Skip to main content

Full text of "KZN283 Ntambanana IDP FINAL 2014-15"

See other formats


NTAMBANANA MUNICIPALITY 
INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PLAN 




Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


TOPIC PAGE 


A EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 

1. INTRODUCTION 16 

2. BACKGROUND TO THE IDP PROCESS 20 

3. KEY MUNICPAL CHALLENGES 25 

4. NTAMBANANA LONG TERM VISION 33 

5. INTERVENTIONS TO CHALLENGES 34 

6. MEASURING PROGRESS 42 


B PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES 

1 PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES 44 


B2 GOVERNMENT PRIORITIES 46 


1 . MILLENIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS 47 

2. NATIONAL OUTCOMES 47 

3. NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN 48 

4. KZNPGDS 49 

5. STATE OF THE NATION ADDRESS 52 

6. STATE OF THE PROVINCE ADDRESS 53 

7. NTAMBANANA MTAS 55 


2 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


C SITUATION ANALYSIS 

SECTION Cl SPATIAL ANALYSIS 

1 . 1 REGIONAL CONTEXT 62 

1 .3 ADMINISTRATIVE ENTITIES 64 

1 .4 EXISTING NODES AND CORRIDORS 69 

1 .5 LAND COVER & BROAD LAND USERS 7 1 

1.6 LAND OWNERSHIP 72 

1.7 LAND REFORM 75 

1.10 ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS 75 

1.10.1 Policy and Legislation 75 

1.10.2 Habitats 75 

1.10.3 Protected Areas 75 

1 . 1 0.4 Biodiversity and Ecological Viability 76 

1 . 1 0.5 Climate and Climate Change 78 

1.10.7 Aesthetic 78 

1.11.8 Hydrological Features 78 

1.11.9 Biological Environment 78 

1.11.10 Protected Species 78 


3 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.11.11 

ENVIRONMENTAL AND SPATIAL SWOT ANALYSIS 

80 

1.11.12 

MUNICIPAL INSTITUTIONAL CAPACITY 

88 

1.11.13 

SPATIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROJECTS 

89 

1.12 1 

DISASTER MANAGEMENT 

89 

1.12.1 

Municipal Institutional Capacity 

90 

1.12.2 

Risk Assessment 

91 

1.12.3 

Risk Reduction and Prevention 

91 

1.12.4 

Response and Recovery 

92 

1.12.5 

Training and Awareness 

94 


SECTION C2 

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS 96 

2. 1 POPULATION SIZE 96 

2.2 POPULATION DISTRIBUTION 97 

2.3 POPULATION DENSITY 99 

2.4 POPULATION DISTRIBUTION BY POPULATION GROUP 100 

2.5 POPULATION DISTRIBUTION BY SEX AND AGE 1 0 1 


4 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2.6 POPULATION DISTRIBUTION BY FIVE YEAR AGE 103 

2.7 HOUSEHOLD AND SERVICES 105 

2.7.1 Female Headed Households 105 

2.8 HIV/AIDS SCENARIOS 1 06 

SECTION C 3 

MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 109 

3.1 MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION 109 

3.2 COUNCIL AND MFMA COMMITTEES 109 

3.3 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT 1 1 0 

3.3.1 Institutional Arrangements 1 1 1 

3.3.2 Organizational Structure 1 13 

3.3.3 Powers and Functions 1 13 

3.3.4 Municipal Institutional Capacity 1 15 

3.3.5 Ntambanana Municipality Outsourced Service 1 16 

3.3.6 Human Resource Development 1 1 7 

3.2.7 Municipal Policies and Sector Plans 1 1 7 

3.4 SWOT ANALYSIS 123 


May 2014 


5 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION c 4 

SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE ANALYSIS 124 

4. 1 WATER AND SANITATION SERVICES 1 24 

4.1.1 Water Service Backlog 1 25 

4.1.2 Future Water Supply 127 

4. 1 .3 Sanitation Backlog 1 30 

4. 1 .4 Funds Required for eradicating backlogs 1 34 

4.1.5 uThungulu Infrastructural Projects for Ntambanana Municipality 1 35 

4.2 REFUSE REMOVAL 138 

4.2.1 Collection 141 

4.2.2 Removal and Disposal 1 4 1 

4.2.3 Waste Recycling Unit 1 4 1 

4.2.3 Challenges and Recommendations 1 4 1 

4.3 MUNICIPAL ROADS AND PUBLIC TRANSPORT 1 43 

4.3.1 Introduction 143 

4.3.2 Spatial Distribution 143 

4.3.3 Distance Travelled by community to access roads 143 

4.3.4 Proposed Transport Services 144 


May 2014 


6 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.3.5 

Municipal access roads 

144 

4.3.6 

Assessment of existing road 

144 

4.3.7 

Railway line 

145 

4.4 

ENERGY 

147 

4.4.1 

Access to Energy 

147 

4.4.2 

Electricity backloa 

149 

4.4.2 

Alternatiye Energy 

150 

4.4.3 

Resource Capacity 

150 

4.5 

COMMUNITY FACILITIES 

152 

4.5.1 

Sport facilities 

152 

4.5.2 

Health Facilities 

152 

4.5.3 

Educational Facilities 

153 

4.6 

HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 

154 

4.6.1 

Housina Projects 

156 

4.6.2 

Institutional Capacity 

156 

4.6.3 

Current and Planned Human Settlement 

156 

4.7 

TELECOMMUNICATION 

158 

4.8 

POSTAL SERVICES 

158 


7 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.9 EMEGERCY CALL OUT POINTS 1 59 

4.10 CEMETRIES/CREMOTORIA 159 

4.1 1 GEOGRAPHICAL DEVELOPMENT NODES 161 

4. 1 2 SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SWOT ANALYSIS 1 62 

SECTION C 5 

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL SERVICES 163 

5.1 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 163 

5.1.1 Municipal Comparative and Competitive Advantages 1 63 

5.1.2 Economic Profile and the Population 1 64 

5. 1 .3 Employment and Unemployment 1 65 

5.1.4 LED Institutional Arrangement 169 

5.1.5 BEE and SMME Development 170 

5. 1 .6 Co-operatives Development 1 7 1 

5.1.7 Agriculture 173 

5.1.8 Food Security 175 

5.1.9 Tourism 175 

5.1.10 Trade and Industry 179 

5.1.11 LED SWOT ANALYSIS 179 


May 2014 


8 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.2 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 

180 

5.2.1 

Broad Base Community Needs 

183 

5.2.2 

Education 

186 

5.2.3 

Health 

188 

5.2.4 

Safety and Security 

189 

5.2.5 

Nation Buildina and Social Cohesion 

190 

5.2.6 

Special Proarams 

190 

SECTION C6 


MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 

194 

6.1. 

Leaislative Requirement and Approach 

194 

6.2 

Strateaic Financial Framework 

194 

6.3 

Capital Financinq Strateqv 

196 

6.4 

Indiqent Support 

196 

6.5 

Grants and Subsidies 

197 

6.6 

Infrastructure Operations and Maintenance 

199 

6.7 

Asset Management Strategies 

199 

6.8 

Loans and Investments 

199 

6.9 

Potential Sources of Income 

199 


May 2014 


9 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.10 

Expenditure Reports 

200 

6.1 1 

Financial Policies 

200 

6.12 

Revenue Raisina Strateaies 

200 

6.13 

Billina Svstem 

200 

6.14 

Financial Statements 

201 

6.15 

Supply Chain Manaaement Policy 

201 

6.16 

Employee and Councilors Related Costs 

201 

6.17 

FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEENT SWOT ANALYSIS 

203 

SECTION C7 


GOOD GOVERNANCE AND COMMUNITY PARTICPATION 


7.1 

OPERATION SUKUMA SAKHE 

204 

7.2 

EPWP AND CWP 

205 

7.3 

IGR STRUCTURES 

205 

7.3.1 

UThunaulu IGR Forum 

205 

7.3.2 

Municipal IGR Structures 

206 

7.3.3 

Audit Committee 

210 

7.4 

STATUS OF MUNICIPAL POLICIES 

210 

7.5 

STATUS OF SECTOR PLANS 

214 


10 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.6 MUNICIPAL RISK MANAGEMENT 2 1 5 

7.7 BY-LAWS 2 1 5 

7.8 PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 2 1 6 

7.9 GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICPATION SWOT ANALYSIS 2 1 7 

D MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK 

4.1 INTRODUCTION 217 

4.2 VISION 217 

4.3 MISSION 219 

4.4 MUNICIPAL STRATEGIC FRAMEWORK 226 

El STRATEGIC MAPPING 226 

5. 1 Spatial Development Framework 226 

5.2 The Land Use Configuration 226 

5.3 Urban and Rural Hierarchy 227 

5.4 Development Corridors 23 1 

5.5 Spatial Development Plan 233 

E2 DRAFT IMPLEMANTATION PLAN 235 

F FINANCIAL PLAN 248 

G SERVICE DELIVERY AND BUDGET IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 248 

H ORGANISATIONAL PERFOMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 287 


11 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


9.1 201 2/20 1 3 Annual Performance Report 29 1 

I ANNEXURES 312 


LIST OF TABLES 

Table 1: Summary of Basic Facts 18 

Table 2: Risk Response Protocoi 93 

Tabie 3: Popuiation Distribution by Age 103 

Tabie 4: Femaie Headed Househoids 105 

Tabie 5: Incedence of HIV/AIDS 105 

Tabie 6: Demographic Profiies of Empioyment 108 

Tabie 7: Access to water 1 1 8 

Tabie 8: Water Service Backiog 124 

Tabie 9: Access to Water 132 

Tabie 10: Status of Sanitation Backiog for uThunguiu Famiiy of Municipaiities 134 


12 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Table 11: Planned Water and Sanitation Projects 

135 

Table 12: Water and Sanitation Project under Construction 

136 

Table 13: Electricity Backlog 

149 

Table 14: Types of Dwelling 

154 

Table 15: Current Housing Projects 

157 

Table 16: Planned Housing Projects 

157 

Table 17: Labour force by Industry 

166 

Table 18: Infrastructure Priorities per Ward 

185 

Table 19: Indigent Support Budget 

197 

Table 20: Settlement Hierarchies 

230 

FIGURES 

Figure 1 Population Growth and Decline 

97 

Figure 2 Population Distribution by Wards 

98 

Figure 3 Population Distribution by population Group 

100 

Figure 4 Population Distribution by Race 

101 

Figure 5 Ward Population Distribution by Sex 

102 

Figure 6 Percentage Population Distribution by Sex 

103 

Figure 7 Population Distribution by Age 

104 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Figure 8 

Flead of Flousehold bv Gender 

106 

Figure 9 

FIIV/AIDS Incidents uThunquIu District 

107 

Figure 10 

Sources of Water 

126 

Figure 11 

Access to Sanitation 

133 

Figure 12 

Access to refuse remove i 

140 

Figure 13 

Enerqv for liqhtinq 

148 

Figure 14 

Enerqv for Cookinq 

149 

Figure 15 

Distribution bv Functionai Grouo 

164 

Figure 16 

Emplovment and Unemplovment Rate 

164 

Figure 17 

Emplovment bv Tvpe of Sector 

165 

Figure 18 

Flousehold Income 

166 

Figure 19 

Education bv Institution 

186 

Figure 20 

Education Profile 

187 

Figure 21 

Revenue bv Source 

198 

Figure 22 

Expenditure bv Tvpe 

202 


14 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


List of Maps 

Map 1 

Locality Plan 

19 

MAP2 

Existinq Development Centers and Corridors 

37 

Map 3 

uThunquIu Reqional Map 

63 

Map 4 

Ntambanana Municipalitv Localitv Plan 

65 

Map 5 

Arial View for Bhucanana as service center 

67 

Map 6 

Administrative Entities 

68 

Map 7 

Existinq Nodes and Corridors 

69 

Map 8 

Existinq Development centers 

73 

Map 9 

Property Ownership 

74 

MaplO 

Environmental Areas 

86 

Map 11 

Population Density 

99 

Map 12 

Transport Facilities 

146 

Map 13 

Existinq Infrastructure Enerqy Types 

151 

Map 14 

Infrastructure Service and Facilities 

155 

Map 15 

Existinq Aqricultural Activities 

172 

Map 16 

Tourism Status Ouo 

178 


15 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION A 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 


INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND 


All municipalities, at bath the district and the lacal level, are required by natianal legislatian (Municipal Systems Act, Nc. 32 
at 2000) tc prepare Integrated Develapment Plans (IDPs) and review them annually. The abave mentianed legislatian 
specifies that the IDP shauld reflect the ccmmunity needs and the priaritized actians ta address these needs, i.e. the priarity 
prajects ta be implemented. 

The Municipal Systems Act (MSA) aisc prescribes that an extensive cansultatian pracess must be undertaken as part at the 
IDP pracess tc cbtain the inputs tram ccmmunities in respect at their needs. Apart tram specifying the needs at 
ccmmunities, the IDP shauld else specify a Visicn far the area, i.e. the desired future state cf the ccmmunity and its 
surreunds and a plan tc achieve it. This dccument therefere signifies the review cf the five year municipal strategic plan 
which was adapted in 2012/2013. The ultimate abjective remains the impreved implementcticn cf the said dispensetien's 
five-year strategy, as well as ensuring impreved respensiveness tc ccmmunity needs ever the time. The aim cf the 
municipal IDP is therefere tc present a ccherent plan tc impreve the quality cf life far pecpie living in the NTAMBANANA 
area, else reflecting cn issues cf naticnol and prcvincicl impcrtance. One cf the key imperatives is tc seek alignment with 
Naticnol and prcvincicl pricrities, pciicies and strategies. 

The Municipality’s leadership ccntinucusly emphasizes the impcrtance cf develapment planning end it remains mindful cf 
the fact that feremest purpese cf the IDP is indeed tc map cut the cere issues that affect the pecpie and tc ccllectively 
ccncur cn the manner in which each cne cf these aspirctiens will be addressed. In spite cf the develapment pregress that 
has been made ever the post years, Ntambanana Municipality recegnize that mere werk still lays ahead in terms cf 
addressing all the needs end expectetiens cf the ccmmunity. In this regard it remains critically impertant that the 
erganisetien remain ccnscicus cf the fact that it cennet be business as usual. The pecpie have waited far sc Icng far the 
services that they require net tc be wealthy but tc survive. Acccrdingly Ntambanana Lccal Municipality has taken the 
Turncrcund Strategy far lccal gevernment literally. We have tc repert in this regard that it has structured its prcpcsed 
Budget and IDP in a manner that will ensure that indeed we turn arcund cur business mcdels censistent with the ncticnal 
guidelines tc ensure that we hasten the pace cf service delivery in cur ccmmunities. 


May 2014 


16 I P a g e 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.1 Who are we ? 

The Ntambanana Local Municipality (KZ283) is located in the central port of the uThungulu District Municipality. It is approximately 160km north 
of Durban andean be accessed via the R34 from Empongeni. It is one of the six local municipalities under uThungulu District and is embraced 
with meandering valleys which house numerous rivers flowing either towards the UMfolozi River in the North or the UMhIathuze River to the South. 

The Municipality covers on area of 1083km2 and has o population of 74 337 people as per Census 201 1. There are four Traditional Authorities that 
foil within the jurisdiction of Ntambanana Municipality, which ore: Obizo, Obuka, Somopho and Mombuko Traditional Authorities. 85% of land in 
the municipal area of jurisdiction belongs to Ingonyoma Trust and 15% of the land is privately owned by commercial farmers. Ntambanana 
Municipality is rated os the poorest municipality in DC 28; because of its dependency on equitable share and other government grants, however 
the Implementation of the property rates act has set o base in revenue collection. 

The municipal area is divided into eight words that ore represented by eight ward councilors and therefore having 80 word committee members. 
There are o number of rural nodes which serve os service centres notably Buchonono, Mambuka, Luwombo and Heotonville, but these centres 
need to be expanded in terms of social, economical and educational service delivery, together with the upgrading of the physical infrastructure. 

From o tourism perspective Ntambanana has good potential. Thulo Thula Game Reserve, near Buchanana, is already world renowned. Other 
similar activities, although to a lesser extent, are also in operation. The R34, running from Empongeni to Melmoth, offers opportunities for 
commercial activities in need of good exposure and access, and again some possibilities are being investigated. Rood P700, which is still in 
construction cuts across Ntambanana area of jurisdiction. The Ulundi to Richards Boy corridor con result in economic growth for Ntambanana 
because of its character os development corridor. 


May 2014 


17 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


1.2 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 


Table 1 : SUMMARY OF BASIC FACTS 


Basic Facts 

Figures 


Census 1996 

Census 2001 

Census 2011 

Total Population 

72 727 

84 772 

74 337 

Population Growth 


3.07% 

-1.31% 

Number of Households 


12 441 

12 826 

Female Headed HH 


46.5% 

57.5% 

Dependency Ration per 
too (16-84) 


85.7% 

79.3% 

Age Profile 


0-4 

13% 

0-4 

13.9% 



5-14 

29% 

5-14 

25.3% 



15-34 

33% 

15-34 

36.1% 



35-64 

20% 

35-64 

19.6% 



Over 65 

5% 

Over65 

4.97% 

Unemployment 






Rate 


58.5% 


49.2% 


HIV/Aids Rates 


There are no clear statistics 



Source Stat SA 


May 2014 


18 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.3 OVERVIEW OF NTAMBANANA MUNICIPALITY 


Map; 1 - Locality Plan 



19 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2. HOW WAS THE IDP DEVELOPED 


2.1 


IDP PROCESS PLAN 


The Integrated Development Plan (IDP) process is a process through which the municipalities prepare strategic development plans for a five- 
year period. An IDP is one of the key instruments for local government to cope with its new developmental role and seeks to arrive at decisions 
on issues such os municipal budgets, land management, promotion of local economic development and institutional transformation in o 
consultative, systematic and strategic manner. 

In order to ensure certain minimum quality standards of the IDP Review process and proper coordination between and within spheres of 
government, municipalities need to prepare IDP review process plan and formulate budget to implement the IDP. 

The IDP and Budget Process Plan has to include the following: 

A programme specifying the timeframes for the different planning steps; 

Appropriate mechanisms, processes and procedures for consultation and participation of local communities, organs of state, traditional 
authorities and other role players in the IDP review and budget formulation processes; and 
• Cost estimates for the review process. 

The preparation of IDP process plan is in essence the formulation of the IDP and Budget processes, set out in writing and requires the adoption 
by Council. 


2.2 PARTICIPATORY MECHANISMS AND THE IDP ALIGNMENT PROCESS 


IDP Steering Committee 


The Executive Committee through its portfolio committees os well os the MANCO of Ntombonona ore actively involved in the planning process 
of the IDP. As the senior members of the municipality, the executive committee is responsible for overall management, co-ordination, monitoring 


May 2014 


20 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


and drafting of the IDP. The IDP steering committee is the principle decision making body with respect to oil operational aspects of the 
Municipal Council’s IDP. The IDP Steering Committee meets twice in o month to discuss matters of development planning. 


IDP Representative Forum, Alignment with Sector Departments 


The co-ordination of the Ntombonona IDP Forum, UThungulu District IDP Forum and Service provider alignment meetings has played o major role 
in assisting the municipality to collate a development plan that is informative and that is aligned to oil development plans of other government 
department. 


Alignment with the District Municipality 


There has been a fair alignment of activities with the district’s framework. Numerous meetings have been convened by the district in order to 
ensure that the plans of the district family are aligned. Further there has been a one on one with locals on how we con together improve the 
quality of the district family’s IDP thus improved service delivery in our municipality’s will be witnessed. 


Cross-Border alignment 


UThungulu District municipality formally engages with neighbouring municipalities (either district or local) on cross boarder planning and 
development issues. As such, the neighbouring municipalities e.g. uMkhanyokude, Zululand and ILembe Districts, members of the uThungulu 
Family of municipalities os well os provincial representatives are invited to cross border IDP Alignment sessions, where issues that ore of a cross 
boarder development nature ore discussed such os : 

■ Projects that have o service delivery or developmental impact across municipal boundaries, e.g. water networks, transportation systems. 
- Community facilities that are located close to municipal borders that either have the potential to or do serve catchment that includes 

beneficiaries from different municipalities 

■ Responses to provincial planning initiatives or projects that hove o provincial impact such os the proposed Dube Trade Port, Rood P700 
as well as the PSEDS. 


PUBLIC PARTICIPATION AND CONSULTATION PROCESS 


Chapter 4 of the Municipal System Act, 32 of 2000, provides that all municipalities must continuously interact with its community in all 
development initiatives. In terms of the adopted IDP process plan, the first round IDP rood shows were conducted in October 2013 and the 
second round was held in April 2014 for Ntombonano Municipality although previously it used to conduct joint IDP Roadshows with uThungulu 
District Municipality in order to: 


May 2014 


21 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- Align the activities of the municipality with those of the districts 

- Strengthen relations with the district 

- Avoid confusion by the community and inadequacy of answers on queries and request 

- Maximize community participation and 

■ Give ownership of the IDP to all stakeholders of Ntombonona Municipality 

- Minimize unnecessary expenditure 


Some of the tools used for communicating the Budget/ IDP, as contained in the Communication strategy ore: 

- IDP Roadshows annually during October and May 

- Monthly radio talk shows by the Mayor on Ikhoro FM 

- Monthly Newsletter, Ntombonona News 

- Ntambanana Municipality Website 

- Annual Report 

- Print medio and press release as and when required to local and provincial newspaper and radio stations 

- Adverts in local and provincial newspapers as required 

- IDP Alignment stakeholder Forum meetings 


22 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP | 2014/2015 

SCHEDULE OF DATES AND EVENTS FOR 2014/2015 IDP PREPARATION 

NTAMBANANA MUNICIPALITY 

ACTION PLAN FOR IDP, PMS AND BUDGET CYCLES IDP REVIEW 2014/15 


PHASE I: I QUARTER- JULY-SEPTEMBER -ANALYSIS 

Identifying priority issues, meeting with stakeholders, compile existing and new information; agree on priority issues 

■ Initial compilation of the draft IDP process plan 

■ Alignment of framework plan and process plan 

■ Municipalities submit draft 2014/15 IDP Process and Framework plans for comments to COGTA 

■ Final IDP Process Plan with comments from public and COGTA submitted to Council for adoption 

PHASE 2 QUARTER OCTOBER-DECEMBER- STRATEGIES 

• Growth and Development Summit 

• Local First round Budget/IDP Road show 

• IDP Sector and Services Alignment (district) 

• Review and draft initial changes to 2014/2015 IDP 

PHASE 3 -3’’° QUARTER JANUARY-MARCH- 

• District Service and Sector Alignment 

• Meeting COGTA and Municipalities on IDP submission and assessment process 

• District Growth and Development Summit 

• Submission of Draft 2014/2015 IDPs to COGTA 

23 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


• IDP Representative Forum 

• Advertise draft IDP for public comments (21 days) 


quarter- april-june 

• Local Public Participation session on the draft IDP and Budget 

• Adjustment of the draft IDP as per public comments and assessment 

• Final Approval of IDP/Budget by Council (at least 30 days before start of the new financial year) 


24 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


3. KEY MUNICIPAL CHALLENGES 


Significant steps have been made to address the key development challenges in the municipality. While significant progress has been made in 
all areas, there is still some distance to go towards addressing the following challenges: 

- limited employment opportunities 

- low education and skills levels 

- limited economic development 

- high backlogs in basic service delivery 

■ spatial profile: most of study area is sparsely populated making service delivery costly 

■ lack of business support facilities. 

- limited co-operation between AmaKhosi and Municipality on LUMS 

- the municipality has a small income base 

- lack of alignment of activities between notional, provincial and local activities 

■ sustainability of poverty alleviation projects 

- land ownership 

- lack of basic infrastructure e.g. electricity, water and rood 

- ensuring food security 

- high rote of unemployment 

- high crime rate 

■ attraction and retention of skilled personnel e.g. engineers 

■ attraction of investors because of poor infrastructure 

■ prevalent to natural disasters especially, veld fires 


25 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


3.1 . ORGANISATIONAL SWOT ANALYSIS PER KPA 


KPAl : MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

O 

The Municipality has developed a host of Human Resource 

O 

Failure to fully adhere to Employment Equity plan, in os far as employing 


Strategies. 


Disabled persons, and Indians orcolourds. 

O 

Code of Conduct is adhered to by both councilors and 

O 

Capacity to expand on other functions of Local Government due to 


employees 


limited resources. E.G Municipal Health, Municipal Police/ Traffic. 

o 

Functional Workplace Skills Plan. 

o 

Critical Position vacant; i.e Municipal Manager 

o 

Community Skills Assessment Database 



o 

Transparent recruitment and selection. 



o 

Most top positions ore filled. 



Opportunities 

Threats 

O 

Cooperativeness between employees, councilors and 
AmoKhosi. 

O 

Unfunded Mandates 



O 

Political Deployment of staff 

o 

Through Employee bursary, exists an opportunity of more 
academics within the institution with specialized skills. 

o 

De-motivated Employees 



o 

High staff turnover 

o 

Internship programs provides for extended arm. 

o 

Changes in political leadership 

o 

Partnership with SETA, DBSA, CEDA,DED 

o 

Incapacitated councilors on municipal affairs. 



o 

No-Bylaws passed by Council 


26 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


KPA 2: BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o More than 80% of total households have electricity 

o Development of Provincial Corridor P700, v^hich cuts across 
Ntambanana 

o 100% Expenditure on MIG Projects 

o 30% of Budget is soley for Infrastructure Development 

o Municipality budgets for Free Basic Service 

o High Infrastructure Backlogs such as water, sanitation and access roads. 

o Lack of reliable underground water source. 

o Limited Operations and Maintenance resources. 

o Capacity to implement infrastructural projects 

o Lack of Long term planning for capital projects due to financial 
contsraints 

Opportunities 

Threats 

o Continued MIG funding. 

o Good Relations with independent organs E.G. National 

Lottery. 

o UDM Maintenance Plan for water and operations. 

o Housing Sector Plan and Series of sector are in place to 
address the issue of infrastructure backlogs. 

o Effectiveness Solar systems, as alternative source of energy in 
the municipal area. 

o Vandalism of infrastructure 

o Inexperienced contractors 

o Inappropriate project prioritisation process 

o Spatial setting of the municipality 

o Land Ownership 

o Limited Capacity [PowerStation] for additional electricity supply 

o Illegal Connections [water and electricity) 


27 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KPA 3: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o Well located with regards to major economic centres (Empangeni 
and Richards Bay) 

o Good supply of labour with a large population of youth. 

o Diverse small-scale agricultural centre 

o Limited employment opportunities 

o Low education and skills levels 

o Limited economic development 

o High backlogs in service delivery 

o Spatial profile: most of study area is sparsely populated making 
service delivery costly 

o Lack of business support facilities. 

o Most people work and shop outside of municipal area 

Opportunities 

Threats 

o Potential to develop farming, especially co-operatives 

o Range of small business opportunities 

o The new P700 road will improve access to the municipality and 
increase development initiatives 

o There is an abundance of undeveloped land 

o High migration to Umhiatuze 

o High HIV/AIDS infection rates 

o Limited natural resource base 

o Poor skills 


28 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KPA 4: MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o The Municipality functions within its budget 

o Municipal finances are managed in corruption free 
environment 

o Clean audit for the past financial year. 

o Adherence to MFMA 

o Developed Sound financial policies 

o In ability to enhance revenue 

o Poor IT 

o Debt Control measure not effectively implemented 

o Limited source for revenue collection. 

Opportunities 

Threats 

o Full Implementation of Property Rotes Act. 

o Risk Assessment 

o Non-Compliance with MFMA Legislation 

o Fraud and Corruption 

o Increase of indigent population 


KPA5: GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o Political Peace Exist within the area of jurisdiction 

o Fully Functional Audit Committee 

o Good Relations with Traditional Authorities exists. 

o The Municipality has o strategic plan, the IDP which is annually 

o Lock of financial Capacity to fully Implement Special Programs [ Youth, 
Women, Elder/, Disable, Children, Youth, Sports and ttlV] 


May 2014 


29 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


reviewed. 


Opportunities 

Threats 

• Improved functioning of IGR Structures 

o Political frictions 

• Alignment /integration between locals and district plans 

o Compromise of oversight role 

• Enrolment of councillors on accredited training/ programs 

o Lack of communication mechanism 

KPA 6: SPATiAL AND ENViRONMENTAL DEVELOPMENT 

Strengths 

Weaknesses 

Environmental Issues 

Environmental issues 

o low species sensitivity with large expanses of the area already 
degraded. 

o The degree of endemism in the study area is expected to be 
insignificant. 

o Vegetation type is considered to be adequately protected. 

Spatial Issues 

o As a result the intrinsic biodiversity value of land in the project area, 
based on current levels of landscape transformation at a landscape, 
ecosystem and specie level is considered to be high 

o Degradation of wetlands as identified as a result of cultivation, 
communal grazing and artificial drainage, river nitrification, dams, 
urbanisation, soil erosion and alien plant invasion will have far reaching 
consequences for ecological function and water quality. 

o Location-easily accessible from Durban, Johannesburg and 
Swaziland. 

o Proximity to Hluhluwe Game Reserve 

o Informal settlements specifically on the banks of rivers and near major 
roads are a weakness that must be addressed. Informal housing has 
large biophysical, and social impacts namely water pollution due to a 
lack of water or sanitation, aesthetic impacts, poor land management 
and health and safety issues 

o Located on the P700 Corridor 

Spatial Issues 

o Diverse Wild life 

o Lack of diverse accommodation establishments 

o Unique Culture and Heritage 



30 I P a g e 

May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


o Established adventure tourism and associated activities 

o The eastern section of the municipal area is close to the 
industrial centres of Richards Bay and Empangeni 

o Poor secondary road Infrastructure 

o Poor market access for farmers and tourist 

o income generated within the municipality is spent elsewhere 
particularly in the urban areas such as Durban, Richards Bay and 
Empangeni 

o Limited economic development 

o most of study area is sparsely populated making service delivery 
expensive 

Opportunities 

Threats 


Environmental issues 

o An open space system will help to ensure the maintenance of the 
biodiversity and amenity of the municipality. 

o To ensure linkages and the added benefit of improving biodiversity 
goods and services, the plan should focus on catchments and 
rivers os well os entry points to the area in terms of amenity. This 
should look at the existing areas and work of the conservancies os 
well os the existing protected area. 

o A Land Use Management System for the municipality 

o There is fauna and flora with conservation significance, 
educational and tourism value. 

o As port of the Zulu route the area has large cultural value that con 
be tapped into for both social upliftment and tourism 
development. 

Spatial issues 


Environmental issues 

o Subdivision of agricultural land is of concern os small subdivisions 
hove in the post proved to be unsustainable 

o Over development of the area due to the large demand for 
tourism and residential development in the area is a threat to the 
atmosphere and os such the areas appeal os a tourism 
destination. 

o Due to the lock of employment opportunities within the 

municipality and the cutting bock of form worker employment 
opportunities much of the population is involved in migrant labour. 

o Inappropriate development will impact on the aesthetics and 
amenity of the area and will result in a loss of tourism potential. 


Spatial Issues 

o Over development of the area due to the large demand for 


May 2014 


31 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


o Social upliftment as a result of economic growth is an expected 
positive spin off. 

o Economic growth is expected mainly in areas of tourism attraction 
such as, near the protected areas and the indigenous forests as a 
result of increased tourism interest. 

o Provision of housing and basic services, particularly in the rural 
areas, including the identification of areas with patential far 
housing development and the formalisation of current informal or 
overcrowded 

o There is good provision of electricity in major nodes. 


tourism and residential development in the area is a threat to the 
atmosphere and as such the areas appeal as a tourism 
destination. 

o Inappropriate development will impact on the aesthetics and 
amenity at the area and will result in a loss of tourism potential. 

o Electricity supply /transmissicn failure 

o Low supply of water and sewage systems 

o Unstructured settlement is a threat to sustainable service delivery 


32 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4. NTAMBANANA LONG TERM VISION 


To improve the quality of life of the residents in the Ntambanana Municipal area by expanding the role and the 

effectiveness of the Ntambanana Municipality by 2022. 


33 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5. WHAT ARE WE DOING TO UNLOCK OUR CHALLENGES 


KZN KPA 

DEVELOPMENT GOALS 

NTAMBANANA STRATEGIES 

MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND 
INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

People Empowerment 

o Development of a workplace skills plan 
o Implementation of workplace skills plan 
o Filling of critical posts 
o Development of the succession plan 
o Implementation of Risk Management Policy 
o Implementation Individual Performance 
Management Systems 

o Implementation of Organisational Performance 
Management Systems 

LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 
AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

Rural Development 

o Implementation of programmes with regards to 
the unemployed youth database 
o Review LED Strategy 

o Conduct Agricultural Development Land Audit 
o Establishment of co-operatives 
o Review and implement the Tourism Strategy 
o Development of Heritage sites 

o Implement Led Projects 

o Implement EPWP Projects 
o Implement CWP Projects 

BASIC SERVICE AND 

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

Intrastructure Development 

o Rehabilitation of 60% of access roads (Internal 
Municipal roads) 


34 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




o Increase waste collection by 80% 
o 90%of households must hove access to 
electricity. 

o provision of sports and recreational facilities 

GOOD GOVERNANCE AND PUBLIC 
PARTICIPATION 

Good Governance and Public 
Participation 

o Ensure functional Word Committees 

o Effective internal auditing 
o Effective Audit Committee 
o Effective Municipal Public Accounts Committee 
o Maintain unqualified audit opinion 

FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND 
MANAGEMENT 

Financiai viabiiity and 
management 

o Development and implementation of debt 
recovery plan 

o Implementation of the rates policy 
o Develop Revenue Enhancement Strategy 

(Financial Sustainability Strategy and Investment 
Strategy) 

o Supplementary valuation roll 
o Financial policies review 
o Maintenance of o Grapp compliant Asset 

Register 

o Implementation of Supply Chain Management 
Policy 

o Implementation of MFMA 

CROSS CUniNG ISSUES 

Spatiai Pianning 

o Review of SDF 



o Review Integrated Development Plan 

o Conduct IDP / Budget Roadshows 


35 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




o Review EMP 

o Development of an SEA 

o Identify land for burial purposes 



o Implementation of Housing sector plan 



o Implementation of LUMS 



o Review Disaster Management Plan 



o Implement Operation Sukuma Sakhe 



o Review and implementation of HIV/AIDS 

Strategy 


36 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.1 SDFMAP 


Map 2: Existing Deveiopment Centers and Corridors 



37 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SPATIAL VISION 


6. SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVES & TARGETS 


KPA1: MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

Development Goals 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUTS/TARGETS 

People Empowerment 

O 

To improve skills 

O 

Development of a workplace skills 

Approved WSP 



and capacities of 


plan 




councillors and 

O 

Implementation of workplace skills 




staff 


plan 



O 

To enhance 

o 

Filling of critical posts 

All critical posts filled 



institutional 

development 

o 

Development of the succession plan 

Approved succession plan 




o 

Implementation of Risk 

Management Policy 



o 

To ensure an 
Integrated 
Management and 
Information System 

o 

Implementation of the IT Policy 

IT development priorities implemented 


o 

To ensure 

o 

Implementation Individual 

100% individual performance 



monitoring and 
evaluation of 


Performance Management Systems 

agreements signed 



municipal 



Approved organisational 



performance 



scorecard 




o 

Implementation of Organisational 
Performance Management Systems 

2014/15 annual report submitted 


38 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KPA2: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

Development 

Goals 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGETS 

Rural 

Development 

o To align the LED Strategy 
with the PGDS, EPWP and 
CWP 

o Review the LED Strategy 

Reviewed LED Strategy 


o To improve support to Local 
Economic Development 

o Implementation of programmes with 
regards to the unemployed youth 
database 

Training programmes for 
unemployed youth 



o Conduct Agricultural Development 

Land Audit 

o Establishment of co-operatives 
o Review and implement the Tourism 
Strategy 

o Development of Heritage sites 

completed land audit 

co-operatives established 

reviewed Tourism strategy 

Heritage sites developed 


o To increase job creation 

o Implement Led Projects 
o Implement EPWP Projects 
o Implement CWP Projects 

jobs created through these 
programmes 


KPA3: BASIC SERVICE AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

Development 

Goals 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

TARGETS 

Infrastructure 

Development 

o To improve access to basic 
service delivery 

o Rehabilitation of 60% of access 
roods (Internal Municipal roods) 

o Increase waste collection by 80% 
o 90%of households must hove 
access to electricity. 

o Mointoned internal access 
roods 

o 80 % households with access to 
solid waste disposal services 
o 90 % households with access to 
free basic electricity 


39 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




o provision of sports and recreational 

o Sport and recreational facilities 



facilities 

provided 


KPA 4: Good Governance and Public Participation 

Development 

Goals 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGET 

Good 

Governance 
and Public 
Participation 

To promote community 
empowerment and public 
participation 

o Ensure functional Ward 
Committees 

ward committee meetings 


To ensure compliance with all 
requirements of legislative 
framework in preparation of 
Clean Audit 2014 

o Effective internal auditing 
o Effective Audit Committee 
o Effective Municipal Public 
Accounts Committee 
o Maintain unqualified audit 
opinion 

o Approved Internal Audit Plan 
o Audit Committee meetings 
o oversight report 
o Clean audit, Audit opinion 


KPA 5 : FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 

Development 

Goals 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGET 

Financial 

Viability 

o To enhance revenue 
collection 

o Development and implementation 
of debt recovery plan 
o Implementation of the rates policy 
o Develop Revenue Enhancement 
Strategy (Financial Sustainability 
Strategy and Investment Strategy) 

o Percentage improvement of debt year- 
on-year 

o Percentage of objective implemented 
o Date of approval of Revenue 
Enhancement Strategy 


40 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 







o To ensure that financial 
resources are efficiently and 
effectively allocated 

o Supplementary valuation roll 
o Financial policies review 
o Maintenance of a Grapp 
compliant Asset Register 

o Percentage campletian at valuatian 
roll 


o Ensure compliance with 

MFMA 

o Implementatian of MFMA 



o Ensure effective and 
management and 
monitoring of expenditure 

Implementation of Supply Chain 
Management Policy 

Percentage completion of supplier database 
update 


KPA 6 : Cross Cutting Issues 



Development 

Goals 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGET 

Spatial 

Planning 

o Ta ensure impraved Spatial Development 
planning 

o Review of SDF 

o Reviewed and appraved of the SDF 


o To achieve sustainable development 

o Review Integrated 
Development Plan 

o Conduct IDP / 

Budget Roadshows 

o Credible IDP 

o IDP Roadshows conducted 


o To ensure Environmental Sustainability and 
Management 

o Review EMP 

o Development of an 
SEA 

o Identify land for 

o Date of approval of the EMP 

o Date of appointment of service 
provider 

o Date at submission of proposal ta 


41 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 





burial purposes 

Council 


o 

To ensure susfainable human sefflemenfs 
and land managemenf 

o Implemenfafion of 
Housing secfor plan 

Percenfage of houses builf as per housing 
secfor plan 


o 

To ensure effecfive land use managemenf 

o Implemenfafion of 
LUMS 

Percenfage of recommendafions 
implemenfed 


o 

To minimize fhe effecf of nafural and ofher 
disasfers 

o Review Disasfer 
Managemenf Plan 

Dafe of approval of fhe Disasfer 

Managemenf Plan 


o 

To implemenf Operafion Sukuma Sakhe 

o Implemenf 

Operafion Sukuma 
Sakhe 

Number of infervenfions as per OSS 


o 

To implemenf programmes fo reduce 
incidenfs of HIV/AIDS infecfions 

o Review and 

implemenfafion of 
HIV/ AIDS Sfrafegy 

HIV/AIDS Sfrafegy 


7. HOW WILL OUR PROGRESS BE MEASURED? 

Ntambanana Municipality has adopted the Performance Management Framework which will monitor and measure our performance as the 
municipality. Performance measurement refers fo fhe formal process of collecfing and copfuring performance dofo fo enable 
reporfing fo fake place for each Key Performance Indicator and againsf fhe fargef sef for such indicafor. A manual process will be 
used fo measure performance af Nfambanana Local Municipalify. The municipal SDBIPs and scorecards should spell ouf fhe name 
of an official who will be reporfing on each indicafor. The said official will, when performance measuremenf is due, have fo collecf 
and collate fhe necessary performance date or informafion and capfure fhe resulf againsf fhe fargef for fhe period concerned. As 
such, fhey need nof be accounfable for performance on fhe said performance indicafor. 


42 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



43 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


B. PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES AND GOVERNMENT PRIORITIES 


1 . PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES 


Planning and Development Principles 

Alignment with municipality 

Development / investment must only happen in locations that are 
sustainable (NSDP) 

Ntambanana municipality has prepared a spatial Development 
Framework and is in a process of preparing its wall to wall scheme to 
ensure that developments occur in sustainable lacations 

Balance between urban and rural land development in support of each 
other (DFA Principles) 

Ntambanana Municipality is annually prioritising the, construction 
and rehabilitation of access roads in all wards, which are rural roads. 
The construction of these allows for access in wards either for the 
communities or developers. 

Basic services (water, sanitation, access and energy) must be provided to 
all households (NSDP). 

The Ntambanana Municipality facilitates all water and sanitation 
projects and ensures that they are implemented. The current 
electrification project decrease the electricity backlog in 
Ntambanana area. 

Development / investment should be focused on localities of economic 
growth and/or economic potential (NSDP) 

A capital investment plan will be developed as a camponent of the 
SDF and will direct where public and private investment should 
occur. 

In localities with low demonstrated economic potential, development / 
investment must concentrate primarily an human capital development by 
providing education and training, social transfers such as grants and 

Food Security Programs 

Operation Sukuma Sakhe. 

Implementation of LED plan 


44 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


poverty-relief programmes (NSDP) 

Facilitate early childhood program 

Prime and unique agricultural land, the environment and other protected 
lands must be protected and land must be safely utilised 

Preparation of spatial development framework and Wall to wall land 
use management systems. 

Engagement with stakeholder representatives on policy, planning and 
implementation at national, sectoral and local levels is central to 
achieving coherent and effective planning and development. 

Engagement sector departments through the IDP representative 
forum meetings to ensure alignment. 

If there is a need to low-income housing, it must be provided in close 
proximity to areas of opportunity (“Breaking New Ground": from Housing 
to Sustainable Human Settlements) 

The municipality currently has rural housing projects planned for all 
wards. 


45 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


B2. GOVERNMENT POLICIES AND IMPERATIVES 


2. GOVERNMENT PRIORITIES 


The UN, World Bank and 1 89 countries adopted the Millennium Goals in September 2000. The aim is to reduce poverty while improving health, 
education and environment. Each goal is to be achieved by 2015. Below is the alignment between the goals and strategic priorities of 
Ntambanana Local Municipality as contained in the strategic framework. 


Millennium Development 

Goals 

Ntambanana Strategic Priorities 

Ntambanana Action Plan 

1 . Eradicate extreme poverty 
and hunger 

Rural Development 

Operation Sukuma Sakhe (War on Poverty) 

Co-operatives Development 

SMME’s Develop 

2. Achieve universal primary 
education 

Human Resource Development 

Community Bursary Scheme 

Early Childhood Development - Centres 

3. promote gender equality 
and empower women 

Human Resource Development 

Women empowerment projects 

4. Reduce child mortality 

Improve Health profile of the community 

Through Operation Sukuma Sakhe, we work with 
the Department of Health to ensure that child 
mortality is reduced 

5. Improve maternity health 

Improve Health profile of the community 

Working with Department of Health through 
Operation Sukuma Sakhe 


46 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6. combat HIV/AIDS malaria 
and other diseases 

Improve Health profile of the community 

HIV/AIDS strategies ore in place 

7. Ensure environmental 
sustainability 

Local Economic Development 

Infrastructure Development 

Improve Health profile of the community 

Environmental project, like the Indigenous Tree 
Plantation 

Conduction of Environmental Impact Assessment 
before any project con be implemented 

Awareness campaigns on Waste Management 

8. develop a global 
partnership for development 

Corporate Governance Revenue 
Enhancement 

Relations with Neighbouring Municipalities on 
Development initiatives 

Intergovernmental Relations, is strengthen through 
respective Forums. 


2. NATIONAL OUTCOMES 


Based on the Medium Term Strategic Framework, a set of 1 2 outcomes were developed through extensive consultation and discussion at both 
Ministerial and administrative levels. These outcomes reflect the desired development impacts we seek to achieve given government policy 
priorities. The twelve key outcomes that hove been identified and agreed to by Cabinet ore: 


12 National Outcomes 

Response to Outcome 9 by Ntambanana Municipality 

1 . Improve quality of basic education 

2. Long and healthy life for oil South Africans 

3. All people in South Africa ore free and feel safe 

4. Decent employment through inclusive economic growth 

5. Skilled and capable workforce to support on inclusive growth 
path 

6. Efficiency, competitive and responsive economic infrastructure 

7. vibrant, equitable sustainable rural communities contributing 
towards food security for all 

8. Sustainable human settlements and improved quality of 
household life 

- The Municipality seeks to promote accountability by being 
transparent in all its business including taking the budget, IDP and 
PMS to the communities. 

- The involvement of oil stakeholders in development initiatiotives 
promotes efficiency in service delivery. 

■ People with required skills are hired to conduct the municipal 
business and this enhances efficiency in the delivery of services 

- Batho Pele Principle ore adopted and implemented to ensure 
that the municipality operates in an effective and efficient 
manner. 

■ Service Delivery remains the key priority of the municipality. 


