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THE UNIVERSITY 
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THE 


MODELMAKER 


FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WORKING MODELS 


Hdited by 


3 W. EDMUNDS SPON 


VOLUME Ill 


SPOON & CHAMBERLAIN 
Publishers of Technical Books 

(20. 122 LIBERTY STREET NEW YORK, N. ¥Y. 

; 1926 


ra 
4 


Copyright, 1926, 
By 
Sron & CHAMBERLAIN 


All rights reserved, including that of translation 
into foreign languages. 


LECOUVER PRESS CO. 
51 Vesey Street 
New York, N. Y¥., U. S.A 


-_ Electrolyte for Dry Cells, 


ae Locomotive, Electric, 


- 


Paist. Of Societies, 


(ep. 


INDEX 


Addresses of mae cries, 188. 
Aeroplane, 85, 101. 

Aeroplane Engine, 104. 

Air Compressor, 82. 

Air-Cooled Gas Engines, 5, 6. 
Alcohol as Fuel, 192. 

American Marine Resa eation 61. 
American Model Locomotives, 156. 


pnteneae Power Boat Records, 


Blow Torch, 138. 

Boat Races, 111, 149. 

Boilers, 9, 30, 168, 191. 

Book Notices, 15, 29, 51, 73, 
140, 153, 154. 191. 

Brigantine ‘‘Breda,”’ 103. 

Canadian Model Power Boats, 

Chinese Junk, 135. 

Clipper Ship ‘‘Lightning,”’ 69. 

Clipper Ship “Flying Cloud,” 13, 
165, 180. 

Clubs’ and Societies, 188. 

Contents Model Engineer, 23, 44, 45, 
te 74, 78, 79, 93, 109, 116, +53; 174, 
9 

Contents, Model Railway News, 3. 19, 
34, 45, 51,75, 106, 123,°138, 182. 

Correspondence, 2, 30, 41, 43, 76, 92, 
110, 124, 140, 141, 191, 195. 

Crank: -pins for ‘Locomotives, 183. 

C..S. M. E. Exhibition, 192. 

SEutty Sark, 91, 


Design for a Model Launch, 9. 
Drilling Holes at an Angle, 107. 
Dry Cells Electrolyte, 184. 


Electric Car, 172, 


151, 


110, 116, 


193: 


134, 


' Electric Locomotive, 133. 


Electric Locomotive Crane, 122. 


184. 
English Power Boats Records, 173,°485. 


“Flying Cloud,” 13, 134. 165, 180. 
Foreword, 2, 18, 34, 50, 66, 82, 99, 
at 5 ee Sle 147, 163, 179. 


Gas Engines, 5, 6, 


V3 78 
Gasolene Aero Engine, 6, 104. 


Lead Paint, 138. 

188. 
Locomotive, B. & O. of 1863, 67. 
Locomotive Construction Notes, 38. 
Locomotive Club, 43. 

Locomotive, Crank Pins for, 183. 


133. 
Locomotive, French, 59. 
Locomotive 4” Gauge No. 1900, 164. 


Locomotive Races, 14. 
genni 1%” Scale Mountain’ Tyfey . 
1 ’ 
Locomotive, sn Scale, 25, 59. 
Scale Mikado, 117. 


% Syn Scale Pacific, 27, 60. 
4 1%” Scale Pacific, gs. 

i 9997" 59. 

? Steam Tests, 141. 


Model Aeroplane, 85, 101. 

Aeroplane Baines: 7, 104. 

Boilers, 9, 30, 168, 191. 

” British S. E. 5A Single Seater 

Aeroplane, 85, 101. 

”? Chinese Junk, 135. 

Electric Locomotive Crane, 122. 

” Engineer, 23, 44, 45, 52, 74, 78, 
79, 93, 109, 116, 153,.174, 190. 

Engineer Societies, 13, 23, 31, 
43, 44,45, 61, 63, 74, 83, 92, 
110; 111,-139, 141, 149, 168, 
184, 188, 192. 

Gas Engines, 5, 6. 

1 A oUseboats. 1372. 


“Clipper Ship “Flying Cloud,” 
13, 134, 165,-° 180. 

” - Clipper Ship “‘Lightning,” 69, 

” ~~ Exhibition, 106, 192. 


Locomotive Races, 14. 
Marine Gasolene Engines, 6. 
Power Boat Races, 149. 
Eevee Boat Records, P51 17.35 
” - Railway News, 3, 19, 34. 45, 51, 
455-106; 123, 138, 182, 
> Sail ‘Boats, Aire hts 
Santa Maria, 134. 
ete Shipbuilding Notes, 9. 
3 Sbip.! Exhibits, 68, 92, 
Ship Fittings, 139. 
Steam Engines, te; 
181, 
” Viking Ship, 35. 
MGS Workshops, 12, 
IY a 


108, 110, 


155, 169, 


195-455 


Notes on %” Scale Locomotive, 25. 
N. Y. S. M.-E. Power Boat Races, 149. 


Our Foreword, 2, 18, 34, 50, 66, 82, 
99; 15 se131; 147, 163, 179. 
Ownership Statement, 4, 62, 154. 
Gauge Locomotive ‘Drawing, 
Gauge Locomotive Speeds, 

Gauge Pacific, > 
Gauge Switches, 187. 
“QO”? Gauge Tracks, 187, 


111. 
180. 


634102 


iv INDEX 





Paint Non-Rusting, 138. 

Photographing Models, 137. 

te Valve Steam Engines, 9, 155, 

9 

Proportioning the. Parts for Model 
Steam Engines, 42. 

Power Boats, 1938. 

Power Boat\Records, 151, 173, 185. 


Question Box, 195. 


Races for Model Locomotives, 14. 

Rail Measurements, 184. 

Railway Model Shop, 148. 

Se for Electrolyte for Dry ‘Cells, 


aoe Model Power Boats, 151, 173, 
18 
Rust-Proof Paint, 138. 

Sailing Boat Races, 75, 111. 
“Sandpiper”, Model of, 37. 


Santa Maria, 134. 
Seagoing Tugboat, 136. 


Setting Out Locomotive Crank Pins, 183. — 


Ship Fittings, 139. 
Ship Models, 52, 69, 103, 134, 135, 137, 
165, 180. 


Ship Model Exhibits, 68, 92, 108, 110, 
12 


1, 
Silver Soldering, 124. : 
Single-Cylinder, 4-Cycle Air Cooled 
Gasoline Engine, 5. 
Speeds of “O” Gauge Locomotives, Bee 
Statement of Ownership, 4, 62, 
Steam Engines, 9, 155, 169, 181. 


Ten-Wheeled Locomotive, 67. ; 
Under 


Testing Locomotive Chassis 
Steam, 141. 

Two-Cylinder, 4-Cycle, Air Cooled Gas 
Engine, 6 


Two- Cylinder Horizontal Steam Engine, 
189 

Two-Foot Water Line Model Yacht, 71. 

Uniflow Steam Engine, 9. 

Unique Locomotive Model, 53. 

U. S. S. Schooner-of- War “Grampus,”’ 
DS 75 

Vertical Steam Engine, 155, 169, 181. 

Water-Cooled Gasoline Engine, 6. 


Woodworker, 93. 
Workshops, 12, 19, 45, 157. 


LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS 


Mr. Frank Birch 

Mr. W. H. Buckley 

Mr. Harry A. Campbell 
Mr. F. G. Carter 

Mr. Wm. Chamberlain 
Mr. J. W. C. Corbusier’ 
Mr. H. J. Coventry, M.E, 
Mr. G. B. Douglas 

Mr. A. R. Ferris 

Mr. F. D. Grimke 

Mr. Cecil G. Hamilton 
Mr. H. O. Havemeyer, Jr. 
Mr. C. C. Helmick 


Mr. John A. Howland 
Mr. W. G. Landon 
Mr. L. Lawrence (“L.B.S.C. 2) 
Mr. C. O. Liljegren 
Mr. Roy. E. McAdams 
Mr. H. Muncaster 

Mr. J. W. Neptune 
-Mr. Paul Reithmaier 
Mr. E. I. Schock 

Mr. Oscar Schuwendt 
Mr. Ralph Skinner 
Mr. C. Harry Squier 
Mr. Emil Vollenweider 





THE 


ELMAKER 


FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WOKING MUOQLLS | 


JANUARY, 1926 _... 10 cents 


THREE MODEL GAS ENGINES—A SINGLE CYLINDER, AIR- 
COOLED; TWIN CYLINDER, AIR-COOLED; AND 
A MARINE TYPE, WATER-COOLED 


BUILT BY MR. EMIL VOLLENWEIDER 





oli. 
! ue 


THE MODELMAKER 


Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, January, 1926 


Vol. Ill. 


No. 1 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925 at the Post Office at 
\Wew\ York, N. Y. under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


In glancing over a pile of cor- 
respondence the writer notes the 
variety of requests. One reader 
asks, ““Where can I obtain a set 
of castings for a Model Corliss 
Engine?” Another wants a Gar- 
den Lacgmotive, with about 
12” drivers for a gauge of about 
15”. Another asks where could 
he get drawings and castings for 
a road traction engine. Another 
wants an air turbine for high- 
pressure compressed air, and one 
a shaper to fit on a Lathe; and 
many other articles too numer- 
ous to mention in this limited 
space. 

These requests bring to the 
writer’s mind a Sunday after- 
noon call upon a gentleman, the 
owner of a house on Long Island 
that had a big garret, consisting 
of four finished rooms heaped up 
with a most miscellaneous col- 
lection of articles. A barrel of 
railway tracks; several aero- 
plane models; a model trolley 
car fitted with only two wheels 
to run on a single rail, driven by 
an electro-gyroscopic device; two 
luna telescopes; five motion pic- 
ture projectors; stacks of scien- 
tific magazines and books. The 
owner then took the writer into 
the basement, where he had a 
regular machine shop. Here 
were finished models, partly fin- 
ished models, and sets of cast- 
ings. A very fine model of a 


single cylinder marine type gas 
engine, with all fittings, carbu- 
retta, spark coil and starting de- 
vice, that ran almost noiselessly. 
Also a finished’ 2-cylinder gas 
engine. He also had several hun- 
dred cylinders and parts of 
the gas engine. 

He explained that he wished — 
to dispose of many of these ar- 
ticles, as his co-worker, a me- 
chanical engineer and inventor, 
who had lived with him for many 
years, had recently died. My 
host was a scientific investiga- 
tor. The two men had worked 
out many problems betwen them 
making models of their inven: 
tions. 

Many of their models, no 
doubt, would be readily pur- 
chased if the various items could 
be brought to the attention of 
our readers. 

G. B., a gentleman who always 
enjoys his summer. vacations 
near Cape Cod’ told this little 
anecdote: : 

One day he was passing the 
local antiquity-junk shop when, - 
glancing into the open door, he 
saw a familiar object standing 
on end against the wall.that in- 


‘duced him to enter the store and 


make a closer examination. It 
was a half-body model of a sail- 
ing vessel, mounted on a panel | 
of wood, in excellent condition. — 

The old storekeeper, remark- 


~~ 


we 
~ ev 





3 
3 
‘ing he had some more of them 
things in the barn, left the store. 
‘He returned in a few minutes 
carrying two similar models, 
‘both looking rather dilapidated, 
He said that was all he could 
‘find, the missus must have 
chopped up the others for fire 
wood. 

. “Can you use them?” 

— “What do you want for this 
one?” said G. B. 

The storekeeper mentioned a 
ridiculously small price. 
= “Why,” said G. B., “to any- 
one interested that would be 
cheap at $50.00.” 

_.The storekeeper shook his 
head incredulously. 

' A few days later G. B. was 
passing the store when the old 
man stopped him and, with a 
‘smile, said: 

“A party in yachting togs 
came here after you left and 
‘asked me what I wanted for that 
model thing. I told him fifty 
plunks. He took it to the door 


- In the October issue of The 
Modelmaker for 1925, at the re- 
quest of the Postmaster of New 
York, we inserted a notice re- 
questing all our customers to be 
very careful in writing their 
name and to give us a full postal 
address. We have had quite a 
few complaints from subscribers 
to the effect that they are not 
Zetting their numbers regularly. 
Upon investigation we find that 
in most cases it is because the 
subscriber has moved or 
changed his address and has not 
notified us to that effect. We 
particularly wish to stress this 
‘point, viz., notify us as soon as 
you possibly can your change 
of address so that we can alter 
our records and prevent the 
losses of copies in the mail. 


ae: 


ee THE MODELMAKER 3 
ee i 8 


and looked it over carefully, then 
he said alright. He produced a 
roll of bills and pealed off fifty, 
then he carried it off. 

“The next day he came again, 
with another gent in yachting 
togs, and that gent bought the 
other two.” 

Looking at G. B., he said, “I 
guess you know something about 
them model things.” 

‘Yup, you can’t fool me on 
those things,” said G. B. “That 
was a half-model of one of Don- 
ald MicKay’s clippers.” 

“My word! I ought to have 
asked that gent a hundred.” 

How many homes are there in 
this great country that contain 
similar hoarding places, where 
long-forgotten models of ships 
or engines, or mechanical de- 
vices are waiting to be resur- 
rected and placed in the hands 
of those who would appraise 
them at their true value. 

WHAT HAVE YOU IN YOUR 
GARRET? 


The Model. Railway News, 
principal contents for December 
issue: G. N. Southerden’s Gauge 
I Clockwork Line. C. L. Ben- 
net’s “O” Gauge Solid-fuel Tank 
Engine. Gauge “O” Engine 
Shed. Rev. H. A. Turner’s “OO” 
Gauge Line. Ballasting Model 
Railways. Distant Control of 
Steam Locomotive Models. 
Model Level Crossing Gates. 
“OO? Gauge Developments. 
Lieut. H. Awde, R. E. Model 
Railway System in Germany. 
Electric Locomotive Types for 
Modeling. General View of the 
Glover-Merriam Railway. Our 
Mail Bag. Club Notes. Answers 
to Correspondence. Trade Top- 
ics. With title page and index 
for Volume 1. 


~ 


é ; THE MODELMAKER 





STATEMENT OF THE OWNER- 
SHIP; MANAGEMENT, CIRCU- 
LATION, ETC., REQUIRED BY 
THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF 
AUGUST 24, 1912, OF THE 
MODELMAKER, published monthly 


at New York, N. Y., for October 1, 
1925. 
i sS.: 


State oF New York 
County or New York 

Before me, a Notary Public, in and 
for the State and County aforesaid, 
personally appeared Edmunds 
Spon, who, having been duly sworn 
according to law, deposes and says *that 
he is the Editor and Business Manager 
of the MopELMAKER and that the fol- 
lowing is, to the best of his knowledge 
and belief, a true statement of the 
ownership, management, etc., of the 
aforesaid publication for the date shown 
in the above caption, required by the 
Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in 
section 443, Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions printed on the reverse of this 
form, to wit: 

1, That the names and addresses of 
the publishers, editor, managing editor, 
and business manager are: 


Publishers, Spon & Chamberlain, 120 
Liberty St., New York, N. Y. Editor, 
W. Edmunds Spon, 120 Liberty St., 
New York, N. Y. Managing Editor, 
none; Business Manager, W. Edmunds 
St 120 Liberty Street, New York, 


The owners are W. Edmunds Spon, 
120 Liberty St., New York; Wm. Cham- 
berlain, 120 Liberty St., New York. 


3. That “the known bondholders, 
mortgagees, and other security holders 
owning or holding 1 per cent or mote 
of total amount of bonds, mortgages, 
or other securities are: None. 


4. That the two paragraphs next 
above; giving the names of the owners, 
stockholders, and security holders, if 
any, contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders as they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company, 
but also, in cases where the stockholder 
or security holder appears upon the 
books of the company as trustee or in 
any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom 
such trustee is acting, is given; also 
that the said two paragraphs contain 
statements embracing affiant’s full 
knowledge and belief as to the circum- 
stances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who 
do not appear upon the books of the 
company as trustees, hold stock and se- 
curities in a capacity other than that 
of a bona fide owner; and this affiant 
has no reason to believe that any other 


person, association, or corporation, has 
any interest, direct or indirect, in the 
said stock, bonds, or other securities 
than as so stated by him. 


W. EDMUNDS SPON, 
Editor and Business Manager, 


Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 29th day of September, 1925, 
ELVIRA H, PFLUGER, 
Notary Public, New York Co., New 
York. 


(My commission expires March 30; 
1927.) 
[Seal] 


Certificate filed in New York Co. No. 
857. Reg. No. 7073. 


Mr. Milton Cronkhite, care of 
Liberty Electric Corporation, 
Stanford, Conn., who is a very 
old customer of ours and an en- 
thusiastic modelmaker for a 
good many years, dropped in to 
pay us a call the other day. He 
informed us that he had not 


done much model work for sev- 
eral years, but this fall he has 
become again very much inter- 
ested in this hobby. He wished 
to know if we could put him in 
touch with any model fans in 
his locality. 
many readers in Connecticut, 
and’ we hope they will get in 
touch with this gentleman and 
try and arrange an occasional 
meeting. After a few gather- 
ings they may see their way 
clear to form a model engineers 
society for their mutual benetfi. 


We have a good 


Mr. E. Vollenweider, of 1022 — 


14th Street, Sacramento, Calif., — 


would like to get in touch with 
any model enthusiasts in his 


vicinity, with a view to having — 


an occasional meeting and if pos- 
sible forming a modelmakers 
club for mutual benetfi. We 
hope he will hear from some of 


2 eetcee “A 


our many Californian readers. — 


ee ae 


THE MODELMAKER 5) 


MODEL GAS ENGINES 
By EMIL VOLLENWEIDER 


It was through the courtesy of my employer, Mr. Harry D. Kin- 
hear, automotive electrical engineer, of Sacramento, that I was 
able to build these engines, with the use of his tools and lathe dur- 
ing my spare time. 

I received the copy of the October number of the ““Modelmaker,” 
and it contains several good articles on modelmaking as well as 
much needed information. 

The picture on the front cover of this issue shows my efforts 
as a modelmaker. The three model gasoline engines were con- 
structed by me during the past year. First was the single-cylinder, 
four-cycle engine. After that I tried a two-cylinder motor, using 
more or less the same principles of construction. The last model 
is a single-cylinder, two-cycle, water-cooled marine engine. All of 
these engines run very well, and in many ways surprised me. With 
the exception of the platform for the twin cylinder, no castings 
were used. AIl parts are machined out of the solid. 

Following is the data for each engine: 


Single-Cylinder, 4Cycle, Air-Cooled Engine 

Bore 27/32”, stroke 1”, highest measured R.P.M. over 7000; driv- 
ing a generator will develop four amps at 6 volts. Cooling is ef- 
fected by blades built in fly wheel; battery ignition; coil and con- 
denser are located in the base; cylinder is made of cast iron; 
cylinder head of steel; piston of hard aluminum; valves of tool 
steel; main bearings, Norma E-15; arranged side by side, spaced 
about 1”; crankshaft is made of tool steel; assembled. I have 
tested this engine’s usefulness for model airplanes and boats and 
find the following: Driving an aerial propeller 16” diameter, 24” 
pitch, a speed of 2000 R.P.M. was attained. One filling of gas, about 
2 ounces, was sufficient for a full-speed run of 1 hour and 20 
minutes. Equipping the power plant with a boat propeller of 4” 
diameter, 10” pitch, turning the same over at one-half engine speed, 
the R.P.M. attained for submerged propeller were 1950. Due to 
very little space in the cylinder head, I had to make the valves 
rather small. The ports are 44,” round. The engine is oiled by a 
drop oiler with pipe line to cylinder wall. The piston is fitted with 
two eccentric cast iron rings, which at first gave a little trouble 
while turning them. Patience is always the greatest help in model 
| making and is rewarded by a smooth-running, desirable product. 


6 THE MODELMAKER 


In this engine I use a simple mixing valve with adjustable plunger 
to control the air intake. The camshaft is also assembled, as is 
the flywheel. Between the core and the rim there are four spokes 
and four cooling blades. The crankcase consist of two halves, filed 
and turned out of steel, 2” x2” x1”. 


2-Cylinder, 4-Cycle Engine—Air Cooled 


The angle between cylinders is 45°. Main bearings are Norma 
E-15 ball bearings; camshaft bearings are H-12. Plain bearings in 
the connecting rods. Stroke 1”, bore 27/32”. The pistons are of 
_hard aluminum, each fitted with three rings made of cast iron; 
cylinders and' heads are turned out of solid cast iron bar and the 
crankcase out of cold rolled steel three inches in diameter. The 
connecting rods work side by side on a counterbalanced tool steel 
crank. The cylinders are offset. A Z.E.V. Bosch magneto supplies 
the spark. The small timing gear is fitted between the H-15 bear- 
ings on crankshaft; the assembled camshaft, mounted on two bear- 
ing supports screwed to crankcase, is located’ between the cylinders. — 
Bronze is uesd for push rod guide, which is fastened to top of 
camshaft bearing supports. The rocker arm supports are screwed 
to the cylinder heads. It was rather a difficult job to make a 
carbureter which would function equally well on low and high 
speeds. After building several types, I finally succeeded. The 
simple product consists of an automatic air check valve, needle 
valve and throttle. Splash oiling was adapted in this engine and 
made a breather necessary. The motor is started with a hand 
crank, engaging on camshaft; ten ounces of ordinary gasoline are — 
sufficient for a two-and-one-half-hours’ run. Oil consumption for 
this period is about one-half ounce. The highest R.P.M. obtained 
without heavy rim on flywheel was 8000; with rim on, as shown in 
photos, only 6000, but it will idle down to about 200. 


2-Cycle, Water-Cooled Marine Engine 


114” bore, 114” stroke, highest R.P.M. 4300; cylinder head, crank- 
case, flanges, piston and flywheel are turned out of one cast iron 
bar 23,”%x12”. The circular water pump is built in the cylinder 
and is driven from the flywheel by a belt. Ports are machined. 
Piston is fitted with three rings, two on top and one below; con- 
necting rod is steel, bushed with bronze bearing; crankshaft is 
counterbalanced; main bearing is 2144” long and extends into fly- 


wheel. I have used battery and magneto ignition. The latter seems j 


q 


tele 4 


THE MODELMAKER ¢ 





to be far better. 
trol, takes care of carburation. 
one, is used. 


A simple mixing valve, with adjustable air con- 
Gasoline mixed with oil, eight to 
E have also built a radiator for this engine, but it is 
just a little too small to be used without a fan. 


So far no power 


tests have been made, but, judging from speed and performance, 


it seems to be there. 





GAS ENGINE FOR MODEL AEROPLANE 


We are preparing to bind’ up 
some sets of Volume I, Model 
Railway News, and if any of our 
readers would like to have their 


volume bound up, mail it to us 
at once and we shall be glad to 


include your volume in our bind- 
ing order. If you have not sent 
in your subscription for 1926, let 
us have jit at your earliest con- 
venience, to enable us to com- 
plete our mailing List at as early 
a date as possible. 


THE MODELMAKER 











: THE MODELMAKER 9 





MODEL SHIPBUILDING NOTES 
A Design for a Model Launch 


By CECIL G. HAMILTON 


Having received a number of queries lately about drawings 
for model launches and motor boats, and thinking it would be of 
interest to readers of the “Modelmaker,” the following design was 
prepared. While following no particular prototype, the general 
outline is typical of this class of ship. The model measures 46 
inches over all, with a beam of 8 inches and a mean draft of 2 
inches. 'The sections are well rounded at the bilge, this feature 
making it much easier for plank building the hull, or for metal con- 
struction. Fittings have been reduced to the minimum, and the 
sheer given a pronounced sweep; this, with the broad, flat stern, 
gives a very pleasing effect. It will be noted that from the mid- 
section to the stern the L. W. L. is much broader than the deck; 
this is known as the tumble home of the frames. At the bow there 
is the flag pole, one single bollard and one anchor with stock. The 
cabin cover extends from No. 1 section to the cockpit and is entirely 
covered, while on top of it, just aft of the mid-section is arranged 
the wheelhouse and a short mast. A seat is fitted all round the 
cockpit, and at the front is a windshield. Two cleats are fitted on 
each side of the deck, a flag pole at the stern, and a sliding hatch 
on top of the cabin cover, just aft of the mast. The rudder is of 
spade form and underhung, while the propeller is three bladed, 2 
inches diameter. The usual coloring used on this class of ship is 
white top side, with red or green bottom, while the cabin cover and 
wheelhouse are finished to a mahogany tone, also the mast and 
flag poles. A fine gold line round the top sides complete the model. 
Following the usual policy with these designs, no machinery details 
have been given, as these will be attended to later. 


It will. have a water tube pot 
boiler, with super-heater. The 
barrel of the boiler is about 10” 
x 2144”, with a 150 square inches 


Mr. Angell has given us the 
following particulars about an 
engine and boiler he is working 
on: It is a two-cylinder, single- 


acting uniflow piston-valves ma- 
rine steam engine. Bore %” x 
ips / 64", sizeof base 3” x2”, 
height about 4”, with ball-bear- 
ing crankshaft. To operate on 
high pressure super-heated 
steam, approximately 200 Ibs. 


heating service to boiler and 
about 25 square inches heating 
service for super-heater. Fired 
with a blow torch. We hope to 
be able to give a fuller descrip- 
tion of this engine when it is 
finished. 


THE MODELMAKER 








gue ee ‘ aed +. 12 a - 





THE MODELMAKER 11 


Ye” SCALE MOUNTAIN 4—8—2 TYPE 
COAL FIRED LOCOMOTIVE 


By HENRY O. HAVEMEYER, Jr. | 


The engine is modeled after Baltimore and Ohio R. R. Com- 
pany No. 5500, the largest passenger locomotive in the world, from 
plans kindly furnished by Col. George H. Emerson, Chief of Motive 
Power of that road. It is planned to have the model an exact 

working miniature of the prototype, with all fittings working and 
all construction according to standard locomotive practice. Two 
cylinders, 144” stroke and 11/16” bore, working at 100 lbs. pressure, 
are expected to furnish tractive effort of 17 lbs. Weight of engine 
complete, exclusive of tender, will be about 60 lbs. Length, 30”; 
with tender, 48” long. 


Construction Details—Frame, pedestal binders, frame cross- 
ties cut from 4%” cold rolled steel, fastened together with hexagon 
head steel bolts and studs. Auxiliary frames extending from be- 
hind rear drivers tail brace, and’ frame angles of 4” steel, frames 
held together by the customary rivets. Pilot beam, equalizers, 
spring saddles, links and jibs all cut from. steel stock. Correct 
laminated springs with 16 leaves are of .022” thick spring steel. 
Axleboxes of brass 1%” thick, slotted for pedestals and of correct 
pattern. Trailing truck of Hodges pattern, with standard springs, 
brasses and equalizers. Pilot truck of standard pattern. All other 
details cut from steel stock, no castings being used' in the frame 

- construction. 


