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Olnmmrurnnrnt Prngram 



Invocation REV. C. G. LUCAS 



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Song SCHOOL f. 

Salutatory MR. JOE HAND ^ 

Piano Solo MISS ZILLA COOK ^ 

AddreM HON. FREEMAN H. BLOODGOOD | 

Vocal Solo MR. L. V. RICHARDSON f. 

Class Will MISS NEVA SHEDDRICK I 

Vocal Solo MISS LINDA GEHRINGER | 

Valediaory MISS BLANCHE JUETT $ 

Piano Duet THE MISSES FOTHERINGHAM 

Presentation of Diplomas MR. J. I. MARTIN ''\ 

Class Song GRADUATING CLASS ^; 

Benedi<aion REV. C. G. LUCAS 

DANCING ij 

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Silent /y oer the mounuin stole 
A soft grey cjoud tinted with gold-, 

And down behind tmo purple peaks 
Sank the sun that never sleep s^ 

But on the morrow with glories unfurled^ 
It will rise again to brighten our worlds 



By Ruth B.Lent. '1% 




Pa.a:e 

Frontispiece. "Poppy", class flower, opposite pasre one 

Title Paire '.. 1 

Dedication 2 

In Meuioriam 3 

The Faculty and Trustees 4 

Commencement Projrram 5 

Sunset. Ruth Lent, '18 6 

Senior Pictures, Girls 8 

Senior Pictures, Boys 9 

Manual Training Exhibit 10 

Editorial Stafif 11 

Alumni Notes, Harold (^ollis, '14 12 

Senior Prophecy, Ella Wurz, '15 14 

Opening of P. P. I. E., Blanche Juett, '1.') 1.") 

Felix Frankfurter's Bride. Ruth Lent, '18 16 

The Freshman Class, Virginia Lent, '18 17 

Extracts from a Boy's Correspondence, Frances Brown, '1.^ 18 

Sophomore Class, Harold Lucas, '17 22 

Wanted — A Rejuvenator, Blanche Juett, '15 23 

Junior Hay Ride. Frances Brown. '15 25 

Experience of a Freshman, Ella Wurz, '15 29 

Junior Poem, Polly I?arkley. '1(5 31 

The West for the East, Mabel Steding, '18 32 

The Seniour Classe. Frances Brown, '15 30 

Love Will Find a Way. Ella Wurz. '15 39 

Our Freshie Girls and Boys. Minerva Weihe, '18 41 

The Domestic Science Class. Ruth Lent, '18 42 

Class Will 44 

Forge Work, Joe Hand, '15 46 

Girls' Athletics, Polly Barkley, '16 47 

Boys' Athletics, Eddie Hevey, '16 49 

Society and Dramatics, Neva Sheddrick, '15 53 

Junior Play 54 

Exchanges, Alvin Howard, '15 ^^ 

Horoscope 56 

Cartoons, School Days, Roy Frerichs, '15 58 

Joke Department 59 

Advertisements "4 

Josh Calendar, pages 5 and 14 in advertisement section 



3SSn»\^SSS5SH»«^ 




®1]^ ^raftuattng QIlaBB 



BLANCHE JUETT 




FRANCES BROWN 




ELLA WURZ 



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1915 




NEVA SHEDDRICK 



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(ilir (Braitnattun (Clafis 




JOE HAND 




ROV FRERICHS 




ALVIN HOWARD 




>X ALTER SWIFT 



TXibrrtij 11 ?i|. &. 

1B13 




Exhibit of work from Manuiil Traininjj Department 
of Liberty Union Hiijh Sehool. 




TORIflL 



iEittnnal g>taff 



Blanche Jurtt, Editor-in-Chief 
Frances Brown, Associate Editor 
Neva Shcddrick. Society Editor 



Joe Hand, Business Manager 
Walter Swift, Associate Manager 
Harold Colli*. Alumni Editor 



Polly Barkley, Girl's Athletics 
Edward Hevey, Boy's Athletics 
Roy Frerichs. Cartoonist 



Ne 



1 Sheddrick, Josh Editor 



Poor old Annual ! It seems as if our 
Annual has a new name nearly everv 
'vear. In 191:^ the Student Body itself 
nanuMl it the Liberty Bell and it was then 
decided never to change it asain, but last 
year's ejass named it "Lux." This year 
\vf have resumed the former title and hope 
to see it remain unehansed in th? future. 

Our boys are doinjr splendidly in Man- 
ual Traininjr and Blaeksmithinir and our 
?irls are doing some very creditable wi>rl< 
in sewin«r. 

Our latest feature is the Cookinir De- 
partment. The trustees had a neat litHe 
b\iniralow built especially for this purpose 
and had it equipped with all the necessary 
utensils, includiui: many electrical appli- 
ances. The irirls en.joy takiiip cookins 
imder the able instruction of the head of 
that dciiartment and the boys certainly 



rp.Be 1 

lEIevenJ 



Alvin Howard, Exchange Editor 



enjoy the .sirls' dainty viands which are 
concocted in the kitchen. 

We have more school spirit this year 
than last. The boys surely have awak- 
ened and are not sf'i'i? to let the jrirls iret 
ahead of them in athletics. They jiut a 
stronjr football team in the field, tyins: for 
third place in the C. C. A. L. Schedule 
and are also takins: up baseball and are 
iroinji in for the track meet. The £>irls of 
the basket ball team showed splendid spirit 
and team work. Both boys and jrirls ha\e 
very ffood basket ball teams, and havo 
won the ch.ampionship |ieiuiants for 191.'). 

The Editor wishes to thank all who have 
so willindy assisted her. The staff has 
worked very dilisrently and the school has 
^•enerously contributed to the success of 
this book. 

We wish to thank the advertisers who 
have so cheerfully patronized us. 




CLASS "05 

Editli A. Sellers (Mrs. Herbert French), 
an iiccomplished pianist, resides in Sa- 
liiiiis. 

CLASS '06 

Anno O'llara is teafhina' sclioo] in 
Pitlsbnr<>; Roy Ileek is employed by Hlnn- 
hiun, Carrisian and Hayden of San Frau- 
fisco; Fiffie A. Chadwiok (Mrs. Ray Bon- 
nickson) resides near Byron; Ilattie Rus- 
sell (Mrs. O'Banion) in Oakland; Pearl 
Grove (Mrs. Henry Sellers) near Kniijlit- 
sen ; Fern Y. Cninminiis in Berkeley; Pern 
Howard is farming' on Marsh Creek; 
Georae Barkeley, now a full fledged law- 
yer, is deputy county clerk in Marl Inez; 
Bertha Sanders (Mrs. Arthur Bigiow) re- 
sides in San Francisco. 

CLASS '07 

Alma. Allen resides with her parents 
near Escalon; Harold Swift is emjiloyed 
in Arizona; Euna Goodwin (Mrs. Earl 
Shafer) resides near Oakley; Johanna 
Grueninger (Mrs. Joe Jesse) in Oakley. 

CLASS '08 

Leonard Dainty is a successful farmer 
on Marsh Creek; Millard Dillin is a hus- 
tling voung rancher in the same nei<rhl)or- 



hood and in his leisure niomeiiis has shown 
great skill nt baseball; Addle Kniizht (Mrs. 
Mecum) resides in Berkeley. 

CLASS '09 
Edna Heck (Mrs. Ralph Crowther) is 
principal of the Brentwood Grammar 
School ; Bessie Collis is keeping house for 
her father in Brentwood, Edna Heidorn is 
principal of the grammar school in Knight- 
sen; Iva Bonnickson resides with her 
mother in Berkeley; Willie Morgans, after 
an atlack of serious illness, is endeavoring 
to regain his health under the watchful 
care of his mother in Brenlwood; Robert 
Wallace is a very successful fanner near 
Brentwood. 

CLASS '10 

Chas. O'Hara, James and Joseph Barklev 
are students at U. C, Berkeley; Ray 
Shafer has returned to his studies at the 
College of the Pacific after a rest of 
one semester; Rose Miller (Mrs. Eugene 
Wilson) resides in San Jose; Claude Wris- 
ten, Arthur Sheddrick, William Cakebread. 
DeWitt Richardson. William Murphy and 
Ellis Howard are successful farmers in 
their resjiective neighborhoods; Camille 
Sresovich is cashier and bookkeeper for 
the Pittsburg Aluminum Co of San Fran- 

fP.j, 1 



rispo; Manrnrot Wliito resides in Vncn- 
ville. 

CLASS '11 

Frank Helm is shipping r-lerk for Wm. 
(luff of San Franfiseo; Van I'rince. a 
skilled maehinist, is employed by Holt 
Bros.. Stockton; Marguerite Geddes is a 
junior at l'. t'. ; Morgan Schroeder is man- 
aging the home place near Oakley. 

CLASS '12 

Esther Dainty has been teaching the 
Deer Valley school for the past two years; 
Olive Siple has been teaching the Iron 
House for two years; Katie Murphy is 
piiniary teacher in Brentwood; Jessie 
Johnson (Mrs. H. J. Wood) resides in San 
Francisco. 

CLASS '13 

Judson Swift is attcndinc Polvlechnic 



Business College in Oakland; Richard 
Wallace is assistant cashier in the Brent- 
wood Bank; Edith Cakebread will finish 
her course at the San Jose Normal in 
June; Myra Pearce (Mrs. Simpson) lives 
in Berkeley; Elaine Wallace is her moth- 
er's most efficient helper at home in Brent- 
wood. 

CLASS 'U 
Esther Murphy is attending San Jose 
Normal; Mary Parenti and Mae Pcmber- 
ton are attending Western Normal at 
Stockton ; Susie Dickinson is attending 
San Francisco Normal; Aileen Porter has 
recently completed a business course at 
Polytechnic Business College. Richmond ; 
Henry Plumbley is attending V. C. ; Ever- 
ett Lemoin is attending Polytechnic Busi- 
ness College, Oakland; Harold CoUis is 
employed by Balfour-Guthrie Co., Brent- 
wood. 




fP.gr 1 
IThirtecnJ 



BRENTWOOD NEWS 



VOL. XI. No. 50 



BRENTWOOD, CAL., JUNE 1. 1925 



ALVIN HOWARD, Editor 



REFORM PARTY 



TRIUMPHS AT LAST 



Miss Juett Elected Mayor — 
Radical Reforms Proposed 

In the election of Miss Hlanehe Juett 
to the mayoralty of fireater Brent- 
wood, the Progressive Reform Party 
has triumphed at last Miss Juett is 
a young woman of sterling character 
whose greatest pride is her native 
city, Brentwood. The city may hope 
for great things. 

Possessing a large heart and a great 
pity tor all dumb an<l suffering ani- 
mals. Miss Juett has promised to found 
a home for invalid and indigent eats 
and dogs. \Vc liopc tliis pn^ji^et will 
win the approval and liearty support 
of all the citizensof our beautiful city, 
as it is one of the greatest philan- 
thropic movements of the age. 

She also proposes a striking reform 
in the public schools. She wishes the 
teachers to provide a dainty repast for 
each class. The wisdom of this re- 
form Miss Juett learned in her high 
school days. She vividly reiuembers 
the hours when she siit sulVering the 
pangs of hunger, while she patiently 
awaited the sound of the bell which 
would bring to her the much desired 
article— food. 

These are only two of the great 
number of reforms which Miss Juett 
will bring to pass. Again we wish to 
n^peat that the city may hope for 
great things. 



TO HONOR BRENTWOOD 



Beautiful Star to Give Perform- 
ance in City of Her Birth 

Miss Neva Sheddrick, the beautiful 
young star, is to make her appearance 
in Brentwood ne.xt week at the Brent- 
wood Opera House (nee C^oates' Hall I 
in her famous play, "The Flirt." 

Her stagi! career has been one of 
continued success. Her dazzling 
lieauty and sweet personality have 
endeared her tii many, to say nothing 
of the eliarm of her wonderful acting. 
Miss .'-iluMldrick's rooms are always a 
bower of beautiful Howers. Many 
suitors have sought her hand, but she 
has steadfastly ainioiniced her de- 
termination to remain true to her art. 

"Tlie Flirt" is one of the most pop- 
ular plavs of the season. It ran for 
ten months at the Maxine Klliot Thea- 
tre in New York, and Miss Sheddrick 
closed her engagement there to ap- 
pear in her native city. Brentwood. 
She is to return to New York when 
her present engagement is i!nded. 



NEW BOOK APPEARS 

A new book has just maile its ai)- 
pearance from the pen of the brilliant 
young author. .loe Hand. The title of 
till' book is "Strolling." Mr. Hand 
has eonleniplated this book for some 
time as he gathered most of his ma- 
terial from his experiences during 
his high school days. "Strolling" has 
become very popular and is much in 
demand. 

"Sliding Through" is another book 
by Mr. Hand, also very popular, es- 
pecially among high school and col- 
lege students. 

Other books by Mr. Hand are "Pop- 
ularity With the Girls." "The Singh! 
Man," and "The Athlett\" 



BRINGS PUBLIC TO HIS FEET 



Roy Frerichs Biggest Laugh in 
Bing-Bing's Circus 

Mr. Roy Frerichs, a former resident 
of Brentwood and vicinity has scored 
one of thi' biggest hits of the season 
as chief clown in Hing-Hing's Circus. 
He impersonati'S Tom Thumb and 
other diminutive figures. He is the 
ehililren's favorite and the little ones 
seri'am with delight whi'U their funny 
friend appears on the tanbark. 

Although Mr. Frerichs is at his best 
as a clown, he is a skilled tight-rope 
walker. It is thrilling indee<l to see 
the slender, figure in purple tights 
make his way swiftly and carefully 
across the tent upon the tightly 
stretched wire. People hold their 
l)reath for fear he will fall, but they 
do not know the cool nerve and the 
(irm footing of the man high up in the 
air with nothing between him and 
death but his feet. 

Brentwood will soon have a chance 
to see Roy perform, for Bing-Bing's 
will appear in this city early in .Sep- 
tember. 

E dH T O'R I A L 

ALVIN HOWARD, Editor 
We wish to call the attention of the 
public to the rapid growth of our 
beautiful city and al.so of this, our 
news scatlc^rer, especially after we 
took hold. We remember our high 
school days in dejir old Liberty 
I'nion. 

In those days Brentwood was only 
a village and tlii' NKWS was printed 
once a week. Now (!reat<'r Brentwood 
is second only to San Francisco. The 
NKWS is one of the leading dailies 
and Liberty t'nion is among the 
greatest schools in the State. And 
we art editor of the NKWS. Also 
please notice the good fortune of all 
our classmates. 

WANTt:t)— By an old maid, some- 
one to love me. Apply fo Ella Wurz, 
a! Prune Avenue, Brentwood, (.'al. 



BRILLIANT WEDDING 

OF POPULAR COUPLE 

Miss Brown and Mr. Hoggen- 
heimer Plight Their Troth 

A we<Iding of great interest took 
place in Brentwood last evening. At 
a brilliantly appointed ceremony 
Miss Fraiu'es Brown liecame the bride 
of Mr. Kgbert lloggi-nheimer. The 
wedding took |)liice in the new t'on- 
gregatioua I Church on Chestinit Ave- 
nue. 

The church was beautifully decor- 
ated with marigolds and potato 
plant. Preceded liy her attendants 
the charming briile, upon the arm of 
her father, swept up the aisle to the 
altar, where th<" unfortunate groom 
awaiti'd his doom. 

Miss Brown was exquisitely gowned 
in a charming creation of the new 
yellow lace over red satin. A veil of 
yellow mosiiuito netting completed 
the costinne. The groom wore the 
conventional suit of blue silk crepe 
emt)roidered in pink sweet peas. 

Miss Alicia Hoggenheimer attended 
her future sister-in-law as maid of 
honor, while the Misses Joy Heart- 
breaker, Helen .street and Marjorie 
Love acted as bridesmaids. Mr. Ma- 
grath Alexander was best man and 
the ushers were Messrs. Weary Willie, 
Erasmus Jones and Riicey Speed. 

.\fter the ceremony a reception and 
dinner was att<'nded by the many 
friends of the counli' at the magnili- 
cenl Brown residence on Liberty 
Avenue. 

Following a honeymoon spent in 
Oakley the liappy pair will reside in 
Knight.sen where Mr. Hoggenhi'imer 
is hea<i of the Pork Trust. 



HEAVY LOSS IN EXPLOSION 

Work of Many Years Destroyed 
When Chemist Forgets 

A violent explosion, which took 
place in the laboratory of Walter 
Swift, the well known chemist, de- 
stroyed one of the great<'st discov- 
eries of the century. For several 
years Mr Swift has been working up- 
on a giis by means of which students 
could obtain their lessons without 
study. 

He was deeply absorbed when a cry 
from his infant son caused him to 
drop everythinganil run to the rescue. 
But alas! after removing the heat 
from luider the flask he forgot to re- 
move the delivery tube from the water 
and, bangi the valuable work was 
<lestroyed. 

But Mr. Swift is of a persevering 
nature and will begin at the begin- 
ning. In a few years he hopes to 
presi'Ut his work to the public. 

Klla Wurz 'n'l 



IroutteenJ 



^r 




©;jrHimj of tlir ^3. JJ. 31. E. 



Willi bonuty and ;:ra(lt'iir, the woild"^ '^rcate-t fair, 

Kmblazoned in irlory, witii settinsi most rare. 

Lookinsr out to the sea and the tamed Golden Gate 

The triumphal door-way of our srold-famous Stale. 

The President at Washinjiton, from exe<'ntive chair. 

Set the ^reat wheels revolvinir, by spark throimh the air. 

This city of beauty in wonders arrayed. 

From memories history never will fade. 

Our Australian neiiihbor from the antipodes, 

With Japan and China from the orient seas. 

Have erected their temjiles of beauty and art. 

Aidinir most nobly in doinir their part. 

Nations of P]urope did ,i>racionsly share, 

In jiromotinir and bnildinjr our world's ureate-t f.iir. 

Kaeh one has l)nili a palace most irraiid. 

To exhibit t^lne arts of their native land. 

The States of our I'nion, and (".inada too. 

Erected art buildinjrs. antiipie ones and new. 

Filled with exhibits, of art new and old. 

With temples of jewels and palace nl' ;:old. 

Our -i-ter Republics, of the South Hemisphere. 

In our creat family circle, all have drawn near. 

With viiind, mission buildinirs. with facades of old. 

In myriad colors finished in jrold. 

Thi> ualherinir of Nations, famous hi-tory will make. 

May it fon:e lies of friendship, thai never will break. 

Blanche .Juetl. '!.'>. 



fP.ee 



3tlxK 3frankfurtrr*0 TSvxht 



, ll;li4^. 



Felix Frankfurther was a butcher as 
you well may know by his title. A short 
girl with red curly locks and a little turned 
up, freckled nose entered the butcher shop 
one day, with her wobbly, bowlegged dog, 
Needles. She and Felix were very well 
acquainted. The first day Felix met her 
he said to himself, "There's the girl for 
me," and straightway proceedei to court 
Sapphire. Finally he asked her to become 
his wife. The day of their marriage ap- 
proached and all was in readiness but no 
Sapphire appeared. Felix waited and 
waited and waited which was about ten 
minutes, and finally growing impatient he 
.-started in the direction of Sapphire's 
nome to find her if he could. 

Meanwhile Sapphire, who had decided 
that she cared nought for marriage, fled 
to the feed stable and there hid in the bar- 
ley bin. As she sat there all huddled up 
Felix's voice could be heard through the 



cracks calling, "Sapphire! Sapphire! My 
darling, for the love of Mike appear, and 
make me a happy man once more." 

Sapphire upon hearing the sad and sor- 
rowful voice of Felix began to weep. When 
the rooster, who was picking up kernels 
of barley near by, heard the sobs, he be- 
came frightened and broke the .speed 
limit. He hurried from the place, making 
such a noise that Felix's attention was 
drawn at once towards the bin which con- 
cealed his sobbing Sapphire. At a glance 
he had taken in the situation. Then lift- 
ing the lid, he helped out his long, lost 
love, brushing the barley from her hair 
while doing so. She sobbed out her 
troubles on his spotless white vest, which 
was no longer spotless. "Well Pet, brace 
up and we'll have a wedding after all," he 
comforted, pressing her hands. 

Ruth Lent. "18. 




fP.se 1 

ISixtcenJ 



«s*S!s:-s;x\^''^$sss55$^^58s; 



Q^ht iFr^fihmau (ElafiB 



In our class are just eifrhteen, 
Seniors treat us awful mean, 
Take our shoes off, pull our hair. 
If they hurt us the\ don't earc. 

Let me tell you of our elass 
We're not all as ijreen as jirass. 
Some are pretty brijiht you know 
And the mark they always toe. 

Ruth in drawing is a shark. 
And of genius has a spark, 
Minerva wiio has cheeks like roses, 
DuriufT Knsrlish po'ms (•omj)oses. 

Carl at the shop does work, 
And his Enirlish likes to shirk, 
While in Alsiebra every day, 
Mabel is our chief mainstay. 

Ned Macuurn is a fiend at spellins. 
What he sets there is no tellinu. 
Kate at typinjr is some swell. 
For she surely does it well. 

Jack Suffren is the hijrh school tease, 
And with irirls seems (|uite at ease, 
Jlerschel Miller is quite coy. 
And with the siirls a popular boy. 

Muriel is some class at sewina:. 
And in her brain is knowlediie stowinsi'. 
In shorthand Ksther breaks the speed. 
And in the class she takes the lead. 

Ransom always knows his History, 
How he frets it. is a mystery. 
Smart in German is Georgia Nunn, 
And she think's il's lots of fun. 

Mya does work at the shop. 
When he bcirins he hates to stop. 
Stanley in Knylish is very jrood. 
And can always be understood. 

Homer is never in a hurry. 
His motto is "I should worry." 
Now, this is enoufrh of the Fresliies dear, 
Wc hope their traits are made fpiite clear. 
\'iri:inia Lent. '18. 



tP.tr 1 



i I 



Brentwood. California. 
April 2, ]914. 

Deer Bill : — Gosh, but it's lonesome since 
you went away, don't seem like nothin's 
the saim. Yestiddy was April Fools and 
we had a fjreat time, but I kinda wish we 
hadn't. I aint been able to set down sent-e 
about six o'clock last nite, when pa got 
home. 

Well, you know them to white kittens 
your ma gave mine when she went away? 
Well you know the darn things are always 
gettin my dt)g in trouble, the one I got from 
Red Elkiiis. They pest and tease around 
him and you know he's a good dog but 
theres some things he can't stand and eats 
is one, and so he lights out and chases em, 
and then when ma comes out and sees her 
kittens stuck upon the fence with their 
tales swelled up and there eyes poppin 
out and jest spittin like the fire when you 
throw water on it, why she ties»ipoor 
Spotty up and then tells pa, and pa says: 
"Gues we'll have to get rid of that dog." 

So yestiddy, that crosseyed Smith kid 
and me, we got those kittens and tied there 
tales together and slung em over the 
close-line, then I hollered to ma to come 
and see the airship and jest as she got to 
the back dore I yelled "April Fool!" and 
beet it. Say, you oughta seen them cats! 
I thought they liked each other but the 
way they went to it when they was slung 
over that dose-line you'da thought they 
sure had it in for each other. They clawed 
and spit and scratched and bit and there 
was white hare aflying in every durect'on. 
Mn didn't ask where the airship was, just 
yelled, "Oh my poor kittens!" and I didn't 
wait to hear no more, but crawled through 
the hole in the fen.se and hiked through 
the back alley to school. 

You know that the new girl with the 
lonu' hnrc sets in front of me now. Well 



she's a kinda nice kid, gave me some gum 
last week, but she's awful stuck on herself 
and loves that brade of hare more than 
anything. Keeps switchin it around in my 
face all the time, so yestiddy I picked it 
up reel quiet, took my gum out of my 
mouth (it was the wad she gave me too) 
rapped it around the end of her brade and 
then plastered it down to my desk. Gosh, 
I never knew gum would stick so. Well she 
sat still long enuf to let it git hard then 
the teecher called on her to read. She 
tried to git up but that brade was stuck 
fast and so she stuck. The teecher asked 
what was the matter but she never sed a. 
word, jest started in to crv' and then the 
teecher came down to see what was the 
matter. When she found out she jumjied 
on me rite away never even asked who 
done it or nothin, and there I was studyin 
just as hard as you please. She gave me 
an awful lickin but that girl hov>-led louder 
than I did Avhen the teacher sed she 
guessed she'd have to cut the end of 
her hare off, she jest bellered like n young 
calf and all that fuss over a measly o'd 
brade of hare. Gosh aint girls the queer 
things? 

AVell when I got home for lunch I walked 
in like nothin had happened, but I was 
shakiii in my boots. Ma's eyes was kinda 
red and she says, "Robert," (you know 
ma means business when she says Robert, 
its generally Bobbie.) "Robeit I shall tell 
your f'ther on you and he wi'l jiunish you 
when 'he comes home this evening." I 
kinda wished she'd waited till after lunch 
because I cou'dii't eat much then hut she 
didn't say anything more. 

Nothin happened in the afternoon <-cpt'n 
that Jack Rhodes got a lickin for lausrhin 
at the new girl's hare, she's gol about fi 
incli(>s cut off. She dont set in front of 
nic no more but it wouldnt matter if she 



iF.ighte 



(lid, luT liaiv's too short to t'iistcii now 
mill besides I haveiit any more j;uiii. 

But 1 sure irot an awful wallopin frnni 
l>a tluit iiiirht. 1 ate supper olT tlie kitclien 
table, standin up and today tlie tceclier 
asked me it' there wa.s a pin stickin nio 
I wijr<;led around so much. 

But I'll sret even with that i)esky irirl 
and them darned cats tor the two lickins 
they caused me. Neitiu'r cats nor skirls is 
any uootl no liow. 

Yours, 
Robert B. Ames Jr. 

I*. S. I forjrot to tell yon nnr cow Imd 
twi.i calves yestiddy. — Bob. 

P. S. The new jrirl's mother won't 
speak to ma now. wimmen is (piear as 
well as irirls and cats. — B. 



Brentwood, California. 
May 12, 1914. 

Dear Bill : — Say Bill, maybe you wont 
believe it. but Ive pretty near lerned to 
dance. You know they have dancinc: 
school here now. They have it in the af- 
ternoon for the kids and at nijiht for 
•rrownups. 

Well yesterday afternoon ma dressed 
me all up, put that darned old collar on 
tlhat spreads out on my coat (Eton she 
calls it) and took me over to the dancinjr 
school. There was a bunch of kids there, 
and they looked awf.il funny, especially 
the boys. I suess I looked funny too. 
cause me cars srot awful red and felt 
just like red lamp-shades, and my feet 
felt awful liirht and <|ueer in them pumps 
and silk socks. The srirls was havinir a 
swell time, sittinsr around irisrirlinir and 
fussinsr their hare and lookinjr at the boys. 

Well a younjr lady with a awful tijrht 
skirt with rufTles. and hiirh heel shoes and 
hair slicked back and earrinjrs on came 
H|> to ma and ask "Does your litt'e boy 
want to dance." and I stood up real 
straijrht so's she'd see I wasn't very small 
and Ma says, "Yes. jro with the lady dear." 
and the lady irrabbed my hand and started 
to walk arToss the floor with mc where 
a bunch of boys were standinir. Maybe 
von think I didnt feel like a darn fool. 



and tliat tat .Morse kid j:rinned all over. 
I'll swa/; him ne.xt time I see him just to 
make liiin uruni he's so fat. Well she 
take.-- nic up to the bunch, and says to 
Fatly Morse, "Percy will you try this 
boy. Its his first time." And 1 had to put 
my arm arou,;id that fat slob, (he felt jusi 
like a sack of flour) and Fatty starts in 
"One two, one two." and otf we jioes. Gosh 
that kid was heavy and he'd land on my 
foot every time he'd say two. Pretty soon 
I <rot sore, and just tHien we ^ol to the 
door ;;nd I says "Lei's sio jret cooled off," 
so we went outside and maybe you think 
1 didn't land i'nto that kid. I mussed him 
up somethinjr tierce, and just as I got 
throusih we heard somebody comin, and 
I says, "You better sjo home, son," so 
Fat beat it and the younjr lady come out 
and says, "Oh here you are Robert, I 
missed you. Dont you want to come in and 
dance with some of the little jjirlsf" 1 
didn't want to a,ad besides I was kinda 
mussed up but she took my hand and I 
had to. She hiked over to where there 
was a bis mob of the {rirls, with me taj>- 
frinsr after her, and who do you spose she 
made me dance with? The kid that had to 
ha\e her hair cut off 'cause I put <ium 
in it. Gee I w-as sore. Well T put my arm 
around her and grabs into the onlv th'"i 
I could find, it was the bow of the ribbon 
she had around her waist, and we started 
off. I stejiped on her foot just for mean- 
ness, first thing and she gives a funny lit- 
tle gasp but don't say nothing. I only 
wished I'd had on my big boots stead of 
them pumps. She could dance pretty good 
so I hangs on to that blue ribbon for dear 
life and used it for a handle to turn her 
around with, and every time the rest of 
'em turned I'd give that ribbon a yank and 
switch her around. I sure got even for 
that lickin she caused me. I just walked 
all over her feet and twisted that blue 
ribbon in fifty different directions. And 
then what do you sujipose happened? Well 
that ribbon came untied and she kei>t on 
dincing and there I was hopping aro\ind 
with about fifty yards of blue ribbon in 
my band. The fel'as just howled and ihe 
kid says, "Yon nasty mean horrid bov 
von, von'vc mined mv <ash. You :i'nt ?ot 



no manners at all. You just pulled it rite 
off on purpose." And I says, "Aw go on, 
1 was just, hanging on to it, you did the 
pulling yourself." And then the dancing 
teacher comes up and says, "\Vhy Rob- 
ert, Im surprised at you. Give Marie her 
sash," and I says, "Gosh I don't want the 
darned thing." She must have thought I 
wa:nted it. All this time the fellows was 
laughing fit to bust and I slams the rib- 
bon down on the floor and starts over to 
clean up the bunch and I catches my foot 
in that ribbon and falls flat on the floor. 
Goi^h I was mad. And just then ma comes 
over and the dancing teacher says, "Mrs. 
Ames, I think you'd better take Robert 
home he seems to be rather excited." Ex- 
cited! Iluh! I guess she'd have been ex- 
cited too if she'd been made a fool of be- 
fore about fifty people. And then Marie's 
ma comes rushing up and says to ma, 
"Madam, your son seems bent upon hu- 
miliating my daughter in everj' possible 
m-anioer," and ma freezes up and says "I 
pre.sume it is too great a stretch of mem- 
ory to recollect that you were a child 
once." And s^he takes my hand and says, 
"come dear lets go home." And Marie's 
ma just got purple but ma never looked 
at her, just sails right out and we goes 
home. ■•« 

I heard her and pa laughing awful hard 
after I went to bed Hint night, but it was 
no joke T tell you. 

Yours, 

Bob Ames. 

P. S. Til be darned if T go to that 
dancing school again, and I gave Red El- 
kins and Jim Barnes a couple of black 
eyes today when they says something 
about blue ribbons. 



Brentwood, Cal.. 
June 28. 1014. 

Dear Bill: 

Yestiddy was the first day of vacation 
and I earned a dollar. 

You know Uncle Dick, ma's brother that 
goes to College? Well he came up Friday 
nite and said he was going to spend his 
vacation here. He's a kinda decent sort 
of fella but there's a giri staying at Field's 



right next to us, who he used to know 
and he's awful sweet on her. She's a nice 
girl but she kisses me and musses my hare 
and calls me "Bobbie dear" right before 
all the folks. 

Well yestiddy morning I was showin 
Uncle Dick around the place and you know 
tlhose twin calves I was tellin you about? 
Well they was out in the loit back of our 
house and so was the old cow. The calves 
are pretty husky now and Uncle Dick says : 
"Say Bob, ol top les have some sport," 
and I says, "Sure." And he says, "Go 
get your little red wagon and a couple of 
pieces of rope." And so I did and he 
started ouit after the calves. They was at 
oine end of the lot and the old cow was 
at the other. Well he walks up to them 
calves and ties the ropes around there 
necks and starts to leed them over to 
where the wagon Was. Did they leed? Well 
I gess not. The red calf began to run 
one way and the spotted calf the other 
just as hard as they could tare. When 
they got to the end of the roap they fell 
down and spun around on 'there jaw bones 
ond nearly jerked Uncle Dicks arms out. 
But he's as game as they make em and 
hung on. Well those calves gets up in a 
jiffy and both starts to run the other way 
and Uncle Dick gets one roap twisted 
around his nees and the other around his 
ankles and then both calves starts off 
in the same direction and he has to go 
to. At first he tried hopping, but they 
went too fast and he trips and stumbles 
and finally falls down and skates along 
on his nose. Gosh it was the funniest 
^ thing I ever saw. You oughta seen them 
calves run, arnd there wa.s Uncle Dick 
draggin and bumpin along behind 'em. He 
had swell white flannel pants on, and they 
was getting all streaked up with grass and 
dirt, and he 'had on low shoes and they 
both got untied and flew off and one 
bounced up and hit him on the ear. Gee 
he was the sorest guy I ever saw. "For 
Lord sake Bob," he yells, "get a knife 
and cut me loose," and he just swore a 
blue streak. But I was laughing so hard 
I couldn't do nothin but just run beside 
him. Just about that Hime though the old 
cow spots 'em and she starts toward 



rp,Be 1 

ITwrnlyJ 



I'lifle Dick with her houl down nnd tnil 
n'flyiu' niid then I got scared cause 1 
thoujtht slie'd ^ore him. So 1 grabs my 
knife and cuts the ropes and those fool 
calves just kept on running and the old 
cow keeps heading for I'ncle Dick. Well 
I cut the ropes around his feet and knees 
and then we bo;h starts for the fence lick- 
ety split. We just got there in time and 
crawled over as she took a board off with 
her horns. Well you oughta seen Uncle 
Dick. All the skin was off the end of 
his nose and his hair was full of weeds 
and his face was pretty near covered with 
din and grass stain and his clothes too. 
The parts of his face that weren't covered 
were kinda pale yellow color aind he was 
scared stiff. He didn't say nothin for 
about five minutes, then he stuck his hand 
in his pocket and says, "Say Bob this is 



yours if you never breathe a word of this 
to anybody, Marjorie especially." I 
wouldn't have told her anyway, but didn't 
tell him so, and I took the dollar and just 
grinned an says, "Sure." 

Last night I heard him telling Marjorie 
how he bumped into a door in the dark 
and skinned his nose, and she says, 
"That's too bad." 

But what do you know about it, she saw 
the whole thing cause she was over this 
morning and I heard she and ma laughin 
about something' and I listened and I 
heard Marjorie say, "Yes I was standing 
in the kitchen window and saw it all. lie 
bribed Bobby not to tell." Wouldnt that 
bump you? But I should worry. I got the 
dollar anyway. 

Yours, Bob Ames. 

F. B. '15. 




fP.Bc 1 

ITwtBiy-OneJ 



I Srttihnmnn> flTI?i«« I 



0pl|nmnrf (Clasa 







There are many who form the Sophomore Class, 

Many a jolly laddie and lass. 
Of these I will now try a little to tell, 

So j'ou will know they're coming: along well. 

Our Virgie has left us, 'tis sad to say, 

To go Amaeortes, which is verj' far away. 

And now we turn to our classmate, Grace, 

Who to use big words think's it's very good taste. 

In bnsket ball Sayde is sure some shark, 

And in Geometry always gets a good mark. 

Adella always knows her lessons to a "t" 
And can recite poetry as fast as can be. 

Our Zelnia thinks a lot of a certain boy, 

And to play the part of Portia is to her a great .joy. 
But Bertha thinks each boy a beast 

And cares for them, no, not in the least. 

Studious Fern is adapted to learning, 

And her greatest trouble is translating German. 
May is always smii^g it surely does seem, 

And her ambition is to make the team. 

Now to the boys and to their sports, 

We find them on all sorts of "courts." 
In hand-bail Ellis does sure take pleasure. 

And no other S()i)h. can to his skill measure. 

In foot ball Aubrey is sure some racer, 

He can run and dodge like a "nigger charier." 

Frank has his sport in another way, 

He's courting the girls most every day. 

In Rugby, Clifford takes interest, they say. 

And a clever player he'll be some day. 
Sometimes John to school takes a hike, 

And Charles conies whenever he likes. 

And now, my friends, my tale is ended. 

And all my knowledge is nearly exi)ended. 
I ar.i a Soph, and proud of the name. 

And no doubt you will give me no blame. 

Harold Lucas. '17, 



[?;-;; 



ly-TwoJ 



Wautrit— A Sr|uitruatnr 



Personal — A business man of '.\'i lias re- 
cently had a bereavement tiiat depresses 
lii> spirits and makes olliee routine most 
ditliiiilt. His pliysieian insists ui)on a 
cuuii)lete ehanjre. 

Miiat younjr man, entlmsiastie, a lo\ei' 
of sports wishes to undertake the "Rejuv- 
enation of Aunt Mary's brother?" 

"Jones" foots the bills; requisites are 
retinement. i)ersonality, and temperament. 
I'lease state (lualitications and aire. F. '2'.\ 
Tribune. 



The Gloom-man sat in his elaborate lib- 
rary starini: into spaee, when tiie soft- 
footed servant brouiriit in a card on a tiny 
tray, "Hub Phillips," it read, "the answer 
to your Ad." 

He turned to view n saucy, boyish, tai- 
lored irirl. 

Hub seated herself. '"Pm Dad's boy and 
you'll never know me from the real thini: 
if you take me on, — 'Baseball enthusiast, 
happy temperament and willinsr to rejuve- 
nate. Jones foots the bills,' is what won 
me." 

As the man sat silently eyeinjr her, she 
glanced around and said, "Where's Aunt 
Mary, >liall I transr.ct the business with 
her .'" 

The Gloom-man seemed to come back to 
life aiiain and replied "That's the trouble, 
she put the advertisement in the paper on 
inspiri'.tifm. then received a tele^zram from 
home saying, 'Tommy had the mumps' and 
away she flew, tellin'.: me to be sure to se- 
lect the ridit applicant. Molly always 
was the kind of a sister to set a fellow into 
a mess." 

"Aw. never mind, it's yon decision that 
counts, let's proceed. I read the ad and 
went down to the Tribune office early to 
await developments. I waited and when 
vonr man i-alled for mail F. 23 I followed 



bin). Personal interview is always desirable. 

'if you like-a me and I like-a you. 

And we both like about the same,' 
she hummel, now the question beft)re the 
house is, are you respectable? Pm in for 
•A iiood decent time. Dad's away for three 
months and he said I could do anythin<;' 
respectable, if I'd keep out of debt and 
not marry. 

"Could you make it a hundred a month? 
the salarv, I mean. Dad said I never could 
earn that much. And a three months' en- 
irairement ? Would you for the sake of re- 
spectability call for me and take me home 
each day?" 