47 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


9. Responsive accountability accountable, ettective and etticient 
local government system 

10. Environmental assets and natural resources that are well 
protected and enhanced 

1 1 . Create a better South Africa and contribute to a better South 
Africa and the world 

12. Efficient, effective and developmental oriented public service 
and an empowered, fair and inclusive citizenship 


- Strengthening of Intergovernmental Relatians, pravides for various 
ways that contributes to an effective government 

- Employment Equity Plan 

- Committed to operation Clean Audit 2014 


3. National Development Plan 

The objectives ot the plan are the elimination ot poverty and the reduction ot inequality through 

- Uniting South Africans of all races and classes around a common programme to eliminate poverty and reduce inequality 

■ Encourage citizens to be active in their own development, in strengthening democracy and in holding their government accountable 

- Raising economic growth, promoting exports and making the economy more labour absorbing 

■ Focusing on key capabilities of both people and the country 

© Capabilities include skills, infrastructure, social security, strong institutions and partnerships both within the country and with key 
international partners 

- Building a capable and developmental state 

- Strong leadership throughout society that work together to solve our problems 


May 2014 


48 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




4. 

Provincial Growth and Development Strategy (PGDS) Goals 


STRATEGIC KZN PGDS STRATEGIC 

goals strategic framework OBJEQIVES 



@ HUMAN RESOURCE 


DEVELOPNENT 


§ 


HUMAN I 
COMMUNITY DEmonif^ 


@ STRATEGIC 
INFRASTRUaURE 


SUSTWNAIlifTY 



Slie iiBlt 

iiffifl iiiuiiiiMiih 

r* ai w c< 

CwTttfnif 

RnY 


Vision 






I T»# . !!>■— m W fc JlUM UiUPH 



49 I P a g e 


May 2014 




Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Government Priorities 

Municipai Action/Aiignment 

Economic Growth 

- Ntambanana Municipality is in a process of establishing an Informal Trading centre, which is 
aimed at boosting the local economy. 

■ Support through our LED Initiatives is given to SMME’s, Co-ops and other young emerging 
entrepreneurs 

- The Municipality’s budget contributes more to infrastructural development 

- Tourism development plan is one of the strategies to boost economic growth. 

■ P700 Corridor development 

- Revenue enhancement strategies, once explored will have a positive impact towards the 
municipal economic growth. 

■ Essential Oils project which employs about — people 

- Luwamba 

Land Reform 

o No land claims currently known by the municipality 

War Against Corruption 

o Ntambanana Municipality is committed to operation clean audit 2014. 

o And the municipality has received unqualified audit report for three consecutive years and a 
clean audit in the 201 2/1 3 financial year 

o Sound Internal controls are implemented 

Infrastructure Development 

Ntambanana Municipality has a turnaround strategy which focuses more on infrastructure 
development, however just to name the few successes : 

- In terms of electricity about 95% of the total households have electricity 

■ About 4500 housing units have been built throughout municipal wards. 


50 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



- Road P700, and rehabilitation of access roads is currently improving the standard of roads 
within the municipality. 

Violence Against Women 

o Awareness Campaigns on women supported by SAPS, Department of Social Development are 
conducted through community engagement sessions. 

o Through operation Sukuma Sakhe affected women are identified and given support needed. 

Job Creation 

Ntambanana Municipality have the following programs which have created job more than 300 job 
opportunities 

- CWP 

- EPWP 

- Moringa tree plantation 

- Luwamba Project 

Spatial Issues 

o Awareness on Land use 

o C-operative engagements with amaKhosi on Ingonyama Trust Land 

o Development of Ntambanana scheme has been funded by the Department of C-operative 
Governance and traditional affairs 

o Refinement of the SDF to reflect a spatial vision 

o Ntambanana Small Town Development, by COGTA 

Crime 

o A community safety plan has all the strategies that we as the municipality embark on in fighting 
crime 


51 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5. STATE OF THE NATION ADDRESS 


President Zuma delivered his State of the Nation Address to o joint sitting of Parliament in Cope Town on Thursday, 13 February 2014, and 
presented the Programme of Action, setting out government’s plans to address various key government programmes. 

The president mentioned that the country still faces the triple challenge of poverty, inequality and unemployment, which we continue to 
grapple with. Dealing with these challenges has become o central focus of all democratic administrations. The country has elected to focus on 
five priorities, education, health, the fight against crime and corruption, rural development and land reform os well as creating decent work. 

The country has also reorganised the state to improve performance by creating two key functions, long term planning as well os monitoring and 
evaluation. The Notional Planning Commission which produced the landmark National Development Plan, the country’s socio-economic 
blueprint and one of the major achievements of this fourth odministrotion.The Plan outlines what we should do to eradicate poverty, increase 
employment and reduce inequality by 2030. Our monitoring and evaluation indicates that many services continue to improve. For example, 
social grants and identity documents now take o shorter time to be processed. But many others still require further work. 

The national wealth, measured in terms of GDP, has grown to more than 3.5 trillion rand. South Africa’s Notional Development Plan has set the 
ambitious target of creating 1 1 -million jobs by 2030, which will require teamwork to get the economy growing at a rote of more than 5% a year. 

The President said the Notional Development Plan (NDP), the country’s vision for the next 20 years, contained proposals for tackling the 
problems of poverty, inequality and unemployment, while outlining interventions to put the economy on o better footing. 


2.5.1 Key themes of 2014 State of the Nation Address 
- Economic Growth 

The national wealth, measured in terms of GDP, has grown to more than 3.5 trillion rand.Jobs ore now being created ogoin.There ore now 15 
million people with jobs in the country, the highest ever in our history, and over 650 thousand jobs were created lost year, according to Stats 
SA. 


May 2014 


52 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- Land reform 

We have made good progress in the land reform programme. Since 1994, nearly 5,000 farms, comprising 4.2 million hectares, have been 
transferred to block people, benefiting over 200,000 families. Nearly 80,000 land claims, totaling 3.4 million hectares, hove been settled and 
1 .8 million people hove benefited. The next administration will need to take forward a number of policy, legislative and practical 
interventions, to further redress the dispossession of our people of their land. These include matters relating to the establishment of the Office 
of the Valuer-General and thereby opening of the lodgement of claims. 

■ Infrastructure development 

The President mentioned that other than mining, five other job drivers hove been identified in 2009. These are tourism, agriculture, the green 
economy, infrastructure development and manufacturing. In 2012 we unveiled the National Infrastructure Plan, led by the President through the 
Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission. One trillion rand in public infrastructure has been invested over the post five years. 

• Youth Development and Local Economic Development 

The Expanded Public Works Programme and the Community Works Progromms were the highlight that hove been able to create jobs for the 
people of south Africa. 3.7 million jobs have been created through these programmes. Cabinet has set a target of 6 million job opportunities 
targeting the youth. 


6. KZN 201 4 STATE OF THE PROVINCE ADDRESS 


The key Themes of 201 4 state of the province address also focused on the following 

• Education 

• Health 

• Infrasctructure Development 

• Job Creation through programmes such as Expanded Public Works Programme 
- Human Settlements 

■ Roods 


May 2014 


53 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- Electricity 

In 2009 (March) 74.16 % of households in the Province had access to electricity (household connection). In 2012, this had risen to 76.69%. The 
backlog remaining is approximately 575 000 households. The Census 201 1 dataset indicates 78 % access. 

■ Water and Sanitation 

In 2009 (March) 78.3 % of households in the Province hod access to piped water within 200 metres of their dwelling (or higher level of service) . In 
2012, this hod risen to 83.47%. The backlog remaining is approximately 400 000 households. The Census 201 1 dataset indicates 86 % access. This 
includes households with access to piped water in excess of 200 metres from the dwelling. 

In 2009 (March) 76.18 % of households in the Province hod access to sanitation (ventilated approved pit latrine or better). In 2012, this hod risen 
to 80.36%. The backlog remaining is approximately 480 000 households. The Census 201 1 dataset indicates 88 % access. 

■ Building SMME’s and Co-Operatives 

The role of small entrepreneurs in building our economy and provision of job opportunities has been well established. It is also clear that the 
challenges faced by the small business sector require more drastic action to moke them successful. This sector must be built and supported to 
create hundreds of thousands of jobs, os the case is in many countries. 

■ Rural Development and Agriculture 

Rural development is aimed at ensuring food security for oil rural and peri-urban households os well os creating o vibrant rural economy and 
sustainable lives for people in the rural areas by providing them with appropriate technology, skills development and building on asset base. 
Discussions between municipalities and Ingonyoma Trust Board must be held on o regular and structured basis to facilitate rural development 
and resolve matters of rotes and levies and the obligations that flow from such. 

- Crime 

As society, we con only win the war against crime when we acknowledge that o lasting solution con only be achieved when the criminal 
element in our society is isolated. 


May 2014 


54 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


NTAMBANANA MUNICIPALITY MTAS PRIORITY - 2013/2014 


MTAS PRIORITY 

MILESTONE 

DETAILED 

ACTIVITIES 

RESPONSIBLE 

OFFICIAL 

TARGET 

DATES 

BLOCKAGES / 
CHALLENGES 

REPORTING MAY 2014 

1 . Access to 

Water and 

Sanitation 

Provision of 4000 

households with 

access to Water 

and Sanitation 

Uthungulu District 
Municipality to 
protect springs and 
drill boreholes and 

also refurbish old 

water schemes. 

Municipal 

Manager 

PMU Manager 

30 June 2014 

Limited equitable 
share 

Non-supply by 
uThungulu District 
Municipality 

The municipality is 
experiencing 
backlogs in terms of 
water provisions. 

2. Water 

Infrastructure 

(Capital) 

Construction of 

new waterworks 
treatment plant 
and construction 

of new schemes 

DC 28 to allocate 
funding in 2013/2014 
budget for 
connection of 
Nomponjwana 
reservoir and to 

revive small schemes 
at Masangweni 

Municipal 
Manager PMU 
Manager 

30 June 2014 

Funding 

constraints 

The municipality is 
experiencing 
backlogs in terms of 
water provisions 



Luwamba Water 

scheme to feed 

households around 



Non-supply by 
uThungulu District 
Municipality 



55 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


MTAS PRIORITY 

MILESTONE 

DETAILED 

RESPONSIBLE 

TARGET 

BLOCKAGES / 

REPORTING MAY 2014 



ACTIVITIES 

OFFICIAL 

DATES 

CHALLENGES 




Word 5 and Ward 7 





3. Access to 
Electricity and 
maintenance 

2306 connections 
of electricity to 
households 

Council to provide 

670 connections in 

the Bhadozo area, 

1 136 connections in 

Obuko area and 500 
in-fills utilising normal 
Notional 

Electrification Grant 

Municipal 
Manager & CFO 

30 June 2014 

Delays by Service 
Providers and 

Eskom to switch 

on 

Electrification of 

households in 
progress. 85% of 
households electrified 



Municipality to enter 
into a signed 
agreement with 

Eskom for Free Basic 
Electricity 





4. Refuse 

removal and 

solid waste 
disposal 

Collection of 

waste on all 
municipal words 

Collection of waste 2 
times per week 

Director: 

Corporate and 

Community 

Services 

30 June 2014 

Collecting waste 
in rural households 
it’s o challenge os 
they are 

Waste is collected 

twice o week. 



Placement of waste 
bins and waste skips 
on strategic points 



scattered. 

The municipality 
provides waste bins 
and waste skips in 


56 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


MTAS PRIORITY 

MILESTONE 

DETAILED 

RESPONSIBLE 

TARGET 

BLOCKAGES / 

REPORTING MAY 2014 



ACTIVITIES 

OFFICIAL 

DATES 

CHALLENGES 








strategic points 


Appointment of 
Waste 

Management 

Officer 

Appointment of 

Waste Management 
Officer to monitor 

the waste 

management 

function 




Waste Management 
Officer position was 
replaced by 15 Waste 
Management interns 
through Department 
of Environmental 

Affairs 

5. Provision of 
Rural housing 
projects 

3000 units 

construction in all 

8 Wards of the 
municipality 

To strengthen and 
enhance co- 
ordination role with 
the Department of 
Human Settlement 

Manager: 

Human 

Settlement 

30 June 2014 

Approval of 
projects by DOHS 

3200 units completed 

6. Anti- 

Corruption 

strategy 

Develop Anti- 
Corruption 

Strategy 

To table the strategy 
to Council for 
adoption 

Director: 

Corporate and 

Community 

Services 

30 June 2014 

Funding 

constraints 

Anti-corruption 
strategy is under 
review and will be 
adopted by 30 June 
2014 


57 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


MTAS PRIORITY 

MILESTONE 

DETAILED 

ACTIVITIES 

RESPONSIBLE 

OFFICIAL 

TARGET 

DATES 

BLOCKAGES / 
CHALLENGES 

REPORTING MAY 2014 








7. 

Functionality 
of Word 

Committees 

To ensure all 

Ward 

Committees are 

functional in all 8 
municipal wards 

Training of Ward 
Committee in all 

Seta accredited 

courses for Ward 

Committees 

Director: 

Corporate and 

Community 

Sen/ices 

30 June 2014 

MSIG not enough 
to train all Ward 

Committees 

Ward Committees has 

been trained on 6 

accredited modules 
and 2 remaining to 
complete the whole 
qualification 

8. Clean 

audit 

Implementation 
of effective 
accounting 
procedures 

Address all matters 

contained in 

2011/2012 

Management matter 

Monitor compliance 
with applicable laws 
and policies 

Training of MPAC 

Improve Financial 
Management 

Controls 

Director: 

Corporate MM. 
CFO, 

Mayor 

30 June 2014 

Non-compliance 
to MFMA 

The municipality 
obtained a clean 

audit 

Training of MPAC will 
take place on the 23^^ 
of May 2014 to 
strengthen their 
oversight responsibility 
and also to improve 
their financial 
management controls 


58 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


MTAS PRIORITY 

MILESTONE 

DETAILED 

RESPONSIBLE 

TARGET 

BLOCKAGES / 

REPORTING MAY 2014 



ACTIVITIES 

OFFICIAL 

DATES 

CHALLENGES 


9. Section 

57/56 signed 
Performance 
Agreements 

To ensure all 3 

Section 57/56 
Managers have 
signed 
agreements 
aligned to 
Municipal IDP 

Development of 
predetermined 
objectives that are 
linked to the budget 
and aligned to 

S57/56 Performance 
agreements 

Director: 

Corporate and 

Community 

Services 

30 July 2013 

31 

December 

2013 

Poor performance 

2 Performance 
Agreements were 
signed and submitted 
to COGTA 

The municipality also 
approved the SDBIP 
and OPMS Framework 



Appointment of the 
Municipal Manager 





10. 

Administration 

(Work place 
skills plan and 
Annual 

Training 

Report 

Implementation 
of WSP 

Training of staff and 
councillors 
according to their 
needs as were 

outlined on the skills 

audit 

Director: 

Corporate and 

Community 

Services 

01 July 2013 

(Ongoing) 


Most staff was trained 

on different kinds of 
trainings and it is still 
on going 

2014/2015 Workplace 
Skills Plan was 

submitted to LGSETA 
on the 30th of April 

2014 

11. Debt 
Management 

Review and 
approval of Debt 
management 

To table the 
reviewed policy to 
Council for adoption 

Chief Financial 

Officer 

30 June 2014 

Financial loss and 
poor service 
delivery 

Policy is under review 
and will be workshop 
to all Councillors on 
the 19th of May 2014 


59 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


MTAS PRIORITY 

MILESTONE 

DETAILED 

RESPONSIBLE 

TARGET 

BLOCKAGES / 

REPORTING MAY 2014 



ACTIVITIES 

OFFICIAL 

DATES 

CHALLENGES 



policy 





before Council 







approves it. 


60 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION c 
SITUATION ANALYSIS 


1 . 


SPATIAL ANALYSIS 


1.1 


REGIONAL CONTEXT 


61 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Map 3: uthungulu Regional Context 

The uThungulu District is located in the north eastern region of the KwaZulu-Natal Province. The district comprises of six local municipalities, 
namely: 


• UMfolozi (KZ 281) 

• uMhlothuze (KZ 282) 

• Ntombonona (KZ 283) 

• uMlalazi (KZ 284) 

62 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


• Mthonjaneni (KZ 285) 

• Nkandia (KZ 286) 

Significant economic centres at the district and provincial levels ore Richards Boy and Empangeni. Richards Bay, as a harbour and industrial 
town attracts people from surrounding towns, rural settlements and from beyond the district. Empongeni’s role as on industrial and service 
centre to the settlements of Esikhawini, Eshowe, Nkondla, Ntambanana and other rural settlements attracts many people to the range of higher 
order services available in the town. 

The vast majority of economic activity (88,6%) in the district is vested in Richards Boy, Empangeni and Felixtonl. This area is the third most 
important in the province of KwaZulu-Natal in terms of economic production and contributes 7,6% of the total GGP2 and 5,5% of the total formal 
employment. Between 1986 and 1995 the overage annual growth rote for the uThungulu region was 3,77% - substantially higher than the 
province at 1 ,45% and the national rote of 1,19% per annum. In 2002, the growth rote was 3,0%. 

The district is further characterized by low levels of urbanization; approximately 80% of the people live in the rural areas. Also, more than 50% of 
the population is younger than 19 years. The female population is significantly higher than the mole population - o phenomenon that con be 
attributed to migration patterns associated with the province in general. 

The district is further characterized by large infrastructure backlogs, particularly in respect of water and sanitation mainly in the rural areas. The 
implementation of the district WSDP (Water Services Plan) has reduced the rural backlogs for water supply to RDP standard from 81,7% in 
2001/02 to 43,9% in 2006/07. The backlogs in rural sanitation to RDP standards has been reduced from 89,1% to 72,2% over the some period. 

The district is host to o wide variety of infrastructure and services. Richards Boy, Empangeni, Gingindlovu, Mthunzini and Eshowe oil hove 
reasonably good levels of infrastructure and services. Formal, urban infrastructure is focused on these centres and in some of the secondary 
nodes in the district like Melmoth and Fieotonville. Nkondla, Melmoth, Ntambanana, Buchanana, Mbonambi and Eshowe are administrative 
nodes of economic significance in the district. Even though Mtubatubo, Ulundi and Mondeni ore centres that toll outside the district they ore 
considered as important as they service portions of the district. The district’s transportation infrastructure is under pressure. 

The rood network connects the major nodes, like Richards Bay and Empangeni to the notional network, however the heavy vehicles servicing 
the Port of Richards Bay and the adjoining industrial areas are placing considerable strain on the infrastructure. Rail is o declining transport 
sector, with no major commuter networks in place a limited industrial linkages (with the exception of the cool link from Mpumalanga to the 
Richards Bay Cool Terminal at the Port of Richards Boy. 

uMlolazi is the largest municipality covering 2214 km^ and uMhlothuze the smallest with an area of 795 km^. Nkondla covers an area of 1827 km^, 
Mbonambi 1208 km^, Mthonjaneni 1086 km^ and Ntambanana 1083 km^. UThungulu district has o good climate and an abundance of natural 
resources. The available arable land is suitable for large-scale agricultural initiatives, like the present sugar and forestry os well os specialised and 
intensive ogrigon opportunities like natural oils and fruits cultivation. The intrinsic beauty of the area enhances the opportunities for tourism in the 
district. The terrain of uThungulu varies from the flat coastal belt, to the escarpment 900m above sea level. The brood spatial structure of the 

63 1 P a g e 

May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


district consists of a coastal plain or corridor that is rich in natural and built resaurces. A ‘shadaw corridor’ comprising of commercial agriculture 
forms a rim of higher lying land around the coastal plain. The land is characterised by undulating topography containing commercial 
agriculture, which is dominated by forestry, rural settlement and small towns. The rest of the district is characterised by high lying dramatic 
landscape with rural settlement and forestry. The general spatial trend is that access to services and economic opportunities appears to lessen 
as one moves inland. Also found in the area are a variety of river valleys, the best known the Tugela River on the western boundary of the 
district. The variety of soils, temperate climate and good annual average rainfall as well as the large water catchments area of the Thukela 
catchments area all combine for added attractiveness. 


1.2 ADMINISTRATIVE ENTITIES 


The Municipality covers an area of 1 083km2 and has a population of 74 337 as per Census 201 1 . 

There are four Traditional Authorities that fall within the jurisdiction of Ntambanana Municipality, which are Obizo, Obuka, Somopho and 
Mambuka. The municipal area is divided inta eight wards that are represented by eight ward committees. The area around Heatonville is 
primarily in private ownership, and utilized for commercial sugar cane farming and other agricultural enterprises. There are a number of rural 
nodes which serve as service centres notably Buchanana, Mambuka, Luwamba and Heatonville. 

A significant proportion of the population (656 - 9434 people/km2) reside in the Traditional Authority areas. These areas are predominantly rural 
in nature and characterised by low levels of basic services and are relatively far removed from major employment centres like Empangeni and 
Richards Bay. 


May 2014 


64 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Map4; Ntambanana Locality 


65 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The Map above illustrates Ntambanana Municipality location within uThungulu District, with few existing centres nearby the provincial corridor 
N2. 

Buchonono demonstrates several key Ingredients of on activity node as defined as a place of highest accessibility, where both public and 
private investment tends to concentrate. It is an activity node that offers the opportunity to locate o range of activities from small to large 
enterprises, and it offers mixed use development. Transport interchanges (such as bus stops and/or Taxi Rank) are ideally located within the 
node along the activity spine in a primary corridor (P700). 

Buchanano is the most dominant Centre within the Ntambanana Local Municipality and is rightfully referred to as the Primary Administration 
Centre, owing to its 'diverse' economy (when compared to the other minor centres), relatively superior level of infrastructure and service, and 
sphere of influence. It is home to the Ntambanana Local Municipality. Furthermore, Buchonono enjoys o central location in relation to other 
centres. 


66 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Map 5: Arial view of Buchanana as Service Centre 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 



Indoor Sports Facility Under Constructibm-^ 




nformal Taxi Rank 


KostwOffice 






Market Stalls 






image <S> 2009 DigitaiOlobe 


67 I P a g e 


May 2014 





Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Map 6: Administrative Entities 



68 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The map above illustrates the spatial location of traditional administrative within the municipal area. There are four Tribal Authorities within the 
Municip b al Area, which ore : 

• Obuko tribal Authority 

• Somopho Tribal Authority 

• Mombuko Tribal Authority and 

• Obizo Tribal Authority 


From the map above it is also clear that most of the land is within the traditional authority. For proper implementation of the Land Use 
Management and the Spatial Development Framework is therefore important that a shared understanding on development issues between 
AmaKhosi and Ntambanana Council be established and maintained. 


1 .4 EXISTING NODES AND CORRIDORS 


Map 7 : Existing Development Centres 



69 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


1.4.1 Existing Settlement Hierarchy 


Category 

Settlement 

Existing Administrative and 
Service Centre 

Buchonono 

Secondary Nodes (Rural 

Upper Nseleni - Emathuneni (Obuka), 

Centres) 

Luwamba, Makhwelo (Somopho South) 


Mambuka, Edv^oleni (Somopho North), 


eGroundini (Obizo) 

Tertiary Nodes (Emerging Rural 

Mawonda, Emkhondliwni (Obuko), 

Centres) 

Nomponjwona, Njomelwane 

Scattered Settlement and 
Scarcely 

Remainder of the Municipal area 

Populated Areas 



70 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1 .5 LAND COVER AND BROAD LANDUSE 


The broad land use configuratian devised for the municipal area, bearing in mind the Umfolazi Sub-regianal Development Plans, land use 
configuration was basically derived from the existing land use pattern incorporating the need to link certain areas to promote or ensure natural 
mavement between systems. These include: 

Agriculture, as ane of the main econamic activities and principal land use in the municipal area is depicted in terms of intensity i.e. high 
intensity agriculture in the Heatonville area with lower intensity development in all the tribal authorities. 

Tourism and Recreation cannot be defined as a dedicated land use zanes, even at a municipal scale as a result af its dispersed and 
nodal nature thereof. However, high potential tourism areas are depicted on the plan as symbols, but generally the tourism potential 
the Municipal area is largely underutilized. 

Urban Development Zone is not only represented by emerging towns such as Buchanana, but also informal peri-urban areas that are 
functianally lined ta formal urban areas. 

lit Spatial Development Initiatives: As with tourism these initiatives can be reflected in the form of overlays in recognition thereof. 

Intrastructure: Only transportation corridors are reflected on the plan. However, problem areas in terms of water provision and sanitation 
are included an some the other plans and in recognition of their spatial significance. 

Spatial element cannot be depicted on the plan as zones or nodes but rather as symbols. For instance, it is one of the functions of the 
plan ta indicate projects of regional impartance (key projects), key opportunity areas i.e. these areas that has potential that still has ta 
be exploited, and suggested key infrastructural projects. 

These categories will typically include Key projects in the:- 
Tourism; 

Industrial; 

Housing 

Administrative; 

Infrastructure; 

Conservaticn, and 
Agriculture fields. 

Ntambanana is predominantly rural with no big or formal established town. The settlement pattern in the study area is largely what is defined as 
rural scattered, which is an extremely sparsely populated settlement pattern and makes infrastructure prevision difficult. This type of settlement 
pattern accounts for around 65% of the population. Buchanana has been designated as the Primary Node because of its centrality and is 
termed as a small emerging rural centre. This is where it is envisaged that a high level af services and infrastructure be provided in line with the 
IDP objectives of nodal development. Currently, the level of services provided is very elementary. Several other secondary and Tertiary nodes 

71 I P a g e 

May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


have also been identified for further nodal development. There has also been a proposal of relocating the current Primary Node to Heatonville 
where land is currently been utilised for agricultural purposes. 

In the Southern Heatonville district, there is commercial farming of sugarcane; however, the rest of the spatial area is comprised of traditional 
settlement with only small scale agriculture. There are also o number of formal conservation areas in the form of private gome forms; these 
include Mfuli Game Ranch, Nyola Gome Ranch, Enyini Lodge and Thula-Thula Game Reserve. 


1.6 Land Ownership 


Land ownership rest largely with Ingonyoma Trust, with Traditional Authorities acting as the custodians thereof. The largest amount of land is 
controlled by the Obuka Traditional Authority, but others include Somopho north, Obizo, Mombuko and Somopho south. There are private 
landowners in the Heatonville area where commercial sugar cone farming takes place. There is also some state-owned land which includes the 
land that Buchanano is situated on and the surrounding properties. The Ntombonona State Forms ore owned by the Department of Land Affairs 
(DLA) and controlled by the Department of Agriculture, but are in the process of being transferred to the community through a land 
redistribution project. 


72 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.7 Development Corridors 


Map 8: Existing Centres and Corridors 



This section seeks to identify and categories a number of roads as part of the Municipai Deveiopment Corridor network based on condition of 
roads, ievei of access afforded and its significance at a district/regionai scaie in terms of access to economic and service centers, and as 
carriers of investment. The existing Deveiopment Corridors are broken-down in descending order (in terms of the above criteria) into Primary, 
Secondary and Tertiary Corridors. 


73 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Map 9 : Property ownership 



74 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.7 Land Reform 


Department of Land Affairs in April 2008 transferred three state land portions to Ntambanana Municipality. The land was disposed for purposes 
of:- 


■ The development of a low cost housing project of about 250-300 houses; 

■ The development of clinic 

■ The development of a multi-purpose centre 


The land that was disposed is known as, 144, 1453 hectares of land from portion 2 of the form Drisdernnon no. 1 1541-GLI and 105, 8547 hectares 
of land from portion of the remainder of the Form Sondown number 12025-GLI 5 hectares of land from remainder of the Form Sevendole NO:- 
12135 GU. Currently there ore no land claim applications or projects. 


1.10 ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS 


Ntambanana Municipality has developed an Environmental Management Plan which was funded by the Development Bonk of Southern 
Africa. An Environmental Management Plan is on environmental management tool used to ensure that undue or reasonably avoidable adverse 
impacts of the development projects such as construction operation and decommissioning of o project ore prevented, and that the positive 
benefits of the projects ore enhanced. 

The Ntambanana Environmental Management Plan focus mainly on development Nodal points, where future development is to take place. 
The Ntambanana Environmental Management Plan is on important tool for ensuring that the management action arising from the 
Environmental Impact Assessment processes related to future development projects are clearly defined and implemented throughout all phase 
of the project life -cycle. 

The Municipality has planned to budget for the development of the strategic environmental assessment of the Municipal area in 2014/2015 
financial year. 

The Constitution Act 1996 


Environmental rights Section 24 of the Constitution provides that everyone has the right to an environment that is not harmful to their health or 
well-being and to hove the environment protected, for the benefit of present and future generations, through reasonable legislative and other 
measures that 


75 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


■ prevent pollution and ecological degradation; 

■ promote conservation; 

■ secure ecologically sustainable development and use of natural resources while promoting 

■ justifiable economic and social development; and 

■ The Constitution also provides for the right to have access to adequate water. 


The National Environmental Management Act (NEMA) 


The National Environmental Management Act is South Africa’s overarching environmental legislation and came into operation in January 1999. 
This Act replaces parts of the Environment Conservation Act (Act 73 of 1989) with exception to certain parts pertaining to the Integrated 
Environmental Management and EIA regulations (National Environmental Management Act 1998, Chapter 10, Section 50 (2)). NEMA provides 
the framework for environmental management in South Africa. Given that a number of environmental issues (particularly policy issues) are 
spread across various functional areas, its prime aim is to provide for co-operative environmental governance by establishing principles for 
decision making on all matters affecting the environment. NEMA also establishes procedures and institutions that will promote public 
participation in environmental management. NEMA recognizes that the State must respect, promote, protect and fulfill the social, economic 
and environmental rights of everyone and strive to meet the basic needs of previously disadvantaged communities. 

The information below is extracted from the Environmental Management Plan of the Municipality. 


1.10.1 Biodiversity and Ecoiogicai Viabiiity 


■ Geoiogy 

The rocks in the study area belong to the Karoo Sequence, a thick series of sedimentary rock that cover a large part of South Africa. In this area 
the Karoo Sequence is represented by the Dwyka Formation of glacial deposits at the base, followed by a conformable sequence of 
sandstones, mudstones and shales of the Ecca Group and covered by basaltic lavas. The geology of the majority of the Ntambanana area is 
characterised by sandstones of the Natal Group. These sands cover the western sections of the study are. Extensive outcrops of Dwyka Tillite 
occur which comfortably overly the Natal Sandstones. A thick succession of basaltic lava of the Letaba Formation dips towards the south east. 


May 2014 


76 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Sandstone with minor shale of the Ntobano formation dips under the Letabo Basalt towards the south east. The remaining areas ore 
characterised by the mudstones of the Nyoka and Emakwezini Formations. 

■ Soils 


The western sections of the area consist of reddish soils associated with the Basalt of the Letaba Formation, Lebombo group. These soils ore 
characterised by marked clay content. 

■ Topography 


The topography of the area is strongly undulating rising from the coastal plain at approximately 200masl (metres above mean sea-level) in the 
east to the edge of plateau at 600masl in the west. The area is characterised by a number of valleys with numerous rivers flowing either towards 
the Umfolozi River in the north or the Mhlatuze River to the south. 


1.10.2 Hydrological features 


Surface Water 


The Municipal area is bounded by two major rivers, the White Umfolozi to the north and the Mhlatuze River to the south. Servo I perennial rivers 
originate within the study area and include the Munywano and the KwoMayayeni draining to the White Umfolozi in the north and the Nholo, the 
Nhlozan, the iBusane, the Nsimnakazi, the Mtimona and the Ntambana which are all tributaries of the Mhlatuze to the south. The source of the 
Nseleni and important tributary of the Mhlatuze also lies outside. 

The Gigizana, the Mzini and the Okula Rivers are tributaries of the Nseleni, the latter which forms the south eastern boundary of the area. There 
ore no prominent lakes or dams within the area except for the newly constructed Crocodile dam near Buchonono. Mhlathuze Water is the bulk 
water supplier in the area, ttowever, the water authority in the area is the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) envisages the 
formulation of Catchment Management Agencies (CMAs) in the next five years which are lawful entities of the National Water Act. The Mfolozi 
and the Mhlatuze Rivers offer potential for irrigation. There are however currently great demands on the Mhlatuze Supply System due to water 
demand in Empangeni and Richards Bay. 

Groundwafer 


77 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Being predominantly sandstone, the geology of the area has a high potential for good groundwater aquifers. The majority of the study area falls 
into Class 2 (water fit for short term use for human and animal consumption). This is interspersed by water of Class 1 (water fit for human 
consumption) while in the north eastern section the trend is not as good and reflects Class 3 (emergency use for human consumption) water 
quality. The majority of the area consists of shallow soils on hard weathered rock belonging predominantly to the Glenrosa and Mispah forms. 

Small sections along the western and southern boundary are characterised by red and yellow apedal freely drained soils. Soils in the area 
surrounding Ntambanana are shallow and show minimal development. This area is surrounded by grayish sandy excessively drained soils. The 
greatest reliance on borehole water is in the northern western sections within the Obuka Traditional Authority area placed in Category 2. Water 
quality in the north eastern sections is generally considered as unsuitable for use. The yields over most of the study area are moderate of 
between 0.5 and 3 litres per second. Poor yields are expected to the south east of less than 0.1 litres per second. 


1.10.3 Air Quality 


Clean Air Management 

The air quality of Ntambanana Municipality may be greatly influenced by Tronox Sands and the surrounding developments at Richards Bay. 
Industrial development in Ntambanana Municipality is at present insignificant but the situation may change in future years. The ecological 
impact of poor air quality depends largely on the actual pollutants found in the atmosphere as well as their concentrations. Air pollutants 
eventually impact upon the terrestrial and aquatic environment through precipitation and condensation. Acid deposition, associated with 
sulphur and nitrogen oxides, will result in changes in soil and water pH, and nutrient concentrations. This commonly affects local flora and 
fauna, particularly sensitive species. 


1.11.5 Climate and Climate Change 


The Ntambanana area is generally cooler and drier than the coastal belt with a mean annual rainfall of between 760mm and 846mm. Most 
rainfall falls in summer. Summers are hot and winters are mild with a mean annual temperature of approximately 20°C. 

The climate of a region is a major natural resource, having a physical aspect, which characterizes the climate-related factors, parameters and 
phenomena that shape the quality and quantity many existing natural resources. As a resource, climate can have considerable influence on 
many of the other natural resources. In fact, its variation may impact agricultural performance, water management, soil management, forestry 
exploitation, the environment, fisheries and other industries. At the same time, the threat of climate change is a significant constraint to 
sustainable socio-economic development and environmental management in the region. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 


May 2014 


78 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Fourth Assessment Report (2007) concludes that climate change will impede nations abilities to achieve sustainable development and the 
Millenium Development Goals, and that regions in Africa will experience reduced agricultural yields. 

Global climate change is possibly the greatest environmental challenge facing the world this century. 

Although often referred to as ‘global warming’, global climate change is more about serious disruptions of the entire world’s weather and 
climate patterns, including impacts on rainfall, extreme weather events and sea level rise, rather than just moderate temperature increases. The 
developing world faces greater challenges than the developed world, both in terms of the impacts of climate change and the capacity to 
respond to it. Climate change is a truly cross cutting issue that can affect the entire economy as well as many specific sectors including energy, 
transport, agriculture, forestry, water resources management and provision of water services, and health. A national climate change response 
strategy promote integration between the programmes of the various government departments involved to maximize the benefits to the 
country as a whole, while minimizing negative impacts. 

Further, as climate change response actions can potentially act as a significant factor in boosting sustainable economic and social 
development, a national strategy specifically designed to bring this about is clearly in the national interest, supporting the major objectives of 
the government including poverty alleviation and the creation of jobs. The strategies outlined below are designed to address issues that have 
been identified as priorities for dealing with climate change in Ntambanana area. 


1.10.5 Climate Change 


Currently the municipality is conscious of the occurrences that might be related to climate change such as:- 

■ Temperature 

- Rainfall 

■ Severe draught 

- More hot days 


Flowever there has been no research as such conducted on the impact of climate change in the area. The municipality will have to develop a 
Climate Change Response Strategy, which will clearly define the risk and strategies for responding to climate change. 


79 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


However the Municipality in corporation with NHBC has started to act despite the absence of the strategy. 

- Almost 1000 Housing units hove been handed with Jojo tanks for water harvesting 
■ Solar geysers will be installed in all housing projects of the municipality. 


1.12 ENVIRONMENTAL SWOT ANALYSIS 


STRENGTHS 


WEAKNESSES 


o According to Comp (1999), the Ntambanana area can be generally 
characterized as having low species sensitivity with large expanses of 
the area already degraded. 


o The degree of endemism in the study area is expected to be 
insignificant. 

o The Moist Zululand Thornveld Bioresource Group shows low 
transformation but is highly fragmented. In general the vegetation 
type is considered to be adequately protected. The Dry Zululand 
Thornveld however shows high transformation and is largely 
unprotected 


o The protection of this Bioresource Group should be seen os a priority. 
Areas identified os having the most important conservation value in 
the area ore the zones bordering on the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Pork os 
well os the Fundimvelo Conservation area to the north of 
Ntambanana town. 


o As a result the intrinsic biodiversity value of land in the project area, 
based on current levels of landscape transformation at a 
landscape, ecosystem and species level is considered to be high 


o Degradation of wetlands os identified os a result of cultivation, 
communal grazing and artificial drainage, river nitrification, dams, 
urbanisation, soil erosion and alien plant invasion will have far 
reaching consequences for ecological function and water quality. 


o Informal settlements specifically on the banks of rivers and near 
major roads are a weakness that must be addressed. Informal 
housing has large biophysical, and social impacts namely water 
pollution due to a lack of water or sanitation, aesthetic impacts, 
poor land management and health and safety issues 


80 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


o The grasslands to the west of the study area are regarded as 
moderately sensitive. 


o There ore also a number of formal conservation areas in the form of 
private game forms; these include Mfuli Game Ranch, Nyalo Game 
Ranch, Enyini Lodge and Thula-Thula Game Reserve. 


o Ntambanana area is not exposed to environmental problems, 
because there are no industries in the area. The only environmental 
issue is air pollution from the burning of sugarcane farms during the 
harvesting season. 


OPPORTUNITIES 


o An open space system will help to ensure the maintenance of the 
biodiversity and amenity of the municipality. 

o To ensure linkages and the added benefit of improving biodiversity 
goods and services, the plan should focus on catchments and rivers 
as well as entry points to the area in terms of amenity. This should look 
at the existing areas and work of the conservancies os well os the 
existing protected area. 


o A Land Use Management System for the municipality is critical to 
ensure sustainable well planned development that will not jeopardise 
the biodiversity, amenity or atmosphere of the municipality. The 
Open Space System as discussed above should be incorporated into 


THREATS 


o Subdivision of agricultural land is of concern as small subdivisions 
hove in the past proved to be unsustainable and therefore have an 
impact on the agricultural potential and economic development of 
the area. Areas of high tourism development demand such the 
coastal areas ore most threatened 


o Inappropriate development will impact on the aesthetics and 
amenity of the area and will result in o loss of tourism potential. 


May 2014 


81 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


this. 


o The municipality exhibits some important fauna and flora with 
conservation significance, educational and Tourism value. 


o As port of the Zulu route the area has large cultural value that can be 
tapped into for both social upliftment and tourism development. 


1.1 0.n SPATIAL SWOT ANALYSIS 


STRENGTHS 

WEEKNESSES 

o 

Locotion-easily accessible from Durban (2 hours drive by car.) 

o Lock of diverse accommodation establishments 

o 

Proximity to Hluhluwe Gome Reserve 

o Poverty and unemployment is a problem throughout the country 
however it is particularly problematic in rural areas. 

o 

Located on the P700 Route 


o 

Diverse Wild life 

o Poor secondary rood Infrastructure 

o 

Unique Culture and Heritage 

o 

Established adventure tourism and associated activities 

o Distance between towns in one region 

o 

The eastern section of the municipal area is close to the 

industrial centres of Richards Boy and Empongeni 

o Market access both for farmers to markets and for tourists is quite 
poor in the rural areas inland from the N2. This limits the realisation of 

O 

1 1 OOOha of state land forms port of the municipal area of 


82 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


jurisdiction 

areas Agricultural and tourism potential. 

o The Municipal Area has good Agricultural Potential, 

particularly in the southern Heotonville area. 

o Due to the rural nature of the municipality and the migration of 
labour much of the income generated within the municipality is 
spent elsewhere particularly in the urban areas such as Durban, 
Richards Bay and Empangeni 

o Ntambanana domestically dominates the hunting and safari 

industry with 29%. It has 30% of the game hunting market, yet not fully 
explored. 

o Limited employment opportunities 

o The existing unskilled labor supply could be a key 

attraction/deciding factor for Industry considering locating within the 
Ntambanana Municipality. 

o Low education and skills levels 


o Limited economic development 


o High backlogs in service delivery 


o Spatial profile: most of study area is sparsely populated making 
service delivery costly 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

o Social upliftment as a result of economic growth is an expected 
positive spin off. 

o Over development of the area due to the large demand for tourism 
and residential development in the area is a threat to the 
atmosphere and as such the areas appeal as a tourism destination. 

o Economic growth is expected mainly in areas of tourism attraction 



83 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


such as, near the pratected areas and the indigenous forests os a 
result of increased tourism interest. Care should however be token to 
strategically determine nodes for various types of development. This 
will help the preservation of the holiday atmosphere of the tourist 
and residential nodes and enable efficient service delivery to the 
various tourism, residential, agricultural and industrial nodes. 


o Provision of housing and basic services, particularly in the rural areas, 
including the identification of areas with potential for housing 
development and the formalisation of current informal or 
overcrowded settlements with housing. Sanitation and storm-water 
drainage. 


o Through increasing awareness of planning documents and 
procedures in the municipality, integrated development will be 
encouraged and community capacity increased to enable the 
communities to realise development opportunities in their areas. 


o There is good provision of electricity in major nodes. 


o As mentioned above the municipality has o large capacity for 
tourism and value adding in the Agricultural industry. 


o Business Tourism 


o Economic growth through integrated development that fits with 


o Due to the lack of employment opportunities within the municipality 
and the cutting back of form worker employment opportunities 
much of the population is involved in migrant labour. This has many 
social impacts and results in the demographic anomalies exhibited 
above such os the high percentage of the population that ore not of 
employable age. 


o Inappropriate development will impact on the aesthetics and 
amenity of the area and will result in o loss of tourism potential. 


o Electricity supply/transmission failures in rural Areas 


o Low supply of water and sewage systems 


o Unstructured settlement is o threat to sustainable service delivery 


May 2014 


84 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


municipal spatial planning objectives will uplift the economic 
environment without encouraging piece-meal development. 


o Optimisation of the tourism potential of the region, through 
sustainable development and association with the district tourism 
promotion, will highlight the environmental and tourism assets of the 
area and aid in poverty alleviation. 


o Cultural and Heritage resources found in Ntombonona 


85 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



86 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Map 10 : Environmental areas 


1.11.12 Municipal Internal Capacity 


In terms of the organizational structure there is currently no position for an environmental officer. However the municipality has employed an 
Intern, with the Environmental Planning degree who is housed at the planning unit. As part of scope of the intern, he also facilitates all issues 
regarding environmental planning. Over and above that, the Manager IDP also is responsible to influence the Management on the issues of 
environment like making sure that all legislative requirement are met and that necessary plans are developed for example the development of 
the SEA. 

Ntambanana Municipality is a small municipality, which makes it difficult to establish a forum for Environmental issues, however all issues relating 
to environmental are discussed in the IDP Representative Forum , which is the best plat form at this point to table such issues. In addition to that, 
the IDP Manager and the Intern represent Ntambanana Municipality in the 

^ The uThungulu District Waste Management Forum 

The Forum which consists of Waste Management Officers and all LMs are represented, including Ntambanana. The waste issues are 
discussed and clean-up campaigns are conducted to the communities, through these forums. As a result Ntambanana annually conduct 
cleanup campaigns in schools in an effort to educate learners about waste minimization, reduction, re-use and recycling or desposal. 

)• uThunguiu District Environmentai Pianning Forum 

The District Environmental Forum is dealing direct with the community in terms of environmental education and awareness. It comprises of 
environmental stakeholders, NGOs, uThungulu DM , industries and affected LMs. Ntambanana LM has participated a lot in the program in 
201 2, in terms of warm bodies and budget was committed in the program and will continuously participate. 

It is the vision of the municipality to establish an environmental office; however financial constraints are hindering the process. 


Successes 

On the b* of March 2013 Ntambanana Municipality hosted the Environmental Protection Awareness Campaigns to more that 1500 
people. The theme of the campaign was “Love your Environment through Reduce, Re-use and Recycle" the initiative was greatly 
supported by the Department of Environmental Affairs in uThungulu Region. 


87 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


iii Ntambanana Municipality adopted the Green Municipality concept, the implementation of which started with Landscaping of 
municipal structures. 

^ Ntambanana Municipality annually participate in the Arbour Day Activities, by donating and planting trees in community structure and 
in schools and teaching people about the importance of water and the environment. 

^ Community Works Program, has assisted the municipality with the employment of people who are responsible for Weed Eradication in all 
community structures. 


1.10.13 Spatial and Environmental Projects/Priorities 


<i Development ot a Strategic Environmental Assessment 

The municipality has observed that there is limited information regarding environmental analysis of the entire Ntambanana area, the information 
that is currently at our disposal needs to be enhanced. 

The SEA aims at ensuring that environmental issues are addressed early in the process of formulating policies, plans, and development 
programs. The need for Strategic Environment Assessment was identified os on indication of the perceived limitations of Project Specific 
Environmental Impact Assessment which only comes in after some approvals have been made. 

It is based on the above that the municipality has planned to budget for the development a Strategic Environmental Assessment in 2014/2015 
financial year . 

<• Feasibility Study tor the Cemetries 

As part of the process of establishing a municipal cemetery/ies, a feasibility will be undertaken to ensure that the area earmarked for this project 
is suitable for such development, following than an EIA will be the next step of the project process 


# Indigenous Tree Plantation programme 

Ntambanana Municipality is in engagements with Wild Lands Conservation Trust which is a Non Governmental Organisation. The engagements 
are among the implementation of indigenous tree plantation programme, waste management and food security. This project will not only 
enhance our environment but will also create job opportunities for local people. 

This initiative is in line with the provincial development goals and those of National Vision 2030. 


May 2014 


88 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


iit Development of Ntambanana Municipal Scheme 

Ntambanana Municipality does not have an existing planning scheme. With the assistance of COGTA, the process of developing the scheme 
has begun. 