Wheels of cast iron, drivers 314” dia., trailing 111/16” dia., pilot 
S17 /16” dia., all mounted on axles of steel and pinned. Cylinders of 
cast iron, steam being distributed by piston valves. Alligator pat- 
tern crosshead and slides of steel. Valve motion full Walschaert 
all cut from mild steel. Connecting and driving rod'’s all of steel 
' fluted, with correct brasses, of phosphor bronze, secured by hexa- 
gon wedges and pins. 5 


Boiler of locomotive, fire tube type, built entirely of copper. Fire- 
box 6” long by 43” wide at bottom, water legs 144”, inner firebox 
of 1/16” copper and outer wrapper, back plate, tube plates and 
throat plate correctly flanged of 3/32” copper. Barrel of 354” dia.— 
10 gauge tube 23” long. Tubes seven in number, 14” dia. 20 gauge 
cu. screwed and expanded at tubeplate and expanded at smokebox 
end. All rivets 1%” dia. in double rows staggered. Two roof bars 


ee 


12 THE MODELMAKER 





fitted. 5/32” dia. bronze staybolts, 64 in number, maintain distance 
between inner and outer shells. Superheater of steel tube fitted. 
Grate area 19.6 square inches, tube heating surface 178.50 sq. in., 
firebox heating surface 44.3 sq. in. Total heating surface 222.84 sq. 
in. Pressure carried, 100 lbs. 

Fittings.—Throttle valve in dome, with regulator on back plate, 
water gauge, pressure gauge, blower valve, blow-off valve, 2 check 
valves forward, 2 injectors, whistle valve, steam sanding gear valve, 
steam brake valve, train valve, shifting valve, ba tepe sais lubri- 
cator valve. 

Thus far the frames have been finished and assembled with 
driving boxes and wheels finished and spring rigging laid out. The 


boiler is being built by Tim Kennedy, a boilermaker, in the shops 


of the railroad with which the writer is connected. The wheels, 
cylinders and pilot truck are the work of Mr. Frank Birch of Detroit. 
It is expected to have the engine on the tracks in the spring, after 
which a train of 10 all-steel Pullman cars will be built, making up 
a complete train over 40 feet long. Accurate to the range in the 


' get 
' modelmakers residing within a 


dining car. 


Mr. Edward Hoffman, 10 Gour- 
ley Street, Passaic, N. J., is very 
much interested in model work, 
especially locomotives. He has 
a good screw cutting lathe, with 
a well-equipped worshop for this 
class of work. He would very 
much like to get in touch with 
any enthusiasts in his neighbor- 
hood, with a view to having an 
occasional meeting and discuss- 
ing models. Having had some 
experience in this work he would 
be glad to help any other brother 
modelmakers if in his power. 





Mr. George Kuhr, of 218 Di- 
vision Street, Bellevue, Ky., is 
very much interested in model- 
making and he would likek to 
in touch with any other 


reasonable distance of his city, 
with a view to having an occa- 
sional meeting and in the hope 
that he will get sufficient replies 
to enable him to form a small 


The tender is of Vanderbilt type. 


model engineers club. We hope 
all our Kentucky readers will 
get in touch with this gentle- 
man. 


Correspondence 


To the Editor Modelmaker: 

I am just about finishing a 
model of the Flying Cloud’, about 
30” W. L., which I think is a 
beauty. I wish some genius 
would dope out some way to sail 
a square rigged ship so she 
would tack. I am not enough 


of a real sailor to be able to do 


that. 
With best wishes for your fur- 
ther success, I am, 
Sincerely yours, 
J. W. C. CORBUSIER. 
Hudson, Ohio. 
(If any of our readers can give 
this gentleman any information 


4 
2 


or suggestions for sailing square . 


riggers I am sure that he will © 
appreciate it very much.—EKd.) 


: 
2 fal 
a A. ae 


THE MODELMAKER 13 





We have just received a most 
appreciative letter from Mr. J. 
‘W. C. Corbusier. <A short de- 
scription and illustration of his 
fine model of the S. S. Aquitania 
was in the November issue of 
The Modelmaker. This enthusi- 
astic model boat builder informs 
us he has nearly completed a 
model of the famous American 
Clipper, “The Flying Cloud.” 
The prototype of this model was 
built by Donald McKay, one of 
the most famous shipbuilders of 
his time. We expect to give a 
description and illustration of 
this model in a future issue of 
The Modelmaker, and we hope it 
will encourage some of our read- 
ers to build models of some of 
MicKay’s other Clippers and help 
to perpetuate the memory of one 
of our really great Americans. A 
man who put his very heart and 
soul into his work. A man who 
demanded only the very best, in 
workmanship, materials and de- 
sign, and who was always striv- 
ing in each new ship to make a 
finer vessel than any he yet had 
built. That is the spirit we 
would like to see in all of our 
readers. Aim for the very best 
that is in you and never be sat- 
isfied with just “good enough.” 
Cultivate skill in workmanship, 
perseverance and infinite pa- 
tience. You will then be justly 
proud of your models. 


Mr. H. Meier, of 49 Bower 
Street, Jersey City, N. J., is very 
much interested in the construc- 


tion of models of old ships. He 
would like to get in touch with 
any fellow-enthusiasts who may 
be residents of his vicinity. He 
would also like to know where 
he can procure scale fittings for 
model ships. 


Mr. Frank Birch writes . us 
that he has quite an assortment 


of model locomotive drive 
wheels, and he would like to 


‘hear from any of our readers 


who are contemplating the build- 
ing of a model locomotive. 





The Elveron Speed Boat Club, 
of 13 Bentley Avenue, Jersey 


City, N. J., would like to hear 
from anyone in their neighbor- 
hood who is interested in the 
construction of model power 
boats, with a view to a get-to- 
gether meeting with the object 
of planning for a series of model 
power boat races next year. We 
know there are a good many 
model boat builders in New Jer- 
sey, and we hope they will get 
in touch with this club with the 
above object in view. 


Mr. G. H. Stegmann has in 
preparation a full-sized drawing 


of the lines of the model of the 
U. S. S. Frigate “Constitution,” 
from which he will be able to 
obtain blueprints. He has also 
promised to write an article on 
the details and fittings for this 
model, with scale drawings. This 
additional information will be of 
value to all of our readers who 
have decided! to construct a sim- 
ilar model. Considerable inter- 
est is being taken in the con- 
struction of models of old-time 
ships. “Old Ironsides” should 
especially appeal to Americans 
interested in this line of work. 


Mr. Ralph J. Kelley, of Trini- 
dad, Col., writes us he is build- 
ing a Coventry locomotive, 214- 
inch gauge, and if there are any 
model enthusiasts in his vicin- 
ity he would like to get in touch 
with them, with a view to a 


friendly meeting once in a while. 


* 7” ra + bs 


7 i 
w Fae, 


Vee THE MODELMAKER 





MODEL LOCOMOTIVE RACES 


By C. 0. LILJEGREN 


Airplanes, cars, motor and sailing yachts owe their present high 
perfection primarily to racing—-why not have races for locomotives? 
It is a matter of railroad history that Stephenson won the first 
locomotive race ever held, but the Swede, John Ericson, was a close 
second, and but for the breaking of a small part of the gear might 
have won. In that case, the Monitor would perhaps not have been 
built, but it is idle to speculate. 


To my knowledge, model locomotive races have never been held, 
and indeed the difficulties are many when you consider that as a 
rule no one can make the run aboard: the locomotive. Of course, 
big models have been built, both in this country and abroad, big 
enough to carry many men. Such models cost a good deal of money, 
and tracks to accommodate them are not cheap. 


For these reasons some outside braking arrangement to stop — 
the train is necessary. It could consist of a number of weights — 
attached to kind of a harness for the locomotive to run into, or 
fitted with some kind of snubbers, one on each side. 


Then there is the matter of rating the locomotives, and the — 
scale. As for the latter, I should suggest both %-inch and 1-inch 
scale, with gauges of 21%4 and 5 ins., although these are not strictly 
to scale. For rating steam locomotives, the same formulas can be ~ 
used as for full-size cars, and for gasoline and Diesel locomotives, 
American Power Boat Association has developed formulas that 
could be used with advantage. 


After being rated, the locomotives should be handicapped by 
extra loads, just as in horse racing, each locomotive to pull at 
least one car, if found practicable. 


Regarding the track, provision should be made for two or more — 
trains to race at one time, which add tremendously to the interest. — 
This means that two. or more tracks must be laid, all of the same 
length and form. Besides, there should be a home stretch, or — 
straight part near the finish line, where the trans can run parallel. — 
Crossings, at least grade crossings, are too risky and should be ~ 
avoided. It seems, then, that the best track should have horseshoe — 
shape, two or more tracks all pointing the same way. Of course, the 
track need not be level, although, since there can be no braking z 
down hill, too steep grades are to be avoided. 








: ~ Sea arid THE MODELMAKER 15 
3 Clearly, oval tracks would be best suited for racing but for the 
“necessary two crossings, on the curved part of the tracks, too. Hach 
track need not be level, although, since there can be no braking 
insuring equal tracks and fair play. In this manner any length 
‘of a course can be obtained simply by running so many laps, an 
“undeniable advantage of the oval track. Unfortunately, there are. 
not room for two trains to pass each other on the same track, as 
in auto car racing, hence two tracks must be used to get real thrills. 

By these lines the writer hopes to influence some Model Society 
to lay such tracks, and to inaugurate racing for locomotives, steam 
as well as internal combustion, both of which may be seen in 


increasing numbers in the near future. 


BOOK REVIEWS 
Steamboat Days, by F. E. Day- 
ton; illustration by J. 
Adams; xi ++ 436 pages, one col- 


-ored plate and 88 illust; 8% in. 
x 6 in.; 


cloth; $5.00. 


_ We believe this book will in- 
terest many of our readers, be- 
cause it contains a considerable 
amount of historical and practi- 
cal data relating to the develop- 
ment of steam navigation in the 
United States, commencing from 
the earliest attempts to the pres- 
ent day, giving the names of 
steamers, dates of construction, 
builders and owners ,with the 
names and a short account of 
the pioners of the steamship in- 
dustry. Many interesting items 
and amusing anecdotes are in- 
cluded. While the general make- 


up of the book is excellent, the 


"i 


‘quality of the illustrations is de- 


‘cidedly poor. 


FOR SALE 


Complete working drawings, 
24 x 36 in., postpaid $1.50. Free 
list of Modelmakers Supplies. 
P. 


W. Cornelius, 2457 &K. 
Washington St., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

a 


| ae 


oa 
i-- 


Bench Drill—Build your own. 


FOR SALE 


Patterns—Wood and Metal, 
Models and Small Castings. 
Special attention to modelmak- 


ers wants. J. H. Koch, 103 
Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 


Morgan twenty-foot glider 
parts. Precision machine work 


for models a specialty. F. W. 
Icken, Morsemere, N. J. 


-Constructional 
24” Model Racing Yacht, 1 
sheet, $2.25. Perry’s Flagship, 
the famous brig Niagara, which 
won the battle of Lake Erie. 
Length of hull, 254%”. 3 large 
sheets, $5.00. These blueprints 
give all details and measure- 
ments to build and rig above 
models. A. R. Ferris, 284 Hast 
151st St., Cleveland, Ohio. 


Blueprints — 


HELP WANTED 


Help Wanted—Mechanics to 
make old-time wooden ship mod 
els. Also riggers and hand 
painters. Write, Becker, 4135 
Third Ave., Bronx, New York. 


re 


AF LR eae 


16 THE MODELMAKER 





FOR SALE 


Gears and Model Supplies of 
every description, catalogue 5 
cents. Experimental Supply 
House, Box 10, Station Y, New 
York City. — 

Horizontal Flue Boiler and 
Blow Torch, fully equipped. Also 
two-cycle, single acting, slide 
valve engine. Send for particu- 
lars. Robert Engel, Rid'gewood, 
New Jersey. 

Locomotive Drive Wheels, all 
sizes, from 134” dia. to 414”. 
1”x1” vertical engine castings 
and parts, $10. 1”x1” horizontal 
engine castings and parts, $10. 
Passenger and freight car truck 
castings. Hexagon steel bolts, 
Nos. 2-56, 5-40, 7-32, 10-82, taps to 
suit. List 5 cents. Frank Birch, 
General Delivery, Highland 
Park, Mich. 





WADE 
3 Bench 
Via Lathes 


Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” length. 
Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 
Winding, Thread Cutting 


No. 1 Plain Machine as above .........$28 
No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58 


SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
CATALOG 





Shows full details and accessories 


THE GEROLD CO. (Dept. M8) 
120 Liberty St., N. ¥. 


Gas Engines—The three Gas 
Engines shown on the front page 
of this Modelmaker. Write for 
particulars to Mr. E. Vollenwei- 
der, 1022 14th St., Sacramento, 
Calif. / 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
Modelmakers, send for circular. 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Models Parts _ Lathes 
Domestic — Imported 
A. Alexander Singer 


15 Moore Street 
New York City 


Enquiries Invited 


TRIPLE X comsainartion : 


Lathe Milling and Drilling Machine 


IDEAL 


FOR 


MODEL 
WORK 


SEND FOR 

CATALOGS 
2 FREE 

TRIPLEX MACHINE CoO. 

50 Church Street _ New York City 





MODEL SLIDE VALVE MARINE ENGINE 


14” bore, $12.75, or 54” bore, $15.75. Be sure to 
power your boat with a Bathe steam engine 
and boiler model. We are builders of working 
model engines and boilers of many types. We can 
supply you with a power unit that will meet the 
requirements of your particular model boat. Boiler 
fittings and Model Steam line fittings. Special 
work. Illustrated catalogue, 20 cents. 


BATHE MANUFACTURING CO. 
Dept S, 5214 Woodland Ave. Philadelphia, Pa. 








THE 


MIDELMAKER 


FOR THOSE 
| INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WORKING MODELS | 


Vol. Iil, No. 2 ° FEBRUARY, 1926 10 cents 











MR. A. R. FERRIS’S MODEL 24” RACING YACHT 





Serie ars. ea ak, it eal 


THE MOD ELMAKER 


Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, February, 1926 


Vol. Ill. 


No. 2. 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925 at the Post Office at : 
New York, N. Y. under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


The boiler is, without question, 
the most important part of a 
steam power plant, for without 
its product—steam—the engine 
would not function. 


Much time and scientific ex- 
perimentation has been devoted 
to the development and im- 
provement of the steam boiler, 
and in consequence the shapes 
and types, and designs, are very 
numerous. 


Three of the most important 
essentials are :Strength and dur- 


ability, high efficiency in steam - 


production, and low cost for 


fuel. 


The water tube boiler may be 
cited as one of the most effi- 
cient type, but it is an expen- 
sive piece of apparatus, and if 
not properly taken care of the 
cost of upkeep and repairs may 
be very considerable. 


One of the most difficult prob- 
lems for the engineer is the re- 
moval of scale from the tubes, 
for if this is not properly attend- 
ed to, corrosion may set in and 
that means leaky tubes with loss 
of valuable time in making re- 
pairs. 


A Mr. Atmos, a Saedn en- 
gineer, has made a radical in- 
ovation in boiler designs. He 
has constructed a boiler of a 
tube about 8 in. dia. and about 
11 ft. long. This is revolved at 


for the steam to generate. 


a speed of 3800 R. P. M. The 
water is pumped in at one end 
and the steam taken out at the 
other. The tube is kept about 
half full of water allowing space 
The 
centrifugal action of the tube 
throws a film of water against 
the hot tube wall ensuing quick 
steaming. This boiler has been . 
in successful operation for near- 
ly three years producing 700 Ibs. 
of steam per sq. in. 4 

Here is an opportunity for sci- 
entific experimentation that 
should appeal to some of our 
readers. 

As no details of construction — 
were given it leaves the Model- 
maker free to commence his 
work from his own particular 
view point. z 

The following details would 
have to be determined by ac- 
tual experiment. 

Material—Brass, hard drawn 
copper or steel tubing. 

Dimensions—T hickness of 
wall, diameter, and length of © 
tube. 

Ends—Form of end pieces. 


Method of Fixing Ends—Weld- 
ed, riveted and hard soldered, 
or threaded and screwed on. It 
might be advisable to make one 
end piece to screw on so that the 
tube could be readily opened and 
cleaned out. 


ne eae OG 










THE MODELMAKER 19 


Trunnions—These could be 
part of the end pieces, but with 
hollow centers for water pipe 
inlet and steam supply pipe. 


_ Pipe Joints—These could be 
of the ball and socket type 
ground to a tight fit to prevent 
water, or seam leakage. 


Gears—One for tube and one 
to fit on shaft of motive power. 


Fire Box—Approximately % 
the length of tube and fired with 
hard fuel, row of burners, blow 
torch, or primus burner. 


. Framing for Boiler—Could be 
made of light T iron, the ends 
of uprights bolted to a heavy 
piece of sheet iron as a base 
plate. The frame work arranged 
so that it could be made wider 
and longer if desired to accom- 
modate tubes of varying diame- 
ters and lengths. A pillow block 
secured on the base plate at each 
end of frame bored out at the 
top for bearing brasses and fit- 
ted with bearing caps. 


Mr. G. M. Clarke, of 432 N. 
Huron Street, Ypsilanti, Mich., 
is the happy possessor of a very 


neat and well equipped work- 
shop, where he occupies his 
spare time at his hobby, build- 
ing models. He is now at work 
on a % in. scale locomotive. 
He wrote us he would-be very 
pleased to meet anyone interest- 
ed in this delightful pastime and 
has asked the Modelmaker to 
put him in touch with any of our 
reacers who may be residents of 
his city, or nearby towns. We 
hope all of our readers up his 
way will get in touch with this 
gentleman with a view to an 
occasional meeting. These no- 
tices have been the means of get- 
ting many little groups together 
in different parts of the States. 


Boiler Casing—The frame 
work could be covered with as- 
bestos sheeting and sheet iron, 
but the form of casing would 
depend somewhat on what type 
of power plant the boiler was in- 
tended to operate. 

R. P. M—tThe right speed to 
rotate the tube could be decided 
upon after actual tests under 
steam. 

Condenser—A surface con- 
denser might be added if the 
beiler was to be used on a model 
boat. The condensed water go- 
ing back into the supply tank. 
This would give the boiler a 
larger steaming radius. 

Lubrication—The type of lubri- 
cators best suited to the special 
conditions. 

Boiler Braces—There might be 
two or three longitudinal rods to 
hold the ends firmly. 

We should be very pleased to 
receive comments or construc- 
tive criticisms upon the above 
subject from any of our readers. 


Model Railway News, contents 
of January issue 1926. Mr. Beal’s 
00” Gauge West Midland Rail- 


way. Too much Model Railway? 
An “00” Gauge Wagon Tippler 
for a Model Mineral Depot. 
Railway Planning Suggestions. 
Notes on Model Loads. Signs 
for Permanent-way. Speed Re- 
strictions. A New Zealand Mod- 
el Locomotive, 2” Gauge 4—6—0. 
Why Not Narrow-gauge Proto- 
types? Photographing the Model 
Railway. Designs for Model 
“0” Gauge. Mr.-H. R. Norman’s 
1 N. L. R. Line. Our Mailbag. 
Answers to Correspondence. 
With the Clubs. With this is- 
sue Volume 2 commences. Pub- 
lished monthly, annual subscrip- 
ee $2.50. No single numbers 
sold. 


THE MODELMAKER 


20 


Li UIQdE) LOL pC Frf PLlCOG WEP CO PHUNODS NTYUL 





er) 
an 


THE MODELMAKER ? 21 





MODEL SAIL BOAT 
By MR. A. R. FERRIS. 


The hull of this 24” racing yacht was made by the “Bread 
and Butter’ method from 5 white pine boards each of which had 
its corresponding waterline or outline of the shape of the hull at 
that particular section marked on it from a templet. Each board 
was sawed out to its particular outline on a scroll saw. The 5 
boards were then screwed together one on top of another, but 
not glued as yet. The assembled boards, making a rough out- 
line of the hull were then mounted on a base board. This base 
board had 5 lines drawn across it and for each line a templet 
had been made to the correct shape of the hull at that particular 
section. The lines were numbered and each templet numbered 
with the same number as its corresponding line. The hull was 
then carved out by cutting off the sharp corners of the board 
and applying the templets as needed. 


When the hull was nearly worked to shape with the gouge it 
Was gone over with a small block plane, wood file and No. 2 sand- 
paper. The hull was then dissembled and the inside of each 
‘board sawed out leaving the thickness of the walls approx. 14”. 


Hull was then screwed together, LePages glue having been ap- 
plied to the boards and left to dry for 24 hours. It was then 
gone over with No. 1 sand paper and then with No. 00. Hull 
was then mounted on a cradle the remaining surplus wood cut 
out leaving the walls 3/16” thick. The shear was then cut and the 
inside given two coats of paint. 


This method of making a hull I have found to be very satis- 
factory as it requires less work than carving from a solid block. 
This is due to the fact that when the sharp corners of the boards 
are cut off, which is readily done, the hull is very nearly to the 
shape it will be when finished. 


The deck was made from white pine 14%” thick on which parallel 
lines were drawn on with a scratch awl and straight edge to rep- 
resent planking. Deck was then nailed on with brads two ribs with 
a slight curve having been fitted in before. 

The rigging is as simple as possible, fish line being used 
and rigging hooks and bouses being used to attach the sails. Sails 
and masts can be taken down in a few minutes. The rudder and 
keel are lead weighted. 


ee ee ess | ne sae i ae 
; am ‘- ¥ a - Y aah ; yy 
¥ ¢: 


THE MODELMAKER 


22 


———_— —_ - ———, 
oo —_ * oe 


titi iki all 





‘B08 ch Ui Ge, papldal, Blinoys aPilgNO Pandey MEAL WL — 





' for Milling Operations. 


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THE MODELMAKER 


23 





The model has proved to be a very steady sailer and makes 
a fine appearance on the water. The principal dimensions are 


-as follows: 


Hull, 24” long, 54% beam, 6% deep. 


Masts and Spars 
Main mast, 26” long, 7/16 dia. at large end tapered to 3/16 at 


small end. 


Topmast, 754” long, % dia. at middle. 
Main boom, 18” long, % at middle tapered to 1%4 at each end. 


Gaff, 1034” long. 
Bowsprit, 13” long. 


Topsail yard, jib boom and foresail boom all 6” long. 


Four sails: 


Model Engineer, principal con- 
tents for December 3, 10, 17, 24, 
31. Interchangeable Vice-Jaws 
A 214" 
Gauge 4—4—0 Locomotive. Clock 
Repair work. Making a pair of 
Lathe Standard and _ Treadle. 
Making a Small Drilling Pad. 
Making Condenser’ Ferrules. 
The Importance of Modelmaking 
and Model Engineering. Bevel 
Gear Control for Lathe Top- 
slide. Locomotive Prototypes 
and Economical Battery-charging 
Rectifier. Thermos Stats. A 
Model 2%” Gauge —4—4J2. 


Electrically-driven Tank Loco- . 


motive. Automatic Railway Sig- 
nalling. Cutting Approximate 
Metric Pitches. Self-acting 
‘Brake Mechanism for Lathes. 
Model Locomotive Building. The 


Model Battleship “Hopeful.” <A 


Portable Dividing Head. Practi- 


a 


shop Topics. 


eal Telephone Installations in 
private houses. A Column of 
“Live Steam” by “L. B. S. C.” 


Wireless Telephony and Sub- 


marine. Light Engineering 
Equipment and Supplies. Work- 
Domestic Engi- 
‘neering. An Electric Light 
Supply Failure. Model ‘Marine 


‘* 
ge 


Main sail, top sail, jib and fore sails. 


Notes. Recent Inventions. A 
2” by 2” Horizontal Steam En- 
gine. Queries and Replies. Prac- 
tical Letters from Our Readers. 
Acetylene Welding and the Mod- 
el Engineer. Reviving Dry Bat- 
teries. Society and Club Doings. 


‘Titlepage and Index for Volume 
53. 





We understand a Model Yacht 


Club has recently been organ- 


ized in Providence, R. I., and 
amongst its members are some 
very skilled model yacht build- 
ers. We wish them every suc- 
cess. | 





Mr. A. A. Singer recently held 
another meeting at his office, 15 
Moore Street, New York. There 
were fifteen model enthusiasts 
present. Mr. Lozier exhibited 
one of his steam locomotives and 
some cars which were very much 
admired. Mr. Singer expects to 
hold another meeting in Febru- 
ary and is in hopes that he will 
get sufficient support to warrant 
the formation of a Model Engi- 
neers Club. He would be glad to 
hear from any of our readers re- 
siding in New York or vicinity. 


2192944] 7 4ly . : 4apulfA 164 


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THE MODELMAKER 25 





NOTES ON %4” SCALE LOCOMOTIVE 
By W. G. LANDON 


I am building a half-inch scale locomotive. The nucleus was 
a set of castings purchased from Carson (England) in 1912, for a 
North Hastern Atlantic type. The work, after many long interrup- 
tions, is at last nearing completion. 


The following are notes on a few oddities incorporated in the 
‘design. After machining the wheels and the cylinders, and cutting 
out the frames, it was G2cided to make an American locomotive. 
I wanted to use Walshaert’s valve gear. Did not wish to attempt 
piston valves, and did not want the incorrect combination of a piston 
‘valve casing with a valve gear arranged for outside admission. 


The New Haven Atlantic type engines, in their original condi- 
tion, fulfilled these conditions, and as I was familiar with the mo- 
tive power on this road, I adopted this design. 

The castings supplied were for outside cylinders, with valves 
between the frames. A piece of 1/16” sheet brass was bent to a 
right angle and the flange, which in English practice would be bolted 
‘to the frames, was, after tinning, riveted on one face of the angle 
piece, an opening being cut for the valve seat to project through. 
Braces were attached to the cylindr flanges. A block of brass, with 
center cut out, formed the steam chest and was bolted on. 


Dummy springs are fitted, but they form a very live part of the 
equalizing system, which is according to the Pennsylvania E-6s class, 
i.e. the truck is equalized with the forward drivers, and the main 
drivers with the trailer. With this arrangement any predetermined 
weight may be put upon each set of wheels, with the assurance that 
it will not vary. The truck is also self-centering as any side mo- 
tion swings the lower end of rod, (a) Fig. 3, in an are and puts 
greater weight thereon, with the tendency to return to central 
position. ; 

Several years ago I had great trouble, the front truck of 4—4—0 
engine leaving the rails through lack of weight. Equalizing the 
drivers and thus throwing weight on the front part of the engine 
on the truck effected a cure. 


