkstand  ; a large  silver 
mounted  blotting  pad  ; a silver  minia- 
ture frame  ; an  antique  silver  box,  oval 
in  shape ; a large  toilet  mirror,  set  in  sil- 
ver ; a pair  of  antique  silver  candlesticks. 

I Each  of  the  bridesmaids  gave  ahandsome 

I present,  including  diamond  marquise  rings. 


2 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


1070 


VVe  are  sending  the  Retail  Trade  some  cuts 

of  our  new  “ TIFFANY  ” DIAMOND 
MOUNTINGS  that  they  will  do  well  to  notice. 


M.  B.  BRYANT  & CO., 


10  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

We  think  our  line  of  Fancy  Stone  Rings  the  Best  in  the  Market. 


A.  J.  HEDGES  & CO., 

MAIsrUFACXUI^ERS  OK 


♦ ♦ ♦ 

Black  and  White  Mnameled 
Goods  a Specialty. 

VEIL  PINS,  SCARF  PINS,  HAT  PINS,  LACE 
PINS  AND  BROOCHES. 

GOLD  AND  SILVER  GARTER  BUCKLES. 
CHATELAINES,  SIDE  COMBS,  LINK  BUTTONS. 

6 MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

FACTORY: 


VEIL.  PIN 


00  MECHANIC  SX..  NEWAl^K,  N J. 


Towle  Mfg.  Co., 

Silversmiths, 

Newburyport,  Mass. 

149=151  State  St.,  Chicago,  III. 


OAMPBELL-METOALF  SILYEE  CO., 

SILVERSMITHS, 


ALL  GOODS  925/1000  FINE. 

Factory,  Offices. 

Providence.  B.  f,  New  York  anil  San  Francisco. 


WOOD  <&  HUGHES. 

STERLING  SILVERWARE  MANUFACTURERS 

New  York  Agents  for  the  Derby  Silver  Co., 
FINE  QUADRUPLE  PLATED  WARE, 
No.  16  JOHN  STREET,  - - NEW  YORK. 

206  Kearney  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 
HASKELL  & MUEGGE,  Agents. 


FERD.  FUCHS  & BROS. 

SILVERSMITHS, 

MAKERS  OF  STERLING  SILVERWARE, 
808-810  Greenwich  St.,  - New  York. 


Nail  Polishers 

AND  OTHER 

QUICK  SELLERS 

ARE  MADE  BY 

CODDING  BROS.  & HEILBORN, 

North  Attleboro,  Mass. 


F.  M.  WHITING  COMPANY, 

SILVERSMITHS. 


Factory  and  Main  Office, 

North  Attleboro,  Mass. 


New  York  Office, 

1128  Broadway 

ADDRESS  ALL  COMMUNICATIONS  TO  FACTORY. 


Our  new  NEAPOLITAN  pattern  is  now  ready.  Dealers  will  do  well  to  withhold  all  orders  until  they 
have  inspected  this  new  and  artistic  design  in  flatware. 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


Our  is  A Guaranty  of  Quality. 

TRADE  MARK  ^ OUR  SILVER  IS  Q2;/iooo  FINE.  I ' TRADE  MARK 


925/1000  Fine, 

Our  Trilby  Hearts  are  Trumps.  Our  Trilby  Chains  Sell  Well  for  Lockets,  Fans  and  Vinaigrettes. 

Our  400  Patterns  of  Silver  Articles  are  useful  tor  Wedding  and  Birthday  Gifts  and  Whist  Prizes. 

Our  rianicure  Sets  and  rianicure  Goods  are  beautiful,  of  fine  quality  and  low  in  price. 

Our  Toilet  Sets  of  Brushes,  Combs  and  Mirrors  are  fine. 

Our  Bracelets  with  Padlocks,  Sterling  Silver  and  Gold  Plate  sell  well. 

Our  Lockets,  Charms,  Lace  Pins,  Hair  Chain  Mounts,  Vest  Chains,  Link  Buttons,  Mount  Hope  Sleeve  Buttons,  Ear- 
rings, and  everything  we  make  is  manufactured  expressly  for  you  to  make  some  money  on.  If  you  fail  to  find  our  goods  with  your  jobber 
write  and  we  will  give  you  the  names  of  wholesale  dealers  who  carry  our  goods. 


No.  306.  Desk  Knife  and  Letter  Opener. 


New  York  Office,  Samples  Only, 

178  BROADWAY. 


FOSTER  & BAILEY, 

SILVERSMITHS,  ' 

100  Richmond  Street,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 


4 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


ANNOUNCEMENT. 


Cur  Annual  Catalogue  is  now  ready.  It  con- 
tains a large  variety  of  the  newest  and  very 
latest  patterns  in  Diamond  Goods,  Silver  Novel- 
ties, Watches  and  Jewelry.  We  have  very 
carefully  selected  the  best  and  most  salable  goods 
in  the  market  at  the  present  time  for  illustration, 
and  think  that  we  can  truthfully  say  that  no 
catalogue  issued,  representing  similar  lines,  can 
show  so  large  a proportion  of  new  things  in  novel- 
ties and  staples.  It  is  yours  for  the  asking. 


J.  T.  SCOTT  & CO., 

4 HAIDEN  LANE,  N.  Y. 

SENT  TO  WATCHMAKERS  AND  JEWELERS  ONLY 


pendent  hearts,  incrusted  with  diamonds  ; 
side-combs  set  with  pearls,  old  Spanish 
fans,  vinaigrette  bottles  mounted  with  gold 


LOUIS  XV  MIRROR.  BY  BOUCHE.RON. 


KETCHAM  & McDOUGALL, 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 
GOLD  AND  SILVER  THIMBLES, 

AND  THE  IMPROVED 

AUTOMATIC  EYE-GLASS  HOLDER  OR  REEL. 
198  BROADWAY,  N.  Y. 


CATALOGUE  SENT  ON  APPLICATION. 


DE51QNER 

Aaker. 


HENRY  C.  HASKELL, 

II  JOHN  STREET, 
NEW  YORK. 


CLASS  RINGS,  PINS, 
SOCIETY  BADGES, 
EMBLEMS  OF  ALLl 
KNOWN  ORDERS, 
PRIZE  MEDALS,  ETC. 
(V  Send  for  plates  of  Copyrighted  designs. 


and  precious  gems,  golden  meshed  purses. 

The  Duke  at  the  wedding  presented 
souvenirs  to  the  bridesmaids  in  the  shape 
of  diamond  and  turquoise  butterflies. 


Came  Over  in  the  Mayflower. 


Relics  brought  over  on  the  good  ship 
Mayflower  are  generally  looked  for 
in  National  or  State  museums  and  are  rarely 
found  elsewhere,  but  an  old  farmer  in  Al- 
lenwood,  N.  J.,  exhibits  with  considerable 
pride  a set  of  silverware  which  he  declares 
an  ancestor  brought  over  in  that  famous 
ship,  says  the  New  York  Herald.  He  is 
Walter  H.  Morton,  and  he  owns  a large  and 
productive  farm,  which  has  decended  from 
father  to  son  for  generations  and  yields  him 
a substantial  living. 

Morton  is  close  to  80  years  old,  and  with 
his  wife  still  tills  the  soil  of  the  old  home- 
stead, raising  fruit,  vegetables,  meat  and 
fowl,  which  he  ships  to  the  markets  in  this 
city  and  banks  the  profits  for  his  son. 
Whenever  the  farmers  of  the  neighborhood 
have  any  kind  of  a festival  the  old  Morton 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


5 


Waterman  & Lehmann, 

LMPORTERS  OF  DIAMONDS. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  DIAMOND  JEWELRY. 

20  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 


New  York,  November,  1895. 

To  the  Trade: 

We  present  a card  with  a photographic  reproduction  of  a line  of  our  FINE  AND  ARTISTICALLY 
HAND  CARVED  DIAMOND  RING  MOUNTINGS  FOR  GENTLEMEN.  They  are  made  in  Roman  and  antique 
finished  gold ; also  in  steel,  gold  lined.  These  rings  are  made  only  to  order,  and  the  stones  should  be  sent  with  the  or- 
der, to  attain  proper  fitting  and  finish. 

Taking  for  granted  that  our  patrons  are  familiar  with  our  facilities,  we  beg  to  again  call  their  attention  to  our 
well-assorted  line  of  LOOSE  DIAMONDS  AND  DIAMOND  JEWELRY,  and  complete  stock  of  mountings,  which 
enable  us  to  fill  orders  immediately. 

We  have  excellent  facilities  for  making  to  order  any  article  in  the  line  of  FINE  JEWELRY. 

RECUTTING  DIAMONDS  in  the  most  artistic  manner,  and  repairing  of  Diamonds,  is  an  important  feature 
of  ours. 

All  our  work  is  strictly  first-class,  and  prices  as  low  as  consistent- 

We  will  send  goods  for  approval  when  so  desired.  We  solicit  your  patronage,  and  remain. 

Yours  truly. 


WATERMAN  & LEHMANN. 


6 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


OUR  LATEST  PATTERN 


New  York  — ..6  Fifth  Avenue.  R.  WALLACE  & SONS  M’F’Q  Co., 

Chicago  — 109-111  Wabash  Avenue. 

San  Francisco  — 120  sutter  street.  SILVERSMITHS. 


Nov.  J3,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


7 


silverware  occupies  a prominent  place- 
and  is  talked  about  and  admired  by  the 
neighbors  who  are  not  equally  fortunate  in 
possessing  family  heirlooms.  The  set  con- 
sists of  a silver  teapot,  plated  in  some  sort 
of  earthenware,  a cream  pitcher  and  sugar 
bowl.  Then  he  has  a half  dozen  thin  china 
cups  and  saucers,  all  of  which,  he  says, were 
brought  to  this  country  by  his  forefathers. 
He  declares  that  an  inspection  of  the  list  of 
passengers  who  came  over  on  the  May- 
flower will  disclose  the  name  of  his  great- 
great-grandfather  among  the  number,  and 
he  tells  of  how  his  ancestor  came  to  New 
Amsterdam  and  afterward  went  down  in 
New  Jersey,  near  the  ocean,  and  settled 
with  a few  other  intrepid  spirits,  who  made 
friendly  overtures  to  the  Indians,  who  be- 
came their  fast  friends. 


To  Advance  American  Manufacturers* 
Interests  in  South  Africa. 

W.-isHiNGTON,  D.  C.,  Nov.  7. — The  Gov- 
ernment of  the  South  African  Republic  has 
informed  President  Cleveland  that  the 
International  Industrial  exhibition  will  be 
held  at  Johannesburg,  beginning  May  ist 
and  ending  June  30th,  iSg6.  In  his  letter 
to  the  President, the  Director-General,  Chas. 
P.  DeGarmo,  states  that  the  Government 
of  the  South  American  Republic  offers, 
through  this  exhibition,  an  opportunity  to 
introduce  and  advance  American  products, 
and  will  be  pleased  to  extend  its  protection 
to  any  merchants  or  manufacturers  desiring 
to  exhibit  in  that  country. 


The  charge  for  space  will  be  $2.50  per 
square  foot  in  the  erounds  and  $3.75  per 
square  foot  in  the  halls.  The  awards  will 
consist  of  crosses  of  honor,  gold,  silver  and 
bronze  medals,  and  certificates. 

Exhibits  of  jewelry  and  clocks,  watches 
and  other  timekeepers  are  especially  re- 
quested. 


Decision  in  Favor  of  Jeweler  Frederick 
Crum  pton. 

Toronto,  Can.,  Nov.  6 — In  the  action  by 
Robert  James  McNichol,  a commercial 
traveler,  against  Frederick  Crumpton, 
jeweler,  and  Alice  Crumpton,  his  wife,  to 
set  aside  as  fraudulent  against  the  plaintiff 
and  other  creditors  of  Frederick,  a convey- 
ance of  a house  and  lot  in  King  St.,  Toronto, 
bv  1 Frederick  to  his  wife.  Judge  Falcon- 
bridge  finds  that  Ae_^ed  impeached  was 
executed  and  delivered  at  or  about  the 
time  it  bears  date  ; that  there  was  an  ante- 
nuptial verbal  agreement  by  Frederick  to 
give  Alice  a house ; that  she  did  not  wish 
him  to  sell  certain  lands  in  the  township  of 
York  ; nor  to  bar  her  dower  therein  (they 
both  supposing  she  had  dower),  and  he 
agreed  if  she  would  execute  the  deeds  he 
would  give  her  the  house  ; that  when  Fred- 
erick made  the  deed  he  had  assets  enough 
to  pay  his  debts,  and  the  debts  due  at  the 
time  (except,  perhaps,  mortgage  debts), 
have  been  paid  since. 

The  Judge  held  that  the  concurrence  of 
the  wife  in  the  conveyance  of  the  township 


lands  was  a sufficient  consideration  to  sup- 
port the  conveyance  to  her  of  the  house 
and  lot.  Action  dismissed  without  costs. 


Safe  Deposit  Wat:h  Co.  Denied  the  Privi- 
leges of  the  Mails. 

Washington,  D.  'C.,  Nov.  7. — The  Post 
Office  Department  has  denied  the  privilege 
of  the  United  States  mails  to  the  Safe  De 
posit  Watch  Co.,  Murray  St.,  New  York. 
The  company  advertised  as  an  inducement 
a gold  watch  to  be  given  away  free  on  re- 
ceipt of  money  for  another  article,  but  the 
watch  sent  by  them  was  a small  tin  affair, 
one-half  inch  in  circumferance,  and  without 
works. 


A party  in  Mansfield,  O.,  writes  to 
Rogers  & Bro.,  16  Cortlandt  St.,  New  York, 
asking  if  they  can  furnish  him  with  forks 
and  spoons  of  the  “ Dunraven  ” pattern.  To 
this  query  the  firm  sent  the  following 
reply: 

New  Vork,  Nov  4th,  1895. 
Mr  John  Gertig,  Mansfield,  Ohio. 

D*ear  Sir  : Your  favor  of  the  31st  ult.  has  just 
been  received.  We  inclose  you  illustrations  of  some 
of  our  newest  patterns,  which  any  jeweler  in  your 
town  can  order  for  you,  if  he  does  not  have  them  on 
hand.  We  notice  that  you  ask  for  the  “ Duraven 
pattern.”  We  have  no  such  style  and  do  not  think 
that  a pattern  of  that  name  would  be  very  popular  in 
this  country,  for  the  design  would  have  to  be  some- 
thing like  this : A cur  with  ears  and  a tail  down 

sneaking  away  from  a fox  terrier  rampant. 

Truly  yours, 

Rogers  & Bro. 


CrcDtoix  llj. 


Makers  and  DecoratoiY 
of  Fine  China  and 
, porcelain 
'(-^eciallies 

"jif  dif  ^ 


and  for  sale  by  the 

or|aiDiHaDufaciurii)i 

^01DpaD^^5ilvcnmiili5 

Broadway  and  19th  Sircei'^^ 


8 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13.  iSqt;. 


Leon  J,  Glaen^er  & Co., 


82  CHAMBERS  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 


FALL 

NOVELTIES. 


Clocks  and  Regulators, 

Bronzes,  Lamps  and  Globes, 
Fine  Austrian  Glassware, 

Fine  Teplitz  Vases, 
Onyx  Pedestals, 

Fine  Porcelains, 
Delft  Pottery,  Bric-a-Brac. 


SEVRES  GOODS,  CABINETS,  Etc. 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


9 


A Consignment  of  Opals  to  F.  j.  Essig 
Seized  for  Undervaluation. 

Chicago,  111.,  Nov.  8. — A consignment  of 
opals  sent  to  F.  J.  Es-ig,  lapidist.  115  State 
St.,  was  seized  at  the  Custom  House  for 
alleged  underva'uation.  The  stones  came 
from  Melbouine,  Australia,  and  were  ac- 
companied by  consular  invoices,  giving  the 
valuation  as  £120.  The  appraiser  values 
the  consignment  at  $1,500.  The  penalty  is 
double  duty  for  over  i per  cent,  over  10 
per  cent  increase  made  by  the  appraiser, 
or  in  the  present  case  (for  20  per  cent  ) the 
.sum  of  $15,000,  which  would  mean  the  con- 
fiscation of  the  opals  if  the  appraiser’s 
valuation  stands.  Mr.  Essig,  in  an  inter- 
view, states  the  party,  who  is  a personal 
friend,  consigned  the  stones  to  him  under 
an  arrangement  whereby  he  agreed  to  pur- 
chase all  of  his  opals  at  a stated  price.  “•  It 
is  the  first  time  I ever  imported  anything 
and  I am  unaware  of  the  value  of  the 
goods.  They  are  shipped  with  matrix  and 
may  or  may  not  cut  wel  .”  The  Circular’s 
correspondent  was  referred  to  Mr.  Essig’s 
attorney,  P.  L.  Sherman,  who  said,  in 
answer  to  a question,  that  Mr.  Essig  had 
no  private  invoice  of  the  stones  in  ques- 
tion. 

“The  consular  invoice  valued  them  at 
$600  and  Appraiser  Hoyne  at  $1,500.  It  is 
only  a question  of  valuation.  The  stones 
were  not  bought  by  Mr.  Essig,  only  con- 
signed to  him.  The  opals  are  in  the  rough 
and  disinterested  persons  have  estimated 
their  value  at  all  the  way  up  from  a few 


dollars.  As  I said,  it  is  entirely  a question 
of  value.  I shall  apply  to  the  Secretary  of 
the  Treasury  for  the  release  of  the  opals.  ’ 
Mr.  Essig  feels  confident  he  will  secure 
the  release  of  the  gems. 


About  100  Watches  Stolen  from  the 
Frank,  Laubach  & Nutt  Co. 

Akron,  O.,  Nov.  9 — A reward  of  $200  is 
being  offered  by  the  Frank,  Laubach  & 
Nutt  Co.,  fur  the  return  of  about  100 
watches  stolen  from  their  store  on  the  night 
of  Nov.  8th,  and  for  information  that  will 
lead  to  the  arrest  and  conviction  of  the 
thief  or  thieves. 

A few  of  the  watches  which  are  silver, 
gold,  filled  and  nickel  are  as  follows;  i 18-k 
lady’s  gold,  Swiss  movement.  No.  76135; 
I lady’s  filled,  Illinois  movement.  No.  743- 
828;  I lady’s  filled,  Elgin  movement.  No. 
605144;  I lady’s  filled,  Elgin  movement. 
No.  5497268;  I lady’s  filled,  Elgin  move- 
ment, No.  3476230;  I lady’s  filled,  Elgin 
movement.  No.  4494504;  i lady’s  filled, 
Hampden  movement.  No.  5744930;  i 18- 
size  gent’s  gold,  Elgin  movement,  No.  40 
29331;  I 18-size  gent’s  silver,  P.  S.  Bartlett 
movement  No.  2405531;  i 18-size  O.  F., 
silver,  Foltz  & Frank,  No  100956;  i 18-size 
O.  F.,  nickel,  Elgin  movement,  No.  6205993; 
I 18-size  O.  F.,  nickel,  Elgin  movement. 
No.  6373359; , 1 18-size  O.  F.,  nickel,  Elgin 
movement,  No.  6051445;  i8-size  Hy.  filled, 
F.,  L.  & N.  Co.  movement.  No.  175008; 
16-size  and  Hy.  14  k,  Elgin  movement,  No. 


3371420,  I 6-size  Hy.  Boss  Case,  U.  S.  W. 
Co.  No.  71191 . 

Interesting  Suit  Decided  in  the  Boston 
Courts. 

Boston, Mass  ,Nov.  7 — In  the  case  of  John 
H.  Collamore  vs.  Alfred  A.  Marcus  & Son 
et  al,  Judge  Sheldon  has  given  a finding 
of  $8,580  for  the  plaintiff  as  against  the  de- 
fendant, Mary  Ann  Marcus,  alone. 

The  suit  was  brought  to  recover  upon  a 
promissor)'  note  for  $7,029  given  by  the  de- 
fendants. The  firm  of  Marcus  & Son  gave 
the  plaintiff  a large  number  of  articles  con- 
sisting of  silverware,  paintings  and  dia- 
monds as  collateral  security  for  the  pay- 
ment of  the  note.  The  note  became  due  on 
Feb.  4,  1894,  but  it  w'as  not  paid,  and  the 
collateral  was  sold  by  the  plaintiff  at 
auction,  and  realized  a net  sum  of  $2,462, 
which  the  plaintiff  applied  to  the  payment 
of  the  note.  For  the  balance  of  the  amount 
of  the  note,  the  plaintiff  sued,  but  the  de- 
fendants, Marcus  & Son,  claimed  they  were 
not  liable,  as  the  plaintiff  had  not  given 
them  any  notice  of  his  intention  to  dispose 
of  the  collateral,  and  they  contended  that 
the  articles  were  worth  at  least  $15,000. 

The  plaintiff  at  the  trial  discontinued  his 
suit  as  against  Marcus  & Son,  and  the  court 
found  upon  the  evidence  that  there  was  no 
sale  of  the  collateral,  but  gave  a finding  for 
the  full  amount  of  the  note  with  the  stip- 
ulated interest  of  8 per  cent,  a year  as 
against  the  defendant,  Mary  Ann  Marcus. 
She  is  a daughter  of  Alfred  A.  Marcus. 


THE  DIAMOND  DIGGER. 


CUTTERS  OF  DIAMONDS. 


OPPENHEIMER  BROS.  & VEITH, 


DEALERS  IN  WATCHES. 


65  NASSAU  ST., 

PRESCOTT  BUILDING, 

JOHN  AND  NASSAU  STS., 

xN’EW  YOr^K. 


THE  DIAMOND  CUTTER. 


LONDON : 

10  Hatton  Garlaen. 

AMSTERDAM  : 

Tulr  Straat  No.  2, 


THE  DIAMOND  WEARER. 


10 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


DIAMONDS. 

Wm.  S.  Hedges  &.  Co., 

IMPORTERS  OF 

Diamonds  and  Precious  Stones. 

DIAMOND  JEWELRY. 

170  Broadway,  New  York. 

22  Holborn  Viaduct,  London. 


The  Swan  Fountain  Pen. 

Made  on  Distinct  Principles,  Patented. 

3 SIZES  OF  SWAN  “SAFETIES  ” CAN  BE 
CARRIED  ANYHOW  OR  ANYWHERE. 

Three  sizes  of  “ Self-Filling”  Swans,  the 
wonder  of  the  day,  illustrating  the  improve- 
ment between  the  first  fountain  pen  on 
record,  patented  150  years  ago, 

“ A Quill  Covered  With  Sheepsgut.” 
An  English  patent  in  those  days  cost  a 
fortune,  thus  the  advance  from  the  past  to 
the  present  is  sharply  defined. 


Alfred  H.  Smith  & Co., 

IMPORTERS 


DIAMON  DS 


W.  W.  Stewart,  Inventor  & Patentee 


PRECIOUS  STONES, 


182  BROADWAY,  COR.  JOHN  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 

''•’"^'eSiiding.  34  & 36  Washington  St. 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


L.  BONEX. 

ESTABLISHED  1866. 

CAMEO 

PORTRAITS 

Works  of  Art, 
Precious  Stones. ' 

927  BROADWAY. 

NEW  YORK, 


DON’T  FORGET  THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S  BOOK  LIST  when  in  want  of  any  tech- 
nical book  in  the  Jewelry  or  Kindred  Trades. 


Marie,  Todd  & Bard, 

MANUFACTURERS, 

New  York  & London. 


Purchasers 

. . OF  . . 

RARE  GEMS, 

PRECIOUS  STONES 
AND  ALL  GOODS  FOR 
JEWELRY. 

ADDRESS 

R.  A.  Kipling,  Paris, 

19  Rue  Drouot,  France. 


The  Bowden  Rings 

ARE  COMPLETE  IN  VARIETY,  CORRECT 
IN  QUALITY  AND  PERFECT  IN  FINISH. 
WE  MAKE  EVERY  VARIETY  OF  FINGER 
RINGS — ^ 


J.  B.  Bowden  & Co., 


Jewelry  and  Silver  Fashions  of 
the  Fall  Season. 


A LADY’S  RAMBLES  AMONG  THE  JEWELERS. 


The  plume,  scroll  and  coronet  are  popu- 
lar designs  for  the  elaborate  dinner  rings 
which  are  set  with  diamonds,  pearls  and 
other  precious  gems. 

*• 

Seal  and  velvet  chatelaine  bags,  mounted 
with  silver  in  antique  designs,  are  both 
stylish  and  serviceable. 

*■ 

There  is  quite  a fad  just  now  for  finger 
rings  composed  of  tiny  hoops  set  with  five 
small  colored  stones. 

* 

A unique  and  appropriate  birthday  gift, 
is  a brooch  containing  the  month  jewel  or 
flower. 

* 

Swords  with  jeweled  hilts  and  scabbards, 
serve  the  two-fold  purpose  of  a pin  for  the 
chatelaine  watch  and  a bodice  ornament, 
when  the  watch  is  not  worn. 

Modern  patrons  of  the  chrysophase  may 
not  know  that  it  was  deemed  a lucky  stone 
in  the  days  of  King  Solomon.  What  an  ex- 
quisite color  it  has,  but  no  two  specimens 
are  of  quite  the  same  tint. 

A charming  bandeaux  for  the  hair  is 
furnished  in  a half  wreath  of  grape  vine 
leaves  and  fruit;  the  former  is  similated  in 
small  brilliants  and  the  latter  in  amy- 
thest. 

* 

The  fleur-de-lis  is,  and  always  will  be,  a 
popular  design  ; wrought  in  small  pearls  or 
diamonds  it  furnishes  a brooch  which  lacks 
only  novelty  to  make  it  perfect. 

* 

Special  claims  are  made  for  diamond 
jewelry  that  is  mounted  in  platinum  lined 
settings. 

Y 

Burnt  ivory,  with  applied  silver  decora- 
tions, forms  the  handles  of  some  |of  the 
new  umbrellas. 

Dresden  china  toilet  sets  are  e.xception- 
ally  attractive  this  sea';on. 

A corsage  ornament  courted  by  many 
women,  is  composed  of  two  diamond  butter- 
flies with  pearl  bodies,  and  connected  by 
a fine  gold  chain. 

* 

Powder  puff  boxes  of  cut  glass  have  gold 
covers  wrought  with  enamel  and  gems. 


Branch  Office  : 

206  Kearny  Street, 
San  Francisco  Cal. 


3 MAIDEN  LANE, 


New  York. 


The  opal  with  its  mixture  of  green,  red 
and  milky  white  is  not  only  beautiful  but 
accords  with  the  chameleon  idea  of  three 
colors  combined,  which  runs  riot  in  dress 
materials. 


Nov.  13.  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


11 


Necklaces  formed  of  graduated  rows  of 
•opals  are  among  the  fashions  of  the  season. 
■» 

Plain  enamel  in  delicate  colors  is  used  for 
the  backs  of  hair  brushes  and  the  tops  of 
■combs. 

Repousse  silver  is  still  employed  for  toilet 
table  accessories. 

* 

Every  kind  of  ingenuity  has  been  brought 
to  bear  with  regard  to  new  forms  in  brace- 
lets,and  a series  of  flexible  gold  joints  united 
by  turquoise  is  a new  departure. 

* 

Balls  of  agate  set  with  miniature  jewels 
make  effective  hat  pins.  Elsie  Bee. 


ESTABLISHED  50  YEARS. 

RANDEL,  BAREMORE  & BILLINaS, 

IMPORTERS  OF 

DIAMONDS, 

And  Other  Precious  Stones. 

FINE  PEARLS  A SPECIALTY. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 


How  an  Alleged  Drummer  Sells  Brass 
Watches  for  Five  Dollars. 

Binghamton,  N,  Y.,  Nov.  7. — A new 
swindle  has  been  perpetrated  on  several 
Jrotel  keepers  in  this  section,  and  one  hotel 
man  in  this  city  is  wiser  by  the  loss  of  $5. 
The  swindler  has  an  office  in  some  city  and 
hangs  out  a jeweler’s  sign.  His  next  move 
is  to  go  over  a route  such  as  traveling  men 
would  be  likely  to  take  and  write  ahead  to 
the  principal  hotel  in  each  town  saying 
that  he  had  left  his  watch  to  be  repaired 
and  asking  the  hotel  man  to  pay  the  express 
charges  when  the  same  was  forwarded  to 
the  hotel. 

A bill  for  $5  accompanied  the  express 
package,  and  the  hotel  keeper  supposing 
the  charges  to  be  for  repairs,  pays  it  and 
locks  the  package,  which  he  believes  con- 
tains a watch,  in  the  safe  to  await  the  drum- 
mer’s arrival.  When  the  claimant  for  the 
watch  fails  to  appear,  which  is  always  the 
case,  the  hotel  man  opens  the  package, 
and  finds  a brass  watch  case.  He  then 
knows  he  has  been  buncoed. 


Jeweler  P.  Roarig  in  Trouble. 

Edwardsville,  111.,  Nov.  6. — Much  sur- 
prise was  occasioned  here  by  the  arrest  of 
John  P.  Roarig,  a jeweler  of  this  city  for 
10  years,  who  is  charged  with  burglary  in 
An  indictment  returned  by  the  Grand  Jury. 
He  promptly  gave  bond  for  his  appearance 
in  court  and  has  been  released. 

Roarig  was  tried  early  last  week  upon 
the  charge  of  receiving  stolen  goods.  The 
trial  took  place  last  Mondayjand  Tuesday, 
and  the  jury  acquitted  him  after  being  out 
■only  10  minutes. 


DIAMOND  JEWELRY 

IH  THE  LATEST  DESIGNS. 


Diamonds  Recut  in  Modern  Styles  or  Repaired  on  Premises. 


58  Nassau  Street, 

I St.  Andrews  St., 

29  Maiden  Lane, 

I Tulp  Straat, 

Holbom  Circus, 

NEW  YORK. 

AMSTERDAMt 

Tonoon  e.  c. 

ESTABLISHED  1841. 


TRADE  MARK. 


GARTER,  SLOAN  S CO.. 

PNUFAGIUREIIS  OF  GOLD  JEWfFLRY, 


Ho.  15  AAIDEH  LANE, 
HEW  YORK. 


A.  CARTER,  Jr. 

A.  K.  SLOAN. 

C.  E.  HASTINGS. 


GEO,  R.  HOWE. 
WM.  T.  CARTER. 
WM.  T.  GOUGH. 


Edward  Reimer’s  jewelry  store,  511  Pat- 
■erson  Ave.,  West  Hoboken,  N.  J.,  was  vis- 
ited by  thieves  on  the  night  of  Nov.  6th. 
The  burglars  must  have  secured  entrance 
by  means  of  skeleton  keys,  as  all  the  doors 
and  windows  were  securely  locked  when 
the  robbery  was  discovered.  The  thieves 
obtained  a gold  watch,  12  gold  pens,  a rifle, 
two  parlor  clocks,  an  overcoat  and  three 
suits  of  clothes.  They  did  not  attempt  to 
open  the  large  safe  which  stands  near  the 
window. 


FACTORY,  NEWARK,  N.  J. 


A.I^XISXIC 

50LID  GOLD  CASES 


_ Warranted  Absolutely  aa  to  Quality. 

Trade  Mark  Registered.  Sold  to  LegiUmate  Jobber*  only. 

NEW  YORK.  BROOKLYN.  CHICAGO.  SAN  FRANCISCO. 


u 


'I  HE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


14kt.  Stud  Settings  for 


$2,861 


BAUM  & OPPENHEIM, 

■Manufacturers  of 

— MOUNTINGS. 

41-43  MAIDEN  LANE,  N.  Y. 


I Postpaid  ) 


S.  A.  BOYLE  & CO., 


AUCTIONEERS 


FOR  THE  LEGITIMATE 
JEWELRY  TRADE  ONLY 


WE  GUARANTEE  YOU  AGAINST  LOSS. 

WE  PAY  ALL  OUR  OWN  EXPENSES. 

Make  no  contracts  with  others  before  consulting  us 


Write  for  Parfalars, 


OFFICES  : 

14  MAIDEN  LANE,  N Y. 

61  1 PENN  AVE.,  WASHINGTON,  D.  C. 


Profit,  Certain: 

Satisfaction,  Sure! 

Wepropose  that  kftail  Jewelers  shall  havt 
unusual  advHm.iire  m pa-lung  the  sale  of  tht 
New  York  .'-tamlaiil  Watch.  Therefore 


“ Any  product  of  tins  Company  in  the  hands 
of  any  Ke.  ular  Jew  ler  whether  found  in  his 
own  stock  or  eturned  to  him  by  a customer, 
which  isjiot  entirely  satisfactory  from  any 
cause  whatever,  may  be  sent  by  mail  to  the 
New  York  office  of  this  Company  ( No.  11 
John  Street ),  and  avV/i/M  one  day  (or  two,  at 
farthest)  it  will  be  returned  to  him  repaired,  or 
a new  Watch  sent  in  exchange;  and  in  the 
large  majority  of  instances  there  will  be  no 
charges  whatever.”  No  bothering  to  know  the 
■why  for  its  return  ; no  grumbling  or  hesitating ; 
no  delay ; no  questioning  the  sender’s  state 
ment;  just  a straight-forward  :oingo{  what  we 
say  we  will  do,  and  liberal  methods  in  our 
doing  it. 

Such  a guarantee  has  never  before  been 
ventured  by  any  Watch  Manufacturer  in  the 
World.  We  submit  it  as  the  earnest  of  oui 
faith  in  our  “works,”  and  in  token  of  oui 
desire  to  increase  the  profit  and  satisfaction 
of  the  Jeweler  in  handling  the  line. 

The  New  York  Standard  Watch  Co. 


i 

i 

rSTABLlSIILD  JiALF  A CENTUKT. 


HAVE 

NOT  FOUND 

THAT  Will  WELL  REPAY  Aff 

INVESTIGATION 

BY  THOSE  WHO^  secure 

THE  BEST  SAFE 

MARVIN  SAFE  CO. 

12  PARK  PLACE,  NEW  YORK. 


SECURITY  PIN  GUARD 

Pat’d  DEC.25,  1894  1^  /F 

Security  M f'g  Co. 


7 ASTOR  HOUSE  (BROADWAY)  N.Y 


85c.  doz.  Net  Cash. 


Discount  to  Jobbers 


B 

n> 


c> 

rt> 


r-i  ^ 
05  ^ 


a ? 


05 

3 


C/3 

ft 


3 Cu 


3 

3* 

ft 

ft3 

c/3 

0 

&5 

3 

C5. 

0 

C 

3 

B 

0 

ft 

t/3 

Oa 

a 

n 

0 

S* 

B 

B 

"B. 

0 

3 

ft 

Cu 

ft 

ft 


n 

05 

n 


ft 


05 

■n 

CfQ 

ft 

C/3 


Judgment  Against  W.  F.  Doll  in  the 
Sensational  Scandal  Case. 

Toronto,  Can.,  Nov.  8th. — On  Thursday, 
Uct.  31st  the  case  of  the  American  Watch 
Case  Co  . Toronto,  vs.  W.  F.  Doll  was  con- 
tinued at  the  Assize  Court  before  Judge 
Rose.  Mr.  Wills,  secretary  of  the  Canadian 
Ass<  elation  of  Jobbers  in  American  Watches, 
A.  C.  Anderson,  wholesale  jeweler,  and  M. 
C.  Ellis,  of  P.  W.  Ellis  & Co.,  were  called 
for  the  plaintiffs  and  gave  evidence  in  re- 
buttal The  incorporation  of  the  company 
was  proved  by  J.  D.  Wade,  of  the  Provincial 
Secretary’s  Department. 

Mr.  Doll  asked  for  two  hours  time  to  pre- 
pare h-s  address  to  the  jury,  but  the  Court 
while  complimenting  him  on  the  ability 
shown  in  conducting  the  case  refused  to 
grant  it.  Mr.  Doll’s  speech  lasted  through 
the  afternoon.  He  read  many  extracts 
from  the  Trader,  the  journal  published  by 
Mr.  McNaught,  manager  of  the  company, 
which  he  claimed  were  a direct  challenge  to 
him  to  expose  the  ‘ tricks  of  the  trade  ” and 
stated  that  it  was  in  reply  to  these  articles 
that  he  had  rented  a window  in  the  Rossin 
House  block  and  displayed  the  watches  and 
placards  complained  of. 

He  banded  the  jury  a watch  stamped  14 
karats,  made  by  the  plaintiff  company  and 
quoted  from  the  evidence  in  which  wit- 
nesses had  testified  that  the  center  was  not 
solid  gold.  He  also  handed  them  another 
case  stamped  “ Premier,”  with  14  karats 
engraved  on  the  back,  to  which  he  said 
plaintiffs  objected  because  it  was  not  hon- 
estly marked,  being  merely  a plated  case, 
and  asked  them  if  it  was  not  honest  to  en- 
grave 14  karats  upon  a plateri  case  like  the 
“ Premier  ” how  could  it  be  honest  to  stamp 
a case  14  karats  when  the  center,  springs 
and  crown  were  not  solid  gold  ? 

Mr.  Doll  resumed  his  address  on  Friday, 
concluding  at  about  11.30  o’clock  a.  .m. 
Mr.  Fount,  for  the  plaintiffs,  followed  in  a 
speech  of  some  three  hours,  giving  an 
analysis  of  [the  evidence  which  he  claimed 
utterly  failed  to  justify  the  damaging 
statements  as  to  the  business  methods  of 
the  plaintiffs,  put  forth  by  Doll. 

Judge  Rose’s  summing  up  occupied  the 
remaining  portion  of  the  afternoon  and  was 
not  concluded  until  Saturday  morning. 

The  jury  after  a deliberation  of  two  hours 
and  a half  brought  in  a verdict  for  the 
plaintiffs  with  $100  damages  and  judgment 
was  accordingly  given  for  that  amount 
with  costs. 

Mr.  Doll  applied  for  a stay  of  proceed- 
ings, for  the  purpose  of  appealing  against 
the  judgment,  w'hich  was  granted.  He 
claims  that  in  conducting  his  own  case  he 
was  at  a disadvantage  on  account  of  his 
ignorance  of  technicalities  and  owing  to  a 
misunderstanding  was  unable  to  present 
some  important  evidence.  He  states  that 
if  a new  trial  is  secured  he  will  engage  B B. 
Osier,  one  of  the  ablest  counsel  in  Canada, 
to  represent  him. 

W.  H.  Everitt  will  open  a jewelry  store 
in  Montgomery.  Pa. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


— ,.v. 

^ ; TRADE  MARK. 

CANTERBURY. 


low  READY. 


“pOWLE  y^FQ.  (^O., 


CHICAGO  : 


NEWBURYPORT, 

HASS. 


145-151  STATE  ST. 


14 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13.  1895. 


BRADLEY  & HUBBARD  MFG.  CO., 

INVITE  THE  ATTENTION  OF 

Jewelers  and  Fancy  Goods  Dealers, 

TO  THEIR  SUPERIOR  LINE  OF  GOODS. 

B & H.”  Banquet  Lamps, 

Onyx  Top  Tables,  Candelabras,  Vases, 
Pitchers,  Urns,  Five  O’Clock  Teas,  Mirrors, 
Jewel  Cases,  Etc. 

NEW  YORK:  BOSTON.  CHICAGO:  PHILADELPHIA: 

26  PARK  PLACE,  160  CONGRESS  ST.  204  MASONIC  TEMPLE.  7 1 O BetZ  BUILDING. 
21  Barclay  St.  factories  and  offices:  Meriden,  Conn. 


Art  Metal  Goods,  j 


BUFF  AND  BLUE 

i^ere  the  Victorious  Colors  of  the  American  Revolutionists. 

The  A1  Williamsville  Buff 


has  been  equally  victorious  in  revolutionizing  the 
market  in  Buffs. 

OMA  (INf  dUALlTY.-THE  BE^T. 

Prepaid  Samples  if  you  want  them. 

WlLLIAiVlSVILLE  MEG.  CO., 

18  South  Water  St.,  PROVIDENCE,  R,  I. 

MILLS  AT  WILLIAMSVILLE,  KILLINGLY,  CONN. 


MERICAN 


ESTABLISHED  t87S. 
INCORPORATED  189^. 


WATCH  TOOL  CO 


ebster= 


GROWS  IN  POPULARITY. 


PRICES  AS  LOW  AS  CONSISTERT  WITH  QUALITY. 

Ask  your  Jobber  for  Price  List  of  1895,  or  write  to  us  at 


Stoney  - Batter  Works,  Chymistry  Dist.,  Waltham,  Mass. 


■■■■  ■■■■ 


■■ 

■ 

■ 

■■ 


H.  M.  RICH  & CO., 

Jewelry 

Auctioneers, 

21  SCHOOL  ST.,  BOSTON,  MASS. 


SALES  MADE  FOR  RETAIL  JEW- 
ELERS ONLY  IN  THEIR  ESTAB- 
LISHED PLACES  OF  BUSINESS. 


■ 

■ 

■■ 


WE  CONDUCT  MORE  AUCTIONS 
THAN  ANY  OTHER  FIRM  IN  OUR 
LINE  AND  WITH  BETTER  RE 
SULTS  AND  GUARANTEE  VOU 
AGAINST  LOSS. 

SEM)  FOU  l’.tJIPHLET  COXTAIMMJ  (U  K 
METHODS  AM)  KEKEUEMES  FROM 
SEARLY  100  RETAIL  JEWELERS  FOR 
WHOM  WE  HAVE  1'0M)l(’TKI)  SALES  IS 
THE  LAST  1-2  MONTHS. 

ALL  CORRESPONDENCE  CONFIDENTIAL. 


■ 

3 

■ 

■ 

3 

■ 

■ 

3 

■ 

■ 

■■ 

.1 


"5 

■ 

■ 

7i 


.s 

■s 


FLATWARE 
HOLLOW  WARE 

STAMPED 


^IS  THE  GENUINE.^ 

JHanvifactiired  by 

WM.  ROGERS  M’P’Q  60., 

HARTFORD.  CONN. 


Li/VIVIIBIECFCT  <fe  CO., 

“““  Fine  Gold  Pens,  = Holders,  = Pencils,  = Picks 

AND  NOVELTIES  IN  GOLD,  SILVER  AND  PLATE. 

Having  mcrea-sed  ttie  size  of  our  factory  we  are  prepired  to  make  larger  quantities  of  goods  than  ever.  Every  pen  carefully  tested  and  fully  warranted. 


CHICAGO  BRANCH:  103  State  Street, 
S.  N.  JENKINS,  Manager. 


19  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 


GENERAL  AGENTS  FOR 
PAUL  E.  WIRT  FOUNTAIN  PENS. 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


15 


The  Reorganization  of  The  Kent  & Stan- 
ley Co. 

Providence,  R.  I.,  Nov.  5. — During  the 
past  few  days  it  has  been  evident  to  those 
watching  for  new  developments  that  some- 
thing out  of  the  usual  was  transpiring  in 
the  affairs  of  the  Kent  & Stanley  Co.  Last 
Friday  afternoon  a meeting  of  the  stock- 
holders of  the  original  company  was  held, 
nearly  all  of  them  being  in  attendance. 
The  transactions  of  that  meeting  have  been 
closely  guarded,  but  it  is  learned  that  the 
principal  object  was  to  take  some  action  in 
relation  to  completing  the  disposal  of  the 
stock  in  the  new  company,  as  prosposed  by 
the  previously  reported  plan  of  reorganiza- 
tion. No  action  could  be  taken  looking 
toward  the  consummation  of  this  plan  until 
all  of  ihe  stock  had  been  subscribed  for 
and  it  is  understood  that  there  was  a small 
balance  remaining  up  to  last  Friday  and 
this  was  an  effectual  barrier  to  the  reor- 
ganization of  the  new  company. 

The  meeting  adjourned,  however,  with- 
out anything  being  accomplished  other 
than  to  stir  the  matter  up  in  the 
minds  of  all  and  impressing  them  with  the 
importance  of  speedily  disposing  of  the 
unsubscribed  balance.  Yesterday  an  ad- 
journed meeting  was  held  and  the  com- 
mittee having  in  charge  the  disposal  of  the 
stock  reported  that  only  a very  small 
amount  remained  to  be  taken  to  complete 
the  sum  of  $500,000  planned  as  the  amount 
necessary  to  a reorganization. 


The  plan  of  procedure  as  now  determined 
upon  is  practically  as  follows:  The  capital 
stock  in  the  new  company  will  be  $500,000, 
of  which  amount  $300,000  will  be  preferred, 
and  $200,000  common  stock.  This  is,  in 
fact,  exactly  as  has  been  before  arranged 
by  the  projectors,  and  published  in  these 
columns.  The  several  creditors  of  the 
company  have  been  interviewed  by  the 
committee  appointed  several  months 
ago  to  report  upon  the  best  plan 
for  settlement  of  the  concern’s  affairs 
and  have  each  signed  agreements  to 
accept  $225,000  in  full  of  all  claims.  (The 
liabilities  were  stated  when  the  firm’s  em- 
barrassment was  first  known  at  about  $1,- 
000,000.)  This  amount  will  be  paid  in  part 
by  cash,  partly  by  stock  in  the  Kent  & 
Stanley  Co.  Limited,  (the  new  corporation 
title),  and  the  remainder  in  notes.  The 
Rhode  Island  National  Bank  of  this  city, 
(of  which  F.  A.  Chase,  chairman  of  the  com- 
mittee on  reorganization  is  cashier),  is  to 
act  as  agent  in  this  matter,  and  will  receive 
the  cash  payments  made  for  stock  and  settle 
with  the  several  creditors.  As  a guarantee 
for  the  faithful  settlement  with  these  credi- 
tors, the  present  Kent  & Stanley  Co.  will 
deposit  with  the  above  named  bank,  deeds 
of  their  entire  property  on  Fountain,  Sabin, 
Mason,  Aborn  and  Beverly  Sts.,  subject, 
however,  to  the  mortgages  thereon,  which 
deeds  will  be  held  by  the  bank  until  the 
liquidation  is  complete. 

All  of  the  bank  creditors  and  practically 


all  other  creditors  have  agreed  to  this  mode 
of  settlement.  Small  merchandise  creditors 
of  $100  or  less  will  receive  cash  in  full  im- 
mediately, while  those  of  more  than  $100 
are  to  receive  25  per  cent,  cash  and  liquida- 
tion notes  to  run  for  two  years. 

Less  than  two  years  ago  the  Kent  & 
Stanley  Co.  finished  the  construction  of  the 
largest  and  most  expensively  furnished 
jewelry  building  in  the  country,  and  took 
upper  floor  for  their  own  business.  There 
came  a time  when  the  company  could  not 
meet  the  interest  on  the  notes  given  on  ac- 
count of  construction,  and  they  were  forced 
to  ask  for  an  extension  and  later  the  plan  of 
reorganization  was  proposed.  J.  W.  Bishop 
& Co.,  contractors,  Worcester,  Mass.,  had  a 
claim  amounting  to  $104,600  on  the  building 
and  this  had  to  be  satisfied  before  anything 
further  could  be  done  toward  reorganizing. 
It  has  now  been  agreed  that  this  concern 
shall  receive  about  33  per  cent,  cash  and 
the  balance  in  preferred  stock.  Holders  of 
shares  in  the  old  company  will  receive  a 
certain  amount  of  new  stock  for  their  hold- 
ings. Edwin  F.  Kent  is  to  retain  an  interest 
in  the  new  company,  and  an  over-issue  of 
stock  to  the  amount  of  about  $90,000,  it  is 
understood,  is  to  be  wiped  out. 

It  is  confidently  believed  that  the  late 
serious  financial  troubles  of  this  important 
concern  are  overcome,  and,  as  the  plans 
above  annoiinced  have  been  endorsed  by 
practically  all  of  the  creditors,  that  no  new 
impediments  are  likely  to  be  encountered  in 


The  Hamilton  Watch  Co. 

has  added  to  its  line  four  new  i 8 size  full  plate  1 5 and  1 7 jewel  movements. 

Write  for  description  and  prices. 

The  increasing  popularity  of 

HAMILTON  WATCHES 

is  due  to  the  fact  that  they  excel  all  others  in  accuracy,  mechanical  excel- 
lence, and  beautiful  finish.  They  are  especially  adapted  to  Railroad  service, 
and  are  in  general  use  on  all  the  principal  Railroads  of  the  courTry.  They 
are  sold  to  Legitimate  Retail  ^Jewelers  only.  No  Catalogues  or 
Printed  Price  Lists  are  Issued.  No  movements  are  Named.  Prices 
are  Guaranteed.  Full  Rebates  will  be  made  on  all  movements  that  are 
reduced  in  price  or  discontinued. 

HAMILTON  WATCH  CO.,  LANCASTER,  PA. 


16 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


Factory, 

NEWARK,  N.  J. 

♦ i ♦ 


Carter,  Elcox&Co., 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  GOLD  JEWELRY 

. . . IN  . . . 


Office,  21-23  Maiden  Lane. 
NEW  YORK. 


LADIES’,  GENTLEMEN’S  AND  CHILDREN’S  RINGS. 

STONE  SEALS,  LINK  BUTTONS. 


OUR  TRADE  MARK. 


OUR  LINE  OF 


SPRING  BACK  STUDS 


33B1  3362  3363 

Contains  the  GREATEST  VARIETY,  Improvements  make  them  the  STRONGEST. 

All  i4k.  and  PRICES  ARE  RIGHT.  — ^ 

Ask  your  Jobber  or  send  to  us  for  a selection  package  of  studs. 


Would  You?  ? ? 


YOU 

AND 

WE 


KNOW 


THAT  YOU  WOULD  NOT  BUY 
PATCHED  TROUSERS  f OR  NEW  ONES. 


Wh  Y THEN  SELL 

PATCHED  EYE-CLASS  GUARDS 


FOR  NEW 
ONES? 


WHY  NOT  BUY 
THE 


WHEN  JUST  AS 
CHEAP? 


nELI5HEK  6r  FETTER, 

128  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

WALL  AND  COUNTER  CASES, 

FOR  JEWELRY,  SILVER- 
WARE, ETC. 


PAT.JAN.29.e4. 

SEND  FOR  PRICES  TO 


E.  KIRSTEIN’S  SONS  CO., 


ROCHESTER, 

NEW  YORK. 


Regina  flusic  Boxes. 


Having'  the  general  agency  for  the 
Regina  Music  Boxes,  I am  in  a position 
to  offer  special  inducements  to  dealers. 

Remember  that  there  is  no  Music  Box 
on  the  market  that  can  compare  ■with 
the  Regina  in  quality  and  volume  of 
tone,  and  durability  of  construction. 

SEND  FOR  ILLUSTRATED  CATALOGUE  TO 

A.  WOLFF,  General  Agt., 

LINCOLN  BUILDING, 

Cor.  Nth  Street  and  Union  Square,  W.,  N.  Y. 


ll/E  make  to  order  only,  and  guaraLtec  our  work  to  be 
YV  Dust  Proof  and  First-Class  in  all  its  details,  and  to 
have  all  the  Latest  Improvements  as  regards  Shelf 
Aricingements,  Electric  1 ights,  Etc.  We  will  ctieerfully 
furnish  Estimates  and  Sketches  for  any  store  free  of  charge. 

CALL  AND  BEE  US. 


- - EMMONS  - - 
ASSOCIATED  LAW  OFFICES. 

POKXI.ANn,  SEATTI-E,  XACOIUA, 
Orcg'oii.  Wa^li.  Wa»>li. 

Foreign  Business  a Specialty. 


No  Jeweler  or  Watch  Repairer  should  be  without 
a copy  ol  “WORKSHOP  NOTES,”  a new  and  very 
useful  book  for  the  workshop.  Send  for  circular 
containing  a complete  index  of  the  book,  and  judge 
of  its  merits  for  yourself. 


L.  B.  & H.  H.  SMITH, 

Manufacturers  of 

Fine  Wedding  Rings. 

Successors  to  Hildreth  Meg.  Co.,  53  Mae)en  Lane,  N.  Y. 


I 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


17 


this  prospective  era  of  better  times.  It  is 
understood  that  all  liens  upon  the  estate 
have  been  withdrawn. 

The  new  company  will  call  a meeting 
shortly  and  proceed  to  organize  in  the  usual 
way,  and  decide  upon  plans  for  the  future 
course  of  business  operations.  There  are 
all  kinds  of  rumors  afloat  as  to  whom  the  new 
officers  will  be,  but  they  cannot  be  consid- 
ered as  having  any  authority  at  present. 


A New  Seamless  Wire  Manufactory  Pro- 
jected. 

Providence,  R.  I.,  Nov.  9. — Another 
seamless  filled  wire  plant.  The  Circular 
correspondent  is  informed,  will  be  in  opera- 
tion in  this  city  next  January.  The  Nelson 
Improved  Seamless  Filled  Wire  Co.  have 
taken  out  a charter  limited  to  $100,000  and 
have  sold  the  first  issue  of  stock. 

This  concern  was  incorporated  at  the  last 
session  of  the  General  Assembly  by  Thomas 
F.  Carlisle,  a gold  plater  of  this  city,  Ed- 
ward Nelson,  a plater  of  this  city,  and 
Abraham  C.  Munfort,  of  Pawtucket.  The 
capital  stock  is  $100,000  in  10,000  shares  of 
$10  each.  Of  these  Mr.  Nelson  holds  9,998 
while  Messrs.  Carlisle  and  Monfort  each 
holds  one  share.  At  the  organization  of  the 
corporation  Mr.  Nelson  was  chosen  as 
president  and  auditor  ; Mr.  Monfort,  vice- 
president,  and  Mr.  Carlisle,  secretary  and 
treasurer.  These  gentlemen  also  consti- 
tute the  board  of  directors. 

Part  of  the  machinery  has  been  ordered 
and  the  remainder  will  be  placed  under 
contract  this  week.  It  is  expected  that  the 
company  will  locate  in  the  building  re- 
cently occupied  by  the  Providence  Steam 
& Gas  Pipe  Co.  at  the  corner  of  Pine  and 
Eddy  Sts.,  or  in  the  new  Kent  & Stanley 
building.  The  capacity  of  the  plant 
probably  will  not  be  less  than  2,000 
ounces  a day,  and  in  addition  to  wire, 
general  plating  and  the  manufacture  of 
jewelers’  findings  will  constitute  the  busi- 
ness conducted.  All  of  the  machinery  is  to 
be  of  the  latest  design,  and  there  will  be  a 
special  furnace  for  soldering,  designed  by 
Mr.  Nelson. 


Proceedings  of  the  Jewelers*  Security 
Alliance. 

On  Nov.  8th  the  following  were  admitted 
to  membership  in  the  Jewelers’  Security 
Alliance ; Benedict  & Howard,  Newark,  N. 
J.;  G.  H.  Bassinger,  Glens  Falls,  N.  Y. ; 
Henry  Dehnel,  Sandusky,  O.;  Chas.  A. 
Tanciette,  Fall  River,  Mass.;  The  Lewis 
Jewelry  Supply  Co.,  Denver,  Col.;  S.  B. 
Leonard!  & Co.,  Tampa,  Fla.;  Menger  & 
Wagner,  Baltimore,  Md.;  J.  C.  Tracy, 
Willimantic,  Conn. 


Alfred  Barber,  the  well  known  salesman 
for  the  Meriden  Britannia  Co.,  has  been 
sadly  bereaved  in  the  death  of  his  wife, 
who  passed  away  Nov.  8th,  at  her  home  in 
Meriden,  aged  61  years.  She  was  married 
to  Mr.  Barber  35  years  ago, 


Brilliant  Preparations  for  the  New  York 
Association  Dinner. 

TJie  2ist  annnal  banquet  of  the  New  York 
Jewelers’  Association,  which  will  be  held 
to-night,  in  Delmonico’s  banquet  hall,  26th 
St.  and  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York,  promises  to 
be  more  largely  attended  than  any  previous 
dinner  in  the  history  of  the  organization. 

The  invited  guests  who  are  almost  all 
men  of  National  reputation  include  the  fol- 
lowing gentlemen  : Hon.  Wm.  L.  Strong, 

Mayor  of  New  York  ; Judge  Edw.  T. 
Bartlett,  of  the  New  York  Court  of  Ap- 
peals ; Dr.  Chauncey  M.  Depew ; Hon. 
Fred’k  W.  Wurster,  Mayor-elect  of  Brook- 
lyn ; Hon.  Lemuel  Ely  Quigg,  editor  of 
the  New  York  Press ; St.  Clair  McKel- 
way,  editor  of  the  Brooklyn  Eagle ; 
Congressman  Robert  W.  Taylor,  of  Ohio ; 
J.  Seaver  Page,  Rev.  James  M.  Farrar, 
D.  D.  and  Ex-Judge  Noah  Davis,  known 
as  the  godfather  of  the  Association.  At 
the  speakers’  table  in  addition  to  these 
gentlemen  and  president  Ludwig  Nissen, 
will  be  Daniel  F.  Appleton,  of  Robbins  & 
Appleton,  the  Association’s  oldest  living 
president,  and  Aug.  K.  Sloan,  the  last 
president. 

The  toasts  with  their  sentiments  are  as 
follows: 

The  President  of  the  United  States. 

The  Land  We  Love. 

“ Strike — for  your  altars  and  fires: 

Strike — for  the  green  graves  of  your  sires: 
God,  and  your  native  land.” 

Fitz-Greene  Hallock. 

Commercial  Honor  and  Commercial  Hon- 
esty. 

“He  who  filches  from  me  my  good 
name,  steals  that  which  not  enriches  him 
and  makes  me  poor  indeed.” 

Shakespeare. 


The  Artist  and  the  Jewel. 

“ The  perfection  of  art  is  to  conceal 
art.”  Quintilian. 

The  Loveliest  Jewel  of  All. 

“And  young  as  beautiful!  And  soft  as 
young  ! 

And  gay  as  soft ! And  innocent  as  gay  1” 

Young. 

Thanksgiving  for  the  Past. 

Congratulations  for  the  Present. 

Prayer  for  the  Future. 

Our  Majority. 

“ I have  drunken  deep  for  joy,  and  I 
will  taste  no  other  wine  to-night.” 

Shelley, 

The  decorations  which  will  confront  the 
guests  are  expected  to  surpass  anything 
before  seen  on  similar  occasions.  This  work 
has  been  in  charge  of  Geo.  W.  Shiebler,  who 
has  brought  into  play  his  well  known  artistic 
taste  in  arranging  undoubtedly  the  greatest 
collection  of  fine  silver  pieces  and  beautiful 
art  pottery  ever  displayed  in  a banquet  hall 
in  this  country.  The  extent  and  richness 
of  the  silver  decorations  are  due  to  the  gen- 
erosity of  the  Whiting  Mfg.  Co.,  the  Gor- 
ham Mfg.  Co.,  Dominick  & Haff,  and  Geo. 
W.  Shiebler  & Co.,  who  placed  at  the  dis- 
posal of  the  Association  all  the  finest  table 
pieces  in  their  various  stocks. 

Through  the  kindness  of  Bawo  & Dotter, 
art  pottery  importers,  the  banquet  tables 
will  show  the  choicest  examples  of  colored 
Hungarian  glassware,  cut  crystal.  Royal 
Worcester,  Doulton,  Crown  Derby,  Royal 
Meissen,  Dresden,  Sevres,  and  various 
Italian  and  other  potteries.  The  floral  dec- 
orations will  be  supplied  by  Chas.  E.  Apple- 
gate,  of  Brooklyn,  who  is  making  one  of 
his  greatest  efforts  in  the  production  of  a 
new  floral  effect  from  combined  chrysan- 
themums and  cosmoses. 


^RToisE  Shell 

DRESSING  HAIRPINS 

IN  ALL  WEIGHTS  AND  LENGTHS. 


Write  for  Holiday  Selection  Shipments. 


RICE  & HOCHSTER 

Makers  of  Everything  in  Tortoise  Shell, 

485  BROADWAY,  NEW  YORK, 


18 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


N'ov.  13,  1895. 


T Window  Attraction 

Oiir  Little  German  Band. 

IN  HANDSOME  DRESDEN  DECORATION. 


SIZE  OF  EACH  FIGURE,  3^  INCHES. 

....  Price  of  Band,  $4.00  net  cash. 


Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co., 

9 & II  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

Largest  Stock  of  Art  Goods  Especially  Collected  for  Jewelers. 


Death  of  Eliaship  Tracey. 

Eliaship  Tracey,  formerly  an  extensive 
manufact'.irer  of  watch  cases  in  Philadel- 
phia, Pa.,  died  some  time  ago  in  Rosemont, 
Pa.,  in  the  84th  year  of  his  age.  His  widow 
and  a daughter  survive  him. 

Mr.  Tracey  was  born  in  Connecticut. 
He  was  educated  to  be  a dental  surgeon,  and 
though  he  did  not  continue  the  practice  of 
his  profession,  was  known  as  Dr.  Tracey 
among  his  intimates.  He  embarked  in  the 
manufacture  of  gold  watch  cases  in  Phila- 
delphia first  as  a member  of  the  firm  of  C. 
& E.  Tracey,  which  continued  but  a few 
years,  and  later  of  the  successors,  E. 
Tracey  & Co.  He  was  the  predecessor  of 
Hagstoz  & Thorpe,  who  were  in  turn  suc- 
ceeded by  the  present  Keystone  Watch 
Case  Co.  Mr.  Tracey  had  at  one  time  a 
wide  acquaintance  in  New  York. 

Mr.  Tracey  joined  with  Rohtins  & Apple- 
ton,  in  the  purchase  of  the  Waltham  V^atch 
works  in  1857,  at  which  time  the  firm  of 
Appleton,  Tracey  & Co.  formed  which  con- 
tinued business  until  they  incorporated. 
I'he  first  watch  made  in  Waltham  after  the 
purchase  received  the  name  of  “ Appleton, 
Tracey  & Co.  ” which  continues  as  the  name 
of  one  of  the  leading  Waltham  watches  to 
this  day. 

Mr.  Traiey  had  been  so  long  retired,  that 
few  remain  in  the  trade  who  remember  him, 
but  these  few  feel  a deep  sense  of  personal 
loss  in  the  death  of  a so  good,  upright  and 
trustworthy  man. 


Unusual  Opportunity. 

M.  D.  Rothschild’s  Entire  Stock  of 

Colored  Stones, 

Opals  and 

Pearl  Neelilaee. 


Will  be  Sold  at  Public  Auction  to  the  Highest  Bidder,  by 

JAS.  P.  SILO,  AUCTIONEER,  at 

a3  LIBERTY  STREET.  NEW  YORK. 

The  lots  will  be  on  exhibition  at  the  office  of  M.  D.  Rothschild, 
14  Maiden  Lane,  from  10  to  12  o’clock  A.  M.  and  from  i to  3 o’clock 

P.  M.  on  NOV.  18,  19  and  20. 

CATALOGUES  WILL  BE  SENT  TO  THE  TRADE  THIS  WEEK. 


The  Regina  Music  Box 

Plays  an  unlimited  number  of  tunes ; has  a 
brilliant  and  rich  tone,  and  is  suitable  for  the 
jewelry  trade.  Prices  run  from  $8.00  to  $125  00. 

THE  “STAR^^ 

Is  a Music  Box  with  interchangeable  cylinders, 
and  is  pronounced  by  experts  to  be  the  most 
perfect  Music  Box  in  the  maiket. 

SEND  FOR  CATALOGUE. 

E.  L.  CUENDET,  General  Agent, 

21  JOHN  STREET,  N.  Y, 


T'l.^  Bonner  Combination 


RING,  STUD  and  SCARF  PIN. 
A Long  Screw  and  a Round  Bezel. 


Send  for  Selection  Package 


BONNER,  RICH  & CO., 

41  & 43  >Vlaiden  Lane,  NEW  YORK, 
155  State  St,  CHICAGO. 

German  kohlbusch,  sr. 


Ittftbilabed  lS6t 
Uftnufaotarer  •t 
Fill  Balajicx* 
AMD  Wbiohts  for 
every  p o 
where  eooc 
required. 

•eo  Street 
iCaldeo  La. 

Bepalre  (aity  u>aa«i 
prompuj  made. 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


19 


Last  Week’s  Arrivals. 


THM  CIRCULAR  has  perfected  ar- 
rangements tor  obtaining  the  names 
and  hotel  addresses  of  all  the  latest 
buyers  visiting  New  York,  and  each 
day  posts  in  its  ofice,  i8g  Broadway, 
a bulletin  which  every  member  of 
the  trade  is  cordially  invited  to  copy. 


The  following  out-of-town  jewelers  were 
registered  in  New  York  during  the  past 
week;  C.  B.  Eustis,  Minneapolis,  Minn., 
Holland  H ; W.  A.  Mortimer,  Pottsville, 
Pa.,  Imperial  H.;  E.  F.  Jakeman,  Norfolk, 
Va. , St.  Denis  H.;  A.  G.  Paul,  Boston, 
Mass.,  Marlborough  H.;  S.  Kaufman,  jew- 
elry buyer  for  Kaufman  & Co.,  Richmond, 
Va.,  531  Broadway;  R.  K.  Higgins,  Os- 
wego, N.  Y. ; J.  D.  Wilson,  Boston,  Mass. 
Imperial  H.;  A.  La  France,  Elmira,  N Y., 
Astor  H.;  D.  N.  Lathrop,  Syracuse,  N.  Y., 
Continental  H.;  F.  W.  Brooks,  Ithaca, 
N.  Y.;  W.  S.  McDougall,  Pittston,  Pa.;  L. 
Emery,  Jr.,  Bradford,  Pa.,  Gerlach  H.;  G. 
J.  Strobel,  Waterbury,  Conn.,  Grand 
Union  H.;  E.  R.  Bennett,  Amherst, 
Mass.,  Astor  H.;  W.  S.  Biedler, 
Baltimore,  Md.,  Astor  H.;  F.  A. 
Cross,  Chester,  Pa.,  Morton  H.;  J.  B. 
Levison,  San  Francisco,  Cal.,  Holland  H.; 


H.  W.  Phelps,  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  Imperial  H.; 

G.  S.  Chatfield,  Waterbury,  Conn.,  Grand 
Union  H.;  L.  B.  Bloom,  Cincinnati,  O., 
Imperial  H.;  L.  Furtwangler,  Greensburg, 
Pa.,Gilsey  H.;  F.  E.  Penfold,  Buffalo,  N. 
Y.,  Grand  Union  H.;  C.  Wendell,  Oswego, 
N.  Y.,  St.  Denis  H.;  Mr.  Birks,  Montreal, 
Can.;0.  Cone,  Akron,  O.,  Continental  H.; 
J.  R.  Graves,  Corry,  Pa.,  St.  Stephen  H.; 

H.  Bunn,  Springfield,  111.,  St.  James  H.; 
C.  C.  Riggs,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  St.  Denis 
H.;  J.  H.  Foster,  of  Dey  Bros.,  Syracuse, 
N.  Y.,  66  Grand  St.,  H.  Albert;  J.  F.  Jones, 
of  J.  N.  Adam  & Co.,  Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  55 
White  St.,  H.  Imperial. 


The  Circular  has  often  considered  the 
popularity  of  the  Colonial  style  in  silver- 
ware. One  of  the  houses  who  have  entered 
very  extendedly  into  the  manufacture  of 
this  class  of  goods  is  Reed  & Barton,  Taun- 
ton, Mass.,  and  13  Maiden  Lane,  New 
York.  In  addition  to  a large  line  in  ster- 
ling silver  they  have  placed  on  the  market 
an  extensive  line  in  plated  ware,  compris- 
ing almost  every,  class  of  articles,  some 
of  which  are  illustrated  on  this  page. 
Being  the  class  of  goods  now  most 
in  demand  Reed  & Barton  will  reap  the 
profits  of  their  enterprise. 


General  Strike  Among  the  Working 
Diamond  Cutters. 

The  striking  diamond  workers  of  the 
shops  of  Wallach  & Schiele,  in  Mott  St., 
New  York,  and  Zilver  Bros.,  St.  Marks  and 
Underhill  Aves.,  Brooklyn,  were  joined 
Friday  and  Monday  by  those  in  other  shops 
in  New  York,  and  the  strike  became  general. 
Among  the  firms  whose  workmen  went  out 
are:  Stem  Bros.  & Co.,  29  Gold  St.;  Arnstein 
Bros.  & Co.,  45  John  St.;  S.  Van  Wezel, 
Elizabeth  and  Bleecker  Sts.;  Brown  & Co., 
29  Gold  St.;  and  Sanders  & Bruhl  Co., 
Newark. 

The  men  demand  an  increase  in  wages  of 
about  25  per  cent.  Some  employers  state 
that  their  men  had  no  grievance  but  were 
called  out  by  the  Union  to  assist  others  who 
had  grievances. 

Herman  Levy,  15  Dutch  St.  and  Gold- 
smith & Weil,  I Maiden  Lane,  claimed  that 
their  men  were  still  working.  The  manu- 
facturers express  themselves  as  fearing  no.^ 
inconvenience  from  the  strike  of  their 
workmen. 

Adolph  G.  Schuster,  of  G.  A.  Schuster  & 
Sons,  grocers,  and  Miss  Ada  B.  Hager, 
daughter  of  Phil  W.  Hager,  of  Hager  & 
Hetch,  jewelry  manufacturers  and  diamond 
setters,  Louisville,  Ky.,  were  married  at 
the  home  of  the  bride’s  parents,  on  Nov.  12. 


CSIABLUHED 


SALESROOMS 
07  UNION  SQUARE  8c  13  MAIDEN  LANE  NEW  YORK  - 
' ALSO  AT  FACTORIES,  TAUNTON  MASS. 

CHICAGO  OFTICE  54.  WASHINGTON  ST,  PHILADELPHIA  OmCE  925  CHESTNUT  ST. 


INCORPORATED 

IS86 


20 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


Nov.  J3,  1895. 


Philadelphia. 

H.  C.  Rowbotham,  of  J.  Muhr  & Bro., 
has  just  returned  from  a trip  to  the  Pacific 
coast. 

John  H.  Shulier,  1135  Passyunk  Ave., 
has  completed  extensive  improvements,  in 
view  of  the  holiday  trade. 

George  B.  Evans  has  opened  a branch 
establishment  at  106  S.  nth  St.  with  bric-a- 
brac  and  holiday  goods  as  a specialty. 

S.  Sommers,  1027  Columbia  Ave.,  was 
visited  by  a sneak  thief  on  Saturday  after- 
noon. The  marauder  got  away  with  $50 
worth  of  jewelry,  while  Mr.  Sommers  was 
busy  with  a customer. 

The  property  at  132  S.  loth  St.  occupied 
by  Hamilton  & Diesinger,  silversmiths,  has 
been  purchased  by  the  trustees  of  the  Jef- 
ferson Medical  College.  A fine  pathological 
and  bacteriological  laboratory  will  be  built 
on  the  site. 

Simons,  Bro.  & Co.  have  just  completed 
and  delivered  to  the  Master  Builders’  Ex- 
change, a sterling  silver  loving  cup  of  beau- 
tiful design,  which  will  be  presented  by 
the  local  organization  to  the  Master 
Builders’  Exchange  of  Baltimore,  by  whom 
the  Philadelphia  builders  were  recently 
entertained. 

Stock  was  laid  in  last  week  by  the  follow- 
ing jewelers  from  neighboring  towns : C. 
Hunsberger,  Souderton,  Pa.;  M.  Lewis, 
Bridgton,  N.  J.;  H.  W.  Bolte,  Atlantic  City, 
N.  J.;  C.  F.  Rudolph,  Wilmington,  Del.; 
John  Fish,  Bryn  Mawr,  Pa.;  H.  E.  Thomas, 
Wilmington,  Del.;  Joseph  Ladomus,  Ches- 
ter, Pa.,  and  J.  Tyson  Ogden,  Woodstown, 
N.J. 

Richard  Brown,  a resident  of  the  Masonic 
Home  andaretired  jeweler,  wasburiedNov. 
yth  from  the  Home,  where  he  died  on  Tues- 
day last  of  pneumonia.  Mr.  Brown  was 
born  in  Dublin,  Ireland,  in  1814,  and  came 
to  this  country  when  quite  young.  For 
many  years  he  carried  on  the  jewelry  busi- 
ness in  this  city.  After  the  death  of  his 
wife,  three  years  ago,  he  became  a resident 
of  the  Home.  He  was  a member  of  Phila- 
delphia Lodge,  No.  72,  F.  & A.  M.;  Col- 
umbia Mark  Lodge;  Jerusalem  Chapter,  No. 
8;  St.  John’s  Commandery,  No.  4,  Knights 
Templar;  Philanthropic  Lodge. 


Boston. 

TRADE  CONDITIONS. 

Trade  during  the  past  ten  days  has  shown 
an  improvement.  The  traveling  men  report 
a renewal  of  demand,  less  hesitancy  about 
stocking  up  and  quite  a movement  in  holi- 
day goods.  Jobbers  note  a better  tone. 
More  buyers  have  been  in  Boston  than  usual 
since  the  beginning  of  the  month  and  silver 
and  plated  ware  departments  especially 
have  had  a good  run  of  custom.  Watches 
are  also  in  better  demand.  The  whole- 
salers as  a rule  are  jn  a much  more  cheer- 
ful frame  of  mind  than  they  were  in  the 
latter  half  of  October. 

William  B.  Senious,  Jr.,  has  entered  the 
employ  of  E.  B.  Floyd  & Co, 


G.  W.  Whittemore  is  in  New  York  this 
week  on  a business  trip  for  Nelson  H. 
Brown. 

William  Rugg,  formerly  with  the  Ameri- 
can Waltham  Watch  Co.,  has  entered  the 
employ  of  H.  Weber. 

The  Boston  Jewelers’  Club  will  have 
their  Fall  meeting  and  banquet  at  Young’s 
next  Saturda)'. 

Murray  Cheever,  watchmaker,  and  A.  W. 
Briggs,  engraver  to  the  trade,  have  re- 
moved from  370  to  406  Washington  St. 

Adoniram  J.  Applegate,  jeweler.  Cam- 
bride,  is  respondent  to  an  insolvency  peti- 
tion, filed  by  the  Waterbury  Watch  Co. 

The  E.  Howard  Watch  & Clock  Co.  re- 
port a large  number  of  orders  for  their  new 
bicycles  and  will  have  some  on  the  market 
in  a few  weeks. 

E.  E.  Hall,  formerly  with  E.  H.  Saxton, 
but  for  the  past  year  located  in  Washington, 
has  returned  and  is  again  connected  with 
the  E.  H.  Saxton  Co. 

E.  E.  Shedd,  of  Eastport,  Me.,  was  in 
Boston  this  week,  accompanied  by  Mrs. 
Shedd.  They  have  gone  south  on  a month’s 
outing  and  will  visit  Atlanta  and  other 
points  of  interest. 

Buyers  in  town  the  past  week  included  ; 
Dana  N.  Coy,  Windsor  ; Harry  A.  Houl- 
ton.  White  River  Junction,  Vt. ; L.  C. 
Bailey,  Calais ; G.  W.  Redman,  Green’s 
Landing  ; E.  F.  Robinson,  Ellsworth ; 
Charles  H.  Osgood,  Lewiston,  Me.;  S. 
Clark,  North  Brookfield ; Gooding  Bros., 
Plymouth  ; C.  A.  Thomas  and  George  O. 
Foye,  Athol  ; J.  G.  Ryder,  2d,  Harwich  ; 
G.  A.  Bailey,  West  Brookfield  ; W.  B. 
Studley,  Rockland,  Mass  ; C.  B.  Duck- 
worth, Pawtucket,  R.  I,;  J.  R.  Ferguson, 
St.  John,  N.  B. 


Springfield,  Mass. 

M.  D.  Fletcher  has  decided  to  enlarge  his 
business  and  will  leave  his  present  location 
for  a better  one  on  Main  St.,  opposite  Court 
Square. 

Fred  Cook,  who  has  been  in  the  employ 
of  jeweler  E.  R.  Bennett,  of  Amhurst,  for 
several  years,  has  taken  a position  with 
Taintor  & McAlpine,  Easthampton. 

Harrison  A.  Strong,  a jewelry  peddler 
whose  trouble  with  the  town  of  Windsor 
Locks  over  an  illegally  imposed  license  fee 
was  mentioned  in  a recent  number  of  The 
Circular,  has  placed  his  claims  in  the 
hands  of  a lawyer  and  will  bring  suit. 

Miss  Ailce  Winans,  for  a number  of 
years  bookkeeper  for  L.  B.  Coe  will  shortly 
open  a store  in  the  Mayasset  Club  building 
on  State  St.  She  will  put  in  a stock  of 
dolls,  silverware  and  jewelry.  A.  C. 
Southall,  for  seven  years  manager  of  Mr. 
Coe's  watchmaking  department,  will  occupy 
a part  of  the  store. 

Taintor  & McAlpine’s  store,  Easthamp- 
ton, was  robbed  Wednesday  night,  the 
thieves  making  an  entrance  by  prying 
open  a rear  wil4ow,  The  valuables  were 


in  the  safe  which  was  untouched  and  the 
firm  thought  that  with  the  exception  of  a 
few  pieces  of  plated  ware,  they  lost  little. 
Friday  the  police  of  this  city  run  across  a 
couple  of  suspicious  characters  and  shad- 
owed them.  The  men  went  to  a second- 
hand store  on  Water  St.  and  two  officers 
followed.  The  latter  entered  the  store  just 
as  the  suspects  were  trying  to  make  a trade 
with  the  proprietor.  The  men  were  ar- 
rested and  taken  to  the  police  station  where 
they  gave  their  names  as  Charles  Wilson 
and  Henry  Corcoran.  Both  were  searched 
and  on  Wilson  was  found  a large  pocket- 
book,  six  pocket  knives,  a dark  lantern,  a 
file  and  a rubber  tube  loaded  so  as  to  make 
a good  slug  shot.  Corcoran  had  a loaded 
revolver  and  a box  of  cartridges,  two  pocket 
knives,  a pair  of  new  eyeglasses  and  other 
things.  Wilson  had  a small  hand  bag,  in 
which  was  a number  of  articles  such  as  are 
found  in  a jewelry  store.  In  a burlap  bag 
which  the  thieves  carried  were  found  about 
20  pieces  of  silverware.  The  men  claimed 
that  they  found  the  goods  secreted  in  a 
piece  of  woods  near  the  city,  but  as  the  list 
of  articles  contained  some  Easthampton 
souvenir  spoons  the  police  telephoned  to 
that  town  and  R.  A.  McAlpine  came  down 
and  identified  the  property.  1 he  men  were 
held  for  appearance  before  the  Grand  Jury. 


Pittsburgh. 

Maurice  Baer  has  gone  to  Cleveland,  O., 
for  a visit. 

William  Justice  has  retired  from  the  jew- 
elry business. 

B.  Jenney,  Jr.,  has  opened  a store,  on 
Perrysville  Ave.,  Allegheny. 

J.  W.  McKean,  of  Charleroi,  has  opened 
a new  store  in  Morgantown,  W.  Va. 

W.  R.  Reinhardt,  traveler  for  Grafner 
Bros.,  has  returned  from  an  eastern  trip. 

Albert  Dentzer,  formerly  with  Heckel, 
Bieler  & Co.,  is  now  with  J.  M.  Shaefer  & 
Co. 

G.  Boss,  of  McKee’s  Rocks,  is  very  ill  at 
his  home  with  a slim  chance  for  re- 
covery. 

John  Z.  Graham,  a former  oculist  of  this 
city,  and  well  known  in  Knights  of  Pythias 
circles,  died  on  Tuesday  night,  Nov.  6tb 
at  Bunker  Hill,  111.,  from  hemorrhage  of 
the  lungs. 

Jewelers  who  visited  Pittsburgh  last 
week  and  who  were  present  at  the  new 
Carnegie  Hall  festivities  were:  Loy  Hanna, 
New  Castle;  T.  H.  Marshall,  Derry;  D.  L. 
Cleland,  Butler;  W.  F.  Brehm,  Rochester; 
J.  C.  Rhodes,  Homestead;  F.  E.  Leitzell, 
Scottdale;  S.  C.  Schuster,  Latrobe;  D.  F. 
Rosen,  McKeesport;  H.  Ulrich,  Etna;  A.  C. 
Grand,  Sharpsburg;  Mrs.  L.  C.  Brehm, 
West  Newton. 


Late  reports  of  the  fire  in  Springfield,  O., 
say  that  the  fire  did  not  reach  Margileth’s 
jewelry  store,  but  almost  everything  was 
carried  out.  A few  things  were  broken  and 
the  loss  is  about  $50. 


Nov.  ij,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


21 


Providence. 

All  communications  for  this  column^  addressed  to 
P.  O.  Box  1093,  Providence,  R.I.,  will  receive  prompt 
attention. 

TRADE  CONDITIONS. 

There  is  a somewhat  brighter  aspect  to 
trade  than  there  has  been  for  the  past  few 
weeks.  This  is  due  to  the  receipt  of  the 
initial  holiday  orders.  These  are  small, 
but  this  is  a characteristic  of  the  holiday 
trade  and  it  is  expected  that  in  the  aggre- 
gate it  will  surpass  that  of  several  seasons 
past.  There  are  few  good  men  idle  and 
but  little  doubts  as  to  a good  business  the 
remainder  of  this  Fall  and  next  Spring. 
No  especial  rush  is  expected,  but  a fair 
steady  business. 


Henry  W.  Steere,  of  Arnold  & Steere, 
has  gone  on  a three  weeks’  trip  through  the 
Middle  States. 

Ernest  Campbell,  of  the  Campbell-Met- 
calf  Silver  Co.,  has  returned  from  his 
honeymoon  trip. 

L.  A.  Willemin,  a well  known  designer, 
tool  maker  and  engraver,  of  this  city, 
died  here  the  past  week. 

The  estate  of  the  late  Thomas  W.  Gorton 
is  being  settled  up  and  the  business  wil^ 
probably  be  discontinued. 

Arthur  Henius,  local  manager  for  Bruhl 
Bros.  & Co  , has  recently  returned  from 
Paris,  where  he  has  been  upon  a business 
trip  for  that  firm. 

Stephen  C.  Howard,  of  the  Howard  Ster- 
ling Co.,  and  wife  have  rented  a suite  in 
i8th  St.  New  York,  which  they  will  occupy 
during  the  Winter. 

The  regular  monthly  meeting  of  the 
directors  of  the  Manufacturing  Jewelers’ 
Board  of  Trade  will  be  held  in  the  rooms  of 
the  Board  the  i6lhinst. 

Since  moving  into  their  new  factory  at  59 
Page  St.,  the  E.  H.  Reynolds  Co.  have  en- 
joyed a largely  increasing  business  ann 
have  greatly  enlarged  and  improved  their 
new  quarters. 

Col.  C.  H.  Osgood,  of  H.  A.  O.sgood  & 
Son,  Lewiston  Me.,  William  Ferguson, 
Ferguson  & Page,  New  Brunswick,  and  H. 
Weber,  Boston,  were  among  the  visitors 
noted  the  past  week. 

The  recent  financial  trouble  of  the  Anchor 
Pearl  Co.  has  been  fully  settled.  At  the 
time  the  attachment  was  made,  it  is  stated, 
several  of  the  gentlemen  connected  with 
the  company  were  absent  from  the  city. 

Among  the  busiest  concerns  at  present  in 
this  vicinity  on  new  goods  are  George  F. 
Greene  & Co.  Their  latest  is  the  Parish 
Society  combination  sets,  while  their  hard 
enamel  work  is  very  pretty  and  catchy. 


Andrew  W.  McCue,  for  the  past  16  years 
with  the  Gorham  Mfg.  Co.  has  opened  a 
shop  at  no  Richmond  St.,  where  he  is  pre- 
pared to  do  embossing,  designing,  modeling, 
chasing,  saw  piercing  and  similar  work. 

A pretty  W’edding  occurred  last  Thursday 
evening  at  21  Barnes  St.,  the  residence  of 
the  bride’s  parents,  when  Miss  Bertha 
Balch  Kelly  was  united  in  marriage  to  Will- 
iam Owen  Hutchins,  manufacturing  jew- 
eler. 

George  L.  Vose,  for  several  years  a mem- 
ber of  the  Common  Council  from  the  Eighth 
ward  of  this  city,  declined  a renomination 
at  the  recent  caucus  of  the  Republicans  on 
account  of  removal  from  the  city  to  Edge- 
wood. 

Philip  H.  Rose,  Erving  J.  Knight  and 
Eugene  F.  Bown  have  taken  out  papers  of 
incorporation  as  the  American  Loan  Co., 
with  a capital  stock  of  $100,000,  to  carry  on 
a loan  business,  together  with  a general 
retail  jewelry,  watch  and  diamond  busi- 
ness. 

The  little  retail  jewelry  store  of  Marcus 
Reiness,  ii  Olney  St.,  was  entered  Monday 
forenoon  last  and  36  solid  gold  rings,  three 
silver  and  one  lady’s  gold  watch  taken. 
At  10.30  o’clock  Mr.  Reiness  went  out  to 
breakfast  and  when  he  returned  half  an 
hour  later  he  found  that  a tray  containing 
the  above  articles  was  missing.  It  is  sup- 
posed that  an  entrance  was  effected  by  the 
means  of  a faPe  key,  as  the  doors  and 
windows  (showed  no  signs  of  havring  been 
tampered  with. 

The  Providence  and  Attleboro  creditors 
of  Kaspar  & Barnes,  Chicago,  have  ac- 
cepted the  proposition  made  by  them  to  pay 
in  full  on  two  years’  time  notes.  This 
proposition  is  that  all  claims  for  $200  or  less 
shall  be  paid  in  full  in  cash  on  or  before 
January  15,  1896,  while  all  claims  for  more 
than  $200  shall  be  extension  notes  of  two 
years.  The  business  will  go  on  under  the 
assignee  pending  a settlement.  Most  of  the 
creditors  of  this  city  and  the  Attleboros  are 
within  the  $200  limit,  the  aggregate  being 
less  than  $3,000. 


The  Attleboros. 

TRADE  PROSPECTS. 

Business  in  this  vicinity  is  good.  One 
manufacturer  states  the  case  thus;  “ The 
demand  for  strictly  high  priced  goods  has 
fallen  off,  but  there  is  a steady  demand  in 
good  sized  orders  for  cheap  goods.”  Cheap 
goods  do  not  mean,  however,  the  quality  it 
once  did.  Improved  machinery  and 
methods  have  made  even  the  cheapest 
quality  desirable.  Wages  were  cut  down 
slightly  during  the  hard  times,  and  they 
have  not  been  put  back  to  where  they  were. 


on  account  of  this  demand  for  cheap  goods, 
which  do  not  require  the  most  skilled  labor. 

The  shops  in  Plainville  are  doing  a good 
business  compared  to  last  year,  and  the 
outlook  indicates  a good  season. 

R J.  Marsh,  son  of  Charles  A.  Marsh,  is 
making  his  maiden  trip  to  the  western  trade 
in  t’  e interests  of  C.  A.  Marsh  & Co. 

Leo  A.  Heilborn  and  wife  are  visiting  the 
Atlanta  Exposition.  They  will  visit  several 
southern  cities  before  returning  home. 

Clifton  King,  of  G.  D.  King  & Son,  has 
invented  a new  machine  which  is  expected 
to  prove  useful  and  profitable  to  manufac- 
turing jewelers. 

James  F.  Leary,  formerly  one  of  the  Co- 
operative Manufacturing  Jewelers  of  North 
Attleboro,  is  at  present  connected  with 
George  K.  Webster. 

John  E.  Doran,  a young  jeweler,  has  been 
appointed  postmaster  at  Attleboro  Falls,  to 
succeed  J.  B.  Parsons,  who  has  held  the 
office  for  a dozen  years  or  more. 

At  a special  meeting  of  the  citizens  of 
North  Attleboro  held  on  Wednesday  it  was 
voted  not  to  change  the  name  of  the  town. 
The  vote  stood  : No.  295  ; yes,  254. 


THE 

Goldstein  Engraving  Co. 

1 Maiden  Lane, 

Cor.  Broadway,  New  York. 

ENGRAVING. 

Lettering,  Monograms. 

ETCHING. 

Views  of  Buildings,  Portraits,  etc., 
on  Souvenir  Spoons  and  all  Silver 
Wares. 


PHOTO  = MINIATURE  PORTRAITS 
on  WATCHES  and  BROOCHES. 


FOR  THK  TRADE, 

JACOT  & 50N, 

Importers  and  Manufacturers  of 

riusical  Boxes, 

DECKER  BUILDING. 

Union  Square,  New  York. 

Jules  jLirgensen, 

. OF  COPENHAGEN. 

The  reputation  these  watches  have  maintained  /or 
Fifty  Vea.rN  has  never  been  equalled,,  being  made 
on  strictly  scientific  principles  and  no  expense  spared  to 
give  the  Uest  results  in  mechanism  and  timekeeping 
qualities.  SOLE  AGENTS. 

i0&ii 

NO.  22  MAIDEN  LANE. 


CANE  HEADS, 
UMBRELLA  MOUNTINGS 
WE  MAKE  PENCIL-CASES, 
WATCH-CASES, 
rrS=  ( WATCH-CROWNS, 

\ THIMBLES, 

STOCK  FOR  ' SPECTACLE  and 

EYE-CLASS  BOWS, 

I DIAMOND  MOUNTINGS, 

^ &C.,  &C.,  Ac. 


Established  1849.  Incorporated  1890. 

J.  BRIGGS  & SONS  GO., 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

Gold  and  Silver  Plate  and  Seamless  Wire, 

65  CLIFFORD  STREET,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  1. 


22 


THF  JEWELFRS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


rpjivelinj 


Traveling  repreientatlvea  may 
oooatder  these  oolomna  open  for 
the  poblioatioD  of  any  news  or 
times  of  interest  regarding  ibem> 
selves  or  their  oonfreres. 


A’ 


MONO  the  travel- 
in  g salesmen 
who  called  on  Daven- 
port, la.,  jewelers  la<t 
week  were  : Fred.  H. 
England,  Koch,  Drey- 
fus & Co.;  Charles 
Byron,  Whiting  Mfg. 
Co.;  Steve  H.  Bridges,  H.  F.  Hahn  & 
Co.;  Louis  Hirsch,  Lissauer  & Co.;  M. 
Hoefer,  M.  A.  Mead  & Co.;  A.  Marschuetz, 
Spencer  Optical  Mfg.  Co.;  S.  K.  Jones, 
Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co.,  and  T.  H.  Pope, 
for  Frank  W.  Smith. 

Indianapolis  jewelers  received  calls  from 
the  following  representatives  last  week  ; I. 
Price,  Henry  E.  Oppenheimer  & Co.;  Geo. 
C.  Booth,  Hutchison  & Huestis  ; J.  Roths- 
child, for  I.  M.  Berinstein  ; Wm.  W.  Mid- 
dlebrook,  B.  A.  Ballou  & Co.;  H.  D.  Mix, 
Wightman  & Hough  Co.;  Monroe  Engels- 
man,  Louis  Weil  & Co.;  Sol  Kaiser,  Louis 
Strasburger’s  Son  & Co.;  A.  H.  Oakley, 
Thornton  Bros.;  Millard  Veit,  Marx, 
Veit  & Co.,  and  representatives  of  T. 
Quayle  & Co.  and  S.  & A.  Borgzinner. 

The  following  traveling  salesmen  passed 
through  Detroit,  last  week:  Joseph  Becker, 
Jos.  Fahys  & Co.;  Mr.  Moorhead,  R.  L. 
Moorhead  & Co.;  A.  D.  Engelsman,  Good- 
friend  Brothers;  W.  A.  Weichman,  Wood  & 
Hughes;  Mr.  Knapp,  Smith  & Knapp;  C. 
W.  Cary,  J.  B.  & S.  M.  Knowles  Co.;  W.  C. 
Coombs,  Edward  F.  Sanford  & Co.;  Alfred 
Varian,  Dennison  Mfg.  Co.;  J.  N.  Beckwith, 
Jos.  H.  Fink  & Co.;  W.  H.  Harrison, 
Harrison  & Groeshel ; O.  C.  Lane,  Reed  & 
Barton;  E.  Todd,  Jr.,  Ed.  Todd  & Co.;  Mr. 
Parker,  Osmun-Parker  Mfg.  Co.;  Mr.  Ken- 
nion,  H.  D.  Merritt  & Co.,  and  a represen- 
tative of  H.  Ludwig  Co. 

Eastern  jobbers  and  manufacturers  repre- 
sented in  the  Twin  Cities  the  past  week 
were  ; F.  H.  Noble  & Co.,  by  H.  C.  Van 
Pelt;  E.  Ira  Richards  & Co.,  by  S.  W. 
Abbey;  S.  & B.  Lederer,  by  G.  Rodenber^; 
Illinios  Watch  Case  Co.,  by  Ed.  A.  Man- 
heimer  ; I.  M.  Berinstein,  by  J.  Rothchild  ; 
O.  W.  Bullock  & Co.,  by  W.  A.  Peck ; 
Spencer  Optical  Mfg.  Co.,  by  Mr.  Huteson  ; 
C.  A.  Marsh  & Co.,  by  R.  John  Marsh  ; 
Foster  & Bailey,  by  Mr.  Limbach  ; Wm. 
Rogers  Mfg.  Co.,  by  A.  H.  Clinger  ; Provi- 
dence Stock  Co.,  by  M.  L.  Jacoby  ; Simpson, 
Hall,  Miller  & Co.,  by  W.  F.  Adams. 

Among  the  travelers  in  Kansas  City, 
Mo.,  last  week  were:  M.  Weindig,  Fahys 
Watch  Case  Co.;  Chas.  Altschul,  Oppen- 
heimer Bros.  & Veith;  S.  Rodenberg,  S.  & B. 
Lederer;  M.  L.  Jacoby,  Providence  Stock 
Co.;  D.  A-  Wilkins,  Ostby  & Barton  Co,; 


De  Lancy  Stone,  Shafer  & Douglas;  Jno. 
Lunn,  Snow  & Westcott;  Mr.  Welmes,  St. 
Louis  Clock  & Silverware  Co.;  F.  F.  Gib- 
son for  Wm.  Kinscherf;  James  Morris, 
Wendell  Mfg.  Co.;  Geo.  S.  Pollitz,  Rice  & 
Hochster;  J.  Phail,  Edward  Todd  & Co. 

The  commercial  travelers  of  this  city  are 
looking  forward  to  next  Saturday  night 
with  pleasurable  anticipations,  for  it  is  on 
that  evening  that  their  first  banquet  will  be 
held,  at  Cooley’s  Hotel.  The  banquet  will 
be  enlivened  by  music,  and  among  the 
speakers  will  be  Senator  Irwin,  Mayor 
Long,  Rev.  Drs.  Moxom  and  Trask,  E.  H, 
Lathrop  and  C.  C.  Spellman.  The  club 
rooms  will  be  open  from  6.30  to  8 for  the 
inspection  of  friends. 

Among  the  traveling  salesmen  who 
called  on  Cleveland,  O.,  houses  the  last  two 
weeks  are:  W.  F.  Clark,  W.  F.  Cory  & 
Bro.;  Lou  Fay,  Kirby,  Mowry  & Co.;  Wm. 
G.  Gough,  Carter,  Sloan  & Co.;  Mr. 
Wheeler,  Dominick  & Haff;  Mr.  Knapp, 
Smith  & Knapp;  R.  E.  Wilcox,  Wilcox  & 
Evertsen  and  representing  Rogers,  Smith  & 
Co.;  W.  A.  Lamb,  Geo.  H.  Fuller  & Son  ; 
Mr.  Bliss.  Enos  Richardson  & Co.;  D.  C. 
Dodd,  Jr.;  C.  F.  Ketcham,  Riker  Bros.; 
Mr.  Lawton,  Dennison  Mfg.  Co.;  Mr. 
Morrow,  American  Watch  Case  Co.;  C.  P. 
Russell,  Chas.  N.  Swift  Mfg.  Co.;  Mr. 
Carter,  John  A.  Riley  & Sloan  Co.;  J.  H. 
Heiser,  H.  C.  Hardy  & Co.;  Mr.  Cook, 
J.  F.  Fradley  & Co.;  Mr.  Powers,  Powers 
& Mayer;  Mr.  Berry,  Larter,  Elcox  & Co.; 
Mr.  Fink,  Keller,  Ettinger  & Fink;  Mr. 
Tinker,  for  Wm.  B.  Durgin;  David  Kaiser, 
Lewis,  Kaiser  & Luthy;  Mr.  Cary,  J.  B.  & 
S.  M.  Knowles  Co.,  and  many  others.  Mrs. 
Aug.  Trenkman  was  also  a visitor.  As 
usual  she  showed  a very  handsome  line  of 
tortoise  shell  goods. 

Travelers  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  last  week 
were:  W.  W.  Middlebrook,  B.  A.  Ballou  & 
Co.;  N.  D.  Prentiss,  Ailing  & Co.;  Mr. 
Oakley,  Thornton  Bros.;  G.  Hofman, 
Ansonia  Clock  Co.;  Wm.  Bosselman,  T. 
Quayle  & Co.;  A.  A.  Greene,  A.  A.  Greene 
Co.;  A.  B.  Chace,  G.  W.  Cheever  & Co.; 
J.  G.  Fuller,  J.  G.  Fuller  & Co.;  E.  H. 
Rhoads,  Simons,  Bro.  & Co. ; Gus.  W. 
Strandberg,  E.  L.  Spencer  & Co.;  Wm. 
Rosenberger,  A.  Wallach  & Co.;  H.  C. 
Rowbotham,  J.  Muhr  & Bro.;  Mr.  Parker, 
Osmun-Parker  Mfg.  Co. ; I.  Fisher,  Kraus, 
Kragel  & Co. ; E.  S.  Shepherd,  R.  F.  Sim- 
mons & Co.;  A.  Kiersky,  Roeder&  Kiersky; 
Mr.  Stephenson,  J.  J.  Sommer  & Co.;  Mr. 
Tinker,  for  W.  B.  Durgin;  C.  F.  Duffy, 
Enos  Richardson  & Co.;  “ Hop,”  otherwise 
E.  T.  Hopkins  and  Thomas  H.  B.  Davies, 
two  well-known  tourists. 

The  following  traveling  representatives 
were  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  the  past  week  : 
Samuel  L.  Howland,  Eisenmann  Bros.;  W. 
H.  Tarlton,  Wightman  & Hough  Co.;  S. 
Blackinton,  W.  & S.  Blackinton  ; B.  Frank 
Davis,  Hipp.  Didisheim  & Bro.;  Frank  L. 
Wood,  Carter,  Sloan  & Co.;  Ben  Schloss, 
A.  Wallach  & Co.;  Harry  C.  Larter,  Larter, 
I Elcox  & Co.;  A.  H.  Jacot,  Jacot  ^ Son  ; A. 


Williams,  Geoffroy  & Co.;  Geo.  Hood,  Wm. 
B.  Kerr  & Co.;  B.  Griscom,  Bippart  & Co.; 
Chas.  Willemin,  T.  C.  Frothingham  &Co.; 
George  Osborne,  Wm.  Smith  & Co. ; Otto 
Wolff  and  Wm.  R.  Ailing,  Ailing  & Co.; 
Albert  Rose,  Durand  & Co. ; Steve  Kent, 
Wm.  H.  Ball  & Co.;  Mr.  Townley.  Ripley- 
Howland  Mfg.  Co  ; Edward  Horten,  J.  B. 
Bowden  & Co.;  E.  Unter,  Chas.  Keller  & 
Co.;  Chas.  Duffy,  Enos  Richardson  & Co.; 
Robt.  Schley,  Williamson  & Co. 

Traveling  men  in  Boston,  Mass.,  the  past 
week  included:  George  B.  Evans,  Trenton 
Watch  Co.;  W.  G.  Clark,  W.  G.  Clark  & 
Co.;  Mr.  Henderson,  Enos  Richardson  & 
Co.;  A.  Kaufman,  Bruhl  Bros.  & Co.;  Fred 
Clarkson,  Snow  & Westcott;  Thomas  L. 
Kelly,  J.  Muhr  & Bro.;  William  H.  Jones, 
Jones  & Woodland;  W.  H.  Miller,  Seth 
Thomas  Clock  Co.;  Arthur  Bogani,  L.  H. 
Keller  & Co.;  Mr.  Stern,  Hammel,  Rig- 
lander  & Co.;  D.  E.  Mowry,  Kirby,  Mowry 
& Co.;  L.  G.  Call,  Simpson,  Hall,  Miller  & 
Co.;  George  Whiting,  S.  E.  Fisher  & Co.; 
T.  G.  Frothingham;  . D.  Pettengill, 
Derby  Silver  Co.;  F.  H.  Sadler;  A.  A. 
Greene;  Benj.  Levy,  H.  H.  Kayton&Co. ; 
Henry  G.  Thresher,  Waite,  Thresher  Co.; 
Ray  Randall,  Riley,  French  & Heffron; 
Charles  S.  Isabel,  L.  Strasburger’s  Son  & 
Co.;  M.  Adler;  W.  D.  Elcox,  Larter,  Elcox 
& Co.;  C.  E.  Hancock,  Hancock,  Becker  & 
Co.;  Everett  Bliss,  Bliss  Bros. ;J.  Bernstein; 
W.  S.  Metcalf,  Plainville  Stock  Co.;  A.  C. 
Van  Houten,  for  C.  Sidney  Smith;  A.  A. 
Wood,  Howard  Sterling  Co. ; B.  W.  Bugbee, 
Southbridge  Optical  Co. 

E.  W.  Carlton,  traveler  for  E.  B.  Floyd 
& Co.,  Boston,  Mass.,  has  been  ill  with 
pneumonia  for  upward  of  a week. 

William  S.  Robinson,  formerly  on  the 
road  for  the  Ripley- Howland  Mfg.  Co., 
Boston,  Mass.,  who  has  been  on  the  sick 
list  several jmonths,  is  now  much  improved 
in  health,  and  recently  went  to  Colorado 
Springs,  where  he  contemplates  starting  a 
retail  jewelry  business. 

J ewelry  represen tati  ves  favoring  Syracuse 
houses  with  a call  the  past  week  Included: 
H.  S.  Hempel,  for  Frank  H.  LaPierre; 
Philip  C.  Kelly,  Dazian  & Burchell  Bros.; 
W.  M.  Swayze,  Oneida  Silverware  Mfg.  Co.; 
E.  W.  Dellar,  William  S.  Hicks’  Sons;  A.  L. 
Halstead,  Barbour  Silver  Co.;  James  Pan- 
ton, Mabie,  Todd  & Bard;  Mr.  Smith, 
S.  Cottle  Co.;  C.  W.  Marple,  Acme  Silver 
Plate  Co.;  E.  H.  Cox,  Sussfeld,  Lorsch  & 
Co  ; T.  S.  Richter,  Bruhl  Bros.  & Co.; 
Louis  A.  Scheuch,  Jeannot  & Shiebler; 
Frank  W.  Harmon,  M.  B.  Bryant  & Co.; 
L.  H.  Bosworth,  Potter  & -Buffinton;  E.  M. 
Bracher,  E.  M.  Biacher  & Co.;  E.  C.  Ellis, 
J.  J.  Sommers  & Co.;  Jos.  T.  Brennan,  Buf- 
falo Watch  Co.;  Mr.  Kramer,  John  T. 
Mauran  Mfg.  Co.;  H.  E.  Kingman,  Arnold 
& Steere;  J.  R.  Goodwin,  Carter,  Sloan  & 
Co.;  H.  H.  Dillingham,  N.  H.  White  &Co. ; 
Robert  Welch,  Welch  & Miller;  E.  Horton, 
J.  B.  Bowden  & Co.;  Frank  H.  Dana,  G.  E. 
Luther  & Co. ; W.  R.  Cobb,  W.  R. 
Cobb  & Co.;  Max  Nathan;  My.  Stearqs, 
Roy  Watch  Case  Co, 


Nov.  13.  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


23 


Thejewelers’ Circular 

AND 

HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


PUBLISHED  EVERY  WEDNESDAY  BY 

THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB’G  CO., 

189  Broadway,  New  York  City. 


A JOURNAL  DEVOTED  TO  THE  INTERESTS  OF 
JEWELERS.  WATCHMAKERSu.  SILVERSMITHS, 
ELECTRO-PLATE  MANUFACTURERS^,  AND  ALL 
ENGAGED  IN  KINDRED  BRANCHES  OF  INDUSTRY. 