The man was silent, so she continued, 
"Am 1 the rejuvenator?" 

"You interest me," declared the Gloom- 
man, "and Pm respectable, I hope. Yes, 
I'll meet your terms. Now, I suppose you 
ouuht to know what ails me. Well, I wa.s 
entrasred to the sweetest jrirl on earth, so 
1 thouirht : she eloped with her chauffeur. 
Pm broken, nothina interests me, you'll 
hate me, for it's weak, I know." 

"No," she answered softly, "1 like you 
because you care, but don't sret cold feet. 
I couldn't marry you if I would. Let's s:o to 
the ball game. I want to see the Oaks win. 
If we don't count the coin, we can have a 
jolly time. Pm iioini; home, call for me 
soon." 

He followed her tr) the library where she 
turned and said, "I'm sorry about my 
slauir. if you care. Dad says no one would 
ever iruess the money lie's spent on my 
collcL'e polish. Say. when I have on my 
evening: irown you can't iruess what a pol- 
ished lady I become. Pm sroinir to call 
you Cousin Gloom. '\\i''s a cousin of 
mine,' " she sanir. 

The G'oom-man cauirhl her band and 
said. "Say, but you arc linod tOr the 
diimjjs." 



rp,B, 1 

iTwrnty -Thre^ J 



She quickly withdrew her hand and 
said, "None of the clasp stuff, just a good 
time. Give me twenty minutes, then hump." 

The ball game was over, Kub had proved 
a good fan and as they entered the auto- 
mobile she took the wheel. 

"Bub," exclaimed the Gloom-man, almost 
with enthusiasm, "let's don our evening 
clothes and dine at the 'Poodle Dog.' " 

She seemed embarrassed a moment, then 
said, "Oh, rats, its a cinch. We'll go." 

They were waiting for the ordered dinner 
to be served, the glittering lights, the be- 
witching music and the buzzing voices en- 
veloped them. Bub was demure, ti'ans- 
formed; the Gloom-man could not account 
for the change. 

"Bub," he said, "do you believe in dual 
personality? I believe between the two of 
you I will rejuvenate." And the man almost 
smiled. 

"No," she replied, "not dual, just dif- 
ferent." Then with a bewitching little 
laugh she i-ippled, "T am sure it sounds 
queer, but I even think differently in ray 
evening gown." 

Two months have passed. He was again 
himself. They were returning from the 
golf links and Bub was,at the wheel, break- 
ing the speed law. . • 

"Stop, Bub, let's enjoy the sunsety.' he 
rather demanded. 

"Ah, chuck it, I'm afraid its the clasp 
stuff," she said, "but here goes. I'm leased, 
you know." 

She stopped the car under a large 
spreading oak. He took out a large bas- 
ket and she saw it, she said "Bully for 
you, Cousin Gloom." 

They had a merry feast and lingered on 
the slope "to see 'the sunset," Bub said. 

As they started off again, the Gloom- 
man drew a slip of paper from his pocket 
and said, "Here's your check for three 
hundred dollars; it's only two months, but 
iyou've earned it royally and now I want to 
release you and begin again but on a dif- 
ferent footing." 



Bub looked perplexed and uncomfort- 
able. "I know you mean well, but I can't 
take it all, I haven't earned it, its the sum 
I named and it makes me feel like a 
lemon." 

"You keep it. Bub, your services were 
invaluable. You have coaxed me back to 
normal and I have better poise than I ever 
had before. If my love could lease you 
for life I should be happy. \Miy couldn't 
you marry me if you would?" 

"Father would object," she replied ro- 
guishly. 

"But if father would gii'e his consent?" 
he persisted. 

"('ousin Gloom, which of my two do you 
like best, evening gown or this?'' pointing 
to her golf costume. 

"Well, to tell the truth, I think I should 
choose the lassie of the evening gown, but 
I'm not certain. Why?" 

"Say, Cousin Gloom, it's getting late so 
we'll spin tov/ards home and on the way I'll 
tell you why I couldn't if I would." 

They reached the Park and Bub brought 
the car to a stop under a large electric 
light and jerked off her cap. "This is 
why." She removed a wig and laughed. 
"Don't take it too hard, old man." 

"A boy!" the Gloom-man choked. 

Bub replaced wig and cap and said, 
"Buck up old chap." 

The car now stopped at Bub's home 
and Bub, turning to Cousin Gloom, said: 
"Come on in. we'll settle the matter. Yon 
must forgive me, but I did it for a joke. 
I didn't think you'd get to care that way." 

The man objected but Bub pulled him 
inside, pushed him into the parlor and 
switched on the lights. There sat Bub in 
an evening gown. He looked from one to 
the other in bewilderment. 

"Twins," chuckled the golf clothes Bub. 
"Tell it to her, she could if she would, and 
she's spoons on you, she said so." 

And then they were alone. 

Blanche Juett. '15. 



[P.ge 1 

iTwenly-FourJ 




^):^ 



(ihr Jiiniur l^ag SJtbr 



'Twas a lovely autumn evoniiiir, 

And tlio stars were clear and l)riulit, 

Wlu'ii a loud and awful claiter 

Sounded tliriuiuli the |)('aeet'ul niiilit. 

To their windows rushed tli<' people 

At this lerrifyinir noise, 
And they saw a jrravel wasion 

Piled up hiiih with <rirls and hoys. 

'Twas the famous "Junior Hay Hide" 

Set tins: forth upon its way. 
Hut 'twas in a sr'i^t"' wasron. 

And tluTc was no sisn of hay. 

Oh, the shrieks that rent the niuht air! 

Oh, the asjoniziny: uroans! 
When a .jolt caused hy a chuck-hole 

I'roved too hard for sonu' one's hones 

So their painful way they wended. 

(loini: westward from the school. 
Drawn by two poor beasts of burden — 

One a horse and one a nude. 



Tiien they turned into the creek road. 

Followini; the creek alonu': 
Till at last they reached a fariniiouse. 

Then upro.se the weary thromr. 



Stretflied their cramped and wears- muscles, 
Grabbed their hats, and pins, and hair. 

Tlien advanced upon the farmhouse 
For there was a hay-rack there. 

Should they take it? Would they dare to? 

Should they have a real hay ride? 
And — remembring bumps and bruises — 

As with one voice, "Sure!" they cried. 

But 'twas quite too full of hay, so 

Ev'i-y boy stripped off his coat, 
But the Juniors sat by idly, 

While the Seniors played the goat. 

For the Juniors lazy creatures. 

Always did their duty shirk. 
Seniors were their guests of honor, 

Juniors sat and watched them work. 

Wlien the hay-rack was unloaded. 

And the Seniors quite worn out, 
Ev'ryone piled in the wagon. 

Juniors first, you need not doubt. 

Sandwiches and cakes and apples, 

All were i>iled up in a heap. 
And the way that they were set on 

Was a sight to make one weep. 

And they left the gravel wagon 

Standing -tjiere beside the road. 
Then urged on the weary creatures 

To draw forth their heavy load. 

IVferrily they clattered onward 

Song and laughter filled the air, 
And the chaperones were busy. 

Chiding many a spooning pair. 

'(^)urse the Seniors were not guilty. 

Tliey would not do such a nhing. 
Juin'ors were the worst ofTenders, 

Bet this makes their conscience sting. 

After all the lunch was eaten 

They decided to return, 
Freshies who were getting sleepy, 

For their little beds did yearn. 

Fainter grew the songs and laughter, 

Just a few sang merrily. 
Many eyes wore growing heavy. 

Many heads dri)oped wearily. 



ITwenly-SixJ 



Ev'rytliinsj was still jind poiu-oful. 

Thoy were on tlieir lioinewiird way, 
Wlieii was heard tlie forcet'ul comment, 

"(Josli! l?nt here's the deuce to pay I' 

Instantly the steeds were halted. 
Instantly the sleepers woke. 

Some in wonder, some amusement, 
But they found it was no joke. 

Quickly all climbed from the waiion. 

For it lurched unsteadily. 
And examined ii on all sides. 

What the trouble was to see. 

Soon they found it. 'twas a hind wheel. 
And the tire lay on the frround. 

Tiien arose a dismal Kroaninij, 

When the news was passed around. 

For it pierced their sleep-foi;iL>ed sense^ 
There was nothinsi' but to walk. 

They inis-lv; just as well be startinu', 
'Twas no use to stand an! talk. 

So with many uroans and j^rotests 
They set forth ujion their way. 

Some there were who would be merry 
Rut the most were far from say. 

Two and two. in threes, and sinuly. 

Wearily they plodded on, 
Rarer, fainter. i>rew the lauu'iiter. 

All their siiirits ua.v were srone. 

Well, of course they not home sometime, 

'Twas not over half a mile. 
At the time they swore 'twas twenty. 

Now they tell it with a smile. 

Had one come alonjr next morninit, 
'Fore the wreck was cleared away. 

He'd have seen the poor old hay-rack. 
And the road all strewn with hay. 

Hats and handkerchiefs and a])ples, 
Nfarked their projiress into town, 

Apples, 'specially nice ureen ones, 
Were strunir all alonir the sround. 

When it comes to entertaining 

Juniors really can't l)e beat. 
You must travel far and wide e'er 

Yon will with their eipials nu'ct. 



fP.g. 1 

IT wenly-ScvenJ 



Yet we'd offer a suggestion, 

One or two'd not be amiss, 
Juniors surely won't be angry; 

Our suggestion's simply this: 

"Tis not really (juite the thing to 
Make your guests of honor work. 

So we would advise the Juniors 
Duty never more to shirk. 

Also when you give a hay-ride 

You must have a lot of hay, 
Never use a gravel wagon, 

In a hay-rack is the way. 

Some who were a bit partic'lar. 

Didn't get enough to eat: 
Sandwiches are not improved by 

Lying under someone's feet. 

Still considering the bright side, 

Ev'ryone had a great time. 
May it be recalled by all those 

Who should (diance to read this rhyme. 

Frances Brown '15 




[P.ge 1 



jp^$^^^ 



^xpmmst nf a 3Frp0l|man 



Lawrence, Cal. 
Auffiist 22, 1914. 
Dearest Mae : 

Well at last I have my heart's desire, 1 
am jroing to a public school. On Aujrust 10 
I became a Freshman in the Lawrence 
Ili^ih School. It's just the srrandest place 
in the world. But let me tell you what 
they did to me. 

Ilazin.ir may be forbidden in this school 
but the Sophomores don't know that it 
is. They take a delight in hazing me be- 
cause I am one of the freshest, greenest, 
humans that ever entered the portals of 
a high school. Of course, coming straight 
from the select Miss Shinn's, I thought 
that I knew it all, but when these same 
ignorant Sophomores were through I was 
convinced that I didn't know a thing. The 
second day that I was here they seemed 
to become aware of my presence and the 
third day they were ready to bid me wel- 
come. That morninsr Dad brouglU me to 
school and I was in the pink of j)erfection 
when I entered the door. There I was 
met by five girls who escorted me to the 
dressing room where about twenty more 
were assembled. I didn't know that they 
were all Sophomores. I thought that they 
were unusually sociable, but alas all my 
illusions soon vanished. They told me 
that all Freshmen must go through certain 
ordeals before they became full-fledged 
students. They read me a lot of rules, 
of which they gave me a copy, and then 
jx-rfomied the ordeal. They took down 
my hair which I had arranged with such 
loving care that morning and braided it 
into six tight pig tails, each of which they 
tied with .» different colored rib))on. I 
was a sight I The girls howled with laugh- 
ter. Just then the bell rang and they left 
me alone in misery. At first I was angry 
and was on the point of iroing to the prin- 
< ipal, but just then I happened to get n 



glimpse of myself in the mirror. I had to 
hold my sides and roar. 

My common sense told me that the Sophs 
thought that I would rather miss class 
than be laughed at. I stood still a min- 
ute and asked myself, "Are you game?" 
(That's high school slang). 1 replied to 
my question, "I am." 

All Freshmen are warned and cautioned 
against being late for class but this par- 
ticular morning I wasn't afraid. I would 
wait until the class was deep in the les- 
son and then 1 would appear. What a sen- 
sation I would create ! And let me an- 
nounce that it was some sensation! The 
class went wild and the teacher couldn't 
control them. She wrote a little note and 
sent me to the office with it. You might 
think that I was afraid to go to the of- 
fice but strange to relate I was not. The 
principal thought that I was the one who 
was i)laying the joke and I allowed him to 
think so. He gave me a pretty stiff lec- 
ture but I didn't mind it because I hapjiened 
to spy a twinkle way back in the corner of 
his eye. Then he sent mc down to rearrange 
my hair. There are several Sophs in the his- 
tory class and two of them are girls. 
When I reappeared they glanced at me 
an.xiously, but I smiled sweetly and took 
my seat. Of course they expected that 
I had told and that it would soon be their 
turn to go to the office. Rut when the day 
passed and nothing ha]>])ened, they seemed 
relieved. 

The next morning the whole twenty met 
me at the door and I wondered whit would 
l>ap|>en. Each girl stei>i)ed forward and 
shook hands with me. I was feeling 
j>ufTed up and was about to pat myself on 
the back when I overheard one girl say, 
"Cordy acted more like a Sophomore than 
a measly little scrub." This made me feel 
prettv small and I resr)lved to be the meek- 
est Freshman of the flock. Fiut I could 



fP.r- 

lTw«nty-Nii 



never live up to a resolution and besides 
you know "Freshmen are Freshmen" just 
as "pigs is pig's." Consequently I get 
my nose pulled quite often. 

I've signed for "gym" work and basket- 
ball. I also belong to the tennis club. Next 
spring t'he fiirls are going to have a base- 
ball team. I think I'll try out for pitcher. 
Spring is a long way off and I may be able 
to throw a ball straight before that time. 
But I'm afraid I'll throw it too straight 
and hit the batter. 

I'm taking History, English, Algebra, 
German and Physical Geogxaphy. It's all 
lots of fun and vfully interesting. Les- 
sons aren't very hard and I find that wit'h 
la. little extra work I'll get a. passing mark. 

Well, I will have to stop now and do 



that little extra work. Good-bye, lots of 
love from. 

Your Freshie Friend, 

Cordy Johnson. 
P. S. Every Freshman thinks that his 
class is the greatest institution on earth. 
But I found that the rest of the school 
doesn't think so and that the Sophomores 
think that their sole duty in life is to cor- 
rect and manage the morals and manners 
of those low beings, sometimes called 
"Freshmen," but more frequently "Scrubs." 
Oh I tell you it's great to be a Scrub in 
Lawrence but Mae I'm longing for the 
time -vVhen I shall be a Sophomore. 

C. J. 

Ella Wurz. '15 




fP.g. ] 

iThirlyJ 



3«ntnr0 'Ifi 



When you speak of work or of speed, 
There's nothiiiij tliat we lat-k or need. 
Xow let me explain one by one 
Who we are and what we have done. 

Ruth her cooking does first rate, 
Some man'il find her a pood mate. 
He'll have to eat lunch with a smile 
And often have to wait a while. 

Henrj' oft explosions has 
Trying: to manufacture fras. 
He takes away the heat too late 
And just escapes a mournful fate. 

Chick in Latin has gained renown. 

He oft has "hie" and "hoc" turned 'round 

But in his class he stands ahead 

Or next to it his teacher said. 

Raymond does always want the facts 
The Prof, explains them out in acts, 
If Raymond should more points desire 
He might arouse the Prof's just ire. 

Now what can I of Andrew say 
Who sits adreaming all the day. 
Of what he thinks, I'm in the dark 
His thoughts are on the sea embarked. 

Henry has much to learn as yet 
He is the cooking class' pet. 
He sits there shyly looking on 
While all the girls around him throng. 

Vernon is perfect in one art 
For he has won a Freshman's heart 
There's nothing more left to explain 
You've all been there — he's not t<> blame. 

B^mma's a lonely girl this year 

She misses a graduate 1 fear. 

She sits and dreams for hours at a time. 

And to disturb her would be a crime. 

There's nothing of myself to tell 
I'm sure you know me very well. 
'Twould not be ladylike you know 
To talk and of mvself to blow. 

P. M. B., 'IG. 



rp.ge 

iThiny-Onr 



®i|f Wtst fax tl|? lEaat 



A boy about eighteen years of age, sat 
in the drawing room of an old southern 
Alabama mansion. Suddenly he rose rest- 
lessly to his full height. Into his eyes 
crept a look of wistful longing, as he lifted 
his violin and passed his fingers caress- 
ingly over it. As he gently drew the bow 
across the strings, soft, sad strains of 
exquisite music floated through the large 
French windows and drifted away among 
the stately old trees and beautiful shrub- 
bery. All unconscious of time, he played 
softly on, pausing now and then to gaze 
unseeingiy before him. 

A soft step was heard in the hall and 
a tall woman entered the room. She was 
evidently his mother, for there was a 
striking resemblance between the two. 

"Ralph," she said in a voice, refined 
and low, "Do stop that sad music ! What 
is ailing you?" 

"You know mother," he answered some- 
what irritably. 

"But, my son, do you want to really go 
to that horrid wild West?" 

"Yes." 

"Oh, Ralph, I thought I could have you 
stay here and grow up a gentleman !" 

"Yes, mother, but can't there be gentle- 
men in the West as well as in the East?" 

"I don't know about that," she answered 
doubtfully. 

"Father always says that the outward 
appearance doesn't make the gentleman, 
but that which is in his heart." 

Mrs. Brown looked at the boy thought- 
fullv. then said, "Do you really want to 
go?" 

"I sure do," he replied eagerly. 

"Well then, you will have to .settle it 
with father." 

The boy kissed his mother and hurried 
away in search of his father. Father and 
son had a long talk together, which ended 
in Ralph having his own way. 



Exactly a week later Ralph hurried 
through the hall on his way to the car- 
riage, which was waiting. At the door he 
was stopped by a slender girl with eyes 
and hair considerably lighter than his own. 
She clung to him with her arms about his 
neck. 

"I wish I were going with you," she 
whispered. 

"So do I, Sis," he answered, "but you 
can't, Who'd stay and comfort mother? 
Besides the West's no place for girls like 
you. Good-bj'e Dot." 

He kissed her and was gone. The brown 
eyes brimmed with tears as they saw the 
horses trot briskly down the avenue. A 
few minutes later he was being rapidly 
whirled away. Away from home ! Into the 
world ! 

Out of the face of his father, stern with 
suppressed feeling, shone his gentle eyes. 
Again he felt the grip that made his fin- 
gers ache and heard that familiar voice, 
he so loved, "My son, my son, Good-bye !" 
"Dear Father," he murmured and then 
turned to divert himself with the objects 
whirling' by. 

At first the country through which he 
passed was well known to him. Gradually 
it all grew strange. In Colorado the rail- 
way stopped abruptly at a small station 
called Redding. Ralph looked about him 
w'hcn he stepped from the train and saw 
only a few shanties, strangly, lonely-look- 
ing out there in the wide plains covered 
with sage brush. While he stood there 
a "sawed off" man in a ereat felt hat and 
"chaps" came up to him. The twitchinu' 
of his sandy mustache plainly indicated 
the presence of a quid of tobacco com- 
fortably stowed in his cheek. Yellow hair 
and big bushy eye-brows were given force 
by the blue eyes which gleamed wickedly. 
Such a face few people liked. He stared 



fP.ge 1 

IThirty-TwoJ 



at Halph tor a moment ami tluMi spoke in 
a deep voiee. 

"Air you (he younj;: feller lliat is due tor 
the St:'.r Ranelif" 

"Yes." replied Ralph, "I am." 

"Wal." continued the cowboy, "I'm 
Sandy Benard, my ri<rht name be John, 
but you see everybody calls me Sandy. 1 
iruess we'll be ijoin'." 

He led the way to a pair of bronchus 
standinir in the sliade of one of tiie shan- 
ties. Halph followed silently, inwardly 
amused at his compa:iion. They mounted 
and rode away throujih the trackless plain. 
The Easterner was by no means asleep. 
They were surrounded on every side 
barren plains, only broken here and there 
by a clum]> of saac brush, which occasion- 
ally held a friirhtened rabbit or a ho|>pinji 
horntoad. The dim purple mountains in 
the distance fonned a frinjie for the vast 
l)lains. The men rode in silence which 
was almost unbroken. Sandy stole sly 
yrlances at his companion. He saw a youth 
with honest eyes, clear brow and deter- 
minedly set chin, a face wholly unafraid. 

That niffht they camped at a water- 
hole. After cookinir and eatinir their sup- 
pers, they rolled up In their blankets and 
slept soundly beneath the stars. 

It was Sunday mornin-r when they ar- 
rived at the Star Ranch. The ranch was 
in the low foot-liills. The ramblin<r ranch 
house was ap])roached from the front. It 
was made of adobe with some clay. All 
of the buildinjrs around the place were 
as neat as the house itself. As the horse- 
men rode to the door the owner of the 
ranch, a middle aired man, came out. He 
approached Ralph in a brisk, authoritative 
manner and received him srraciously. Af- 
ter the Boss, as he was called by all the 
cowboys, had arranged all matters of im- 
)>ortance with Ralph, Sandy escorted him 
to the bunk house where the cowboys' 
quarters were. 

At first the men treated him distantly. 
This did not matter much to Ralph for 
he had his work to do and he did it faith- 
fully. It was not long until they saw that 
he was honest and wanted to work. When 
he first came to the ranch the men had 
teased him incessantly about his white 



hands, — "Lady tim;ers," they called them. 
This was rather embarrassinj;, but he soon 
succeeded in ••ettiiiir them as brown and 
rouirh as the others. 

About n week after he came, an old In- 
dian rode up to the ranch on a beautiful 
black horse. Ralph and Sandy were sit- 
tina- in the shade fixinjr their saddles. 
Ralph was silently admirinfj the animal 
when Sandy volunteered "That thar lndi'..n 
is a old risident of the country and ain't 
never been taken to a risarvation. What 
cher thinkin' about"?" 

Ralph only started sli.uhtly and irrinned. 

"I'urty fine natr he's ridin', ain't it?" 
With these words Sandy's eyes narrowed 
to mere slits in his roujrh, sunburned face 
and searched Ralph's face like cold points 
of blue steel. He found no clue for sus- 
jiicion and shifted his fraze ajjain to the 
horse, where it rested lonninaly. He sud- 
denly spied a fly near the toe of his boot, 
and s|)at his vensreance at it. 

The old chief had seen Ralph and had 
trusted him instantly. Ralph went about 
his work ajiain, but he had not forgotten 
the horse. He decided to have it. 

The new cowboy was beinjj watched all 
the time although he did not realize it. 
The boss was thinkina about retiring amd 
was in need of a reliable foreman. He was 
attracted to Ral])li and questioned the 
men reaardinir him. 

When Rali)h Brown had been at the 
Star RaiH'h for a few months, a letter was 
handed to bim by one of the men. He 
looked at it curiously, it was not from 
home for it bore no postmark. On tearinsr 
it open he found a slip of jiaper on which 
was written in a cramjicd hand: 
"mr r brown 
"der ser. 

"red feather is soiii to dar haiii)y 
huntin srroun and want you to hav 
black hawk, jrive him a home 

"red feather." 

Ralph aazed at the letter in bewilder- 
ment. Black Hawk! For him! Meditatinsr 
a moment he turned and went in search of 
the Boss. After readin<r the letler, the 
Boss looked at the younjr man. 

"Will you lake him?" he asked simjily. 

Ralph nodded. The older man laid a 



iThirty-Thr, 



hand on his shoulder and said, "Red 
Feather was fond of you from the first 
time he ever laid eyes on you. Now ijo 
and get your horse." 

The young man mounted his pinto and 
rode away to Red Feather's hut. On 
knocking at the door, he received a faint, 
"Come." Entering, he found himself in a 
dark room. Its furniture consisted of 
a chair, a stove and a bed, on which the 
old man lay. Ralph went quickly to the 
bed side and held the offered hand in si- 
lence. Finally Red Feather spoke. It was 
in a low voice, "Rod Feather — is — goin — 
to — the — Happy — Hunting — Grounds. Take 

— Black — Hawk. Take good — care — of 

him — always." 

Ralph promised he would and the old 
man closed his eyes with a sigh. Red 
Feather was now with the Great Spirit. 

In the stable Ralph found the black 
horse. For a while he gazed at him fondly, 
then mounted and rode sadly away. 

A week later the Boss summoned him to 
the office. An hour or more passed be- 
fore he again reappeared. He was now 
foreman of the Star Ranch. The other 
cowboys, with the exception of Sandy, 
heard the news joyfully. They had learned 
to love him. Sandy eyed him from a dis- 
tance with envy. He was exceedingly jeal- 
ous of Ralph. 

One day Sandy was wandering aboxit 
the buildings in a very black mood. He 
passed the open door of Ralph's office in 
his wandering and glancing in he found it 
vacant. A sudden impulse to do Ralph harm 
seized him. He quickly had a pen in his 
fingers and Ralph's account book open. • 
In a minute he had changed several num- 
bers and taken some bills from the table 
and was gone just as the foreman was 
about to enter an opposite door. 

Ralph discovered the fix up in his num- 
bers and worked for hours to straighten 
it out but was unsuccessful. When the 
Boss heard of it, he investigated it but 
without result. Accordingly Ralph was 
discharged. 

The young man felt his disgrace very 
keenly. After selling Black Hawk, much 
against his will he left the country. The 
bovs could not believe him guiltv. ITis 



friend Jack, was sure that he was not. 
One bright June morning, when all out 
doors was alive and glad, a dark figure 
was seen against the distant horizon by 
the cowboys of the Star Ranch. As it drew 
nearer and became more distinct, they be- 
gan speculating as to the idently of the 
rider. 

"That's that kid. Brown on Black Hawk!" 
ejaculated Jack. 

Surely it could not be he ! Yes he was 
coming directly toward them. The cow- 
boys raised a joyful yell which was aji- 
swered by a well-known shout. 

Black Hawk, as if knowing that this 
was home, bore his rider up to the group 
with a dash. There followed a great deal 
of hand-shaking and joyful exclamations. 
"Where have you been?" asked Jack, 
slapping Ralph affectionately upon the 
shoulder. 

The rest were like a I)unch of eager 
school-boys. 

"Tell the whole story," someone cried. 
"There's not much to tell," began Ralph. 
"Only when I left this ranch I was dis- 
gusted with the West and decided to go 
home. I got as far as Kansas City when 
my funds ran low so I had to stop. I 
hunted work for a week before I. finally 
landed a job as reporter for a small paper. 
By the time I had earned enough for a 
ticket home I had no desire to go. Instead 
I had an intense yearning for the West and 
the free open life of the plains," he 
paused and ran his hand carressiiigly over 
the glossy mane of Black Hawk. The 
horse rubbed his nose against Ralph's 
shoulder, "and for you, too, Black Hawk," 
he continued, "I arrived in Wyoming a few 
weeks ago. I wasn't brave enough to face 
you just then. I didn't like the country so 
well and besides work was scarce. Finally I 
found myself in these mountains. I just 
felt sure that yon fellows didn't believe me 
crooked in spite of the dope the Boss had 
on me." 

"And we didn't," the boys rejilied, all 
speaking at once. "You aren't of (hat 
sneaking kind." 

"Thankee, for the com])liment, hoys," 
urinned Ralph. 

"But what became of that man, Mitchell, 



IThitty-FourJ 



who boujiht this there iiasr off you?" nskcfl 
one man a laomeiit later. 

"Sear<*li lae," said Kalpli. 

"1 seen Sandy ridin' tliat thar lioss over 
ill Keddin' last week, — sure tliiujr — ." 

"Oh ! Go on ! You were seein' soldiers 
hy the half dozen too," put in Jaek. 

"Not on your life. I warn't induijjin'." 

"Fellows," interru|ited Ral])h, "I'm here 
today with sad news for you. I wouldn't 
liave been here otherwise. — Sandy's dead — 
stone dead." 

"Whateher mean?" All eyes were turned 
on the speaker in bewilderment. 

Ralph drew a i)aek of papers from liis 
pocket and .selected a dirty piece of an 
old envelr)pe from the others. 

"Head that," he said, "It's my pass port 
into respectable society and back to my 
honor." 

Just then the Boss came out of the cor- 
ral carryin;:: a coil of rope in his hand. 
Jack read. 

"I took those bills, — Sandy." 

For a moment the truth seemed to per- 
colate slowly, then a lusty shout set the 
buildiufrs rinirin^. Glad hands seemed to 
extend out of space. Ralph saw them 
throuirh tear dimmed eyes, thinkinir, these 
are friends indeed. 

After these expressions of u;ladness and 
trust were completed, Rali>li sj>oke in his 
most solemn tones. All heads were bowed 
the moment the rollinjr tones broke uj><)n 
their ears. 

"Fellows," he said, "I left his body un- 
der a tree at Willow Watering, about four 
hours ride to the north east on the Red- 
dinsr Trail. We must sret him away be- 
fore niiilit or the coyotes will." 

"What's ealinfr you fellows?" the voice 
of the Boss was cool. No one sjioke. 
Ralidi's eyes met those of his former em- 
l)loyer almost hau<rhtily. 

"Well Brown, What brinps you back?" 

"He's innocent." Jack put in before 



Ralph could answer," "and here's the 
prool." 

The Boss read the |)aper, extendinj; his 
free hand, srripped Ralph's and said, "For- 
jrive me ! 1 have never believed it of you 
in spite of the evidence! There was no 
other way. I had to discharj^e you." 

"Sandy's lyinjr dead away out there. 
Boss. I eame ui)on him when 1 was on 
my way to Mitchell's with this horse. 
He was within a few yards of Willow Wat- 
erinjr. His eyes were bloodshot and his 
hands bleedinfr, bis knees stuck throujih his 
trousers swollen and bruised." 

"What was the matter? What liapix'iied 
to him?" 

"Rattler." 

"He raved for hours and about midnijrht 
sat up straiaht and wild-eyed jrazed at me." 

"Are you Brown?" he demanded at last. 

"Yes.'*' 

"Wal, I reckon as now I've told you, I 
sup|>ose you're jjlad to see me dyins." 

"He wouldn't lie down, Boss, but jrazed 
at the stars a few minutes. Suddeidy he 
fumbled about his clothina-. He could not 
articulate; his hands fell helplessly to his 
side and he sank back afrainst the sad- 
dle. His lips were moviufr. Piece paper — 
pencil, were all I heard. He seemed to 
sleej). I 5rot there Lut could not arouse him. 

"At sunrise he turned his head and 
reached for the paper, tryins: to write. I 
sruided his hand as he mumbled. "I took 
— those — bills. — Sandy. He was tryinsr to 
thank me out of that bruised and broken 
body of his. Poor unfortunate fellow! Now 
let's brinfr him home." 

That nijj-iit at sunset Ralph drove the 
backboard into the circle of buildinirs. The 
body of Sandy lay on a heaj) of straw in 
the bottom. Ralph jrnided the horses into 
the yard thinkinjr of his first cominj: to 
the West. Now he could go home and face 
his father. lb- had jiroven his honesty. 
M. R. '18. 



iTh.ily Fi. 



i 



(With due apologies to the shade of Chaucer. ) 

Whan that we ar(e) about (e) to .sraduate 

It is ris'ht fitt(e) to tell(e) of Seniours aiglite. 

So ye iihal kno\v(e) of what condicioun 

And of what wourth they ar(e), hem everiehon. 

And of them al ther ar(e) bold youthes foiirc 

Whom, we al hop(e) this rhim(e) will nat mak(e) sore, 

For we do mean(e) hem al to bawle oute, 

And we beseech yow al no word(e) to doubte. 

Four(e) girls ther ar(e), and wourthy Tnayd(e)s they are 

And we intend(e) ther faim(e) to sprede fare. 

SLATSE 

With(e) us ther is a youth (e) yeleped Slatse 

Who, when address{e)d by us, doth say(e), "Oh ratse," 

Or "oh shut up !" or "oh go on !" and swiche, 

So, as yow see, in curteisy nat riche, 

This youth (e), who is ful selendre, len(e) and lank(e), 

Is in this sc'hool(e) an artist(e) of ,areat(e) ranke. 

For it is his plea sour to draw(e) cartoones 

Of whisker (e)d aentilmen and ugiie coones, 

And doog(e)s and fo<W(e)s. And e'en the Prof besides 

Is caricatur(e)d, yet ne'er this rash(e) youth(e) chides. 

A pompadour he hath, this gentil boye 

The which (e) he doth regard with pryd(c) and joye: 

With anxious cayr(e) he hath his lokkes trained 

And e'en to plaster them with soap(e) hath deigned, 

And now strait from his nobel brow they ryse 

And he appears ful scolarlike and wyse. 

BLANCHE AND FRITZ 

Of maydens two T will(e) vow next devyse 

Theyr disi)ositiouiis and ek(e) ther guise. 

The mayd(e) called Blanch(e) she is full short and i)hunpe 

Yet she nathles is always on the jumpe. 

Ful ruddie is hir fac(e) e'en lyk{e) a rose. 

And snial hir mouth(e) and tiptilted hir nose. 

The other mayden is right(e) len(e) and talle. 

And when she is arrayd for basket balle 

Lyk(e) matches sem(e) hir legg(e)s and ck{e) hir anr.es. 

Siie is nat vayn(e), yet anxious stryv(e)s for charmes, 

To crull(e) hir lokk(e)s an iron she doth use. 

And loni;' l)cfor the mirrour she doth muse. 



fPage 1 

IThirly-SiiJ 



Hir nos(c), which is ful laiii, a iiobl(c) beai<c>, 

She doth bideck witli pmulr(i'), also in-h cheaive. 

Thes(e) nuiydens, in ther Seniour difjnit.ve, 

Ful wourthy ar(e), yet aft ar(c) rii;iu sillye, 

For biuirh(e) they do, e'en lyk(e) a Fresliman srreene, 

Yet ne'er lyk(e) under eiassnien do they (lueene. 

JOE 

We hav(e) a traytor in onr(e) ehiss(e) nani(e)d Jo(e). 

He lyk(e)d a Freshman pirl nat loni; ajro. 

Altho a eiiarniinjr niayden. and ful si)rye, 

Stil this does nat explain the reason whye 

A Freshman jrreen(e) to notie(e) he shold deisrne. 

And he shold know that this doth cansle) us payne. 

But stil. he is a youth (e) of eourteisye 

And he doth lov(e) to aid(e) a fayr(e) ladye. 

And he doth serv(e) ech on(e) rijjht jrallantly 

Wheth(e)r fatt(e) or slim, or tall(e) or short be she. 

In basket ball(e) he hath amazinjr skilie 

And he cann(e) throw a sioelle) when e'er he wille. 

ALVIN AND WALTER 

Thes(e) two Seniours ther teaeliers do harasse 

For it is aft ther wish(e) to cut a classe. 

Yet who shold hav(e) a perfect rii>ht to cut 

And 'seap(e) unpleasaunt thinjres, but 

A Seniour, who doth liav(e) all privilejres? 

And what reck they that ev(e)ry teacher rages? 

The first nam(e)d youth (e) a risrht shy ladd(e) is he 

And it doth vex him, Oil I so dredfulyl 

When s()m(e) bold mayd(e) to flirt with him doth trye, 

Tiien he doth blush, and shyly drooj) his eye. 

The other youth (e) is r|uyt(e) the contra rye 

And sur(e)ly doth behav(e) dis,s:rac(e)fullye. 

For flirt he doth with ev(e)ry mayden fayre 

He haps to met(e), nor littl(e) doth he cayre 

What ,guis(e) she hav(e), or what positioun 

For he doth flirt with al. hem everichcm. 

From lofty Seniour down(e) to Freshman <.Meeiie 

With ech and al of hem he lov(e) to <|ueene. 

ELLA 

This mayden onc(e) did think this schooKe) to leaven, 

Yet coud nat bear(e) to leav(e) the Seniours seven; 

So slie return (e)d and now we ar(e) just eijrhte. 

She oft. alas! too oft! doth com(e) in laite 

And even when she doth arryv(e) at nyne. 

She must hir hayre fixe, or the shyne 

Kemov(e) from oflf hir iios(e) with poudre white 

So she may nat appear a i)erfect frijrhte. 

This mayden is of sj^each oft riirht sarcastic. 

And oii(e) must be of tempre riirht elastic 



fP-r- 

IThiny-Srv 



Els(e) he wold be quit(e) crush(e)d by hir sharp speaches, 
Eeh word(e) of whiehe to its marke reaches. 
To suitors she is sarcastic and cru(e)le 
Or, what is wors, indifferent and coole. 

NEVA 

Our(e) Neva is a coy, retiring; mayde 
And e'er wold keep hirself quyt(e) in the shade. 
Swieh(e) modesty (e) is right pleasing to finde, 
And in Seniours quyt(e) rare is its kinde. 
Hir cheak(e)s and lipp(e)s are redd(e) as any rose, 
A payr(e) of spectacles adorn hir nose 
And lend to hir a look of dignitye. 
Yet quj-t(e) imdig-nified right aft is she, 
For on a day so madlie did she danee 
(And quyt(e) unlik(e) a Seniour she did prance) 
Hir spectacles from off hir nos(e) did drop, 
And break in two, then only did she stop. 
She is right short, yet doth long to be talle 
And it to her is lyk(e) wormwood and galle. 
That e'en the Freshmen surpass her in height, 
But still she is of tempre swet(e) and brighte. 

F. B. '15. 




fPage 1 

iThirly-EightJ 



i 
^aw Wtll ^inh a Hay | 



Gloom had laid his heavy hand upon 
■the three boys who sat in Room 21, in 
Tail's Hall, of The Hamilton Military 
Academy. They were Jaek Daulton, Senior, 
captain and center of the basket ball team, 
Ray Woodrviff, Senior, and forward on the 
basket ball team, and Willie Dustin, plain 
Freshman. 

"Talk about your luck." growled Jack, 
"Here are Ray and I waiting to be put in 
the suard-house and the championship 
game with Hilton coming off a week from 
Saturday night. Besides I suppose Betty 
and Carol are about crazy because they 
haven't heard from us since last Saturday. 
It's all your faulty Dusty. If you had held 
on to those letters we would be in the gym 
now instead of waiting to be escorted to the 
guard-house." 

"You fellows make me tired!" snorted 
Willie. As long as Nancy and I delivered 
your messages safely at the risk of our 
own necks it was all right. But because 
I let one slip you are ready to call me seven 
kinds of a fool and then some, and here I 
am risking my life for you again. If I'm 
caught here it will be the guard-house for 
little Willie. But I'll tell you what I'll do. 
Wednesday, after the team passes the 
guard-house you fellows drop a couple of 
notes out of the window and yours truly 
will deliver them. Hall will be in his study 
and there will be no chance of being 
caught. I'll — " but just then footsteps 
were heard approaching the door so Willie 
beat a hasty retreat down the fire escape. 

Cadets Daulton and Woodruff were to be 
confined in the guard-house Tuesday at 9 
p. m.. to await a general court-martial. 
Their offense was the most serious in the 
history of the school. They had been cor- 
resi>onding with two girls of the Garwood 
Seminary and two of the letters fell into 
the hands of the head master of Hamilton. 
* Waldon Hall. 