Fig. 2 shows a throttle, which externally is an imitation of the 
Chambers throttle and internally is of the slide valve type. The 
seat has the dry pipe expanded and sweated in and holes (b) bored 
and countersunk for screws. The dry pipe, with seat, is put in posi- 







pM Teen a hier Mg! ie Sha ae. 
26 THE MODELMAKER 


tion before the dome. The pipe is annealed and bent in a long 
curve, Fig. 2-B, so that it can be pushed through the large hole C 
and thence through its hole in front tube plate. Then the seat can 
be pushed down and secured with screws. A U piece is riveted on 
the valve. Its height must allow crank in vertical position to pass 
through it for assembly. The valve is then ground in on the seat. 
Assemble as.follows: The valve is placed in position, the dome 
having been fixed. The crank shaft is put in gland, packing lint 
put on, and gland packed. The operating arm (V) is then secured 
by a small pin. The whole can then be inserted through hole (H) 
in the dome. This hole must be large enough to permit the crank 
to pass. The crank is held vertically, while the gland nut is screwed 
into dome. Washers may be needed at the shoulder to keep the other 
end of crank in its bearing (X). The outside throttle connections — 





section j 
at A 


Fig3 Eevalizers 


form an easy means of control without ungainly extension handles 
in the cab. 

I presume a good many modellers use my method of measure- | 
ment, but I do not remember seeing it described. Whether I am 
using a photograph, or a drawing, the first thing I do is to make 
a scale of feet and inches to correspond. If no dimensions are 
given, the scale may be computed from some known factor, such 
as diameter of driving wheel, or extreme height. Next I construct 
a ruler the scale I am going to model; for instance for 17 /32: 20 
spaces, or so, each 17/32 which would be 20 ft. and one space divided 
into 12 parts, each being a scale inch. The measurements are then 
taken from the drawing of the original, supplemented, if possible, 
by a table of leading dimensions, and transferred to the model by 
the second rule. This scheme is convenient whether one is making 
a full set of drawings, or only occasional sketches and using the 
eye. Sg 












THE MODELMAKER 2'¢ 





A PACIFIC LOCOMOTIVE 


CONSTRUCTED BY MR. L. LAWRENCE 
(PED, Oi) 


While it is not our policy to feature the work of our foreign 
contemporaries. We cannot resist the desire to insert an illustra- 
tion and few particulars of “L. B. S. C.’s” latest Model Locomotive. 

_He has earned an international reputation for the splendid workman- 
ship he always puts into his models; and we believe our readers 
are always interested in such men and the work they do. He is a lo- 
comotive engineer by profession and knows the “in’ards and 
out’ards” of the iron horse so thoroughly that it would “go agin 
his grain” to turn out a piece of bum work. 


We have heard of firms who have become so commercialized 
that they are content to trade on a bygone proposition; but murder 
will out, and they will find that the lemon they have stuck some 
innocent model fan with will one day come back to them as a 

. boomerang. ; 


We feel quite sure that this will never happen to “‘L. B. S. C.” 
or to several good conscientious workmen in the U. S. who we know 
are doing their level best to give a square deal and turn out work 
that will stand the severest test and scrutiny. 


There seems to be one thing that purchasers of finished models 
overlook, i.e. a good job well done should be well paid for. The 
maker of a fine model is just as much entitled to a good price for 
his finished product as a sculptor, artist or jeweller for their handi- 
work. The construction of a fine working locomotive means good 
material, skillful workmanship and many weeks of arduous, pains- 
taking work. 


DETAILS OF “PACIFIC” LOCOMOTIVE; ENGLISH SOUTHERN 
RAILWAY OUTLINES. 


Loading gauge, American; rail gauge 21% in. 

Length over buffers, 3 ft. 8% in. 

Boiler—4% in. diam., 1 ft. 10 in. long, including smokebox. 
- Tubes—Twenty-two % in. diam., two 9/16 in. flues for super- 
heater; all 13 in. long. Two-element Robinson superheater. 

Firebox—4 in. x 41%4 in.; grate area 17 sq. in.; working pressure, 
75 lb. (can be increased to 100 if desired). Fuel, hard coal. 

Cylinders (four, high pressure), % in. bore, 1% in. stroke. Inside 
‘cylinders drive leading coupled wheels. 


bb 


Ne 


¢ 
‘ 
j Ar 


28 THE MODELMAKER 





Bogie, pony and tender wheels, 1% in. diam. Drivers, 3 5/16 in. 
diam. | | 
Valve gear, full Walschaert’s, two sets. Inside valves worked by 
rockers; 1/64 in. lead, 1/16 in. lap; cut off at 75% in full gear; 
will link up to 20% when running and maintain even beats with 
three passengers up. 


Working details—Boiler fed by two eccentric-driven pumps, 
5/16 in. bore % in. stroke, and a working injector, the delivery 
cone of which has a bore of 1/40 in. and works down to 35 Ib. pres- 





sure. Three snifting valves; whistle, with spring lever valve; 
working leaf springs on tender trucks; throttle in dome; two % in. 
safety valves, ring blower, and all other details as in English prac- 
tice, including all boiler head fittings. 


The engine maintains its working pressure with ease, waen both | 
pumps are putting cold water into the boiler. With 75 lb. pressure — 
it has actually hauled one load of five adult passengers, and on a 
second trip, another load of three adults and six children, Its _ 
maximum hauling capacity has never been fully tested, but on 
sanded rails with 100 lb. steam would probably exceed 1,000 lbs. 


THE MODELMAKER 29 





REVIEW NOTICE 


Galvanizing a theoretical and 
practical treatise on the subject 
for the use of works managers, 
students and others by Heinz 
Bablik translated by C. T. C. 

Salter, iv 168 pages, 84 illus., 9 
in. x 6 in., cloth, $5.00. 

During the many years devot- 

ed to the management of the 
large galvanizing works the au- 
thor has made many scientific 
experiments in this subject and 
he believes the results of his 
researches will prove of some 
_value to others interested in this 
[ industry. Contents of Chapters: 
I. Rust and its Prevention. II. 
The Structure of Galvanized 
Coating; Hot-Galvanized Coat- 
ings, Electro-galvanized coatings, 


Sheradized Coatings, Schoop 
‘Coatings. III. Pickling. IV. The 
‘Flux. V. Hot-Galvanizing; The 


| Galvanizing Tank, The Galvaniz- 
'ing Process, The Austrian Gal- 
vanizing Process, Galvanizing 
Cast Iron. VI. Raw Materials 
and Waste Products of Hot- 
Galvanizing. VII. The Theoreti- 
cal Principles of Electro-Galvan- 
izing. VIII. Electro-Galvanizing 
Plant. IX. Sheradizing. X. The 
Schoop Process. XI. Testing 
and Judging Galvanized Coat- 
ings; Mechanical Properties, 
Method of Galvanizing, Thick- 
ness of Coating, Action of Cor- 
rosives. Index. 





Mr. Volney F. Crouch, of 530 
West Oak Street, Roseburg, Ore., 
writes us that he has found two 

| very enthusiastic modelmakers 
and he has written us to know 
if we cannot put him in touch 
with any other gentlemen inter- 
ested who might be residents of 
his state. He would very much 
like to form a modelmakers club 
providing he can get enough 
members to support the move- 
ment. Please write to him. 


¢ 
A 


Mr. Frank Birch, of Highland 
Park, Mich., after six months of 
very close work and long hours, 
took a Sunday off for a “toot.” 
He made a call upon Mr. G. M. 
Clarke, of Ypsilanti, Mich., and 
had a delightful visit with that 
genial and enthusiastic model 
maker. They had a grand time 
talking models. We are glad to 
do all we can to bring our read- 
ers in contact with each other. 
That is the best and surest way 
to encourage the development of 
really worth-while work and en- 
thusiasm in their pet hobby. 





Mr. Ernest Maunder, of St. 
John’s, Newfoundland, has sent 
us photos of three of his model 
ships representing some of the 
old Newfoundland Sealing Fleet. 
We hope to be able to give a 
description and illustrations of 
one or more of these models 
later on, 





Wr. ©. S. Spargo, 41 Randall 
Ave., Freeport, Long Island, N. 
Y., has built quite a number of 
models. He is now interested 
in the construction of a locomo- 
tive power of which will be elec- 
tric motors. He would like to 
hear from any of our readers 
who could advise him as to 
where he could get some small 
electric motors suitable for this 
work. 





Mr. John Martynek, 16 Holland 
Street, Binghampton, N. Y., is 
very much interested in models. 
He would like to get in touch 
with any of our readers in. his 
vicinity who would be interest- 
ed in an occasional get-together 
meeting to talk models. 





When writing for information 
please enclose stamped and ad- 
dressed envelope for reply. 


cae RR 8 8) ne en Gy a ra 
; oe ar Se 
‘fo 


30 | THE MODELMAKER 





CORRESPONDENCE 


The Modelmaker, 
120 Liberty St., 
New York, N. Y. 


' Dear Sits:— 

Inclosed find $1.00 to pay for 
my subscription for the Model- 
maker for the coming year, you 
have a great little magazine and 
keep the good work up. 

In reading your editorials in 
the December issue you say 
that there is some criticism as to 
the amount of space that you 
devote to model locomotives, I 
should think that could be 
blamed directly to the model 
makers as it is your obligation 


to publish descriptive matter of 
all interesting and unique mod- 
els that come to your attention. 
I admit that there is something 
fascinating in model locomotives 
and expect to start construction 
on one soon, but there is such 
a wonderful field for models, for 
instance, stationary engines built 
to scale the same as locomotives 
and there are any number of 
_types to choose from, corliss en- 
gines either simple or compound 
and by the time that the model 
maker builds one and finishes a 
full releasing gear with standard 
governor control, he will have a 
beautiful piece of work and one 
that will well pay him for his 
labor, then there is the auto- 
matic cut-off engine that could 
either be made simple or com- 
pound and when made to scale 
would make a fine model and 
the model maker could also 
make a small D. C. generator and 
direct connect to the engine, 
there is also the hoisting engine 
that would make a fine model 
to say nothing of pumps of va- 
rious ‘xinds also boilers. The 


portable engine, traction engine, 


also road rollers would make 
fine models, and to go into the 
electrical game there are motors, 
generators, miniature switch- 
boards and a host of other 
things, a model of the house that 
you might be living in completely 
furnished would make a novel 
exhibit. I am merely offering 
these suggestions to try to open 
a new train of thought for some 
model maker that may want ete 
get out of the rut. 


The average model maker I 
have found does not take the. 
same painstaking labor to con- 
struct a model stationary engine 
that he would if it were a loco- 
motive and almost always while~ 
they run very well do not look 
like a large engine and the same 
holds true to boilers as most. 
model boilers are not designed 
to promote rapid circulation 
which is essential to all boilers 
regardless of size, I would like 
to see some of the model makers 
make some of the above models 
to scale as I know that they will 
be delighted with results. . 


You may think that I am un- 
duly critical in regards to the 
stationary engine models but 
will say in reply that I have 
been a stationary engineer for 
seventeen years and in that time 
have- made a number of scale 
models of both engines and boil- 
ers and the results were al- 
ways highly gratifying. 

I resolved to write this letter 
when I read the editorial T 
spoke of in the beginning of this - 
epistle and hope that you will 
take it in the spirit in which it 
is written, so hoping that the 
Modelmaker will have a highly 
prosperous year, I remain, “a 

Sincerely yours, 
W.W. MATHER, 
Warren, Ohio. 









3 THE MODELMAKER 31 


_ Mr, J. W. Neptune, 130 Paul 
Court, Akron, Ohio, writes us 
that the notice we inserted in 


the Modelmaker several issues 
ago has brought him a number 
of enthusiastic visitors. They 
are planning to have another 
meeting shortly with the object 
of forming a Modelmakers club. 
If any of our readers in this 
section are interested in this 
movement and have not already 
communicated with Mr. Nep- 
tune we would suggest they do 
so at once as it seems from Mr. 
Neptune’s letter that it will be a 
real live organization and worth 
belonging to. 





Mr. F.. C. Icken, of Morsemere, 
N. J., has in hand the construc- 


tion of an up-to-date electric 
‘locomotive for “O” gauge. He 
would be glad to exchange views 
with any of our readers inter- 
ested in the construction of a 
similar model. 





In writing to the Modelmaker 
for information please enclose 


a stamped’ and addressed envel- 
ope. While we are always will- 
ing to answer our readers let- 
ters to the best of our ability 
our correspondence is getting so 
large as to make the item of 
postage very considerable. 





J. H. B. we would recommend 
Practical Lessons in Metal 
Turning and Screw Cutting, by 
Marshall, price $1.25. This is 
considered one of the most 
‘practical works on this subject 
and will fully cover all the 
questions you ask. The many 
illustrations are very clear and 
explicit, copies of this book can 
be obtained from our Book De- 
partment. 






WANTED 


One 6 in. Universal Lathe 
Chuck in good condition, priced 
right. Neptune, 130 Paul Court, 
Akron, Ohio. 


FOR SALE 


14% horse power 
gasoline) engine. Largest size 
Goodell double head grinder 
guaranteed. Clow, 226 Second 
St., N. E., Washington, D. C. 


gas (not 


Radio and Electrical Supplies, 
Robert E. Bedford, Johnstown, 
New York. 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
Modelmakers, send for circular. 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Patterns—Wood and Metal, 
Models and Small Castings. 
Special attention to modelmak- 
ers wants. J. H. Koch, 103 
Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 


Morgan twenty-foot glider 
parts. Precision machine work 
for models a specialty. F. W. 
Icken, Morsemere, N. J. 


Bench Drill—Build your own. 
Complete working drawings, 
24 x 36 in., postpaid $1.00. Free 
list of Modelmakers Supplies. 


P. W. Cornelius, 2457 KE. 
Washington St., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


Constructional Blueprints—24” 
Model Racing Yacht, 1 sheet, 
$2.25. Perry’s Flagship, the fa- 
mous brig Niagara, which won 
the battle of Lake Erie. Length 
of hull, 254%”. 3 large sheets, 
$5.00. These blueprints give all 
details and measurements. to 
build and rig above models. A. 
R. Ferris, 284 Hast 151st St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 


32 THE MODELMAKER 





MODEL SLIDE VALVE MARINE 


ENGINE 


14” bore, $12.75, or 54” bore, $15.75. Be sure to 


work. 





power your boat with a Bathe steam engine. 
and boiler model. 
model engines and boilers of many types. We can 
supply you with a power unit that will meet the 
requirements of your particular model boat. Boiler 
fittings. and Model Steam line fittings. 
Tilustrated catalogue, 20 cents. 


BATHE MANUFACTURING CO. 
Dept S, 5214 Woodland Ave. 


We are builders of working 


Special 


Philadelphia, Pa. 





MODEL MACHINERY 


Sole U. S. Agent for the noted Eng- 
lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
makers of Model Steam, Gasoline, 
Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
Trimmings; Electrical Machinery. 
Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 
gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 
and parts, etc. “CABLE SERVICE.” 


Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 


3 Ashland Street _ 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. S. A. 


Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
Advices and Suggestions Cordially Given 


WADE 









\ 4 Sos Bench 
Vine Lathes 
Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” length. 
Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 


Winding, Thread Cutting 


No. 1 Plain Machine as above ........ $28 
No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58 


SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
, CATALOG 
Shows full details and accessories 


THE GEROLD CO. (Dept. M8) 
120 Liberty St., N. Y. 


Models’ Parts Lathes 
Domestic — Imported 


A. Alexander Singer 


15 Moore Street 
New York City 


Enquiries Invited 


Please state in detail what you are 
interested in. 


TR IP LE X comsinartion 


Lathe Milling and Drilling Machine 


IDEAL 


FOR 


MODEL 
WORK 


SEND FOR | 
CATALOGS — 
FREE 

TRIPLEX MACHINE Co. 
50 Church Street New York City 








THE MODELMAKER 


BOUND VOL. I. 


1924. $1.60 





or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 


BOUND VOL. II. 


1925. $2.10 





or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 of Vol. I. Price 10¢c each. | 

4 

We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. ee 


Price 10c each. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 


vor 


\0 





THE 


MODELMAKER) 


FOR THOSE hak 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 7 


WORKING MODELS") ° 


Vol. Ill, No. 3 March, 1926 10 Cents 











“ey MODEL OF A VIKING SHIP 
: MADE BY MR. H. 0. HAVEMEYER, JR. 





THE MODELMAKER 


Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, March, 1926 


Vol. Ill. 


No. 3. 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925 at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y. under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


With the approach of Spring 
and warmer weather our Model 
Yachtsmen will be tuning up 
their last year’s boats and com- 
pleting new ones for the open- 
ing races of the coming season. 

We shall be glad to receive 
advance notices of forthcoming 
events from the Secretaries of 
the various Model Yacht Clubs 
in the U. S. and Canada. We 
hope the time is not far distant 
when there will be Annual 
Model Yacht Races at which 
members of the various Clubs 
will enter their boats. A Na- 
tional Model Boat Regatta 
would increase the interest very 
considerably in this delightful 
recreation. 

We note from letters received 
a very considerable interest is 
being taken in the construction 
of models of old-time sailing 
ships. The models of Donald 
McKay’s Clippers we described 


The Model Railway News, 
principal contents for February 
issue: Mr. E. G. Attenborough’s 
214” Gauge Outdoor Railway. A 
very complete installation. 
Modelling the New L. M. S. R. 
“Baltic’ Tanks. Modelling Nar- 
row Gauge Railways. Model 
Railway Signalling. Building a 


Number 1 Gauge. 


in the December, 1925, issue of 
The Modelmaker, have all been 
sold, realizing very good prices. 

Model Sail Boat enthusiasts 
are still in the majority, but 
an increasing number are devot- 
ing their energies to model 
power boat design and construc- 
tion. 

This is a much larger field 
than the sail boat, as there are 
such a great variety of hull de- 
signs to model from. While the 
propelling power could be 
steam, electric, gas engine or 
clockwork, the selection of the 
most suitable power plant would 
largely depend upon the type 
and size of hull, and the work 
it was intended to perform. 

We shall be pleased to re- 
ceive from any of our readers. 
descriptions and illustrations of 
boats they have built for inser- 
tion in future issues of this 
Magazine. 


1” Scale “Pacific’ Under Diffi- 
culties. Walschaert’s Gear for 
A Country 
Railway. Two. 
Fittings. | 


House Model 
Dummy Locomotive 
Sub-structures for Permanent | 
Indoor Railways. “O” Gauge. 
Locomotives. A Novel Locomo- 
tive Competition. Our 
Bag. Club Notices, ete. 


: 


THE MODELMAKER 35 





A MODEL VIKING SHIP 
By MR. H, 0. HAVEMEYER, JR. 


This model was made as accurately as possible to records pub- 
lished by the British Society of Nautical Research of the famous 
Viking ship, unearthed several years ago. 

The keel, stem and stern pieces are cut from clear oak, lined 
up and screwed together. The planking, of thin pine strips, is 
nailed on clinker fashion with the top plank lapping the next lower 
one. The floor beams and planks are next inserted and carefully 
laid down with brads. The rowers’ seats, or thwarts, twenty-four 
in number, are next put in, arranged so as to leave an aisle the 
whole length of the vessel. The forward and stern decks are then 
fastened, being raised about 3%” in the bow and about 5%” in the 
stern. 

The holes for the oars are marked, re-enforcing pieces glued in 
behind the bulwarks, and the holes carefully drilled. The figure- 
head and tail end are carved from mahogany, and fastened to the 
hull with dowel pins and glue. The small serpent designs are made 
of wood and pinned fore and aft, as shown. 

The heal of the mast is fitted into a block of wood, fastened 
to the keel and the mast and spar erected. 


The shields, 34 in number, are turned from hard wood, their 
edges beveled, backs cored, and bosses left on the fronts. On each 
‘shield is painted a different Norse insignia in colors. 

The blocks are made of mahogany; the rudder is of carved 
mahogany with a tiller handle, also of carved mahogany. The rud- 
der is affixed to the ship with a brass rod. 


The hull is painted a medium blue, with alternating planks a 


light green. The serpent designs are yellow with black spots. The 


figurehead is done in various tones of bronze and copper. The 
-horse’s mouth is red, with darts ornamented like fire with yellow 
and black. The tail is bronzed similar to stem piece. The entire 
interior of the ship with all the fittings, spars, blocks and oars are 
stained with penetrating weathered oak stain. 


The sail is a piece of muslin edged with cord and painted in 


stripes of yellow and red, with narrow blue bands. The streamer 


36 THE MODELMAKER 





is a length of tri-shade of green silk ribbon wired to hold its form. 


Mast top ornament is of brass soldered to a length’of rod and 
painted dull silver with black spots. 


Rigging is black cord belayed in proper fashion. 
finish of boat is dull, no varnish being used at all, and when swung — 


The entire 


from the ceiling on a wire, renders a very pleasing piece of in- 
terior decoration, its principal charm being in accuracy of form. 


Principal Measurements 


Length overall, 32”. 

Depth of Hull, bow 5”. 
Depth of Hull, midship 3%”. 
Depth of Hull, stern 414”. 
Beam, 5”. 


Height of Mast above bulwarks, 12”. 


Length of yard arm, 10”. 
Diameter of Shields, 1144”. 


Mr. Dobler was in to see us 
the other day and he informed 
us he was making good progress 
with his P. R. R. K. 4s 1%” scale 
Locomotive. He spoke very en- 
thusiastically of Mr. Coventry’s 
set of drawings. The working 
parts were made at different 
times following the drawings 
most carefully, and when he as- 
sembled the finished parts they 
fitted together perfectly. He 
has the chassis and working 
parts all finished and assembled. 
This goes to show it is worth 
while to make a full and com- 
plete set of working drawings 
before the actual construction 
is commenced. 


We know of several cases 
where much time was lost and 
considerable extra work entailed 
because the Modelmaker did not 
make scale drawings of the 
working parts... It takes time 
and calculation to lay out de- 
tailed drawings, but it does pay 


in the long run to do this work. 
If a Modelmaker is not compe- 
tent to do this work himself, it 
would be much better for him 
to purchase a complete set of 


drawings or enlist the help of © 


some model fan who could do 
this work for him. In the lat- 
ter case they could either work 
together on the construction of 
one model or each could build 
his own model, comparing nates 
as the work on their models 
progressed. 





We have just received from 
Mr. John A. Howland, of Jack- 
son, Mich., a very full and in- 
teresting account of the con- 
struction of his 
modelled after the famous N.Y. 


C.R. “Number 999,” built partly — 
of wood and partly of metal. He — 


also sent us some photographs. 


locomotive, 


ee ae a ae a ee) 


We shall include this article in 3 


the April issue of ane Model- 4 


maker. 








On ae th 


THE MODELMAKER 37 





MODEL OF “SANDPIPER” 


By MR. HARRY A. CAMPBELL 


I have sent you some snap-shots of Sandpiper which may inter- 
est some of the readers of The Modelmaker. 
Sandpiper was built from designs by Mr. William Atkin that 
were published in Motorboating. I built my model on a scale of 
2” to 1’. This gave me a 60” model of a 30’ boat. There was 


‘nothing very difficult in building her as all lines are straight. How- 


ever, I found that the only way to start a thing of this kind is to 
make full size lines and plans before attempting the framing. My 


boat is framed with soft pine and planked with redwood. The 


redwood I salvaged from two old tank staves. The deck and house 


are oak. 





| _ For power I used a “Klaxon” horn, which came from a Chevrolet., 


{ 
iW 


‘This type of motor is especially good for boats, as it has a thrust 
bearing. Five dry cells drove her four miles per hour, “Sand- 
piper’ 3” tunnel stern makes a small high-speed prop Necessary, 
which is the reason for electric drive. 

Ma For caulking seams I found that a stiff mixture of glycerin and 

red lead or litharge is really great. It’s water proof and can be 


easily covered with paint. Sandpiper never has leaked. 


ws 
| oo 
> 
a 


38 THE MODELMAKER 


SOME 
LOCOMOTIVE CONSTRUCTION 
NOTES oS 
By H. J. COVENTRY, Assoc. Mem. A. S. M. E. 


There is probably no more discouraging experience than to 
find after many hours of labor spent in producing model locomo- 
tive frames, wheels, axles and side rods, that the wheels stick tight 
in certain parts of the revolution. The requirements for free run- 
ning are: (1) Axles must be parallel; (2) wheels must be cor- 
rectly quartered, that is, the crank pins must be at right angles; 
(8) center distances of side rod bushing’s must be same as axle 
centers. 


To attain these results it is not enough to merely work as close 
as possible to respective dimensions, neither is it necessary to do 
so. It is, however, more important that the axle centers and side 
rod bush centers be identical. 


We will assume that frames have been rough sawn out, not 
forgetting to allow for the inevitable warping if cold rolled steel 
is used. Straighten as well as possible and then file the top true 
and straight. From this edge mark out all openings and drill holes. 
The frames should be rivetted or bolted together, using any of the 
holes required later for brasses, etc. Now proceed to operate on 
the front jaw of main pedestal and get this square both with side > 
of frame and the straight top edge; file down close to the line. — 
Next make a simple gauge-like sketch, Fig. 1, which is made to 
center distance of axles. Having front jaw of main pedestal true, 
proceed to front jaws of the other pedestals, filing till the gauge 
just goes over. Keep the gauge parallel with top edge of frame 
and feel with it just as you would with calipers. 


After the front faces of all pedestals are true, file up the back 
face of main, using inside calipers set to dimension of jaw opening. 
The backs of the other jaws can be trued up the same way, using 
the same caliper setting, or the axle distance guage may be used 
working off the main back face. Before taking the frames apart 
it is better to drill all holes, in fact finish completely. F 

Now make the driver bearings, but do not bore them, leave — 
solid and fit snugly to pedestal jaws. It is now necessary to make 
a simple jig for side rod centers. Take a piece of cold rolled steel, 
almost any flat section will do, say %4” x %”, and on its length 


J 
2 


THE MODELMAKER 39 


| AXLE CENTER DISTRNCE. | 
! a . i 


| TareReo_ , 


Fic. / 





40 THE MODELMAKER 
OR Mae Pence ea he Usa ERT cL REL BLT 
scribe a line, and from this set off the centers of the side rod 
bushes, starting from the main driver, and with the dividers set to 
the correct dimension step off the front, and back, or according 
to the number of coupled wheels. You can, if you prefer, lay the 
piece of c. r. s. on your finished frame and scribe lines, using the 
front faces of pedestals as a guide for the scriber. Center punch 
the points and drill same diameter as the unbushed holes in side- 
rods. Mark the jig so that you will know which is the front crank 
pin center, also mark whether right hand, or left. See Fig. 3. 


Taxe another piece of cold rolled steel, and using the jig ciaypeum 
to it, spot sink with same drills as at BM and F, Fig. 3. Take off 
the jig and drill holes same diameter as bearings. You will now 
have two jigs satisfying condition No. 3, axle centers will be same 
as side rod centers, and whether actually a few thousandths more, 
or less, than the required dimensions will not affect the result in | 
the least. 


Driving boxes can now be drilled. Clamp the two frames to- | 
gether. Simplest way is to lay them bottom edge up on a surface 7 
plate and square off through pedestals. Mark the center of main 
bearing, and right here it is as well to check the distance to center 
of cylinder seat. If not in agreement with drawing, shift the 
center line on bearing, or compensate the error in cylinder flange 
when this is being put in frames. Center punch the main bearing ~ 
and drill, and ream, right through the two bearings, taking care: 


that the frames are well and truly supported on the drilling table. F 


Now take the jig, place it on the frame, and locate with a well- 
fitting pin pushed through into bearing. Be careful that you have- 
the jig correctly located with hole marked F coming over front. 
bearing and edge of jig parallel with top edges of boxes. Clamp 
jig tight and run drill through all other bearings. a 


The side rods are made in a similar manner by laying out fronil 
main, drilling same, put jig on and locate with pin, clamp and drill 
the eye ends. In the case of locomotives with more than a 


coupled axles, fit the side rod knuckles before drilling eyes. 