Our  Editorial  columns  wiU  contain  our  own  opinions 
only,  and  we  shall  present  in  other  columns  only  what 
we  consider  of  interest  or  value  to  our  readers  Adver- 
tising matter  will  not  be  printed  as  news. 

Aiwertising  rates  in  The  Circular  are  lower, 
considering  the  number  of  tradesmen  reached  by  its 
large  circulation,  than  in  any  other  jewelry  journaL 
Notices  of  changes  in  standing  advertisements 
must  be  received  one  week  in  advance;  new  matter 
can  be  received  up  to  Monday. 


INFORMATION  FOR  SUBSCRIBERS. 


Terms  of  Subscription,  Postage  Prepaid. 

PER  ANNUM. 

United  States  and  Canada,  - • - $2.00 

Foreign  Countries  in  Postal  Union,  • *3.00 

Single  Copies, .10 

New  subscribers  can  commence  at  any  time. 

Payments  for  The  Circular  when  sent  by  mail, 
should  be  made  in  a Post-Office  Money  Order,  Bank 
Check  or  Draft,  or  an  Express  Money  Order  or  Ro- 
istered Letter.  All  postmasters  are  required  to  regis- 
ter letters  whenever  requested  to  do  so. 

Pay  money  only  to  authorized  coUectors  having 
proper  credentials.  ' 

Returning  your  paper  will  not  enable  us  to  discon- 
tinue it,  as  we  cannot  find  your  name  on  our  books 
unless  your  address  is  given. 

In  changing  address  always  give  the  old  as  well  as 
the  new  one.  Your  name  cannot  be  found  on  our 
books  unless  this  is  done. 

We  will  continue  to  send  papers  until  there  is  a 
specific  order  to  stop,  in  connection  with  which  all 
arrearages  must  be  paid ; but  such  an  order  can  be 
given  at  any  time,  to  take  effect  at  or  after  the  ex- 
piration of  the  subscription.  All  such  orders  will  be 
promptly  acknowledged  by  mail. 

The  Courts  have  decided  that  all  subscribers  to 
Journals  are  responsible  until  arrearages  are  paid  in 
full  and  an  order  to  discontinue  has  b^n  received  by 
the  publisher. 


Member  of  the 

American  Trade  Press 

Association. 

Yol.  XXXI. 

Nov.  13.  1895. 

No.  15. 

Every  line  of  reading  matter  in  The 
Jewelers’  Circular,  ivtth  the  exception  of 
the  few  brief  extracts  frotn  exchanges 
always  properly  credited,  is  written  ex- 
clusively for  this  journal.  Each  issue 
of  The  Jewelers’  Circular  is  copy- 
righted. 


FEATURES  OF  THIS  NUMBER. 


Page  39 — Workshop  Notes. 

Page  35 — Catalogues  of  the  Season. 

Page  22 — Our  Traveling  Representatives. 

Page  37 — Art  Stationery  for  Jewelers. 

Page  45 — The  Connoisseur  — Rambler’s 
Notes. 

Page  10— Fall  Fashions  in  Jewelry  and 
Silverware. 

Page  4t — Optical  Department — New  Opti- 
cal Devices. 

Frontispiece — Characteristic  French  Art 
Work  i.n  Metals. 

Page  42 — Quarter-Centennial  Ceremonies 
ON  THE  Death  of  Ferdinand  Adolph 
Lange. 


' I 'HAT  history  repeats  itself  is  again 

* proven  by  the  revival  of  the  bangle, 
though  the  new  bangle  is  somewhat  differ- 
ent from  the  old.  It  is  now  a flexible 
affair,  comfortable  to  the  arm,  unlike  in 
this  respect  the  bangle  of  a few  years  ago. 

^UCH  weddings  as  the  Marlborough- 
Vanderbilt  and  Paget- Whitney  have 
a stimulating  effect  upon  all  the  higher 
branches  of  indnstry,  particularly  that  of 
the  jeweler.  It  is  true  that  perhaps  hut  a 
half  dozen  dealers  at  most  benefit  directly 
through  them,  but  the  whole  trade  profits 
by  the  examples  set  by  the  participants  of 
these  high  social  affairs.  It  is  a matter  for 
muiual  congratulation  among  the  jewelers 
that  works  of  the  precious  metals  still  form 
so  large  a part  of  the  gifts  on  these  occa- 
sions. Were  it  otherwise  the  fashion  set 
would  be  disastrous  in  its  effect  upon  the 
jewelry  industry  generally. 


■l^^HILE  the  profitableness  of  the  pub- 
* * lishing  of  a catalogue  is  an  open 
question,  bearing  in  mind  not  only  the 
direct  pecuniary  expenditure  for  printing, 
engraving,  distributing,  etc.,  and  the  energy 
and  time  spent  in  its  production,  but  also 
the  indirect  loss  due  to  the  prejudice  against 
the  practice  of  catalogue  publishing  existing 
in  the  minds  of  numerous  members  of  the 
retail  trade,  which  loss  is  not  incon- 
siderable, the  fact  remains  that  many  re- 
markable volumes  are  produced  in  this  class 
of  commercial  literature.  In  the  depart- 
ment of  The  Circular  entitled  “ Cata- 
logues of  the  Season,”  some  admirable 
specimens  are  described  at  length. 


'^RADE,  according  to 
Trade  1 general  reports. 

Conditions.  opened  quiet  for  the 
month,  with  no  seem- 
ing reason,  unless  it  be  the  proneness  of 
some  of  the  smaller  retailers  to  delay  mak- 
ing their  selections  until  the  last  moment 
and  trust  to  pot  luck  on  broken  lines  in 
jobbers’  hands.  This  pernicious  habit  has 
no  sufficient  cause  for  its  being,  and  inevit- 
ably results  in  untold  inconveniences  to 
the  jobber  and  annoyance  to  the  retailer 
who  fails  to  secure  as  good  selections  as  he 
might,  had  he  bought  while  wholesale 
stocks  were  replete  with  the  latest  fashions. 
Crops  throughout  the  west  are  large  and 
are  moving  freely  with  the  certainty  of  a 
largely  increased  amount  of  money  in  the 
hands  of  consumers.  Every  indication 
points  to  good  sales  by  retailers 
the  country  over,  with  every  probability 
of  a rush  on  the  jobbing  houses  the  latter 
part  of  the  month,  a crush  in  December, 
and  a continued  good  demand  through 
January  and  February,  owing  to  retail 
stocks  being  depleted  by  the  anticipated 
holiday  business. 


O.  E Curtis  & Bro.,  Decatur,  111.,  have 
added  a new  glass  front  to  their  store,  also 
a china  department  and  new  fixtures  of 
mahogany. 


Letters  to  the  Editor. 


A VOTE  OF  THANKS  TO  THE  JEWELERS’ 
CIRCULAR. 

COMMERCIAL  TRAVELERS’  CLUB. 

Springfield,  Mass.,  Nov.  8,  1895. 
Editor  ^The  Jewelers’  Circular  : 

At  a meeting  of  the  above  club  a vote  of 
thanks  was  passed  to  the  publishers  of  The 
Jewelers’  Circular  for  their  kindness  in 
presenting  us  with  a copy  of  the  same  and 
also  for  the  binder.  Please  accept  the  same. 

Yours  respectfully, 

F.  S.  Jervis,  Sec. 


VIRGINIA  LIKELY  TO  ADOPT  SILVER  STAMPING 
LEGISLATION. 

Norfolk,  Va.,  Nov.  7,  1895. 
Editor  ^The  Jewelers’  Circular  : 
Referring  to  your  letter  of  July  22,  1895, 
concerning  an  Act  to  regulate  the  sale  of 
goods  marked  sterling,  etc.  Our  election 
took  place  the  5th  inst.,  and  Legislature  con- 
venes soon.  We  have  spoken  to  both  reper- 
sentatives,  who  take  to  the  Act  kindly  and  ex- 
press the  opinion  that  the  bill  can  be  passed 
easily.  We  will  use  our  efforts  to  have  it 
done.  We  think  every  honest  dealer  would 
like  to  have  such  a bill  enacted. 

Yours  truly, 

C.  F.  Greenwood  & Bro. 


PROSPECTS  FOR  SILVER  STAMPING  LEGIS- 
LATION IN  MARYLAND. 

Baltimore,  Md.,  Nov.  3,  1895. 
Editor  i^The  Jewelers’  Circular: 

Your  petition  to  the  Legislature  in  refer- 
ence to  a silver  stamping  bill  we  have  had 
signed  and  will  forward  in  proper  time 
as  you  have  directed. 

The  Legislature  of  Maryland  passed  an 
Act,  creating  the  Office  of  Assayer  of  Silver 
Plate,  in  February,  1814.  All  silver  to  be 
assayed,  and  marked  by  the  Assayer,  be- 
fore being  offered  for  sale;  the  Mayor  and 
City  Council  of  Baltimore  to  appoint  the 
Assayer,  and  the  Law  to  go  into  effect  on 
the  ist  of  August. 

In  January  1830,  a petition  from  Samuel 
Kirk  and  others,  praying  for  a modification 
of  the  Law,  was  presented,  and  a bill  in- 
troduced and  passed,  authorizing  the  sale 
of  silver  without  the  stamp  of  the  Assayer, 
provided  that  the  silver  be  stamped  with 
the  maker's  name,  and  the  fineness  of  the 
silver,  and  if  the  said  silver  should  not  be 
of  the  quality  marked  on  it,  the  said  silver 
to  be  defaced  by  the  assayer. 

Thomas  Warner  was  Assayer  from  1814 
to  1824,  and  perhaps  longer.  Atkinson 
Leroy  succeeded  him.  Warner  was  a sil- 
versmith. Leroy’s  occupation  is  unknown. 

The  people  objecting  to  paying  the 
Assayer’s  charges  the  office  died  out,  but  we 
have  uniformly  continued  to  stamp  our 
name  and  the  quality  alongside  of  it^from 
that  day  to  this,  and  do  so  now. 

Respectfully, 

g,  Kirk  & Son, 


M 


tHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  iS95‘ 


.yVxfxxfyxfx xV xfxxfxx'fx xtxxfxxfxxfx  X 


^ •Hli 


NO! 


>^[ IV 

^'x|vyjxy^vyix  y|vxj>,y{>,yix  yivyixyixy|x ’■j' 


T 


HE  controversy  which  has  for  some  time  been 
between  William  B*  Kerr  & Co*  and  the  late  C 
relative  to  the  right  to  use  on  pocket  boxes^ 
picture  of  the  Nymph  and  Satyr  has  finally  terminated  in  the  issue  of  a pat 
W illiam  B*  Kerr  & Co*  The  latter  determine  to  assert  their  rights  to  priority  not 
so  much  because  they  desire  to  patent  their  production  as  to  establish  their 
claim  to  the  exclusive  use  of  the  design*  They  also  intend  to  pro- 
tect their  rights  upon  all  their  other  designs  whether  copy- 
righted or  patented* 


original  and  entirely  1 
productions  will  be  found  1 


WM.  B.  KE 


860  BROADWAY,  N.  Y. 


Nov.  13. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


25 


ig  in  the  patent  office^ 
:e  W*  Sedgwick^ 
;uereau^s 


finish^ 


WE  take  advantage  of  this 
occasion  to  call  the  at- 
tention of  the  trade  to 
the  fact  that  we  are  now  manu- 
facturing and  showing  a line  of 

LEATHER  GOODS 

comprising  card  cases^  pocket  books^  port- 
folios^ desk-pads;  etc^^  acknowledged  to  be  of 
the  finest  grade  of  leather  obtainable  as  to  quality  and 
with 


TERLINQ  SILVER  MOUNTINGS  IN  HIGH  RELIEF, 

i in  design  ♦ The  same  distinctive  artistic  features  that  characterize  our  silver 
inguish  our  entire  line  of  leather  goods* 


iR  & e©., 

FACTORY,  NEWARK,  N.  J. 


26 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  189^. 


New  York  Notes. 

§.  Lltuski  & Son  have  filed  a judgment 
for  $84.81  against  A.  L.  Toole. 

A judgment  for  $1,858.85  has  been  entered 
against  Adolph  Bechtold  by  E.  A.  Henle. 

A judgment  for  $5,416.83  has  been  en 
tered  against  Gyula  De  Fes  etics  by  S 
Watson. 

A judgment  against  Wolf  and  Nathan 
Kaplan  for  $2,033.66  has  been  filed  by  E. 
Bossut  and  others. 

The  United  States  Diamond  Cutting  and 
Polishing  Co.  have  entered  a judgment  for 
$1,030.08  against  E.  E.  Kipling. 

The  judgment  of  $tgo.8i  entered  by  Mrs. 
T.  Lynch  April  6th  against  Isidore  Roth- 
stein,  was  satisfied  last  week. 

The  judgment  for  $54  70  entered  by  the 
Bradley  & Hubbard  Mfg.  Co.  on  Oct.  2d, 
against  Thomas  O'Shea,  was  satisfied  last 
week. 

The  police  of  this  city  have  been  asked 
to  look  for  Arthur  Levy,  the  missing  jew- 
eler of  Elizabeth  N.  J.  against  whom  three 
indictments  for  larceny  have  been  found. 

The  Rockford  Watch  Co.,  Thursday,  in 
the  City  Court  before  Judge  'Van  Wyck, 
recovered  a judgment  for  $120  against 
Ephraim  Grin.^pan  for  watches  sold  several 
years  ago. 

The  Brooklyn  police  are  looking  for  the 
thief  who  recently  entered  Frank  Nugent's 
jewelry  store,  199  N.  8th  St.,  through  a rear 
window  and  stole  jewelry  wo  th  $50  and 
$8  in  cash. 

A branch  of  the  business  of  John  Wells, 
silversmith  and  jeweler,  London,  England, 
has  been  opened  at  384  Fifth  Ave.  The 
branch  store,  formerly  at  2 Travers  Block, 
Newport,  R.  L,  has  been  discontinued. 

Miss  Julia  Platt,  of  ii  W.  64th  St  , was 
arrested  Saturday  on  aw’arrant  procured  by 
Thomas  Kirkpatrick,  jew'eler,  22d  St.  and 
Broadway,  who  charged  her  with  obtaining 
a $200  ring  on  credit  several  years  ag  >, 
which  she  never  returned  or  paid  for. 
Magistrate  Mott,  in  the  Yorkville  Police 
Court,  held  her  in  $1,000  bail,  which  she 
furnished. 

Recorder  Goff,  in  Part  I of  General  Ses- 
sions, Wednesday  sentenced  Max  Fried- 
lander  to  four  years  and  ten  months  in  State 
prison  for  grand  larceny.  Friedlander  is 
the  man  who  recently  entered  the  jewelry 
store  of  Joseph  Brunner’s  Sons,  176  Broad- 
way, and  stole  a diamond  pin  valued  at  $30 
from  a tray  He  was  caught  by  a clerk  em- 
ployed in  the  store. 

A long  article  giving  the  life  history  of 
Edmund  Heinecke,  watchmaker  and  jeweler 
of  W.  125th  St.,  was  published  in  the  New 
York  Herald,  Saturday.  Heinecke,  it  said, 
is  his  assumed  name,  he  being  Count  Ed- 
mund Von  Larisch,  of  Ttiuringia,  Germany, 
who  fled  to  this  country  nearly  40  years 
ago,  after  killing  in  a combat  the  major  of 
the  regiment  in  which  he  w’as  lieutenant. 

M.  D.  Rothschild’s  entire  stock  of  colored 
stones  and  opals  and  a pearl  necklace  will 
be  sold  at  auction  Nov.  21st.  James  P. 


Silo,  auctoneer,  will  conduct  the  sale  at  his 
rooms,  43  Liberty  St.  The  goods  will  be 
on  exhibition  at  Mr.  Rothschild’s  office,  14 
Maiden  Lane,  Nov.  18th,  19th,  20th,  from 
10  to  12  A.M.  and  from  i to  3 p.m.  The  sale 
of  these  goods  closes  Mr.  Rothschild’s  con- 
nection with  the  precious  stone  trade. 

The  appeal  of  Freudenheim  & Abramson 
from  the  decision  of  the  General  Term  of 
the  City  Court  which  affirmed  a verdict 
directed  foi-  the  defendant  in  the  firm's  suit 
against  Julia  Raduziner,  was  argued  before 
the  General  Term  of  the  Supreme  Court, 
last  week,  and  decision  was  reserved. 
Freudenheim  & Abramson  sued  Mrs  Radu^ 
ziner  in  the  City  Court  to  recover  $729  for 
goods  sold. 

Judgment  against  the  following  Brooklyn 
pawnbrokers  have  been  entered  in  favor  of 
I.  Silverman;  Moses  Bruckheimer  for  $581,- 
04;  August  Behrens.  $171.04;  John  J.  Freel, 
$216  23,  and  $to2.2g:  Samuel  Goldstein, 

$253. 25, and  $102.20:  Joseph  Harris,  $75  and 
$105.29:  and  John  J.  Martin,  $153  and  $191.- 
79.  The  judgments,  as  previously  reported 
in  The  Circui.ar,  are  the  results  of  replevin 
suits  to  recover  watches  obtained  on  mem- 
orandum by  one  Newman,  who  pawned 
them  with  the  defendants. 

David  Keller,  of  Keller,  Ettinger  & Fink, 
has  succeeded  Benj.  Allen  as  the  represen- 
tative of  the  Chicago  Jewelers’  Association 
on  the  committee  which  will  endeavor  to 
draw  up  a memorandum  agreement  to  be 
recommenced  by  the  various  associations. 
The  other  members  are  O.  G.  Fessenden, 
of  H.  W.  'Wheeler  & Co.,  representing  the 
New  York  Jewelers'  Association,  and  Wm. 
A.  Copeland,  of  Martin,  Copeland  & Co., 
of  the  New  York  Jewelers'  Board  of 
Trade. 

The  wedding  of  Miss  Harriet  Phillips 
Beacham.  dauehter  of  Joseph  W.  Beacham, 
of  Rogers  & Brother,  to  Charles  Henry 
Adams,  son  of  George  W.  Adams,  cashier 
of  the  Seventh  National  Bank,  toi-'k  place 
last  night  at  the  home  of  the  bride’s  father, 
289  Clermont  Ave.,  Brooklyn  The  brides- 
maids were  the  Misses  Edna  Beacham  and 
Alice  Adams,  while  Miss  Bessie  Beacham 
was  a flower  girl.  The  ushers  were  J. 
Albert  Tuthill.  Jr.,  of  Montclair,  N.  J., 
Joseph  W.  Beacham,  Jr.,  and  John  D. 
Beacham  was  best  man. 

The  great  fire  which  last  week  gutted 
four  buildings  in  the  vicinity  of  Broadway 
and  Bleecker  St.,  destroyed  among  others 
the  premises  occupied  by  Hecht  & Co., 
manufacturers  of  fancy  goods,  at  the  south- 
east corner  of  Bleecker  St.  and  Broadway, 
and  those  of  J.  A.  Flomerfeldt  & Co.,  job- 
bers of  jewelry^  in  the  Manhattan  Savings 
Institution  building,  644  Broadway.  J.  A. 
Flomerfeldt  & Co.  have  opened  offices  in 
the  Lincoln  building,  i and  3 Union  Square. 
Their  loss  was  first  reported  as  $25  ,000,  but 
this  is  believed  to  be  somewhat  magnified. 
No  one  at  the  office  would  volunteer  any 
information  on  the  subject. 

Tiffany  & Co.  have  delivered  the  fuor 
fine  bronzes  selected  by  the  department  of 


Rifle  Practice  as  the  State’s  special  prizes 
for  marksmanship  in  the  National  Guard, 
annually  offered  for  competition  at  Creed- 
moor  by  the  regiments  and  battalions  of 
the  State  militia.  The  State  prize,  a 
massive  bronze  of  “El  Cid,”  goes  to  the 
23d  Regiment  of  Brooklyn,  as  does  also  the 
Second  Brigade  tropy,  the  bronze  “ David.” 
The  First  Brigade  prize,  “Peace  and  War,” 
goes  to  the  12th  Regiment,  New  York, 
while  the  Fourth  Brigade  prize,  a bronze 
entitled  “ Le  Cour  plus  haute  que  la 
Taille,”  was  won  by  the  13th  Separate 
Co.,  of  Jamestown,  N.  Y. 

Edward  A.  Freeman,  receiver  of  the  E. 
N.  Welch  Mfg.  Co.  in  Connecticut  and  an- 
cillary receiver  of  the  company’s  assets  in 
New  York,  applied  to  Judge  Lawrence,  in 
the  Supreme  Court,  Saturday  for  an  order 
authorizing  him  to  turn  over  all  moneys  or 
funds  in  his  hands  as  ancillary  receiver,  to 
himself  as  receiver  of  the  company  in 
Connecticut.  The  motion  was  granted. 
Mr.  Freeman  was  appointed  receiver  of  the 
E.  N.  Welch  Mfg.  Co.,  Oct.  13,  1893,  in  the 
suit  in  Connecticut  of  the  Bristol  Brass  & 
Clock  Co.,  and  was  appointed  ancillary 
receiver  of  the  company’s  property  in  New 
York,  Jan.  2,  1894,  in  the  action  brought 
by  Geo.  H.  Mitchell.  The  receiver  has  sold 
all  the  property  and  paid  all  the  debts  of 
the  company. 

Joseph  W.  Field,  Galveston,  Tex.,  made 
an  assignment  Saturday.  Field  was  a re- 
tail jeweler  at  2221  Market  St.,  that  city. 


STERN  PARENTAL  RESOLUTION. 

“ Father,”  said  Sammy,  “ the  teacher 
says  you  ought  to  take  me  to  an  optician  s. 
He  says  I’ve  got  astigmatism.” 

“ Got  what  ?” 

“ Astigmatism.” 

“ Well,  if  he  don’t  thrash  that  out  of  you,” 
roared  Mr.  Wipedunks,  “ I will  ! ’’—Chicago 
Tribune.  

WRONG  IN  THE  UPPER  STORY. 

Some  time  ago  a man  went  to  visit  a 
friend  who  was  an  inmate  of  a lunatic 
asylum.  After  a prolonged  chat  in  a 
humorous  if  not  edifying  vein,  the  visitor 
thought  it  about  time  to  go. 

“ Is  that  clock  right,  Jock?”  he  asked  of 
the  inmate. 

Jock  gazed  at  him  for  a minute  and  said; 

“ Mon,  dae  ye  think  it  wid  be  here  if  it 
was  richt?” — Du7idee  News. 


L.  A.  Jernigan,  jeweler,  Gainesville,  Fla.,, 
is  in  possession  of  a very  peculiar  freak  of 
nature,  a hen’s  egg  with  an  exact  represen- 
tation of  the  dial  of  an  average  sized  watch 
on  one  side.  The  egg  is  indented  on  that 
side,  and  the  twelve  Roman  figures  are 
raised  around  a circle.  Three  of  the  figures 
are  fairly  plain.  The  egg  was  laid  by  one 
of  his  own  hens.  The  only  way  Mr.  Jerni- 
gan can  account  for  the  peculiar  freak  is 
that  the  hen’s  nest  was  directly  opposite  an 
old  clock. 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


27 


Trade  Gossip. 

Bene,  Lindenberg  & Co.,  Cincinnati,  O., 
are  receiving  new  importations  of  Hun- 
garian and  Royal  Worcester  wares,  pur- 
chased by  Mr.  Bene  while  abroad  last  Sum- 
mer. 

The  factory  of  Jos.  Noterman  & Co., 
Cincinnati,  O.,  is  still  running  with  the  old 
hands  at  old  wages.  Mr.  Noterman  says  he 
has  cut  prices  on  all  goods,  but  the  wages 
of  the  men  have  never  been  cut. 

An  interesting  story  of  studs  is  told  by 
Baum  & Oppenheim,  41  and  43  Maiden 
Lane,  New  York,  in  their  advertisement  in 
this  issue  of  The  Circular.  They  are 
offering  the  trade  nicely  finished  solid  gold 
mountings  for  three  sizes  of  studs,  at  prices 
that  will  doubtless  cause  a large  demand 
for  these  goods. 

The  Spencer  Optical  Mfg.  Co.,  15  Maiden 
Lane,  New  York,  have  put  on  the  market  a 
combined  opera  glass  and  opera  glass  holder, 
so  constructed  that  the  proiier  focus  can  be 
obtained  by  turning  the  holder.  The  work- 
ing device  is  perfect,  the  handle  or  holder  is 
telescopic,  and  in  every  other  particular,  the 
novelty  will  meet  with  appreciation  from  all 
who  examine  it.  A good  demand  for  it  can 
easily  be  created. 

The  line  of  choice  papers  manufactured 
and  imported  by  the  Parsons  & Greene  Co., 
18  Murray  St.,  New  York,  comprises  400 
numbers  and  styles.  The  strong  point  of 
this  line  is  quality.  Without  question  it  is 


one  of  the  best  lines  of  writing  papers  for 
the  legitimate  trade  to  handle,  for  it  is  in  a 
sense  exclusive  and  is  second  to  none  in 
quality,  style,  finish  and  manner  of  packing. 
The  fact  that  no  department  store  or  price 
cutting  bazar  has  it  for  sale  gives  the  stat- 
ioner or  jeweler,  who  desires  to  do  a fine 
business,  an  immense  advantage. 


Syracuse. 

W.  H.  Thorpe,  of  Clayton,  and  Fred. 
Woodruff,  of  Lodi,  were  noticed  m town 
last  week. 

H A.  Williams,  who  failed  week  before 
last,  has  reopened  his  store,  as  agent. 
Deputy  sheriff  P.  F.  Cahill  sold  the  stock  of 
jewelry  belonging  to  Mr.  Williams  in  the 
store  at  348  Salina  St.  Nov.  4,  on  several 
executions  in  favor  of  judgment  creditors. 
C.  A.  Weaver,  as  trustee,  bid  the  stock  in 
at  $2,000. 

Charles  D.  Bennett,  alias  Marcus  Marks, 
and  Mathew  Lane,  alias  “ Red  Matt,”  were 
arraigned  before  Justice  McLennan,  in  the 
Court  of  Oyer  and.  Terminer  last  Monday 
morning.  Marks  was  indicted  for  grand 
larceny,  second  offence,  the  jury  having 
found  that  previous  to  the  Becker  & Lathrop 
robbery  he  had  been  convicted  in  Baltimore 
of  stealing  a pair  of  trousers.  By  the  ad- 
vice of  his  counsel,  E.  N.  Wilson,  he  de- 
ferred his  plea.  Lane  pleaded  not  guilty  to 
the  indictment  charging  him  with  complicity 
in  the  diamond  robbery. 


New  Jewelry  Stores. 

Arthur  West,  Victor,  Cal. 

W.  L.  Gantt,  Rockport,  Tex. 

Charles  Jenkins,  Sunbury,  Pa. 

Harry  Gildersleeve,  Cresco,  la. 

A.  D.  Harlow  & Son,  Monroe,  Me. 

F.  W.  Sensiba,  Stephenson,  Mich. 

George  W.  Miller,  Jr.,  Weatherby,  Pa. 

William  B.  Vredenberg,  943  South  St., 
Peekskill  N.  Y. 

H.  J.  Kuechler,  42  N.  El  Dorado  St., 
Stockton,  Cal. 

R.  Randall  Davidson  will  open  a jewelry 
store  this  week  in  Ansonia,  Conn. 

Sol.  Moers,  Askland,  N.  Y.  He  bought 
out  the  fixtures  and  stock  of  the  late 
Charles  Joseph. 

A.  F.  Feddersen,  Belle  Plaine,  la.  He 
had  been  working  at  the  jewelry  trade  in 
Duluth,  Minn.,  for  13  years. 

Frank  M.  Bowen,  who  formerly  was  em- 
ployed as  jeweler  and  repairer  at  R.  S. 
Gardner’s  jewelry  store,  Ansonia,  Conn., 
will  soon  open  a jewelry  and  watch  repair- 
ing establishment  corner  of  Main  and 
Minerva  Sts.  that  city. 


Brierly  Bros.,  Oshkosh,  Wis.,  have  put 
in  a steel  ceiling  and  built  an  addition  to 
their  beautifully  decorated  store,  making 
it  160  feet  deep,  resplendent  in  new  fix- 
tures. 


JHWHLHRS  ARE  INVITED  TO  INSPECT  OUR 


IN  OUR 


AT 

915  BROADWAY,  NEAR  21st  STREET. 


THE  DISPLAY  COVERS 


THE  WHOLE  LINE  OF 


Cut  Glass 


IF  YOU  CANNOT  CALL,  SEND  FOR  A CATALOGUE. 


C.  Dorflinqer  & 5ons, 

36  MURRAY  STREET,  ■<  <■  NEW  YORK. 


28 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


J^ov.  13  18^5. 


News  Gleanings. 


B.  F.  Rothsteiu  has  bought  out  E.  Jones, 
Bradford,  Pa. 

Charles  Young,  Franklin,  Pa.,  is  ill  with 
tj'phoid  fever. 

Mrs.  S.  C.  Chaney,  Osceola,  la. . is  closing 
out  her  stock  at  auction. 

Theodore  Jospe,  Huntington,  N.  Y.,  will 
move  to  Glen  Cove,  N.  Y. 

J.  A.  George,  Ackley,  la.,  has  removed 
to  a new  store  in  that  town. 

W.  H.  Snyder,  Kalamazoo,  Mich.,  has 
removed  to  123  S.  Burdick  St. 

E.  K.  Bean,  Landsdale,  Pa.,  has  moved 
to  a new  location  in  that  town. 

A new  front  is  to  be  built  to  the  store  of 
Jacobs  Bros.,  Washington,  D.  C. 

In  a fire  in  Woodbine,  Kan.,  Nov.  4,  the 
jewelry  store  of  Geo.  Klover  was  burned 
out. 

Geo.  M.  Harrington,  Milford,  Del.,  who 
has  been  ill  for  some  time,  is  conva  es- 
cing. 

A.  J.  Comrie,  jewelers’  auctioneer,  is 
conducting  a sale  for  T.  C.  Parker,  Wilkes- 
barre.  Pa. 

The  Ontario  silverware  factory,  Muncie, 
Ind.,  will  not  begin  work  until  after  ihe  first 
of  the  year. 


J.  W.  H.  Ernst,  Camden,  N . J.,  has  moved 
from  Garfield  Ave.,  to  913  Cooper  Ave., 
North  Cramer  Hill. 

C.  F.  Sulzner,  St.  Augustine,  Fla.,  has 
returned  from  the  north  and  opened  his 
jewelry  store. 

W.  J Hanks  is  again  proprietor  of  the 
jewelry  store  in  Postville,  la  , which  he  sold 
a year  ago  to  H.  J.  Bentley. 

The  Woodman-Cook  Co.,  Portland,  Me., 
are  making  arr-ngemerts  to  increase  their 
facilities  by  adding  new  machinery  in  their 
silver  plated  ware  factory  in  that  city. 

George  H.  Gage,  formerly  with  jeweler 
Ordway,  Lowell.  Mass.,  has  taken  the  store 
recently  occupied  by  F.  E.  Grant,  and  Mr. 
Grant  has  bought  out  and  removed  to  the 
Ordway  establishment. 

J.  F.  Hartwell,  head  of  J F.  Hartwell  & 
Co  , St.  Joseph,  Mo.,  announces  that  he 
will  retire  from  the  jewelry  business  on 
Jan.  I,  to  enable  him  to  devote  himself  to 
several  large  outside  interests. 

On  Nov.  ist  T.  C.  S.  Howard,  adminis- 
trator of  the  estate  of  T.  S.  Spear,  Colum- 
bus, Ga.,  placed  with  C.  M.  Kinsel,  jeweler, 
for  delivery  all  watches  and  jewelry  jobs  re- 
maining in  the  store  of  the  late  T.  S.  Spear. 

Calvin  Harvey,  jeweler,  Belfast,  Me.,  who 
has  been  in  business  there  nearly  50  years, 
will  retire  from  business  Monday  evening 
last  he  began  to  sell  his  goods  at  auction. 
At  the  close  he  will  either  rent  his  store  or 
shut  it  up. 


Louis  E.  Shurtleff  has  purchased  the 
jewelry  business  of  H.  S.  Francis,  20 
Purchase  St.,  New  Bedford,  Mass.  Mr. 
ShurtlefT  has  been  in  the  business  for  some 
time,  first  with  C.  W.  Haskins  and  then 
with  Mr.  Francis  when  he  took  the  busi- 
ness. 

A defective  flue  caused  a slight  blaze  in 
the  store  room  of  J.  J.  Mercer,  416  Mulberry 
St.,  Macon,  Ga  , a few  dajs  ago.  The  fire 
department  responded  promptly  and  put 
out  the  fire  without  using  enough  water  to 
do  great  damage.  The  fire  caught  in  the 
roof  of  the  building,  and  had  evidently 
been  smouldering  a long  while  before  it  was 
discovered. 

O K.  Taylor,Jr.,a  jeweler  of  Salem, O., was 
arrested  Thursday  night  by  Deputy  United 
States  Marshal  R.  M.  Hiland,  of  Cleveland, 
on  the  charge  of  sending  improper  letters 
through  the  mails  to  Mrs.  Hummer,  the  wife 
of  a prominent  business  man  of  Lisbon.  The 
woman’s  husband  has  a $20,000  damage 
suit  pending  against  Taylor  for  alienating 
his  wife’s  afftctions. 

Henry  Sartorius,  jeweler  for  T.  Kircher, 
Davenport,  la.,  suffered  a deep  bereave- 
ment last  week  in  the  death  of  his  wife, 
after  an  illness  of  only  two  months  from 
nervous  prostration.  The  affliction  has 
elicited  evidences  of  sympathy  from  the  trade 
not  only  in  Davenport  but  in  Chicago,  the 
home  of  Mr.  and  Mis.  Sartorius  for  14 
years  prior  to  their  removal  to  Davenport, 
in  1886. 

The  firm  of  Davidow  Bros  , Scranton, 
Pa.,  composed  of  E.  B.  and  M J.  Davidow, 
doing  business  under  the  name  of  Davidow 
Bros.,  and  the  wholesale  department  of  the 
Atlas  Jewelry  Co.,  have  been  mutually 
dissolved,  M.  J.  Davidow  withdrawing,  and 
E.  B.  Davidow  continuing  the  business 
under  the  old  firm  name.  All  accounts  due 
the  firm  should  be  paid  to  E.  B Davidow, 
and  all  accounts  against  the  old  firm  will 
be  paid  by  him. 

Hester  J.  Travis,  widow  of  Mr.  Travis,  a 
jeweler  of  Asbury  Park,  N.  J.,  who  was 
killed  at  Long  Branch  while  riding  his  bicy- 
cle last  Summer,  was  a few  days  ago  com- 
mitted to  the  insane  asylum.  Mrs.  Travis’ 
mind  has  failed  rapidly  since  her  husband’s 
death,  and  that,  together  with  business 
troubles,  was  the  cause  of  her  insanity. 
Among  other  hallucinations  she  believes 
she  has  diamonds  weighing  tons  stored 
away  in  secret  receptacles. 

A peculiar  fire  occurred  in  Martin’s  jew- 
elry store,  81  Public  Square,  Wilkesbarre, 
Pa.,  at  3:20  on  the  afternoon  of  Nov.  i, which, 
if  it  had  started  in  the  night,  would  have 
made  a serious  fire.  The  store  room  sud- 
denly filled  with  smoke  and  for  a time  the 
cause  could  not  be  discovered.  Suddenly  a 
large  desk  of  drawers  in  the  rear  burst  into 
flames  almost  beside  where  one  of  the  men 
was  at  work  and  it  took  several  pails  of 
water  to  extinguish  it.  Matches  were  kept 
in  one  of  the  drawers  and  it  is  thought  the 
fire  originated  from  the  matches.  The 
damage  was  slight. 


RACRIFICE  QALE. 

To  clear  our  enormous  stock  we  have  made  sweeping 
reductions  in  prices;  and  until  December  first  will  offer 
large  lines  of 

COALPORT, 

ROYAL  WORCESTER, 

CROWN  DERBY, 

DOULTON, 

MINTON, 

POINTON, 

WEDGWOOD. 

FRENCH  BRONZES, 

GILT  REGULATORS, 

ENAMELED  AND  CUT  GLASS 

PEDESTALS. 

MEISSEN  ; 

f ^at  from  5 to  15  per  cent,  less  than  the  goods  can  be  imported  at  to-day. 

^ — The  goods  are  marked  in  plain  figures  and  we  think  this  is  the  best  and 
cheapest  line  ever  offered  to  the  trade. 

GOOD  GOODS  AND  GOOD  VALUES. 


LE  BOUTILLIER  & CO., 

860  BROADWAY, 

Northeast  corner  of  Seventeenth  Street,  - NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  13.  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


29 


Canada  and  the  Provinces. 

TRADE  CONDITIONS. 

The  demand  for  vvatehes  and  silver  novel- 
ties is  active  and  the  ring  trade  is  particu- 
larly good.  Long  wa'ch  chains  in  all 
classes  of  manufacture  are  still  much  called 
for. 

Rhoda  Jorgenson,  Toronto,  advertises 
her  stock  to  be  sold  by  auction. 

The  stock  of  A.  Vaillancoutte,  Quebec,  is 
advertised  to  be  sold  by  auction. 

M.  A.  Payne  & Son,  St.  Thomas,  Ont., 
have  compromised  with  their  creditors. 

Mr.  Woodmancy,  representing  Potter  & 
BufSnton,  Providence,  R.  I.,  was  in  To- 
ronto last  week. 

Elizabeth  C.  Morrison,  iewelry  and  re- 
galia manufacturer,  Toronto,  has  assigned 
to  J.  B.  Boustead. 

The  store  of  T.  J.  Bonner,  Antigonish,  N. 
B.,  was  burglarized  a few  nights  ago,  and 
about  $350  wor  h of  jewelry  stolen.  The 
burglar  or  burglars  entered  by  a window  in 
the  front  door. 

Wm.  Henderson,  jeweler,  Lancaster, 
Ont.,  was  one  of  the  sufferers  by  the  de- 
structive fire  which  devastated  that  village 
on  the  3d  inst.  His  store  and  dwelling 
were  destroyed. 

The  Goldsmiths’  Stock  Co.,  Toronto, 
make  a specialty  of  chain  bracelets  in  gold, 
silver  and  high  grade  plate  in  which  they 
.show  some  fine  lines.  They  have  just  in- 
troduced a large  assortment  of  domestic 
manufacture  in  the  new  burnished  finish 
after  the  Engli,-.h  style. 

S.  Frenkel,  wholesale  jeweler,  55  and  57 
Yonge  St.,  Toronto,  is  making  important 
changes  in  his  business.  He  is  embarking 
in  the  manufacture  of  diamond  mountings 
and  gold  rings  of  all  descriptions,  the  upper 
portion  of  his  premises  having  been  largely 
refitted  to  accommodate  this  new  branch. 
Mr.  Frenkel  has  just  purch.ased  a handsome 
residence  at  53  Wellington  Place. 

In  the  police  court  in  Montreal  last 
Thursday  a well  dressed  and  very  respect- 
able looking  young  man  giving  his  name  as 
Percy  Pierson  was  arraigned  on  a charge 
ot  theft.  Pierson  pleaded  guilty  to  stealing 
about  $400  in  money  and  $100  in  goods 
from  Hemsley’s  jewelry  store,  where  he  was 
employed.  Mr.  Hemsley  ot  late  missed  a 
number  of  articles  as  well  as  money  from 
his  store  and  notified  the  City  Detective 
Bureau.  The  detective  found  some  of  the 
articles  on  the  person  of  young  Pierson, 
who  confessed  to  the  crime  \vhen  arrested. 


Cleveland 

Mr.  Lee,  with  the  Bowler  & Burdick  Co  , 
was  married  on  the  6th  10  a young  lady  of 
Elyria. 

Webb  C.  Ball  and  R E.  Burdick,  antici- 
pate going  to  the  Atlanta  exposition  with 
the  Cleveland  Chamber  of  Commerce,  on 
Nov.  12.  Webb  C Ball  has  been  in  New 
York  the  past  week  buying  additional  stock 
for  the  Winter  trade. 


M.  Meckes’ jewelry  store,  541  Pearl  St., 
w’as  broken  into  about  two  weeks  ago  and  a 
number  of  opera  glasses  and  a quantity  of 
cheap  jewelry  taken.  No  trace  was  found 
for  awhile  until  a number  of  boys  were 
noticed  selling  such  goods  at  very  low 
prices.  The  police  were  informed  and  at 
once  went  to  work  to  find  the  thieves,  who 
were  finally  seen  at  the  head  of  Detroit  St. 
hill,  but  upon  sight  of  the  blue-coats  they' 
took  to  their  heels.  The  ofiBcers  fired, 
wounding  one  of  them,  but  the  other  es- 
caped. 

The  Towle  Mfg.  Co.’s  Notable 
Sueeess. 


i i [V  TOTHING  so  enriches  a table  as  a 
1 1 chaste  pattern  of  silverware  ” 
recently  remarked  a woman  to  the  writer, 
and  added:  “ So  much  that  is  shown  is  of 

complicated  pattern,  as  if  the  designer  were 
overcrowded  with  ideas  and  tried  to  com- 
bine them  all  in  one  spoon  or  fork,  that  it 
rather  overwhelms  one  an  1 destroys  the  ef- 
fectiveness of  the  prices  ’ tiid  she  had  in 
mind  the  new  pattern  of  the  ID. vie  Mfg. 
Co.,  “ the  Canterbury,”  her  words  could  not 
have  been  more  trite,  for  is  it  not  a fact 
that  the  tastes  of  cultivated  tastes  of  culti- 
vated people  are  better  met  with  a sim- 
plicity of  design  ? 

The  Towle  Mfg.  Co.  in  the  past  have  been 
exceedingly  fortunate,  for  after  all  there  is 
a : element  of  luck  in  producing  a pattern 


that  at  once  meets  the  approval  of  the  public 
and  continues  to  hold  it.  The“01d  English” 
of  this  company  has  had  a remarkable  run 
in  public  favor,  and  has  to-day  an  even  in- 
creased popularity.  “ The  Colonial,”  issued 
this  Fall,  has  surpassed  the  highest  expecta- 
tions of  its  producers.  And  now  comes 
“The  Canterbury,”  a pattern  simple  in 
design  and  chaste  in  appearance,  which  is 
in  fair  way  to  rival  the  notable  successes  of 
the  “Old  English  ” and  “The  Colonial.” 

Though  made  in  medium  weight,  the 
convex  plain  surfaces  of  “The  Canter- 
bury  ’’  give  it  the  appearance  of  heavy 
weight,  and  the  construction  of  the  pieces 
IS  such  as  to  give  great  strength  and  in  all 
respects  make  it  in  matter  of  durability  the 
equal  of  the  heavier  weights.  The  plain  con- 
vex surfaces  of  the  center  of  the  handles  is 
bordered  by  a graded  beading,  the  smaller, 
minute  beads  at  the  shank  increasing 
gradually  in  size  to  the  swell  of  the  handle, 
one  third  way  down  from  the  point,  thence 
decreasing  in  size  to  the  top,  which  is 
formed  of  three  delicate  scrolls,  the  smaller 
of  the  three  forming  the  tip  of  the  handle. 
These,  with  a slight  scroll  tracery  at  the 
broadened  part  of  handle,  form  the  only 
orr  amentation,  and  the  result  is  a rich 
and  chaste  pattern. 

“The  Canterbury  ” is  shown  in  a full 
line  of  flatware,  which  is  now  re.idy  for 
delivery,  and  will  also  be  shown  in  cutlery, 
which  every  effort  is  being  made  to  have 
ready  for  delivery  for  the  holiday' season. 


SURPASSED  ALL  RECORDS! 

AT  THE  OBSERVATORY  OF  GENEVA,  OUT  OF  TEN 
ISIOVEMENTS  ( CONSECUTIVE  NUMBERS, ) THE 

Chas.  Meylan  Watches 


OBTAINED 

4 MEDALS 

AND 

6 DIPLOMAS. 


MATHEY  BROS.,  MATHEZ  & CO.. 

SOLE  AGENTS, 

21  AND  23  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

PLAIN  AND  COMPLICATED  WATCHES. 

JUST  RECEIVED  FOR  THE  HOLIDAYS  AN  EXTENSIVE  LINE  OF  FINE 

ENAMELED  AND  DIAMOND 

'MZ' A T C HC  JE  S . 


30 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13  1895. 


CLASSIF'IED  INDEX  TO  ADVERTISEMENTS. 


All  Advertisements  are  entitled  to  one  Insertion  under  proper  heading.  Extra  Insertions,  $6.00  per  annum. 

Extra  Headings,  fist. 00  per  annum. 


Page 


Art  Furniture. 

Smith,  Geo.  W.,  St  Co.,  818  Broadway,  N.  Y..  46 

Art  Pottery,  Bric-a-brae,  ete. 

Bawo  & Dotter,  26-32  Barclay  St..  N.  Y 44-48 

Bloom  & Philips,  228  \V.  4th  St.,  Cincinnati, 

0 34 

Bradley  & Hubbard  Mfg.  Co..  Meriden,  Conn.  14 
Dwenger,  Chas  L.,  35-37  Park  Place,  N.  Y. . . . 47 
Glaenzer,  L6on  J.  & Co.,  80  & 82  Chambers 

St.,  N.  Y 8 

Hinrichs  & Co.,  29-31  Park  Place,  N.  Y 47 

Lazarus,  Rosenfeld  & Lehmann,  60-62  Murray 

St.,  N.  Y 47 

Le  Boutillier  & Co.,  860  Broadway,  N.  Y 28 

Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co.,  11  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y ..  18 

Assayers  & Keflners. 

Baker,  Geo.  M.,  Providence,  R.  1 36 

Goldsmith  Bros.,  63  & 65  Washington  St., 

Chicago,  111 33 

Lelong,  L.  & Bro.,  Newark,  N.  J 48 

Auctioneers. 

Boyle,  S.  A & Co.,  14  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 12 

Comrie,  A.  J.,  22  John  St.,  N.  Y 48 

Rich,  H.  M.  & Co..  21  School  St.,  Boston, 

Mass 14 

Silo,  Jas.  P.,  43  Liberty  St.,  N.  Y 18 

Badges,  Medals,  Etc. 

Braxmar,  C.  G.,  10  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 43 

Haskell.  H.  C.,  ii  John  St.,  N.  Y 4 

Smith,  H.  L.,  4 Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 31 

Cameo  Portraits. 

Bonnet,  L.,  927  B’way,  N Y 10 

Clocks,  French,  English  and  American. 

Jacques,  Chas.,  Clock  Co.,  22  Cortlandt  St., 


Cut  Qlass. 

Doiflinger,  C.  & Sons,  36  Murray  St.,  N.  Y. . . 27 
Diamond  & Precious  Stone  Importers. 
Falkenau,  Oppenheimer  & Co.,  40  M.  L.,  N.Y  48 
Hedges,  Wm.  S.  & Co  , 170  Broadway,  N.  Y...  10 

Kahn,  L.  & M.  & Co.,  172  Broadway,  N.  Y 48 

KipUng,  R.  A.,  Hays  Bldg.,  N.  Y 10 

Lorsch,  Albert,  & Co.,  37  Maiden  Lane.  N.  Y.  48 
Nissen,  Ludwig  & Co.,  18  John  St.,  N.Y 12 


Randel,  Baremore  St  Billings,  29  Maiden  Lane, 

N.Y II 

Rich  & Allen,  State  and  Madison  Sts.,  Chicago  33 
Smith,  Alfred  H.  & Co.,  182  Broadway,  N.  Y. . 10 

Diamond  Cutters. 

Oppenheimer  Bros.  & Veith,  Prescott  Bldg., 
N.Y 9 


Randel,  Baremore  & Billings,  29  Maiden  Lane  ii 

Diamond  Jewelry. 

Sauter,  L.,  & Co.,  194  Broadway,  N.  Y 36 

Waterman  & Lehmann,  20  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  5 

Diamond  Mountings. 

Oppenheimer,  H.  E.  & Co.,  14  Maiden  Lane, 

N.  Y 48 

Spies  & Co.,  126  State  St.,  Chicago.  Ill — 33 

Engraving,  Etching,  Etc. 

Goldstein  Engraving  Co.,  i Maiden  Lane, 
N.Y 21 


Page. 


Fine  Engraving. 

The  Stationers’  Engraving  Co.,  98-102  Nassau 
St  .N.  Y... 36 

Fine  Stationary. 

Hurd,  Geo.  B.,  & Co.,  425  Broome  St.,  N.  Y..  37 
Parsons  s.  Greene  Co.,  18  Murrav  St.,  N.Y...  36 
Gold  Jewelry. 

Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.  19  Maiden  Lane 14-40 

Carter,  Sloan  St  Co.,  15  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y ..  ii 
Hedges,  A.  J.,  & Co.,  6 Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y...  2 

Kerr,  Wm.  B.  & Co.,  S60  Broadway,  N.  Y..  24-25 

Larter,  Elcox  & Co.,  21  Maiden  Lane 16 

Richardson,  Enos.,  & Co.,  23  Maiden  Lane, 

N.  Y 43 

Gold  and  Rolled  Plate  Jewelry. 

Smith,  Wm.,  & Co.,  5-7  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y. ..  36 
Gold  and  Silver  Plate. 

Briggs,  J.  & Sons  Co.,  Providence,  R.  1 21 

Horologieal  Schools. 

Parson’s  School  for  Watchmakers,  Peoria,  HI.  35 


Jewelry,  Silverware  and  Optical  Cases. 


Jackson,  S.  C.,  180  Broadway,  N.  Y 40 

Jobbers,  Watches,  Diamonds,  Etc. 

Albert  Bros.,  ‘ incinnati,  0 35 

Aikin- Lambert  Jewelry  Co.,  19  Maiden  Lane  14  40 
Friedberger,  L.  S , A:  Co  , 484  Broadway,  N.  Y 36 
Friedlander,  R.,  L.  & M.,  Ltd.  30  Maiden  Lane, 

N.Y 43 

Lapp  & Flershem,  92  98  State  St.,  Chicago — 33 

Myers,  S.  F.  & Co.,  48  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 48 

Scott,  J.  T.,  & Co.,  4 Maiden  Lane.,  N.  Y — 4 

Lawyers . 

Emmons  Associated  Law  Offices,  Portland, 

Ore 16 

Musical  Boxes 

Cuendet,  E.  L.,  21  John  St. ,N.  Y 18 

Jacot  a Son,  39  Union  Square,  N.  Y 21 

Wolff,  A.  & Co.,  14th  St.  & Union  Square,  W. 
N.Y 16 

Muslin  Buffs. 

Williamsville  Mfg.  Co.,  18  S.  Water  St.,  Provi- 
dence, R.  1 14 

Optical  Goods. 

Geneva  Optical  Co.,  Chicago,  Ills 33 

Kirstein’s,  E.,  Sons  Co  , Rochester,  N.  Y...  . 16 


Spencer  Optical  Mfg.  Co..  15  Maiden  L.,  N.  Y.  40 
Sussfeld.  Lorsch  & Co.,  13  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  40 

Optical  Schools. 


Chicago  Ophthalmic  College,  Chicago,  111 33 

Knowles,  Ur., 31 

Pens,  Pencils,  etc. 

Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.,  iq  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  14-40 

Mabie,  Todd  & Bard,  .New  York 10 

Ring  Makers 

Baum  & Oppenheim,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y...  12 
Bowden.  J.  B.  & Co.,  W2  Broadway,  N.  Y....  10 
Bonner,  Rich  & Co.,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y...  iS 
Bryant,  M.  B.,  & Co.,  10  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  2 
Smith,  L.  B.  & H.  H.,  34  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  16 
Safes. 

Marvin  Safe  Co.,  12  Park  Place,  N.  Y 


Sample  Trunks, 

Crouch  & Fitzgerald,  161  Broadway,  N.  Y..-  43 

Security  Pin  Guard. 

Security  Mfg.  Co.,  7 Astor  House,  N.  Y 12 

Beales. 

Kohlbusch,  Herman.  Sr.,  59  Nassau  St.,  N.  Y.  18 

Show  Cases. 


Melishek  & Better,  128  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y...  16 

Silver  Plated  Ware. 

Reed  & Barton,  37  Union  Square,  N.  Y 19 

The  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.,  Hartford,  Conn...  14 

Sterling  Silver  Novelties. 

Codding  Bros.  & Heilborn,  North  Attleboro 

Mass 2 

Foster  & Bailey,  Providence,  R.  1 3 

Sterling  Silverware. 

Campbell-Metcalf  Silver  Co.,  Providence,  R.  I.  2 
Fuchs,  Ferd.  & Bros.,  808-810  Greenwich  St., 

N.Y 2 

Gorham  Mfg.  Co.,  B’way  & 19th  St.,  N.  Y — 7 


Towle  Mfg.  Co.,  Newburyport,  Mass 2-13 

Wallace,  R„  & Sons  M’f’g  Co.,  Wallingford, 

Conn 6 

Whiting,  F.  M.,  Co.,  North  Attleboro,  Mass..  2 
Wood  & Hughes,  16  John  St.,  N.  Y 2 

Thimbles. 

Ketcham  & McDougall,  198  Broadway,  N.  Y..  4 

Tool  Manufacturers  and  Dealers. 

American  Watch  Tool  Co.,  Waltham,  Mass  . . 14 
Bowman,  Ezra  F.  & Co.,  Lancaster,  Pa 39 

Tortoise  Shell  Goods. 

Rice  & Hochster,  415  Broadway,  N.  Y 17 

Trunks  and  Traveling  Bags. 

Crouch  & Fitzgerald,  161  Broadway,  N.  Y — 43 

Watch  Case  Manufacturers. 

Dueber  Hampden  Co.,  Canton,  O 31 

Fahys,  Jos.,  & Co.,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y 18 

Jacobson,  F H.  & Co  , q6  Stale  St.,  Chicago  . 33 
Queen  City  Watch  Case  Co  , Cincinnati,  O.  • . 34 
Roy  Watch  Case  Co., 21  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y...  ii 

Watch  Case  Materials. 

Newark  Watch  Case  .Material  Co.,  Newark. 

N.  J 43 

Watch  Case  Repairers. 

Felix,  N.  J.,  17  John  St.,  N.  Y 48 

Henry,  Peter,  Cincinnati,  O 35 

Watch  Importers. 

Hyde's,  J.  E.,  Sons,  22  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y ..  21 
Mathey  Bros.,  Mathez  & Co.,  21  and  23  Maiden 
Lane,  N.Y 29 

Watch  Manufacturers. 

Dueber  Hampden  Co..  Canton,  O. 31 

Hamilton  Watch  Co.,  Lancaster,  Pa 15 

New  York  Standard  Watch  Co.,  ii  John  St., 

N .Y 


12 


12 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


31 


Nov.  13,  1895. 

Special  Notices. 


Rates  7Sc.  per  Insertion  for  notices  not  exceeding 
3 lines (25  words);  additional  words  2 cents  each. 
If  answers  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  stamps 
must  be  enclosed.  Two  insertions,  iS  per  cent,  off; 
three  insertions,  20  per  cent  off ; four  insertions  or 
more,  25  per  cent.  off.  Payable  strictly  in  advance. 
Display  cards  on  this  page  will  be  charged  at  $2.00 
per  inch  for  first  insertion,  subject  to  same  discount 
as  above  for  subsequent  insertions. 

Under  the  heading  of  Situations  Wanted 
on  this  page  advertisements  will  be  inserted  for 
One  Cent  a Word  each  insertion,  no  discount.  This 
offer  refers  to  Situations  Wanted  only* 
Payable  strictly  in  advance.  If  answers  are  to  be 
forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


Situations  V^anted. 


Notices  under  this  heading  ONL  Y are  charged  at 
one  cent  a word,  payable  strictly  in  advance.  // 
answer  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


■pXPERT  watchmaker,  jeweler,  salesman,  desirous 
^ of  situation.  Address  X.,  care  Jewelers’  Cir- 
cular. 


Y^ATCHMAKER  and  engraver  wants  permanent 
^ ’ position  ; state  wages.  Address  P.  S.  Burleigh, 
Franklin,  N.  H. 


■VOUNG  MAN  would  like  an  opportunity  to  work 
* for  a reliable  jewelry  house  ; best  of  references. 
Address  Energetic,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


PERMANENT  POSITION  by  young  married 
^ man ; do  anything  except  engrave ; eight  years’ 
experience;  sober.  "J,”  care  Jewelers’  Circu- 
lar. 


A LAD  16  years  of  age,  with  a good  school  educa- 
tion,  would  like  a position  in  a wholesale  or 
manufacturing  house.  Address  Albion,  care  The 
Jewelers’  Circular. 


P'OMPETENT  watch  repairer,  jeweler  and  fair 
engraver ; 23  years’  experience ; all  tools ; no  bad 
habits,  wishes  a steady  job;  $15  per  week.  R.,  care 
Jewelers’  Circular. 


VAJANTED— A young  lady  stenographer  and  type- 
’ writer,  six  years’  experience,  desires  a position  ; 
highest  references.  Address  A.,  care  P.  O.  Box 
New  York  city. 


VA^ANTED  SITUATION  by  first  class  watch- 
’ maker,  jobber,  salesman  and  plain  engraver; 
best  of  references  ; California  preferred.  Address  C., 
Lock  Box  26.  Poplar  Bluff,  Mo. 


V\J ANTED  SITUATION  by  first  class  watch- 
''  * maker,  good  jewelry  jobber,  also  salesman,  used 
to  fine  American  and  complicated  Swiss  watches;  15 
years  experience  ; tools.  Address  G.,  care  Jewelers’ 
Circular. 


CALESMAN — Experienced  jewelry  salesman  de- 
sires  situation  in  that  or  in  any  other  line ; speaks 
French,  German  and  Italian;  first  class  references. 
A.  Salisco,  care  of  Mr.  Vender,  94  5th  Ave.,  Brooklyn. 


■yOUNG  MAN  wishes  position;  first  class  jeweler, 
^ salesman,  and  optician ; can  mount  diamonds 
and  do  some  watch  work ; seven  years’  experience ; 
good  references  ; $12  a week.  Address  K.,  care  Jew- 
elers’ Circular. 


CALESMAN,  well  acquainted  in  the  jewelry  busi- 
business  and  having  good  trade  in  loose  and 
mounted  diamonds,  wants  to  make  connection,  Jan. 
ist  with  first  class  importing  firm  carrying  an  exten- 
sive line ; on  commission  basis  or  salary.  Address 
“Diamonds,”  care  Jewelers’  v.,ircular. 


YY^ anted  immediately  position  with  first 
’ ’ class  jeweler  by  first  class  watchmaker  and  fine 
engraver ; young  man  6 years’  solid  bench  and  counter 
experience  ; my  present  employer  is  about  to  sell  out ; 
A I references ; have  an  iS  jeweled  (upper  balance 
jewel  set  in  ivory)  solid  nickel,  stem  wind,  Breguet 
sprung  watch  made  by  myself  ; not  a horological  stu- 
dent. Address  F.,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


^elp  \^anted. 


TO  RENT: 


YYJ ANTED— Experienced  traveling  salesman  fora 
material  house,  to  take  in  the  western  States; 
permanent  position  Address  “ Steady,”  care  J ewel- 
ERs’  Circular. 


(~)PTICAL  LENS  GRINDER  and  general  repairer 
wanted.  Must  be  capable  of  doing  the  best 
work ; good  position  for  the  right  man.  Address 
Optician,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


A T ONCE— An  experienced  watchmaker,  f ngraver, 
^ optician  and  salesman,  must  be  an  expert  in 
these  branches ; a permanent  position ; send  samples 
of  engraving  and  photo  in  first  letters,  also  salary  ex- 
pected, with  references.  The  Upson  Jewelry  Co., 
Waterbury,  Conn. 


lousiness  Qpportunities. 


Factory  formerly  occupied 
by  the  Alvin  Mfg.  Co.,  at 
Irvington,  N.  J.  3 story 
brick,  40x120,  with  annex 
and  out-buildings.  16,000 
square  feet.  Ample  yard 
room,  100x200  ft. 

Fire  proof  vaults  with  Mar- 
vin safe  doors  on  each  floor. 
♦ 


pOR  SALE— Good  paying  jewelry  business  in  town 
of  12,000 ; easy  teims;  must  te  sold  at  once  on 
account  of  poor  health.  Address  M.  J.  Mann,  Johns- 
town, N.  Y. 


QLDEST  JEWEI.RY  STORE  in  city  of  20,000, 
near  Boston,  Mass.;  established  30  years;  inven- 
tory about  #5,000 ; good  paying  business:  can  reduce 
stock ; will  sell  cheap  if  sold  immediately.  Address 
W.  1298,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


( jNE  OF  THE  BEST  paying  jewelry,  silverware 
and  bric-a-brac  stores  in  Philadelphia  is  for  sale, 
the  whole  thing,  stock,  fixtures  and  lease  ; fine  store 
and  in  the  best  location  ; ill  health  the  sole  reason  for 
selling ; established  1855.  Geo.  Eakins  & Son,  930 
Chestnut  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


'TO  CLOSE  AN  ESTATE— The  entire  business  of 
^ the  late  S.  F.  Merritt,  manufacturer  of  eyeglass 
holders,  chains,  etc.,  and  will  be  sold  at  auction,  Nov. 
TOth,  at  :o  a.  m.,  at  the  office,  corner  of  Main  and 
Ferry  Sts.,  Springfield,  Mass.  For  particulars,  ad- 
dress H.  W.  Merritt,  Executor. 


pjFFICE  TO  LET  in  the  Hays  Building.  21  and  23 
Maiden  Lane,  New  York;  rent  $50  per  month. 
Apply  to  janitor. 


Address,  Alvin  Mfg.  Co,,  4 Maiden 
Lane,  N.  Y.  Or  apply  on  premises 
to  Pierce  & Noble,  Enterprise  Hill. 


YOUR  WIFE 

AND  DAUGHTER  WANT 


“TO  LET — A good  office  at  moderate  price  in  the 
Diamond  Exchange  building,  14  Maiden  Lane, 
New  York.  Apply  to  Janitor. 


The  Four  Hundred. 


TWiscellaneous 


THE  BEST,  THE  SMALLEST 


YY7  anted  you  to  know  that  the  genuine  “Moseley 
’’  Lathe”  equals  the  best  of  the  very  best.  V\  hen 
interested  write  your  jobber  for  new  price  list,  or  to 
the  manufacturers,  Moseley  & Co.,  Elgin,  111. 


YA7 ANTED — Genuine  Webster  Whitcomb  or  No.  2 
Waltham  lathe  with  attachments;  must  be  in 
good  condition  and  moderate  price.  Address  full 
particulars  to  “ J.  57,”  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


pOR  SALE— A Parkinson  and  Frodsham  chron- 
ometer  in  A I condition,  rate  i-io  second;  also  a 
comph  te  trial  case,  made  by  J ulius  King  Optical  Co  . 
almost  new  ; for  particulars,  address  L.  M.,  care  Jew- 
elers’ Circular. 


CTOLEN — Ladies’  solid  18  k.  hunting  case.  Lady 
^ Washington  No  27.526,  gold  watch.  Baldwin  & 
Co.,  St.  Joseph,  Mo  , written  on  face.  Also  long  14  k. 
link  chain  with  cameo  slide.  Return  of  property 
liberally  rewarded  and  no  questions  asked.  Miss 
Georgiene  Scott,  Severance,  Ooniphen  Co.,  Kansas. 


DR,  KNOWLES’ 

PRIVATE  COURSE 
IN  OPTICS. 

Lectures  \3ith  Diploma  $25.00 

Those  who  desire  to  study  with  the  Doc- 
tor will  send  in  their  application. 
Students  received  at  any  time. 

The  Key  to  the  Study  of  Refraction. 
50c.  per  copy, 

For  Sale  by 

R.  H.  KNOWLES,  M.  D., 

189  Broadway,  NEW  YORK. 

Care  of  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR. 


LADIES’  WATCH  IN  AMERICA. 


HAMPDEN  WATCH  CO. 


CANTON,  0. 

H.  L.  SMITH,-‘"“^t,w'v‘3Jv 


AND 

Babgps 


OF  EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 


♦ 

Jewel  y Repairing 


OF  ALL  KINDS 
AT  LOWEST  PRICES 


It  Pays 


to  read  a live  Trade  Paper. 


The  Jewelers’  Cireular 


IS  ONE, 

$2,00  a year. 


CtiicaKO  Office:  Room  517,  Inter-Ocean  Building;. 


VOL.  XXXI.  CHICAGO,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  I3,  1895.  NO.  15. 


Chicago  Notes. 

S.  Friedberg  opened  a jewelry  store 
Saturday  at  510  Wells  St. 

F.  T.  Weigle,  Nesler  & Co.,  Newark,  left 
Monday  for  Indianapolis,  taking  in  Cincin- 
nati, St.  Louis.  Kansas  City  and  Omaha 
before  his  return. 

Elmer  A.  Rich,  president  of  the  Rich  & 
Allen  Co  , was  able  to  be  at  the  office  Mon- 
day last  for  the  first  time  since  Sept.  24.  He 
is  getting  along  nicely  and  recuperating  by 
taking  an  abundance  of  light  outdoor  exer- 
cise. In  a week  he  will  resume  active  work. 

The  sale  of  the  assets  of  Richards  & 
Rutishauser  has  been  postponed  by  the 
sheriff.  It  is  understood  from  unofficial 
sources  that  the  postponement  was  caused 
by  a desire  on  the  part  of  certain  creditors 
to  have  the  confession  of  judgment  set  aside. 

People  the  jobbers  were  pleased  to  see 
last  week  last:  Chas.  S.  Slifft,  Little  Rock, 
Ark  ; Sourwine  & Hartnett,  Escanaba, 
Mich.;  C.  A.  McGregor,  Pontiac,  Mich.;  A. 
L.  Woodward,  Clinton,  Wis.;  P.  K.  Wiser, 
Mankato,  Minn. ; Chas.  Price,  Jacksonville, 
111.;  G.  A.  Lacey,  Wahpeton,  N.  Dak.; 
Frank  Ricketts,  Charleston,  111. 

James  E.  Moore,  known  to  the  jewelry 
trade  of  Chicago  for  many  years,  died  of 
heart  disease  at  his  home  in  Clyde,  111.,  a 
suburb  of  this  city.  For  some  time  Mr. 
Moore  was  confidential  clerk  of  the  old 
house  of  IM.  Kronbei  g & Co. , later  being  in- 
terested in  the  A.  E.  Shader  Mfg.  Co.  At 
the  time  of  his  death  he  was  m the  instal- 
ment furniture  business. 

Richard  C.  Akerly,  85  years  of  age  and 
an  old  resident  of  Chicago,  died  recently  of 
a complication  of  asthma  and  Bright’s 
disease.  He  came  here  in  1857  from  New 
York  and  opened  a jewelry  store  at  123 
Lake  St.,  where  he  remained  until  the  fire, 
which  wiped  out  most  of  his  fortune.  For 
the  last  ten  years  he  has  been  tngaged  with 
his  son,  R.  P.  Akeily,  in  the  manufacture 
of  marking  crayons. 

The  Electricians’  Time  Co.,  a local  con- 
cern conducting  an  instalment  business  in 
watches,  diamonds  and  miscellaneous 
lines,  at  room  512,  167  Dearborn  St.,  are 
unable  to  meet  their  obligations  and  have 
suspended  business  until  able  to  make  ar- 
rangements with  creditors.  John  Brison 


and  son,  of  whom  the  latter  managed  the 
concern,  compose  the  company.  Mr.  Bri- 
son, Sr.,  was  for  a long  time  associated 
with  Giles,  Bro.  & Co.  and  is  an  old  timer 
in  the  trade.  “ Large  losses  from  bad 
debts,  poor  collections,  and  chief  of  all  the 
treacherous  conduct  of  a former  trusted 
employe”  make  the  embarrassment  read: 
Assets  $7,000,  liabilities  $3,200,  though 
these  figures  are  subject  to  change. 


Cincinnati. 

Sig.  Strauss  has  left  for  a tour  among  his 
customers. 

Gustave  Fox  & Co.  have  issue<i  a new 
diamond  catalogue. 

O.  E.  Bell  Co.  are  getting  out  another 
circular  of  “ hummers.” 

Squire  Armour,  Richmond,  Ky.,  is  in 
town  calling  on  the  trade. 

Fred.  Strang,  of  Jonas,  Dorst  & Co., 
leaves  this  week  for  a long  trip. 

E.  & J.  Swigart  have  issued  their  regular 
annual  catalogue  of  tools,  materials,  etc. 

Frohman,  Wise  & Newman  have  been 
marking  a big  line  of  new  goods  prior  to 
Mr.  Wise  going  on  his  trip  this  week. 

Fox  Bros.  & Co.  are  mounting  up  some 
elegant  novelties.  The  travelers  are  on  the 
road.  George  Fox  leaves  this  week  with 
an  elegant  line. 

Jos,  Mehmert  has  returned  from  a trip 
south,  where  he  made  many  new  acquaint- 
ances. His  new  tools  are  taking  well  and 
trade  is  brightening  considerably. 

Joe  Phillips,  of  Bloom  & Phillips,  will 
make  a short  trip  south  and  then  close  the 
firm’s  season,  after  which  they  will  display 
all  their  samples  in  their  salesrooms  at  228 
W.  4th  St. 

Oskamp,  Nolting  & Co.  are  about  to  in- 
augurate an  optical  plant  that  will  be  of 
interest  to  the  trade.  They  will  do  all  their 
own  grinding  and  manufacture  many  opti- 
cal novelties. 

The  numerous  friends  of  Simon  Hesse 
will  overlook  all  discrepancies  during  his 
trip  as  he  was  recently  blessed  with  twins 
and  has  not  yet  recovered  from  surprise 
and  admiration. 

The  Cincinnati  Coffin  Ornament  Co.  are 
opening  a branch  department  to  make  hol- 


low ware,  triple  and  quadruple  plate.  Their 
samples  are  already  out  and  bid  fair  to 
become  lively  competitors. 

In  order  to  close  the  estate  the  entire 
handsome  stock  of  the  Clemens  Hellebush 
jewelry  store  will  be  sold  at  auction  com- 
mencing Nov.  i2th  and  continuing  daily 
until  all  is  sold.  Auctioneer  Burroughs,  of 
Chicago,  will  conduct  the  sale. 

Owing  to  the  death  of  Mrs.  Hyman 
Moses,  aged  99,  several  jewelry  houses  were 
closed  Saturday.  She  was  the  grandmother 
of  David  and  Isa  Schroder,  Mrs.  A.  Her- 
man and  Mrs.  A G Schwab,  and  Ed.  L. 
Hirsch,  of  Bene,  Lindenberg  & Co. 

S.  M.  Peck,  who  was  robbed  last  week  of 
about  $2,000  worth  of  diamonds  by  two  men 
who  called  on  him,  has  not  yet  recovered 
them,  but  the  detectives  think  they  have  a 
clue  and  are  trying  to  locate  the  men. 
Through  a combination  of  misconceptions, 
this  robbery  was  reported  in  The  Circular 
last  week  as  occurring  in  the  office  of  the 
H.  Keck  Mfg.  Co.  The  report  was  erron- 
eous in  the  respect  of  names. 


St.  Louis. 

Fred  Eynatten  and  wife,  Peoria,  111., 
were  visitors  in  St.  Louis  last  week. 

Henry  Freund  of  Max  Freund  & Co., 
New  York,  was  here  last  week. 

Sara  Bauman,  of  the  Bauman  - Massa 
Jewelry  Co.,  has  gone  to  Texas  on  a busi- 
ness trip  which  will  cover  the  south. 

Congressmen  Joy  and  Bartholat  will  pre- 
sent and  endeavor  to  have  passed,  at  the 
coming  session,  the  bill  asking  for  the 
enactment  of  a law  to  designate  sterling 
silver  and  gold  by  government  standard 
mark. 

The  quarterly  report  of  the  doings  of  the 
Retail  Jewelers’  Association  is  being  mailed 
to  the  members  of  the  association.  It  con- 
tains some  very  interesting  matter.  The 
assays  of  the  different  silver  manufacturers 
is  embodied  in  the  report. 

Wm.  T.  Gough,  Carter,  Sloan  & Co.,  was 
in  the  city  last  week;  also  L.  F.  Clark,  W. 
F.  Cory  & Bro.;  T.  L.  Carrow,  Mandeville, 
Carrow  & Crane;  M.  Galasund,  Renommee 
Mfg.  Co.;  Millard  Veit,  Mar  x,  Viet,&  Co.; 
and  Henry  H.  Jacobson,  Jacobson  Brothers 


Xov.  13.  iSgs. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR — Wfstern  Supplemevt. 


33 


Minneapolis  and  St.  Paul. 

S.  N.  Waldron,  Eden  Valley,  Minn.,  was 
married  Occ.  31st,  at  St.  Cloud,  Minn  , .0 
liis  step  daughter,  his  wife  having  died  a 
year  ago. 

Munns  & Pomerleua,  Minneapolis,  last 
week  removed  from  202  Central  Ave.  to 
No.  2o8  same  street,  and  now  occupies  an 
entire  store. 

C.  Weding,  Minneapolis,  who  several 
years  ago  retired  from  the  jewelry  busi- 
ness, has  again  started  in  the  same  busi- 
ness at  his  former  stand,  1411  Washington 
Ave.  S. 

E.  E.  Spaulding,  representing  the  Bassett 
Jewelry  Co.,  New  York,  has  rented  an 
office  in  the  Lumber  Exchange  building, 
Minneapolis,  which  he  intends  to  make  his 
permanent  quarters. 

Out  of-town  jewelers  visiting  the  Twin 
Cities  the  past  week  were  : E.  J.  Steuer- 
wald,  Brookings,  S.  Dak.;  C.  H.  Todd,  New 
Richmond,  Wis. ; A.  W.  Voedisch,  Aber- 
deen, S.  Dak.;  Lucien  Diacon,  Chaska, 
Minn. 


William  H.  Adams,  as  assignee  of  Samuel 
Lacs,  Minneapolis,  appeared  before  Judge 
Smith  last  week  with  an  application  asking 
the  court  to  grant  him  permission  to  in- 
spect the  books  and  papers  and  documents 
of  the  adverse  parties  in  the  suit  brought 
against  A.  S.  Lovett  & Co.  The  court 
denied  the  motion,  but  intimated  that 
another  application  would  be  granted  if  it 
should  be  confined  solely  to  the  facts  in 
controversy. 

Columbus. 

E.  M.  Blauvelt  has  removed  his  stock  of 
jewelry  to  the  new  Chittenden  building. 

Charles  and  Frank  Oger  have  gone  into 
the  jewelry  business  in  the  Monnypenny 
block. 

John  Painter,  formerly  engraver  for  F.  F. 
Bonnet,  has  established  himself  in  business 
on  High  St. 

Miss  Hudson,  who  has  been  with  her 
brother,  J.  B.  Hudson,  in  the  jewelry  busi- 
ness in  Minneapolis,  Minn.,  is  with  F.  F. 
Bonnet,  this  city. 


San  Francisco. 

Theodore  B.  Starr  and  wife,  of  New 
York,  were  at  the  Palace  Hotel  last  week. 

Fred  Roth,  of  L.  Strasburger’s  Son  & 
Co.,  New  York,  was  here  some  days 
ago. 

Barrett  & Sherwood  are  contemplating 
holding  an  auction  in  the  course  of  a few 
weeks. 

E.  C.  Martiave,  of  Phelps  & Miller,  re- 
ports from  southern  California  that  business 
is  very  good  in  that  section. 

J.  B.  Klune,  of  Klune  & Floberg,  Sacra- 
mento, Cal.,  was  in  the  city  last  week  He 
is  slowly  convalescing  from  a severe  attack 
of  illness. 

The  following  buyers  were  in  town  re- 
I cently:  J.  H.  Langhorst,  Jackson,  Cal.; 

O.  M.  Campbell,  Petaluma,  Cal.;  and  I. 
Me  Mannus,  San  Luis  Obispo,  Cal. 

M.  Wunsch  & Co.,  in  Sutter  St.,  will 
close  out  their  entire  stock  at  auction  and 
retire  from  business.  Mr.  Wunsch  has 
I been  in  business  in  this  city  for  the  past  35 
years. 


REPRESENTATIVE  CHICAGO  HOUSES. 


ELMER  A.  RICH,  PRES. 


HERBERT  W.  ALLEN,  TREAS. 


RICH  & ALLEN  CO  , 

126  STATE  STREET, 

CHICAGO.  ILL. 


JOHN  H.  MERTZ,  SEC’Y. 


AND 


DIAMONDS 
PR”CIOUS  STONES, 


LOOSE  AND  MOUNTED. 


=:-»  MEMORANDUM  PACKAGES  SENT  TO  THE  TRADE  ON  APPLICATION.  ®= 


OJPTIOX^JNJ  S"  SOXiOOXa. 

If  you  want  a GOOD  ROOF  over  your  head,  come  to  our  school.  We 
Earnest  students,  leave  the  rest  te  us,  we  do  not  want  diploma  hunterrt 

The  Chicago  Ophthalmic  College  and  Hospital; 

H.  M.  MARTIN  M.  D.,  PRESIDENT.  607  VAN  BUEEN  ST.,  OHIOA&O 

Being  the  oldest  and  most  favorably  known  College  of  Theoretical  and  Appliec 
Ophthalmic  Optics  in  America,  having  more  thoroughly  qualified  opticians  n the  field  than 
all  other  so>called  schools  combined*  


SPIES  & CO., 


DIAMOND  MOUNTING, 
REPAIRING. 


126  STATE  ST.. 


CHICAGO,  ILL. 


Watch  Case  Maniiracturcrs 

F.  H.  JACOBSON  & CO. 

96  STATE  ST,  CHICAGO. 

REPAIRING. 


ft 


DVERTISE  YOUR  WANTS  IN  OUR 

SPKCIAL  NOTICE  PACE 

\ 


GENEVA  OPTICAL  CO. 

67  and  69  Washington  St., 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


Geneva  Grip  Eyeglasses. 

The  construction  is  such  as  can  be  seen  from  the 
accompanying  illustrations,  that  they  can  be  adjusted 
to  perfectly  conform  to  the  anatomy  of  any  nose,  no 
matter  what  the  shape. 


SEND  POH  SAMPLES  AND  PRICE  LIST. 


PRESOKIPTION  Made  with  Promptness 
WOKE  And  Accuracy. 


BULLETIN,  NOV.,  1895. 


Wholesale  Jewelers.  Chicago. 


‘Busiest  House  in  America”  1896  Catalogue  ready. 
The  largest,  finest  and  best  arranged  catalogue  in 
the  jewelry  business.  Sent  to  Jewelers  on 
application. 


QOLDSniTH  BROS., 

63  & 66  WASHINGTON  STREET,  CHICAGO,  ILL. 

“rSTIMATF.8  GIVEN  ON  GOLD  AND  SILVEB.  IF  NOT  SATISFAOTOBf  WE  WILL  RETUBN  SHIPMENT  INTACT  AND  P<IY  ALL  OHARGES.”  


)4 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  Western  Supplement. 


Nov  13,  1895. 


Hammersmith  & Field  have  closed  their 
auction  sale  for  the  present. 


PaciHc  Coast  Notes. 

J.  P.  Lowe,  Dunsinner,  Cal.,  has  opened 
his  new  store. 

E.  Foltz,  watchmaker  and  jeweler,  has 
opened  a branch  shop  in  Tres  Pinos,  Cal. 

The  daughter  of  S.  Conrad,  Los  An- 
geles, Cal.,  will  be  married  on  Nov.  27  to  a 
Mr.  Vance. 

Ingalls  & Cragg,  of  Castle  Rock,  Wash., 
have  formed  a partnership  and  located  in 
South  Bend,  Wash.  There  are  now  three 
jewelry  firms  in  South  Bend,  while  Castle 
Rock  has  none. 

Indianapolis. 

IRADE  CONDITIONS. 

October  trade  failed  to  come  up  to  the 
expectations  of  local  jewelers,  although  it 
was  an  improvement  over  the  same  month 
last  year.  Business  in  the  country  was 
much  better  than  in  the  city. 

Sam  Thall  is  about  to  open  a new  jewelry 
store  in  Red  Key,  Ind. 

W.  Teeter,  Middletown,  Ind.,  was  here 
last  week  selecting  new  goods. 

L.  W.  Comstock  has  succeeded  Robt. 
Heaton  as  Indiana  and  Illinois  representa- 
tive for  Heaton,  Sims  & Co. 


R ARSONS  1 School 

FOR 

W/lTCHnflKER5. 

PEOIJIA,  ILL 

Send  for  Circular  and  Terms 

PARSONS  <Sc  CO 


G.  R.  Reber  will  shortly  occupy  hand- 
some quarters  in  the  new  Pembroke  Arcade, 
Virginia  Ave.  Mr.  Reber  occupied  this 
same  site  for  18  years  and  temporarily  re- 
moved while  the  new  building  was  being 
erected.  

Detroit. 

B.  Jackson,  jeweler,  Youngstown.  N.  Y., 
has  opened  a well  appointed  store  in  Mon- 
roe, Mich. 

The  stock  of  E.  C.  Jobes,  Fenton,  was 
last  week  sold  to  Benj.  Allen  & Co., 
Chicago.  The  price  paid  was  about  $1,500. 

D.  E.  Holland,  jeweler,  Lapeer,  Mich., 
last  week  moved  his  stock  and  fixtures  into 
new  quarters  in  the  new  Hart-Lincoln  block. 

A.  L.  Gark  has  sold  his  jewelry  stock  in 
Imlay  City,  Mich.,  to  J.  M.  Farnsworth. 
Mr.  Gark  will  shortly  start  in  the  business 
again  in  Flushing,  Mich. 

Two  judgments  were  last  week  taken 
before  Justice  Simpson  against  the  old 
firm  of  F.  G.  Smith,  Sons  & Co.  One  was 
m favor  of  John  W.  Reddall,  for  $65. 78, and 
the  other  in  favor  of  Wm.  B.  Kerr  & Co., 
for  $477.50. 

Mail  orders  last  week  were  plentiful  and 
of  generous  proportions,  and  jobbers  report 
that  city  trade  is  purchasing  more  freely. 
Onl/  a few  Michigan  country  jewelers  were 
in  the  city  among  whom  were;  John  Web- 
ber, Wayne;  A.  Greger,  Bay  City,  and  J.  S. 
McLachlan,  Wyandotte. 

George  Sharrar  has  caused  the  arrest  of 
jeweler  E.  C.  Taylor,  Alma,  Mich.,  on  a 
capias,  for  alleged  defamation  of  character. 
Sharrar  claims  $5,000  damages.  Taylor,  it 
is  alleged,  made  some  rash  statements  con- 
cerning the  complainant’s  relations  with  a 
certain  woman  there.  The  jeweler  was 
allowed  to  go  on  bail. 


Kansas  City. 

C.  A.  Kiger  has  left  on  a business  trip  to 
last  several  weeks. 

W.  E.  Fingenbaum,  Oregon,  Mo.,  spent 
several  days  in  town  last  week. 

J.  L.  Hodgson,  watchmaker,  formerly  of 
Maitland,  Mo.,  is  now  with  J.  Shellenberger 
& Son,  Mound  City,  Mo. 

G.  W.  Rowley  has  opened  a new  jewelry 
store  in  McPherson,  Kan.  He  has  a 
good  business  location  and  an  entirely  new 
stock. 

G.  O.  Schneider  is  moving  his  store  back 
10  feet  in  compliance  with  the  new  boule- 
vard law,  and  at  the  same  time  is  remodel- 
ing the  front  and  interior. 

The  report  of  M.  Glass,  assignee  of  the 
R.  N.  Herschfield  Jewelry  Co.,  who  failed 
recently,  was  filed  in  Judge  Scarritt’s  court 
Nov.  4th.  It  states  that  there  was  already 
a mortgage  on  the  stock  when  he  was  ap- 
pointed assignee  and  that  the  bank  holding 
the  mortgage  sold  the  goods  and  got  the 
proceeds,  leaving  nidhing  for  the  other 
creditors. 

The  following  out-of-town  buyers  were 
here  last  week;  C.  H.  Morrison,  Topeka, 
Kan. ; J.  B.  Lowe,  Independence,  Mo. ; G.  W. 
Waymere,  Pleasanton,  Kan.;  J.  L.  Potts, 
Marceline,  Mo.;  G.  H.  Sherman,  Paola, 
Kan.;  O.  Kolstad,  Pleasant  Hill.  Mo.;  J.  B. 
Guines,  Lexington,  Mo.;  W.  R.  Willet, 
Olathe,  Kan.;  W.  S.  Laisen,  La  Junta,  Col.; 
A.  Gluck,  Dodge  City.  Kan. 


Lyman  Barnett,  Omro,  Wis.,  recently 
sold  out  to  Chas.  Chase. 

The  jewelery  store  of  Charles  and  Julius 
Wurston,  Huntington,  Ind.,  was  robbed  of  35 
gold  watches  valued  at  $900  last  week.  The 
thieves  were  caught  in  the  act. 


Too  Many  Samples 

Our  Fall  line  of  Samples,  received  from  our  various  factories,  is  so  large  we  find  it 
woidd  be  impossible  to  carry  them  in  trunks  on  the  road,  therefore  we  have  been  compelled 
to  display  them  at  our 

Western  Sample  Rooms,  No.  228  West  Fourth  Street,  Cincinnati,  Ohio, 

where  we  cordially  invite  you  to  call  and  inspect 

Rich  American  Cut  Glass,  Fine  Imported  China  and  Fancy  Brio-a-Brac, 

Tortoise  Shell  Combs,  Leather  Novelties, 

Wares  in  Sterling  Silver,  Rookwood  Pottery  (Sole  Agents). 


WE  ARE  NOT  JOBBERS,  BUT 
MANUFACTURERS’  SELLING  AGENTS 


Bloom  & Phillips. 


L.  BLESCH,  Secretary. 

XHE  QUEEN 


C.  A.  REMME,  Manager. 

CITY 


H.  DUNWOODIE,  Treasurer. 

WATCH  CAh$E 

MANUFACTURING  COMPAN 


Manufacturers  of  Fine  Gold  and  Silver  WATCH  CASES. 


Y, 


Special  Attention  Given  to  Repairing. 
Altering  Rnglish  and  Swiss  to  American. 
Gold  Plating. 

ESTIMATES  CHEERFULLY  GIVEN. 


New  No.  i2g  East  Fourth  Street  (Keck  Bui  ding), 

Cincinnati,  Ohio. 

SEND  FOR  PRICE  LIST. 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


35 


Catalogues  of  the  Season. 


R.  Wallace  & Sons 
Mfg.  Co.’s  Fine 
Silverware  Cat- 
alogue. 


Am  A G N I F I- 
cent  produc- 
tion is  the  sterling 
silverware  c a t a- 
logue  for  1895  of 
the  R.  Wallace  & 


Sons  Mfg.  Co.,  Wallingford,  Conn.  The 
volume  is  14  inches  broad  and  10  inches 
high,  and  is  divided  into  two  parts,  one  de- 
voted to  flatware  and  novelties,  and  the 
other  to  hollowware  and  toilet  articles.  The 
former  part  consists  of  93  heavy  pages,  the 
illustrations  being  in  fine  wood  engravings, 
while  the  latter  is  composed  of  104  beauti- 
ful photogravure  sheets.  Uf  the  flatware 
full  lines  of  the  “ Waverley,”  “Louvre,”  the 
new  and  beautiful  “ Sappho”  are  shown, 
making  an  elegant  exhibit,  some  of  the 
fancy  pieces  being  shown  in  photogravure. 
Other  flatware  illustrated  are  various  pat- 
terns of  tea  spoons  in  die  worx,  and  hand 
engraved,  hand  engraved  coffee  spoons, 
small  coffee  spoons  in  numerous  pretty 
patterns,  and  souvenir  spoons.  An  ex- 
ceptionally fine  line  of  novelties  is  illus- 
trated,including  match  boxes, manicure  sets, 
toilet  sets  and  a great  variety  of  useful  and 
ornamental  articles  which  appeal  to  those  of 
artistic  instincts  as  being  real  productions 
of  the  silversmith’s  art.  That  portion  of 
the  catalogue  devoted  to  tea  sets,  vases, 
wine  sets,  prize  cups,  toilet  sets,  bowls  and 
dishes  for  various  purposes,  trays,  I eta-  a-te'e 
sets,  manicure  sets,  sugar  and  cream  sets, 
black  coffee  sets,  jewel  boxes,  inkstands  and 


pages;  bicycles,  etc.,  3 pages;  jobbing  and 
repairs,  2 pages.  The  tools  and  materials 
occupy  a special  catalogue,  which  is  sent 
free  upon  application. 

From  the  above  classification  several 
unique  features  will  be  noted — the  bicycles, 
fire  arms,  safes  and  show  cases.  The  tables 
of  contents  occupying  several  pages  enu- 
merate thousands  of  different  classes  of 
articles,  comprising  everything  conceivable 
made  in  the  various  lines.  An  attractive 
and  notable  feature  of  the  volume  is  the 
32  pages  devoted  to  diamond  jewelry. 
These  pages  are  rif  heavy  paper  and  the 
printing  of  the  thousands  of  jewels  is  in 
tints,  making  the  representations  very  re- 
alistic. This  jewelry  is  in  the  latest  designs 
of  solid  gold,  hand-made,  and  with  finely 
finished  mountings.  The  diplay  is  unpre- 
cedentedly extensive  and  reflects  marked 
ability  upon  the  part  of  the  manager 
of  this  department  of  the  house.  The 
watch  exhibit  in  the  catalogue  is  a 
voluminous  work  in  itself.  This  may 
be  truthfully  said  of  every  department,  so 
complete  is  the  work  and  so  painstaking 
has  been  the  production  of  it.  As  to 
general  information,  terms,  directions  for 
ordering,  etc.,  nothing  desirable  is  omitted. 
An  idea  of  the  extensive  ramifications  of 
the  business  of  S.  F.  Myers  & Co.  is  offered 
in  the  22  photographic  views  of  their  estab- 
lishment, artistically  arranged  on  five  pages 
of  the  book.  Taken  all  together,  the  40th 
catalogue  of  S.  F.  Myers  & Co.  is  an  ad- 
mirable specimen  of  the  printer’s,  engrav- 


er’s and  bookbinder’s  crafts,  and  will  stand 
as  a permanent  lesson  in  catalogue  mak 
ing. 

Racine  jew- 
elry MFG 

Mfg  Co  CO.,  manufacturers 

of  materials,  findings 
and  supplies  for  jewelers,  Racine,  Wis., 
have  issued  a net  price  list  and  catalogue 
of  50  pages,  which  will  prove  of  great  value 
to  the  jeweler  and  should  be  preserved  for 
reference.  The  index  enumerates  about 
120  articles,  comorising  almost  everything 
in  the  line  of  jewelry  findings,  as  well  as  a 
large  assortment  of  badges  and  bangles. 
This  concern  has  been  established  27  years, 
and  this  long  experience,  combined  with  a 
completely  equipped  factory,  guarantees 
them  to  be  able  to  meet  the  wants  of  the 
manufacturer  and  repairer. 

DR.  PETER  HENRY, 

SPECIALIST  IN 

Watch  Case  Diseases 

Key  Winders 
changed  to 
Stem  Windcrs- 

Hunting  Case 
changed  to  O.s 

English  Case 
changed  to  lit 
American 

movements^ 

Can  be  cured  at 

53 

LONGWORTH  ST, 

Cincinnati,  Ohio. 


accessories,  water  sets,  salt  bottles  and 
other  large  pieces  of  silver,  and  case 
goods  will  be  examined  with  much  interest 
by  the  jeweler.  In  these  lines  are  seen 
some  of  the  highest  expressions  of  the  sil- 
versmiths’ art.  The  catalogue  itself  harmo- 
nizes with  the  character  of  the  goods  de- 
scribed and  illustrated,  it  being  a master- 
piece of  the  printer’s  and  engraver’s  crafts. 
It  reflects  the  highest  credit  upon  the  com- 
pany who  issue  it  to  the  trade, 

The  1896  catalogue 
No.  40,  of  S.  F. 

Mammoth  ’ +s-5o 

Maiden  Lane  and  33-35 

Catalogue.  Liberty  St.,  New  York, 
is  out.  It  is  a stupend- 
ous work,  being  the  largest  of  its  kind  that 
has  come  under  our  notice.  It  contains  820 
pages,  9x12  inches  in  dimensions.  This 
enormous  number  of  pages,  showing  over 
21,000  engravings,  is  divided  into  the  fol- 
lowing departments;  Diamonds,  31  pages; 
watches,  93  pages;  gold  jewelry,  plated 
jewelry,  and  silver  jewelry  and  novelties,  225 
pages;  pens,  pencils,  etc.,  5 pages;  canes 
and  umbrellas,  6 pages;  solid  silver  ware, 
26  pages;  cut  glass  ware,  2 pages;  silver 
plated  ware,  125  pages;  cutlery,  9 pages; 
clock,  143  pages;  bronzes,  lamps,  etc.,  5 
pages;  optical  goods,  47  pages;  jewelers’ 
findings,  20  pages;  plush  cases,  boxes,  etc., 
17  pages;  musical  merchandise,  27  pages; 
fire  arms,  5 pages;  safes,  show  cases,  etc.,  2 


STERLING  SILVER  WARE 


In  addition  to  oar  already'  large 
stock,  we  have  added  a line 


Sterling 


Silver 


Ware 


If  yon  want 
nice,  new,  sal- 
able goods  in  this 
line— goods  that  are 
guaranteed  to  he  hue 
— send  your  orders  to 


ALBERT  BROS. 

Wholesale  Jewelers, 

Pike  Building,  Cincinnati,  0. 


\SENOlFOR  ILLUSTRATIONS  AND  PRICES. 


36 


THE  JEWELERS'  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


OVEre  HALF  A THOUSANID  SOLD  DAILY! 

OF  WHAT?  WHY 

THE  IDOL. 

— ^SAMPLE  SENT  POST  PAID  TO  ANY  JEWELER  FOR  $1.50.^=^^^ 

STEM  WINDING,  CYLINDER  MOVEMENT,  HIGHLY  FINISHED, 

NICKEL  MOVEMENT,  NICKEL  CASES.  EXCELLENT  TIME  KEEPER, 

HANDSOME  APPEARANCE,  CONVENIENT  SIZE, 

ABSOLUTELY  THE  BEST  LOW  PRICED  WATCH  EVER  MADE. 

LIBERAL  DISCOUNT  FOR  QUANTITIES.  ORDER  EARLY  IF  YOU  WANT  THEM. 

L.  S.  FRIEDBERCER  2^  CO., 


L.  Sauter  & Co., 

DEALERS  IN  DIAMONDS 

. . . AND  . . . 

MAKERS  OF  FINE  JEWELRY, 

194  BROADWAY,  NEW  YORK. 

Selection  Packages  Sent  on  Request.  Mouwting  of  Diamonts  and 

OTHER  PRECIOUS  STONES  IN  NEW  AND  ORIGINAL  DESIGNS  A SPECIALTY. 

THE  STATIONERS’  ENGRAVING  CO., 

98,  100,  102  NASSAU  ST.,  NEW  YOHK. 

MAKERS  OF 

WEDDING  INVITATIONS,  RECEPTION  AND  VISIT INQ  CARDS 

of  the  Best  Quality,  which  are  offered  to  Stationers  of  recognized  standing  and  reputation  only 
Avoid  Dry-qoods  ‘5l''re  Compel  tion  by  always  ordering  those  bearing  our  registered  trade  mark  “ SILVER  WHITE 

X^IVC.  ISHVIXTH  cto  oo>.. 

Manufacturers  of  Bold,  Silver  and  Roll  Plate  Ghaius  and  Jewelry. 


Novelties  in  Gold  and  Silver  Bead  Necklaces  and  Bracelets.  Also  a large  line  of 
Chain  Trimmings  and  Silver  Rings. 

Office:  5 and  7 Maiden  Lane.  New  York.  Manufactory:  61  Peck  Street,  Providence,  E.  1, 


ONE  TRIAL 

OF  OUR  WORK  ON  REFINING  OF  ALL 
KINDS  WILL  CONVINCE  YOU  THAT 
OUR  RETURNS  ARE  THE  BEST, 


CONVINCE  YOURSELF. 


GEO.  M.  BAKER, 

Gold  aod  Silver  Refiner  and  Sweep  Smelter 

PROVIDENCE  R.  I. 

DON’T  FORGET  THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S  BOOK  LIST  when  in  want  of  an,  tech- 
nical book  in  the  Jewelr  or  Kindred  Trades. 


OUR  PLAN  15  WORKING  WELL. 


CHOICE  PAPERS 


JEWELERS  ARE  FINDING  THAT  A LINE  OF  PAPERS  SOLD 
ONLY  TO  THE  REGULAR  STATIONERY  TRADE  IS  WHAT 
THEY  V/ANT. 

ESPECIALLY  WHEN  THAT  LINE  IS  THE  BEST  IN  THE 
WORLD. 

WRITE  TO  US  FOR  SAMPLES,  AND  JUDGE  FOR  YOURSELF. 

Parsons  Greene  Co., 

Manufacturing  Stationers. 

18  MURRAY  ST..  NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  13.  iSys 


ANO  HOROLOGiCAL  REVIEW. 


37 


Connecticut. 

Plaut  & Co.,  Meriden,  have  added  a piano 
department  to  their  business 

L.  Massicotte,  jeweler,  Danielsonville, 
will  occupy  a store  now  being  erected. 

The  annual  opening  at  Henry  Kohn  & 
Sons’ jewelry  establishment,  360  Main  St., 
Hartford,  occurred  on  Friday  and  Saturday. 
A magnificent  new  stock  was  shown. 

W.  V.  Linden,  optician,  has  leased  part 
of  a store,  23  Broadway,  New  Haven,  and 
is  fitting  it  up  and  will  open  with  a new 
stock  of  optical  goods  in  a few  days. 

Herman  C.  Parker,  a graduate  of  the 
Waltham  Horological  school,  Waltham, 
Mass.,  has  taken  a position  as  watch  re- 
pairer at  M.  L.  Carter  & Co.’s  jewelry  store, 
Danbury. 

A large  addition  to  the  factory  of  the 
Holmes  & Edwards  Silver  Co.,  Bridgeport, 
is  now  in  progress  of  construction.  Busi- 
ness is  so  lively  with  this  concern  that  the 
factory  is  being  run  nights. 

The  Bradley  & Huobard  Mfg.  Co., 
Meriden,  are  having  a large  addition  built 
to  their  already  extensive  works.  The  new 
part  will  be  over  353  feet  long,  43  feet  wide, 
and  one  story  high.  When  first  begun  the 
design  was  to  have  the  new  building  300 
feet  long  but  it  has  been  decided  to  make  it 
53  feet  longer.  The  new  building  will  be 
used  for  blacksmith  shop  and  foundry  pur- 
poses. 


JEWELERS’  ART  STATIONERY. 


NOTES  ON  AND  FASHIONS  IN  FINE  CORRESPONDENCE  AND  INVITATION 
PAPERS,  WEDDING  AND  VISITING  CARDS,  NOVELTIES,  ETC. 


Jewelers’  Art  Stationery  Departments. 


QALT  & BRO.,  Washington,  D.  C.,  who 
have  had  an  established  business 
since  1802,  have  had  an  art  stationery  de- 
partment for  a number  of  years.  Mr.  Grey, 
the  genial  manager  of  the  department,  says 
that  for  the  last  year  or  two  they  have 
given  it  special  attention,  and  their  display 
is  both  neat  and  attractive.  They  handle 
Hurd’s  papers. 

The  two  principal  novelties  for  the  com- 
ing season  which  will  open  about  the 
middle  of  November,  are  golf  and  bicycle 
papers.  The  former  is,  of  course,  only  a 
passing  fad,  but  the  latter,  it  is  thought, 
will  become  very  popular.  Galt  & Bro., 
share  the  cream  of  this  trade  with  Brentano, 
the  best  stationer  of  the  city,  located  a few 
doors  below.  The  reason  that  no  other 
jewelry  stores  in  Washington  handle  these 
goods  is  perhaps  due  to  the  fact  that  Gault 
& Bro.  have  the  best  trade,  and  the 
middle  class  find  what  they  require  in  the 
various  large  department  stores  of  the  city. 

The  new  feature  lately  adopted  by  some 
jewelry  establishments  of  selling  what  may 
be  termed  “delicate”  stationery,  and  all  the 


attendant  knick-knacks  of  the  writing  desk, 
has  made  some  headway  in  Montreal, 
Canada.  One  of  the  windows  of  the  large 
jewelry  store  of  Henry  Birks  & Sons.  St. 
Catherine  St.,  is  devoted  to  a display  ot 
extra  fine  note  paper  and  envelopes,  deli- 
cately tinted  and  aesthetic  There  are  writ- 
ing tablets,  gold  and  silver  pens  and  pencil 
holders,  paper  weights,  memorandum  books 
etc.,  etc  , all  being  high  class  goods.  Out- 
side of  Henry  Birks  & Sons  there  is  little 
of  the  stationery  business  done  at  present, 
as  none  of  the  jewelers  have  the  facilities  for 
doing  so,  like  the  large  uptown  firm. 


The  Popularity  of  Crane's  Papers. 


CRANE’S  Old  Style  Bond  in  white,  azure 
and  shell  rose  is  losing  none  ot  its 
popularity  with  the  trade.  It  is  of  the  same 
standing  quality  as  the  regular  Crane’s 
bond,  but  is  made  with  the  peculiar  snow- 
flake appearance  which  is  so  desirable.  The 
effect  is  very  striking.  This  paper  is  to  be 
had  only  of  Geo.  B.  Hurd  & Co.,  425-427 
Broome  St  , New  York.  Crane’s  “Buckram,” 
bond  in  white,  blue  and  French  grey  is  also 
one  of  the  reigning  finishes. 


P apersThat  Please,  Pay. 

OUR  PAPERS  PLEASE.  THEY  PLEASE  THE  JEWELER  AND 
THEY  PLEASE  THE  CUSTOMER.  WHEN  YOU  HAVE  ONCE 
SOLD  A BOX  OF  OUR  FASHIONABLE  STATIONERY,  SUCH  AS 
CRANE'S  EARLY  ENGLISH,  PRINCE  OF  WALES  OR  EMPERIOR 
NAPOLEON,  YOU  HAVE  MADE  A FRIEND  FOR  HURD'S 
PAPERS  WHO  WILL  COME  AGAIN  AND  WHO  WILL  BRING 
HIS  FRIENDS  AND  HIS  FRIENDS'  FRIENDS. 

AS  THE  RESULT  OF  OUR  MANY  YEARS  EXPERIENCE,  WE 
MANUFACTURE  THE  FINEST  LINE  OF  STATIONERY  IN  THE 
MARKET.  SAMPLES?  CERTAINLY,  WRITE. 

GEO.  B.  HURD  & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

FINE  STATIONERY, 

HURD’S  NAME  ON  THE  BOX.”-  425=427  Broome  St.,  N.  Y. 

EVERYONE  KNOWS  WHAT  THAT  MEANS. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


3» 


Avt  ^tationcvy. 

( Continued  from  page  jj.) 