IThhtT-NiBcJ 



Madame Eliza Brandon, Dean at Gar- 
wood, was Mr. Hall's bitterest enemy and 
he refused to allow his boys to have any- 
thing to do with her girls. She upheld the 
same rule in her school. Several years 
before they had been engaged but had quar- 
reled over some trivial matter and had not 
spoken since. 

Wednesday afternoon at four o'clock the 
basket ball team passed the guard-house 
on the way to the gym. Ten minutes later 
footsteps were heard on the walk and two 
notes dropped at the feet of Mr. Hall, who 
had just rounded the corner of the guard- 
house. He picked thm up. glanced at the 
inscription, frowned and i)ut them in his 
pocket. After a minute of deliberation he 
proceeded on his way. Five minutes later 
Dusty came running down the path. 

"Fellows", he called softly as he reached 
the window. No answer. He called again. 
Two heads appeared at the window. 

"What's wanted?" asked Ray. 

"Where are the letters?" asked Willie. 

"The letters? Didn't you get them? We 
dropped them out about five minutes ago 
when you passed." 

"I just got here. Wheelan kept me for 
algebra. Who is on guard today?" 

"Toots Reynolds. He'd help us out of 
trouble so ^o and ask him if he knows 
anything about the letters." 

In a few minutes Willie was back with 
a look of despair upon his countenance. 

"He says that Hall came down with some 
orders a little while ago and went back 
this way.'' 

"Great Scott! Isn't that just our luck!" 
exclaimed Jack. "Now we'll get it for 
sure. No chance of playing a week from 
Saturday night now. You're the best mes- 
senger I ever saw. Dusty. You couldn't 
b)iy a postage stamp without losing it 
before it crossed the counter. You make 



me tired. Don't ever suggest anything to 
me again." 

"Aw shut up ! You fellows must think I'm 
your goat. I hope Hall gives you the limit," 
and with that the cruel Willie made for 
the gym. 

Monday at two o'clock the court con- 
vened. Just as the case was called a note 
was handed to Mr. Hall. This is what he 
read: 

"Dear Waldon : 

Last night as I was making my 
usual round of visits I found one of 
my students, Elizabeth Wall, crying as 
if her heart would break. On inquir- 
ing into the cause I learned that she 
was crying because she had not heard 
from Jack Daulton of your school, 
since a week ago last Saturday. In- 
stead of being angry I was sorry and 
my heart went out to her. I thought 
at once of you and of our quaiTel of 
several years ago. Waldon, I am sorry 
for I know now that I was wrong. I 
ask vour foririveness. 



I also ask that you let your boys 
join with my girls in giving their com- 
mencement dance. 

Affectionately yours, 

Eliza." 

Mr. Hall looked up and smiled as he 
noted the gloomy faces of the cadets in 
front of him. 

"I withdraw my charges against Cadets 
Daulton and Woodruff and reinstate them 
in their former position. Also I wish t'. 
state that you will be joined by the girls 
of Garwood Seminary at your commence- 
ment.", he said. 

Bedlam broke loose. The yelling, cheer- 
ing mob of boys with Daulton and Woodruff 
on their shoulders made their way outside 
and marched around and around the build- 
ing. 

"Look, look," whispered Betty to Jack 
as they strolled slowly up and down in the 
moonlight on commencement night, "I be- 
lieve Mr. Hall is proposing to Madame 
Brandon under Lover's Oak." 

Ella Wurz, '15. 



< 




fP.ge 1 
IForty J 



(iur Jr^Hhtr (Strls anil Inga 



OUR FRESHIE GIRLS 

A cutio biiiicli ol' Fresliint'u we, 

When first we entered Liberty: 

Coy Esther, with her lauirhinjv eyes, 

lias many a liandsonie boy capsized. 

^Vnd Kate considers it no sin 

To wear a handsome Jnnior's pin. 

Our Mabel is so meeiv and dear, 

Doth ever blush when a boy is near. 

There's Muriel who's not so very quiet 

And we all know she's on no diet. 

Most everyone knows how "Dinks'' is in History 

But her love affairs are still a mystery. 

Briffht Georsria is our B. B. star 

And in her i)layin«: is no mar. 

Yirsrin' in German's not very smart 

I'm afraid her thonjrhts are all of "Mart — ." 

While Ruth is sure a trump in drawinii 

She thinks that English "f*()mi)s." are horinu'. 

OUR FRESHIE BOYS 

We have a happy set of Freshie boys, 
They're dear old Liberty's pride and .joys. 
Ransom's our German and Alirebra shark 
lie never fails to iiet a hitrh mark. 
Homer thinks that all History's a bore 
And usually makes a detested "4." 
Younir Carl sure is our handsome boy 
And when dolled uj) looks truly coy. 
Iloratius his place in Ensrlish loses 
But nevertheless the whole school amuses. 
Roswell is certainly no teacher's pet 
They all think, "There's rooms to let." 
Stanley doesn't care to see his sister rn-jc. 
He's sure to stop her and start to nair. 
Jack is the boy with the curly hair 
He'd cut "Enslish" every day if he dare. 
Mya to school on a blue motor rides 
And most of the time in the basement hides. 
Forrest is a fpiiet and bashful lad 
And in school could never be bad. 
And the -/iris all think that Ned 
Should be spanked and sent to bed. 

Jlincrva Weihe, '18. 



(Slip Bnmfstir ^ri?«r? (Elaaa 



Oh Heaven! Oh Heaven! Oh help ns! 
Oh Lordy! What shall we do 
When we find that Huni^arian Goulash 
Is only a plain Irish Stew! 

"What's in a name!" says Shakespeare. 
"What's in a doughnut !" cries Zeb, 
"Naught but a hole in the center 
With the dough as heavy as lead." 

Zeb knows all about doughnuts, 
For out of the window hers flew, 
O'er the back fence of the alley, 
When she thought that nobody knew. 

Kuth Weihe. a golden-haired augel, 
Who never does an^-thing wrong, 
Hid her white sauce in the locker, 
To wait until Teacher had gone. 

Then into the sink she poured it 
And when if- had disappeared. 
She sighed a sigh of contentment 
And bid farewell to her fears. 

The best of the class is Emma, 
She knows how to cook real well. 
Her favorite dish is "Lemons". 
Served how? she will not tell. 

Fern knows how to cook biscuits. 

As light as the clouds above. 

She never gets into mischief 

And claims she knows nothinir of love. 

Frances, the dear little lassie. 
With all of her winning ways 
Fed some of the boys her cookies. 
The doctor was busy for days. 

Next comes our good cook. Polly, 
Who makes the French Fried Sjuids, 
Aiul when she's washing dish-towels 
She's bound to have plenty of suds. 



rP»Be 
iForty-Twf 



WIkmi Hcrtliii, llic nirl ol' tlic inountiiiii, 
Hroko opoii iin ejjfj one day, 
A chick .jumped out to surprise her 
And slic let it riy away. 

Now conies our dark eyed Sayde, 
Jler pastry we all adore. 
Tlie shape of some of lier cream puff.s 
AVonld make an elephant roar. 

Then last of all comes Henry, 
Whose jriii'rer- bread was swell. 
A Carneirie Medal he merits 
For makinjr it so well. 

Now the one who eomjwsed this poem 
Has as many faults as the rest. 
And amouii all the cooks in the dou;ih-houst 
It's hard to pick ont the best. 



Huth Lent. '18. 




lOOKINC CLASS— I)().\n;sTlC SCIKNCK DKl'.MM'.MKXT 



lForty-T>itre J 



I 



IGaBt Will nnh iEtBtammt 

iif tljr Class uf 1915 



Wo, the illustrious members of the 
Senior Class of the Liberty Union High 
School of the City of Brentwood, County 
of Contra Costa, State of California, 
being sound in mind, though worn in body 
because of the trials of our past four 
years, and not entirely influenced by the 
Faculty, do hereby meet on this Twenty- 
eighth day of May, 1915, to make, publish 
and declare this our last will and testa- 
ment with all the sadness which the oc- 
ca,sion demands. We will and bequeath in 
the manner following: 

First. To the Junior Class we will and 
betjueath our Senior dignity, our un- 
bounded talent, to be used in compiling the 
lOin Annual, and our enviable positions as 
bosses of the school. 

Second. To the Sophomore Class we 
will and bequeath our ability to escape 
hard work. 

Third. To the Freshman Class w«^will 
and bequeath our unsurpassable egotism. 
Fourth. The Senior girls leave their 
copies of Emerson's essays to the janitor 
with the stipulation that he use them in 
making the fire in the sewing room, and 
leave no trace of them behind to worry 
future generations. 

Fifth. I, Ella Wurz, do will and be- 
queath my long used aiul much abused 
whip to Mr. Martin to be used on the Jun- 
ior Class to enable them to get up enough 
speed to write an annual next year. My 
brown corduroy dress I will and bequeath 
to the cooking class, to be used in making 
holders to lift hot pans from the stove. 
My gift of sharp and pointed speech I 
leave to Herschel Miller, to be used spar- 
ingly in repartee with the girls. My anti- 
quated gray horse I bequeath to the man- 
ual training boys to carry them to and 
from the shop. My beloved frizzly locks 
I bequeath to Ruth Weihe on condition 



that she weai them in a fringe from ear 
to ear around her face. 

Sixth. I, Neva Sheddrick, do will and 
bequeath my glasses to the 1916 Josh 
Editor, to aid him in seeing the point to 
the jokes contributed to the annual from 
various sources. My dilapidated equi- 
page with the broken top I leave to those 
boys who have so kindly assisted me in 
harnessing my horse after school, to be 
divif'od among them as they see fit. My 
envied desk and chair in the Assembly, 
near the back window, I leave to Raymond 
Prcwett, so he may not have to crane his 
neck to see everything that is going on 
in the street. My rosy complexion I leave 
to Miss Gehringer, to be applied judiciously 
to those participating in school plays in 
the future. My abundance of hair I leave 
to Ruth Weihe, to be added to the fringe 
bequeathed by Ella Wurz, and worn only 
on special occasions, such as St. Patrick's 
Day. My blue cheviot skirt I leave to 
Zelnia Dainty to be worn with her mid- 
die blouses on condition that she consign 
her plaid skirt to the ash heap. 

Seventh. I, Blanche Juett, do bequeath 
my superfluous avoirdupois to Minerva 
Weihe, to be applied where she needs it 
the most. My red sweater I leave to next 
year's sewing class, to be dyed green and 
then made into chest protectors for the 
P^reshmen. My irrepressible giggle I leave 
to the Student Body to be distributed 
equally among the various members. My 
typewriter in the commercial room, I leave 
to any poor unfortunate who wants it. My 
hair, which curls in rainy weather I leave 
to Roswell Donaldson, to be superimposed 
upon his own straight locks. My blue 
serge dress I bequeath to Hulh Lent on 
condition that she make no alterations in 
the same, but wear it in its original con- 
dition. Mv unfailins talkativeness, I leave 



fP.Be ] 

IForty-FouiJ 



to Andrew Porter, knowin*; thnt it will be 
well used ;uid appreeiated. 

Kii:litli. I, Franees Brown, do will and 
l)e<|iieatli my slender Hjrure to the sewinji 
class, to be used as a model. My Pan- 
ama lial, wliieh I have worn to sehool tor 
two years and whieii is uood for at least 
ten years more, I bequeath to Kate Hud- 
son. My large voeabulary, whieli hass 
served me faithfully for the last four 
years I be(|ueath to the Freshman English 
Class, knowing I hem to be sadly in need 
of the same. My privilege of (|ueeniiig at 
noon I leave to Fern Squires and Hertha 
Howard hoping that they will not abuse 
the same by availing themselves of it loo 
frequently. My Mary Jane pumps I be- 
(pieath to Ransom Fox. knowing that he 
will want something to remember me by. 
My privilege of teasing same young mt\n 
I leave to Zelma Dainty. 

Ninth. I, Roy Frerichs, do bequeath my 
beautiful disposition to Frank Shellen- 
berger. My corduroy trousers and black 
shoes I leave to Henry Winfree, knowing 
that what he laeks in size he will make uji 
in conceit when he gets to be a Senior. 
My plaid mackinaw I leave to Eddie 
Hevey. My comet I leave to the Prof, to 
be used when the electric bell is out of or- 
der. My old motor I leave to Mr. Clark to 
use in riding to and from school. 

Tenth. I. Walter Swift, do bequeath 
my everlasting grouch to Aubrey William- 
son, to offset his own peri)etual cheerful- 
ness. My iiabit of flirting with all the 
trirls, I leave to my brother. Homer Swift, 
trusting that he will uphold the family 
reputation. My privilege of cutting 
classes. I leave to Ellis Cakebread, hoping 
that he will .appreciate the same and make 
good use of it. My dilapidated text books 
I leave to Adella Willett knowing that she 
has Ion-; admired and enviously coveted 
the same. My overdeveloped fondness for 
loafinir I leave to Mab«'l Sieding. 



Eleventh. I, Joe Hand, do becpieath my 
suite of rooms over the Tea Cup Inn to ihe 
High School to be used as a gynniasium. 
My pompadour, 1 leave to the Freshman 
girls, hoping there will be no quarreling 
over the division of the same. My popular- 
ity with the girls I leave to Henry Hark- 
ley, knowing that he has long envied me the 
same. My basket-ball suit 1 leave to 
Clifford McNaimara, on condition that he 
get no stouter, as the suit ean stand no 
undue strain. My red stocking cap 1 leave 
to Sayde Brown, knowing that it will har- 
monize beautifully with her hair. 

Twelfth. 1, Alvin Howard, do be(|ueath 
my bashfulness to Carl (\)wan, knowing 
him to be sadly in need of something of the 
kind. My accuracy in throwing nnid balls 
I leave to the ne.xt year Freshie boys, to 
be used in protecting themselves from the 
attaeks of the upper classmen. My fond- 
ues.':; for being absent from recitations I 
leave to Grace Milet. My facility of slow 
and deliberate locomotion, I leave to Emma 
Shellenberger. My habit of eoming any 
time after nine o'clock, I leave to John 
Snllenger. 

In witness hereof we set our hands and 
seals on this twenty-eighth day of May, in 
the year of our Lord, One Thousand Nine 
Hundred and Fifteen. 

Siyncd : 
Blanche Juett 
Ella Wurz 
Neva Sheddrick 
Franees Brown 
Roy Frerichs 
Alvin Howard 
Walter Swift 
Joe Hand 

Signed and sealed in the presence of: 
Herschel Miller 
Board of Censorship 
Ransom Fox 



[P.„ 1 

iForly.Fivr) 



Ill giving an account of our forge work 
it would take manj' pages to give in detail 
the work as we have gone over it in our 
course. ''Practical work," has been our 
motto all winter, and to keep us properly 
interested in our work we have, after a few 
weeks of all kinds of work, been allowed 
to make various small articles the process 
of making which leads to thoroughness and 
to an experience which places us upon a 
firmer footing and inspires each student 
with more confidence in his ability. Some 
of the work is difficult and trying, but in the 
end we have all enjoyed our small accom- 
plishments. 

In our shop we lack many conveniences, 
but this need of various articles has in- 
spired initiative and made us resourceful. 
We supply these articles by making them 
ourselves and thus learn to attain results 
under difficulties. 

Our processes have involved heating iron 
and steel of various compositions to {Tsroper 
temperatures for shaping, also the shap- 



ing, bending and welding of iron and steel 
of a high temper. 

We turn out genuine hand made tools, 
shaoed, polished and tempered. Amoii;? 
these articles are cold chisels, wrenches, 
screw drivers, diiferent kinds of hammers, 
flatters and hot eye cutters, drawing and 
bench knives, and hack saws. 

Many of these articles we color in var- 
ious ways in the fire and with acids and 
other metals. 

There is no way of judging how much is 
done during the term by examining our 
exhibit, for not more than a third of our 
actual work can be shown on account of 
our economical phase of the work which 
involves repeated use of \arious articles 
and scraps for other steps and phases of 
the course. 

A visit to the shop any day will enable 
you to get a fair notion of the character 
and importance of this department and to 
understand how intimately it is related to 
the evervdav life of ranch work. 




fP.g* 1 

IFoity-SiiJ 




GIRLS' ATHLETICS 

Tlio uirl> bouaii l)a?.ket-ball practice 
early in September. Enthusiasm ran liiirli 
and twice a week teams appeared on the 
court. 

LIBERTY VS. MX. DIABLO 

Our Krst i;ame was played with Mt. 
Diablo team Oct. 10, on the home court. 
The Liberty girls led the score tlirouuliout 
the game. It was the first contest srame 
Mt. Diablo had ever played but they kept 
us nioving. The score stood at the end 
of the last half 18-6 in favor of Liberty. 
The line up was as follows: 

LIHERTY MT.DIAHLO 

FORWARDS 
Kinma ShelleiiliorKer Evelyn F:nos 

Ella Wurz (("apt* Eleanor Rirti-out U'apt. I 

GIARDS 
Franees Brown Gladys Geary 

Ruth Weihe Beatrice Soto 

CEXTER? 
Sayde Brown Lora January 

I'olly Burklt-y Winetta Bott 

LIBERTY VS. ALHAMBRA 
Previous to this game we did noi prac- 
tice as faithfully as we should have done 
and showed it when we played Alhambra 
on the home court Nov. 20. The Liberty 
irirls seemed paralyzed the first half. The 
•<core stood 10-0 in favor of Alhambra. 
The second half the Liberty team played 
hard, makinu: the game very exciting. But 
.\lhambra had such a lead that when the 
whistle blew for time the score stood 1')- 
11 in favor of Alhambra. The line-up was 
as follows: 

LIBERTY ALHAMBRA 

FORWARDS 
Emma sli.'llenlx'nf.'r Il'-rtha Netherton 

Ella Wur/ K'apt.l Marwiret MrMahon 

(ifARDS 
Ruth Weilu- Margaret Swift 

FniiHfs Brown In>ne Brewi-n 

CENTER." 
Saytle Brown Somia Mellarry 

Polly Barkl.-y Marsruirite Perk (CViptt 

This was our last game until after the 
holidavs. 



After the holidays the girls showed 
more vigor in practicing for the scheduled 
games of the C. C. A. L. were on hand. 
The first game was to be played Jan. 1") 
with Mt. Diablo. They forfeited the game 
at the last minute and in order not to dis- 
appoint the public the Liberty first and sec- 
ond teams played a game. It was a splen- 
did game, well played throughout both 
halves. At the close of the game the score 
stood 17-5 in favor of the first team. The 
line up was as follows: 

FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM 

FORWARDS 
Georjria Nunn (iladys Nuiui 

EniniH SliellenlM>rRiT (Oipt.) Velnia Cowan 

(iUARDS 
Fmnces Brown Roma IVnit«>rton 

Ruth Weihe Beatriet> .Sanders 

CENTERS 
.Sayde Brown Minerva Weihe 

Polly Barkley Viririe Spnidley ( Capt. ) 

On Feb. 13. a game was scheduled with 
Rivcrview to be i>layed on their court. Riv- 
erview forfeited the game to Liberty. 

LIBERTY VS. ALHAMBRA 

The game with Alhambra was scheduled 
for Jan. M) but both teams agreed to play 
a week later. Feb. (i Alhambra met Liberty 
on the hitter's court. Both teams entered 
with the spirit of the game written on their 
fiices, as this wa.s to decide the champion- 
ship of the county. A few minutes after 
the game started P'ranccs Brown sprained 
her ankle and Mae Rctberts took her place. 
The game was as snappy as could be 
wished for and the crowd went wild with 
enthusiasm. Liberty scored first and kept 
the lead throughout the game. The score 
at the end of the first half stood H)-7 in 
favor of Liberty. When the whistle blew 
for the second half profound silence 
reigned until the ball was j)ut in play. Both 
teams showed more vigor than ever but our 
iippoiicnts were irradually losini: •rround. 



rp,,r 

Uorlr-Srv 



The cTowd stood up with excitement. The 
Alhiirnbra jiirls i)layed a splendid fjaine but 
the Liberty Girls' fast team work was too 
much for them. At the end of the second 
half the score stood 22-9 in favor of Lib- 
erty. This made Liberty the championship 
basket-ball players of the county, winning' 
the championship pennant of the C. C. A. L. 
The Martinez girls were game losers giv- 
ing' us a rousing' good cheer after the game 
which we heartily returned. The line up 
was as follows: 

LIBERTY ALHAMBRA 



Georgia Nunn 
Ella Wurz (Capt.) 



Frances Brown 
Ruth Wt'ihe 



Sayde Brown 
Polly Barkley 



FORWARDS 

Marpraret McMahon 
Hfrtlia Netherton (Capt.) 
Gl'ARDS 
Mae Roberts Irene Brewen 
Margaret Swift 
CENTERS 

Marguerite Peck 
Norma McHarry 



The g-irls in Basket Ball who were win- 
ners of the block "L" are: 

Frances Brown, '1'). 
Ella Wurz, '15. 

Ruth Weihe, '16. 

Emma Shellenberger, 'IG. 
Polly Barkley, ']6. 
Sayde Brown, '17. 
Mae Roberts, "17. 

Georgia Nunn, '18. 




GIRLS' BASKET BALL TEAM 

Top row (left to right) : France.s Brown, (manager), Ruth Weihe, Georgia 

Nunn, Ella Wurz. Miss Linda Gehringer, (coach). 
Bottom row: Polly Barkley. Emma Shellenberger, (captain), Sayde Brown, 

Mae Roberts. 



rP.ge 1 

IForty-EighlJ 



Atl|kttr0 (Ennttnu^ft 



FOOTBALL 

The year lOH-lo lias Iuhmi the most 
eventful year in atliletics al Lil)erty for a 
nunilwr of years. 

Seliool opened in Aufrust with proniisinsi 
football material. Durin<r the second 
scliool week the boys met and elected 
ilenry Winfree, manasrer, and Edward Ile- 
vey. captain, of tiie football team. Two 
weeks hiter trainiiiiT was sroiiisr on in earn- 
est in spite of the warm weather. It was 
found that we were in ursrent need of a 
coach and football suits. When the trus- 
tees heard of our needs, they kindly do- 
nated forty dollars (.f40) to us. We are 
all srateful to them for their keen interest 
in our athletic affairs, and it was their aid 
that made us as successful as we were. We 
secured the services of Ray Rhafer, an ex- 
]>erienced football jilayer, to coach us. We 
were a sn'een squad that »vent throuirh the 
first maneuvers and there seemed little hope 
of learnins the scientific part of the frame. 
But Ray proved equal to the conditions and 
we were soon acquirinsr some ideas of Rusr- 
by. At first i1 was hard work for the cap- 
tain and manaoier to iret some of the boys 
to come out to practice re?ularly. But 
gradually they became more enthusiastic, 
and, in spite of our inexperien<'e in Rnsby. 
much was accomplished. 

RTVERVTEW VS. LIBERTY 
We challensred Rivervicw Ili^h of Aiiti- 
och to i>lay us a practice same on Septem- 
ber lf>lh, as we desired to have some prac- 
tical experience before the scheduled 
sames in October. The Riveniew boys, 
liowever. were experienced in the jrame and 
their knowledge of it caused them to 
triumph. Their scrum was heavier, but 
l>ioved little better than ours, if any. 
They excelled in the back field. Their men 
cr)nld dods:e. tackle and pass, while we 



could not. However, we held our own and 
several of the boys showed up well. After 
two hard fought halves the pame ended 
with the score of 18-0 in their favor. We 
profited by our exjierience. 

MT. DIABLO VS. LIBERTY 

October Kith marked the opening' of the 
League schedule and Mt. Diablo High of 
(^oncord journeyed over to play us on the 
local srridiron. They were a "clean" bunch 
of players and too much for us. During 
the first half we held them down and played 
good ball. When the whistle blew the score 
stood 12-0 in Mt. Diablo's favor. 

During the second half our boys seemed 
to lose faith in themselves and our oppo- 
nents began to pile up a number of points. 
At the end of the game the score was H7- 
0. 

RIVERVIEW VS. LIBERTY 

111 spite of our former defeats, we were 
not disheartened and played our league 
game with Riverview on Oct 24th on our 
home grounds. But, after two weeks of 
drilling- and coaching we did not come up 
t(> expeetatioiis. 

The first half was very exciting and 
Liberty did her best playing. Our tackling 
and running was better. Our forwards did 
well but the back field lacked "pep." 

In the second half we met our downfall 
and in spite of repeated efforts to cross 
the line for a try the game ended with 
another "goose egg:" for Liberty and 45 
points tabulated on the score board for 
Riverview. 

SAN RAMON VS. LIBERTY 

The boys practiced hard the following 
week and were confident of victory in the 
game with San Ramon High of Danville 
on Oct. :Hst. Richard Wallace having re- 
turned to high school, our team was greatly 
strenu'thened. It was in this game that the 



fP««* 1 

IForty-NiaeJ 



drilling of Coach Shafer showed to per- 
fection, even though the game was some- 
what rough. Williamson, one of our best 
and swiftest back field men, was the first 
Liberty man to make a trj'. Swift soon 
followed. Final!}', at the end of the sec- 
ond half the score stood 17-0 in Liberty's 
favor. 

The Danville girls furnished us with a 
fine meal and we certainly appreciated it. 
ALHAMBRA VS. LIBERTY 

We were scheduled to play Alhambra 
at Martinez on Oct. 17th, but did not go on 



field, the first half ended with neither side 
having scored. 

When the second half started, we were 
determined to win and began with the 
kick-off. The bail continued to see-saw, 
now one side on the oflfensive and now the 
other. Toward the end of the second half 
the Alhambra left wing ran around our 
right wing and over near the edge of the 
field. The touch line was not distinguish- 
able at that point, w-hile the 5 yard line 
was. The opponent ran across the line 
that could be seen and our right wing 




BOYS' BASKET BALL TEAM 

Top Row: Vernon Cakebread, Henry Winfree, Walter Swift, Joe Hand. 
Bottom Row: Harold Lucas, Roy Frerichs, Jack Suffern. 



account of delayed train and rain. How- 
ever, on Nov. 3rd ths trustees kindly gave 
the high school a vacation, so we went 
down intending to scalp the county seat 
team. The game commenced about 3:10 
and we had the ball on their 2.') yard line 
nearly all of the first half. Alhambra did 
not hire a referee from U. C. or Stanford, 
as the county rules prescribe, but one from 
Crockett. Many times we were on the 
point of crossing the goal line, but were 
forced back. After see-sawing across the 



thinking he h;id passed ou't of bounds 
stopped running. The result was a try 
for Alhambra and it was also converted. 
It was too near the end for us to get a 
try; however, we did our best. The sec- 
ond half ended with the score of 5-0 in 
ffvor of Alhambra. We went home feeling 
that we did not have quite a square deal 
and confident wc could beat Ihem in another 
game. 

JOHX SWETT VS. LIBERTY 
The final game of the league was played 



fP.ge 1 
iFihy J 



iuro on Nov. 7th witli Jfliii Swctt Hi,i;li 
of Crockett. They caiue with tiie intention 
of beiitiiifr us "jrood and proper", as tliey 
tlid two years asro. However, we irave tliein 
a surprise. 

Of all the sranies this was the best. All 
our boys were in tiahtiui: trim and Shafer 
was pleased with our showintr. Our serum 
worked tine and the back field was also 
better than usual. Almost immediately af- 
ter the kiek-olT in the first half, Barkley 
crossed the line and scored 3 points for 
Liberty. We failed to convert and for the 
rest of the first half it was about an equal 
fiiiht. Gradually, Crockett forced us back 
and forced their way, after many scrums, 
over the i,">^l ''"p- When the whistle blew 
the score stood 3-3. 

Durinjr the second half we had the ball 
in our territory almost continually. Our 
scrum seemed to be jretting: better all the 
time and Joe Hand, our hook, got the ball 
out on our side line continually. After 
nuiny scrums and "rucks" on our 5 yard 
line the ball was taken over, but we failed 
to convert. In a minute or so the whistle 
blew and the score stood 6-3 in our favor. 

In honor of our victory Coach Shafer 
treated us to soda water at the Teacup 
Inn. 



BASKET BALL 

Liberty was very successful in basket 
ball this year. Immediately after foot- 
ball wa.s over, the boy.s commenced prac- 
tice. Joe Hand was elected captain, and 
Walter Swift, manajrer. A great interest 
was taken in the game and there was much 
material to pick from. Through the gener- 
osity of Bruns Brothers, we were allowed 
to practice in the garage when the weather 
was bad. The county schedule was ar- 
ranged in December, and the games were 
to be played in Januar>'. Riverview, Al- 
hambra and Liberty were the only schools 
having boy's teams that were represented. 
Riverview forfeited her games to Liberty 
and Alhambra, so we only needed to de- 
feat the boys from the county seat, to win 
the county championship. 

LIBKRTY VS. TOWN TKAM 
On Fridav evening, Jan. 1."). wc had a 



practi<'e game with a home tea.m of for- 
mer high school boys. It was a very lively 
game throughout and Liberty always kept 
the lead. The game ended with the score 
18-21 in favor of Liberty. 

LIBKRTY VS. ALHAMBRA 

Saturday evening, Feb. G, the Alhambra 
team of Martinez came up to Brentwood 
with the best "intentions." However, they 
were somewhat surprised. The boys prac- 
ticed hard during the week preceding the 
game and were ia good trim. 

The game commenced immediately after 
the girls had finished, and was exciting 
from the start. Liberty made a number 
of goals within a few minutes. 

The Alhambra guards were kept on a 
lively move by our fast forwards, while 
their forwards tried time and again to 
"ditch" our guards, but without avail. At 
the end of the first half Liberty was con- 
siderably in the lead. 

The second half started with a rush. 
Alhambi'a's fighting spirit was up, but her 
forwards could not find the basket ex- 
cept on special occasions. When the whis- 
tle blew at the end of the last half the- 
score stood 26-12. Liberty had won her 
first boy's basket-ball pennant. 

We received the championship pennant 
in the latter part of March and it was set 
up on the wail in the assembly hall. There 
it hangs beside the girl's pennant, as a 
proof of Liberty's ability ii. basket-ball. 

WINNERS OF THE "L". 

The following have w-on the block "L" 
for faithful practice and participating in 
four or more football games: 

Ifllo. Walter Swift, Josei)h Hand, Alviu 
Howard. 

1016. Henry Barkley. Henry Winfree, 
Edward Ilevey, Vernon (^akebread. 

1917. Frank Shellenberger, Aubrey Wil- 
liamson, (^lifTord McNamara, James Cake- 
bread. 

1918. Stanley Nunn, John SntTern. 

TRACK MEET 

The annual track meet was held in Con- 
cord, April 24. The Liberty men were: 
J. Hand. R. Fox. C. McNamara, A. Rob- 
erts, F. Shellenberger, W. Swift, and A. 
Williamson. 



iK.l.y-On^) 



The boys had a very poor track on which 
to practice and with no coach Ihey found 
it difficult to induce any one to train prop- 
erly or sufficiently. The captain, W. Swift 
and manager, H. Winfree did the best they 
could under trying conditions and deserve 
credit for putting a team in the meet. 

Two of the team, H. Winfree and A. 
Howard were, at the last moment, unable 
to go. 



^Y. Swift took third place in the 440 and 
880 yd. 

C. McXamara third place in the ham- 
mer; and our relay team, composed of 
Swift, Hand, Williamson, Roberts, and 
Cakebread, took third place. 

Let us hope that the trustees will em- 
ploy a young man on the faculty for next 
year who can lead us in all our sports. 




TRACK TEAM 



fPage 1 

iFihy-Twoj 




Till' social events of our srhoo! dnys are 
ffood times to be remembered throiia;!! life. 
Let us live over ajrain those of this year. 

First : — C)n Thursday evening, September 
10, 1914. the friirhtened, shiiiingj cleanly- 
washed faces of the Freshmen, appeared 
timidly, in the door-way of Coates' Hall. 

The anuisement started by playino; jjames 
but as usual, the srrcater part of the eveninfr 
was devoted to dancing'. Freshmen, up- 
per classmen, and the Alumni joined in 
the fun. 

At twelve o'clock, sisrn? of drowsiness 
were noticed amonjr the little ones, so we 
fed them with dainty refreshments made 
and served by the jrirls of the cookinc: 
class. The little Freshmen certainly looked 
sweet as they sat at the table with a irreen 
bib tucked about the neck of each. As 
you well know, our rules forbid festivities 
after twelve o'clock. We do not count eat- 
iuL' a festivity so it was a'most one o'clock 
before we started for home. 

THE HAY RTDE 

On the evening of October 2iid, 1014. the 
Juniors L'ave a Hay Ride, in honor of the 
Seniors. 

The jolly crowd irathered at Liberty 
about seven thirty and ))iled into a lumber 
waijon. This wnsron not beinj!: lar^'e enouL'h 
they went out of town a few miles and. 
after unloadinir the hay from a header- 
bed, clambered in, voumr folks and teach- 



ers, and started for the Marsh (^reek 
school house. Before they reached their 
destination, the horses refused to go any 
further, so the crowd agreed to stop and 
eat their lunch. After apples, pieces of 
cake, and sandwiches had been tucked 
away, they started home. Alas! when they 
had gone but a few miles the wagon 
broke down, and the crowd had to walk. 
Nevertheless we all enjoyed the ride. 

On December 12, 1914, the annual 
Senior Ball, was given by members of the 
class. 

The hall was artistically decorated with 
holly berries and mistletoe. The Seniors 
wore badges of orange and black, those 
being the class colors, and acted as floor 
managers. Delightful music was provided 
by the Shafer & O'Hara Orchestra. 

At twelve o'clock a Tamale Supper was 
served, and after eating, all went home 
declaring, it to be one of the best times of 
the season. 

Saturday evening, February (>, 191."). at 
the close of a double-header basket ball 
game, the students of L. V. H. S. gave a 
(lance in honor of the Martinez girls and 
boys. 

The affair was given in Coates' Hall, 
and the music was provided by the Shafer 
& O'Hara Orchestra. The dance closed 
at twelve o'clock, and all went home, the 
visitors declaring that they had had a de- 
lightful time. 



iFihy-ThfreJ 



©Ijf Junior flag anJi lall 



On the evening- of March 19, 1915, the 
Junior Class presented "His Uncle John" 
at Coates' Hall, before a large and appre- 
ciative audience. It proved to be a great 
success and was praised by all who were 
present. The cast of characters was as 
follows : 
John VanCourtland (His Uncle John).... 

Joe Hand 

Jack Sanderson Henry Winfree 

Bert Allison Edward Hevey 

Nubbins Goodwin Vernon Cakebread 

Mrs. Sanderson Ruth Weihe 



Lucy Harrington Polly Bark ley 

Mrs. Slaters Emma Slu'llenberger 

After the play dancing- was enjoyed until 
twelve o'clock. 

The Annual Junior Ball given in the 
"Hotel Brentwood," proved to be one of 
the most e.xclusive and elaborate affairs 
of the school year. 

The O'Hara & Shafer Orchestra fur- 
nished the music. The dance lasted until 
midnight and terminated with a splendid 
b^^nf|uet. 




fPnge 1 

IFilly-FoutJ 




In lookinir up our oxclinnires we liave 
hi'cn able to find a very small number. Of 
tlie six schools in this county beside our 
own we have heard from only two. If a 
pajier has been sent to us and not men- 
tioned, don't feel slisrhted. for you probably 
know the care with which students rephu-e 
papers in the pro]>er places. We will en- 
deavor to do onr l)est with what we have. 



Far Darter — St. Helena — A verA' arood. 
well arranjred pajier. Your stories speak 
well for your school talent, and your .i<)k<> 
department is especially jrood. You are 
fortunate that the citizens of vonr dis- 
trict take such an interest in vour school. 



The Netherlands — Rio Vista — Glad to 
hear from you. Your paper would be a 
credit to a much older school than yours. 



a nee. Otiierwisc yon are a very jrood 
paper. 



The Advance — Areata — An exceptionally 
i.'ood pai)er. full of well arranjicd and in- 
tercstin.ir matter. No criticism. 



The Acta — Concord — We are pleased to 
see you amoujr us asrain. You have a 
ffood paper, but why do you send out ex- 
chanjres when you have no exchange de- 
partment yourself. We would also sujr- 
•rest that you number your paiies and have 
a table of contents. 



The Golden Bear — Sonoma — A splendid 
pa])er, but why crowd the literary so near 
the front. You have a very approi)riatc 
cover dcsi<rn. 



La Jolla — Antioch — Yon are quite a 
The Elk — Elk Grove — Your many stories stranger, .s:lad to see you. Your pictures 
are very well written but a little more space are excellent, but your stories could be 
fur headiiiirs would im))ro\e the ajipear- improved. 






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[Page 1 

iFilty-SixJ 



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fP.«« 1 

IFifty-SevenJ 



5CH00L DAY3 




An I notation Of- 
a. GfcKfoc l//ne. 



Tile L<-'T-j A n(.( Short 







Ca.u'^ec/ Great / 
E'xcitefTtent. 





^5 tone House 



busij i/ith H.- 5 
Camera On 77/ e 
Gr-our\ds. 




^''•"^'•f.i/ti 




(h Th^ CcoMitKf Oeft ,\\ ., ^ fe 
To Punch- tio/es In i^ 
Douqhnuis. 







'. .,V4Ti 1?.. 
T^e ^ro-ff McAl^in^ His li'tty 
Through -^ Mi/c4 FJcfhi On 
l^i;>.u To Celri^ 3h<iriff 



lFrfty-Ei«hJ 




The editor requests tluit ;)11 jokes be 
written on tissue paper so slie may be able 
to see tliroiiirh I hem. 

Miss G. (in written Ensrlish Ex.): Tell 
what you can about the life of Chaueer. 
Haynioiid: Ilis father was a wine eellar. 

Miss G. (in Ensr. 1. Lady of the Lake) : 
Ilerschel, what is the meanins: of. "His 
suit was warm?" 

Hersehel : It means his <'lotlies were 
warm. 

Henry W: Today is Columbus Day. 
isn't it? 

Knmia : Yes. 

Ruth W: Is today Columbus' birthday? 

Blanche: Oh. look, that man has trim 
med his wiir- 

Neva : Why. you ivory dome, it don't 
srrow ! 

Miss Domonoske: Harold, what is the 
meaninjr of >ar<-ophofrus ? 

Harold: (doubtfully) We'l 1 think it is 
-nine kind of an animal. 

Blanehe: For the love of Mike, elose that 
door or the stove will jro out. 

Frances: Yes. I noticed that it has been 
treatinjr us rather coldly of late. 

Prof: Boys, can't this case be settled 
i.ut of school ? 

Boys: Sure, that's what wc were tryiutr 
to do when you called us in the otfice. 

Emma (noticing a ri? j-'o by): Did that 
biisrtry have rubber tires? 