One more requisite is necessary to smooth running: that is the 
angle which the crank pins bear to each other from side to side 
must be the same throughout the whole act of wheels. It is not 
absolutely necessary that the cranks be at 90 degrees; they could 
just as well be 89 or 91, but it is easier for practical reasons to 
make the cranks all at 90 degrees than some other angle. 


The wheels should all be of the same diameter. If an error has 









¥ af THE MODELMAKER 41 


‘been made in any one or any one pair, turn the others down to same 


_ gize. 


Having the axles and wheels already, and one wheel pressed 


on its axle with crank pins already in, mount on a V block and 


‘clamp by the axle, adjust so that the crank pin is horizontal. 


This 


is easily done by setting the surface gauge to axle center and 


turning the wheel round till crank pin center coincides. 


A small 


‘collar should be made to slip over the crank pin of other wheel. 
|The outside diameter of the collar should be the same as axle 


diameter in wheel seat. 


Push the wheel onto the axle as far as it 


will go, by hand, and as near as possible to 90 degrees slip the 
collar over the pin and with the square or surface plate adjust 
the wheel so that the blade of square just touches the collar and 
at the same time is in line with circumference of axle. 

Another method is to set the wheel and axle on the V block 
at 45 degrees, using the head of a “B and S,” or “Starrett,” uni- 
versal square in conjunction with the collar on crank pin. 

- In setting the wheels be careful you make them with same crank 


lead. 


If the above procedure be adopted no fear need be had that 


‘the wheels will stick, or bind, when the engine is erected. 


CORRESPONDENCE 


The Modelmaker: 
Dear Sir: 


In a previous issue of your 
paper a reader asked where he 
could get small brass balls. 


The following kink for making. 


them may interest him. 





_ forming Toot ler Phaking Bronze Balls 


Secure a suitable piece of tool 


steel that will fit in the tool post | 


of the lathe. Select a twist 


3 
ee 
of ; Z 


—s | 


drill of the diameter of the ball 
desired. Drill a hole through 
the steel on the end and saw 
the steel directly through the 
center of the hole leaving a 
kalf circle. The tool is undercut 
and sharpened, and then hard 
ened.. Center a piece of brass 
rod the size required in the 
lathe and with this tool you can 
make as many balls as you re- 
quire. (See illustration.) 
Edgar L. Brown, 


Greensboro, N. C. 





Mr. W. H. Buckley, of Guys- 
boro, N. S., has just sent us a 
photograph of a_two-cylinder 
horizontal stationary engine he 
built from scrap material, and 
it is certainly a clever little 
model. He is quite a genius in 
utilizing odd scraps that other 
members would throw away. 


42 THE MODELMAKER 





PROPORTIONING THE PARTS FOR 
A MODEL STEAM ENGINE 


The following is a table of dimensions of a standard type of 
horizontal single-cylinder steam engine, working up to 100 lbs. per 
sq. in. in steam pressure. 

The proportions of parts are based upon the cylinder diameter, 
which is assumed to be the unit. 

To find the correct size of any corresponding parts for a model 
of a given size, it is only necessary to multiply the cylinder diame- 
ter by the decimal fractions given. 

This data should prove of interest to any reader wishing to build 
a model steam engine of this type. 


PROPORTION OF STEAM ENGINE PARTS 
(H. Muncaster) 
Piston dia., 12 ins. = 1.000: 
Stroke, 18 ins. = 1.500. 
Piston Rod dia., 2 ins. = .166. 
Cross Head dia., 2144 ins. x 3 ins. = .187 x .25. 


Crank Pin, 2% ins. x 3% ins. = .23 x .3. 
Connecting Rod dia. ends, 2%, ins. = .187. 
Connecting Rod dia. middle, 23, ins. = .238. 


Connecting Rod length, 4 ft. = 2.66 x stroke. 

Crank Shaft dia., 5 ins. = .416. 

Crank bearings dia., 4144 ins. = .375. 

Crank length, 6% ins. — .506. 

Crank W.1., 3% ins. wide, 9 ins. boss = .3 x .75. 

Valve Spindle dia., 14%, ins. = .104. 

Eccentric Rod dia., taper 1% ins. to 1% ins. = .104 to .125. 


Steam Ports, 5 ins..x % ins. = .416 x .073. 
Valve travel, 2% ins. = .208. 

Valve lap, % in. = .041. 

Valve cavity, 3% ins. = .3. 

Valve lead, % in. = .O1. 

Steam inlet dia., 234, ins. = .23. 

Exhaust outlet dia., 344 ins. = .3. 


Flywheel dia., 5 ft. = 5.0. 
Flywheel rim, 6 ins. square in section — .5. 


THE MODELMAKER 43 


THE BOYS’ STEAM LOCOMO- 
TIVE CLUB 


Forest Hills, L. I. 


Dear Sirs: 


Please renew my subscription 
to the ‘“‘“Modelmaker’” for the year 
1926 for enclosed $1.00. 


The club is very much inter- 
ested in the Modelmaker, espe- 
‘cially the articles on model lo- 
comotives, and we think that 
‘both you and your contributors 
‘deserve great praise. 


_ Three weeks ago some mem- 
‘bers of the club, including my- 
self, visited Morris Park Yards 
for our fifth trip there. They are 
the property of the L. I. R. R. 


The men down there were 
very kind to us, just as they 
always are, letting a man take 
us all through the yards and 
shops. We started out by going 
over to the coaling stage where 
the coal is brought up on an end- 
less belt, then we went to the 
sand drying house where the 
sand is put on pans around fur- 
naces and when it is dried it is 
put into the sand bunkers. From 
there we went to the ash pits 
and graveyard where all the old 
locos are stored before breaking 
up. Near by were two 4-6-0’s, 
one of which is the L. I.’s fast- 
est loco. making the run from 
Patchogue to Jamaica in 40 min- 
utes, the distance being 50 miles. 
From there we crossed the 
yards to the turntable and went 
all through the roundhouse out- 
side of which a locomotive was 
being cleaned of dirt and grease 
by means of a long nozzle 
through which hot water was 
shot. We then went through 
the main shops from beginning 
to end. Starting at a locomo- 
tive which was stripped down 
to the frame, then working up 





& 





to one that was nearly read'y for 
the road. This shop is the main 
repair shop of the Long Island 
Railroad. In there they make 
all sizes of bolts, repair tenders, 
boilers, and all general repair 
work. We saw a tender cut open 
and got a fine idea of how it is 
braced in the water tank to re- 
sist the water pressure. We 
also saw a locomotive with the 
smoke-box door off and men 
working in the smoke-box. From 
there we went to the flue shop 
where they were knocking scale 
from the flues. We also saw 
them tapering the ends of the 
pipes while red hot and in other 
words getting the raw material 
ready for the locomotive and 
making the old ones fit once 
more for service. This com- 
pleted our finest trip and we 
were much the wiser when we 
reached home than when we left. 


Thanking you in advance, I 
remain, 


Yours truly, 
BILL NEISEL, 


56 Tennis Place, 
Forest<Hills; Li I. N.Y. 





The Gerold Co. report they 
have had a very busy three 
months, during which time they 
have filled many orders for the 
Wade Lathe, and have also sup- 
plied many complete sets of 
fittings and odd parts. Our 
readers are beginning to appre- 
ciate the fact that this compact 
little tool is the ideal lathe for 
model work. 





Mr. Frank Birch of Detroit is 
building a Pacific Locomotive 
and expects to have it completed 
shortly. He has patterns for lo- 
comotive drive wheels from ‘“O”’ 
to % in. gauge. 





44 THE MODELMAKER ae 
- 


Model Engineer, principal 
contents of Volume 42: Design 
for an Outboard Marine Petrol 
Motor. Model Railway and 
Locomotive Matters. Model Ma- 
rine Notes. Some Attachments 
for a Lathe. Modern Machine 
and Hand Tools. A Model Beam 


Engine. New 4—8—0 Type Tank 
Locomotive. 13 Ft. Windmills. 
Model Engine Building. Punch- 
ing and Cutting Tools. A Model 


Power Boat Steam Plant. 
10-Rater Miodel Yacht. 2%” 
Gauge Steam Railway. Con- 


struction of Rolling Stock for 
*O” Gauge Railway. Overtype 
Steam Engine. A French Model 
Locomotive. A New Design for 
an Electrically - driven Clock. 
Model Power Boat Rob Roy. 
Model of Parson’s Steam Tur- 
bine. A Small Milling Machine 
Attachment. Three-cylinder Sim- 
ple 4—6—0. Canadian Railway 
Bridges. Models at South Ken- 
sington Museum. Description of 
Stewart Turner’s Factory. M. E. 
Lathe Competition. A Six-foot 
Windmill. A Five-foot Model 
Yacht. A 4—6—0 Locomotive 
for India. Three-cylinder Simple 
Steam Engine for Model Power 
Boat. Clockwork-driven Loco- 
motive. Model of a Ford Truck. 
Model Sail and Power Boat Ex- 
hibition. Precision Work. De- 
scription of the Eskdale Rail- 
way. Universal Cutter Frame. 
Petrol Hydroplane. A Built Up 
Four-jaw Chuck. Further De- 
tails of a 13 Ft. Windmill. A 
Compound Slide Rest. An Elec- 
trically-driven Model of the 
S. S. Australian. Drummond 
Brothers Works. Design for a 
Built Up Model Horizontal 
Steam Engine. Model L. & S. 
W. R. Hlectric Coach. ‘The Con- 
struction of a Small Fishpond 
and Fountain. A Tele-rainguage 


at Work. Model Steam Engines 
and Boilers. Electrical News 
and Notes. Practical Letters 
News of the Trade. Society 
and Club Doings. Title and In- 
dex. 524 pages, price $3.00 ig 
numbers. 





CLUB NOTES 


The New York Society of Mod- 
el Engineers was organized on 
the evening of March 9th at 
15 Moore Street, New York. 
Mr. A. A. Singer was elected. 
Secretary. It was arranged to. 
hold regular meetings the second 
Tuesday of each month at 8 P. M. 
at the above address. The next. 
meeting will be held on bee 
13th. There were quite a num- 
ber of enthusiastic Modelmakers 
present. Mr. T. Bray showed 
some models he had made of 
stationery engines and Mr. F. D. 
Grimke exhibited two “O” Gauge 
Locomotives. The models were 
much admired for their excellent 
workmanship. Any reader wish- 
ing to become a member should. 
write to Mr. A. A. Singer, Secre- 
tary, 15 Moore Street, New York 
City. Therd are a great many 
Modelmakers residing within 
easy distance of New York and 
there is no reason why this club 
should not grow into a big or- 


ganization. 4 
: 





Akron, Ohio. We have just 
received a communication to the 
effect that a group of Model- 
makers in this city have formed 
a Model Engineers Club. They 
have already had three meetings, 
We hope that all our readers ing 
terested in this work living 
within a reasonable distance oa 
this city will either write or 
call upon Mr. R. W. Jacobs, the 
Secretary, 115 North 16th ne 
Kenmore, Ohio, for full particu- 
lars of membership. 





THE MODELMAKER 45 








| Model Railway News. Con- 
tents for March, 1926. Notes of 
the Month. What We Want. In 
Praise of Two-inch Gauge. A 
Super Detail Gauge “O” Model. 
Locomotives of the “OO” Gauge 
West Midland Railway. Sketches 
in Hlevation and Plan Showing 
the Extension to Mr. G. S. Rees’ 
Garden Railway. Model Three- 
ton Open L. N. E. R. Fish Truck. 
A Suggestion for a Pressed 
Metal Keyed Chair. A Busy 
Station. H. A. G.’s Layout for 
his “O”’ Gauge Model Electric 
Railway. Mr. S..M. Hunter’s 
Model 4—4—0 Midland Railway 
Locomotive. Our Mailbag. Ques- 
tions and Answers. With the 
Clubs. For Sale and Exchange. 





' Mr. Roy Ashley of the Ameri- 
can Model Locomotive Co., San 
Francisco, Calif., is building up 
quite a nice connection. There 
seems to be quite a number of 
model fans in this sunny state. 
Some of them are trying to get 
sufficient men together to form 
a good live Model Engineers 
Club. We shall be very pleased 
to help in any way we can by 
inserting notices in the Model- 
maker. 
Mr. James H. Koch, 103 Sum- 
mit Ave., Linwood, Pa., writes 
us that there are quite a num- 
ber of young Modelmakers in 
his vicinity and they often get 
‘together to help one another. 
All of our readers who are living 
within a reasonable distance of 
‘Mr. Koch should get in touch 
‘with this gentleman if they have 
not already met him. He is a 
fetchmaker by profession, but 
a Modelmaker by choice. Hav- 
ing a well equipped workshop 
m his home he is in a position 
‘help any Modelmaker who 












lacks the facilities for doing dif- 
ficult machine work. Here is 
a good opportunity for the form- 
ation of a Modelmakers Society. 





At the annual meeting and 
dinner of the Montclair Model 
Engineers Club, Mr. E. T. Judd 
was elected president and Mr. 
J. B. Rettallack of 65 Dunnell 
Road, Maplewood, N. J., was 
elected secretary and treasurer. 
Those present had a very enjoy- 
able evening and are. planning 
considerable activities for the 
coming season. 





The Gerold Company advise 
us that very shortly they will 
have ready for the market an- 
other addition to the celebrated 
WADE line of tools. The latest 
addition is a small power driven 
bench drill. Combined with the 
WADE lathe and a small bench 
grinder this offers the model- 
maker an almost complete home 
shop for handling all sorts of 
jobs. 





Mr. A. A. Singer had another 
enthusiastic meeting of Model- — 
makers at 15 Moore Street, New 
York, on the evening of March 
9. They are making good prog- 
ress towards the formation of a 
real live organization in the in- 
terests of Modelmaking. We 
wish them every success. 





The Model Engineer, princi- 
pal contents for January 7, 14, 
21, 28: Model Engineers and 
Their Work. Mr. W. G. Cor- 
ner’s Four-cylinder Triple Ex- 
pansion Marine Engine. The 
Bed of Small Lathes and Their 
Fittings. Model Bell-crank En- 
gine. L. B. S. C.’s Column of 
Live Steam. Peculiarities of 
Pumps. 





46 THE MODELMAKER 


WHAT'S IN YOUR GARRET? 





SALE—EXCHANGE—WANTED 


EVERYTHING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters of 


figures count as words, 
accompany copy. 


compound words as separate words. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 
Castings and Drawings, for 
Atlantic, or Pacific, Locomo- 


tives; Passenger coach trucks; 
Freight car trucks and Boiler 
Fittings; all 4% in. scale. Atlan- 
tic Steam Locomotive, % in. 
scale, $275.00. Photo 10 cents. 
Preliminary list 2 cent stamp. 
One-horse electric motor, direct 
current, new, $25.00. Frank 
Birch, Highland Park, Mich. 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
Miodelmakers, send for circular. 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Gears and Model Supplies of 
every description, catalogue 5 
cents. Experimental Supply 
House, Box 10, Station Y, New 
York City. 


Morgan twenty-foot glider 
parts. Precision machine work 
for models a specialty. F. W. 
Icken, Morsemere, N. J. 


Bench Drill—Build your own. 
Complete working drawings, 
24 x 36 in., postpaid $1.00. Free 
list of Modelmakers Supplies. 


P. W. Cornelius, 2457 &. 
Washington St., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 


Locomotives. I can supply di- 
mensions for American Locomo- 
tives. Crater, 458 Colonial Road, 
Roselle Park, N. J. 


High Class Imported Lathe, 
with milling, gear-cutting and 
grinding attachments; overhead 
motion, by Drummond, England. 
Numerous chucks and accessor- 
ies. Complete machine shop in 
itself. Cost over $700 last year, 
scarcely used. Price $250.00 for 
quick sale. Seen working by 
appointment. Hamilton Church, 
The Old Parsonage, Sharon, 
Mass. } 


4 
Model Railroad Cars to scale 
to order. John Woollven, a 


port Richey, Florida. 
WANT TO SWAP i 
New (shot only 20 times) L. C. 
Smith double barrel, 20 ga. shot 
gun, and practically new Ship- 
man-Ward rebuilt depen | 
typewriter standard size —fo 
Bench Lathe. Either Gerold #2 
or Watsons’ Baby Grand | 


gether with all accessories. Mus 
be in #1 condition. Address, 


BK. B. Hanby, Coal Valley, Ala. | 
i 


WORK WANTED 


I make patterns, small cast. 
ings and working models. Mode 
making is my trade. James Koch 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 






Models 


' Engrs. 
_ Modelmaker. 


THE MODELMAKER 


‘WANTED 


A Full Size Drawing, with all 
dimensions of Baker Valve Gear 
for 1%” scale, coal-fired, working 
model B. & O. Mountain 4—8—2 
Type Locomotive. Bore 11/16”, 
Stroke 1%”. Length of main 
rod 5 5/16”.- Send estimates 
for drawing and setting gear. 


Address H. O. Havemeyer, Jr., 


25 Broadway, New York City. 


Models, Railways and Locomo- 
tives, back nos. and Vols. in 
good condition. Box 10, Model- 


maker. 


Everyday Mechanics, Nos. 1 2 
and 6 of Vol. 1, Nos. 1 2 and 3 
of Vol. 2. Box 2, Miodelmaker. 


American Institute of Elec. 
Volumes 1 to 8. Box 4, 


Electric Motor Stampings. 
Small sizes suitable for electric 
motors for model locomotives. 
Modelmaker, Box 10, 120 Liberty 
Street, New York. 


THE NAMES AND AD- 
DRESSES of the Secretaries of 
U. S. and Canadian Model En- 
gineer Clubs and Model Yacht 
Clubs, address Modelmaker, 120 


Liberty Street, New York. 


Parts Lathes 
Domestic — Imported 


A. Alexander Singer 
15 Moore Street 
New York City 
Enquiries Invited 


‘Please state in detail what you are 
interested in. 


st 1S or 


47 


EXCHANGE 


Railway Centenary; 
of Models & ‘Tractive Power 
Chart’s both in Cylinder & 
Wheel Diameters, etc. For back 
Nos. of Model Railway News, 
with November and December 
included, 1925, Charles LeRoy, 
Dovetail, Montana. 


Theory 


FOR SALE 


Rough Sketching; The Han- 
dy Sketching Book, consisting 
of sectional ruled paper, plain 
eight squares to the inch, with 
some useful tables, size 5 x 8, 
bound in limp card to fit the 
pocket, price $.35, Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


A BC of The Steam Engine, 
describing a high speed single 
cylinder, double acting, hori- 
zontal steam engine and auto- 
matic governor, with large 
drawings, price 35c. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Railway Centenary — 1825- 
1925, being an exceedingly in- 
terested historical account of. 
the British Locomotive, cars, 
and signalling apparatus during 
a hundred years of develop- 
ment, with many illustrations 
and some larger colored plates, 
124 pages, 11 x 8%” paper bind- 
ing, $1.60 postpaid. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Practical Manuals, fully illustrated, 
stiff covers, 75 cents each: 


Violin Mal:ing and Repairing. 
Practical Engraving on Metal. 
Model Sailing Boats, build and rig. 
Beginners Guide to Carpentry. 
Beginners Guide to the Microscope. 
Practical Bookbinding, 

Induction Coil Construction. 
Dynamo and Motor Construction. 
Workshop Wrinkles and Receipta. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120 LIBERTY ST. NEW YORK 





48 THE MODELMAKER 


MODEL SLIDE VALVE MARINE ENGINE 


14” bore, $12.75, or 54” bore, $15.75. Be sure to 
power your boat with a Bathe steam engine 
and boiler model. We are builders of working 
model engines and boilers of many types. We can 
supply you with a power unit that will meet the 
requirements of your particular model boat. Boiler 
fittings and Model Stearn line fittings. Special 
work. Illustrated catalogue, 20 cents. 


BATHE MANUFACTURING CO. 
Dept S, 5214 Woodland Ave. Philadelphia, Pa. 


TRIPLE X comsrnation 0, GAUGE 


Vulcan Freight Trucks. (Finished.) 
$3.50 per pair, castings $1.75. 











Lathe Milling and Drilling Machine Six-wheeled Passenger Trucks. $7.00 
per pair, castings $3.00. 
IDEAL " SCALE 
FOR Vulcan Freight Truck castings, $3.00 
per pair. 
MODEL Six-wheeled Passenger Truck cast- 
Ww RK ings, $7.00 per pair. 
O Small cylinder drain cocks, $1.75 per 
Sodas pair. 
Small’ Hexagon Bolts, American 
SEND FOR pitches, 40 cts. per dozen. 
CATALOGS Quick Service. List 5 -cts. 
FREE FRANK BIRCH 





TRIPLEX MACHINE CO. Gen. Del. Highland Park, Mich. 


86 Church Street New York City 


MODEL MACHINERY 


Sole U. S. Agent for the noted Eng- 
lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
makers of Model Steam, Gasoline, 
Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
Trimmings; Blectrical Machinery. 
Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 
gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 
and parts, etc. “CABLE SERVICE.” 





Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” length. 


Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 
Winding, Thread Cutting 
No. 1 Plain Machine ase above ........$23 
No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58. 


Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 


: 38 Ashland Street 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. S. A. 


SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
CATALOG 


Shows full details and accessories 


Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
Advices and Suggestions Cordially Given 


THE GEROLD CO. (Dept. M8) _ 
120 Liberty 8St., N. Y. 2 
THE MODELMAKER Pe 

BOUND VOL. I. 1924. $1.60 : 

or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 5 


BOUND VOL. II. 1925. $2.10 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy.. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 8, 4, 5 of Vol.-I. Price 10c each. 


We still have a few copies of Nos, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. 2 
Price 10c each. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 









FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WORKING MODELS: 


Vol. Ill, No. 4 April, 1926 10 Cents 














MR. W. G. LANDON’S 
4” Scale Locomotive (see p. 59) 





THE MODELMAKER 


Pre as ee 


Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, April, 1926 


Vol. Ill. 


No. 4. 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925 at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y. under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


The many letters we have re- - 


ceived in the past twelve months 
from readers wishing to be put 
in touch with other Modelmakers 
in their vicinity is a clear indi- 
cation of the growing interest 
being taken in this delightful 
pastime. 


Here is where the Club fea- 
ture looms up strong, the band- 
ing together of little groups of 
men with similar interests for 
their mutual benefit, with a 
meeting place where members 
can exhibit and discuss their 
models and where the begin- 
ner can get help and practical 
suggestions from the older and 
more experienced Modelmaker. 
A’ community of interests that 
creates enthusiasm and encour- 
agement. 

There are a number of well 
established organizations, viz., 
The Canadian Model Engineer- 
ing Club, of Toronto; The Chi- 
cago Society of Model Engi- 
neers; The Montclair Model En- 
gineers Club; The Boston So- 
ciety of Model Engineers; The 
Brooklyn Model Yacht Club; 
The Detroit Model Yacht Club; 
The Toledo Model Yacht Club; 
The Central Park Model Yacht 
Club, and The St. John’s Model 
Boat Club, N. B., Canada. 


Last Fall a Model Yacht Club 
was formed in Providence, R. L., 


and we understand there is a 
similar organization in Washing- 
ton; -D.2G3 

Several new clubs have recent- 
ly been organized. 

Mr. R. W. Jacobs and some 
friends have formed the Akron 
Association of Model Engineers. 


The members meeting at each | 


others homes. They are mainly 
interested in steam and electric 
locomotives. 

Mr. A. A. Singer and a num- 
ber of enthusiasts have organ- 
ized the New York Society of 
Model Engineers. 
meeting night 
Tuesday in each month. 

Both of these new clubs have 


a number of likely prospects — 
from whom they expect to get 


additional members. 
Mr. J. H. Koch of Linwood, 


Pa., has become acquainted with — 
a number of young men inter- 


ested in this work and they hope 
to be able shortly to organize 
into a real active club. 


Mr. Bill Neisel is sponsor for 


The Boys Steam Locomotive 
Club of Forest Hills, Long 
Island, N. Y. 

The Elverson Speed Boat Club 
of Jersey City, N. J., hopes to 
be quite active this summer. 


Mr. Volney F. Crouch of Rose-— 


burg, Ore., has found several en- 
thusiastic Modelmakers 


‘Aen 


Their regular | 
is the second — 


and 


a ee Tee 


THE MODELMAKER 51 


they hope to get enough new 
men interested to form a Club. 
There are also some small 
groups of men in different parts 
of the country who are meet- 
ing at each others homes. 
Besides the Clubs we have spe- 
cified we understand there are 
others whose Secretaries have 
not yet favored us with their 
names and some particulars of 
their organization. 
We shall be glad to hear from 
the Secretaries of any of these 
Clubs and to. help them in any 
way we can to increase their 
membership, and extend their in- 
fluence in their chosen field. 

While it is true that there are 
numbers of Modelmakers doing 


BOOK REVIEWS 

Interior Wall Decoration, by 
F. N. Vanderwalker. 451 pages, 
fully illus., 74% in. x 5 in., limp 
cloth, $4.00. 

This work shows Practical 
Working methods for plain and 
decorative finishes, new and 
standard treatments. New ar- 


‘tistic and the novelty finishes; 
color stippling; glaze colors, Tif- 
fany blending and mottling; 
spatter work; plaster staining; 


sand float; sponge - stipple; 
Spanish palm finish; Roman 
travertine; Old English; Hol- 


jJand; French Caen Stone; Ital- 
ian plaster and other aritstic 
rough textures; decorative wall 
panels; plain painting jobs 
and calcimining methods; hang- 
ing wall fabrics. Tools and ap- 
pliances. Spray gun decorative 
finishes, the use of the spray- 
gun. Index. 

_ A very excellent and practical 
guide book written in good Eng- 
lish and profusely illustrated. 


their work unaided, and doing it 
well, there are many men who 
would gain much by being a 
member of an active organiza- 
tion that helps its members to 
persevere and to aim for the 
highest perfection in their work. 

Every reader of the Model- 
maker can help in the develop- 
ment of American Modelmaking 
by joining one of the existing 
organizations or by getting in 
touch with one or more men in- 
terested in this pastime and havy- 
ing an occasional meeting in the 
home. An experienced Model- 
maker can often help and en- 
courage a novice and by doing 
this he is helping the good work 
along. 


We have just received an ad- 
vance circular giving a short de- 
scription of a new book entitled 
Ship Modelmaking by Captain 
BE. A. McCann. It will be pro- 
fusely illustrated with scale 
drawings. We believe this book 
will interest a good many of our 
readers and as soon as it is pub- 


lished we will give fuller par- 
ticulars. 