Review of the Spatial Development Framework 

The SDF will be reviewed to include amongst others current and future developments and also to reflect a spatial vision. 

I. Development of a fully fledged Waste Management Unit 

Through the funding from National Department of Environmmentol Affairs which has employed 15 youth the municipality has established a fully 
fledge waste management unit which will respond to waste management issues. Waste Management officer has been budgeted for in the 
2014/15 organogram. 

1.13 DISASTER MANAGEMENT 


Ntambanana Municipality faces increasing levels of disaster risk. It is exposed to a wide range of natural hazards, including severe storms that 
con trigger widespread hardship and devastation. In addition to these natural threats and despite ongoing progress to extend essential services 
to poor rural communities, large numbers of people live in conditions of chronic disaster vulnerability - in underdeveloped, ecologically fragile or 
marginal areas - where they face recurrent natural and other threats that range from flooding to fires. 

The Ntambanana Disaster Management Policy Framework is the legal instrument specified by the Act to address such needs for consistency 
across multiple interest groups, by providing a coherent, transparent and inclusive policy on disaster management appropriate for the 
Municipality of Ntambanana as a whole. 


1.13.1 Municipal Institutional Capacity 


Ntambanana Municipality has appointed a Disaster Manager as an initiative to respond to Disaster Management Plan. The role of the Disaster 
Manager is to coordinate and facilitate which includes policy and planning particularly prevention and mitigation, as well as ensuring that 
response plans are in place in the case of emergency incidents. The Disaster Manager interact with all municipal departments, councillors and 
is part of the IDP forum. 


May 2014 


89 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Ntambanana Municipality is also on shared service with the District Municipality for Fire Fighting services. Rural Metro is based in the municipal 
premises and is responsible for immediate response to disaster occurrences, relief and preventions. A certain percentage of the municipal 
budget is reserved for disaster relief. 

Current there is an Interim Disaster Management Forum which report to the EXCO. Councillor Sibiya S.B was nominated by Ntambanana 
Council to serve on Disaster Portfolio of uThungulu District and report bock on all matters regarding disaster in the area. 

Disaster Management Framework was adopted by Council in July 201 1 


1 .1 3.2 Risk Assessment 


Ntambanana Local Municipality faces many different types of risk on a daily basis, including health risks, environmental risks, financial risks and 
security risks. Flowever, disaster risk specifically refers to the likelihood of harm or loss due to the action of natural hazards or other external 
threats on vulnerable structures, services, areas, communities and households. 

Disaster risk assessment is the first step in planning an effective disaster risk reduction programme. It examines the likelihood and outcomes of 
expected disaster events. This would include investigating related hazards and conditions of vulnerability that increase the chances of loss. 

Disaster risk assessment planning requires identification of key stakeholders, as well as consultation with them about the design and/or 
implementation of the assessment and the interpretation of the findings. Risk assessment was done in July 201 2 for Ntambanana Municipality. 

The following hazards and treats were identified during risk assessment: 

I. Waterborne Diseases 

Diseases such as cholera and typhoid are major hazard due to water shortage in Ntambanana. Most people in the tribal areas use water from 
streams, rivers, water springs, thus exposed to waterborne diseases. The lock of proper sanitation also contributes to the high levels of 
waterborne diseases in the community 

II. Flooding 

It has been identified as one of the major hazards especially during rainy season in summer. As the roads including the main road in 
Ntambanana are gravel and when wet they become muddy and slipper thus making traveling very difficult during the rain season. This keeps 
Ntambanana at standstill as business activities and social services cannot even access essential services such os Municipal Offices, clinics and 
Police Station 

III. Drought 


May 2014 


90 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Ntambanana area suffers from drought during the winter season, and it is o result of shortage of water. The shortage of water affects the 
community os livestock and crops die. As crops and livestock ore means of survival for the tribal community, therefore their lives ore adversely 
affected due to drought. Even the subsistence sugarcane farmers who do not hove the irrigation system are affected. 

IV. Veld and Bush Fires: 

Veld fires hove been identified as one of the major risks because Ntambanana area has approximately 55% sugarcane plantations which ore 
susceptible to veld fires. Homesteads are also exposed to veld fires especially in dry wither months, as there was o major fire in July 2002 and 
recently in 2008 and in 2010 where homesteads were destroyed and left with nothing. According to the Department of Water Affairs and 
Forestry the type of fire which Ntambanana is exposed to is moist woodland, which is related to type of vegetation found in Ntambanana. 

The following ore common in all the wards: 

o Fires 
o Floods 
o Storms 
o Tornadoes 
o Drought 
o Epidemics 


1.13.3 Risk Reduction and Prevention 


Although Ntambanana faces o brood range of Disaster Risks, it is not possible to address all potential threats at once. Effective disaster risk 
management planning by all municipal departments as well as by other essential external role players requires careful identification of priority 
disaster risks and the areas, communities, households and infrastructure most vulnerable to the identified risk. 

Not oil areas, communities and households face the same disaster risks. In undertaking disaster risk management planning, priority must be 
placed on those areas, communities and households that ore exposed to natural or other threats, and hove the least capacity to resist and 
recover from the resulting impacts 

Priorities For Focusing Disaster Risk Protection Efforts 


For disaster risk management planning purposes, oil municipal organs of state must, according to their functional area of jurisdiction, give priority 
to protecting; 


May 2014 


91 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


■ strategic infrastructure or services whose damage or disruption during disaster events would result in serious and widespread 
consequences 

- critical economic, commercial, agricultural and industrial zones or sites whose damage or disruption would have serious and widespread 
consequences 

- fragile natural ecosystems and environmental assets that offer protective environmental services and which, if damaged or destroyed in 
a disaster event, would result in serious natural and economic losses 

- communities in areas exposed to extreme weather and/or other natural and technological hazards and which ore therefore likely to 
sustain serious human and property losses in the event of a disaster 

■ poor and underserved rural and urban communities, including informal settlements, especially those located in fragile ecological areas, 
that sustain repeated losses from recurrent small, medium, and large disaster events, and who lock insurance coverage to facilitate 
recovery 

- Highly vulnerable households at-risk with limited capacity to resist or recover from external shocks, particularly child-headed households or 
those headed by the elderly or households affected by chronic illness. 

Where possible, this process must take place in consultation with those most at risk. 

Unfortunately, many small, medium and large disaster events cannot completely be prevented. Their severity con be reduced, however, 
through ongoing disaster mitigation efforts. 


1.13.4 Response and Recovery 


The Response Protocol of Ntambanana therefore identifies relevant agencies and individuals within those agencies who would respond to o 
specific incident and then, in a collective process, a plan of action or o Contingency Plan must be developed for each incident 

The Ntambanana Disaster Management Advisory Forum has studied the Risk/Hazard Analysis os contained in the Ntambanana Disaster Risk 
Profile and has identified the relevant agencies and individuals within those agencies who would respond to o specific incident. 

The following Risk Response Protocol Matrix has subsequently been developed by the Ntambanana Disaster Management Advisory Forum in o 
consultative process. 


May 2014 


92 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Table 2 ; Risk Response Protocol 


DEPARTMENT 

DROUGHT 

FIRE 

FLOOD 

EPIDEMIC 

STORM 


RAILWAY 

MUNICIPAL 








NTAMBANANA MUNICIPALITY 








D/S. MAM. OFFICER 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

MUNICIPAL MANAGER 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

MAYOR 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

C.F.O. 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

TECHNICAL 


X 

X 


X 



UTHUNGULU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY 








D/S. MAN. CENTRE 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

NATIONAL 








N.D.M.C. 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

S.A.P.S. 


X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

PROVINCIAL 








P.D.M.C. 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

HEALTH 


X 

X 

X 

X 


X 


May 2014 


93 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


WELFARE 

X 

X 

X 


X 



TRANSPORT 



X 


X 



R.T.I. 


X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

AGRICULTURE& E/AFF 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



EDUCATION 


X 

X 

X 

X 



HOME AFFAIRS 


X 

X 


X 



HOUSING 


X 

X 


X 



KZN WILDLIFE 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



N.G.O. 








S.A. RED CROSS 


X 

X 

X 

X 



ORG. AGRICULTURE 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 



F.P.A. 


X 






ORG. BUSINESS 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 

S.A. WEATHER 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 


X 


1.13.5 Training and Awareness 


Training programmes for communities focus on disaster risk awareness, disaster risk reduction, volunteerism and preparedness. Local indigenous 
knowledge is incorporated into training programmes aimed at local communities. Where appropriate, communities are given the opportunity 
to modify and enhance training programmes through the inclusion of indigenous knowledge, practices and values, and the incorporation of 
local experience of disasters and disaster risk management. Indigenous knowledge must is also harnessed and incorporated into needs analyses 
and course development processes. 

The Provincial Disaster Management Centre (PDMC) is responsible for promoting, facilitating and overseeing the development and 
implementation of training programs and materials for practitioners in disaster risk management and associated fields. 

Provincial and municipal organs of state must plan, organise and implement training programmes relevant to their respective areas of 
responsibility in consultation with local communities. 

The Disaster Management Section of Ntambanana Municipality has established links with existing community risk awareness programmes in 
schools for the purposes of disseminating information on disaster risk management and risk avoidance. 


May 2014 


94 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The creation of programmes in schools, focusing on relevant and appropriate aspects of disaster risk management, are encouraged 


o Ntambanana Municipality in association with the District are conducting disaster awareness campaigns 
o The municipality plans to install the lighting poles in the areas that almost hit by lightning 

o The municipality in association with Rural Metro have training programs for communities on how to prevent and respond to disaster 
occurrences 

o Through the Land Use Management System and in corporation with amakhosi it is a municipality plea that people be placed in more 
safer and accessible areas. 


95 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2. 

DEMOGRAPHIC CHARATERISTICS 


2.1 

Population Size 


The comprehensive census survey undertaken from 1996-2011 suggests that Ntambanana does not have a static population growth nor 
decline. This is evidenced from a growth that of 14% that was experienced between 1996-2001 while a very sharp decline of 12% was 
experienced between 2001-201 1 . 

This implies that the number of people found in Ntambanana is almost the same for the past 15 years (between 1996-2011). This growth and 
decline can be attributed to factors such as in and out migration, an increase in child birth rates and increase in death rates. Below is the figure 
reflecting the fluctuation of municipal population growth since 1996. 

Figure 1: Population 


96 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


90000 

80000 

70000 

60000 

50000 

40000 

30000 

20000 

10000 

0 


84771 


7270 



12826 


12441 


Population Households 

■ 1996 ■ 2001 ^2011 


Figure 1: Population Growth and Decline 



PO PLI LATIO N PO PLI LATIO N PO PLI LATIO N 
1996 2001 2011 


The figures above depicts a number of questions for the leadership and management, as to what is the cause for a decrease. For example if 
the decrease in household size or population is a result of dearth’s, on investigation need to be explored working together with affected 
stakeholders like the Department of Health, Social Development and Home affairs. To establish the causes of dearths and thereafter develop 
strategies that will mitigate those challenges. 


2.2 Population Distribution 


The population is relatively evenly spread among the eight wards with Wards 1 , 4 and 6 being the least populated words within the municipality. 
Although the population size is not very high, of significance is the high average household size which is worsened by the low level of services 
enjoyed in the area. The largest proportion of the population (656-9434 people/ km^) is based in the traditional authority areas. These areas ore 
predominantly rural areas and ore characterized by low levels of basic services and access to major employment centres in Empangeni and 
Richards Bay. These areas have low levels of employment and high levels of poverty. 


97 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Figure 2 : Population Distribution by Wards 



Figures: Population Distribution b 

y Ward; 


WdiQ o 


4/4 

no 


vvdro / 


yozu 


WdlQ D 


4bb 

17 

VVdrQ J 


onr 


M 

WdlQ 4 


oUbo 



WdlQ j 




WdlQ L 

Wardl 


12 



0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 


Source: Census 2011 


98 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2.3 Population Density 


The largest proportion of the total population in the Ntambanana Municipal area is based in the Traditional Authority areas. The average 
population densities varies from 0 - 1200 people/km2. The highest population densities are found in the Somopho North area and Somopho 
South Traditional Authorities (which varies from 600 - 1200 people/km2). 

The population density in the other tribal areas ore 100 -400 people/km2. The overage population density is less than 300 people/km2. This is low 
bearing in mind that the overage number of people per km2 in Richards Bay area for instance will be above 2000 people/km2. 

Map 11: Population Density 



99 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2.4 Population Distribution by population Group 


Figures: Population Distribution by population Group 


Population Distribution by population group 

wards 
ward? t 
wards 

wards | 

ward4 
wards __ 

Ward? ^ 

Wardl 


0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 



Wardl 

Ward? 

wards 

ward4 

wards 

wards 

ward? 

wards 

■ other 

0 

1 

2 

5 

11 

6 

47 

4 

■ white 

0 

6 

5 

8 

22 

S 

6S 

8 

■ Indian 

6 

21 

11 

5 

2S 

2 

29 

16 

■ Coloured 

2 

1 

15 

0 

7 

5 

94 

4 

■ Black A 

6994 

9491 

10261 

8046 

10644 

94S8 

9587 

9442 


Source Stat SA 2011 

Overall, more than three quarters of the municipal population is block African, with o percentage of 99%, which has remained constant over 
the post two decades. The percentage number of white population has decreased slightly from 0, 2% in 2001 to 0,1% in 201 1 . A high number of 
block Africans ore found in word 5 followed by ward 3. Remarkable word 7 has o number of whites’ population and colourds as compared to 
the rest of the municipal wards. 

The figure below indicates the percentage number for each population group in the municipal total population. 


100 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Figure 4 : Percentage Population Distribution by Race 


Population Distribution by Race 


c 

o 

'ip 

re 


o. 

o 

Q. 


100000 

90000 

80000 

70000 

60000 

50000 

40000 

30000 

20000 

10000 



u 

Black 

African 

Coloure 

d 

Indian 

White 

Other 

■ 2001 

84538 

83 

11 

140 

0 

■ 2007 

94050 

0 

0 

144 

0 

■ 2011 

73904 

127 

29 

116 

75 


Source Census 2001, 2011 and Community Survey 


The figure below is reflecting the comparison of 2001 census, 2007 community survey and 201 1 Census. It evident that the residents within 
Ntambanana Municipality remains Black Africans with high numbers as compared to other population groups. However it is important to note 
that there has been a decrease of black Africans in 201 1 , this may be as result of total decrease of the entire population. It is further notable 
that the “other” column has representation; it might be a case of the influx of Chinese people in the area, some of which have became 
permanent residents within the municipal area. 


2.5 Population distribution by sex and Age 


The age and sex structure of the population is a key determinant of population change and dynamics. The shape of the age distribution is an 
indication of both current and future needs regarding educational provision for younger children, health care for the whole population and 
vulnerable groups such as the elderly and children, employment opportunities for those in the economic age groups, and provision of social 
security services such as pension and assistance to those in need. 


101 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The age and sex structure of smaller geographic areas are even more important to understand given the sensitivity of small areas to patterns of 
population dynamics such as migration and fertility. If one con better understand components of population growth in a local municipality, 
such information can be used as o direct indicator of the needs of the population 


Figure 5 

: Ward Distribution by Sex 

Ward Population Distribution by 

Sex 

Wards 

Ward? 

Ward 6 

Wards 

Ward 4 

Wards 

Ward? 

Wardl 

■ Females ■ Males 










Source: Census 2011 


Figure 6: % of Municipal Population Distribution by Sex 


102 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


% of Municipal Population Distribution by Sex 

60% 

50% ^ 

■ 2001 

■ 2007 

■ 2011 


Females Males 

Source : Census 201 1 



When referring to the figure above, it is normal for rural regions to have a higher ratio of female to males. This is exacerbated by their higher life 
expectancy of the female group and the absence of a significant proportion of males due to migrant labour practices. In the comparison 
above it remains unquestioned that female population remain dominant in the municipal area. Community Survey shows that although there is 
a slightly decreases of 1% in males which make females to remain dominant in the area, there is an increase in 201 1 where we see the male bar 
growing. This could be as result of closure of mines in Johannesburg where more males used to work. It may be also a fact that more males from 
other countries have settled within the muncpali area, including the Somalians, Ethiopians and Chinese. It is vital for the municipality to divise 
more programs targeted at women empowerment have been undertaken by the municipality. 


2.6 Distribution of Municipal Population by Five Year Age Groups and Sex 


Table 3: Population Distribution by Age 


Age Group 

Ward 

1 

Ward2 

Wards 

Ward4 

Wards 

Wards 

Ward7 

Wards 

total 

% 

85+ 

47 

50 

48 

44 

52 

60 

32 

55 

388 

0 . 05 % 

80-84 

59 

94 

109 

52 

66 

67 

53 

72 

571 

0 . 76 % 


103 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Source : Census 201 1 


A high percentage of the population foils within the economically active group i.e. the 15-34 age categories. Notable there is on increment of 
1% in economically active group. However unemployment in the potentially economically active group is high and excessive poverty is 
prevalent. The municipality has various youth programs developed to capacitate the large group of youth that is unemployed. The second 
large number in age distribution is 5-14 years. The municipality in co-operation with the Department of Education and Social Development has 
an early childhood programme that is aimed at capacitating children. 

Figure: 7 Population Distribution by Age Cohorts 


May 2014 


104 I P a g e 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



<15 15-64 65 + 


Source: Census 2011 

It is interesting to note that even at district level, age profile 
indicated that the majority of the population approximately 60% is 
between 15-64 with children accounting about 36%of the 
population. Further it is important to note that in 201 1 there has 
been fair growth in 0-4 age group which may mean that Child 
mortality rate has dropped. It may also mean that more people are 
becoming pregnant and have babies. It is a challenge for the 
municipality to develop more programs for the young age since it 
dominant group within the municpality 


2.7 House Holds and Services 


Ntambanana Municipality has 12 826 households with an average of 5.8 household size. In 2001 there were 12441 households with an average 
of 6.6 household size. 

2.7.1 Female Headed Households 

Table 4: Female Headed Households 



Female 

Male 

KZN283: 

Ntambanana 

7375 

5451 

Ward 1 

805 

388 

Ward 2 

936 

553 

Ward 3 

1037 

609 

Ward 4 

806 

531 

Ward 5 

1085 

856 

Ward 6 

883 

676 

Ward 7 

940 

1134 

Ward 8 

883 

703 


105 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Grand Total 


14749 


10903 


Source SA 201 1 


Figure 8 : Head of House Hold by Gender 


Head of Household by Gender 

1200 
1000 
800 
600 
400 
200 
0 

wl w2 w3 w4 w5 w6 w7 w8 
■ Female ■ Male 



Source SA 201 1 

It is clear from above those most households ore headed by females in almost oil the words, o total percentage of 57% for the entire municipal 
households are headed by females. This indicates that for the municipality, more projects and programs of women empowerment must be 
initiated. 


2.8 HIV/AIDS SCENARIOS 


There ore no clear statistics which con be reliable be used to determine the rote of HIV in Ntombonona area. The only reliable HIV/AIDS 
situation for Ntombonona is based on the District and provincial information. 

The uThungulu District emphasize that the impact of HIV/Aids is o very serious issue and should be incorporated into municipal strategies. Typical 
impacts of AIDS include decreased productivity of workers, increased absenteeism and additional costs of training of new workers. It also 
represents o greater demand and pressure on health facilities and as the statistics gathered from antenatal clinics indicate a very real problem 
of AIDS orphans and child (minor) headed households. These factors must be token cognizance of when devising local economic development 


106 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


strategies. The concerns about the impact of HIV on uThungulu District need to be reiterated os KwoZulu-Notal has the highest HIV prevalence 
rate of all the provinces. 

The Centre for Actuarial Research compiled o report that considers the Demographic Impact of HIV/Aids in South Africa and a number of 
findings from the above mentioned report ore also shown in this section (Dorrington R E, Johnson L F, Bradshaw D and Daniel T. The 
Demographic Impact of HIV/Aids in South Africa. National and Provincial Indicators for 2006. Cope Town: Centre for Actuarial Research, South 
African Medical Research Council and Actuarial Society of South Africa.) 

The following figure depicts the incidence of HIV/Aids in the province and in the uThungulu Family of Municipalities. It is noted that HIV/Aids has 
increased by 140% between 1996 and 2010 in the province and by 163% in uThungulu district. 


Figure 9: uThungulu District HIV/AIDS Incidences 


KZN - DC28 Uthungulu 
District Municipality 

KZN281: Mbonambi 
Local Municipality 

KZN282: uMhIathuze 
Local Municipality 

KZN283: Ntambanana 
Local Municipality 

KZN284: uMlalazi 
Local Municipality 

KZN285: Mthonjaneni 
Local Municipality 

KZN286: Nkandia Local 
Municipality 


It is interesting to note from the above figure that the incidence of HIV/Aids seems to have stabilized - this is in line with the notion that the 
disease in reaching maturity. More details are provided in the following table with regard to the infection numbers for the district and its local 
municipalities between 1996 to 2010. 



107 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Table 5: Incidences of HIV/AIDS 



KZN 

uThungulu 

Mbonambi 

uMhIathuze 

Ntambanana 

uMlalazi 

Mthonjaneni 

Nkandia 

1996 

548,065 

50,382 

6,863 

13,790 

4,757 

15,051 

2,343 

7,577 

1997 

724,922 

67,367 

8,964 

19,667 

6,336 

19,264 

3,305 

9,832 

1998 

911,221 

85,551 

11,111 

26,544 

8,007 

23,380 

4,407 

12,102 

1999 

1,093,690 

103,761 

13,158 

34,032 

9,670 

27,078 

5,594 

14,230 

2000 

1,248,504 

119,693 

14,823 

41,301 

11,114 

29,802 

6,731 

15,921 

2001 

1,382,173 

133,897 

16,196 

48,435 

12,390 

31,772 

7,832 

17,272 

2002 

1,403,087 

136,980 

16,194 

51,697 

12,634 

31,005 

8,308 

17,142 

2003 

1,457,086 

143,357 

16,630 

55,934 

13,206 

31,109 

8,967 

17,511 

2004 

1,474,813 

145,947 

16,631 

58,642 

13,421 

30,450 

9,375 

17,429 

2005 

1,436,264 

142,829 

15,997 

58,899 

13,108 

28,729 

9,394 

16,702 

2006 

1,405,089 

140,284 

15,482 

59,067 

12,861 

27,330 

9,413 

16,131 

2007 

1,361,817 

136,440 

14,861 

58,450 

12,499 

25,847 

9,313 

15,470 

2008 

1,319,154 

132,627 

14,287 

57,644 

12,142 

24,514 

9,186 

14,855 


SOURCE: Global Insight 2010 

Evidence from the National AIDS Spending Assessment (NASA) data shows that over the last five years KZN has witnessed limited investment in 
primary prevention interventions compared to treatment, care and support; particularly those aimed at sexual behavioural change. For 
example, in 2007/08 and 2008/09 the province spent only about 2% of voted expenditure on communication prevention; no funds were voted 
for communication prevention in 2009/10. ART on the other hand (ARV and ART nutrition) received up to 36% of the voted funds in 2008/09. No 
conditional grant was allocated to behaviour change interventions, providing further testimony to inadequate investment in prevention. While 
the imperative of treatment and care programmes cannot be ignored, additional focus on prevention needs is necessary as is drastic scaling 
up on investment in order to halt the epidemic and achieve the municipal vision. Focus on prevention and scaling up means that a multi- 
pronged approach will be adopted where biomedical, behavioural, social and structural approaches are simultaneously applied. Prevention of 
new FIIV/AIDs infections therefore remains a priority. 


May 2014 


108 (Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION C3: MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND ORGANISATONAL DEVELOPMENT 


3.1 MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION 


Ntambanana Municipality has an adopted Human Resource Strategy that is inclusive and aware of the municipal transformation and 
organisational development. The administrative section which is headed by the Municipal Manager and the political wing which is headed by 
the Honourable Mayor ensures the smooth operation of the municipality. 


3.1 .1 COUNCIL AND MFMA COMMITTEES 


Ntambanana Municipality is a category B municipality in terms of the Municipal Demarcation Act. The municipality functions under the 
collective Executive System. The Executive Committee consists of 4 members, and the municipal council has 8 ward councilors and 8 
proportional Representative councilors. In terms of gender balance there ore six female councilors one being the Mayor and a member of the 
Executive Committee. The rules committee has been established and operates when or where necessary. The Audit Committee has also been 
established and serves os an advisory committee to the Executive Committee 


109 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




3.2 

Organizational Development 


3.2.1 Institutional Arrangements 


•Council Meeetings sits every quarter to take resolutions on the municipal matters, special 
council meetings are also held as and when necessary. Other Council Committees such as 
Portfolio Committees and Executive Committee sits every month and their 
recommendations are submitted to council for final approval. Resolutions are 


•The Municipal Manager submit institutional reports to council on quarterly basis 


•Section 56 managers report to the MM and portfolio committees monthly after the sitting 
of Management Committees that are inclusive of Departmental Senior Managers that are 
not Section 56 


•Junior staff members report on departmental meetings held every month by each 
department. General staff meetings are also held quartely to address other staff issues. 
Resolutions are submitted to Manco meetings 


The municipal workflow is smooth. Staff members sign the attendance registers every morning and every afternoon to endorse their presence at 
work. The statutory meetings ore adhered to every quarter for Council and every month for EXCO. Resolutions token through these meetings are 
recorded on Decision Circular system which is circulated to all relevant departments within the municipality for action. Minutes of the previous 
minutes ore kept as proof of the sitting and ore approved during the next meeting 

The structure established to manage oil aspects of the Municipality is summarised os follows: 


110 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


^ Executive Department, which house the office of the Municipal Manager 
)• Financial Services; 

<• Community and Corporate Services; 

The Section 56 positions ore filled for the above posts. There is currently only one vacancies (see organograms overleaf), which translates to o 
vacancy rote of 0, 5%. 


3.2.3 Organizational Structure 

Ntombonona Municipality has o staff compliment of 39 officials excluding councilors. The municipal organogram as approved by councilors 
makes provision for a Municipal manager, the Chief Financial Officer and Director Community and Corporate Services as Senior Management 
of Ntambanana. 

The municipal organogram will be approved by Council in May 2014. Due to the municipal capacity, our structure does not reflect Technical 
Services Department which is very critical for the municipality. It is operating under the Municipal Managers office. We are in a process of 
sourcing funding for the establishment of this office. 

The municipality has filled most critical positions and is only having a challenge with the Municipal Manager’s vacancy as there ore still some 
legal proceedings which are beyond the municipality’s control. 

Attached is the current Municipal Organogram. 


Ill I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



May 2014 











Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


3.2.2 Powers and Functions 


FUNCTION 

RESPONSIBLE BODY 

SHARED FUNCTION 

Air Pollution 

Local Municipality 

Fire Fighting Services 

Building Regulations 

District and Local Municipality 

Tourism 

Child Care Facility 

Local Municipality 


Electricity Reticulation 

District Municipality 

Municipal Planning 

Fire Fighting 

District and Local Municipality 

Municipal Public Transport 

Local Tourism 

District Municipality and Local Municipality 

Cemeteries, Funeral Parlours and 

Municipal Airports 

District Municipality 

Crematoria 

Municipal Planning 

District and Local Municipality 

Markets 

Municipal Flealth 

District Municipality 

Municipal Abattoirs 

Municipal Public Transport 

Local Municipality 

Municipal Roads 

Storm Water Management 

Local municipality 

Refuse Removal, Refuse Dumps 

Trading Regulation 

Local Municipality 


Water and Sanitation 

District Municipality 


Beaches and Amenities 

Local Municipality 


Billboards, display of advertisements in public 
places 

Local Municipality 


Cemeteries, funeral parlors and crematorium 

Local Municipality 



113 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Control of Public nuisance 

Local Municipality 


Cleansing 

Local Municipality 


Control of undertaking selling liquor to public 

Local Municipality 


Facilities for accommodation , care and burial 
of animals 

Local Municipality 


Fencing and Fences 

Local Municipality 


Licensing of Dogs 

Local Municipality 


Licensing and control of undertakings that sell 
food to the public 

Local Municipality 


Local amenities 

Local Municipality 


Markets 

Local Municipality 


Municipal abattoirs 

District Municipality 


Municipal Parks and Recreation 

Local Municipality 


Municipal Roads 

Local Municipality 


Noise Pollution 

Local Municipality 


Pounds 

Local Municipality 


Public Places 

Local Municipality 


Refuse Removal, refuse dump and solid v^aste 
disposal 

District and Local Municipality 


Street Trading 

Local Municipality 



114 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Traffic and Parking 


Local Municipality 


3.2.4 Municipal Institutional Capacity 

As indicated earlier Ntambanana Municipality is a low capacity municipality, hence, having three Departments that is. Executive and Council, 
Finance and Corporate and Community Services. All critical positions hove been filled. Below is the summary of key functions for each 
department within the municipality. 


Department 

Responsibility 

aj Executive & Council Department; 

■ Integrated Development Planning 

■ Local Economic Development 

■ Property rates 

■ Performance Management 

■ Community participation 

■ Ward Committees 

■ IT 

■ Internal Audit 

■ Technical / Planning 

b) Community and Corporate Services Department; 

Administrative Services 

Community Services 

Human Resources 

Organizational Pertormance Management System 

Legal Services 

c) Finance Services Department 

■ Revenue and Debt collection 

■ Supply Chain 


115 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



■ stock Management 


■ Income and expenditure 


■ Internal Audit 


■ IT Services 


■ Internal Pracedures 


■ Property valuation 


3.2.4.2 STATUS OF CRITICAL POSTS 


POST VACANT 

DEPARTMENT 

DATE POST VACANT 

RECRUITMENT PROGRESS AS 
AT 15 MAY 2014 

REASONS POST NOT 
FILLED WITHIN THREE 
MONTHS 

Municipal Manager 

Executive Department 

2013 

Investigation ongoing 

The post has a legal 
investigation pending. 

Assistant Manager: LED 

Corporate & Community 
Department 

January 2014 

Post advertised in May 2014 

None-Post will be filled 
within three months 


NTAMBANANA MUNICIPALITY OUTSOURCED SERVICES 

Due to lack of capacity within the municipality, some of the municipal functions are autsourced to external service prcviders; however the 
municipality facilitates and approves all work done by external suppliers. 

- Internal Audit Services 

■ Spatial Development Framework 

■ Geo tech investigations services 

■ Preparation of Financial Statements 

- Develapment of Performance Management System 

- Development of Fluman Resource Policies 

- Provision of Information Technology Services 

- Development of prioritized Sector Plans 

■ Local Ecanomic Development Strategy 


116 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


3.2.5 Human Resource Development 

The municipality has a challenge of skills shortages. Since there are no engineers, artisans, financial experts. The municipality escapes by 
outsourcing the skills which are normally costly. There is a budget for training although it is not enough to capacitate each and every employee 
per year. 

The municipality approved a set of Human Resources policies for smooth workflow purpose (see next section). The municipality also approved a 
set of financial management policies os required by legislation. 

The Municipality is in a process of appointing a Municipal Administration Expert which will be shared with all the municipalities falling within the 
jurisdiction of uThungulu District. 

3.3.6 Policies and Sector Plans 
Workplace Skills Development Plan 

Ntombonona Municipality has developed comprehensive Workplace skills Development Plan that is in line with the Skills Development Act . The 
municipality has registered with the Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA) and skills development initiatives hove 
carried out at oil levels of employment. The main focus of the WSDP is on the following:- 

- Employment profile 

- Employment qualification profile 

- Annual Training and skills objectives 

- Number of beneficiaries to be trained 

- Leornerships, skills programmes 
■ Quality assurance 

- IDP Objectives 


^ Employment Equity Plan 

Ntambanana Municipality has developed on Employment Equity Plan according to the Employment Equity Act (no 55 of 1998). The 
municipality recognizes the need to redress post discriminatory treatment of persons from designated groups and to eventually establish an 
environment where “employment equity “prevails. The management and Council are making every effort to establish a representative 

117 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP | 2014/2015 

workforce os quickly and equitable as possible, through transparent and legitimate process that do not impact negatively on the quality of 
service delivery. 

Table 6: Demographic Profile of Employees 


Employment Equity 

Implementation 

Designated 

Group 

Women 

Top Management 

100% 

95% 

Middle Management 

100% 

1% 

Professional staff 

100% 

80% 


The figure above illustrate that the municipality has employed 100% designated group. Further notable is insufficient representative of women in 
top and middle management level. Management is aware of these imbalances and intends to address it 

# Code of Conducf 

Councilors and staff are required to sign the code of conduct and declaration of interest form on an annual basis. These records are kept for 
internal and external purposes only 

ii* Human Resource Policies 

The municipality has developed a number of policies that deals with Human Resource, below is a list of policies found in the Municipal HR Policy 
manually:- 


NO 

POLiCY 

ADOPTED (YES/NO) 

DATE OF ADOPTION 

1. 

Sexual Harassment policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 

2. 

Racial and Ethnic Harassment policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 

3. 

Recruitment policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 


118 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 






4. 

Labour relations policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 

5. 

Remuneration policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 

6. 

Subsistence and Traveling Allowance policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 

7. 

Vehicle policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 

8. 

HIV/AIDS Policy 

Yes 

28 June 2013 

9. 

Occupational Health policy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 

10. 

Training and Skills Development policy. 

Yes 

28 June 2013 

11. 

Human Resource Strategy 

Yes 

03 July 2012 


The above documents can be mode available on request from HR Department. 


119 I P a g e 


May 2014 


The Municipality has a Human Resource Strategy and Retention Strategy to be guided in terms of Human Resource Management, to assist with planning 
of future service delivery and to analyse the gap between the demand, supply and strategies to close the gap. 


It is also aligned to the strategic objectives of the IDP and its also give strategic direction to the municipality which include the following : 

• Health profile 

• HR Development 

• Rural Development 

• Infrastructure Development 

• Revenue enhancement 

• Corporate 

^ Governance 


Succession Plan & Retention 

Ntombonona Municipality like most of municipalities in KZN has difficulties in keeping skilled staff in their post. There ore resignations in almost every year. 
The municipality therefore faces difficulties of maintaining consistency in the workplace 

Council and management are doing oil possible to ovoid this frustrating situation. As o result there is o succession and retention policies which was 
developed and adopted by council. The municipality has developed o Bursary police for staff and reserved R200, 000.00. This is one of the strategies the 
municipality is implementing hoping that it will capacitate and retain skilled staff. 

iit Performance Management 

In terms of the municipal systems act oil municipalities are required to prepare a performance management system that will serve o strategic approach to 
management which is aimed at equipping managers, employees at different levels with a set of tools and techniques to regularly plan, continuously 
monitor, periodically measure and review performance of the organization. 

Ntambonona municipality has started implementing the new PMS template provided by COGTA. 

« HIV/AIDS STRATEGY 

Ntombonona municipality sow the need to develop o plan that will help it in its Endeavour’s to fight against this disease. This strategic plan is o tool that 
will guide the municipality in co-coordinoting efforts of oil those that have committed their time, energy and resources to trying to reduce the impact of 
the disease. The strategy was adopted by council in September 2006 it is still in operation but there is need for review since new relevant statistics will be 
available from Statistics 201 1 results. 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


* COMMUNICATION POLICY 

Local government has a legal obligation and a political responsibility to ensure regular and effective communication with the community. The 
Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Act 1996 and other statutory enactments all impose an obligation on local government communicators and 
require high levels of transparency, accountability, openness, participatory democracy and direct communication with the communities to improve the 
lives of all. It is on these basis that Ntambanana Municipality has developed its communication strategy which was adopted by Council in September 
201 1 . Highlights of The Strategic Objective of Ntambanana Communication Policy 

Firstly through external communication, to seek continued participation in municipal affairs and an improvement in public perception and 
understanding of the municipality, its functions and the services it provides. As part of the external communication process it will: 

Secondly through e-communication, to maximise the opportunities to communicate creatively and effectively through the use of new technology, so that 
the community has easy access to information about the Municipality, including the investment and tourism opportunities it presents. It undertakes to 
continuously update its website and use it to 

Thirdly to establish a corporate identity for the Municipality so as to strengthen the council's visual profile locally, regionally and nationally through 
consistent use of a strong corporate logo. It will: 

Fourthly to improve internal communication so as to increase staff understanding of the aims and objectives of the municipal council and promote ways 
of improving communication between business units. The outcome of the Municipality’s objective must clearly result in the Municipality keeping the 
community informed about issues relating to the Municipality, to involve them in the affairs of the Municipality and lastly and extremely importantly, to 
consult them on important issues in accordance with the various statutory enactments regulating the relationship between the Municipality and the 
community it serves. 

^ Municipal Indigent Policy 

Ntambanana has compiled an Indigent Register as per the requirement of the Municipal Systems Act of 2000, Section 74. The register is continuously 
implemented by the municipality. The act provides that aMunicipal Council should take into consideration the extent of subsidization of tariffs for the poor 
households who cannot afford the cost of full provision by the municipality. Indigents are classified as people who are earning a combined total monthly 
income of R1500 or less. Ntambanana Municipality is currently offering the following services to indigents as per the Indigent register: 

■ Destitute/Pauper/Indigent burials support 

■ Refuse Removal 

■ Free Basic Electricity 

■ Free Basic Energyjgel & stoves) 

■ Water (district) 

■ Fire/disaster Protection 


May 2014 


121 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


■ Recreational Facilities 


<• Youth Policy 

The Ntambanana Youth Policy was formulated after the youth committee was established. The policy was compiled using the national guidelines for the 
establishment of youth committees 

Objectives for the Establishment of Youth Committees 

■ Too organize the youth into o recognized institution 

■ To nurture encourage and promote youth involvement in its own development and that of its own community 

■ To encourage a sense of belonging among the youth of Ntambanana 

■ To instill and promote responsibility among young youth 

■ To promote youth working - togetherness by bringing the youth together through sports, entertainment and other activities. 

■ To fit youth unemployment and lock of skills 

■ To facilitate information amongst oil youth structures within Ntambanana os well os with the international , national and provincial youth structures 

■ To identify existing or potential resources that could facilitate and accelerate Local Economic Development 

■ To ensure that youth is an integral port of the planning of oil sectors and spheres of government and benefits in projects initiated by those sector 
departments 

■ To ensure that youth plays a visible and tangible role in fighting against all epidemic diseases including HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis etc. 


122 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


3.4 Municipal Transformation and Organisational Development SWOT Analysis 


STRENGTHS 

WEAKNESSES 

o Human Resources Policies in place 
o Human Resources Strategy in place 
o Performance Management System in place 
o Workplace Skills Plan 
o Organogram with few vacancies 
o Job Descriptions 

o Budget constraints for capacity building 
o Low municipal capacity 
o Resignation of critical staff 

o Incapacity to attract critical staff due to its 
geographical location 

OPPORTUNITIES 

THREATS 

Funding sources 

Shared Services 

• Improved functioning of IGR Structures 

• Alignment /integration between locals and district 
plans 

• Enrolment of councillors on accredited training/ 
programs 

o Geographical location of the municipality 

o Incapacitated staff members 

o Political environment 

o High unemployment rote 

o Illiteracy 


123 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION C4 : SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE ANALYSIS 

4.1 Water and Sanitation Services 


Adequate water supply in the Ntambanana Municipal area is a major problem. The majority ot residents (64% to 100%) within the tribal areas 
have not adequately been provided with water supply, which need to be addressed urgently. Water supply in the tribal areas is basically 
provided from boreholes. The basic human right ot people having access to a potable source ot water at a rate of 251/capita per day 
within a walking distance of 200m as provided for in the Constitution, need to be recognized as the eventual goal in the provision of this 
service. The majority of the households (69 %) within the municipal area has inadequate access to potable water supply and has to use 
water from streams and rivers for human consumption. Only 1 .28 % of the households have water connected to their houses. A backlog of 
almost 12000 households (1 1 850) with inadequate water supply has to be addressed. 

The responsibility to provide water and sanitation services vests in the uThungulu District Municipality, being the appointed Water Services 
Provider and also the Water Services Authority. The function os Water Services Provider is undertaken in terms of o Service Agreement 
between the Ntambanana Local Municipality and the uThungulu District Municipality. In terms of this responsibility, uThungulu District 
Municipality is responsible for the implementation of new capital projects to extent water services to those communities that have not been 
served thereby, and is also responsible for the operation and maintenance of these facilities. 

Table 7: Access to water 


Geography by Piped water 
for Household weighted 


Piped (tap) 

water inside 
dwelling/institut 
ion 

Piped (top) 

water inside 
yard 

Piped (tap) 

water on 

community 
stand: distance 
less than 200m 
from 

dwelling/institut 

ion 

Piped (top) 

water on 

community 
stand: distance 
between 200m 
and 500m from 
dwelling/institut 
ion 

Piped (tap) 

water on 

community 
stand: distance 
between 500m 
and 1 000m 

(1km) from 

dwelling 
/institution 

Piped (tap) 

water on 

community 
stand: distance 
greater than 
1000m (1km) 

from 

dwelling/institut 

ion 

No access to 
piped (tap) 

water 

KZN283 

608 

2250 

3264 

1375 

869 

329 

4131 

Word 1 

26 

10 

434 

58 

20 

115 

530 


May 2014 


124 [Page 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Ward 2 

9 

23 

223 

362 

109 

21 

742 

Ward 3 

19 

177 

471 

48 

261 

69 

600 

Ward 4 

192 

292 

47 

338 

47 

1 1 

408 

Ward 5 

122 

437 

312 

107 

239 

8 

715 

Ward 6 

86 

485 

447 

201 

62 

42 

237 

Ward 7 

89 

379 

438 

150 

101 

56 

861 

Ward 8 

63 

447 

891 

1 1 1 

30 

6 

37 


Source : Census 201 1 


4.1 .1 Water Services Backlogs 


In terms of the most recent update of the Water Services Development Plan, it has been indicated that 42% backlogs still exists in respect of 
v/ater services v/ithin the Ntambanana Local Municipality, and about 6969 households have no access to v/ater. The table above indicates 
an improvement in the number of household v/ith access to tap v/ater. Recent statistics are evidence v/hich proves the district is doing a 
commendable v/ork in an effort to lessen the v/ater backlog. Belovv' the table shov/ the districts backlog for v/ater supply: 


Table 8: Water Service Backlog 



2001 / 2002 
Households 

2001/2002 

% 

Backlog 

2008 / 2009 

Households 

Households with 
Water 

Household without 

Water 

2011/2012 

% Backlog 

Mbonambi 

(KZ281) 

12664 

97.% 

20 615 

12 689 

7 130 

34% 

Ntambanana 

(KZ283) 

9528 

81% 

16 339 

9 024 

6 969 

42% 


May 2014 


125 1 P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


uMlolozi (KZ284) 

34484 

82 % 

42 623 

21 885 

20 738 

48% 

Mthonjoneni 

(KZ285) 

6056 

78 % 

9 712 

5 026 

2 874 

30% 

Nkondlo (KZ286) 

21085 

72 % 

25757 

17626 

8131 

32% 

Total 

83817 

81% 

115 046 

67727 

47319 

41 % 


Source : uThungulu DM Water Service Plan 

Figure 10: Sources of Water 


126 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



The access to different sources of wafer varies per word, os we can see above in word 8 if is clear that there is a wafer scheme that is active 
cmapring to word 4 and 2. 


4.1 .2 Future Water Supply 


The Premier of Kwazulu Natal and uThungulu District Municipality signed a public /private parrmenrship with Tongoot Hulett. The partnership 
comes with a 75 million from the office of the premier and notional treasury , this partnership will ensure that water is tost tracked over the 
next three years. The project is culmination of Ntambanana Development needs. Tongaat Mullet will allow for the use of bulk water supply 
from Heatonville to other areas in Ntambanana. 

Due to the susceptibility of the existing water supply schemes to drought conditions and the failure thereof during such times, the uThungulu 
District Municipality has identified the Goedertrouw Dorn as the only sustainable source to supply the western regions of the Ntambanana 
Local Municipality, and hove thus embarked on a programme to establish o regional water supply scheme from this source. The scheme will 

127 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


be known as the Goedertrouw regional supply scheme and will provide water to the total tribal area of Biyela. The original intention of the 
regional water supply scheme was to develop this in 6 phases. Funding has already been received for the first 2 phases, which will allow for 
the construction of: 

■ A new treatment works at the Goedertrouw Dam. 

■ Pump stations and bulk pipelines from the treatment works in a northerly direction towards Mthonjaneni. 

■ Bulk reservoirs, gravity pipelines and reticulation network to the southern communities of Mthonjaneni ending at Nomponjwana. 


The project will thereafter continue in the provision of infrastructure north from Nomponjwana to the northern boundary of Ntambanana as 
the final phases. The total duration for the implementation of this project is not known as this is dependent on the receipt of sufficient funding 
to complete this. 

Water supply to the eastern portion of the Ntambanana Local Municipality is currently effected through the Upper Nseleni pipeline, the 
capacity of which is currently insufficient. Upgrading to the bulk pipeline have already commenced through construction and it is 
anticipated that this will continue over a period of time until sufficient capacity has been established to provide to all of the communities up 
to the Buchanana town through this pipeline 


128 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



NTAMMMAMA MUMiCIMUJrVi 
lor 


Water Sarvica Backlog 


Legend 

# Existing Centres 


□□ Ntambanana LM 
I I Municipal Wards 




129 I P a 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.1.3 Sanitation Backlogs 

In Ntambanana informal towns and settlements there is no formal sewerage disposal system. Sewerage disposal is causing harm to 
underground water. Study shows that water from the boreholes in most municipal wards is not suitable for human consumption due to 
unacceptable waste disposal system of Ntambanana municipal areas. 

In terms of the Census 201 1, more than 57% of the households within the municipal area have no access to sanitation facilities. However o 
recent local study which was conducted by uThunglu in 2009 indicate only 29% backlog in sanitation. Forty three percent of the households 
use Pit Latrines. The lack of access to adequate sanitation facilities occur basically in the municipal area at schools, creches, pension 
payout points, etc. From this it is apparent that the majority of the population does not adequately have access to a formalized service in 
this respect. A programme for the implementation of sanitation in the form of ventilated improved pit latrines in ward 6, 7 and 8 respectively 
has been approved and funded by uThungulu District Municipality. 


