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I 


JOIISTT    DOCUMENTS 


State  of  Michigan, 

FOR    THE    YEAR    18<}i>. 


BY  AUTHORITY. 


LANSING: 
ff.  8.  GEORGE  &  CO.,  PRINTERS  TO  THE  STATE. 


C  ONTENTS. 


i 


1.  Annual  Report  of  the  Auditor  General. 

2.  Annual  Beport  of  the  State  Treasurer. 

3.  Annual  Beport  of  the  Commissioner  of  the  State  Land 

Office. 

4.  Annual  Beport  of  the  Board  of  State  Auditors. 

5.  .Knnual  Beport  of  the  Superintendent  of  Public  In- 

fitmction. 

fi.  Annual  Beport  of  the  Secretary  of  State. 

7.  Compilation  by  the  Auditor  General  of  the  Annual 
Beports  of  B.  R  Corporations. 

K  Annual  Beport  of  the  Inspectors  of  the  State  Prison. 

9.  Annual  Beport  of  the  Attorney  General. 

10.  Anmiftl  Beport  of  the  Superintendent  of  St.   Mary^s 
Falb  Ship  Canal. 

11.  Beport  of  the  State  Military  Board. 


JOINT    DOCUMENTS. 


Ai«>njAL    REPORT 


Auditor  General 


STATE  OF  MICHIGAN, 


FOZl    THH    TTHA-R    1800. 


BY  AUTHORITY. 


LANSING: 

W.  9.  GEOBOE  &  CO.,  PBISTEBS  TO  THE  STATE. 

1869. 


REPORT. 


Auditor  Gexekal's  Office,       ) 
LanMng,  Michigariy  Xovember  SO^  1869.  j' 

Hi*  faivllciicy,  IIexby  P.  Baldwin, 

Governor  of  the  State  of  Michigan : 
The  Auditor  General  submits  the  following  report  for  the 
fecal  Tear  ending  this  day : 

rbe  totui  'IVeasury  receipts  fi'om  all  sources  during  the  liscal 
itaramoonted  to _ '$2,116,586  69 

To  which  add  balance  in  the  Treasury  at  close 
"f  hkst  fiscal  year 1,130,227  15 

•iid  the^  appears,  as  the  amount  of  funds 
wiilible  during  the  year $3,246,813  74 

■l|wii«t  which  ain't  warrants  have  been  drawn 
nd  charged,  amounting  to 2,412,724  02 

UaTin|r  a  balance  charged  to  the  State  Treas- 
Mtr  It  the  close  of  fmsiness  this  day  of $834,089  72 

STATE    IXDEBTEDXESS. 

^  total  bonded  debt  of  the  State  matured  and  unmatured, 

•Boimted,  on  the  30th  day  of  Nov.,  1868,  to-  .-$3,614,078  49 

^ day  it  amonnta to _._   %043,578  49 

Awing  a  reduction  since  Xov.  30th,  1868,  of..      $570,500  00 


fi  38  dur^ged  State  Treasorer  under  Joint  Rceolation  No.  25,  Ijiwb  of  1809. 
'« Ait  Mmemnt,  ^I2,5TS  4B  being  put  due  bore  no  inteKst. 

^^^  fc»rt»de«  $d4,079  49  iMfft  matnred,  on  which  the  interest  has  been  stopped. 
^i|9adix,  p.  4- 


AUDITOR  GENERAL.  5 

TUs  Rflolution  was  construed*  as  providing  for  the  in  vest- 
Bent  of  any  aarplns  over  and  above  the  balance  to  the  credit 
of  &e  Sinking  Funds.  Under  this  constmction  of  the 
iumtioii  of  the  Legislature  in  the  passage  of  said  resolution^ 
tke  oficora  therein  designated  acted  at  their  first  meeting 
on  the  26th  day  of  March,  1869.  It  was  there  expressed  as 
tbe  opinion  of  said  officers  that  the  amount  of  funds'  then  in 
tike  Tieasnry,  together  with  the  justly  anticipated  receipts 
thereto  during  the  year,  W9uld  warrant  the  use  of  9200,000  00 
excess  of  the  amounts  accruing  to  the  Sinking  Funds — 
the  poTchase  of  outstanding  Bonds  of  this  State.    And 


''EzicunTB  OFnoB,  ) 
Lantinff,  April  1, 1869.  f 

Ite  l»w  proTld«a  the  manner  by  which  the  holance  to  the  credit  of  the  Sinking 
f^nde  thmB  he  inTCBted.  Bennte  Joint  Retolntlon  No.  5  (7)  proridefl  for  the  inTeetmen t 
ef  wmj  flBpini  oTcr  and  abore  the  baUmee  to  the  credit  of  the  Sinking  Fonda. 

0«  tte  Mik  of  Uarch,  nltlmo,  the  State  Treasorer  proceeded,  in  pnrsoance  of  hiw,  to 

ipcion  $900,MO  of  war  loan  bondi.    In  addition  to  that  flom,  he  has  an- 

i  hopes  to  be  able  to  purchase  $200,000  of  the  first  matoring  bonded 

of  tiM  State. 

HENKT  P.  BALDWIN/' 

"AUDITOB  GSKBRAL*8  OfUCE,  { 

Lansing,  March  25, 1869.      f 
of  the  condition  of  the  War  Loan  and  Two  Million  Loan  Sinking  Fnnda 
Ala  tej.  a*  alfeowB  by  an  examination  of  the  books  of  this  office,  showing  the  amount 
wtm  leading:  to  the  credit  of  said  Funda;  also,  the  receipts  to  the  Trust  Funds  since 
JUFr  lat.  l^iS,  ^Bt  which  have  not  yet  been  credited  to  M  Two  Million  Loan  Sinking 

«•  credit  of  Two  MflUon  Loan  Sinking  Fund,  Nor.  80, 1868 $70,4OS  04 

B*t  expended  la  purchase  of  Bonda  to  date 60,000  00 

■MFndthladay $10,408  04 

la  War  Loan  Sinking  Fund,  Not.  80, 1868,  (same  to-day,) 490,088  OT 

credit  to  Sinking  Funda  this  day $486,440  11 

to  Tnat  Funda  ainoe  July  let,  1868,  not  yet  tranafsned  to 
MOttani  Loan  Sinking  Fund 188,506  07 

t  ttia  day  In  Treaawy  pledged  to  the  payment  of  the  State  debt.  $676,086  18 


»♦ 


Atrr>XXOK    (GENERAL. 


1 


tkehaliDtv  of  and  probable    increment  to  the  Fund  through 
»hidi WT reduction  must  be  made: 

Bihncethis  day  to  credit    of  Two  Million  Sink- 
ing Fund  ^$119,101  51 

Rpceipt^  daring  year,  ^  mill  tax 38,495  73 

-     from  Trnst  ITuixds  (estimated) =155,000  00 

'•     Surplus  of  Intorcgt  (estimated)  .  -     '100,000  00 

»TiTing  for  am'*!  of  f  uxxds  "which  may  be  used  in 
the  puichase  of  Bonds  of  the  State  during 
the  ensuing  year $412,597  24 

The  above  statement  does  not  include  any  computation  as 
U)  the  amount  of  surplns  funds  which,  under  Joint  Resolu- 
tion Xo.t,  Laws  of  1869,  might  be  used  in  the  purchase  of 
fenda  of  this  State,  beeaiise,  if  experience  may  be  relied  upon 
«  fumidhing  an  approximate  estimate  of  the  power  of  the 
State  Treasurer  to  malce  such  purchases,  but  a  portion  of  the 
•innre  stated  amount  iwill  be  absorbed  in  the  purchase  of  such 
B<mds  as  he  may  \y2  able  to  retire.  Hence,  the  surplus  funds 
•^  *Vic  Treasury,  if  any,  will  probably  remain  untouched. 

T>ie  ^'ar  Ljoan  being  so  far  withdrawn  as  to  render  certain 
tike  aggregate  expenditure  by  the  State,  both  for  principal  and 
tnttrest,  in  carrying  and  extinguishing  this  indebtedness, 
/jt?yukr  statements  of   the  transactions  and  changes  in  said 


Statemeot  **  UT  P-  68. 

i  Fvad  raeelptB  will  probably  exceed  this  estimate,  as  during  the  past  year 
atao, 744  42 ;  and  have  aveniged  for  the  last  three  years,  $170,008  29. 

e  la  deemed  not  too  high.   The  total  amoant  of  interest  iSBlllng  dne  during 

ted  upon  the  present  amount  of  the  debt,  is  $164,197  98.  The  proTlsions 

of  fMa  interest  arc,  an  appropriation  fh>m  the  General  Fund  of  $100,000  00 

Spedflc  Tax  Fund  what  remains  to  the  credit  thereof  after  paying  the 

the  Tnist  Funds.    The  Spedfie  Tax  Fund  supplied  $108,574  87  for  the 

o#  lateveet  npon  the  State  debt  during  the  year  Just  closed.    It  will  probably 

■BOfunt  the  coming  year,  which  would  give  for  "  surplus  of  Interest  *' 

than  that  stated  In  the  text. 


AUDITOR  OEKEBAL.  9 

ACgieg»te  payments,  principal  and  interest,  as 

AovnaboTe $1,784,213  33 

as  shown  aboTe 30,128  66 


91,814,341  89 

Accrued  int  on  Bonds  sold  in  1861. . .  84,338  14 

«  "  "      1862...     2,578  80 

**  "  *'      1864...     5,258  36 

Premiom,  as  above 10,196  75 

22,372  05 


GiTing  for  total  payments  from  State  revenue 
<m  account  of  the  War  Loan $1,791,969  84 

The  retiring  of  the  War  Loan  has  rendered  it  possible  to 
determine,  with  a  degree  of  certainty  not  before  attainable, 
the  sufficiency  of  the  present  proyisions  for  the  payment,  at 
its  malnrity,  of  the  yet  outstanding  unmatured  portion  of 
the  bonded  State  debt.    To  reach  such  a  determination,  com- 
potations — which  are  exhibited  below — ^haye  been  carefully 
Bade,  and  are  presented  in  the  belief  that  they  thoroughly 
demonstrate   the  conclusions  derived  therefrom,  viz:   That 
tardier  than  the  i  mill  tax,  taxation,  for  the  purpose  of  pay- 
ing the  bonded  State  debt  as  fast  as  it  matures,  need  not  be 
impo«ed ;    that  after  the  leyy  of  1870  the  i  mill  tax  may  be 
abolifhed ;  and  that  the  Trust  Fund  receipts  will  be  sufficient 
to  pay  the  installments  of  the  debt  as  fast  as  they  may  become 
due;.    The  computations  are  as  follows : 
Conunencing  with  the  balance  now  to  the  credit  of  the  Two 

Minion  Loan  Sinking  Fund,  amounting  to.. .    8119,101  51 
%<VI   leoeipts  from  i  mill  tax  for  two  years,  f9 

99SA95  73 - 76,991  46 

Add  receipts  ftt)m  Trust  Funds  for  1870, 1871, 

and  1872 — ^3  years,  ^  $130,000 390,000  00 

Which  gives  for  am't  on  hand  Nov.  30, 1872. .    $586,092  97 
2 


ArorroR  oexeral. 


11 


amoant  lower  than  the  receipts  from  that  source  during  the 
pift  year  by  ♦oCOOO,  and  $40,000  below  the  average  receipts 
ftir  iho  last  three  years.  This  estimate  lias  been  purposely 
krpi  M>  fiir  below  the  reasonably  expected  receipts  that  the 
re^alt  reached  by  said  computation  might  be  more  certain. 
I:  thus  appears  that  the  pi-esent  provisions  for  the  payment  of 
the  bonded  State  debt  are  more  than  ample^  and  that  the  next 
Lefislatare  conld  with  safety  abolish  the  i  mill  tax,  and  con- 
fidently rely  upon  the  receipts  from  the  Trust  Funds  as  be- 
ing sufficient  to  provide  for  the  disoliarge  of  the  State  debt  as 
fim  as  it  mat  ares. 

A  oompntation^  of  the  annually  accruing  interest  upon  the 
cow  outstanding  State  indebtedness  demonstrates  that  direct 
taxation  will  ueed  be  resorted  to  but  for  a  short  time — three 
ycir?  at  the  longest — as  a  resource  from  which  to  obtain  the 
funds  necessary  to  meet  the  current  interest  upon  the  now 
w^tnainiTifr  ]K>rtion  of  the  state  debt.    The  Constitution  pro- 


»rj 


of  the  amowU  cf  Annual  Interest  upon  the  note  atitstandinff  State 
'  '    each  year  to  the  maturity  qf  the  gereral  cloMes  therefjf. 


1ZA&. 


*»-r 


^9.»9fi9S 


o    . 

a** 

sppSs 


::::::::::.  i: 


.- 


$28,140 
88,140 
S8J40 
14,070 


o  . 

go- 


$27,000 
27,000 
27,000 
27.000 
27,000 
27,000 
27,000 
27,000 
18,500 


$11,&20 
11,520 
11,620 
11,520 
11,520 
11,520 
11,520 
11,520 
11,520 


$19,952  M    $98,490  $229,800  $108,«S0 


»' 


£o2 


$45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
46,000 
45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
45,000 
22,600 


?>2 


ig 


$88,285 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88.460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
88,460 
16,780 


$607,500  $686,755 


It? 

o  S  S 

Eh 


$164,897  98 

145,120  00 

145,120  00 

181,060  00 

116,980  00 

116,980  00 

116,980  00 

116,980  00 

108,480  00 

78,460  00 

78,460  00 

78,460  00 

78,460  00 

55,960  00 

88,460  00 

88,460  00 

88,460  00 

88,460  00 

88,460  00 

88,460  00 

16,780  00 


$1,744,877  98 


\. 


AUDITOB  OBNEBAL.  13 

Ofteosiblj,  this  tax  is  levied  for  the  payment  of  expenses  in- 
cured  for  the  maintainance  of  the  military  forces  of  this 
Sute.  Actually,  however,  but  a  small  portion  of  the  fund  ac- 
erainf  therefrom  is  used  for  any  such  purpose.    During  the 
wpa^  bat  about  one-fourth  of  the  receipts  from  this  tax 
kn  been  expended '  in  the  discharge  of  obligations  contem- 
flited  bj  the  Act  under  which  it  was  levied.    Other  expendi- 
tone— legitimate  and  proper  in  themselves — have  been  made 
froB  ]his  fund,  but  it  is  respectftiUy  submitted,  that  it  would 
bt  pobcT  to  reduce  this  tax  to  the  requirements  of  the  fund, 
cf  better,  to  abolish  the  tax  altogether,  and  to  supply  the  Mil- 
ttm  Fund  by  appropriation  from  the  General  Fund. 
It  IB  not  supposed  that  such  a  change  would  effect  a  diminu- 
tioftm  the  amount  of  funds  actually  necessary  to  carry  on  the 
itee  Government  and  support  her  Institutions,  but  it  is  pre- 
aiiible  that  the  future  will  show — ^as  has  the  past — ^that  the 
nued  balances  of  any  fund  are  convenient  sources  from 
rtifh  to  make  extraordinary  expenditures.    Such  balances 
JsD  hare  the  appearance  of  unnecessary  and  excessive  taxa- 
OMu  and  having  accrued  are  too  often  assumed  as  warranting 
^nvopriadons  which  else  would  not  have  been  made.    Politic 
ttd  economical   considerations  alike  would  induce  such  a 
f  bn^  in  the  manner  of  supplying  the  funds  from  which  are 
to  be  paid  the  exjjenses  of  the  Military  Department.    Indeed 
tie  xkt  more  than  suggests  itself  here  that  the  policy  of  pro- 
dding by  law  for  the  perpetual  levy  of  special  taxes  for  indefi- 
cik  and  growing  amounts  and  indeterminate  purposes,  is  at 
*wt  a  doubtful  one.    Such  a  tax  once  fixed  upon  the  State 
^  not  always  pass  away  with  the  necessity — real  or  supposed — 
2£der  which  it  was  imposed. 

The  virtual  extinction  of  the  War  Loan  has  been  assumed 
W  the  Auditor  General  as  warranting  him  in  not  apportion- 
ii?  the  M 6  mill,  or  War  Loan  Sinking  Fund  tax  for  1869, 
■i*«^  the  several  counties-    Withholding  this  tax  has  re- 

ifyeailx.  **]fmtU7Fniid/*  p.  U. 


ALTDITOK  C4EXERAL.  15 

igricaltund  College  Fund *U,165  00 

PrimiiT  School  deposits 1,061  25 

^       Interest  deposits 171 

SviDp  Land  deposits - 60  00 

^mn  Building  deposits - 50  00 

Tbe  new  deposit  accounts  have  been  opened  under  a  neces- 
«tT  CR«ted  by  the  amendment  of  Sec.  2463  of  the  Compiled 
Uwi,  as  effected  by  Act  No.  85,  Laws  of  1869,  which  gives 
•apTctr'g  time  for  the  redemption  of  lands  which  have  been 
forfeited  to  the  State  for  the  non-payment  of  interest  upon 
lie  nnpaid  balance  of  the  purchase  price.  The  entries  to 
tiicae  fands  are  for  a  temporary  purjiose  and  the  amounts 
tediog  credited  thereto  at  the  close  of  the  period  of  re- 
ienption  will  then  be  transferred  to  the  several  funds  to 
^kiA  these  deposit  accounts  are  auxiliary. 

REVENUE. 

The  total  revenue  to  the  State  from  all  sources  for  the  year 
JBfit  closed;  and  exclusive  of  the  balance  in  the  Treasury  at 
tke  dose  of  the  last  fiscal  year,  is $2,116,584  07 

Tke  cash  receipts,  however,  are  less  than  this 
aiKMuit  by  the  price  of  the  Swamp  land  ex- 
paded  during  the  year  in  the  construction  of 
^vtmp  Land  State  Roads,  which  amounted  to      538,000  42 

Giring  for  cash  receipts  for  the  year,  exclusive 

of  the  balance  in  the  State  Treasury  Nov. 

30,  1868.. $1,578,583  65 

'f  this  amount  there  was  received  through  the 

irenue  of  direct  taxation $722,409  57 

Fromfipecific  taxes 268,530  51 

990,940  08 

'firing  for  amount  of  actual  cash  I'eceipts  from 
all  sources  other  than  taxation' _    $587,643  67 


'Tw^etMll  of  recripCa  eee  Appondix,  p.  8. 


AUDITOR  GENERAL.  17 

tiittee  county  had,  under  a  warrant  issued  by  tlie  Auditor 
GtoenL  collected  by  levy  and  sale,  a  portion  of  the  tax — five 
kwirHl  doUars — charged  on  the  books  of  this  oflSce  against 
tke  Rnt  National  Bank  of  Owosso.  This  tax  was,  after  the 
dfciaon  of  the  Supreme  Court  in  the  above  cited  case  became 
horn,  refunded. 

Tht  specific  tax  revenue  from  all  sources— other  than  Na- 
QQioI  Banks — ^for  the  last  year,  exceeded  that  from  the  same 
wnrws  during  the  previous  year  by  $16,999  54.  There  yet 
MBiins  uncollected  from  various  corporations  subject  to  this 
ax,  Dpvards  of  $35,000,  as  appears  from  the  Auditor  Generals 
booki  This  amount  would  be  much  larger  had  all  corpora- 
uooj  made  their  reports  as  required  by  law,  and  upon  which 
^  tu  is  estimated.  The  iron  mining  companies  are 
wptcially  noted  as  being  delinquent  in  this  respect. 

THE  TRUST  FUNDS. 

Tit  credit  balance   of   the  Trust  Funds  amounted,  on  the 

30di  day  of  November,  1868,  to .  -  - $2,029,268  31 

The  net  receipts  thereto  for  the  year  are  as 

f»DoTK: 

T'»  the  Primary  School  Fund $114,946  46 

-  fire  per  cent.  Pri.  Sch'l  F'd     24,411  07 

-  Xonnal  School  Fund 1,675  23 

-  Tniversit V  Fund 7,562  57 

148,495  33 

Giving  for  credit  balance  of  Trust  Funds, 
XoT.30,  1869 - - $2,177,763  64 

DJCBECT  TAXES. 

The  receipts  from  this  source  for  the  year  amount  to 
KHm  57—1688  by  $142,638  86  than  for  the  previous  year. 

The  State  tax  apportioned  to  the  several  counties  in  Sep- 
^her  last,  amounted  to  $465,264  97— less  by  $248,482  87 
3 


AUDITOE  OEKEBAL.  19 

18T0.  The  payment  of  these  amounts  will  absorb  the  present 
crcdit  to  the  fond,  when,  having  served  the  purpose  for  which 
it  was  opened,  the  War  Loan  Sinking  Fund  will  be  closed. 

CANAL  FUND. 

The  accoant  with  this  Fund  shows  receipts  thereto,  from 
ivial  tolls,  during  the  year,  to  the  amount  of  $12,396  50 
^ast  •13,959  67  for  1868. 

The  Canal  Fund  indebtedness  to  the  counties,  under  Joint 
Resolution  Na  2,  Laws  of  1863,  now  amounts  to  $12,817  44, 
with  interest  from  January  1,  1869,  at  7  per  cent.  On  this 
indpbtednesfl  there  will  be  paid  on  the  first  day  of  January 
aext,  $4,067  72,  leaving  an  unpaid  balance  of  $9,646  94. 

WAR  FUND. 

The  total  resources  of  this  Fund  for  the  year  amounted  to 
$137,169  44,  against  which  there  has  been  drawn  warrants 
amounting  to  $124,645  23,  leaving  an  excess  of  receipts  over 
expenditures  of  $12,524  21.  The  present  outstanding  and 
Batnred  liabilities  of  the  War  Fund  are : 

Fttt  due  interest  on  War  Bounty  Bonds $10,955  00 

«    Bonds 803  25 

Gcttrdnirg  Cemetery  Appropriat^n,  Act  118, 1865  854  80 

Toial  liabiHties $12,613  05 

Shoving  a  deficiency  of $88  84 

MILITARY  FUND. 

This  Fund  received  credits — ^including  balance  Nov.  30, 
1B68 — during  the  year,  amounting  to  $48,555  03,  of  which 
$16,156  53  was  by  transfers  of  unexpended  balances  from  the 
SWdierc'  Belief  and  Soldiers'  Home  Funds'.  The  legitimate 
expenditures  therefrom  amounted  to  $10,416  65,  leaving  a 
Wance  of  $38,138  38,  which  has  been  transferred  to  the 
Asylum  Fund*  for  the  benefit  of  the  Asylum  for  the  Insane. 


'Act  yo,  ft.  Laws  of  1809.    >Ibid.  No.  «d,  1809. 


AUDITOR  OSSfEBAL.  21 

NORMAL  SCHOOL. 

Of  the  amount  appropriated  by  Act  No.  123,  Laws  of  1869, 

there  htt  been  paid  the  Normal  School $  2,500  00 

And  ftom  Nonnal  School  Interest  Fund 16,000  00 

Total $18,500  00 

PRIMARY  SCHOOLS. 

Hiere  has  been  paid  daring  the  year  to  the  several  coun- 
tiu,  on  the  apportionment  of  the  Superintendent  of  Public 
loAniction,  for  the  benefit  of  Primary  Schools,  $165,651  27. 

REFORM  SCHOOL. 

The  Board  of  Control  has  drawn  for  the  use  of  the  Reform 
School: 

F«  corrent  expenses.  Act  100, 1867 t  1,000  00 

-  building,                   «    195,    «    4,052  48 

-wanning,                  "      "       "    5,000  00 

-  current  expenses,     "    108, 1869 ^  - . .  35,000  00 

*  building  and  repairs.  Act  108, 1869 .  * 10,973  05 

$56,025  53 


STATE  PRISON. 

For  the  past  year  this  institution  has  paid  its  own  current 
eipsiaesy  and  has  drawn  but  $2,000  of  the  $20,000  appropri- 
ated b?  Act  No.  120,  Laws  of  1869,  for  repairs  and  buildings. 

GEOLOGICAL  SURVSY. 

The  whole  of  the  amount  of  the  Qeological  Survey  appro- 
pnadoii,  amounting  to  $8,000,  has  been  drawn  from  the 


IMMIGRATION  AQSNCT. 

The  appropriation  of  $5,000  for  the  support  of  an  Immi- 
pttion  agency  abroad,  has  all  been  drawn  from  the  treasury. 


AUDITOR  OEKEBAL.  23 

coofltT,  whose  returns  were  not  received  at  the  Auditor  Gen- 
fiiFi  office  until  the  seventh  day  of  June.  Because  of  so  late 
I  Rtnni,  the  taxes  were  rejected,  and  no  sale  made  in  Delta 

COUtT. 

NiTvere  there  any  sales  in  the  counties  of  Emmet,  Mack- 
ion,  or  Maniton,  on  account  of  the  failure  of  Express  Qom- 
puies  to  get  the  sales'  books  into  the  hands  of  the  several 
eomiT  treasurers  in  season  for  the  sale,  though  said  books 
VCR  ddivefed  to  the  Express  Company  in  this  city  on  the 
atk  difof  September,  twenty-eight  days  prior  to  the  time  of 

RSOISTERS  IN  CHANCBRY. 

The  clerks  of  the  counties  of  Alcona,  Alpena^  Antrim,  Ben- 
QtChsrieroix,  Cheboygan,  Chippewa,  Clinton,  Emmet,  Grand 
TiiTttge,  Jackson,  Keweenaw,  Mackinac,  Manistee,  Manitou, 
IbrriQette,  Mason,  Ontonagon,  Osceola  and  Saginaw  have 
Ued  to  ffle  with  the  Auditor  General  the  bond  that  the  law 
vt%m$  them  to  file  as  Registers  in  Chancery  for  their  several 
fwnties,  for  the  term  commencing  January  1, 1869. 

DRAIN  TAXBS. 

The  present  drain  law^  enacts  that  it  shall  be  the  di\ty  of 
the  tmsorer  of  any  county  to  return  all  lands  delinquent  for 
aiei  thereon,  levied  under  the  provisions  of  said  act,  to  the 
Auditor  General,  and  that  such  lands  shall  be  advertised  and 
mU  therefor,  at  the  same  time  and  in  the  same  manner  as 
ssds  delinquent  for  other  taxes  so  returned.'  The  general 
%  kw  requires  that  when  the  returns  of  delinquent  taxes  are 
i^Ted  by  the  Auditor  General,  the  amount  thereof  shall  be 
j^ttd  to  the  credit  of  the  proper  county  on  the  books  in  his 
sfice.'  Drain  taxes,  being  spread  upon  the  general  tax  roll, 
iR  included  in  the  list  of  delinquent  taxes  returned  to  the 

%a  !E».  41.  Law*  of  ISSe.   sSectton  12.  Oroin  Law.    'Tax  Law,  Sec.  63. 


AUDITOR  GENEBAL. 


25 


3«  40:  for  1868,  •102,381  75/  and  that  the  return  thei-eof 
WIS  from  twenty-fiix  of  the  fifty-nine  counties  of  the  State ; 
diitof  the  twenty-six,  fourteen  counties  return,  for  1868,  less 
tba  tlyOOO  each,  thus  showing  that  the  great  bulk  of  the 
iifluit  loomed  was  from  twelye  counties. 

Ilk  examination  affords  the  means  of  illustrating  the  finau- 
exilproviaoDs  of  the  drain  law,  and  of  showing  the  results  of 
a  ohaenrance  of  such  provisions.  As  affording  an  extreme 
OK,  attention  is  called  to  Monroe  county. 

Tlie  whole  amount  of  delinquent  taxes  returned  from  this 
tmtjm  March  hist  was  $27,321  04.  Of  this  sum  120,287  60 
VK  Umqaent  drain  taxes — $148  95  of  which  was  rejected — 
Ki85  73  was  paid  before  or  at  the  October  tax  sales,  and  the 


^VinOOarr  y  as  mmefutU  qf  DeUttquetU  Drain  Tatxea  returnsd  to  the  Andifar 
w^ibr  tke  ftan  186S,  1866^  1867,  and  1868,  returned  retpectively  in  the  yeare 
■1  MP,  UBS  — *  "*** 


oonmEs. 

1865. 

1866. 

1867. 

1868. 

tey. 

$475  56 

$568  10 

11,161  51 

145  18 

i^.. :.::::::::::::::::::::: 

$9  00 

119  60 

275  76 

480  95 

67  60 

1,89185 

^J^Ht.. 

162  19 

A^m_ 

828  89 

4,581  17 

628  19 

6,981  68 

2,488  17 

882  47 

^llB 

^■WCL. 

1,681  21 

6,192  96 
819  02 

4i0tL 

BWiJe....::::::::::::::::::::::: 

864  12 

704  27 

1,090  58 

699  95 

15  60 

810  87 

Sti:.:::::  :"":::;::::::: 

205  07 

^K^HI. 

106  08 

UnuM 

217  86 

2,084  68 

512  41 

■'""4",869'49 

4,989  61 

1  68 

I<MVti 

501  95 

7,784  02 

6,418  56 
29  48 

w^*i:::::::::::::: ::::::::::: 

1,420  47 
1,410  48 
1,062  67 

1,999  49 

9,040  50 

682  24 

1,886  27 

20,287  60 

288  47 

j^^^^^ 

%ili^_ 

^M 

1,447  06 

•81,509  84 

4,754  89 

8,104  14 

88  62 

s^iz ::::::::::::::::::::::: 

sSee....;.::::::: 

80  65 

6,792  87 

5,665  88 

665  15 

492  44 

648  48 

4,860  62 

^orir ::::::::: 

^ImJ^ 

fmtii^^. 

8,408  91 
822  78 

n^^^^^^ 

98  88 
2,785  65 

824  94 
8,045  69 

Wtf^._, 

5,298  16 

IMt. 

$9,278  25 

$18,165  89 

$56,842  40 

$102,881  75 

to  Conaty  nnder  Act  No.  405,  Laws  of  1869. 
4 


AUDITOR  GENERAL.  27 

qiind  bj  titt  general  law,  and  payment  has  been  made  by  the 
;?tile  TiMsaiery  as  required  by  the  drain  law,  thereby  giving 
■id  county  a  doable  benefit  of  her  delinquent  drain  taxes, 
aad  rhcuig  the  funds  in  the  hands  of  the  County  Treasurer 
vith  vUch  to  take  up  and  cancel  her  drain  orders,  those 
4aa  Olden  must,  if  tendered  for  that  purpose,  be  taken  in 
pmnt  of  such  drain  taxes  due  the  State. 

That  is,  the  county  of  Monroe  may  become  as  deeply  in 
M»tM  pooible  under  the  drain  law;  she  may  impose  taxes 
wftm  buds,  as  she  has  done,  so  high  that  they  will  not  be  paid 
Iff  the  owner,  and  for  which  the  lands  cannot  be  sold,  and 
Oder  aid  law  the  State  may  become  doubly  responsible  for 
it  jaTiiient  of  the  greater  portion  of  such  county  indebted- 
m  she  has  become  responsible  for,  and  has  paid  to  the 
tj  the  $13,512  92  as  before  stated,  and  is  yet  held  for  the 
pnteni  of  the  same  amount  of  Monroe  connty  drain  orders, 
ikcid  saeh  orders  be  tendered  in  payment  of  the  taxes 
RfRsmted  by  the  above  stated  amount 

Tbe  above  are  some  of  the  objectionable  financial  features 
if  tke  kw  under  consideration.  These  features,  in  their  oper- 
nm,  oe  not  confined  to  Monroe  county,  but  extend  to 
lA  eovnties  in  which  draining,  under  said  law,  is  carried 
m  to  any  considerable  extent  That  the  requirements  of 
ttu  kv  have  not  been  complied  with,  does  not  remove  the 
kt  tkat  its  provisions  are  as  above  set  forth.    That  they  can* 

be  complied  with  ftdly  by  the  State  oflScers,  whose  duties 
■  the  pranises  are  therein  set  forth,  does  not  relieve  the  law 

<i  ob|ectionable  features,  but  they  remain  there  as  a  con- 

omce  of  irritation  and  unpleasantness  between  all 

coneenied  in  the  execution  of  the  law,  and  are  given 

in  Bomc  known  instances,  by  County  Treasurers, 

vUch  they  decline  to  pay  drain  orders  when  presented  to 
notwithstanding  they  have  withheld  from  the  State 


AUDITOR  GENERAL.  29 

pAyment  of  which  such  order  might  h^  tendered,  assessed  for 
tk  constmction  of  another. 

Tke  nature  of  the  objectionable  features  of  the  drain  law 
vili  r»dily  suggest  the  reason  for  stating  them  here.  These 
«b|Mtioiifi  do  not  necessarily  lie  against  a  drainage  system,  but 
flftly  agiinst  the  present  form  of  the  law  through  which  such 
afjUem  is  to  be  kept  in  operaMon.  The  remedy  is  simple, 
and  dioold  it  be  applied  by  competent  authority,  there  would 
laudn  little  to  mar  the  execution  of  one  of  the  most  impor- 
tat  Isvs  upon  the  statute  books  of  this  State. 

WILLIAM  HUMPHREY, 

Auditor  Genei^al 


.AlPPENDIX 


A  PPENDIX. 


STATEMENT 
*if  lirptitdiiMreii  atid  Rettipt*  for  the  yefir  ending  Noc.  30th,  1869. 


EXP'NDITURXfl. 


*bffbduc«  ta  the  hands  of  the  Sute  Treaporer,  on 
^ff.  ^.  l<iiK.  exclUFlTe  of  amount  to  meet  oat- 
•uia;  vamnt  OB  General  Fund,  was 

rwd* 

L7$aoolKiind 

?  School  Interest  Pond 

Lnd  Fmnd  

land  Interest  Fund 

'iiitnity  Pand..     ..  ._ 

iJ^mltT  lawest  Fnnd 

^(vMlKchcMlFaBd 

^^Ml  School  Interest  Fend 

i^initiial  Oolk^  Fnnd 

iCoIteee  Interest  Fund 

YwaA     

^MtBaiUhirFiud 

ana]  lB|)foi  ement  Fnnd 

WirFai... 

VirL«i^faikinpFand.  

*v-k  liln  Loan  Sinking  Fnnd 

^  Sm'a  Ftllti  Ship  Canal  Fnnd 

***?  Farf 

HuaeFond 

ft»arf  Fnnd 

LudDeposiL 

^««7  ^chciol  Depofdt 

School  Interest  Deposit 

fciUi«;  Deposit 

Ceatrel  Ranroad  Deposit 

Tax  Faad 

Aid  Pond 

''«~««tT  AU  Fand 

charged  State  Trcasorer,  Nov.  80, 1S419.. 


^ftsr^ed 


r  J.  B.  15.  I««. 


$T22,S86  88 

620  00 

166,688  46 

M6,567  6ft 

179  44 

254  75 

88,786  &i 


W4,&15  28 

479,500  00 

104,000  00 

10,418  7S 

8,816  65 

2.500  00 

1,^18  87 


185  00 

SI 


87  50 

4,718  47 

2,000  00 

38,197  02 

s«4,089  72 

$8,246,818  71 


Receipts. 


$1,180,227  15 

1,006,869  12 

115,466  46 

56,965  68 

508,651  50 

4,980  04 

7,817  82 

10,219  08 

1,575  28 

1,861  78 

11,866  00 

56  96 

2.826  7S 

998  52 

699  68 

15,017  60 

1,889  41 
12,489  rH» 


2,999  90 
60  00 

1.246  25 

2  52 

50  00 

268,580  51 


$8,246,818  74 


APPENDIX. 


LED(i£R   BALANCE»—Xov.  »Oth,  l^(j^^ 


Dm. 


Cr. 


*Q»Titi«rrr 

^'rod. 

5ctonlKniHl 

Srbool  Intett^t  Fund 

fTWK}  Maul  Five  Per  Ct-nt.  Fund. . . 

^«i^»Liad  Fimd 

''oayLni  laterc^t  Fand 

■n-wiij  Fvnd 

'■•^tylatfrp*!  Fnnd 

(oriMioolFaDd. 

^Mnl.^rtebol  UlteffMVt  FuDd 

ir*&itai!  Colics^  Fund 

lenhaoii  t  oIIc«sr  Interest  Fnnd 

•«*teF]iBd. 

"a^lWUiaiE  Food 

Jinri  la^vvt^nent  Fund 

IvTwii 

*ff(jnsiaUB|f  Pimd 

*Mimum  Law  Sinking  Fond 

H  ImV  FtD^  Ship  Canal  Fund 

ci.^n^iET  Aid  Fond... 

Kkwl  Deposit 

LndDvpoHit 

BwUia;  Deposit 

>efc*>]  lnttfrrf>r  Depot«it 

Aecoant 

r/ Xot«» 

i'rarml  ICailroad  Dcponltf^ , . . . 
i^oathmi  Sa!lro«d  Dcpoi>ite . . 
*  i'Mffk  VtOcT  Railroad  Depotflti*. . . . 
OtUwm  Bailroad  Deposits. 
Dcporitit 


fb84.(>8S»  72, 


^•mnft  yceond  »crli». . 
iapntraieDt  Warranta. 
LaadWananln 


•>,4«0.ryi6  2S 


s'lCOlO  9'i 


:m.(lOI  81 


I 


$321,42)9  05 

l,fi08,190  2ft 

90,1S7  02 

210,011  07 

188,900  99 

110,008  02 

,  818,525  18 

742  20 

46,08T  IJS 

18,041  87 

14,165  0() 

58  90 

1«I9,8S9  92 

27.CGO  78 

12,524  21 
.106,000  (Ml 

29,405  79 

7.599  5S 

1.061  25 

60  «N» 

50  IMl 
1  71 

780  m 

1.850  52 

146  72 

55  00 

8  5f< 

15  (H) 

1,602  56 

656  06 

3,568  75 

645  99 


$4,160,528  2S  ,       $4,160,528  2s 


APPENDIX. 


GENERAL    FIND. 


Cr. 


119. 
^.».  By'Wnee.  Nor.  40,  l94i8,  exclusive  of  ontstand'g  warrant. 

-  hM\  recoT'd  of  Pboenix  B*k  (aw'd  of  B'd  of  St.  Aod'n) 

*  Site»  of  lands  for  Uxcs  in  October 

~  Saadiy  Coontlei^— taxes  collected,  &c 

^  Mlaqaent  Taxe^  collected 

.  "         ••  **       iotereston 

•*  Bxpenw  of  nlet» 

'  ^Oflee  Charges 

-  Redemption  of  sales  to  individuals 

State  bldii 

-  Hotte  bid*  Mid 

intereaton 

-  State  Tax  Lands  sold 

intereston 

4 

"  Tu  Histories,  Ac,  And.  Qen*l8  Office 

"  Fee»and  Chniy?s    State  Land  Office 

Secretary  of  State 

.State  Treasurer 

**  Slate  8alt-s|ning  Lands  and  interest 

••ludriet  iH> 

*  la't  tranaf  *d  from  St.  Mary's  Palls  Ship  Canal  Fand 
*•         -  Contingent  Fund 

Military  Fund 

Specific  Tax  Fnnd. 


$170,868  86 

502,047  88 

176,810  16 

12,778  85 

2,4fi6  M 

4,827  87 

19,379  48 

18,916  46 

15,799  40 

2,928  66 

19,919  73 

1,021  98 


Aa't  under  J.  R.  £>.  isn9,  (outstanding  warrant). 


$1,168,441  46 
10,000  00 


947,287  44 

1,581  08 

1,018  80 

288  95 

166  60 

1,887  67 

• 

48,666  66 

6,605  15 

892  85 

100  00 

12,887  89 

2  52 


$2,189,285  4* 


APPKXDIX. 


1) 


SPECIFIC    TAX    FIND. 


Cr. 


ym  *t  Br  Carh  rcc'd  on  R.  R.  Specific  Tax  (h. 

Bank  <!). 

Tolegnph    -  (I). 

Exprc«f>  (I>. 

Tnsiiranco    ■•  (H. 

Mininir  (H. 


».26r>  0(1 

1.16A  no 

77.207  04 
y,42fi  ^,i 


'|(26(>,5S0  51 


INTERNAL  IMPROVEMENT  FUND. 


^.%  B7  ImenMl  laiprD\  cment  Lands  Kold 

**  balancr.  inclndinsr  ont«tandinj;  warrantt*. 


Cn. 

$609  62t 
2.486/126  2>^ 


$2.4«7.22.'i  IM 


ST.    MARY'S    FALLS    SHIP   CANAL   FUND. 


^.'».».  Brhalaiicr.  Nov.  }W,  I86> 

"  Cash  reccired  onaccoant  of  tollj« 

"  DiKonnt  OB  Canal  Bondtt  purchaMcd  and  retired . 


Cn. 

|u«,91H»  22 

12.896  .')(> 

AH  00 


O 


$46,429  72 


APPENDIX. 


SWAMP  LAND  FUND. 


11 
Cb. 


'Stf  »  Brbfttanee.  Nov.  an.  1868 

I 

**  Aii*t4  rcc*d  on  sale  of  State  Swamp  Lande : 

WamntK,  Act  117, '»,  Ac $S4,T(M  SI 

Wvnnts.  Sec.  0,  Act  76,  '67... 008,285  58 
C^Mh 60,746  68J 

"  nuesflnom  tre»paesen  onlande 

*  Fttt    Swmp  lAnd  State  Road  Com'rs  Office 


$116,123  09 


.'188,747  10 

4,895  40 

9  00 


Amoant  carried  forward.. 


$709,774  50 


APPENDIX. 


13 


SWAMP    UCUD  rUND-CojfTiNUED. 


Cr. 


y^sM,  AwNiBt  brooi^t  forward. 


$T09.7T4  ;*>9 


$709,774  59 


APPENDIX. 


15 


SWAMP    LAND   INTKKEST   FUND. 


Oil. 


X«r. «  By  bilaacc  Nor.  SO,  isee 

"  HeeHpts  dnring  fiscal  year. 


$105,249  02 
4.089  04 


$110,288  06 


APPENDIX. 


17 


UNIVERSITY   FUND. 


utj 

KBfaBrhi]uce.KoT.  80, 1868 

"  Biodfito  dnring  flecal  jear. 


Cb. 


(805,982  56 
7,817  82 

$818,779  88 


rNIVKRSITY   INTEREST   FUND. 

SirVBrbduecNoT.  80, 186B 

I 
"  Rcedpto  during  fiscal  year 

"  Im't  tnmaf  *d  from  Specific  Tax  Fond— Interest  on  Uni 

vcrsity  Fund 


C?B. 


I6U88 
10,219  08 

28,644  48 


$89,477  84 


UNIVERSITY   AID   FUND. 


Cb. 


APPENDIX. 


19 


NORMAL    SCHOOL    FUND. 


Cb. 


Ir.ft  BfbaluMe,  Not.  ft),  ISte 

*  Receipts  during  llflcal  rear. 


$44,461  95 
1,575  28 

$46,087  18 


NORMAL    SCHOOL    INTEREST    FUND. 


Cb. 


%^aByta]Baee.NoT.  80,  ISae 

**  Reeeipts  during  flacal  yetr 

-'  Am*t  tnasf  *d  from  Oenl  Fnnd— Act  92, 1860 

*'      Spedflc  Tax  Fund,  iDt.  on  N.  S.  Fond 


$14,459  29 

1,864  78 

10,000  00 

2,782  80 

$29,066  87 


APPENDIX. 


21 


PRIMARY    SCHOOL    FUND. 


Cb. 


.■LBrbduM»,NoT.8D,18«8 

"  OMh  recdTod  dnrlBip  lUcal  yetr,  on  lands. 
anderJ.  R.8,  18W 


$1,498,248  80 

116,n9  98 

186  48 

$1,808,710  28 


PRIMART    SCHOOL    INTEHS8T    FUND. 


Cb. 


IivH.^r%«lnee, 


I  u 


NOT.aO,18<8. 

reeeiTcd  doting  flBetl  year  for  rant 

Int.  on  Eflcheat. 

gran 

ImwHt  on  balanoes  dne  ftt>m  parchaaera. 

t  tmu.  from  Spedflc  Tax  Fond,  Tnt  on  Prl.  Sch'l  Fd 

under  Act  81, 1858.... 


$81,867  88 

180  00 

210  00 

'  80  00 

08,615  88 

108,894  88 

10,268  09 

$268,876  48 


,  PRIMART    SCHOOL    PIVB    PER    CENT.    FUND. 


Cb. 


^  balance.  Not.  80, 1888 

-  AB*t  tTaaiferred  frtnn  Swamp  Land  Fund. 


$186,600  00 
24,411  07 

$210,011  07 


APPENDIX. 


23 


AGRICULTURAL    COLLEGE    FUND. 


V«r».  BTla]aiK«,NoT.  ao,  ISfiS. 

"  8tle  of  Agrlcnltiira]  College  Lands. 


Cr- 


$2,800  00 
11,865  00 

$14,165  00 


AGRICULTURAL    COLLEGE    INTEREST    FUND. 


^.  M.  Bf  ea»h  received  daring  fiscal  rear. 


Cb. 


$66  90 


$58  96 


TWO    MILLION    LOAN    SINKING    FITND. 


.^7  ditc't  on  Two  Million  Loan  Bonds  pnrchaeed  and  retired. . 

-      Renewal 
.  "  Am't  tranP.  from  Oen'l  Fund,  under  8co>.  4^5,  Act  122,  *61 
■  *•         '•  "  Discount 


Cr. 


$1,246  41 
148  00 

88,495  78 

560  OO 

&56,910  97 


$897,856  11 


APPENDIX. 


25 


WAR    LOAN    SINKING    FUND. 


Cb. 


l0?».B7bdaikce,NoT.»),  15«S. 

,  "  AbH  traa*.  from  Geii*l  F*d  under  Sec  6,  Act  5,  Ex.  Sess.  *61 
I  -        »•  "         "        ♦*       J.  R.  7/69  (surplus fands) 

•*        "       Act  75, 1869 

Two  Million  Loan  Sinking  Fund 

I 

1 


$605,688  07 

19,847  87 

200,000  00 

174,728  97 

76,490  09 


$1,076,100  OO 


WAR    FUND. 


Nov.  80,1868. 

EiNueuiis  pajment  of  interest— reftuided 

Bounty  Bonds  issued. 

i*t  tcsns.  from  Spe.  Tax  F*d,  under  Sec.  1,  Art  14,  St.  Con. 


Cb. 


$91,201  M 

17  60 

15,000  00 

100,950  40 


$187,169  44 


MILITARY    FUND. 


Bybahnoe, 


Nov.  80, 1868 

t  tnasf 'd  from  Soldiers'  Relief  Fund,  under  Act  27,  '68 

Home  "  "    27, '69 

General  Fund 

under  Sec.  98,  Act  16, 1863 


Cb. 


$7,674  25 

8,666  68 

7,600  00 

60  00 

^,674  25 


$48,655  08 


APPEXDIX. 


37 


SOLDIBRS*    RELIEF    FUND. 


5«vlLBxhdcace,XoT.  80, 1^68 

"  aa*t  leoL'iird  of  Got.  H.  H.  Crapo  (bal.  unexpended). 


Cr. 


$7,000  00 
2,090  90 


$9,990  90 


SOLDIEB8'    HOME    FUND. 


Cr. 


Vf.ai.  By  balaiioe.  Nor.  SO.  18«i. 


$10,000  00 


$10,000  00 


SOLDIERS*    AID    FUND. 


Cr. 


.t».  Bt  am't  trmav.  fhmi  Military  Fond,  andcr  Act  85. 18d0. 


$2,000  00 


$S,000  00 


APPENDIX. 


39 


ASYLUM    FUND. 


Cb. 


^.11  9yliilftace,NoT.90,  1868. 

**  Reedpti  doiiqg  flflCBl  year. 

"  tm't  traat.  from  Oen*]  F^d,  ander  Sec.  9,  Act  (0',  1809 

■  *•         *•  »•  "        Seel,  Act  118, 18».... 

-         *•  •*  "        Sec  2,  Act  118, 1869.... 

Sec.  1,  Actl21,186».... 
MilltKTT  F'd,  ^nde^  Soc.  9,  Act  68, 1869. . . 


$82,477  » 
9,885  78 
8,861  69 
15,000  00 
87,600  00 
70,000  00 
88,188  88 


$854,806  47 


STATE    BUILDING    FUND. 


Cb. 


^.a^Ilf  baluMe,  Not.  80, 1868. 

"*  R«oelptc  during  flacal  jear. 


$26,679  71 
996  59 


$27,666  28 


30 


AUDITOR  GENERAL. 


Db. 


PRIMARY    SCHOOL    DEPOSIT-AcT  85,  ISC©. 


1869. 
Nov.  80. 


To  am't  rcfiinded  on  redeemed  bide. 
"  balance 


Dr. 


PRIMARY    SCHOOL    INTEREST    DEPOSIT-AcT  8.' 


1809. 
Nov.  80. 


To  am't  paid  on  redeemed  certiflcatea,  P.  S.  Deposit. 
"  balance 


Dr. 


SWAMP    LAND    DEPOSIT-Act  85,  1809. 


180. 
Nov.  80. 


To  balance. 


APPENDIX. 


31 


PBIMARY    SCHOOL    DSPOSIT-~Act  85,  IBCO. 


Cb. 


PRIMARY    8CHOOL    INTEREST    DEPOSIT— Act  85,  1668.  Cb. 


I'lm. 


Vt.  m  By  cath  recelTCd  during  fiscal  year. 


$2  52 


$2  52 


SWAMP    LAND    DEPOSIT— Act  95,  1860. 


Cb, 


^  ■•  Bf  cash  reedred  dnrlng  fiacal  year. 


$eooo 


$eooo 


32 


AUDITOR  OENEBAL. 


Dr. 


STATE    BDILDING    DEPOSIT— Act  85,  1869. 


18<». 
Not.  80. 


To  balance. 


Db. 


CONTINGENT    FUND. 


18<». 
Nov.  80. 


To  am't  trSDii.  to  Gen*l  Fnnd,  nnder  Act  88, 1809. 


Dr. 


INTERNAL    IMPROVEMENT    WARRANTS 


1860. 
Nov.  80. 


To  balance. 


APPENDIX. 


33 


8TATK     BUILDING    DEPOSIT- Act  86,  1860. 


Cb. 


$60  00 


$60  00 


CONTINGENT    FUND. 


Or. 


CiTBRNAL    nCPROYSMENT    WAERANT8. 


Cb. 


^  K  By  Maaee,  Not.  80,  IBOBl. 


$8,508  76 


$8,666  76 


34 


AUDITOR  OBKEBAL. 


Db. 


LAND    WARRANTS. 


1809. 
Not.  80. 


To  1>aUnce. 


Dm, 


LAND    WARRANTS— Sboond  Sebibs. 


1869. 
Nov.  80. 


To  balance. 


Db. 


SWAMP    LAND    WARRANTS-AoT  117,  1850 


1809. 
Nov.  80. 


To  WarrantB  paid  during  flecal  year. 
"  balance 


Db.    swamp  LAND  WARRANTS— Thibd  Sbrxbb— Sbo. 


1869. 
Nov.  80. 


To  WarrantB  paid  during  fiscal  year. 


APPENDIX. 


35 


JUOID    WABBANT8. 


I 


ym,n.  ^f  teknee.  Nor.  80, 1868. 


GE. 


$1,608  66 


$1,608  66 


LAND    WABRAMTS— SsooiiD  Snoxe. 


9mM 


^fbtliMe,  Nov.  80, 1868.. 


Gr. 


$666  06 


$686  06 


SWAJfP    LAND    WARRANT8-ACT  117,  18S0,  Ac 


CB. 


atiBftakaoe, 


Not.  80, 1868 

Is  tened  dmlng  fUctl  year. 


$8«6  99 
84,664  84 


$86,410  88 


SWAMP  LAND  WARHANTB— Thdu>  8xbix»~6sc. 

6,  Act  76,  1867.     Cb. 

t 
^9l9L  ^f  Wvmti  litB«d  dnrlQg  flical  yesr. 

$608,285  68 

i 

$608,886  68 

36 


AUDITOR  GENERAL. 


Db. 


MICHIOAN    SOUTHERN    RAILROAD   DEP08] 
To  balance. 

ST.    JOSEPH    VALLEY    RAILROAD    DBPOSl 
To  balance 

MICHIGAN    CENTRAL    RAILROAD    DSPOS 

To  amH  paid  nnder  Sec  7,  Act  42, 1846 

"  balance 

OAKLAND    AND    OTTAWA    RAILROAD    DS 
To  balance. 


18M. 
Not.  80. 


Db. 


1889. 
Not.  80. 


Db. 


1880. 
Not.  80. 


Db. 


1800. 
Not.  80. 


APPENDIX. 


37 


MICmOAN    SOUTHERN    RAILBOAB    DEPOSITS. 


Cs. 


9K.M,  Tbbiknee,  Not.  80,  IMS. 


$146  72 


$146  18 


8T.   JOSEPH    VALLEY   RAILBOAD    DEPOSITS. 


inajlytelHioe,  Not.  SO,  186B. 

i 


Cb. 


$05  00 


$06  00 


mCHIQAN    CENTRAL    RAILROAD    DEPOSITS. 


Cb. 


M  Wf  Mnce,  Nov.  SO,  1808. 


$1,947  08 


$1,947  08 


OAKLAliD    AND    OTTAWA    RAILROAD    DEPOSITS.  Cb. 


*i.»'«if 


Nor.  W.  1868. 


$8S6 


$S68 


38 


AUDITOR  GEKEBAL. 


Db. 


LIQHT    HOUSE   DEPOSIT. 


1869. 
Kov.ft). 


To  balance. 


0B. 


TBEASUBY   NOTES. 


18«. 
Not.  80. 


To  balance.. 


Db. 


SUSPENSE   ACCOUNT. 


18<». 
Nov.  80. 


To  balance,  Nor.  80, 1863. 


APPBKDIX. 


39 


LIGHT    U0U8B    DEPOSIT. 


Cb. 


KKAjlrMnoe,  Kov.  80,  isesL. 


$16  00 


$16  00 


TBSA8URY    NOTES. 


Cb. 


Sw.ll. 


]lrWuc«,NoT.80, 1668. 


$780  00 


$780  00 


SUSPENSE   ACCOUNT. 


Cb. 


$88,001  81 


$88,001  81 


40 


AUDITOB  GENSBAL. 


^ 


I 


H      9 


4 


11 

^1 


S 


•2 


•2  O 

0 


I 


I  S  i? 

PI 

<  o  o 


9  o 

o 


s 

9  px 


41 


o 

CO 


i:- 

a  £ 
"I 

O 


9Q 

a 


O 


5 


8 


s 


as 


Ok 


«0     a 

8   S 


S    &    8 


9    9    S 


S 


^ssqi?3::s^ 


:^  s  s 


«D       lO       40       »• 


^    8 


SSSSSSSS^od. 


04 


^  s  i  s  ss 

2      to       0»       04       A 


g  at;  s 

to         09 


S    $    3    3    S    S 


S 


I  s  5  S  I  S  s 


III 

iS     m     PQ     O      O 


APPENDIX. 


41 


m 


s 
s 


s 

en 


&  s 


9 


s 


» 

§ 


;5   S 


8 


s 


8S8SS8SS 


Ok      fS 


as 


s  s 


9  s  s  s 

88    2    8    S 


^  2 


8   S 
IS 


9    S8    S    SS 


S838SSSSS8 

^  •  ^        V  *■ 


8    8 


6    S 

i  8 


11 


i 


s    3 


a  f  - 


I 


s 

o 
a 


"  9  § 


B  B  m  fi  5  s  ,s 


M 

»^    M    M    M    i3    iJ 


ill!  ^ 

Q     M     ^     t^     %jt 


Ills 

3  ;3  »  M 


42 


AUDITOR  GBNESAL. 


li 


11 

IS 


ill 

-<  6  o 


fl   a 

0    o 


I 


^    GQ 


I'' 


o 


CD 


O 


a 


s 

s 


S    2 

I! 


1^  "^ 


S      01 


S 
a 


04 


8 


T-l  iO 


S   9   S   6 

i  i  i  §  §  ^ 


ri       00 


g  S5  ;s  s  I  9  s 


OS 


I  ?   I   §   g   1  I  S    i    S 


I  I  I  i  S  t  2  s  s  * 


ri     ee 


5 


a 


a    ^ 

-111 

§  e  §  i  s  2  Si 


APPBKDIX. 


43 


t 

1        < 

.   :  «    : 

•  *        • 

•  ■        • 

:   8 

s 

1 

*       «        •         • 

*  t          1            • 

*  I           1           i 

*  ••II 
I                 *         1          1            1 

*  1                     •            •              • 
'                           *           •            • 

*  *      •       »        1         I 

«     •      I      «       t        • 

s 
S 

I 
1 
• 

:  8    : 

:   s 
1   ^ 

s 

1 

*4 

»         • 

•  1 

•        «         1 

•  •  • 

•  1 
1                  « 

«                 f 

i 

:::  9   :  S  $  Si  s 

I'M!'    ! 

I 

1 

<S  8 
5  •  • 

Its 

II « 

ils 
i!  = 

:  2  8   8    Si 

:  S  S  9   S 

S 

:  «  8  8  8 

;  i  s  -  3 

8 

i 

18  1 

• 

:  *  : 

9    m  h  > 

44 


AUDITOR  GENERAL. 


1 


iH        p        CO 
CO 

^  ^  »•  ^  ^ 


SiS§ka^^ 


51 


r^       CO       ■«* 


50 


^ 


eo 
3 


8 


3 


CD 

g 

s 

s 

e 

-^ 

s 

04 

»^ 

o 

OD 

a 
o 

I 


$    S 


04 


o     3     S     So     S     S 


§  s 


s  s  s 


-J 


I 


6 

o 

a 


s  s  ^ 


S  3  s  s  r: 


^ 


g  s 


f     I— 


^      »-l      »-»      *-l      ^ 


o 


I  ^ 


s. 


S   'S 
"E 


Q 

o 


<<^-^2SScq3oo 


I  € 


o 
«s 


APPENDIX. 


46 


«     •-      = 


»     91 


S  ;: 
8   -' 


i  3  3  S  i  §  S  § 


8  s;  s 


<9-      <0 

Ok       ■^ 
f       Ok 


I 


«       O       •-• 


■*       »-> 


^       pi 


o* 


S  8  = 

{  8  « 


s  s 

9    9 


s  s 


g 


:  s 


s 


s  s  s  a:  2 

S    P*    S    S    o» 

«H  k'"  ^^  »^ 


S    8 


2  s  s  s  s  s 


:  !  I  2   I 


§ 


s  s 

w      O 


iSSililHSIIi 


w 


i  § 


9< 


«   •H 


I 


llll 


n  ^  I  i  I  i 

-  *  =  o    3  f  g 

a  B  £  .S 


•5  *-9 


^    i   8 


I 


J3  I 


46 


AUDITOR  GhEKERAL. 


K 
O 


;' 


s 

s 

00 

s: 

S 

s 

s 

s 

8 

s 

^ 

• 

s 

1 

OD 

s. 

i 

1 

*• 

§ 

•• 

IO 

i 

& 

<o 

r^ 

04 

o 

CO 

"* 

iO 

iO 

8 

a 

P 

4: 

CO 


O      io      « 
OD     CO     ee 


§S3SS8SS8fS 


2    r:    8    IS    S 

Ok       rH 
0« 


§      S 


^     S8 

r^       GO 

i    ^ 


s 


o 


9 

I 


S    S    3    S 

s  ^  i  s 

1-4     o«     oS     St 


SS    8    S    9    S 


9 


S3iii^S2 


e«     f-i 


3 


S5 
?2 


on 


6 
O 


I 


assess 
§§§111 

«•  »  ••  ^  «* 


00 


»  5  «  *-  'I 

*<-  fr-  M  MO  ^ 

3!  "^  S  ss  : 

o  1-4  «s  «o  e 


CO       M 


CO 

E3 
&4 


o 


3 


5 


0         S         oi         E         M 

ET   S    8    I   S 


o    o 


APPBKDIX. 


47 


} «  :  $  s  s 

151  P| 

•                   MM                        « 

n                1-I 

S 

■    9        •      «      O 

3 

Z  S  1  % 

iSil 


s 


s  s  s  2 
S  S  •  5 


S 

i 


*  •    t 


I 


i  : 

a  c 

s 

8 

U 

ii 

8 

^4 

8 

«i4 

1 

« 

B  -f 

of 

1 

•       •       •        • 

ifiSl 

*  •*  5  "  -a  £ 

'  «  •  ^  >  ^  ^ 


Ik 


48 


AUDITOB  GEKEBAL. 


[C.J 
STATEMENT 

Of  Tax  Sales,  Oct.  4th,  1869,  for  Tcuees  of  1868,  and  Unm 

of  Precious  Tears. 


COUNTIES. 


Allegan 

Alpena 

Antrim 

Barry 

Bay 

Berrien 

Branch ^ 

Calhoon 

CSasa.. 

Cheboygan 

Chippewa  (no  rotnms) 

Clinton 

Belta  (no  sales) 

Baton 

Emmet  (no  sales) 

Genesee. 

Qrand  Traverse 

Orattot 

HiUadale. 

Hoogfaton 

Hnron 

Ingham 

Ionia. 

loaoo 

iMbdla 

Ja^son. 

Kalamaaoo 

Kent. 

Keweenaw........ 


Amount 
Advertised. 


$10,888  76 

11,216  67 

1,149  29 

4,858  64 

29,668  85 

4,084  28 

1,806  66 

1,264  49 

858  17 

2,626  85 


Ledanaw. 


6,570  24 


8,160  25 


12,748  88 
8,242  72 

12,278  68 
1,491  84 

12,288  85 
4,886  78 
7,218  09 
8,808  06 

10,926  98 

10,685  25 
4,940  60 
1,006  61 

15,921  70 
7,155  87 
6,780  80 
1,607  18 

10,200  06 


Paid 
Co.  Troas^rs 
before  sale. 


$8,881  40 

1,225  20 

85  49 

1,285  92 

12,087  97 

1,168  88 

884  44 

240  88 

809  M 

115  99 


1,854  66 


751  60 


2,848  54 
622  44 

2,060  92 
151  99 

4,668  70 
515  65 
870  08 
854  72 

1,465  98 
875  79 
981  51 
146  84 

4,867  80 

8,687  49 

1,844  19 
225  01 

1, 


Amoant 
Sold. 


$8,488  67 

2,709  64 

164  98 

2,489  56 

2,480  70 

1,482  62 

799  77 

989  66 

829  46 

208  68 


Bids  tc 
Stat 


8,718  68 


1,688  60 


$8,8 

6,8 

fl 

4 

14,S 


1,^ 


1; 


8,694  26 

884  n 

1. 

7,682  11 

1. 

1,069  78 

1,264  78 

5 

80»7O 

2 

5,244  08 

2,201  78 

746  96 

1 

1,511  22 

S 

1,026  65 

476  75 

9,551  82 

1 

618  84 

« 

8,880  81 

• 

788  11 

8,889  76 

' 

APPENDIX. 


49 


[C.  ] 
STATEMENT-  CoKTUinED. 


oonrmss. 


(■oretonw). 


Inten  CM  Ktvns). 


Amonnt 
Advert  ifled. 


$595  2^ 


2,980  78 
4,9T4  84 


4,S88S8 

1,895  » 

10,885  82 

2,289  97 

81,527  68 

26,747  08 

10,012  08 

10,988  88 

9,916  14 

1,988  88 

7,654  51 

12,941  61 

18,000  02 

64,192  74 

14,211  27 

21,»S96 

11,182  20 

928  97 

17,147  95 

4,605  04 

2,882  71 

17,144  41 


$607,28S79 


Paid 
Co.Treas'w 
before  sale. 


$190  11 


796  85 
1,540  04 


484  16 

197  44 

881  87 
67  29 
8,849  90 
1,765  22 
8,290  28 
8,826  06 
1,571  54 

445  09 
1,982  64 
1,805  05 
5,080  40 
28,150  07 
1,857  95 
3,609  12 
1,200  85 

466  96 
8,178  44 
1,808  50 

881  76 
8,656  29 


$114,802  61 


Amount 
Sold. 


$694  48 


1,028  90 
768  86 


762  85 
289  98 

1.896  78 
116  72 

2,644  17 

4.897  95 
8,287  84 
4,947  88 
1,115  28 
1,805  45 
1,600  65 
1,577  85 
5,797  76 
7,674  60 
1,427  76 
8,194  86 
7,620  60 

886  18 
2,247  09 
1,888  26 
1,860  44 
4,868  05 


$188,089  70 


Bids  to  the 
SUte. 


$28  11 


75  00 
2,402  41 


8,028  04 

601  15 

6,815  15 

2,090  82 

28,988  16 

18,610  87 

2,862  86 

2,847  01 

5,606  28 

129  25 

8,627  89 

8,277  78 

1,887  52 

80,468  46 

10,078  61 

8,709  08 

2,002  70 

11,885  09 

1,881  94 

111  94 

8,808  46 


$224,860  49 


Paid  or 
DiBcbg'd  at 
A.  O.  Office. 


$27  68 


879  98 

168  08 


818  94 
816  66 

1,241  57 
15  14 

1,045  40 

1,978  02 
682  10 
847  88 

1,688  09 

58  69 

408  88 

580  96 

824  84 

2,899  61 
851  95 

1,129  95 
299  05 

75  88 
887  88 

76  25 
460  57 
816  61 


$80,060  99 


50 


AUDITOR  GENERAL. 


[D.  ] 
STATEMENT 

Of  DeUnqusnt  Taxes  of  1868  ^  Betumed  to  AvdUor  Gemra 
of  Balance  due  to  and  from  the  semral  Counties,  Nov. 


COUNTIES. 


Allegan 

Alcona. 

Alpena 

Antrim 

Barry 

Bay 

Benzie 

Berrien 

Branch 

Calhoon... 

Cass 

Cheboygan  

Chippewa. 

Clinton 

Delta 

Eaton 

Emmet 

Qenesee 

Grand  Traverse. 

Gratiot 

Hillsdale 

Honghton 

Haron 

Ingham 

Ionia 

Iosco 

Isabella. 

Jackson 

Kalamazoo 

Kent 

Keweenaw 

Lapeer 


4,689 
2,04S 
1,941 
1,189 
4,885 
1,525 
8,890 
660 
5,510 
129 

17,675 
5,288 

14,515 
1,968 

•20,157 


7,223 


10,840 
5,287 

16,847 

17,682 
4,877 
1,750 

19,004 
6,S42 

11,500 


88 
61 
08 
81 
48 
25 
49 
68 
68 
87 
65 
94 
85 
18 
02 
05 
86 
98 
79 
02 
20 
17 
02 
88 
25 


Db. 
Nov.  80,  1860. 

$•28,510  2C 
1S8  7{ 


166  4 
•2.611  { 


87 


4,681 


199 
10,99S 


1,85i 

9S 

97 

•i,8« 

5,1$ 


14,0 

8 

11,4 


IS,? 


T,( 


APPEXDIX. 


51 


[D.  1 
STATEMENT— CojrrDTUED. 


IVCKTUES. 


186S. 
Tazefl  Retarn'd 

$l,5dS94 
11,480  41 

1.418  81 
3,979  48 
4,088  02 

7.419  83 
4«1  96 

6,018  75 

4,961  81 
81,487  27 

8,892  91 
06,907  88 
37,068  86 
16,688  49 

9,471  68 
17,072  66 

3,079  40 
13,6il  fi3 
18,002  68 


Dr. 

Nov.  80,  1S69. 


14,668  48 

Sl,914  86 

38,187  10 

16,742  98 

13,514  94 

1,0S7  97 

32,920  97 

6,817  50 

3,170  49 

18,820  11 


$714,520  70 


$5,168  01 
5,168  56 


7,888  43 


147  05 


6,794  88 


78  65 


887  94 
17,082  15 


9,800  86 
9,878  77 
1,528  87 


280  96 
1,540  40 
8,981  59 

198  41 


$175,411  27 


CfB. 

Nov.  80, 1869. 
$1,808  68 


2,161  74 

5,568  79 
418  08 

7,060  11 

1,667  88 
18,876  85 

1,769  48 
88,627  19 

7,111  42 

12,757  46 

10,101  64 
88,815  80 


40,874  79 
29,886  94 


89,042  48 


$822,217  68 


52  AUDITOR  GENERAL 


[E.  ] 
STATEMENT 

Of  th6  Salaries  of  the  State  Officers^  and  other  Officers  pratic 
paid  from  (General  Fwnd^  showing  the  appropriations  fo 
amount  paid  during  lastjiscal  year. 


Appro 
tloi 


Qovernor,  H.  H.  Crapoand  H.  P.  Baldwin $l,i 

Secretary  of  State,  O.  L.  Spanldlng. 

State  Treasurer,  E.  O.  GrosveDor J       1, 

Anditor  General,  Wm.  Hamphrejr 1, 

Commissioner  of  State  Land  Office,  B.  D.  Pritchard 

Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction,  O.  Hosford 

State  Librarian,  n.  A.  Tenncy 

A4)ntant  General,  John  Robertson  (balance  of  1866  salary). .. 

Q.  M.  General,  Friend  Palmer,  ($50  balance  of_1868  salary,  $S0 

erroneously  paid  out  of  Gen'l  Fund ;  corrected  by  trans.) 

Attorney  General,  W.  L,  Stoughton  and  D.  May 

Inspector  (General,  R.  A.  Alger  (for  1868) 

Officers,  Asylum  for  Insane 

Commissioner  on  Deaf,  Dumb  and  Blind  Institution 

Goyemor's  Private  Secretary,  Cobb  and  Russell 

Secretary  State  Board  of  Agriculture,  Howard 

Deputy  Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction 

Deputy  Secretary  of  State  and  regular  Clerk 

Deputy  State  Treasurer  and  Book-keeper. 

Deputy  Aud.  Gen*l,  Book-keeper  and  four  principal  Clerks. . .  I 
Deputy  Land  Commissioner  and  Book-keeper 
Clerk  to  Attorney  General 


APPENDIX. 


53 


STATEMENT 

Of  the  ExpenMi  of  the  Judieiary 

QMiMla,T.]f.Cooley 

UwtoJaitke,J.V.CarapbelL 

-      1.  P.  ChrlBtlancy 

*•      aP.Gnrefl 

'Mam^JcdgelstCircaU 

IBtoi,       *•     ad       " 

fevnadPitcUn^JiideeSdCirciiit 

£I«mnoF,  Jod^ith  Circuit 

^▼••iitf,       •*   Ctb       " 

llliirvtjr.        •»    6tli       " 

'•Ttafc,  *•   7tli       *• 

LlLtnfi,         »*   8th       *•     

l^NehBiiiaBroini,Jadge9thClren!t 

XaflKbcritad^JndcelOtliCircBit 

>0«««fa,jadg«  nth  Circuit 

■ifitiiida'Ondy.  Judge  12th  CircQit 

'•^•teiidcil,JiidgelSthCircait 

I.I.BtpklB]k       '*    lith     '^*     

^^tar^WB,        •*    15th     »'     

^C.I«jft.Kceoidcr  City  of  Detroit 

^tChi4«1ek,Beeoi4crClty  of  Port  Huron. , 

Bepctfter  Sapreme  Court 

Fact,  Bent,  AdTcrtising,  Ac 

YoU.U,17uid18 


$2,088  88 

2,C00  00 

2,600  00 

2,000  00 

1,600  00 

1,412  60 

1,600  00 

1,600  00 

1,026  00 

1,600  00 

1,600  00 

1,026  00 

1,600  00 

1,600  00 

1,600  00 

GT0  84 

1,600  00 

1,600  00 

086  00 

1,600  00 

100  00 

800  00 

2,186  90 

8,04T  24 

$88,184  80 


APPENDIX. 


55 


IH.  J 
STATEMENT 

iif  General  Fund  BeeeipU  {lu^t  enumerated  eUewhere.) 


«rit  «r  Ml^lgaB  Beports,  Vol.  5. 


•'  8. 

*•  9. 

•  10. 

'*  11. 

'•  12. 

"  16. 


$882  85 

85  00 

188  85 

60  00 

50  00 

85  72 

50  00 

180  00 

800  00 


ivAuMled  by  Gnttot  Coonty,  under  Act  29,  of  18S9. 
l«v«.  Mle  of 


Lew,  Bttle  of. 


omltaadA  depocited 

«  County  Orders  of  Giatlot  Coanty,  under  Act  29,  of  1809 
«•  OTV  dve  Spccifle  Tax— Corlles  &  Thunder  Bay  R.  W.  Co. 

Detroit  and  Milwaukee  R.  R.  Co. 
Grand  Raplda  and  Indiana    '' 
Bay  City  and  E.  Saginaw 
~        *•  ••  Flint  and  P.  Marquette 

Copper  Falls  Mining  Co 

Ogima  Mining  Co 

from  Ontonagon  County  Treasurer,  on  Tax  Sales  of  1868. 

Books  and  Documents 

•oU 


$1,666  42 

1,600  00 

625 

150  25 

406  06 

88,882  47 

1,086  87 


495  55 
96  69 

820 
800 

$48,656  66 


APPENDIX. 


57 


8TATBMBNT— Ck)KTiNrED. 

NATIONAL   BANKS. 


TITLE. 


>«BiK.nnt5atk>]iik]  Bank  of. 


f\nt  Xatlonid  Bulk  of. 


When  Dae. 


Apn  *  Oct., 

1868. 

Oct,  1867, 

*  Ap'l  * 

Oct.,  1863. 


Paid. 


$1,000  00 
1,865  00 


$2,865  00 


Unpaid. 


STATS   BANKS. 


Qty 


2d  M.  Jan. 


$900  00 


$900  00 


TKUEOKAPn   COXFAKXXS. 


TnioB. 


ttefeMdPBdle. 


March. 

41 

$76  00 

972  86 

111  61 

58 

$1,160  00 

EXFBKSS   COMPANlXfl. 


SL  Clair. 


March. 

*4 

$166  64 

690  95 

77  60 

12  10 

8T  60 

$968  88 

8 


APPENDIX. 


59 


[I.  J 
STATEMENT— Continued. 

INBURANCK   OOMPANUU. 


TITLE. 


CvMrtint  Fire.  Uartforl,  Conn 

OcaeiAl  Life,  Hartford,  Conn 

Motoal    *• 

'MttoettBlUfle;  Hartford,  Conn. 

X«w  Yofk 

Ufe.NewTork 

(«iEidM^e,Nev  York  City 

rnii—iiil  Jfatoal  Life,  Proxldence,  R.  I 

terpriM.  Clndanad,  Olilo 

ipteMtUlieAmiranoe,  New  York 

Ufr.  New  York 

Flff.        ••         

r,X«w  York 

KdecHc  Aararance  of  V.  S.,  N.  Y.. 

hihiPlit !... 

^oanfti  Life.  New  Tdk  City 

Ok  f  iD*.  Xew  York 

'SAtlitailUfe.  New  York  City 

Life.         "       ••       

MatnalLife,    -  

Ufe,CleT€land.O]iio 

EaiAti  Life  and  Annnitj.  Hartford,  Conn 

MMflK. 

BfciiiLcaliKr.  Boston 

■wrVatKa  Life,  Cincinnati,  Ohio 

XnrHatvn,  Conn. 

5«w  York  City 

life,  Brooklyn.  N.Y 

'Ve.  horUawe,  R.  I 

York 

Company  of  America,  Pbiladdpbla 

New  York  City 

*»^  fire.  New  York 


When  Dne. 


February. 


$164  11 

88  00 
9,849  79 

408  85 
698  88 
881  08 
181  49 

87  95 
1,080  08 

181  79 

8  89 

105  67 

89  97 
18  06 

150  84 
515  86 
194  98 

90  68 
60  78 

1,888  78 

185  64 

84  68 

8,114  95 

18  94 

801  46 

1,511  78 

5,468  80 

88  81 
187  76 
876  04 

8,810  74 
714  18 
886  85 


Unpaid. 


APPENDIX. 


61 


[1.1 
STATEMENT— Co]VTi!«uxi>. 

CVSURAHCX   COMPAiriBS. 


TITLE. 


Bartfovd,  Conn 

rtviitecc  Waahiagtott,  ProTidence,  R,  I 

fltMB^  Bmlbrd,  Conn 

liHtT  Pftwnger,  HartforA,  Conn 

IdUfnrv^XrvToricCItj 

ftpUk^CUc^o 

AMtKiTer,Bcloit.Wl». 

bprVOteiM. 

testy.  New  York  Cltj 

<a*r  Ufead  Annnltj.  New  York  City 

CpiNMd  Fbc  and  Xniine,  Springfield,  Mass. . 

feBteinr»,XevYorkCitj. 

^ftnTcClerelaad,  OMo 

is.Clmtead,0]ilo 

l>iliM,arTeiaBd,  Ohio 

^liiwaatFire « 

^Brin\  Hartford,  Conn 

C>*«ii8e»'  Agcocj,  K«w  York 

^vioiliatBilLife.  Angnata,  Me. 

riad  Stata  nre  and  Marine,  Baltimore,  Md... 

"ii^SateaUfe,  New  York  City 

r.lLkiBckof  Imperial  PIre,  London 

*  9. Uutk  of  <^ecn,  UTcrpool  and  London.. 
'  1  teack  of  N.  Brittah  and  Mercantile,  N.  Y. 

'raid  Ufe,  New  York  City 

*«*faftaQ  life.  New  York 

New  York  City 

'•«D»B  Fire,  New  Yoric 

taea.  BaAlo,  N.  Y 

^^wSilk,  IDinoia 

VvttlctBtlUfe,  New  York 

^••fc*"  nd  New  York  Fire,  Yonkers,  N.  Y. . . . 


When  Due. 


February. 


Paid. 


f  l,ei8  87 

90  68 

1,028  81 

116  08 
*      6066 

968  46 

2100 

85  78 

18  06 

2,487  56 

188  04 

455  60 

108  65 

256  24 
21  12 

150  58 

80  48 
660  09 

2,572  18 

C06  76 

68  86 

154  97 

100  40 

81  81 
178  06 

67  10 
94  20 

117  56 
7  10 

277  96 

257  01 
11  49 

802  48 

$77,207  04 


Unpaid. 


APPENDIX. 


G3 


II.  J 
STATEMENT— CowTiKUBiJ. 

Mnmie  coxpakibs. 


Tki 


TITLE. 


"«.  Dec.  SI. '  South  PewBbiCL 

«.  D«t  nJSBperior. 

*  Dec  11.        •*        

*  »«.  Sl.-VktorU 


When  Due. 

Paid. 

Unpaid. 

Jnly. 

1818  24 

18  65 

21  00 

8  68 

ki 

k« 

•  • 

$9,426  89 

$221  98 

II.  J 

STATEMENT— <k»MTiNpED. 
xixiHtf  ooaPAXiEB  mncH  ha\'b  tiled  reports,  a8  rbquxrxd  bt  law. 


^                 ! 

Humboldt  Copper. 

Pontiac 

dM. 

HongmrUn  Copper. 

Hesolnte. 

1^ 

Indiana. 

Rhode  Iflland. 

^cHriiM. 

Keanage. 

Seneca. 

•*HHw. 

Knickerbocker. 

Silver  Creek. 

'^pvHB^or  Copper. 

Madison. 

Shirley. 

tetth. 

Manhattan. 

Soath  Side. 

** 

Mandan. 

Star  Copper. 

•«*! 

Meadow. 

St  Lonis  Copper. 

mdhir. 

Medora. 

St.  Mary's  Copper.. 

«**iCo|ip«r. 

Meenard. 

Torch  Lake. 

NteCbpper. 

Nanmkeag. 

Tremont. 

'^Itod  Rlrer. 

New  England. 

True. 

*'^MA 

Noble  Copper. 

Union  Copper  Land. 

■_  a 

Northwestern. 

Vulcan. 

•^ww^neni. 

Ontonagon. 

Washington  Copper. 

«*««, 

Onipee. 

West  Minnesota. 

*«i^O»pper. 

Petherick. 

WInthrop. 

IA« 

PPEKDIX. 


65 


s  s  7  a  s  s 


s:     S    SS    8   S   8 


9    SS    So 


E  2  S  §  3  S  S   S    § 


S    S  '9 


A  k  S  S.  g,  I  R  S  S  g  5  S 


«  a  l:  8 

*« 

1^    S 

s 

S2 

S 

s 

s  s 

s 

s 

8 

P 

S 

S    9 

8 

M55 

S 

2  § 

3 

s 

S 

§ 

It 

00 

§. 

i 

04 

{2 

§  1  i 

g 

♦         •- 

»M      V4 

e» 

0« 

■* 

12  2? 

s 

8    8 

s 

a: 

s 

9 

s  u 

s 

8 

s 

s 

s 

S    3 

S 

1  1  S  S 

s 

S  1 

g 

S 

»i^ 

s 

i  i 

i 

s. 

»4 
*- 

s 

% 

g 

t   1 

3 

*■                      V* 

* 

▼^ 

of 

o« 

M 

TH 

00       «-i 

1  S  8   S 

8 

«  s 

s 

s 

fs 

8 

fS   ss 

9 

s 

GO 

s 

8 

»^ 

8    S 

8 

»    *-    o     •• 

2 

«^  s 

5S 

s 

s 

s 

8    S 

^4 

1 

00 

a 

1H 

§   § 

00 

t:  $  S  S 

SS 

s   a 

s 

Sd 

2 

s 

S    8 

S 

s 

8 

25 

s 

8 

s  s 

s 

M  =  § 

•— 

S   S 

§ 

9 

§ 

•- 

a  l: 

1^     1^ 

1 

■r* 

§ 

»- 

8 

S 

%  S 

9 

8S8««x   9    as    3    ;:sssa3SS9sss@ 


I  8  S   S    S    8 

i  «  H  S  s  2. 
U  ;  S  S  2 


S 


1 
1 


S    SSSS8SSS83SSS 

g.  t  i  I  I  t  I  S  £.  g  5  S  I  i 

2  f  I  3  i.  S  I  i  I  g  i  8  I  S 


iiiiii 


«    n 


S 


I  I  ^    il  I  I   ^ 

S  S  o  i  %  3  A  S 


A 


i 


I 


II 


3 


a  N 


APFBNDIZ. 


67 


tssssese  a  ;s  s 

\  \  i  M.  H  J  i  f  S  i 


5  \  \  5  H  I  a  5  §  2  g 

-  ■  c  «i  «    «*   oT    «•    W^    t-r    «r 


3 

I 


ts:S2Ssss?:sS|S 

i  n.  §  f  $  §  §  s  §  I 


^      e»     Ok 


15  2  a  T  §   9   t: 


o« 


s 

tt       »-      ao 

S    S    5 


1 1 


IS 
:5 


8  3  ;:   S    S    S 
S  S  S   S    i    i 


»«         OO         t-« 

lis 


^  ^ 


*  8    *    S    ff    S 
§  8  S   3    8    § 


00     a« 


00        w4 

0*     lO 


f  s 


!  S  s  f  8  a  s  s  pT 


Him 

1  3  y  1  ^  ^ 


M  I « I  s 

ao    aa    c*    ^    ^    ^ 


e 


8 


& 


I 


s 

2 


I 


APPENDIX. 


69 


tM.  ] 
8TATE1QCNT— {SununOEHTAi.  to  Statkxxmt   L.) 

Any  ike  Bdceiptt  to  the  Truit  Fand»  for  the  year  ending  June  SO, 
XIE9,  QMd  ike  amount  tranrferred  to  the  Two  MQUon  Loan  Sinking 
had. 


1 

\m.      Mouth. 

NonnAl  SchooL 

UnlTcrtity. 

PrimAry. 

AmH  Trans,  to 
2,000,000  Lotn 
Sinking  Fnnd. 

m.  Jilj 

$11,649  85 

9,008  06 

11,578  98 

10,996  16 

12,158  52 

9,176  80 

6,484  60 

7,545  15 

29,982  07 

6,285  15 

8,666  89 

8,761  84 

$62  20 

SeptcBber.. 

$40  00 

41  90 

441  00 

1,850  40 

860  00 

1,827  18 

738  80 

1,647  64 

90  00 

760  82 

•Sflvmbcr... 

210  00 
810  00 

'j&nuj 

A»«fl 

»»y~ 

897  86 
180  00 
247  88 

$1,856  28 

$6,719  89 

$172,168  80 

*  $180,744  42 

toSCatemcnt  "L.' 


A.PKBKDIX. 


71 


[O.  ] 
ST ATEM£NT— ( BunuDiuiTAL  to   STATUcnffT  N.) 

Ae  atUfomnt  cf  Interui  accruing  on  the  Bonded  State  Debt  to  be  paid 
mt  cf  AppropriaUtMu  under  Acta  125^  1867^  and  7$,  1869;  the  amount 
4  mid  Appfvpriatione,  the  paymemU  to  which  they  were  appUed^  and  the 
«eftu:4,  under  eaid  law$^  uxte  trantferred  to  War  Loan  Sinking 


«r  ai]fn>]»totfoii  of  IBdT  for  1868  Interest.. 
of  186B  for  18<9  interwL 


Total  of  a|i|vopriAtioiit  for  intereet  CilUng  due  in  1860. 

:  «■  War  LottB,  Janii«7,  IM. 

Jnly,  IM? 

-  Two  Million  Loaa^Janiury,  1860 

-  -  "     July,  1860 

-  WarBonntr     "     May,  1860 

"     Norember,  1860 

Loan,  Janvary,  1860 

•*      Jaly,1860 


itonntarettfUUng  doe  in  1860 

of  Spodic  Tax  applieable  to  paymH  of  Int.. 


It  «f  latenat  to  be  paid  fh>m  appropriations. 


of  ^propriatlona  to  War  Loan  Sinking  Fund. 


$87,803  60 
80,637  90 
02,140  00 
60370  00 
16,205  00 
16,200  00 
6,000  00 
0,850  00 


$210,810  40 
108,674  87 


$121,460  00 
160,000  00 


$281,460  00 


106,786  08 


^174,728  07 


GcaaaI*B  Boport  for  1868,  p.  SI. 
It  **P." 
:Qmlad  to  Statement  *'  N.*' 


ANNUAL    REPORT 


STATE  TREASUKEE 


STATE  OF    MICHIGAN, 


Fon.  x'lix:  Yi^A-it  i»oo. 


BT    ACTHOBITT. 


LANSING: 
W.  S.  GEORGE  A  CO.,  PRINTERS  TO  THE  STATE. 


ANNUAL    REPORT 


STATE  TEEASUKEE 


STATE  OF    MICHIGAN, 


■^"OR  Tun  v3'::a.r  i  hoo. 


BT    ADTUOBITT. 


LANSING: 
■-  OEOROE  A  CO.,  PRINTERS  TO  THE  STATE, 
1869. 


REPORT 


STATE  OP  MICHIGAN, 

STATE  TREASURER'S  OFFICE, 

Lansing,  Nov.  30th,  1869. 

To  His  Excellency  Henry  P.  Baldwin, 

Oovernor  of  the  State  of  Michigan : 

Sm — As  required  by  law,  I  herewith  submit  the  Annual 
Report  of  this  Department  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  this  day. 
The  balance   of  cash   in  the  treasury  Nov.  30, 

1868,  was $1,130,229  67 

The  receipts  during  the  fiscal  year  were 2,116,684  07 


$3,246,813  74 
The  disbriiBements  during  the  year  amount  to..  2,412,724  02 

l^eairin^  a  balance  in  tlie  treasury  of. $834,089  72 

The  demands  u])on  the  treasury  maturing  on  or  before  Jan- 
ry  1st,  1870,  are  as  follows: 

of  War  Loan  Bonds,  drawn  Oct  1, 1869 $651,500  00 

"      due  Jan.  1,  &  July  1,  '69  45,000  00 

Interest,  due  Jan.  1, 1870 77,652  50 

dne  interest  coupons  not  presented 12,310  25 

CoTTHit  State  expenses 30,000  00 

Balance  of  appropriations  for  1869 50,407  32 

$766,870  07 

la  eompliance  with  the  provisions  of  Joint  Resolution  No.  7, 
afiproTed  March  6,  1869,  it  was  determined  on  the  25th  of 


4  ANNUAL  BEPOBT  OF  THE 

March,  to  purchase  State  Bonds  to  the  amoont  of 
Not  being  able  to  secure  any  considerable  amount  c 
maturing  six  per  cent.  Bonds  of  the  State^  the  amo 
of  War  Loan  Bonds  was  drawn  on  April  Ist,  for  pay 
1st,  1869,  and  on  the  25th  of  September  following, 
cided  to  retire  the  balance  of  the  War  Loan  Bonds,  i 
to  $590,500.  In  pursuance  of  this  decision,  the  £ 
drawn  on  October  Ist,  for  payment  January  1st,  187 
Bonds  drawn  for  payment  July  1st,  there  are  still  oi 
$41,000,  which  have  not  been  presented  for  paymen 
Bonds  last  drawn,  $39,000  have  been  presented 
together  with  the  accrued  interest 

The  Specific. Tax  due  from  the  First  Nationa 
Owosso,  amounting  to  five  hundred  dollars,  which 
collected  by  the  Sheriff  of  Shiawassee  county,  on 
issued  by  the  Auditor  General,  was  refunded  to  said 
Supreme  Court  having  decided  the  law  levying  the 
122,  Laws  of  1867)  to  be  unconstitutional.  Prior 
cision  there  had  been  paid  into  the  treasury  $3,265  1 
Banks,  leaving,  after  the  payment  above  mentionec 
of  $2,765,  as  the  amount  of  Specific  Tax  receive( 
National  Banks  during  the  fiscal  year. 

The  claim  of  the  State  against  the  Phoenix  Bs 
York  has  been  adjusted  by  the  payment  in  Septem 
000,  making,  with  the  payment  of  $28,772  04  in  th 
a  total  of  $38,774  02.  The  amount  of  the  allow; 
Bank  by  the  Board  of  State  Auditors  in  Decembe 
$35,603  74. 

The  amount  of  the  last  outstanding  Patriotic  I 
cate,  issued  in  the  Spring  of  1861',  was  paid  in  De 
the  original  certificate  having  been  lost  by  its  hold 
satisfactory  proof  was  furnished,  and  a  bond  filed,  i 
State  against  its  future  presentation  for  payment. 

Swamp  Land  Warrants  have  been  issued  on  e 
proved  since  the  spring  of  1867,  and  still  iinloi 


STATE  TREA8LREK. 


5 


affloont  of  t293,492  13.    The  amount  of  Swamp  Land  War- 
nnts  issued  daring  the  fiscal  year  is  $538,000  42. 

Mimicipal  Bonds,  issued  under  the  general  railroad  law,  (Act 
So.  45,  Laws  of  1869,)  haye  been  deposited  for  the  benefit  of 
tbe  following  named  companies : 

Micliipui  Air  Line  Railroad  Company $515,000  00 

li&ang,  St.  Johns  and  Mackinac  Bailroad  Co..      161,803  90 


Detroit.  Hillsdale  and  Indiana 

Kilaoiazoo  and  South  Haven 

ClicigD  and  Michigan  Lake  Shore 

JttkmiUe,  Marshall  and  Grand  River 

Qkkut  and  Lake  Michigan 

Hotel]  and  Lansing 

hniosalar 

Fort  Wayne,  Jackson  and  Saginaw 

Port  Huon  and  Lake  Michigan 

ADegui  and  Holland 

lania  and  Lansing 


i.' 


4. 


136,000  00 

.      124,300  00 

115,800  00 

109,700  00 

84,000  00 

57,200  00 

50,000  00 

48,600  00 

42,000  00 

31,000  00 

20,000  00 

$1,495,303  90 


The  following  named  companies  having  complied  with  the 
i»  ind  the  conditions  imposed  by  the  municipalities  voting 
'ht  lid,  on  presentation  of  the  certificate  required  by  law  to 
*b»t  effect,  received  their  bonds,  as  follows : 
P'fft Huron  and  Lake  Michigan  Railroad  Co... 
?»iiin5nlar  *' 

^ilunazoo  and  South  Haven  *'     _  _ . 

^<tt  Wayne,  Jackson  and  Saginaw  *•     ... 


$42,000  00 
50,000  00 
26,000  00 
48,500  00 


$166,500  00 


Aa  by  the  operation  of  Joint  Resolution  No.  7,  Laws  of 
■^^,  in  connection  with  Acts  134  of  1863,  and  309  of  1865, 
>  Sinking  Funds  of  the  State  are  practically  consolidated, 
^  following  resume  is  given,  showing  all  ti-ansactions  relating 
•"  tbtin  gince  their  origin  : 


6  ANNUAL  REPORT  OP  THE 

CREDITS. 

1-16  mill  tax,  1862  to  1866,  $10,753  49, 5  years. .     $S 
"  "        1867  to  1869,  $19,247  87,  3    "    . .       5 

i  "        1863  to  1866,  $21,506  98, 4    "     ..       i 

1867  to  1869,  $38,495  73,  3    "    . .     11 

Surplus  of  taxes  levied  for  interest  on  War  and 
War  Bounty  Loans 2( 

Surplus  of  taxes  levied  for  interest  on  Two  Mil- 
lion Loan 

Discount  on  Two  Million  Loan  Bonds  purchased 
"         "  Renewal  *  "  " 

Trust  Funds  received  from  Feb.  1,  1863,  to  July 
1,1869 1,0 

War  expenses  refunded  by  the  United  States- . .      1 

Surplus  from  Specific  Taxes  for  1865, 1866, 1867 
and  1868 4 

Surplus  of  taxes  levied  for  interest  for  1869 1 

$2^ 

DEBITS. 

War  Loan  Bonds  drawn  for  Sinking  Funds $( 

"       "         "       purchased  for        "  

Temporary  Loan  Bonds  retired 

War  Bounty  Bonds  purchased  for  Sinking  Funds      ' 

Two  Million  Loan  Bonds  retired 

"  "  "       purchased 

Renewal  "  *'  "        

$1, 

Leaving  a  balance  in  the  Sinking  Funds,  after  pr 
the  interest  falling  due  January  1st,  1870,  of  $; 
The  receipts  into  the  fund  during  the  ensuing  fisca 
the  Trust  Funds,  surplus  of  Specific  Taxes  and  ta: 
interest,  and  the  i  mill  tax,  it  is  estimated,  will  noi 
$250,000.  The  amount  chargeable  to  the  fund  J 
1870,  (balance  of  War  Bonds  drawn,)  is  $551,500, 


STATE  TREASUBEB.  7 


pill  feBBining,  $93,803  58,  can  be  used  iu  the  purchase  of 
Tvo  XiSioii  liOan  or  Renewal  Loan  Bonds. 

STATE   DEBT. 

He  Bonded  interest-bearing  debt  of  the  State  is  as  follows : 

telt  Canal  Bonds,  6's,  due  July  1, 1879 184,000  00 

loKval  Loan  Bonds,  6%  due  July  1, 1878 192,000  00 

Tvo  Million  Loan  Bonds,  6's,  due  Jan.  1, 1873. .  469,000  00 

6's,        "        1,1878..  450,000  00 

6'8,        ''       1,1883..  750,000  00 

fir  Loan  Bonds,  T^s,  due  Jan.  1,  1870 561,500  00 

Wit  Bounty  Loan  Bonds,  7*8,  due  May  1, 1890. .  463,000  00 

Total 12,959,500  00 

Non-Interest  Bearing  Bonds. 

idjuted  Bonds,  dne  Jan.  1st,  1863, 
aot  imsented  for  payment $3,000  00 

hll-Faid  Five  Million  Loan  Bonds, 
doe  Jan.  Ist,  1863,  not  presented  for 
pajment 3,000  00 

fir  Loan  Bond,  drawn  Oct  Ist,  1862, 
Ibr  redemption  Jan.  1st,  1863,  not 
poented  for  payment 50  00 

fir  Loan  Bond,  drawn  Oct  1st,  1863, 
br  redemption  Jan.  1st,  1864,  not 
pRaented  for  payment 50  00 

fir  Loan  Bonds,  drawn  Oct  Ist^  1868, 
br  redemption  Jan.  1st,  1869,  not 
preamted  for  payment 4,000  00 

fv  Loan  Bonds,  drawn  April  1st, 
1869,  for  redemption  July  Ist,  1869, 
Bot  presented  for  payment 41,000  00 

UlSM  unrecognized   Fiye    Million 

Loan  Bonds,  adjustable  at 32,978  49 

84,078  49 

Total  bonded  debt $3,043,578  49 


8  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

The  Trust  Fund  debt  of  the  State  is  composed  o 
lowing  Funds  and  amounts : 

Primary  School  Fund _ $1,6 

Five  ^  cent.  Primary  School  Fund..^ 2 

University  Fund 3 

Normal  School  Fund _ 

Railroad  and  Lighthouse  Deposits 

$2,1 

The  following  tables  will  show  the  details  of  re^ 
expenditures  for  the  fiscal  year : 

RECEIPTS. 

Fees  for  statements  or  tax  histories. .     $1,531  08 

State  tax  deeds 403  84 

State  bids  and  tax  lands  sold 39,669  02 

Redemptions 39,786  53 

Delinquent   taxes 184,663  24 

Primary  School  Principal $115,279  98 

'^           *•       Interest 56,515  63 

Swamp  Land  Principal 588,747  10 

"          "       Interest 4,980  04 

University  Principal 7,817  32 

Interest 10,219  03 

Normal  School  Principal-- 1,575  23 

"            "        Interest 1,864  78 

x\gricultural  College  Principal 11,865  GO 

"                 '"         Intei-est 58  96 

Asylum  Principal 1,118  91 

"       Interest 1,706  87 

Stat<5  Building  Principal 495  60 

"            *'       Interest 498  02 

Salt  Spiing  Principal 732  61 

"        "        Interest 1,155  06 

Internal  Improvement  Lands 699  63 


STATE  TBBASUREB.  9 

Tmm  on  jiart-jiaid  lands $10,330  54 

Feo,  pbts,  &c^  from  Commissioner 

SteteLand  Office 1,038  81 

Farftited  Primary  School  land  bids.  1,246  35 
Farfeited  Primary  School   land  in- 

terest 2  52 

Foifeited  Siramp  Land  bid 60  00 

State  Building  bid 50  00 

$818  072  70 

Fnan  Coanties,  State  Tax  1868 $373,345  75 

Tax   sales 170,465  45 

General  account 07,045  30 

Taxes    and   redemp- 
tions  31,656  83 

— 672,613  33 

>pedfic  Taxes:  Bailroads $176,487  70 

Insurance  companies  77,207  04 

Mining            "  0,426  80 

Banks 3,265  00 

Telegraph  companies  1,160  00 

Express  '•  083  88 

268,530  51 

^hSte  Marie  Canal,  Tolls.. $12,306  50 

''  discount  on 

N)D<b  purchased 43  00 

12,430  50 

isefwt  on  State  deposits 38,382  47 

Vw  Bounty  Bonds  sold - 15,000  00 

ftwiii  Bank,  N.  Y.,  claim  adjusted _ .  10,000  00 

^'imp  Land  Road  Commissioner,  trespass,  &v .  4,004  40 

^^•Mien'  Belief  Fund,  returned  by  H.  H.  Crapo.  2,000  00 

'UaofMichigan  Reports 1,566  42 

^^'^"tiot  County  orders  of  1850,  (Act  20,  Laws  of 

189,)  ....' 1,500  00 

•«««  on  the  same 1,036  87 

ft*wint  on  Two  Million  Loan  Bonds  purchased  1,280  41 

'•    Renewal                *'                   "  100  00 
2 


10  ANNUAL  REPORT  OP  THE 

Interest  on  past  due  Specific  Taxes 

Peddlers'  licenses 

Fees  from  Secretary  of  State's  OflSce 

Interest  on  mortgage,  escheated  lands  sold  W. 
Crane 

Lansing  lot  sold  to  T.  Ford,  north  f ,  Joint  Reso- 
lution No.  8, 1869 

Rents,  house  on  Capital  square,  and  public  squares 

Fees  on  Railroad  Aid  Bonds  delivered 

Compiled  Laws  sold - 

Grass  on  Capital  and  State  OfRce  squares 

War  Coupon  paid  in  error,  refunded 

Redemptions        "        "  "        

County  Treasurer  overpaid  for  sales,  refunded. . 

Books  sold  by  State  Librarian 

Old  stove  in  Auditor's  office  sold 

I 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Sault  Ste  Marie  Canal  Bonds $2,000  00 

Renewal  Loan  Bonds 8,000  00 

Two  Million  Loan  Bonds  due  in  1868      3,000  00 

1873    28,000  00 
"    1878    44,000  00 
Warljoan  Bonds 485,500  00 

Sault  Ste  Marie  Canal  Coupons $5,190  00 

Renewal  Loan                   "        11,910  00 

Two  Million  Loan             **        102,825  00 

War                   '                "        70,030  83 

War  Bounty     **                *'        35,106  00 

Counties — 

Taxes  collected $118,268  44 

Primary  School  apportionment...  165,651   2"] 


it  u 


STATE  TREASURER.  11 

\  Bming  tax    Upper    Peninsala, 

1^68  and  1869 $7,308  88 

Diitribation  of  canal  tolls.  Joint 

Bewlution  No.  2,  1863 5,973  28 

1297,201  87 

Jiilmtt 101,932  16 

ladonptionfl  refanded 69,599  89 

UnherBtTof  Michigan 76,597  02 

itateXonnal  School 18,500  00 

ifpiyrutions — 

Bc&fm  School $56,025  63 

ipicultoral  College 46,000  00 

Aivlnmfor  Insane 63,400  00 

iniiim  for  Deaf,  Dumb  and  Blind    81,500  00 

^itePriaon 2,000  00 

:»late  Libmry 350  00 

bmigration  Commission,  Act  112, 

Uw8  of  1869 5,000  00 

MapcMl  survey.  Act  65, 1869  . .      8,000  00 

Aifietam  National  Cemetery,  Con. 

Bea  Xo.  1,  1869 3,045  80 

264,321  33 

(lurter  Master  General,  for  bounties  $19,600  00 

kttrta  Master  General,  for  military 

opeoses 6,000  00 

25,500  00 

Ufioi' Home,  Aid  and  Belief 5,843  37 

h;  and  expenses  of  Jjegislatore,  1869 54,473  99 

ilbwukces  of  Board  of  State  Andi- 

tm—Printing  and  Binding 54,572  24 

iSsvanoes  of  Board  of  State  Andi- 

K(R»-Paper  and  Stationery 37,488  61 

Ahvaaces  of  Board  of  State  Andi- 

UffK-Miaoellaneons  General  Fund    16,909  91 

108,970  76 

bpenses  of  Swamp  Land  State  Boad  Office 3,014  19 

**    Supreme  aud  Circuit  Courts 2,045  90 


12  ANNUAL  BEPOBT  OP  THK 

Coroners'  Fees 

Teachers'  Institutes _ 

Salt  Bonn ty..- 

Indexing  Laws  and  Journals,  Con.  Res.  No.  6, 1860 

Advertising  Tax  Sales _ 

County  Treasurers,  for  conducting  tax  sales 

Miscellaneous  expenses  of  sales,  Notary  fees,  &c. . 

Ijocating  Agricultural  College  Lands 

Publishing  Michigan  Reports 

Constitution  of  1867,  J.  R  3,  1860. . 

Exjxjnses  Sault  Ste  Marie  Ship  Canal 

Trustees  of  Asylums 

Inspectors  of  State  Prison 

Insurance  of  State  Library 

Wolf  Bounties 

Reporting  for  Supreme  Court,  J.  R.  No.  23,  1869 
Costs  of  Suits,  (National  Bank,  Owosso,  St.  Marie 

Can  al,  &c.) 

PrimaiT  School  Principal  refunded 

*'            "        Interest  refunded,  and  expenses 
Swamp  Land  Warrants 

*•  *•       Principal  refunded,  and  expenses. 

**      Interest  *'  ** 

University  Principal  refunded 

*'  Interest  refunded,  and  expenses 

Normal  School  Intei-est  refunded,  and  expenses. . 
Salt  Spring 
Asylum  Fund 
State  Building 

Land  Office  bids  refunded ., 

Specific  Tax,  First  Nat  Bank,  Owosso,  refunded 
Michigan  Central  Railroad  Deposit  " 

Over-payment  on  tax  sales  *• 

Tax  Statements  *• 


«*  «.  t» 

i»  .»  t* 

(.'  i.  k* 


STATE  TBEA8UBER.  13 

htnest  OQ  Patriotic  Lioan  Certificate $        9  40 

-  Bank  Specific  Tax  refunded 22  90 

f tt  Bonaty  Bonds  retired  from  Sinking  Fund. .  15,000  00 


$2,412,724  02 


Very  respectfully, 

E.  0.  GEOSVENOE, 
StcUe  Treasurer. 


14  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


Treasurer  of  the  State  of  Michigan,  in  account  m 

of  Michigan. 


DEBIT. 

1869. 

Not.  30. 

To  balance, 

Nov.  30, 

1868 1 

receipts 

on  ace 

'tof  General  Fund.. 

<( 

t( 

Prim.  Schn  Fund 

tc 

it 

a        it  Int.  « 

ii 

it 

Swamp  Land  " 

u 

it 

it       it  Int. '. 

« 

a 

Uniyersity       " 

(( 

it 

"          Int.  " 

u 

it 

Normal  Sch'l  " 

u 

it 

it        ti  Int. « 

(( 

it 

Asylum           " 

(( 

it 

State  buildi'g  " 

u 

ti 

Agriculta  Col. " 

u 

ti 

"         Int " 

a 

a 

Internal  Imp.  " 

it 

(( 

War                  " 

a 

a 

Sault  Ste  Mari. 

Canal  Fund 

To  rec'ts  on  acc't  of  Two  Million  Loa 
Sinking  Fund 

To  rec'ts  on  acc't  of  Sold'rs  Relief  Fun 
"      "        «  Specific  Taxes 

"      "        ''  Prim.  SchT  Deposi 

it      ti        it  it      Int.    « 

"      "        "  Swamp  Land     *• 

State  Building 


tc  t.  n  Q4-04-A  Tlii{1/i;«<k#v    ii 


STATE  TBEABUBEB.  15 


4.  <* 

it  <• 


T^fonrer  of  the  State  of  Michigan^  in  account  with  the  State 

of  Michigan. 

CBEDIT. 

1M9. 

Sw.  30.  By  war'ts  p'd  on  acc't  of  General  Fund  $722,886  38 

"          Prini.SchT     "  520  00 

"                  «    Int.  "  166,688  46 

Swamp  L'd    "  546,567  63 

u                    "  Inh  ''  179  44 

University     "  254  75 

"       Int.  "  38,735  58 

Nor.  Sch.  ''   '*  16,015  00 

Asylum          "  144,963  65 

State  Build'g"  5  50 

.  War               "  124,645  23 

"           «  Un  Sink.  *'  479,500  00 

"  "  Two  Mil.  Loan 

Sinking  Fund 104,000  00 

By  war'tfl  p'd  on  acc't  of  Sault  Ste  Mario 

Canal  Fund 10,418  78 

By  war*t«  paid  on  acc't  of  Militar}'  Fund  8,316  65 

«             "           «             Sold's  Home  **  2,500  00 

"             Sold's  Relief "  1,343  37 
'^             Mich.  Central 

Railroad  Deposit* 87  50 

By  war'ts  p'd  on  acc't  of  Specific  Taxes  4,713  47 
*•            "           "            University  Aid 

Fund 38,197  02 

By  war'ts  p'd  on  acc't  of  Sold's  Aid  Fund  2,000  00 

"             Prim.  Sch'l  Dep.  185  00 

"  Int.    "  81 

-    balance 834,089  72 

$3,246,813  74 


16  AXXUAL  REPOKT  OF  THE 


Ledger  Balance-8. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.30.  Cash t 

Internal  Improvement  Fund 2, 

War  Loan  Sinking  Fund 

Two  Million  Loan  Sinking  Fund 

Suspense  Account 


4 

STATE  TREASURER.  17 


Ledger  Balances. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

Sof.  30.  General   Fund tlfiQl^iSe  98 

Primary  School  Fund 1,608,190  26 

**            -        Interest  Fund 90,187  02 

Five  per  cent.  Fund..  210,011  07 

Svamp  Ijand  Fund 139,641  98 

**      Interest  Fund 110,068  62 

rnirersitv  Fund 313,625  13 

''          Interest  Fund 742  26 

Xormal  School  Fund 46,037  18 

Interest  Fund 13,041  37 

AaylnmFund 109,839  92 

State  Building  Fund :....  27,660  73 

War  Fund 12,624  21 

Sault  Ste  Marie  Canal  Fund 29,406  79 

Treasury  Notes 730  00 

Michigan  Central  Railroad  Deposits...  1,869  62 

Michigan  Southern      "           "        ...  146  72 

St  Joseph  Valley         "            "        ...  65  00 

Oakland  &  Ottawa        "           "        ...  8  68 

Lighthouse                                '*        ...  16  00 

Agricultural  College  Fund 14,166  00 

"      Interest  Fund 68  96 

UniTersity  Aid  Fund 7,699  68 

Primary  School  Deposits 1,061  26 

"           "      Interest  Deposits 1  71 

Swamp  Land  Deposits 60  00 

State  Building      "       60  00 

13,833,913  84 
3 


18  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 


General  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Not.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year —    \ 
"  am't  trans,  to  Intem'l  Improvem't  F'd 


a      i< 

UniYersity  Aid 

((      a 

Military 

u      a 

War  Loan  Sinking 

i(      a 

TwoMiLL'n    " 

((      if 

Normal  Sch'l  Int. 

iC        it 

Asylum  Fund 

.  -  - 

"  balance  __ 

..  ] 

ts 

Primary  School  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year t 

**  balance 

I 


STATE  TREASURER.  19 


General  Frmd, 

CREDIT. 

5foT.30,  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $1,605,671  55 

*"    caah  received  during  fiscal  year 1,005,956  60 

**    am't  trans,  from  Contingent  Fund. .  392  35 

"         Canal              «     ..  6,605  15 

Military          "     ..  50  00 

Specific  Taxes 13,837  39 


<4 

ti  it 

U  4( 


$2,631,513  04 


Primary  School  Fund, 

CREDIT. 

X<rr.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 $1,493,243  80 

"    cash  received  during  fiscal  year 115,466  46 


$1,608,710  26 


20  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF   THB 


Primary  School  Interest  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  dnring  fiscal  year. . 
"  balance  --.. 


Five  ^  Cent.  Primary  School  Fund 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov,  30.  To  balance 


Swamp  Land  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  land  war'ts  paid  during  fiscal  year. . 
"  cash      "        "    refunding,  and  ex- 
penses   

To  cash  warrants,  salaries  and  expense; 

of  Swamp  Land  State  Bead  Office 

To  am't  trans,  to  5  ^  ct  Prim.  Sch'l  Fc 
"  balance 


STATE  TREASUBER.  21 


Primary  School  Interest  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1969. 

Sot.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 $81,257  38 

•*   cafih  received  daring  fiscal  year 56,965  63 

"    am't  transferred  from  Specific  Taxes  118,652  47 


$256,875  48 


Five  ^  Cent  Primary  School  Fund. 

CREDIT. 
18e9. 

5&T.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 $185,600  00 

^   am't  trans,  from  Swamp  Land  Fund  •     24,411  07 


$210,011  07 


Swamp  Land  Fund, 

CREDIT. 

vm. 

Sw.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 $116,969  08 

"    cash  received  during  fiscal  year 593,651  50 


$710,6^0  58 


22  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


Swamp  Land  Interest  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year $ 

"  balance 1 

$1 


University  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year. . .     I 
"  balance l 


$^ 


University  Interest  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year 

"  balance 


Xormal  School  Fund. 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance 


STATE  TRSASUBER.  23 


Swamp  Land  Interest  Fund. 

CBBDIT. 

1869. 

Sot.  3a  By  balance  Nor.  30, 1868 - .    $105,249  02 

"  cash  receiyed  during  fiscal  year 4,989  04 


9110,238  06 
University  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

SoT.aa  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $305,962  66 

cash  received  during  fiscal  year 7,817  32 


u 


$313,779  88 


University  Interest  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1^69. 

Wv.30.  Bv  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 $      614  33 

**  cash  received  during  fiscal  year 10,219  03 

•*  am't  transferred  from  Specific  Taxes  28,644  48 


$39,477  84 


Normal  School  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

XcT.ao.  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $44,461  95 

**    cash  received  daring  fiscal  year 1,576  23 

$46,037  18 


24  ANNUAL  BEPORT  OF  THE 


Normal  School  Interest  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year { 

"  balance 


Asylum  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year ( 

"  balance 


State  Building  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year 

"  balance 


STATE  TBEASUBEB.  25 


Xormal  School  Interest  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

IS69. 

XoT.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $14,459  29 

"  cash  received  during  fiscal  year 1,864  78 

*'  am't  transferred  from  General  Fund  10,000  00 

Specific  Taxes  2,732  30 


u  «  a 


$29,056  37 


Asylum  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

Jot.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $82,477  69 

"  cash  received  during  fiscal  year 2,825  78 

"  am't  transferred  from  General  Fund  131,361  62 

"    **            «             «     Militarv     "  38,138  38 


$254,803  47 


Stale  Building  Fund, 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

.^OT.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $26,672  71 

cash  received  during  fiscal  year 993  52 

$27,666  23 


u 


26  AKNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


Agricultural  College  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.30.  Tobalance t: 


I 


Agricultural  College  Interest  Fund. 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Nov.30.  To  balance 


War  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year 
"  balance 


STATE  TKEASUBER.  27 


Agricultural  College  Fund, 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

X«?.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 $2,300  00 

*'  cash  received  daring  fiscal  year 11,865  00 


114,165  00 


Agricultural  College  Interest  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

im. 

5oT.  30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year $58  96 


$58  96 


War  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

Sot.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $21,201  54 

**  cash  received  during  fiscal  year 15,017  50 

*'  am't  transferred  from  Specific  Taxes  100,950  40 

$137,169  44 


28  ANNUAL  REPORT  OP  THE 


Internal  Improvement  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 $2,4J 


12,4: 


War  Loan  Sinking  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  balance  Nov.  30, 1 868 *4 

"   warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year 4 


ti 


Two  Million  Loan  Sinking  Ftmd. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 

'^  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year 


STATE  TREASUBER.  29 


Internal  Improvement  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

XoT.30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year t        699  63 

*•  am't  transferred  from  General  Fund  300  00 

-  balance 2,430,713  91 


$2,431,713  54 


War  Loan  Sinking  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 
IfoT.  30.  By  am't  transferred  from  General  Fund   $560,101  48 
^  balance 379,787  17 


$939,888  65 


7\eo  Million  Loan  Sinking  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

^OT.  30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year $  1,289  41 

*^  am't  transferred  from  General  Fund  39,155  73 

*•  balance 156,321  73 

$196,766  87 


30  ANKUAL  REPOR'B  OF  THE 


Ste  Marie  Sliip  Canal  Fund. 

DEBIT. 
1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year I 

"  amount  transferred  to  General  Fund 
"  balance  .  - 


Military  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Not.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year 

"  amount  transferred  to  General  Fund 

"  Sold'sAid  " 

"        "  "  Asylum      " 


Soldiers^  Hanie  Fund.  ' 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year. . . 
"  am't  transferred  to  Military  Fund 


STATE  TREASURER, 


31 


Sfe  Marie  Ship  Canal  Fund. 

CREDIT. 


1860. 


XoT.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 

^    cash  received  during  fiscal  year 


t33,990  22 
12,439  50 


$46,429  72 


Military  Ftmd. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 

5ot.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 

^  am't  trans,  from  Sold'rs  Home  Fund 

"     Sold'rs  Relief 
**     General 


ii  U 


U 


ii 


« 


ii 


•7,674  25 
7,500  00 
8,656  53 

24,674  25 


•48,505  03 


Soldiers'  Home  Fund. 


CREDIT. 


1M9. 

.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 


•10,000  00 


•10,000  00 


32  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THB 


Soldiers*  Relief  Futid. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Not.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year. . . 
"  am't  transferred  to  Military  Fund 


Contingent  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  am't  transferred  to  General  Fund, 


Suspense  Account. 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 


Treasury  Notes. 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance 


8TATE  TREASUBEB.  33 


Soldiers'  Selief  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1889. 

Xot.30.  By  balance  Not.  30, 1868 $7,000  00 

"  cash  receiyed  during  fiscal  year 2,999  90 


$9,999  90 


Contingent  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 
XoT.30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 $392  35 


$392  35 


Suspense  Account. 

CREDIT. 

Id69. 
S«T.30.  By  balance $33,001  31 


$33,001  31 


Treasury  Azotes, 

CREDIT. 

U69. 
5«r.30.  By  balance  KoT.  30, 1868 $730  00 

•730  00 


34  ANNUAL  HEPOBT  OF  THE 


Michigan  Cefitral  Railroad  Deposits. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Nov.  30.  To  warrant  paid  during  fiscal  year 

**  balan  ce 


Michigan  Southei^n  Railroad  Deposits. 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance 


St  Joseph  Valley  Railroad  Deposits. 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance 


Oakland  atid  Ottawa  Railroad  Deposi 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance 


STATE  TREASUBER.  35 


Michigan  Central  Railroad  DepoMs. 

CREDIT. 
1809. 

XoT.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 11,947  02 

•1,947  02 


Michigan  Southern  Railroad  Deposits. 

CREDIT. 

im. 

SoT.30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 1146  72 

1146  72 


Si»  Joseph  Valley  Railroad  Deposits. 

CREDIT. 

18e9. 
*OT.30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 155  00 

155  00 


Oakland  and  Ottawa  Railroad  Deposits. 

CREDIT. 

Sw.30.  By  balance  Nov.  30, 1868 W  68 

•8  58 


36  AKN^UAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


Lighthouse  Deposit 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Not.  30.  To  balance 


Specific  Taxes. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Not.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year t 

"  am't  trans,  to  University  Interest  Fund 
«     "        «         Prim.  ScVl      «  "      1 

"     "        "        Normal  Sch'l  " 

u     «        «         War  Fund 1 

«     "       "         General  Fund 


University  Aid  Fund. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year, 
"  balance 


STATE  TREASUBEB. 


37 


Lighthouse  Deposit. 

CBEDIT. 

1969. 
Sov.  30.  By  balance  Nov.  30,  1868 tlS  00 

115  00 


Specific  Taxes. 

CBEDIT. 


186d. 


IToT.  30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year 1268,530  51 


1268,530  51 


University  Aid  Fund. 

CBEDIT. 


1869. 


Sov.30.  By  amount  transferred  ft'om  General  Fund  $45,796  60 


145,796  60 


38  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


Soldiers^  Aid  Fund, 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  warrant  paid  during  fiscal  year. 


Pritnary  School  Deposits. 

i 

DEBIT. 
1869. 

Not.  30.  To  warrants  paid  during  fiscal  year, 
"  balance — 


Priinary  School  Interest  Deposits. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 

Not.  30.  To  warrant  paid  during  fiscal  year 

"  balance 


Swamp  Land  Deposits. 

DEBIT. 


1869. 
Not.  30.  To  balance. 


STATE  TREASUBER.  39 


Soldiers'  Aid  Fund. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 
Not.  30.  By  am't  transferred  from  Military  Fund.    $2,000  00 


$2,000  00 


Primary  School  Deposits, 

CREDIT. 

ld€9. 
Sot.  30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year $1,246  25 


$1,246  25 


Primary  School  Interest  Deposits. 

CREDIT. 

1869. 
5cT.30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year $2  52 


$2  52 


Swamp  Land  Deposits. 

CREDIT. 

1S69. 
5n.30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year $60  00 

$60  00 


40  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


State  Building  Deposits. 

DEBIT. 

1869. 
Nov.  30.  To  balance 


STATE  TREASURER,  41 


State  Building  Deposits. 

CREDIT. 

-VoT.  30.  By  cash  received  during  fiscal  year $50  00 

$50  00 


BANK    STATEMENTS. 


STATEMENT  showing  the  condition  of  the  Jackson  City 
Bank,  ai  the  close  of  busifiess  AourSy  November  30,  1869,  as 
rt^ired  by  the  Banking  Law  of  the  State  of  Michigan : 

RESOURCES. 

Tcifeed  States  Bonds  .  - - $        350  00 

low  and  Dificonnts 295,703  68 

Wring  House,  Safe  and  Fixtures 10,000  00 

fcrome  Stamps 826  40 

Die  from  Banks  and  Bankers 20,359  81 

M  Tenders,  Bank  Not^,  and  Prac'l  Currency.  35,221  70 

Coin 348  62 

Witemg - 2,315  52 


•365,125  73 


LIABILITIES. 

Ciptal _ -  $100,000  00 

fcporits -  236,274  76 

DaeBcnluand  Bankers 2,993  18 

hqfo 25,857  79 


$365,125  73 


L  Benjamin  Newkirk,  Cashier  of  the  Jackson  City  Bank,  of 
Jicbon,  Michigan,  do  solemnly  swear  that  the  aboTc  statement 
■trie,  to  the  best  of  my  knowledge  and  belief. 

BENJ.  NEWKIRK,  Cashier. 

Wwcribed  and  sworn  to  before  me  this  twenty-second  day 

1^  Dwwnber.  1869. 
GILBERT  R,  BYRNE, 
Notary  Public. 


44  ANKUAL  REPOBT  OP  THE 


STA  TEMENT  showing  the  condition  of  the  Ann  A 
ing^  Bank,  at  the  close  of  business  hours,  Nov.  3 
required  by  the  BanMng  Law  of  the  State  of  Mic 


LIABILITIES. 


Capital I 

Deposits 

Profit  and  Loss 


I 


RESOURCES. 

Loans  and  Discounts $ 

United  States  5-20  Bonds 

Furniture  and  Fixtures 

Revenue  Stamps 

Due  from  Banks  and  Bankers 

Legal  Tenders  and  National  Bank  N'otes 

Fractional  Currency  and  Nickels 

Cash  Item  s 


I,  Schuyler  Grant,  Cashier  of  the  Ann  Arbor  Sa-' 
of  Ann  Arbor,  Michigan,  do  solemnly  swear  the 
statement  is  true,  to  the  best  of  my  knowledge  an< 

SCHUYLER  GRANl 

Subscribed  and  sworn  to  before  me  this  first  da 
ber,  1869. 

R.  S.  SM 
Xotary  Public  for  Washtena 


STATE  TREASURER.  45 


STAT£MEXT  showing  the  condition  of  the  Merchants'  and 
Matntfaeturers'  Bank  of  Detroit,  at  the  close  of  business 
ioan,  December  31,  1869,  as  required  by  the  Banking  Law 
ff  Mitkigan : 

RE80UKCE8. 

lAOfi  and  Diflcounts $123,995  22 

fvBitnre  Account 3,000  00 

tuted  States  and  State  of  Michigan  Bonds 6,200  00 

Die  frwn  Banka  and  Bankers 25,457  81 

tnk-Legal  Tender  Notes,  National 

Bank  Notes,  Fract'l  Currency 

ind  Reyenne  Stamps $20,981  01 

Exchanges  for  Clearing  House   18,501  90 

39,482  91 

$198,135  94 

LIABILITIES. 

*jp»lp«id  in $100,000  00 

'wfcand  Loss 3,498  00 

ftpoau 94,637  94 

$198,135  94 

^  Clurtes  C.  Cadman,  Cashier  of  the  Merchants'  and  Manu- 
^^Ktfi  Bank,  Detroit,  Michigan,  do  solemnly  swear  that  the 
•"•t  ttatement  is  true,  io  the  best  of  my  knowledge  and 

■fcU 

CHARLES  0.  CADMAN. 

0 

^J«cribed  and  sworn  before  me  this  seventh  day  of  January, 

MABCUS  F.  DOW, 
Notary  Public,  Wayne  Co.,  Mich. 


ANNTTAL    KEPORT 


milSSIONER  OF  THE  STATE  IIIIID  OFFICE 


STATE  OF  MICHIGAN, 


POR    TSS    VE3A.R    1809. 


BY  AUTHORITY. 


LANSING: 

W.  S.'.OEOBQE  &  CO.,  PRINTERS  TO  THE  8TATB. 


REPORT. 


CE,  ) 


MicHiGAK  State  Land  Office, 
Lansing  J  November  SOy  1869. 

To  Hi«  ExceUency  Hekby  P.  Baldwin, 

Governor  of  the  State  of  Michigan  : 

SiB — In  obedience  to  the  provisions  of  law  establishing  and 
Rgoladng  the  duties  of  the  State  Land  Office,  I  have  the 
hoaoT  to  submit  the  following  report  of  the  business  transac- 
iioiffi  of  this  office  during  the  fiscal  year  ending  Noyember 
Mkiu  1869. 

The  following  statements  and  tabular  exhibits  will  show  the 
mkounts  of  land  sold,  belonging  to  the  several  Trust  Funds, 
together  with  the  amount  received  of  Principal,  Interest,  and 
Penalty  of  each  of  said  funds.  Also  the  amount  of  Swamp 
sold  and  disposed  of  during  the  year  under  the  various 
regulating  the  sale  and  disposition  thereof. 

PRIMARY  SCHOOL  LANDS. 

There  has  been  sold  of  the  Primary  School  Lands,  at  orig- 
4ial  Bales  during  the  year,  22,662.18  acres,  for  the  sum  of 
150.648  72  ;  and  of  land  forfeited  and  resold,  3,278.15,  for  the 
of  •13,287  60.  Total  sold,  25,940.33,  for  $103,936  32, 
28,84&28,  for  the  sum  of  $115,393  12,  during  the  year 
1K8L  This  shows  a  decrease  in  original  sales  of  this  year, 
m  compared  with  the  sales  of  1868,  of  6,186.10  acres. 

The  receipts  on  account  of  principal  for  the  fiscal  year 
«e  •115^79  98,  against  $115,386  63,  for  the  year  1868 ;  on 
aetaant  of  interest,  $53,719  96 ;  and  on  account  of  penalty^ 
tt,?»5  67. 


ANNUAL  BEPOET  OF  THE 


UNIVBBSITY  LANDS. 


Total  amount  sold  during  the  year,  87.76  acres 
sum  of  11,053  12,  against  188.75  acres,  for  the  sum  of 
for  the  previous  year.    There  is  yet  unsold  of  the  Ui 
Lands,  132.24  acres,  lying  in  the  county  of  Ealamazoi 

The  receipts  on  account  of  principal  for  the  j 
$7,817  32,  against  $7,114  97  for  the  year  1868;  on  ac 
interest,  $9,976  90,  against  $10,369  45  for  the  previc 
there  has  also  been  receiyed  on  account  of  penalty,  th 
$242  13. 

NORMAL  SCHOOL  LANDS. 

No  original  sales.    Whole  number  of  acres  forfeite 
sold  during  the  year,  40  acres,  for  the  sum  of  $16( 
a  like  number  of  acres  for  a  like  sum,  during  the 
year. 

Receipts  to  the  fund  on  account  of  principal, 
against  $760  for  1868;  and  on  account  of  interest, 
against  $1,887  28  for  1868 ;  and  on  account  of  pena 
the  year,  $69  86. 

ASYLUM  LANDS. 

Total  of  sales  during  the  year,  160  acres,  80  acre 
was  forfeited  and  resold,  for  the  sum  of  $640,  a 
acres  for  $800,  during  the  year  1868. 

There  remains  unsold  of  lands  belonging  to  t 
Fund  660  acres. 