The Model Railway News con- 
tents for April: A Model “Gar- 
rett” Type Loco. Result of the 
Popular Locomotive Competi- 
tion. The St. Lawrence Model 
“O” Gauge Electric Railway. 
Scenic Effects. Model Railway 
Signalling. Construction of an 
“O” Gauge Model Railway. An 
Australian Gauge “1” Model 
Electric Railway. An Outdoor 
“O” Gauge Overhead Electric 
Line. Our Mail Bag. Queries 
and Replies. Sale and Exchange, 
Etc. 


52 THE MODELMAKER 





SHIP MODELS 


At a recent sale of Ship Mod-- 


els and Marine Antiques at An- 
derson’s Gallery, in New York, 
a very fine antique model of a 


Spanish Galleon of the early six- 
teenth century was sold for 
$3,750.00. It had been found in 
an ancient church near Burgos, 
in Spain, where it had been pre- 
sented as a votive offering by 
some early Mariner before start- 
ing on some perilous voyage. 
Models of this period are very 
rare. It measured 54 inches 0.a. 
And was about 50 inches from 
truck to keel. 

A Model of a British Frigate 
made of bone, by some of the 
imprisoned seamen at  Dart- 
moore, between the years 1790 
and 1820, brought $1,250.00. 

A Model of the U. S. S. Fri- 
gate Constitution brought $630. 

A Model of the American 
Whaling Bark Lagoda of New 
Bedford another bone model, 
fetched $425.00. 


A Model of a Spanish Frigate 


of the eighteenth century was, 


knocked down for $390.00. 


We have no doubt that the 
above Models are fine examples 
of their periods, and the high 
prices paid for them is evidence 
of the growing popularity and 
demand for real ship models for 
ornamental purposes. 


Mr. Frank Barchard, Jr., of 
The Onlooker, Foley, Alabama, 
is at work on an “OQ” Gauge 
Pacific Locomotive. He would 
be very glad to hear from any 
of our readers who have built 
one of this type of Locomotive 
as he is rather new at this bus- 
iness. Any hints or practical 
suggestions would be very much 
appreciated. 









The Model Engineer, principal 
contents for January 14, 21 and 
28 omitted from page 45 of last 


issue. 
Spindle For 3-in: Lathe. 
Krauss ‘Pacific’ For the 15-in. 
Gauge Munich “Lilliput” 
way. Model Marine Notes. An 
Electric Horn. A Small Heating 
System For the Workshop. Small 
Sheet Metal Pressings. 
ing Surfaces of Lathe Slides. A 
Built Up Beam and Flywheel. 


A Milling and Drilling — 
The > 


Rail- 


Bear- : 


Locomotive News and Notes. A ) 


Foolproof Lock For Motor Cars. 


Experiments on the Design of — 


Steam Whistles. 
Using Hand Reamers. 


The Art of | 
.Con: © 


struction of a Tractor Seaplane — 


Model. 
Small Boilers. 
For Sheet Metal. February 4. 


Method of Making Small Wood- 
en Pulleys. 
l-in. Scale Locomotive Chassis 


With Cylinders and Valve Chests — 
1-in. Scale a : 


in Half Section. 
6—4 Tank Locomotive. 
T. Griswold’s 


Mr. H. 
Workshop. aaa 


Working Model of. 


Pressure Gauges For 
A Cutting Gauge 





Model Of His Old Sailing Ship. 4 


Recent Inventions. Light Engi- — 
neering, _“L. B. S. ©.” On Loco-~ 
motive Boiler Construction. — 
Queries and Replies. Practical 

Letters. Society and Club 
Doings. : : 





Mir eae Dobler 470 Senator — 
is mak- 
ing a very fine job of his Cov- 
entry 2%” gauge P. R. R; Ke: 
He 
would like to silver solder the 
boiler and would be very glad 
to hear from any of our readers 
who are familiar with this kind i 


Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 


4s 1%” scale Locomotive. 


of soldering. 








THE MODELMAKER 53 





A UNIQUE LOCOMOTIVE MODEL 
4-4) 
By JOHN A. HOWLAND 


It is doubtful if the construction of a model was ever undertaken 
_ with less pre-determination as to what it would be when finished, 
or less intention to finish anything. 
The elements entering into its inception and growth being a 
“sharp knife, a nice piece of wood and some spare time. First 
result a crosshead and there would, probably, have been no further 
growth except for a question from my wife as to “Why don’t you 
whittle out an entire engine’? That started the performance and 
piece followed piece until the end. So, like “Topsy,” the model 
“just growed.” 


About that time Mr. Jas. Buchanan, S. of M. P. of the N. Y. C. 
'R. R. brought out the famous high wheeled, high speed eight wheel- 
er “No. 999.” 


-I saw this magnificent machine when she passed through Jackson, 
-Mich., en route to the World’s Fair, at Chicago, and a little later at 
that Exposition where she posed as the star attraction of the Trans- 
portation Exhibit of locomotives. 

Up to that time I had never seen a locomotive that could com- 
pare with the “999” in beautiful proportion or elaborate finish, and 
these influences determined the type and dimensions of my model. 


The pilot coupling bar was nickle plated as were also the bell, 
driver brake triple valve body, in fact everything usually seen in 
brass was nickeled as well as some of the iron and steel parts— 
even her frames. The planished iron jacket extended to front end 
of smoke arch and the short, straight, stack was jacketed with the 
same material, a piano finish on interior of cab, and the paint work, 
striping, numbering, lettering, etc., was the work of an artist. The 
huge drivers 871% inches in diameter extended through the run- 
ning boards and were covered with low wheel housings. The height 
of the engine deck and correspondingly high tender frame necessi- 
tated the use of extra large tank wheels and these were spoke 
f centre wheels. 
& In every line she looked the sleek, clean-limbed, capable racer 
and her looks were not deceiving. I believe her record of 112.5 


54 THE MODELMAKER 





miles per hour still stands—for a locomotive. She was the clipper 
ship of the locomotive world and to those who may differ, from hav- 
ing seen the engine in the N. Y. C.’s “Service-Progress Special,” I 
would say, you have only seen the clipper after being stump-masted, 
and relegated to the coal-carrying trade. 

I only wish the model herewith described was a faithful replica, 
in all details of that wonderful engine. The principal dimensions 
and general appearance are those of its prototype though the 
shape of some of the superficial features was changed to correspond 
to Michigan Central practice, as it was at that time, and these 
changes I now regret as they make the model a “Man Without a 
Country”’—representing, faithfully, neither the “999” or any Michi- 
gan Central engine. 

Note of the principal changes mentioned shows the pilot slats 
arranged horizontally instead of vertically, a “bootleg” type stack 
instead of a straight jacketed one, dome and sand box casings differ- 
ent shape. Account of overhead clearance the radius of curvature 
of the “999’s” cab roof was shorter than usual to bring the edge 
(or eaves) lower. This lowered the whole side of cab and with 
it the running boards which had openings for tops of drivers with 
wheel housings. With Michigan Central curve of roof the cab and 
running boards of the model are a little higher, allowing latter to 
clear tops of wheels. The body of tender is higher and the wheels 
are. solid instead of spoke centred. The lettering is M. C. R. R. 
instead of N. Y. C. & H., and the number 527 is that of the first 
4—6—0, or ten wheeled, passenger engine produced by the Michi- 
gan Central. ‘ 


GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS—ENGINE 

Length—Overall, 551%”. 
Height—From rail to top of stack, 144%”. 
Wheel Base—Engine truck, 55%”. 

+ ** —Driving, 8”. 
—Total of engine, 2136”. 
“ *“ —Tender truck, 4%”. 
x “ —Total of tender, 154%”. 
—Total engine and tender, 45144”. 
Wheel Diameter—Engine truck, 2 13/16”. 

os s —Drivers, 714”. 

oe aS —Tender, 2%”. 


Valve Gear—Stephenson link motion complete, of brass, and mov- 


ing the engine, or reverse lever, produces the corresponding mo- 


tion in the valve stems. 


Bie 


THE MOCELMAKER 55 


GENERAL DESCRIPTION 
Excepting the valve gear, boiler accessories in cab, truck frames 
and some small things such as hand rails, oil pipes to steam chests, 
etc., the material used was wood. Work in wood requiring a lathe 
was done on a machine of the “Lathe and Scroll Saw” variety. 
Aside from the wheels, dome, sand-box, stack, air pump and reser- 


_voirs, the work in wood was by the jack-knife route—occasionally 


a little plane, as for pilot frame, running boards, etc. 


Pilot, cherry wood, frame built up and mortised together with 
brass angle plates bolted to bottom corners. Coupling bar (or 
“push bar’) on pilot turned and carved of cherry and coupling bar 


casting carved of same wood. Pilot beam, headlight and shelf, 


stack, bell, bell standard, sand-box, dome and running boards of 
cherry, as are the main and auxiliary reservoirs, boiler checks and 
air pump. Boiler checks and air pump are jacketed with plan- 
ished iron held by white metal bands. 


Boiler is white pine hollowed out, but leaving a half-inch shell to 


take fastenings, and jacketed from boiler head clear to front end 
of smoke arch; jacket bands held by clamps and clamp bolts under- 


neath. Stack is hollow, bolted to smoke arch, and will “smoke” if 
smoke is made in fire-box, or front end. Bell standard, sand-box and 
dome have dowels that fit snugly into holes in the boiler, and the 
boiler jacket iron fits neatly around bottoms of these. The bell is 
of cherry, gilded, hollowed, and its “tongue” balances it about 
right. 

All engine truck, driving and tender springs, spring hangers and 
equalizers are wood, and the springs show the spring bands, leaves, 
ete. Engine truck and tender truck centre castings are turned of 


' cherry, and their journal boxes and pedestals are carved of it. 





Dry graphite provides nicely for the lubrication of wood bearings. 


The cylinders, steam chests and saddle were jack-knifed from 
a solid pine block; top of chests corrugated to prevent slippery 
foothold, and same applies to sand-box steps. Motion plate and 
guide yokes of that same famous cherry, and smoke-box door ring 


turned up of whitewood to exact shape and has turned brass number 


plate and curved handrail. 


Headlight carved out of solid block, hollowed out—chimney and 
all, and has block tin reflector. 
_ The engine truck wheels and axles were turned up integral, and 
spokes—12 to each wheel—worked out with knife, small carving 








THE gd ubadashitestae 57 


gouge and little files, and all smoothed, of course. Driving wheels, 
| ‘rock elm, turned and faced from slices sawed off the ends of wagon 
“hub material, 20 spokes in each wheel. The rims, flanges, etc., 
turned to proper shape, and the crank pin bosses, counterbalances 
and spokes worked out in same manner as engine truck wheels. 

_ There are no corners or roughness, every spoke being smoothly 
elliptical, and any wheel would serve as a pattern for a casting. 
Hickory driving axles turned, fitted, driven, keyed and glued in 
- wheels (the only place, aside from window sashes, where glue was 
used); other fastenings are bolts and nuts. Hickory crank pins 
and cherry driving boxes; fluted, or channeled, main and side rods 
are of hard maple, and cab is whitewood. 

- Cab windows are glass (not mica), and sashes built up of maple 
_veneer. Those in front of cab—the hinged ones—are paneled below 
the glass. 

A feature that adds greatly to the attractiveness of the model 
is the bright finished parts in brass. All rod and guide cups are 
of. this, and in size and shape are to scale. Valve stem exten- 
| _ sions on front of steam chests, flag holders, or sockets, on ends of 

pilot beam, hand rails and standards—the rails tipped with orna- 

mental balls made separately and screwed into ends of rails—a 
brass chime whistle on side of dome, and boiler accessories in cab, 
such as throttle-box—or steam turret—extending through front of 
cab into base of dome casing and having on its inner end the 
_ throttle stuffing-box and bracket, with three gauges—steam, air 
and coach heater, and the throttle lever and curved slide rest. 
_ The reverse lever is complete with its latch, latch spring, trigger 


3 
and links, and two bar quadrant notched for close cut off; a per- 
fect model of a Westinghouse D-5 Engine brake valve, and an 
equally perfect Nathan sight feed lubricator. These two latter, if 
"plated, would be just right for watch charms; they, as well as 
ee whistle, gauges and other brass parts requiring a lathe, were 
roduced by a model maker, a good friend who took much interest 
in my little engine. 
The fire door is built up of metal with hinges, spring latch and 
“combustion openings, and has door chain from latch to cab roof, 
chain provided with coil spring—the very common handhold for 
protection of fireman’s left hand in the almost continuous perform- 
ance of opening and closing the fire door for every scoopful of coal 
| —in this case the spring is smaller than a straw. The cab roof 
ventilating trap has adjusting rod and thumb nut, 









58 THE MODELMAKER 





DESCRIPTION OF TENDER | 

The tender is a pine block, hollowed to reduce weight, and 
metal sheathed all over—coal pit and all—and with flange around 
top with 144-round finish (of brass wire) on upper edge. Sheathing 
fastened to body with pins (with heads an inch to the foot!), 
thereby giving the rows of proper sized rivets. 

Manhole, with hinged cover, on top at rear end; two tank boxes 
with hinged covers—one on each side—for the spare tools, jack- 
screws, extra air hose, etc. Just in front of the left tank box is 
the small one for ice and the water jug, and the jug itself—an 
inch to the foot and about the size of a thimble—is in the box. 
The coal gate is built up of wood, as they were then, two uprights 
with horizontal slats. Tender frame is wood with the heavy end 
sills—or buffer beams at front and back, and on the latter the draw 
bar casting with curved buffer. This “casting” and buffer were 
built up of %” iron plates, some bored for dowels on others, and 
all riveted together. The tender wheels are cast iron with steel 
axles. Wooden ones were turned up, same as for engine truck, 
but the job of carving the spoke centres in eight wheels looked 
too big, so a pattern was made of a solid wheel, castings procured 
and lathe finished. 


The tender trucks are fitted with the regulation brake rigging— 
wooden brake beams, brake heads and shoes. The auxiliary reser- 
voir and brake cylinder are wood, the latter with brass piston rod 
connecting to usual horizontal equalizing, and truck levers, and 
brake rods, and all shoes will come up to the wheels by a pull on the 
hand brake rod. The auxiliary reservoir has a brass triple valve 
body as complete and true to scale as the lubricator and brake 
valve already mentioned as being in cab. Tender steps, iron, with 
wood “treads.” Brass hand irons on front of tank and back of cab; 
metal apron between engine and tender, and iron ladder up back of 
tender. 


The finish is black—several coats of black paint and varnish. 
The lettering and numbering, which shows up poorly in the photos, 
though really one of the crowning features, was done with artist’s 
oil colors and little camels’ hair brush. The form, size and colors 
were standard on the Michigan Central at that time; colors are 
a rich yellow with red shading. 


Inspection is usually followed by the query, “That’s a real work- 
ing model, isn’t it?’ and “How long did it take to make it?” When 


=. 


THE MODELMAKER 59 


‘told, “Spare time off and on for 10 years, though not by any means 
continuous spare time,” the rejoinder is, ““‘How could you ever have 


had the patience?” etc. 


When I look back at the time, labor and patience expended— 
enough to have completed several working models—I wonder if 
there was no fool-killer at that time, or if he missed me accident- 
ally. But, even so, I take some pride and satisfaction in the re- 
sult, and do not regret the necessary effort. 


A PECULIAR FRENCH MINI- 
ATURE LOCOMOTIVE 


Mr. W. G. Landon sends us 
the following article and a 
sketch which he thinks will in- 
terest our readers. “T have 
often thought that French Me- 
chanical Engineers must have 
for their motto “Try to make 
_two parts where only one suf- 
‘ficed before.’ I could give sev- 
eral illustrations of the Wal- 
schaert gear as applied to loco- 
motives where numerous use- 


less parts have been added, but 
that is another story. 





The subject of this article was 
seen at a fair in France about 
15 years ago. The locomotive 

was a 2—4—0 type about 20” 
gauge and hauled passengers on 
a circular track about 40 ft. in 
diameter. The peculiarity of 
this design was that each axle 
was set radially to the centre 
of this circular track. This in- 

_ volved side rods of different 


length as well as knuckle joints. 
Theoretically this was a poor 
arrangement and practically the 
engine would have run all right 
with parallel driving wheel ax- 
les; or as the load was light, a 
single driver would have met 
the requirements. Probably 
the outside wheels were larger 
than the inside to compensate 
for the difference in length of 
rail. The French are nothing 
if not exact. However I did not 
have an opportunity to measure 
them with 24” wheels the differ- 
ence would have been about 1”. 





4” SCALE LOCOMOTIVE 
By W. G. Landon 

We have just received from 
Mr. Landon a photograph of his. 
Locomotive at the present time, 
showing how much work he has 
accomplished. (See illustration 
on first page of this issue.) On 
page 25 of the February issue of 
The Modelmaker is a_ pretty 
good description of the construc- 
tion -of this model. It certainly 
looks like a very nice piece of 
work and we have no doubt that 
when Mr. Landon has it finished 
he will be well satisfied with its 
performances. He certainly de- 
serves great credit with the way 
he has persevered after so maly 
interruptions. We wish him 
every success in his work. 


ae & + t Dy au Mer a . Bia ’ 
- i oD 4 - 





60 THE MODELMAKER 





MODEL PACIFIC 
LOCOMOTIVE 

By Cecil G. Hamilton 
Please find enclosed snapshot 
of my model Pennsylvania Loco- 
motive (as far as it has got). I 
am using Mr. Coventry’s cast- 
ings and they are really very 





scale 


34" 
Pacific Type K4S used by the 
Pennsy for main line passenger 


good. The model is 


service. I am working on this 
class of Locomotive almost every 
day and have all the details off 
pat, which helps quite a lot. 

It will be noted that the @ylin- 
ders are built up of steel, this in 


Mr. William Wilson, 140 23rd 
Avenue, San Francisco, Galif., 
would very much like to get in 
touch with any Modelmakers in 
California with a view to the 
formation of a Model Engineers 
Club. At present time he writes 
he is very much interested in 
the construction of Model Steam 
Boats. We know there are a 


my opinion being better than the 


casting. Just at present I am 
carrying out a series of experi- 
ments with main and side rods 
in maleable cast steel; this, I 
think, being an easier way than 
hacking them out of a steel bar, 
and then it is not necessary to 


have the flutes milled out. The 
results of these experiments will 
in due course be available for 
readers of The Modelmaker. f 

I never thought that mild steel 
could be so hard until I started 
work on the main frames, but 
now that they are finished I 
don’t mind. 


Ps a 
good many readers of the Model- 
maker in California who are in-— 
terested in Modelmaking and es- 
pecially Model Boats and we 
hope that a goodly number of 
these gentlemen will immedi- 
ately get into correspondence 
with Mr. Wilson or otherwise 
make his personal acquaintance 
with a view to the formation of 4 
real live Model. Bnelipets clabg 


— 





Mr. R.°W: Jacobs, 115 North 


16th Street, Kenmore, Ohio, 
writes that they have adopted 
the following name for their 
Society “The Akron Association 


of Model Engineers.” At pres- 
ent they have no regular meet- 
ing place, but they go to each 
others homes where they have 
workshops generally on Sunday 
afternoons. He will be very 
glad indeed to hear from any of 
our readers in his locality who 
are interested in Model Work. 
At present there are eight mem- 
bers with a good number of 
prospects. The members are 
all interested in Railway Mod- 
els, both steam and electric. Two 


locomotives have been complet-. 


ed, one an American 4—4—0 of 
4” gauge. It is complete with 
all fittings and gauges on the 
boiler. The other is an Atlan- 
tic 4—4—2 Type of 1%4” gauge. 
This locomotive has been under 
steam a good many times. They 
have two Locomotives under 
construction one an_ Electric 
Locomotive of 2” gauge scaled 
down from an inter-urban elec- 
tric freight locomotive the plans 
of which were in the Electric 
Railway Journal. The other is 
a Steam Locomotive Mogul 
Type 2—6—0 of 1144” gauge ex- 
ternally fired. Mr. Jacobs would 
like to get some good photo- 
graphs taken of these locomo- 
tives and would like to get some 
suggestions on the best method 
of taking good photographs suit- 
able for reproduction. Here is 
an opportunity for some kind 


photographic friend living with- 


in a reasonable distance of Mr. 
Jacobs to offer. his services and 
apparatus and show these boys 


how to make some real good. 


pictures of the work they have 
accomplished. 


“7 






THE MODELMAKER oe 62 


Ohio readers should all try 
and join up with this associa- 
tion and help to make it a real 
live organization even if some 
of them, by force of circum- 
stances, can only be for the 
time being corresponding mem- 


bers. Get this club going full 
speed and it would be very easy 
to form branches in different 
parts of the state that could be 
affiliated with the parent organ- 
ization in Akron. We hope in 
time that there will be a Na- 
tional Organiaztion whose mem- 
bers are representatives from 
the different clubs in the vari- 
ous states. 


Mr AW. Re yon; uP. OF <Box 
256, Atlanta, Ga., had a meeting 
of some men at his house the 
other night who were very much 


interested in model work. We 
would suggest that all of our 
readers who are located within 
a reasonable distance of Atlanta 
should get in touch with this 
gentleman with a view to form- 
ing a little gathering of Model- 
makers for an occasional get- 
together-meeting. 


Last year the American Ma- 
rine Association offered three 
prizes to the Marine Boy Scouts 
at the Kanahwanke Camps for 
the three best Model Ships. Over 
one hundred Model Ships were 
submitted in the competition. 
Plans are being made to extend 
this work this summer in other 
camps. During the past winter 
a number of Chicago Boy Scouts 
have built Model Racing Yachts 
and they expect to hold some 
competitive races this summer 
with the boats. 


62 THE MODELMAKER 


STATEMENT OF THE OWNER- 
SHIP, MANAGEMENT, CIRCU- 
LATION, ETC., REQUIRED BY 
THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF 
AUGUST 24, 1912, OF THE 
MODELMAKER, published monthly 
at New York, N. Y.,-for April 1, 


1926. 

STATE OF New YorkK i : 
County or Nrw Yorx § °° 

Before me, a Notary Public, in and 
for the State and County aforesaid, 
personally appeared W. Edmunds 
Spon, who, having been duly sworn 
according to law, deposes and says that 


he is the Editor and Business Manager 
of the MopELMAKER and that the fol- 
lowing is, to the best of his knowledge 
and belief, a true statement of the 
ownership, management, etc., of the 
aforesaid publication for the date shown 
in the above caption, required by the 
Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in 
section 443, Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions printed on the reverse of this 
form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publishers, editor, managing editor, 
and business manager are: 

Publishers, Spon & Chamberlain, 120 
Liberty St., New York, N. Y. Editor, 
W. Edmunds Spon, 120 Liberty St., 
New York, Managing Editor, 
none; Business Manager, W. Edmunds 
eee 120 Liberty Street, New York, 


The owners are W. Edmunds Spon, 
120 Liberty St., New York; Wm. Cham- 
berlain, 120 Liberty St., New York. 


3. That the known _ bondholders, 
mortgagees, and other security holders 
owning or holding 1 per cent or more 
of total amount of bonds, mortgages, 
or other securities are: None. 


4. That the two paragraphs next 
above, giving the names of the owners, 
stockholders, and security holders, it 
any, contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders as they ap- 
pear upon the books of the company, 
but also, in cases where the stockholder 
or security holder appears upon the 
books of the company as trustee or in 
any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom 
such trustee is acting, is given; also 
that the said two paragraphs contain 
statements embracing afhant’s_ full 
knowledge and belief as to the circum- 
stances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who 
do not appear upon the books of the 
company as trustees, hold stock and se- 
curities in a capacity other than that 
of a bona fide owner; and this affiant 


LO = RAIS aA ee ee 
= 





has no reason to believe that any other 
person, association, or corporation, has 
any interest, direct or indirect, in the 
said stock, bonds, or other securities 
than as so stated by him. 
W. EDMUNDS SPON, 
Editor and Business Manager. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this third day of April, 1926. 
J ot. “HAREGEY, 
Notary Public, New York Co., New 
York. 


(My commission expires March 30, 
1927.) ; 
(Seal) \ 


Certificate filed:in New York Co. 
301,. Reg. No. 7183. 


No. 


Since the first of January we 
have had many complaints from 
subscribers not getting all their 
copies of the Modelmaker regu- 
larly. We take every care in 
getting our Stencils correct. We. 
wish our Subscribers would 
make a complaint at their local 
Post Office to see if we cannot 
find out what becomes of all 
the lost mail. Sometimes we 
find the reader is to blame in 
that he has changed his resi- 
dence and has not notified us 
to that effect. Readers please 
remember the United States 
Post Office Authorities will not 
forward any second class mail 
to any Subscriber even if he has 
notified’ them of his change of 
address. All such mail is de- 
stroyed ‘by the Post Office. This 
is a regulation we _ believe 


should be altered for the con- 


venience of the public. 


When writing for information — 
please enclose stamped and ad-— 
dressed envelope for reply. 


THE MODELMAKER 63 





THE NEW YORK SOCIETY 
OF M. E. 

The New. York Society of 
Model Engineers held their last 
meeting at 15 Moore Street, New 
York City, on the evening of 
April 13.. Several new members 
joined, and a large attendance 
Was on hand: They all had a 
very enjoyable evening. 

Mr. Berg brought his 4—4—0 
American Type 214” gauge Loco- 
‘motive, and Mr. Lozier showed 
a 1%” gauge Atlantic Type 
Locomotive, a freight car and a 
cattle car. Mr. Bosshardt 
brought a 4-cycle Gasoline En- 
gine, 1144” bore, which he had 
designed and constructed. Mr. 
Bray exhibited the completed 
pilot truck for a %” scale, Pa- 
cific Locomotive. 

The next meeting will be held 
on Tuesday, May 11, at 7:30 
P. M. Mr. Grimke will give a 
‘short talk on Model Locomotive 
Cylinders. Mr. Berg will speak 
on Locomotives, and Mr. Bray 
will also make a short address. 
All interested should communi- 
cate with Mr. A. A. Singer, Sec- 
retary, 15 Moore Street, New 
York City. 


FOR SALE 


Morgan twenty-foot glider 
parts. Precision machine work 
for models a specialty. F. W. 
Icken, Morsemere, N. J. 

Models, Railways and Locomo- 


tives, back nos. and Vols. in 
good condition. Box 10, Model- 
maker. 


Everyday Mechanics, Nos. 1 2 
and 6 of Vol. 1, Nos. 1 2 and 3 
of Vol. 2. Box 2, Modelmaker. 

American Institute of Elec. 
Engrs. Volumes 1 to 8. Box 4, 
Modelmaker. 

Electric Motor Stampings. 
Small sizes suitable for electric 
motors for model locomotives. 
Modelmaker, Box 10, 120 Liberty 
Street, New York. 