Fall  business  is  reported  by  the  Parsons 
& Greene  Co.,  makers  of  fine  stationery,  as 
being  very  satisfactory.  The  legitimate 
jewelry  and  stationery  trades,  to  which 
they  cater,  are  showing  their  appreciation 
of  the  fine  papers  manufactured  by  this 
company.  There  is  a great  demand  for 
their  Scotch  Linens  from  fashionable  buy- 
ers this  year.  Other  stales  that  are  meet- 
ing with  well  deserved  success  are  Vellum 
Laid,  Velvet  Finish,  and  Parson’s  First 
Class  Bond.  The  Parsons  & Greene  Co. 
claim  for  all  of  their  goods  exclusiveness 
and  freshness.  They  include  no  outre 
tints.  A handsome  sample  book  showing 
a large  variety  of  popular  papers  will  be 
furnished  jewelers  upon  application.  The 
offices  of  the  company  are  at  i8  Murray  St., 
New  York. 


The  Latest  Patents. 


ISSUE  OF  NOVEMBER  5,  1895. 


.54»,Uil.  COMB.  Lewis  A.  Schultz,  Wilkins- 
burg.  Pa.— Filed  May  lo,  1895.  Serial  No.  548,851. 
(No  model.) 


.549, ALARM-CLOCK.  Almeron  M Lane, 
Meriden,  Conn.— Filed  Apr.  26,  1895.  Serial  No. 


547,213.  (No  model.) 

.549,-2.5«.  TOOL-HOLDER  FOR  JEWELERS’ 
LATHES.  Thomas  P.  Owens,  Adams.  Neb. 
—Filed  July  17,  1894.  Serial  No.  517,781.  (No 
model.) 


A safety  device  for  combs,  comprising,  in  combina- 
tion with  a comb,  a bearing  secured  to  the  comb,  a 
downwardly  projecting  hook  hinged  in  the  bearing 
having  a retracting  finger  piece. 

549,165.  FOUNTAIN-PEN.  William  W. 

Stewart,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. — Filed  Feb.  17, 1893. 

Serial  No.  468,686.  (No  model.) 


In  a fountain  pen,  a holder  having  a nozzle  com- 
bined with  a tubular  feed-bar  extended  through  the 
nozzle  and  communicating  with  the  pen,  and  an  elastic 
split  vent  tube  inserted  through  the  bore  of  the  feed- 
bar  engaging  the  bore  frictionally,  so  as  to  be  adjust- 
able up  and  down,  and  its  legs  tending  to  spring  apart 
so  that  when  they  project  below  the  feed-bar  they 
diverge 

549,166.  FOUNTAIN-PEN.  William  W 
Stewart,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.--Filed  Apr.  11,  1895, 
Serial  No.  545,373.  (No  model  ) 


The  herein  described  lathe-attachment,  the  same 
consisting  of  the  hollow  stationary  shaft,  a rotatable 
shaft  supported  therein  and  adapted  at  one  end  for 
receiving  motion  from  a lathe,  a tool  receiving-device 
at  the  opposite  end  of  the  rotatable  shaft,  and  an 
intermediate  support  for  the  stationary  hollow  shaft, 
and  adapted  at  its  lower  end  to  be  secured  to  the  rest 
of  a lathe. 

.549.27?^.  INDIVIDUAL  COMMUNION-SER- 
VICE. Edward  W.  Ryan,  Ypsilanti,  Mich. — 
Filed  July  16,  1894.  Serial  No.  517,627.  (.No 
model.) 


The  combination  with  a base  having  a seat  formed 
with  an  irregularity  in  its  wall,  of  a cup  comprising  a 
base  having  an  irregularity  conforming  substantially 
to  the  irregularity  of  the  seat,  and  a bowl  having  its 
upper  edge  inclined  throughout,  from  rear  to  front. 

549,287.  WATCH.  Bahne  Bonniksen,  Coven- 
try, England.— Filed  Jan.  18,  1894  Serial  No. 
497,3i6-  (No  model.)  Patented  in  England  Nov. 
24,  1892,  No.  21,421. 


5 49,186.  ELECTROLYTIC  APPARATUS. 
Thomas  Craney,  Bay  City,  Mich.— Filed  Mar. 
16,  1893.  Serial  No.  466,213.  (No  model.) 
549,191.  COMBINED  NAME-PLATE  AND 
HAT-HOOK.  August  H.  Fubstnow,  Fond 


du  Lac,  Wis. — Filed  Mar.  8,  1895.  Serial  No.  541,- 
014.  (No  model.) 


In  a time  piece,  a time  correcting  device  consisting 
of  a turnable  body  having  an  independent  axis,  and 
supporting  an  escapement  device,  the  axis  of  said  body 
being  coincident  with  the  axis  of  a wheel  of  the  said 
time  piece,  the  pivot  of  the  said  wheel  passing  through 
an  opening  in  the  axis  trunnion  of  the  said  body,  and 
having  a turnable  bearing  with  the  latter,  and  a means 
for  moving  said  body 


Nov.  13  1895. 


,549,289.  CABINET  FOR  HOLDING,  DIS- 
PLAYING AND  RATI  NG  WATCHES.  Ros- 
COE  M.  Floyd,  Boston,  Mass. — Filed  July  25, 
1895.  Serial  No.  557,085.  (No  model.) 


A cabinet  for  rating  watches  for  adjustment  to  heat 
and  cold,  said  cabinet  being  divided  into  compart* 
ments  of  successive  grades  of  temperature,  and  having 
a refrigerating  chamber  and  a heating  chamber,  a cold 
air  compartment  cooled  from  thejefrigerating  chamber, 
a compartment  for  medium  temperatures  with  pipes 
leading  thereinto  from  both  the  refrigerating  chamber 
and  ithe  heating  chamber,  and  valves  to  regulate  the 
supply  of  cold  air  and  hot  air,  and  a compartment  for 
high  temperatures  having  a pipe  leading  thereto  from 
the  heating  chamber,  and  a valve  to  regulate  the  sup- 
ply of  hot  air. 

549,:i.54.  WORK-HOLDER  FOR  EVEGASSES. 
James  H.  Gallup,  Denver,  Col.  — Filed  July  9, 
1895.  Serial  No.  555,409.  (No  model.) 


The  combination  with  the  arms,  the  ends  of  which 
are  made  to  conform  to  the  shape  of  eyeglass  studs, 
of  the  lever  pivoted  to  one  of  said  arm  ends,  and  a 
slidable  spring  controlled  bar  adapted  to  operate  the 
said  lever. 

519,434.  SHIRT  OR  OTHER  STUD.  George 
W.  Budd,  London,  England.— Filed  June  13, 1895. 
Serial  No.  552,656.  (No  model.)  Patented  in 
England  Sept.  6,  1893,  No.  16,774,  and  June  i,  1894, 
No.  10,645. 


In  a stud,  a head,  a base  and  a rigidly  connecting 
stem  in  combination  with  a movable  clamping  flange 
and  stem,  a spring  which  normally  holds  the  movable 
flange  in  contact  with  the  fixed  base,  and  a tube  in- 
closing the  spring  a bayonet  jointed  slot  in  the  tube 
and  a pin  on  one  of  the  stems  which  moves  in  said 
slot  whereby  the  clamping  flange  may  be  held  apart 
from  the  base,  the  stud  as  a whole  being  non- 
separable. 


Nov.  13  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


39 


World  of  Invention. 


STYLE  B SINGLE  ACTING  POWER  PRESS. 

This  adjustable  frame  over-hang  press  is 
■open-back,  and  designed  so  as  to  give  large 
die  space,  permitting  the  stock  to  be  fed 
sideways  or  from  front  to  back.  It  is 
specially  adapted  for  cutting  and  punching 
articles  from  sheet  metal,  such  as  can  tops 
and  bottoms,  gas  fixtures,  umbrella  and 
pocket  book  trimmings,  watch  parts,  jew- 


elry, silver  and  brass  work,  as  well  as  vari- 
ous parts  of  electrical  apparatus.  These 
machines  for  rigidity,  workmanship  and 
design  cannot  be  surpassed.  The  crank 
shaft  is  made  of  steel,  of  such  diameter  that 
the  crank  is  cut  from  the  solid,  leaving  the 
diameter  of  the  shaft  extra  large  where  it 
enters  the  bearings.  These  bearings  are 
fitted  with  bushings,  which  can  be  replaced 
when  worn.  For  adjustment  of  dies  the 
sleeve  connection  is  used,  wh'ch  is  exceed- 
ingly strong  and  one  that  will  not  loosen  by 
the  shock  or  jar  of  the  press.  The  clutch 
on  the  balance  wheel  is  friction,  of  recent 
design,  and  grips  the  instant  the  treadle  is 
pressed.  It  is  made  with  a safety  catch  or 
stop,  so  that  the  shaft  can  make  but  one 
revolution,  after  the  operator’s  foot  is  re- 
moved from  the  treadle;  also  by  means  of 
this  safety  catch  or  stop,  if  any  accident 
happens  to  the  clutch  or  the  balance  when  it 
sticks  on  the  shaft  from  neglect  to  oil,  the 


slide  cannot  come  down,  injuring  the  tools 
or  the  operator’s  fingers,  which  is  a feature 
which  will  be  appreciated  by  users.  This 
press  is  built  with  dial,  finger,  ratchet  or 
jiatent  friction  power  feed  if  desired.  The 
manufacturers  are  the  Mossberg  Mfg.  Co., 
Attleboro,  Mass. 


Workshop  Notes. 

Regulator  Pins. — In  regulating  a watch, 
t much  care  cannot  be  used  in  laying  the 
balance  spring,  and  its  vibration,  and  the 
]iins  of  the  regulator;  it  must  not  have  too 
much  play. 

No  End  Shake  to  Balance. — It  is  often 
the  case,  says  a correspondent,  that  there 
IS  no  end  shake  to  the  balance  to  make 
it  absolutely  safe  when  screwed  into  the 
case,  and  when  this  happens,  I take  the 
point  of  a sharp  graver  and  prick  up  a burr 
i>n  the  bridge,  but  never  on  the  plate,  as 
any  unskilled  workman  does,  for  the  under 
side  of  the  bridge  never  being  finished,  you 
really  mar  nothing,  and  sometimes  this 
raising  of  the  cock  (or  bridge)  becomes  a 
necessity,  to  have  it  clear  the  rim  of  the 
liilance,  which  if  raised  it  will  clear,  and 
then  by  bending  down  the  end  of  the  cock 
at  the  point  where  the  jewel  is,  and  thus 
1 egulate  the  end  shake. 

Broken  Parts. — The  repairer  will,  in  his 
practice,  meet  with  a certain  set  of  ail- 
ments every  day.  Among  these  are 
'Token  pivots,  worn  pivots  (sometimes  re- 
(|  tiring  new  ones),  worn  holes  in  plates  and 
at  the  intersection  of  barrel  arbor,  ratchet 
and  bridge  of  Swiss  watches,  etc.,  which, 
as  a rule,  require  common  sense  as  much  as 
practice;  and  these  ailments  vary  in 
different  watches  so  that  the  common- 
sense  rule  applies  the  best  to  nearly 
all  these,  and  if  you  have  not  got  common 
mechanical  sense,  then  you  have  mistaken 
your  calling  and  should  do  something  else. 
In  any  of  these  repairs,  don't  “ go  it  blind,” 
but  study  your  case  carefully  and  do  the 
best  thing  you  study  out.  When  there  is  a 
worn  pivot  hole  in  a plate,  and  one  side  is 
countersunk  for  oil,  then  have  a punch 
rounded  at  the  point,  just  the  shape  of  the 
countersink,  and  by  screwing  this  punch 
into  the  vise,  and  with  a smooth  flat-point 
punch  (slightly  cornered,  of  course)  in  one 
hand  and  holding  the  plate  or  bridge  with 
the  other,  with  the  countersink  on  the 
punch,  have  a striker  tap  light  and  quick 
blows,  and  you  move  the  punch  around  on 
the  side  most  worn  (and  one  side  is  almost 
invariably  worn  most,  throwing  the  wheel 
arbor  out  of  upright),  and  close  up,  even  a 
little  too  much , and  then  with  a smooth  round 
broach  enlarge  it,  so  that  it  will  be  the  right 
size,  and  this  leaves  it  hard  and  smooth. 

Broken  Jewels. — As  regards  replacing 
broken  jew’els,  keep  a full  assortment  of 
jewels,  turned  (the  setting)  to  match  any 
make  or  style  of  watch;  except,  of  course, 
Swiss  watches,  and  for  these  keep  a large 
assortment  of  sizes,  both  of  cock  and  foot 
and  wheel  jewels;  a full  stock  once  pro- 
cured will  last  a long  time,  and  are  a good 


investment,  for  with  them  the  repairer  can 
meet  any  emergency.  In  a Swiss  watch  or 
any  watch  where  the  jewel  is  set  into  the 
plate,  have  some  one  of  the  devices  for 
throwing  up  the  burnished  bezel,  and  then 
select  a jewel  that  just  fills  this  space,  and 
then  with  a smooth  pointed  punch,  such  as 
is  used  for  closing  up  a pivot  hole,  turn  this 
bezel  back  by  sliding  this  round  pivoted 
punch  around  the  outside,  making  it  act  as 
a burnisher.  Cap  jewels  can  either  be 
treated  in  the  same  manner  as  the  last, 
or  cut  away  the  setting  and  insert  them  as 
they  are  inserted  in  most  Swiss  watches. 


“Making  a Drill.’’ — No.  2. 

— The  article  on  page  46  of  the  Cir- 
cular, Oct.  31st,  under  the  above 
heading,  was  read  with  a great  deal  of 
interest.  The  directions  for  making 
a drill  in  the  old  way  are  correct,  and 
the  writer  has  made  lots  of  them. 
There  is  one  important  objection  to 
drills  made  in  this  way,  however, 
and  that  is  that  they  are  too  expen- 
sive. We  are  indebted  to  modern 
ingenuity,  skill,  patience  and  the 
investment  of  Jarge  capital  in  this 
one  little  industry  alone  for  the  pro- 
duction of  a drill  that  makes  it  too 
expensive  for  the  “up  to  date  ” mod- 
ern watchmaker  to  make  drills  in  the 
manner  so  correctly  described  in 
the  article  of  October  31st.  The 
modern  drills  that  we  refer  to  are 
the  “ Mascot,”  which  are  furnished 
by  Ezra  F.  Bowman  & Co.,  Lancas- 
ter, Pa.,  at  50  cents  per  dozen,  in- 
cluding a neat  wooden  receiver, 
which  holds  each  drill  separately  and 
has  a cover  over  this  receiver,  which 
thoroughly  protects  the  drills.  They 
can  be  had  in  separate  sizes,  or  12 
sizes  in  a single  dozen,  beginning  at 
.004  of  an  inch  in  diameter  up  to 
.026  inclusive  (skipping  every  other 
number.)  These  drills  are  a mar- 
vel, and  must  be  seen  to  be  appre- 
ciated. Nearly  all  jobbers  in  tools, 
materials  and  supplies  handle  them. 
If,  however,  your  regular  jobber 
should  not  have  them,  Ezra  F.  Bow 
man  & Co.  will  send  you  a dozen, 
postage  paid,  on  receipt  of  the  above 
price.  If  you  are  not  now  a user  of 
these  drills,  you  should  send  for  a 
dozen  to  convince  yourself  of  what 
modern  mechanics  and  capital  have 
done  to  produce  better  drills  than 
you  can  make,  at  a price  at  which  it 
will  be  impossible  for  you  to  produce 
them  yourself. 


40 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


FOR  SPECIAL  HOLIDAY  PRESENTS, 


LORGNETTES,  OPERA  GLASS  HOLDERS, 


OPERA  GLASS  WITH  NEW  FOCUSING  ADJUSTMENT.  NEW  STYLE 
OF  GOLD  SPECTACLES  AND  EYE  GLASSES. 


The  lorgnette  so 
easily  carried,  so  quick* 
ly  lifted  into  its  place, 
in  itself  so  graceful 
and  capable  of  being  as 
effectual  as  a fan,  is  a great 
addition  to  one’s  outfit  for  a 
jaunt,  or  one’s  preparation 
for  theatre  or  opera.  With 
such,  no  creeping  invasion 
of  age,  since  youth  and 
roses,  equally  with  wrinkles 
and  gray  hair  find  it  such  a 
satisfactory  possession. 


New  style 


The  NEW 
I has  the  right  of  way. 

STRONGEST! 
LIGHTEST! 
HANDSOMEST  ! 

and  they  will  give 
no  trouble. 


The  OLD 

has  been  knocked  out. 

The  trouble  of 
broken  frames  ends 
with  the  purchase  of 

SWELL 

FRAMES. 

word  to  the  wise 
is  sufficient. 


The  Audemair  opera 
glass  with  the  focusing 
handle  is  the  most  perfect 
focusing  glass  made.  It  is 
more  easily  adjusted,  and 
more  simple  in  its  con* 
struction  than  any  in  the 
market.  Its  popularity  has 
increased  beyond  all  com* 
prehension. 


There  is  really  no  comfort  without  a holder  to  an  opera  glass.  While  at  a place  of  amusement  it 'al- 
lows the  elbow  to  rest  easily  on  the  arm  of  the  chair,  fatigue  is  reduced  to  a minimum,  and  an  action  often 
ungraceful,  and  always  causing  more  or  less  exertion  when  ‘tight  sleeves  or  wraps  are  involved,  becomes  at 
once  graceful  and  elegant.  These  are  made  in  all  varieties  of  metal  and  pearl. 


Special  Attention  Given  to  Prescription  Work.  All  Done  on  the  Premises. 


Spencer  Optical  Manufacturing  Company,  n?w™york,''n"t 


THINNEST,  STRONQEST,  BEST 


EYE  GLASS  CASE. 


nsk  your  jobber 

FOR  THE 

“SAIT, TV  CASE." 


THE  NEATEST  AND  MOST  COMPACT 
For  Frameless  Offset  Fye  Glasses. 


SDSSrELD,  LORSCH  & CO., 

13  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 


[patent  applied  FOR.J 


P'TABLISHFD  1870. 


SAMUEL  C.  JACKSON, 

MANUFACTURER  OF 

FINE  CASES 

lewelry.  Silverware,  &c.,  also  Hardwood 
Chests,  Trays,  and  Sample  Cases. 

180  BROADWAY, 

NEW  YORK. 


AIKIN-LAMBERT  JEWELRY 


IMPORTERS  OF 


DIAMONDS. 


JOBBERS  IN 


Watches,  Jewelry,  Chains, 

NOVELTIES,  ETC. 

Latest  Designs.  Lowest  Prices. 


NEW  YORK. 

AGENTS  FOR 

ROCKFORD 
WATCH  CO. 


Nov.  13,  1895  . 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


41 


OPTICAL  DEPARTMENT. 


Ocular  Refraction 

AS  RELATES  TO  THE  CORRECTION  OF  VISUAL 
DEFECTS  * 


BY  K.  H.  KNOWLES,  M.  D. 

NOTE — The  purpose  of  this  series  of  articles  is  to 
gave  to  the  student  without  his  having  had  any  previous 
technical  education,  a clear  and  practical  course  of  in- 
struction in  optics  with  its  application  to  the  fitting  of 
glasses.  The  Correspondence  Column  is  open  to  all 
readers  of  The  Jewelers’  Circular.  All  questions 
asked  will  be  fully  answered. 

XX. 

{Conijnenced  Feb.  2j,  i8g^.) 

CHAPTER  V. 

AMETROPIA — (Continued.) 

COMPOUND  hyperopic  astigmatism  is 
that  variety  of  astigmatism  in  which 
we  have  hyperopic  astigmatism  combined 
with  hyperopia,  that  is,  in  addition  to  the 


vex  spherical  lens  and  not  enough  of  the 
convex  cylindrical  lens.  Another  good 
reason  for  correcting  the  astigmatism  first 
is,  that  after  relieving  the  astigmatism  it 
becomes  relatively  easier  to  correct  the 
hyperopia. 

If  the  distance  charts  are  beyond  the 
range  of  vision,  bring  both  Snellen’s  letters 
and  the  clock  dial  within  range  ; then  pro- 
ceed in  the  usual  manner. 

The  illustration  below  will  give  an 
idea  as  to  what  compound  hyperopic  astig- 
matism is. 

It  is  generally  understood  that  compound 
hyperopic  astigmatism  is  an  error,  requir- 
ing a convex  cylindrical  lens  and  a convex 
spherical  lens  to  correct  it  ; but  we  may 
have  a state  or  condition  with  which  to 
deal,  requiring  a concave  cylinder  to  cor- 
rect the  myopic  astigmatism  and  a convex 


MMI'LK  llVl'l.kl.l'lC  ASI  hi.VlA  nSM. 

A.— RAYS  OF  LIGHT  IN  THE  11  JKI7.0.N  FAL  MERIDIAN;  H.— RAYS  OF  LIGHT  IN  THE  VERTICAL  MERIDIAN. 


ellipsoidal  formation  of  the  cornea  to  which 
reference  has  been  made,  the  axial  diam- 
eter of  the  eyeball  is  also  too  short  ; the 
rays  of  light  from  a point  therefore  pass 
through  the  transparent  portions  of  the  eye 
and  both  focus  behind  the  retina,  the  verti- 
cal rays  meeting  in  advance  of  those  rays 
which  travel  in  the  horizontal. 


spherical  lens  to  correct  the  hyperopia. 
Now,  if  the  convex  spherical  lens  corrects  a 
greater  amount  of  hyperopia  than  the  con- 
cave cylindrical  lens  required  to  correct  a 
less  amount  of  myopic  astigmatism,  we 
have  a state  or  condition  characterized  as 
Compound  Hyperopic  Astigmatism.  The 
better  to  illustrate  the  foregoing  statement 


COMPOUND  HYPEROPIC  ASTIGMATIS.M. 

A.— RAYS  OF  LIGHT  IN  THE  HORIZONTAL  MERIDIAN;  B.— RAYS  OF  LIGHT  IN  THE  VERTICAL  MERIDI.AN. 


The  proper  way  to  proceed  in  correcting 
such  an  error  is  to  correct  the  astigmatism 
first  and  then  add  the  spheres  for  the  relief 
of  the  hyperopia.  As  it  often  occurs  that 
if  the  convex  spherical  lens  remains  in  the 
frame  while  testing  for  the  astigmatism,  the 
latter  error  cannot  be  fully  corrected,  and 
the  result  is  that  we  have  too  great  a con- 

‘Copyrighted.  i8g5,  by  The  Jewelers’  Circular  Pub  Co. 


take  the  two  examples  as  follows  : 


COMPOUND  HYPEROPIC  ASTIGMATISM. 


I.  R.  E-  V.  fn  ; ?Jy.  w -{-  i.O^  T “b  I . ax  9u^- 
I..  E.  V.  : Sg.  w -j-  1.  D’  C -t-  i.D“  ax.  go'’. 


2.  K.  E.  V.  Jg  ; 5,9  w i.D’  _ — .75  D-  ax  180“. 
L.  E.  V.  IS  : 18  w -b  i.D-  C — .75  D ax.  180°. 


( To  be  continued.) 


Optical  Correspondence. 


Will  you  kindly  inform  me  as  to  whether  the  several 
optical  schools  have  the  right  to  give  students  a state- 
ment or  certificate  of  having  taken  lectures  or  instruc- 
tions in  refraction?  W.  E. 

Answer  ; The  present  status  of  the  re- 
fractionist  is  such  that  it  remains  unclass- 
ified, and  until  a law  is  passed  restricting 
the  sale  of  spectacles  and  eyeglasses,  any 
one  who  may  desire  can  sell  glasses.  Those 
who  give  instructions  in  optics  have  the 
right  to  state  that  the  pupil  has  spent  some 
time  in  study  with  them.  It  is  expected  of 
persons  who  undertake  to  refract  the  eyes, 
that  they  have  in  their  possession  some 
statement  in  order  that  laymen  may  know 
that  they  have  passed  their  time  under  a 
competent  instructor,  although  there  is 
as  yet  no  written  law  in  relation  to  this 
matter. 


New  Optical  Devices. 


THE  BAUSCH  & LOME  GUARD. 


The  Bausch  & Lomb  guard  is  so  made 
that  all  the  angles  seen  in  the  cut  herewith, 
can  be  bent  from  a stock  of  but  two  dif- 
ferent shapes  of  arms.  The  arm  of  the 
guard  is  formed  of  rounded  metal,  which 


.permits  bending  to  any  needed  angle, 
without  weakening  the  guard.  This  cir- 
cumstance, as  is  very  apparent,  means  a 
great  saving  in  time  and  expense  to  the 
retailer. 

The  guards  are  made  of  nickel  and  gold, 
cork  and  zylonite  lined.  Everyone  should 
have  this  guard  in  stock.  It  is  for  sale  by 
Mclntire,  Magee  & Brown,  southeast  cor- 
ner 8th  and  Sansom  Sts.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


PLAINLY  numbered  TEST  LENSES. 

Fox  & Stendicke,  61  Fulton  St.,  New 
York,  are  out  with  a new  method  of 
marking  the  focus  upon  test  lenses.  The 
figures  are  very  distinct,  being  first 
eaten  into  the  surface  of  the  glass  and  then 
filled  with  the  enamel,  which  maybe  white, 
black  blue,  red  or  gold.  The  enamel  is 
baked  in. 

The  cost  of  placing  such  numbers  upon 
test  lenses  is  surprisingly  light,  and  op- 
ticians will  find  it  worth  while  to  have  the 
lenses  in  test  sets  now  in  use  numbered  as 
above  described.  The  present  method  of 
stamping  the  sign  and  numbers  on  the 
handle  is  unsatisfactory,  because  the  fingers 
-cover  the  handle.  Scratching  the  numbers 
on  the  surface  of  the  glass  is  crude  and  un- 
satisfactory. Fox  & Stendicke  do  not  lay 
claim  to  any  novelty  in  the  above  described 
test  lenses.  Efforts  have  been  made  from 
time  to  time  to  mark  test  lenses  in  this 
way,  but  the  methods  employed  were  so 
expensive  tdat  a general  use  of  such  lenses 
was  out  of  the  question. 


42 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


Monument  to  Ferdinand  Adolph 
Lange. 

The  circular  deplores  the  fact 
that  owing  to  the  press  of  other  matter 
on  its  columns,  it  was  unable  at  the  proper 
time  to  speak  of  the  quarter  centennial 
celebration  on  Aug.  31,  1895,  in  Glashiitte, 
Saxony,  in  honor  of  the  memory  of  Ferdi- 


FERDINAND ADOLPH  LANGE. 

nand  Adolph  Lange,  to  whom  a monument 
was  at  the  same  time  erected.  It  is  un- 
necessary to  enter  into  a minute  biography 
of  the  man,  it  being  sufficiently  well  known 
to  everyone  of  The  Circular’s  readers,  as 
he  was  the  founder  of  the  watch  industry  of 
Glashiitte. 

The  first  incentive  to  the  erection  of  the 
monument  was  given  by  Messrs.  Stiickel, 
of  Berlin,  at  that  time  the  editor  of 
Deutsche-Ufn-Juacher  Zeitung^  Diirrstein, 
of  Dresden,  and  Hulber,  of  Vienna,  who 
together  contributed  several  hundred 
marks  at  the  time  of  the  lo-years’  organiza- 
tion of  the  watchmakers’  school  at  Glas- 
hiitte,  in  1888.  A collection  was  then  taken 
up  among  the  watchmakers  of  Germany, 
which  netted  1,350  marks;  the  town  council 
donated  2,000  marks  and  a site  for  the 
monument,  thereby  swelling  the  gift  to 
4,000  marks.  The  children  of  Lange  gave 
another  1,000  and  finally  the  citizens  do- 
nated 600  marks. 

Several  orations  were  delivered',  but  the 
principal  one  was  that  by  Richard  Lange, 
who  said  in  the  introduction:  “ Honored 

fellow-citizens,  I have  only,  after  mature 
reflection,  consented  to  deliver  the  festival 
oration,  because  I considered  it  to  be  both 
unsuitable  and  unnatural  to  speak  of  the 
merits  of  my  father.  If,  in  spite  of  these 
scruples,  I permitted  myself  to  be  prevailed 
on,  it  was  simply  for  the  reason  that  his 
former  colleagues,  co-laborers  and  personal 
friends,  Grossmann,  Assmann  and 


Schneider,  who,  by  their  hearty,  friendly 
intercourse  and  assistance  were  best  en- 
titled to  enlarge  upon  his  daily  activity 
from  personal  knowledge,  _ are  no  longer 
with  us.  Obviously,  I can  speak  only 
briefly  of  his  unending  activity.” 

The  orator  then  stated  in  substance  that 
his  father  was  the  son  of  a poor  gunmaker, 
and  was  born  in  Dresden,  Feb.  18, 1815.  The 
father  was  exceedingly  iras- 
cible, and  kept  the  son  fre- 
quently from  school  to  assist 
him  in  his  work.  The  boy 
passed  through  a wretched 
childhood,  and  only  after  his 
mother  and  sister  left  the 
choleric  man  did  the  chari- 
tably disposed  take  an  in- 
terest in  him  by  apprenticing 
him  to  a famous  watch- 
maker, who  instructed  him 
well  in  all  the  branches  of 
horology.  After  having 
served  his  time,  he  went  to 
Paris,  worked  in  various  fa- 
mous shops  there  for  four 
years,  and  returned  to  Dres- 
den. He  married  the  daugh- 
ter of  his  former  instructor 
and  became  his  associate  in 
business. 

At  the  beginning 
of  the  ’40’s  the  Sax- 
onian  Government 
sought  to  alleviate 
the  terrible  chronic 
distress  of  the 
people  living  in  the 
Saxonian  Eryge- 
hinge,  and  looked  for 
talented  men  to  go 
among  the  starving 
multitudes  and  teach 
new  branches  of  in- 
dustry. Mr.  Lange 
obeyed  the  call,  quit 
his  flourishing  busi- 
ness, and  settled  in 
Glashiitte. 

“ In  my  mother,” 
the  orator  contin- 
ues, my  father  had 
a faithful  companion 
and  assistant;  in 
common  they  shared 
their  joys  and  griefs; 
in  common  their 
weight  of  labor.  My 
father  was  untiring- 
ly occupied  from 
early  morning  until 
late  at  night,  after 
which  he  frequently 
still  took  astronomical  observations.  After 
Schneider  left,  he  conducted  the  whole  en- 
terprise; superintended  construction,  adjust- 
ment, timing,  correspondence,  bookkeeping, 
and  held  for  18  years  also  the  office  of  Mayor 
of  Glashiitte,  to  the  satisfaction  of  all  and  in  a 

most  disinterested  manner My 

mother,  on  the  other  hand,  discharged  the 
duties  of  boarding  all  the  apprentices  and 


pupils,  besides  taking  care  of  her  own  ex- 
tensive household.  A firm  reliance  in  God, an 
inexhaustible  fund  of  patience  and  'he  en- 
deavor to  discharge  their  self-imposed  func- 
tionsfully  and  completely  aided  them  in  ban- 
ishing all  cares  and  conquering  all  difficul- 
ties. The  tavern  had  no  pleasures  for  him.” 
It  is  unnecessary  to  fully  enter  into  minute 
details,  as  affairs  of  this  kind  are  conducted 
about  on  the  same  plan  everywhere,  and 
The  Circular  closes  this  brief  mention 
with  the  closing  sentence  of  Mr.  Lange’s 
oration  : “ May  the  work  created  by  him 

continue  to  develop  and  flourish;  may  the 
town  with  its  industry  so  bright  and  full  of 
hope  grow,  flourish  and  mature.” 


Tempering  Steel. — It  is  known  that  soft 
steel  increases  its  volume  when  it  is  hard- 
ened, and  it  is  easy  to  arrive  at  the  conclu- 
sion that  the  steel  is  less  dense  in  proportion 
as  it  approaches  the  condition  of  iron.  If, 
therefore,  a piece  of  steel  is  heated  in  the 
open  fire  and  an  air  current  passed  over  it, 
then  the  outer  part  of  the  metal,  in  conse- 
quence of  its  decarburation,  partakes  less 
of  the  nature  of  steel  than  formerly  ; thence 
follows  that  the  interior  part  of  the  article, 
compared  to  the  outer,  becomes  too  large, 
and  the  worieman  is  consequently  exposed 
to  the  danger  of  seeing  it  burnt.  But  when 
the  piece  is  surrounded  with  a mixture  suit- 


MONUMENT ERECTED  TO  FERDINAND  ADOLPH  LANGE 

able  for  effecting  cementation,  or  exposed  to 
a fire,  which  may  also  operate  with  a steel- 
forming effect,  containing  animal  charcoal, 
then  the  opposite  phenomenon  will  result. 
The  outer  part,  instead  of  being  decarboni- 
zed by  the  fire,  becomes  richer  in  carbon  than 
the  inner  portion,  in  consequence  of  which, 
in  place  of  cracking  during  the  cooling,  it 
will  become  harder  and^more  dense. 


Nov.  13,  1895 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW, 


ZJ3 


FROM 


47  Cortlandt  St., 
to  10  Maiden  Lane. 


NEW  QUARTERS 

Come  and  see  us. 


CEOUCH  & FITZGERALD. 


AJAX  INSULATORS. 

PATENTED  OCTOBER  28,  1889. 

THEY  are  Cheap;  THEY  Reduce  Wear  and  Tear  of  the  Case  ; 
THEY  Protect  from  all  Ordinary  Magnetic  Influences. 

Perfect  in 
Action. 

Convenient 
in  Use. 

MADE  IN  ALL  SIZES,  OPEN  FACE  AITD  HUNTING. 

FOR  SALE  BY  JOBBERS. 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

The  Newark  Watch  Case  Material  Co. 

19  WARD  STREET,  NEWARK,  N.  J. 


Educate 

Your  Customers 
by  Talking 
up 

Ajax  Watch 
Insulators. 


‘^The  Benedict.” 

(TRADE  MARK.) 

The  Perfect 

Collar  Button. 


END  VIEW. 


MADE  IN  GOLD,  STERLING  SILVER 
fand  ROLLED  PLATE. 

Enos  Richardson  & Co., 

23  riaiden  Lane, 

New  York, 

Sole  rianufacturera. 


6ioe  vieiM. 


44 


fHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


From  The  Celebrated 
factories  at  Venice 

AND  IHURANO. 

' EAUTIFULIIESI05 

PERFEOTIOIN  or  GkASS  MAKER'3  AW. 


PLITZ  - IVORY  WARE.  BUSTS 

FIGURESIBEAUTIFUL 
MODELS. ELEGANT  FINISH, 
STRIKING  DECORATIONS 

AT  MODERATE  PRICES 


OPI/C  , French  Clocks  and  Sets,  Traveling  Clocks,  Gilt  and  Enameled  Regulators, 
Vernis-Martin  and  Boulle  and  Shell  Clocks,  Porcelain  and  Dresden  Clocks, 
etc.,  etc. 

l-I  A I I n\  API/C  The  Largest  Display  in  New  Designs,  Superior  Movements 

and  Richest  Dials  to  be  seen. 

NO  JEWELER 

Should,  fail  to  inspect  our  assortment  of  Novelties  suitable  for 


BAWO  & DOTTER, 

Importers,  Manufacturers  and  Commission  Merchants, 

26,  28,  30  and  32  Barclay  Street,  p.  o.  box  1372.  NEW  YORK. 


OUR  MOTTO:  QUALITY  AND  PRICE  SPEAK  LOUDER  THAN  WORDS. 


I' 


Artistic  Tables. 


TO  those  mernbers  of  the  trade  who 
handle  the  best  products  we  would 
call  attention  to  a captivatingly  interesting 
Empire  table,  which  has  just  been  manu- 
factured by  George  W.  Smith  & Co.,  New 
York  and  Philadelphia.  This  table  is  a 
veritable  monument  of  the  highest  grade  of 
cabinet  making,  and  as  such  will  be  of 
priceless  value  to  future  students  and  his- 
torians of  art  products  of  the  present  age. 
Designed  on  Empire  lines,  it  is  constructed 
of  mahogany  with  consummate  execution. 
The  leaf  of  the  table  is  decorated  with 
medallion  portraits  of  the  Empress 
Josephine  and  the  ladies  of  her  court. 
These  exquisite  portraits  are  most  artis- 
tically painted  on  china  in  France  by  one 
of  the  finest  portrait  painters.  The  list  of 
portraits  comprises,  in  addition  to  the 
Empress  Josephine, those  of  Caroline  Murat, 
the  Duchesse  de  Montebello,  the  King  of 
Rome,  Pauline  Bonaparte;  Madame  Reca- 
mier.  Queen  Hortense  and  Queen  Marie 
Louise. 

The  table  is  otherwise  decorated  with 
borders  and  enrichments  in  gold  finished 
bronze  in  the  Empire  style.  The  expression 
of  the  whole  is  chaste,  joyous  and  dignified. 
Most  of  the  fine  art  furnishings  made  by^ 
this  firm  are  of  equally  exacting  limitations 
and  this  is  only  one  of  many  articles  of 
household  furnishings  which  are  executed 
with  equal  picturesqueness  and  beauty. 
The  firm  also  make  the  table  in  Marie  An- 
toinette style,  with  a picture  of  Louis  XVI's 
queen  in  tne  center,  surrounded  with  those 
of  eight  ladies  of  the  court. 


New’ Fads  in  Art  Pottery. 

This  season  will  show  a great  revolution 
in  the  styles  of  the  art  potteries  which 
are  to  be  introduced  in  this  country  and  in 
Europe,  says  the  China  Decorator.  All 
that  is  best  in  the  periods  past  has  been 
drawn  upon,  and  the  result  shows  a collec- 
tion of  styles  exquisite  in  shape  and  color- 
ing, decorated  with  the  brush  of  well  known 
artists  of  the  old  world,  and  beautiful  almost 
beyond  description. 


There  are  four  styles  which  will  be  most 
prominent  in  the  display  of  art  pottery  this 
Fall.  The  Hans  Holbein  is  most  distinctive 
in  its  character.  Taking  its  name  from  the 
two  Flemish  artists  of  the  latter  fifteenth 
century  and  the  early  sixteenth,  Holbein 
the  elder  and  Holbein  the  younger,  this 


AN  EMPIRE  TABLE.  GEO.  W.  SMITH  & CO. 

FROM  “decorator  AND  FURNISHER.” 

Style  is  very  quaint  in  appearance,  assuming 
some  of  the  picturesque  Dutch  characteris- 
tics. Each  piece  is  decorated  with  a Hol- 
bein portrait,  the  principal  type  being  old 
men  with  long  flowing  hair  and  immense 
hats,  and  when  the  original  was  Dutch, 
there  is  seen  the  pipe,  while  a cloud  of 
smoke  obscures  the  background  and  acces- 
sories of  the  picture,  bringing  into  promin- 
ence the  sturdy  features  of  the  face 


When  the  portraits  are  introduced  into- 
the  decoration  of  the  pottery,  a peculiar 
background  is  employed,  covering  the  re- 
mainder of  the  piece,  and  can  only  be  de- 
scribed as  representing  a lizard’s  skin  with 
its  depressions  and  prominences,  while  the 
coloring  seems  to  change  from  the  dull  to 
the  brilliant  spots  in  the  living  skin.  The 
most  prominent  colors  used  in  this  pottery 
are  the  browns  and  the  blues  in  every  shade 
conceivable.  The  heads  depicted  after  the 
style  of  the  Holbeins  show  delicacy  of  hand 
and  a wonderful  facility  for  seizing  char- 
acter. The  forms  and  the  dress  of  the 
residents  of  Augsburg  the  time  of  these 
Flemish  artists  in  the  sixteenth  century  are 
admirably  depicted,  and  though  the  sever- 
ity of  the  style  and  the  dignity  is  felt,  there 
is  also  a sweetness  about  the  pictures  and  a 
great  richness  of  coloring.  Holbein,  the 
younger,  painted  the  portraits  of  Henry 
VHL,  of  England,  of  Anna  Boleyn,  and 
other  members  of  the  court. 

Another  style  showing  exquisite  style  is 
that  of  the  Luscian  ware,  which,  with  the 
Hans  Holbein,  comes  from  the  manufac- 
tories of  Sir  Henry  Doulton,  who  on  ac- 
count of  the  beautiful  and  artistic  work 
turned  out  by  the  workmen,  was  knighted 
by  the  Queen  of  England.  No  two  pieces 
are  alike  in  decoration,  and  the  variety  of 
designs  and  the  marvelous  shades  of  color- 
ing employed  are  almost  infinite.-  The 
work  is  all  that  of  the  best  artists  of 
Europe.  One  piece  of  the  Luscian  ware, 
upon  which  appears  the  signature  of  C.  L. 
Bilton,  represents  a couple  of  Japanese 
flower  dealers.  The  decoration  makes  a 
continuous  picture.  The  dealer  in  the 
foreground  has  stopped  for  a short  rest  and 
is  sitting  on  the  ground  smoking  his  pipe. 
His  two  trays  of  flowers  are  suspended 
from  either  end  of  a long  pole  which  he 
carries  upon  his  shoulders.  In  the  hazy 
distance  another  dealer  is  discerned  moving 
on  with  the  ware.  The  flowers  are  chry- 
santhemums and  are  as  natural  in  form  and 
delicacy  of  coloring  as  though  just  picked 
from  the  garden. 

Another  piece  of  this  same  ware  corre- 
sponds in  shape  to  the  former,  but  while 
that  is  bright  in  general  tone  the  second  is 


46 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


ISov.  13  1895. 


^IlC  ®OUn 0X56 CUV. 

{Continued from  page  4^.) 


somewhat  dull,  telling  of  the  approach  of 
night.  The  scene  depicted  is  the  pond  out 
of  which  come  the  ducks,  who  make  their 
way  along  the  path  which  runs  about  the 
hill  to  the  farm  beyond.  The  shades  on  the 
trees  are  deep,  but  the  path  still  catches  the 
light  from  the  glowing  clouds  beyond,  and 
very  prominent  are  the  ducks,  who,  scatter- 
ing the  water  from  their  wings,  are  stretch- 
ing out  their  long  necks  toward  home,  and 
can  almost  be  heard.  Beautiful  scarlet  pop- 
pies adorn  another  beautiful  vase,  and  upon 
a fourth  are  lovely  lifelike  figures,  whose 
flesh  seems  to  glow  with  vitality. 

The  Royal  Indigo  ware  is  what  its  name 
suggests,  and  the  molding  of  the  pottery 
and  the  designs  which  appear  upon  its  face 
enhance  its  beauty.  Louchet,  of  Paris,  has 
brought  out  a distinctive  style,  which  bears 
his  name.  It  is  covered  with  an  exquisite 
blending  of  green  and  pinks,  a grouping 
and  blending  of  the  charm  of  landscape 
beauty  with  the  soft  tints  of  the  sky  at  sun- 
set. This  style  is  unique  for  Louchet,  since 
his  decorations  have  almost  always  been 
blues  in  various  combinations  of  shading. 

With  this  great  stride  in  art  pottery  this 
season,  and  the  promise  of  still  finer  next 
Fall,  for  the  designs  are  already  cast  for  a 
year  hence,  there  is  also  a great  increase 
in  the  demand  for  miniatures,  and  the  mini- 
atures on  ivory  will  be  especially  beautiful. 


The  Rambler’s  Notes. 


WHAT  THE  RAMBLER  SAW  AND  HEARD  AMONG  THE 
DEALERS  IN  ART  POTTERY,  CUT  GLASS. 
BRONZES.  ETC. 


GLAENZER  FRERES 


& RHEINBOLDT. 


Q 


L A E N Z E R 
Freres  & Rhein- 
boldt  is  the  name  by 
which  the  former  firm  of  Leon  J.  Glaenzer 
& Co.,  importers  of  bronzes,  clocks  and  fine 
art  pottery,  80-82  Chambers  St.,  New  York, 
are  now  known.  The  personne/  of  the  firm 
remains  the  same.  Since  the  death  of  Leon 
J.  Glaenzer  on  March  ist,  the  surviving 
partners.  Frank  and  Camille  Glaenzer,  and 
Charles  J.  Rheinboldt  have  carried  on  the 
business  under  the  old  firm  name,  but  here- 
after will  continue  it  under  the  style  above 
mentioned. 


RARE  OPPORTUNITY 


FOR  JEWELERS. 


pERD.  BING  & 
Co.,  106  Grand 
St.,  New  York,  are  at 
present  busy  re-marking  their  stock  and 
reducing  the  prices  of  many  lines  which 
they  carry  especially  for  the  jewelry  trade. 
These  lines  will  be  cleared  out  prior  to  the 
removal  of  the  firm  to  10  Washington  Place, 
It  is  the  intention  of  this  firm  to  open  their 
new  building  on  Feb.  ist,  with  an  entirely 
new  stock  and  the  shipments  now  coming 
from  Europe  are  being  warehoused  until  the 
present  stock  is  cleared  out.  Jewelers  will, 
no  doubt,  here  find  a rare  opportunity  to 
obtain  holiday  lines  of  art  pottery,  clocks, 


etc.  at  prices  not  heretofore  offered  by  this 
firm. 

RICH  VIENNA 

TABLES.  about  10  different 

sizes  and  styles  are  shown  by  Levy, 
Dreyfus  & Co.,  ii  Maiden  Lane,  New 
York.  All  the  pieces  are  in  fine  gilt  and 
set  with  hand  painted  Vienna  plaques. 
In  some  of  the  tables,  principally  the  round 
styles,  this  plaque  covers  almost  the  entire 
top,  with  just  sufficient  gilt  around  it  to 
form  a handsome  frame  for  the  picture. 
The  subjects  of  all  the  panels  are,  as  usual, 
of  a mythological  character,  the  majority 
being  copies  of  famous  masterpieces. 

* 


'OME  rich  Vienna 

" tcihlpc  onH  ctanHc 


Among  the  many 
beautiful  lines 
ORIENTAL  of  decorated  glass- 

ware displayed  in  the 
warerooms  of  Chas. 
Ahrenfeldt  & Son,  50-54  Murray  St.,  New 
York,  none  are  more  striking  in  appearance 
than  the  collection  of  pieces  in  Persian 
styles.  The  goblets,  bowls  and  vases 
which  compose  this  line  are  in  purely  Ori- 
ental shapes  and  are  ornamented  with  de- 
signs and  colors  distinctly  Persian  in  char- 
acter. Another  popular  line  consists  of 
reproductions  of  famous  ancient  glassware. 
These  pieces,  which  are  principally  large 
tankards,  loving  cups  and  goblets,  are  of 
greenish  glass,  ornamented  with  colored 
designs  consisting  of  coats  of  arms  and  in- 
scriptions. The  Rambler. 


nm  f6R  T0UR  insFECTien  ii 

. . THE  LINE  OF  . . 

Art  Furniture 

AND 

Hall  Clock  Cases. 

ESPECIALLY  ADAPTED  FOR  THE 

JEWELRY  and  ART  TRADES. 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

Geo.  W.  Smith  & Co., 

MAKERS  OF 

ART  FURNITURE. 

Factory:  ^907-19  POWELTON  AVE., 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 

NEW  YORK  OFFICE  BROADWAY, 

AND  H.  P.  VOLLMER, 

SALESROOMS.  Manager. 


Nov.  13,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


47 


FERNERIES  IN  GLASS  AND  CHINA. 


HINRICHS  & 

29  & 31  Park  Place,  N.  Y. 
Useful  and  Art  Goods  for  Jewelers 


CHINA  LAMPS,  all  sizes  and  prices,  FINE  FRENCH 
CHINA.  CHOCOLATE  POTS,  CRACKER  JARS, 
BOWLS,  FANCY  TRAYS,  and  an  enormous 
assortment  of  A.  D.’S,  CHOCOLATES, 

TEAS,  ETC. 

Brush  and  Comb  Trays,  Pen  Trays,  Pin  Trays,  Boxes, 
Toilet  Sets  and  Fancy  Knick<=Knacks 

In  French  and  Dresden  China. 

SEND  FOR  CATALOGUES  AND  PRICE  LISTS. 

Bric=a=Brac  and  Art  Pottery. 


Oil  Bottle,  3 Lip. 
Can  be  retailed  at  $1.00. 


WRITE  FOR  OUR  ILLUSTRATED  CATALOGUE  OF 

CUT  CUSS CHINA  SPECIACTICS. 

GOODS  PARTICULARLY  SUITABLE  FOR  JEWELERS. 

Lazarus,  Rosenfeld  & Lehmann, 

60  & 62  MURRAY  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 


Chicago  Office  and  Sample  Rooms,  45  and  47  East  Lake  Street. 


FRENCH 


“A.  K.” 


CHINA, 


IS  PRODUCED  IN  THE  NEWEST 
SHAPES  AND  DECORATIONS. 

^ FOR  THE  JEWELRY  TRADE. 


BEAUTIFUL 

GLASS 

ROSE 

FLOWER 

HOLDERS. 

IN  CRYSTAL  AND 
GRbEN  WITH 
GOLD 

DECORATIONS. 


CHOICE 

BRIC= 

A=BRAC. 

NEW  GOODS 
BY  EVERY 
STEAMER. 


A CALL  IS 
EXTENDED 
TO  VISITING 
BUYERS. 


SUCCESSOR  TO 

A.  KLINGENBERG 


CHAS.  L.  DWENQER, 


35  and  37  PARK  PLACE,  NEW  YORK. 


LIMOGES. 


IMPOl^TER, 


T 

37  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

Branch,  167  Weybosset  Street,  Providence,  R.  I. 

-^IMPORTERS  OK  DIAMONDS, 

Rose  Diamonds,  Rubies,  Sapphires,  Emeralds,  Opals,  Moonstones, 
Fancy  and  Imitation  Stones,  Novelties. 


SOLE  OWNERS  AND  IMPORTERS  OF 


HIGHEST  AWARD  AT  THE  COLUMBIAN  EXPOSITION,  CHICAGO.  1893. 


BRILLIANCY  >nd 

hardness 


WHAT  IS  the  h7  E.  O. 
ROYAL  CLUSTER? 


FOR  THE  ANSWER 
WRITE  TO 

H.  E.OPPENHEIMER&CO., 

14  MAIDEN  LANE, 

NEW  YORK. 


are  the  firm  of  S.  F.  IVlyers  & Co.,  of  the  Myers  Buildings,  48  & 50 
Maiden  Lane,  New  York,  selling  more  goods  and  doing  a larger  business 
than  any  other  wholesale  jewelry  house  in  the  world? 


CHAS.  JACQUES 

CLOCK 


they  are  ihe  only  firm  in  the  Empire  City  who  are  bona  fide  manufacturers, 
importers,  exporters,  and  wholesale  dealers  in  all  lines  of  goods  that 
pertain  to  the  jewelry  trade.  Their  twenty-three  departments  require 
seven  double  floors.  With  one  Arm  expense  (instead  of  23),  and  minimum 
rental,  they  are  in  a position  to  quote  prices  and  sell  goods  on  a margin 
ordinarily  asked  by  Legitimate  commission  houses. 


WATCHES,  Diamonds,  Jewelry,  Optical  Goods,  Haterials,  Clocks,  Silverware, 
Lamps,  riusical  flerchandise.  Cut  Glass,  Bicycles,  Fire  Arms,  Safes,  Etc. 


ARE  YOU  ON  THEIR  HAILING  LIST?  Have  you  their  great  800-page 
a inual  catalogue?  Do  you  receive  and  inspect  Myers'  Monthly  Jeweler? 


CO., 

22  CortlandtSt. 

NEW  YORK. 

Hall  Clocks, 
Traveling  Clocks, 
Gilt  Clocks, 
Porcelain  Clocks, 


Englisi  Hall  Clocks, 
Frencli  Traveling 
Clocks, 

Ckiining  Mantel 
Clocks, 

PARIS  NOVELTIES, 
BRONZES, 
Largest  Variety  of 

Art  Pottery  and 

Bric*a»Brac. 


JOB  SPRING  FOR  AMERICAN  CASES 


Patented  U83. 

Adjusted  While  You  WalL  25  Cents. 


ESTABI.ISHED  1865. 


N.  J.  FELIX, 

Watch  Case  Repairing, 


A®-This  Spring  is 
made  from  0 to  18  size. 
$1.00  per  dozen. 


X7J0HN  STKB:^T,  N^W  YORK. 


GOLD  AND  SILVER 

Refiners^  ^ssaj/eps  ^ Sw?eef)  Smelters, 

^ SOUIHWESI  COMER  HAESEY  AND  MARSHAEE  SIREEIS,  > 

NEWARK,  N.  J. 


S liOTTEII, 

Importers, 
Manufacturers 
and  Commission 
Merchants. 

26=32  BARCLAY  ST., 

NEW  YORK. 

P.  O.  Box  1872. 


A.  J.  CoriRiE, 

AUCTIONEER,. 

22  John  St.,  N.  Y. 

Special  Salesman  of  WATCHES,  DIAMONDS 
BRIC'A-BPAC,  FOR  ESTABLISHED  JEWELERS. 

WRITE  roP  pa  PTICHL*  P «■ 


Delft  Clocks, 
riantel  Chime 
Clocks, 

Bronzes, 

Sevres  Vases. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 

Ana  keep  informed  on  the  latest  Trade  events.  > 


LARGEST  CIRCULATION  OF  ALL  THE  i>EWELRY  PcBLICATIJNS 
OLDEST  OF  ALL  THE  JEWELRY  PUBLICATIONS.  26th  YEAR. 


AND 


Copyright  by  Thb  Jewelers’  Circular  Pub.  Co. 


Entered  at  the  Post  Office  in  N.  Y as  second^lass  matteri 


NEW  YORK,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  20,  1895 


LUDWIG  NISSEN 
PRESIDENT. 


henry  RANDEL, 
treasurer. 


EO.  w.  SHIEBLFR 
VICE-PRESIDENT 


The  New  York  Jewelers’ 


Association 


2 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


FLEMISH. 


Spoons,  .P'orks,  Knives,  &c. 

IS  STAMPED 

'A^ROGERS  & BRO.,  A.  I. 


FLEMISH. 


FLEMISH. 


A Large  Line 
in  Electro 
Sterling 
able  for  the 
Holiday 


of  Novelties 
Silver  Plate 
Silver  suit= 
Fall  and 
Seasons. 


ROGERS  & BROTHER, 


WATERBURY,  CONN. 


16  CORTLANDT  ST.,  NEW  YORK, 


R. 


TOMATO  OR  CUCUMBER  SERVE 

Length,  8 inches. 

Useful  also  for  serving  poached  or  fried  eggs, 
croquettes,  fried  oysters,  etc.,  etc. 


BON  BON  SPOON. 

THE  ORIGINAL  AND  GENUINE 

STAR  ★ BRAND 

manufactured  continuously  for 
HALF  A CENTURY  and  which 
has  made  the  name  of  ROGERS 
celebrated. 

MANUFACTURED  BY 


GENUINE  ROGERS 

^=^X:iiECTRO  SIX. VSR  PlaATR. 


Nov.  20,  18^5 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


Our  Trilby  Hearts  are  Trumps.  Our  Trilby  Chains  Sell  Well  for  Lockets,  Fans  and  Vinaigrettes. 

Our  400  Patterns  of  Silver  Articles  are  useful  lor  Wedding  and  Birthday  Gifts  and  Whist  Prizes. 

Our  rianicure  Sets  and  flanicure  Goods  are  beautiful,  of  fine  quality  and  low  in  price. 

Our  Toilet  Sets  of  Brushes,  Combs  and  Mirrors  are  fine. 

Our  Bracelets  with  Padlocks,  Sterling  Silver  and  Gold  Plate  sell  well. 

Our  Lockets,  Charms,  Lace  Pins,  Hair  Chain  Mounts,  Vest  Chains,  Link  Buttons,  Mount  Hope  Sleeve  Buttons,  Ear- 
rings, and  everything  we  make  is  manufactured  expressly  for  you  to  make  some  money  on.  If  you  fail  to  find  our  goods  with  your  jobber 
write  and  we  will  give  you  the  names  of  wholesale  dealers  who  carry  our  goods. 


No.  306.  Desk  Knife  and  Letter  Opener. 


FOSTER  & BAILEY, 

SILVERSMITHS, 


100  Richmond  Street,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 


New  York  Office,  Samples  Only 

178  BROADWAY. 


M ■ I 


I?  •!■ ; ! 


!i- 


U!'. 


r. 

U'  I : 

If.'l 


/ ( ^^a//y//e  /o/V/.'c 


^9)/' 

t:  i?n  c\ 


^^ciCc/c fV  ’O^^Joc/aZ/o// . ^ 


mcc^, 

I \i.'‘i^C////cK/‘fZ/SM'J. 


COVER  OF 
MENU  SOUVENIR. 


Those  who  are  responsible  for  the  ar- 
rangements of  the  2ist  Annual  Banquet 
of  the  New  York  Jewelers’  Association  are  to 
be  congratulated  upon  having  prepared  one 
of  the  most  successful  affairs  of  the  sort  in 
th  e h istory  of  the  Association . Aided  by  the 
most  favorable  weather  and  by  the  knowl- 
edge of  the  fact  that  upon  this  occasion 
the  Association  would  celebrate  the  attain- 
ment to  their  majority,  they  brought  forth 
a monster  gathering. 

President  Ludwig  Nissen  with  secretary 
P.  T.  Tunison  received  the  guests.  At 
about  7 o’clock  the  members  formed  into 
twos  and  marched  into  the  dining  room  to 
the  strains  of  “The  Cotton  King  March,’’ 
played  by  an  orchestra  in  the  gallery.  As 
the  company  filed  into  the  room  their  gaze 
fell  upon  perhaps  the  most  gorgeous  sight 
this  famous  dining  hall  has  ever  offered. 

The  cream  and  gold  banquet  hall  shone 
resplendent  with  silver,  pottery,  cut  glass 
and  flowers,  to  a degree  exceptional  even 
for  Delmonico’s.  When  four  leading  Ameri- 
can silversmithing  concerns,  Gorham  Mfg. 
Co.,  Whiting  Mfg.  Co.,  Dominick  & 
Haff,  and  Geo.  W.  Shiebler  & Co.,  and  one 
of  the  most  extensive  importers  of  art  pot- 
tery, Bawo  & Dotter,  offered  the  use  of  the 
most  beautiful  decorative  pieces  in  their 
stock,  and  the  selections  were  arranged  un- 
der the  supervision  of  a man  possessing  the 
artistic  taste  of  Geo.  W.  Shiebler,  something 
outside  the  ordinary  was  to  be  expected,  and 
these  expectations  were  more  than  realized. 
More  than  one  half  of  the  silverware  adorn- 
ing the  tables  which  alone  was  valued  at 
nearly  $40,000,  were  exquisite  prize  pieces 
and  interesting  works  of  art,  any  one  of 
which  would  prove  to  be  a chief  feature  at 
an  ordinary  banquet.  About  $2,000  worth 
of  choice  art  pottery,  cut  glass  and  richly 
decorated  glassware  helped  the  silver  in 


supporting  the  mass  of  roses,  chrysanthe- 
mums and  ferns  tastefully  arranged  by 
florist  Chas.  Applegate. 

Fronting  the  President  and  speakers  was 
a table  decorated  entirely  with  articles  of 
silver-gilt  including  silver-gilt  and  crystal, 
and  silver-gilt,  Russian  enamel.  Here  alone 
was  one  of  the  richest  displays  the  hall  has 
ever  contained.  At  the  center,  in  front  of 
the  President,  was  a magnificent  silver-gilt 
plateau  filled  with  American  Beauty  roses 
and  smilax.  Four  large  candelabra  and 
two  large  punch  bowls,  also  of  silver-gilt, 
with  two  Bohemian  glass  vases  with  silver- 
gilt  bases,  cut  crystal  trimmed  in  sil- 
ver-gilt and  ornamental  pieces  of  gilt 
Russian  enamel,  were  arranged  to  hold 
the  mass  of  white  and  pink  chrysanthe- 
mums and  white,  pink  and  red  roses  on  the 
speakers’  table.  At  each  end  of  the  table 
stood  an  eight  foot  Nubian  figure  and 
pedestal  of  Italian  porcelain,  supporting  a 
mass  of  palms. 

The  ornamental  pieces  of  the  six  guests’ 
tables  were  arranged  on  the  same  plan  as 
those  on  the  speakers’  table.  At  the  center 
of  all,  with  the  exception  of  the  chief  table, 
stood  an  unusually  large  punch  bowl  filled 
with  roses.  The  centerpiece  of  the  chief  table 
was  a magnificent  plateau  of  oxidized 
silver  and  green  and  white  cut  glass;  this 
piece  held  a mass  of  white  roses  and  sweet 
peas.  The  other  silverware  on  each  table 
consisted  of  two  large  special  pieces,  two 
punchbowls  and  two  candelabra.  Between 
these  silver  pieces  were  six  tall  vases  of  cut 
or  richly  decorated  glassware,  filled  with 
roses  and  chrysanthemums.  Additional  or- 
naments were  choice  vases  in  Sevres, 
Royal  Worcester,  Italian  pottery,  Doulton, 
Crown  Derby  and  Royal  Vienna. 

When  the  guests  had  found  their  places 
some  one  proposed  three  cheers  for  the 


President  of  the  Association,  which  wer 
given  with  a will  and  a tiger.  The  Rev. 
Dr.  Farrar  then  asked  a blessing  and  the 
members  seated  themselves. 

At  the  guest  table  sat,  besides  President 
Ludwig  Nissen,  Daniel  F.  Appleton,  Rev. 
James  M.  Farrar,  D.  D.,  Hon.  Frederick 
W.  Wurster,  Hon.  Lemuel  E.  Quigg,  St. 
Clair  McKelway,  Hon.  Robert  W.  Tayler, 
J.  Seaver  Page,  Judge  Edward  T.  Bartlett, 
Augustus  K.  Sloan. 

The  menu  was  a fine  specimen  of  the  cul- 
inary art  and  met  with  approval  from  the 
most  exacting  of  the  later  day  Epicureans 
present. 

After  calling  the  gentlemen  to  order  the 
President  said  : 


PRESIDENT  NISSEN  S WELCOMING  ADDRESS. 


Members  of  the  New  York  Jewelers'  Association 
and  guests To  this  our  twenty-first  annual  banquet 
I bid  you  all  in  the  name  of  the  Association  a most 
hearty  welcome.  Another  year  has  rolled  into  the 
limitless  space  ofjtime,  since  we  last  greeted  each  other 
over  this  festive  board.  We  meet  here  in  annual  re- 
union to  bury  the  barren  past  and  to  seek  through 
social  ^intercourse,  renewed  vigor  and  encouragement 
for  the  future,  as  well  as  to  renew  old,  and  strengthen 
new  friendships 

For  one  night  we  sink  all  our  differences  into  the  sea 
of  pleasure  (Cries  of  “Hear!  Hear!”) — even 
though  we  may  later  fish  for  them  again  in  order  to 
keep  up  the  good  natured  rivalry  for  supremacy. 
(“Hear!”  “Hear!”,  For  we  jewelers  know,  above  all 
men  that  we  cannot  have  polish  without  friction. 
(Cries  of  (“Hear!  Hear!”  and  applause) — nor 
can  we  have  a healthy  state  of  business  without  a fair, 
honest  and  healthy  competition.  ( “ Hear  ! Hear  ! ’ ) 

To-night  we  are  celebrating  our  twenty-first  birthday. 
We  are  of  age.  We  have  passed  through  the  vicissi- 
tudes of  childhood  and  the  temptations  of  youth,  into 
full  manhood,  and  it  is  my  proud  privilege  to  record 
from  this  platform  that  the  Association  is  to-day 
stronger  in  membership,  stronger  in  material  weatlh, 
stronger  in  influence  and,  if  I may  be  permitted  to 
say  it,  stronger  in  intellect  and  character  than  it  has 
ever.been.  (Great  applause.) 


s 


r' 


But  we  deserve  all  the  blessings  that 
Providence  has  bestowed  upon  us,  for, 
though  we  were  struck  hard  by  the 
financial  cyclone  which  has  been  storm- 
ing about  our  heads  since  ihg?,  and 
whose  lofty  aim  it  seems  to  be  to  wreck 
the  very  foundation  of  every  financial 
. and  commercial  structure  of  the  count- 

ry, we  have  withstood  the  waves  of  destruction  that 
swept  fortunes  out  of  the  grasp  of  many,  and  the  gales 


GEO.  c.  WHITE. 

And  now,  gentlemen,  in  order  to  derive  our  full 
share  of  benefit  from  the  good  times  to  come,  let  us 
all  work  together  to  attain  and  maintain  that  standard 
of  business  integrity  and  business  morality,  that  is  due 
to  our  exalted  station  by  reason  of  the  commodities 


In  conclusion,  gentlemen,  allow  me 
to  make  the  declaration  of  doctrine  that 
to  maintain  the  standard  of  our  jewels, 
our  jewelry,  and  above  all  our  jewelers, 
is,  and  forever  shall  be,  the  fundamental 
principle  of  the  New  York  Jewelers’ 
Association.  (Great  applause.) 

Gentlemen,  our  first  toast  is  for 

The  President  of  the  U7iited  States. 


Frank  M Kelley 
James  P.  Harper 
J.  F.  Thomas 
S.  C.  Howard 
Joseph  Banigan 
Geo.  N.  Wilcox 
W.  W.  Hayden 
Win.  P.  Sackett 
Clarence  Pettit 
George  S.  Lemcke 
Henry  Witte 
Gustav  Otto 
Camille  Glaenzer 
Chas.  J.  Rheinboldt 
N.  C.  Downs 
G.  A.  Carter,  Jr. 

A.  S.  Pitt 
J.  Frank  Beers 
J.  P.  Slattery 
C.  B.  Safford 
E.  E.  Sanborn 


Harrison  B.  Smith 
Fred’k  A.  Jeanne 
J.  C.  Wakefield 
B.  F.  Griscom 


A.  Bippart 
Chas.  Hartdegen 
Harry  Schimpf 
Wm.  G.  Kirtland 
John  T.  Howard 
Herbert  Cockshaw 
John  T.  Loughery 
A.  W.  Caney 
S.  B.  Leonard! 

W.  H.  Wheeler 
M.  de  M.  Marsellus 
H.  W.  Tisdale 
W.  N.  Walker 
F.  T.  Ward 
C.  H.  Case 


John  C.  Mount 
H.  K.  Dyer 
J.  R.  Greason 
F.  H.  Proudfoot 
Cottle 

Albert  H.  Jones 
Geo.  R.  Turnbull 
Geo.  C.  White, 
Fred’k  Greenwood 
Geo.  C.  White' Jr. 
R.  H.  White 
C.  R.  Hansel 
J.  S.  P'ranklin 
H.  W.  Phelps 
W.  H.  Thurber 
Judge  J.  F.  Fort 
George  R-  Howe 
C.  Weaver 
Gen.  Geo.  H.  Ford 


0.  G.  Fessenden. 


C.  E.  Hastings. 


L.  S.  Lewis 

Geo.  W.  Shiebler 

George  Scherr 

Leon  Barre 

Charles  O’Bryon 

Alfred  F.  Wise 

W.  J.  Jones 

L.  A.  Blackinton 

W.  F.  Cory 

M.  W.  Smith 

Walter  W.  Eakins 

H.  W.  Patterson 

L.  J.  Mulford 

Arthur  0.  Jennings 

Horace  C.  Hardy 

George  E.  Stevens 

James  C.  Grogan 

W.  H.  Kaye 

Henry  E.  Ide 

E.  T.  James 

G.  W.  Russell 

A.  E.  Johnston 

W.  T.  Carter 

W.  C.  Kimball 

C.  B.  Eustis 

J.  E.  Parker 

A.  T.  Hubbard 

W.  H.  Strawn 

David  Dodd 

L.  E.  Bomeisler 

William  Murray 

H.  P.  Doremus 

Robert  C.  Black 

A.  A.  Webster 

Joseph  H.  Brazier 

J.  H.  Johnston 

Henry  G.  Lambert 
Edward  S.  Newell 
Marshall  T.  Davidson 
John  T.  Brown 

C.  B.  Churchill 
Frank  J.  Stevens 

E.  J.  Spall 

W.  F.  Ackerman 
C.  Strobel 

F.  H Sloan 
M.  L.  Bowden 

A.  N.  Wood 

B.  T.  Schmauk 
B.  Karsch 

R.  S.  Ferguson 
George  M.  Hard 


J.  B.  B owden. 


Emil  Knopf 
I.  A.  Lewis 

I.  G.  Dillon 
H.  F.  Quast 

J.  E.  Prior 
George  W.  English 
Frank  Holt 
Charles  C.  Orcutt 
Philip  N.  Jackson 
Frederick  S.  Douglas 
A.  Ailing  Reeves 
Frank  E.  Davis 
Arthur  H.  Pray 

C.  G.  Braxmar 

D.  V.  P.  Cadmus 
H.  W.  Steere 

A.  W.  Osmun 


Wm.  A.  Thompson 

C.  W.  Starkey 

William  B Kerr 

H A.  Bliss 

Hon.  J.  A.Lebkuecher 

F.  A.  Hubbard 

Henry  Tilden 

S.  Jaquette 

James  0.  Bates 

F.  W.  Lewis 

George  W.  Read 

John  N.  Taylor 

J.  Stuart  McDonald 

William  H.  Long 

• 

C.  F.  Pierce 

H.  W.  Richards 

John  F.  Harriott 

Z.  J.  Pequignot 

Stanley  A.  Bryant 

P.  L.  V.  Thiery 

Thomas  E.  Rice 

Frank  Krementz 

William  Barthman 

Wm.  A.  Halsey 

H.  B Beach 

Charles  H.  Crane 

T 5 n\ 

P.  T.  Tunison 

Frank  Reed 

Charles  W.  Wattles 

T.  A.  Spaulding 

Smith  A.  Keim 

W.  D.  Elcox 

r\ 

James  R.  Gleason 

T.  B.  Morse 

C.  A,  Weber 

Harry  C.  Larter 

c 

V 

Appleton  Smith 

J.  R.  Keim 

b 

J.  Eagleton 

W.  Luther  LaRue 

r 

Rev.  J G.  Hamner,  Jr. 

J.  A.  Linherr 

N.  H.  White 

John  S.  Spencer 

C.  E.  Beckley 

James  E.  Spencer 

Frank  H.  La  Pierre 

Oliver  M.  Farrand 

Warren  S.  Sillcocks 

Charles  H.  Paine 

G.  A.  Henckel 

John  L.  Shepherd 

Geo.  W.  Fairchild 

B.  Drake  Smith 

G.  L.  Crowell,  Jr. 

Emi!e  J.  Wittnauer 

Geo.  W.  Hutchison 

R.  M.  Woods 

C.  V.  Schuyler 

E.  H.  Unkles 

Wm.  H.  Hennegan 

.Albeit  Wittnauer 

T.  J.  Haring 

John  Chatellier 

Ferd.  Volkmar 

Harvey  Huestis 

Wi'liam  P.  Shreve 

Alanson  Bigelow 

James  R.  Armiger 

F.  L.  Crawford 

George  Krementz 
J.  V.  Rockwell 
H.  A.  Crawford 
James  Kingman 
Wm.  L.  Zieglar 
Thomas  Krementz 
Samuel  H.  Kirby 
Fred’k  H.  Larter 
H.  G Peirsons 
Isaac  Champenois 
Louis  Lelong 
Edward  Balbach 
M.  L.  Devoursney 
Alexander  Lelong 
Abram  Joralemon 
Albert  Remicke 
Louis  Wittnauer 
Armin  Fritz 
William  L.  Rich 
Thomas  Kirkpatrick 


C.  F.  Wood. 


H.  B.  Dominick. 


David  C.  Townsend. 


THE  BANQUETERS  AND  WHERE  THEY  SAT. 


that  blew  many  hard  earned  reputations  to  the  four 
winds  of  the  compass.  We  have  stood  up  to  the  rack 
and  combatted— man  fashion— all  the  elements  of  dis- 
aster, until  to-day  we  are  again  confidentially  and  hope- 
fully gazing  into  the  dawn  of  prosperity.  (Applause.) 

i 


we  deal  in,  (Cries  of  “ Hear,  Hear!  ” ) and  by  reason 
of  the  intelligence  it  requires,  on  account  of  its  artistic 
nature,  to  make  success  of  our  business.  C haracter  and 
intelligence  should  forever  stand  shoulder  to  shoulder 
for  the  accomplishment  of  good. 


I would  ask  you  all  to  fill  your  glasses,  arise  from 
your  seats  and  drink  in  silence  and  reverence  to  the 
President  of  the  United  States. 

The  banqueters  filled  their  glasses  and 


1 


can  have  no  clear  conception  of  the 
office  they  serve  in  the  economy  of  na 
ture.  The  justification  of  a fault  is  the 
measure  of  comfort  and  satisfaction 
that  can  be  extracted  from  its  possession  and  practice. 
Our  faults  are  not  made  for  other  people’s  delectation. 
That  is  the  function  of  our  virtues.  This  view  of  error 
may  not  be  ethically  found,  but  it  is  substantially  true. 
We  must  have  our  faults.  We  should  feel  singular 
and  out  of  touch  with  our  surroundings  without 
them. 

This  is  our  land.  It  has  made  us,  and  we  have 
made  it.  \\  hat  it  is  and  what  we  are  have  resulted 
from  the  action  of  our  quality  upon  its  resources 
Bringing  to  their  development  a confidence,  a pa- 
tience, a pertinacity,  a perception  and  a courage 
which  have  come  to  be  recognized  as  characteristically 
American,  it  stands  before  the  world  to-day  the  land 
of  immeasureable  power,  uncountable  wealth  and  in- 
finite opportunity.  If  it  likes  us  and  we  like  it,  which 
seems  to  be  the  case,  why  should  we  be  asked  to  make 
concealment  of  a relation  at  once  so  agreeable  and 
commendable  ? 

There  is  a cult  or  a sort  of  a cult  hereabouts, 
small  to  be  sure,  and  fearfully  select,  to  which  declara- 
tions of  a fervent  patriotism  seem  somehow  or  other 
to  give  offence.  It  is  of  us,  but  not  with  us.  It  is 
composed  of  persons  to  whom  the  condescending  pat 
ronage  of  English  newspapers’  surcynical  sneer,  high 
talk  and  bullyrag  seem  to  give  more  confidence,  more 
pleasure  than  the  confidence  and  respect  of  their 
American  fellow  citizens.  (Applause.)  From  the 
shelter  of  the  doctrine  of  universal  brotherhood  they 
sally  forth  to  attack  every  manifestation  of  American 
spirit,  however  necessary  or  however  just.  (Applause. ) 
Their  weapon  is  always  a sneer.  They  are  not  of  any 
political  party,  for  it  is  the  pride  and  glory  of  Ameri- 
can history  that  throughout  the  century  of  our 
National  life  we  have  preserved  in  an  unbroken  line  a 
policy,  crystallized  from  the  traditions  of  our  earliest 
statesmanship,  which  forbids  meddling  with  things 
wherein  we  have  no  concern,  and  enjoins  the  stalwart 
assertion  of  every  true  interest  and  the  constant  main- 
tenance of  every  actual  right  (Applause.) 

You,  as  merchants,  no  matter  what  you  sell,  are 
directly  concerned  in  the  extension  over  these  conti- 
nents and  in  the  new  and  wonderful  Orient  of  the 
American  influence.  You  are  directly  concerned  to 
see  that  it  is  not  overshadowed  by  the  influence  of  any 
other  nation.  All  that  contributes  to  the  respect  in 
which  our  Government  is  held,  all  that  facilitates 
foreign  enterprise,  contributes  directly  to  the  develop- 
ment of  our  internal  resources  and  to  the  earnings  of 
every  citizen.  And  any  step,  however  indirect,  on  the 
part  of  a European  power  which  affects  one  of  these 
American  nations  to  the  south  of  us,  which  embar- 
rasses them  in  the  exercise  of  sovereign  rights,  which 
disturbs  them  in  their  financial  relations, which  despoils 
them  of  their  territory,  which  undertakes  to  suppress 
their  just  aspirations  of  self-government  and  which 
robs  them  of  their  territory  and  which  confronts  them 
with  the  guns  of  a foreign  fortification  flying  a Euro- 
pean flag,  is  to  be  resented  by  a self-respecting  Ameri- 
can Government  as  an  act  unfriendly  to  the  American 
people.  (Applause.)  (Cries  of  “ Not  much”  “Give  us 


some  more,”  “Jingo  is  true  American.”) 

This,  I suppose,  is  jingo  talk,  and  those  Americans 
who  love  to  bask  in  the  condescending  smiles  of  the 
surcynical  sneer  of  the  duke  of  bullyrag  (cries  of  ' No 
jingo  there  ) will  ob-erve  it  with  their  unfailing  sneer. 
I wish  that  words  of  mine  were  worthy  to  be  classed 
among  the  jingo  sentences  that  stand  out  to  our 
eternal  delight  in  the  pages  of  American  history.  It 
was  a jingo  sentence  that  rang  through  the  halls  of 
the  Virginia  assembly  when  Patrick  Henry  suggested 
that  Caesar  had  had  his  Brutus.  Charles  I.  his  Crom 
well,  and  that  George  HI.  might  profit  by  their  ex- 
perience. (Loud  applause. ) It  was  a jingo  sentence 
with  which  Charles  Pinckney  answered  the  threat  of 
Talleyrand,  “ Millions  for  defense,  but  not  onecentfor 
tribute!”  It  was  a jingo  sentence  that  warned  the 
British  minister  of  the  consequences  of  a second 
Alabama,  “ Your  lordship  does  not  need  to  be  told 
that  this  is  war  I”  The  American  jingoes  will  be  found 
to  include  every  public  man  whose  name  has  survived 
his  generation.  And  if  there  be  those  in  these  more 
easy  times  whose  hearts  are  not  stirred  with  interes 
and  sympathy  when  a band  of  patriots  rise  in  a south- 
ern isle  and  offer  their  bodies  to  bullets  and  their 
homes  to  devastation  in  the  cause  of  liberty  ar.d  free 
government ; if  there  be  those  who  are  willing  that  a 
feeble  neighbor  shall  be  robbed  of  its  territory,  its 
mines  and  its  trades  by  a European  power  seeking  not 
these  only,  but,  through  these,  the  control  of  interests 
and  properties  that  are  ours ; if  there  be  those  to 
whom  it  is  a matter  of  no  importance  that  the  Ameri- 
can flag  shall  fly  on  every  sea  and  in  every  port  as  the 
symbol  of  a National  authority,  far-reaching  and 
great  enough  to  protect  every  citizen  in  his  rights — I 
seek  no  kinship  with  them  I 'They  may  call  “Jingo!” 
if  they  please.  I shall  call  “Shame!”  (Loud  ap- 
plause ) 

If  there  is  anything  that  is  generous,  honorable  and 
creditable  to  us,  it  is  the  attitude  of  the  United 
States  towards  the  interests  of  the  other  American 
nations.  We  take  substantially  all  that  they  produce. 
We  aie  not  only  their  best  customer  but  in  many  cases 
it  is  true  to  say  that  we  are  a better  customer  than  all 
the  rest  put  together.  Our  friendly  offices  have  been 
extended  to  them,  one  after  another,  upon  all  manner 
of  occasioi  s,  and  there  is  no  sentiment  in  this  country 
that  |is  injurious  to  their  independence  or  their  in- 
fluence, and  surely  it  is  not  an  unwarranted  request 
that  we  make  of  other  countries  that  they  shall  be  as 
considerate  of  the  interests  of  these  southern  American 
States  as  we  are.  The  propositions  of  the  American 
government  have  been  so  just  and  so  reasonable  that 
no  European  government  has  ever  ventured  to  oppose 
them.  In  terms  they  are  these  : 

First : That  no  government  of  Europe  shall  seek  to 
extend  its  influence  in  this  hemisphere  to  any  extent 
further  than  that  which  existed  when  the  American 
government  was  formed. 

Second : That  there  shall  be  no  exchange  of 

sovereignties  here  from  one  European  government  to 
another. 

Third  : That  in  any  controversies  which  may  arise 
between  any  European  government  and  such  colonies 
as  it  may  now  possess  here  in  this  hemisphere,  other 
European  governments  shall  hold  themselves  aloof 


all  standing,  drank  the  toast.  A gentle- 
man present  suggested:  “Mr.  President, 

I propose  three  cheers,  while  we  are  on  our 
feet,  for  our  worthy  president,  Mr.  Nissen.” 
Three  cheers  were  given  with  a will  and  a 
tiger. 

President  Nissen:  “ I think  that  motion 
was  carried.  Our  next  toast,  gentlemen,  is 
“ ‘ T’/i^  Land  We  Love. 

“ ‘ Strike — for  your  altars  and  your  fires: 

Strike — for  the  green  graves  of  your  sires: 

God,  and  your  native  land.’ 

■ — Fits-Greene  Halleck. 

“ To  respond  to  this  toast  we  have  with 
us  a gentleman  who  has  become  widely 
known,  respected  and  admired,  not  only  in 
our  own  great  metropolis,  but  in  the  State 
and  nation  as  well,  for  during  the  last  two 
sessions  of  our  National  Congress  there  was 
no  representative  from  the  Empire  State 
whose  voice  enjoyed  greater  attention  and 
whose  arguments  greater  consideration 
than  those  of  the  gentleman  whom  I shall 
introduce  to  you  to  respond  to  the  toast  of 
■*  The  Land  We  Love,’  I have  the  honor 
to  present  to  you,  gentlemen,  the  Hon, 
Lemuel  E.  Quigg.” 

This  name  was  greeted  with  great  ap- 
plause and  Mr.  Quigg  arose  and  replied  as 
follows  : 

ADDRESS  OF  HON.  LEMUEL  E.  QUIGG. 

It  is  not  an  unfamiliar  suggestion  that  we  Ameri- 
cans are  over  fond  of  adverting  to  the  good  things 
that  distinguish  the  land  we  live  in.  This  has  been 
said,  indeed,  sometimes  by  those  who  love  us,  some- 
times by  those  who  don’t,  to  constitute  our  most 
serious  fault.  That,  of  course,  is  from  the  point  of 
view  of  the  critic,  and  a critic,  being  without  faults. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


7 


I 


ii 


I 


I 


I 


Nov.  1895 


i 


8 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20  1095. 


Q)iS^G)>S^S^^S£^Q))£^B)iS6(gtS^SQ(a 


]0i)9s?a-^ 

5^ 

(0^ 

«t»  ♦x-  ^ 




Rings  of  Romance. 

A Story  of  Solid  Moral. 

fCOLD  DECEMBER  glitter  in  her  eye.  The  spark  of  love  had  crystal- 
ized  into  a gaze  which  meant  business.  “John”  she  said,  “ the  best  of 
everything  has  been  mine  at  your  expense — your  caramels  have  cost 
sixty-five  cents  a pound — there  were  Providence  River  oysters  in  every  milk 
stew  which  passed  my  lips — this  Christmas  ring  looks  well,  but  I want  you  to 
distinctly  understand  that  before  we  are  married,  I am  going  to  have  just  what  I 
want,  and  when  you  give  me  a ring,  I want  a ring  that  will  last  through 
matrimony,  not  through  courtship  only.  To  be  blunt  with  you,  you  can  take 
that  ring  back  and  give  me  an  Ostby  & Barton  ring,  or  you  need  not  come  back.  ” 





OSTBY  & BARTON  CO.,  PROVIDENCE.  R.  I. 


4i»  ♦Xo  »x« »x»  >>\ 


ALL  KINDS 

FANCY  WOOD 

CHESTS 

FOR 

TEA  SETS 

AND 

FLAT  WARE. 


FANCY  KID. 

CHAMOIS, 
SILKS  and 
BROCADE 


CASES, 

FOR 

SILVERWARE 

AND 

JEWELRY. 


HEBBARD  & BI^OTHEI^, 

A Y,  YORK. 


«oo 


Fourth.  That  in  any  controversy  which 
may  arise  in  any  American  country  or 
between  American  countries,  no  European 
influence  shall  seek  to  influence  the  result,  , 
or  to  assert  itself  in  any  particular  what-  I 
ever.  (Applause.) 

That,  gentlemen,  is  the  Monroe  doctrine. 
-(Long  and  loud  applause.) 

This  is  the  Monroe  doctrine,  and  the  reasons  for  its 
maintenance  have  grown  in  number  and  in  force  with 
every  year  since  it  was  first  proclaimed.  It  is  the  car- 
dinal principle  of  our  foreign  policy.  Upon  its  literal 
enforcement  depend  great  and  enduring  interests.  We 
have  engaged  ourselves  to  build  a canal  through  one 
of  the  Central  American  States,  connecting  the  At- 
lantic and  Pacific  oceans,  and  shortening  the  voyage 
to  Oriental  countries  by  the  boundaries  of  a continent. 
Every  consideration  of  National  interest  requires  that 
this  canal  shall  be  an  American  enterprise,  the  product 
of  American  capital,  American  science  and  American 
labor,  and  held  for  the  benefit  of  mankind  by  Ameri- 
can power  against  the  danger  of  every  interference. 

Mr.  Quigg  was  interrupted  frequently 
with  applause,  and  he  was  cheered  when  he 
ended  his  address.  He  spoke  at  some 
little  length  on  the  subject  of  the  Monroe 
doctrine,  and  at  the  close  of  his  address, 
the  guests  were  in  an  uproar  and  the  Presi- 
dent had  great  difficulty  in  restoring  order. 
When  order  was  restored  the  President 
continued  the  regular  order  of  toasts  as 
follows: 

President  Nissen:  “ Gentlemen,  we  were  to  have 
-with  us  to-night  the  Honorable  Chauncey  M.  Depew, 
but  late  last  night  I received  this  telegram : 

New  York,  Nov.  12,  1895. 

Ludwig  Nissen,  146  Broadway,  N.  Y. 

I have  your  letter  of  Nov.  ii.  I regret 
that  the  death  of  my  brother-in-law,  J. 
Niven  Hegeman,  will  prevent  my  atten- 
dance Chauncey  M.  Depew. 

"Consequently,  we  will  not  have  the  pleasure  of  hear- 
ing the  Hon.  Chauncey  M.  Depew.  We  were  also  to 
have  with  us  his  Honor,  the  Mayor  of  New  York. 
(Applause.)  We  had  him  here  last  year;  he  accepted 
the  invitation  of  the  New  York  Jewelers’  Association 
as  its  first  entertainment  after  his  election.  (Ap- 
plause.) And  he  would  have  been  very  glad  to  have 
been  with  us  to-night,  but  he  has  been  sick  in  bed  for 
three  days.  I have  had  an  interview  with  him  this 
afternoon.  He  was  not  quite  sure  then  that  he  would 
be  able  to  come,  and  he  told  me  that  if  his  doctor 
would  let  him  do  so  he  would  be  here ; but  this  is  the 
result ; 

November  13th,  1895. 

Mr.  Ludwig  Nissen,  Brest.  Jewelers' 
Ass'n,  New  York  City- 

My  Dear  Sir: — The  invitation  received 
from  the  Jewelers’  Association  to  attend 


H.  D.  SHERRILL. 

their  dinner  this  evening,  is  the  second 
invitation  with  which  I have  been  honored 
by  your  organization.  Shortly  after  my 
election  to  the  office  of  Mayor  I attended 
the  dinner  of  the  Jewelers’  Association,  the 
first  one  after  such  election.  The  recollec- 
tion of  the  cordial  reception  I received  ; of 
your  exquisite  entertainment,  and  the  good 
fellowship  evidenced,  make  me  regret  the 
keener  that  illness  prevents  my  being  with 
you  to-night. 

I cannot  refrain,  however,  from  sending 
this  written  line  to  wish  you  good  cheer  and 
a pleasant  evening,  and  to  express  my  be- 
lief that  the  custom  now  quite  established 
in  this  city,  of  annual  dinners  by  the  various 
businesses  and  professions,  is  one  that  can- 
not fail  to  bring  good  results  iu  establishing 
lines  of  friendship  and  making  more  pleas- 
ant business  and  social  intercourse. 

Very  respectfully  yours, 

W.  L.  Strong, 
Mayor. 

“ Gentlemen,  our  next  toast  is 

Commercial  Honor  and  Commercial 
Honesty.' 

He  who  filches  from  me  my  good  name 
Steals  that  which  not  enriches  him,  and 
makes  me  poor  indeed.’ 

— Shakespeare. 

Over  in  Brooklyn,  the  city  of  homes  and  churches 
and  good  morals,  we  have  at  the  head  of  a powerful 
newspaper  a gentleman  who  is  the  very  incarnation  of 
independence.  He  is  the  slave  of  no  master,  no  boss 
and  no  party.  His  only  master  is  his  conscience,  and 
he  masters  that  himself.  (.Applause.)  He  has  the 
very  happy  faculty  of  almost  always  finding  himself 
on  the  right  side  of  all  public  questions,  not  as  a fol- 
lower of  public  opinion,  but  as  the  creator.  He  be- 
lieves in  the  maxim  that  the  pen  is  mightier  than  the 
sword,  and  he  sometimes  gives  illustrations  of  the 
fact  that  the  tongue  is  even  mightier  than  the  pen,  and 
that  is  what  I hope  he  will  do  now,  I will  introduce 
to  you,  gentlemen,  Mr.  ,St.  Clair  McKelway.” 
(Great  appause,  cries  of  “ Hurrah ! ” and  three 
cheers ) 

ADDRESS  OF  ST.  CLAIR  MCKELWAY. 

Mr.  Chairman  and  friends  : If  I am  under  a con- 
tract of  courtesy  to  your  compliments  and  to  your  at- 
tention, I will  express  the  hope  that  I may  be  allowed 
for  a little  while  to  do  all  of  the  talking  that  is,  done 
in  this  room.  (Applause.)  The  confidential  inter- 
communications of  the  gentlemen  upon  the  left,  and 
the  audible  utterances  of  the  gentlemen  upon  the 
right,  and  the  interest  in  one  another  of  the  gentlemen 


directly  in  front  of  me,  are  in  themselves 
admirable,  but  in  their  effects  confusing. 

There  are  two  forces  entitled  to  congrat- 
ulation here  to-night;  one  is  the  Jewelers’ 

Association,  and  the  other  is  the  Mayor- 
elect  of  my  city.  (Applause  ) You  are  21 
years  old  ; he  has  attained  his  majority. 

Applause  and  laughter.)  I listened  with  pleasure  to  this 
interruption  to  the  speech  which  immediately  preceded 
the  one  that  I have  not  yet  delivered  (Applause.)  I 
thought  it  was  it  was  to  be  an  encomium.  I discovered 
that  it  was  an  indictment.  (Applause  ) I thought  it 
was  to  be  a eulogy  of  the  land  we  loved.  I found  that 
it  was  an  attack  upon  the  land  suspected  of  not  loving 
us.  (Long  and  long  applause,  and  “ Hurrah  !”  ) 

Now,  why  should  they  not  love  us?  If  there  are 
unlovely  qualities  in  ourselves,  let  us  e.xtirpate  them  ; 
let  us  charm  them  by  an  example  ; let  us  not  think 
ourselves  superior  to  the  cultivating  influences  of  the 
criticism  of  mankind. 

National  egotism  is  quite  as  objectionable  as  per- 
sonal egotism,  and  both  are  faults  to  be  corrected. 
(Applause.)  No  man,  I hope,  can  exceed  me  in  being 
the  friend,  but  I believe  that  there  are  many  can  exceed 
me  if  I should  try  neither  to  envy  or  emulate  them. 
* * « * We  should  also  be  careful  lest  our  resent- 
ment of  criticism  at  home  or  abroad  be  not  the  rebuke 
of  a disapproving  conscience  for  failing  to  reach  the 
ethical  standard  which  makes  of  one  brotherhood  all 
the  nations  of  this  world  as  of  one  race  and  one  blood. 
The  Lord  made  all  the  people  of  this  world.  I believe 
in  the  Monroe  doctrine  I believe  in  it  profoundly. 
(Applause.)  I believe  in  it  in  one  particular  at  least 
to  a greater  extent  than  my  distinguished  predecessor 
advanced.  He  said  that  he  meant  the  maintenance  of 
the  status  of  all  governments  as  they  were  at 
the  time  of  the  formation  of  our  government. 
Gentlemen,  at  that  time  France  was  at  least 
the  nominal  owner  and  controller  of  the  great  tract 
which  we  call  the  Louisiana  purchase,  and  which  ex- 
tended from  the  Gulf  at  the  south  upward  on  the 
western  side  of  the  Mississippi,  where  it  hears  no 
sound  save  its  own  dashing.  The  government  status 
of  that  portion  of  our  country  has  been  changed  since 
the  formation  of  our  government. 

At  the  time  of  the  formation  of  our  government 
Spain  was  regnant  in  a whole  line  of  republics  in 
South  America ; had  a grip  upon  Florida ; controled. 
if  not  the  government,  at  least  the  policy  of  Mexico, 
which  in  turn  controled  her  coast  along  the  Pacific 
sea.  Under  the  benign  influence  of  the  peaceful  ex- 
ample and  of  the  rigorous  application  of  the  Monroe 
doctrine  our  country  now  extends  from  the  Rio 
Grande  to  Portland  Mexico  belongs  to  herself ; the 
South  American  governments  belong  to  themselves  ; 
each  one  of  them  in  turn  belongs  to  whichever  parti- 
carried  the  last  revolution  (laughter  and  applause) 
and  is  able  to  put  down  the  next  election.  (Applause  ) 
***** 

Thus  by  easy  stages  I approach  my  speech.  (Laugh- 
ter.) I have  been  asked  to  speak  about  commercial 
honor  and  commercial  honesty,  all  things  which  last 
organize  themselves,  from  Tammany  Hall  to  the 
Jewelers’  Association. 

Labor  has  organized  itself  into  a class.  Talent  and 
cultivation  have  organized  themselves  into  a profes- 
sion. The  class  and  the  professions  at  once  sub- 
organize themselves  into  specialties.  Every  man  has 


10 


•i 


Ip  his  specialty  in  his  own  profession.  In 

W my  profession  my  specialty  has  been 

ll  called  the  discussion  or  consideration 

M of  biographies.  Now  about  this  toast. 

W I see  in  it  a seductive  snare  for  me  to 

^ dissect  in  extenso  the  biographies  of  all 

of  you.  For  are  you  not  men  of  honor 
and  men  of  honesty  If  not,  what  are  you?  (Laughter 
and  applause.)  Why  merely  members  of  the  Jewelers’ 
Association  ? And  if  then  membership  in  this  As- 
sociation is  not  synonymous  with  honor  and  with 
honesty  where  are  the  police?  (Laughter  and  ap- 
plause.) If,  therefore,  I am  not  talking  about  you, 
what  am  I talking  about,  and  assuming  that  1 am  talk- 
ing about  you,  why  this  alacrity  for  ante-mortem 
consideration  ? 

Important  people  are  biographed  when  they  die. 
Unimportant  people  desire  to  be  biographed  before 
they  die.  (Laughter  and  applause.)  Why  your  alac- 
rity to  anticipate  the  debtor  or  the  sheriff  or  the 
coroner.^  (Laughter and  applause  ) And  then  look  at 
that  word.  Commercial  means  commerce.  Commerce 
comprises  buying  and  selling  or  exchange  some  things 
for  other  things.  Commercial  honor.  Commercial 
honesty.  How  much  do  I hear  for  it?  (Laughter  and 
applause.)  Is  it  for  sale?  What  will  you  charge  ? Is 
it  for  exchange  ? And  what  will  you  take  for  it  ? Do 
you  resemble  the  legislator  in  a western  State  who 
declared  “ Every  man  has  his  price  and  that  fellow  is 
getting  pretty  near  to  my  price”  ? (Laughter  and 
applause.)  I trow  not. 

A little  girl  of  mine  is  studying  grammar.  She  tells 
me  that  adjectives  are  modifiers.  Commercial  is  an 
adjective,  before  honor  and  honesty.  Are  you  men  of 
modified  commercial  honor  or  of  modified  commercial 
honesty?  (.\pplause.)  Or  is  this  toast  a trap  to  my 
unwary  feet  ? (Applause.) 

Seriously,  however,  between  honor  and  honesty 
there  should  be  no  difference.  Honesty  in  common 
parlance  is  behavior  sufficiently  good  to  keep  us  out 
of  jail.  (Laughter  and  applause.)  Honor  is  the 
aroma  of  what  honesty  ought  to  be.  (Applause.) 
Shylock  was  law  honest,  but  he  demanded  his  pound 
to  Shylock.  Honor  would  have  torn  and  trampled 
the  bond  he  held.  (Applause.)  Honesty  is  perhaps  to 
do  as  you  promise.  Honor  is  to  do  as  you  ought. 
Your  calling,  gentlemen,  should  make  you  men  of 
honor.  You  deal  in  diamonds,  rubies,  pearls  and  the 
like,  you  deal  in  the  rarest  and  most  valuable  gems  of 
nature.  You  work  the  most  precious  metals  into  the 
most  beautiful  forms. 

Said  Shakespeare  : “ The  hand  of  little  employment 
hath  the  daintier  sense.”  As  true  is  it  that  the  hand  of 
dainty  employment  hath  the  better  sense. 

The  analogies  of  your  products  in  the  field  of  morals 
and  in  the  domain  of  conscience  should  charm  and 
control  your  mind.  Nowhere  do  any  of  your  posses- 
sions privately  owned  tempt  men  to  wrong  doing, 
tempt  the  owners  of  them  to  wrong  doing  outside  of 
the  walls  of  the  Custom  House. 

There  is,  therefore,  always  a prejud.ee  of  men  against 
paying  duties  on  valuable  possessions.  A man  says, 
“ If  1 can  carry  myself  from  one  country  to  another 
my  portable  values  ought  to  go  in  also  duty  free  ” 
Law  has  recognized  this  in  that  it  has  allowed  per- 
sonal possessions  as  I understand  it  to  come  in  duty 
(lee.  If  it  has  put  a duty  on  those  which  you  import 


CHARLES  F.  WOOD. 

for  sale  I know  that  with  unanimous  feeling  you  have 
added  the  Custom  House  price  to  the  price  of  the 
home  article.  (Laughter  and  applause.) 

Perhaps  your  craft  needs  protection.  The  Cape 
May  diamond  must  be  protected  from  the  South 
African  gems  and  Brazilian  stones  of  the  first  water. 
The  pearls  we  get  from  Fulton  Market  oysters  may 
need  protection  from  those  which  are  brought  up  by 
the  divers  of  Ceylon,  ultimately  to  appear  in  mag- 
nificent splendor  around  the  neck  of  .American  heir 
esses  transferred  to  foreign  titles.  The  former  r ait  I 
cannot  understand,  for  what  we  do  not  make,  what 
our  mines  do  not  hold,  what  our  waters  do  not  yield  I 
cannot  understand  why  those  things  should  be  barred 
from  our  country. 

Nevertheless,  gentlemen,  you  have  your  honesty.  I 
am  satisfied  that  the  whole  tendency  of  your  calling  is 
elevating  purifying  and  ennobling.  You  look  like 
men  who  would  nathen  cheat  one  another  than  defraud 
a confiding  public.  (.Applause.)  And  it  is  certainly 
true  that  when  after  a life  well  spent  for  others  you 
die  and  enter  Heaven,  you  will  enter  it  with  more  sen- 
sations of  pleasure  than  any  other  of  the  sons  of  man, 
because  as  you  enter  that  really  Eternal  City  (the 
speaker  pauses  and  refers  to  the  Bible),  you  will  find 
that  the  walls  of  it  are  of  jasper  and  the  City  is  of  pure 
gold  like  unto  clear  glass.  ( Applause. ) And  you 
will  find  that  the  foundations  of  the  walls 
are  garnished  with  all  minerals  and  precious  stones. 
And  the  first  foundation  is  of  jasper,  the  second  with 
sapphire,  the  third  with  calcedony,  the  fourth  with 
emerald,  the  fifth  with  sardonyx,  the  sixth  with  sar- 
dius,  the  seventh  with  crysolite,  the  eight  with  beryl, 
the  ninth  with  topaz,  the  tenth  with  chrysoprasus.  the 
eleventh  with  jacinth,  and  the  twelve  gates  are  twelve 
pearls,  and  every  several  gate  is  one  pearl  and  every 
street  of  the  City  is  of  pure  gold. 

Those  splendors  may  your  eyes  uncovetously  see 
(laughter  and  applause',  your  minds  uninquisitively 
contemplate.  And  may  He  who  imprints  all  these 
things  in  our  minds  makes  truth,  in  our  hearts  makes 
love,  and  into  our  lives  makes  wisdom,  guarantee  to 
one  and  to  all  of  us  wonderful  entrance.  (Applause.) 

President  Nissen:—”  Gentlemen,  I want  to  call 
your  attention  to  one  thing.  Living  pictures  seem  to 
be  the  order  of  the  day,  and  we  present  to  you  to-night 
in  living  pictures  the  progress  of  our  .Association  by 
having  upon  the  platform  the  oldest  living  president 
in  point  of  service.  He  requested  me  to  say  that. 
(.Applause)  as  well  as  the  youngest  who  ushered  the 
Association  into  the  year  of  its  majority.  The  youngest 
looks  as  old  as  the  oldest,  but  he  says  he  is  not.  And 
we  who  know  him  are  in  the  habit  ot  taking  his  word 
for  anything  he  says.  You  will  also  observe  that  as  a 
guarantee  of  their  good  behavior  the  committee  was 
competed  to  put  an  eminent  judge  at  the  side  of  one 
of  them  and  a doctor  of  divinity  at  the  side  of  the 
other.  Our  next  toast  is  : 

“ The  Artist  and  the  Jeivel. 

“ ‘ The  per  lection  of  art  is  (o  conceal  art.’ 
Qiiintitian. 


“ Cientlemen,  a very  few  years  ago 
when  the  great  State  of  Ohio  began  to 
realize  that  it  was  was  running  short  of  ^ 

home  made  statesmen,  it  robbed  the  ^ 

Empire  State  of  one  of  its  promising  1 

members  by  inviting  him  to  come  west 
and  grow  up  with  the  country  He 
accepted  the  invitation,  but  I take  it  that  they  must 
have  been  terribly  disappointed  in  him  for  they  have 
already  decreed  that  he  shall  spend  a large  part  of 
his  time  outside  of  the  State  by  having  elected  him  to 
the  honor  of  occupying  the  seat  formerly  occupied  by 
the  great  McKinley  in  our  National  Congress.’' 


CONCltr  bSM  \N  TAYLIk’s  SIEICH. 


.I/"-.  C/inhvuju  and  Members  of  the  Je-wetet  s'  As- 
sociation: lam  quite  thankful  to  be  still  here,  be- 
cause when  Mr.  McKelway  opened  that  strange  but 
authentic  book  and  for  the  first  time  furnished  pou 
with  the  knowledge  of  the  wonderful  place  where 
pearls  and  diamonds  and  rubies  are  plentiful,  I thought 
you  might  all  go  there.  (Laughter  and  applause.J  * * 

I rejoice  with  you  in  your  prosperity  this  year  be- 
cause I notice  that  the  annual  crop  of  robberies  of 
artists’  jewels  and  actors’  jewels  exceeds  all  former 
records.  (Laughter  and  applause.)  But  I cannot 
understand,  Mr.  Chairman,  why  any  of  the  recent 
years  should  have  been  unfortunate  from  the  jewelers’ 
standpoint,  for  an  observation  of  the  stores  cf  the  re- 
ceivers of  stolen  goods  and  of  other  places  where  this 
genuine  jewelry  goes  ought  to  make  you  ready  to 
supply  the  vacuum  that  is  created.  (Applause  and 
laughter  ) It  is  several  days  since  anything  of  im- 
portance of  this  kind  has  happened,  and  1 hope  that 
while  you  are  still  in  the  throes  of  recovering  from  the 
ecstasies  of  this  gathering,  you  may  read  in  the  news- 
papers of  some  5500,000  necklace  that  has  been  stolen. 
(Laughter  and  applause.) 