Xevn : Xo. but it had "Slat-" at tlic bar-k. 



Bertha: Is this of the riuiit consistency? 
(Miss Anthony: Yes, now beat it. 

WHY DOESN'T HE BITE? 

Emma: Isn't it strange that the leiisrth of 
a man's arm is equal to that of a jiiri's 
waist? 

Ran.som : Let's get a string: and see. 

Roy: One of the cylinders is missina:. 
Zelma : Let's jro right back and sret it. 

RURAL RYMES. 

The cows are in the meadow, 
The sheep are in the grass. 

But all the simple geese. 
Are in the F'reshman class. 

Miss Gehringer: What are the three 
words used most in this class? 
Hersehel: 1 don't know. 
Miss Gehringer: Correct. 

Blanche: (Running her finger down the 
back of Frances' neck sings) "My boney, 
honey lassie." 

Blasiche: What is the matter with this 
lamp, it's all green ? 

Walter: It nuist have been near a 
Fi-eshman. 

Viririnia: The mice have eaten my pnt- 
tern. 

Miss Anthony: Yes. they got in the 
chemistry room and ate iqi two yeast 
cakes. 

Ruth: Xo woiulcr they have been raisin_' 
the dickens. 



lf,(.v.\,n^ 



JOKE ON THE TEACHER 

Miss Gehringer: (coming across the 
word heirloom, explains it). "An heirloom 
is a loom they used to use in olden days. 
The women saved their combings and made 
.switches of them on heirlooms." 

Prof.: What is the meaning of ague? 
Aubrey: A chilly fit. 




There is a young lady named Blanche 
Who once did visit a ranche 

She climbed up a tree 

And skinned up each knee 
And came down like a great avalanche 

WHO COULD IT BE? 

(Joe standing in the hall waiting for 
German class to commence). 

Roswell (inquisitive Fresh.): What cha 
doing? 

Joe: Waiting for class. _ 

Roswell: What's her name? * 

Ruth W: I see you're back again, Hank. 
Henry B: Gosh, I told ma to fix that. 
Ruth: Fix what? 
Henry : Why, my shirt. 

Frances: Aw, I think that your brains 
have gone to your feet. 

Ruth W: (Unthinkingly) Yes, that's 
why they're so small. 

There, there, little Freshie, 

Do not cry. 
You'll be a Suffermore, 

Bye and Bye. 

Adella: Who originated the first geom- 
etry problem? 

Harold: I pass, who? 

Adella : Noah. 

Harold: What's the answer? 

Adella : Why, didn't he construct the 
Ark-B. C? 



Eddie (after defeating the intention of 
a Freshie) Did you ever get left? 
, Ned: My mother always took me. 

Ella: (appearing in a new dress). Is 
this dress easily spotted? 

Ruth : Gosh, yes, at least four blocks 
off. 

THOSE SENIORS 
Roy: I can tell you how much water 
runs over Niagara Falls to a quart. 
Henry W: How much? 
Roy : Two pints. 

Minerva : He was the goal of my am- 
bitions, but — 

Zeb: But what. Sis? 

Minerva : Father kicked the goal. 

Prof. (in algebra) : If your work 
doesn't pick up, you'll be kept back a year. 
How would you like to have all the class 
get ahead of you? 

Jack S : Oh, I guess there will be more 
class next year, all right. 

Prof: Who is responsible for all this 
noise? 

Raymond : I just dropped a perpendicu- 
lar to a horizontal line. 

Miss Anthony : Of whom was Caesar a 
descendant? 

Bright Soph: Adam and Eve. 




There is a young lady named Neva 
She is a heartless deceivah 

She flirts with each boy 

And tries to be coy 
But not one of them will believe her. 

(Raymond looking out of the window at 
a swell dame passing by). 

Mr. Mai'tin : Let's give attention to the 
class, Raymond. 

Raymond : I am. 



Miss Gehrinjrer: Fnink. if ymi lind re- 
cited that poetry as fast !)> May, wliat 
\V(iul«l it liave l)eeii .' 

I'Vank : A tliree step. 

WHAT DOKS SllH MKAN.' 
Hulli L: 1 put olive oil on my face to 
keep the "cliaps" off. 

Miss Gehrinfrer: Neva, do yoii know 
what the blue devils are? 

Neva: Sure, tliey are some kind of an 
insect, aren't thev? 




There is a youni; lad named Walter 
His habits he surely must alter 

For whoever tlie jrirl 

He thinks lier a pearl 
If only his wink's she will fall ter. 

Miss Demonoske (in shorthand) : Kstiier. 
what are you doinir with your "i" there? 

Polly: (Speakinjr to doir) ("ome here and 
let me kiss you. 

Andrew: Do you always kiss vour doir? 

Polly: Yes. 

Bud: I suppose that's why Jack is so 
snappy lately. 

Walter: Can't you put a nickel in nitric, 
acid and tret copper out of it? 

Miss Anthony: Oh no. only dimes and 
dollars contain copper. 

Walter: Well put two nickels in then, 
that makes a dime. 

• NOT OIT OK COIKTHSY 

Blanche: Aw, hit Zelma. Ilerschel. 
Herschel: Oh. I wouldn't do that. 
Blanche: Why not? 
Ilerschel: She mifrht hit me back. 

Blanche : Is the color of this froods fast ? 

Clerk: Certainly, it's as fast as the roses 
in your cheeks. 

Blanche: (hastily) Show me -ionu'thinu- 
else please. 



Frances' Dad : Frances, why don't you 
ask that younu' man why he doesn't fjo 
home earlier.' 

Frances: But papa. I know already. 

Franees: Gee, I smell tamales! 
Raymond: .\w, it's somebody burninu: 
rubbish. 

Neva (rushinji' into the Assembly): 
Who's -ot "Freckles.'" 

ClIKMISTRY 

Miss .Vntbony: What causes an explo- 
sion? 

Blanche: When two siases meet. 

.Miss .\.: Yes. but there's another cause 
•loo. 

Blanche: When too lariie an object srets 
in too small a space. 

Henry: Look out, Blanche! 

A FRKSHMAN'S FIRST ATTEMPT 
AT POKTRY 

'Tis eveninj: and the settinu sun 
Is risiuii' in the j;lorious West. 
The rai)id rivers slowly run; 
The frojr is in his downy nest ; 
The festive iroat and sportive cow, 
Hilarious le.ip from bow to bow. 

Blanche: Oh I Alvin's irot the measles! 
Klla ((piickly): Yes, and Bertha's srot 
my cap. 



Tick 




There is a younji Senior named Roy 
lli^ watch is in his srreat jiridc and joy 

He winds it in school 

And acts rpiito the fool 
And plays with it as 'twere a toy. 

POOR FRKSHMAN 
Vernon: What is the difference between 
a PVeshman and a monkey? 
•John : 1 don't see. 
Vernon : Neither do F. 



ISiitv-Onc 



Blanche: Gee, mj' hands are cold. 

Frances : Well sit on them. 

Blanche : Aw, I don't want to smash 'em. 

CHAUCER AGAIN 

Senior (reading-) : And rag(e) he coud(e) 
as it wer(e) right a whelpe. 

Miss G: Please give that in your own 
words. 

Senior: And he could rag just like a 
puppy dog:. 





There is a young boy we call Joe 
'Mong: the girls he has not a foe 

On him they use smiles 

And all their gay wiles 
And he never can answer them, "No." 

He prepareth a table before me in view 
of my ignorance. He stuffed my ivory 
craniumi with anecdotes. My head T«n- 
neth over. Surely brain fever will follow 
me all the days of my life and I shall go 
to Stockton and dwell there forever. 

OF COURSE 

Miss Gehringer: Who fell at the battle 
of Hastings? 

Harold: Soldiers. 

HEARD IN CHEMISTRY 

Miss Anthony: If you put sodium on 
water, what will happen? 

Blanche (Bright Senior) : You'll have 
soda water. 

Prof: But you had to take the examina- 
tion last time. 

Roswell : I know it. 

Prof: And you g-ot 5. 

Roswell : I know it. 

Prof, (with relieved expression) : Well, 
you do know something:. 



Miss Anthony: (in chemistry) Frances, 
tell the class all you know about match 
making. 

Roy: That was a rash act of Howard's. 

Raymond: What did he do? 

John : Went and caught the measles. 

Mr. Martin (to Blanche who is chewing 
gum): What's tlie matter with the lower 
l)art of your face? 

Blanche : It's loose. 

CLEVER FRESH 

Miss G. : Carl, did I see you looking in 
your book? 

Carl : Oh, no. Miss Gehringer I'm sure I 
closed it before you saw me. 

THOSE FRESHIES 

Freshie: (translating German) : Der Sohn 
des Lehrers schreibt dem Onkel einen Brief 
(the son of the teacher writes the uncle a 
letter). 

Miss G. : Give the syntax of "einen Brief 
(a letter). 

Freshie: "Einen Brief" is accusative, be- 
cause it accuses the letter of being writ- 
ten. 

HEARD IN BYRON SKATING RINK 

Henry W: What did you find to be the 
hardest thing about roller skating when 
you were learning? 

Katie: The floor. 




Poor Alvin's a bashful young boy 
Yes, he is exceedingly coy 

When girls talk mush 

Oh, how he doth blush 
And to tease him is their special joy. 

Frank (reciting Merchant of Venice) : 
"Tell ine where is fancy bred. In the heart 
or in the head?" 

Esther: In the bakerv. 



ISixly-Two J 



I'mt': lli\ri>lil, you luul Ui'tter iret to 
work and stop lookins; at Graco. 

Harold: Yes, Mr. Martin, but I want to 
soo lu'i- oullino. (Meaninsi; History.) 

tup: TRl'TH 

Miss G (in Enirlish .'? to Ray:iiond who 
was crabbinir about studyinii) : \\ liy do you 
conu' to scliool ? 

Rayn.oiid: Because I liavo to work if I 
don't and this is easier. 




There is a youns- lady named Ella 
Her sarcasm she should quell-a 

For what ever one's fault 

She never doth halt 
For say she doth ball them out well-a. 

\VI\D 

Klla : Huth Weihe is some breeze around 
here. 

Frances : Why so? 

Klla: Haven't you heard her i)low? 

WAY TO srrcKss 

"The .<ecret of success." the stamp said, 
"is stickinjr to it." 

"To succeed." said ihc knife, "be brisrht 
and sharp". 

"Keej) up to date", said the calendar. 

"Aspire to "rreater things," said the init- 
meir. 

"Don't knock it's old fashioned," said 
the electric bell. 

"Do a drivinir business," said the ham- 
mer. And the barrel added, 

"Never lose your head." 

"Make lisht of everythinsr." the fire ob- 
sened cynically. 

"Rut always keep cooU" .said the ice. 



Miss G. (in Kn-lish, after Koy had fin- 
ished scamiinft h line of poetry) : What kind 
of feet have you, Koy? 

Walter (aside) : They're nuniber tliir- 
teens. 

Klla: Where caai I tjet "Freckles"? 
Hlaiiche: Out in the sunshine I fjuess. 

Miss Anthony: In what country is the 

sea of Galilee.'" 

Henry B. : Well I'll be hanjied. 

Alvin: Why? 

Henry: Km suspended. 

HKARD IN (TIKMISTRY LABORATORY 

Alvin was taking: chemistry. 

He played with lots of thinsrs. 
He took a whiff of chlorine, 

Now he navigates on winjrs. 

Miss Anthony (in cooking) : I told you 
twice to make muffins. Haven't you any 
intellect? 

Zelma: No, Miss Anthony. There's none 
in the house. 

Frank: John was put out of the game 
last night. 

Aubrey: What for? 

Frank: He forgot to shave and was 
ki( ked out for roughness. 




There is a young lady named Frances 
Who oft tries to learn the new dances 

She slides and she dips 

She whirls and she trips 
And every one howls as she prances. 

Miss Gehringer: When did the revival of 
learning take place? 

Walter: .Just before examinations. 

Minervji (pointing to Henry Barkley in 
a football suit) : What's that? 
Kavmond: A mistake. 



lSiMy.TKte«J 



fl 



PLEASE pat- 
ronize our ad- 
vertisers. It IS 



we owe our financial 



©l|? Hthfrtg I0U 



I 

i to them mainly that ^ 



i 



I 

i success. i 

I 
I I 

p i 

I WHEN IN ANTIOCH REMEMBER | 

1 .....,,,... « 1 



I ANTIOCH HARDWARE & 
I FURNITURE COMPANY \ 



A COMPLETE LINE OF 



LEUMS, MATTINGS. PLUMBING. 



ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA 



i HARDWARE, STOVES, PAINTS A N D O I LS, I 

i RANGES, FURNITURE, CROCKERY, ETC. GET p 

I CARPETS, RUGS, LINO- OUR PRICES ON ^' 



i 



a^^s^^ssssss^^5^^^^r!^^s.\^m^^^^^^s;^^^^^;^•;r;^^5^^^•■-■"^^^^^ 



Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 



q The Irri- 
gation Pro- 
jed IS now 
completed 
and the land 
IS on the 
market in 
small hold- 
ings. 



OWNERS 



Los Meganos 
Rancho 

Hotel 
Brentwood 



s&^^^ssi^issm' 



Warehouse 
Grain 



A. BURNESS, Agent 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 



BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS HOTEL 



L. R. MEAD, Manager 

New Unqualifiedly Fire- 
proof Hotel at Byron Hot 
Springs. Opened to the 
Public April 30th, 1914. 



RED FARM DAIRY 


LOGAN & HINEBAUGH 


R. E. LEMOIN. Proprietor 






GENERAL CONTRACTORS 


Milk from Tuberculin Te^ed Cows 




Delivered Fresh Every Day 


PLUMBING. WINDOW SHADES 


^^^^^^ 


LINOLEUMS. CARPETS 
AND CURTAINS 


$2.50 for quart per monlh 
$1.23 for pint pel month 


^^^^^^^ 


^^^^^S^ 


GAS ENGINES AND TANKS 


Whipping Cream Furnished at Any 


CONCREl E WORK 


Time on Notice. 


^^^^^M 


BRENTWOOD. CALIFORNIA 


Brentwood, California 



BANKING 

DO YOU DO ANY? 



If 

If not, why not? ^ 

^ Did it ever occur to you that a bank account, even p 

i though it be a small one, is the safest means of doing A 

i business? Your checks are the best receipts for all ^ 

1 bills paid, and your funds will be neither lost nor stolen i 

i from our vaults. ^ 

i Sometimes bills are sent out by mistake after they ^ 

A have been paid. If you pay by check, however, the A 

P cancelled checks are returned to you and can be pro- ^ 

'A duced as receipts. Checking accounts are, therefore, ^ 

P more than a convenience — they are an insurance A 

i against overpayment. 4 

U . . . p 

p Your checking account will be welcomed at this bank, ^ 

^ where you are assured of absolute security and the 4, 

^ most courteous service. A 

I BANK OF BRENTWOOD | 

I COMMERCIAL ^ 

I R. G. Dean, President Lee Durham. Cashier. I 

^ Alex. Burness, Vice-President 4 

I ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ 

I DIRECTORS I 

I R. G. Dean Robt. Wallace. Jr. | 

I Alex. Burness R. F. MacLeod | 

^ Frank H. Ludinghouse i 

I 4 per cent interest Paid on Term Deposits Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent | 



The Byron Times 

It Stands 
Right 

It Is 
Right 

Always Boosting 

$2.50 A YEAR 
HARRY HAMMOND, Editor 



I 



Arlington i^aUi 

anil drill 



Superior Attention paid 
to Dinner Parties 



TURNER & DAHNKEN 



PROPRIETORS 



LB.WEATHERBEE, M.D. 



Brentwood Forenoon 

Oakley Afternoon 

Sunday By Appointment OAKLEY, CAL. 



- i 



f^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



iluah (Ealfuiar 



~ I 

J;iii. 11 — (llooiii. School starts auiiiii. Fnuiccs stnrts a lire in CluMiiistrv but Miss p 

Anthony comes to llic rescue. ^ 

l^ Jan. 12 — Neva makes a dramatic entrance into tlie Enulisli (Mass. 4 

h , ■ W 

^ Jan. 14 — Ksther trios to turn somersaults in the basement. 

f. . ,. . „ I 

^ Jan. 1") — Zeima takes her hair down — I'll i)e '"swilclied." Ruth dies, Fiaymond 'A 

p faints. Frances finds a hunk of pink sium and jjenerousiv divides with p 

i "■ ,. ' I 

d Jan. 18 — Smiley falls down stairs, Minerva jjlays footman. % 

P Jan. li) — The seliool is suddenly stricken with an attack of relis;ion. f 

'm Jan. 20 — A dii;nified Senior is tumbled under her desk and emerires. lookinj; p 

^ somewhat disheveled. p 

^ ^ 

A Jan. 21 — Neva falls u|) stairs; the thiee (dis)irraces have jirominent ]>laces in J 

i German. I 

I . . . . i 

p Jan. 22 — Neva <;oes to sleep in Ensrlish and sneezes violently in Student Rody ; 

% meetins. - 

% Jan. 27 — Gloom, historv Exam's bei^in. Liuhtweiirht Prewett and Middleweiirht '/. 

% ' ' ' 't 

^ Miller have n one round bout in the basement. A 

{':■ Jan. 28 — Minerva scatters snufT in the Assemblv room. Aehoo! Kercho! ^ 

i . ' , i 

% Feb. 2 — Mr. Martin savs there will be no ITist. E\. Slats iroes into hvsteries. ^ 

i ' 

% Feb. 5 — Frances' mind must be wanderinjr. she briniis her Intich in the olFice. 

P Feb. — Polly jumps the hurdles in Enirlish. ^ 

J Feb. 10 — Neva has a new hair comb. 4. 

i . , . p 

?f Feb. 12 — Seniors have a discussion about cheese in Enirlish. % 

i t 

^ Feb 1.") — Miss GehriiiL'er iiets a valentine box and treats the Senior Enirlish Class. 

I 

(CoiifliKloil on til'- iiiiitli ptiRp forwii rrt . I 



I FRANK H. LUDINGHOUSE | 

I — ^ = ^ I 

^ DEALER IN | 

I HARDWARE AND | 

I AGRICULTURAL IM- | 

I PLEMENTS, HER. | 

I CULES HARNESS I 

i i 

p AGE^^^ for p 

i BUGGIES, SHARPLES' ^ 



^ 



RAFF & WEEKS 

Phone 34J Antioch, California. 



^ 



I CREAM SEPARATOR, | 

I AERMOTOR WIND- P 

j MILLS, AND JOHN | 

i r. F- F7 r. r- r. I /^ t»r o .^ 



i DEEREPLOWS. p 

I 

I 



i i 



I Brentwood, California I 

i I 

I p 

i ^ 

^ lifE do all the planning and scheming for you — '%■ 

^ we've solved all little problems that stand be- I 

A tween you and the best for the least. That's why we j 

i can say to you, come and buy merchandise here of |; 

p unquestionable merit as low as, if not lower than vou |^ 

J can buy goods elsewhere where the guarantee of per- % 

ii feet satisfaction is lacking. We want you to feel at all % 

%■ . . . y'- 

^ times that no sale is considered consummated here i 

% until you are thoroughly satisfied with our Dry Goods, ^ 

# Men's Furnishings and Groceries. ^ 

i 



I ■ i 



H. H. BRUNS J. F. BRUNS 

Brentwood Garage 

Reinforced Concrete Fire Proof 



BRENTWOOD 



GARAGE , 

AGEKTS FOR OVERLAND 5 FORD CARS. 





I AGENTS FOR p 

I i 

Overland and Ford Cars, Gasoline En- 
gines, Indian Motocycles, Samson 
i Seive Grip Tradors 



MACHINE WORK AND GENERAL REPAIRING SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS % 

I 
AUTOMOBILES FOR RENT DAY OR NIGHT | 



Phone 41 


Sundays 


by Appointment 


D. E. 


HAWLEY, 

DENTIST 


D. D. S. 


Central Building 
Over Logic's Drug Store 


Antioch, Cal. 

1 



3. Wallarp irHitt. M. B. 



ANTIOCH, CAL. 



Swiss Watchmaker 
Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

(^. iHroQliammpr 

JEWELER 



SECOND STREET ANTIOCH. CAL. 



Phone Main 1311 Hours 9 to 5 

Sundays By Appointment 

d. (Silbrrt (Eamplirll. 0. D. B. 

DENTAL OFFICE 
Tuesdays and Fridays, 9 to 3, at Brentwood 

McAravy Building Antioch, Cal. 



THE ALWAYS 
BUSY STORE 



THE BELSHAW CO. 



THE ALWAYS 
BUSY STORE 



We carry the largest and most varied ^ock of 
Dry Goods, Ladies' and Men's Furnishings, Cloth- 
ing, Boots and Shoes, Staple and Fancy Groceries 
in the County of Contra Costa, at the lowest prices. 

When in Antioch pay us a visit, we are always glad to show you the 
merchandise whether you purchase or not. Below are listed some of the 
many articles we carry in the various departments. 



SILKS 

DRESS GOODS 

LININGS 

FINDINGS 

WASH GOODS 

WHITE GOODS 

CRETONNES 

GINGHAMS 

IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CREPES 

CRASHES 

TOWELS 

SCRIMS 

SILKOLINES 

SHEETINGS 

SHEETS 

PILLOWS 

BLANKETS 

COMFORTERS 

CLOTHING 

DRESSES 

LINENS 

CURTAINS 



The Home 

of 

Hart Schaffner 

& Marx 

Clothes 



%. 



.^^mmm^^m^^^^^^^^^ 



DENIMS 
BURLAPS 
LAWNS 
BIRDS EYE 
UNDERMUSLINS 
NOTIONS 
HOSIERY 
GLOVES 

HANDKERCHIEFS 
RIBBONS 
LACES 

ROYAL WORCES- 
TER CORSETS 
EMBROIDERY SILKS 
AND COTTONS 
NECKWEAR 
BOOTS AND SHOES 
WAISTS 
HATS 
APRONS 
RUCHINGS 
VEILS 



SQUARE DEALING AND COURTEOUS TREATMENT OUR MOTTO. 



ANTIOCH. CALIFORNIA 



^^s^^^^^^^^^^s^^^^$^^^^^^^^^8^^^^^^^m^>^^;sssm^^$.%sss.\^?s?¥ 



Latest Ladies' Patent 



East Contra Costa Mercantile Co. 



ware. Teas, Coffees 



Agents for Sampson's 



Poultry Food 
OAKLEY BRENTWOOD 



SPRING STYLES | 



I Lace Shoes I 



i Ladies', Misses' and Children's Sandals and Mary Jane Pumps i 

i Boy Scout Shoes in All Sizes i 

i Men's Dress and Work Shoes in All Grades i 

I i 

p AH Kinds of Polishes and Laces | 

I ANTIOCH SHOE STORE j 

1 i 



I Dealers In Groceries, | 

I Dry Goods and Hard 



i 



I andSpices a Specialty | 



i 



f Windmills and Lee's I 



*i 



Brentwood Pharmacy 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



DRUGS and DRUG SUNDRIES 



n 



We carry a complete line of Drugs and 
Chemicals and are prepared to fill any 
and all Doctors' Prescriptions. 



^ 



Why send out of town when you can 
just as cheaply at home 



buy 



Kodaks and 
Supplies 

Developing 
and Printing 

Framed Pictures 

A Full Line of 
Stationery 

Hot Water 
Bottles 

Fountain 
Syringes 




i 



Tooth Brushes 
Tooth 

Preparations 
Hair Brushes 
and Combs 
Bath Brushes 
Hand Scrubs 
Soaps 
Razors and 
Strops 

And Many Other 
Household Articles 



ICE CREAM AND ICE CREAM SODAS IN SEASON 

BRENTWOOD PHARMACY 

T. J. WIGET, Manager 
Phone Main 15 Brentwood, Cal. 



P P 

I 



■SsSSi^SSisSSSiS^^iJ^iSSSitSJSJwiiis^^'^CSS 



^sss;:^:;js?«i:. 



BYRON HOTEL 

J. W. WINFREE. Prop.ieior 

First Class in All Its Appointments 

At Southern Pacific Depot 

Particular Attention Paid to the Traveling Public 

BYRON. CAUFORNIA 



c 



ANDIES 

and 
NOTIONS 



KNIGHTSEN. CALIFORNIA 



Byron Re^aurant 



MRS. S. PLUMMER 



n 



HOME 
COOKING A 
SPECIALTY 



Byron, California 



DEALER IN GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 



Syrott, (Galifdrnia 



Butchers and Dealers in Live Stock 



Brentwood Market 

Bucholtz Bros., Proprietors 



BRENTWOOD. CALIFORNIA 



Kll'l'KNIlKl.MKK ('IA)TIIKS 

STYLE-PLrs CLOTHES 

DI'TCIIESS TROUSERS 

STETSON HATS 

AIx'KOW SHHiTS 

MiNsiNG rxiox sriTS 

KVKRWEAR HOSIERY 

REISER'S CRAVATS 

CAIxMIARTT'S OVERALLS 

FOR MEN 




iMjiiwuniswtff opttfifflom* 



Let Your Next Pair Be 

WALK-OVERS 

Wortls cannot oxpn>ss the Ili'tuity. Style. Fit and Finish in these new Spring WALK -OVER models. 

THK WORLD'.'; MOST SKILLICn SHOK M.XKERS are employed in the construction of these Shoes. 
The selection of Lasts. I'atterns and Leathers are the best the shoe market aftords. and you will BKn-e 
(once you see thes«' new Spring Boots > that they are the Iwst buy of the season. Look in our windows- 
pick out your favorite style, then come inside and let us show yon how well they tit. 

We carry all lenifths and widths and am fit yon properly. Will you let us try? 

Prices: $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 



AND UPWARDS 



DOPE MODEL 
$4.00, $4.50 and $5.00 Grades 




FOR WOMEN 

FOWNES' GLOVES 

NEMO CORSETS 

WARNER'S CORSETS 

NIAGARA MAID SILK GLOVES 

AND UNDERWEAR 

I'lloKXIX GUARANTEED SILK 

HOSIERY 

-MUNSING UNDERWEAR 

LADIES' HOME JOl'RNAL 

PATTERNS 




. ^^^^^^^ 



3oal| Qlakniar-oiunduiifii 



i 



4 Feb. 17 — Frances gets the measles. Mr. Martin peeves tlie kids by telling them 4 
d to take care of their belongings hereafter. d 



d Feb. 19 — Mr. Martin announces Monday will be a holiday. Raymond faints. p 

I Feb. 22— Holiday! Oh, joy! | 

■0 Feb. 24 — Miss Anthony puts a can of sealing wax on the stove. It boils over p 

P but Mr. Martin comes to the rescue. 

I Feb. 2G— Cliff tries to take a bite out of T(.be's head and loses a tooth. I 

d Mar. 2 — Blanche sjiills alcohol on her hands and gets on fire. d 

d Mar. 3 — Great accident. Ella runs into a bunch of cows and demolishes her d 

d equipage. Blanche gets a Avad of gum stuck on her neck. d 

d Mar. 4 — Blanche announces that she has to churn. d 

p Mar. 5— Swifts p:o too swift. | 

d Mar. 8 — Zelma wears a new skirt and girdle, not saying whose they arc. p 

d Mar. 9 — Neva causes a great commotion bv taking her tvpcwriter into her I']nulish d 

i ■ «^ • . • 1 I 



'd Mar. 10 — Henry Winfree has a new pompadour. d 

d Mar. 11 — Eventful day! Neva and Adella a]>pear in new creations. Zcb has 

d a new hair comb. ITelii! Frances makes a dash for Liberty. d 

d Mar. 12 — A tempest in a teapot is aroused in German II. 4 

d Mar. l."") — Our iokes are examined bv the National Boai'd of Censorship and only 4 

i ' . . . i 



d half of them escape. The editorial staff has hysterics. %. 

d Mar. 10 — A compromise is effected on the joke business. d 



d Mar. 10 — A compromise is effected on the joke business. d 



P Mar. 17 — St. Patrick's day is celebrated in a fitting manner. '^ 

d Mar. 18 — Ned Macgurn frightens the slii>rt-li;ind class into hysterics by fainting. 



P Mar. 22 — An atack of Spring fever seizes Liberty. d 



d Mar. 2.'5 — The Senior Girls disgrace themselves liy cutting uji in the otricc. 



I 



DRY GOODS 



SHOES 



11 



W. W. MORGANS 



III 



III 



Let us keep you cool this summer. 
By fuinishing you 

SUMMER DRESS GOODS 

LATEST THINGS IN HATS 

COOL EASY COMFORTABLE 
SHOES 

CANNED MEATS AND VEGET- 
ABLES, that need little or no 
cooking. 

STEPHENSON COOLERS. 

We have RUBBER HOSE and 
SPRINKLERS for that lawn. 

When in need of anything in our 

line, 

CALL ON US. 



'A 

pip 
^' i p 

i 



I i 

Hi 

it i 

■ % 

; 4 f>. 



W. W. MORGANS 



GROCERIES 



I HARDWARE 



( 



Imttmnoi iMrtliniiiat 


\ 


lEptBrnpal (!ll|urrl| 


OAKLEY 


^^^^^^ 


GARAGE 


Opposite the Park, Corner Maple and Second Sts. 


TONY DALPORTO 
Proprietor 


^^^^^ 




Services every Sunday morning and 
evening; Prayer meeting Wednesday 
evening. A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to all, especially to ilrangers. 


FIRST CLASS REPAIRING DONE 

MACHINES FOR HIRE DAY OR 

NIGHT 

OAKLEY, CALIFORNIA 


(E. d. ICuras. Jlastur 





MILLER SISTERS 



I Dry Goods, Men's Furnishing Goods, | 



Shoes, Millinery and Notions 



i 



OAKLEY, CALIFORNIA 



!'^«S^^^^T^:?^^^ 



Byron Garage 




Sundries Carried for Automobiles, Motor- 
cycles and Bicylces. 

AGENTS FOR 
Studebaker Automobiles and Harley-Davidson Motorcycles 




Repair Work of All Kinds a Specialty 

BYRON - - - CAUFORNIA 



^?»*?--;s^ 



p. H. SCHIRMER 



FARM IMPLEMENTS 
AND WAGONS 
GENERAL BLACK- 
SMITHING,CASTIRON 
WELDING AND RUB- 
BER TIRE WORK 



GAS ENGINE REPAIR- 
ING A SPECIALTY 



Knightsen, California 



<i^5^¥S^i»5i^S¥^^^^^^^^!SSi^!^^ 


MATTHEW WARD 




^^^^^^^8^;m^^s$^^\^^^^^^§^^sss^ 


Sn0a' dan&tf 


ATTORNEY. 

AT- 
LAW 
and 


««^ ^ti Qlrtam 


NOTARY 
PUBLIC 


ARE 
THE 
BEST 
IN 


TELEPHONE 

MAIN 

1401 


TOWN 


^8^S^^^ 




624 


Anttorlj 
(EaUfontm 


SECOND 
STREET 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^s^^s^sss 


ANTIOCH 




CALIFORNIA 



CHASES' STABLES 



HOBSON & PRESTON 
Proprietors 

FINE RIGS 

OF ALL KINDS 



ANTIOCH 



CALIFORNIA 



^ It's not the name that makes 
the clothes good; It's the clothes 
that makes the name good. 

^ New Styles Every Month. 

^ New Suits Made to Order. 

^am litrHh 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

Cleanin.ff and repairins neatly done 

f;>r Ladies and Gentlemen. 

Next Door to Express Office. ANTIOCH, CAL. 



E. J. OLSEN 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES 
AND BERRIES 

Brentwood, California 

S8^^^S^$S$SS$^SM! SEE ^^SS^^^^^S^S^^ 

W. LYTLE 

For Bread and Pastry EverythiiiK Fresh Daily 

Olsen's Emporium 



THERE ' IS A GOOD 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

IN YOUR TOWN 
Do You Patronize Him? 

O.KAURIN 

ANTIOCH, CAL. 



Robert Wallace 

AGENT FOR KENILWORTH AND THE WELLINGTON 



i 



COAL 



HOME. LONDON. GLOBE. PHOENIX. CONNECTICUT. LONDON AND NEW 
ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

FRESNO AND CALIFORNIA NURSERIES 

BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



^^^^\■^NHx^^5;r^s-;tv*^:s^ss^''^^•■r^^•■ 



I • I 

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t GEO. H. SHAFER | 

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* 



i i W^UNERAL DIRECTOR f 

i f W^ *^^ EMBALMER | 

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I 

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I I LIVERY STABLE j I 

i i i. % 

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^ ^ Brentwood, California I 

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WHEN IN TOWN STOP AT ^ 



Palace of Sweets 



FOR 



Light Lunches, Chicken 
Tamales, a Delicious Dish of 
Ice Cream, Ice Cream Soda 
or Real Home Made Candy 
Antioch, California 



J. M. TREMBLEY 



E. TREMBLEY 



BRENTWOOD PLUMBING 
& HARDWARE STORE 

Plumbing and 
Tinning, Well 
Boring and 
Pumping 
Plants a 
Spec i a 1 1 y 

Estimates Furnished 
BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



$2 Per Year A Real Live Newspaper 1 



THE BRENTWOOD NEWS 

J. J. McCULLOCH, Publisher 



fl Our Clubbing Offer the Best Out. For 25c 

We Give You Three Magazines. 

Can You Beat It? 



4 Job Printing— the Kind That Pleases. 



iffirst National lank 

of Anttorli 



FOR SAFETY and SERVICE 



Affiliatril Sitii 

Antiorli ISank nf ^•amnga 



M. G. GRUNAUER 

GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 



GOODS DEUVERED BY 
AUTO 



BYRON, 
CALIFORNIA 



I 

I 



When you desire real news you 
do not read a sensational, yel-^. 
low, unreliable newspaper. The 



ANTIOCH LEDGER 



is always reliable, conservative, 

gives both sides of the question, 

id is fair at all times. Try it 
J 



gives 
an 
and see. 



We do the kind of job printing 
the "other fellow" does not 
know how to do. 



p ^ Is Always Full on the Hotted Days, | 

I BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA | 



I y I 

I Jd.iii6s 1 orrc S'"^^"! I 

I I ^ Nice Cold Ice from | j 

i I an Ice Cold Ice House | < 



I I 

I 

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FRED ALTENHOFF 



^ss; 



GENERAL 
BLACKSMITHING 
and 
REPAIRING 



HORSESHOEING 
A SPECIALTY 



ALL ORDERS 
PROMPTLY 
ATTENDED TO 



SATISFACTION 
GUARANTEED 



i BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



f 

lOR a 

Fir^-Class 
Shave and 

a Good Cigar 
GO TO 

ADOLPH 

He Has 'Em 



Brentwood, Cal. 



Brentwood Lumber Co. 



LUMBER, LIME, CEMENT and 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



THE VERY 

BEST GRADE 



Rail and Water Ship- Agents Winner Silo* 

fj , . . J State Distributor* for 

mentS OOllClted Papec Ensilage Cutlert 

F. E. SLUTMAN, Manager Brentwood, tal. 



i 

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I 




4 Per Cent. Interest Paid on Savings Accounts 




A DIAMOND set piece of Jewelry 

is not only a present, but an inve^ment you are mak- 
ing for the recipient. The April birthstone has increased 
80 per cent in value in the last ten years, and you can- 
not go wrong if you buy it from us. 



Anirf ui ^fibak 



iiatrn JfwrlrH »tart ANTIOCH. CAL. 



EatabliBlfrb 1B92 



Good Lumber Company 



INCORPORATED 
GEORGE A. GOOD, Manager 



DEALERS IN 



I GOOD LUMBER AND GOOD 

I BUILDING MATERIAL 



BYRON 



TRACY 



WANTED! 

YOUNG MEN FOR THE ARMY 

of foresighted folk who perceive the desirability 
and the benefits of identifying themselves or 
their business with 

A STRONG BANK 

and this particular appeal is addressed to the 
young, men because we are not the least a 
hensive lest the elderly ones should fail to d; 
er the advantages of banking with us. We know 
they know, from experience, the signs of a reliable, 
accommodating institution. Hence we bank on 
the older men to bank with us upon the in\itation 
we herewith extend, without further argument. 
But to the young men, let us repeat 

Get With Us and Grow With Us! 

There is future power and prestige in the fact 
that you have come straight up the hne of busi- 
ness growth with such an institution as ours. A 
banking connection with us v^ill mean additional 
credit to you in the minds of others, as well as the 
best financial service obtainable. 

OUR BANK IS OPERATED FOR YOUR BEST INTERESTS 

It is not our policy to conserve the interests of a 
few favored patrons but rather to help all our cus- 
tomers and to extend to all such legitimate cour- 
tesies and conveniences as make a good strong 
bank of inifinite value to those who do business 
with it. 

The manner with which all our business is 
conducted is the best evidence that our relations 
with our depositors are very satisfactory. 



^i ' i S. OUR l: 
xJ AS TAR 


:E_THE 

WAS 


. OUR I 


•vS 





HIGHLY PROTECTED. 

BYRON BRANCH 

BANK OF TRACY 

BYRON, CALIFORNIA. 



Capital Paid Up and Surplus, $81,000. Ass«ta, Ovar Half a Million. 

ComnMrcial Savln(S Safe Oeposlta 

"The Banh for Everybody." 



U«8aUN10e(HlfiHSCHe0bUBRARV 



I 

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to SIhm Ir Nn 3IU Will 



(Ealtfnrma Pn^^jg 



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i i!iuii'iiii miiuui 151UU1 S5'iniiui | 

i/: ffirmlnimiiJ. (Ealifiirnia ^^ 



I (ElasB (Unlnrs ^ 

I Hark anit ®raimr | 

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I — 

I (Clasa (iDfftrrrs | 

I — i 

I ISoB 3frrrtrl|r., ^Ir^Hi^^llt ^ 

i ^lanrhr 3urtt. Hirr ilrr«(driit 4. 