Receipts  on  account  of  principal,  $1,118  91 ;  on 
interest,  $1,521  66 ;  and  on  account  of  penalty,  $1 

STATE  BUILDING  LANDS. 

The  sales  of  lands  belonging  to  the  State  Buildii 
confined  to  the  resale  and  forfeited  lots  lying  in 
Lansing,  and  aggregate  the  sum  of  $260. 

Amount  received  on  account  of  principal,  $49S 
count  of  interest,  $472  20 ;  and  on  account  of  pen 


COMMISSIONER  OF  THE  STATE  LAND  OFFICE.  5 

SALT  SPRUNG  LAXDS. 

Whole  number  of  acres  sold,  236.40,  of  which  40  acres  were 
(nfeited  and  resold,  for  the  sum  of  $945  60,  against  640  acres 
ibr  the  gum  of  $2,560  for  the  year  1868. 

There  has  been  received  on  account  of  principal  to  this 
fbd  the  sum  of  $732  61 ;  on  account  of  interest,  11,033  52 ; 
ttd  on  account  of  penalty,  $121  54. 

IKTEBNAL  IMPBOYEMEKT  LAKDS. 

JTomber  of  acres  sold  during  the  year,  559.70,  for  the  sum  of 
K99  63,  against  584.36  acres  for  $730,  during  1868. 

AGRICULTURAL  COLLEGE  LANDS. 

He  whole  number  of  acres  sold  during  the  fiscal  year,  were 
12,180,  for  the  sum  of  $43,000. 

The  receipts  on  account  of  principal,  were  $11,865;  on 
•eeoimt  of  interest,  $56  68 ;  and  on  account  of  penalty,  $2  28. 

The  sale  of  lands  belonging  to  the  Agricultural  College 
fvnd  daring  the  year,  have  not  reached  the  estimates  of  this 
<Aee:  For  it  was  anticipated  that  a  rapid  sale  would  be  the 
nealt  of  placing  these  lands  in  market  under  the  liberal  terms 
pnnided  by  law.  Situated  as  they  are  in  the  best  farming 
&tnctB  of  our  State,  and  a  large  portion  of  which  were  selected 
*^  tp&cial  reference  to  their  qualities  for  agricultural  pur- 
PMESi  it  cannot  be  doubted  that  they  now  offer  the  best  induce- 
Uti  to  the  actual  settler  of  any  class  of  lands  yet  held  for 
<de  by  the  State.  And  I  think  it  was  an  oversight  that  some 
■OBtt  were  not  provided  whereby  a  more  general  knowledge  of 
im  hods  could  be  brought  to  the  public. 

SWAMP  LAKDS. 

There  has  been  sold  at  original  sale,  for  cash,  of  the  Swamp 
UndA,  7,369.69,  for  the  sum  of  $9,212  12 ;  and  of  lands  for- 
md  resold,  2,307.39  acres,  for  $2,043  53,  against  7,439.22 
for  $9,299  during  1868. 


6  ANNUAL  REPOBT  OF  THE 

There  has  been  patented  to  actual  settlers,  under  th 
stead  act^  5,012.67  acres. 

The  whole  number  of  acres  licensed  during  the  yea 
homestead  laws,  were  23,595.66. 

Whole  number  of  acres  sold  and  patented  on  ac 
Swamp  Land  Roads  and  Ditches,  266,221.28,  at  an  a 
value  of  $332,776  60. 

It  will  be  seen  by  a  comparison  of  the  above  with  t 
ments  of  other  years,  that  the  sales  and  disposition  oi 
Lands  under  existing  laws,  during  the  last  year,  have 
the  sales  of  any  former  year,  excepting  the  year  1867. 

There  has  also  been  a  larger  amount  licensed  to  actui 
than  during  the  year  1868. 

The  greater  portion  of  the  Swamp  Lands  have  heretc 
placed  in  market  There  is  still  remaining,  howev 
100,000  acres  unoffered.  A  public  sale  is  nowpendii 
place  on  the  6th  day  of  January  next,  at  which  tim 
pected  to  place  in  market  the  entire  body  of  Swamp 
which  the  State  has  received  patents. 

The  amount  remaining  unpatented  is  about  35,( 
lying  in  the  county  of  Cheboygan,  and  is  embra< 
Indian  Reservation,  and  cannot  be  reached  until  saic 
tion  is  extinguished. 

TAXES. 

There  has  been  received  for  taxes  assessed  upon 
lands,  during  the  year,  the  siim  of  110,336  54. 

FEES  AND  PLATS. 

There  has  been  received  on  account  of  fees,  plal 
sum  of  $1,038  81.  This  does  not  include  the  amoi] 
now  due  from  counties  for  copies  of  Field  Notes 
which  could  not  be  paid  until  the  taxes  of  1869  are 


COMMISSIONER   OF  THE  STATE  LAND  OFFICE.  7 

TRESPASSES. 

This  office,  under  existing  laws,  has  charge  of  trespasses 
eommitted  only  npon  the  Trnst  Fund  and  Bailroad  Lands ; 
and  the  course  adopted  by  this  office  with  reference  to  tres- 
(nsaea  npon  the  latter  is  to  place  them  as  far  as  practicable 
m  the  hands  of  the  different  Bailroad  Companies,  as  they  are 
lUe  to  secure  a  better  vigilance  on  the  part  of  timber  agents. 

There  has  been  but  few  trespasses  upon  Primary  School 
Laads  reported  during  the  year,  and  but  few  adjusted. 

The  total  amount  received  on  account  of  trespass  upon  Pri- 
aaiT  School  I^nds  is  8180 ;  expenses  incurred  in  collecting, 

Total  amount  collected  on  account  of  trespass  upon  Railroad 
Unds.  $186  ;  expense  to  the  State  nothing. 

la  adjusting  trespasses  upon  the  Trust  Fund  Lands,  I  have 
ftinpeUed  the  parties  in  all  cases  to  purchase  the  lands  tres- 
MBed  upon  and  pay  in  full  for  the  same. 

There  are  several  cases  of  trespass  in  the  northern  part  of 
the  State,  still  pending,  but  which  could  not  be  adjusted  in 
tine  for  this  report. 

All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted. 

BENJ.  D.  PRITCHARD, 

Cafnmissioner. 


SALES  AND  RECEIPTS 


From  Decmber  1st,  1868,  to  Nov.  SOth,  1869,  inclusive. 


PRIMABT  SCHOOL  LANDS. 


tniUjf  Abstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  November  SO,  1869. 


iu 


MOUTH. 


18©  December, 
IMJannaiy. . 

IMSJFebmarT.. 
U(9  March... 

I»  April 

iWMty 

*8®jJiuie  ... 

muj , 

1*9  August... 
I^  September 
W.October.., 
W^ISorember 


state  Lands, 
Acns* 


2,146.95 
1,125.17 
1,467.48 
1,941.55 
1,008.31 
1,359.25 
2,109.21 
1,998.81 
1,067.07 
3,083.60 
2,890.82 
1,473.96 


Forfeited 
Luds,  Acres 


22,662.18 


760.00 
160.00 
699.12 
339.48 
360.00 
200.00 

40.00 
135.95 
200.00 
120.00 
183.60 

80.00 


3,278.15 


Amount  lold 
for. 


♦11,762.80 
9,140.68 
8,626.40 
9,124.12 
5,473.24 
6,277.00 
8,596.84 
8,539.04 
5,068.28 
12,814.40 
12,297.68 
6,215.84 


(103,936.32 


Receipts. 

Onccount  of  principal $115,279  98 

•  "  interest 53,719  96 

•  -  penalty 2,795  67 

•171,795  61 


10  ANNUAL  BEPOBT  OF  THE 


UNIVERSITY   LANDS. 

Monthly  Abstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  Nov.  3 


Tkab. 


MONTH. 


State  Lands, 
Acres. 


Amooi 


1869 


Noyember 


87.76 


Beceipts. 
On  account  of  principal $ 


"        "  interest. 

"        "  penalty . 


$1 


NORMAL  SCHOOL  LANDS. 

Monthly  Abstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  Nov. 


TVAB. 

MONTH. 

Forfeited  Lands, 
Acres. 

Amc 

1868 

December -  - 

40.00 

On  a 

ccountof  principal - 
"           interest- -. 
"           penalty . . 

Receipts. 

»^MMM    «^»»ai 

I 

COlOflSSIONEB   OF  THE  STATE  LAND  OFFICE. 


11 


AGRICULTURAL  COLLEGE  LANDS. 

M9niUtiAbsiraciofScdesfor  theyear  ending  November  30, 1869, 


Tu& 


MOUTH. 


l^December 
IMdjjAiiaary.. 
l»9  February  . 
1SS9  April.... 

IS©  May 

ISe&Jnne 

mjxHj 

18»;Aiigu«t... 
IWJ.October . . 
IWSjXoTember 


State  Lands, 
Acres. 


920.00 

120.00 

120.00 

6,800.00 

1,120.00 

2,120.00 

600.00 

360.00 

680.00 

640.00 


13,480.00 


Amonnt  sold 
for. 


14,600.00 
600.00 
600.00 

20,400.00 
3,360.00 
6,360.00 
1,800.00 
1,080.00 
2,280.00 
1,920.00 


$43,000.00 


JReceipts. 

Ob  icoottnt  of  principal $11,865  00 

"      •*  interest 56  68 

*      ^  penalty 2  28 

$11,923  96 


1% 


ANNUAL  BBPOBT  OF  THB 


ASYLUM  LAKD8. 


Man  thly  A  bstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  Novembe 


1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 


MOITTH. 


February 

June 

July 

August . . 


state  Lands 
Acres. 


40.00 


40.00 


80.00 


Forfeited 
Lands,  Acra 


40.0C 
40.0C 


80.0( 


On  account  of  principal 

interest. - 
penalty  . . 


u 


ti 


(C 


ii 


Receipts, 


STATE  BUILDING  LANDS. 

Monthly  Abstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  Noventi 


Tbab. 

MONTH. 

Forfeited  Lands 

1869 

March 

Lansing 
Lots. 

1869 

July 

On  a 

<i 

a 

Receipts. 
ccount  of  Drincinal - 

**           interest 

"           penalty 

COKlOflSIOKEB  OF  THE  STATE  LAKD   OFFICE. 


13 


SALT  SPBING  LANDS. 

Mmtkfy  Abstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  November  SO,  1869. 


Titt 


MONTH. 


18S9  January .. 
18$9  February  . 

1969  June 

IW  September. 


tetecount  of  principal. 
"  interest . 

"  penalty . 


state  Umds, 
Acre*. 

Forfeited 
Lands,  Acre* 

Amoant 
Bold  for. 

40.00 
80.00 
40.00 
36.40 

40.00 

1 

$320.00 
320.00 
160.00 
145.60 

196.40 

40.00 

$945.60 

Receipts. 


$    732  61 

1,033  62 
121  54 

•1,887  67 


IKTERNAL  IMPROVEMENT  LANDS. 

fca^jf  Abstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  November  SO,  1869. 


Tm.; 


MONTH. 


WTAruary 
WMarch.V 

m\]xnj 


Amoant 
sold  for. 


150.00 

99.63 

50.00 

350.00 

100.00 

50.00 

$699.63 


Receipts. 
^  Kcoimt  of  principal $699  63 


14 


ANNUAL  REPORT  OP  THE 


SWAMP  LANDS. 

Monthly  Abstract  of  Sales  for  the  year  ending  November 


TBA.B. 

1868 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 


MONTH. 


December 
January  . 
February- 
March  . . . 

April 

May 

June 


July 

August .  -  - 
September. 
October... 
November 


state  Lands, 
Acree. 


719.10 
437.22 
320.00 
680.00 
889.84 
725.86 
560.00 
431.52 
962.11 
660.64 
550.92 
432.48 

7,369.69 


Forfeited 
Lands,  Acres. 


240.00 
443.04 


192.51 
200.00 
320.00 
471.84 


240.00 
200.00 


2,307.39 


Receipts. 

On  account  of  principal ti 

"         "  interest 

penalty 


$1 


COVMISSIOKEB  OF  THB  STATE  LAND  OFFICE. 


16 


RECAPITULATION. 


ftmutty  School  Land 

Sianp  Land 

rniveraty  Land 

Sonnal  School  Land 

igricultnral  College  Land., 
i^hm  Land _ 


Stee  Bnilding  Land 

Srft  Spring  Land 

btenud  Iraproyement  Land 


State  Lands, 
Acres. 


22,662.18 

7,369.00 

87.86 


13,480.00 
80.00 


196.40 
559.70 


45,475.05 


Forfeited 
L'nds,  Acres 


3,278.16 
2,307.39 

40.00 

80.00 
Lansing 
lots. 
40.00 


5,745.54 


Amount  sold 
for. 


$103,936.32 

11,263.65 

1,053.12 

160.00 

43,000.00 

640.00 

260.00 

946.60 
699.63 


$161,948.32 


16  ANNUAL  REPORT  OP  THE 


Total  Amount  of  Receipts  during  the  year  ending  Nov. 

Primary  School  Principal  Fund $1! 

"  "      Interest  "  

"  «      Penalty  "  

Swamp  Land  Principal  "  5 

"         "         Interest  "  

"         "         Penalty  "  

Uniyersity  Principal  "  

"  Interest  "  «.. 

"         Penalty  «  

Konnal  School  Principal      "     

"  "       Interest        "     

"       Penalty        "     

Agricultural  College  Principal  Fund 

"  "        Interest        "     

"        Penalty        «    

Asylum  Principal  Fund 

"      Interest        « 

"       Penalty       "    

State  Building  Principal  Fund 

"  "         Interest       «     

"         "         Penalty        «     

Salt  Spring  Principal         "     

"        "        Interest  "     

"        "        Penalty  "     

Internal  Improvement  Principal  Fund 

Forfeited  State  Land  Bids 

"  "        "     Interest 

Fees,  Plats,  &c 

Taxes  on  part-paid  Lands 


COMMISSIONER  OF  THE  8TATB  LAND  OFFICE. 


17 


TABLEf  showing  by  Counties,  the  amount  of  Swamp  Lands 
M  for  cash  and  Swamp  Land  Scrip,  for  the  year  ending 
Xotmier  30, 1869. 


cocsn 


Aloona . 

iipcna. 
ifitrim 


Clicbojgan 
ITiippewa. . 


Cliaton 

Clifford 

IWu 

Ei:oii 

iamet 

iilhlciii 

fiand  TraTerse. 

fittdot 

Hoi^ton 

HVQQ 

bfbam 

I«i 

toelk 

liDatka. 

lot... 

ioliiiair 

liAinac 


l^liKtte 


Cash  Sales. 
Acre*. 


97.48 


775.66 

160.00 

61.60 


814.20 


55.30 
240.00 


831.52 
1,176.29 


40.00 
280.00 
320.00 


77.74 
40.00 
43.80 


40.00 
397.36 
281.98 


Swamp  Land 
Scrip.  Acres. 


9,033.06 

449.11 

6,798.53 

1,626.45 

14,130.12 

141.18 

21,557.82 

1,965.82 

4,450.06 

1,433.14 

1,069.54 

930.50 

160.00 

21,696.96 

3,802.27 

1,392.00 

2,284.47 

14,605.34 

25,599.26 

720.00 

160.00 

6,000.52 

2,960.86 

2,159.19 

937.08 

662.98 

521.42 

629.78 

5,908.70 

2,507.49 

5,872.07 

1,239.97 

3,782.44 


Total  Sales. 
Acres. 


9,130.54 

449.11 

7,574.19 

1,786.45 

14,191.72 

141.18 

22,372.02 

1,965.82 

4,450.06 

1,488.44 

1,069.54 

1,170.50 

160.00 

21,696.96 

3,802.27 

1,392.00 

3,115.99 

14,605.34 

26,775.55 

720.00 

200.00 

6,280.52 

3,280.86 

2,159.19 

1,014.82 

662.98 

561.42 

629.78 

5,952.50 

2,507.49 

5,912.07 

1,637.33 

4,064.42 


18 


ANNUAL  BEPOBT  OF  THE 


Swamp  Land  Sales — {Continued,) 


COUNTIES. 


Menominee  - . 

Midland 

Missaukee 

Montcalm 

Montmorenci 
Muskegon ._. 

Newaygo 

Oceana 

Ogemaw 

Osceola 

Oscoda 

Otsego 

Ottawa 

Presque  Isle. 
Roscommon  . 

Saginaw 

Sanilac 

Schoolcraft. - 
Shiawassee  -  _ 
St.  Clair.... 

Tuscola 

Van  Buren . . 
Wexford 


Cash  Sales. 
Acres. 


120.00 


660.00 


80.00 


Swamp  Land 
Scrip.  Acres. 


Ti 


40.00 
29.92 


690.96 


123.88 


7,369.69 


9,713.99 
6,196.84 
2,881.15 

894.53 
3,396.33 
6,252.26 
7,963.88 
3,123.44 
3,480.68 
3,664.16 
6,377.60 
7,662.03 
1,668.07 
2,994.83 
6,737.03 
4,996.89 
6,025,13 
3,660.75 

592.05 

160.00 

12,941.51 

40.00 

720.00 


266,221.28 


COMXISSIONEB   OP  THE  STATE  LAND  OFFICE. 


19 


TABLE,  showing  by  Counties^  the  amount  of  Swamp  Lands 
fw  which  Licenses  were  Patented,  and  not  Patented,  during 
tt#  jfMr  ending  November  30,  1869. 


COUNTIES. 


Alcona 

Alfcgw 

ilp^ 

Cheboygan 

Ouppewa 

CWre 

CBaton .. 
Deh 

EttOQ 

Emoiet 

GnndTntTerse 
fiatiot , 

Hnon 

•■fliim 

IflKo... 

Uridk 

Ledsnaw 

Xtton 

Ifwotta 

XcBominee 

^oitcalm 

"•A^n 

J2r 

Oiceok 

^•pnnr 

Sttilic 

^vaaaee 

StCliir 

^Joeeph 


Settlers' 

Licenses 

Patented. 

Acres. 


174.10 


161.26 


116.20 
80.00 
40.00 
160.00 
160.00 
520.00 
502.26 
120.00 


240.00 


40.00 
320.00 
240.00 
480.86 
119.12 

80.00 


680.00 

148.80 

40.00 

600.08 

5,012.67 


Settlers' 

Licenses 

Not  Patented. 

Acres. 


788.27 
588.69 
1,844.19 
5,124.62 
522.21 
130.02 

.  80.00 

56.50 

40.00 

1,469.78 

2,362.18 

80.00 

1,136.00 

726.34 

80.00 

816.17 

1,398.52 

236.70 

314.98 

645.85 

120.00 

1,244.07 

760.00 

156.14 

40.00 

660.00 


2,376.43 


23,595.66 


ANNUAL    REPORT 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUDITORS 


STATE  OF   MICHIGAN, 


FOK    Till::    VT^AIt    ISOO. 


BY   AUTHORITY. 


LANSING; 

*■  8,  CEOHGE  &  CO.,  PRINTEHS  TO  THE  STATE. 

18Cfl. 


ANNUAL    KEPORT 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUDITORS 


STATE  OF   MICHIGAN, 


FOR    milf:    VFIAR     ISOO. 


BY  AUTHORITY. 


LANSING: 

W  5-  GEORGE  &  CO..  PRINTERS  TO  THE  STATE. 

1869. 


REPORT. 


Office  of  the  Boakd  of  State  Auditors,  ) 
Laming,  Dec,  1st,  A.  I).  1869.  J 

To  Oi«  Exccllencv  Henky  P.  Baldwin, 

Governor  of  the  State  of  Michigaii  : 

In  obedience  to  the  requirements  of  law,  the  undersigned 
•dwitregpeetfully,  the  following  report,  showing  the  proceed- 
^o(  the  Board  of  State  Auditors  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 
JieKWi  dav  of  Novemher,  A.  D.  1869. 

0.  r^  SPAULDING, 

Secretary  of  State, 
E.  0.  aROSVENOR, 

State  Treasurer. 
B.  D.  PRITCHARD, 

Com.  of  the  Land  Office. 


AXXrAL  SETTLEMENT  WITH  THE  STATE  TREASURER. 

The  Board  of  State  Auditors,  for  the  purpose  of  making  an 
**aBal  settlement  with  the  State  Treasurer,  met  at  the  oflSce 
^  Uht  Secretary  of  State,  on  the  3d  dav  of  December,  A.  D. 

mi 

'Wnt,  Hon.  O.  L.  Spaulding.  Secretary  of  State,  Hon. 
'fit  Humphrey,  Auditor  General,  and  Hon.  B.  D.  Pritchard, 
^jiiimiaaoner  of  the  State  Land  Office. 

The  Hon.  E.  O.  Grosveuor,  State  Treasurer,  having  exhibited 
-te  stfcfonnt  current  with  the  State  of  Michigan,  and  the  same 


4  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THK 

having  been  compared  by  the  Board  witli  the  books 
Auditor  General,  we  find  tliat  during  the  fiscal  year  enc 
30th  day  of  November,  1868,  the  State  Treasurer  has : 
into  the  treasury  the  sum  of  two  millions  eight  hund 
four  thousand  seven  hundred  and  foi-ty-one  and  41 
dollars  ($2,804,741  43),  and  that  he  has  disbursed  thi 
one  million  six  hundred  and  seventy-four  thousand  fi 
dred  and  eleven  and  76-lOOths  dollars  ($1,674,511  76). 
ing  a  balance  in  the  treasury  of  one  million  one  hun< 
thirty  thousand  two  hundred  and  twenty-nine  and  C 
dollars  ($1,130,229  67),  for  which  balance  he  exhibi 
accredited  vouchers  and  certificates. 

O.  L.  SPAULDING, 
Secretary  oj 

WM.  HUMPHREY, 
Auditor  C 

B.  D.  PRITCHARD 
Com.  of  State  Lam 


BOND  OF   EDWARD   A.    BRECKENRIDGK, 

MarcJi  26t 

The  bond  of  Edward  A.  Breckenridge,  as  commi 
superintend  the  building  of  a  bridge  across  the  "  A 
river,  as  mentioned  in  act  Xo.  273,  of  laws  of  1860 
March  13,  1869,  with  L.  M.  Mason  and  B.  N.  Jenks 
in  the  sum  of  $5,000  was,  on  motion,  approved  ai 
filed  in  the  office  of  the  Secretary  of  State. 


HOND   OF  LORENZO  B.  CURTIS. 

April  6 

The  bond  of  Lorenzo  B.  Curtis,  as  Swamp  Land 

(/ommissioner,  as  provided  for  by  the  laws  of  1869, 

II.  Jerome  and  Gurdon  Coming  as  sureties,  in  the  e 


BOARD   OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  T) 

Tag*  on  motion,  approved  and  ordered  filed  in  the  office  of  the 
Si<Tvtan'  of  State. 


BOND   OP  PETER   MITCHELU 

May  26th,  1869. 

The  bond  of  Peter  Mitchell,  as  Swamp  Land  State  fioad 
Commi^oner  for  the  Upper  Peninsnla,  in  the  sum  of  ten 
dumsand  dollars  ($10,000),  with  Charles  Fisher,  Joshua  W. 
Cn»»eT«  and  Lie  wis  J.  Longpie  as  sureties,  was  approved  bv  the 
R<«rd.  and  filed  in  the  office  of  the  SecreUiry  of  State. 


CLAIM   OF  THEROK    FORD. 

April  28th,  1869, 

On  thi^  day  the  Board  executed  and  delivered  to  Theron 
Ford,  a  deed  conveying  to  him  the  north  forty-four  (44)  feet 
flC  of  lot  number  one  (1),  of  block  number  eighty-three,  in 
thit  city  of  Lansingy  agreeable  to  provisions  of  joint  resolution 
comber  eight  (8),  of  the  Tjcgislature  of  eighteen  hundred  and 
?ixtT-nine. 


CLAIM   OF   HENRY   S.   (hVmi. 

April  28th,  1869. 

C/laim  of  Henry  S.  Clnbb,  iis  reporter  in  the  14th  Judicial 
*  irrnit,  in  the  case  of  Frank  H.  White  vs.  Hermanns  Doesburg, 
vkidi  wajB  referred  to  the  Board  by  joint  resolution  No.  23,  of 
Tise  eeerion  of  1869,  was  allowed  at  one  hundred  and  sixtv-two 
doIlsrA  (•162). 


6  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

CLAIM   OF  WM.   P.  RATHBON. 

• 

October  '2oth, 
This  claim  was  presented  October  25th,  1869,  ai 
out  of  sale  by  State  of  lot  4,  Ship  Yard  Tracts  in 
county,  to  Thomas  Greene,  to  whom  University  Land 
cate  No.  824  was  issued,  and  wiio  subsequently  assign 
claimant.  The  claimant  alleged  that  the  State  com? 
said  certificate,  3  86-lOOths  acres  of  land  more  than  i 
by  actual  survey,  and  asked  repayment  of  purchase 
such  excess,  and  interest  thereon  from  date  of  purcha 
The  Board  having  considered  the  claim,  unaninu 
jected  the  same  for  the  reason  that  there  was  no  aut 
law  for  its  allowance. 


C0JSTRACT8. 

On  November  24th,  1869,  the  Board  proceeded  to 
compare  the  bids  presented  for  printing  and  bindin 
State,  and  for  furnishing  print,  news  and  book  paper 
tionery ;  also  fuel,  in  pursuance  of  Act  No.  163,  Sesi 
1851,  and  Act  No.  171,  Sess.  Laws  of  1861,  and  after 
examination  and  comparison,  made  the  following  a 
contracts  to  parties  making  the  lowest  bids,  and  for 
hereinafter  named : 

To  John  J.  Bush,  the  contract  for  furnishing  400  cords  of 
body  beech  and  maple  wood,  at  $2  59  per  cord,  the  que 
increased  at  the  option  of  the  Board  of  State  AuditorH. 

Printing. 

To  Messrs.  Parker  &  8cripps,  the  contract  for  printing,  at  t 
rates  of  compensation,  viz : 

For  composition  on  Session  Laws,  Joint  Documents, 
Keporta,  and  all  other  printing  in  book  form,  contemplate 
No.  1,  except  the  Daily  Journals,  Bills,  Resolutions,  Doeuii 
panying  the  House  and  Senate  Journals,  and  filank.s  and 
the  rate  of  forty -five  (45)  cents  per  1 ,000  ems. 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUDITOBS.  7 

fbrcoiiipositkM&  on  the  Official  Journals  of  the  House  of  Representa- 
thoaod  Senate,  twenty  (20)  cents  per  1,000  ems. 

Foroompontian  on  the  Dally  Journals  of  the  House  of  Repreaenta- 
tH«i  tod  Senate,  foity-flTe  cents  per  1 ,000  ems.  • 

?v  composition  on  the  BUls  and  Joint  Resolutions,  twenty-five  (25) 
eats  per  1,QOO  ems. 

Fbr  composition  on  the  Documents  accompanying  the  House  and 
Smite  Joonmls,  at  the  rate  of  four  (4)  cents  per  1 ,000  ems. 

For  printins  the  Blanks  and  Circulars,  at  the  rate  of  five  dollars  and 
Ittf  ents  per  ream  on  both  sides,  and  at  the  rate  of  three  dollars  and 
ftt^eentsper  ream  on  one  aide. 

ftm  work,  at  the  rate  of  thirty-five  (85)  cents  per  token. 

TW  whole  work  to  be  done  at  the  seat  of  Goyemmen^,  at  Lansing, 
md  k  ercfy  respect  to  be  equal  to  the  work  done. for  the  Stat^  in, the. 
imrlM.  The  laws  to  be  printed  and  delivered  to  the  State  Binder 
iUya  forty  days  after  the  close  of  each  sesaion  of  the  Legislature. ; 

Binding^  dc, 

ToMcKTs.  Parker  &  Scripps,  the  contract  for  binding,  at  the  followuig 
atmof  eompenaation,  viz : 

FW  badiu^  the  laws  of  each  session  of  the  Legislature,  in  cloth  backs, 
H  ten  (tO)  cents  per  copy ;  in  leather  backs,  half  binding,  twenty  (20) 
ttui  per  copy,  if  not  exceeding  sixty  signatures ;  twenty -five  (25)  cents 
iior«r«ixty  and  not  exceeding  one  hundred  signatures ;  and  thirty  (80) 
oitts  for  all  books  of  over  one  hundred  signatures. 

Par  fain^ng  the  Journals  of  the  House  of  Representatives  and  Senate, 
atke mne  rate  as  for  the  laws. 

For  hiadmg  the  Docaments  accompanying  the  Journals  of  the  House 
md  Smmte,  at  the  rate  of  ten  (10)  cents  per  copy. 

For  hinduig  the  Joint  Documents,  at  the  same  rate  as  for  the  laws. 

F«  iHidmg  any  book  in  full  cloth,  if  not  more  than  00  signatures,  at 
foe  me  of  twenty-five  (25)  cents  per  copy,  and  for  any  book  in  full  cloth 
^<KttuKtj  aignatares,  thirty-five  (85)  cents  per  copy. 

Fbr  drjii^  and  pressing  sheets,  at  the  rate  of  four  and  a-half  (4i)  cents 
9<r  oae  hundred  signatures. 

?<v  foiding  sheets  at  the  rate  of  five  (5)  cents  per  100  signatures. 

For«titchfaig  pamphlets  and  bills,  at  the  rate  of  ten  (10)  cents  per  100 
of  two  signatores  or  under,  and  fifteen  (15)  cents  for  Ayb  signa- 
lad  under,  and  twenty  (20)  cents  for  nine  signatures  and  under, 

id  twenty-five  (25)  cents  for  fifteen  signatures ;  all  of  the  above  prices 

'Weepies. 

F«  niHni;  blanks,  forty -five  (45)  cents  per  ream  for  each  time  the 
aay  require  to  be  ruled. 


8  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

For  pressing  blanks,  Iwcnty-fivc  (25)  cents  per  ream. 

For  trimming  blanks,  twenty  (20)  cents  per  ream. 

For  binding  blank  books  for  the  Executive  Department,  at  the  fol 
rates,  per  quire : 

Gap,  full-bound,  20  cents;  c^ip,  half-bound,  15  cents;  clem; 
bound,  75  cents;  demy,  half-bound,  40  cents;  medium,  full 
$1  00;  medium,  half-bound,  50  cents;  medium,  fuUbound, 
comers,  $1  25;  medium,  fidl-bound,  Russia  ends  and  bands, 
ment  backs  and  raised  bauds,  $1  75  per  quire ;  medium,  all 
$2  00  per  quire ;  for  binding  the  letters  in  the  style  used  by  th 
$i  00  per  volume. 

For  binding  sales'  books,  75  cents  per  copy. 

For  binding  the  manuscript  laws  and  journals,  half- bound, ! 
per  quire;  in  the  style  used  by  the  State,  $1  75. 

The  work  to  be  done  at  the  seat  of  Government,  and  in  ace 
with  the  advertisement  of  the  Secretary  of  State  inviting  prop< 
the  same. 

[At  a  meeting  of  the  Board,  held  Dec.  8th,  1860,  at  the  re 
Mcssra.  Parker  &  Scripps,  the  above  contract  for  printing;  and 
was  assigned  to  Messrs.  W.  8.  George  &  Co.] 

Statianert/. 

To  Wm.  A.  Throop  &  Co.,  the  contnict  for  furnishing  stati 
the  Executive  Departments,  at  the  prices  named  in  the  list  dep 
the  said'Wm.  A.  Throop  &  Co.,  in  the  office  of  the  Board  of  ! 
ditors.  The  various  articles  of  stationeiy  to  be  furnished  by  sai 
«&  Co.,  to-con'espond  in  every  respect  with  the  samples  deposit e( 
in  the  office  of  the  Secretary  of  State. 

Book  Paper. 

To  George  L.  Pease,  the  contract  for  furnishing  book  pur 
Executive  and  Legislative  Depaitments,  ac  the  price  named  1 
deposited  in  the  office  of  the  Board  of  State  Auditors ;  the  Ix 
to  be  furnished  to  correspond  in  every  respect  with  the  sampler 
in  the  office  of  the  Board  of  State  Auditors. 

Xeiciy  Print  Paper. 

To  L.  A.  Barns,  the  contract  for  furnishing  news,  print 
the  Executive  and  Legislative  Departments,  at  the  following  i 

Sample  No.  8,  news  print 1  Ic  ] 

*'      9,    **        " 10c 

The  above  to  be  made  of  any  size  or  weight  desired,  nt 
prices. 


BOABD   OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  0 

An  the  foregoing  named  contracts  to  extend  during  a  period  of  two 
yiw.from  and  after  the  Slst  day  of  December,  1869. 


ADJUSTMENT  OF  ACCOUNTS. 

The  foUowiug  is  a  statement  of  the  accounts  current  allowed 
by  the  Board,  to  each  department  of  thv^^  State,  for  the  year 
tnding  Dooerabor  1st,  1869,  to  wit : 

Executive  DepaHment 

V8. 

The  Stafr  of  Michigan, 

December  30th,  1868. 
^.R.  Greene, 

To  1  set  castors  for  Gov's  room >0  60 

1^  yards  velvet  for  Qov^s  table 1  50 

H  vards  oil  cloth o  50 

W.  0.  Donoughne,  P.  M., 

To  1100  2c.  ])ostage  stamps,  for  proclamation. . .  22  00 

1142  2c-,  used  in  sending  off  proclamation .  _ .  22  84 
WMtnev  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  letter  postage ^ 1  18 

drawer. ._ 1  00 


Jamiary  2ethy  1860. 
Henry  H.  Craix), 

To  paid  for  telegrams 25  15 

eipresa  charges 2  95 

P.O.stamps 72  00 

fj^eneral  traveling  expenses,  one  year,  from 

Jan.  1st  to  Dec.  31st,  1868 50  00 

•^wmut  carried  forward *204  72 

o 


10  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

JExecutive  Department 

vs. 
Tlve  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward ♦2< 

Henry  H.  Crapo, 

To  expenses  to  Washington  in  adjusting  the  mil- 
itary and  other  claims  of  the  State  against 
the  General  Government 4 


January  27th,  1869. 
S.  B.  Greene, 

To  1  hairbrush,  2&;  1  mirror;  putting  same  in 

Got's  room,  50c 

2  keys,  20c.;  cloth,  8s.;  fit  keys,  4s.;  table 

cover,  8s.,  in  Gov's  room 

repair,  door 

2  keys  and  fit,  and  other  repairs  for  Gov's 

room 

repairs  in  Gov's  room 

2  registers,  and  work  to  put  in  Gov's  room.. 

repair.  desk,  75c. ;  and  repair,  door,  50c 

1  rod  to  open  windows 


February   10th,  1869. 
Jno.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  paid  telegrams  from  Gov.  Crapo 

paid  express  charges  on  Gov.  Crapo's  message 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  5  rms.  letter,  lithograph  head '.- 

2  rms.  note,  '*  *'     — 

1  waste  basket 

Amount  carried  forward _ 


I 

BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  11 

Executive  Department 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $672  51 

W.  &  QeoTge  &  Co., 

To  2  portfolios  for  Executive  office _ 12  00 

pn?fi&and  trim.  3  rms.  circulars 1  50 

dry.  and  press.  8,000  sigs.  retiring  Qoyemor's 

message - 4  00 

folding  same 4  00 

stitching  2,000  pamphlets 4  00 

cover,  and  trim.  650  pamphlets 6  50 

trimming  1,350  pamphlets 3  38 

dry.  and  press.  8,000  sigs.  Gov's  inaugural 

message 4  00 

folding  same 4  00 

stitching  2,000  pamphlets 4  00 

cover,  and  trim.  650  pamphlets 6  50 

trimming  1,350  pamphlets 3  37 

44,520  ems  composition  on  Oov.  Baldwin's 

message 20  03 

47,488  ems  comp.  on  Oov.  Crapo's  message..  20  36 

120  tokens  press  w^ork  on  messages 48  00 


February  16th,  1869. 
F.G.  Russell, 

To  3  blank  books,  3  qrs. 3  75 

1  blank  book  record,  2  qrs 80 

postage 7  15 

Amount  carried  forward $829  85 


12     '  AXNU-Vr.    REPORT  OF  THE 

Executive  Department 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan, 

February  18th.  I 

Amount  brongh t  forward W 

Michigan  JouniaU 

To  comp.  45,000  ems.  Gov.  Crapo's  message 

translating  Gov.  Crajw's  message. 

press  work,  4  forms,  34  tokens. 

stitch,  and  trim.  2,000  messages. 

comp,  45,000  ems, Gov.  Baldwin's  message.. . 

translation ^. 

press  work,  4  forms,  34  tokens 

stitch,  and  trim.  2,000  messages 

\Vm.  Verburg  &  Co., 
To  printing  2,000  copies  of  Gov.  Baldwin's  mes- 
sage, and  500  copies  of  Gov.  Crapo's  mes- 

siige,  in  Dutch 

translation  of  same 


March  Sei,  1809. 
S.  R.  Greene, 

To  repair,  lock  in  Gov's  room _. 

(jreorge  L.  Pease, 

To  blank  book _ _ 


March  ^6thy  1S60. 
(reo.  L.  Pease, 

To  3  rms.  14  lb.  linen  letter 

1  rm.  note _ 

lith.  4  rms 

2  rms.  legal  cap 

10  mis.  book 

Amount  carried  forward i 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  13 

Executive  Department 

V8, 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward tl,332  85 

W.  &  George  &  Co., 

To  printing  joint  res,  asking  $50,000  of  U.  S 5  50 

"         '•        •*      for  erection  of  light- 
houses - - _  _  3  50 

paper  for  same. 1  50 

printing  joint  res.  for  Gov.  to  transmit 5  50 

piper  for  same 75 

printing  joint  res.,  harbor  at  mouth  Cheboy- 
gan river 5  50 

paper  for  same 75 

printing  joint  res.,  completion  of  harbor  at 

month  of  Cheboygan  river 5  50 

paper  for  same , 75 

printing  joint  res..  Mineral  Range  B.  R 5  50 

paper  for  same 75 

print  1  blank  book,  record  of  warrants,  &c.- .  5  00 

••     2  "  "  requisitions--.  11  00 

t  rms.  pa|)er  for  same _ 12  80 

Whitney  Jones,  P.  M., 
To  letter  postage,  paper  do.,  drawer,  131  54,  95c., 

♦1 - 33  49 

D«Ti«  &  Lamed, 

To  1  ewer  and  basin  for  Gov's  room 2  25 

1  covered  soap  dish 1  00 

^•T  H.  Bow, 
To  paid  for  engrossing  3  copies  of  joint  resolution 
of  1869,  ratifying  amendment  to  Constitu- 
tion of  the  United  States. 3  00 

tin  tube  for  transmitting  same  to  Washington  40 

Amount  carried  forward $1,485  29 


14  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

EjcecuMve  Department 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 
Amount  brought  forward 11,41 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  printing  joint  resolution  relative  to  vaccina- 
tion of  Indians 

paper  for  same 

printing  joint  resolution  relative  to  the  In- 
dian Reservation 

paper  for  same 

printing  joint  resolution  relative  to  navigation 
between  IT.  S.  and  Canada 

paper  for  same 

printing  joint  resolution  relative  to  i>en8ions 
of  soldiers  of  war  of  1812 

paper  for  same 

printing  joint  resolution  relative  to  Soldiers' 
National  Cemetery  at  Gettysburg 

paper  for  same. _ _ 

binding  3  requisition  books 

print,  joint  res.  rel.  to  Geological  survey 

paper  for  same 

print,  joint  resolution  relative  to  relief  of  El- 
mina  Brainard.: 

paper  for  same 

print,  joint  resolution  asking  Congress  for  an 
appropriation  of  money  to  improve  Port- 
age lake -_ 

paper  for  same 

print  joint  resolution  relative  to  railroad  un- 
der the  Detroit  river 

paper  for  same _ — 

Amount  carried  forward t 


BOARD  OF  8TATE   AUDITORS.  15 

Executive  Department 

vs. 
The  Stute  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  fonvard $1,547  93 

Cml  L  Pease, 

To  1  qt  copy-  ink 1  25 

1  bottle  carmine,  60o. ;  pads,  10c 70 

2  knife  erasers 1  50 

3  robber  erasers,  30c. ;  3  letter  clips,  90c 1  20 

1  box  pens,  25c. ;  1  pr.  shears,  $1  50 1  75 

Ispool  tajx?-- 1  25 

i  doz.  rubber  bands,  35  and  25c. ;  6  pen  hold- 
ers, 60c. 1  20 

2  role  rs 80 

2pen  racks 2  00 

1  box  mucilage 75 

2  doz,  rubber  bands _ 50 

2doz.  pencils 1  80 

2  sponge  cui)8  and  sponges 1  70 

IktU-rbook 4  00 

1  dailj  journal 1  50 

2  sheets  blotting  paper 20 

16  file  sticks,  48c. ;  2  paper  cutters,  12s 1  98 

2  paper  weights 2  50 

2  qrs.  file  paper 2  00 

1  box  eyelets,  50c. ;  2  sheets  blot,  paper,  20c.. .  70 

1  brush,  lOs- ,  3  rubber  sheets,  $1  20 2  45 

2  qrs.  legal,  80c. ;  1  qt  Arnold's  fluid,  lOs.. . .  2  05 

2qr8.1egal 80 

10  file  sticks,  30c. ;  1  paper  folder,  40c 70 

2  doz.  pens 25 

^  sheets  parchment 6  00 

3  gr.  rubber  bands 3  00 

3  doz.  rubber  bands 75 

'Vmonut  carried  forward $1,592  70 


16  AXNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

Executive  DepaHment 

vs. 
Th£  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,^ 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  1  knife  eraser,  T5c. ;  1  red  and  blue  pencil,  20c. 
Grove  &s.  Whitney, 

To  repairing  and  lining  stove  in  Gov's  room 

Daily  Post, 

To  adv.  Gov's  proclamation,  T  fols.  2  times 


April  28ih,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  printing  joint  resolution  relative  to  the  trans- 
fer of  St.  Mary's  Ship  Canal  to  the  IT.  S..  . 

paper  for  same 

printing   joint   resolution   relative   to  light- 
house at  mouth  of  Pere  Marquette  river.  > 

pai)er  for  same 

printing  joint  resolution  relative  to  improve- 
ment of  Mackinac  harbor 

paper  for  same 


Jmi^  30 thy  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  printing  blank  commissions  for  Gov 

E.  B.  Millar  &  Co., 

To  soap  for  Gov^s  office - 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  Governor 

Whitney  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  letter  postage -. 

drawer,  qr.  ending  June  30th,  1869 

Amount  carried  forward 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  17 

ExeeiMx^  Department 

vs. 
The  State  of  Mi4Mg<m. 

August  27th,  1869. 

Amoant  brought  forward $1,651  79 

G«aLPett8e, 

To  1  letter  copy  book 3  00 


October  5th,  1869. 
Vlutney  Jones, 

Toletter  postage 03 

dnwcr 1  00 

tifaL  Pease, 

ToJMIfal2  white  envelopes 6  00 

100  ex.  large  white       "      2  00 

1  gross  000  mbber  bands,  No.  5 6  00 


October  27th,  1869. 
"^  B.  Greene, 
To  tsL  down  and  clean,  stove-pipe  in  Gov's  room  1  50 


November  24th,  1869. 
^'  ^  George  &  Co., 

To  pub.  Gov's  Thanksgiving  Proc,  6  f.  4  w 10  50 

IP.  Baldwin, 

To  cash  paid  telegrams 1  72 

<»sh  paid  postage  stamps 28  00 

telegrams  on  account  of  Board  of  Control 

SanltCanal 2  40 

'«*• »1,713  94 

3 


18  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

Secretary  of  State 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

December  3d, 

Jno.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 
To  print,  circulars  to  county  clerks,  for  transmis- 
sion of  documents 

print,  certificates  of  election  for  presidential 

electors  

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  blank  receii)ts 

binding  230  siession  laws,  vol.  1,  0)  32c 

adv.  notice  of  meeting  of  Swamp  Land  Board, 

1  sq.  3  w 

adv.  official  canvass  for  presidential  electors, 

38fors,  2  w. 

adv.  official  canvass,  cir.  judge  3d  circuit,  4 

f.  2w - 

Whitney  Jones, 

To  letter  postage 

paper 

drawer 


December  SOfhy  1868. 
State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  stamps 

0.  L.  Spaulding, 

To  paid  telegram  to  Governor 

Detroit  Free  Press, 

To  adv.  proc.  const,  election -. 

"         thanksgiving 

Geo.  L.  Pea«e, 

To  1  ream  medium 

1      "      flat  cap 


Amount  carried  forward. 


f 


BOARD  OP  STATE   AUDITORS.  19 

Secretary  of  Stcute 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amonnt  brought  forward $192  34 

Geo.L  Pease, 

To  2  reams  P.  0.  paper 14  00 

Iream       *•        "     5  25 

1  doz.  red  and  bine  pencils 1  00 

6        "              "             "       4  50 

1  doz.  No.  13  pencils 90 

2  rms.  12  lb.  1st  class  flat  letter 9  00 

1  nn.  enrolling  paper 20  00 

10  rms.  double  cap 200  00 

10  rms.  single  cap 100  00 

10  rms.  flat  foolscap 75  00 

10  rms.  letter 60  00 

Bingham,  Kerr  &  Co., 
To  pub.  official  canv.  of  State  officers,  66  f.  2  w..  69  30 

"     State  B'd  of  Ed.,  11  f.  2  w..  11  55 

*•        "      Rep.  in  Cong.,  1st  Dist.,  5  f. 

2w 5  25 

pub.  official  canv.  of  Rep.  in  Cong.,  2d  Dist., 

6f.2  w 6  30 

pub.  official  cauT.  of  Rep.  in  Cong.,  3d  Dist., 

5f.2  vr 5  25 

pub.  official  canv.  of  Rep.  in  Cong.,  4th  Dist., 

7£  2w 7  35 

pub.  official  canv.  of  Rep.  in  Cong.,  5th  Dist., 

5fl2w 5  25 

pub.  official  canv.  of  Rep.  in  Cong.,  6th  Dist., 

7£2  w 7  35 

Jao.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 
To  print,  certificates  of  election  of  State  officers 

and  members  of  Congress 12  00 

print  5  rms.  notary  commissions 17  60 

Amonnt  carried  forward 1828  09 


20 


AKKUAL  BEPORT  OF  THE 


Secretary  of  State 

The  Sta/te  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 

Jno.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  print  3  rms.  patents 

ream  commissions 

"     blanks,  com.  deeds 

"     registration 

"     extradition  blanks 

^*      delivery  of  fugitives 

form"P" 


m 


66 


16 


66 


66 


66 


66 


66 


it 


rul. 
press. 


66 


66 

66 

66  66 

6( 


66  UgW 

66      66  Q  yy 


"D" 


66 
66 
(i 

« 

66 
66 

« 
66 
66 


paper  twice 

and  trim.  4  reams  notary  commissions. 

3      "    patents 

1  ream  notary  commissions. 


66 


66 


66 
66 
6i 
6i 
66 
%6 

%6 
66 


i 


^'  g^ieral  commissions 

"    com.  deeds 

"    requisitions 

*'  extradition  blanks.. 

"  delivery  of  fugitives. 

"    blanks  "A" 


66 


«% 


66 


66 
66 
66 


66 


D" 


ruling  4  reams  blanks,  A,  B,  C,  D,  3  times 
each 


January  26ih,  1869. 
State  Treasurer, 
To  postage  for  Secretary's  office 

Amount  carried  forward 


BOARD   OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  21 

Secretary  of  State 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amouut  brought  forward $912  69 

West  Un.  Telegraph  Co., 

To  telegrams  from  Jan.  1,  to  Jan.  20, 1869 3  59 

Geo.  L  Pease, 

To  1  doz.  pieces  popular  ribbon 900 


January  27thy  1869. 
\  B.  Greene, 

Tol  box 85 

1  box 85 

repair.  1  chair 60 

"      chairs 2  60 


February  lOthy  1869. 
T.  B.  Thrift, 

To  2  Yale  drawer  locks 3  60 

1  pr.  shears 60 

American  Express  Company, 
To  express  charges  from  Nov.  18th,  1868,  to  Jan. 

19th,1869 3  65 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  instructions  to  foreign 

insurance  companies 60 

printing  envelopes 1  60 

print  blanks,  instructions  to  foreign  insurance 

companies 6  50 

print  certificate  of  election  of  U.  S.  Senator.  -  3  60 

-Amount  carried  forward $948  63 


22  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

J 

Secretary  of  State 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigaji. 

February  16th,  186 

Amount  brought  forward $941 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  Sec.  State's  office _ 5< 


March  3d,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  press-  and  trim.  1  rm.  circulars  to  sheriffs. . . . 

dry.  and  press.  19,500  signatures 

folding  "  "  

stitching  1,500  pamphlets 

cover,  and  trim.  1,500  pamplets 

printing  circulars  to  sheriffs 

"  "         to  county  clerks 

**        4  rms.  notary  commissions 

'*        numbers 

S.  R  Greene, 

To  1  small  desk  case 

1  box,  (prison  reports) _ 

set  2  Yale  locks 

3  boxes  for  office 

1  box 

3  boxes 

repair,  drawers  in  office 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  6  rms.  No.  15  legal  cap 

6  gross  rubber  bands 

18  rms.  letter  paper 

lithographing  24  rms 

State  Treasurer, 
To  postage  for  use  of  office 


Amount  carried  forward $1 

0 


ftft 


•t 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  23 

Secretary  of  State 

V8, 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

March  26th,  1869. 

Amount  brought  fonvard $1,281  39 

Secretarv  of  State, 
To  amount  paid  for  abstract  of  title  and  valua- 
tion of  lands  embraced  in  mortgages  held 
by  i£tna  Live  Stock  Insurance  Co.  of  Ox- 
ford, Mo.,  as  Capital  Stock 11  00 

S.  S.  Greene, 

To  repairing  and  covering  stool 1  00 

desk 2  00 

drawer 75 

ti«x  Lw  Peaae, 

To  1  ream  folio  post 7  50 

^  M  legal  envelopes 3  38 

\    *•  " 2  04 

\  M  notarial  wafers 5  50 

W-  Sl  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  4  rms.  notary  commissions 2  00 

Wfile  boxes 4  20 

enclofling  250  reports  in  wrappers  for  mails. .  1  25 

trim,  and  press.  4  rms.  licenses 200 

print.  4  rms.  licenses 14  00 

envelopes 3  00 

542,316  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Sec 244  04 

1^  tokens  press  work  on  same 78  00 

print  4  rms.  covers  for  same 8  00 

WUtney  Jones,  P.  M., 
To  letter  postage,  69c. ;  paper  do.,  91  05 ;  draw- 
er, $1  00 2  74 

George  Y.  Gordon, 
Tol  Hughes' Shipper's  Guide 1  00 

Amount  carried  forward 11,674  79 


24  ANNUAL  BBPOBT  OF  THE 

Secretary  of  State 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

April  6th,  18\ 

Amonnt  brought  forward tl,6'i 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print.  1  ream  paper  for  certificates 

"     blanks,  certificates  of  filing 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  certificates  of  filing.. 

"  "     1  ream  blanks 

ruling  2  rms.  4  times 

print,  envelopes  to  county  clerks 

5,936  ems  comp.  on  laws  relative  to  duties  of 
overseers  and  commissioners  of  highways 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  1  inkstand 

1  rm.  legal  cap 

1  knife  eraser 

1  monitor  inkstand ,. 

1  eyelet  machine 

1  gross  eyelets 

1  gold  pen  and  case 

3  letter  clips 

1  sponge  cup 

2  letter  clips,  8s.  and  6s 

ink 

sealing  wax 

10  rubber  pen  holders 

blottingpaper 

1  rm.  P.  0.  paper 

2  qrs.  file  paper 

i  M  legal  envelopes 

1  inkstand 

6  rms.  plain  letter _. 

1  doz.  pencils 

Amount  carried  forward %\ 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  25 

Secretary  of  Stivte 

vs. 

The  Skete  of  Miehigan, 

Amount  brought  for^^ard $1,766  70 

To  postage  stampe  ftimished  Secretary  of  State.  50  00 

Deowt  Daily  Post  Co., 

Todaay  to  office  to  March  27th,  1870 10  00 

W.  H.  ChapmaBy 
To  rent  of  bnilding  used  as  store  and  packing 
room  for  laws,  from  April  Ist,  1868,  to 

April  Ist,  1860 --. 70  00 

^B.  Greene, 

Tolboi 85 

^te  ft  Whitney, 

To  1  key  for  office 50 

30  lbs,  assorted  nails 1  95 

1  tin  pail  for  office 30 

lire  foroffioe 10 


April  38iky  1860. 
T.&  George  &  Co., 

T'>  print,  circulars  to  county  clerks 3  50 

*•     1500  envelopes 2  25 

**     7  rms.  cir.  to  supervisors  and  assessors.  24  50 

-  certificates 3  50 

-  1500  envelopes  (small) 2  25 

-  circulars  to  county  clerks 3  50 

blanks  for  justice  of  supreme  court. . .  7  00 

'•*          regents  of  University 7  00 

*•           circuit  judge 7  00 

15.904  ems  comp.  on  laws  for  registration  of 

births,  marriages  and  deaths 7  95 

^nnt  carried  fomard $1,968  75 

4 


26  ANNUAL  REPOET  OF  THE 

Secretary  of  State 

V8, 

TJie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward II,' 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  7  tokens  press  work  on  same 

print  insurance  laws,  50,744  ems  comp 

15  tokens  press  work  on  same 

print.  3  rms.  covers  for  same 

press,  and  trim.  7  rms.  circulars  to  supenrisors 
"  "    1  ream  circulars  to  co.  clerks 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  1  doz.  quarts  Arnold^s  ink 

1  eyelet  machine 

50  M  legal  envelopes,  eng'd,  &c . 

300  sheets  blotting  paper,  No.  2 

3  boxes  eyelets 

American  M.  U.  Express  Co., 
To  express  charges  from  Feb.  18th,  1869,  to  April 

17th,  1869 

telegrams  from  Feb.  19th,  1869,  to  April  17th, 

1869 

Bingham,  George  &  Co., 
To  subscription  to  Republican  from  No.  661  to 

No.  763,2  years 

8.  DeGraw, 
To  team  and  help  moving  11  loads  books  for 

office 

State  Treasurer, 
To  postage  for  office 

Amount  carried  forward i 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDIT0B8.  27 

Secretary  of  State 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

May  26thy  1869. 

AmoDnt  brought  forward t;2,155  51 

^  4  M.  U.  Express  Company, 
To  express  services  from  April  19th,  1869,  to  May 

24th,1869 4  50 

tekgrams 3  35 

•''•I  Greene, 

i  To  17  boiea  for  office 14  45 

iStGeoige  ft  Co., 

Tb  print  certificates  of  election  for  Chief  Justice, 
Begents,  and  circuit  judges  of  the  16  dif- 
ferent circuits.- 18  00 

print  blanks,  oaths  of  oflSce 1 5  50 

*•    circulars  to  county  clerks 5  50 

1  dieet  thick  paste  board 25 

pR8&  and  trim.  1  ream  oath  of  office 50 

"  '*         1  rm.  circulars  to  co.  clerks  50 

print  600  copies  of  fire  ins.  act 10  00 

print  2  reams  covers  for  same 4  00 

•dv.  official  State  canvass  of  justice  of  su- 
preme court  and  circuit  judges,  in  Lan- 

ong  Republican,  128  fols.,  2  w 133  40 

tCHine, 

To  Vol  17,  Ins.  Monitor  and  Wall  St.  Review  3  00 

Ulhkfr, 

Tolwpybook 1  50 

fa^LPoae, 

T»Snn«.37  lb.  medium 98  48 

5nng.ilat  letter 20  00 


^wnt  carried  forward 12,472  44 


&S  ANTTUAL   BEPORT  OP  THK 

Secretary  of  State 

The  State  of  Jtfii^igan. 
Amonnt  brought  forward I 

SamT  H.  Row, 
To  preparing  the  State  canvaaB  on  Juatice  Su- 
preme Court,  Regenta  of  UniYeraty,  and 
circuit  judges 


June  30th,  tS89. 
W.  8.  George  &  Co., 
To  print,  circulars  to  county  clerks  relative  to 

order  for  blanks. 

print.  3  rms.  blanks,  returns  of  births. 

2       "  "      of  marriages — 

2        "  "      of  deaths - 

L  rm.  life  insurance  application 

I  rm.  blank  life  ins.  authority 

L  rm.  appointment  of  agents 

1.  circular  No.  1  to  foreign  Ins.  Go's 
"        to  county  clerks 


life  insurance  record 

circulars  to  county  clerks 

schedule  "  D,"  bond  and  mort.. 

i  rms.  patents _, 

400  labels 

8.  R.  Greene, 

To  1700  ft.  lumber,  ceihng 

paid  for  sawing,  kiln  dry.  and  match 

paid  for  carting 

134  ft.  pine  for  margin  and  work  on  same.  - 
3  days  to  smooth  and  bead  the  ceihng 


Amount  carried  fons'ard. . 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUBITOBS.  29 

Secretary  of  Stai^ 

vs. 

The  suae  of  JdUhigan. 

AaioBiit  broiight  forward 12,673  74 

>.  R.  Greene, 

Tb9daj8' work  to  put  onceiliug 24  00 

50  Ibe.  nailB  for  same 1  30 

cadi  for  paint  and  oil  and  turpentine. 12  25 

painter's  work - 11  75 

ctfting  staging  to  and  from  office 2  00 

repaLring  chair  for  Sec.  of  State 60 

91  boxes  for  laws  of  1869,4c, 77  35 

alter,  and  rehang.  door  in  office 2  00 

1. 8.  George  ft  Co^ 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  ream  circulars  to  co.  clerks  50 

"    1    "      ine.  blanks.  No.  1 50 

*•*    1    **      appointment  of  ag'ts  50 

*•'    1    "      applications 50 

**    1    "      circulars 50 

**    1    "  **        to  CO.  clerks, 

letom  births 50 

presB.  and  trim.  1  ream  recdpts  for  laws. ... .  50 

^*    3  reams  returns,  births 150 

2    "           "        marriages  . .  1  00 


"    2    ''  «        deaths 1  00 


mling  2  reams  returns,  deaths,  6  times 6  00 

*•      2      **           "     marriages,  6  times...  6  00 

-      3      «           **     births,  6  times 9  00 

folding  and  stitching  7  reams  above 3  50 

piesB.  and  trim.  ins.  blank,  ^  D '' 50 

rating  same  4  times 2  00 

I^BuXOlarftCo, 

Tol  broom - 75 

IpaO u 35 

carried  forward $2,840  09 


30  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THK 

Secretary  of  State 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amouut  brought  forward - I 

State  Treaaurer, 

To  )>ostagc  for  office 

letter  postage 

paper  postage,  qr.  ending  June  30, 1869 

drawer 

postage  for  office  of  Sec.  of  State 


Jtilg  28th,  1869. 
ff.  S.  CkKirge  &  Co., 

To  print.  1  ream  blanks,  form  No.  1,  fire 

"      3         '•  B,C&D 

"      2  reams  appoint,  of  an  attorney 

"      48  labels 

1  rm.  blank  circnlars  No.  1,  for  insn- 

ranee  companies 

printing  labels - . 

"         circnlars  to  life  ins.  companies 

110  file  boxes,  35c 

press,  and  trim,  1  ream  paper 

ruling  same  4  times 

binding  10  qrs.  foreign  life  insurance  company, 

Russia  ends  and  bands 

]}aging  same 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  patents _  _ 

"  "  1    "    commissions 

bind.  40  vols,  session  laws,  1869,  leatber 

press,  and  trim.  %  rme.  ins.  blanks,  appointment 
of  attorneys 

Amount  carried  forward 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  31 

Secretary  of  State 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  broQght  forward $3,045  76 

W.  8.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  applications 50 

1    "   schedule  B,  C,  D 50 

rating  1  ream  schedule,  10  times 5  00 

**      1     *•      applications,  3  times ^  1  50 

prws.  and  trim.  2  rms.  circulars 1  00 

Gfo.  L  Pease, 

To  6  do*.  Faber'a  pencils,  No.  13,  90c 5  40 

6  dos.  Eagle  pencils,  No.  14,  75c 4  50 

5  rms.  flat  letter  paper,  $4  00 20  00 

5  reams  bond  paper,  $20  00 100  00 

S.  B.  Greene, 

To  2  doors  for  blank  case,  CD  $3 6  00 

7  door  butts,  25  screws,  12  fastenings 97 

▼ork  of  easing,  fit.  and  hang,  doors 2  75 

4  boxes  for  office,  U  85c 3  40 

1  day  to  re-hang  windows 3  00 

cord  for  windows 50 

1  box 85 

11  boxes  for  laws 9  35 

lumber,  work  and  other  materials  for  pigeon- 
hole cases  in  office 65  75 

2  boxes  for  books 1  70 


August  27th,  1860. 
Mite  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  office  of  Secretary  of  State 25  00 

i.  M.  Un.  Ex.  Co., 
To  express  charges  from  May  27th,  1869,  to  Aug. 

24th,1869 6  30 


Amount  carried  forward $3,309  73 

/ 


32  ANNUAL  REPOKT  OF  THE 

Secretary  of  State 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan.. 

Amount  brought  forward t3, 

Geo.  L.  Peiue, 

To  1  gross  riibber  bands,  3  lbs. 

1     "  '■  ■'        olbs. 

if    "  "  "        61b8.,flije00 

1     "  "       strings 

3  doz.  red  and  blue  pencils,  O  6s, 

30  lbs.  ex.  roll  manilla,  O  20c 

S.  R  Greene, 

Tol  box 

1     "  


1 


Yale  lock,  12r,  and  pnt  ou  P.  0.,  50c 

7  boxes 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print.  1  ream  No.  1  original  cert  of  anthoritj. 

1  rm,  certified  copy  of  same 

1  rm.  oert.  No.  1  of  Fire  Ins.  Co. 

1  rm.  ins.  record  l)ook 

3,000  lai^  labels  for  books,  &c.,  and 

paper  for  same 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  ins.  circnlars 

"  "     2  rms.  blanks,  No.  1 

binding  Vri  qrs.  record  of  births,  marriages 

and  deaths,  Russia  ends  and  bands,  ISs.. . 

paging  same 

Amount  carried  forward 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  33 

Secretary  of  Stdte 

The  Staie  of  Michigan. 

Odober  Sth,  1S69. 

Amount  brought  forward $3,502  83 

WUtDey  Jones,  P.  M^ 

Tbletter  postage 1  33 

ptperpoatage 1  05 

drawer 1  00 

Poodift  Esselstyn, 
To  2  pieces  cocoa   matting,  50  and   49  yds., 

997d&,0$l  00 99  00 

State  Treasurer, 

To  portage  for  office 25  00 

llLUn.£x.  Co^ 
To  express  charges  from  Aug.  25th,  1869,  to  Oct. 

4Ui,1869 5  60 

telegrams,  do. 2  14 

express  omitted  from  former  acct. 1  00 

W.  8.  Oeoige  &  Co., 

To  print  1  ream  blanks,  births,  1  side 3  50 

piessL  and  trim,  one  ream  paper 50 

nding  1  ream  4  times 2  00 

bind.  8  qrs.  For.  Fire  Ins.  Co.,  fall  bound, 

Russia  ends  and  bands,  12  00 16  00 

ruling  1  ream  return  of  births,  3  times 1  50 

fiio.L  Pease, 
To  20  nns.  crown 115  00 


October  27th,  1869. 
Site  Trwsurer, 
To  portage  for  office 30  00 

Anomit  carried  forward 13,807  45 

5 


34  ANNDAL   REPOBT   OF  THE 

Secretary  of  State 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward _  13,8 

S.  K.  Greene, 

To  1  writing  desk  for  Secretary 1 

work  to  lay  matting  in  back  office 

tacke,  60c. ;  move  old  desk,  75c 

work,   %%  50 ;    tacks,   35c.,    lay.   matting  in 
front  office 

1  box  for  compiled  laws 

2  boxes  

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  ream  notice  to  clerks 

print,  circnlars  to  county  clerks 

"     100  labels -, 

labels 

George  L.  Pease, 

To  i  doz.  ink  erasers 

i  doz.  ivory  paper  folders 

1  doz.  grooms  2  oz.  carmine 


Sovember  S4ih,  J869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  Gov's  proc. 

paste  board 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  marriage  returns 

ruling  1  ream  marriage  retuma  twice 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  ins.  reports 

'"  "     1  rm.  life  in&  reports 

print.  1  ream  blanks,  marriagoa,  1  side 

"      3  reams  blanks,  schedule  B,  G,  and  £, 
2  sides 

Amount  carried  forward 1 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  35 

Secretary  of  Stat% 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $3,960  50 

W.  &  George  k  Co^ 

Toprint  2  rms.  blanks,  schedule  B 11  00 

(ieoiLPefise« 

To500manaia  envelopes,  4i  x  lOJ 6  00 

500        "                "       5ixl4 7  75 

5  nns.  commercial  note 13  75 

SOboxesseals 32  50 

Totil 14,021  60 


AudUcfr  Oeneral 

The  State  of  Miehigan. 

December  Sd,  1868. 
hx  L  Kerr  &  Co^ 

To  print  ciicnlars,  form  S $3  50 

print  21  nn&  blanks,  No.  3 116  60 

4    "          "        "     12 U  Op 

«       6    "          "        "     13 21  00 

"     10    «          "        "     U 35  00 

1  portfolio 75 

roling  1  rm.  ledger,  4  times 2  00 

bind.  7  qrs.  do.  foil  boxiiidy  Rnssia  ends  and 

bands 14  00 

paging  same 66 

separate  index  for  same 100 

preaa  and  trim.  40  rms.  blanks,  No.  2 20  00 

rnlingsame  fonr  times 80  00 

press,  and  trim.  21  rms.  blanks 10  50 

ruling  same  four  times 42  00 

pesaand  trim.  4  rma  blanks,  No.  12 2  00 

«        10    "        "        "     14 5  00 

raling  20  rms.  blanks,  Nos.  12, 13,  and  14,  once  10  00 
Bnett  ft  Bemer, 

To  phstering  and  whitewashing  in  olBce 6  00 

JobNagle, 

Tbcuih  paid  for  lamp  fixtures  for  office 38 

•*           «       twobrooms      "      «    100 

WLPease, 

To  10  rms.  flat  cap 54  00 

2  rms.  P.  O.  paper 10  50 

J  nns.  P.  0.  paper 14  00 

Aaoont  carried  forward 1465  69 


38  ANNUAL   ItEPORT   OF  THE 

.Auditor  General 

vs. 

The  Statfi  of  Michigan. 

December  30th,  li 

Amount  brouglit  forward ti 

Davis  &  Larncd, 

To  I  porcelain  lamp  ehuilc .  - 

6  chimneys _ 

GrOTe  &  Wliitncy. 

To  1  shovel 

1  tunnel,  15c.;  sheet  iron  pan  for  register,  41 
Hitchcock  &  Bro.. 

To  tape  for  curtains  in  office. .  - 

S.  K.  Greene. 

To  counter  for  3  deeks 

I  desk  for  table 

top  case  for  two  clerks 

alter,  and  re-finish,  old  desk 

case  for  large  books  on  counter 

1  Yale  drawer  lock - 

fix.  and  put.  on 

foot  stool  for  office 

draying  to  office 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  4  rms,  supen-oyal 

3  rms.  34x36  manilla 

3  rms.  36x48  manilln 

Jno.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  print.  C  nna  deeds,  No.  33 

!      '■       "        ■■     34 


1      '■        •■         -     17.. 
1  warrant  book 


Amonnt  carried  forward.. 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  39 

Auditor  General 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $787  01 

Jna  L  Kerr  &  Co», 

To  print  3  rm&  blanks,  No.  18 10  50 

*•      1     "         **        "    40 3  50 

*'     blanks  for  books — list  of  counties 5  50 

bind.  10  qrs.  State  tax  lands,  full  Russia 22  50 

paging  same 80 

linen  corers,  2  books,  same - 3  00 

lettering  11  books 1  65 

repair,  and  letter.  15  State  tax  land  books 2  50 

press,  and  trim.  10  nns.  paper 5  00 

roling  10  rms.  unpaid  tax  books,  6  times 30  00 

bind.  184  qrs.  unpaid  tax  books,  double  cap, 

full  bound,  Eussia  coTcrs 276  00 

paging  same 14  70 

ppwa.  and  trim.  6  rms.  blanks,  No.  32 3  00 

"          2    "        "        "34 1  00 

1     "        "        "    44 50 

ruling  same  3  times 1  50 

press,  and  trim.  5  rms.  blanks,  No.  9 2  50 

mlingsame 2  50 

"      2  rms.  paper  twice _ 2  00 

pressing  and  trim.  1  ream.  No.  17 50 

"         3      "      '•'     18, 128 ;  paste- 
board, 48. 2  00 

pressing  and  trim.  1  ream,  No.  40, 46. ;  ruling 

same,  48. 1  00 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  list  of  counties,  50c.; 

ruling  same  twice,  tl 1  50 

Aaount  carried  forward $1,180  66 


40  ANNUAL  RBPOBT  OF  THE 

Auditor  General 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

January  26tk,  IS 

Amount  brought  forvard tl,ll 

S.  DeGraw, 

To  draying 

Brifibin  &  Coaelj, 
To  2  Ibe.  gum  arable 

January  27th,  JS69. 
S.  R  Greene, 

To  repair,  letter  scales 

3  days'  work  repairing 

draying 

lumber  and  work  for  case  of  pigeonholes.... 
lumber,  $3 ;  work  to  make  and  bang,  $7 ;  trim- 
mings for  doors  to  pigeon  hole  case,  Via.. . . 

4J  day's  work 

repair,  and  finisb.  table 

cloth  and  re-cover,  table 


February  10th,  1869. 
American  Express  Company, 
To  express  charges  from  Xot.  18th,  1868,  to  Jan. 

10th,  1869 

Wm.  A.  Throop  &  Co., 

To  2  doz.  Arnold's  qts. 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  mling  1  rm.  paper  8  times 

bind.  7  qrs.  roughs,  Russia  ends  and  bands. . 

bind.  11  quires  general  fund  warrants,  Russia 

ends  and  bands 

Amount  carried  forward t 


BOABD  OF  8TATB  AUDITORS.  41 

Auditor  (General 

The  St(Ue  of  Michigan. 

Aaoont  brought  forward $1,299  21 

W.  8L  George  &  Co., 

TojMsteboard  for  office 60 

ralmg  1  rm.  paper  3  times 150 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  blanks.  No.  43 50 

mounting  18  lists  of  counties 2  00 

dry.  and  press.  18,000  signatures 9  00 

fbldingsame 9  00 

stitching  1,000  pamphlets 3  00 

coTcr.  and  trim.  1,000  pamphlets 10  00 

printing  blank  book — ^taxes  received 5  50 

"        list  of  county  treasurers  and  clerks. .  6  00 

print  2  rms.  blanks,No.31 7  00 

776,474  ems  comp.  on  report 349  41 

2S4  tokens  press  work  on  same 93  60 

print  3  rms.  covers  for  same 6  00 


March  Sdy  1869. 
¥.  9L  George  &  Co., 

To  pi«8&  and  trim.  2  rms.  blanks,  No.  31 1  00 

bind.  5  qrs.  State  tax  land,  full  Russia 11  25 

paging  same 40 

outside  cover  for  same 1  50 

press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  paper 1  00 

roling  same  6  times 6  00 

bind.  25  qrs.  taxes  received,  full  Russia 56  25 

papng  same 2  00 

4aBt8ide  covers 6  00 

bind.  6  qr&  State  tax  lands,  full  Russia 13  50 

pa^same.... 48 

AaKnmi  carried  forward $1,901  60 

6 


42  ANNUAL   REPOBl   OF  THE 

Auditor  Oen^ral 

Tlte  State  of  Mulligan. 

Amount  brought  forward *1,S 

W.  S.  Ocorgo  &  Go- 
to outside  for  same 

trim,  and  press.  4  rms.  blanks,  No.  11 

ruling  4  rms.  blanks.  No.  11 

dry.  and  prose.  875  sigs. 

folding  same 

stitching  35  ])amphlcts - 

oovcr.  and  trim.  350  pamphlcta 

print,  blanks,  directions  for  marking  boxes. . . 

"      4  rme.  blanks.  No.  II 

y.  It.  Greene, 

To  1  high  stool  for  oHice _ 

1  day's  repairing  in  office 

mend.  1  chair _ 

1  day's  work 

1  lock  for  door 

work 

1  castor  and  fi."t.  chair 

A.  II.  Thayer, 

To  1  lamp 

1  bunch  lamp  wicks 


March  36th,  1869. 
.S.  H.  Greene, 

To  lumber,  work,  &c.,  for  case  for  tax  books 

lumber  and  ivork  to  back  pigeon  lioles 

repairing  2  chairs 

IbOK - 

1  bos 

Amount  carried  forward 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  43 

Auditor  Oeneral 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  fonvard $2,106  63 

fkifi.  Humphrev, 

To  1  gross  block  mcm& 16  60 

2  mucilage  reserroirs 2  70 

2  ruling  i)en8 2  00 

rtwt  L  Pease, 

To  22  rms.  crown 148  60 

W .  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  enclodng  500  reports  in  wrappers  for  mailing  2  50 

bind.  31  qrs.,  lands  advertised 31  00 

•^     23    ''    State  tax  lands 23  00 

bind.  130  qrs.,  lands  returned 130  00 

trim,  and  press.  30  rms.  assessment  rolls 16  00 

mling  same  4  times 60  00 

print  30  reams  blanks,  No.  2 165  00 

«       2     "          "         "31 7  00 

•Pitney  Jones,  P.  M., 
To  letter  postage,  $2  36 ;  paper  do.,  $2  50;  draw- 
er, tl 5  86 

Gtorgc  V.  Gordon, 

To  1  copy  Hughes*  Shipper's  Guide 100 


April  6th,  1869, 
^'  K  George  &  Co., 

To  print  1  ream  deeds,  No.  33 5  60 

-      1      "        "        "    34 5  50 

1  rm.  16  lb.  folio  post  for  same 9  60 

print  4  rms.  blanks,  No.  31 14  00 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  blanks.  No.  33 50 

1     "          "         "     34 50 

hind.  5  U.  S.  returns 3  75 

Afiionnt  carried  forward 12,756  04 


44  ANNUAL  EBPOBT  OP  THE 

Auditor  General 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amonnt  brought  forward $2,7 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  blanks,  N'o.  31 

ruling  6  reams  adrertiaed  lists,  %  times 

"      1      "     paper  6  times 

bind.  %  qr&,  appropriation  ledger,  fall  leather, 

Russia  ends 

paging  same 

Oeo.  L.  Pease, 

To  60  file  sticks 

1  gross  pens 

1  eyelet  machine 

3  boxes  eyelets 

1  gross  pens 

1  knife  eraser 

1  gross  eyelets 

J  doz.  rubber  pen  holders 

1  gross  eyelets 

J  doz.  carmine  ink 

1  panch 

Detroit  Post  Co., 

To  daily  for  office  to  March  27th,  1870 

R  B.  Greene, 
To  lumber  for  book-case  and  work  making  same 

repairing  1  chair 

work  to  stop  mice  fh)m  pigeon  hole 

tapeZOc;  repair,  curt^n,  10c. 

GroTe  &,  Whitney, 

To  6  lbs.  nails 

Chas.  Hnmphrey, 
To  10  gross  steel  pens 

Amonnt  carried  forward 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  45 

jiudUar  Oeneral 

vs. 

The  StfxU  of  MichAgoun. 

Amount  brought  forward t2,836  56 

JkUun  k  Conel  jy 

To  3  9-16  IbB.  castile  soap 1  23 

Iciddy  of  matches 1  75 

DiTis  t  Lamed, 

To3  maDL  chimneys 60 

1    **           <*         20 

1  mug 30 

I  If  a  2  chimney 15 

Ibnnch  wicks 25 

lltmp 1  75 

L  H.  McGeorge, 

ToSbiooms 1  50 

1     «      40 


m 


«* 


ApHl  28th,  1869. 
V.S.Geoige  ft  Co^ 
To  printing  '^note^on  2  rms.  note  paper,  relative 

to  taxes  and  interest 7  00 

print  "^note"  on  2  nn&  additional 7  00 

"*        '<  3  rms.  blanks,  No&  29  and  30  10  50 

20  rms.  blanks,  No.  60 110  00 

30,692  ems  comp.  on  tax  law 45  34 

168  tokens  press  work  on  same 67  20 

print  11  rms.  covers  for  same 22  00 

presB.  and  trim.  20  rms.  blanks,  No  60 10  00 

nding  20  rms.  bknks.  No.  60,  twice 20  00 

*».A.Thioop&Co., 

To  U  rms.  crown,  for  assessment  rolls 159  72 

A«oimt  carried  forward 13,303  45 


46  AXNUAL   REPORT  OF  THK 

Auditor  Qeneral 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Atnontit  brought  fonvard 13^ 

H.  R  Qreeue, 

To  repairing  chair  and  cuahion 

American  M.  U.  Express  Co., 
To  oipresa  charges  from  Jan.  25th,  1809,  to  April 

17th,  1869 

Bingham,  Qeorge  &  Co., 

To  subscription  to  Republican  from  No.  661  to 
No.  763,  8  years 


Afatf  26th,  1S69. 
Am.  &  M.  U.  EspresB  Company, 

To  express  serrices  from  April  20tli,  1869,  to  May 

80th,  1869 

S.  E.  Greene, 

To  6  cane  seat  dining  chairs 

3  new  stools 

repair,  old  stools 

fit.  up  7  chairs  for  office 

1  door  lock 

work  to  put  on  same  and  repair,  door 

repair.  1  chair 

mend.  1  chair _ 

repairs  in  office 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print.  40  reams  blanks.  No.  60 


•'      filing  on  county  treas.  bonds  . 
Amount  carried  forward 


BOARD  Of  8TATE  AUDITORS.  47 

AudUcr  General 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan^. 

Amonnt  brought  forward 13,632  85 

W.  SI  Gcoige  &  Co., 
Toprinti  reams  circulars  calling  attention  to 

tailaw : U  00 

^nn.  folio  post  paper  for  same 3  20 

print  2  reams  blanks,  No.  6 7  00 

-     8      '*          "        "    59 44  00 

*•     4      •*          **        "     4 14  00 

"     note  relative  to  taxes  on  3  rms.  letter 

heads 10  50 

print  4  nns.  blanks,  No.  5 14  00 

pre»  and  trim.  4  rms.  tax  notice 2  00 

40    "    blanks.  No.  70 20  00 

niling  same  twice 40  00 

pen.  and  trim.  8  reams  blanks,  No.  69 4  00 

niling  same  twice 8  00 

pntg.and  trim.  8  rms.  blanks,  No.  68 4  00 

ntfingaune  once 4  00 

Pfe«.and  trim.  2  reams  blanks,  No.  6 1  00 

niEng  same  once 1  00 

pt«^  and  trim.  4  rms.  blanks,  No.  5 2  00 

rvlingsame  once 2  00 

pwa  and  trim.  4  rms.  blanks,  No.  4 2  00 

pwteboard  and  pasting  list  of  counties 3  00 

mBng  4  rms.  blanks,  No.  4,  once 2  00 

print  250  copies  R  R.  Act 5  00 

**«  4  Conely, 

T'>  2  gallons  carbon  oil 90 

*    "             •*      « 90 

2  Ibe.  best  select  gum  arabic 2  50 

^mnt  carried  forward $3,841  85 


50  ASSCAL  REPOBT  OF  THE 

Auditor  General 

vs. 

The  StcOe  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward |4, 

W.  S.  George  &  Co^ 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  iiii,  blanks,  "  I " 

1     "        "       "T" '..... 

Ehigatt  &  Forbirger, 

To  bill  of  lithographed  letter  and  note  paper. . . 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  10  gross  envelopes,  No.  12 

6        "  "  "    12,  official 

4  doz.  grooms  carmine 

5  lbs.  red  wax,  No.  2 

J.  S.  Baker, 

To  Idoz.  Dessauer's  carmine  ink 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  work  and  cord  to  re-hang  windows 

repair,  and  cover,  stool 

alter,  and  re-fit.  3  drawers 

1  stool 


August  27th,  1869. 
A.  M.  U.  Express  Company, 

To  express  charges  from  June  4th,  1860,  to  Aug. 

24th,  1869 

telegrams 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  253  2-20  nns.  demy,©  $6  00 

3|  doz.  Arnold's  genuine  qts.,  ait6  69 

12  gross  pens,  a  68 

3  rmB.legal,  a  *5  50 

4  mucilage  reservoirs,  O  12  00 

Amount  carried  fornard ...-- 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  51 

•iudUor  Oeneral 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $6,266  95 

fecLLPease, 
To  1  great  grofifi  rubber  bands,  31  lbs. 9  00 

100  reams  crown,  O  $6  76 676  00 

20     ^'       flat  cap,  a  $4  20 84  00 

40 

1 

1 


CD  1640. _ 216  00 

P.  0.  paper 3  00 


*i  i4 


6  00 

1       "       blotting 24  00 

tetei  A  Conelv, 

To  1  gal.  carbon  oil 46 

1       •*  "     45 

1      "  ^'     46 

1       -  " 45 

1       -  "     45 

1  large  chimney 15 

1  gaL  carbon  oil 46 

i  Ibfl.  best  gum  arable 2  00 

M  Greene, 

To  mending  3  chairs 150 

^N  George  A  Co., 
To.  print  1  rm.  blanks,  No.  44 

*  5,000  envelopes 

6  rms.  blank  sales'  books 

«        o       M  ((  a  a 

"     250  reams  blanks,  No.  59 1,375  00 

"     1        **'        abstract  blanks 

-     1        "        circulars,  " A^' 

pit»B.  and  trim.  1  rm.  blanks,  No.  44 

«lingl  ream  blanksS  times _ 

•  1    **^       abstract  paper  6  times 

i»oimt  carried  forward $8,739  80 


3  50 

7  50 

33  00 

16  50 

1,376  00 

5  50 

3  50 

50 

1  50 

3  00 

5?  ASNUAL    REPORT   OF  THE 

Auditor  General 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward . .  - ti 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  bind.  40  qra  county  treoB.  receipts 

"     7  vols.  U.  S.  Statutes,  full  leather 

"     116  sales'  books,  a  6a. 

press,  and  trim.  8  rms.  jiaper  for  same,  W  48.-  - 

ruling  8  rras.  pajwr  for  same  i  times 

paging  116  sales'  books 


October  5fh,  1869. 


R  F.  Simons, 
To  1  pacWgc  pins. . 


Frank  Wells, 

To  sponges  for  office 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  1  small  double  desk  cose 

1  book  case  for  And.  General's  room - 

repair,  bell  in  office 

repair,  and  recover,  stool 

American  M.  I'.  Express  Co., 
To  express  charges  from  Aug.  27th,  1869,  to  Oct. 

4th,  1869 - 

telegrams,  do 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print.  1  ream  blanks,  No.  19, 1  side 

«     3    "  '•  39, 2    » 

"      2    "  "  -P,  1     " 


Amount  carried  forward.. 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  53 

Auditor  Oeneral 
vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward $9,214  80 

r  &  George  4  Co^  • 

Toprint  20  reams  blanks,  No.  16, 1  side 70  00 

"    2    «            «            15, 1    " 7  00 

-  1    **            "            57,1    " 3  50 

-  10  **            ^            61,1    " 35  00 

*■     4    "            "             10,1     " 14  00 

-  12  "            "             11,1     " 42  00 

*•     6    -            "             12,1     " 21  00 

-  12  «            "             13,1     " 42  00 

"    .16  "            «             14,1     " 56  00 

••    2    ♦*            «             18,  1     " -  7  00 

-  statement  of  State  tax,  &c 10  00 

IWS8L and  trim.  1  rm.  circulars,  "A" 50 

u         1    "    cir.,  fire  ins 50 

"         2    "    statements,  No.  39 100 

niling  same  4  times 4  00 

pRSB.  and  trim.  1  rm.  abstract  of  State  tax  land  50 

niKng  same  4  times 2  00 

stitching  same 50 

rahng  1  rm.  abstract  paper  6  times 3  00 

piiteboard  and  pasting  time  tables 3  00 

peML  and  trim- 1  rm.  circulars,  "  C  " 50 

1  «          "         «F'' 50 

20    *^    blanks.  No.    2 10  00 

2  "        "         "    15 1  00 


u 

u 


20    "        "          ''     16 10  00 

2     "        "          "    18 1  00 

1     "        "          "    57 50 

10    ''        "          «    61 5  00 

nifing20  rms.  blanks,  No.  2,  4  times 40  00 


I  ^•otiit  carried  forward 19,605  80 


54  AXXUAL    REPOKT  OF   THE 

Auditor  General 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amonnt  brought  forward %%< 

W.  S.  George  &  Co, 
To  press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  State  tax  BtatciuentB. . . 
4    "    blanke,No.lO 


"       12    '■        '■         '•     13 

"       16    •■        '■         '■     14 

ruling  50  reams  blanks.  No's  10,  11,  13. 13, 14 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 

Tol32rmB.  13x16  flat  cap 

12      "        "  "       - 

224    "        "  '■ 

2  great  gro.  rubber  baada 

i        "  "         '■     

i  doz.  Arnold's  gen.  quarts 

i  M  No.  6  cloth  lined  envelopes 

-     100  No.  12         ■'  "        

lOONo.10         ■•  "         


Ocioier  27th,  1869. 
Brisbin  &  Conely, 

To  9  galloDB  carbon  oil 

1  broom 

T.  B.  Thrift, 

To  1  pair  shears 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  1  light  glass,  35c. ;  putty,  lOc 

3  window  fastenings  Bi  20c. ;  screws,  10c. 

work  to  repair  windows 

repair.  1  chair 

Amount  carried  forward % 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  55 

Auditor  General 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $10,937  78 

T.  S.  Oeoige  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  ream  blanks,  No.  55 50 

«      4nn8.        "        "    7 2  00 

**              «      4    «          «        «    8 3  00 

<•              «      4    «           a        u    9 2  00 

raKng  12  rms.  blanks,  No's  7,  8,  9,  once 6  00 

presfi.  and  trim.  1  rm.  blanks.  No.  62 50 

binding  36  qrs.,  land  advertised 36  00 

pteaa.  and  trim.  2  reams  blanks,  No.  7 1  00 

<•               «    4    w            u         u  8 2  00 

-  «    4    "            «         «   9 2  00 

niling  10  reams  blanks,  No's  7,  8,  and  9 5  00 

print  4        «          "      No.  7 14  00 

«     4        "          "        «    8 14  00 

-  4        "           "        "    9 14  00 

"      250    "           "        "    60 1,375  00 

**     1        «           "        «    55 3  50 

"1        **      circulars  to  county  treas.-.-  3  50 

"•    1,000  envelopes 1  50 

•^    1  ream  blanks.  No.  62 3  50 

"    2    «            "        «    7 7  00 

-  4    "            "        "    8 14  00 

•*    4    <*            "        "9 14  00 

-  5    «            "        "  31 17  50 

fea  L  PcMe, 

To  4  reams  commercial  note 9  60 

^Kenvelopes 6  66 

1  law  register 5  00 

Amount  carried  forward 112,499  54 


56  AXKUAL    BEPOBT   OF   THE 

Auditor  General 

vs. 

Tlie  State  of  Michigan. 

Xovemhtr  2ith,  IS 

Amount  brought  forward  - 112,4' 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  presa.  and  trim.  2  reams  blauks,  J*'o.  17 

mling  statement  No.  30.  [Rejected  in  Sep- 
tember bill,  but  subsequently  iiUowed  in 
same  bill,  but  the  erasure  was  such  that 
we  finally  lost  the  *3  00  which  we  were 
honestly  entitled  to.    W.  S.  George  &  Co.] 

print.  250  reams  blanks,  Ko.  58,  2  sides l,t 

■■      100       "        "  "     1, 2  sides i 

"     labels 

'*      15  reams,  affidavits  to  be  attached  to 

overseers'  aceonnts 

print.  2  rms.  blanks,  No.  IS,  1  side 

•■     80  "        "         "    2,  2  Bides 

•'      2     "    blank  book,  taxes  rec'd,  2  sides. 

1  ream  blanks,  No.  46, 1  side 

'■      1      "        "  "    47,  1  side 

B.  R  Bnali, 

To  1  map  of  Bay  county 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  repairs  on  chair 

21  boxes  for  blanks 

43  "  " 

Total tV. 


BOABD  OF  STATE    AUDITORS.  57 


State  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

December  Sdy  1868. 

/na  A.  Kerr  4  Co., 

To  print  circulars,  swamp  land  sale $3  50 

paperfor  same 1  25 

print  blank  description  of  land 3  50 

i  ream  paper  for  same 2  50 

}»Beg.  and  trim.  2  rms.  description  of  lands. .  1  00 

rnling  same  four  times , 4  00 

**      1  rm.  ledger,  4  times 2  00 

binding  8  qrs.  do.,  fnll  Russia,  extra 18  00 

paging  same 64 

Wffleboxes 8  40 

adTertising  sale  of  Lansing  lots,  10  f.  6  w. . .  -  24  50 

J^  4  Lamed, 

To2  lamps - - 6  50 

2  dox.  wicks 45 

**o.  L  Pease, 

To  1  rai.medium 12  75 

4  tma.  foolscap 19  00 

4nnfi.flatcap 19  00 


December  SOthy  1868. 
'^Wtney  Jones, 

To  Irtter  postage 1  94 

!»per 95 

dnwer 1  00 

•efc  ft  Warner, 
To  ?  ledger  rests 1... 1  50 

Amount  carried  forward  $131  38 

8 


S8  ANHUAL   REPOKT  OF  THE 

State  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward ^13 

Detroit  Free  Press  Co.. 

To  pub.  sale  of  State  ewnmp  lands,  4  fols.  5  w... 
Detroit  Advertiser  &  Tribune  Co., 

To  pub.  sale  of  State  swnmp  lands,  4  fols.  5  w. . . 
Detroit  Post  Co., 

To  adv.  sale  of  State  swamp  lands,  4  f.  10  v ] 

Vfouroe  Commercial, 

To  adv.  sale  of  State  swamp  lauds,  4  f.  5  w 

Dceana  Times, 

To  adT.  sale  of  State  swamp  lauds.  4  f .  5  w 

3rand  Haven  ITniou, 

To  adv.  sale  of  State  swamp  lauds,  4  f.  5  w 

Pontiac  Gazette, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

'■         "     swamp  lands _ 

[ouia  Co.  Sentinel, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lauds 

'•  "      swamp,  85c.;  asylum,  85c 

Ut.  Clemens  Monitor, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

jrrand  Trarerse  Herald, 

To  pub.  Bale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

'•  "      swamp  lands 

Uarshttll  Statesman, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

'■        "  '■      swamplands 

"        "  "      Tniversity  lands 

Manistee  Times, 
To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands.  Primary 
School 

Amount  carried  forwanl 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  59 

iS^o^  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $227  98 

Umpton  Bqiublican, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 3  00 

**  "      swamp  lands 1  20 

Ci«  Ca  Republican, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 105 

**         "  "         swamplands 1  05 

TmcoU  Ca  Koneer, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 5  00 

•         '•         "  "  swamplands 1  30 

iipena  Ca  Pioneer, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 4  20 

Oceuia  Times, 

To  publish-  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 4  20 

Pot  Huron  Press, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 3  00 

"  "      swamp  lands 6  60 

"  "      Normal  School  lands  3  00 

W«Aly  Clarion, 

To  publish,  sale  of  State  lands 4  20 

^ntiot  Journal, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 1  00 

**               "      swamp,  13  30 ;   Asy- 
lum, $1  00;  salt  spring,  $1  00 5  30 

^^^kc  Jeffersonian, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 9  00 

*■  «  "        swamplands 9  90 

^IcMHainee  Herald, 

Topuksale  of  forfeited  State  lands 1  20 

"  "        swamplands 3  00 

Aaonnt  carried  forward $295  18 


tiO  ANNUAL    REPORT  OF  THE 

lHate  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 1295 

Mecosta  Co.  Pioneer, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  Htate  ]auds ( 

Berrien  Co.  Record, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands ', 

'•  "  '■        University  lands 

Clinton  Oo.  Republican, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

"  '•  '•        swamp  lands 

'■  ■'        University  lands 

Grand  Kapids  Eagle, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lande 

"  ■'  "        swamp  lands 

"  "  "        University  lands 

Portage  Lake  Mining  Gazette, 

To  pnb.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands - . 

'•  '■        swamplands 

Monroe  Commercial, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

Newaygo  Republican, 

To  pub  sale  of  for.  Htate  lauds 

'•  '•      '■    swamp,  65o.;  Asylum,  65c..., 

Saginaw  Republican, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

"  "  "        swamp  lands 

Midland  Indeiwndent, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 

"  "  "    ■    salt  spring  lands 

"  '•  ■■        swamplands 

Amount  carried  forward t 


I 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  61 

Stute  Land  Office 

vs. 

TJve  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $349  18 

Isabella  Co.  Pioneer, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 6  00 

**  *•        swamp  lands 2  40 

Traverse  Bay  Eagle, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 1  20 

"  "        swamplands 3  00 

WoWerine  Citizen, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 4  20 

Peninsular  Courier,  • 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands  _ 210 

Hastings  Banner, 

To  pub-  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 3  00 

^  '•  "         swamp  lands 3  00 

Huron  Co.  Xews, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 4  99 

•^  "  "        swamp  lands 9  80 

Grand  Haven  Union, 

To  pub.  sale  of  for.  State  lands _ . .  5  00 

"      swamp,  50c.;  University,  12.  2  50 
*'      Asylum,  II  50 ;   State  build- 
ing, tlSO 3  00 

Montcalm  Herald, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 5  00 

"      swamp  lands 3  00 

'•      Asylum  lands  1 2  50 

True  Xorthemer, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 3  00 

**  *'       swamp  lands 1  20 

Sukegon  News, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 4  20 

Amount  carried  forward 1418  27 


u 


<•  it 


•i 


t  ANKL'AL   BEPORT  OF  THE 

State  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward <418 

ay  City  Journal, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands i 

"  "  "      swamp  lands 'i 

.llegan  Journal, 

To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  Htate  lands % 

"  "  "      swamplands 2 

>8C0  Go.  Gazette, 

To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands 4 

eo.  L.  Pease, 

To  1  gross  No,  13  lead  pencils 10 

6  boxes  rubber  bands,  No.  2,  *l  09 C 

6      "  "  "        "    2,    135 8 

rubber .". 1 

1  M  common  note  envelopes J 

2  gross  pens 1 

10.  A.  Eerr  &  Co., 

To  print  2  rms.  blanks,  swamp  land  certs,  of  pur.  11 

"     2    "        "  "  "        "  I] 

report  of  Com'r  of  State  Land  OflSce,  comp. 

67,236  ems 31 

press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  swamp  land  certificates 
of  purchase 


January  26th,  1869. 
tate  Treasurer, 
Tol  card  P.  0.  stamps,  18c 1 


Amount  carried  forward.. 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  63 

StxuU  L(md  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Mi4)higa7i. 

January  27th,  1869, 

Amount  brought  forward $577  81 

HI  R.  Greene, 

To 5 days' work  repairing _..  15  00 

lumber  and  other  materials 75 


February  10th,  1869. 
ff.  St  George  &  Co., 

To  print  blanks  for  description  of  land _  5  50 

**     Swamp  land  receipts 3  50 

••     University  land  receipts 3  50 

i  ream  paper  for  same 3  50 

print  2  reams  affidavits  for  settlement  upon 

swampland 7  00 

print  2  reams  blanks,  co.  treas.  receipts 7  00 

1  index ^ 50 

ruling  1  ream  paper  4  times 3  00 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  swamp  land  receipts  . .  50 

u          u          -^    a   University  receipts 50 

Wnd  1  vol.  reports,  law  sheep 1  50 

nionnting  5  maps  of  Michigan  -. 10  00 

dry.  and  press.  4,000  sigs 2  00 

foldingsame j  2  00 

stitching  1,000  pamphlets 2  00 

cover,  and  trim.  1,000  pamphlets 10  00 


March  3d,  1869. 
^-  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  prefis.  and  trim.  2  rms.  circulars,  co.  treas.  int. 

receipts 1  00 

Amount  carried  forward $655  56 


I 


Hi  ANNUAL    REPORT   OF  THE 

State  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward  .- 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  nu.  paper 

mliag  1  rm.  deser.  land,  4  times 

press,  and  trim.  3  rms.  principal,  int.  and  pen- 
alty receipts 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  Swamp  land  interest 

receipts 

dry.  and  press.  4,000  sigs. 

folding  same 

stitching  1,000  ))amphlets 

trimming  1,000  pamphlets 

print  blanks,  description  of  lands 

"      3  rms.  penalty,  interest,  and  principal 

receipts,  conuty  treasurers ; . 

print.  1  rm.  int.  receipts,  swamp  land 

'*      1  ream  receipts,  principal,  interest  and 

penalty,  swamp  land _ , 

print.  2  rma  blanks,  description  of  land 

'•      blanks,  county  treasurers  in  acc't  with 

Land  OfBco- 

S.  It  Greene, 

To  work,  cover,  lumbttr,  butts,  moulding  on  dum- 
my   

repairs  in  office _ 

repair.  1  cliair - 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  4  rma.  flat  cap _ - 

1  rm.  double  cap 

2  doz.  Arnold's  genuine  irinta 

i  doz.  Rogers'  ink  erasers 

Amount  canied  forward _. 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  65 

State  Land  Office 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 1762  74 

GcaL  Pease, 

To^ doz.  sponge  dishes. - 3  00 

\  doz.  ink  stands ^ 4  50 

:2  gross  OiUott's  303  pens 1  50 

1  doz.  sticks  India  ink 3  00 

2  doz-  crayon  pencils 2  00 

1  doz.  rubber  pen  holders 3  00 

1  Na20  rubber 96 

4  rms.  flat  foolscap. 12  96 

4rms.  note 11  20 

Tinns-letter 33  75 

Srms.  note 22  40 

lithographing  13  rms.  note 32  50 

4  rms.  14  lb.  foolscap 19  00 


March  26th.  1869, 
Gfa  L.  Pease, 

To  4  nn&  superroyal 108  00 

2  doz.  grooms  2  oz.  carmine 10  00 

5  M  envelopes,  engi'aved  and  printed 37  50 

5  *•          "          legal,  engraved  and  printed.-  70  00 
*'.  H.  George  k  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  description  of  lands. .  1  00 

ruling  same  3  times 3  00 

bind.  1  Preston's  int  table 1  QO 

ruling  1  rm.  county  treas.  statements  4  times  2  00 

*•      1  rm.  jourtial  6  times 3  00 

press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  same 1  00 

Amount  carried  forward $1,149  01 

9 


86  ANSUAL   BBPORT  OP  THB 

State  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward tl,U 

W.  a  George  &  Co., 

biad.  6  qrs.  county  treos. journal,  full  Russia.         1 

paging  same .,- 

press,  and  trim.  3  rms.  int.  receipts 

"  "         1     "    statements 

ruling  same  3  times 

press,  and  trim.  3  rma.  paper _  _ 

ruling  1  rm.  tax  book,  A 

'■       1     "         "  B 

"       1     "         "  C 

bind.  13  qrs.  tax  book.  A,  B,  C,  full  Husaia  . . 

paging  same 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print,  blank  tax  book,  "B" 

"         •'      treas.  statements .■ 

"      3  rms.  int.  receipts  (3  forms) 

"      I     "    blanks 

"      fax  book, "  A  " 

"C" 

Whitney  Jones,  P.  M^ 

To  letter  postage,  $1  11 ;  paper  do.,  95c.;  drawer, 

*1 

Morgan  Bates, 
To  foes  as  register  for  the  entry  and  location  of 
109,295  acres  of  Ag"!  College  lands  at  IJc. 

j)er  acre 1 

Reuben  Goodrich, 
To  fees  as  receiver  of  the  land  oflGce  at  Traverse 
City,  for  the  location  and  entry  of  109,295 
acres  of  Agl  College  lands  at  l^c.  pr.acre      1 

Amount  carried  forward t! 


BOABD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  67 

SUUe  Land  Office 

V8. 

The  St{Ue  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 93.975  68 

StUe  Treagnrer, 
To  postage  stamps  for  office,  viz : 

2cards,  10c 20  00 

1     ^       12c _ 12  00 

15    -         3c. - 45  00 

5     -         2c- - 10  00 


April  6th,  1869. 
W.  S.  Qeorge  &  Co., 
To  print  blank  book,  statement  of  moneys  rec!d 

by  State  Treas.,&c... , 5  50 

8«a  L  Peaae, 

Tolgroas  pens 1  00 

Ipr.ahears 3  50 

Iknife  eraser 80 

1  doz.  spools  tape 12  80 

2  qta.  maure  ink 2  50 

i  doz.  bot  mucilage *. 7  50 

1  ^elet  machine 3  00 

1  gross  eyelets 3  00 

I  sponge  cup 100 

ffponge 20 

Iruler 1  25 

1  qionge  cup  and  sponge 50 

1  gold  pen  and  case 11  00 

Ipaperfolder 1  00 

1  barometer  inkstand 2  00 

Ipaperweight 1  00 

Amount  carried  forrvard $4,120  23 


68  ANNLUAL  BEPOET  OF  THE 

State  Land  Office 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward.. -' t4,12l 

Geo-  L.  Pease, 
To  1  paper  folder 

1  letter  clip -,. , ,--^ 

5  reamB  pIiUQ  cap 2 

2  reams  legal  cap 1 

3  qts.  copy,  ink 

1  jMpor  folder 

Pub.  P.  L.  Mining  Gazette, 
To  piibllsh.  sale  of  forfeited  State  land,  Primary 

School 

Pub.  Ingham  Co.  News, 
To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lauds.  Primary 

School  -- ■---. ■-- 

to  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands,  B«'amp 
Lake  Superior  Miner, 
To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands,  Primnrv 

School - 

Pub.  Cass  Co.  Republican, 
To  publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands.  Primary 

School 

publish,  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands,  swamp 
Detroit  Post  Co., 

To  daily  for  office  to  March  .i7th,  1870 

S.  R.  Greene. 

To  12  yds.  window  curtain  .-. 

trimmings,  making  4  in  number,  and  putting 

up  same - -  - 

Fonda  &  Eswlstyn, 

To  2  pieces  coir  matting,  86  yards 

Grand  Rapids  Eagle. 
To  pnb,  sale  of  forfeited  State  swamp  lands 

Amount  carried  forwanl •4, 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  69 

State  Land  Office 

vs. 

Hie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward _-_ $4,289  73 

Wlj  Post, 
To  pub.  sale  of  forfeited  State  lands  for  non-pay- 
ment of  interest,  2  f.  5  times 4  20 

Grove  &  Whitney, 

To  repair,  locks 50 

dean,  store-pipe  at  oflRce 1  00 

L  J.  Viele, 

To  cord :..-  18 

linkstand 2  00 


April  28th,  1889. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  printing  circulars  to  co.  treasurers  relative  to 

])art-paid  lands 3  50 

book,  State  Land  Office 5  50 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  paper 50 

ruling  same  6  times 3  00 

binding  5  qrs.,  receipts  on  act.  of  Land  Office, 

Russia  ends  and  bands 10  00 

paging  same 40 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  receipts 50 

ruling  1  ream  receipts 50 

Wttt  Un.  Telegraph  Co., 

Totelegram 1  20 

Kagham,  George  &  Co., 
To  subscription  to  Republican  from  No.  661  to 

No-  763,2  years 4  00 

ttt  Porter, 

To  paid  freight  bill  on  matting  for  office 3  38 

•*    cartage 25 

Amount  carried  forward - $4,330  34 


70  ASNCAL  KEPOBT  OP  THE 

State  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan.. 

.Way  26th,  18i 

Amount  brought  forward $4,33' 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  1  case  for  books,  and  altering  old  one 

caao  of  pigeon-holes  for  book-keeper 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print  blanks,  description  of  landts 

paper  for  same 

print.  2  rms.  of  blanks,  proof  of  settlement. 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  abstract  paper 

"  "      1  rm.  paper - 

ruling  1  ream  4  time« 

binding  8  qrs.  medium 

paging  same - 

])ress.  and  trim,  'i  reams,  proof  of  non-settle- 
ment .  - 


June  SOth,  J869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print,  list  of  counties 

"      1000  town  plata 

a  reams  blanks  for  description  of  lands 
S.  1{,  Greene, 

To  2  parallel  rules - 

1  gate,  trim,  and  hang. -  - . 

Goo.  L.  Pea*e. 

To  6  rms.  flat  cap 

2  doz.  draughting  tacks 

Amount  carried  forward ^4 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  71 

Stdte  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 44,432  13 

W.  SL  Geoi^  &  Co.. 

TobinA2field  notes 400 

-  1  book  of  plats 2  00 

pms.  and  trim.  2  rms.  description  lands 1  00 

rating  1  ream  twice 100 

-  1       "     3times 1  50 

*•      1       "     blanks  twice 100 

*•      2       '*     field  note  paper  4  times 4  00 

press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  field  note  paper 1  00 

fold,  and  stitch,  same _ 1  00 

itate  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  office 48  00 

WWtney  Jones,  P.  M.. 

To  letter  postage '.  1  04 

paperpostage 1  10 

drawer,  qr.  ending  June  30,  1 860 1  00 

Cilren  Lithographing  Co.. 

To Ktb.  1,000  plats,  Oxllf,  bond  pai>er 40  00 

500      "      14x17          '*           30  00 

'•    1,000      '•         *•               *•            60  00 


July  28th,  J800. 
'^.\  George  &  Co.. 
To  prinL  2  reams  swamp  land  certificates  of  pur- 
chase  - ->- 11  00 

bind.  1  book  of  plats 2  00 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  purchase  of  swamp  land  50 

f'loth  and  pasting  1  large  map 75 

Amount  carried  forward 14,644  02 


3  ANNUAL    REPORT  OF  THE 

State  Land  Office 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $4,64 

ieo.  L.  Pease, 

To4rmB.  14  lb.  legal,  a  to  50 3 

i  rms.  14  lb.  foolscap,  a  t5 1 

i  doz.  artist's  flexible  rules 

8  rms.  linen  foolscap  W  16 4 


August  37th,  1869. 
Ieo.  L.  Pease, 

To  4  rms.  not* 

100  envelopes 

100  euvelopes 

5  yds.  tracing  linen 

f.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print.  1  rm.  blanks,  sui>erviaorB' certificates  of 

appraisal 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  plats 

ruling  same  4  times 

bind.  10  quirGS  plat  book,  full  bound,  Russia, 

extra 

outside  linen  cover  for  same 

binding  XltH  quires  taxes  rec'd,  from  1858  to 

1868  inclusive 

)>ress.  and  trim.  1  ream  BUper>isor8'  appraisal 

of  forfeited  part-paid  land 

ruling  same 

^  doz.  file  boxes,  35a 

Amount  carried  forward $4 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  73 

Stdbe  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  Stdte  of  Michigan. 

October  5th,  1869. 

ifflount  brought  forward $4,932  T2 

Whitney  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  letter  postage 1  02 

paper    "        _ 1  10 

drawer 1  00 

^'^Ufe  Treasurer, 

To  postage  stamps  for  office - 58  00 

>1  E  Greene,  x 

To  work  and  lumber,  pigeon  holes  in  case  in 

office 15  50 

iM.Cn.Ex.Co^ 
To  express  charges  and  telegrams  from  July  9th 

to  Aug.  24th,  1869 2  90 

'.S.  George  &  Co., 

To  adv.  forfeited  State  lands,  5  w 29  00 

print  2  rms.  circulars  to  supervisors,  1  side. .  7  00 

"    envelopes 1  60 

niling  1  ream  paper 1  00 

pasteboard,  and  pasting  Lansing  plat 50 

W  L  Pease, 

To?  doz.  rubber  holders 7  20 

^  ^ross  penB,  6s 1  50 

5    •*     quill  pens 126 

t   •*     Spenoerian  pens 1  50 

€   -     rubber  rings _ 4  50 

1  great  groas  rubber  rings 6  00 

I  dos.  cana  mucilage 3  00 

U  quiiea  40x60  tracing  paper 12  00 

Aawuit  carried  forward 15,088  29 

10 


74  AKSL-AL   BEPOET  OP  THB 

State  Land  OffUe 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

October  S7tk,  li 

Amount  brought  forward 15,01 

State  Treaaurar. 

To  postage  stain))H  for  use  of  office 

S.  It.  Greene, 

Tol  table,  15;  top  case  for  same,  14 

oil  cloth  for  cover  of  table 

1  chair  and  repair,  chnir - 

W.  S.  Oeorge  &  Co.. 
To  press,  and  trim.  I  ream  each  of  7  kinds  of  re- 
ceipts, viz :  Swamp,  Primary  School,  Asy- 
lum, Normal  School,  Salt  Spring,  State 

Building,  University  lands,  Q  50c.  -  - 

press,  and  trim.  2  reams  certificates 

"  '■  2      "  "  of  lands.. 

ruling  2  rraw.  3  timra 

press,  and  trim.  3  nns.  swamp  land  certs..'.-. 

■'  "  1  rm.  pajKF 

ruling  1  rm.  jHiper  4  times 

hind.  1  rm,  forfeited  land  sales 

31,500  cms  comp.  on  list  of  Lansing  lots  nud 

land  for  sale  for  interest _ 

blank  book,  forfeited  State  lands.  &c 

print.  1  rm.  int.  receipts.  Prim.  School  land.". 

1     '•        "  Swamplands 

'■      1     "        "  University  lands. . . 

I     '■        "  Normal  School  I'ds. 

'•      1     "        '•  Asylum  lauds _ 

■■      1     ■'        ■■  State  Build.  lands.  _ 

■'      1     '■        "  Salt  Spring  lands. . 

Amount  carried  foncard ^ 


BOA.RD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  75 

State  Land  Office 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigafi^, 
Amoant  brought  forward $5,206  95 

W.  8.  George  &  Co., 

To  print.  2  rma.  description  of  lands 7  00 

"      2    "    certificates 11  00 

**      1  rm.        "  of  purchase,    swamp 

lands 5  00 

G«aL  Pease, 

To  4  nns.  commercial  note _ .  9  60 

2  M  legal  envelopes 15  12 

2  M  envelopes 666 

2M  white  envelopes 7  00 

i  doz.  ivory  folders 2  25 


November  24th,  J869, 
^-  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim.  1  ream  certificates 50 

**  "3  reams  description  of  lands 

to  be  sold  at  auction 1  60 

paper  for  blanks.  State  land  bids 1  50 

print.  1  ream            **            "       3  50 

1  ream  State  certificates 3  50 

1  qr.  assignments  of  certificates _.  75 

iwint,  1  rm.  blanks,  list  of  ag'l  lands,  1  side.,  3  50 
-      2  nns.    '*             "          "            in  Up- 

\yoT  and  Lower  Peninsula,  1  side. 7  00 

fi-  Ferte  &  Warner, 

To  1  desk. 25  00 

.1  lockfl -  - 1  60 

;^skK>l8 2  00 

repair,  and  cover.  2  stools 75 

Amount  carried  forward $5,320  58 


76  ANNCAL   REPOBT  OP  THE 

State  Land  Office 

vs. 

Tlie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brouglit  forward 15,2 

Calvert  Lithographing  Co., 
To  lithographing  and  furnishing  500  plats,  14  x 

17,  bond  paper 

State  Ti-oaaurcr, 
To  postage  stamps  for  use  in  offico,  10  cards,  t3, 

2card8,  »2 

1  card,  tC 

The  following  aeconnts  for  adTcrtising  sale  of  for- 
feited >State  lands  were  presented,  duly  certified 
to  by  E,  H.  Porter,  and  allowed,  viz : 

Pratt  &  Kittredge,  composition  31,000  ems. . . 
Dc  Orond  Wet,  11  folios  5  insertiouH- . 

St.  Clair  Republican,  18  "  5 
Greenville  Independent,  8  "  5  " 
Mt.  Clemens  Monitor,  2-5 
Charlotte  Republican,  5  "  5  " 
Midland  Independent,  5  ■'  5  " 
Ingham  Co.  News,  14  '•  5  " 
Menominee  Herald,  2  '■  2  " 
Monroe  Commercial,  4  "  5  "- 
JaclcBoii  Citizen,  3    "     5        *' 

Mecosta  Co.  Pioneer,  3  "  5  " 
Cass  Co.  Republican,  ,  2  "  5  " 
Huron  Co,  News,  5    "5         " 

Mursliall  Statesman,  5  "  4  " 
Times  and  Expositor,  2  "  5  " 
Manistee  Times,  3     "     5         " 

Oceana  Times,  2    "      5         " 

Charlevoix  Sentinel  1    "     5         " 

Wolverine  Citizen,  3    "     S         " 

Amount  carried  forward t 


BOABD  OF  STATE    AUDITORS. 

^^tc  Land  Office 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 

Clinton  Co.  Ilepublican,  4  folios  5  insertions. 

Gratiot  Journal,  10  ^*  5 

Pen.  C-our.  &  Visitant,     2  '•'  5 

Xewaygo  Republican,      3  "  5 

loeco  Co.  Gazette,  2  "  5 

Berrien  Co.  Record,         4  "  5         '' 

Saginaw  Bepublican,        5  ^'  5 

Sanilac  Jeffersonian,        6  '^  5 

Mason  Co.  Record,  2  "  5 

Tascola  Co.  Pioneer,        3  *'  4 

Allegan  Journal,  4  '*  5 

liyingston  Co.  Repub.,    5  "  5 

I»bella  Co.  Enterprise,    3  "  5 

Lapeer  Republican,  4  *'  5 

Ionia  Sentinel,  3  ''  5 

Bar  Citv  Journal,  2  "  5 

St  Joseph  Republican      2    "      5 
Hastings  Banner,  9    ^'      5 

Total 


ti 


(( 

a 

ti 
u 
a 

a 
a 


$5,619  63 

8  40 

21  00 

4  20 

6  30 

4  20 

8  40 

10  50 

12  60 

4  20 

5  25 

8  40 

10  50 

6  30 

8  40 

6  30 

4  20 

4  20 

18  90 

15,771  88 

St(Ue  Treastcrer 
vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

December  3d,  1868, 
Jno.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  print,  blank  book,  caah  acc't $5  50 

8tate  Tteasiunery 

To  postage  for  use  of  Treas.  office 30  00 


December  SOtk,  1868. 
W.  H.  Boothroydy 

Par  daUy  journal  for  1869 _  1  50 

Wkitney  Jones,  P.  M^ 

To  ktter  postage 83 

paperpostage 1  06 

drawer 1  00 

Stale  Treasurer, 

To  postage  stamps 36  00 

paying  N.  T.  exchange  on  coupons  of  war 

bounty  loan  bond,  $11,532  50  tD  1-10  %  11  53 

paying  K.  Y.  exchange  on  coupons  of  war 

bonds,  11,767  50  CD  1-10  % 1  77 

paying  N.  Y.  exchange   on    2,000,000  loan 

bonds  purchased  ©  $5,000,  CD  1-10  %...  5  00 

paying  interest  on  patriotic  loan,  certificate 
No.  130,  issued  to  Gilbert  Smith  for  $50, 

(Sec  9,  Art  5,  Ex.  Ses.  1861) 9  40 

S-  T.  'Rmes, 
To  adT.  the  payment  of  int  on  State  bonds  due 

Jan.  Ist,  1869, 11  lines,  6  times 13  20 

Anomit  carried  forward $116  78 


80  ASSCAL    REPOKT  OP   TRK 

Stute  Treasurer 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  broiiglit  fonvnrd -.      lUfl 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  1  case  for  weights  und  measures  and  books. .        16£ 
Jno.  A-Kerr&Co., 

To  eomp.  on  report  of  State  Treasurer,  53,424 

cms -   -- 2' 

press  work  on  same,  65  tokens 2i 

print.  3  reams  covers  for  same 

bind.  66  vol's  letters 6 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  paper 

ruling  same  for  cash  aec't 

bind.  8  qrs.  daily  cash  bal.,  Russia  ends  and 

bands 1 

dry.  and  press.  5,000  sigs.  Treas,  report 

fold,  same 

fold.  1,000  pamphlets 

cover,  and  trim,  same 

bind.  1.600  Adj.  Gen'a  report,  vol.  3 5 


January  26th,  1869. 
Detroit  Wafe  Co., 

To  repair,  key  for  State  Treasurer 

Calvert  Lithographing  and  Engraving  Co., 

To  I  canceling  stamp _ 

State  Treasurer, 
To  paid  N.   Y.  exchange  on  t597  coupons,  fii 

1-10% 

1  years'  subscription  to  N.  Y.  Times,  from  Na 

5,410 

postage  for  State  Treasurer 

Amount  carried  forward %1 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  81 

» 

State  Treasurer 

The  Sta/te  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,031  01 

A.J.Viele, 

To2caIlbell8 4  00 

Gea  L  Pease. 

To  1  doz.  grooms  carmine 5  00 

1 18  inch  patent  ruler. 1  50 

1  900  page  copying  book 5  00 

1  gross  rubber  bands 35 


January  27th,  1869. 
T,  H.  Boothroyd, 

To  1  Shipper's  Guide 1  25 

1  Michigan  Almanac 15 

1  Tribune  "         20 

&  R.  Greene, 

To  1  table  for  letter  press 4  00 

work,  screws,  and  hooks  for  wardrobe 1  00 

State  Treasurer, 
For  paying  N.  Y.  exch.  on  $132,285  00  of  bonds 

and  coupons,  flH-10  % 132  00 

V.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  ruling  1  rm.  paper  4  times 2  00 

bind.  1  specific  tax  ledger,  6  qrs.,  full  Russia, 

extra 13  00 

paging  same 50 

6  qr&  paper  for  same _ 5  00 

print  blank  book,  taxes  received 5  50 

"      1,000  check  orders,  and  paper  for  same  5  00 

print  supplemental  page  to  State  Treas.  report 

and  pasting  in  500 _  3  50 

Amount  carried  forward $1,219  96 

11 


0«  ANNUAL    BEPORT  07  THE 

State  IVvaTOJw 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward tliZll 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  11,872  ems  comp.  reprint  on  8  pages  of  State 

Treas.  report - -  I 

11  tokens  press  work  on  same 

B.  K.  Grosvenor  &  Co., 
To  exchange  on  N.  Y.  draft  of  »39,3O0  a  1-10 

% -   3 

State  Treasurer, 
To  paying  express  charges  on  140,000  of  State 

bonds  from  New  Bedford,  ilass. 3 


March  3d,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  binding  4  vol's  letters 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  paper 

ruling  1  rm.  paper  6  times 

bind.  16  qrs.,  taxes  rec'd,  full  Knsda 

paging  same 

press,  and  trim.  2rms.  cash  acc't 

4  qrs.  crown  paper 

rul.  1  ream  paper  0  times _. 

rul,  1  swamp  land  journal  6  times - 

bind.  8  qrs.  same,  full-bound,  Russia  ends,  &c. 

paging  same 

print.  3  rms.  small  cash  acc't  blanks 

•'     "a    "    large      "  "      

1  ream  16  lb.  cap  paper  for  same 

print,  blank  book,  cash  acc't 

Amount  carried  forward tl 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  83 

l^aite  Treasurer 

vs. 

The  Ski^  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward 11^396  52 

W.  &  Qeorge  &  Co., 

To  print  1  rm.  insurance  receipts 3  50 

paper  for  same 4  00 

&  IL  Oreese, 

To  work  and  lumber  to  cover  dummy 1600 

1  door,  ISc;   bolts,  50c.;    moulding,   75c.; 

draying,  25c 1  68 

work,  lumber  and  cloth,  fix.  book  shelves 2  25 


Mm-ch  26th,  1869. 
i  H.  Greene, 

Tb  work,  deepen  case  for  books .  80 

"     and  lumber,  divide  case 125 

'•St George  &  Co., 

To  ruL  1  rm.  paper  6  times 3  00 

bind.  1  cash  book 2  00 

paper  for  same 1  00 

bind.2U.S.  statutes, fuU  leather..: 3  00 

^Trwwurer, 

To  portage  for  oflBce 30  00 

^Wtnej  Jones,  P.  M., 
To  letter  postage,  69c.;  paper  do.,  tl  05;  drawer, 

•100 2  74 

'•  H.  Boothroy  d. 
To  1  Merchant's   and  Banker's  Almanac  for 

1869 '      2  50 

*•  W.  Edmonds, 
To  work  and  leather  on  matting 5  00 

Aawuiit  carried  forward $1,475  24 


84  ANHUAL  BEPOBT   OF  THE 

State  Treasurer 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amonnt  bronght  forward $1,47 

D.  W.  Buck, 

To  2  stools  for  office,  a  *6  50 1 

State  Treasurer, 
To  paid  exchange  on  $2,767  50,  «  1-10  % 


April  6th,  1860. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print  bonds  drawn  for  redemption 

paper  for  same 

Geo.  Tj.  Pease, 

To  1  fountain  inkstand 

1  lb.  sealing  wax 

1  doz.  pencils 

1  ruling  pen 

8  file  sticks - 

1  sponge  cup 

12  file  sticks 

1  gross  rubber  bands 

*   "        "       "    :- 

1  inkstand 

2  doz.  pencils 

1  inkstand _ 

New  York  Times, 
To  adv.  redemption  of  war  loan  bonds,  48  lines, 
6  times 

State  Treasurer, 

To  pacing  commission,  exchange  and  exprcssage 
on  $4,000  of  State  bonds  CT  35-100  %. . . 

Amount  carried  forward >1 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  85 

Stai^  Treasurer 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $1,583  60 

Stste  Treasorer, 
To  paying  freight  and  drayage  for  3  packages  for 

Gov's  room 94 

paying  freight  and  drayage  on  matting  for 

Treas.  ofGice 75 

Sathan  Lane, 
To  1^00  checks  lithographed,  5  deep,  i  bound, 

and  engraving  same 26  00 

Detroit  Post  Co^ 

To  dafly  for  office,  March  27th,  1870 .      10  00 

Detroit  Free  Press, 
To  adv.  redemption  of  war  loan  bonds,  11  folios 

6times 26  95 

1 VL  Greene, 

To  work  to  clean  furnace  and  pipes 1  25 

Grove  &  Whitney, 
To  speaking  tubes,  and  labor  at  office 7  00 


April  28thy  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print  blanks,  ledger  balance 3  50 

paperforsame 1  50 

print  blanks,  statement  of  balances  in  State 

depositories 3  50 

paperforsame 2  50 

print  300  drafts 3  50 

ruling  1  ream  ledger  balances  3  times 1  50 

"      1    '•     cash  statements  6  times 3  00 

press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  paper 1  00 

Amount  carried  forward $1,676  49 


86  ANNUAL  REPOET  OP  THE 

State  Treasurer 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward ♦!,( 

8.  R  Greene, 

To  repairing  window 

New  York  Times, 
To  adr.  the  payment  of  tlie  interest  due  on  State 

hondB,  May  Ist,  1869,  8  linea,  7  times 

Bingham,  George  &  Co., 
To  subscription  to  Republican  from  No.  661  to 

No.  763.  2  years 

Daily  Post  Co.. 
To  ady.  Treas.  notice  of  redemption   of  bonds. 

11  f.  6  times 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  stami>s  for  office 

Advertiser  and  Tribune, 

To  adv.  war  loan  bonds,  11  f,  daily,  1  week 

State  Treasurer, 
To  pay.  commissions,  cscbange,  and  cxpressagc 
on    bonds    purchased:    com.  on    t5,000 

bonds  0!  1  1-4% 

exchange  on  15,000  bonds  O  l-IO  % 

espreesage  on  $5,000  bonds  fl  1  1-4  % 


Mag  aeth,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  printing  blank  receipts 

paper  for  same 

print.  4,000  envelopes 

blank  book,  cash  acc't 

Amount  carried  forward %i, 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  87 

State  Treasurer 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward tl,830  34 

V.  8. 6eoT;ge  &  Co., 

Topiesfi.  and  trim.  1  ream  receipts 50 

ruL  1  ream  receipts  twice 1  00 

«rta  L  Pease, 

To  3  M  canary  envelopes 10  50 

IMwhite          "        4  50 

1  ream  14  lb.  flat  foolscap 5  00 

1  Team  14  lb.  legal  cap _ .  5  00 


June  30th,  1869. 
T.S,  George  &  Co., 
To  printing  blanks,  descriptive  list  of  securities 

issned 3  50 

paper  for  same 5  00 

print  6  different  forms,  4  reams  each,  notice 

of  bonds  canceled.- 21  00 

print  1  ream  No's  of  2,000,000  loan  bonds. .  3  50 

paper  for  printing  No's  of  different  bonds,  8 

forms -  6  00 

print  1  ream  war  bounty  bonds , 3  50 

"^^  B.  Greene, 
To  box  and  boxing  up  bank  notes  and  plates  for 

Treasurer - 1  00 

'i .  &  George  &  Co., 

To  ruling  1  ream  paper  8  times 4  00 

binding  6  qrs.  daily  cash  book,  Russia  ends 

and  bands 12  00 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  description  list 50 

ruling  1  ream  description  list  twice 1  00 

Amount  carried  forward $1,917  84 


iS  ANNUAL   REPOET  OP  THE 

State  Treasurer 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward $1,917 

New  York  Times, 
To  adv.  the  payment  of  the  intflrest  due  on  State 

bouds,  July  Ist,  1869, 11  lines  6  times...  II 

Calvert  Lithographing  Co., 

To  I  Buggies  hand  stamp,  ink  and  pads i 

Btate  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  office 3i 

Whitney  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  letter  postage .-.. 

paper      " 

drawer,  quarter  ending  June  30, 1869 

[iharles  Humphrey, 

To  1  gross  bands,  rubber,  xxsi 

1     "      rubber  bonds,  xxxz^ 

1     "  "  ^i 

1     "  "  38 

1  gt.  gross      "  11 


July  S81A,  18G9. 
IV.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print,  labels  for  bonds 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  paper 

ruling  same  4  times 

bind.  7  qrs.  register  of  bonds,  B.  R.  Co.,  Rus- 
sia ends  and  bands - 

paging  same 

Amount  carried  forward ftS,' 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDIT0B6.  89 

State  Treasurer 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

August  27th,  1869. 
Amount  brought  forward $2,001  32 

&  B.  Greene, 

To  shelves  over  letter  press 1  75 

repair,  window  sash,  glass,  &c 5  00 

W.  S.  Qeorge  &  Co., 

To  print  blank  book,  E.  IL  bonds 6  60 

"      monthly  cash  statement 3  50 

ruling        "          "           "        4  times 2  00 


October  5th,  1869. 
TUtney  Jones, 

Toletter  postage 48 

jM^r 1  05 

drawer 1  00 

Second  National  Bank,  Detroit, 
For  exchange  on  bonds  and  coupons  paid  in  New 

York,  $180,607  50,  fb  1-10  % 182  60 

express  charges  on  Bonds  and  coupons  trans- 
mitted from  New  York 3  50 

Sev  York  Times, 
For  adv.  redemption  of  war  bonds,  77  lines  6 

times 92  40 

5^^  Treasurer, 

To  postage  used  in  office 30  00 

W.  8.  Oeorge  &  Co., 
To  pi^r  for  blanks,  bonds  drawn  for  redemption  1  00 

print  100  bonds  to  be  paid 3  50 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  paper 50 

Amount  carried  forward $2,335  10 

12 


00  ANNUAL  EKPOKT  OF  THE 

State  Treasurer 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amonat  brought  forward .' 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

Tornling  1  ream  4  times 

binding  1  index,  i  Kuseia 

4  qrs.  paper  for  same 

press,  and  trim.  1  ream  bonds  for  redemptio 


October  27th,  1869. 
New  York  Times, 

To  adv.  interest  dne,  &i.\.  7  lines,  7  times 

S.  It.  Greene, 

To  repair.  1  chair 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim,  si  reams  receipts 

"  "1  rm.  statement  of  State  debt 

•■      1  rm.  notice  of  delivery  of 

bonds 

print.  2  rms.  receipts  for  tax  sales 

1  ream  paper  for  same .'. 

paper  for  circnlarB  relative  to  railroad  bonds. 

print,  1  ream  blanks.  State  debt 

"      1     "      circulars  relative  to  delivery  of 

railroad  bonds 

print.  1700  order  checks -.-. 