I confess  that  1 labor  under  some  embarrassment  in 
responding  to  this  toast,  and  by  so  doing  seem  to  want 
its  sentiment.  •' The  Aitist  and  the  Jewel.”  ‘‘The 
Perfection  of  .Art  is  to  Conceal  Art.”  1 hat  art  ought 
to  concf-al  itse.f  is  true  enough,  as  art  generally  ex- 
presses itself.  But  when  we  apply  the  rule  to  the  jew- 
eler, we  discover  that  he  honors  it  in  the  breach  and 
not  by  its  observance.  The  achievement  of  the  jew- 
eler declares,  in  every  line  and  curve,  in  every  tone 
and  flashing  ray  the  superb  capacity  of  man,  and  de- 
cL res  that  whatever  nature  may  be,  the  jeweler  im- 
proves on  nature,  and  intends  that  all  the  world  slu-uld 
know  it. 

It  is  the  artist  jeweler’s  glory  that  he  is  exactly  what 
he  seems  to  be.  He  is  no  disciple  of  delusion  or  decep 
tion.  His  work  advertises  the  art  that  is  in  it,  and 
the  more  it  proclaims  it,  the  greater  is  it  his  art.  A 
painter  may  so  copy  nature  as  that  nature  herself  may 
seem  to  speak  in  the  canvas  ; the  actor  may  so  fill  him- 
self with  the  spirit  of  his  part  as  that  his  audience 
may  forget  the  stage.  But  art  in  this  instance  is  more 
truly  art  the  more  it  conceals  itself  and  the  nearer  it 
approaches  nature.  Not  so  the  jeweler.  His  duty  is 
to  take  what  nature  has  left  commonplace  and  make 
it  superb  and  beautiful.  (.Applause.)  He  does  not  im- 
itate, ha  creates.  (.Applause.)  His  it  is,  so  far  from 
concealing  his  art,  to  declare  it  everywhere. 

“ The  artist  and  the  jewel ’’  \\  hat  an  union  I When 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


11 


COLONIAL  SILVER. 

4 »»4  - -4 

IN  RESPONSE  TO  THE  WIDE  AND  INCREASING  DEMAND  FOR  SILVERWARE 
IN  COLONIAL  STYLE,  WE  HAVE  PRODUCED  A FINE  LINE  COMPRISING  TEA 
SETS,  BLACK  COFFEE  SETS,  TETE-A-TETE  SETS,  CONDIMENT  SETS, 
BOWLS,  SUGARS  AND  CREAMS,  ETC,  ETC.,  OF  WHICH  A 
SPLCIMEN  GROUP  IS  BELOW  ILLUSTRATED. 


Geo.  W.  Shiebler  & Co., 

179  BROADW.AY, 

....  New  York. 


12 


'IHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


B.  & F. 


/So  Better  L-irje 

0hristmas  J^ovelties 


Trade  Mark. 


OKIQIN^L  DIM  I5)IESB'^IM5„ 

EXTEM5IVE  DM  W/^I^IETY  m 

nObERflTE  m riKEo- 


For  HiQn~CLfl55  Trade. 


B/lCHR/ICn  & fREEDn/IN,  ‘ ~ 


3 Union  5qm/ire, 

New  Tokk. 


WRITE  FOR  SAMPLES.  ^ 


L 


n_-n 


O^o 


S.  A.  BOYLE  & CO., 


AUCTIONEERS 


FOR  THE  LEGITIMATE 
JEWELRY  TRADE  ONLY 


WE  GUARANTEE  YOU  AGAINST  LOSS. 

WE  PAY  ALL  OUR  OWN  EXPENSES. 

Make  no  contracts  with  others  before  consulting  us. 


Write  for  Parliciilars. 


OFFICES  : 

14  MAIDEN  LANE,  N.  Y. 

61  1 PENN  A VE.,  WASHINGTON.  D.  C. 


BAND  RINQ  nOUNTINQ 


3351. 


De.rign 

P.ATENTED 

Sept.  24, 
1895. 


3350.^ 


CHARLES  KNAPP, 


MANUFACTURING  JEWELER, 

41  & 43  Maiden  I^ane,  New  York. 


SPECIALTY:  SUPERIOR  LADIES’ and  CHILDREN’S  RINGS 


The  Hamilton  Watch  Co. 

has  added  to  its  line  four  new  18  size  full  plate  15  and  17  jewel  movements. 

Write  for  description  and  prices. 

The  increasing  popularity  of 


HAMILTON  WATCHES 

is  due  to  the  fact  that  they  excel  all  others  in  accuracy,  mechanical  excel- 
lence, and  beautiful  finish.  They  are  especially  adapted  to  Railroad  service, 
and  are  in  general  use  on  all  the  principal  Railroads  of  the  country.  They 
are  sold  to  Legitimate  Retail  [Jewelers  only.  No  Catalogues  or 
Printed  Price  Lists  are  issued.  No  movements  are  Named.  Prices 
are  Guaranteed.  Full  Rebates  will  be  made  on  all  movements  that  are 
reduced  in  price  or  discontinued. 

HAMILTON  WATCH  CO.,  LANCASTER,  PA. 


13 


they  have  communed  amid  the  har- 
monies of  the  artist’s  sensibdities  and 
the  jewel  has  emerged  from  its  sinister 
source  and  we  see  the  dainty  touch  and 
the  creating  power  behind,  we  know  that 
art  is  not  concealed  but  has  glorified 
herself.  ( Applause.  ) The  jewel  is 
an  epic  that  always  and  everywhere  displays  itself 
in  loveliness  and  proclaims  its  own  art.  Is  the  jewel 
beautiful  because  it  is  rare,  or  is  it  rare  because 
it  is  beautiful  ? Can  it  be  that  we  attribute  beauty  to 
a thing  because  it  may  be  novel  ? Curiosity  finds  its 
birth  in  the  novel,  but  beauty  never.  What  is  it  then 
that  makes  the  diamond  a jewel,  the  precious  and  rare 
articles,  the  evidences  of  inanimate  nature  so  rare? 
There  is  a beautiful  legend  of  mythology  that  attril> 
utes  to  the  earth  creative  energy  and  declares  that  it 
possesses  the  power  of  intelligently  recognizing  its 
own  forces  and  its  creative  products,  and  that  nature 
produces  like  man  its  most  splendid  results  only  at 
wide  intervals  and  by  stupendous  effort.  (Cries  of 
“ Hear  1 Hear  1”)  And  that  nature  in  her  supreme 
effort  has  given  birth  to  these  most  beautiful  objects 
which  the  jeweler  makes  more  beautiful.  (.Applause.) 
And  so  the  diamond,  which  is,  1 suppose,  the  rarest 
of  all  the  products  of  inanimate  nature,  in  a state  of 
nature  we  find  surrounded  with  the  evidences  of  gigan- 
tic and  stupendous  throes  and  we  see  the  evidence  of 
the  effort  of  the  forces  of  the  'earth  to  produce  it. 
(.Applause  ) 

And  so  we  may  imagine  the  soul  of  the  artist  when 
he  thinks  of  the  origin  of  the  jewel.  His  soul  thrills 
like  a harp  of  a thousand  strings.  His  poetic  instinct, 
looking  back  to  the  legendary  origin  of  the  jewel, 
peoples  it  with  myriads  of  spirits.  Spirits  of  good  and 
spirits  of«  evil ; spirits  of  love  and  demons  of  hate. 
-And  as  he  polishes  the  faces  or  sides  of  the  jewel  he 
thinks  upon  the  spirits  that  inhabit  the  stone  and  as 
he  labors,  behold  from  the  center  of  the  jewel  comes  a 
Hash,  the  gleam  of  the  spirit  that  loves  to  do  good,  and 
the  artist  smiles  and  the  world  is  warm  and  welcome 
And  then  another  and  a quicker  gleam  flashes  forth, 
the  flash  of  the  spirit  of  evil.  And  the  artist’s  heart  is 
sore,  for  here  is  the  face  of  the  spirit  of  avarice,  of 
greed,  of  luit  and  disgrace  and  of  death.  And  then 
again  from  the  heart  of  the  stone  comes  another  and 
all-absorbing  ray  and  clears  the  night  and  makes  the 
pulse  to  beat  and  the  heart  to  warm  for  the  spirit  of 
love  has  spoken  and  joy  that  endureth,  and  peace  that 
remaineth  are  in  the  air  and  round  about  him,  for  here 
are  fatherly  love  and  brotherly  love  and  filial  love,  and 
best  and  cheeriest  and  happiest  of  all,  the  lover’s  love. 
(.Applause  ) All  the  world  loves  a lover,  and  the 
jeweler  loves  him  ineffably.  (Laughter  and  applause.) 
■And  the  flash  that  comes  from  the  diamond’s  heart  is 
the  beam  that  glows  in  the  lover's  eye,  smiling  into 
the  eyes  of  love.  Oh  rare  and  radiant  moment  this  ! 
And  happy  the  artist  with  the  jewel  that  brings  it. 
(.Applause.) 

President  Ni.ssen  ; — “ Gentlemen,  I made  no  mis- 
take when  I introduced  to  you  Bob  Tayler.  .An  after 
dinner  toast  is  a very  good  thing,  but  it  is  also  a good 
thing  to  have  a little  sprinkling  of  something  else  with 
it.  Just  about  a week  ago  we  had  an  election  in 
Brooklyn.  We  have  tbe  result  with  us.  Several 
parties  put  candidates  in  the  field  for  the  mayoralty. 
Kach  party  was  supposed  to  pick  the  best  man,  and  as 


J.lIlN  K.  KKlvI. 

the  man  finally  selected  among  those  thus  taken  by  the 
leading  three  parties  is  of  necessity  the  best  of  them, 
he  is  of  necessity  the  best  man  of  the  city.  I take 
pleasure  in  introducing  to  you  the  first  citizen  of 
Brooklyn,  Mayor  elect  Frederick  W.  Wurster.” 

ADDRESS  OF  MAYOR  WURSTER. 

Mr.  President  an  i Members  of  the  Jexvelers'  Associa- 
tion : 

Mr.  Tayler,  of  Ohio,  formerly  of  New  York,  has  just 
said  that  if  he  was  to  die  he  did  not  know  whether  he 
would  go  to  heaven  or  to  Brooklyn.  I want  to  say 
gentlemen,  that  most  of  the  inhabitants  of  the  City  of 
New  A’ork  generally  go  to  heaven  via  Brooklyn.  As 
one  who  expects  soon  to  be  sizzling  in  the  frying  pan 
of  public  office.  I expected  to  meet  to-night  the  Mayor 
of  this  great  city,  and  hear  from  his  lips  words  of 
wisdom  and  counsel,  because  he  has  had  one  year  of 
the  frying  pan. 

A few  years  ago  it  seemed  almost  impossible  for  our 
great  city  to  have  anything  lut  political  administra- 
tions. Foreigners  who  have  visited  our  shores  have 
said  that  the  greatest  blot  on  our  American  institu- 
tions has  been  the  misadministration  and  the  political 
administration  of  our  great  municipalities.  It  seems 
as  if  it  was  almost  impossible  to  change  that  and  that 
what  foreigners  have  said  to  us  was  true.  Brooklyn 
at  last  has  broken  the  tie.  and  the  political  administra- 
tion was  followed  by  a business  administration.  That 
example  was  followed  by  Buffalo  and  finally  by  New 
York  city  itself,  and  the  quotations  which  were  made 
by  the  distinguished  citizens  of  this  country  and  of 
England  that  business  men  had  no  right  in  our  munici- 
pal administrations  have  been  proved  false,  for  the 
business  administrations  of  Brooklyn,  of  Buffalo  and 
of  New  York  have  been  proved  far  superior  to  the 
political  administrations  of  those  cities  when  they  were 
in  their  hands.  (.Applause.) 

Brooklyn  has  been  the  first  to  show  that  it  wishes  a 
continuance  of  that  good  governm-'nt  and  an  honest 
administration  of  its  municipal  affairs.  It  is  left  to 
Buffalo  and  to  New  York  in  its  following  elections  to 
prove  by  the  votes  of  its  citizens  whether  it  also  wishes 
a continuance  of  that  government,  and  I believe  that 
when  the  time  comes  the  citizens  of  this  city  will  go 
to  the  polls  and  say  by  their  votes  whether  we  shall 
have  a business  administration  of  this  city  or  whether 
we  shall  go  back  to  the  political  methods  which  have 
controlled  it  for  so  long.  ***** 

I want  to  just  say  a few  words  for  my  intimate  and 
old  friend,  Ludwig  Nissen.  I am  glad  to  be  here 
to-night,  gentlemen,  for  that  reason.  I have  known 
him  for  a great  many  years.  I have  followed  his 
career.  I am  proud  to  be  here  to-night  to  see  you, 
gentlemen  of  the  Jewelers’  Association,  pay  him  the 
high  honor  of  having  elected  him  as  your  president.  I 
am  glad  to  be  here  on  that  account.  Mr.  Nissen, 
gentlemen,  is  like  the  jewels  that  he  sells,  without  a flaw. 
(Great  applause.) 

President  Nissen:  “I  am  afraid  Mr.  Wurster 
don’t  know  me  as  well  as  some  of  you  boys  do.  Gen- 
tlemen, our  next  toast  is  : 


“ ‘ The  Loveliest  Jewel  of 
All. 

“ ‘ And  young  as  beautiful  ! 

And  soft  as  young  ! 

And  gay  as  soft ! And  innocent 
as  gay  1’  — 3 ’ottng. 

“It  has  been  the  custom  to  invite  lawyers,  and 
journalists,  and  judges,  and  congressmen  and  the 
like  to  make  after  dinner  speeches,  but  there  are 
otheis.  (Applause  and  laughter.)  .And  as  one  of 
those  others  I will  introduce  to  you  a plain  citizen. 
The  only  office  that  he  holds  is  that  of  Commis- 
sioner of  the  New  A'ork  and  Brooklyn  Bridge,  but 
outside  of  that  he  is  the  plain  Mr.  J.  Seaver  Page-’ 
(Great  applause. ) 

ADDRESS  OF  J.  SEAVER  PAGF,. 

Mr.  President  an  i Gentlemen : 

Before  I proceed  to  do  as  the  other  speakers  have 
done,  chew  up  those  that  have  just  got  in  front  of 
them,  you  will  allow  me  to  say  to  you  that  I came 
here  to-right  very  unexpectedly,  nothwithstanding  the 
fact  that  1 am  down  here  for  this  toast.  The  good 
Mayor  of  this  town  has  asked  me  to  do  a certain  work 
in  which  I know  I can  count  upon  your  hearty  co- 
operation when  I simply  state  the  case  to  you,  to  wit ; 
Awaken  an  enthusiasm  in  our  lethargic  New  York 
citizens  as  to  a due  appreciation  of  what  we  ought  to 
do,  namely,  go  down  and  visit  the  Cotton  E.xposi- 
tion  at  .Atlanta,  November  25.  Manhattan  Day.  (.Ap- 
plause. ) * * 

Now  then,  gentlemen,  if  I shall  combine  good  policy 
with  genuine  patriotism  and  ask  you  to  attend  as 
citizens  and  show  your  hearty  good  will  and  by  it  cap- 
ture a little  commercial  prosperity,  I shall  only  have 
said  that  which  I deserve  to  say  to  make  you  all  flock 
to  the  standard  and  go  down  there  and  show  these 
boys  in  gray  that  all  the  animosities  of  the  war  are 
long  passed  away  and  we  look  forward  to  the  time, 
hoping  it  will  not  come,  but  should  it  come  when  they 
shall  march  with  us  side  by  side  to  defend  our  glorious 
country.  (Long  and  loud  applause.)  * * 

My  friend  the  Judge  here  has  been  pumping  me  full. 
He  says,  “ Page,  do  you  know  that  I have  been  wdtb 
this  Association  for  the  last  twenty-one  years? ’’  He 
don’t  look  it ; he  looks  to  me  as  if  it  could  not  be  so, 
but  he  has  said  it.  And  he  tells  me,  “ Do  you  know 
that  1 spoke  at  the  first  dinner  that  they  had.  ' -And: 
he  said,  “ I distinctly  recollect  that  I spoke  to  your 
toast  eight  times.”  And  said  he  “ I am  mighty 
anxious  to  see  how  you  are  going  to  treat  it.”  Well  I 
said,  “ 1 am  anxious  myselt.”  * ^ 

Andnow,if  I have  not  talked  too  long  (cries  of  "go 
on”)  let  me  tackle  this  subject  that  I am  assigned 
to.  (Laughter.) 

“ The  Loveliest  Jewel  of  All. 

“ And  young  as  beautiful  ! And  soft  as  young  .' 
And  gay  as  soft ! And  innocent  as  gay  ’’ 

I think  Young  was  about  right  when  he  wrote  this. 
Whoever  selected  this  quotation  had  a great  head  He 
is  a jeweler  sure.  Quintilian  was  dead  right,  but 


It 

if 

!■( 


¥ 

[» 

1 

h 

I! 

r 

I 

t 

ii  '• 

!' 

% 


n 


i 

I: 

f 

"i 


14 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


My  toast  is  the  proverbial  one,  “Women.”  .\nd 
many  men  are  accustomed  to  treat  this  subject  in  a 
very  humorous  vein.  I once  heard  that  somebody 
■said,  “ Why  is  it  that  always  to  the  toast  of  women 
they  assign  either  a bachelor  or  a widower  to  respond?” 
And  the  answer  came  quickly,  “ Well,  married  men 
know  better.-”  (Loud  applause.)  * * * » * 

I know  not  how  I can  make  a lovelier  tribute  to 
women  than  to  tell  you  those  notes  of  history  that  I 
have  just  told  you.  I know  not  what  more  splendid 
escutcheon  can  be  furnished  than  this  simple  story 
constitutes,  and  I will  leave  it  with  you.  I shall 
simply  close  what  I have  to  say  with  this  little  quota, 
tion,  and  that  is; 

■“  What  the  rose  to  the  garden,  the  leaf  to  the  tree. 

The  grass  to  the  hills,  to  man’s  mansion  is  she. 

She  is  the  warmth  of  his  life,  the  light  of  his  eye. 

She  is  more  than  all  this,  she  is  companion,  friend- 
wife. 

Without  whom  man  may  live,  but  would  living  be 
life?” 

(Great  applause.) 

President  Nissen  : “ Gentlemen,  you  have  been 
turnished  with  a page  of  history  which  it  will  be  safe 
for  you  to  take  with  you  and  paste  in  your  family 
Bible.  Our  next  toast  is  ; 

Thajiksgivifig  for  the  Past. 
Congratulations  for  the  Present. 

Prayer  for  the  Futicre. 

“ To  respond  to  this  feeling  toast,  1 wi'l  introduce 
to  you  the  Rev.  Dr.  James  M.  Farrar.”  (Applause.) 

ADDRESS  OF  DR.  FARRAR. 

A/r.  President  and  Gentlemen  of  this  'J.ivelers' 
Association  : 

You  have  been  coerced  into  silence  and  1 cannot  do 
better  now  than  only  say  to  you  that  1 hope  the  greater 
part  of  the  talk  will  be  done  by  the  press  and  as  little 
as  possible  by  myself. 

As  1 look  over  this  audience  and  recognize  a number 
of  young  men,  I also  notice  that  you  have  evidently 
flint  or  iron  constitutions,  and  we  are  sufficiently 
acquainted  with  chemistry  to  know  that  iron  is  rusted 
by  water  (laughter  and  applause),  and  therefore  I am 
perfectly  willing  that  50U  should  do  all  the  talking 
that  you  see  fit. 

Now  I am  to  speak  to  the  toast,  and  just  a word  as 
to  thanksgiving  for  the  past.  And  if  there  are  any  two 
men  that  I especially  pity,  it  is  the  man  who  has  lost 
his  shadow  and  the  man  who  has  forgotten  where  he 
pigeonholes  the  past.  I find  that  the  book  that  Mr. 
McKelway  opened  to-night  is  the  only  book  in  which 
1 can  find  the  remote  past  of  the  Jewelers’  Association 
and  1 find  that  it  originated  with  Cam  and  Abel. 
Their  parents  did  not  wear  jewelry,  they  had  no  place 
to  pin  it,  but  you  remember  that  Cain  sinned,  and  it 
has  been  generally  supposed  that  God  put  a mark  upon 
him  to  mark  him  as  a sinner,  but  God  does  not  so  deal 
with  men.  He  asked  forgiveness  and  God  forgave  him 
and  you  remember  that  when  Cain  had  the  mark  of 
forgiveness  upon  him  he  immediately  set  to  work 
building  cities  and  doing  that  which  his  sin  would  have 
prevented  him  from  doing.  You  remember  that  there 
came  three  fruits  with  that  sin  forgiven.  The  first 
was  an  incentive  to  all  our  prosperity  and  industry  ; 
the  second  was  to  fill  us  with  sweet  sensations,  and  the 
third 'J'ubal  Cain,  who  was  an  instructor  and  artificer 
in  brass  and  iron. 

And  from  that  day  to  this  the  jeweler  has  had  his 
place.  It  was  he  who  placed  upon  the  High  Priest 
his  breast-plate  filled  with  precious  stones.  It  was  he 
who  gave  the  inspired  appointment  to  the  description  | 
of  the  beautiful  city  beyond,  and  it  was  to  you  who 
was  given  the  thought  in  us  that  inspired, if  I may  even 
say  it,  God  to  speak  to  Cain  and  say,  “ Him  that 
overcometh  will  1 give  a white  e,tone,  and  on  that  stone 
a new  name  is  written  ” 

We  also  remember  that  the  second  gift  of  the  past 
was  when  Isabella  planted  some  jewels  on  this  virgin 
soil,  and  everywhere  can  we  thankfully  look  around 
upon  the  husbandry  of  those  jewels.  And  then  the 
last  is  one  to  which  reference  has  already  been  made, 
the  engagement  ring  and  the  wedding  ring.  (Ap- 
plause.) 

You  remember,  boys,  and  when  we  remember  what 
they  meant  to  us,  we  are  certainly  thankful  for  that 
art  of  the  jeweler  in  the  past.  And  now  for  just  a 


word  as  to  the  congratulations  for  the  present. 

Gentlemen,  I am  just  simply  overwhelmed  with  the 
present.  When  1 look  at  this  magnificent  display  of 
jewelry,  when  I look  upon  tne  faces  of  men  who  have 
made  art  and  who  have  been  made  by  art,  1 am  simply 


A.  K.  SLOAN. 

PRESIDENT  1894. 

made  silent.  But  I read  to-day  in  the  Brooklyn 
edition  of  a New  \'ork  paper  this  sentence,  that  a cer- 
tain man  was  the  absolute  crowbar  of  inflexibility,  and 
I think  that  1 would  fill  that  position  if  I did  not  say 
something  as  to  the  congratulations  for  the  pres- 
ent. 

The  present  is  your  individual  place.  The  past  is 
set  in  the  environment  of  the  present,  and  sparkling  in 
the  ray  of  the  near  future.  Vou  make  the  present 
what  it  is,  but  I wish  to  say  just  this  word  at  this  late 
hour,  that  you  shou'd  remember  in  making  the  pres- 
ent, in  putting  this  setting  into  our  present  environ- 
ment, that  you  are  soon  to  be  the  past,  and  that  those 
who  follow  you  must  profit  by  your  present,  and 
therefore  you  owe  it  to  those  who  are  to  come  to  give 


J.  IS.  BOWDEN, 

PRESIDENT  1S93. 

them  not  only  the  past,  but  the  past  beautified  and 
enriched  by  the  present.  (Applause  ) 

And  now  friends,  our  last  thought  is  prayer  for  the 
future.  Many  of  you  are  from  Brooklyn,  and  1 know 
that  your  wives  are  praying  for  you  now,  and  to  those 
who  are  to  depart,  1 would  like  to  say  to  them  that  it 
might  be  well  for  you  to  wait  a moment,  for  frequently 
I have  wives  say  to  me,  “ Were  you  in  such  and  such 
a place  ; well,  my  husband  came  in  at  a very  late  hour 
and  about  the  only  thing  that  he  could  say  was,  that  you 
had  been  with  him.  Were  you  there  ?”  And  so  maybe 
I can  help  you  out  of  some  di.fficulty  if  you  will  remain 
a little  longer. 

My  prayer  for  your  future  is  this:  I have  said  that 
art  has  made  you  and  that  you  are  making  art.  It  is 
impossible  for  you  to  deal  with  jewels,  it  is  impossi- 


ble for  you  to  be  surrounded  by  the  beauties  which  you 
create  without  being  created  by  them.  And  I am  no 
flatterer  when  I say  to-night  that  the  evidences  of 
your  art  are  upon  your  own  faces.  Remember  that 
air  castles  are  our  valuable  possessions.  It  only 
remains  for  us  to  bring  our  air  castles  from  the  clouds 
and  make  them  realities.  The  past  and  the  present 
have  not  exceeded  the  possibilities  of  your  art.  Surely 
will  your  air  castles  be  brought  down.  And  I hope 
that  you  will  all  dream  of  the  beautiful,  and  that  you 
will  all  love  the  ideal,  and  that  you  will  strive  to  bring 
your  high  ideals  into  reality,  and  always  remember 
that  the  perfection  of  your  art  can  never  go  beyond 
the  perfection  of  your  own  chaXcter.  What  you  are 
will  be  the  trademark  of  your  art.  (Applause.) 

Pre.sident  Nissen  : "Our  next  toast  is 

“ Onr  Majority 

“ ‘ I have  drunken  deep  of  joy. 

And  I will  taste  no  other  wine  to-night.’ 

— Shelley. 

" Nothing  could  have  been  more  appropriate  than  to 
have  had  the  godfather  of  our  Association  respond  to 
this  toast.  He  has  been  with  us  at  every  birthday 
celebration  and  now  we  have  aJrived  at  the  age  of 
legal  responsibility,  he  would  have  addressed  us  upon 
the  duties  of  mature  manhood.  But,  unfortunately, 
he  had  to  take  to  his  bed  because  he  was  sick,  and  late 
to-day  he  addressed  a letter  to  our  Secretary,  stating 
the  reasons  why  he  could  not  be  with  us  to-night,  on 
the  2ist  anniversary  of  our  existence,  although  he  had 
been  with  us  every  year  before.  I will  request  the 
secretary,  Mr.  Tunison,  to  read  that  letter.  ’ 

The  secretary  read  the  letter  of  Hon. 
Noah  Davis  : 

New  York,  Nov.  12,  1895. 

Mr.  P.  T.  Tunison,  Sect'y,  etc.. 

My  Dear  Sir  : — When  by  the  ceaseless 
march  of  time,  I became  the  godfather  of 
the  New  York  Jewelers’  Association,  the 
greatest  honor  of  the  year  was  my  invita- 
tion to  its  anniversaries.  It  was  with  great 
joy  that  I received  my  invitation  to  the 
annual  banquet  this  present  year  for  the 
twenty-first  ye^r.  I accepted  with  joy  un- 
speakable, and  at  once  wrote  the  acceptance 
provided  it  should  be  providentially  pos- 
sible. Now  I have  been  eight  weeks  on  the 
sick  list  of  our  great  army,  hoping  and 
praying  that  God’s  providence  might  so  ar- 
range that  I could  be  present.  Bu,t  alas,  as 
the  time  comes  near,  I find  myself  com- 
peled  to  say  that  it  is  not  in  my  power. 
Yesterday  I felt  sure  I could  come,  and  I 
sent  words  of  joy  accordingly.  But  last 
night  a change  came  and  I lie  pinioned  and 
exhausted  at  the  feet  of  our  great  common 
enemy.  The  agony  of  last  night  was  more 
than  re-doubled  by  the  sad  fact  that  I must 
to-day  tell  you  of  my  inability  to  be  with 
you. 

In  that  gathering  to-morrow  night  I could 
have  greeted  and  shaken  hands  with  so 
I many  of  the  best  and  worthiest  citizens  of 
New  York,  congratulated  them  that  our 
city  is  now  more  worthy  of  good  men  and 
good  deeds  than  ever  before.  That  it  has  a 
chance  if  we  will  only  embrace  it,  to  be- 
come the  noblest  and  purest  city  of  the 
world,  worked  out  by  its  own  good  and  true 
men.  And  possibly  I could  have  helped 
on  by  a few  words  this  patriotic  work. 

Now,  that  duty  must  go  to  others.  But 
whoever  perforins  it  I hope  will  not  fail  to 
assure  New  Yorkers,  now  in  the  midst  of  so 
many  good  things  to  be  done,  that  this  is 


Nov.  20,  lays. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


15 


no  time  to  go  back  or  to  doubt  or  fear,  but 
to  light  up  both  hope  and  heart,  and  ex- 
claim in  the  language  of  the  humble  fol- 
lower of  Douglas: 

“ God  is  not  dead.” 

Yours  very  truly, 

(Signed.)  Noah  Davis. 

President  Nissen:  “I  will  ask  you  all  to  rise 
and  drink  the  speedy  recovery,  the  long  preservation 
and  continued  health  and  prosptrity  of  our  beloved 
godfather,  the  Hon.  Noah  Davis.” 

The  guests  rose  and  drank  the  toast  in 
response  to  the  request  of  the  President. 

President  Nissen:  ‘‘Now,  while  we  deeply  re- 
gret the  absence  of  our  godfather,  yet  his  health  is  not 
fatal  to  our  expectation  of  having  a good  speech  in 
response  to  that  toast.  We  have  with  us  to-night  a 
gentleman  who  has  been  with  us  about  fourteen  or 
fifteen  times  during  our  existence  ; he  has  spoken 
here  a number  of  times  ; as  Mr.  Page  said,  he  has  for 
eight  times  responded  to  the  toast  for  the  ladies.  He 
was  for  a number  of  years  the  counsel  to  the  New 
York  Jewelers’  Association,  and  that  recommendation 
■was  sufficient  to  make  him  Justice  of  the  Court  of 
Appeals  of  the  State  of  New  York.  I will  call  upon 
the  Hon.  Edward  T.  Bartlett  to  respond  to  the 
toast.” 

ADDRESS  OF  JUDGE  BARTLETT. 

I was  once  informed  by  a very  distinguished  after 
dinner  speaker  that  any  man  who  would  address  an 
audience  after  12  o’clock  at  night  must  be  tired  of  life. 

I am  very  happy  to  appear  here  to-night,  and  to  con- 
gratulate you  upon  having  attained  your  majority  as 
a society.  But  I intend  to  say  that  when  your  com- 
mittee were  good  enough  to  invite  me  to  dine  with  you 
this  evening  it  was  with  the  stipulation,  signed,  sealed 
and  delivered,  as  the  lawyers  say,  that  I should  not  be 
asked  to  say  a word.  ***** 

Your  President  said  the  godfather  of  the  Associa- 
tion, who  had  attended  all  the  dinners,  was  ill,  and  he 
would  like  to  have  me  say  a few  words  in  his  place. 
Before  1 proceed  to  discuss  this  toast,  like  my  friend 
McKelway,  I propose  to  approach  ifin  gradual  stages, 
and  as  my  friend  Page  said,  the  first  thing  is  to  deal 
with  those  who  have  preceded  me. 

Now,  as  to  the  gentleman  who  has  just  preceded  me 
I have  not  one  word  to  say.  He  dealt  out  to  you  an 
amount  of  morality  that  is  calculated  to  do  you  all 
good,  and  there  are  many  in  this  audience  who  may 
■say  that  that  is  the  first  sermon  they  have  heard  in  a 
year.  ******* 

In  regard  to  this  association  having  attained  its 
majority,  I confess  that  it  would  have  given  me  great 
pleasure  to  have  responded  this  toast  in  something 
like  an  adequate  manner,  but  the  hour  is  late  and  1 
must  content  myself  with  a very  few  words. 

I can  recall  the  early  history  of  this  association  with 
great  distinctness.  I remember  the  time  of  its  first 
annual  dinner,  which  was  held  in  the  daytime,  in  the 
old  Bond  St.  building  that  was  afterwards  destroyed 
by  fire.  The  late  Seth  W.Hale  was  the  President  of  the 
association,  and  he  invited  me  to  come  uptown  and 
break  bread  with  him,  and  I remember  that  after  the 
cloth  was  removed  he  arose  and  made  a few  very  brief 
remarks,  and  then  said  that  as  he  was  no  speaker  he 
would  call  on  the  counsel  of  the  association  to  respond. 
Now,  that  may  have  a very  cut  and  dried  look  to  the 
observer,  but  the  tact  was  I had  not  received  the 
slightest  intimation  that  1 was  to  be  called  upon,  and 
I presume  some  of  the  older  members  here  to  night 
who  recollect  that  speech  will  be  inclined  to  believp 
that  statement.  But  as  1 have  sat  here  to-night  and 
looked  over  this  scene  before  the  tables  were  disturbed 
of  the  rarest  beauty  of  flowers,  menus  and  feasting  and 
good  fellowship,  I recollect  the  past  with  great  dis- 
tinctness. It  certainly  gives  a man  great  pleasure  to 
consort  with  others  in  whose  veins  the  blood  of  health 
is  singing,  also  a feeling  of  solemnity  when  he  sees  be- 
fore him  men  whose  history  is  practically  accom- 
plished and  who  are  waiting  the  last  summons  that  no 
man  fails  to  obey. 

I confess  to  you  that  as  I have  sat  here  to  night  with  j 
the  memory  of  the  past,  the  places  at  these  tables  are  | 
filled  with  the  forms  and  faces  of  those  who  walk  no 
more  in  the  light  of  the  sun,  and  I have  been  reminded  1 
of  that  considerable  number  who  arise  before  you  ' 


now  in  mental  vision  and  who  come  back  to  us  from 
the  silent  land  and  for  an  hour  make  a part  of  this 
scene  to-night. 

I am  one  of  those  who  believe  that  the  dead  should 
not  be  banished  from  the  scenes  of  our  everyday  life. 
I think  with  Washington  Irving  that  there  is  a voice 
in  the  tomb  that  is  sweeter  than  song,  a recollection  of 
the  dead  to  which  we  turn  even  from  the  charms  of 
the  living,  and  it  is  in  this  spirit  that  I have  alluded  to 
your  departed,  and  not  to  cast  a shadow  over  this 
feast,  but  to  touch  that  tender  chord  of  memory  in 
its  minor  strain.  And  before  I take  my  seat  I would 
tender  to  you  this  toast:  “To  those  who  come  no 
more.” 

The  guests  rose  and  in  silence  drank  the 
toast. 

President  Nissen:  “ Gentlemen,  as  the  closing 
event  of  the  evening,  I will  once  more  introduce  that 
great  citizen,  Mr.  J.  Seaver  Page,  to  close  the  exer- 
cises.” 

Mr.  Page  made  a few  humorous  replies 
to  what  Judge  Bartlett  had  said  about  him, 
and  his  witty  sallies  were  greeted  with 
great  applause. 

President  Nissen  : “ Gentlemen,  at  this 
time  I will  declare  this  dinner  adjourned, 
with  the  request  that  as  a sort  of  a benedic- 
tion you  will  all  join  in  singing  ‘ Auld  Lang 
Syne.’  ” 


A Significant  Fact 


is  the  ONLY  spring  having  an  Adjustment 
that  prevents  excessive  Pressure  on  the 
Nose. 

SEND  FOR  SAMPLE  TO 

E.  KIRSTEIN’S  SONS  CO., 

ROCHESTER,  N.  Y. 

4 MAIDEN  LANE.  NEW  YORK. 


The  members  rose  and  together  sang 
“ Auld  Lang  Syne.” 

The  Supreme  Court  Decides  on  John 
Mason’s  Appeal. 

The  General  Term  of  the  New  York  Su- 
preme Court,  Friday  handed  down  its 
opinion  in  the  appeal  of  John  Mason  from 
an  order  directing  his  receiver  to  pay  cer- 
tain moneys.  Mason  assigned  June  21st, 
1892,  to  John  Oscar  Ball,  and  later  his  sister, 
Edith  Mason  Faxon,  brought  suit  in  which 
she  succeeded  in  having  the  assignment 
declared  fraudulent  and  void,  and  a receiver 
appointed.  Assignee  Ball  turned  over  $26,- 
234-35  to  the  receiver. 

After  the  judgment  was  affirmed  by  the 
General  Term,  an  order  was  entered  direct- 
ing the  receiver  to  pay  over  the  funds  in 
his  hands  to  Mrs.  Faxon,  less  $3,000  to 
assignee  Ball  and  $1,384.81  to  himself  for 
commissions  and  disbursements.  Mason 
appealed  from  such  parts  of  the  order  as 
directed  the  $3,000  to  be  paid  to  the  former 
assignee.  The  General  Term  has  decided 
against  him  on  this  appeal  by  affirming 
the  order  with  $10  costs  and  disbursements. 


ENGRAVING 

Lettering  and  Monograms. 

ETCHING 

Views  of  Buildings,  Portraits,  etc., 
on  Souvenir  Spoons  and  all  Silver 
Wares. 

PHOTO= 

MINIATURE 

Portraits  on  Watches  and  Brooches. 

FOR  THE  TRADE. 

THE 

GOLDSTEIN  ENGRAVING  CO., 

1 Maiden  Lane,  Cor.  B’way. 

NEW  YOEK. 


The  Regina  Music  Box 

Plays  an  unlimited  number  of  tunes ; has  a 
brilliant  and  rich  tone,  and  is  suitable  for  the 
jewelry  trade.  Prices  run  from  $8.00  to  $125.00. 

THE “STAR” 

Is  a Music  Box  with  interchangeable  cylinders, 
and  is  pronounced  by  experts  to  be  the  most 
perfect  Music  Box  in  the  market. 

SEND  FOR  CATALOGUE. 

E.  L.  CUENDET,  General  Agent, 

21  JOHN  STREET,  N.  Y. 


L Sauter  & Co., 


DEALERS  IN  DIAMONDS 

. . . AND  . . . 

MAKERS  OF  FINE  JEWELRY, 

194  BROADWAY,  NEW  YORK. 

Selection  Packages  Sent  on  Request.  Mounting  of  Diamonds  and 

OTHER  PRECIOUS  STONES  IN  NEW  AND  ORIGINAL  DESIGNS  A SPECIAlTIf. 


16 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


CUTTERS  OF  DIAMONDS. 


OPPENHEIMER  BROS.  & VEITH, 


DEALERS  IN  WATCHES. 


65  NASSAU  ST. 

PRESCOTT  BUILDING, 

JOHN  AND  NASSAU  STS., 

NEW  YOl^K. 


‘tv 

THE  DIAMOND  CUTTER. 


LONDON : 

10  HATTON  Garden. 

AMSTERDAM  : 

Tlilp  Straat  No.  2. 


THE  DIAMOND  WEARER. 


CQ 


U, 

cs 

u 


<u 


'TS 

c 


^ o 

= s 

C CQ 

S 5 


c/3 

O 

E 


c 

ca 


T3 

a> 

'E 

3 

o 


c/3 

o>  ^ 
3 C 


o> 

c« 

3 

O 


3 

3 


^ O 


£ 

flj  ^ 

<u  c 


These  well-known  Razors,  the  quality  of  which  is  warranted, 
possess  this  great  advantage,  that  they  may  be  used  for  ten 
years  before  they  require  actual  sharpening.  Before  using  them. 
It  is  necessary  to  rub  them  on  good  leather  strop.  Lecoultre’s 
Strops  (to  be  had  with  the  Razors),  should  be  used  m preference 
to  others. 


THIS  CUT  IS  TWO-THIRDS 
OF  REGULAR  SIZE. 


MATHEY  BROS.,  MATHEZ  & CO.. 


SEND  FOR 

PRICE  LIST. 


SOLE  AGENTS.  21  & 23  Maidefi  Lane,  N.  Y. 


Tm  Swan  Fountain  Pun. 

Made  on  Distinct  Principles,  Patented. 

3 SIZES  OF  SWAN  “SAFETIES”  CAN  BE 
CARRIED  ANYHOW  OR  ANYWHERE. 

Three  sizes  of  “ Self-Filling  ” Swans,  the 
wonder  of  the  day,  illustrating  the  improve- 
ment between  the  first  fountain  pen  on 
record,  patented  150  years  ago, 

“ A Quill  Covered  With  Sheepsgut.” 
An  English  patent  in  those  days  cost  a 
fortune,  thus  the  advance  from  the  past  to 
the  present  is  sharply  defined. 


W.  W.  Stewart,  Inventor  & Patentee 


Mabie,  Todd  & Bard, 

MANUFACTURERS. 

New  York  & London. 

HI  nil  I LJ  “t  Maiden  Lane, 

. Laa  O nrl  I I ri  I NEW  YORK. 

IRfiials 

AND 

Babgfs 

OF  EVERY 
DESCRIPTION. 

♦ 

Jewel'! 

OF  ALL  KINDS 
AT  LOWEST  ORICES 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


17 


Imports  and  Exports  for  September, 
1895,  and  the  Preceding  Nine  Months. 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Nov.  14. — The  sum- 
mary statement  of  imp  irts  and  exports  for 

elry  trade. 

The  merchandise  remaining  in  warehouse 
on  Sept  30,  1S94  and  1895,  respectively, 
was  as  folio  vvs  : 

Imports  of  Merchandise. 

ARTICLES. 

SEPTEMBER.  i 

! 

NINE  MONTHS  END- 
ING SEPTEMBER  — 

1894  1895 

1894  1 1895 

Values.  [ Values. 

Values,  i Values. 

Clocks  and  waiches.  and  parts  of  : 

Clocks  and  par's  of dut... 

Watches,  watch  materials,  and  movements. dut... 
Jewelry,  manufactures  of  gold  and  silver,  and 

PRECIOUS  STONES  : 

Diamonds  and  other  precious  stones,  rough  01 

uncut,  etc free... 

Jewelry,  and  manuf'r’s  of  gold  and  silver. ..dut... 
Precious  stones,  and  imitations  of,  not  set. ..dut... 
Imported  from — 

United  Kingdom 

Dollars. 
34.283 
86  706 

Dollars 

73  142 
109.972 

Dollars. 
66  565 
677  625 

Dollars. 

290.71a 

788,427 

5.785 

25.030 

124.709 

17.93> 

132,920 

628,880 

812,253 
253,922 
5 196.163 

81,032 

741.871 

5-598.423 

3.337 

12,946 

142 

175 

4 668 

585  550 

82,965 
104,154 
22  249 
16.639 
696 

39  065 
2,136 
2.073 
35  511 
1,426 
821 

2 448 

Total  diamonds,  elc tree.. 

United  Kingdom 

5 785 

17.931 

812  253 

81  Oj2 

40.143 

15.479 

14.263 

66,642 

5,760 

530 

529 

88 

305 

230,655 

187,382 

39,813 

200,538 

92,148 

4,807 

142 

1.773-624 

1,280,584 

230,733 

1,812,378 

185.452 

104.618 

5.617 

3,032 

4.047 

2,052,037 

1,275,405 

306,295 

1,715,650 

952,822 

5.787 

21,187 
6 422 
4,689 

British  North  Anieiici . 

Other  counti  it  

315 

Total  jewelrv,  precious  stones,  etc dut.. 

149.739 

761,800 

5 450,085 

6.340,294 

Exports  of  Domestic  Merchandise. 

Llocks  and  watches  : 

Clocks,  and  parts  ( f 

Waiches,  and  parts  o' 

78.5j7 

28,735 

65,018 

36.5^2 

648,640 

222.673 

623.261 

318,175 

107.27- 

101.570 

871.313 

941.436 

Jewelry,  and  manufactures  of  gold  ai.d  silver.. 

48  07.. 

79  653 

545.936 

1 567  20s 

17.051 

42  320 

171  488 

200,019 

Exports  of  Foreign  Merchandise. 

Clocks  and  watches  and  parts  of  ; 

Clocks,  and  parts  of dut. . 

Waiches,  and  watch  materials,  elc dut. . 

Jewelry,  manufactures  of  gold  and  silver,  and 

PRECIOUS  S I ONES  : 

Diamonds  and  other  precious  stones,  roui^h  or 
uncut,  etc free . . 

52 

18 

98 

318 

48.42c 

106 

1.550 

2,22c 

49,297 

4,264 

2,141 

35.755 

18,097 

Jewelry,  and  manut’r’s  of  gold  and  silver,  .dut. . 
Precious  stones,  and  imitations  of,  not  set . . dut . . 

1,196 

2,096 

296 



the  month  ending  Sept.  30,  1895.  and  the  1894  1895 

nine  months  ending  the  same  date,  com-  Clocks,  etc $42,221  $50,421 

pared  with  the  corresponding  periods  of  Watches,  etc 23,682  37.792 

1894,  has  been  issued,  and  contains  the  Jewelry,  etc 55.345  49,109 

accompanying  figures  relative  to  the  jew-  Precious  stones,  etc 25,006  18,919 

Silver  Plated  Ware  for  the  New  York 
Navy  Yard. 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Nov.  14. — Bids  were 
opened  at  the  Bureau  of  Supplies  and  Ac- 
counts, Nov.  i2th,  for  furnishing  the  New 
York  Navy  Yard  with  silver  plated  ware. 
The  only  bid  received  was  that  of  the  Wil- 
cox Silver  Plate  Co.,  Meriden,  Conn.,  as 
follows; 

Four  sets  plated  ware  for  captain, 
$1,205  401  three  sets  plated  ware  for  ward- 
room, $800,21;  two  sets  plated  ware  for 
wardroom,  $548.76. 


Proceedings  of  the  Philadelphia  Horo- 
logical  Society. 

Philadelphia  Pa..  Nov.  13. — The  stated 
meeting  of  the  Philadelphia  Horological 
Society  was  held  on  the  evening  of  Nov. 
7th.  president  W.  T.  Lewis  presiding.  The 
following  applicants  for  membership  were 
duly  admitted  a.s  active  in,  ;ni:'ers  : T>  is 

Brody  W J,  Haines  andi  Ge.c  W.  Jal'i.; 
meit  all  of  Philadelphia  ; and  as  associate 
members,  Alex  R.  Harper,  Philadelphia, 
and  Arvid  Jette,  Lancaster,  Pa. 

It  was  decided  to  have  a mid-Winter 
“ smoker  ” either  in  the  coming  January  or 
February,  to  be  in  charge  of  a committee 
consisting  of  W.  N.  Brunner,  Jos.  A.  Bol- 
linger and  Chas.  E.  Hamer. 

Albert  Moeller  presented  to  the  society  a 
well  made  model  of  the  chronometer  es- 
capement, all  the  essential  parts  of  which 
are  exposed  to  view  and  are  readily  access- 
ible for  anexplanation  of  theis  action,  the 
motive  mechanism  being  below  the  upper 
plate.  The  thanks  of  the  society  were  ten- 
dered to  Mr.  Moeller  for  his  useful  gift. 

The  paper  of  the  evening  being  next  in 
order,  James  Orr  then  read  an  essay  on 
“ The  Pendulum  and  its  Application  in 
Horology.”  The  thanks  of  the  society 
were  tendered  to  Mr.  Orr  for  his  able  and 
instructive  exposition  of  the  subject.  Owing 
to  the  lateness  of  the  hour  few  of  the  queries 
in  the  “ question  box  ” could  be  discussed, 
many  remaining  over  until  the  next  regular 
meeting. 

At  the  December  meeting  F.  W.  Schuler 
will  deliver  a lecture  upon  the  cylinder 
escapement,  illustrating  his  subject  with 
the  aid  of  lantern  slides. 


Very  conspicuous  at  this  time  in  the  cast- 
ing room  of  the  Gorham  Mfg.  Co.  is  an 
8-foot  high  angel  figure,  very  excellent  in 
proportion  and  detail,  splendidly  devised 
and  worked  out,  which  is  to  be  one  of  the 
group  of  four  figures  being  cast  for  a mau- 
soleum. The  colossal  equestrian  statue  of 
Gen.  Hancock  for  the  City  of  Washington 
lies  around  the  casting  room  in  portions, 
but  will  very  soon  be  completed. 


w 

A 

T 

C 


GOLD  FILLED 


c 

A 

S 

E 

S 


7 ASTOR  HOUSE  (BROADWAY)  N.Y 


99(1.  do;.  Not  Cash.  Discount  to  lobtier^ 


A.  J.  CoriRiE, 

AiirTinisiFFP, 

22  John  St.,  N.  Y. 

Special  Salesman  of  WATCHES,  DIAMONDS 
BRIQ'A-BRAC,  FOR  Established  Jewelers. 

WPITE  ron  rARTICUlARB 


1 


i>: 


l!' 

I" 


*tl 


t 

f 


18 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


DIAMONDS. 

Wm.  S.  Hedges  & Co., 

IMPORTERS  uF 

Diamonds  and  Precious  Stones. 

DIAMOND  JEWELRY. 

170  Broadway,  New  York. 

22  Holborn  Viaduct,  London. 


Alfred  H.  Smith  & Co., 


IMPORTERS 


DIAMONDS 


AND 


PRECIOUS  STONES, 


182  BROADWAY,  COR.  JOHN  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 

''®"®‘Buiiding.  34  & 36  Washington  St. 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


D.  BONET, 

ESTABLISHED  1866. 

CAMEO 

PORTRAITS 

Works  of  Art, 
Precious  Stones.’ 

9;^7  UROADAVAY. 

NEW  YORK, 


DON’T  FORGET  THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S  BOOK  LIST  when  in  want  of  any  tech- 
nical book  in  the  Jewelry  or  Kindred  Trades. 


HENRY  FERA, 

Importer  and  Cutter  of 

DIAMONDS 

PRESCOTT  BUILDING, 

65  Nassau  St.  cor.  John  NEW  YORK. 
FACTORY 

60  Fulton  St.,  NEW  YORK. 


Cutting  for  the  Trade  a Specialty, 


Purchasers 

. . OF  . . 

RARE  GEMS, 

PRECIOUS  STONES 
AND  ALL  GOODS  FOR 
JEWELRY, 

ADDRESS 

R.  A.  Kipling,  Paris, 

19  Rue  Drouot,  France. 


The  Bowden  Rings 

ARE  COMPLETE  IN  VARIETY,  CORRECT 
IN  QUALITY  AND  PERFECT  IN  FINISH. 
WE  MAKE  EVERY  VARIETY  OF  FINGER 
RINGS__--=^ 


J.  B.  Bowden  & Co., 


Branch  Office  : 

206IKEARNY  Street 
San  Francisco  Cal. 


3 MAIDEN  LANE, 

c^New  York. 


Immigration  of  Watchmakers,  Jewelers, 
etc.,  During  1894-5. 

Washington,  D.  C.,  Nov.  15. — The  report 
of  the  Commissioner  General  of  Immigra- 
tion for  the  year  1894-5  shows  that  during 
the  year,  258,536  immigrants  arrived  at  the 
various  ports  of  the  United  States,  of  whom 
256,117  were  landed  and  2,419  were  debarred 
and  returned  to  th^  various  countries 
whence  they  came,  at  the  expense  of  the 
various  steamship  lines  transporting  them. 
Of  this  2,419  deported  694  were  under  con- 
tract to  perform  labor  in  this  country,  said 
contracts  being  made  previous  to  their 
arrival. 

The  total  number  of  engravers  reported 
during  the  year  was  55,  four  of  whom  ar- 
rived at  Boston,  Mass.,  one  at  New  Orleans, 
La.,  44  at  New  York,  five  at  Philadelphia, 
and  one  at  Point  Levis,  P.  Q. 

The  total  number  of  jewelers  who  sought 
admittance  was  136,  of  whom  one  came  to 
Baltimore,  Md.,  97  to  New  York,  19  to 
Philadelphia,  Pa.,  one  to  San  Francisco, 
Cal.,  two  to  Point  Levis,  one  to  Quebec,  P. 
Q.,  and  one  to  Vancouver,  B.  C. 

The  largest  number  of  applicants  for  ad- 
mission to  our  ports  during  the  year  1894-5 
in  connection  with  the  jewelry  lines,  were 
the  watch  and  clockmakers,  under  which 
heading  the  number  reported  was  245.  Of 
this  number  219  applied  for  admission 
through  the  port  of  New  York,  and  four 
through  Canadian  ports. 


Delaware  jewelers  Define  What  “Solid 
Gold”  Is. 

Wilmington,  Del.,  Nov.  13. — A case,  in- 
volving the  legal  value  of  the  term  “ solid 
gold,”  was  heard  by  Magistrate  Daly,  of 
this  city,  and  by  him  referred  to  the  General 
Sessions  Court. 

John  Walanski  had  George  Drake,  an 
auctioneer,  arraigned  on  a charge  of  obtain- 
ing money  under  false  pretenses.  Drake 
had  sold  him  a watch,  representing  it  to  be 
solid  gold.  It  proved  to  be  only  plated. 

A number  of  jewelers  testified  on  both 
sides.  Some  held  that  nothing  less  than 
14-karat  gold  could  be  held  to  be  solid. 
Others,  that  solid  gold  was  the  pure  metal 
without  alloy.  Still  others,  who  appeared 
for  the  defendant,  held  that  any  compo- 
sition into  which  gold  entered  as  a compo- 
nent part  could  properly  be  called  solid 
gold.  Magistrate  Daly  felt  incompetent  to 
decide  from  the  conflicting  testimony,  and 
so  held  Drake  in  bail  for  the  Grand  Jury. 

Death  of  a Former  Well  Known  Penn- 
sylvania Jeweler. 

West  Chester,  Pa.,  Nov.  16. — A dis- 
patch from  Benton,  Wash.,  received  at 
Spring  City  by  Frank  Kline,  bore  the  in- 
telligence of  the  death  of  Abraham  Kline. 
Mr.  Kline  was  well  known  throughout  the 
northern  part  of  the  county,  having  carried 
on  the  jewelry  business  in  Spring  City, 
Collegeville  and  Pine  Grove.  A few  years 
ago  he  left  these  parts  to  seek  his  fortune 
in  the  west,  opening  a jewerly  establish- 
ment in  Seattle. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


19 


He  finally  sold  out  his  busines  and  pur- 
chased a 320  acre  ranch  in  Benton.  A 
goodly  portion  of  this  land  was  heavily 
timbered  and  it  was  while  clearing  the 
ranch  of  this  that  he  met  his  death.  The 
details  of  the  accident  are  not  as  yet  known, 
any  more  than  that  a heavy  log  fell  on  him, 
breaking  several  ribs,  and  injuring  him 
otherwise  internally.  He  lived  one  week 
after  he  received  the  injury. 


ESTABLISHED  50  YEARS. 

RANDEL,  BAREMORE  & BILLINGS, 

IMPORTERS  OF 


DIAMONDS, 


Workmen  Accuse  Van  Wezel  Bros,  of 
Violating  the  Contract  Labor  Law. 


And  Other  Precious  Stones. 


Five  suits  have  been  commenced  in  the 
United  States  Circuit  Court  in  New  York 
against  Marcus  S.  and  Joachim  S.  Van 
Wezel  composing  the  firm  of  Van  Wezel 
Bros.,  cutters  of  diamonds,  Elizabeth  and 
Bleecker  Sts.,  New  York.  The  suits  are 
brought  in  the  name  of  the  United  States 
to  recover  $1,000  each  for  five  workmen 
which  Van  Wezel  Bros,  are  alleged  to  have 
brought  to  this  country  under  contract  last 
January,  in  violation  of  the  Alien  Contract 
Labor  Law. 

The  five  men,  who  arrived  on  the  Adri- 
atic, are  Jacob  Witmundt,  Isaac  Witmundt, 
Meyer  Juda,  Philip  Matteman  and  Simon 
DeVos.  The  suits  are  the  outcome  of  dif- 
ferences between  Van  Wezel  Bros,  and  their 
employes.  The  latter  after  leaving  the 
firm’s  employ,  went  before  the  Immigration 
authorities  and  admitted  that  they  had 
been  brought  over  under  contract.  Ullo, 
Ruebesamen,  Cochrane  & Baldwin,  coun- 
sel for  the  Immigration  Commissioner, 
claimed  that  they  learned  last  week  that 
DeVos  and  another  workman  had  seen  the 
Van  Wezels  with  reference  to  leaving  the 
country  by  Saturday  last.  An  order  was 
thereupon  entered  Friday  for  a subpoena  to 
issue  to  DeVos  calling  him  to  appear  before 
Commissioner  Shields  Saturday  to  give  his 
testimony  in  the  suit.  He  appeared  but  the 
examination  was  adjourned  until  yesterday. 

These  cases  are  the  first  of  the  kind 
to  come  up  in  New  York  though  similar 
actions  have  been  commenced  against  the 
Coetermans- Hem ichs- Keck  Co.,  Cincin- 
nati, O.  It  is  expected  that  the  question 
whether  or  not  diamond  cutting  is  a new 
industry  in  this  country  and,  therefore,  ex- 
empt from  the  Contract  Labor  Law,  will 
play  an  important  part  in  these  suits. 

Both  members  of  Van  Wezel  Bros.,  who 
were  seen  Monday  at  the  ofiBce  of  their  at- 
torneys, Hays  & Greenbaum.  told  a Circu- 
lar reporter  that  the  suits  were  nothing 
more  than  a scheme  for  blackmail. 

They  characterized  as  untrue  the  state- 
ment that  they  had  arranged  with  De  Vos 
or  any  other  witness  to  leave  this  country. 


FINE  PEARLS  A SPECIALTY. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

DIAMOND  JEWELRY 

IN  THE  LATEST  DESIGNS. 


Diamonds  Recut  in  Modern  Styles  or  Repaired  on  Premises. 


58  Nassau  Street, 
29  Maiden  Lane, 

NEW  YORK. 


I Tulp  Straat, 

AMSTERDAM. 


I St.  Andrews  St., 
Holbom  Circus, 

IlONOON  E.  C. 


ESTABLISHED  1841. 


CARTER,  SLOAN  S C0„ 


TRADE  MARK. 


PNUFJIGTURERS  OF  GOLD  JEWELRY, 


No.  15  AAIDEN  LANE 


NEW  YORK. 


A.  CARTER,  jR. 

A.  K.  SLOAN. 

C.  E.  HASTINGS. 


GEO.  R.  HOWE. 
WM.  T.  CARTER. 
WM  T.  GOUGH. 


FACTORY,  NEWARK,  N.  J, 


Directors’  Meeting  ofthe  Manufacturing 
Jewelers’  Board  of  Trade. 

Providence.  R.  L,  Nov.  16.— The  regular 
monthly  meeting  of  the  directors  of  the 
Manufacturing  Jewelers’  Board  of  Trade 
was  held  in  the  rooms  in  the  Wilcox  build- 
ing this  afternoon.  There  was  a good  at- 


THE  STATIONERS’  ENGRAVING  CO., 

98,  100,  102  NASSAU  ST.,  NEW  YOEK, 

MAKERS  OF 

WEDDING  INVITATIONS,  RECEPTION  AND  VISITING  CARDS 

of  the  Best  Quality,  which  are  offered  to  Stationers  of  recognized  standing  and  reputation  only 
Avoid  Dry-goods  Store  Competition  by  always  ordering  those  bearing  our  registered  trade  mark  “ SILVER  WHITE. 


20 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


tendance,  among  those  present  being  the 
recently  elected  member,  E.  B.  Bullock. 
Secretary  Morton  announced  the  following 
settlements  since  the  last  meeting; 

The  assignee  of  McBride  and  Marcellus 
Co.,  Cleveland,  O.,  has  declared  his  first  and 
final  dividend  amounting  to  7^  per  cent. 
?ash.  This  case  is  one  that  has  been  pend- 
ing since  early  in  1891,  has  been  the 
cause  of  more  or  less  litigation  ever  since, 
and  has  occupied  the  attention  of  the  manu- 
facturing jewelers  in  discussions  as  to  a 
settlement.  Eastern  manufacturers  are  in- 
terested to  the  amount  of  about  $10,000. 

In  the  case  of  C.  M.  Linington  & Co., 
Chicago,  an  offer  of  60  per  cent,  has  been 
accepted.  All  accounts  of  $100  or  less  will 
be  settled  in  cash  immediately,  while  those 
over  $100  will  be  settled  on  the  basis  of  20 
per  cent,  cash,  and  the  balance  in  guaran- 
teed notes  of  3,  6 and 9 months. 


Four  Jewelers’  Deaths  in  Providence. 

Providence,  R.  I.,  Nov.  16. — John  Conrad 
Schott,  formerly  well  known  among  the 
jewelers  of  this  city,  died  Nov.  12,  at  his 
residence  136  Prairie  Ave.,  after  a brief  ill- 
ness. The  deceased  was  48  years  of  age 
and  expired  on  his  birthday.  He  was  born 
in  Hanau,  Germany,  but  was  brought  to 
this  country  by  his  parents  when  quite  an 
infant.  The  family  settled  in  New  York. 
The  elder  Mr.  Schott  being  a jeweler,  ob- 
tained employment  there.  Here  about  half 
of  the  life  of  the  deceased  was  spent.  He 


was  apprenticed  by  his  father  to  learn  the 
trade  of  jewelry  engraving,  at  which  he 
worked  for  several  years  for  Bockenheimer 
& Kohler,  manufacturing  jewelers.  Maiden 
Lane.  He  came  to  Providence  in  1870  and 
found  employment  with  Arnold  & 
Webster,  ring  makers.  He  left  them 
in  1873  to  accept  a situation  as  en- 
graver for  William  C.  Greene  & Co.  In  1878 
he  was  offered  a situation  as  engraver,  de- 
signer and  assistant  foreman  for  Howard  & 
Scherrible,  and  upon  the  retirement  of  Mr. 
Scherrible  in  1882  he  became  superintend- 
ent of  the  extensive  factory.  He  continued 
in  this  position  under  the  successors  of 
Howard  & Scherrible  (Howard  & Son), 
until  April,  1886,  w’hen  he  resigned  and 
went  into  business  for  himself.  He  formed 
a co-partnership  with  George  H.  Cahoone, 
now  of  George  H.  Cahoone  & Co.,  and  con- 
tinued in  the  business  of  making  jewelry 
until  September,  1887,  when  he  withdrew 
to  devote  his  attention  to  the  making  of 
several  ingenious  machines  which  he  had 
planned.  He  formed  a partnership  with 
his  brother,  Charles  H.  Schott,  now  of  New 
York,  under  the  style  of  Schott  Bros., 
which  has  continued  until  the  death  of 
John.  Deceased  leaves  a widow  and  eight 
children. 

JOSEPH  M.  GRAHAM. 

Joseph  M.  Graham,  one  of  the  most 
familiar  retail  jewelers  and  watchmakers 
in  the  eastern  section  of  this  city,  died  on 
the  nth  inst.,  in  the  58th  year  of  his  age. 


For  more  than  20  years  the  deceased  car- 
ried on  business  on  S.  Main  St.  until  about 
a year  ago,  when  through  mental  troubles 
he  was  forced  to  give  up  business  and  was 
sent  to  the  Butler  Hospital  for  treatment. 

EDWARD  HAVENS. 

Edward  Havens  died  at  his  late  resi- 
dence, 204  Dean  St.,  the  nth  inst.  He  was 
64  years  of  age,  having  been  born  in  Smith- 
field,  R.  I.,  April  25,  1831.  When  quite  a 
young  man  he  removed  to  this  city  and 
engaged  in  the  enameling  business,  being 
among  the  pioneers  of  that  now  important 
and  extensive  auxiliary  of  the  jewelry 
business.  He  carried  on  this  business  for 
many  years,  retiring  from  active  employ- 
ment some  three  years  ago. 

URIAH  STAFFORD. 

Uriah  Stafford,  78  years  of  age,  died  at 
the  residence  of  his  daughter,  Mrs.  Martha 
N.  Dana.  Pawtucket,  R.  I.,  last  Monday 
forenoon.  He  was  among  the  pioneer  jew- 
elers of  this  section,  and  was  considered  a 
fine  workman. 


Newark. 

T.  H.  Buckenfield,  359  Mulberry  St.,  has 
given  a chattel  mortgage  on  machinery  to 
F.  S.  Greene,  for  $3  000. 

The  Wm.  P.  Mockridge  Mfg.  Co.  have 
changed  their  name  to  Newark  Jewelry  Co. 
The  company  are  manufacturing  jewelers 
at  245  N.  J.  R.  R.  Ave. 

The  trial  of  George  W.  Heinemeyer,  in 
Elizabeth,  charged  with  a serious  crime, 
was  to  have  taken  place  Nov.  12th,  but  the 
daughter  was  not  present.  Her  mother 
was  charged  by  Prosecutor  Marsh  with  hav- 
ing sent  the  girl  away.  The  accused  was  a 
well  known  jeweler  in  Elizabeth. 


Attention  is  called  by  E.  Kirstein's  Sons 
Co.,  wholesale  dealers  in  optical  specialties, 
Rochester,  N.  Y.,  to  the  fact  that  their 
spring  is  the  only  one  on  which  there  is  an 
adjustment  whereby  excessive  pressure  on 
the  nose  may  be  prevented.  It  is,  they 
say,  the  only  spring  made  in  different 
lengths  and  it  gaining  favor  every  day 
with  the  jewelers’  and  opticians’  customers. 
The  complete  stock  carried  by  this  com- 
pany permits  them  to  fill  all  orders  for  these 
springs  without  the  slightest  delay. 

The  reproduction  of  portraits  on  watch 
cases  and  in  brooches  by  the  photo-minia- 
ture process  is  increasing  in  popularity.  A 
concern  that  makes  a specialty  of  this  class 
of  work  is  the  Goldstein  Engraving  Co., 
I Maiden  Lane,  New  York.  This  company 
have  built  up  a large  business  with  the 
trade  in  letter  and  monogram  engraving 
and  in  etching  views  on  souvenir  spoons 
and  other  silver  articles.  Their  success  is 
not  surprising  to  any  one  who  is  familiar 
with  the  care  and  skill  withjwhich  all  their 
work  is  executed. 


Diamonds 

AND 

Diamond  Jewelry 

Foi^  xhe; 

Holidays. 

CROSS  & BEQUELIN, 

43  Rue'!  Meslay,  17  Maiden  Lane, 

PARIS.  * NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


21 


New  Jewelry  Stores. 


Mr.  King,  Oakfield,  N.  Y. 

W.  Sifleet,  Kingston,  Mich. 

A.  D.  Harlow,  Monroe,  Me. 

W.  J.  Watson,  Athens,  Tenn. 

Oscar  H.  Ressegiue,  20  Spring  Si.,  Sing 
Sing,  N.  Y. 

D.  F.  Rosen,  108  Fifth  Ave.,  McKeesport, 
Pa.  He  has  an  optical  department. 

Smith  & Son,  Parkersburg,  W.  Va., 
have  opened  a branch  store  in  Clarksburgh, 
W.  Va. 


Philadelphia. 

James  McKeone,  manufacturer  and  re- 
pairer of  jewelry,  722  Chestnut  St.,  has 
closed  out  his  business. 

The  Philadelphia  Jewelers’  Club  gave 
another  of  their  entertaining  and  successful 
smokers  on  Tuesday  evening,  igth  inst. 

George  S.  Katz,  Germantown  Ave., 
resigned  as  president  of  the  Retail  Jewel- 
ers’Association  at  the  last  meeting.  Mr. 
Katz’s  reason  for  withdrawing  from  the 
position  is  ill  health. 

Albert  Alber,  Ridge  Ave.,  has  made 
application  for  a patent  on  an  instrument 
to  register  the  pulse  beat.  It  is  described 
as  a most  important,  delicate  and  intricate 
piece  of  mechanism. 

Out-of-town  jewelers  were  plentiful  here 
last  week,  among  them  being  P.  R.  Hans- 
bury,  Lafayette,  Pa.;  D.  H.  Krouse,  North 
Wales,  Pa.;  E.  P.  Zane,  Christiana,  Pa.; 
C.  B.  Kohl,  Heightstown,  Pa.;  S.  W.  Banks, 
Crambury,  Va. ; Frank  White,  Weatherly, 
Pa.;  F.  H.  Lewis,  Bridgton,  N.  J.;  Ed. 
Massey  and  D.  W.  White,  Woodstown,  N.  J. ; 
B.  C.  Foster,  Bristol,  Pa. ; Rudolph  Engle- 
hart.  Riverside,  N.  J.;  C.  F.  Rudolph. 
Wilmington,  Del.;  Joseph  Ladomus,  Ches- 
ter ’ Pa.;’,  Howard  Fitzsimmons  West 
Chester,  Pa.;  Chas.  Kohler,  Norristown,  Pa, 

The  man  who  had  been  systematically 
pilfering  Albert  Sommers’  jewelry  store, 
1027  Columbia  Ave.,  was  last  week  arrested 
and  committed  for  trial.  The  culprit  had 
visited  the  place  several  times  and  looked 
at  jewelry  which  he  did  not  purchase. 
After  each  visit  various  articles  of 
jewelry  were  missing,  among  them  being  a 
diamond  pin  and  locket.  On  Tuesday  last 
Mr.  Sommers  saw  the  man  pass  his  store, 
holding  a newspaper  in  front  of  his  face. 
He  recognized  him,  however,  and  going  to 
the  door  saw  special  policeman  Yeager 
standing  on  the  corner.  He  directed 
Yeager  to  arrest  the  man,  who  gave  the 
name  of  Charles  Wilson.  At  the  station 
house  27  pawn  tickets  for  articles  of  jewelry 
were  found  in  his  possession.  It  is  stated 
that  Wilson  is  wanted  in  Reading  and 
other  places  for  similar  robberies. 


A tramp  on  Nov.  ii  went  into  E.  E. 
Muller’s  jewelry  store,  Malone,  N.  Y.,  and 
undertook  to  hold  up  Clarence  Ames,  a ) 
clerk,  who  happened  to  be  alone,  it  being 
noontime;  but  he  did  not  make  it  work, and 
his  fiasco  resulted  in  his  arrest. 


A.  WITTNAUER, 

SUCCESSOR  TO  J.  EUGENE  ROBERT  & CO. 

IMPORTER  AND  MANUFACTURER  OF  WATCHES. 

19  HAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

EXTENSIVE  LINES  IN 

New  and  attractive  designs  of  small  size  watches  at 

various  prices. 


Enameled  in  all  suitable  colors, 

Swith  and  without  handsome 
diamond  or  pearl  decorations. 

ACTUAL  SIZE. 


HERMAN  KOHLBUSCH,  SR. 

Iatsbllihe4  1S69 
Manafsotarer 
Fiva  BAi^Aaoaa 
AND  Wai«HT8  for 
every  po 
where  aoot 
required. 

MQ  Street 
If^den  La. 

Bepalrt  iiuxy 

P'ooipti?  made. 


ALL  KINDS  OF 

KELETON 

FOR 

ILVERSMITH 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

CHULDER  BRO 


S 


FACTORY  AT  SOLINGEN,  GERMANY.  FOUNDED  1850 
6464647PEARLST..NEAR  BROADWAY  NEW  YORK 


TIC-AL  INSTITUTE 

'SCHOOLFOR  BUSINESSMEN 


THE  SPENCER  OP 

THE  RECOGNIZED  OPTICAL 

SEND  FOR  APPLICATION  BLANK  & PROSPECTUS.  CL' 


SPENCER  OPTICAL  MAMUFAC  TURING  CO.  I5MAIDEN  LANE.N.Y. 


OURSTUDENTS 
ARE  THE 
SUCCESSFUL 
OPTICANS 


ASSES  CONVENE  TUE5.  EACH  MONTH 


22 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


News  Gleanings. 

Guntersville,  Ala.,  is  to  have  a town 
clock. 

Harry  Thompson,  Matawan,  N.  J..  has 
gone  out  of  business. 

In  a fire  in  Evanston,  111.,  Nov.  13  the 
jewelry  store  of  James  Walton  suffered. 

J.  G.  Suhrer,  jeweler,  Fernandina,  Fla., 
w’jm  married  a few  days  ago  to  Miss  Agnes 
Kelly. 

A.  E.  Lee,  Holyoke,  Mass.,  is  moving 
nto  his  ne'.v  store  in  Hubbard  & Taber’s 
new  block. 

C.  H.  Voight,  Holyoke,  Mass.,  has  de- 
cided to  go  out  of  business  and  will  soon 
close  up  his  store. 

In  a fire  Nov.  ii,  in  Maysville,  Ky.,  the 
jewelry  store  of  P.  J.  Murphy  was  damaged; 
insurance  $7,000. 

T.  M.  Hannah,  Belvidere,  111.,  has  taken 
a new  store  and  added  departments  of  art 
wares,  books  and  stationery. 

C.  M.  Fuller  has  opened  in  St.  Augustine 
the  branch  jewelry  store,  for  the  Winter,  of 
Greenleaf  & Crosby,  Jacksonville. 

Jeweler  Frank  Kline,  Spring  City,  Pa., 
won  first  premium  at  the  Trenton,  N.  J., 
fair  recently  on  yellow  flying  tumblers. 

Thieves  entered  the  jewelry  store  of 
Speckman,  Gall  & Co.,  New  Bremen,  O., 
a few  nights  ago  and  took  away  $500  worth 
of  jewelry. 


Joseph  T.  Montgomery,  jeweler,  Wilming- 
ton, Del.,  who  recently  had  his  foot  mashed 
while  moving  a safe,  is  again  able  to  attend 
to  business. 

Heller  & Benton  have  consolidated  the 
stocks  of  their  two  stores  in  Alexandria  and 
Marion,  Ind.,  both  stocks  being  centered  in 
the  Alexandria  place. 

Adam  Imig,  Sheboygan,  Wis.,  has  just 
completed  for  himself  and  family  what  is 
said  to  be  one  of  the  most  charming  private 
residences  in  the  State. 

Sheriff  Shinn  of  Bridgton,  N.  J.,  closed 
the  large  store  of  James  C.  Doughty,  Mill- 
ville, last  week.  The  stock  and  fixtures 
were  sold  at  public  sale  Friday. 

Fred.  Walker,  who  for  the  last  year  has 
run  a jewelry  shop  in  Spencer,  Mass.,  has 
gone  to  Honesdale,  Pa.,  where  he  will  carry 
on  the  business  in  a part  of  a store. 

W.  T.  Plumb,  Peoria,  111.,  has  closed 
out  his  stock  there,  and  is  now  located  in 
Spring  Valley,  where  jewelry  forms  but  a 
part  of  his  general  merchandise  stock. 

M.  E.  Bowley,  Belvidere,  111.,  has  re- 
modeled a recently  purchased  block,  and 
put  in  plate  glass  windows  and  fine  furnish- 
ings, making  a store  light  and  attractive. 

E.  F.  Rohn,  Milwaukee,  Wis.,  has  moved 
from  his  old  stand  to  W.  Water  St.,  a better 
location.  A.  H.  Stecher,  also  of  Milwau- 
kee, has  fitted  up  a new  store  on  the  same 
street. 

George  McL.Pressan. jeweler  and  optician. 


Farmington,  Me.,  has  leased  the  store 
adjoining  his.  The  partition  between  the 
two  stores  will  be  taken  out.  Mr.  Pressan 
will  have  an  optical  department. 

Thomas  Trapp,  jeweler,  Trenton,  N.  J., 
has  bought  the  fixtures  in  the  jewelry  store 
of  JohnE.  Demmert.  The  latter  is  going 
out  of  business.  Mr.  Trapp  will  move  Feb. 
I to  the  stand  now  occupied  by  Mr.  Dem- 
mert. ^ 

The  co-partnership  heretofore  existing 
between  W.  J.  Stifiler  and  A.  S.  Stoner  in 
the  grocery  business  in  Martinsburg,  Pa., 
has  been  dissolved.  Mr.  Stiffierwho  retires 
will  enter  more  largely  into  the  jewelry 
business. 

Col.  St.  Clair  Fechner,  jewelers’  auction- 
eer, commenced  a reduction  sale,  Nov. 
i6th,  for  F.  J.  Hutchinson,  Hornellsville, 
N.  Y.  He  has  realized  good  prices  and 
over  300  people  have  been  unable  to  gain 
admittance  to  the  sale,  so  crowded  has  it 
been. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  E.  L.  Leeds,  Terre  Haute, 
Ind.,  have  returned  from  a hunting  and 
fishing  trip  on  the  Indian  reserve  in  Wis- 
consin. Besides  taking  unto  himself  a wife, 
Mr.  Leeds  has  built  an  addition  to  his 
store,  for  the  display  of  art  china  and  brass 
and  onyx  gords. 

F.  A.  Gruebel's  jewelry  store,  14  and  16  E. 
Baltimore  St.,  Baltimore,  Md.,  was  robbed 
last  Saturday  night.  The  thieves  secured 
a lot  of  old  silver,  a necklace  and  a few 
small  rings,  valued  at  $50.  An  attempt 
was  made  to  enter  G.  T.  Sadtler  & Sons 
store,  but  the  burglar  alarm  frightened  the 
thieves. 

An  attempt  was  recently  made  to  burglar- 
ize Smith’s  jewelry  store,  Elyria,  O.  En- 
trance was  made  through  the  cellar  door, 
and  then  the  burglar  tried  to  force  the  door 
leading  into  the  store.  Failing  in  this  he 
tried  to  get  through  the  wall,  but  did  not 
make  it,  or  else  was  frightened  away  by 
some  one. 

On  the  evening  of  Nov.  8,  about  eight 
o’clock  a robbery  was  attempted  in  Cum- 
berland, Md.  Several  men  took  their 
stand  before  the  large  plate  glass  window 
of  L.  C.  Rosseler,  jeweler,  and  when  a 
crowd  was  passing  a square  of  about  eight 
inches  was  cut  with  a steel  wheel.  The 
glass  was  about  to  be  knocked  in  when 
some  shoppers  stopped  at  the  window  and 
the  cut  was  discovered.  The  men  escaped. 

About  9 o’clock  last  Monday  night,  a 
window  smasher  got  in  his  work  on  Broad 
St.,  Columbus,  Ga.,  breaking  three  large 
plate  glass  windows.  One  of  the  windows 
broken  was  in  the  jewelry  store  of  C.  M. 
Kinsel,  fr^m  which  place  the  thief  took  18 
pairs  of  gold  eye-glasses.  The  jewelry 
establishment  of  C.  Schomberg  suffered  in 
a similar  manner,  though  nothing  was 
stolen,  as  the  window  was  filled  at  the  time 
with  large  pieces  of  silverware,  which  could 
not  be  gotten  through  the  opening  which 
was  made.  A negro,  Charles  Jones,  has 
been  arrested  charged  with  the  crime. 


QACRIFICE  RALE. 

To  clear  our  enormous  stock  we  have  made  sweeping 
reductions  in  prices;  and  until  December  first  will  ofifer 
large  lines  of 

00  ALPORT, 

ROYAL  WORCESTER, 

CROWN  DERBY, 

DOULTON, 

MINTON, 

POINTON, 

WEDGWOOD, 

FRENCH  BRONZES, 

GILT  REGULATORS, 

ENAMELED  AND  CUT  GLASS 

PEDESTALS, 

MEISSEN ; 

at  from  5 to  15  per  cent,  less  than  the  goods  can  be  imported  at  to-day. 
The  goods  are  marked  in  plain  figures  and  we  think  this  is  the  best  and 
cheapest  line  ever  offered  to  the  trade. 

GOOD  GOODS  AND  GOOD  VALUES. 


LE  BOUTILLIER  & CO., 

860  BROADWAY, 

Northeast  corner  of  Seventeenth  Street,  - NEW  YORK. 


Mov.  20,  i8gs. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


1} 


Springfield,  Mass. 

TRADE  CONDITIONS. 

The  prospects  for  a good  holiday  trade  in 
the  jewelry  line  are  exceedingly  b'^ight,  and 
local  jewelers  are  correspondingly  happy. 
Last  year  and  the  year  before  there  was  a 
considerable  business  stagnation  in  this 
section,  a condition  which  made  itself  more 
keenly  felt  in  the  jewelry  trade  than  in  any 
other.  Last  year  was  better  than  the  pre- 
ceding one,  but  even  then  it  was  not  so 
good  as  was  hoped,  and  jewelers  look  for 
the  reaction  this  year,  basing  their  hope  on 
the  improved  conditions  already  manifest. 
Some  of  them  have  their  holiday  goods  in 
stock  and  one  of  the  leading  jewelers  pur- 
chased $2,000  worth  of  gold  goods  several 
weeks  ago,  although  they  have  not  yet  been 
placed  on  exhibition.  The  holiday  shopping 
has  already  commenced  and  those  jewelers 
who  have  taken  time  by  the  forelock  in 
purchasing  their  stock  have  an  advantage 
over  their  competitors. 

The  first  banquet  of  the  Springfield  Com- 
mercial Travelers’  Club,  at  Cooley’s  hotel, 
Saturday  night,  was  a great  success  even 
in  the  face  of  the  fact  that  Mayor  Long,  one 
of  the  speakers,  could  not  resist  the  tempta- 
tion to  talk  politics  in  the  hope  of  increasing 
his  chance  of  re-election.  The  best  of  good- 
fellowship  prevailed  and  the  banqueters,  es 
pecially  the  traveling  men,  were  in  the 
happiest  of  moods.  There  were  over  200 
gentlemen  present,  including  representa- 
tives of  almost  every  walk  of  life  and  the 


outsiders  enjoyed  themselves  fully  as  well 
as  the  knights  of  the  road.  President 
W.  M.  Titus  presided  and  introduced  the 
speakers:  Mayor  Long,  E.  H.  Lathrop, 

Senator  R.  W.  Irwin,  and  Rev.  Drs.  Trask 
and  Moxom.  The  reception  committee 
consisted  of  F.  T.  Stevens,  C.  C.  Munn, 
F.  W.  Taylor,  H.  L.  Gaylord,  H.  C.  Pel- 
ham, C.  W.  Ranneberg,  Frank  D.  Whit- 
comb and  W.  F.  Sibley.  Among  the  jewelry 
men  present  were:  C.  C.  Munn,  E.  W. 

Merrill,  F.  A.  Hubbard  and  F.  E.  Ladd. 


Canada  and  the  Provinces. 

There  is  a noticeable  increase  in  Toronto 
in  the  demand  for  enameled  silver  for  the 
holiday  trade. 

Alfred  Arthur  Eaves,  Montreal,  has 
ceased  to  do  business  under  the  style  of 
Edmund  Eaves. 

L.  Depoliniere,  of  the  Montreal  Watch 
Case  Co.,  has  been  admitted  to  membership 
in  the  Montreal  Board  of  Trade. 

A boy  aged  14  years,  son  of  C.  Midwinter, 
jeweler,  Birtle,  Man.,  was  instantly  killed 
last  week  on  the  farm  of  A.  Roseburgh,  by 
a log-sled  falling  on  him. 

J.  B.  Gunn,  watchmaker  and  jeweler, 
has  commenced  business  in  Summerside, 
P.  E.  I.  Mr.  Gunn  was  for  a number  of 
years  in  the  employ  of  M.  S.  Brown  & Co., 
Halifax,  N.  S. 

Carl  Bastedo,  traveler  for  the  Acme 
Silver  Plating  Company,  Toronto,  a few 
evenings  ago  left  his  valise  containing  sam- 
ples in  a train  at  the  Union  Station,  in 


Toronto,  while  he  stepped  out  to  see  a friend 
on  the  platform.  When  he  returned  it  was 
missing,  and  no  trace  of  it  or  the  thief  has 
been  found. 

Pittsburgh. 

J.  C.  Shaefer  is  now  with  John  Roberts, 
as  watchmaker. 

C.  C.  Will  is  improving  his  storerooms 
inside  and  outside. 

Alexander  Heyl  has  almost  recovered 
from  a very  serious  illness. 

Jacob  Bobbs,  jeweler,  Scottsdale,  is  now 
running  messenger  service  between  Scot's- 
dale  and  Pittsburgh. 

John  Roberts  is  making  considerable  im- 
provements in  his  storerooms.  Sam  F.  Sipe 
is  also  refitting  his  rooms. 

Mr.  Hayes,  of  Hardy  & Hayes,  will  go  to 
New  York  this  week  on  business,  and  will 
remain  to  see  the  football  game. 

Fred  W.  Laban,  Toronto,  O.,  has  built 
a new  block  in  that  town,  and  will  himself 
remove  into  his  new  storeroom  this  month. 

Local  Pittsburgh  travelers  in  for  a few 
days  with  large  orders  are:  George  West, 
West,  White  & Hartman;  James  M.  Keller, 
G.  B.  Barrett  & Co.,  and  Charles  O’Brien, 
Goddard,  Hill  & Co. 

Visiting  jewelers  last  week  were:  William 
Hunt,  Uniontown;  I.  W.  Caler,  Beaver;  B. 
Neville,  Dawson;  Mr.  Holt,  McKeesport; 
W.  W.  Mather,  Belle  Vernon;  R.  L.  Kirk- 
patrick, Butler;  W.  F.  Brehm,  Rochester; 
Mr.  Linnenbrink,  Rochester;  E.  H.  Shaefer, 
Beaver  Falls,  and  Mr.  Bernstein,  Salem,  O. 


Qlaenzer  & Co., 


80  & 82  Chambers 


Aw 

Clocks  and  Regulators, 
Bronzes, 

Lamps  and  Globes, 
Fine 

Austrian 

Glassware, 
Fine  Teplitz  Vases, 


New  York* 


Onyx  Pedestals, 

Fine  Porcelains, 
Delft  Pottery, 

Bric-a-Brac, 
Sevres  Goods, 

Cabinets,  Etc. 


FALL  NOVELTIES. 


Hones,  Slabs,  Files. 


24 


THE  JEWELERS'  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


EADQUARTERS  FOR  HIGH  GRADE 

^-“Silver  Novelties. 

SUSPENDERS,  GARTERS,  PIPES,  MANICURE  GOODS  IN  ALL 
SIZES,  ERASERS,  MEMORANDUM  TABLETS,  UMBRELLA 
STRAPS,  TAPE  MEASURES,  LETTER  CLIPS,  ETC.  ALSO 
MAKERS  OF  lOkt.  AND  I4kt.  CHAIN  BRACELETS,  MINIA- 
TURE BROOCHES  IN  BOTH  SILVER  AND  i4kt.  GOLD. 


PRICES  RIGHT  FOR  HIGH  GRADE  GOODS. 


REEVES  & 5ILLC0CKS, 


“EVERYTHING  IN  SILVER  SMALL  WARES.” 


THE  GREATEST  ABRASIVE  YET  DISCOVERED. 


Four  times  the  Labor  and  Expense-saving  qualities  of  Emery,  Corundum  or  other  abrasives. 

Adapted  for  Lapidary  Work,  Grinding,  Polishing  and  every  operation  where  a perfect  abrasive  is  necessary. 
A box  of  the  Crude  Carborundum  Crystal  as  taken  from  the  electric  furnace,  will  be  sent  free  to  any  Jeweler 
on  application. 


Price  List  of  Carborundum  Wheels. 


Acheson's  Patent,  February  28th,  1893;  February  26th,  1895.  i 


DIAM. 

IN. 

THICKNESS  IN  INCHES. 

MAX. 
REV.  ! 

>4 

% 

% 

1 

iki 

m 

2 

2¥ 

214 

2Ji 

3 

314'” 

4 

1 

$ .15 

$ 

15 

$ 

20 

$ .20 

$ .20 

$ 

25 

$ .30 

$ 

30 

$ 

35 

$ .40 

$ .40 

* .45 

$ 

50 

$ 

50 

$ 

60 

$ 

70 

18000 

.20 

25 

25 

.25 

.30 

30 

.35 

40 

40 

.45 

.50 

.65 

55 

60 

70 

75 

14000 

2 

.20 

.30 

30 

.30 

.35 

40 

.45 

50 

55 

.60 

.60 

.65 

70 

75 

85 

90 

11(100 

.25 

35 

40 

.45 

.50 

55 

65 

70 

80 

.90 

1 00 

1.10 

1 

20 

1 

25 

1 

40 

1 

50 

8.800  j 

3 

.30 

45 

55 

.60 

.65 

75 

.85 

1 

00 

1 

15 

1.25 

1.40 

1.50 

1 

60 

1 

75 

2_ 

no 

2 

20 

7400  1 

3!4 

.40 

50 

65 

.70 

80 

1 

00 

1.15 

1 

30 

1 

45 

1.65 

1.80 

1.95 

2 

10 

2 

20 

2 

55 

2 

90 

6300  , 

4 

.50 

60 

75 

.85 

1.00 

1 

20 

1 .40 

1 

60 

1 

80 

2.110 

2.20 

2 40 

2 

60 

2 

80 

3 

2 ) 

3 

60 

5500  I 

5 

.70 

85 

95 

1.15 

1.25 

1 

60 

1.95 

2 

30 

2 

61) 

3.00 

3.30 

3.65 

3 

95 

4 

25 

4 

90 

5 

55 

4400 

6 

.9.5 

1 

10 

] 

30 

1 55 

1.75 

2 

20 

2 70 

3 

15 

3 

60 

4.10 

4.55 

5 00 

5 

45 

5 

90 

6 

80 

7 

70 

3700 

7 

1.25 

1 

45 

1 

65 

1.95 

2.30 

2 

9.) 

3.50 

4 

15 

4 

80 

5.40 

6.00 

6.60 

7 

20 

7 

80 

9 

UO 

10 

25 

3160 

8 

1 

70 

2 

00 

2.40 

2.80 

3 

60 

4.40 

5 

20 

6 

00 

6.75 

7.55 

8 30 

9 

10 

9 

90 

11 

4) 

13 

00 

2770  i 

9 

1.80 

2 

10 

2 

40 

2.90 

3.35 

4 

30 

5.30 

6 

25 

7 

25 

8.20 

9.15 

10.10 

11 

10 

12 

05 

14 

00 

15 

90 

2460 

10 

2.15 

2 

50 

2 

85 

3.45 

4.00 

5 

15 

6.30 

7 

45 

8 

60 

9.75 

10.90 

12.00 

13 

20 

14 

35 

16 

6i) 

18 

90 

2210 

12 

2.65 

3 

10 

3 

70 

4.50 

5.25 

6 

80 

8.40 

9 

95 

11 

50 

13.05 

14.60 

16.20 

17 

75 

19 

30 

22 

4) 

25 

50 

1850 

14 

5 

05 

6.05 

7.00 

9 

00 

11  00 

13 

00 

15 

OU 

16.95 

18.95 

20  95 

22 

95 

24 

90 

28 

9il 

32 

80 

1580 

16 

9.10 

11 

70 

14.30 

16 

85 

19 

95 

22.(10 

24.55 

27.15 

29 

70 

32 

30 

37 

40 

42 

50 

1380 

18 

11.25 

14 

45 

17.70 

21 

00 

24 

25 

27.50 

30.75 

34.00 

37 

25 

40 

50 

47 

(0 

63 

50 

1230 

20 

17 

50 

21.55 

25 

55 

29 

60 

33.70 

37.80 

41.90 

45 

95 

50 

00 

58 

00 

66 

00 

1100 

The  wheels  are  made  with  a vitrified  bond  and  pressed  under  hydraulic  pressure.  Those  over  three  inches  in  diameter 
are  turned  up  after  firing.  The  same  numbers  are  used  to  designate  the  degrees  of  fineness,  as  are  used  with  Emery,  and  the 
wheels  are  made  in  seven  degrees  of  hardness,  marked  SSS,  SS,  S,  M,  H,  HH,  HHH,  from  extremely  soft  to  extremely  hard. 

In  ordering,  state  diameter,  thickness,  hole,  number  and  hardness. 

THE  CARBORUNDUM  CO. 

WORKS:  MONONGAHELA,  PA.,  AND  NIAGARA  FALLS,  N.  Y. 


CUT  THIS  OUT. 


Nov.  20  189$. 


25 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


The  Jewelers’ Circular 

AND 

HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


PUBLISHED  EVERY  WEDNESDAY  BY 

THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB’G  CO., 

189  Broadway.  New  York  City. 


A JOURNAL  DEVOTED  TO  THE  INTERESTS  OF 
JEWELERS.  WATCHMAKERS,  SILVERSMI I HS, 
ELECTRO-PLATE  MANUFACTURERS,  AND  ALL 
ENGAGED  IN  KINDRED  BRANCHES  OF  INDUSTRY. 


Our  Editorial  columns  will  contain  our  own  opinions 
only,  and  we  shall  present  in  other  columns  only  what 
we  consider  of  interest  or  value  to  our  readers  Adver- 
tising matter  will  not  be  printed  as  news. 

Advertising  rates  in  The  Circular  are  lower, 
considering  the  number  of  tradesmen  reached  by  its 
large  circuTation,  than  in  any  other  jewelry  journal. 

Notices  of  changes  in  standing  advertisements 
must  be  received  one  week  in  advance;  new  matter 
can  be  received  up  to  Monday. 


INFORMATION  FOR  SUBSCRIBERS. 


Terms  of  Subscription,  Postage  Prepaid. 

PER  ANNUM. 

United  States  and  Canada,  - - - $2.00 

Foreign  Countries  in  Postal  Union,  - • 3.00 

Single  Copies, .10 

New  subscribers  can  commence  at  any  time. 

Payments  for  The  Circular  when  sent  by  mail, 
should  be  made  in  a Post-Office  Money  Order,  Bank 
Check  or  Draft,  or  an  Express  Money  Order  or  Reg- 
istered Letter.  All  postmasters  are  required  to  regis- 
ter letters  whenever  requested  to  do  so. 

Pay  money  only  to  authorized  collectors  having 
proper  credentials. 

Returning  your  paper  will  not  enable  us  to  discon- 
tinue it,  as  we  cannot  find  your  name  on  our  books 
unless  your  address  is  given. 

In  changing  address  always  give  the  old  as  well  as 
the  new  one.  Y our  name  cannot  be  found  on  our 

books  unless  this  is  done. 

We  will  continue  to  send  papers  until  there  is  a 
specific  order  to  stop,  in  connection  with  which  all 
arrearages  must  be  paid ; but  such  an  order  can  be 
given  at  any  time,  to  take  effect  at  or  after  the  ex- 
piration of  the  subscription.  All  such  orders  will  be 
promptly  acknowledged  by  mail. 

The  Courts  have  decided  that  all  subscribers  to 
Journals  are  responsible  until  arrearages  are  paid  in 
full  and  an  order  to  discontinue  has  been  received  by 
the  publisher. 


Member  of  the 

American  Trade  Press  Association. 

Vol.  XXXI. 

Nov.  20,  1895.  No.  16. 

Every  line  of  reading  matter  hi  The 
Jewelers’  Circular,  ivith  the  exception  of 
the  few  brief  extracts  from  exchanges 
always  properly  credited,  is  written  ex- 
clusively for  this  journal.  Each  issue 
of  The  Jewelers’  Circular  is  copy- 
righted. 

FEATURES  OF  THIS  NUMBER. 


Page  41 — Workshop  Notes. 

Page  41 — Technical  Articles. 

Page  28 — Our  Traveling  Representatives. 
Page  29— Art  Stationery  for  Jewelers. 
Page  46— Queries  by  Circular  Readers. 
Page  42 — Matters  in  Jewelry  Storekeep- 
ing. 

Page  45 — The  Connoisseur  — Rambler’s 
Notes. 

Frontispiece — Officers  of  the  New  York 
Jewelers’  Association. 

Page  4 — 2 1 ST  Annual  Banquet  of  the 
New  York  Jewelers’  Association. 


IN  our  last  issue  we 
took  occasion  to 
Now.  point  out  some  of  the 

dangers  the  retailers 
will  meet  in  delaying  the  making  of  holiday 
selections.  A vision  of  these  dangers  can- 
not be  brought  too  vividly  before  the  mind’s 
eye  of  the  retailer.  We  will  therefore 
remind  him  that  every  large  manufacturing 
concern  produces  and  displays  a fine  and 
large  stock  for  the  Fall  and  holiday  busi- 
ness, expecting  to  dispose  of  the  major  part 
this  stock  in  September  and  October,  and  to 
run  the  factory  in  November  and  December 
to  piece  up  broken  lines  and  desirable 
goods.  In  these  calculations  allowance  is 
made  for  that  class  of  jewelers  who  begin 
to  order  their  holiday  goods  a few  days 
before  Christmas.  These  jewelers  are  not 
entitled  to  be  called  merchants,  and  we  de- 
plore the  fact  that  their  number,  this  year, 
threatens  to  be  greatly  increased.  They 
expect  the  goods  ordered  will  be  received  by 
return  express,  when  it  is  an  impossibility 
from  all  aspects  to  either  fill  orders  satis- 
factorily from  a broken  up  stock  or  to  ship 
goods  promptly  when  the  transportation 
companies  are  taxed  to  their  utmost  capa- 
city. 

Christmas  will  come  this  year,  as  it  has 
come  every  year  for  a long  time  past,  and 
people  intend  to  continue  the  time  honored 
custom  of  buying  goods  for  Christmas  pres- 
ents. Therefore,  if  the  dealer  does  not  pre- 
pare now  for  the  demand  that  will  be  made 
upon  him , he  will  certainly  find  himself  deep 
in  the  Slough  of  .Despond,  when  the  busy 
days  of  the  season  are  over.  While  he  has 
been  vacillating,  the  department  store  has 
been  laying  in  a large  and  varied  stock  of 
jewelry  and  kindred  lines,  and  the  customer 
will  find  in  the  latter  what  he  could  not  find 
in  the  jewelry  store  and  he  infers  that  a 
jewelry  store  is  not  the  proper  place  to  buy 
jewelry  after  all.  This  is  the  greatest 
danger. 

IF  there  is  one  rea- 
son more  potent 
than  any  other  why 
the  United  States  is 
passing  through  a commercial  crisis,  it  is 
that  this  country’s  export  trade  is  far  below 
what  the  territorial  extent,  productiveness 
and  population  of  the  country  warrant. 
This  condition  is  rooted  in  the  character  of 
the  American  people,  or  rather  in  the  cir- 
cumstances of  government  and  education, 
social  institutions  and  ideas,  and  modes  of 
life  and  thought  which  produce  the 
American  people.  The  charge  made  by 
many  Europeans  that  the  inhabitants  of  the 
United  States,  at  the  present  day,  are  not 
a homogeneous  people  but  are  a conglomera- 
tion of  heterogeneous  elements,  may  or 
may  not  be  susceptible  of  refutation, 
but  that  they  are  almost  universally  gov- 
erned by  the  same  ambitions  is  an  ad- 
mitted fact;  and  the  most  prominent  of 
these  ambitions  is  to  get  the  largest  possible 
amount  of  money  in  the  smallest  possible 
space  of  time  and  with  the  least  possible  dis- 
play of  energy.  Therefore  the  Americans 


Do  as  the 


Germans  Do. 


have  no  time  to  build  up  an  export  trade, 
which  is  a slow  and  exacting  process.  Had 
the  Americans  the  persistence,  patience 
and  long-sightedness  of  the  people  of 
Germany,  who  are  monthly  gaining  new 
foreign  fields  for  their  products,  they  would 
be  in  a better  position  commercially  than 
they  are  to-day.  While  the  Germans  are  not 
eager  to  get  our  goods,  they  are  very 
eager  to  sell  theirs  to  us,  and  it  would  seem 
that  there  is  no  better  way  of  pointing  out 
to  the  people  of  the  United  States  what 
might  be  done  to  obtain  an  increased  ex- 
port trade  than  by  urging  them  to  do  as  the 
Germans  do. 

The  United  States  Consul  at  Chemnitz 
reports  that  hardly  a mail  goes  to  that  city 
that  does  not  contain  letters  asking  for 
information  as  to  how  to  find  markets 
for  goods  made  in  Gemany.  Twice 
in  each  year  Ameiican  houses  send 
from  50  to  75  representatives  to  buy  goods 
in  Chemnitz  and  in  all  the  larger  cities  of 
Germany.  The  men  leave  orders  for  sums 
ranging  in  the  aggregate  from  $25,000,000 
to  $30,000,000  or  even  $40,000,000  annually. 
Soon  after  these  buyers  have  left  the  coun- 
try the  German  manufacturers  send  their 
agents  with  their  trunks  to  the  United  States 
where  they  cover  the  country  from  New 
York  to  San  Francisco,  and  from  Portland, 
Me.,  to  New  Orleans,  showing  samples  and 
taking  orders. 

This  energy  upon  the  part  of  the  Ger- 
mans is,  of  necessity,  bearing  fruit.  Suc- 
cess to  these  people  has  been  so  certain, 
that  they  are  already  building  on  larger 
sales  and  better  tim^s  than  they  have  ever 
experienced.  The  only  way  for  our 
merchants  to  gain  and  maintain  a foothold 
among  these  people  is  to  do  as  they  do; 
send  out  agents  with  well  filled  sample 
cases.  This  advice  is  offered  to  the  man- 
ufacturers of  jewelry,  watches,  clocks, 
sterling  silver  and  silver  plated  wares  and 
optical  goods  in  particular,  as  well  as  to 
manufacturers  in  general. 


The  event  of  the 
past  week  and  of 
Banquet.  the  month  of  Novem- 
ber, as  it  has  been  for 
many  Novembers  past,  was  the  banquet  of 
the  New  York  Jewelers’  Association.  It  is 
a matter  of  common  courtesy  to  remark  that 
each  recurring  banquet  excels  all  its  pre- 
decessors, but  the  assertion  this  year  has  the 
ring  of  truth,  for  there  were  circumstances 
surrounding  this  affair  that  made  it  unique. 
In  the  first  place  it  marked  the  attainment  of 
the  majority  of  the  organization;  second, 
the  attendance  was  unusually  large;  third, 
the  decorative  features  were  unprecedent- 
edly rich  and  magnificent,  the  treasures  of 
the  greatest  silverware  and  pottery  houses 
in  America  being  called  into  requisition. 
The  manifestation  of  good  will  among  the 
guests  and  the  general  appreciation  of  the 
mutual  advantages  of  such  a banquet  war- 
rant the  prediction  that  annual  banquets 
will  be  an  interesting  and  important  insti- 
tution in  the  trade  for  many  years  to  come. 


26 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  2o,  iSg^. 


New  York  Notes. 

Herman  Kobbe  has  satisfied  the  judgment 
for  $986.77  entered  by  Tiffany  & Co.,  Dec. 
4,  1893. 

J.  L.  Levy,  in  the  City  Court,  Wednesday, 
recovered  a judgment  for  $224.08  against 
Adolph  Bechtold. 

The  New  York  Jewelers’  Board  of  Trade, 
Friday,  distributed  to  the  creditors  of  J. 
M.  Howe,  Nashville,  Tenn.,  a dividend 
amounting  to  36  per  cent. 

Max  Freund,  of  Max  Freund  & Co.,  has 
been  the  recipient  of  numerous  letters  and 
telegrams  of  congratulation  on  the  occasion 
of  the  silver  anniversary  of  his  wedding 
which  he  recently  celebrated. 

The  following  gentlemen  have  been  ap 
pointed  as  the  banquet  committee  for 
1895-96,  of  the  New  York  Jewelers’  Board 
of  Trade:  Geo.  E.  Fahys,  chairman,  E.  V. 
Clergue,  Appleton  Smith,  Leo  Wormser, 
Ira  Barrows,  Chas.  F.  Wood,  David  Keller, 
T.  K.  Benton,  Sam  Wallach,  William  I. 
Rosenfeld,  and  A.  J.  G.  Hodenpyl,  e.v- 
officio. 

Ludwig  Nissen,  of  Ludwig Nissen  & Co., 
accompanied  by  his  wife,  leaves  to-day  for 
a week’s  visit  to  the  Cotton  States  and  In- 
ternational Exposition.  Mr.  Nissen  goes 
with  the  delegation  of  100  from  Brooklyn, 
of  which  he  is  treasurer.  Joseph  B.  Bow- 
den, of  J.  B.  Bowden  & Co.,  is  one  of  the 
New  York  delegation  to  the  same  city.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Bowden  also  start  for  Atlanta 
to-day. 

A letter  received  in  this  city  last  week 
from  the  United  States  District  Attorney, 
in  Cincinnati,  O.,  stated  that  the  motions 
by  the  Coetermans-Henrichs  Keck  Co.  and 
by  Herman  Keck  to  dismiss  the  actions 
brought  against  them  for  bringing  to  the 
United  States  diamond  cutters  under  con- 
tract were  denied.  The  demurrers  inter- 
posed to  the  complaint,  it  was  also  stated, 
were  also  overruled,  and  the  defendants 
ordered  to  answer. 