FOR SALE 


Constructional Blueprints — 
24” Model Racing Yacht, as il- 
lustrated in February, Model- 
maker. 1 sheet, $2.25. Perry’s 
Flagship, the brig Niagara, 3 
Sheets, $5.00. These blueprints 
give all details necessary to 
build above models. <A. R. Fer- 
ris, 284 East 151st Street, Cleve- 
land, O. - 


Drawings made to order for 
model locomotives (Amer. Prac- 
tice). Crater, 458 Colonial Rd., 
Roselle Park, N. J. 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
Modelmakers, send for circular. 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 





WANTED 


Wade Lathe No. 
without accessories. Must be in 
A-1 condition. State lowest 
price. W. L. Scott, 19 Ellsworth 
Avenue, San Mateo, Calif. 


1 with or 


A 2!4 in. gauge steam loco- 
motive, send particulars and 
prices to F. C. Heneken, 510 
Monmouth Street, Jersey City, 
Ni 


PRACTICAL LESSONS IN METAL 
TURNING AND SCREW CUTTING 
By Percival Marshall 


A practical handbook for Model- 
makers and Mechanics. Contents of 
chapters: 1. The Lathe and Its Parts. 
2: Tools and Toolholders. 38. Measur- 
ing Appliances. 4. Chucks and Man- 
drels. 5. How to Center Work for 
the Lathe. 6. Driving Work Between 
Centers. 7. Turning Work Between 
Centers. 8. Speeds, Feeds and Lubri- 
cants. 9. Chucks and Face-plate 
Work. 10. Drilling and Boring in 
the Lathe. 11. Screw Cutting. Tables 
of Change Wheels. Index. 218 pages, 
220° illus. / Cloth, $1.25. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120 Liberty Street New York 


64 THE MODELMAKER —— 


WORK WANTED 


I make patterns, small cast- 
ings and working models. Model- 
making is my trade. James Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 








JUST LAUNCHED 


The Ideal Model Steam Boat 
‘‘Henley’’ 

Designed and Built by Stuart Turner, 
Ltd., Engineers, England 
Manufacturers of Model Machinery, 
Steam and Gas Engines, Boilers, 
Pumps, Fittings, Castings, etc, 
Represented by 
ALFRED PAUL & SON 
8 Ashland Street, Melrose Highlands, 
Massachusetts, U. S. A 
Sole U. S. Agent * 

Catalogs 25¢ coin, post free 
Cable Service 








i op? WADE 
cee») Bench 
Lathes 








Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” length. 


Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 
Winding, Thread Cutting 


No. 1 Plain Machine as above ........ $23 
No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Catting $58 
SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
CATALOG 
Shows full details and accessories 


THE GEROLDCO. (Dept. M13) 
120 Liberty St., N. ¥. 





THE MODELMAKER 

BOUND VOL. I. : 

or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 
BOUND VOL. II. er 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 of Vol. I. Price 10c each. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 


Price 10c each. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 


May, 1925. 


YP eee aa ae on 
vy ’ 7 Pet ae 








WANTED > 


Modelmaker, Volume 1, Num- 
ber 6, November, 1924. Model- 
maker Volume 2, Number 65, 
Will send a copy of 
Mechanical Age in exchange, 


Spon, 120 Liberty Street, New 
York. eee 4 

i. 
Models Parts Lathes 


Domestic — Imported 


A. Alexander Singer _ 
15 Moore Street — 
New York City 3 ; 


Enquiries Invited 


; 


Please state in detail what you are 


interested in. 





TRIPLE X comaination | 


Lathe Milling and Drilling Machine > 


: 
IDEAL 


FOR 


MODEL 
WORK 













SEND FOR — 
CATALOGS 
FREE 


TRIPLEX MACHINE CO. | 
50 Church Street New York City 





P 


1924.. $1.60 


1925. $2.10 


os 


4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. 2. 






= ire : 


DELMAKER 


FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WORKING MODELS” 


Vol. Ill, No. 5 ; - MAY, 1926, PT AN f 









. 10 cents 





t 
> 





MODEL OF DONALD McKAY’S FAMOUS 
: | CLIPPER SHIP “LIGHTNING” 
MADE BY MR. G. B. DOUGLAS 








THE MODELMAKER 





Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 


120-122 LIBERTY ST., 


Issued Every Month 


NEW YORK,.N. Y. 
Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, May, 1926 


Vol. Ill, 


No. 5 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925 at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y. under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


Our High and Manual Train- 
ing Schools have well equipped 
shops for Woodworking, but the 
work done seems to be mostly 
in the making of uninteresting 
things, bits of furniture, and so 
forth. 

Mr. Roy F. B. Shaver, Inst. in 


Woodwork in Los Angeles, has 


introduced in his classes a nov- 
elty that should take with our 
boys. The construction of a well 
designed V-bottom ‘“R” class 
Model Sail Boat. 

The Los Angeles Evening Her- 
ald has adopted this classy 
model and are offering four sil- 
ver trophies for a competition 


Mr. Ernest S. Macgowan, 836 
Security Building, Minneapolis, 
Minn., is very much interested in 
Models and believes there are 
sufficient men of the same mind 
in his vicinity to form the n1- 
cleus of a Model Engineers Club. 
We hope that all of our readers 
living within easy reach of Min- 
neapolis will write this gentle- 
man, or get into personal touch 
with him. In our Foreword of 


April we gave a list of the Mod- - 


el Engineers Clubs in the U.S. 
We hope Minnesota will be the 
next on the list. 





Please don’t forget to mention 
the Modelmaker when you write 
to our Advertisers. 


amongst boats built to this de- 
sign. The Regatta will be held 
in June on the lake at Westlake 
Park, Los Angeles. 

We have before us a full size 
drawing and full particulars of 
the construction of this Boat. 

This information reaches us 
just as we are featuring a simi- 
lar Sail Boat designed and oe 
structed by one of our subscrib- 
ers. 

We are glad to see such a from 
mendous amount of interest be- 
ing taken in this delightful sport. 
A sport that the poor boy, old 
or young, as well as the rich boy, — 
can take part in. i 


Mr. James Everest, 2023—47th | 
Ave., Oakland, Calif, is very 
much interested in Model Work, 
and is now working on a Coven- 
try P. R. R. Passenger Locomo- 
tive %” scale. Mr. Coventry has 
sold a good many sets of this 
Locomotive and very shortly a 
good many of them will be under 
steam. ; 





Mr. Donald Umphrey, 328 
Quincy Ave., Cottage Grove, Ore- 
gon, is very much interested in 
Model Work and would like to 
get in touch with any other Mod- 4 
elmakers in his district with a 
view to an occasional get-to- 
gether meeting. ; 


2 





THE MODELMAKER 67 


A MODEL TEN 
WHEELER LOCOMOTIVE OF 1863 


H. J. COVENTRY, ASSOC, MEM. A. S. M. E. 


The subject for this model was built in 1863 by Thatcher Perkins 
for the Baltimore and Ohio R. R. and was one of a group that 
worked through passenger traffic over the seventeen mile grade 
‘between Piedmont and Altamont until 1890. These engines had 
cylinders 19” by 26” with 6414” drivers and weighed 90,700 pounds. 
68,300 being available for adhesion. The boiler was 18’8” long from 
backhead to front tube plate, and smallest ring 49” dia. 1388 tubes 
2%” dia. provided 570 sq. ft. of heating surface, to which the fire- 
box added 59 sq. ft. and a combustion chamber an additional 62 


sq. ft., making a total evaporating surface of 691 sq. ft., grate area 
18 sq. ft. Wood was used for fuel. | 

The model to 1%” scale was built for Mr. Edward Hangerford, 
Centenary Director of B. and O. R. R. by whose courtesy the writer 
is enabled to present these notes and illustration. A working 
-model—that is a self propelling steam model—was not desired, but 
correctness in external appearance was made the chief desideratum. 
The model was to represent the engine as it was in 1863, and not 
as it now stands as an exhibit in one of the company’s round- 
houses. To this end much information was gathered from Mr. O. C. 
Cromwell, Assistant Chief of Motive Power of B. and O. R. R., and 
the writer is indebted to this gentleman for his assistance and 
suggestions in obtaining a closer degree of accuracy to the original 
engine than would otherwise be the case. 

The model is 26” long, 2144” gauge of track. Frames are bronze 
castings of correct bar type, wheels of gray iron, drivers being 254” 
dia., the main and front drivers are flangeless. Side rods are of 
steel, crossheads cut from solid metal. Cylinders are made in 
pairs, with half saddle. Steam chests are cast solid and have 
mouldings around the top. The chests are held to the cylinders 
by means of the shank of lubricators, which screw into cylinder. 


_ The boiler is of wood, covered with sheet brass, while domes, 
‘smokebox and front are bronze castings machined all over. Stack 
is built up of sheet brass. Front bumper beam is of wood, while 
the pilot is a bronze casting. (The actual engines had wooden 
‘pilots and cabs.) The shackle bar is cut from steel, also the 


. 





68 THE MODELMAKER 


knuckle and bolt, the pocket is cut from solid metal. 


opportunity of making the model cab of castings there being six in 
number %” thick, the window sashes are thin strips of brass 
The extra weight at rear end is 
also an advantage in balancing the weight of cylinders and smoke- 


soldered in place on the inside. 


pulled. 


The paint scheme is for wheels, vermillion; boiler and domes, 
black, with polished brass mouldings and bands; pilot, black; cab 
venetian red outside, light green inside. 
in yellow and red. Side rods, crank pins, brasses, and shackle bar 


polished. 


In an article published in the 
Modelmaker last year the au- 
thor, Mr. G. A. Cuthbertson, on 
page 156, remarks he does not 
know of any place in the United 
States where they have a collec- 
tion of Models similar to that 
shown in the South Kensington 
Museum in London, England. 
Mr. Ernest S. Macgowan writes 
us that he thinks our readers 
would like to know that there 
are two very fine collections of 


box, making the model roll easily and smoothly when pushed, or 


The cabs on 
the actual engines being of wood averaging 244” thick gave a good 


















| 


4 


4 


Lettering in yellow, lining 


boat and ship models, one at the 
Institute of Technology, Boston, 
Mass., and the other Smithsoni- 
an Institute at Washington, 
D. C. If any of our readers 
know of any other collection in 
the U. S. that is open to the 
public we should be very glad to. 
have the address and mention it 


lightful pastime. 


THE MODELMAKER 69 


MODEL OF CLIPPER SHIP 
“LIGHTNING” 


S By G. B. DOUGLAS 


I am sending you a photo of a model of the Clipper Ship “Light- 
ning” recently completed by me from the plans I have advertised 
in your Magazine. 

_ The model is 4%” scale and was built in about 6 weeks’ time. 

_ A few remarks on the ship’s performances will, I think, be of in- 
terest to your readers. 

_ “Lightning” was built by Donald McKay at East Boston, Mass., 
to the order of James Bains, in the winter of 1853-4 at a cost of 
£30,000 and on her arrival in Liverpool was furnished and decorated 
below at a further cost of £2,000. 

_Her measurements were: Tonnage builders 2,096 tons; register, 
1468 tons; burthen, 3,500 tons. Length, 244 feet. Beam, 44 ft. 
Depth, 23 feet. Dead rise at half floor, 20 in. She was one of the 
sharpest ships ever built. Capt. A. H. Clark said of her, she had 
long, concave water lines and at her load displacement line, a 
cord from her cut water to just abaft the fore rigging showed a 
concavity of 16 inches. Mainmast deck to truck, 164 feet; fore- 
mast, 151 feet; mizzen mast, 115 feet; main yard, 95 feet; lower 
studdingsail booms, 65 feet. The spread, 13,000 yards of canvass 
under all plain sail. 

On her first trip from Boston to Liverpool she made the run in 
February-March, 1854, from Boston Light to Rock Light in 13 days, 
19% hours and according to her log of March ist in strong gales 
was making 18 to 1814 knots; the day’s run being 436 miles, a day’s 
record which has never been equalled by a sailing ship. 

- She left Liverpool for Melbourne on her first voyage on May 14th, 
1854, and arrived out July 31st, 77 days. Left on her return, August 
20th and arrived at Liverpool October 23rd, in 64 days, 3 hours and 
10 minutes. A record that has never been broken. The round 
voyage, including 20 days in port, was only 5 months, 8 days and 
21 hours. On this voyage in ten consecutive days, she sailed no 
less than 3,722 miles, her best day’s run being 412 miles. 

3 On this voyage she brought home gold and dust to the value of 
fl, 000,000 sterling. 

_ During the Sepoy Mutiny in 1857 she was chartered by the 
British Government to carry troops to India. 


70 THE MODELMAKER 


The “Lightning” on October 31st, 1869, while alongside the pier 
at Geelong, Australia, with 4,000 bales of wool on board, caught 
fire from spontaneous combustion and was burned to the water’s 
edge and sank. 








23.25°W.L£. PIODEL 
44 Jehock 1926 
vies 


Sail Plan of Mr. E. |. Schock’s Model Yacht. 


: 

PY 

7. f 
, on 





THE MODELMAKER 71 


A TWO-FOOT WATERLINE 
MODEL YACHT 


By E. Il. SCHOCK 


For the beginner at model yacht building and for the man who 
wishes to have a model that is easily moved from place to place 
without special boxes, I believe a boat of this size and type is very 
satisfactory. 


The fin-keel may be removed and the rig unshipped, making a 
very portable boat. 


The model shown in the accompanying plans is 2314 inches water- 


line, 9 5/16 inches beam, 34% inches overall, and has a draft of 9 
inches. 


The hull is built up in the conventional way of boards cut to shape 
inside and outside, then glued together. After the glue has set a 
block of wood is fastened inside the boat, and the model is held 
in the vise by means of this block while the outside is shaped. For 
the outside I use the smallest plane I can buy, a Stanley iron plane 
about 3 inches long. This is a very satisfactory tool, for it is short 
enough to slide around the curves of the hull, and can be held in 
one hand. For the cross sections I use cardboard templates. Thin 
wood makes better ones if you have it. After it is planed smooth 
the hull may be finished on the inside with a big, long-handled 
gauge, outside bevel. For this job I hold the model between pillows 
to protect the outside. Leave the hull thick in way of Rudder Stock 
and Keel Bolts. The deck beams are carefully notched into the 
hull, making a little dovetail joint. I do not crown the decks, as a 
flat deck saves much labor in fitting, and looks very well on small 
models. 


- Before putting on the deck all fittings must be fastened in place, 
both on deck and below. The keel clips must be a strong and 
watertight job. The vertical rudder stock and tube are very much 
easier to fit than slantwise ones. I have had one very difficult 
and trying experience with a sloping rudder, and shall try them no 
‘more. } 

Fa Deck fittings may be bought from model fitting dealers, or made 
at home. The home made ones are stronger and can be made the 


#. 


‘size you want them. Bought ones are very expensive. 
= The rudder action shown on the Lines Plan is this: 





72 THE MODELMAKER 





A double ended tiller is held amidships by a strong elastic and 
a “runner” such as is used on tents. The line leads through an 
eye bolt amidships and is fastened to another eye forward. The 
main sheet is fastened to the aft end of this tiller. This rig is 
very easily built, and works almost as well as the very complicated © 
ones in use on larger models. 


The Rudder is a piece of sheet metal, preferably something light. 
It is riveted to the stock, which in turn is split with a hacksaw 
to receive the blade. The tiller has a square hole in it, which fits 
over a square part on the stock. It is held on by a screw fitting 
into a tapped hole in the rudderstock. By removing this screw the 
rudder may be unshipped. . 


The fin is held in its clips by small countersunk head bolts. This 
does not look very rigid, but if the model is lifted out of the water 
by the hull and handled carefully these will hold. 


I have this rig on a 39-inch model which has been in use twelve 
years. It is still strong. The lead bulb on this boat is about 8 lbs. 


The drawings do not show the lead bulb for the keel. No two 
builders will get exactly the same weight of hull, so that each. 
keel should be determined by experiment. 


The rigging on this boat is dark green braided fens line. All 
lines have hooks at both ends so that they may be removed easily. 
The sails are Lonsdale Cambric, finished with Wright’s Bias Tape. 
The selvage of the material parallels the leach of each sail. | 


In making spars the white pine sticks are planed square, tapered, 


planed octagonal and then round. Spars, hull and deck should be. 


scraped before sanding and sandpapered as smooth as possible. 


To fasten a sail to a spar stretch a fine enameled radio wire | 
along the spar next to the sail, fastening both ends securely. Lace 
the sail to the wire, then fasten the wire to the spar with double. 
pointed tacks bent from small common pins. By this method you 
avoid having lacing around the spars, which gives the yacht a more 
realistic appearance. 3 


I have used shellac on decks with perfect results. ee dnae a 
nish of course is better, but it dries slowly. The hull should have 
not less than four coats of paint, each coat sanded to make 
smooth back for the next. The last should be enamel, and left 
bright. It is not wise to use steel wool in place of sandpaper. It 
is fast, but scratches. 


When finished the model is placed in the bath tub for keel experi- 
ment. Everything in place. Junk of any kind is piled on deck 








‘ 
| 


until she floats on her designed waterline. 


The weight of the 


_ junk is the weight of lead required for the keel. 


. The junk is then removed and the model pressed down with a 
finger to get the position of the center of gravity of the lead. The 
model may be adjusted for trim by pressing down on her deck in 
_ different spots and when the correct trim is found the spot marked. 
_ The center of gravity of the lead should come just below this point. 
_ When the model is in the water you cannot see her waterline 
i from above. To see it from below put some polished pie tins on the 
bottom of the tub to act as mirrors. With these the contrasting 
‘colors of the waterline can be seen. 
_ These suggestions, while not very complete, may be of some 


help in building a first boat. 


Much of the detail of hull building 


I have omitted because good books on hull construction are avail- 


Z, able in libraries. 


The plans shown are almost exactly like those of one of my 
_ models, and should produce a good, fast boat. 


yo ~ BOOK REVIEWS 
Sailing Ships at a Glance, by 
E. W. Hobbs, A.I.N.A. xviii, 113 
pages,-150 illustrations, size 8% 
 x5%, cloth, $2.50. A pictorial rec- 
ord of the evolution of the sail- 
— ing ship from the earliest times 
until today. An extremely in- 
_ teresting historical sketch show- 
_ ing the progress of shipbuilding 
_ from period to period including 
illustrations of a great variety 
_ of different types of sailing ves- 
_ sels. While only giving a few 
details of construction it will 
~ still prove of very considerable 
interest and’ value to all who 
_ are interested in the construc- 
tion of old time model sailing 
_ ships. 











_ Amateur Telescope Making, by 
the Rev. W. F .A. Ellison and 
_ others, 102 pages, 61 illustra- 
| tions, size 8x5%, inches, cloth, 


$2.00. Work is divided into sev- 
en parts as follows: 1. Mirror 
Making and Mounting a Sun 
Telescope; by R. W.. Porter, 


‘M.S. 2. The Amateur Telescope, 


Rev. W. F. A. Ellison. 3. Meth- 
ods of Silvering. 4. Miscellany 
by Albert J. Ingalls. 5. Tele- 
scope Mounting From Automo- 
bile- Parts, «by °C: Ions: °-6:. A 
Telescope That Anyone Can 
Make, J: M. Pierce. 7. Bibliog- 
raphy. There is very little prac- 
tical information to be had on 
this subject so this small work 
should prove helpful to all those 
interested in this fascinating 
subject. 


We have had inquiries from 
several of our readers for stamp- 
ings for small electric motors 
suitable for electric locomotives. . 
If any of our readers know 
where these can be purchased, 
will they kindly send the address 
to the Modelmiaker. 


74 THE MODELMAKER 


NEW YORK SOCIETY OF 
MODEL ENGINEERS 


The regular meeting of the 
New York Society of Model En- 
gineers was held at 15 Moore St., 
New York on the evening of 
May 11. There were twenty-four 
members present. Mr. F. R. 
Pope, the Chairman, presided. 

Mr. Berg gave a short talk on 
Locomotive wedges and pedes- 
tals, and Mr. F. D. Grimke spoke 
on the construction of locomo- 
tive cylinders. 

The folowing models were ex- 
hibited. A 2-step Hydroplane, 
39” x 11”, engined with a 2-cyl- 
inder Westinghouse %” x 3,4” 
single acting steam engine, with 
a centre-flue boiler. A 2-Cylinder 
Westinghouse steam engine di- 
rect connected to a centrifugal 
pump. A set of castings for a 
P. R. R. K. 4s Locomotive, 21%” 
gauge, 14%” scale. A single Cyl- 
inder, 4-Cycle Gas Engine, with 
overhead poppet valves and 
some photographs of other mod- 


els. These models greatly inter- 
ested those present. 


The Chairman announced that 
there was to be a Competitive 
Model Locomotive Construction 
Contest and that a friend had 
promised to donate a silver cup 
to the winner. 


The rules for the contest were 
roughly outlined as follows: 

Contest open only to Members 
of the Society in good standing. 


Loco must be built to a defin- 
ite scale. 


Must be an actual working 
model. 


True in every detail to its pro- 
totype. 


Details to be to scale. 


Workmanship and finish to be 
considered. 


Contest to close June 1, 1927. 


A committee was appointed to 
consider and put into definite 
form the above recommendations 
so that they can be voted upon 
at the next meeting. 


The next meeting will be held 
on June 8. When Mr. Berg will 
give a talk on the Baker Valve 
Gear and will demonstrate with 
a sectional model. Mr. W. Elli- 
ott will give a talk on Model 
Power Boats. 


The members especially inter- | 
ested in Model Power Boats will 
have an informal meeting at the 
above address on May 25th at 
7°30 p.m. 

All communications should be 
addressed to Mr. A. A. Singer, 
Sec’y N. Y. S. M. E., 15 Moore * 
Street, New York. 


Principal contents of the Mod- 
el Engineer for February 4, 11, 
18 and 25: Method of Making 
Small Wood Pulleys. A Work- 


ing Model of a 1” Scale Loco- 
motive Chassis with Cylinders 
and Valve Chests in Half Sec- 
tion. Annual Speed Boat Com- 
petition. Locomotive Boiler Con- 
struction by “L. B. 8S. C.” Loco- 
motive Prototypes. Two Disc 
Cutters. Electrolytic  Rectifi- 
ers. Private Electric Lighting. 
Making Patterns for Roller and 
Pulley Castings. Adjustable Drill 
Jig for Screw Dies. The New 
Work Shop of the Glasgow So- 
ciety of Model Craftsman. Mod- 
el Marine Notes. Two Model 
Vertical Steam Engines. Mak- 
ing a Set of Corebox Planes. A 
Hand Press for Small Jobs. The 
Construction of Stream-line Ap- 
paratus. Recent Inventions. 
Queries and Replies. Practical 
Letters. Club Notes. Etc., ete. 


7 


So PA 
it. : 


=: 


aa? 


THE MODELMAKER © 75 


Model Railway News, contents 
for May, 1926. A Veteran Rail- 


way Model Engineer. Mr. M. R. 
Clarke’s Model 3%” Gauge 
Single-driver 2—2—2 Type 
Steam Locomotive, his. Electric- 
ally Driven 2” Gauge Model G. 
W.R. 4—6—0 Type Loco “Sir 
Felix Pole” and his 7/16” Scale 
Model G.W.R. 4—4—0 City Class 
Loco “Lord Reading’ and Views 
of his 2” Gauge Garden Railway. 
Construction of an “O” Gauge 
Model Railway. An “O” Gauge 
L.M.S. Railway. Mr. T. W. Mars- 
den’s Model 2—4—2 L.M:S. ‘“‘Col- 
-umbia Type” Mixed Traffic Loco 
and Junction of his ‘“‘O” Gauge 
Railway. Mr. H. Greenly’s Gar- 
den Railway System. Advantages 
of the non-continuous lay-out. L 
& N.E.R. Standard 12-ton Miner- 
al Wagon. Mr. G. H. Alexan- 
der’s 50-year old Model Locomo- 
tive, Carriage and Van. Scales 
and Standards in the Smaller 
Gauges. Mr. N. Evans, “O” 
Gauge L and N. W. R. Model 
Railway. Mr. F. W. Hindes’ “O” 
Gauge Locomotive and 4-coach L 
and N. W. R. Train. Our Mail- 
bag. What We Want. The Mod- 
el Railway Club Exhibition. 


We have just received a very 
encouraging letter from the 


American Model Locomotive Go. 
of San Francisco. They inform 
us that they have hada big de- 
mand for their railroad track 
which has cleaned them out, but 
_that they will have a new stock 
shortly. They also inform us 
they have a number of orders 
and about 100 inquiries for the 
“0” gauge locomotive. We are 
“very glad to hear that they are 
doing so well and hope all our 
Californian readers will get in 
touch with this firm who certain- 
ly have some very nice models 


Mr. O. Harry Squier-is very 
much interested in-Modelmak- 
ing. Last year he finished a loco- 


motive crane. It is electrically 
operated with universal motion 
and has a lifting capacity of 40 
pounds. He is now working on 
a Pacific Type Model Locomo- 
tive similar to those used for 
English express passenger traf- 
fic. It is designed to operate 
with 100 Ibs. of steam pressure 
and the main drivers will also 
be connected through shaft and 
gearing toa 100 volt A. C. motor 
located in the tender. He says 
he believes this combination 
drive is rather unusual, later on 
when he has the model finished, 
we feel sure many of our read- 
ers will be interested in his tests 
of its running capabilities. 





Mr. Newton James, Jr., of Los 
Angles, Calif., has very kindly 
sent us particulars of the Los 
Angeles Evening Herald Model 
Yacht Races to take place next 
June, also a full sized drawing 
of their V-Bottom ‘“‘R” Sail Boat. 
The boats are to. be built by 
boys and sailed by them. Four 
handsome silver trophies will be 
given. We believe a good many 
of our readers will be interested 
in this, the fourth annual regatta 
full particulars of which can be 
obtained from the Los Angeles 
Evening Herald. 





Mr. J. H. Guild, 33 Cranston 
Ave., St. John, N. B. Canada, is 
working on a model of the 
C. N. R. Mountain Type Loco- 
motive, and seems to be mak- 
ing good progress with it. 





When writing to us or to our 
advertisers for information, 
please enclose a stamped and. 
addressed envelope for reply. 


_ and supplies. 


a 





76 x THE MODELMAKER 
CORRESPONDENCE T. B. S—We do not know of — 
Akron Association of Model any book that describes and il- 
Engineers lustrates all the parts of a model — 
ship. There are several new 
pia etree 7. 1926 books in the press and these will 


The Modelmaker. 
Dear Sirs: 

Here we are at last. How does 
the above strike you? After so 
long a time of talking it over we 
are now hitting on all “four” 
and going strong, with bright 
prospects for increased mem- 
bership. We have a live bunch, 
and all fine mechanics. Any as- 
sistance you can give us in the 


way of suggestions, etc., will cer- 
tainly be appreciated. You can 
look to the Akron bunch for 
some results in Model Engineer- 
ing in the future by the looks 
of the fine work I witnessed at 
our first regular meeting, when 
some of our members showed 
specimens of their work. We 
hope to have some good dope 
for Modelmaker soon, also new 
“subs.” We are getting started 
about right in line of building 
models as we have draughtsmen, 
patternmakers, machinists, elec- 
tricians and some experienced 
modelmakers and some fine mod- 
els. I will have to close the 
throttle for this time. Hoping 
to have more for you later. 