])aper  for  same 

print.  1  ream  blanks,  ins.  oo 

"      1      "        "        life  ins.  CO 

Amount  carried  forrt-ard  _ #3,; 


bojlrd  of  state  auditors.  91 

state  Treasure?* 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

November  2J^th,  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward $2,393  50 

V.S.  George  &  Co^ 

To  paper  for  ins.  blanks _  4  00 

printing  endorsements  on    Kalamazoo  and 

South  Haven  railroad  bonds 3  50 

■>tate  Treasurer, 
To  postage  stamps  for  use  in  this  office 30  00 

Totil $2,431  00 


Attorney  Oenerai 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

December  30th,  1868. 
State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  stamps $25.  00 

Jdin  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 
To  print  record  of  ease  of  G.  W.  Brown  vs.  Wall 

W.  Williams  et  al 85  00 


January  26th,  1869. 
L  8.  Trowbridge, 
To  coste  allowed  him  by  Supreme  Court  in  the 

case  of  Rvan  vs.  Brown 20  00 

l&Gowles, 
To  ftimiahing  copy  of  record  for  printer  in  the 
case  of  Ryan  vs.  Brown,  and  reading  proof 

of  same 10  00 

S«te  Treasurer, 
To  postage.. 30  00 


January  27th,  1869. 
LR  Smith, 
To  his  fees  and  disbursements  while  acting  un- 
der warrant  of  Aud.  General,  in  the  case 

of  the  First  Nat.  Bank  of  Tecumseh 60  75 

S.1  Greene, 

To  repair,  table,  48.,  and  chairs,  12s. 2  00 

1  mirror,  $3;  1  lounge,  $16 19  00 

repair,  lock  and  door,  and  making  1  key 1  50 

Amount  carried  forward 1253  25 


94  AKNUAL   REPOBT  OF  THE 

vittomey  Oeneral 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $253 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  prin  tbrief,  Dixon  vs.  People 1 

print,  record,  Smith  vs.  The  Bank  of  Tecum- 

seh It 

March  3d,  1869. 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  4i  rms.  letter 2 

2^  rms.  note 

lithographing  7  rms 1 

Ed.  Bloedon, 
To  120  fols.  copying  case  of  Chas.  S.  Kimberly 

V8.  Stewart  et  al.,  i-ecords  and  files ] 

certificate _ 

revenue  stamp 

4  certificates  to  register  of  deeds 

4  revenue  stamps 

A.  L.  Bingham, 

To  certified  copy  deed  from  Phoenix  Bank  by 

trustees  to  Chas.  H.  Stewart 

certified  copy  deed  from  Phoenix  Bank  by 

trustees  to  Charles  H.  Stewart _  - . 

certified  copy  of  decree  in  Chancery  Circuit 
Court,  Saginaw  county,  Chas.  S.  Kimberly 

V8.  Phoenix  Bank 

copy  of  deed  from  Chas.  H.  Stewart  to  Daniel 
L.  C.  Eaton 

Amount  carried  forward S 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  95 

Attorney  General 

vi. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

March  S6th,  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward $3^  00 

GeoiLPease, 

Tortatioaery 5  30 


April  6th,  1869. 
W.SL  George  &  Co., 
To  print  brief,  Thos.  Ryan  vs.  G.  W.  Brown, 

et  al 18  00 

print  brief;  Potter  vs.  The  People 17  00 

«         "      Postervs.             "       9  00 

Detroit  PlAper  Company, 

TolWOl^  envelopes 2  00 

4  bottles  mucilage 100 

iiBLkgal 2  75 

ptds,  10c. ;  1  pack,  envelopes,  15c 25 

1  paper  knife,  8s. ;  1  pencil  and  tip,  15c 1  15 

ireamnote 1  00 

1  qt  Arnold's  ink,  $1  25  ;  mucilage,  26c. 1  50 

1  If  envelopes,  tl  25 ;  i  rm.  legal,  $2  75 4  00 

I  doz.  rubber  bands 25 

leydet  machine 3  00 

1  box  eyelets 50 

2boxes    "     1  00 

I  knife  eraser,  80c. ;  1  ream  note 3  00 

1  letter  clip,  tl  00;  ink,  20c 1  20 

1  pr.  shears,  $1  50;  1  ruler,  $1  00 2  50 

lrm.l^al 5  50 

fid  H.  Jerome, 
To  eenrioes  and  expenses  examining    Phoenix 

Bank  lands  in  Saginaw  Co.,  for  appraisal..  51  50 

^nnt  carried  forward ^467  40 


96  ANKPAL  REPORT  OP  THE 

Attorney  GeiieraZ 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount;  brought  forward 146' 

Dwight  May, 
To  expenses  to  Flint  in  Dewey  and  Hazelton 

matter 

other  expenses 

expenses  to  Detroit  commencing  suits    for 

Chippewa  county  oflBcers,  railroad 

other  expenses 

expenses  going  to  Jackson  on  order  of  the 

Governor 

cash  paid  express  charges  on  package  of  pa- 
pers from  Got.  Crapo,  Phoenix  Bank  mat- 
ter  

cosh  paid  for  telegrams  in  reply  to  Prison  In- 
spectors  

expenses  to  Jackson  to  meet  Prison  Inspec- 
tors   

other  expenses - 

express  on  deed  to  Phtenix  Bank 

"        on  briefs 

A.  J.  Vielc, 
To  1  Webster's  Unabridged  Dictionary 


Jprit  3Sth,  1S69. 
S.  Stevens, 
.      To  fees  as  Ubrarian  for  A.  Williams,  Att'y  GenT 
"    W.  L.  Stoughton,  " 
"  "  "    Dwight  May  " 

Amount  carried  forward 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  97 

Attorney  General 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

May  26th,  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward 1525  23 

¥*  &  George  &  Co., 

To diy. and  press.  1,500  sigs,  report...- 75 

folding  same 75 

stitching  300  pamphlets 60 

oorer.  and  trim.  300  pamphlets 2  00 

206,352  ems  comp.  on  report 92  85 

50  tokens  press  work  on  same 20  00 

print  1  rm.  covers  for  same •  -  2  00 

Dtight  May, 
To  B.  B.  and  omnibus  fare  to  Detroit  to  attend 

April  term  of  Supreme  Court 3  80 

pud  for  use  of  Detroit  Bar  Library  during 

April  term  of  Supreme  Court 10  00 

expenses  at  Michigan  Exchange  4  days 10  00 

return  R  R.  fare  from  attendance 3  40 

paid  for  j^pers  in  Johr  case 25 

B.  R.  iare  to  Detroit  to  attend  April  term  of 

SnpremeCourt 3  40 

expenses   in  Detroit  while  attending  April 

term  of  Supreme  Court 10  75 

wtnra  R.  R.  f are : 3  40 

pud  telegram  from  Gov.  about  Phoenix  Bank  75 


August  27 thy  1869. 
'•••L  Pease, 

To  1  roL  note  lithographed 5  30 

iHl^;al  envelopes 6  00 

-^Kmnt  carried  forward $701  23 

13 


98  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

Attorney  General 

V8. 

Tfip  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward i $701 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  1  rm.  legal  cap 7 

100  case  holders  for  legal  paj^er 7 

blotting  pajwr 2 


October  6th,  1869. 
Orrin  B.  Lyon, 
To  register  fees  in  the  case  of  Thomas  Ryan  vs. 
Geo.  W.  Brown,  W.  W.  Williams,  and  Ezra 

Williams 

register  fees  in  the  case  of  Jacob  M.  Howard 

vs.  Ebenezer  Warner 

register  fees  in  the  case  of  Thomas  Byan  vs. 
Geo.  W.  Brown,  W.  W.  Williams,  and  Ezra 

Williams 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print,  brief  for  Attorney  General,  The  People 

vs.  Friend  Palmer 

print  brief  for  Attorney  General,  The  People 
vs.  John  Hanna 

October  27thy  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print  brief,  Roberts  vs.  The  People 

Amount  carried  forward 


BOABD  OP  STATE   AUDITOBS.  '    99 

Attorney  Oeneral 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

November  24tk,  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward $810  60 

Dwig^t  May, 
To  expenses  in  Detroit  while  in  attendance  on 
Supreme  Court,  the  first  week  of  term, 

(hotel) 14  50 

express  paid  on  briefs 35 

railroad  fare 6  80 

expenses  while  before  same  court  (hotel) 7  75 

railroad  fere 6  80 

cash  paid  for  postage  stamps  used  in  Att^y 

Generarsoffice 25  00 

Total 1877  80 


SwfA,  of  PiMic  Instrucbiaii 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

December  3d,  1868. 
C.  &  Stebbins, 

To  paid  express  on  package  to  OlWet 10  35 

"    for  thermometer  for  office 60 

'^    exp.  on  package  to  Hillsdale 50 

"     "            "          «   Houghton 75 

'*     "  "  "    Marshall^   Comnna, 

Adrian  and  Flint 2  00 

paid  exp.  on  package  from  Pontiac 50 

"         "      box  reports  to  Marshall 1  16 

package  from  Charlotte 40 

''     East  Saginaw...  25 


a  a 

«4  u  u 


December  SOth,  1868, 
Whitney  Jones,  P,  M., 

To  letter  postage 39 

paper     «         1  22 

drawer 1  00 

^^  Treasarer, 

To  postage  stamps 25  00 

F«ife  &  Warner, 

To  repair,  and  recover,  lounge '    12  00 

(ienL  Pease, 

Toiepointing  gold  pen 50 

'■fli  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 
To  comp.  on  report  of  Sup't  of  Pub.  Inst,  from 
page  1,  to  and  including  page  112, 172,204 
ems 77  49 

Amount  carried  forward $124  01 


102  ASNl'AL  REPOBT  OF  TQF, 

Supt.  of  Publie  Instruction 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amouiit  brought  forward - 1124 

Jno.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  presa  work  on  eaine,  588  tokeuB 235 

comp.  on  report  of  Sup't  of  Pub,  Inst.,  from 
poge  112,  to  and  incloding  page  144,  41',- 
488  ems 21 


Janvart/  26tk,  1869. 
State  Treasurer, 

To  poBtago  for  Sup't  of  Pub.  Inetniction 25 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  repair,  gold  pen 

C.  B.  Stebbins, 

To  paid  for  3  qts.  Arnold's  6uid ;: 

"      gold  pen '. 

•'       1  copy,  book,  600  ]>ages ' 

"      1  doz.  Faber'e  pencils 

1      rubber  pencil 

II.  L.  Dayica, 
To  cngraTing  steel  plate  for  State  teacher's  cer- 

tiflcstc - 7 


February  10th,  1869. 
W.  S,  George  &  Co., 

To  dry.  and  press.  5,350  signatures _ . 

fold,  same 

stitch.  250  pamphlets 

trim.  250  "        

Amount  carried  forward •*' 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUDITORS.  103 

Supt.  of  Public  Instruction 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $494  30 

ff.  &  George  &  Co., 
To  41,720  ems  comp.  on  report  from  page  144,  to 

and  inclnding  page  168 1 18  77 

294  tokens  press  work  on  same 117  60 


March  Sdy  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press,  and  trim,  circulars 25 

print  circulars  to  co.  sup'ts  of  schools 3  50 

"     5  reams  Teacher's  Institute  circulars, 

spring  series 17  50 

print  2,000  envelopes 3  00 

6«Q.L  Pease, 
To  2  M  envelopes 6  ^^ 


March  mh,  1869. 
'•&  George  &  Co., 

To  dry.  and  press.  38,000  sigs,  Sup'ts  report 190  00 

fold.  38,000  sigs.  same 190  00 

print  35  rms.  teachers*  certificates 122  50 

6}  rms.  folio  post 62  40 

comp.  on  report  from  page  168,  to  close,  in- 
cluding preface,  266,551  ems 119  94 

760  tokens  press  work  on  same 304  00 

^tney  Jones,  P.  M., 
To  ktter  postage,  12c. ;  paper  do.,  $1  22 ;  drawer, 

•1 2  34 

Afflonnt  carried  forward $1,652  76 


104  ANNUAL  EEPORT  OP  THE 

Stipt.  of  PuHie  Instruction. 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

April  6tk,  186 

Amount  bronght  forward tl.BSi 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print.  3  rms.  Institute  certificates 1( 

paper  for  same ! 

print,  blanks  for  co.  clerks'  returns  of  election 

of  CO.  Bupt 

paper  for  same 

press,  and  trim.  1  rm.  election  retams 

bind.  65  books  of  teachers'  certificates  for  co. 

snpts. 3 

Geo.  h.  Pease, 

To  1  pencil  sharpener 

1  doz,  rubber  bands 

1  package  blotting  pads 

5  qrs.  P.  0.  paper 

i  rm.  commercial  note 

20  sheets  blotting  paper 

Detroit  Post  Co., 

To  daily  for  office  to  March  27th,  1870 

Daily  Post, 
To  adv.  State  Teach.  Inst,  3  sqs.,  'i  times 


April  28th,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print,  circnlars  to  co.  clerks 

"     4  rms.  covers  for  Supt's  report 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

,     To  one  2  qt  can  mucilage 

\  rm.  36x40  manilla 

Amount  carried  forward-  * 1 1,' 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  105 

Suipt.  of  PubUc  Instruction 

vs. 
The  Stoite  of  Michigan, 

AmonDt  brought  forward tl^riO  26 

6eaL  Pease, 

To^doj.  quills 1  65 

Kigiuun,  Oeorge  ft  Co., 

To  flttbocription  to  Republican  from  No.  661  to 

No.  763,  2  years 4  00 


May  26th,  1869. 
&&  Greene, 

To  47  boxes  for  report  of  Sup*t  of  Pub.  Inst. . .  39  95 

paid  for  deKvery •  60 

W.&Geoige  ft  Co., 

To  prini  1,000  enyelopes 1  60 

Mni  4  ToFs  House  bills 8  00 

"    2  YoFs  Senate  bills 4  00 

diy.  and  press.  300,000  sigs.  school  report 160  00 

fold.  300,000  sigs.  same 160  00 

bind.  1,500  school  reports,  paper 160  00 

**    6,000        "          "        leather  backs 1,920  00 

Fofc  ft  Warner, 

To  reprir.  chair  for  Sup'ts  office 1  25 


June  SOth,  1869. 
V.&Geoige  ft  Co., 

Toprint40  nns.  directors*  reports 220  00 

"       7    **     school  inspectors*  reports 38  60 

Aaonnt  carried  forward $4,429  5i 

14 


V 


106  AKKUAL  REPOKT  OP  THE 

Supt.  of  Pvilie  Instruction 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  fonvunl t4,43' 

S.  K.  Greene, 

To  lumber,  nails,  and  work  for  caae % 

cash  for  4  doors 1 

(Iraying 

cosli  for  bolt«  luid  screws,  aud  looks 

paint  and  pninting 

Oramcl  Hosford, 

To  expenses  to  Adriau  on  official  business 1 

"  "  OWOBSO  "  "  

'■         "  Greenville       "  "         1 

"         "  Marshall  '■  "         

'•         "  Saginaw  '*         "        

"  '■  Chicago  '■  "         ] 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  20  reams  folio  post 1; 

8         "  '■         

E.  B.  Millar  &  Co., 

Tol  ball  twine 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  office.,  j 

Whitney  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  letter  jwstoge,  9c.;  paper  do.,  <1  22 

drawer  . .  - 

C.  B.  Stebbins, 

To  jMiid  cxp.  charges  on  copy  from  Sup't. 

"            "           "      certificates  to  Coldwater 
"            "           *■      pack,  to  Sup't,  Oliyet . . 
«       School- 
craft   - 

paid  for  list  of  co.  supt's  addresses 

Amount  carried  forward ♦4> 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  107 

Supt.  of  Public  Instruction 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amonnt  brought  forward 14,776  83 

C.  &  Stebbins, 

To  paid  for  letter  book  brush 75 

"     "   cuts  of  plans  for  school-liouses,  for 
school  laws 14  25 


July  28th,  I860. 
W.  S,  George  &  Co., 

To  bind.  1  book  of  certificates 50 

press,  and  trim.  7  reams  inspectors'  reports ..  3  50 

ruling                 7      "             "             "      ..  10  50 

press,  and  trim.  40    «              "              *'       . .  20  00 

ruling                 27    "             ''             *'      ..  27  00 

dry.  and  press.  1,400  sigs.  school  laws 70 

fold.  1,400  sigs.  school  laws 70 

stitching  100  pamphlets 30 

tiim.100                " 25 


August  27th,  1869. 
^'  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print  4  rms.  Teach.  Inst,  blanks 14  00 

-      1     "        "  *'     at  Kalamazoo 3  50 


October  Sth,  1860. 
^iitBer  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  letter  postage 51 

ptperpostage 1  22 

drawer 1  00 

Attoont  carried  forward $4,875  51 


108  ANNUAL  BSPOBT  OF  THE 

Su.pt.  of  Puilio  Itutruetion 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michi£cm. 

Amount  brought  forward 14,8 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  81  boxes  for  echool  lawa. 

call  bell,  8s. ;   cord,  20c. ;  vire,  36c. ;  tassels, 

Is.;  work  to  hang,  8b. 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print.  1  ream  circulars  to  co.  clerks,  1  side... 


October  27th,  1869. 
State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  office 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  clean,  stoves  and  pipe 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  bind.  38  qrs.  inspectors'  report* 

"    1  qr.  teachers' certiRcates 

Total »5, 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  109 


State  Library 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

December  3d,  1868. 
Jw.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  bind.  12  Tolfl.  rolls  of  honor *18  00 

<imlL  Pease, 

To  1  doz.  mucilage 3  00 

^Treasurer, 

To  portage  for  State  Library 16  00 

Fetle  4  Warner, 

TocoTering  tables  in  Library 3  60 

'toney  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  letter  postage 1  00 

paperpostage 1  24 

drawer 1  00 

^A-Kerr  &  Co., 
Tocomp.  on  catalogue  of  State  Librarian,  412,- 

652ems 186  64 

presB  work  on  same,  90  tokens 36  00 

print  2  rms.  corers  for  same 400 

dry.  and  press.  18,000  sigs.  catalogue 9  00 

foU.  same 9  00 

ititch.  1,000  pamphlete 3  00 

oofer.and  trim.same 10  00 

Mnd.  1  Hogarth's  works 10  00 

Scatalognes 7  60 

6  Tols.  magazines 7  60 

^    Iregister 2  60 

Amount  carried  forward $326  88 


110  ANNl'AL    REPORT  OP  THE 

State  Library 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

January  mh,  1S6. 

Amount  brought  forwnn.1 . .  - *38C 

John  Ficht, 

To  sawing  10  cords  wood,  once i 

"        8  "  twice 15 

State  Treaaurcr, 
To  postage  for  State  Library 1! 


January  27th, 
S.  B.  Greene, 

To  40  drawer  handles 

labor  and  screws  to  put  on  same 

knobs,  30c. ;  repair,  door,  6s. 


February   10th,  1869. 
Jacob  Bone, 
To  4^  days  hauling  wood  at  the  Capitol,  self  and 

team 

John  Ficht, 

To  sawing  4^  cords  wood,  once -  - 

"        3  "  twice 

American  Express  Oompoay, 
To  express  charges  from  Kot.  18th,  1868,  to  Jan. 

19th,  1869 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  bind.  1  roll  of  honor 

1  Lani-ing  city  map 

Amount  carried  fopwani ♦^ 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  Ill 

Sta;te  Library 

The  Staiie  of  Michigan. 

March  3d,  1869. 

Amoant  brought  forward $413  10 

W.  SL  George  &  Co., 

To  bind  3  vols.  Littell's  Living  Age 3  75 

dry.  and  press.  3,000  rigs. 1  50 

folding  same. 1  50 

sdtching  750  pamphlets 1  50 

cover,  and  trim,  same 7  50 

Wiitney  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  piper  postage,  tl  24 ;  drawer,  tl 2  24 


April  6ih,  1869. 
6«aL  Pease, 

Tolgoldpen 8  00 

1  paper  folder 40 

linkstand 2  00 

6  qrs.  gold  envelope  paper 2  40 

1  ink  eraser 60 

Idoz.  rubbers 60 

idoz.  paper  weights 4  50 

3boxe8  eyelets 1  50 

i  dos.  balls  twine 1  50 

llH*.bank  shears 3  50 

1  dox.  glass  inkstands 2  25 

Ipenrack 1  00 

Ibhnkbook 75 

I  bot  carmine 75 

1  doz.  pen  holders 75 

t  doz.  lead  pencUs 1  88 

1  colored  pencil 1  00 


^■wiuit  carried  forward 1464  47 


I 


i 


i! 
I 


112  AKKXJAL  BEPOBT  OF  THE 

State  Library 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

»  Amount  brought  forward 1464 

George  L.  Pease, 

Tol  ream  commercial  note 2 

1  punch 1 

1  gross  steel  pens 1 

1  rubber  ruler 

2  doz.  pencils 1 

2  doz.  rubber  pen  holders S 

^  doz.  colored  pencils ' 

1  paper  cutter j 

1  gross  pens ' 

1  pair  shears 

1  rm.  legal  cap  paper 

3  inkstands 

i  rm.  legal  cap 

note  paper  and  envelopes 

1  wicker  waste  basket 

1  sponge  cup  and  sponge 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  stamps 1 

Detroit  Post  Co., 

To  daily  to  office  to  March  27th,  1870 


April  28thy  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print,  placards 

1  register,  with  index 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  1  ream  legal  cap 

i  M  envelopes,  white 


Amount  carried  forward %l 


\ ... 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUDITOBS.  113 

Stcete  Library 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $531  46 

(caLPeaae, 

To  1  pr.  poBt  office  scales 5  00 

1  can  mncilage 76 

^  M  white  enyelopes 2  09 

robber  hands 4  00 

i  raim  24x36  manilla 3  00 

i«     30x40        "     3  60 

idos.  balls  hemp  twine 1  60 

Sspoolsred  tape 4  60 

iCquills 1  60 

Iprscissors 1  26 

1  pencil  sharpener 26 

1  ifory  paper  folder 1  60 

^  M.  U.  Express  Company, 
1*0  express  charges  from  Dec.  3d,  1868,  to  April 

17th,1869 11  60 

1^  ft  Lamed, 

To  1  feather  duster 3  00 

1  dnsting  brash 66 

K^gbm,  George  ft  Co., 
Tocnbscription  to  Bepnblican  from  No.  661  to 

Na763,  2  years., 4  00 

llTenney, 

To  paid  for  small  duster 1  00 

"       dust  pan 30 

^  F .  Stnons, 

To  4J  ytids  oil  cloth 11  26 


^onnt  carried  forward $692  10 

15 


i 

'! 

( 

1  > 

1   : 

i 

1 

\ 

!   ' 

1.  . 

114  ANNUAL  EEPORT  OF  THK 

State  Library 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

May  mh,  m 

Amount  brought  forward 15? 

Am.  M.  U.  Express  Company, 

To  express  charges  from  April  17th,  1869,  to  May 

22d,  1869 

S.  E.  Qi-eene, 

To  work,  glass  and  trimmings  to  repair  cases... 
work,  lumber,  glass  and  trimmings  for  3  new 

cases 1 

cash  paid  for  paint  and  painter's  work 

1  case  for  writing  table 

work  to  alter  and  repair  shelves 

2  days  work 

lumber,  &c.,  to  repair  old  cases 

2  irons  for  maps 

Ben.  Verner, 
To  premium  on  ins.  of  State  Library  in  the  Lor- 

illard  Ins.  Co.,  of  $3,000 

do.  in  the  Springfield  Ins.  Co.,  of  $3,000 

J.  E.  Tenney, 
To  renewal  of  ins.  on  the  State  Library  in  the  De- 
troit Fire  and  Marine  Ins.  Co.,  for  $5,000, 
from  May,  1869,  to  May,  1870,  prem.  fl)  2  % 
$5,000  in  the  Putnam  Fire  Ins.  Co.,  for  one 
year,  from  May,  1869,  to  May,  1870,  prem. 

®2  % - 

Brisbin  &  Conely, 

To  1  gal.  carbon  oil 

1  Bussiahair  brush 

6  gals,  carbon  oiL_ 

6    "  "     

Amount  carried  forward $ 


BOABD  OF  STATK  AUDITORS.  115 

State  Library 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

June  30th y  1869. 

Amoaut  brought  forward $1,096  45 

S.  R,  Oreene, 
To  Inmber,  labor,  glass  and  paint  for  one  book 

ctise  trimming 18  00 

1 12  foot  step-ladder  painted 7  60 

13i    *•           "               " 3  00 

i  irons  for  map  racks 2  00 

W.  8.  George  &  Co., 

To  bind  12  vols,  magazines 15  00 

•*    1  law  register,  full  bound 1  50 

-    3  vols,  newspapers 7  50 

E.B.Millar&Co., 

Toigallons  oil ..l.! 70 

2     •«       «  : 80 

2  "        "  90 

1  whisk 50 

2brooms.. 1  15 

3  **       2.70 

Icedarpail 1  50 

2  doz.  wicks  ._ 40 

Sbarssoap 1  00 

Imonsetrap 25 

brushes 80 

lutnqr  Jones,  P.  M., 

To  paper  postage 1  24 

drawer,  qr.  ending  June  30th,  1869 1  00 

It  F.  Simonfi, 

To  1  velvet  rug 10  00 

£k1&  Fuller, 

To  12  boxes  mat<>hes 1  20 

Anount  carried  forward tl,175  09 


116  ANNUAL  BEPOBT  OP  THE 

J^ate  LUrary 

v$. 

The  i^ate  of  Michigan. 

Amount  bronglit  forward tl,l' 

Earl  4  Fnller, 


Tol  gallon  keroaene  oil.. 


J.  S.  Baker  &  Co., 

To  1  OTal  frame 

3  pictnre  knobs 

3  screw  eyes 

3  jarda  pictare  cord. . 
.  1  lianf^g  frame 


July  2Sth,  1 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  bind  15  vols.  sesB.  laws  of  1869,  leather. . 
F.  F.  Russell, 

To  3  frames,  85c 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  State  Library 


August  27th,  1869. 
A.  M.  U.  Express  Company, 

To  express  charges  from  June  1st,  1869,  to  Aug. 
24th,  1869 

Amount  carried  forward tX^ 


BOABD  OF  STATS  AUDITOBS.  117 

State  Library 
vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward ...    11,236  12 

SLfi.Oreene, 

To  work  to  rehang  windows,  library 2  26 

1  hght  glass,  30c. ;  cord  for  windows,  28. 55 

W.8.  George  &  Co., 

To  bind.  3  vols,  magazines 3  75 


October  5th,  1869. 
TUtney  Jones, 

To  letter  postage 06 

paper        •*     1  22 

dawer 1  00 

^uican  M.  U.  Express  Co., 
To  express  charges  from  Sept  7th,  186d,  to  Oct 

2d,1869 7  25 


October  27th,  1869. 
&1L  Greene, 
To  taking  down  and  clean,  stove-pipe,  chimney, 

4c. 2  50 


November  24th,  1869. 
^  I  Greene, 
Torapairsin  State  Library 30 

Totd 11,255  00 


Swajnp  Land  State  Jioad  Commissioner 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

Deceviber  Sd,  1868. 
Jno.  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  print,  blanks,  acceptance  of  local  comers. .  1 . .  $5  50 

**         "        certs,  to  And.  General 5  50 

paper  for  same 4  00 

bind.  1  book,  Manistee  and  Leland  road 1  50 

press,  and  trim.  2  rms.  blanks 100 


December  SOfh,  1868. 
LJLCnrtitf, 

To  ctth  paid  hotel  bill  at  Lansing 5  00 

iiwp  to  Saginaw 2  20 

rulroad  fare  to  Chicago 10  35 

dinner  at  Marshall - 75 

Wei  bill  at  Chicago 10  50 

fiireto  Saginaw 10  35 

sapper  at  Xiles 75 

hotel  bill  at  Jackson 1  25 

expenses  from  June  9th  to  Aug.  28thy  items 
of  which  I  kept  in  a  diary  which  has  been 
lost ;  these  items^  as  nearly  as  I  could  rec- 

coUect  at  the  time,  amounted  to 283  00 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 8  50 

niboad  fare  to  Saginaw 2  20 

&re  to  Bay  City,  hack  and  dinner 2  00 

-*     Detroit 3  50 

hotelbill  at  Detroit 6  00 


^•oant  carried  forward $363  85 


130  AKNUAL   BEPORT  OF  THE 

Swamp  Land  State  Boad  Com-missioTier 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward tSi63 

L.  B.  Curtis, 

To  fare  to  Chicago 10 

hotel  bill  at  Chicago 10 

boat  Eire  to  Mackinac 6 

boat  and  man 10 

hotel  bill  at  Kackinac IS 

boat  fare  to  St  Mary's ( 

horse  and  wagon  2  days t 

hotel  bill  at  St  Mary's :..  li 

steamboat  fare  to  Detroit V. 

hotel  bill  at  Detroit ! 

fire  to  Saginaw ; 

railroad  fare  toOwoseo 

hotel  bill  at         "        

fire  to  Grand  Rapids 

breakfast  on  the  road 

hotel  bill  at  Grand  Rapids 

dinner  for  self  and  horee 

hotel  bill  at  Newaygo 

dinner  for  self  and  horse 

hotel  bill  at  Pine  Run 

team  at  Traverse  City 

hotelbillat    "        '• 

dinner  and  keeping  team  3  days 

hire  of  team  2  days 

bill  at  Baker's 

dinner  and  horse  feed 

cash  paid  bill  at  tavern 

bill  at  Big  Rapids 

bill  for  mending  buggy 

Amount  carried  forward %B 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  121 

Swamp  Land  State  Eoad  Cormnissianer 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward 1502  08 

L&  Curtis, 

To  hotel  bill  at  Aniss 3  00 

horse  hire 1  50 

liTcry  team  8  days 32  00 

repairs  on  buggy 3  00 

hotel  bill  at  Grand  Eapids 2  00 

tare  to  Corunna 3  25 

dinner  atOwosso 75 

hone  hire  at  Corunna 2  00 

hotelbiUat        "        175 

omnibus  to  Owosso 50 

fiure  to  Lansing. : 1  10 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 6  25 

breto  Saginaw 2  20 

**      Bay  City  and  back 120 

livery  bill  and  dinner  at  Bay  City 2  75 

Hyery,  horse  feed,  and  dinner  at  East  Saginaw 

and  Junction  road 3  20 

Cue  to  Midland  and  back 2  06 

liTery  and  dinner  at  Midland 2  50 

fiue  to  Lansing 2  20 

hotel  biU      "     130 

fiueto  Jackson 1  60 

hotel  bill  at  Jackson 1  50 

fiffeto  Detroit 2  70 

hotel  bill  at  Detroit 4  50 

fiueto  Saginaw 3  53 

«     Owosso 1  40 

dinnerat    "    75 

hotel  bill  at  Ionia 1  65 

Amount  carried  forward $594  %t 

16 


133  AIfNUA.L   SEPORT   OF  THE 

Swamp  Land  State  Rood  Commissioner 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward ..l $594 

L.  B.  Curtis, 

To  fare  to  Ionia. 1 

dinner  and  liorae  feed 1 

bill  at  farm  house 2 

dinner  and  horee  feed  at  Greenville 1 

hotel  bill 3 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Big  Rapids _  1 

bill  at  farm  house _ 3 

repairs  on  buggy S 

hot#l  bill S 

dinner  and  horse  feed 1 

team  4  days. 1( 

fare  to  Milwaukee ! 

supper  on  boat 

hotel  hill  at  Milwaukee _ J 

fare  to  Greeu  Bay,  and  supper 

hotel  bill  at  Green  Bay 1 

fare  to  Escanaba,  and  dinner 

hotel  bill  at  Escanaba 

dinner  on  the  road 

fare  from  Escanaba  to  Menominee 

"    to  Green  Bay 

2  meals  on  boat 

hotel  bill  at  Green  Bay 

railroad  fare  to  Chicago 1 

breakfast - 

dinner 

railroad  fare  to  Detroit 

hotel  bill  at  Detroit - 

fere  to  Holly 

Amonnt  carried  forward %& 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  123 

Swamp  Land  State  Road  CommUsicner 

TJie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward - •602  32 

L  B.  Curtis, 

Tohotclbmatllollv--- -.  3  50 

fcrc  home 1  63 

hotel  biU  at  Midland 3  60 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  St.  Louis 1  25 

hoTse-hire  at  Alma 2  00 

hotelbillat       "     3  75 

dinner  and  feed  at  Elm  Hall 1  15 

repairs  on  buggy 3  25 

hotel  bill  at  Elm  Hall 3  25 

dinner  and  feed  at  Stanton 1  10 

bill  at  farm  house 2  50 

dinner  and  feed  at  Mill  Creek 115 

bill  overnight 2  75 

dinner  and  feed 1  00 

repairs  on  buggy 5  50 

hotel  bill  at  Isabella ' 3  50 

dinner  and  feed 1  25 

hotel  bill  and  horse  keeping  at  Midland 2  50 

fiuv  home 78 

man  and  expense  going  to  Midland  for  team.  2  78 

KverybiU  8  days 32  00 

fiwe  to  Lansing 2  20 

hotel  biU  at  Lansing 12  50 

fiae  home 2  20 

team  to  Tuscola  and  back 4  00 

dinner  and  feed 1  00 

repairs  on  buggy 3  30 

lareto  Detroit 3  63 

hotel  bill  at  Detroit 9  00 

-^Hioimt  carried  forward >810  14 


I 

]     , 


124  ANNUAL  BEPOBT  OF  THE 

Swam/p  Land  Sta4^  Rood  Commissioner 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 1810  ' 

L.  B.  Curtis, 

To  fare  to  Grand  Rapids 5  < 

dinnerat  Owosso ' 

hotel  bill  at  Qrand  Bapids 2  * 

dinner  and  feed 1 

hotel  bill  at  Muskegon 3 

dinnerand  feed 1 

hotel  bill  at  Hart 3 

dinnerand  feed 1 

hotel  bill  at  Pere  Marquette 3 

dinner  and  feed 1 

hotel  bill  at  Manistee 3 

dinnerand  feed 1 

hotel  bill  at  Bear  Lake. .  -^ 7 

repairs  on  buggy 8 

dinner  and  feed 1 

hotel    bill  at  Frankfort,  and  keeping    and 

sending  team  to  Benzonia  next  day 6 

horse-hire  to  Empire,  and  back  to  Benzonia..  4 

dinner  and  horse  feed 

bill  at  Empire 2 

repairs  on  harness 2 

hotel  bill  at  Benzonia 5 

man  to  return  horses 2 

dinner  and  horse  feed 1 

repairs  on  buggy 4 

livery  bill 4 

hotel  bill  at  Traverse  City •; 

dinnerand  feed 1 

hotel  bill  on  road,  and  dinner  and  feed ^ 

Amount  carried  forward #90^ 


BOA.BD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  125 

Swamp  Land  State  Boad  Commissioner 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 1900  39 

L.  RCmtiB, 

To  hotel  biU  on  road^  and  dinner  and  feed 4  75 

shoeing  horses 2  50 

hotel  bill  at  Newaygo 3  25 

dinnerand  feed 1  00 

sapper  at  Grand  Rapids 50 

team  15  days 60  00 

&reto  Detroit 7  10 

hotel  bill  at  Detroit 1  50 

five  home 3  50 

railroad  fare  to  Lansing 2  20 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 10  50 

Cue  home---..- 2  20 

RRfEire  to  Lansing 2  20 

telegraphing  from  April  Ist,  1867,  to  date...  14  20 
Fcffle  ft  Warner, 

To  1  ledger  rest 75 


January  26th,  1869. 
Sl  Farmer  &  Co^ 
To  5  sets  nncolored  sheets  of  Mich.  State  maps.  20  00 


January  27th,  1869. 
ti  B.  Greene, 
To  repairing  chair 60 


Amimnt  carried  forward — --   ti,037  14 


186  ANNUAL   R£POBT   OF  THE 

Swamp  Land  State  Road  CoTnmissioner 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michi£an. 

February  10th,  J8 

Amount  brought  forward il,0! 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  dry,  and  press.  3,000  sigs. 

folding  name 

stitcliing  750  pamphlets 

cover,  and  trim,  same 

149,480  cms  comp.  on  report ' 

48  tokens  press  work  on  same 

3  reams  covers  for  same 

monntiug  3  large  maps  of  ?t(ichigaii 


S.  R.  Greene, 
To  work,  lumber,  tix  maps.. 


April  Gth,  1869. 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 

Toi  rm.  legal  cap 

1  inkstand _ 

1  spool  tape 

State  Treasurer, 
To  postage  furnished  Commissioner  of  Swamp 
Land  State  RoiuU 


May  S6th,  1SG9. 
L.  B.  Curtis, 
To  cash  paid  bill  at  Lansing 

Amount  carried  forwanl  •!, 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  127 

Swamp  Land  State  Roa,d  CoTnmissioner 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward $1,171  35 

U  B.  Curtis, 

Tofiure  home ! 2  20 

"     to  Midland  and  dinner 1  28 

bill  at  Forks  Tobacco 3  00 

dinner  for  self  and  horse 1  25 

liTcry  Willi  days 6  00 

hotel  bill  at  Midland -.  1  75 

fiure  home 78 

"    to  Lansing 2  20 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 6  25 

fareto               "       ---.-.- 2  20 

hotelbillat       "       16  00 

fiweto               "       .-.. 2  20 

hotelbillat       "       3  00 

fcre  to               '*       2  20 

hotelbillat       "       9  60 

•*                  «       9  00 

fareto  Berlin 4  40 

dinner  at  Owosso - 75 

fine  home 4  40 

bin  at  Grand  Rapids 2  00 

fare  to  Lansing 2  20 

home 2  20 

biOat  Lansing 12  00 

dinner  and  horse  feed 125 

hotel  bill  at  Alma 3  25 

dinner  and  horse  feed 4  40 

hotel  bill  at  Mount  Pleasant 3  20 

dinner  and  horse  feed 1  00 

hotel  biU  at  Midland 3  25 

Amount  carried  forward $1,283  46 


I 


128  ANNUAL  BBPOBT  OF  THE 

Swamp  Land  State  Boad  CommissioTur 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  bronght  forvard tl,2i 

L.  B.  CnrtJB, 

To  dinner  and  horse  feed 

team  4  days 

fare  to  lAnsing. 

bill  at       «      

fiire  to       "      

hotel  bUl  at  Lanring 

"        "        Chicago 

fare  to  Chicago 

fare  home , 

Innch  at  Jackson 

fare  to  Lansing ; 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 

tan  to  Lansing - 

«      Detroit 

"      Lansing 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 


paid  Hon.  Mr.  Blake  for  team li 

iare  to  Lansing  and  back  home 

bill  at  Lansing 

fare  to  Lansing 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 

fare  to  Detroit 

dinner 

hotel  bill  at  Detroit 

fare  to  Grand  Rapids 

Amoont  carried  forward #1,4< 


BOA  ED  OP  STATE   AUDITORS.  129 

Swamp  Land  State  Road  Commissioner 

vs. 
The  State  of  MichitSan. 

Amoimt  brought  forward $1^445  36 

L  B-  Ciirtis, 

To  hotel  bill  at  Grand  Eapids 1  75 

fare  to  Grand  Haven 1  50 

dinner  at  Grand  Haven 50 

bill  at  tavern 3  25 

dinner  and  horse  feed 1  20 

bill  at  farm  house 2  75 

dinner  and  horse  feed _ 1  00 

bill  at  farm  house 2  75 

dinner  and  horse  feed 1  25 

bill  at  farm  house 2  50 

dinner  and  horse  feed 1  00 

livery  bill  5  days 22  50 

fiire  to  Chicago,  and  dinner  on  boat 3  50 

hotel  bill  at  Chicago 5  00 

fare  home 9  65 

dinner  at  Marshall 75 

£ftre  to  Lansing 2  20 

2  bottles  ink  for  office 2  05 

1  gold  pen  and  case 5  50 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 5  50 

&rehome 2  20 

•'    to  Lansing 2  20 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing 75 

fiure  to  Owosso 1  10 

sapper  and  lodging 1  25 

feretoGrand  Rapids 2  80 

hotel  bill 75 

fare  to  Cedar  Springs 1  25 

dinnerat      " 50 

Amount  carried  forward $1,534  26 

17 


j 


130  ANNUAL  REPORT   OF  THE 

I 

Swamp  Land  State  Boa^  Commissiojier 

I  j  I  .  TJie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $1,534 

L.  B.  Curtis, 

Torepairson  bugg}^ -__ 3 

supper  and  horse  feed 1 

bill  at  tavern.- 3 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Big  Sapids 1 

hotel  bill 3 

dinner  and  horse  feed 1 

bill  at  Harfs  tavern - 3 

dinner  at  Cedar  Springs 

livery  bill  3^  days _ 14 

fare  to  Grand  Rapids 1 

supperat       "  .. 

fare  to  Owosso S 

lodging  and  breakfast  at  Owosso 1 

fare  home.-.. 1 

"    to  Berlin 

dinner  at  Owosso _ 

hotel  bill  at  Berlin 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Fairfield 

livery  team  one  day 

hotel  bill - 

fare  home. 

dinner  at  Owosso 

dinner  and  horse  feed  on  East  Saginaw  and 

Junction  road 

horse  and  buggy  one  day 

fare  to  Lansing 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  stamps  furnished  office 

Amount  carried  forward %l,lj 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  131 

Swamp  Land  State  Boad  ComTnissioner 

Tlie  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 81,606  %1 

Gfo.  L.  Pease, 

To  2  reams  letter  paper _ 9  00 

lithographing  above  2  reams.. _  5  00 

1  doz.  No.  3  Faber  pencils 90 

1    '•      **    4           "            _ 90 

\    '•    red  and  blue  pencils 50 

1  box  eyelets 60 

1  gross  rubber  bands 1  00 


Jnne  30  thy  1869. 
Pet^  Mitchell, 

To  print.  60  blank  swamp  land  commissions 3  60 

LRCortis, 

To  hotel  bill  at  Lansing 8  60 

fkrehome 2  20 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Midland 1  26 

hotel  bill  at  Midland 3  16 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  St  Louis _  1  10 

hotel  bill  at  Alma,  $3  25 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed  at  Elm  Hall,  $1  00 J 4  25 

hotel  bill  at  Isabella,  $3  10 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed  at  Half  Way  House,  $1 4  60 

hotel  bill  at  Midland,  $3  20 ;   livery  bill,  5 

days,  $20 23  20 

fare  to  6r.  Bapids,  $4  40 ;  dinner  at  Owosso, 

75c. 5  16 

hotel  bill  at  Grand  Rapids 5  00 

fitte  to,  and  dinner  at  Cedar  Springs _  6  75 

Amount  carried  forward $1,691  66 


» 


r  <  H  * 


l>   ' 


( 


i  :  • 


132  AKKUAL  BEPORT  OF  THE 


N  

SuKump  Land  Sta^  Boad  Canvmisdoner 

IIJI;  The  Bbate  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward  - $1,691 

L.  B.  Curtis, 

To  hotel  biU  at  Big  Eapidfi 3 

.  "        atHart 3 

dinner  andhorso  feed  at  tavern 1 

"        at  Cedar  Springs 

livery  bill  3  days 12 

paid  livery  to  Grand  Bapids IC 

hotel  bill  at  Grand  Bapids S 

fare  home ^ 

dinner 

paid  telegraphing I 

fare  to  Chicago 1 

hotel  bin  at  Chicago 1 

fare  to  Muskegon,  and  breakfast 

hotel  bill  at  Muskegon,  13,  and  fare  to  Chi- 
cago, $4 

hotel  bill  at  Chicago,   18,  and  fare  home, 

$9  60 

dinner  at  Marshall  and  supper  at  Owosso. . . 

fare  to  Lansing 

S.  B.  Greene, 
To  1  box  for  packing  stationery  to  Upper  Penin- 
sula Commissioner 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  Iseal  press  and  die 

1  M  envelopes.  No.  9 _. 

2M        "  «    6 

1  ream  14  lb.  legal  cap 

1    "     Congress  letter -_ 

25  sheets  19x23  bank  bond 

Amount  carried  forward ,    ♦!, 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  133 

Sufamp  Land  State  JSoad  Commissioner 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

A»ouiit  brought  forward $1,823  10 

Oeo.  L  Pease, 

To  6  gross  rubber  strings 3  00 

idoz.gTooms  carmine 76 

}   "  Arnold's  genuine  quarts 1  68 

1  qi  French  copying  ink 1  ^5 

2  doz.  Faber's  pencils,  No.  3 1  60 

1   "    draughting  tacks 2  50 

1,500  page  French  copying  book 4  75 

W.  8.  George  ft  Co., 

Topre88.and  trim.  1  ream  plats 50 

niling  1  ream  plats  4  times 2  00 

print  2  reams  letter  heads 7  00 

"    envelopes 3  00 

*•     1  ream  town  plats 5  50 


July  28th,  1869. 
LBl  Curtis, 
To  hotel  UU,  Lansing,  $5  50 ;  fare  home,  t2  20.  7  70 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Freeland 1  20 

hotel  bill.  Midland,  $3  50 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed  at  St.  Louis,  $1  25 4  75 

hotel  bill  at  Ferries,  $3  25 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed  at  fiurmers,  II 4  25 

hotel  bill  at  Seed's,  $3 ;  hotel  bill  at  Stanton 

♦130 4  30 

hotel  bill  near  Harris',  13 ;  mending  buggy, 

•1  75 4  75 

i  bushel   oats,  tl  50;   dinner  and  hay  for 

horses,  75c 2  25 

Amoimt  carried  forward 11,885  74 


131  ANNDAL   REPORT   OF  TDE 

Swamp  LaTid  State  Rood  CoTmnissioner 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 11,885 

L.  B.  Curtis, 
To  bill  at  farm  house,  (3 ;  dinuer  aud  horse  feed 

at  farmers,  75c 3 

diiiaer  and  horse  feed  at  Mt.  Pleasant 1 

hotel  bill  at  St  Louis,  t3  35 ;  diuuer  and  liorsc 

feed  at  Midland,  «1  25 ~ 

repairs  on  buggy,  ti  75 ;  livery  hire,  8  days, 

133 3f 

toll  on  bridge  and  plank  road,  84c. ;  dinner 

and  feed  at  Vassar,  $1  25 

hotel  bill  at  WatrousTille,  13  50 ;  dinner  and 

feed  at  Sebewaing,  ♦!  30 

repairs  on  harness,  tl ;  1^  bushels  oats,  $1  75 
liot«l  bill  at  Pigeon  River,  (3  50 ;  dinner  and 

hay  for  horses,  75c 

hotel  bill  at  Port  Austin,  t2  50 ;  dinner  and 

feed  at  Huron  City,  75c 

hotel  bill,  *3  50;  dinner  and  feed,  H  20 

bill  at  &nn  house,  $3  50 ;  dinner  aud  feed  at 

Carson's,  Jl  20 

livery  hire,  #3;  repairs  on  buggy,  $3 

dinner  at  tavern 

hotel  bill  at  Lexington,  t6  50;  Ij^  bush,  oats, 

»1  50 

dinner  and  feed,  75g.;  shoeing  horses,  $2  60. 
bill  at  fanners,  $2  50 ;   dinner  and  feed  at 

tarem,  tl  25 

repairs  on  buggy - 

hotel  bill  at  Junction 

toll  on  plank  road  and  bridge 

Amount  carried  forward ^l.^ 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  135 

Swamp  Land  State  Road  Covvniissioner 

vs. 
Tlie  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $1,982  58 

L  &  Curtis, 

To  liTerj  bill  ten  days 40  00 

fare  to  Lansing 2  20 

IVt«r  Mitchell, 

To  blank  books  for  ofSco  acc't _  1  40 

fare  from  Ontonagon  to  Marquette 12  00 

biU  at  Marquette 1  75 

fiure  to  Negonna,  65c.,  and  dinner,  75c 1  40 

*"      Escanaba,  $3,  and  breakfast,  75c 3  75 

bill  at  Tilden  House,  $3,  and  berth  on  steam- 

er,50e 3  50 

fare  to  Menominee,  $3,  and  bill  at  Menomi- 
nee, $4 7  00 

fare  to  Escanaba,  $3>  and  fare  to  Marquette, 

$3  75 6  75 

dinner  and  supper,  tl  50,  and  fare  to  Hough- 
ton, $4 5  50 

bin  at  Houghton,  $1,  and  fare  to  Ontonagon, 

•8 9  00 

postage,  $1  50 ;  telegram,  t4  50,  and  charges 

on  blank  plats,  50c 6  50 

letter  press  to  Crozier 13  00 

S.  R.  Greene, 
To  repair,  and  alter,  drawers  for  maps 2  25 


Atigust  27th,  1869. 
LB.  Curtis, 
To  cash  paid  hotel  bill  at  Lansing,  15  50 ;  fare 

toEakmazoo,  14  70 10  20 

Amount  carried  forward $2,098  78 


186  ANNUAL  ERPORT  OF  THE 

Swamp  Land  State  Soad  Commissumer 

The  State  of  Michigan- 
Amount  brought  forward t2,09S 

L.  B.  Curtis, 
To  cash  paid  hotel  bill  at  Kalamazoo,  t2 ;  fare  to 

Grand  Rapida,  »2  20 4 

cafib  paid  for  hotol  bill  at  Orand  Rapids ' 

12  60, 

and  dinner  and  borse  feed,  tl  3a • 

caab  paid  bot«I  biU  at  Berlin,  $3 ;  lirery  bill 

2  days,  »10 i; 

supper  at  Grand  Rapids,  50c ;  fare  to  Hai- 
nan-, $4  40 ' 

hotel  bill  at  Owosso 

livery  bill  on   East  Saginaw  and  Jnnetion 

road 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Midland 

caah  paid  for  hotel  bill  at  Midland 

"  "      dinner  and  horac  feed  at  Riley's 

hotel  bill  at  St   Louis,  $3  25 ;   dinner  and 

horse  feed  at  Elm  Hall,  $1  30 

hotel  bill  at  Stanton,  *3  25 ;  2  btiBli.  oats,  »2 ; 

mending  buggy,  il  40 

shoeing  horses,  II  00;  dinner  and  horse  feed 

at  Mill  Brooks,  ♦!  25 

bill  at  farm  house,  12  50;    dinner  and  horse 

feed  at  M  t.  Pleasant,  ♦!  30 

hotel  bill  at  St.  Tjonis,t3  35;  dinner  and  horse 

feed  at  Midland,  «1  25 

team  and  buggy  7  days,  CT  14 

fare  to  Lansing 

Peter  Mitchell, 
To  cash  paid  for  postage  for  road  office 

Amount  carried  forward taj 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  137 

Swamp  Land  State  Boad  CommissioTier 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward %%yl^\  35 

L  B.  Curtis, 

To  express  charges  on  box  of  blanks 5  10 

«           "         "  oflBcialseal 160 

2c.  postage  stam])s  for  oflSce 60 

fare  from  Ontonagon  to  Marquette 12  00 

"          Marquette  to  Mackinaw 8  00 

board  bill  at  Mackinaw 8  60 

&re  from  Mackinaw  to  Whiska  Bay 3  00 

"         Whiska  Bay  to  Houghton 8  00 

&re  and  meals  to  Ontonagon 7  60 

fiteel  pens  for  oflSce  use 60 

W.  &  Gtoorge  ft  Co., 
To  bind.  1  survey,  Newaygo  and  Norfchport  State 

road 1  00 


October  6th,  1869. 
V.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  1  ream  14  lb.  cap  paper,  for  contracts 5  00 

print  1  rm.  blank  contracts ^  6  60 

press,  and  trim  1  rm.      " 60 


October  27th,  1869. 
LR  Curtis, 
To  cash  paid  hotel  bill  at  Lansing,  $6 ;  fiire  to 

Owos8O,$110 7  10 

cash  paid  hotel  bill  at  Owosso,  12  26 ;  fare  to 

Grand  Rapids,  $2  90 5  15 

Amount  carried  forward $2,270  30 

18 


138  ANNUAL   EEPOBT   OF  THE 

Swamp  Land  State  Road  Conimisaioner 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 13,270 

L.  B.  Curtis, 
To  cash  paid  for  hotel  bill  at  Graud  liapids,  t3  ; 

fare  to  Big  Rapids,  *3  65 5 

cash  paid  dinner  at  Howard 

"        hotel  bill  at  Big  Rapids,  $2  ;  dinner 

und  horse  food,  11  25 3 

cash  paidhot«I  bill  at  Pine  River,  13  50;  din- 
ner and  horse  feed,  $1  20 4 

caah  paid  hotel  bill  at  Traverse  City,  t3  35 ; 
fare  from  Big  Rapids  to  Traverse  City, 

»16 19 

cash  paid  dinner  and  horse  feed 1 

"        hotel  bill  at  Benzonia,  13 ;  dinner 

and  horse  feed,  tl 4 

cash  paid  horse  and  buggy  2  days 8 

''         hotel  bill  at  Benzonia,  $2 ;  dinner 

and  horse  feed,  tl 3 

cash  paid  livery  hire 6 

"         hotel  bill  at  Empire,  (2;   fare  to 

Glen  Arbor,  *4 6 

cash  paid  dinner  at  Glen  Arbor 

"        horse  and  buggy  one  day 4 

'■        hotel  bill  3  days,  $6 ;  faro  to  Kan- 

istee  on  boat,  I2-. 8 

cash  paid  horse  and  buggy 4 

hotel  bill  at  Manistee,  13  50 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed,  ♦!  35 3 

cash  paid  hotel  bill,  13  35;  dinner  and  horse 

feed,  $1 4 

Amount  carried  forward t2,35f 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  139 

Swamp  Land  State  Boad  Covnnissioner 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $2,356  40 

L  &  CnrtiSy 
To  cash  paid  hotel  bill  at  White  Hall,  $3 ;  livery 

bill  from  Manistee  to  White  Lake,  •16....  19  00 

cash  paid  lirery  bill  at  White  Lake 4  00 

«  «  "  *•  $4 ;  fare  to 

Grand  Haven,  II  55 5  55 

cash  paid  liveiy  bill  at  Grand  Haven,  $2 ;  fare 

to  Ionia,  $2  80 4  80 

cash  paid  livery  bill  at  Ionia 1  75 

"  "  ••     Stanton,  $4;  livery  3 

day8,t8 12  00 

cash  paid  hotel  bill  at  Ionia,  $2 ;  fare  to  Sagi- 
naw, $3 ;  dinner,  75c 5  75 

cash  paid  fare  to  Bay  City,  70c.;  livery,  $2 ; 

dinner,  75c.;  fare  to  Saginaw,  70c 4  15 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Hemlock  City 1  20 

lively,  1  day 4  00 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Midland 125 

hotel  biU  at  Bay  City,  13  50 ;  livery  2  days,  $8  11  50 
dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Flint  Biver,  tl ;  liv- 
ery lday,$4 5  00 

&rc  to  Lansing 2  20 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing,  $3  00 ;  fare  to  Detroit, 

»410 7  10 

hotel  bill  at  Detroit,  $2  50 ;  fare  to  Owosso, 

»270 5  20 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing,  $3 ;  fare  to  Saginaw, 

$220 5  20 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Freeland's 1  20 

Amoimt  carried  forward 12,457  25 


^^^ 


I  ,• 


v  , 


■i 


140  ANKUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

Swamp  Land  State  Hoad  Commi'Seioner 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $2,457  2 

Ij.  B.  Curtis, 

hotel  bill  at  Midland,  13 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed,  $1 4  0 

hotel  bill  at  St.  Louis,  13 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed,  II  20 

hotel  bill  at  Ferris. _ 

"         "    Stanton,  $4  00 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed,  n 

repairs  on  buggy 

bill  at  farm  house,  $2  50 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed,  $125 3 

hotel  bill  at  Alma,   13;    dinner  and  horse 

feed,  II 4 

livery  bill   7  days,  128;   repairs  on  buggy, 

I8  60. 

fare  to  Saranac,  13  55 ;    dinner  at  Owosso, 

75c 4 

hotel  bill  at  Saranac,  12 ;  fare  to  Grand  Ha- 
ven, 12  30 4 

hotel  bill  at  Grand  Haven,  II  76 ;  livery  bill, 

14  50 6 

hotel  bill  at  Grand  Haven,  II  75;   fare  to 

Holland,  II  50 3 

hotel  bill  at  Holland,  13  50 ;  livery,  15 8 

*'        '•  "        II  50 ;  fare  to  Lansing, 

and  dinner,  15  15 O 

State  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  Swamp  Land  office 6 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  1  pigeon  hole  desk 12 

Amount  carried  forward l2^54rS 


♦ 

1 
•  I 

M 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  141 

Swcofvp  Land  Stdte  JRoctd  Commissiofier 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

November  24th,  1860. 

Amount  brought  forward $29642  75 

L  B.  Curtis, 

To  hotel  bill  at  Lansing 5  50 

fare  to  Saginaw 2  20 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Hemlock  City,  $1  20 ; 

horse  and  buggy  1  day,  $4 5  20 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  Freeland 1  00 

"  Areriirs,  $1;  hotel 

bill  at  Midland,  $3 4  00 

repairs  on   buggy,  12 ;   shoeing  horses,  $1 ; 

hotel  bUl  at  Sixteen,  $3  25 6  25 

dinner  and  horse  feed  at  farm  house 1  00 

bill  over  night,  t3 ;  dinner  and  horse  feed, 

$1  20 4  20 

paid  nuin  to  drive  team  around  on  wood  road 

while  I  walked  over  line  of  State  road. . .  3  00 

hotel  bill  at  Houghton  Lake,  11  50 ;   dinner 

and  horse  feed,  $125 2  75 

bill  at  farm  house  over  night,  $2  50 ;  horse- 
shoeing, $1  50 4  00 

hotel  bill  at  Traverse  City,  $4  50 ;  dinner  and 

hor8efeed,$l 5  50 

hotel  bill  at  Sherman,  $3 ;  dinner  and  horse 

feed,$125 4  25 

hotel  bill  at  Grass  Lake -  3  25 

hotel  bill  at  Big  Bapids,  $4  25 ;   dinner  and 

horse  feed,  $1 5  25 

Kverv  team  to  Stanton 4  00 

hotel  bill  at  Stanton,  $6 ;   dinner  and  horse 

feed  $1 7  00 

Amount  carried  forward $2,609  10 


142  ANSCAL   REPORT   OF  niE 

Swamp  Land  State  Road  Commissioner 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brouglit  fomard i2,60! 

L.  B.  Curtis, 
To  bill  at  farm  liouse,  li2 ;  dinner  and  horse  feed, 

»i : 

shoeing  horse  and  repairs  on  huggy ! 

bill  at  farm  house,  t4;  dinner  and  horse  feed 

at  Isabella,  »1  25 ! 

hotel  bill  at  Alma,  13;  dinner  and  horse  feed 

at  Bailey's,  il  10 

supper  and  keeping  team  over  uight,  $2  50 ; 

fare  home,  78c ; 

paid  man  for  going  to  Midland  for  team,  (3 ; 

and  expenses,  t2  25 

pair  of  horses  and  buggy  17  days C 

faro  to  Lansing 

State  Treasurer, 
To  postage  furnished  .Swamp  Land  Office 

Total *2,71 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS. 


143 


Upper  Peninsula  S.  L.  S.  R.  Commissioner 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

November  24th,  1869. 
Peter  MitcheU, 

To  paid  Sure  to  Mackinac $16  00 

bill  at  Mackinac 5  60 

fine  to  Marqnettc 8  00 

bill  at  Marquette 160 

fiire  to  Xegannee _ 70 

*•     Escanaba 3  00 

**     Menominee. 4  26 

bill  at  Menominee 2  00 

fiue  to  Escanaba 3  00 

bill  at  Eecanaba.- 5  60 

fitfe  to  R.  De  Tour  and  return 3  00 

bai  at  Pt  De  Tour 2  00 

ofBce  account  book 1  40 

postage  stamps  for  road  office 1  00 

biU  at  Escanaba  and  on  road  to  Delta  county 

line 5  60 

tare  from  Escanaba  to  Negaunee 3  00 

bill  at  Negaunee 2  00 

fare  to  Marquette 66 

bill  at  Marquette 3  00 

fiuieto  Houghton 4  00 

&re  \o  Eagle  Harbor  and  dinner  at  Clement.  4  26 

bill  at  Eagle  Harbor 4  00 

fine  to  Ontonagon ^ 6  00 

Amount  carried  forward t92  25 


144  ANNUAL  REPOET  OF  THE 

Upper  PeidTisuZa  S.  L.  S.  B.  Commissumer 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amonnt  brought  forward $9! 

Daniel  G.  Caec, 
To  serriceB  as  clerk  to  Peter  Mitchell,  under  act 
155,  of  1869,   from  Nov.  1   to   Not.  31, 

incl  UBive 3; 

services  as  clerk  to  Peter  Mitchell,  under  act 
156, 1869,  from  September  1  to  October 
31,  inclnsive 6 

Total tia 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  145 


Supreme  Court 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

December  SOth,  1868. 
Wm.  Jeniuson, 
To  amount  paid  for  copying  Snpreme  Court 
opinions  in  16th  vol.  Mich.  Beports,  1^340 
folios,®  10c $134  00 


February  10th,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print  dockets  for  1869 60  00 


March  3d,  1869. 
GeoL  L.  Pease, 
To  bin  of  stationery 13  60 


March  26thy  1869. 

C.  H.  Bohl, 

To  rent  of  room,  including  heating  the  same  for 

use  of  Supreme  Court  in  Detroit,  from 

August  1  to  Feb.  1, 1869,  CK 1200  00  per 

annum 100  00 


Amount  carried  forward $297  60 

19 


146  ANNUAL   BBPOBT  OF  THE 

Supreme  Court 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

April  6th,  1869. 

Amoant  brought  forward 1397  ( 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  1  qr.  file  paper 2  ( 


•       April  38lh,  1869. 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 
To  stationery  delivered  to  Judge  Cooley 


May  36th,  1869. 
Wm.  Jennison, 

To  am't  paid  for  copying  Supreme  Court  opin* 
ions  contained  in  the  17t1i  vol.  of  Mich. 

Beporte,  to  wit:  1,346  fols. 

amount  paid  for  statement  of  cases  in  said 
opinions  in  said  17th  vol.  Mich.  Reports, 

to  wit:  167  folios - 

am't  paid  for  copying  briefs  of  attorneys  in 

said  opinions,  to  wit:  430  folios 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

Tol  rm.  letter 

bill  of  stationery 


October  S7th,  1869. 
Geo.  L.  Pease, 
To  bill  of  stationery  for  Judge  Cooley 

Amonut  carried  forward 


BOABD  OF  8TATB  AUDIT0B8.  147 

Supreme  Court 

vs. 
The  SkUe  of  Michigan. 

November  24thy  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward 1525  87 

OeaLPeasey 

To  stationery 3  25 

a  P.  Purdy, 
To  am't  paid  fees  of  Clerk  of  Supreme  Court  in 
case  of  Thomas  Ryan  vs.  G^o.  H.  Brown 
etal 6  00 

Total $535  12 


Reform  School 
vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

December  SOthy  1868. 
Beform  School, 

To  expenses,  per  vouchers $2,000  00 

"                      "      2,000  00 

"      1,241  05 

"      4,000  00 

Jna  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  comp.  on  report  of  Board  of  Control  of  State 

Reform  School,  123,596  ems 55  61 

press  work  on  same,  72  tokens 28  80 

print  4  rms.  coyers  for  same 8  00 

dry.  and  press.  16,000  sigs.  report 8  00 

fold,  same 8  00 

stitch.  2,000  pamphlets 5  00 

coyer,  and  trim,  same 20  00 


January  27th,  1869. 
Beform  School, 
To  expenses  as  per  youchers 5,000  00 


March  Sd,  1869. 
T.  8.  George  ft  Co., 

To  dry.  and  press.  11,200  sigs. 5  60 

folding  11,200  siga 5  60 

sdtch.  1,400  pamphlets 3  50 

Amount  carried  forw ard $14,389  16 


150  AKNUAL  SEPOBT  OF  THE 

Refarmi  Sdhod, 

vs. 

The  State  of  Miehi£an. 

Amount  brought  forward tl4^8{ 

W.  S.  George  &  Co^ 

To  trim.  1,400  pamphlets I 

133,696  ema  comp.  on  report  of  Board  of 

Control 6{ 

66  tokens  press  work  on  same 2' 


March  26th,  1869. 
Befonn  School, 
To  expenses  as  per  voucher .-- 


April  6th,  1866. 
Reform  School, 

To  expenses  as  per  roncher 2,0( 

"  "     103 a,o( 

"  "        104 2,0C 

"        106 2,0{ 


May  26th,  1860. 
Reform  School, 
To  cash  paid  on  purchase  of  instruments  for 

Comet  Band,  as  per  Toucher  No.  1 ,  li 

expenses  as  per  Toucher  No,  107 2,0i 

"                       "            "     108 2,0 

"                       "■           "    109 2,0 

"                       "            "     106 8,0 

"      13 1,6 

Amount  carried  forward 93^ fi 


BOABD  OF  6TATB  AUDITORS.  151 

Refomh  School 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

October  5th,  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward $32,826  74 

Be&nn  School, 

To  expenses,  voucher  No.  1 3,600  77 

"  "  "      2 2,630  81 

"  113 2,000  00 

"  "  "  lU.- 2,000  00 

«  "  "115 2,000  00 


Octoler  27th,  1869. 
Brfonn  School, 

Toexpenses,  per  voucher  No.  3 2,641  47 

«            "         «         "116 2,000  00 

"            "         "         "  117 1,000  00 

"         «         "  118 2,000  00 

Total 152,699  79 


Asylum  for  Deaf,  Dumib,  and  Blind 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

December  30th,  1868. 
Jna  A.  Kerr  &  Co^ 

To  comp.  on  report  of  Asylum^  99,106  ems $44  59 

press  work  on  same,  112  tokens 44  80 

print  3  rma  covers  for  same 6  00 

dry.  and  press.  10,000  sigs 5  00 

fold.  same. - 6  00 

8dtch.  1,250  pamphlets 3  13 

corer.and  trim,  same 12  60 


January  27th,  1869. 
iE.  Greene, 
Tol  box,  bindery 85 


March  Sd,  1869. 
^-  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  dry.  and  press.  10,400  sigs. 5  20 

fold.  10,400  sigs. 5  20 

stitch.  1^00  pamphlets 3  25 

trinLl,300            "        3  25 


March  26thy  1869. 
JoMs  Shearer, 
To  services  as  architect,  and  expenses  in  making 

examination  and  estimate 40  00 


Total $178  77 

20 


Asylum  for  Insane 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

February  10th,  1869. 
T.&  George  &  Co., 

To  diy.  and  press.  16,750  Bigs $7  88 

foidingsame 7  87 

fititeh.  1,750  pamphlets 4  38 

cover,  and  trim.  1,750  pamphlets 17  50 

133,537  cms  comp.  on  report 60  09 

153  tokens  press  work  on  same 61  20 

print  4  rms.  coTers  for  same 8  00 


March  3d,  1869. 
'^fit George  k  Co., 

To  diy.  and  press.  11,700  sigs. 5  85 

foidingsame 5  85 

stitching  1,300  pamphlets 3  25 

trim,  same 3  25 


April  6th,  1869. 
^«  St  George  &  Co., 

To  dry.  and  press.  4,200  sigs.  Sup't's  report 2  10 

foidingsame 2  10 

ttitch.  1,400  pamphlets 2  80 

wrer.  and  trim,  same 14  00 

A»«wmt  carried  forward $206  12 


156  ANNUAL  BEPOET  OP  THE 

Asylum  for  Insane 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

April  asth,  J8y 

Amount  brought  forward - jac 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  837,368  eme  comp.  on  appendix  to  report  of 

TruBteea  for  Asylum 10 

40  tokens  press  work  on  same 1 

Total »3a 


BOARD  OF  STATE    AUDIT0B8.  157 


State  Prison 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

February  10th,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  dry.  and  press- 8,250  sigs 14  12 

folding  same 4  12 

stitching  750  pamphlets 2  25 

coTer.and  trim,  same 7  50 

178,564  ems  comp.  on  report 80  35 

143  tokens  press  work  on  same 57  20 

print.  2  rms.  covers  for  same 4  00 


March  3d,  1869. 
T.SbGeoi^c  &Co-, 

Todij.  and  press.  14,300  sigs 7  15 

folding  same.. 7  15 

stitching  1,300  pamphlets 3  90 

trimming  same 3  25 

Total $180  99 


BEJEGTED  ACCOUNTS. 

April  28th,  1869. 
Tie  following  accounts  were  rejected : 

%&Z7  H.  Bingham,  Ag't  State  Prison, 
To  expenses  for  counsel,  witnesses,  &c.,  incurred  in  the  in- 
Testigation  of  the  affairs  of  the  Prison,  amounting 
to  <5  35. 


108  ANNDAL   aSFOBT  OF  THR 

State  Prison 
vs. 
The  State  of  MuMjan. 
Also: 
An  account  certified  to  by  Ira  Eaton,  for  vitness  fees 
Prank    Perrine  and  thirteen  others,  in  the  case 
the  examination  of  Henry  H.  Bingham,  Agent  SI 
Prison,  amonnting  to  (65  G8. 
Also: 
The  ooconnt  of  V.  M.  Bostwick  for  fifteen  days'  legal  i 
rices  in  the  case  of  the  examination  of  H.  H.  Bi 
ham,  Agent  State  Prison,  amonnting  to  1300. 
Also: 
The  account  of  John  E,  Parsons  for  6  days'  legal  service 
the  case  of  the  examination  of  H.  H.  Bingh 
Agent  State  Prison,  amounting  to  1130. 


BOASD  OF  8TATB  AUDITORS.  159 


XJniiieA  States  Land  Office 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan. 

March  26th,  1869. 
Anudd  Kaichen, 
To  locat  and  transcrib.  indemnity  Swamp  Land 

liats,  No.  2,  for 7,352  13-100  acres 

do.       "     3,  for - .  3,776  25-100    " 

da       •'    5,  for 1,723  57-100    « 

12,851  95-110    "  180  00 

Hwrd  LeFayonr, 
To  locat  and  transcribing  indemnity  swamp  list 

No.  2,  for 7,352  13-100  acres 

do.    «  3,  for 3,723  25-100    « 

da    «5,  for 1,723  57-100    " 

12,798  95-100    "  80  00 

^S.  Uiid  Office  at  Traverse, 
To  Iwlance  due  on  account  of  location  fees  for 
locating  6,536  52-100  acres  of  land  in  the 
Grand  Trayerse  District,  with  swamp  in- 
demnity certificates,  on  the  11th  day  of 
Xovember,  1868 40  85 

Tow $200  86 


jigriculfuraZ  College 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

May  26th,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  2  mifi.  tinted  book  paper  for  cuts  in  agricul- 
tural reports $42  00 

hauling  same  from  depot 60 


October  Sfh,  1869. 
T.8t  George  &  Co., 

To  853,971  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Secretary  of 
State  Board  of  Agriculture,  from  page  158 

to  close  of  Tolume 384  38 

1,482  tokens  press  work  on  same 592  80 


November  2ithj  1869. 
^•iOeoigeft  Co., 
^0  drjr.  and  press.  462,000  sigs.  report  Sec'y  of 

Board  of  Agriculture 231  00 

bUingsame 231  00 

Mni  6,000  copies  same  in  fall  cloth 2,100  00 

ToUl $3,581  58 

21 


state  of  Michigan 

vs. 

1  he  State  of  Michigan. 

December  2d,  1868. 
Giles  Hubbard, 

To  1  day*8  attendance  as  Presidential  Elector. . .  $3  00 
mileage  from  Mt  Clemens  to  Lansing  and  re- 
turn, 260  miles,  ft  10c 26  00 

B.  M.  Cutcheon, 

To  1  day's  attendance  as  Presidential  Elector. .  -  3  00 

mileage  from  Manistee  to  Lansing  and  retnm, 

512  miles,  ft  10c 51  20 

Wm.  I>oeltz, 

To  1  day's  attendance  as  Presidential  Elector. . .  3  00 

mileage  from  Detroit  to  Lansing  and  return, 

220  miles,  a  10c 22  00 

Clutf.  T.  Oorham, 

Xo  1  day's  attendance  as  Presidential  Elector. . .  3  00 

mileage  from  Marshall  to  Lansing  and  return, 

140  miles,®  10c U  00 

Jbo.  Bart, 

To  1  day's  attendance  as  Presidential  Elector. . .  3  00 
mileage  from  Marquette  to  Lansing  and  re- 
turn, 1,458  miles,  «i  10c 145  80 

^ItmrT    W-  Clisbee, 

To  1  day's  attendance  as  Presidential  Elector. ._  3  00 
milea^  from  Cassopolis  to  Lansing  and  re- 
turn, 376  miles,  f?  10c - 37  60 

Cb^aa.  H.  Croswell, 

To  1  day's  attendance  as  Presidential  Elector. . .  3  00 

mileage  from  Adrian  to  Lansing  and  return, 

160  miles,  ID  10c 16  00 

^ffm^ypnt  carried  forward $333  60 


166  ANNUAL   REPORT   OF   THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $2,388 

Geo.  L.  Peaae, 

To  26  reams  45  lb.  paper 256 

"      book  paper 395 

531i  "      flatcap 1,723 

45  lb.  book  paper 948 

671 

book  pai)er 276 


December  30th,  1868. 
S.  K.  Greene, 

To  rail  in  fence  at  offices - 

60  boxes  for  Auditor's  office 

curtain,  34c. ;  work  at  curtains 

work  at  Capitol  cave  troughs,  self 

3  boxes  for  Secretary's  office 

bill  paid  for  tinner's  work  on  eave  trough 

caps. 

Henry  H.  Crapo, 

To  expenses  to  Sanit  Ste  Marie  to  examine  canal 
John  Ficht, 

To  5  day's  work  wheeling  wood,  cleaning  walks, 

and  moTing  paper 

A.  D.  EUiott, 

To  hauling  16  loads  of  paper 

J.,  L.  A  S.  R.  R.  Company, 

To  fi^ight  on  chairs  for  Gov's  room,  and   the 

State  offices 

freight  on  Bt«p  ladder 


Amount  carried  forward ♦6,78' 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  167 

Sbate  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward ., «6,787  18 

T.F.'Abbott, 

To  100  yds.  4-4  Calcutta  matting,  ®  $1  30 130  00 

20     «    5-4        "                «       32  60 

3  pr.  striped  Ferry  curtains,  0)  $66 198  00 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  1  book  case  for  Gov's  room 68  00 

Tarnish  and  labor  for  Supt's  oflSce 3  00 

To  work  to  repair  Capitol  and  furniture  : 

glue 75 

whiting 1  60 

staging. 75 

paid  for  whitewashing 8  00 

"        papering 3  76 

"        8  rolls  of  paper 2  40 

iday— self 1  60 

i    «       "     1  60 

i    «       man 1  26 

work  of  man 1  00 

self 1  60 

man  1  day 2  75 

rinc  for  Gov's  stove 1  96 

^day— self -.-  1  60 

21ba.nail8 14 

Iday--. 2  75 

Iday 2  00 

2iron  thimbles 60 

screws  -- 65 

plank  for  walk 2  25 

nuls 65 

mortar,  brick  and  mason  work  for  chimneys  2  60 

Amount  carried  forward -- .• 17,260  32 


168  AKKUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  bronght  forward >7,250 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To  glasB,  90c. ;  patty,  23c.;  pointa,  10c 1 

1  man 3 

1  man 2 

soap,  35c. ;  %  zinc  collarfl,  50c. ;  repair,  pipe, 

36c y 1 

3  lights  glass 

2  men  1  day _ - 4 

1  day,  self 3 

2  m«n  1  day 4 

blind  trimmings 

1  light  glass 

my  work 2 

paid  Bakemen  to  repair  paper  in  conrt  room.  1 

1  zinc  board  for  stove,  privy ,' 

8i  lbs.  zinc,  and  cover,  board S 

1  box  stove 13 

aOJlbe-pipe S 

1  day S 

1  day £ 

J  day,  self. S 

2  days,  a  22a t 

1  day ; 

3  lights  13x20  glass,  90c. ;  putty,  20c 

2  days,  a  18b. 

iday,  O  24b. 

6  papers  tacks 

work,  self 

3  days,©  20b. 

1  paper  tacks 

Amoant  carried  forward... Vi^^ 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  169 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $7,S'Z^  35 

S.B.  Greene, 
To 


0  yards  oil  cloth 

day's  work 

08  ft  lumber  for  steps  at  gate. 

4  lbs.  nails 

day's  work 


day's  work 


u 


U 


HgaOons  Tarnish 

i gallons  turpentine... 
day's  work  varnishing 


"  self. 

paper  tacks 

day's  work 


u 

u 

"         self. 


paper  tacks 
day's  work . 


M 

U 


2  75 

2  00 

1  50 

1  38 

1  00 

8  50 

1  60 

a  00 

91 

2  75 

2  00 

12  75 

1  25 

2  75 

2  75 

2  00 

2  76 

1  50 

20 

2  75 

2  00 

2  75 

1  50 

20 

2  75 

2  75 

2  00 

60 

papers  tacks 

A»«imt  carried  forward $7,393  89 

22 


170  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward J7,3 

S.  R.  Greene, 
To  work  by  self 

1  day's  work 

1  "         

lumber,  nails,  and  trimming  cellar  door 

1  day's  work 

2  "        a  228. 

work,  self 

2  day's  work,  (J  228 

1  "  

nails 

1  day's  work 

!>  lights  glass 

putty 

4  screw  hooks,  work  on  pipe 

24  lbs.  sheet  zinc , 

rivets  for  matting _ 

1  latcb,  Idc. ;  hasp  and  staples,  lOc;   glass 

and  putty,  48c 

H  days'  work,  ffl  22s. 

2  cupboard  catches 

water  tank  furniture 

work  to  mend  tables 

lumber  for  gate  posts , 

1  day's  work 

2  "        a  22s. 


Amoant  carried  forward ^7 


V 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  171 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward ^7,455  03 

S,  R  Oreene,  * 

To  cover,  table 2  00 

lumber  for  gate  and  steps  to  walk 3  44 

iuoIb 46 

lunges  and  labor  for  gate 150 

2  papers  stove  polish _ 20 

4  papers  tacks 40 

Iday'swork 2  75 

1         "          2  00 

1         «         self 100 

1         "         1  38 

repair,  paper  on  walls 50 

paint - - 5  50 

work  of  jNiinters 6  00 

14  days'  work,  Mr.  Bose,  washing  windows 

andhouse 21  00 

1  day's  work  painting 3  00 

\         «           1  38 

i         «          self 1  50 

I  gate  latch,  48.;  draying,  2s 75 

CeaLPeaae, 

To42rms.book  paper,  fD$9  88 414  96 

MinKagel, 
To  services  as  porter  in  State  ofSces  for  Dec, 

1868 62  00 

washing  48  pieces.- 2  40 

iLindsIev, 
To  services  as  porter  in  State  offices,  for  Decem- 
ber, 1868 62  00 

paid  for  sawing  wood 85 

paid  for  draying 25 

Anoiint  carried  forward $8,052  25 


I 


'<i 


iT 


i 


172 


ANNUAL  BEPORT  OF  THE 


State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $8,052  2 

L.  M.  SuUiyan, 

To  services  as  night  watchman  in  State  offices 

for  December,  1868 62  (! 

John  Broad, 
To  services  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  December, 

1868 

paid  freight  and  cartage  on  matting 

washing  30  pieces 

Chas.  A.  Schafer  &  Co., 

To  repair,  and  clean,  cylinder  clocks 

1  octagon  and  8  day  clock. 

1 

1 

1 

(6  6i  1 


i( 


ii 


U 


ii 


ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 


ii 


ii 


ii 


ii 


ii 


ii 


ii 


ii 


it 


ii 


ii 


ii 


EUen  McCarty, 
To  washing  and  cleaning  in  the  Capitol  building 
14  days 

John  Picht, 

To  1  day's  sawing  wood  and  shoveling  snow 

Wm.  Van  Fleet, 

To  sawing  wood  at  Capitol 

Emil  Anneke, 
To  locating  and  transcribing  indemnity  swamp 

list  No.  1,  for 4,538.15  acres. 

locating  and  trans,  indemnity 

swamp  list  No.  4,  for 1,998.37     " 


6,536.52     " 
Q)  $1  for  each  160  acre  lot  located 


4< 

1 

% 

1 

2 

1 


Amount  carried  forward #8^5' 


BOA£D  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS.  173 

Skate  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $8,259  32 

TWola  Ca  Pioneer, 
To  puh»  time  of  holding  special  term  of  circuit 

court 4  45 

LB.  Millar  &  Co., 

To  8  bars  aoap,  tl ;  6  boxes  matches,  60c 1  60 

2brooms,$l;  soap,  45c 1  45 

20  lbs.  candles 8  46 

liOiiuui,  Silsbee  ft  Co., 

To  1  fine  ofiBce  swivel  chair 65  00 

4  walnut  dining  chairs 20  00 

i  oak  cane  back  rotary  office  chairs 64  00 

4  leather  cushions  stuffed  with  hair 16  00 

2  oak  cane  back  library  chairs 17  00 

2oak8lat      "        "           "     12  00 

8  library  chairs  in  leather ,    96  00 

1  11  ft.  atep-ladder 7  60 

repair.  2  office  chairs  in  goat  skins 36  00 

5mat8for  packing 3  76 

1  single  walnut  wash-stand 16  00 

1  stndenfs  lamp,  extra  chimneys  and  wicks..  8  60 
*HJ«m,  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  pnb.  thanksgiying  proclamation 4  20 

*»•  A.  Kerr  4  Co., 

To  dry.  and  press.  16,200  sigs.  railroad  reports. .  7  60 

fold,  same 7  60 

ititch.  800  pamphlets 2  40 

corer.and  trim,  same 8  00 

Amount  carried  forward $8,665  82 


I 


(     I 


*     »• 


174  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

January  26th,  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward $8,655  8 

Thomas  Davison, 

To  clean,  well  at  State  oflSces 3(1 

John  Picht, 

To  2i  days'  work  sawing  wood,  ®  14s 

sawing  15  cords  wood,  ®  68 

Zi  days'  work  wheeling  wood,  9)  148. 

Bennie  W.  Bours, 

To  services  as  messenger  in  State  offices,  from 

Jan.  12th  to  31st,  inclusive 20 

Tribune  Job  Office, . 

To  comp.  and  press  work  upon  the  Seventeenth 

Mich.  Law  Report 150 

Wm.  Jennison, 

To  expenses,  hotel  and  railroad,  incurred  while 

attending  the  Supreme  Court,  January 

term,  at  Lansing,  1869 32 


< 


^■ik 


January  27th,  1869. 

John  Oilman, 

To  paid  expenses  to  and  from  the  meetings  of 

the  Board  of  Trustees  for  the  Asylum  for 

the  Insane,  during  the  years  1866,  1867, 

and  1868 47 

Daniel  S.  Mevis, 
To  services  as  assistant  porter  at  the  Capitol  for 

the  month  of  January,  31  days 62 

Amount  carried  forward 98^991 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  175 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $8,991  15 

John  Broad, 
To  aerrices  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  January,  1869 _ 62  00 

washing  46  pieces 2  30 

paid  for  four  towels 2  60 

Lemuel  M.  Sullivan, 
To  aerrices  as  night  watchman  in  State  offices 

for  the  month  of  January,  31  nights 62  00 

John  Nagel, 
To  services  as  porter  in   State  offices  for  the 

month  of  January,  1869 62  00 

6eo.L  Pease, 

To  U  rms.  24x36  book 138  32 

J.  Btumgras, 

To  4  papers  gold  bronze  for  register 3  00 

labor  putting  same  on 3  00 

i  lindsley, 
To  aerrices  ajs  porter  in  State  offices  for  January, 

1869 62  00 

f«rie  k  Warner, 

To  4  tables  for  Legislature 20  00 

•^'  B.  Greene, 
To  10  days'  work  making  and  putting  in  dummy  27  50 

lumber  for  same  in  all 195 

pulleys,  lOs.;  rope,  40c.;  draying,  25c 1  90 

paid  for  springs,  8s.;  putting  in  same,  8s. 2  00 

2,300  brick  for  well  at;^Capitol 27  60 

water  lime _ 3  00 

amd 1  00 

Amount  carried  forward 19,473  32 


1 


I 
I 


Mr 


■  ( 

\ 


'\     \ 


I'll    "  I . 
I.I       i- 


176  ANKUAL  BEPOBT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $9,473  32 

S.  B.  Greene, 

To  paid  for  circle  for  bottom  of  well 200 

"       labor  to  dig  and  brick  up  well 28  00 

work  to  move  off  house  and  set  on  new 3  00 

nails,  lumber,  &c.,  repair,  well-house  and  fence  3  65 

work  of  carpenter  fit  up  well-house,  fence,  &c,  7  00 

work  to  draw  out  water  from  well 1  00 

my  time  to  supply  materials,  &c 8  00 

2  days'  work  in  bam,  $5  50 ;  drayage,  50c 6  00 

280  ft  lumber,  18  09 ;  1  light  glass,  10c 8  19 

i  day's  work  in  bam,  SI  38 ;  nails,  75c.;  lum- 

ber,50c 2  63 

24  drawer  locks,  $9  60 ;  put.  on  same  in  House 

of  Bepresentatives,  12s 11  1( 

8  locks,  13 ;   7  extra  keys,  fit.  and  put  on  in 

Senate,  $1  20 4  2( 

5  keys  to  clerk's  desk,  50c. ;  one  day  repair., 

♦2  75-... 3  2i 

1  "  Yale  lock,"  repair,  and  refit  clerk's  desk. 

House  of  Beps. 3  & 

2  locks  for  drawers  in  Senate 1  9 

1  chain  bolt  for  Senate  door 6 

repairs  in  House  and  Senate 3  C 

1  doz.  coat  hooks,  and  putting  same  up  in 

privy 1  C 

1  lock,  14s. ;  put  same  on  in  Senate  Cham- 

ber, 4s 2  i 

4  drawer  locks  for  House  of  Beps.,  CH  40c. ; 

repair.,  8a 2  t 

2  door  locks  for  com.  rooms,  House  of  Beps..  ' 

Amount  carried  forward 19^576  < 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDIT0B8.  177 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $9,576  04 

SL  S.  Greene, 

Torepair.  table,  House  of  Keps. 1  50 

▼ork  on  door,  House  of  Heps.  com.  room 50 

cash  paid  and  work  repairing  stove  in  House 

of  Bep.  cloak  room 1  75 

repair.  1  chair.  Senate 50 

1  light  glass  12x30,  30c. ;  put  same  in  House 

of  Reps.,  4s. 80 

3  extra  keys,  20c. ;  and  2  locks  80c.,  for  Sen- 
ate com.  rooms 1  00 

work  fit  keys,  and  put  locks  on,  for  Senate.  50 

repair,  cellar  door  at  Capitol 50 

"     clerk's  desk  in  Senate 75 

cash  paid,  and  work  for  cap  on  chimney 6  50 

f-  T.  VanKeuren, 
To  kalsomining  ceiling.  Hall  of  House  of  Reps...  20  00 

'^BL  A.  Thompson  &  Co., 

To  6  Green's  Practice 36  00 

^•^.Tenney, 
To  6  copies  Cooley's  Digest,  ordered  by  House  of 

Beps. 30  00 


February  10th,  1869. 
•>'  8.  Roihrock, 

To  cleaning  walk  from  snow  in  front  of  Capitol  1  50 

Job  Ficht, 

To  I  day's  work  wheeling  wood  at  State  offices. .  88 

Aaottnt  carried  forward «9,678  72 

23 


fl       if 


>• 


ft 


178  AKNUAL  RKPOHT  OF  TUE 


I        .    •  $State  of  Michigan 

|!  TJie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward tdfiUS  72 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

Tol  blank  book  for  House - 3  00 

1      "             ^'      Senate "^  00 

niling  1  rm.  paper  4  times 'I  00 

bind.  8  qrs.  journal  Board  of  State  Auditors, 

Russia  ends  and  bands. 16  OC 

paging  same _ 6^ 

8  qrs.  paper  for  same _ 7  0( 

ruling  6  reams  paper  for  House,  once 3  Oi 

"      2        "            "       Senate,,   "    10^ 

Qeo.  L.  Pease, 

To  30  rms.  24x36  book,  a  W  88 296  4 

30    "         •          •*              ^'     296  4 

46    *'        "          "              ''     454  4 

« 

46    *'        *'          "              *•     454  4 

20     "         •           •              •*     296  A 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print.  300  lists  of  members  of  Legislature. . .  3  ^ 

"      200  yeas  and  nays  for  House 2! 

*'      200    "             "          Senate.--' 1  i 

*'      No's  on  cardsfor  Senate 2 

*•      200  yeas  and  nays  for  House 1 

**     1,500  blanks  for  introducing  bills.  House 

of  Reps 6 

print,  yeas  and  nays  for  House 1 

"     joint  res.  for  copper  mining --  5 

paperfor  same : 1 

print.  2,100  blanks  for  reports  of  committees, 

four  fonns 15 

Amount  carried  forward •llySSl 


IL^ 


r 


BOAfiD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  179 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $11^551  77 

W,  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print  1,300  blanks  for  messages,  House  of 

Reps. 10  50 

print  General  Order  blanks 3  60 

"     small  blanks  for  reports 2  00 

2  rms.  14  lb.  cap  paper  for  blanks,  House  of 

Reps. 11  20 

print  400  blanks  for  See'y  of  Senate 3  00 

"     envelopes        **                   '*      100 

'•     No*s  on  cards  for  House  of  Reps. 3  00 

*•     300  blank  reports,  small,  for  Senate. . .  2  00 

-     300            "             large,           /-      _..  3  50 

'•     2  rms.  blank  circulars  for  meeting  of 

conmiittees 7  00 

paperfor  same 3  50 

print  300  lists  standing  committees,  House 

of  Beps. %00 

mounting  25  of  same 3  00 

paperfor  same 3  50 

print  100  list  standing  committees  (Senate) .  _  4  00 

mounting  16  same 2  00 

paper  for  same. __ _ 1  25 

print-  and  bind.  1  order  book  for  House  of 

Representatives 8  00 

print  and  bind.  1  order  book  for  Senate 6  00 

^     blanks  for  House  of  Heps. 3  50 

•'    Senate— reJ)orts  of  Sec'y-.-  3  50 

*•    reportsofeng.com 3  50 

"     200  yeas  and  nays  for  House 1  50 

••     200        "          '*      "       "       1  50 

A»oiuit  carried  forward 111,649  22 


180 


ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


! 


: 


u 


(( 


a 


a 


2  00 
5  00 
7  00 

13  00 

3  50 


3  50 
75 


State  of  Michigan 

V8, 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 111,649  22 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print.  400  yeas  and  nays  for  Senate 

200  lists  of  Senators  with  P.  0.  address 
600     "  "  "        "        " 

500  lists  of  members  of  House 

200  blank  reports  for  Senate 

print  joint  resolution  for  Governor  to  trans- 
mit to  Senators  and  Representatives  in 
Congress,  relative  to  river  and  harbor  ap- 
propriations   - 

paper  for  same 

composition  on  daily  journals  from  and  inclu- 
ding Jan.  6th,  to  and  including  Jan.  29th, 

1869,  1,221,142  ems 

720  tokens  press  work  on  same 

116,820  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Supt.  of  Sault 

Canal 

60  tokens  press  work  on  same 

print.  1  ream  covers  for  same 

85,027  ems  comp.  on  report  of  President  of 
Agricultural  College,  for  House  of  Bep- 

resentatives ._ 

6  tokens  press  work  on  same 

comp.  on  Governors'  messages  as  per  order  of 
House  of  Kepresentatives  and  Senate,  viz : 

44,520  ems  on  Gov.  Baldwin's 

47,488    "        "        Crapo's 

40  tokens  press  work  on  same 

comp.  on  Senate  bills  from  and  including  No. 
1,  to  and  including  No.  60,  058,272  ems.. 


594  51 
288  00 

52  11 

24  0( 

2  (M 


38  a 

2  4 


20 
21 
16 


306 


Amount  carried  forward tl3,049 


^ 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUDITORS.  181 

State  of  Michigan 

vs, 

Tlie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $13,049  28 

V.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To380  tokens  press  work  on  same 152  00 

comp.  on  House  bills  from  and  including  No. 

1,  i^  and  including  No.  63, 981,456  ems. .  314  06 

399  tokens  press  work  on  same 159  60 

26,712  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Adj't  Qen'l. . .  12  02 

18  tokens  press  work  on  same 7  20 


February  16th,  1869. 
John  Ficht, 

To  3  days' labor  at  State  offices 2  25 

J.  B.  Tenney, 
To  services  as  Secretary  of  the  Board  of  State 
Auditors  from  August  25th,  1868,  to  Feb. 

iOth,  1869— 51  days 153  00 

DiTid  Enright, 
To  4  dajTb*  attendance  before  special  committee  of 

Legislature 6  00 

214  miles  travel  from  Detroit  to  Lansing  and      ' 

return 12  84 

H.  H.  Emmons, 
To  2  days'  attendance  before  special  committee 

of  Legislature 3  00 

214  miles  travel  from  Detroit  to  Lansing  and 

return 12  84 

^  Jerome, 
To  2  days'  attendance  before  special  committee  of 

Legislature 3  00 

214  miles  travel  from  Detroit  to  Lansing  and 

return 12  84 

Amount  carried  forward $13,899  93 


\ 


n 

It 


f(  182  ANNUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

I 

;    *  State  of  Michigan 

vs. 
I    j  The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward il3,899  93 

C.  C.  Trowbridge, 

To  2  days'  attendance  as  witness  before  si)ecial 

committee  of  Legislature 3  0C 

214  miles  travel  from  Detroit  to  Lansing  and 

return 

A.  Gould, 

To  2  days'  attendance  before  special  committee  of 

Legislature 

56  miles  travel  from  Owosso  to  Lansing  and 

return  - . . 

Morris  Osburn, 

To  2  days' attendance  before  special  committee  of 

Legislature 

56  miles  travel  from  Owosso  to  Lansing  and 

return ' 

Edwin  Enapp, 

To  2  days'  attendance  before  special  committee  of 

Legislature .- 

56  miles  travel  from  Owosso  to  Lansing  and 

return _ 

Ferle  &  Warner, 

To  12  cane  seat  chairs 

1  table 

1  mattress 

1  letter  box  - ...- -. 

1  common  chair _ 


February  ISth,  1869. 
A.  A.  Jenue, 

To  100  cords  four  foot  wood,  as  per  contract 293 


Amount  carried  forward (14^288 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  183 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

March  3d,  1869. 

Amonnt  brought  forward ♦14,:^88  85 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  folding  336,600  Bignatures,  daily  jourual  of 

Legialature,  from  Jan.  6  to  Feb.  24th,  '69  168  00 

irtitching  60,000  Nos.  same 150  00 

fokL  53,000  sigs.  House  bills,  1  to  156 25  50 

'•     66 J500  sigs.  Senate  bills,  1  to  134 33  25 

stitch.  10,250  Nos.  House  bills,  1  to  166 19  00 

••      12,000  Nos.  Senate  bilk,  1  to  134 23  25 

trim.  392  rms.  bill  paper 98  00 

103,880  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Board   of 

State  Auditors -.  46  75 

117  tokens  press  work  on  same 46  80 

print.  2  rms.  covers  for  same 4  00 

500  yeas  and  nays  for  House 3  00 

blanks  for  House 2  00 

*'          "           2  50 

0JM06  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Trustees  of  D., 

D.  &  B.  Asylum,  per  ord^r  of  Legislature.  44  59 

48  tokens  press  work  on  same 19  20 

A^  A.  Jenne. 

To  50  cords  four  foot  wood  furnished  on  contract  146  50 
ina  A.  Kerr  &  Co., 

To  6  Beid's  Index 12  00 

W-  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  dry.  and  press.  2,750  sigs.  Supt.  of  Canal  re- 
port   1  38 

fold  2,750  same 1  38 

stitch.  550  pamphlets 1  10 

carer,  and  trim.  350  pamphlets 3  50 

Amount  carried  forward $15,140  55 


u 


»• 


184  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs.  • 

Tfie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward (15,140  55 

W.  S.  Qeorge  &  Co., 

Totrim.200  pamphlets 50 

dry.  and  press.  8,550  sigs.  report  Board  of  State 

Auditors 

folding  same 

stitch.  950  pamphlets 

cover,  and  trim.  550  same 

trim.  400  same - 

dry.  and  press.  25,200  sigs.  (re-print  of  same) 

folding  same 

stitch.  1,400  pamphlets 

trim,  same 

dry.  and  press.  1,650  sigs.  report  of  Quarter- 
master General 

folding  same 

stitch.  550  pamphlets 

cover,  and  trim.  350  same 

trim.  200  same 

Lemuel  M.  Sullivan, 
To  services  as  watchman  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  February,  1869,  28  nights 

John  Nagel, 
To  services  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  February,  1869,  28  days 56 

washing  48  pieces 2 

John  Broad, 
To  services  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  February,  1869,  28  days 

washing  45  pieces 

Amount  carried  forward ♦! 5,370 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  185 

State  of  Michigan 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 1159370  71 

Duiel  S.  Meyis, 
To  services  as  porter  (ass't)  for  the  month  of  Feb- 
ruary, 1869,  28  days 56  00 

L  Lindsley, 
To  Bervices  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  month 

of  February,  1869,  28  days 66  00 

&  B.  Greene, 
To  repair,  and  alter.  Speaker^s  chair.  House  of 

Bepresentatiyes 1  75 

1  bell,  8&;  wire,  SOc;  4  cranks,  50c.;  cord,  2s.; 

work,  20s. 4  55 

repair,  water-drawer  at  Capitol  well 75 

1  lock   and  2  keys,  Senate,  8oc.;   mending 

chairs^  Senate,  50c -• 1  35 

work  and  nails  to  mat  stairs  at  Capitol 1  50 

nails  20c.;  work  in  Senate  Chamber,  2s. 45 

paid  for  2  yards  mat,  12 ;  time,  15c 2  15 

hinges  to  hang  gates.  State  office  square 1  50 

work  to  hang  gates 1  00 

cash  and  work  repair,  ft'ont  door  lock,  Capitol  1  25 

work  to  clean  furnace,  Capitol 50 

*a.L  Pease, 

To  36  rms.  State  book,  24x36,  ®  «9  88 355  68 

30    ^             «               "              "    296  40 

34    **             "               "              *'    335  92 

p'd  for  engraving  diagrams  of  House  of  Rep- 

resentatiTes  and  Senate  Chamber 85  00 

paper  and  print,  same •  85  00 

i2  rms.  manual  paper  for  Legislature 220*  00 

Amount  carried  forward 116,877  46 

24 


186  AHMUAL    BEPOET  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoiiut  bmuglit  forward |il6r8T7 

Abbott  &  Ketchuni. 

To  17  yards  6-4  matting 33 

ThaddeuB  Foote, 
To  paid  for  1  Geil's  large  map  of  Micbigau,  oi-- 

deredby  resolation  of  the  Senate 10 

Mails  and  rings  for  same 


March  amh,  1869. 
S,  E.  Oroeuc, 

To  work  and  lumber  to  repair  door  at  Capitol..  { 

1  lock  for  same ' 

putting  rubber  on  edge  of  door  at  Capitol--. 

repairing  stove  and  pipe 

"         at  State  Library _ . 

oliair  at  Capitol .  -  _ 

1^  yards  oil  cloth  for  *'    _ _ 

repairing  desk  at  Capitol 

Geo.  Ij.  Pease, 

To  9i  rms.  flat  cap 3 

■>      "  "       1 

22  3-a  mis.  flat  cap 1 

117  3-20  rms.  flat  cap a: 

A.  A.  Jcnne, 

To  44^  cords  wood,  a  *2  93 i; 

Fred.  Trostle, 
To  making  2  tubes  for  eyelet  punch 

Amount  carried  forward •17.5 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  187 

State  of  Michigan 

V8, 

TJve  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 117,562  76 

Gca  L  Pease. 
To  40  rms.  45  lb.  book 
0     "     flat  cap -•- 
^0 
25f 

m 

15 
24 


45  lb.  book,  reports. 


*4  tk 


cover  pai)er 

45  lb.  book 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print.  500  yeas  and  nays  for  House 
-     blanks  for  Sec*v  of  Senate. . . 


a  a 


••     see.  attached  to  Muskegon  charter 

'•     300  blanks  for  House  of  Reps- 

'•      100        **  Senate 

wmp.  on  daily  journal,  from  Friday,  March 
5th,  to  and  including  March  20th,  1869, 
l,877,MOem8 

**T2  tokens  press  work  on  same 

1  portfolio  for  Senate _ 

comp.  on  daily  journal  from  and  including 
Tuesday,  Feb.  9th,  to  and  including  Fri- 
day, March  5th,  1869,  1,912,025  ems 

i»81  tokens  press  work  on  same 

comp.  on  Senate  bills  from  No.  60,  to  and  in- 
cluding No.  144,  1,761,984  ems 

W3  tokens  press  work  on  same 

comp.  on  House  bills  froni  No.  64,  to  and  in- 
cluding No.  210, 2,588,880  ems 

1.080  tokens  press  work  on  same 

Amount  carried  forward »24,826  17 


395 

20 

22 

50 

64  80 

254  41 

1,600  00 

120  00 

237 

12 

3 

75 

3 

00 

1 

50 

3 

00 

2 

00 

1 

50 

845 

05 

388  80 

2 

50 

860  41 

392 

40 

563 

83 

261 

20 

828  44 

412  00 

\  I 


4! ! 


I 


•  'i 


9 


s 


i 


f/ 


188 


ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 


« 


« 


« 


« 


^a^  o/  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $24,826  1 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  print  300  blanks  for  Clerk  of  House  of  Reps.  2  I 

and  binding  cheek  book,^  "  " 

"  "        "      Sec'y  Senate 

1,500  cards,  general  order,  for  House. . 
50  "  "        "  Senate.- 

print  report  of  joint  committee  on  Geological 
Survey,  for  Senate,  Feb.  24th,  23,744  ems 

8  tokens  press  work  on  same 

print.  2  rms.  covers  for  same 

print  report  of  joint  com.  for  House  on  Geo- 
logical Survey,  23,744  ems 10 

10  tokens  press  work  on  same •. 4 

print  3  rms.  covers  for  same 6 

"     300  blanks  for  House 3 

Geo.  H.  House, 

To  650  Geil's  maps  of  Michigan  for  binding  with 

manual •. 195 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  printing  supplement  to  report  of  Trustees  of 
Asylum  for  Insane,  for  House  of  Repre- 
sentatives, 29,680  ems 

18  tokens  press  work  on  same 

print  3  rms.  covers  for  same 

Beunie  W.  Bours, 

To  services  as  messenger  in  State  offices,    for 

March,  1869 

services  as  messenger*  for  State  offices,  for 
February,  1869 


Amount  carried  forward I^^S,!! 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITOBS.  189 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

TJie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward _  l^d^lGO  78 

John  Ficht, 

To  sawing  5  cords  wood  for  State  offices 3  75 

2  dajs'  work  wheeling  wood  for  State  offices. .  3  60 

sawing  15  cords  wood  once,  at  Capitol 11  25 

7i         "           twice 9  38 

:J  J  days'  work  wheeling  wood 4  38 

D.  R.  Bothrock, 

To  cleaning  walks  in  front  of  Capitol 3  00 

I    WuL  A-  Howard, 

To  cash  expenses  attending  investigation  charges 

against  H.  H.  Bingham,  St.  Prison  Agent  17  40 

5  days'  services  in  above  at  Jackson 50  00 

Veetcott  &  Mnrrev, 

To  repairing  flag  at  Capitol  building -  5  00 

Davis  &  Lamed, 

To  3  doz.  lamp  wicks,  2  doz.  it  50c.,  1  doz.  n  20c.  1  20 

2  burners,  75c.  and  40c 115 

2        *• 1  15 

repairing  kunp 20 

8  sun  chimnevs 1  60 

2  burners  complete 1  50 

6  chimnevs. 1  20 

2         ••         40 


April  eth.  1869. 
W.  S.  George  A  Co., 

To  print,  blanks  for  Sec'y  of  Senate 5  00 

32,648  ems.    comp.   on    laws    for  draining 
swamps,  marshes,  &c 16  32 

AjDount  carried  forward  $25,310  23 


190  ANSLAL    KEPORT  OF  TBE 

State  of  Michigan' 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward %%^^Vi  2 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  18  tokens  press  work  on  siime 1  i 

'I  rms.  covers  for  mme lO 

11.872  ems  eomp.  on  railroiu)  law,  for  Senate  5  S 

(J  tokens  press  work  on  same 2  J 

*38,0S8  cms  composition  on  druining  law,  for 

Senate - -  U  ( 

12  tokens  proas  work  on  same 4  t 

1  rm.  covers  for  same _- i  i. 

11.873  ems.  comp.  on  railroad  law,  for  House 

of  Reps 5  1 

10  tokens  press  work  ou  same. 4  ' 

print.  300  yeas  and  nays  for  House  of  Reps..  3  : 
•'      Senate  amendments  to  House  bill  No. 

449.  for  Honse  of  Reps.,  150  copies *  3 

print.  300  yeas  and  nays  for  Senate 3 

"      300  blanks  for  Clerk  of  Hooee 2 

"      200  blanks  for  Sec'y  of  Senate 3 

31  galls,  paste  furnished  the  Legislature 12 

fold.  426,000  gigs,  daily  journal 313 

stit«h.  54,000  No's        "            135 

fold.  38,100  sigs.  Senate  bills,  No's  135  to  224  19 

stitch.  7,500  Senate  bills.  No's  135  \o  224 14 

fold.  1,000  sigs.  joint  res 

fold.  128,500  sigs.  House  bills -  64 

etitch.  19,500  Nos.  House  bills,No.  137  to  .360  41 

fold.  1,500  sigs.  House  joint  resolutions 

stitch.  500  Nob.    "  "  "  

trim.  445  rms.  bill  paper _ 111 

fold.  1,000  R  R.  act,  for  House 

stitch,  same -_ 1 

Amount  carried  forw  ard t^5,9Sf 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  191 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  Sta;te  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $25,988  20 

W.  &  George  &  Co., 

Totrim.  same - 2  50 

drying  and  press.  900  sigs.  drainage   law,  for 

Senate 45 

fold.  900  sigs.  same 45 

stitch.  300  pamphlets 60 

cover,  and  trim.  300  pamphlets 3  00 

ruling  1  rm.  enrolling  paper  4  times 2  00 

fold.  500  R  R.  acts 25 

stitch,  same 75 

trim.6ame.- _ 1  25 

dry.  and  press.  500  sigs.  report  D.  &.  M.  R  R. 

Co 1  25 

fold.  2,500  sigs.  same 125 

stitch.500  pamphlets 1  00 

trim.  500  same _ 1  25 

dry.  and  press.  3,600  sigs.  report  of  Geological 

Survey 1  80 

fold.  3,600  sigs.  same 1  80 

stitch.  1,800  pamphlets 2  70 

cover,  and  stitch.  1,800  pamphlets 18  00 

dry.,  press,  and  fold.  500  Senate  docs. 50 

stitch,  and  trim.  500  Senate  docs..  No.  2 2  00 

drying  and  press.  1,500  sigs.  drainage  act,  for 

House 75 

folding  1,500  same 75 

rtitch.500  pamphlets 1  00 

cover,  and  trim,  same 5  00 

putting  300  in  wrappers  for  mailing 1  00 

print  200  blanks  for  House 2  50 

Amount  carried  forward 126,042  00 


I 

I 

I 


192  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $26,042  00 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  550,492  ems  comp.  on  statement  on  Int  Imp. 

Fund,  for  House 247  72 

30  tokens  press  work  on  same 12  00 

96  rms.  12  lb.  flat  cap  paper *.        311  04 

216,384  ems  comp.  on  Senate  joint  resolutions 

during  entire  session 69  24 

141  tokens  press  work  on  same 56  40 

293,664  ems  comp.  on  House  joint  resolutions 

during  entire  session 93  97 

198  tokens  press  work  on  same 79  20 

1,468,320  ems  comp.  on  Senate  bills,  from  No. 

144  to  and  including  No.  227 469  86 

756  tokens  press  work  on  same 302  40 

3,148,080  ems  comp.  on  House  bills,  from  No. 

210  to  and  including  close  of  session 1,007  38 

1,822  tokens  press  work  on  same 728  80 

1,490,243  ems  comp.  on  daily  journal,  from 
Saturday,  March  20th,  to  the  evening  ses- 
sion of  March  31st,  of  the  House,  and  the 
afternoon  session  of  March  31st,  of  Senate        670  60 

756  tokens  press  work  on  same 302  40 

print,  joint  res.  relative   to  construction  of 

wagon  roads,  &c 5   50 

paper  for  same _  Ti 

furnishing  paste  and  wrappers,  and  address- 
ing and  mailing,  with  postage  stamps  ])ut 
on,  the  daily  journal  of  the  Legislature  for 
62  days,  for  the  session  of  1860, 250  copies 
per  day,  as  per  res.  of  the  Legislature,  $2 
perday 124    O 


Amount  carried  forward $30,523 


^ 


BOARD   OP  STATE  AUDITORS.  193 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 130,523  26 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  40  rms.  book  paper  for  laws 320  00 

60    "    45  lb.  book  paper  for  laws 480  00 

36    **        ^*  "  reports 355  68 

Daniel  S.  Mevis, 
To  services  as  janitor  at  the  Capitol  for  the 

month  of  March,  CH  $2  per  day,  31  days. .  62  00 

6  days  in  the  month  of  April 12  00 

A  lindsley, 
To  serrices  as  porter  in   State  offices  for  the 

month  of  March,  1869,  31  days 62  00 

John  Broad, 
To  services  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  March,  1869,  31  days 62  00 

washing  45  pieces 2  25 

Lemnel  M.  Snllivan, 
To  services  as  watchman  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  March,  1869,  31  nights 62  00 

John  Nagel, 
To   services  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  March,  31  days,  Q)  t2 62  00 

washing  52  pieces,  ID  5c 2  60 

>i.  R-  Oreene, 

To  1  light  12x20  glass,  30c.;  setting,  45c 75 

work,  lumber  and  bolts  to  fasten  gates  at  State 

offices 75 

Grore  &  Whitney, 

To  repairing  chandeliers  at  Capitol - 2  50 

Russia  pipe,  repair,  pipe,  and  wire,  Capitol. . .  1  25 

6  papers  stove  polish 60 

Amount  carried  forward $32,011  64 

25 


194  AKNDAL   REPOBT   OP  TBK 

fitaie  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward WS,©!!  6 

Grove  &  Wliitney, 

To  sheet  iron  pan _  1  0 

repairing  hinips 12 

1  axe  and  helve -  2  0 

repairing  lamps IE 

25  lbs,  zinc  pipe,  and  labor... t  ' 

tacka  at  Capitol 1 

Win.  Jennieon, 
To  cash  paid  Wni.  B.  Wesson  tor  insuring  the 

15th  and  16th  Michigan  Jteporta *i5  ! 

cash   paid   the  same  for  insuring  the   17th 

Mich.  Rqwrts 12 

Daniel  M.  Rice, 

To  expenses  in  defending  title  to  laud  deeded  to 

him  by  the  State  by  error,  being  c  ^  of  n 

e  i  of  sec.  16,  town  13  n,  of  range  9  w. .  72 

interest  on  $330,  amount  paid  for  land,  from 

Dec.  4th,  1868,  to  April  6th,  1869,  four 

months,  O  7  % Y 

drawing  qnit  claim  deed,  and  stamp 1 

B.  F.  Simons, 

To  13  yds.  toweling 4 

1  spool  cotton  thread 

April  38th,  I860. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  463,480  ems  comp.  on  daily  journal  of  Legis- 
lature, including  evening  session  of  House 
of  Saturday,  March  31sl,  and  from  and 
including  afternoon  session  of  Senate  of 
March  31st ^O. 


Amount  carried  forwanl $33.35 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  19$ 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward _ 132^358  01 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  125  tokens  press  work  on  same 50  00 

print  blanks,  certificates  of  taxes  due  on  lands 

in  the  city  of  Lansing 3  50 

paperfor  same _ _ 3  00 

11^872  ems  eomp.  on  law  authorizing  the  lo- 
cation of  water  courses  by  highway  com- 
missioners  - t-.  5  93 

5  tokens  press  work  on  same 2  00 

print  blanks  for  Sec.  of  Senate 3  50 

178,564  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Inspectors  of 

State  Prison,  per  order  of  Legislature 80  35 

«0  tokens  press  work  on  same 24  00 

133,537  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Trustees  of 
the  Asylum  for  the  Insane,  per  order  of 

Legislature 60  09 

54  tokens  press  work  on  same 21  60 

2«721,791  ems  comp.  on  official  journal  of  the 
Senate  fit)m  and  including  page  1  to  and 

including  page  1714 644  35 

tr42  tokens  press  work  on  same 256  80 

4,052,157  ems  comp.  on  official  House  journal 
from  and  including  page  1  to  and  inclu- 

dmgpage2480 810  43 

i^30  tokens  press  work  on  same 372  00 

dry.  and  press.  6,500  sigs.  improvement  fund.  3  25 

fold,  same 3  25 

stitch.  650  pamphlets 1  95 

coTer.  and  trim.  650  pamphlets 6  50 

carried  forward 134,610  51 


196  ANNUAL   BEPORT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

Tfie  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward 134,610  5 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  dry.,  fold.,  atitgh.,  and  trim.  300  Senate  Doc. 

No.  3 - 1  S 

fold.  10,500  sigs.  daily  journal,  from  April  let 

to5tli 0  '. 

stitch.  3,000  same 7  i 

dry.  and  press.  40,000  sigs.  tax  laws SO  ' 

fold.  40,000  same 20  1 

stitch.  5,000  paniphleta 13  I 

ooTcr.  and  trim.  5,000  same 50  ' 

dry.  and  press.   1,600  sigs.,  act  to  register 

births,  &c 

fold.  1,600  same _ 

stitch.  1,600  pamphlets 3 

trim.  1,600  "         4 

fold.  1,500  "        and  putting  in  cnTcl- 

opes  for  mailing 2 

dry.  and  press.  3.000  sigs.  of  hfe  ins.  law 1 

fold.  3,000  same 1 

fititch.  1,000  ].mmplilet8 2 

coTCr.  and  trim.  1,000  same 10 

dry.  and  press.  1,200  sigs.  ditch  act 

fold.  1,300  same 

stitch.  1,200  pamphlets 1 

trim.  1,200  "        3 

bind.  1  abstract 1 

"    14  vol's  letters--., 1^ 

Lemuel  M.  Sullivan, 
To  services  as  natchmaa  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  April,  1869,  30  nights 6i 

Amount  carried  forward. 134,83 


BOARD  OP  STATE  AUDITOES.  197 

State  of  Michigan 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 134,837  76 

John  Nagel, 
To  eervices  as  porter  in   State  offices  for  the 

month  of  April,  1869,  30  days 60  00 

washing  48  pieces 2  40 

hemming  12  towels 60 

Chas.  Nagel, 

To  i  days'  work  wheeling  wood  into  cellar 1  25 

John  Broad, 
To  eerrices  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  April,  1869,  30  days 60  00 

washing  32  pieces 1  50 

A.  Lindsley, 
To  serrioes  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  April,  1869,  30  days 60  00 

Gto.  L.  Pease, 

To  50  rms.  book  paper  for  laws 400  00 

126      "            «          «          1,008  00 

10  rms.  colored  medium  for  laws 150  00 

49}  rms.  bill  paper 161  19 

50  rms.  book  paper  for  reports 494  00 

76        «                 «       laws 608  00 

80        «                  «          "   640  00 

en      **                 «       reports 607  62 

54  rms.  super  sized  book  paper  for  reports. .  533  52 
&  B.  Greene, 

To  repairing  one  chair 50 

12  boxes  for  books 10  20 

repair,  and  rehang.  door 75 

5  boxes  for  books 2  55 

Amount  carried  forward $39,639  84 


198  ANNUAL  KEPOET  OF  THE 

Utat'C  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brouglit  fonvnrd t39,63I 

S.  R.  Greene, 

To!  Bet  castorB,  ?5c. ;  puttiug  on  table,  50c.... 

work  and  materials,  repairing  dome  of  Capitol  ; 

L  K  Oarleton, 

To  services  as  Senator  t)f  tlie  Legialfttureof  186!*  31 

h.  S.  Trowbridge. 
To  taxable  attorney's  coBtJ  in  tlie  case  of  Thom- 
as Ryan  ts.  Geo.  W.  Brown  et  al,  deter- 
mined in  the  Supreme  Court  upon  appeal 
from  cii-cuit  court:  from  the  county  of 
Cliipi>ewa,  in  Chancery.  Deci-ec  affirmed, 
with  costs,  as  follows:    Att'ys  fe«B,  »60: 

printing  briefs,  flifl 8 

0.  L.  Spaulding, 
To  expenses  going  to  Wayne  county  to  investi- 
gate title  and  condition  of  certain  landt> 
snppoBe<l  to  have  escheated  to  the  State. .  1 
Henry  S.  Clubb, 
To  attendance  at  court,  14th  judicial   circuit, 
Grand  Haven,  Ottawa  county,  to  report 
the  evidence  in  the  case  of  "  The  State  ex 
ret  Frank  H.  White,  vs.  Hermanns  Does- 
burg,  9  dftys,ffl  tlO 

trnnsoribing  evidence  of  said  trial,  360  folios, 

ffl  20c 

E.  B.  Bonn,                   ... 
To  hauling  wood  from  Capitol  to  State  offices, 
self  and  team  li  day ..,. 

Amount  carrie<l  forward t30,1 


BOARD  OF  STATE   AUDITORS.  199 

atate  of  Michigan 

vs, 

Tlie  Skite  of  Michigan . 

Amount  brought  forward $39,945  54 

Benj.  W.  Bours, 
To  services  a8  messenger  for  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  April  1860_ 30  00 

H.  P.  Baldwin, 
To  paid  for  telegrams  to  State  Prison  during  win- 
ter of  1868  and  1869 7  80 

K.  0.  Grosvenor. 
To  actual  expenses  incurred  in  going  to  New 

York  on  business  for  the  State T6  50 

ftter  Mitchell. 

To  cash  paid  fare,  Ontonagon  to  Marquette 12  00 

bill  at  Marquette* r^  00 

fare  to  Negaunee 65 

telegram 4  80 

fare  to  Escanaba 3  00 

**    Green  Bay,  and  berth  on  boat  5  50 

breakfast  and  dinner  on  boat 1  50 

fare  to  Lansing 16  50 

supper,  breakfast  and  dinner 1  75 

supper  and  lodging  at  Jackson 1  50 

hotel  bill  at  Lansing,  2  days 6  00 

>«ime amount  estimated  as  return  expenses...  55  20 


•• 


•• 


»• 


•■ 


•» 


May  WtJu  1869. 
Jm^  B.  Porter, 
To  insurance  in  Home,   North  American   and 

Mich.  State,  $3,000  each 180  00 

^luK.  NageU 
To  gawing  1  cord  of  wood  for  State  offices 75 


Amount  carried  forward $40,350  99 


200  ANNDAL  HEPOUT  0¥  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

VB. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward tlOtaSO 

Lemuel  M.  Sullivan, 
To  services  as  watchman  for  the  month  of  May, 

1869,  31  nights fi2 

John  Nagel, 
To  services  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  the  month 

of  May,  1869,31days 03 

waahing  52  pieces 2 

John  Broad, 
To  services  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  May,  1869, 31  days 62 

crashing  31  pieces 1 

A.  Lindsley, 

To  ser^'ices  as  porter  in  Stat«  offices  for  the  month 

of  May,  1869,  31  days 62 

S.  E.  Greene, 
To  8  lights  glass,  $2  40;   pwtty,  27c,  for  cellar  in 

Capitol 3 

work  and  lumber  to  repair  cellar  at  Capitol. .  1 

repair,  well  and  gate  at  State  offices 

work  and  pickets  repair,  fence  at  Capitol 3 

repair,  door  and  lock  for  privy  at  Capitol 1 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  press.,  fold.,  &c.,  200  R.  E.  acts 

"  "       300  records  of  State 

dry.  and  press.  1,800  sigs.  fire  and  marine  in- 

enrance  laws 

folding  same. 

stitching  600  pamphlets -, 

cover,  and  trim,  same _ ( 


Amount  carried  forward $40,€ 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITOES.  201 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward  ..i 140,622  71 

W.S.  George  &  Co., 
To  53,424  ems  comp.  on  re-print  of  State  Treas- 
urer's report,  by  order  of  Legislature 24  00 

25  tokens  press  work  on  same 10  00 

Benj.  W.  Bours, 

To  sendees  as  messenger  in  State  offices  for 

the  month  of  May,  1869 31  00 

Junes  Hurley, 
To  drawing  and  sowing  1  ton  of  plaster  on  the 

State  office  and  Capitol  grounds 10  00 

im»  O'Dell, 
To  i  days'  work  mulching  trees  in  State  office 

vard 4  00 

m 

Wiert  Reese, 
To  H  days'  work  around  trees  in  the  State  office 

vard 7  88 

fcwttABird, 

To  1  ton  plaster 8  00 

ftmkWeUs, 
To  1  marking  brush,  15c.;  1  feather  duster,  93  50  3  65 

i  pint  tupentine 10 

0,  L  Spanlding, 
To  expenses  to  Detroit  to  perfect  appeal  from  or- 
der of  probate  of  Wayne  county,  in  the 
matter  of  the  estate  of  Findon,  deceased..  12  20 

expenses  to  Grand  Rapids  to  investigate  claim 

against  State  for  salt  bounty 8  25 

*«^LPeaae, 
To  30  rms.  45  lb.  super  sized  book  paper 296  40 

^ount  carried  forward $41,038  19 

26 


302  ANNUAL   REPORT   01'   THK 

State  of  Mit^i^an 

!*#  .State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $41,0 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  120  rma  46  lb.  book  paper,  tor  iawa 8 

60    '■        '■  '■  •'        __ 4 

48  mis.  24x36  book  paper 4 

The  following  account  was  reject*}d : 
C.  E.  Weaver, 
For  ser\-ice8  in  the  suit  between  the  National 
Bank  of  TccumBeh  and  Sylvester  B.  Smith, 
"'being  called  upon  by  Attorney  General 
Stoughton  to  appear  in  belialf  of  defend- 
ant." said  account  amounting  to  t25  00. 


June  Snth,  1869. 
W.  S.  George  &  Co.. 
To  adv.  official  canvass  for  Uegcnts  and  Circuit 

Judge,  lUh  circuit,  36  fols.  2  w a 

1,153,544  cms  comp.  on  Ist  vol.  laws  of  186!i        57 

3,225  tokens  press  work  on  same __.      1,29 

717,768  cms  comp.  on  report  of  Sec'y  of  State 
Board  of  Agriculture,  from  and  including 

page  1  to  and  including  page  158 32 

t;00  tokens  press  work  on  same _         24 

print.  3  rms.  covera  for  same,  per  order  of  Leg- 
islature   

(147,222  ems  comp.  on  manual 39 

1 14  tokens  press  work  on  same 4 

Lemuel  M.  Sullivan. 
To  services  as  night  watchman  in  State  offices 

for  the  month  of  June.  1869 e 

Amount  carried  forward.. $45,7^ 


BOARD  OF  BTATE   AUDITORS.  203 

vs. 
The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward $45,742  84 

A.  lindslev, 
To  services  as  porter  in   State  offices  for  the 

month  of  June,  1869 00  00 

John  Broady 
To  services  as  porter  at  Capitol  for  the  month  of 

June,  1869 60  00 

washing  30  pieces. - 1  50 

Jobn  XageL 
To  services  as  porter  at  the  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  June,  1869 CO  00 

washing  48  pieces 2  40 

<>€o.  L  Pease, 

Tollrms-book 108  68 

116  •'        -^    laws 028  00 

40    *•        '•      395  20 

27  15-20  rm8.book _ 274  17 

38rm8.book 375  44 

50    •*        •'     _  494  00 

240  *'        "    laws - 1,920  00 

16    "        '• 158  08 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  dry.  and  press.  20,000  sigs.  report  on  agricul- 
tural aflfairs,  1868 10  00 

fold,  same 10  00 

stitch.  1,000  pamphlets 3  00 

t*over.  and  trim.  1,000  pamphlets 10  00 

dry.  and  press.  750,000  sigs.  vol.  1,  sos.  laws  of 

1869 376  00 

fold,  same 375  00 

bind.  5,000  vol's  same 1,750  00 


Amount  carried  forward 153,113  31 


304  ANNUAL  REPORT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forwanl 153,1^3 

John  Kneller, 

To  sawing  wood  lif  days  at  Ktate  oflBees 3 

Bennie  W.  Bours, 
To  services  as  messenger  in  State  ofifices  for  the 

month  of  June,  1869 30 

Daniel  Bums, 
To  costs  allowed  said  Bnnis  in  suit  between  State 
of  Michigan  and  Burns,  by  circuit  court 
of  Bay  county 37 


July  asa,  1SG9. 
E.  O.  GroBvenor, 
To  9  days'  services  as  member  of  Board  of  Con- 
trol of  St.  Mary's  Canal,  in  ^siting  Sault 

Canal,  a  *3 37 

1,260  miles  travel  to  and  from,  returning  via 

Chicago  and  Eseanaba,  10c.  per  mile 196 

H.  P.  Baldwin, 
To  9  days'  services  in  visiting  and  inspecting  St. 

Mary's  Canal,-fl)  $3 37 

1,260  miles  travel,  returning  via  Eseanaba  and 

Chicago,  fli  10c 136 

D wight  May, 
To  going  to  Centerville  to  attend  case  of  Sturgis 
Bank  vs.  SherilF,  railroad  fare  and  return, 
and  livery 5 

hotel a 

some  place  and  retnm S 

hotel a 

Amount  carried  forward t53,50C 


BOABD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  205 

State  of  Michigan 

■  The  State  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 153,505  03 

Dwight  May, 
To  going  to  Detroit  to  prepare  return  of  Q.  M. 