A special  meeting  of  the  stockholders  of 
the  Spencer  Optical  Mfg.  Co.  has  been 
called  for  Dec.  6th  at  2 o’clock  p.  m.,  to  be 
held  at  the  office  of  the  company,  15  Maiden 
Lane.  The  object  of  the  meeting  is  stated 
to  be  to  decide  whether  the  capital  stock  of 
the  company  shall  be  reduced  to  such 
amount  as  may  be  then  determined  by  the 
stockholders,  and  also  to  transact  such  fur- 
ther business  with  reference  to  the  assets  of 
the  company,  and  the  disposition  thereof, 
as  may  then  be  determined. 

Charles  G.  Braxmar, badge  manufacturer, 
10  Maiden  Lane,  recently  purchased  the 
entire  plant,  machinery,  tools,  dies,  pat- 
terns, stock  and  good  will  of  the  E.  Will- 
iams Jewelry  Co.,  successors  to  the  late 
Edw.  Williams,  who  was  the  oldest  estab- 
lished and  at  one  time  one  of  the  most 
widely  known  manufacturers  of  badges  and 
emblem  goods  in  the  country.  With  his 
increased  facilities  for  manufacturing,  Mr. 
Braxmar  intends  to  march  in  the  very  front 
rank  of  the  “ badge  and  medal  makers 
brigade.” 


A number  of  the  striking  diamond  work- 
ers decided  to  return  to  work  Monday. 
The  employes  of  Zilver  Bros.,  Brooklyn, 
and  a few  of  the  workmen  of  Van  Wezel 
Bros.,  New  York,  are  said  to  have  returned. 
The  employes  ot  Wallach  & Schiele,  Stern 
Bros.  & Co.,  Arnstein  Bros.  & Co.,  Kryn  & 
Wouters  Bros,  are  among  those  still  on 
strike. 

A fire  occurred  shortly  after  midnight 
Thursday  in  the  five  story  iron  front  build 
ing,  63  Nassau  St.,  which  resulted  in  dam- 
age by  water  and  smoke  amounting  to 
about  $1,000.  The  fire  broke  out  under  the 
stairs  leading  to  the  top  floor,  burning  the 
stairs,  hall,  and  the  premises  of  the  janitor. 
Among  the  tenants  whose  offices  were 
damaged  are  Graham  & Co.  lapidaries,  C. 
Oberlander,  stone  setter,  M.  Kleinberger, 
manufacturing  jeweler.  Geo.  Smith,  watch 
and  chronometer  maker,  Ernest  H.  Kessler, 
engraver,  and  Fisher  & Sons,  dealers  in 
jewelers’  supplies.  Fisher  & Sons'  stock 
was  damaged  by  water  to  the  extent  of 
$200. 

Nicholas  Weiss,  a watch  maker,  and  Chas. 
Schultz,  who  as  told  in  The  Circular  Oct. 
23d,  were  arrested  on  the  charge  of  black, 
mailing  lawyers  Hugh  O.  Pentecost  and 
Richard  Gatling,  were  indicted  by  the 
Grand  Jury,  Wednesday  on  that  charge. 
Weiss  was  sent  to  prison  a year  ago  for 
robbing  Tiffany  & Co.  Pentecost  & Gat- 
ling were  his  lawyers,  and  he  gave  them  his 
tools  to  secure  their  fee.  When  he  was  par- 
doned he  declared  that  he  had  only  mort- 
gaged his  tools  to  the  lawyers,  and  on  this 
statement  the  Grand  Jury  indicted  them 
for  grand  larceny.  After  that,  Weiss 
through  Schultz,  it  is  claimed,  offered  to 
leave  the  country  for  $280. 

The  police  are  believed  to  have  made  a 
mistake  in  ordering  the  arrest  at  Colon,  of 
a passenger  on  the  Allzanga  who  was  be- 
lieved to  be  Joseph  Reis  a fugitive  from 
this  city.  The  Circular  Nov.  6th,  told  how 
Reis  had  been  arrested  by  the  United 
States  Consul  at  Colon,  on  the  charge  of 
swindling  L.  S.  Friedberger  & Co.,  484 
Broadway,  out  of  $1,900  worth  of  watches 
and  jewelry.  The  man  arrested  turned  out 
to  be  Christian  Reis,  Jr.,  who  says  he  is  a 
merchant  of  San  Francisco.  On  Nov.  ist 
Reis  was  put  on  board  the  Newpor-t  for 
New  York,  but  before  the  steamer  sailed  a 
cablegram  was  received  from  Capt.  O’Brien, 
stating  that  Christian  Reis  was  not  the 
man  wanted.  Mr.  Reis  was  so  indignant 
that  he  came  back  to  New  York  on  the  'New- 
port which  arrived  last  week  and  had  an 
interview  witji  Acting  Police  Captain 
O’Brien.  Mr.  Reis  says  he  intends  to  present 
his  case  at  Washington,  Capt.  O’Brien  ac- 
knowledged that  he  had  made  a mistake  in 
ordering  Christian  Reis’s  arrest. 


Death  of  Stanton  Champlin. 

Providence,  R.  L,  Nov.  18. — The  death 
is  reported  of  Stanton  Champlin,  at  Dans- 
ville,  N.  Y.  The  death  occurred  on  Satur- 
day. 


Last  Week’s  Arrivals. 

CIRCULAR  has  perfected  ar- 
rangements tor  obtaining  the  names 
and  hotel  addresses  of  all  the  latest 
buyers  visiting  New  York,  and  each 
day  posts  in  its  ofSce,  i8g  Broadway, 
a bulletin  which  every  member  oi 
the  trade  is  cordially  invited  to  copy. 

The  following  out-of-t(^wn  dealers  were 
registered  in  New  York  during  the  past 
week;  A.  M.  Jewett,  Cortland,  N.  Y.,  St. 
Stephen  H.;  W.  S.  Shreve,  Boston,  Mass., 
Holland  H.;  F.  A.  Hubbard,  Springfield, 
Mass.,  B’way  Central  H.;  W.  H.  Thurber, 
Providence,  R.  I.,  Murray  Hill  H.;  H.  Til- 
den,  Providence,  R.  I.,  Murray  Hill  H.;  G. 
C.  Allis,  Derby,  Conn.,  St.  Cloud  H.;  E.  D. 
Mix,  Albany,  N.  Y.,  New  Amsterdam  H.; 
J.  A.  Cross,  Chester,  Pa.,  Morton  H.;  C.  R. 
Hansel,  Hartford,  Conn.,  Park  Ave.  H.;  F. 
H.  Sloan,  Hartford,  Conn.,  Park  Ave.  H.; 
W.  H.  Herr,  Lancaster,  Pa.,  Union 
Square  H.;  J.  C.  Grogan,  Pittsburgh, 
Pa.,  St.  James  H.;  A.  L.  La  Rue,  Pittsfield, 
Mass.,  Morton  H.;  H.  W.  Tisdale,  Taunton, 
Mass.,  Everett  H.;  C.  C.  Shaver,  Utica, 
N.  Y.,  Union  Square  H.;  G.  W.  Fairchild, 
Bridgeport,  Conn.,  St.  James  H.;  H.  G. 
Peirsons,  (F.  W.  Sim  & Co.),  Troy,  N.  Y., 
Marlborough  H.;  J.  S.  McDonald,  Balti- 
more, Md.,  Imperial  H.;  A.  H.  Pray,  Bos- 
ton, Mass.,  Barrett  H.;  A.  Bigelow,  (Bige- 
low, Kennard  & Co.),  Boston,  Mass.,  St. 
James  H.;  Gen.  Geo.  H.  Ford,  New  Haven, 
Conn.,  St.  James  H.;  S.  H.  Kirby,  New 
Haven,  Conn  , Park  Ave.  H.;  C. 
O’Bryon,  (L.  A.  Scherr  & Co.),  Philadelphia, 
Pa.,  Grand  H.;  Z.  J.  Pequignot,  Philadel- 
phia.  Pa.;  Albemarle  H.;  G.  W.  Scheir, 
Philadelphia,  Pa.,  Grand  H.;  H.  Schimpf, 
(J.  Muhr  & Bro  ),  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  Grand 
H.;  J.  F.  Beyerle,  Reading.  Pa.,  Sturtevant 
H.;  S.  L.  George,  Watertown,  N.  Y.,  Ven- 
dome  H.;  Dr.  M.  Longstreth,  Philadelphia, 
Pa.,  Albert  H.;  C.  W.  Wattles,  Pittsburgh, 
Pa.,  Westminster  H.;  J.  H.  Brazier.  (J.  E. 
Caldwell  & Co.),  Philadelphia,  Pa.;  G.  W. 
Russell,  Philadelphia,  Pa.;  C.  Weaver, 
(Bailey,  Banks  & Biddle  Co  ),  Philadelphia, 
Pa.;  F.  B.  Nourse,  Cortland,  N.  Y.;  J.  P. 
Slattery,  Manchester,  N.  H.;  F.  Green- 
wood, Norfolk,  Va. ; M.  W.  Smith,  Boston, 
Mass.;  H.  W.  Pattersen,  Boston,  Mass.; 
C.  Strobel,  Waterbury,  Conn.;  I.  G.  Dillon, 
Wheeling,  W.  Va. ; N.  H.  Hennegan, 
Baltimore,  Md.;  J.  R.  Armiger,  Baltimore, 
Md.;  W.  H.  Long,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  Im- 
perial H.;  F.  B.  Fon  Dersmith,  Lancaster, 
Pa.;  Wyman  & Perkins,  St.  Albans,  Vt. ; 
H.  J.  Hallock,  Wyalusing,  Pa.,  St.  Stephen 
H ; R.  Harris,  Washington,  D.  C..  Marl- 
borough H.;  L.  Furnwangler,  Greensburg, 
Pa.,  Gilsey  H. ; S.  Chapin,  Oneida,  N.  Y., 
St.  Cloud  H.;  M.  Timpane,  Troy,  N.  Y., 
G’d  Union  H.;  J.  Frank  Alice  Dover,  Del.; 
J.  W.  Tuttle,  Plattsburg,  N.  Y. ; M.  Glass, 
Kansas  City,  Mo.,  Astor  H.;  J.  G.  Crump, 
Boston,  Mass.,  Morton  H.;  E.  G.  Acheson, 
Monongahela,  Pa.,  Astor  H.;  I.  L.  Amberg, 
Cincinnati,  O.,  Astor  H.;  B.  Kent,  Toronto, 
Can.,  Murray  Hill  H. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


27 


Providence. 

All  communications  for  this  column,  addressed  to 
P.  O.  Box  1093,  Providence,  R.I.,  will  receive  prompt 
attention. 


Howard  Blake  has  opened  a retail  store 
in  Westerly. 

John  Nelson  has  discontinued  his  branch 
store  at  382  S.  Main  St. 

F.  A.  Stevens  has  started  at  129  Eddy 
St.  under  the  style  of  the  Crown  Optical 
Co. 

The  demand  for  holiday  silverware  is  in- 
creasing and  bids  fair  to  be  unusually  large 
this  season. 

David  Bernkopf,  of  Leeder  & Bernkopf, 
is  rejoicing  in  the  birth  on  Friday  last  of  a 
nine  pound  son  and  heir. 

B.  E.  Daggett,  one  of  the  old  time  manu- 
facturing jewelers,  is  now  interested  in  the 
Nicholson  Telephone  Co. 

Warren  C.  Green,  jobber,  who  has  been 
out  of  business  for  some  time  past,  has 
started  again  at  174  Weybosset  St. 

William  C.  Barber,  who  has  been  doing 
business  at  725  Westminster  St.,  for  some 
months  past,  is  now  selling  out  his  stock  at 
auction. 

J.  Parker  Ford,  of  Baldwin,  Ford  & Co,, 
has  gone  west  with  a fine  line  of  samples 
including  numerous  new  and  catchy 
patterns. 

Joseph  Holden,  Pawtucket,  has  given  up 
his  business  there  and  has  joined  his  son  in 


Syracuse,  N.  Y.,  and  become  a member  of 
J.  Holden  & Co.,  manufacturing  opticians. 

Charles  H.  Fuller,  of  George  H.  Fuller 
& Son,  Pawtucket,  has  been  granted  a 
patent  for  a neat  device  for  fastening  the 
pin  and  tongue  in  front  of  a brooch  or  breast 
pin. 

Alfred  H.  Smith,  son  of  DeWitt  Smith, 
at  one  time  one  of  the  most  prominent 
manufacturing  jewelers  in  this  city,  has 
started  as  a manufacturer  of  plated  jewelry 
at  363  Eddy  St. 

The  Howard  Sterling  Co.  have  leased  a 
shop  on  the  ground  floor  of  the  old  bleach- 
ing and  calendering  building  on  Mathewson 
St.,  and  are  equipping  it  with  drop  presses 
and  other  heavy  machinery  for  making 
large  silverware. 


The  Atlleboros. 

Frank  Whiting  is  in  the  west  in  the  inter- 
ests of  Wade,  Davis  & Co. 

A number  of  the  factories  have  com- 
menced running  nights  again. 

Business  is  booming  at  the  enameling 
factory  of  J.  B.  Maintien  & Son. 

George  Sweet,  of  Hayward  &’Sweet,  is  on 
an  extended  visit  among  their  trade. 

Hon.  H.  F.  Barrows  and  family  left  for 
their  residence  in  New  York  the  past  week. 

J.  Fred  Ripley,  traveler  for  Watson,  New- 
ell Co.,  is  in  Chicago  for  a 10  days’  stay, 
calling  upon  the  firm’s  customers.  He  is 
meeting  with  good  sales. 


Seymour,  Knapp  & Warren  Co.,  Plain- 
ville,  are  doing  a brisk  business  on  their 
new  lines  of  ornamental  dress  buttons, 
making  both  the  enamel  and  white  stone 
styles. 

Charles  P.  Young,  Jr.,  eldest  son  of 
Charles  P.  Young,  one  of  North  Attleboro’s 
large  manufacturing  jewelers,  died  at  his 
father’s  residence,  Tuesday  last,  of  typhoid 
fever.  He  was  28  years  of  age. 

W.  W.  Wright  & Co.,  who  recently 
started  in  business  in  Attleboro  Falls,  are 
selling  directly  to  the  retail  trade.  They 
are  contemplating  the  employment  of  22 
traveling  salesmen  in  the  New  England 
district. 

As  soon  as  arrangements  can  be  made 
Watson,  Newell  Co.  will  remove  into  the 
large  building  at  Mechanics,  which  was 
formerly  used  as  a cotton  mill.  A few  years 
ago  the  mill  was  partly  destroyed  by  fire 
and  rebuilt  but  since  then  it  has  not  been 
used.  It  is  reported  that  Watson,  Newell 
Co.  have  bought  the  property. 

There  is  now  no  doubt  that  William  Bar- 
rett, the  notorious  burglar,  paid  Attleboro 
more  than  one  visit  and  succeeded  in  carry- 
ing off  silver  and  money  worth  at  least 
$5,000.  There  were  no  less  than  four  dar- 
ing breaks  in  Attleboro  in  1889,  and  the 
identification  of  property  stolen  from  the 
residence  of  Albert  A.  Bushee,  on  the 
morning  of  May  25,  1889,  gives  the  impres- 
sion that  Barrett  was  implicated  in  the 
other  affairs. 


JEWELERS  ARE  INVITED  TO  INSPECT  OUR 


IN  OUR 


AT 

915  BROADWAY,  NEAR 


store: 

21st  STREET. 


THE  DISPLAY  COVERS 

THE  WHOLE  LINE  OF 

IF  YOU  CANNOT  CALL,  SEND  FOR  A CATALOGUE. 


Cut  Glass. 


C.  Dorflinoer  & Sons, 


36  MURRAY  STREET. 


NEW  YORK. 


28 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


iSTov.  20.  1895. 


rpjivelinj 


Traveling  repreientatlvei  may 
ooQsider  tbeie  oolamna  open  for 
the  publication  of  any  newa  or 
timea  of  intereat  regarding  them* 
aelvea  or  their  oonfrerea. 


A’ 


MONO  the  travel- 
ers in  Kansas 
City  last  week  were  ; 
W.  C.  Willis,  Gorham 
Mfg.  Co.;T.  J.Hoefer, 
M.  A.  Mead  & Co.;  O. 
L.  Lane,  Reed  & Bar- 
ton; Sol.  H.  Veit, 
Marx,  Veit  & Co.;  Lawrence  H Smith,  Bip- 
part  & Co.;  M.  H.  Harrison,  Harrison  & 
Groeschel;  Millard  Veit,  Marx,  Veit  & Co. ; 
W.  D.  Post.  Codding  Bros.  & Heilborn;C.  A. 
Boynton,  Wm.  B.  Kerr  & Co.;  S.  K.  Jonas, 
Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co.;  R.  J.  Marsh,  C.  A. 
Marsh  & Co.;  H.  S.  Dix,  Wightman  & 
Hough  Co.;  M.  Hirsch,  Hirsch  & Hyman. 

Eastern  jobbers  and  manufacturers  rep- 
resented in  the  Twin  Cities  the  past  week 
were:  Wightman  & Hough  Co.,  by  H.  S. 
Dix;  S.  O.  Bigney  & Co.,  by  G.  G.  Berry; 
Irvington  Smelting  & Refining  Co.,  by  Mr. 
Woolsey;  Hancock,  Becker  & Co.,  by  Mr. 
Joseph;  R.,  L.  & M.  Friedlander,  by  Abe 
Harris. 


Travelers  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  last  week 
were;  Monroe  Engelsman,  Louis  Weil  & 
Co.;  Frank  J.  Keller,  Downing,  Keller  & 
Co.;  Mr.  Townley,  Ripley-Howland  Mfg. 
Co.;  A.  L.  Crook,  S.  E.  Fisher  & Co.;  F.  S. 
Sherry,  Jos.  Fahys  & Co.;  C.  W.  Battey, 
Waite,  Mathewson  & Co.;  J.  Williams,  for 
G.  Armeny;  Mr.  Sinnock,  Ehrlich  & Sin- 
nock;  J.  C.  Mann,  Hermann  & Co.;  Mr. 
Salms,  Wm.  Morris  Co.;  S.  H.  Brower,  R. 
L.  Griffith  & Son;  Charles  B.  Bartlett, 
Whiting  Mfg.  Co. 

The  following  traveling  men  secured 
orders  from  the  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  jewelers 


last  week:  Tom  Davis,  Middletown  Plate 
Co.;  Geo.  Munson,  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.; 
F.  H.  Carpenter,  R.  F.  Simmons  & Co.; 
Mr.  Smith,  Bippart  & Co.;  Ernest  Block, W. 
& S.  Blackinton;  Geo.  S.  Pollitz,  Rice  & 
Hochster;  Geo.  Whiting,  S.  E. Fisher  & Co.; 
Jos.  Becker,  Jos.  Fahys  & Co.;  E.  B.  Bliss, 
Bliss  Bros.;  Mr.  Duncan,  American  Wal- 
tham Watch  Co. ; and  representatives  of  the 
New  Columbus  Watch  Co.,  and  Natchaug 
Silk  Co. 

Among  the  salesmen  in  Philadelphia,  Pa., 
the  past  week  were:  F.  Woods,  Carter, 
Sloan  & Co.;  Chas.  Duffy,  Enos  Richardson 
& Co.;  John  Taylor,  Krementz  & Co.;  H. 
Dingee,  Gorham  Mfg.  Co.;  Chas.  Cook,  J. 
F.  Fradley  & Co.;  Geo.  Hutchison,  Hutch- 
ison & Huestis;  B.  Griscom,  Bippart  & 
Co. ; B.  Schloss,  A.  Wallach&Co.;  A.  G. 
Rutherford,  Kirby,  Mowry  & Co.;  James 
Barclay,  Stevens  Silver  Co.;  Harry  Larter, 
Larter,  Elcox  & Co.;  Geo.  W.  Reed,  Wm. 

B.  Kerr  & Co.;  Frank  Locklin,  Unger 
Bros.;  Arthur  Chapin,  for  F.  Keim;  J.  D. 
Pettingill,  Derby  Silver  Co.;  and  Robert 
White,  Homan  Silver  Plate  Co. 

Traveling  salesmen  calling  on  Davenport, 
la.,  jewelers  last  week  were : C.  G. 
Schwitter,  Averbeck  & Averbeck  ; Samuel 
Kohn,  Leopold  Weil  & Co.;  Albert  Kahn, 
American  Watch  Case  Co.;  A.  M.  Shepard, 

C.  G.  Alford  & Co.;  W.  S.  Willis,  Gorham 
Mfg.  Co.;  C.  G.  Cushman,  Reed  & Barton; 
Robert  B.  Steele,  J.  B.  Bowden  & Co.;  E. 
C.  Bowen,  Rogers  & Bro. ; Alfred  G.  Stein, 
L.  H.  Keller  & Co.;  Mr.  Gregory,  Strobell 
& Crane  ; A.  E.  Scheuler,  Wendell  Mfg. 
Co.;  J.  H.  McCormick,  Waterbury  Clock 
Co.;  Charles  Altschul,  Oppenheimer  Bros. 
& Veith  ; S.  K.  Jonas,  Imperial  Optical  Co  ; 
W.  F.  Adams,  Simpson,  Hall,  Miller  & Co.; 
Charles  Sands,  King  & Eisele  ; Mr.  Fried- 
mann, Odenheimer,  Zimmern  & Co. 

Jewelry  travelers  in  Boston,  Mass.,  dur- 
ing the  week  included:  Samuel  Howland, 

Eisenmann  Bros.;  Otto  Wormser,  A.  J. 
Grinberg  & Co.;  William  Miller,  Seth 
Thomas  Clock  Co. ; E.  W.  Martin,  Martin, 


Copeland  & Co.;  Mr.  Van  Houten,  for  C. 
Sidney  Smith;  H.  W.  Dunham,  Meriden 
Silver  Plate  Co.;  George  B.  Osborn,  Will- 
iam Smith  & Co.;  W.  S.  Campbell,  Day, 
Clark  & Co. ; Charles  T.  Gallagher,  Sinnock 
& Sherrill;  Louis  Jones,  R.  F.  Simmons  & 
Co.;T.  B.  Wilcox,  Jr.,  Pairpoint  Mfg.  Co.; 
W.  D.  Elcox,  Larter,  Elcox  & Co.;  George 
W.  Reed,  William  B.  Kerr  & Co.;  Mr.  Con- 
nett,  Unger  Bros.;  S.  H. ^Brower;  H.  E. 
Bleecker,  Bassett  Jewelry  Co.;  Mr.  Knight, 

S.  B.  Champlin  & Son;  W.  S.  Metcalf, 
Plainville  Stock  Co.;  Alfred  Krower,  Albert 
Lorsch  & Co.;  S.  E.  Fisher;  Mr.  Mowry, 
Kirby,  Mowry  & Co. 

Travelers  in  the  jewelry  line  noticed  in 
Syracuse,  N.  Y.,  the  pa.st  week  included: 
Fred  Clarkson,  Snow  & Westcott;  F.  A. 
Averbeck,  Averbeck  & Averbeck;  S. 
Harris,  for  J.  Goldberg;  W.  G Pollack, 
W.  S.  Pollack  & Co.;  L.  H.  Bosworth, 
Potter  & Buffinton;  B.  E.  Osgood,  F.  L, 
Shepardson  & Co.  and  New  York  Mutual 
Optical  Co.;  C.  T.  Dougherty,  Sexton  Bros.; 
N.  Coughlin,  for  William  Link;  Dayton  T. 
Reed,  Belknap,  Johnson  & Powell;  C.  F. 
Herdle,  King  & Eisele;  F.  G.  Burgess, 
John  Scheidig  & Co.;  Milton  S.  Herzog, 
Henry  ,S.  Herzog  & Co.;  W.  H.  Browne, 
Wilcox  Silver  Plate  Co.;  W.  R. 
Cattelle,  Henry  E.  Oppenheimer  & 
Co.;  Monroe  Engelsman,  Louis  Weil&  Co.; 
W.  O.  Thierey,  Illinois  Watch  Co.;  S. 
Glenn  Walmsley,  Tenner  & Baum;  Gus. 
W.  Strandberg,  E.  L.  Spencer  & Co.; 
H.  W.  Frohlichstein,  Henry  Froehlich  & 
Co.;  Francis  E.  Cocks,  Treibs  Bros.;  Theo. 
L.  Parker,  Martin,  Copeland  & Co.;  M.  B. 
Markman,  for  A.  Wolff,  W.  H.  Bryant, 

T.  G.  Havikes  & Co.;  C.  B.  Lawton,  Den- 
nison Mfg.  Co. ; James  A.  Cheney,  Ludwig 
Nissen  & Co.;  Chas.  Isabel.  L.  Strasburger’s 
Son  & Co.;  Mr.  Lawton,  Harris  & Lawton; 
E.  W.  Ely,  Derby  Silver  Co.;  R.  L.  Moor 
head,  R.  L.  Moorhead  & Co.;  F.  S.  Sherry- 
Jos.  Fahys  & Co  ; Mr.  Van  Bergh,  Van 
Bergh  Silver  Plate  Co.;  Mr.  Skinner,  J. 
Muhr  & Bro. 


OUR  PLAN  IS  WORKING  WELL. 


(trade 


AfWYORK 


MARK  ) 


CITY  U.S.A 


CHOICE  PAPERS 


JEWELERS  ARE  FINDING  THAT  A LINE  OF  PAPERS  SOLD 
ONLY  TO  THE  REGULAR  STATIONERY  TRADE  IS  WHAT 
THEY  WANT. 

ESPECIALLY  WHEN  THAT  LINE  IS  THE  BEST  IN  THE 
WORLD. 

WRITE  TO  US  FOR  SAMPLES,  AND  JUDGE  FOR  YOURSELF. 

Parsons  Greene  Co.. 

Manufacturing  Stationers. 

18  MURRAY  ST.,  NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW, 


29 


JEWELERS’  ART  STATIONERY. 

NOTES  ON  AND  FASHIONS  IN  FINE  CORRESPONDENCE  AND  INVITATION 
PAPERS,  WEDDING  AND  VISITING  CARDS,  NOVELTIES,  ETC. 


Art  Stationery  Carried  by  Detroit  Jewelers. 

Art  stationery  cannot  be  obtained  at 
any  place  in  Detroit,  Mich.,  except 
from  a jewelry  store.  All  the  leading  jew- 
elers in  the  city  have  facilities  for  turning 
out  fine  work,  and  all  but  one  conduct 
stationery  departments  on  old  lines.  The 
exception  is  Roehm  & Son.  In  their  store 
is  located  a most  complete  line  of  art 
stationery  goods,  and  the  proprietor  is  D. 
P.  Work,  who  came  here  from  New  York 
last  June  and  took  a large  space  on  the 
north  side  of  the  store  and  placed  in  it  a 
handsome  show  case  and  side  case.  Mr. 
Work  says  he  chose  a jewelry  store  in  which 
to  locate,  because  the  two  lines  of  business 
are  closely  allied  and  the  class  of  customers 
which  patronizes  one  benefits  the  other. 
The  department  is  a business  entirely  sep- 
arated from  the  Roehms’  interests,  and  is 
the  only  one  of  the  kind  in  the  city. 

The  showcases  are  stocked  with  the  latest 
novelties  in  the  stationery  line  consisting  of 
programs,  invitations  of  all  kinds,  dainty 
jeweled  pen  boxes  and  holders,  paper 
weights, paper  cutters,  sealing  wax, etc.  The 
stock  is  very  complete  and  the  department 


is  a decided  attraction  in  the  store.  Mr 
Work’s  specialty  is  wedding  invitations, 
and  some  fine  work  for  a desirable  class  of 
customers  has  been  turned  out.  He  says 
that  apparently  a distinct  want  has  been 
filled  by  the  introduction  of  the  line  in  such 
a special  way. 

Smith,  Sturgeon  & Co.  and  their  predeces- 
sors have  always  conducted  an  art  stationery 
department  in  their  jewelry  store.  Twenty- 
five  years  ago  it  was  a recognized  adjunct  of 
every  leading  store,  and  the  firm  had  a 
printer,  engraver  and  a plant  for  turning 
out  their  own  work.  Tom  Wilkinson  and 
the  Bergers  were  with  the  firm  of  M.  S. 
Smith  & Co.  at  that  time,  and  were  consid- 
ered the  best  men  in  the  country.  Tiffany 
& Co.  and  the  old  firm  of  Ball,  Black  & Co., 
New  York,  sent  work  to  the  former.  Now 
the  engraving  is  done  by  an  outside  firm. 
The  department  of  Smith,  Sturgeon  & Co. 
is  located  near  the  front  of  their  new  store 
and  F.  G.  Smith,  Jr.,  has  charge  of  it. 
Cards,  invitations,  and  programs  are  the 
specialties. 

Wright,  Kay  & Co.  also  have  a complete 
department  of  this  kind,  over  which  Don 
C.  Jewett  presides.  Like  Mr.  Work,  the 


firm  carry  a stock  of  novelties  in  stationery 
and  kindred  lines. 

Traub  Brothers,  both  in  their  uptown  and 
downtown  stores,  have  facilities  for  supply- 
ing customers  with  fine  art  stationery. 


Whiting’s  Wedding  Goods. 

A NEW  shape  and  style  in  envelopes  for 
wedding  invitations  are  manufactured 
by  the  Whiting  Paper  Co.,  150  Duane  St. , 
New  York.  This  shape  is  now  in  great 
demand  from  the  customers  of  the  large*  t 
jewelry  houses  of  the  country.  It  is  a de- 
parture from  the  former  square  styles, 
being  slightly  wider  than  high  and  resem- 
bling the  styles  for  correspondence  both  in 
shape  and  flap.  Attention  is  called  to  the 
flap,  which  is  now  pointed  and  reaches  but 
little  more  than  half  way  down  the  envel- 
ope. These  goods  come  in  two  sizes,  known 
as  Whiting’s  31-6  and  41-6,  and  in  two  fin- 
ishes, the  fashionable  rough  “Angora,” 
and  the  always  popular  satin  or  ivory. 

Wedding  cards  to  match  these  styles  are 
always  in  stock.  Another  popular  wed- 
ding shape  is  the  “ Consuelo,”  an  envelojDe 
more  pronouncedly  wide  than  even  the 
shape  before  mentioned.  This  comes  with 
the  usual  style  of  flap,  and  is  also  made  in 
“Angora”  and  their  No.  i Extra  finishes. 


The  jewelry  stock  of  T.  Erickson,  Red 
Wing,  Minn.,  was  robbed  recently  of  about 
$100  worth  of  watches. 


A Golden  Opportunity 

comes  to  a Jeweler  every  time  he  receives  an  order  for  Whiting’s  Wedding  Invitations. 
If  perfect  satisfaction  is  given,  the  purchaser  continues  to  trade  with  him.  To  have 
the  best  stock  that  can  be  manufactured  is  of  the  highest  importance  in  securing 

♦ A Permanent  Customer » 

WHITINQ’SJ  “NUMBER  ONE  EXTRA” 
and  “ANGORA”  WEDDING  PAPERS 

are  the  finest  that  the  paper  maker’s  art  can  produce.  The  beauty  of  the  engraving  is  shown  to  best  advantage  on 
these  Standard  Papers.  They  can  be  had  in  all  the  prevailing  sizes,  including  the  new  and  dainty  “Consuelo,” 
“ Princess  ” and  “Eugenie”  cuts.  The  “Number  One  Extra”  and  “Angora”  Cardboards  exactly  match  the 
respective  papers  in  color  and  finish. 


Whiting  Paper  Company, 


Mills  at  Holyoke,  Mass 


148,  150  and  152  Duane  Street,  NEW  YORK 


30 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


Boston. 

John  W.  Sherwood  is  in  New  York  on 
business. 

Wilson  Bros,  have  added  a music  depart- 
ment to  their  already  extensive  line  of  goods. 

President  Nathaniel  L.  Ripley,  of  the 
Ripley-Howland  Mfg.  Co.,  is  in  New  York 
on  a business  trip. 

D.  J.  Ingraham,  optician,  and  L.  H. 
Green,  both  on  Washington  St.  near  Brom- 
field  St.,  have  removed  to  17  Winter  St. 

William  Galloupe,  formerly  with  M. 
Benjamin,  has  gone  to  Chicago,  entering 
the  employ  of  the  Crescent  Watch  Case  Co. 
in  their  Chicago  branch  office. 

The  New  England  Association  of  Opti- 
cians held  their  November  meeting  Monday 
night  at  Young’s  hotel,  and  the  speaker  of 
the  occasion  was  Dr.  Williams,  the  noted 
eye  specialist. 

Contracts  have  been  made  for  new  tower 
clocks  for  Trinity  Parish  Institute,  Mounds- 
ville,  W.  Va. , and  the  court  house  in 
Swainsboro,  Ga.,  with  the  E.  Howard 
Watch  & Clock  Co. 

A number  of  jewelers  who  handle  bi- 
cycles as  an  adjunct  to  their  business  have 


Cup  and  Saucer 

With  Sterling  Silver 

e 

Spoon,  Gilt  Bowl  and 
Ribbon. 


0 


applied  for  the  agency  of  the  E.  Howard 
Watch  & Clock  Co.’s  new  wheel.  Among 
the  first  to  secure  an  agency  and  forward  a 
large  order  is  A.  M.  Hill,  New  Orleans. 

Arthur  H.  Pray  and  wife  celebrated  their 
15th  or  crystal  wedding  anniversary  with 
a reception  at  their  home  in  the  suburbs  of 
Brookline,  Saturday  evening.  Many  costly 
presents,  among  them  some  exquisite 
specimens  of  cut  glass,  were  received  by 
them. 

One  of  the  dynamos  used  in  generating 
electric  light  for  the  American  Waltham 
Watch  factory,  in  Waltham,  exploded  last 
Thursday,  completely  wrecking  the  dyna- 
mo room  and  burning  the  assistant  elec- 
trician, Clifton  Lord,  about  the  face  and 
hands. 

The  , Fall  meeting  and  banquet  of  the 
Boston  Jewelers’  Club  was  held  at  Young’s 
Hotel  last  Saturday  evening,  among  those 
present  being  Charles  F.  Morrill,  who  pre- 
sided, Henry  W.  Patterson,  Charles  Har- 
wood, James  S.  Blake,  John  B.  Humphrey, 
E.  A.  Bigelow,  W.  H.  N.  Pratt,  L.  S.  Stowe, 
of  Springfield. 

Treasurer  Arthur  M.  Little,  of  the  E. 
Howard  Watch  & Clock  Co.,  who  has  just 
returned  from  a trip  to  New  York,  Pitts- 
burgh and  Chicago,  finds  the  trade  condi- 
tions much  improved  in  those  centers.  He 
also  reports  that  much  interest  has  been 
aroused  regarding  the  concern’s  new  bicycle 
project  announced  by  The  Circular  a few 
weeks  ago. 


The  store  of  George  S.  Mansur,  366 
Broadway,  Chelsea,  was  broken  into  at  noon 
Thursday,  while  Mr.  Mansur  was  at  lunch, 
and  money  and  jewelry  to  the  value  of 
$1,684  were  taken  by  the  thieves.  Two 
men  were  seen  by  people  in  neighboring 
stores  in  an  alley  at  the  rear  of  the  Mansur 
establishment,  about  the  time  of  the  rob- 
bery, and  are  supposed  Vto  be  the  ones 
wanted. 

Buyers  in  town  the  past  week  included 
W.  H.  Emerson,  Wilton,  N.  H.;  Mr.  Brooks, 
Bethal,  Vt. ; E.  Jacot,  Quebec;  W.  W. 
Hutchings,  Newport,  Vt. ; Walter  B.  Stud-- 
ley,  Rockland,  Mass.;  N.  C.  Dodge,  Spring 
field,  Vt. ; E.  J.  Elliott,  Pawtucket,  R.  L; 
Phoebe  Clisby,  Nantucket,  Mass.;  F.  E. 
Dana,  Warren,  R.  L;  J.  J.  Woodward, 
Somersworth,  N.  H.;  W.  T.  Cummings, 
Winchendon,  Mass.,  E.  P.  Morgan,  Goffs' 
town,  N.  H. 

Irving  G.  Hatch,  who  has  been  with  John 
W.  Sherwood  in  his  Boston  office  since  it 
was  opened  a few  months  ago,  and  who  was 
formerly  in  New  York,  having  been  asso- 
ciated with  Mr.  Sherwood  for  three  years 
and  previous  to  that  time  with  the  Dueber- 
Hampden  Co.,  was  stricken  with  paralysis 
last  week  Monday  while  dining  at  the  Savoy 
restaurant,  and  the  physician  who  was 
called  to  attend  him  at  his  room,  ordered 
his  removal  to  the  hospital.  N.  H.  Hatch, 
of  New  York,  his  son,  was  summoned,  and 
on  Thursday  the  sufferer  was  taken  to  New 
York.  At  last  accounts  his  condition  was 
considered  quite  critical. 


0 

Complete  with  Trilby  Spoom 

0 

as perCut,  dozen,  $6.00. 

Complete  with  Spoon,  Gilt 

0 

Bowlj  (not  the  Trilby  Pattern) 

0 

dozen,  $6.00. 

9 and  II  Maiden  Lane, 
New  York. 


Art  Goods  for  Jewelers. 


Arnstein  Bros.  & Co., 


Importers  and  Cutters  of 


6^  NASSAU  STREET, 


CUTTING  WORKS, 

4S  JOHN  STREET, 


New  York. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW, 


31 


Special  Notices. 


Rates  75c.  per  Insertion  for  notices  not  exceeding 
lines (25  words);  additional  words  2 cents  each. 
If  answers  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  stamps 
must  be  enclosed.  Two  insertions,  i5  per  cent,  off; 
three  insertions,  20  per  cent  off ; four  insertions  or 
more,  25  per  cent.  off.  Payable  strictly  in  advance. 
Display  cards  on  this  page  will  be  charged  at  $2.00 
per  inch  for  first  insertion,  subject  to  same  discount 
as  above  for  subsequent  insertions. 

Under  the  heading  of  Situations  Wanted 
on  this  page  advertisements  will  be  inserted  for 
One  Cent  a Word  each  insertion,  no  discount.  This 
offer  refers  to  Situations  Wanted  only* 
Payable  strictly  in  advance.  If  answers  are  to  be 
forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


Situations 


Notices  under  this  heading  ONLY  are  charged  at 
one  cent  a word.,  f/ayable  strictly  in  advance.  If 
answer  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


A’^OUNG  MAN  would  like  an  opportunity  to  work 
^ for  a reliable  jewelry  house  ; best  of  references. 
Address  Energetic,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


A LAD  16  years  of  age,  with  a good  school  educa- 
tion,  would  like  a position  in  a wholesale  or 
manufacturing  house.  Address  Albion,  care  The 
Jewelers’  Circular 


ANTED,  POSITION- Am  good  jobber,  clock 
’ ' repairer  and  do  some  watch  work  ; no  bad 
habits  : best  references  ; wages  reasonable.  Address 
W.  Eflicer,  Lithonia,  Ga. 


YY anted  situation  by  first  class  watch- 
’’  maker,  jobber,  salesman  and  plain  engraver; 
best  of  references  ; California  preferred.  Address  C., 
Lock  Box  26,  Poplar  Bluff,  Mo. 


Y OUNG  MAN,  20;  with  thorough  knowledge  of  the 
^ diamond  and  jewelry  business,  is  open  for  posi- 
tion ; best  references  ; moderate  salary.  Address 
Hustler,  care  Jewelers’  Circul.^r. 


■pXPERIENCED  traveling  salesman  in  jewelry 
line  with  first-class  jobbing  trade  in  the  East, 
West  and  South,  wants  position  with  manufacturing 
jeweler.  J.  Sidney,  care  Jewelers’  Circul.ar. 


CALESMAN — Experienced  jewelry  salesman  de- 
sires  situation  in  that  or  in  any  t.ther  line ; speaks 
French,  German  and  Italian ; first  class  references. 
A.  Salisco,  care  of  Mr.  Vender,  94  5th  Ave.,  Brooklyn. 


YYATCHmaker  or  traveling  SALES- 

' ^ MAN  would  like  position  with  reliable  house  ; 
Ai  references  and  well  known  through  ut  New  York 
and  Pennsylvania.  .Address  B 86,  317  Arch  St.,  Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 


A YOUNG  LADY  of  five  years’  experience  as 
double  entry  bookkeeper  in  the  jewelry  line, 
entirely  familiar  with  its  details,  seeks  position  with 
first-class  house.  A i references.  J.  H.,  care  Jewel- 
ers’ Circul.ar. 


CALESMAN,  well  acquainted  in  the  jewelry  busi- 
ness  and  having  good  trade  in  loose  and  mounted 
diamonds,  wants  to  make  connection,  Jan.  ist  with 
first  class  irnporting  firm  carrying  an  extensive  line  ; 
on  commission  basis  or  salary.  Address  “ Diamonds,” 
care  Jewelers'  Circular. 


V\?cinted. 


YYANTED.— Experienced  traveling  salesman  for  a 
’ material  house,  to  take  in  the  western  States  ; 
permanent  position.  Address  “ Steady,”  care  Jewel- 
ers’ Circular. 


YY’’ANTED  till  after  CHRISTMAS,  sales- 
’ * men  in  our  silver  department  ; must  be  of  good 
address  and  have  best  references.  William  Wise  & 
Son,  Flatbush  Ave.  and  Fulton  St.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 


YY’^ anted  — Two  first-class  jewelry  auctioneers, 
’ ' salary  or  commission  ; prompt  and  sure  pay ; 
plenty  of  work  for  good  men  ; no  lushers  wanted  ; no 
railroad  fares  paid.  Address  St.  Clair  Fechner,  care 
of  F.  J.  Hutchinson,  Hornellsville,  N.  Y. 


A T ONCE. — An  experienced  watchmaker,  engraver, 
optician  and  salesman,  must  be  an  expert  in 
these  branches  ; a permanent  position  ; send  samples 
of  engraving  and  photo  in  first  letters,  also  salary  ex- 
pected, with  references.  The  Upson  Jewelry  Co., 
Waterbury,  Conn. 


YOUR  WIFE 


lousiness  0pf)OPtunities. 


rrOR  S. ALE— Good  paying  jewelry  business  in  town 
of  12,000 ; easy  terms  : must  be  sold  at  once  on 
account  of  poor  health.  Address  M.  J.  Mann,  Johns- 
town, N.  Y. 


T70R  SALE— Old  established  jewelry  store  in 
splendid  location  in  the  South  ; stock,  fixtures, 
etc.;  stock,  $6,000;  will  reduce  to  suit  purchaser; 
cause  for  selling,  old  age  and  failing  eyesight.  .Address 
for  particulars  New  South,  care  Jewelers’  Cir- 
cular. 


(WNE  OF  THE  BEST  paying  jewelry,  silverware 
and  bric-a  brae  stores  in  Philadelphia  is  for  sale, 
the  whole  thing,  stock,  fixtures  and  lease ; fine  store 
and  in  the  best  location  ; ill  health  the  sole  reason  for 
selling;  established  1855.  Geo.  Eakins  & Son,  930 
Chestnut  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


YO  CLOSE  AN  ESTATE— The  entire  business  of 
^ the  late  S.  F.  Merritt,  manufacturer  of  eyeglass 
holders,  chains,  etc  , will  be  sold  at  auction,  Nov. 
30th,  at  10  .A.  M.,  at  the  office,  corner  of  Main  and 
Ferry  Sts.,  Springfield.  Mass.  For  particulars,  ad 
dress  H.  W.  Merritt,  Executor. 


To  Cet. 


YJFFICE  to  lei  in  the  Hays  Building.  21  and  23 
Maiden  Lane,  New  York;  rent  $50  per  month. 
Apply  to  janitor. 


"YO  let — A good  office  at  moderate  price  in  the 
^ Diamond  Exchange  building,  14  Maiden  Lane, 
New  V ork.  Apply  to  janitor. 


TWiscellaneous. 


YY’^ anted — You  to  know  that  the  genuine  “ Mose- 
' ’ ley  Lathe  ” equals  the  best  of  the  very  best.  When 
interested  write  your  jobber  for  new  price  list,  or  to 
the  manufacturers,  Moseley  & Co.,  Elgin,  111. 


■pOR  S.ALE — A Parkinson  and  Frodsham  chro- 
^ nometer  in  A i condition,  rate  i-io  second  ; also  a 


complete  trial  case,  made  by  Julius  King  Optical  Co., 
almost  new  ; for  particulars,  address  L.  M.,  care  Jew- 
elers’ Circul.ar. 


The  Four  Hundred. 

THE  BEST,  THE  SMALLEST 
LADIES’  WATCH  IN  AMERICA. 


HAMPDEN  WATCH  CO. 

CANTON,  O. 


ENHnELER5 


Of  GOLD,  SILVER  AND  PLATED  JEWELRY, 

Enameled,  Plain  and  in  Colors. 

ALSO  OF 

SOCIETY  EnBLEnS, 

Y4CHT  AHh  COLLEGE  FLflQS. 

All  Varieties  of  Painted  Enamel  Work, 

5.  5.  WILD  6^  50N, 

179  Eddy  Street,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  1. 

Correspondence  Solicited, 

Telephone  C — ^rr*' — m\  — 


TVOTIOE. 

Send  Samples  of  Jewelry  and  NTovelties 
of  Job  Lots  you  wish  Marketed  to 

H.  P CUTTER, 

Manufacturers’  Agent. 

113  State  Street,  = CHICAGO. 


Nail  Polishers 

AND  OTHER 

OyiCK  SELLERS 

ARE  MADE  BY 


lOU  WANT  A POSITION 
YOU  NEED  A SALESMAN 
YOU  NEED  A WORKMAN 
YOU  DESIRE  TO  EXCHANGE 
YOU  WANT  A PARTNER 
YOU  WISH  TO  SELL  OUT 
YOU  HAVE  TOOLS  TO  SELL 
YOU  HAVE  A PLACE  TO  LET 
YOU  WANT  ANYTHING 

USE  THE 

SPECIAL  NOTICE  PAGE 

OF  THE 

JeWEIERS’  ClRElllill, 

Published  Every  Wednesday. 


CODDING  BROS.  & HEILBORN. 

North  Attleboro,  Mass. 


To  insure  Publication  of  Advertisement  in 
current  week,  copy  should  be  received 
not  later  than  Monday  Night. 


OLDEST  PEBLICATION 

Of  all  the  Jewelry  Journals. 


Jewelers’  Circilar  PiMisMiis  Ce., 

189  BROADWAY,  NEW  YORK. 

ESTABLISHED  25  YEARS.  ^ 


Clilcaico  office:  Room  517,  Inter-Ocean  Building:* 


VOL.  XXXI.  CHICAGO,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  20,  1895.  NO.  16. 


Chicago  Notes. 


Mr.  Glickauf,  of  Glickauf  & Newhouse, 
returned  to  his  duties  the  past  week,  com- 
pletely recovered  from  his  typhoid  attack. 

W.  E.  Jenkins,  associated  with  his  father, 
S.  N.  Jenkins,  in  the  western  otSce  of 
Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.,  was  married  Nov.  6, 
to  Miss  Moore,  of  Vincennes,  Ind. 

A.  R.  Knights,  Dubuque,  la.,  made  pur- 
chases here  on  his  return  from  a visit  to  the 
old  homestead  in  Wardsboro,  V't.,  where 
he  spent  several  weeks  in  rest  and  recrea- 
tion. 

Titles,  while  common  in  the  south,  in  the 
north  are  a mark  of  honorable  distinction. 
Hence  the  smiles  of  Judge  John  S.  Fifield, 
of  Glickauf  & Newhouse,  whose  friends  of 
the  Twelfth  Ward  conferred  the  honor  upon 
him  during  the  recent  election. 

The  forming  of  a new  class  every  two 
months  is  little  trouble  nowadays  for  the 
Chicago  Ophthalmic  College,  607  Van 
Buren  St.  The  recent  class  closed  Nov.  5 
with  a goodly  attendance,  and  already  13 
applications  are  on  file  for  the  class  begin- 
ning Jan.  7.  A continued  increase  in  the 
attendance  is  noted. 

The  past  week  Theo  Schrader  & Co.  were 
busy  placing  new  machinery  in  their  new 
quarters  at  the  southwest  corner  State  and 
Washington  Sts.,  and  removed  from  their 
old  quarters  Saturday.  With  the  added 
machinery  the  firm  were  enabled  to  resume 
work  Monday  with  practically  no  interrup- 
tion in  their  manufacturing  business. 

Otto  Young,  the  past  week,  bought  the 
property  184  and  186  State  St.,  a part  of  the 
frontage  occupied  by  the  store  known  as 
The  Fair,  paying  therefore  $525,000  or  at 
the  rate  of  $10  714.28  per  front  foot.  It 
was  a cash  transaction,  without  trade, 
mortgage  or  99  years  lease  entanglement, 
and  is  the  highest  price  ever  paid  for  State 
St.  property  south  of  Monroe  St. 

Kasper  & Barnes  having  been  granted 
a two  years’  extension.  Assignee  Wittstein 
was  relieved  of  his  duties  Monday  week 
after  the  customary  five  days’  notice  re- 
quired by  court.  The  adjustment  stands 
out  prominently  as  an  e.xception  from  all 
similar  cases.  All  parties  were  agreeable  to 
the  arrangement  and  but  two  weeks  were 
required  to  carry  out  all  the  details.  Mr. 


Kasper  sent  out  his  notes  immediately  on 
again  taking  possession. 

Buyers  in  Chicago  last  week  included  E 
Lyons,  Mt.  Pleasant,  Iowa;  J.  E.  Haeb, 
jMontpelier,  Ohio  ; E.  L.  Marsh,  Ft.  Dodge, 
Iowa;  F.  E.  Shortiss,  Traer,  Iowa  ; D.  W. 
Amsden,  Manchester,  Mich. ; J.  W.  Neas- 
ham,  Ottumwa,  Iowa;  Frank  Ricketts, 
Charleston,  111.;  L.  O.  Gale,  Mitchell,  S. 
Dak.;  Chas.  Price,  Jacksonville,  111.;  D.  S. 
Whitaker,  with  son,  Lebanon,  Ind.;  A.  R. 
Knights,  Dubuque,  la.;  John  Robinson, 
Morrison,  111.;  Geo.  S.  Lacy,  Wahpeton,  N. 
Dak. 

Considerable  legal  entanglement  has 
arisen  over  the  failure  of  Richards  & Rutis- 
hauser.  Nov.  g.  Attorney  Wihartz  applied 
before  Judge  Stein  for  a restraining  order 
upon  the  sheriff  to  prevent  the  latter  from 
turning  over  a considerable  amount  of 
property,  which  he  seized  under  an  attach- 
ment writ  at  the  time  of  the  failure.  Judge 
Stein  granted  the  order,  as  a petition  is 
pending  in  the  County  Court  attacking  the 
assignment,  and  the  Court  wanted  the  situ- 
ation to  remain  unchanged  until  after  this  is 
disposed  of. 

Si.  Louis. 

Grumme,  Duvonaux  & Co.,  opticians, 
have  moved  into  very  handsome  offices  at 
714  Pine  St. 

Goldberg  & Meyer  is  the  name  of  a new 
firm  who  have  opened  a material  business 
in  the  Commercial  building  here. 

l\Ir.  Barbour,  of  the  Barbour  Silver  Co., 
is  in  the  city  for  a few  days  on  a tour  of 
inspection  of  the  company’s  branch  agencies. 

The  following  buyers  were  in  town  dur- 
ing ihe  past  week:  John  B.  Wiser,  Tomb- 
stone, Ariz  ; Fred  Jacoby,  O’Fallon,  Mo.; 
and  Al.  Chenue,  Cape  Girardeau,  Mo. 

A new  firm  under  the  name  of  Max  Rigot 
& Co.  have  been  formed  and  they  have 
located  at  700  N.  7th  St.  The  senior  mem- 
ber of  the  firm  was  for  many  years  with 
Coe,  Young  & Co. 

Each  week  more  interest  is  shown  in  the 
projected  Jewelers’  Exchange,  and  there  is 
money  being  subscribed  for  stock  quite 
rapidly.  It  is  now  almost  an  assured  fact 
that  the  building  will  be  erected. 

At  the  last  meeting  of  the  Retail  Jewelers’ 
Association  it  was  decided  that  the  meeting 


of  Nov.  20th  would  be  the  last  until  after 
the  holidays,  owing  to  the  members  being 
busy  looking  after  holiday  business. 

The  traveling  representatives  of  the 
leading  New  York  and  eastern  jewelry 
houses,  after  trying  the  New  Planters’ 
house  for  a while  have  gone  back  to  their 
old  headquarters  at  the  Southern  hotel. 

Quite  a number  of  St.  Louis  jewelers  had 
packages  in  the  Pennsylvania  Railroad 
train  that  was  burned  Oct.  23,  in  Pennsyl- 
vania and  they  are  now  receiving  orders 
that  the  manufactures  be  duplicated  on  ac- 
count of  their  loss. 

Sam  Bauman  returned  last  week  from  a 
trip  through  Texas,  where  he  was  warmly 
greeted  by  a large  number  of  friends. 
While  in  Tyler,  Tex.,  he  met  Joe  Friede, 
who  was  quite  ill.  Mr.  Friede  is  a repre- 
sentative of  the  M.  Eisenstadt  Jewelry  Co., 
this  city. 

Joseph  Kahn,  one  of  the  oldest  and  best 
known  jewelers  in  the  city,  and  who  has 
been  for  a quarter  of  a century  with  E.  Jac- 
card  Jewelry  Co.,  has  resigned  from  that 
firm.  His  associates  on  his  leaving  pre- 
sented him  with  a beautiful  diamond 
studded  match  box. 

Herman  Mauch,  president  of  the  National 
Retail  Jewelers’  Association,  is  doing  a 
great  deal  of  good  work  here  and  is  the 
right  man  in  the  right  place.  Besides  doing 
a great  deal  of  work  locally,  he  intends  to 
take  an  extended  eastern  trip  and  organize 
three  or  four  new  State  associations. 

The  quarterly  report  of  the  Retail  Jewel- 
ers’ Association  was  made  last  week  and 
outside  of  the  regular  statements,  the  fol- 
lowing points  of  interest  were  submitted: 
The  report  of  the  committee  on  the  conven- 
tion was  that  the  affairs  had  been  entirely 
wound  up  and  a nice  balance  was  shown; 
the  report  of  the  entertainment  committee 
was  to  the  effect  that  there  was  quite  a 
balance  in  the  hands  of  the  treasurer  accru- 
ing from  the  picnic  given  since  the  last 
report;  the  report  from  the  committee 
who  had  the  assaying  of  spoons  of  the  lead- 
ing solid  silver  manufacturers  was  one  of 
the  most  interesting  of  all.  The  meeting 
then  voted  on  a proposition  that  was  sub- 
mitted to  increase  the  annual  dues  and  it 
was  carried  by  an  overwhelming  majority 
of  53  to  7. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


fHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR— Western  Supplement. 


)3 


Pacific  Coast  Notes. 

H.  A.  Reed,  jewelers’  auctioneer  of  San 
Francisco,  is  conducting  a sale  for  Hyman 
Frederick,  Reno,  Nev. 

R.  H.  Wade,  Montesano,  Wash.,  has 
moved  his  residence  and  jewelry  store  to 
the  corner  Main  and  3d  Sts. 

A pretty  wedding  took  place  in  San  J ose. 
Cal.,  recently,  the  contracting  parties  being 
Miss  Anna  Kocher,  daughter  of  R.  Kocher, 
jeweler,  and  John  G.  Guth. 

W.  H.  Dutton,  formerly  of  Redlands, 
Cal.,  but  more  recently  of  Los  Angeles,  is 
now  in  San  Bernardino,  Cal.,  where  he  will 
soon  open  a jewelry  store. 

W.  Friedlander,  who  has  been  in  the  jew- 
elry business  in  Portland,  Ore.,  for  the 
past  25  years,  is  now  occupying  his  new 
store  at  268  Washington  St.  He  is  said  to 
have  the  finest  quarters  in  the  northwest. 


San  Francisco. 

J.  Rosenberg, 7 Kearney  St.,  is  holding  an 
auction  sale. 

Louis  Freund,  of  Max  Freund  & Co.,  New 
York,  was  in  the  city  recently. 

Robert  Bonestell,  of  the  California  Jew- 
elry Co.,  is  on  a trip  in  southern  California, 
Rowland  Allan,  of  the  Meriden  Britannia 


Co.,  is  on  a business  trip  in  the  Sacramento 
valley. 

Charles  Weinshenk,  of  Armer  & Wein- 
shenk,  is  on  the  road  in  California,  and  re- 
ports business  improving. 

William  Warren,  formerly  of  this  city,  is 
now  in  charge  of  the  jewelry  department  of 
John  G.  Fox,  Carson  City,  Nev. 

The  Holmes  & Edwards  Silver  Co.  have 
just  leased  the  offices  formerly  occupied  by 
S.  B.  Dinkelspiel  & Co.,  120  Sutter  St. 

Among  the  buj^ers  from  nearby  cities 
here  recently  were:  W.  H.  Osgood,  San 

Jose,  Cal.;  H.  S.  Bailey,  Pomona,  Cal.,  and 
A.  F.  Dobrowsky,  Redding,  Cal. 


Minneapolis  and  St.  Paul. 

TRADE  CONDITIONS. 

Fall  trade  is  in  full  blast  at  the  present 
time  in  the  Twin  Cities,  and  is  up  to  expec- 
tations. The  jobbers  are  hopeful  that  the 
rush  will  continue  until  the  close  of  the 
holiday  trade.  Collections  are  improving 
steadily. 

Out  of-towm  jewelers  visiting  the  Twin 
Cities  the  past  week  were:  E.  J.  Steuer- 
wald,  Brookings,  S.  Dak.;  G.  Gilbertsen, 
Hayfield,  Wis.;  T.  G.  Thompson,  Amery, 
Wis.;  Lucien  Diacon,  Chaska,  Minn. 


A bold  robbery  was  reported  to  the  Min- 
neapolis police  last  week.  T^vo  men  en- 
tered the  jewelry  store  of  C.  Weding,  1411 
Washing;on  Ave.  S.,  while  the  proprieroi 
was  at  supper  and  the  store  was  in  charge 
of  a young  girl,  and  asked  to  look  at  some 
watches.  The  young  lady  took  out  from 
the  case  a valuable  lady’s  watch.  The 
men  looked  at  it,  said  they  thought  it  would 
do,  put  it  in  their  pocket,  ordered  the  girl 
not  to  utter  a sound  and  then  left  the  store. 
As  soon  as  she  recovered  from  her  surprise 
she  rushed  to  the  door,  but  the  men  had 
disappeared.  , 

Kansas  City. 

C.  A.  Clement,  Springfield,  Mo.,  has 
added  to  his  stock  a line  of  fine  china. 

L.  S.  Grimm  has  moved  his  jewelry 
store  from  Washington  to  Galena,  Kan. 

Fred  C.  Merry  is  calling  on  the  trade  in 
northern  Missouri,  after  a few  days’  visit 
home. 

H.  O.  Bailey  was  in  town  last  week  buy- 
ing goods  for  his  new  store  in  Emporia,. 
Kan.,  having  just  moved  there  from  Smith 
Center,  Kan. 

Eugene  G.  E.  Jaccard  has  severed  his 
active  connection  with  the  Jaccard  Watch 
& Jewelry  Co.,  and  has  gone  into  partner- 


REPRESENTATIVE  CHICAGO  HOUSES. 


ELMER  A.  RICH,  PRES. 


HERBERT  W.  ALLEN,  TREAS. 


RICH  & ALLEN  CO  , 

126  STATE  STREET, 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


JOHN  H.  MERTZ,  SEC’Y. 


AND 


DIAMONDS 
PRECIOUS  STONES, 


LOOSE  AND  MOUNTED. 


MEMORANDUM  PACKAGES  SENT  TO  THE  TRADE  ON  APPLICATION.  ®: 


o_eTicx^isrs’  scii.ooi_i. 

If  you  want  a GOOD  ROOF  over  your  head,  come  to  our  school.  We  wat| 
Earnest  students,  leave  the  rest  ta  ut,  we  do  not  want  diploma  huntert. 

The  Chicago  Ophthalmic  College  and  Hospital, 

H.  M.  MARTIN  M.  D.,  PRESIDENT.  607  VAN  BUEEN  ST.,  OHIOAGO 

Being  the  oldest  and  most  favorably  known  College  of  Theoretical  and  Applied 
Ophthalmic  Optics  in  America,  having  more  thoroughly  qualified  opticians  n the  field  than 
all  other  so-called  schools  combined* 


SRiES  & CO., 

JEWELRY  MANOFACTOfiERS, 

DIAMOND  MOUNTING, 
REPAIRING. 


126  STATE  ST., 


CHICAGO,  ILL. 


Watch  Case  .Maimfactiirers 

F.  H.  JACOBSON  & CO. 

96  STATE  ST  , CHICAGO. 


REPAIRING. 


ft 


DX^ERTISE  VOUR  WANTS  IN  OUR 
SPECIAL  NOTICE  PAOE- 


GENEVA  OPTICAL  CO. 

67  and  69  Washington  5t., 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


Geneva  Grip  Eyeglasses. 

The  construction  is  such  as  can  be  seen  from  th» 
accompanying  illustrations,  that  they  can  be  adjusted 
to  perfectly  conform  to  the  anatomy  of  any  nose,  no 
matter  what  the  shape. 


SEND  FOR  SAMPLES  AND  PRICE  LIST. 


PRESOKIPTION 

WOEK 


Made  with  Promptness 
and  Accuracy. 


\ V Wholesale  Jewelers.  Chicago. 


BULLETIN,  NOV.,  1895. 


“Busiest  House  in  America"  1896  Catalogue  ready. 
The  largest,  finest  and  best  arranged  catalogue  in 
the  jewelry  business.  Sent  to  Jewelers  on 
application. 


)4 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  - Western  Supplement. 


Nov  20,  1895. 


ship  with  W.  B.  Johnson  & Co.,  under  the 
firm  name  of  W.  B.  Johnson,  Jaccard  & 
■Co.,  fire  insurance  underwriters  and  adjust- 
ers. Mr.  Jaccard  still  retains  his  interest  in 
the  jewelry  house,  although  most  of  his  time 
will  be  spent  in  his  new  field. 

Among  the  out-of-town  buyers  last  week 
were:  Ambrose  Melluish,  Ottawa,  Kan.; 
J.  B.  Lowe,  Independence,  Mo.;  O.  Kol- 
stadt,  Pleasant  Hill,  Mo.;  Frank  Wuerth, 
Leavenworth,  Kan.;  H.  J.  Black,  Baldwin, 
Kan.;  E.  E.  Hoffman,  PhilHpsburg,  Kan. 

Detroit. 

Frank  Schroeder  last  week  took  charge  of 
the  watch  making  department  of  H.  Koester 
■&  Co. 

W.  P.  Post,  representing  Codding  Bros. 
& Heilborn,  will  visit  the  trade  of  this  city 
on  or  about  Dec.  14th. 

Jeweler  J.  C.  Herkner,  Grand  Rapids, 
Mich.,  has  presented  the  Woman’s  Gym- 
nasium of  that  city  with  a handsome 
chronometer. 

John  Breitenbecher,  who  was  killed  in 
the  Lamed  St.  explosion,  was  a son  of 
Jeweler  Breitenbecher,  corner  of  Farrar  and 
Bates  Sts. 

Alderman  Oscar  B.  Marx,  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  Michigan  Optical  Co.,  last 
week  started  for  a month’s  hunting  trip  in 
the  southwest. 


R ARSONS  t School 

FOR 

WflTCHnflKERS, 

JPEOI^IA,  ILL. 

Send  for  Circular  and  Terms. 

PARSONS  & CO 


A.  E.  Waterbury  and  S.  O.  Adams  have 
formed  a partnership  in  Traverse  City, 
Mich.,  and  will  shortly  put  in  a complete 
stock  of  jewelry  there. 

Traub  Brothers  and  R.  J.  F.  Roehm  & 
Son  have  contributed  liberally  toward  the 
fund  for  the  relief  of  the  families  of  those 
who  were  killed  in  the  Lamed  St.  explosion. 

E.  A.  Pudrith,  representing  Eugene 
Deimel,  returned  last  Wednesday  from  a 
month’s  trip  to  the  Michigan  trade  The 
firm  report  that  they  have  already  com- 
menced working  nights  so  as  to  keep  up 
with  orders. 

Mrs.  Esther  D.  Bliss,  wite  of  Calvin  Bliss, 
who  recently  retired  from  the  jewelry  busi- 
ness in  Ann  Arbor,  Mich.,  last  week  died, 
aged  70  years.  The  couple  recently  cele- 
brated the  50th  anniversary  of  their  mar- 
riage. 

B.  A.  Gannett,  jeweler.  Traverse  City, 
Mich.,  has  purchased  the  jewelry  stock  of 
D.  E.  Carter,  of  the  same  place,  who  has 
been  in  the  business  there  for  the  past  30 
years.  Mr.  Carter  will  devote  his  entire  at- 
tention to  his  manufacturing  business. 
Lavern  Wood,  who  has  had  charge  of  Mr. 
Carter’s  business,  will  go  south  on  account 
of  poor  health. 

A large  number  of  Michigan  country  jew- 
elers were  in  the  city  recently.  Among 
them  were:  George  H.  Chappell,  Howell;  S. 
A.  Cleveland,  Utica;  J.  S.  McLachlan, 
Wyandotte;  George  Chambers,  Mt. 
Clemens;  George  D.  Hamilton,  South  Lyon; 

C.  E.  Montford,  Utica;  M.  E.  Briggs, 
Howell;  F.  Hamlin,  Hadley;  W.  F.  Bias- 
hill,  Oxford;  H.  E.  Holland,  Lapeer;  C.  G. 
Draper,  Plymouth;  W.  W.  Bridges,  Marine 
City;  H.  W.  Clark,  Grass  Lake;  W.  E. 


Skinner,  Hartford;  A.  Limpright,  Flat 
Rock;  John  Bates,  New  Haven;  W.  H. 
Horton,  Clarkston;  George  Carhart,  Pon- 
tiac; Fred.  Grimm,  Mt.  Clemens;  B.  Rich- 
mond, May  bee;  H.  Doelle  & Son,  North- 
ville;  Mr.  Hinckley,  Fenton;  H.  F.  Baker, 
Brighton;  and  W.  Walton,  Richmond. 

The  following  traveling  salesmen  passed 
through  Detroit,  Mich.,  last  week  : Edward 
A.  Manheimer,  Illinois  Watch  Case  Co.; 
Mr.  Porter,  R.  Wallace  & Sons  Mfg.  Co.; 
Alfred  R.  Varian,  Dennison  Mfg.  Co.;  A.  O. 
Waterman,  Pairpoint  Mfg.  Co.;  L.  A.  Drey- 
foos.  The  Dreyfoos  Chemical  Co.,  refiners  ; 
Mr.  Borgzinnner,  S.  & A.  Borgzinner  ; Mr 
Houek,  H.  H.  Smith  & Co.;  W.  C.  Coombs, 
Edward  F.  Sanford  & Co.;  R.  Rhoda,  Bawo 
& Potter  ; William  T.  Gough,  Carter,  Sloan 
& Co.;  Harry  Osborne,  Howard  Sterling 
Co. ; Robert  Welch,  Welch  & Miller  ; George 
W.  Bleecker,  the  Bassett  Jewelry  Co. ; and 
representatives  of  Nicholas  Muller’s  Son  & 
Co.  and  the  Manhattan  Silver  Plate  Co. 


Indianapolis. 

Lafayette,  Ind.,  has  one  less  jewelry  store, 
A.  B.  Wahl  having  retired. 

Jos.  H.  Durando,  Dunkirk,  Ind.,  has 
given  a chattel  mortgage  for  $2,500. 

S.  E.  Bowersox  recently  bought  out  the 
jewelry  business  of  Denney  Bros.,  Portland, 
Ind. 

G.  R.  Reber  is  receiving  a complete  new 
line  of  watches,  clocks  and  jewelry  for  his 
new  store  in  the  Pembroke  Arcade. 

Thos.  F.  Cahill,  Spencer,  Ind.,  and  L.  J. 
Savage,  Macy,  Ind.,  were  in  the  city  last 
week  looking  for  holiday  goods. 


Too  Many  Samples 

Our  Fall  line  of  Samples,  received  from  our  various  factories,  is  so  large  we  find  it 
would  be  impossible  to  carry  them  in  trunks  on  the  road,  therefore  we  have  been  compelled 
to  display  them  at  our 

Western  Sample  Rooms,  No.  228  West  Fourth  Street,  Cincinnati,  Ohio, 

where  we  cordially  invite  you  to  call  and  inspect 

Rich  American  Cut  Glass,  Fine  Imported  China  and  Fancy  Brie-a-Brac, 

Tortoise  Shell  Combs,  Leather  Novelties, 

Wares  in  Sterling  Silver,  Rookwood  Pottery  (Sole  Agents). 

WE  ARE  NOT  JOBBERS,  BUT 
MANUFACTURERS’  SELLING  AGENTS. 


L.  BLESCH,  Secretary.  C.  A.  REMME,  Manager. 

THE  QUEEN  CITY 


H.  DUNWOODIE,  Treasurer. 

CASE 

. . HANUFACTURINQ  COMPANY, 


Manufacturers  of  Fine  Gold  and  Silver  WATCH  CASES. 


Special  Attention  Given  to  Repairing. 
Altering  Rnglisli  and  Swiss  to  American. 
Gold  Plating. 

ESTIMATES  CHEERFULLY  GIVEN. 


New  No.  i2g  East  Fourth  Street  (Keck  Bui  ding), 

Cincinnati,  Ohio. 

SEND  FOR  PRICE  LIST. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR — Western  Supplement. 


35 


Cincinnati. 

O.  E.  Bell  is  out  this  week  with  an  illus- 
trated booklet  of  prices  of  watches  and  sil- 
verware that  every  dealer  should  see. 

The  Homan  Silver  Plate  Co.  are  busy  in 
every  department.  Their  new  tea  sets  are 
especially  attractive  and  ready  sellers. 

The  Hellebush  auction  sale  opened  last 
week  and  will  be  continued  daily.  The 
store  is  thronged  with  purchasers  and  the 
sales  are  large  and  satisfactory. 

C.  J.  F.  Bene,  of  Bene,  Lindenberg  & 
Co.,  left  last  week  for  a prolonged  trip  in 
the  south.  He  carries  an  immense  line  of 
novelties  for  the  holiday  trade. 

The  visitors  in  town  last  week  were- 
Charles  Ham,  Franktort,  Ind. ; W.  E. 
Mount,  Elwood,  Ind.;  Everson  & Todd, 
Madison,  Ind.;  J.  J.  Winters,  Paris,  Ky. 

The  many  friends  of  M.  L.  Blesch,  sec- 
retary of  the  Queen  City  Watch  Case  Co., 
will  be  pained  to  learn  of  the  death  of 
his  wife,  after  a lingering  illness  with  con- 
sumption. 

Harry  Walton,  of  the  Wadsworth  Watch 
Case  Co.,  has  returned  from  a very  profit- 
able trip  through  Ohio  and  the  northern 
lake  cities.  The  most  popular  cases  are  the 
6,  o,  and  the  16,  size  in  the  new  designs. 

Jos.  Mehmert  is  making  a specialty  this 
Fall  of  jewelers’  boxes  and  trays.  Those 
desirous  of  brightening  up  their  stock  and 
producing  attractive  displays  should  write 
to  him  for  circulars  and  prices. 

Bloom  & Phillips,  manufacturers’  selling 
agents,  have  had  numerous  calls  the  past 
week  from  out-of-town  dealers,  who  are  be- 
ginning to  realize  the  advantages  of  buying 
fancy  goods,  bric-a-brac,  etc.,  at  first  hands. 

The  Queen  City  Watch  Case  Co.  have 
received  an  order  for  solid  gold  cases  for 
the  new  16  size  Howard  movement.  They 
were  given  carte  blanche  iox  fine  quality 
and  workmanship.  They  will  be  the  finest 
cases  ever  turned  out  in  this  city. 

Albert  Bros,  are  having  a brisk  trade 


in  sterling  silverware,  of  which  they  are 
making  a specialty  this  year.  They  con- 
trol a line  of  hollowware  that  is  especially 
attractive  and  the  alert  dealer  finds  it  very 
advantageous  to  carry  it  in  his  stock. 

Wm.  Pflueger,  of  Jos.  Noterman  & Co., 
has  returned  from  a very  successful  trip. 
He  carried  a case  of  fine  mounted  miniatures 
that  Mr.  Noterman  bought  in  Paris  while 
abroad  during  the  Summer.  The  house 
keeps  abreast  of  the  times,  with  all  the 
fashionable  jewelry  items  in  the  market. 

The  suit  of  J.  Walter  Thompson  against 
the  E.  L.  Anderson  Distilling  Co.,  R.  W. 
Nelson  and  others,  filed  in  the  United 
States  Circuit  Court,  in  Covington,  s^me 
time  ago,  has  been  decided  in  favor  of  the 
defendants  by  the  United  States  Court  of 
Appeals.  The  plaintiff  sued  out  an  in- 


junction to  set  aside  the  transfer  of  stock  in 
the  company  in  exchange  for  the  real 
estate  belonging  to  the  Wadsworth  Watch 
Case  Co  , situated  at  6th  and  Overton  Sts,, 
and  to  enjoin  the  transfer  and  the  voting  of 
the  transferred  stock  by  the  members  of 
the  watch  case  company.  The  judgment  of 
Judge  Barr,  discharging  the  restraining 
order  granted  upon  the  filling  of  the  bill, 
was,  on  Nov.  12,  affirmed  by  Judges  Taft, 
Lurton  and  Hammond,  sitting  as  the 
United  States  Circuit  Court  of  Appeals. 
The  decision  was  rendered  from  the  bench 
UDon  conclusion  of  the  argument.  The 
transferred  stock  was  supposed  to  be  valued 
at  $30,000,  and  the  property  at  $6,000. 


William  Calkins  has  bought  out  Albert 
Philips,  La  Farge,  Wis. 


To  successfully  advertise  your  place 
of  business  you  must  cater  to  the  con 
venience  as  well  as  the  aesthetic  eye  of 
the  public.  Examine  the  accompany- 
ing fac-simile  of  our  Bracket  Clocks. 

Did  you  ever  see  any  di  mmy  so  per- 
fectly proportioned.  We  make  this 
Clock  for  either  Brack  ;t  or  Post.  It 
measures  four  feet  from  op  of  ring  to 
bottom  of  ornament ; .s  30  inches  in 
diameter  and  10  inche ) hick.  It  is  water  and  dust  proof, 
and  the  dials  are  protejl  :d  by  Glass  Bezels.  Power  is  fur- 
nished by  a small  Battery.  The  circuit  is  opened  and  closed 
every  30  seconds  by  a small  contact-wheel  and  spring  placed 
on  your  regulator,  thus  moving  the  hands  ahead  every  half 
minute. 

The  case  is  made  of  cast  iron  and  the  mechanism  is 
simple.  This  clock  is  no  experiment  but  a positive  success 
and  will  last  you  a life  time. 


TIME  KEEPING 

ELECTRIC  SIGN  CLOCK. 


PRICE,  from  $40.00  up. 

Correspondence  Solicited. 

Joliet  Electric 
Mfg.  Co.,-^ 

JOLIET,  ILL. 


HE  CINCINNATI  SILVER  CO. -THE  O.  E.  BELL  CO., 


MANUFACTURERS  OF  Write  foF  ciTCulars  and  Complete  pficc  list.  Exclusive  control 

FINE  QUADRUPLE  AND  ^ given  to  live  dealers.  Sold  direct,  saving  middlemen's  or  job- 
TRIPLE  SILVERWARE.  bers’  profits.  New  and  exclusive  designs. 


J 1 r I 'I  I •('!  iple  pla’e,  hand  burnished,  gold  lined  cream  and  sugar,  satin  engraved  tray. 
• i If  3 pieces  $5.25  less  6 per  cent,  for  cash.  Write  for  sample. 


THE  BEIL  WATCH  CASE  CO., 
THE  0.  E.  BELI  CO 


lo  and  i4kt.  Filled  Cases 


i4kt.  cases  sold  direct  to  the 
retail  trade  at  about  the  same 
price  charged  for  lokt.  goods  on 
lines  sold  through  wholesale  deal- 
ers. THE  COriET. 

O.  F.  lokt.  warranted  to  years. 
Antique  Pendant,  joint  back 
and  bezel,  complete  with  7 jewel, 
American  stem  wind  movement, 
at  $6.38  each  net. 

Write  for  complete  price  list 
and  illustrated  circular  on  Red 
Hot  stuff  for  Christmas. 


“ Flyer 


for  Boys 


The 


Comet 


No.  726. 


Cincinnati  Silver  Co. 


The  Bell 
Watch  Case  Co. 


THE  0.  E.  BELL  CO.,  Fourth  and  Walnut,  CINCINNATI,  0 


36 


THE  JEWELERS'  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


il 


I 


^RToiSE  Shell 


DRESSING  HAIRPINS 


IN  ALL  WEIGHTS  AND  LENGTHS. 


Write  for  Holiday  Selection  Shijynients. 


RICE  & HOCHSTER, 

Makers  of  Everything  in  Tortoise  Shell, 

485  BROADWAY.  NEW  YORK. 


A,  J.  HEDGES  & CO., 

MANUFACTUI^ERS  OF 

COLD,  VARIEGATED  **»  ENAMELED  JEWELRY. 


♦ ♦ ♦ 

Black  and  White  Enameled 
Goods  a Specialty. 

VEIL  PINS,  SCARF  PINS,  HAT  PINS,  LACE 
PINS  AND  BROOCHES. 

GOLD  AND  SILVER  GARTER  BUCKLES. 
CHATELAINES,  SIDE  COMBS,  LINK  BUTTONS. 

6 MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

FACTORY : 


VEIL  PIN 


00  MECHANIC  ST.,  NEWAI?K,  N J 


KNOW  That 

TO  USE  THE  BEST  GOODS  IS 
TO  PROTECT  YOUR  INTERESTS. 

THEN  WHY  NOT  USE  THE 


“GENUINE” 


AT  THE  PATCHED  GUARD  PRICES. 


WRITE  FOR  OUR  PRICES  ON 
THESE  - . - . 


FRAMES  AND  MOUNTINGS. 


E.  KIRSTEIN’S  SONS  CO.,  sole  agents, 

No.  4 MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK.  ROCHESTER,  N.  Y. 


Connecticut. 

The  Middletown  Plate  Co.  are  doing  a 
rushing  business,  the  best  in  several  years. 

Ryan,  Barrows  & Parker,  Middletown, 
are  having  their  store  equipped  with  electric 
lights. 

W.  A.  Ingraham,  wife  and  family,  of 
Bristol,  sailed  from  New  York  Nov.  15th,  ■ 
for  the  Bermudas. 

Jeweler  J.  H.  GV  Durant,  New  Haven,  I 
has  completed  the  addition  of  a large  room 
with  thorough  equipment  for  his  optical 
department. 

Jeweler  Henry  Kohn,  Hartford,  a member 
of  the  board  of  Hartford’s  fire  commission- 
ers, has  just  presented  to  the  board  as 
a testimonial  of  his  esteem,  an  elegant 
tilting  silver  ice  pitcher,  with  gold  lined 
cups. 

A charming  wedding  took  place  in  Meri- 
den Nov.  12,  when  Dr.  Elbridge  W.  Pierce 
was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Bessie  M. 
Hubbard,  niece  of  Walter  Hubbard,  of  the 
Bradley  & Hubbard  Mfg.  Co.  Among  the 
distinguished  guests  present  were  Governor 
and  Mrs.  O.  V.  Coffin. 

Suit  was  brought  Nov.  15  against  the 
New  Haven  Clock  Co.  for  $5,000  damages. 

The  plaintiff  is  James  Hogan,  a driver  of  a 
coal  cart.  Last  week  in  the  yard  of  the 
clock  company  he  was  told  that  it  would  be  j 

safe  for  him  to  step  on  a box  encasing  a ' 

shaft  running  between  buildings  in  the  clock 
company’s  yard.  Hogan  stepped  on  the 
box  but  it  proved  not  strong  enough  to  bold 
his  weight.  The  boards  on  top  of  it  were 
rotten  and  his  feet  broke  through.  One 
foot  came  in  contact  with  the  shaft  swiftly 
revolving  inside  and  the  heel  of  it  was  j 
ground  to  a jelly,  and  Hogan  was  taken.  * 
home.  I 


Program  Clock. 

Leon  H.  WATTERS,  principal  of  the 
public  schools  of  Media,  Pa.,  has  just 
received  a patent  for  a program  attachment 
for  clocks.  Soon  after  taking  charge  of  the- 
Media  schools  Mr.  Watters  found  that  much 
valuable  time  was  wasted  in  looking  after 
the  electric  bells  used  for  calling  and  dis- 
missing school,  and  that  even  then  the  bells, 
were  not  always  rung  on  time,  for  in  the 
midst  of  an  interesting  recitation  the  bells 
for  the  dismissal  of  the  lower  grades  would 
often  be  overlooked.  He  therefore  set 
about  devising  apparatus  by  which  the  bells 
might  be  rung  by  the  large  clock  which 
hangs  in  the  high-school  room. 

It  was  a year  or  more  before  he  struck 
upon  the  right  device  ; but  finally  an  at- 
tachment was  made  for  the  dial  of  the  clock, 
by  which  any  number  of  bells  can  be  rung 
at  any  minute  of  the  day.  The  apparatus 
has  been  in  successful  operation  for  the  past 
five  years,  and  has  in  that  time  relieved 
him  from  pressing  the  button  some  20,000 
times.  The  device  is  one  that  may  be  used 
in  any  school,  factory,  or  other  place  of 
business  where  work  must  be  done  on  time. 


I 


Nov.  20,  1895, 


AND  HOROLOGiCAL  REVIEW. 


37 


H.  M.  RICH  & CO., 

Jewelry 

Auctioneers, 

21  SCHOOL  ST.,  BOSTON,  MASS. 


SALES  MADE  FOR  RETAIL  JEW- 
ELERS ONLY  IN  THEIR  ESTAB- 
LISHED PLACES  OF  BUSINESS. 


WE  CONDUCT  MORE  AUCTIONS 
THAN  ANY  OTHER  FIR.M  IN  OUR 
LINE  AND  WITH  BETTER  RE 
SULTS  AND  GUARANTEE  YOU 
AGAINST  LOSS. 

SENT)  FOR  PAMPHLET  COMAIMMJ  OIR 
METHODS  AM)  BEFEREXCES  FROM 
NEARLY  100  RETAIL  JEWELERS  FOR 
WHOM  WE  HAVE  COXDUt'TED  SALES  IX 
THE  LAST  12  MONTHS. 


■■ 

■ 

■ 

■■ 

■ 


ALL  CORRESPONDENCE  CONFIDENTIAL. 


■■■■■  HH  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■■■■ 

!■  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■■■  ■■ 


nELI5HEK  6r  FETTER. 

128  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 


MANUFACTURERS  OF 

WALL  AND  COUNTER  CASES, 

FOR  JEWELRY,  SILVER- 
WARE, ETC. 


l^E  make  to  order  only,  and  g^uarattee  our  work  to  be 
If  Dust  Proof  and  First-Class  in  all  its  details,  and  to 
have  all  the  Latest  Improvements  as  regards  Shelf 
Anaugements,  Electric  Lights,  Etc.  We  will  cheerfully 
furnish  Estimates  and  Sketches  for  any  store  free  of  charge. 


SEND  BUSINESS  CARD 

FOR  OUR 

New  Illustrated 


NLVy 

s 


REDUCED  FAC-SIMILE  OF  COVER. 

Catalogue  and  Price  List 

OF 

Intercliangealile  Cylinder  Musical  Boxes 

JUST  ISSUED. 


JACOT  & SON, 


39  UNION  SQUARE. 

FERD.  FUCHS  & BROS. 


NEW  YORK. 

OAMPBELL-METOALF  SILVER  00., 

SILVERSMITHS, 


CALL  AND  SEE  US. 


DON’T  FORGET  THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S  BOOK  LIST  when  in  want  of  any  tech- 
nical book  in  the  Jeweir  or  Kindred  Trades. 


SILVERSMITHS, 

MAKERS  OF  STERLING  SILVER  WARE, 
808-810  Greenwich  St.,  - New  York. 


ALL  GOODS  925/1000  FINE. 

Factory,  Offices. 

Frovidence,  R.  f.  Xew  York  and  Sail  Francisco. 


9 


•9 


«rRTE?s  0'""  Fine  Gold  Pens,  = Holders,  = Pencils,  = Picks 

AND  NOVELTIES  IN  GOLD,  SILVER  AND  PLATE. 

Having  increased  the  size  of  our  tactory  we  are  prepared  to  make  larger  quantities  of  goods  than  ever.  Flvery  pen  carefully  tested  and  fully  warranted. 


CHICAGO  BRANCH:  103  State  Street. 
S.  N.  JENKINS,  Manager. 


GENERAL  AGENTS  FOR 
PAUL  E.  WIRT  FOUNTAIN  PENS. 


19  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 


38 


'IHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


BRADLEY  & HUBBARD  MFQ.  CO., 

INVITE  THE  ATTENTION  OF 

Jewelers  and  Fancy  Goods  Dealers, 

TO  THEIR  SUPERIOR  LINE  OF  GOODS. 

' B&H.”  Banquet  Lamps. 

Onyx  Top  Tables,  Cande labras,  Vases, 
Pitchers,  Urns,  Five  O’Clock  Teas,  Mirrors, 
Jewel  Cases,  Etc. 

NEW  York:  boston.  Chicago:  Philadelphia: 

26  PARK  PLACE,  160  CONGRESS  ST.  204  MASONIC  TEMPLE.  710BCTZ  BUILDING. 
21  Barclay  St.  factories  and  offices:  Meriden,  conn. 


Art  Metal  Goods.  | 


BUFF  AND  BLUE 

Were  the  Victorious  Colors  of  the  American  Revolutionists 

The  A1  Williamsville  Buff 


has  been  equally  victorious  in  revolutionizing:  the 
market  in  Buffs. 


Prepaid  Samples  if  you  want  them. 


WILLIAMSVILLE  MFQ.  CO., 

18  South  Water  St.,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 

MILLS  AT  WILLIAMSVILLE,  KILLINGLY,  CONN. 


s 


TERLINO  SILVER 

TABLE  WARE 


Manufactured  at 

Newburyport,  Mass. 


TOWLE 


/V\ANUFACTUR1NQ  (^OMPANY. 
Chicago  Office:  ia9-l51  STATE  STREET. 


OUR 

APOLLO 

CONTINUES  THE 
LEADING  PAT- 
TERN ON  THE 
MARKET. 


tr^de.  mark 

STERLI\G  925  1000  FINE. 

J.  B.  & S.  M.  Knowles  Co., 

SILVERSniTHS, 

riain  Office  and  Shops : 

PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 
WOOD  & HUGHES. 

STERLING  SILVERWARE  MANUFACTURERS 

New  York  Agents  for  the  Derby  Silver  Co., 

FINE  QUADRUPLE  PLATED  WARE, 
No.  16  JOHN  STREET,  - - NEW  YORK, 

206  Kearney  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 
HASKEliIi  & MUBGGE,  Agents. 


F.  M.  WHITING  COMPANY, 

SILVERSMITHS. 


Factory  and  Main  Office, 

North  Attleboro,  Mass. 


TAAOE^MARK 


New  York  Office, 

1128  Broadway 


ADDRESS  ALL  COMMUNICATIONS  TO  FACTORY. 


Our  new  NEAPOLITAN  pattern  is  now  ready.  Dealers  will  do  well  to  withhold  all  orders  until  they 
have  inspected  this  new  and  artistic  design  in  fiatware. 


Nov.  20  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


39 


The  Latest  Patents. 


ISSUE  OF  NOVEMBER  I2.189S. 


STUD  FOR  SHIRT®.  Charles  H. 
Cooke,  Providence,  K-  I. — Filed  Aug.  22,  18^5. 
Serial  No.  560,078.  (No  model.) 


The  improved  stud  or  button  herein  described, 
consisting  of  the  head  A,  the  post  B centrally  attached 
to  the  head  and  having  the  slot  i near  its  end,  the 
fixed  shoe  C extending  from  the  end  of  the  post  Bat 
one  side  thereof  and  provided  with  the  hole  or  open- 
ing c near  its  connection  with  the  post  and  with  the 
stop  pin  c'  at  its  end,  and  the  extension,  hinged  shoe 
D,  of  spring  metal  and  made  in  the  shape  of  a loop, 
mounted  at  its  end  upon  the  end  of  the  fixed  shoe  C by 
a pivot  d and  provided  with  slots  d' d'  on  its  edges, 
adapted  to  receive  the  stop  pin  c'  of  the  shoe  C and 
with  a central  slot  d^  on  one  edge,  adapted  to  receive 
the  post  B and  with  a knob  or  teat  d-  on  the  inner  sur- 
face of  the  loop,  adapted  to  engage  with  the  opening 
or  hole  c of  the  fixed  shoe  C- 

.549.K7-1.  FINGER-RING.  Adolph  Lederek, 

Providence,  R.  I.— Filed  May  ii,  1893.  Serial  No. 

548,980.  (No  model.) 


A finger  or  similar  ring  con'-isting  of  a spiral  band  1 
the  ends  of  which  are  separated  one  from  the  other, 
one  of  said  ends  extending  laterally  from  the  general 
plane  of  the  band  and  overlapping  the  opposite  por- 
tion of  the  band  at  a distance  from  its  end. 

54»,7iri.  ELECTRIC  CLOCK  SVSTEM. 
Adolf  Franke,  Berlin,  Germany.  Filed  iiept. 
19,  1893-  Serial  No.  485,850.  (No  model  ) Pat- 
ented in  Germany  March  7,  1893,  No.  73I850;  in 
SwitzerlanH,  Aug.  12,  1893,  No-  6,978;  in  England 
Aug.  14,  1893;  No.  15,450;  in  Norway,  Aug.  i-’, 
1893,  No.  3,362;  in  Belgium  Aug.  19,  1893,  N<  . 
106,030;  in  France  Aug  21,  1893,  No.  232,285  and 
in  Italy  Sept.  30,  1893,  -X-XVllI,  34,703,  LXVHl, 
123. 

.549.74:1.  PENDULUM-CLAMP.  Wilson  E. 
Porter,  New  Haven,  Conn,  assignor  to  the  New 
Haven  Clock  Company,  same  place.  Filed  Jan. 
14.1895.  Serial  No.  534,847.  (No  modrl.) 


A clock  providedwith  a pendulum  cl. imp  constructed 
o engage  directly  with  the  pendu.um  ball  and  hold 
the  same  against  movement,  and  to  be  retired  for  per- 
mitting the  normal  oscillation  thereof  and  means 
combined  with  the  clamp  for  operating  it. 

.549,744.  PENDULUM-CLAMP  FOR  CLOCKS. 
Wilson  E.  Porter,  New  Haven.  Conn.,  assienur 
to  the  New  Haven  Clock  Company,  same  place. 
Filed  March  22,  1S95.  :?erial  .so.  542769  i 

model  ) ' 

A clock  provided  with  a horizont.lly  arrang' d 


pendulum  clamp  constructed  to  engage  directly  with 
the  pendulum  and  hold  the  same  against  movement, 
and  means  connected  with  the  clamp  for  moving  it  up 


and  down  in  a diagonal  path  without  deflecting  it  from 
a horizontal  position. 

.549.798.  COMMUNION-CUP.  Paul  G.  Kling- 
LER,  Catasauqua,  assignor  of  two-thirds  to  Henry 
W Elson,  Philadelphia,  and  H.  Klinger  & Co.. 
Butler,  Pa.— Filed  Jan.  19,  1895.  Serial  No.  535,- 
495.  iNo  model. I 


A self  cleansing  attachment  for  a communion  cup 
consisting  of  a segmental  cap  with  a channel  on  its 
under  side  to  receive  cleansing  material,  and  means 
for  attaching  it  to  the  cup,  permitting  the  rotation  of 
the  body  of  the  latter. 

Design  ‘24,868.  BUTTON  OR  BADGE.  Al- 
fred Harris,  Knoxville,  Tenn.— Filed  May  22, 


Q 


1895.  Serial  No.  550,272.  Term  of  patent  3)4 
years. 

Design  ‘24,869.  BADGE.  Alberl  S.  Carter, 


554.648.  Term  of  patent  7 years. 


Serial  No.  518  275  Term  of  patent  7 years. 
Design  ‘24,87.5.  GLASS  DISH.  Solon  O. 


Rich.ardson,  Jr.,  Toledo,  Ohio. — Filed  July 
21,  189L  Serial  No.  518,276.  Term  of  patent  7 
years.  

In  The  Jewelers’  Circular  of  Aug.  7 
appeared  a lengthy  editorial  on  the  method 
adopted  by  the  W F.  Main  Company,  of 
Iowa  City,  la.,  to  secure  extra  business. 
It  is  a principle  of  The  Circular  to  dis- 
courage all  illegitimate  and  quasi-illegiti- 
mate schemes  practiced  in  the  jewelry  trade, 
and  that  of  the  Main  Co.  appeared  to  savor 
somewhat  of  illegitimacy.  It  transpired, 
however,  that  the  company  did  not  hide 
the  fact  that  they  cater  to  other  merchants 
besides  jewelers  and  that,  according  to 
many  testimonials  they  have  received  from 
the  trade,  their  plan  is  widely  endorsed. 
Their  prompt  response  to  the  editorial 
speaks  w'ell  for  the  concern.  The  company 
have  a good  standing  in  the  trade,  are  en- 
terprising, and  undoubtedly  their  $157  case 
of  jewelry  is  fully  worth  the  cost  and  yields 
the  dealer  a good  profit. 


FLATWARE 
HOLLOW  WARE 


STAMPED 


I 

I 


^IS  THE  GENUINE.^ 


Manttffaottared  by 


WM.  ROGERS  M’F’Q  CO., 


HARTFORD.  CONN. 


DR,  KNOWLES’ 

PRIVATE  COURSE 

IN  OP  I ICS. 

Lectures  with  Diploma  $25.00 

Those  who  desire  to  study  with  the  Doc- 
tor will  send  in  their  application, 
students  received  at  any  time. 

The  Key  to  the  Study  of  Refraction. 
50c.  per  copy. 

For  Sale  by 

R.  H.  KNOWLES,  M.  D., 

189  Broadway,  NEW  YORK. 

Care  of  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR. 


40 


fHE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895 


R 


MERFCAN 


4 


ESTABLISHED  1372, 


^1  INCORPORATED  139^, 


WATCH  TOOL  CO. 


ebster= 


GROWS  IN  POPULARITY. 


PRICES  AS  LOW  AS  CONSISTENT  WITH  QUALITY. 

Ask  your  Jobber  for  Price  List  of  1895,  or  write  to  us  at 


Stoney  - Batter  Works,  Chymistry  Dist.,  Waltham,  Mass. 

1895-WINNERS-1895 


PAILLARD  NON=MAQNETIC 
CHARMILLES  .... 
PRINCETON  


..WATCHES. 


ORDER  OF  YOUR  JOBBER  OR  DIRECT. 

R.  A.  LOVELAND, 

177  Broadway,  = = = = 


New  York. 


FROM 

47  Cortlandt  St., 
to  10  Maiden  Lane. 


NEW  QUARTERS. 

Come  and  see  us. 


CROUCH  & 


FITZGERALD. 
Jewelry  Trunks 
and  Cases, 
161 


Bet.  Cortlandt  and 
Liberty  Sts., 


6l)8B’W(ii|, 
JOl  6th  Hue 

NEW  YORK. 


‘The  Benedict.” 

(TRADE  MARK.) 

The  Perfect 

Collar  Button. 


eiMO  VIEW. 


MADE  IN  GOLD,  STERLING  SILVER 
and  ROLLED  PLATE. 

F:nos  Richardson  & Co., 

[2s  riaiden  Lane, 

New  York, 

Sole  rianufacturers. 


SIDE  View. 


Nov.  20,  1895  . 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


41 


Workshop  Notes. 

Hardening  Casts. — Plaster  of  Paris  is 
made  hard  enough  for  a mould  for  metal 
casting  by  the  use  of  10  per  cent,  of  alum  in 
the  water  used  for  mixing  the  plaster. 

To  Preserve  Pencil  Drawings. — Pencil 
drawings  may  be  preserved  by  pouring 
over  them,  when  stretched  upon  the  draw- 
ing board,  a thin  solution  of  gum  Arabic  or 
the  white  of  an  egg,  dissolved  in  dilute 
ammonia  by  agitation  with  broken  glass. 

Composition  Files. — These  files,  which 
are  frequently  used  by  watchmakers  and 
metal  workers  for  grinding  and  polishing, 
and  the  color  of  which  resembles  silver,  are 
composed  of  8 parts  copper,  2 tin,  1 zinc, 
I lead.  They  are  cast  in  forms;  treated 
upon  the  grindstone;  the  metal  is  very  hard 
and  is  worked  with  difficulty  with  the 
file. 

Silvering  Inside  of  Hollow  Glass. — 

Covers,  mirrors,  reflectors,  globes,  hollow 
glass  vessels,  etc.,  can  quickly  be  silvered 
with  the  following  amalgam,  which  becomes 
fluid  at  a very  low  heat  and  adheres  to 
glass.  Lead  and  tin,  each,  2 ounces;  bis- 
muth, 2 ounces;  mercury  4 ounces.  Add 
the  mercury  to  the  rest  in  a melted  state, 
and  then  take  from  the  Are;  mix  with  an 
iron  rod. 

To  Smooth  an  Oilstone. — Oilstones 
are  apt  to  wear  hollow,  and  it  is  necessary 
to  smooth  them.  For  this  purpose  take 
coarse  emery  and  water  upon  a slate  or 
marble  slab,  and  with  a circular  motion 
grind  the  oilstone.  Another  very  good 
way  is  to  nail  a piece  of  coarse  emery 
paper  upon  a board,  and  treat  the  stone  in 
the  aforesaid  manner.  Paper  is  best,  be- 
cause the  grains  of  emery  remain  station- 
ary, while,  when  loose  upon  the  slab,  they 
roll  around,  and  therefore  are  less  effective. 

Colorless  Varnish. — A colorless  varnish, 
suitable  for  optical  instruments,  prints,  oil 
paintings,  and  hard  white  wood,  may  be 
made  by  dissolving  two  and  one-half 
ounces  of  shellac  in  a pint  of  rectified 
spirits  of  wine.  To  this,  about  5 ounces  of 
well  burned  animal  charcoal  which  has 
recently  been  heated,  must  be  added,  and 
the  whole  boiled  for  a few  minutes.  If  upon 
filtering  a small  portion  of  the  mixture 
through  blotting  paper  it  is  not  found  to  be 
perfectly  colorless,  more  charcoal  must  be 
added  until  the  desired  result  is  obtained. 
When  this  has  been  achieved,  the  mixture 
is  to  be  strained  through  a piece  of  silk  and 
filtered  through  a blotting  paper. 

Mercury-Stained  Gold. — Accident  will 
occasionally  cause  untold  mischief,  says  a 
correspondent.  Some  time  ago  I shifted  a 
thermometer  from  one  side  of  the  window 
casing  near  my  work  bench  to  the  other; 
while  doing  this  I resolved  to  exercise  great 
care,  which  I did  by  accidentally  hitting  the 
bulb  against  the  edge  of  the  bench  and 
spattering  the  mercury  over  a gold  watch 
case.  What  can  I do  to  get  out  the  stain? 
Perhaps  the  safest  way  is  to  expose  the 
stained  part  to  the  lowest  degree  of  heat 
possible  to  drive  off  the  mercury,  and  to 


polish  it  again.  If  the  spot  is  not  large,  a 
flame  might  be  blown  on  with  the  blowpipe. 
Since  nitric  acid  will  dissolve  mercury,  a 
bath  of  the  former  diluted  with  its  bulk  of 
pure  water,  might  with  proper  caution  be 
used;  then  neutralize  the  acid  by  plunging 
the  case  into  ammonia,  and  then  into 
alcohol. 

Safe  Rules. — I cannot  resist  the  tempta- 
tion of  giving  my  ideas  about  the  cleaning 
and  repairing  of  watches.  First  and  fore- 
most, do  not  undertake  any  job  that  you 
have  any  or  considerable  doubt  but  what 
you  can  do  it  successfully;  never  leave  a 
job  worse  than  you  found  it,  and  never  mar, 
cut  or  slash  any  part  of  a watch.  In  other 
words  do  not  undertake  a job  that  you  have 
any  doubt  as  to  whether  you  can  do  it  cor- 
rectly. One  of  my  old  masters  told  me 
never  to  undertake  to  improve  on  the 
maker’s  work,  and  this,  while  not  true  in 
every  case,  particularly  in  cheap  watches, 
is  a safe  rule  to  go  by.  Never  allow  your 
file,  screw  driver,  plyers,  tweezers,  or  any 
tool  to  deface  anj’part  of  a watch.  Be  care- 
ful and  not  let  the  movement  swing  so  as  to 
in  any  way  injure  the  balance  in  taking 
from  case,  and  if  a lever  watch,  take  out 
the  balance  the  first  thing  after  uncasing 
the  movement. 

Drop  in  the  Cylinder  Escapement. — 

Though  excellent  for  ordinary  pocket 
watches,  the  cylinder  escapement  cannot  be 
said  to  be  equal  to  the  lever  and  some 
others,  where  great  accuracy  is  required. 
The  drop  of  the  escapement  is  the  cause  of 
much  trouble  to  watchmakers,  but  the  fol- 
lowing method  will  enable  them  to  ascertain 
how  far  the  drops  are  equal  and  correct. 
The  movement  being  slightly  wound,  turn 
the  balance  with  a fine  wire  or  slip  of  paper 
till  a tooth  falls  ; now  try  how  much  shake 
the  escape  wheel  has  and  allow  the  tooth  to 
escape  ; then  try  again  and  go  all  round  the 
wheel  to  see  how  all  the  teeth  and  spaces 
agree  in  size.  To  correct  any  inequality  is 
certainly  a job  for  an  expert  hand;  directions 
will  not  avail  much  unless  to  an  expert. 
When  the  tooth  contained  within  the 
cylinder  has  no  freedom  and  rubs  at 
the  point  and  heel,  there  is  no  internal 
drop ; when  the  tooth  has  escaped  and 
the  cylinder  rubs  on  the  point  of  one 
tooth  and  the  heel  of  the  next,  then 
there  is  no  outward  drop.  The  internal 
drop  is  increased  by  reducing  the  length  of 
the  teeth ; the  external  drop  is  increased  by 
increasing  the  space  between  the  teeth. 
When  the  drop  is  very  slight,  the  watch  is 
quite  liable  to  stop  through  excessive  fric- 
tion; in  the  case  of  unequal  drop,  the  rate  of 
a watch  cannot  be  maintained,  and  occa- 
sional stoppages  will  occur.  This  fault  is 
found  by  dotting  the  balance  with  spots  of 
rouge,  and  carefully  noting  the  vibrations, 
which,  if  unequal,  indicate  unequal  drops. 
Though  this  is  the  usual  course,  the  same 
effect  may  be  the  result  if  some  teeth  lift 
more  than  others.  A noisy  drop  is  caused 
by  badly  polished  surfaces,  and  in  such  a 
case  the  wheel  of  the  cylinder  should  be 
carefully  noticed. 


Gilding  by  Contact. 