:! Sfranrra Srnuin, STrrrtani aitli tHrraBurrr J 

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Silvia 1915 Numbrr of 



3I0 SpappflfuUg Spbtratpft 



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WtUtam g>I]afrr 



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i I 

I I 

I Jatultg I 

i — i 

P 3.3I.ilartm,Pnitnpal | 

P fHalliematirB, l|tHtnrg, anl> Satin 1 ^ 

I fir. (E. (E. Cniark | 

P HoDftuinrk. IForgp, aitfi fHrrl^aniral Srauting % 

I iliBH 1^. inmmtoakr | 

i ffiDramerrial SraurhfB. Catin n. attb mebitcMal ^ 

J an^ fflabrrn SislurH J 

I iHtas lE. AnlI|onit | 

^ Anripnt ffitatnrit. SnmfBlir ^rirnrt al1^ (EhniriBtrs ^ 

P HisH 2j. (Spl|riit0rr p 

I iRr0. iH. S. (Satra | 

^ ifrrr Sanft Brannmi J 

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i M. y. I^ntnarft. ^rrstJJrut | 

■§. i)nsr;jh ^rruirtt i 

i iB. IH. litrrintglia ^ 



i ?Riibrrt Wallarr. (Clrrk i 

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Cnmmrnrrm? nl Program 



Addrejs HON. FREEMAN H. BLOODGOOD 

Vocal Solo MR. L. V. RICHARDSON 



I I 

I Invocalion REV. C. G. LUCAS f 

P Song SCHOOL ^ 

I Salutatory MR. JOE HAND | 

i PianoSolo MISS ZILLA COOK J 



i 



i Class Will MISS NEVA SHEDDRICK p 

^ Vocal Solo MISS LINDA GEHRINGER | 

I Valediaory MISS BLANCHE JUET7 i 

I Piano Duet THE MISSES FOTHERINGHAM | 

i Presentation of Diplomas MR. J. I. MARTIN % 

i ClassSong GRADUATING CLASS | 

I Beoediaion REV. C. G. LUCAS P 

I DANCING i 

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1 I 

i f 




Silently oer the mounUin stck 
^ soft grey chud tinted with gold, 

And down behind two purple peaks 
Sank the sun that never steeps^ 

But on ttie morrow with glories unfurled^ 
It will rise again to brighten our worlds 



By Ruth E.Lent. 'i% 




Page 

Frontispiece. "Pojipy", class flower. oi)i)osite page one 

Title Paire , 1 

Dedication 2 

In Menioriam 3 

The Faculty and Trustees 4 

Conimeucenient Proirram 5 

Sunset. Ruth Lent. '18 6 

Senior Pictures, Girls 8 

Senior Pictures, Boys _ 9 

Manual Training Exhibit 10 

Editorial Staff 11 

Alumni Notes, Harold Collis, '14 12 

Senior Prophecy, Ella Wurz. '15 14 

Opening of P. P. I. E., Blanche Juett, 'l.'i 15 

Felix Frankfurter's Bride. Ruth Lent, '18 16 

The Freshman Class, Virginia Lent, '18 17 

Extracts from a Boy's Correspondence. Frances Brown, '15 18 

Sophomore Class, Harold Lucas, '17 22 

Wanted — A Rejuvenator. Blanche Juett, '15 23 

Junior Hay Ride. Frances Brown. '15 25 

Experience of a Freshman, Ella Wurz, '15 29 

Junior Poem, Polly Barkley. '16 31 

The West for the East, Mabel Steding, '18 .32 

The Seniour Classe. F'rances Brown, '15 36 

Love Will Find a Way. Ella Wurz. '15 39 

Our Freshie Girls and Boys, Minerva Weihe, '18 41 

The Domestic Science Class. Ruth Lent, '18 42 

Class Will 44 

VoTise Work, Joe Hand, '15 46 

Girls' Athletics. Polly Barkley, '16 47 

Boys' Athletics. PMdie Hevey, '16 49 

Society and Dramatics, Neva Sheddrick, '15 53 

Junior Play •''4 

Exchanges, Alvin Howard, '15 55 

Horoscojie ^^ 

Cartoons, School Days, Roy Frerichs, '15 58 

Joke Department ^^ 

Advertisements 64 

Josh Calendar, pages 5 and 14 in advertisement section 



•»T:^ .- ' ..^.a BS8<S^ 



s^t 




SIl)? ^rabimting OIlaBa 





FRANCES BROWN 



ELLA WURZ 



ICtb^rtg 1. % ^. 

1915 




NEVA SHEDDRICK 



?\-m«-.Wi^Ms:-$s^\^sis.!SJ.^^5m'S§s$^^^ 



Slir (Sraiinattmi (Class 





ALVIN HOWARD 



JOE HAND 





WALTER SWIFF 



ROY FRERICHS 



Eibrrtii 11 ii. #. 



Exhibit of work from Miiminl Tniinina Department 
of Liberty rnion Iliuli School. 




.^\^^^\mm^^.^\^^\^m^\^5^^^^^sk^\m\^m\^\^^ 




TORIfll 



Efttlnrtal g>taff 



Blanche Juelt, Edilor-in-Chief 
Frances Brown. Astociale Editor 
Neva Sheddricic, Society Editor 



I'cior (lid Annuiil! It seems as if onr 
Anmi.il liiis ii new iiiinie nearly every 
■year. In lf)i:{ the Student Body itself 
named it the Liberty Bell and it was then 
decided never to ehanire it ajrain, but last 
year'> class named it "Lux." Tliis year 
we have resumed the formei- title and ho|)e 
to see it remain unchantred in tlu' future. 

Onr boys are doinir s|)lendidly in Man- 
ual Traininir and Bla<ksmitiiin<r and onr 
sirls are d(»intr some very creditable worU 
in scwinjr. 

Our latest feature is the Cookiuir Dc- 
jiartmenl. The trustees had a neat lit'ie 
bnniralow built esjieciaily for this purjiose 
and had it e(|ui|»|)ed with all the necessary 
utensils, inc-lndinir many electrical apiili- 
ances. The iL'irls enjoy takinjr cr>okin'r 
uniler tlie able instruction of the bead of 
that department and the boys certainly 



Joe Hand, Business Manaxer 


Polly Barkley. Girl's Athletics 


Walter Swift, Associate Manager 


Edward Hevey. Roy's Athletics 


Harold Collis. Alumni Editor 


Roy Frerictis, Cartoonist 


ck. Josh Editor Alvin Howard, Excha 


inge Editor 



enjoy the siirls' dainty viands which arc 
concocted in the kitchen. 

We lia\"e more school spirit this year 
than last. The boys surely have awak- 
ened and ai'e not ,iroin<>: to let the jrirls iret 
ahead, of them in athletics. They j)ut a 
stronirW'ootball team in the field, tyin^- for 
third place in the ('. C. A. L. Schedulv 
and are also taking- up baseball and aro 
uoinir in for the track meet. The iiirls of 
the basket ball team showed splendid spirit 
and team work. Both boys and u^irls have 
\ery iiood basket ball teams, and havv> 
Won the championship pennants for lOL'). 

The Kdilor wishes to thaid< all who have 
so willingly assisted licr. The stalT has 
worked very dilijrently and the school has 
irenerously contributed to I he success of 
this book. 

We wish to thank (he advcitisers wli-i 
have so cheerfully p;itroni/.ed us. 



rp.,e 1 

lEIevrnJ 




CLASS '05 

Edith A. Sellers (Mrs. Herbert French), 
an afoomplished pianist, resides in Sa- 
linas. 

CLASS '06 

Anna O'llara is teaching: school in 
Pitisburs; Roy Heck is employed by Dnn- 
hani. Carrioan and Hayden of San Fran- 
cisco: Effle A. Chadwick (Mrs. Ray Bon- 
nickson) resides near Byron; Hattie Rus- 
sell (Mrs. O'Banion) in Oakland; Pear! 
Grove (Mrs. Henry Sellers) near Knight- 
sen ; Fern V. Cumminofs in Berkeley ; Pern 
Howard is farming on Marsh Creek; 
Georae Barkeley, now a full fledsied law- 
yer, is deputy county clerk in ^Lartinez; 
Bertha Sanders (Mrs. Arthur Bigiow) re- 
sides in San Francisco. 

CLASS '07 

Alma Allen resides with her parents 
near Escalon ; Harold Swift is employed 
in Arizona; Euna Goodwin (Mrs. Ear! 
Shafer) resides near Oakley; Johanna 
Gruening'er (Mrs. Joe Jesse) in Oakley. 

CLASS '08 

Leonard Dainty is a successful farmer 
on Marsh Creek: Millard DilTin is a hus- 
tlinir vounp rancher in the same neiirhbor- 



hood and in his leisure moments* has shown 
great skill at baseball: Addie Knight (Mrs. 
Mecum) resides in Berkeley. 

CLASS '09 
Edna Heck (Mrs. Ralph Crowther) is 
principal of the Brentwood Grammar 
School : Bessie Collis is keeping house for 
her father in Brentwood, Edna Heidorn is 
principal of the grammar school in Knight- 
sen : Iva Bonnickscn resides with her 
mother in Berkeley; Willie Morgans, after 
an attack of serious illness, is endeavoring 
to regain his health under the watchful 
car& of his motlier in Brentwood: Robert 
Wallace is a very successful farmei- near 
Brentwood. 

CLASS '10 

Chas. O'Hara, James and Joseph Barkloy 
are students at V. C. Berkeley; Ray 
Shafer has returned to his studies at the 
College of the Pacific after a rest of 
one semester: Rose Miller (Mrs. Eugene 
Wilson) resides in San Jose: Claude Wris- 
tcn, Arthur Sheddrick, William Cakebread. 
DeWitt Richardson, William Murphy and 
Ellis Howard are successful farmers in 
tlieir respective neighborhoods; Camillc 
Sresovich is cashier and bookkeeper for 
the Pittsburg Aluminum Co of San P>an- 

fr "'. 1 

I 1 wrWeJ 



cisco; Miiruaret Wliito res;i(les in Vncii- 
villo. 

CLASS '11 

Frank Helm is shij)pin<j: clerk for \\m. 
Cluff of San Francisco; Van Prince, a 
skilled machinist, is employed by Holt 
Bros., Stockton ; Mariiuerite Geddes is a 
junior at l". C; Morgan Sdiroeder is man- 
aging; the home place near Oakley. 

CLASS '12 

Esther Dainty has been teaching the 
Deer Valley school for the past two years; 
Olive Siple has been teaching the Iron 
House for two years; Katie Murphy is 
primary teacher in Brentwood; Jessie 
Johnson (Mrs. H. J. Wood) resides in San 
Francisco. 

CLASS '13 

Judson Swift is attending Polvlechnic 



Business College in Oakland; Richard 
Wallace is assistant cashier in the Brciil- 
wood Bank; Edith Cakebread will tiiiisli 
her course at the San Jose Normal in 
June; Myra Pearce (Mrs. Simpson) lives 
in Berkeley; Elaine Wallace is her moth- 
er's most efficient heljier at home in Brent- 
wood. 

CLASS '14 
F^sthcr Murphy is attending San Jose 
Normal; Mary Parenti and Mae Pembcr- 
tou are attending Western Normal at 
Stockton; Susie Dickinson is attending 
San Francisco Normal; Aileen Porter has 
recently completed a business course at 
Polytechnic Business College, Richmond; 
Henry Plumbley is attending V. C; Ever- 
ett Lemoin is attending Polytechnic Busi- 
ness College, Oakland; Harold Collis is 
employed by Balfour-Guthrie Co., Brent- 
wood. 




fP.t» 1 

IThirteenJ 



BRENTWOOD NEWS 



VOL. XI. No. 50 



BRENTWOOD, CAL.. JUNE I. 1925 



ALVIN HOWARD. Editor 



REFORM PARTY 

TRIUMPHS AT LAST 



Miss Juett Elected Mayor - 
Radical Reforms Proposed 

In till' .■lection of Miss Blanche Juett 
to the mayoralty of Greater Brent- 
wood, the Progressive Reform Harty 
has triumphed at last Miss Juett is 
a young woman of sterling character 
whose greatest pride is her native 
city, Brentwood. The city may hope 
for groat things. 

Possessing i\ large heart and a great 
pity tor all dumb and suffering ani- 
mals. Miss Juett has promised to found 
a home for invalid and indigent cats 
and dogs. We hope this project will 
win the approval and hearty support 
of all the citizensof our beautiful city, 
as it is one of the greatest philan- 
thropic movements of the age. 

She also proposi'S a striking reform 
in the public schools. She wishes the 
teachers to provide a dainty repast for 
each class. The wisdom of this re- 
form Miss Juett li'arned in her high 
school days. She vividly remembers 
the hours when she sat suffering the 
pangs of hunger, while she patiently 
awaiteil the sound of the bell which 
would bring to her the much de.sired 
article— food. 

These are only two of the great 
number of reforms which Miss Juett 
will bring to pass. Again we wish to 
repeat that the city may hope for 
great things. 



NEW BOOK APPEARS 

Anew book has just made its ap- 
pearance from the pen of the brilliant 
young author. Joe Hand. The title of 
the book is "Strolling." Mr. Hand 
has contemplated this book for some 
time as he gathered most of his ma- 
terial from his e.xperieiices during 
Ills high school days. Strolling" has 
become very popular and is much in 
demand. 

"Sliding Through" is another book 
by Mr. Hand, also very popular, es- 
pecially among high school and col- 
Ic'ge stuilents. 

Other I ks by Mr. Hand are Pop- 
ularity With the Girls." "The Single 
Man." and "The Athlete." 



TO HONOR BRENTWOOD 



Beautiful Start© Give Perform- 
ance in City of Her Birth 

Miss Neva Sheddrick, the beautiful 
young star, is to make her appearance 
in Brentwood m-xt week at the Brent- 
wood Opera House (nee Coates' Halli 
in her famous play, "The Flirt." 

Her stagi' career has been one of 
continued success. Her dazzling 
beauty and sweet personality have 
endeared her to many, to say nothing 
of the cliarm of her wonderful acting. 
Miss Sheddrick's rooms are always a 
iiower of beautiful (lowers. Many 
suitors have sciughl hi-r hand, but sin- 
has steadfastly announced her de- 
termination to remain true to her art. 

"The Flirt" is one of the most pop- 
ular plays of the season. It ran for 
ten months at the Maxine Elliot Thea- 
tre in New York, and Miss .Sheddrick 
closed her engagement there to ap- 
pear in her native city. Brentwood. 
She is to return to New York when 
her present engaK«'ment is ended. 



BRINGS PUBLIC TO HIS FEET 



Roy Frerichs Biggest Laugh in 
Bing-Bing's Circus 

Mr. Hoy Frerichs. a former resident 
of Brentwood and vicinity has scored 
one of the biggest hits of the season 
as chief clown in Biug-Bing's Circus. 
He impersonates Tom Thumb and 
other diiiiiiiutivi' figures. He is the 
chiliireii's favorite and the little ones 
scream with delight when their funny 
friend api)ears on the tanbark. 

Although MrjjFrerichs is at his best 
as a clown, he is a skilled tight-rope 
walker. It is thrilling indeed to see 
the slender figure in purple tights 
make his way swiftly and <'arefully 
across the tent upon the tightly 
stretched wire. People hold their 
breath for fear he will fall, but they 
do not know the cool nerve and the 
firm footing of the man high up in the 
air with nothing between him and 
death but his feet. 

Brentwood will soon have a chance 
to see Koy perform, for Bing-Bings 
will appear in this city early in Sep- 
tember. 

e"d~i tori ~W l 

AIAIN HOWARD, Editor 
We wish to call the attention of the 
public to the rapid growth of our 
beautiful city and also of this, our 
news scatterer, especially after we 
took hold. We remember our high 
school days in dear old Liberty 
riiioii. 

In those days Brentwood was only 
a village and the NEWS was printed 
once a week. Now Greater Brentwood 
is second only to San Francisco. The 
NEWS is one of the leading dailies 
an<l Liberty fiiioii is among the 
greatest schools in tin' Suite. And 
we are editor of the NEWS. Also 
please notice the good fortune of all 
our classmates. 

WANTED— By an old maid, some- 
one to love me. Apply to Ella Wurz, 
'£i Prune Avenue, Brentwood, ("al. 



BRILLIANT WEDDING 

OF POPULAR COUPLE 

Miss Brown and Mr. Hoggen- 
heimer Plight Their Troth 

A wedding of great interest took 
place in Brentwood last c-vening. .\t 
a brilliantly appointed ceremony 
Miss Frances Brown became the l)ride 
of Mr. Egbert Hoggenheimer. The 
wi'dding took place in the new Con- 
gregational Church on Chesimit Ave- 
nue. 

The church was beiiutifiiUy liecor- 
ated with marigolds and potato 
plant. Preceded by her attendants 
the charming bri<le, upon the arm of 
her father, swept up the aisle to the 
altar, where the unfortunate groom 
awaited his doom. 

Miss Brown was exijuisitely gowned 
in a charming creation of tlie new 
yellow lace over red s;itin. .\ veil of 
yi'llou mosuuito netting completc'd 
the costume. Tlie groom wore the 
conventional suit of blue silk crepe 
embroidered in pink sweet peas. 

Miss .\licia Hoggenheimer attended 
hi'r future sister-in-law as maid of 
honor, wliile the Misses .loy Heart- 
breaker. Helen Street and Marjorie 
Love acted as bridesmaids, Mr. Ma- 
gnUh .Mexander was best man and 
the ushers were Messrs Weary Willie, 
EnisiMus .lones ami Rjicey Speed. 

.\fter the ceremony a reception and 
dinner was attiMided by the many 
friends of the couple at the magnifi- 
cent Brown residi'iice on Liberty 
.\ venue. 

Following a honeymoon si)»>nt in 
Oakley the happy pair will reside in 
Kiiightsen where Mr. Hoggenheimer 
is he^d of the Pork Trust. 



HEAVY LOSS IN EXPLOSION 

Work of Many Years Destroyed 
When Chemist Forgets 

A violent explosion, which took 
place in the laboratory of Walter 
Swift, the well known chemist, de- 
stroyed one of the greatest discov- 
eries of the century. For s«'Veral 
years Mr Swift has been working up- 
on a gas by means of which students 
could obtain their lessons without 
study. 

He was deeply absorlM-d when a cry 
from his infant son caused him to 
dropeverythingand run to the rescue. 
But alas! after removing the hi-at 
from under the flask he forgot to re- 
move the delivery tube from the water 
and, bang! the valuable work was 
destroyed. 

But Mr. Swift is of a pi>rsevering 
nature anil will l»'gin at the begin- 
ning. In a few years he hopis to 
present his work to the public. 

Ella Wurz 'n') 



[Page 1 




©^ruimj lit* thr f . f . 3. E 



Witli Ix'iiutv Miul ur;i(1(Mir. tlic world's ^rcntpst fnir. 
Kmbliizoiu'd in jrlory, with settiiij; most ijirp. 
Lookinsr out to the sea aiul the faiiied Golden Gate 
The triumphal door- way of our srold-famous State. 
The President at Washins-ton, from exeentiw chair. 
Set the .irreal wheels revolvin.i:, by spark tliruiiuh the 
This eity of beauty in wonders arrayed. 
From memories history never will fade. 
Our Australian neijrhhor from the antijjodes, 
With Japan and China from the orient seas. 
Have erected their temjiles of beauty and art. 
Aidiujr most nobly in doinji their part. 
Nations of Euroiw did irraciously share, 
In promotinfr and buiidinu our world's ur<'atest fail. 
Each one has built a palace most inland. 
To e.xiiil)it fine arts of their native land. 
The States of our I'nion, and Canaila too. 
Erected art buildings, antifpie ones and new, 
Filled with exhibits, of ait new and old. 
With temples of jewels and i)alace of j-old. 
Our sister Rei)ublics, of the South Hemisphere. 
In our '.rreat family circle, all have drawn lu-ar, 
With grand, mission buildings, with facades of old, 
In myriad colors finished in gold. 
This gathering of Nations, famous history will niak 
May it forge ties r»f friendship, that never will break 

HIanclic Jnett. 



■1.-). 



rp.«e 1 

iFUiecnJ 




3tlxK 3Prankfurt^r'a Irtb? 



Felix Frankfurther was n butcher as 
you well may know by his title. A short 
girl with red curly locks and a little turned 
up, freckled nose entered the butcher shop 
one day, with her wobbly, bowlegged dog, 
Needles. She and Felix were very well 
acquainted. The first day Felix met her 
be said to himself, "There's the girl for 
me," and straightway proceedel to court 
Sapphire. Finally he asked her to become 
his wife. The day of their marriage ap- 
proached and all was in readiness but^ no 
Sapphire appeared. Felix waited and 
waited and waited which was about ten 
minutes, and finally growing impatient he 
started in the direction of Sapphire's 
flome to find her if he could. 

Meanwhile Sapphire, who had decided 
that she cared nought for marriage, fled 
to the feed stable and there hid in the bar- 
ley bin. As she sat there all huddled up 
Felix's voice could be heard through the 



cracks calling, "Sapphire! Sapphire! My 
darling, for the love of Mike appear, and 
make me a happy man once more." 

Sapphire upon hearing the sad and sor- 
rowful voice of Felix began to weep. When 
the rooster, who was picking up kernels 
of barley near by, heard the sobs, he be- 
came frightened and broke the speed 
limit. He hurried from the place, making 
such a noise that Felix's attention was 
drawn at once towards the bin which con- 
cealed his sobbing Sapphire. At a glance 
he had taken in the situation. Then lift- 
ing the lid. he helped out his long, lost 
love, brushing the barley from her hair 
while doing so. She sobbed out her 
troubles on his spotless white vest, which 
was no longer spotless. "Well Pet, brace 
up and we'll have a wedding after all." he 
comforted, pressing her hands. 

Ruth Lent. '18. 




fP.ge 1 
ISisleenJ 



iHlir iFr^sIiman QIlaaB 



111 oiir class arc jiisi ciulilcon. 
Seniors treat us awful moan, 
Take our shoes oflf, pull our liair, 
If they hurt us the\ don't care. 

Let uie tell jou of our class 
We're not all as areen as irrass. 
Some are pretty briijht you know 
And the mark they always toe. 

Ruth in drawinir is a shark. 
And of irenius has a s|)ark. 
Minerva wlio has cheeks like roses, 
Durinii: Eufrlish po'ms composes. 

Carl at tiie shop does work, 
And his Ensrlish likes to shirk, 
While in Alyebra every day, 
Mabel is (tur chief mainstay. 

Ned Mac^urn is a fiend at spcllinjr. 
What he uets there is no tellinjr, 
Kate at typinjr is some swell, 
P^or she surely does it well. 

Jack Sufifren is the hiji:h school tease, 
And with irirls seems quite at ease, 
Ilerscliel Miller is quite coy. 
And with the ttirls a popular boy. 

Muriel is some class at sewinjr, 
And in her brain is knowledi-e stowinir, 
In shorthand Ksther breaks the speed, 
And in the <-lass she takes the lead. 

Ransom always knows his History, 
How he frets it, is a mystery, 
Smart in German is Georjiia Nunn, 
And she think's il's lots of fun. 

.^fya does work at the shop. 
When he besnns he hates to stop. 
Stanley in Enjilish is veiy {lood. 
And can always be understood. 

Homer is never in a hurry. 
His motto is "I shoulcl worry." 
Now, this is enoufrh of the Freshies dear, 
Wc hope their traits are made quite clear. 
Virginia Lent, '18. 



■^^k^\*k^^^m^^^^ 



IExtrafl0 ifram a lng'0 (Eorrf H^JDniif ur? 



Brentwood, California, 
Ai)ril 2, 1914. 

Deer Bill : — Gosh, but it's lonesome since 
you went away, don't seem like nothin's 
the saim. Yestiddy was April Fools and 
we had a great time, but 1 kindii wish we 
hadn't. I aint been able to set down sence 
about si.\ o'clock last nite, when pa got 
home. 

Well, you know them to white kittens 
your ma gave mine when she went away? 
Well you know the darn things are always 
gettin my dog in trouble, the one I got from 
Red Elkins. They pest and tease around 
him and you know he's a good dog but 
theres some things he can't stand and cats 
is one, and so he lights out and chases em, 
and then when ma comes out and sees her 
kittens stuck upon the fence with their 
tales swelled up and there eyes poppin 
out and jest spittin like the fire when^u 
throw water on it, why she ties poor 
Spotty up and then tells pa, and pa says: 
"Gues we'll have to get rid of that dog." 

So yestiddy, that crosseyed Smith kid 
and me, we got those kittens and tied there 
tales together and slung em over the 
close-line, then I hollered to ma to come 
and see the airship and jest as she got to 
the back dore T yelled "April Fool!" and 
beet it. Say, you oughta seen them cats! 
I thought they liked each other but the 
way they went to it when they was slung 
over that close-line you'da thought they 
sure had it in for each other. They clawed 
and spit and scratched and bit and there 
was white hare aflying in every durection. 
Mil didn't ask where the airship was, just 
yelled, "Oh my poor kittens!" and I didn't 
wait to hear no more, but crawled through 
the hole in the fense and hiked through 
the back alley to school. 

You know that the new girl with the 
lonu' h;ire sots in frfxit of me now. Well 



she's a kinda nice kid, gave me some gum 
la.st week, but she's awful stuck on herself 
and loves that brade of hare more than 
anything. Keeps switchin it around in my 
face all the time, so yestiddy I picked it 
up reel quiet, took my gum out of my 
mouth (it was the wad she gave me too) 
rapped it around the end of her brnde and 
then plastered it down to my desk. Gosh, 
I never knew gum would stick so. Well she 
sat still long enuf to let it git hard then 
the teecher called on her to read. She 
tried to git up but that brade was stuck 
fast a.nd so she stuck. The teecher asked 
what was the matter but she never sed a 
word, jest started in to cry and then the 
teecher came down to see what was the 
matter. When she found out she jumped 
on me rite away never even asked who 
done it or nothin, and there I was studyin 
just as hard as you please. She gave me 
an awful lickin but that girl howled louder 
than I did when the teacher sed she 
guessed she'd have to cut the end of 
her hare off, she jest bellered like n young- 
calf and all that fuss over a measly old 
brade of hare. Gosh aint girls llic queer 
things? 

'^ Well when T got home for lunch 1 walked 
in like nothin had happened, but 1 was 
shakin in my boots. Ma's eyes was kinda 
red and she says, "Robert," (you know 
ma, means business when she says Robert, 
its generally Bobbie.) "Robeit I shall tell 
your father on you and he will punish you 
when lie comes home this evening." I 
kinda wished she'd waited till after lunch 
because I couldn't eat much then but she 
didn't say anything more. 

Nothin hai)pened in the afternoon cei>tin 
that Jack Rhodes got a lickin for lausrhin 
at the new girl's hare, she's got about 6 
incihes cut of¥. She dont set in front of 
me no more but it wouldnt matter if she 



rP«8e 1 
LEilhternJ 



did. her hare's too slioit to fasten now 
and besides 1 liavent any more i;uin. 

Bui I sure irot an uwl'ul wailopin from 
\M tlwit niirlit. 1 ato supper ofT tlie kitelien 
table, standin up and today tlie toecher 
asketl nie if there was a i)in stickin nie 
1 wiiisrled around so mucli. 

Hut I'll sret even with that ])esky srirl 
and them darned eats for the two liekins 
they caused me. Neitlier cats nor liirls is 
any jrood no how. 

Yours, 
Robert B. Ames Jr. 

P. S. I forsrot to tell you our cow iiail 
twia calves yestiddy. — Bob. 

I'. S. The new irirl's mother won't 
speak to um now. wimmen is quear a.s 
well as irirls and cats. — P>. 



Brentwood, California. 
May 12, 1914. 

Dear Bill: — Say Bill, maybe you wont 
believe it, but Ive pretty near lerned to 
dance. You know they have damein^ 
.schoid here now. They have it in the af- 
ternoon for the kids and at niuhl for 
•rrownups. 

Well yesterday afternoon nua dressed 
me all uj), put that darned old collar on 
tlhat spreads out on my eoat (P^ton she 
calls it) and took me over to the dancinir 
scho(d. Tliere was a bunch of kids there. 
and they looked awful funny, especially 
the boys. I jruess I looked funny too, 
e^use me cars got awful red and felt 
just like red lamp-shades, and my feet 
felt awful liirht and (pieer in them pumps 
and silk socks. The srirls was havin<r a 
swell time, sittiiiir around !rii:irli:i}r and 
fussin;: their hare and lookinsr at the boys. 

Well a younir lady with a awful tijrht 
skirt with rufTles. and hiirh heel shoes and 
hair slicked back and earrinjrs on came 
up to ma and ask ''Does your little boy 
want to dance," and I stood up real 
straight so's she'd see I wa.sn't very small 
a.nd Ma says, "Yes, i:n with the lady dear." 
and the lady <jrabbed my hand and started 
to walk across the floor with mc where 
a bunr-h of boys were slandinir. Maybe 
von think I didnt feel like a darn fool. 



and that I'al Morse kid izrinncd ill! over. 
I'll swai; him ne.xt time I >ce him just to 
make him urunt he's so fat. Well she 
takes me up to the bunch, and says to 
Fatty Morse, "Percy will you try this 
boy. Its his first time." And 1 had to put 
my arm around thai fat slob, (he felt jnsl 
like a sack of flour) and Fatty starts in 
"One two, one two," and off we jroes. Gosh 
that kid was heavy and he'd land on my 
foot every time he'd say two. Pretty soon 
I jjot sore, and just tlien we g:ot to the 
door and I says "Lei's jio jiet cooled off," 
so we went outside and maybe you think 
I didn't land into that kid. I mussed him 
uji somethinjr fierce, and just as I jrot 
throujfh we heard somebody comin, and 
I says, "You better i>o home, son," so 
Fat beat it and the younjj lady come out 
and says, "Oh here you are Robert, I 
missed you. Dont you want to come in and 
dance with some of the little girls?" I 
didn't want to and besides I was kinda 
mussed up but she took my hand and I 
had to. She liiked over to where there 
was a bijj mob of the jjirls, with me ta^- 
<rin<r after her, and who do you s])ose she 
nuule me dance with? The kid that had to 
have her hair cut off 'cause I put uum 
in it. Gee I was sore. Well I put my arm 
around her and jjrabs into the only thiim 
I could find, it was the bow of the ribbon 
she had around her waist, and we started 
off. I stejiped oin her foot just for mean- 
ness, first thinjr and she gives a funny lit- 
tle gasp but don't say nothing. I only 
wished I'd had on my big boots stead of 
them pumps. She could dance i)retty good 
so I hangs on to that blue ribbon for dear 
life and used it for a handle to turn her 
around with, and every time the rest of 
'em turned I'd give that ribbon a yank and 
switch her around. I sure got even for 
that lickin she caused me. I just walked 
all over her feet and twisted that blue 
ribbon in fifty different directions. And 
then what do you suppose happened? Well 
that ribbon came untied and she kept on 
dancing and there 1 was hopping around 
with about fifty yards of blue ribbon in 
my hand. The fellas just howled and ihe 
kid says, "You nasty mean horrid boy 
von. von've ruined mv sash. You aint got 



lNin*'lern 



no manners at all. You just pulled it rite 
off on purpose." And I says, "Aw go on, 
1 was just hauiiiug on to it, you did the 
pulling yourself." And then the dancing 
teacher comes up and says, "vVhy Rob- 
ert, Im surprised at you. Give Marie her 
sash," and I says, "Gosh I don'-t want the 
darned thing." She must have thought I 
wanted it. All this time the fellows was 
laughing fit to bust and I slams the rib- 
bon down on the floor and starts over to 
clean up the bunch and I catches my foot 
in that ribbon and falls flat on the floor. 
Goslh I was mad. And just then ma comes 
over and the dancing teacher says, "Mrs. 
Ames, I think you'd better take Robert 
home he seems to be rather excited." Ex- 
cited! Huh! I guess she'd have been ex- 
cited too if she'd been made a fool of be- 
fore about fifty people. And then Marie's 
ma comes rushing up and says to ma, 
"Madam, your son seems bent upon hu- 
miliating my daughter in every possible 
manner," and ma freezes up and says "I 
presume it is too great a stretch of mem- 
ory to recollect that you were a child 
once." And s%e takes my hand and says, 
"come dear lets go home." And Marie's 
ma just got purple but ma never looj^d 
at her, just sails right out and we goes 
home. 

I heard her and pa laughing awful liard 
after I went to bed that night, l)ut il was 

no joke I tell you. 

Yours. 

Bob Amos. 
P. S. Til be darned if T go to that 
dancing school again, and I gave Red El- 
kins and Jim Barnes a coui)lo of black 
eyes today when they says something 
about blue ribbons. 

Brentwood, Cal., 
June 28. 1914. 

Dear Bill: 

Yestiddy was the first day of vacation 
iind I earned a dollar. 

You know Uncle Dick, ma's brol^her tliat 
goes to College? Well he came up Friday 
nite and said he was going to spend Ins 
vacation here. He's a kinda decent sort 
of fella but there's a girl staying at Field's 



right next to us, who he used to know 
and he's awful sweet on her. She's a nice 
girl but she kisses me and musses my hare 
and calls me "Bobbie dear" right before 
all the folks. 

Well yestiddy morning I was showin 
Uncle Dick around the place and you know 
those twin calves I was tellin you about? 
Well they was out in the ioit back of our 
house and so was the old cow. The calves 
are pretty husky now and Uncle Dick says : 
"Say Bob, ol top les have some sport," 
and I says, "Sure." And he says, "Go 
get your little red wagon and a couple of 
pieces of rope." And so I did and he 
started ouit after the calves. They was at 
oinie end of the lot and the old cow was 
at the other. Well he walks up to them 
calves and ties the ropes around there 
necks and starts to leed them over to 
where the wagon Was. Did they leed? Well 
I gess not. The red calf began to run 
one way and the spotted calf the other 
just as hard as they could tare. When 
they got to the end of the roap they fell 
down and spun around on 'there jaw bones 
«,nd nearly jerked Uncle Dicks arms out. 
But he's as game as they m^ike em and 
hung on. Well those calves gets up in a 
jiffy and both starts to run the other way 
and Uncle Dick gets one roap twisted 
around his nees and the other around his 
ankles and then l)oth calves starts off 
in the same directian and he has to go 
to At first he tried hopping, but they 
went too fast and he trips and stumbles 
and finally falls down and skates along 
on his nose. Gosh it was the funniest 
thing I ever saw. You oughta seen them 
calves run, amd there wa.s Uncle Dick 
draga-in and bumpin along behind 'em. He 
had swell white flannel pants on, and they 
was getting all streaked up with grass and 
dirt and he 'had on low shoes and they 
iK.tli u(.t untied mid flew off and one 
bounced u]) and hit him on the ear. Gee 
he was the sorest guy I ever saw. "For 
Lord sake Bob," he yells, "get a knife 
nnd cut me loose," and he just swore a 
blue streak. But T was laughinir so hard 
I couldn't do nothin but just run beside 
him Just about that 'lime though tlie old 
r-ow spots 'em and slie starts t<.ward 



[Page 1 
ITwenlyJ 



I'liolc Dick with her head down nnd tail 
n'flyin' nnd then I got scared cause I 
thought she'd gore him. So 1 grabs nay 
knife and cuts the ro^)es and those fool 
calves just kept on running and the old 
cow keeps heading for Uncle Dick. Well 
I cut the ropes around his feet and knees 
and thpn we boih starts for the fence lick- 
ety split. We just got there in time and 
crawled over as she took a board off with 
her horns. Well you oughta seen Uncle 
Dick. All the skin was off the end of 
his nose and his hair was full of weeds 
nnd his face was pretty near covered with 
dirt and grass stain nnd his clothes too. 
The parts of his face that weren't covered 
were kinda pale yellow color and he was 
scared stiff. He didn't say nothin for 
about five minutes, then he stuck his hand 
in his pocket and says, "Say Bob this is 



yours if you never breathe a word of this 
10 anybody, Marjorie especially." I 
wouldn't have told her anyway, but didn't 
tell him so, and I took the dollar and just 
grinned an says, "Sure." 

Last night I heard him telling Marjorie 
how he bumped into a door in the dark 
and skinned his nose, and she says. 
"That's too bad." 

But what do you know about it, she saw 
the whole thing cause she was over this 
morning and I heard she and ma laughin 
about somethitng and I listened nnd I 
heard Marjorie say, "Yes I was standing 
in the kitchen window and saw it all. He 
bribed Bobby not to tell." Wouldnt that 
bump you? But I should worry. I got the 
dollar nnyway. 

Yours, Bob Ames. 

F. B. '!.'>. 




rp..« 1 

lT%rcOt7-OMj 



;SS!SSSSSS5>S!SS 



j ^opl|0morp (ElaHH j 



There are many who form the Sophomore Class, 

Many a jolly laddie and lass. 
Of these I will now try a little to tell, 

So you will know they're coming along well. 

Our Yirgie has left us. 'tis s;id to say, 

To go Anacortes, which is verj' far away. 

And now we turn to our classmate, Grace, 

^Mio to use big words think's it's very good taste. 

In basket ball Sayde is sure some shark. 

And in Geometry always gets a good mark. 

Adella always knows her lessons to a "t" 
And can recite poetry as fast as can be. 

Our Zelnia thinks a lot of a certain boy, 

And to play the part of Portia is to her a great .joy. 
But Bertha thinks each boy a beast 

And cares for them, no, not in the least. 

Studious Fern is adapted to learning, 

And her greatest trouble is translating German. 
May is always smiling it surely does seem, 

And her ambition is to make the team. 

Now to the boys and to their sports, 

We find I hem on all sorts of "courts." 
In hand-ball Ellis does sure take pleasure, 

And no other Soph, can to his skill measure. 

In foot ball Aubrey is sure some racer, 

He can run and dodge like a "nigger chaser.'' 

Frank has his sport in another way. 

He's courting the girls most every day. 

In Rugby, Clifford takes interest, they say. 

And a clever player he'll be some day. 
Sometimes John to school takes a hike, 

And Charles comes whenever he likes. 

And now, my friends, my tale is ended. 

And all my knowledge is nearly expended, 
I am a Soph, and proud of the name. 

And no doubt you will give me no blame. 

Harold Lucas. 



fP.B. 1 

ITwenly-TwoJ 



Mautrli— A Sr;uitpnatnr 



PersonnJ — A business man of 35 hns re- 
cently liail a bereavement that depresses 
liis spirits and makes otliee routine most 
ditHcult. His physieian insists upon a 
complete chanjre. 

What younjr man, entlnisiastic, a lover 
of sports wishes to undertake the "Rejuv- 
eiuition of Aunt Mary's brother?" 

"Jones" foots the bills; requisites are 
refinement, personality, and temperament. 
Please state (|ualifications and asje. F. 23 
Tribune. 



The Gloom-man sat in his elaborate lib- 
rary starinjr into space, when the soft- 
footed servant broutrht in a card on a tiny 
tray, "Bub Phillips," it read, "the answer 
to your Ad." 

He turned to view a saucy, boyish, tai- 
lored irirl. 

Bub seated herself. "I'm Dad's boy and 
you'll never know me from the real thins 
if you take me on. — 'Baseball enthusiast, 
happy temperament and willing to rejuve- 
nate. Jones foots the bills,' is what won 
me." 

As the man sat silently eyeing her, she 
fflanced around and said, "Where's Aunt 
Mary, shall I transi'.ct the business with 
lier .' " 

The Gloom-man seemed to come back to 
life ajrain and replied "Tliat's the trouble, 
she put the advertisement in the paper on 
insjjirr.tion, then received a telegram from 
home saying, 'Tommy had the mumi)s' and 
away she flew, telling me to be sure to se- 
lect the right applicant. Molly always 
was the kind of a sister to get a fellow into 
a mess." 

"Aw. never mind, it's you decision that 
counts, let's proceed. 1 read the ad and 
went down to the Tribune office early to 
aw.iit developments. I waited and when 
vour man called for mail F. 2.3 I followed 



him. Personal interview is always desirable. 