G.  to  mandamus,  li.  B _ 6  80 

hotel 5  25 

:kmT  H.  Bow, 
To  services  as  Clerk  to  Board  of  State  Auditors 

from  Jan.  1  to  July  28th,  '69,  7  months. .  150  00 
W.  S.  George  &  Co., 

To  print.  Supreme  Court  docket,  July,  1869 30  00 

11,872  ems  comp.  on  title  page  and  contents 

to  joint  docs.  1868 5  34 

10  tokens  press  work  on  same 4  00 

776,474  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Aud.  Gen'l, 

reprinted  by  order  of  Legislature,  tD  45c.-  349  41 

108  tokens  press  work  on  same. 43  20 

36  rms.  tinted  paper,®  122 792  00 

cash  paid  M.,  L.  &  Co.,  (see  bill) 2  00 

ex.  charges  to  and  from  Chicago  on  same 1  00 

10  copies  Rep.  for  Circuit  Judges _ 80 

pub.  notice  of  new  rules  of  Circuit  Court 2  80 

binding  5,000  sess.  laws,  vol.  1,  tD  35c 1,750  00 

600  manuals,  1869 600  00 

diy.  and  press..  25,800  sigs.  manual,  ft  5c 12  90 

fold,  same,  fr  5c 12  90 

J^n  Broad, 
To  services  as  ])orter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  montli 

of  July 62  00 

paid  for  carting  books 1  00 

washing  28  pieces,  f!>  5c 1  40 

Amount  carried  forward 157,337  83 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  '  W7 

JifUtte  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  SUUe  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward WSjSlO  68 

JolmNagel, 

To  washing  5:2  pieces,  (£  5e 2  60 

Lemnel  M.  SuUiran, 
To  gerrices  as  watchman  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  July,  tD  12  per  day 62  00 

0.  Hofiford, 

To  amount  paid  for  (?ut8  for  school  laws 31  00 

^L  Pease, 

To  48  rms.  45  lb.  book,  «*  18 384  00 

^    •*    25  lb.  German  cover,  ij)  $8 160  00 

Sute  Treasurer, 

To  postage  for  use  of  this  office 30  00 

office  of  Supt.  of  Public  Schools.        100  00 
Beanie  W.  Bours, 
To  senrices  as  messenger  for  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  July,1869 31  00 

Jsute  Tieasorer, 

To  post  stamps,  Land  office,  15  sheets  3c.  stamps         45  00 
•efcrm  School, 

To  expenses  as  j)er  voucher  No.  1 2,000  00 

''    110 2,000  00 

-     Ill 2,000  00 

Brform  fcichool. 

To  expenses  as  per  voucher  No.  112 2,000  00 

^t  Greene, 

To  moving  desk  and  fit.  for  court 1  26 

eash  paid  for  tin  work  on  eave-trough  and 

conductors  at  Capitol 7  50 

mvworkonsame 1  25 

Amount  carried  forward $67,375  18 


308  ANKCAL  EEPOKT  OF  THK 

State  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

August  37 fh,  1869. 

Amount  brought  forward *67^75  11 

H.  P.  Baldwin, 

To  actual  expenses  in  Tisiting  Portage  Lake  and 
I^ake  Superior  Canal,  now  in.  process  of 

construction 2C  0( 

Benj.  W.  Bours, 
To  services  as  messenger  in  State  offices,    for 

month  of  August,  1869 .-  31  <M 

Board  of  State  Auditors, 

To  postage  stHmps  for  ofiicc  use 3  O 

John  Broad, 
To  serWees  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  August 62  O* 

washing  32  pieces 1   5( 

A  E.  Cowlea, 
To  fees  due  him  as  Clerk  of  the  Supreme  Court 
in  the  case  of  Tlie  People  ex  rel.  D.  Mc- 
Intyrc  vt.  the  Auditor  General,  which  was 

decided  against  the  Aud.  Gen'l 6  O 

A.  Liudsley, 
To  services  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  montli 

of  August 63  O 

John  Nagel, 
To   services  as  porter  in   State  offices  for  the 

month  of  August 68  0 

washing  52  pieces 3   6 

E.  S.  Port«r, 
To  1  months'  services  as  Sec'y  of  the  Board  of 
State  Auditors,  at  the  rate  of  t400  per 
annum 33   3 

Amount  carried  forward $67,664  ( 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  209 

State  of  Michigan 

V8. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward. .  - 167,664  6.1 

Lemuel  M.  Sullivan, 
To  servioes  as  watchman  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  August,  1869 62  00 

C.  H.  Buhl, 
To  rent  of  office  in  Bank  blocks  Detroit,  occupied 
by  the  Supreme  Judges,  from  Feb.  Ist  to 
Aug.  1st,  including  heliting,  {t  $200  per 

annum 100  00 

GiDTe  &  Whitney, 

To  1  brush,  per  Nagel,  2s 25 

tacks;,  per  Lindsley 12 

lOlbs-nails,    "     60 

4  papers  tacks,  per  Lindsley 20 

i  doz.  W.  B.  hooks  and  screws,  per  Nagel 18 

12  lbs.  nails,  per  Lindsley 72 

10      «  "  60 

repair,  water  cooler 25 

6eo.L.  Pease, 

To  36  rms.  45  lb.  super  sized  book,  ft  19  88 355  68 

60        *•        '•  S.  &0.  "        "         592  80 

42         '•        "  super  sized    "        *•         414  96 

40         •'        "  "  **        "  395  20 

42         '*        *•  *'  "        "         414  96 

50  reams  24x36  book,  for  laws,  ^  $8 400  00 

88    «  "  *'  "  "     704  00 

32    *•  '•      S.  S.  &  C,  fT  $9  88 316  16 

^  B.  Greene, 
To  repairs  on  tenement  house : 

paid  for  shingles 52  50 

nailsandwork 18  00 

Amoant  carried  forward 171,493  79 


210  ANHUAL  BEPOBT  OF  THE 

State  of  Michigan. 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward fiJ  ,i98  7! 

8.  R.  Greene, 

To  work  repairing  west  piazza 10  Of 

•'  "         window  blinds 3  (X 

cash  paid  for  repairing  eave  trough t  O 

•'  "  "  plastering 1   7. 

W.  S.  George  &  Co., 
To  207,793  ems  comp.  on  adhool  laws  with  side 

notes,  Q  50c 103   8 

193,613  ems  comp.  on  school  laws  without 

side  notes,  fli  45c 87  1 

3,964  tokens  press  work  on  same,  fli  40g 1,185   6 

paper,  ruling  and  binding  1  index  for  Board 

of  State  Auditors 

dry.  and  presB.  350,000  siga.  joint  docs. 

folding  same 

bind.  1,000  toIs.  same 

dr J.  and  press.  693,000  sigs.  school  laws 

folding  same 

stitching  5,000  school  laws,  pamphlets 

cover,  and  trim,  same 


Oclober  oik,  1869. 
Sam'l  H.  Row, 

To  bill  paid  freight  and  cartage  on  rolls  matting  2   i 

Dwight  May, 
To  expenses  to  St.  Clair  in  case  of  People  vs. 

Johr,  fare  by  rail,  water,  &c 14  1 

other  expenses 5    ' 

Amount  carried  forward 974,366 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  211 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amotuit  brought  forward t?4,856  81 

E.  S.  Porter, 
To  one  month's  services  as  Clerk  of  the  S.  L.  B. 

of  Control,  tJ  $50  per  annum 4  17 

1  month's  services  as  Secretary  of  the  Board 

of  State  Auditors,  tD  1400  per  annum 33  33 

Lemuel  M.  Sullivan, 
To  services  as  v^atchman  in  State  offices  for  the 
month  of  September,  1869, 30  nights,  fD  12 

per  night 60  00 

1  Linddey, 
To  services  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  month 

September,  CH  $2  per  diem 60  00 

John  Nagel, 
To  services,  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  tlie 

month  of  September,  30  days,  f}  $2 60  00 

washing  50  pieces 2  50 

X.  C.  Chapman, 

To  46  rods  sidewalk,  «  $4  60  per  rod 211  60 

B»  F.Simons, 

To  10  rolls  ribbon,  O  40c 4  00 

D.W.  Buck, 

To  1  common  table 2  00 

Mn  Broad, 
To  services  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  September 60  00 

washing  28  pieces,  f?  5c 1  40 

*«uiie  W.  Bonrs, 
To  services  as  messenger  for  State  offices  for  the 

monthof  September,  1869 30  00 

Amount  carried  forward %74,885  81 


212  ANNUAL  BEPOBT  OP  THE 

State  of  MicJbigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amouiit  brought  forward $74,885  ( 

A.  D.  Elliott, 

To  hauling  books  from  State  ofQces  to  Capitol. .  1  t 

S.  B.  Greene, 

To  work  on  book  case * 

Ideak 79  { 

2  boxes 1  1 

5  boxea _.  3  ' 

work  repair,  deak,  Clerk  B.  S,  Auditors 2  J 

1  top  case  for  books 7  I 

call  bell,  8s.;  wire,  28.;  cord,  20c.;  tassels,  13c.; 

work,  10b 3  1 

call  bell,  8s.;  wire,  3s.;  cord,  20c.;  tassels,  13c.: 

work,  tl  60 1 3  ( 

work,  lumber  and  nails,  to  repair  fence  at 

Capitol 4  i 

Geo.  L.  Pease, 

To  30  rms.  super  sized  book  paper  .  - 296   ■ 

S6  rms.  24x36,  for  laws 448  ■ 

44    "        "  "       353 

160  "        "      45  Jb.  book  paper 1,200 

13  3-20  rms.  24x36  S.  S.  &  C.  book 129 

14  rms.  45  lb.  book,  for  laws 113 


Oclobei-  27th,  1869. 
John  Nagel, 
To  services  as   porter  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  October,  31  days 62 

washing  48  pieces,  fli  5c 'i 

cash  paid  for  repairing  register 

"  '■      drayman 

Amount  carried  forward ^ *77,696 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITORS.  213 

State  of  Michigan 

(  The  Stojte  of  Michigan, 

Amount  brought  forward 177,596  48 

A.  Lindfiley. 
To  serrices  as  porter  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  October 62  00 

John  Broad, 
To  services  as  porter  at  the  Capitol  for  the  month 

of  October 62  00 

washing  28  pieces 1  40 

cash  paid  for  carting  books ^.  75 

Lemuel  M.  Sulliran, 
To  serrices  as  watchman  in  State  offices  for  the 

month  of  October 62  00 

E.  &  Porter, 
To  serrices  as  Sec'y  of  the  Board  of  State  Aud- 
itors for  the  month  of  October 33  34 

L  S.  Jenison, 
To  famishing  ice  for  State  offices  for  the  season 

of  1869 55  00 

W.  D.  Bumham, 
To  1  wheelbarrow 10  75 

John  Kneller, 

To  sawing  5  cords  wood  once 3  75 

"        2         "  twice 2  50 

3^  days'  work  cleaning   basement    story  of 

State  offices : 6  13 

Metlen  ft  Tunison, 
To  brick,  mortar,  and  labor  in  repairing  furnace 

in  State  offices 72  50 

reps,  on  furnace,  5  boxes,  bolts,  &c...  1125  69 
By  1,376  lbs.  old  casting 17  20 

Balance 108  49 

Amount  carried  forward $78,077  09 


al4  -VXKUAL   REPORT  OF  THE 

Sttzt'e  of  Michigan 

vs. 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $78,077  OB 

Advertiser  &  Tribune. 

To  adv.  war  loan  bonds  called  iu,  £1  sq.,  G  v 51  45 

adv.  proposals  for  printing,  10  sq.,  6  w^  oaw..  24  50 

adv.  Gov's  proclamation  for  Thanksgiving,  8 

sqs^  daily  and  weekly,  3  each .  _ 14  00 

Daily  Post  Co., 

Toadv.  Treas.  notice,  21  fols,  fi  times 51  46 

adv.  pKiposals,  10  fols.  6  times 24  BO 

adv.  proclamation,  8  fols..  d.  A  w..  3  each 14  00 

John  Eneller, 

To  sawing  3  cords  wood 2  25 

S.  R.  Greene. 
To  cash  paid  for  niat«rial8  and  work  for  chimney 

top  on  tenant  honse 10  50 

W.  S.  George  4  Co.. 

Toadv.  proposals,  9  fols.  ti  w 24  50 

print.  1  rm.  Thanksgiving  proclamation 3  50 

reprint.  1  rm.  •'  '■  3  50 

i  ream  folio  post  paper  for  some 3  75 

36  lb.  demy  paper  for  reprint.,  &e 5  5C 

67,336  ems  comp.  on  report  of  Com'r  of  Land 

Office,  per  order  of  Leg. 30  2i 

20  tokens  press  work  on  same 8  (M 


yovftuder  .iUh,  1869. 
B.  S.  Porter, 
To  services  as  Sec'y  of  the  Board  of  State  Aud- 
itors for  the  montji  of  November 


Amount  carried  forward $78.3 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUD1T0B8.  215 

State  of  Michigan 

V8, 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amoant  brought  forward $78,382  07 

W.  S.  George  A;  Co., 
To  eomp.  on  2d  and  3d  vols,  session  laws,  3,783,- 

430eins 1,891  71 

9,080  tokens  press  work  on  same 3,632  00 

A«  lindslejy 
To  services  as  porter  in   State  o£Sces  for  the 

month  of  November,  30  days 60  00 

John  Xagel, 
To  services  as  porter  in  the  Auditor  GenTs  and 
Treas.  office  for  the  month  of  November, 

aOdays 60  00 

washing  48  pieces 2  40 

paid  for  rexmiring  a  lock 50 

John  Broad, 
To  services  as  porter  at  Capitol  for  the  month  of 

November,  1869 60  00 

washing  28  pieces 1  40 

Lemuel  H.  Sullivan, 
To  services  as  night  watchman  in  State  offices 

for  the  month  of  November,  1869 60  00 

M)eGraw, 
To  removing  4  loads  dirt  from  basement  of  State 

offices ^ 2  00 

Dtvifl  ft  Lamed, 

To  3  No.  2  chimneys 60 

llamp - 1  75 

1  spittoon 60 

1  bunch  wicks 30 

9chimneys 1  40 

Amount  carried  forward $84,156  73 


316  ANNCAL  BEPOHT  OF  THE. 

State  of  Miohigan 

The  State  of  Jffiehigan. 

Amount  brought  forward »84,166  M 

Davis  &  Lamed, 

Tol  mug 30 

1  wick as 

6  BhadcB — 1  5( 

1  Bun  chimney If 

1  lamp  and  Bhade 3  7' 

S.  R.  Greene, 
To  work  and  cash  paid  to  mend  eave-troagh  at 

offices 'i  81 

work  to  move  furniture,  take  up  and  clean 

carpets  at  Reps.  Hall 6  & 

a  boxes  for  compiled  laws 1 1  6 

19        "       2d  and  3d  volfl.  lawB 16  1 


■}  day  at  repairing  in  offices 1  5 

labor  and  cash  paid  and  lumber  to  Sx  dummy  31  S 

3  foot  stools 3  < 

cloth,  $3 ;  work,  trimmings,  and  tape  for  cur- 
tains, tl  25 4  ; 

George  L.  Pease, 

To  5  rms.  36  lb.  medium,  sample 56  i 

E.  0.  Grosveuor, 
To  telegrams  on  account  of  meeting  of  Board  of 

Control  of  Sault  Canal 2  ' 

Bobinson  &  Brooks, 

To  costs  08  per  bill  and  certificate  enclosed 80 

James  Phelps, 
To  cleaning  walks  of  Bnow  and  wheeling  wood 

at  State  offices  one  day l 

Amount  carried  forward __ (84,444 


BOARD  OF  STATE  AUDITOBS,  217 

State  of  Michigan 

The  State  of  Michigan. 

Amount  brought  forward $84,444  61 

Junes  Phelps, 

To  cleaniDg  walks  of  snow  at  State  offices 1  50 

Bennie  W.  Bonrs, 
To  serrices  as  messenger  in  State  offices  for  the 

months  of  October  and  November,  1869..  61  00 

John  S.  Bulkley, 
To  examining  title  of  private  land  claim  No.  39, 

and  drawing  abstract  and  copy 25  00 

Total <84,532  11 

28 


RECAPITULATION. 


I     k 


$1,713  94 

4,021  50 

15,030  29 

5,771  88 

2,431  00 

877  80 

5,004  44 

1,255  00 

ExecutiTe  Departments^.  The  State  of  Michigan 
y  of  State  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan. . . 

Auditor  €reneral  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan 

State  Land  Office  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan 

^te  Treasurer  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan 

Attorney  Creneral  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan 

Stperintendent  of   Public    Instruction  vs.  The 

State  of  Michigan 

5?tite  library  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan 

Svamp  Land  State  Road  Commissioner  vs.  The 

Stale  of  Michigan 2,711  68 

Tpper  Peninsula  S.  L.  S,  R.  Commissioner  vs.  The 

State  of  Michigan 

•"Mqireme  Court  r*.  The  State  of  Michigan 

Beform  School  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan 

Asrlom  for  Deaf.  Dumb  and  Blind  vs.  'Vho  State 

of  Michigan - 

Asrlom  for  Insane  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan... 

J^tate  Prison  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan 

Tnited  States  Und  Office  t^/f.  The  State  of  Mioh- 

ig«n , 

Agricultund  College  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan.. 
of  Michigan  vs.  The  State  of  Michigan... 

Total •181,243  41 


192  24 

535  12 

52,699  79 

178  77 

324  43 

180  99 

200  85 

3,581  58 

84,532  11 

TfflRTY-THIED  ANNCAL  REPORT 


Sttpmiilfairent  irf  f  ublic  Inslndioit 


STATE  OF   MICHIGAN, 


ACCOMPANYING     DOCUMENTS, 


FOR    TmH   •SHA.R    ISOO. 


Br  AUinoBixy:. 


LANSING: 

V.  S.  GIOROE  ft  CO.,  FRZNTKRB  TO  THE  STATE. 

1869. 


CONTENTS. 


Pags. 

BkPOBT  of  BUPEBIKTENDEirr 3 

School  Apparatus 10 

School-Houses 14 

Deemani  of  Supreme  Ckmrt : 

Creation  of  new  township  puts  all  the  territory  under  control 

of  its  Inspectors 17 

Part  of  District  set  off  with  new  township  has  no  claim  on 

fiinds  of  original  District 21 

Rightsof  Colored  Children 28 

Dissolution  of  Districts 80 

Debts  of  a  District  attached  to  another  District 82 

Districts  organized  by  Legislature 84 

Library  Funds  fh>m  Fines 40 

lines  imposed  by  Police  Court 44 

Reports  of  County  Superintendents 46 

List  of  County  Superintendents 150 

Educational  Funds 152 

School  Statistics 156 

ATeiage  Wages— 1868  to  1869 168 

Lflnwies 159 

Apportionment  in  1869 161 

fichocd  Revenues  in  1869 162 

Qiaded  Schools 165 

State  Teachere' Institutes ■ 171 

Slate  Uniyersity 174 

Nonnal  School 176 

AgrlcoHund  College 178 

Kalamazoo  CoUege 180 

Ottret  College 182 

EdQcatknial  Needs  of  Michigan 184 

Hecosta  County  Superintendent's  Report 194 

Qcnene  County  Superintendent's  Report 196 


APPENDIX. 

Piu. 

Uhivebsitt  of  Michioan  : 

Report  of  RegeDts 201 

Report  of  Prendeot - 818 

Officers  aad  Faculty _ 318 

Report  of  Prof.  Wataon— Astronomical  Obaervatory 221 

Report  of  Prof.  Winchell— Geology,  Ac - -  221 

Report  of  Prof.  Douglaas— ChemlBtry _  284 

Report  of  Librarian .23! 

Report  of  Boabd  of  Educatiok _  331 

State  Norsul  School  : 

Report  of  Principal 231 

Report  of  Treasurer 3H 

State  Agricultural  College  : 

Report  of  Preudent. 3K 

Olitet  College  : 

Report  of  President. _ 26' 

Report  of  VlBitors 371 

Kalauazoo  College: 

Report  of  President 2T 

State  Rgfobk  School  : 

Report  of  Board  of  ControL 27 

Report  of  Superintendent 38 

Report  of  Teacher. 2» 

Sunday  Schools: 

Report  of  General  Agent 2ft 

Abstracts 80 


NOTICE. 


lldB  Report  has  been  considerably  delayed,  partly  because  of  the 
ludiDeflB  of  many  school  officers  in  famishing  their  reports,  thus  delay* 
i^  the  preparation  of  the  work  for  the  press,  and  partly  from  the  great 
ttioant  of  other  work  crowding  upon  the  St^te  printers,  in  spite  of  three 
cjfiBder  presses  in  constant  operation.  This  delay,  however,  has  given 
taie  to  make  the  statistics  more  elaborate  than  usual. 

As  no  seasioii  of  the  Legislature  has  been  held  in  the  winter  of  1870, 
tills  dday  is  not  of  serious  damage ;  but  it  is  yeiy  important  that  the 
BqNRt  lor  1870  should  be  through  the  press  before  the  meeting  of  the 
ligiditnre  in  January,  1871.  This  cannot  be,  however,  unless  the  Di- 
netanare  prompt  in  making  their  Reports.  Directors  are  earnestly 
«S^  to  aee  to  it  that  they  have  their  blanks  before>the  1st  of  Septem- 
^.  If  not  received  by  the  middle  of  August,  apply  to  the  Town  Clerk 
fcr  them  withoat  delay ;  so  that  in  case  of  accident  or  loss,  there  will  be 
^ae  to  obtain  a  new  supply. 

Tins  Report  is  forwarded  to  the  several  County  Clerks,  who  are  re- 
<l^ated  to  forward  it  to  the  towns  in  numbers  sufficient  (as  shown  by  the 
IttfKctora'  Reports  for  1869)  to  supply :  one  copy  to  each  School  Di 
■Klor,  and  one  to  each  Township  Clerk.  The  County  Clerk  and  County 
txetaorer  are  each  entitled  to  one  copy ;  and  one  or  more  copies,  as  may 
^  nquirud,  and  can  be  furnished,  after  supplying  the  preceding  officers, 
be  delivered  to  County  Superintendents. 


DEPARTMENT  OP  PUBLIC  INSTRUCTION, 

Office  of  Supeeintendekt, 
Lansing^  Michigan,  December  28, 

To  His  Excellency  Hekby  P.  Baldwik, 

Governor  of  the  State  of  Michigan  : 

Snt — I  have  the  honor  to  submit  herewith,  in  accordance 

vith  the  provisions  of  the  laws  of  this  State,  the  Annual 

Report  of  the  Department  of  Public  Instruction,  and  the 

accompanying  documents,  for  the  year  of  our  Lord  1869. 

I  am  yery  respectfully. 

Yours,  &c., 

ORAMEL  HOSFORD, 

Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction. 


REPORT. 


The  condition  of  the  Public  Schools  and  higher  institu- 
tioM  of  learning  in  the  State,  does  not  differ  materially  from 
Uie  report  made  of  them  last  year,  as  the  same  general  plans 
rf  school  work,  and  the  same  system  of  instruction,  have  been 
ffl  operation,  producing  their  usual  results.  The  increased  in- 
*wwt  felt  by  the  people  generally,  in  the  schools,  spoken  of  in 
^  report  of  last  year,  has  not  in  the  least  diminished,  but 
^  greatly  increased.  This  is  seen  in  the  improvement  of 
■i^ool  grounds^  the  building  of  school-houses,  and  more  taste 
^liyed  in  both  the  building  and  the  grounds. 

There  is  also  a  demand  for  better  teachers;  and  this  de- 
*ttd  is  rapidly  increasing.  There  is  a  readiness  to  meet  any 
"asonable  expense  necessary  to  secure  good  schools.  The 
'M'n  qoestion  is  not  now,  who  will  teach  the  cheapest  school, 
to  who  will  teach  the  best  one  ? 

The  most  manifest  evidence  of  an  increasing  interest  in  the 
pablic  schools  is  the  fact  that  men  are  now  often  engaged  in 
■MMt  earnest  discussions  of  topics  pertaining  to  the  best  in- 
^"Otsta  of  the  schools.  The  time  has  been  when  such  discus- 
**tt  would  have  been  considered  an  eighth  wonder.  No  one 
*B  paas  through  the  State  with  his  eyes  open  at  all,  without 
■^^feing  the  new  school-houses  with  their  improved  grounds, 
•*D  fenced,  and  having  the  necessary  out-buildings.  They 
'ffl  9iao  see  great  improvements  in  many  of  the  old  school- 
•wiaes;  those  browned  by  age,  that  have  during  all  these  years 
^  open  to  the  public  streets;  many  of  them  have  had  their 


PUBLIC   INSTRUCTIOK. 


grounds  graded  and  fenced,  the  old  houses  thoroughly  repaired 
and  painted. 

Nearly  every  report  coming  from  the  County  SHperintend- 
ejits  mentions  especially,  the  great  change  in  school  buildings, 
more  taste  displayed  in  the  plan  of  the  house,  they  are  better 
furnished,  many  of  them  being  supplied  with  the  best  style  of 
seats  now  used,  and  having  other  furniture  to  correspond.  All 
these  things  speak  most  emphatically  of  the  increased  interest 
felt  in  the  prosperity  of  the  public  schools.  Formerly  all  this 
kind  of  work  would  have  been  looked  upon  as  unexcusable  ex- 
travagance. The  increased  interest  in  the  schools  is  also 
seen  in  the  increased  length  of  time  devoted  to  the  schools. 
Three  months  only,  were  believed  by  many  to  be  time  enough 
for  children  to  attend  school  in  a  single  year,  or  at  least  this 
was  all  that  many  people  were  inclined  to  sustain  a  school ; 
five  or  six  months  were  deemed  generous  in  the  extreme.  In 
many  parts  of  the  State,  this  plan,  which  is  a  most  desirable 
one,  is  now  adopted ;  dividing  the  school  year  into  three  terms 
of  three  months  each,  giving  nine  months  for  school  each  year, 
short  recesses  are  allowed  between  the  first  and  second  terms, 
and  also  between  the  second  and  third,  the  third  term  ending 
early  in  July,  a  vacation  of  eight  or  ten  weeks  follows,  con- 
tinuing through  July  and  August,  the  fall  term  commencing 
the  first  of  September. 

This  arrangement  has  been  found  most  valuable  by  thoi 
who  have  tried  it.     The  average  attendance  has  been  muc 
larger  than  before ;  in  some  cases  nearly  double  what  it  w 
when  the  schools  were  continued  through  the  hot  months 
July  and  August    The  pupils  have  made  much  greater  p 
gress  in  their  studies  than  formerly.    There  seems  to  be  b 
one  opinion  as  to  the  desirableness  of  the  change  among  th 
who  have  tried  this  plan.    In  many  places  in  the  State  the  th 
terms  system  is  adopted,  and  is  to  be  the  permanent  order 
the  schools  hereafter. 

The  County  Superintendents  speak  of  another  fact  which 
of  especial  interest.    They  say  that  the  schools  are  more 


I 


superintendent's  report.  5 

craDy  visited  by  the  school  oflScers,  (and  the  fact  is  corrob- 
ontod  by  the  school  reports.)  The  universal  testimony  of  teach- 
en  was,  that  they  could  not  interest  the  patrons  sufficiently  to 
induce  them  to  visit  the  schools,  and  their  success  with  the 
officers  was  but  little  better ;  they  wei*e  seldom  found  within 
the  school-room ;  those  who  ever  spent  an  hour  there  formed 
tn  exception  to  the  general  rule.  No  care  was  taken  in  the 
selection  of  school  officers ;  it  was  no  recommendation  for  a 
nan  that  he  was  qualified  for  the  position  he  was  asked  to  fill, 
or  that  he  was  at  all  interested  in  the  success  of  the  school ; 
indeed  it  was  often  the  case,  that  a  knowledge  of  these  facts 
vould  only  excite  the  suspicion  of  the  people,  and  tend  to  de- 
fa^  their  election.  The  fear  was  that  such  men  would  strive 
to  secure  good  schools  without  regard  to  expense;  cheap 
adiools  was  the  great  end  to  be  secured.  The  Superintendents 
m  in  their  reports,  that  more  care  is  now  taken  to  secure 
competent  men  for  school  officers  who  have  a  care  for  the 
^hool  during  its  session.  They  do  not  feel  that  they  have 
been  elected  simply  to  hire  the  teacher,  and  that  the  cheapest 
poaatble,  and  when  the  school  opens  for  the  term  their  duties 
■re  ended,  but  they  frequently  visit  the  school,  striving  to  en- 
courage both  pupils  and  teacher  in  their  work.  One  of  the 
Superintendents  says  that  the  reports  from  the  districts  of  his 
county  enumerate  three  hundred  and  twenty  director's  visits  to 
the  schools.  This,  he  says,  does  not  include  the  daily  visits 
of  the  director  of  the  city  schools.  With  regard  to  the  visits 
of  patrons,  the  same  Superintendent  says  "  parents  and  other 
citizens  have  visited  the  schools  with  unusual  frequency." 
Other  Superintendents  report  similar  facts.  This  change  has 
been  secured  very  largely  through  the  agency  of  the  County 
Superintendents ;  it  is  the  natural  result  of  their  efforts.  Wher- 
ercr  these  men  have  labored  earnestly  and  wisely,  the  district 
offeers  have  become  more  efficient  in  the  discharge  of  their 
dotieB.  and  the  people  manifest  more  interest  in  the  prosperity 
•f  the  schools,  and  have  a  stronger  desire  that  their  children 


G  PUBLIC   INSTSUCnOIT. 

Bhoald  receive  a  good  ediicstiou.  It  needed  not  a  prophelf! 
ken  to  predict  these  reaulfa.  AU  that  was  required  to  secnre 
this  intereet,  was  to  turn  the  thoughts  of  the  people  to  the 
Bchoolsy  and  hold  them  there  for  a  time.  They  were  not  accna- 
tomed  to  give  a  thought  to  the  schools,  unless  some  queatiot 
should  arise,  about  which  there  might  he  a  difference  of  opiu' 
ion ;  then  an  excitement  would  be  created,  often  approaching 
the  dignity  of  the  "  tempest  in  the  teapot,"  and  whose  reanlb 
were  about  as  important. 

These  excitements  secured  no  permanent  interest  in  thi 
schools,  for  they  were  produced  by  the  discuBsion  of  qaestion 
outside  of  the  school,  or  school  duties;  they  were  of  n 
importance  at  all  to  the  schools ;  mere  matters  of  opinioE 
affecting  no  one  except  those  holding  them.  Pride  of  opinioi 
and  the  determination  to  carry  a  point,  simply  becanse  it  i 
"  OUBB,"  is  the  foundation  of  these  neighborhood  quarrels,  f<c 
they  are  little  else  than  quarrels.  From  such  disputes  no  pe' 
manent  desire  to  maintain  a  good  school  can  be  secured  ;  ni 
not  even  a  present  desire.  As  a  rule  those  who  have  the  lea 
care  for  tlie  education  of  the  children,  will  be  found  the  mo 
noisy  dieputers,  willing  to  spend  days  in  going  fVom  neigbb 
to  neighbor  to  induce  them  to  join  their  party,  who  woa 
never  dream  of  spending  a  half  hour  in  the  school-room  e: 
oouraging  teacher  and  pupils  by  their  presence  and  couns 
The  Superintendents  in  their  visits  and  discussions,  keep  t] 
great  subject  of  education  and  its  advantages  before  the  peo| 
continually,  no  excitement  is  created,  but  the  thoughts  a 
turned  in  the  right  direction  and  held  there,  producing  intel 
gent  conviction,  which  results  in  corresponding  effort ;  hen 
we  Bud  that  the  schools  are  more  frequently  visited  by  bo 
parents  and  school  officers  This  is  a  healthy  normal  coni 
tion,  which  ensures  permanent  interest  and  constant  progre 

A  most  manifest  change  for  the  better  has  taken  place 
the  reports  of  school  officers ;  they  are  more  carefully  prepan 
hence  more  accurate  and  fuller  than  formerly.    The  nuiTei 


supebiktskdekt's  report.  7 

iodilfepenoe  which  has  prevailed  in  regard  to  the  schools  has 
M  the  Tarions  officers  to  feel  that  their  duties  were  of  little 
oanaeqaencey  and  they  haye  been  careless  in  their  discharge, 
adeaYoring  to  meet  the  demands  of  law,  bnt  being  yery  snre 
not  to  go  far  beyond  this,  they  were  of  little  value  except  the 
datofomiahed  by  which  the  public  money  might  be  apiK)rtioned* 
Oieater  care  is  now  taken  in  making  out  these  reports,  men  of 
aore  experience  are,  in  many  instances,  chosen  to  fill  the 
offices.  These  men,  desiring  good  schools,  seek  for  competent 
tescbera,  rejecting  those  of  inferior  qualifications,  compelling 
tiiem  either  to  abandon  the  calling  or  make  the  neceissary  pre- 
fsation  for  it ;  which  is  a  most  desirable  result 

In  all  branches  of  business  those  only  are  employed  perma- 
Mfttly  who  are  prepared  for  their  work ;  having  received  the 
rajoisite  training  to  enable  them  successfully  to  perform  well 
vkatever  they  undertake,  mere  pretenders  are  at  once  rejected, 
M  one  thinking  of  employing  them  simply  because  they  work 
than  others.     The  labor  of  mere  charlatans  is  the 

that  can  be  had,  let  the  price  be  the  smallest  imagin- 
able. The  omen  is  a  good  one,  when  teachers  are  improving 
evoj  ojiportunity  to  make  higher  attainments,  not  only  in  the 
bnnches  of  study  they  will  be  required  to  teach,  but  also  in 
Bcthods  of  teaching  tod  governing.  Almost  every  Superin- 
todent  makes  special  mention  of  the  fact  that  in  his  county 
the  teachers  are  employing  every  spare  moment  to  make  thel9e 
sftliuimentfl.  Many  who  at  first  complained  most  bitterly  of 
vhat  they  termed  **  stringent  requisitions,'^  and  '^  arbitrary 
made  by  the  Superintendents,  most  heartily  endorse 
oouise  now.  Quietly  yielding  to  the  requisitions,  they  at 
oaoe  commenced  a  rigorous  cotirse  of  study  and  reading,  which 
kflf  resulted  in  a  broader  education,  which  not  only  better  fits 
to  instruct,  but  gives  them  more  intelligent  views  of  the 

of  their  work,  they  are  full  of  expressions  of  grati* 
tide  that  they  were  compelled  to  give  this  time  and  labor  to 

a  more  thorough  preparation  for  their  work.    They  are 


6  PUBLIC    INSTBUCTIOS. 

maoh  better  satisfied  with  what  they  arc  able  to  do,  and  take 
mach  more  pleasure  in  their  labor. 

All  are  aware  how  qnickly  ever^-  department,  whether  ol 
government  or  business,  feels  a  change  that  is  at  sU  radical  in 
any  of  its  parts.  If  one  is  improved  all  others  very  soon  girt 
evidence  of  improvement.  The  school  system  is  not  an  ex- 
ception to  this  gencml  law.  The  change  in  the  supervision  o: 
the  schools,  although  so  recently  effected,  shows  plainly  iti 
influence  for  good  on  all  the  other  departments. 

The  plan  of  free  schools  that  has  been  in  ojieration  less  thai 
a  single  term  gives  promise  of  moat  gratifying  results.  Fo 
.several  years  the  effort  was  made  to  induce  the  Legislature  t 
abolish  the  rate-bill,  and  make  all  the  public  scfiools  froi 
■Those  urging  this  change  were  ever  met  with  the  reply  tfai 
the  people  were  now  burdenc<l  with  taxes  and  would  resist  i' 
men  who  had  heavy  taxes  to  pay  and  no  children  to  send  i 
the  schools,  would  not  submit  to  this  increase  of  their  burden 
Besides,  it  was  as  much  the  duty  of  pai'ents  to  educate  tJie 
children  as  to  clothe  and  feed  them,  and  it  was  as  imreaaoi 
able  to  tax  the  jwople  to  do  the  one  as  the  other. 

The  friends  of  free  schools  continued  to  urge  upon  each  sii 
ceediug  Legislature  the  abolition  of  the  rate-bill.  Many  wou 
admit  the  importance  and  necessity  of  the  change,  that  t] 
interest  of  the  public  schools  demanded  that  they  should  be  &t 
tmb  these  same  Legislators  would  further  say  that-  "  we  canii 
take  the  responsibility  of  passing  a  law  that  will  he  bo  univc 
sally  opposed  as  this  would  be  at  present; "  and  when  the  h 
was  passed  by  tlie  last  legislature,  many  who  were  friends 
the  bill  and  voted  for  it,  were  yet  fearful  that  it  would  m< 
with  opposition  from  the  people;  they  felt  quite  sure  that 
many  localities  it  would  be  defeated  by  a  large  majority  if  I 
to  the  popular  vote.  But  contrary  to  all  these  impressions, 
act  of  the  Legislature  has  given  more  universal  satisfiactit 
The  warmest  friends  of  the  measure,  and  those  moat  famil 
with  the  public  feeling  with  regard   to  it,  have  been   nn 


superintendent's  repoht.  0 

agreeably  disappointed  at  the  uniyersal  fayor  with  which  the 
law  has  been  received.  This  law  has  not  been  in  operation 
long  enongh  to  show  any  definite  resnlts.  The  reports  from 
aD  part«  of  the  State  speak  of  an  unusually  large  attendance 
apon  the  Annual  Meeting,  and  that  in  many  places  a  more 
competent  class  of  school  officers  were  selected.  The  law 
doubtlees  had  its  influence  in  securing  both  these  very  desir- 
tble  re8ult&  Many  men  have  hitherto  refused  to  accept  these 
positions  because  of  the  time  required  to  look  after  so  many 
things  that  were  looked  upon  as  the  petty  interests  of  the 
tthool,  such  as  seeing  that  each  man  had  provided  his  propor- 
tion of  the  woody  then  making  out  and  collecting  the  rate-biU, 
felt  to  be  the  most  irksome  of  all.  The  law  abolishing  the  rate- 
bill  80  diminishes  these  labors  that  business  men  can  accept 
aad  perform  the  duties  of  the  various  school  offices  without 
detriment  to  their  private  interests,  and  they  are  willing  if  de- 
nied, to  occupy  these  places.  We  cannot  expect  men  of  busi- 
BC88,  whose  time  is  wholly  occupied  with  their  own  affairs,  to 
do  this  kind  of  work ;  they  certainly  will  not  do  it  unless  they 
have  some  special  interest  to  secure.  Some  have  children  to 
educate,  and  are  willing  to  make  sacrifices  to  secure  good 
fffaools.  There  arc  also  occasionally  men  to  be  found  who 
kave  sufficient  interest  in  the  children  and  youth  of  their 
neighborhood  to  lead  them  to  devote  time  and  labor  for  this 
object,  although  they  may  receive  no  personal  benefit.  These 
esses  are  however,  exceedingly  rare.  The  length  of  time  de- 
Toted  to  the  schools  has  been  greatly  increased  in  consequence 
^  the  schools  being  free.  In  some  districts  they  are  to  have 
acttly  twice  the  length  of  school  that  they  have  had  before. 
The  advantages  of  the  free  school  system  are  so  manifest,  that 
it  was  adopted  in  most  of  our  cities  and  large  towns  several 
jietTB  rince,  the  rate-bill  being  abolished  by  public  vote.  A 
larger  number  of  children  are  found  to  attend  the  public 
sdiools,  and  there  is  far  less  irregularity  of  attendance.  If 
these  were  the  only  advantages  gained  by  the  change,  they 
t 


10  PUBLIC  INSTKOCnON. 

would  famish  an  abundant  com])cnBation  for  all  the  time  and 
labor  expended  in  effecting  it  No  one  thing  hinders  the 
progress  of  a  school  more  than  the  frequent  absences  of  th« 
pnpils.  In  many  places  teachers  find  it  almost  impossible  to 
conduct  the  classes  with  any  degree  of  saccess,  because  the 
different  members  of  the  class  are  so  frequently  away.  Th^e 
repeated  absences  not  only  destroy  the  interest  of  those  who 
are  away,  which  they  wonld  otherwise  feel  in  their  studies,  but 
mar  that  of  those  who  are  present,  and  greatly  discourage  the 
teacher.  This  is  one  great  cause  why  so  little  is  acoomplished 
in  the  district  schools  of  the  State.  Another  cause  of  the 
failure  of  these  schools  to  do  what  they  miglit  do,  is  the  fre- 
quent change  of  teachers.  No  school  can  ever  attain  a  high 
degree  of  excellenoe,  or  even  a  moderate  degree,  whose  pnpils 
are  often  uway  from  the  school-room,  and  whose  teacher  is 
changed  every  term.  However  well  prepared  teachers  may  be, 
or  however  succcssftil  in  their  work,  a  single  term  does  by  no 
means  give  them  time  enough  to  make  such  an  impression  as 
to  gire  anything  like  a  permanent  character  to  the  school. 
The  fact  may  be  demonstrated  that  the  teacher  is  a  good  one, 
but  nothing  more.  A  good  school  has  been  taught  in  thia  dis- 
trict for  one  term,  but  there  is  no  certainty  that  the  same 
success  will  be  realized  the  next,  as  a  stranger  has  been  em- 
ployed. The  teacher  secures  some  reputation  by  the  anccesB 
of  the  school,  but  the  district  gains  nothing.  If  that  teacher 
should  remain  permanently,  or  for  a  series  of  years,  the  repu- 
tation that  he  might  have,  would  be  transferred  to  the  school, 
and  it  becomes  known  as  a  school  of  rare  merit  The  good 
that  such  a  teacher  can  do  the  pupils  is  incalculably  greater 
than  a  stranger  can  do,  even  if  equally  well  qualified. 

SCHOOL  APPABATUS. 

Uore  care  should  be  taken  in  furnishing  apparatus  for  the 
schools.  Every  foot  of  wall  that  can  possibly  bo  soured  for 
the  purpose,  should  be  finislied  for  a  black-board.  In  the  dis- 
trict school-houses  a  part  of  the  board  should  be  made  low,  so 


superintendent's  report.  11 

M  to  be  within  reach  of  the  small  children.  In  most  of  these 
iKNises  bnt  a  single  board  is  found,  and  that  so  high  as  to  be 
entirely  out  of  their  reach,  and  can  never  be  used  by  them.  In 
wmnj  of  the  Union  schools  the  blackboards  in  the  primary 
rooms  are  placed  so  high  that  the  children  have  to  stand  on 
tlicir  tip-toes  and  stretch  the  arm  to  its  full  length,  in  order  to 
mch  them.  To  remedy  this  defect,  a  step  has  been  raised 
around  the  room  for  the  children  to  stand  upon  when  at  the 
board,  bat  this  is  always  in  the  way ;  it  would  be  much  better 
to  make  the  wainscoting  shorter,  so  that  the  blackboard  could 
be  made  low  enough  at  first  The  platforms  are  necessarily 
Tecy  narrow,  and  the  pupils  are  compelled  to  stand  close  to  the 
van,  making  it  very  inconvenient  to  work  upon  it  The  modes 
of  insimction  now  almost  universally  employed,  require  a  large 
fnnt  of  blackboard  surface.  Very  much  time,  even  of 
Teiy  youngest  pupils,  can  be  profitably  employed  in  exer- 
upon  the  board.  Every  school  should  be  supplied  with 
ovtMne  maps,  globes,  the  various  solids,  and  the  like.  A  skill- 
fU  teacher  finds  much  use  for  all  the  various  kinds  of  appa- 
;  scarcely  will  there  a  day  pass  without  occasions  offering 
the  use  of  some  of  these  things  as  illustrations.  It  is  of 
the  greatest  importance  that  children  should  obtain  clear  and 
notions  of  the  subjects  that  are  presented  to  them. 
notions  are  obtained  through  the  eye  more  fully  than  by 
y  or  all  the  other  senses.  Attempt  to  describe  a  cube  to  a 
to  give  him  a  clear  idea  of  what  it  is,  by  the  use  of 
aimply,«and  how  tedious  the  effort,  and  how  imperfect 
vesolt;  it  is  very  doubtful  whether  he  would  recognize  the 
if  he  should  see  it  afterward.  But  with  a  cube  before 
the  smallest  children  would  get  so  perfect  an  idea  as  to 
the  form  ever  after,  whenever  seen.  There  are  other 
why  children  should  have  these  clear,  definite  notions 
to  them,  than  the  mere  knowledge  acquired.  One  is  the 
the  children,  from  the  very  commencement  of 
■cfaool  life,  to  feel  that  they  have  not  learned  anything  until 


12  PUBLIC   1N8TRCCTI0S. 

they  have  a  well  defined  idea  with  regard  to  it.  There  is  so 
much  of  mere  memorizing  of  words,  without  getting  Bcarcely 
the  shadow  of  an  idea,  in  the  achoolH,  that  pupils  naturally 
come  to  think  study  is  simply  memorizing  the  text,  and  when 
they  are  able  to  repeat  what  there  is  in  the  text-book,  they 
have  mastered  the  subject.  How  many  there  are  who  hate 
been  through  some  Orammar  repeatedly,  so  that  they  are  able 
to  repeat  definitions,  rules,  remarks  and  exceptions  in  the  mort 
fluent  manner,  and  yet  have  but  little,  if  any,  real  notion  ol 
the  nature  of  language  or  its  laws,  and  so  fur  as  to  rtieivinf 
any  practical  benefit  from  its  study,  their  correspondence  anj 
daily  conversation  bear  ample  testimony.  Arithmetic  is  tot 
often  studied  in  a  similar  manner.  If  some  example  of  a  prac 
tical  character  is  given  them  to  perform,  they  at  once  ask  b; 
what  rule  it  is  to  be  wrought.  If  their  early  instruction  hai 
been  such  as  to  have  given  them  some  clear  notions  of  th 
various  subjects  they  were  studying,  they  never  would  hav 
been  satisfied  with  this  mere  memorizing  of  text^books.  The 
would  have  studied  the  laws  of  language,  or  the  nature  < 
numbers,  until  they  had  so  fully  comprehended  them  as  to  h 
in  a  measure  at  least,  free  from  rules  or  formulas,  and  enable 
to  apply  the  general  principles  to  practical  life. 

Another  reason  why  children  should  gain  clear  idvaa  trai 
their  earliest  school  exercises  and  studies  is  the  interest  th< 
will  surely  acquire  in  the  school  and  school  duties.  What 
monotonous  and  tiresome  round  are  these  duties  to  the  elii 
that  sees  no  light  in  them !  In  blindness  are  they  going  tfaf 
daily  round,  the  only  things  of  interest  are  the  sly  pranks,  t 
undetected  misdemeanors  which  act  as  safety-valves  to  pent  i 
mirthfulneas.  This  ought  not  so  to  be.  The  school-room  nt 
and  should  be  made  attractive ;  not  merely  by  vasea  of  flova 
and  jars  of  fragrant  flowering  plants.  These  arc  well  in  tb 
place,  and  add  greatly  to  the  cheerfulness  of  the  scliool-rooi 
but  the  highest  pleasure  is  secured  by  awakening  thought,  a 
imparting  real  knowledge.      Children  love  to  think  and 


supsbintendbkt's  bepobt.  13 

leun.   Erery  new  fact  learned  only  stimulates  the  child  and 
excites  the  desire  for  learning  others^  bnt  these  things  must 
be  in  the  highest  sense  learned,  fully  comprehended,  clearly 
understood    Simply  learning  the  words  which  may  express 
ideu  to  minds  somewhat  matnre,  is  learning  nothing  beyond 
wordB.    At  this  point  has  been  the  failure  with  many  teachers ; 
they  haye  taken  it  for  granted  that  the  child  who  could  readily 
repeat  the  words  that  conveyed  ideas  to  themselves,  must  of 
leomty  have  the  same  idea.    To  the  teacher  the  idea  is  simple, 
ind  the  words  clearly  express  it,  and  the  child  must  be  very 
<Bpid  not  to  see  it.    This  by  no  means  follows.    Words  alone 
file  very  imperfect  ideas ;  general  knowledge  aids  materially  in 
BBderstanding  any  new  subject,  whether  this  knowledge  has 
«y  direct  connection  with  it  or  not.    Children  have  not  this 
ffDenI  knowledge ;  their  range  of  thought  is  very  limited.  It 
^kes  them  a  long  time  to  fully  master  any  new  theme,  and 
^  want  something  more  than  words  and  word  description 
B>  enable  them  clearly  to  comprehend  the  topics  presented  to 
iWoL    If  the  eye  can  be  brought  into  use  to  aid  in  gaining  iet- 
«te  notions  at  first,  the  word  description  given  in  the  pres- 
ence of  the  actual  object,  or  something  that  will  represent  it  to 
if  eye,  the  child  speedily  comprehends  it,  and  after  a  time 
Mes  so  to  understand  the  nature  and  force  of  words  as  to  gain 
•Oft  definite  notion  from  description  by  words  than  at  first. 
if  the  use  of  apparatus  the  teacher  is  enabled  to  secure  the 
■litaiice  which  the  eye  gives,  to  enable  the  child  to  compre- 
^  what  he  is  endeavoring  to  describe. 

The  amount  of  apparatus  needed  in  the  school  is  not  very 

^feuiTe.     A  few  dollars  judiciously  used  each  year,  would  in 

^Aort  time,  famish  all  that  would  be  needed.    Some  districts 

i*e  commenced  to  obtain  all  the  apparatus  that  could  be 

IpAably  used,  but  they  complain  that  it  was  of  little  value  to 

lAiiehool,  the  teacher  seldom  used  it,  and  it  was  very  soon  scat- 

IM  and  destroyed.    I  have  often  seen  the  remnants  of  out- 

fc^  nafie  and  fragments  of  different  kinds  of  furniture  scat- 


14  PCBLIC   IlfSTBUCTION. 

tered  about,  but  in  every  such  case  tfiere  haa  been  no  place  to 
put  the  apparatus,  it  was  Ijing  about  in  the  open  Bchod- 
room,  the  maps  perhaps  used  as  curtains,  and  other  kinds  <A 
apparatus  used  ae  toys  for  the  younger  pupils.  With  all  the 
care  that  a  teacher  could  exerciBe,  there  would  be  great  daogei 

that  the  apparatus  thus  exposed,  would  be  m >    -  ^ — 

aged.  Every  school-room  should  be  euppUi 
furnished  with  a  lock  and  key,  whereall  this  k 
could  be  deposited,  and  then  the  tcaclier  be 
for  its  safe  keeping.  With  Buch  an  amu^ 
apparatus  would  last  for  many  years. 

It  may  be  in  place  just  here,  to  make  a  fe« 
regard  to  building  district  school-houses.  Of 
has  been  written  upon  the  importance  of  thon 
Too  much  cannot  be  said  upon  the  subject ;  it^ 
not  be  overestimated.  Special  attention  is 
places,  to  ventilating  school-rooms.  All  of  t 
school-houses  are  designed  to  be  thoroughly 
ventilating  tubes.  But  in  the  cheaper  bnildit 
district  school-houses,  no  such  arrangement  ha 
any  care  has  been  taken  in  ventilating  any 
buildings,  it  is  only  in  those  that  form  very 
In  the  volume  of  revised  School  Laws  may  b 
vatioQs  aud  ground  plans  of  various  school 
them  the  ground  plan  and  elevation  of  a  dietri 
As  comparatively  few  may  have  access  to  the 
some  mistakes  were  made  in  the  description  ol 
given,  it  is  thought  best  to  insert  it  here,  and  j 
reasons  for  using  this  plan  in  building.    The  i 

all  the  windows  in  the  school-room  in  the  sidf     ._ „. 

this  prevents  the  light  from  shining  directly  into  the  eye*  < 
either  teacher  or  pupils.  The  ground  plan  shows  the  interu 
arrangement  of  the  house.  A  is  the  Sre-place.  The  chimiK 
is  designed  to  come  to  the  floor,  and  a  small  fire-place  to  1 
built  in  it;  this  is  to  be, closed  by  a  movable  register.    There  k 


superintendent's  report. 


16 


1 

1 

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B 


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c^leii  days  uot  cold  enough  to  require  a  fire  in  the  stove,  a  fire 
there  would  render  the  room  uncomfortable,  and  yet  it  is 
damp  and  chilly,  raining  it  may  be,  and  the  children  come 
with  damp  if  not  wet  feet  At  such  times  it  would  be  a  very 
peat  convenience  to  have  such  a  place,  in  which  a  Uttle  fire 
ooald  be  kindled  as  this  fire-place  would  furnish.  All  that 
vonld  be  necessary  would  be  to  remove  the  register  and  build 
the  fire.  A  small  hearth  should  be  laid  to  prevent  the  fire  from 
giettmg  upon  the  floor.  B  is  the  platform  placed  a  little  one 
ode  of  the  centre,  to  allow  the  door  to  open  from  the  entrance 
hall,  aa  well  as  to  remove  the  teacher  from  the  immediate  vi- 
chiity  of  the  stove.  G  is  the  stove ;  it  should  be  a  large  box 
store  with  a  drum  on  the  top,  with  opening  through  the  centre. 
A  tin  or  sheet-iron  tube  passing  through  the  wall  of  the  house 


18  PUBLIC   IKSTRUCTION. 

opens  into  the  ccutral  opening  of  the  drum,  and  this  tnbe  shoult 
be  fnmiBhed  with  a  damper  to  regulate  tlie  flow  of  air  from  thi 
outside.  The  smoke-pipe  paeses  from  t)ie  stove  to  the  centr 
of  the  room,  then  along  tlie  centre  to  the  chimney.  With  thi 
arrangement  a  constant  flow  of  air  is  secured  ttom  tb 
outside,  which  ia  warmed  in  passing  through  the  drum,  at  th 
same  time  there  is  a  current  of  cold  impure  air  passing  througl 
the  register  and  rising  through  the  chimney.  The  school 
room  will  thus  be  supplied  with  pure  warm  air,  and  relieTod  c 
the  cold  impure  air  from  the  floor.  It  is  beliered  that  thi 
simple  arrangement  will  supply  a  want  which  has  never  bee 
met  in  district  school-houses  of  the  country. 

The  additional  expense  is  but  trifling,  and  this  will  be  fa 
more  than  compensated  by  the  diminished  expense  in  heatiu 
the  school-room,  while  the  advantages  to  the  health  of  tt 
pupils  will  be  beyond  estimate.  The  remaining  parts  of  tl 
house  are  easily  described.  F  is  a  closet  for  the  uae  of  tl 
teacher.  It  should  he  made  large  enough  to  hold  all  maps  an 
other  apparatus  belonging  to  the  school.  D  and  D  are  wan 
robes,  in  which  hooks  or  boxes  can  be  put  up  for  the  use  < 
the  pupils.  It  is  much  better  to  have  the  clothes  hnng  : 
these  protected  wardrobes,  than  to  have  them  in  a  commt 
entrance  hall,  or  to  have  them  taken  into  the  school-room. 

The  pupils  ai-e  expected  to  pass  through  these  wardrobes 
going  into  the  school-room — the  boys  passing  through  one  ai 
the  girls  the  other — while  the  teacher  and  visitors  pass  at  on 
from  the  entrance  way  to  the  school-room,  the  f«aeher,  of  couri 
using  the  closet  back  of  the  platform  as  a  wardrobe.  Plai 
walks  should  be  placed  in  front  of  the  school-house,  and  frc 
the  gate  to  the  door,  and  also  from  the  door  to  the  woodsh 
and  out-houses.  The  out-houses  should  always  be  sepan 
buildings,  and  located  some  distance  from  each  other.  A  lo 
piece  of  heavy  strap  iron  should  be  nailed  to  either  Bide  of  t 
walk  to  be  used  as  a  scraper,  and  a  large,  stout  foot  mat  ahoi 
be  placed  in  the  entrance  hall.    A  little  attention  to  some 


supekintendent's  report.  17 

these  would  aid  materially  in  keeping  the  school-room  clean, 
wholesome  and  attractive. 

DECISIONS  OF  THE  SUPREME   COURT. 

iSevenil  very  important  decisions  of  the  Supreme  Court  have 
been  made  which  pertain  to  questions  touching  the  well-being 
of  the  schools,  which  have  been  thought  of  sufficient  general 
interest  to  have  them  inserted  in  this  report. 

The  first  decision  determines  the  effect  that  the  division  of 
a  township  has  upon  the  school  districts  of  the  portion  of  the 
territory  set  off  to  another  township,  or  that  may  be  formed 
into  a  new  township.    The  case  before  the  court  was: 

*'The  People  on  the  relation  of  School  District  No.  1  of  the 
township  of  Portage  vs.  William  Ryan,  Supervisor  of  the  town- 
thip  of  Adams.'' 

The  application  was  for  a  mandamus  to  compel  the  defend- 
ant to  assess  certain  school  taxes. 

In  1863  the  Graded  and  High  School  District  No.  1  of  the 
township  of  Portage  was  enlarged  so  as  to  extend  over  the 
whole  township  of  Portage.  In  1864  the  Legislature  con- 
finned  the  boundaries  of  this  district.  In  1866  the  Supervisors 
of  Houghton  county  organized  a  new  township  out  of  this  ter- 
ritory, naming  the  township  Adams. 

The  claim  of  the  relator  was  that  the  division  of  the  town- 
diip  of  Portage  did  not  in  any  manner  affect  the  territorial 
limits  of  the  district,  as  above  established,  but  that  all  the 
township  of  Adams  is  still  a  portion  of  District  No.  1  of  Por- 
?,  and  liable  to  taxation  for  the  purpose  of  building  school 
and  the  support  of  schools  therein,  and  the  payment 
of  debts  incurred  thereby.  The  Supervisor  of  Adams  refus- 
ing to  assess  the  taxes  called  for  by  said  district,  a  mandamus 
was  asked  to  compel  the  assessor. 

The  defendant  claimed  that  the  organization  of  the  town- 
ship of  Adams,  ipso  facto,  severed  its  connection  from  the 
relator,  and  being  thus  severed,  is  not  liable  for  any  debts  in- 

3 


18 


PUBLIC   INSTRUCTION. 


J    y 


^    ♦ 


'I    I 


:l      t, 


t        t 


«     !• 


•i 


'■{1     ^ 


curred  by  the  latter  in  the  absence  of  any  statute  creating 
such  liability. 

The  following  is  the  decision  of  the  Court : 

The  main  question  to  be  considered  in  this  case  is,  whether 
the  erection  of  the  township  of  Adams  out  of  territory  em- 
braced by  School  District  No.  1  of  Portage  severed  all  connec- 
tion between  the  district  and  township,  or  left  the  people  of 
the  latter  subject  to  the  district,  liable  for  a  portion  of  its 
debts. 

In  considering  this  question,  our  attention  is  properly  con- 
fined to  the  case  as  it  stands  before  us,  and  our  decision  will 
be  regulated  by  what  has  actually  occurred,  and  not  by  any 
supposition  of  what  might  have  taken  place,  or  what  may 
hereafter  be  done. 

The  relators  expressly  avow  in  the  petition,  that  the  town- 
ship of  Adams  wa«  set  off  from  the  territory  embraced  in  the 
district,  and  organized,  and  in  taking  this  proceeding  against 
the  respondent,  as  the  Supervisor  of  that  township,  they  neces- 
sarily assert  the  complete  existence  of  the  latter. 

The  proceedings  of  the  Board  of  Supervisors  in  erecting  the 
township  are  not  before  us,  and  as  the  record  is  silent  on  the 
subject,  and  as  no  claim  of  a  contrary  kind  is  interposed,  it  is 
right  to  presume  that  the  board  made  no  attempt  to  impose 
upon  the  people  of  the  township  any  portion  of  the  eKisting 
debt  of  the  district,  or  to  subject  them  to  any  of  the  corporate 
powers,  or  to  the  jurisdiction  of  the  latter.  And  whether  with 
or  without  the  sanction  of  the  Legislature  directed  to  that 
end,  any  such  action  could  be  supported,  is  a  point  we  do  not 
consider. 

That  the  Legislature  were  of  opinion  that  no  portion  of  the 
debts  of  the  district  w  ould  devolve  on  the  people  of  the  new 
township  without  an  express  enactment  on  the  subject,  is  to 
be  inferred  from  the  passage  of  the  law  of  1867,  which  re- 
quired the  board  to  apportion  the  debts  when  any  new  town- 
ship should  be  formed.    ( Vol  2y  Ses.  Laws  1867,  p.  10S2.) 


superintendent's  report.  19 

This  law,  howeyer^  seems  to  have  been  passed  a  short  time 
after  the  erection  of  the  township  by  the  boards  and  in  all 
probability  without  any  knowledge  by  the  Legislature  that  the 
township  had  been  already  formed.  The  relators  do  not  claim 
that  it  had  the  effect  to  make  the  tax*payers  of  Adams  liable 
for  any  portion  of  the  debts  in  question. 

Aasuming,  then,  as  we  must,  that  the  new  township  was 
duly  formed  and  organized  by'  legislative  action,  under  and 
aooording  to  the  Constitution,  and  without  any  special  con- 
ditions or  restrictions,  that  it  became  one  of  tlie  townships  of 
Houghton  couuty  by  the  same  kind  of  general  action  by  which 
new  townships  are  commonly,  if  not  always,  formed,  the  ques- 
tion recars,  did  it,  when  thus  formed  and  organized,  possess 
the  same  legal  functions,  the  same  immunity  from  obligation, 
the  same  right  to  order  and  manage  its  municipal  affairs,  as 
are  conceded  by  the  laws  of  the  State  to  new  townships  gen- 
enDy? 

The  question  will  admit  of  but  one  answer.  Upon  becom- 
ing one  of  the  organized  townships  of  the  State,  without 
special  conditions,  it  becomes  a  ^Hownship'^  within  the  mean- 
ing of  the  Constitution  and  laws,  and  clothed  with  the  same 
rights  and  powers,  and  subject  to  the  same  duties  which  be- 
long to  new  townships  generally.  It  was  the  equal  in  rights 
and  duties  of  all  new  townships  not  specially  fettered  by  par- 
ticular legislation. 

Such  being  the  status  of  the  new  township,  the  people  were 
entitled  and  required  to  conform  in  all  respects  to  the  general 
hws  of  the  State  bearing  upon  townships  and  township  affairs. 
Tliey  were  required  to  elect  school  officers,  organize  school  dis- 
trictfly  and  to  institute  and  set  in  motion  a  complete  school 
lyirteni  from  the  beginning. 

They  were  entitled  to  exercise  their  own  discretion  within 
waeh  limits  as  the  general  laws  prescribe  respecting  the  schools 
tkcy  would  support,  and  certainly  they  could  not  be  compelled 
to  iapport  any,  however  desirable  in  the  opinion  of  the  relat- 


so  PUBLIC    1»8TRCCTI0X. 

ors,  nnless  constrained  to  do  bo  by  positive  law ;  nor  could  th 
discretion  of  the  people  of  the  new  township  be  in  this  reepec 
cramped  or  orcrborue  by  the  preyious  action  of  the  school  i 
territory  formerly  compreheading  that  of  the  township,  unl« 
in  virtue  of  some  special  statute. 

It  ie  nevertheleBs  maintained  on  the  part  of  the  relators  tht 
the  Legislature,  by  the  Act  of  1855, 1  Conip.  Laws,  2411,  dt 
clared  that  boundaries  of  a  school  district  having  a  Unio 
School  should  not  be  changed  without  the  written  consent  i 
a  majority  of  the  district  board  of  such  district,  and  that  th 
waa  equivalent  to  saying  that  no  action  of  the  Board  of  Snpe 
visors  in  dividiug  townships,  or  erecting  new  ones,  should  hai 
the  effect  to  change  or  alter  the  boundaries  of  a  school  dietrii 
having  a  Union  school.  But  this  position  cannot  bo  supporte 
even  if  it  bo  conceded  that  this  law  is  applicable  to  the  grad< 
schools  established  under  the  act  of  1859. 

The  law  of  1855,  See.  2411  Com.  L,  if  still  in  force,  cou 
never  have  been  intended  to  take  from  the  Board  of  Supen 
sors  their  constitutional  power  to  erect  townships,  since  th 
would  have  been  im)Ki8sible,  and  we  must,  therefore,  Buppo 
the  prohibition  was  intended  for  the  inspectors  and  inhab 
ants  in  whom  nas  the  exclusive  power  to  form  and  alter  Bchc 
districts.  \ 

Tho  law  of  1835  could,  therefore,  have  formed  no  impcx 
ment  to  the  action  of  the  Board  of  Suiicrvisors,  or  in  a 
manner  modified  the  consequences  of  such  action. 

The  view  we  have  taken  of  the  question  which  has  be 
considered,  makes  it  unnecessary  to  notice  the  other  and  \ 
important  jKiints  which  were  argued  for  the  resiHinde 
We  are  satisfied  that  the  rights,  powers  and  duties  of  the  toil 
ship,  as  erected,  are  wholly  inconsistent  with  the  claim  sot 
by  the  relator. 

Tlic  iiosition  taken  by  tho  district  could  only  ho  sustaix 
by  abridging  some  of  the  i)rescnt  legal  rights  and  jiowcrs 
berent  in  the  township,  and  by  dispensing  with  some  of  i 


supebintexdei^t's  report.  21 

dntiefl  now  cast  by  law  upon  it.    We  are,  therefore,  of  opinion 
that  the  motion  must  be  denied,  with  costs. 

DEBTS  OF  DISTRICTS  OX   DIVISION   OF  TOWNSHIP. 

The  Saginaw  case  covers  the  same  ground  as  the  above,  but 
decides,  also,  another  question,  to  wit :  That  when  a  district  is 
divided  by  the  creation  of  a  new  township,  the  territory  set  off 
has  no  claim  in  law  for  any  of  the  funds  of  the  distnct,  though 
ihe  officers  of  the  original  district  were  residents  of  the  terri- 
tMj  set  off.    The  following  is  the  decision : 

-Township  of  Saginaw  t%  School  District  Xo.  1  of  the  city 
of  Saginaw.'' 

The  City  of  Saginaw  was  incorporated  of  territory  which 
constituted  about  one-fourth  of  School  District  No.  1,  of  the 
townahip  of  Saginaw.  The  officers  of  the  district  (being  with- 
in the  city)  thereafter  assumed  to  be  officers  of  School  District 
Xa  1,  of  the  city  of  Saginaw,  and  brought  suit  in  that  name 
to  recover  moneys  levied  and  collected  for  said  School  District 
Xo.  1,  of  the  township  of  Saginaw,  claiming  an  identity  of 
corporate  existence.  Ileld^  That  whether  the  plaintiff  in  the 
nit  was  identical  with  School  District  No.  1  of  the  township 
of  Saginaw,  was  a  question  of  law,  and  not  of  fact  for  the 
jaiT. 

IIM^  further y  That  the  city  charter  (which  provided  for  a 
board  of  city  School  Inspectors)  had  tlie  effect  to  sever  from 
ibe  school  district  the  territory  included  in  the  city,  but  with- 
oat  in  any  other  respect  depriving  the  district  of  any  of  its 
legal  rights. 

The  city  in  such  case  has  no  remedy  to  recover  its  propor- 
tion of  the  school  district  moneys  or  other  property,  there 
being  no  statute  providing  for  su^h  recovery. 

Htard  January  8th.    Decided  January  20thy  1862. 

Maxkikg,  J. : 

School  District  No.  1,  of  the  township  of  Saginaw,  was  or- 
in  1837.    In  1857  the  city  of  Saginaw  was  incorpor- 


29  PUBLIC  IN8TRCCTI0N. 

sted,  the  city  limito  being  vhollj  irithiu  tho  Echool  district, 
and  comprising  about  one-fourth  of  the  district.  A  mill  tax 
for  schools  had  been  levied  and  collected  in  the  district  the 
preceding  year  and  paid  over  to  the  township  treasurer,  whicli 
the  preseot  action  was  brought  to  recoTcr,  by  the  defendant  in 
error,  who  waa  plaintiff  in  the  court  below.  After  the  incor- 
poration of  the  city,  the  officers  of  the  district  assumed  to  act 
as  officers  of  School  District  Xo.  1  of  the  city  of  Saginaw,  for 
that  part  of  the  district  comprised  within  the  city  limits,  and 
to  change  the  name  of  the  district  from  School  District  No.  1, 
of  the  township  of  Saginaw,  to  School  District  No.  1,  of  the 
city  of  Saginaw.  Tho  city  charter  provides  for  the  election  of 
two  school  ius])ector8  for  the  city,  and  also  makes  the  recorder 
of  tho  city  ex -officio  a  school  inspector,  thereby  clearly  indica- 
ting an  intention  to  sever  the  city  from  School  District  No,  1 
of  the  township  of  Saginaw;  and  such,  we  think,  was  its 
effect  We  are  also  of  opinion,  that  while  the  charter  took 
from  the  district  a  part  of  its  territory,  it  in  no  other  rcepoct 
deprived  it  of  any  of  it^  legal  rights,  which  remained  the  same 
after  as  before.  And  that  however  cqnitable  it  may  be  that  the 
city  shonld  have  it«  proportion  of  the  mill  tax,  or  other  prop- 
erty belonging  to  the  district  when  the  severance  took  place, 
we  know  of  no  law  giving  it  to  the  city,  or  under  which  it  can 
be  claimed  by  the  city  as  a  legal  right  Provision  is  made  bj 
statute  for  such  cases  when  a  school  district  is  divided,  or  c 
part  of  one  school  district  is  set  off  to  another,  by  a  board  o 
school  inspectors,  but  the  case  does  not  come  within  the  law. 

The  question  on  the  trial  was  one  of  law  for  the  Court  t< 
decide,  and  not  of  fact  for  the  jnry.  The  judgment  must  \n 
reversed  with  costs. 

The  other  justices  concurred. 


supjkrixtendest's  report.  23 

rights  of  colored  children. 

The  next  decision  here  given  relates  to  excluding  colored 
children  from  the  public  schools. 

The  suit  was  brought  against  the  school  board  of  Detroit 
for  reftising  to  admit  a  colored  pupil  into  one  of  the  public 
fchools.  The  school  board  claimed  that  they  had  the  power 
to  regulate  the  schools  as  they  saw  fit.  They  believed  that  it 
was  best  that  the  colored  children  should  be  placed  in  schools 
b?  tfaemsolveSy  and  had  accordingly  formed  three  such  schools 
ia  the  city,  and  required  all  colored  children  desiring  to  attend 
nhool,  to  attend  one  of  these.  The  excluding  the  colored 
duMren  from  the  schools  o])en  to  the  white  children  was 
daimed  by  the  board  to  be  a  reasonable  regulation,  the  pros- 
perity of  the  free  schools  of  the  city  demanding  this  arrange- 
ment .  The  board  also  claimed  that  they  had  the  same  right 
to  separate  children  of  different  colors,  that  they  had  to  sepa- 
iBte  those  of  different  sexes ;  that  they  had  tl>e  same  right  to 
oi]gBnize  a  colored  school  that  they  had  to  organize  a  boys'  or 
gills'  sehooL 

On  the  other  hand,  it  was  claimed  by  the  plaintiff  that  the 
hw  expressly  provided  that  '^  All  residents  of  any  district  shall 
have  an  equal  right  to  attend  the  schools  therein :  Provided, 
That  this  shall  not  prevent  the  grading  of  schools  according 
to  the  intellectual  progress  of  the  pupils,  to  be  taught  in 
•tparate  places  when  deemed  ex))edieni" 

This  act,  it  was  claimed,  effectually  prevented  any  school 
board  making  regulations  which  should  exclude  residents  of 
the  di^rict  from  the  schools  "  because  of  race,  color,  religious 
belief,  or  personal  peculiarities ;"  that  no  school  board  has  the 
right  to  organize  a  class  of  schools  which  a  part  of  the  chil- 
dren of  the  district  must  attend  or  be  deprived  of  all  school 
privileges. 


supebiktexdent's  report.  25 

Opiuion  by  Cooley,  Chief  Justice,  as  follows: 

Under  the  general  law  of  the  State,  entitled  "  Of  primary 
schools,"  the  several  townships  are  divided  by  the  township 
boards  of  school  inspectors,  into  districts;  each  of  which  is  a 
corporation,  with  officers  chosen  by  its  members,  and  with 
large  powers  in  the  establishment  and  control  of  schools,  the 
management  and  disposition  of  school  moneys,  and  the  levying 
and  collection  of  taxes. 

These  districts  generally  have  a  single  school-house  only, 
and  they  need  only  the  simple  machinery  prescribed  by  the 
general  law  for  the  pi*oper  performance  of  their  corporate 
fnnctions. 

For  the  larger  towns  of  the  State,  it  has  been  deemed  nee- 
tsaary  to  make  special  regulations;  and  general  and  special 
laws  haye  been  passed  ui^der  which  most  of  the  cities  and 
large  villages  of  the  State  have  been  made  union  school  dis- 
tricts, with  larger  boards  for  the  management  of  their  affairs ; 
larger  powers  of  taxation,  and  })eculiar  powers  in  the  grading 
of  the  one  school,  or  the  several  schools  which  they  may 
eetablish. 

In  so  far  as  the  laws  creating  these  districts  establish  special 

r^nlations  for  them,  or  confer  special  or  enlarged  powers, 
they  are  removed  from  the  control  of  the  general  primary 
school  law ;  but  in  all  other  particulars  that  law  still  controls, 
and  as  school  districts,  they  make  their  reports  and  receive 
their  primary  school  moneys  under  it. 

The  city  of  Detroit  is  one  of  the  towns  provided  for  by 
special  legislation.  By  an  act  '^  relative  to  free  schools  in  the 
tity  of  Detroit,"  passed  in  1842,  Session  laws  1842,  p.  112,  it  was 
provided  that  ^'  the  city  of  Detroit  shall  be  considered  as  one 
school  district,"  and  the  control  of  all  schools  organized 
Uierein  was  pat  under  the  direction  and  regulations  of  the 
board  of  education  therein  provided  for.  Previous  to  this  act 
there  had  been  within  the  city  the  anomaly  of  a  district 
within  a  district ;  the  former  including  only  the  colored  pop- 
ulation, but  this  was  inconsistent  w^itli  the  free  school  act. 


26  I'CBLIC  IN8TKUCXI0N. 

and  was  therefore  rejiealed  by  implicatioii.  The  free  sch 
act  has  been  modified  Bubsequeiitly,  and  in  the  present  y 
has  been  revised  throughout,  but  the  city  ie  still  declared 
be  one  school  district,  in  the  same  language  ve  have  quo 
from  the  original  act 

Such  being  the  division  of  the  State  into  school  di8tri< 
the  Legislature  of  1867  passed  an  act  amendatory  of  the  ] 
mary  school  law,  one  section  of  which  is  as  follows : 

"  All  residents  of  any  district  shall  have  an  equal  right 
attend  any  school  therein:  Provided,  That  this  shall 
prevent  the  grading  of  schools  according  to  the  intellect 
progress  of  the  pupils  to  be  taught  in  separate  places  w! 
deemed  expedient."    Seas,  laws  1867,  vol.  1,  j).  43. 

It  cannot  he  serionsly  nrged  that  with  this  provision 
force,  the  school  board  of  any  district  which  is  subject  U 
may  make  regulations  which  would  exclude  any  reeiden 
the  district  from  any  of  its  schools,  because  of  race  or  cc 
or  religious  belief,  or  personal  ]>eculiarities.  It  is  too  plain 
argument,  that  an  equal  right  to  all  the  schools  irespectiv 
all  such  distinctions,  was  meant  to  be  established. 

Does  this  provision  apply  to  the  city  of  Detroit? 

That  city,  as  we  have  seen,  is  expressly  declared  "  to  be 
school  district,"  and  is,  therefore,  within  the  words  of  the 
of  1867.  That  the  Legislature  seriously  intended  their  de< 
ation  of  equal  right  in  the  schools  to  be  partial  in  its  op 
tions,  is  hardly  probable.  But  they  may,  nevertheless,  1 
failed  to  make  it  universal,  if  they  have  incorporated  it 
law  from  the  operation  of  which  some  portion  of  the  Sta 
exempted  by  other  laws. 

The  declaration  is  incorporated  in  the  general  primary  ac 
law.  I  am  not  aware  that  there  is  any  organized  porttc 
the  State  that  does  not  come  under  some  of  the  provisio: 
that  law.  The  specially  created  Union  school  district* 
subject  to  it,  except  so  far  as  the  special  legislation  creatii 
governing  them  is  inconsistent    The  declaration  in  thi 


buperintendekt's  report.  ^  27 

tioit  free  school  act,  that  the  city  shall  constitute  one  school 
district,  is  idle  for  anj  other  purpose  than  to  connect  the  city 
■ith  the  primary  school  system  which  the  general  law  estab- 
iishesy  and  to  give  its  citizens  the  adyantages,  and  to  require 
of  its  oflScers  the  performance  of  such  duties  as  are  essential 
to  Ae  harmonious  working  of  the  general  system  within  the 
city.  That  was  undoubtedly  its  purpose.  It  is  not  true, 
Aerefore,  that  the  primary  school  law  has  no  application  in 
the  city  of  Detroit,  or  that  we  can  say  of  any  of  its  provisions 
respecting  districts  that  Detroit  is  exempt  from  them,  unless 
we  foe  able  to  see  how  those  provisions  are  inconsistent  with 
the  free  school  act,  or  with  any  other  special  legislation  that 
may  hare  established  |)eculiar  regulations  for  that  city. 

Many  things  in  the  free  school  act  clearly  refer  to  the  general 
kwy  and  require  its  aid  to  give  them  effect.  The  primary 
idiool  money  and  district  library  money  are  apportioned  under 
it,  and  are  only  received  by  the  city  in  its  capacity  of  a  school 
district  The  free  school'act  provides  for  reports,  but  it  is  the 
general  law  which  prescribes  to  what  office  they  shall  be  sent, 
and  gives  the  State  Superintendent  a  supervisory  and  direc- 
tory power  in  respect  to  them.  The  free  school  act  empowers 
the  city  board  of  education  to  make  by-laws  and  ordinances 
letaliTe  to  the  taking  of  a  census  of  children,  but  this  is  con- 
trolled by  the  general  law  which  provides  that  children  in 
afane-honses,  prisons  or  asylums,  not  otherwise  residents  of  the 
distiict,  and  not  attending  the  school,  shall  not  be  included  in 
■nch  oensns,  nor  shall  Indian  children  bo  included,  unless  they 
intend  the  school,  or  their  parents  are  liable  to  pay  taxes  in  the 
district  (Ses.  Laws,  1867,  Vol.  1,  p.  43.)  The  penalty  which 
ike  general  law  imposes  on  any  one  who  shall  willfully  disturb 
my  district  or  Union  schools,  (Ibid.)  will  protect  the  schools 
in  Detroit  as  well  as  those  in  the  country.  At  every  point  the 
general  law  is-complementary  to  the  special  legislation,  and  is 
to  give  it  complete  operation.  Even  the  tax  which 
be  levied  by  the  city  board  for  school  purposes,  is  grad- 


28  PUBLIC   IN3THUCT10N. 

uated  by  tlie  number  of  children  within  the  district,  as  slion 
by  the  report  made  under  tlie  general  law.  And  sb  all  othc 
portions  of  that  law,  not  inconsiBtent  with  the  free  school  ac 
apply  to  the  city  of  Detroit,  bo  muBt  tlie  section  cstablishii 
equality  of  right  in  the  schools  apply  also,  unless  it  can  1 
shown  to  be  inconsiBtent.  No  inconeistency  was  pointed  oi 
on  the  argument,  nor  was  any  reason  suggested  as  likely  i 
have  influenced  the  Legislature  to  make  that  city  an  csoeptio 
It  is  true  that  the  board  of  education  are  Tested  with  lar, 
powers  to  make  rules  and  regulatiouB  respecting  the  Bchoo 
and  the  attendance  of  pupils  therein,  but  this  fact  alone  is  n 
sufficient  to  show  a  legislative  Intention  that  they  shall 
exempted  from  general  regulations  like  that  in  question, 
general  statute  regardiug  graded  and  high  schools  empowt 
the  trustees  "  to  classify  and  grade  the  scholars  in  such  distri 
and  cause  them  to  be  taught  in  such  schools  or  departmei 
as  tliey  may  deem  exi)edient ;  to  establieli  in  said  district 
iiigh  school,  when  ordered  by  a  vote  of  the  district  at  a 
anuual  meeting,  and  to  determine  the  qualificatioua  for  i 
mission  to  such  schools,"  "and  to  make  such  rules  and  rej 
lations  as  tliey  may  think  needful  for  the  goyemmeut  of  i 
schools."  [Sess.  I*  1859,  p.  447.]  No  broader  powers  tF 
these  are  conferred  on  the  Detroit  board  to  make  rules  f 
regulations  respecting  attendance  upon  schools;  and  cv 
rule  of  construction  which  will  confirm  to  that  board 
power  they  claim,  will  give  it  also  to  every  board  of  truB< 
of  a  graded  or  union  scliool  district  under  this  law.  Yet  if 
were  to  look  outside  the  act  of  18G7  for  the  occasion  of 
passage,  we  should  probably  And  that  uccasioa  to  exist  c 
in  the  city  of  Detroit  and  in  some  two  or  three  of  the  ut 
or  graded  districts  wliere  diBtiuctions  based  upon  color  ^ 
kept  up,  which  were  unknown  in  the  other  portions  of  the  Si 
We  might  perhaps  take  notice  of  the  fact  that  imtnediu 
preceding  the  passage  of  that  act,  an  application  was  inad< 
this  court  for  a  mandamus  to  com)>el  the  trustees  of  or 


superintendent's  report.  29 

the  anion  school  districts^  embracing  the  city  of  Jackson,  to 
idmit  a  colored  pupil  to  ihc  same  school  with  white  children, 
notwithstanding  thev  had  established  a  colored  school  within 
the  diftrict. 

If  that  application  was  not  the  immediate  occasion  of  the 
legislation  in  question,  it  is  at  least  highly  probable  that  it 
presented  one  of  the  cases  which  made  new  legislation  appear 
important ;  and  if  the  act  was  not  intended  to  reach  the  dis- 
tricts which  are  empowered  to  make  their  own  regulations, 
then  we  shall  witness  the  remarkable  spectacle  of  a  law  which 
assumes  to  prohibit  what  the  Legislature  evidently  regard  as 
an  unjust  discrimination,  but  which  is  so  framed  as  t^  reach 
only  those  portions  of  the  State  where  the  distinction  does 
not  exist,  and  to  exclude  from  its  operation  those  portions 
rhere  the  Legislaturc  is  notified  that  it  prevails. 

Id  one  jmrticular  the  section  in  question  is  undoubtedly 
modified  in  its  operation  within  the  city  of  Detroit,  and  within 
every  other  school  district  of  the  State  which  lawfully  estab- 
iiehee  more  than  one  school  for  pupils  of  the  same  grade. 
The  fixing  of  school  limits  in  such  case,  and  the  establish'- 
ment  of  regulations  which  shall  require  children  residing 
within  those  limits  to  attend  the  schools  therein,  are  within 
the  contemplation  of  the  statutes  creating  or  authorizing  the 
creation  of  the  districts,  and  arc  therefore  lawful  and  proper. 
Bat  we  do  not  discover  that  there  is  anything  in  any  of  those 
etatntes — and  we  include  particularly  in  this  statement  the 
Detroit  free  school  act — that  overrules  or  modifies  the  require- 
ment of  the  general  law,  that  the  right  to  attend  the  schools 
shall  be  possessed  equally  and  impartially  by  all  classes  of 
midents. 

The  conclusion  is  inevitable,  that  the  Legislature  designed 
the  impartial  rule  they  established,  to  be  of  univei'sal  appli- 


It  remains  to  be  seen  whether  .there  are  any  formal  objec- 
tkms  to  the  writ  prayed  for.    It  was  suggested  by  the  respond- 


30  PL-BI,IC    INSTRUCTIOK. 

enta  that  the  father,  as  such,  could  not  apply  for  a  mandam^ 
on  behalf  of  his  infant  child,  but  that  the  child  should  app 
by  guardian  ad  Jitem.  The  father  is  the  natural  guardian 
the  child,  charged  with  his  nurture  and  education,  and  havii 
a  peraonal  duty  to  perform  in  respect  thereto.  Although  t 
proceeding  is  for  the  benefit  of  the  child,  the  duty  of  placi 
him  in  school  is  the  parent's,  and  the  father  is  entitled  on  ] 
own  behalf  to  appeal  to  tiie  courts  for  the  remoral  of  any  i: 
kwfnl  impediments  It  was  also  urged  tliat  the  application 
the  writ  did  not  sliow  aSirmatively  that  the  child  poaseBi 
the  necessary  qualifications  for  lulmission  to  the  school 
shows,  however,  that  the  father  applied  for  his  admission,  ( 
offered  to  submit  him  to  all  the  rnles,  examinations  and  re; 
lations  of  the  board  with  regard  thereto,  and  was  refu 
because  of  the  child's  color.  The  lioard  having  made  this 
sole  objection,  the  relator,  if  this  foils,  is  presumptively  entil 
to  the  writ.  We  think,  under  the  statute,  tbc  objection  is 
valid. 

As  the  statute  of  1867  is  fonud  to  be  applicable  to  the  c 
it  does  not  become  important  to  consider  what  would  oti 
wiae  have  been  the  law. 

Christiancy  and  Graves,  J.  J.,  concurred. 

DISSOLUTION   OF   DISTRICTS. 

"  People  ex  rel.  Strong  vs.  Davidson  and  others,  school 
specters  of  the  township  of  Greenfield." 

Under  the  statut«  (See.  Laws  1840,  p.  315,  Sec.  35)  cut] 
ering  the  school  inspectors  of  any  township  "  to  divide 
township  into  such  number  of  districts,  and  to  regulate 
alt«r  the  boundaries  of  said  school  districts,  as  may  from 
to  time  be  ueoessary,"  they  may  dissolve  one  organized  die 
and  aunes  it  to  another. 

Whipple,  Justice,  delivered  the  opinion  of  the  court- 

The  authority  of  the  inspectors  thus  to  dissolve  Districi 
13,  and  re-annes  it  to  the  old  district  ^om  which    it 


superintendent's  report.  31 

lerered,  must  depend  upon  the  construction  of  the  twehty- 
fifkh  fieetion  of  the  act  entitled  ^'  An  act  to  amend  tlie  Bevised 
Statutes  relative  to  primary  schools,"  approved  April  12, 1840, 
(See.  Laws,  1840,  p.  215).  By  that  section  the  inspectors  are 
Mthorized  '^  to  divide  the  township  into  such  number  of  dis- 
tricts, and  to  regulate  and  alter  the  boundaries  of  said  school 
districts,  as  may  from  time  to  time  be  necessary." 

It  will  be  perceived  that  the  number  of  districts  in  any 
township  is  to  be  determined  by  the  school  inspectors.  This 
foUows,  necessarily,  from  the  language  of  the  section,  which 
confers  authority  to  divide  the  township  from  time  to  time 
into  such  number  of  districts  as  may  be  necessary.  If  they 
may  divide  the  township  into  twelve  districts,  why  may  they 
not  divide  it  into  ten,  by  enlarging  the  boundaries  of  one  or 
more  of  those  in  existence  ?  or,  which  is  the  same  thing,  by 
annexing  two  or  more  so  as  to  constitute  but  one  district,  as 
may,  from  time  to  time,  in  the  judgment  of  the  inspectors, 
become  necessary  ?  The  power  could  not,  perhaps,  be  derived 
tnaa  the  words  '^  regulate  and  alter  the  boundaries,"  &c.,  but 
theae  words  taken  in  connection  with  the  authority  to  ^*  divide,'^ 
from  time  to  time  as  may  be  necessary,  justified,  legally,  the 
Older  made  by  the  inspectors. 

That  order  may  have  been  unwise ;  it  may  have  been  an 
aimae  of  the  discretion  with  which  the  inspectors  are  clothed ; 
bat  sack  abuse  of  discretion  cannot  authorize  the  interference 
of  this  court 

We  think  it  clear,  that  the  authority  to  determine  the  num- 
ber of  districts  in  each  township,  ought  to  be  lodged  in  some 
Ripoiuible  body. 

TTnless  it  is  conferred  upon  the  inspectors,  the  power  does 
not  exist;  and,  as  the  words  of  the  twenty-fifth  section  justify 
tlie  construction  we  have  given  to  it,  we  feel  bound  to  overrule 
tlie  motion  for  a  mandamus.    (2d  Douglas'  Reports,  page  12L) 


;J3  PUBLIC   INSTRUCTIOS. 

DEBTS  OF  A  DISTHICT  WHEN  ATTACHED   TO  ANOTII£K  DlSTKl 

The  followiug  decision,  made  January  28tli.  1864,  Bettla 
question  that  aometimes  arises  in  reference  to  the  debta  o1 
district  when  its  corporate  existence  is  destroyed  by  bei 
attached  to  iinother  district : 

Lawrence  Brewer  rs.  Chauncey  B.  Palmer. 

School  Digtrids — Their  Consolidalion  —  Former  Dthis 
Where  two  school  districts  are  united,  in  pursuance  of  1 
statute,  (1  C.  L.,  §  2335,)  the  district  so  formed  is  alone  lia 
for  all  tlie  prior  debts  of  eiich. 

Accordingly,  where  school  district  number  five  was  attael 
to  district  number  two,  and  a  judgment  having  been  sul 
qucntly  obtained  against  the  former,  the  township  sujierri 
refused  to  assess  the  amount  of  the  same  against  the  prop* 
of  number  five,  held  that  said  judgment  was  a  nullity,  i 
that  the  supervisor  was  not  liable,  for  refusing  to  make  i 
assessment. 

Campbell,  J.; 

Plaintiff  sued  defendant  for  neglecting,  as  suiwrvisor,  to  1 
a  tAs  on  the  district  formerly  known  us  school  district  nnn 
five,  in  the  township  of  Almeno,  in  Van  Buren  county. 

This  district  bad  once  formed  apart  of  school  district  n 
bor  two,  aud  was  in  September,  1858,  attached  again  to 
district,  which  retained  its  number  as  before.  The  suil 
which  judgment  was  obtained  against  school  district  uni 
five,  was  commenced  in  December,  1858,  by  service  tipoi 
proper  officer,  if  one  existed,  and  judgment  was  taken  b; 
fault.  Judgment  was  given,  in  this  cause,  for  the  defeni 
on  the  ground  that  district  number  five  had  ceased  to  exL 

The  jwwer  which  was  formerly,  in  People  vs.  Dnv^ida 
Doug.  Mich,  I!..  121,  said  to  Lave  been  implied  in  the  1 
of  inspectors  of  each  town,  to  combine  school  districts 
afterwards  granted  expressly  by  section  2335  of  the  com 
laws,  which  was  in  force  when  the  action  of  the  town  au 


BUPERINTENDEKT^S  REPORT.  33 

itiea  of  Almena  was  had>  in  uniting  the  districts  referred  to. 
Bj  that  action,  the  territory  was  all  made  to  embrace  but  one 
district  The  statute  is  very  clear  upon  this  point.  But  the 
question  whether,  by  the  change  of  limits,  either  of  the  old 
oiganizations  became  entirely  extinct  for  all  purposes,  is  one 
of  some  importance.  It  is  difficult  to  maintain  that  the  Leg- 
iilature  could  hare  designed  to  extinguish  all  claims  which 
hid  arisen  upon  the  faith  of  the  corporate  authority  in  the 
old  districts;  and  it  may,  perhaps,  be  questioned  whether 
sach  impairing  of  contracts  could  be  lawfully  permitted  by 
the  Legislature,  to  be  accomplished  at  the  uncontrolled 
dificretion   of  town   officers. 

We  are  not  at  liberty  to  assume  that  any  such  result  should 
be  accepted,  without  a  strict  necessity  for  such  a  conclusion. 

The  only  statutory  provisions  expressly  referring  to  changes 
in  the  boundaries  of  districts,  apparently  refer  to  partial 
ehanges,  although  the  language  may  admit  of  a  broader 
iffiicfttion. 

But  we  may,  at  least,  derive  from  these  provisions  some 
light  upon  the  character  of  these  corporations.  And  when 
ve  consider  that  the  power  to  combine  districts  was  originally 
derived  from  the  expressed  power  to  change  and  regulate 
faoandaries,  there  is  reason  to  believe  that  these  provisions 
vere  meant  to  reach  all  cases.  When  any  change  is  made  by 
sd£ng  to  one  district  any  part  of  another,  that  district  which 
retains  the  school-house  of  the  divided  district,  is  made  liable 
to  refund  to  the  portion  set  off  from  it,  the  proportion  of  the 
latter  in  the  value  of  the  property  retained,  less  its  proportion 
of  debts  which  were  chargeable  upon  the  whole  district,  as  it 
vaa  before  division.  In  other  words,  it  is  evident  that  the 
district  retaining  the  school-hoiise  is  the  corporation  liable  for 
the  debts,  and  retains  the  entire  corporate  rights  and  powers. 

And  where  this  district  has,  at  the  same  time  been  aug- 
mented from  another,  the  district,  as  augmented,  obtains  these 
rigfata,  and  incurs  these  obligations.    (See  Comp.  Laws,  Sec. 

3 


34  PUBLIC   INBTECCTIOK. 

^18,  'iiZl.)  When  two  dietricta  are  amicsed,  without 
other  chaiige  in  their  boundaries,  the  mere  fact  that  one  n 
ber  is  preferred  to  auother,  does  not  change  the  real  chan 
of  the  annexation.  Applying  tlie  rules  just  referred  to,  it 
be  seen  at  once  that  tlic  debts  of  both  districts,  and  the  cr 
of  both,  would  unite  in  the  newly  formed  district.  To 
extent,  the  statutory  provisions  may  apply  without  diffic 
And  in  the  absence  of  any  statutory  provision  for  any  di 
cut  rule,  we  think  the  entire  district,  as  a  district,  mua 
held  reapousible  for  the  debts  of  both,  as  it  receives  the  j 
erty  of  both.  There  may  be  equitable  reasons  why  old  t 
should  be  chargetl  upon  the  separate  lauds  of  the  old  diet 
but  we  cannot,  without  a  statute,  undertake  to  regulate  i 
equities.  And  we  have  no  doubt  tiiat  the  union  of  diet 
is  to  be  considei-ed,  under  the  statute,  a  consolidatioo  o 
former  corporations,  and  not  tlie  annihilation  of  one  or 

The  suit  against  school  district  number  five  was  impro 
brought,  because  no  such  district  remained  as  a  separai 
ganization.  The  suit  should  have  been  against  the  coi 
dated  district,  as  succeeding  to  the  liabilities  of  its  parts, 
judgment  being  a  nullity,  the  supervisor  was  not  boui 
regard  it.  The  court  below,  therefore,  did  not  err  in  rel 
to  hold  liini  responsible  for  declining  to  levy  the  anaou 
tax. 

Judgment  must  be  ufiirmed,  with  cost«. 

DISTEICTS  ORG.iSIZBD   BV  THK   LEGISLATURE. 

School  District  No.  13.  of  the  township  of  Oshteni 
Isaac  S.  Dean,  et  at. 

Equity  juriadietion:  School  Districl»:  Account.  On 
rnary  7, 1867,  the  Legislature,  by  an  act  which  took  imni 
effect,  established  ii  new  school  district  out  of  parts  of 
old  ones,  in  the  same  township,  and  provided  that  a.  tax, 
in  the  latter  districts  for  1866,  should  be  collected  in  tht 
manner  as  though  tlicy  hatl  remained  unaltered,  and  tli 


SUPEBINTEKDEOT'S  BBPORT.  36 

M  difitrictfiy  together  with  the  new  one,  should  respectively  be 
entitled  to  certain  relatiye  portions  of  the  whole  tax.  The 
new  district  having  been  organized  on  the  Ist  of  March^  1867> 
porsaant  to  law,  the  township  board  of  school  inspectors^  on 
April  2dy  1867,  assumed  to  set  back  to  the  old  districts  the 
territory  carved  out  of  them  by  the  special  act,  and  to  dissolve 
the  new  district;  and  one  of  the  old  districts  holding  and 
lefosing  to  account  to  the  new  district  for  a  part  of  the  tax  of 
1866,  in  wliich  the  latter  was  entitled  to  participate  according 
to  said  act,  the  new  district  filed  a  bill  against  the  insx>ectors 
Mid  such  old  district  for  an  account,  and  to  enjoin  the  pro- 
ceedings had,  and  threatened  for  the  extinction  of  the  new 
di^ct. 

MMy  That  under  the  circumstances  shown,  the  court  had 
jniiddiction  on  the  case  made  for  an  accounting,  if  not  on 
other  grounds. 

Hdd  further,  That  the  inspectors  had  no  power  under 
I'omp.  Laws,  vol.  1,  Sec.  2314,  to  suspend  or  prevent  the  oper- 
ation of  the  special  act  in  respect  to  the  distribution  of  the 
tax  for  186G,  nor  to  extinguish  the  new  district  established  by 
the  direct  action  of  the  Legislature. 

Casts :  It  appearing  that  one  of  the  defendants  was  a  school 
district,  and  the  others  school  inspectors,  and  that  the  pro- 
ceedings in  question  were  had  at  tlie  instance  and  with  the 
ifproval  of  the  Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction, 

Hdd,  That  neither  party  should  recover  costs  as  against  the 
other. 

Hmrd  July  10th,    Decided  July  13th,  1868. 

Opinion  by  Graves,  Justice,  as  follows : 

On  the  seventh  day  of  February,  1867,  the  Ijcgislature,  by 
iB  act  made  to  take  immediate  effect,  established  a  school  dis- 
trict, numbered  thirteen,  in  the  township  of  Oshtemo,  in  the 
cottnty  of  Kalamazoo,  and  to  constitute  the  same,  detached 
portions  of  the  territory  embraced  in  districts  three,  nine  and 
tm  of  the  same  township.    The  second  section  of  the  act  re- 


36  PUBUC   INBTRCCTION. 

qnired  that  the  same  course  shonld  be  taken  for  the  oigw 
tioa  of  the  nev  district  as  already  prescribed  bj  law  in 
case  of  districts  formed  by  township  inspectors. 

The  third  section  provided  that  the  tax  for  district  pnr 
in  the  districts  three,  nine  and  ten,  other  than  for  the  pay 
of  debts  of  the  dietricte  which  bad  been  levied  for  1866,  ei 
be  collected  in  the  same  manner  as  if  no  part  of  said  dial 
had  been  set  off,  and  that  said  three  districts,  and  the  dii 
established  by  the  act,  shonld  each  be  entitled  to  such  pp 
tion  of  said  tax  as  the  amonnt  of  taxable  property  in 
part  bore  to  the  whole  amonnt  of  taxable  property  on  i 
the  tax  was  levied. 

On  the  first  day  of  March,  I8C1',  the  now  district  was 
organized,  pursuant  to  the  act,  and  district  oOicers  re^ 
chosen ;  and  on  the  second  day  of  April  thereafter,  the 
of  school  inspectors  of  the  township  convened  for  the  pi 
of  re-establishing  the  districts  as  they  were  before  the  cr 
of  the  new  district  by  the  Le^slatnre.  In  pursnancc  ol 
design,  the  board  of  inspectors  resolved  in  due  form  th 
territory  embraced  by  the  new  district  shonld  be  tas 
•  thereby  set  back  to  the  districts  numbered  three,  nine  ai 
tmd  thus  assuming  at  that  time  to  dissolve  the  district 
the  Legislature  had  established  on  the  preceding  seve 
February. 

Thereupon  the  new  district,  number  thirteen,  filed  a 
the  Circuit  Court  in  Chancery,  for  the  county  of  Kf^a 
setting  forth  the  foregoing  and  other  facta,  and  et&tii: 
BEud  district  Ko.  3  and  said  inspectoi's  threatened  to  < 
by  law  the  said  determination  of  the  latter,  and  tliat  ss 
trict  Na  3  held  and  retained  from  compiaioanta  the 
of  the  tax  of  18(30  Iielonging  to  tliem,  amounting  to  i 

The  bill  prayed  an  account,  and  that  the  defeudaati 
be  enjoined  from  further  interference  with  the  corporati 
of  the  complainants,  and  for  general  relief 


SUPEHISTENDEyr'a   REPORT.  37 

he  school  iuspcctors  nud  district  No.  3  only  appeared  and 
rered,  and  the  complainants  filed  a  general  replication, 
material  Tacts  were  admitted  by  etipnlation,  and  it  vue 
ti  that  the  only  question  of  law  to  be  submitted  was 
Jter,  upon  the  facts,  the  board  of  school  instjectors  had 
power  to  re-district  the  township  in  such  manner  as  to 
■oy  the  new  district.  The  court  below  decided  that  the 
district  was  legally  constituted;  that  the  action  of  the 
i  of  inspectors  complained  of,  was  unanthorized  and 
,  and  perpetnally  enjoined  the  inspectore  and  their  sac- 
>rs  from  making  any  change  in  the  boundaries  of  the 
ict  as  established  by  the  Legislature, 
le  school  inspectors  and  the  district.  No.  3,  have  appealed 
liscoort. 

ro  points  arc  made:  First,  That  the  cose  is  not  one  of 
table  jurisdiction,  and  that  the  remedy  of  the  complaln- 
if  any,  could  only  have  been  found  in  a  proceeding  by 
Ittomey  General ;  and  Second,  That  the  school  inspect- 
bad  the  same  power  OTcr  the  new  district,  as  over  one 
led  by  themselves. 

w  first  point  must  be  determined  upon  the  theory  of 
ilainant's  bill,  and  not  upon  the  nature  of  the  relief  given 
le  coorL  According  to  the  theory  of  the  bill,  the  district 
I,  in  port,  by  means  of  the  active  and  illegal  efforts  of  the 
■ctors,  wrongfully  and  inequitably  holds  certain  taxes 
iging  to  complainants,  and  refiisee  to  account  there- 
and  which  tasee  were  among  those  mentioned  in  the 
of  the  Legislature,  and  collected  in  the  original  districts. 
e  think  that  under  the  peculiar  circumstances  of  this 
tbe  jnrisdiction  may  be  maintained  on  tbe  ground  that 
Konnting  may  be  called  for,  if  not  on  other  grounds. 
,  respect  to  the  second  point,  it  is  very  clear  that  tlie 
a  claimed  for  the  inspectors  did  not  exist  to  the  extent 
tod  on.  The  act  of  the  Legislature  not  only  estalisbed 
new  district,  by  combining  portions  of  three  old  ones,  bnt 


38 


PUBLIC    INSTRUCTION. 


\r> 


made  positive  provision  for  a  portion  of  the  taxes  collectable 
for  1866,  in  the  territory  comprehended  by  the  four  districts, 
which  was  wliolly  incompatible  with  the  asserted  anthority  of 
the  inspectors. 

The  exercise  of  power  by  them,  as  they  assumed  to  exercise 
it,  and  as  they  now  insist  upon  as  a  matter  of  right,  could  not 
possibly  co-exist  with  the  positive  regulation  as  to  the  taxes 
made  by  the  Legislature.  Either  the  legislative  regulation 
was  a  law  superior  to  the  authority  of  the  insi^ectors,  or  the 
power  of  the  inspectors  was  superior  to  the  authority  of  the 
act. 

The  act  itself  did  not  purport  to  vest  any  authority  in  th< 
inspectors  to  dispense  with  the  law,  and  as  the  statute  was  th< 
superior  authority,  it  was  beyond  the  power  of  the  inspector 
to  destroy  or  invalidate  its  operation. 

Since  the  regulation  as  to  the  taxes  was  necessarily  in  opei 
ation,  when  the  inspectors  resolved  to  vacate  the  new  distric 
and  since  such  action  necessarily  involved  the  overthrow  ( 
that  regulation,  the  proceedings  of  the  inspectors  were  whoU 
invalid.  If  the  complete  disposition  of  the  case  depends 
therefore,  upon  the  invalidity  of  the  action  of  the  inspector 
it  would  be  unnecessary  to  go  further.  But  on  looking  in* 
the  record  it  apjxjars  that  the  court  below  perpetually  enjoim 
the  inspectors  and  their  successors  from  changing  the  boun 
aries  of  the  new  district. 

It  was  argued  with  much  force  on  tlie  part  of  the  defen 
ants,  that  the  reasoning  of  the  complainants  would  place  tl 
district  forever  beyond  the  possibility  of  change  by  the  inspe 
ors,  and  that  it  was  reasonable  to  suppose  that  the  Legislati 
intended  to  leave  the  district,  when  established,  under  i 
control  of  the  insjwctors  to  the  same  extent  as  districts  fom 
bv  them. 

It  must  be  admitted  that  there  is  no  middle  ground.  Eit 
the  district  must  be  independent  of  change  by  the  inapcct4 
or  it  must  be  as  much  under  their  sway  as  other  districts.     A 


r-w'f 


SUPEKINTEXDENrS   REPORT. 


ad 


ooqwration  brought  into  existence  by  the  direct  act  of  the 
L^gidature,  it  would  not  be  dependent  upon  any  general  act, 
or  upon  the  inspectors  for  its  continuance ;  nor  could  it  exist 
if  its  organic  act  should  be  repealed.  It  would,  therefore, 
stiiid  by  itself  as  an  independent  corporate  existence,  and  de- 
liimg  no  vital  support  from  the  law  under  which  inspectors 
fonn  districts ;  and  it  is  difficult  to  see  how  it  could  be  essen- 
UmUj  altered  without  an  alteration  of  the  act  which  stands, 
in  flome  respects,  in  the  place  of  a  charter. 

We  have  already  seen  that  the  inspectors  could  take  no 
iction  which  would  change  or  extinguish  the  operation  of 
thit  part  of  the  act  which  regulated  the  taxes,  and  it  seems 
namfest  that  in  so  far  as  that  provision  would  be  practically 
<jpeiative,  the  legislative  intent  would  be  plain  against  any 
iotenneddling  by  the  local  authorities. 

There  would  necessarily  be  a  period  then,  when  the  corpo- 
ntion,  created  by  the  act  in  question,  would  be  exempt  from 
ted  interference.  The  Legislature  have  not  declared  by  this 
*ct,  nor  can  it  be  implied  from  any  other,  when  this  period  of 
-xemption  should  terminate.  It  is  a  fair  inference,  then,  that 
it  was  meant  to  be  ^lerpetual.  The  district  in  question  was 
created  by  direct  legislation,  and  a  continuing  independent 
power  to  dissolve  it,  vested  in  another  body,  would  be  anoma- 
i«ifc  It  would  suppose  two  powers  in  operation  at  the  same 
Qme,  one  of  which  would  have  the  right  to  create,  and  the 
«her,  at  the  same  instant,  the  right  to  destroy,  while  one  of 
d»«e  conflicting  authorities  could  only  exist  by  the  sufferance 
'>f  the  other. 

It  seems  to  me,  therefore,  upon  general  reasoning,  that  it 
ocmkl  not  have  been  the  purpose  of  the  Legislature  to  allow 
tie  inspectors  to  make  any  change  in  the  boundaries  of  the 
district  established  by  the  statute. 

There  remains  a  single  question  relating  to  costs. 

The  court  below  decreed  costs  against  the  defendants,  to  be 
•^Uected  bv  execution.    One  of  the  defendants  is  a  school  dis- 


,«. ' 


HI 


i  '1ii 


1      I 


I 


1 

I 


f  I 


t    ii  m 


ri      » 


I     ' 


40  PUBLIC   IS8TEUCTI0N. 

trict,  and  the  others  are  school  iaspectore,  and  I  am  pcrBQU 
that  the;  ought  Dot  to  be  charged  with  costs. 

Although  the  course  paraaed  by  them  is  open  to  suspic 
that  personal  feeling  had  a  lively  inSuence  where  none  she 
have  existed,  yet  ve  are  informed  by  the  answer  that  the  [ 
ceedinga  to  dissolve  the  new  district  were  npon  the  suggest 
and  with  the  approval  of  the  State  Superintendent  of  Pul 
Inatmction,  for  the  State  of  Michigan  for  the  time  bei 
This  circumstance  is  entitled  to  weight  upon  the  questioi 
oosta  against  this  school  district  and  their  school  officers. 

I  think  that  the  decree  below  onght  to  be  affirmed,  ex( 
OB  to  the  costs,  and  aa  to  them  that  it  should  be  reversed, 
that  neither  party  should  recover  costs  as  against  the  othei 

The  other  Justices  concurred. 

LIBRARY    FUNDS    FROM    FIMES. 

There  is  probably  no  statute  of  the  State  so  extensively 
lated  by  public  officers  as  that  pertaining  to  the  dispositio 
moneys  paid  for  fines  for  breaches  of  the  peace,  Ac.  The 
both  the  constitution  and  the  statutes  declare  that;  all  t 
funds  shall  be  paid  over,  and  used  exclusively  for  the  pure 
of  books  for  sohool  libraries,  it  has  been  a  very  common 
torn  for  magisti'at«a  imposing  the  fines,  to  reserve  a  porti< 
pay  fees;  and  that  which  reaches  the  hands  of  the  co 
treasurer  has  been  frequently  added  to  the  General  Fi 
(strange  to  say,  sometimes  by  a  direct  vote  of  the  supervis 
and  that  which  reaches  the  inspectors*  and  district  otE 
hands  is  as  likely  to  be  paid  for  teachers'  wages  as  for  b 

All  these  officers  should  know  that  they  and  their  ba 
holden  for  all  these  funds,  so  illegally  used.  In  the  firal 
which  follows,  the  facts  were,  that  in  Wayne  county,  ni 
moneys  had  for  years  been  paid  over  to  the  inspectors  b 
jounty  treasurer.  Suit  was  brought,  and  the  ease  carri 
the  Supreme  Court;   and  there  could  be  but  one  result- 


superintendent's  report. 


41 


statute  is  plainer;   and  the  county  was  required  to  refund 
mtny  thousand  dollars  that  had  been  illegally  retained. 

The  second  following  case  had  some  color  of  plausibility 
igMBst  the  application  of  the  law,  as  we  think  the  first  had 
not  In  this  it  related  to  fines  imposed  by  the  municipal  mag- 
istrates elected  under  the  charter  of  the  city  of  Detroit ;  and  it 
was  held  that  the  provisions  of  the  general  law  would  not  ap- 
ply. But  the  Court  decided  otherwise,  and  the  city  was  com- 
piled to  pay  over  the  money.  Especial  attention  to  these  de- 
cidons>  of  all  who  have  anything  to  do  with  these  moneys,  is 
desired. 

**  The  People  on  relation  of  the  Board  of  Education  of 
Detroit  vs.  The  Treasurer  of  Wayne  county/' 

On  the  hearing  of  an  application  for  a  mandamus,  the  part}' 
allowing  cause  is  entitled  to  open  and  close  the  argument 

Under  the  present  Constitution  and  statutes,  all  moneys 
which  are  paid  into  the  office  of  the  county  treasurer,  on  ac- 
count of  fines,  penalties,  forfeitures  and  recognizances,  are  to 
be  credited  to  the  Library  Fund,  and  apportioned  and  paid 
over  by  the  treasurer  to  the  proper  local  officers,  without  any 
deduction  for  expenses  either  attending  the  collection  of  the 
particular  sums  paid  in,  or  embracing  the  general  criminal 
expenses  of  the  county.  The  taxable  costs  in  proceedings  to 
edlect,  should  be  kept  separate,  and  do  not  belong  to  this 
fimd. 

Heard  June  6th.    Decided  June  9tky  1860. 

Campbell,  J.: 

A  mandamus  is  applied  for  to  compel  the  respondent  to  pay 
OTcr  to  the  Board  of  Education  their  share  of  moneys  in 
bis  hands  received  from  fines  and  recognizances.  The  ques- 
tion submitted  is,  whether  the  amounts  paid  in  to  him  from 
tbose  sources  are  liable  to  any  deductions  for  expenses,  either 
•ttending  the.  collection  of  the  particular  sums  paid  in,  or 
mbracing  the  general  criminal  expenses  of  the  county. 
4 


' 


i 


!«: 


A 


I' 

I    t 


t     I'll 


I 


'  1 


'  I 


.  ■   , 


ii't 


'    1    ;i; 


J':'       ' 


i''!' 


j,'..i.ii 


1 1 


t 


supkrintkndent's  report. 


43 


allowable  ba  iu  civil  cases  upon  the  proceedings  to  collect,  and 
are  separate  from  the  penalty : — Sections  (5136,)  (5140.)  On 
indictments  the  costs  are  expressly  given  to  the  use,  not  of 
Ubraries,  but  of  the  county ; — (5688.)  The  whole  amount  col- 
lected ni)on  the  penalty  itself  is  plainly  required  to  be  paid 
over  to  the  county  treasurer  by  these  sections.  The  taxable 
costs  cannot  be  deducted  from  the  amount  forfeited,  but  should 
be  kept  separate;  and,  if  paid  into  the  library  fund  by  mistake 
ma?  be  corrected. 

m 

By  Section  5151,  it  is  declared  that  **  every  county  treasurer 
i^all  keep  an  accurate  account  of  all  moneys  paid  to  him  on 
aoconnt  of  fines,  penalties,  forfeitures,  and  recognizances,  sepa- 
ntc  and  distinct  from  all  other  accounts,  and  shall  credit  the 
fiune  to  the  Librarv  Fund,''  &c. 

And  by  Sec.  5152,  it  is  directed  that  all  the  moneys  belong- 
ing to  Boch  Library  Fund  shall  be  apportioned  by  the  treasurer 
at  the  times,  &c.,  and  shall  be  paid  over,  &c.,  according  to  such 
H«portionment." 

The  moneys  belonging  to  this  fund  must  necessarily  include 
aQ  that  has  been  legally  paid  into  it,  subject  to  such  deductions, 
after  it  has  been  paid  in  as  the  laws  authorize  or  require. 

Without  questioning  the  right  of  the  Legislature  to  make 
fucfa  deductions  as  they  deem  expedient  except  from  fii^es,  it 
is  very  clear  that  until  they  see  fit  to  make  such  deductions, — 
inasnach  as  no  money  can  be  drawn  from  the  treasury  with- 
out some  legal  authority — the  fund  must  remain  inviolate. 
So  proTision  of  law  has  yet  been  enacted  allowing  or  requiring 
any  money  to  be  deducted  from  this  fund.  The  criminal  ex- 
penses are  not  a  charge  upon  it.  The  clear  proceeds,  therefore, 
as  the  laws  now  stand,  include  all  sums  paid  into  the  treasury 
from  the  sources  mentioned. 

It  is  unnecessary  to  consider  the  collateral  questions  argued. 
We  are  of  opinion  that  the  treasurer  is  bound  to  include  in 
his  apportionment,  and  to  pay  over  to  the  several  local  oflB- 
c^n  all  moneys  which  are  paid  into  his  office  on  account  of 


•  t 


;   1 ' 
I ' 


I 

1 


'  I 


'i! 


Q 


J  J.  Ill 


44  PUBLIC  INSTRnCTION. 

fiaes,  penalties,  forfeitures,  and  recognizances.  A  mandamtu 
BbotUd,  therefore,  issue  as  prayed.  We  do  not,  however,  regard 
this  as  a  proper  case  for  costs. 

FINEH  IMPOSED  BY   POLICE  COUUTS. 

"  The  People  ex  ret.  the  Treasurer  of  Wayne  County  vs.  the 
Controller  of  the  city  of  Detroit" 

Central  Police  Court :  Fines:  Penal  Laws :  Library  Fund 
The  prosecutions  of  offenses  ftt  the  Central  Police  Court,  chap 
13,  sec.  11,  city  charter,  are  to  be  regarded  aa  prosecutioii 
under  the  peual  provisions  of  the  city  charter,  and  not  undei 
the  municipal  ordinances,  aud  the  fines  so  collected  are  to  b 
applied  to  the  support  of  township  libraries. — 17  Mich.,  390. 

Heard  and  decided  May  10,  1869. 

Ail  those  fine  moneys  which  were  collected  of  persons  con 
victed  of  drunkenness,  or  as  disorderly  persons  or  vagranti 
amounting  in  all  to  $10,279,  are  within  the  previous  decisio 
of  this  court  in  Wayne  county  vs.  the  city  of  Detroit,  17  Mich 
390,  and  there  could  have  been  no  valid  excuse  for  not  payin 
them  over  on  demand.  We  held  before,  that  the  penalties  i 
those  coses  were  not  collected  under  the  city  ordinance  at  al 
but  ander  section  11  of  chapter  13  of  the  city  charter — the  ci) 
ordinance  being  a  mere  re-enaotment  of  that  section,  am 
therefore,  entirely  idle  and  nugatory. 

The  remaining  moneys  are  not  covered  by  the  former  di 
cision,  but  we  think  they  fall  within  the  same  principle.  It 
the  statute  which  gives  the  police  justice  the  authority  to  hei 
and  determine  these  cases,  which  prescribes  what  species  i 
criminal  conduct  he  shall  take  cognizance  of,  and  what  pei 
alty  he  shall  impose.  We  do  not  decide,  nor  intimate  whethc 
if  these  cases  were  ordinary  prosecutions  under  the  city  ore 
nances,  the  penalties  imposed  by  the  ordinances  conid  1 
regarded  as  imposed  under  "  the  penal  laws  of  the  State 
That  question  is  not  before  ns. 

The  ordinary  prosecutions  for  breaches  of  the  city    ore 


BUPERtNTESDENT'8   REPORT. 


4S 


aancee  are  had  in  the  Recorder's  Gonrt.  and  not  before  the 
police  justice. 

At  the  Central  Police  Court  are  to  be  tried  the  cases  of 
iS^ncT  and  disorderly  coudnct,  which  cases  do  not  come 
rnder  the  ordinances  at  all ;  and  also,  "  violations  of  the  city 
rdinances  relative  to  breaclies  of  the  peace," 
In  regard  to  these  latter  cuBes,  however,  it  is  to  be  observed 
bat  the  statute  makes  new  and  peculiar  regulations  concem- 
ng  them,  and  that  it  does  not  refer  to  the  ordinances  at  all 
icept  to  ascertain  what  conduct  is  made  a  breach  of  the 
nblic  peace  by  them.  The  ordinances  are  referred  to  for  defi- 
ition,  and  not  for  penalties. 

This  will  be  made  very  apparent  by  looking  into  the  ordi- 
lance  before  us  in  this  case,  where  we  find  that  the  same  con- 
act  when  punished  under  it  by  prosecution  in  the  Recorder's 
•onrt,  may  be  punished  by  a  fine  of  three  hundred  dollars ; 
rhile,  if  punished  as  a  breach  of  the  section  in  the  city  char- 
•r  which  we  have  referred  to,  the  jwnalty  is  limited  to  fiftj' 
ollars. 

We  ore,  therefore,  of  opinion  that  all  of  these  prosecutions 
re  to  be  regarded  as  prosecutions  under  the  penal  provisions 
r  the  city  charter,  and  not  aa  prosecutions  in  any  proper 
ruae  under  the  municipal  ordinances. 

It  was  objected  to  this  view,  that  in  some  cases  shown  by 

le  letum,  the  fines  appear  to  have  been  imposed  for  acts 

hich  arc  neither  vagrancy,  disorderly  conduct,  nor  breaches 

f  the  peace,  and  therefore  not  within  the  section  of  the  char- 

sr  referred  to.  and  not  made  criminal  by  any  law  of  the  State. 

"he  answer  is,  that  the  police  justice  only  has  authority  to 

ry  in  the  court  which  imposed  these  tines,  the  cases  enumer- 

ust  assume  that  every  case  he  has  tried,  was 

m  OB  falling  mthin  one  of  these  three  clasBCS. 

t:  has  erred,  and  imposed  a  penalty  for  conduct 

;  be  legally  thus  classitied.  the  error  was  one  of 

le  party  convicted  might  at  the  time  have  had 

■emedy. 


46  rUHLIC   INSTBCCriON. 

We  cauuot,  iu  this  cotUteral  proceeding,  enter  npou  i 
investigation  whether  liie  rulings  have  been  correct  or  not. 

It  is  proper  to  say  in  this  connection,  tliat  in  coming  to  tl 
conclusion,  we  do  not,  as  counsel  seem  to  suppose,  hold  a 
provision  of  the  city  charter  to  be  unconstitutional.  T 
charter  provides  that  these  fine  moneys  sliall  be  ptud  into  t 
city  treaanry,  but  it  is  to  be  presumed  that  ttie  Legislature  c 
signed  the  subsecjuent  disposition  of  them  to  be  in  oocordan 
with  the  constitutional  provision. 


REPORTS  OF    COUNTY    BDPERINTENDENT8 


ALLEGAN  BOUNTY— P.  A.  Lattee,  Sup't. 

I  was  engaged  iu  teaching  at  the  time  of  my  election, 
commenced  active  work  in  tlie  month  of  June,  followi 
since  which  time  I  have  visited  eiglity  districts,  leaving  al 
the  same  number  to  be  visited  during  the  winter  moi 
Dnring  these  visits  I  have  in  many  cases  been  occompanici 
one  or  more  of  the  district  ofiicers,  and  mueli  intorcst 
manifested  in  tlie  welfare  of  tlie  schools. 

At  my  fall  examinations  I  granted  certificates  as  follt 
r  of  the  first,  17  of  the  second,  and  133  of  the  third  gi 
Nearly  all  of  these  candidates  have  Iiad  an  experience  l 
one  to  severul  terms,  actual  teaching.      I  find  the    teac 


superintendent's  report. 


4? 


tH 


cTerywhere,  nobly  and  earnestly  preparing  themselves  for  the 
better  discharge  of  their  duties ;  almost  invariably  the  same 
teachers  have  been  continued  for  the  winter  school,  where 
they  have  been  successful  during  the  summer. 

New  school-houses  have  been  built  tlic  past  season  in  the 
foUo¥dng  townships:  Gun  Plain,  Dorr,  Wayland,  Salem, 
Cheshire,  and  a  large  number  have  been  repaired  and  much 
improved.  These  houses  are  built  on  the  most  improved  plan ; 
are  large,  convenient,  and  well  ventilated.  Several  districts 
are  making  arrangements  to  build  the  coming  year. 

The  new  School  Law  is  received  everywhere  with  the  most 
imhounded  favors  by  the  i)eoplc  of  this  County.  The  District 
Boards  welcome  it  as  the  harbinger  of  better  days  for  the 
schools  under  their  charge.  Necessary  means  have  been  most 
generously  provided  by  the  district  boards  for  the  support  of 
the  schools  the  coming  year.  Everything  betokens  future  pros- 
perity and  success. 

The  greatest  obstacle  I  have  found  in  the  way  of  the  success- 
ful operation  of  the  schools  under  my  charge  is  the  great  di- 
reraty  of  text-books  in  use  among  them.  In  some  district 
ichools  I  have  found  from  this  cause  as  many  as  thirty-four 
dasaea.  I  have  used  my  best  endeavors,  to  the  fullest  extent 
<>f  my  ability  to  i*emedy  this  evil.  I  anxiously  look  forw  ard  to 
the  day  when  a  law  will  be  enacted  establishing  a  uniformity 
throoghoat  the  State.  Such  a  law  would  be  hailed  with  glad- 
QC9g  by  both  the  teachers  and  patrons  of  the  schools  of  this 
eounty.  It  would  save  the  former  a  great  amount  of  labor 
and  the  latter  a  large  amount  of  [money  and  largely  in  my 
^^^Hnion  benefit  the  schools.  Finally  I  am  much  encouraged 
*ith  the  progress  that  the  schools  juv  making  and  the  interest 
that  is  manifest. 


PUBLIC   IS8TRUCTI0N. 


BARRY  COUNTY-^OHN  H.  Palmer,  Scrt. 

The' report  from  thia  connfy  is  this  yyar  more  hopeful  ai 
encouraging  than  the  report  of  one  year  ago,  and  the  gener 
feeling  among  the  people  is  one  of  increased  interest  in  schc 
aSiiirs. 

In  some  localities  there  is  yet  loo  much  of  carelcssnces, ' 
what  is  worse,  penurionsness ;  but  the  increased  attendance 
school  meetings,  the  search  by  school  officers  for  higher  grad 
of  teachers,  and  the  erection  of  new  houses  of  improved  arcl 
tectural  design  and  finish,  bear  ample  testimony  to  the  ft 
that  the  schools  of  this  county  occupy  u  larger  place  in  ( 
minds  of  the  people  than  they  have  at  any  time  in  the  past 

Among  teachers,  more  particularly  than  among  the  peo| 
is  a  "  forward  movement "  manifested.  This  is  shown  in  I 
increase  of  second  and  first  grade  teachers,  and  in  a  manil 
desire  on  the  part  of  those  who  arc  yet  holding  only  th 
grades  to  fit  themselves  for  promotion.  The  whole  ntim 
presented  for  examination  was  290.  Of  this  number  15 
ceived  first  grade,  83  received  second  grade,  and  181  recei' 
third  grade  certificates. 

Institute  work  during  the  )>ast  year  amounted  to  twei 
two  days.  The  number  of  visits  to  schools  and  to  distri 
164.    Evening  lectures,  17. 

There  is  still  a  great  lack  of  furniture  and  apparatus  in 
schools  of  this  county,  and  the  lack  is  likely  to  contii 
unless  by  legislative  enactment  people  are  not  told  that  t 
may,  but  that  they  must  provide  such  things  as  are  necc«i 
for  the  proiKir  success  of  their  schools.  Some  of  the  be 
schools  are  supplying  themselves,  hut  the  great  majority 
hardly  be  said  to  liave  any  apparatus  whatever. 

The  abolition  of  the  rate-bill  is  so  recent  a  matter  that 
result  is  not  very  manifest  in  the  schools  yet,  hut  the  fee 
of  the  people  is  all  in  one  direction,  and  the  almost    un 


superihtendekt's  beport.  4! 

)iu  expresaioa  is  that  the  abolition  should  have  been  aocom- 
ihed  long  ago. 

While  the  schools  of  the  county  are  not  up  to  the  high, 
standard,  while  there  are  yet  many  abuses  in  our  system 
be  corrected,  and  many  obstacles  to  be  removed  from  the 
Ih  of  educational  progress,  we  cannot  help  feeling,  as  we  set 
:  forward  movement  that  has  been  made  in  the  last  three 
a;  qaalification  in  the  stead  of  incompetency,  good,  new 
laea  in  stead  of  old,  unsightly  shells,  interest  inst«ad  oj 
iffereDCe — and  more  than  all  else,  the  schools  all  free;  that 
have  abDodant  reason  to  thank  God  for  the  good  of  the 
■ent,  and  the  glowing  hope  of  the  future. 