130 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Sanit»tion Service Bacfclo9 


Legend 

# Extstrng Centres 
I i Ntambar\ana LM 

I I Municipal Wards 

Census_2011 

1^1 idiet PfT VIP 
i^iet cneTTTicai 
^letBucxet 
ibiet Pn 

'C^ietPitMifthoiitveniiaeon 
*toiet^Mne 
tMl 'toietOVier 


131 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Table 9: Access to Sanitation 


Toilet facilities by Geography 
for Household weighted 


KZN283: Ntombanana 

52803001; Ward 1 

52803002: Ward 2 

52803003: Ward 3 

52803004: Ward 4 

52803005: Ward 5 

52803006: Ward 6 

52803007; Ward 7 

52803008: Ward 8 

Grand Total 

None 

3112 

577 

1045 

660 

96 

559 

14 

129 

30 

6224 

Flush toilet (connected to sewerage system) 

228 

10 

8 

14 

7 

57 

1 1 

77 

45 

456 

Flush toilet (with septic tank) 

216 

17 

4 

8 

1 1 

39 

16 

91 

30 

432 

Chemical toilet 

351 

9 

38 

151 

4 

12 

108 

16 

12 

702 

Pit toilet with ventilation (VIP) 

5057 

334 

18 

202 

703 

195 

1307 

988 

1310 

10115 

Pit toilet without ventilation 

3012 

108 

365 

462 

391 

1048 

94 

396 

149 

6025 

Bucket toilet 

271 

37 

2 

99 

117 


3 

8 

4 

541 

Other 

579 

101 

9 

49 

7 

32 

5 

369 

6 

1157 

Grand Total 

12826 

1193 

1490 

1646 

1337 

1941 

1558 

2074 

1586 

25652 


Source: Census 201 1 

Figure 1 1 : Access to Sanitation 


May 2014 


132 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



133 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Table 10: Status ot Sanitation Backlog For uThungulu Family ot Municipalities 



2001 / 2002 
Households 

2001/2002 

% 

Backlog 

2008 / 2009 

Households 

Households with 

Sanitation 

Households without 

Sanitation 

2011/2012 

% 

Backlog 

Mbonambi (KZ281) 

12664 

99.% 

20 615 

10 572 

10 043 

49% 

Ntambanana 

(KZ283) 

9528 

76% 

16 339 

7 796 

4 761 

29% 

uMlalazi (KZ284) 

34484 

85% 

42 623 

12 253 

30 370 

71% 

Mthonjaneni (KZ285) 

6056 

95% 

9 712 

8480 

1232 

13% 

Nkandia (KZ286) 

21085 

94% 

25 757 

15 321 

10 436 

41% 

Total 

82817 

89% 

115 046 

54 422 

56 842 

49% 


4.1 .4 Funds required eradicating backlogs in water and sanitation 


The current funding of about R 200 million (excl. escalation and inclusive of MIG & DWA funding), will take UDM at least 20 years to eradicate Water 
Service Backlogs If the access target of 100% were to be achieved in 3 years (i.e. by 2014) then UDM would require approximately R1 .95 billion per annum 
from 2012/13 and 2013/14 to eradicate backlog An additional R140 million per annum MIG funding for operation and maintenance of infrastructure is also 
required. 


134 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


Summary of Ntambanana Local Munipality Capital Funding Required 

Rural water scheme R 494 Millions 
Rural Sanitation R 41 Millions 

Total R534 Millions 


4.1 .5 UThungulu Infrastructural Projects for Ntambanana Municipality 


Table 1 1 : Planned Water & Sanitation Projects for 3 years 


KZ 

PROJECT NAME 

COUNCIL 

WARDS 

START 

COMPLETE 

ESTIMATED 

COST 

SUB WARDS 

2012/13 

2013/14 

2014/15 

KZ 283 

283-3 VIP Project 

1,2 

Sep-1 1 

March-14 

R 1 3,500,000 

ALL SUBWARDS 

R 7,500,000 

R 7 1 30 000 

R 0 

KZ 283 

283-4 VIP Project 

3 

April -12 

October-12 

R 1 3,500,000 

ALL SUBWARDS 

R 3 500 000 

R 8 300 000 

R 3 000 000 

KZ 283 

Greater 

Mthonjoneni SSA 4 

Partial 4,3 

Nov-12 

May-15 

R 21,096,433 

KZ 285-Ncluclulu, 
Hawule, Wabaza 
& KZ 283-Mpevu, 
Nkwenkwe, 
Emosongweni, 
Nomponjwono 

R 5,000,000 

R 5,362,433 

R 10 000 000 


135 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KZ 283 

Greater 

Mthonjaneni SSA 5 

partial 2,3,5 

April -12 

Oct-14 

R 47,078,511 

Oqhabiyeni, 
Ogelweni, Emfeni, 
Esidakeni, 
Gobihlahia, 

Partially 

Emkhandiwini 

R 5,384,607 

R 10,000,000 

R 15,000,000 

KZ 283 

Luamba Bulk 

Supply 

Partial 

2,5,7 

July 13 

Nov- 14 

R 73 000 000 

Mabhensa 

Hetonville, 

bhucanana 

R 0 

R 20 000 000 

R 40 000 000 

TOTAL 







R 21 384 
607 

R 50 792 433 

R 68 000 000 


Table12 : Projects under Construction 


PROJECT NAME 

SCOPE OF WORKS 

CONTRACT 

AMOUNT 

COMMENCE 

DATE 

COMPLETION 

DATE 

ACTUAL 

PROGRESS% 

ACTUAL 

CASH FLOW 

WARD 

SUBWARDS 

Ntambanana 
Sanitation Phase 
3 

Construction of 
2934 precast VIP 
toilets. 

R 13,723,511.91 

03-Oct- 

2011 

31-Dec-13 

58% 

R7,964,850 

1&2 

All Subwards 

Greater 

Mthonjaneni 

SSA5 Bulk 

Construction of 
bulk pipeline and 
reservoirs 

R 29,970,000.00 

13-Mar- 12 

31-Jul-13 

51% 

R 20,101,507 

2,3 & 5 

Emfeceni, 

Emkhandiwini, 

Esidakeni, 

Gobihlahia, 

Ongelweni, 

Oqhabiyeni 


136 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 










KZ 285-Ndudulu, 

Greater 

Mthonjaneni SSA 
4 Bulk 

Construction of 
bulk pipeline and 
reservoirs 

R22, 993, 775.00 

14-May- 12 

12-Jul-13 

66% 

R 15,973,002 

4 

Howule, Wobaza & 
KZ 283-Mpevu, 

Nkwenkwe, 
Emosangweni, 
Nomponjwana 


137 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.2 WASTE MANAGEMENT /REFUSE REMOVAL 


The notion of waste management may be described as the control system for limiting, collecting and disposing of waste, through the establishment of 
relevant policies, environmental standards, and rules and regulations. Hence it is imperative for every society, ranging from local, national and 
international levels to have legislative frameworks that guide human and societal behavior towards managing all form of waste. The Ntambanana Local 
Municipality (NLM) is no exception from this requirement, hence it must have its own integrated waste management plan (IWMP). 


The United Nations and EU principles on waste management emphasizes the development of measures such as: 

• Inculcating a philosophy of cleanliness and waste management; 

• Promoting clean technologies and products; 

• Reducing the hazardousness of wastes; 

• Establishing technical standards and possibly EC-wide rules to limit 

• The presence of certain dangerous substances in products; 

• Promoting reuse and recycling schemes goods or resources; 

• Encouraging appropriate use of economic instruments; 

• Initiating eco-balances; and 

• Implementing eco-audit schemes. 


In order to introduce a formal waste removal system within the municipal area, the service will have to be expanded substantially with a resultant increase 
in costs, which can be afforded by the community due to the low level of income. Only 1 .3 % of the households have access to refuse removal. 
Hauseholds (43.4%) especially in the tribal area make use of their own dumping sites. 

The alternative current practice in disposing of solid waste on site by the respective communities must also be recognized as a traditional practice, and an 
acceptable manner as the volume of waste generated by these households are not large and the land available to dispose thereof is in most instances 
adequate to continue with the current practice. It is thus not the idea to introduce a service in a costly manner, which can be accommodated through 
the efforts of the community on their own in an affordable manner. 


138 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 





MTJUMAMAMA MUMICmUirYi 

lor fttvifew 


Waste Cellection 


Legend 

• Exrstrng Centres 
□□ Ntambanana LM 
I I Municipal Wards 

I I laffodi 


139 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Figure 12: Access to refuse Removal 


access to refuse removal 


other 


no rubbish disposal 


own refuse dump 


comunaidump 


Removed by local less often 


Removed by local once a week 



0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 


■ KZ283 


2 

Source: Census 2011 


140 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.2.1 Collection 


The short and long term objective is to implement an optimized, (economically viable) and environmentally acceptable collection service through the 
entire Municipal area. A possible solution to address this issue is to empower the community to take responsibility for the provision of an environmentally 
acceptable and affordable waste collection service. The waste separation project or sorting site should be implemented so that cans, paper, plastics, 
etc., can be recycled and for a good cause. Bins and skips should be provided in strategic where it will be collected and sent to the Transfer Station in 
Buchanana. 

The frequency of waste collection is usually influenced by the size of the community or waste generators as well as the size of the waste. Presently the 
collection of waste in Ntambanana does not seem to be adequate. It is therefore, recommended that waste collection, that is being done once a week 
in both residential and business areas should be improved. 

Ntambanana Municipality bought a skip loader and 1 1 skips for waste removal and collection. 


4.2.2 Removal and Disposal 


A waste separation unit should be established at the waste transfer site in Ntambanana. Waste should be separated in materials of like character implying 
that cupboard material will be separated from cans. 

Re-useable material should be pre-treated (cleaned) before it is sent to appropriate recycling units. These materials should not be transferred to landfill 
sites. 


4.2.3 Waste Recycling Unit 


A waste recycling site has been established in Ntambanana, recyclable waste separated by the separation unit to the site by suitable transport means. It 
is important that the recycling of waste is done using the most economic means. Some of the recycling activities include composting, sale of packaging 
and organic material. 


4.2.4 Waste Management 


STRATEGIC ISSUE 

CHALLENGES 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Integrated Waste 

Management Planning 

• Lack ot waste avoidance 

• Poor resource recovery 

• Implement separation at source 

• Start recycling programmes 


141 (Page 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



• Lack of waste treatment 

• Poor waste disposal practices 

• Treat waste where possible 

• Improve waste disposal practices 

Waste Management Intormation 

• Lack of waste information. 

• Lack of waste information, 
collection & recording. 

• Lack of reporting requirements 

• Lack of information management and dissemination systems 

• Collect information regarding waste management & landfills 

• Develop a Municipal Waste Information System (WIS) 

• Monthly meetings to report on waste management 

• Collect information on environmental impact 

Human Capital Development 

• Lack of appropriate skills and education. 

• Community inadequately skilled and educated. 

• Lack of appropriate training institution. 

• Ensure sufficient staff compliment for service delivery. 

• Initiate community knowledge and skills enhancement 

• Initiate programmes and/or institution for knowledge growth 

Waste Collection Services 

• Lack of access for collection services in rural households. 

• Lack of standardized waste collection systems for rural areas. 

• Inflexibility of current waste collection systems to collect separated waste 
for recycling 

• Illegal dumping 

• Poor monitoring of waste collection services 

• Include collection services for households in rural areas 

• Appropriate waste collection systems for rural areas 

• Provide refuse bags and bins to start processes. 

• Mark and monitor areas prone to illegal dumping 

• Regulate and monitor waste production using bylaws 

• Enforce waste control measures 

Waste Minimisation and Recycling 

• No separation at source 

• Disposal of garden waste in landfill sites. 

• No composting facilities 

• Poor coordination of recycling activities 

• Implement separation at source to facilitate recycling. 

• Encourage people to use biodegradable materials. 

• Establish composting facilities for wastes & biodegradable 
materials. 

• Recycling infrastructure & market for recyclables. 




Waste Disposal Facilities 

• Poor design of landfill sites. 

• Incorrect location of landfill site. 

• Poor rehabilitation of abandoned landfill sites. 

• Rehabilitation not done as per DWAF Minimum Requirements. 

• Existence of unlicensed landfill sites. 

• Lack of fencing and poor access control. 

• Scavenging by people and animals. 

• No waste screens resulting in waste debris scattered all over. 

• Co-disposal of waste like garden waste with domestic waste, construction 
and demolition waste. 

• Design landfill sites as per DWAF requirements. 

• Keep to the buffer zone requirements as per DWAF. 

• Closed landfill sites should be rehabilitated as per DWAF. 

• Unlicensed landfill should be closed down. 

• Landfill site should be fenced to prevent scavenging. 

• Erect waste screens to prevent waste debris flying around. 

• Different types of wastes should be separated. 

• Waste treatment and processing technologies and facilities 

Education, Capacity Building and 
Awareness Needs 

• Lack of coordination of education and awareness. 

• Inadequate education and awareness on waste management issues. 

• Lack of comprehensive understanding of waste management issues. 

• Involve communities in waste management committees. 

• Educate communities and run awareness campaigns on waste 
management issues. 

• Conduct refresher courses on staff involvement with waste 
management issues. 


142 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.3 Municipal Roads and Public Transport 


4.3.1 Introduction 


The road network comprises a hierarchical network of roads, being Primary, District and Local roads. The Ntambanana Municipal aims to develop a road 
network that will service all its communities and people to ensure that they need not walk more than 5 km to reach a Primary road or District road. This 
objective is already realized for some areas in the municipal area of jurisdiction. A shortage of roads however occur in the northern area of Obuka, south- 
western area of Obuka, the north-eastern area of the State Land and the eastern area of Obizo where residents have to walk more than 5 km to reach a 
district or local road. 

The condition of gravel roads are deteriorating rapidly and maintenance thereto appears to be inadequate and roads often become impassable in wet 
conditions. The maintenance of these roads is a dedicated responsibility of the Department of Transport. A feasibility study for the road to the North was 
identified in the UThungulu IDP as a special project. The objective of this road is to link Richards Bay with Ulundi and further north. The first phase of this 
project, i.e. the upgrading of P700 to Ulundi is currently underway. 


4.3.2 Spatial Distribution 


An assessment of the location of the proposed development nodes have indicated an adequate all weather access to each of these. The nodes are 
further located on bus routes, which enhances the development potential thereof. The development nodes identified are located on district roads and it 
is proposed that these roads been well maintained to ensure all whether access. 


4.3.3 Distance by Community to Access Road 


An analysis of the adequacy of the road network have been undertaken in terms of determining the distance and spacing of the road network in respect 
of all roads up to a local standard. The analysis indicates that the road network has so been constructed to enable access to a road system to be gained 
by the majority of the population over a distance not exceeding 1 to 2km, which is deemed to be adequate. A deficiency however exists in the road 
system in the North-western area of Obuka Traditional Authority, where a walking distance of 4km and more, has been established, which can be 
alleviated by the incorporation of a connector road to this area traditional. 

Through the Municipal turnaround strategy, the municipality has procured a Grader which is meant for rehabilitation and construction of access roads. It is 
hoped that this will reduce the distance travelled by communities to reach a district road. 


May 2014 


143 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.3.4 Proposed Transport Facilities 


In order to enhance the public transport facilities, it is proposed that taxi/bus stops be introduced at current locations two types of facilities are foreseen, 
namely: 

■ Major taxi/bus facilities which will comprise formal paved areas with passenger waiting facilities, the last mentioned which will be roofed. This will 
normally be served by existing shops and post boxes. This facility can be enhanced by formalized institutional facilities in the form of clinics, tribal 
courts and pension payout points. 

■ Minor taxi/bus facilities which will be only market stall facilities and passenger waiting facilities. 


4.3.5 Municipal Access Roads 


Ntambanana Municipality with its limited resources has budged for the construction of the access roads and for the maintenance of old roads. There is an 
implementation plan currently in place that rotates in all municipal wards for the purpose of maintain all municipal access roads. There’s a huge demand 
as far as constructing access roads. With the limited infrastructure the municipality has procured a new Grader machine to try and meet the demand of 
the communities, although it is not enough, engagements with the Department of Transport and COGTA to procure funding for another grader are 
initiated. 


4.3.6 Assessment of Existing Roads 


• Road functionaiity 

During the study that was conducted by the municipality in October 2007, various roads were flagged by the local community as being of importance. 
These are also indicated on Map 3 and entitled Roads: Functionality. 'Various other roads have also been identified which have not been flagged by the 
community, but which have been identified in terms of physical functionality to be of importance, being those roads providing through access, implying 
use by busses and taxis, or serving community facilities such as schools and others. The functionality of the roads has thus been prioritized in terms of 
aforementioned. 

• Upgrade requirements 

Arising from the condition assessment, the upgrade requirements to the existing road network have been determined. The upgrade predominantly calls 
for the improvement of the dirt roads to gravel roads, implying the application of a suitable gravel surfacing course thereto, with associated drainage. 

Minor instances of the construction of new roads have been identified which mostly relates to the tracks that have been created in the past, whilst rework 
have also been identified, being the reshaping of existing gravel roads. The annual capital costs may be reduced, should the capital implementation 
programme be phased over a longer period of time, or alternatively should specific roads be identified that need not be upgraded. 


144 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


• Maintenance 

The maintenance cost can be reduced through a reduced maintenance programme, which will however result in upgrades to the rood network to be 
effected in a shorter space of time. Should specific roods be identified that will not be upgraded, the maintenance costs con also be reduced 
accordingly. 

Integrated Roads and Transport System 

This is not the function of the municipality. Ntombonona Municipality does not hove budget for roods. The Provincial Department of Transport is responsible 
for road construction and transport systems. Ntambanana is o small municipality in rural areas, there is no town establishment therefore currently there is 
no need for a planned transport system. uThungulu District has an Integrated Transport Plan for oil local municipalities. 

• Operations and Maintenance 

The provision and maintenance of roods is a dedicated responsibility of the Department of Transport. The said Department has established Road 
Transportation Forums, which prioritize the provision thereof in terms of the needs expressed by the community. This includes the provision of river crossings 
and bridges. The Municipality of Ntambanana is only responsible for the maintenance of access roods. This is budgeted for in our annual budget. 


4.3.7 Railway Lines 


The railway line from Empangeni to Heotonville is essentially used for the transport of sugarcane. 


145 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Map 12 : Transportation Facilities 



146 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.4 ENERGY 


Bulk Electricity supply and reticulation is provided by Eskom. More households in the tribal areas hove access to electricity now; this is witnessed by the 
huge decrease in electricity backlog in the area. The Eskom coverage indicates than an adequate supply is available to most of the identified 
development nodes. With the aid of an Infrastructure investment plan, the municipality has managed to secure funding for electrification from DME since 
2009. This has aided the municipality to increase the number of households in the area that have access to electricity. Census 201 1, indicate that more 
than 80% of total households have electricity. Allocation of 1 7 million has been approved by DME for the 2013/2014 financial year for electrification. 


4.4.1 Access to Energy 


147 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Figure 13: 


Energy for Lighting 


Energy for lighting 



■ None 

■ Solar 

■ Candles 

■ Parafin 

■ Gas 

■ Electricity 


Source Census 2011 
Figure 14: 


Energy for Cooking 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



■ Animal Dung 

■ Coal 

■ Wood 

■ Paraffin 

■ Gas 

■ Electricity 

I 

1500 2000 


Source Census 2011 


4.4.2 Electricity Backiog 


Electrical infrastructure (22kV overhead lines) is widely spread over the Ntambanana municipal area. The number of houses connected has 
increased drastically as compared to the past decade. The recent backlogs in electrification in terms of the respective wards within the 
municipal area ore provided in the following table. 

Tabie 13: Electricity Backlog per Ward 


Word 

Backlog & 

1 

70% 

2 

20% 


149 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


3 

50% 

4 

50% 

5 

20% 

6 

40% 

7 

2% 

8 

4% 

Total 



4.4.3 Alternative Energy 


In areas where electricity is not available, gas cookers and paraffin stoves are provided to 7800 indigent households as o free basic service. It 
may also be feasible for the District Council and/or Municipality to enter into a co-operation agreement with Eskom to provide the necessary 
infrastructure on on agency basis. 


4.4.4 Resource Capacity 


Eskom is the supply authority in this municipality and Eskom is thus also responsible for Operations and Maintenance of all electrical 
infrastructures. In terms of human capacity the municipality does not have officials responsible for electricity, since it is an outsourced function. 
With regard to financial capacity, funds for electricity ore transferred by DME to ESKOM. It has for the first time since 2009 that DME has 
transferred funds for electrification direct to the municipality. 


150 I P a g e 


May 2014 




existing Iwfr— tri>ctwi 
en«r«y TypM 


Lag«nd 

• ExiAting Cxnir— 

Eskom Re<icul»on 
I I Ntambanarw LM 
Municipal Ward a 



ELEC.LA 
I ELEC.OTHER 
GAS 

I PARAFFIN 
I CANDLES 

i.A^2oo9 «a 
Omi u ' 

soM ^ laeooo 



Mapl3: 


Existing infrastructure Energy types 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.5 Access to Community Facilities 


In preparation of the Municipal Infrastructure Investment Plan, all community facilities were inspected and an assessment was mode of the 
condition thereof. No definite norms ore available for the provision of community facilities. Strategically, community facilities should be clustered 
to provide the best possible benefit to the community, implying that community halls, creches and sports fields should be in close proximity to 
one another in strategic locations. The strategic locations should also coincide with the vision of the municipality for development in the specific 
regions and the identified development nodes should thus form the primary focus for the establishment of such facilities. 

Although community facilities are currently confined to community halls, creches and sport fields, consideration needs to be granted to the 
possible expansion of the function of such clustered community facilities to include for the possible expansion into other services to also be 
delivered such os library services, indoor sports centre, remote municipality pay point, and other similar functions. The clustering of the services 
may also attract other service providers for pension payouts, clinics, police services and such to this facility. The concept of development nodes 
will be strengthened through this approach, and also allow physical service delivery such os roads, water and electricity to be prioritized 
thereto. The greatest benefit will thus be achieved through the development of the community facilities in prioritized order in the primary nodes, 
thereafter in the secondary nodes and thereafter in the tertiary nodes, with additional facilities required in further locations to be followed 
thereafter. 

The status quo investigation indicated that o large portion of the existing community facilities require upgrading in some form or another, 
ranging from partial upgrading to total reconstruction. 


4.5.1 Sports Facilities 


In terms of the UThungulu District policy, only one regional sports facility will be provided, and this has already been provided at Richards Bay. 
Secondary sports facilities need also be provided at the Primary nodes such os Buchonono. Tertiary sports facilities, which will mainly comprise a 
lower order facility in the form of soccer fields, con be established at secondary and tertiary nodes, so as to be distributed evenly throughout 
the municipal area. Aforementioned does not however detract from the provision of sportingfacilities within every Traditional authority area, 
which is regarded os o fourth order facility. 


4.5.2 Health Facilities 


The Municipal area is generally not adequately serviced by the health facilities, most notably in the traditional areas. In terms of the spatial 
distribution of health services there is o shortage within the northern and central areas of Obuka, the Somopho North tribal area, Mambuko, 
Obizo and Somopho South. The KZN Department of Health, due to lock of funding, will probably not be in o position to provide new clinics in 


May 2014 


152 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


response to the total demand. These clinics should however be substituted through the provision of mobile clinics. In order to promote the 
establishment of clinics, 

Ntambanana Municipality in conjunction with the KZN Department of Health, need to evaluate existing clinics in the region, and jointly prioritize 
the construction of new clinics. An analysis of the health services available within the Ntambanana Municipal area has been conducted and 
from this it has been established that the area is not adequately serviced by the health facilities. In terms of the spatial distribution of the clinics, 
additional clinics are required in municipal area. One Provincial Hospital and two Provincial Clinics occur within the municipal area. An 
assessment of the capacity of the clinics has also been undertaken which indicates an alarming lack of adequate health facilities in the area. 
The community of Ntambanana relies primarily on the provincial Hospitals of Ngwelezane and Empangeni Memorial War for health services. 

In response to the demands, the Office of the Premier with other government departments funded the construction of the Luwamba 
Community Health Centre. 

Existing Heaith Structures 

- Nomponjwana clinic 

- Luwamba Community Care Centre 

- Ntambanana clinic 

- Bhuchanana clinic 


4.5.3 Educationai Faciiities 


The analysis undertaken in terms of the distribution of both primary and secondary schools have indicated an adequate distribution thereof in 
terms of coverage, with the municipal area adequately provided with schools in terms of the spatial distribution thereof, the analysis have been 
expanded so as to investigate the adequacy of the classrooms provided overall throughout the Ntambanana Municipal area. There are 53 
schools within the municipal area, 40 of the 53 schools have more than 40 learners per classroom, indicating a lack of adequate facilities in this 
respect. The distribution of the scholars in relation to the location of schools is not in all instances conducive in optimizing the use of the provided 
classrooms to its fullest capacity. Of further concern on the existing educational facilities, is the condition of classrooms and the ablution 
facilities which have been provided at each of these schools. The Department of Education is a responsible service provider to ensure 
education facilities within the municipal area are well maintained. 


153 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.6 HUMAN SETTLEMENTS 


Approximately 80% of the residents within the municipal area earn an income of less than R1 500 per annum; that is in respect of 2001 statistics. 
The balance is essentially taken up by the unspecified category. With an average household size of 7 it can be assumed that there are 
approximately 12 000 households in the area, while the housing backlog, in terms of PHB criteria, is in the region of 9 686 units. Then it was only 
13.5 % of the households within the Ntambanana Municipal area that had formal dwellings. Fortunately Department of Housing initiatives per 
ward have served to defeat the backlog. Four of eight rural housing projects have begun construction and towards completion. Currently 
approximately 55% of the households in the area have formal dwelling, this is in line with meeting the millennium goals. The table below 
indicates the status of housing project in all eight wards. 

Table 14: Types of Dwelling 



Source : Census 201 1 


There are approximately 6109 households that need to be provided with proper housing. These include 5 845 families that reside in traditional 
dwelling/ hut/ structure made aut at traditional materials, 123 that reside House/ flat/ room in backyard, 82 hauseholds lives on Informal dwelling 
(shark in backyard), 36 households lives in Informal dwelling (shark not in backyard (e.g. squatter camp) and 23 in Caravan/ Tent. 

According to 201 1 Census data, there approximately 53.1% of the households reside on formal hausing structures as opposed to 31.6% residing 
on formal housing in 2001. This increase can be attributed by an increase in urbanisation, need for formal housing as well as the completed 
housing projects that provided additional formal housing. 


May 2014 


154 [Page 







Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Map ^infrastructure: Services and faciiities 


155 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.6.1 HOUSING PROJECTS 


Over the past few years Ntambanana Municipality and the Department of Human Settlements have actively pursued the delivery of rural 
housing projects. However the demand is still very high (6109 units) when compared to what has been supplied at this present moment (+3000 
units). The projects in the pipeline are os follows: 


^ Obuka Rural Housing - 1000 beneficiaries; 

Bhiliya/Mombuko Rural Housing - 1000 beneficiaries; 
)• Somopho rural housing - 1 1 60 beneficiaries; 

Obizo rural housing - 1000 beneficiaries; 
Bhuchanana Rural Housing - 1000 beneficiaries; 
Nomponjwono Rural Housing - 1000 beneficiaries; 

<i Njomelwone Rural Housing - 1000 beneficiaries; and 
Ogelweni Rural Housing - 1000 beneficiaries. 


Future housing projects should go beyond the delivery of housing units and focus on the creation of sustainable communities and settlements. 
This includes improving access to basic services, social/public facilities and creating opportunities for economic development. 

There appears to be no urban housing project that has been undertaken in context of Ntambanana. This must be due to the fact that the area 
is predominantly rural and the highest demand for housing is within the traditional council areas. However with the advent of Heotonville os a 
formal node, the demand for urban housing projects will also emanate. 


4.6.2 Institutional Capacity 


With reference to the municipal organisational structure os reflected on the implementation framework, there is o Housing Division within the 
Corporate and Community Services Unit. This division is headed by the Manager: Human Settlements. This structure further provides for o Housing 
Officer and Housing Facilitator who report directly to the Human Settlements Manager. 


156 (Page 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.6.1 Current and Planned Housing Projects 
Table 15: Current Housing Project 


PROJECT DESCRIPTION 


No. 


WARD PROJECT 


STATUS 


TIME FRAME/ PROJECT 2012/2013 


Obuka Rural Housing 

Nomponjwana Rural 
Housing 

Bhiliya/ Mambuka Rural 
Housing 

Somopho rural housing 
Obizo rural housing 


Units VALUE PERIOD 


1000 

1 

R 54,906,000.00 

Construction has commenced 

5 years 

R 38,865,000.00 

1000 

4 

R 54,906,000.00 

Beneficiary administration 

5 years 

R 38,984,000.00 

1000 

6 

R 54,906,000.00 

Construction has commenced 

5 years 

R 29,670,000.00 

1160 

7 

R 63,690,960.00 

Construction of houses is towards 
completion 

5 years 

R 45,083,400.00 

1000 

8 

R 54,906,000.00 

Construction of houses is towards 
completion 

5 years 

R 29,670,000.00 


Tablet 6: Planned Housing Projects 


PROJECT DESCRIPTION 

No. Units 

WARD 

PROJECT VALUE 

STATUS 

TIME FRAME/ PROJECT PERIOD 


CURRENT BUDGET 

Ogelweni Rural Housing 

1000 

2 

R 54,906,000.00 

Planning Stage 

5 years 

R 29,670,000.00 

Njomelwane Rural Housing 

1000 

3 

R 54,906,000.00 

Awaiting MEC’s approval 

5 years 

R 29,670,000.00 

Bhuchanana Rural Housing 

1000 

5 

R 54,906,000.00 

Identified 

5 years 

R 29,670,000.00 


157 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


• Luwamba Housing Project 

The National Department of Housing has approved an amount of One hundred million rands (100m) for the establishment of houses of 
Luwombo. Currently it is estimated that 250 units will be constructed, however there ore negotiations between the department and 
Implementing Agents with regard to the number of units to be constructed. The type of housing will range from Low Cost, Middle Income and 
High Income Housing (mixed subsidies). Land is available for this establishment to take place. The Department of Land Affairs has transferred 250 
ho of land to the municipality for development purposes; port of this land is for the establishment of the said housing project. Ntombonona 
municipality has reviewed the Spatial Development Framework for inclusion of this and other development initiatives undertaken and future 
development plans. The SDF identify Luwombo os one of the Development nodes. 

The main problem that has hindered the project implementation is the lack of reliable water source in the area. However the Cffice of the 
Premier in KwaZulu Natal has intervened to assist in securing funds that will enable bulk water supply to the area. Currently about 30 million has 
been secured by the Cffice of the Premier, the remainder of about 50 million is still outstanding for entire project to kick start. This issue was 
intensively engaged on during the District Growth and Development summit. 


4.7 TELECOMMUNICATION 


Telecommunications network supplied by Telkom, which comprises both a land line and o radio communication network systems, as well as the 
cellular phone network system provided by the current service providers, namely, Vodacom, MTN, and Cell C. The telecommunications network 
of Telkom is prone to interruptions mainly due to the theft of coble, which aspect is currently being addressed by the service provider in the 
provision of optic fibre coble links and also through o combination of telephone lines and radio links. This upgrading program mainly affects the 
urban centers. Rural centers ore still in need of these assured supply facilities. Telkom is further replacing the whole system and still automating 
exchanges for o more efficient system and expanding the network facilities with on aim of providing access to telephones over the long-term 
over o 30 minute walking distance. The contribution that cellular phones hove mode in rural areas is significant and os such, telecommunication 
service provision is geared to improve drastically in the short possible term. 

Telkom is the service authority for the land line communications network in the Ntombonona Municipal area. The policy on the level of service 
within this organization envisages o minimum service os access to o telephone within 2km from every residence, which norm is however 
dependent on the available funds. Although it has been established that the municipal area is inadequately served by land line 
communications, this is however supported by cellular communications. This service does also not adequately serve the community within the 
previously identified norms. 


May 2014 


158 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.8 POSTAL SERVICES 


The Post Office operates the postal services in the Ntambanana Municipal area. A post office has been provided within Obuka and Somopho 
South Traditional Authorities with post boxes and sub-services at various locations throughout the municipal area. This service has also not been 
identified as a major requirement by the communities. There is a new Post Office established at Bhuchanana, it started operating early in 2007, 
the post office serves communities from Obuka and surrounding areas. Extension of services will be looked at depending on the demand of this 
service. 


4.9 Emergency Call-Out Points 


Emergency call-out points have in the past been installed at clinics and traditional courts throughout the municipal area. In order to provide a 
structure to these services, it is recommended that the use of emergency call out points be extended and that these also be placed at all of the 
nodes to be identified for development. This will enhance the security situation and provide the basis for the community against crime 
campaign, the principles of which need to be advocated by the District Municipality in support of the National Police Service. There is an 
emergency call out point at Ntambanana Municipal offices for fire fighting services, in case of fire outbreak. 


4.10 Cemeteries/Crematoria 


The UThungulu District Municipality is the designated service provider at a regional scale, but the local municipality is responsible for local burial 
sites. There is a district shortage of cemeteries and the establishment thereof should enjoy priority. However because of the African culture and 
tradition, the community still believes that their loves ones should be buried at their homesteads, which remains a challenge for the municipality. 
Communication with the stakeholders and community leaders and Amakhosi regarding this issue therefore remains of vital importance. 
Ntambanana Municipality therefore has planned to establish cemetries in four tribal authority areas, however a process of consultation with 
affected stakeholders is currently undertaken, subsequently a feasibility study will be established. This is to remedy a host of problems including 
the issue of underground water pollution and travel cost to the regional burial site. 


May 2014 


159 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Map 15 Existing Deveiopment & Corridors 


160 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.1 1 GEOGRAPHICAL DEVELOPMENT NODES 


The spatial distribution of the development nodes and the inherent function of each of these nodes in terms of the hierarchical order are of 
prime importance in determining o strategy in respect of service provision within the municipal area. The development nodes should be 
identified, initially on the basis of population density where people hove naturally clustered together, and thus require o higher level of services 
than in rural scattered areas, and furthermore on the basis of the spatial distribution of these nodes so as to ensure a uniform distribution of the 
various nodes throughout the municipal area for ease of access by the community at large. The current distribution of the population within the 
municipal area is characterized by settlement clusters which have informally been established in specific locations for various reasons. 

Map 16: Infrastructure Service and Facilities 



May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


4.12 SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE SWOT Analysis 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o 80% of total households have electricity 

o Development of Provincial Corridor P700, which cuts across Ntambanana 

o 100% Expenditure on MIG Projects 

o 30% of Budget is soley for Infrastructure Develcpment 

o Municipality budgets for Free Basic Service 

o High Infrastructure Backlogs. 

o Lack of reliable underground water source. 

o Limited Operations and Maintenance resources. 

o Capacity to implement infrastructural projects 

o Lack of Long term planning for capital projects 

Opportunities 

Treats 

o Ccntinued MIG funding. 

o Good Relations with independent organs E.G. National Lottery. 

o UDM Maintenance Plan far water and aperations. 

o Housing Sector Plan and Series of sector are in place to address the issue of 
infrastructure backlogs. 

o Effectiveness Solar systems, as alternative source of energy in the municipal 
area 

o Vandalism of infrastructure 

o Inexperienced contractors 

o Inappropriate project prioritisation process 

o Spatial setting of the municipality 

o Land Ownership 

o Limited Capacity [PowerStation] for additional 
electricity supply 

o Illegal Connectians [water and electricity ] 


162 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5. LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 


5.1 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 


Bordered by uMhIatuze local municipality to the south east, Ntambanana is relatively closely situated to Empangeni and to Richards Bay. In 
terms of the sub-region’s economy Empangeni and Richards Bay are significant, representing the bulk of the economic activity of the District. 
The Richards Bay harbour has boosted the trade links of the area and its identification as an Industrial Development Zone will further stimulate 
the manufacturing sector. Empangeni serves as an industrial and service centre to the surrounding settlements. Ntambanana is reliant on these 
areas for employment, economic activities and consumer goods and services. 


5.1 .1 MUNICIPAL COMPARATIVE & COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES 


« Excellent biodiversity 
« Intse Lika Dingiswayo 
« Thula Thula Game Reserve and Residence 
« The municipal area is rich in historical and cultural assets. 

* Ntambanana is located in the central part of the uThungulu District Municipality It is approximately 160km north of Durban and can be 
accessed via the R34 from Empangeni. 

« Provincial Corridor , Road P 700 cuts through the Municipal Area 


163 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.1 .2 ECONOMIC PROFILE OF THE POPULATION 


Figure 15: Distribution by functional gro up 



164 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.1 .3 EMPLOYMENT AND UNEMPLOYMENT 


Figure 16: Employment and Unemployment 



The unemployment rate is determined by expressing the number of unemployed people os a percentage of the economically active 
population, i.e. the employed plus the unemployed. In Ntambanana Municipality, the unemployment rate has decreased slightly from 54% in 
2001 to 46% in 201 1. This is considered to be considerably high when one takes inta accaunt the number at the active labour force within the 
area. 

The fact that Ntambanana Municipality is a rural area with paor infrastructure is one of the factors that contribute to the unemployment figures. 
In order to find employment opportunities, the economically active population has to travel to areas such as Richards Bay and Empangeni. In 
terms of people in poverty, the Ntambanana Municipality is listed third out of fifty-two municipalities in KZN, with number ane being most 
deprived. Approximately 56 763 people are living in poverty within the municipality. This accounts for almost 60% of the population in 
Ntambanana, which indicates high levels of poverty. 


165 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


Figure 1 7: Employment by Type of Sector 



Labour Force by type of Sector 












J.ZUUU 

10000 

8000 

6000 

4000 

















- 

■ Formal 









■ Informal 










■ Private FI FI 










■ don't knovy 




■ 



■ 




■ not applicable 


Ward Ward Ward Ward Ward Ward Ward Ward 

12345678 


Source Census 2011 

Tablet 7; Labour Force by Industry 


Industry 

Census ‘01 

CS ‘07 

Agriculture; hunting; forestry; and 
fishing 

1456 

3024 

Mining and quarrying 

127 

47 

Manufacturing 

578 

827 

Electricity; gas and water supply 

63 

46 

Construction 

393 

1193 

Wholesale and retail trade 

638 

1030 


166 [Page 

May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Transport storage and communication 

463 

412 

Financial; Insurance; real estate and 
business services 

290 

613 

Community ;social and personal 
services 

682 

981 

Other and not adequately defined 

0 

778 

Private Households 

499 

0 

unspecified 

2210 

4062 


The table above indicates that most employed people ore in the agricultural sector, which is characterized by long hours of work and low pay. 
It is anticipated that the contributing factor to the above is the low levels of education for the young to adult population in the municipality 


167 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Figure 18: Household Income 


Figure 5: Individual Monthly Income 



Ntambanana has fairly low levels of income, with 90.2% of the population earning less than R1600 per month and only 4.6% earning more than 
R1600 per month in 2011. These low income levels do not moke the area particularly attractive for tertiary sector industries. However on the 
positive side, the amount of people with no income has drastically declined since 2001, with o greater proportion of the population earning 
some kind of income in 201 1 , even though it may be less than R400 per month. 


168 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.1.4 LED Institutional Arrangement 


Internal Capacity 

Making sure that the appropriate institutionai arrangements are in piace for LED it is essentioi to ensure its continued presence and success in 
the municipaiity. For LED to be an ongoing process o municipoiity has incorporated it into its organisotionoi structure, it is cieariy outiined in the 
organogram where LED fits into the overaii structure, who is responsibie for LED functions and who the LED officer report to. 

Skiiis and Training Programmes 

SMME deveiopment requires entrepreneurship which is o function of factors iike skiiis, environment, resources and motivation. Skiiis ore a vioi 
component of entrepreneurship and if iocking con retard serious efforts at business deveiopment and innovation. This is on area of porticuior 
importance in the context of South Africa os o whoie and has been o key poiicy focus, seen in the numerous Sector Education and Training 
Authorities (SETAs) that hove been initiated os weii os various other skiiis and training programmes that exist. Reievont skiiis training shouid inciude 

not oniy skiiis reioted to specific trades but aiso business skiiis such os managing or basic accounting for o smoii business. Providing skiiis training 
programmes is neither the responsibiiity of nor may it be feosibie for the municipaiity to impiement. Rather there shouid be o focus on making 
the environment for accessing resources and programmes os optimoi as possibie. For exampie providing o hoii or simiiar venue from where 
courses con be run or providing o database resource to the community which documents ovaiiobie programmes, courses or institutions in the 
region. 

There ore about 65 co-operatives estabiished at Ntambanana. The co-operatives have registered with the department of Economic 
Deveiopment. Co-operatives have been trained on various programs. The municipaiity in co-operation with the Department of Economic 
Deveiopment has trained aii co-operatives on Finoncioi Management Skiiis, Deveiopment of Business Pions by SEDA and Business Management. 

Further Computer training has been offered to oii co-operatives and SMME’s of this municipaiity by SEDA KZN. The municipaiity wiii constontiy 
assist these groups in securing funding for sustoinabiiity. The Department of Agricuiture has oiso donated moterioi to co-operatives that are in 
Agricuiture. 

Local Economic Development Forum 

The responsibiiity of the municipaiity in terms of the LED process is to pioy o connector roie whereby they fociiitote and draw on resources from o 
range of support instruments into their municipoiities, for exampie the various government departments, ithoia bank or the Sector Education and 
Training Authorities (SETAs) os weii os o number of non-government support initiatives. The Ntambanana Municipaiity performs o networking roie 
to combine resources from different sources os weii os coordinating with district strategies. This requires o high degree of dedication and 
capobiiity from the municipaiity on both on individuoi and on institutionai ievei. There ore two key components to enhancing the obiiity of the 
municipaiity to perform its LED roie and functions. The first is creating the appropriate institutionai structures. The second component is LED 


May 2014 


169 (Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


training, which ensures municipal officers and field workers hove the necessary skills and know-how to perform their LED duties efficiently and 
effectively. The establishment of an LED Forum has been of positive outcome. The LED Forum serves os on advisory committee to Council on 
matters and issues relating to LED. Further the forum assist in seeking possible solutions to identified challenges on the implementation of the LED 
Strategy meetings ore hosted on quarterly basis and os and when necessary. 


5.1 .5 BEE and SMME development 


BEE refers to Block Economic Empowerment which aims to address the inequalities in South Africa’s social and economic system. It seeks to 
promote new opportunities for and increase the levels of participation of block people in the ownership, management and control of 
economic activities. Since the African component of the population is worse affected in terms of poverty and unemployment, BEE sets out to 
target this previously disadvantaged subset of SA’s population. 

SMME refers to small, micro and medium enterprises. SMME development is o central tenet of the government’s focus on creating employment 
and promoting economic growth in South Africa. There are a number of government initiatives, facilitated by the Department of Trade and 
Industry and other organisations which aim to promote and grow small enterprises. These two strategies have been combined for the purposes 
of this document since Ntombonona is 99% African and predominantly rural so any development initiatives will be along block and rural 
economic empowerment lines and thus increase economic participation, and be to the benefit of, the black population. Given Ntambanona’s 
limited formal economic development the SMME sector is of particular significance in developing and driving the local economy and 
facilitating employment generation. . The development of SMMEs however is currently constrained by a number of factors: there is no 
established market place in the municipality. The issue of market space should be addressed by looking at the current geographic layout. The 
primary node is currently Buchonona and thus it would make sense to locate it here. Entrepreneurial capacity is limited by poor education and 
limited training opportunities. 

A skilled population is the backbone of economic development and thus needs to be addressed. In this regard skills development centres 
should be located in local areas so that local people and those with the greatest need con also access them. Opportunities that were 
identified by the community from the LED workshop include block making, poultry farming, garden services, sewing and a bakery. Key 
opportunities in this sector will depend on capacity building, co-operatives, local business support centres and funding opportunities. 

Key Issues 

- There is o variety of opportunities for this sector given the current limited economic activity in the area. 

- There ore many government support programmes to stimulate this sector. 

- A lock of skills constrains development in this sector. 

- There ore no facilities to access credit. 

- There is o need for o local business support centre. 


May 2014 


170 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.1.6 Co-operative Development 


A key method of promoting small scale agricultural production in South Africa is by means of co-operatives. Co-operatives ore organisations 
that ore democratically controlled by their members. There is shared decision making, with benefits distributed to all. They function os a group of 
people working together on a cost sharing basis to achieve common goals and provide employment. The KZN government has mode the 
provision of support to co-operatives It also plans to set up secondary co-operatives in each district municipality whose main function will be 
providing support to primary co-operatives. 

The KZN Department of Economic Development co-operatives programme’s vision is to moke KZN’s poor urban and rural communities to be 
self-reliant, self sufficient and be able to meet their basic needs in a sustainable manner. The programme aims to provide access to finance, co- 
operative training os well os skills training to co-operatives. There is thus huge opportunity to develop agricultural co-operatives. 

Organic products should be investigated since they ore currently in fashion and there is strong international demand. Other niche products such 
os vegetables, indigenous crops or teas such os rooibos and honey bush should also be investigated os well os organic drought tolerant crops 
such os prickly pears and dotes os well os njugo beans, cow beans and cassava. Hydroponics projects should also be stimulated, although 
these hove high start-up costs, running costs ore reasonable and they could be very appropriate in the context of Ntambanana with its poor 
rainfall and soil quality os this type of farming controls for these variables and mokes farming less risky. The area has the best potential for 
livestock farming which has good opportunities for further downstream activities such os meat, cheese and yoghurt production. 