'If you like-a me and I like-a you. 

And we both like about the same,' 
she hummed, now the question before the 
house is, are you respectable? Fm in for 
a good decent time. Dad's away for three 
months and he said I could do anything 
res])ectable. if Fd keep out of debt and 
not marry. 

"Could you make it a hundred a month? 
the salary. I mean. Dad said I never could 
earn that much. And a three months' en- 
gagement? Would you for the sake of re- 
spectability call for me and take me home 
each day?" 

The man was silent, so she continue<l, 
"Am I the rejuvenator?" 

"You interest me," declared the Gloom- 
man, "and Fm respectable, I hope. Yes. 
Fll meet your terms. Now, I supj)ose you 
ought to know what ails me. Well, I was 
engaged to the sweetest girl on earth, so 
I thought; she eloiied with her chautfeur. 
Fm broken, nothing interests me, you'll 
hate me, for it's weak, I know." 

"No." she answered softly, "I like you 
because you care, but don't get cold feet. 
I couldn't marry you if I would. Let's go to 
the ball game. I want to see the Oaks win. 
If we don't count the coin, we can have a 
jolly time. Fm going home, call for me 
soon." 

He followed her to the library where she 
turned and said. "I'm sorry about my 
slang, if you care. Dad says no one would 
ever guess the money he's spent on my 
college polish. Say. when I have on my 
evening gown you can't guess what a jiol- 
ished lady I become. Fm going to call 
you Cousin Gloom. 'He's a cousin of 
mine,' " she sang. 

The Gloom-man cauuh; her hand and 
said. "Say, but you arc good for the 
dumps." 



ITwrnly -Thii 



She quickly withdrew her hand and 
said, "None of the clasp stviff, just a good 
time. Give me twenty minutes, then hump." 

The ball f>ame was over, Bub had proved 
a good fan and as they entered the auto- 
mobile she took the wheel. 

"Bub," exclaimed the Gloom-man, almost 
with enthusiasm, "let's don our evening 
clothes and dine at the 'Poodle Dog.' " 

She seemed embarrassed a moment, then 
said, "Oh, rats, its a cinch. We'll go." 

They were waiting for the ordered dinner 
to be served, the glittering lights, the be- 
witching music and the buzzing voices en- 
veloped them. Bub was demure, trans- 
formed; the Gloom-man could not account 
for the change. 

"Bub," he said, "do you believe in dual 
personality? I believe between the two of 
you I will rejuvenate." And the man almost 
smiled. 

"No," she replied, "not dual, just dif- 
ferent." Then with a bewitching little 
laugh she lippled, "I am sure it sounds 
queer, but I even think differently in ray 
evening gown." 

Two months have passed. He was again 
himself. They were returning from the 
golf links and Bub was at the wheel, break- 
ing the speed law. 

"Stop, Bub, let's enjoy the snnset," ho 
rather demanded. 

"Ah, chuck it, I'm afraid its the clasp 
stuff," she said, "but here goes. I'm leased, 
you know." 

She stopped the car under a large 
spreading oak. He took out a large bas- 
ket and she saw it, she said "Bully for 
you. Cousin Gloom." 

They had a merry feast and lingered on 
the slope "to see ihe sunset," Bub said. 

As they started off again, the Gloom- 
man drew a slip of paper from his pocket 
and said, "Here's your check for three 
hundred dollars; it's only two months, but 
lyou've earned it royally and now I want to 
release you and begin again but on a dif- 
ferent footins." 



Bub looked perplexed and uncomfort- 
able. "I know you mean well, but I can't 
take it all, I haven't earned it, its the sum 
I named and it makes me feel like a 
lemon." 

"You keep it. Bub, your services wert 
invaluable. You have coaxed me back to 
normal and I have better poise than I ever 
had befoi'e. If my love could lease you 
for life I should be happy. \Miy couldn't 
you marry me if you would?" 

"Father would object," she replied ro- 
guishly. 

"But if father would g'we his consent?" 
he persisted. 

"Cousin Gloom, which of my two do you 
like best, evening gown or this?" pointing 
to her golf costume. 

"Well, to tell the truth, I think I should 
choose the lassie of the evening gown, but 
I'm not certain. Why?" 

"Say, Cousin Gloom, it's getting late so 
we'll spin towards home and on the way I'll 
tell you why I couldn't if I would." 

They reached the Park and Bub brought 
the car to a stop under a large electric 
light and jerked off her cap. "This is 
why." She removed a wig and laughed. 
"Don't take it too hai'd, old man." 

"A boy!" the Gloom-man choked. 

Bub rcjilaced wig and cap and said, 
"Buck up old chap.'* 

The car now stopped at Bub's home 
and Bub, turning to Cousin Gloom, said: 
"Come on in. we'll settle the matter. You 
must forgive me, but I did it for a joke. 
I didn't think you'd get to care that way." 

The man objected but Bub pulled him 
inside, pushed him into the parlor and 
switched on the lights. There sat Bub in 
an evening gown. He looked from one to 
the other in bewilderment. 

"Twins." chuckled the golf clothes Bub. 
"Tell it to her, she could if she would, and 
she's spoons on you, she said so.'" 

And then they were alone. 

Blanche Juett. '15. 



fP.ge 1 

ITwenly-FouiJ 




®1|F Jmttnr ifag Stir 



'Twas a lovely autumn evcniiiir, 

And the stars were elear and brisjht, 

When a loud and awful cialter 

Sounded tlirouuh the peaceful niulit. 

To their windows rushed tli*' pcojjje 

At this lerrifvins' noise, 
And tliey saw a sjravel wa.uon 

Piled up hiiih with airls and boys. 

'Twas the famous ".Innior Ilay Kide" 

Seltinir forth upon its way, 
Hut "twas in a irravol was-on. 

And there was no siirn of hay. 

Oh, the shrieks that rent tiie niiiht air! 

Oh, the aironizintr irroans! 
When a jolt eaused hy a ehuck-hole 

Proved too hard for some one'^ bones. 

So their painful way they wen<led, 
(joiiiii Westward from the seliool. 

Drawn by two poor beasts of burden — 
One a hor>e and one a mule. 

Then they turned into ihe ereek road. 

Followinir tlie ereek alon;r; 
Till at last they reaedied a farmhouse. 

Then uprose the weary ihronu;. 



Stretflu'd their riiimpcd and weary muscles, 
Grabbed their hats, and pins, and liair. 

Then advanced upon the farndiouse 
P'or Ihere was a hay-rack tliere. 

Should they take it? Would they dare to? 

Should they have a real hay ride? 
And — remembring bumps and bruises — 

As with one voice, "Sure!" they cried. 

But 'twas quite too full of hay, so 

Ev'ry boy stripped off his coat. 
But the Juniors sat by idly. 

While the Seniors played the goat. 

For the Juniors lazy creatures. 

Always did their duty shirk. 
Seniors were their guesits of honor, 

Juniors sat and watched them work. 

When the hay-rack was unloaded. 

And the Seniors quite worn out, 
Ev'ryone piled in the wagon, 

Juniors first, you need not doubt. 

Sandwiches and cakes and apples, 

All were piled up in a heap, 
And the way that they were set on 

Was a sight to make one weep. 

And they left the gravel wagon 

Standing there beside the road, 
Then urged on the weary creatures 

To draw forth their heavy load. 

Merrily they clattered onward 

Song and laughter filled the air. 
And the chaperones were busy, 

("hiding many a 'spooning pair. 

'Course the Seniors were not guilty, 

They would not do such a ahing. 
Juniors were the worst offenders. 

liet this makes their conscience stins. 

After all the lunch was eaten 

They decided to return, 
Freshies who were getting sleepy, 

For their little beds did yearn. 

Fainter grew the songs and laughter, 

Just a few sang merrily. 
Many eyes were growing heavy. 

^fa'iiv heads drooped wearily. 



ITwenly-SixJ 



E\ 'rvlliiiiir was still and ponccliil, 
Thoy were on tlicir lioinowiinl way, 

When was heard the I'orceful ciiinnienf, 
"(ii)sli I lint here's ilie deuce to |>ay !" 

Instantly the steeds were halted, 

Instantly tiie sleepers woke. 
Some in wonder, some amusement, 

But they found it was no joke. 

Quiekly all elimbed from the wauon, 

For it lurched unsteadily. 
And examined it on all sides. 

What tiie trouble was to see. 

Soon tiiey found it. 'twas a hind wheel, 
And the tire lay on the p:round. 

Then arose a dismal iiroaninir. 

When the news was passed around. 

For it jiierced tlieir sleep-fouijed senses 
Tiiere was nothi'ij? but to walk. 

They miglvi just as well be .-ftartinjr, 
'Twas no use to stand and talk. 

So with many jrroans and protests 
They set forth upon their way, 

Some there were who would be merry 
But the most were far from nay. 

Two and two. in threes, and sinsly, 

Wearily they plodded on, 
Rarer, fainter, grew the laughter. 

AM their sjiirits say were gone. 

Well, of course they got home sometime, 

'Twas not over half a mile. 
At the time they swore 'twas twenty. 

Now they tell it with a smile. 

Had one come along ne.xt morning. 

'Fo)e the wreck was cleared away. 
Ilc'd have seen the poor old hay-rack. 

And the road all strewn with hay. 

llat- iind handkerchiefs and apples, 
Marked their progress into town. 

Apples, 'spec-ially nice green ones, 
Were strung all iilong the gronn<l. 

When it comes to entertaining 

Juniors really can't be beat. 
You must travel far and wide e'er 

You will with their erpials n\eet. 



fP.ge 1 



Yet we'd offer a susststion, 
One or two'd not be amiss, 

Juniors surely won't be angry; 
Our su,<;<>estion's sinii)ly tliis: 

'Tis not really quite the thing to 
Make your guests of lionor work, 

So we would advise the Juniors 
Duty never more to shirk. 

Also when you give a hay-ride 
You must have a lot of hay, 

Never use a gravel wagon, 
In a hay-rack is the way. 

Some who were a bit partio'lar, 

Didn't get enough to eat: 
Sandwiches are not improved by 

Lving under someone's feet. 



Still considering the bright side, 
Ev'ryone had a great time. 

May it be recalled by all those 
Who should chance t<> rend th 



rhyme. 
Frances Brown '15 



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ITwenly-EishU 



^^^•s;s-^«5ss.^^x;v^ 



i£xpnimtt nf a iErpaI)man 



Lil.WTCIU'C, ('ill. 

August '22, 1014. 
Dearest Mae : 

Well at last I have my lieint's ilesiic, I 
aui sroinjr to a public school. On Auyiist 10 
I became i Freshman in the Lawrence 
Iliuii Scliool. It's just the srrandest i^lace 
in the worhl. Hut let me tell you what 
they did to me. 

ITazinjr may be forbidden in t'lis school 
but the Sophomores don't know tlvat it 
is. They taUe a delitriit in hazin.a: me be- 
cause I am one of the freshest, srreenest. 
humans that ever entered the portals of 
a hijrh school. Of course, coming straisrht 
from the select Miss Shiun's. I thouijht 
that I knew it all, but when these s\me 
iirnorant Sophomores were throuuh I was 
convinced that I didn't know a thins;'. The 
second day that I was here they seemed 
to become aware of my presence and the 
third day they were ready to hid me wel- 
C(mie. Tliat mornins: Dad brouulit me to 
school and T was in the i)ink of jierfection 
when I entered the door. There I was 
met by five sirls who escorted me to the 
dressinir room where about twenty more 
were assembled. I didn't know that they 
were all So|>homores. I thouiiht that they 
were unusually sociable, but alas all my 
illusions so(m vanished. They told me 
thai all Freshmen must iro throuirh certain 
ordeals bef<.re they became full-fledired 
students. They read me a lot of rules, 
of which they "nwo me a copy, and then 
IX'rformed tlie ordeal. They took down 
my hair which I had arran<red with such 
lovinn care that morninu: and braided it 
into six tifrht pisr tails, each of which they 
tied with .i different colored ribbon. I 
was n sight I The irir's howled with Inugh- 
ter. Just then the bell rnng and they left 
me alone in misery. At first I was angry 
and was on the point of going to flic prin- 
ci)ial. but just then I happened to get a 



glimpse of myself in the mirror. I had to 
hold my sides and roar. 

My common sense told me that the Sophs 
thought that 1 would rather miss class 
than be laughed at. 1 stood still a min- 
ute and asked myself, "Are you game?" 
(That's high school slang). 1 replied to 
my question, "I am." 

All Freshmen are warned and cautioMcd 
against being late for class but this ]iar- 
ticular mornnig I wasn't afraid. I would 
wait until the class was deep in the les- 
son and then I would appear. What a sen- 
sation I would create! And let me an- 
nounce that it was some sensation! The 
class went wild and the teacher couldn't 
control them. She wrote a little note and 
sent me to the office with it. You might 
think that I was afraid to go to the of- 
fice but strange to relate I was not. The 
priiici])al thought that I was the one who 
was playing the joke and I allowed him to 
think so. He gave me a pretty stiff lec- 
ture but I didn't mind it because 1 hapi)ened 
to spy a twinkle way back in the corner of 
his eye. Then he sent me down to rearrange 
my hair. There are several Sophs in the his- 
tory class and two of them are girls. 
When 1 rea])|ie:>red they glanced at me 
anxiously, hut 1 smiled sweetly and took 
my seat. (H' course they exjiected that 
1 had told and that it would soon be their 
turn to go to the ollice. Hut when the day 
|)assed and nothing hapiiened, they seemed 
relieved. 

The next moniing the whole twenty met 
me at the dor)r and I wondered wh it would 
hiipjH'ii. Each girl stepped f<irward ami 
shook hands with me. I was feeling 
puffed uj) and was about to pat myself on 
the back when T overheard one girl say. 
"Cordy acte<l more like a Sophomore than 
n nieasly little scrub." Tiiis made me feel 
pretty smnll and I resolved to be the meek- 
est Frcshmaii of the flock. Hiit I could 



ITwtnty-NineJ 



never live up to a resolution and besides 
you know "Freshmen are Freshmen" just 
as "piiis is pigs." Consequently I get 
my nose pulled quite often. 

I've signed for "gym" work and basket- 
ball. I also belong to the tennis club. Next 
spring' the '^irls are going' to have a base- 
ball team. I think I'll try out for pitcher. 
Spring is a long way off and I may be able 
to throw a ball straight before that time. 
But I'm afi'aid I'll throw it too straight 
and hit the batter. 

I'm taking History, English, Algebra, 
German and Physical Geography. It's all 
lots of fun and awfully interesting. Les- 
sons aren't very hard and I find that wit'h 
la. little extra work I'll get a passing mark. 

Well, I will have to stop now and do 



that little extra work. Good-bye, lots of 
love from, 

Your Freshie Friend, 

Cordy Johnson. 
P. S. Ever.v Freshman thinks that his 
class is the greatest institution on earth. 
But I found that the rest of the school 
doesn't think so and that the Sophomores 
think that their sole duty in life is to cor- 
rect and manage the morals and manners 
of those low beings, sometimes called 
"Freshmen," but more frequently "Scrubs." 
Oh I tell you it's great to be a Scrub in 
Lawrence but Mae I'm longing for the 
time w'hen I shall be a Sopliomoro. 

C. J. 

Ella Wurz, '15 




[Page 1 
iThirtyJ 



i 



p 



When you speak of work or of speed. 
There's nothing: that we Inck or need. 
Now let me explain one by one 
Who we are and wha; we have done. 

Ruth her cookinp: does first rate, 
Some man'll find her a good mate. 
He'll have to eat lunch with a smile 
And often have to wait a while. 

lieni-j' oft explosions has 
Tryinsr to manufacture sras. 
He takes away the heat too laile 
And just escapes a mournful fate. 

Chick in Latin has gained renown. 

lie oft has "hie" and "hoc" turned "round 

But in his class he stands ahead 

Or next to it his teacher said. 

Raymond does always want ihe facts 
The Prof, explains them out in acts. 
If Raymond should more points desire 
He might arouse the Prof's just ire. 

Now what can I of Andrew say 
Who sits adreaming: all the day. 
Of what he thinks, I'm in the dark 
His thoughts are on the sea embarked. 

Henry has much to learn as yet 
He is the cooking class' pet. 
He sits there shyly looking on 
While all the girls around him throng:. 

Vernon is perfect in one art 
For he has won a Freshman's heart 
There's nothing more left to explain 
You've all been there — he's not to blame. 

Emma's a lonely girl this year 

She misses a graduate I fear. 

She sits and dreams for hours at a time. 

And to disturb her would be a crime. 

There's nothing of myself to tell 
I'm sure you know me very well. 
"Twould not be ladylike you know 
To talk and of mvself to blow. 



P. M. B.. '1(J. 



iThltly-Onr 



®t|f WpHt fnr tijf lEaat 



A boy about eighteen years of age, sat 
in the drawing room of an old southern 
Alabama mansion. Suddenly he rose rest- 
lessly to his full height. Into his eyes 
crept a look of wistful longing, as he lifted 
his violin and passed his fingers caress- 
ingly over it. As he gently drew the bow 
across the strings, soft, sad strains of 
exquisite music floated through the large 
French windows and drifted away among 
the stately old trees and beautiful shrub- 
bery. All unconscious of time, he played 
softly on, pausing lunv and then to gaze 
unseeingly before him. 

A soft' step was heard in the hall and 
a tall woman entered the room. She was 
evidemtly his mother, for there was a 
striking resemblance between the two. 

"Raiph," she said in a voice, refined 
and low, "Do stop that sad music! What 
is ailing you?" <,^ 

"You know mother," he answered some- 
what irritably. 

"But, my son, do you want to really go 
to that horrid wild West?" 
"Yes." 

"Oh, Ralph, 1 thought T could have you 
stay here and grow up a gentleman!" 

"Yes, mother, but can't there be gentle- 
men in the West as well as in the East?" 
"I don't know about that," she answered 
doubtfully. 

"Father always says (hat the outward 
appearance doesn't make the gentleman, 
but that which is in his heart." 

Mrs. Brown looked at the boy thought- 
fully, then said, "Do you really want to 
sio?" 

"I sure do," he rei>lied eagerly. 
"Well then, yon will have to settle it 
with father." 

The boy kissed his mother and hurried 
away in search of his father. Father and 
son had a long talk together, which ended 
in Ralph having his own way. 



Exactly a week later Ralph hurried 
through the hall on his way to the car- 
riage, which was waiting. At the door he 
was stopped by a slender girl with eyes 
and hair considerably lighter than his own. 
She clung to him with her arms about his 
neck. 

"I wish I were going with you," she 
ft-hispered. 

"So do I, Sis," he answered, "but you 
can't. Who'd stay and comfort mother? 
Besides the West's no place for girls like 
you. Good-bye Dot." 

He kissed her and was gone. The brown 
eyes brimmed with tears as they saw the 
horses trot briskly down the avenue. A 
few minutes later he was being rapidly 
whirled away. Away from home! Into the 
world ! 

Out of the face of his father, stern with 
suppressed feeling, shone his gentle eyes. 
Again he felt the grip that made his fin- 
gers ache and heard that familiar voice, 
he so loved, "My son, my son. Good-bye!" 
"Dear Father," he murmured and then 
turned to divert himself with the objects 
whirlins' by. 

At first the country through which he 
■ passed was well known to him. Gradually 
it all grew strange. In Colorado the rii'- 
way stopped abruptly at a small station 
called Redding. Rali)h looked about him 
w'hen he steimcd from the train and saw 
only a few shanties, strangly, lonely-look- 
ing out there in the wide plains covered 
with sage brush. Winle he stood there 
a "sawed ofif" man in a tr?at felt hat and 
"chaps" came up to him. The twitchin',' 
of his sandy mustache plainly indicated 
the presence of a quid of tobacco com- 
fortably stowed in his cheek. Yellov.- hair 
and big bushy eye-brows were given force 
bv the blue eyes which gleamed wickedly. 
Such a face few people liked. He stared 



[Page ^ 1 
llhirty-TwcJ 



lit Ralph tor a nionii'iit itiid tln'ii spoko in 
a deep voice. 

"Air you (lie yoiinsr teller iliat is diii' tor 
the Star Raiieh"?" 

"Yes," replied Ralpli, "I am." 

"Wal," continued the cowboy, "I'm 
Sandy Benard, my rijrlit name be John, 
but you see everybody calls me Sandy. I 
;ruess we'll be jroin'." 

He led the way to a pair of bronchus 
standiiiir in tiie sliade of one of tlie shan- 
ties. Ralph followed silently, inwardly 
annised at his comjMinion. They mounted 
and rode away throuirh the trackless plain. 
The Kasterner was by no means asleep. 
They were surrounded on every side 
barren plains, only broken here and there 
by a I'lunij) of saire brush, which occasion- 
ally held a frijrbtened rabbit or a lioi>pi!i,u' 
liorntoad. The dim puri)le mountains in 
the distance formed a frinsje for the vast 
plains. The men rode in silence whicii 
was almost unbroken. Sandy stole sly 
jrlances at his comjianion. He saw a youth 
witii honest eyes, clear brow and deter- 
minedly set chin, a face wholly unafraid. 

That niirlit tiiey cam])ed at a water- 
hole. After cookino; and eatinjr their sup- 
pers, they rolled up in their blankets and 
slept soundly beneath the stars. 

It was Sunday morninir when they ar- 
rived at the Star Ranch. The ranch was 
in the low foot-hills. The ramblinir ranch 
house was apjjroached from the front. It 
was made of adobe with some clay. All 
of the buildiiifrs around the place were 
as neat as the house itself. As the horse- 
men rode to the door the owner of the 
ranch, a middle asred man, came out. ITe 
approached Ralph in a brisk, authoritative 
manner and received him irraciously. Af- 
ter the Boss, as he was called by all the 
cowboys, had arranired all matters of im- 
portance with Ralph. Sandy escorted him 
to the bunk house where the cowboys' 
rpiarters were. 

At first the men treated him distantly. 
This did not matter much to Ralph for 
he had his work to do and he did it faith- 
fully. It w.Ts not Ion": until they saw that 
he was honest and wanted to work. When 
he first came to the ranch the men had 
teased him incessantly about his white 



hands, — '■|.;uly linuers," they called tlicui. 
This was rather embarrassinjr, but he soon 
succeeded in irettinjr them as brown and 
rouirh as the others. 

About a. week after he came, an old In- 
dian rode up to the ranch on a beautiful 
black horse. Ralpli and Sandy were sit- 
liiiiT ill the shade fixiiifr their saddles. 
Ralph was silently admirinjr the animal 
when Sandy volunteered ''That thar Indian 
is a old risident of the country and ain't 
never been taken to a risarvatioii. What 
<lier thinkiii' about?" 

Ralph only started slifihtly and jrrinned. 

"Party fine najr he's ridin', ain't it?" 
With these words Sandy's eyes narrowed 
to mere slits in his roujrh, sunburned face 
and searched Ralph's face like cold points 
of blue steel. He found no clue for sus- 
])icioii and shifted his <raze afraiii to the 
horse, where it rested lonsrinjriy. He sud- 
denly si)ied a fly near the toe of his boot, 
and spat his venjreance at it. 

The old chief had seen Ralj)ii and had 
trusted him instantly. Ralph went about 
his work asrain, but he had not forfrotten 
the horse. He decided to have it. 

The new cowboy was beinjr watched all 
the time althoufrh he did not realize it. 
The boss was thinkin.a: about retirinjr and 
was in need of a reliable foreman. He was 
attracted to Ral])h and f|iiestioned tlie 
men reirardinjr him. 

When Ralph Brown had been at the 
Star Ranch for a few months, a letter was 
handed to bim by one of the men. Ho 
looked at it curiously, it was not from 
home for it bore no jiostmark. On tearinsr 
it open he found a slip of paper on which 
was written in a cramiied hand: 
"mr r brown 
"der ser. 

"red feather is a:oin to dar liapjiy 
huntin trroun and want you to hav 
l)lack hawk, sive him a home 

"red feather." 

Ralph L'azed at the letter in bewilder- 
ment. Black Hawk! For him! MeditatiuL' 
ii moment he turned and went in search of 
the Boss. After readinjr the letter, the 
Boss looked at the younsr man. 

"Will y(ui take him?" he asked simply. 

Ralph nodded. The older man laid a 



rp.,, 

iThmy-Thr. 



liand on his shoulder and said, "Red 
Feather was fond of you from the first 
time he ever laid eyes on you. Now 5>o 
and get your horse." 

The young- man mounted his pinto and 
rode away to Red Feather's hut. On 
knocking at the door, he received a faint, 
"Come." Entering, he found himself in a 
dark room. Its furniture consisted of 
a chair, a stove and a bed, on which the 
old man lay. Ralph went quickly to the 
bed side and held the offered hand in si- 
lence. Finally Red Feather spoke. It was 
in a low voice, "Red Feather — is — goin — 
to — the — Happy — Hunting — Grounds. Take 

— Black — Hawk. Take good — care — of 

him — always." 

Ralph promised he would and the old 
man closed his eyes with a sigh. Red 
Feather was now with the Great Spirit. 

In the stable Ralph found the black 
horse. For a while he gazed at him fondly, 
then mounted and rode sadly away. 

A week later the Boss summoned him to 
the office. An hour or more passed be- 
fore he again reappeared. He was now 
foreman of the Star Ranch. The other 
cowboys, with the excejjtion of Sandy, 
heard the news joyfully. They had learned 
to love him. Sandy eyed him from assis- 
tance with envy. He was exceedingly jeal- 
ous of Ralph. 

One day Sandy was wandering about 
the buildings in a very black mood. He 
passed the open door of Ralph's office in 
his wandering and glancing in ho found it 
vacant. A sudden impulse to do Ralph harm 
seized him. lie quickly had a pen in his 
fingers and Ralph's account book open. 
In a minute he had changed several num- 
bers and taken some bills from the table 
and was gone just as the foreman was 
about to enter an opposite door. 

Ralph discovered the fix up in his num- 
bers and worked for hours to straighten 
it out but was unsucce.ssful. When the 
Boss heard of it, he investigated it but 
without result. Accordingly Ralph was 
discharged. 

The young man felt his disgrace very 
keenly. After selling Black Hawk, much 
against his will he left the country. The 
bovs could not believe him guiltv. His 



friend Jack, was sure that he was not. 

One bright June morning, when all out 
doors was alive and glad, a dark figure 
was seen against the distant horizon by 
the cowboys of the Star Ranch. As it drew 
nearer and became more distinct, they be- 
gan speculating as to the idently of the 
rider. 

"That's that kid, Brown on Black Hawk !"' 
ejaculated Jack. 

Surely it could not be he! Yes he wa.s 
coming directly toward tiiem. The cow- 
boys raised a joyful yell which was an- 
swered by a well-known shout. 

Black Hawk, as if knowing that this 
was home, bore his rider up to the group 
with a dash. There followed a great deal 
of hand-shaking and joyful exclamations. 

"^Yhere have you been?" asked Jack, 
slapping Ralph affectionately ujion the 
shoulder. 

The rest were like a bunch of eager 
school-boys. 

"Tell the whole story," someone cried. 

"There's not much to tell," began Ralph. 

"Only when I left this ranch I was dis- 
gusted with the West and decided to go 
home. I got as far as Kansas City when 
my funds ran low so I had to stop. I 
hunted work for a week before I finally 
landed a job as reporter for a small paper. 
By the time I had earned enough for a 
ticket home I had no desire to go. Instead 
I had an intense yearning for the West and 
the free open life of the plains," he 
paused and ran his hand carressingly over 
the glossy mane of Black Hawk. The 
{lorse rubbed his nose against Ralph's 
shoulder, "and for you, too, Black Hawk," 
he continued, "I arrived in Wyoming a few 
weeks ago. I wasn't brave enough to face 
you just then. I didn't like the country so 
well and besides work was scarce. Finally I 
found myself in these mountains. I just 
felt sure that you fellows didn't believe me 
crooked in spite of the do])e the Boss had 
on me." 

"And wo didn't." the boys ro)ilied, all 
speaking at once. "You aren't of that 
sneaking kind." 

"Thankee, for the coni]iliment. boys," 
arinned Ralph. 

"But what became of that man, Alitcholl, 



IThirly-FourJ 



who boujrlit tliis iliero iias; olT you?" askoil 
one man a inonieiit later. 

"Searcli nie," said Ralph. 

"1 soon Sandy ridin' that thar hoss over 
in Kedtlin' last weok, — suio thiiisj — ." 

"Oh ! Go ou ! Yon were seein' soldiers 
by the half dozen too," put in Jack. 

"Not on your life, I warn't induisiin'." 

"Fellows," interrupted Ralph, "I'm here 
today with sad news for you. I wouldn't 
have been here otherwise. — Sandy's dead — 
stone dead." 

"Whatcher mean.'" All eyes wore turned 
on the speaker in bewilderment. 

Ralph drew a paek of papers from his 
I)ocket and sele<*ted a dirty piece of an 
old envelope from the others. 

"Read that," he said, "It's my pass port 
into respectable society and back to m.y 
honor." 

Just I hen the Boss came out of the cor- 
ral carryinjr a coil of rope in his hand. 
Jack read. 

"I took those bills, — Sandy." 

For a moment the truth seemed to per- 
colate slowly, then a lusty shout set the 
buildinirs rinsrinjr. Glad hands seemed to 
extend out of space. Ralph saw them 
throuirh tear dimmed eyes, thinkinjr, these 
are friends indeed. 

After these expressions of gladness and 
trust were comi)leted, Ralph spoke in his 
most solemn tones. All heads were bowed 
the moment the rollinji- tones broke ui>on 
their ears. 

"Fellows," he said. "I left his body un- 
der a tree at Willow Watering, about four 
hours ride to the north east on the Red- 
ding Trail. We must get him away be- 
fore night or the coyotes will." 

"What's eating you fellows?" the voice 
of the Boss was cool. No one spoke. 
Ralph's eyes met those of his former em- 
ployer almost haughtily. 

"Well Brown, What brings you back?" 

"He's innocent." Jack put in before 



Ralph could answer," "and here's the 
proof." 

The Boss read the |>aper, extending his 
free hand, gripped Ralph's and said, "For- 
give me! I have never believed it of you 
in spite of the evidence! There was no 
other way. I had to discharge you." 

"Sandy's lying dead away out there, 
Boss. I came upon him when I was on 
my way to Mitchell's with this horse. 
He was within a few yards of Willow Wat- 
ering. His eyes were bloodshot and his 
hands bleeding, his knees stuck through his 
trousers swollen and bruised." 

"What was the matterf What happened 
to him?" 

"Rattler." 

"He raved for hours and about midnight 
sat up straight and wild-eyed gazed at me." 

"Are you Brown?" he demanded at last. 

"Yes.'*' 

"Wal, I reckon as now I've told you, I 
sujipose you're glad to see me dying." 

"He wouldn't lie down. Boss, bul gazed 
at the stars a few minutes. Suddenly he 
fumbled about his clothing. He could not 
articulate; his hands fell helplessly to his 
side and he sank back against the sad- 
dle. His lips were moving. Piece paper — 
pencil, were all I heard. He seemed to 
sleep. I got there but could not arouse him. 

"At sunrise he turned his head and 
reached for the paper, trying to write. I 
guided his hand as he mumbled. "I took 
— those — bills. — Sandy. He was trying to 
thank me out of that bruised and broken 
body of his. Poor unfortunate fellow! Now 
let's bring him hcrme." 

That night at sunset Ral])h drove the 
buckboard into the circle of buildings. The 
body of Sandy lay on a heap of straw in 
the bottom. Rali)h guided the horses into 
the yard thinking of his first coming to 
the West. Now he could go home and face 
his father. He had proven his honesty. 
M. S. '18. 



rp«B<- 

lTt..r.>.Fi 



i 1 



2II|? ^?ninur OUaaa? 



(With due apologies to the ihade of Chaucer. ) 

Whan that we ar(e) about(e) to s'r^dnnte 

It is right fitt(e) to tell(e) of Seniours aighte. 

So ye shal know(e) of what condicioun 

And of what wourth they ar(e), hem everichon. 

And of them al ther ar(e) bold youthes foure 

Whom, we al hop(e) this rhim(e) will nat mak(e) sore, 

For we do mean(e) hem al to bawle oute, 

And we beseech yow al no word(e) to doubte. 

Four(e) girls ther ar(e), and wourthy mayd(e)s they are 

And we intend(e) ther faim(e) to spredc fare. 

SLATSE 

Wit.h(e) us ther is a youth (e) ycleped Slatse 

Who, when address(e)d by us, doth say(e), "Oh ratse," 

Or "oh shut up!" or "oh go on!" and swiche, 

So, as yow see, in eurteisy nat riehe, 

This youth (e), who is ful selendre, len(e) and lank(e), 

Is in this school (e) an artist(e) of great{e) raiike. 

For it is his pleasour to draw(e) eartoones 

Of whisker(e)d gentilmen' and ugiie coones. 

And dogg{e)s and fowl(e)s. And e'en the Prof besides 

Is caricatur(e)d, yet ne'er this rash(e) youth{e) chides. 

A i^omimdour he hath, this gentil boye 

The which{e) he doth regard with pryd(e) and joyc; 

With anxious cayr(e) he hath his lokkes trained 

And e'en to plaster them with soap(e) hath deigned, 

And now strait from his nobel brow they ryse 

And he appears ful scolarlike and wyse. 

BLANCHE AND FRITZ 

Of maydens two I will(e) yow next devyse 

Theyr disjwsitiouns and ek(e) ther guise. 

The m:iyd(e) called Blanch(e) she is full short and plumpe 

Yet she nathles is always on the jumpe. 

Ful ruddie is hir fae(e) e'en lyk(e) a rose. 

And smal hir mouth (e) and tiptilted hir nose. 

The other mayden is right (e) lcn(e) and talle. 

And when she is arrayd for basket balle 

Lyk(e) matches sem(e) hir legg(e)s and ek(e) hir amies. 

She is nat vayn(e), yet anxious stryv(e)s for channes, 

To crull(e) hir lokk(e)s an iron she doth use, 

And long befor the mirrour she doth muse. 



fPa.e 1 

IThirly-SixJ 



llir iios^i'), wliicli is I'nl Uwix, n ii(il)l(o) bcake, 

She doth bidei-k with i)(iiulr(o), also ech t'hoake. 

Thes(e) niiiydL'iis. in ther Seniour difjnitye. 

Ful woiirthy ar(o), yet aft ar(e) ritthi sillye, 

For lau<rh(e) they do, e'en lyk(e) a Freshman sireene, 

Yet ne'er lyk(e) under classmen do they ([ueene. 

JOE 

We hav(e) a traytor in our(e) ehiss(c) nnm(e)d Jo(e). 

lie lyk(e)d a Freshman jrirl nat lonir ajro. 

Altlio a eliarminsr mayden. and fnl sprye, 

Stil this does nat exphiin the reason whye 

A Freshman iireen(e) to notie(e) he shold deiirne. 

And he sindd know that this doth eaus(e) us payne. 

But stil, he is a youth (e) of courteisye 

And he doth lov(e) to aid(e) a fayr(e) ladye. 

And he doth serv(e) ech on(e) rijrht fiallantiy 

Wheth(e)r fatt(e) or slim, or tall(e) or short be she. 

In basket ball(e) he hath amazing skille 

And he eann(e) throw a s-oel(e) when e'er ho wille. 

ALVIN AND WALTER 

Thes(e) two Seniours ther teachers do harasse 

For it is aft ther wish(e) to cut a elasse. 

Yet who shold hav(e) a perfect riaht to out 

And 'seap(e) unpleasaunt thinsjes, but 

A Seniour. who doth hav(e) all privilesres? 

And what reek they that ev(e)ry teacher raaes? 

The first nam(e)d youth (e) a rijj-ht shy ladd(e) is he 

And it doth vex him, Oh! so dredfuly! 

When som(e) bold mayd(e) to flirt with him doth trye, 

Then he doth blusli. and shyly droop his eye. 

The other youth(e) is f|uyt(e) the contrarye 

And snr(e)ly doth behav(e) dis<rrae(e)fnllye. 

For flirt he doth with ev(e)ry mayden fayre 

He haps to met(e), nor littl(e) doth he cayre 

What .iruis(e) she hav(e), or what positioun 

For he doth flirt with al. hem everichon. 

From lofty Seniour down(e) to Freshman srreene 

With ech and al of hem he lov(e) to f|ueene. 

ELLA 

This mayden <)nc(c) did think this school! e) to leaven, 

Yet coud nat bear(e) to leav(e) the Seniours seven; 

So she return(e)d and now we ar(e) just eijrhte. 

She oft. alas! too oft! doth com(c) in laite 

And even when she doth arryv(e) at nyne. 

She nnist hir hayre fixe, or the shyne 

Remov(e) from ofT hir nos(e) with pou<lre white 

So she may nat appear a perfect friL'hte. 

This mayden is of s|>each oft risrht sarcasti<-. 

And on(e) must be of tempre riirht elastic 



rp.t- 1 

lThiTiy-Sr,,n] 



Els(e) he wold be quit(e) crush(e)d by hir sharp speaches, 
Ech word(e) of whiehe to its marke reaches. 
To suitors she is sarcastic and cru(e)le 
Or, what is wors, indifferent and coole. 

NEVA 

Our(e) Neva is a coy, retiring mayde 
And e'er wold keep hirself qnyt(e) in the shade. 
Swich(e) modesty(e) is right pleasing to finde, 
And in Seniours quyt(e) rare is its kinde. 
Hir cheak(e)s and lipp(e)s are redd(e) as any rose, 
A payr(e) of spectacles adorn hir nose 
And lend to Mr a look of dignitye. 
Yet quyt(e) undignified right aft is she, 
For on a day so madlie did she danee 
(And quyt(e) unlik(e) a Seniour she did prance) 
Hir spectacles from off hir nos(e) did drop. 
And break in two, then only did she stop. 
She is right short, yet doth long to be talle 
And it to her is lyk(e) wormwood and galle. 
That e'en the Freshmen surpass her in height, 
But still she is of tempre swet(e) and brighte. 

F. B. '15. 



< 




rp.se 1 

iThitty.EisJitJ 



ICnitr Mill mnh a Hag 



Gloom had laid his heavy hand upon 
tho three boys who sat in Room 21, in 
Tail's Hall, of The Hamilton Military 
Afademy. They were Jack Danlton, Senior, 
cajitain and center of the basket ball team, 
Kay Woodruff, Senior, and forward on the 
basket ball team, and Willie Duslin. plain 
Fresiiman. 

"Talk about your luck." arowled Jack, 
•Here are Ray and I waiting to be put in 
the iruard-liouse and the championship 
irame witii Hilton cominsr off a week fi-om 
Saturday night. Besides I suppose Betty 
and Carol are about crazy because they 
haven't heard from us since last Saturday. 
Ii's all your faulty Dusty. If you had held 
on to those letlers we would be in the gym 
now instead of waiting to be escorted to the 
guard-house." 