BAY  COUNTY— A.  L.  Cummino,  Scp^. 

i  great  portion  of  this  Connty  is  unsettled,  and  visited  only 
the  lumbermen ;  yet  a  great  interest  is  manifested  in 
wis,  even  in  this  section  of  the  county,  and  good  commo- 
u  fnme  houses  have  been  built,  supplied  with  many  first 
R  coDTeniences.  In  fact,  the  director  of  one  of  the  most 
ote  districts  in  the  pineries  informed  me  they  were  able  and 
ing  to  maintain  a  school  nearly  the  whole  year,  if  teachers 
id  be  induced  to  remain.  Daring  the  past  year  a  fine  Union 
M>l-faoaae  has  been  erected  in  the  village  of  Bangor  on  the 
iuav  river,  at  a  cost  of  over  t6,000,  and  schools  arc  now  in 
operation  with  three  teachers. 

he  fine  brick  honse  in  Wenona,  erected  in  1867,  wa^  found 
snail  to  accommodate  the  500  children  in  the  district  and 
ing  the  past  summer  a  new  building  was  erected.  Six 
^ers  are  now  employed  in  this  district,  and  another  honse 
I  be  bnilt  the  coming  summer. 
"he  village  of  Portsmouth  has  a  fine  school  building,  re- 


50  PUBLIC  IS8TRUCTI0K. 

cently  finiBlied,  and  the  school  is  in  a  very  flourishiug  ooi 
dition. 

The  highest  wages  pmd  teachers  is  $'i,500,  to  Sup't  of  Be 
City  schools.  The  principals  of  Wcnona  and  Portsmoul 
schools  receive  each  (1,400>  Two  lady  teachers,  one  in  eat 
of  the  tatter  places,  receive  $500  each. 

In  conversing  with  the  i>eople  in  every  locality  of  the  eoun 
they  express  themselves  much  interested  in  educational  ma 
ters;  and  so  far  as  lending  their  inflncnce,  paying  taxes,  ai 
otherwise  contributing  liberally  to  support  schools,  it  is  tin 
but  as  to  visiting  the  schools,  or  making  any  other  special 
general  effort  to  i>romote  their  welfare,  I  am  sorry  to  say,  a  grt 
amount  of  apathy  and  seeming  indifference  is  apparent.  Ev 
the  school  officers  generally  consider  they  have  performed  th 
duty  when  they  have  hired  the  teacher  and  paid  him  his  wag 
I  trust  an  improvement  in  this  respect  may  take  place. 

Since  my  election  last  Spring,  I  have  published  in  one  of  i 
county  papers  weekly,  articles  devoted  to  the  educational  int 
csts  of  the  county,  and  I  believe  I  have  done  some  good  wi 
thereby.  I  know  that  many,  at  least,  have  been  interested 
reading  them. 

I  have  also  held  monthly  meetings  of  the  teachers  at  1 
nona  during  school  sessions.  These  meetings  were  held  e\ 
ings,  aud  were  well  attended  by  the  people.  I  believe  then 
be  productive  of  much  good. 

The  following  is  a  statt'ment  of  work  I  have  done  since  1 
last: 

Number  of  school  districts  outaidu  of  Bay  City  is  twe: 
three.  Three  of  these  schools  employ  fourteen  teachers 
have  paid  forty -one  visits.  I  have  examined  forty-»iine  teacl 
I  have  rejected  nine,  and  granted  forty  certificates,  viz. :  T 
grade,  thirty-one ;  second  grade,  nine ;  first  grade,  none,  T 
are  two  first  grade  certificates  in  force,  issued  by  my  predece 
I  have  attended  nine  school  celebrations,  and  delivered  » 
lectures,  and  written  ninety-f9ur  letters  on  school    mat 


SCPERlin'ENDEirr'S   REPORT.  51 

e  weekly  articles  to  a  county  paper.  I  have  also  spent 
1  time  in  endeaToring  to  aecare  the  fine  money  for  the 

7  fund.  Ever  since  the  organization  of  the  connty,  some 
c  rears,  tlie  fines  collected  and  paid  into  the  county  and 
rsaauriea  have  been  used  and  appropriated  by  the  Board 
iperrisors  of  Bay  county,  and  the  common  council  of 
Sty.  I  deemed  it  my  duty  to  secure  this  money,  and  I 
in  a  manner  succeeded.    I  found  about  one  thousand 

8  of  back  fines  in  the  county  treasurer's  hands,  and  the 
T  Bupcrrisors,  at  my  request,  ordered  the  amount  placed 
;  credit  of  the  library  fund.  I  have  also  claimed  of  the 
rer  two  thousand  dollars,  which  I  am  now  endeavoring 
e  converted  to  its  proper  use,  and  although  meeting  with 
opposition,  I  trust  to  be  able  to  secure  the  money  without 
to  law, 

VQcludiug  this  report  I  must  say  I  feel  proud  of  the 

Bof  Bay  county.    The  schools  of  Bay  City  may  be  classed 

be  first  in  the  State,  and  the  magnificent  High  school 

ig  just  completed,  costing  $50,000,  in  charge  of  reedly 

nt  teachers,  is  not  only  an  ornament  to  the  city,  but  a 

«1  example  of  the  wisdom  and  intelligence  of  the  enter- 

•people  of  this  city.    The  schools  throughout  the  county 

f  of  Bay  City,  are  in  a  sound   and   flourishing  con- 

The  people  of  Bay  county  entertain  liberal  views  re- 

g  schools,  and  generously  c.vpond  large  sums  in  main- 

;them,  and  in  the  purchase  of  ample  grounds  and  the 

Qd  commodious  buildings.    I  must  speak 

IS  of  all   district  or  county   oflicers  with 

ess  intercourse  connected  with  the  schools, 

I  my  duty  were  I  not  to  bear  testimony  to 

let  of  every  member  of  the  Board  of  Super- 

ty — favoring  and  assisting  me  in  every 

to  advance  and  promote  the  best  interest 


52  PUBLIC   INBTRUCTION. 

The,  Oouniy  Superiatendent  eyetem  meets  with  gei 
£avor,  and  its  workings  so  far,  although  only  in  its  infanc} 
spoken  of  as  a  great  improvement  on  the  old  township 
ganization.  In  the  higher  qualifications  required  of  teaci 
more  especially  is  this  favorable  diSerence  conspicuoue, 
very  generally  remarked  upon — and  as  a  matter  of  co 
where  only  really  qualijUd  teachers  are  employed,  better 
more  efficient  schools  are  the  certain  result 


BENZIE  COUNTY— A.  E.  Walkeh,  Srp'T. 

Since  my  election  last  April,  I  have  held  fourteen  exac 
tions;  given  five  first  grade  certificates,  eighteen  second  j 
and  seventeen  third  grade. 

I  have  done  twenty-four  and  a  half  days  work  exam: 
teachers  and  visiting  schools.  Our  county  is  new  and  t 
We  have  only  ten  oi^uized  townships ;  but  schools  am 
ucatipnal  interests  seem  to  be  on  the  increase. 

As  the  blanks  for  the  annual  reports  of  districts  and  \ 
ships  were  not  sent  to  this  county  direct,  our  towns  wer 
all  supplied,  consequently  the  reports  were  bthind  timt 
one  township.  Crystal  Lake,  containing  the  village  of  F 
ford  has  not  yet  reported. 

I  have  notified  tbem  to  report,  but  do  not  know  wl 
they  have  any  blanks  or  not. 

The  free  school  laa'  I  think  is  tending  to  advance  t 
terests  of  education  in  this  new  county  very  much ;  but 
is  some  "howling"  about  taxes — the  school  tax  alone  in 
instances  aniounting  to  six  per  cent. 


superintendent's  report. 


53 


■t» 


BERRIEN  COUNTY— Henry  A.  Ford,  Sup't. 

I  have  agaia  the  honor  to  report  a  year  of  hopeful  progress 
in  tiie  edacational  work  of  Berrien  county. 

SCHOOL  districts. 

We  have  now  one  hundred  and  forty-eight  school  districts. 
Two  new  districts  (one  in  Lincoln  and  one  in  Weesaw  town- 
ikip)have  been  organized  during  the  year;  district  No.  9^  in 
Berbrandy  has  been  reorganized,  and  district  No.  11,  Benton, 
Auginixed,  and  consolidated  with  stronger  districts.  No 
ptft  of  the  county  remains  unorganized  for  school  puiposes, 
except  a  small  tract  in  the  northwest  comer  of  Lake  township. 

GRADED  schools. 

New  graded  schools  have  been  established  in  Benton  Har- 
Wr,  HiUburg,  New  Buffalo,  and  Three  Oak&  There  are  eleven 
ptded  schools  in  the  county,  three  of  them  in  Benton  town- 
Aip.  They  occupy  eighteen  school-houses,  besides  five  rooms 
it  private  buildings,  and  employ  fifty  teachers.  The  total 
Bomber  of  Union  school  departments  and  ungraded  schools 
tt  (me  hundred  and  eighty-three,  employing  a  hundred  and 
«^tv-nine  teachers. 

NEW    SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

Fourteen  new  school-houses  have  been  erected  during  the 
peu;  or  are  in  course  of  construction  as  follows :  One  each,  in 
Btduman,  Galien,  Boyalton,  Benton,  St  Joseph  and  Hagar ; 
^cach,  in  Pipestone  and  Bertrand;  and  four  in  Sodus.  The 
lev  school-house  at  Oalien  Station  is  a  spacious  two-story 
hdlding,  costing  $2,500,  and  seated  with  improved  furniture. 
Thst  in  district  1,  Royalton,  is  similarly  seated  and  cost  $1,600. 
^ith  the  erection  of  a  new  building  at  "  the  Buckhorn^'  next 
',  as  exx^^<^^d>  every  school-house  in  Royalton  will  be  a  new 


i^, 


hi' 


>:  I 


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If) 


^1^1 


i;< 


\  'li 


ll'.i' 


■:ti 


i  •) 


M 


64  I'CBLIC    INSTRUCIIOK. 

one.  That  in  district  2,  Benton,  is  to  cost  12,000.  Tbect 
the  new  house  in  district  6,  Hagar,  is  defrayed  in  part  by 
Ecriptions  from  citizene  of  that  towuship,  iu  order  to  build 
larger  scale  than  the  original  plan  contemplated.  That  ii 
trict  C,  Bertmnd,  cost  $2,000,  and  has  the  patent  furnii 
that  in  district  4,  Pipestone,  |il,500.  In  district  3,  8odne 
second  ucV  school-boiisc  within  a  year  is  going  up ;  the 
with  the  old  building,  having  been  destroyed  by  fire  in  ■ 
Too  much  praise  cannot  be  awarded  the  jieoitle  of  this  dii 
for  their  entcrpriBO,  energy,  and  self-sacrifice.  The  new  t 
ing  in  district  4,  is  a  fine  one,  in  a  commanding  position 
cost  11,300.  It  has  the  improved  furnitnre.  The  school 
ertyat  Heath's  CorucrB,  Benton,  where  is  the  only  two- 
country  school-house  in  the  county,  is  valued  at  *4.00C 
most  of  the  new  buildings,  ventilation  has  not  been  ncgl< 
Water'-closets  and  other  out  buildings,  and  fences  have 
added  to  many  of  the  school-bouses. 

Fourteen  districts,  including  nearly  all  in  which  a  new 
seems  necessary,  arc  preparing  to  build,  by  voting  taX' 
the  purpose,  or  otherwise  agitating  the  subject.  Seven 
build   nest  yenr.      But  one  log  school-honsc  is  still    i 

Al'PARATCB   AND    BOOKS. 

A  number  of  districts  have  supplied  their  schools  witb 
apparatus  since  my  last  report.  Four  sets  of  outline  map 
been  purchased,  and  primary  charts,  globes,  numeral  f 
and  other  articles,  in  reasonable  quantity.  The  chcmic 
other  apparatus  in  the  Nilcs  City  High  School  has  be 
larged  and  materially  improved.  Several  dietricta  hai 
introduced  improved  text-books.  At  the  late  meeting 
County  Bible  Society,  a  grant  was  voted  of  a  copy  of  thi 
Scriptures  to  every  school-room  in  the  county,  not  no 
plied. 


srPKBiNTBN dust's  beport.  55 

THE  SCHOOL   OFFICERS 

Bave  been  more  interested  in  their  duties,  and  more  atten- 
e  to  them,  than  ever  before.  The  Annual  Reports  this  fall 
imerate  three  hundred  and  twenty  directors'  visita  to  the 
iooIb,  against  two  hundred  und  thirty-four  lost  year — this, 
^  without  counting  the  daily  visits  reported  by  the  Director 
the  Niles  city  schools.  The  reports  of  the  year  arc  in  much 
ter  shape  than  before,  and  much  credit  is  due  to  the  Town 
'iks,  Inspectors,  and  Directors,  for  their  general  fullneee 
1  accuracy. 

THE   INTEREST   OF   THE   l-EOPLE 

In  education  has  largely  increased.  The  building,  and  pre- 
tatioD  for  building,  so  many  new  school-honseB,  ai^e  this, 
leannaal  meetings,  in  most  districts,  were  well  attended, 
1  the  YOtes  for  terms  of  school,  etc.,  under  the  Free  School 
i,  liberal,  even  in  townships  which  hare  heavily  burdened 
tmselTes  with  taxation  for  railroad  purposes.  That  our 
)ple  were  getting  ready  for  the  free-school  system,  or  rather 
tdually  institnting  one  of  their  own,  is  evinced  by  the  fact 
it  only  forty-three  report  rate-bills  for  the  last  year,  against 
ty-ooe  the  year  before.  More  care  has  been  exercised  in 
^  election  of  Directors,  and  a  number  of  the  first  men  in 
;  county  urenow  in  that  position.  Parents  and  other  citizenr 
(e  visited  the  schools  with  unusual  frequency,  and  well  at- 
ided  the  Teachers'  Institutes  and  educational  meetings  held 
th^r  neighborhoods.  A  largerattcndanceof children upoE 
t  public  schools  has  been  enforced.  The  percentage  of  tota' 
mdaace  reported  this  fall  is  78.3  of  the  whole  number  OB 
t  school  census  rolls,  against  73  per  cent  last  year.  Then 
■lao,  I  think,  less  disposition  to  interfere  with  teachers  ii 
eir  efforts  to  introduce  improved  methods  of  instruction  anc 
idpline.  The  pay  of  teachers  has  noticeably  increased,  t< 
e  great  improvement  of  both  instructors  and  instructed. 


56  PUBLIC    IN8TRDCTI0N. 

THE   TEACHERS 

Haye  ccmtributed  much  to  the  progress  of  the  year.  Seve 
etudents  from  the  State  Normal  School,  and  manj  excelli 
teachers  ^oni  Eastern  and  Middle  States,  have  been  at  w< 
among  us.  The  Teachers'  Institutes  have  been  very  larg 
attended,  as  will  be  stated  more  fully  below.  A  County  . 
Bociation  has  been  Buceessfully  maintained,  and  two  well 
tended  semi-annual  meetings,  with  ably  executed  programti 
have  been  held  during  the  year.  Orders  for  professio: 
books  and  magazines  have  been  frequent  and  judicious.  M 
toes,  and  the  cheaper  articles  of  apparatus,  have  been  b 
plied  to  the  schools  in  considerable  numbers,  at  their  expe: 
They  have  taught,  in  general,  with  conscientiotis  fidelity  i 
care,  with  better  methods  and  a  higher  ambition.  I  hare 
a  "total  failure"  to  record  for  the  year.  These  facts  can 
but  be  regarded  with  the  highest  interest  and  warmest  c 
mendation.    "As  is  the  teacher,  so  is  the  school." 

Thus  far  the  work  of  others,  mainly.  My  own  work  i 
be  classified  thus: 

I.  AHONO*THE  SCHOOLS. 

The  number  of  superintendent's  visits  for  the  year  foots 
two  hundred  and  thirty-one,  (reckoning  each  round  of 
itation  to  the  departments  ofa  Union  school  as  but  c 
against  two  hundred  and  eight  reported  last  year.  The  vi, 
tion  of  the  winter  schools  reached,  I  believe,  every  one  i 
in  session.  From  the  limited  time  heretofore  allowed  n 
was  unable  to  visit  the  summer  Bchools  in  two  entire  t< 
ships,  and  in  parts  of  others.  The  larger  allowance  whicli 
been  made  will  enable  me  to  make  fiill  rounds  of  visitatic 

II.   AHONQ   THE  TEACHERS. 

Nine  Institutes  have  been  held  during  the  year — seven 
trict  institutes  in  the  spring,  at  Coloma,  Benton  Harbor,  ] 
stone,  Berrien  Springs,  Dayton,  Three  Oaks,  and  Nilea, 


superintbkdent's  report. 


57 


Ittdng  two  to  three  days ;  and  two  county  institutes^  of  a  week 
eichy  daring  the  last  fortnight  in  October,  at  Buchanan  and 
St  Joseph.  The  former  were  satisfactorily  attended.  The 
total  membership  of  the  latter  was  surprisingly  large,  aggrega- 
ting one  hundred  and  fifty-one,  or  more  than  one  for  every 
echool  district  in  the  county.  Nearly  all  in  attendance  are 
tndiersy  or  preparing  to  become  such ;  and  the  most  eager 
attention  and  interest  were  manifested. 

I  have  circulated  among  the  teachers  of  the  county  several 
knadred  copies  of  Maaon's  Lecture  on  Pcstalozzianism,  a  tract 
on  Music  in  Schools,  Mrs.  Smith's  paper  on  Geographical 
Teiching,  and  whatever  could  be  obtained  gratuitously  for 
their  use.  Continued  sale  has  been  made  of  professional  bookB> 
strictly  at  cost  rates,  which  have  been  very  favorable.  I  make 
it  also  a  part  of  my  work  to  canvass  thoroughly  for  educational 
magazines,  which  are  taken  in  considerable  numbers. 

There  has  been  an  unusual  pressure  for  teachers'  certificates ; 
and,  notwithstanding  an  uncommon  number  of  rejections,  the 
total  number  granted  during  the  year  is  three  hundred  and 
twenty-three — fifty  of  the  first,  one  hundred  and  ten  of  the 
Kcond,  and  a  hundred  and  sixty-three  of  the  third  grade.  Al- 
most all  have  been  used  in  teaching,  in  this  county  or  neigh- 
boring counties.  The  standard  of  successful  examination  has 
been  steadily  elevated,  and  I  am  enabled  to  announce  that  here- 
after candidates  for  any  grade  of  certificate  must  possess  some 
biowledge  of  physiology,  the  history  and  constitution  of  the 
United  States,  and  the  new  School  Law  of  Michigan. 

III.  AMONG  THE   PEOPLE. 

The  most  effective  agency  in  this  work  is  the  Press.  I  am 
publishing  an  article  on  education  weekly  in  each  of  the  six 
neukr  papers  of  the  county.  The  publication  of  The  Berrien 
Sekaoi  Journal,  quarterly,  is  regularly  continued.  It  is  circu- 
lated in  every  school  district,  in  part  gratuitously,  partly  on  a 
Aibseription  basis. 
8 


58  PUBLIC  1N8TBUCTI0N. 

Several  pablic  educational  meetings  have  been  held,  wil 
marked  results.  School-house  dedications  are  becoming  an  li 
tereeting  and  profltablo  feature,  and  I  expect  to  attend  a  nun 
ber  this  fall  and  winter. 

4DDITI0SAL   ALLOW ASCK — CONCLUSION', 

The  Board  of  Supervisors,  at  the  October  Beseion,  unai 
mously  granted  me  an  additional  allowance  of  twenty-five  da 
per  year,  and  were  otherwise  liberal. 

I  close  this  Report  with  a  heart  grateful  to  my  hospital 
and  helpful  fellow  citizens,  and  to  that  Providence  which  b 
blessed  the  year,  and  which  sees  and  blesae-s  every  effort  for  I 
children. 


BRANCH  COUNTY— A.  A.  Luce,  Svp't. 

This  report  cmbiTices  the  term  from  October  1st,  1868, 
October  1st,  1869,  and  it  has  been  a  year  of  unremitting  i 
for  me.  Twenty-six  meetings  have  been  held  for  the  exami 
tion  of  teachers,  and  238  applicants  have  been  e.tamiQed. 
these,  0  have  received  first  grade  certificates ;  second  grade  i 
tificates  04  ;  third  grade  certificates  90,  and  36  have  been 
jected.  I  have  endorsed  4  certificates  issued  by  other  snpe 
lendents. 

Whole  number  of  children  enrolled  in  the  public  school 
the  county,  7,353,  or  84  per  cent,  of  tlie  whole.  It  is  n  fac 
be  lamented  that  ao  great  a  number  of  our  children  are  no 
the  schools  during  any  portion  of  the  yuar,  and  of  those  ■ 
£o  attend,  but  a  small  portion  are  there  more  than  3  or  3  nioi 
in  the  year.  The  result  is,  that  they  grow  to  man's  estab 
most  entirely  disqualified  for  intelligent  citizenship.  The 
is  apparent ;  the  remedy  is  not  so  clear,  unless  we  resort  to  a 
compelling  an  attendance  at  least  a  part  of  the  year. 


BrPBRISTENDEXT'S    RKPOkT,  B( 

CNION   SCOOOLS. 

five  Union  schools  (includiDg  the  city  of  Ooldwat«r; 
33  teachers,  and  all  src  very  vigorously  sustained 
they  have  in  procoBS  of  erection,  and  nearly  com. 
rj  neat  and  commodious  building  for  the  use  of  tht 
lat  place,  at  a  cost  of  $16,000.  It  will  be  ready  foi 
lio  middle  of  November. 

BCnOOL-nOL'SES. 
1-houses  there  has  been  a  marked  improvement 
Rst  report.  The  log  houses  have  all  disappearei 
Eighteen  new  ones  have  been  built  at  an  averagt 
50.  Of  these,  there  are  4  built  of  wood,  2  of  stoni 
rick,  and  nearly  all  of  them  are  constructed  wit! 
>  health  and  comfort  of  the  pupilsk 

MULTIPLICITY    OK  TEXT    BOOKIS 

eatest  obstacle  to  the  success  of  our  district  sehoole 
irhat  1  can  to  remedy  this  enl  and  expect  to  b< 
;e  a  better  report  upon  this  subject  next  year. 


two  institutes  last  fall,  each  continuing  one  week 
ison,  and  one  at  Qirard;  01  teachers  availed  them 
«e  opport«nit«8  for  improvement.  A  "  State  Teach 
te"  was  held  in  Coldwater  last  spring,  attended  b; 
B  eager  for  improvement  in  their  chosen  profession 
nts  arc  made  for  a  Normal  training  class  in  con 
h  the  Union  school  in  Coldwater,  where  teacher 
lorongh  drill  in  the  science  of  teaching.  A  Teach 
tioQ  was  organized  luet  spring  with  about  70  mem 
ill  hold  its  meetings  semi-annnally.  Two  hnndre< 
sitfl  have  been  made  during  the  year.  These  visit 
rendered  all  the  more  pleasant  by  the  extrem 
if  my  reception  by  both  teacliers  and  patrons. 


PCBUC  lN6THCCnOK. 


CALHOUN  COUNTY— Bbla  Fascher,  Sup't. 

Advancement  in  the  public  schools  appears  to  be  the  par 
poae  of  the  people  of  this  couuty.  It  is  evident  in  schoo 
buildings. 

There  is  a  tide  of  improvement  in  the  building  and  conven 
iences  of  school-bouses.  The  Marshall  school-house,  at  a  cos 
of  seventy  or  eighty  thousand  dollars,  the  gem  of  the  city,  an< 
Bu  honor  to  the  cause  of  education  in  this  part  of  the  Stab 
is  approaching  completion.  Albion  with  its  three  ward  school 
after  the  pattern  of  those  in  Afarahal),  and  soon  to  be  prepare 
for  occupancy,  is  moving  in  the  right  direction.  Battle  Cree 
has  just  raised  by  vote,  $75,000  for  a  central  building,  to  I 
put  under  contract  at  once.  Two  district  houses  have  bee 
built  in  Homer.  Burlington  village  has  erected  a  very  fit 
house  at  an  expense  of  $2,500,  which  is  nearly  completed,  ax 
in  Eckford,  Sheridan  and  Albion,  fractional  districts,  a  sa' 
stantial  brick  house  at  about  tlie  same  expense-has  been  cod 
pleted  the  past  year.  Marengo  and  Emmet  were  among  t1 
first  towns  in  building  and  furnishing  their  school-houses  wi 
modem  improvements.  Other  improvements  are  contemplate 
Inqniries  are  made  respecting  sites  and  desirable  locatioi 
Some  friction  attending  the  erection  of  suitable  houses  is  e 
perienced,  but  as  soon  as  a  good  comfortable  house  is  comp 
ted  and  its  beauty  and  advantages  seen,  all  speak  in  comment^ 
tion  of  "  Our  fine  school-house," 

The  abolition  of  the  rate  bill  meets  with  almost  aniver 
■approbation. 


In  the  practical  working  of  the  school  system,  respecti 
teachers,  there  are  new  difficulties  and  necessities  constan 
irisiog,  and  developments,  in  some  cases,  of  very  briglit  Bp« 
mens  of  scholarship  and  adaptation  to  teach  and  to  goTe: 
md  in  others,  of  incapacity  and  want  of  knowledge  of  wha 


8UPERINTBNDEin:'8  BEPORT.  61 

■I 

1 

required  of  a  teacher.    Before  the  way  is  cleared  and  school  I 

boards  and  superintendents  in  their  united  action  can  secure  { 

in  all  cases  such  teachers  as  will  fully  meet  the  wants  of  the  ^ 

community,  some  very  hard  and  unpleasant  work  must  be 
done  in  refusing  certificates.  Too  much  money  has  been  paid 
for  school-houses,  and  too  much  is  being  paid  for  teachers' 
wage^  for  school  boards  or  superintendents  to  wink  at  incom- 
petency, to  be  influenced  by  favoritism  and  not  to  exact  suitable 
qualifications  in  every  case,  and  earnest  devotion  of  teachers  to 
their  work.  In  order  to  avoid  the  accumulation  of  disappoint- 
ments of  those  designing  to  teach,  and  to  encourage  the  de- 
velopment of  the  requisite  talents,  and  a  full  supply  of  teach- 
ers, the  following  method  has  been  adopted. 

At  the  time  of  visiting  schools,  all  in  the  school,  who  antici- 
pate teaching  arc  invited  to  meet  the  superintendent  for  in- 
stroction  concerning  what  a  teacher  is  required  to  know  and 
da  A  few  directions  and  questions  answered  will  do  very  much 
to  prevent  the  disappointment  of  many  ambitious  young  men 
and  women,  who,  at  a  public  examination,  for  the  first  time, 
find  to  their  sad  regret  that  they  are  not  half  prepared  for  the 
▼ork.  It  inspires  them  with  hope  and  encourages  them  to 
greater  diligence  in  study,  and  to  study  what  is  especially  es- 
sential ;  and  they  arc  not  left  in  expectation  of  hearing  at  an 

4 

institute  all  that  is  required  of  them. 

At  the  same  time  teachers  are  requested  to  report  to  the 
Superintendent,  at  or  near  the  close  of  the  schools,  such  of 
their  pupils,  with  their  deportment,  moral  character,  and 
scholarship,  as  are  candidates  for  teaching.  Some  of  our  very 
best  specimens  of  teachers  have  been,  and  will  be  found,  whose 
education  has  been  obtained  for  the  most  part  in  district 
^hools. 

UBHAKIES. 

libraries  are  a  fSiilure  throughout  the  county.  Some  action 
of  a  general  nature  is  required  to  revive  them.  What  can  be 
ione? 


«  I'UBLIC    IH8TRDCTI0N. 

STATISTICS. 

A  few  facts  will  iudicah;  clearly  the  geuera)  directJou  of 
efforts,  and  the  public  will.  There  &re  in  the  county  163  dia- 
tricts,  and  schools  were  taught  in  all  but  two  or  three.  There 
are  four  graded  schools,  and  several  with  two  or  more  apart- 
ments and  teachers,  and  a  very  good  begiuuing  made  in  grade. 

WORK    DOSK. 

No  mail  can  be  long  engaged  in  so  large  a  field  and  compre- 
hend the  amount  of  work  required  of  a  Superintendent,  with- 
out feeling  a  burden  relieved  only  by  incessant  toil,  patience 
and  fidelity,  in  meeting  in  order  and  in  time  the  varied  calls 
made  upon  him.  My  whole  time  is  devoted  to  the  work,  and 
it  is  due  to  the  supcrvisorB  to  say,  that  in  increasing  the  num- 
ber of  days  of  service  to  three  Imndred,  they  have  showed  that 
they  have  comprehended  the  greatness  and  importance  of  the 
work.  The  time  of  service,  four  months,  could  not  matun 
much  fruit.  But  the  planting  and  reaping  have  began  aa 
follows : 

Onehundred  schools  have  been  reached  iu  visiting.  Tweuty 
eight  certificates  have  been  given — none  of  the  first  grade 
three  of  the  second  grade,  twenty-five  of  the  third  grade.  Th 
number  of  certificates  granted  by  Mr.  Marble,  my  predecesaoi 
at  the  fall  and  spring  examinations,  and  during  his  term  c 
office,  as  appears  from  the  records  were:  Of  the  first  grade,  5 
of  the  second  grade,  139 ;  of  the  third  grade,  32C.  In  all  b 
him,  470 ;  by  mc,  28. 

I  have  not  ascertained  the  number  of  visits  mode  by  hin 
but  he  was  a  true  and  faithful  worker,  and  has  left  pleasin 
remembrances  in  families,  among  teachers  and  scholars,  of  h 
earnest  efforts  iu  the  cause  of  public  schools. 

The  three  term  system  is  earnestly  recommended,  aud  to 
considerable  extent  is  adopteil ;  though  in  some  towns  it  mee 
with  decided  opposition. 


aUPERIKTEMDBNT'8   REPORT.  63 

been  done  lu  the  way  of  ornamenting  grounds, 
the  Bnrroundings  of  school-honsea  pleasant  The 
-st  a  house,  and  then  the  ornaments ;  but  a  good 
Qg  in  the  spring  for  fences,  maple  trees  and  CTer- 

I'eachers'  Institute  was  held  in  Homer  in  October, 
'  Hon.  0.  Hosford,  State  Superintendent,  and  Profs. 
I  Bellows,  of  the  Normal  School.  There  were 
lers  of  the  Institute,  and  one  hundred  or  more 
rho  did  not  enroll  their  names.  It  was  a  decided 
achers  and  others  who  had  begun  to  look  upon 
,  dull  aud  unproti table,  unanimously  expressed 
terest  and  approval  of  the  mode  and  results. 
I  prepared  for  a  race  up  the  hill  of  science,  for 
long  towns  and  counties  and  States,  and  for  the 
itellectual  culture  of  those  who  in  years  to  come 
e  to  advance  the  great  interests  of  the  nation  and 


!i  COUNTY— Irviko  Clbndbnes,  Sdp't. 

St'UMARY  OP  LABOB. 
mined  one  hundred  and  five  teachers  and  have 
ity-six  certiScates.  Sixty  of  the  third  grade,  aino 
,  and  seven  of  the  first.  I  have  made  one  bund- 
riaita  to  schools;  some  of  one-half  day,  others  of 
;  have  held  one  day  and  Sabbath  School  celebra- 
institute.  I  have  also  published  the  first  num- 
s8  County  Educational  Journal,  which  will  bo 
irly,  and  devoted  to  educational  interests  in  this 
lave  also  performed  the  various  other  work  con- 
he  office. 


64  PDBLIO  INflTRnCTIOK. 

SCHOOI^HOUSEfi. 

We  hare  one  bnndred  and  twenty  districts  and  not  mo: 
than  fifty  good  hoosee ;  leaving  some  seventy  very  poor  hoDM 
some  of  which  are  a  disgrace  to  any  district,  or  commnDit^ 
bnt  there  seems  to  be  a  dispositioo  on  the  part  of  districts 
erect  better  houses. 

BOOKS,   AC. 

I  am  trying  to  secure  a  uniformity  of  text  books  in  tli 
connty  and  am  succeeding  very  well. 

QUALIFI CATION    OF  TEACHERS. 

I  find  but  few  well  qualified  teachers  in  this  county.  T 
opinion  is  general,  "  that  if  I  am  not  fit  for  any  other  bu 
ness,  I  will  teach  school ;"  but  I  have  rejected  34  per  cent, 
thereabout,  and  there  are  still  a  great  many  who  are  not  w 
qualified  for  their  work,  and  as  soon  as  we  can  get  a  better  ' 
of  qualified  teachers,  we  will  ship  the  poorer  ones  who  are  \i 
Bnt  teachers  will  have  to  be  elevated  before  our  schools  can 
raised  to  that  standard  which  they  ought  to  occupy  at  i 
present  time,  and  I  do  not  think  one  in  twenty  of  our  presi 
teachers  have  ever  read  any  works  or  made  any  preparation 
their  work.  But  I  suppose  we  must  learn  to  labor  and 
wait. 


EATON  COUNTY— G.  H.  Town6end,  Sup^. 

The  general  condition  of  school  Interests  in  my  field  of  la 
is  gratifying.  The  School  Inspectors'  reports  for  the  y 
though  D»t  as  complete  and  accurate  as  was  desired,  show  e 
stantial  progress.  Under  specific  heads,  it  will  also  be  fo^ 
that  evidence,  which  promises  for  the  near  future,  resulti 
keeping  with  the  genius  of  our  school  system,  is  not  Want 


SrPKEINTBNDBNT'a   BEPORT.  65 

PROOBESS. 

'  of  scboot  districts  is  the  same  as  last  year.    The 

ties  have  frequently  been  importuned  to  iccreaBe 

ut  generally,  have  wisely  consulted  the  interests 

opOBed  for  diBorganization,  in  preference  to  the 

le  who  would  like  schools  near  by.    Five  of  the 

have  been  replaced  with  well-arranged  and  cora- 

)l-honseB.    During  the  year  there  has  been  an 

10  school  children.    The  record  of  attendance 

ter  habits  inculcated  on  the  part  of  parents,  by  4.7 

The  value  of  school  property  has  been  increased 

ad  teachers  have  been  paid  better  wages. 

Qual  Meetings,  so  far  as  heard  from,  were  the  largest 

liarmoniouB  ever  held  in  the  county.    With,  but  few 

,  they  were  characterized  by  a  desire  to  promote  the 

>od  of  onr  schools.    A  few  items  taken   from  my 

}lv  will  show  wherein.     Eight  more  districts  voted 

mde,  and  five  more  for  second  grade  teachers,  than 

applied.    More  than  one-third  of  the  districts  in  the 

IB  declared  for  teachers  of  a  high  standard  of  q  nali- 

This  feet,  important  and  cheering  in  itself,  becomes 

of  broader  significance,  as  the  expression  of  more 

alf  of  our  population.    Forty  districts  voted  liberal 

or  repairs ;  twenty-one  to  protect  school-houses  fh)m 

'  the  highway ;  ten  to  set  out  shade  trees;  and  one, 

ing  element  of  the  pure  and  poetic  in  its  citizenship, 

leautify  school  grounds  with  shrubbery  and  flowers. 

icts  voted  to  bnild  next  year — including  a  (10,000 

errnonti-ille,  and  a  $2,500  frame  at  Potterville.    Ten 

leclared  in  favor  of  the  "  three  term  system,"  thas 

railablc  such  labor  as  school  children  can  perform 

e  pressing  season  of  agricnltural  life,  without  the 

jf  disturbing  school-room  work.    Fifteen  districts 

ror  of  procuring  apparatus :  and  five  voted  to  induce 


66  PUBLIC    INBTBUCTION. 

a  love  for  school  exerciBes,  to  enconrage  teacher  and  pu 
frequent  school  visits. 

The  above  iodlces  of  broader  aud  better  views  aiuo: 
people,  were  gathered  n:om  eighty-Sre  annual  meetiugs. 
may  not  be  commensurate  with  the  deathless  import 
educational  interests ;  are  not  all  a  thoroughly  vitaliz< 
healthy  pnblic  sentiment  would  reflect — they  are,  how 
sure  basis  upon  which  to  found  strong  hopes  for  the 
Kducators  may  reasonably  take  courage,  when  one  year 
BO  many  cheering  signs  of  progress. 

And  the  upward  tendency  is  not  confined  to  nchool  i 
Our  teachers  will  compare  favorably  with  those  of  othe: 
ties.  Several  have  an  enviable  and  extended  rcputatio 
a  large  number  give  evidence  of  a  desire  for  honorable  i 
tion.  The  written  examinations  on  file  in  my  office,  coi 
with  the  old  record,  show  a  majority  to  be  ambitions,  ei 
and  deserving — the  sure  precursors  of  constantly  inc 
oaefulnees  in  the  profession.  More  exalted  views  of  the 
er's  mission,  rational  ideas  of  the  true  theory  of  educati 
better  methods  of  instruction,  are  fast  supplanting  tht 
estimate,  and  crude  conceptions,  so  common  a  few  yes 
It  gives  me  great  pleasure  to  attest  the  settled  purpoae 
teachers  to  take  no  backward  step,  but  to  press  forwai 
oring  themselves,  and  exalting  their  profession  to  its  : 
place  in  public  estimation.  But  five  instances  have 
my  knowledge  of  a  desire  to  retrogade;  while  a  large  i 
richly  deserving,  have  been  passed  to  higher  honors. 

THE   mTCATIOti. 

The  last  school  census  returns  8,259  children  betv 
ages  of  five  and  twenty  years.  Of  this  number,  6,587  e 
school  during  some  portion  of  the  year,  leaving  1,67 
counted  for.  For  the  benefit  of  these  children,  841.91 
school  were  taught,  at  a  cost,  in  teachers'  wages  a 
•21,343.42— or,  at  the  rate  of  a  fraction  over  J3.24  jjer 


scPESiirrEN dent's  bepoht.  67 

ttendance  record  will  show,  that  of  the  number 
ool  taught,  but  oue-half  were  productive  of  solid 
!iat  one-half  the  sum  paid  teachers  was  practically 

This  is  one  of  the  worst  evils  with  which  oar 
is  afflicted ;  the  more  to  be  lamented  on  account 

influence.  By  it,  not  only  the  int«reat8  of  the 
mt  the  fntiire  well-being  of  the  children,  are  put 
•-  The  man  is  in  /he  eJiild,"  and  whatever  tends 
ose  habits,  carelessness  concerning  intellectual 
necessarily  produce  mischief.  Society  feoU  now, 
it  of  lives  made  aimless  and  burdensome,  by  the 
rents  to  inculcate  habits  of  close  attention  to 
1 ;  and  it  demands  remedy.  He  who  is  equal 
lifting  this  grievous  burden  from  our  school  sys- 
lited  as  a  public  benefactor, 
la  visited  last  summer,  but  20  were  supplied  with 
;>aratus,  excepting  blackboards ;  35  were  squan- 
ers'  hard  earnings,  with  on  appalling  variety  of 
>  school-houses  were  practically  in  the  highway; 
ible  with  age ;  and  5  were  unfit  for  use. 
)f  the  teachers  in  these  schools,  iu  culture  and 
ence  of  fitness  for  the  work.  I  know  of  but  two 
failure.  Varying  degrees  of  excellence  were 
same  grade ;  several  of  the  third  grade  possessed 
as  correct  methods,  and  were  meeting  with  as 
;ees8,  as  a  majority  of  the  first  and  second  grade 


TUB    CXION   aCHOOUi 

t  exception,  in  charge  of  Teachers  and  Trustees, 
nd  progressive.  >f  any  changes  in  their  manage- 
Q  made  recently,  which  promise  better  results 
than  have  accrued  in  tlie  past.  With  but  one 
ire  on  an  "  Object  Teaching  "  basis,  and  are  also 
he  good  effects  of  new  and  better  text-books. 


68  PUBLIC    IN8TKCCTI0N. 

The  school  boards  of  Charlotte  and  Eaton  Baplds  have  pn 
chased  a  respectable  amount  of  apparatus ;  reorganized  ai 
regraded  their  Bchoola ;  the  former  being  placed  in  charge 
a  BaperinteDdent. 

SUMMABY  OF  WOBK,  ETC, 

Labor  performed  tiom  the  Ist  of  May  to  31st  day  of  Octobc 
1869,  is  as  follows:  100  Yisitations  vere  made  to  80  dlffere' 
sommer  schools.  These  visits,  it  was  my  conetant  endear 
to  render  pleasant,  and  were  not  unprodnctire  of  good  resul 
In  a  majority  of  schools  the  children  were  induced  to  extei 
a  cordial  and  respectful  invitation  to  their  parents  to  visit  t 
Bchool-room.  So  fur  as  heard  from,  this  plan  had  the  deal 
effect — the  invitation  being  kindly  received,  and  respond 
to  beyond  my  expectation.  I  held  50  examinations — 14  regnl 
1  special,  35  office.  Most  of  the  latter  were  in  the  early  pi 
of  summer.  A  special  effort  was  made  this  fall  to  do  ai» 
with  sach  ofBce-work,  as  generally  an  unnecessary  expense 
the  county,  and  I  succeeded  so  far  as  to  reduce  the  nnmbei 
eight  Of  195  applicants,  SSwerc  refused,  and  157  hceoaed 
teach,  as  follows :  6  first  grade,  30  second  grade,  and  110  th 
grade.  Of  this  number,  4  were  advanced  from  second  to  fi: 
and  18  from  third  to  second.  Applicants  for  "small  schoo 
and  those  too  young  to  be  invested  with  the  interests  of 
school-room,  make  up  the  sam  total  of  rejections.  In  addit 
to  examination  in  the  usual  branches,  oral  exercises  in  epell 
by  letters  and  sounds,  examination  upon  Analysis  and  Con 
tntion  of  the  United  States  were  generally  had.  Five  even 
lectures  were  delivered  to  good  and  apparently  appreciai 
aadiences.  Ten  school  picnics,  and  8  examinations  of  sohe 
were  attended.  Twenty-five  school  boards  were  induced 
prescribe  a  uniform  list  of  text-books.  Twenty-three  h( 
of  families,  who  habitually  kept  their  children  f^m  the  sch 
room,  were  visited,  and  in  a  friendly  way  the  evil  of  their  coi 
pointed  out.  Twenty  children  were  started  in  school  life, 
result  of  these  visits,  districts  kindly  furnishing  bookB. 


CPERlNTENDENr'S  BBPORT.  69 

KORHAL  CLASS. 

was  organized  September  20th,  in  connection 
!  High  School,  and  under  the  Bupemeiou  of 
continued  in  daily  session  of  two  honre  each, 
ing  October  29tb.  Aa  stated  in  a  circnlar  to 
»l  featnres  were,  eKaminationB  and  drill  on 
iches,  lectures  on  school  goTemment  and 
188  was  fairly  attended,  and  so  far  successful 
formation  of  others  at  an  early  date. 

ON  COUNTY  SCHOOL  JOCBNAL. 
of  a  medium  of  communication  with  Bchool 
rs,  which  would  be  sure  to  reach  every  school- 
inty,  I  commenced  in  July  the  publication 
tit/  School  Journal,  a  monthly  paper,  devoted 
1  interests.  Four  numbers  have  been  issaed, 
iopies  distributed  through  the  county.  My 
:ation,  has  been  to  encourage  healthy  public 
it  out  errorB  in  the  management  of  onr  school 
■resent  to  teachers  methods  and  suggestions 
rit  Thus  far,  I  believe,  it  has  met  the  ex- 
'riends,  aud  in  common  with  all  emanations 
td  its  inSuence.  For  the  sake  of  the  canse  it 
mat  that  influence  has  been  for  good. 

IMPRESSIONS, 
-onnty  Superintendent  is  no  sinecure.    He 
he  school  interests  of  Eaton  county  efficiently, 
le  work  his  beet  energies  and  whole  time, 
the  people  approve  the  county  superinten- 
ty  will  favor  (fompulsory  Education. 

my  first  report,  it  gives  me  pleasure  to  say, 
ow  co-laborers,  and  the  people  and  children, 

received  cordial  welcome  and  kind  treatment, 
lly  relations  may  continue,  and  that  together, 


PUBLIC   INBTaCCTION. 


we  may  be  the  instruments,  in  Qod's  good  tinic,  of  elevating 
the  standard  of  our  public  sclioola,  is  my  fenent  wish. 


GRATIOT  COUNTY— GiLBB  'i'.  Bbown,  Sl'p't. 

The  past  year  has  been,  with  mo,  one  of  biird  ivork,  liul 
showing  many  signs  for  encouragement. 

Our  schools,  or  most  of  them,  are  in  a  decidedly  improved 
[condition  in  eomi)nrison  with  what  tlicy  have  been  years  be^ 
fore.  Teachers  are  much  better  qualified,  especially  us  far  ai 
the  common  branches  taught  in  school  arc  concerned,  but  thej 
ire  generally  quite  dostitnte  of  historical  knowledge  and  genera 
nformation.  It  has  been  my  aim  during  the  year,  to  indnci 
;hem  to  devote  more  time  to  reading  and  studying  histories 
ind  other  valuable  works.  While  ray  examinations  have  beei 
equally  strict,  I  have  grant^'d  a  greater  number  of  higher  grad 
;ertificates  than  in  any  previous  year.  During  the  Spring  ex 
iminations  I  granted  77  certificates;  1  of  the  first,  13  of  th' 
lecond,  and  63  of  the  third  grade.  There  were  then  alrcad; 
a  force  from  previous  examinations,  S  first,  and  22  soconi 
'radc  certificates. 

I  have  visited  nearly  all  the  schools  in  the  county  each  term 
)ut  I  notice  many  directors  fail  to  report  my  visit.  My  visil 
irc  usually  about  two  hours  in  length.  The  distance  fVom  on 
loiise  to  another,  or  the  bad  roads,  usually  prevent  my  (fivin 
k  full  half  day  to  each  school. 

At  the  Stat«  Institute  which  you  condiicted  at  Ithaeu  tlij 
Tall,  there  were  seventy-seven  teachers  present,  who  give  nnan 
Dous  testimony  as  to  the  pleasure  and  profit  derived  fn» 
t;  the  most  of  them  never  having  attended  one  before. 
lave  taken  a  teachers'  class,  which  was  well  attended,  throug 
.  six  weeks  term  this  Fall. 

Several  now  school-houses  have  been  erected  during  the  yea 
DUO  at  Alma  costing  five  thousand  dollars,)  but  nil  of  thei 


78  PtIBUC  INSTRUCTIOK, 

If  the  patrons  of  the  bcIiooIb  would  give  the  teachers  nu 
eocoaragement  and  connsel,  most  of  those  tetuihers  that  n 
fail  would  succeed  very  well,  and  all  our  schools  would  bi 
great  deal  better  than  they  now  are. 

But  while  the  patrons  of  the  schools  make  it  a  point  to  fi 
all  the  fault  and  pick  all  the  flaws  with  the  teacher  thai 
vigorous  imagination  thoroughly  trained  in  that  direction  c 
possibly  invent,  and  that  too,  in  presence  of  their  children,  a 
then  sending  them  to  school  witli  their  minds  filled  with  pi 
udice  against  the  teacher,  and  feeling  that  they  are  unfit  t 
anqualified  to  fill  the  office  of  teacher,  is  it  any  wonder  tl 
so  many  teachers  fail  to  give  satisfaction  under  such  circn 
stances,  and  are  they  really  wholly  responsible  for  that  failu: 
We  cannot  expect  our  schools  to  be  anything  near  what  tl 
might  be  until  the  patrons,  teachers  and  superintendent 
heartily  co-operate  to  secure  their  advancement.  Most  of 
school-houses  throughout  the  county  are  very  good,  some 
excellent,  well  finished  and  furnished,  and  are  an  omam 
and  a  blessing  to  the  country  around  them ;  while  a  tew 
unfit  for  use ;  but  steps  are  being  taken  in  most  of  such  i 
tricts  to  build  new  ones.  In  visiting  the  schools  I  could 
help  but  notice  that  those  districts  where  the  patrons  were 
t«rested,  and  where  they  were  managed  on  the  liberal  princi 
that  they  were  far,  very  far  in  advance  of  those  that  were  c 
ducted  on  the  penurious  penny  system.  While  the  fon 
uniformly  spoke  of  having  had  very  good  teachers,  the  lai 
found  fault  with  nearly  all  of  theirs.  And  was  it  really 
teachers,  or  the  influence  that  was  brought  to  bear  upon  th 
that  made  the  difierence?  In  addition  to  the  one  hund 
and  seventy  district  schools  of  the  county,  we  have  seven  gn 
schools.  One  at  Reading,  reporting  146  children,  occupy 
two  houses,  and  employing  two  teachers.  One  of  their  hoi 
is  new,  but  not  as  good  aa  they  expect  to  have  in  a  fev  ye 
The  Lansing,  Saginaw  and  Fort  Wayne  R.  R.  has  just  b 
completed  to  that  place,  and  the  citizens  hardly  know  at  prea 


supebintendknt's  beport.  73 

what  the  futare  of  the  place  is  going  to  require,  in  the  shape  of 
school  accommodations;  but  when  the  minds  of  the  people 
lie  fdlly  made  up,  we  are  confident  the  enterprising  spirit  of 
the  people  will  do  something  worthy  of  praise.  Cambria  Mills, 
a  small  Tillage,  reporting  one  hundred  and  eleven  children,  has 
biult  the  past  summer,  a  yery  nice  brick  house,  at  an  expense 
gf  some  sis  or  seven  thousand  dollars,  a  sure  indication  of  the 
enteipriae,  intelligence  and  prosperity  of  the  people.  The 
village  of  Osseo,  on  the  Southern  R.  R.,  reporting  133  children, 
has  a  very  nice  brick  house,  worth  some  five  or  six  thousand 
dcrfhrs,  and  is  sustaining  a  very  good  school  indeed. 

Litchfield,  another  town,  reporting  205  children,  with  no 
railroad  communication,  is  sustaining  a  good  Union  school  un- 
der the  supervision  of  Prof.  Jackson.  Allen,  a  thriving  little 
town  on  the  Southern  B.  R,  reporting  164  children,  has  nearly 
completed  a  new  brick  house,  at  an  expense  of  910,000.  Jones- 
▼iOe,  an  enterprising  place  on  the  Southern  B.  B.,  reporting 
44S  children,  has,  the  present  school  term,  been  occupying 
thdr  new  school  building,  unequaled  perhaps  in  architectural 
Beauty  and  richness  of  finish,  by  any  other  school  building  in 
the  State,  in  a  place  of  equal  size ;  costing  $40,000.  The  school 
it  conducted  by  Prof.  Mc  Clelan,  a  gentleman  well  qualified 
fiyr  the  place  he  occupies,  and  assisted  by  an  able  corps  of 
teadiers,  and  an  enterprising  school  board.  The  city  of  Hills- 
dak  reports  992  children.  They  have  one  Union,  or  central 
bvUding,  costing  some  840,000,  and  there  was  a  school  employ- 
ing 13  teachers,  all  under  the  direction  of  Prof.  0. 0.  Bobertson ; 
a  teacher  who  for  clearness  and  thoroughness  of  instruction, 
haa  but  few  equals,  and  perhaps  no  superiors  in  the  State.  He 
it  alao  aaaisted  by  an  able  corps  of  teachers  and  an  energetic 
•cliool  board. 

And  last,  though  not  least,  we  have  the  Hillsdale  College ; 

an  inatitntion  that  has  done  much  for  the  educational  interesta 

«f  this  and  other  places.    Though  it  stands  outside  of  my  field 

of  labor,  not  being  connected  with  the  county  schools,  we  hope 

10 


74  PUBLIC   INHTBCCnON. 

to  be  pardoned  for  briefly  referring  to  it.  Hillsdale  us  » t 
and  the  high  educational  attuinments  of  the  county,  ore 
debted  much,  very  much,  to  Htllgdale  College.  Hills^ 
County  has  just  cause  to  bo  proud  of  her  educatioual  facilit 
Too  much  cannot  be  said  in  praise  of  those  men  who  havetl 
earnestly  labored  for  the  moral,  intellectual  and  Christain  < 
ture  of  the  youth.  The  intelligence,  prosperity  and  happit 
of  the  people  is  a  monument  to  their  praise,  more  loating  tl 
the  hardest  granite,  which  is  worn  away,  though  slowly,  by 
wasting  finger  of  time ;  and  if  the  work  has  been  done  i 
special  reference  to  the  good  of  man,  and  the  glory  of  God,  t 
have  no  reason  to  fear  that  they  will  not  he  ubundai 
blessed. 


HURON  COUNTY— Cii A KCY  Chapman,  SlVt. 

I  notice,  by  a  comparison  of  the  present  list  of  County 
perintendenta  with  the  former,  that  our  people,  in  decidiuj 
change,  in  the  election  of  a  Superintendent  for  the  second  te 
only  followed  in  the  wake  of  one-half  of  the  Statr,  juat  one- 
the  number  of  the  old  counties  which  reported  an  electio 
a  County  Superintendent,  reporting  a  new  name:  so  t 
whilst  we  abide  the  inconveniences,  and  endure  the  evils  < 
frequent  change  of  officers,  we  may  plead  the  bad  cxamp] 
sister  counties  ua  an  ckcusc  for  this  exhibition  of  our  folly, 
console  ourselves  with  the  fact  that  many  other  conutiee 
losing  a  similar  force  with  ourselves,  in  this  great  worl 
bringing  a  new  man  into  the  field. 

Very  much  would,  I  think,  be  gained  by  the  people,  bj 
lecting,  at  as  early  a  date  as  practical,  the  best  maa  for 
position,  and  then  holding  him  to  it;  thereby  securing  a 
formity  of  action  for  a  term  of  years,  and  avoiding  the  coi 
ual  bickering  of  past  ofUcers,  against  present  iDcnmbents 
their  acts. 


sndbkt'b  rbpoht.  75 

it  of  my  term  of  office,  wbicli  was 
p  to  tlie  first  of  November,  I  have 
'  first  grade,  16  of  the  second  grade. 
ive  made  appointments  for  a  nnm- 

bnt  have  never  had  an  attendance 

one  candidate  at  a  time. 

certificates  in  the  countj,  granted 
hold  over  this  date.  The  present 
ew  law,  meets  a  rerj-  favorable  re- 
hail  the  plan  of  free  schools  (aa  it 
»f  better,  and  more  efficiont  school 
imately  combines  the  interests  of 
jf  the  Parents  and  Guardians  in  a 
ittire  of  all  snms  raisMl  for  school 

B  its  universal  handmaid,  a  strong 
in  imperative  demand  for  a  higher 
Gcationa  of  teachers:  if  the  schools 
r  money,  we  want  good  schools,  and 
re  competent  and  willing  to  earn 
jat  little  more  than  to  expend  the 
jmplifllied  by  our  schools,  generally 
having  only  the  legal  school  term 

fall  I  have  visited  the  schools  in  V2 
county,  have  met  a  welcome  recep- 
l  schools,  with  the  hearty  expression. 
I  come  in  often,  I  want  to  learn  to 

school  had  contracted  a  dislike  to 
,  but  you  have  made  a  different  im- 
est  school  we  can  have  with  our 
onclusively  a  rising  interest  in  the 
an  appreciation  of  the  system  of  one 
ly  of  the  districts  have  determined 


76  POBIIO  INSTRUCTION. 

upott  longer  terms  of  Bchool  than  the  law  requires — : 
to  ten  months. 

At  their  annual  meeting  the  one  district  in  the  tow 
Port  Austin,  formed  itself  into  a  Qraded  school,  the 
the  county — a  step  out  of  the  beaten  path  of  the  comi 
trict ;  they  resolve  on  maintaining  a  school  the  year  ' 

They  have  a  new  house  iu  a  good  state  of  progress 
struction ;  the  lower  story  ready  for  plastering,  whi 
propose  to  do  for  winter  school.  The  house  is  303 
with  a  side  entry,  stairway,  &c.,  20x33  feet,  and  will  coi 
finished,  about  four  thousand  dollars. 

Other  places  are  strongly  agitating  the  subject  of  b 
some  districts  passed  a  voto  to  do  so,  but  none  are  mi 
that  direction  this  fall,  except  at  Caseville,  the  MUl  con 
building  a  small  house  30x30  feet,  which  it  is  expe< 
district  will  assume  when  it  is  finished. 


INGHAM  COUNTY— Geo.  W.  Brown,  Sop'' 

I  have  the  honor  to  report  that  the  interest  in  < 
school  education  in  Ingham  county  is  steadily  int 
This  is  evinced  in  the  care  of  school  boards  to  employ 
more  competent  than  those  heretofore  employed,  also 
plying  their  schools  witli  many  of  the  necessary  aids  t 
Tenieuces,  without  which  no  school  can  succeed.  I  hi 
to  impress  Bchool  boards  with  the  importance  of  unifo 
text  books.  Many  have  adopted  a  uniform  series  to 
in  their  schools,  while  many  others  ought  to  do  so  at  o 

The  teachers  uniformly  seem  interested  in  their  worl 
ing  the  best  methods  of  instruction ;  pupils  are  enc 
and  stimulated  to  habits  of  study  and  thought,  so  esa 
their  progress;  parents  and  friends  are  becoming  na 
more  interested  in  the  general  management  and  welfai 
Bchoola  District  No.  1,  village  of  Mason,  is  building 
school-house,  which,  when  completed,  will  rank  am 


HTBNDBJrr'8   KBPORT.  77 

the  State.  Other  dietricte  have  bailt 
leir  wants.  Manj  have  built  new  out* 
,  made  fences,  and  improved  the  school 
te  a  number  contemplate  building  new 
nch  remains  to  be  done  by  district 
iends  of  education  generally,  to  give 
y,  bnt  with  persistent,  energetic,  well- 

I  be  accomplished. 

nch  the  same  neglected  and  scattered 
ng  been  done  by  way  of  improvement. 

II  examinations;  have  examined  504 
anted  314  certificates,  as  follows,  viz: 
of  the  second,  76 ;  of  the  third,  226. 
8  to  report 

a  contain  many  mistakes  too  glaring 

pecification.    I  hare  sent  some  back 

rare  returned  not  materially  improved. 

8  they  are. 

1  among  the  schools,  many  of  which 

lirectors. 


Y— E.  Y.  W.  Beokaw,  Sup't. 

ike  the  following  report  of  the  schools 
year  ending  October  10, 1869 : 
at  the  year  past  has  been  one  of  pro- 
Knowing  the  wants  of  the  schools 
ideavored  to  meet  them,  and  am  not 
th  the  resnlts  of  my  efforts.  Though 
as  much  as  I  had  wished,  yet,  on  the 
nany  respects  there  has  been  a  marked 

iricts  in  the  county,  including  Union 
there  are  aeven,  employing  in  the 


78  I'UBLIC   IK8TKUCTI0N. 

aggregate,  HQ  teachers.  Tlic  whole  number  of  teachers 
to  sapplj  all  the  schools  is  168. 

DariDg  the  year  two  new  districts  have  ))een  formed- 
Oiatrict  No.  9,  and  Otisco,  District  No.  0,  this  lat: 
formerly  a  branch  of  the  Otisco  Union  school.  I 
only  two  private  schools  in  the  county. 

I  am  glad  to  report  the  condition  of  our  school-h< 
improving.  New  ones  are  being  built — large  and  well 
— and  old  ones  that  will  do,  are  being  refitted  and  ni 
fortable.  The  matter  of  ventilation  is  receiving  coi 
attention,  and  in  nearly  all  the  new  houses  provisioj 
to  ventilate  near  the  fioor.  A  large  amount  of  b1 
surface  has  been  put  into  all  the  new  houses. 

I  have  held  33  public  examinations;  have  csan: 
teachers,  and  granted  certificates  to  320.  Of  these, ' 
first  grade,  137  second  grade,  and  176  third  gra 
number  of  second  grade  certificates  is  increased  ve 
over  the  number  of  the  same  grade  given  last  year 
number  of  third  grade  has  decreased  in  the  same  rat 

The  standard  for  all  certificates  has  not  been  lov 
on  the  other  hand  there  has  been  a  gradual  increas 
given  the  past  year  have  averaged  a  higher  perceni 
any  previously  given. 

As  a  general  thing  teachers  have  made  especial  e£ 
themselves  for  the  work,  and  only  those  who  were 
of  securing  certificates  have  applied.  Those  coufc 
teaching  are  now  pursuing  studies  with  that  especial 
and  we  have  reason  to  believe  that  in  the  course  of  a 
at  most,  we  shall  have  in  the  field  only  those  who 
make  teaching  a  business. 

Two  State  Institutes  have  been  held  in  the  coui 
Spring  one  in  South  Boston,  with  an  attendance  of  &'■ 
last  September  at  Portland,  with  an  attendance  of  1! 

Of  the  300  attending  both  Institutes,  nearly  all  v 
teachers  or  those  preparing  for  that  work. 


iUPEKINTKKDEMX'S  BBPOBT.  70 

teachers  a  report  at  the  close  of  each  t«rm — 
mmber  of  pupils  enrolled,  average  attendance, 
lays  lost  by  absence,  number  of  vieits  fh)m 
I  parents,  and  the  number  of  pupils  neither 

lose  are  given,  and  to  cncli  1  send  u  "  Certifi- 

the  lost  summer  schools,  between  four  and 

eee.    I  publiBh  abstracts  of  these  reports  in 

I,  pablisbing  the  names  of  those  receiving 

onor." 

that  the  percentage  of  attendance  will  be 

he  coming  winter  term.    If  there  is  any  one 

lave  paid  more  than  common  attention,  it  is 

tadance;  believing  that  here  is  one  of  the 

ting  our  schools. 

ual  increase  of  interest  among  the  people  in 

ation,  aud  the  Free  school  law  is  cheerfully 

ounty. 


,  COUNTY— T.  E.  Hahrison,  Sop'r. 

I  experience  I  have  had  as  Superintendent  of 
nty,  and  besides  the  duties  of  the  office  being 
le  during  that  part  of  the  year  when  but  few 
rill  necessarily  prevent  my  giving  a  very  full 
I  know  of  two  schools  only  that  were  in 

last  mouth. 

ny  predecessor,  Mr.  Young,  in  visiting  some 
>r  to  his  resignation,  and  these  visits  enabled 
;  observationa    The  cause  of  education  is 

progress,  and,  I  thinlc,  is  keeping  pace  with 
lents  of  this  new  county.  All  the  school* 
a  to  see  are  in  good  repair,  and  aa  comfort- 


80  PUBLIC    IMSTBUCnON. 

able  aa  ordinary  log  bnildicgs  are  espected  to  be.  The  higl 
Bpecial  tax  that  has  been  reqaired  of  the  people  in  Bome  i 
tricte  since  the  close  of  the  var,  has  been  for  the  purpos 
building  school-bouses.  Two  very  good  frame  houses  were 
np  during  the  last  year,  each  costing  about  $900.  Occas 
ally  we  find  a  few  people  who  are  disposed  to  complain,  1 
fortunately,  a  decided  majority  willingly  support  the  comn 
school,  and  favor  education  generally. 

I  am  grateful  to  know  the  rate  bill  has  been  abolished— 
free  school  system  being  more  satisfactory  t«  teacher 
patrons.  The  wages  of  teachers  during  the  past  year  avei 
as  follows:  Males,  t30.63  per  month,  including  board; 
males,  $15.56  per  month,  including  board. 

An  uQusaal  interest  seems  to  hare  prerailed  among 
people  at  the  annual  meeting,  from  the  fact  that  a  proport 
atfily  larger  amount  than  formerly  was  voted  for  school  ] 
poses,  and  all  the  directors  who  have  applied  to  me  for  teacb 
are  not  willing  to  hire  such  as  they  have  had  heretofore ; 
good  teachers,  those  who  have  had  experience,  and  "  know  t 
business,"  are  required  to  "fill  the  bill."  I  am  glad  of  thii 
it  will  have  a  tendency  to  elevate  the  standard  in  this  cou 
If  the  people  are  contented  with  third  and  fourth  class  tei 
ers,  and  do  not  feel  the  necessity  of  procuring  the  best,  it 
difficult  matter  for  the  Snperintendent  to  accomplish  muc! 
his  efforts  to  benefit  the  schools. 

In  examining  teachers,  I  have  been  guided  by  the  demi 
of  our  schools  and  my  own  judgment.  Some  teachers,  1 1 
are  deficient  in  the  different  branches,  but  have  a  facull 
preserving  order,  and  conducting  schools  with  considei 
success.  My  method  of  grading  certificates  has  been  ace 
ing  to  the  number  of  questions  correctly  answered, 
questions  are  given  on  each  branch.  Ten  signifies  very  g( 
nine,  very  fair;  eight,  good;  seven,  fair;  six,  medium,  &c 
have  deemed  it  proper  to  refuse  a  certificate  of  the  third  g: 
when  the  grade  of  any  branch  is  less  than  sLt.    During 


dpebintendent'8  report.  81 

>rt  Fox  granted  one  certificate  of  the  first 
f  the  second,  and  twenty-three  of  the  third 
young  granted  one  of  the  second,  and  eight 
.  These  figures  are  according  to  the  dupli- 
in  my  posBession.  I  have  given  two  of  the 
f  the  third  grade. 

had  time  to  hold  a  Teachers'  Institute,  but 
s  soon  as  1  visit  all  the  schools  in  the  county. 
iacher,  an  association  of  this  character  last 
by  Mr,  Fox,  and  my  esi)erience  then  only 
Id  as  a  self-evident  fact,  after  attending  a 
leetings  in  other  places, 
have  eonaiderod  the  propriety  of  opening  a 
of  eight  or  ten  weeks  during  the  coming 
teachers  and  those  who  desire  to  qualify 
;  teacher's  work.  I  have  made  known  the 
oee  I  have  met  ut  examinations,  and  all 
:>  suppoi't  a  school  of  that  kind, 
my  pLins  and  purposes  for  the  coming  year, 
heir  development  with  "  great  oxpcetations." 
lit  the  report  of  John  Young: 

s  visited 24 

re  who  have  tanght  more  than  5  years.       1 
"  "       less  than  1  year. . .       7 

"        had  no  previous  experience      5 
t  in  each  school,  two  hours. 

s  met  in  school 5 

rs  who  have  attended  Institutes 3 

ichers 21 

nade  with  directors 7 

i  opened  during  summer 24 

attending  schools 685 


PUBLIC    ISSTRCCnOX. 


JACKSON  COUNTY— W.  Ikying  Bknxett,  Slp't. 

In  making  the  subjoined  report  I  would  beg  leave  to  c 
your  attention  to  tlie  fact,  tliat  it  is  more  strictly  a  sen 
aanual  than  au  annnal  one,  dating  back  to  my  assumption 
the  duties  of  the  office  in  May  last,  anteriorly  to  wliioh  tii 
I  have  no  reliable  data. 

STATISTICS. 

In  the  compilation  of  the  following  statistics,  though  ac( 
racy  lias  been  striven  for,  yet,  I  fear,  only  approxirant 
attained,  owing  to  riiany  imperfect  and  deficient  reports. 

There  are  in  this  county  one  hundred  and  siity-tli 
school  buildings,  witli  an  aggregate  of  two  hundred  and  a 
departments.  Of  this  iiumlwr,  forty-two  are  brick  stmctn: 
one  hundred  and  fifteen  frame,  two  atone,  tlirec  log,  and  ■ 
grout 

The  valuation  of  scliool  proiwrty  in  the  county  is  t33S,( 
The  total  bonded  and  floating  debt  of  school  districts,  on 
first  of  September,  amounted  to  $48,158  28.  A  large  shan 
this  indebtedness,  however,  ftill  be  liquidated  during 
present  school  your.  The  expenditures  for  the  sui>port 
schools,  building,  repairing,  etc.,  with  surplus  funds  on  ha 
auiouuted,  during  tlic  last  school  year,  to  $113,061  52.  Tl: 
have  been  employed  during  tJuit  time,  three  hundred  ; 
thirty-five  (qualified  teachers — eighty  being  males,  and 
hundred  and  fifty-five  females.  The  i>resent  year  will  cxh 
a  larger  iirojwrtion  of  males  employed  than  last. 

LIBKARIES. 

The  condition  of  the  district  libniries  is  deplorable, 
system,  I  am  convinced,  is  devoid  of  vitality.    The  degene: 
remains  of  tlie  former  town  libraries  may  be  found  (if  foi 
at  all)  musty  and  "ruinously  old,"  in  garix'ls.  consi^no<l 


hcpeki^ttexuemt's  beport.  83 

rf.  No  iatcrcst  is  felt,  no  ileaire  uxpressed, 
that  tho  condition  of  these  district  libraries 
i.  The  era  of  public  school  libraries  has 
I  BO  efforts  oil  the  part  of  the  Superintendent 
tlicm.  NGWB)mpers  have  usurped  the  place, 
necessity,  to  a  greiit  I'stent,  of  these  libraries ; 
their  nsofulueaa,  why  shonUl  they  now  be 


st  six  niout)is  there  have  uppeikred  for  esam- 
dred  and  sixty  uppliennts.  Of  this  number, 
1  tweiity-eix  received  certificates,  twenty-eight 
i  the  remaining  six  withdrew  before  the  ex- 
completed.  Of  the  certificates  granted,  five 
t  grade ;  twenty- tlu'ce  of  the  second  grade ; 
of  the  third  grade. 
D  remark  in  this  connection,  that  the  required 

first  and  second  grades  have  been  materially 
!  of  last  year.  For  the  winter  term  it  was 
higher  average  was  necessarj",  even  for  the 
tificates;  and  To  instead  of  G5  hundredths 
as  the  average  standing  in  tlie  different 
lefieiencies  of  applicants  arc  most  apparent 

branches,  respectively:  Geography,  mental 
ing  and  reading;  also,  a  fair  specimen  of 
rely  met  with  in  the  written  examinations. 
:tudents  from  the  graded  schools,  too  young 
k]  to  teach,  and  yet  sustaining  saitisfactory 
ve  received  •'  corapliraentary"  certificates, 
en  twelve  instances  of  certificates  from  other 
idorsed  and  approved  for  this. 

(JRAllKD   SCHOOLS. 

;  time  have  the  gi'aded  soliools  of  the  county 
Drmly  a  healtliy  and  prosperous  condition  as 


84  PUBLIC   INSTRCCTIOK. 

at  present.  The  attendance  has  increaBed  llirgely  during  tl 
present  term,  and  the  interest  manifested  by  patrons  and  tt 
commiiDity  at  large,  has  kept  pace  with  their  general  advnnci 
ment.  There  are  at  present  thirteen  graded  gcIiooIb  in  tl 
county,  employing  5S  teacliers,  and  having  an  attendance  • 
3,100  pupils. 

In  the  more  thickly  settled  rural  neighborhoods  the  plan  < 
nniting  two  or  more  districts  and  hiiildiug  schools  on  tl 
Union  model,  i*  being  thoroughly  discussed,  and  will  result, 
trust,  in  the  merging  of  weak  and  eneiTated  schools  in 
strong  and  efficient  ones.  Several  small  hamlets  and  villag 
are  in  pressing  uccd  of  graded  schools,  and  I  cannot  don 
that  the  want  will  evenfually  be  supplied  in  these  cases  lik 


VISITATION"    OF   SfllOOLa. 

During  the  past  summer  nearly  one  hundred  and  thii 
scliools  and  departments  were  visited.  An  average  of  hali 
day  was  spent  in  each,  the  length  of  visit  being  regulated 
the  size  and  condition  of  the  Bchool.  Notes  were  takeu  of  I 
attendance,  deportment,  methods  of  recitations,  test  boo 
condition  of  bnildings,  and  such  other  items  as  might  be  u 
ful  for  reference.  I  am  glad  to  be  able  to  state  that  sumn 
terms  of  school  were  sustained  in  all  the  districts  throughi 
the  county  with  three  exceptions  only,  in  two  of  which 
deficiencies  wei-c  remedied,  so  that  no  injury  resulted.  A  la 
proportion  of  the  summer  schools  were  conducted  in  a  reas 
ably  satisfactory  manner;  some  few  were  eminently  euccesB 
while  others  were  total  failures. 

That  the  schools  have  made  decided  advancement  un 
the  county  superinteudency,  there  is  sufficient  evidenc* 
prove,  and  admissions  of  this  kind  arc  frequent  from  tl 
formerly  hostile  to  the  system.  Yet  we  feel  little  cuuse 
self-congratulation  in  view  of  the  intinitudo  that  is  yet  U 
accomplished,  and  the  meager  harvest  that  is  garnered  a 
the  most  untiring  labor. 


SCPERINTEXDENT'a  BEPORT. 


IS3T1TCTES. 


riy  Teachers'  Institnte,  which  was  inaugnrated  by 
essor,  held  its  third  annual  session  in  the  city  of 
he  2Tth  and  2Sth  days  of  August.  The  attendaace 
-averaging  about  one  hundred  teachers — forty-four 
ng  attended  an  institute  before.  lu  addition  to  this 
ititute.  four  town  institutes  have  been  held,  as  fol- 
rompkins,  Henrietta,  Concord  and  \apo1eon,  the 
tendance  at  these  being  thirty-seven.  The  interest 
siaam  manifested  by  the  teachers  at  these  institutes 
lative  of  future  benefit  to  the  schools  under  their 

he  utmost  faith  in  the  amount  of  good  which  may 
ilisbed  by  means  of  these  instituteB,  believing  tliat 
r  way  can  so  much  be  done  to  advance  the  interests 
'  education.  As  the  teacher  is,  so,  to  a  great  extent, 
•Jiool  be,  and  any  means  which  may  be  adopted  to 
era  a  just  view  of  their  duties  and  responsibilities, 
irect  improvement  to  our  schools. 

HCUOOL  "MOSITOS." 

ilication  of  a  school  journal  devoted  to  the  cause  of 
Qcatiou  and  free  schools,  styled  the  Jackson  School 
H-as  commenced  in  September  last.  In  point  of 
^  it  is  equal  to  any  similar  paper  in  the  State.  Its 
ilation  of  two  thousand  copies  in  the  countVi  was 
vithout  difficulty,  on  ike  gratuitoua  plan.  It  has 
L  very  warm  reception  from  the  teachers  and  others, 
It  that  it  may  be  the  means  of  aiding,  in  some  de- 
ise  which  needs  not  only  all  the  labor,  but  all  the 
that  can  be  brought  to  aid  it 

IN    CONCLDSION, 
it  close   this  hasty  report  without  expressing  my 
hanks  due  to  the  people  of  the  county  at  large,  the 


PDBLK:    IsaTBUCTIOS. 


Echool  officers  aud  teachers,  and  the  members  of  the  board 
supervisors,  for  many  acts  of  kindness  bestowed,  and  the  a 
which  they  have  rendered  me  in  Hie  proeecution  of  my  dutii 


KENT  COUNTY— H.  It.  Fallass,  Srp'x. 

We  hiiTC  about  two  hundred  scliool  districts,  wiiich  empl' 
about  two  hundred  and  thirty  teachers.  Our  schools  are  ge 
orally  doing  well,  and  arc  constantly  iniproTing,  as  is  cvinc 
by  the  fact  that  the  teachers,  almost  all  of  them,  are  studyin 
not  only  for  the  purpose  of  bearing  a  better  examination,  a 
obtaining  a  higher  griidc  certificate,  but  also  for  the  purp( 
of  accomplishing  more  in  the  school-room.  A  large  niiml 
of  them  also  touch  one-half  of  the  school  year,  and  attc 
school  the  other  half,  and  in  this  way  improve  their  edacati 
very  rapidly,  as  is  shown  by  comparing  their  oxaminutions 
two  or  three  years  ago  with  those  of  late. 

The  fall  examinations  are  not  finished  yet.  so  1  eaimot 
port  the  number  aud  grade  of  the  winter  teachers'  certificat 
but  of  those  already  granted,  two  were  of  the  first  grade,  ei| 
of  the  second,  and  seventy-five  of  the  third ;  in  all,  eighty-f 

I  have' visited,  siuce  the  first  of  May  last,  all  of  the  schc 
in  fifteen  townships,  except  the  few  that  were  not  in  sesa: 
when  I  went  through,  leaving  nine  to  visit  next  winter, 
fbuud  that  several  teachers  were  keeping  school  withont  a  < 
tificate,  expecting  that  when  the  superintendent  eumc  aroi 
to  visit  them  that  would  be  time  enough  to  be  cxiudIikhI, 
in  two  cases  they  failed  to  come  up  to  the  required  standi 
aud  had  to  close  their  schools.  I  also  found  that  a  few  tes 
ers  who  talked  the  theory  o(  teaching  very  well,  made  very 
work  ])utting  it  in  practice. 

I  was  not  a  little  surprised  to  find  such  a  marked  differc 
between  those  teachers  who  had  attended  a  State  Institnto 


siPEKiMEX dent's  report.  87 

had  not.  In  nearly  every  case  the  former  maDnged 
dIs  so  (liffereDtly  and  su  much  better  that,  after 
ew  eelioulit,  I  could  tell  thom  by  their  management 

many  of  our  distric^tH  have  adopted  the  practice  of 
me  terms  a  year  instead  of  two.  making  about  nine 
■hool  instead  of  six,  seven  or  eight,  us  before,  and 
t  the  months,  or  parts  of  the  months  of  July  and 
rhiH  course  Ih  found  to  secure  a  better  attendaoce, 
le  children  feel  more  sjiirit  to  work  in  <^ool  weatlier 
gii  the  excessive  heat  of  jnidsummer, 
still  a  very  few  old  log  and  old  frame  school-honses 
ut  fit  to  hold  schools  in,  but  every  year  is  substi- 
he  place  of  such  those  that  are  large,  well  arranged, 
me  cases  well  ventilated.  Wo  have  seveml  in  the 
It  cost  from  *10,000  to  #50,000.  and  two  districts 
he  last  annual  meeting,  one  $8,000  and  the  other 
itb  which  to  commence  the  ereelion  of  ii  couple 
brick  buildings. 

pie  are  U-ginning  to  feel  and  lo  lulk  more  upon  the 
education,  which  I  consider  a  mark  of  improve- 
:yiusc,  in  bringing  about  any  great  reform  in  our 
:  is  first  necessary  to  convince  the  people  that  it  is 
nd  u.s  aoon  iis  they  begin  lo  inquire  about  the 
d  into  their  management,  tbe  necessity  of  a  great 
wars  at  once. 

g  ago  it  was  a  rare  thing  to  iieiir  two  men  talking 
r  school,  unless  percliance  they  were  district  officers, 
higgling  with  some  teacher  about  a  dollar  or  two  a 
his  wages;  now  it  is  not  so  much  about  the  price, 
e  teach  and  govern  our  school?  Our  school  has 
0  take  care  of  itself  so  long  that  we  must  have  an 
ler,^  4c. 

e  school  system  is  very  popular,  and  tlic  men  are 
e  who  would  be  willing  to  go  back  to  the  days  of 


88  PUBLIC    IXSTRUCTIOir. 

duns  for  school  bills.  One  thing  more,  however,  is  neede 
that  18,  to  compel  those  that  do  not  feel  disposed 
give  their  children  the  benefit  of  the  law,  to  Bend  them 
school.  The  men  that  pay  heavy  taxes  say  it  will  coat  us 
more  to  educate  all  of  the  children  than  tbree-fourths 
them,  and  it  certainly  is  no  more  than  right  that  eyery  chi 
should  have  the  benefit  of  the  money  that  we  pay  for  him. 


KEWEENAW  COUNTY— G.  R  Dwelley,  Sdp't. 

The  school-houses,  furniture,  out-buildings  and  grouni 
are  substantially  in  the  same  condition  as  last  year.  There 
the  same  insufficiency  of  apparatus,  and  the  same  lack 
growth  in  the  libraries.  There  has  been  the  usual  misappi 
priation  of  library  funds.  Nine  applicants  foi  certificai 
have  been  examined,  and  nine  certificates  issued ;  of  the  fii 
grade,  one ;  of  tlie  second  grade,  three ;  and  of  the  third  gra< 
five.  There  has  been  one  private  school,  with  one  teacher  ai 
thirty  pupils.  Of  its  character  and  influence  I  can  repc 
nothing,  as  I  know  nothing. 

The  public  acliools,  as  a  whole,  deserve  commendation  1 
the  work  of  the  year.  They  are  backward,  and  the  best 
them  have  serious  defects,  but  they  have  done  many  thin 
well ;  much  that  they  have  done  ill  they  tried  to  do  well,  ai 
where  they  have  failed,  success  was,  perhaps,  beyond  reaso 
able  hope.  The  teachers  are  for  the  most  part  quite  impi 
fectly  educated,  but  I  have  always  found  them  frank  in  t 
confession  of  their  deficiencies,  and  gratified  for  aid  a 
advice.  One  of  my  first  acts  as  superintendent,  was  to  gj 
notice  that  all  recipients  of  first  and  second  grade  certiSea 
must  give  satisfactory  proofs  of  qualification  in  all  the  stad 
prescribed  by  law.  The  immediate  fruits  of  this  rale  -va 
several  third  grade  certificates.    Soon,  howeTer,  requests  ; 


superintendent's  report. 


89 


Usta  of  text-books  began  to  be  made,  and  now  all  holders  of 
certificates  of  the  lowest  grade  with  my  signature,  are,  with  a 
angle  exception,  actively  at  work  to  secure  promotion. 

My  plan  for  the  improvement  of  the  schools  during  the 
current  year  includes  frequent  visits,  annual  examinations,  a 
Teachers'  Institute,  lectures  in  the  different  towns,  and  con- 
saltations  with  the  district  boards.  In  visitations,  I  devote 
most  of  the  time  to  the  drill  of  classes — pointing  out  errors, 
foggefiting  remedies,  illustrating  better  methods  of  instruc- 
tion,  and  endeavoring  to  infuse  fresh  life  into  teacher  and 
tutght  By  annual  examinations  I  design  to  give  a  wider 
publicity  to  the  merits,  faults,  aptitudes,  and  incapacities  ex- 
isting at  present  in  our  school-rooms.  Recommendations  to 
district  boards  will,  I  am  positive,  result  in  an  increase  of 
^ipamtos.  Already,  in  two  of  the  districts,  the  officers  have 
pffomised  to  purchase  such  articles  as  I  advised. 

Bat  this  work  of  mine  can  weaken  to  a  limited  extent  only, 
che  strongholds  of  school  inefficiency.  The  most  potent  reme- 
dies lie  in  legislative  action.  I  have  here  entered  a  field  too 
brood  for  adequate  treatment  in  the  limits  of  this  report,  and 
must  content  myself  with  little  more  than  mention  of  disease 
and  care. 

The  worst  hindrance  to  progress  our  schools  encounter,  is 
Ae  extreme  irregularity  in  attendance.  Parents  and  guard- 
iizu  are,  in  an  alarming  degree,  indifferent  to  educational 
Qfiportiinities.  Of  the  whole  number  registered  during  the 
fmsL  year,  forty-six  per  cent  has  been  the  average  attendance. 
Bat  the  remaining  fifty-four  per  cent,  by  no  means  represents 
the  1008.  Term  after  term  many  children  never  once  attend 
■chooly  and  all  cease  to  attend  at  an  unusually  early  age ;  con- 
tly,  the  register — though  a  good  index  as  far  as  it  goes 
to  mark  the  full  extent  of  irregularity  and  absence* 
Farther,  the  pupils  of  yesterday  are  not,  in  any  large  pro- 
pQrtkm  the  pnpils  of  to-day,  and  this  interruption  of  oon- 
tiamty  in  the  instruction  subtracts  much  from  its  value.    In 

12 


90  PUBLIC   IN8TRCCTI0S. 

repeated  instances  it  has  been  founit  us  difficult  to  re 
even  the  skeletons  of  classes  as  for  a  General  in  a  lost  bi 
to  prcBcrvc  the  organization  of  his  brigades.  Scanty  retn 
in  such  eircum stances,  must  follov  the  most  spirited 
dcavors,  and  the  reaction  on  the  teacher  is  very  unfavon 
It  quenches  his  entbnsiasin,  and  ]}alsies  his  ambition,  i  tl 
it  no  exaggeration  to  state  that  by  this  colossal  evil  of  irr 
lar  attendance,  the  worth  of  our  schools  is  reduced  tw 
third  of  their  possible  offectiveneas.  Wise  legislation  c»n 
a  stop  to  much  of  this  ruinous  waste  of  money  and  el 
In  my  opinion,  au  additional  section  in  the  school  law, 
appropriate  provisions,  wonld  be  a  more  powerfnl  checl 
this  blight  of  irregularity,  than  a  ccnturi^  of  argument 
expostulation  from  Supcrintondents. 

A  second  hindmnce  to  progress  is  the  want  of  nnifor 
in  text  books.  The  existing  variety  seems,  wherever  it 
vails,  to  l)c  deplored  as  a  calamity,  but  in  this  connty,  w 
from  local  causes,  the  population  is  almost  as  mi^p-uto 
birtis  of  passage,  it  works  especial  injury.  It  is  no  un 
mon  thing  for  children  to  attend  school  in  thret-  difl 
districts  in  the  same  year,  and,  as  tht;  little  nomads  carry 
Ixioks  with  them,  teachers  find  a  satisfactory  classificati 
their  schools — previously  difficult  enough  from  fbcdiverg 
authors  in  the  home  supply — a  labor  of  Hercules.  The 
cient  remedy  for  all  this  mischief  is  such  an  amendnn 
the  school  law  as  shall  fake  the  power  to  prescribe  text  : 
from  the  district  boards,  and  lodge  it  with  the  connty  S 
int^ndents,  or  with  the  Superintendent  of  Public  InBtm 

A  third  hindrance  to  progress,  and  the  last  to  which  ] 
call  attention,  is  the  r|uality  of  the  instruction  in  our  sc 
We  need  a  corps  of  teachers  with  a  riper  culture,  and  i 
far  more  complete  mastery  of  the  arte  of  develojimcn 
communication.  I  do  not  wish  to  wound  anybody's  fe< 
but  truth  compels  mc  to  say  that  there  arc  much  better  cdii 
in  the  world  than  we  have  in  this  connty,  and  that  h  di' 


PUBLIC  INSTRUCTION. 


LAPEER  COUNTY— Jamks  H.  Vincent,  Sup't. 

SCMMARY  OF   LABOR. 

This  anuual  report  will  embrace  the  record  of  my  of 
work  from  Nov.  Ist,  1868,  to  Nov.  lat,  1869. 

Number  of  public  schools  in  the  county,  one  hundred 
twenty-two.  Number  of  graded  or  union  schools,  five, 
ploying  from  two  to  nine  teachers.  Number  of  digtrictB 
ing  to  sustain  schools  during  the  winter,  two ;  during 
summer,  one.  Nnmbor  of  schools  visited  during  the  wi 
ninety-eight ;  during  the  summer,  ninety-two.  Whole  i 
ber  of  visitations  made  during  the  year,  one  hundred 
ninety,  uot  including  more  than  one  visit  to  a  school  di 
the  same  term.  Number  of  miles  traveled,  one  thou 
eight  hundred.  Number  of  days  devoted  to  official 
during  the  year,  two  hundred  and  forty-one.  Average  tii 
each  visit,  two  hours.  Whole  number  of  persons  exan 
for  teachers'  certificates,  two  hundred  and  thirty-two.  V 
iinmber  liaving  received  certificates,  two  hundred  and  el 
Number  of  first  grade  certificates  granted,  three ;  s< 
grade,  sixty-oue;  third  grade,  one  hundred  and  forty-sevf 

LNION   SCHOOLS. 

The  five  union  schools  employ  nineteen  teachers.  T 
tliese  schools  have  two  departments  each ;  one  foni 
eight,  and  one  not  in  full  operation.  Two  of  these  have 
graded  this  year.    Two  partially  supplied  with  apparatus 

SCHOOL-HODSBS. 
During  the  year  a  large  number  of  school-houseB  have 
repMred  and  several  new  ones  bnilt.  Perhaps  I  ana  to< 
ticular  as  regards  seats  and  ventilation;  hut,  should 
work  for  the  health  of  the  children,  as  well  as  their  e 
Hon?    There  are  five  school  buildings  in   the  eoanty 


bcperinibkdent's  BEPOUT.  93 

constructed  and  arranged,  and  three  properly 
:ill  I  feel  hopeful,  for  the  i^oplc  are  beginning 
e  health  and  comfort  of  their  children.  More 
buildings  arc  being  constructed,  school  gronnds 
liere  appears  to  be  n  general  disposition  to  im- 
ccommodations.  Number  of  frame  buildings, 
and  seven ;   log,  fourteen ;   brick,  two ;   plank, 

supplied  with  sufficient  black-boards,  thirty ; 
res,  scTenty-fivo.    Number  painted  outside  and 


SCHOOLS,  BOOKS  AND  ST0DIE8. 
schools  in  which  the  Bible  ia  read,  fifty.  Num- 
ith  school  registers,  thirty.  Number  supplied 
ies,  thirty.  I  have  visited  all  but  two  of  the 
id  most  of  them  twice.  In  those  districts  where 
d  patrons  make  frequent  visits,  I  find  the  best 
ral  of  the  winter  schools  cume  near  closing  on 
e  billti.  That  is  past,  I  hope  never  to  return. 
;hty-threc  per  cent,  of  the  children  attended 
the  year,  I  find  a  great  lack  of  uniformity  of 
ver  twenty-five  per  cent,  being  uniform.  Dis- 
ley,  and  the  children  precious  time,  by  this  neg- 
ir  is  taught  in  leas  than  fifty  per  cent,  of  the 
tal  arithmetic  (except  primary)  in  less  than 
r  cent,  while  orthography  (e.\cc]>t  spelling)  is 
n  the  schools. 

EXAMINATIOSS. 

iminations  of  teachers  were  held  during  tho 
pril  and  October,  and  each  Saturday  in  May 
>r,  at  Lapeer.  Those  occurring  in  October 
re  held  in  the  various  townships  as  tho  law 
joard  of  supervisors  allow  me,  for  the  nextyeai 


FUBLIC    IKSTRUCTIOK. 


Id  coQuhision,  I  will  a&y  that  I  liave  beeu  treated  i 
oourtesy  aiid  reapect  by  the  puoplc  of  the  county,  which 
gircn  me  courage  and  a  lighter  heart  for  the  work.  May  t 
prosper  and  our  schools  improve. 


LEELANAW  COUNTY— S.  J.  HuTcHiNaoN,  Sup'x. 

On  the  first  day  of  June  last  I  lirat  entered  upon  luy  di 
of  county  superintendent  of  schools,  and  since  that  time  \ 
made  two  tours  for  examination  of  teachers  in  the  eight  to 
dhips  of  the  county,  and  a  round  of  tuenty  visits  in  the  sei 
districts  of  the  same, 

I  have  held  no  "  Teachers'  Institutes,"  but  in  lieu  of  tl 
have  practiced  meeting  the  teachers,  district  boards,  and  o 
n-iends  of  education,  as  circumstances  allowed,  passing 
time  in  consulting,  suggesting  and  advising  as  to  the  best  m 
of  teaching  the  scholar  self  dejjcndeuce  in  study,  powt 
expressing  thought,  and  eliciting  of  moral  sentiment — t 
great  aims  in  education ;  also,  the  best  test-books  to  be  i 
apparatus  required,  use  of  Idack-boanls  and  drawing  si 
ventilation  and  warming  of  the  school-room,  and  everyt 
pertaining  to  its  economy.  Have  urged  upon  them  the  f 
ing  of  large  districts,  discouraging  fractional  ones, 
thougli  they  may  in  some  cases,  at  present,  seem  the 
convenient;  but  have  advocated  large  districts,  tliey 
securing  better  teachers  and  longer  terms  of  school,  will 
e\i>enBe  to  the  )iatroiis, 

I  have  advised  the  fonnation  of  township  libraries  iu 
ferencc  to  distiict.  In  the  tlistrict  library  the  books  be 
scattered,  and  then  the  library  comes  to  nought.  More 
the  readers  are  limited  to  the  few  volumes  that  may  be  all 
each  district,  while  in  the  township  libmry  the  book 
within  the  i-eacb  of  all  (herein  residing.  The  libnu-y  m 
in  most  ca^-es,  be  located  at  or  near  the  post  office,  whi 


60  PEKINTSX  debt's   REPOBT.  95 

jqneiited  by  the  people,  and  thus  do  away  with 
of  "too  great  distance"  for  exchanging  books, 
r  libraries  in  tliis  county,  three  bnt  gemis ;  tlie 
Leelauaw  township  Library,"  numbers  between 
r  hundred  volumes  of  well  selected  works. 
y  is  new,  the  population  few  and  scattered,  yet, 
I  soil  and  peculiar  climatic  conditions  favoring 
f  fruit,  we  may  hope  for  wealth  and  the  conse- 
to  do  much  for  education  in  u  not  far  distant 
t  is,  it  requires  hope  and  patience;  but  a  good 
1  great  step  toward  the  end, 

0  impress  upon  the  teachers  tlie  necessity,  upon 
constant  advancement  in  mental  culture,  and 

iieir  being  adepts  in  the  several  branches  which 
ired  to  teacb.  I  find  bnt  few  eqiml  to  the  public 
^L  Have  given  two  first  class  certificates,  twelve 
and  eighteen  third  class,  making  in  nil,  thirty- 
ejected  two  applicauta  In  several  instances,  as 
ecessity,  I  bare  been  obliged  to  give  certificates 
ere  not  merited,  in  order  that  schools  might  be 
Certificates,  in  tlieir  three  degrees  of  grading,  I 
<iuate  in  representing  all  degrees  of  qnalificatiou, 
have  the  indications  in  each  of  veri/  good,  good, 
poor,  attached  to  the  several  branches  examiuoil 
^  may  1k'. 

hree  government  schools  among  the  Indiaus  on 
which  extends  over  a  large  portion  of  this  county, 
ion  of  free  schools,  and  the  other  conditions  of 
There  is  one  graded  school  in  the  village  of 
i'his  is  held  in  the  new  school-house  erected  last 
s  a  fine  frame  building,  well  finished,  and  has 

1  for  a  year  past.  Excepting  this,  a  small  frame 
lie  village  of  Leeland,  and  a  gravel  wall  house  in 
r  filen  Arbor,  the  school  buildings  are  all  log 


%  PUBLIC   INSTRL'CTIOS. 

houses,  and    iiiiinber  twenty-four.      Of  districts,  there 
twenty-five  whole  and  ten  fractional. 

The  interest  in  educational  matters  is  lively,  and  were 
means  equal  to  the  interest  shown,  school  affairs  would  1 
prosperous  as  could  be  desired. 

Eradication  of  the  "rate  bill" — a  goi-m  uncongenia 
human  nurture  and  culture — was  a  humane  act,  omtnoi 
good,  and  one  that  meets  the  hearty  approval  of  the  peop 

County  euperintendency,  in  its  provieions  and  result 
well  received,  and  its  aclvautages  over  the  old  method,  in 
economy  and  efficiency,  generally  conceded. 

By  vote  of  the  board  of  supervisors,  my  services  have 
limited  to  fifty  days,  at  three  dollars  per  day  for  days  of  ai 
service,  which  is  allowing  scarcely  enough  time  or  remi 
ation  for  the  work,  even  in  this  new  county. 

As  above  suggested,  we  confidently  believe,  tbat  as  so< 
this  county  becomes  entirely  occupied  by  white  popnlo 
our  schools  will  rank  among  the  foremost  in  the  State. 


LENAWEE  COUNTY— C.  T.  Bateman,  Sup't. 

The  number  of  districts  in  this  county,  as  rci)orte<l  b 
township  inspectors,  is  one  hundred  and  ninety-eight — 
crease  of  one.  The  number  of  graded  schools,  including 
independent  union  districts,  is  twelve.  Four  of  these  en 
two  teachers  each,  the  other  eight  from  ihnti  to  thirty 
The  whole  number  of  teachers  necessary  to  run  the  echo 
this  county  is  two  hundred  and  sixty-one.  The  uuml 
visits  made  to  district  schools,  and  to  the  different  departi 
of  graded  schools,  is  two  hundred  and  fifty.  Sis  new  st 
houses  have  been  erected  since  my  last  report,  all  of  wliit 
good  buildings.  One  of  these,  in  East  Blissfield,  cost 
six  thousand  dollars ;  another  one,  a  branch  of  the  TecM 
union  school,  from  eight  to  ten  thousand  dollars. 


H'PEK1NTENI>KNT'S    BEPOET.  97 

istitutej  have  been  held,  but  a  Normal  class 
pt  16th,  1869,  of  about  thirty  teachers,  and 
ion  sixteen  days.  The  course  of  study  con- 
ir  series  of  recitations  and  reviews  of  tlie 
I  tauglit  in  district  schools,  and  familiar  lec- 
i  of  teaching  aud  governing  schools.  The 
certificates  f;ranted  since  last  report,  is  iHS ; 
5  second  grade,  aud  233  third  grade.    The 

have  now  closed ;  the  attendance  has  been 
alL  In  some  of  the  towofihips  no  caudidateB 
lination.  About  one-half  of  the  teachers  of 
amined  at  my  oflice. 

t  year  the  schools  liave  generally  done  well, 
idvanccment  haa  been  noticed.  There  have, 
me  failures,  but  not  as  many  as  heretofore. 
ve,  in  nearly  all  coses,  been  from  a  want  of 
Our  graded  schools  are  all  of  them  in  a 
ion.  A  majority  of  our  districts  have  pro- 
for  tlio  coming  school  year,  and  inst«ad  of 
arc  rapidly  adopting  the  system  of  having 
rear. 

oks  and  apparatus,  there  has  been  but  little 
report.  A  variety  of  text  books  still  hinders 
irtain  schools,  but  efforts  are  being  made  to 

There  is  a  great  want  of  apparatus,  and  but 
i  been  noted. 

I  would  say  that  there  has  been  an  encour- 
edncational  matters  in  this  county,  and  the 
e  adrancemeut  is  good. 


PUBLIC  INSTECCTION. 


LIVINGSTON  COUNTY— Wm.  A.  Speout,  Sup*!. 

I  prepared  for  publication  in  the  county  »  somewhat 
nute  report  of  my  ofScial  work  thus  fer,  and  of  edocatit 
progress  within  my  jurisdiction,  which,  judging  to  be 
lengthy  for  your  purpose,  I  give  the  following  synopsis: 

I  have  granted  certificates  aa  follows :  First  grade,  sev 
second  grade,  thirty-six  ;  third  grade,  one  hundred  and  t 
four ;  total,  one  hundred  and  ninety-seven.  I  have  reje 
thirty-eight  applicants.  In  deciding  npon  the  qualificat 
of  candidates,  I  have  adhered  quite  strictly  to  the  stant 
adopted  by  the  Association  of  County  Superint«ndeiiti 
their  meeting  in  July  of  last  year.  ^ 

The  examinations  of  this  fall  indicate  increasing  int^ 
and  more  thorough  preparation  on  the  part  of  the  appUci 

During  the  summer  I  made  seventy  visits.  The  tcac 
very  generally  were  active,  earnest,  and  meeting  with  a 
measure  of  success. 

The  neat  and  tidy  appearance  of  the  school-rooms,  so  fi 
the  teachers'  care  could  make  them  so,  was  especially  wo 
of  remark — so  different  from  the  condition  of  things  n 
years  ago. 

Two  District  Teachers'  Associatioiis  have  been  organi 
one  of  which  —  the  Hartland  Teachers'  Association,  : 
Cronse,  President — has  held  three  meetings,  attended 
increasing  interest.  At  its  next  meeting,  Jan.  8th.  18' 
County  Teachers'  Association  is  to  be  organized. 

I  have  edited,  with  some  degree  of  regularity,  an  e( 
tional  column  in  each  of  our  two  county  papers,  whicli 
been  read  with  interest,  and,  1  think,  with  beneficial  resu 

The  free  school  law,  I  believe,  gives  general  satisfaction 
few  opiiose  it  through  ignorance  of  its  provisions  and 
ciples,  and  a  few  otliers  whose  parsimony  exceeds  their  libei 
and  i>ublie  spirit. 


SUPERINTENDENl'S  REPORT.  99 

1  condition  of  our  Bchool-Iionsee  and  grounda  \a 
imended.  Want  of  care,  age  and  decay  render 
I  better  adapted  to  uee  as  corn-housea  than 
It  gives  me  much  pleasure,  however,  to  report 
treat  in  the  erection  and  proper  preservation  of 
ibstantial,  and  even  beautiful  school  buildings, 
priations  were  made  at  the  annual  meeting  for 
ilding  purposes,  and  ere  long  the  old-time  struc- 
e  had  their  day,  and  served  their  purpose,  will 
iway,  and  their  places  be  occupied  by  school- 

of  the  name. 

le  number  of  district  school-houses  visited  last 
!0  were  in  good  serviceable  condition.    Twenty 

situated,  and  so  fallen  to  decay,  as  to  be  quite 
:  10  had  no  privies;  29  were  surronnded  with 
inds,  but  only  5  of  tltese  had  received  any  im- 

the  way  of  fencing  or  shade.  Seven  school- 
ell  ventilated ;  quite  a  large  number  were  too 
,    Four  were  well  supplied  with  ordinary  school 

had  outline  maps ;  6  had  a  uniformity  of  books, 
s  read  in  18.  All  but  one  employed  female 
1  average  salary  of  t2  60  per  week  and  board, 
je  of  teacliers  was  20^  years. 

PRINCIPAL  SCHOOLS. 

past  two  years  several  fine  school  buildings  liave 
and  schools  established.  Tiic  Howell  Union 
gwaeerwtedin  1868,  at  a  cost  of  *30,000.  The 
ich  it  stands  has  been  graded  and  planted  with 
id  is  valued  at  $5,000.  The  school  is  furnished 
hical  and  chemical  apjiaratus  valued  at  tTOO. 
Murse  of  study  embraces  a  period  of  16  years; 
lary  and  intermediate  departments ;  two  in  the 
irtment,  and  foor  in  the  academic.    There  is  a 


103  PUBLIC  INSTBCCTIO». 

schools  much  atteution  has  been  paid  to  good  manners,  as  v 
as  to  books.  Many  of  our  teachers  are  Impi'eBsed  with  i 
belief  that  the  same  hand  which  deals  out  knowledge  in( 
criminately  to  all  the  children  of  the  school,  should  aim 
engraft  as  universally  upon  the  manners  of  all  these  child 
the  amenities  and  courtesies  of  life. 

Should  not  all  teachers  be  selected,  and  schools  inspect 
with  reference  to  this  object,  so  that  a  change  would  co 
over  the  manners  of  the  young,  which  would  add  a  new  cha 
to  society  ?  The  erection  of  new  and  beautiful  school-houi 
and  the  introduction  of  neat  and  elegant  furniture,  i 
greatly  facilitate  the  task  of  the  teacher  in  regulating 
intercourse  and  personal  habits  of  their  pupils.  A  8ch< 
room,  comfortable  and  neat  in  finish,  with  a  teacher  of  re& 
manners  in  it,  cannot  fail  to  elevate  the  sentiments,  taste,  t 
manners  of  the  pupils.  It  will  be  no  room  for  the  awkws 
ness,  rudeness,  and  vulgarity  in  behavior  and  speech,  t 
have  been  too  generally  tolerated,  and  sometimes  enconra 
in  our  district  schools.  The  refining  process  here  commen 
will  be  carried  into  the  social  circle.  The  lessons  of  pol 
ness  and  courtesy  that  may  here  be  learned  will  be  repeater 
every  fireside  and  practiced  in  every  relation  of  life.  Train 
the  young  to  deferential  deportment,  and  to  the  comn 
civilities,  the  absence  of  which  can  never  be  noticed  but  ^ 
grief,  should  be  regarded  as  most  appropriate  and  imputi 
work  in  our  public  schools.  There  has  been  a  marked 
provement  also  in  the  mode  of  instruction  and  managexn 
of  our  schools  during  the  past  year.  Our  teachers,  genen 
have  shown  an  anxiety  to  inform  themselves  in  regard  to 
more  approved  methods  of  instruction  and  discipline  wii 
view  to  their  practice. 

6CHOOL-H0USE8. 

In  my  first  annual  report  allusion  was  made  to  our  ecli 

houses,  representing  that  these,  as  regards  comfort  and    < 


■PEBINTENDEHT'a   REPOET.  103 

rally  full  far  short  of  what  they  should  he. 
)ort  that  during  the  past  two  years  twenty- 
lave  been  erected  in  the  connty.  Nearly  all 
itial,  convenient  and  tasteful,  highly  cred- 
its in  which  they  are  located.  Of  the  113 
4  are  f^mc,  14  brick,  2  stone,  and  3  log, 
estitute  of  out-buildings.  Twelve  have 
imented  with  trees  ant)  shrubbery. 

SCHOOL   ATTENDANCE. 

^rm  Reports,  adopted  two  years  ago,  is  still 
visiting  the  schools,  the  teachers  are  sup- 
ports, to  be  filled  out  and  forwarded  to  me 
term ;  and  these  furnish  a  formal  statement 
each  school  in  respect  to  attendance  and 
They  are  kept  on  file,  to  be  handed  over 
its,  to  my  successor  in  office.  Abstracts  of 
shed  in  the  School  Journal.  This  system 
inly,  in  the  hope  that  it  might  aid  in  se- 
nd punctuality  in  attendance.  The  system, 
granting  of  Cards  of  Honor  to  those  schol- 
d  as  not  absent  during  the  term,  is  accom- 
:  than  was  anticipated.  All  this  is  but  a 
ever,  to  accomplish  what  might  and  ought 
I  by  suitable  legislative  action.  Is  it  too 
motto,  Let  compulsory  attendance  follow  the 


EXAMINATIONS, 

Ltions  of  teachers  were  held  during  the 
id  October.    The  spring  series  were  held  at 

central  points  in  the  county ;  each  exam- 
two  days,  and  much  time  was  given  to  a 

the  methods  of  teaching  and  managing 
leries  were  held  in  the  several  townships,  in 


104  PUBLIC   INBTRPCTIOX. 

compliftQcc  with  law.  All  the  examinations  were  both 
and  written,  ae  heretofore.  Managing  ability,  being  coi 
ered  as  important  as  scholastic  attainment,  was  taken 
account  in  the  granting  of  certificates.  The  examinatii 
each  candidate  was  accurately  marked,  and  the  certifii 
granted  bear  upon  their  face  the  per  cent  of  questione 
gwered  in  each  branch  of  study ;  also  the  average  mar) 
cared  in  both  the  oral  and  written  examination.  A  com] 
record  of  the  standing  of  every  applicant  for  a  certifical 
also  the  manuscripts  furnished  by  the  written  examina 
may  be  found  on  file  in  my  office,  for  inspection.  A  co 
iniitation  was  extended  to  all  citizens,  interested  in  the  ] 
perity  of  our  schools,  to  attend  these  examinations.  A 
special  examinations  were  held  during  the  year,  at  my  o 
to  accommodate  those  who  could  not  make  it  convenie 
attend  the  regular  ones. 

Number  of  applicants  for  teachers'  certificates  durinf 
year,  210 ;  number  receiving  certificates,  190 ;  number  hi 
had  experience  in  teaching,  157.  Number  of  first  grad< 
tificates  granted,  11;  second  grade,  04;  third  grade 
Number  of  qualified  teachers  residing  in  the  county  N 
1869, 163,  of  whom  22  held  first  grade ;  92,  second  grade 
third  grade  certificates,  and  four  Normal  school  and 
certificates.  Nineteen  certificates,  issued  by  other  ct 
superintendents,  were  endorsed  by  me  during  the  year, 

Ce.VNGE   OF  TEACHERU. 

The  frequent  change  of  teachers  is  a  great  hindrance  1 
rapid  improvement  of  our  schools,  operating  with  almoe 
varying  constancy  from  year  to  year.  It  is  evident  thi 
fellow  citizens  are  not  awaro  to  what  an  extent  these  cfa 
retard  the  progress  of  education  in  our  schools.  Every  t< 
commences  his  labors  in  a  school  with  which  he  is 
quaintcd  under  very  considerable  disadvantages,  which 
not  exist  if  he  were  not  a  stranger.    A  considerable  poii 


SUPErtXTENDENT'S   REPORT.  106 

a  brief  school  tenn  is  often  s|)ent  before  he  and  his  pupils 
come  to  a  good  understanding,  and  get  into  working  order. 
Bat  a  teacher,  between  whom  and  the  school  there  is  a  mutual 
aequaintaucey  has  many  important  advantages.  He  is  familiar 
irith  the  natural  characteristics  of  his  scholars,  and  this  is  a 
ciidinal  point  in  successful  school  teaching;  he  knows  their 
IHoficiency,  and  is  prepared  to  carry  the  school  forward  with 
rapid  progress  from  the  day  of  its  commencement.  This  sub- 
ject should  be  more  thoroughly  considered  by  our  district 
effioers  than  it  ever  yet  has  been,  and  when  employing  teach- 
«»,  should  have  reference  to  the  question,  if  they  may  not  bo 
seenred  for  a  succession  of  terms,  providing  they  prove  skill- 
hi  and  successful  instructors.  During  the  year  only  nine 
techers,  being  about  one-twelfth  of  the  whole  number  em- 
ployed in  the  rural  districts,  have  been  retained  in  the  same 
«rhooI  both  winter  and  summer. 

SCHOOL  VISITATION. 

The  visitation  of  the  schools  is  the  most  prominent,  and 
perhaps  the  hardest  part  of  the  superintendent's  work.  Num- 
ber of  different  schools  visited  during  the  winter,  113 ;  number 
of  different  schools  visited  during  the  summer,  114 ;  whole 
number  of  visitations  made  during  the  year,  264.  Whole 
nunber  of  days  devoted  to  visitations  and  other  official  work, 
t73.  It  has  been  my  purpose  to  make  these  visits  both  agree- 
able and  beneficial,  by  establishing  a  feeling  of  confidence  and 
tnwt  between  the  teacher  and  myself;  suggesting  hints  when 
needed,  by  which  the  character  of  the  instructions  may  be 
improved*  and  the  mode  of  discipline  bettered,  so  that  the 
kIiooIb  may  be  made  more  profitable  by  making  them  places  of 
Interest,  and  even  attractive  to  the  pupils.  It  has  been  my  aim 
ibo,  when  visiting  the  districts,  to  secure  personal  interviews 
one  or  more  members  of  the  district  board,  to  urge  the 
ty  of  "  aids  to  instruction ;"  of  a  uniformity  of  books, 
and  especially  of  school  visitation  on  their  part,  that  they 

14 


106  PCBUC  ISSTECCnOK. 

may  see  with  their  own  eyes  the  immediate  and  pressing  ne 
of  the  school  of  which  they  are  the  ohoeen  gnardians. 

From  my  Visitation  Book,  the  following  items  are  gathei 
Of  the  127  pnblic  schools,  58  have  a  uniformity  of  books, 
are  properly  classified,  52  in  which  the  Bible  is  read  as  a  dj 
exercise,  48  in  which  singing  occnrs,  38  in  which  attentioi 
given  to  map-drawing,  32  are  snpplied  with  some  enita 
"Aids  to  Instmction,"  as  outline  maps,  primary  chuls,  6 
66  supplied  with  Teachers'  Registers  by  the  District  Board, 
famished  with  an  Unabridged  Dictionary  by  the  DistricI 
Union  Schools  favored  with  philosophical  and  chemical  ap 
ratns  and  a  library,  13  (other  than  Union)  in  which  the  hig 
branches  are  taught,  and  16  schools  in  which  pupils  are  i 
fnlly  supplied  with  text-books.  It  most  be  said,  to  the  sha 
of  some  districts,  that  their  teachers  were  even  allowed 
famish,  from  their  scanty  means,  school  books  for  the  uei 
children. 

COCNTY   SCHOOL  JOUBNAL. 

The  School  Joumal  published  by  me,  is  now  completing 
second  year,  the  firBt  number  being  issued  in  January,  If 
It  is  a  quarto  sheet,  and  makes  its  appearance  qnarterly. 
has  a  tVee  and  equal  distribution  in  the  school  districts.  1 
wards  of  5,000  copies  have  been  issued  during  the  year.  ' 
aim  of  the  Joumal  is  to  keep  the  people  of  our  conaty  c 
stantly  informed  in  regard  to  their  own  schools,  and  thei 
awaken  a  more  lively  interest  in  them ;  to  consider  sabji 
relating  to  school  instruction  and  discipline,  and  bring  to 
attention  of  school  officers,  teachers  and  parents  their  res] 
tive  powers,  duties  and  obligatioos.  No  charge  has  been  m 
upon  the  county  for  its  publication.  It  has  been  suppoi 
mostly  by  advertisements  contributed  by  a  few  of  our  lib 
minded  citizens. 


30PEBlKlBNDENT'a  REPORT.  107 

STATE  teachers'  1N8TITDTE, 

^achera'  Institute  for  our  county,  held  at  Romeo, 
it,  was  a  very  profitable  one.    It  fully  raet,  I  am 

desires  and  wants  of  our  teachers.  There  were 
endance  upwards  of  one  hundred  teachers,  not- 

the  unfavorable  weather  during  the  week.  At 
!ie  Institute,  a  County  Teachers'  Association  was 
organized.  The  constitution  adopted  provides 
;al  meetings.  The  Association  already  numbers 
It  is  expected  that  every  teacher  in  the  county 
identified  with  it,  as  the  benefits  to  be  derived 

organization  are  fully  understood. 


ITTE  COUNTY— Chas.  C.  Yemans,  Sup't. 

county  is  the  •"  Iron  Region  "  of  Lake  Superior, 
Grand  Island.  The  county  is  now,  for  the  first, 
i  in  the  "Superintendent's  Report."  We  have 
ol  districts.  I  have  read  many  reports  of  the 
1  undeveloped  resources  of  this  region,  written 
,nd  travelers,  but  have  never  seen  it  reported  too 
ago,  understanding  our  present  and  prospective 
pushed  a  railroad  into  and  along  the  llineral 
we  have  a  railroad  from  Marquette  the  entire 
Mineral  Range,  and  the  capacity  of  both  roads 
[>  the  demand  for  shipment  of  iron  alone, 
lay  have  but  ten  districts  and  be  very  prosperous 
r  a  wise  policy  our  towns  are  not  divided  into 
ts.  Our  villages  are  very  compact  and  better 
ppy  organization  than  a  new  rural  region.  The 
plan  prevails.  Marquette  with  6,000,  Negaunee 
nd  Ishpcming  with  2,000  inhabitants,  are  undi- 
aving  a  good  union  school,  Marquette  having  a 


108  PUBLIC    1S9TBUCTI0N. 

The  iinmber  of  teachers  in  each  diBtrict  is  as  follows :  ) 
quctte,  aitiG ;  Xegaanee,  seven ;  l8hpeming,five,  and  one  ei 
in  Champion,  Edvrafds,  Clarksburg,  Greenwood,  Lake  Ai 
line,  Morgan,  CoIlioBville,  Cheirv  Creek,  Haircy,  Gr 
Island.    Total,  thirty-one. 

Mar<]uette  schools  have  Prof.  Olcot  for  principal,  which 
iiures  success.  The  course  of  study  includes  more  tl 
preparatory  course  in  the  Natural  Sciences,  and  a  full  ] 
paratory  course  in  Latin  and  Greek.  I  think  this  school 
have  n  class  prepared  for  the  University  each  year  after 
present. 

Negaunec  and  Ishpeming  schools  are  much  younger, 
will  take  rank  with  Marquette  in  a  few  years,  no  doubt. 

Our  schools  arc  quite  well  supplied  with  modern  appan 
Our  primaries  use  the  "  Word  Method,"  with  "  Webb's  Dissei 
Cards,"  and  moBt  rooms  have  blackboard  surface  suflScicn 
admit  of  the  approved  methods  of  spelling,  t'.  e.,  with  era 
and  pencil. 

At  this  time  five  school-houses  arc  being  built.  Twi 
Marquette — one  brown  stone,  one  brick ;  two  at  Ishpem 
each  with  primary,  intermediate  and  grammar  departin< 
and  one  at  Edward's  Mine. 

I  have  granted  in  all  thirty-four  certificates.  Of  the 
grade,  seventeen ;  of  the  second  grade,  nine ;  of  the  t 
grade,  eight.  Three  hold  "  second  grade  "  who  i>asBed  all 
studies  required  for  "first  grade,"  but  tlicy  had  not  taugh 
Michigan  the  required  time.  The  number  of  first  grade 
tificates  giveu  may  appear  too  large.  I  cannot  speak 
highly  of  our  school  boards  in  selecting  teachers ;  neither 
nor  money  has  been  spared.  Teachers  of  known  ability 
experience  have  been  found  in  Michigan  and  Wisconsin  w 
makes  the  superintendent's  report  favorable,  his  duties  p 
ant,  and  his  visits  to  the  several  schools  delightful. 


hupekintbnubkt'h  report. 


IN  COUNTY— Henry  H.  Hall.  Sup't. 

i  of  tlie  puat  year  bear  evidence  to  a  marked 

dyancement  in  matters  pertaining  to  our  school 

lis  county.    Sixteen  schools  hare  been  in  session 

ar,  all  supplied  with  qualified  teachers. 

t  year  will  mark  u  great  change  in  educational 

ir  county,  we  expect;   for  the  present  prospect 

resumption   that  the  number  of   schools    will 

(hool  property  proportionately  increase.    Schools 

ig  wonderfully  in  two  or  three  towuB,  and  we 

ope  that  this  will  be  but  common  soon  through- 

y- 

days  have  been  occupied  by  the  County  Super- 
visitation  and  examinations.  Certificates  have 
to  twenty-five  persons.  First  grade,  three  ;  eec- 
ight;  third  grade,  fourteen.  Three  have  not 
sfactory  examination,  consequently  denied  cer- 
one    certificate    has    been   annulled  —  reason. 

raded  school  in  the  county,  situated  in  the  vil- 
gton,  is  quite  prosperous  and  is  doing  a  good 
:atiou.  There  is  a  want,  generally  felt  and  ac- 
ind  until  wo  secure  competent  teachers  for  all 
e  want  cannot  be  met.  Every  year,  however,  is 
atter  better,  and  the  time  is  not  far  distant  when 
teas  within  ourselves  the  ability  to  meet  this 
thus  1)0  relieved   of   our    present    dependent 

the  past  year  to  be  the  prelude  of  a  still  more 
e,  and  that  in  the  future  will  bo  met  the  realiza- 
eaent  glorious  promise. 


PUBLIC  IN8THirCTI0if. 


MIDLAND  COUNTY-^.  R.  Joneh,  Sup^. 

The  period  covered  in  this  report  is  seven  months,  cIoe 
with  November  30.  The  educational  intereat  in  this  coai 
generally,  manifests  an  improved  condition  under  the  pree 
system,  as  the  efforts  being  put  forth  to  bring  our  schools 
to  the  standpoint  desired,  are  having  their  influence.  A  be 
grade  of  teachers  is  being  employed  for  the  winter  term  t 
previous. 

The  number  of  districts  reported  by  Inspectors  is  ninet 
of  which  five  new  districts  have  been  organized,  including 
old  and  one  new  district  in  Gladwin  county,  which  reporl 
nie. 

I  have  renewed  certificates,  and  given  new  ones  to  the 
eral  teachers, -either  at  regular  examinations  or  privately, 
number  of  certificates  issued  is  23 ;   number  of  second  gi 
5 ;  number  of  third  grade,  18 :  deferred,  1. 

Most  of  the  schools  are  in  working  order.  The  housei 
generally  comfortable,  A  number  of  houses  have  been  h 
and  are  in  process  of  construction.  Many  of  them  are 
houses,  but  are  warm,  and  furnished  as  well  as  the  aventj 
the  houses  from  which  the  children  come.  Children  a< 
tomed  to  log  houses  are  not  disturbed  by  them  us  those 
older  places  would  be.  Moi"c  is  depending  upon  the  tea 
than  the  house.  The  inhabitants  are  generally  providinj 
the  comforts  of  the  children  as  rapidly  as  in  older  places. 

One  graded  school  has  been  organized  in  Midland  Cil 
the  last  annual  meeting.    I  have  visited  nearly  all  the  scl 
during  the  summer,  some  of  them  two  or  three  times. 
number  of  visits  made  was  21. 

The  condition  of  libraries  in  the  several  towns  and  disi 
is  poor,  owing  to  the  fact  that  no  moneys  have  been  pa 
the  treasurer  for  a  number  of  .years.  Tlie  matter  wi 
looked  after  in  the  future. 


superintendent's  report. 


ON  COUNTY— Augustus  J.  Looms,  Sup't. 

hfl  are  too  brief  a  period  to  admit  of  very  exten- 
«ide  aud  careful  obscrvatioQ,  relative  to  the  im- 
i  of  the  office  of  county  superintendent,  to  which 
ed  the  third  of  May  last.  Yet  it  is  hoped  that 
igh  short,  has  not  been  altogether  unimproved, ' 
!  good  bae  already  been  realized ;  that  the  field 
1  Home  extent,  under  better  cultivation,  giving 
newed  and  continued  effort,  of  greater  good,  and 
re  abandant  harvests  in  the  future. 

districts  and  schools. 
i7  school  districts  in  the  county,  two  of  whicli 
obools.  Fifty-seven  schools  were  taught  during 
imer.  Length  of  terms  during  the  year,  from 
months  each.  Average  length  of  time,  6  0-20 
rteen  districts  had  no  summer  school. 

SCHOLARS   AND   ATTENDANCE. 

scholars  in  the  county,  as  per  InsjMictors'  Ee- 
several  districts  not  having  reported.  Number  of 
nool  2,955 ;  not  attending,  905,  (this  number  is 
irger).  Per  cent,  of  scholars  in  school,  76  5-13. 
.  in  school  in  any  town,  (Dalton)  53  5-13.  Great- 
in  any  town,  (Lowell)  91J.  It  is  probable,  in 
considerably  less  than  one-half  the  scholars  were 
ng  the  year  any  time. 

IE   AND    PER  CENT.  OF   ATTENDASCK. 

number  of  months'  school  during  the  year, 
ige,  207  17-20  ;  jwr  cent,  of  attendance  of  3,955 
or  40}  per  cent,  of  3,860  pupils.  If  the  scholars 
cere  taken  into  the  above  estimates,  the  school 


l\i  PLMtl.IC   ISSTE0CTIOS. 

attendance  of  the  wholf  Louiity  wore  equal  to  ubout  35 
cent,  of  all  the  scholars  during  a  term  of  6  9-20  monthi 
100  per  rent,  of  all  the  arholars  for  a  term  of  2J^  months. 

HOUSliS,  GKOUNDH,   FUKIflTUBH:,  if. 

'L'here  is  much  need  of  improvement  in  school  buildi 
The  good,  however,  as  well  UB  the  very  poor,  are  found  in 
■  ferent  parts  of  the  county.  Several  new  lionsoB  have  1 
erected  the  past  summer  aud  fall.  In  districts  of  lin 
means  the  material  in  some  cases  is  logs;  the  people  t1 
they  ai'c  the  best  they  can  afford  at  the  present  time.  A 
houses  only  are  entirely  enclosed  by  fences ;  some  are  part 
enclosed,  and  the  rest  have  play-grounds  of  almost  unlin 
extent.  The  grounds  of  but  few  have  been  improved  bj 
except  to  have  the  timber  removed,  which  usually  is  so  1 
uughly  done  that  not  a  tree  is  left  to  protect  from  the  v 
of  winter,  or  to  afford  shelter  from  the  summer  heats.  S 
however,  are  situated  within  the  most  beautiful  groves  oi 
and  pine  that  can  be  planted  by  the  hand  of  nature.  Sui 
out -buildings  are  sadly  deficient  in  many  districts.  9 
consideration,  as  well  as  decency  and  comfort,  demand  a 
tion  to  this  subject.  Very  few  schools  in  the  county  are 
iiiahcd  with  a  supply  of  pure,  cold  water  for  the  accomn 
tion  of  the  pupils  who  attend  them.  Ventilation  has  rec 
but  little  attention.  Maps,  globes  and  charts  are  found  in 
of  the  schools,  and  occasionally  a  copy  of  Webster's  Di< 
ary.  Blackboard  surface  is  quite  too  limited,  but  is  becc 
more  extensive,  and  there  are  some  clocks.  Some  of  the  i 
are  well  seated,  and  most  of  them  comfortably.  MncI 
provement  is  manifest  in  the  arrangement  of  seats  with 
around  the  room,  so  that  blackboards  will  be  ncct 
when  they  Ijecome  more  abundant.  Some  rooms  are  wi 
teachers'  desks,  tables,  or  chairs.  But  notwithstanding 
arc  many  deficieueics,  there  are  everywhere  indications 
increasing  spirit  of  progress,  and  better  houses,  with 


supebintendbkt's  beport.  113 

iindiDgB,  and  better  furniture  more  conveniently 
I,  gradually  take  the  place  of  that  which  now 
liall  by  no  means  be  disheartened  if  we  can  in- 
liers  to  come  nobly  up  to  their  work,  for,  really, 
depends  upon  the  accomplished  teacher,  with 
ndance  of  pupils,  for  success,  than  upon  all  the 
Qodem  improvements  of  houses,  furniture,  or 
ibined,  however  much  they  are  to  be  desired. 

VISITING. 
e  summer  schools  were  visited,  and  everywhere 
good  will  have  been  manifested  by  parents,  pu- 
lerB,  indicating  that  the  relation  of  County  Su- 
to  the  common  schools  is  one  with  which  the 
Isfied,  and  ready  to  co-operate. 

TEACHEB8. 
me  e.\cellent  teachers,  among  the  many  others 
rery  young,  with  a  limited  experience,  and,  too 
limited  knowledge  of  the  branches  they  are  ex- 
;h.  The  latter,  however,  with  few  exceptions, 
>fession,  are  earnest  workers,  anxious  to  t«ach 
,  good  degree,  appreciate  the  responsible  relation 
oward  their  pupils;  and  with  more  experience 
will  be  able  to  take  their  jilaces  with  others  who 
itt^ined  the  rank  of  good  teachers. 

CERTIFICATES. 

1  7  first,  14  secoJid,  and  40  third  grade — in  all, 
,  always  urging  the  importance  of  attaining  to  a 
tnl  of  qualification,  and  assuring  teachers  of 
laments,  that  their  ci>rtificates  are  not  likely  to 
Jess  some  progress  has  been  made,  and  that  ed- 
mals,  works  on  teaching,  institutes,  associations, 
ta  of  studiousness,  are  important  means  of  ac- 
he desired  object.     Five  certificates  have  been 


114  PUBLIC   IN8TBU0TI0N. 

renewed,  after  a  careful  re-examination,  vifch  rery  gn^ 
results. 

OPENINQ  EXERCISES. 
The  opening  eiercieea  are  usual  reading  of  the  Scripti 
singing,  and  aometimea  prayer. 

BOOKS  AND  LIBRARIES. 
A  diversity  of  booica  prevails.     Libraries  are  of  but  I 
account 

WAGES. 
Total  wages  of  teachers  for  the  year,  $13,637.27.  Ave 
wages  per  month,  $35.87^.  Average  wages  outside  gr 
schools,  434.02.  Males,  t36.00;  females,  $22.10.  "Boar 
around"  is  the  custom  in  many  districts,  bat  the  board  it 
included  in  the  above  estimate  of  wages. 

GRADED  SCHOOLS. 

There  are  two  graded  schools  in  the  county.  The  o 
Whitehall  has  three  departments,  under  the  superrisic 
A.  G.  Ellsworth,  Principal.  These  schools  are  well  condu 
and  in  a  fiourishing  condition. 

The  graded  school  in  Muskegon  has  thirteen  depurtm 
employing  fourteen  teachers.  C  L.  Whitney,  well  knon 
a  highly  qualified  teacher  throughout  the  State,  hai 
supervision  of  these  schools.  A  high  school,  a  grai 
school,  two  intermediate  and  two  primary  schools,  oocnp 
maia  building.  Each  of  the  four  wards,  except  No.  3, 
first  and  second  primary  departments;  the  latter  will 
both  at  the  commencement  of  the  winter  term  in  Jai 
next.  The  main  buUdiag  has  a  good  chemical  and  a 
loBophical  apparatus,  globes  and  outline  maps;  the  lat 
private  property.  A  students'  lyceum  connected  wit 
school  meets  every  Friday  evening;  the  debates  and 
exercises  are  animated  and  vigorous,  and  both    male 


PUBLIC   IK8TECCTI0K. 


shall  keep  pace  with,  and  control  onr  intelligence,  then, 
people,  we  may  be  truly  prosperous  and  happy. 