May 2014 


171 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Legend 


g j i BU og C e nse s 


Existing 

Agricultural Activity 


L I Mcti Aoncucm Po te r m a Land 


Map15: Existing Agriculture Activity 


172 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.1.7 AGRICULTURE 


The most important economic activity in the Ntambanana Municipal area is sugarcane production concentrated on the privately owned land 
around Heatonville which is also the highest potential agricultural land. Remaining agricultural activity is traditional and not predominantly 
commercially motivated. 

The natural conditions within the Ntambanana Municipal area (climate and soils) provide a high potential for formal agricultural activities such 
as sugar cane. The Ntambanana Municipal area still has the potential to enlarge its agricultural sector by promoting agricultural activities within 
the tribal areas. To ensure the success of emerging new small farmers within the tribal areas it is thus important to develop a strategic agricultural 
plan and educational policy to pave the way for the more productive use of land and better land use management in specific areas. 
Uncoordinated settlement patterns have a negative impact on the availability of land for sustainable agricultural production. This is caused 
primarily through the process of smaller land parcels associated with such settlement patterns. The municipality can, through spatial planning, 
assist traditional authorities and its subjects to counter this trend. 

The agriculture sector has further been improved by the establishment of community gardens and grazing land. The Ntambanana Municipal 
area is located within the North Eastern region in terms of the Department of Agricultural demarcation. The named department has its own 
agricultural Development programs currently being implemented throughout the region. The identification of new projects still remains the 
responsibility of the community and the project planning technical form the North Eastern Regional Office. 

I. Commercial farming 

This takes place in the south-eastern Heatonville district and is predominantly sugarcane farming. Although some of the farmers in the area also 
grow other crops for example macadamia nuts, maize and vegetables the bulk of the farming activity in the area is sugarcane. There is also 
some cattle farming in this area. There are about 20 to 30 farms in the greater Heatonville region, which includes areas beyond Ntambanana’s 
borders. This farming is labour intensive, for to mechanise the harvesting of their operations would be cost prohibitive. Although individual farms 
differ in their size and therefore their requirements, each farm hires around 40 to 50 workers. These are mostly locals from the surrounding areas. 
This sector is therefore a significant contributor to employment. The labour employed consists of permanent workers as well as temporary workers 
that would be hired over the harvesting period. In this regard some farmers outsource their harvesting operations to contractors and do not hire 
additional local labour. In terms of the cost structure of the farming operations, labour constitutes by far the greatest cost. Thus the recent 
legislation with regard to farm workers wages has had negative effects on the amount of labour employed. 

The area is about 80% irrigated. The rainfall in the region is neither sufficiently adequate nor reliable to make farming in this area viable without 
irrigation. The farms that are situated along the Mhlathuze River extract their water from the river in terms of riparian rights. There is also the 
Heatonville Irrigation Project which covers an area of roughly 4000 hectares. This is a contract with Tongaat Hulett whereby the farmers are 
provided with irrigation for a period of twenty years 


May 2014 


173 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


II. Small Scale and Rural Farming 

The rest of the municipality is made up of small scale and subsistence farming activities. There are a number of poultry, vegetable and cotton 
projects that are in varying stages of implementation. These are funded mainly by the Department of Agriculture as well as some coming from 
the municipality for fencing. At the moment they are mostly poverty alleviation and subsistence initiatives. There is however a promising newly 
established commercial hydroponics project situated nearby Buchanana. This is a co-operative of fifteen women who grow and sell tomatoes. 
They used their funding to buy equipment and hire a contractor who facilitates with training and running of the project. 

As stated the area would be best suited to livestock farming and there is pastral agricultural potential in the northern areas due to the 
availability of water through aquifers (this is an underground layer of rock and sand that contains water). In terms of livestock farming there is 
currently a poultry projects and goats projectts 

The land to the east of the municipality in the Mambuka area presents the best prospects for agricultural development and would be suited to 
sugar cane and vegetable farming. This land also has the advantage of being located next to an old dam that was at one stage used for 
water consumption. However in order to develop the potential of this land, it would need to be cleared as it is very bushy and a pump would 
be required to get water from the dam. 

The establishment of more co-operatives would present good prospects for the further development of this sector. The KZN Department of 
Agriculture and Environmental Affairs has recently established a number of support programmes directed at the agriculture sector, with 
particular focus on the development of co-operatives. This can be seen within the context of the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy 
(PGDS) to fight poverty and unemployment in KZN. The five key areas in whichsupport will be focused are the provision of animal handling 
facilities, irrigation interventions, fencing, shed storage and water provisioning. Co operatives are a good generator of income and employment 
and could provide the basis for further agro-processing activities. Agro-processing is defined as the transformation of agricultural produce into a 
different chemical or physical state. Such activities may include drying and grinding of products or packaging of produce. The value added 
from marketing and processing raw products is often greater than the value of primary production and can provide further opportunities for 
employment and income generation. 

III. Key Issues on Agricultural Farming 

■ Lack of adequate water supply in the study area constrains farming activites. 

- Farmers lack the relevant equipment and skills to farm effectively. 

- There is no credit facility available and farmers have no security for financial approval. 

- Ntambanana is conveniently situated to large markets, the closest being Empangeni and there is potential to develop the local market 
for products. 

- Mambuka area represents best prospects for further agriculture projects in terms of its soil potential and has available water nearby in 
the form of a dam. 

■ This sector can form a base for agro-processing activities eg packaging of products. 


May 2014 


174 (Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


■ Possible opportunity to moke use of on old abattoir that is nearby. 

■ The potential for new business development in this sector could relate to ploughing, hydroponics and livestock farming. 
- There is need for the development of on Agricultural Development Plan 


5.1.8 FOOD SECURITY 


Food security exists when all people, at all times, hove physical, social and economic access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food that meets 
their dietary needs and food preferences for on active and healthy life. This is the most common definition of food security, and it is generally 
accepted by the majority of organizations working in this area. Following from this definition, there ore four important dimensions to food 
security: 

- Availability-The availability of sufficient quantities of food of appropriate quality, supplied through domestic production or imports 
(including food aid). 

■ Access-Access to adequate food resources appropriate to a nutritious diet. 

- Utilization-Utilization, through adequate diet, clean water, sanitation and health core, to reach a state of nutritional well-being where all 
physiological needs ore met. 

- Stability-For stability, a population, household or individual must hove access to adequate quantities of food at all times. There cannot 
be a risk of losing access to food os a consequence of sudden shocks (for instance, on economic or climatic crisis) orcyclicol events (for 
instance, patterns that result in seasonal food insecurity). 

Contribution ot Ntambanana Municipality to Food Security. 

Ntambanana Municipality os port of Local government is ideally placed to concentrate on several of the variables which figure into the 
food security equation. 

■ They provide basic infrastructure that supports the production and distribution of food crops (including roods, wells, dams, markets, 
etc); 

■ adjudicate land title disputes; 

■ provide a forum for community groups (including farmer cooperatives); and monitor local food security. 

Ntambanana Municipality is closest and most directly accountable to smallholder farmers, and therefore has the knowledge and incentives to 
address the issues of local food security. 


175 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The Municipality is mostly likely to understand local variables such os weather and crop planting patterns, local trade flows, and synergies as well 
os the causes of chronic and transitory food insecurity. Thus, the municipality should be the one acting to mitigate those effects of climate 
change that are expected to impact food security most significantly. Interventions such as reforestation, erosion control, terracing and 
groundcover replacement con oil contribute to the mitigation effort and need to be enacted at the local level. Successful local interventions 
should be shared with other local governments and integrated into national development plans to build bottom-up food security development. 

Institutional Challenges on Food Security 

The most problematic and endemic issues for the municipality is o lock of funding, o lock of capacity and o lock of necessary personnel. This is 
especially acute in Ntambanana Municipality since offices ore small, understaffed and underfunded. Increasing revenue collection in the short 
term, and promoting local economic development in the long term, can help mitigate the above issues. When it comes to food security, it is 
especially critical to reinforce the connection between local government programs and national strategies undertaken by ministries of 
agriculture and commerce. It is also important that os capacities ore expanded, there is appropriate coordination with the notional ministries to 
maintain coherence between districts. 

How can the potential ot local government in enhancing tood security be unlocked? 

Looking ahead, it is crucial to ensure that the role of local government authorities in enhancing food security is integrated into notional 
development plans. Local authorities must also be given sufficient autonomy to address issues specific to their particular region. Through the 
development of infrastructure and markets, agricultural extension services, land and water rights, women’s empowerment, and environmental 
protection, among other options, it is possible for local governments to be at the forefront of agricultural production and local economic 
growth. But in order to do this, local governments must be equipped with the capacity to identify appropriate projects, as well os the skills, 
personnel and funding to manage those projects from start to finish. There must be appropriate communication between ministries of local 
government, ministries of agriculture and commerce and the local government authorities. It is equally important to ensure that local 
government authorities recognize the full spectrum of possible food security mechanisms available to them with which they can mitigate 
potential food insecurity. Typically, local authorities only conceptualize food insecurity in terms of seasonal deficits or times of crisis. Adding 
variables such as nutrition, household income, land titles and infrastructure to the discussion of possible options can greatly expand the potential 
for local government authorities to hove o meaningful impact on food security 


Achievements 

- Municipal tractor to assist Small Scale farmers 

- More than thirty (30) community gardens received funding and assistance from the municipality 

- Two viable Goat Farming project 

- Poultry Farming projects in oil eight words received funding from the municipality 

- Established relations with iThala to secure financial assistance to farmers 

176 1 P a g e 

May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- Moringa Tree plantation Project 
■ Essential Oil project funded by COGTA 


5.1.9 TOURISM 


The tourism sector currently ploys o minimal role in the economy. There ore o few privately owned gome reserves in the area including Thulo 
Thula and Nyalo Game Ranch. There may be opportunites to take advantage of the presence of the game reserves in the area as they attract 
outside people into the area, for example by setting up a craft market for SMME or co-operatives to sell their products at these game reserves 
curio shops. In the areas adjacent to these game reserves or by the numerous river catchment areas and watercourses the Spatial 
Development Framework has identified that there may be potential for tourism and recreational development, for example hiking, camping 
and 4x4 trails. Currently the area holds little in the way of tourist attractions; however the proposed Royal Zulu Reserve could radically change 
the tourism potential of the area. This project aims to link up land in Ntambanana with the Hluhluwe-Umfolozi game reserve and would increase 
the overall size of the reserve by 50%. This project would bring about employment, tourism and investment opportunities to the municipality. 

A problem with developing this sector is that the community themselves are unfamiliar with the concept and what it involves and therefore are 
unlikely to take advantage of any available opportunities without considerable co-ordination, training and capacity building. There is also a 
lack of associated infrastructure which is necessary for tourism. 

The tourism sector is being promoted as a leading sector in KwaZulu-Natal and it certainly seem to be an important potential generator of 
economic growth in the Ntambanana Municipal Area as tourism nodes mentioned below: 

- Mfuli Game Ranch; 

- Nyala Game Ranch; 

- Fundimvelo; 

- Thula-Thula Game Reserve; and 

- Intabayengwe 


Ntambanana municipality with the assistance from COGTA has 
opportunities in this industry particularly along the P700 corridor. 


developed a Tourism and Marketing Sector plan which will explore more 


May 2014 


177 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Legend 


Eztstrg C«ntr«s 


P7GI Comoor 

Man Roaos 

Oar^e Reserves 
Censervatien 
NSambanara LM 
r 1 Mieiicpa 


Map 17: Tourism 


178 I P a g e 


May 2014 



5.1.10 Trade and Industry 


The limited economic activity within Ntombonana which is focused primarily on agriculture means that the trade and industry sector is fairly 
small. Trade is usually indicative of a more developed economy with local industry. Factors that influence trading activities include the 
availability of alternatives, household incomes and the presence of other well established trade centres. Incomes in Ntambanana are low with 
56% of the population earning less than R800 a month and the close proximity of Empangeni results in most of the population travelling to 
Empangeni for consumer goods and services. Both these factors have contributed to the limited trading activities in the study area. 

Trading activities in Ntambanana are limited to spaza shops which are located in key nodes such as Buchanana. This sector provides 
considerable potential for further development in the form of developing further small scale shops, retail stores and services such as hairdressers, 
a bakery, sewing, laundry and a small commercial hub. By encouraging the population to buy local and spend their money in the area they 
can support a range of trading activities in the area. This sector is important in terms of employment and SMME development as it is one of the 
sectors with the greatest ease of entry and does not require entrepreneurs to be highly skilled. 

Key Issues 

- Potential to develop small scale retail and services. 

■ The proposed P700 which is to run through the area may provide commercial opportunities. 

■ The planned railway upgrade may also provide opportunities as there will be better infrastructural links in the study area. 

■ The potential for a small business hive in the area should be investigated. 

■ Constraints to development in this sector include a lack of capital and infrastructure. 

- Another constraint is the lack of skills in the study area and business support institutions. 

- The municipality does not own land with which to attract business. 

- There is no access to finance for entrepreneurs. 


5.1.11 LED SWOT Analysis 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o Well located with regards to major economic centres (Empangeni and 
Richards Bay) 

o Good supply of labour with a large population of youth. 

Diverse small-scale agricultural centre 

o Limited employment opportunities 

o Low education and skills levels 

o Limited economic development 

o High backlogs in service delivery 

o Spatial profile: most of study area is sparsely populated making 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



service delivery costly 

o Lack of business support facilities. 

o Most people work and shop outside of municipal area 

Opportunities 

Treats 

o Potential to develop farming, especially co-operatives 

o Range of small business opportunities 

o The new P700 road will improve access to the municipality and 
increase development initiatives 

o There is an abundance of undeveloped land 

o High migration to Umhlotuze 

o High HIV/AIDS infection rates 

o Limited natural resource base 

o Poor skills 

5.2 SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ANALYSIS 


5.2.1 Broad Based Community Needs 


Wardi 

Ward 1 is situated in the Northern part of Ntambanana. It shares Municipal boundaries with uLundi, Mthonjaneni and Hlobisa and Word 
boundaries with Words 2, 3, 5 and 6. This entire word falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi P.C. Biyela. This Ward is entirely populated 
by Traditional Rural Communities and Subsistance Farming is the only form of economic activity. 

There are no emergency facilities situated in this Ward. The nearest S.A.P.S. Station and Clinic are situated in Melmoth and all other emergency 
services ore provided from Empongeni and Word 5. There ore sufficient Schools, Churches and Community Halls in this Ward that would be 
suitable for use as evacuation centres if necessary. 

The only vulnerable infrastructure identified in this Ward is the Railway line and bridge. Identified the hazards and threats that are common 
occurrences in the Word and which hove the potential to escalate to the level of a disaster. 


180 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Ward 2 

Ward 2 is situated in the central Western part of Ntambanana Municipality. This Ward shares Ward boundaries with Wards 1, 3 and 5. This entire 
ward falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi P.C. Biyelo. Apart from subsistence farming, the only other economic activity is the Timber 
industry. There are no emergency facilities situated in this Word. The nearest S.A.P.S. Station is situated in Melmoth and all other emergency 
services are provided from Empongeni and Word 5. 

There ore sufficient Schools, Churches and Community Halls in this Word that would be suitable for use as evacuation centres if necessary. No 
vulnerable infrastructure was identified in this Ward. 


Wards 

Word 3 is situated in the Western port of Ntambanana and shares a Municipal boundary with Mthonjaneni and Ward boundaries with Wards 1, 
2, 4, and 5. This entire word falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi P.C. Biyelo. This Word is entirely populated by Traditional Rural 
Communities and, opart from subsistence farming, commercial Timber and Poultry farming are the only economic activities in the Word. The 
Kwombizo Clinic is the only emergency facilities situated in this Ward. The nearest S.A.P.S. Station is situated in Melmoth and oil other emergency 
services are provided from Empongeni and Word S.There are sufficient Schools, Churches and Community Halls in this Word that would be 
suitable for use as evacuation centres if necessary. Apart from the Mfule River Bridge separating Wards 3 and 4, no other vulnerable 
infrastructure was identified in this Word. 

Ward 4 

Word 4 is situated in the South/ Western port of Ntambanana and shares Municipal boundaries with Mthonjaneni and uMlalozi and Ward 
boundaries with Wards 3 & 5. This entire ward falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi P.C. Biyelo. This Word is entirely populated by 
Traditional Rural Communities and, opart from subsistence farming, community Poultry farming and Timber farming are the only economic 
activities in the Word. The Nomponjwono Clinic is the only emergency facilities situated in this Word. The nearest S.A.P.S. Station is situated in 
Melmoth and all other emergency services are provided from Empongeni and Word 5. There are sufficient Schools, Churches and Community 
Halls in this Word that would be suitable for use as evacuation centres if necessary. The Mkhwokhwini River Bridge and the Mfule River Bridge ore 
the only vulnerable infrastructure identified in this Word. 


May 2014 


181 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Wards 

Ward 5 is situated in the centre of Ntambanana. The Municipal Offices and Trade Centre of Ntambanana are accommodated in this Word, 
which shares a Municipal boundary with uMlalazi and Ward boundaries with Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8. This entire ward falls within the 
Traditional Authority area of Inkosi P.C. Biyelo. Economic activities in this Word include Tourism and Commercial Timber and Sugar Cone 
Farming. Emergency Services situated in this Ward include the Buchonana and Luwombo Clinics, Ntambanana S.A.P.S. and the Ntambanana 
Fire Brigade services. There ore sufficient Schools, Churches and Community Flails in this Word that would be suitable for use os evacuation 
centres if necessary. The Nhlanhieni River Bridge was the only vulnerable infrastructure identified in this Ward. 


Ward 6 

Word 6 is situated in the North/Eastern port of Ntambanana and shares Municipal boundaries with ttlabisa and Mfolozi and Ward boundaries 
with Wards 1, 5, 7 and 8. Part of this Ward falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi B.S. Mthembu whilst the remainder of the Ward falls 
within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi M. Mthiyone. 

This Word is entirely populated by Traditional Rural Communities and, apart from subsistence farming, commercial Sugar Cone farming is the 
only economic activity in the Word.The Ntambanana Clinic is the only emergency facilities situated in this Word, all other emergency services 
are provided from Empongeni and Word S.There are sufficient Schools, Churches and Community Flails in this Word that would be suitable for 
use os evacuation centres if necessary .The Railway line and the bridges across the Nseleni and Berea Rivers were the only vulnerable 
infrastructure identified in this Ward. 

Ward 7 

Ward 7 is situated in the South/Eastern part of Ntambanana and shares Municipal boundaries with uMlolazi and uMhlotuze and Word 
boundaries with Words 5, 6 & 8. Port of this Word falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi B.S. Mthembu whilst the remainder of the Ward 
falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi R.N. Cebekhulu. This Ward is entirely populated by Traditional Rural Communities and, apart 
from subsistence farming, commercial Sugar Cone and Poultry farming ore the only other economic activity in the Word. There ore no 
emergency facilities situated in this Ward. The nearest S.A.P.S. Station is situated in Empongeni and all other emergency services ore provided 
from Empongeni and Word 5. There ore sufficient Schools, Churches and Community Flails in this Ward that would be suitable for use os 
evacuation centres if necessary. The Railway line and the bridges across the Mazakotha and Nandlozono Rivers were the only vulnerable 
infrastructure identified in this Ward. 


May 2014 


182 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Wards 

Ward 8 is situated in the Western part of Ntambanana and shares Municipal boundaries with Mfolozi and uMhIatuze and Ward boundaries with 
Words 5, 6 & 7. Part of this Ward falls within the Traditional Authority area of Inkosi M.M. Mthiyane whilst the remainder of the Ward falls within the 
Traditional Authority area of Inkosi R.N. Cebekhulu. This Word is entirely populated by Traditional Rural Communities and, apart from subsistence 
farming, commercial Sugar Cone farming is the only economic activity in the Word. There are no emergency facilities situated in this Ward. The 
nearest S.A.P.S. Station is situated in Empongeni and all other emergency services ore provided from Empongeni and Word 5. 

There ore sufficient Schools, Churches and Community Halls in this Word that would be suitable for use os evacuation centres if necessary. No 
vulnerable infrastructure was identified in this Ward. 


• Hazards and Treats in all wards 

The following hazards and threats ore common occurrences in all Words and which have the potential to escalate to the level of a disaster. 


o 

Fires 

o 

Floods 

o 

Storms 

o 

Tornadoes 

o 

Drought 

o 

Epidemics 


5.2.2 BROAD BASED COMMUNITY NEEDS 


Community-Based Needs Analysis, os a pilot project in the municipality started in ward 2 and to other words. Due to the capacity within the 
municipality the Community Bose Plans will be developed otter the analysis or profiling has been completed in all words. However with the 
public participation meetings and through the minutes submitted by war rooms and word committees the following priorities were established 
for each ward:- 


183 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 




Ward 

Name of the Project 

1. 

Mowanda paypoint 


Lumbi Sportsfield 


Songoyana Sportsfield 


Qongwone Sportsfield 


Upgrading of Mowondo sportsfield 



2. 

Tholulwozi Creche 


Esisingeni Creche 


Ketezo Creche 


Qolukuvuka Creche 


Mkhondlwini Community Hall 



3. 

Esithinto Creche 


Upgrading of Bhodozo Paypoint 


Oviceni Creche 


Njomelwone Community Hall 


Bhadozo Creche 


Upgrading of Nseleni Sportsfield 


Upper Nseleni Community Hall 


Upgrading of Upper Nseleni 
Sportsfield 



4. 

Thembo Creche 


Thulosizwe Creche 


Mkhakhwini Community Hall 


Vilokozi Creche 


Masangweni Creche 


Nomponiwono Creche 


Zifozonke indoor Sports centre 


Mpevu Community Hall 


Nkwenkwe Sportsfield 




184 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5. 

Qhibukhowe Creche 


Themba Creche 


Ncemane Creche 


Emancence Creche 


Nsimbakazi Sportsfield 



6. 

Mathunzi Creche 


Mningi Creche 


Izimpolomba Creche 


Ntuzuma Creche 


Thulubheke Creche 


Vumelani Creche 



7. 

Macekane Indoor Sports Centre 


Mocekone Sportsfield 



8. 

Obizo Creche 


Hlozo Sportsfield 


Emzeni Creche 




Table 18: Five Infrastructural Priorities in their order of Priority 


INFRASTRUCTURAL PRIORITIES 

SOCIAL NEED 

Infrastructural Priority 

No. of Wards Citing Priority 

Social Priorities 

Number of Wards 

Water and Sanitation 

All eight wards 

Job Opportunities 

All Wards 

Road [bridges, tar road, guery] 

All eight wards 

Bursaries 

All Wards 

Housing 

5 wards 

Clinics and Ambulances 

Services 

1,2, 3, 7 and 8 

Community Halls 

4 wards 

Skills Development 

All Wards 

Electricity 

2 

Community Projects 

All wards 


185 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.2.2 EDUCATION 

The analysis undertaken in terms of the distribution of both primary and secondary schools hove indicated on adequate distribution thereof in 
terms of coverage, with the municipal area adequately provided with schools in terms of the spatial distribution thereof, the analysis have been 
expanded so as to investigate the adequacy of the classrooms provided overall throughout the Ntambanana Municipal area. There are 53 
schools within the municipal area, 40 of the 53 schools have more than 40 learners per classroom, indicating a lack of adequate facilities in this 
respect. The distribution of the scholars in relation to the location of schools is not in all instances conducive in optimizing the use of the provided 
classrooms to its fullest capacity. Of further concern on the existing educational facilities, is the condition of classrooms and the ablution 
facilities which hove been provided at each of these schools. The Department of Education is o responsible service provider to ensure 
education facilities within the municipal area are well maintained. 

Figure 19: Education by Education institution 


Education Institution 



■ Education Institution 


186 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Source Census 2011 


Figure 20: Education Profiie 


100.0 


Figures: Educational Profile 



NoSchooling Primary 

Matric 

Higher 

Educational 


Education 

Enrolment 





The levels of education within Ntambanana are very law such that the majority of the population only have some form of primary education. 
However on the positive note, the number of individuals who have completed matric is increasing when compared to the previous year’s 
census. The implicaticns for these low levels of education is the lack of skills within the area in arder ta support initiatives that can be intended to 
create employment opportunities. 


187 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.2.2.1 Challenges affecting Education 

• Learner transport 

• Pregnancy at schools 

• Faction fights cause the absenteeism for both learners and educators 

• Drug and alcohol abused 

• Under performing schools for Motrics 

• AET centre shortage Library& laboratory facilities 

• Food security and cooking kitchens 

• My life my future campaign 

• Motivational speeches at schools to support them 

• Shortage of classrooms 

• Not well sanitation establishments at schools 


5.2.3 HEALTH 


I. Morbidify and Morfalify Profiles 

According to the department of Fieolth the following ore the ten common causes of Adult and Child morbidity 

- Diarrhea 

- Pneumonia 

- Malnutrion 

■ Scabies 

- HIV/AIDS 

- Asthma 

■ Diabetes 

■ Flypertension 

■ Epilepsy 

- Mental illness 


II. Morfalify 

According to the department of Health the following are the ten common causes of Adult and Child mortality. 


188 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- TB 

- HIV/AIDS 

- Meningitis 

■ Diabetes 

- Asthma 

- Stroke and cardiac conditions 

■ Respiratory Tract Conditions 

■ Hypertension 

III. Health Facilities 

• Nomponjwono clinic 

• Luwomba Community Core Centre 

• Ntambonono clinic 

• Bhuchonono clinic 


IV. Health Issues 

• HIV & AIDS issues related to ARV and food shortages 

• Unable to access ARVs at the local clinics 

• HCT campaigns for the communities 

• Women giving birth at their homes 

• Defaulters in medication 

• Love life campaign at clinics to support the vulnerable people 

• Distribution of condoms to the community 


5.2.4 Safety and Security 


It has come to a state where oil stakeholders soy its enough with crime in Ntambanana. This area has o very bod history of crime especially 
hijackings of government vehicles, theft of projects material and equipment, violence against women, stock theft etc 

The Municipality has started engagements with the Department of Community and Liaison, in an effort of developing o community safety policy 
that is specifically for NTAMBANANA area. 


189 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Fire Protection 

o Rural Metro is based in municipal offices and is responsible for fire protection 
o Fire Awareness campaigns ore conducted to sensitize communities and school children on fire. 


5.2.5 Nation Buiiding and Sociai Cohesion 


Sports 

Siyadlalo 

Saiga KwoNaloga Games 

Arts 


Local Zulu Donee Competition 
Supporting small crofters with material 
Assisting new artist 


Cuiture 


Maidens programme 

Eariy Chiidhood Programme 

• School uniforms for indigent school kids 


5.2.6 Speciai Programms 


5.2.6. 1 Youth Deveiopment 

In the National Youth Commission Act youth are defined os those people who are between 14 and 35 years of age (this is the definition that has 
been used in oil youth planning and statistical representations - Statistics South Africa, 2001). Ntambonono Municipality through o brood 
consultative process with youth has identified several youth development chollenges:- 


190 (Page 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


These are: 

- Youth unemployment 

■ Rapid spread of HIV and AIDS 

- Limited or unequal access to education facilities and low education standards 

■ Lack of youth development infrastructure 

- Limited participation in development projects 

- High youth involvement in crime 

■ Lack of leadership skills 


Many of the above challenges result from inability to mainstream youth development. In port this is both symbolised by and resulting from low 
levels of youth mobilisation, limited targeting of youth in service delivery processes and o lock of resources to contribute to youth development. 

Youth Development Programs 

Ntombonona Municipality has recently established Youth Council that is represented by youth from oil eight words of Ntombonona. Hence o 
draft Youth policy was formulated and provides for the following youth development programs of which some ore currently being implemented 
by the municipality with the limited budget:- 

Programmel:- Youth Skills Development Programme 

The components of the programme ore the following: 

- Developing and maintaining o skills profile of the youth of the municipality. 

■ Producing and implementing a municipal youth skills development plan annually, this shall be reviewed quarterly. 

- Provision of on Adult Basic Education and Training (ABET) service to illiterate youth. 

- Facilitate mentorship, internship and leornership opportunities for unemployed youth within the municipality. 

- Facilitate financial support for marginalized youth seeking participation in higher education. 


Programme 2:- Youth Economic Empowerment Programme 

This shall be achieved through o Youth Economic Empowerment Programme (YEEP). The YEEP shall hove the following components: 

- The municipality shall set aside at least 25% of oil jobs created by the municipality, other public sector agencies and private sector, more 
especially those doing business with the municipality, for unemployed youth in the municipal area. 


May 2014 


191 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- Facilitate at least 25% participatian at young entrepreneurs in business opportunities created by the municipality and within the 
municipality. 

- Avail at least 30% of suitable land for urban agriculture in the municipality to youth. 

- Facilitate and support the formation of youth co-operatives that will be linked to production processes across sectors such as agriculture, 
tourism, manufacturing and information technology. 

- Facilitate the preparation of youth in and out of school for the exploitation of economic opportunities available through mechanisms 
such as career guidance and life-skills. 


Programme 3: Youth United Against HiV/AiDS 

ttlV/AIDS is seen by the Municipality as a serious challenge and the municipality implement an integrated yet robust youth programme against 
ttlV/AIDS. The programme entail: 

- Implementation of o vigorous ttlV/AIDS education and awareness project through the schools, extro-educotionol social clubs, 
community institutions and public media with youth as the audience. 

■ Consolidating and expanding the voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) project. 

- Training youth on peer counselling skills 

- Facilitating a life-style and treatment management project for the youth living with ttlV 

■ Empowering families of those living with ttlV and AIDS in order to provide the required support. 

- Facilitate the empowerment of health institutions and personnel in order to be youth sensitive and supportive. 

■ Support o project aimed at protecting victims of rope against ttlV/AIDS. 

■ Set-up and support facilities aimed at preventing mother-tochild transmission of ttlV targeting young women. 

■ Support and promote the campaign of tuberculosis treatment in ttlV coses and in youth generally 

Mainstreaming Programme 

All of the above programmes require adequate institutional support for their success. The Mainstreaming Programme (MP) is aimed at putting in 
place sufficient conditions for implementing these programmes with administrative ease. 

- Youth Council has already been established 

- The municipality shall set-up a municipal youth desk that shall oversee and advise the municipality with the implementation of youth 
policy/strategy 

- Ntambanana Municipality shall report annually to the youth of the municipality on the progress made in the implementation of the 
Youth Sector Plan 

- The Municipality shall ensure that each municipal department includes youth programmes in its plans and account for their 
implementation os port of continuous performance management. 


May 2014 


192 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- The Municipality shall continuously investigate and explore innovative mechanisms for advancing youth development (e.g. Youth 
Development Fund) without any bureaucratic inertia 

Although the municipality is poor, it has already started implementing on some of the programmes listed above. Engagements with sector 
departments have been initiated for the purpose of advancing youth development in the area. The budget for youth programs is allocated 
annually, see budget 

5.2.6.2.1 WOMEN, ELDERLY, CHILDREN AND DISABLE 

- For women the municipality recognizes the Women 's Day and budget for the event 

- In all municipal initiatives first preference is given to women 

- For the needs of elderly o Senior Citizens Forum was established 

- Annually there is o celebration for senior citizens 

- For the disabled the municipality established o disability forum, where all matters of mutual understanding ore being discusses 

- All municipal projects constructed to accommodate needs of the disabled. 


193 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6. MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 


6.1 Legislative requirement and Approach 


The Financial affairs of Ntambanana Municipality are governed by the following legislation: 

- Division of Revenue Act 

- Public Finance Management Act 

- Municipal Finance Management Act 
■ Treasury regulations 


Ntambanana Municipality is low capacity municipality os considered by Notional Treasury. In terms of the Municipal Finance Management Act 
no 56 of 2003 section 16 (2) the mayor of the municipality must table the annual budget at council meeting at least 90 days before the start of 
the budget year. 

Since the Ntambanana Municipality is characterized by a substantial lock of basic services (for the major portion of the Municipality), the 
emphasis will fall on basic service provision which could be funded by oil levels of government and service providers. Flowever, in certain areas 
local economic development should be encouraged as it could hove a spill over effect which would be beneficial to the municipality as a 
whole triggering more investment. 


6.2 Strategic Financial Framework 


The financial framework of the IDP three year period is based on the funding that would be available to the Municipality from its own funds and 
grants received from the national government in terms of Distribution of Revenue Act (DORA). 

The Municipality therefore finds itself in the unfortunate position that it will be unable to fund some of the integrated functions that it would like to 
undertake os planned for in the IDP. The municipality has to access additional external sources of funding if it is to undertake the integrated 
functions indicated in the IDP. Possible sources for additional funding for IDP projects could be obtained from the following: 

- Increase in the payment for municipal services through the establishment of o municipal valuation roll for the entire municipality; 

- The Municipality could enter into long term loan funding to o level of 20% of income; 

- Additional external sources of funding not yet identified could be sourced such as international and domestic donor funds, additional 
notional and provincial government funding and private sector involvement projects 


194 (Page 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


In addition stringent financial control measures should be introduced in order to ensure that the limited financial resources ore managed 


Summary of budget over Last three years 


Vote 

No 

Description 

Funde 

r 

2010/2011 

2011/2012 

2012/2013 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 


REVENUE BY SOURCE 






Grants and Subsidies 

NT & 
PT 

53,974,000 

52,527,000 

65,044,758 


Rates and Services 

IG 

1,544,271 

1,228,788 

1 ,248,343 


Other Income 

IG 

86,995 

130,750 

522,946 


Interest 

IG 

511,376 

787,288 

1,232,152 


TOTAL REVENUE 


56,116,642 

54,673,826 

68,048,199 








OPERATiONAL EXPENDiTURE 

BY VOTE 






Executive and Council 


2,737,726.55 

3,451,235.58 

5,952,976 


Finance 


4,740,827.90 

5,858,070.98 

6,697,878 


Corporate 


2,585,082.74 

2,494,331.59 

5,244,597 


Community 


1,922,817.20 

3,068,340.03 

8,171,580 


Human Settlement 


436,455.80 

533,181.55 

776,170 


Planning and Development 


252,800.41 

349,403.64 

450,925 


Technical 


25,071,475.88 

15,102,759.07 

27,605,214 


Subtotai (a) 


37,747,186.48 

30,857,322.44 

54,899,340 








195 [Page 

May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 






MIG Projects 


8,475,000.00 

10,193,000.00 

11,782,340 


Other 



1,125,000.00 

2,204,168 


Subtotal (b) 


8,475,000.00 

11,318,000.00 

13,986,508 








TOTAL EXPENDITURE (Subtotal 
(a) + (b)) 






6.3 Capital Financing Strategy 


All infrastructure capital projects are funded by the Municipal Infrastructure Grant; Ntambanana has little revenue to fund capital projects. 


6.4 Indigent Support (Free Basic Service) 


Ntambanana Municipality developed on Indigent Register for the purpose of identifying and assisting indigent. The analyses above indicated 
that above half of the total population ore earning below R1 600, meaning there is high percentage of indigent people within the municipality. 

In terms of water the uThungulu District gives free 6 6kl of free water per household per month (in areas with functional schemes). Ntambanana 
Municipality hove various support services for Indigent people which include:- 

• Free Basic Energy 

• Community Student Bursary 

• Indigent/Pauper Burial Support 

• Free Refuse Removal 

Refuse is collected once a week in all eight wards for free, for now it collected in key areas like schools, community halls , nodal points in a due 
cause the municipality is in the process of developing its by-law regarding waste. Below is the budget for the above support services:- 


196 (Page 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Tablel 9; Indigent Support Budget 



2011/2012 

2012/2013 

2013/2014 

2014/2015 

Free Basic Energy 

745,717.00 

790,461 

944,064 

996,932 

Indigent/Pauper Burial 

296 367.81 

335, 808 

373, 762 

350,000 

Student Support 

- 

65, 440 

72, 836 

130,000 

Refuse Removal 






6.5 Grants and Subsidies 


The following chart is a breakdown of the operational revenue per main category for the 2013/14 financial year. Ntambanana Local 
Municipality derives most of its operational revenue from operating grants from organs of state as it is shown on the chart that 96 per cent of 
revenue is from grants and subsidies. 


197 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


Figure 22; Revenue by Source 



198 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.7 Infrastructure Operations and Maintenance 


Ntambanana Municipality budgets for Repairs and Maintenance of buildings, vehicles, roods and computers. See the financial plan below. 


6.8 Asset Management Strategies 


The Municipality must ensure that the asset management system is fully implemented and functional. There is a need for the municipality to 
identify all the unutilized assets so that they can be disposed of. The status of the asset register review process and asset verification starts 
towards the end of January every financial year. This is on ongoing process that is now done in-house by Ntambanana Municipality and 
consultants are only called in for a review to ensure we comply with required standards. The municipality has appointed an asset officer and is 
to ensure full compliance with the MFMA and GRAP/GAMAP standards. The Municipality was able to implement the assets project in-house for 
the financial year 201 2/1 3 financial year. 

The Municipality is utilizing computerized asset management software and already in the process of investigation, identification and 
implementation of the suitable integrated asset management system. This will also include the capture of all assets onto the system, the 
maintenance of this system and the production of a complete asset register in terms of GRAP/GAMAP requirements. 


6.9 Loans and Investments 


For the financial year 2012/13 Ntambanana has managed to operate on its own funds as a result there are no loans acquired. The municipality 
has a short term (6 months) investment totalling to an amount of R4 270, 000.00, council is planning to use the investment for development 
initiatives. 


6.10 Potential Sources ot Income 


Ntambanana Municipality needs to establish relationships with various funding organizations, for the purposes of securing extra funding for 
unfunded projects and to reduce the infrastructure backlog. Possible funding or assistance has been sourced from:- 

- Intergovernmental grants and subsidies 

■ COGTA 

■ Department of Minerals, Energy and Mining 

- Porastatal 

- Private Companies (FOSKOR, EXXARO) 


May 2014 


199 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.11 Expenditure Reports 


The Chief Financial Officer submits expenditure reports to the finance portfolio on monthly basis for information. With the Venus system the 
municipality is able to make prompt reports to the Executive Committee. 


6.12 Financial Policies 


Ntambanana municipality have developed and implemented the following budget policies as per the MFMA 

■ Supply Chain Management Policy 

- Indigent policy 

- Asset Management Policy 

■ Credit control and Debt management policy 

■ Valuation Roll 

- Land Disposal Policy 

■ IT Policy 


6.13 Revenue Raising Strategies 


■ Property rates collection, council plans to extend to Ingonyoma Trust land 
- The municipality plans to improve on waste collection and impose tariffs 

■ The development of a Trading Centre will assist in revenue enhancement 


6.14 Consumer Debt Position 


Prior to the implementation of the property rotes act, the municipality has o billing system in place which is a package of the Venus system. This 
system is adequate for the purpose that it is used for and will be extended in terms of its use in the future to include revenue management 


Ntambanana Municipality mokes an important contribution to poverty alleviation and economic development through providing free basic 
services (FBS) to poor households and investing in infrastructure. To deliver these services effectively, Ntambanana rely on two important sources 
of revenue, one is from grants and subsidies while the other is municipality’s own revenue which is mainly composed of property rates. 

200 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


One critical question that the Municipality has to consider, is its ability to generate adequate levels of ov^n revenue. The issue of non-payment 
also referred as municipal consumer debt poses a serious threat to the financial health of Ntambanana Municipality os the municipality heavily 
relies in grants and subsidies. 

In cose of Ntambanana Municipality consumer debt refers to non-payment of property rates. Municipal consumer debt encompasses late 
payments for property rates as well as the amounts that are deemed irrecoverable. 

The municipality manages municipal consumer debt through interest charges in outstanding amounts, debt impairments and writing off of bod 
debts. In setting its annual tariffs the municipality takes into cognisance the Tariffs Policy which is implemented in terms of Section 74 of the Local 
Government Municipal Systems Act of 2000. 

Ntambanana Municipality utilises the Credit Control and Debt Collection Policy to administratively maintain and execute accounts and billing. 
Ntambanana Municipality has adopted property rotes by-laws which are reviewed annually. 

The quarterly consumer debt position for the municipality for 201 2/201 3 financial year improved. 


6.15 Financial Statements 


The 2012/13 financial statements were submitted timeously to Auditor General. The municipality improved and has managed to receive clean 
audit report for 201 2/1 3 financial year. 


6.16 Supply Chain Management Policy 


Ntambanana Municipality has implemented a, SCM policy. 


6.17 Employee Related Costs 


The budgeted allocation for employee related costs for 2014/15 financial year totals R14.5 million, which translate to 31 per cent of the total 
operating expenditure. Ntambanana Local Municipality has budgeted for an increase of 6.79 per cent for 2014/15 financial year. An annual 
increase of 6.4 and 6.4 per cent has been budgeted for in two outer years of the MTREF respectively. 

The cost associated with the remuneration of councillors is determined by the minister of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs in 
accordance with the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers Act, 1998 (Act 20 of 1998). The most recent proclamation in this regard has been 
token into account in compiling the Municipalit’s budget. 


May 2014 


201 (Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


Figure 23: Expenditure by Type 



Employee related costs 
31% 


Other expenditure 
39% 


Contracted services 
10 % 


Expenditure By Type 


Repairs and Maintenance 
3% 


Finance charges asset impairement 


Transfers and grants 

2% Other materials 
1 % 


Remuneration of councillors 
9% 

Debt impairement 
Depreciation and 0% 


202 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.18 Financial Viability and Management SWOT Analysis 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o The Municipality functions within its budget 

o Municipal finances are managed in corruption free environment 

o Unqualified reports for three consecutive years. 

o Adherence to MFMA 

o Developed Sound financial policies 

o In ability to enhance revenue 

o Poor IT 

o Debt Control measure not effectively implemented 

o Limited source for revenue collection 

Opportunities 

Treats 

• Full Implementation of Property Rotes Act. 

o Risk Assessment 

o Non-Compliance with MFMA Legislation 

o Fraud and Corruption 

o Increase of indigent population 


203 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


GOOD GOVERNANCE AND COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION 


7.1 Operation Sukuma Sakhe 


Ntambanana Local Municipality, under the leadership of its District Political Champion, MEC for Education, Mr. Senzo Mchunu has launched the 
Operation Sukuma Sakhe, with the aim of changing the lives of the citizens of this municipality for the better. 

The initiative is part of the provincial government Flagship Program known os Sukuma Sakhe aimed at integrating all departments to focus on 
solving community problems on the ground, starting with areas of abject poverty and making o difference by partnering with the communities. 

Outcomes with regard to Operation Sukuma Sakhe tunctioning in Ntambanana 

■ Local Task Teams (LTT) have been established 

- War rooms in all eight wards have been established 

- Training by the Office of the Premier was conducted to all LTT Members. 

- Ward Aids Committees has been established 

- More than 20 students have received bursaries to study at University of Zululand, through Sukuma Sakhe initiative. 

- All eight wards have been profiled by Community Development Workers. 

- HIV & AIDS support groups functionally in all clinics 

- Know your status campaign 

■ Supply of porridge to ARV users 

- Wheel chairs to disabled people 

- HCT & MMC campaign 

■ CCG s equipment’s supply eg napkins 

■ House hold profiling and service delivery 

CHALLENGES 

- Minutes, Reports and Yearly plans are not submitted timeously by war rooms champions 

■ Some representatives from sector departments do not attend flagship meetings; these are Department of Health, Department of 
Transport, Home Affairs, Department of Sports and Recreation and Department of Economic Development and Trade and as result they 
attend service delivery (MBO) 

■ Some word Councilors also do not attend meetings. 


May 2014 


204 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.2 EPWP and CWP 


The national development plan set a target of 2 million jobs is created through labour intensive methods or infrastructure development. 
Ntombonano Municipality as on organ of the state is obliged to participate and contributes some work opportunities through infrastructure 
development. Ntombonano Municipality has been o poor performer in reporting about job opportunities and this has affected the incentive 
received for EPWP jobs. Ntambanana Municipality during 2012/2013 financial year has been allocated R1 million rand toward the EPWP. This 
incentive is ploughed bock to job creation and poverty reduction initiatives. 

Community Works Program is another program implemented at Ntombonano. It is on iniotiove of the Department of Co-ooperotive 
Department and Traditional offiors with Lima os an implemeneting agent. Currently the CWP program employs more than 200 people. Their 
activities includes cleaning the municipal area and assisting in community facilities. 


7.3 Intergovernmental relations structures 


7.3.1 UThungulu District IGR Forum 

In terms of the Intergovernmental RELATIONS framework Act (no 13 of 2005) all district municipalities must establish “district intergovernmental 
forum'' to promote and facilitate intergovernmental relations between the district municipality and local municipalities in the district. The 
legislation further indicates that the role of the forum is to serve os o consultative forum for the district and locals in the in the district to discuss 
and consult each other o matters of mutual interest. Ntambanana Municipality participates in the various structures established by the 
uThungulu District Municipality nomely:- 

- District GIS Forum 

- District Sports Forum 

- Mayors Forum 

- IDP and Service Providers Forum 
■ Disaster Management Forum 

- Communications Forum 


May 2014 


205 (Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.3.2 Municipal Structures 


I. Ward Committees 
Establishment 

Eight Ward committees hove been established in the municipality following the May 201 1 local government elections. Inductions of the new 
members took place in September 2011, based on the Guidelines for the Establishment and Operation of Municipal Word Committees and 
Municipal Policy on Ward Committees. Accordingly the municipality invited all stakeholder groups to nominate representatives and submit their 
names to the municipality. Meetings were then convened in each word to elect ward committee members from those nominated. The Council 
was satisfied that the committees are adequately representative of the residents of the wards 

Ward committee policy 

The municipality has o “Policy on Ward Committees and Public Participation," which was passed by council resolution NTMC 39 in May 201 1 and 
which sets out, amongst other things, the establishment, status, functions and composition of ward committees. It also explains the roles of the 
Speaker, administration and PR councillors, and includes a ward committee members’ code of conduct. While comprehensive, much of the 
policy is generic and is based on the Municipal Structures Act and the Guidelines for the Establishment and Operation of Word Committees. The 
council took a resolution to make the term of office of ward committees five years, in line with the term of council. 