"You fellows make me tired!" snorted 
Willie. As long as Nancy and T delivered 
your messages safely at the risk of our 
own necks it was all right. But because 
I let one slip you are ready to call me seven 
kinds of a fool and then some, and here I 
am risking my life for you again. H I'm 
caught here it will be the guard-house for 
little Willie. But I'll tell you what I'll do. 
Wednesday, after the team passes the 
u'uard-honse you fellows drop a couple of 
notes out of the window and yours truly 
will deliver them. Hall will be in his study 
and there will be no chance of being 
caught. I'll — " but just then footsteps 
were heard approaching the door so Willie 
beat a hasty retreat down the fire escape. 

Cadets Daultcm and Woodniff were to be 
confined in the guard-house Tuesday at fl 
P m., to await a •reneral court-Tiiartial. 
Their ofTense was the most serious in the 
history of the school. They had been cor- 
responding with two girls of the fiarwood 
Seminary and two of the letters fell into 
the hands of the head master of Hamilton. 
Wald.m Hall. 



Madame Eliza Brandon, Dean at Gar- 
wood, was Mr. Hall's bitterest enemy and 
he refused to allow his boys to have any- 
thing to do with her girls. She upheld the 
same rule in her school. Several years 
before they had been engaged but had fpiar- 
reled over some trivial matter and had not 
spoken since. 

Wednesday afternoon at four o'<'lock the 
basket ball team passed the guard-house 
on the way to the gym. Ten minutes later 
footsteps were heard on the walk and two 
notes dropped at the feet of Mr. Hall, who 
had just rounded the corner of the guard- 
house. He picked thni np, glanced at the 
inscrijition, frowned and put them in his 
])ocket. After a minute of deliberation he 
l)roceeded on his way. Five minutes later 
Dusty came running down the path. 

"Fellows", he called softly as he reached 
the window. No answer. He called again. 
Two heads apjieared at the window. 

"What's wanted?" asked Ray. 

"Where are the letters?" asked Willie. 

"The letters? Didn't you get them? We 
droi)])ed them out about five minutes ago 
when you passed." 

"I just got here. Wheelan kcjjt me for 
algebra. Who is on guard today?'' 

"To(xts Reynolds. He'd help us out of 
trouble so go and ask him if he knows 
anything about the letters." 

In a few minutes Willie was back with 
a look of despair upon his countenance. 

"He says that Hall came down with some 
orders a little while ago and went back 
this way." 

"Great Scott! Isn't that just our hickl" 
exclaimed Jack. "Now we'll get it for 
sure. No chance of playing a week from 
Saturday night now. You're the best mes- 
senger I ever saw, Dusty. You couldn't 
buy a postage stamp without losing it 
before it crossed the counter. Yr)u make 



iTIwrtyNinc 



me tired. Don't ever sugiiest anything to 
me again." 

"Aw shut uj)! You fellows inusl iliink I'm 
your goat. 1 hope Hail gives you tlie limit," 
and with that the cruel Willie made for 
the gym. 

Monday at two o'clock the court con- 
vened. Just as the case was called a note 
was handed to Mr. Hall. This is what he 
read : 

"Dear Waldon : 

Last night as I was making my 
usual round of visits I found one of 
my students, Elizabeth Wall, crying as 
if her heart would break. On inquir- 
ing into the cause I learned that she 
was crying because she had not heard 
from Jack Daulton of your school, 
since a week ago last Saturday. In- 
stead of being angry I was sorry and 
my heart went out to her. I thouglit 
at once of you and of our quarrel of 
several years ago. Waldon, I am sorry 
for I know now that I was wrong. I 
ask your forgiveness. 



I also ask that you let your boys 
join with my girls in giving their com- 
mencement dance. 

Affectionately yours, 

Eliza." 

Mr. Hall looked up and smiled as he 
noted the gloomy faces of the cadets in 
front of him. 

"I withdraw my charges against Cadets 
Daulton and Woodruff and reinstate them 
in their former position. Also I wish t'> 
state that you will be joined by the girls 
of Garwood Seminary at your commence- 
ment.", he said. 

Bedlam broke loose. The yelling, cheer- 
ing mob of boys with Daulton and Woodruff 
on their shoulders made their way outside 
and marched around and around the build- 
ing. 

"Look, look," whispered Betty to Jack 
as they strolled slowly up and down in the 
moonlight on commencement night, "I be- 
lieve Mr. Hall is proposing to Madame 
Brandon under Lover's Oak." 

Ella Wurz, '15. 




fPage 
[Forty 



(§nr 3ttBl}u ^trlfi anJi IngB 



OUR FRESHIE GIRLS 

A cutic bunch of Froshineii we. 

When first we entered Liberty : 

Coy Estlier, wiili her lanirliiii.u ej'e.s, 

Has many a liandsome boy capsized. 

And Kate considers it no sin 

To wear a handsome Junior's pin. 

Our Mabel is so meek and dear, 

Dotli ever blush when a boy is near. 

There's Muriel who's not so very quiet 

And we all know she's on no diet. 

Most everyone knows how "Dinks" is in History 

But her love affairs are still a mystery. 

Briirht Georsria is our B. B. star 

And in her playinjr is no mar. 

Viririn' in German's not very smart 

I'm afraid her thoujihts are all of "Mart — ." 

AVliile Rutli is sure a trump in drawinir 

She thinks that Enulish "(•(>mi)s." are horinjr. 

OUR FRESHIE BOYS 

We have a hapjiy set of Freshie boys, 
They're dear old Liberty's pride and joys. 
Ransom's our German and Alirebra shark 
lie never fails to jret a hijrh mark. 
Homer thinks that all History's a bore 
And usually makes a detested "4." 
Younsr Carl sure is our handsome boy 
And when dolled up looks truly coy. 
Iloraiius his place in Euirlish loses 
Hut nevertheless the whole school amuses. 
Roswell is certainly no teacher's pot 
They all think, "There's rooms to let." 
Stanley doesn't care to ;;ee his sister ras. 
He's sure to stop her and start to nas- 
Jack is the boy with the curly hair 
He'd cut "Ensrlish" every day if he dare. 
Mya to school on a blue motor rides 
And most of the time in the basement hides. 
Forrest is a quiet and bashful lad 
And in school could never be bad. 
And the irirls all think that Ned 
Should be spanked and sent to bed. 

.Minerva Weihe, '18. 



IfX One] 



1 ®hf iotttpattr ^t\t\\it (Elaaa j 



Oh Heaven ! Oh Heaven ! Oh help ns ! 
Oh Lordy! What shall we do 
When we find that Hungarian Goulash 
Is only a plain Irish Stew! 

"What's in a name!" says Shakespeare. 
"What's in a doughnut!" cries Zeb, 
"Naught but a hole in the center 
With the dough as hea\T as lead." 

Zeb knows all about doughnuts. 
For out of the window hers flow, 
O'er the back fence of the alley, 
When she thought that nobody knew. 

Ruth Weihe, a golden-haired angel, 
Who never does anything wrong, 
Hid her white sauce in the locker, 
To wait until Teacher had gone. 

Then into the sitik she poured it 
And when it had disappeared, 
She sighed a sigh of contentment 
And bid farewell to her fears. 

The best of the class is Emma, 
She knows how to cook real ^ycll. 
Her favorite dish is "Lemons", 
Served how? she will not tell. 

Fern knows how to cook biscuits. 

As light as the clouds above. 

She never gets into mischief 

And claims she knows nothing of love. 

Frances, the dear little lassie, 
With all of her winning ways 
Fed some of the boys her cookies. 
The doctor was busy for days. 

Next comes our good cook. Polly, 
Who makes the French Fried Spuds, 
And when she's wasiiing disli-towels 
Siu-'s Ixnuid t(. have iilonty of suds. 



rp»a« 

iFoity-Twr 



Wlu'ii 15crtliii, till' uirl of tlio mi>iint:iiii, 
Hroko opoii iiii ejrij one diiy, 
A chii'k .jumped out to surprisf Iut 
And she let it fly away. 

Now eoines our dark eyed Sayde, 
Her pastry we all adore. 
The shape of some of her cream pijfip.s 
Would make an elepinuit roar. 

Then last of all conies Henry, 
Whose s;inj:er-hread was swell. 
A Carnesrie Medal he merits 
For makinir it so well. 

Now the one who composed this poem 
Has as many faults as the rest. 
And amonir all the cooks in the douiih-honsp 
It's hard to pick out the best. 



Hnth Lent. '18. 




COOKINC <L.\S.'<— DO.MKSTIC S( I KXt K DKI'AKT.MKNT 



fP««' 1 

iKorty-Th.^fJ 



ICa0t Hill mh ®?0tam?nt 



of % (Ulaaa nf 1915 



We, the illustrious members of the 
Senior Class of the Liberty Union High 
School of the City of Brentwood, County 
of Contra Costa, State of California, 
beins' sound in mind, though worn in body 
because of the trials of our past four 
years, and not entirely influenced by the 
Faculty, do hereby meet on this Twenty- 
eighth day of May, 1915, to make, publish 
and declare this our last will and testa- 
ment with all the sadness which the oc- 
casion demands. We will and bequeath in 
the manner following": 

First. To the Junior Class we will and 
bequeath our Senior dignity, our un- 
bounded talent, to be used in compiling' the 
1910 Annual, and our enviable positions as 
bosses of the school. 

Second. To the Sophomore Class we 
will and bequeath our ability ^to escape 
hard work. *■• 

Third. To the Freshman Class we will 
and bequeath our unsurpassable egotism. 
Fourth. The Senior girls leave their 
copies of Emerson's essays to the janitor 
with the stipulation that he use them in 
making the fire in the sewing: room, and 
leave no trace of them behind to worry 
future generations. 

Fifth. I, Ella Wurz, do will and be- 
queath my long- used and much abused 
whip to Mr. Martin to be used on the Jun- 
ior Class to enable them to get up enough 
speed to write an annual ne.xt year. My 
brown corduroy dress I will and bequeath 
to the cooking class, to be used in making 
holders to lift hot pans from the s-tove. 
My gift of sharp and pointed speech I 
leave to Herschel Miller, to be used spar- 
ingly in repartee with the girls. My anti- 
quated gray horse I bequeath to the man- 
ual training boys to carry them to and 
from the shop. My beloved frizzly locks 
1 bequeath to Ruth Weihe on condition 



that she weai them in a fringe from ear 
to car around her face. 

Sixth. I, Neva Sheddrick, do will and 
bequeath my glasses to the 1916 Josh 
Editor, to aid him in seeing the point to 
the jokes contributed to the annual from 
various sources. My dilapidated equi- 
page with the broken top I leave to those 
boys who have so kindly assisted me in 
harnessing my horse after school, to be 
divided among them as they see fit. My 
envied desk and chair in the Assembly, 
near the back window, I leave to Raymond 
Prewett, so he may not have to crane his 
neck to see everything that is going on 
in the street. My rosy complexion I leave 
to Miss Gehringer, to be applied judiciously 
to those participating in school plays in 
the future. My abundance of hair I leave 
to Ruth Weihe, to be added to the fringe 
bequeathed by Ella Wurz, and worn only 
on special occasions, such as St. Patrick's 
Day. My blue cheviot skirt I leave to 
Zelma Dainty to be worn with her mid- 
die blouses on condition that she consign 
her plaid skirt to the ash heap. 

Seventh. I, Blanche Juett, do bequeath 
my superfluous avoirdu])ois to Minerva 
Weihe, to be applied where she needs it 
the most. My red sweater I leave to next 
year's sewing class, to be dyed green and 
then made into chest protectors for the 
Freshmen. My irrepressible giggle I leave 
to the Student Body lo be distributed 
equally among the various members. My 
typewriter in the commercial room, I leave 
to any poor unfortunate who wants it. My 
hair, which curls in rainy weather I leave 
to Roswell Donaldson, to be superimposed 
upon his own straight locks. My blue 
serge dress I bequeath to Kulh Lent on 
condition that she make no alterations in 
the same, but wear it in its original con- 
dition. My unfailing talkativeness, I leave 



IFotly-FoutJ 



to Aiulri'w I'orfcr, kiiowini; tli.it it will \w 
wt'll ii>i'il ;iii(i appriM-iati'd. 

Kiiilitli. I, Fraiici's Brown, do will ami 
lnMlufatli iiiv sU'ikUt Htriiie to the si'wina 
class, to bo used as a model. My Pan- 
ama lull, wiiicli I have worn to sciiool for 
two years and wliidi is uood for at least 
ti-n years more, I l)ef|ueatli to Kate Hud- 
son. iMy large vocabulary, which has 
.served me faithfully for the last four 
years I bequeath to the Freshman English 
Class, knowing them to be sadly in need 
of the same. My privilege of (lueening at 
noon I leave to Fern Squires and Hertha 
Howard hoping that they will not abuse 
the same by availing themselves of it too 
freipiently. My Mary Jane pumps I be- 
queath to Ransom Fox, knowing that he 
will want something to remember me by. 
My privilege of teasing same young man 
I leave to Zelmu Dainty. 

Ninth. I, Roy Frerichs. do bequeath my 
beautiful disposition to Frank Shellen- 
berger. My corduroy trousers and black 
shoes I leave to Henry Winfree, knowing 
that what he lacks in size he will make up 
in conceit when he gets to be a Senior. 
My |)laid mackinaw I leave to Kddie 
Hevey. My comet I leave to the Prof, to 
be used when the electric bell is out of or- 
der. INIy old motor I leave to Mr. Clark to 
Use in riding to and from school. 

Tenth. T. Walter Swift, do betpieath 
my everlasting grouch to Aubrey William- 
son, to offset his own perpetual cheerful- 
ness. My habit of flirting with all the 
uirls, I leave to my brother. Homer Swift, 
trusting that he will uphold the family 
reputation. My privilege of cutting 
classes. I leave to Ellis Cakebread. hoping 
that he will appreciate the same and make 
good use of it. My dilapidated text books 
I leave to .\della Willett knowing that she 
has louir admired and enviously coveted 
the same. My overdeveloped fondness for 
loafing I leave to Mabel Sieding. 



Eleventh. 1, Joe Hand, do be(|ueath my 
suite of rooms over the Tea Cup Inn to the 
High School to be used as a gynmasium. 
My pompadour, I leave to the Freshman 
girls, hoping there will be no quarrclini: 
over the division of the same. My popular- 
ity with the girls I leave to Henry Bark- 
ley, knowing that he has long envied me the 
same. My basket-ball suit I leave to 
ClitTord McNaimara, on condition that he 
get no stouter, as the suit can stand no 
undue strain. My red stocking cap I leave 
to Sayde Brown, knowing that it will liar- 
monize beautifully with her hair. 

Twelfth. I, Alvin Howard, do betpieath 
my bashfulness to Carl Cowan, knowing 
him to be sadly in need of something of the 
kind. My accuracy in throwing nuid balls 
I leave to the next year Fresh ie boys, to 
be used in protecting themselves from the 
attacks of the upper classmen. My fond- 
ness for being absent from recitations I 
leave to Grace Milet. My facility of slow 
and deliberate locomotion, I leave to Enmia 
Shellenberger. My habit of coming any 
time after nine o'clock, I leave to John 
Sullenger. 

In witness hereof we set our hands and 
seals on this twenty-eighth day of May. in 
the year of our Lord, One Thousand Nine 
Hundred and Fifteen. 

Signed : 
Blanche Juett 
Ella Wurz 
Neva Sheddrick 
Frances Brown 
Roy Frerichs 
Alvin Howard 
Walter Swift 
Joe Hand 

Signed and sealed in the jircsencc of: 
Herschel Miller 
Board of Ccnsorshi]) 
Rarsom Fox 



lForty-F.i 



iEnrg? Waxk 



In ijiviiig an aceount of our forge work 
it would take many pages to give in detail 
the work as we have gone over it in our 
course. "Practical work," has been our 
motto all winter, and to keep us properly 
interested in our work we have, after a few 
weeks of all kinds of work, been allowed 
to make various small articles the process 
of making which leads to thoroughness and 
to an experience which places us upon a 
firmer footing and inspires each student 
with moi-e confidence in his ability. Some 
of the work is dilificult and trying, but in the 
end we have all enjoyed our small accom- 
plishments. 

In our shop we lack many conveniences, 
but this need of various articles has in- 
spired initiative and made us resourceful. 
We supply these articles by making them 
ourselves and thus learn to attain results 
under difficulties. ., 

Our processes have involved heating iron 
and steel of various compositions to proper 
temj>eratures for shaping, also the shap- 



iiig, bending and welding of iron and steel 
of a high temper. 

We turn out genuine hand made tools, 
shaped, polished and tempered. Amoii,/ 
these articles are cold chisels, wrenches, 
screw drivers, different kinds of hammers, 
flatters and hot eye cutters, drawing and 
bench knives, and hack saws. 

Many of these articles we color in var- 
ious ways in the fire and with acids and 
other metals. 

There is no way of judging how much is 
done during the term by examining our 
exhibit, for not more than a third of our 
actual work can be shown on account of 
our economical phase of the work which 
involves repeated use of \arious articles 
and scraps for other steps and phases of 
the course. 

A visit to the shop any day will enable 
you to get a fair notion of the character 
and importance of this department and to 
understand how intimately it is related to 
the evervdav life of ranch work. 



^M 


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k< 




\:i^\\l 


ft^ 


^S, 



[Page 1 
iForty-SixJ 



GIRLS' ATHLETICS 

T\\o .>;irl> beu;iii l»asket-lj:iil practice 
early in September. Entluisiasni ran hiirh 
and twice a week teams appeared on tlie 
c*t)urt. 

LIBKRTY VS. MT. DIABLO 

()\ir first t;anie was played with Mt. 
Diablo team Ovt. 10, on the home court. 
TJie I^iberty ^irls led the score throuiihout 
the irame. It was the first contest irame 
Mt. Diablo had ever played but they kejit 
us movinsr. The score stood at the end 
of the last half 18-6 in favor of Liberty. 
The line up was as follows: 

LIBERTY MT.DIAJ51,0 

KORW.\RDS 
Emnia Shelleiitier^r Evelyn Enos 

Ella Wunt (Capt.i Eleanor Rid.'mitU apt. i 

<;tARDS 
Fmnei'S Brown Gladys (Jeary 

Ruth Weihf Beatrice .Soto 

( ENTER-S 
.Sayde Brown Lore Janmiry 

Polly Barkley WInetta Bott 

LIBKRTY VS. ALHAMBR.^ 
Previous to this game we did no; prac- 
tice as faitlifully as we should have done 
and showed it when wc played Aihambra 
on the home court Nov. 20. The Liberty 
•rirls seemed paralyzed the first half. The 
score stood 10-0 in favor of Aihambra. 
The second half the Liberty team played 
hard, making the srame very e.xcitinjr. Bui 
Aihambra had such a lead that when the 
whistle blew for time the score stood 1.')- 
11 in favor of Aihambra. The line-up was 
as follows: 

LIBERTY ALH.XMBRA 

FORWARDS 
Emma Slielleiilx-rKi-r Hertha Nethcrton 

Ella Wiirz i fapt. i Maman't MoMalion 

CfARDS 
Ruth Weihe Margaret Swift 

Knou-i^ Brown In-ne Brewn 

(■EXTER.<» 
Sayile Brown Noniia McHarry 

Polly Barkley MarKU.riu- Peck (fapti 

This was our last same until after the 
holidavs. 



After the holidays the jrirls showed 
more vijror in practicinjr for the scheduled 
irauies of the C. C. A. L. were on hand. 
The first game was to be played Jan. 1.') 
with Mt. Diablo. They forfeited the game 
at the last minute and in order not to dis- 
appoint the public the Liberty first and sec- 
ond teams played a game. It was a sjilen- 
did game, well played throughout both 
halves. At the close of the game the score 
stood 17-5 in favor of the first team. The 
line up was as follows: 

FIRST TEAM SECOND TEAM 

FORWARDS 
(ieorRia Nunn Gladys Nunn 

EnniiH Shellenlx-rger Uiipt.) Velnia Cowan 

GIIARD.S 
Frances Brown Roma I'enilx'rUin 

Ruth Weihe B«^atrice Sanders 

CENTERS 
Sayde Brown Minerva Weihe 

I'olly Barkley Virifie Spnidley i ( apt. i 

On Feb. l.'l. a game was scheduled with 
Riverview to be played on their court. Riv- 
erview forfeited the game to Liberty. 

LIBERTY VS. ALIIAMBRA 
The game with Aihambra was sclieduicd 
for Jan. .50 but both teams agreed to play 
a week later. Feb. 6 Aihambra met Liberty 
on the hitter's court. Both teams entered 
with the spirit of the game written on their 
faces, as this was to decide the champion- 
ship of the county. A few minutes afier 
the game started Frances Brown sprained 
her ankle and Mae Roberts took her place. 
The game was as snappy as could be 
wished for and the crowd went wild with 
enthusiasm. Liberty scored first and kept 
the lead throughout the game. The score 
at the end of the first half stood 16-7 in 
favor of Liberty. When the whistle blew 
for the sec(md half profound silence 
reigned until the ball was jiut in l)lay. Fioth 
teams showed more vigor than ever but our 
opponents were gradually losing ground. 



IFortv -Seven 



Tlie crowd stood up with oxf-itement. The 
Alhambra yirls phiyed a splendid game but 
the Liberty Girls' fast team work was too 
much for them. At the end of the second 
half the score stood 22-9 in favor of Lib- 
erty. This made Liberty the championshiji 
basket-ball players of the county, ^vinnine 
the championship pennant of the C. C. A. L. 
The Martinez girls were same losers sriv- 
injr us a rousinsr good cheer after the srame 
which we heartily returned. The line up 
was as follows: 

LIBERTY ALHAMBRA 

FORWARDS 
Gporpia Xunn Margaret MrMahon 

Ella Wurz (Capt.) Hertlia Xethertoii (Capt.) 

filARDS 
Franoes Brown Mae Rol)erts Irene Brewcn 
Ruth Weihe >rargaret Swift 

CEXTERS 
Sayde Brown Marguerite IVok 

Polly Berkley Norma McHarry 



The li-irls in Basket Bal 
ners of the block "L" ai'e: 



who were win- 



Frances Brown. '1."). 
Ella Wurz, '1.'). 

Kuth Weihe. "16. 

Emma Shellenbcruer, 
Polly Barkley. '16. 
Sayde Brown. 
Mae Robert; 
Gcoruia 



16. 



S -17. 
Xunn. '18. 




GIRLS' BASKET BALL TEAM 

Top row (left to risrht) : Frances Brown, (manager), Ruth Weihe. Georgia 

Xunn, Ella Wurz. Miss Linda Gehringer, (coach). 
Bottom row: Polly Barkley. Emma Shcllenberger, (captain). Sayde Brown. 

Mac Roberts. 



fPaje 1 

IForty-EighlJ 



Athlrttr^ Qlnntinu^Ji 



FOOTBALL 

The year 1914-1.") has been the most 
eventful year in atliletii's at Liberty for a 
nuinl)er of years. 

Scliool opened in Ansrust with ])roinisini;' 
football material. Uurinjr tiie second 
school week tiie boys met and elected 
Henry Winfree, manasrer, and Edward He- 
vey, captain, of tlie football team. Two 
weeks later traininir was iroinir on in earn- 
e>t in spite of the warm weather. It was 
found that we were in urtrent need of a 
coach and football suits. When the trus- 
tees heard of our needs, they kindly do- 
nated forty dollars (.f40) to us. We are 
all irrateful to them for their keen interest 
in our athletic affairs, and it was their aid 
that made us as successful as we were. We 
secured the services of Ray Shafer. an ex- 
perienced football i)layer. to coach ns. We 
were a irreen sipmd that ivent throuirh the 
fir>t maneuvers and there seemed little hope 
of learninir the scientific |>art of the name. 
Rut Kay proved equal to the conditions and 
we were soon ac(]uirin,ir some ideas of Rui:- 
by. At first it was hard work for the cap- 
tain and manauer to yet some of the hoys 
to come out to practice rearularly. But 
irradually they became more enthusiastic, 
and, in spite of our ine.xperience in Ruirby. 
much was accomplished. 

RIVERVIKW VS. LIBERTY 
We challenged Riverview Iliirli of Anti- 
o< h to play Us a practice irame on Sej^tem- 
ber l!)ili, as we desired to have some prac- 
tical experience before the scheduled 
iramcH in October. The Riveniew boys, 
however, were ex|>erienced in the frame and 
their knowledirc of it caused them to 
triumph. Their serum was heavier, but 
pioved little better than ours, if any. 
Tliey excelled in the hack field. Their men 
could rjodire. lackle and pass, while we 



could not. However, we held our own and 
several of the boys showed up well. After 
two hard foufjht halves the frame ended 
with the score of 18-0 in their favor. We 
profited by our experience. 

MT. DIABLO VS. LIBERTY 

October lOth marked the openinir of the 
LeafTue schedule and Mt. Diablo Hiuh of 
Concord journeyed over to play us on the 
local frridiron. They were a "clean" bunch 
of players and too much for us. Duriiiii 
the first half we held them down and i)laycd 
srood ball. When the whistle blew the score 
stood 12-0 in Mt. Diablo's favor. 

Durinsr the second iiaif our boys seemed 
to lose faith in themselves and our oppo- 
nents befjan to pile up a number of points. 
At the end of the iiame the score was ;{"- 
0. 

RIVERVIEW VS. LIBERTY 

In spite of our former defeats, we were 
not disheartened and played our leairue 
frame with Riverview on Oct 24th on our 
home firounds. But, after two weeks of 
drillinir and coachinfr we did not come up 
to exjHM'tations. 

The first half was very excitiufr and 
Liberty did her best playinfr. Our tackliufr 
and runninfr was better. Our forwards did 
well but the back field lacked "pep." 

In the second half we met our downfall 
and in spite of rejieated efforts to cross 
the line for a try the frame ended with 
another "froose etrfr" for Liberty and 4.") 
points tabulated on the score board for 
Riverview. 

SAN RAMON VS. LIBERTY 

The boys [iracticed hard the followinfr 
week and were confident of victorv in the 
frame with San Ramon IliL'h of nanville 
m Oct. :nst. Richard Wallace havinfr re- 
turned to hifrh school, our team was irreally 
stremrlhcncd. It was in this irame that the 



fP.r- 1 

IFofty-NiocJ 



drilling of Coach Shafer showed to per- 
fection, even though the game was some- 
what rough. Williamson, one of our best 
and swiftest back field men, was the first 
Liberty man to make a trj'. Swift soon 
followed. Finally, at the end of the sec- 
ond half the score stood 17-0 in Liberty's 
favor. 

The Danville girls furnished us with a 
fine meal and we certainly appreciated it. 
ALHAMBRA VS. LIBEETY 

We were scheduled to play Alhambra 
at Martinez on Oct. 17th, but did not go on 



field, the first half ended with neither side 
having scored. 

When the second half started, we were 
determined to win and began with the 
kick-off. The ball continued to see-saw, 
now one side on the offensive and now the 
other. Toward the end of the second half 
the Alhambra left wing ran around our 
right wing and over near the edge of the 
field. The touch line was not distinguish- 
able at that point, while the 5 yard line 
was. The opponent ran across the line 
that could be seen and our right wing 




Top Row: Vernon Cakebread, Henry 
Bottom Row: Harold Lucas, Roy Fre 



BOYS' BASKE I BALL TEAM 

Winfree, Walter Swift, Joe Hand, 
richs, Jack Suffern. 



account of delayed train and rain. How- 
ever, on Nov. 3rd the trustees kindly gave 
the high school a vacation, so we went 
down intending to scalp the county seat 
team. The game commenced about 3:10 
and we had the ball on their 25 yard line 
nearly all of the first half. Alhambra did 
not hire a referee from U. C. or Stanford, 
as the county rules prescribe, but one from 
Crockett. Many times we were on the 
point of crossing the goal line, but were 
forced back. After see-sawing across the 



thinking he had passed out of bounds 
stopped running. The result was a try 
for Alhambra and it was also converted. 
It was too near the end for us to get a 
try; however, we did our best. The sec- 
ond half ended with the score of 5-0 in 
f?vor of Alhambra. We went home feeling 
that we did not have quite a square deal 
and confident we could beat them in another 
game. 

JOHN SWETT VS. LIBERTY 
The final game of the league was played 



iFitiy J 



hort' (.11 Ni>v. 7th witli Jolui Swctt lliuli 
of Crockett. They cunu' with the intentit)ii 
of beatiiii! us "irood uiul proper", as they 
did two years airo. However, we jjave them 
a surj)rise. 

Of all tlie irames this was the best. All 
our boys were in fiirhtinsr trim and Shafer 
was pleased witli our showinjj. Our s<'rum 
worked tine and the bark field was also 
belter tiian usual. Almost immediately af- 
ter the kiek-otr in the first half. Harkley 
crossed the line and scored 3 points for 
Liberty. We failed to convert and for the 
rest <)f the first half it was about an equal 
tiirht. Gradually, Crockett forced us back 
and forced their way, after many scrums, 
over the jroal line. When the whistle blew 
the score stood 3-3. 

Duriiisr the second half we had the ball 
in our territory almost continually. Our 
scrum seemed to be gettino; better all the 
time and Joe Hand, our hook, itot the ball 
out on our side line continually. After 
many scrums and "rucks" on our 5 yard 
line the ball was taken over, but we failed 
to convert. In a minute or so the whistle 
blew and the score stood 6-3 in our favor. 

In honor of our victory Coach Shafer 
treated us to soda water at the Teacup 
Inn. 



BASKET BALL 

Liberty was very successful in basket 
ball this year. Immediately after foot- 
ball was over, the boys commenced prac- 
tice. Joe Hand was elected captain, and 
Walter Swift, manatrer. A jrreat interest 
was taken in the jrame and there was much 
material to pick from. Throuirh the ijener- 
osity of Bruns Brothers, we were allowed 
to practice in the uarajje when the weather 
was bad. The county schedule was ar- 
ranued in December, and the frames were 
ti> be played in January. Riverview, Al- 
liambra and Liberty were the only schools 
havinpr boy's teams that were represented. 
Riverview forfeited her pames to Liberty 
and Alhambra, so we only needed to de- 
feat the boys from the county seat, to win 
the county championship. 

LIBKRTY VS. TOWN TEAM 
On Friday evening;. Jan. 1.'). we had a 



practice ijame with a home team of for- 
mer hiirh school boys. It was a very lively 
iranie throuj;hout and Liberty always kept 
the lead. The jiame ended with the score 
18-21 in favor of Liberty. 

LIBERTY VS. ALHAMBRA 

Saturday eveninjj. Feb. 6, the Alhambra 
team of Martinez came up to Brentwood 
with the best "intentions." However, they 
were somewhat surjjrised. The boys prac- 
ticed hard durinii the week |)rccedin,u the 
aame and were in jrood trim. 

The sjame commenced immediately after 
the ifirls had finished, and was exciting 
from the start. Liberty made a number 
of aoals within a few minutes. 

The Alhambra guards were kept on a 
lively move by our fast forwards, while 
their forwards tried time and ajrain to 
"ditch" our guards, but without avail. At 
the end of the first half Liberty was con- 
siderably in the lead. 

The second half started with a rush. 
Alhambra's fightin<r spirit was up, but her 
forwards could not find the basket ex- 
cept on special occasions. When the whis- 
tle blew at the end of the last half the 
score stood 26-12. Liberty had won her 
first boy's basket-ball pennant. 

We received the championship pennant 
in the latter part of March and it was set 
up on the wall in the assembly hall. There 
it hanjrs beside the jrirl's pennant, as a 
proof of Liberty's ability ii. basket-ball. 

WINNERS OF THE "L". 

The followinfr have won the block "L" 
for faithful practice and participatinsr in 
four or more football frames: 

191.-). Walter Swift. Joseph Hand. Alvin 
Howard. 

1 !•](!. Henry Barkley. Henry Winfree, 
Edward Hevey. Vernon Cakebread. 

1017. Frank Shellenbertrer, Aubrey Wil- 
liamson. Clifford McNamara. .James Cake- 
bread. 

1918. Stanley Nunn. John SufTern. 

TRACK MEET 

The annual track meet was held in Con- 
cord. April 24. The Liberty men were: 
J. Hand. R. Fox. C. McNamara. A. Rob- 
erts, F. Shellcnbersrer. W. Swift, and A. 
Williamson. 



iFiliy-On 



The boys had a very poor track on which 
to practice and with no coach they found 
it difficult to induce any one to train prop- 
erly or sufficiently. The captain, W. Swift 
and manager, H. Winfree did the best they 
could under trying conditions and deserve 
credit for putting a team in the meet. 

Two of the team, H. Winfree and A. 
Howard were, at the last moment, unable 
to go. 



W. Swift took third place in the 440 and 
880 yd. 

C. McNamara third place in the ham- 
mer; and our relay team, composed of 
Swift, Hand, Williamson, Roberts, and 
Cakebread, took third place. 

Let us hope that the trustees will em- 
ploy a young man on the faculty for next 
year who can lead us in all our sports. 




TRACK TEAM 



fP-ge 




The sofial events of our school days are 
pood times to be remembered throug:h life. 
Let us live over airain those of this year. 

First : — On Thursday eveniiisr, September 
10, 1914. the frifrhtened, shining, cleanly- 
washed faces of the Freshmen, appeared 
timidly, in the door-way of Coates' Hall. 

The amusement started by playing games 
but as usual, the greater part of the evening 
was devoted to dancing. Freshmen, up- 
per classmen, and the Alumni joined in 
the fun. 

At twelve o'clock, sign? of drowsiness 
were noticed among the little ones, so we 
fed them with dainty refreshments made 
and served by the girls of the cooking 
class. The little Freshmen certainly looked 
sweet as they sat at the table with a green 
bib tucked about the neck of each. As 
you well know, our rules forbid festivities 
after twelve o'clock. We do not count eat- 
inir a festivity so it wa.s almost one o'clock 
before we started for home. 

THE HAY RIDE 

On the evening of October 2nd, 1914. the 
Juniors gave a Hay Ride, in honor of the 
Seniors. 

The jolly crowd gathered at Liberty 
about seven thirty and piled into a lumber 
watron. This wason not beins lar^e enough 
they went out of town a few miles and. 
after unloading the hay from a header- 
bed, clambered in, youn<r folks and teach- 



ers, and started for the Marsh Creek 
school house. Before they reached their 
destination, the horses refused to go anj' 
further, so the crowd agreed to stop and 
eat their lunch. After apples, pieces of 
cake, and sandwiches had been tucked 
away, they started home. Alas! when they 
had gone but a few miles the wagon 
broke down, and the crowd had to walk. 
Nevertheless we all enjoyed the ride. 

On December 12. 1914, the annual 
Senior Ball, was given by members of the 
class. 

The hall was artistically decorated with 
holly berries and mistletoe. The Seniors 
wore badges of orange and black, those 
being the class colors, and acted as floor 
managers. Delightful music was provided 
by the Shafer & O'Hara Orchestra. 

At twelve o'clock a Tamale Supi)er was 
served, and after eating, all went home 
declaring, it to be one of the best times of 
the season. 

Saturday evening. February 6, 1915. at 
the close of a double-header basket ball 
game, the students of L. V. H. S. gave a 
dance in honor of the Martinez girls and 
boys. 

The affair was given in Coates' Hall, 
and the musi<- was i)rovidcd by the Shafer 
& O'Hara Orchestra. The dance closed 
at twelve o'clock, and all went home, the 
visitors declaring that they had had a de- 
lii'htfnl time. 



fP.r- 1 



®I)r Junior ^lag txnh lall 




On the eveiiinjj of Marf-h 19, 1915, the 
Junior Class presented "His Uncle John" 
at Coates' Hall, before a large and appre- 
ciative audience. It proved to be a great 
success and was praised by all who were 
present. The cast of characters was as 
follows : 
John VanCourtland (His Uncle John).... 

Joe Hand 

Jack Sanderson Henry Winfree 

Bert Allison Edward Hevey 

Nubbins Goodwin Vernon Uakebread 

Mrs. Sanderson Ruth Weihe 



Lucy Harrington Polly Barkley 

Mrs. Slaters Emma Shellenberger 

After the play dancing was enjoyed until 
twelve o'clock. 

The Annual Junior Ball given in the 
"Hotel Brentwood," proved to be one of 
the most exclusive and elaborate affairs 
of the school year. 

The O'Hara & Shafer Orchestra fur- 
nished the music. The daince lasted until 
midnight and tenninated with a splendid 
banquet. 



1 




ri£jt 




!r« 


1 




il!i;U 





iFifly-FourJ 




ance. Otherwise you are a very jrood 
jiapor. 



Tlic Advance — Areata — An exceptionally 
•rood paper, full of well arranjjed and in- 
tercstinsr matter. No criticism. 



In lookinjr up our exchanjres we have 
been able to find a very small number. Of 
the six schools in this county beside our 
own we have heard from only two. If a 
pai>er has been sent to us and not men- 
ti<»ned. don't feel slisrhted, for you probably 
know the care with which students rci)lace 
papers in the jiroper jilaces. We will en- ^^^^ 

dcavor to do our best with what we have. 

The Acta — Concord — We are pleased to 
see you amoiiji- us aiiain. You have a 

Far Darter— St. Helena— A verv srood. -""^^ P^^P^^' '^"^ why do you send out ex- 
well arransred paper. Your stories speak f'"i"Se« ^'hen you have no exchaufje de- 
well for vour school talent, and vour joke l'='rt"ient yourself. We would also susj- 
department is especiallv irood. You are ^'''^' ^^'""^ >'«" """^^^'" >'"'"• '"'-•'•^ '""' '"'^'^ 
furiunate that the citizens of your dis- " *»'»'*' "^ contents, 
trict take sni-h an interest in your school. 

The Golden Bear — Sonoma — A sjilendid 

~, ., ,, , , „. ,,. ^, , paper, but whv crowd the litcrarv so near 

The Netherlands — Rio Vista— ad to I, ^ . v u » 

, , _ ,, , the front. i on have a verv ajjpropriate 

hear from vou. lour paper would be a j ■ 

<'over desiuTi. 

credit to a much older school than vours. 



La Jolla — Antioch — You are quite a 
The Elk — Elk Grove — Your many stories stranper, ?lad to see you. Your pictures 
are verv well written but a little more space are excellent, but your stories could be 
for headincs would improve the appear- improved. 



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iFiftT-SrreoJ 



SCHOOL DAY3 



A 




PreiyeifCifn -T 
j^n I mita t ion Of- 
a. GycKfC y/ne. 




-fjie Lr^<^ And ^hctt ^xJ^S^fSi^ fflt^ 

V^, >SlonC House 







7~h ^ Junior Hay-^ffi/^^ 
Causec^ Great /;' 
£'xcitenierit. \ 



Carrieru On 1'he 
Grot/nUs. 









- .Hank Botk/eifs . \\\ 

fh r,',e Coo/cm <f Oe/^t ^\\ ^ , "^ 
To Punch rio/es In 1^ J 
^ Dovqhnuis. 