Yours sincerely, 
J. W. Neptune, 
130 Paul Court. 





F. H.—We think you will find 
just the information you require 
about the construction of Model 
Marine Engines in the first Vol- 
ume of Modelmaker. The arti- 
cles are by Mr. F. ‘D. Grimke, 
and are illustrated with detailed 
drawings. 


be reviewed in our book columns © 


as soon as published. 


We have just received some : 
copies of the Bathe Manutactur- 
ing Company’s new Catalogue, : 


listing Model Marine Steam En- 


gines, Model Stationary Steam © 
Engines, the various types of 


boilers with boiler and pipe line 


fittings and some illustrations — 
of sectional models and patent © 
demonstration models with de-- 
scriptive matter with a number — 


of notes and useful hints. A 


charge of 20 cents is made for 
this catalogue. We would sug- 


gest that all our readers inter- 


ested in this line of model work 


send two dimes to the above — 


company and get acquainted 


with the new line of goods this © 
firm has ready for the market. % 


The Gero!d Company advise — 
that the call in the past several 
years for a Wade lathe with a 
larger capacity between centers — 
has caused them to bring out the © 


No. 1 and the No. 2 machines 


with extended bed to accommo- — 
date work up to 18” between — 
In every. other respect > 
the lathes are the same as the — 
well known standard. There are 
many jobs on metal where such — 
increased capacity will come in 
very handy and for woodworking ~ 
it will prove to be a boon to 
those desirous of handling long-— 
er pieces of work. Deliveries 
can now be made in limited 
quantities of this new size but 
soon the stock on hand will be 
sufficient to meet all demands. ~ 


centers. 


~ 





aa 





THE MODELMAKER P 17 


@ WHAT'S IN YOUR GARRET? 


|SALE—EXCHANGE— WANTED 


ee THING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters or 


_ figures count as words, compound words as separate words. 


accompany copy. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 


_ Gears and Model Supplies of 
every description. Catalog 5 
“sg cents. Experimenters Supply 
Bouse, Box 10, Station Y, New 
"York City. 


_ YH.P. Horizontal double act- 
ing, piston valve, Steam Engine. 
(See Modelmaker, June, 1925.) 
- Also Corliss Engine single cylin- 
der, bore 2”, about 214” stroke. 
Full particulars, Goodwin, 354 
75th Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 


NC-4 Seaplane Set, complete, 
4% ft. wingspread, carved ,pro- 
_pellers, parts cut, instructions, 

$10. 00; eight 2%4-inch finished 
- loco drivers, $8.00 Frank Bar- 
by chard, Jr., Foley, Ala. 


The Coming Sport—Buy your 

sockets for your man-sized glider 

- from Icken, 903 Ray Ave., Ridge- 
@iield, N. J. 


. Blue Prints of Ships for 
_ Modelmakers, send for circular. 
 G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
_ Upper Montclair, N. J. 


-_ Drawings made to order for 
- model locomotives (Amer. Prac- 
“ tice), Crater, 458 Colonial Rd., 
- Roselle Park, N. J. 


2-Cylinder Marine Steam En- 
gine, %”x%4”, $15.00. A Single 
_ Cylinder Marine Engine, 5"x5%", 
_ $5.00 Box 10, Modelmaker, 120 
. Liberty St., New York. 









Rough Sketching; The Han- 
dy Sketching Book, consisting 
of sectional ruled paper, plain 
eight squares to the inch, with 
some useful tables, size 5 x 8, 
bound in limp card to fit the 
pocket, price $.35, Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


A BC of The Steam Engine, 
describing a high speed single 
cylinder, double acting, hori- 
zontal steam engine and auto- 
matic governor, with large 
drawings, price 35c. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 





WANTED 
Models, Railways and Locomo- 


tives, back nos. and Vols. in 
good condition. Box 10, Model- 
maker. 


Everyday Mechanics, Nos. 1 2 


and 6 of Vol. 1, Nos. 1 2 and 3 


of Vol. 2. Box 2, Modelmaker. 

American Institute of Elec. 
Engrs. Volumes 1 to 8. Box 4, 
Modelmaker. 





| WANT YOUR WORK 


I make patterns, small castings 
and handle Modelmakers’ Wants. 
Modelmaking is my business. I 
will do work for all Modelmakers 
at small cost. James H. Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 


g THE MODELMAKER 


MODEL ENGINEER Vo] VI. 





Model High Speed Steam Yacht. | Illustrated. 

Tools for Small Engineering Work. 

Hints on Building a Model Steam Pinnace. Illustrated. 

A Mo el Contractor’s Locomotive. illustrated. 

A Model Electric Light and Power Plant. Illustrated. 

A Small Electric Dark Room Lamp _IIustrated. 

A Sparking Dynamo for Gas Engine Service. Illustrated. 

A Model Industrial Exhibition. Ulustrated 

Simply Made Electric Clocks. [lustrated. 

An Easily Made Amateur’s Bench Drill. Illustrated. 
Fittings for Model Yachts. Illustrated. 

A Simp’‘e Working Model Locomotive. Illustrated. 

A Model Traction Engine. lllustrated. 

A New Locomotive Valve Gear. 

The Construction of a Small Storage Cell. Illustrated. 

Hints on Building a Model Torpedo Boat Destroyer. Illustrated. 
An Invertible Electric Night Light Set- Illustrated. 

The Uses of Engince:ing Models. Illustrated. 

A Working Model Coiliery. Ulustrated. 

Hints on lesting and Repairing Small Dynamos and Moters. 
Design for a Minature Model Yacht. Illustrated. 

A Model Clock Work Railway. Illustrated. 

Design for Model Launch Engine. Illustrated. 

An Acetylene Generator and Reservoir. Illustrated. 

A Small Power Vertical Steam Engine. 

A Model Travelling Steam Crane. Illustrated. 

Electric Furnaces. Illustrated. 

Building of a Model Battleship. IUlustrated. 

A Model Thornycroft-Type Boiler. Illustrated. 

A Model Electric Locomotive. Illustrated. 

Motor Cycles and How to Construct Them. Illustrated. 
Motor Bicycles, Their Design and Construction. Illustrated. 
Design for an Engine to Drive a Model Twin Screw Steamer. Illustrated. 
How to Make a Galvyanometer. Illustrated. 

How to Make a Tank Locomotive, 1 in. scale. Illustrated. 
How to Demagnetize a Watch. Illustrated. 

How to [ake Experimental Electrical Apparatus. Illustrated. 
How to Build a Model Steam Launch Hull. Illustrated. 

How to Make a4In. Spark Coil. Illustrated. 

How to Make Home Made Dry Cells. 

How to Make a Simple Relay. Illustrated. : 
How to Make an Engine and Boiler for a Fast Steam Launch. Illustrated. 
How to Make a Simple Volt Meter or Ammeter. Illustrated. 
How to Make a Powerful Bicromate Battery. Illustrated. 
How to Make an Electric Motor. Illustrated. 

How to Make Permanent and Electro Magnets. Illustrated. 
How to Make a Model First-Class Battleship. Illustrated. 
How to Build a Model 4=-pole Electro=-Motor. Illustrated. 
How to Fit Up a Grindstone. Illustrated. 

How to Build a Steam Turbine. Illustrated. 


With many pages of Short Articles, Practical Letters, Notes, Questions and 
Answers, Book Notices, New Tools, Supplies, &c., &c. 


284 pages, 322 Diagrams, 95 Half-tones, 2 Full Page 
Plates, 9 Full Single Page and 1 Double Page Scale Draw- 


ings. Price, B2.OO,, vet. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN - 
120-122 Liberty Street 
New York City 


THE MODELMAKER } 79 


MODEL ENGINEER Vol. 7. 





How to Become an Electrical Engineer. 

How to Make a Lever Switch. Illustrated. 

How to [Make a Model Battleship. Detail Drawing. 

ios to sake an Air Compressor, for Driving Model Engines. Detail 
rawings. 

How to set a Simple Slide Valve. Illustrated. 

How to Make a Simple Model Steamer. Diagram. 

How to Make an Electrical Indicator. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Model Electric Launch. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Gramaphone. Detail Drawings. 

How to Test Small Engines and Boilers. Diagrams. 

How to Make Clock Work Locomotives Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Model Vertical Marine Engine. Detail Drawings. 

How to [ake a Built-Up Horizontal Steam Engine. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a 40=Ampere-Hour Accumulator. Illustrated. 

How to Make a Model Steam Travelling Crane. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a 1/10 H. P. Electric Motor. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Small Lathe from ‘' Scrap.’’ Illustrated. 

How to [Make a Power Fretsaw. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Spring Lathe Chuck. Diagrams. 

Model * Willians’’ Central Valve Engine. Detail Drawings. 

Two Simple Forms of Resistance. Illustrated. 

The Motor Bicycle: Its Design, Construction and Use. Many Detail Draw- 


ings. 
The Rating of Model Yachts. With Diagrams. 
Jaz Stuart Compound Vertical Engine. Complete Detail Drawings. 
Construction of Dug-out [Model Yachts. Detail Drawings. 
Construction of 1-2H. P. Water Motor. Illustrated. 
Mr. Taylor’s Model Launch Engine. Illustrated. 
The Pitmaston-Moor-Green Model Railway. Mlustrated. 
Model Tank Locomotive. Detail Drawings. 
' Mr Willis’ Model Steam Launch. Illustrated. 
Original Designs for 750-watt Direct Coupled High Speed Steam Engines. 
and Dynamos with Full Details. 
A Four Inch Screw Cutting Lathe. Illustrated. 
Detail Drawings for 80-watt Multipolar Dynamo. 
Design for 100-watt Manchester Type Dynamo. 
Model Electric Railway. ‘‘ Three Rail System,’’ with Diagrams. 
Models made without a Lathe. Some Notes on a Large Static Machine. 
The Castelli Coherer for Wireless Telegraphy. Illustrated. 
A Cheap Petrol Carburetter for Small Gas Engines. Illustrated. 
A Neat Model! Electric Launch. 
A Water-Regulating Resistance for a 1-in. to 2-in. Spark Coil. Diagrams. 
A Carbon Electrolytic Interruptor, Illustated. 


With many pages of Short Articles, Practical Letters, Notes, Questions and 
Answers, Book Notices, Yachting Notes, New Tools, Supplies, &c. 


286 pages, 311 Diagrams, 101 Half-Tones, 17 Full Single 
Page and Two Double Page Scale Drawings. 


Price B2A.OO,7" Net. 
Copies Mailed to any part of the World on Receipt of 


Price. 
SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 Liberty Street 
New York City 


80 





” Pacific 
Locomotive Castings 


with drawings, $30.00 per set. 


Most Complete on the Market 


Castings for six-wheeled Pullman and 
Vulean Freight Trucks, in ‘O’’ Gauge 
and half-inch scale. 


FRANK BIRCH 


Gen. Del., HIGHLAND PARK, MICH. 





Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” length. 


Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 
Winding, Thread Cutting 
No. 1 Plain Machine as above ........ $23 


No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58 


SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
CATALOG 


Shows full details and accessories 


THEGEROLDCO. (Dept. M13) 
120 Liberty St., N. ¥. 


THE MODELMAKER x ete 2 


iron Sighs eae nr, ae 





MODELS 
LATHES 


PARTS 


DOMESTIC—IMPORTED 
Models of All Kinds Made to 


Order rare - 


Machine Work Done 


A. ALEXANDER SINGER 
15 MOORE STREET. 


NEW YORK CITY | a 


PRACTICAL LESSONS IN METAL — 
TURNING AND SCREW CUTTING | 


By Percival Marshall 


‘A practical handbook for~ Model-_ 


makers and Mechanics, Contents of 
chapters: 1. The Lathe and Its Parts. 
2. Tools and Toolholders. 3. Measur- 
ing Appliances. 


drels. 5. How to Center Work for 
the Lathe. 6. Driving Work Between 
Centers. 7. Turning Work Between 
Centers. 8, Speeds, Feeds and Lubri-— 
eants. 9. Chucks and Face-plate 
Work. 10. Drilling and Boring in 
the Lathe. 11. Screw Cutting. Tables 
of Change Wheels. Index. 218 pages] 
220 illus. Cloth, $1.25. 


+ 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120 Liberty Street 


LOCOMOTIVE DRAWINGS 


New York 


4, Chucks and Man- 





Large Sectional Drawings 
showing every part numbered 
and named of the following:— 
American, or 4—4—0 type loco- 


motive; Micado, or 2—8—2 
type locomotive; Consolidated, 
or 2—8—0 type locomotive, 





with Walschaert valve gear; 
Pas- 


Atlantic type locomotive; — 
senger and Sleeping Car, each 
of these 25c. Freight Box Car, 
35c; Gondola Car, 35¢; Pacific, 
or 4—6—2 type locomotive, aizg 
44” x 17”, 50c. 


THE MODELMAKER, 120 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, 


¥ 


4 
| 
: 
: 





Supplement 


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FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WORKING MODE 


BU ar Ns 600 Ill, No. 6 : suka. eee. oe 10 Cents — 








a A MODEL BRITISH S.-E. 5 A. SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTER, 
: MADE BY MR. OSCAR SCHUWENDT 








THE MODELMAKER_ 


Published by SPQN & CHAMBERLAIN 


120-122 LIBERTY ST., 


Issued Every Month 


Vol. Ill, 


NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 
No. 6 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, June, 1926 
“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925 at the Posi Uffice ut 


New York, N. Y. 





under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 


OUR FOREWORD 


Model boat building and sail- 
ing is certainly becoming one 
of the greatest pastimes 
amongst our young men in the 


U.S. if the reports to hand have. 


any’ significance. 

There were 300 entries in the 
recent Regatta held in Central 
Park, New York, under the 
management of the Junior Ship- 
pers’ League of America, when 
fifteen prizes were awarded. 
The President has received ap- 
plications from fifteen other 
cities for membership in the 
League and for arrangements 
for regattas in those cities. It 
is now proposed to hold a Na- 
tional Regatta on Labor Day 
when the winners at the differ- 
ent regattas will compete for a 
National Trophy. 

The Los Angeles Evening 
Herald have arranged for a big 
Regatta this month. They had 
275 entries at their 1925 Re- 
gatta, and this year they expect 


a much greater number. 
nd 


3 Many of our readers will be 
interested in the Small Curtiss 


Air Compressor, Which is rated 


to give 60 lbs. pressure. This 


is something quite unique in the 
model field, yet a very useful 
adjunct to the Modelmaker’s 
workshop. Compressed air is 
an ideal nvower for testing out 
an engine under construction or 


- you new members. 


The Detroit Model Yacht Club | 
and the Toledo Model Yacht 
Club have also full programs. 
Now we hear that the N. Y.: 
Soc. of M. E. are planning fer a 
Model Power Boat Contesf in 
September. The Marblehead 
Model Yacht Club and_ the 
Brooklyn Model Yacht Club. 
have also to be reckoned with.’ 
And we have no doubt that the) 
boys in- Montclair, N. J., are all) 
busy tuning up their boats for’ 
their annual Regatta. 

We would like to see more. 
interest taken in the building of. 
Model. Power Boats and in 
Model Power Boat Contests. 

Mr. Secretary, send us in par- 
ticulars of what your members 
are planning for the season of 
1926. We are always glad to in- 
sert such notices with the sec- 
retaries’ names and addresses 
in the Modelmaker, as we be- 
lieve such publicity is beneficial 
to the club in particular and 
may be the means of bringinss 


E 
a 
to demonstrate the roden when. 
finished. It has many other 
uses: paint spraying, running 
small tools, in a gas blow pipe 
for heating metals, tempering, 
brazing, or hard soldering, ete. 

etc. It is easy to handle, ‘tear 
and effective. Complete sets of 
castings with detailed blue 
prints can bee Beets: for a 
nominal cost. 








"The last page of this issue of 
‘the Modelmaker, we are quite 
sure, will interest most of our 


readers who do their best to 
produce fine examples of model- 
work. There are many little 
jntricate jobs the Flexible and 
Portable Shaft Outfit can suc- 
‘eessfully accomplish, as drilling 
‘mall holes in awkward places, 
cleaning up soldered joints that 
cannot be reached with a file, 
grinding the seats of small 
‘valves, cocks and unions to 
make them steam tight, ream- 
ing holes in metal, buffing and 
polishing, cleaning out boiler 
tubes, hollowing out and clean- 
ing up the hulls of model boats 
made from the solid, and many 
‘other like jobs. As to the value 
‘of the goods offered, there can 
‘be no auestion, for the quality 
and perfection of the delicate 
machinery the S. S.. White 
Dental Manufacturing Co. pro- 
duce is known the world over. 
‘This looks like a pretty good 
proposition for the Modelmaker. 
‘He should write for full particu- 
Jars about their special offer. 


j 


ie, 
_ Mr. Roy E. McAdams, Me- 


‘chanical Engineer, 703 Clifton 
‘Street, Springfield, Ohio, has 
been very much interested in 
‘modelmaking - for some years. 
He would like to get in touch 
with all of our readers who re- 
side within an easy distance 
0 of his home, with a view to a 
‘get-together meeting, and we 
hope he will receive a sufficient 
number of replies from this no- 
ice to enable him to form the 
ucleus of a Model Engineers’ 
Society. He has been very suc- 
‘cessful in the construction of 
‘Model Gasoline Engines both 
water cooled and air cooled. 
jis 2-cylinder Aero Hngine 
oks very attractive. 



















- THE MODELMAKER 83 


NEW YORK SOCIETY 
OF 

MODEL ENGINEERS 
The Marine Section of the 
New York Society of Model En- 
gineers held a svecial meeting 
at 15 Moore Street, New York, 
on the evening of May 25. Mr. 
Walter Elliott was in the chair. 
Mr. F. D. Grimke promised to 


donate a silver cup as a prize 
for a Model Power Boat 
Competition. 


The following tentative rules 
were formulated: 

The: boats to be of the dis- 
placement hull type. A metre 
over all and not to exceed the 
12 lbs. displacement. 

Competition open to members 
only. 

EKach competitor 
construct not less 
thirds of the boat. 

Hull 1 unit, boiler 1 unit, en- 
gine and auxiliaries 1 unit. 

Hull may be constructed 
either of wood or metal. 

All entries must be in 
hands of the Committee 
later than the meeting of 
10th of August. 

Race to take 
September. 

Course and racing rules to be 
finally decided upon at the 
meeting of the Society on the 
8th of June. 

Flash steam installation 
admissible. 

It is hoped there will be a 
good number of boats entered 
for this competition. 

All of our readers interested 
in Model Power Boats who are 
not members of this energetic 


to actually 
than two- 


the 
not 
the 


place in 


not 


Society should enter their 
names at once. Mr. A. ~A, 
Singer is the Secretary, 15 


Moore Street, New York. This 
gentleman will furnish full par- 
ticulars of membership and 
dues. 


Mee 


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ae od 


nS ae 
a Ue pene 
hie 


oo Nae 


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‘THE MODELMAKER 


84 








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THE MODELMAKER 85 





A MODEL BRITISH ba Boca: SENGLE- 
SEATER FIGHTER 


By OSCAR SCHUWENDT 


(Drawings by the Author) 


' The model which is the subject of this article was built by the 
writer shortly after the World War and is intended to be an exact 
Teplica of a plane which was captured by the Germans. The 
original data was obtained from an article published in the maga- 
Zine Aerial Age Weekly, some time in 1918, which in turn was 
‘a copy of a description appearing in the German aviator journal, 
Deutsche Luftfahrer Zeitschrift. The aeroplane in question was 
‘built by Vickers, Ltd., and numbered B507, wearing further as a 
recognition initial or that of a squadron an “A,” as well as a white 
circle. The S. E. 5 A. type of plane is equipped with a 200 H. P. 
Hispano-Suiza motor geared down to a four-bladed_ propeller, 
whereas the older type called the S. E. 5 was equipped with a 150 
A. P. motor of-the same make direct connected to a two-blade 
propeller. 

my: The dimensions of the plane which appeared in the above men- 
tioned magazine article were all given in milimeters. These were 
reduced to feet and inches, and the drawings were then made for 
a model to be built to the more or less standard scale of one inch 
‘to the foot and the model then built from these. 


- The writer has revised and redrafted his original drawings 
especially for this article, and it is believed that they are sutf- 
ficiently comprehensive and complete that very little description 
will be needed. However, a few pointers here and there will prob- 
‘ably be of some use to the prospective builder and will therefore 
be given. 
. It might be well to state at this point that the model was not 
built as a flying model, it being the writer’s opinion that it would 
be folly to attempt to fly a model such as this after one has spent 
sveral weeks to complete it. However, it could easily be re- 
jesigned slightly to make a flying model by dropping the propeller 
‘shaft below the top line of the fuselage and adding a motor stick to 
3 the pull of the rubber band motor rather than putting the 
Strain on the small members of the fuselage. It would, of course, 
be necessary to substitute a different propeller of much higher 
itch than the one shown, as this was intended for a scale repro 









THE MODELMAKER 


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THE MODELMAKER 87 


‘duction of the real one. The propeller for a flying model could 
just as well be a two-bladed one, as this would be much stronger 
as the four-bladed one must be mortised together at the center. 
Much of the small detail work, which is, of course, the making 
of an exhibition model, could be omitted. Even with all the de- 
tail work and the heavy enamel coating on the coverings, the model 
weighs less than 14 ounces, so one can see the Bospibility of making 
a very good flyer of it. 


The suggestions for building will be taken in a somewhat logical 
‘order and will follow the same order as the drawings are numbered. 
_ The general overall dimensions can be seen on Sheet 1 of the 
drawings, which will also give one an idea of various parts of the 
‘assembly which might not be clear from the photographs of the 
model. 

_ Sheet 2 of the drawings gives details of the fuselage and also 
‘a few additional parts of the body. The size of the members is 
for the most part % inch square wood as noted, and they are put 
together in the conventional method, using glue and small brads as- 
‘sisted here and there by binding with thread while the glue is 
‘drying. The builder will probably prefer to buy his wood all ready 
‘planed to the proper sizes from s~me model aeroplane supply 
‘house, but the writer would like to point out that in his model prac- 
tically all of the wood used was cut from ordinary yard sticks such 
“as are usually used for advertising purposes by most furniture 
stores. This wood is very light and dry, and as a general rule 
is very straight grained, which is much to be desired in model 
“aeroplane work. The yard stick is ripped with a fairly fine saw 
into several strips of convenient width, and then is finished with 
a plane to the size required. The radiator and forms for the top of the 
“body may be made from any soft light wood, preferably sugar pine. 
"Where bristol board is noted the builder should not attempt 
to use heavier than two-ply board, as this will be found to be just 
about right. A word might be said here in regard to the tail skid. 
On the original plane this is of the spring absorber type, and is 
arranged to turn behind the stern post and is connected with the 
‘rudder cable by intermediance of springs. No attempt has been 
Bras te accomplish either of these points on the model, the skid 
being made rigid and stiff. The angle of incidence of the tail 
Epiane is also variable on the original plane between 14.5 ands 
degrees by means of a threaded post riding in a gear-nut and actu- 
ated from the pilot’s seat. There also has been no attempt made 
to carry out this detail on the model. 
(To be continued ) 






88 THE MODELMAKER © 





yy” SCALE PACIFIC LOCOMOTIVE 
AG 


By MR. F. G. CARTER 


I enclose a photo of 44” scale Pacific loco which I have just com- 
pleted after working on it almost continuously in my spare time 
for three years, and give the following particulars of its construe- 
tion in the hopes that it will give other model makers some data 
to work on, and probably save months of weary experimenting. It 
may encourage others to know that this is my first model and 
constructed with home-made equipment with a card table for a 
bench. The loco does not closely follow any particular protype 
and was designed with the idea of crowding the maximum power 
possible in a 1144” gauge engine, combined with ability to negotiate 
moderate curves. Appearance has been sacrificed to efficiency and 
ease of dismantling for repairs. 


The cylinders are made from bronze castings purchased in Eng- 
land, and together with the six drivers are the only castings used. 
They are 3” x %” stroke. They were first made with drilled. holes 
for parts, but the power was low and I decided to chip the parts rec- 
tangular. In doing this I got the slots all shapes and sizes and spoiled 
them. So I made two phosphor bronze plates 1%” thick and the size 
of the cylinder port face, cut the ports in the plates, which was 2 
simple drilling and filing job and after cutting 1%” off the cylinder 
block I silver soldered the plates to the cylinders, this saved the 
day. 


The valves are P. B. and five sets were made all told. The most 
successful ones have 1/32” lap and the exhaust cavity is the exact 
distance between the inside edges of the cylinder ports. This al- 
lows early release and probably wastes steam but increased the 
power 100% over a set of valves, which provided compression and 
were probably more thoretically correct. 


The pistons are cast iron and were fitted with cast iron rings, | 
later I changed to asbestos packing to try and reduce blowing by, 
but one works as well as another. 


The valve gear is Walschaert. First it was arranged to provide 
for 1/64” lap, this necessitated an eccentric arrangement at the lap 
and lead lever points to reduce the %” movement of the X head 
to 1/64”. After a little running I found that instead of giving the > 
valve 1/64” movement, this arrangement lost 1/64” movement ow- 


THE MODELMAKER 8 


ing to wear in the various pins and points and this of course com- 
pletely upset the timing. So a new set of valves were made the 


valves having 1/32” lap and a new set of lewers made proportioned 


to give 3/64” movement to the valve. This allows the eccentric 
movement to be dispensed with, and provides a bare 1/64”lead. The 
valves are “set” by sight, by leaving the steam chest off. Turning 
the wheels and watching the movement of the valve. At first this 
was very misleading as the valve under these conditions would 


appear to operate correctly but when assembled the pressure of 
_ steam on the valve and the friction of the gland took up all the lost 


motion in the various pins and altered the timing, In later attempts 
to set the valves the spindle was gripped between the fingers when 
the wheels were revolved to more nearly approximate running con- 
ditions. All the valve gear parts were made from boiler steel case 
hardened. Cold rolled steel proving too weak and brittle at the 





z fork joints, which are only 1/32” thick. One other point about the 
all important valve gear. I found it better to have the crank arms 
1/32” longer than design proved necessary to ensure enough move- 
ment of the valve and to avoid having to jam the link block down 
to the extreme end of the link. The gear can be “hooked up” to 
give the correct valve travel. After making an endless number of 


eccentric rods of the wrong length an adjustable rod was made and 


when the gear was adjusted to give the correct port opening, the 
| adjustable rod was removed and used as a jig to drill the holes in 
_ the eccentric rods. I had trouble with the main pins moving, which 


of course allows the crank arm to be displaced from its correct po- 


sition of 90° from the main pin. This was corrected by screwing 
the main pins into the wheel, fitting back nuts, drilling thro wheel 
and pin and driving in a dowel, then finally sweating the whole 


< 
i 


works. They should be there to stay now, 


ae ane al 





90 THE MODELMAKER 


The drivers are 114” dia. Smaller than scale to allow for the ; 
considerably oversize flanges. Engine and tender truck wheels %” — 
dia. cut from C. R. steel. Trailer truck wheels 13/16” dia. 