4 6 I N my  long  practice,”  says  E.  Ger- 
I witz,  in  Deutsche  Uhrmache)-  Zei- 
tuu^.  in  his  answer  to  a complaint  about 
the  inferior  qualities  of  the  commercial  gold 
solutions,  “ I have  generally  found  them 
efficient  for  all  ordinary  purposes — if  used 
in  the  right  way.  The  many  failures  ex- 
perienced by  workmen  in  their  first  attempts 
at  gilding  were  most  frequently  due  to  their 
want  of  experience;  they  did  not  employ 
the  agent  properly. 

“ Before  an  article  is  to  be  placed  in  the 
gold  bath  it  is  absolutely  necessary  that  it 
be  cleaned  in  the  most  perfect  manner  pos- 
sible. For  copper,  the  principal  metal  that 
comes  into  the  gilder’s  hands,  and  its  alloys, 
the  scouring  operation  is  the  most  difficult 
and  requires  the  following  chemical  opera- 
tions before  the  article  to  be  gilt  is  fit  for 
the  operation:  i.  Scouring  with  potash, 
lime,  or  caustic  potash;  2.  Pickling  in  sul- 
phuric acid;  3.  Passing  through  cold  nitric 
acid;  4.  Passing  through  nitric  acid  and 
lampblack;  5 Passing  through  an  acid  mix- 
ture; 6.  Passing  throueh  nitrate  of  mercury. 

“The  inexperienced  operator  will  now 
understand  why  he  has  frequently  obtained 
black  spotted  gilding,  and  that  the  poor 
result  was  not  the  fault  of  the  gold  solu- 
tion. A number  ot  times  have  gildings, 
quite  satisfactory  in  other  respects,  been 
sent  to  the  writer  for  his  opinion;  and  in 
nearly  every  instance  the  sender  has  asked 
why  the  gilding  turned  out  so  brown.  The 
only  reason  that  could  be  assigned  was 
that  the  operator  had  not  treated  the 
gilding  properly. 

“ The  tyro  who  makes  his  first  attempts  at 
gilding  or  silvering  should  begin  with  a 
small,  smooth  article,  and  gradually  in- 
crease the  difficulty  of  his  experiments. 

“ Every  dip  or  contact  gilding  that  is  per- 
formed without  the  assistance  of  a battery, 
is,  strictly  speaking,  only  a coloring  of  the 
article.  A coating  that  will  adhere  well  is 
produced  by  first  gilding  the  article,  then 
dipping  it  into  a solution  of  nitrate  of  mer- 
cury, and  then  returning  it  to  the  gold 
bath.  This  operation  should  be  repeated 
several  times  until  the  gilding  has  obtained 
the  required  thickness  and  adhesiveness. 
The  thin  film  of  nitrate  of  mercury  forming 
each  time  is  dissolved  again  in  the  gold 
bath  to  make  room  for  another  layer  of 
gold,  which  has  a great  affinity  for  quick- 
silver, and  separates  from  the  gold  bath  to 
combine  with  it. 

“ The  writer  has  used  this  method  for  the 
past  two  years  and  has  gilded  articles  in 
this  manner  for  which  he  before  had  to  em- 
ploy a battery.  The  method  is  also  prefer- 
able to  that  requiring  a battery,  because  the 
gilding  obtained  by  dipping  is  distinguished 
from  the  latter  kind  by  the  softer  tone, 
greater  luster  and  purity,  that  only  pure 
gold  will  deposit  ; while  by  gilding  with  the 
battery  a basic  salt  of  gold  will  invariably 
separate.  The  thickness  of  the  gold  film 
deposited  can  easily  be  tested  by  trying  it 
from  time  to  time  with  nitric  acid.” 


42 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


MATTERS  IN 

JEWELRY  STOREKEEPINQ. 


In  the  former  the  advertiser  strikes  out 
from  the  shoulder,  so  to  speak,  and  while 
he  uses  general  terms,  his  sentences  hit 


That  this  department  shall  prove  mutually  beneficial  to  our  readers,  it  is  desirable  that  the  members  of 
the  trade  generally  communicate  with  The  Circular  regarding  any  advantageous  device  or  plan  that  they  are 
utilizing  in  connection  with  their  business. 


Advertising  Ideas  in  Brief. 


Jeweler  J.  T.  Xander,  Pennsburg,  Pa., 
offered  a cuckoo  clock  as  a prize  to  the  one 
who  would  guess  the  time  the  clock  would 
run.  The  clock  ran  31  hours  and  17 
minutes. 

— vn — 

F.  A.  Hubbard,  jeweler,  Springfield, 
Mass.,  has  issued  a very  handy  indexed  \ 
street  railway  time  table.  Nine  cards,  with 
index  at  the  right-hand  side,  are  fastened 
at  the  top  between  neat  covers.  The  time 
table  of  each  line  is  on  a separate  card,  and 
can  be  turned  to  without  trouble. 

— aw — 

A.  M.  Greer,  Iowa  City,  la.,  offered 
to  the  public  after  Nov.  i,  to  repair  free 


Gardner  Bros.,  29  E.  Market  St.,  Indian- 
apolis, Ind.,  are  already  advertising  a guess- 
ing scheme  for  the  holidays.  A solid  gold 
watch  will  be  given  to  the  woman  and  a 
diamond  stud  to  the  man  guessing  nearest 
the  number  of  people  entering  their  store 
on  the  23d  and  24th  days  of  December, 
1895.  Each  person  is  entitled  to  one  guess 
(not  necessary  to  make  a purchase),  if  the 
I guess  IS  delivered  in  person. 

— — 

The  Wadsworth  Watch  Case  Co.,  New- 
port, Ky.,  issue  a puzzle  card  bearing  an 
announcement  of  their  line.  An  explana- 
tion of  this  puzzle  will  be  mailed  upon 
receipt  of  2 cents  in  postage,  and  additional 
puzzle  cards  will  be  supplied  if  desired. 


I I . ^ My  store  and  myself  are  permanent  fixtures  in 

rid*C  LO  X Centerville.  I desire  to  build  up  a reputation  for 

3 dealing  in  absolutely  nothing  but  the  VERY  BEST 
VrUI  f t of  everything  in  the  line  of 

4ZJCI  VC  I uu  . I Jewelry  and  Silverware, 

And  for  doing  work  in  the  repair  line  that  is  not  surpassed  anywhere.  If  you 
have  a Watch  or  Clock  that  is  not  in  running  order,  bring  it  to  me  and  I will 
bring  my  years  of  experience  to  bear  upon  the  disability,  and  then  if  the  result 
is  not  satisfactory  to  you, 

WHY,  YOU  PAY  ME  NOTHING. 

This  is  certainly  a fair  proposition — nothing  could  be  fairer  and  good  evidence 
that  I will  do  your  work  right.  Everything  in  my  line  at  as 

■LOW  A PRICE. 

As  they  can  be  bought  anywhere  in  Appanoose  county  — quality  considered. 

E*  J*  MARSH,  North  Side,  Centerville,  la. 


% 


t 


1 


No  Back 

Numbers  Here! 

s 

OUR  VOLUME  IS  FIN  DE  SIECLE. 

The  Latest  Out. 


ON  TOP. 

This  is  what  you  get  when  you  buy 
goods  of  Avery  the  Jeweler — the 
latest — that  is  what  you  want.  If 
you  think  there  is  a novelty  I 
haven’t  got,  suppose  you  ask  for  it. 


On  the  Bottom. 

There  is  one  thing  about  this  busi- 
ness in  which  I am  on  the  bottom, 
down  to  bedrock,  under  all  competi- 
tion— that  is,  prices.  I don’t  expect 
you  to  believe  this  till  you’ve  seen 
for  yourself.  Come  to  the  store, 
1514  Main  Street,  before  you  de- 
cide. Don’t  care  how  skeptical 
you  are.  I merely  want  you  to  know 
the  facts  from  your  own  observation. 


Facts 

Like  These. 

Sterling  Silver  Belt  Buckles  $1.00 
A large  assortment  of  Buckles  at  25 
cents.  Belt  Pins  10  cents  to  $10.00. 
Ladies’  or  Gents’  gold-filled  case, 
Elgin  Watch  $13.50. 

Solid  Silver  Thimble,  with  three 
initials,  for  25  cents. 

Solid  Silver  Ladies’  or  Boys’  Stem 
winder  Watches,  $4  50. 

A handsome  Banquet  Lamp,  with 
silk  shade,  $2.75. 

Crepe  Tissue,  10  feet  roll,  25  cents. 


w 

You  Save  Money  when  you  Deal  with  fr 

I AVERY,  THE  JEWELER,  | 

1514  MAIN  ST.,  COLUMBIA,  S.  C.  ^ 


Smith,  Sturgeon  & Co., 


We  invite  the  attention  of  all  lovers  of  elegant  and  artistic 
Table  Silverware  to  the  new  patterns  we  have  recently  added  to 
our  stock,  which  we  exhibit  in  all  the  regular  and  special  pieces  for 
every  variety  of  serving.  These  patterns  especially  meet  the  re- 
quirements of  those  of  a truly  refined  taste. 

Samples  of  Wedding  Invitations,  worded  and  engraved  in  the 
latest  form  and  style,  sent  on  application. 


237=239-241  Woodward  Ave.,  Corner  Clifford. 

DETROIT,  MICH. 


GOLD  AND 
SILVERSMITHS. 


of  charge  every  other  watch  brought  in 
up  to  100  watches,  providing  no  parts 
were  gone. 

— c/n — 

Jeweler  MacKeller,  Lock  Haven,  Pa., 
offers  as  a prize  for  improvement  in  pen- 
manship by  the  pupils  of  the  First  ward 
grammar  school,  a handsome  gold  watch. 


Some  Effective  Ads. 


\)^7E  present  here  four  well  designed  and 
T V worded  ads.  Particularly  notice  is 
directed  to  those  of  E.  J.  Marsh  and  Avery, 
the  Jeweler,  which  embody  several  of  the 
elements  of  effective  advertisement  writing. 


with  the  force  of  truth.  In  the  latter,  this 
quality  is  combined  with  a surprisingly  low 
price  list  of  popular  goods. 


Our 


44 


Hobby 


ff 


is  Prescription  Work — and  we  do 
it  in  a technical  manner  that  suits 
both  oculist  and  patient.  A little 
better  work  at  a little  lower  price 
than  elsewhere.  Try  us. 


I Opt 


ician^^* 

MERTZ’S  MODERN  PHARMACY, 

Tith  and  F Streets, 

Washington,  D.  C.  j 

wwwv^ 


W-W>-V.WVWW  w-wwwvwv  . 


Nov.  20.  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


43 


Bear  in  mind 


ENOUGH  SAID. 


Jules  Jurgensen 

OF  COPCNHAGEN. 

The  reputation  these  watches  have  maintained /o: 
Fifty  Years  has  never  been  equalled^  being  modi 
on  strictly  scientific  principles  and  no  expeyise  sparedtc 
give  the  Best  results  in  mechanism  and  timekeepiiH 
qualities,  — — 

«OLE  AQCNT*. 

Kohtt 

No.  2?  MAIDEN  Lane 

- - EMMONS  - - 
ASSOCIATED  LAW  OFFICES. 

PORTI.AIVD,  SEAT'ri.E,  'rACO.-UA, 

Oregron.  Wasli.  Wasli. 

Foreign  Business  a Speciaity. 


Regina  flusic  Boxes. 


Having  the  general  agency  for  the 
Regina  Music  Boxes,  I am  in  a position 
to  offer  special  inducements  to  dealers. 

Remember  that  there  is  no  Music  Box 
on  the  market  that  can  compare  with 
the  Regina  in  quality  and  vokime  of 
tone,  and  durability  of  construction. 

SEND  FOR  ILLUSTRATED  CATALOGUE  TO 

A.  WOLFF,  General  Agt., 

LINCOLN  BUILDING, 

Cor.  14th'Street  and  Union  Square,  W.,  N.  Y. 


AIKIN-LAMBERT  JEWELRY  CO.. 


IMPORTERS  OF 


DIAMONDS. 


JOBBERS  IN 


Watches,  Jewelry,  Chai  ns, 

NOVELTIES,  ETC. 

Latest  Designs.  Lowest  Prices. 


NEW  YORK. 


AGENTS  FOR 

1 1 ROCKFORD 

'watch  CO. 


44 


i HE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


I Gi  T F-* 

OF  DECORATI'ON 
HAS  A MARVELOUS 
SUCCESS. 


WE  CARRY  A FULL  LINE. 


Prom  rei\ou/i4^  m^l^ers  af 

rioreace,Ba55aao  ^Naples, 

Comprisii^  tf\e\i/apes  [SoVe^, 
Oii\opi  ,l/pbii\o , Isparvet-'Ape^fco  M 

FOR  JEWELERS 

WE  DISPLAY  THE  LATEST  STYLES  IN  POTTERY. 

SEVRES  VASES  in  endless  variety.  Cloisonne  Enamel  Writing  Sets 


and  Card  Receivers. 
Choice  Selections. 


BRONZES, 

O pj  C p?  ]\J  Statuettes  and  Figures  in  Old  Dresden, Vienna  and  Dresden  Vases, 

Dresden  Central  Draft  and  other  Lamps,  an  Immense  Assortment. 


BAWO  <So  DOTTER, 

Importers,  Manufacturers  and  Commission  Merchants, 

26,  28,  30  and  32  Barclay  Street,  p.  o.  box  1872.  NEW  YORK. 


OUR  MOTTO:  QUALITY  AND  PRICE  SPEAK  LOUDER  THAN  WORDS. 


The  Hambicr’s  Notes. 


WHAT  THE  RAMBLER  SAW  AND  HEARD  AMONG  THE 
DEALERS  IN  ART  POTTERY,  CUT  GLASS, 
BRONZES,  ETC. 


FINE  PRODUCTS  BY  THE 


PAIRPOINT  MFG.  CO. 


NO  more  beautiful 
examples  of  the 
fine  work  of  American 
■decorators  may  be  found  than  the  orna- 
mentation on  the  new  pieces  of  the  wares 
of  the  Pairpoint  Mfg.  Co.,  now  exhibited  in 
the  New  York  salesrooms,  46  Murray  St. 
In  the  three  principal  wares,  Crown  Milano, 
■Colonial  and  Crown  Pairpoint,  there  may 
here  be  found  an  assortment  of  cracker  and 
biscuit  jars  with  the  finest  decorations  yet 
produced  by  this  company.  In  addition  to 
the  artist’s  work,  these  jars  are  also  orna- 
mented with  rich  silver  plated  mountings. 
Particularly  worthy  of  mention  is  the  small 
but  select  assortment  of  jewel  boxes,  prom- 
inent among  which  are  those  in  Colonial 
ware  decorated  with  hand  painted  Napo- 
leonic medallions. 


BOULTON  DELFT. 


A NOVEL  line 
^ which  will  in- 
terest jewelers  is  Doulton  Delft,  consisting 
of  vases,  jars  and  loving  cups,  made  by  the 
Doulton  Co.  and  decorated  in  Delft  colors 
and  styles  with  noted  English  scenes  sub- 
stituted for  the  usual  Delft  subjects.  This 
ware  combines  the  attractive  features  of 
the  Delft  coloring  and  the  soft  fine  finish 
for  which  Doulton  ware  is  noted.  The  line 
has  just  been  opened  by  Hinrichs  & Co.,  29 
Park  Place,  New  York,  who  are  making  a 
feature  of  the  loving  cups  contained  there- 
in. In  Doulton  Delft,  Doulton  pottery  and 
Bohemian  glass,  this  firm  are  showing  an 
assortment  of  three  handled  loving  cups 
that  the  trade  will  do  well  to  inspect. 

■Sf 

ITALIAN  A COLLECTION  Of 

rich  small  articles 

MDSAIC  WORK.  • T*.  1- 

in  Italian  mosaic 
work  is  shown  by  Bawo  & Dotter,  in  their  art 
■pottery  and  bronze  department,  30  Barclay 
St.,  New  York.  The  articles  include  pict- 
ure frames,  paper  weights  and  clocks  in 
several  sizes  and  shapes,  with  mosaic 
decorations  of  small  flowers  such  as  forget- 
me-nots,  daisies  and  violets  on  backgrounds 
-of  solid  color,  principally  turquoise  blue. 


The  clocks  are  set  in  stars,  crescents  and 
horseshoes  of  mosaic  work. 


HANDSOME 


BANQUET  LAMPS. 


A COLLECTION  of 
handsome  banquet 
lamps  is  among  new 
lines  for  this  season,  manufactured  by  th  e 
New  Jersey  Lamp  & Bronze  Co.,  45  Maiden 
Lane,  New  York.  The  lamps  are  com- 
posed mainly  of  standing  figures  supporting 
an  openwork  fount,  and  are  in  silver,  gilt 
and  oxidized  silver  finishes.  Some  pretty 
effects  are  also  seen  with  onyx  and  imita- 
tion onyx  stems.  A large  lamp  worthy  of 
particular  mention,  which  stands  about  45 
inches  high,  has  the  fount  supported  by  the 
upraised  hands  of  two  dancing  girls. 


POPULAR  NOVELTIES 


IN  A.  K.  PORCELAIN. 


c. 


L.  D W E N- 
GER,  35  Park 
Place,  New  York,  is 
having  a run  on  the  novelties  in  A.  K. 
Limoges  china  which  his  stock  now  con- 
tains. Among  the  most  popular  pieces 
have  been  the  small  handled  flower  baskets, 
individual  chocolate  pots  and  sets,  the  new 
inkstands,  trays,  bonbon  dishes,  biscuit 
jars,  boudoir  sets,  individual  coffee  sets  and 
lunc'n  bells.  A few  changes  in  shapes  and 
decorations  have  made  many  of  these  nov- 
elties, formerly  used  almost  exclusively  by 
the  feminine  half  of  mankind,  into  suitable 
presents  for  the  sterner  sex.  Especially 
true  is  this  of  the  trays  which  now  show 
decorations  of  pipes,  matches,  cigars  etc., 
turning  them  from  pin  trays  to  cigar  or 
ash  receivers.  Shaped  after  the  card  suits, 
hearts, diamonds  spades  and  clubs,  they  also 
become  suitable  favors  for  progressive  card 
parties. 


P.  H.  LEONARD'S  POPULAR 


n 


ARKED  success 
has  been  scored 
among  the  jewelry 
trade  by  the  Vienna  and  Limoges  nov- 
elties of  P.  H.  Leonard.  Almost  all  the  ar- 
ticles heretofore  shown  in  the  latter  ware 
are  now  contained  in  the  Vienna  lines,  both 
in  the  decorated  and  white  varieties.  Many 
of  the  styles  which  proved  so  popular  this 
Spring  in  Limoges  goods,  have  also  been 
introduced,  together  with  several  that  are 
entirely  new,  among  which  the  “ Mignon  ” 
and  the  “ Renaissance  ” may  be  mentioned 


as  examples.  Many  novelties  new  to  china 
may  be  seen  at  Mr.  Leonard’s  warerooms, 
78  ReadeSt.,  New  York 

The  Rambler. 


Foreign  Notes  on  Fancy  Goods. 

Majolica  has  been  found  the  medium  for  ! 

the  reproduction  of  almost  exact  copies  of  | 

the  ever  popular  Bohemian  bronzes.  j 

The  popular  opaque  glass,  for  decorative  1 

purposes,  is  now  being  made  in  various  art 
colors  and  in  several  useful  shapes,  such  as 
heart,  circular,  cross,  kite,  elliptical,  seg- 
ment and  other  shapes. 

Another  opponent  to  pottery  has  cropped 
up  recently  in  the  shape  of  handsome 
aluminium  vases  of  all  sizes  and  shapes. 

The  edges  are  heavily  gilt,  and  the  body 
what  is  known  as  plain  white  aluminium. 

Ladies  buy  the  goods  and  decorate  them 
with  sprays  of  flowers  and  other  designs. 

A new  use  has  been  discovered  for  the 
tall  Venetian  shape  vases.  Round  them  is 
built  a basket  design  in  supple  pith  or  wil- 
low twigs.  The  sides  are  draped  with  rich 
looking  silk,  and  a loop  is  made  at  the  top  j 

in  Staffordshire  knot  shape.  The  twig  bas-  | 

ket  is  gummed  and  dusted  with  bronze  i 

powder. 

Recently  a number  of  new  patterns  in  • 

scent  bottles  have  been  submitted  to  the  ’ 

chemists,  by  a house  dealing  largely  in 
foreign  wares.  The  long  used  crystal,  cut, 
and  polished  goods  are  in  danger  of  being 
replaced  by  the  new  candidates  for  public 
favor.  The  new  bottles  are  crystal,  deco- 
rated with  white  opaque  figures,  in  cameo 
style,  artistically  drawn.  The  decoration 
has  long  been  common  on  ruby,  green,  and 
blue  vases,  especially  among  those  hailing  | 

from  Bohemia. 

The  silversmiths  are  showing  a taking  ; 

novelty  in  swinging  china  teapots,  not  yet 
catalogued,  suitable  for  presents.  The  pot  1 

is  of  a pretty  design,  hung  on  a frame. 

The  frame  is  of  silver,  or  silver  plated 

nickel,  according  to  price.  The  decoration  j 

is  chiefly  in  light  blue,  printed  on  glaze. 

The  pattern  is  in  a light,  artistic  French 
style,  and  there  is  a fair  sprinkling  of  gild- 
ing on  the  .spout,  knob  and  edges.  A 
cream  jug  graces  one  side  of  the  pedestal 
and  a sugar  the  other — both  in  frames, — 1 

Pottery  Gazette  (London.)  ) 


\ 


46 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  20  1895. 


Queries  by  Circular  Readers. 


NOTE. — Questions  under  this  department  will  be  answered  as 
promptly  as  possible.  Some  queries  require  careful  investigation  be* 
fore  a satisfactory  answer  can  be  given;  hence  such  answers  are 
often  seemingly  delayed.  The  Circclar  desires  every  jeweler  to 
take  advantage  of  this  department. 


Warren,  Pa.,  Nov.  12.1895. 
Editor  o/The  Jewelers’  Circular  : 

We  are  in  want  of  the  Derby  Silver  Plate  Catalogue 
and  as  we  do  not  find  the  address  of  this  company  in 
The  Circular  you  will  confer  a favor  by  sending  us 
the  address  and  greatly  oblige 

Morck  Bros. 

Answer:—  The  factory  address  of  the 
Derby  Silver  Co.  is  Birmingham,  Conn. 
The  New  York  office  of  the  company  is  at 
25  Maiden  Lane. 

Providence,  R.  I.,  Nov.  ii,  1895. 
Editor  o/The  Jewelers’  Circular: 

Could  you  inform  us  the  addresses  of  some  houses 
who  make  ‘it.  a business  of  publishing  a pamphlet 
pertaining  to  designs  or  for  the  use  ot  designers  in  our 
line  ? You  will  confer  a favor  by  so  doing. 

Yours  respectfully, 

R.  L.  Griffith  & Son. 

Answer: — The  only  pamphlet  of  the  char- 
acter specified  is  P aris-Joatllerie , published 
by  Louis  Rougeaux,  7 bis  Rue  du  Perche, 
Paris,  France.  The  pamphlet  is  published 
monthly  and  its  yearly  subscription  price 
is  48  francs.  The  Jewelers’  Circular  pub- 
lishes occasionally  a plate  of  jewelry  and 
silverware  designs,  as  does  the  London 
Watchmaker , Jeweler,  Silversmith  and 
Optician. 


A Singular  Clock  Piece. 


Avery  singular  specimen  of  antique 
clockwork  has  recently  come  to  the 
possession  of  J.  A.  Macpherson,  watch- 
maker, Inverness,  Scotland.  He  is  unable 
to  comprehend  the  purpose  which  it  was 
originally  intended  to  serve,  as,  although 
in  miniature  it  is  shaped  like  an  eight-day 
clock  of  the  old  fashioned  style  in  outward 
form,  it  bears  no  other  resemblance  to  such 
a timepiece  in  the  purpose  it  was  intended 
to  serve.  To  others  in  the  trade  whom  Mr. 
Macpherson  has  consulted  it  has  also  proved 
a veritable  puzzle. 

It  was  acquired  lately  from  a woman  up- 
wards of  80  years  of  age,  in  a crofter’s 
house  in  Lochaber,  who  stated  that  it  had 
been  in  the  possession  of  the  family  as  far 
back  as  she  could  remember,  and  probably 
much  longer.  In  height  it  is  just 
inches,  breadth,  3 inches.  There  is  a dial 
plate  with  one  hand  (both  of  brass),  and  the 
figures  1,2,3,  4.  5.  6-  engraved  on  the  plate. 
The  hand  revolves  round  the  dial  once  every 
15  seconds.  When  wound  up  the  clock  goes 
for  12  hours.  On  the  part  of  the  case 
stretching  downwards  from  the  dial  there 
is  a regular  succession  of  small  brass 
plates,  on  which  are  engraved  other  figures. 
These  are  9,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9. 
There  is  a weight  inside  the  case,  to  which 
is  attached  a small  thin  brass  indicator, 
projecting  outwards,  and  as  the  weight 
gradually  descends,  this  indicator  occupies 


just  an  hour  to  travel  between  each  of  these 
successive  numbers. 

The  case  is  of  mahogany  and  the  work- 
manship altogether  is  superior,  while  the 
whole  is  in  a most  perfect  state  of  preserva- 
tion. The  movement  is  of  the  old  verge 
description,  with  a balance  instead  of  a 
pendulum.  No  maker’s  name  is  to  be  seen 
anywhere.  The  puzzle  is,  why  these  par- 
ticular figures  are  selected,  as  they  don’t 
seem  to  indicate  anything  in  regard  to 
proper  time. 

New  Way  to  Buy  a $1,000  Pin. 

IN  one  of  the  Washington  jewelry  stores 
is  a diamond  breastpin  valued  at  $i,ooo. 
A young  woman  whose  love  for  ornaments 
is  much  greater  than  her  ability  to  buy 
them  happened  to  be  in  this  store  when  the 
pin  was  shown  to  a lady  who  did  not  pur- 
chase it.  Two  or  three  times  a week  since 
then  the  girl  has  gone  to  obtain  a glimpse 
of  the  beautiful  pin,  until  she  finally  made 
up  her  mind  that  she  would  make  an  effort 
to  own  it,  so  the  following  colloquy  took 
place,  that  I happened  to  hear: 

“ How  much  is  that  pin?” 

“A  thousand  dollars.” 

“ Well,  I will  take  it  if  you  will  let  me 
pay  for  it  at  $i  a week.  I only  make  $2  a 
week.  I buy  everything  else  that  way.” 
The  astonished  clerk  told  her  that  he 
would  have  to  speak  to  the  proprietor,  who 
was  out,  and  the  girl  promised  to  return. — 
Washington  Star. 


ffmPT  f0tt  TOUR  inSFECTlGn  I! 

. . THE  LINE  OF  . . 

Art  Furniture 

AND 

Hall  Clock  Cases. 

ESPECIALLY  ADAPTED  FOR  THE 

JEWELRY  and  art  TRADES. 

MANUFACTURED  BY 

Geo.  W.  Smith  & Co., 

MAKERS  OF 

ART  FURNITURE. 

Factory:  '^907-19  POWELTON  AVE., 

PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 

NEW  YORK  OFFICE  818  BROADWAY, 

AND  H.  P.  VOLLMER, 

SALESROOMS.  Manager. 


Nov.  20,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


47 


FERNERIES  IN  GLASS  AND  CHINA. 


HINRICHS  & 

29  & 31  Park  Place,  N.  Y. 
Useful  and  Art  Goods  for  Jewelers 


CHINA  LAMPS,  all  sizes  and  prices,  FINE  FRENCH 
CHINA.  CHOCOLATE  POTS,  CRACKER  JARS, 
BOWLS,  FANCY  TRAYS,  and  an  enormous 
assortment  of  A.  D.’S,  CHOCOLATES, 

TEAS,  ETC. 

Brush  and  Comb  Trays,  Pen  Trays,  Pin  Trays,  Boxes, 
Toilet  Sets  and  Fancy  Knick=Knacks 

In  French  and  Dresden  China. 

SEND  FOR  CATALOGUES  AND  PRICE  LISTS. 

Bric=a=Brac  and  Art  Pottery. 


Oil  Bottle,  3 Lip. 
Can  be  retailed  at  $1.00. 


WRITE  FOR  OUR  ILLUSTRATED  CATALOGUE  OF 


CUT  GWSS  CHIHA 

GOODS  PARTICULARLY  SUITABLE  FOR  JEWELERS. 

Lazarus,  Rosenfeld  & Lehmann, 

60  & 62  MURRAY  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 


Chicago  Office  and  Sample  Rooms,  45  and  47  East  Lake  Street. 


FRENCH 


44 


BEAUTIFUL 

GLASS 

ROSE 

FLOWER 

HOLDERS. 

IN  CRYSTAL  AND 
GREEN  WITH 
GOLD 

DECORATIONS. 


A.  K.  ” 


CHINA, 


IS  PRODUCED  IN  THE  NEWEST 
SHARES  AND  DECORATIONS. 

FOR  THE  JEWELRY  TRADE. ^ 


CHOICE 

BRIC= 

A=BRAC. 

NEW  GOODS 
BY  EVERY 
STEAMER. 


A CALL  IS 
EXTENDED 
TO  VISITING 
BUYERS. 


SUCCESSOR  TO 

A.  KLINGENBERG 


CHAS.  L.  DWENQER, 


LIMOGES. 


I M POINTER, 


35  and  37  PARK  PLACE,  NEW  YORK. 


WHY 


are  the  firm  of  S.  F.  Myers  & Co.,  of  the  Myers  Buildings,  48  & 50 
Maiden  Lane,  New  York,  selling  more  goods  and  doing  a larger  business 
than  any  other  wholesale  jewelry  house  in  the  world  ? 


they  are  the  only  firm  in  the  Empire  City  who  are  bona  fide  manufacturers, 
importers,  exporters,  and  wholesale  dealers  in  all  lines  of  goods  that 
pertain  to  the  jewelry  trade.  Their  twenty-three  departments  require 
seven  double  floors.  With  one  firm  expense  (instead  of  23),  and  minimum 
rental,  they  are  in  a position  to  quote  prices  and  sell  goods  on  a margin 
ordinarily  asked  by  Legitimate  commission  houses. 


WATCHES,  Diamonds,  Jewelry,  Optical  Goods,  flaterials.  Clocks,  Silverware, 
Lamps,  riusical  flerchandise.  Cut  Glass,  Bicycles,  Fire  Arms,  Safes,  Etc. 

ARE  YOU  ON  THEIR  HAILING  LIST?  Have  you  their  great  800-page 
annual  catalogue  ? Do  you  receive  and  inspect  Myers'  Monthly  Jeweler  ? 


BAWO  & DOTTER, 

Importers, 
Hanufacturers 
and  Commission 
Merchants. 

26=32  BARCLAY  ST., 

NEW  YORK. 

P.  O.  Box  1872. 

English  Hall  Clocks, 
icli  Tr  .v^.Iing 
Clocks, 

jhiming  Mantel 
Clocks, 

PARIS  NOVELTIES, 
BRONZES. 
Largest  Variety  of 

Art  Pottery  and 

Bric=a=Brac. 


rSTABLISHEI)  HALF  A CENTURY. 


HftVE  ’^'wre^i^fpRavEMENTs 

NOT  FOUND 

THAT  Will  WELL  REPAY  Alf 

INVESTIGATION 

BY  those  .,0  secure 

THE  BEST  SAFE 

MARVIN  SAFE  CO: 

12  PARK  PLACE,  NEW  YORK. 


AI^XISTIC 

SOLID  GOLD  CASES 

Warranted  Absolutely  as  to  Quality. 

Trade  Mark  Registered.  Sold  to  Legitimate  Jobbers  only. 

NEW  YORK.  BROOKLYN.  CHICAGO.  SAN  FRANCISCO, 


JOB  SPRING  FOR  AMERICAN  CASES 


Adjusted  While  You  Walt  2S  Cents. 


i:STABr.lSXlED  1S63. 


N.  J.  FELIX, 

Watch  Case  Repairing, 

X7  JOHN  STim:ElT,  NHW  YORK. 


CHAS.  JACQUES 


CLOCK 

CO., 

22\^ortlandt  St. 

NEW  YORK. 

liall  Clocks, 
Traveling  Clocks, 
Gilt  Clocks, 
Porcelain  Clocks, 
Delft  Clocks, 
riantel  Chime 
Clocks, 

Bronzes, 

Sevres  Vases. 


Profit,  Certain: 
Satisfaction,  Sure! 

We  propose  that  Retail  Jewelers  shall  have 
unusual  advantage  in  pushing  the  sale  of  the 
New  York  Standard  Watch.  Therefore 

“ Any  product  of  this  Company  in  the  hands 
of  any  Regular  Jeweler,  whether  found  in  his 
own  stock  or  returned  to  him  by  a customer., 
which  is  not  entirely  satisfactory  from  any 
cause  whatever,  may  be  sent  by  mail  to  the 
New  York  office  of  this'  Company  (No.  11 
John  Street ),  and  one  day  (or  two,  at 

farthest)  it  will  be  returned  to  him  repaired,  or 
a new  Watch  sent  in  exchange;  and  in  the 
large  majority  of  instances  there  will  be  no 
charges  whatever.”  No  bothering  to  know  the 
■why  for  its  return  ; no  grumbhng  or  hesitating ; 
no  delay ; no  questioning  the  sender’s  state- 
ment; just  a straight-forward  doing  of  what  we 
say  we  will  do,  and  liberal  methods  in  our 
doing  it. 

Such  a guarantee  has  never  before  been 
ventured  by  any  Watch  Manufacturer  in  the 
World.  We  submit  it  as  the  earnest  of  our 
faith  in  our  ^‘works,”  and  in  token  of  our 
desire  to  increase  the  profit  and  satisfaction 
of  the  Jeweler  in  handling  the  line. 

The  New  York  Standard  Watch  Co. 


IT  SEEMS 
STRANGE 


THAT  YOU 


continue  buying  poor  mountings  when 
you  can  buy  good  ones  for  the  same 
money  this  season. 

HENRY  E.  OPPENHEIMER  & GO., 

14  MAIDEN  LANE,  N.  Y. 

ROYAL  CLUSTERS. 


LARGEST  Circulation  of  all  the  jewelry  publications. 
Oldest  or  all  the  Jewelry  publications.  26th  Year. 


Cocyright  by  The  Jewelers’  Circular  Fub.  Co.  Uroadway.  New  York.  Entered  at  the  Post  office  in  N.  Y as  second-class  matter 


VOL.  XXXI  NEW  YORK,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  27,  1895.  No.  17. 


REVIEW  OF  REIGNING  STYLES  IN  JEWELERS’  LINES. 

BY  ELSIE  BEE. 


' ERE  to  day  the 
idea  of  re  pre- 
seating  in  one 
^ house  several 
distinct  styles, 
such  as  have 
been  in  the  past 
demon  strated 
in  a Turkish  room, 
a Japanese  room,  an 
old  Dutch  room  and 
the  like,  has 
given  place  to  the 
more  recent  fashion 
which  selects  all  the 
fitments  from  revivals  of 
the  Queen  Anne,  Colonial 
or  Chippendale  periods. 

With  this  revival  of  early  English  and 

Colonial  in  furniture  has  come  about 
naturally  enough  the  equally  notice- 
able one  in  silverware,  which  to-day  is 
known  to  both  maker  and  purchaser  as 
Queen  Anne  or  Colonial.  Just  where  the 
Queen  Anne  ends  and  the  Colonial  begins 
no  one  appears  able  to  tell,  but  there  exists, 
in  the  amateur’s  mind  at  least,  the  belief 
that  all  the  cozy,  unpretentious  pieces  of 
low  or  medium  height 
Silverware.  in  fluted  ware  enclos- 
ing a polished  surface 
is  Queen  Anne,  while  silverware  taking 
on  outlines  square,  pentagon,  hexagon 
octagon  or  oval  are  Colonial,  i'his  revival 
does  not  stop  with  the  large  pieces  in  hol- 
low and  flatware,  but  its  influence  is  seen, 
more  or  less,  in  all  classes  of  silversmith- 
ing,  and  notably  in  spoons  and  forks. 

The  term  Colonial  is  applied  to  the  pres- 
ent styles  of  decoration  as  well  as  of  forms. 
Its  distinction  lies  in  slender  lines,  and 
beaded  edges,  in  graceful  scrolls,  chased 
borders  and  bands,  and  floral  designs.  The 
salient  points  of  this  style  of  decoration  are 
combined  in  some  of  this  season’s  table  ware 
with  a grace  and  beauty  that  leave  nothing 
to  be  desired  from  an  artistic  standpoint. 


While  much  of  the  silver  ware  shows  a 
bright  finish,  the  newer  French  grey  finish 
is  employed  with  admirable  effect.  This 
French  grey  finish  gives  an  antique  appear- 
ance to  the  new  silver  and  shows  to  better 
advantage  all  the  beauties  of  the  chased 
ornamentation. 

There  is  a strong  tendency  toward  sets, 
tete-a-tete  sets  being  in  high  favor,  and 
each  set  includes  its  own  special  tray. 
Coffee  sets  are  quite  distinct  from  tea  sets, 
and  chocolate  drinkers  find  sets  especially 
designed  for  that  beverage.  In  tea  sets, 
the  pieces  are  medium  or  low  with  octagonal 
body  swelling  out  at  the  lower  part.  Coffee 
and  chocolate  pots  stand  high,  have  slender 
necks  and  are  of  tapering  cylindrical  or 
octagonal  form. 

A conspicuous  feature  in  Colonial  repro- 
ductions is  the  gallery  tray  of  highly  pol- 
ished wood  of  large  oblong  shape  and  sur- 
rounded by  a rail  of  silver  lattice  or  pierced 
work;  silver  salvers  were  never  more  popu- 
lar; even  a pitcher  is  no  longer  considered 
complete  without  a corresponding  tray. 
Trays,  large  and  small,  incline  to  the  oval 
shape,  while  beaded  edges  and  cord  work 
and  chasing  are  all  employed  in  their  enrich- 
ment. 

Presents  in  cases  are  the  inevitable  se- 
quence to  the  popular  demand  for  sets,  and 
one  is  left  in  doubt  which  to  admire  most, 
the  case  or  the  contents,  so  beautiful  .are  the 
former;  they  are  marvels  of  fine  workman- 
ship in  wood,  kid,  chamois,  brocade  and 
leather.  Popular  wedding  presents  are  a 
complete  set  of  knives,  forks  and  spoons, 
inclosed  in  an  oak  or  mahogany  chest, 
adapted  to  contain  from  one  to  twenty  dozen 
each.  Ice  cream  sets  include  knife,  twelve 
spoons  and  cream  ladle.  When  it  comes  to 
asparagus  sets,  one  has  a choice  of  tongs, 
forks  or  servers.  In  this  connection  it  may 
be  well  to  state  that  table  knives  and  most  I 
all  game  carvers  are  furnished  with  silver  I 
handles  in  patterns  to  match  the  forks  and  | 
spoons. 


In  some  of  the  flatware  designing,  new 
treatment  of  the  bead  work  is  observable, 
in  which  appears  a production  of  beads  in 
high  relief.  The  beaded  edge  occurs  on 
spoons  and  forks,  combined  with  scrolls, 
and  is  exceedingly  attractive;  so  is  the 
combination  of  beads  and  raised  shell 
work.  There  are  some  pleasing  fruit  and 
floral  patterns  in  which  the  ornament  is 
continued  into  the  bowl  of  the  spoons,  on 
the  prongs  of  the  forks  and  the  decoration 
of  the  backs.  The  influence  of  the  Old 
English  style  is  noticeable  in  the  form  of 
much  of  the  flatware  as  the  decided  oval  and 
octagonal  in  trays,  and  the  spoons  and  forks 
which  show  angular  lines  in  bowls  and 
tines. 

— — 

TO  enumerate  even 
half  of  the  many 

Novelties. 

is  now  used  in  the 
small  wares,  would  be  impossible  within 
pi  escribed  limits  of  space.  How  it  serves 
as  a mounting  for  every  imaginable  thing, 
from  the  fittings  of  elaborate  traveling 
bags  to  the  handles  of  our  sticks  and  um- 
brellas ; how  it  has  taken  possession  of 
writing  desks  and  turned  many  dressing 
tables  into  exhibitions,  on  a small  scale,  of 
some  of  the  best  work  of  the  silversmiths’ 
craft ; these  are  but  a few  instances  of  the 
many  and  various  ends  it  serves.  A conspic- 
uous feature  this  season  is  the  silver  gilt. 
This,  in  some  instances,  copies  Indian  de- 
signs with  the  aid  of  colored  stones.  Equally 
noticeable  are  the  beautiful  effects  devel- 
oped with  colored  enamels.  Especially 
attractive  results  are  gained  with  the  Rus- 
sian colored  enamels  in  which  are  skilfully 
blended  the  three  hues,  red,  yellow  and 
green.  Odd  pieces,  such  as  loving  cups 
and  vases  have  been  rendered  especially 
beautiful  with  a decoration  that  employs 
different  colored  gilding,  enamels  and 
jewels,  all  in  one  object.  Among  the 
prettiest  manifestations  of  the  season  are 


2 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  i8q5 


THE  genuine  ROGERS 


Spoons,  P^orks,  Knives, 


FLEMISH. 


ORANGE  SET. 


IS  STAMPED 

'A^ROGERS  & BRO.,  A.  1. 


FLEMISH. 


A Large 
Novelties 
tro  Silver 
Sterling 
suitable 
Fall  and 
Seasons. 


Line  of 
in  Elec= 
Plate  and 
Silver 
for  the 
Holiday 


BON  BON  SPOON. 


THE  ORIGINAL  AND  GENUINE 

STAR  ★ BRAND 

manufactured  continuously  for 
HALF  A CENTURY  and  which 
has  made  the  name  of  ROGERS 
celebrated. 

MANUFACTURED  BY 


FLEMISH. 


TOMATO  OR  CUGUMBER  SERVER. 

Length,  8 inches. 

Useful  also  for  serving  poached  or  fried  eggs, 
croquettes,  fried  oysters,  etc.,  etc. 


ROGERS  & BROTHER, 

WATERBURY,  CONN.  16  CORTLANDT  ST.,  NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  27,  1893. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW, 


3 


J^B.  Jewelry. 

*"‘1E  MARK 

Fine 

Rolled  Plate 
Watch  Chains. 


X xtx  X.V  ..V  yf  ^ xt>-  )i 

> 

A iSt 

4 ALL  4 


GOOD 


SELLERS. 


' • _ , , , , I *V 

^ y|xyixxixxjxyi'Ryj>  •=4''  X 


Sterling; 

Silver 

Novelties 

ALL  FINE. 


In  great  variety,  fine 
wearing  qualities,  and  beau- 
tiful patterns.  F & B on  every 
chain,  thereby  guaranteeing 
quality. 


Are 

You 

Looking 


For  Toilet  Sets  or  single  pieces,  such  as  Mirrors 
Hair  Brushes,  Tooth  Brushes,  Nail  Brushes, 
Shaving  Brushes,  Whisk  Brushes,  Hat  and 
Bonnet  Brushes,  Razors  and  Razor  Strops. 


Bracelets 

HANDSOHE, DURABLE.  ' 

Curb — in  all  sizes— Chased  or  Polished 
Silver  and  Gold,  Light  and  Heavy  Weight, 
with  Padlocks  or  Snap  and  Trilby  Heart. 
Very  popular. 

Lockets, 

Charms. 

In  both  Gola  Plate  and 
Sterling  Silver.  New  pat- 
terns constantly  being 
added  to  our  already 
choice  line. 


No.  408  POLISHED. 

NO.  422  SATIN  FINISHED.  ENGRAVED. 

This  Handle  is  applied  Co  Letter  Openers,  Nail  Files  Polishers,  Button 
Hooks,  Shoe  Horns  and  a large  number  of  toilet  and  manicure  goods. 


Embroidery 

Articles. 


Scissors,  large  and  small, 
straight  and  curved.  Button- 
hole, in  Silver  and  some  in 
Gold  plate,  beautiful  designs, 
and  of  Henckel’s  German  Steel 


Manicure 
Pieces  and  Sets. 


No.  366  41-2  INCHES  LONG. 

Files,  Cuticle  Knives,  Nail 
Polishers,  Paste  and  Powder 
Boxes,  Trays  for  the  Dresser, 

Tweezers,  Curlers,  and  Cases 
for  Pocket  Files  and  Combs. 

Our  Sterling  Silver  Dripless  Tea  Strainer, 
Butter  Picks,  Mustard  Spoons,  Butter 
Spreaders,  Batter  Plates,  Fruit  Knives, 
Letter  Openers,  Candle  Sticks,  Game 
Counters,  Ink  Erasers,  Stamp  and  Match 
Boxes  suggest  that  we  can  furnish  a 
multitude  of  the  most  useful  and  orna- 
mental articles  that  can  be  furnished  by 
any  manufacturer.  (Over  400  Sterling 
Silver  Novelties.) 


Reminders 

FOR  THE 

Holiday 

Season. 


No.  275/1256  GOLD  PLATE 
No.  279/1302  STERLING’ 


262/1328  SIZE  OF  THIS  CUT- 
261/1330  SIZE  LARGER. 
263/1383  SIZE  SMALLER. 


NEW  YORK: 

I 78  BROADWAY. 


Providence,  R.  I. 

100  Richmond  St. 


CHICAGO: 

167  DEARBORN  ST 


Foster  & Bailey, 

Manufacturing  Jewelers  ^ 51LYER5MlTli5. 


4 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


the  fine  porcelain  and  faience  atomizers, 
vases  and  toilet  pieces  incased  in  a perfor- 
ated coat  of  silver  by  means  of  the  electro 
deposit  process.  This  silver  deposit  is  es- 
pecially attractive  on  liquor  sets. 

The  season  is  fertile  in  silver  expedients 
for  the  convenience  of  the  fair  sex.  So  ex- 
tended is  the  list  of  things  designed  for  the 
exclusive  use  of  women,  that  it  is  impossible 
to  more  than  mention  a few  of  those  least 
known,  such  as  silver  capsule  boxes,  bird 
cages,  conservatory  trowels,  spurs,  per- 
fumery funnels,  odor  boxes,  and,  last  but 
by  no  means  least,  the  hemming  gage. 
This  last  as  the  name  indicates,  aids  the 
seamstress  in  turning  down  hems  of  any 
desired  width.  Muff  holders,  hand  warm- 
ers and  blouse  ornaments  may  be  named  as 
timely  affairs.  The  last  present  the  ap- 
pearance of  small  buckles,  but  are  mounted 
as  pins  and  are  designed  to  ornament  the 
front  pleat  of  the  blouse  wmist.  All  sorts  of 
beautiful  possibilities  are  developed  in  the 
bonbonnieres;  rich  ornamentations  and  deli- 
cate workmanship  are  lavished  on  them. 
Increased  attention  is  now  given  by  the 
holiday  shoppers  to  toilet  sets  and  knick- 
knacks  in  china  and  crystal  with  rich  gold 
and  silver  decorations. 

The  idea  is  annually  expressed  that 
men  do  not  profit  as  largely  as  women 
do  in  the  silver  novelties.  A visit  of  inspec- 
tion to  any  of  the  retail  houses  wnll  refute 
this  idea.  The  doubting  Thomas  will  find 
anything  his  heart  can  wdsh  for,  from  the 
conventional  toilet  articles  down  to 
mustache  spoons  and  cocktail  mixers  and 
strainers.  An  article  of  utility  and  this 
time  an  object  of  beauty,  is  the  combination 
pocket  knife  containing,  in  addition  to  the 
usual  blades,  scissors,  nail  file  and  cork 
screw.  This  combination  affair  is  out  in 
gold  and  silver  handles  wrought  into  artistic 
designs  in  high  relief.  Other  convenient 
combinations  are  paper  knife  and  cigar 

cutter,  and  paper  cutter  and  desk  knife. 

The  details  of  domestic  life  have  been  so 
minutely  considered  as  to  develop  for  the 
dyspeptic  a silver  tongue  scraper,  for  the 
lazy  man  silver  boot  pulls,  and  for  the 
awkward  one  a silver  food  pusher. 

JEWELRY  is,  to  a 
certain  extent, 
influenced  by  the 
wheel  of  fashion. 
Up  comes  a long  forgotten  mode  in  dress 
and  with  it  the  ornaments  of  that  period. 
Now  and  then  a particular  stone  will  be 
“ discovered”  by  an  enterprising  jeweler, 
who  will  boom  it  for  all  it  is  worth,  like  the 
moonstones  of  a few  years  back,  and  the 
opal  and  amethyst  this  season.  The  decree 
of  fashion  has  set  a decided  value  on  these 
latter  stones;  the  olivine  and  topaz  also 
come  in  for  a large  share  of  patronage;  in 
the  meantime,  the  turquoise  continues  to 
please  with  its  own  special  blue  tint,  as  do 
fine  garnets,  that  masquerade  as  Cape 
rubies  and  supply  the  ruby  red  when 
Oriental  rubies,  now  scarce  and  costly,  are 
not  to  be  had.  A notable  feature  is  that  all 


kinds  of  colored  stones  are  being  used  with 
lavish  hand  in  jewelry.  The  diamond  re- 
mains, of  course,  the  popular  gem,  and 
specimens  mos.  sought  after  are  either  per- 
fectly colorless,  or  possessing  decided  tints  of 
rose  red,  green  or  blue.  The  association  of 
small  diamonds  with  semi-precious  stones 
is  too  familiar  to  need  comment.  A com- 
bination that  never  fails  to  please  and 
which  is  now  exceedingly  fashionable,  is 
that  of  fine  pearls  and  diamonds. 

— UTj — 

Finger  rings  are 
^ worn  by  both 

sexes  and  the  number 
is  unrestricted,  so  far  as  women  are  con- 
cerned. The  most  popular  ring,  at  the 
moment,  is  doubtless  the  hoop,  with  from 
three  to  seven  stones.  The  very  latest  thing 
in  hoop  rings  that  are  set  with  colored 
gems  is  the  placing  of  tiny  diamonds  in  the 
small  intervening  spaces  between  the  large 
stones.  Cross  over  rings  are  also  favorites 
and  the  noveltj'  in  this  line  shows  shanks 
covered  with  small  stones  that  lead  up  to 
the  large  single  gems  in  the  ends.  There 
is  a fad  now  for  rings  composed  of  tiny 
hoops  set  with  small  gems;  the  fancy  also 
continues  for  little  finger  rings.  Marquise 
and  cluster  rings  are  counted  with  staple 
styles.  A solitaire  diamond  represents  the 
conventional  engagement  ring,  and  the 
plain  gold  hoop,  the  wedding  one.  Rings 
desired  especially  for  full  dress  occasions 
are  very  elaborate  and  expensive  trinkets. 
These  take  on  the  forms  of  scrolls,  plumes 
and  coronets,  wrought  with  diamonds,  em- 
eralds, rubies  and  pearls. 

Finger  rings  for  men  are  remarkable  this 
season  for  their  fine  hand  carved  mountings, 
made  in  Roman  and  antique  finished  gold. 
Gem  rings  are  worn,  the  cabochon  style  of 
setting  being  fashionable.  A decidedly 
up-to-date  ring  is  the  all  gold  seal  ring. 
Massive  gold  rings  with  elaborately  carved 
shanks  are  set  with  sard,  bloodstone  and 
other  seals.  A highly  coveted  ring  is  one 
set  with  a genuine  antique  seal. 

— — 

The  latest 
development  in 
brooches  is,  in  point 
of  fact,  an  old  idea  revived,  namely  that  of 
mounting  a large  single  colored  stone  of 
round  or  oblong  shape  in  a setting  of  brill- 
iants, small  pearls  or  a framework  of  gold. 
Amethysts  and  topazes  are  introduced  with 
effective  results  in  these  broocffes.  Butter- 
fly pins  remain  popular  but  their  use  is 
restricted  chiefly  to  the  service  of  veil  pins. 
Flower  pins  are  in  stock,  and  miniature 
brooches  continue  to  please.  Diamond 
clusters  are  always  enviable  possessions, 
and  the  jeweled  crescents  and  harvest 
moons  still  find  admirers. 

Elaborate  gem  set  brooches  are  made  in 
sections  which,  transferred  to  a gold  ban- 
deau, afford  without  extra  expense  an 
equally  resplendent  effect  as  a tiara.  Tiaras, 
on  the  other  hand,  are  made  in  sections 
which  are  variously  transferred  to  bracelets. 


necklace  or  corsage  ornament  as  occasion 
may  require. 

Never  was  a fashion  more  general,  per- 
haps, than  that  of  the  bracelet,  which  is 
now  represented  in  both  flexible  and  stiff 
forms.  Elegantes  select  the  gem  incrusted 
ones.  Pearl  and  diamond  half  hoops,  and 
large  single  pearls  for  half  hoops,  are 
counted  among  fashidipable  bracelets. 

— -JT. — 

V^ATCHES  for  wo- 
Watches.  **  men  are  smaller 

and  more  elaborately 
decorated  than  ever.  The  chatelaine  watch 
with  open  face  and  richly  decorated  back, 
represents  the  approved  mode  and  bids  fair  to 
be  afavorite  for  alongtime  to  come.  Itis  not 
only  exceedingly  convenient  but  decidedly 
ornamental.  Watch  and  chain  are  similarly 
decorated  whether  the  means  employed  is 
chasing,  enameling  or  gems.  Colored  enam- 
els figure  largely  in  their  embellishment. 
The  backs  of  some  of  the  newest  watches 
are  pink  or  Sevres  blue,  framed  in  a circle  of 
diamonds  or  pearls,  touches  of  the  same 
color  reappearing  in  the  brooch  to  which 
the  watches  are  suspended. 

Men’s  watches  also  incline  to  smaller 
sizes.  The  hunting  case  is  standard  and 
still  preferred  by  persons  with  athletic 
tendencies,  but  the  fin  de  siecle  is  the  open 
face  watch,  in  small  or  medium  plain  gold 
case.  The  correct  chain,  for  day  wear, 
according  to  the  best  dressers,  is  the  gold 
vest  chain,  of  medium  or  light  weight.  For 
evening  wear  fashion  still  demands  the  fob 
with  dial. 

P>UHL  and Vernis-Martin 

Clocks.  ^ clocks,  the  charms  of 
which  have  been  previously 
sung,  improve  on  acquaintance.  This  sea- 
son’s products  bring  new  patterns  to  please 
the  eye,  while  the  latest  improvements  in 
chime  movements  are  equally  pleasing  to 
the  ear.  Chiming  clocks,  by  the  by,  are 
having  quite  a run  just  now  and  are  en- 
closed in  such  a variety  of  cases  as  to  suit 
all  purses.  French  chiming  clocks  for 
mantels  are  constructed  in  oak,  mahogany 
and  walnut,  and  receive  their  decoration  in 
carvings  and  mountings  of  brass.  Gilt  and 
bronze  trimmings  are  employed  on  clock 
cases  with  pleasing  results.  Colonial  and 
Empire  styles  are  reflected  not  only  in  the 
forms  but  the  ornamentation  of  clocks. 
Traveling  clocks  are  included  among  attrac- 
tive holiday  novelties  and  represent  an 
infinite  variety  of  styles.  Boudoir  clocks 
of  porcelain  and  Dresden  china  charm  with 
picturesque  effects  in  the  way  of  coloring 
and  design.  In  hall  clocks  the  display  is  a 
notable  one,  introducing  novel  designs, 
superior  movements  and  attractive  dials, 
a combination  that  ought  to  prove  irresist- 
ible. An  inexpensive  line  of  porcelain 
clocks  has  won  deserved  attention  with 
artistic  decorations  that  employ  royal  blue 
and  yellow  with  unique  effects.  Among 
Delft  clocks  antique  styles  prevail  and 
many  are  enriched  with  antique  finished 


Jewelry  and 
Gems. 


Nov.  27,  i«95. AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW.  . _ 

IN  DOUBT  BUY 

“PAIRPOINT”  SILVERWARE 


f?airpoint  /Y\fg.  (^o., 


NEW  YORK:  46  Murray  Street. 


NEW  BEDFORD,  MASS. 

. CHICAGO:  224  Wabash  Avenue.  - SAN  FRANCISCO:  220  Sutter  Street. 


CUT 

GLASS 


FINE 

CHINA 


6 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27  1895. 


bronze  trimmings.  Additional  attractions 
in  this  direction  are  cuckoo  clocks  in  original 
designs,  cloisonne  clocks  and  pretty  French 

affairs  with  bronze  mountings. 



I FATHER  goods  with 

Leather  ^ applied  gold  and  silver 

mountings  are  distinguished 
Goods.  season  to  a greater 

degree  than  ever  before  by 

distinctive  artistic  features  which  render 

their  possession  a real  joy  to  connoisseurs. 
The  mountings,  in  some  cases,  represent 
Grecian  patterns;  again,  floral  designs  bor- 
rowed frcjm  the  Empire  period  are  simu- 
lated; cupids  are  also  popular  subjects, 
both  in  hand  andin  die  work.  Little  pocket 
boxes,  including  match  safes,  memoranda 
and  court  plaster  cases.  And  their  enrich- 
ment in  high  relief  designs  that  depict  Bou- 
guereau’s  “ Nymphs  and  Satyr”  and  other 
equally  effective  objects.  Colored  enamel- 
ing, stones  and  gilt  play  important  parts 
in  enhancing  the  value  and  beauty  of  the 
smaller  articles,  such  as  card  cases  and 
pocketbooks.  Increased  value  is  fre- 
quently imparted  to  these  articles  by  the 
addition  of  a tiny  watch  or  fine  miniature 
painting. 

An  exceedingly  popular  article  at  this 
time  is  the  chatelaine  bag.  Uncut  velvet 
bags  mounted  with  sterling  silver,  gilded 
and  enameled  in  old  Indian  mosaic  pattern 
are  elegant  as  well  as  costly  affairs.  The 
chatelaine,  of  course,  matches  the  mount- 
ings, while  the  chains  are  of  gilded  silver. 
Chatelaine  bags  of  seal,  mounted  with  sil- 
ver in  antique  design  and  showing  the 
French  grey  finish,  are  both  stylish  and 
serviceable  and  the  same  holds  true  of  the 
newest  pigskin  bags. 

Next  in  importance  come  the  traveling 
bags  which  are  out  for  both  sexes  in  what  is 
known  as  the  “ cabin”  shape.  These  cabin 
bags  have  been  made  in  various  sizes  and 
materials,  and  are  fitted  with  straps  and 
compartments  for  holding  all  sorts  of  silver 
toilet  articles  which  jewelers  so  gladly  fur- 
nish. These  silver  mounted  bags  are  not 
complete  without  a silver  tag  and  it  must 
be  confessed  that  some  of  these  tags  are 
sufficiently  handsome  to  jeopardize  the 
safety  of  the  bags. 

Belts  continue  to  be  worn  and  are  out  in 
new  widths  for  the  Winter  trade.  A popu- 
ular  style  is  about  three  inches  in  width  and 
fastens  with  a clasp.  Favorite  materials  for 
the  belts  are  white  kid,  silk,  ostrich  skin, 
elephant’s  hide  and  pig  skin.  The  clasps, 
sometimes  of  silver,  sometimes  of  gold,  are 
of  medium  size  and  reflect  the  styles  of 
ornamentation  seen  on  the  buckles.  While 
the  clasps  are  newer,  buckles  in  artistic  de- 
sign continue  to  find  willing  customers. 


w 


TTH  each  recur- 
Bric-a-Brac.  ring  season  the 

bric-a-brac  appropriate 
Keramics.  to  the  jewelers’  art 
department  grows  in 
importance  with  its  varied  lines  of  kera- 
mics, metal  goods,  china  and  art  furniture. 
'J’he  reproductions  noted  in  jewelry  and 


silverware  have  also  invaded  these  goods, 
and  dextrous  copies  of  the  Marie  Antoinette, 
Empire  and  Colonial  periods  are  in  evi- 
dence everywhere.  As  for  keramics,  this  is 
their  hour.  All  prosperous  jewelers  recog- 
nize them  as  a proper  part  of  their  stock 
which  includes  usually  a few  pieces  of  Capo 
de  Monte  and  Sev^res,  with  a liberal  display 
of  Doulton,  Royal  Worcester,  Dresden,  Lim- 
oges,Cauldon,  Hungarian,  Belleek  and  other 
prized  products  in  this  line.  Quite  new  fea- 
tures are  Limoges  vases  of  ivory  hue  over- 
laid with  hand  painted  decorations  depicting 
Empire  subjects,  in  Sevres  colorings.  In 
Doulton  Delft  are  vases,  loving  cups  and 
other  objects,  decorated  in  the  usual  Delft 
colors  but  portraying  English  scenes. 
Small  articles  in  Italian  mosaic  work,  and 
including  picture  frames,  paper  weights, 
and  the  like,  are  also  new.  Other  notice- 
able features  are  porcelain  and  onyx  vases 
with  bronze  mountings,  and  plaques,  com- 
ports, trays,  wall  pockets,  photo  frames  and 
similar  novelties  in  Italian  ware. 


Quite  new  in  de- 
corated glass- 

Bronzes. 

jewel  boxes  of  crystal, 
beautified  with  gilt  scrolls  and  colored 
figured  panels.  Reproductions  in  artistic 
glassware  have  been  brought  out  in  the  form 
of  pitchers,  cordial  and  wine  sets,  tankards 
and  mugs,  in  the  new  Austrian  glass- 
ware. These  antique  shapes  receive  their 
enrichment  in  old  style  decorations. 

For  the  lighting  of  the  table  there  is  pro- 
vided an  infinite  variety  of  lamps  of  china, 
glass,  silver  and  bronze.  Some  of  the  new 
banquet  lamps  stand  unusually  high  and 
are  covered  with  a unique  Byzantine  decora- 
tion, in  which  scroll  work  in  yellow,  green 
and  gold,  is  conspicuous.  Large  lamps  of 
opal  glass  with  floral  decoration  are  effec- 
tive. Very  handsome  are  the  lamps  con- 
structed with  a standing  figure  of  bronze 
supporting  a silver  fount.  The  acme  of 
elegance  and  good  taste  is  reached  in  the 
lamps  composed  entirely  of  cut  glass. 

Bronzes  are  notable  this  season,  not  only 
for  the  wide  variety  of  subjects  represented, 
but  the  wide  range  in  sizes.  It  is  a praise- 
worthy fact  too,  that  many  of  the  smallest 
pieces  are  finely  modeled  from  well  known 
and  desirable  subjects. 

vr- 


Cut  Glass. 


[ T is  a recognized 


■ fact  that  fine  glass 
is  destined  to  become  a necessary  factor  in 
the  jewelry  trade  at  large.  In  the  cities  it 
is  already  indispensable  and  there  is  a pe- 
culiar fitness  in  this  combining  of  jewelry 
and  glass  for  modern  productions  of  the 
glass-maker’s  craft  are  veritable  jewels. 
Milady  some  time  ago  discovered  the  spec- 
ial attractiveness  of  fine  cut  glass  which, 
selected  with  intelligence  and  tastefully 
distributed,  add  pleasing  features  to  the 
house  beautiful.  But  glass  is  not  restricted 
to  the  dining  room,  but  introduces  the  effect 
of  dazzling  brilliants  in  boudoir  and  parlor, 
in  vases,  lamps,  center  globes  and  articles 


for  the  toilet.  Cut  glass  changes  its  shapes 
and  patterns  with  each  recurring  season, 
and  thus  keeps  pace  with  the  ever  shifting 
modes  in  other  directions.  The  present 
season  is  rich  in  new  forms  and  styles  of 
cutting. 

This  Autumn,  to  a more  marked  extent 
than  ever,  does  the  combination  of  glass 
and  silver  enlist  the  ^finest  art  of  the  jew- 
elers. Sometimes  the  glass  object  is  raised 
on  ornamental  supports  of  silver;  again  the 
silver  is  added  in  an  elaborate  top,  as  in  the 
case  of  powder  boxes  and  cracker  jars. 
This  combination  of  cut  glass  and  silver  is 
not  only  artistic  and  effective,  but  it  is 
fashionable,  an  important  item  in  these 
days.  Especially  beautiful  is  the  silver 
deposit  on  cut  glass.  The  differing  brill- 
iancy of  the  glass  and  silver  produces 
most  effective  results. 

tOTi 

E'BONY,  ivory  and 
< shell  are  valu- 

Art  Furniture.  adjuncts  in  the 

jewelers  trade,  for 
from  these  desirable  materials  have  been 
developed  a surprising  number  of  articles 
useful  and  beautiful. 

Shell  and  ivory  backed  brushes  are  al- 
ways staple,  many  patrons  preferring  these 
to  the  silver  backed  ones.  A new  feature 
in  ivory  is  the  “ burnt”  ivory,  which  is  de- 
cidedly attractive  with  its  rich  golden 
brown  hue.  Th's  affords  an  effective  back- 
ground for  applied  decorations  in  gold  and 
silver. 

A few  years  ago  it  would  have  been  re- 
garded as  a commercial  heresy  for  jewel- 
ers to  display  any  article  of  furniture  out- 
side of  hall  clocks.  It  is  now.  however,  no 
unusual  occurrence  to  meet  with  fine  exhi- 
bitmnsof  art  fitments  in  the  way  of  cabinets, 
tables,  stands,  pedestals,  etc.  This  fur- 
niture has  its  artistic  as  well  as  intrinsic 
value  enhanced  in  the  elegance  of  its  con- 
struction and  perfection  of  its  finish.  Con- 
roisseurs  in  such  matters  are  this  season 
sure  to  find  delight  in  the  collections  on  ex- 
hibition of  the  Vernis-Martin,  buhl,  gilt 
and  enameled  specimens.  Quite  out  of  the 
ordinary  are  the  Vienna  tables  and  stands 
in  fine  gilt  and  set  with  rich  hand  painted 
plaques  that  depict  mythological  characters 
from  well  known  masterpieces.  History 
repeats  itself  in  bric-a-brac  cabinets  de- 
signed dn  European  lines,  constructed  in 
mahogany  and  inlaid  with  hand  painted 
portraits  on  porcelain  of  celebrities  of  the 
Empire  reign.  Other  art  fitments  conform 
to  Marie  Antionette  style.  Much  of  the  art 
furniture  is  decorated  with  borders  and  en- 
richments in  gold  finished  bronze  in  Empire 
designs.  

The  growing  popularity  of  the  tomato  in 
England,  has  stimulated  the  manufacturing 
silversmiths  there  to  bring  out  a tomato 
frame  with  three  small  cruet  bottles  attach- 
ed. The  dish  is  simply  a wider  form  of  the 
elongated  leaf,  so  well  known  to  lovers  of 
the  cucumber  plant.  A new  dish  in  china, 
colored  to  nature,  or  in  majolica,  ought  to 
sell  well,  if  called  a tomato  dish. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW, 


Nov.  2*, 


CD 

73 

> 

Z 

o 

3 


3 

O 

C 

C/5 

m 


z 

m 


•< 

o 

T, 


hJ 

to 

O' 


-n  SI 

5 s 

^ > 


> 

< 


o 

3 


O 

> 

o 

o 


f 

H 

0 


« y 


o* 

S5 

V) 

rr 


> 

o 


Q 

0 


t/5 

> 

2 


"n 

?D 

> 

2 

O 


t/> 

o 

o 


— ♦ 

to 

o 


t/5 

c 


ft 

■1 


t/> 


n 

ft 

ft 


8 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


RICH 


THE 


GLASS. 


KOTIU 

cninn 

DECORniinG 

CO.,  • 


35  Warren  St.,  New  York, 


IS  OFFERING  TO  JEWELERS 
A LINE  OF  HAND  DECORATED 
CHINA  ESPECIALLY  SUITED  FOR  ’ 

THE  HOLIDAY  TRADE.  THIS 
BEAUTIFUL  WARE  IS  SURE  TO 
PROVE  A VALUABLE  ADDITION  TO 
THE  STOCK  OF  EVERY  DEALER.  IT 
IS  MADE  UP  IN  VARIOUS  FOR.MS  OF 


YOU  HAVE  NOT  ALREADY  SENT 
FOR  ONE  OF  OUR  $100.00  AS- 
SORTMENTS OF  THE  CHOICEST 
AND  MOST  ARTISTIC  CUT  GLASS 
ON  THE  MARKET, 


SHOULD 

DO 

SO 

AT 

ONCE. 


piece  not  found  satisfactory  upon  in= 
spection  may  be  returned. 


TOILET  ARTICLES, 

WRITING  SETS, 

A.  D.  CUPS  and  SAUCERS, 
PLATES  and 
FANCY  ARTICLES 

of  all  kinds. 


THE  $100.00  ASSORT- 
MENT  OF  OUR  BEST 
SELLERS.  ANYTHING 
NOT  FOUND  SATISFAC- 
TORY UPON  INSPECTION 
MAY  BE  RETURNED. 

IT  PLEASES  OTHERS.  IT  WILL  PLEASE  YOU. 


ALL  GOOD.S  ARE  MADE  IN  OUR  OWN 
FACTORY  BY  THE  MOST  SKILFUL 
GLASS  CUTTERS  IN  AMERICA.  OUR 
DESIGNS  ARE  UNIQUE  AND  TASTY, 
AND  FINISH  IS  UNEXCELLED.  EVERY 
JEWELER  WHO  HANDLES  OURGOODS 
IS  PLEASED.  THEY  .MAKE  A FINE 
DISPLAY  AND  ARE  EASY  TO  SELL- 


CUT 

Ginss  C0.. 

35  WARREN  ST., 

New  York. 


ROYAL 

HAND  PAINTED  CHINA. 


Nov.  27,  1805. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


<•) 


SOME  WINDOW  DRESSING  HINTS  FROM  MAIDEN  LANE. 


■%^7ERE  any  signs  necessary  to  convince 
one  that  the  merry  holidays  are  ap- 
proaching, they  would  be  observed  in  the 
little  groups  of  pedestrians  gathered  about 
the  show  windows  of  the  retail  stores,  ad- 
miring and  commenting  upon  the  beauties 
of  the  articles  displayed  therein.  At  this 
time  of  the  year  the  show  windows  of  the 
jewelers  especially  are  thus  favored,  be- 
cause of  the  desire  on  everyone’s  part  to 
bestow  some  holiday  gift  and  the  peculiar 
fitness  of  jewelry  for  serving  as  such. 

It  is  not  the  writer’s  purpose  here  to 
argue  with  the  reader  upon  the  advantages 
of  artistic  and  striking  window  dressing. 
It  is  practically  universally  admitted  that 
window  dressing  is  an  important  factor 
in  the  conduction  of  a retail  business. 


ing  the  past  eight  years  essays  on  the  sub- 
ject have  been  published  in  these  columns. 
Still  the  subject  will  never  be  exhausted, 
and  a few  of  the  limitless  number  of  hints 
are  to  be  obtained  and  absorbed,  if  the  eye 
is  clear  and  the  mind  receptive.  We  will 
use  our  eyes  for  the  reader,  if  he  will  ac- 
company us  in  the  spirit  down  Maiden  Lane 
which  is  now  in  the  heyday  of  its  pre-holi- 
day activity. 

Maiden  Lane,  from  a window  dressing 
standpoint,  may  not  offer  any  remarkable 
lessons;  but  inasmuch  as  so  many  jewelry 
stores  are  congregated  in  a little  area,  it  is 
rr  ore  fruitful  of  suggestions  than  any  equal 
area  in  New  York.  As  we  enter  the  “Lane’’ 
our  attention  is  drawn  to  the  vvindow  of 
Wm.  Barthman,  at  No.  i.  Mr.  Barthman 


EFFECTIVE  ARRANGEMENT  OF  JEWELRY.  WINDOW  OF  WM.  BARTHMAN. 


To  that  small  minority,  if  there  really 
is  a minority,  who  do  not  acquiesce 
in  the  foregoing,  we  will  address  the  fol- 
lowing questions : 

Why  do  retail  stores  have  show  windows? 
Are  they  not  for  the  purpose  of  showing 
goods?  Is  it  not  the  purpose  of  showing 
goods  to  attract  the  attention  of  the  public  ? 
By  attracting  the  attention  of  the  public,  is 
not  trade  generated,  providing  no  extra- 
neous deterring  condition  exists?  By  in- 
creasing this  attractive  power  is  not  trade 
also  increased  ? Hence  does  not  a beneficial 
force  exist  in  an  attractive  window  which  is 
not  to  be  found  in  a dull  or  uninteresting 
window  ? 

The  Jewelers’  Circular  has  ever  ad- 
vanced ideas  in  this  important  subject,  to 
be  copied,  or  revi.sed,  or  improved  upon  if 
desirable,  by  the  retail  jeweler.  It  ran  a 
series  of  articles  extending  over  three  to 
four  years,  in  which  numerous  phases  of  the 
subject  were  presented;  in  many  issues  dur- 


carries an  extensive  stock  of  jewelry,  and 
displays  really  a goodly  portion  of  it  in  his 
windows;  but  the  arrangement  is  so  sys- 
tematic that  the  display  does  not  impress 
the  observer  as  being  overcrowded.  On 
the  day  we  observed  the  windows,  it  was 
arranged  as  here  depicted.  On  the  flooring 
was  ageometrical  arrangement  of  the  patent 
curved  trays  made  by  Wiggers  & Froelick, 
60  Nassau  St.,  New  York.  In  these  trays 
gemmed  rings  were  set ; within  the  space 
formed  by  the  trays  jewelry  of  various 
character  was  arranged,  while  at  the  front 
corners  of  the  window  watches  were  set  on 
the  tightly  drawn  cloth  covering  of  the 
flooring. 

At  the  back  portion  of  the  window  was  a 
plateau  describing  an  arc  of  a circle  as 
shown . On  the  rising  surface  were  attached 
a line  of  lockets,  while  at  the  top  were 
stuck  sword  pins,  aigrettes,  etc.  On  the 
upright  at  the  extreme  back  was  a line  of 
chains  looped  prettily.  The  whole  display 


was  set  on  a firm  background  of  cloth  of 
indigo  color,  which  set  off  the  jewelry  to 
great  advantage.  As  a symmetrical  and 
effective  disposition  of  a large  quantity 
of  jewelry,  this  display  is  a fine  example. 


WATCH  SUPPORT.  O.  M FARRAND. 


We  next  come  to  the  windows  of  Oliver 
M.  Farrand,  also  at  No.  i.  A feature  in 
one  of  the  windows  is  an  enormous  crystal 
of  ruby  corundum,  which  arouses  the  cu 
riosity  of  many  passers-by.  In  the  other 
window  is  an  upright  device  covered  with 
plush,  shaped  like  a longitudinal  section  of 
a truncated  cone.  On  this  device  hang 
watches,  as  seen  in  the  accompanying  illus- 
tration. 

Continuing  down  the  street  the  three 
windows  of  Edwin  A.  Thrall,  at  Nos,  3 and 
5,  attract  our  attention.  The  displays  in 
these  windows  are  always  marked  by  a rich 
simplicity  that  almost  defies  description. 
T his  firm  has  ever  devoted  much  time  and 
exercised  the  best  taste  available  in  the 
establishment  in  the  dressing  of  the 
windows,  with  the  result  that  they  are  a 
constant  source  of  suggestion  in  refined 
window  decoration.  On  the  day  of  our 
observation,  the  first  window  showed  on 
the  flooring  an  arrangement  of  white  cards 
holding  brooches,  which,  with  the  dark 
cloth  background,  formed  a checker  work 
setting  for  the  jewelry.  This  arrangement 
occupied  a space  of  about  1x3  feet,  the  re- 


CORNER  OF  REED  & BARTO.n’S  WINDOW  SHOW- 
ING COLONIAL  SILVER. 


mainder  of  the  floor  being  bare  with  the 
exception  of  a symmetrical  device  of  long 
chains  at  the  back.  In  another  of  Mr. 
Thrall’s  windows  was  a fine  ivory  miniature 


It) 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


Factory, 

NEWARK,  N.  J. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 


Larter,  Elcox&Co., 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  GOLD  JEWELRY 


Office,  21-23  Maiden  Lane. 
NEW  YORK. 


IN 


LADIES^  GENTLEMEN'S  AND  CHILDREN'S  RINGS. 

STONE  SEALS,  LINK  BUTTONS. 


OUR  TRADE  MARK. 


OUR  LINE  OF 


SPRING  BACK  STUDS 


33BI 


3362 


3363 

Contains  the  GREATEST  VARIETY,  Improvements  make  them  the  STRONGEST. 

All  i4k.  and  PRICES  ARE  RIGHT. 

Ask  your  Jobber  or  send  to  us  for  a selection  package  of  studs. 


SURPASSED  ALL  RECORDS! 

AT  THE  OBSERVATORY  OF  GENEVA,  OUT  OF  TEN 
MOVEMENTS  ( CONSECUTIVE  NUMBERS, ) THE 

Chas.  Meylan  Watches 

OBTAINED 

4 MEDALS 

AND 

6 DIPLOMAS. 

MATHEY  BROS.,  MATHEZ  & CO.. 

SOLE  AGENTS, 

21  AND  23  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

PLAIN  AND  COMPLICATED  WATCHES. 

JUST  RECEIVED  FOR  THE  HOLIDAYS  AN  EXTENSIVE  LINE  OF  FINE 

ENAMELED  AND  DIAMOND 

'SAl  A TC  H ES. 


AI^TISXIC 

SOLID  GOLD  CASES 

Warranted  Absolutely  as  to  Quality. 

Trade  Mark  Registered.  Sold  to  Legitimate  Jobbers  only. 

NEW  YORK.  BROOKLYN.  CHICAGO.  SAN  FRANCISCO, 


ONE  TRIAL 

OF  OUR  WORK  ON  REFINING  OF  ALL 
KINDS  WILL  CONVINCE  YOU  THAT 
OUR  RETURNS  ARE  THE  BEST. 


CONVINCE  YOURSELF. 


GEO.  M.  BAKER, 

Gold  and  Silver  Refiner  and  Sweep  Sielter 

PROVIDENCE  R.  I. 


ESTABLISHED  1870. 


SAMUEL  C.  JACKSON, 

MANUFACTURER  OF 

FINE  CASES 

lewelry.  Silverware,  &c.,also  Hardwood 
Chests,  Trays,  and  Sample  Cases. 

180  BROADWAY, 

NEW  YORK, 


AIKIN-LAMBERT  JEWELRY  C0.,'VEnr 


IMPORTERS  OF 


JOBBERS  IN 


AGENTS  FOR 


nTAMHAinQ  II  '^^tches.  Jewelry,  Chains,  imoCKFORD 

IllAMUJNiliS.  novelties. etc. "watch  CO. 


Latest  Designs 


Lowest  Prices. 


Nov.  27.  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


11 


of  Trilby  as  she  appears  in  the  old  soldier’s 
coat.  The  miniature  was  set  in  a deep 
glass  frame.  . As  the  Trilby  fad  is  still  on, 
any  picture  of  the  blaiichissetise  or  any- 
thing appertaining  to  her  will  prove  an 
object  of  attention  and  interest.  The  third 
window  was  devoted  to  a display  of  leather 
novelties  with  burnt  decorative  effects. 
These  goods  being  of  recent  production, 
and  coming  in  diversified  shapes,  and  with 
more  or  less  comical  or  at  least  unique 
decorations,  are  an  attractive  feature  in  any 
window  display. 

Further  down  the  street,  at  No.  9,  we 
note  a pretty  exhibit  of  pottery,  bric-a-brac, 
porcelain  clocks,  lamps  and  similar  articles, 
in  the  window  of  the  store  of  Levy,  Dreyfus 
& Co.  An  engraving  illustrating  this  dis- 
play is  here  given.  Perhaps  no  classes  of 
goods  lend  themselves  to  more  effective 
arrangement  in  a show  window  than  those 
above  specified.  In  the  arrangement  of 
these  goods,  artistic  confusion  rather  than 
symmetry  should  be  the  prevailing  charac- 
teristic, but  the  individual  beauties  of  the 
pieces  should  not  be  hidden.  While  a 
white  background,  as  in  the  present  case,  is 
effective,  the  drapings  should  always  other-' 
wise  be  of  warm  colors  such  as  maroon, 
royal  purple  or  black ; no  off  shade  as  laven- 
der or  pale  blue  should  be  used.  Another 
point  of  equal  importance  is  that  the  arti- 
cles displayed  should  be  in  the  reigning 
colors;  for  instance.  Delft  blue  is  at  the 
present  time  very  fashionable,  so  if  any 


average  jewelry  store,  yet  a half  or  a single 
window,  or  a corner  in  the  store  itself  can 
be  ^o  arranged. 

Turning  our  gaze  we  are  dazzled  by  the 
brilliancy  of  the  display  of  silverware  in  the 
window  of  Reed  & Barton,  at  No  13.  This 


brilliancy  is  due  to  the  arrangement  of  sev- 
eral pieces  of  Colonial  silverware  whose 
plain  surfaces  act  like  mirrors  and  reflect 
many  times  the  objects  before  them.  We 
show  a corner  of  this  window,  but  no  black 
and  white  drawing  can  adequately  repro- 
duce the  brilliancy.  A large  waiter  in  the 
corner,  backing  the  coffee  pots,  jugs  and 
other  pieces,  produces  the  effect  of  a mirror. 


Pens  and  pencils  in  themselves  are  not 
admirably  adapted  to  effective  window 
dressing,  but  by  the  use  of  variously  shaped 
boxes,  cases  and  display  devices,  a striking 
exhibit  can  be  created.  Such  an  exhibit 
was  noted  in  one  of  the  windows  of  the 


store  of  Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.,  at  No.  19, 
and  is  depicted  in  this  article.  The  en- 
graving is  so  clear  that  a description  of  the 
display  is  scarcely  necessary.  A change- 
able sign  occupied  a front  position;  from 
the  front  it  read  “ Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.”; 
from  the  left  “ Fountain  Pens  "and  from 
the  right  “ Gold  Pens.”  An  arrangement 
of  pens,  pencils,  toothpicks  and  similar 
articles,  founded  upon  that  of  Aikin,  Lam- 
bert & Co.,  would  produce  beneficial  re- 
siTts  as  an  occasional  window  exhibit 
during  the  holidays. 

Crossing  the  road,  we  admire  the  display 
of  silverware  in  the  window  of  E.  G.  Web- 
ster & Son,  at  No.  10.  Rumpled  plush  of  a 
pale  blue  color  formed  the  background, 
w hile  the  wood  work  was  ebony  colored. 

The  phrase,  “the  Lane,”  has  come  to 
mean  more  than  Maiden  Lane.  It  now 
comprehends,  at  least,  the  square  bounded 
by  that  street,  Broadway,  John  St.  and 
Nassau  St.  We  will  therefore  hie  ourselves 
into  the  other  thoroughfares  and  note  what 
they  offer.  The  windows  of  the  store  of 
Geo.  W.  Shiebler  & Co.,  179  Broadway, 
form  one  of  the  attractive  features  of  lower 
Broadway.  Of  course  few  jewelry  stores 
offer  a stock  from  which  so  gorgeous  an 
exhibit  can  be  made.  One  large  window  is 
usually  filled  with  rich  enamel  silver  goods 
which  attract  a great  deal  of  attention.  The 
vivid  coloring  seen  in  these  articles  excites 
much  interest,  and  all  jewelers  would  find 
it  to  their  advantage  to  display  a greater  or 
lesser  quantity  of  this  fashionable  ware. 


ARRANGEMENT  OF  PENS,  ETC.  AIKIN,  LAMBERT  & CO. 


special  display  of  bric-a-brac  is  made  the 
majority  of  the  pieces  should  show  this 
color.  It  is  also  desirable  to  introduce  in 
the  display  the  reigning  shapes  as  well  as 
the  reigning  colors.  While  such  a display 
as  that  of  Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co.  is  hardly 
possible  of  being  made  from  the  stock  in  the 


Not  only  is  silverware  in  Colonial  style 
much  in  demand,  which  can  be  increased 
by  displaying  the  goods,  but  its  employ- 
ment in  the  decoration  of  a jewelry  window 
is  bound  to  aid  the  other  styles  in  their 
sales  by  reason  of  the  brilliant  and  dazzling 
effects  it  produces. 


The  smaller  window  of  the  store,  on  the 
day  of  our  ramble,  was  particularly  effec- 
tive in  its  arrangement.  The  window  is 
about  5 feet  wide.  The  bottom  was  set 
with  uprights  of  various  heights,  covered 
gracefully  with  cloth  of  navy  blue  color. 
On  these  uprights  were  displayed  symmet- 
rically sterling  silver  smokers’  sets  of  many 
designs. 

While  it  is  to  be  admitted  that  black. 


12 


'[HE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27  1895. 


navy  blue  and  other  dark  colored  back- 
grounds are  well  adapted  to  set  off  jewelry 


ARTIFICIAL  FLOWERS  IN  THE  WINDOW  OF 
BARTENS  & RICE. 


and  silverware,  a daub  of  brilliant  coloring 
introduced  into  the  scheme  will  greatly 


enhance  the  general  effect,  producing  a 
gentle  warmth  that  is  reassuring.  Such  a 
daub  of  color  was  seen  in  the  window  of 
Bartens  & Rice,  20  John  St.  In  each  of 
the  two  front  corners  was  a silver  vase  of 
Colonial  style,  one  containing  imitation 
pink  and  red  roses,  and  the  other  imitation 
white  and  yellow  roses. 


Important  Insurance  Decision  Handed 
Down  by  the  Toronto  Courts. 

Toronto,  Can.,  Nov.  21. — At  the  non- 
jury sittings  at  Osgoode  Hall  an  important 
insurance  case  was  tried  by  Chief  Justice 
Armour,  last  week.  It  was  an  action 
brought  by  John  Wanless  & Co.,  jewelers, 
Toronto,  against  the  Lancashire  Insurance 
Co.,  and  the  British  American  Insurance 
Co.  to  recover  $3,226  loss  sustained  on 
their  stock  by  fire  on  March  3,  1895.  The 
insurance  in  the  Lancashire  amounted  to 
$4,000  and  in  the  British  American  to  $6,000. 

The  British  American  Co.  contended  that 
their  policy  contained  a clause  called  the 
75  per  cent,  co-insurance  clause,  as  follows 
“ It  is  a part  of  the  consideration  of  this 
policy  and  the  basis  upon  which  the  rate  of 
premium  is  fixed,  that  the  assured  shall 
maintain  insurance  on  the  property  covered 
by  this  policy  of  not  less  than  75  per  cent, 
of  the  actual  cash  value  thereof,  and  that 
failing  to  do  so  the  assured  shall  be  a co- 
insurer to  the  extent  of  such  deficit,  and  in 
that  capacity  shall  bear  his,  her,  or  their 


proportion  of  any  loss,”  and  that  by  reason 
of  such  clause  the  premium  paid  was  20  per 
cent,  less  than  the  ordinary  rate.  They 
also  claimed  that  the  cash  value  of  the 
property  insured  was  $28,732.51,  that  the 
insurance  upon  it  w'as  $6,000  with  them  and 
$4000  with  their  co- defendants,  and  there- 
fore, as  under  the  above  clause,  plaintiffs 
must  be  treated  as  co-insurers  to  the  extent  of 
difference  between  $io,Soo  and  $28,732.51. 
viz.,  $11,549.38,  and  taking  $3,226.84  as 
plaintiffs’  loss  asserted  by  their  statement 
of  claim,  all  they  should  pay  w’as  $898.84. 

The  plaintiffs  alleged  that  the  said  clause 
was  contrary  to  the  provisions  of  the  Re- 
vised Statutes  of  Ontario,  chapter  167,  Sec. 
1 16  as  being  a variation,  addition  or  omis- 
sion in  the  meaning  of  that  section.  The 
law  provides  that  all  variations  of  the  stat- 
utory conditions  shall  be  printed  under  the 
heading  “ Variations  in  Conditions,”  in 
conspicuous  type  and  ink  of  a different  color 
and  with  a provision  attached  to  the  effect 
that  they  should  only  be  in  force  so  far  as 
by  a Court  or  Judge  and  before  whom  a 
question  is  tried  relating  thereto, they  should 
be  held  just  and  reasonable. 

. Chief  Justice  Armour  decided  in  favor  of 
the  plaintiffs,  holding  that  the  clause  in 
question  was  not  part  of  the  contract  but  an 
addition  to  the  contract  and  not  being  in- 
serted as  required  by  the  statute  but  ap- 
pearing in  the  body  of  the  policy,  was  void. 
He  declined  to  find  whether  if  it  had  been  a 
good  condition  within  the  terms  of  the  act, 
it  was  a ‘‘  just  and  reasonable  one.” 


CUTTERS  OF  DIAMONDS. 


OPPENHEIMER  BROS.  & VEITH, 


DEALERS  IN  WATCHES. 


THE  DIAMOND  DIGGER. 


65  NASSAU  ST., 

PRESCOTT  BUILDING, 

JOHN  AND  NASSAU  STS., 

NEW  YOI^K. 


THE  DIAMOND  CUTTER. 


LONDON : 

10  HATTON  Garden. 

AMSTERDAM  : 

Tulp  Straat  No.  2. 


THE  DIAMOND  WEARER. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


13 


EADQUARTERS  FOR  HIGH  GRADE 

—^Silver  Novelties  and 

Gold  Jewelry. 

SUSPENDERS,  GARTERS,  PIPES,  MANICURE  GOODS,  ALL  SIZES;  NAIL  POLISHERS, 
BONNET  BRUSHES,  WHISK  BROOMS,  ERASERS,  MEMORANDUM  TABLETS  AND 
BOOKS,  UMBRELLA  FASTENERS,  CANE  STRAPS,  PAPER  CUTTERS,  TAPE 
MEASURES,  RATTLES,  LETTER  CLIPS,  &c.,  IN  STERLING  SILVER.  ALSO 
HAKERS  OF  loKT.  AND  14KT.  CHAIN  BRACELETS,  DIAMOND  BRACELETS, 
MINIATURE  BROOCHES  IN  GOLD  AND  SILVER,  PLAIN  AND  DIAMOND  14KT. 
LINK  BUTTONS. 

• MUFF  HOLDERS, • 

BELT  BUCKLES  IN  GREAT  VARIETY. 

N.B.— ALL  OUR  BELTS  ARE  MADE  WITH  OUR  PATENT  DEVICE  FOR  INTER- 
CHANGING RIBBONS. 

REEVES  & 5ILLC0CKS, 

HAKE^  “EVERYTHING  IN  SILVER  SMALL  WARES.” 


flounted  Goods 


Special  order  work  is 
a leading  and  successful 
feature  of  our  business. 


Keller,  Ettinger  & Fink, 
American  Watches 

AND 

Diamonds, 

24  John  St.,  New  York. 


Diamonds 


f 


14 


I'HE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1S95 


I 


MANUFACTURING  COMPANY, 

SILVERSMITHS, 

NEWBURYPORT,  MASS, 


iMARlC 


CHICAGO. 


One  of  our  New  Patterns. 


ORANGE. 


Correspondence 

solicited 

from  Jewelers  only. 


Ready  for  delivery. 


DESSERT 

(Reverse.) 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


15 


Waterman  & Lehmann, 

IMPORTERS  OF  DIAMONDS. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  DIAMOND  JEWELRY. 


20  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 


New  York,  November,  1895. 

To  the  Trade: 

We  present  a card  with  a photographic  reproduction  of  a line  of  our  FINE  AND  ARTISTICALLY 
HAND  CARVED  DIAMOND  RING  MOUNTINGS  FOR  GENTLEMEN.  They  are  made  in  Roman  and  antique 
finished  gold ; also  in  steel,  gold  lined.  These  rings  are  made  only  to  order,  and  the  stones  should  be  sent  with  the  or- 
der, to  attain  proper  fitting  and  finish. 

Taking  for  granted  that  our  patrons  are  familiar  with  our  facilities,  we  beg  to  again  call  their  attention  to  our 
well-assorted  line  of  LOOSE  DIAMONDS  AND  DIAMOND  JEWELRY,  and  complete  stock  of  mountings,  which 
enable  us  to  fill  orders  immediately. 

We  have  excellent  facilities  for  making  to  order  any  article  in  the  line  of  FINE  JEWELRY. 

RECUTTING  DIAMONDS  in  the  most  artistic  manner,  and  repairing  of  Diamonds,  is  an  important  feature 
of  ours. 

All  our  work  is  strictly  first-class,  and  prices  as  low  as  consistent- 

We  will  send  goods  for  approval  when  so  desired.  We  solicit  your  patronage,  and  remain. 

Yours  truly. 


WATERMAN  & LEHMANN. 


16 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


\0'-  27  (8q 


■/Christmas 


and 


I New  Years 

^ouvraiR 
•'  sroons 


Gold  Bowl,  Sterling,  .925 
fine, guaranteed,  3^4  in., 
fastened  with  ribbon  to 
handsome  Christmas 
and  New  Years  cards. 

Sent  on  APPROVAL  to 
reliable  Jewelers. 


F.M.VaiTtten, 

Souvenir 
Spoon  nfgr. 

218  W.  116th  St., 

NEW  YORK. 


YOUR  WIFE 


AND  DAUGHTER  WANT 


Mf 

iiiil  We  Are  Showing  * jij 

■ 

■ii”iia  

■ a<:iiiiB 

Biii'iiB  a a 

[=1  The  Finest  Assortment  of 


aiuMB 

aimna 

Smiua 

a IB 

a 


aiiiiiia 

aiiiiiia 

B'lHiiB 


Jewelers’  Holiday  Goods 


IN  THE  MARKET. 


^ 


Steiner,  Davidson  & Co. 

Importers  of  Fans  and  Fancy  Goods, 

547  Broadway,  New  York. 

V \ Mi 

% '''l!999999i9999999ii99999999999999999999999!9999999i9999999999999999999999999999999999!99999999999999999HVi^‘€''''^ 


a>'i  "a 

BlilillB 

amnia 


The  Four  Hundred. 

THE  BEST,  THE  SMALLEST 
LADIES’  WATCH  IN  AMERICA. 


HAMPDEN  WATCH  CO. 

CANTON,  0. 

Ju.les  jLirgensen, 

OF  COPENHAGEN. 

The  reputation  these  watches  haz'e  maintained  for 
Fifty  V'ea.ra>  has  never  been  equalled^  being  made 
on  strictly  scientijic principles  and  no  expense  spared  to 
give  the  Best  results  in  mechanism  and  timekeeping 
qualities  SOLE  agents. 

NO.  22  MAIDEN  LANE. 


Nov.  27.  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


17 


The  Philadelphia  Jewelers’  Club  Pro- 
vide an  Enjoyable  Entertainment. 

Philadelphia,  Pa.,  Nov.  21. — The 
“ smoker  ” given  by  the  Jewelers’  Club  of 
Philadelphia  on  the  evening  of  the  19th 
inst.,  was  the  most  successful  of  the  series 
of  these  delightful'entertainments.  Apart 
from  the  good  fellowship  and  enjoyable 
social  intercourse  that  marked  the  event, 
there  was  an  entertainment  provided  that 
brought  together  a good  many  of  the  con- 
spicuous performers  then  at  the  various 
local  theatres.  Among  those  who  thus 
contributed  to  the  amusement  were  J.  A. 
Smith,  F.  B.  Weinman,  J.  N.  Brown,  Jr., 
and  J.  A.  Smith  in  solo  vocalisms;  the 
Meistersinger  quartette.  Professor  Lilly  and 
his  orchestra  from  the  Museum;  Professor 
Mettler  , Bingham,  ventriloquist,  Albert 
Foy,  monologist,  and  John  Geiger,  violin- 
ist. 

The  out-of-town  guests  included  J.  E. 
Simonson,  A.  J.  Hedges  & Co.;  R.  J. 
Adams,  T.  W.  Adams  & Co. ; Frank  Locklin, 
Unger  Bros.;  L.  S.  Lewis,  Randel,  Bare- 
more  & Billings;  G.  A.  Henckel,  of  Frank 
H.  La  Pierre;  E.  G.  Hall,  R.  Wallace  & 
Son  Mfg.  Co.;  Geo.  W.  Reed,  Wm.  B.  Kerr 
& Co.;  Harry  Larter,  Larter,  Elcox  & Co., 
and  F.  P.  Wormser,  Mauser  Mfg.  Co. 

The  attendance  of  members  was  particu- 
larly large,  and  included  Wm.  H.  Long  and 
W.  S.  Quinn,  of  J.  E.  Caldwell  & Co.; 
Samuel  Jacquette,  James  Eddy,  James  H. 


Kelly  and  A.  G.  Lee,  of  Bailey,  Banks  & 
Biddle  Co.;  Paul  P.  Souden  and  Walter 
Loveland,  of  Sackett  & Co.;  J.  Van 
Dieven  and  T.  Farrell,  of  Wm.  G.  Earle  & 


WM.  P.  SACKETT, 

PRESIDENT,  PHILADELPHIA  JEWELERS’  CLUB. 

Co.;  A.  J.  Lejambre,  L.  P.  White,  Wm.  G. 
Earle,  Wm.  P.  Sackett,  James  W.  Barry, 
Harry  Schimpf,  Jules  Levy,  L.  Beconne, 
Wm.  F.  Parry,  John  S.  Diamond,  Tros. 
Hickey,  J.  A.  Smith,  Thos.  Keon,  Walter 
Eakins  and  J.  A.  Leeds. 

President  Sackett  and  the  committee  hav- 
ing charge  of  the  “smoker”  were  the 


recipients  of  many  congratulations  on  the 
excellent  entertainment  they  had  provided 
and  the  hospitable  manner  in  which  they 
looked  after  the  comfort  of  the  guests. 


Latest  Developments  in  the  Rumpf 
Suits. 

Seattle,  Wash.,  Nov.  15. — The  full  text 
of  the  decision  of  the  Supreme  Court  re- 
versing the  action  of  the  Superior  Court 
allowing  a temporary  injunction  to  the 
Rockford  Watch  Co.  in  their  case  against 
Simon  Rumpf  has  been  received  by  County 
Clerk  Gordon.  The  history  of  the  many 
maneuvers  in  that  sensational  case,  together 
with  the  flight  of  Rumpf  to  Honolulu  and 
his  escape  from  Vancouver  just  as  the 
detective  arrived,  are  well  known  to  the 
trade.  After  going  over  the  case  at  length 
the  Supreme  Court  says; 

“No  affidavits  were  filed  in  support  of 
the  motion  for  a temporary  injunction  and 
upon  a careful  examination  of  the  com- 
plaint we  fail  to  find  sufficient  acts  stated 
to  warrant  either  the  restraining  order  or 
the  temporary  injunction.” 

Judges  Anders,  Hoyt  and  Scott  concurred, 
but  Dunbar  thinks  there  were  facts  suffi- 
cient to  warrant  the  action  of  the  Superior 
Court. 


A.  J.  Schifeling,  Peoria,  111.,  has  moved 
into  his  new  store  nearer  the  center  of 
trade. 


Freres  & 


'W 


Qlaenzer 

SUCCESSORS  TO 

Leon  Glaenzer 


Clocks  and  Regulators, 
Bronzes, 

Lamps  and  Globes, 
Fine 

Austrian 

Glassware, 
Fine  Teplitz  Vases, 


Rheinboldt, 

82  Chambers 

New  York^ 


Onyx  Pedestals,  ° 

Fine  Porcelains, 
Delft  Pottery, 

Bric-a-Brac, 
Sevres  Goods, 

Cabinets,  Etc. 


^1^ 


WILL  REMOVE  ON  OR  ABOUT  APRIL  1ST,  1896,  TO  26  AND  28  WASHINGTON  PLACE, 


18 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


NINE  PICTORIAL  ADVERTISING  SUGGESTIONS  FOR  RETAIL  JEWELERS. 


Advertising  by  means  of  pictures 
is  having  a boom,  says  an  authority 
on  advertising.  There  is  no  manner  in 
which  an  advertiser  can  appeal  to  the  pub- 
lic so  effectively  as  by  pictures,  provided 
they  are  good  ones.  More  merchants  are 


using  pictures  in  their  circulars  and  news- 
paper ads.,  and  good  cuts  cost  so  little  now- 
adays that  here  is  no  reason  why  the  practice 
should  not  spread  as  it  deserves  to.  A good 
cut  in  a newspaper  ad.  will  draw  attention 
to  the  ad.  as  soon  as  the  paper  is  opened. 


and  if  it  is  striking,  pretty  or  unique,  it  will 
be  remembered  with  pleasure  much  longer 
than  almost  anything  that  could  be  said  in 
the  same  space. 

The  Circular  offers  here  nine  sugges- 
tions in  pictorial  advertising  for  retail  jew- 


No.  41 


WE  HAVE 
ON  HAND 

The  Best  Stock  in  the  City, 

also  the  cheapest, 
also  the  newest, 
also  the  largest. 

Clocks  in  all  Fashionable  Styles. 

Porcelain,  Onyx,  Etc. 

Silver  Novelties  in  infinite  variety. 
Art  Goods,  Bric-a-Brac, 

Latest  Importations. 

JEWELRY.  WATCHES,  DIAMONDS. 

STONE  Sr  SETTINQ, 

Jewelers  and 

Watchmakers.  627  UPTIUP  ST. 


A FINE  LINE 


No.  43. 


Thb  JtwRi.BR8'  Circular. 

IS  NOW  ON  EXHIBITION  AT 

STERLING  &.  SOLID,  Watchmakers  and  Jewelers 


33  1 ANY  S'X'HEET 


HOLIDAY  GOODS. 


No.  42. 


QK  Invoiced  or  {loubAT  ® 

Qo0b5  ARE  KECElVEb. 


Trb  Jbwblibb*  I' 

CiBOOLAB 


THE 

FALL 

IS  HERE  With  a Rush 

FOOTBALL  and  Jewelry  are  not  closely 
allied,  but  the  season  of  football  is  the  begin- 
ning of  the  season  of  the  jeweler. 

We  have  anticipated  the  brisk  Fall  and 
Holiday  Season  with  the 

THE  BEST  LINE  WE 

HAVE  EVER  CARRIED. 

If  you  are  in  doubt  what  to  buy  for  holiday 
presents,  call  upon  us.  We  have  aimed  j 
particularly  to  fill  your  wants. 


You  can  find  any  Novelty  on  the  market  in  our 

Holiday  Stock, 


JEWELRY,  W/ITCHE5, 
SILVERW/1RE, 

SILVER  rL4TEb  W/IRE, 


OFTK/IL  Q00D5, 

CMT  QL/ISS,  ART  QOODS, 
QLOQKS,  ETC.,  ETQ„  ETC. 


0 


Jewelers  and  Watchmakers. 
309  MAIN  SXREEX. 


QETUP,  DOO  & CO., 

23a  S.  MAIN  STREET 


WA  TCHM AKERS, 
SILVERSMITHS,  JEWELERS. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


elers,  following  ont  a plan  inaugurated  by 
this  journal  over  a year  ago.  It  is  not  ex- 
pected that  the  reading  matter  of  the  ad- 
vertisements will  be  reproduced  to  the 
letter.  In  each  case  it  is  intended  to  serve 
as  a basis  upon  which  the  jeweler  can  con- 
struct his  announcement  governed  by  the 
character  of  his  stock.  Electrotypes  of  any 
of  the  illustrations  will  be  furnished  by  The 
Jewelers’  Circular,  at  the  prices  specified 
below. 

No.  41  : “ We  have  on  Hand”  attracts  by 

reason  of  its  exaggeration.  It'can  be  used  at 
all  seasons  of  the  year.  Electrotypes,  75 
cents  each  ; postage  prepaid. 

No.  42;  “The  Fall  is  Here”  while  not 
particularly  pertinent  to  the  trade  reflects 
the  season  of  the  year  in  an  effective  man- 
ner. Electrotypes,  75  cents  each,  postage 
prepaid. 

No.  43  : “A  Fine  Line  ” shows  the  bug- 

lers heralding  the  beauties  of  the  various 
jewelers’  lines.  This  is  an  especially  strik- 
ing cut.  Electrotypes,  $1.25  each;  postage 
prepaid. 