The Pr'off Mcit^in^ His I-/qij 
Through ^ Mud Fiqhi On 
l^<^v To Cct-^ ^he.riff 



fP.ge 1 




The editor requests that all jokes be 
written on tissue paper so she may be able 
to see throujrh them. 

Miss G. (in written Ensriish Ex.): Tell 
what you can about the life of Chaucer. 
Raymond : His father wa.s a wine cellar. 

Miss G. (in Eno;. 1. Lady of the Lake) : 
Ilerschel, what is the meaninsr of, "His 
suit was warm?" 

Herschel : It ineans his clothes were 
warm. 

Henry W: Today is Columbus Day, 
isn't it? 

Emma : Yes. 

Ruth W: Is today Columbus' birthday? 

Blanche: Oh, look, that man has trim- 
med his wit;. 

Xeva : Why, you ivory dome, it don't 
trrow! 

Miss Domonoske: Harold, what is the 
meaning of >arcophofj:us? 

Harold: (doubtfully) Well I think it is 
s<Mne kind of an animal. 

Blanche: For the love of Mike, dose that 
door or the stove will <ro out. 

Frances: Yes. I noticed that it has been 
treating us rather coldly of late. 

Prof: Boys, can't this case he settled 
out of school? 

Roys: Sure, that's what we were tryin? 
to do when you called us in the office. 

Emma (noticing a rip po by): Did that 
busjry have rubber tires? 

Neva : Xo. but it had "Slats" at the back. 



Bertha: Is this of the risht consistency? 
(Miss Anthony: Yes, now beat it. 

WHY DOESN'T HE BITE? 

Emma : Isn't it stranjje that the ienjrth of 
a. man's arm is equal to that of a fiirl's 
waist? 

Ransom : Let's get a striufj and see. 

Roy: One of the cylinders is missinjr. 
Zelma : Let's go rifjht back and get it. 

RURAL RYMES. 

The cows are in the meadow, 
The sheep are in the grass. 

But all the simple geese. 
Are in the Freshman class. 

Miss Gehringer: What are the three 
words used most in this class? 
Ilerschel : I don't know. 
Miss Gehringer: Correct. 

Blanche: (Running her finger down the 
back of Frances' neck sings) "My honey, 
honey lassie." 

Blanche: What is the matter with this 
hnnp. it's all green? 

Walter: It must have been near a 
Freshman. 

Virginia: The mice have eaten my pat- 
tern. 

Miss Anthony: Yes. they got in the 
chemistr\' room and ate up two yeast 
cakes. 

Ruth: No wonder they have been raisini: 
the dickens. 



rp.gr 1 

iKllly-NiotJ 



JOKE ON THE TEACHER 

Miss Gehringer: (coming across the 
word heirloom, explains it). "An heirloom 
is a loom they used to use in olden days. 
The women saved their combings and made 
switches of them on heirlooms." 

Prof.: What is the meaning of ague? 
Aubrey: A chilly fit. 




There is a young lady named Blanche 
Who once did visit a ranche 

She climbed up a tree 

And skinned up each knee 
And came down like a great avalanche 

WHO COULD IT BE? 

(Joe standing in the hall waiting for 
German class to commence). 

Roswell ( inquisitive Fresh. ) : Wha t ej^a 
doing? 

Joe: Waiting for class. 

Roswell: What's her name? 

Ruth W: I see you're back again, Hank. 
Henry B: Gosh, I told mn to fix that. 
Ruth": Fix what? 
Henry : Why, my shirt. 

Frances: Aw, I think that your brains 
have gone to your feet. 

Ruth W: (Unthinkingly) Yes, that's 
why they're so small. 

There, there, little Freshie, 

Do not cry, 
You'll be a Suffermore, 

Bye and Bye. 

Adella: Who originated the first geom- 
etry problem? 

Harold: I pass, who? 

Adella : Noah. 

Harold: What's the answer? 

Adella : Why, didn't he construct the 
Ark-B. C? 



Eddie (after defeating the intention of 
a Freshie) Did you ever get left"? 
Ned : My mother always took me. 

Ella: (appearing in a new dress). Is 
this dress easily spotted? 

Ruth : Gosh, yes, at least four blocks 
off. 

THOSE SENIORS 
Roy: I can tell you how much water 
runs over Niagara Falls to a quart. 
Henry W: How much? 
Roy : Two pints. 

Minerva : He was the goal of my am- 
bitions, but — 

Zeb: But what, Sis? 

Minerva : Father kicked the goal. 

Prof. (in algebra) : If your work 
doesn't pick up, you'll be kept back a year. 
How would you like to have all the class 
get ahead of you? 

Jack S : Oh, I guess there will be more 
class next year, all right. 

Prof: Who is responsible for all this 
noise? 

Raymond : I just dropped a perpendicu- 
lar to a horizontal line. 

Miss Anthony: Of whom was Caesar a 
descendant? 

Bright Soph : Adam and Eve. 




There is a young lady named Neva 
She is a heartless deceivah 

She flirts with each boy 

And tries to be coy 
But not one of them will believe her. 

(Raymond looking out of the window at 
a swell dame passing by). 

Mr. Martin : Let's give attention to the 
class, Raymond. 

Raymond: I am. 



ISixty J 



Miss Geliriiiu'iM- : Frjink, it' you had re- 
cited that poetry as fast a>. May, tc\v.\t 
wouhl it ha VI' been ? 

Frank : A three step. 

WHAT nOKS SIIK MKAN? 
!{iith i,: I put olive oil on my faee to 
keep the •'cliaps" otT. 

Miss Gelirinsrer: Neva, do you know 
what the blue devils aref 

Neva: Sure, tliey are some kind of an 
insect, aren't they .' 




There is a younir lad named Waiter 
Ilis habits he surely nuist alter 

For whoever the irirl 

He thinks her a pearl 
If inily his wink's she will fall ter. 

Miss Demonoske (in shorttiand): Kstlier. 
what are you doinir with your "i" there? 

Polly: (Speaking-- to dou) Come here and 
let me kiss you. 

Andrew: Do you alwavs kiss vour doir ? 

I'olly: Yes. 

|{nd : I suppose thal'> why Jack is so 
snappy lately. 

Walter: Can't you put a nickel in nitric, 
acid and .:ret <-opper out of it ? 

Miss Anthony: Oh no. only dimes an<l 
dollars contain copper. 

Walter: Well put two nickels in then, 
that makes a dime. 

NOT OCT OF COIRTKSY 

Blanche: Aw. hit Zelma. Ilcrschel. 
Iier>chel: Oh, I wouldn't do that. 
Blanche: Why not ? 
Ilerschel : She mijrht hit me back. 

Blanche: Is the color of this -roods fast ? 

Clerk: Certainly, it's a> fast as the roses 
in your cdieeks. 

Blanche: (ha>tily) Show me somethin-r 
eUe please. 



Frances' Dad: l''rances, why don't you 
ask that youni; man why In- doe.su't go 
linmc earlier.' 

h' ranees: Hut papa. I know already. 

Frances: (Jee, I smell lamales! 
Haymond : Aw, it's somebody burninu 
rubbish. 

Neva (rushinir into the Assembly): 
Who's u.«t "Freckles"?'' 

CIIHMISTKY 

Mi^s .\ntlinny: What i-auses an explo- 
sion ? 

Blajiclie: When two -rases meet. 

]\liss \.: Yes. but there's another cause 
loo. 

Blanche: When too larjre an object yets 
in too small a space. 

Henry: Look out. Blanche! 

A Kh'KSllMAN'S FIKST ATTFMI'T 
AT I'OKTK'Y 

'Tis evcninjr and the settinir sun 
Is risinir in the jrlorious West, 
The ra|>id rivers slowly run; 
The frojr is in his downy nest; 
The festive sroat and sportive cow, 
Hilarious leii) from bow to bow. 

Blanche: Oh I .Mvin's jrot the measles! 
Klla (i|uii-kly): Yes. anil Bertha's u:ot 
my cap. 



Tick 




There is a youny: Si'uior named Ri>y 
lli^, watch is in his irreat pride and joy 

He wind> it in school 

And acts (piite the fool 
And ))lays with it as 'twere a toy. 

POOR FRKS11MAN 
Yernon: What is tjie difTeremc between 
a Freshman and a monkey? 
John : I don't see. 
\'crnon : Neither do 1. 



fP.r- 1 

ISiitr-Onc] 



Blanche: Gee, my hands are cold. 

Prances: ^Yell sit on them. 

IJlaiiche: Aw, I don't want to smash 'em. 

CHAUCER AGAIN 

Senior (reading) : And raj»(e) he coud(e) 
as it wer(e) right a whelpe. 

Miss G: Please give that in yonr own 
words. 

Senior: And he could rag just like a 
puppy dog". 





There is a young boy we call Joe 
'Mong' the girls he has not a foe 

On him they use smiles 

And all their gay wiles 
And he never can answer them, "No." 

He prepareth a table before me in view 
of my ignorance. He stuffed my ivory 
oraniumi with anecdotes. My head run- 
neth over. Surely brain fever will follow 
me all the days of my life and I shall go 
to Stockton and dwell there forever. 

OF COURSE 

Miss Gehringer: Who fell at the battle 
of Hastings? 

Harold: Soldiers. 

HEARD IN CHEMISTRY 

Miss Anthony: If you jnvt sodium on 
water, what will happen? 

Blanche (Bright Senior): You'll have 
soda water. 

Prof: But you had to take the examina- 
tion last time. 

Roswell : I know it. 

Prof: And you got 5. 

Roswell : I know it. 

Prof, (with relieved expression) : Well, 
vou do know something. 



Miss Anthony: (in chemistry) Frances, 
tell the class all you know about match 
making. 

Roy: That was a rash act of Howard's. 

Raymond: What did he do? 

John: Went and caught the measles. 

Mr. Martin (to Blanche who is chewini? 
gum) : What's the matter with the lower 
part of your face? 

Blanche: It's loose. 

CLEVER FRESH 

Miss G. : Carl, did I see you looking in 
your book? 

Carl : Oh, no. Miss Gehringer I'm sure I 
closed it before you saw me. 

THOSE FRESHIES 

Freshie: (translating German) : Der Sohn 
des Lehrers schreibt dem Onkel einen Brief 
(the son of the teacher writes the uncle a 
letter). 

Miss G. : Give the syntax of "einen Brief" 
(a. letter). 

Freshie: "Einen Brief" is accusative, be- 
cause it accuses the letter of being writ- 
ten. 

HKARD IN BYRON SKATING RINK 

Henry W: What did you find to be the 
hardest thing about roller .skating when 
you were learning? 

Katie : The floor. 




Poor Alvin's a bnshful young boy 
Yes. he is exceedingly coy 

When girls talk nnish 

Oh, how he doth blush 
And to tease him is I heir special joy. 

Frank (reciting Merchant of Venice) : 
"Tell me where is fancy bred. In the heart 
or in the head?" 

Esther: In the bakerv. 



ISixly-TwoJ 



Prof: Harold, you lind better sret to 
work and stop lookinjr at Grace. 

Harold: Yes, Mr. Martin, but I want to 
see her outline. (.Meaning History.) 

TllK THITII 

Miss G (in Kntrlish -i to Raymond who 
was erabbinir about studying:) : Why do you 
come to school ? 

Raymond: Because I have to work if I 
don't and this is easier. 




There is a younsr lady named Ella 
Her sarcasm she should quell-a 

For what ever one's fault 

She never doth halt 
For say she doth ball them out well-a. 

WIND 

Klla : Ruth Weihe is some l)reeze around 
here. 

Frances: Why ,so? 

Ella: Haven't you heard her blow? 

W.\Y TO srccKss 

"The secret of success." the stamp said, 
"is stickinsr to it." 

"To succeed." said the knife, "be brisrht 
and sharp". 

"Keep up to date", said the calendar. 

"Aspire to <rreater thinjis," said the nut- 
meg'. 

"Don't knock it's old fashioned." said 
the electric bell. 

"Do a driviu'T business." said the ham- 
mer. .\nd the barrel added. 

"Never lose your head." 

"Make liirht of everyfhiuir." the fire ob- 
served cynically. 

"But always keej) cool." said the ice. 



Miss G. (in EnsHsh, after Roy had fin- 
ished scanninsi a line of poetry) : What kind 
of feet have you, Roy? 

Walter (aside) : They're number thir- 
teens. 

Klla: Where can I jret "Freckles"? 
Blanche: Out in the sunshine I fjuess. 

Miss Anthony: In what country is the 
sea of Galilee? 

Henry B. : Well I'll be hanired. 

Alvin: Why? 

Henry: I'm suspended. 

HEARD IN CHEMISTRY LABORATORY 

Alvin was taking: chemistry. 

He played with lots of things, 
He took a whiff of chlorine, 

Now he navigates on wings. 

Miss Anthony (in cooking) : I told you 
twice to make muffins. Haven't you any 
intellect? 

Zelma: No. Miss Anthony. There's none 
in the house. 

Frank: John was put out of the game 
last night. 

Aubrey: What for? 

Frank: He forgot to shave and was 
kicked out for roughness. 




There is a young lady naned Frances 
Who oft tries to learn the new dances 

She slides and she dips 

She whirls and she trips 
And every one howls as she prances. 

Miss Gehringer: When did the revival of 
learning take place? 

Walter: Just before examinations. 

Minerva (pointing to Henry Barkley in 
;i foMtball -nil): What's that? 
Rinnion*!: A mistake. 



ISiiiy-ThweJ 



I i 

ronize our ad- 



i ^ • 1 I 




PLEASE pat^ 



to them mainly that 
we owe our financial 



ANTIOCH HARDWARE & 
FURNITURE COMPANY 



I HARDWARE, STOVES, PAINTS AND OILS, 

i RANGES, FURNITURE, CROCKERY, ETC. GET 

i CARPETS, RUGS, LINO- OUR PRICES ON 

i LEUMS, MATTINGS. PLUMBING. 

i == — = — = 



vertisers. It is I 



I we owe our financial | 

I success. i 



I I 

I I 

I WHEN IN ANTIOCH REMEMBER | 

1 .„...,... . I 



A COMPLETE LINE OF | 



I ANTIOCH, CALIFORNIA j 



Balfour, Guthrie & Co. 



q The Irri- 
gation Pro- 
jed IS now 
completed 
and the land 
is on the 
market in 
small hold- 
ings. 



OWNERS 



Los Meganos 
Rancho 

Hotel 
Brentwood 



Warehouse 
Grain 



A. BURNESS, Agent 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co, 



BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



BYRON HOT SPRINGS HOTEL 



L. R. MEAD, Manager 

New Unqualifiedly Fire- 
proof Hotel at Byron Hot 
Springs. Opened to the 
Public April 30th, 1914. 



RED FARM DAIRY 


LOGAN & HINEBAUGH 


R. E. LEMOIN. Proprietor 


GENERAL CONTRACTORS 


Milk from Tuberculin Te^ed Cows 




Delivered Fresh Every Day 


PLUMBING. WINDOW SHADES 


$2.50 for quart f)er month 
$1.25 for pint per month 


LINOLEUMS. CARPETS 
AND CURTAINS 


^^^^S^ 


GAS ENGINES AND TANKS 


Whipping Cream Furnished at Any 


CONCREl E WORK 


Time on Notice. 


^^^^^ 


BRENTWOOD. CALIFORNIA 


Brentwood, California 



|issss^5^ss^^5sm^^5^^«^^^m5.w.smr;i^^j.^^^^;8^^^-;'^^^^i.^^^s^^^^^^s^^^s^^ 



BANKING 

DO YOU DO ANY? 



Alex. Burness, Vice-President 



If not, why not? i 

Did it ever occur to you that a bank account, even ^ 

though it be a small one, is the safest means of doing A 

business? Your checks are the best receipts for all A 

bills paid, and your funds will be neither lost nor stolen i 

from our vaults. A 

Sometimes bills are sent out by mistake after they ^ 

have been paid. If you pay by check, however, the ^ 

cancelled checks are returned to you and can be pro- A 

duced as receipts. Checking accounts are, therefore, ^ 

more than a convenience — they are an insurance A 

against overpayment. ^ 

I 

P COMMERCIAL f 

I R. G. Dean. President Lee Durham, Cashier, p 



Your checking account will be welcomed at this bank, 
where you are assured of absolute security and the ^ 

most courteous service. 

BANK OF BRENTWOOD 



DIRECTORS I 



P R. G. Dean Robt. Wallace, Jr. | 

i Alex. Burness R. F. MacLeod 1 

f 'v 

i Frank H. Ludinghouse i 

I 4 per cent interest Paid on Term Deposits Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent | 

I P 



The Byron Times 

It Stands 
Right 

It Is 
Right 

Always Boosting 

$2.50 A YEAR 
HARRY HAMMOND, Editor 



Arlington ^atA 



Superior Attention paid 
to Dinner Parties 



TURNER & DAHNKEN 

PROPRIETORS 
ANTIOCH. CALIFORNIA 



L.B.WEATHERBEE, M.D. 



Brentwood Forenoon 

Oakley Afternoon 

Sunday By Appointment OAKLEY, CAL. 



^j^m^^^^^^^^^M^^^^^^^^^m-^m^^^^^^^^^^^^JS^s^s^^sSfc^s^s^s^^^j 



i^^^5^^^^5^^^5SS5^^^^S^S^5S^^8S^«8S5SS8«S8S«8SS5SSS^S^^^^S5^58^^ 



3nal| (Ealrtiiiar 



''f\ J;in. 11 — Gloom. School starts aiiniii. Frniicos starts a fire in (^liomistrv hut Miss % 

% ' f 

%, Aiillioiiy conit's to liic ri'sciu'. J 

% . . . , . ^ 

'iy, Jan. 12 — Neva makes a dramatic entrance into tlie Enuiish Class. % 

t , . I 

f Jan. 14 — ^K^tlier tries to turn somersaults in the basement. % 

r i 

& .... p 

% Jan. l'> — Zelma takes her hair down — I'il be "swilched." Ruth dies, Ravmond ^ 

P f 

^ faints. Frances finds a hunk of pink anni and ueneroiislv divides with A 

I ' ■ i 

I Wa„..r. I 

A Jan. 18 — Smilev falls down stairs, Minerva i)lavs footman. % 

t ' . . . ' i 

M Jan. 19 — The school is suddenly stricken with an attack of religion. 

Jan. 20 — A diirnified Senior is tund)led under her desk and emerges, lookin" J 
somewhat disheveled. ^ 

I 

German. ^ 

Jan. 22 — Neva ;roes to sleep in F.nirlish and sneezes violently in Student Body ; 

meetintr. yi 

I 
y Jan. 27 — Gloom, history Exam's beiriii. Li;:htweii:ht Prewett an<l Middleweisrlit > 

p ' ' . ' ' ' ■' 

d Miller have a one round bout in the basement. if, 

§ f- 

d Jan. 28 — Minerva scatters snnfT in the Assembly room. Aelioo! Kercho! 4 

^ ^^ 



p Feb. 2 — Mr. Martin says there will be no Hist. E\. Slats iroes into hysterics. 



d Feb. 3 — Frances' mind must be wanderinir. she brings her luncli in the olTice. 

i ■ ?; 

Feb. n — I'ollv iumps the hurdles in Enirlish. 'd 

Yv\>. 10 — \eva has a new hair comb. d 

% . . , . I 

?^ Feb. 12 — Seniors have a discussion about cheese in Eimlish. ^ 

Feb. l.'S — Miss Gehrinirer irets a valentine box and treats the Senior Enirlish Class. ^ 

I 

(fonrlurlod o'l ttic- iiiiitli imKi' foruiird.l d 

I I 



i 1 

i FRANK n. LUDINGHOUSE j 

1 



I en AMI/ u iiim\iruAiicc | 

_= = 



I . 



P DEALER IN | 

I HARDWARE AND | 

I AGRICULTURAL IM- f 

I PLEMENTS, HER. | 

I CULES HARNESS | 

i AGENT FOR j 

i BUGGIES, SHARPLES' | 

p CREAM SEPARATOR, | 

I AERMOTOR WIND- I 

I MILLS, AND JOHN | 

I DEEREPLOWS. | 



w 



i 



tween you and the best for the least. That's why we 
can say to you, come and buy merchandise here of 



feet satisfaction is lacking. We want you to feel at all 



I Brentwood, California | 

I i 

i 



I - P 

i I4/E do all the planning and scheming for you — f, 

we've solved all little problems that stand be- § 



p unquestionable merit as low as, if not lower than you p 

can buy goods elsewhere where the guarantee of per- fi 



M times that no sale is considered consummated here p 

^ until you are thoroughly satisfied with our Dry Goods, ^ 

$ Men's Furnishings and Groceries. U 

I RAFF & WEEKS j 

i I 

3 Phone 34J Antioch. California. | 

I i 



H. H. BRUNS 



J. F. BRUNS 



Brentwood Garage 



Reinforced Concrete 



Fire Proof 



BRENTWOOD 



GARAGE 

AGENTS FOR OVERLAND 5 FORD CARS. 




AGENTS FOR 



Overland and Ford Cars, Gasoline En- 
gines, Indian Motocycles, Samson 
Seive Grip Tradors 

MACHINE WORK AND GENERAL REPAIRING SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS 

AUTOMOBILES FOR RENT DAY OR NIGHT 



Phone 41 


Sundays 


by Appointment 


D. E. 


HAWLEY, 

DENTIST 


D. D. S. 


Central Building 
Over Logic's Drug Store 


Antioch, Cal. 



3. Wixiitxtt HpHm. M. i. 



ANTIOCH, CAL. 



< 



Swiss Watchmaker 
Fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing 

(S. IBrogliammpr 

JEWELER 



SECOND STREET ANTIOCH. CAL. 



Phone Main 1311 Hours 9 to 5 

Sundays By Appointment 

(£. mbtrt (Campbrll. KKB, 

DENTAL OFFICE 
Tuesdays and Fridays. 9 to 3, at Brentwood 

McAravy Building Antioch, Cal. 



THE ALWAYS 
BUSY STORE 



THE BELSHAW CO. 



THE ALWAYS 
BUSY STORE 



We carry the largest and most varied ^ock of 
Dry Goods, Ladies' and Men's Furnishings, Cloth- 
ing, Boots and Shoes, Staple and Fancy Groceries 
in the County of Contra Costa, at the lowest prices. 

When in Antioch pay us a visit, we are always glad to show you the 
merchandise whether you purchase or not. Below are listed some of the 
many articles we carry in the various departments. 



SILKS 

DRESS GOODS 

LININGS 

FINDINGS 

WASH GOODS 

WHITE GOODS 

CRETONNES 

GINGHAMS 

IMPORTED AND 

DOMESTIC CREPES 

CRASHES 

TOWELS 

SCRIMS 

SiLKOLINES 

SHEETINGS 

SHEETS 

PILLOWS 

BLANKETS 

COMFORTERS 

CLOTHING 

DRESSES 

UNENS 

CURTAINS 



The Home 

of 

Hart Schaffner 

& Marx 

Clothes 



DENIMS 
BURLAPS 
LAWNS 
BIRDS EYE 
UNDERMUSLINS 
NOTIONS 
HOSIERY 
GLOVES 

HANDKERCHIEFS 
RIBBONS 
LACES 

ROYAL WORCES- 
TER CORSETS 
EMBROIDERY SILKS 
AND COTTONS 
NECKWEAR 
BOOTS AND SHOES 
WAISTS 
HATS 
APRONS 
RUCHINGS 
VEILS 



SQUARE DEALING AND COURTEOUS TREATMENT OUR MOTTO. | 




ANTIOCH. CALIFORNIA 



SPRING STYLES * 



I _ _ I 



East Contra Costa Mercantile Co, 

Dealers In Groceries, 
Dry Goods and Hard 



Poultry Food 



1 



i 

i Latest Ladies' Patent ^ 

i Lace Shoes I 

I i 

I Ladies', Misses' and Children's Sandals and Mary Jane Pumps | 

i Boy Scout Shoes in All Sizes I 

I Men's Dress and Work Shoes in All Grades I 

I • i 

P All Kinds of Polishes and Laces i 

I ANTI OCH SHOE STORE j 

I : I 

i Fa^t f ontra fn^ta Mercantile Co. | 



• 



I 

P uij UUUU3 aiiu iiaiu- I 

I ware. Teas, Coffees | 

I and Spices a Specialty | 



I Agents for Sampson's 

j Windmills and Lee's | 

i 

j OAKLEY BRENTWOOD | 



A^- 



Brentwood Pharmacy 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 



DRUGS and DRUG SUNDRIES 



^ 



We carry a complete line of Drugs and 
Chemicals and are prepared to fill any 
and all Doctors' Prescriptions. 



^ 



Why send out of town when you can 
just as cheaply at home 



buy 



V.S«VV.XVJ^VN<^<55.V^^^^^ 



&^^m\'s-? 



Kodaks and 
Supplies 

Developing 
and Printing 

Framed Pictures 

! A Full Line of 
Stationery 

Hot Water 
Bottles 

Fountain 
Syringes 




Tooth Brushes 
Tooth 

Preparations 
Hair Brushes 
and Combs 
Bath Brushes 
Hand Scrubs 
Soaps 
Razors and 
Strops 

•And Many Other 
I Household Articles 

I 



ICE CREAM AND ICE CREAM SODAS IN SEASON 

BRENTWOOD PHARMACY 

T. J. WIGET, Manager 
Phone Main 15 Brentwood, Cal. 



SS!??SSS?S?S^ 



BYRON HOTEL 

J. W. WINFREE. PiopriHor 

First Class in All lis Appointments 

At Southern Pacific Depot 

Particular Attention Paid to the Traveling Public 

BYRON. CALIFORNIA 

Mrs. iMarg farafttn? 

CANDIES 
and 
NOTIONS 

KNIGHTSEN, CALIFORNIA 



Byron Reflaurant 



MRS. S. PLUMMER 



n 



HOME 
COOKING A 
SPECIALTY 



Byron, California 



DEALER IN GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 



Ilyron. (flalifarnia 



Butchers and Dealers in Live Stock 



Brentwood Market 

Bucholtz Bros., Proprietors 



BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES 

STYLE-PH'S CLOTHES 

Dl'TCHESS TROUSERS 

STETSON HATS 

ARROW SHIRTS 

MI^NSING UNION SUITS 

F.VERWEAR HOSIERY 

REISER'S (^RAVATS 

CARHARTT'S OVERALLS 

FOR MEN 




IBMWUItliCmUF GPCtflUKDW* 



Let Your Next Pair Be 

WALK-OVERS 

Words cannot express the Beauty, Style, Fit and Finish in these new Sprin«r WALK-OVER models. 

THE WORLD'S MOST SKILLED SHOE MAKERS are omployod in the construction of these Shoes. 
The selection of Lasts. l"iitterns and Leathers are the best the shoo market affords, and you will a(?rt>e 
(once you see these now Spring Boots » that they are the best buy of the season. Look in our win<lows— 
pick out your favorite style, then come inside and let us show you how well they fit. 

We carry all lengths and widths and can fit you properly. Will you let us try? 



I Prices: $3.50, $4.00, $4.50, $5.00 



AND UPWARDS 



DOPE MODEL 
$4.00. $4.50 and $5.00 Grade* 




FOR WOMEN 

FOWNES' GLOVES 

NEMO CORSETS 

WARNER'S CORSETS 

NIAGARA MAID SILK GLOVES 

AND UNDERWEAR 
PHOENLX GUARANTEED SILK- 
HOSIERY 
MUNSING UNDERWEAR 
LADIES' HOME JOURNAL 
PATTERNS 




I 3001} Olabitbar-oiunriubfii | 

I - I 

4 Feb. 17 — Frances .sets the measles. Mr. Martin peeves tlie kids by tellins; tbein 4 

1 to take care of their belongings hereafter. 4 

'%■ JeD. ly — Mr. iuarrin announces i>ionuav wm ue u inMma_>. iia_\ujuiiu i.mii.-^. ^ 

I Feb. 22— Holiday ! Oh, joy ! | 

i Feb. 24 — Miss Anthony puts a can of scaling wax on the stove. It boils over i 

A but Mr. Martin comes to the rescue. ^ 

i Feb. 26 — Cliff tries to take a bite out of Tobe's head and loses a tooth. i 

P P 

^ Mar. 2 — Blanche spills alcohol on her hands and gets on fire. ^ 

i Mar. 3 — Great accident. Ella runs into a bunch of cows and demolishes her ^ 

4 equipage. Blanche gets a wad of gum ^tuck on her neck. J 

i Mar. 4 — Blanche announces that she has to churn. ^ 

i Mar. 5 — Swifts fo too swift. ^ 

i Mar. 8 — Zelma wears a new skirt and girdle, not saying whose tlicy are. ^ 

J l^j^j. 9 — Neva causes a sreat commotion bv takina her typewriter into her English J 

I ^'-" ' I 

^ Mar. 10 — Henry Winfree has a new pompadour. ^ 

i Mar. 11 — Eventful day! Neva and Adella appear in new creations. Zeb has J 

^ a new hair comb. Help! Frances tnakes a dash for Liberty. P 

i Mar. 12 — A tempest in a teapot is aroused in German 11. | 

I I 

p j^I.,r. 1.-^ — Our jokes are examined by the National Board of Censorship and only p 

i half of them escape. The editorial staff has hysterics. | 

f P 

^ Mar. 16 — A compromise is effected on the joke business. ^ 



i Mar. 17 — St. Patrick's day is celebrated in a fitting manner. i 



i 



f Mar. 18 — Ned Macgurn frightens the short-hand class into hysterics by fainting. | 



% 



i -^ 

i Mar. 22 — An atack of Si)ring fever seizes Liberly. % 

i Mar. 23 — The Senior Girls disgrace themselves by cnttii'g up in the ofTice. 



i 



i 



, DRY GOODS i 1 SHOES I \ 

W. W. MORGANS 



Let us keep you cool this summer. 
By fuinishing you 



% t % 



W. W. MORGANS 



^^" :-:•" — :?^rtT^;^""T^ 



I SUMMER DRESS GOODS I || | 

p LATEST THINGS IN HATS I I | | 

i COOL EASY COMFORTABLE I 

I SHOES I 

I CANNED MEATS AND VEGET- | 

III ABLES, that need little or no ''■ 

I '^ -'^ cooking, ^ ^ t r 

I STEPHENSON COOLERS. ||| | 

i I We have RUBBER HOSE and | I I | 

I I SPRINKLERS for that lawn. ^ ^ I 

$ f / P 

I I . When in need of anything in our ^ . p p 

I is. '- cues. Ill f 

I i 

I I 



1 i 



^ 



1 1 GROCERIES I I HARDWARE , , 

1 1 i i 6 i 



p i 






Opposite the Park, Comer Maple and Second Sts 



Services every Sunday morning and 
evening; Prayer meeting Wednesday 
evening. A cordial invitation is ex- 
tended to all, especially to dangers. 



(E. (jg. CuniB. pastor 



OAKLEY 
GARAGE 



TONY DALPORTO 
Proprietor 



HRST CLASS REPAIRING DONE 

MACHINES FOR HIRE DAY OR 

NIGHT 



OAKLEY, CALIFORNIA 



MILLER SISTERS 



I Dry Goods, Men's Furnishing Goods, | 



Shoes, Millinery and Notions 



OAKLEY, CALIFORNIA 



B5nron Garage 




Sundries Carried for Automobiles, Motor- 
cycles and Bicylces. 

AGENTS FOR 
Studebaker Automobiles and Harley-Davidson Motorcycles 




Repair Work of All Kinds a Specialty 

BYRON - - - CALIFORNIA 



p. H. SCHIRMER 



FARM IMPLEMENTS 
AND WAGONS 
GENERAL BLACK- 
SMITHING,CASTIRON 
WELDING AND RUB- 
BER TIRE WORK 

GAS ENGINE REPAIR- 
ING A SPECIALTY 



Knightsen, California 






ARE 

THE 

BEST 

IN 

TOWN 



Antinrh 
California 



MATTHEW WARD 

ATTORNEY. 

AT- 
LAW 
and 

NOTARY 
PUBUC 



lELEPHONE 

MAIN 

1401 



624 

SECOND 

STREET 

ANTIOCH 
CALIFORNIA 



CHASES' STABLES 


E. J. 01 .SF.N 


HOBSON & PRESTON 


FRUITS. VEGETABLES 


Proprietors 


AND BERRIES 


FINE RIGS 

OF ALL KINDS 


Brentwood, California 

^^^^^^S$SSSS§^ SEE ^S$^$^SS$S^^^$^^ 


5$SSs^S$^^5S^'SS§S5\^^W 


W. LYTLE 


ANTIOCH CALIFORNIA 


For Bread and Pastry EverythinK Fresh Daiijr 
Olsen's Emporium 


^ It's not the name that makes 




the clothes good; It's the clothes 
that makes the name good. 


THERE IS A GOOD 


^ New Styles Every Month. 


PHOTOGRAPHER 


^ New Suits Made to Order. 


IN YOUR TOWN 


^ant l|trah 

MERCHANT TAILOR 

Cleaniny: and rei)airiin: neatly doiio 


Do You Patronize Him? 


O.KAURIN 


fir Ladii's and fuMillcnicn. 


ANTIOCH, CAL. 


Next Door to Expreti Office, ANTIOCH. CAL, 





Robert Wallace 

AGENT FOR KENILWORTH AND THE WELLINGTON 



I 



COAL 



HOME. LONDON. GLOBE. PHOENIX, CONNECTICUT. LONDON AND NEW 
ZEALAND INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

FRESNO AND CALIFORNIA NURSERIES 

BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



I 

I 



I 



GEO. H. SHAFER 



F 



UNERAL DIRECTOR 
AND EMBALMER 



LIVERY STABLE 



^8Ssi^^sx:iv^5SSi 



I 



I Brentwood, California | 



i 



WHEN IN TOWN STOP AT ? 



Palace of Sweets 



FOR 



Light Lunches, Chicken 
Tamales, a Delicious Dish of 
Ice Cream, Ice Cream Soda 
or Real Home Made Candy 



I 

I 



^SSS$S$S«m>S^S&5^ 



Antioch, California 



:^ss$^^$ss$8^$^^s$^^ 



J. M. TREMBLEY 



E. TREMBLEY 



BRENTWOOD PLUMBING 
& HARDWARE STORE 

Plumbing and 
Tinning, Well 
Boring and 
Pumping 
Plants a 
Spec i a 1 1 y 

Elstlmates Furnished 
BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



$2 Per Year A Real Live Newspaper 



THE BRENTWOOD NEWS 

J. J. McCULLOCH. Publiiher 



^ Our Clubbing Offer the Be»t Out. For 25c 

We Give You Three Magazines. 

Can You Beat It? 



4 Job Printing— the Kind That Pleases. 



iFtrat Nattnual lank 

of Antiarli 



FOR SAFETY and SERVICE 



Antiarli IBank of ^auinga 



M. G. GRUNAUER 

GENERAL 
MERCHANDISE 



GOODS DEUVERED BY 
AUTO 



BYRON, 
CALIFORNIA 



When you desire real news you "' 
do not read a sensational, yel- 
low, unreliable newspaper. The 



ANTIOCH LEDGER 



is always reliable, conservative, 
gives both sides of the question, 
and is fair at all times. Try it 
and see. 



We do the kind of job printing 
the "other fellow" does not 
know how to do. 



I 



James Torre's 






, I 



I I q Nice Cold Ice from I | 

I I an Ice Cold Ice House | I 

I I q Is Always Full on the Hotted Days. | | 

I I BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA | | 



! I 

i i 



P 

1 I 



I f 



I FRED ALTENHOFF 



GENERAL 
BLACKSMITHING 
and 
REPAIRING 



HORSESHOEING 
A SPECIALTY 



ALL ORDERS 
PROMPTLY 
ATTENDED TO 

SATISFACTION 
GUARANTEED 



BRENTWOOD, CALIFORNIA 



f 

lOR a 

Fir^-Class 



Shave and 

a Good Cigar 
GO TO 

ADOLPH 

He Has 'Em 



i Brentwood, Cal. 

i 



Brentwood Lumber Co. 



LUMBER, LIME, CEMENT and 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE 



THE VERY 

BEST GRADE 



Rail and Water Ship- Agent* Winner Silos 
J, , . . J State Distributors for 

mentS solicited Papec Ensilage Cutter* 



F. E. SLUTMAN, Manager Brentwood, Cal. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^MS^?^*? 



I 




4 Per Cent. Interest Paid on Savings Accounts 




A DIAMOND set piece of Jewelry 

is not only a present, but an inve^ment you are mak- 
ing for the recipient. The April birthstone has increased 
80 per cent in value in the last ten years, and you can- 
not go wrong if you buy it from us. 



An&r? ui ^ftbak 



lintrn Smtlrvi »tart AN! lOCH. CAL. 



Eatabltal^pa 1B92 



Good Lumber Company 



INCORPORATED 
GEORGE A. GOOD, Manager 



DEALERS IN 



I GOOD LUMBER AND GOOD 

I BUILDING MATERIAL 



BYRON 



TRACY 



BRENTWOOD NEWS PRINT 
BRENTWOOD. C*L 



t# 



WANTED! 

YOUNG MEN FOR THE ARMY 

of fore?]<rhted folk who \ the desirability 

and the benefits of idei...,- :.,; themselves or 
their business with 

A STRONG BANK 

and this particular appeal is addressed to the 
young, men because we are not the least apirre- 
hensive lest the elderly ones should fail to discov 
er the advantages of banking with us. We know 
tliey know, from experience, tl:e signs of a reliable, 
accommodating institution. Hence we bank on 
the older men to bank with us upon the invitation 
we herewith extend, without further argument. 
But to the young men, let us repeat 

Get With Us and Grow With Us! 

There is future power and prestige in the fact 
that you have come straight up the Une of busi- 
ness giOwth with such an institution as ours. A 
banking connection with us will mean additional 
credit to you in the minds of others, as well as the 
best financial service obtainable. 

OUR BANK IS OPERATED FOR YOUR BEST INTERESTS 

It is not our policy to conserve the interests of a 
few favored patrons but rather to help all our cus- 
tomers c* ad to extend to all such legitimate cour- 
tesies and conveniences as make a good strong- 
bank of inifinite value to those who do b"^"npcs 
with it. 

The manner with which all our busine . s is 
conducted is the best evidence that our relations 
with our depositors are very satisfactory. 

WE^ARRY_A>''^! F P^'^' RVES. 0^'^' !\"'— — — . ^.r^ .-mj^ 

BEST. WE A'^ , TO AS ' • S 



HitrHi X FkuihLitiJ. 



BYP.ON BRANCH 

BANK OF TRACY 

BYRON, CALIFORNIA. 



CaplUI Paid Up and Surplua, $81,000. Assets, Ov«r Half a Million. 

CAinmercial Savings Safe Deposits 

••The Bank for Everybody." 



.% -TV 



TT ^ 



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