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Marvels  of  Modern  Science 

Paul  Severing 

The  purpose  of  this  little  book  is  to  give  a  general  idea  of  a  few  of  the  great 
achievements  of  our  time.  For  instance,  the  flying  machine  is  engaging  the  attention 
of  the  old,  the  young  and  the  middle-aged,  and  soon  the  whole  world  will  be  on  the 
wing.  Radium,  "the  revealer,"  is  opening  the  door  to  possibilities  almost  beyond 
human  conception.  Wireless  Telegraphy  is  crossing  thousands  of  miles  of  space  with 
invisible  feet  and  making  the  nations  of  the  earth  as  one.  'Tis  the  same  with  the  other 
subjects, — one  and  all  are  of  vital,  human  interest,  and  are  extremely  attractive  on 
account  of  their  importance  in  the  civilization  of  today.  Mighty,  sublime,  wonderful,  as 
have  been  the  achievements  of  past  science,  as  yet  we  are  but  on  the  verge  of  the 
continents  of  discovery.  Just  as  our  conceptions  of  many  things  have  been 
revolutionized  in  the  past,  those  which  we  hold  to-day  of  the  cosmic  processes  may 
have  to  be  remodeled  in  the  future.  Science  is  ever  on  the  march  and  what  is  new  to¬ 
day  will  be  old  to-morrow.  We  cannot  go  back,  we  must  go  forward,  and  although  we 
can  never  reach  finality  in  aught,  we  can  improve  on  the  past  to  enrich  the  future. 

Total  running  time:  5:26:01 


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Cover  designed  by  Availle  using  the  original  cover  and  an  image  from 
The  Scientific  American,  June  26,  1909.  This  design  is  in  the  public  domain. 


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