NEWAYGO  COUNTY— C.  Altos,  Srp'i. 

The  Bchools  of  this  conuty  havo  improved  considerabl 
the  last  year.  I  think  wo  have  better  qualified  teachers 
the  wiut«r  term  than  we  hare  been  before  able  to  secure  e 
my  appointment  to  the  office  of  County  Superintent 
Our  text  books,  althougli  not  yet  what  they  ought  to  be 
improTlng, 

I  hare  visited  nearly  all  the  schools  in  tlic  county  do 
the  past  year,  and  some  of  them  twice.  I  have  deliv 
lectures  wherever  I  thonght  it  would  be  beneficial,  upon  ' 
relatiTe  duties  of  school  officers,  parents,  teachers  and  schol 
And  throughout  the  county  I  havo  been  received  with  e 
marks  of  kindness,  and  listened  to  with  respectful  atten 
and  most  sincerely  do  I  hope  that  the  words  spoken  in  i 
evening  lectures  may  be  "as  seed  sown  in  good  ground." 

Dayton,   Shermau,   Ensley,   and    Big    Prairie,  have 
opened  a  new  school-house,  which  speaks  well  for  the  int 
taken  in  tlic  great  subject  of  education  in  these  townshi 
least 

We  have  hut  one  graded  school  in  the  county ;  this  is  lt> 
at  Newaygo  village,  and  under  the  care  of  N.  B.  Wallaci 
a  good  corps  of  officers,  is  doing  a  good  work  towards 
paring  teachers  and  raising  the  standard  of  educat 
interests  iu  onr  county.  I  have  held  public  examiuatio 
all  parts  of  the  county;  have  examined  one  hundred 
nine  applicants,  granted  five  1st  grade,  fifty  2d  grade. 
forty-throe  3d  grade  certificates.  Future  prospects  ar 
couragiiig  here,  parents,  teachers  and  school  officers  ar 
ginning  to  realize  the  importance  of  the  work  Iwfore  the 


SUPEBINTENDENT'S  KBPOBT. 


iNA  COUNTY— A.  A.  Daelino,  Sup't. 

now  fifty  school  diBtricts  in  this  connty.  Pent- 
art  have  each  a  union  gchool ;  Pentwater  three 
■t  two  teachers.  There  were  thirty-di  districts 
mer  school.  About  one-half  the  districta  have 
ime  school-houses,  the  balance  are  log,  and  some 
poor.    There  is  an  entire  lack  of  furuiture  in  all 

DDIS. 

BOOKS. 

)Ut  few  districts  that  have  a  uniformity  of  books, 
almost  as  many  claaseB  as  scholars. 

SCHOOL   VISITS. 

ted  most  of  the  schools  once,  and  a  few  twice, 
every  case  with  much  benefit  to  both  teachers 

EXAMINATIONS. 

nber  of  candidates  examined,  fifty ;  of  these  re- 
cites as  follows:  First  grade,  six;  second  grade, 
rd  grade,  twenty-five ;  rejected  six.  I  should  not 
;  many  certificates,  but  it  would  leave  the  schools 
tiers. 

[  no  Institutes  this  fall — the  roads  have  been  bad, 
bad;  and  worst  of  all,  there  is  a  large  number  of 
ling  that  have  families,  and  other  business  to 
d  teaching  is  with  them  only  a  good  means  of 
J  dollars,  without  that  interest  a  t«acber  should 
Luse  of  education. 

ole,  there  is  a  coming  up  in  the  cause  of  educa- 
neral  thing  parents  are  quite  as  much  interested 
cpected. 

[le  teachers  read  the  Bible  in  school,  and  some 
ritfa  prayer.    A  few  will  do  neither. 


118  PUBLIC  IN8TRCCTI0K. 

Judging  fh>iii  onr  improvement  in  t)ie  past  few  mouths, 
hope  to  succeed  in  the  glorious  cause  of  education,  and  hi 
the  children  of  Oceana  county  not  behind  any  in  leamii 
morality  and  position,  and  hope  to  make  a  good  report  in  I 
fntnrc. 


OTTAWA  COUNTY— A.  W.  Tavlok,  Rup't. 

It  affords  me  gi-eat  pleasure  in  thia  my  second  statcmenl 
the  Department  of  Public  Instruction,  of  the  cqnditioi 
the  schools  in  this  county,  to  be  able  to  report  them  c( 
mendably  progressive. 

teachers'  institutes. 
Since  my  report  of  my  labors  in  connection  with  the  8ch( 
■  of  the  county,  made  to  the  department  last  autumn,  f 
Teachers'  Institutes  have  been  held  in  as  many  differ 
points  in  the  county,  each  fur  excelling  in  the  numbci 
teachers  in  attendance  and  the  general  interest  manifestec 
the  various  topics  under  consideration,  the  preceding  « 
At  the  last  one,  held  at  Coopereville,  commencing  on 
12th  day  of  October  last,  seventy  teachers  and  upward  v 
in  attendauce.  The  influences  radiating  from  these  Institi 
to  nearly  every  school  district  in  the  county  has  wrong! 
marked  change  for  the  better  in  respect  to  discipline,  metl: 
of  instruction  and  general  efficiency;  and  so  generally 
this  pleasing  and  desirable  change  taken  place  that  very 
of  the  schools  indeed,  during  the  paat  summer  have  pre 
failures. 

SCHOOL  VISITATIONS. 

I  have  visited  nearly  all  the  schools  in  the  county  ti 
during  the  past  year,  and  several  of  them  the  third  ti 
spending  as  nearly  a  half  day  as  possible  in  a  school;  at  ( 
visitation  uniformly  taking  charge  of  one  or  more   els 


auPEBINTEKDENr'8  BEPOETi  119 

I  deemed  it  necessary  to  illnstrate  improved 
caching  to  a  comparatively  inexperienced  teacher, 
Jmelj  and  useful  liints  to  pupils,  as  to  deportment 
om  duties. 

SCHOOL  BUILDINGS, 
umber  of  first  class  school  buildings  have  been 
kriouB  portions  of  our  connty  during  the  past 
size,  architectural  taste,  convenience,  and  ele- 
h,  speak  forcibly  of  the  liberality  and  progressive 
[citizens  as  pertaining  to  popular  education. 

SCHOOL  LIBBAEIES. 

tter  of  school  district  libraries  but  little  if  any 
ly  of  note  haa  been  made  during  the  past  year. 

EDL'CATIOKAL   IMPEOVEMENTS. 

this  my  brief  report,  1  congratulate  the  teachers 
^,  many  of  whom  are  young  and  have  had  but 
ice  in  teaching,  on  the  marked  success  that  has, 
nces,  crowned  their  prompt  and  earnest  labors 
1  their  endeavors  to  promote  the  physical,  moral 
lal  well-being  of  their  pupils,  as  well  as  in  their 
nent  in  a  knowledge  of  the  sciences  taught,  and 
thods  of  teaching  them. 

are  due  and  tendered  the  various  school  boards 
ho  have  so  generously  aud  promptly  assisted  me 
to  promote  the  educational  interests  of  Ottawa 
;by  her  schools  are  assuming  a  very  pleasing  and 
nk,  in  point  of  usefulness  and  eflSciency,  among 
lister  counties. 


PUBLIC  IN8TRPCTI0H. 


SAGINAW  COUNTY— J.  S.  Goodman,  Sup^. 

Daring  the  year  jaat  closed  I  have  endeavored  to  disch 
to  the  best  of  my  ability,  the  duties  of  my  office.  Air 
have  I  learned  that  to  do  this  as  it  should  be  done,  in  a  coi 
geographically  as  large  as  this,  ia  no  light  task,  but  one 
offers  an  abundance  of  work  for  the  most  earnest  and  in 
trions.  As  I  look  orer  the  work  of  the  past  year,  while  '. 
painfully  conscious  of  defects  both  on  my  own  part  and 
on  that  of  the  school  officers  in  the  several  districts,  still  ] 
encouraged  by  the  belief  that  progress  has  been  made, 
that,  too,  in  the  right  direction.  The  great  importam 
better  schools,  and  the  consequent  necessity  of  abler  t«nc 
is  becoming  everywhere  recognized  and  disenssed.  Ii 
respect  I  notice  a  marked,  and  I  might  almost  say,  a  sti 
change.  When  I  first  entered  upon  the  duties  of  this  oi 
found  teachers  wages  very  low,  and  totally  insufiicient  t 
courage  any  to  fit  themselves  for  the  work  of  teaching 
the  same  time  there  seemed  to  be,  even  at  this  meager 
pensation,  a  full  supply  of  teachers,  or  at  least  of  those  ( 
ing  to  be  teachers.  Gradually,  however,  this  whole  sfc 
things  has  been  changing.  Wages  have  advanced  to 
compensation  for  serviccB  rendeifed,  and  in  some  cases 
liberal  salaries  are  paid,  and  yet  the  supply  of  teachers  is 
means  equal  to  what  it  was  three  years  ago.  It  is  true 
has  been  a  gradual  increase  in  the  qualifications  demau 
applicants  for  certificates,  and  it  is  further  tme  that  soni 
been  rejected  as  having  failed  to  meet  this  higher  dei 
but,  after  all,  the  percentage  of  rejections  has  been  toe 
to  materially  affect  the  matter.  Generally,  I  suppose, 
crease  in  price  brings  an  increased  supply,  but  in  this  in 
this  has  not  been  the  case,  and  to-day  it  is  more-  diffii 
find  teachers  at  from  six  to  ten  dollai's  per  week  thaa 


SUPBEIKTBNDBNT^S  REPORT.  121 

three  years  ago  at  from  three  to  six.  Especially  do  these  re- 
marks hold  good  with  reference  to  the  supply  of  young  men  as 
teachers  in  onr  winter  schools. 

In  seyeral  of  onr  districts  the  plan  of  having  a  fall,  winter 
and  spring  term  of  school  has  been  adopted,  though  I  am  not 
yet  prepared  to  speak  of  its  effect  so  far  as  increasing  the 
ayerage  of  attendance  is  concerned. 

Quite  a  number  of  school  buildings  have  been  erected  during 
the  year.  Among  the  most  noteworthy  of  which  are  two  in 
East  Saginaw  and  one  in  Chesaning.  These,  though  not 
quite  ready  for  occupancy,  will  be  finished  in  a  few  weeks.  The 
imilding  at  Chesaning  is  a  fine  two  story  brick,  costing  about 
$10,000,  and  is  to  be  occupied  by  a  graded  school.  In  the  village 
of  St.  Charles  an  effort  has  also  been  made  to  unite  the  two  dis- 
tricts, and  thus  have  a  union  school,  and  although  not  yet 
saccessfal,  still  I  believe  the  time  is  not  far  distant  when  it 
d&all  succeed.  In  other  districts  where  school  buildings  are 
greatly  needed,  the  steps  necessary  for  their  erection  have  also 
been  taken. 

In  another  respect  has  the  past  year  been  one  of  progress  in 
this  great  work  of  education.  I  refer  now  to  the  length  of 
time  school  is  to  be  taught  during  the  coming  year.  Many  of 
the  districts,  not  satisfied  with  merely  meeting  the  require- 
ments of  the  law,  and  thus  securing  their  share  of  the  primary 
school  fund,  have  gone  far  beyond  the  requisite  three  or  five 
months,  and  are  to  have  seven,  eight,  nine,  or  even  ten  months* 
school  during  the  ensuing  year.  Moreover,  they  have  so  ar- 
ranged the  school  terms  as  to  retain,  if  desirable,  the  same 
teacher.  I  think  I  may  safely  say  that  at  no  previous  time 
has  the  prospect  in  this  direction  been  so  good  as  it  is  to-day. 
la  shorty  with  not  a  few  of  the  districts  in  the  county,  the 
motto  seems  to  be  "  beiter  schoohy  better  teachers^  better  wages" 
I  will  not  say  there  are  no  exceptions,  or  that  in  no  sections 
diej  are  content  to  jog  along  after  the  old  style,  but  on  the 
whole  we  are  gaining  ground — are  moving  forward. 

16 


188  PUBLIC   INSTRUCTION. 

During  the  yuar  I  have  examined  two  hundred  and  b 
applicants,  and  have  given  two  certificates  of  the  first  gra 
seventeen  of  the  second,  and  one  hundred  and  sixty-six  of  I 
third.  Nineteen  applicants  have  been  rejected — about  ten  ; 
cent.  I  am  endeavoring  to  elevate  the  standard  of  exam 
atione,  and  thongh  the  progress  is  slow,  it  does,  nevertheh 
move. 

Of  school  or  district  visits,  I  have  made  one  hnndred  » 
BOTenty-five,  a  number  which  it  is  my  settled  purpose  larg 
to  increase  during  tlie  coming  year.  In  addition  to  this  we 
I  devoted  the  month  of  April  to  a  normal  class  for  tenchi 
This  was  held  in  the  city  of  Eaat  Saginaw;  lasted  the  en 
month,  and  was  attended  by  forty  teachers.  In  condnctiDg 
class  I  received  great  aid  from  Prof.  Estabrook,  to  whom  I 
under  the  greatest  obligations.  Nor  may  I  omit  to  ment 
the  school  board  of  East  Saginaw,  who  kindly  fnmiahed 
with  every  facility  in  their  power  for  the  succesaftil  prose 
tion  of  this  branch  of  the  work.  The  exercises  of  the  c 
were  pleasant,  and,  we  trust,  profitable  to  those  in  attendai 
and  the  inquiry  is  already  quito  frequently  made  as  to  whet 
we  may  not  have  auotber  session  next  Spring.  I  have  i 
endeavored  to  meet  with  the  Saginaw  County  Teachers'  Ai 
ciatiou  whenever  practicable,  dnring  the  lifetime  of  t 
organization,  and  Iiave  aided  in  holding  a  Teachers'  Instit 
at  Midland  City.  A  few  school  picnics  I  have  also  atten< 
and  have  spoken  to  the  friends  present  on  subjects  conne< 
with  our  educational  interests. 

Thus,  then,  hath  the  year  passed — a  year  of  close  and  t 
some,  and  yet  of  pleasant  labor — and  thus,  I  trust,  will  be 
year  to  come,  only  richer  and  more  powerful  in  its  inflae 
for  good;  more  IVuitfnl  in  its  results;  more  enduring  in 
successes.  And  thus  as  the  seasons  come  and  go,  may  eaci 
its  flight  witness  a  corresponding  improvement  until 
school  system  of  our  noble  State  shall  have  reached  the   1 


124  PUBLIC    INSTBUCTJON. 

LIBBABIES. 

Not  much  progress  can  be  reported  in  this  matter.  Dai 
the  coming  vinter  I  shall  make  an  earnest  effort  to  awakei 
interest  and  effect  a  reform. 

BXA1I1NA.TI0N9. 

Whole  number  of  certificates  granted,  two  hundred  : 
thirty-two,  graded  as  follows :  Of  the  first  grade,  six ;  of 
second  grade,  six ;  of  the  third  grade  two  hundred  and  twe 

A  number  of  candidates  have  been  rejected,  but  owinj 
the  thoroughness  of  my  predecessor  a  large  majority  of  d« 
quent  teachers  have  retired  from  the  "work,"  and  are  tr] 
other  means  to  gain  a  sustenance. 

I  do  not  wish  to  convey  the  idea  that  all  of  the  teacl 
who  hold  third  grade  certificates  are  third  rate  teachers, 
the  contrary,  many  of  them  are  first  class  teachers,  but  i 
have  not  studied  the  higher  branches  which  are  reqnired 
the  higher  grades.  A  large  number  of  tlie  third  grade 
tificatee  are  marked  above  80,  and  many  of  them  reach 
per  cent  in  most  of  the  branches.  Quite  a  large  uumbe 
teachers  in  the  county  are  preparing  themselves  for  a  hij 
grade  certificate  at  the  nest  examination. 

NOBUAL  tXASSEa  AND   IK8TITUTES. 

Normal  classes  are  held  in  connection  with  our  a 
schools,  at  Corunna  and  Owosso,  at  the  commencement  of 
fall  and  spring  terms.  These  classes  have  been  well  atten 
I  think  the  teachers  of  the  county  have  received  much  be 
from  these  classes,  and  if  they  are  properly  conducted 
will  receive  much  more. 

The  Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction  held  a  Stuti 
stitute  at  Owoeao  in  October.  Number  of  teachers  pre 
one  hundred  and  twenty ;  nearly  all  of  them  are  actuall' 
gaged  in  the  schools  of  the  county.    They  all  expressed  tl 


BUPBBINTBNDMrr'S  BBPOBT.  125 

»8ed    with    the    instruction  received  at  the 

SCHOOL  VISITATIONS. 

Bsible  for  me  to  visit  all  the  schools  in  the 
imer ;  but  I  did  the  best  I  conld.  I  hope  to 
during  the  coming  winter.  I  found  most  of 
3ing  as  well  as  could  be  expected  with  the 
command  for  teaching.  Yet  in  moet  cases 
r  improvement.  It  is,  however,  but  justice  to 
»;,  that  the  most  of  them  have  worked,  and 
ithfoUy  to  prepare  for  the  important  duties 

age  of  teachers  in  schools  visited  is  twenty 
wTiges  per  week,  two  dollars  and  ninetj-seven 
I. 

per  cent,  of  the  number  of  pupils  enrolled 
the  time  the  schools  were  visited.  Should  not 
3oiie  to  prevent  this  irregular  attendance  ? 
done  if  school  boards  would  have  school  terms 
vacation  would  come  during  the  sultry  months 
le  i>er  cent,  of  attendance  in  schools  visited 
ths  of  May  and  June  was  much  greater  than 
risited  during  the  months  of  July  and  August. 
i  visited  during  the  last  two  months  named, 
)f  the  number  enrolled  were  present.  In  this 
lart  of  the  money  expended  for  our  summer 
n  away.  I  recommend  three  terms  in  a  year — 
and  a  spring  tenn. 

OONCLCSION, 

of  the  State  Institute  we  organized  a  County 
iation.  I  am  hopeful  that  the  teachers  will 
mefit  from  this.  Most  certainly  they  will,  if 
)  labor  with  the  zeal  and  energy  with  which 
lenced. 


136  PDBUO  IN8TBUCTI0N. 

In  cloBing  this  report,  I  wish  to  extend  my  thanke  to  tb 
of  whose  generous  liospitalities  I  have  partaken ;  also,  to  tl 
who  have  extended  courtcBies  and  lent  a  helping  hand  to  m 
the  work  pleasant  to  rae,  and  profitable  to  the  people. 


ST.  CLAIR  COUNTY— John  C.  Clarke,  Hup't. 

Id  many  respects  there  has  been  impravement  in  the  sch 
of  this  county  since  my  report  two  years  ago.  This  is  tni 
regard  to  teachers,  school-houses,  and  the  special  as  wei 
general  interest  manifested  in  the  success  of  the  schooli 
parents.  And  while,  in  all  these  respects,  we  are  fax  bel 
what  we  ought  to  be,  yet,  as  did  the  great  Apostle  to 
Gentiles,  we  tliank  God,  and  take  courage. 

There  arc  144  districts  in  St  Clair  county,  including 
union  schools,  of  which  there  are  four,  viz :  At  Port  Hu 
St  Clair,  Uarine  City  and  Algonac.  The  union  school 
Port  Huron  and  St  Clair  arc  under  the  supervision  and 
trol  of  the  boards  of  education  of  those  cities.  There  is 
a  graded  school  at  Fort  Gratiot,  and  a  union  school  at  3M 
phis,  a  village  partly  in  this  county  and  partly  in  Macomb; 
school-house  being  in  Macomb.  These  comprise  tlie  hi. 
schools  to  which  the  children  of  this  county  have  access. 

Port  Huron,  St  Clair  and  Algonac  have  good  school  hi 
ings ;  Marine  City  has  not,  but  its  citizens  have  long  felt  I 
need  of  better,  and  are  preparing  to  supply  it  Fort  Gr 
has  a  neat,  commodious  school-house,  pleasantly  located, 
ing  primary  and  secondary  departments. 

Fourteen  new  school-houses  have  been  built,  or  compl 
within  a  period  of  about  two  years.  In  the  country  diet 
these  have  ranged  in  valne  from  about  tSOO  or  |400  to  91 
The  best  of  these  are  excellent  houses,  with  the  modem 
provements  and  conveniences;  the  others  are  supposed  I 


SUPBBIKXfiKDENT'8  REPORT.  127 

qoite  up  to  the  ability  of  the  several  districts  to  build^  and 
certainly  are  a  great  advance  on  what  was  possessed  before. 

The  city  of  Port  Huron  is  doing  much  for  its  educational 
interests,  taking  the  lead,  in  fact,  in  the  county.  A  new  ward 
school-house,  of  brick,  32x62  feet  in  size,  two  stories  high, 
has  just  been  completed  there,  at  an  expense  of  about  $8,000, 
and  a  new  union  school-house  is  in  process  of  erection,  to  be 
abo  of  brick,  in  size,  68x86  feet,  four  stories  high,  including 
bttaement,  to  cost  $30,000.  The  schools  of  this  city,  under 
the  able  management  of  Mr.  C.  S.  Fraser,  have  reached  a  high 
diegree  of  proficiency. 

Since  my  last  report,  several  districts  have  be^n  divided  and 
new  districts  formed  from  them.  I  do  not  regard  favorably, 
as  a  general  rule,  this  division  of  districts  into  smaller  and 
necessarily  weaker  ones,  involving,  as  it  usually  does,  shorter 
schools  under  less  competent  teachers ;  but  in  these  cases  it 
WBSy  perhaps,  rendered  necessary  by  the  peculiar  formation  of 
the  divided  districts.  Other  districts,  on  the  contrary,  are 
union,  hoping  thereby — certainly  a  rational  hope — to 
longer  schools,  taught  by  better  teachers,  under  better 
aospioes.  This  is  looked  upon  as  a  movement  in  the  right 
direction,  and  it  is  expected  that  at  no  distant  day,  well  con- 
ducted graded  schools  will  be  thus  established  at  different 
potnis  in  the  county. 

BelieTing  a  good  teacher  to  be  the  most  important  acquisi- 
ticm  for  a  good  school — ^more  desirable  than  good  text  books, 
or  than  good  school-houses — I  have  constantly  endeavored^  in 
mxj  exanunations,  to  raise  and  keep  up  the  standard  of  schol- 
airiiip  and  fitness  for  the  teacher's  vocation.  In  this  I  have 
■et  with  a  fair  measure  of  success,  though  not  always  to  the 
extent  I  could  wish.  I  have  received  in  my  efforts  in  this 
direction,  as  I  should  expect  to  receive,  the  earnest  co-opera- 
lion  of  every  good  teacher,  and  of  all  really  interested  in 
having  their  children  intelligently  and  correctly  taught.  The 
lesolt  has  been,  a  better  preparation  for  the  several  grades  of 


IS6  PDBLIC  INSTBUCTION. 

certificates,  a  more  correct  idea  of  the  nature  and  importai 
of  a  teacher's  duties,  and  consequeiitly  greater  succeeB  In 
Echool-rooni.  A  hopeful  Indication  of  progress  has  been 
increasing  demand  for  good  teachers.  It  is  true,  that  bc 
districts,  from  a  real  or  imaginary  inability  to  pay  for  bet 
ate  apparently  satisfied  with  teachers  of  very  limited  atti 
mente.  But  they  are  fast  finding  out  that  what  costs 
least  in  the  beginning,  is  often  the  dearest  in  the  end. 
the  other  hand,  by  those  who  have  already  learned  this,  I 
constantly  urged  to  send  them  good  teachers — am  remin 
that  with  them  the  pay  is  not  the  most  important  consid 
tion — they  want  good  teachers,  and  have  even  been  instrui 
to  employ  the  teacher  at  my  own  terms,  only  send  a  good  ' 
It  has  been  difficult  to  comply  with  this  call  for  good  teacl 
for  my  supply  of  this  class  has  not  been  large,  and  all  of  t1 
are  in  demand.  OF  the  first  and  second  grades,  there  are 
over  thirty  now  teaching  in  the  connty.  I  have  fortnns 
been  enabled  to  draw  from  the  tlurd  grade  to  some  extent. 
The  follon'ing  summary  will  show  the  result  of  my  ex 
inations  of  teachers  for  the  years  1867-^9 : 

1867,  examined  113;  certificates,  101 ;  Ist  grade 

3d'grade 

3d  grade 

1868,  examined  319;  certificates.  !i08;  let  grade 

2d  grade _ 

3d  grade 

1869,  examined  272;  certificates.  193;  1st  grade 

2d  grade , 

3d  grade 

A  uniformity  of  text  books  lias  been  secured  in  about 
half  of  the  county,  attended,  I  think,  with  beneficial  rei 
to  children,  parents  and  teachers. 

A  serious  hindrance  to  the  success  of  the  schools  is  a  i 
of  proper  apparatus,  such  as  blackboards,  maps,  globes. 
Almost  every  school-liouse  has  a  black,  or  blofkish  board. 


idpebihtendent'b  bepoet.  189 

e  BchoolB  are  not  properly  funiished  in  tfaia 
few  of  them  hare  any  other  apparatus. 
I  drawback  is  the  irregalarity  of  attendance. 
}DBtant  source  of  grief  to  some  teachers,  and 
that  otherwise  would  have  been  fairly  suc- 
c[uite  failures.  It  is  possible  that  the  law 
a  school-week,  thus  giving  parents  one  day 
their  children  at  home,  may  remedy  this  eyil. 
twiU. 

xm  to  have  fallen  into  general  neglect  I 
rae  voted  for  library  books  the  past  year,  and 
iQces  was  that  received  from  fines  and  penal- 
that  purpose. 

ipervisora  fixed  my  compensation  at  45  per 
of  labor  from  300  to  S25  days,  the  same  as 

[  would  express  my  gratitude  to  that  kind 
has  blessed  us  with  free  sckooU,  and  granted 
}  my  feeble  efforts  for  their  improvement. 


I  COUNTY— L.  B.  Ahtisdale,  Sup't. 

ty  consists  of  sixteen  townships,  having  in 
hundred  and  twenty-seven  organized  school 
airing  when  our  schools  arc  all  in  session, 
sixty  teachers.  In  the  county  are  eleven 
ving  respectively  from  two  to  ten  depart- 
ical  reports  from  the  several  townships  have 
you,  I  regard  it  unnecessary  for  me  to  add 
it  subject  in  this  connection, 
of  May  last,  I  assumed  the  duties  of  the 
lately  commenced  the  tour  of  school  visita- 
tbat  no  essential  benefit  would  accrue  to 
g  calls  upon  them,  I  decided  to  appropriate 


190  PUBLIC   IKBTBUCTIOS. 

a  hftif  day  to  each  school  of  one  department,  and  a  Ion 
time  to  union  schools.  I  have  endeavored  in  all  cases 
seonre  the  company  of  school  officers  or  other  patrons  in 
visitd,  and  have  been  gratified  to  find  bo  many  possessed 
snfficient  interest  to  secure  their  attendance.  In  my  visit 
hsTe  endeavored  fully  to  learn  the  methods  adopted  by  tea 
ers  in  teaching  each  branch,  and  their  systems  of  govern 
and  conducting  schools.  In  order  to  leam  these  facts  I  hi 
as  for  as  practicable,  required  teachers  to  pursue  their  eT< 
day  course  with  each  class,  until  their  systems  were  fully 
veloped.  Did  I  notice  any  improvement  requisite,  I  w< 
sabsequently  suggest  it,  sometimes  illustrating  it  by  using 
class  before  me.  In  a  large  majority  of  cases,  my  visits  I 
apparently  been  well  received  by  teachers  and  pupils,  ai 
oan  but  hope  that  some  little  good  will  result  to  our  sch 
from  this  plain,  frank  method  of  dealing  with  them. 

I  succeeded  in  visiting  nearly  all  the  summer  scbo 
though  about  twelve  closed  before  I  could  reach  then: 
shall  endeavor  not  to  have  the  same  schools  passed  by  a  set 
time. 

For  the  purpose  of  securing  an  opportunity  for  fully 
cussing  methods  of  teaching,  and  as  far  as  possible  to  n 
teachers'  fall  esaroinations  subservient  in  establishing 
formity  in  systems  of  instruction,  I  decided  to  divide 
oounty  into  eight  sections,  of  two  townships  each,  and  to 
an  examination  of  two  days  fur  each  section.  Much  gei 
interest  was  created  hy  this  method,  and  I  think  n 
teachers  went  from  this  ordeal  to  their  field  of  labor  n 
more  appreciative  of  the  work  to  be  done,  and  bettei 
quainted  with  the  metho<l  of  doing  it  In  my  exami.nal 
of  teachers,  I  have  given  great  prominence  to  what  I  re 
the  central  element  in  a  teacher's  attainments — the  ahilii 
impart  instruction  in  an  attractive  and  thorough  mannB 
have  found  it  unavoidable  many  times  to  refuse  applio 
In  quite  a  number  of  instances,  however,  after  being  ref 


llKTENDBNT'a  HEPOBT.  181 

iicant,  in  the  true  spirit  of  the  earnest 

I  commendable  improvement  that,  npon 
lird  trial,  be  has  worthily  obtained  a 

though  they  hare  in  some  instances 
re  nevertheless  been  taken  by  earnest 
demanded  by  our  educational  interests, 
to  stimulate  expectant  applicants  to  a 
preparation  for  the  ordeal ;  and  I  am 
ion  that  more  thoronghnese  will  mark 
nre  candidates. 

upon  the  duties  of  the  ofBce,  I  have 
'  tho  first  grade,  18  of  the  eecond  grade, 
ode. 

iueral  examiuatione,  I  called  a  Teachers' 
ned  at  Constantine  Not.  6th,  and  con- 
attendance  was  large,  the  interest  deep, 
.d  I  trust  the  good  accomplished  in  the 

II  be  generally  manifest  by  those  who 
?a8ed  zeal,  system  and  thoroughness  in 

Wm.  H.  Payne,  of  Adrian,  spent  one 
Uuable  service. 
ildiugs  have  been  erected  in  the  county 

The  villages  of  Go&staQtine  and  Burr 
Ine  structures,  which  are  monnmeats  to 
mI  sense  of  their  citizens,  who  have  as- 
Y  burdens  in  order  that  suitable  advan- 
for  the  education  of  their  children. 

Colon,  Sherman  and  Gonstaatia^  corn- 
re  been  erected ;  in  other  townships  old 
epaired;  while  the  decree  has  already 
le  coming  year  other  old  relica  of  the 
3  of  the  pioneer,  shall  give  place  to 
res  which  mark  the  progress  of  intelli- 
1  a  prosperous  commonwealth.    In  di»- 


13S  PUBLIC  INSTBUCTIOir. 

trict  No.  3,  of  Nottairo  township,  repordn 
pupils,  aTTanj^mentB  hare  been  made  for 
Bchool-house,  the  school-room  of  which  ii 
It  is  intended  that  this  room  shall  supply  w 
rooms  is  almost  a  total  deficiency,  or  muc 
modions  recitation  seats  fronting  ample 
adapted  to  the  handling  of  classes  and  the  s 

The  lack  of  nniformity  of  text  books,  in 
is  everywhere  an  annoyance.  District  offic 
snme  the  reeponsibility  of  restriction;  teac 
pecnliar  tastes  and  preferences,  secure  a  pai 
dren  are  coming  into  districts,  bringing  th 
and  feel  unable  to  make  a  change ;  and  tl 
rions  causes  and  excuses  this  confusion  e: 
incalculable  mischie£ 

Our  schools  experience  another  difficulty : 
cases  of  disorder  which  occur.  The  respoc 
rests  upon  teachers,  pupils  and  patrons  ii 
tions,  depending  upon  circumstances  and 
is,  however,  a  growing  tendency  to  insnboi 
ers  seem  to  feel  more  and  more  restriction  o 
their  schools.  This  arises  mainly  from  the  j 
public  sentiment  which  prevails.  It  is  a  stig 
ization,  that  lads  may  walk  our  streets  and 
prating  upon  their  rights  to  do  as  they  pi 
that  the  teacher  has  neither  the  power 
control  them.  Such  misdemeanors  nnabati 
extend  their  poisonous  influences  over  the 
generations  in  insubordination  and  vice; 
dire  consequences  incident  to  uncurbed  pai 
subdued  wilL  We  need  a  more  elevated 
public  sentiment  upon  this  subject.  It  seei 
that  legislation  should  extend  and  more 
powers  of  a  teacher,  and  should  make  m< 


184  PUBLIC  IN8TBCCTI0ir. 

want  of  acqnaititaQce  with  the  principles  and  improved  i 
ods  of  present  progress  in  science,  art,  and  enterprise, ' 
beUeres  that  each  district  can  manage  its  own  Bcbooli 
enough,  and  much  cheaper  than  to  employ  any  higher  ol 
for  the  purpose.  But  we  find  the  hirge  majority  of  the  cil 
of  this  county  deeply  interested  in  the  improved  systei 
education.  The  people  see  clearly  that  the  present  cli 
children  must  be  educated  in  order  to  meet  the  deman 
business  and  intelligence  in  their  day.  Parents  arc  aws 
this.  They  ask  for  the  best  teachers,  they  arc  willing  to 
good  school-houses,  and  to  pay  fair  salaries  to  qualified  tea 

The  schools  of  this  county  are  keeping  pace  with  oth( 
provements  here.  The  large  part  of  the  schools  have 
well,  and  have  been  well,  attended.  Teachers  are  ear 
striving  for  better  and  higher  qualifications.  We  find  m 
those  intending  to  teach  agfiin,  either  reviewing  their  si 
at  home,  or  attending  the  higher  schools  of  the  county. 
High  Schools  at  Vassar  and  Caro  are  doing  finely,  and 
bcr  in  each  a  large  class  of  stndente  advancing  into  the  I 
branches.  Special  credit  is  due  to  each  of  the  ProfoBE 
the  High  Schools  for  their  attention  to  the  thoronghr 
reviews  in  the  common  branches.  Progress  is  being  mi 
school  facilities  in  Tuscola  and  Watronsvillc.  Each  ai 
larging  their  scoool-houses,  and  will  soon  be  operating 
the  graded  system. 

It  has  been  the  practice  of  the  Superintendent,  in  hie 
to  the  schools,  to  give  model  examples  tf  training  class- 
of  working  them  up  to  thoroughness  in  every  exercise,  a 
believe  this  method  has  met  the  approbation,  generally 
wholly,  of  both  teachers  and  scholars.  I  have  endeavo 
meet  the  full  demands  of  this  office,  in  the  spirit,  ever 
than  in  the  letter  of  duties,  and  believe  the  returns 
labors  to  the  families,  children,  and  teachers,  to  be  fo\ 
the  expense  to  them.  Yet  the  Board  of  Snpervieori 
small  majority, — with  bat  little,  if  any  censure,  eithet 


iintendbht's  bepobt.  13S 

r  the  office,  ;et  perhaps  imagining  the 
ing,  with  perhaps  a  spicing  of  political 
ny  salary  to  fonr  dollars  per  day.  Hence 
Jie  majority  of  tax-payers  save  10  cents 

TS'  Institute,  recently  held  at  Vassar, 
ep  and  improved  interest  among  the 
of  education.  The  class  consisted  of 
;  largest  ever  held  in  the  county.  Prep- 
i  made  for  the  organization  of  a  County 
which  will  doubtless  add  much  to  the 

Jiis  county  at  present  is  about  14,000. 
en  returned  by  the  census  of  the  past 
lole  number  of  districts  is  93 ;  five  hav- 
tst  year.  The  number  of  children  hav- 
ome  portion  of  the  time  is  3,570.  The 
jhers'  wages  is  about  tl4,000.  I  have 
iie  schools,  having  visited  all  that  have 
three  months,  except  three  or  four,  and 
t  to  visit,  but  found  them  not  in  session 

,  dangerous  crossways,  cold  storms,  &&, 
ist  be  met  like  the  difficulties  of  every 
!4ow  we  hope  to  find  the  schotls  again  in 
eacher  doing  thorough  work. 


JNTY — Edwaed  Cleveland,  Snrt. 

of  my  first  year  in  the  office  of  County 
immon  Schools,  it  becomes  my  duty  to 
I  now  have  the  honor  to  submit, 
ses  one  hundred  and  thirty-eight  school 
!  schools  are  graded,  having  twenty>siz 


1S6  PUBLIC  IN8TR0CTI0M. 

departments.  Those  in  Lawton  and  Lawrence  have  been 
tablished  during  the  last  year.  Those  at  South  Haven,  I 
Paw  and  Decatur  have  been  increased  and  improved.  ' 
house  at  Mattawan  has  been  completed  and  the  school  ni 
perfectly  organized.  At  Eeeler  Center  a  anion  school  of  : 
departments  has  been  formed,  and  a  new  honse  bnilL  Tb 
others  of  the  same  kind  exist  at  Bangor,  Breedsrille,  i 
Hartford.  Thns  we  have,  of  union  school  departments) 
ungraded  schools,  one  hundred  and  sixty-two,  requiring 
hnndred  and  sixty-five  teachers. 

Seventeen  new  school-houses  have  been  bnilt  in  the  cou 
during  the  year,  and  others  finished  or  repaired.  Am 
them,  the  anion  honses  at  Lawton,  Lawrence,  Paw  Paw, 
Eeeler,  are  the  principal.  The  others  are  bailt  according 
good  models,  and  are  very  convenient  and  pleasant 
worth  of  these  will  be  found  in  the  inspectors'  reports,  esi 
that  of  Paw  Paw,  which  is  yet  nnfinished.  It  will  c 
perhaps,  140,000. 

Daring  the  month  of  April  I  held  examinations  in  i 
different  places,  two  days  each.  The  first  day  I  speal 
questioning  and  drilling  teachers  upon  the  various  bram 
of  stady  they  were  to  teach.  The  secoad  day  was  en]pl< 
in  writing  and  examining  answers  to  qaestions,  reqaired  1 
certificate.  About  two-thirds  of  the  teachers  of  the  coi 
received  certificates  on  these  occasions.  The  rest  I 
obliged  to  examine  variously  as  they  presented  themse 
Our  graded  schools  are  supplied  with  very  intelli^nt 
structors,  and  the  rest  are  well  qualified  and  many  excel. 

The  whole  number  of  scholars  in  our  schools,  over 
years  of  age  and  under  twenty,  is  9,553.  There  have  bee 
attendance  some  part  of  the  year,  7,896.  The  average  d 
tion  of  the  schools  has  been  six  and  a  half  months. 

I  have  visited  most  of  the  schools  twice  during  the 
making  in  all,  two  hundred  and  thirty-five  visits.     Iq   i 
I  have  endeavored  to  answer  the  requirements  of    the 


tINTBNDENT'S   BEPOBT.  137 

■^l  teachers  and  pupils  to  act  well  their 
ven  leotnres,  in  many  instances,  la  the 
d  in  the  schoola  daring  their  sesaioas. 
es  by  school  boards,  letters  to  the  nnm- 
;he  inspectors'  reports,  newspaper  arti- 

meetinge,  and  the  Goanty  Institute, 
'.  attention. 

at  the  connty  has  been  liberal  in  their 
Is,  and  much  exertion  has  been  made  in 
lit  is  much  improvement  and  brighter 
re.    Under  a  kiud  Providence,  health 

has  been  the  general  experience  of  the 


)UNTY— Geo.  S.  Wheeleb,  Sup't. 

entering  upon  the  duties  of  my  official 
f  May,  1869,  a  broad  field  for  earnest 
county  containing  12,593  children  be- 
d  30  years,  organized  into  164  Bcbool 
I  an  educational  force  of  237  teachers, 
cd  was  the  work  to  be  performed  that 
well  nigh  failed,  hod  it  not  been  tbiA 
ice,  the  Hon.  John  D.  Pierce,  had  so 
ent  departments  of  the  educational  in- 
by  two  years  of  earnest  and  persistent 
xmei  everywhere  to  prevail. 

TISITATI0N6. 

■  months  I  visited  80  different  schools, 
each,  and  giving  such  instruction  and 
r  and  pupil  as  circumstances  seemed  to 
xceptiona,  the  schools  appeared  to  be 
and  the  teachers  faithful  and  earnest  in 


188  POBLIO    INSTRUCTION. 

their  work.  But  too  many  of  them  were  left  to  disci 
their  dntiea  aa  beat  they  could,  without  proper  encourage) 
from  district  officers  or  parents.  While  the  whole  naroli 
Tisita  iu  the  county,  made  by  diatrict  officers,  is  334,  belt 
BTerage  of  two  to  each  district,  46  districts,  or  28  per  cei 
the  whole  number,  received  no  visits.  It  is  a  noticeable 
that  while  those  schools  which  received  no  visita  were 
paratively  dull  and  lifeless,  those  receiving  a  large  numt 
visits  gave  evidence  of  increasing  prosperity.  It  is  only 
officers  and  parents  enlist  heart  aud  hand  in  the  canee  of 
cation,  that  the  teacher's  efforts  are  crowned  with  perfecl 
cess.  Both  teacher  and  pupil  can  have  no  better  pn 
eamestnees,  and.  can  receive  no  greater  enconragement, 
that  found  in  frequent  visits  to  the  school-room.  This  i 
the  teacher  in  his  true  position,  and  he  discharges  his 
gratified  by  the  assurance  that  a  proper  relation  exists  be 
himself,  parent  and  pupil,  without  which  his  c£Fortfi  ii 
attended  with  only  partial  success. 

EXAMIFATIOK   OF  TEACHEBB. 

In  addition  to  the  examiuations  held  by  my  predf 
during  last  April  in  Ypsilanti,  Ann  Arbor,  Dexter,  CI 
Manchester  and  Saline,  and  a  Normal  training  class  ' 
weeks'  session  held  at  the  village  of  Manchester,  whii 
eminently  Buccessful,  I  have'  held  34  regular  examin 
giving  four  days  at  Ann  Arbor,  and  one  day  to  each. 
ship,  besides  holding  many  special  examinations  at  my 

I  have  granted  181  certificates,  as  follows :  1st  grade, 
grade,  62 ;  3d  grade,  113  ;  and  have  transferred  from 
ing  counties  two  certificates  of  the  first  grade,  five 
second,  and  four  of  the  third  grade.  In  my  ezamint 
have  endeavored  to  keep  the  standard  of  scholarehip  f 
to  that  prescribed  by  the  county  superintendents  in  ( 
tion  last  July,  and  I  am  happy  to  say  that  02  per  cen 
applicants  have  sustained  a  creditable  examination. 


140  PUBLIC  iNsiBncnON. 

several  achool  districts  of  the  coanty,  not  160  of  it  has  1 
put  to  its  legitimate  use.  The  amount  receiTed  by  each  dist 
IB  so  small  that  it  voald  scarcely  supply  each  library  with 
good  book.  Before  we  can  sustain  good  district  libraries,  s< 
better  way  mast  be  provided  to  replenish  them. 

TEXT-BOOKS, 

At  the  close  of  last  school-jear,  not  a  dozen  school  diatr 
in  the  county  had  prescribed  a  uniformity  of  text-books, 
this  condition  we  of  course  have  every  conceivable  variety, 
great  confusioD  arises  therefrom  in  many  of  the  ache 
nearly  or  quite  destroying  their  usefulness. 

There  is  not  a  week  but  that  I  receive  a  note  from  m 
earnest  teacher,  asking  if  something  cannot  be  done  to  rem 
this  evil.  I  have  urged  the  necessity  of  a  uniformity  of  be 
before  every  school  board  in  the  county.  Still,  however  m 
they  may  become  interested  in  every  other  department  of 
school,  in  this  it  seems  almost  impossible  to  get  any  acl 
But  much  more  interest  is  cow  being  manifested  than  hei 
fore,  and  I  am  in  hopes  during  the  coming  year  to  secure 
desirable  result 

UNION  AND  QBADED  SCHOOLS. 

We  have  in  the  county  the  graded  schools  of  Ann  A 
city,  numbering  in  attendance  1,869  pnpils,  occnpying 
large  brick  buildings,  valued  at  1108,000  and  employii 
corps  of  five  male  and  thirty  female  teachers.  Also  the  n 
and  graded  schools  of  Ypsilanti  city,  numbering  in  attend 
1,350  pupils,  occupying  three  large  brick  buildings,  at  the 
of  (84,000,  and  employing  a  corps  of  twenty-one  taaoh< 
six  male  and  fifteen  females.  The  union  school  of  the  vi 
of  Manchester,  numbering  in  attendance  435  pupils,  occ 
ing  a  building  valued  at  121,000,  and  employing  a  cor 
eight  teachers — one  male  aud  seven  female.  The  union  at 
of  the  village  of  Saline,  numbering  231  pupils  in  the  die 
occupying  a  building  at  a  cost  of  135,000,  and  employi 


'EBINTEKDEirr'8  EBPOST.  141 

6 — one  male  and  three  female.  The  union 
of  Dexter,  nnmbering  in  attendance  284 
building  at  a  cost  of  tlO.OOO,  and  employ- 
ichera — one  male  and  five  female.  Aleo 
the  village  of  Chelsea,  numbering  in  at* 
occupying  a  building  valued  at  t4,000, 
male  and  four  female  teachers.  These 
flouriebing  condition,  and  nith  the  State 
;he  nurseries  that  furnish  the  county  with 
teaobers.  Could  not  their  sphere  of  use- 
ihanced  by  establishing  each  spring  and 
'or  special  training  of  teachers? 

SCHOOL-HOUaHB. 
r  in  the  county  is  180 ;  number  of  stone, 
frame,  118;  of  log,  7.  The  total  valua- 
(313,085,  an  average  valuation  of  11,739 
the  union  and  graded  school  buildings  of 
ige  valuation  of  each  is  only  $3715.  While 
el  much  pride  in  the  beauty  and  conven- 
chool  buildings,  there  are  in  the  rural  dis- 
)t  of  buildings  belonging  to  the  common 
in  service  for  forty  years  or  more,  and  are 
ij  the  name  of  house. 
wly  giving  way  to  fine  and  commodious 
fleet  much  credit  on  the  citizens  of  their 
In  the  constrnstion  of  new  houses,  too 
eu  to  the  important  subject  of  ventilation. 

IDLABIIY  OF  ATTENDANCE 

difficult  evils  to  correct  with  which  the 
snd.  While  our  schools  are  ii-ee,  and  de- 
itatistics  show  that  only  9,873  children,  or 
vhole  number  in  the  county,  have  attended 


143  PDBLIO  JMSTRUCTION. 

Only  47^ per  cent  of  the  number  eDroUed  in  the  Bohoolf 
the  county  vere  ia  attendance  daring  the  months  of  July  { 
Augnat.  Parents  are  too  apt  to  think  that  if  they  retail 
child  A*om  school,  the  child  ia  tlie  only  sufferer;  bat  a  vb 
class  is  often  embarrassed  in  its  progress  by  a  pupil  made  d 
by  irregnlar  and  tardy  attendance. 

A    CIRCULAR 

was  sent  to  each  director,  to  be  read  at  the  annual  sch 
meeting,  containing  suggestions  in  relation  to  the  employm' 
of  teachers,  uniformity  of  books,  aids  to  instruction,  sch 
Tisitationa,  and  such  other  subjects  aa  the  school  intei 
seemed  to  demand. 

IK   CONCLUSION, 

permit  me  to  testily  to  the  kind  and  courteous  treatment  t 
I  haye  receired  in  every  part  of  the  county,  and  to  state  t 
the  opposition  to  the  system  of  county  saperintendency  set 
to  be  slowly  and  surely  giving  way.  Its  enemies  u«  desir 
that  the  system  should  have  a  fair  trial-  Under  it  our  pn' 
schools  show  concluBive  evidence  of  progress.  It  t«nda 
elevate  them  to  poaitions  of  greater  efficiency  and  inflaei 
creating  a  lively  interest  iu  the  minds  of  both  teacher  ; 
parent  Yet,  there  is  a  vast  deal  of  labor  to  be  performed, 
every  department  there  are  abuses  and  excesses  to  be  correc 
which  will  require  years  of  earnest  and  patient  effort 

However  alow  our  progreas,  may  we  not  be  disconragei 
disheartened,  but  guided  by  the  conservative  and  invigon 
principles  of  religion  and  morality,  faithfully  discharging 
dnties  and  obligations  of  life,  may  we  ever  remember 
"Education  is  a  debt  due  from  present  to  future  generatic 


■BBiyTElTDENT'S  BEPOBT. 


JOUNTY— L.  K.  Beown,  Sdp-t. 

'  report  for  IS69, 1  am  happy  to  be  able 
^t  "  progress"  is  the  watchword,  and  "  oon- 
"  the  motto  of  •ur  school  interests  as  a 

ne  during  the  past  year  to  eneonrage  tho 
«reat  in  the  county  of  Wayne,  I  have 
applying  for  certificates  who  could  not 
amination;  have  granted  more  first  and 
cates  than  at  any  previons  examinations, 
and  earnestness  on  the  part  of  t«achers. 
non  schools  hare  done  more  to  encourage 
itchers;  liberal  appropriations  have  been 
the  expense  of  the  school ;  with  longer 
ns  and  district  ofScers  have  made  more 
txim ;  in  a  word,  there  is  a  general  waking 
e  of  caring  for  the  nnrseries  of  our  fntnre 


^'ear  an  estimated  expenditure  and  appro- 
has  been  made  for  school  buildings  and 
his  about  $5,000  for  repairs,  fixtures,  ap- 
ited  throughout  the  county,  and  we  have 
)Out  $100,000 ;  more,  we  venture  to  say, 
ded  during  the  last  ten  years.  The  thrlr- 
^te  completed  their  Union  school  building 
t  a  total  cost  of  $30,000.  It  is  the  pride 
lasting  monument  of  their  munificence, 
pproved  style,  and  superior  workmanship, 
ith  large,  airy  school-rooms,  high  ceilings, 
s  among  the  best  The  seating  is  of  the 
•  seat  and  desk  manufactured  by  C.  G. 
rthville,  Michigan,  reflecting  credit  on 
irkmanship  and  skill  in  the  manufacture 


144  PUBLIC  INSXBUCnON. 

of  school  comforts.    The  Bchool  wae  opened  in  Septembei 

tmder  the  Bupeirision  of  Prof.  Thomas,  assisted  by  an 

corps  of  teachers — they  are  mating  their  mark.    At  the  i 

iBhing  village  of  Wayne,  the  district  organized  under  the  D 

School    I^wg  in   September   last,  and  mai 

tion  of  $25,000  for  the  erection  of  a  lai^e 

building  next  season.    A  goodly  number  of 

have  been  erected  during  the  past  year,  n: 

good  dimensions,  vith  neat  and  commodic 

inside,  having  always  an  eye  to  a  good  exU 

being  made  to  supply  a  large  unmber  of  dia 

globes,  Webb's  word  method,  numerical  fiu 

forms,  &c.,  &c.,  for  the  use  of  the  school-nx 

mtk. 

A  county  Teachers'  Association  was  organized  at  the  vi 
of  Wayne  in  August  last,  bom  which  we  anticipate  h 
results.  It  was  well  attended,  and  a  general  interest  i 
fested  by  teachers  and  friends.  After  associating  tog 
three  days  in  a  pleasant  interchange  of  thought,  viewf 
plans,  we  disbanded,  feeling  "it  was  good  to  be  there." 

Especially  to  the  good  people  of  Wayne  do  we  owe  a  «] 
debt  of  gratitute  for  their  kindness  during  our  gratuitou. 
among  them,  no  pains  waf  spared  to  make  it  pleasant  on 
part.  Jjong  will  their  kindness  be  remembered  by  us  all. 
same  is  true  of  Wyandotte,  also,  where  we  reassembli 
November. 

Much  has  been  done  by  district  boards,  pointing  to  t 
formity  of  text-books,  and  we  hope  ere  long  to  see  not  i 
uniformity  of  books,  bat  aU  the  necessary  appliances  to 
with  inside  of  the  school-room. 

While  we  are  gratified  to  know  that  so  much  is  beiii| 
in  many  localities,  that  the  people  are  wide  awake  to  tli 
interests  of  their  children,  we  regret  to  find,  alas!  too 
taking  more  interest  in  the  growing  of  crops  and  stoc 
how  they  can  beet  invest  money  to  pay  the  largest  per 


dperintendent's  beport.  145 

ind  yital  interests  bo  clearly  connected  with 
an  education.  And  while  this  is  trne  of  the 
me  teacherB  who  for  want  of  proper  oppor- 
rell  defined  method  or  plans  of  operation, 
owing  how  to  teach  properly ;  many  of  them 
opportunities  to  prepare  properly  for  the 
This  teaches  ue  the  necessity  of  more  pre- 
tefore entering  upon  the  daties  of  teaching; 
schools  to  instruct  teachers  in  the  art  of 

mbarrassments  we  have  this  to  cheer  us — 
g,  yea  anxionB  to  be  taught,  and  manifest 
for  improTcment. 

lis  in  this  county,  without  an  exception,  are 
teachers  of  ability,  and  tniBt«eB  wide  awake 
Lse  of  God  and  hnmanity. 
looking  over  the  connty,  it  gives  me  pleas- 
t  fear  of  EucceBBf\il  contradiction,  that  oar 
Bg  their  profession,  and  are  determined  to 
;  a  large  namber  give  evidence  of  a  deter- 
Among  the  people  more  esalted  vie^s  of 
m — more  common  sense  ideas  of  the  theory 
!ing  entertained. 

d  foster  this  spirit  of  improvement,  I  have 
iieet  known  as  the  Common  School  AsBist^ 
t  year,  and  circulated  2,000  copies  monthly 
1,500  of  them  have  been  a  gratuitous  dis- 
strict  boards.  It  has  been  a  ready  means 
between  Connty  Superintendent,  teachers, 
[  trust  has  done  its  share  in  accomplishing 
;.  I  have  been  kindly  received  throughout 
e  to  the  friends  of  education,  school  boards, 
ing  debt  of  gratitude.  Hoping  these  kind 
ly  relations  may  never  be  less,  that  the  cause 
>e  first  and  foremost  in  the  hearts  of  the 


146  PUBLIC   INSTRUCnOX. 

good  people  of  "  Old  Wayne,"  that,  together  ae  co-laborew 
may  be  BnccesBfiil  instrumentalities  in  the  great  work  of 
paring  the  coming  generationB  for  nseful  and  happy  li 
and  a  blessed  immortality  throngh  the  never  ending  cycle 
eternity,  I  snbacribe  myself  your  humble  and  obedient  eerv 


CLINTON  COUNTY— E.  Mudge,  Sup^. 

With  a  humble  acknowledgment  of  Divine  favor,  I  b 
with  transmit  my  third  annual  report  of  schools  in  Clii 
county.  Another  year  of  official  labor  and  responsi 
deepens  the  conviction  that  the  interests  of  edncatiou  an 
most  important,  of  families  and  of  the  State.  Seven  thooi 
five  hundred  and  eighty-eight  children  within  my  ofl 
jurisdiction,  are  to  be  prepared  by  intellectaal  and  moral 
tare,  to  meet  the  responsibilities  of  life,  promote  the  inte 
of  the  community,  and  secure  to  coming  generationa 
blessings  of  f^  institutions  and  an  improved  civiliza 
''Of  all  the  men  we  meet,"  says  Locke,  "nine  out  of  ten 
what  they  are,  good  or  evil,  useful  or  not,  by  their  educat 
This  great  work  of  educating  7,588  human  beings  is  i 
mitted  to  the  custody  and  instruction  of  144  teachers, 
believe  a  just«r  estimate  is  beginning  to  be  placed  upoi 
value  of  our  common  schools;  and  yet,  too  many  citizei 
this  county  are  satisfied  with  lauding  education,  wit 
actively  and  zealously  laboring  for  its  promotion.  The  i 
ment  is  too  common,  that  anybody  may  become  a  teacher 
that  responsibility  is  at  an  end  when  a  teacher  of  legal  c 
Scations  is  employed  and  placed  in  the  school-room, 
most  moderate  ability  is  thought  competent  to  the  ta 
the  instructor. 

Another  crying  evil  is,  that  the  schools  are  seldom  or 
visited.    Term   after  term  passes,  and  a  large  major! 
parente  never  enter  the  school-room ;  and  were  it  not  thi 


superintekdent's  report.  147 

teacher  "boards  around/'  they  would  never  meet  the  person 
to  whom  they  commit  the  most  important  responsibilities.  A 
idorm  in  this  particular  is  imperatively  demanded. 

AAotiher  cause    of   inefficiency  is  the  constant  change  of 
teachers.    School  officers  and  parents  need  to  be  convinced  of 
the  importance  of  securing  to  the  schools  a  competent  body  of 
ioitmctorsy  who  shall  make  the  business  of  teaching  a  life- 
long work.     A  majority  of  our  teachers  are  young  persons, 
just  grown  up,  wlio  enter  upon  the  business  of  teaching,  not 
fnan  love  of  the  profession,  but  merely  for  some  temporary 
porpose.    A  want  of  matured  judgment  results  in  laxity  of 
i&cipline,  and  not  unfrequently,  in  the  breaking  up  of  the 
achooL    The  limits  of  this  report  will  not  permit  a  recapitu- 
Uion  of  all  the  defects  that  hinder  the  progress  of  education 
in  this  county.    Indications  of  progress  are  numerous,  and 
ctrnest  friends  of  education  are  encouraged  ^'  to  labor  and  to 
wait" 

Pablic  sentiment  is  more  healthy ;  teachers  are  more  eam- 
^  and  enthusiastic ;  and  these  facts,  in  connection  with  the 
Bieral  provisions  of  the  last  State  Legislature,  must  result  in 
Bttded  reform.  We  submit  a  few  thoughts  under  the  following 
^edfie  heads : 

OFFICIAL  LABOR. 

Daring  the  school  year  ending  Sept.  6th,  1869,  209  certifi- 
•^teg  were  granted ;  eight  of  the  first  grade,  70  of  the  second, 
ttd  131  of  the  third.  For  the  purpose  of  making  examina- 
^onif  the  16  townships  of  the  county  were  twice  visited.  The 
ruminations  evinced  improvement  in  intellectual  qualifica- 
Qofi^  and  encourage  the  hope  that  ere  long  we  shall  be  provided 
^  a  better  supply  of  competent  teachers. 

There  are  in  the  county  132  school  districts,  requiring  the 
■^'ices  of  144  teachers.  During  the  winter  128  schools  were 
^  operation,  with  a  total  enrollment  of  5,144  pupils ;  of  whom 
i438  were  met  in  our  winter  tour  of  visitation.  This  indi- 
atefithe  total  enrollment  to  be  69  per  cent,  of  the  whole  num- 


148  PUBLIC   INSTBUCTION. 

ber  on  census  list,  and  that  only  68  per  cent  of  the  scin 
enrolled  were  regularly  in  the  schools. 

During  the  summer  121  districts  were  prorided  with  sch 
with  a  total  enrollment  of  4,678  pupils ;  of  whom  2,772 
met  by  the  Superintendent,  IncIudiDg  the  estimated  avera 
those  schools  not  visited  during  the  summer.    This  showi 
enrollment  to  be  61  per  cent,  of  the  whole  number  on  ce 
list,  and  that  the  average  attendance  was  only  58  per  cei 
the  enrollment     Of  the  128  winter  schools,  121 
and  100  of  the  121  summer  schools.    Many  ^sl 
the  plaii  of  commencing  their  summer  terms  eai 
close  before  the  hot  months ;  and  for  this  reason 
closed  before  reached  by  the  Superintendent 
practice  has  been  to  visit  two  schools  each  day. 
duties  above  ennmerated,  time  has  been  spem 
plans  for   school-houses,  delivering  educational 
tending  institutes  and  educational  meetings,  i 
matter  for  the  public  press.    Whole  number  of  i 
oiScially,  about  2,500. 

GBAWNQ  OF  SCHOOLS. 

While  many  schools  have  been  found  eminently  effi 
others  were  wanting  in  zeal,  resulting  from  incom] 
instruction ;  but  the  greatest  evil  has  resulted  fron 
too  common  practice  of  employing  young  and  inexperi 
teachers  in  large  and  advanced  schools.  Many  yoang  tea 
after  securing  a  license  and  conducting,  perhaps  with  so 
a  light  summer  school,  deem  themselves  competent  tc 
responsibility,  seek  engagement  in  leading  schools,  reo 
the  wages  of  experienced  and  efficient  teachers.  Fail 
the  natural  result  To  remedy  this  wrong  to  school 
teachers  ahke,  we  entertain  the  project  of  grading  a 
schools  of  the  county,  classifying  them  according  to  ad' 
ment  and  difficulty  of  management.  This  done,  we  p: 
grading  the  teachers  according  to  intellectual  and  mat 
ability  to  correspond,  and   license  them   with   the    p. 


supebintendent's  befokt.  149 

>y  are  not  to  teach  in  schools  of  higher 
IS.  To  perfect  this  system  we  have  in 
invention  of  school  officers  and  teachers 
;  of  prices.  This  plan  to  us  seems  prac- 
igurated,  must  remedy  many  prevailing 

SCHOOL-HOrSES. 

or  houses  is  steadily  diminishing,  and 
structures  are  occupying  their  places. 
es  have  been  completed  during  the  year, 
in  process  of  erection.  The  new  house 
i  Bapide  is  a  model  of  excellence,  and  is 
tnged  means  of  ventilation.  Ventilating 
by  Wood,  Bishop  &  Co.,  Bangor,  Me., 
!  perfect  satisfaction.  The  building  at 
early  completed,  and  is  a  credit  to  the 
'  DeWitt  is  to  do  honor  to  herself  by 
oming  summer,  a  brick  structure  at  an 
3,000.  The  specifications  require  a  sys- 
f  means  of  the  Rutan  furnace  stoves. 
;he  luxury  of  a  commodious  house,  at  a 

Many  country  houses  lately  erected,  are 
ng  apparatus.  The  sites  selected  for  nev 
>Tement8  on  the  old,  both  in  location  and 
is  beginning  to  be  manifested  in  the 

of  school  grounds. 

ACHERS'   INSTITUTES. 

i'  Institnte  held  in  the  village  of  Ovid 
nencing  March  22d  was  highly  satisfac- 
ind  forty-foar  teachers  were  regularly  in 
of  them  manifested  a  commendable  zeal 
rca  in  the  great  art  of  teaching, 
organized  in  the  village  of  Maple  Rapids, 
b,  and  continued  sis  weeks ;  65  students 
le  result  was  highly  satisfactory.     Such 


150  PUBLIC  INBTBtJCTlOK. 

classes  are  important  instrumentaliticis  for  improving  the 
ificatione  and  increasiug  the  zeal  of  those  to  whom  are 
mitt«d  the  interests  of  our  schools,  and  their  valne  can  h 
be  overrated. 

teachers'  association. 

The  Clinton  County  Teachers'  Association,  the  organu 
of  which  vras  mentioned  in  my  last  annual  report,  ie 
highly  prosi)erous  condition.  Already  it  has  a 
nearly  150,  and  the  meetings  have  been  large 
teachers,  school  o£Scers,  and  numerous  friend 
The  subjects  discussed  have  been  practical,  and 
to  promote  a  healthy  educational  interest. 

Clinton  county  is  becoming  a  county  of  railroatla,  ai 
trust  the  commendable  zeal  now  manifested  in  the  cat 
education  may  ere  long  place  her  in  the  front  rank  ui  n 
and  moral  improvement.  While  something  has  been 
much  remains  to  do  before  the  millennium  of  c 
arrives. 


COUNTY  SCHOOL  SUPERINTENDENTS,  1869- 


COCNTIEB.  NASiEB.  PaST~< 

Allegan --  Pattoclue  A.  Lalta _  Otsego. 

BuT7 John  H.  Palmer Niultvi] 

Bay - Ajcliibfild  L.  CuniDiing Portsmi 

Beniie Alpheus  B.  Walker Piatt. 

Benien Henry  A-  Ford NUes, 

Branch A.  A.  Luce Oilead. 

Calhoun BelaFaacker Uaralxa 

Casa Irving  Clendenen Dowag 

Charlevoix J.  S.  Dixon Charlp> 


PUBLIC  IN3TECCTI0N. 


EDUCATIONAL  FUNDS. 


The  following  is  an  exhibit  of  the  Edncational  Fund 
the  30th  of  NoTember,  1869  : 

PrimMj  School  Fund,  7  per  cent. IgjaSOjaO: 

"  "  "       Spercent. 210,01 

Total ♦8,590,21 

Uniretaity  Fund,  7  per  cent 561,03 

Normal  School  Fnnd,  6  percent 66,85 

Agricultaral  College  Fund - 45,30 

Total t3,283,40 

Increase  of  Primary  School  Fund IISMT 

"        of  University  Fund 1,05 

"        of  NormalSchool  Fund 16 

"       of  Agricultural  College  Fund 43,00 

Total  increase  in  1869 tl84,0S 

The  increase  to  the  Primary  School  Fund  was  •9,3- 
less  than  in  the  previous  year ;  the  increase  to  the  UniTt 
-  Fund  wae  991  88  less ;  and  to  the  Normal  School  Fond 
more.  The  means  for  further  augmentation  of  the  TJnivi 
and  Normal  School  Funds  are  about  exhausted;  and  i 
new  means  from  permanent  funds  are  provided,  their  ei: 
ments  have  about  reached  their  limits. 

Of  the  Primary  School  lands,  however,  nearly  half  a  m 
acres  are  yet  unsold,  and  must  in  time,  add  at  least  one 
half  million  dollars  to  the  present  amount  If  the  pr 
these  lands  could  be  graded — as  it  ia  believed  they  might 
60  they  could  be  sold  somewhat  according  to  their  vali 
stead  of  the  valuable  and  the  worthless  being  alike  h( 
four  dollars  per  acre,  the  aggregate  might  be  increased 


scpebintendeht's  bepoet.  153 

f  thoasands  of  dollars.  Under  a  graded  syatem  no 
nt  of  land  that  is  not  worth  fonr  dollars  per  acre,  and 
le  sold  at  all  for  that  sum,  might  be  sold  for  some- 
thousands  of  acres  now  liable  to  be  taken  at  four 
aid  command  twice,  thrice,  and  four  times  that 
Ve  know  a  piece  of  eighty  acres  that  was  taken  at 
and  within  two  jears  the  holder  refused  forty 
acre  for  it.  Why  should  not  the  State  have  some 
:fit  of  such  value  ? 

icaltural  College  lands  are  held  at  three,  and  for 
tuber  land,  five  dollars  an  acre.  They  are  not  sell- 
',  aa  yet;  the  Fund  now  amounting  to  t45,300; 
lich  was  for  sales  during  the  past  year;  but  the 
increased  in  population,  from  fifty  to  seventy 
>er  annum  since  the  close  of  the  rebellion,  and 
veil  as  the  Primary  School  lands — must  be  in 
!  long. 

iwing  8tat«meQt  will  show  more  in  detail,  the  state 
ral  funds : 

PBIHABY    SCHOOL   FUND. 

uring  the  year  fh>m  Primary  School 

$115,468  46 

mda  previously  sold 3,264,736  78 

OT.  30, 1869 »3,380,203  24 

1  State  holds 11,608,190  26 

ds  of  purchasers. 772,012  98 

md  drawing  7  ^  cent 12^80,203  24 

nd  Fund  drawing  5  ^  cent 210,011  07 

imary  School  Fund 42,590,214  31 

iringthe  year 139,877  53 

1  the  entire  fund 177,114  78 


154  PUBLIC   INSTBtrCTIOK. 

Amount  appordooed  w  May  1869 $16 

"                   "        W68 15 

'■            "                   "        1859,  lOyearsago-  10 

Increase  of  annual  distribution  in  10  years 6 

CNIVEBSITY  FUND. 

Principal,  due  from  purchasers $14 

In  the  hands  of  the  State 41: 

Total .■ $56 

Increase  during  the  year 

Interest  at  7  ^  cent __       3' 

NORUAL  SCHOOL   FUND. 

Principal,  due  from  purchasers t2i 

In  the  hands  of  the  State 4i 

Total «6i 

Increase  during  the  year 

Interest  at  6  |»  cent 

AGfllCtTLTURAL  COLLEGE   FUND. 

.  To  he  invested  in  honds t4j 

The  appropriations  by  the  Legislature  for  1860  and 
the  seyeral  educational  institutions  were  as  follows : 
University $5. 

Of  this,  $15,000  per  annum  is  a  permanent  appro] 
and  the  balance,  $30,796  60  is  the  appropriation  made 
on  condition  that  the  Begents  establish  a  chair  of  Horn 
Medicine;  but  which,  in  1869,  it  was  enacted  should 
over  without  conditions. 
Normal  School — expenses  for  1869  and  1870 $2' 

"  "        for  completing  building 

Agricultural  College — expenses  for  1869  and  1870       41 

"  "  for  buildings 3' 

Reform  .Sfc/joo?— expenses  for  1869  and  1870 7 

"  "         for  improvements 1, 


superintendent's  bbpoet.  155 

for  the  Deaf,  Dumb  and  Blind — 

for  arrearages 415,000  00 

expenaee  for  1869  and  1870 70,000  00 

completing  buildiDge,  &c 70,000  00 

a  total  of  appropriations  for  educational  porposcs, 
e  drawn  from  the  Treasury  during  the  years  1869 
1393,896  60-  Over  one-third  of  this,  however,  is  for 
improvements,  and  should  not  be  charged  solely  to 
es  of  the  institutions  for  those  years, 

VfUAT  EDCCATION  COSTS, 
not  be  unprofitable  to  make  some  calculation  of 
r  common  school  education  in  the  State  the  past 
:  total  casli  expenditures  are  reported  at  $2,388,111. 
not  include  the  expense  of  board  of  teachers ;  bnt  it 
le  Primarj'  School  Fund ;  and  estimating  board  at 
irs  i>er  week,  the  two  are  about  equal.  We  let  the 
>unt  stand,  therefore,  as  the  sum,  as  near  as  can  be 
i,  actually  esitended  by  the  people,  for  support  of 
>D  schools.  Great  as  this  sum  is,  it  is  but  (6  37  for 
enrolled  in  the  school  census.  But  over  half  of 
ir  other  purposes  than  tuition — mainly  for  building 
-and  should  not  be  set  down  to  the  expense  of  the 
,  bnt  to  many  future  years. 
[>unt  paid  to  teachers  constitutes  the  principal  "  cur- 
Lse."  Probably  not  more  than  ten  per  cent  of  the 
lould  be  so  accounted.  Teachers'  wages  amonnted 
147  86.  This  was  $3  14  to  each  child  in  the  census, 
jT  each  one  attending  school.  But  the  average  time 
.tendance  was  not  over  three  and  a  half  mouths ;  so, 
to  obtain  the  actual  cost  for  actual  attendance,  it 
he  amount ;  and  yet  it  leaves  only  about  ene  dollar 
if-jive  cenlsper  month  for  the  actnal  attendance  of 
ar.  But  all  who  attend  at  all,  might  attend  the 
le,  at  a  very  slight  additional  cost.    The  result  is, 


1B6  PDBLIC   INSTKOCTION. 

therefore,  about  370,000  children  are  in  school  an  ave 
three  and  a  half  monthB,  at  an  expense  of  ten  shil 
month ;  and  the  whole  might  be  in  school  six  and  three 
months  at  not  more  than  seventy  centa  per  month.  '. 
saming — as  ia  perhaps  fair  to  do,  and  certainly  it  is  a 
estimate — that  twenty  per  cent  of  expenses  for  bulldin 
should  be  reckoned  with  current  expenses  for  the  y- 
atill  find  that  the  entire  cost  of  education  is  less  thi 
dollars  per  month  for  the  time  pupils  are  actually  in 
and  would  be  less  than  one  dollar  per  month,  if  atte 
was  regular. 

The  schools  are  now  free  to  all — supported  mainly  b< 
on  the  property  of  the  district  Will  the  people  of  t 
trict  remember  that  it  costs  but  the  smallest  fraction  c 
keep  all  the  children  in  school,  than  it  does  to  keep 
them  there?  And  if  any  one  thinks  school  expeni 
heavy,  let  him  inquire  what  it  will  cost  to  send  the  hah 
children  which  we  hope  be  has.  to  a  private  school;  aD< 
is  little  danger  that  he  will  not  vote  every  time  to  snst 
public  school. 

SCHOOL   BTA.T1STICB. 

The  number  of  counties  in  which  schools  are  repo 
63 — an  increase  of  four  ;  and  the  number  of  townships 
an  increase  of  38 ;  and  the  number  of  districts,  6,0 
increase  of  197. 

Five  new  counties  were  organised  the  past  year:  j 
Benzie,  Charlevoix,  Osceola  and  Wexford.  These  c< 
have  heretofore  reported  through  other  counties,  to  whii 
were  attached;  and  their  addition  to  the  list  of  c< 
reporting,  brings  no  new  territory  or  schools  to  our  sti 
No  reports  have  been  received  from  Emmet  county ; 
schools  reported  in  that  county  last  year  being  now  n 
in  Charlevoix. 

The  number  of  children  between  the  ages  of  fi 
twenty  years,  is  374,771 — an  increase  of  20,021.    This  in 


SUPBBINTENDENT'S  REt*OBT.  167 

an  increase  of  population  of  60,663 ;  atid  if  the  census  to  be 

taken  the  coming  season  does  not  entirely  differ  in  its  ratio  to 

the  school  census,  as  shown  by  the  average  ratio  of  former 
jears,  the  State  will  be  found  to  have  a  population  not  far 
from  1,140,000. 

The  number  of  children  reported  in  1859,  was  237,541. 
This  shows  an  increase  in  ten  years,  of  137,233 ;  or  an  average 
annual  increase  of  13,723.  The  smallest  increase  was  in  1862, 
namely,  6,790— and  the  largest  in  1866,  reaching  22,529.  The 
increase  of  that  year  only  exceeds  that  of  1869. 

The  number  reported  attending  school,  is  269,587 — in- 
crease, 14,852.  The  reports  under  this  head  are  very  unrelia- 
ble; 234  difltricts  failing. to  report  any  attendance;  while  on 
the  other  hand,  it  is  supposed  that,  in  many  districts,  a  part 
rf  the  children  are  counted  twice.  So  it  is  believed  that  the 
nnmber  given  is  not  greatly  out  of  the  way. 

The  number  in  school  under  five  and  over  twenty  years  of 
ige,  was  5,869 — an  average  of  a^little  more  than  one  to  each 
district 

The  average  length  of  the  schools  in  the  State,  was  six  and 
three-tenths  months.  This  is  one-tenth  of  a  month  in  ad- 
vance of  any  former  year ;  the  four  previous  years  being  six 
and  two-tenths.  The  indications  are  that  the  year  1870  will 
«how  a  still  longer  average.  Sixty-one  districts  report  less  than 
three  months  school,  or  none. 

The  whole  number  of  months  by  male  teachers,  was  9,021 — 
tt  increase  of  931 ;  and  by  females,  30,443 — an  increase  of 
524.   Total  number  of  months,  39,464 — increase,  1,455. 

There  were  2,354  male  teachers — ^increase,  259  ;  and  females, 
7,895— increase  360.  Total  number  of  teachers,  10,249.  This 
u  something  more  than  the  actual  number  of  persons  engaged 
"fi  teaching;  as^  where  teachers  were  employed  part  of  the 
J^  in  one  school  and  part  of  the  year  in  another,  they  are 
counted  in  both. 


158  PDBLIC   INSTRUCTION, 

The  wages  of  male  teachers  was  $430,389  36 ;  an  a?e 
♦47  71  per  month — or  seven  cents  per  month  less  th; 
year. 

The  wages  of  female  teachers  was  1747,458  50  ;  an  i 
of  t34  55  per  month — an  advance  from  last  year  of  t2 
month.  This  increase  is  believed  to  be  no  more  th 
increased  value  of  their  services. 

Blanks  were  first  prepared  in  18G3,  to  ascertain  the  i 
monthly  wages  of  teachers ;  and  the  following  statemen 
the  amount  from  year  to  year  since  that  time,  also  the  i 
of  months  of  labor  by  teachers : 


*'i.SS" 

bjnulM. 

by  femalH. 

"S." 

6,917 

26,131 

t28  17 

6,618 

26,071 

34  00 

5,049 

29,046 

41  It 

6,319 

29,243 

43  53 

7,681 

29,729 

44  03 

8,090 

29,919 

47  78 

9,021 

30,443 

47  71 

1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 


The  total  cash  wages  of  teachers  the  past  year,  was  l 
847  80.  In  1859— ten  years  ago—it  was  1435,321  27 ; 
1864— five  years  ago — »591,295  33.  Thus  we  see  that 
gregate  of  teachers'  wages  has  about  doubled  in  live  yea 
ten  years  the  average  wages  of  male  teachers  has  iu 
abont  seventy  per  cent.,  and  that  of  females  ninety-se' 
cent. 

But  to  the  cash  wages  of  teachers  should  be  added  tt 
of  14,107  months'  board.  Estimating  this  at  twelve 
per  month,  we  have  $169,384 ;  making  the  actual  cost  of 
tl,347,131  86— an  average  of  (266  65  for  each  districl 
State. 

Teachers  "  boarded  around  "  in  2,235  districts.  Thi 
ner  of  boarding  a  teacher,  is  of  the  nature  of  a  rate- 


SUPEBIirrEKDEKT'S  BEPORT. 


159 


▼hich  there  was  neyer  any  positive  law ;  but  under  the  present 
l*w,  certainly,  no  one  can  be  compelled  to  board  a  teacher. 

The  number  of  yisits  to  the  schools  by  County  Superin- 
tendents, is  reported  by  the  directors,  at  5,744 ;  an  increase 
ot  486.  Several  Superintendents  have  stated  that  the  full 
Dumber  of  their  visits  is  not  reported. 

The  number  of  visits  by  directors  was  10,670 ;  an  increase 
of  1,050.  This  is  an  encouraging  symptom ;  but  what  would 
be  thought  of  the  superintendent  of  a  mechanical  establish- 
ment employing  twenty-five  hands,  who  should  appoint  a  fore- 
man, and  then  visit  the  factory — twice  a  year  ? 

The  number  of  graded  school  districts  reported,  is  236 ;  an 
increase  of  28.  Several  of  these  can  be  regarded  as  graded 
schools  only  in  a  very  limited  sense. 

The  number  and  kind  of  school-houses  reported  in  1868  and 
1869,  and  total  value  of  school-houses,  are  as  follows : 


TKAR. 

No.  of 
stone. 

No.  of 
Brick. 

No.  of 
Frame. 

No.  of 
Los. 

Total. 

Value. 

1868 

im 

72 
74 

2 

416 

459 
43 

3,609 
3,767 

158 

618 
621 

3 

4,715 
4,921 

206 

14,303,478 
5,331,774 

Increase.. 

$1,028,296 

WTuIe  the  increased  value  of  buildings  is  reported  at 
ll,M8,296,  the  amount  paid  for  building  and  repairs  is  re- 
ported at  only  $776,074 ;  showing  a  considerably  higher  value 
pat  upon  school  property  than  before. 

In  130  districts  no  house  is  reported ;  and  in  30,  houses  are 
'^rted  without  value. 


LIBRARIES. 

So  libraries  are  reported  in  1,822  districts  in  townships 
•apposed  to  have  the  district  library  system ;  and  222  towns 
Ja  which  no  district  libraries  are  reported,  fail  to  report  any 
^WB  library.    It  is  believed  that  several  thousand  volumes  in 


PUBLIC   IiraTRUCTIOX. 


both  town  and  district  libiariee  are  not  reported.    Th 
ing  ie  a  summary  of  the  reports: 


Liberia 

^«4. 

Nnmbaiot 

p«i 

District  Libraries 

Town  Libraries 

1,287 
163 

7,635 
8,370 

96,580 
40,254 

»1 

Total  in  1869 

10,005 
9,188 

136,834 
134,106 

CI 

There  was  received  iirom  fines,  fix)m  county  tr 
127,413  38.  The  previous  year,  the  amount  repor 
111,634  55. 

The  amount  voted  for  libraries  at  township  meeti 
t2,056  50.    In  1868, 11,673  40. 

These  figures  show  an  increasing  interest  in  school  1 
but  with  *29,464  88  library  money,  and  only  $14,39 
pended  /or  books — comment  is  nnnecessat;.  In  2 
counties,  and  in  538  towns,  no  moneys  from  fines  are 
received  by  the  Inspectors, 

The  Inspectors  report  the  organization  of  141  new* 
hut  ae  107  more  districts  have  made  a  report  than  in 
vious  year,  the  actual  number  is  probably  greater. 

The  Inspectors  held  1,501  meetings;  for  which  they 
t4,335  55.  But  nothing  is  reported  received  by  then 
towns;  and  in  169,  no  meetings  are  reported. 

The  number  of  private  schools  is  173 ;  in  which  t 
ber  of  pupils  is  estimated  at  $8,807.  About  half 
pupils  are  reported  in  Wayne  connty. 

la  31  entire  counties  no  dog  tax  is  reported.    But  t 
with   the  exception  of  Shiawassee  and  Wayne,  am 
newer  counties.    But  in  Genesee  the  tax  is  reportet 
fAree  towns;  In  Lapeer,  one;  In  Oakland,  two;   in 
two  ;  in  Tuscola,  three. 


bupbrintendent's  report. 


161 


■ing  tabular  Etat«meiit  shows  the  progresa  made 
tbe  more  important  details  of  Primary  School 
reral  years  past : 


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PUBLIC   IHSTSUCriON. 


COUNTIES, 

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If 

35:iM 

302,881 

REVENU3!3   OF  THE   St 

H00L3. 

The  following  is  a  tabular  statement  of  the  fiDBUcee 
past  two  years : 


RECBIPTS. 

lua. 

im,tii«  M 

M8,GM<HI 

Hi 

"asss 

superintekdent's  bepobt. 


163 


BXPENBITUBES. 

1868. 

1869. 

IVdaiale  teachers 

$881,026  ^ 
641,277  78 
805,882  41 
808,898  98 
818,275  85 

$480,901  81 
728,560  06 

Mi4  ftimak  tmchrra 

Md  for  building  and  repairs. 

776,074  00 

Md  for  all  other  porposeB. 

466,988  60 

Affloimt  on  hand  at  close  of  year 

388,542  87 

l^til 

$2,449,856  Tl 
94,011  46 

$2,786,060  88 

Dtifwipancr  ^  reports  between  receipts  and  ozpen- 
ditarai. 

26,968  89 

In  1868  the  difference  is  in  receipts  over  the  expenditures; 
and  in  1869,  in  expenditures  over  receipts. 

In  the  abstracts  at  the  close  of  the  volume,  it  will  be  seen 
that  the  total  of  receipts  and  expenditures  agree ;  the  amount 
being  112,556  98  more  than  the  receipts,  and  $13,406  91  less 
than  the  exi>enditures  as  above.  The  difference  comes  in  this 
way:  Turn  to  the  abstracts  at  the  close  of  the  volume,  and 
yon  will  see  that  the  total  of  each  county  is  obtained  by  itself, 
tnd  those  totals  of  receipts  and  expenditures  agree ;  and  of 
oonise,  when  the  totals  of  the  counties  are  added,  the  grand 
totals  will  agree.  But  in  the  above  statement  the  total  is 
obtained  by  adding  the  total  amount  of  each  item  by  itself, 
instead  of,  as  in  the  abstracts,  the  aggregate  amount  of  all  the 
items  by  counties.  The  simple  fact  is,  multitudes  of  directors 
Bttke  their  accounts  balance  when  they  would  not  if  the 
items  thereof  were  correctly  added.  They  cannot  make  their 
•ocount  balance,  but  they  carry  out  the  footings  alike,  so  that 
the  totals  agree  while  the  details  do  not. 

It  may  be  asked — if  such  are  the  inaccuracies  of  the  reports, 
of  what  use  are  they?  We  answer,  they  approximate  the 
tnith ;  and  it  is  shown  in  various  ways  that  in  the  aggregate, 
onmerous  as  the  errors  are,  they  very  nearly  balance  each 
other.  For  instance,  the  amount  of  funds  on  hand  at  the 
dose  of  1868  should  agree  exactly  with  the  amount  on  hand 
«t  the  commencement  of  1869 — there  being  but  an  imaginary 
point  of  time  between.  But  the  two  items  are  reported  a  year 
H^fft;   and  in  not  more  than  one-half  the  districts  do  they 


164  PUBLIC    INBTEUCTIOK. 

report  they  same  amount  In  Allegan  coonty,  with  1( 
tricts,  but  48  report  the  same ;  which,  after  deductii 
dUtricts  that  make  no  report  of  funds  on  hand,  leave 
than  half  which  seem  to  guess  at  the  amonnt  And  ; 
nearly  balanced  are  these  errors,  the  discrepancy  in  the 
gate  is  less  than  four-tenths  of  one  per  cent  on  an  amc 
t336,446  33. 

So  in  the  above  table,  the  escess  of  receipts  in  1868, 
the  smallest  variation  from  the  excess  of  expenditures  ir 
one  error  balancing  the  other. 

We  assume,  therefore,  that  the  general  result,  thouj 
absolutely  correct,  is  measurably  so,  and  shows  as  wi 
very  insignificant  fraction,  a  true  state  of  the  case. 

The  amount  raised  by  rate-bill  the  past  year,  showi 
crease  of  t5,903  43.  The  free  school  law  went  into  op 
July  3d,  after  which  no  rate-bill  could  be  collected ;  a] 
accounts  for  a  considerable  amount  of  the  increase  of  : 
edness,  viz:  t273,347  53 ;  though  the  greater  portion  is 
less  on  building  account  The  reports  show  tl8,S99 
female  teachers  at  the  close  of  the  year.  Most  of  this 
probably  have  been  added  to  the  rate-bill ;  making  it  son 
larger  than  in  the  previous  year. 

To  prevent  difficulty  in  districts  where  provisions  wi 
made  to  pay  for  the  summer  school  without  a  rate-bill, 
designed  not  to  have  the  law  take  effect  till  the  close 
school  year;  but  there  is  just  one  moment  in  the  hii 
an  Act  when  such  a  motion  can  be  made ;  and  at  th 
ment  the  gentleman  having  the  matter  in  charge  forgo 
it  was  too  late.  So  the  Act  took  effect  in  ninety  da 
the  3d  of  July.  Rate-bill  payers,  at  least,  will  rejoice 
'  mistake. 

The  greater  part  of  1490,076  13  raised  "from  a) 
sources,"  is  probably  for  money  loaned  for  building  pu 
yet  a  good  many  thousand  of  it  should  bo  distributed 
the  preceding  items. 


superintendent's  report.  166 

The  amount  of  resources  for  payment  of  teachers  appears 
to  be  146,059  06  more  than  was  paid  to  teachers,  without 
coanting  any  portion  of  the  moneys  on  hand  as  belonging  to 

that  fund. 

* 

GRADED   SCHOOLS. 

The  following  statistics  of  the  graded  schools  present  items 
of  interest:  Thirty-four  per  cent,  of  the  children  in  the  State 
are  in  231  districts.  Thirty-four  per  cent  of  the  pupils  in 
the  State  had  a  little  moro  than  eight  and  eight-tenths  months 
■chools.  But  this  thirty-four  per  cent  of  children  required 
but  about  fifteen  per  cent  of  the  teachers ;  while  to  them  was 
paid  about  forty-four  per  cent,  of  the  wages.  Yet  a  compari- 
son shows  that,  while  the  average  tuition  in  the  State  was  50 
cents  per  month,  in  the  graded  schools  it  was  but  46  cents. 
It  will  appear  still  more  favorable  to  the  latter,  when  we  con- 
«der  that  hardly  any  of  the  expense  of  14,107  months  board 
Bhonld  be  accounted  to  the  graded  schools.  But  in  the 
arerage  of  the  State,  the  graded  schools  are  themselves 
ineluded.  Therefore,  their  expense  being  less  than  that  of 
the  State,  including  themselves,  the  difference  is  still  greater, 
compared  with  the  average  of  the  other  schools  alone.  All 
these  data  show  that  tuition  in  the  graded  schools  is  at  least 
ten  cents  a  month  the  cheapest. 

In  these  estimates  of  the  cost  per  scholar,  we  reckon  the 
▼hole  number  of  children  in  the  districts,  as  the  reported 
number  attending  school  is  so  unreliable.  Eleven  of  the  graded 
•cbools  fail  to  report  any  attendance.  In  these  districts  are 
3^61  children  on  the  census  list  In  the  State,  234  districts 
report  no  attendance. 

The  value  of  the  school-houses  in  the  graded  districts,  is 
13459,067,  or  fifty-nine  per  cent,  of  the  State.  This  a  heavier 
expense  per  scholar ;  but  brick  and  stone  are  as  much  more 
enduring  than  boards  and  logs,  as  they  are  more  expensive  \ 
to  say  nothing  of  the  advantages  on  the  ground  of  taste. 


166  PUBLIC   INBTBUCTION. 

BeBide,  if  we  leave  the  log-houses  out  of  the  account,  ( 
arc  considered  but  temporary  expedients,)  it  is  probabl 
the  buildings  of  the  graded  schools  arc  a  no  heavier  tas 
iheproperiy  than  those  of  the  other  districts. 

In  the  following  statement  it  will  be  see'n  that  the  mi 
tuition  ranges  from  fourteen  cents  (where  only  femalei 
employed)  to  ninety-eight  cents.  lu  Detroit  it  was  t 
cents.  But  for  those  actually  attending  school  in  Det: 
was  fifty-two  cental  Her  schools  are  actually  amoi 
cheapest  in  the  State. 


aUPERINTENDBNT'B   REPORT. 
«RAD£D  SCHOOLS. 


isoooo 

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1.228  00 

SOOOO 

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siooo 

mv 

PUBLIC    INBTRCCTION. 
GRADED  SCHOOLS. 


buperintendekt's  bepoet. 


169 


GRADED  SCHOOLS. 


LOCATION. 


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1,000  00 

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1,000  00 
200  00 
215  00 
748  85 

1,000  00 
400  00 
800  00 
540  00 
800  00 
492  00 

1,894  00 
489  00 

1,852  75 
827  25 
750  00 
151  94 
800  00 
170  50 

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2,255  00 

2,000  00 


988  88 

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652  20 
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1,155  00 
860  00 
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885  09 

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222  04 

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1,100  00 

1,240  00 

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$10,841  80 
588  20 

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826  00 
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8,110  00 

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219  08 
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1.780  00 

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1,186  48 

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PDBLIC  iNsTai;c?rioK. 
OBADED  HCH001& 


8! 

51 


Spring  I^kD 

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Trenton,  No.  i... 


superintendent'b  eeport. 


ORADED   SCHOOLS. 


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4« 

STATK    TEACHEKS'    IXSTITUTES. 

'  and  Autumn  scries  of  Teachers'  Institutes  were 


Spring  Seriex. 

nmiencing  March   15th,  Teachers  present,     100 

22nd,  "                 144 

29th,  '-                 136 

ek.     '■             April  5th,  '■                 205 

"       5th,  "                   70 

■era.   "                "     13th,  •'                   90 

1,        '■                "     19th,  "                   GO 

ton,  "                "     26th,  "                   88 

Aiiiumn  Series. 

immencing  Aug.  33rd,  Teachers  present,  80 

SepL    6th,  "                     131 

"     13th,  '•                     101 

"     20th,  "                      70 

"      37th,  "                      77 


178  PUBLIC   INSTHnCTIOIC. 

At  Rockford,  commencing  Oct.   4th,  Teachers  preeent 
At  Owosso,  "  "    11th,  " 

At  Homer,  "  "    18th,  " 

At  Romeo,  "  "    35th,  " 

At  Kalamazoo,      •'  Nov.  let,  " 

Total,  hoth  series 

The  influence  of  these  Institutes  has  been  very 
The  remark  is  often  made  by  County  Supeiintende 
they  can  tell  almost  immediately  upon  yisiting  a 
whether  the  teacher  has  attended  an  Institute;  and  i 
without  the  least  inquiry.  The  classification  of  the 
the  order  of  recitations,  and  method  of  conducting  th 
general  management  of  the  school ;  the  kind  of  ins 
given ;  in  short,  the  general  character  of  the  school 
once  whether  the  teacher  has  had  special  instmctio] 
theory  of  teaching. 

The  interest  felt  in  these  Institutes  does  not  wan 
least.  There  has  never  been  a  series  held  in  which  t 
been  more  lively  interest  felt  than  in  those  of  the  L 
The  numbers  attending  them,  the  promptness  of  the 
ance,  and  the  close  attention  given  to  the  various  e 
show  that  the  interest  is  not  in  the  least  abating.  Tl 
ers  have  taken  occasion  to  express  their  appreciatic 
benefits  they  have  derived  from  the  Institutes,  both  b 
tions  and  iu  private  conversation. 

I  cannot  refrain  from  expressing  my  full  convictiot 
better  result  can  be  obtained  from  so  small  an  eicpen 
time  and  money.  This  is  not  simply  my  own  opii 
that  of  the  best  educators  in  the  State,  who  are  most 
with  the  work  done  by  the  Institutes. 

I  wish  here  to  express  my  indebtedncaa  to  the  CounI 
intendents  for  their  hearty  cooperation  in  this  work, 
their  efficient  aid  in  calling  together  the  teachers, 
their  constant  presence  and  assistance  in  conducting 


SCPERINTENDENT'a   REPORT,  173 

leir  efforts  is  th&growing  interest  in  the  Institatfis 
I  say  growing  intereBt,  for  I  believe  it  is  true 
:;oiistantly  iocreasiiig  interest  in  these  meetings, 
was  often  made  by  eminent  educators  who  haye 
kf  with  the  working  of  these  lustitnteH  from  the 
;hat  they  never  attended  those  of  more  interest 
ies  of  the  last  year,  or  those  in  which  snch  earnest 
t  attention  was  maQifestcd. 

ance  with  the  requirements  of  law,  most  of  the 
lerintendents  have  held  County  Teachers'  Insti- 
ning  one  week,  and  also  what  are  termed  district 
>ntinijing  two  or  three  days,  in  connection  with 
ition  of  teachers.  Many  of  these  Institutes  have 
attendance,  and  the  exercises  have  been  esceed- 
iting  and  profitable.  Instead  of  Institutes,  some 
-intendents  have  formed  teachers'  classes  in  con- 
some  union  school  of  the  county.  These  classes 
)cd  from  four  to  eight  weeks,  the  Principal  of  the 
)ther  teachers  aiding  in  the  work.  These  classes 
'  the  highest  value  to  the  teachers.  It  has  been 
•  to  give  to  these  classes  a  thorough  review  of  the 
were  expected  to  teach,  having  daily  recitations 
1  branches.  At  the  same  time  lectures  were  given 
Is  of  teaching,  and  upon  school  organization  and 
In  some  cases  general  discnssions  were  condncted 
,nd  kindred  topics. 

liances,  with  others  which  might  be  named,  have 
mifcst  changes  in  the  character  of  our  teachers, 
rse,  as  great   changes  in   the   condition  of  the 

cordial  welcome  has  been  extended  to  the  teachers 
m&  of  the  several  places  in  which  the  Institutes 
eld,  as  have  heretofore  been  given,  and  the  same 
ifested  in  the  various  exercises  as  has  always  been. 
g  the  responsibility  of  conducting  the  Institutes 


174  PUBLIC   1  SSTHUCTIOS. 

have  fully  appreciated  the  k  iidnese  of  tlio  people,  and 
felt  that  their  generous  court  iy  lias  contributed  very  It 
to  the  success  of  these  Institu:  s. 

THE   STATE    INIVERSITY. 

President  B.  O,  Haven  commenced  bis  Am 
saying:  "It  becomes  my  duty,  for  the  lost  ti 
Annual  Keport  to  t)ie  Regents,  and  throug 
Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction,  and  ti 
the  State,  of  the  affairs  of  the  University  of  M 
greatest  harmony  has  prevailed  between  tlie  vt 
and  the  President,  as  well  as  between  tbe  Presi 
of  Eegents,  during  the  entire  ais  years  of  his 
There  has  also  been  a  steady  growth  of  the  I 
of  its  dcpartmenta  Those  having  any  respc 
management  of  the  University,  as  well  as  ite 
where,  regretted  that  the  President  felt  it  his 
his  chair.  He  bad  performed  tbe  duties  of 
fidelity  and  marked  success.  Dr.  Haven  leav 
warmest  friends  who  follow  him  with  their  1: 
he  may  be  equally  successful  in  his  present  n 
tion — wishes  for  his  welfare,  not  mingled  with 
lest  he  prove  unequal  to  the  onerous  duties  h< 
but  wishes  accompanied  with  tbe  fullest  conlidi 
pose  and  ability  to  discliargc  every  obligation  ^ 
honor. 

No  one  has  as  yet  been  selected  to  fill  the  vac 
by  the  resignation  of  President  Haven.  I 
Frieze  has  been  elected  President  pro  tempt 
charging  the  duties  with  great  acceptance.  T 
some  changes  in  tbe  Board  of  Instruction,  as 
tbe  report  of  tbe  President.  Two  new  depa 
strnction  have  been  opened — Mechanical  Ei 
Pharmacy.  From  the  latter  department  ti 
graduated  at  the  last  commencement. 


PBBINTBNDENT'8  kepobt.  175 

the  annual  appropriation  of  fifteen  thou- 
!  funds  of  the  Univeraity  has  been  a  great 
'■  Kegents  to  make  various  improTemente 
leeded,  Tho  University  had  reached  the 
g  ability  with  the  amount  of  funds  at  its 
unds  Iiad  been  added  it  must  have  remained 
iuiiiug  to  do  the  work  it  had  beon  doing, 
Now  the  field  of  effort  may  be  conaider- 
lie  time  will  soon  come,  we  trust,  when  a 
I  be  needed  to  meet  the  grotaing  wants  of 
learning;  and  we  believe  when  this  time 
Fill  not  be  loath  to  extend  the  needed  aid. 
1  of  the  University  is  shown  more  by  the 
terary  Department  than  by  the  whole  num- 
the  several  departments.  The  President's 
n  1863  there  were  admitted  to  the  Literary 
in  1864,107;  in  1865,  lU;  in  1866,137; 
L868,  156.  The  President  says  that  "  the 
ienta  who  have  returned  has  regularly  in- 
the  number  who  have  correepon.ded  with 
e  to  coming  to  the  University,  has  been 
last  year  than  any  previoua  year. 
the  University,  embracing  all  who  assisted 
on  during  the  year  in  the  several  depart- 
rty-four. 
ler  of  students  during  the  year  liaa  been  aa 


BCIENCB,  LFTEHATDBE,  AND   THE  ART3. 


176  PUBLIC  IN8XEUCTI0N. 

In  Select  Studies _ 

Ijj  Higher  Chemistry 

In  Pharmacy _ 

Total  in  this  department 

DEFARTHENT  OF  UEDICIHS  AND  SUBOERT. 

Stadenta 

DEPARTMENT  OF  LAW. 

Seniors 134 

Juniors 308 

Total  in  department 

Total 

Deduct  counted  twice 

Total  in  University 

BUUHARY   OF  TREASURER'S   REPORT. 

Total  of  receipts,  and  balance  to  credit  of  State 

Aid  Fund  and  Reserve  Fund JlOajS: 

Total  of  expenses 68,5' 

Balance  in  treasury  June  S8, 1869 J34,9. 

NORUAL    SCHOOL. 

This  Institution  is  enjoying  unusnal  prosperity.  The 
ber  of  students  has  increased  until  more  room  is  need< 
their  accommodation.  The  edifice  which  was  commenc 
a  museum,  designed  for  the  use  of  both  the  Normal  S 
and  the  State  Agricultural  Society,  has  been  completed, 
used  by  the  Normal  School  alone,  not  simply  as  a  Mn 
bnt  also  to  furnish  rooms  for  the  experimental  Bcho< 
was  originally  the  design  to  use  a  part  of  the  building  f 
experimental  school,  but  not  so  much  as  will  now  be 
During  last  year  the  Executive  Committee  of  the  Aj 


SOPEEINTKNDEirr'8  BEPORT.  177 

;y  p88scd  over  to  the  Normal  School  all  their  right 
the  Musenm,  and  the  Legislature,  at  its  laat  seesion, 
ppropriation  to  complete  the  edifice.  It  is  now 
I  seated,  and  is  to  be  occupied  immediately  by  the 
is  will  gire  great  relief  to  the  Normal  School  in 
;rowded  condition. 

langes  have  taken  place  in  the  Faculty.  Prof,  A. 
has  been  added  to  the  board  of  instruction  as 
f  Elocution  and  English  Literature.  Prof.  L. 
aa  elected  to  fill  the  vacancy  occasioned  by  the 
of  Prof.  J.  Goodiaon. 
nary  of  officers  and  students  is  as  follows : 

FACULTY. 

Instructors 11 


Students,  Winter  Term 362 

"  Summer  Term ,.  181 

Fall  Term 889 

Graduated 19 

'■         receiving  Training  Certiflcato 32 

'-  firom  the  Normal  Department  acting 
ined  as  Teachers  in  the  Experimental  Depart- 
- 86 

PCPILS. 

Pnpils,  Winter  Term 106 

"       Summer  Term _     93 

Fall  Term 114 

)resentatiTe  has  the  right  to  appoint  two  pnpila 
strict  as  members  of  the  Normal  School.  This 
t  is  good  for  one  year.  The  following  is  the  usual 
ointment : 


178  public  instruction. 

Date - ,18 

I  hereby  certify  that has  been  appointe 

me  to  fill  the  next  vacancy  in  the  Michigan  State  No 
School,  among  pnpils  from  this  district. 


Kepreaenlatit'e District, CouK 

The  number  of  pupils  who  have  secured  these  appointi 
has  been  fifty-five. 

A  catalogue  has  beeu  published  during  the  last  year,  g 
the  course  of  study  and  a  fnll  statement  of  the  methc 
instrnction,  and  the  topics  discussed  in  the  several  dt 
ments  that  are  purely  professional.  Heretofore,  much 
has  been  given  to  the  usual  routine  of  teaching ;  the  e 
of  instruction  differing  from  the  course  pursued  in 
schools,  chiefiy,  in  devoting  more  time  to  the  discussi 
methods  of  teacliing  in  connection  with  the  daily  recita 
It  is  now  the  purpose  of  the  Faculty  to  give  more  ti 
purely  professional  work.  To  do  this,  the  standard  of  bcI 
ship  required  as  a  condition  for  admission,  must  be  i 
This  advanced  standard  will  be  adopted  and  insisted 
It  will  not  be  raised  at  once,  but  gradually,  as  the  o 
tunities  for  securing  this  better  preparation  shall  be  incr 
To  do  a  kind  of  preparatory  work  has  been  a  necesBi 
necessity  which  is  every  year  diminishing,  as  the  Union  » 
are  so  rapidly  increasing.  We  hope  the  time  is  not  far  d 
when  the  chief  instruction  given  ut  the  Normal  School 
be  purely  professional. 

STATE   AQKIUULTUBAL  UOLLBQE. 

By  reference  to  tho  report  of  the  College  by  President  j 
it  will  be  seen  that  more  progress  has  been  made  durii 
past  year,  that  is  of  a  permanent  character,  than  hat 
made  during  any  one  year  since  the  College  was  foundet 

The  erection  of  the  new  College  edifice,  capable  of  a 
modating  a  large  number  of  students,  and  furnishing  tl 


scpbbkttbhdkkt's  bepobt.  179 

rding,  h&ving  introduced  every  improTement 
at,  so  far  as  the  instruments  are  concerned, 

a  new  cm  in  the  history  of  the  College, 
t  which  long  embarragsed  the  College  author- 
T  more  applications  have  been  rejected  than 
k  of  room  to  accommodat«  those  wishing  to 
of  the  educational  advantages  of  the  College. 

have  been  subjected  to  great  inconvenience, 
into  comparatively  email  rooms,  four,  and  in 
!ven  six  occupying  the  same  apartment.  The 
1  new  edifice  will  furnish  will  lie  most  fully 
oth  Faculty  and  students. 
lisadvantagcs  go  long  Buffered  from  the  loca- 
ly  disappearing.  Much  of  the  ground  in  the 
ty  of  the  College  has  had  the  stumps  removed, 
reduced  to  an  even  grade,  greatly  improving 
)pearance  of  everything.  The  stumps  are 
lly  removed  (torn  that  portion  of  the  farm 
d  to  be  caltivated,  so  that  more  attention  can 

special  work  of  farming  and  stock  raising. 
I  be  conducted  much  more  satisfactorily,  and 
?.  It  is  gratifying  to  know  that  the  several 
iments  already  made  have  attracted  so  much 
»ve  been  eo  widely  published,  and  so  favorably 

f  students  has  not  increased  during  the  last 
f  obvious  reason  that  no  larger  number  than 
it  could  be  accommodated.  The  limit  of  ac- 
is  reached  some  years  since ;  of  course  the 
nts  catalogued  has  for  the  past  few  years  been 

of  officers  and  students  is  as  follows: 

FACDLTY. 


180  PUBLIC   IN8TRCCTI0N, 

STUDENTS. 

Senior  class 

JoDior  class 

Sophomore  class 

Freshman  class 

Total--, 

A  mnch  larger  uumbor  will  doubtless  be  en 
the  coming  year.    The  College  has  reached  the 
growth   when  every  year  will  exhibit  a  mani 
Heretofore  much  toil  has  been  had,  aud  labor  e 
but  little  to  show  for  it,  except  to  those  immediately  coi 
with  the  institution.    Hereafter  the  results  of  the  expei 
of  labor  and  money  will  be  apparent  to  all.    Never  W' 
friends  of  the  College  more  confident  of  its  ultimate 
than  they  are  at  present.    They  have  the  best  of  reasot 
confident.     Prejudice  ia  giving  way ;  friends  are  mnlti; 
doubters  are  growing  confident ;  the  great  tide  of  in 
which  has  been  against,  is  turning  in  its  favor.    The  i 
tnral  College  is  yet  t«  see  a  grand  triumphant  future, 
rejoice  in  it. 

KALAMAZOO   COLLEGE. 

The  report  of  Kalamazoo  College  represents  the  ins 
to  be  in  a  prosperous  condition.  During  the  past  y 
Endownment  Fund  baa  been  augmented  by  the  add 
t50,000.  Thorough  re])airs  have  been  made  upon  the 
buildings.  The  following  is  a  statement  of  the  present  n 
of  the  College : 

Real  Estate - $3t 

Invested  funds  and  interest  bearing  notes 8f 

Total »12; 

Amid  its  jirosperitv,  the  College  has  suffered  an  im 
loss  in  the  death  of  Prof.  James  A.  Clark,  who  was  an 
and  successful  worker.  His  influence  was  not  confinei 
the  College,  but  was  felt  throughout  the  State. 


SUPERIirrEKDEHT'B  BEPORT.  181 

L&rj  of  teachers  and  students  is  as  follows: 

FACULTY. 

10 

8TUDBNT8. 

jlassof  1869 6 


class 14 

lass 18 

Students 109 

ALBION  COLLBQE. 
ef  report  from  Albion  College  represents  its  con- 
abont  the  same  as  last  year.  President  G.  B. 
^ed  at  the  close  of  the  last  College  year,  and  Eer. 
Lown  was  elected  to  fill  the  vacancy.  The  friends 
:ge  are  gratified  with  its  present  prosperity  and 
■ects.  The  permanent  endowment  fond  is  annu- 
ag,  the  means  for  accommodation  enlarging,  and 
for  instruction  improving. 
lary  of  teachers  and  students  is  as  follows : 

FACULTY. 

9 

STUDENTS. 
12 

16 

class 28 

lase 19 

ilasses 75 

1  and  Hnsic 21 

jry  Classes 180 

876 
«d 18 


mber  for  Collegiate  year,. 


183  PUBLIC   INSTRUCTION. 

OLIVET    COLLKGE. 

ThiB  Institution  is  Btill  enjoying  its  usual  prosperity, 
ditions  to  its  pcrmaTient  funds  are  secured  every  year,  a 
College  aeema  to  be  steadily  approaching  a  condition  of 
pendence  when  it  will  have  an  ample  endowment,  and  i 
facilities  possessed  by  the  older  institutions  of  learning. 
history  of  the  College  is  like  that  of  others,  every  a< 
made  is  the  result  of  constant,  dgorous  effort. 

The  summary  of  ofRcers  and  students  is  as  follows : 

FACULTY. 

Instructors - 

Assistant  Teachers 

STUDENTS. 

Graduates  of  1869 _ 

Senior  class 

Junior  class - 

Sophomore  class 

Freshman  class ! 

In  College  classes _ 

Ladies'  Course _ 

Elective  Studies.. 

Preparatory  Department,  (Classical  Course) 

Preparatorj-  Department,  (English  Course) 

Ladies'  Preiianitory  Course _ 

Whole  number  of  geutlomcn 1 

Whole  number  of  ladies l 

Total 

No  reports  have  been  received  fhim  tho  following  O 
Adrian,  Hillsdale,  Hope,  and  Grand  Traverse.  From  i 
these  no  report  has  been  received  for  several  years.  Oc 
ally,  intelligence  reaches  this  Department  from  theso 


BCPERINTENDENT*8   REPORT.  183 

e  learn  that  the  College  edifice  at  Adrian,  which  was 

by  fire,  has,  during  the  past  year,  been  rebuilt.  A 
report  from  this  College,  for  the  year  1868,  repre- 
i  condition  lis  very  hopeful.  Arrangementa  were 
iquidsto  a  debt  that  had  long  embarrassed  the  Trus- 

the  friends  of  the  College  were  very  sanguine  in 
its  future, 
close  of  tlie  last  College  year  President  E.  B,  Fair- 

[illsdale  College,  resigned  bis  position,  and  Rev. 

«  elected  to  fill  the  vacancy.  The  College,  it  is  he- 
snjoying  its  uanal  prosperity, 

gratified  with  the  intelligence  that  several  thousand 
avc  bcrn  added  to  the  endowment  fnnd  of  Grand 
College.  This  institution  is  now  stmggling  throagh 
iculties  incident  to  all  new  enterprises  of  this  kind, 
rthem  portion  of  the  Lower  Peninsula  is  developed, 

sections  now  a  wilderness  become  populated,  as  they 
very  few  years,  this  CoUegc,  built  with  so  much  toil 
sacrifice,  will  be  a  power  for  good  that  can  bo  but 
ized  now. 
the  last  year  Miss  A.  C.  Kogers,  Principal  of  the 

Female  College,  was  suddenly  called  from  her  labors 
>r  home  above,  and  to  her  eternal  reward.    With  her 

doors  of  this  Institution  were  for  the  present  closed, 
jr  years  her  efforts  to  build  np  this  school  have  been 
She  now  rests  from  her  labors,  and  her  works  will 
iredly  follow  Jier. 

r  read  by  C.  B.  Stebbins,  Deputy  Superintendent  of 
istmctioii,  before  the  Convention  of  County  Superin- 

at  Saginaw  City,  is  inserted  here,  believing  that  the 
ns  made  in  it  are  an  appropriate  conclusion  to  what 
before. 


184  PDBLIO  IKSTRCCTION. 

THB   EDUCATIONAL   NEEDS   OF   »ICHIGAN. 

A  school  examiner,  wishing  to  test  a  teacher's  wita  as 
as  his  scholarship,  asked — "  If  you  stand  at  the  North 
and  travel  due  west,  where  will  yon  strike  land?"  The  « 
date  for  a  certificate  thought,  looked  west,  and  looked 
and  finally  guessed  he  couldn't  tell. 

In  discussing  the  Ediicatioual  needs  of  Michigan,  I 
somewhat  like  the  teacher — uncertain  which  way  to  go, 
douhtful  where  I  shall  land,  if  I  go  at  all.  He  had  the  e: 
circnmference  to  aim  at ;  he  would  be  sure  to  hit  somewt 
and  ae  for  going  west,  he  might  as  well  start  in  one  diret 
w  another. 

So  with  me :  I  may  fail  of  finding  my  way  in  the  inte 
directiou,  but  in  all  the  amplitude  of  the  subject,  I  can  hi 
foil  to  strike  land  somewhere. 

"  The  Educational  Keeds  of  Michigan  "  discussed  in  a 
of  twenty  minutes !  Ask  the  Saginaw  Firemen  to  pumf: 
their  noble  river  In  that  time! 

I  feel  as  though  I  were  set  down  in  the  centre  of  a  2i 
acre  farm — such  as  we  read  of  in  Illinois — stocked  with 
000  sheep,  fed  by  9,000  shepherds,  who  are  appointed  by  1' 
agents  of  the  million  owners  of  the  farm,  and  I  am  j 
twenty  minutes  to  point  out  all  the  deficiencies  of  the 
and  tell  all  that  is  required  in  the  future,  for  the  best 
tection  and  sustenance  of  the  350,000  lambs. 

I  look  back  twelve  years,  and  contrast  the  then  sts 
things  with  the  present,  and  the  progress  is  so  great,  the 
thought  is,  what  more  can  be  needed  ? 

At  that  time  there  were  little  more  than  half  the  pr 
number  of  Iambs.  Thousands  of  them  had  no  sheltf 
such  a  one  as  disgraced  the  farm  and  its  owners.  ICa: 
the  shepherds  were  mere  time-servers,  hardly  knowing 
from  poison.  Each  worked  upon  his  own  system,  or  oz 
system  of  his  grandfather,  or  without  system,  with  ani 
all  tools  that  came  to  his  hand.    The  agents  kept  litt! 


8UPKEINTKMDENT'8  repobt,  186 

turesorresnlU;  half  the  money  was  virtually 
d  Dobody  cared.  There  was  a  superintendent 
entreated,  and  scolded,  and  no  one  cared.  He 
h  as  the  Governor,  and  was  expected  to  keep 
,000  man-power  moving,  withont  so  much  as 
3  thousand  letters  he  annually  received, 
3  horn  of  experience.  The  people  at  length 
t  their  lambs  were  not  properly  cared  for,  and 

came.  The  laws  have  been  from  time  to 
and  the  system  of  operation  changed.  The 
1  with  educational  zeal,  and  for  some  years 
uoted  throughout  the  country  as  the  model 
ind.  I  must  say,  however,  that  I  fail  to  see 
system,  as  a  whole,  especially  superior  to  that 
itates.  We  have  this  reputation,  I  apprehend, 
account  of  the  system  itself,  as  from  the  spirit 
th  which  it  is  administered.  The  people  have 
k;  and  the  walls  of  the  temple  would  rise 
ly  system.    This  spirit — not  the  system — has 

with  school-houses  that  rival  the  best  houses 
States,  and  our  little  cities  and  villages  chal- 
ficence  of  the  great  cities  and  centres  of  com- 

ions  of  teachers  have  improved  50  to  100  per 
,rger  schools  have  grown  from  mere  Primaries 
High  schools,  superceding  the  necessity  of 
I  University,  or  expensive  private  Academies, 
tendent  of  Public  Instruction  is  no  longer 
t,SOO  schools  in  the  crown  of  his  hat,  but  he 
assistants,  with  a  laudable  ambition  to  rival 
leir  work. 

Superintendency  is  fully  meeting  the  expecta* 
ads,  and  that,  not  merely  because  it  is  good  in 
lae,  generally,  the  people  have  elected  live  men, 
ined  to  justil^  its  wisdom.    Had  the  first  elec- 


186  PPBLIC   INSTKUCTION. 

tion  given  iis  incompetent,  time-seiring  men,  they  would 
JiiDed  the  system  in  two  years.  But  so  far  from  that  wi 
fact,  a  few  malcontents,  who  wishLiJ  to  repeal  the  law, 
to  obtain  a  hardly  respectable  hearing  from  the  last  Lc 
ture,  Tiie  benefits  of  the  system  are  very  apparent  i 
increased  interest  of  the  people,  in  tho  abolition  of  the 
est  clog  to  our  school  system,  and  esjiecially  in  the  1 
standard  of  ([ualitication  in  the  teachers. 

Onr  school  laws  linTe  for  several  years  known  no  distil 
of  color,  condition,  or  sex.  The  man  or  woman,  wh 
black,  native  or  alien,  whose  property  helped  suppoi 
schools,  was  a  voter  in  school  meetings,  and  eligible  to 
I  havy  never  known  of  a  family,  or  community,  beci 
demoralized  thereby. 

Our  jusHce  and  our  hvmanity  arc  equally  broad  j  a 
human  being,  who  is  a  proper  subject  of  mental  improvf 
can  be  kept  from  the  school-room,  on  equal  terms  wi 
others. 

For  four  years  bloody  war  raged  all  around  Mt.  Verno 
federal  and  rebel  alike  stood  aloof,  as  though  the  Tisible 
of  Washington  stood  over  it  with  drawn  sword,  to  gua 
hallowed  spot.  In  like  maimer  the  warfare  of  parti 
neyer  entered  the  domain  of  our  schools,  and  all  mei 
our  school  interests  aa  sacred  as  the  repose  of  the 
whose  tomb  overlooks  the  Potomac, 

And  now  comea  our  crowning  glory,  Free  Schools !  1 
to  the  patriot  toilers  who,  for  the  past  ten  years,  hav 
educating  the  people  up  to  this  grand  consummation 
principle,  that  "  tho  property  of  the  State  should  1 
means  for  the  education  of  the  State,"  is  vindicated, 
unanimity  with  which  the  Free  School  law  was  enacts 
the  almost  universal  joy  of  the  people  over  the  event 
that  it  was  a  measure  of  the  jieople,  and  assure  na  tl 
rate-bill  will  never  again  raise  its  hideous  form,  to  stat 


fiDPEHINTEKDKST'S    REPORT.  187 

ghost,  at  the  Bchool-room  door,  to  frighten  children 
D  the  ftltar  of  light. 

ig  from  the  common  schools,  we  haro  tlie  Normal  . 
lever  otherwise  than  popular  with  the  people;  the 
iral  College,  already  ao  educational  power,  and  des- 
t  glorions  ftiture ;  and  the  University,  great  in  nnm- 
in  fame. 

these  State  Institutions — not  to  speak  of  the  Reform 
id  Institution  for  the  Deaf  and  Blind — we  have  the 
leges,  the  outgrowth  of  enlightened  religious  conyic- 
i  never  to  be  omitted  in  a  view  of  onr  educational 
May  the  day  never  come  when  they  shall  lose  their 
a  the  hearts  of  men ! 

hat  need  we  more  ?  Have  we  any  further  "  Educa- 
eeds?"  Alas,  there  ia  much,  very  much,  land  yet  to 
sed.  The  problem  ia :  are  wo  able  to  go  np  and  drive 
giants  of  ignorance,  indifference,  prejudice,  bigotry, 
shness.  still  so  potent  for  eril,  even  in  this  favored 

r  Superintendents  need  not  he  told  that  we  need  more 
er  school-houses,  and  better  furnished,  within  and 
Yon  have  Buneyed  the  rustic  structures,  walked 
:hc  towers  thereof,  and  mourned  over  the  desolate 
Well  do  yon  know  that,  notwithstanding  our  High 
>alaccs,  and  many  noble  country  houses,  a  great  de- 
still  exists.  Statistics  might  startle  those  who  get 
IS  from  the  city  school-houses ;  you  "  have  traveled," 
not  be  surprised  at  anything.  The  rich  old  county 
vee  has  t324,000  invested  in  school -ho  nses,  and  yet 
■  64  districts,  or  38  per  cent,  of  the  whole,  in  each  of 
,c  honac  and  lot  are  valued  at,  or  under  t800.  Lapeer 
Genesee,  39;  Waehtcuaw,  33;  Barry,  54;  Oakland, 
!  town  in  Oakland  has  11  school-houses,  and  10  of 
erage  $147  50  each.  One  town  in  Lenawee  has  nine 
he  whole  averaging  tl57  37  eacli. 


168  PDBLIO  INSTSUCnOK. 

If  this  was  the  result  of  poverty,  reason  would  tha 
should  bear  with  it.  But  it  is  not.  I  take  at  random 
towns  in  Livingston  county.  One  (Handy)  has  8  dist: 
and  houses  worth,  in  all,  t975.  The  other  (Hartland)  ) 
districts,  and  houses  worth  *8,20O.  The  former  paid  teai 
the  past  year,  $960  58 ;  the  latter  tl,750  16 ;  almost  doi 
yet  the  former  has  138  more  children,  and  has  a  heaviei 
mill  tax,  than  the  latter.  These  are  pictures  not  love 
behold. 

The  reported  value  of  school-houses  in  the  State  foi 
past  year,  will  be  about  $5,300,000.  If  we  could  enter 
the  coming  new  year  with  $3,000,000  added  to  this,  it  v 
no  more  than  meet  the  reasonable  demand ;  while,  to  si 
the  increase  of  population,  calls  for  500  new  houses  anni 

Let  us  not  cease  to  keep  this  subject  before  the  people, 
them  not  dwell  in  ceiled  houses  while  the  temples  of  leai 
lie  waste.  The  eye  is  a  medium  of  education,  no  less  thai 
ear ;  and  he  who  cannot  perceive  its  importance,  would 
glasses  to  see  a  mountain.  Let  us  have  elegant,  well  fum 
school-houses,  with  eligible  sites,  and  beautiful  surrounc 
and  it  will  be  worth  more  than  two  months  per  annum  t 
to  the  terms  of  school. 

But  given  the  school-bouses,  how  shall  they  be  fi 
Thank  Ood,  the  rate-bill,  that  horrible  bugbear  to  pare 
often  becoming  a  bear  indeed,  whose  claws  tore  the  schoi 
pieces — no  longer  stands  in  the  way.  Like  an  incubus,  ao 
sitting  on  the  breast  of  our  school  system,  it  vanished  fo 
with  the  light  of  1869.  Every  district  with  more  ths 
children  must  now  have  five  months'  school ;  and  that  g 
word  Free,  is  inscribed  over  every  door. 

There  are  some  who  think  their  poverty  demands  that 
shall  keep  their  children  at  home  for  their  labor ;  othei 
allowed  to  stay  away  from  school  from  mere  indiffei 
What  shall  be  done  for  them  P  Compulsory  attendi 
This  is  a  delicate  question.    What  will  do  in  Prusaia  i 


3DPEEINTKNDENT'8   fiEPOHT.  189 

e.    The  ]aw  already  provides  the  poor  with  text 
safely  attempt  more?    A  qualified  compulsory 
oiild  enpport. 
:  on  the  opening  of  school,  let  it  be  the  duty 

to  know  who,  between  the  ages  of  8  and  15, 
^t  him  at  once  sec  the  parents.  If  an  excuse  is 
actory  to  the  district  board,  very  well.  If  the 
inflScient  in  their  minds  to  justify  absence,  let 
aplaint  to  the  school  insiwctors,  who,  upon  cx- 
il  excuse  the  child,  or  order  its  attendauce,  on 
penalty  as  they  shall  in  each  ease  prescribe, 
t  every  case  upon  its  own  merits,  and  tho  ob- 
is of  a  sweeping  law  be  avoided, 
another  class,  still  more  difficult  to  reach.  At- 
ory  attendance  with  them,  and  there  would  be 
11  the  power  of  tlie  State  could  not  accomplish 
hate  the  free  schools,  and  seek  for  part  of  the 
rt  their  own  strictly  sectarian,  so  called  schools, 
.  be  enlightened,  till  they  can  see  that  intelli- 

tban  ignorance,  mental  freedom  better  than 
!ind  God's  Word  better  than  the  traditions  of 
ion  we  may  not  ignore.  Bnt  it  is  a  work  too 
m  law;  they  must  be  reached  by  other  than 

I  school  is  not  the  real  question.  The  school 
features,  is  an  offense  to  them.  We  eon  only 
iniate  omnipotence  of  truth,  and  that  time  will 
■ejudices,  the  progress  of  thought  reach  their 
r  schools  shine  with  a  light  so  attractive  that 
I  won. 

:  houses,  and  the  scholars — how  shall  we  secure 
ihers  ?  No  question  is  more  difficult  than  this, 
t  time  to  discuss  it.  Time,  increased  wages  for 
and  diminished  wages  for  all  others,  a  stronger 
thy  between  the  parents  and  teachers,  a  hun- 


PL'BIJC    IX8T8UCTI0N. 


Ired  vieits  to  the  schooU  where  there  is  uow  one,  exploBi< 
he  &llacy  that  a  teacher  mus:  quit  the  schoolroom  as  ew 
he  ii  marricci,  enlarged  oppoitunity  for  formal  inBtrnc 
[■eacliere'  loBtitutes  and  Aaaociationa,  faithful  aid  and  guai 
louaty  SiiperintGndeitts,  and  a  magnifying  of  tlio  profei 
ly  all — and  I  leave  you  to  fill  out  the  picture. 

I  propose  not  to  speak  of  methodB  of  teaching;  bnt  ii 
tears  to  me  that,  at  this  time,  there  is  a  tendency  to  an 
Q  attempting  too  mneh.  Gonsiderablo  is  being  said  upoi 
nbjeet  of  reducing  the  length  of  the  daily  sessions  of  st 
rom  six  hours  to  five,  four,  or  even  three,  on  the  ground 
ix  hours  study  is  too  much  for  the  strength  of  the  f 
lut  why  talk  of  reducing  the  time,  while  with  six  houre 
hild  is  often  obliged  to  study  one  or  two  hours  at  hoE 
:eep  up  in  the  course,  and  with  his  class?  Are  we  not 
ng  tlie  lambs  too  fast,  rather  than  too  long,  for  their 
levelopnient,  physically  and  intellectually  ? 

And  what  shall  I  say  of  Libraries  ?  The  founders  ol 
chool  system  thought  libraries  indispensable,  to  furnish 
Qg  for  the  young.  We  do  not  need  them  now  m  mu 
umieh  reading,  as  to  secure  the  proper  kind  of  reading, 
ur  present  law  would  do,  but  for  one  fatal  defect — a  deft 
atal  as  would  be  the  omission  of  the  connecting  rod 
ocoraotive. 

The  old  law  demanded  J25  of  the  mill  tax  in  every  f 
ifteu  absorbing  the  entire  tax.  This,  with  the  fines, ' 
nuch  of  them  as  could  be  coaxed  through  the  hands  of  n 
rates  and  county  treasurers,  was  paid  for  town  libraries, 
looks  were  distributed  to  the  districts  by  the  town  clei 
le  returned  by  tlie  directors  every  third  month  for  excb 
This  would  now  require  more  than  60,000  miles  trave 
.nnum,  at  a  positive  expense  to  the  directors,  eertaii 
1100,000,  to  say  nothing  of  more  than  10,000  days' 
Phis  was  like  putting  "  two  locomotives  ahead  of  each  ol 
.8  an  old  editorial  friend  once  expressed  it,  to  draw  a  1 


19S  PUBLIC  1H8TECCTI0H. 

State  fhnd  more  than  the  other.  It  was  at  first  propose 
make  the  proceeds  of  the  16th  sections  a  fund  for  the  t€ 
in  which  they  were  situated,  as  some  States  have  done.  ' 
would  hare  given  the  town  of  Lansing  tlOO.OOO.  But  ^ 
counsels  prevailed,  and  it  was  made  a  State  fund.  But 
start  back  with  horror  at  the  idea  of  making  the  two  mil' 
a  State  fnnd.  "Robbery!  say  they.  Biit  the  town  of  Lan 
might  just  as  reasonably  say  it  is  robbed  of  nine-tenths  c 
Primary  School  fund. 