No.  44:  “Our  Invoices  are  Received” 
illustrates  in  a unique  manner  the  arrival  of 
the  jeweler’s  Fall  lines.  Electrotypes,  $1.00 
each ; postage  prepaid. 

No.  45  : “A  Maiden’s  Dream  of  Christ- 
mas” is  a pretty  picture  which  tells  its  own 
story.  It  can  be  used  with  equal  effect  as 
a wedding  gift  ad.  Electrotypes,  75  cents 
each  ; postage  prepaid. 

No.  46 : “A  Little  Chap’s  Dream  of 
Christmas”  belongs  to  the  same  order  of 


A riAIDEN’S 

DREAM  OF  CHRISTHAS. 

It  is  not  a difficult  matter  to  become  one  of  the 
angels  in  your  daugther’s,  sister’s  or  sweetheart’s 
dream,  if  you  will  visit  our  store,  for  here  you 
find  jewels  of  all  character  and  prices. 

Diaixionca,  GolcJ,  TT^AArFT  D 

Silver-,  Plated,  fj  D W 1 • 

FUSHE  ENTERPRISE, 

675  MAINSTREET  ST. 


No.  47. 


Tes  JswBLER’a 


WE  DON’T  EMPLOY 


IOC.  to 
$100. 


SA^^DWICH  MEN 

If  we  did  we  would  make  the  above  an- 
nouncements. 

In  anticipation  of  a heavy  demand  for  silver 
goods,  in  novelties  and  table 
ware,  for  bric-a-brac 
and  cut  glass, 
we  have 
made  special 
purchases  of  these  lines 
which  we  have  added  to  our 
large  regular  stock  of  jewelry  and  watches. 

FOLLOW  THESE  MEN  TO, 

313  Main  Street. 

STIFFANNIE  & CO. 


$1.50  to 
$150.00. 


A LITTLE 
CHAP’S 
DREA/T  OF 
CHRISTMAS. 


His  most  beautiful  dream  brings  him  no 
sweeter  vision  than  a watch,  all  for  his 
ownself. 

HOW  EASY  IT  IS  TO  MAKE  HIS 
DREAM  COME  TRUE. 

HflTf'UpC  from  $1.50  to  $150.00, 

time=keepers. 

HOLIDAY  GOODS, 

CHRISTMAS  PRESENTS. 

JOHN  J.  PIVOT,  Watchmaker  and  Jeweler. 

555  High  Street. 


THE  ANNUAL 
PROBLEM  

DON;t  STAY  AWAKE  AT  NIGHTS 
worrying,  but  call  on  us  or  look  into  our 
windows.  Here  you  will  see  the  latest 
productions  in 

{Diamond, 

Silver, 

Plated. 


No,  49. 


( Gold, 

WATCH  EsJ  Silver, 

( Filled, 

r Novelties, 

SILVERWARE-!  Spoon=ware, 

( Table  HolIow=ware. 

CLOCKS,  BRIC=A=BRAC, 

Cut  Glass,  Silver  Plated  Ware,  Optical 
Goods. 

GOODTRADE  & CO.,  121  TotherSt. 


CROWD 
LOOKING 
INTO  OUR 
WINDOWS. 

A SIGHT 

^ NOT  TO  BE 

MISSED. 

Our  Holiday  lines  of  Jewelry,  Watches, 
Silverware,  Clocks,  Optical  Goods,  Cut 
Glass,  Art  Goods,  etc.,  etc.,  have  arrived. 

DOWELL  & CO. 


Jewelers, 

Watchmakers, 


Silversmiths, 

Opticians. 


375  Any  Street. 


20 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1805. 


GRANDFATHERS  CLOCK,  $2.25 

Largest  Porcelain  Clock  ever  offered  foV  the 
money.  Handsomely  decorated  incolo.s.  Made 
in  two  shapes,  ii  inches  high. 

r Six  Assorted  Handsomely  Decorated  Small 
Porcelain  Clocks.  5 to  7 inches  high,  $9.00 
for  the  lot. 


DECORATED  FIGURE  OF  THE 
SKIRT  DANCER. 

II  inches  high.  $2.50  each. 


Quick  Selling  Holiday  Goods. 


Art  Cups  and 
Saucers, 
$3.00  Doz. 
to  $15.00 
Each. 

Plates,  $3.00 
Doz.  10 
$300  00 
Doz. 

Fancy  Brie  a- 
Brae, 

Figures, 

Jardinieres, 


OUR  LITTLE  GERMAN  BAND. 


Brie  a Brae 
and  Curio 
Cabinets, 

Marble  Busts  and 
Statuary, 

Vienna  Gilt  and  Por- 
celain Tables, 


Makes  Splendid  Window  Attraction.  In  Handsome  Dresden  Decoration.  Figures  3^  inches 
high.  Price  of  Band,  $4.00  Net  Cash. 


Royal  Windsor, 
Royal  Stuart, 

Royal  Thuringia 
Vases,  all  our  own 
patterns  and  dec 
orations. 


Limoges  Fish  and 
Game  Sets, 

Brush  and  Comb 
Trays, 

Pen  and  Pin  Trays, 

Miniature  Clocks, 

Fine  French  Travel- 
ing and  Mantel 
Clocks  and  Clock 
Sets,  etc.,  etc. 


Vienna,  Dresden  and 
Sevres  Vases, 

Candlesticks  and 
Candelabras, 

Italian  Vases  and 
Brie  a-Brac, 


SELLS  AT  SIGHT.  OUR  PRICE,  $3.50  PER  SINGLE  SET. 


SILVER  PLATE  AND  DECORATED  PORCELAIN  BACK  MIRROR  AND  BRUSH. 


Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co., 

9 & II  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

Largest  Stock  of  Art  Goods  Especially  Collected  for  Jewelers, 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


21 


illustrations  as  the  foregoing,  and  in  fact 
could  be  used  with  striking  effect  as  a com- 
panion to  it  as  well  as  alone.  Electrotypes, 
75  cents  each;  postagfe  prepaid. 

No.  47:  “ Sandwich  Men  ” is  a comic 

cut  which  cleverly  contradicts  itself,  inas- 
much as  it  advertises  a fact  denied  in  the 
catchline.  It  can  be  used  with  various 
catchlines  as:  “ Follow  Our  Sandwich 

Men,”  “Have  You  Seen  Our  Sandwich 
Men?”  etc.,  etc.  Electrotypes,  75  cents 
each;  postage  prepaid. 

No.  48:  “The  Annual  Problem  ” shows 

an  algebraic  equation  which  illustrates 
what  is  passing  now  through  everyone’s 
mind.  The  solution  of  the  problem  can  be 
pertinently  adjoined.  Electrotypes,  75 
cents  each;  postage  prepaid. 

No.  49:  “ Crowds  Looking  Into  Our 

Windows  ” serves  to  arouse  curiosity  in  the 
mind  of  the  readers  as  to  what  is  in  the 
jeweler’s  window.  This  cut  is  especially 
chic  and  timely.  Electrotypes,  75  cents 
each;  postage  prepaid. 


Connecticut. 

N.  S.  Valk,  southern  representative  for 
the  Meriden  Britannia  Co.,  is  in  Meriden 
for  a few  days. 

Ryan,  Barrows  & Parker,  Danbury,  have 
been  appointed  agents  for  the  Eagle  bicycle 
in  Danbury  and  vicinity. 

The  Derby  Razor  Co.,  formed  by  Presi- 
dent Brinsmade,  of  the  Silver  Plate  Cutlery 
Co.,  has  been  organized  with  a capital  of 
$15,000. 

F.  Lyman,  manufacturing  optician, 
Bridgeport,  has  completed  his  eye  testing 
rooms  which  he  says  are  as  fine  as  any  in 
the  State. 

E.  J.  Brown,  who  has  been  in  the  employ 
of  P.  T.  Ives,  Meriden,  as  watchmaker  and 
jeweler,  has  left  to  take  a position  with  the 
Ernst  Schall  Co. , Hartford. 

The  Hotel  Russwin,  New  Britain’s  lead- 
ing hotel,  boasts  a new  and  elegant  silver 
mounted  cabinet  manufactured  by  the 
Stevens  Silver  Co.,  Portland,  Me. 

All  the  New  Haven  jewelers  have  made 
unusual  preparations  for  the  holiday  trade, 
and  say  the  indications  warrant  expecta- 
tions of  an  extensive  business,  larger  than 
in  any  year  since  1892. 

P.  H.  Stevens  & Co.,  Bristol,  have  hand- 
somely enlarged  their  equipments  and  accom- 
modations at  the  store  to  keep  pace  with 
their  increasing  trade,  especially  in  their 
silver  ware  department. 

President  W.  J.  Miller,  of  the  Derby  Sil- 
ver Co.,  has  been  elected  a director  of 
the  Shelton  Street  Railway  Co.,  just  organ- 
ized, as  has  also  president  D.  S.  Brinsmade, 
of  the  Silver  Plate  Cutlery  Co.,  Shelton. 

Duff  & Sollace  Dial  Co.-  of  Thomaston, 
incorporated  Nov.  r9,  to  manufacture  watch 
and  clock  dials,  etc;  capital  stock  $5000,  100 
shares  of  $50  each;  directors,  J.  Sollace,  W. 
H.  Griswald,  A.  E.  Blakeslee.  Paid  in  in 
cash,  $1000. 


A Holiday  Money  Maker ! 

OUR  LINE  OF 

MUSICAL  BOXES. 


THE  FORTE-FICCOLO  Am  IDEAL  1 

Are  the  two  leading  styles  of  Musical  Boxes.  Any  number  of 
tunes  can  be  obtained  for  these  Boxes  on  cylinders 
of  six  tunes  each  at  low  prices. 


SEND  CARD  FOR  CATALOGUE  AND  PRICE  LIST. 

JdCOT  & 50N,  ” “"'“".rr'o'iK 


THE  MAUSER  HEQ.  CO., 


® ® ® ® SILVERSniTHS,  ® ® ® ® 


14  East  15th  Street,  = New  York. 


22 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


WHOLESALE  EXCLUSIVELY.  SPECIAL  ATTENTION  GIVEN  TO  ORDERS. 

POSITIVELY  NO  GOODS  SOLD  AT  RETAIL 


W.  F.  MAIN  CO., 


W ^ ^ Sw  ^ I ^ S _ I ^ w 

J IE  W|E|L  RlY 


Factory,  Cor.  Friendship  and  Eddy  Sts. 
Eastern  Salesrooms,  67  Friendship  St., 
PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 


Western  Office  and  Salesrooms,  Corner 
College  and  Dubuque  Streets, 
IOWA  CITY,  IOWA. 


WATERBURY, 

INGRAHAM, 


^ vCv  s'^  T^z.  3^  vfz_jrfz_rJz_rfz  vJz_r'/ 

I CLOCKS 


SETH  THOMAS, 

^ AND  WELCH. 


i-'j^  zjs  -T^srz^ 

IMPORTERS  AND  JOBBERS  IN  WATCHES,  NOVELTIES  AND  MATERIALS. 

WESTERN  DEPOT  FOR  WH.  ROGERS’  SPOONS,  FORKS,  ETC. 


Fro7ti  the  Jewelers'  Magazine  for  Sep- 
tember, j8g^. 


THE  W.  F.  MAIN  COMPANY. 


w E are  in  receijDt  of  quite  a num- 
ber of  inquiries  from  retail 
dealers  in  jewelry,  in  different  sec- 
tions of  the  west  regarding  the  size 
of  plant  or  capacity,  standing,  meth- 
ods of  doing  business,  etc.,  of  the 
W.  F.  Main  Co.,  of  Iowa  City,  la., 
whose  factory  is  located  in  Provi- 
dence. As  a rule  we  should  answer 
such  inquiries  by  mail,  but  upon  in- 
vestigating the  company  we  were 
struck  with  the  phenomenal  growth 
of  this  concern  and  concluded  to 
answer  the  questions  in  the  columns 
of  The  Jewelry  Magazine  as, without 
doubt,  the  matter  will  prove  of  inter- 
est to  the  trade  all  over  the  country, 
as  well  as  to  the  hundreds  of  patrons 
of  the  concern  throughout  the  United 
States  and  Canada. 

The  W.  F.  Main  Co.  was  organized 
about  seven  years  ago,  beginning 
with  a limited  capital.  To-day  they 
are  undoubtedly  one  of  the  largest 
jewelry  manufacturing  concerns  in 
the  country,  that  make  a high  grade 
of  gold,  silver  and  rolled  plate  jew- 
elry of  all  kinds  and  styles,  who  sell 


their  entire  production  to  the  retail 
trade. 

They  employ  a very  large  force  of 
skilled  artisans  in  their  factory  at  67 
Friendship  St.,  having  recently  been 
obliged  to  double  their  capacity, 
owing  to  the  steady  increase  of 
orders.  The  writer  called  at  the 
factory  a few  days  since  and  was 
most  courteously  received,  being 
shown  throughout  the  shops  of  the 
concern,  wherein  he  found  a busy 
scene,  and  he  was  considerably  sur- 
prised to  find  that  a concern  with 
such  evidence  of  prosperity  had 
sprung  up  and  assumed  its  present 
proportions  which  but  a short  time 
ago  was  not  existing,  all  of  which 
goes  to  show  the  possibilities  of  the 
jewelry  trade  when  ambition,  push, 
and  brains  are  combined  in  the  work. 
The  factory  is  under  the  superin- 
tendence of  Mr.  F.  R.  Pennell,  of 
this  eity,  a practical  workman  of  25 
years’  experience. 

From  a reliable  source,  we  are 
informed  that  they  employ  25  reg- 
ular traveling  salesmen,  that  make 
regular  trips  through  the  various 
States  and  Territories  in  the  Union, 
and  also  in  Canada.  These  salesmen 
are  under  the  charge  and  direetion 


of  Mr.  S.  C.  Coman,  who  for  many 
years  was  a traveling  salesman  for 
some  of  the  largest  manufacturing 
and  jobbing  establishments  in  the 
United  States.  He  is  well  and  fav- 
orably known  among  the  jobbing 
and  retail  trade  in  nearly  every  State 
in  the  Union.  Mr.  Coman  also  acts 
as  chief  clerk  and  correspondence 
and  confidential  clerk  for  Mr.  Main. 

The  concern  distributes  their  vari- 
ous productions  through  one  of  the 
largest  wholesale  jewelry  houses  in 
the  West.  The  jobbing  department 
is  under  the  direction  and  charge  of 
Mr.  Morris  T.  Taylor,  a practical 
business  man,  who  is  well  known 
and  liked  in  the  western  eountry. 

There  is  one  thing  in  connection 
with  this  company  that  in  duty 
bound,  the  writer  feels  obliged  to 
criticize,  namely,  the  fact,  that,  in 
addition  to  the  large  clientage  among 
retail  jewelers,  the  concern  sells  to 
the  retail  dry  goods  trade  as  well. 
In  justice,  we  must  say  however,  they 
sell  only  to  the  better  class  of  retail 
dry  goods  houses,  nearly  all  of  which 
have  a jewelry  department.  Not- 
withstanding the  latter  fact.  The 
Jewelry  Magazine  is  of  the  opinion 
that  it  is  better  to  confine  the  busi- 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


23 


(Continued  fro7nW,  F.  Main  Co.’s  adv., 
page  22.) 

ness,  as  far  as  possible,  to  the  legiti- 
mate jewelry  trade. 

The  W.  F.  Main  Co,  is  reported  to 
be  financially  solid.  They  certainly 
must  have  a large  capital  in  order  to 
carry  on  their  immense  business  suc- 
cessfully, and  also  to  be  able  to  sell 
their  goods  upon  the  long  and  easy 
terms  of  credit  which  we  understand 
they  are  giving  their  customers. 

By  a perusal  of  the  above  it  will  be 
seen  that  Mr.  Main  has  been  able  to 
build  up  in  a few  years  an  extensive 
business,  under  the  rule  of  systema- 
tization; as  it  will  be  seen  that  he  has 
placed  a responsible  head  over  each 
department,  who  in  turn  is  responsi- 
ble for  the  business  carried  on  under 
his  direction. 

From  the  M anuf  acturing  Jeweler.  J^tne 
27,  i8gs- 

FROM  MANUFACTURER  TO  RE- 
TAILER DIRECT. 

'Y'HE  middleman  has  been  having 
a hard  time  for  the  last  few 
years.  The  tendency  has  been 
noticeable  among  leading  manufac- 
turers in  all  lines  to  get  as  near  the 
consumer  as  practicable.  Even  in 
the  jewelry  business,  while  a major- 
ity of  the  manufacturers  still  consider 
it  wise  to  market  their  goods  through 
jobbers,  there  is  a growing  number 
of  leading  concerns  who  deal  only 
with  the  retail  trade. 

There  is  a pro  and  con  to  every 
question,  and  while,  as  stated  above, 
the  majority  seems  to  be  against 
this  policy,  there  are  a few  who  have 
made  a marked  success  in  carrying 
out  this  course.  We  could  refer  to 
several,  but  choose  for  illustration 
the  W.  F.  Main  Co.,  which  is  a 


P.  D.  BERTINE, 

MANUFACTURER  OF 

Spectacle  Qases 

4hd_leaTHER  goods. 

Estimates  on  Special  Work. 

139  WILLIAM  ST.,  N.  Y.  CITY. 


young  firm,  but  has  had  a phenom- 
enal growth  within  the  last  few  years. 
Under  the  energetic  management  of 
W.  F.  Main,  this  firm  own  and  oper- 
ate their  own  factory  in  Providence, 
R.  I.,  conduct  a large  wholesale 
house  in  Iowa  City,  la.,  and  push 
their  trade  into  all  parts  of  the 
country  through  the  medium  of 
about  twenty  salesmen,  who  travel 
exclusively  in  their  interest. 

Starting  in  business  less  than  ten 
years  ago,  with  small  capital,  meagre 
prospects,  but  an  unbounded  supply 
of  push,  pluck  and  energy,  they  have 
worked  step  by  step  from  the  bottom 
to  the  top  of  the  ladder.  From 
manufacturing  a few  articles  in  a 
small  shop  they  have  increased  the 
size  of  their  plant  from  time  to  time 
until  they  now  occupy  new  and  com- 
modious quarters  and  manufacture 
everything  in  the  newest  patterns 
and  up-to-date  lines  of  solid  gold, 
rolled  gold  plate  and  sterling  silver 
jewelry. 

Their  factory,  at  the  corner  of 
Friendship  and  Eddy  streets,  is  under 
the  immediate  supervision  of  Mr.  F. 
R.  Pennell,  who  has  been  in  the 
jewelry  business  for  twenty-five 
years,  and  identified  with  W.  F. 
Main  Co.  for  the  past  seven.  Mr. 
Pennell  recently  made  the  statement 
to  a representative  of  The  Manu- 
facturing Jeweler  that  during  the 
present  hard  times  business  was 
steadily  on  the  increase,  and  that  he 
believed  W.  F.  Main  Co.  were  selling 
as  many  goods  as  any  manufacturer 
in  the  country.  With  this  example 
of  what  pluck  and  energy  can  do,  is 
it  safe  for  even  the  majority  to  say 
these  departures  from  the  old  estab- 
lished ways  of  trade  are  not  sound 
business  principles? 


SECURITY  PIN  GUARD 

PAT’o  0EC.25,  1894  PT’  <1- 

Se^rity  M f'g  Co.  ^ ^ ^ 

7 ASTOR  HOUSE  (BROADWAY)  N.Y. 
85c.  doz.  Net  Cash.  Discount  to  Jobbers 


HERMAN 


KOHLBUSCH,  SR. 

litsbllibed  186f 
MsDQfAotarsr  sf 
Pi* a Bala*ok* 

AKS  WnOBTS 

•T6I7  p«rp«s« 
where  aoooracj  la 
required.  69  Km* 

•*Q  Street,  eor«  , 

Malden  Le.  K«  T 
Bepelre  (Au;  iumo)'' 
prompUj  made. 


Assorted  Styles  of  Cups  and 
Saucers  if  Desired. 


LEW,  MEVFES  S-  CO., 

9 & II  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y. 


A Significant  Fact 


is  the  ONLY  spring  having  an  Adjustment 
that  prevents  excessive  Pressure  on  the 
Nose. 

SEND  FOR  SAMPLE  TO 

E.  KIRSTEIN’S  SONS  CO., 

ROCHESTER,  N.  Y. 

4 MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 


24 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1896 


DIAMONDS. 

Wm.  S.  Hedges  & Co., 

IMPORTERS  OF 

Diamonds  and  Precious  Stones. 


DIAMOND  JEWELRY. 

170  Broadway,  New  York. 

22  Holborn  Viaduct,  London. 


The  Store  of  Will  H.  Booth  Closed  by  the 
Sheriff. 

Sioux  Falls,  S Dak.,  Nov.  20. — The  jew- 
elry store  of  Will  H.  Booth,  the  oldest  jew- 
eler in  the  city,  was  closed  yesterday  by  the 
sheriff  under  an  execution  in  favor  of  the 
State  Banking  and  Trust  Co.  for  $4,155. 
Mr.  Booth  attributes  his  financial  em 
barrassment  to  poor  collections,  but  expects 
to  soon  reopen.  ^ 


Alfred  H.  Smith  & Co., 

IMPORTERS 


DIAMONDS 


The  Swan  Fountain  Pun. 

Made  on  Distinct  Principles,  Patented. 

3 SIZES  OF  SWAN  “SAFETIES”  CAN  BE 
CARRIED  ANYHOW  OR  ANYWHERE. 

Three  sizes  of  “ Self-Filling  ” Swans,  the 
wonder  of  the  day,  illustrating  the  improve- 
ment between  the  first  fountain  pen  on 
record,  patented  150  years  ago, 

“ A Quill  Covered  With  Sheepsgut.” 
An  English  patent  in  those  days  cost  a 
fortune,  thus  the  advance  from  the  past  to 
the  present  is  sharply  defined. 


A Memorandum  Case  in  the  Buffalo 
Courts. 

Buffalo,  N.  Y.,  Nov.  21. — George  P. 
Critsinger  has  been  arrested  on  a grand 
larceny  warrant  sworn  out  by  King  & Eisele. 
In  the  complaint  the  firm  allege  that  some 
time  ago  they  sold  Critsinger  $70  worth  of 
goods  on  memorandum  and  that  he  refused 
to  settle  for  the  same  after  disposing  of 
them. 


Absconding  Jeweler  Levy  Arrested  on  a 
Tug  Boat. 


AND 


PRECIOUS  STONES, 


182  BROADWAY,  COR.  JOHN  STREET, 

NEW  YORK. 

''•'""‘BSiiding.  34  & 36  Washington  St 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


D.  HONET, 

ESTABLISHED  l866. 

CAMEO 

PORTRAITS 

Works  of  Art, 
Precious  Stones.' 

937  BROAmVAY. 

NEW  YORK, 


DON’T  FORGET  THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S  BOOK  LIST  when  in  want  of  any  tech- 
nical book  in  the  Jewelry  or  Kindred  Trades. 


W.  W.  Stewart,  Inventor  & Patentee 

Mabie,  Todd  & Bard, 

MANUFACTURERS. 

New  York  & London. 

Purchasers 

. . OF  . . 

RARE  OEMS, 

PRECIOUS  STONES 
AND  ALL  GOODS  FOR 
JEWELRY, 

ADDRESS 

R.  A.  Kipling,  Paris, 

19  Rue  Drouot,  France. 


Elizabeth,  N.  J.,  Nov.  22. — Arthur  Levy, 
who  some  time  ago  kept  a jewelry  store  on 
ist  St.,  and  was  indicted  on  several  charges 
of  fraud  and  embezzlement  of  goods  of 
customers,  has  been  arrested.  He  jumped 
his  bail  and  was  seeking  to  elude  the  of- 
ficers. Mrs.  Adams,  who  was  his  surety, 
engaged  officers  to  look  up  the  fugitive, 
and  he  was  located  aboard  the  tugboat 
Chase,  lying  at  one  of  the  downtown 
wharves. 

Justice  Charles  Jacobs  and  Constable 
Schoppe  had  the  capias  for  Levy’s  arrest, 
and  getting  the  assistance  of  Policeman 
McCracken,  they  boarded  the  vessel  at 
10.30  o’clock  and  surprised  Levy,  who  was 
asleep  in  the  cabin.  Levy  was  taken  to  the 
county  jail.  When  arraigned  he  pleaded 
not  guilty,  and  the  bail  was  fixed  at  $300  in 
the  several  cases. 


The  Forthcoming  Banquet  of  the  Chicago 
Jewelers’  Association. 

Chicago,  111.,  Nov.  23— At  the  last  meet- 
ing of  the  Chicago  Jewelers’  Association, 
it  was  decided  to  hold  a banquet  some- 
time in  January  and  last  week  the  follow- 
ing banquet  committee  was  appointed  by 
President  Sackett;  A.  L.  Sercomb,  chair- 
man, Lem  W.  Flershem,  J.  F.  Talbot,  F. 
M.  Sproehnle,  F.  A.  Hardy,  and  Grove 
Sackett,  ex-officio.  From  the  personnel  of 
the  above  committee  the  success  of  the 
affair  can  be  confidently  predicted.  The 
day  and  place  of  holding  the  banquet  were 
to  be  decided  upon  at  a meeting  of  the  com- 
mittee held  Nov.  27th,  of  which  details  are 
not  at  hand. 


The  Bowden  Rings 

ARE  COMPLETE  IN  VARIETY,  CORRECT 
IN  QUALITY  AND  PERFECT  IN  FINISH. 
WE  MAKE  EVERY  VARIETY  OF  FINGER 
RTNn.c; 


J.  B.  Bowden  Ssl  Co., 


Branch  Office  : 

206  Kearny  Street 
San  Francisco  Cal. 


3 MAIDEN  LANE, 


.New  York. 


Webb  S.  Ball  and  R.  F.  Burdick  were 
among  the  party  that  went  with  the  Cleve- 
land Chamber  of  Commerce  to  the  Atlanta 
Exposition.  The  train  which  conveyed 
the  party  made  the  remarkable  time  of  5 
hours-  and  24  minutes  from  Cleveland  to 
Cincinnati,  being  the  fastest  time  evermade 
over  the  distance. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


25 


Last  Rites  to  the  Memory  of  Stanton  B. 

Champlin. 

Providence,  R.  I.,  Nov.  21. — The  jewelry 
business  of  this  vicinity  has  met  with  sev- 
eral losses  by  [death  within  the  past  fort- 
night, no  less  than  five  well  known  mem- 
bers of  the  trade  having  passed  away 
during  that  period,  f One  that  occasioned 
the  most  surprise  was  that  of  Stanton  B. 
Champlin,  of  the  manufacturing  concern  of 
S.  B.  Champlin  & Son,  who  died  at  Dans- 
ville,  N.  Y.,  on  the  26th  inst.  after  a short 
illness. 

Stanton  B.  Champlin  was  the  youngest 
of  a family  of  fourteen  children  of  Elijah 
Champlin,  was  born  at  South  Kingston, 
R.  I.,  in  1827,  and  was  in  the  6gth  year  of 
his  age  at  the  time  of  his  death.  His  father 
was  a farmer,  and  his  early  life  was  passed 
upon  the  latter’s  farm  and  in  obtaining  such 
an  education  as  was  afforded  by  the  country 
schools  of  that  section  and  time.  When  he 
reached  his  majority  he  came  to  this  city 
and  learned  the  jewelry  business  as  an  ap- 
prentice to  Christopher  and  Americus  Potter, 
with  whom  he  remained  for  several  years, 
following  which  for  a short  time  he  was 
employed  by  L.  & D.  S.  Carr.  When  the 
financial  panic  of  1857-58  shattered  the  jew- 
elry business  and  compeled  many  of  the 
trade  to  seek  employment  of  the  city  in 
digging  away  Smith’s  Hill  at  75  cents  per 
day,  Mr.  Champlin  opened  a small  market 
on  Pine  St.  Here  success  attended  his 
venture  and  he  was  obliged  to  enlarge  his 
place  of  business  several  times.  Sixteen 
years  were  passed  in  this  connection,  until 
in  February,  1872,  he  formed  a copartner- 
ship with  his  son  George  B.  Champlin,  for 
the  manufacture  of  jewelry  as  S.  B.  Champ- 
lin & Son,  who  have  continued  ever  since. 
For  several  years  they  were  located  on 
Friendship  St.,  but  early  in  1889  they  re- 
moved to  the  commodious  building  which 
they  had  erected  on  Chestnut  St.  at  the 
junction  of  Ship  St. 

Mr.  Champlin  was  interested  in  real  estate 
in  this  city  to  a considerable  degree  and 
was  very  largely  instrumental  in  developing 
parts  of  Edgewood.  He  was  also  erecting 
a fine  new  building  on  Broad  St.  The 
deceased  never  entered  politics  although  he 
had  had  the  nomination  of  Alderman  ten. 
deredhim  several  times  but  declined. 

He  leaves  a widow  and  one  son,  George 
B.  Champlin,  who  was  his  partner  in  his 
business.  The  funeral  was  solemnized  from 
his  late  residence  36  Parkis  Ave.  this 
afternoon,  the  ceremony  being  conducted 
by  Rev.  Wallace  Nutting,  of  the  Union 
Congregational  Church.  There  was  a large 
attendance  of  relatives  and  friends.  The 
casket  was  fairly  buried  in  flowers.  Among 
these  offerings  were  a number  sent  by  those 
with  whom  the  deceased  had  been  associ- 
ated in  business.  One  was  from  the  em- 
ployes of  S.  B.  Champlin  & Son,  another 
from  the  Manufacturing  Jewelers’  Board  of 
Trade,  and  others  from  the  employes  of  the 
E.  M.  Dart  Mfg.  Co.,  and  the  directors  of 
the  Campbell  Machine  Co.  The  interment 
was  at  Swan  Point. 


ESTABLISHED  50  YEARS. 

RANDEL,  BAREMORE  & BILLINSS, 

IMPORTERS  OF 

DIAMONDS, 

And  Other  Precious  Stones. 

FINE  PEARLS  A SPECIALTY. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

DIAMOND  JEWELRY 

IN  THE  LATEST  DESIGNS. 


Diamonds  Recut  in  Modern  Styles  or  Repaired  on  Premises. 


58  Nassau  Street, 

I St.  Andrews  St. 

29  Maiden  Lane, 

I Tulp  Straat, 

Holbom  Circus, 

NEW  YORK. 

AMSTERDAM. 

'LONDON  E.  C. 

ESTABLISHED  1841. 


TRADE  MARK 


CARTER,  SLOAN  S CO., 


MANUFACTURERS  OF  COED  JEWFFRI, 


No.  15  AAIDEN  LANE 
NEW  YORK. 


A.  CARTER,  jR. 

A.  K.  SLOAN. 

C.  E.  HASTINGS. 


GEO,  R.  HOWE. 
WM.  T.  CARTER. 
WM  T.  GOUGH. 


FACTORY,  NEWARK,  N.  J. 


THE  STATIONERS’  ENGRAVING  CO., 

98,  100,  102  NASSAU  ST.,  NEW  YOEK, 

MAKERS  OF 

WEDDING  INVITATIONS,  RECEPTION  AND  VISITING  CARDS 

of  the  Best  Quality,  which  are  offered  to  Stationers  of  recognized  standing  and  reputation  only 
Avoid  Dry-goods  Store  Competition  by  always  ordering  those  bearing  our  registered  trade  mark  “ SILVER  WHITf  . 


26 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


Meriden  Britannia  Co.  silver  Plate  that  Wears. 

MERIDEN,  CONN. 

New  York,  208  Fifth  Ave.  Chicago,  147  State  St. 

San  Francisco,  i34  Sutter  St.  Hamilton,  Ont. 


TOILET  WARE  IN  THE  ABOVE  PATTERNS. 


NO.  99J6 


Hair  Brush, 
Military  Brush, 
Comb,  wide, 
Comb,  narrow, 
Hand  Mirror, 


Cloth  Brush, 

Hat  Brush, 

Velvet  Brush, 
Whisk  Broom, 

Puff  Box,  cut  glass. 


No.  9937 


Hair  Brush, 

Comb,  narrow. 
Comb,  wide. 

Hand  Mirror, 

Puff  Box,  cut  glass. 


Cloth  Brush, 

Hat  Brush, 

Whisk  Broom, 

Soap  Box,  traveling 


In  buying  silver-plated  ware  of  any  kind,  there  are  two  things  to  consider — 
durability,  and  artistic  quality — both  of  which  can  be  secured  by  purchasing 
Meriden  Britannia  Co.  goods,  which  for  half  a century  have  been  famous  for  these 
characteristics. 


SPOONS.  FORKS,  KNIVES,  ETC. 


ORANGE  SPOON. 


lotus 


VESTA. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


27 


Death  of  Gebhard  Henry  Mahler. 

Raleigh,  N.  C.,  Nov.  21. — At  his  home 
on  Fayetteville  St.,  Gebhard  Henry  Mahler, 
well  known  as  one  of  Raleigh’s  best  and 
most  public  spirited  citizens,  died  at  ii 
o’clock  Monday  evening,  of  heart  failure. 
Death  came  suddenly  and  was  a severe 
shock,  not  only  to  the  public,  but  to  his 
family  and  friends,  who  had  no  idea  that 
his  condition  was  in  the  least  serious.  For 
more  than  two  years  Mr.  Mahler  had  been 
in  feeble  health,  but  was  not  thought  to  be 
in  danger.  He  passed  away  in  a second  of 
time,  and  without  pain. 

Mr.  Mahler  was  born  in  Osnaburck, 
Prussia,  64  years  ago.  He  came  to  this 
city  in  1854  S’lid  engaged  in  business  while 
yet  a young  man,  and  at  his  death  had 
amassed  a considerable  fortune.  During 
his  long  residence  in  this  city,  he  had  built 
up  from  a small  business  the  largest  jewelry 
establishment  in  the  State.  His  business 
success  was  due  to  his  thoroughness  and  to 
his  never  failing  honesty.  This  honesty 
and  straightforwardness  of  purpose  were 
the  conspicuous  traits  of  his  character. 

During  the  war  he  married  Mrs.  Kramer, 
who  survives  him.  He  leaves  three  chil- 
dren; Louis  and  Fred  Mahler,  of  Raleigh, 
and  Julius  Mahler,  of  Durham;  three  step- 
children, Mrs.  Joseph  E.  Pogue,  of  Ral- 
eigh, Sam  and  Albert  Kramer,  of  Durham; 
his  grandaughter.  Miss  Blanch  Blake,  of 
this  city. 

The  funeral  services  took  place  yesterday 
in  Christ  Church.  A large  number  of  peo- 
ple gathered  to  show  their  respect  for  the 
memory  of  the  deceased.  The  burial 
services  were  conducted  with  Masonic 
ceremonies  at  Oakwood  Cemetery. 

The  business  of  the  deceased  will  be  con- 
tinued by  his  sons. 


A STRONG  LINE  FOR  1896. 
CAHOONE’S 


Sold  exclusively  through 

the  jobbing  trade 

GEORGE  H.  CAHOONE  & CO., 

Kent  and  Stanley  Bldg.,  Providence,  R.  I.  21  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 


Diamonds 


Clever  Capture  of  a Trio  of  Burglars. 


AND 


Sandy  Hook,  Conn.,  Nov.  23. — William 
B.  Sniflen,  proprietor  of  a jewelry  store 
in  this  place  was  awakened  about  1.30  o’clock 
this  morning  by  the  ringing  of  a burglar 
alarm  which  was  connected  with  his  store. 
Accompanied  by  his  son,  Mr.  Sniffen  hur- 
ried to  the  store,  which  is  about  an  eighth  of 
a mile  from  his  residence,  and  found  three 
burglars  at  work. 

Mr.  Sniffen  and  his  son  were  armed,  but 
they  decided  not  to  take  any  chances  with 
the  burglars.  They  summoned  assistance 
and  surrounded  the  store.  Then  the  burg- 
lars were  commanded  to  surrender.  They 
came  without  weapons  and  threw  up  their 
•hands.  A justice  was  summoned,  and  the 
men  were  given  a hearing  immediately. 
They  gave  their  names  as  James  Fuller, 
Charles  Harvey,  and  Andrew  Ferguson. 
Probable  cause  was  found  and  they  were 
bound  over  to  the  Superior  Court  under 
bonds  of  $1,000  each. 

Eight  years  ago,  Mr.  Sniffen  captured  a 
number  of  burglars  in  his  store  in  a similar 
manner,  the  burglar  alarm  giving  him 
warning. 


Diamond  Jewelry 

FOr^  THFj 

^iSi^Holidays. 

CROSS  & BEQUELIN, 

43  Rue  Meslay,  17  Maiden  Lane, 

PARIS.  NEW  YORK. 


28 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


Awards  at  the  Cotton  States  and  Inter- 
national  Exposition. 

Atlanta,  Ga.,  Nov.  22. — The  jury  of 
awards  of  the  Cotton  States  and  Interna- 
tional Exposition  have  completed  their  re- 
port. The  awards  in  the  jewelry  and 
kindred  trades  are  as  follows: 

MANUFACTURES. 

Grand  Prize  or  Gold  Medal. 

The  Waterman  Pen  Company,  New 
York — Fountain  pens. 

Barnett  & Co.,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  files. 
Diploma  for  General  Excelle7ice  or 
Bronze  Medal. 

H.  A.  Lawton,  Los  Angeles,  Cal. — Foun- 
tain pens. 

WORK  OF  GOLDSMTIIIS. 

Grand  Prize  or  Gold  Medal. 

J.  P.  Stevens  & Bro.,  Atlanta,  Ga. — 


Watches  and  patent  lever. 

Snead  & Co.,  Louisville,  Ky. — Mantel- 
piece. 

Diploma  of  Honor  or  Silver  Medal. 

The  Goldsoll  Co.  — Gentlemen’s  patent 
watch  chains. 

Madame  A.  L.  Pogosky. — Russian  silver. 

Diploma  of  General  Excellejice  or 
Bro7ize  Medal. 

A.  J.  Valck — Metal  shield  “ Cortez  in 
Battle,”  repousse  and  modeling  work. 
Colony  S.  Osgood — Silver  polish. 

Honorable  Mention. 

Snead  & Co.,  Louisville,  Ky. — Art  metal 
work. 

J.  P.  Stevens  & Bro.,  Atlanta,  Ga. — Gen- 
eral exhibit,  including  Libbey  cut  glass, 
Whiting  silver,  and  watches. 


DECORATIVE  ART  DEPARTMENT. 

Grand  Prize  or  Gold  Medal. 

M.  & E.  Healey,  Washington,  D.  C. — 
Decorated  china. 

The  Libbey  Cut  Glass  Co.,  Toledo,  O. — 
Cut  glass  tableware. 

The  Rookwood  Pottery  Co.,  Cincinnati, 
O. — Vases  and  art  goods. 

Royal  Copenhagen  Potteries — Fine  art 
pottery.  ^ 

The  Russian  Silversmiths  Co.,  Moscow, 
Russia — Enameled  silverware. 

Landers,  Frary  & Clark,  New  Britain, 
Conn. — Table  cutlery. 

Diploma  of  Honor  or  Silver  Medal. 

Peasants  of  the  Province  of  Exaterinburg 
— Precious  stone  cutting. 

The  Ceramic  Art  Co.,  Trenton,  N.  J. — 
Art  pottery. 

MINING. 

Grand  Prize  or  Gold  Medal. 

Geological  Survey  of  North  Carolina,  J. 
W.  Holmes,  Geologist,  Chappell  Hill,  N.  C. 
— The  mineral  products  of  North  Carolina. 

David  T.  Day,  United  States  Geological 
Survey,  Washington,  D.  C. — The  mineral 
wealth  of  the  Southern  States. 

George  W.  Kunz,  Tiffany  & Co.,  New 
York  City— The  geology  of  the  diamond, 
opal,  garnet  and  platinum  and  a collection 
of  North  Carolina  quartz  crystals. 

Geological  Survey  of  Georgia,  W.  S. 
Yeates,  Geologist,  Atlanta,  Ga. — Mineral 
resources  of  the  State  of  Georgia  and  build- 
ing stones  of  the  State. 

The  member  of  the  jury  who  passed  upon 
work  of  goldsmiths  and  silversmiths  was 
Paulding  Farnham,  of  Tiffany  & Co.,  New 
York. 


Examination  of  Van  Wezel  Bros.*  Dia- 
mond Cutters. 

The  examination  of  Simon  De  Vos, 
Isaac  Wittmundt,  Myer  Juda  and  Phillip 
Mattemann,  diamond  workers,  took  place 
Tuesday,  Wednesday  and  Thursday  of  last 
week,  in  the  office  of  Commissioner  Shields, 
in  the  Post  Office  building.  New  York. 
These  men  are  witnesses  in  the  five  suits 
brought  by  the  United  States  against 
Van  Wezel  Bros.,  diamond  cutters,  Eliza- 
beth and  Bleecker  Sts.,  New  York,  for  im- 
porting diamond  cutters  under  contract  in 
violation  of  the  Alien  Contract  Labor 
Law. 

All  the  men  testified  to  the  effect  that 
they  had  been  engaged  in  Amsterdam  to 
work  at  Van  Wezel’s  factory  here.  Assist- 
ant U.  S.  District  Attorney  Ely  con- 
ducted the  examination  on  the  part  of  the 
United  States  and  Samuel  Greenbaum, 
counsel  for  Van  Wezel  Bros.,  cross  ex- 
amined the  witnesses.  The  examinations 
are  not  yet  concluded. 


J.  George  Gehring,  jeweler,  Baltimore, 
Md.,  is  being  urged  for  Fire  Commissioner. 
He  has  the  endorsement  of  the  Old  Town 
M.  & M.  Association,  as  well  as  many  other 
prominent  East  Baltimore  business  men. 


ESTABLISHED  1870. 


TRADE  MARK. 


Samuel  C.  Jackson, 


MANUFACTURER  OF 


Fine  Cases 


For  Jewelry,  Silverware,  «Scc. 

in  Plush,  Chamois,  Kid, 

Brocade  Silk,  &c. 

ALSO  HARDWOOD 

Trays  and 

IC-O  I O,  Sample  Cases, 

180  Broadway,  New  York. 


w 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


28-a 


The  Revised  Law  of  Attachment  in  New 
York  State. 

In  the  New  York  Superior  Court,  Judge 
McAdam,  Thursday,  rendered  an  interest- 
ing decision  on  a motion  to  vacate  an  at- 
tachment obtained  against  Gabriel  M. 
Rouge,  for  $25,000,  in  an  action  brought 
by  Margaret  E.  Rouge  to  recover  that 
amount  of  money  from  the  defendant  for 
alienating  the  affections  of  her  husband, 
Hubert  Rouge,  son  of  the  defendant. 

The  defendant  resides  in  Geneva, 
Switzerland,  and  is  a member  of  the 
watch  manufacturing  firm  of  Patek,  Phil- 
lippe  & Co.  The  plaintiff  married  Hubert 
Rouge  in  New  York,  April  7,  1890.  He 
took  his  bride  to  Geneva,  where  they  lived 
together  until  March,  1891.  She  then  re- 
turned to  her  invalid  mother  in  New  York. 
She  and  her  father-in-law  did  not  get  along 
well  together.  The  wife  says  that  the 
father  alienated  the  affections  of  her  hus- 
band, and  induced  her  husband  to  leave 
her  and  begin  an  action  for  divorce  on  the 
ground  of  abandonment,  in  the  Geneva 
courts,  which  action  is  still  pending.  She 
says  that  her  father-in-law  told  her  husband 
that  she  was  not  a worthy  wife  for  him. 

Under  the  new  law,  which  went  into  ef- 
fect on  Sept,  ist  last,  an  attachment  for 
$25,000  was  granted  against  the  property  of 
the  elder  Rouge  in  New  York  State.  The 
attachment  was  served  against  the  interest 
of  the  defendant  in  the  moneys  of  Patek, 
Phillippe  & Co.  in  the  hands  of  L.  H. 
Keller  & Co.,  New  York. 


Under  the  Code  before  it  was  amended 
an  attachment  against  the  property  of  a 
non-resident  could  be  had  when  the  action 
was  to  recover  money  damages  for  one  of 
the  following  causes  ; i.  Breach  of  con- 
tract other  than  a contract  to  marry  ; 2. 
Wrongful  conversion  of  personal  pr>'p  rty  ; 

3.  Any  other  \n\\xxy  to  personal  property , 
in  consequence  of  negligence,  fraud,  or 
other  wrongful  act.  On  May  9th  last  the 
Legislature  amended  clause  3 to  read  : ‘ An 
injury  to  perso?i  or  property  va  consequence 
of  negligence,  fraud,  or  1 ther  wrongful  act.’ 

judge  McAdam  says  : 

“Prior  to  this  amendment  resort  to  the  process  of 
attachment  was  allowed  only  to  ‘ creditors  ’ or  for 
injuries  to  property  where  the  amount  demanded  was 
capable  of  accurate  computation,  the  existence  and 
restriction  of  the  remedy  being  of  course  dependent 
upon  the  terms  of  the  governing  statute.  While  it  is 
easy  to  understand  why  a creditor  proceeding  against 
a non  resident  should  be  allowed  to  impound  property 
found  within  the  jurisdiction  of  the  court  to  answer 
as  security  for  any  claim  existing  or  for  the  amount  in 
dollars  and  cents  of  any  specified  injury  done  to 
property,  it  is  not  apparent  on  first  view  why  the 
Legislature  should  have  included  actions  for  injuries 
to  the  person  where  the  damages  are  unliquidated, 
and  where  the  plaintiff  in  his  declaration  and  affidavit 
generally  places  them  at  a high  figure.  Neither  the 
complaint  nor  affidavit  in  such  an  action  can  furnish  ! 
any  certain  guide  from  which  the  Judge  granting  the  j 
attachment  may  determine  what  the  actual  damages 
are.  The  Legislature  certainly  did  not  intend  that 
the  attachment  should  run  for  any  amount  a plaintiff 
might  see  fit  to  insert  in  the  ad  damnum  of  his  com. 
plaint. 

“ The  plaintiff  has  in  this  instance  fixed  the  damages 
at  $25,000,  and  she  might  have  put  them  at  $250,000  ; 
but  it  does  not  follow  that  property  of  the  defendant 
is  to  be  impounded  to  answer  the  demand  thus  made. 


The  practice  in  this  respect  must  therefore  assimilate 
to  that  followed  in  granting  orders  of  arrest.  W'here 
such  orders  are  made  in  actions  for  injuries  to  the 
person  the  bail  is  fixed  in  such  sum  as  the  judge  may 
judicially  determine  in  view  of  the  nature  and  extent 
of  the  injuries  complained  of  and  the  probable  ultimate 
recovery. 

“ Doubtless  the  legislature  .intended  to  reach 
a class  of  cases  where  injuries  to  the  person  were  in 
flicted  upon  residents  of  this  State  who  in  consequence 
of  the  non-residence  of  the  wrongdoer  were  practically 
remediless  No  order  of  publication  would  lie  because 
no  property  has  been  attached.  To  supply  this  omis- 
sion in  the  law  the  new  remedy  was  furnished,  and  it 
was  designed  more  to  coerce  the  appearance  of  the  tort 
feasor  than  to  impound  his  property.  With  this  end 
in  view  the  act  may  be  wise  legislation  ; but  to  go 
further  and  grant  attachments  against  the  property  of 
non-residents  in  ordinary  tort  actions  for  any  sum  the 
plaintiff  sees  fit  to  demand  would  lead  to  great  abuse. 

“ It  is  evident,  therefore,  that  the  Legislature  in- 
tended that  a judge  in  issuing  the  attachment  should 
exercise  judicial  discretion  as  to  the  damages  likely  to 
be  recovered  in  order  to  fix  the  amount  for  which  the 
attachment  should  go  upon  the  principles  which  guide 
him  in  granting  an  order  of  arrest  ; the  plaintiff  may 
thus  recover  the  sum  impounded  if  the  damage  is 
equal  to  that  amount,  and  the  defendant  by  his  non- 
appearance  prevents  a judgment  in  personam  that 
might  be  enforcible  by  an  action  thereon  in  any  other 
jurisdiction.” 

Judge  McAdam  reduced  the  amount  of 
the  attachment  to  $2,500  and  ordered 
! Mrs.  Rouge  to  file  a bond  of  $500.  At  the 
! office  of  L.  H.  Keller  & Co.  it  was  said  the 
sheriff  had  not  attached  any  goods.  The 
firm  contended  that  they  held  no  property 
belonging  to  Mr.  Rouge,  and  the  attach- 
ment was  returned  unsa'isfied.  The  mem- 
bers of  L.  H.  Keller  & Co.  are  to  be  ex- 
amined Friday  as  to  the  property  held  by 
them  as  agents  for  Patek,  Phil  ippe  & Co. 


Shall  Size  Decokatlo  Watches 

^QREAT  DISPLAY. 


Large  variety  of  new  and  attractive 
designs  in  several  grades, 

AT  VARIOUS  PRICES. 

Enameled  in  all  suitable  colors. 

With  and  without  Handsome  Diamond  or 
Pearl  Decorations. 


A,  WITTNAUER, 

Successor  to  J.  Eugene  Robert  & Co.  I9  MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK. 

Manufacturer  and  Importer  of  Watches. 

A complete  line  of  most  desirable  Movements  fitting  ready -made  Cases  of  all  sizes.  Specially 

Adjusted  i6  and  i8  size  Movements  tor  railroad  use. 


2%-b 


THE  JEWELERS'  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


Striking  Diamond  Workers  Returning  to 
Amsterdam. 

A new  development  in  the  strike  of  the 
diamond  workers  employed  by  Stern 
Bros.  & Co.,  Wallach  & Schiele,  Arnstein 
Bros  & Co., Van  Wezel  Bros,  and  Lewis  & 
Co., New  York,  was  the  departure  Satur- 
day of  15  diamond  cutters  for  Europe. 

At  the  strikers’  headquarters,  263  Bowery, 
a Circular  reporter  was  told  that  besides 
the  15  men  who  sailed  Saturday,  30  others 
had  previously  returned  to  Europe  and  that 
they  expected  the  remaining  160  men  still 
out  on  strike  to  do  the  same,  if  the  strike 
was  not  settled  soon. 

Said  the  secretary  of  the  union  : “ If  the 
combination  continues  to  refuse  what  we 
ask,  all  the  men,  even  the  Americans,  will 
go  to  Amsterdam,  as  we  have  offers  of  em- 


K2T 

PnOTO- 

niNmiuREj. 


The  Best. 

The  Most  Durable. 


Roy  Watch  ♦ ♦ ♦ 
♦ ♦ ♦ Case  Co*, 

2C23  MAIDEN  LANE, 
NEW  YORK. 


O.  NEWn/IN, 

SUCCESSOR  TO 

L.  NEWriAN, 


Etruscan  Coloring  a Specialty. 


Watch  Case  Polishing. 


75  Nassau  St.,  Room  8 (Rear  Building), 
New  York  City. 


ployment  for  all  who  will  return  to  Europe 
and  $800  has  already  been  sent  us  to  pay 
passages.  The  European  workers  recently 
won  in  their  strike  for  30  per  cent,  advance, 
which  is  5 per  cent  more  than  our  men 
receive  here.  We  can  continue  to  hold  oui 
as  long  as  we  please,  as  we  have  14,000  men 
in  Amsterdam  willing  to  support  us,  if 
necessary.” 

If  the  men  go  to  Europe  there  would  be, 
he  said,  no  men  here  to  take  their  places, 
as  the  strikers’  demands  had  been  acceded 
to  in  the  shops  of  Van  Dam,  R.  H.  Rams- 
gate, H.  A.  Groen  & Bro.,  John  Weiner, 
Goldsmith  & Weil,  Henry  Fera  and  Norden 
& Co.,  and  no  more  would  come  from 
Europe. 

The  Failure  of  V.  J.  Pekor. 

V.  J.  Pekor,  Columbjs,  Ga.,  failed  Nov. 
19th,  giving  preferences  to  creditors  for 
$15,000.  His  liabilities  are  given  as  $25,000, 
w ith  assets  of  $20,000. 

On  Oct.  12  last,  a New  York  firm  re- 
ceived a letter  from  Mr.  Pekor,  in  which 
the  latter  stated  that  he  had  a stock  worth 
about  $25,000,  on  which  he  owed  $4  300. 
On  this  statement  the  firm  shipped  him 
goods  and  are  now  attacking  his  failure  on 
the  ground  of  fraud. 

Two  Atlanta  Jewelers  at  Law  over  a 
Spoon. 

Atlanta,  Ga.,  Nov.  22.  — Judge  New- 
man has  issued  a restraining  order  against 
jeweler  A.  L.  Delkin,  forbidding  him  to 
sell  or  to  expose  for  sale  a certain  spoon 
which  bears  a peculiar  mark  and  which  is 
known  in  trade  circles  as  the  “watermelon 
spoon.”  This  order  was  granted  on  the 
motion  of  C.  W.  Crankshaw,  another  jew- 
eler, who  claims  exclusive  ownership  of  the 
design.  The  petition  was  presented  to 


Judge  Newman  Monday  afternoon.  On 
hearing  the  allegations  of  the  bill  Judge 
Newman  granted  the  prayer,  subject  to 
final  action  Saturday  morning. 

In  his  petition  the  aggressive  jeweler 
avers  that  several  months  ago  he  had  the 
spoon  copyrighted  as  a work  of  art, 
and  holds  the  papers  which  are  necessary 
to  establish  his  claim.  He  invented  the  de- 
sign himself  after  much  pains  and  labor 
and  felt  that  he  was  entitled  to  protection 
from  the  government  after  he  had  already 
paid  for  it  in  advance.  He  further  prayed 
in  the  petition  for  Judge  Newman  to  direct 
Delkin,  in  appearing  before  him,  to  make  a 
complete  statement  of  the  number  of  spoons 
already  sold  and  the  number  which  he  still 
had  on  hand.  It  was  furthermore  alleged 
in  the  petition  that  Delkin  was  involved  and 
was  doing  business  for  parties  whose  names 
were  not  familiar  to  him.  He  had  no  other 
means  of  protecting  his  rights  except  by 
resorting  to  the  courts  and  asking  for  the 
process  of  injunction. 

The  bowl  of  the  spoon  represents  a water- 
melon sliced  in  two.  The  representation 
is  a good  one,  showing  not  only  the  indi- 
vidual seed  of  the  melon,  but  the  delicate 
fibers  of  the  meat.  Across  the  bridge  of 
the  spoon  the  word  “ Atlanta”  is  printed  in 
raised  capital  letters.  The  spoon  is  mounted 
with  a negro’s  face,  expressive  of  intense 
satisfaction  over  the  capture  of  the  water- 
melon, which  has  always  been  the  pet  vege- 
table of  the  Georgia  darky. 


The  safe  in  the  postoffice  in  New  Sharon, 
la.,  was  blown  open  on  the  night  of  Nov. 
2oth,  and  $100  worth  of  stamps  taken.  The 
jewelry  store  of  W.  P.  Hammond  was  also 
robbed  of  15  to  20  gold  watch  cases,  valued 
at  $200.  The  acts  were,  committed  by 
three  men. 


f 

i < 

I UUDEKE  & POWER,  1 


IMPORTERS  OF 


)») 

if' 

i 

i 


0^, 


Diamonlis 


AND  OXMER  PSECIOUS  STONES, 


Exceptionally  Pine  Brilliants,  Rubies,  Emeralds,  Sapphires  and  Pearls 


A SPECIALTY. 


t23  John  Street,  New  York. 


ADOLPH  LUDEKE. 


CHAS.  L.  POWER. 


$ 

$ 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


A Crownina  Success. 


M 

b 

o 

fD 

•-» 

D* 

O 

N 


M > 


< 

n) 

•-J 


o 

2 w 
D - 


o 3 


k: 
o 
c 

O 

'3‘ 

2. 

^ 2 

3 (D 


M 

o 

'I 


o ^ 

JO 

D 


for 


L.  H.  K.  & CO. 
CROWNS 

10  K.  FILLED. 


DUKBKK 

CASES 


^gsV^altham.  i6s  Wait/, 


14  K.  FILLED. 

\SS ^aif/, 


10  K.  PENDANT  SET. 

^6s  E'g'n-  6s 


GoM, 

$2.25  Ooz 


ASSORTMENT  No.  4. 


Silver, 
$1.00  Doz. 


o 


to 

Ln 


o 

(T>  O 
■I  -» 
^ O 

§*  ^ 
N 3 
n>  w 
D 


O > B 


o 2 

>-j  3* 

3 2. 

2 n> 


A FULL  LINE  OF  CROWNS  STEMS  NOT  ILLUSTRATED  ABOVE  CONSTANTLY  ON  HAND. 


ESTABLISHKD  1853 


L.  H.  KELLER  & CO., 


64  NASSAU  ST,.  NEW  YORK. 


f 


2E-a 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  18,5. 


American  Cut  Gl 

FOR  THE  HOLIDAYS. 


ass, 


To  retail  at  $5.50  each. 


LARGE  VARIETY 


AT 

LOWEST 

POSSIBLE 

PRICES. 


**  W alter  Scott  **  8 in.  Olive  Dish. 
Profitable  to  retail  at  $3  each. 


Examine  our  lines  of  Olive  Dishes,  Bon-Bons  and  Nappies  of  all  kinds. 


CUT  GLASS 
BOWLS 


of  every  description. 

We  have  kept  several  cut- 
ting shops  busy,  which  usu- 
ally shut  down  during  the 
summer,  and  by  large  orders 
placed,  secured  reductions, 
which  enable  us  to  give  you 
Lowest  Prices  ever  Quoted 
on  these  High-class  Goods. 


'^Cicero’'  Orangfc  Bowl,|n/^x7  in.  To  retail  at  $12. 


Punch  Bowls 


to  retail  at 

$25  and  $27. 

Vf? 

Send  us  your  order  for 

our  “$ioo  Assortment  of  Cut 
Glass,  or  as  a sample  order 
buy  our  “^50  Assortment.” 
The  selections  include  a 
FULL  VARIETY,  only  the 
best  sellers,  and  are  what  ex- 
perience has  shown  us  to  be 
the  styles  most  wanted. 

SEND  FOR  LISTS. 


‘‘Daphne'^ — tO  in.  Bowl.  To  retail  at  $t2. 


^‘Cicero’'  9 in.  Bowl,  To  retail  at  $t2. 


GEO.  BORGFELDT  & CO., 

18=20=22  Washington  Place,  cor.  oreene  st.,  NEW  YORK. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


29 


The  Jewelers’ Circular 

AND 

HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


PUBLISHED  EVERY  WEDNESDAY  BY 

THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  PUB’G  CO., 

189  Broadway,  New  York  City. 


A JOURNAL  DP  VOTED  TO  THE  INTERESTS  OF 
JEWELERS  WATCHMAKERS,  SILVERSMI 1 HS, 
ELECTRO-PLATE  MANUFACTURERS,  AND  ALL 
ENGAGED  IN  KINDRFD  BRANCHES  OF  INDUSTRY. 


Our  Editorial  columns  will  contain  our  own  opinions 
only,  and  we  shall  present  in  other  columns  only  what 
we  consider  ol  interest  or  value  to  our  readers  Adver- 
tising matter  will  not  be  printed  as  news. 

Advertising  rates  in  The  Circular  are  lower, 
considering  the  number  of  tradesmen  reached  by  its 
large  circulation,  than  in  any  other  jewelry  journal. 

Notices  of  changes  in  standing  advertisements 
must  be  received  one  week  in  advance ; new  matter 
can  be  received  up  to  Monday. 


INFORMATION  FOR  SUBSCRIBERS. 


Terms  of  Subscription,  Postage  Prepaid. 

PER  ANNUM. 

United  States  and  Canada,  • - - $2.00 

Foreign  Countries  in  Postal  Union,  - - 3 00 

Single  Copies, .10 

New  su^'scribers  can  commence  at  any  time. 

Payments  for  The  Circular  when  sent  by  mail, 
should  be  made  in  a Post-Office  Money  Order,  Bank 
Check  or  Draft,  or  an  Express  Money  Order  or  Reg- 
istered Letter.  All  postmasters  are  required  to  regis- 
ter letters  whenever  requested  to  do  so. 

Pay  money  only  to  authorized  collectors  having 
proper  credentials. 

Returning  your  paper  will  not  enable  us  to  discon- 
tinue it,  as  we  cannot  find  your  name  on  our  books 
unless  your  address  is  given. 

In  changing  address  always  give  the  old  as  well  as 
the  new  one.  Vour  name  cannot  be  found  on  our 
books  unless  this  is  done. 

We  will  continue  to  send  papers  until  there  is  a 
specific  order  to  stop,  in  connection  with  which  all 
arrearages  must  be  paid : but  such  an  order  can  be 
given  at  any  time,  to  take  effect  at  or  after  the  ex- 
piration of  tne  subscription.  All  such  orders  will  be 
promptly  acknowledged  by  mail. 

The  Courts  have  decided  that  all  subscribers  to 
Journals  are  responsible  until  arrearages  are  paid  in 
full  and  an  order  to  discontinue  has  been  received  by 
the  publisher. 


Memlier  of  the 

American  Trade  Press 

Association. 

Vb.l,  XXXI 

Nov.  27,  1895. 

No.  17 

Every  line  of  reading  matter  in  The 
Jewelers’  Circular,  lijith  the  exception  of 
the  few  brief  extracts  from  exchanges 
always  properly  credited,  is  written  ex- 
clusively for  this  journal.  Each  issue 
of  The  Jewelers’  Circular  is  copy- 
righted. 


npHIS  Fall-Holiday  Edition  of  The  Jew- 
■ elers’  Circular  is  essentially  a retail- 
ers’ number,  and  such  it  has  been  the  pur- 
pose of  the  management  to  make  it.  It 
retains  all  the  established  features  of  inter- 
est and  value  to  the  manufacturer  and  job- 
ber, but  the  several  additional  special  arti- 
cles are  designed  with  the  interests  of  the 
retailer  in  view.  The  extended  review  of 
the  various  jeweler’s  lines  written  by  the 
most  experienced  and  best  writer  on 
jewelry  fashions  in  the  country,  the 
essay  on  retail  jewelers’  advertising  with 
type'  specimen  ads.,  the  article  on  pictorial 
advertising  with  several  specimens,  and  the 
illustrated  article  on  window  dressing,  each 


written  by  an  expert  in  his  Respective  line, 
the  Art  Stationery  for  Jewelers,  the  Con- 
noisseur, the  Matters  in  Jewelry  Store  Keep- 
ing, the  Optical  Department,  etc.,  etc.,  have 
all  been  prepared  with  the  purpose  of  sup- 
plying the  retailer  with  information  and 
instruction  particularly  valuable  to  him  at 
this  season  of  the  year.  But  the  advertising 
pages  must  not  be  forgotten;  these  will  in- 
terest the  retailer  as  absorbingly  as  the 
reading  pages,  for  they  are  full  of  announce- 
ments showing  and  describing  seasonable 
jeweler  s lines. 


• A S predicted  by 

Revival  of  /V  the  Circu- 

thc  Diamond  lar  some  time  ago, 

diamond  earrings 
Earring.  have  again  become 

fashionable,  and 
they  are  now  seen  sparkling  in  the  ears  of 
many  of  society’s  fair  leaders.  The  Paris 
correspondent  of  this  journal  reported, 
nearly  a year  ago,  that  these  ornaments  had 
been  restored  to  popularity  in  the  French 
capital,  and  this  revival  was  bound  to  reach 
the  United  States.  The  prognostications 
in  this  connection,  of  one  of  the  oldest  and 
most  experienced  jewelry  buyers  in  the 
country  are  worthy  of  being  heeded  by  the 
entire  trade.  He  says:  “ By  next  year  the 

fashion  of|wearing  diamond  earrings  will 
have  reached  us  in  full  strength.  I fancy 
that  pendants  are  to  return,  first  as  knobs 
and,  if  the  tailors  bring  out  patterns  of  very 
low  necks  and  short  sleeves,  then  the  pen- 
dant will  increase  in  size  until  it  reaches  the 
old  two-inch  patterns.  Of  course  it  will 
take  two  years  or  more  to  bring  the  big 
pendants  back,  because  the  fashion  must 
grow  from  the  simple  screw  knob  by  easy 
lengths.  It  is  only  natural  that  the  earring 
craze  should  revive.  Never  since  jewels 
were  first  worn,  I will  venture,  have  ear- 
rings been  out  of  fashion  for  more  than  five 
years  consecutively.” 

The  following 
review  of 

Technical  Educational  technical  eduac- 
tion  in  Switzer- 
Establishments.  land,  translated 

by  the  London 
foiirnal  of  the  Society  of  Arts  from  the 
Deutsches  Handels  Archiv  will  serve  to 
explain  the  great  advances  made  by  Swiss 
national  industry  in  the  last  15  years,  both 
in  the  technical  and  artistic  character  of  its 
products;  “ It  is  very  remarkable  how 

much  is  done  in  the  cantons  of  Geneva  and 
Neuchatel  to  encourage  and  improve  local 
industries,  especially  in  finer  classes  of 
goods,  for  the  manufacture  of  which  a con- 
siderable amount  of  skill  and  artistic  knowl- 
edge is  required.  In  these  two  cantons, 
numbering  little  more  than  220,000  inhab- 
itants, there  are  five  schools  for  watch- 
makers, and  in  Geneva,  Neuchatel  and 
Chaux  de  Fonds  there  are  schools  for  in- 
struction in  the  fine  arts  and  in  artistic 
handicrafts.  Besides  the  institutions  there 
are  commercial  schools  in  Geneva  and 


FEATURES  OF  THIS  NUMBER. 

Pages  I,  4,  6 — Review  of  the  Reigning 
Fashions  in  Jewelers’  Lines. 

Pages  9,  ii,  12 — Window  Dressing  Hints 
from  Maiden  Lane. 

Pages  18,  19 — Nine  Original  Pictorial 
Ads.  for  Retail  Jewelers. 

Page  37 — Our  Traveling  Representatives. 

Pages  48,  49 — Hints  in  Retail  Jewelers’ 
Advertising. 

Page  50— Queries  by  Circular  Readers. 

Page  53 — Art  Stationery  for  Jewelers. 

Page  55 — The  Latest  Patents. 

Page  69 — The  Connoisseur  — Rambler’s 
Notes. 

Page  57 — Optical  Department — New  Opti- 
cal Devices — Notes. 

Page  58 — Workshop  Notes. 

Pages  61-63 — Discovery  and  Development 
OF  Carborundum. 

Page  63 — Production  of  Precious  Stonis 
IN  1894. 

Page  67 — Matters  in  Jewelry  Storekeep- 
ing. 

Page  70 — Catalogues  of  the  Season. 


Neuchatel,  and  the  professional  schools  in 
which  instruction  in  various  indust  ies 
is  given  to  persons  of  both  sexes. 
In  the  watchmaking  school  at  Geneva 
a class  for  girls  has  recently  been  estab- 
lished, where  certain  operations  peculiirly 
suitable  for  female  labor  are  taught.  C>>n- 
siderable  assistance  is  also  rendered  to  the 
watch  industry  by  the  astronomical  ob-er- 
vatories  at  Geneva  and  Neutchatel,  both  liy 
testing  chronometer  i,  and  by  their  co-ope  - 
ations  in  the  annual  trade  competiii  r. 
In  West  Switzerland  many  trades  which 
were  formerly  carried  on  almost  exclusively 
by  foreigners  are  now  in  the  hands  of  na- 
tives. Ten  or  15  years  ago  the  youths 
of  Geneva  were  seldom  taught  the  com- 
moner handicraft.  Those  who  could  n-  t 
devote  themselves  to  a profession,  to  bank- 
ing or  mercantile  pursuits,  turned  to  watch- 
making, jewelry,  and  kindred  businesses. 
Shoemakers,  tailors,  bakers,  bu  chers,  car- 
penters, masons,  cabinet  makers,  lock- 
smiths, glaziers,  etc.,  were  almost  all 
foreigners.  Nowadays  people  are  becom- 
ing more  sensible  of  this  mistake,  and 
these  trades  are  far  less  neglected  by  the 
Swiss  than  formerly.”  Switzerland  is,  in 
many  respects,  the  model  industrial  nation 
of  the  globe,  and  this  position  m.iy  be  at- 
tributed to  a great  extent  to  the  benefic  al 
influences  of  state  and  municipal  establish- 
ments for  technical  education. 


The  Seth  Thomas  Clock  Co.  commence 
work  this  week,  putting  up  the  tower  clock 
presented  by  the  Rev.  Dr.  Alexander  Mac- 
kay  Smith,  of  Washington,  to  the  town  of 
Roslyn,  L.  I.  The  clock  was  presented  to- 
gether with  a public  tower  and  1,500  pound 
bell,  and  will  be  set  up  in  the  plot  alloted 
by  the  town  authorities  of  Roslyn  for  that 
purpose. 


30 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


New  York  Notes. 

E.  Tellinke  has  entered  a judgment  for 
$45.56  against  M.  Bass. 

Jacot  & Son  have  entered  a judgment  fcr 
$205.63  against  Peter  Kramer. 

Benedict  Bros,  have  filed  a judgment  for 
$153.37  against  A.  A.  Blauvelt. 

Benedict  Bros,  have  filed  a judgment  for 
$740.80  against  Chas.  H.  Benner. 

A judgment  for  $327.62  has  been  entered 
against  Adolph  Bechtold  by  C.  F.  Haug. 

Wm.  J.  Palmer,  of  the  Canadian  Watch 
Case  Co. . Montreal,  Canada,  visited  New 
York  last  week. 

C.  G.  Braxmar  has  entered  a judgment 
for  $681.72  against  Roland  S.  Pettit  and 
Arthur  H.  Colby. 

A judgment  against  John  Klipper  for 
$230.14  has  been  entered  in  favor  of  Han- 
cock, Becker  & Co. 

A judgment  for  $223.53  been  entered 
against  Simon  Dessau  in  favor  of  S.  W. 
Ehrich  and  others. 

Ehrlich  & -Sinnock,  Newark,  N.  J.,  have 
been  elected  members  of  the  New  York 
Jewelers’  Association. 

B.  M.  Henschel,  with  Marx,  Veit  & Co., 
is  ill  at  the  German  Hospital,  where  he  has 
undergone  an  operation. 

A judgment  against  Wolf  and  Nathan  S. 
Kaplan  for  $2,595,39  has  been  entered  in 
favor  of  N.  Hobart  and  others. 

Augustus  Tietjen,  son  of  President 
Tietjen  of  the  West  Side  Bank,  has  ac- 
cepted a position  as  salesman  for  the  Jno. 
B.  Yates  Co.,  46  Maiden  Lane. 

E.  Aug.  Neresheimer,  of  E.  Aug.  Nere- 
sheimer  & Co.,  was  among  the  Brooklyn 
delegation  visiting  the  Cotton  States  and 
International  Exposition,  Atlanta,  Ga.,  last 
week. 

Wm.  I.  Rosenfeld  returned  Saturday 
from  his  wedding  trip,  after  visiting  Atlan- 
tic City,  Washington,  Old  Point  Comfort, 
Baltimore  and  other  places  of  interest.  Mr. 
Rosenfeld  was  married  Nov.  14th  at  Del- 
monico’s,  to  Miss  Julia  Rosenbaum,  of  this 
city. 

Harriet  Josephine  Smith,  the  wife  of 
Alfred  H.  Smith,  of  Alfred  H.  Smith  & Co., 
died  Wednesday  evening,  at  the  Hotel 
Majestic.  Mrs.  Smith  was  the  daughter  of 
the  late  Nathan  T.  Carryl,  of  this  city.  The 
funeral  services  were  held  Saturday 
morning,  at  the  residence  of  her  daughter, 
Mrs.  John  H.  Holden,  347  Lexington  Ave. 

The  sale  of  M.  D.  Rothschild’s  stock  of 
turquoises  and  precious  stones  took  place 
Nov.  2ist  in  the  auction  rooms  of  Jas.  P. 
Silo,  43  Liberty  St.  The  prices  realized 
averaged  about  50  cents  on  the  dollar.  Mr. 
Rothschild  has  now  retired  from  the  pre- 
cious stone  business  and  will  start  about 
Jan.  I,  1896,  on  a two  years’  trip  around  the 
world . 

A reception  by  the  Silver  Platers’  Relief 
Association  was  recently  held  at  Baehr’s 
Mozart  hall,  87  Montrose  Ave.,  Brooklyn, 
and  a considerable  sum  for  relief  purposes 
was  realized.  A feature  of  the  evening  was 
the  drawing  for  a silver  goblet  beautifully 


decorated,  gold  lined  and  suitably  en- 
graved, a “ souvenir  of  the  Silver  Platers.” 
Every  member  of  the  association  did  some- 
thing personally  toward  the  completion  of 
this  unique  article. 

It  will  interest  many  readers  of  The  Cir- 
cular to  know  that  S.  A.  Boyle,  Jr.,  the 
crack  left  end  player  of  the  University  of 
Pennsylvania  football  team,  is  the  son  of 
the  well  known  jewelry  auctioneer  of  14 
Maiden  Lane,  He  greatly  resembles  his 
father,  from  whom  he  inherits  the  qual- 
ities that  have  distinguished  his 
work  on  the  gridiron.  He  is  finely  propor- 
tioned and  although  the  youngest  man  on 
the  team,  is  considered  by  experts  to  be  one 
of  the  best  left  ends  in  the  country. 

Andrew  J.  Maisch,  bookkeeper  for  Byron 
L.  Strasburger  & Co.,  who,  as  previously 
told  in  The  Circular,  was  arrested  Oct.  23 
charged  with  forgery  and  grand  larceny, 
pleaded  guilty  Monday,  in  Part  I,  General 
Sessions,  to  larceny  in  the  second  degree 
and  was  remanded  by  Recorder  Goff  until 
to-day,  for  sentence. 

David  N.  Demarest,  dealer  in  diamonds, 
26  Maiden  Lane,  died  suddenly,  Nov.  13th. 
His  death,  which  was  due  to  heart  disease, 
occurred  at  the  house  where  he  was  a boarder 
at  the  time,  in  \V.  29th  St.  Mr.  Demarest 
did  a small  retail  business  but  was  known 
to  many  in  the  diamond  trade  in  the  vicinity 
of  Maiden  Lane.  He  was  born  in  1851  in 
Woodbridge,  N.  J.  He  had  been  in  the 
diamond  business  for  about  seven  years  and 
had  previously  been  connected  with  the 
gold  pen  trade.  The  funeral  was  held 
Nov.  i6th  from  the  home  ot  his  family,  in 
Woodbridge,  N.  J. 

The  trade  has  been  warned  to  look  for  a 
young  man  calling  himself  Eugene  Van 
Der  Vien,  a former  watchmaker  for  Geo. 
Schaffner,  jeweler,  210  Woodward  Ave., 
Detroit,  Mich.  The  young  man  is  charged 
with  stealing  three  watches  from  his  em- 
ployer. It  is  expected  that  he  will  seek  a 
.situation  in  the  trade  as  watchmaker.  He 
is  described  as  follows;  Age  23,  height  5 
feet  10  or  ii  inches,  weight  about  160 
pounds,  fair  complexion,  smooth  face,  talks 
broken  English  but  speaks  German  flu- 
ently. Information  is  requested  to  be 
sent  to  the  Superintendent  of  Police,  De- 
troit, Mich. 

In  the  Supreme  Court,  special  term, 
Wednesday,  Justice  Patterson  reserved  de- 
cision in  the  suit  brought  by  Airs.  Lillie  J. 
Earle,  wife  of  Gen.  Ferdinand  P.  Earle, 
to  recover  damages  from  the  Gorham 
Alfg.  Co.  for  alleged  wrongful  seizure  of 
silverware  in  the  Hotel  New  Netherlands. 
In  1894  Earle  bought  $35,000  of  silver  from 
the  Gorham  Co.,  giving  notes  for  that 
amount.  The  first  note  for  $2,100  fell 
due  April  5,  1894,  but  was  not  paid  until 
April  23d,  and  the  company  then  adver- 
tised the  silver  for  sale.  Gen.  Earle  claimed 
that  the  acceptance  of  the  money  for  the 
note  was  a waiver  on  the  part  of  the  com- 
pany. Justice  Patterson  enjoined  the  sale, 
and  now  Mrs.  Earle  sues  to  get  possession 
of  the  silver  and  to  recover  damages. 


Last  Week’s  Arrivals. 


THM  CIRCUl/AR  has  perfected  ar- 
rangements lor  obtaining  the  names 
and  hotel  addresses  of  all  the  latest 
buyers  visiting  New  York,  and  each 
day  posts  in  its  office,  i8g  Broadway, 
a bulletin  which  every  member  of 
the  trade  is  cordially  invited  to  copy 


The  following  out-of-lown  jewelers  were 
registered  in  New  York  during  the  past 
week  : H.  G.  Shupp,  Wilkesbarre,  Pa., 

Westminster  H.;  P.  Birtwistle,  London, 
Ont.,  Astor  H.;  J.  F.  Podmore,  Troy,  N 
Y.,  Astor  H.;  H.  A.  Heath,  Newport,  R.  L, 
L.  S.  Stowe,  Springfield,  Mass,  Astor  H.; 

S.  Aloe,  St.  Louis,  Mo.,  Stewart  H.;  An- 
drew Aluller,  Baltirfiore,  Md.,  Belvidere  H.; 
Walter  Vail,  Deposit,  N.  Y.;  W.  T.  Chap- 
man, Pawling,  N.  Y .;  R.  H.  Galbreath, 
(Duhme  Co.)  Cincinnati,  O.,  Imperial 
H.;  C.  Lemon,  Louisville,  Ky.,  Hoffman  H.; 
A.  L.  Benedict,  Lockhaven,  Pa.;  Brennan 
& Davis,  Bradford,  Pa.;  Parker  & Davis, 
Bridgeport,  Conn.;  C.  D.  Hosley,  Sprin- 
field.  Mass.,  Alurray  Hill  H.;  J.  Sheafer, 
Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  Westminster  H.;  W.  F. 
Nye,  New  Bedford,  Mass.,  Astor  H.;  D. 
W.  Janowitz,  Baltimore,  Aid.,  Metropole  H.; 

T.  Lubin,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  Astor  H.;  A. 
Kurtzeborn,  St.  Louis,  AIo.,  St.  James  H. 
J.  B.  Alayer,  Buffalo,  N.  Y , Hoffman  H.; 
S.  F.  Sipe,  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  Astor  H.;  I.  G. 
Whittier,  Providence,  R.  L,  Grand  Union 
H.;  E.  Schertzinger,  Mahonoy  City,  Pa., 
Morton  H.;  J.  A.  Wetherell,  Parkersburgh, 
W.  Va.,  St.  Denis  H.;  J.  W.  Podmore, 
Troy,  N.  Y.,  Astor  H. 


George  F.  Stevenson  & Son’s  Store 
Robbed  in  Broad  Daylight. 

Bridgepok  r.  Conn.,  Nov.  25. — A daring 
daylight  robbery  was  perpetrated  in  this 
city  sometime  between  11.30  o’clock  and  12 
o’clock  this  morning.  The  jewelry  store  of 
George  F.  Stevenson  & Son,  457  Main  St., 
was  the  scene  of  the  theft  and  diamonds  to 
the  value  of  $450  were  taken.  The  plans 
laid  by  the  tnief,  who  is  evidently  an  ex- 
pert at  the  business,  were  of  the  most  skil- 
ful description.  Just  when  and  how  it  was 
done  cannot  be  positively  stated. 

Mr.  .Stevenson,  Sr.,  was  in  the  store  at  the 
time,  but  he  cannot  give  the  slightest  ink- 
ling as  to  how  the  thief  did  the  job.  The 
diamonds  were  kept  in  a tray  in  a show- 
case and  the  thief  is  supposed  to  have 
slipped  his  hand  into  it,  while  Mr.  Steven- 
son’s attention  was  directed  elsewhere. 
The  thief  had  been  in  the  store  before  the 
same  day.  and  conversed  at  length  with 
Chas.  F.  Stevenson,  the  son,  about  purchas- 
ing a diamond.  The  thief  watched  his 
chances  and  when  the  son  had  stepped  out, 
entered  the  store  again  and  when  the  elder 
Air.  Stevenson’s  attention  was  elsewhere 
occupied  deftly  effected  the  robbery.  The 
police  think  the  thief  has  escaped  to  New 
York  with  his  booty. 


Nov,  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


31 


Providence. 

All  communications  for  this  column,  addressed  to 
P.  O.  Box  1093,  Providence,  R.I.,  will  receive  prompt 
attention. 

S.  A.  Otis,  of  Harvey  & Otis,  is  having;  a 
racing  yacht  built. 

Michael  Fitzgerald  has  been  elected  a 
director  of  the  Mercantile  Trust  Co. 

C.  H.  Finley,  with  A.  Paul  &Co.,  Boston, 
called  upon  the  retail  trade  in  this  city  the 
past  week. 

Joseph  H.  Savey  has  removed  from 
Chepachet,  R.  I.,  to  High  St.,  Pawtucket, 

R.  I. 

Charles  Richards  has  the  sympathy  of  a 
large  circle  of  acquaintances  in  the  recent 
death  of  his  wife. 

Louis  Freiberg,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y.,  was  in 
town  the  past  week,  calling  upon  the  manu- 
facturers. 

The  A.  C.  Messier  Co.  have  been  making 
extensive  alterations  and  improvements  at 
their  factory  in  Pawtucket. 

F.  E.  Pierce  has  severed  his  connection 
with  Lambert  & Schofield,  and  gone  with 
the  Northwestern  Brush  Co. 

Allan  E.  Olney,  Holyoke,  Mass.,  and 
Walter  H.  Durfee,  this  city,  have  formed  a 
co-partnership  for  the  manufacture  of  auto- 
matic tubular  chimes  for  clocks. 

Herbert  R.  Lowe,  traveler  for  the  A.  B. 
Pitkin  Co.,  manufacturers  of  jewelers’  tools 


and  machinery,  was  married  last  week  to 
Miss  Hill  in  Pawtuxet. 

There  is  considerable  inquiry  being  made 
in  this  vicinity  as  to  the  Providence  Ring 
Co.  They  have  an  office  in  the  Hughes 
building  on  Weybosset  St.,  but  the  office  is 
either  locked  up  or  else  there  is  no  one  there 
who  can  or  will  give  any  information. 

A.  J.  Robinson,  who  some  years  ago  was 
a leading  retail  jeweler  on  Westminster  St., 
but  now  a resident  of  San  Francisco,  Cal., 
has  been  in  town  the  past  week.  He  is 
now  president  of  the  National  Base  Ore 
Reduction  Co. 


The  Atlleboros. 

D.  E.  Makepeace  is  enjoying  a hunting 
trip  down  on  the  Cape. 

Ezekiel  Blake,  F.  W.  Weaver,  Benjamin 
P.  King,  A.  M.  Richards  and  George  H. 
Alfred  are  among  the  officers  of  Ezekiel 
Bates  Lodge  of  Masons,  installed  last 
week. 

C.  G.  Sandland,  who  has  been  located  in 
the  enameling  business  in  Providence  for  a 
year  or  more  past,  has  returned  to  North 
Attleboro,  and  is  occupying  his  new  shop 
on  East  St. 

Fred  Perry,  a well  known  engraver  and 
chaser  of  this  place,  died  in  Providence 
Thursday  morning,  of  hemorrhage,  having 
been  confined  to  his  bed  for  some  time. 

Syracuse. 

George  E.  Wilkins  is  at  his  place  of  busi- 


ness again  after  a week’s  experience  with 
an  attack  of  sciatic  rheumatism. 

The  engagement  of  Edward  C.  Howe, 
and  Miss  Bessie  Dana  Walden,  daughter  of 
Mrs.  Mary  Elizabeth  Walden,  was  formally 
announced  last  week. 

Last  Friday  articles  of  incorporation  were 
filed  with  the  Secretary  of  State  at  Albany 
in  the  matter  of  the  Inter-State  Importing 
Co.  of  Syracuse,  to  import,  manufacture 
and  deal  in  watches,  jewelry  and  gold  and 
silver  wares.  The  capital  is  $10,000  and 
the  directors  are  Charles  A.  Lockard 
Harry  C.  Flood,  and  Edward  A.  Kingsbury, 
of  this  city. 

The  Queen  City  Watch  Case  Co.,  Cin- 
cinnati, O.,  are  prepared  to  do  all  kinds  of 
alteration,  changing  English  and  Swiss 
watches  to  American  watches,  and  repair- 
ing old  cases.  Special  attention  is  given  to 
gold  plating. 

The  “ Lulu”  sleeve  buttons  are  made  by 
Jacob  Strauss  & Sons,  53  Maiden  Lane, 
New  York.  They  are  made  in  10  karat  and 
14  karat  gold.  They  have  the  new  patent 
attachment  owned  by  this  house,  which 
for  simplicity  and  strength  is  all  that 
could  be  desired.  The  easy  manner  in  which 
the  link  is  put  through  the  button  hole  will 
save  an  infinite  amount  of  worry  to  the 
wearer,  jewelers  will  be  interested  in 
Jacob  Strauss  & Sons’  advertisement  in 
another  column,  in  which  an  illustration  of 
the  new  patent  link  is  to  be  seen. 


Dorflinger’s  American  Cut  Glass. 


Jar  shown  is  made  in  two  sizes— for 
50  and  for  100  cigars* 

They  are  plain^  cut  like  illustration^ 
and  richly  cut* 

Stopper  is  ground-in  air-tight^  and 
has  place  for  sponge* 


C.  Dorllinger  & Sons, 

NEW  YORK. 

36  Murray  St.  and  915  Broadway. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


44 


SILVER  PLATE 


No.  1146.  PRINCESS  LAMP. 


THAT  LOOKS  AND  WEARS  LIKE 


No.  855.  EMBOSSED  CAKE  BASKET. 


No.  914.  FRUIT  BOWL 


No.  347.  SHAVING  CUP  and  BRUSH. 


The  Homan  Si 

CINCINNA 

CHICAGO: 

155  State  Street. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAI.  REVIEW. 


33 


STERLING  SILVER.” 


No,  2050.  TEA  SET,  BEADED  EDGE. 


Iver  Plate  0o., 

TI,  OHIO. 

NEW  YORK : 

304  Fourth  Avenue. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


\4 


THE  DUNRAVEN 


MADE  IN  THE 


i 


Silver  - Plated  - Ware. 


manufactured  by  the 


Factories  : 
HARTFORD.  CONN. 
NORWICH.  CONN. 
TAUNTON,  MASS. 


Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co,, 

OFFICE  AND  SHOWROOM, 

FIartford,  conn. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


Philadelphia. 

Henry  A.  Kammerer  has  removed  from 
1721  Fairmount  Ave.  to  2202  Fairmount 
Ave. 

Edward  McCall,  manufacturer  of  rings, 
154  S.  8th  St.,  is  closing  out  his  business 
owing  to  ill  health. 

Hamilton  & Diesinger  will  move  into 
their  new  building  at  12th  and  Chestnut 
Sts.  about  the  beginning  of  the  year. 

George  Rose  and  “ Bucky  ” Weaver  were 
arrested  Wednesday  morning  last  for  ped- 
dling “ gold  ” spectacles.  It  was  the  old 
dodge,  and  they  were  committed  for  trial. 

The  whereabouts  of  Joseph  C.  Gigon  con- 
tinue to  be  a mystery  to  his  friends  and  cus- 
tomers. The  watch  club  interests  are 
being  looked  after  by  his  brother,  Jules 
Gigon. 

Bailey,  Banks  & Biddle  Co.,  announce 
the  completion  of  the  second  edition  of 
“ Ancestry,”  compiled  by  Eugene  Zieber, 
which  contains  much  new  information  re- 
specting the  Patriotic  Hereditary  Societies. 
The  work  is  complete  up  to  Oct.  25,  1895. 

Early  Wednesday  morning  last  fire  broke 
out  in  the  factory  building  at  the  northeast 
corner  of  12th  and  Buttonwood  Sts.  The 
second  floor  is  occupied  by  the  silver  plating 
establishment  of  J.  C.  Wanner,  and  Mr. 
Wanner  places  his  loss  at  close  on  $1,000. 

The  annual  exhibition  of  paintings  and 
sculpture  by  J.  E.  Caldwell  & Co.  is  now 
under  way.  The  collection  includes  130  oil 
paintings,  50  aquarelles  and  water  color 
drawings,  a number  of  high  class  pastels, 
marbles,  bronzes,  porcelains,  fine  furniture, 
etc. 

Sackett  & Co.  provided  the  silver  trowel 
with  which  Bishop  Whitaker  laid  the  corner 
stone  for  the  new  dormitories  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Pennsylvania,  and  a consignment 
of  souvenirs  for  the  Della  Fox  Fleur-de- 
Lis  Opera  Co.  The  latter  were  miniature 
candlesticks. 

Stock  was  laid  in  by  the  following  visit- 
ing jewelers  last  week:  E.  P.  Zane, 

Christiana,  Pa.;  C.  Hunsberger,  Souder- 
ton.  Pa.;  Jacob  Thurer,  Clifton,  Pa.;  E.  K. 
Bear,  Lansdale,  Pa.;  J.  Tyson  Ogden, 
Woodstown,  N.  J.;  S.  Thayer,  Royersford, 
Pa.;  E.  Keller,  Allentown,  Pa.;  E.  Kerper, 
Pott'-town,  Pa.;  D.  Schulz,  Pennsgrove, 
N.  J.;  and  Israel  James,  Swedsboro, 
N.  J. 

Rudolph  Leowidt,  a salesman  with 
Queen  & Co.,  and  Sylvester  Leidich  were 
arrested  on  Friday  last  while  trying  to  pawn 
a case  of  instruments  at  17  th  and 

Market  Sts.  Manager  Gray,  of  the  optical 
establishment,  stated  that  about  20  cases  of 
instruments  similar  to  that  which  the  pris- 
oners had  tried  to  pawn  had  been  stolen 
from  the  firm.  The  accused  denied  having 
stolen  the  instruments,  but  Mr.  Gray  iden- 
tified them  beyond  dispute.  The  prisoners 
were  committed  for  triak 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


Canada  and  the  Provinces. 

John  Leslie,  jeweler,  Ottawa,  died  last 
week. 

John  Munroe  has  started  in  the  jewelry 
business  in  Baden,  Ont. 

Julien  Schwob,  of  Schwob  Bros.,  Mon- 
treal, made  a trip  to  Halifax  last  week. 

W.  J.  Barr,  of  the  Goldsmith’s  Stock  Co., 
Toronto,  was  in  Montreal  for  a few  days 
last  week. 

S.  Rosenthal,  Ottawa,  made  a visit  to 
Montreal  recently  with  the  Ottawa  City 
football  team. 

Charles  E.  Wood,  Knowlton,  Que.,  has 
assigned  and  there  will  be  a meeting  of 
creditors  on  Dec.  4. 

Charles  Green,  representing  Simpson, 
Hall,  Miller  & Co.,  is  in  Toronto,  and  Geo. 
Smith,  of  the  same  firm,  is  in  Quebec. 

Geo.  Chillas,  Montreal,  representing  the 
Pairpoint  and  Mount  Washington  wares, 
has  just  returned  from  a successful  trip 
through  western  Ontario. 

Mr.  Guy,  of  Simpson,  Hall,  Miller  & Co., 
Wallingford,  Conn.,  was  in  Montreal  last 
week  with  Mrs.  Guy,  stopping  at  the  Wind- 
sor Hotel  for  a couple  of  days. 

Springfield,  Mass. 

L.  S.  Stowe  has  been  elected  vice-presi- 
dent of  a recently  organized  chapter  of  the 
Sons  of  the  Revolution,  in  this  city.  Mr. 
Stowe  was  one  of  the  incorporators  and  the 
branch,  which  will  be  known  as  George 
Washington  chapter,  is  the  first  in  the  State 
to  receive  a charter  from  the  Massachusetts 
association.  Sons  of  the  Revolution. 

James  Wilson  and  Henry  Corcoran,  whose 
arrest  in  this  city  was  noted  in  last  week’s 
Circular,  were  tried  in  the  District  Court 
in  Northampton  last  week  on  the  charge  of 
breaking  and  entering  the  jewelry  store  of 
Taintor  & McAlpine,  Easthampton.  They 
were  bound  over  to  the  criminal  term  of 
the  Superior  Court,  which  meets  next 
month,  under  bonds  of  $1,500  each. 

Auction  sales  among  jewelers  seem  to  be 
contagious.  The  latest  one  to  take  the 
fever  is  J.  C.  Manning,  and  he  begins  to 
dispose  of  his  stock  this  week  with  H.  M. 
Rich  as  auctioneer.  Mr.  Manning  an- 
nounces that  he  is  not  going  ‘‘out  of  busi- 
ness ” but  says  that  owing  to  the  stringency 
of  the  past  few  months  and  the  paucity  of 
cash  customers,  he  owes  something  on  his 
stock,  and  as  his  regular  trade  will  not  pro- 
duce sufficient  revenue  to  meet  his  obliga- 
tions on  time  he  plans  this  auction  sale  to 
hustle  matters.  He  advertises  $17,000 
worth  of  goods. 

The  carriage  clock  or  timepiece  imported 
by  E.  A.  Haldimann,  33  Maiden  Lane, 
New  York,  has  been  a great  success.  It 
has  been  purchased  by  drivers  of  all  sorts 
of  vehicles,  who  have  found  it  a very  con- 
venient thing  to  have  the  time  constantly 
before  their  eyes.  A circular  and  price  list 
will  be  sent  to  any  one  desiring  them,  by 
applying  to  Mr.  Haldimann,  at  the  above 
address. 


3'; 


LORSCE  BUILDINE, 


Has  a frontage  of  50  feet,  of  Indiana  lime- 
stone, rock  facing,  and  white  bricks  with 
terra  cotta  ornamentations,  making  it  es- 
pecially elegant  and  attractive ; is  eleven 
stories  high  and  is  absolutely  fireproof, 
having  steel  girders,  columns  and  floor 
beams  and  terra  cotta  floor  arches  and  par- 
titions. The  large  marble  entrance  leads 
to  two  swift  running'  elevators.  All  offices 
have  windows  opening  to  external  air  and 
each  office  has  a window  facing  Xorlli  light. 
Moderate  rents,  including  steam  heat,  elec- 
tric light,  janitor’s  service,  mail  chute; 
plumhiiig  and  toilet  accommodations  ac- 
cording to  the  latest  and  improved  methods; 
toilet  rooms  on  every  floor.  Floors  will  be 
rented  entire  or  be  subdivided  into  offices 
from  $350  a year  upwards  according  to 
size  and  location.  Every  effort  has  been 
put  forth  to  make  this  a substantial  building; 
it  occupies  a prominent  position  upon  the 
curve  of  the  street.  Portions  have  already 
been  let  to  prominent  firms  and  a number  of 
applications  are  now  on  hand. 

For  particulars  apply  to 

ALBERT  LORSCH, 

35  Maiden  Lane,  New  York. 

Offices  ready  prior  to  May  1. 


5^ 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov  27,  1S95. 


News  Gleanings. 


The  death  occurred  a few  days  ago  of 
William  H.  May,  Rockford,  111. 

Kleber  Denmark,  Kingston,  N.  C.,  has 
removed  to  a better  location  in  that  town. 

In  a fire  in  ^labtown.  Pa.,  last  week  the 
jewelry  store  of  Jerome  Lundy  was  de- 
stroyed. 

Jeweler  Grimm,  formerly  in  business  on 
Water  St.,  Sharon,  Pa.,  has  removed  to 
Buffalo,  N.  Y. 

H.  C.  Ingles,  Oshkosh,  Wis.,  has.  closed 
out  his  business  and  will  remove  with  his 
family  to  Tennessee. 

H.  O Bailey  has  removed  from  Smith 
Center,  Kan.,  to  Emporia,  Kan.,  where  he 
has  opened  a new  store. 

Anthony  Bros,  expect  to  ocupy  their  store 
in  the  new  Stowers  building.  West  Palm 
Beach,  Fla.  in  a lew  days. 

G.  W.  Lowe’s  jewelry  store,  Seaford, 
Del.,  was  entered  by  burglars  last  week, 
who  stole  about  $150  worth  of  goods. 

The  exercises  attending  the  presentation 
of  the  silver  service  to  the  battleship  Maine 
took  place  in  the  City  Hall  last  evening,  in 
Portland,  Me. 

H.  B.  Zullar's  jewelry  store,  Cumberland, 
O.,  was  robbtd  a few  nights  ago  of  $800 
worth  of  jewelry  and  $80  in  money.  There 
is  no  clue  to  the  robber. 

Fredeiick  Bleuer,  senior  member  of  the 
jewelry  firm  of  Bkuer  Bros.,  Rock  Island, 
111.,  and  Mi  s Tdlie  Marsi.hall,  were  mar- 
ried in  Rock  Lland  last  week. 

'I  hieves  la^t  week  entered  the  house  of 
D.  W.  Dav^  s,  jeweler,  Stroudsburg,  Pa., 
and  took  $3, .50  from  his  clothes  while  he 
slept  and  reliev'ed  his  son  of  $19.50. 

Mr.  and  .Mrs  11  C.  Graffe.  Ft.  VVayne, 
Ind.,  have  gone  to  Hot  Springs,  Ark., 
where  they  will  remain  for  several  weeks. 
The  trip  is  made  in  hope  that  it  will  benefit 
Mr.  Graffe's  he.  1th 

The  jewelry  st<  ck  of  Grant  Puff,  Pine 
Bush,  N.  Y . was  last  week  sold  at  auction 
by  James  H Wallace,  assignee.  The 
goods  brought  fair  prices.  Mr.  Puff  has 
gone  to  Montgomeiy,  where  he  has  started 
in  business  again. 

Cards  have  been  issued  announcing  the 
approaching  wedding  of  James  F.  Kuhn, 
jeweler.  Easton.  P.i.,  a' d M ss  Jennie 
Tin  man,  (laugh  er  oi  .Mrs.  Josephine 
Tin'inan  ol  East  iii.  The  ctrenioiiy  takes 
place  on  Th.uiksv.iviii.i  I <a  . 

While  at  W'  rk  at  h s sti  r , 507  Broad- 
way, Logansp  .rt,  In  I..  last  Wednesday 
evn.ing,  B.  Z Lt  wis,  je  veler.  was  seized 
suddei.ly  with  an  attack  of  nervous  pros- 


tration. He  was  conveyed  to  his  home 
where  he  is  reported  critically  ill. 

Mr.  Edmunds,  of  Hardwick,  Vt.,  will 
open  a jewelry  store  in  Morrisville,  Vt. 

The  marriage  took  place  Nov.  21st  of 
John  L.  Weaver  and  Miss  California  M. 
Au^hinbaugh,  in  Chambersburgh,  Pa.  Mr. 
Weaver  was  some  years  ago  manager  of 
Aughinbaugh’s  jewelry  store  in  Chambers- 
burgh,  but  is  in  the  jewelry  business  now 
in  Gettysburgh,  Pa. 

William  P.  Wehrle,  optician,  Indiana, 
Pa.,  has  concluded  to  locate  in  California 
in  the  near  future,  and  has  sold  out  his 
business  to  his  brother,  JR.  W.  Wehrle, 
who  has  been  in  the  practice  of  the  pro- 
fession in  Blairsville  for  nearly  20  years, 
and  who  has  now  taken  charge  of  the  busi- 
ness in  Indiana.  He  has  just  returned  from 
a four  months’  visit  to  Chicago,  where  he 
spent  most  of  the  time  in  taking  lessons 
from  the  most  advanced  specialists  in  the 
country. 

A movement  is  on  foot  in  Lyons,  N.  Y., 
to  start  a new  silver  plating  factory. 
George  W.  Hill  recently  resigned  his  po- 
sition as  secretary  of  the  Manhattan  Silver 
Plate  Co.,  and  has  announced  that  a new 
factory  will  shortly  be  started.  Whether 
the  business  will  be  conducted  by  a partner- 
ship or  by  a corporation  is  yet  to  be  de- 
cided. A number  of  prominent  citizens  are 
interested  in  the  movement,  and  it  is  said 
an  option  has  been  secured  upon  the  William 
W.  Agget  ’olock  on  Geneva  St.,  at  present 
owned  by  the  Mutual  Life  Insurance  Co., 
New  York. 


Store  of  the  Ernst  Schall  Co.  Badly 
Damaged  by  Fire. 

Hartford,  Conn.,  Nov.  25. — Fire  which 
broke  out  at  6 o’clock  Sunday  morning  in 
the  jewelry  store  of  Ernst  Schall  Co.,  cor- 
ner of  Main  and  Asylum  Sts.,  did  $10,000 
damage  to  the  company.  The  fire  broke  out 
in  the  rear  of  the  store  on  the  Asylum  St. 
side.  Damage  to  the  amount  of  $2,000  was 
done  to  the  building. 

The  origin  of  the  fire  is  unknown,  but 
Mr.  Schall  is  of  the  opinion  that  it  was 
caused  by  electric  light  wires.  Mr.  Schall 
carried  $g,ooo  insurance,  but  thinks  his  loss 
will  exceed  that  amount  as  he  was  unus- 
ually well  stocked  with  holiday  goods  and 
his  fixtures  were  ruined.  The  fire  was 
hottest  among  the  toys  in  the  annex  and  it 
is  supposed  to  have  started  where  the  elec- 
tric wires  entered  the  building,  the  stair- 
ways at  this  point  being  badly  burned. 

Mr.  Schall  yesterday  afternoon  had  a 
force  of  clerks  at  work  clearing  up  the 
jewels,  which  were  wet  and  smoked. 


New  Jewelry  Stores. 


Ashley  Harger,  Marshall,  Wis. 

M.  B.  Warriner,  Wellsboro,  Pa. 

J.  H.  Edmunds,  Morrisville,  Vt. 

Willard  Waggoner,  Hamilton,  111. 

Stephen  D.  Merritt,  Water  St.,  Westerly, 
R.  I. 

Donald  C.  Hollister,  Eddy  building, 
Syracuse,  N.  Y.  ( 

W.  C.  Seigfried,  14  N.  Phelps  St., 
Youngstown,  O. 

A.  E.  Waterbury  and  S.  J.  Adams  have 
embarked  in  the  jewelry  business  and  have 
opened  a stock  in  one  side  of  E.  E.  Miller’s 
drug  store.  Traverse  City,  Mich. 


Advertisers’  Notes. 


An  interesting  advertisment  of  the  W. 
F.  Main  Co.,  Iowa  City,  la.,  is  published 
elsewhere  in  this  issue.  This  firm  are  re- 
liable manufacturing  jewelers,  and  they 
cater  exclusively  to  the  wants  of  the  re- 
tail jewelry  trade. 

Something  new  of  interest  to  watch- 
makers is  Schirmer’s  pivot  cap,  on  which  a 
patent  has  been  applied  for.  These  capscome 
four  dozen  in  a box,  the  price  of  which  is 
$1.00.  They  are  made  of  Stub’s  steel  wire 
and  in  12  different  sizes,  so  that  they  can  be 
fitted  to  any  wheel  in  any  size  movement, 
Swiss  or  American.  Watchmakers  will  find 
the  cap  a veiy  valuable  piece  of  material 
for  cheap  watches.  The  caps  are  for  sale 
by  Benj.  Allen  & Co.,  141-143  State  St., 
Chicago,  111. 

A treat  awaits  the  dealer  in  art  goods 
visiting  the  art  pottery  department  of  Levy, 
Dreyfus  & Co.,  ii  Maiden  Lane,  New  York, 
where  100  new  marble  busts  have  just  been 
put  on  display.  These  pieces  are  of  the 
finest  Cararra  marble  and  are  in  subjects 
which  are  bound  to  prove  popular  among 
the  seekers  after  fine  holiday  goods.  The 
prices  at  which  they  may  be  profitably  sold 
are  another  feature  which  will  recommend 
them  to  live  jewelers. 