Ward committee training 

An initial round of training was conducted in September 201 1 for ward committee members, which consisted of a two day induction workshop 
followed by two further days of training with clusters of committees. The need for further training has been identified by the Municipality os on 
immediate priority. The Municipality is in process of appointing a service provider to provide accredited training for Ward Committees, as per 
the requirement of COGTA. The accredited training has eight (8) modules conducted over o twenty five days (25) period and thereafter 
certificate of competency will be issued to each member. 


Resources 

Despite being o relatively poor municipality, the municipality has been able to make some resources available to support word committees. In 
2013/14 Financial year a budget was set aside forward committees. Therefore all ward committee members receive a monthly stipend from the 
municipality of R300. However in order to qualify for the stipend, members need to attend meetings and provide proof of attendance i.e. 
attendance register and minutes to the office of the speaker. No member shall be paid a stipend if he/she did not attend the meeting. A 
number of word committee members suggested that ideally the stipend should be much higher. According to the municipality the stipend is 


May 2014 


206 (Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


meant to serve os an incentive, rather than remuneration for what should be voluntary community work by word committee members. The 
municipality also provides other support to word committees, in the form of stationery and transport. 

Functionality 

According to post and current experience, the functioning of word committees is mixed, although generally there is much room for 
improvement. One of the specific constraints is the capacity and level of education of members. A skills audit of word committee members has 
been conducted. It found that, of the 80 word committee members and Councilor surveyed, (4%) were illiterate, (1 1%) were semi-literate, (80%) 
had a motric level education and (5%) had some kind of post-matric qualification. 

Typically, word committees raise issues with their word councillor, who then takes the issues to the Speaker, who then notifies the relevant 
portfolio committee to have the issue addressed. It was noted that ward committees do not take issues directly to council. A general concern of 
word committees is that there is not enough follow up from councilors with the Speaker regarding issues that ore raised by the word committees. 
Communities then do not receive feedback from the municipality about the concerns they register with the ward committee. 

Ward Committee engagements with the iDP 

A central component of the communication role of word committees relate to the municipal IDP and budget processes. Word committees of 
Ntombonona Municipality ore o key conduit for bock and forth communication between communities and municipalities on community 
priorities and development strategies. In order to effect this, the municipality has made available o package planning and budget information 
disaggregated to word level in much more accessible and user-friendly formats, which word committees then engage with. 

Besides ward committees, the other formal structure the municipality has established to promote community participation is the IDP forum, 
which includes representatives of word committees os well os councillors and officials and representatives of o host of sectors within civil society. 
The relationship between ward committees and community development workers (CDWs) is currently good. The relationship between ward 
committees and traditional leaders is strained in some coses, where traditional leaders sometimes feel word committees ore taking over their 
powers. 

II. Led Forum 

The establishment of on LED Forum has been of positive outcome. The LED Forum serves os on advisory committee to Council on matters and 
issues relating to LED. Further the forum assist in seeking possible solutions to identified challenges on the implementation of the LED Strategy. 

III. Local Aids Council 

Ntombonona Municipality has established o Local AIDS Council; the role of the LAC among other things it is to do the following: 


May 2014 


207 (Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


■ Co-ordinate the implementation of the comprehensive response to HIV/AIDS 

- Develop a Local Municipal strategy based on PSP 

- Review program development and progress 

■ Support functioning of Ward AIDS Committees 

- Review and approve the annual work plans. 

- Facilitate multi sectoral and inter-departmental collaboration in the campaign against HIV & AIDS; 

- Facilitate capacity building for the different sectors. 

- Mobilize financial and technical resources 

- Commission relevant research 

■ Serve as the leading Local Municipal public advocate to create an enabling environment 

■ Report to the District AIDS Council. 

- Establish and maintain community feedback mechanisms 

Membership and Responsibility assigned to each department are broadly discussed on the Ntambanana HIV/AIDS Strategy. 

IV. IDP Representative Forum 

The purpose of the IDP Representative Forum, it is to ensure communication between all stakeholders and the municipality. Members 
representatives from Sector Departments, Ward Councilors, Ward Committees, CDW’s, Amakhosi, NGO’s, Eskom, Telkom, Farmers Association, 
UNDP and IDT and other stakeholders. The Forum is chaired by the Mayor and seat quarterly. The Forum is re- established annually when 
necessary. Matters discussed in the IDP Representative forum includes , planning issues, environmental issues, local economic development, 
performance issues and budget. 

V. Disability Forum 


The purpose of the establishment was to bring together different stakeholders that will seat together in common minds and address the 
challenges facing people living with disability at all levels. This Forum hasa positive relationship with the Office of the Premier. Representatives 
are from different sector departments, to mention a few that play a major role in this committee are. Department of Social Development, Home 
Affairs, SASSA, Arts and Culture and Housing 

The existence of this forum has open many doors to the people living with disability in the area of Ntambanana. Many programs have been 
established by each of the Department in the Forum, these programs are aimed at making lives of people living with disability better. 


May 2014 


208 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


VI. Youth Committees/Youth Council 


Ntambanana Youth Council (NTAYCO) is a non profit organization engaged in activities aimed at propelling youth development. Statistics 
obtained from the Department of Social Development, Micro, Correctional Services Department, SAPS and HSRC revealed o high incidence of 
youth in conflict with the low. The research indicates that the criminal activities amongst youth con be attributed to poverty, high level of 
unemployment and low levels of education and skills. The youth of goodwill with the assistance of Ntambanana Municipality initiated a co- 
ordinated program to respond to, reduce and prevent youth criminality. The focus of the youth council is on three programs i.e technical skills 
development, life skills training, sports and entertainment. Financial constraints will impact on the sustainability of these structures however 
positive relationship has been established with the Department of Social Development, Economic Development and the Department of Sports 
and recreation to fund identified youth programs. 

VII. Housing Forum 


There ore 8(eight) housing projects in the area, therefore o need to established housing forum was relevant. The forum is fairy represented by 
ward committee members. Traditional Leaders, Housing Department, and Implementing Agents and Municipal Officials. 

This forum meets bi monthly to report and the progress regarding the implementation of housing projects. 

VIII. Community Safety Forum 


The Forum has been established. Its main objective currently the development of a community safety plan. The first draft will be tabled to 
Council in May. 

IX. Senior Citizens Forum 

Ntambanana Municipality Has established a senior Citizens Forum. This forum is aimed at attending problems or issues concerning old people of 
this area e.g. pensioners. This initiative was supported by the Department of Welfare and Education. This forum was established after a research 
conducted revealed that senior citizens ore being abused in many ways and therefore they have no one to talk to. 

X. Other internal Structures 

• MPAC 
. EXCC 

• CCUNCIL 

• PCRTFCLIC CCMMITEES 

• IDP STEERING CCMITEE 


May 2014 


209 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.3.3 AUDIT COMMITTEE 


The Audit Committee of Ntambanana was formally established in accordance with section 166 of the Municipal Finance Management Act No 
56 of 2003. the Audit committee serves as an Independent advisory body that advice the municipal council , political bearers, the accounting 
officer and the management staff of the municipality on matters relating to 

- Internal Financial Control 

- Risk management 

■ Accounting policies 

■ The adequacy, reliability and accuracy of the financial reporting and information 

- Performance management 

- Effective governance 

■ Compliance with the act, the annual Division of Revenue Act 

- Performance evaluation and any other issues referred to it by the municipal entity 

- Review the annual Financial statements 

■ Respond to the council on any issue raised by the Auditor General in audit report 


7.4 Status ot Municipal Policies 


4- WORKPLACE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

Ntambanana Municipality has developed comprehensive Workplace skills Development Plan that is in line with the Skills Development Act . The 
municipality has registered with the Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA) and skills development initiatives have 
carried out at all levels of employment. As of January 2012, R 350 000 has been spent on skills development of staff. 

The main focus of the WSDP is on the following:- 

- Employment profile 

- Employment qualification profile 

- Annual Training and skills objectives 

- Number of beneficiaries to be trained 

- Learnerships, skills programmes 
■ Quality assurance 

210 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


- IDP Objectives 


4- EMPLOYMENT EQUITY PLAN 

Ntambanana Municipality has developed an Employment Equity Plan according to the Employment Equity Act (no 55 of 1998). The 
municipality recognizes the need to redress past discriminatory treatment of persons from designated groups and to eventually establish an 
environment where “employment equity “prevails. The management and Council ore making every effort to establish o representative 
workforce as quickly and equitable os possible, through transparent and legitimate process that do not impact negatively on the quality of 
service delivery. 

4- CODE OF CONDUCT 

Councilors and staff ore required to sign the code of conduct and declaration of interest form on an annual basis. These records ore kept for 
internal and external purposes only 

4- HUMAN RESOURCE POLICIES 

The municipality has developed o number of policies that deals with Human Resource, below is o list of policies found in the Municipal HR Policy 
manually:- 

■ Sexual Harassment policy 

- Racial and Ethnic Harassment policy 

■ Recruitment policy 

■ Relocation policy 

■ Labour relations policy 

- Remuneration policy 

■ Subsistence and Traveling Allowance policy 

- Vehicle policy 

- HIV/AIDS Policy 

■ Occupational Health policy 

- Training and Skills Development policy 


The above documents can be made available on request from HR Department. 


211 (Page 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4 SUCCESSION PLAN & RETENTION 

Ntambanana Municipality like most of municipalities in KZN has difficulties in keeping skilled staff in their post. There ore resignations in almost 
every year. The municipality therefore faces difficulties of maintaining consistency in the workplace 

Council and management ore doing all possible to ovoid this frustrating situation. As o result there o succession and retention policies have 
been developed and adopted by council. The municipality has developed o Bursary police for staff and reserved R200, 000.00. This is one of the 
strategies the municipality is implementing hoping that it will capacitate and retain skilled staff. 

4- PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT 

In terms of the municipal systems act all municipalities are required to prepare a performance management system that will serve a strategic 
approach to management which is aimed at equipping managers, employees at different levels with a set of tools and techniques to regularly 
plan, continuously monitor, periodically measure and review performance of the organization. 

Ntambanana municipality started implementing the new PMS template provided by COGTA in 201 1/12 IDP Review and forward. 

4- HIV/AIDS STRATEGY 

Ntambanana municipality sow the need to develop a plan that will help it in its Endeavour’s to fight against this disease. This strategic plan is a 
tool that will guide the municipality in co-coordinating efforts of all those that have committed their time, energy and resources to trying to 
reduce the impact of the disease. The strategy was adopted by council in September 2006 it is still in operation but there is need for review since 
new relevant statistics will be available from Statistics 201 1 results. 

4- COMMUNICATION POLICY 

Local government has a legal obligation and a political responsibility to ensure regular and effective communication with the community. The 
Constitution of the Republic of South Africa Act 1996 and other statutory enactments oil impose an obligation on local government 
communicators and require high levels of transparency, accountability, openness, participatory democracy and direct communication with 
the communities to improve the lives of oil. It is on these basis that Ntambanana Municipality has developed its communication strategy which 
was adopted by Council . 

4- MUNICIPAL INDIGENT POLICY 

Ntambanana has compiled on Indigent Register os per the requirement of the Municipal Systems Act of 2000, Section 74. The register is 
continuously implemented by the municipality. The act provides that Municipal Council should take into consideration the extent of 
subsidization of tariffs for the poor households who cannot afford the cost of full provision by the municipality. Indigents ore classified as people 


May 2014 


212 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


who are earning a combined total monthly income of R1500 or less. Ntambanana Municipality is currently offering the following services to 
indigents os per the Indigent register: 

■ Destitute/Pouper/Indigent burials support 

■ Refuse Removal 

- Free Basic Electricity 

- Free Basic Energy(gel & stoves) 

- Water (district) 

■ Fire/disaster Protection 

■ Recreational Facilities 


4- YOUTH POLICY 

The Ntambanana Youth Policy was formulated after the youth committee was established. The policy was compiled using the national 
guidelines for the establishment of youth committees 

Objectives for the Establishment of Youth Committees 

■ Too organize the youth into a recognized institution 

- To nurture encourage and promote youth involvement in its own development and that of its own community 

■ To encourage a sense of belonging among the youth of Ntambanana 

- To instill and promote responsibility among young youth 

■ To promote youth working - togetherness by bringing the youth together through sports, entertainment and other activities. 

- To fit youth unemployment and lack of skills 

■ To facilitate information amongst all youth structures within Ntambanana as well as with the international , national and provincial youth 
structures 

- To identify existing or potential resources that could facilitate and accelerate Local Economic Development 

■ To ensure that youth is an integral part of the planning of all sectors and spheres of government and benefits in projects initiated by 
those sector departments 

■ To ensure that youth plays a visible and tangible role in fighting against all epidemic diseases including ttlV/AIDS, Tuberculosis etc. 


213 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.5 STATUS OF SECTOR PLANS 


NO 

SECTOR PLAN 

COMPLETED (YES/NO) 

ADOPTED (YES/NO) 

ADOPTION DATE (IF 
ADOPTED) 

DATE OF NEXT 
REVIEW 


Housing Sector Plan 

YES 

YES 




Disaster Management 
Plan/Framework 

YES 

YES 




Waste Management Plan 

YES 

YES 




Tourism & Marketing plan 

YES 

YES 




HIV & Aids Plan 

YES 

YES 




Local Economic 

Development Plan 

YES 

YES 




Municipal Infrastructure 
Investment Plan 

No 





Energy Sector Plan 

YES 

YES 




Perfarmance Management 
Framework 

YES 

YES 

30 June 2013 

30 June 2014 


Communication Strategy 

YES 

YES 


30 June 2015 


Integrated Develapment 
Planning 

YES 

YES 

29 May 2013 

30 May 2014 


Spatial Development 
Framework 

YES 

YES 




Environmental Management 
Plan 

No 





Human Resource Strategy 

YES 

YES 

June 2012 

30 June 2015 


Employment Eguity Plan 

YES 

YES 

June 2012 

30 June 2015 


Employee Wellness Strategy 

YES 

YES 

Under review 

30 June 2014 


May 2014 


214 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.6 Municipal Risk Management 


The Ntambanana Municipality is cammitted ta managing its risks in a proactive, ongoing and positive manner. 
Types of risks 

• Financial / Budget risk (overspend, run out of money, failure to pay etc.); 

• Performance risk (lock of skills and delivery leads to termination); 

• Political risk (stakeholder unhappiness e.g. voters); 

• Legal Risk / monies not utilized according to regulations; 

• Audit Risk (disclaimer qualified audit reports reflects very badly on management’s performance); 

• Organisational Risk (Lack of skills, succession, capacity, training) 

• Reputation Risk (Branding of the municipalities, external images to the community) 


7.7 BY -LAWS 


Ntambanana Municipality is in a process of developing the following by-laws in the 2014/15 financial year; 

• Refuse By- Lows 

• Cemetery By-Law 

• Fire Prevention By-Law 

• Lease of Flails and Conference Facilities Bylaws 

• Advertising By-Law 

• Environmental Management by-law 


215 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




7.8 

Public Participation 


A municipality is required to disseminate information on processes and procedures that will allow the community to express itself on any matter 
of concern that affects it. Transforming this general requirement to the integrated development planning process means that o municipality has 
to follow at least the following procedures: 

a) Residents to be informed on the integrated development planning process os a whole including, on crucial public events related to that 
process through public announcements, Ward committees including stakeholder associations and any other recognised community 
organisations. 

b) Councillors hove to inform the communities within the area of the ward, through o public constituency meeting/imbizo. 

c) The Representative IDP Forum has to be involved at least once in each major stage of the drafting process. 

d) The community and stakeholder representatives have to be given adequate time (2-4 weeks) to conduct meetings or workshops with 
the groups, communities or organisations they represent, before the issue is dealt with by the Representative IDP Forum. This is to give o 
fair opportunity for legitimate representative participation, but does not necessarily have to involve the municipality in community or 
stakeholder level workshops. 

e) Draft planning documents have to be accessible to every resident, and everybody has the right to submit written comments. There must 
be a time period of at least four weeks for ward committees, stakeholder associations, interest groups and residents to discuss the draft 
document publicly, and to comment on it before the Representative IDP Forum deals with the draft. 

f) The IDP committee has to inform the word committees and stakeholder associations on the manner comments were considered, or on 
reasons why they were not considered by the Representative IDP Forum, before the draft is submitted to the council for approval. 

g) Council meetings on the approval of integrated development planning must be public meetings. 

The municipality has community participation programmes such as: 

□ IDP/ Budget Roadshows - these took place in the third quarter of each financial year. 

The municipality goes to the people in trying to assess their needs. All communities ore targeted and issues that raised at the above 
participation processes are cascaded through the necessary Council structures, departments and to Provincial sectoral departments. 

IDP Roadshows 

In preparation for the review of the IDP for 2014/15 financial year, the IDP Roadshows were held in October 2013 and April 2014. 


May 2014 


216 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.10 Good Governance and Public Participation SWOT Analysis 


Strengths 

Weaknesses 

o Political Peace Exist within the area of 
jurisdiction 

o Fully Functional Audit Committee 

o Good Relations with Traditional Authorities 

exists. 

o The Municipality has a strategic plan, the IDP 
which is annually reviewed. 

o Lack of Capacity to Implement Special Programs [ Youth, Women, Eldery, 
Disable, Children, Youth, Sports and FIIV] 

Opportunities 

Treats 

• Improved functioning of IGR Structures 

• Alignment /integration between locals and 
district plans 

• Enrolment of councillors onl accredited 
training/ programs 

o Political frictions 

o Compromise of oversight role 

o Lock of communication/ mechanism 


217 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION D 

VISION, MISSION AND STRATEGIES 

Formulating a long term vision for growth and development is an important step to inspire and focus the attention of all residents, communities, 
stakeholders, politicians, and officials in creating a desirable future for the Ntambanana Municipality. The Strategic Plan of the Municipality was 
developed in alignment with National, Provincial and District Perspective. 

The vision is the destination, while the objectives and strategies are the various steps required to reach this destination within the next five years. 
The following vision was formulated for the Ntambanana Municipality in consultation with all stakeholders, during the initial IDP process and has 
been revised to suit the council objectives. 

Vision 

To improve the quality of life of the residents in the Ntambanana Municipal area by expanding the role and the effectiveness of the 
Ntambanana Municipality by 2022. 

Mission 

The municipality is determined to ensure longer term growth of the community by ensuring good governance in all aspects of service delivery 
whilst being over of the needs of the community and treating each member of the community with respect. 


218 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


LONG TERM DEVELOPMENT GOALS ALIGNED WITH KZN PGDS 


KPAl: MUNICIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT 


Development Goals 

KZN PDGS 

Development 

Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUTS/TARGETS 

People 


o To improve skills 

O 

Development of a workplace 

Approved WSP 

Empowerment 


and capacities 


skills plan 




of councillors 

O 

Implementation of workplace 




and staff 


skills plan 




o To enhance 

o 

Filling of critical posts 

All critical posts filled 



institutional 



Approved succession plan 



development 

o 

Development of the 



o. 



succession plan 



o 

lU 

> 


o 

Implementation of Risk 



m 

a 



Management Policy 



u 

o To ensure an 

o 

Implementation of the IT 

IT development priorities 


3 

Integrated 


Policy 

implemented 


o 

Management 





</> 

IJJ 

and Information 






System 





< 

o To ensure 

o 

Implementation Individual 

101 % individual performance 



monitoring and 


Performance Management 

agreements signed 



evaluation of 


Systems 




municipal 



Approved organisational 



performance 



scorecard 






2014/15 annual report 


219 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 





o Implementation of 

Organisational Performance 
Management Systems 

submitted 



KPA2: LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 

Development 

KZN PGDS 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGETS 

Goals 






Rural Development 


o To align the LED 

O 

Review the LED Strategy 

Reviewed LED Strategy 



Strategy with the 
PGDS, EPWP and 

CWP 






o To improve support 

O 

Implementation of 

Training programmes for 



to Local Economic 


programmes with regards to 

unemployed youth 



Development 


the unemployed youth 
database 







completed land audit 


O 


o 

Conduct Agricultural 

co-operatives established 


< 



Development Land Audit 



lU 


o 

Establishment of co-operatives 

reviewed Tourism strategy 


u 


o 

Review and implement the 



CQ 



Tourism Strategy 

Heritage sites developed 


o 


o 

Development of Heritage sites 




o To increase job 

o 

Implement Led Projects 

jobs created through 



creation 

o 

Implement EPWP Projects 

these programmes 




o 

Implement CWP Projects 



220 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KPA3: BASIC SERVICE AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

Development 

KZN PGDS 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

TARGETS 

Goals 





Infrastructure 


o To improve access to basic 

o Rehabilitation of 60% of 

o Maintaned internal 

Development 

IJJ 

service delivery 

access roads (Internal 

access roads 




Municipal roads) 

o 80 % households with 


u 



access to solid waste 


U =3 


o Increase waste collection 

disposal services 


o “ 


by 80% 

o 90 % households with 


< 


o 90%of households must 

access to free basic 


< DC 

U- 


have access to electricity. 

electricity 


^ 2 

00 _ 


o provision of sports and 

o Sport and recreational 




recreational facilities 

facilities provided 


221 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KPA 4: Good Governance and Public Participation 

Development 

KZN PGDS 

Development Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGET 

Goals 





Good 


To promote community 

o Ensure functional 

ward committee meetings 

Governance 


empowerment and 

Ward Committees 


and Public 

ed 

public participation 



Participation 

IJJ 





u 

To ensure compliance 

o Effective internal 

o Approved Internal Audit Plan 


< 

with all requirements of 

auditing 

o Audit Committee meetings 


>- 

legislative framework in 

o Effective Audit 

o oversight report 


lU U 

preparation of Clean 

Committee 

o Clean audit, Audit opinion 


o o 

Audit 2014 

o Effective Municipal 



o2 


Public Accounts 





Committee 





o Maintain unqualified 





audit opinion 



222 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KPA 5 : FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND MANAGEMENT 

Development 

KZN PGDS 

Deveiopment Objectives 

Deveiopment Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGET 

Goals 





Financial 


o To enhance revenue 

o Development and 

o Percentage 

Viability 


collection 

implementation of debt 

improvement of debt 




recovery plan 

year-on-year 




o Implementation of the rates 

o Percentage of 




policy 

objective implemented 




o Develop Revenue 

o Date of approval of 




Enhancement Strategy 

Revenue 




(Financial Sustainability 

Enhancement Strategy 


U 


Strategy and Investment 



O 


Strategy) 



ed 

o To ensure that 

o Supplementary valuation roll 

o Percentage 


UJ 

financial resources 

o Financial policies review 

completion of 


u 

are efficiently and 

o Maintenance of a Grapp 

valuation roll 


< 

effectively allocated 

compliant Asset Register 



UJ 

o Ensure compliance 

o Implementation of MFMA 



o 

with MFMA 




o 

o Ensure effective and 

Implementation of Supply 

Percentage completion of 



management and 

Chain Management Policy 

supplier database update 



monitoring of 





expenditure 




223 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


KPA 6 : Cross Cutting Issues 


Development 

Goals 

KZN PGDS 

Development 

Objectives 

Development Strategies 

OUTPUT/TARGET 

Spatial 


o Ta ensure 

o Review of SDF 

o Reviewed and 

Planning 


improved 


approved of the 



Spatial 


SDF 



Development 





planning 





o To achieve 

o Review Integrated 

o Credible IDP 



sustainable 

Development Plan 




development 


o IDP Roadshows 




o Conduct IDP / 

conducted 




Budget Roadshows 




o To ensure 

o Review EMP 

o Date of approval 



Environmental 


of the EMP 



Sustainability 

o Development of on 




and 

SEA 

o Date of 



Management 


appointment of 




o Identify land for 

service provider 




burial purposes 






o Date of submission 





of proposal to 





Council 



o To ensure 

o Implementation of 

Percentage of houses built 



sustainable 

Housing sector plan 

as per housing sector plan 



human 




D 

n 

settlements 




UJ 

and land 




< 

management 




< 

Q. 

o To ensure 

o Implementation of 

Percentage of 



effective land 


recommendations 


224 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




use 

management 

LUMS 

implemented 


o Ta minimize the 
effect of 
natural and 
other disasters 

o Review Disaster 
Management Plan 

Date of approval of the 
Disaster Management Plan 


o 

o To implement 
Operation 
Sukumo Sokhe 

o Implement 

Operation Sukuma 
Sakhe 

Number of interventions as 
per OSS 


o 

o To implement 
programmes to 
reduce 
incidents of 
HIV/AIDS 
infections 

o Review and 

implementation of 
HIV/AIDS Strategy 

HIV/ AIDS Strategy 


225 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION E -1 

STRATEGIC MAPPING 


1 . SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK 


Ntambanana Municipality completed the SDF in 2008 due to development initiatives around the area, the Department of Local Government 
and Traditional Affairs has given funding for the re-view of the Municipal SDF. The draft review was completed by July 2009 and will be reviewed 
during 2014/15 . 

The following has been extracted from the Spatial Development Framework of 2008. Spatial Development Plan is attached at the end of this 
Sub-Section. 


2. THE LAND USE CONFIGURATION 


The broad land use configuration devised for the municipal area, bearing in mind the Umfolozi Sub-regional Development Plans land use 
configuration, was basically derived from the existing land use pattern incorporating the need to link certain areas to promote or ensure natural 
movement between systems. These include: 


• Agriculture, as one of the main economic activities and principal land uses in the municipal area is depicted in terms of intensity i.e. high 
intensity agriculture in the tteatonville area with lower intensity development in all the tribal authorities. 

• Tourism and recreation. Tourism and recreation cannot be defined as a dedicated land use zones, even at a municipal scale as a result 
of its dispersed and nodal nature thereof, ttowever, high potential tourism areas ore depicted on the plan as symbols, but generally the 
tourism potential of the Municipal area is largely underutilized. 

• Urban development. This zone is not only represented by emerging towns such as Buchanana, but also informal peri-urban areas that 
are functionally linked to formal urban areas. 

• Spatial development initiatives. As with tourism these initiatives con be reflected in the form of overlays in recognition thereof. 

• Infrastructure. Only transportation corridors are reflected on the plan, ttowever, problem areas in terms of water provision and sanitation 
ore included on some of the other plans and in recognition of their spatial significance. 

• Spatial elements. Some elements cannot be depicted on the plan as zones or nodes but rather as symbols. For instance, it is one of the 
functions of the plan to indicate projects of regional importance (key projects), key opportunity areas i.e. those areas that has potential 
that still has to be exploited, and suggested key infrastructural projects. 


May 2014 


226 I P a g e 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


These categories will typically include Key projects in the: 

• Tourism; 

• Industrial; 

• Housing; 

• Administrative; 

• Infrastructure; 

• Conservation, and 

• Agriculture fields, are indicated. 


The control of development within these zones will be addressed in the next section i.e. land use management, with the main purpose being to: 

• Indicate a minimum level of regulatory response; 

• Offer the municipal authority some guidelines about land use decisions; and to 

• Provide o simple mechanism to assist in making rational and consistent decisions in response to development applications. 


3. THE URBAN AND RURAL HIERARCHY 


In terms of the need to balance growth, o number of emerging centres hove been identified and added to the existing established service 
and administrative centres, in order to improve service delivery to these towns and their hinterlands, and to promote local economic 
development. It is further the intention to establish and expand the administrative and service delivery functions of these towns which 
hopefully will serve to attract other investment in response to the concentration of facilities and people. 


Despite the new municipal order, service provision is still concentrated in the urban centres where economies of scale, rates recovery and 
local authority control renders sustainable service provision o viable option. Limited budgets, historical bios, costs and rates recovery have 
militated against the provision of services in the municipality, but the establishment of o hierarchy will provide guidance for the gradual 
eradication of the imbalance. 


227 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The balancing of development throughout the municipal area should not be restricted to services only, but opportunities should also be 
created in the employment and production fields. It is the expressed government policy that the development of small towns should be 
encouraged in order to improve service provision and opportunities to rural areas thereby providing o disincentive for people to migrate to 
urban areas where the quality of life is much lower, and the burden on the authorities unmanageable. 


The Provincial Growth and Development Strategy has identified the need to support growth in small towns to inter olio improve the delivery 
of services to rural areas. This strategy was refined in the Integrated Rural 

Development Policy (IRDP) which, through o set of guidelines, will act os the mechanism to achieve this aim The idea then is to establish and 
promote the development of existing and emerging towns through public investment which will focus spatial development whilst providing 
basic services os o fundamental right. On o municipal scale the nodal hierarchy, functions and service standards hove been, to o large 
extent, based on criteria os outlined in o report entitled: A Pilot Rural Service Centre Initiative for KwaZulu-Natal and the IRDP. These ore: 


• Location; as primary criterium requires that o node should enjoy good accessibility and linkages to other nodes and target service areas; 

• Population; the existing population numbers and prospects for future growth ore important os service delivery should reach os many 
people os possible; 

• Status; nodes with established local authority control hove on advantage over emerging towns where structures still hove to be 
established and a culture of payment for services developed; 

• Infrastructure; The existing level of physical and social services os o means to facilitate further development is important; 

• Economic considerations; the current level of economic activity and future growth prospects should sustain development and the 
designation of o node os o PASC or RC should not be o prerequisite for sustained economic growth; and 

• Public participation; the identification and selection of nodes should bear in mind stakeholder input. 

The preferred hierarchy of nodes, their typical roles, level of engineering services, ore outlined hereafter. However, the land use 

management table contains o more comprehensive outline or definition of these nodes, and should be consulted in preference. 


May 2014 


228 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




3.1 

PRIMARY NODES 


These towns generally have a wide range of public and private sector activities and Buchanana and Heatonberry Farm has the potential to 
develop into this category provided that public and private investment is secured, In terms of the functions assigned to this category 
Buchanana will have to: 

• continue to serve as municipal administrative centre Buchanana); 

• provide services and opportunities to areas such as the adjacent traditional authorities; 

• contain residential accommodation, financial services, health services communication facilities and SMME facilities; 

• serve as a transportation mode, specifically geared towards passenger services; 

• serve as the locality for the establishment of infrastructure such as sports facilities, cemeteries, landfill sites, and the like; 

• Provide local economic development opportunities through appropriate industrial and commercial development. 


3.2 SECONDARY NODES (RURAL CENTRE) 


These are small dynamic places that have developed as a result of their location at an important junction for instance, the existence of a clinic, 
shops, bus and taxi stops and informal and formal business. The level of service supply anticipated include: 

• the provision of services to the surrounding rural areas such as basis engineering services, administration facilities, markets, 
telecommunication, education and transportation facilities; and 

• the provision of periodic mobile services. 


3.3 TERTIARY NODES (EMERGING RURAL CENTRE) 


These centres are typically characterized by an accessible location, postal services and public phones, limited economic activity, a pension 
payout point and educational facilities. It is clear from the above that every attempt was made to stay clear from an urban bias and to 
misdirect any service provision from the hardcore rural areas. However, densities will still dictate programming and budgets but at least this will 
be informed by the complete picture. The proposed hierarchy is outlined in the Table hereafter. Proposed settlement hierarchy 


May 2014 


229 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Table 20: SEHLEMENT HIERARCHIES 


CATEGORY 

SEHLEMENT 

Primary Node (administrative 
and service centre) 

Buchonono 

Secondary nodes (Rural 

centre 

Upper Nseleni - Empothuneni 
(Obuko), Heotonville 

Tertiary nodes (Emerging rural 
centre) 

Nomponjwono, Mawanda, 
Emkhondlwini (Obuko), 

Edwoleni 

(Somopho North), Mombuka 
(Mombuko), Makhwela 

(Somopho South), eGroundini 
(Obizo) 

Scattered settlement and 
scarcely populated areas 

Remainder of the municipal 
area. 


The typical physical and social infrastructural services to be provided to these settlements ore outlined in the Tables hereafter. The emphasis on 
service provision remains with initiatives that con be introduced by public programmes and support. To this end it is hoped that these initiatives 
will pave the way for private sector involvement in the form of shopping centres, small industrial activity, market gardens, market stalls and the 
like. Also, for the benefit of the Municipality and other service providers, the Table overleaf indicates the responsible authority. This does not 
mean that service providers should religiously stick to the funding of one component only, but at least it gives on outline of core responsibilities. 


230 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4. DEVELOPMENT CORRIDORS 


Corridors hove varying levels of mobility and access. The following summarizes the relationship between these concepts and locates the three 
levels of corridors in the Ntambanana Local Municipality, hence their implications to the Ntambanana SDF. 


4.1 PRIMARY CORRIDOR 


Provincial Road P700 


P700 is a Provincial route which emanates from the R66 to Hluhluwe-Umfolozi Park. It provides a shorter and more direct link to the Park from 
Mpumalanga and Gauteng. It runs east-west to the north-eastern quadrant of Ulundi Local Municipal boundary and south of Ulundi town. 


It serves as a major transportation route between two towns i.e. Ulundi and Nquiwane. The extent of the corridor is approximately 35km. P701 is 
in extent about 62km running from P700 and joins the R34 TO Empangeni. 


It bisects two local municipal areas namely, Ntambanana Local municipality and Umhiathuze Local municipality. Both local municipalities form 
part of Uthungulu District Municipality. The development of this corridor seeks to facilitate the distribution of benefits arising from tourism and 
other economic activities. In economic and conservation terms, the tourism sector is regarded as the key development catalyst in the 
Ntambanana Municipal area. 


As note, development of this corridor presents further opportunities for tourism development, as it will provide a shorter and more direct link to 
the Park from Mpumalanga and Gauteng, which would effectively draw eMakhosini and the adjoining Ophathe Game Park closer to the 
Greater St Lucia complex. This would channel visitors via the Municipal area to the Park, stimulating growth in the tourism sector. 


231 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




4.2 

SECONDARY CORRIDORS 


Primary corridors are linked to one another by Secondary corridors. These corridors also provide important inter-settlement and inter-suburb 
linkages within the municipality. 


P702 


This road emanates from the P700 linking Upper Nseleni and Mawonda settlement, running north-west to the north-western quadrant of the 
municipality towards Melmoth. The other secondary corridors in the municipality ore: 


P534 

P509-P493-D873-D3 1 2-D 1 30 
R34 (P393) 

P568 


4.3 TERTIARY CORRIDORS 


Tertiary corridors link the rural hinterland and settlements with the urban core as well os one another. Ntambanana municipal tertiary corridors 
ore: 

• D877, D 1 579 and P57 1 D477 


May 2014 


232 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5. NTAMBANANA SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN 


The SDP is a product of the analysis, development principles, legal requirements, vision and mission and spatial model 


5.1 Levels of Investment 


Level 3: Heatonville 


As per the directive from the municipality, Heatonville must be promoted as the future Primary Node, given its suitability in comparison to the 
existing Administrative and Service Centre i.e. Buchanana. 


The Heatonville area is situated approximately 17km outside Empangeni on the R34, and as a result is accessible in the sub-regional and 
regional context. Since it takes direct access from the R34 it enjoys excellent exposure, and thus has potential for development other than 
agriculture. 


Heatonville is the only town allocated level 3 investment, in that it the area of highest potential for development given its future status. Whilst 
there exist some remnant of basic services, local capacity and existing infrastructure within the area, there is a need for strategic focus towards 
its development as the future Primary Node of the Municipality. 


Level 2: Buchanana, Upper Nseleni, Emathuneni (Obuka), Luwamba, Makhwela (Somopho South), Mambuka, Edwaleni (Somopho North), 
eGroundini 


These secondary nodes are earmarked as level 2 investment nodes. Whilst these towns have access to basic services, there is a critical need to 
develop local capacity and eliminate infrastructure backlogs. 

233 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


What these centres have in common is their location at important junctions i.e. existence of o clinic, shops, bus and taxi stops and informal and 
formal business. 


It must be noted that whereas Buchanana is the current Administrative and Service Centre, its current location is less strategic, compared to the 
proposed Heatonville node. Furthermore, it is the intention of the Ntambanana Local municipality to subordinate Buchanana into secondary. 
Level 2 investment node. 


Level 1: Mawanda, Emkhandlwini (Obuka), Nomponjwana, Njomelwane 


These lower order centres fall under the level 1 investment. In most coses these areas are deeply rural and hove minimal to non existent access 
to basic services. They are essentially emerging rural centres. These areas are typically characterized by accessible location of postal services, 
and public phones, limited economic activity, a pension pay point and educational facilities. 


234 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


E.2 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 2014/15 


SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 


KEY 

PERFORM 

ANCE 

AREA 

KEY 

CHALLE 

NGE 

OBJEC 

TIVE 

REF 

GOAL 

OBJECTIV 

E 

STRATEGIE 

S 

PERFORM 

ANCE 

INDICAT 

ORS 

BASE 

LINE 

5 YEAR TARGETS 

TAR 

GET 

AND 

YEAR 

IF 

OUTS 

IDES 

YEAR 

PERI 

OD 

BUD 

GET 

SOU 

RCE 

RESPONSI 

BILITY 

YEAR 1 

YEAR 2 

YEAR 3 

YEAR 4 

YEARS 

MUNCIPAL TRANSFORMATION AND INSTITUTIONAL 
DEVELOPMENT 

Low 
educati 
on and 
skills 
level 

1.1.1 

Ensure 

people 

empowe 

rment 

To 

improve 
the skills 
and 

capaciti 
es ot 

Councillo 
rs and 
statt 

Develop 
ment ot 
the 

Workplac 
e Skills 

Plan 

Date ot 
approval 
ot the 

WSP 

30- 

Jun- 

12 

30-Jun- 

13 

30-Jun- 

14 

30- 

Apr-15 

30- 

Apr-16 

30- 

Apr-17 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

1.1.2 

Implemen 
tation ot 
the 

Workplac 
e Skills 

Plan 

Number 

ot 

training 
interventi 
ons tor 
statt and 
Councillo 

rs 




8 

8 

8 


R37 

9 

738 

EOS- 

Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Attract! 
on and 
retentio 
n ot 
skilled 
personn 

2.1.1 

Improve 

insitution 

al and 

organisat 

ional 

capacity 

To 

enhance 

institution 

al 

develop 

ment 

Filling ot 

critical 

position 

Percenta 
ge ot 
critical 
positions 
tilled by 

30 June 




100% 

100% 

100% 



EOS 

Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 


235 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



el 

2.1.2 



Develop 
ment of 
the 

successio 
n plan 

Date of 

approval 

of 

Success! 
on Plan 






30-Jun- 

16 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

2. 1.2.1 

Implemen 
tation of 
Risk 

Manage 

ment 

Policy 

Date of 
Annual 

Risk 

Assessme 

nt 




31-Jul- 

14 

31-Jul- 

15 

31-Jul- 

16 




Financial 

Services 

2. 1.2.2 

Percenta 
ge of 
risks 

resolved 

during 

the 

financial 

year 




100% 

100% 

100% 




Financial 

Services 

Lack of 
business 
support 
facilities 

2.2.1 

To ensure 

an 

Integrate 

d 

Manage 

ment 

and 

Informati 

on 

System 

Implemen 
tation of 

IT Policy 

Percenta 

ge of 

annual 

develop 

ment 

priorities 

impleme 

nted as 

per 

business 

plan 




100% 

100% 

100% 


R60 

000 

EQS 

Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Lack of 

alignme 

nt 

betwee 

n 

national 

provinci 
al and 

3.1.1 

Ensure 

function 

al 

Performa 

nee 

Manage 

ment 

System 

To ensure 
monitorin 
g and 
evaluatio 
n of 

municipa 

1 

performa 

nee 

Implemen 

tation 

Individual 

Performa 

nee 

Systems 

Number 

of 

individua 

1 

performa 

nee 

agreeme 

nts 

signed 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 


236 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



local 

activities 

3.1. 2.1 



Implemen 
tation ot 
Organisat 
ional 
Pertorma 

nee 

Manage 

ment 

Systems 

Date ot 
approval 
ot OPMS 
Scorecar 
d 

30- 

Jun- 

12 

30-Jun- 

13 

30-Jun- 

14 

30-Jun- 

15 

30-Jun- 

16 

30-Jun- 

17 




Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

3.1. 2.2 

Date ot 
submissio 
n ot 

Annual 

Pertorma 

nee 

Report to 
AG 

30- 
Aug- 
1 1 

30- Aug- 
12 

30- 

Aug-13 

30- 
Aug-1 4 

30- 
Aug-1 5 

30- 
Aug-1 6 




Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

3.2.1 

To 

improve 

customer 

percepti 

on and 

pertorma 

nee 

Conduct 
Customer 
Satistacti 
on Survey 

Date ot 
submissio 
n ot 
survey 
results to 
Council 




30-Jun- 

15 




R50 

000 

EQS 

Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE 
DEVELOPMENT 

High 

backlog 

s in 

basic 

service 

delivery 

4.1.1 

Improve 
d access 
to basic 
services 

To 

improve 

access 

to roads 

Rehabiliat 
ion ot 

access 

roads 

Number 

ot 

access 

roads 

rehabilita 

ted 

10 

40 

20 

45 

50 

55 


R12 

293 

EQS 

Office ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.2.1. 1 

To 

improve 

access 

to 

electricit 

y 

Provide 
tree basic 
electricity 

Number 

ot 

househol 
ds with 

access 

to tree 

basic 

electricit 

y 

1788 

1788 

1788 

2844 

2844 

2844 




Office ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.2.1. 2 

Number 
ot new 
electricit 

y 

0 

0 

1056 

0 

0 

0 




Office ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 


237 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 








connect! 

ons 










Manager 

4.3. 1.1 

To 

improve 

access 

to solid 
wraste 
disposal 
services 

Provide 

basic 

solid 

v/aste 

disposal 

services 

Number 

ot 

househol 
ds with 

access 

to solid 
waste 
disposal 
services 


12826 

12826 





R18 

0 

000 

EQS 

Ottice ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.3. 1.2 

Number 

ot new 

solid 

waste 

disposal 

connect! 

ons 










Ottice ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.4. 1.1 

To 

provide 
communi 
ty halls 

Construct 
communi 
ty halls 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on ot 
Themba 
Commun 
ity Hall 




100% 




R 

2 41 

0 

0000 

MIG 

Ottice ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.4. 1.2 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on ot 
Magedip 
leti 

Commun 
ity Hall 




100% 




R 

2 08 

3 

871 

MIG 

Ottice ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 


238 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




4.4. 1.3 




Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on of 

Debe 
Commun 
ity Hall 




100% 




R2 0 
83 

871 

MIG 

Office of 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.5.1. 1 

To 

provide 

creches 

Construct 

creches 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on of 
Enhianhl 
eni 

Creche 




100% 




R2 0 
83 

871 

MIG 

Office of 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.5.1. 2 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on of 
Izithomb 
othi 

Creche 




100% 




R1 2 
36 

708 

MIG 

Office of 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.6.1. 1 

To 

provide 

sports 

facilities 

Develop 

sports 

faclities 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on of 
Njomelw 
one 

Sports 

Field 




100% 




R2 4 
10 

000 

DSR 

Office of 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

4.6.1. 2 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on of 
Mabhens 
a Sports 
Field 




100% 




R2 4 
10 

000 

DSR 

Office of 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 


239 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




4.6. 1.3 




Percenta 

ge 

completi 

on ot 

Mvazana 

Indoor 

Sports 

Centre 




100% 




R1 2 
03 

100 

DSR 

Office ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 


Limited 

5.1.1 

Create 

To align 

Review ot 

Date ot 












econom 


economi 

the LED 

LED 

approval 












ic 


c growth 

Strategy 

Strategy 

ot LED 












develop 


and 

with the 


Strategy 










Corporat 


merit 


develop 

PGDS, 












e and 




ment 

EPWP 












Commu 





and 





30-Jun- 


30-Jun- 





nity 

1— 

-7 




CWP 





14 


16 



- 

- 

Services 



5.2.1 


To 

Implemen 

Number 


UnempI 









Q_ 




improve 

tation ot 

ot 


oyed 









0 
1 




support 

program 

training 


Youth 









> 




to Local 

mes with 

program 


Databa 









Q 




Develop 

regards 

mes 


se 








Corporat 

(J 




ment 

to the 



comple 








e and 

5 





unemploy 



ted 30 








Commu 

u 

z 





ed youth 



June 








nity 

0 





database 



2013 

2 

2 

2 

2 




Services 

u 

LU 


5.2.2 



Enhance 

Date ot 










Corporat 

1 

< 





agricultur 

completi 










e and 

u 





al 

on ot 










Commu 

u 
1 





develop 

land 





30- 





nity 






ment 

audit 





Jun-16 





Services 



5.2.3 



Establish 

Number 
















ment ot 

ot CO- 










Corporat 






agricultur 

operativ 










e and 






al CO- 

es 








R21 


Commu 






operative 

establish 








0 


nity 






s 

ed 



5 

10 

10 

10 


000 

EQS 

Services 


240 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




5.2.4.1 



Review 

and 

implemen 
tation ot 
Tourism 
Strategy 

Date ot 

approval 

ot 

Tourism 
Marketin 
g Plan 





30-Jun- 

16 

30-Jun- 

17 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

5.2.4.2 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on ot 
Somoph 
o 

Heritage 

Site 





100% 





Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Limited 

employ 

merit 

opportu 

nities 

5.3.1. 1 

To 

increase 

job 

creation 

Implemen 
t LED 
Projects 

Number 
ot jobs 
maintain 
ed 

through 

the 

Moringa 

Project 




20 






Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

5.3.1. 2 

Number 
ot jobs 
maintain 
ed 

through 

the 

Essential 

Oils 

Project 


33 

33 

33 

33 

33 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

5.3.2 

Implemen 
t EPWP 
Projects 

Number 
ot jobs 
maintain 
ed 


33 

33 

58 

58 

58 




Office ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 


241 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




5.3.3 



Implemen 

tCWP 

Projects 

Number 
ot jobs 
maintain 
ed 




1018 

1018 

1018 




Office ot 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

FINANCIAL VIABILITY AND FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 

The 

municip 
ality has 
a small 
income 
base 

6.1.1 

Improve 

d 

Financial 

Viability 

and 

Manage 

ment 

To 

enhance 

revenue 

collectio 

n 

Implemen 
tation ot 
debt 
recovery 
plan 

Percenta 

ge 

improve 
ment ot 
debt 
yeor-on- 
yeor 


5% 

5% 

5% 

5% 

5% 




Financial 

Services 

6.1.2 

Implemen 
tation ot 
the rotes 
policy 

Date ot 

annual 

review 




31- 

May- 

15 

31- 

May- 

16 

31- 
M ay- 
17 




Financial 

Services 

6.1.3 

Develop 

Revenue 

Enhance 

ment 

Strategy 

(Financial 

Sustainabi 

lity 

Strategy 

and 

Investme 

nt 

Strategy) 

Date ot 

approval 

ot 

Revenue 

Enhance 

ment 

Strategy 




31- 

Moy- 

15 






Financial 

Services 

6.2.1. 1 

To ensure 
that 

tinancial 

resources 

ore 

ettecienti 
y and 

Mointena 
nee ot 
the 

Supplem 

entary 

Valuation 

Roll 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on ot 
valuation 
roll 


100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 

100% 




Financial 

Services 


242 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




6.2.1. 2 


effectivel 

y 

allocate 

d 

Maintena 
nee of a 
CRAP 
complian 
t Asset 
Register 

Percenta 

ge 

complia 
nee with 
CRAP 




100% 

100% 

100% 




Financial 

Services 

6.3.1 

To ensure 

effective 

manage 

ment 

and 

monitorin 
g of 

expendit 

ure 

Implemen 

tation of 

Supply 

Chain 

Manage 

ment 

Policy 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on of 
supplier 
databas 
e update 




100% 






Financial 

Services 

GOOD GOVERNANCE AND COMMUNITY 
PARTICIPATION 

Lack of 

informat 

ion 

sharing 

betwee 

n 

municip 

ality 

and 

commu 

nity 

7.1.1 

Effective 

Public 

Participa 

tion 

To 

promote 

communi 

ty 

empowe 

rment 

and 

public 

participa 

tion 

Ensure 

functional 

Ward 

Committe 

es 

Number 
of ward 
committ 

ee 

meetings 


32 

32 

32 

32 

32 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Non- 

complia 

nee with 

legal 

require 

ments 

8.1.1 

Improve 

Municipa 

1 Audit 

Opinion 

and 

Account 

ability 

To ensure 
complia 
nee with 
all 

requirem 
ents of 
legislativ 
e 

framewo 

Effective 

internal 

auditing 

Date of 
approval 
of the 
Internal 
Audit 

Plan 


30-Jun- 

13 

30-Jun- 

14 

30-Jun- 

15 

30-Jun- 

16 

30-Jun- 

17 




Financial 

Services 


243 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




8.1.2 


rk in 

preparati 
on of 
Clean 
Audit 

2014 

Effective 

Audit 

Committe 

e 

Number 
of Audit 
Committ 

ee 

meetings 


4 

4 

4 

4 

4 




Financial 

Services 

8.1.3 

Effective 

Municipal 

Public 

Accounts 

Committe 

e 

Date of 

approval 

of 

annual 

report, 

inclusive 

of 

oversight 

report 


31 -Mar- 
13 

31- 
Mar- 14 

31- 
Mar- 1 5 

31- 
Mar- 1 6 

31- 
Mar- 1 7 




Office of 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

8.1.4 

Maintain 
unqualifie 
d audit 
opinion 

Audit 

Opinion 


Unqualif 

ied 

Unqual 

ified 

Unqual 

ified 

Unqual 

ified 

Unqual 

ified 




Office of 
the 

Municipa 

1 

Manager 

CROSS CUTTING 

Spatial 
profile - 
most of 
study 
area is 
sparsely 
populat 
ed 

9.1.1 

Improve 

Strategic 

and 

Municipa 

1 Spatial 
Planning 

To ensure 

improve 

d Spatial 

Develop 

ment 

planning 

Review of 
the 

Spatial 

Develop 

ment 

Framewor 

k 

Date of 
approval 
of SDF 


30-Jun- 

13 


30-Jun- 

15 


30-Jun- 

17 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Lack of 
alignme 
nt of 
activities 
betwee 

n 

national 

provinci 
al and 
local 
activities 

9.2.1 

To 

achieve 

sustainab 

le 

develop 

ment 

Review 

Integrate 

d 

Develop 
ment Plan 

Date of 
approval 
of IDP 


30-Jun- 

13 

30-Jun- 

14 

30-Jun- 

15 

30-Jun- 

16 

30-Jun- 

17 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

9.2.2 

Conduct 
IDP / 
Budget 
Roadsho 

ws 

Number 
of IDP 
Roadsho 

ws 


2 

2 

2 

2 

2 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 


May 2014 


244 [Page 


Spatial 
profile - 
most of 
study 
area is 
sparsely 
populat 
ed 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


9.3.1 


To ensure 

Environm 

entol 

Sustoino 

bility and 

Manage 

ment 

Review/ 
Develop 
ment of 
the 

Environm 
entol 
Manage 
ment Plan 

Date of 
approval 
of EMP 





30 Jun 
2016 





Corporot 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

9.3.2 

Develop 
ment of 

on 

Strategic 

Environm 

entol 

Assessme 

nt 

Dote of 
completi 
on of 

assessme 

nt 





30-Jun- 

16 





Corporot 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

9.3.3 

Identify 
land for 
burial 
purposes 

Dote of 
submissio 
n of 

proposal 

to 

Council 





30-Jun- 

16 





Corporot 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

9.3.3.1 

Conduct 

El A study 

Dote of 
appoint 
ment of 
service 
provider 




31- 

Dec-14 






Corporot 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

9.3.3.2 

Dote of 
submissio 
n of EIA 
Study on 
cemeteri 
es to 
Council 





30-Jun- 

16 





Corporot 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 


245 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



Limited 

co- 

operatio 

n 

betwee 

n 

AmaKh 
osi and 
municip 
ality on 
LUMS 

9.4.1 


To ensure 
ettective 
land use 
manage 
ment 

Implemen 
totion ot 
LUMS 

Dote ot 
approval 
ot LUMS 
by 

Council 




30-Jun- 

15 






Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Land 

ownersh 

ip 

9.5.1 

To ensure 
sustoinob 
le human 
settleme 
nts and 
land 
manage 
ment 

Review ot 
the 

Housing 

Sector 

Plan 

Dote ot 

approval 

ot 

Housing 

Sector 

Plan 




30-Jun- 

15 






Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Prevale 
nt to 
natural 
disasters 

10.1.1 

Ensure 

improve 

d 

response 

to 

disasters 

To 

minimize 

the 

ettect ot 

natural 

and 

other 

disasters 

Review 
Disaster 
Manage 
ment Plan 

Dote ot 

approval 

ot 

Disaster 

Manage 

ment 

Plan 






30-Jun- 

17 




Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

10.1.2 

Enhance 

Rural 

Metro 
Services 
to the 
communi 
ty 

Number 
ot tire 
tighting 
training 
interventi 

ons 




8 






Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

Sustoina 
bility ot 
poverty 
ollevioti 

on 

1 1.1.1. 