While  a  common  interest  would  make  the  two  mill  t 
State  fund,  there  is  little  hope  it  will  ever  be  done.  I 
partial  remedy  might  be  found  in  a  better  distribution  ol 
Primary  School  money.  This  fund  will  soon  reach  t20( 
per  annum.  I  would  apportion,  say  one-fonrth  of  thai 
recti y  to  the  districts;  amounting  to  about  ten  dollars  i 
The  populous  districts  would  never  feel  the  loss,  while  ti 
feeble,  new  districts,  it  would  give  essential  aid. 

Much  more  might  be  said,  but  time  forbids ;  and  in 
have  said,  I  have  omitted  so  much,  that  I  feel  as  though  1 
writing  an  index  rather  than  an  essay. 

I  cannot  close,  however,  without  a  few  words  upon 
higher  Institutions.  What  are  onr  needs  there?  Our 
Colleges  have  now,  in  buildings  and  endowment  fnnds, 
one  million  dollars  invested.  That  sum  ought  to  be  dou 
and  the  friends  of  these  noble  enterprises  are  abundantly 
to  do  it,  if  they  will  think  so. 

By  the  death  of  the  lamented  Miss  Rogers,  the  Mid 
Female  College  is  closed.  What  are  its  future  prospet 
am  not  advised.  I  have  sometimes  wondered  that  a  citiz 
onr  State,  who  once  gave  this  school  (1,000,  has  not  tho 
to  rear  a  lasting  monument  for  himself  by  devoting  a  s 
year's  income  to  this  school,  and  making  himself  the  V 
of  Michigan.  But  do  we  need,  most  of  all,  an  exclusivt 
male  College,  endowed  by  the  State  ?     I  have  no  hostili 


supebihtbndbnt's  eepobt.  198 

!,  but  I  believe  our  daughters  may  grow  up  with 
ifter  the  similitude  of  a  palace,  without  it. 
,  about  equal  educational  advantages  for  woman. 
EKjnal  advaatagee  at  Adrian,  Albion,  Hillsdale, 
•and  TntTerse,  Olivet  ?  Equal  at  the  Normal 
,  I  trust,  before  your  next  annual  convocation, 
^cultural  College. 

)ut  the  University  P  All  iu  good  time,  and  the 
I. 

me  to  discuss  the  benefits  or  dangers  of  cOedn- 
vantages  are  everywhere  apparent  to  those  who 
ad  the  history  of  our  Colleges  above  named,  as 
f  Oberlin,  Wheaton,  Knox,  and  others,  proves 
Ts  exist  only  in  the  fears  of  timid  men,  whose 
s  lost  its  effect.  And  above  all  this  question,  I 
daughters  have  as  valid  a  right,  in  equity  and 
J  in  the  University,  as  in  the  Normal  or  corn- 
To  repel  them  is  an  abuse  of  trust  in  the  use  of 
nal  grant,  given  to  educate  the  people ;  and  no 
s  a  right  to  do  it;  much  less  the  Regents,  in 
the  will  of  the  Legislature.  It  is  a  wrong  so 
hat,  if  not  rectified,  the  people,  who  made  both 
and  the  Regents,  will,  if  need  be,  ere  long,  wipe 
th  of  them.  Heartily  do  I  accord  to  them  all 
-pose;  but  I  cannot  forbear  the  opinion  that 
erto  alike  mistaken  the  nature  of  true  progress 
timent. 

rity  is  now  proud  in  its  fame,  and  asks  for  no 
Id  never  see  its  fame  grow  less;  but  pride  and 
;o  before  destruction.  Its  fame  has  in  it  no  ele- 
artality,  and  the  sooner  the  Regents  defer  to 
voice  of  the  people,  by  welcoming  the  daughters 
)  its  halls,  the  surer  will  they  secure  its  giory 
ming  dim. 
ying  to  record  that,  since  this  was  written,  the 


PDBLIC  INSTRUCriOK. 


Regenta  have  resolTed  to  admit  womeu  to  the   UniTei 
equal  terms  with  mon.] 


COUNTY    SUPERINTENDENTS'    KEPORTl 

tRcMlTod  too  laic  for  IdsctUod  In  thetr  proper  place.) 


MECOSTA   COUNTY — U.   BROWN,  SUP"T. 

This  county  was  orgauized  by  the  provisions  of  an 
the  Legislature,  approved  February  11, 1859.  The  set 
of  the  county,  however,  does  not  date  back  so  far  aa 
time  of  its  organization ;  at  that  time  it  was  for  the  m 
an  unbroken  wilderness.  Immigrants  began  to  come 
county  in  great  numbers  in  1863  and  1863.  Those  w 
here  prior  to  those  dates  were  pine  land  speculatorB  oni 
in  quest  of  fortunes,  but  not  of  permanent  homes. 

A  great  many  of  the  actual  settlers  came  to  this  c( 
a  sequence  of  an  Act  of  Congress,  commonly  kuowi 
Homestead  Act.  Others  came  from  older  countries,  w 
consequence  of  the  high  price  of  land,  they  were  not 
procure  suitable  dwelling  places. 

This  county  is  in  the  midst  of  the  pine  region,  and 
seqacncD  thereof,  many  localities  are  but  spareely  settled 
quantities  of  land  have  been  granted  to  railroad  corp 
These  lands  are  not  taxable,  nor  can  they  be  settled  i 
degree  of  safety  to  the  settler;  they  are,  therefore 
worthless,  so  far  as  our  common  school  interest  is  con 

Even  after  the  terms  of  the  grants  have  been  compl 
on  the  part  of  tlie  corporations,  and  the  equitable  tit 
land  vests  in  them,  they  allow  the  legal  title  to  rcma 
State,  and  tliereby,  as  they  claim,  prevent  the  lands  frc 
taxed  for  any  purpose  wliatcver.    The  common  et-ho 


•ERINTENDENT'8  bbport.  195 

ire  also  injurioiialy  affected  by  a  portion  of 
to  speculators,  who  arc  non-reeideute. 
1  county  one  organized  union  school  and 
Y  school  districts.  The  union  school  dis- 
y  and  part  of  the  township  of  Big  Rapids, 
ol-house  was  built  during  the  fore  part  of 
and  school  is  now  being  kept  in  it  under 
Prof.  C  W.  Borst.  There  arc  upwards  of 
rs  in  attendance. 

ery  comfortable  houses  in  the  primary  dis- 
■  part  of  them  are  of  an  inferior  kind,  huilt 
ice  to  comfort  or  health.  Wherever  there 
buildings  erected,  I  have  seen  to  it,  that 
n  defects  were  guarded  against 
Lifiicult  to  procure  suitable  teachers  for  the 
nty.  I  have,  therefore,  been  compelled  to 
ry  liberally,  and  grant  certificates  in  many 
not  have  done  eo  nuder  a  strict  intcrpreta- 

f  of  May,  1869, 1  have  granted  certificates 
First  grade,  2 ;   second  grade,  10 ;  third 

ry  school  in  the  county  at  least  once  since 
of  the  school  year,  and  report  that  there 
manifested  in  the  cause  of  e<lucation,  and 
well  attended, 
carefully  the  effect  of  the  amendment  of 

to  the  rate-bill   system,  and  believe  the 

r  the  liettcr. 

atute  could  be  amended  bo  as  to  prevent 

^  teachers  upon  condition  that  they  board 
Bcliolars,  I  think  the  change  would  be  a 

deld  no  Institutes  yet,  but  expect  to  hold 

ling  spring. 


196  PUBLIC  INSTilUCTIOS. 

GENESEE   COUh'TY — SAMUEL    PEBRT,  SUP't. 

The  duties  of  this  office  I  entered  upon  in  May  lai 
that  time  the  examination  of  teachers  for  the  snmrae 
had  been  nearly  completed  hy  my  predecessor,  and  I  vei 
commenced  the  visitation  of  schools. 

Abont  one  Inindred  and  twenty  were  visited  by  thi 
part  of  September,  when  I  found  them  generally  clost 
was  compelled  to  defer  the  remainder  until  winter. 
could  have  been  accomplished  in  this  time  but  for  the 
tainty  of  finding  schools  in  operation.  Some  had  comi 
early  for  a  spring  term,  and  in  these  I  found  gathei 
largest  percentage  of  pupils,  with  the  highest  average 
ance. 

The  majority  began  in  the  latter  part  of  May,  or 
June,  and  continned  through  the  hot  and  busy  moi 
harvest.  In  the  latter  I  found  enrolled  scarcely  moi 
half  the  children  of  legal  school  age,  and  fh>m  thee 
shonld  be  eliminated  a  large  percentage  of  in/am 
there  for  the  convenience  of  the  parent,  and  whose  att* 
was  an  injury  to  the  child,  and  a  vexatious  burden 
teacher — a  much  fitter  ornament  to  the  nursery  tl: 
school-room.  The  remainder  was  so  few  in  numbers  an 
ular  in  attendance,  that  I  was  forced  to  the  conclnsi 
summer  terms,  if  not  costly  failures,  give  at  most  a  vet 
return  for  the  outlay  of  money  involved;  that  if  desi] 
benefit  those  pupils  who  weed  the  instruction  most,  t 
jtrofit  most  by  it,  they  accomplish  far  less  than  coul< 
complished  at  a  season  less  busy,  and  more  favorable  t 
ous  mental  labor.  I  have  earnestly  endeavored  to  c 
parents  and  school  officers  of  the  disadvantages  of 
system  of  winter  and  summer  terms,  and  have  urged  a 
to  a  fall,  winter  and  spring  term.  Many  district 
promptly  adopted  this ;  others  have  given  assurance 
shall  be  done  at  their  next  annual  meeting,  while  n 
either  too  indifferent  to  educational  interests,  or  are  t< 


198  PUBLIC   ISSTBrCTIOS. 

But  few  Bcliools  outside  the  union  schools  are  furnUl 
mapB  or  apjtarutus  of  any  kind ;  appropriations  ba 
made,  liowevcr,  by  many  districts  to  purchase  them  du 
coming  year.  Many  schools  arc  amply  provided  witl 
board;  too  many,  though,  have  but  a  miserable  apoli 
only  ono  the  disgrace  of  having  none  at  all. 

There  are  throe  thoroughly  graded  union  schooh 
county — two  located  at  Flint,  one  at  Fentonville;  ( 
provided  with  a  full  corps  of  capable  teachers,  and  ai 
noble  wo^k  for  the  educational  interests  of  the  coui 
the  latter  village  there  hoe  just  been  completed  an 
private  Seminary,  designed  to  give  a  thorough  conn 
Btmction  to  youug  ladies  and  gentlemen.  The  bui 
fonr  stories  in  height,  built  of  stone,  and  in  arch 
beaaty  and  completeness  of  appointment,  has,  perl 
equal  in  northom  Michigan.  Two  other  private  Se: 
will  soon,  it  is  hoped,  bo  completed  there.  They  spe 
own  words  of  praise  and  honor  to  the  liberality  ani 
tional  zeal  of  the  citizens  of  Fentonville. 

I  am  happy  to  report  that  there  is  a  very  general  un 
of  text-books  in  use  throughout  the  county.  Som 
flnouB  ojies  might  be  lopped  off  with  good  advantag 
schools;  and  would  every  district  board  make  a  j 
selection  of  text-books  to  be  used  therein,  very  grea 
Teuience  would  be  saved  the  teacher,  and  much  benefl 
to  the  scholar. 

In  conclusion,  I  would  testify  to  the  uniform  kindi 
generous  hospitality  that  has  awaited  me  at  every  door  1 
out  the  county ;  kind  words  of  encouragement,  judic 
vice,  and  the  active  coBpcratiou  of  friends  of  cducati 
aided  me  not  a  little  in  the  discharge  of  duties  always  ; 
bat  often  laborious. 


APPENDIX. 


UNIVERSITY    OF   MICHIGAN. 


ROT  ANNUAL   REPORT  OP  THE   BOARD  OF  BEGENTS. 

.H EL  HosFOBD,  Supt.  of  Public  Instruction : 
pliance  with  the  requirements  of  Section  2197  of 
iled  I*WB,  we,  the  undersigned,  Regente  of  the  Uni- 
treby  make  an  exhibit  of  the  aSiiirs  of  the  University 
e  last  Academic  year,  and  np  to  the  present  date, 
ral  terms  we  state  that  the  University  has  oontinned 
ioDB  in  all  the  departments,  not  only  with  nndimin- 
cess,  but  with  the  advancement  of  its  substantial 

the  year  two  conrsea  of  study  have  been  added  to 
riously  provided.  To  meet  an  urgent  demand  from 
uartera  of  the  country,  a  coarse  of  Pharmacy  has 
blished  in  the  Chemical  Department,  with  marked 
iwenty-three  young  men  having  graduated  as  "Phar- 
il  Ghemiats"  in  June  last. 

Engineering  Department,  a  course  of  Mechanical 
ing  has  been  added  to  the  branches  therein  previously 
ad  the  degree  of  Mechanical  Engineer  is  to  be  con- 

those  who  pass  an  approved  examination  in  the 

NUMBER   OF   STUDENTS. 

imber  of  students  during  the  year  ending  Jnly  1, 
,he  several  departments  and  classes,  was  as  follows: 


80S  PUBLIC  INSTBUCTIOK. 

IN  THE  DKPARTMENT  OP  SCIENCE,  LITERATURE,  AND  TH 

Kesident  Graduates _ 

Seniore 

Juniors - 

Sophomores 

Freshmeu 

In  Mining  Engineering- 

In  Selected  Stndies - 

In  Higher  Chemistry 

In  Pharmacy 

Total  in  the  department - 

DEPARTMENT  OF  UEDICIKE  AND  BvaOERT. 
Students - 

DEPARTMENT   OF   LAW. 

Seniors - 13 

Juniors 20 

Total  in  the  department 

Deduct  counted  twice _ 

Total  in  the  Ilniveraity--. _ 

DEGREES   CONFBREKD. 

The  degrees  conferred  during  the  year  were  as  follow 
March  Slst — Law  and  Medical  Course. 

Doctor  of  Medicine 

Bachelor  of  Laws 

June  SOth — Annual  Commencement. 

Pharmaceutical  Chemist 

Doctor  of  Medicine _ 

Mining  Engineer , 


Civil  Engineer. . 


CKIVERSITT  OF   UICHIOAN.  203 

f  Science 9 

if  Arts 33 

Arte - 18 

Science 1 

Arts  ad  enndtmi 3 

320 

XCUBER  OF   PROPE8S0H». 

aber  of  Profesaore  tind  other  officers  employed  during 

08  OB  follows: 

taideDt,  1 ;  Professors,  18 ;  Acting  Profeesor,  I ;  Ae- 
ofeasors,  5 ;  Lecturers  in  Medical  Department,  S ; 
itor  of  Anatomy,  1 ;  Prosector  of  Surgery,  1 ;  As- 
irator  of  Mnsenm,  1 ;  Assistants  in  Chemistry,  2 ; 

1;  Assistant  Librarian,  1 — thirty-fonr  persons  giv- 
anectcd  vith  iuBtrnction ;  also  the  Secretary  and 
he  Treasurer  and  four  Janitors, 
tries  of  said  officers  arc  stated  in  one  of  the  jiapers 
png  this  report.  The  salary  of  the  Treasurer  ceased 
let  day  of  July,  1865,  and  interest  at  the  rate  of  5 
>er  stmum  on  current  balances  in  his  hands  is  to  be 
2  Uniyersity  from  the  Ist  day  of  October,  1869, 

KECEIPTS  AND    EXPENDITUKES. 
eipte  and  expenditures,  and  the  general  condition  of 
■cs  for  the  year  ending  June  28th,  1869,  were  as 


Balance  in  troasury $12,028  88 

iaring  the  year  from  the  University  In- 
Fond,  (inclnding  not  far  from  113,000 

rly  belonging  to  the  preceding  year) 48,434  88 

from  Btadents  for  matriculation  fees,  in- 

tal  expenses,  diploma  fees,  4c 23,009  00 


804  PUBLIC   IN8TRUCTI01T. 

Loan  to  Engineering  Department  for  instnimentg, 

refunded _       l 

Old  Branch  UniTerBity  building  sold 

Stat*  aid  for  the  year  1869  (in  part) 1 

Receipts  for  acconut  General  Fund t90 


Warrants  paid,  being  for  salaries  of  Pro- 
fessors and  others,  buildings,  repairs, 
increase  of  libraries,  museums,  ap- 
paratus, fuel,  insurance,  and  general 
expenses »66,357  84 

Restored  to  the  Reserve  Fund 2,310  00 

68 

Balance  to  credit  of  General  Fund J21 

State  Aid  Fund  for  1867 »15,898  30 

Warrants  drawn  on  this  account 5,465  83 

Transferred  to  Reserve  Fund.... 4,000  00 

^  »9,465  83 

Balance  to  credit  of  State  Aid  Fund...  6 

Balance  to  credit  of  Reserve  Fund 6 

June  28, 1869,  balance  in  treasury t34 

The  Reserve  Fund  originated  as  follows:  The  Boan 
a  lot  in  Detroit,  which  was  sold  for  about  $20,000 
Board  thought  that,  it  ought  not  to  use  this  money  for 
expenses,  or  the  erection  of  buildings ;  but  they  were  t> 
use  the  same  in  the  erection  of  the  new  Medical  bnlldii 
it  was  determined  to  restore  the  same  to  the  permanen 
of  the  University  by  setting  apart  (2,500  for  tbat  j 
annually,  till  the  whole  was  restored.  The  interest 
can  then  be  devoted  to  the  Library,  or  snch  other  pa 
the  board  may  determine. 

Several  matters  required  by  law  to  be  settled  in  out 


rXIVEBSlTY  OP  MICHIGAN.  8ft 

ith  others  deemed  proper  to  lie  referred  to,  are  se 
the  papers  and  docnmeDta  accompanyiug  this  report 
s: 

annual  report  of  the  President,  for  tlie  year  1868-D 
i  to  the  Board  Anguet  18th,  stating  the  change 
ring  the  year  in  the  Professional  Corps,  and  othe 
information — marked  A. 

names  of  Professors,  and  other  persons  employed  b; 
ersity,  witli  their  salaries,  respectively — marked  B. 
eBtimat«  of  the  expenses  for  the  year  ending  July  Ist 
presented  by  the  committee  of  finance — marked  C. 

operations  of  the  Astronomical  Obserratory,  an 
the  paper  prepared  by  Prof,  Watson — marked  D. 

additions  to  the  Geological,  Mineralogical,  and  Zott 
'abincts,  and  the  work  done  therein,  are  detailed  ii 
t  of  Prof.  AViuchell— marked  E. 
e  would  here  make  onr  cordial  acknowledgments  foi 
rouB  donation,  by  Mrs.  Dr.  Ames,  of  Niles,  of  thi 
I  valuable  Botanical  and  Entomological  Cabinet  o: 
lusbaud,  Dr.  George  L.  Ames. 

improved  facilities  of  the  Oliemical  Jjaboratory,  anc 
done  therein,  are  specified  in  the  statement  of  Prof 
— marked  F. 

general  condition  and  character  of  the  genera 
re  stated  in  the  paper  of  the  Librarian,  Profl  Ter 
narked  G. 

catalogue  of  the  officers  and  students  for  1868-9 
iled  statements  of  the  several  courses  of  study  in  al 
ttnents,  the  books  of  instruction  used,  and  a  "  Syu- 
^  view  of  Glass  Exercises,  and  lectures  in  the  severa 
rill  be  found  iu  tlie  pamphlet — marked  H. 
iopy  of  the  minutes  of  the  proceedings  of  the  Board 
mar}'  Ist,  1864,  to  and  including  the  action  of  tht 
the  close  of  the  present  year,  will,  as  soon  as  bound 
tted.  and  which  we  request,  may  be  deemed  a  part  o 


*06  public  instruction. 

>:nlarqeu£nt  of  the  library. 

The  capacity  of  oiir  Library  Hall  liaa  been  largely  iocr 
by  the  addition  of  caaca,  placed  transversely  to  tlio  wa 
the  room,  thus  forming  the  spacG  into  alcoves. 

For  a  long  aerioH  of  years  the  Board  have  appropi 
$1,500,  anunally,  for  the  enlargement  of  the  Library 
while  the  number  of  its  volumes  has  thus  been  steaiU 
creased,  and  now  approsimates  to  20,000,  it  is  as  yet,  1 
moans  entitled  to  rank  with  the  large  libraries  of  the  coi 
We  beg  leave  here  to  call  attention  to  the  fact  that  a 
proportion  of  most  of  the  great  libraries  of  the  world, 
sist  of  works  presented  to  them  by  the  friends  of  leai 
We  would  respectfully  and  earnestly  make  an  appeal  1 
such,  and  especially  to  the  alumui,  and  other  fHends  o 
University,  in  behalf  of  our  Library.  We  would  iudulf 
hope  that  their  generous  remembrances,  with  the  mot 
aid  of  our  own  funds,  will,  in  due  time,  expand  our  'Z' 
into  100,000  volumes.  As  a  noble  and  noteworthy  act  i 
direction,  we  refer  with  pleasure  to  the  donation,  by  the 
lishing  house  of  McMillan  &  Co.,  of  London  and  New  ' 
of  a  copy  of  the  entire  series  of  their  publications,  cone 
of  one  hundred  and  thirty-five  volumes. 

CATALOGUE. 

One  of  the  desiderata  relating  to  the  Library,  has  h 
convenient  catalogue.  Such  a  work,  having  been  for 
time  in  progress,  is  now  nearly  or  quite  brought  up  t 
present  date.  Among  the  methods  of  constructing  a 
logue  for  a  large  Library,  are :  let  An  arrangement  of 
by  the  names  of  authors ;  2il.  By  the  snbjecta  treatei^ 
By  the  age  or  era  of  their  appearance ;  or,  4th.  By  thi 
guage  in  which  they  are  written.  These  are  all,  sepai 
more  or  less  defective  in  practical  utility.  A  methtk 
deemed  among  the  best,  and  which  we  have  adopted 
sists  of  a  combination   of  two  of  those  above  stated 


UKIVBBSlTr  OF  HICHiaAN.  20? 

talogne  hy  the  names  of  anthore ;  and,  3d.  A  cata- 
a  strict  analysis  of  the  subjects  treated.  The  first 
uld  not  answer  all  the  purposes  of  a  catalogue,  for 
nes  of  authors  are  unknown,  and  the  reader  does  not 
low  the  name  of  the  author  whose  work  he  seeks, 
rould  the  second  method  alone  answer;  for  the  titles 
are  often  found  a  very  defective  indication  of  their 
and  many  hooks  treat  of  a  great  variety  of  topics, 
(  subjects  are  treated  by  a  multitude  of  writers. 
>ove,  as  now  prepared,  are  separate  and  distinct  cata- 
id  are  written  not  in  Volumes — which  require  incessant 
ttioQS,  and  frequent  revised  editions  to  keep  up  with 
nt  issues  of  the  press,  but  are  written  (each  name — 
c)  on  Ge])arate  slips  of  paper,  or  blank  cards.  By 
uigement,  additions  may  be  made  from  day  to  day, 
ly,  with  great  convenience,  preserving  intact  the 
work.  Each  card  contains  a  number  referring  to  the 
ace  in  the  library  where  the  book  is  to  be  found. 

SALABIES  Of  PEOPESSORS. 
lints  were  made  by  Professors,  during  the  high  prices 

caused  by  the  war,  that  the  salaries  paid  them  of 
ere  insufficient  to  meet  the  necessary  expenses  of 
[wrt  The  justice  of  such  complaint  was  strongly 
be  Board,  and  to  meet  the  case,  as  far  as  in  their 
temporary  arrangement  was  made  by  resolution 
im  year  to  year,  increasing  the  compensation  fifteen 

making  the  amount  paid  to  resident  Professors  on 
entire  year,  tl,725  per  annum.  Our  Professors  were 
f  invited  to  the  service  of  other  Institutions  with 
of  much  greater  salaries.  From  this  cause,  we 
lie  loss  of  highly  accomplished  Professors,  and  were 
it  danger  of  the  loss  of  others.  The  State  aid  pro- 
the  Legislature  of  1867,  seemed  to  give  us  the  first 
ind  for  providing  the  proper  remedy.  In  March, 
solndon  was  adopted,  to  go  into  effect  from  and  after 


>8  PUBLIC  INSTECCTIOK. 

nly  iBt  of  that  year,  to  increase  the  salaries  of  Professoi 
le  Literary  Department,  wlio  shall  have  rendered  foni 
3ars  service,  to  $3,000  per  annum,  and  in  March,  1869,  ( 
le  modification  of  the  Aid  Act,)  the  salaries  of  all  the 
!88ors  in  the  Literaiy  Department  were  fixed  at  $3,004 
anum,  and  of  the  Assistant  Professors  at  tl,300,  and  the 
es  of  others  were  also  raised.  At  tlie  same  time  the  I 
ent's  salary  was  fised  at  t3,000  per  annum,  with  the  nee 
ouse. 

Such  provision  may  not  prove  entirely  effectual.  And 
:  not  for  the  prestige  of  our  University,  created  in  great 
y  the  acknowledged  eminence  and  skill  of  oar  Profei 
nd  the  honorahlc  ambition  of  permanently  associating 
tme'with  its  fortunes,  we  should  still  be  in  danger  trot 
ime  canse.  An  offer  to  one  of  our  Professors  of  $4,001 
nnnm,  and  firmly  declined,  illustrates  our  meaning. 

NEW    QlEBTIONa. 

Questions,  not  the  simplest  of  solution,  are  from  tin 
me  pressing  upon  the  attention  of  the  Board.  In  a  coi 
)  new  as  ours,  so  full  of  the  most  active  cnci^es,  and  o 
recedented  growth,  where  theories  of  novel  charact«i 
rising  on  all  subjects — political,  religious,  philosop 
x;ial  and  scientific,  it  is  us  of  course,  tliat  new  views  on 
ational  training  demand  attention.  Arriving  at  the  hi 
ractical  cnlture  within  the  time  devoted  to  a  Univ 
ourse,  it  becomes  the  duty  of  flic  Board,  while  giviu 
pectfal  attention  to  all  proposals  for  the  improTemcnt  o 
aurses  of  study,  to  guanl  against  precipitancy  of  octioi 
lie  adoption  of  hazardous  experiments.  It  may  be  eai 
n  impulsive  spirit  to  mar  what  our  predecessors  am 
riends  of  education  have  built  ap, — an  Institution  whic 
bief  glory  of  our  State.  It  is  easier  to  move  steadily  fo: 
iich  an  Institntiou  toward  its  beckoning  goal,  than  to 
ist  its  bearings  when  thrown  from  its  proper  course  I 
latnre  measures.    "UTicn  it  has  clearly  appeared  that  i 


UNIVEBfllTY  OP  MICHIQAN.  209 

X  was  wise,  neceasary,  and  within  the  meiutB  of  the 
ey  confidently  appeal  to  their  acta  to  show  that  they 
rfnlly  taken  the  advanced  gronnd  and  firmly  held  it. 
J  reaaon  to  donbt  that  the  Board  will  continue  to  act 
principles. 

PECCSIARY  AID   FBOM  THE  STATE. 

be  recollected  that  the  chief  foandation  of  the  Uni- 
nnds,  consists 'of  the  proceeds  of  the  sales  of  the 
■two  sections"  of  land  granted  to  the  State  for  TJni- 
irposes,  at  an  early  day,  by  the  Congress  of  the  United 
rhat  fnnd  amonnts  to  abont  1500,000,  and  is  man- 
ic State ;  the  interest  of  which — abont  t35,000  per 
ie  from  time  to  time,  paid  into  the  treasury  of  the 
y.  It  became  a  fact  many  years  since,  that  the  Uiii- 
I  its  rapid  growth,  had  worked  up  to  the  fnll  extent 
ms.  As  a  further  resort,  the  policy  was  very  relnc- 
opt«d,  of  increasing  the  charges  on  students.  The 
>  those  of  Michigan  were  fixed  at  tlO,  and  to  those 
;where,  $25  for  matriculation  fees — while  all  were 
(10  per  annum  for  incidental  expenses.  But  with 
tion  to  our  resources,  it  was  still  palpable  that  the 
y  conld  not  maintain  itself  in  its  attitude  of  high 
r,  without  further  pecuniary  aid.  It  must,  inevita- 
^rade  or  obtain  help.  Buildings  were  wearing  out, 
ed  large  sums  for  repairs.  New  buildings  were 
>r  the  enlarged  operations  of  the  several  depart- 
A  Hospital,  a  Gymnasium,  an  enlarged  Chemical 
7,  especially  for  instraction  in  Pharmacy,  and  a 
ere  among  the  essentials  needed.  More  force  was 
as  aid  to  the  Professors,  from  the  increase  of  the 
)f  courses  of  study,  and  the  division  of  enlarged 


lonsiderations  not  only  jnstified  the  Board,  but  ren- 


JIO  PDBI.IC  INBTRDCTION. 

dered  it  their  duty,  to  present  with  eamostneBS  these  foe 
the  Legislatare.  That  body,  moved  by  an  enlightened  1 
aUty,  in  fost«ring  an  Inatitntioo  bo  justly  looked  upon  tu 
of  the  nohlest  objects  of  State  pride,  passed  the  ai 
March  15tli,  1867,  providing  for  tlie  University,  a  ta 
l-20th  of  a  mill  on  the  dollar  of  the  State  assessment 
amonnting  to  somewhat  over  (il5,000  jier  aunam. 

This  act  was  not  then  available  to  us.  The  ftirthe 
passed  Feb.  34th,  18G9,  provides  that  the  former  act  1 
modified,  that  for  the  year  1869,  and  each  subsequent  yea 
specific  Bum  of  >15,000  be  paid  to  tbe  University,  froi 
State  Treasury ;  and  also,  that  the  fund  accumulated  1 
the  former  act,  in  1867  and  1868,  l)c  paid  over  U 
University. 

We  beg  leave  here  to  State  that  we  had  justly  hoped 
the  benefit  provided  by  the  act  of  1867,  would  be  cont 
as  a  permanent  and  wise  policy,  enabling  the  Univere 
expand  its  operations  with  the  e^ipansion  in  numben 
wealth  of  the  State.  Every  argument  proving  the  nee 
of  the  fostering  care  of  the  State  for  its  University,  pro' 
the  same  time  that  the  pecuniary  aid  extended  to  it,  s 
keep  step  with  the  strength  of  tlie  people,  whose  highe 
tcrests  it  upholds.  Double  our  present  numbers  will  n 
double  our  University  capabilities,  and  as  wealth  increaj 
a  greater  ratio  than  numbers,  the  l-20th  of  a  mill  per 
could  hereafter  be  more  easily  paid  than  now.  We 
therefore,  that  the  Legislature  in  itfi  wisdom,  will  rctii 
the  policy  of  the  act  of  1867,  (but  unrestricted  by  its  prt 
for  the  time  displaced  by  that  of  the  act  of  1869.  Und< 
act,  the  wants  of  the  University  will  reappear.  With  i 
sum  on  one  hand,  and  the  increasing  needs  of  an  lustii 
constantly  increasing  the  sphere  of  its  activities  on  the 
the  ratio  of  the  aid  to  the  wants  is  continually  dinini 
We  hope  not  to  be  misuudorstood  in  these  remarks. 


[mxTBBsrTr  of  kicbiqas.  211 

:in  ID  no  complain ing  ^irit.     TVe  aimply  etate  the 

;  think  the  facts  logically  rcqaire. 

d  furnished  to  tlie  University  by  these  Acts  is  ae- 

th  the  most  sincere  thankfulness.  It  ia  proving  a 
timely  bcueflt,  and  ia  effectually  promoting  objects 
long  been  felt  to  be  of  urgent  necessity. 

nESIONATIOS   OF   PRESIDENT  HAVEN. 

mes  our  duty  to  report  that  Dr.  Haven  resigned  his 
President  of  the  University  on  the  29th  day  of  June 
p  Board  received  the  announcement  with  mnch  regret, 
filled  the  position  for  sis  years  with  distinguished 
id  with  the  warm  approval  of  all  immediately  con* 
ith  the  University,  as  well  as  of  the  people  of  the 
erally.  The  Board  reluctantly  accepted  his  resigna- 
[;ousentiug,  at  the  earnest  solicitation  of  the  Board, 
the  position  until  other  arrangement  could  be  made. 
made  earnest  and  unxioua  efforts  to  fill  the  vacancy. 
.  without  effect 

PRESIDENT   PRO  TEM. 

ccial  meeting  of  the  Board,  held  August  18th,  Prest. 
jervices  terminated,  and  Professor  Henry  S.  Freizo 
inionsly  elected  President  ^ro  lem.  of  the  University, 
ippy  to  say  that  under  his  prudent  supervision  the 
the  University  have  moved  on  with  gratifying  suc- 
d  we  add  that  he  has  introduced  the  practice  of 
lie  in  the  Chapel  exercises,  a  beautiful  feature  of  the 
ine  which  we  hope  will  become  permanent. 
latever  uncertainty  there  may  be  enpposed  to  be  in 
next  to  be  taken  by  the  Board,  we  find  no  reason  to 
1  any  disastrous  events.  On  the  contrary,  we  feel 
iQce  that  our  esteemed  and  prosperous  Institntion — 


318  PCBLIO  INSTRUCnOIT. 

already  an  element  of  acknowledged  power  in  the  wor] 
thonght — will    move   forward   with    more    than   her 
prosperity. 
All  of  which  is  respectftiUy  submitted. 

J.  EASTMAN  JOHN  SO 
J.  M.  B.  SILL, 
JAMES  A.  SWEEZEY, 
C.  M.  STOCKWELL, 
E.  C.  WALKEK, 
GEO.  WILLAED, 
THOS.  D.  GILBEET, 
HIRAM  A.  BUKT. 


UmVEHSlTY  OF  UICHIOAK. 


L  REPORT  OP  THE  PRESmENT  FOR  1868-9. 


mea  my  duty  for  the  last  time,  to  make  an  Annual 
I  the  Regents,  and  through  them  to  the  Superintend' 
iblie  Instrnction,  and  to  the  People  of  the  State,  of 
}  of  the  UniTereity  of  Michigan, 
hanges  were  made  in  the  Facnlties  at  the  beginning 
U-,  as  follows:  Charles  A.  Kent,  M.  A.,  was  appointed 
Profeesor  of  Law,  in  place  of  Ashley  Pond,  M.  A., 

Martin  L.  D'Ooge,  M.  A.,  was  appointed  acting 
of  the  Greek  Language  and  Literature,  in  place  of 
Boise,  LL.  D.,  who  had  some  time  before  resigned ; 
L  Walter,  B.  A.,  was  appointed  Assistant  Professor 
icient  Languages,  in  place  of  Prof.  D'Ooge,  promo- 
iry  F.  Lyster,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  was  appointed  Lecturer 
ry,  in  place  of  Prof,  W.  ff.  Green,  M,  D.,  resigned ; 

Cheever,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  was  appointed  Lecturer  on 
.tics  and  Materia  Mediea,  in  place  of  Dr.  S.  G.  Armor, 

Raymond  C.  Davis  was  appointed  Assistant  Libra- 
Wm.  F.  Breakey,  M.  D.,  was  appointed  Prosector  of 
and  Associate  Demonstrator  of  Anatomy, 
iculties  of  the  University,  embracing  all  who  assisted 

instruction  dnring  the  year,  were  as  follows :  (See 
"  B"  following  this  report.) 

ew  departments  of  Instrnction  have  been  opened; 
ail  Engineering  and  Pharmacy.    Id  Mechanical  En- 

instmction  is  given  in  Mathematics,  the  English 
ich  Languages,  History,  Physics,  Theory  and  use  of 
nts,  Principles  of  Mechanism,  Drawing,  Theory  of 
Geology,  Metallurgy,  Mill-work,  and  various  other 
lubjects. 


311  PUBUC  INSTBDCTIOS. 

The  department  of  Pharmacy  includes  Lectures  upon  ( 
ical  Physics,  Inorganic  and  Organic  Chemistry,  and  To 
ogTi  Lectures  upon  Materia  Medica;  Recitations  and  Le< 
Hpon  Practical  Pharmacy;  thorough  and  systematic  pr 
in  Quantitative  Chemical  Analysis,  optional ;  Practi 
Medico  legal  Analysis  of  Poisons,  and  in  Analysis  of  X. 
Systematic  exercises  in  Metrology,  Acidimetry,  Alkalis 
Distillation,  and  Alcoholometry,  and  in  the  preparati< 
Pharmacopceial  and  Chemical  Compounds  and  Med 
Prescriptions.  During  the  prosecution  of  this  course,  stu 
are  admitted  to  the  class  in  Botany,  and  to  classes  in  En 
German,  French  or  Latin,  or  any  other  branch  of  stu 
prepared  to  proceed  advantageously  in  the  same.  The 
necessary  for  a  satisfactory  completion  of  the  PhormacC 
Course,  is  from  one  and  a  half  to  two  years.  To  thoa 
submit  a  satisfactory  Thesis  upon  any  branch  of  Pharma 
cal  Chemistry,  and  successfully  pass  all  tlie  examination 
Diploma  of  Pharmaceutical  Chemist  is  awarded. 

This  degree  was  conferred  at  the  last  Commencement 
twenty-three  young  men. 

The  whole  number  of  students  during  the  year  has  b< 
tollowB : 

DEPARTMENT  OP  BC^IENCE,  LITERATURB  AND  THE  AK 

Resident  Graduates. 

Seniors 

Juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

In  Mining  Engineering 

In  Selected  Studies _ 

In  Higher  Chemistry 

In  Pharmacy - _ 

Total  in  Department 


CNIVEHSITT  OP  MICHIGAN.  216 

DEPABTHEKT  OF  MEDICIXE  AND  6TTR0EBT. 

368 

DEPAETMENT  OP  LAW. 

184 

208 

)1  in  Department 342 

il 1128 

Deduct,  counted  twice 8 

U  in  the  University 1114 

king  out  this  summarj*  for  the  catalogue,  I  was  careful 
le  only  those  who  have  actually  received  instruction 
•.e  the  year  186S-9  began.    It  is  the  custom  in  some 

and  heretofore  was  the  custom  here  in  the  Literary 
lent,  to  include  the  names  of  such  as  had  graduated 
her  classes,  and  were  entitled  to  be  reckoned  as  mem- 
.hose  classes,  even  though  absent  from  the  University, 
included  such  names,  as  heretofore,  the  number  would 
\n  increased  about  twenty  or  thirty.  But  I  deem  snch 
ling  not  strictly  honest. 

lew  students  admitted  to  the  Literary  Department 
the  last  six  years,  were  as  follows:  In  1863, 113;  in 
'7;  in  1865,  114;  in  1866, 137;  in  1867, 129  ;  in  1868, 
he  namber  of  old  students  who  returned  has  regularly 
d-  The  number  of  persons  who  have  corresponded 
i  during  the  past  year  with  reference  to  coming  to  the 
ity  has  been  very  much  larger  than  heretofore. 
f  useum  has  been  considerably  enlarged,  for  the  details 
h  I  refer  to  the  reports  of  the  Curators.  The  collec- 
loDging  to  Dr.  Sager,  has  been  purchased  for  tl,000, 
i  excellent  collection  of  fossils  belonging  to  Dr.  Bo- 

bas  been  purchased  for  tl,500.  The  addition  to  the 
imical  Observatory  has  been  completed,  furnishing  a 
ent  residence  for  the  Director. 


UNIVBESiTY  OP  MICHIOAJT.  317 

t  a  small  portion  of  the  money  thus  secured 
>]e  daring  the  year  just  closiug,  the  tJniverflity 
^  the  healthful  influence  of  this  action  of  the 
itds  are  encouraged.  Complaints  of  want  of 
the  Stat«  hare  ceased  Provision  is  made  for 
jaw  Building,  the  Museum,  and  the  Medical 
Mm.  A  plan  is  in  preparation  for  a  Qymna- 
Tence  aronnd  the  grounds  will  soon  be  made. 
;he  Medical  Department  is  promised,  and  many 
ire  projected. 

ly  connection  with  the  Uniyersity,  I  will  not 
imendations  with  reference  to  its  future  man- 
care  and  wisdom  of  the  Regents  heretofore, 
that  it  will  be  judiciously  managed  hereafter, 
broad  and  liberal  basis  will  always  be  maiu- 
ihe  enlarged  income  now  bestowed  by  the  State, 
ticable  to  continue  and  increase  the  various 
J,  while  the  Library,  Museum,  and  other  appa- 
ition  can  be  regularly  improved. 
:e  my  departure  from  the  University,  where  I 
I  of  the  best  years  of  my  life,  six  as  its  Fresi- 
xpressing  my  sincere-  thanks  to  the  respective 
lie  Board  of  Regents  for  their  unvarying  kind- 
rsonally,  and  I  deem  it  not  improper  to  bear 
eir  earnest  labor  for  the  best  interests  of  the 
lie  manly  and  moral  and  religious  character  of 
as  been  especially  gratifying,  and  I  trust  that 
d  brilliant  future  is  before  the  TJnivereity  of 

E.  0.  HAVEN,  President. 

OP  MiCHiOAN,  Aug.  19,  1869. 


PUBLIC   IKSTRUCnOlf. 


«B." 


Names  of  Professors  and  other  persons  employed  by  ih 
versity,  with  their  salaries  respectively. 

Rev.  Erastua  O.  Haren,  D.  D^  LL.  D.,  President  of  tb 
Teraity,  and  Professor  of  Moral  and  Mental  Philosophy ; 
$3,500. 

ReT.  George  P.  Williams,  LL.  D.,  Professor  of  P 
salary  $3,000. 

Abram  Sager,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  Professor  of  Obstetri 
Diseases  of  Women  and  Children ;  salary  11,000. 

Sihis  H.  Douglass,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  Professor  of  Che 
Mineralogy,  Pharmacy  and  Toxicology;  salary  13,000. 

Alonzo  B.  Palmer,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  Professor  of  Pathok 
Practice  of  Medicine,  and  of  Hygiene ;  salary  $1,500. 

Alexander  Winchell,  LL.  D.,  Professor  of  Geology,  I 
and  Botany ;  salary  $2,000. 

Corydon  L.  Ford,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  Professor  of  Anato: 
Physiology;  salary,  $1,000. 

Henry  S.  Frieze,  M.  A.,  Professor  of  the  Jjatin  La 
and  Literature;  salary  $2,000. 

DeVolson  Wood,  C.  E.,  M.  A.,  Professor  of  Civil  Er 
ing;  salary  $1,500. 

Hon.  James  V.  Campbell,  LL.  D.,  Marshal  Professor  c 
salary  $1,000. 

Hon.  Charles  I.  Walker,  Kent  Professor  of  Law ; 
$1,000. 

Hon.  Thomas  M.  Cooley,  Jay  Professor  of  Law; 
$1,500. 

James  C.  Watson,  M.  A.,  Professor  of  Astronomy  i 
rector  of  the  Observatory;  salary  $1,500. 

Edward  P.  Evans,  Ph.  D.,  Professor  of  Modem  La 
and  Literature ;  salary  $1,500. 


CNrTEKBITT  OF  HICHIOAN.  216 

rard  Olney,  M.  A.,  Profeeeor  of  Mathematica ;  salary 

.  Aodrcw  Ten  Brook,  M.  A.,  Ijibrarian ;  salary  tl,500. 

im  K.  Spence,  M.  A.,  Professor  of  the  French  Language 

jteratnre ;  salary  11,500. 

irles   K.  Adams,  M.  A.,  Professor  of  History;   salary 

t. 

KB  Coit  Tyler,  M.  A.,  Professor  of  Khetoric  aud  English 

tare ;  salary  tl,500. 

ries  A.  Kent,  M,  A.,  Fletcher  Professor  of  Law ;  salaij 

ert  B.  Prescott,  M.  D.,  Assistant  Professor  of  Chemistry 
(Cctnrcr  on  Organic  Chemistry  and  Metallargy;  salary 

rge  B.  Merrimau,  M.  A.,  Assistant  Professor  of  Msthe- 

I ;  salary  tl,OO0. 

]man  W.  Hoblnson,  C.  E.,  Assistant  Professor  of  Mining 

eering  and  Geodesy;  salary  tljOOO. 

■tin   L.  D'Ooge,  M.  A.,  Acting  Professor  of  the  Greek 

lage  and  Literature ;  salary  tljOOO, 

iry  F,  Lyster,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  Lectnrer  on  Surgery;  salary 

rard  L.  Walter,  B.  A.,  Assistant  Professor  of  the  Ancient 
lageB ;  salary  $1,000. 

1^  S.  CheeTer,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  Lecturer  on  Therapentics, 
ia  Medica;  salary  tl,000. 

ston  B.  Rose,  M.  A.,  M.  D.,  Assistant  Professor  of  Chem- 
salary  $800. 

iTge  E.  Frothingham,  M.  D.,  Demonstrator  of  Anatomy, 
larator  of  the  Medical  Museum;  salary  $500. 
lliam  F.  Breakey,  M.  D.,  Prosector  of  Surgery  and  Assist- 
lemonstrator  of  Anatomy;  salary  $500. 
rk  W.  Harrington,  B.  A>>  Assistant  Curator  of  the  Mu- 
of  Geology,  Zoology  and  Botany ;  salary  $400. 
ory  S.  Jevett,  B.  A.,  Assistant  in  Chemistry ;  salary  $160. 


220  PUBLIC  DtSTSCCnOH. 

Engeoe  J.  Weeks,  Aaastant  in  Chemistry ;  saluy  •] 
Baymond  C.  Darla,  AssiBtaiit  Libmun ;  salur  MU 
John  H.  Burleson,  Secretary  and  Steward ;  sabur  $1 
Abram  Sager,  M.  D,  Dean  of  Medical  Facolty ; 
9200. 
Henry  C.  Fiiebangh,  Iaw  Librarian;  salary  tllO. 
John  CaningtoD,  Janitor;  salary  (450. 
James  Ottiey,  Janitor ;  salary  $4o0. 
Robert  Howard,  Janitor ;  salary  t450. 
Gregory  Xaglee,  Janitor;  salary  t400. 


Estimate  of  the  expenses  for  the  year  endinv  Juig  1, 
presented  by  the  Committee  of  Finamee. 

For  Salaries ■. %Sk 

"  0  ntetanding  Warrants 1 

'■  New  Catalogue  General  Library 

"  Printing  Catalogue _ ] 

"  Bepairs  and  alterations ] 

"  Begents'and  Visitors' Ex  pen  see 

"  Postage 

"  InBurance _ : 

"  Fuel  aud  Lights : 

"  General  Library 

"  Law  *'      _ 

"  Medical       "       

"  Improvement  of  Grounds 

"  Other  Incidental  Expenses 

»6 


CNITBBSITT  OF  MICHIGAN. 


ASTBONOHICAL  ObBEBVATOBT,  ) 
Ann  Arbor,  Dec.  20, 1869.     f 

s.  J.  E.  Johnson — Dear  Sir :  In  reply  to  your  reqncat 
irief  statement  of  the  ecientific  operations  conducted  by 
I  addition  to  my  duties  as  a  Professor  in  the  UniTersity, 
5  the  year  ending  July  let,  1869, 1  have  the  honor  to 
ihat  during  the  entire  year  I  have  carried  forward  the 

npon  which  I  have  been  engaged  for  several  years, 
y,  the  survey  of  the  heavens  in  the  regions  of  the 
c.  My  plan  is  to  observe  and  catalogue  the  places'  of 
irs,  visible  through  our  telescope,  in  the  vicinity  of  the 
c,  and  more  particularly  in  a  belt  of  considerable  ex- 
orth  and  south  from  the  ecliptic,  on  each  side  of  the 
Hitial  colure.  This  work  is  one  involving  immense 
both  in  observing  and  in  the  sabsequeut  reductions  for 
talogno  places  of  the  stars ;  but  when  complet€d,  it  will 
great  value  to  astronomers,  not  only  as  a  contribution 
treal  astronomy,  but  aleo  as  a  means  of  facilitating  the 
ery  of  unknown  members  of  our  solar  system.    In  the 

of  the  observations  during  the  past  year  I  had  the  for- 
;o  discover  six  new  planets  belonging  to  our  system, 

had  hitherto  escaped  the  notice  of  astronomers.  The 
yt  these  discoveries  were  as  follows: 
r  11,  1868;  August  15, 1868;  September  7, 1868;  Sep- 
r  13,  1868 ;  September  1 6, 1868 ;  October  10, 1868. 
ee  discoveries  were  subsequently  confirmed  at  other 
atories  in  America  and  Europe,  and  tlie  several  planets 
ibserved  by  me  on  every  favorable  night  until  they  were 
I  the  approaching  twilight. 

addition  to  these  observations,  I  made  the  usual  routine 
ationf  with  the  meridian  circle  for  time  and  for  position 


i%2  PDBLIC  IKSTR0OnO». 

of  etara.  I  hare  also  given  the  standard  local  time,  by  i 
of  the  electric  telegraph,  regularly,  to  many  places  in  thi 
adjoining  States. 

I  hare  made  the  requisite  calculations  for  determinin 
clemeDts  of  the  orbita  of  tlie  sis  new  planets  aboTo  ment 
and  I  have  also  revised  my  treatise  on  Theoretical  Astro 
a  new  edition  of  which  has  lately  been  issued. 

I  am  now  engaged,  in  connection  with  Professor  I 
Superintendent  of  the  IT.  S.  Coast  Survey,  in  a  work  of 
magnitude,  and  of  great  practical  value  to  navigators,  ni 
in  the  preparation  of  new  tables  of  tlie  motion  of  the  i 
the  necessity  for  whicli,  alrea<ly  apparent,  was  clearly 
lished  by  the  observations  of  the  recent  total  eclipse  > 
ann.  Of  this  work  I  sliall  speak  more  particularly  in 
sequent  report. 

Very  truly  yours, 

JAMES  C.  WATSOl 
Director  of  the  Observai 


CNITEBSITT  OP  HICHIOAIT. 


OPERATIONS  IN   THE  MUSEUM. 


year  in  the  history  of  the  University  has  been  marked 
nore  rapid  growth  of  tlie  Mnseum,  a  greater  amount  of 

performed,  or  a  greater  interest  in  ita  contents,  on  the 
if  the  public.  Two  large  collections  liave  been  added, 
nc  by  be<iueat,  the  other  by  purchase.  Dr.  George  L. 
,  late  of  Niles,  a  man  of  high  standing  in  liis  profession, 
ttained  a  conspicuous  position  among  the  naturalists  of 
)nntry.     He  had  devoted  an  immense  amount  of  labor 

collection  and  study  of  the  plants  and  animals  of  the 
d  States,  when  he  was  stricken  down  by  valvular  disease 
!  heart.  A  portion  of  his  collection  of  insects  bad  been 
I  in  the  Union  Scliool  at  Niles.  The  remainder,  t6gether 
tig  vast  magazine  of  dried  plants,  was  presented  b;  Mrs. 
to  the  University.  These  specimens  have  been  received ; 
lie  plants  have  been  thoroughly  invoiced  and  arranged, 
otal  number  of  specimens  of  all  kinds  is  about  23,500. 
etails  are  given  in  their  proper  place, 
id  Van  Vecliten  was  a  practical  man,  who  went  firom 
n  New  York  to  California  and  Nevada,  where  he  spent 
I  years  among  the  mines,  and  accumulated  a  large  mass 
terial,  much  of  which  was  valuable,  while  some  of  the 
lens  possessed  unique  interest  Returning,  about  three 
nnce,  he  deposited  his  collection  in  the  University,  with 

to  sale.    He  removed  to  Michigan,  was  taken  sick,  and 
ly  died.    The  executors  of  his  estate  finally  consented 
:  *200  for  the  collection.    It  contains  about  1,000  entries 
T88  specimens, 
er  interesting  additions  will  be  specified  in  the  sequel 


234  PUBLIC    INSTBUCnOX. 

The  rooms  of  the  Mnaenm  are  daily  throDged  viti 
from  all  parts  of  the  country.  Though  it  is  estimated 
more  than  one-half  of  them  register  their  names,  the  i 
have  been  recorded  during  the  rear  ending  with  Aug 
September,  314;  October,  541;  November,  376;  D 
304;  January,  407;  February,  446;  March,  512;  Ap 
May,  317;  June,  391;  Jnly.899;  August,  355.  Toti 
It  is  probable  there  have  been  not  less  than  ten  I 
individual  visits  to  the  Museum  during  the  year. 

The  efficiency  and  usefulness  of  the  Museum  h 
greatly  promoted  by  the  assistance  which  has  been  f 
in  the  multiplied  details  of  its  management.  Mr.  Har 
services  have  been  of  immense  value.  His  rewards,  pec 
have  been  so  meagre  that  I  feel  it  to  be  equally  a  dti 
pleasure  to  testify  to  his  knowledge,  skill,  fidelity,  ; 
and  patience  in  the  performance  of  his  work.  Con 
aid  has  been  received  from  Messrs.  J.  B.  Steere,  A. 
Mark,  H.  W.  Montrose,  H.  C.  Markham,  and  S.  T.  C 
lain,  A.  B.  W.  J.  English,  A.  B.,  and  E.  L.  Mark  hf 
as  janitors. 

I.      DEPABTUENT  OF  OEOLOOY,   ZOOLOGY   AXD  B01 

/.     Geology. 

Eight  cases,  holding  192  drawers,  have  been  coi 
for  the  accommodation  of  duplicat«B  and  specimens 
investigation;  and  provision  has  been  made  for  the 
tion  of  the  series  of  exhibition  cases  in  the  P&leoi 
Hall. 

Some  exchanges  have  been  effect«d  during  the  year 
duplicates  of  the  Musenm.  The  usual  number  of 
tions  has  been  made.  The  University  has  purchased 
Vechten  collection.  The  resumption  of  the  State  { 
survey,  under  improred  auspices,  will  resnlt  in  a  great 
tation  of  authentic  specimens  from  Michigan  and  ct 


DNIVBBfllTT   OP  WCHIOAX.  235 

JniTersity  has  very  properly  been  made  the 
the  survey. 

tions  in  geology  and  paleontology  have  made 
In  these  I  have  been  assisted  by  Mr.  M.  W. 
Air.  T.  G.  GhamberhuD.  Among  the  more  im- 
may  be  mentioned  the  determination  of  the 
"  Marshall  Qronp,"  in  Tennessee,  and  in  Ve- 
Pennsylrauia  —  a  region  which  the  highest 
asserted  to  be  occopied  exclusively  by  the 
kUother  interesting  result  is  the  discovery  of 
nens  of  the  peculiar  genus  Syringothyris 
Marshall  sandstones  of  Ohio  and  Pennsylvania, 
originally  founded  on  specimens  known  only 
.  These  determinations  have  been  based  on 
itted  by  Prof.  James  M.  Safford  of  Tennessee, 
Andrews  and  Bev.  H.  Herzer  of  Ohio.  The 
t  and  importance  of  these  discoveries  will  be 
he  geologist  They  tend  to  settle,  if  they  do 
ettle,  a  great  geological  controversy. 

iiions  to  the  Museum  in  Oeologg. 
tcETEK  OoLLEcnoK.  This  was  accnmnlated 
Techten,  an  amateur  geologist,  during  a  red- 
years  on  the  Pacific  coast.  It  embraces  the 
specimens  &om  the  mining  districts,  and  some 
mammalian  remains  ft-om  Table  Mountain, 
oh  are  teeth  and  bones  of  Mastodon,'  tooth  of 
nil  and  horns  of  Bos  {latifronsf);  bones  and 
horse,  and  fragments  of  the  sknll  and  femnr 
specimens  acquire  interest  in  connection  with 
lating  to  fossil  man  in  Galifbroia.  The  fol- 
lysis  of  the  collection : 


238  PUBLIC   IlTSTBUCriON'. 

Ores,  including  gold,  sliver,  lead,  copper,  man- 
ganese,  a  Uttlo  antimony,  and  very  little 
tellurium 

Minerals 

Lithological  specimeoB 

Fossils,  Mammalian 

"       Invertebrate 

Geological  specimens,  unlabeled 

Zoological 

Botanical - 


Totals _ 1003 

J.  F.  Steward,  Piano,  111.  Fifty-one  entriea  ol 
plants  from  concretions  in  the  Coal  Meafiares  of  Mazoi 
Grundy  county,  111.  In  exchange  for  Lake  Superior  ept 
collected  by  A.  Winchell. 

J.  T.  ScovELL,  M.  D.,  Denver,  Cal.,  (AluniDtiB.) 
four  entries,  (65  spectmenB,)  illustrating  the  mining  j 
of  Colorado. 

John  Peach,  Washtenaw  eonnty,  Mich,  A  box  o 
mens  of  canuel  and  bitnminous  coals,  galena,  calcite,  1i 
potters  and  firo  clays,  and  associated  rocks  from  the  n 
H.  &  T.  Simpson,  Mountain  Co.,  Mo. 

Natdeal  History  Society  of  St.  Johns,  N.  B.  (T 
the  Smithsonian  Institntion.)  Thirteen  species  of  "Di 
Plants,  collected  by  Prof.  C.  F.  Hartt,  at  the  '  Fern  : 
near  St.  Johns,  New  Brunswick,  and  described  in  Jot 
Soc.,  London,  Vols,  xviii  and  sis;  and  in  Dawson's  j 
Geology,  3d  edition.    Set  No.  xxsiil" 

John  H.  Hall,  Oxford,  Cheater  Co.,  Penn.  Twe 
entries  (60  specimens)  of  minerals  ftom  Lancaster  and 
counties,  Penn.  In  exchange  for  Lake  Superior  ep 
collected  by  A.  Winchell. 

A.  E.  FooTE,  M.  D.  (Alnmnns.)  A  small  vial  ol 
astrolitcB  from  Isle  Boyale. 

G.  W.  DuRHAU.     (Alumnus  '60.)     Specimen  of  Gal' 


UNIVBHSnr  OF  MICHIGAN.  237 

iOEOB  W.  Lawton,  a.  M.,  Lawton,  Mich.    Gray  calcifer- 
andstone  Aom  Bangor  and  Antwerp,  Van  Buren  county, 

N.  BBE^rsTBB,  Houston,  Texas.    A  large  specimen  of 
Bed  wood  fVom  Texas. 

ELLiAM  Freeman,  Milton,  Canada.     Plaster  cast  of  a 
Silarian  trilobite,  (Asapkus  gigas). 
V.  Hakbinoton,  Assistant    (1.)  Section  of  a  gypsum 
Salina  group,"  Camillas,  N.  Y. 
Two  specimens  of  travertin,  Camillos. 
.  Dewet.    (Alumnus  '69.)     Ten  geological  specimens 
mthem  Michigan. 

PH  Beown,  Lemoat,  HI.    A  box  of  specimens  of  bnild- 
nes  from  the  quarries  at  Lemont. 
S.  B.  Olnei,  Ann  Arbor.    Snowy  gypsum  from  Fort 
Iowa. ' 
Stbehe,  A.  B.    (Alumnus.)    Glass  sand  from  Monroe, 


loNTQOMBBT.  (Alumnus.)  Twenty-one  specimens  of 
isn  fossils  from  Ontario. 

'.  Harris,  M.  D.,  Ann  Arbor.  Fragments  of  a  scori- 
meteorite,  which  fell  in  May,  1869,  on  the  farm  of  D. 
ris,  Elihorn,  Wis.  An  analysis  of  this  by  Pro£  A.  B. 
tt,  gives : 

0.878 

tide  or  iron 


Bchidbig  traces  of  tnanganese  and  soda) 

1.000 
II.    Zoology. 
rangements  have  been  made  for  the  construction  of  a 
case  in  the  Bouth-west  comer  of  the  zoological  gallery, 
le  entire  collection  of  birds  has  been  rearranged  and  re- 


888  puBuo  iNersuciioir. 

labeled,  so  that  the  visitor  can  now  read  both  the  scli 
and  popular  names  of  the  species.  The  labels  are  snpi 
by  a  new  device  which  seems  to  be  very  effective. 

The  rearrangement  and  relabeling  of  the  land  and 
water  aniralves  has  been  completed;  and  the  visitor  cai 
read  distinctly  the  name  of  each  species.  Many  marine 
and  other  specimens  have  for  the  first  time  been  arrange 
placed  on  exhibitiou.  Among  these  are  the  last  dep« 
sheila  from  the  Smithsonian  Institution ;  and  the  spec 
from  the  coast  of  Maine,  received  some  years  since  froi 
J.  DeLaskL  A  collection  of  forty  species  (400  apecime 
duplicate  shells — mostly  marine — has  been  bronght  froi 
attic,  where  they  had  Iain  since  the  lifetime  of  Dr.  Houj 
and  worked  over  and  packed  away.  The  zoological  spec 
of  the  Foote  collection,  40  in  number,  so  for  as  received 
been  worked  up.*  The  Cicades  have  been  investigate 
arranged;  and  the  diurnal  Lepidoptera  further  stadie 
catalogued. 

Mr.  Harrington,  assisted  to  some  extent,  by  T.  C.  I 
berlaiu,  and  Messrs.  Mark,  Markham  and  Montrose,  hi 
lected  the  following  fresh  specimens:  Mammals,  14  ; 
3fl0;  Reptiles,  15;  Articulates,  1,850;  Mollnscs,  350. 
1,979  specimens.  Most  of  these  have  been  identiGe< 
labeled. 

Mrs.  S.  E.  Becraft,  a  lady  of  Ann  Arbor,  has  been  oci 
nearly  four  months  aa  taxidermist  to  the  University,  ai 
given  good  satisfaction.  She  is  still  on  duty.  She  hai 
principally  engaged  in  renewing  the  illustration  of  ou 
mon  species  of  birds  and  quadrupeds.  Something  uv 
specimens  of  birds  have  been  mounted,  and  nomeroui 
preserved  for  exchanges.  Mr.  J.  Hobson,  the  taxldert 
the  Audubon  Club,  of  Detroit,  was  employed  to  monnl 
panther  and  a  boa  constrictor. 


UXITEBSITY   OF   UICHIOAX.  229 

Additions  to  the  Museum  in  Zoology. 
Baynes,  EsQt  Toronto,  Ontario.  A  case  of  nine  moanted 
I,  under  glass,  with  the  following;  inscription:  "This 
of  birds  fh)m  Onatemala,  Central  America,  is  presented 
le  TJniTersity  of  Michigan  by  a  member  of  the  Yonng 
B  Christian  Association  of  Toronto,  Canada,  in  gratefol 
mbrance  of  the  Detroit  Convention  of  AssociationB  in 
^,  1868,  and  of  the  Tisit  then  paid,  by  invitation  of  the 
orities  of  the  TJniTersity,  to  Ann  Arbor. 
iRONTO,  September,  1868." 

le  following  is  a  list  of  the  birds,  so  far  as  identified:  1. 
pn  resplendens;  2.  Dacrie  atricapilla;  3.  Tiogon  Mexi- 
s;  4.  RamphoceluB  sangninolentus ;  5  and  6.  Unknown; 
bamnophilus ;  8.  C^reba  cyanea;  9.  Bamphocelns  pas- 
iL 

iLLiAU  B.  Sageb,  Cheyenne,  Neb.    (I.)  A  Boa  constrictor, 
I  feet  in  length,  from  Sonth  America. 
)  Skin  of  a  Panther,  {Felts  concolor,)  shot  near  Chey- 
,  Neb.     These  were  ])reBented  through  Professor  Sager, 

iTATE  OF  QEOROf:  L.  Ahe8,  ]Vf.  D.,  late  of  Niles,  deceased, 
llection  of  about  5,000  specimens  of  insects — mostly  Cole- 
■a  and  Lepidoptera — pinned  in  close,  glazed,  portable  cases. 
IS  Excellency,  Domingo  F,  Sarmiento,  President  of  the 
ntine  Republic,  S.  A.  (1.)  A  fine  specimen  of  the  Condor 
le  Andes,  {Tultur  gryphus,)  which,  when  living,  probably 
inred  nine  feet  from  tip  to  tip  of  the  wings.  (Not  yet 
nted.) 

.)  Chlatnyphorus  tmncatus,  (Harlan.)  A  unique  species 
le  family  of  armadillos,  from  the  mountains  of  Chili,  of 
■h  only  one  specimen  is  known  to  have  hitherto  reached 
th  America,  while  only  one  exists  in  Europe. 
OBO  Collection.  Attached  to  the  Ford  Anatomical  col- 
on, pnrchased  by  the  Board  of  Regents,  were  two  or  three 


S80  PUBLIC  IHSTBCCnON. 

hundred  specimens  of  shells,  mostly  marine,  which  lisve 
transferred  to  the  cabinet  of  zoology. 

Dk.  C.  B.  Poster,  Ann  Arbor.  Plastron  of  tortoise,  (. 
meleagris,)  carved  with  his  initials  in  1838 — fonud  aga 
1867,  and  found  a  third  time  in  1868.  In  thirty  yean 
individnal  had  varied  but  very  little  in  size,  as  was  demonsi 
by  the  fact  that  one  of  the  figures  was  still  quite  close  to  < 
the  sutures  separating  tbc  sbields  of  the  plastron. 

A.  B.  Wood.  Cutting  by  Beavers  through  the  trunk 
Yellow  Birch  tree  fourteen  inches  in  diameter.  The  ( 
diagonal,  and  measures  sixteen  inches  in  length.  A  fine 
men. 

E.  A.  Ellsworth,  Lafayette,  Ind.    Storeria  Dekayi. 

H.  S.  Jewett,  a.  B.    (Alumnus  and  Chemical  Assista 

(1.)  Epeira  insularis,  (Hentz,)  from  Dayton,  Ohio. 

(2.)  Ten  species  of  laud  and  fresh  water  shells  from  Di 

(3.)  Fifty  specimens  of  insects  from  Dayton. 

T.  C.  Chambeklain,  A.  B.    Storeria  Dekayi.    Ann  I 

C.  P.  Gilbert,  (Student.)  Lower  jaw  and  teeth  of  a 
TUB,  (Trickecus  rosmarus,)  from  an  inland  lake,  Kewfonnt 
Perhaps  should  be  regarded  a  fossil, 

J.  B.  Steere,  A.  B.  (Alumnus.)  Two  weasels,  (Put 
Noveboracensis,)  from  Ionia,  Mich. 

J.  C.  Starkey,  M.  D.  (Alumnus.)  Bob-o-liuk,  (Z) 
onyx  oryzivorus,)  in  winter  dress — having  been  kept  in  a 

Bev.  L.  D.  Burch,  Ann  Arbor.  Skin  of  a  very  large  i 
men  of  the  Wild  Cat,  {Lynx  rufas,)  from  near  Reel 
Oakland  county. 

M.  Kelloqq.    Deer  mouse.    {Hesperomys  Uucopus.) 

J.  T.  ScovELL,  M.  D.  (Alumnus.)  Larves  of  grain  : 
(Tinea  granella.) 

E.  Henderson,  Homer,  Mich.  Lake-fly,  (Corydali 
nuta.) 

Mrs.  Prof.  Frieze.    Kest  and  Eggs  of  a  Canary  Bird 
M.  W.  Haerinoton.    Skull  of  Skunk,  {Mephitis  chit. 

F.  H.  Lewis,  Adrian.    A  double-headed  turkey  chick. 


UNITEBSITY  OF  MICHIQAN.  231 

///.  Bolany. 
firrington  has  expended  a  large  amoant  of  labor  Dpon 
aical  cabinet  The  300  apecimens  from  Lake  Snpe- 
liahed  by  Dr.  Foote,  have  been  investigated,  labeled, 
uged.  The  entire  collection  of  plants  has  been  looked 
imerated,  and  claBsifled ;  exchanges  of  duplicate  speci- 
>re  been  effected ;  a  collection  of  100  species  of  seeds 
Lg  from  the  Houghton  survey  has  been  bottled,  labeled, 
:ed  on  exhibition,  and  seeds  of  40  species  of  plants 
n  added ;  the  7,000  specimens  in  the  serial  collection 
}  of  the  Ames  Herbarium  have  been  catalogued,  and 
00  specimens  of  duplicates  have  been  carefully  and 
ily  indentified,  catalogued,  and  put  away.  Mr.  Har- 
has  also  collected  and  preserved  600  fresh  specimens 
e  vicinity  of  Ann  Arbor,  m^ing  3,519  specimens  in 
and  botany  added  by  him  during  the  year. 

Additions  to  the  Museum  in  Botany. 
Imes  Hbbbabiuu.    ITie  total  number  of  specimens 
rial  collection  is  7,000.    The  total  number  of  dupli- 
,500.    Grand  total  of  specimens,  17,500.    Total  num- 
lecies,  1,375.    Number  of  species  new  to  the  University 

400. 

8  a  very  important  acquisition  to  the  Museum.  The 
im  comprises,  1.  A  collection  of  Xew  England  plants, 
g  some  from  the  summits  of  the  White  and  Green 
na,  most  of  which  are  new  to  the  TTniversity.  2.  A 
n  from  the  pine  barrens  and  salt  marshes  of  Xew 
ncluding  a  large  number  of  rare  plants  new  to  the 
ity.  3,  A  collection  of  Tennessee  plants,  among  which 
w  not  mentioned  in  Gray's  Botany,  and  new  to  the 
ity.     4.  A  collection  of  plants  from   the  vicinity  of 

few  of  which  are  new  to  the  Flora  of  the  Stat«,  as 
fA,  and  also  new  to  the  University.  Among  these  are 
orum  diphyllum  (Nutt.),  Draba  Caroliniana  (Walt), 


232  PUBLIC  INSTBDCnOir. 

Silene  nivea  (DC),  Detmodium  eiliare  (DC),  Conioxei 
Canadenge  {Ton,  &  Onty),  Stachya  hyssopifolta  (Mx.), 
Sieudelii  (Enntb.),  C.  deeomposita  (UohL),  C.  adnata  (E 
C.  aperta  (Booth),  C.  panicea  (L.),  C  Careyana  {Tom 
retrorsum  (Dew.),  and  others. 

Among  the  dnplicates  of  the  Ames  Herbarimn  are 
desirable  species,  among  which  may  be  enumerated,  AU 
Americana,  Lechea  major,  Hypericum  eUipticum,  Desmi 
eiliare,  D.  sessifolium,  Ert/nffium  yuceafoUum  Poly 
Nuttalli,  Archemora  rigida,  and  var,  ambigua,  Eupat' 
teucrifoliutn,  Solidago  tkyrsoidea,  S.  Muhlenbergii,  C 
Bis,  tripteris,  0.  palmata,  Stachyg  hyssopifolia,  Onoami 
CaroUnianum,  Frasera  Carolineniit,  Sckeuxeria  pah 
Goodyera  repens,  Liparia  Laaelii,  ApUctrum  hyemale, 
Steudelii,  C.  adusta,  0.  aurea,  C.  plantaginea,  C.  Cat' 
C.  Schweinitzii,  C,  oKgosperma,  Olyceria  acutiflora,  P 
hilia,  P.  nemoralis,  Eragroatia  powoides,  Andropogon  m< 
rua,  Woodtoardia  Virginica,  Opkioglosaum  xmlgatum 
many  others. 

A.  WiNCHELL.  A  colktction  of  151  8i)ecies  (63  spec! 
of  Enropean  plants. 

H.  S.  Jewett,  a.  B.  Limb  natnrally  grafted  into  s  i 
of  the  same  tree. 

M.  W.  Hahrington.  (1.)  Forty  species  of  seeds  o 
plants  from  the  vicinity  of  Ann  Arbor. 

(8.)  Cone  of  Pinus  atrohua  from  Isle  Royale. 

Rev.  a.  p.  Fobtbr,  Springfield,  Mass.  Fifty-seveu  i 
of  dried  plants  new  to  the  TTniveraity.    Obtained  by  exc 

Geoege  H.  Beiogs,  Vicksbnrg,  Mich.  Fruit  of  the  "! 
Nelumbo  {^elambium  luteum) — erroneonsly  reporte 
Egyptian  Lotne — from  Vicksbnrg,  Kalamazoo  connty. 

Mrs.  Crosby.    Seeds  of  an  unknown  plt^it  from  Cul 

Geoeob  0.  Fry.  (AJnmnns.)  Fungus  of  the  trib< 
teromycetes,  genus  Jftdularia  {?)  from  Freeport,  Dl, 

Miss  Maey  H.  Clare,  Ann  Arbor.  Specimens  of  TV 
dasyatachium  from  the  Grand  Traverse  region. 


DSTVBRSrtT  OP  MICHIOAH.  SS3 

BV.  Seth  Rebd,  Ann  Arbor.  Seed  of  "  Shrub  Palm," 
the  Fan  Palm,  Corypha  umhraculifera  from  Oejlon. 
like  of  seeds  of  another  Ceylonese  {?)  plant. 

SUMHABTB8. 

IditioQB  during  the  year,  (approximate.) 
Geological,  1,163  entries,      3,063  specimeae. 
Zoological,  1,185     "  5,358         " 

Botanical,  1,656      «    .       17,845         " 

Totals,    3,904  35,365 

rand  aggregates  (approximate.)  In  1363,  and  again 
I  presented  approximate  estimates  of  the  tot»l  nnm- 
ipecimens  in  the  Mnseum  nuder  my  charge.  To 
he  continued  growth  of  this  Department,  I  submit 
ving  GomparatiTe  statement: 


BdItIm.      Bpedmen*. 


ala:    Bntrica.  W,l«8.    Bpcdmou,  M.aM.t 

DBPAKTMENT  OF  ARCHEOLOGY  AND  RELICS, 
entries  of  relics  of  the  late  war  have  been  labeled 
ed  on  exhibition.    The  following  additions  have  been 

rECHTEX  CoLLBCnoK.    AboQt  eight  specimens  from 


iben  for  Botanj,  in  18W,  u  given,  *ra  leu  Uum  orlglnallf  tcporltd.  In 
:  at  ■  fonner  orer-ntlnutfl  of  one  of  the  coUecUaix. 
t  banc  In  mind  th*t  thne  noiaben  do  not  Mt  forth  the  mignltnde  of  the 
UD,  dace  ther  do  not  embncs  the  oblaet  of  Hlnenlogr.  nar  the  epecl- 
In  ZooIoBT  *>id  oompuatlce  Oiteologj)  In  the  HnHmu  of  the  Uedlol 
,  nor  the  apeclmen*  of  tbo  Art  CollectlanB. 
30 


UNITEH8ITT   OF   UICHIOAN.  335 

traction.    Thna  the  work  of  Bupplying  the  pressing  de- 
fer educated  PbturtnaciatB  may  he  said  to  have  fairly 
enced.    We  anticipate  that  this  department  will  he  an 
ment  of  great  public  good. 
"G." 

THE  CNIVEBSITY    LIBBARY. 

general  library  of  the  University  consists  of  aboat 

Tolnmes.  The  first  purchase  was  made  by  Professor 
boot  the  time  of  the  opening  of  the  central  institntiou 
1  Arbor.  For  »5,000  he  purchased  in  England  3,707 
9,  which  made  a  respectable  beginning  for  a  library. 
)m  this  time  until  1861,  about  ten  years,  the  income  of 
iiversity  ftind  was  so  small  that  nothing  worth  men- 
j  waa  expended  for  books.  Since  the  year  1852  there 
en  about  an  average  expenditure  of  (1,500  per  annum 
)k8,  periodicals,  and  binding.  The  eelections  have  been 
lade,  and  the  number  of  useless  books  ia  much  smaller 
n  moet  collections  of  the  kind.    The  library  embraces 

in  all  branches  of  study  pursued  in  the  University, 
I  some  lying  outside  of  the  specific  range  of  study, 
ed  to  profeaaorships ;  and  it  would  often  be  found  that 
ee  numbering  several  times  as  many  volumes,  would 
lat  the  same  matter  several  times  repeated. 

greatest  deficiency  of  the  library  is  in  ita  supply  of 
for  original,  historical,  and  aatiqnarian  research ;  works, 
er,  which  are  scarcely  to  be  expected  in  a  western,  or, 
I,  in  any  American  University,  to  any  great  extent, 
re  haa  been,  until  the  present  time,  no  catalogue  of  the 
r,  nor  is  the  catalogue  as  yet  complete,  but  it  will  be  so 
bort  time,  and  is  even  now  ready  for  use.  It  is  upon 
;  the  question  of  printing  it  will  be  one  for  the  future 

of  the  Board  of  Kegents. 

!  library  is  open  10^  houra  each  day  of  term  time,  and  a 
)f  each  day  in  vacation.     It  is  a  great  resort  for  both 


236  PDBLIC  IITSTBUCnON. 

stndenta  and  professors.  The  arerage  number  o 
making  more  or  Ibbh  daily  use  of  the  library  is  sn 
fall  little  sbort  of  300,  from  the  first  of  October  to  1 
March ;  from  this  latter  time  to  the  annual  comm< 
near  the  end  of  Jane,  the  attendance  is  very  much 
during  the  long  vacation,  from  the  last  of  June  t«  t 
of  September,  it  is  still  risited  daily,  but  by  only  a  fe^ 

The  library  takes  78  literary  and  scientific  peri 
American  and  European — besides  a  considerable  n 
newspapers  and  magazines  of  a  somewhat  lighter  o 
nished  by  the  Students'  Lecture  Asaociation,  forminj 
a  collection  of  popular  periodical  reading  matter  i 
ever  found  elsewhere,  in  connection  with  an  edncatii 
tutlon.  The  appropriation  made  by  the  students  is  i 
t250  a  year.  The  periodicals  purchased  by  this  appi 
are  under  the  care  of  the  oflScers  of  the  library, 
their  first  use,  become,  by  the  original  contract,  a  pt 
library,  and  those  which  are  worth  the  expense,  are  b 
entered  upon  the  catalogue. 

There  is  no  discrimination  made  between  stud 
others  in  regard  to  the  permission  to  consult  boo! 
library- 

ANDREW  TEN  BBC 
Lit 
ITniveebitt  op  Michioan,  I 
December  SO,  1869.        f 


rAL  REPORT  OF  THE  STATE  BOARD 
OF  EDUCATION. 


6t  year  has  been  rery  siicceasful,  bo  far  as  the  work  of 
aal  School  is  eonceroed. 

tie  change  has  taken  place  in  the  Facnlty.  Prof.  J. 
1  resigned  at  the  close  of  the  last  school  year,  and 
Dia  McLouth  was  appointed  to  fill  his  place.  The 
ship  of  Elocution  and  English  Literature  was  created, 
r.  A.  A.  Griffith  was  appointed  to  fill  the  chair.  A 
it  want,  which  has  always  existed  in  the  Normal 
I  met  The  duties  belonging  to  this  department  have 
formed  by  the  teachers  of  other  branches,  and  but 
ntU  attention  could  be  giren  to  them, 
iropriation  was  made  by  the  last  Legislature  sufficient 
i  the  Board  to  complete  the  new  Normal  School 
The  finishing,  seating  and  heating  bare  cost  about 
he  esact  amonnt  caniiot  be  stated,  as  the  bills  are  not 
^e  seats  were  f^imiehed  by  Sherwood  &  Co.,  Chicago, 
aces  are  the  Lawson,  made  by  Fuller,  Warren  &  Co., 
T. ;  obtained  &om  their  branch  house,  Chicago. 
its  are  admired  by  all  who  have  seen  them,  and  the 
give  entire  satisfaction. 

dierto  crowded  condition  of  the  Normal  School  is  now 
uid  there  will  be  room  beside,  so  that  a  much  larger 
of  pupils  can  be  accommodated  than  have  ever 
this  institution. 

irary  will  be  increased  during  the  coming  year  by  the 
of  many  books  much  needed.  Six  hundred  dollars 
a  appropriated  for  this  purpose.    A  new  piano  has 


238  PUBLIC  INBTBCCTION. 

been  purchased  for  the  nmsical  departmeiit,  and  add! 
to  be  made  to  the  apparatus  in  eereral  departments  ni 
With  the  several  departments  of  the  Normal  School 
over  by  competent  teachers,  and  with  all  the  facilitiei 
parting  instruction  now  enjoyed  by  this  institution, 
feel  assured  that  it  will  continue  to  command  the  conf 
the  people,  and  will  exert  a  wider  influence  over  the  s 
the  Stat£. 

WITTER  J.  BAXTER,  Presidt 
DANIEL  E.  BHOWN, 
EDWIN  WILLITS, 
ORAMEL  HOSFORD,  Se<fi/,  ex 


STATE   NORMAL  SCHOOL. 


REPOBT  OF  PBINCIPAL. 

TEL  Ho!f.  0,  H08FORD,   Supt.   Public  Jnstraction,  and 
fTttart/  of  Hoard  of  Education  : 

daye  the  pleasure  of  anbmitting  the  following  report  for 
ear  1869,  showing  the  continued  prosperity  of  the  Normal 
wL    The  statistics  of  attendance,  &,c.,  are  for  the 
Winter  Term  tjf  1868^. 

M  Aand  B »8 

C 88 

D 41 

BandF 46 

2«2 

Summer  Term  of  1869. 
M  Aand  B _ 61 


Faa  Term  of  1869. 
I  A  and  B 107 


ci^ee  ORADDATmo  kabch  4th,  1869. 

•  A.  AnDstroDg Detroit. 

Brinkerhoff. YpsUantL 

E.  Benham Tp»Uan«. 

e  Hubbard Battle  Creek. 

K.  Hajea YpeilanU. 

e  E.  Meacbem .Briatol,  Ind. 

Stark StoDj  Creek. 


S40  PUBLIC   INSTRUCTION. 

HuyH.Underdnnk Bal 

Chaa.  L.  Baker .Col 

L.  O.  Biu-ted lift' 

Edwin  T.  CurtlB .Tp 

Junes  C.  Campbell Ax 

Cbaa.  E.  Davia Tr 

Locius  E.  Hull L(t 

Luke  8.  Montague Un 

Peter  Shields Un 

H.  W.  Sahln Lo 

A.  M.  Webater B« 

BmmonB  White Hi 

Numher  of  pnpila  receiving  the  Training  Certificate  at  close  ol 

terTeimof  1606-9 

At  close  of  Summer  Term,  1869 

This  number  33,  against  75  who  received  the  Train 
tificate  the  year  before,  is  due  to  the  increaaed  requirei 
snch  certificate.  The  studies  requisite  for  the  Train 
tificate  Tvili  be  found  in  the  "  Time  Table  "  hereafter  g: 

The  number  of  Normal  pupils  acting  and  trained  at 
in  the  Experimental  School  was  86. 

laSpriagTerm 

In  Summer  Term 

Id  Fall  Term - 

In  the  Experimental  School  the  number  of  pupil 
the— 

winter  ISS^'W.      Snminer  ISW. 

Ist  Primary 7    S    ... 

2d  Primary 8    

SdPrimary 12    ... 

lU Intermedial e 9    4    ... 

3d  Intennediate 9    

3d  Interaiedlate 21    16    ..- 

Ist  Grammar 80    9    -.. 

2d  Qrammu- IS    £2    ... 

8d  Grammar 13    6    ... 

High  School 2    ...junior    U    H. 

"       "      jeuior     8    h. 

106  93 


STATE   ITOSHAL   SCHOOL. 

Slatittkal  Table  of  Attendanet. 


\ 

NOBMiL  BCHOOL. 

EZPEBUIINT 

L  School. 

a 

1 

«     1    108 

1 
1 

8T 

1 

3 

1»6 

8 

484 

f 

1 

48 

1 

1 
■s 
3 

& 

98 

1 

i 

s 

■  one  would  know  how  many  are  taught  during  the  year, 
1  January  to  January,  the  number  in  the  Z%&  term  not  at- 
ling  the  33d  and  34th  terms,  may  be  added  thna : 

nte  Normal  Pupjla  in  Bumoier  (38d)  Teim 806 

(S4U))  Tenn _ 178 

If  (88d)  Tenn 137 


aking  the  total  of  separate  pupils  who  have  received  in- 
ition  in  either  tlte  Normal  or  Experimental  School  at  least 

■preeentatives  in  the  Legislature  have  each  the  right  to  ap- 
t  two  pupils  from  his  district,  as  members  of  the  Normal 
>ol,  who  are  excused  from  payment  of  the  usual  entrance 
The  appointment  is  good  for  one  year,  and  is  usually 
e  in  the  following  form : 

Date,...- 18.. 

ttttibj  certi^"  ihst has  been  ^pointed  b;  me  to 

«  next  Tacancy  in  the  Hichlj^n  State  Nonnal  Scliool,  among  pupila 
this  district. 


tUpreuatatitt,  _ Dittrict, Count!/. 

report  fiilj-flve  pupila  have  presented  appointments  from 
or  the  district  whence  tbej  came,  whoae  names,  and  by 
appointed,  arc  given  in  the  following  Hat : 
31 


8TA.TB   NOBHAL  SCHOOL. 


Hon.  Heniy  H.  Holt,  Muak^on. 

'  Robert  V.  firiggs,  8d  Wayne. 
'    Isaac  D.  Be&ll,  3d  Branch. 

l' 

'  J88.  W.  Romeyn,  1st  Wayne. 
•    W.  R  Eck,  1st  St.  Joeeph. 

Reed 

on  Smith 

'    P.  Lane,  Ist  Saginaw. 

J  Stacy 

'    Victor  A.  Dusseau,  Monroe. 

Fadwrorth 

.Whilney 

'    F.  C.  Kendrick,  2d  Macomb. 

Van  Vleet 

•    L.  Hntchinson,  2d  Calioun. 

■nkVanFoBgen 

'    Chas.  Bhier,  Ist  Washtenaw. 

ff.  StocUej - 

•    Wm.D.  WUbams,  Ontonagon. 

Ruddiman 

'    J.  W.  Romeyh,  Ist  Wayne. 

Fitch 

'    D.L.Crosaman,  2d  Ingham. 

Fitch 

CO0R8a  OF   BTUDT-PREPARATORT   CI.A8S. 

ical  Arithmetic. 

Reading.                     SpeUing. 

bhGruDiuar.  Sjntlietic. 

Oeograpliy.                 Penmanship. 

COCB8E  OP  STUDY   IS 

NORUAI.   SCHOOL— FIBBT  TBAR. 

mater  Twm. 

Summer  Term. 

eaury  Algebra. 

Histoty. 

log  or  Vocal  Hu^. 

Yocal  Music  or  Elocution. 

rtphy.  Phydcai. 

Arithmetic,  Analytical 

ing. 

Training  Class. 

IIIIU-.  Analytical. 

Writing  and  Book-Eeeping. 

WinUr  Term. 


Shimmer  Term. 


nmental   School  and  Training    EzpcrinientalSchI  and  Training. 

mms.  Higher  Algebra. 

lal  Philoeophy.  Latin  {No.  2)  and  Qerman  (No.  3.) 

oric.  Botany. 

Ktiy.  Professional  Traming. 

I,  began  (for  Gentlemen.) 

un,  bt^n  (for  Ladies.) 


344  PUBLIC  INSTBUCTION. 

NOtUCAL  TRAINING  CEBTIFtCATES  CONFERBED — THIRD  I£J 

Wmier  Term.  Summer  Temi, 

Latin  (No.  S)  and  German  (No.  3.)  Latin  (No.  4)  and  German 

Experimental  School  Work.  EsperimenUl  Bcbool. 
TrigonometrjandApTdMathematice. Greek  No.  S.  French  No. 

French  and  Greek,  begun ;  Greek  by  Geology, 

Gentlemen ;  French  by  Ladlee. 
Chemistty. 

FOURTH  lEAB. 

Winter  Term.  Summer  Term. 

Intellectual  Fhiloeophy.  Fhiloeopby  of  Education. 

Latin  No.  6.    German  No.  3.  lAtin  No.  6.    German  N( 

Greek  No.  3.    French  No.  3.  Professional  Ethlca. 
Blstoiy  of  Education  and  School        Greek  No.  4.    French  N( 

Laws  of  Michigan. 
Experimental  Bcbool. 


346  PUBLIC  INBTRCCnOiT. 

GENERAL    EXPLANATION. 

PROFBBBIONAL     INSTRUCTION. 

Professional  Instruction  given  in  the  Konnal  Schoo 
sists  of: 

Methods  of  teaching  Spelling  and  Reading;   meth 
teaching  Arithmetic,   Geography,   Grammar,   and    gei 
whatever  subject  is  tanght  in  classes  is  given  with  rel 
to  the  best  methods  of  teaching  it,  together  witJi  the 
gogic  axioms  applicable  to  each  Bt«p,  by  which   to  t* 
correctneBB  of  the  methods,  as,  e.  g.: 
The  edncational  principle  relating — 
To  a  thorough  knowledge  of  the  Subject ; 
"  presentation  in  Logical  order ; 
"  the  Pupil's  degree  of  H&turity ; 
"      Self  Activity ; 

"      Progress  from  Ibc  Known  to  tlie  Unknown  ; 
•'  "  "      "  Easy  to  the  DifflCDlt ; 

'■  "  "      "  Simple  to  the  Complex  i 

"  "  "      ''   Single  to  the  Combined ; 

"  "      "  Concrete  to  th«  Abstract ; 

"  Empirical  to  tbe  Rational,  &c 


e  designate  our  classes  by  letters :  The  (A 
are  Preparatory.  The  (C)  claaa  pursno  studies  belonging  to  tl 
Year.  The  (D)  class  those  of  the  Second  Tear.  The  (E)  thow 
Third  Tear,  and  the  (F),  those  of  the  Fourth  Tear. 

Special  training  begins  with  the  (C)  cbiss,  second  term,  accor 
the  following  outline : 

(A.)  Elbmkkts  Phtsical  Edocation,— Value  of  the  Body— 
ance  of  Its  proper  development  and  trtdning.  The  bones — mi 
nervous  system — Digestive  apparatus — Circulatory  apparatus — 
■tuB  for  breathing — the  Skin  and  its  appendages. 

The  Dsea  of  each  of  these  divi^ons  of  the  body,  and  the  meani 
sary  to  their  proper  development  and  right  action — importance  < 
habits  in  respect  to  position  in  sitting,  standing,  &c. — in  respect  t 
exercise,  rest  and  sleep.  Bodily  health  and  vigor  necessary  to  t 
and  highest  mental  activity,  and  to  success  in  the  work  of  teachi 


iflATE   NORUAL    SCHOOL.  347 

ECTUA1.  Bducatiok.— General  diviaiona  aDd  deflniiions  of  the 
if  the  mind. 

dbcuMbn  of  the  order  id  which  these  faculties  arc  developed. 
lanB  of  development  and  tnining. 

ree  natural  dirlsions,  or  periods  of  intellectnal  development 
III. 

lod,  Youth,  and  Early  Maturity, — the  powers  which  arc  espe- 
eloped  in  each  period. 

■KitCEPTrvB  FowBRB — How  best  developed  and  trained — the 
d  purpose  of  Etenientarj  or  Primarj  instruction — Oral  Teach- 
eeeons  hy  tneanii  of  objects— Designs— Mattei^-Preparation— 
of  Teaching. 

e  (D)  clasa  instruction  will  be  continued  in  Metliods 

ling  the  perceptive  powers,  by — 

I  and  Forms  of  Natural  Objects — Sounds — Elementary — of 

^oice — of  Animals— of  Bh-da— Hodiflcatlon  of,  by  distance,  &c 

sake  Up  and  present  Developing  lessons  on  Trees,  Shmba, 

Vines,  Flowers,  Grain,  Vegetables,  Fruits,  Nuts,  Seeds,  Ac. 

o(  Human  Body,  Air,  Water,  Rain,  Snow,  HmI,  Vapor,  Steam, 

ist,  Fog,  Clouds,  Bun,  Hoon,  Stars. 

in,  counting  by  objects.  Currency,  Drawing  straight  lines. 

asons  in  LAnoUAOB,  words  by  Word-Method  without  a  book  ; 

'bjects  enumerated.  Moral  Stories,  &c.    Gymnastics  for  cbQ- 

iglng.     Descrlminate  carefliUy  between  Object  Lessons  and 

a  Objects. 

rring  to  the  Course  of  Study  in  the  Preparatoiy  Department, 

I  list  of  subjects  for  training  the  observing  faculties  may  be 

bllow  Lectures  on  GrganlxatloB  of  District  Schools,  Principles 
flcatinn,  Discipline,  Management — Ooremnient,  Attendance, 
n,  Tardiness — Incitements  to  Study,  School  Room  Duties — 
of  Teacher  to  Pupil — to  Parents — to  Socmtt,  Mohal  and 
IS  tiainiog  in  Schools. 

I  the  (D)  and  (G)  Classes  work  in  the  Experimental  School  is 
to  pupils,  to  be  done  under  the  supervision  of  experienced 

and  so  arranged  that  special  practice  may  be  ^ren  in  each 
■  study. 

observation  of  the  pupil's  practice  is  made  and  bis  aftmxbb  in 
;  his  DiTEBEST  therein,  and  earnzstkebs  and  Buccsea  are  made 
la  on  which  to  found  special  recommendations  for  ftilure  em- 
ling  to  the  time  which  may  be  spared  for  the  purpose,  to  the  (E) 


248  PUBLIC  IMBTRUCnON. 

or  (F)  claages,  Lectures  on  the  School  Lbwb  of  Hichigan,  and  upi 
History  of  Education,  Oriental,  Clastic  and  Hodetn.willbe  gireD. 
Intbe  (F)claa8,  [Senior],  beside  the  Text-Book  instruction  in 
lectual  PhiloHopliy,  Lectures  are  given  on  the  Philosophy  of  Edu< 
with  mainly  the  following  range  of  topics :  Edncation,  What ;  of  ] 
Physical  importance  of  a  well  developed  body,  Mental — PtiiloBO| 
Education  based  upon  a  knowledge  of  Psychological  powers,  anal; 
such  powers ;  Minute  and  careful  analysis  of  the  Mental  acts  com 
in  eacli ;  The  precise  definition  of  each  power  based  on  Buch  ani 
The  order  of  development  and  growth  of  each  group  of  fac 
Transition — Out  of  the  law  of  development  and  growth  are  evolve 
taia  Pedagogic  or  Educational  axioms  or  principles  useful  as  tests 
methods  of  instruction — to  determine  the  selection  of  materials  tht 
and  the  proper  presentation  of  the  same ;  Examination  of  the  s 
and  subjects  employed  in  school  education — The  peculiar  cm 
secured  byeach.  How  only  symmetrical  culture  can  tie  reached,  g 
ing  of  studies  for  each  period  of  mental  and  physical  growth.  CI 
cation  of  the  sensibilities,  their  culture  and  control ;  Th«  imt 
importance  of  careful  attention  to  snch  culture  and  control.  Tbe  ^ 
how  to  strengthen  and  guide  it.  Culture  of  CoDsdenco— Direc 
reflex,  influence  of  body  and  spirit. 


VOCAL    MUSIC. 


pRiHARV  Grade. — Pupils  are  taught  to  sing  easy  songs  by 
Beating  Time,  and  to  sing  the  Hi^or  Scale,  applying  tbe  ^llables 
Ete,  Mi,  &c.,  and  the  Numerals.  Tlie  proper  Useof  the  Voice  m  Sti 
8  tauglit  by  imitation. 

aECOKDAKV  AND  QHAHHAR  ORAD£. 
ExercisesonlheBlaclcboardand  from  the  "  School  Song  Booka  " 
>e  sung  by  note.    Pupils  are  also  required  to  slug  the  Major,  Minor, 
!3hromatlc  Scales,  applying  Syllables  and  Numerals.    Songs  by  rote 
he  Cultivation  of  tbe  Voice  by  imitation. 

In  this  class  pupils  are  required  to  sing  entirely  by  note,  Solfeg 
Icalea,  Solos,  and  Two  and  Three-Part  Songs.  Boys  being  subjei 
tlie  age  to  a  change  of  voice,  are  not  allowed  to  sing. 


STATE   yORHAL    SCHOOL. 


HORUAL  aCHcKiL. 


Vocal  Music,  Musical  Notation,  Sluing  aud  Writing  of  the 
jior  and  Cbomatic  Sc&les  in  all  the  keye.  Explauation  and 
f  the  IsTKRYALs,  OulUvation  of  tlie  Voice,  and  the  Phj^ology 
(ethoda  of  Instruction. 

CHOIR    OR   ADVASCKD    CLASS. 

I  of  Church  Music,  SelectionB  from  the  Works  of  the  Groat 
llees.  Solo  and  Quartette  Singing. 


UEOGBAPHY. 

moK  in  this  subject  occupies  two  Terms,  Elementary  Oeo- 
laught  in  the  Preparatorjr  Claso,  and  comprises  first  lessons  on 
1  States  by  river  basins,  commencing  with  tlie  St.  Lawrence 
Ilowed  by  tbe  Atlantic  Coast  system,  the  Oulf  system,  the 
tem,  tbe  Inland  syvtem.  The  ontlinea  of  Oeneral  Qeography 
lugbt,  embracing  poddon,  form,  ^c,  motions  and  lines  of  the 
1  elementary  definitions  of  the  forms  of  contour  and  relief, 
owed  by  a  study  of  the  Continents  and  Oceans.  The  study  of 
enta  Includes  their  pceilion,  boundaries,  form  and  area,  capes, 
,  islands,  surface  (plateaus,  mountains,  low-lands),  climate, 
regetation,  distribution  of  animals,  races  of  men,  political 

t  comparisons  are  made  between  the  different  countries  con* 
nstruction  is  given  orally,  tlie  only  text-book  being  an  atlas, 
ranced,  or  "  C  "  Class  is  occupied  with  a  thorough  study  of 
>mparatiTe  Geography  as  established  by  Carl  Ritter,  followed 
on  account  of  the  comparative  geography  of  the  continents 
),  as  time  allows.  Pupils  make  use  of  a  text-book  which  is 
ted  by  oral  instnictlon.  The  class  first  receives  a  course  of 
)  upon  the  Earth  as  a  planet  in  which  are  discussed  its  origin, 
I  space,  form,  size,  motions,  modes  of  determining  position 
urfacc.  The  text-book  is  then  taken  up  at  the  section  on 
U,  followed  by  oral  lessons  on  llie  nature  of  tbe  earth's  in- 
le  concluding  topic,  the  surface  of  tbe  earth  Is  taught,  partly 
'Xt,  partly  orally.  The  topics  considered  are  tbe  structure  of 
including  forms  of  contour  and  relief,  and  tbe  modes  of  repre- 
am;  the  grouping  of  the  continents,  and  their  comparative 
d  relief;  Hydrography  and  climate  from  the  text-book,  distri- 
ii^nic  life  and  action  of  man  upon  the  earth. 
32 


S50  PCBLIC   IN8TBDCTI0N. 

This  class  also  recelrcs  a  course  of  lesaons  on  Methods  of  1 
Oeography,  ia  which  are  discuKsed  Geojp^phj  ta  a  Science  j  C! 
lioua  of  Geography  i  Natural  order  of  topics ;  Rules  or  Method 
cadoa  to  the  different  grades  of  schools ;  Order  of  topics,  and  i 
presentation  appropriate  to  each.  Primatj  Instruction  in  Geog 
considered  under  the  heads  proper,  point  of  departure  the  home, 
for  this,  natural  features  tn  bo  eudied  first,  the  river  basin  a  natt 
graphical  unit,  order  of  lessons  and  modes  of  presentation.  T 
ciplea  of  which  should  govern  advanced  teaching  arc  discusf 
reference  made  the  methods  of  the  elementary  and  "C"  cl 
models  of  the  course  lo  be  pursued. 


One  term  is  given  to  the  study  of  this  subjecl.  The  limited  U 
not  permit  the  acquisition  of  great  manual  elcill  in  the  art,  bt 
receive  a  thorough  groundhig  in  principles.  Real  objecls  and  ni 
form  the  subjects  of  the  leBseons,  and  the  laws  of  Perspective  art 
hy  observation.  The  lessons  include  drawing  the  geometrical  so 
objects  of  similar  form,  construction  of  sliadows  and  reflections, 
flower  forms,  and  the  elements  of  Linear  Perspective.  In  additit 
in  printing  on  the  blackboard  and  in  drawing  lines,  an^es  ai 
figures  b  given. 


DEPARTMENT  OP  MODERN   LANOUAGES- 


PrRBT  Tbrh.  [Fall.]— Reading.Writing  Method.  Affinity  bet 
German  and  English.  Words  of  a  febfect  end  nfFBRrs< 
tion.  Declension  of  Nouna.  Auxiliarj  Verbs  for  the  fom 
sentences.    Practical  application  as  for  as  possible. 

Second  Term.  [Sprino.]— Words,  having  a  coNDmoKAi.  In 
Soft,  or  weakly  inflected  verba.  Separable  and  inseparal 
pound  verbs.  Verbal  compounds.  Reflexive  verbs.  Ac 
passive  voice.    Numerals.    Practical  application  as  fkr  as  p 

Thibd  Teru.  [Pall.}— Words  having  an  indefekdekt  ii 
Prepositions;  their  peculiarities  and  government.  Conji: 
their  influence  upon  the  coUocation  of  words  and  constn 
the  sentences  in  German.  Reading,  always  however  with  1 
to  grammatical  principles,  taught  thus  far.    Practical  applii 


STATE    NORUAL    SCHOOL.  251 

rsBH.     [Spbikq.] — Infloctkni  of BttxiiigTerbs.    Irr^olftrrerbi. 
iorities  or  the  mode.    Auxitiaiy  Terbs.    Adverbs.     Inteijec- 

AnalysU  of  reading  mattpr.  Practical  application. 
EBV.  [FAii.] — Short  BjnopBia  of  the  nbolc  grammar  as  a 
V,  Reading  with  analysis,  and  with  reference  to  the  ezplana- 
f  idiomatic  eipresaiona.  Practical,  hut  as  yet,  Litbrart  coa- 
;ioiis,  about  matter  read  and  aualjzcd.  Writing  of  lettera, 
tires,  fkbles,  etc.  Selections  fhun  Theodore  Emmer's  works. 
ERM.  [Spbisq,]— Fbbk  conveiwiion  in  Oerman  between 
n  and  pupil  throughout  the  whole  term.  Description  of  ob- 
in  Qerman,  by  the  pupils.  Continuation  in  Theodore  Eccmer's 
I.  Letters,  Receipts,  InTitationa,  BillH,  etc.  Method  of  tcacb- 
le  Qciman  luignage. 


RM.— GcneraUy  as  far  as  lesson  XXXVIII  in  FasqueUe's  New 

>d. 

^KUt. — Formation  and  cbaracteristica  of  tenses.    Inlroductioa 

ne  irregular  Terbe.    In  general,  about  the  equlTalent  to  the 

[  Lesson  in  Fasquellc. 

EBic. — Irregular  verbs,  continued.    Reading  lessons — "Trtds 

■ouslaneige,"  or  "  La  bataillede  dames" — Fasquelle  to  Lesson 

X. 

Term. — To   Lesson  C.  in  Fasquelle.     Colloquial  ezercises. 

imre  dc  Charles  XII,"  or  "  Les  Aventurea  de  Telemaquc,"  or 

Berline  dc  Peralgre."    Letters,  febles,  etc. 


LATIN  and;  GREEK. 

iins  of  these  studies  in  a  liberal  system  of  education  hoTC  been 
I  in  onr  State,  and  ample  provision  has  been  made  for  them  in 
B  Schools.  Therefore  an  institution  for  the  education  of  the 
f  the  State,  cannot  overlook  the  demands  made  to  supply  this 
It.  Ktherto  the  study  of  these  litnguages  in  the  Normal  School 
br  the  most  part  optional,  and  a  very  limited  amount  of  time 
I  them.  It  is  now  proposed  to  require  fh>m  candidates  for  our 
ploma,  such  a  knowledge  of  Latin  and  Greek  as  will  qualify 
leet  the  wants  of  our  Union  Schools.  It  is  the  purpoee  of  this 
it  to  impart  a  thorough  training  in  the  rudiments  and  prindplee 


STATE    NOBUAI,  3CH001_  253 

Arithmetic,  togetlier  wiih  revlewB,  and  extended  clnboraUons  of 
odB  or  teactuQg  Arithmetic  in  its  different  departments. 
asTAKY  Algebra.— T Lis  brancb  ia  studied  during  tLe  flrat  tenn 
fear,  and  embraces,  in  connection  with  training  in  Methods, 
iBslly  presented  by  our  text-books  as  far  as  the  "  Progressions." 
rrar. — To  this  study  the  student  regulariy  eumcs  ttom  his  exam- 
ti  Higher  Arithmetic.  The  work  is  that  of  our  common  text- 
1  Plane,  Solid,  and  Spherical  Oeomeiry,  constant  reference, 

being  had  to  the  development  of  the  power  of  original  dcmon- 
Lnd  invcstigatian  beyond  the  limits  of  the  author. 
.K  Aloebka. — This  branch,  following  Qcometry  during  the  last 
^ach  year,  is  commenced  with  Ihe  subject  of  "  Series,"  and  pnr- 
lugh  the  "  Theoiy  of  Equations, "  as  pre8ent«d  bj  our  common 

treatises  upon  this  science.     To  this  is  added  a  full  analysis 
liova  topics  of  the  subject,  with  careflil  elucidation  of  Hetbods 


In  its  two  departments,  follows  Higher  Algebra, 
lie  first  half  term  of  the  year,  and  is  introductory  to  a  short 
the  higher  applications  of  Algebra  to  Ocometry  and  Mechanics. 
ED  Matrexatics. — Herein  b  embraced  a  practical  couise  in 
g  and  Astronomy,  extending  through  the  year. 


FrRST  TEKU  PKEPAKATORT. 

nij  of  the  English  sentence,  with  special  reference  to  simple 

entaiy  forms. 

orda — as  material  with  which  to  ci 

nlhcNls. 


«ments  of  the  language  reconsidered.    Special  attention  paid  to 
I  and  complicated  forms  of  sentence,  and  to  the  properties  of 

fferent  systems  compared. 

tended,  eclectic  classifications  of  the  whole  subject. 

[ethoda  of  illustrating  the  definitions  and  powetv  of  words  before 


PUBUC  INSTBCCnOlT. 


COHPOfllTIOH  PnUT  TBBM. 


1st.  Wriling  with  regard  to  correttness  In  ortbograpby,  graii 
of  capitals,  &c. 
3d.  Reading  essays,  subject  to  criticlsni  In  attitude,  articnlati 


SECOIID  TEBM. 


IbI.  Writing  with  regard  to  full  development  of  the  theme  ai 
of  consecuttTe  thought. 
2d.  Oral  instructions  in  Prosody. 


DEPARTMENT  OP  ENGLISH  LITEHATUE  ANF*  ELO< 

1.  ENQLtsa  Literature  akd  Rhetobic— In  this  class  is  t 
Origin  of  Language,  aim  of  Com  portion.  Cultivation  of  Style  b 
and  the  analysis  of  the  best  Authors  secures  practical  results. 

3.  Ei^CDTioN  AKD  ExpRBssiois— Vocal  Pirr8iou>QY. - 
breathe,  and  manage  the  breath  in  Vocalizing.  Qualitibb 
Pure  and  Impure ;  Impure  subdivided  into  Orotund,  Gutteral 
and  Tremor  Quality.  Exercises  in  Quality,  largely  dwell 
monotony  is  broken  thereby.  Necesdty  of  ARTICULATION 
ceived.  Vocal,  sub- vocal  and  aspirate  elements,  mastered,  with 
and  Circumflex.  Transition  of  Voice  next,  tbroogfa  the 
speaking  compass  ten  notes,  ^very  individual  capable  of  sn 
tion.  Ehtkasis  and  Stress,  radical — vanisbing — median — 
pound — Mastery  of  these  ■with  (juality,  essential  to  the  esp 
varied  thought.  Pbrbon.vtion  vocai-  and  facial.  Gestcbk- 
of  body,  utting  and  standing — use  of  hands  and  anna — PbIe 
down,  enforcing  positives  or  negatives  of  speech.  Combinatk 
CIBE8  throughout  Ibe  course,  securing  position,  oestore  ant 
[Practical] — Model  Readings,  and  esercises  showing  hon 
these  Principles. 

RBADIKO  .MUD  KLOCUTIOH   IN  MODEL  DBPABTXEHT. 

The  aim  in  these  classes  is  to  show  how  aptly  children  can 
EXPRRsnoN,  and  made  to^plyall  the  qUALmEa  of  voice,  IRI 
and  STRESS — when  taught  tbese  principles  at  first,  by  app 
MODELS.  Monotony  is  unknown,  and  the  Interest  of  pupils  Is 
by  the  sentiment  of  the  lesson,  and  much  emulation  is  m*i 
excel  in  its' appropriate  rendering.  Elements  of  language  and 
of  expression  are  taught  in  conjunction.    Those  preparing  to  t 


STATE   NORMAL  SCHOOL.  256 

milt;  to  test  tbeir  prOf^resB  as  teachers  of  elocution,  with  tbeie 

BOOK-EEBFINO  AND  CORSEBPDNDEHCK. 

[Hand  for  iostraction  in  Book-Keeping  and  Business  forms,  Is  to 
i;  the  graduates  In  the  Training  Coune,  who  receive  careftil 
Single  and  Double  Entry  forms,  with  notes,  receipts,  checks, 
sinesa  letters,  etc.     Pknmasship  is  taught  hy  principles. 


NATURAL    SCIENCE. 


iTBr. — In  additioa  to  the  ordinary  instrnction  i 
«xt-boob,  dcmonslrative  experiments  are  made  before  the  class 
eir  ABTAKCE,  with  such  instruction  in  preparJDg  experiments 
inipulatlon  as  wiU  be  of  service  to  them  in  leaching.  During 
lEW,  a  set  of  simpk  salts,  soluble  in  water,  is  fiimished  them, 
with  Hie  reagents  necessary  for  analysis,  and  each  member  of 
s  required  to  determbe  and  prove  what  is  the  base  and  what  is 
Porming  each  salt,  stating  the  color,  form  and  appearance  of 
es,  &c. 

iL.  Philobofbt.— The  subject  will  be  taught  topically  in  all  its 
Its,  and  the  demonstrative  experiments  win  be  made  as  Ibll  as 
aa,  and  the  nature  of  eacb  topic  will  allow. 
UI  be  taken  to  show  how  many  of  the  Important  and  leading 
of  the  science  can  be  taught  and  illustrated  by  means  of  simple 
>eii^Te  apparatus. 

OEOLOOT  AUn  BOTANY. 

lign  is  to  teach  those  branches  in  such  a  manner  as  to  give,  not 
knowledge  of  the  subjects,  but  also  to  show  how  tbey  may  be 
ralne  to  the  teachers  in  the  various  grades  of  schools  in  our 
d  to  show  how  and  what  to  observe  in  the  mineral  and  vegetable 


TEXT-BOOKS. 

NOBMAI.     DBPAHTMBKT. 

I  Complete  Arithmetic.      Wood's  Clasa-Book  of  Botany ' 

■  Higher  Arithmetic.  Rolfe  and  OUlett'a  Natural  Phllos. 

iiudyna  of  Aritbemetlc.  ophj. 


356  PUBLIC  INSTRCCTION. 

Robinson's  Elementary  Algebra.       Wells'  Geology. 
Robinson's  University  Algebra.         Slockhardt's  Chemistry, 
Kobinson's  Qeometery.  Wayland's  Intellectusl  PhiJ 

Bellow's  Trigonometry.  Fssquelle's  PrencL  Method. 

Sill's  Synthetical  Grammar.  Fasquelle's  Telemaque. 

Welch's  Analysis  of  the   English  Harkncss' Latin  OrammBr. 

Sentence.  Harkness'  Latin  Reader. 

Bain's  Rhetoric.  Harkness'    Introduction    tc 

Griffith's  Drill-Book  of  Elocution.  Composition. 

Griffith's  Lessons  on  Elocution.        Frieze's  Vir^I. 
May liew's  Practical  and  UniTerajly  Johnson's  Cicero. 

Book-Keeptng.  Spencer's  Ctesar. 

Payson,    Dunton    ami    Scribner's  Hadley's  Greek  Grammar. 

Penmanship.  Whiton's  Companion  Book. 

'  Golton's  American  School  Atlas.      Boise's  Anabasis. 
Brockelsby's  Physical  Geography.     Arnold's  Greek  Prose  Conipi 

BXPEBIUBKTAL  DEPARTMENT. 

Robinson's    Rudiments  of   Arith-  Webb's  Word  Method. 

metic.  Griffith's  Drill  Book  of  Eloc 

Stoddard's  Intellectual  Arithmetic.  Griffith's  Lessons  on  Elocut 
Stoddard's  Complete  Arithmetic.  Wood's  Object  Lesson  Bota 
Daiies'  Elementary  Algebra.  Quackenboss'  U.  8.  History 

Sill's  Synthetical  Grammar.  Hooker's  Child  Book  of  Nai 

Welch's  Analysis  of  the  English  Guyot's  Primary  Qeographj 

Sentence.  Ouyot's  Intermediate  Gcogr 

Hillard's,  Parker  and  Watson's,  and  Spencer's  Penmanship. 

Bandera'  Readers. 

The  Course  of   Study  m   the  £xperimeiit«I   Schoo 

follows : 

EXPERIMENTAL  SCHOOL. 

PRIMARY    DEPARTMENT — FIRST  ORADE. 

Facte  in  Natural  Science,  hy  oral  leBSons,    Primary  C 
by  any  objects  haring  them. 

Botany. — Trees,   Shrubs,   Bnehee,   Vines,  Flowers, 
Vegetables,  Fruits,  Nuts,  Seeds,  Ac. 

Physiology. — Parts  of  the  Human  Body, 


STATE  HOKKAL  SCHOOL.  !(57 

■al  Pkilosopky. — ^Air,  Water,  Kain,  Snow,  Hail,  Vapor, 

!)ew.  Frost,  Fog,  Clouds,  Sud,  Moon,  Stars. 

mattes. — Counting  by  objects.  Time  Table,  Currency. 

t  Straight  Lines. 

tage. — Words  by  Word  Method  and  Familiar  Talks ; 

before  Names ;  Stories;  Gymnastics;  Singing. 

PRIMARY   DEPARTMENT — BECOND  QBADE. 
y  continued — Simple  Leaf  and  Flower  Forms ;  Trees 
}d. 

'ff. — Animals — Mammals,  let,  Two-handed ;  2d,  Four- 
,  3d,  Flesh-eating;  4tli,  Cud-chewing;  5th,  Thick- 
;  6th,  Gnawers — Color,  Form,  Size,  Habits,  Food,  Use 
id  of  Domestic  Animals. 

•al  Philosophy. — Color,  Scale  of  Tints  and  Shades  of 
,  Simple  Properties  of  Matter. 

•mattes. — Counting  by  Objects  continued — Addition 
traction  to  o's.  Long  and  Liqnid  Mcaenres  by  objects; 
;  A  ngles  and  Plane  Fignres. 

tage. — Webb's  Primarj'  Reader,  Printing  Words,  Sounds 
els.  Combinations  with  Consonants,  Moral  Stories, 
,  Concert  Verses,  Singing,  and  Gymnastics. 

PRIMARY   DEPARTMENT — THIRD   GRADK. 
y   continued — Leaf  and   Flower  Forms,  (Compound 
Parts  of  the  Flower,  Root  Forms,  Fruits.) 
ly.— Birds,  1st,  Flesh-eaters;  2d,  Perchers;  3d,  Climb- 
,  Scratchers;  6th,  Waders;  6th,  Swimmers. 
•al  Pkilosopky. — Simple  Experiments. 
iary  C'ofors,— With  Tints  and  Shades. 
tnaties. — Counting,  Writing  and  Reading  Numbers  to 
Lddition  and  Subtraction  extended ;  Multiplication  and 
by  objects  to  5'b  ;  Tables  of  the  Weights  and  Measures 
ts;  Drawing  Angles  and  Simple  Figures. 
lage. — Webb's  Header  finished;    Printing  continued; 
by  Sound;  Concert  Verses ;  Stories;  Singing,  &c. 
33 


S68  PPBUC  INSTRUCTION. 

INTEK3CEDIA.TE — FIRST     GRADE. 

Operations  iu  Simple  Rules ;  Simple  FractionB ;  Mnltij: 
and  other  Tables;  Writing  Numbers  extended ;  Eoman  N 
History  and  Elementary  Qeography  by  oral  Lessons  and 

Second  Reader. — Fifty  pages;  Printing  and  Sound  1 
continued;  Singing,  &c. 

INTERMEDIATE — SECOND  QBADB. 

Rudiments  of  Arithmetic  to  Division  of  Fractions. 

Natural  Philosophy — By  Objects  and  Experiments, 
Lessons  in  Botany;  Second  Reader  finished;  Spelli 
Writing. 

INTERMEDIATE    DEPARTMENT — THIRD  GRADE. 

Rudiments  of  Arithmetic  completed;  Primary  Qe 
(Quyot) ;  Third  Reader,  150  pages ;  Spelling  by  Writin 
ing;  Penmanship,  &c. 

GRAMMAR   DEPASTMENT — FIRST    GRADE. 

Oral  Lessons  in  Grammar;  Practical  Arithmetic,  { 
Third  Reader  completed;  Spelling;  Composition,  Decli 
Penmanship,  or  Drawing ;  Vocal  Music. 

GRAMMAR    DEPARTMENT — SECOND  GRADE. 

Sill's  Synthesis ;  Arithmetic  to  Per  Oentage;  Fourth 
Spelling ;  Composition,  Penmanship,  or  Drawing 
Music. 

GRAMMAR  DEPARTMENT — ^THIRD  QRADE. 

SUl's  Synthesis  completed;  Arithmetic  completed; 
Reader,  vitli  Spelling,  Composition  and  Declamatic 
mauship  or  Book-Keeping;  Vocal  Music  or  Qeograpli 

HIGH   aCBOOL — JUNIOR   GRADE. 

Analysis;  Algebra;  U.  S.  History  or  Physical  Gei 
Latin  or  German ;  Vocal  Music. 

HIGH   SCHOOL — SENIOR   GRADE. 

Algebra;  Botany;  Physiology,  Latin  or  German 
Music. 

At  this  stage  of  advancement,  pupils  who  are  of  t 
maturity,  and  intending  to  become  Teachers,  may  e 
Preparafary  Class  of  the  Normal  School. 


BTATE  NOHitAL   SCHOOL. 


REPORT  OF  TREASURER. 


Ypsilanti,  Mich.,  June  17, 1869. 
t  Board  of  Education  in  account  with  R.  W.  Hemphill, 


'o  paid  No.  204,  Prof.  Mayliew,  ealory.. 
Bengel, 


J.  QoodiBon,  salaiy-- 
BellowB,  mlftiy...... 

Whitney,     "     


309.      '•    Darrow,      "     

SOD  00 

214,  Yps[lsnUaaeCo.,gas 

101  17 

215,  lid  wards  &  Cooper,  museum 

600  00 

216,  Hon.D.E.BrovD.cxp'gandserv's 

85  00 

217,      "    O.Hoeford,        " 

23  00 

218,  Smith  Bros.,  Normal  Bchool 

36  B9 

219,  Prof.  GoodiBOn,  postage--- 

1  60 

320,  Edwards  &  Cooper,  museum 

380  00 

228,      ■•    Ooodison,    "     

S7S  00 

150  00 

23. 


PUBLIC   IHSTBITCTIOir. 

331,  Hod.  E.Willits.cxp'n'usnd  m 
383,      "    O.  Hosford,    "      " 

288,  "    D.E.  Brovm.  ■'      " 

234,  Prof.  Hajbew,  salarj 

335,      "    Beiigel, 

386,  "  Ooodison, 

387,  "  Bellow?, 
238,  "  Putnun, 

289,  "  Darraw. 


341,  Hiss  Hoppin, 

343,      "    Bice, 

S48,      "    Pomeroj, 

244,  Hon. D.E. Brown, exp'aandaenr'B 

346,      "    O.  Hosford, 

346,  Prof.  Pease,  balance  ealary 

347,  Edwards,  Cooper  &  Co.,  museom- 
246,  James  Andereon,  plans  and  specifl- 

cations  for  museum, 

IB69. 
Jm,     8.  To  paid  No.  349,  Hon.  D.B. Brown,  serv's and  exp's 

"      8.        "        "    250,    "     O.  Hosford, 
MarchS.        "        "    331,    "     E.  WilUts, 

'    262,  Prof.  Haybew,  salarj 

'    368,    '■     Bengel,         "     

'    864,    '■      Ooodison,    "     

■  255,    ■'      BeUowB,       "     

'    256,    "     Putnam,       "    

'    357,    "     Darrow,       "     

'    358,    '•     Griffith.        '■    

'    359,     ■■     Peaae,  "     

'    360,  Miss  Hoppin.        '■     

'    361,    "      Bice,  '■     

'    282,    "      Pomeroy,  

2SS,  Hon.  D.E.Brown',exp 'sand  senr'B 
'    264,  Misa  Hoppin,  Normal  Scboo] 

■  365,  Prof.  Ooodison,  "  "      

■  366,  David  Coon,        "  "      

'  367,  Smith  &  Convcise.U.S.  Laboratory 
'  268,  Bickford  &  Camp,  Normal  Bchool. 
'    289,  Smith  &  Converse,      "  "    . 

'    370,  Hon.  O.  Hosford, csp'n'sandBerv'a 


aiATK  NOKUAL   SCHOOL. 

11.  To  paid  No.  271,  Hop.  W.J.  Baxter,  exp'sandgerv's 

11.  "        •'    272,    "    0.  Hoslbrd, 
38.        "        ■■    274.    "    E.  WUlito, 

38.  '■  "    275,    "    p.  E.  BrowD,    " 

B.  '■  "    277,  Det.  F.  P.  Co., notice oew  building 

12.  '■        ■'    278,  Detroit  Poet  Co.,  printing 

IT.  ' '     expense  account  as  per  bill  of  items 


enty-three  voucbera  surrendered. 


Yl^lLANTi,  Mich.,  June  17,  1869. 
8tatt  Board  of  Education  in  account  with  R.  W.  Hemp- 
hill, TVeasKrer. 


17.  To  paymentB  u  per  acconnt  tonexed $16,165  TV 

17.  To  bklance  to  new  account 1,266  SO 


2*.  Bf  balance  cash  account t  866  1» 

24.  By  order  on  Auditor  General 6,000  00 

24.        "                  "           "        1,000  00 

2B.        '■                               ■■        - 8,500  00 

». 

Ii3.  By  order  on  Auditor  Qeneral 3,500  00 

5.  By  IB  diplomas,  ®(300. 45  00 

119.  By  caab  for  ashes  and  tuition 0  00 

17.  By  tuition  from  June  24, 1868,  to  Junel7, 1860 3,606  00 

117.422  59 

17.  By  balance  old  account  brought  down $1,866  80 


PITBLIC  INSTBCCTIOli". 


STATE   AGRICULTUKAL   COLLEGl 


report  of  the  president. 

State  Agricultubal  Colleg 
December  1, 1869, 
Hour.  O.  HoSFOHD,  Supt.  of  Public  Instruction  : 

Sib — With  its  accustomed  liberality,  the  Legislature  c 
appropriat«d  *20,000  for  the  current  expenses  of  the  ; 
year. 

By  an  Act  approved  March  16, 1869,  it  is  enacted  tl 
lands  donated  by  Act  of  Oongreaa,  July  2,  1868,  and  be 
on  this  College,  shall  be  sold  for  uot  lees  than  $3  an  at 
cepting  only  those  lands  which  are  valuable  principi 
timber,  which  lands  shall  be  sold  for  not  less  than  16  i 
The  management  of  these  lands,  and  of  the  fund  arisin 
the  sale  of  the  same,  is  entrusted  to  the  "Agricultura 
Grant  Board,"  consisting  of  the  Governor,  the  Andito 
eral,  Secretary  of  State,  State  Treasurer,  Attorney  Genei 
Commissioner  of  the  State  Land  Office. 

The  Legislature  also  designated  the  Agricultural  Co 
one  of  the  depositories  for  suites  of  specimens  which  ai 
collected  by  the  director  of  the  State  Geological  Survey 

An  appropriation  of  (30,000  was  made  for  the  erectii 
new  Hall,  for  the  accommodation  of  students. 

NEW  HALL. 

The  new  hall  is  fast  approaching  completion,  and 

ready  for  students  by  the  opening  of  the  term  of  187C 

building  is  of  brick,  in  the  form  of  an  L,  having  a  f 

101  feet,  and  a  depth  of  109  feet,  the  projection  having  ; 


PUBLIC  INSIBCCTION. 


College.  Some  additions  have  been  made  to  the  Btoc 
omongBt  other  thiogB,  a  Spectroscope  of  Mr.  Alran  ' 
manufacture,  an  Induction  Coil,  and  a  Holty's  £1« 
Machine  to  tlie  apparatus  in  chemical  physics. 


The  total  number  of  students  has  been  seventj-uine 
Senior  class  has  numbered  eleven,  ten  of  whom  were 
ated  in  the  autumn,  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  S 
The  Junior  class  numbered  thirteen;  the  Sophomon 
twenty-seven ;  the  Freshman  class,  twenty-eight.  The  t 
age  of  the  Senior  class  was  twenty-two  years,  the  yoi 
nineteen ;  of  the  Juniors,  average  age  between  twenty-o 
twenty-two,  youngest  eighteen ;  of  the  Sophomores,  i 
age  between  twenty  and  twenty-one,  youngest  sixteei 
record  of  the  Freshman  class  is  imperfect. 

INSTRUCrOBS. 

The  number  of  persons  regularly  employed  in  ineti 
haa  been  six.  In  this  enumeration,  however,  is  count 
President  and  the  superintendents  of  the  farm  and  the  g 
By  Ear  the  greater  part  of  the  duties  of  these  superiatc 
are  upon  tlie  farm,  gardens,  experiments  and  the  like, 
give  students  instruction  out  of  doors,  while  but  the  t 
portion  of  their  time  is  given  to  classes  in  class  rooms. 
Prentiss,  Professor  of  Botany  in  Cornell  University,  de 
a  nine  week's  daily  course  of  lectures  on  the  Vegetable 
dom,  during  the  second  half  of  the  term.  Mr.  Bra 
Olivet,  gave  instruction  in  penmansliip  during  the  first 
the  year,  without  cost  to  the  College.  Admirable  ad 
were  delivered  at  the  College  at  commeucement  time  b 
Cbadboume,  LL.  D.,  Chancellor  of  the  University  of  1 
sin;  at  Junior  exhibition  time,  by  the  Rev.  George  Wil 
Battle  Creek;  at  other  times  by  Professor  A.  A.  Qrif 
the  Normal  School,  and  others. 


8TATK    AQRICULTURA.L  COLLEGK.  366 

iPOBT  OF  THE  STATE   BOABD  OF  AQBICDLTUBR. 

[  the  year  the  Report  for  1868  of  the  State  Board  of 
ire  has  been  pablishod.  Thia  volume  gives  some  ac- 
the  College,  its  farm,  gardens,  &c.,  for  1868.  The 
}f  the  experiments  in  field  crops,  and  in  feeding,  fill 
«  one  hundred  pages  of  the  report  These  experi- 
ive  beeu  widely  commented  upon  by  the  agricultural 
the  country  in  terms  highly  complimentary  of  the 
nd  value  of  them.  The  Report  also  contains  the  full 
igical  Record,  kept  for  the  College  by  R.  C.  Eedzie, 
professor  of  Chemistry;  accoontsof  new  implements 
he  farm,  and  mnch  other  matter. 