One  of  the  biggest  successes  ever  scored 
by 'the  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.,  Hartford, 
Conn.,  has  been  achieved  with  their  new 
“ Dunraven  ” pattern  in  flatware,  which  is 
proving  to  be  among  the  best  selling  de- 
signs ever  handled  by  the  trade.  The  com- 
pany have  been  forced  to  run  their  factory 
night  and  day  to  fill  the  orders  for  pieces 
in  this  pattern  and  in  the  '‘Chevalier,’ 
another  popular  pattern.  The  “ Dunraven’ 
is  illustrate  ’ in  ihis  is-ue  of  The  Circular. 


EsTABLisiirD  1849  Incorporated  j8qo. 

J.  BRIGGS  <&.  SONS  GO., 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

Gold  and  Silver  Plate  and  Seamless  W^ire, 

65  CLIFFORD  STREET,  PROVIDENCE,  R.  I. 


WE  MAKE 
STOCK  FOR 


/ CANE  heads. 
1-UMBRELLA  MOUNTINGS 
PPNCIL-CASES, 
WATCH-CASES. 

I WATC1-CROWNS, 

I THIMBLES, 

SPECTACLE  AND 
t YE-CLASS  BOWS, 
DIAMOND  MOUNTINGS, 
&C.,  &C.,  &C. 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


37 


TravellDg  repreientatlvei  may 
ooaslder  ibese  oolamns  open  for 
the  pablioation  of  any  news  or 
Uemi  of  intereit  regarding  item* 
•elves  or  their  oonfrerei. 


Indianapolis  travel- 
ers are  all  busy  on  tbe 
road  sending  in  fair 
orders  to  their  houses; 

D.  J.  Reagan  in  Iowa 
and  O.  Derndinger  in 
Indiana  are  booking 
orders  for  Baldwin, 
Miller  & Co.;  L.  W.  Comstock  in  Indiana 
and  E.  Sims  in  Illinois,  are  endeavoring  to 
keep  their  house,  Heaton,  Sims  & Co.,  busy. 


THE  WANING  YEAR. 


With  swift,  resistless  speed 
The  years  roll  by, 

A nd  ere  we  reck  or  heed 
Their  end  is  nigh. 

And  with  each  waning  year 
Some  hearts  grow  sad, 

Or  feel  a chilling  fear— 

And  some  aie  glad. 

For  many  a night  and  day 
An  eager  band 
Has  gone  its  restless  way 
Through  all  the  land. 

Each  one,  with  grip  and  sign 
Is  keen  and  deft ; 

Their  motto— quaintly  fine — 

Is  “ Don't  get  Left ! ” 

A stray  hour  here  and  there 
For  sleep  and  food, 

Is  all,  'tis  said,  they  spare 
From  doing  good. 

Most  kindly,  genial  men 
They  clasp  in  hand  ; 

And,  sometimes,  in  a den 
With  cranks  they  stand. 

The  course  will  soon  be  o’er — 

And  Christmas  here— 

And  drums  will  beat  no  more 
This  festive  year. 

Then  who  more  glad  than  they. 

Who  soon  will  turn 
Towards  loved  ones  far  away — 

For  whom  they  yearn  ? 

Swift  speeds  the  closing  year. 

May  all  our  hearts 
Be  stanch  and  filled  with  cheer. 

Till  life  departs ! 

— De  Lancey  Stone. 

Travelers  in  New  Haven,  Conn.,  last 
week  were;  Herbert  Dillingham,  N.  H. 
White  & Co.;  James  A.  Cheney,  Ludwig 
Nissen  & Co.,  representative  of  Wm.  L. 
Gilbert  Clock  Co. 

Albert  Kahn,  American  Watch  Case  Co., 
is  expected  in  St.  Louis  Dec.  ist.  H . A.  B iss, 
Krementz  & Co.  was  in  the  city  recently, 
passing  through  en  route  east  from  Denver. 
He  reported  fairly  good  business  in  that 
section  of  the  country. 

Eastern  jobbers  and  manufacturers  re- 


presented in  the  Twin  Cities  the  past  week 
were  ; Nicholson  File  Co.,  by  W.  S.  Tragle; 
Dueber  Watch  Case  Mfg.  Co.,  by  F.  R. 
Cross  ; F.  W.  Gesswein  estate,  by  Fred.  C. 
Steinman  ; Albert  Berger  & Co.,  by  Hubert 
Somborn  ; Waterbury  Clock  Co.,  by  W.  L. 
Pettee. 

Traveling  salesmen  calling  upon  Daven- 
port, la.,  jewelers  the  past  week  were  ; A. 

E.  Charlesworth,  Johnston  Optical  Co.;  F. 
R.  Horton,  Carter,  Sloan  & Co.;  S.  W. 
Frohlichstein,  Henry  Froehlich  & Co,; 
Ferguson  Mead,  Barbour  Silver  Co  ; A.  M. 
Shepard,  C.  G.  Alford  & Co.;  H.  W.  Allen, 
Rich  & Allen  Co.;  Millard  Veit,  Marx, 
Veit  & Co.;  Mr.  Anderson,  Simons,  Bro. 
& Co.,  and  E.  S.  Johnston. 

Among  the  traveling  salesman  who  called 
on  Indianapolis,  Ind.,  houses  last  week  were; 
Albert  L.  Stearns,  Roy  Watch  Case  Co.; 
Gus  Dorchester,  Brown  & Dorchester;  C. 

F.  Willemin,  T.  G.  Frothingham  & Co.; 
Frank  W.  Trewin,  Keystone  Watch  Case 
Co.;  J S.  Platt,  Foster  & Bailey;  Daniel 
Earl;  Geo.  C.  Booth,  Hutchison  & Huestis; 
A.  Peabody,  Peabody  & Engelsman;  Mr. 
Beck,  with  J.  Fink  & Co.;  Fred.  Foster, 
Unger  Bros.;  H.  E.  Duncan,  American 
Waltham  Watch  Co. ; and  representatives 
of  Holmes  & Edwards  Silver  Co.,  Good- 
friend  Bros.,  Fessenden  & Co.,  and  Bern- 
heim,  Cohn  & Beer. 

Travelers  in  Pittsburgh,  Pa.,  last  week 
V ere  scant  in  numbers.  Among  them  were; 
J.  E.  Simonson,  A.  J.  Hedges  & Co.;  Louis 
E.  Fay,  Kirby,  Mowry  & Co.;  M.  L.  Jacoby, 
Providence  Stock  Co.;  C.  F.  Willemin,  T. 
G Frothingham  & Co.;  R.  A.  Thompson 
for  Henry  Glorieux;  G.  C.  Booth,  Hutchi- 
son & Huestis;  R.  John  Marsh,  C.  A.  Marsh 
& Co.;  J.  H.  Patton  for  D.  S.  Spaulding; 
.Mr.  Foster,  Unger  Bros.;  J.  W.  D.  Block, 
for  Charles  Knapp;  J.  N.  Beckwith,  Jos.  H. 
Fink  &Co. ; J.  F.  Crane,  Mandeville,  Car- 
row  & Crane;  G.  F.  Kaiser,  Henry  Froeh- 
lich & Co.;  E.  H.  Pelletreau,  Shafer  & 
Douglas. 

Jewelry  travelers  in  Boston,  Mass.,  dur- 
ing the  past  week  included;  Mr.  Unter- 
meyer,  Keller  & Untermeyer  Mfg.  Co.;  W. 
D Elcox,  Larter,  Elcox  & Co.;  A.  W.  At- 
water, Brooklyn  Watch  Case  Co.;  Joseph 
W.  McClannin,  for  John  W.  Sherwood  ; S. 
O.  Bigney  ; W.  H.  Tarlton,  Wightman  & 
Hough  Co.;  Mr.  Kurtz,  George  W.  Cheever 
& Co.;  Mr.  Durlach,  Durlach  Bros  ; James 
M.  Fisher,  J.  M.  Fisher  & Co.;  George  L. 
Vose  ; Heniy  G.  Thresher,  Waite,  Thresher 
Co.;  Frank  Wood,  Carter,  Sloan  & Co.;  Mr. 
Call,  Simpson,  nail.  Miller  & Co.;  J.  D. 
Pettingill,  Derby  Silver  Co. 

1 he  following  salesmen  called  upon  Cleve- 
land, O.  houses  recently;  Mr.  Carpenter, 
Alfred  H.  Smith  & Co.;  C.  E.  Dorr,  Gorham 
Mfg.  Co.;  J.  B.  Beach,  Wilcox  Silver  Plate 
Co.;  Mr.  Lane,  Reed  & BarUn  ; Mr. 
Osborne,  Howard  Sterling  Co  ; Wm.  T. 
Gough,  Carter,  Sloan  & Co.;  Mr.  Woods, 
Battin  & Co.;  Mr.  Cubie,  Levy,  Dreyfus  & 
Co.;  Walter  Shute,  Day,  Clark  & Co.;  Mr. 
Berth,  leather  goods  department  Gorham 


Mfg.  Co.;  C.  A.  Buynton,  Wm.  B.  Kerr  & 
Co.;  J.  E.  Karelsen,  for  E.  Karelsen  ; and 
representatives  of  J.  W.  Richardson  & C >. 
Cox,  Cooper,  Ward  & Young,  and  other 
firms. 

Among  the  jewelrymen  recently  in  Spring- 
field,  Mass.,  were;  H.  W.  Dunham,  Meriden 
Silver  Plate  Co.;  Arthur  M.  Connett,  Unger 
Bros.;  C.  T.  Dougherty,  Sexton  Bros. ;Chas. 
Van  Ness,  Reeves  & Sillcocks;  Arthur  H. 
Bogani,  L.  H.  Keller  & Co.;  C.  E Medbury, 
F.  M.  Whiting  Co.;  H.  C.  Barnum,  Shafer 
& Douglas;  C.  Schwartz,  Krementz  & Co.; 
Wm.  Matschke,  Kuhn,  Doerflinger  & Co. ; 
W.  S.  Campbell,  Day,  Clark  & Co.;  James 
A.  Cheney,  Ludwig  Nissen  & Co  ; V.  W. 
Hendersen,  Enos  Richardson  & Co.;  Mr! 
Glover,  for  Henry  Cowan;  Charles  K.  Wad- 
ham,  Geo.  B.  Hurd  & Co.;  Mr.  Smith,  S. 
Cottle  Co.;  J.  F.  Angell,  Link,  Angell  & 
Weiss. 

Dave  Beer,  of  Bernheim,  Cohn  & Beer, 
had  a narrow  escape  from  being  a heavy 
loser  at  the  hands  of  some  sneak  thieves  in 
Butte,  Mon.,  a few  nights  ago.  Beer  was 
stopping  at  the  Butte  Hotel,  and  had  a room 
on  the  third  floor,  one  of  the  windows  of 
which  opens  out  onto  the  fire  escape  in  the 
rear  of  the  building.  Some  time  between 
9 and  II  o’clock  sneak  thieves  reached  the 
bottom  of  the  fire  escape  by  means  of  a 
ladder,  after  which  entrance  to  Beer’s 
room  through  the  window  was  compara- 
tively easy.  Beer’s  baggage  consisted  of  a 
big  sample  trunk  containing  several  thous- 
and dollars  worth  of  jewelry  and  two 
valises  which  contained  his  personal 
effects.  The  thieves  probably  concluded 
that  the  trunk  contained  Mr.  Beer’s  ward- 
robe and  fine  linen  and  that  he  carried  his 
samples  in  the  valises.  They  carried  the 
grips  away  and  cut  them  open  in  the  alley 
in  the  rear  of  the  hotel  and  were  rewarded 
with  a suit  of  clothes  and  some  underwear. 

The  following  salesmen  took  orders  in 
Syracuse,  N.  Y.,  the  past  week;  C.  J.  Mann, 
Hermann  & Co.;  Alva  J.  Lasher,  Whiting 
Mfg.  Co.;  C.  Sweasy,  Wm.  B.  Kerr  & Co.; 
W.  J.  Carrow,  Mandeville,  Carrow  & Crane; 
Frank  G.  Moyer,  Max  Freund  & Co.;  G B. 
Osborne,  Wm.  Smith  & Co.;  A.  J.  Parker, 
Osmun-Parker  Mfg.  Co.;  M.  H.  Harrison, 
Harrison  & Groeschel;  B.  H.  Knapp,  Smith 
& Knapp;  M.  Traab,  Herzog,  Goldsmith  & 
Frank;  Otto  H.  Wolff,  Ailing  &Co  ; Geo.  C. 
Booth,  Hutchison  & Huestis;  Wm.  W.  Mid- 
dlebrook,  B.  A.  Ballou  & Co. ; Mr.  Pike.  Pik  i 
Mfg.  Co.;  E.  H Ackley,  Eckfeldt,  Ackley 
& Woodland;  Col.  J.  L.  Shepherd,  Keysto;ie 
Watch  Case  Co.;  Emanuel  Levy,  Sam 
Stern  & Co.;  Mr.  Mumford,  Waite, 
Thresher  Co.;  Mr  Simons,  Stern  Bros.  & 
Co.;  Mr.  Jacoby,  Providence  Stock  Co.; 
Oscar  Stearne,  Hammel,  Riglander  & Co  ; 
Mr.  Lockwood,  Jas.  W Gibson  Co.;  George 
Hull,  Silver  Plate  Cutlery  Co.;  C.  F.  Glan- 
ville,  Waterville  Cutlery  Co.;  H.  W.  Mer- 
rill, for  F.  M.  Van  Etten;  William  H.  Pull- 
man, for  Charles  Knapp;  David  Zimmeru. 
Odenheimer,  Zimmeru  & Co.;  Charlis  E. 
Bride,  Bride  & Tinckler;  W,  G.  Poliak;  W, 
R.  Washburne. 


38 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27.  1895. 


CLASSiF'lED  INDEX  TO  ADVERTISEMENTS. 

All  Advertisements  are  entitled  to  one  Insertion  under  proper  heading.  Extra  Insertions,  $6.00  per  annum. 

Extra  Headings,  ^la.oo  per  annum. 


Page. 


A.rt  Furniture. 

Smith,  Geo.  \\'.,  & Co..  818  Broadway,  N.  Y..  70 

A.rt  Pottery,  Bric-a-brac,  etc. 

Bawo  & Dotter,  26-32  Barclay  St..  N.  Y 72 

Bing,  Ferdinand  & Co.,  106  Grand  St.,  N.  Y..  68 
Bloom  & Philips,  228  W.  4th  St.,  Cincinnati.  . 44 
Borgfeldt,  Geo,,  & Co.,  18-22  Washington 

Place,  N.  Y 28d 

Bradley  & Hubbard  Mfg.  Co..  Meriden,  Conn.  64 
D Wenger,  C has  L , 35  37  Park  Place,  N.  Y. . . 71 
Glaenzer,  Freres  & Rheinbjldt,  80  & 82  Cham- 
bers St.,  N.  V 17 

Hinnchs  & Co.,  29-31  Park  Place,  N.  Y 71 

Lazarus,  Rosenfeld  & Lehmann,  6062  Murray 

St.,  N.  Y 71 

Levy,  Dreyfus  & Co.,  ii  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  20-23 
Straus,  L.  & Sons.  42-48  Warren  St., 

N.  Y Back  Cover. 

-Vasayere  6i  KeUnera. 

Baker,  Geo.  M.,  Providence,  R.  1 10 

Lelong,  L.  & bro.,  Newark,  N J 72 

i.uctioneera. 

Boyle,  S.  A & Co.,  14  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 52 

Comrie,  A.  J.,  22  John  St.,  N.Y 62 

Rich,  H.  M.  & Co..  21  School  St.,  Boston, 

Mass 64 

Badges,  Medals,  Ftc. 

Braxmar,  C.  G.,  10  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 59 

Haskell.  H.  C.,  II  John  St.,  N.  Y 62 

Smith.  H.  L.,  4 Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 52 

Cameo  Portraits. 

Bonnet,  L.,  927  B’way,  N.Y 24 

Carborundum. 

The  Carborundum  Co.,  Monongahela,  Pa  ...  66 


Clocks,  French,  FngUsh  and  American. 
Jacques,  Chas.,  Clock  Co.,  22  Cortlandt  St., 

N.Y 72 

Cut  Glass. 

Dorflinger,  C.  & Sons,  36  Murray  St.,  N.  Y. . . 31 
Empire  Cut  Glass  Co.,  35  Warren  St  , N Y.  ..  8 

Diamond  6c  Precious  8tone  Importers 
Falkenau,  Oppenheimer  & Co.,  40  M.  L.,  N.Y  72 
Hedges,  Wm.  S.  & Co  , 170  Broadway,  N.  Y...  24 

Kahn,  L.  & M.  & Co.,  172  Broadway,  N.Y 72 

Keller,  Ettinger  <t  Fink,  24  John  St.,  N Y...,  13 

Kipling,  R.  A.,  Hays  Bldg.,  N.  Y 24 

Lorsch,  Albert,  & Co.,  37  Maiden  Lane.N.Y.  35-72 

Ludeke  & Power,  23  John  St.,  N.  V 28b 

Nisstn,  Ludwig  & Co.,  18  John  St.,  N.Y 16 

Randel,  Baremore  & Billings,  29  Maiden  Lane, 

N.Y 25 

Rich  & Allen,  State  and  Madison  Sts.,  Chicago  41 
Smith,  Alfred  H.  ti  Co.,  182  Broadway,  N.  Y ..  24 
Diamond  Cutters. 

Oppenheimer  Bros.  & Veith,  Prescott  Bldg., 

N.Y 12 

Randel,  Baremore  ^ Billings,  29  Maiden  Lane  25 
Diamond  Jewelry. 

Noterman,  Jos.,  & Co.,  509  Race  Street,  Cin- 


cinnati, O 43 

Sauter,  L.,  & Co  , 194  Broadway,  N.  Y 50 

Waterman  at  Lehmann,  20  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  15 

Diamond  Mountings. 

Bachem,  Chas.,  355  Mulberry  St.,  Newark, N.J.  28 


Oppenheimer,  H.  E.  (V  Co.,  14  Maiden  Lane, 


N.  Y 2 

Schrader,  Theo..  & Co..  100  State  St.,  Chicago  46 
Spies  & Co.,  126  State  St.,  Chicago.  Ill — ...  41 
Engraving,  Etching,  Etc. 

Goldstein  Engraving  Co.,  i Maiden  Lane, 

N.Y 58 

Fans  and  Fancy  Goods. 

Steiner,  Davidson  & Co.,  547  Broadway,  N.Y.  16 

Pine  Engraving. 

I'he  Stationers’  Engraving  Co.,  98-102  Nassau 
St..  N.  Y 25 


Page. 

Pine  Stationery. 

Parsons  * Greene  Co..  iX  Murrav  St..  N.Y...  52 

Whiting  Paper  Co.,  148  Duane  St.,  N.Y 53 

Gold  and  Silver  Platers. 

Newman,  O.,  7 -77  Nassau  St.,  N.  Y 28b 

Gold  Jewelry. 

Aikin,  Lambert  & Co.  19  Maiden  Lane 10-64 

Carter,  Sloan  & Co.,  13  Maiden  Lane.  N.  Y ..  25 
Cross  & Beguelin,  17  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  ...  27 
Hedges,  A.  J.,  & Co.,  6 Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y...  60 

Larter,  Eleox  & Co.,  21  Maiden  Lane 10 

Reeves  & Sillcocks,  21  Maiden  Lane.  N.  Y..  13 
Richardson,  Enos.,  & Co.,  19  Maiden  Lane, 

N.  Y 59 

Schwartz.  W H.,  & Co.,  Newark,  N.J 65 

Strauss,  Jacob,  & Sons,  51  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  47 
Gold  and  Rolled  Plate  Jewelry. 

Main,  W.  F.,  Co.,  Iowa  City,  la 22-23 

Smith,  Wm.,  <s  Co.,  5-7  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y...  50 
Gold  and  Silver  Plate. 

Briggs,  J.  & Sons  Co.,  Providence,  R.  1 36 

Gorological  Schools. 

Parson’s  School  for  Watchmakers,  Peoria,  111.  41 
Jewelry  Repairers. 

Hunt  & Fuller.  73  Nassau  St.,  N.  Y 50 

Jewelry,  Silverware  and  Optical  Cases. 

Jackson,  S.  C.,  180  Broadway,  N.  Y 10-28 

Jobbers,  Watches,  Diamonds,  Etc. 

Albert  Bros.,  ' incinnati,  0 43 

Aikin-Lambert  Jewelry  Co.,  19  Maiden  Lane  10  64 

Bell,  O-  E , Co.,  Cincinnati,  O 44 

Becken,  A.  C..  103  State  St.,  Chicago,  111 46 

Bene,  Lindenberg  & Co  , Carew  bldg., Cincin- 
nati, 0 41 

Friedberger,  L.  S.,  & Co  , 484  Broadway,  N.  Y 62 
Friedlander,  R.,  L.  & M,,Ltd.  30  Maiden  Lane, 

N.  Y 23-59 

Frohman,  Wise  & Newman,  Cincinnati,  O ...  45 

Goddard,  Ira,  14  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 50 

Lapp  a:  Flershem,  92-98  State  St.,  Chicago 41 

Main,  W.  F.,  Co  , Iowa  City,  Iowa 22-23 

Marquardt.  G.  W.,  it  Sons,  Chicago,  111 41 

Mehmert,  Jos.,  5th  and  Race  Sts.,  Cincinnati, O.  42 
Myers,  S.  F.  at  co„  48  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y 72 

Lawyers . 

Emmons  Associated  Law  Offices,  Portland, 

Ore 72 

Musical  Boxes 

Cuendet,  E.  L.,  21  John  St.,N.  Y 60 

lacot  A Son,  39  Union  Square,  N.  Y 21-55 

Wolff,  A.  & Co.,  iith  St.  & Union  Square,  W. 
N.Y 65 

Muslin  Buffs. 

Williamsville  Mfg.  Co.,  18  S.  Water  St.,  Provi- 
dence, R.  1 62 

Optical  Goods. 

Geneva  Optical  Co.,  Chicago,  Ills 56 

King,  Jul.,  Optical  Co.,  14  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  54 
Kirstein’s,  E.,  Sons  Co  , Rochester,  N.  Y . . 23  50 
Oskamp,  Nolting  & Co.  5th  and  Vine  Sts., 

Cincinnati,  0 42 

Spencer  Optical  Mfg.  Co..  15 

Maiden  Lane.  N.Y Inside  Front  Cover 

Sussfeld.  Lorsch  & Co.,  13  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  57 
Optical  Schools. 

Chicago  Ophthalmic  College,  Chicago,  111 41 

Knowles,  Dr., 55 

Pens,  Pencils,  etc. 

Aikin,  Lambert  & Co..  19  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  10-64 
Fairchild,  Le  Roy  W.  & Co.,  220  4th  Ave.,N.Y.  54 

Mabie.  Todd  & Bard,  New  York 24 

Ullrich,  J.,  & Co.,  106  Liberty  St.,  N.  Y 50 


Ring  Makers. 

Bowden.  J.  B.  & Co.,  192  Broadway,  N.  Y....  24 
Bonner,  Rich  & Co.,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y...  58 
Bryant,  M.  B.,  & Co.,  10  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  60 
Cohoone,  Geo.  H.  & Co. .providence,  R I — 27 
Smith,  L.  B.  & H.  H.,  34  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y.  62 

Safes. 

Marvin  Safe  Co.,  12  Park  Place  N.Y 65 

Sample  Trunks. 

Crouch  & Fitzgerald,  161  Broadway,  N.  Y . . 59 

Security  Pin  Guard. 

Security  Mfg.  Co„  7 Astor  House,  N.  Y 23 

Scales. 

Kohlbusch,  Herman.  Sr.,  59  Nassau  St.,  N.  Y.  23 

Show  Cases. 

Melishek  & Petter,  128  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y...  62 

Silver  Plated  Ware. 


Homan  & Co.,  Cincinnati,  Ohio 32-33 

Meriden  Britannia  Co.,  Meriden,  Conn 26 

Pairpoint  Mfg.  Co.,  New  Bedford,  Mass s 

Rogers  & Bro.,  16  Cortland  St.,  N.  Y 2 

Simpson,  Hall,  Miller  & Co.,  141  State  St., 

Chicago,  111 51 

The  Wm.  Rogers  Mfg.  Co.,  Hartford,  Conn.  34-64 
Spectacle  Cases. 

Bertine,  P.  D.,  139  William  Street,  N.Y 23 

Sterling  Silver  Uovelties. 

Codding  Bros.  & Heilborn,  North  Attleboro 

Mass 60 

Foster  & Bailey,  Providence,  R.1 3 

Provenzano,  J.  N.,  114  E.  14th  St.,  N.  Y 52 

Van  Etten,  F.  M„  218  W.  ii6th  St  , N.  Y 16 

Sterling  Silverware. 

Campbell-Metcalf  Silver  Co.,  Providence,  R.  I.  60 
Fuchs.  Ferd.  & Bros.,  808-810  Greenwich  St., 


Mauser  Mfg.  Co.,  14  E.  15th  St.,  N.  Y 21 

Towle  Mfg.  Co.,  Newburyport,  Mass 14 

Wallace,  R.,  & Sons  M’f’g  Co.,  Wallingford, 

Conn 7 

Whiting,  F.  M.,  Co.,  North  Attleboro,  Mass..  60 

Wood  & Hughes,  16  John  St..  N.  Y 60 

Tea  Kettles,  Chafing  Dishes,  Etc. 

Sternau,  S.,  & Co.,  36  Park  Place, 

N.  Y Inside  Back  Cover. 

Thimbles. 

Ketcham  & McDougall,  198  Broadway,  N.  Y . . 64 

Tool  Manufacturers  and  Dealers. 

American  Watch  Tool  Co.,  Waltham,  Mass  . . 64 

Trunks  and  Traveling  Bags. 

Crouch  & Fitzgerald,  161  Broadway,  N.Y  — 59 

Watch  Case  Manufacturers. 

Dueber- Hampden  Co.,  Canton,  O 16 

Fahys,  Jos.,  & Co.,  41  Maiden  Lane,  N.Y.  39 
Jacobson,  F.  H.  & Co.,  96  State  St.,  Chicago  . 41 
Roy  Watch  Case  Co.,  21  Maiden  Lane..  io-28b 
Watch  Case  Materials, 

Newark  Watch  Case  Material  Co.,  Newark. 

N.  J 59 

Watch  Case  Repairers. 

Felix,  N.  J.,  17  John  St.,  N.  Y 72 

Henry,  Peter,  Cincinnati,  0 4.' 

Watch  Importers. 

Haldiman,  E.  A.,  33  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y 55 

Hyde's,  J.  E.,  Sons,  22  Maiden  Lane,  N.  Y ..  16 
Mathey  Bros.,  Mathez  & Co.,  21  and  23  Maiden 

Lane,  N.Y 10 

Wittnauer,  A.,  19  Maiden  Lane.  N.  Y 28a 

Watch  Manufacturers. 

Dueber  Hampden  Co..  Canton.  O — 16 

Hamilton  Watch.  Co.,  Lancaster,  Pa  66 

Watch  Materials  and  Tools. 

Keller,  L H.,  & Co  , 64  Nassau  St.,  N.  Y 28c 

Muehlmatt,  Ad.,  145  5th  St.,  Cincinnati 39 

Window  Display. 

Pearce,  Frederick,  77-79  John  St,  N.  Y 67 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


>9 


Special  Notices. 


Kates  75c.  per  Insertion  for  notices  not  exceeding 
3 lines (25  words);  additional  words  2 cents  eacii. 
If  answers  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  stamps 
must  be  enclosed.  Two  insertions,  i5  per  cent,  ofi; 
three  insertions,  20  per  cent  off ; four  insertions  or 
more,  25  per  cent.  off.  Payable  strictly  in  advance. 
Display  cards  on  this  page  will  be  charged  at  $2.C0 
per  inch  for  first  insertion,  subject  to  same  discount 
as  above  for  subsequent  insertions. 

Under  the  heading  of  Kituittions  Wanted 
on  this  page  advertisements  will  be  inserted  for 
One  Cent  a Word  each  insertion,  no  discount.  This 
offer  refers  to  Situatiuns  Wanleil  only. 
Payable  strictly  in  advance.  If  answers  are  to  be 
forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


ANTED. —A  temporary  city  and  nearby  sales- 
’’  man  by  a manufacturing  jewelry  house;  must 
have  some  acquaintance  with  the  trade  ; reference  re- 
quired. Address  Salesman,  care  Jewelers’  Cir- 
cular.  

ANTED. —First-class  watchmaker  and  jeweler, 
' ’ one  who  can  do  plain  engraving  preferred ; 
position  permanent ; wages  $12  to  Jij ; must  have 
good  references.  L.  S.  Meyer  & Bro.,  42  Maiden 
Lane,  N.  Y. 

WANTED  TILL  AFTER  CHRISTMAS,  sales- 
' ' men  in  our  silver  department  ; must  be  of  good 
address  and  have  best  references.  William  Wise  & 
Son,  Flatbush  Ave.  and  Fulton  St.,  Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 
ONCE.— An  experienced  watchmaker,  engraver, 
optician  and  salesman,  must  be  an  expert  in 
these  branches  ; a permanent  position  ; send  samples 
of  engraving  and  photo  in  first  letters,  also  salary  ex- 
pected, with  references.  The  Upson  Jewelry  Co., 
Waterbury.  Conn. 


Situations  \\)anted. 


Notices  under  this  heading  ONLY  are  charged  at 
one  cent  a word,  payable  strictly  in  advance.  Ip 
answer  are  to  be  forwarded,  postage  must  be  enclosed. 


Y’OUNG  MAN  would  like  an  opportunity  to  work 
for  a reliable  jewelry  house  ; best  of  references. 
Address  Energetic,  rare  Jewelers’  Circular 
A LAD  16  years  of  age,  with  a good  school  educa- 
tion,  would  like  a position  in  a wholesale  or 
manufacturing  house.  Address  Albion,  care  The 
Jewelers’  Circular 

CALESMAN  DESIRES  POSITION,  Jan.  istl 
acquainted  with  jewelry  trade  in  New  York 
Eastern  and  Middle  States.  Hustler,  care  Jewelers’ 
Circular. 

tJiTUATION  to  finish  trade  with  a practical  watch- 
maker;  have  had  six  years'  experience  on  clocks  ; 
New  York  State  preferred.  Address  L.  B.,  Box  229, 
Clare,  Mich. 

A POSITION  by  a first-class  salesman  to  represent 
a good  jewelry  or  material  house  on  the  road  ; 
one  used  to  pushing,  up-hill  trade  ; best  of  references. 
Address  C.  G.,  Jr.,  care  Jewelers’  Circular 
VA’ ANTED  SITUATION  by  first  class  watch- 
’ maker,  jobber,  salesman  and  plain  engraver ; 
best  of  references  ; California  preferred.  Address  C., 
Lock  Box  26.  Poplar  Bluff,  Mo. 


lousiness  Qpportunities. 


prOR  SALE— Good  paying  jewelry  business  in  town 
of  12,000 ; easy  terms  ; must  be  sold  at  once  on 
account  of  poor  health.  Address  M.  J.  Mann,  Johns- 

town,  N.  Y. 

■pOR  SALE — Old  established  jewelry  store  in 
splendid  location  in  the  South  ; stock,  fixtures, 
etc.;  stock,  $6,000;  will  reduce  to  suit  purchaser; 
cause  for  selling,  old  age  and  failing  eyesight.  Address 
for  particulars  New  South,  care  Jewelers’  Cir- 

cular. 

pANE  OF  THE  BEST  paying  jewelry,  silverware 
and  bric-a  brae  stores  in  Philadelphia  is  for  sale, 
the  whole  thing,  stock,  fixtures  and  lease ; fine  store 
and  in  the  best  location  ; ill  health  the  sole  reason  for 
selling ; established  1855.  Geo.  Eakins  & Son,  930 
Chestnut  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


T'o  [^et. 


pO  LET — A good  office  at  moderate  price  in  the 
^ Diamond  Exchange  building,  14  Maiden  Lane, 
New  V ork.  Apply  to  janitor. 


w 

GOLD  FILLED 

c 

A 

A 

T 

r 1 

s 

C 

H 

E 

S 

nNTOTIOE. 

Send  Samples  of  Jewelry  and  Novelties 
of  Job  Lots  you  wish  Marketed  to 

H.  P.  CUTTER, 

Manufacturers’  Agent. 

113  State  Street,  = CHICAGO. 


SiTOLEIV. 

I 18  or  20  size  H.  C.,  stamped  i8k., 
polished  case,  gold  repeater  with 
sweep  fly-back  timer,  without 
small  second  hand,  child’s  pho  o 
pasted  in  front  cap.  Cheaper 
make  of  movement. 


1 I 18  size,  key  wind  gold  Elgin. 
Works  797899.  Case  84502. 


I H.  C.  14k.  gold,  6 size,  Elgin.  Full 


A TRAVELING  MAN  of  many  years’  experience 
South  and  West  in  the  jewelry  line,  first-class 
salesman,  and  references,  is  desirous  of  a change, 
lanuary  ist.  Address  “Ware,”  care  Jewelers’ 

Circular. 

Y\JATCHMAKER  wants  position.  1 have  been 
' ^ for  the  last  six  years  with  Messrs.  Bartens 
& Rice,  repairing  fine  watches,  French  clocks,  etc.; 
references  from  same.  B.  M.  Marine,  64  Fourth 
Ave  . Brooklyn,  N.  Y. 

watchmaker  or  traveling  SALES- 

MAN  would  like  position  with  reliable  house  ; 
Ai  references  and  well  known  through  ut  New  York 
and  Pennsylvania.  Address  B 8b,  317  Arch  St.,  Phila- 
delphia.  Pa. 

S.ALESM AN,  well  acquainted  in  the  jewelry  busi- 
ness  and  having  good  trade  in  loose  and  mounted 
diamonds,  wants  to  make  connection,  Jan.  ist  with 
first  class  importing  firm  carrying  an  extensive  line  : 
on  commission  basis  or  salary.  Address  " Diamonds,” 

care  Jewelers'  Circular. 

^YCLIST.  — Watchmaker,  single,  twenty-eight, 
twelve  years  in  store  and  factory,  own  bench  and 
tools ; experienced,  well-posted  eyefist.  wishes  place 
with  jeweler  handling  wheels  or  bicycle  house.  Address 

Cyclist,  care  Jewelers’  Circular. 

Y\J  ANTED  — To  correspond  with  a firm  that  needs 
' a temperate,  industrious,  all  around  jewelry 
salesman  accustomed  to  best  city  trade ; good  en- 
graver, watch,  clock  and  jewelry  repairer;  locality  no 
object,  and  wages  not  the  main  object  ; willing  to  be 
useful  and  to  come  on  trial.  Address  Fidelity,  care 
Jewelers’  Circular. 


V\}anted. 


YY’^ANTED,  for  the  West  and  Southwest,  a first 
class  traveler  by  a first-class  jobbing  house. 
Address  John  St.,  care  Jewelers’  Circul.ar. 

VV  ANTED.— For  a few  weeks  a first-class  engraver. 
Apply  at  once  to  Mrs.  E.  H.  Fisher,  Elyria, 

Ohio. 

\\fANTED. — First-class  salesman  by  a jobbing 
house  for  New  York,  Pennsylvania  and  Ohio; 
state  salary  expected.  Address  Dennison,  care 

Jewelers’  Circular.  

VYJANTED.  — A material  clerk,  who  thorouahly 
understands  select  ng  .'American  and  Swiss 
watch  materials.  Address  Green  Bros.,  11  Maiden 
Lane,  N.  Y. 

A .N  I'ED.  — Experienerd  traveling  salesman  to 
’ ’ sell  watches  to  the  trade  in  the  city  and  nearby 
towns ; must  have  the  best  references.  Address 
Watches,  care  Jewelers’s  Circular. 
YYJANTED.— A traveler  for  the  South  ; permanent 
position  to  right  man  ; state  amount  of  business 
and  salary  expectecL  Address  O.  G.,  care  Jewelers' 
Circular. 


I 

TWiscellaneous. 


engraved  case  with  small  g Id 
balls  soldered  around  edge. 


YY’^ANTED — You  to  know  that  the  genuine  “ Mose- 
ley  Lathe  ” equals  the  best  of  the  very  best.  When 
interested  write  your  jobber  for  new  price  list,  or  to 

the  manufacturers.  Moseley  & Co..  Elgin.  111. 

UUR  SALE — A Parkinson  and  P'rodsham  chro- 
*■  nometer  in  A i condition,  rate  i-io  second  ; also  a 
complete  trial  case,  made  by  Julius  King  Optical  Co., 
almost  new  ; for  particulars,  address  L.  M.,  care  Jew- 

ELERs’  Circular 

YY^A^LED. — A line  of  rings  on  commission:  must 
* * be  first-class  in  every  respect ; will  carry  with 
my  own  line  of  14  k.  jewelry  ; have  an  established 
trade  with  the  best  retailer  in  every  city  of  the  union  ; 
this  is  an  e.xceptional  opportun  ty  for  a manufacturer 
to  place  his  go  ds  at  I’ttle  expense.  Address  Oppor- 
tunity, care  Jewelers’  Circular. 


I o size  H.  C.,  full  eng.  filled  case 
with  Elgin  m vement,  and  May 
Richards  engraved  on  cap  in  old 
Engli  h letters. 


Suitable  reward  paid  for 
recovery  of  yoi  ds  by  oivner. 


WANTED. 


Address  Superintendent  of 


Ai  TRAVELER  for  the  Middle  States.  To  call  on 
the  retail  jewelry  trade  only,  with  a full  line  of  watches, 
diamonds  and  jewelry.  Liberal  arrangements  offered 
to  the  right  party.  Only  siggle  men,  who  have 
traveled  IN  THIS  LINE  E.XCLUSIVELY  for  a 
number  of  years  need  apply,  stating  age,  references 
and  full  particulars.  Address 

l.lSSAdEK  A:  CO.^PANV, 

12  iTla.idcn  l,a.iie, 

P.  O.  Box  2516.  New  York. 


The  caps  are  made  of  Stubs  steel  wire  in  twelve 
different  sizes,  so  that  they  can  be  fitted  to  any  wheel 
in  any  size  movement  — Swiss  or  American.  They 
can  be  used  on  the  staff  of  any  wheel  or  lever  in  a 
watch  where  the  staff  projects  far  enough  from  the 
wheel  or  lever  to  admit  the  cap.  and  as  these  caps  are 
perfectly  true  the  pivot  will  always  be  in  the  exact 
center  of  the  staff  when  driven  on  Very  valuable  for 
cheap  watches,  and  specially  convenient  for  all  watches 
where  staffs  are  very  small  and  easily  split,  as  the  lever 
or  escape-wheel  staff  on  Swiss  watches.  SOU)  BV  .tlL 
JOBB,U{S. 


Police,  Detroit,  Mich. 


NEW  IMPROVED 


PATENTEE. 


AD.  MUEHL'VIATT,  maker. 


145-147  WEST  5th  ST,,  CINCINNATI,  OHIO. 

Manufacturer  of  Engravers’  Specialties. 

Illustrated  and  descriptive  ci-^culars of  Monarch  En 
graving  Bocks  and  Engravers’  Sp.cialties  sent  1 11 
application. 


Cblcaeo  Office:  Room  si7>  Inter-Ocean  Bntldinic. 


VOL.  XXXI.  CHICAGO,  WEDNESDAY,  NOV.  27,  1895.  - NO.  17. 


Chicago  Notes. 

Albert  Miller  is  again  buying  in  person, 
having  recently  returned  from  a visit  of  six 
months  in  Europe. 

There  has  been  a steady  influx  of  country 
buyers  this  week  and  conditions  are  favor- 
able for  a satisfactory  volume  of  trade  for 
December. 

H.  M.  Stephenson,  Escanaba,  Mich.,  who 
was  numbered  among  the  buyers  of  the 
week,  is  holding  an  auction  clearing  sale, 
previous  to  moving  into  new  quarters. 

Shipping  departments  of  jobbing  houses 
are  becoming  more  and  more  crowded,  and 
while  little  if  any  night  work  is  yet  required 
in  the  filling  of  orders,  the  improvement  is 
very  marked. 

Walter  Buckley,  the  Seth  Thomas  Clock 
Co.’s  tower  man,  is  placing  in  position  one 
of  their  tower  clocks  in  a schoolhouse  at  Ft. 
Madison.  la.,  and  goes  thence  to  do  similar 
work  on  the  stock  yards  building,  Kansas 
City,  Mo. 

The  sale  of  the  assets  of  Richards  & 
Rutishauser,  the  catalogue  house  who  re- 
cently failed,  has  been  postponed  from  day 
to  day  for  two  weeks  past,  owing  to  efforts 
of  creditors  to  set  aside  the  confession  of 
judgment.  Friday  it  was  stated  that  bonds 
would  be  given  and  the  sale  held  Saturday 
or  Monday. 

A surprise  to  the  Chicago  trade  Wednes- 
day came  in  the  statement  that  W.  H. 
Booth,  of  Sioux  Falls,  S.  D.,  had  confessed 
judgment.  Mr.  Booth  was  rated  among 
the  best  in  that  section  of  country.  From 
the  fact  that  orders  from  the  firm  had  been 
picked  out  and  were  lying  on  the  shipping 
tables  of  Chicago  jobbers,  it  would  seem  the 
firm’s  action  was  suddenly  taken. 

Sixteen  applications  have  already  been 
made  for  the  class  of  the  Chicago  Ophthal- 
mic College,  607  Van  Buren  St.,  beginning 
Jan.  7th,  and  the  indications  are  that  it  will 
be  the  banner  class  in  the  history  of  the 
college.  The  growth  of  the  college  has 
been  remarkable  and  early  application 
should  be  made  for  information  as  to  the 
benefits  to  be  derived.  The  science  of 
optics  is  a profitable  knowledge  for  the 
jeweler. 

Miss  Luella  Agnes  Wallis,  eldest  daughter 
of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  O.  W.  Wallis,  709  Wash- 
ington boulevard,  was  married  on  the  19th 


inst.  to  Frederick  O.  Streich.  Dr.  With- 
row, of  the  Third  Presbyterian  Church, 
officiated,  and  a musical  programme  was 
rendered  at  intervals  during  the  service. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Streich  left  the  same  evening 
on  a wedding  journey  through  the  south 
and  will  be  at  home  after  Jan.  15th  at  their 
residence,  1149  Washington  boulevard. 
Mr.  Streich  is  associated  with  John  V.  Far- 
well  & Co. 

A movement  has  been  started  by  the 
retail  jewelers  of  the  Northside  that  should 
secure  a large  number  of  followers  through- 
out the  country.  It  is  the  beginning  of  a 
warfare  against  department  stores  by 
means  of  underselling.  Each  day  bulletins 
are  displayed  giving  the  prices  of  the  high- 
rent  downtown  department  stores  on  vari- 
ous advertised  articles,  followed  by  the 
prices  at  which  the  same  articles  are  sold 
by  the  jeweler.  The  deceit  practiced  by 
many  of  the  dry  goods  stores  and  the  unre- 
liability of  their  wares  as  to  quality,  are 
being  shown  up  and  the  movement  promises 
well  for  the  retail  jeweler.  This  particular 
method  of  warfare  is  worthy  the  attention 
of  the  retail  jewelers’  associations,  as  con- 
certed action  by  a large  number  of  the 
trade  would  undoubtedly  result  in  a general 
benefit. 

Retail  houses  represented  as  buyers  in 
the  jobbing  district  the  past  week  included  : 
M.  E.  Briggs,  Howell,  Mich.;  A.  J.  Gibbs, 
Greenfield,  la.;  H.  J.  Golden,  Milwaukee, 
Wis.;  A.  R.  Knights,  Dubuque,  la.;  G. 
Rohrer,  Hancock,  Mich.;  A.  F.  Weiskopf, 
Kenosha,  Wis.;  Julius  Kahn,  Appleton, 
Wis.;  Geo.  F.  Beach,  Valparaiso,  Ind.; 
L.  H.  Bauer,  Elgin,  111.;  C.  E.  Dodge, 
Walnut  Hill.,  111.;  W.  W.  Denny, 
Aurora,  111.;  P.  B.  Holderness, 
Batavia:  A.  B.  Hall,  Danville,  la.; 

J.  F.  Ingalls  & Son,  Waukegan,  111.;  Paul 
Jander,  Columbus,  Ohio  ; M.  C.  Knudson, 
Evanston;  L.  Luchtemeyer,  Blue  Island,  111. 
Albert  Miller,  Dundee,  111.;  H.  A.  Oester- 
rich,  Watertown,  Wis.;  Mrs.  F.  J.  Reamer, 
So.  Chicago,  111.;  E.  Reimel,  Streator,  111.; 
W.  R.  Smith,  Geneva,  111.;  E.  S Saunders, 
Wyoming,  la.;  E.  Wehmhoff,  Burlington, 
Wis.;  R.  A.  Winter,  Highwood,  111.;  W.  P. 
Yeoman,  Waukegan,  111.;  W.  A.  Wuff, 
Renssalaer,  Ind.;  Evertson  & Todd,  Madi- 
son, Ind.;  Smith  Bros.,  Hastings,  Minn.;  O. 
S.  Clayton  & Sons,  Aurora,  111.;  R.  H. 
Trask,  Ottawa,  111. 


St.  Louis. 

Thos.  E.  Rogers,  representing  Hayes 
Bros.  Newark,  N.  J.,  was  the  only  visitor  in 
the  city  the  past  week. 

Sterling  Grimes  announces  to  his  friends, 
through  the  daily  papers,  that  he  has 
connected  himself  with  the  Mermod  & 
Jaccard  Jewelry  Co. 

The  wife  of  Mr.  Gerhardt,  jeweler,  1242 
South  Broadway,  has  just  recovered  from 
a severe  illness.  She  was  very  low  at  one 
time  and  her  death  was  expected. 

Julius  Kahn,  who  was  for  many  years 
with  the  Jaccard  Watch  & Jewelry  Co.,  and 
who  retired  from  that  firm  a few  days  ago, 
has  gone  into  the  insurance  business. 

Sam  Bauman  left  Saturday  night  for 
Memphis  to  sell  a new  firm  a supply  of 
goods.  Mr.  Massa,  of  the  same  firm,  has 
been  absent  for  several  days  in  Illinois  on 
business. 

The  Missouri  Retail  Jewelers’  Association 
held  their  regular  meeting  Nov.  20th.  The 
business  transacted  was  mostly  routine. 
A number  of  applications  for  membership 
were  received  and  will  be  acted  upon  in 
due  course. 

W.  F.  Kemper,  president  of  the  Missouri 
Retail  Jewelers’  Association  and  secretary 
of  the  National  Retail  Jewelers  Associa- 
tion, is  putting  in  an  entire  new  front  and 
completely  refitting  his  store  at  2326  Frank- 
lin Ave. 

H.  Wicke,  for  a long  time  at  nth  St.  and 
Franklin  Ave.,  has  given  up  his  old  place 
of  business  and  has  moved  opposite  to  an 
entirely  new  store  in  the  Fraternal  build- 
ing, which  has  just  been  completed.  Mr, 
Wicke  will  have  one  of  the  brightest  and 
prettiest  stores  on  that  thoroughfare. 

A circular  is  being  prepared  and  will 
soon  be  issued,  possibly  the  coming  weel-, 
by  the  Missouri  Retail  Jewelers’  Associa- 
ting, requesting  the  jobbers  not  to  sell 
goods  at.  retail,  upon  the-  mere  presen- 
tation of  business  cards  of  the  retailers,  but 
that  the  jobbers  request  that  an  order  be 
presented  in  writing  and  signed  by  the 
retail.  A number  of  jobbers  have  been  im- 
posed upon  by  parties  presenting  cards  to 
them  and  stating  that  they  have  been  sent 
by  retailers. 


Nov.  27,  18^5. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR — Western  Supplement. 


41 


Kansas  City. 

0.  r>.  Evans,  formerly  of  Yuma,  Col.,  is 
now  located  in  Oxford,  Neb. 

1.  N.  Marques,  formerly  of  Ottawa,  Kan., 
:s  now  employed  as  watchmaker  for  S.  R. 
Abney,  this  city. 

G.  Brucker  has  discontinued  his  store  on 
5th  St.  and  is  now  working  at  the  bench 
for  L.  Hayter. 

Among  the  out-of-town  buyers  last  week 
were:  E.  V.  Burnett,  Topeka,  Kan.;  R. 

M.  Mann,  Alma,  Kan.;  Z.  Beasley,  Rich 
Hdl.Mj. ; R.  E.  Lafinck,  Manhattan,  Kan. ; 
E.  L.  McDonnell,  Arkansas  City,  Kan.;  L. 
Hoffman,  Leavenworth,  Kan.;  T.  Kolstad, 
Pleasant  Hill,  Mo.;  William  H.  Meyer, 
Larson,  Mo.;  J.  B.  Lowe,  Independence, 


Mo.;  William  P.  Bard,  St.  Paul,  Kan. 

The  travelers  visiting  Kansas  City, 
last  week  were  : N.  D.  Prentiss,  Ailing  & 

Co.;  M.  Brooks,  Brooks  & Pike  ; Henry  H. 
Jacobson,  Jacobson  Bros.;  Fred  Kaufman; 
P.  S.  Pel  ton.  Pel  ton  Bros.  Silver  Plate 
Co.;  W.  S.  Strauss,  Jacob  Strauss  & 
Sons ; T.  L.  Carrow,  Mandeville,  Car- 
row  & Crane  ; E.  A.  Tyler,  Ansonia 
Clock  Co.;  M.  Sinnock,  Ehrlich  & 
Sinnock  ; S.  A.  Goldsmith,  Adolph  Gold- 
smith & Son  ; L.  K.  Jonas,  Imperial  Opti- 
cal Co.;  Jas.  W.  Hagan,  for  Jas.  W.  Miller; 
Herbert  Somborn,  Albert  Berger  & Co.; 
David  Fliss,  Herman  Mfg.  Co.;  O.  C.  Lane; 
Reed  & Barton  ; Henry  Freund,  Max 
Freund  & Co.;  S.  E.  Bolles,  M.  B.  Bryant 
& Co. 


The  stock  of  jewelry  in  the  store  at  23  E. 
nth  St.  was  last  week  levied  on  under  an 
execution  issued  by  Justice  Hawthorne. 
The  execution  was  in  favor  of  S.  W.  Spang- 
ler and  Herman  Oppenheimer,  who  claimed 
that  Max  M.  Maas,  manager  of  the  store, 
owed  them  on  an  old  account.  The  stock 
was  replevied  by  the  Streicher  Watch  & 
Jewelry  Co.,  who  owned  it  and  had  Maas 
in  charge  as  manager. 


O.  S.  Beggs,  of  Hagerstown,  has  accepted 
a position  with  Garthwait  & Kyle,  Gas  City, 
Ind.,  and  B.  A.  Carpenter,  of  Ladd,  111. 
has  taken  the  position  with  Allen  & Co., 
Hagerstown,  recently  vacated  by  O.  S. 
Beggs. 


REPRESENTATIVE  CHICAGO  HOUSES. 


ELMER  A.  RICH,  PRES. 


HERBERT  W.  ALLEN,  TREAS. 


RICH  & ALLEN  CO 

126  STATE  STREET, 

CHICAGO,  ILL. 


JOHN  H.  MERTZ,  SEC’Y. 


AND 


DIAMONDS 
PRECIOUS  STONES, 


LOOSE  AND  MOUNTED. 


:-®  MEMORANDUM  PACKAGES  SENT  TO  THE  TRADE  ON  APPLICATION. 


Watch  Case  Manufacturers 

F.  H.  JACOBSON  & CO. 

96  STATE  ST,  CHICAGO 

REPAIRING. 

\ \ Wholesale  Jewelers.  Chicajjo. 


SPIES  & CO., 

JEWELRY  MANDFACTDRERS, 

DIAMOND  MOUNTING, 
REPAIRING. 

126  STATE  ST.,  - CHICAGO,  ILL. 


Parsons  i Sghool 

FOE 

WATCHnAKER5. 

PFCORIA,  ILL 

Send  for  Circular  and  Terms. 

<Sc  no. 


BULLETIN,  NOV.,  1895. 


“Busiest  House  in  America"  1896  Catalogue  ready. 
The  largest,  finest  and  best  arranged  catalogue  in 
the  jewelry  business.  Sent  to  Jewelers  on 
application. 


Optician’s  School. 


THE  OIKflQO  . . . 

OPHTHALniQ  QOLLEQE 

. . . 4Nb  H2JP1T4L, 

607  VAN  BVRBN  STREET. 


TOEING  the  oldest  and  most  favorably  known  College  of  Theoretical  and 
'f'O  Applied  Ophthalmic  Optics  in  America,  having  more  thoroughly 
qualified  opticians  in  the  field  than  all  other  so-called  schools 
combined. 

From  having  had  the  most  experience,  we  can  honestly  guarantee  the 
best  satisfaction  to  earnest  students,  and  we  do  not  care  for  others,  as  we 
desire  our  students  to  be  considered  the  best.  Our  diploma  is  recognized 
throughout  America  as  conferring  superior  optical  knowledge. 

Opticians  are  admitted  to  the  Hospital  and  may  witness  several  cross- 
eye  and  cataract  operations  during  the  session,  as  well  as  having  the 
advantage  of  personally  examining  and  correcting  all  errors  of  refraction, 
muscular  inequalities,  etc.,  under  the  supervision  of  the  attending  oculist. 

January  7,  1896.  next  class  begins  ; already  16  names  are  registered. 
If  you  want  a r(?^over  your  head,  come  to  our  school.  We  want 
earnest  students,  leave  the  rest  to  tts,  we  do  not  want  diploma  hunters. 


AODRESS  THE  PRESIDENT, 

H.  M,  MARTIN.  M.  D., 


CITY  OPFICE, 

103  State  St.,  cop.  Washington, 

COLUMBUS  MEMORIAL  BUILDING, 

Suite  1010. 


607  VAN  BUREN  ST. 


SPECIAL  PRICES  FOR  FINE'REGULATORS 


42 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR- Western  Supplement. 


Nov  27,  1895. 


Now  is  the  time 


to  make  store  and  cases  attractive.  We 
can  help  you  out  at  very  low  figures.  Our 

Watch  and  Jewelry  Trays 

are  made  of  the  best  materials,  at  prices 
lower  than  the  lowest  elsewhere.  Also 

Plush  and  Paper  Boxes. 

Our  Materials  for  Watchmakers  and  Jewelers 
are  the  best  known  m the  market;  our  prices  the 
lowest. 

Send  for  catalogue  and  prices  for  anything  per- 
taining to  the  jewelry  trade. 

jojzvn  nEHrvEKT, 

General  Jewelers’  Supplies, 

5th  and  Race  Sts.  and  1014  Freeman  Ave.,  Cincinnati,  O. 


A BIG  OPPORTUNITY 

F(^R  ENTERPRISING  JEWELERS  TO  INCREASE  THEIR 

OPTICAL  TRAD£. 


SPECIAL  INDUCEMENTS 


To  Patrons  of  $500  or  over  Per  Annum  in  General  Lines. 


We  have  established  a 
permanent  plant  to  facilitate 
orders  and  we  guarantee 
satisfaction. 

We  handle 

TRIAL  CASES 
OPHTHALMOSCOPES 
and  OCULIST’S 
RECORD  SHEETS. 

Prescription  Work  a Specialty. 


Write  for  Prices  and  Description  of  our  Spectacle  Eye-Glass. 

More  Glasses  are  used  every  day. 

BUILD  UP  YOUR  TRADE.  SEND  FOR  PARTICULARS. 

OSKAMP,  NOLTING  CO-. 

5th  and  Vine  Sts.,  CINCINNATI,  O. 


louring  December  the  liest  Bargains  ever  offered  to  the  trade  in  . . . 


Diamonds,  Watches,  Jewelry,  Clocks, 
Silverware  and 

BEAUTIFUL  LINE  OF  inFORTEb  BRIC-A-BRAC 


Will  be  given  by 


Give  ns  a 
trial  order. 


RENE,  LINDENBERQ  6^  C2., 

Carbw  Building,  d NC! N N ATI , O. 


Pacific  Coast  Notes. 

G.  A.  Ross,  Sitka,  Alaska,  has  moved 
into  a fine  new  store. 

C.  St.  Louis  has  opened  a new  store  in 
Grant  Pass,  Ore. 

M.  E.  Campbell  will  open  a new  jewelry- 
store  in  Santa  Barbara,  Cal. 

Ingalls  & Bragg  are  a ne-w  jewelry  firm 
who  have  opened  up  in  South  Bend,  Wash. 

Joe  Orban,  Oroville,  Cal.,  has  returned 
from  his  extended  trip  through  the  moun- 
tains. * 1 

In  a fire  in  Huntington,  Ore.,  recently  the 
jewelry  store  of  G.  W.  Harris  was  burned 
out. 

J.  Gordino,  Merced,  Cal.,  has  retired 
from  business  and  has  gone  to  work  for 
Fred  Daunt. 

Rawston  Bros.,  Moscow,  Idaho,  have 
sold  their  stock  of  jewelry  to  W.  D. 
Hooper. 

The  California  Jewelry  Co.  have  opened 
up  with  a stock  of  watches,  diamonds  and 
jewelry  at  14  W.  Colorado  St.,  Pasadena, 
Cal. 

N.  H.  Wilson,  formerly  in  business  in 
Merced,  Cal.,  has  gone  into  the  optical 
business  and  will  travel  over  the  Pacific 
coast. 

A fire  in  the  store  of  Paul  Flassey,  San 
Diego,  Cal.,  recently,  damaged  the  stock  of 
jewelry  to  the  extent  of  about  $1,200.  The 
loss  was  fully  covered  by  insurance. 

George  Madeira,  Austin  Creek,  Cal.,  is 
opening  up  a large  new  ledge  of  onyx 
marked  in  a be.autiful  manner.  He  is  get- 
ting out  the  stone  in  large  slabs. 


San  Francisco. 

Alexander  Noack,  Sacramento,  Cal.,  was 
recently  in  town  on  his  wedding  trip. 

Fred  Roth,  of  L.  & M.  Kahn  & Co.,  and 
Mr.  Banm,  of  Rothschild  Bros. , New  York, 
were  recently  in  this  city. 

A.  W.  Hine,  Phelps  & Miller,  returned 
from  a trip  to  southern  California,  voices 
the  common  comment  that  business  is  very 
good  in  that  part  of  the  State. 

Alfred  Seson,  a watchmaker,  is  suing  to  re- 
cover $30,000  damages  from  George  Stierlen, 
who  is  alleged  to  have  alienated  the  affec- 
tions of  the  plaintiff’s  wife. 

S.  B.  Bailey,  formerly  W.  S.  Bailey  & 
Bros.,  Pomona,  Cal.,  has  been  in  the  city. 
He  is  carefully  looking  over  this  part  of  the 
State  for  a business  location. 

W.  P.  Morgan,  of  the  Meriden  Britannia 
Co.,  is  in  the  east  to  be  near  his  daughter 
Therese  Morgan,  who  is  very  ill  with 
typhoid  fever  at  her  school  in  Farmington, 
Conn. 

As  indicated  by  the  number  of  buyers  in 
town  the  past  fortnight,  business  is  again 
picking  up.  Among  the  buyers  were: 
O.  Fromer,  lyivermore.  Cal.;  H.  C.  Ray, 
Visalia.  Cal.;  Chas.  S.  Wilcoxon,  Napa, 
Cal.;  G.  A.  Field,  Redwood  City,  Cal.; 
Read  McCraney,  Martinez,  Cal.;  B.  Hois- 
holt,  Ferndale,  Cal.;  N.  H.  Wilson,  Merced, 
Cal.;  and  F.  T.  Gunther,  Lake  View, 
Oregon. 


Nov.  27th  1895. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR —Western  Supplement. 


43 


JOS.  NOTERMAN  & CO. 


To  avoid  all  disappointment  during  the  holiday  rush  send  your 
order  work  to  us.  We  are  especially  well  equipped  to  get  it  out  on  time. 


IBanuliarluping  Jrtnfbps 

Diahond  Mountings 
Artistic  Diahond  Work 


rilNIATURE  riOUNTINGS 
Plain  Rings,  Hedals,  Job  Work 


o09,  511,  513  Race  St,  CINCINNATI.  OHIO. 


d»|0  CA  net  cash  for  a 14K. 

»pl0.t)U  SOLID  GOLD  WATCH. 


Just  What  You  Want  for  the  Holidays. 


50  COMPLETE 
= NET  CASH 


The  illustrations  represent  a few  of 
the  celebrated  14-k  gold  0-size  Watches 
that  we  are  selling  at  $13.50  Net. 

The  cases  are  14-k.  gold  and  are  fitted 
with  7-jewel  Waltham  Movements.  This 
Watch  can  not  be  duplicated  by  any' 
jobber,  and  we  claim  it  is  the  best  Watch 
for  the  money  in  the  WORLD.  No  jew- 
eler can  afford  to  be  without  them,  so 
send  us  your  orders  at  once,  as  all  orders 
will  be  filled  in  rotation. 


Our  Stock  in  all  Complete  with|  New,  Choice 

and'[Salable  |Qoods — andjj  now  islthe^,  time 
to  send  in  your  orders. 


ALBERT  BROS., 


riKE  puiLDiNQ,  Cincinnati,  Ohio, 


THE  PRACTICAL 

ELECTRO  ♦ PLATER 

By  martin  BRUNOR. 

A comprehensive  treatise  on  Electro  Plating,  covering 
every  branch  of  the  trade,  with  notes  on  ancient  and 
modern  gilding  and  formulas  for  new  solutions. 

300  PAGES,  FULLY  ILLUSTRATED. 
Securely  bound  in  cloth  and  half  morocco. 

F*KICE,  $10.00. 

For  Sale  by 

The  Jewelers’  Circular, 

189  BROADWAY.  NEW  YORK. 


EST. 

<870. 


DR.  PETER  HENRY, 

6PECIALI8T  IN 

Watch  Case  Diseases 

Key  Winders 
changed  to 
Stem  Winders 

Hunting  Case 
changed  to  O.s 

English  Case 
changed  to  lit 
American 

movements 

Can  be  Cured  at 

53 

LONGWORTH  ST 

Cincinnati,  Ohio. 


44 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR — Western  Supplement. 


Nov.  27.  18(^5. 


Our  Samples  are  Going  Fast. 

PRICES  SELL  THE  GOODS. 


Rich  American  Cut  Glass.  Fine  Imported  China,  Lamps, 
wood  Pottery,  Sole  Agents. 


We  are  not  Jobbers, 


Clocks  and  Bric-a-Brac.  Rook- 

but  Importers’  and  Manufacturers’ 
Agents.  The  only  house  in 
the  West,  where  these  goods 
can  be  bought  at  first  hands. 


IT  WILL  PAY  YOU1TO  CALL  TO 
SEE  US. 


Bloom  & Phillips, 

228  WEST  4th  STREET,  CINCINNATI,  O. 


THE  CINCINNATI  SILVER  CO.-THE  O.  E.  BELL  CO., 

MANUFACTURERS  OF  Write  for  circulars  and  Complete  price  list.  Exclusive  control 

FINE  QUADRUPLE  AND  ^ given  to  live  dealers.  Sold  direct,  saving  middlemen’s  or  job- 
TRIPLE  SILVERWARE.  bers’  profits.  New  and  exclusive  designs 


Finest  quadiuple  plate,  hand  burnished,  gold  lined  cream  and  sugar,  satin  engraved  tray. 
For  the  3 pieces  $5.25  less  6 per  cent,  for  cash.  Write  for  sample. 


THE  BELL  WATCH  CASE  CO., 
THE  0.  E.  BELL  CO. 


MANUFACTUKER-i  OK 


10  and  i4kt.  Filled  Cases. 


i4kt.  cases  sold  direct  to  the 
retail  trade  at  about  ttie  same 
pnce  charged  for  lokr.  goods  on 
lines  sold  through  wholesale  deal- 
ers THECOHET. 

O.  K.  lokt.  w’arranted  to  years. 
Antique  Pendant,  j int  back 
and  bezel,  complete  with  7 jewel, 
American  stem  wind  mos'cment, 
at  $6.38  each  net. 

Write  for  complete  price  list 
and  illustrated  circular  on  Red 
Hot  stuff  for  Christmas. 

Cincinnati  Silver  Co. 

The  Bell 
Watch  Case  Co. 


THE  0 E.  BELL  CO.,  Fourth  and  Walnut,  CINCINNATI,  0. 


HIGHEST  QUALITY, 
LOWEST  PRICES, 
JEWELERS  OR  NONE. 

“Our  Trade=riark.” 


I we  sent  our  wo-page illustrated 

*-^^*  *"  yvar  catalogue,  express  prepaid,  to 
almost  every  jeweler  throughout  the  Middle, 
Southern,  Northern  and  Western  States. 

Thic  venf  compiled  from 

I Ilia  ycdl  those  whose  names  are  on 
our  ledger  and  who  have  done  business  with  us, 
and  those  in  territory  directly  tributary  to  Chi- 
cago. The  issue  is  therefore  necessarily  limited. 

The  Catalogue  we  issue 

is  extremely  expensive,  and  as  it  is  so  generally  un- 
derstood that  our  margin  of  profit  is  only  moderate, 
we  are  in  consequence  not  desirous  of  the  expense 
of  sending  Catalogues  where  they  wdll  not  be  used 

Any  jeweler,  though,  2hes 

to  open  an  account  with  us,  we  shall  be  pleased  to 
supply  him  with  a copy  of  our  new  1896  Catalogue, 
express  prepaid  (we  must  know  that  he  is  a 
watchmaker,  or  else  employs  one  , which  we  do  not 
believe  a jrweler  can  be  without  if  he  wishes  all  the 
latest  productions  of  the  leading  manufacturers  at 
prices  guaranteed  to  be  low. 

('ur  1S95  Catalogue  was  pronounced  “a  good 
one  ’’  ; our  " 1896’’  is  still  better. 


“ Our  Catalogue.” 


Q.W.  n/lKQU/lKDT  Sr  501^5. 

Wholesale  Jewelers,  - CHICAGO. 


N>iv.  27,  1895. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR  —Western  Supplement. 


45 


Indianapolis. 

A.  H.  Hawkins,  Noblesville,  Ind.,  and 
R.  H.  Hayward,  Rosedale,  Ind.,  made  pur- 
chasing trips  to  the  city  last  week. 

Jos.  Hummel,  at  one  time  a traveling 
jeweler,  was  in  the  city  last  week  on  his 
way  to  Chicago.  Mr.  Hummel  is  prepar- 
ing to  open  a jewelry  store  just  across  the 
border  line  in  Ohio. 

Ralph  B.  Clark  last  Spring  opened  an 
office  in  the  JEtna  building,  N.  Penn  St., 
as  agent  for  several  clock  and  silverware 
firms.  He  recently  removed  his  stock  and 
office  to  Anderson,  Ind. 

Retail  dealers  report  trade  last  week  an 
improvement  over  the  previous  week. 
Many  customers  are  having  holiday  pur- 
chases laid  away.  Diamonds  promise  to 
sell  well,  while  silver  novelties  and  china 
clocks  hold  the  front  rank. 

At  the  opening  of  the  Pembroke  Arcade, 
Nov.  i6th,  G.  R.  Reber’s  model  little  jew- 
elry store  received  much  attention  and  ad- 
miration. With  its  very  large  windows, 
new  fixtures,  new  stock  and  brilliant  electric 
lights  this  is  one  of  the  handsomest  jewelry 
rooms  in  the  city. 

On  the  night  of  Nov.  i8th  the  je\relry 
store  of  John  J.  Davis,  White  Pigeon,  Ind., 
was  broken  into  and  goods  to  the  value  of 
$5,000  carried  off;  $2,000  worth  of  jewelry 
and  watches  was  stowed  in  the  safe,  which 
was  blown  open  and  emptied.  The  shelf 
goods  were  loaded  into  wagons.  No  clew 
to  the  robbers  has  been  discovered. 


Minneapolis  and  St.  Paul. 

John  H.  Doran,  of  Goldstein  & Doran, 
St.  Paul,  died  last  week. 

The  stock  of  J.  W.  Stein,  Stillwater, 
Minn.,  was  sold  by  the  assignee  recently. 

F.  W.  Spaulding,  Minneapolis,  left  last 
week  for  New  York,  where  he  has  accepted 
a position  with  H.  H.  Kay  ton. 

Out-of-town  jewelers  visiting  the  Twin 
Cities  on  business  the  past  week  were  ; John 
A.  Larson,  Waverly  Mills,  Minn.;  Lucien 
Diacon,  Chaska,  Minn.;  L.  F.  Whitemore, 
Barron,  Wis. ; William  Krohn,  Annandale, 
Minn. 

C.  Wright  Davis  claims  that  he  made  a 
loan  to  Hill,  Sons  & Co.,  for  which  he  was 
to  receive,  as  security,  stock  in  the  Reed  & 
De  Mars  Jewelry  Mfg.  Co.  He  claims  to 
have  never  received  this  security,  and  he 
wants  $8,000,  the  alleged  value.  A suit  has 
been  commenced. 


Cincinnati. 

Jos.  Mehmert  is  offering  fine  regulators 
to  the  trade  at  prices  that  are  selling  them 
in  quantities. 

Henry  Hahn  & Co.  closed  two  days  las:) 
week  on  account  of  the  death  of  Mr. 
Hahn’s  father-in-law,  S.  Levendorf. 

Albert  Bros,  are  making  the  offer  of  the 
season  in  a beautiful  solid  gold  I4k.7-jew- 
eled  Waltham  movement  for  $13.50. 

Bloom  & Phillips  have  received  another 
shipment  of  fine  novelties  from  Ferdinand 
Bing  & Co.,  New  York,  which  are  displayed 
in  their  sample  rooms. 

Frohman,  Wise  & Newman  have  outfitted 
their  travelers  with  a new  general  line. 
B.  F.  Newman  is  south,  Jonas  Wise  is 
west  and  J.  Markus  is  in  Ohio  and  Indiana. 

Sig.  Strauss,  of  the  Sig.  Strauss  Co., came 
home  last  week,  renewed  his  stock  and 
went  out  again.  He  is  having  excellent 
sales  and  continues  to  increase  his  territory. 

S.  Lindenberg  is  sending  in  fine  orders 
this  week.  The  firm’s  customers  are  buy- 
ing up  all  the  bric-a-brac  the  firm  imported. 
They  made  a new  departure  in  bric-a-brac, 
and  found  it  a paying  one. 

Oskamp,  Nolting  & Co.  are  offering  re- 
markable values  in  the  optical  line.  Every 
jeweler  should  avail  himself  of  the  oppor- 
tunity and  increase  his  optical  depart- 
ment. They  make  prescription  work  a 
specialty. 

Jos.  Noterman  & Co.  have  made  up  and 
sold  more  fine  novelties  this  year  than  ever 
before.  Their  workmanship  is  unexceled, 
and  their  designs  and  styles  are  just  right 
and  up  to  date.  Their  travelers,  Wm. 
Pflueger  and  John  Osthoff,  are  making  fine 
sales. 

Visiting  jewelers  in  Cincinnati  last  week 
were  Chas.  R.  Blake,  Marion,  Ind.;  Ed. 
Kelly,  Sullivan,  Ind.;  W.  C.  Ward,  Win- 
chester, Ky.;  H.  P.  Rogers,  Waverly,  111.; 
John  Zelly,  Eaton.  O.;  J.  Hopper  Mayeville, 
Ky. ; A.  J.  Winters,  Paris,  Ky. ; Frank  S. 
Smith,  Parkersburg,  W.  Va. ; Ben  Dillard, 
Lebanon,  Tenn. 

Gustave  Fox  & Co.  have  inaugurated 
an  auction  sale  of  diamonds  and  precious 
stones,  and  the  first  day's  sales  amounted  to 
$3,000.  It  is  rumored  two  more  auction 
sales  will  be  inaugurated  this  week.  The 
Hellebush  sale  has  been  such  a success 
that  the  retail  trade  feel  that  if  they  are  to 
get  any  holiday  business,  they  must  run  an 
auction.  The  Hellebush  sale  the  first  week 
amounted  to  $30,000. 


In  clerk  Lewman’s  office,  Louisville,  Nov. 
9th,  Wm.  S.  Oskamp,  of  Oskamp,  Nolting 
& Co.,  this  city,  filed  a suit  against  Amelia 
Zimmerman  and  her  husband,  O.  F.  Zim- 
merman, now  of  Greensburg,  but  who  for- 
merly conducted  a store  here,  for  the  fore- 
closure of  a chattel  mortgage  on  goods 
which  were  attached  by  Constables  Walford 
and  Coleman  at  the  instance  of  Edward 
Told.  Some  of  the  property  was  sold  at 
public  sale  and  a pair  of  opera  glasses  were 
purchased  by  R.  Zaun.  He  is  made  a 
party  to  the  present  proceeding. 


Pittsburgh. 

W.  C.  Reinhart,  for  Grafner  Bros.,  went 
out  last  week  on  a trip. 

Louis  Gill_,  formerly  with  R.  L.  McWatty 
& Co.,  is  now  with  Hardy  & Hayes. 

O.  S.  Chessman,  Chessman  Optical  Co., 
has  returned  from  a western  vacation  jour- 
ney. 

M.  Black,  department  store,  failed  re- 
cently. Many  eastern  jewelers  are  inter- 
ested in  this  failure. 

W.  S.  Spear,  of  Moundsville,  W.  Va.,  has 
gone  out  of  business,  and  is  now  with  Mr. 
Sheff,  Wheeling,  W.  Va. 

S.  Lee  Weaver,  representing  E.  Kir- 
stein’s  Sons  Co.,  Rochester,  N.  Y.,  who 
was  in  the  city  last  week,  will  shortly  take 
charge  of  the  firm’s  offices  at  4 Maiden 
Lane,  New  York. 

Frank  Worrell  and  George  V.  Brady  were 
in  the  city  last  week  from  Washington,  Pa., 
and  J.  O.  Rhodes,  from  Homestead. 
Among  other  visiting  jewelers  were : L. 

E.  Hanna,  West  Newton  ; F.  Laban, 
Toronto,  O.;  F.  H.  Hayes,  Washington; 
H.  A.  Reineman,  McKeesport ; H.  Johns- 
ton, Apollo. 


The  store  of  Disque  & Hornbrook,  Pow- 
hatan, O.,  was  recently  robbed  of  about 
$500  worth  of  watches,  jewelry,  revolvers, 
etc.  The  thieves  broke  in  through  a door 
in  the  rear  of  the  building. 

The  St.  Louis  Globe-Democrat  of  recent 
date  gives  a column  write-up  of  Charles 
Francis  Jenkins,  Richmond,  Ind.,  declaring 
that  his  most  recent  electrical  triumphs  put 
Jenkins  ahead  of  Edison,  as  he  has  pushed 
to  completion  inventions  that  have  proved 
the  life  puzzles  of  Edison. 


Frohman,  Wise  & Newman, 

WHOLESALE  JEWELERS, 

QINQINNflTI,  OHIO. 


The  latest  styles  in  silver 

NOVELTIES;  THE  CHOICEST 
SELECTION  OF  JEWELRY,  AND 
THE  BEST  SELLING  WATCH  AND 
CLOCK  STOCK  IN  THE  WEST. 
TRY  US.  -:- 


46 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR — Western  Supplement. 


Nov.  27,  1095. 


HERE  IS  THE  GREATEST  WATCH  BARGAIN  ON  EARTH 


GRASP  IT  NOW,  THERE  NEVER  WILL]  BE  ANOTHER  SALE  LIKE  IT. 


A 

18  Size  Full  Plate.  Open  Face  Only. 

Nickel.  15  fine  ruby  jewels  in  gold  settings;  adjusted 
to  temperature,  isochronism  and  three  positions;  Breguet 
hair  spring  ; patent  micrometer  regulator;  double  sunk 
dial;  handsomelydamaskeened  and  finely  finished  through- 


out. Regular  price $ 18.00 

Ourprice 8«00 


c 

18  Size  Full  Plate,  Hunting  and  Open  Face. 
Gilded.  15  ruby  jewels  in  gold  settings;  adjusted  to 
temperature,  isochronism  and  three  positions;  Breguet 
hair  spring;  patent  micrometer  regulator;  double  sunk 


dial. 

Regular  price $ 12. co 

Ourprice 6*00 


PRICES  STRICTLY  NET  CASH. 


IS  Size,  COI.UiTlH(rs 

16  jewels,  adjusted,  jewels  set  in  raised  gold  settings 
extra  centre  jewel.  Breguet  hair  spring,  double  sunk 
dial,  patent  regulator,  damaskeened  in  gold  on  nickel; 
especially  adapted  for  railroad  service. 

No.  28.  Nickel,  Hunting,  Regular  price $ 25.00 

Cut  price €|,«o 

No.  98.  Nickel,  Open-Face,  Regular  price 25.00 

Cut  price 9.0O 


SCREW  BEZEL  AND  BACK. 

18  size,  14k.  filled  guarante.d  to  wear  for  20  years. 
Assorted  Engravings. 

No.  9.  Price $ 7.05 

Fitted  Complete  with  a Paillard  Movement  13.50 

c Paillard  move 12.70 

No.  q8.  Columbus 14.80 


A.  C,  BECKEN, 

103  JTATE  JTREET, 


Special  Agent  jor  Diieber  Hampden  Watches. 

- - - CMICflQO,  ILL. 


THEO.  SCHRADER  & CO., 


THEODORE  SCHRADER 


ALFRED  H,  WITTSTEIN 


MLnufLclurifi^  # ^eweler5 


AND  MAKERS  OF 


Fine  Diamond  Mountings 

IMPORTERS  OF 

DIAMONDS  AND  PRECIOUS  STONES 

ARE  NOW  ESTABLISHED  IN  THEIR  NEW  LOCATION 

100  State  Street,  Cor.  Washington  Street, 


RELIANCE  BUILDING, 


TELEPHONE  MAIN  3893. 


CHICAGO 


Nov.  27,  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


47 


Trade  Gossip. 

R.  Wallace  & Sons  Mfg. 
Co.,  Wallingford,  Conn., 
have  just  placed  on  the  mar- 
ket a pretty  novelty  in  their 
Daisy  coffee  spoon.  The 
bowl  is  of  the  conventional 
shape  and  character,  while 
the  handle  is  a combination 
of  leaves  and  buds,  termi- 
nating at  the  top  in  a bunch 
of  full  blown  marguerites. 
Altogether  the  spoon  is  a 
chic  and  very  pleasing  nov- 
elty. 

That  the  “Golconda 
Gem,”  whose  similarity  to 
the  genuine  diamond  is  such 
as  to  often  deceive  persons, 
is  increasing  in  popularity, 
is  shown  by  the  large  addi- 
tion recently  made  to  the 
stock  of  R.  L.  Griffith  & Son, 
Providence,  R.  I.,  who  con- 
trol this  stone.  The  firm 
have  just  received  859  gross 
or  123,696  of  these  beautiful 
stones,  and  they  say  that 
they  are  now  in  position  to 
fill  all  orders  promptly.  The  gems  are 
made  up  into  a handsome  line  of  drops, 
studs,  scarfpins,  brooches,  and  other  jew- 
elry in  both  solid  gold  and  rolled  plate. 
The  goods  may  be  seen  at  the  New  York 
office  of  the  firm,  237  Broadway. 


Lovers  of  music  are  not  surprised  at  the 
popularity  of  the  Regina  music  boxes,  for 
which  A.  Wolff,  Lincoln  building.  Union 
Square,  New  York,  is  general  agent.  The 
quality  and  volume  of  tone,  and  the  ease 
with  which  the  music  sheets  can  be  changed 
combine  to  cause  a good  demand  for  these 
boxes. 

Waterman  & Lehmann,  20  Maiden  Lane, 
New  York,  make  a specialty  of  hand  carved 
diamond  ring  mountings  for  gentlemen. 
These  beautiful  rings,  which  are  made  to 
order  onlj-,  are  exquisite  in  design  and  work- 
manship and  will  be  appreciated  by  every 
lover  of  artistic  jewelry. 

The  products  of  that  old  and  well  known 
firm,  J.  Briggs  & Sons  Co.,  65  Clifford  St., 
Providence,  R.  I.,  are  in  as  great  demand 
as  ever.  This  is  doubtless  due  to  the  su- 
perior excellence  of  the  wares  and  the  fair- 
ness with  which  all  of  the  firm’s  customers 
are  treated.  Manufacturers  who  use  gold 
and  silver  plate  and  seamless  wire  should 
write  this  firm  for  prices. 

Rice  & Hochster,  485  Broadway,  New 
York,  are  kept  busy  with  orders  for  their 
fine  tortoise  shell  goods,  which  are  made 
up  in  dressing  hairpins  of  various  lengths, 
combs  of  every  description,  and  many 
novel  articles  that  are  in  great  demand. 

An  attractive  line  of  sterling  silver  goods 
is  that  made  by  Foster  & Bailey,  Providence. 
R.  I.  It  comprises  several  hundreds  of 
patterns  of  novel  and  useful  articles  suit- 
able for  holiday  and  wedding  gifts,  whist 


prizes,  etc.  The  handsomely  ornamented 
toilet  and  manicure  sets,  scissors,  and  desk 
knives  are  proving  splendid  sellers,  and 
should  be  included  in  the  stock  of  every 
jeweler.  The  silver  goods  of  Foster  & 
Bailey  are  925-1000  fine,  and  are  so  guaran- 
teed. 

Two  new  spoons,  appropriate  souvenirs 
of  Christmas  and  New  Years,  have  been  in- 
troduced by  F.  M.  Van  Etten,  218  W.  ii6th 
St.,  New  York.  These  spoons  are  in  coffee 
size,  are  of  sterling  silver  with  gilt  bowls, 
and  come  fastened  neatly  with  ribbons  on 
New  Year  and  Christmas  cards.  The  de- 
signs relating  to  Christmas  and  New  Year 
are  struck  in  the  bowls  of  the  spoons,  one 
being  a radiating  star  with  the  inscription 
“ Merry  Xmas,”  and  the  other  a sketch  of 
Old  Father  Time  and  the  words  “ A Happy 
New  Year.”  The  goods  can  be  sold  at  a 
profit  at  prices  which  assure  their  sale. 
They  will  be  sent  on  approval  to  reliable 
dealers,  as  explained  in  the  advertising 
columns  of  this  issue. 

Jewelers  completing  their  line  of  fine 
goods  preparatory  to  the  usual  Christmas 
rush,  will  do  well  to  inspect  the  diamonds 
and  diamond  jewelry  which  are  among 
Cross  & Beguelin’s  specialties  for  the  holi- 
day trade.  Dealers  visting  New  York 
will  find  themselves  more  than  repaid  for 
their  trouble  by  visiting  this  firm’s  sales- 
rooms at  17  Maiden  Lane,  where  diamonds 
and  diamond  jewelry  will  be  found  at  prices 
and  in  styles  that  are  sure  to  cause  them  to 
be  sellers. 


Jacob  3ti*9uss  & Sons, 


Patentees  and  Sole  Manufacturers  of 


“Lulu”  Pat.  Link 

The  “Lulu”  Pat.  Link  Buttons 

ARb  THE 

Easiest  Adjusted  and  Safest 

links  ever  brought  before  the  public. 

We  have  a large  variety  of  styles  in  lo 
and  14  K.  Gold,  both  with  and  without 
diamonds. 

If  you  want  the  best  link  to  be  had,  send 
for  the  “LULU.  ” 


Sleeve  Buttons 

Patented  Feb.  i9th,  1895. 


No  I.  No.  2. 

Cut  No.  1 shows  the  link  and  attachment,  which  are  never  detached. 

Cut  No.  2 shows  the  button  closed  after  put  on  cuffs. 

Before  putting  the  buttons  into  the  Cuffs,  detach  the  Button  B,  then  pass  the 
link  through  and  attach  the  button  on  the 

<*U'rM  DE  of  the  Cuffs,  by  inserting  one  side  of  the  Connection  into  Button 
B and  by  pressing  link  together  pass  the  other  side  through  the  ring,  it  is  then 
secure  and  ready  for  use. 


We  will  send  selection  packages  to  responsible  RETAIL  JEWELERS  on  approval. 

We  also  carry  a full  line  of 


Loose  and  riounted  Diamonds, 

and  respectfully  solicit  your  order  on  approval  for  same. 


JACOB  STRAUSS  & SONS. 

51  and  53  Haiden  Lane,  New  York. 


HINTS  ON  RETAIL  JEWELERS’  ADVERTISINQ. 


BY  CHARLES  AUSTIN  BATES. 


i 


The  really  profitable  busy  months  in  a 
jewelry  store  are  November  and  De" 
cember.  Perhaps  in  the  average  jewelry 
store  the  business  done  in  these  two  months 
amounts  to  one  third  of  the  business  for  the 
whole  year.  Naturally  many  jewelers  be- 
lieve that  it  is  only  during  these  two  months 
that  they  need  to  advertise.  I believe  this 
is  a mistake.  In  fact,  I am  certain  it  is  a 
mistake.  Certainly  the  advertising  at  this 
season  of  the  year  is  more  important  than 
advertising  in  the  Summer  or  during  any 
other  dull  time.  However,  there  is  a cer- 
tain amount  of  business  all  the  time,  and 
this  business  can  be  increased  by  judicious 
advertising.  “Judicious  advertising” 
means  several  things.  It  means  having  the 
right  sort  of  goods  in  the  first  place.  It 
means  having  them  well  displayed  in  a well 
arranged  store.  It  means  having  courteous 
and  attentive  employes  to  show  them,  and, 
last  of  all  though  fully  as  important  as  any- 
thing else,  it  means  the  proper  presentation 
of  these  goods  to  possible  purchasers.  In 
doing  the  last  it  is  necessary  that  the  jew- 
eler select  the  proper  media,  use  sufficient 
space,  and  put  in  it  sensible,  convincing 
matter. 

There  is  undoubtedly  a great  deal  of 
money  spent  in  advertising  foolishly.  There 
is  a great  deal  of  money  paid  for  alleged 
advertising  that  is  not  advertising  at  all. 
Money  is  spent  injudiciously.  Men  go  into 
the  wrong  papers.  Sometimes  they  go  into 
the  right  papers  in  the  wrong  way.  Some- 
times they  spend  too  little  in  one  paper  and 
too  much  in  another.  There  are  all  sorts  of 
ways  of  making  mistakes  in  advertising.  It 
is  not  to  be  expected  that  a man  who  is 
harrassed  and  worried  by  a thousand  other 
details  of  the  business  will  be  able  to  go  on 
forever  without  making  mistakes.  The 
chances  are  against  the  business  man  being 
able  to  do  his  advertising  without  spending 
a good  deal  of  money  for  which  he  gets  no 
adequate  return.  He  gives  people  adver- 
tisements to  get  rid  of  them,  or  to  keep  them 
from  “roasting”  his  business.  He  goes 
into  programs  because  the  canvasser  is  a 
customer  of  the  house.  He  does  all  sorts  of 
things  that  are  not  advertising  and  charges 
them  to  the  advertising  account. 

All  these  things  ought  to  be  cut  off.  When 
a man  cuts  them  off,  he  is  really  not  de- 
creasing his  advertising.  He  is  simply 
declining  to  spend  money  for  something 
which  is  called  advertising  by  courtesy  or 
through  ignorance.  The  trouble  is  that 
when  a man  starts  to  cut  off  his  advertising 


expenses,  he  cuts  off  the  good  ones  and 
lets  the  bad  one  stay.  If  he  is  spending 
$1,000  in  the  newspapers,  he  cuts  that  down 
to  $500  and  congratulates  himself  that  he  is 
saving  $500.  At  the  same  ti  me  he  lets  $2  and 
$5  and  $25  go  into  all  sorts  of  schemes, 
and  doesn’t  count  the  amounts  because  they 
are  so  small.  He  ought  to  cut  off  every  one 
of  these  things  and  put  all  the  money  into 
the  best  newspapers,  and  into  printed  mat- 
ter which  he  gets  out  and  distributes  for 
himself. 

I should  think  that  every  jewelry  store 
ought  to  have  a good  booklet  to  hand  to 
casual  visitors  and  to  send  out  to  customers. 
C.  E.  Gifford  & Co.,  Fall  River,  Mass., 
are  now  giving  out  to  their  holiday  trade  a 
very  handsome  suggestion  book,  containing 
blank  pages  for  the  use  of  holiday  shoppers 
in  making  lists  of  presents.  The  book  is 
full  of  suggestions  for  presents  to  different 
people  and  at  various  prices.  I should 
think  that  this  sort  of  thing  was 
almost  sure  to  pay.  It  mii>ht  be 
carried  out  in  a book  for  all  the  year 
around  for  birthday  presents,  or  wed- 
ding presents,  or  both.  When  all  is  said, 
however,  the  newspaper  is  the  place  of  all 
others  in  which  a jeweler  should  adverise. 
A good  daily  newspaper  really  reaches  all 
of  the  best  people  in  each  community. 
There  is  nobody  worth  talking  to  about 
jewelry  who  doesn’t  take  a daily  paper. 
To  reach  these  people,  it  is  only  necessary 
to  have  the  right  sort  of  space  well  taken 
care  of  and  to  use  it  persistently. 

There  are  thousands  of  things  in  every 
jewelry  store  that  would  excellent  presents. 
The  trouble  is  that  people  don’t  think  of 
them.  They  have  to  make  a present  to 
somebody  and  they  are  at  a loss  to  know 
what  to  give.  They  would  be  more  than 
glad  to  have  somebody  tell  them,  and  here 
is  the  jeweler’s  opportunity.  A jewelry 
store  is  pre-eminently  the  place  to  buy  pres- 
ents, but  it  is  not  enough  to  say  merely  this 
in  an  advertisement.  An  ad.  ought  to  con- 
tain definite  information  about  particular 
goods.  It  jjught  to  make  one  or  more  sug- 
gestions every  day.  It  is  not  essential  that 
the  advertisment  be  confined  to  one  special 
article.  The  ad.  may  be  devoted,  for  in- 
stance. to  silverware,  and  mention  a dozen 
or  fifty  different  things.  An  ad.  about 
precious  stones  may  contain  descriptions  of 
half  a dozen  different  sorts  of  jewelry. 

I believe  that  it  is  generally  wise  to  ad- 
vertise low  priced  goods.  You  may  talk 
about  fine  goods  all  you  like,  but  when  you 


quote  a price,  it  is  advisable  to  make  it  a 
moderate  one,  so  that  a great  many  people 
will  be  attracted  by  it.  There  are  more 
people  who  have  $2.50  than  who  have  $250. 
Probably  the  proportion  would  be  a thous- 
and to  one,  and  the  more  people  you  get 
into  your  store,  the  better  off  you  are. 
The  $250  man  may  occasionally  want  a 
$2  50  article,  and  if  he  comes  for  the  cheap 
thing  and  is  pleased,  he  will  come  for  the 
better  one  also. 

In  the  advertisements  opposite,  I have 
tried  to  exemplify  some  of  my  ideas  on 
jewelry  advertising.  I believe  that  there 
should  be  a general  mention  of  the  entire 
stock  in  most  of  the  ads.  either  at  the  be- 
ginning or  at  the  end;  that  there  should  be 
an  introduction,  containing  a suggestion  for 
the  usefulness  of  the  article  advertised. 
This  is  shown  in  the  advertisement  headed 
“ A proud  boy.”  This  ad.  will  appeal  to 
every  boy  who  happens  to  see  it,  and  also 
to  his  parents.  The  ad.  will  tell  for  just 
how  little  money  a watch  can  be  had.  A 
good  many  people  in  thinking  of  a watch 
would  think  that  it  was  too  expensive  to 
give  to  a boy  as  a Christmas  present.  A 
watch  advertised  ought  to  be  a low  priced 
one.  It  is  a good  deal  easier  to  get  a man 
into  the  store  to  look  at  a low  priced 
watch  than  to  look  at  a high  priced  one. 
It  is  a good  deal  easier  to  get  him  to  buy 
a highe'-  priced  watch  than  he  first  thinks  of, 
than  it  is  to  get  him  to  buy  a low  priced  one 
after  he  has  fixed  his  mind  on  a better  one. 

One  of  the  best  things  a jewelry  store 
can  do  in  its  advertising  is  to  impress  peo- 
ple with  its  absolute  reliability.  People  do 
not  know  much  about  jewelry.  They  have 
to  take  it  on  the  recommendation  of  the 
jeweler.  They  cannot  tell  whether  a thing 
is  solid  gold  or  filled,  or  whether  a stone  is 
genuine  or  not.  They  certainly  cannot  dis- 
tinguish between  the  different  grades  of 
precious  stones.  They  cannot  tell  the  dif- 
ference between  a $200 ruby  and  a $500  one. 
They  have  to  take  the  jeweler’s  word  for  it. 
If  he  has  taught  them  to  believe  that  he  is 
absolutely  honest  and  reliable,  they  will  ac- 
cept his  decision  without  question,  I think 
almost  every  advertisement  ought  to  have 
something  in  it  that  will  give  an  impression 
of  reliability. 

I do  not  offer  these  sample  advertise- 
ments as  models  of  perfection,  but  I believe 
that  they  can  be  profitably  used  by  almost 
any  jeweler  who  will  take  the  trouble  to 
make  the  slight  changes  necessary  to  make 
them  fit  his  requirements. 


Nov.  27  1895. 


AND  HOROLOGICAL  REVIEW. 


49 


The  Question 
of  Price. 

We  don’t  want  anybody  to  think 
of  this  store  as  a “ cheap  ” place. 
It  is  nothing  of  the  kind.  There 
isn’t  anything  as  thoroughly 
cheap  as  cheap  jewelry.  We 
can’t  afford  to  sell  it. 

But  there  is  such  a thing  as  sell- 
ing reliable  jewelry  at  moderate 
prices.  You’ll  find  that  method 
in  operation  here. 

Side  Combs. 

Gold-mounted  Side  Combs  are 
“all  the  rage”  now.  Some 
shapes  and  designs  are  particu- 
larly stylish.  Women  who  desire 
to  have  exactly  the  right  shapes 
will  find  them  in  this  store. 
Prices  range  from  $2.50  a pair 
upward. 

We  want  to 

Sell  Diamonds 

only  when  we  can  do  a little  bit 
better  in  the  way  of  prices  and 
quality  than  anybody  else  in  the 
city.  Whenever  we  find  we  can- 
not do  that,  we  will  go  out  of 
business.  Experience  shows  that 
the  most  profitable  thing  we  can 
do  is  to  look  out  for  the  interest 
of  our  customers.  This  we  do  by 
giving  a full  one  hundred  cents’ 
worth  for  every  dollar  they  pay 
us. 

Diamonds  are 

an  Investment. 

Diamonds  don’t  decrease  in 
value.  You  can  wear  them  for 
years,  and  turn  them  into  money 
instantly,  if  necessity  requires. 

We  have  diamonds  set  in  pins, 
in  rings,  in  ear-drops,  in  studs, 
and  m a good  many  other  things. 
We  guarantee  our  prices  to  be 
lower  than  anybody  else’s  in  the 
city,  quality  considered.  And 
when  we  guarantee  a thing,  we 
do  it  in  earnest. 


All  Sorts  of  Folks 

are  treated  exactly  alike  in  our  j 
store.  We  make  no  distinctions. 
We  want  our  store  to  be  a place  ; 
where  people  of  fortune  can  be 
suited  exactly,  and  where  those 
who  have  to  count  their  dollars 
carefully  can  get  better  value  for 
their  money  than  anywhere  else 
in  this  city. 

The  approach  of  Christmas  sug- 
gests 

Dainty  and  Beau= 
tiful  Things  for 
Presents. 

Silver  novelties  are  always 
appreciated.  They  are  now 
produced  in  hundreds  of 
shapes  by  the  silversmiths. 
We  have  many  of  these  treas- 
ures in  brooches,  necklaces, 
bookmarks,  cologne  bottles, 
hair  brushes,  etc.  Come  in  any 
day  and  look  at  the  beautiful 
things  fashioned  from  the  white 
metal. 

Our  prices  will  interest  all  care- 
ful buyers. 

A Proud  Boy. 

Suppose  you  give  your  boy  a | 
watch  for  a Christmas  gift  ? It 
will  surprise  you  to  see  how 
proud  he’ll  be.  Up  will  go  his 
head,  and  the  ownership  of  a 
watch  will  make  him  look  upon 
life  with  more  earnestness.  It: 
won’t  make  a man  of  him — you  j 
don’t  want  him  to  be  that — but 
it  will  start  him  on  the  road  of 
life  with  an  idea  that  he  amounts 
to  more  than  the  ordinary  boy. 
We  have  silver  watches  that  we 
can  sell  at  $ . They  are  re- 

liable timepieces,  and  are  not 
only  appropriate  as  gifts  for 
boys,  but  many  men  carry  them 
as  well.  We  warrant  them  for 
years. 

Watches  for  Boys. 

We’ve  got  a great  many  kinds  of 
gold  and  silver  watches  for  men 
and  women.  Drop  into  the 
store  any  time.  We  are  particu- ! 
larly  anxious  to  show  the  | 
watches  to  you.  ! 


Nothing  Doubtful. 

We  sell  nothing  we  are  doubtful 
about.  We  can’t  afford  to  handle 
a single  thing  that  does  not  carry 
a good  name.  The  best  makers 
of  cutlery  we  know  of  are  the 

Co.  That  explains 

why  we  handle  their  goods.  It 
explains  why  we  are  so  proud  of 
our  cutlery  in  pearl,  horn  and 
sterling  handles. 

Cutlery  makes 

a Fine  Gift. 

As  a Christmas  gift,  there  is 
probably  no  other  thing  more 

acceptable  than ’s 

cutlery.  We  have  the  biggest 
and  best  line  in  town  — there 
isn’t  any  doubt  about  that.  And 
you  can  see  how  reasonable  our 
prices  are  by  the  following; 


We  Carry  Nothing  j 

In  our  jewelry  store  that  is  not 
the  best  of  its  kind.  No  matter 
what  it  is — it  must  be  the  best, 
or  we  won’t  handle  it. 

Our  chief  aim  is  to  be  reliable.  ! 
We  want  the  public  to  feel  per- 
fectly safe  in  buying  here.  As  [ 
far  as  price  is  concerned,  we  try 
to  be  fair.  We  charge  enough  ; 
for  merchandise  to  insure  reha-  : 
bility  and  a reasonable  profit. 
No  fair-minded  person  could  j 
expect  more  than  that.  j 

Watches  as  Gifts,  i 

A watch  makes  an  ideal  Christ- 
mas gift.  Considering  the  cost  j 
and  usefulness,  there  isn’t  any-  | 
thing  more  sensible  or  desirable.  ' 
We  handle  the  best  American  j 
watches — that  means  the  best  i 
in  the  world,  for  American  j 
watches  excel  all  others  in  j 
beauty,  durability  and  accuracy. 
And  then  the  prices  are  reason- 
able. 

Just  to  give  you  an  idea,  we  are 

now  selling  a watch  for 

$ . 

We  have  others,  of  course,  in 
every  style  and  quality. 


THE  JEWELERS’  CIRCULAR 


Nov.  27  1895. 


SO 


IRA  GODDARD, 


Watches,  Jewelry  and  Diamonds, 


Mo.  14  JOHN  STREET.  NEW  YORK. 


Queries  by  Circular  Readers. 


— Qne.stioDS  udier  ibis  department  will  be  answerc'd  as 
pjomptly  us  possible.  Some  queries  require  careful  investigatiou  be- 
fore a satisfactory  answer  can  be  given;  hence  such  answers  (are 
often  seemingly  delay,  Th<  Circular  desires  every  jeweler,  to 
takes  advantage  of  this  de()artment. 


A letter  received  from  Buder  Bros,  has 
gone  astray.  If  correspondents  will  send  us 
a duplicate  of  their  query  it  will  receive 
prompt  attention. 


Don’t  Bother 

BUT  SEND  ALL  TO 

& FULLER, 

73  Nassau  Street,  N.  Y. 


WITH  YOUR  REPAIRING, 

^ HUNT 

And  ask  for  New  Price  l,ist. 


INDEPENDENT-STXLOGRAPHIOPENS 


WRITE  BEST,  SELL  BEST  AND  BEST  KNOWN.  J 

The  manufacture  is  simple,  consisting  of  a liard  rubber  holder,  tapering  to  a round  & 
pointy  similar  in  appearance  to  a lead  pencil  and  write  with  equal  smoothness.  The 
) point  and  7teedie  are  made  of alloyed  w'wM.  iridium ^ substances  of  great 
\ durability,  not  affected  by  the  action  of  any  ink.  As  they  make  a line  of  uniform 
at  iUl  times,  they  are  UNEQUALLED  FOR  RULING  PURPOSES.  Ev^ry  pen  war- 


ranted.  Price,  $1.00  and  upward.  Illustrated  catalogue  free.  Orders  filled  ^ 
. direct  or  through  any  English  or  American  export  commission  house. 

J.ULLRICtiSC®  106 106  LIBERTY  5"^  MEW  YORl^.UEA 


SMIKX  OO., 

Manufactnrers  of  Gold,  Silver  and  Boll  Plate  Chains  and  Jewelry. 


Novelties  in  Gold  and  Silver  Bead  Necklaces  and  Bracelets.  Also  a large  line  of 
Chain  Trimmings  and  Silver  Rings. 

Office:  5 and  7 'Taiden  Lane.  New  Tork.  Manufactory;  61  Peck  Street,  Providence,  B.  1. 

L.  Sauter  & Co., 

DEALERS  IN  DIAMONDS 

. . . AND  . . . 

MAKERS  OF  FINE  JEWELRY, 

194  BROADWAY,  NEW  YORK. 

Selection  Packages  Sent  on  Request.  Mounting  of  Diamonds  and 

OTHER  PRECIOUS  STONES  IN  NEW  AND  ORIGINAL  DESIGNS  A SPECIALTY. 


KNOW  That 

TO  USE  THE  BEST  GOODS  IS 
TO  PROTECT  YOUR  INTERESTS. 

THEN  WHY  NOT  USE  THE 

“GENUINE” 

AT  THE  PATCHED  GUARD  PRICES. 

'"'"'Vhese'’  FRAMES  AND  MOUNTINGS. 

E.  KIRSTEIN’S  SONS  CO  SOLE  AGENTS, 

No.  4 MAIDEN  LANE,  NEW  YORK.  ROCHESTER,  N.  Y. 


YOU 

AND 

WE 


Brooklvn.^N.  Y..  Nov.  13,  1895 
Editor  ly  The  Jewelers’  Circular; 

Under  the  heading  of  “Workshop  Notes”  of  Oct. 
23d,  relating  to  the  cleaning  of  dull  gold,  which  I 
understand  as  Roman  or  acid  color,  I have  allowed 
articles  ot  jewelry  to  remain  in  the  solution  prescribed 
in  The  Circular  for  half  an  hour,  and  then  re- 
turned same  for  the  balance  of  the  day  with  no  better 
results.  If  you  can  enlighten  me  on  this  subject  you 
will  favor  G-  Lowenstein. 

Answer; — The  Circular  does  not  know  to 
what  cause  to  ascribe  the  failure  of  the  corre- 
spondent to  obtain  desired  results.  Per- 
haps correspondent  expected  too  much  of 
the  receipt ; it  is  simply  for  cleaning  tar- 
nished dull  gold,  but  not  at  all  for  acid- 
coloring  it.  If  he  simply  wants  a bright- 
ener,  he  is  referred  to  an  article  of  that  kind 
in  “ Workshop  Notes  ” of  this  issue;  in  the 
same  column  he  will  also  find  a good  receipt 
for  a renovator  and  partly  acid  color