1 

Alleviate 

Poverty 

To 

impleme 

nt 

Operatio 

n 

Implemen 

t 

Operatio 
n Sukumo 
Sokhe 

Number 

ot 

interventi 

ons 








R34 

0 

000 

EOS 

Corpora! 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 


May 2014 


246 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



projects 

1 1.1.1. 

2 


Sukuma 

Sakhe 


Number 

ot 

maiden 

dance 

events 

hosted 




2 

2 

2 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

1 1.1.1. 

3 

Substanc 
e abuse 

awarene 

ss 




2 

2 

2 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

High 
rate ot 
HIV/ AID 

S 

12.1.1 

Reduce 

incidents 

ot 

HIV/ AIDS 
intection 

s 

To 

impleme 

nt 

program 
mes to 
reduce 
incidents 
ot 

HIV/ AIDS 
intection 

s 

Review 

and 

implemen 
tation ot 
HIV/AIDS 
Strategy 

Percenta 
ge ot 
program 

mes 

impleme 
nted as 
per 

strategy 




100% 

100% 

100% 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 

12.2.1 

To 

impleme 

nt 

program 
mes to 
promote 
sport 
and 

recreatio 

n 

Schools 

and 

Communi 
ty Sports 
Tourname 
nt 

Number 
ot sports 
codes 
participa 
ting 




5 

5 

5 




Corporat 
e and 
Commu 
nity 

Services 


247 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION F: FINANCIAL PLAN 
1 . 1 MUNICIPAL BUDGET OVERVIEW 


The application of sound financial management principles for the compilation of Municipality’s financial plan is essential and critical to ensure that the 
municipality remains financially viable and that municipal services are provided sustainably, economically and equitably to all communities. 


MFMA Circular No. 70 states that the 2014 Budget Review notes that spending plans outlined in the 2014 Budget continue to support government’s 
commitment to broadening service delivery and expanding investment in infrastructure, while taking account of the constrained fiscal environment. South 
Africa’s economy is projected to grow by 2.1 per cent in 2013 while GDP growth is expected to reach 3.5 per cent by 2016. 


Consequently, municipal revenues and cash flows are expected to remain under pressure in 2014/15 and so municipalities must adopt a conservative 
approach when projecting their expected revenues and cash receipts. 

Municipalities should carefully consider affordability of tariff increases; especially as it relates to domestic consumer while considering the level of 
services versus the associated cost. Municipalities should also pay particular attention to managing revenue effectively and carefully evaluate all 
spending decision. Municipalities must implement cost containing measures as approved by Cabinet to eliminate non - priority spending. 


National Treasury’s MFMA Circular No. 70 and 72 were used to guide the compilation of the 2014/15 MTREF.The main challenges experienced during the 
compilation of the 2014/15 MTREF can be summarised as follows: 

• The ongoing difficulties in the national and local economy; 

• Wage increases for municipal staff that continues to exceed consumer inflation. 


May 2014 


248 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The following budget principles and guidelines directly informed the compilation of the 2014/15 MTREF: 


• The 2014/15 Adjustment Budget priorities and targets, as well as the base line allocations contained in that Adjustment Budget were adopted as 

upper limits for the new baselines for the 201 4/1 5 annual budget; 

• Intermediate service level standards were used to inform the measurable objectives, targets and backlog eradication goals; 

• Property rate increases should be affordable and should generally not exceed inflation as measured by the CPI. 

• There will be no budget allocated to national and provincial funded projects unless the necessary grants to the municipality are reflected in the 

national and provincial budget and have been gazetted as required by the annual Division of Revenue Act. 

Table 1 Consolidated Overview of the 2014/15 MTREF 


R thousand 

Audited Outcome 
Budget 2013/14 

Budget Year 
2014/15 

Budget Year +1 
2015/16 

Budget Year + 
2016/17 

Total Operating Revenue 

63 825 000 

45 934 000 

59 878 000 

60 180 000 

Total Operating Expenditure 

62 813 000 

45 655 000 

52 189 000 

54 190 000 

(Surplus)/Deficit for the year 

1 012 000 

279 000 

7 689 000 

5 990 000 

Total Capital Expenditure 

15 358 000 

16 975 000 

15 471 000 

15 978 000 


Total operating revenue has decreased by 28 per cent or R17, 891 million for the 2014/15 financial year when compared to the 2013/14 Adjustment 
Budget due to the none allocation of National Electrification Grant allocation for 2014/15 financial year, total operating revenue for 2013/14 was increased 
by grants that were not spent at the beginning of the financial year which were then brought in to the adjustments budget for spending. For the outer 
years, operational revenue will increase by 30 and 0.5 per cent respectively. 


Total operating expenditure for the 2014/15 financial year has been appropriated at R44.4 million and translates into a budget surplus of R1 , 494 million. 
When compared to the 2013/14 Adjustment Budget, operational expenditure has decreased by 29 per cent in the 2013/14 budget and increased by 15 
and 3.8 per cent for each of respective outer years of the MTREF. 


May 2014 


249 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The capital budget of R16, 975 million for 2014/15 is 10 percent more compared to the 2013/14 Adjustment Budget. The increase is caused by an 
increase in allocation for MIG and top up capital grant from PT for the construction of sports field. The capital expenditure increases by 8.85 and 3.3 per 
cent respectively. The capital budget of Ntambanana Municipality is funded by National & Provincial Government Grants i.e. Municipal Infrastructure 
Grant & Equitable Share for other assets. 

F2. 3 YEAR MUNICIPAL BUDGET 


Operating Revenue Framework 

For Ntambanana Local Municipality to continue improving the quality of service provided to its citizens it needs to generate the required revenue. In these 
tough times strong revenue management is fundamental to the financial sustainability of every municipality. The reality is that we are faced with 
development backlogs and poverty. The expenditure required to address these challenges will inevitably always exceeds available funding; hence difficult 
choices have to be made in relation to tariff increases and balancing expenditure against realistically anticipated revenues. 

The municipality’s revenue strategy is built around the following key components: 

• National Treasury’s guidelines and macroeconomic policy 

• Effective revenue management 

• The municipality’s Property Rates Policy approved in terms of the Municipal Property Rates Act, 2004 (Act 6 Of 2004) (MPRA) 

The following table is a summary of the 201 4/1 5 MTREF (classified by main revenue source): 

Table below is the summary of revenue classified by main revenue source 


May 2014 


250 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Description 

2010/11 

2011/12 

2012/13 

Current Year 2013/14 

2014/15 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 

Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2014/15 

+1 2015/16 

+2 2016/17 

Revenue By Source 










Property rates 

1,858 

1,202 

1,248 

1,679 

1,353 

1,353 

1,353 

1,429 

1,509 

Property rates - penaities & collection charges 
Service charges - electricity revenue 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

_ 

Service charges - water revenue 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Service charges - sanitation revenue 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Service charges - reiise revenue 

Service charges - other 

Rental of facilities and equipment 










Interest earned - external investmente 

90 

713 

1,173 

570 

932 

932 

1,074 

1,132 

1,193 

Interest earned - outetanding debtors 


75 





27 

29 

30 

Dividends received 

Fines 

Licences and permite 

Agency services 

Transfers recognised - operational 

45,499 

34,414 

51,828 

46,428 

58,226 

58,226 

43,378 

57,181 

57,335 

Other revenue 

460 

1,034 

582 

1,992 

3,314 

3,314 

102 

107 

113 

Gains on disposal of PPE 


2,661 








Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers 
and contributions) 

47,907 

40,098 

54,832 

50,669 

63,825 

63,825 

45,934 

59,878 

60,180 


In line with the formats prescribed by the Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations, capital transfers and contributions are excluded from operating 
statement, as inclusions of these revenue sources would distort the calculation of the operating surplus/deficit. 

Property rates cover the cost of the provision of general services. Determining the effective property rate tariff is therefore an integral part of the 
municipality’s budgeting process. Interest comprises of; interest on primary bank account as well as interest earned from call investment accounts. Other 
revenue Includes; tender monies, hall hire, rent-internal and LGSeta refund. 

Operating grants and transfers totals R 63,825 million in 2013/14 financial year and decreases to R 45,934 million in 2014/15 financial year. Note that it 
has increased to R 59,878 and R 60,180 million respectively for the two outer years. The following table gives a breakdown of the various operating 
grants and subsidies allocated to the municipality over the medium term: 

Table below is the Operating Transfers and Grants Receipts 


May 2014 


251 1 P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Description 

2010/11 

2011/12 

2012/13 

Current Year 2013/14 

2014/15 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 

Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2014/15 

+1 2015/16 

+2 2016/17 

RECEIPTS: 










Ooeratina Transfers and Grants 










National Government; 

41,586 

35,914 

46,113 

38,943 

38,943 

38,943 

35,386 

49,009 

48,482 

Local Government Equitable Share 

13,236 

17,674 

19,194 

24,403 

24,403 

24,403 

30,881 

42,192 

42,364 

Finance Management 

1,200 

1,450 

1,533 

1,650 

1,650 

1,650 

1,800 

1,950 

2,100 

Municipal Systems Improvement 

750 

790 

845 

890 

890 

890 

934 

967 

1,018 

Integrated National Electrification Programme 

26,400 

16,000 

23,548 

11,000 

11,000 

11,000 

- 

3,900 

3,000 

EPWP Incentive 



993 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,771 

- 

- 

Other transfers/grante [insert description] 










Provincial Government; 

- 

233 

447 

634 

634 

634 

2,911 

699 

956 

Sport and Recreation 







2,250 



Provincialisation of Libraries 


233 

447 

634 

634 

634 

661 

699 

956 

District Municipality; 

3,913 

5,452 

3,415 

6,851 

6,851 

6,851 

7,181 

7,473 

7,897 

Refuse Removal 

3,913 

5,452 

3,415 

6,851 

6,851 

6,851 

7,181 

7,473 

7,897 

Other grant providers; 

_ 

- 

1,124 


3,876 

3,876 

- 


- 

Cogta - Corridor Development 



1,124 


3,876 

3,876 




Total Operating Transfers and Grants 

45,499 

41,599 

51,099 

46,428 

50,304 

50,304 

45,478 

57,181 

57,335 


Tariff - setting is a pivotal and strategic part of the compilation of any budget. When rates, tariffs and other charges were revised, local economic 
conditions, input costs and the affordability of services were taken into account to ensure the financial sustainability of the Municipality. 


National Treasury continues to encourage municipalities to keep increases in rates, tariffs and other charges as low as possible. Municipalities to must 
justify in their budget documentation all increases in excess of 6 per cent upper boundary of the South African Reserve Bank’s inflation target. 


May 2014 


252 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The following chart is a breakdown of the operational revenue per main category for the 2014/15 financial year. 


Ntambanana Local Municipality derives most of its operational revenue from operating grants from organs of state as it is shown on the chart that 96 per 
cent of revenue is from grants and subsidies. 



Figure 1 Main operational revenue categories for 2014/15 financial year. 


Operating Expenditure Framework 


253 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The Municipality’s expenditure framework for the 2014/15 budget and MTREF is informed by the following: 

• Balanced budget constrains (operating expenditure should not exceed operating revenue) unless there are existing uncommitted cash-backed 
reserves to fund any deficit; 

• Funding of the budget over the medium-term as informed by Section 18 and 19 of the MFMA; 

• Strict adherence to the principle of no project plans no budget. If there is no business plan no funding allocation can be made. 


The following table is high level summary of the 2014/15 budget and MTREF (classified per main type of operating expenditure) 
Table below Summary of operating expenditure by standard classification item 


Description 

2010/11 

2011/12 

2012/13 

Current Year 2013/14 

2014/15 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousand 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original Adjusted | Fuii Year 

Budget Budget | Forecast 

Budget Year | Budget Year | Budget Year 
2014/15 +1 2015/16 +2 2016/17 


Expenditure By Type 










Employee related costs 

8 016 

9 185 

10 146 

11 030 

13 172 

13 172 

14 344 

15 262 

16 238 

Remuneration of councillors 

2 487 

2 871 

2 912 

3 232 

3 850 

3 850 

3 966 

4 219 

4 489 

Debt Impairment 

- 

- 

(22) 

84 

68 

68 

71 

76 

81 

Depreciation & asset impairment 

1 271 

1 260 

2 281 

1 065 

2 281 

2 281 

2 430 

2 586 

2 751 

Finance charges 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

33 

36 

38 

Bulk purchases 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Other materials 

284 

364 

622 

510 

510 

510 

539 

568 

599 

Contracted services 

1 390 

807 

2 390 

14 254 

28 026 

28 026 

4 400 

8 544 

7 901 

Transfers and grante 

731 

746 

746 

944 

944 

944 

997 

1 051 

1 108 

Other expenditure 

Loss on disposal of PPE 

28 301 
(67) 

21 757 

22 227 

17 567 

8 572 

13 963 

18 875 

19 848 

20 985 

Total Expenditure 

42 413 

36 990 

41 300 

48 686 

57 422 

62 813 

45 655 

52 189 

54190 


The budgeted allocation for employee related costs for 201 4/1 5 financial year totals R 1 4,344 million, which equals 31 per cent of the total operating 
expenditure. Ntambanana Local Municipality has budgeted for an increase of 6, 80 per cent for 2014/15 financial year. An annual increase of 6, 4 and 6, 
4 per cent has been budgeted for in two outer years of the MTREF respectively as guided by MFMA circular 70. 


May 2014 


254 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The cost associated with the remuneration of councillors is determined by the minister of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs in accordance 
with the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers Act, 1998 (Act 20 of 1998). The most recent proclamation in this regard has been taken into account in 
compiling the Municipality’s budget. 


Provision for depreciation has been informed by Municipality’s Asset Management Policy. Depreciation is widely considered a proxy for the measurement 
of the rate asset consumption. Budget appropriation in this regard totals to R 2,430 million for 2014/15 financial year and equals to 5 per cent of the total 
operating expenditure. 


Other material comprises of amongst others the purchase of fuel, diesel, material for maintenance, cleaning materials and chemicals. 


Contracted services have been identified as cost saving area for the Municipality. As part of the compilation of the 2014/15 MTREF this group of 
expenditure was critically evaluated and operational efficiencies were enforced. Compared to last financial year there is decrease on contracted services 
expenditure for 2014/15 financial year, this increment has been caused by the reclassification of ‘other expenditure’ to comply with the new version of the 
budget. Some of the expenditure items have been removed from general expenses and they are now under contracted services 


Other expenditure comprises of various line items relating to the daily operations of the municipality. This group of expenditure has also been identified as 
an area in 

which cost savings and efficiencies can be achieved. Growth has been limited to 5.6 per cent for 2014/15 and curbed at 5.4 and 5.4 per cent for the two 
outer years, indicating 

that significant cost savings have been already realised. It must be noted that other expenditure also includes expenditure funded from operating grants. 
The following table gives a breakdown of the main expenditure categories for the 2014/15 financial year. 


May 2014 


255 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 


2014/2015 


Expenditure By Type 



Employee related costs 
31% 


Other expenditure 
39% 


Contracted services 
10 % 


Repairs and Maintenance 
3% 


Transfers and grants 

2% Other materials 
1 % 


Remuneration of councillors 
9% 

Debt impairement 
Depreciation and 0% 


Finance charges asset impairement 
0% 5% 


Figure 2 Main operational expenditure categories for the 2014/15 financial year 


256 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Operational repairs and maintenance 


2010/11 

2011/12 

2012/13 

Current Year 2013/14 

2014/15 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Audited 

Outcome 

Original 

Budget 

Adjusted 

Budget 

Fuii Year 

Forecast 

Budget Year 

2014/15 

Budget Year 

+1 2015/16 

Budget Year 

+2 2016/17 


Description 


R thousand 


Repairs and Maintenance 

Employee related costs 

Other materials 

Contracted Services 

Other Expenditure 

166 

277 

1,653 

983 

983 

983 

1,215 

1,123 

1,184 

Total Repairs and Maintenance Expenditure 

166 

277 

1,653 

983 

983 

983 

1,215 

1,123 

1,184 


In terms of the Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations, operational repairs and maintenance is not considered as a direct expenditure driver but an 
outcome of certain other expenditure, such as remuneration, purchases of materials and contracted services. Ntambanana Local Municipality is aware of 
the Municipal Budget and Reporting Regulations which states that priority must be given to operational repairs and maintenance but because of its 
capacity and a small number of assets that the municipality owns the budgeted amount is reflected on the table above so small. Repairs and 
maintenance has been increased by 28 per cent compared to 2013/14 financial year. 

Capital expenditure 

Table 7 List of capital projects per ward 

The following are some of the projects to be undertaken over the medium-term includes, amongst others: 


257 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Ntambanana Munucipality: Municipal Infrastructure Projects 2014/15 

Project Name 

Provincial Reference No 

Ward 

Finencial Period 

Approved Project Value R 

Debe Community Hall 

201 3MIGFK28321 6836 

1 

2014/15 

2 083 871.47 

Mabhensa Sportsfield 

201 4MIGFK28321 69947 

2 

2014/15 

2 409 999.99 

Njomelwane Sportsfield 

2011MIGFK283204530 

3 

2014/15 

2 409 999.99 

Themba Community Hall 

201 3MIGFK28321 6951 

4 

2014/15 

2 083 871.47 

Enhianhieni Creche 

2012MINGFK2832101991 

5 

2014/15 

1 084 577.85 

Mvazana Indoor Sports Centre 

2012MIGFK283210192 

6 

2014/15 

4 527 921.60 

Izithombothi Creche 

201 3MIGFK28321 6954 

7 

2014/15 

1 236 707.91 

Maqedipleti Community Hall 

201 4MIGFK28321 6955 

8 

2014/15 

2 083 871.47 







Annual Budget : Budget Summary 


258 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Description 

2010/11 

2011/12 

2012/13 

Current Year 2013/14 

2014/15 Medium Term Revenue & 

Expenditure Framework 

R thousands 

Audited 

Audited 

Audited 

Original 

Adjusted 

Full Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Budget Year 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Outcome 

Budget 

Budget 

Forecast 

2014/15 

+1 2015/16 

+2 2016/17 

Financial Performance 










Property rates 

1 858 

1 202 

1 248 

1 679 

1 353 

1 353 

1 353 

1 429 

1 509 

Serv ice charges 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Investment revenue 

90 

713 

1 173 

570 

932 

932 

1 074 

1 132 

1 193 

Transfers recognised - operational 

45 499 

34 414 

51 828 

46 428 

58 226 

58 226 

43 378 

57 181 

57 335 

Other own revenue 

460 

3 770 

582 

1 992 

3 314 

3 314 

129 

136 

144 

Total Revenue (excluding capital transfers 
and contributions) 

47 907 

40 098 

54 832 

50 669 

63 825 

63 825 

45 934 

59 878 

60 180 

Employee costs 

8 016 

9 185 

10 146 

11 030 

13 172 

13 172 

14 344 

15 262 

16 238 

Remuneration of councillors 

2 487 

2 871 

2 912 

3 232 

3 850 

3 850 

3 966 

4 219 

4 489 

Depreciation & asset impairment 

1 271 

1 260 

2 281 

1 065 

2 281 

2 281 

2 430 

2 586 

2 751 

Finance charges 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

33 

36 

38 

Materials and bulk purchases 

284 

364 

622 

510 

510 

510 

539 

568 

599 

Transfers and grants 

731 

746 

746 

944 

944 

944 

997 

1 051 

1 108 

Other ex penditure 

29 624 

22 564 

24 594 

31 905 

36 665 

42 056 

23 347 

28 468 

28 967 

Total Expenditure 

42 413 

36 990 

41 300 

48 686 

57 422 

62 813 

45 655 

52 189 

54 190 

Surplus/(Deficit) 

5 494 

3 108 

13 532 

1 982 

6 403 

1 012 

279 

7 689 

5 990 

Transfers recognised - capital 

8 363 

10 095 

13216 

13412 

15 330 

15 330 

16 696 

15 177 

15 668 

Contributions recognised - capital & contributed a 

- 

- 

- 

264 

264 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Surplus/(Deficit) after capital transfers & 

13 857 

13 203 

26 748 

15 658 

21 997 

16 342 

16 975 

22 866 

21 658 

contributions 










Share of surplus/ (deficit) of associate 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Surplus/(Deficit) for the year 

13 857 

13 203 

26 748 

15 658 

21 997 

16 342 

16 975 

22 866 

21 658 

Caoital expenditure & funds sources 










Capital expenditure 

18 313 

21 713 

13 987 

13 676 

15 358 

15 358 

16 975 

15 471 

15 978 

Transfers recognised - capital 

8 475 

10 193 

12 364 

13412 

15 094 

15 094 

16 696 

15 177 

15 668 

Public contributions & donations 

- 

- 

- 

- 


- 

- 

- 

- 

Borrowing 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Internally generated Hinds 

1 476 

1 425 

1 623 

264 

264 

264 

279 

294 

310 

Total sources of capital funds 

9 951 

11 618 

13 987 

13 676 

15 358 

15 358 

16 975 

15 471 

15 978 

Financial position 










Total current assets 

6 912 

19 467 

23 312 

12 038 

8 939 

5 070 

7 500 

17 481 

25 913 

Total non current assets 

- 

37 660 

49 448 

25 300 

28 000 

62 415 

76 960 

89 846 

103 072 

Total current liabilities 

- 

14 050 

15 560 

540 

650 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Total non current liabilities 


- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Community wealth/Equity 


43 077 

57 200 

36 798 

36 289 

67 485 

84 460 

107 326 

128 985 

Cash flows 










Net cash from (used) operating 

10 512 

19 091 

17 322 

5 081 

(2 646 ) 

( 201 ) 

19 405 

25 451 

24 410 

Net cash from (used) investing 

(7 946) 

(8 019 ) 

(14 091 ) 

- 

(15 094 ) 

(15 358 ) 

(16 975 ) 

(15 471 ) 

(15 978 ) 

Net cash from (used) financing 

_ 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Cash/cash equivalents at the year end 

6 326 

17 398 

20 630 

25 711 

2 890 

5 070 

7 500 

17 481 

25 913 

Cash backina/surplus reconciliation 










Cash and investments available 

6 327 

17 398 

20 630 

10 800 

8 519 

5 070 

7 500 

17 481 

25 913 

^ •' *' ** ' ' ' '■ 1 1 1 1 1 ii 1 




















Balance - surplus (shortfall) 

6 649 

4 827 

7 579 

10 798 

7 989 

5 070 

7 500 

17 481 

25 913 

jTr3incieR|ient 










Asset register summary (WDV) 

_ 

37 660 

49 448 

25 300 

28 000 

62 415 

76 960 

89 846 

103 072 

Depreciation & asset impairment 

1 271 

1 260 

2 281 

1 065 

2 281 

2 281 

2 430 

2 586 

2 751 

Renewal of Existing Assets 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 

Repairs and Maintenance 

391 

277 

1 426 

983 

983 

983 

1 215 

1 123 

1 184 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


Explanatory notes to Budget Summary 

1 . Budget summary provides a concise overview of the Municipality’s budget from all of the major financial perspective (operating, capital 
expenditure, financial position, cash flow, and MFMA funding compliance). 

2. The table provides an overview of the amounts approved by Council for operating performance, resources deployed to capital expenditure, 
financial position, cash and funding compliance, as well as the municipality’s commitment to eliminating basic services delivery backlogs. 

3. Financial management reforms emphasize the importance of the municipal budget being funded. This requires the simultaneous assessment of 
the Financial Performance, Financial Position and Cash Flow Budgets, along with the Capital Budget. The Budget Summary provides the key 
information in this regard: 

a. the operating surplus/deficit (after Total Expenditure) is positive over the MTREF 

b. Capital expenditure is balanced by capital funding sources. 


May 2014 


260 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


F3 PROJECTS WITHIN THE MUNICIPAL AREA 
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT: NTAMBANANA MUNICIPALITY 


Name of the project 



2014/15 

2015/16 

2016/17 

LIGHT REHAB 16/17 

P393 

Overlay 



R16 185 600 

OK VEHICLE BRIDGE 

31 18 P534 MFULE RIVER BRIDGE 

VEHICLE BRIDGE 

R2 200 000 

R572 1816 

R17 000 000 


3564 D1585 NSELENI RIVER 

BRIDGE 

VEHICLE BRIDGE 



R3 600 000 

RED BRIDGE 

3560 MFULE RIVER PEDESTRIAN 

BRIDGE 

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE 

R6 650 000 



REHAB 14/15 

D877/D130 

REHABILITATE D877 

R23 814 000 




DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SEHLEMENTS 


Project Name 2014/15 

District 

Municipality 

Local 

Municipality 

Type of project 

PROJECT 

UATUS 

Total Units 

Qgelweni 

uThungulu 

Ntambanana KZ282 

Rural (ITB) 

Planning 

1 000 

Bhukhanana Housing project 

uThungulu 

Ntambanana KZ283 

Rural (ITB) 

Identified 

1 000 


Department of Environmental Affairs 

1 .Buchanana Recreational Park Ntambanana Municipality 2014/15 


261 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


10. UTHUNGULU DM - Infrastructure Plan & 
Progress 


d 


1 


(§>€skom 



VCKro^/ans ‘S:S ICt' s: WA SS 




SS myjonm '32 'or a*.' 

^or Niaran tna mr. 

ArnaUcJi. '32 i-MbOt wmbt OU 

-■.^arrttorwmB *22-22 KY SS ac*32 Irt* 

.xm aa,-s Sraaoh 

Sk Sar. 3i^are 2: WA SS •• Irt’ 

“.-■f^armar 




»>f«i»an SS •VJIVA ^Sf.l >rtO TrY 
•cvaea ta 29.«\'A .:3S22K'0 


•Ac a noa 22 • ■ K^' 2 S V\'A )a S M\'A 


24A 


%farflr»>3t>7«»i'u 2« tor 
'22 1^' SaAM acA M ar 


34A 


2:U 


C: ESKOM 


Lmj*® j'j 0»JI -.'Vasrjrje Ze^eos-'B-r pbi 

Z01i 



Co*»:r3i->ea \€?Morics 


SitgTty CoTSirahea 



vx Coosiraheo 


11 


262 I P a g e 




Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SUMMARY OF AG REPORT AND RESPONSES 


263 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


of TFIE AU DITOR-GEM EF?A1_ TO THE KWA^^U LU-N ATAL. PROVIISICIAL 
legislature AMD THE COUMCIL OM MTAFWIEAMAMA IWl U M I C I R A LITY 


REPORT OM THE FIMAMCIAL STATEIVIEMTS 

I ntroduction 

1 I audited thie finartcial statements of NtamJoanarja EVlunicipality set out on pages 

... to .... whichi comprise the statement of financiaf position as at 30 June 2012, the 
statement of financial performance, statement of changes in net assets and the cash 
flow statement for the year then ended, and the notes, comprising a summary of 
significant accounting policies and other explanatory information. 

Accounting officer’s respons>t>ilit;v' for fhe financial statements 

2- ^he accounting officer is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these 
financial statements in accordance with the South African Standards of OeneralJy 
Recognised Accounting Practice (SA Standards of ORAF») and the requirements of the 
Local Government; IVtunicipal Rinance IVTanagement Act of South Africa, 2003 (Act fMo 5© 
of 2003) (IVfRIVIA) and the Division of Revenue Act of South Africa, 201 1 (Act Fslo © of 201 1) 
and for such internal control as the accounting officer determines is necessary 
to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material 
misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, 

Auditor-General’s responsibility 

3. !V/ly responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on my 
audit. J conducted my audit in accordance with the Rublic Audit Act of South Africa 
200"«1 (Act fslo. 25 of 200-4^) (RAA). the Geri&r&t fsJotiCG issued in terms thereof and 
International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that I comply with ethical 
requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about 
whether these financial statements are free from material misstatement 

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts 
and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the 
^*-i^itors judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of 
the financial statements, wheth^er due to fraud or error. In making those risk 
assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the municipality’s 
preparation and fair presentatfon of the and separate financial statements in order to 
design audit pr ocedures that are appropriate in the ci rcu mstances . but not for the 
purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the rnunicipality’s internal 
An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies 
used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well 
as evaluating the overall presentation of the and separate financial statements. 

5. I believe that the audit evidence I have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide 
a basis for my audit opinion. 

Opi nion 

6- In my opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the 
financial position of the Mtambanana iVlunicipality as at 30 June 2012, and its financial 
performance and cash flow's for the year then ended in accordance with the SA 
Standards of GFRAR and the requirements of the MFfVIA and DoRA. 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


EmpHasIs of matter 

T. \ draw attention to thio mattor fc>olow. IVIy opinJon is not modified in respect of this 
matter. 


F^estatement of oorresporicJ i ng figures 

As disclosed in note 2S to the annoal financial statements^ the correspond incg figores 
June 201 1 have fc>een restated as a result of an incorrect accounting treatment 
X/alued added tax (\/AT ) input on the fsiational EHIectrification F^rogramme grant 
expenditure identified during the current year in the financial statements of the 
Municipality for the year ended, 30 June 201 2 

Add ifional maffrer 

^ draw attention to the matter below, fs^y opinion is not modified in respect of this 
matter. 


Unaudifed supplementarv schedules 

10. The supplementary information set out on pages XX-X^X. does not form part of these 
financial statements and was presented as additional information. I have not audited 
the schedule and accordingly I do not express an opinion. 

RERORT ON OTHER I_EOAI_ AND REOULATORY R EQ D I R E Afl E NTS 

^ accordance with the ./\^K and the C^enera/ /\/o//ce issued in terms thereof, I report 
the following findings relevant to performance against predetermined objectives, 
compliance with laws and regulations and internal control, but not for the purpose of 
expressing an opinion. 

Rredetermined objectives 

12- I perforrned procedures to obtain evidence about t^^e usefulness and reliability of the 
information in the annual performance report as set out on pages XX to XX of the 
annual report. 

The reported performance against predetermined objectives was evaluated against the 
<^hteria of usefulness and reliability. The usefulness of information in the annual 
performance report relates to w^hether it is presented in accordance with the National 
Treasury s annual reporting principles and whether the reported performance is 
consistent with the planned development objectives. The usefulness of information 
further relates to whether indicators and targets are measurable <f.e. well defined, 
verifiable, specific, measurable and time bound) and relevant as recjuired hy the 
M&tion&i FrGQSLjr-y /=ra/77e wor/c for n'leknQgit-ig fDrogrsmmG fDe^r-fcyrm&rice irtform&tion . 

The reliability of the information in respect of the selected development objectives is 
assessed to determine whether it adeguately reflects the facts Cre. whether it is valid 
accurate and complete). 

1-4. There were no material findings on the annua! performance report concerning the 
usefulness and reliability of the inforrtTation. 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION G: ANNUAL OPERATION PLAN-SDBIP 
DRAFT 2014/15 SDBIPS 


OFFICE OF THE MUNICIPAL MANAGER 


COMPONENT 3 - QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS OF SERVICE DELIVERY TARGETS AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR EACH VOTE 



IDP 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

UNIT OF 
MEASUREMENT 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

(2014/2015) 

QUARTER ENDING 
30 SEPT 

QUARTER ENDING 
31 DEC 

QUARTER ENDING 

31 MARCH 

QUARTER ENDING 
30 JUNE 






TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

1 


Municipal 
Transformation 
and Institutional 
Development 











1.1 

1.1.1; 

1.1.2 

Manage the 
implementation of 
the 2014/2015 

WSP by reporting 
quarterly on the 
percentage of 
budgeted amount 
spent on training 
programmes for 
staff and 

Councillors. 

Percentage of 
budget spent on 

WSP 

1% 

1% 


1% 


1% 


1% 


Number of training 
interventions 

8 

2 


2 


2 


2 


Date of completion 
of Skills Audit 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 




Date of approval of 
WSP 

30-Apr-15 







30-Apr-15 


1.2 

2.1.1 

Manage 
institutional 
development by 
ensuring that 100% 
of critical positions 
are filled quarterly. 

Percentage of 
critical positions 
filled 

100% 

100% 


100% 


1 00% 


100% 


Number of staff 
from employment 
equity groups 
employed in three 
highest levels of 
management 

9 

9 


9 


9 


9 



May 2014 


266 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.3 

2.1.2 

Facilitate the 
review of the Risk 
Management 

Strategy and Risk 
Management Policy 
in preparation of 
Clean Audit 2015 
and identify top 10 
risks through the 
Annual Risk 
Assessment by 31 
July 2014 

Percentage risks 
resolved 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Date of Annual 

Risk Assessment 

31-JUI-14 

31-JUI-14 








1.4 

2.2.1 

Facilitate the 
implementation of 
the IT Policy by 
ensuring that 100% 
of year 1 objectives 
as per business 
plan is 

implemented by 30 
June 2015. 

Percentage 
implementation of 

IT Policy objectives 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


1.5 

3.1.1 

Facilitate the 
implementation of 
the Performance 
Management 
Framework for 
2014/2015 in 
preparation of 

Clean Audit 2015 
through the 
measurement and 
reporting of 
performance of the 
S56 Managers. 

Number of 
Performance 
Agreements signed 

3 

3 








1.6 

3.1. 2.1; 
3.1. 2.2 

Facilitate the 
implementation of 
the Performance 
Management 
Framework for 
2014/2015 through 
the measurement 
and reporting of 
performance of the 
municipality as an 
institution. 

Date of submission 
of draft 

Performance 

Report to AG 

31 -Aug-1 4 

31 -Aug- 
14 








Date of approval of 
final Annual Report 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 





267 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.7 

3.2.1 

Manage the 
conduction of a 
Community 
Satisfaction Survey 
to determine 
community 
perception of the 
municipality and 
report survey 
results to Council 
by 30 June 2015. 

Date of submission 
of survey results to 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


2 


Basic Service 
Deiivery and 
infrastructure 
Deveiopment 











2.1 

4.1.1 

Ensure the 
rehabilitation of at 
least 45 access 
roads by 30 June 
2015 and report 
quarterly progress 
to the portfolio 
committee. 

Number of access 
roads rehabilitated 

45 

10 


10 


10 


15 


Number of 
progress reports 

2 





1 


1 


2.2 

4.2.1 

Eradicate electricity 
services backlogs 
by providing free 
basic electricity 
services to 2844 
households by 30 
June 2015. 

Number of 
households with 
access to electricity 

2844 

2844 


2844 


2844 


2844 


Number of new 
connections 

0 

0 


0 


0 


0 


2.3 

4.3.1 

Eradicate waste 
management 
services backlogs 
by providing basic 
solid waste 
disposal services to 
12 826 households 
quarterly. Report 
quarterly progress 
to portfolio 
committee. 

Number of 
households with 
access to solid 
waste disposal 

12826 





12826 


12826 


Number of 
progress reports 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


2.4 

4.4.1 

Ensure 100% 
completion of the 
Themba, 

Magedipleti and 

Debe community 
halls by 30 June 

Percentage 
completion of 
Themba Hall 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Percentage 
completion of 
Magedipleti Hall 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 



May 2014 


268 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




2015 and report 
quarterly progress 
to the portfolio 
committee. 

Percentage 
completion of Debe 
Hall 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Number of 
progress reports 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


2.5 

4.5.1 

Ensure 100% 
completion of the 
Enhianhieni and 
Izithombothi 
creches by 30 June 
2015 and report 
quarterly progress 
to the portfolio 
committee 

Percentage 
completion of 
Enhianhieni creche 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Percentage 
completion of 
Izithombothi creche 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Number of 
progress reports 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


2.6 

4.6.1 

Ensure 100% 
completion of the 
Njolmeiwane, 
Mabhensa Sports 
Field and Mvazana 
Indoor Sports 

Centre by 30 June 
2015 and report 
quarterly progress 
to the portfolio 
committee 

Percentage 
completion of 
Njolmeiwane 

Sports Field 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Percentage 
completion of 
Mabhensa Sports 
Field 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Percentage 
completion of 
Mvazana Indoor 
Sports Centre 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


Number of 
progress reports 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


Local Economic 
Development 











3.1 

5.2.1 

Facilitate the 
implementation of 
the Unemployed 
Youth Database 

WSP by providing 2 
training programme 
to the community 
by 30 June 2015. 

Number of 
community training 
programmes 

2 



1 




1 


3.2 

5.2.2 

Enhance 
agricultural 
development by 
conducting one 
land audit and 
reporting the 
results thereof to 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of completion 
of land audit 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 



May 2014 


269 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


3.3 

5.2.3 

Manage the 
establishment of 5 
agricultural 
cooperatives by 30 
June 2015. 

Number of 

cooperatives 

established 

5 







5 


3.4 

5.2.4.2 

Facilitate the 
implementation of 
the Tourism 

Strategy by 
ensuring the 100% 
completion of the 
establishment of 
the Somopho 
Fleritage Site by 30 
June 2015 

Percentage 
completion of 
heritage site 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


3.5 

5.3.1; 

5.3.2; 

5.3.3 

Facilitate job 
creation by 
reporting quarterly 
on the number of 
jobs maintained 
through the EPWP, 
CWP and LED 
Projects 

Number of Moringa 
Project jobs 
maintained 

20 

20 


20 


20 


20 


Number of 

Essential Oils jobs 
maintained 

33 

33 


33 


33 


33 


Number of EPWP 
jobs maintained 

58 

58 


58 


58 


58 


Number of CWP 
jobs maintained 

1018 

1018 


1018 


1018 


1018 


4 


Financial Viability 
and Financial 
Management 











4.1 

6.1.1 

Manage the debt 
recovery plan by 
ensuring the 
improvement of 
debtors collection 
by 5% for 

2014/2015 financial 
year in comparison 
with the 2013/2014 
year and report 
quarterly progress 
to the portfolio 
committee 

Percentage 
improvement year- 
to-year 

5% 







100% 


4.2 

6.1.2 

Manage the review 
of the Rates Policy 
by 31 May 2015. 

Date of review of 
the Rates Policy 

31 -May-1 5 







31 -May- 
15 



May 2014 


270 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.3 

6.1.3 

Faciliate the 
development of the 
Revenue 
Enhancement 
Strategy and the 
approval thereof by 
Council by 31 May 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

31 -May-1 5 







31 -May- 
15 


4.4 

6.2. 1.1 

Faciliate the 
updating of the 
supplementary 
valuation roll In 
accordance with 
the new Property 
Rating Act by 30 

Jun 2015. Submit 
quarterly 
maintenance 
reports to the 

Finance portfolio 
Committee. 

Percentage 
valuation roll 
updated 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


4.5 

6.2. 1.2 

Faciliate the 
maintenance of a 
GRAP compliant 
asset register and 
report quarterly on 
the percentage 
compliance to the 
Finance Portfolio 
Committee. 

Percentage GRAP 
compliance of 

Asset Register 

100% 

100% 


100% 


1 00% 


100% 


4.6 

6.3.1 

Manage the 
Implementation of 
the Supply Chain 
Management Policy 
by ensuring the 
update of the 

Supplier Database 
and report quarterly 
on the percentage 
update completed 
to the Finance 
Portfolio 

Committee. 