OTHKR    RBSIAKKS. 

}IIef;^  took  much  pains  to  have  itself  represented  in 
!  Fair,  which  was  held  in  Jackson.  The  Farm  De- 
was  represented  by  stock,  implements,  collection  of 
la,  many  varietiea  of  oats  grown  upon  the  farm,  die. 
len,  by  fruit,  flowers,  &c.  The  Chemical  Department 
Lety  of  dies  and  other  objects  of  interest;  and  the 
sgical  Department,  by  collections  of  insectfl,  injurious 
nial  to  the  farmer.  Proper  deacriptionB  accompanied 
mens.  All  were  entered  for  exhibition  only. 
abor  System,  under  which  all  students  work  three 
ily,  continues  to  be  successful.  Students  work  wil- 
id  well.  They  thus  preserve  their  habits  of  labor,  and 
it,  and  the  wages  received  for  their  work  helps  them 
xpcnsea  of  their  education. 

«d  of  a  new  Chemical  Laboratory  is  so  great  that  the 
ive  proceeded  far  in  forming  plans  for  one.  Students 
ree  hours  daily  at  analysis  during  the  second  half  of 
omore  year,  after  having  completed  the  study  of  Ele- 
Chemistry-.  The  working  laboratory  is  now  crowded, 
rged  accommodations  are  very  necessary,  unless  stu- 
!  Ut  be  prevented  from  prosecuting  this  most  useful 
34 


jeni 
rt  0 

an 

hac 


OT 
lid. 


OLIVET  COLLEGE. 


BEPOUT  OF   PBBSIDEST. 

N.  0.  HosFOBD,  Sapt.  of  Public  Instruction  : 
-As  regards  all  the  iDtereets  of  Olivet  College,  it  maybe 
at  the  nsnal  degree  of  proaperity  has  characterized  the 
ar. 

aggregate  attendance  of  stndentB  lias  been  slightly  less 
uring  each  of  the  laat  few  years.  Tliis  diminntion  in 
tronage  of  the  Institution  is,  however,  more  apparent 
eaL  The  lower  claaees  of  the  Preparatory  department 
offered  some  decrease,  while  the  classes  of  the  College 
have  steadily  increased.  General  staguation  in  basi- 
Qd  particular  depression  in  the  prices  of  farm  produce, 
orked  to  keep  at  home  many  sons  and  daughters,  whose 
i  doubtless  would  otherwise  have  sent  them  away  to 
The  attendance  of  students  during  the  year  1869,  has 
J  follows : 

lege  Classes,  Classical  Studies 34 

Scientific     "       34 

'■         Ladies'  Course 34 

paratory  Department,  Gentlemen _ 116 

"  Tjadiee 68 

namber  of  Gentlemen 162 

Ladies 102 

otal  attendance - 264 

tun  the  year  no  change  has  taken  place  in  the  Board 
istees.  The  names  and  residences  of  the  trustees  are  as 
i:      Rev.    ^Nathan   J.   Morrison,  President,  ex  officio; 


OLIVET  COLLEOB.  26D 

H.  Hewitt,  A.  M.,  Rntan  Professor  of  the  Latin  Lan- 
nd  Literature. 

ih  L.  Daniels,  A.  M..,  Professor  of  the  Greek  Ijangiiage 
eratnre. 

Horatio  0.  Ladd,  Professor  of  Rhetoric  and  Tjogic. 
inder  B.  Brown,  A.  B^  Professor  of  Mnsic. 
ird  P.  Grandy,  A.  B.,  Instructor  in  Mathematics. 

Henrietta  P.  Dennis,  Principal  of  the  I>adies'  Depart- 
nd  Teacher  of  French. 

Annie  M.  Benedict,  Assistant  in  tlie  Ladies'  Department. 
Lizzie  A.  Willard,  Assistant  Teacher  of  the  Piano, 
resonrces  of  the  College  remain  abont  as  reported  to 
t  year,  with,  however,  a  slight  increase  in  the  funds  of 
manent  endowment  During  the  year  a  Prize  Fund, 
silence  in  Greek  scholarship,  has  been  established  by  E. 
t  McKay,  Esq.,  of  New  York  City.  The  amount  die- 
1  annually  in  prizes  from  this  fund,  is  one  hundred 
There  are  four  annual  prizes — two  to  the  Freshman 
id  two  to  the  Junior  class. 

Ision  has  been  made  for  an  annual  course  of  lectures 
the  students,  on  the  BelatiQii  of  Science  to  Revealed 
Q,  by  eminent  clergj-men  and  others  from  various  part« 
^te. 

e  lectures,  treating  of  the  great  subjects  which  the  dis- 
I  of  modem  Science  have  thmst  npon  the  attention  of 
out  scholar,  promise  to  be  very  attractive,  and  of  great 

It  is  reported  that  Rev.  A.  F.  Kemp,  of  Windsor,  On- 
ill  deliver  the  opening  lecture  of  this  course  some  time 
lary,  1870,  taking  as  his  theme.  "  The  Mosaic  Gosmogany 
Diogy.'' 

ftiends  of  the  College,  as  well  as  the  citizens  of  Olivet, 
icing  in  the  prospect  of  the  immediate  opening  of  the 
liar  Railway  to  within  tno  and  a  half  miles  of  the  Col- 
lereby  giving  easy  and  ready  access  to  students  and 
riends.     The  early  completion  of  the  Jonesville,  Mar- 


OLIVET  COLLEGE.  271 

rj,  the  preuent  demand  for  a  female  education  ooOr- 
with  that  of  the  other  sex.  Here,  every  class  in  any 
lent  of  the  College  is  open  to  every  person  of  either  sex 
ly  a«k  admission  to  it ;  and  the  question  of  a  coCdiica- 
the  sexes  has  found  here  a  most  happy  solution. 
We  have  been  iiilly  established  in  former  impressions  of 
lorn  of  these  bodies  of  christians  who  have  established 
stitutions  of  learning  as  Olivet  College,  even  in  a  State 
lias  provided  so  generously  as  Michigan  has  done,  for 
cation  of  her  sons  and  daughters  at  the  public  expense, 
Jiink  that  only  in  sucli  colleges  as  these  can  the  culture 
religious  and  moral  facnlties  of  the  young  take  that 
hich  it  should  always  hold  in  any  system  of  education 
ims  to  be  complete. 

\a  conclusion,  we  wish  to  express  the  impression  we 
ceived  of  the  wisdom  of  the  conductors  of  the  College, 
re  secured  as  instmctors  so  many  professors  of  enlarged 
whose  studies  have  led  them  into  fields  much  wider 
lose  into  which  the  specialties  of  their  departments 
lave  led  them. 

loet  heartily  commend  this  College  to  the  sympathies 
.  support  of  all  lovers  of  thorough  Christian  education 
lom  our  words  may  have  any  weight. 

S.  M.  FREELAND. 
0.  S.  DEAN, 
G.  P.  TINDALL. 


PDBLIC   IS8XRCCTI0N. 


STATE   REFORM   SCHOOL. 


THIBTBKNTH    ANNUAI,   SEPORT  OF  THE   BOAKD   OF   COJ 

To  the  Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction  : 

So  repeatedly  has  the  condition  of  the  State  Beform 
and  the  progress  made  in  its  several  departments  of  lal 
instruction  been  presented  to  the  people  of  the  State,— 
frequently  and  numerously  lias  the  Institution,  duri: 
entire  period  of  its  history,  been  visited  by  citizens  fron 
part  of  the  State,  aa  well  as  from  other  States,  that 
and  continuous  aunual  reports  of  that  condition  and  p: 
may,  to  some,  seem  a  work  of  supererogation,  that  ni 
henceforth  may  well  he  dispensed  with. 

The  people  of  the  State  are,  however,  annually  calle< 
for  the  means  of  support  for  the  Institution,  and  rep( 
past  years  covering  the  amounts  of  previous  appropi 
cannot  satisfy,  and  ought  not  to  be  regarded  as  sufBc 
satisfy  beyond  what  they  actually  cover.  Nor  can  pastp 
fidelity  or  competency  be  regarded  ns  a  sufficient  guars 
the  future. 

The  Board  of  Control,  therefoi-e,  take  pleaeure  in  pre 
this  their  annual  report,  covering  reports  made  to  thei 
by  the  Superintendent  and  teachers  of  the  Institution, 
as  &om  those  having  other  departments  of  interest  in  c 

At  the  opening  of  the  year  commencing  Nov.  16,  It 
Institution  contained  two  hundred  and  forty-seven  i: 
embracing  almost  every  possible  grade  of  youthful  ch 
from  the  simple  hearted,  and  mainly  honest  boy,  wh( 
nnguarded  hour,  under  the  influence  of  temptation. 


1  /JKVlMrtVl'HaKXW-miu 


276  PUBLIC  IH8TBUCTI0N. 

as  a  restraiut  in  case  of  special  temptation.  It  may  h 
remarked  tliat  the  entire  discipline  of  the  Institution 
punitive,  but  reformatory.  The  lads  are  in  no  case  desi] 
treated  as  criminals,  though  committed  for  crime,  the  p 
being,  forgetting  the  past  by  making  amends  therefor,  to 
80  far  as  possible  a  Tirtuous  fiiture. 

From  the  foregoing  statements  it  will  be  seen  thi 
hundred  and  eighty-fire  are  at  this  date  connected  vi 
.  Institution.  And  as  the  deeper  interest  always  does  or 
attach  to  the  work  yet  to  be  done,  were  the  inquiry  to 
forth  as  to  the  ground  of  hope  for  this  large  number,  a 
insight  into  the  secret  powers,  springs  and  tendencies  of 
than  is  allotted  te  man,  alone  could  enable  ns  to  respond 
work  of  the  Institution  is  by  no  means  prophetic  in  it* 
acter,  but  to  do  what  may  be  done  in  lajing  broad  and 
foundation  for  a  future  virtuous  life,  leaving  to  time  ai 
cumstances  wliat  lies  beyond.  "  Nil  desperandum  "  w 
old  Roman  motto,  and  perhaps  one  of  less  import  wo 
become  the  nineteenth  century. 

In  regard  to  the  health  of  tlie  Institution  during  tb 
year,  we  are  happy  to  say,  tliat  humanly  speaking,  it 
hardly  be  improved.  Were  the  same  rate  of  mortality 
lent  in  the  Institution  during  the  last  three  years  to 
to  the  present  race  as  a  whole,  Methuselah  himself  wouk 
a  fair  chance  of  being  sliorn  of  his  honors,  since  in  an  a 
of  at  least  265  inmates,  only  one  deatli  has  occurred  < 
this  three  years,  and  this  would  give  an  average  of  very 
one  per  annum  in  800  individuals,  or  an  average  longe 
800  years.  The  death  alluded  to  was  that  of  a  colon 
from  the  South,  who  came  to  the  Institution  in  a  ve 
feebled  condition,  so  much  so,  as  to  disqualify  him  foi 
or  service  of  any  kind.  He  died  on  the  16th  of  Angus 
16  years,  according  to  his  commitment  papers.  No  i 
cases  of  sickness  have  occurred  during  the  year,  and  bu 
of  any  kind  requiring  the  aid  or  advice  of  a  physician. 


878  PCBLIC    IKSTEUCTIOK. 

make  this  record,  not  from  Bny  desire  to  flatter,  but  b 
their  own  obserration  will  not  admit  of  less. 

No  change  of  any  importance  has  been  made  dnrii 
year  in  the  departments  of  labor.  About  one  Imndn 
fifty  boys  find  employment  in  chair  shops,  caning  and  fl 
chair  seats  and  backs,  and  earning  about  tl75  per  week^ 
no  interruptions  occur.  These  are,  however,  at  all  tim< 
sible,  and  the  past  year  tliey  have  been  more  than  i 
frequent  on  account  of  the  enlargement  of  the  shop,  thi 
being  at  times,  and  in  different  departments,  largely  sus] 
thereby.  In  the  machine  shop  about  twenty  lads  are  era 
in  the  manufiicture  of  frames  for  chain  seats. 

Those  hanng  cliargc  of  the  several  departments  of 
will  make  their  own  reports,  to  which,  those  desiring  to 
further  of  the  employment  of  inmates  can  refer.  We 
however,  that  it  be  ever  and  constantly  borne  in  mim 
profitable  returns  from  the  money  invested  was  not  the 
in  view  in  the  founding  of  the  Institution,  and  to  whicl 
in  charge  were  expected  to  direct  tlieir  eSbrts, — the  pur| 
cmplojTnent  for  the  inmates  being  reformatory.  Ha 
industry  being  essential  to  virtuous  life,  it  cannot  well 
pected  that  those  hound  t«  vicious  indulgences  will  be  rel 
by  idleness.  Hence  the  purpose  of  labor  in  the  Instit 
whatever  of  financial  importance  can  be  realized  from  tl 
ployment  of  the  inmates  is  made  so  fiir  to  lessen  the  but 
taxation,  but  in  no  case  can  it  do  more  than  to  lesser 
man  would  willingly  assume  the  responsibility  of  ff 
clothing,  educating,  and  paying  doctor's  bills  for  a  c. 
vicious  boys,  and  expect  to  realize  a  profit  from  the  labo 
might  perform. 

There  is  a  large  amount  of  labor  performed  by  the 
yielding  no  financial  returns  that  can  be  definitely  state 
labor  being  expended  in  the  current  duties  of  the  Instil 
Its  cash  valne  to  the  State  is,  however,  just  what  woulc 
to  be  paid  were  the  needed  work  aecnred  by  hired  laboi 


STATE   BEPORH   SCHOOL.  27!> 

I  of  the  board  of  those  employed  BUperadded.  This  is 
e  of  and  applicable  to  the  shoe  shop,  the  tailor's  shop, 
and  farm,  as  they,  each  and  all,  mannfactiire  or  pro- 
)F  the   supply  of  the   Institution.      It  will  hence  be 

that  cash  returns  are  realized  only  from  caning  and 

II  be  recollected  that  the  last  Legislature  made  an  ap- 
tion  of  $2,000  for  the  erection  of  a  frame  bam  for  the 
noD.  In  the  execution  of  the  tnist  herein  committed 
1,  the  Board  aimed  ut  the  erection  of  such  a  structure 
lid  be  adequate  t«  the  wants  of  the  Institution,  if  not 
coming  time,  certainly  fur  a  long  time  in  its  future  his- 
d  also  to  provide  a  model  for  convenience,  capacity,and 
i  of  animals,  &c.,  at  least  bo  f^r  as  experience  and  study 
enable  them  to  do.  The  building  is  now  nearly  com- 
md  critics  in  such  matters  can  judge  for  themselves 
!ceBSful  they  have  been  in  the  achievement  of  their  pur- 
To  accomplish  this,  lioweyer,  they  found  it  neceseary  to 
somewhat  in  excess  of  the  appropriation,  yet  cheerfully 

to  those  interested  to  pronounce  as  to  the  judicionsnese 
investment. 

same  Legislature  made  an  appropriation  of  tlO,000  for 
irgement  of  the  work  shop,  and  for  procuring  new  and 
ed  machiner}'.  This  work  was  undertaken  as  early  in 
son  as  practicable,  with  a  view  to  its  early  completion, 
dable  deUys,  however,  intervened,  caused  by  the  ex- 
rains  of  the  season,  operating  not  only  to  interrupt  the 
if  masons,  but  also  greatly  to  delay  the  furnishing  of 
according  to  contract,  whereby  the  laying  of  the  same 
cessarily  at  a  stand  during  many  days  of  fiur  weather, 
ilding  is,  however,  now  enclosed,  and  its  completion  will 
!  reached.  This  work  has  been  carried  forward  with  far 
ermption  of  shop  work  than  was  anticipated;  being  ac- 
ihed  by  raising  the  roofing  and  supporting  the  flooring 
old  shops  without  displacement  or  derangement  of  ma- 


280  PCBUc  iNSTBUcrroN. 

cbiner;  or  motive  power,  and  leaving  all  things  in  theiri 
Torking  condition  while  open  to  the  fresh  breezes  of 
Temporary  intermpfions  and  delays  were,  however,  i 
nnavoidable.  We  nevertheless  expect  to  complete  t' 
within  the  limits  of  the  appropriation,  and  when  com 
cannot  fail  of  largely  increasing  the  prodnctiveness  of 
stitntion,  since  ample  and  convenient  room  will  be  sec 
each  department  of  labor,  all  needfal  machinery  incl 
well  as  for  the  storage  of  material  and  manufactured  wi 
addition  to  all  this,  there  will  be  one  room  arranged 
adapted  to  the  wants  of  the  School  Band, — for  their 
and  the  keeping  of  their  instrnments.  This  bnilding 
contain  a  new  and  improved  wash-room  for  the  Ina 
Such  a  room,  it  will  be  recollected,  was  provided  in 
wing  of  the  main  bnilding,  bnt  as  the  steam  evolved 
likely  seriously  to  injure  the  walls  of  that  portion  of  tl 
ture,  a  change  became  desirable,  and  in  making  the 
the  Board  availed  themselves  of  the  opportunity  to  mi 
improvements  as  experience  and  observation  had  shoi 
desirable. 

We  allude  to  the  School  Band.  It  will  be  recollt 
many  that  about  a  year  and  a  half  since,  instruments  » 
vided  for  a  cornet  band.  Of  the  success  and  beneficia 
of  this  step,  the  Board  arc  happy  to  report  most  fa 
The  instruments  have  not  only  been  paid  for  by  band  i 
musical  and  other  entertainments  given  by  the  boys, 
the  means  of  music  they  furnish,  a  moat  beneficial 
influence  is  made  to  pervade  the  entire  Institution. 

The  work  on  the  farm  has  been  prosecuted  the  pi 
with  better  results  than  jtreviously,  though  the  land  is 
fl-om  being  thoroughly  snbdued,  and  consequently  has 
reached  its  highest  productiye  condition.  We  have  g 
about  1,500  bushels  of  potatoes,  which,  we  trust,  will 
ficient  to  supply  the  wants  of  the  Institution  for  on 
not  far  from  540  bushels  of  corn ;  and  of  garden  vegei 


STATE    HEPORM  SCHOOL.  363 

it  to  be  secured.  Oircumstiuices  often  compel  the 
al  to  labor  for  immediate  results.  Such  ig,  however, 
leans  most  desirable  for  a  State.  It  must  take  into 
)  future  as  affecting  the  imited  and  continuous  inter- 
ill,  and  the  inquiry  in  the  present  case  is,  or  certainly 
(6,  what  is  essential  to  render  the  future  of  these  youth 
ig  both  to  themselves  and  the  State  ?  To  this  inquiry 
response  can  be  given,  to  wit:  A  well  developed  man- 
i  manhood  based  on  the  stern  principles  of  integrity, 
ection  with  well  develoxwd  and  disciplined  powers  of 

and  action, — in  other  words  the  thorough  education 
;ntire  being,  morally,  intellectually,  and  physically, — 
n  this  direction  perfection  is  unattainable,  as  indeed 
ill  that  which  is  nearest  to  it  possible.  For  this  pur- 
'.  Board  of  Control  regard-  the  interest  of  this  Institu- 
liave  been  placed  in  their  hands,  and  to  this  end  they 
)ored,  and  while  occupying  their  present  position,  viYl 
e  to  labor;  if  here  and  there,  nay  often,  unsuccessful, 
>e  remembered  that  continuous  succees  is  not  often 
)le  of  human  action,  and  that  whatever  of  good  ever 
lerefrom,  is  largely  attributable  to  well  directed,  untir- 
irt ;  and  especially  is  this  the  case  when  the  work  in 

the  training  for  future  usefulness  of  those,  the  tlieatcr 
le  life-action  lies  in  advance.  As  applied  to  tlie  inmates 
Institution,  the  point  of  inquirj-  is,  which,  in  view  of 
irest  of  the  individnal  and  of  the  State,  is  the  more 
e, — that  he  be  left  to  grow  up  in  vice  and  profligacy, 
»  being  thus  saved  the  expense  of  his  reform  and  edu* 
and  he  left  to  prey  upon  the  interests  of  otliers,  or  that 
»  made,  which,  if  successful,  shall  lead  to  efficient  and 

manhood,  and  as  a  consequence,  a  life  of  productive 
j  ?    This  view  we  are  aware  does  not  necessarily  extend 

what  of  good  IB  attainable  here,  nevertheless  it  con- 
l:e«  that  condition  of  manhood  best  adapted  to  future 


284  PUBLIC  INSTBUCTIOK. 

From  these  remarks  the  inference  is  obvious  that  t): 
of  Control  regard  the  Institntion  in  their  charge  as  h 
penal  design,  but  one  of  reformation  the  rather,  mid  t 
hold  the  developing  and  giving  right  direction  to  th 
power  of  the  individual,  and  securing  to  him  the  righi 
of  the  energies  of  his  entire  being,  as  the  work  placed 
hands,  and  for  the  performance  of  which  the  beat  ec 
man  are  but  a  feeble  instnimentality. 

GEO.  W.  LEE; 
JAS.  I.  MEAD 
C.  TRACY, 
Board  of  C\ 


SUPERINTENDENTS   REPORT. 

MicHiQAN  State  Reform  Scm 
Lansing,  Nov.  16,  1869. 

To  the  Honorable  Board  of  Control  of  the  JUichigi 

Reform  School: 

Qentleuen — Allow  me  to  present  the  thirteenth 
statement  of  the  mnnagoment,  condition,  and  ettitistic. 
School.  *  •  *  •  • 

In  the  above  tables  [omitted  in  this  report]  are  the 
as  to  numbers  that  have  occurred  among  the  bojs  dm 
year.  But  no  figures  can  give  the  workings  of  thow 
which  have  made  these  commitments  necessary.  Hea 
feel  as  they  are  affected  by  the  influences,  but  words  car 
the  miseries  that  belong  to  those  fomilies  whose  maril 
tions  are  infelicitous ;  where  intemperance  has  fixed  its 
where  the  mother  prostitutes  herself  to  her  own  lu 
sends  her  children  into  the  streets,  that  this  may  1: 
without  restraint,  but  not  witbont  the  observation  of  th 
ren,  even  though  she  may  deem  herself  secure  in  this 
Could  these  and  other  blighting  causes  be  fully  set  ft 
might  then   be  able  to  show  why  the  numbers  of  "j 


STA.TK   REPOBU  SCHOOI.  'iSI 

express  themselves  as  fearful  for  the  training  of  these 

theae  restraint*  shonid  be  too  rigorous,  forgetting 
:  upon  whom  it  devolres  to  administer  this  special 

the  State,  have  themselves  all  the  sympathies  that 
uts  inspire,  and  do  not  fail  to  yield  to  all  the  ezi- 
niring  softened  tenderness,  while  they  are  unfailing  in 
fnlnesB  to  ndminist^r  firmly  the  discipline  essential 
rder. 
s  sometimes  a  misapprehension  in  relation  to  com* 

to  institutions  of  this  character,  both  as  to  their 
1  subjects.  Yet  when  it  is  felt  that  many  are  made 
«  in  society  by  adversity  and  want  of  care,  at  a  much 
;)oriod  than  often  supposable,  and  that  increasing 
ler  them  much  more  efficient  by  association  and 
',  this  miaappreheuBioii  gives  way  to  a  conviction  of 
lity  even  of  enlarging  facilities  for  restraint  and  in- 

especialiy  when  temiiered  with  earnestness  for  the 
le  party  needing  the  corrective. 
:lass  are  entitled  to  the  sympathies  and  tender  inter- 
d  men,  it  must  be  that  those  whom  Providence  or 
jprived  of  that  gnardian  care  which  children  so  much 
call  for  a  larger  share,  and  it  is  not  in  the  nature  of 
*d  humanity  to  refuse  what  helpless  childhood  de- 
?hc  death  of  either  parent  from  any  cause,  whether 

in  pleasantness  and  hope  on  the  part  of  the  dying 
ether  it  is  the  effect  of  passion  or  vice,  will  surely 

restraints,  which,  when  judiciously  wielded  in  their 
cultnrc,  makes  of  innocent  children,  an  intelligent 
ons  manhood,  but  which,  when  neglected,  leads  to 
and  this,  as  in  the  first,  will  soon  ripen  into  practices 
in  their  nature  and  prejudicial  to  the  interests  of 
d  the  personal  good  of  the  individual  in  question, 
inection  between  vagrancy  and  its  results,  in  a  State 
irn,  so  full  of  facilities  for  obtaining  an  honest  com- 
y  any  one  willing  to  make  the  effort,  is  very  closely 


2tl8  PUBLIC   IXBTBL'CTION. 

allied  to  crime.  It  is  indeed  difficult  to  mark  out  the  i 
line.  Children  permitted  to  wander  about  undirected 
as  want  or  caprice  may  prompt,  do  invariably  yield  to 
tion  and  fall  into  error,  which  neglected,  will  become  i 
peet  in  society. 

It  is  not  every  commitment  that  follows  promptly  u 
perpetration  of  the  misdemeanor.  The  sjinbolic  blin 
justice  often  baa  other  significances,  besides  impartial  ( 
tration.  It  is  an  increase  of  delinquencies,  and  ojteu  i 
offense  causing  the  commitment,  covers  up  passions  a 
that  receive  no  name  in  society,  but  which  work  terril 
of  body  and  soiil  by  their  development. 

Another  fact  comes  prominently  into  the  account. 
are  but  few  commitments  but  show  others  equally  < 
concerned  in  the  same  offense,  who  under  various  pretc 
ceed  in  escaping  the  balances  of  the  blind  Qoddess  of 
but  only  to  repeat  in  more  confidential  efforts  the  misdei 
of  the  puet  This  entails  upon  that  portion  least  able 
its  seductions,  the  baneful  influence  of  vicious  exam; 
upon  the  better  portion  of  community  the  annoyance 
irritating  depredations.  This  is  constantly  enlarging  i< 
utions  and  swelling  the  number  of  its  votaries,  ripeni 
deeper  crimes,  as  its  work  can  be  carried  on  with  appai 
punity.  When  it  is  realized  how  the  youthful  portion 
influence  and  yield  to  it,  misapprehension  must  give  w 
earnest  desire  to  make  the  effort  for  prevention  of  c 
vagrancy  more  effective. 

It  is  of  frequent  occurrence  that  commitments  are  i 
conviction  of  simple  larceny,  and  perhaps  a  small  sun 
on  developing  the  history  of  the  boy's  career,  he  is  fom 
an  adept  of  the  most  skillful  kind  in  all  the  intric 
criminal  art.  The  impunity  with  which^he  has  succc 
carrying  on  his  system  of  depredation,  deadens  every 
tion,  and  all  efforts  for  reformation  are  met  with  mere 
cognition,  perhaps  respectful,  of  what  may  be  said  or  do 


STATE  BEPORU  SCHOOL.  289 

no  intention  of  conforming  to  the  principles  laid  down, 
dy  is  how  much  he  can  impose  upon  those  in  charge, 
;are  an  apparent  confidence,  holding  constantly  in  his 
ind  the  chances  of  release,  for  the  purpose  of  seeking 
companions,  who  may  be  awaiting  his  retnm,  intending 
ge  again  into  the  same  course  of  recklessness,  regardless 
;onaeqnences.  Conscience  seems  wholly  stified  or  inert 
liances  are  met  with  a  like  indifference.  The  only  seen 
from  an  apparent  passiveness,  is  a  chafing  at  restraint, 
erishing  a  spirit  of  vindictivencss  toward  those  who 
or  did  not  hinder  his  conviction.  In  many  of  these 
hich  thns  develop  these  worst  criminal  tendencies,  the 
ature  of  the  offense  is  looked  at  only  by  tlie  nnrefleet- 
1  not  the  incorrigible  ^iciousness  of  tlie  boy,  and  more 
tly,  young  man.  The  more  thoughtful  must  look  at  the 
er  of  the  deeper  vicious  tendencies,  and  will  feel  the 
y  of  more  effective  restraint 

1  institution  of  this  kind,  where  every  arraugemeut  is 
itb  special  reference  to  the  culture,  well-being  and  pleas- 
ts  wards ;  where  every  possible  effort  is  made  to  elevate 
loble,  and  give  the  cheerfulness  which  lelongs  to  joyous 
I,  it  is  impossible  to  meet  these  cases  as  they  should  be 
et  by  the  strong  arm  of  the  law,  in  a  more  penal  estab- 
t,  where  it  can  receive  treatment  adapted  to  experienced 
.ess  and  crime. 

deception  used  by  friends  to  secure  commitment  to 
msigumeut  to  a  more  penal  institution,  is  proof  of  the 
y  and  want  of  though tfulnese  and  integrity  in  which 
re  been  reared.  As  proof  of  this  last  statement,  quite 
percentage  of  the  commitmeute  of  the  past  year  as  of 
and  sixteen  years  of  age,  obtained  from  the  courts, 
1  the  peijury  of  themselves  and  friends,  range  from  the 
seventeen  to  twenty-four,  and  have  bad  experience  of 
it  baneful  nature. 


390  PUBLIC  INSTBCCnOV. 

The  eystem  advocated  by  many  of  our  best  prison 
formatory  directors,  and  which  was  set  forth  bo  fon 
Snpt.  Z.  R.  Brockway,  of  Detroit,  in  his  inestimable 
before  our  LegisUture,  in  session  last  winter,  nill  comi 
self,  by  its  practical  sense,  to  all  who  have  made  obseri 
the  nature,  necessities  and  objects  of  reformatory  and 
tional  discipline.  The  State,  by  one  uniform  systei 
control  and  restrain  this  class  of  persons,  giving  the; 
facility  for  improvement,  physically,  mentally  and  mon 
holding  them  by  its  strong  restraining  power,  for  th 
personal  good,  and  the  interest  of  society. 

The  labors  and  cares  of  the  year  have  been  nnje 
The  early  spring  found  us  with  full  force  adding  to  oi; 
land,  and  seventeen  acres  were  cleared  of  its  wood  and 
plowed  with  a  heavy  team  and  put  into  crops.  The  e 
rains  through  the  entire  season  rendered  farming  both 
ant  and  unprofitable.  Often  large  portions  of  our  la 
in  unfavorable  condition  for  culture,  when  it  especially 
the  same.  But  by  dint  of  perseverance,  our  farmer  pre 
Table  12,  a  much  more  favorable  showing  than  we  ant 
We  place  no  monetary  value  on  these  products,  as  i 
all  needed,  and  will  be  consumed  by  our  family  and  st 
is,  in  this  respect,  of  no  special  difference  whether  we 
tain  for  onr  1500  bushels  of  potatoes  from  75  cents  i 
the  current  price  of  20  or  25  cents  of  this  year.  T 
just  as  must  labor  to  raise  them,  and  they  will  be  just  i 
relished  on  our  tables,  filling  a  very  special  want.  T 
may  be  said  of  every  other  article  of  farm  and  garden 
while  as  a  matter  of  economy  it  does  materially  lei 
cash  expenses.  The  work  in  more  thoroughly  subdi 
new  land,  adjusting  and  building  fences,  e.vtcndlng  oui 
grounds,  must  be  of  essential  benefit  in  coming  years. 

During  the  last  winter  the  ferm  boys  cut  and  prep 
wood  we  used  during  the  3'ear,  not  less  than  six  hnndn 


STATE    REFQBU   SCHOOL.  291 

ve  made  a  very  material  addition  to  our  stock  of  cowa, 
i  soon  to  have  a  valuable  herd. 

ve  a  field  of  five  or  six  acres  which  would  be  very  de- 
j  plant  with  fruit  trees.  There  can  be  no  product 
our  farm  that  can  in  a  few  years  yield  so  profitably, 
red  beyond  a  doubt  that  the  entire  State  is  adapted  to 
notion  of  apples,  and  as  this  Institution  is  e8i>ecially 
ren  and  youth,  no  better  provision  can  be  mode  that 
more  to  their  comfort  and  enjoyment  than  an  abund- 
ly  of  apples. 

this  and  a  good  dairy,  and  a  full  supply  of  vegetables, 
issen  the  expense  to  the  State,  and  furnieh  our  tables 
1  best  suited  to  the  wants  of  childhood, 
iiildiug  of  this  year  has  drawn  heavily  upon  the  teams 
er  boys,  and  every  effort  has  been  made  to  push  the 
completion.  The  bam  for  the  farm,  which  has  been 
is  one  of  the  best  structures  of  the  kind  in  the  State ; 
s  48s60.  It  stands  upon  a  basement  of  the  same  size, 
3  in  the  side  of  a  suitable  hill,  and  which  constructed 
n  the  more  thorough  and  satisfiictory  manner,  gives 
stable  and  cellar  for  stock.  The  whole  work  and  ar- 
ut,  we  think,  must  meet  the  approval  of  all  interested 
]g  operations. 

luilding  of  the  shops,  which  the  necessities  of  the 
emanded  this  year,  was  much  delayed  from  the  difS- 
obtoining  suitable  materials  for  the  work.  The  whole. 
Is  now  enclosed,  and  the  work  of  completing  the  in- 
rangemeut,  progressing  with  the  greatest  possible  dis- 
rhis  addition  to  our  facilities  for  shop  labor,  gives  all 
1  that  will  be  needed  for  some  years  to  come,  with  the 
rate  of  increase.  We  had  hoped  to  construct  a  cistern 
lie  dimensions  for  the  special  use  of  the  shops,  but  the 
of  other  duties,  and  the  nnpropitious  season  cuts  off 
t  for  this  fall.  AVe  shall  be  obliged  to  do  this  work 
opening  of  spring. 


392  PUBLIC  IKSTRUCTIOK 

'  The  constructiaa  of  this  shop  removes  about  two  1 
feet  of  the  old  board  fence,  and  constitutes  the  fence 
portion  of  the  yard. 

During  the  construction  of  these  shops  the  work  in 
shops  has  been  very  much  obstructed  fVom  necessit 
chair  shop  vas  obliged  to  suspend  operations  entirely ; 
chair-seating  shops  have  done  during  the  interruption 
than  seemed  possible  at  the  beginning. 

If  the  pressure  of  the  present  stringency  in  busiiiei 
of  the  State  shall  be  lifted  up,  so  that  the  manufactui 
supply  us  work  shall  be  able  to  prosecute  the  business 
fully,  we  may  be  able  to  present  results  even  more  sat 
than  we  are  at  this  time,  although  we  consider  the  k 
the  shop  labor  this  year  as  very  encouraging. 

The  Family  House,  which  was  opened  February 
this  year,  under  the  charge  of  Mr.  H.  B.  Kenjon  and  1 
received  under  its  roof  fifty  boys,  who  had  been  deeme< 
of  the  confidence  which  it  gives.  Most  of  these  bo 
remaining  a  few  months,  have  gone  to  their  home*, 
be  that  this  feature  of  the  Institution  is  calculated 
great  benefit  to  the  boys,  and  you  will  find  yourselvM 
to  enlarge  its  accommodation  for  the  increasing  ni 
boys  who  will  need  its  privileges.  Every  advantage  is  ] 
there  that  can  be  reached  in  a  farm  house.  The  boy 
the  summer  have  worked  on  the  farm  and  in  the  gai 
at  all  the  outside  work  they  could  do,  under  the  dir 
their  overseer.  Their  school  hours  have  been  the  san 
other  boys ;  Sunday  School  and  chapel  services  with  1 
boys. 

The  special  work  and  progress  of  our  School  Depai 
presented  by  Mr.  J.  M.  Sprout,  our  Principal  Teachi 
have  no  doubt  will  be  found  satisfactory. 

The  Sunday  School  and  Sabbath  services  continue  i 
vious  years.  We  are  nnder  special  obligation  to  the 
friends,  ladies  and  gentlemen,  who  have  continued  to 


STATE   BEFORU   SCHOOL.  293 

onnection  with  the  teachers  our  school  furnishes,  in 
liar  field  of  labor  for  the  good  of  the  boys.  Their 
1  memories  will  ever  dwell  in  the  minds  of  the  boys, 
a  they  may  be  separated  by  long  distances  and  long 
f  time ;  sometimes,  too,  in  the  days  of  adreisity,  for 
I  will  come.  We  trust  they  will  find  full  enconrage- 
:eep  their  interests  in  their  clasBes,  to  still  continae 
rs  of  love. 

port  of  our  Physician,  Dr.  J.  B.  Hull,  will  show  the 
londition  of  the  School,  together  with  a  special  refer- 
\  certain  class  of  commitments,  which  cannot  but 
et«rions  to  the  other  boys,  and  which  should,  if  pos- 
reroedied.  For  without  a  greatly  enlarged  corps  of 
t  will  be  found  impossible  to  care  for  the  diseased, 
report  of  last  year,  we  presented  what  had  been  done 
□met  Band,  and  estimated  that  about  t400  would  be 
Ai  complete  payments  for  our  purchased  instruments, 
ental  repairs,  &c.    We  fouud  our  estimate  insufficient. 

during  the  winter,  concerts  in  this  city,  Jackson, 
Ility,  East  Saginaw,  Mason,  Dewitt  and  Qraud  Ledge, 

in  these  concerts  kindly  aided  in  many  ways  by 
terested  in  the  boys.  The  concerts  given  in  the  towns 
[1  home,  owing  to  the  necessity  of  providing  for  the 
'  paid  expenses,  and  yet  we  were  much  fkvored  by  the 
d  friends  where  we  stopped.  The  J.,  L.  &  S.  K.  B. 
^ially  aided  na  in  reduced  fare,  and  the  uniform  kind- 
le  conductors,  and  the  station  agent  of  this  city,  Mr. 
:ended  much  to  make  these  trips  pleasant.  If  only 
at  of  the  boys  were  considered,  we  should  deem  these 
rsble. 

H.  Thomson,  of  Flint,  during  the  session  of  the 
re,  took  great  interest  in  the  boys,  and  aided  us  in 
ays,  besides  giving  for  the  special  benefit  of  the  boys, 
e  Legislature  and  friends,  his  admirable  lecture  on 
are,   defraying  all   the  expenses  of  advertising,  &c.. 


894  PUBLIC   INSTBCCTIOK. 

and  giving  the  entire  proceedB  to  the  Band.  Hie  i 
interest  is  ever  fresh  in  the  memory  of  the  boys. 

The  Legislature  also  manifested  a  deep  interest  ir 
and  appropriated  $100  for  their  use. 

The  Band  Fund  for  the  year  shows : 


Casli  on  hand  per  last  Report.. 

Net  proceeds  0/  concerte 

Col.  Thomaon'a  lecture 

Appropriation  of  Le^alature.. 

Viutora  and  special  Mends 

Serrices  of  Band - 


By  paid  balance  on  instruments 

■"         repairs,  music  paper,  &c.. 

■"         instruction 

"        uniform  for  Band 

By  caali  on  hand 


The  Legislature  appropriated  for  the  purchase  of  b 
sum  of  five  hundred  dollars,  for  the  two  years  ending 
1870.  Of  thiB  amount,  about  eighty  dollars  has 
pended,  and  arrangements  are  now  being  made  foi 
purchases. 

Among  tlie  special  remembrances  which  we  alwaj 
ciate,  must  be  enumerated  the  kindness  of  the  pnbl 
the  following  papers  sent  for  the  boys:  "Lansii 
Eepnblican,"  "Peninsular  Courier,"  of  Ann  Arbor, 
Creek  Journal,"  "Saginaw  Enterprise,"  " Wolverine 
of  Flint,  "Grand  Haven  Herald,"  and  by  Bev.  Mr.  Pott 
city,  the  "Morning  Star."  No  better  gift  can  be  seni 
boys  than  the  several  papers  of  the  counties.  It  ke 
home  interest,  and  it  supplies  much  information  tht 


396  PUBLIC   INSTBUCnOX. 

assured  that  eSbrU  to  elevate  fallen  hnmanit;  must 
cially  coromended  to  his  favor. 

Respectfully, 

CHARIJ:S  JOHNS! 
Saperinte 


EXTBACT   FBOM  TEACHER'B    BEPOHT. 

The  scholarship  of  the  boys  when  received  under 
struction,  is  at  a  low  standard.  Among  these  boys  ai 
who  on  account  of  their  turbulent  spirits  and  indiffe: 
study,  have  been  expelled  from  the  public  schools,  a 
pass  without  restraint  into  another  department  of  ed 
more  congenial  to  their  tastes.  Acting  thus  free 
scarcely  any  eflbrts  of  their  parents  to  direct  their 
they  are  often  drawn  into  associations  and  influence 
mould  them  for  mischief,  and  entrap  them  in  vice.  P 
ity  with  which  unfits  them  for  the  pure  pleasure  whic 
out  of  a  love  of  truth,  or  the  mental  discipline  whlc 
quired  in  this,  our  day,  to  meet  the  duties  of  citizent 
nation  that  calls  for  intelligence  and  virtue. 

It  is  doubtful  whether  the  amount  of  culture  whicl 
pve  them  will  ever  lift  as  completely  as  we  desire,  t 
shadow  of  ignorance  and  error  in  which  they  have 
involved. 

Being  almost  entirely  unnsed  to  any  kind  of  mentj 
they  are  in  the  habit  of  giving  loose  reign  to  their  passi 
letting  their  thoughts  wander  without  control,  as  thii 
temptation  is  brought  to  bear  upon  them.  To  overc< 
check  these  natural  tendencies  is  one  of  the  first  ai 
essential  duties  of  the  teacher. 

These  dormant  faculties  cannot  be  made  to  act  imm 
nor  with  that  precision  or  force  that  they  would  had  tl 
cultivated  in  their  more  juvenile  years.  Our  school  l 
main  as  usual,  fh)m  six  to  eight  A.  M.,  and  from  fi 


SUNDAY   SCHOOLS.  301 

1  great  deal  easier  getting  along  iu  my  school,  the  chil- 
re  BO  much  easier  managed  now  than  before  we  had  a 
r  School,"  said  one  teacher,  and  she  waa  not  alone  in 
timony.  Said  one  of  the  county  common  school  fluper- 
?nt8,  "I  invariably  find  the  best  schools  where  I  find 
lie  on  the  deek,  and  the  best  discipline  where  it  is  daily 

school.^  This  is  not  the  place  to  argue  the  questiou  of 
«ading  in  the  schools,  but  with  your  permission  I  will 

the  testimony  of  one  of  the  closest  observers  and  stu- 
f  the  whole  subject  of  education,  the  late  Frederick  A. 
d: 

cannot  avoid  the  conviction,  that  under  political  insti- 

so  free  as  ours,  and  with  a  population  so  heterogeneous, 
rlnsion  of  systematic,  judicioua,  thorough,  religious  in- 
)n  from  the  public  schools  is  a  radical,  and  we  fear, 
efect.  It  is  not  the  reading  of  the  Scriptures,  nor  a 
nal  service,  nor  an  occasional  recognition  of  moral 
ion,  however  desirable  these  things  may  be,  that  is  '  to 
:h  in  our  youth  the  principles  of  piety  and  justice,  and 
I  regard  to  truth.*  The  conscience  must  be  awakened; 
ognition  of  an  infinitely  perfect  law,  binding  upon  all 
ind  intelligent  beings,  must  be  inculcated.  The  right 
imment,  divine  and  human,  and  the  duty  of  obedience, 
•  consecinence  of  disobedience,  mnst  be  set  forth,  not  in 

exhortations,  perhaps,  but  incidentally  and  naturally, 
iaily  order  of  school  life.  It  must  be  incorporated  with 
,  pastimes,  commendations  and  reproofs.  It  must  liare 
s  and  place,  even  in  the  play-ground.  The  sacred  influ- 
ould  distil  from  the  temper,  tone  of  voice,  gentle  de- 
■  and  tender  sympathy  of  tlie  teacher  upon  the  young 
about  him.  If  he  appreciates  the  responsibility  of  his 
id  comprehends  the  true  end  of  educating  a  child,  he 
,ve  no  difficulty  in  mingling  the  precepts  of  morality 
e  principles  of  piety  with  the  current  of  daily  instruc- 
d  intercourse  with  boys  and  girls,  and  that,  too,  without 


308  PUBLIC  INaTRCCTION. 

trespassing  on  the  rights  of  conscieuce,  or  stepping 
breadth  onb  of  his  propar  prj  /tnce  sa  a  Berruit  of  the 

Onr  Sunday  School  missionj  in  the  new  parts  of  t1 
are  still  conducted  with  zeal  and  efficiency,  and  the  r 
usefulness  constantly  appear.  They  reach  the  places 
by  no  other  agency,  following  up  the  settlers  to  their  fi 
habitations  in  the  woods,  taking  in  for  the  use  of  all  &, 
plies  of  the  New  Testament,  libraries  of  unsectariai 
singing-books,  and  papers,  something  for  the  wants  of 
giving  away  what  the  people  are  not  able  to  buy. 

During  the  past  year  87  new  schools  have  been  orga 
the  aid  of  this  union  agency,  embracing  441  teachers  a 
scholars.  Besides  these,  508  other  schools  have  been  \ 
otherwise  aided. 

As  an  example  of  the  condition  of  things  under  whi 
schools  are  planted,  take  the  cases  of  one  or  two  of  thi 
hearing  that  settlements  were  forming  in  Wexford  eoi 
Sunday  School  missionary  for  the  western  border  of  t 
visited  them  last  summer,  and  was  heartily  welcomed, 
instance  a  young  man  came  out  eight  miles  to  meet 
sionary  and  pilot  him  into  the  neighborhood  where 
Finding  no  school-house  there,  the  missionary  rallied  tl 
to  a  bee,  put  up  a  building  of  logs,  and  planted  the 
School,  and  furnished  it  with  means  to  keep  it  up  and 
useful.  A  school  district  was  organized  immediately,  i 
procured,  and  the  daily  public  school  established. 

In  another  case,  where  other  agencies  had  failed  to  k 
Sunday  School,  the  missionary  was  invited  to  come 
what  could  be  done  through  the  union  agency.  There 
one  Christian  family  in  the  district,  the  others  were  in 
Sabbath  breakers,  and  profane.  By  esciting  their 
they  were  induced  to  attend  the  first  meeting  held  by 
sionary.  The  idea  that  it  was  to  be  a  union  Sundai 
and  that  they  could  have  everything  just  as  they  si 
have  it,  and  that  the  good  people  elsewhere  had  so  mu< 


PUBLIC  IH8TSUCTI0S. 


LOSS  AND  GAIN  IN  THE  COUNTIES. 


In  the  reported  loss  and  gain  in  the  counties,  in 
stractB,  the  reader  may  be  misled,  without  an  explana 

The  new  counties,  of  course,  show  the  entire  nu 
gain.  Thus,  Alcona  shows  a  gain  of  133.  But  the 
this  was  taken  from  Alpena,  which  shows  a  loss  of  1 
actnal  increase  in  Alpena  is,  therefore,  56.  So  Benzie 
from  Grand  Traverse,  and  counts  as  gain,  the  whole 
527.  Grand  Traverse  shows  a  loss  of  463;  bat  th 
gain  being  91,  Wexford,  with  101  children,  was  tak 
Uanistee ;  yet  the  latter  shows  a  gain  of  433 ;  th 
gain  being  533.  Charlevoix,  with  367,  w&e  taken  from 
from  which  no  schools  are  reported.  Osceola,  with  4 
dren,  was  taken  from  Mecosta.  Adding  this  to  the 
gain  of  97  in  Mecosta,  makes  the  actual  gain  518.  C 
reports  a  gain  of  319 ;  but  no  report  was  made  last  ye 
Sanlt  Ste.  Marie,  with  301  children;  so  that  the  ac 
crease  is  not  much  more  than  20.  Of  the  49  childre 
"  supplementary,"  (reports  received  after  the  tables  we 
up,)  7  should  be  added  to  the  gain  in  Isabella,  ai 
Calhoan. 


ABSTRACT  OF  INSPECTOKS'  BEPOBTS. 


■RACT    OF   SCHOOL    IN8PECTOBS'   REPORTS,    BY 
COUNTIES,  FOR  1869. 


1 

■s 
z 

i 

1 

If 

!1 

1? 

1. 

4^ 

1 

III 

I 

1 
1 

1 

1 

SIS. 

ll 

IW 

....1' 

t4I«l 
MM 

us 

40M 

10.IW 

18( 

g» 

'" 

I 

saoo 

48  88 

»8» 

'i 

■a 

IW 

w 

mm 

0.™ 

'w 

mat 

n* 

* 

41 

88H 

1«M 

•" 

••s 

in 

M 

» 

»,»« 

MS 

t.m 

"» 

«f 

" 

i8n» 

'a 

" 

m 

' 

'1 

1»(M 
MSI 

i,iies 

'■JiS 

11 

9.1 

IS 

MW 

Si.i«3 

6.i»a 

« 

ABSTRACT   OF   IKSPECTORS'  REPORTS. 


OF   SCHOOL    INSPECTORS'   REPORTS,    HT 
COUNTIES.  FOR  1869. 


« 

g 

1 

ssjwv;         i 

2 

IC 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

j                    ; 

t 
1" 

m 

.,.<» 

VMM 

4 

1 

m 

>h 

i.tw 

* 

'• 

«,))» 

M  U 

SO 

IBS 

[J 

^ 

"'m 

10  00 

" 

'*H 

10 

..." 

»,ni 

"1 

mx! 

'i 

.*" 

n 

« 

no 

' 

■ 

« 

IW 

■a 

4  M 

' 

-..^ 

in 

iw 

'"*» 

* 

IVH 
0 

in 

' 

l-» 

4M 

«»M 

1 

* 

e 

* 

M 

UI 

Cio 

in 

108  4S 

' 

im 

»] 

-; 

0 

*l 

7M 

wao 

1 

iw 

PUBLIC   INSTRUCTION. 


ABBTRACT  OF  SCHOOL  INSPECTORS'  REPORTS— Ct 


i 

3 

i 

■"K-LTSS: 

!l 

1 

5 

i 

il 

1 

s 

TIBItL  or    COH' 

1 

1 

1 

1 

"5 
Si 

VH 

T( 

Id 

a-lli 

lil 

7,«85 

s(i,e80 

SI  w 

^ 

4» 

s 

M 

ToUd 

I5^i,n 

ABSTBACrr   OF   rSSPECTOES'  BEPORTS. 


A,BSTBA.CT  OP  IKSPECTOBS'  R2P0BTS. 


FINANCIAL  BEPOBT-Rkcwpts. 


'^ 

1 

ll 

fl 

I£B. 

» 

:i 

|l 

i 

1 

E 

1 

V 

1 

«»« 

"■1:1 

ta,MBM 

pstiii 

li>,inoo 

""V.OMW 

una 

5,490  ei 

.,J!i 

1,«81  tH 

l»18 

1,18a  ea 

e.MS4s 

■l.TTS«I 

LIMM 

16,01T  M 

T06  88 

He... 

93»K 

"-- 

(on.. 

8,B0»M 

8.109  M 

i.«8CM 

iuti 

is,Mae» 

PUBLIC   INSTEUCTION. 


FINANCIAL  REPORT— Rkcbiiptb,—Coiitwukd 


-i 

1 

h 

COUNTIES. 

5 

1 

■"1 

% 

a 

s 

9 

* 

^ 

I 

i 

^ 

SoplDeDUrT. 

MW 

M4  «t 

7  IB 

ToUl 

tSit.UHi 

|82g,2«l2 

ttK,»W  DI 

tM.IHW 

tM.iiiwoa 

ABSTRACT  OF  INSPECTORS'  RBPORTB. 


FINANCIAL  REPORT— Hbckipt8,—Continc  ED. 


COUNTIES. 

1 

1 

5 

1 

g 

1 
1 

3 

Si 

fii 

|i,in»7 

H,18«BS 

lii 

III 

16,144  BT 

ewi; 

8511! 

•« 

«80oa 

•■Si,' 

l.BiSOI 

11 

«;4W  61 
I0^S6I  M 

'raw 

IT.BM  Tfl 

j;as 

Mil 
VMTJ 

Ss 

i.m88 

86!fl 

i!l84  711 
B0fl!« 

i;ai«M 

iM;m  ?S 

1.018  W 

■Sli! 

41, til  X 
MO  00 

»8.»04H 

to.imw 

6.04T4* 
!0!H»S 

KleiB  00 
io!84i  n 

«T8«8 

11.148  flS 
7M  81 

lis 

8,881  W 
1.684  14 

"si 

i.ms  1$ 

ss 

S.eM48 
SMST 

<.»WT4 

'Sis 

T«1S 

100  eo 

10,689  « 

i.wi  1 

42  Tl 

i[9  8a 

281  M 

SOB  a 

8«il( 
«B0« 

;4eTfli 

Tt0  4fl 
J,0I7  «1 

i.iM  le 

1   I^NIO 

<i,4se« 

4,44»M 
8«:«»  24 

iSV, 

l«,8Ae£0 

«,o«6  as 

B,I8BSB 
8.T49  61 

If 
■'«S 

6S,618  <« 

l.!W)» 
'  81  X 

*::::::::::;;:;;;:;;:::::: 

MM 

t^M  60 
4.868  « 

4,108  M 

16|Kft  01 

iImt  «1 

8.818  81 

SS9  ST 
UK 

SI8« 

l,OMii 

ABSTBAOT  OF  INSPECTORS'  BEP0RT6. 


FINANCIAL  REPORT— EXPKMDITOBEB. 


COISTIKP. 

1 
1 

pi 
III 

1 

il 

i 

4M00 

!:SS 

I4,5I«  T* 

It'.fiM  1! 

1M*7 
«T«1 
RHOm 
T,07IfiB 

mow 

ill 

i'i!S« 

f*,0I8» 
1«,«6»0 

l^MOOC 

•is 

I'ii 
'•Is 

1,100  M 

Ml  « 

1I,»I0  11 

la.om  w 

SMOtI 

ia.6«s« 
ftwoo 

SI  201  «ft 

!;«» M 

5,6*180 

io,ses  M 

1 0,140  IS 
4,03S» 
10,647  84 

i<,a6i  ;4 

i8.408  BT 

aais^o  44 

l!lM  »\ 
83,488  M 

i«,«a»  1H 

0,806  00 

i,8ai  61 

a.78TW 
«4  00 

1,648  m 

:!; 

ssiiie  i< 
s.isass 

8,421* 
14.S48  68 

ji»,m64 

';'s» 

43^  as 

'S88  44 

48.796  » 
9,10SM 

so  48 

4,»!4>t 

Ill 

88S40 

io,«oi  ss 
"  "fl'iia'on 

3;i40  0S 
1,804  40 

T;eofi4» 
i,o;8  eo 

umbi 
ajm  01 

'Si 
iS 

tm  » 
t^ooao' 

4Sb!| 
04  ol 

IS-BW  11 

6,flW4« 

7.6e0  8I 

886  41 

t.s«sio 

OSMIfl 

161688  15 

JMTC 

*S:iglw 

n\m  47 

S4,880«6 

'■Si; 

!0,S!« 

4,tT§  81 
MOM 

IMIK 

S»iS 

f-KS 

16,178  to 

t;?«« 

PUBUC  IHBTSUCTION. 


FINANCIAL  REPORT— BxPBUDtTUBKS.—CoMTiBtJEi 


B 


Shi>WMH  .'.'.' 

BL  aiii-. 

St.  Jmeph 

W»nie 

Weiford. 

Bopplementu? 

To(bI 


i8,m 

4,009 
B,«Mie 


6J«    - 


SECOND   ANNUAL   REPORT 

OF     THE 

CRETARY  OF  STATE 

dp     TUB 

STATE    OF    MICHIGAN, 

Relatido  to  the  Rboibtry  and  Return  of 

raS,  MARRIAGES  AND  DEATHS, 

FKOI  IPBUi  Sth  TO  DECKIBEB  Hit,  IMS,   ISCLCBITE. 


BT  AUTHORITY. 


LANSING : 
,  OEOBOB  jb  CO.,  PRIHTEB8  TO  THE  BTATE. 


PREFACE. 


;tate  department,  Michigan. 

Secketaky's  Office,        ) 
Lansing,  December  31,  1869. ) 

is  Exceileney  Henry  P.  Baldwin, 

Goveimor  of  Michigan: 
— I  have  the  honor  herewith   to   submit  the 
I  Annual  Report  from  this   Department,  of 
i,  Marriages,  and  Deaths. 
B  report  is  for  only  a  fractional  part  of  the  year 
—from  April  5th  to  December  3l8t — in  accord- 
ffith  the  amended  law  of  last  winter, 
reafter,  the  year  included  in  these  reports,  will 
)ecember  Slet,  instead  of  the  first  Monday  of 
,  aa  under  the  former  law. 
J  value  of  these  returns,  if  correctly  made,  and 
tatistics  compiled  iram   them,  can  hardly  be 
stimated,  and  no  labor  has  been  spared  by  this 
rtraent  to  attain  the  end  contemplated  by  the 

8  gratifying  to  be  able  to  compliment  most  of 
ifficials  whose  duty  it  is  to  collect  and  return 
equired  information,  upon  the  accuracy  and 
ptness  with  which  their  work  has  been  done. 


COxND  REGISTRATION  REPORT. 


)M  APML  6,  TO  DECEMBER  81,  1868,  INCLUSIVE. 


proBent  Report,  comprisiiig  lees  than  three>foarths  of  a 
anDot  be  made  a  full  basis  of  comparison  with  the 
tof  the  prerlons  year,  yet  it  presents  many  items  of  in- 
showing  that  Michigan  possesses  a  salubrious  climate, 
ive  and  hardy  population,  and  that  these  focts  are 
iated  by  constantly  increasing  immigration, 
items  contained  in  the  following  tables  are  gathered 
large  area  of  territory  by  the  numerous  officers  desig- 
by  the  law  to  perform  the  duty,  and  the  collection  and 
of  the  nuraerouB  facts  called  for,  is  a  work  that  experi- 
id  the  utmost  care  can  alone  render  perfect  The  fre- 
change  of  supervisors,  asseeeors  and  county  clerks  will 
,  donbtless,  be  a  hindering  cause  in  the  desired  perfec- 
id  reliability  of  these  reports.  This  can  he  overcome, 
easure,  by  an  earnest  effort  and  willing  cooperation  of 
rho  are  called  upon  to  execute  the  law. 
careful  coUection  and  transcription  of  all  the  material 
s  of  cardinal  importance ;  without  this  the  aggregate 
will  be  materially  defective  and  uncertain.  As  years 
ine,  and  the  experience  of  the  past  furnishes  a  guide  to 
r  excellence,  we  trust  this  Beport  may  become  a  com- 
im  of  valuable  information,  useful  to  the  whole  country, 
pecially  so  to  the  Peninsular  State. 
whole  number  of  names  returned  by  the  several  County 
I,  as  registered  for  the  period  from  April  5,  to  December 


6  BECOKD   REQIBTBATION   REPOBT. 

31,  1868,  ioclusiTe,  waa  thirty-six  thousand  three  1 
and  seventy-seven  (36,377),  viz: 

Nineteen  thousand  one  hundred  and  seventy-one  i 
children  were  bom,  (excluding  still-births,)  of  wl 
thonsand  one  hundred  and  thirty-three  (10,133)  wer 
nine  thousand  and  three  (0,003)  were  females,  and  th 
(35)  sex  not  given,  showing  nearly  as  many  for  a  pei 
than  nine  months  as  were  returned  for  the  entire  ] 
year- 
Ten  thousand  nine  hundred  and  seventy  (10,970) 
or  five  thousand  four  hundred  and  eighty-five  (5,485) 
were  married. 

The  whole  number  of  deaths  returned  was  six  tl 
three  hundred  and  twenty-six  (6,336.) 
The  excess  of  births  over  deaths  was  12,845. 

DELINQUENT. 

No  returns  Jiavc  been  received  from  Cliippewa,  De 
weeuaw,  Mackinaw  and  Manitou  counties.  The  towi 
Pentwater,  in  Oceana  county;  Ossineke,  in  Alpena;  a 
bclla  and  Broomfield,  in  Isabella,  were  not  included 
returns  from  their  respective  counties.  The  third  and 
wards  of  the  city  of  Ann  Arbor  were  received  too 
compilation  in  this  Report  The  counties  of  Alcona, 
Charlevoix,  Osceola  and  Wexford  were  organized  un 
acts  of  the  last  legislative  session.  Their  returns  are  ii 
with  those  of  the  counties  to  which  they  had  formei 
attached. 

The  period  of  time  comprised  in  the  present  report 
fractional  part  of  the  year  1868,  the  returns  to  this  ofl 
braced  the  statistics  of  births,  marriages,  and  deathi 
occurred  both  prior  and  subsequent  to  the  time  speci 
law.  The  work  of  compilation  and  classification  wi 
largely  increased :  19,171  births  were  compiled,  and 
jected;  5,485  marriages  were  compiled,  and  1,420  n 
6,326  deaths  were  compiled,  and  197  rejected,  for  the 
above  stated. 


BIRTHS. 


the  10,171  children  born  alive,  10,133  were  mslea,  9,003 
females,  and  35  sex  not  given.  The  parents  of  10,010 
jen  were  bom  in  the  United  States;  the  parents  of  6,527 
[ren  were  bom  in  foreign  countries ;  848  children  were 
of  Amencan  fathers  and  foreign  mothers ;  1,394  children 
bom  of  foreign  fathers  and  American  mothers;  and  the 
rity  of  the  parents  of  392  children  was  not  returned. 
''rican  and  Indian. — One  hundred  and  fifty-two  children 
nalcs  and  70  females)  were  bom  of  African  parents,  and 
hildren  (45  males  and  40  females)  were  bom  of  Indian 
Qts. 

oitis. — There  were  bom  310  pairs  of  twins — 420  children — 
hich  219  were  males,  and  301  were  femalea 
'ipUts. — Three  sets  of  triplets  were  bom,  1  in  Clinton 
itj,  and  3  in  Wayne  county — 9  children — 4  boys  and  5 

legUijnate. — One  hnndred  and  four  children — 63  males 
41  females — were  rctiimed  aa  illegitimate. 
iU-born. — Forty-sii  still-births  are  reported — 27  males,  17 
Jea,  and  2  sex  not  given.  They  are  not  used  in  the  tables 
lis  report,  except  for  classification.  But  27  still-births 
:  retnmed  for  the  first  report,  being  a  gain  of  19  for  this, 
it  IB  evident  that  the  return  of  still-births  is  incomplete, 
eachusetts,  in  1867,  retnmed  1,007  still-births  to  35,062 
ig  births. 


8  SECOND   BEQISTBATIOK   BEPOBT. 

Betnms  of  Still-births  made  to  this  office  for  the 
from  April  5,  to  December  31, 1868,  inclnsive : 

STILL   BIRTHS. 


Calfaonn 

Houghton  . . 

Ingham 

Ionia 

Kalamazoo.. 

Kent 

Marquette . . . 

Monroe 

Shiawassee.. 
St  Clair.... 
St.  Joseph.. 
Van  Buren . . 
Washtenaw . . 
Wayne 

Totals 


H&1«. 

FemtlM. 

SuDOt 

GlTeo. 

.. 

2 

-- 

10 

— 

— 

— 

37 

1 

7 

% 

Msee — Five  American,  1  Ir 
a  macliiiiiBt.  Total,  6  pai 
and  Traverse — Font  Ameri 
sh  mother.  Of  the  father 
r.  Total,  6  paifB,  or  10  ch 
ladaU — All  of  American 
rs,  1  artist,  and  1  laborer. 
ttffhton — One  American,  1 
e  driTer,  the  other  a  farmer. 
rott — One  English,  1  Gei 
,  1  laborer. 

ham — Five  American,  1  . 
e  fathers,  4  are  farmers,  1 1 
,  7  pairs,  or  14  children. 
ia — Three  American,  1  I 
;r,  1  Scotch  father  and  An 
rmers,  1  blacksmith,  1  mil 
■s,  or  10  children. 
bella — One  pair,  Canadian  j 
iaon — Two  American,  1  G< 
sh  mother.    Three  fathers  i 
,  i  pairs,  or  8  children. 
lamazoo — Two  Americans  a 
rmers.    Total,  3  pairs,  or  t 
vt — Two  Americans,  3  Can 
Canadian  mother.    Total,  5 
9eer — One  American,  3  Cai 
own.    Four  fathers  are  foi 
■8,  or  10  children. 
■ianaw — One  American,  1  < 
er.    The  fathers  are  farm 

tawee — Three  American,  1 
r  and  English  mother,  1  na 


12  SECOND   BEGISTSATION   REPOET. 

are  f&rmers,  2  laborers,  and  1  machinist.  Total,  7  pain 
children. 

Livingston — Two  Americans  and  %  Qennau&  The 
are  farmers.    Total,  4  pairs,  or  8  children. 

Macomb — Three  Americans  and  1  German.  Three 
are  farmers  and  1  a  brewer.    Total,  4  pairs,  or  8  cbildr 

Manistee — One  pair,  French  father  and  American  i 
The  father  is  a  laborer. 

Marquette — One  pair,  American  parentB,and  father  a! 

Mason — One  American  and  1  American  father  and  ( 
mother.    Fathers  are  farmers.    Total,  3  pairs,  or  i  chil 

Mecosta — One  pair,  American  fiither  and  French  i 
Father  is  a  former. 

Monroe — Six  American  and  4  German.  Eight  fath 
farmers,  1  shoemaker,  and  1  a  bntcher.  Total,  10  pair 
children. 

Muskegon — One  pair,  English  parents;  father  a  mas 
farmer. 

Newaygo — One  pair,  Canadian  parents;  father  a  bnt 

Oakland — Three  American,  1  Isle  of  Man,  1  En, 
EngUsh  father  and  American  mother,  1  English  mother 
ity  of  father  not  given.  Fire  fatliers  are  farmers,  1  in 
laborer.    Total,  7  pairs,  or  14  children. 

Oceana — One  American,  1  pair  illegitimate  twins.  At 
mother.  One  father,  mechanic ;  nativity  and  occupa 
the  other  not  given.    Total,  3  pairs,  or  4  children. 

Ottawa — Two  American,  4  Hollander,  1  Scotch,  1 
Two  fathers  are  farmers,  4  laborers,  1  carpenter,  and 
chant.    Total,  8  pairs,  or  16  children. 

Saginaw — One  American,  1  Canadian,  1  German,  1 A 
1  American  father  and  Canadian  mother,  1  Irish  fdXt 
Canadian  mother.  Of  the  fathers,  3  are  farmers,  1  pa 
lumberman,  and  1  blacksmith.    Total,  6  pairs,  or  12  cl 

Sanilac — One  American,  3  Canadian.  Three  fath 
farmers,  and  1  a  laborer.    Total,  4  pairs,  or  8  children. 


BXCOND   BEaiSTRAIIOX    REPOBT. 


3.  One  boy  and  two  girls,  born  in  St  JohnB,  Clinton 
Jane  10, 1868.    Parents  Irish,  and  father  a  ehoemake: 

IIXBOITIIIATB  CHILDREN. 

AnalggM,  by  Counties,  of  the  birth-places  of  the  Pc 
lUegilimate  Children,  according  to  the  returns 

Allegan — Six  children;  3  Amencau,  1  Smes  fat 
German  mother,  1  American  mother,  1  nativity  of 
not  given. 

Barry — Two  children ;  the  parents  of  both  are  An 

Berrien — Three  children ;  2  American  mothers  and 
dian  mother.     Nativity  of  fathers  not  given. 

Branch — Four  children  ;  3  American  parents,  and  : 
can  mothers. 

Calhoun — Four  children ;  1  American,  2  American 
1  African  mother.  Nativity  of  the  fathers  not  given 
of  the  children  were  born  at  the  county  poor-house. 

Cass — Three  children ;  2  African  mothers,  1  na 
mother  not  given.    Nativity  of  fathers  not  returned. 

Clinton — One  child ;  American. 

Emmet — Seven  children;  6  Indian  parents,  1  A 
father  and  Indian  mother. 

Genesee — Two  children ;  both  of  American  moth( 
tivity  of  fathers  not  returned. 

Gratiot — Two  children ;  1  American  mother,  1  m 
Nativity  of  fathers  not  returned. 

Ingham — One  child ;  American  parents. 

Ionia — Two  children  ;  1  American  mother,  and  1 
of  neither  parent  given. 

Jackson — Five  children ;  3  American,  1  Irish  fal 
American  mother,  1  German  mother. 

Kalamazoo — One  child ;  American  parents. 

Kent — One  child;  American  mother.  Nativity  o 
not  returneti. 


SECOND   BBai8TRA.TIUN    BEPOBT. 


TABLE  I. 
BIRTHS  bs  Oounties—PropcrtiM  of  MaUt  to  Femal 


Sent 


T5.I8 
51.78 


M.IS 


SECOND  BEOISTEATION  REPOBT. 


TABLE  II.— BIRTHS. 

BXBIBITIlfG  the  Sez,  eondition,  [at  tain  or  mgiUraate).  and 
of  Children  born  in  the  tnercU  Countiet,  during  the  period  j 
6th  to  December  Slit,  1868,  indutitx. 


1 

1 
1 

'" 

COUHTIKS 

i 

i 

i 

Twin.,  im^'mt 

1 
1 

! 

S 

S 

i 

i 

1 

1 

A]tegw.... 

«4 

ax 

£9S 

^ 

8 

8 

, 

»« 

Ill 

Alpsns 

i( 

M 

7 

18 

Anlrim.... 

S9 
SS9 

IBS 

II 

KM 

48 

Bmxtj 

1 

8 

"J 

B«r 

210 

118 

OT 

5 

.... 

S9 

144 

Beirlea.... 

5W 

m 

S68 

■1 

9 

T 

2 

818 

118 

BlMClL.... 

asa 

1S1 

, 

3 

4 

SOS 

» 

OUwDn... 

B» 

soo 

iS8 

1 

10 

8 

4 

108 

M 

CM. 

SST 

1ST 

1«8 

1 

8 

9 

1 

!SI 

IS 

ChMlevoli. 

88 

18 

1 

1 

18 

li 

Chaboirgui 

i 

Clinton.... 

4SS 

m 

SO! 

io 

J 

.... 

MS 

Emton 

8M 

IDS 

IW 

1 

s 

8 

844 

10 

EmmeL.... 

40 
DM 

M 

!«0 

* 

; 

88 
8(« 

M 

a«ne«c«.... 

9 

T 

OwndTmv. 

IM 

M 

M 

• 

« 

BK 

3> 

OnUot.... 

IBS 

IW 

81 

1 

1 

148 

11 

HDbdil*... 

«6 

Ml 

WT 

4 

t 

848 

ss 

Hooghton.. 

UO 

184 

IM 

8 

1 

.... 

IT 

814 

Hqpon 

in 

89 

T4 

1 

S 

11 

18C 

I=,tan..... 

UB 

888 

UK 

9 

G 

1 

8U 

48 

lonto. 

m 

S« 

m 

8 

< 

4 

1 

«n 

•D 

IMOO 

« 

la 

SI 

BS 

• 

I-beUi.... 

1 

1 

JMkWD.._. 

4TS 

w 

M« 

G 

8 

B 

8H 

M 

KikmuoD. 

m 

Ml 

314 

1 

S 

1 

Sll 

Kent 

tn 

BTB 

818 

1 

8 

T 

.... 

1 

m 

Wt 

t*P~r 

m 

IBT 

m 

...J 

4 

« 

1 

151 

BT 

SECOND   BEGI5TSATI0N    EEPOBT. 


TABLE  III.— BIRTHS, 


MONTHS. 

COUNTIES, 

1 

1 

1 

1 

■< 

1 

ss 

Allen 

i 

w 
» 

38 
4T 

8 

87 
48 

c 

!T 
M 

CI 

M 

4* 

I 

80 

! 

M 

81 

S6 

M 
48 

8 

4> 

4T 

» 

ae 
-s 

48 

u 

SO 

w 

c 

u 

41 

00 

as 
cs 

TO 

S 

86 
« 

W 

18 
81 

tw 

81 

«1 
Mi 

« 
41 
M 

48 

48 

4i 

IT 
SI 
11 
SR 

m 

»B 
tl 
SO 

08 
48 

87 
St 

48 

1* 
M 
81 

I 

00 
88 

4« 

SI 

48 
81 

48 

9 
88 

» 

48 

U 

1 

a» 
so 

AlpBD. 

ChMiflTOll 

Chebojs.n 

HnrOD 

jKkWD 

Kent 

M^RPIIA^GES. 


le  number  of  marriages  from  April  5  to  December  31, 

,  was  5,485,  or  10,970  persons  married.    Three  thousand 

:  hundred  and  forty-one  couples  were  bom  in  the  United 

s ;  1,022  couples  were  born  in  Tarious  Foreign  countries ; 

eoDplea  were  American  male,  and  Foreign  female ;   596 

les  were  Foreign  male,  and  American  female ;  the  nativ- 

F  202  couples  was  not  stated  in  the  returns. 

rty-two  African  and  25  Indian  couples  were  married. 

ro  thousand  uine  hundred,  and   nineteen  persons  were 

led,  under  21  years  of  age,  as  follows : 

ro  hundred  and  seventeen  males,  aged  20 ;  105  males,  aged 

37  males,  aged  18;  and  5  males,  aged  17 — total,  364. 

ve  hundred  and  thirty-eight  females,  aged  20;  589  fe- 

8,  aged  19;  631  females,  aged  18;  398  females,  aged  17; 

females,  aged  16  ;  58  females,  aged  15 ;  8  females,  aged  14; 

i  females,  aged  13 — total,  2,556. 

le  largest  number  of  persons  (4,160)  were  married  be- 

Q  the  ages  of  20  and  25;   the  second  greater  number 

!8)  between  the  ageS  of  25  and  30 ;  and  2,163  were  married 

;r  20  years  of  age.    Upon  mature  consideration — it  is 

to  infer — two  veterans  married  after  passing  the  ago  of 

ty  years. 

lie  greatest  monthly  return  of  marriages  was  for  October 

18 ;  the  least  number  was  for  December — 524. 

be  number  of  marriages  for  each  quarter,  is  as  follows : 


30  SECOND    BE0I8TSA.TI0N    BEPOBT. 

Qnsrter  ending  Jane,  1868 


'•  '•       December,  1868 

Date  of  marriage  not  stated _ 

The  following  analysis,  by  cotintieB,  of  nnmerons 
exhibits  disparity  of  ages  in  some  pariJes,  yonthfn] 
many,  mature  consideration  in  others,  and  a  high  • 
of  matrimonial  alliances  by  all : 

Antrim — Man  aged  61,  married  to  woman  aged  8t 

Barry — Man  78,  woman  66. 

Berrien — Man  74,  woman  23. 

Branch — Man  74,  woman  75. 

Cass — Man  74,  woman  53. 

^a/o«— Boy  18,  girl  16 ;  boy  17,  giri  16 ;  boy  18, 

Emmet — Boy  18,  giri  16,  both  Indians;  Indian 
half-bieed  girl,  aged  13. 

Genesee — Man  27,  girl  15. 

Grand  Traverse — Man  46,  girl  18 ;  man  36,  girl 
50,  girl  20. 

Oratiot — Man  63,  woman  35;  boy  1^,  girl  15. 

Houghton — Man  32,  girl  15 ;  man  21,  girl  15 ;  lat 
13. 

Ingham — Man  74,  woman  68 ;  man  55,  woman  20. 

Ionia — Man  46,  girl  17. 

Isabella — Man  73,  woman  49 ;   Indian  80,  sqnaw  c 

Jackson — Man  31,  girl  14. 

Kalamazoo — Man  75,  woman  67 ;  man  75,  woman 
73,  woman  50. 

ieni— Boy  18,  giri  10. 

Lapeer — Boy  17,  girl  17. 

Lenawee — Man  76,  woman  62 :  man  80,  woman  71 

Mac07nb — Man  50,  woman  20. 

Mason — Boy  18,  girl  15. 

Monroe— 'M&a  68,  woman  25. 

Oltaica — Man  38.  woman  60. 


SECOND    REaiSTBA.TIOK    BBPOBT. 


TABLE  ir.-HARRIAGES. 


All«8»" 

A3pen« 

Antrim 

Berrien 

BiWiA 

CWboDS 

CbAojgux.... 

CUnlOB 

Bmme. 

Oenteee 

Qd.  TnTeree.. 

anOot 

IllUedile 

Bonghton 

log!""' 

loico 

jKkKOl 

Kitaouoo.-.. 

l*P«er 

.„,... 

t 

1 

S 

i 

1 

1 

1 

1 

.8 

« 

1 

!» 

.8 

'" 

IS 

, 

18 

11 

Id 

It 

11 

10 

11 

1> 

11 

ID 

11 

> 

8 

81 

ss 

a 

88 

M 

81 

SB 

18 

IB 

sa 

17 

m 

13 

ta 

SI 

n 

» 

i* 

17 

10 

17 

i« 

17 

10 

S 

.« 

14 

* 

11 

IS 

» 

11 

17 

18 

13 

" 

■  0 

" 

IS 

It 

" 

'! 

'' 

5 

■; 

" 

■^ 

8 

1 

so 

1 

18 
* 

"i 

1 

SO 

1 

B 

J^ 

IB 

SI 

„ 

10 

IS 

„ 

IS 

17 

11 

IS 

IS 

n 

sc 

SI 

18 

IS 

15 

M 

S4 

7 

IB 

« 

" 

KARRI  A0B8. 


TABLE    II-^ONTINUED. 


MOHTEl. 

IBS. 

1 

J_ 

1 

1 

1 

■ 

1 

i 

1 

1 

j 

s 

« 

a 

SO 

on.... 

18 

■' 

.' 

13 

8 

te 

";; 

\ 

,: 

• 

4S 

li 

J 

7 

w 

.... 
* 

s 

C 

' 

41 

JD.... 

IS 

18 

Si 
IS 

.... 

14S 

or 

ISO 

ST 

2! 

IS 

i« 

i8 

« 

85 

m 

1, 

M 

m 

18 

» 

iw 

n 

«6 

« 

s< 

T» 

eo 

s 

CM 

M 

" 

*fn 

«83 

WS 

n. 

MS 

Ml 

ittt 

s 

HSS 

i  II 


1 

s 

i 

SECOND  BE018THATI0N 
■luioiiinn   1       1      :      1 

BBPOHT 

09*.O 

■08  01  01 

;  ■" 

""     i     : 

■aioioi 

" " "  - 

'<UO|<f» 

" 

:    * 

" " "  * 

■w-nw 

-  " 

" " "  ■ 

09  dM 

" 

■ffllolOB 

• 

■    "     ;■»-'-" 

00  «» 

■SfOIW 

""    i'-^s*- 

■»"iee 

S--SSSSSS 

■mmw 

S-«S2«2aS 

■(wnw 

S»'=S83SS!; 

■Bstnw 

ssse:.^|SSs 

■JlOOWJSpoQ 

a  '  -  s  5  s  s 

«    3 

£ 

■nnoitria 

" 

iTT  - 

S---. -»«-.£ 

'Bi«sr»»iv 

os^eoj;-'*"'* 

■o^oj 

»g«,jgg,.     : 

■DWIMOIV 

8    " 

-n 

«  1  S  S  ! 

■froaoo  -ON 

*  " 

^o  o"r 

! 

ii 

ii 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

8BC0ND  BBQI8TBATI0N   BEPOBl. 


1 

s 

1 

■uiuHUna 

" 

«        _            ;        - 

08 '■M) 

• 

wnsi 

• 

•     i 

■MOIOI 

■oi<n» 

;   ■ 

'E9  d  (W 

' 

1  " 

"* 

:     :    " 

Moim 

\   "     i  * 

" 

■MOJOS 

"     •     1  "   '^   " 

"       "           ■        ' 

■MO)  » 

"  "     ;  ■*     1  " 

"   *     i   " 

■St  •n  0* 

■iWOlM 

""     :«»-«-.     :E 

■)»<n  08 

«       ;«S«'--2«       iS 

i 

■OBOlffl 

=:»-'SSS25a"8 

1 

■Si  1)0! 

S*;:e33SSS''S 

B 

■iln9«l  wpqa 

S"'SSi;;!SZB''8 

1 

™^n 

"*""*""*     :-- 

■raifiosa  TUT 

-"---•■•ss-s 

ZiiZ 

.-.«««««-,-« 

■<a^oi 

-«''3-2"---fS 

■i>roi«OT7 

S--B9SBS3-S 

■•runoa  -os 

-^2-^--s  -8  s  s  a-fe---*- 

C0UNTIB8. 

i 

a 

1 

3 

! 

1 

g 

9) 

J 

; 

1 

1  s  S 

52 

ii 
It 


Cat 

s  r 

eg    ^  g 


If 

a  r  f 


8BC0SD  BBOISTBATIOK   EBPOBT. 

■Mns  "u  n,  iBiii.li        i    S    S    1    S   3    S 

,.,„,„™Syi      s  -  -  s  J  S  S 

-sd    pa.    KliH    moi. 

TlwXlswlMm               S     -     •■     S     a     S    S 

«KlK»pnq             -    -      :    5    -    a    S 
I»|JnH    "PR    IWOi 

1 

-a»»u|qi         j      j      1      1       1      i       i 

■lann'Oi       "      ■       ;       |    "       1      j 

■losiM 

,       i     .       i 

TiSMiTB 

£    "      1    S    ^    g    - 

■™,««« 

3    -    '    "    -    2    5 

n^nqaia 

S   "   -   s   •   »   S 

■nasisniN 

S    -     1   -    •    B    S 

'<(1II3«X 

S   '^    -    -^   -   S    S 

a 

si 
S 

1 

■nwMiqj, 

■a«Hacj 

■nwWM 

■n»«ja 

■     1     :     i     i     :     : 

■asMqara 

1     1     1    »     1    -    « 

■njaiBajN 

«      i      !    -    -    -    a 

■x.™*j, 

-    -     i    -    •    .    - 

i 

iiiiiii 

42  8BC0ND    RBOI8TBATION   REPORT. 

records  kept  in  different  States  during  the  war,  o 
jectfid  as  unfit  for  military  service  on  account  o 
which  proved  the  percentage  leas  in  Michigan  th 
other  State. 

Consumption,  occurring  aa  it  does,  with  marked 
throughout  the  civilized  world,  in  countries  d 
widely  in  all  their  physical  aspects,  and  the  inht 
classeB,  so  differently  employed,  and  enjoying  diffen 
of  social  and  mental  culture,  an  attempt  to  poir 
particular  law  of  nature  as  an  essential  and  comi 
would,  perhaps,  be  too  near  conjecture  to  receivi 
sanction,  so  numerous  and  varying  are  the  except 
particular  theory,  however  worthy  it  may  he  of  out 

The  whole  number  of  deaths  was  6,326 ;  of  w 
were  males,  2,915  were  females,  and  27  sex  not  state 
an  aggregate  of  76  greater  for  this  nine  months'  i 
for  tlie  whole  year  given  in  the  previous  report.  I 
crease  of  deaths  is  accounted  for  from  the  fact  tl 
of  Detroit,  the  county  of  Saginaw,  and  some  smallc 
and  parts  of  counties  not  returned  for  last  year's 
comprised  in  this. 

Of  the  0,326  persons  deceased,  5,009  were  of 
birth,  1,047  of  foreign  birth,  and  270  whose  ni 
unknown  or  not  returned. 

For  a  detailed  statemoht  of  nativities,  by  co 
Table  I  of  Deaths. 

As  shown  in  Table  II,  92  Africans,  or  colored  j 
ceased;  60  males  and  32  females — also,  43  Indians 
and  17  females. 

Table  II  also  specifics  the  number  of  AlHcans  ai 
who  deceased  in  each  county  during  the  period  e: 
this  report 


TABLE  II. 
DEATHS  of  Ftrion*  belonging  to  Bomi  othtr  Otan  WhiU. 


Ar«ic*N. 

Ikduh. 

COCNTIES. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

* 

I 
! 
i 

i 
18 

8 

S 
S 

to 

8 

li 

.... 

.... 

.... 

! 
.... 

1 
8 

, 

J 

i;z:;:;z::::z:z; 

" 

eo 

81 

M 

« 

« 

SECOND   BBQISTBATION   SBPOBT. 


TABLE  m. 

BHOWING,  hy  (hnntU»,  the  Age»  of  aS  Malet  abate  tilt  Age 
yeariAaeelwUng  mtmt3u  and  dayt,)  who  died  betaeen  Apr 
and  i)ecemier  31,  1868,  ineLuHee. 


M*i3e-AoM  Di  T«*M. 

COUNTIES. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

m 

III 

1 

1 

• 

... 

J 

; 

• 

a 

' 

J 

J 

, 

> 

J 

■ 

...  1  — 

' 

■ 

' 

i' 

1 

t 

■ 

J 

8 

■ 

I 

s 

; 

' 

1 

■ 

^ 

N«"r«o 

50  SECOND   BEOISTBATION   BEPOBT. 

The  following  Btatement  gives  detailed  particnlars  t 
the  oldest  maa  and  oldest  woman  in  each  county, 
during  the  period  of  time  comprised  in  this  report. 

The  two  oldestpersons  whose  deaths  were  chronicle 
James  Davis,  born  in  Vermont,  died  in  Newaygo 
aged  109  years,  H  months  and  3  days.  Catharine 
born  in  Ireland,  died  in  Marshall,  Calhoun  county, 
years  and  2  months. 

STATEMENT, 

Naming  the  Otdttt  Man  and  the  Oldest  Woman,  in  eath  C 
Died  betUMtn  April  S,  1868,  and  Seeentbtr  31,  1868,  ieitA  tJu 
Hon  when  returned,  JTah'rfly,  Bendenee  at  the  time  of  Beeea 
Death,  Came  of  Death,  arid  Aget  in  ye<ir»,  moniht  and  daj 
whole  number  of  Death*  retimed  from  each  County. 

Allegan — John  Thayer,  farmer,  bom  in  the  Stat 
York,  died  of  old  age  in  Casco,  Oct.  25,  1868,  aged 
Serapta  Haywood,  born  in  Vermont,  died  of  oh 
Cheshire,  August  14, 1868,  aged  82  years,  11  month 
days.    One  hundred  and  seventy-five  deaths  in  the  a 

Alpena — James  Millan,  laborer,  bom  in  Ireland 
consumption,  in  Alpena,  December  30,  1868,  aged 
Olivia  A.  Spratt,  bom  in  Maine,  died  of  child 
Alpena,  July  7,  1868,  aged  28  years.  Eleven  deat 
county. 

Ahtrim — Shabordone,  (Indian,)  born  in  Grand 
died  in  Milton,  April  25,  1868,  aged  70  years,  di. 
occupation  not  given.  Isabella  McBeath,  born  in 
died  of  old  age,  in  Helena,  September  4,  1868,  age<l 
and  11  mouths.    Nineteen  deaths  in  tlie  county. 

Barry — Richard  Young,  farmer,  bom  in  Pen 
died  in  Carleton,  of  old  age,  September  4, 1868,  aged 
Snsannah  Freeman,  bom  in  New  York,  died  of  d 
Thorn  A])ple,  September  12, 1868,  aged  82  years,  i 
and  24  days.    Eighty-six  deaths  in  the  county. 


53  SECOyO   BEQISTBATION    BEPOBT. 

July  13, 1868,  aged  89  years,  11  months,  and  34  i 
hundred  and  forty-seven  deaths  in  the  connty. 

Eaton — William  Lowell,  fanner,  bom  in  Vermo 
old  age,  in  Eaton  Rapids,  April  35,  1868,  aged  8 
months.  Beteey  Spaulding,  bom  in  New  Hampsh 
consumption,  in  Rosand,  May  4, 1868,  aged  75  years 
and  15  days.    One  hundred  and  fonr  deaths  in  the  c 

Emmet — John  Madjiwijiwe,  Indian  hunter,  died 
in  Little  Traverse,  December  18,  1868,  aged  90. 
Wabodjig,  Indian,  bom  in  Emmet  connty,  died  of 
Little  Traverse,  Sept.  30, 1868,  aged  71.    Twenty-fiv 
the  county — all  were  Indians. 

Genesee — John  Hart,  carpenter,  bom  in  Engla: 
pneumonia,  in  Mount  Morris,  Dec.  28,  1868,  aged 
months,  and  14  days.  Cynthia  Vincent,  bom  in  C 
died  of  consumption,  at  Flint,  April  28, 1868,  age< 
hundred  and  fifty-one  deaths  in  the  connty. 

Gband  Teavebse — Nelson  Andrew,  farmer,  boi 
den,  killed  by  fall  of  a  tree,  in  Grant,  December  30, 
40  years,  9  months,  and  3?  days.  Rosina  Swaney,  boi 
sylvania,  killed  by  threshing  machine,  in  Feninsii 
1868,aged  58  years,  1  month,  and  23  days.  Twenty- 
in  the  county. 

Gratiot — Michael  Eggan,  farmer,'born  in  Irelanc 
8, 1868,  aged  89  years,  2  months,  and  21  days;  cans 
and  residence,  uot  given.  Sophia  Parmer,  tailorec 
Massachusetts,  died  of  dropsy,  in  Arcada,  Sept.  17, 
83  years  and  3  months.    Thirty-eight  deaths  in  the 

Hillsdale — Barnard  Cass,  farmer,  bom  in  New  I 
died  of  old  age,  in  Woodbridgc,  August  1, 1868,  age 
5  months,  and  36  days.  Rose  A.  Wood,  bom  in  '. 
died  of  old  age,  in  Scipio,  June  22,  1868,  aged  9 
months,  and  13  days.  One  hundred  and  forty-nine 
the  countv. 


54  SECOND   BEOISTBATION    REPOBT. 

Kalamazoo— James  Goate,  farmer,  bom  in  £ug 
of  pneumonia,  in  PrMrie  Ronde,  April  S7, 1868,  age< 
and  7  monthB.  Mrs.  Moffatt,  born  in  Massacbusett 
old  age,  in  Kalamazoo,  Sept  32, 1868,  aged  91  yeara, 
and  1  day.  One  hundred  and  cighty-seTen  deat 
county. 

Kent — Jedediah  Riggs,  farmer,  bom  in  Conneetic 
old  age,  in  Ada,  July  1, 1868,  aged  91  yeara,  11  mi 
30  days.  Sally  Nicbole,  bora  in  Vermont,  died  of  c 
Algoma,  August  37, 1868,  age<l  85  years,  8  months,  a 
Two  hundred  and  thirty-three  deaths  in  the  connty. 

Lapeeb — James  P.  Pitcher,  farmer,  bom  in  Ven 
of  heart  disease,  in  Elba,  November,  1868,  aged 
Oatbarinc  Reardou,  bom  in  Ireland,  died  of  consul 
Dryden,  August  13,  1868,  aged  83  years.  Eighty-t 
in  the  county. 

Leeianaw — Adam  Hikard,  farmer,  bom  in  New  ' 
of  old  age,  in  CentreTille,  November,  1868,  aged 
Mndaliue  Stimel,  born  in  Germany,  died  of  old  age 
ham,  August  18,  1868,  nged  85  years.  Forty  deat 
county. 

Lenawee — Ezra  Tliomas,  fm-mer,  born  in  New  1 
of  old  age,  in  Fairfield,  October  18, 1868,  aged  04  yea 
Smead,  bom  in  Massarhusetts,  died  of  old  age,  in  A{ 
gust,  1868,  aged  04  years.  Two  hundred  and  hrclve 
the  connty, 

LiviKoaiON — Walter  Wright,  farmer,  bom  in  N 
died  of  old  age,  August  11, 1868,  in  TJnadilla,  aged 
Salona  Stone,  bom  in  New  York,  died  of  old  age,  in 
December  17,  1868,  aged  87  years,  6  months,  and 
Seventy-two  deaths  in  the  county. 

Macomb — Henry  Baker,  pauper,  bom  in  New  Yo; 
old  age,  in  Clinton,  April  16, 1868,  aged  90  years. 
Hamilton,  bom  in  Scotland,  died  of  old  age,  ia  Bi 


fi6  SECOND  BEQISTBATION   BBFOET. 

bom  in  Eagland,  died  of  old  age,  in  Whiteford,  Augnsi 
aged  88  years.    One  hundred  and  sixteen  deaths  in  t1 

MoNTCALU — Martin  Pierson,  joiner,  bom  in  New  1 
of  consumption,  in  Pierson,  Nov.  6,  1868,  aged  7t 
months,  and  23  days.  Sarah  Winchell,  bom  in  VerB 
of  old  age,  in  Sidney,  Sept.  21,  1868,  aged  88  yea 
deaths  in  the  county. 

UusEEOON — John  Squires,  farmer,  born  in  New  1 
of  typhoid  fever,  Oct  17, 1868,  aged  76  years,  4  mi 
3  days.  Martahable  Stevens,  bom  in  Connectiont,  d 
age,  in  Eggleston,  Sept.  28, 1868,  aged  86  years.  On< 
and  sixty-four  deaths  in  the  county, 

Newaygo — James  Davis,  laborer,  bom  in  Vera: 
of  old  age,  in  Ashland,  December  3,  1868,  aged  109 
months,  and  2  days.  Sophia  Sctanton,  bom  in  Ven 
of  heart  disease,  in  Big  Prairie,  July  2,  1868,  aged 
Forty  deaths  in  the  county. 

Oakland — John  T.  Wilcox,  farmer,  bom  ia  Eng 
of  dropsy,  in  Farmington,  July  12,  1868,  aged  8' 
months,  and  10  days.  Abigail  Stone,  bom  in  Yem 
of  old  age,  in  Commerce,  Dec  13,  1868,  aged  85  yt 
hundred  and  sixty-seven  deatlis  in  the  county. 

Oceana — Horace  S.  Pitcher,  farmer,  bom  in  Co 
died  of  dropsy,  in  Beuona,  October  3,  1868,  aged  6 
months,  and  18  days.  Margaret  Enapp,  housekeepc 
Canada,  died  of  old  age,  in  Shelby,  May  20, 1868,  age 
Forty-two  deaths  in  the  county. 

Ontonaook — William  Buck,  laborer,  bom  in  Ire 
at  Rockland,  of  diabetes,  May  21, 1866,  aged  48  yea 
Burns,  bom  in  Ireland,  died  of  asthma,  in  Bocklant 
9, 1868,  aged  70  years  and  7  months.  Fifteen  deat 
county. 

Ottawa — Orange  McClnre,  mason,  died  of  oh 
Wright,  December  26,  1868,  aged  86  years.    Nativ! 


DBATHB.  67 

d.  Susan  Farwell,  bom  in  Connecticut,  died  of  old  age, 
lUand,  Mich.,  Sept  17, 1868,  aged  88  years  and  11  months, 
landred  a.Qd  sixty-nine  deaths  in  the  county. 
3I1TAW — Curtis  Day,  carpenter,  bom  in  New  York,  died  of 
tery,  in  Chapin,  Sept  12,  1868,  aged  84  years  and  5 
fas.  Jenny  Carter,  bom  in  New  York,  died  of  old  age,  in 
1  Saginaw,  Aug.  25, 1868,  aged  89  years,  1  month,  and  8 

Two  hundred  and  fifty  deaths  in  tlie  county. 
NiLAC — Bobert  Booth,  fanner,  bom  in  Ireland,  killed  by 
car,  in  Washington,  Mich.,  Sept  30,  1868,  aged  67  years, 
aret  Donald,  bom  in  England,  died  of  old  age,  in  Marlett, 

16, 1668,  aged  87  years,  3  months,  and  16  days.  Forty 
IS  in  the  county. 

XAWASBEE — ^William  Kenney,  mechanic,  born  in  Conneo- 
,  died  of  paralysis,  in  Perry,  August  7,  1868,  aged  81 
.  Laura  Wheelock,  bom  in  Connecticut^  died  of  old  age, 
unnna,  Dec.  18,  1868,  aged  75  years.  One  hundred  and 
ty-one  deaths  in  the  county. 

.  Clair — Robert  Glassford,  farmer,  bom  in  the  United 
«,  died  of  old  age,  in  Muzzey,  Not,  35, 1868,  aged  83  years 
6  months.  Mary  Bullamy,  bom  in  England,  died  of  old 
in  the  city  of  St  Clair,  June  25, 1868,  aged  85  years  and 
lys.  One  hundred  and  ninety-four  deaths  in  the  county. 
.  Joseph — John  Schraman,  carpenter,  bom  in  Germany, 

of  mortification,  in  Sherman,  August  24,  1868,  aged  88 
I,  b  months,  and  11  days.  Mrs.  Blue,  born  in  PennsylYa- 
died  of  dropsy,  in  Park,  July  18, 1868,  aged  80  years.  One 
Ired  and  twenty-nine  deaths  in  the  county. 
jscOLA — Ira  Pratt,  farmer,  bom  in  New  York,  died  of 
imonia,  in  Juniata,  September  6,  1868,  aged  78  years,  10 
Uis,  and  26  days.    Keturah  A.  Clark,  bom  in  New  York, 

of  old  age,  in  county  poor-house.  May  20, 1868,  aged  85. 
nty-three  deaths  in  the  county. 


58  aacoND  BBGISTEATIOIC  repobt. 

Van  Burbn — William  Thompson,  farmer,  born 
ticnt^  died  of  consumption,  in  Pine  Orore,  May  22, 
93  years,  3  monthe,  and  2  days.  Debor^  Rhodes,  be 
necticut,  died  of  typhoid  fever,  in  Columbia,  Octobe 
aged  78  years.  One  hundred  and  thirtj'-two  dea 
county. 

Washtenaw — Pati-ick  Hagerty,  wheelwTight,  b< 
land,  died  of  old  age,  in  Lyndon,  May  17, 1868,  age 
Mary  Sherwood,  born  in  Ireland,  died  of  old  age,  ii 
October  31, 1868,  aged  86  years,  0  months,  and  SO 
hundred  and  seventy-four  deaths  in  the  county. 

Wayne — Richard  Benton,  farmer,  bom  in  Engla 
old  age,  in  Monguagon,  April  10, 1868,  aged  91  yei 
lotte  Charboney,  bom  in  Detroit,  died  of  dropsy, 
Dec.  4,  1868,  aged  95  years.  One  thousand  and 
deaths  in  the  county. 

Wexpokd — Thomaa  D.  Copley,  farmer,  bom  in  Mic 
of  disease  contracted  in  United  States  service,  in  We 
6, 1868,  aged  33  years.  Martha  Pratt,  birth-place  no 
died  a  suicide  from  insanity,  in  Wexford,  Nov.  26, 18 
years,  i  months,  and  1  day.    Seven  deaths  in  the  co\ 


8BC0ND  BBQIBTRATION  BEPOBT. 


■ 

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ssssssssg* 

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li 

SBCOXD  BEOIBTHATION  BEPOBT. 


TABLE  VIJ.— Ci 
BXHIBrnNO,  bg  Month,  by  Age  and  8n,  IA«  Begi^ered  2ft 


DBATHS. 

UOHtHI. 

Six. 

t 

■a 

1 

1 

3 

1 

4M 

481 

1 

1 

•88 

1 

i 

8t«t«..... 

RSU 

MIS 

SI 

esM 

Hilu 

Halei 

< 





, 

I 

.... 

1 

1 

FenulM... 

7 

IS 

1 

1 

1 

£ 

1 

J 

• 

' 

.... 

J 

t 

, 

2 

8 

J 

J 

Poulea... 

18 

.... 

n 

...: 

*■ 

1 

1 

« 

• 

Kile* 

1 

1 

8 

I 

i 

Femalea... 

li 

88 

I 

9 

1 

3 

8 

1 

Mile. 

1 

1 

1 

t 

S 

1 

1 

FeoulM... 

1 

IS 

1 

1 

1 

1 

• 

FSDUlM... 

J 

, 

....„ 

.... 

1 

FtBUiM... 

1 

1 

IblM 



! 

9 

.... 

1 

* 

1 

8 

P«o«Io... 

13 

41 

! 

■ 

! 

1 

1 

1 

Ihlw 

140 





S 

c 

19 

IS 

18 

H 

M 

P«m.I«... 

18 

in 

1 

i 

s 

S 

4 

i 

1 

^ 

I 

n 

... 

11 

« 

8 

a 

1 

e 

1 

41 

1 
11 

W 

It 

SECOND  BBaiSTBATlON  BEPOBT. 

TABLE  VII.— CAUSES  O 


DBATH8. 

Hoir 

8ix. 

1 

1 

i 

1 

i 

0 

1 
8 

1 

S 

i 

> 

1 

10 

8 
35 
SS 

s 

46 

110 

180 

60 

Fenui«... 

H>1« 

FeiMlw... 

Male* 

Feaudo*... 

«1 

» 

1 
1 

Femiae.... 

Htln 

FenwlM... 

17 

t 

SB 

310 

M»lM 

Tmntln... 

9 

.... 

7 

"t 

» 

1U1« 

" 

8 

s 

0 

Fmuae.... 

IUIe> 

FaulM  ... 

1. 

4B 

\ 

S 

1 

1 

1 

Its 

"'»" 

Hkln 

FsnulM... 

Fsnulee... 

• 

7 
8 

10 

T 

s 
t 

u 

■»■ 

Malee 

FemilBs... 

8 
8 

• 

t 

11 

SECOND   EEaiBTRATIOX   REPORT. 


TABLE  VII.— CAUSES  C 


DEATHS. 

HONTBa 

,„ 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

a 

g 

,£• 

1 

•< 

1 

'■'■ 

"V 

"7 

• 

• 

5 

IB 

...... 

S 

ss 

■ 

1 

* 

* 

FmdiO™  — 

■ 

• 

.... 

TO 

lot 

^ 

• 

* 

T 

Md« 

PenwlH  ... 

1 

J 

11 

FemalM... 

• 

10 

s 

f> 

1 

t 

Fanuaw-.. 

• 

10 

""'.' 

;;;; 

M«lef 

' 

* 

1 

' 

■ 

« 

I 

» 

8 

4 

B 

S 

FCDUlM... 

» 

.T 

Femilci... 

, 

PHABKTICAl.  ABRANOKUXRT,— CONTIliUBD. 


>8ES  of  DEATH. 

.„,. 

1 

s 

g 

B 

S 

S 

S 

3 

S 

3 

s 
s 

s 

9 

s 

2 

i 

1 

s 

j 

• 

• 

i 

1 

s 

.... 

' 

'' 

• 

« 

• 

' 

opiTrf. 

' 

■ 

■ 

w 

ID 

• 

• 

* 

..'. 

i 

( 

10 

a 

11 

1 

I 

1 

> 

• 

■ 

la 

1 

1 

' 

' 

1 

' 

1 

1 

1 

' 

.... 

s 

SI 

I 

■ 

' 

• 

' 

SECOND  BEQISTBATION  BEPOBT. 

TABLE  VII.— CAUSES  OI 


DEATHS. 

MOHTBl. 

Six. 

1 

B 

1 

i 

s 

1 

i 

1 

M 

1 

■™ 

11 

8J* 

Mttlei 

Fanale.... 
CntnowD.. 

* 

18 

10 

St 

88 
M 

,^.... 

to 

> 

W 

1 
18 

Femil 

H>]M 

3 

1 

1 

V 

' 

.... 

' 

s 
s 

""," 

FenulM... 

• 

.... 

,. 

1 

8 

i 

.... 

„ 

M 

' 

• 

^ 

Femil 

' 

8 

1 
1 

8 

1 

8 

1 

1 
1 

FonalM... 

» 

" 

Feoulra,.. 

1I«1«« 

Fcm>l«... 

t 

n 

88 

,^,».. 

■■■; 

" 

11 

i 

• 

' 

1 

1 

Feuulea... 

, 

lAKTIGAI.  ARKAMOEHEITT, — CoKTUICBD. 


B  or  DEATH. 

aiB 

i 

3 

3 

2 

£ 

3 

S 

3 

S 

s 

3 

S 

2 

2 

S 

e 

1 

1 
s 

j 

k».. 

• 

... 

.... 

tat 
m 

t 

Mtloo 

' 

1 

s 

■": 

^ 

' 

^ 

8 

t 

I 

' 

s 

1 

» 

s 

« 

:::: 

, 

^ 

■ 

; 

1 

^ 

1 

1 

.... 

6 

rDiMM 

...... 

.... 

■ 

.... 

itBC 

' 

Dfnue 

(8 

..... 

1 

' 

1 

I 

< 

1 

S 

1 
« 

-'■■■ 

1 
> 

1 

t 

• 

(Potr  F) 

1 

• 

6 

uBtlchlll 

» 

• 

.. 

SECOXD    REOISTRATION  BEPORT. 


TABLE  VII.— CAUSES  Of 


DBATHfl. 

UaNTBB. 

Six. 

1 

1 

1 

1 

i 

< 

S 

I 

i 

1 

- 

1 

■■■; 

HBl 

• 

, 



■ 

1 

> 

■ 

.... 

' 

■ 

' 

■ 

• 

FnoulM... 

n 

m 

• 

1 

1 

1 

: 

• 

FuDUlei... 
Miles 

18 

m 
as 

u 

1 

UalM 

Fanule.... 

Feiulea... 

10 

> 

T 

10 

> 

11 

IT 
IS 

< 
1 

14 

10 
t 

18 

' 

■ 

"; 

S 

> 

FenulM... 

,. 

„ 

' 

S 

F«m>1ca... 

" 

t 

' 

' 

' 

Mil*. 

Femilei... 

' 

■ 

' 

.... 

a 

^FHABETICAL   ARBAKOEIUNT, — CoKTIHDBD. 


DBE8  of  DKATH. 

Asia. 

e 

s 
s 

2 

s 

8 
S 

s 

s 

3 

s 

S 

s 

i 
1 

" 

■ 

rf« 

1 

• 

.... 

., 

UBlbrlllA. 

.. 

■ 

J 

■ 

1 

• 

' 

; 

1 

10 

■ 

I 

I 

9 
11 

8 

1 

■ 

' 

■ 

1 
t 

J 

I 

s 

I 

1 
i 

t 

■ 

.... 

riUnitU 

' 

■ 

■ 

> 

1 

78  SBCOND  SEai8IRA.TI0N  REPORT. 

TABLE  VII.— CAUSES  OF 


DBATH8. 

KOMTHB. 

Skz. 

1 

1 

! 

i 

1 

5 

i 

i 

1 

18 

I 

S8 

B 

1 

HkIm 

...... 

M 

M«lel 

""'„■ 

1 

i 

8 

.... 

' 

1 

1 

n 

SI 

It 
a 

M 

1» 
S 

• 

.... 

1 

■ 

■ 

• 

' 

, 

■ 

,. 

t 

8 

B 
8 

8 

1 
1 

* 

1 

8 

^ 

FenulM... 

,. 

„ 

1 

1 

FemilM... 

JW« 

FaiMlM... 
M«lc» 

ts 

8 

■ 

> 

1 
85 

Halw 

8 

a 

"V 

< 

• 

8 

* 

FemilM... 

■ 

.... 

> 

.... 

.... 
.... 

3 

1 

1 

; 

FenulH... 

" 

- 

' 

1 

• 

Penulec... 

, 

. 

S 

ii 

s 
s 

s 

8 

« 

4 

• 

1 

AoddaoL 

■Mktlan 

18 

1 

1 

8 

, 

Ilpoi 

' 

" 

aIHmuc 

" 

» 

8 

' 

' 

™ehDi««e. 

1 

78  BECOND   HEQISTBATIUN    BEFOBT. 

TABLE  Vn.— CAUSES  OF  1 


DK 

»T., 

l[0>nH>. 

S... 

1 

! 

P 

3 

i 

a 

i 

aa 

1 

t 

1 

- 

1 

s 

lUia 

19 
M 

M 

1 

i»6 

"'"■'■ 

IS 

10 

i 

; 

Hala 

Penuaee... 

40 

** 

.... 

8 

i 

■ 

.... 

8 

: 

9 

Fenale.... 

■ 

10 

1 

Femika... 

• 

w 

.... 

• 

Teaalf... 

• 

■ 

I 

» 

' 

M 

M 

11 

8T 

4i 

at 

61 
8 

88 

Famalea... 

Ht 

1 

U8 

PoDilra... 

JI.1M 

Fcrodu... 

10 

i 
M 

"iio" 

* 

T 

1 
1 

1 

T 
t 

18 
« 

1( 

IS 

' 

.... 

« 

80  8SC0ND  RSQI8TBATI0N  BEPOBT. 

The  following  table,  compiled  at  the  Agricalton 
Lansing,  from  obBerrations  made  at  that  Institntio 
inserted  in  the  report.  The  veather  being  an 
agent  in  connection  with  the  public  health,  it  is  ded 
similar  tables  from  other  localities  should  hereaft 
No  others  were  accessible  this  year. 

METEOROLOGICAL  TABLE 
8S0  WINQ  Mean  JhnpmUure  and  Bain-faO,  from  April  lit 
Sltl,  1868,  i  -'-'-- 


April 

May 

Jnne 

July 

Angnst 

September.. 

October 

NoTember.. 
December . . 


Mean  temperature 53°4f} 


4S°68 
68°46 
70<*33 


Total  rain-fall — in  inches  , 


Mean  temperature  for  conresponding  months  of 
53''92;  and  amonnt  of  rain-fall  for  those  months, 
inches. 


s% 


SECOND  REOI8IBATI0N  BEFOBT. 


The  following  table  ennmeratee  the  ten  caueea  pr 
highest  ratfi  of  mortality,  with  the  number  of  deati 
therefrom,  and  percentage  of  all  deaths  in    the 
April  5  to  December  31, 1868: 


CAUSES  OP  DEATB. 


Consumption 

Infantile 

Typhns  Fever 

Dysentery 

Pneumonia 

Diarrhcea 

Old  Age 

Itemittent  Fever. 

Cephalitis 

Gasoalty 


Conaumption — The  number  of  deaths  from  c 
jS  841,  or  13.31  per  cent,  of  the  whole  number  of  d« 
less  deaths  from  this  disease  than  were  retume< 
Four  hundred  and  twenty-four  males,  and  417 
nearly  equal  numbers  of  each  sex  died  of  this  disei 
ty-nine  died  from  consumption  under  5  years ;  9  bel 
10  years;  21  between  10  and  15  years;  73  between 
years;  211  between  SO  and  30  years;  125  between 
years;  101  between  40  and  50  years;  72  between 
years;  85  between  60  and  70  years;  40  between 
years;  10  over  80  years,  and  15  whose  ages  were 


TABLE  VIII.-OOCDPATIONS. 


vote  and  aterage  ag»»  of  a&  tsAow  ooeupationi  wtrt  rttitmtd,  c  _ 
tamd  flvm  April  5   to  DeotiriitT  31,  1868,  inehaite,  aboee  Ot  ag* 


OCCUPATION. 

•8 

A,«. 

Annno. 

Annce. 

1.4TS 

lie 

M 

H 

SS 

\a 

w 

4» 

T«6 
W 

w 

M,4M 
S.1W 
4^ 
1,B» 
t^lM 
*4M 
8.W» 
3,MB 
S,iM 

M,4M 

»,S1T 

ISO 

J,1B1 
119 
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SECOND   SEQISTBATION    BEPOBT. 


TABLE  VIII— Continued. 


OCCUPATION. 


TABLE    Vm— CoNTDfUKD. 


iDKtlire  DMdiuiIci  In  ahopt— <Coiitliin«d.) 

Bhoe  maken 

TtUon 

Wktchmlkn 

Iionm— no  tpedal  Mdes 

lAbottm. 

Jllncn. 

Ficton  Uboring  ibroad _ 

fio4t  itemrd 

Connctor 

DnTnuu 

Droren _ 

KnglDecrr 

LombaiiieD 

LombCT  iDflpectiir... 

Palent  rl^t  daler. 

Railroad  rapdactAi 

Railroad  repalrer»„ 

Soldlen 

Spttolalot 

Street  car  drlTH.... 

Tcamalm.. 

Whlto-waahera 

HcrchaDU,  flnandcn,  igeott,  *c 

Danken 


UM 


tS.M 
8T.8» 


SECOND  BE018TRATI0N   BBPORT. 
'waimoiUH 


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SECOND  BEQISTBATION  BEPOBT. 


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SECOND   REOIdTBATION    REPORT. 


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120  SECOND  REGISTRATION  REPORT. 


TABLE  IX— CoNTiinjKD. 


(a)  Congestive  Chills  and  Ague  indndes  18  casee  of  Intennittent  Fever. 

(b)  With  Remittent  Fever  are  dasaed  151  cases  returned  as  *^  Fever." 

(c)  All  continned  miasmatic  fevers  are  classed  under  Typhus  Fever. 
id)  Indndes  7  cases  returned  as  Spotted  Fever. 

(e)  With  Brain  Disease,  Ac,  are  classed  8  cases  of  Brain  Softening,  26  cases  of  Sob- 
stroke,  and  08  cases  of  Fits. 

(f)  Ten  cases  of  Hemorrhage  are  dassed  with  Heart  Disease,  Ac 

(ff)  "Causes  not  Classified," indudes  those  cases  reported  simply  as " Tnflsmiaa- 
tion,"  "Suddenly,"  "Colds,"  "Congestion,"  and  such  others  as  are  indeflolteiy 
stated,  or  returned  as  unknown. 


114 


SECOND  REGISTRATION  REPORT. 


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128  REGISTRATION  ACT. 

Secretary  of  State  for  the  year  eighteen  hundred  and  sixty- 
eighty  and  who  haye  not  received  compensation  therefor,  shall 
be  paid  for  the  same  at  the  rates  set  forth  in  the  preceding 
sections. 

Sec.  3.  This  act  shall  take  immediate  effect. 


INDEX. 


Page. 

Remarks  on  Registration 3-5 

Whole  number  of  Names  Registered 5-6 

Comities,  Cities,  Wards,  and  Towns  not  Returned 6 

BIRTHS. 

Geoeral  Statistics  Concerning V 7 

9till-births,  as  Returned  by  Ck>unties 8 

African  and  Indian 9 

Twins,  Birth  Places  of  Parents  of,  and  Occupation  of  Fathers...  10-18 
Triplets,     **  **  "  **  *•  **  "       ...  ia-14 

Illegitimate  Children,  Analysis  by  Counties  of  Birth  Places  of 

Parents 14-16 

For  Specified  Periods 16 

Percentage  of  Parents 16 

Proportion  of  Males  to  Females— Table  1 18-19 

Sex,  Condition,  and  Parentage— Table  II 30-1 

Month  of,  by  Counties— Table  III 23-8 

MARRIAGES. 

Number  of. 26 

In  Quarterly  Rates 26 

Analysis  of,  by  Counties 26-7 

NatiTities  and  Percentage  of- 27 

Percentage  of,  at  Certain  Periods  of  Life -       27 

Ages  of  Parties  Married 28 

Number  of,  in  which  Parties  were  other  than  White— Table  I- . .  29 

"by  Counties  and  Months— Table  II .  30-1 

NatiTities  and  Ages  of  Parties— Table  III 82-5 

Ages  of  Males  and  Females,  number  Married  under  Twenty-one, 

and  whole  number  of  Persons  Married— Table  IV 36-9 

CAUSES  OF  DEATH. 

^iencral  Remarks  Concerning 41-2 

Nativity  of  Persons  Deceased— Table  1 43-4 

17 


130  IKDBX. 

PlAB. 

Deaths  of  Persons  other  than  White— Table  11 4ft 

Ages  of  Males  above  Eighty  years— Table  III 46-7 

Females    "        "         "     —Table  IV 48-9 

Kame  of  oldest  Man  and  Woman  deceased  in  each  County,  Ac...    50-8 

Table  showing  Sex,  Age,  and  Percentage  from  all— Table  V 60 

'*         **       by  Counties,  the  Number,  Sex,  and  Age  of  Per- 
sons Deceased— Table  VI 60-8 

Alphabetical  Arrangement  of— Table  VII 64-79 

Meteorological  Table  for  Year 80 

Ten  Causes  producing  highest  rate  of  Mortality 8d^ 

Occupations  of  Persons  who  have  Died — ^Table  VIII 8M 

Classified  Arrangement  of— Table  IX 90-120 

Act  relative  to  Begintration _ 121-8 


COMPILATIOlSr 

Auditor   General 

ANNUAL      REPORTS 

or  THK 

RAILROAD  CORPORATIONS 
State    of     Michigan, 

FOlt  THE  YEAR  1808. 


BY  AUTHORITY. 


LANSING: 

W.  S.  GEORGE  ft  CO.,  PRINTERS  TO  THE  STATE. 

1869. 


REPORT. 


AuDiTOB  Gei^ebal's  Office,         ) 
LansUig^  Michigan^  December  SI,  1869.  j 

Hifi  Excellency  Henby  P.  Baldwin, 

Governor  of  the  State  of  Michigan : 

In  accordance  with  the  requirements  of  the  law  the  follow- 
ing compilation  of  the  Annual  Beports  of  the  Bailroad  Cor- 
porations organized  under  the  laws  of  this  State,  for  the  year 
ending  December  31,  1868,  is  herewith  respectfully  submitted. 

The  matter  contained  in  this  compilation  is  shown  by  the 
following 

INDEX  OF    contents. 

Paox. 

Table  A.  List  of  Bailroad  Corporations  to  which  blanks 
were  forwarded ;  those  from  which  reports  for 
the  year  ending  December  31st,  1868,  were  re- 
ceived; the  time  when  such  reports  were 
received v 

Table  B.  list  of  Bailway  Corporations  which  have 
filed  articles  of  association  as  required  by  Sec- 
tion 2,  of  Act  No.  82,  Laws  of  1855,  but  have 
neglected  to  make  the  Annual  Beport  required 
by  Section  32  of  said  Act vi 

Table  C.    The  Capital  Stock  and  the  amount  actually 

paid  in viii 

Table  D.    Amount  and  nature  of  its  indebtedness,  and 

the  amount  due  the  Corporation ix 

% 


IV  COMPILATIOK. 

Pa6B. 

Table  E.  The  amount  received  for  the  transportation 
of  passengers^  of  property,  of  mails,  and  from 
other  sources x 

Table  F.  The  amount  expended  for  the  purchase  of 
lands,  for  the  construction  of  the  road,  for  build- 
ings, and  for  engines  and  cars,  respectively xi 

Table  G.  The  amount  of  freight,  specifying  the  quan- 
tity in  tons,  of  the  products  of  the  forest,  of 
animals,  of  vegetable  food,  and  other  agricultu- 
ral products,  manufactures,  merchandise,  and 
other  articles xii 

Table  H.    The  amount  paid  for  repairs,  engines,  cars, 

buildings  and  salaries xiv 

Table  I.  The  number  of  engine  houses  and  shops,  of 
engines  and  cars,  and  their  character;  also, 
number  of  miles  run  by  passenger,  freight  and 
other  trains,  respectively x? 

Table  K.    The  number  of  men  employed xvi 

Table  L.    The  number  of  persons  injured  in  life  or  limb  xvii 

Table  M.  Capital  Stock,  &c.,  of  Street  Railway  Com- 
panies  116 

WILLIAM  HUMPHREY, 

Auditor  OeneraL 


BAILBOAD  OOMPAKIES. 


TABLE  A. 


Pau. 


Wmtir  RxcnvKD  at 

Auditor  Geh/b 

Officb. 


NAME    OF    COMPANY. 


3 

7 
11 


15 
19 
23 
27 
33 
37 
41 
47 


53 
57 
63 

67 

73 

77 

81 

85 

89 

95 

99 

103 

107 

111 


119 
121 
123 
125 
127 

129 
131 
133 


Feb'y  27,  1869. 
Feb'y  23,  1869. 
March  25, 1869. 

Not  Receiyed. 
Jan'y  19,  1869. 
Jan'y  11,  1869. 
Jan'y  21,  1869. 
Peb'y  23,  1869. 
Jan'y  30,  1869. 
March  3,  1869. 
Peb'y  27,  1869. 
Aug.  17,  1869. 
Not  Received. 
Not  Received. 
March  30, 1869. 
March  25,  1869. 
Jan'y  11,1869. 
Not  Received. 
May  15,  1869. 
July  6,  1869. 
July  6,  1869. 
Feb'y  23,  1869. 
Dec.  30,  1868. 
April  19,  1869. 
Jan'y  14,  1869. 
Jau'y  27,  1869. 
July  6,  1869. 
July  6,  1869. 
Jan'y   14,  1869. 


Jan'y  19,  1869. 

July  21,  1869. 

Jan'y  14,  1869. 

Jan'y  12,  1869. 

Jan'y  18,  1869. 
Not  Received. 

FeVy  3,  1869. 


Bay  City  and  East  Saginaw. 
Bay  DeNoquet  and  Marquette. 
Chicago,    Detroit  and    Canada    Orand 

Trunk  Junctit)n. 
Chicago  and  Northwestern^ 
Chicago  and  Michigan  Grand  Trunk. 
Detroit  and  Howell. 
Detroit,  Monroe  and  Toledo. 
Detroit  and  Milwaukee. 
Erie  and  Kalamazoo. 
Flint  and  Holly. 
Flint  and  Pere  Marquette. 
Grand  Rapids  and  Indiana. 
Grand  River  Valley. 
Grand  Trunk  of  Michigan. 
Hecla  and  Torch  Lake. 
Holly,  Wayne  and  Monroe. 
Howell  and  Lansing. 
Ionia  and  Lansing. 
Jackson,  Lansing  and  Saginaw 
Kalamazoo,  Allegan  and  Grand  Rapids. 
Kalamazoo  and  Schoolcraft. 
Marquette  and  Ontonagon. 
Michigan  Central. 
Michigan  Southern. 
Paw  Paw. 
Peninsular. 

Schoolcraft  and  Three  Rivers. 
St.  Jo.  Valley. 
Toledo,  Ann  Arbor  and  Saginaw. 

STREET    RAILWAYS. 

Bay  City  and  Portsmouth. 

Corlies  and  Thunder  Bay  Train. 

Detroit  City  Railway. 

East  Saginaw  City. 

Fort  Street  and  Elmwood. 

Grand  Rapids  Street. 

Grand  River  Street. 


Jan'y  18,  1869. 


Jan'y     7,  1869.  Port  Huron  and  Gratiot. 


Saginaw  Street. 


VI 


COMPILATION. 


TABLE    B. 


DATS  OF  INOOBPOBATION. 


NAMES  OF  RAILROAD  COMPANIES. 


July  29, 
July  29, 
Jan'y  12, 
Jan'y  7, 
May  19, 
March  27, 
March  26, 
Jan^y  15, 
Jan'y  7, 
Dec.  29, 
Jan'y  5, 
May  31, 
June  8, 
Feb'y  21, 
May  4, 
Jan'y  19, 
Sept.  24, 
March  19, 
July  3, 
FeVy  22, 
March  14, 
PeVy  26, 
Sept  26, 
July  20, 
March  16, 
July  28, 
FeVy  2, 
May  18, 
FeVy  23, 
May  9, 
Jan'y  30, 
Jan'y  19, 
April  19, 
Jan'y  16, 
Aug.  25, 
Nov.      3, 


1868. 
1867. 
1857. 
1865. 
1857. 
1858. 
1858. 
1868. 
1863. 
1856. 
1857. 
1855. 
1857. 
1857. 
1846. 
1867. 
1860. 
1866. 
1866. 
1855. 
1855. 
1866. 
1868. 
1865. 
1864. 
1862. 
1857. 
1864. 
1865. 
1868. 
1847. 
1865. 
1860. 
1857. 
1868. 
1864. 


Allegan  and  Holland. 

Amboy,  Lansing  and  Traverse  Bay. 

Amboy  and  Traverse  Bay. 

Chicago  and  Northwestern. 

Chicago,  St.  Paul  and  Fon  du  Lac. 

Detroit,  Port  Huron  and  Samia. 

Detroit  and  Port  Huron. 

Elkhart  and  Lake  Michigan. 

Flint  and  Fentonville. 

Grand  Eapids.  Traverse  Bay  &  Mackinaa 

Grand  Eapids  and  Northern. 

Grand  Rapids  and  Southern. 

Grand  Bapids  and  Mackinac. 

Grand  Eiver  and  Muskegon. 

Grand  River  Valley. 

Grand  Trunk  Railway  of  Michigan. 

Houghton.  "^ 

Iron  Bay.  • 

Iron  Mountain  and  Wisconsin  State  line. 

Iron  Mountain. 

Iron  Mountain. 

Ionia  and  Lansing. 

Jackson,  Fort  Wayne  and  Cincinnati 

Jackson  Union. 

Keweenaw  and  CUff. 

Lake  Superior  and  Iron  Mountain. 

Lake  Superior. 

Lake  Superior  and  Michigan  Air  Line. 

L'Anse  and  Ontonagon. 

Lawton,  Paw  Paw  and  South  Haven. 

Port  Huron  and  Lake  Michigan. 

Mineral  Range. 

Marquette  and  Chicago. 

Marquette  and  State  Line. 

Michigan  Air  Line. 

Northern  Iron. 


aAILBOAD  OOMPAKIES. 


Vll 


TABLE  B.— Continued. 


Bin  01 

>  InOORPORATION. 

NAMES  OF  RAILROAD  COMPANIES. 

Dec 

12,  1867. 

Northern  Michigan. 

Dec. 

2,  1865. 

Ohio  and  Tiake  Superior. 

Aug. 

2,  1856. 

Ontonagon  and  State  Tjine. 

Oct 

27,  1865. 

Peninsular  Branch  R.  R.  Co.  of  Michigan 

Dec 

6,  1855. 

Port  Huron  and  Milwaukee. 

Aug. 

13,  1856. 

Shiawassee  and  Vernon. 

Sept 

8,  1855. 

Saginaw  and  Lansing. 

Not. 

21,  1867. 

St  Joseph  River  Railroad. ' 

Dec 

13,  1866. 

Wisconsin  and  Lake  Superior. 

V^Vj  5,  1856. 
Aug.  14,  1865. 
Dec  8,  1863. 
March  14,  1868. 


STREET  RAILWAYS. 

Grand  Rapids. 
Portage  Lake  Train. 
Salina  Street    • 
Saginaw  Railroad. 


Vlll 


COMPILATION. 


TABLE  C. 


H 

a! 


8 
t 

11 

16 
19 
28 
27 
38 
3T 
41 
4T 
riS 
5T 
08 
67 
78 

ii 
SI 
S5 

b9 

95 

99 

108 

107 

111 


NAME  OF  COMPANY. 


Bay  City  and  East  Saginaw — 

Bay  Dc  Noqnet  and  Marquette 

Chicago,  Detroit  and  Canada 
Grand  Trunk  Junction 


Chicago  &  Mich.  Grand  Trunk 

Detroit  and  Howell 

Detroit,  Monroe  and  Toledo... 

Detroit  and  Milwaukee 

Erie  and  Kalamazoo 

♦  Flint  and  Holly 

t  Flint  and  Perc  Marquette. .. 

Grand  Rapids  and  Indiana 

Heda  and  Torch  Lake 

Holly,  Wayne,  and  Monroe — 

Howell  and  Lansing 

Jackson,  Lansing  and  Saginaw 

Kalamazoo,  Allcgan  and  Grand 
Rapids 


Kalamazoo  and  Schoolcraft 

Marquette  and  Ontonagon 

Michigan  Central 

Michigan  Southern 

Paw  Paw 

Peninsular 

Schoolcraft  and  Throe  RiTcrs.. 

St  Jo.  Valley 

Toledo,  Ann  Arbor  &  Saginaw 


Total. 


CapU  Stock 

of  the 
Company. 


$125,000  00 
1,600,000  00 

1,095,000