Percentage of 
database updated 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


4.7 


Align financial 
management 

Cost Coverage 

Ratio 

1.5 

1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


1.5 



271 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




measurables with 
national indicators 
to reflect the 
financial position of 
the municipality by 
maintaining cost 
coverage at 1 .5 
and ensuring that 

1 00% of capital 
budget is spent on 
capital projects by 

30 June 2015. 

Percentage of 
capital budget 
spent 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


5 


Good Governance 
and Community 
Participation 











5.1 

7.1.1 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the Communication 
Policy through 
effective quarterly 
ward committee 
meetings in each 
ward as well as the 
publication of bi- 
annual newsletters 
to the community. 

Number of ward 

committee 

meetings 

32 

8 


8 


8 


8 


5.2 

8.1.1 

Ensure effective 
Internal Audit 
Management 
through the 
submission of 
quarterly internal 
audit reports to 
Council. 

Number of internal 
audit reports 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


Number of days to 
respond 

7 

7 


7 


7 


7 


Date of approval of 
Audit Plan 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


5.3 

8.1.2 

Ensure the 
functioning of the 
Audit Committee by 
convening quarterly 
meetings in 
compliance with the 
MSA and MFMA. 

Number of Audit 

Committee 

meetings 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


5.4 


Ensure 100% 
compliance with all 
laws and 
regulations 
governing the 

Number of MPAC 
meetings 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


Audit Opinion 

Unqualified 





Unqualified 




Date of approval of 
final budget 

31 -May-1 5 







31 -May- 
15 



May 2014 


272 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




organisation by 30 
June 2015 in 
preparation for 

Clean Audit 2015. 

Percentage MFMA 
compliance 

100% 







100% 


6 


Cross Cutting 











6.1 

9.1.1 

Facilitate the 
review of the 

Spatial 

Development 
Framework and the 
approval thereof by 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.2 

9.2.1; 

9.2.2 

Ensure the review 
and submit the final 
IDP for approval by 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Number of IDP 
Roadshows 

2 



1 




1 


Date of submission 
of Draft IDP to 
Council 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 




Date of approval of 
final IDP 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


Date of 

establishment of 

IDP Representative 
Forum 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.3 

9.3.1 

Manage the 
development of the 
Environmental 
Management Plan 
and the approval 
thereof by Council 
by 30 June 2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.4 

9.3.3. 1 

Manage the 
commencement 
with the EIA Study 
by appointing a 
service provider by 

31 December 2014. 

Date of 

appointment of 
service provider 

31 -Dec-1 4 



31 -Dec- 
14 






6.5 

9.4.1 

Facilitate the 
implementation of 
LUMS through the 
review and 
approval thereof by 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 



May 2014 


273 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.6 

9.5.1 

Facilitate the 
review of the 

Flousing Sector 

Plan and the 
approval thereof by 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.7 

10.1.1 

Facilitate the 
review of the 

Disaster 

Management Plan 
and the approval 
thereof by Council 
by 30 June 2015 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.8 

10.1.2 

Enhance Rural 

Metro Services by 
convening 8 fire 
fighting training 
interventions by 30 
June 2015. 

Number of 
firefighting training 
interventions 

8 

2 


2 


2 


2 


6.9 

11.1.1 

Participate and 
implement 
programmes to 
enhance Operation 
Sukume Sakhe by 

30 June 2015. 

Number of 
interventions 










Number of maiden 
dance events 
hosted 

2 







2 


Number of 
substance abuse 
awareness 
campaigns 

2 



1 




1 


6.10 

12.1.1 

Manage the review 
and implement the 
HIV/AIDS Strategy 
by 30 June 2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


Percentage of 

programmes 

implemented 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


6.11 

12.2.1 

Facilitate the 
promotion of sport 
and recreation 
through the 
coordination of 1 
school and 
community sporting 
event and 
implement 2 
community 
recreational 
substance abuse 
awareness 

Number of 
community 
substance abuse 
awareness 
campaigns 

2 



1 




1 


Date of SALGA 
Games 

15-Dec-14 



15-Dec- 

14 






Number of 
participating sports 
codes 

5 



5 







May 2014 


274 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


campaigns by 30 
June 2015. 


DEPARTMENT OF THE DIRECTOR CORPORATE AND COMMUNITY SERVICES 


COMPONENT 3 - QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS OF SERVICE DELIVERY TARGETS AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR EACH VOTE 



IDP 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

UNIT OF 
MEASUREMENT 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

(2014/2015) 

QUARTER ENDING 
30 SEPT 

QUARTER ENDING 
31 DEC 

QUARTER ENDING 
31 MARCH 

QUARTER ENDING 
30 JUNE 






TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

1 


Management 

Services 











1.1 

1.1.1 

Ensure the 
development of the 
2015/2016 

Workplace Skills 

Plan and the 
approval thereof by 
Council by 30 April 
2015. 

Date of completion 
of Skills Audit 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 




Date of approval of 
Skills Development 
Policy 

30-Apr-15 







30-Apr-15 


Date of approval of 
ATR and WSP 

30-Apr-15 







30-Apr-15 


1.2 

1.1.2 

Implement the 

WSP for 201 4/201 5 
by ensuring the 
training of staff as 
per WSP by 30 

June 2015. 

Percentage of 
budget spent on 

WSP 

1% 

1% 


1% 


1% 


1% 


1.3 

2.1.1 

Ensure institutional 
development by 
ensuring that 100% 
of critical positions 
are filled quarterly. 

Percentage of 
critical positions 
filled 

100% 

100% 


100% 


1 00% 


100% 


2 


Administrative 

Services 












May 2014 


275 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2.1 


Submit items to 
portfoiio committee 
meetings, EXCO 
meetings and 

Council meetings 
as per schedule of 
meetings for the 
year and submit 
agendas, minutes 
and items on bids 
awarded as per 
Council’s Standing 
Rules of Order. 

Number of portfolio 

committee 

meetings 

12 

3 


3 


3 


3 


Number of EXCO 
meetings 

11 

3 


2 


3 


3 


Number of Council 
meetings 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


2.2 

2.2.1 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the IT Policy by 
ensuring that 100% 
of year 1 objectives 
as per business 
plan is 

implemented by 30 
June 2015. 

Percentage 
implementation of 

IT Policy objectives 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


3 


Performance 

Management 











3.1 

3.1.1 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the Performance 
Management 
Framework for 
2014/2015 in 
preparation of 

Clean Audit 2015 
through the 
measurement and 
reporting of 
performance of the 
S56 Managers. 

Number of 
Performance 
Agreements signed 

3 

3 








Number of 

Performance 

Assessments 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


Number of Internal 
Audit Reviews 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


3.2 

3. 1.2.1; 
3.1. 2.2 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the Performance 
Management 
Framework for 
2014/2015 through 
the measurement 
and reporting of 
performance of the 
municipality as an 

Date of submission 
of draft 

Performance 

Report to AG 

31 -Aug-1 4 

31 -Aug- 
14 








Date of submission 
of Mid-Year 
Performance 

Report to Council 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 




Date of submission 
of 2015/2016 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun- 

15 



May 2014 


276 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




institution. 

OPMS to Council 










Number of OPMS 
reports to Council 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


Number of Internal 
Audit Reviews 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


Date of submission 
of Draft Annual 
Report to AG 

31 -Aug-1 4 

31 -Aug- 
14 








Date of approval of 
final Annual Report 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 




3.3 

3.2.1 

Conduct a 
Community 
Satisfaction Survey 
to determine 
community 
perception of the 
municipality and 
report survey 
results to Council 
by 30 June 2015. 

Date of submission 
of survey results to 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


4 


Local Economic 
Development 











4.1 

5.2.1 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the Unemployed 
Youth Database 

WSP by providing 2 
training programme 
to the community 
by 30 June 2015. 

Number of 
community training 
programmes 

2 



1 




1 


4.2 

5.2.2 

Enhance 
agricultural 
development by 
conducting one 
land audit and 
reporting the 
results thereof to 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of completion 
of land audit 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


4.3 

5.2.3 

Ensure the 
establishment of 5 
agricultural 
cooperatives by 30 
June 2015. 

Number of 

cooperatives 

established 

5 







5 



277 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


4.4 

5.2.4.2 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the Tourism 

Strategy by 
ensuring the 100% 
completion of the 
establishment of 
the Somopho 
Heritage Site by 30 
June 2015 

Percentage 
completion of 
heritage site 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


4.5 

5.3.1; 

5.3.2; 

5.3.3 

Ensure job creation 
by reporting 
quarterly on the 
number of jobs 
maintained through 
the EPWP, CWP 
and LED Projects 

Number of Moringa 
Project jobs 
maintained 

20 

20 


20 


20 


20 


Number of 

Essential Oils jobs 
maintained 

33 

33 


33 


33 


33 


Number of EPWP 
jobs maintained 

58 

58 


58 


58 


58 


Number of CWP 
jobs maintained 

1018 

1018 


1018 


1018 


1018 


5 


Planning and 

Economic 

Development 











5.1 

9.1.1 

Ensure the review 
of the Spatial 
Development 
Framework and the 
approval thereof by 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


5.2 

9.2.1; 

9.2.2 

Review and submit 
the final IDP for 
approval by Council 
by 30 June 2015. 

Number of IDP 
Roadshows 

2 



1 




1 


Date of submission 
of Draft IDP to 
Council 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 




Date of approval of 
final IDP 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


Date of 

establishment of 

IDP Representative 
Forum 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


5.3 

9.3.1 

Ensure the 
development of the 
Environmental 
Management Plan 
and the approval 
thereof by Council 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 



May 2014 


278 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




by 30 June 2015. 











5.4 

9.3.3.1 

Commence with 
the EIA Study by 
appointing a 
service provider by 

31 December 2014. 

Date of 

appointment of 
service provider 

31 -Dec-1 4 



31 -Dec- 
14 






5.5 

9.4.1 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
LUMS through the 
review and 
approval thereof by 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


5.6 

9.5.1 

Ensure the review 
of the Housing 

Sector Plan and the 
approval thereof by 
Council by 30 June 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6 


Community and 
Social Services 











6.1 

10.1.1 

Ensure the review 
of the Disaster 
Management Plan 
and the approval 
thereof by Council 
by 30 June 2015 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.2 

10.1.2 

Enhance Rural 

Metro Services by 
convening 8 fire 
fighting training 
interventions by 30 
June 2015. 

Number of 
firefighting training 
interventions 

8 

2 


2 


2 


2 


6.3 

11.1.1 

Participate and 
implement 
programmes to 
enhance Operation 
Sukume Sakhe by 

30 June 2015. 

Number of 
interventions 










Number of maiden 
dance events 
hosted 

2 







2 


Number of 
substance abuse 
awareness 
campaigns 

2 



1 




1 



May 2014 


279 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.4 

12.1.1 

Review and 
implement the 
HIV/AIDS Strategy 
by 30 June 2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


Percentage of 

programmes 

implemented 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


6.5 

12.2.1 

Promote sport and 
recreation through 
the coordination of 

1 school and 
community sporting 
event and 
implement 2 
community 
recreational 
substance abuse 
awareness 
campaigns by 30 
June 2015. 

Number of 
community 
substance abuse 
awareness 
campaigns 

2 



1 




1 


Date of SALGA 
Games 

15-Dec-14 



15-Dec- 

14 






Number of 
participating sports 
codes 

5 



5 






6.6 

7.1.1 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the Communication 
Policy through 
effective quarterly 
ward committee 
meetings in each 
ward as well as the 
publication of bi- 
annual newsletters 
to the community. 

Number of ward 

committee 

meetings 

32 

8 


8 


8 


8 


Number of 
newsletters 

2 



1 




1 



May 2014 


280 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


DEPARTMENT OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER 


COMPONENT 3 - QUARTERLY PROJECTIONS OF SERVICE DELIVERY TARGETS AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS FOR EACH VOTE 



IDP 

KEY 

PERFORMANCE 

INDICATOR 

UNIT OF 
MEASUREMENT 

ANNUAL 

TARGET 

QUARTER ENDING 
30 SEPT 

QUARTER ENDING 
31 DEC 

QUARTER ENDING 
31 MARCH 

QUARTER ENDING 
30 JUNE 






TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

TARGET 

ACTUAL 

1 


Revenue 

Enhancement 











1.1 

6.1.1 

Implement the debt 
recovery plan by 
ensuring the 
improvement of 
debtors coiiection 
by 5% for 

2014/2015 financial 
year in comparison 
with the 2013/2014 
year and report 
quarterly progress 
to the portfolio 
committee 

Percentage 
improvement year- 
to-year 

5% 







100% 


1.2 

6.1.2 

Ensure the review 
of the Rates Policy 
by 31 May 201 5. 

Date of review of 
the Rates Policy 

31 -May- 
15 







31 -May- 
15 


1.3 

6.1.3 

Develop the 

Revenue 
Enhancement 
Strategy and the 
approval thereof by 
Council by 31 May 
2015. 

Date of approval by 
Council 

31 -May- 
15 







31 -May- 
15 


2 


Financial 

Management 












281 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2.1 

6.2.1. 1 

Ensure the 
updating of the 
supplementary 
valuation roll in 
accordance with 
the new Property 
Rating Act by 30 

Jun 2015. Submit 
quarterly 
maintenance 
reports to the 

Finance portfolio 
Committee. 

Percentage 
valuation roll 
updated 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


2.2 

6.2.1. 2 

Ensure the 
maintenance of a 
GRAP compliant 
asset register and 
report quarterly on 
the percentage 
compliance to the 
Finance Portfolio 
Committee. 

Percentage GRAP 
compliance of 

Asset Register 

100% 

100% 


100% 


1 00% 


100% 


3 


Budgeting and 
Reporting 











3.1 


Prepare and submit 
final 2015/2016 
budget to Council 
for approval by 31 
May 2015 in terms 
of section 24 (1) of 
the MFMA 

Date of approval of 
draft budget 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 




Date of approval of 
final budget 

31 -May- 
15 







31 -May- 
15 


Date of approval of 
Credit and Debt 
Control Policy 

31 -May- 
15 







31 -May- 
15 


Date of approval of 
Indigent Policy 

31 -May- 
15 







31 -May- 
15 


Date of approval of 
Tariff Policy 

31 -May- 
15 







31 -May- 
15 


3.2 


Prepare and submit 
the Mid-Year 
Financial Review of 
the 2014/2015 
budget in terms of 
Section 72 of the 
MFMA and the 
adjustments 
budget, if required, 
to Council by 25 
January 2015. 

Date of submission 
of S72 report to 
Council 

25-Jan-15 





25-Jan-15 


30-Jun-15 



May 2014 


282 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


3.3 


Prepare and submit 
monthly financial 
reports to the 

Mayor in terms of 
section 7f of the 
MFMA and monthly 
Grant reports to the 
relevant Provincial 
Departments on all 
DORA grants 
received within f 0 
working days after 
each month end. 

Percentage of 
grants and 
subsidies spent 

100% 

25% 


50% 


75% 


100% 


Number of grant 
reports 

12 

3 


3 


3 


3 


3.4 


Complete and 
formally submit the 
2013/2014 financial 
statements in 
compliance with 
GRAP to Auditor 
General by 31 

August 2014 

Date of submission 
to AG 

31 -Aug-1 4 

31 -Aug- 
14 








3.5 


Submit the 

Financial Audit 

Report of 

2013/2014 financial 
year to Council by 

31 January 2015 

Date of submission 
of Audit Report to 
Council 

31 -Jan-1 5 





31 -Jan-1 5 




3.6 


Prepare and submit 
the quarterly 

SDBIP report to 
National and 
Provincial Treasury 
within one month 
after quarter end. 

Number of reports 
to NT and PT 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


3.7 


Ensure 100% 
compliance with all 
MFMA 

requirements and 
submit MFMA 
checklist to Council 
by 30 June 2015. 

Percentage MFMA 
Compliance 

100% 







100% 


3.8 


Conduct bi-annual 
budget road shows 
with all relevant 
stakeholders to 
ensure that 
community needs 

Number of budget 

roadshows 

conducted 

2 



1 




1 



May 2014 


283 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




are addressed by 
the budget. 











3.9 


Ensure effective 
financial 
management by 
maintaining the 
cost coverage ratio 
at 1 .50 each 
quarter. Submit 
quarterly financial 
viability reports to 
the portfolio 
committee. 

Cost coverage ratio 

1.5 

1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


1.5 


4 


Expediture 

Control 











4.1 


Submit the annual 
review report on 
the Supply Chain 
Management policy 
to Council by 30 

June 2015 

Date of approval of 
SCM review 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


4.2 


Submit annual 
2013/2014 SCM 
report to the 

Finance Portfolio 
Committee by 31 
August 2014. 

Date of submission 
of SCM report to 
portfolio 

31 -Aug-1 4 

31 -Aug- 
14 








4.3 


Submit item 
quarterly to Exco 
on Bids awarded, 
as per Council’s 
Standing Rules of 
Order. 

Number of 
progress reports 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


4.4 

6.3.1 

Implement the 

Supply Chain 
Management Policy 
by ensuring the 
update of the 

Supplier Database 
and report quarterly 
on the percentage 
update completed 
to the Finance 
Portfolio 

Committee. 

Percentage of 
database updated 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 



May 2014 


284 [Page 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5 


Institutional 

Development 











5.1 

2.1.2. 1; 
2.1. 2.2 

Ensure the 
implementation of 
the Risk 

Management Policy 
by reporting 
quarterly on the 
percentage of risks 
resolved as per the 
Annual Risk 
Assessment to the 
Finance Portfolio 
Committee 

Date of Annual 

Risk Assessment 

31-Jul-14 

31-JUI-14 








Percentage of risks 
resolved 

100% 

10% 


30% 


60% 


100% 


6 


Clean Audit 2015 











6.1 

8.1.1 

Ensure effective 
Internal Audit 
Management 
through the 
submission of 
quarterly internal 
audit reports to 
Council. 

Number of internal 
audit reports 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


Number of days to 
respond 

7 

7 


7 


7 


7 


Date of approval of 
Audit Plan 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.2 

8.1.2 

Ensure the 
functioning of the 
Audit Committee by 
convening quarterly 
meetings in 
compliance with the 
MSA and MFMA. 

Number of Audit 

Committee 

meetings 

4 

1 


1 


1 


1 


6.3 


Review all internal 
financial controls 
and submit review 
report to Council for 
approval by 30 

June 2015 

Date of submission 
of review report to 
Council 

30-Jun-15 







30-Jun-15 


6.4 


Review all past 

Audit Reports and 
Management 

Letters and prepare 
a subsequent 
action plan to 
address all matters 
raised previously. 
Submit the action 
plan to Council for 
approval by 31 

Date of approval of 
Action Plan 

31 -Mar-1 5 





31 -Mar-1 5 





May 2014 


285 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


March 2015. 


286 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION H :ORGANIZATIONAL & INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM 

Performance management is a strategic management approach that equips the Mayor, ExCo, Municipal Manager, Head of Departments, employees 
and stakeholders with a set of tools and techniques to regularly plan, continuously monitor, periodically measure and review the performance of the 
institution against indicators and targets for efficiency, effectiveness and impact. 

The performance management system entails a framework that describes and represents how the municipality’s cycle and processes of performance 
planning, monitoring, measurement, review, reporting and improvement will be conducted, organized and managed. Ntambanana Municipality initiated 
a process of institutionalizing performance management system (PMS) in 2007. The system is informed by the following policies and legislations: 


lit The Constitution (1996) 

lit The Batho Pole White Paper (1998) 

tt The White Paper on Local Government (1998) 

i# The Municipal Systems Act (2000) 

lit Municipal Planning and Performance Management Regulations (2001) 

it Municipal Performance Regulations for Municipal Managers and Managers directly accountable to Municipal Managers (2006) 
i# Integrated Development Plan 
it Municipal Finance Management Act (2003) 


1 . The Concept of Performance Management 

COGTA defines performance management as a strategic approach to management that equips all stakeholders with tools to: 

• plan, 

• monitor, 

• measure and 

• review performance in terms of set indicators & targets for efficiency, effectiveness and impact. 


287 (Page 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP | 2014/2015 

Performance management is essentially a mechanism to measure the implementation of the IDP. As such, it can be applied to any level within the 
municipality. Through ensuring accountability at all levels, the following results should be attained: 

• Meeting of strategic objectives 

• Improvement of the overall municipal performance 

• Improved service delivery 

• Getting value for money 

• Meeting the needs of people 

• Creating a performance culture 

• Achieving organisational transformation 

The foregoing legislative framework provides for performance management at various levels in a municipality including organisational (sometimes also 
referred to as municipal, corporate or strategic level), departmental (also referred to as services, operational or section/team level) and lastly, individual 
level. 

At organisational level, the five-year IDP forms the basis for performance management, whereas at operational level the annual SDBIP forms that basis. 
The performance measures associated with the IDP have a long-term focus, whereas those associated with the SDBIP are short-term and focus on 
reviewing the progress made in implementing the current budget and achieving the annual service delivery targets. The measures that are set for the 
Municipality are captured in the organisational scorecard. 

At departmental level, the measures are captured in the SDBIPs of the various departments that operate within the Municipality. Performance 
management should occur at the various levels and relate to one another, as required by the Municipal Planning and Performance Regulations. By 
cascading performance measures from organisational to departmental level, both the IDP and the SDBIP eventually link with individual performance 


May 2014 


288 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP | 2014/2015 

management. Regarding performance management at individual level, the MFMA specifically requires that the annual performance agreements of 
managers must be linked to the SDBIP and the measurable performance objectives approved with the budget. 

2. Objectives of the Performance Management System 

PMS is the primary mechanism to monitor, review, improve the implementation of the IDP and gauge the progress made in achieving the objectives set 
out in the IDP. The PMS process plan outlines the following objectives of the PMS: 

• Facilitate increased accountability 

The PMS should provide a mechanism for ensuring increased accountability between the local community, politicians, the Municipal Council and the 
municipal management team. 


• Facilitate learning and improvement 

The PMS should facilitate learning in order to enable the Municipality to improve delivery. 

• Provide early warning signals 

The PMS should ensure that decision-makers are timeously informed of performance related risks, so that they can facilitate intervention, as 
appropriate. 


• Facilitate decision-making 

The PMS should provide appropriate management information that will allow efficient, effective and informed decision-making, particularly on the 
allocation of resources. 


May 2014 


289 I P a g e 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


The fore listed functions are not exhaustive but also provide a summary of the intended benefits of the PMS. They should also be used for evaluating and 
reviewing the PMS. 

3. Principles Governing the PMS 

The following principles inform and guide the development and implementation of Ntambanana Local Municipality PMS. 


• administratively managed in terms of its day-to-day implementation; 

• implementable within any current resource constraints; 

• integration of the PMS with the other management processes within the Municipality; 

• politically acceptable to the political role players of the municipality; 

• provision of clarity to all employees in terms of their roie in the achievement of 
municipai and departmentai targets; 

• provision of early warning signals in terms of inherent risks for the fuii impiementation 
of the IDP; 

• public participation in terms of granting community members their constitutional right to 
participate in the process; 

• reliability of the information provided on the progress in achieving the objectives as set 
out in its IDP. 

• simplicity in order to the facilitate implementation given any current capacity constraints; 

• transparency and accountability both in terms of developing and implementing the 
system; 


290 I P a g e 


May 2014 



Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2012/13 PERFORMANCE REPORT 


Ntambanana Local Municipality Organisational Performance Management Scorecard 2012/2013 - Quarter 4 


1 . 1 . 

1 


Ntamb 

anana 

Devel 

opme 

nt 

Strata 

gies 


Strateg 

ic 

Object! 


/) 

JJ 

> 

U 

/) 


Q 

c 


o 

Q- 


HIV/AI 

DS 

Progra 

mmes 


Perfor 


mance 


Indicat 


HIV/AID 

S 

Strateg 

y 

(Review 

) 


Unit of 
Measure 


Baseline 

2011/2012 


Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 


30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Actual 
Achieveme 
nt Quarter 1 


Target in 
future 


IDP 2012/2013 

Actual T 
Achie 

get 

veme 

n. 

Quart ^ , 
“ er3 
er2 


In 

progr 

ess 


Actual 

Achie 

veme 

nt 

Quart 

er3 


30- 

Jun 

-13 


Actual 

Achie 

veme 

nt 

Quart 

er4 


Appro 
ved 
by 
Counc 
11 on 
28 
June 
2013 


2012/2 

013 

Perfor 


Repor 

t 


Resp 

onsibi 

e 

Depar 

tment 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 


Corre 
ctive 
meas 
ures/ 
Measu 
res for 
impro 


R 

60 

000 


291 I P a g e 


May 2014 






Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


1.1. 

2 




HIV/AID 

S 

Awaren 

ess 

Campai 

gns 

Number 

of 

HIV/AID 

S 

Awarene 

ss 

Campaig 

ns 

2 

4 

2 


Target in 
future 

1 

2 

Aware 

ness 

camp 

aigns 

condu 

cted 



1 

Mamb 

uka 

Maide 

n 

Progr 
amme 
&HCT 
in 13 
April 
2013 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

18 

000 


1.1. 

3 

Child- 

headed 

Househ 

old 

Databa 

se 

Date of 
establis 
hment 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


In progress 


CompI 

eted 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

Not 
com pi 
eted 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



1.2. 

1 

Sport 

and 

Recrea 

tion 

SALGA 

Games 

Date of 

participa 

tion 



31- 

De 

c- 

12 


50% 

31- 

De 

c- 

12 







Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

238 

000 


1.3. 

1- 

1.3. 

4 

Margin 

alised 

Group 

s 

Youth, 

Disable 

d, 

Women 

Percenta 
ge of 
budgete 
d 



10 

0% 

10 

% 

5% 

30 

% 

50% 

60 

% 


R3 

00 

768 

R303 

168 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 




292 I P a g e 


May 2014 


INhKAbIKUUIUKt ANU 

IMf^TITIITinMAI 

PEOPLE EMPOWERMENT 

STRATEGY 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 



and 

Childre 

n 

amount 

spent 













and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



Disast 

er 

Manag 

ement 

Disaste 

r 

Manage 

ment 

Plan 

(Review 

) 

Date of 
approval 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

12 

In 

pro 

gres 

s 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

Appro 
ved in 
Augus 
t2012 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

100 

000 


Skills 

Develo 

pment 

Numbe 

rof 

staff 

from 

epioym 

ent 

equity 

groups 

employ 

ed in 

three 

highest 

levels 

of 

manag 

ement 

Number 
of staff 

8 

8 

8 

8 

9 

8 

9 

8 


8 

9 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 




293 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 






Women 
employ 
ed by 
the 

munici 

pality 

Number 

of 

women 

18 

22 

18 

18 

19 

18 

19 

18 


18 

19 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



Youth 
employ 
ed by 
the 

munici 

pality 

Number 
of youth 

22 

27 

22 

22 

23 

22 

23 

22 


22 

23 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



Disable 
d staff 
employ 
ed by 
the 

munici 

pality 

Number 
of staff 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

1 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



2.1. 

1 

Skills 

Audit: 

Staff 

and 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



31- 

Ma 

y- 

13 


Target in 
future 





31- 

Ma 

y- 

13 

29- 

May- 

13 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 




294 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 






Council 

lors 














and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



2.1. 

2 

Annual 

Approv 

ed 

Workpl 

ace 

Skills 

Plan 

Date of 
approval 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

12 

27- 

Jun- 

12 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

159 

000 


2.1. 

2 

Date 
submitte 
d to 

LGSETA 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

12 

29- 

Jun- 

12 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

29- 

Jun- 

13 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



2.1. 

2 

Budget 

Spent 

on 

Workpl 

ace 

Skills 

Plan 

Actual 

amount 

spent 



R 

15 

9 

00 

0 

R 

15 

900 

R 22 

585 

R 

47 

700 

R 

63 327 

R 

95 

400 

R 

95 547 

R 

159 

000 

R159 

000 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 




295 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




















Servi 

ces 



2.1. 

2 

Percenta 
ge spent 



10 

0% 

10 

% 

15% 

30 

% 

30% 

60 

% 

60% 

100 

% 

100% 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



2.1. 

3 

Skills 

Develo 

pment 

Trainin 

g 

Policy 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

Appro 

ved 

by 

Counc 

1128 

June 

2013 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



2.3. 

1 

Skills 

Develo 

pment 

Workpl 

ace 

Skills 

Plan 

(Comm 

unity) 

Number 

of 

training 

program 

mes 



1 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 



1 

3 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 




May 2014 


296 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


2.3. 

2 




UnempI 

oyed 

Youth 

Databa 

se 

Date of 

completi 

on 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


In progress 


Target 

in 

future 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

CompI 

eted 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



2.4. 

1 

Inform 

ation 

Techn 

ology 

IT and 

Financi 

al 

System 

s 

Date of 
completi 
on of 
upgrade 
of IT 
system 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


In progress 


Target 

in 

future 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

CompI 

eted 

in 

April 

2013 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

278 

000 


4.2. 

1 

-> 

i ^ 

C 

_ 

_l LI 

sC > 

D C 

_i 

O 

^ 1— 
O S 

O 1 
m2 

_l LU 

< > 
O LU 

O Q 

_l 

LED 

Project 

s 

Jobs 

created 

through 

the 

munici 

polity's 

LED 

initiativ 

es 

Number 
of jobs 

10 

8 

108 

33 

108 

108 

108 

108 

108 


33 

56 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



4.3. 

2 

SMME 

and 

Local 

Busine 

Capacit 

y 

Buildin 

g 

Number 

of 

Capacity 

Building 



1 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 



1 

1 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

R 

105 

000 



297 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 





sses 

Develo 

pment 

Progra 

mmes 

Program 

mes 













and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



4.4. 

2 

Trade 

Invest 

ment 

and 

Busine 

ss 

Suppor 

t 

Ntamba 

nana 

Websit 

e 

Develo 

pment 

Date of 
estabiis 
hment 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Website has 
been 
deveioped 
www.ntamb 
anana.org.z 

a 


Up 

and 

runnin 

g 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

Up 

and 

runnin 

g 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

68 

000 


4.5. 

1 

Expan 

ded 

Public 

Works 

Progra 

mme 

Public 

Works 

Memor 

andum 

of 

Underst 

anding 

Date of 
signatur 
e of 

MOU 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

Signe 
d on 
the 
21st 
May 
2013 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



4.5. 

2 

EPWP 

incentiv 

e 

Project 

s 

Number 
of jobs 

20 

0 

171 

33 

40 

33 

40 

33 

33 


33 

40 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

R 

1 000 
000 



298 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




















Servi 

ces 



5.1. 

1 

BASIC SERVICE DELIVERY AND INFRASTRUCTURE 

INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT 

Acces 

Roads 

Access 

Roads 

Rehabil 

itation 

Number 

of 

access 

roads 

rehabiiit 

ated 

20 

22 

40 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 


10 

4 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipai 

Mana 

ger 


Weeki 

y 

check 

-up of 

the 

Grade 

rto 

minim 

ise 

the 

break 

down 

s 

occuri 

ng 

freque 

ntiy 

5.2. 

1 

Electrif 

ication 

Project 

s 

Obuka 

Electrifi 

cation 

(Phase 

3) 

Date of 
appoint 
ment of 
service 
provider 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


in progress 


in 

progr 

ess 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

Appoi 

nted 

Nove 

mber 

2012 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipai 

Mana 

ger 

R 

20 

000 

000 


5.2. 

2 

Free 

Basic 

Eiectric 

ity 

Number 

of 

Househo 
ids with 

access 

to free 

basic 

eiectricit 

y 

78 

00 

390 

0 

78 

00 

780 

0 

2500 

780 

0 


780 

0 


780 

0 

R719 

645 

paid 

for 

FBE 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipai 

Mana 

ger 

R 

790 

000 



299 I P a g e 

May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


5.3. 

1 



Comm 

unity 

Servic 

e 

Faciliti 

es 

Mawan 

da 

Commu 

nity 

Hall 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on by 30 
Jun2013 



10 

0% 

25 

% 

25% 

50 

% 

62% 

75 

% 

62% 

100 

% 

100% 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 

R 

2 080 
606 


5.3. 

2 

Mkhand 

Iwini 

Sport 

Field 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on by 30 
Jun2013 



10 

0% 

25 

% 

25% 

50 

% 

25% 

75 

% 

25% 

100 

% 

94% 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 

R 

2 410 
000 


5.3. 

3 

Ngqung 

qu 

Creche 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on by 30 
Jun2013 



10 

0% 

25 

% 

25% 

50 

% 

60% 

75 

% 

60% 

100 

% 

99% 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 

R 

972 

379 


5.3. 

4 

Kwa- 

Hlaza 

creche 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on by 30 
Jun2013 



10 

0% 

25 

% 

25% 

50 

% 

37% 

75 

% 

37% 

100 

% 

93% 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 

R 

972 

379 


5.3. 

5 

Bhucan 

ana 

Taxi 

Rank 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on by 30 
Jun2013 



10 

0% 

25 

% 

There is a 
dispute in 
terms of 
site 

identificatio 

n 

50 

% 

20% 

75 

% 

20% 

100 

% 

90% 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 

R 

4 434 
359 


5.3. 

6 

Oyeng 

weni 

Library 

Percenta 

ge 

completi 
on by 30 



10 

0% 

25 

% 

25% 

50 

% 

29% 

75 

% 

38% 

100 

% 

100% 


Office 
of the 
Munic 
ipal 

R 

1 255 
831 



300 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 







Jun2013 













Mana 

ger 



5.3. 

7 

Makhol 

wase 

Creche 

Percents 

ge 

completi 
on by 30 
Jun2013 



10 

0% 

25 

% 

25% 

50 

% 

59% 

75 

% 

71% 

100 

% 

100% 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 

R 

972 

379 


5.4. 

1 

Waste 

Manag 

ement 

Solid 

Waste 

Dispos 

al 

Number 
of wards 
serviced 



8 

8 


8 


8 


8 

8 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 



5.4. 

2 

Rehabil 

itation 

of 

Waste 

Transfe 

r 

Station 

Date of 

purchas 

e of 

skips 

and skip 

loader 

truck 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


In progress 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

Aug- 

12 


Office 

of the 

Munic 

ipal 

Mana 

ger 

R 

300 

000 



D 

Z _ 
St < 

- ^ 
□ < 

^ u. 
> 

1 

VIABILITY AND 

Reven 

ue 

Enhan 

cement 

Cash 
collects 
d from 
custom 

ers 

R value 
of 

revenue 

collecte 

d 

R 

2 

20 

0 

00 

0 

R1 

190 

859 

296 

R 

1 

21 

3 

44 

1 

R 

303 

360 

R 957 

459 

R 

303 

360 

R 

970 

362 

R 

303 

360 

R 1 
034 
729 

R 

303 

360 

R 

11129 

29 

Collec 

ted 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



Amount 

invoice 

d/billed 

to 

custom 

R value 
of 

invoices 

raised 

R 

1 

74 

9 

44 

R 

305 

610 

128 

R 

1 

21 

3 

44 

R 

303 

360 

R 318 

275 

R 

303 

360 

R 

637 

348 

R 

303 

360 

R 

956 

022 

R 

303 

360 

R 

303 

360 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 




301 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 






ers 


1 


1 













Total 

revenu 

e 

receive 
d from 
grants 
and 
subsidi 

es 

R value 

R 

62 

53 

2 

00 

0 

R 

262 

398 

400 

R 

66 

55 

9 

00 

0 

R 

31 

177 

000 

R 23 927 
000 

R 

19 

062 

600 

R 47 
432 
000 

R 

12 

708 

400 

R 54 
858 
000 

R 

6 

354 

200 

R6 

354 

200 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.1. 

1 

Debt 
Recove 
ry Plan 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 


In 

progr 

ess 



30- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



Percenta 

ge 

improve 
ment on 
debt 
collectio 
n year- 
on-year 

5% 

5% 

5% 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 


Target 

in 

future 

5% 

5% 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.1. 

2 

Rates 

Policy 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 


Target 

in 

future 

30- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 




302 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 





Financi 

al 

manag 

ement 

Cost 

covera 
ge ratio 

(AvailabI 
e cash at 
particula 
rtime + 
Investm 
ents) / 
Monthly 
fixed 
operatin 

g 

expeditu 

re 

1. 

2 

1.3 

8 

1.2 

1.2 

0 

1.20 

1.2 

0 

2.50 

1.2 

0 

1.90 

1.2 

0 

1.20 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.2. 

1 

Supple 

mentar 

y 

Valuati 
on Roll 

Percenta 
ge of 
valuatio 
n roll 
updated 

10 

0 

% 

100 

% 

10 

0% 

25 

% 

25% 

50 

% 


75 

% 


100 

% 

100% 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 

R 

168 

000 


6.2. 

2 

Asset 

Registe 

r 

Date of 

completi 

on of 

asset 

register 

update 

30 

Ju 

n- 

12 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

12 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

30- 

Jun- 

13 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.2. 

4 

Financi 

al 

Policie 

s 

(Review 

) 

Number 

of 

policies 

reviewed 



10 


Target in 
future 





4 

8 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 

R 

10 

000 


6.3. 

1 

Budget 

ing 

and 

report! 

ng 

Implem 
entatio 
n of 
MFMA 

Percenta 

ge 

complia 
nee with 
MFMA 

10 

0% 

100 

% 

10 

0% 


Target in 
future 





100 

% 

100% 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 




303 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 







requirem 

ents 
















6.3. 

2 

Budget 
Roads h 

ows 

Number 

of 

budget 

roadsho 

ws 



8 


Target in 
future 

4 




4 

1 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 

R 

200 

000 



Expen 

diture 

control 

Total 

operati 

ng 

expend! 

ture 

R value 

R 

20 

93 

8 

80 

6 

R 

49 

189 

418 

R 

49 

28 

8 

94 

8 

R 

12 

322 

237 

R 12 022 
289 

R 

24 

644 

474 

R 31 
013 
802 

R 

36 

966 

711 

R 49 
320 
701 

R 

49 

288 

948 

5 470 
253 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



Total 

operati 

ng 

budget 

R value 

R 

20 

93 

8 

80 

6 

R 

49 

189 

453 

R 

71 

50 

5 

79 

6 

R 

17 

876 

449 

R 12 022 
289 

R 

35 

752 

898 

R 47 
432 
000 

R 

53 

629 

347 

R 54 
858 
000 

R 

71 

505 

796 

R71 

505 

796 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



Total 

Salarie 

s and 

Wages 

budget 

(includi 

ng 

benefit 

s) 

R value 

R 

8 

96 

5 

47 

8 

R 

20 

062 

711 

R 

9 

11 

1 

92 

3 

R 

2 

277 

981 

R 1 952 
110 

R 

4 

555 

961 

R 4 
419 
000 

R 

6 

833 

942 

R 8 
764 
959 

R 

9 

111 

923 

R2 

686 

000.57 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



Total of 

grants 

and 

Percenta 
ge spent 

10 

0% 

68% 

10 

0% 

25 

% 

16% 

50 

% 

60% 

75 

% 

77% 

100 

% 

100% 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 




304 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 






subsidi 

es 

spent 














Office 

r 



6.4. 

1 

Supply 

Chain 

Manage 

ment 

policy 

(Review 

) 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

12 

29- 

May 

-12 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.4. 

2 

Supplie 

r 

Develo 

pment 

Strateg 

y 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

Suppli 

er 

works 

hop 

condu 

cted 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.4. 

3 

Payroll 

Number 
of days 
to settle 
payroll 
payment 
s after 
month 
end 



wit 

hin 

7 

da 

ys 

wit 

hin 

7 

day 

s 

within 7 
days 

wit 

hin 

7 

day 

s 


wit 

hin 

7 

day 

s 


wit 

hin 

7 

day 

s 

Within 

7 days 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.5. 

1 

Clean 

Audit 

2014 

Establi 

sh 

Internal 

Audit 

Number 

of 

internal 

audit 

report 

4 

4 

4 

1 

1 

1 


1 


1 

1 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 

R 

382 

000 


6.5. 

2 

Establi 

sh 

Audit 

Commit 

tee 

Date of 

re- 

establis 

hment 

4 

4 

30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


1 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

1 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 




305 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.5. 

3 




Review 

of 

Internal 

Control 

s 

Date of 

approval 

of 

review 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.5. 

4 

Internal 

Audit 

Plan 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



30- 

Jul 

-12 

30- 

Jul- 

12 

Approved 
by Council 






Appro 

ved 

by 

Counc 

11 July 
2012 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.5. 

5 

Establi 

sh 

Municip 

al 

Public 

Accoun 

ts 

Date of 
establis 
hment of 
SCOPA 



30- 

Jul 

-12 

30- 

Jul- 

12 

MPAC 

established 






MPAC 

comm 

ittee 

fully 

estabi 

ished 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.5. 

6 

Review 
of Past 
Audit 
Reports 
and 

Manage 

ment 

Letters 

Date of 
approval 
of action 
plan 



31- 

Ja 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 



31- 

Jan 

-13 



23- 

Jan- 

13 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 



6.5. 

7 

Annual 

Financi 

al 

Statem 

ents 

yearly 

work 

plan 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

30- 

Jun- 

13 


Chief 

Finan 

cial 

Office 

r 




306 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


6.5. 

8 




Perfor 

mance 

Manage 

ment 

System 

s 

Date of 

approval 

ofPMS 

Framew 

ork 



30- 

Se 

P- 

12 


12-Jun 






May- 

12 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



7.1. 

1 

>- 

E 

D 

> 

> 

D 

^ < 
u a 

-5 (j 

^ 2 

u ^ 
> 

D 

D 

D 

D 

D 

D 

>- 

0 

0 2 
Q 0 

< < 
LU Q_ 

Z ^ 
< 
III Q- 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

0 

Institut 

ional 

Develo 

pment 

Risk 

Manage 

ment 

Policy 

Date of 

approval 

by 

Council 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



7.1. 

2 

Municip 

al 

Turnaro 

und 

Strateg 

y 

Action 

Plan 

Implem 

entatio 

n 

Percenta 
ge of 
recomm 

endation 

s 

impleme 
nted by 

30 Jun 
2012 



10 

0% 

10 

% 

25% 

30 

% 


60 

% 


100 

% 

100% 


All 



7.Z. 

1 

Organ! 

sationa 

1 

Organis 

ational 

Perfor 

Date of 

approval 

by 

31- 

Ma 

y- 

29- 

May 

-12 

28- 

Ju 

n- 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 



28- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 




307 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 





Perfor 

mance 

Manag 

ement 

mance 

Manage 

ment 

Scorec 

ard 

(Review 

) 

Council 

12 


13 










rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



7.3. 

1 

Individ 

ual 

Perfor 

mance 

Manag 

ement 

S56 

Perfor 

mance 

Agreem 

ents 

Number 

of 

agreeme 

nts 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 








Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



Date 

signed 

31- 

Jul 

-11 

14- 

Jun- 

11 

31- 

Jul 

-12 

31- 

Jul- 

12 

30-Jul-12 








Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



7.4. 

1 

Perfor 

mance 

Manag 

ement 

Monito 

ring 

Perfor 

mance 

Evaluat 

ion 

Panel 

Number 

of 

meeting 

s 

4 

4 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 


1 

3 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 




308 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




















y 

Servi 

ces 



7.4. 

2 

Internal 

Perfor 

mance 

Audit 

Number 

of 

internai 

audit 

reports 



4 

1 

1 

1 


1 


2 

3 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



7.4. 

3 

Annual 

Report 

Date of 

approvai 

by 

Councii 



31- 

Ma 

r- 

13 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 

31- 

Mar 

-13 





Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

80 

000 


7.5. 

1 

Integra 

ted 

Develo 

pment 

Planni 

ng 

IDP 

Review 

Date of 
review 

31- 

Ma 

y- 

12 

29- 

May 

-12 

28- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 


Target 

in 

future 



28- 

Jun 

-13 

28- 

Jun- 

13 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 




309 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


7.5. 

2 




IDP 

Roadsh 

ows 

Number 
of IDP 
Roadsho 

ws 

8 

8 

2 


Target in 
future 

1 

1 



1 

1 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



7.5. 

3 

IDP 

Forum 

Date of 
establis 
hment 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Sep-12 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

01- 

Jul-12 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

100 

000 


7.7. 

1 

Public 

Partici 

pation 

Ward 

Commit 

tees 

Number 
of ward 
committ 

ee 

meeting 

s 



32 

8 

20 

8 


8 


8 

8 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 

R 

432 

000 


7.7. 

2 

Ntamba 

nana 

Newslet 

ter 

Number 

of 

news left 

ers 



2 


Target in 
future 

1 

1 



1 

1 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

R 

40 

000 



310 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 




















and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



8.2. 

1 

SPATIAL PLANNING AND SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FRAMEWORKS 

SPATIAL PLANNING AND SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FRAMEWORKS 

Land 

Use 

Manag 

ement 

Commu 

nity 

Consult 

ation 

Worksh 

op 

Date of 
works ho 

P 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


Target in 
future 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

07- 

Apr- 

13 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 



8.3. 

1 

Housin 

g 

Housin 

g 

Sector 

Plan 

(Review 

) 

Date of 
appoint 
ment of 
service 
provider 



30- 

Ju 

n- 

13 


in progress 





30- 

Jun 

-13 

Appro 
ved 
on the 
28 
June 
2013 


Direct 

or 

Corpo 

rate 

and 

Com 

munit 

y 

Servi 

ces 




311 I P a g e 


May 2014 


Ntambanana Municipality - Final IDP 2014/2015 


SECTION I 
ANNEXURES 


No. 

Sector Plan 

Completed? 

Adopted 

Adoption Date (if 

Date of Next Review 



(Y/N) 

(Y/N) 

adopted) 



Disaster Management Plan 

Yes 

Yes 

2012 

2014 


Spatial Development Framework 

Yes 

Yes 

2010 

2014/2015 


2012/2013 Annual Report and Annual 
Perfomance Report 

Yes 

Yes 

2014 



Environmetal Management Plan 

Yes 

Yes 

2010 

2014/15 


Local Economic Development Strategy 

Yes 

yes 

2013 

2015/16 


Integrated Waste Management Plan 

Yes 

Yes 


2014/15 


2014/2015 IDP Process Plan 

Yes 

Yes 

2013 

2014 


Housing Sector Plan 

Yes 

Yes 

2014 



312 I P a g e 


May 2014