The boiler is the survivor of four attempts, Loco type, 2” dia. x _ 
1214” long overall. Barrel 20 swg. S. D. Copper. Flues: 52:36" «4 
dia x 24 swg. All sheets are flanged and rivetted. The Belpaire © 
firebox was made to copy Pennsylvania Practice and provides large © 
steam space although considerably harder to make than the round ~ 
top type. The inner firebox is 1/32” copper supported by 24 Ign 
bronze stays. Superheater is %” copper tube, two units 4144” long — 
inside. Fuel used is soft coal, or charcoal. The soft coal cokes in 
the flues and plugs them. The charcoal was at first pulled thro 
the stack by the blast and the firebox soon emptied, a brick arch 4 
partly cured this, but a 1/16” mesh netting was fitted in the firebox ~ 
over the openings of the flues and is successful in keeping the fire 
in the box. There is no difficulty in keeping the fire burning fiercely : 
and 80 lbs of steam on the gauge. j 
valve. Pop valve to blow at 80-85 Ibs, this stays open until the pres- e 
sure drops to 50 Ibs. and further experimenting is necessary here. F 
Trottle, screw reverse gear, two blower valves one for connection =. 
to auxiliary boiler for steam raising pump check valve, pump by 
pass, two displacement lubricators imitating air tanks on the front — 
of a P. R. R. I.1.s. class. Hand pump in tank 5/16 bore x 1” stroke, 
eccentric driven pump between frames (at present not working — 
thro leakly valves and being impossible to remove without taking ~ 
off boiler). Five plug cocks were bought to operate the various fit- 
tings but these have all been scrapped owing to leaking and seiz-— 
ing and needle valves made to replace them. These have steel 
needles seating on copper seats and are tight at any pressure by 
lightly screwing with fingers. These were made entirely without ~ 
using a lathe. Frames are steel 14” thick. Driving boxes P. B. on 
coil springs. Wheelbase of drivers 4 1/16”. No brakes are fitted. 
Engine truck is equalised and carried on a central spring with four 
horizontal springs on slides to control lateral movement. Trailing | 
truck is carried on two spiral springs and is built up of brass to : 
resemble a casting. The Worthington pumps and feed water heat- 
er is a dummy and contains the check valve and pump by pass. 
The blower has a single nozzle 1/32” diameter. The dummy head- ¥ 
light generator is brass 4” high and %” wide, people have asked 





















The fittings are Pressure gauge 144” dia., fitted under the cab 
roof with a sliding door to read same. Water gauge with drain. 


a THE MODELMAKER 91 


me if this actually generates current, there is evidently no limit 
‘to what-a modelmaker is expected to do. The sand dome is of 
brass and is a dummy. 


The tender is built up of 1/32” brass, rivetted with small pins, 
sweated and mounted on a 1/16” thick frame. The truck wheels 
are %” dia. equalised and carried on laminated springs. The safe- 

ty chains came from the 10c store. The handpump can be entirely 
removed for repairs by removing four 1/16” nuts. Tank holds 
' about % pint of water. Regular A.R.A. coupler on front, none on 
_ back yet. The loco and tender empty weigh 914 lbs. Length of 
engine over couplers 14”, tender 7144” height to top of stack 315/16 
. width of cab 25%”. 


_ Having no track the engine has not been tested thoroughly, but 
lam getting a track and if any readers are interested I will test the 
- loco accurately for speed, drawbar pull, etc. It runs along the floor 
- at about 6 m.p.h. and on the stand it is impossible to stop it by grip- 
_ ping the wheels. A 60 lb. load was hauled on an improvised track 
~ aver a rough floor. 


The engine is painted black but no attempt was made to give a 
high class paint finish. After a run the engine is covered with 
ashes and oil, and looks as if it had been through the great war and 
_ time spent on painting would be wasted. 


The engine has developed gradually. Two years ago it would 
just stagger around on the stand at 50 lbs. now it buzzes around on 
- 2 lbs. after getting warmed up. Maybe in time I will get it to haul 
$ me along. If any readers would like further particulars I would be 
glad to furnish same, and will be glad to show the loco running to 
any “fans” who happen to stray this way. 


I forgot to mention that the boiler has been tested to 200 lbs. 
hydraulic pressure and shows small weeps of water at the staybolts 
- but no bulging. I screwed the pop valve down and let the pressure 
- rise to 150 Ibs. steam to see how the engine ran at this pressure and 
the boiler did not seem to mind it. 


Mr. Roy Haeusler, 87-45 191st 
- Street, Hollis, Long Island, 
j N. Y., would like to hear from 
any of our readers living in his 


Mr. John P. Brooman, Govern- 
ment Wireless Station, Redhead, 
N. B., Canada, is building a 
model of the famous sailing ship 
“Cutty Sark.” He would like to 


vicinity, with the object of an 
occasional meeting, as he is in- 
terested in the construction of 
models. 


get in touch with anyone resid- 
ing in his locality who is inter- 
ested in the construction of 
model boats and ships. 


92 THE MODELMAKER 


One of our readers writes us 
that there are a number of 
model ships to be seen on ex- 


hibit in the following places: 
The Metropolitan Museum of 
Art, New York; Portsmouth 


Athenaeum, Portsmouth, N. H.; 
The Peabody Museum, Salem, 
Mass., and The Commercial Mu- 
seum at Philadelphia, Pa. We 
might also add the New York 
Yacht Club, who have some 
very fine shiv models, but this 
collection is only open to mem- 
bers. If any other . reader 
knows of additional places 
where models of ships can be 
seen we would like to hear 
where they are located, so that 
we can list them, Should any 
of our readers interested in ship 
models be contemplating a trip 
to England this year, with a 
visit to London, they would find 
it to their interest to go to the 
Greenwich Naval Academy, 
where there is one of the finest 
collections of model ships in the 
world. This collection is open 
free to the public on certain 
days of the week. 





If any of our readers have 
locomotives, passenger, or 
freight cars, they would like to 


place on public exhibit where 
they will be taken good care of, 
write to Mr. R. H. Claudius of 
the>N.o Y.-C. Re Re - Room: 2322; 
466 Lexington Avenue, New 
York: The N.Y: €;:R:-R. have 
been featuring an Exhibit of 
Railway Models for some time 
in the gallery of the great hall 
at the Grand Central Depot, 
New York. Some of these 
models have been returned to 
the owner, and now they wourd 
like to get other models to fill 
up the vacant spaces. Mr. 
Claudius will be glad to give 
you full particulars. 


5 ee, i eee eee ee ee OD he 
i es aS Se iS Re 
oA Sak: i 
v ‘ - y 
je pee : 
P 
; 


AKRON ASSOCIATION OF 
MODEL ENGINEERS 
AKRON, OHIO 


The Editor, The Modelmaker: 
On Wednesday evening, May 
26th, the regular semi-monthly 
meeting of the A. A. M. E. was 
held at the home of Mr. Grover 
Merriman, our oldest member. 
A business session was held, 
followed by a fine luncheon 
served by the host and hostess, 
after which the boys were in- 
vited to inspect the host’s very 
fine and well-equipped machine 
and experimental shop. This 
was a rare treat for the mem- 
bers. Mr. Merriman is one of 
Akron’s oldest and finest me- 
chanics: As the saying goes, 
knows his “onions.” The club 
is very fortunate to possess 
such a fine, able mechanic in its 
membership, and he holes an 
honorary membership card. 
This club has two honorary 
members, the other being Mr. 
H. Helmick, who is an engineer 
and railroad shop mechanic, 
also a fine modelmaker. These 
two members have a “job” as 


instructors to the club, and they 
are always ready to help. We 


certainly appreciate their mem- 


bership and society. The boys 
finally broke away from. the 
said member’s shop at a wee 
small hour. 

The next meeting is called 
for at the home of our Secre- 
tary, Mr. R. W. Jacobs, in Ken- 
more, on Wednesday evening, 
June 10th, and looked forward 
to by all. 


Yours sincerely, 
J. W. NEPTUNE, 
Publicity Agent, Akron, Ohio. 


a illustrated 


In the last December issue of 
the Modelmaker we featured an 
article describing 


Mr. G. H. Stegmann’s model of 


the famous old U. S. Frigate 


- Constitution, Old “Ironsides” as 
- she was more familiarly called. 
This old vessel, at the present 


Congress _ has 


time, is in very bad condition. 
appropriated 


$250,000, half of the amount 
' estimated to put her into good 


- throughout the country. 


repair. The other half is being 
raised by public subscription 
It-may 
seem, at first sight, a large sum 


of money to spend upon the re- 


_ pairs necessary to prolong the 
_ life of an old ship, but it will 
~ be money well invested if only 
_ from an historical as well as a 


patriotic viewpoint. She was a 
very fine vessel in her day, and 
did much, in her numerous 


= fights, to uphold the honor and 


eg 







- suppression 
- Pirates. 
- wishing to contribute to this 
- worthy object should send their 
~donations to the “Save Old Iron- 
sides 
Bank for 
. Street, New-York. 





prestige of the United States 
not only near our own shores, 
but in the Mediterranean Sea, 
where she did good work in the 
of the 
Any of our. readers 


Seaman’s 
56 Wall 


Fund,” The 
Savings, 


The “Woodworker~ and Art 


Craftsman, Volume 16, contains 
_ descriptive articles on the fol- 
lowing: Many chapters on Wood 
Carving, with folding sheets of 


designs. Furniture Making, in- 


- cluding tables, chairs, settees, 


book cases, bookshelves, cabi- 
nets, overmantles, dinnerwag- 
ons, china cabinets. Carpentry, 


the construction of gates and 
fences, the laying of floors of 
 different~ kinds. Fretwork and 


<.e 


Barbary: 


____THE MODELMAKER 98 


scroll sawing, pattern making. 
Forgework, decorative enamels 
and jewelry making. Manual 
training work. _Marquetry and 
inlay. Bentiron work. Finishing 
hardwoods. Repousse work. Pic- 
ture frame making. Clock cases. 
Pen and ink drawings. Fillers 
for different kinds of woods. 
Miscellaneous articles. Question 
Box, ete. The articles are all 
well illustrated. Twelve monthly 
numbers, price $1.50 postpaid. 


Model 
contents 





Engineer — Principal 
fOr HA DEIN s 8, es ee 
and .29:. A Twelve Volt Farm. 
Lighting Plant. Machining the 
Components of a Small Power 
Petrol Engine. “L. B.S. C.’. on 
Locomotive Construction. Elec- 


trical Condensers. Accumulator 
Charging. Locomotive  Proto- 
types. Small Steam Cylinder 
Construction. Setting Out Sheet 
and Plate Metal Fittings. Model 
Speed Boats. Locomotive Cylin- 
ders. An “O” Gauge Solid Fuel 
Q0—4—2. Tank Engine. The 
“Sunny Jim’ Two Cylinder Ma- 
rine Engine for Model Speed 
Boats. Turning a Two-throw 
Crank Shaft. Electrical Measur- 
ing Instruments. A 21%” Gauge 
American Pacific Locomotive. 
Model Marine Notes. Recent In- 
ventions. Light Engineering 
and Equipment. Queries and 
Replies. Practical Letters From 
Our Readers. 


A CORRECTION 


In the. Gerold . Company’s 
Lathe Adv. for April and May 
is a printer’s error in the price 
of the No. 1 Lathe. The proper 
price is $28.00, not $23.00. 





When writing to advertisers 
please mention The Modelmaker. 


- De Marine” 


94 


THE MODELMAKER 


WHAT'S IN YOUR GARRET? 





SALE—EXCHANGE—WANTED 


EVERYTHING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters or 


figures count as words, compound words as separate words. 


accompany copy. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 


Five large fine books full of 
old time ship designs “Souvenirs 
by Vice Admiral 
Paris. $50.00 Express Collect. 
Edgar L. Brown, c/o Schiffman 
Jewelry Co., Greensboro, N. C. 


Blueprints of the 2-ft. Model 


Sail Boat described in the May. 


issue, one large sheet full-size 
lines and body plan, one sheet 
sail. plan, price $1.50. EH. I. 
Schock, 57 Edgewood Ave., 
Longmeadow, Mass. 

Railway Centenary —_ 1825- 
1925, being an exceedingly in- 
teresting historical account of 
the British Locomotive, cars 
and signalling apparatus during 
a hundred years of develop- 
ment, with many illustrations 
and some larger colored plates, 
124 pages, 11 x 814” paper bind- 
ing, $1.60 postpaid. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Designing — Working draw- 
ings prepared; calculation of 
strength of materials; for your 
models or actual size; inven- 
tor’s ideas developed. E. H. 
Grafton, 6542 Lincoln Ave., De- 
troit, Mich. 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
Modelmakers, send for circular. 
G. B. Douglas, {65 Summit Ave.. 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


FOR SALE 





The Coming Sport—Buy your 
sockets for your man-sized glider 


from Icken, 903 Ray Ave., Ridge- 
field, N. J. 


Rough Sketching; The Han- 


dy Sketching Book, consisting — 


of sectional ruled paper, 


plain | 


eight squares to the inch, with 


some useful tables, size 5 x 8, 
bound in limp card to fit the 
pocket, price $.35, Spon; 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Gears and Model Supplies of 
every description. Catalog 5 
cents. Exnerimenters eee 


120- 


House, Box 10, Station Y, New — 


York City. “ 





WORK WANTED 
I make patterns, small cast- 


ings and working models. Model-— 


making is my trade. James Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., ee Pa. 





WANTED | 
Models, Railways. Aas iSéamoss 


tives, back nos. and Vols. in 
good condition. “Box 10, Model- 
maker. 


Everyday Mechanics, Nos. x 20 
and 6 of Vol. 1, Nos. 1 2 and 3 
of Vol. 2. Box 2, Modelmaker. — 


American Institute of — Elec, | 
Engrs. Volumes 1 $0: Pu _ Bom 4). 
M odelmaker. ; 


we 








We have been notified by the 


English Dublishers of the Model 
Engineer that owing to the shut- 


E down of the printing plants dur- 
ing their recent National strike 


the issues of the Model Engi- 
_neer for May 13th and 20th will 
not be published. We trust that 
all our subscribers to that 
magazine wil! bear this in mind 
and sympathize with the pub- 
_lishers in their misfortune. They 
carried on all through the great 
war and never missed the publi- 
eation of a single issue. In 
fact, this splendid magazine has 
never missed an issue since the 
publication of the first number 
in Janwvary, 1898, until this last 
unfortunate stoppage of a Na- 
-tion’s business life. Let us all 
wish them better luck from 
now on. 


i 


yar 





THE MODELMAKER 


95 


Pacific 


Locomotive Castings 

with drawings, $30.00 per set. 

Most Complete on the Market 
Castings for six-wheeled Pullman and 


Vulcan Freight Trucks, in “O’" Gauge 
and half-inch scale. 


FRANK BIRCH 
HIGHLAND PARK, MICH, 


MODEL MACHINERY 


Sole U. S. Agent for the noted Iing- 
lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
makers of Model Steam, Gasuline, 
Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
Trimmings; Electrical Machinery. 
Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 
gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 
and parts, etc. “CABLE SERVICE” 


Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 


3 Ashland Street 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., bl. 8S. A, 


Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
1926 Catalopue Just Issued 


Gen. Del., 


Belt Driven Air Compressor 


lg H. P. delivers %4 cubic feet free air 
per minute at 700 R. P. M. and 60 pounds 
pressure. 


Suitable for use with gas 
torches, small air brushes, etc. 
cludes full set of castings and check valve, 
together with detail drawings for machin-— 


blow pipes, 


Price in- 








ing same. Castings can be finished in 
any lathe. 
4 CURTISS PRODUCTS CoO. 
= 700 Lake Street San Francisco, Calif. 
J 
* 
_ FAST POWER BOATS 
32” and 39” Construction. Sets. 
Seale Model Locomotive Castings. 
_. Freight and Passenger Cars. 
4 Track, O ee. 1 Gauge, 
Pr and 2%” Gauge. & 
x Copper, Brass and Steel. Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” length. 
- Rod, Tube and Sheet Cut to Size. Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 
= 2 Supplies of All Kinds. Winding, Thread Cutting 
-—sW¥FITTINGS — PATTERNS No. 1 Plain Machine as above.......... $28 






MACHINE WORK — CASTINGS 


Models and Boilers Designed 
and. Constructed, 


2 "BLOWLAMPS. Up to 2” Diameter. 
A. ALEXANDER SINGER & CO. 
New York City 


No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58 


SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
CATALOG 


Shows full details and accessories 


THE GEROLD CO. (Dept. M15) 
120 Liberty St., N. ¥. | 


we Pee 9 eee © alee 










96 THE MODELMAKER 


~ 





4 
4 


(a ) il | lH He 
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| | il Wh 


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Ball ll | } 


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Ss 
Get this Flexible and Portable 
Shaft Outfit of a Thousand Uses 


; This Flexible Shaft Outfit, a precision instrument, primarily designed 
i for hard service, is indispensable for model makers, mechanics and for 
machine shop use. There’s lots of pep behind it; it’s portable. 


Consists of a ball-bearing coupling to connect to any motor or re-" 
volving spindle, 3 feet of flexible shafting, and a ball-bearing chuck.’ 
Operates emery and buffing wheels, reamers, metal drills, files, burrs,” 
and many other appliances. Simply place the tool in the chuck and~ 
the outfit is put to work. Runs as smoothly as a highly jeweled® 
watch, : 


s 
A Few Uses Drilling and reaming holes in metal, wood or composi- | 

tion, die-cutting, mold making, engraving; buffing and 
polishing, rectifying dies and punches, cleaning solder joints, ete. A %4 horse- 
power nee sega aaite is eas'ly obtainable at small cost. . In ordering, state” 
size of motor shaft. he an 


SPECIAL OFFER —-SEND ONLY $5.00 


This Flexible Shaft Outft regularly sells for $45. As a special $ntro 
ductory offer from our factory to you, send $5. with order and pay, 
postman $20, plus postage, on arrival. Satisfac- af 
tion guaranteed or money back, Order direct from 
this advertisement. 


The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. 
(Industrial Division) 4 
152° WEST: 42nd: ST. NEW. YORK, ‘Ne -Y. 








— 


FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING: 


MODEL OF TWO-CYLINDER AEROPLANE ENGINE 
(Supported on Two Tobacco Tins) 


Made by Mr. Roy E. McAdams 





98 THE MODELMAKER . ; 





FOR SALE 


Rough Sketching; The Han- 
dy Sketching Book, consisting 
of sectional ruled paper, plain 
eight squares to the inch, with 
some useful tables, size 5 x 8, 
bound in limp card to fit the 





Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” length. 
Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 
: Winding, Thread Cutting 
pocket, price $.35, Spon, 120 No. 1 Plain Machine as above.......... $28 


Liberty Street, New York. No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58 
SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
CATALOG 
WANTED Shows full details and accessories 
Modelmaker, Volume 1, Num- THE GEROLD CO. (Dept. Mi16)9 


ber 6, November, 1924. Model- 120 Liberty St., N. Y. 


maker Volume 2, Number 5, MODEL MACHINERY . 


May, 1925. Will send a copy of 


. . Sole U. S._ Agent for the noted Eng-. 

heme aie a ag, ee oe lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
pon, erty street, ew makers of Model Steam, Gasoline, 
York. Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
2 ; Trimmings; Electrical Machinery. 
American Institute of Elec. Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin-— 





Engrs. Volumes 1 to 8. Box 4, §na parts, otc, “CABLE SERVICE” 
Modelmaker. Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers — 
Everyday Mechanics, Nos. 1 2 3 Ashland Street _ : 

f Vol. 1. Nos. 1 2 and 2 Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. 8. A. 

and 6 0 erie ; Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
of Vol. 2. Box 2, Modelmaker. 1926 Catalogue Just Issued 
THE MODELMAKER 
BOUND VOL. I. 1924. _ $1.60 60 4 


or return your. numbers to us with $1. 10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. # 


BOUND VOL. II. 1925. $2.10 a 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. Z 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 of Vol. I. Price 10c each. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. 24 

Price 10c each. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 
BLUE PRINTS OF PACIFIC “0” GAUGE LOCOMOTIVE 


FAST POWER BOATS 


32” and 39” CONSTRUCTION SETS 
SCALE MODEL LOCOMOTIVE CASTINGS 
BLOW LAMPS Up to 2 In. Diameter 
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER CARS 
TRACK — “O” Gauge, 1” Gauge and 2%%”’ Gauge 
MODELS AND BOILERS DESIGNED AND BUILT 
Copper, brass, aluminum and steel rod, tube and sheet cut to size. 


FITTINGS, PATTERNS, MACHINE WORK, CASTINGS 
HEX BOLTS AND NUTS (an assortment in small sizes, Am. threads). 


When writing please state fully your requirements 


A. ALEXANDER SINGER & CO. — 


15 MOORE STREET, NEW YORK 


pit a? ) 2, 


Ne a ne RY eee et a eee ee, 





; te 


THE MODELMAKER 


Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST.. NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, July 1, 1926 


Vol. 


SIND. ue 


“Entered as second-class matter M ar. 27, 1925 at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y. under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


One of the most difficult op- 
erations for the Modelmaker is 
the painting, or enameling, of 
his model. 


Metal work should first be 


thoroughly cleaned with gaso- 


line or benzine (which is better 
done in the open air). Be sure 


to remove all grease, rust and 


corrosion before attempting to 


do any painting, 


otherwise the 


- first coat of paint will not ad- 


here, 


or dry. Good paint and 


good brushes only should be 


used. 
The first or priming coat 


should be laid on lightly, but do 


not have the paint too thick. 


It may be advisable to thin it 
down with a little turpentine. 
The priming coat should be al- 


lowed to dry thoroughly; 


this 


_will make it easier to apply the 
next coat evenly. 


In some cases it will be found 


more expedient to paint the in- 


~ dividual 
them 


assemble 
especially 


parts and 
afterwards, 


where there are a number of 
nickle, steel or brass parts. 








Locomotives, passenger and 


_— 


| Please do not forget to men- 
_tion The 
writing to our advertisers. 


Modelmaker when 


freight cars—according to the 
regulations of the railway. 

Marine engines—according to 
the regulations of the line. 

Brass work—lacquered. 

Boiler and cylinder laggings 
of Russian iron—dull black, or 
oiled. 

Cylinder lagging of wood— 
varnished, or oiled. 

Passenger and freight trucks 
—dull black. 

Boat hulls — mahogany, 
cedar, marine varnish. 

Painted hulls—prepare the 
surface, thoroughly smoothing 
down with fine sandpaper. Use 
flat paint to build up a good 
body. The more coats the bet- 
ter the body. Let each coat dry 
then rub down lightly with 00 
steel wool. Finish with glass 
enamel, or marine varnish. 

Inside of hull—one or two 
coats of flat paint, or shellac 
varnish, to protect the wood 
from damp. 

We shall be glad to receive 
comments from any reader as to 
his experience, especially as re- 
gards to the lettering on 
locomotives. 


or 


When writing for information 
please enclose a stamped and 
addressed envelope. 


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SWCLIT SIGVocey wWI0HS 


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THE MODELMAKER 


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42 jp DOs 
Seog JO WNW Y 2? SO Pe SYP 
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Beef semen Gonoet 


P2adt, ¥//5- 





mo THE MODELMAKER 101 


MODEL BRITISH S. E.5 A. SINGLE- 
SEATER FIGHTER 


By OSCAR SCHUWENDT 












(Drawings by the Author) 


(Continued from Page 87) 


_ Sheet 3 shows the details of the various wings and surfaces for 
‘the model. Very little comment will be necessary other than 
that it will be well to cut several ribs out of fairly thick wood 
and then split them into several thinner ones with a fine tooth 
saw rather than attempt to cut each thin rib to the required profile. 
Also in regard to the covering material used on the planes and 
body. It will be noted that the note on this drawing calls for silk. 
This need not be strictly adhered to, as any light material ordi- 
; narily used for model aeroplanes will suffice. If a very light grade 
of silk is obtainable that is the ideal thing to use. The writer 
used some old silk handkerchiefs on his model. By doping the 
material either with the suggested solution or with a standard 
preparation sold by model aeroplane dealers, the covering should 
be drawn up to a nice tight finish. The original plane was painted 
brown on top and yellow below, while the writer enameled his 
~ model black both on top and below, copying after an S. E. 5 plane 

Which was in a Government flying circus touring the country at 

about the time the model was being built. This is the only really 
‘serious deviation from the prototype. The drawing of the main 

wing shows a flexible wire running through inside the wing con- 

necting the two ailerons together. The purpose of this is, of 
course, to make the ailerons work together in the conventional 
_ manner as on the large aeroplanes, and should be in both upper 
and lower wings. It should be noted that this wire must be very 
_ flexible indeed to accomplish this result, and it is doubtful whether 
it is worth the trouble, as each rib must be drilled for the wire 
; to pass through, and the small brass tubes must be set exactly 
right. These holes are not shown in the rib profile. In the case 

of the writer’s model the wire was too stiff, and about the second 
or third time that the ailerons were forced into action the wire 
- broke, which necessitated the removal of some of the wing covering 
' to repair the damage and then the trouble of replacing it. Since - 
- then it has never been tried to work the ailerons. It is entirely 


up to the builder whether or not this is.put in. Although the gap 


THE MODELMAKER 


102 


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THE MODELMAKER 103 


‘at the aileron and tail plane hinges is shown as % inch, it is well 
to keep it smaller than this if possible, as a much neater job will 
be had. 


Sheet 4 of the drawings shows a number of small details which 
are for the most part clear enough without description. The rub- 
ber shock absorbers on the landing gear are by no means essential 
but increase the fidelity of reproduction, and are also a great 
novelty to any one viewing the model. The propeller hanger shown 
serves merely as a support for the propeller shaft, and would have 
to be redesigned for a fiying model. The Hispano-Suiza motors 
are quite novel and, as the photographs will show, look quite 
like the real thing when properly put together and painted. 

No details are given for the windshield, as this is merely a small 
piece of celluloid mounted at a slight angle in a small ridge of 
thin wood glued to the top of the body in the position shown, and 
is of the size given on Sheet 2 of the drawings. The photograph 
will also help to make this clear. 

It is not intended that the builder must necessarily follow the 
suggestions as laid out above, but that with the aid of the draw- 
ings and-by exercising his own ingenuity it is the writer’s opinion 
‘that a very presentable model true to type can be produced. 


We have before us a very small 


; model of the Brigantine “Breda” 


of Boston. 


tusk. 
1/32” to the foot by Mr. H. O. 


The hull, masts and 
spars are all cut out of a Walrus 
It is made to the scale of 


_Havemeyer, Jr., and is a very 
clever piece of work. ~The pro- 
_totype was built at Portsmouth, 


N. H. in 1852 and was used by 


Russel & Co. in the opium trade 
between India and Canton. The 


Model is mounted 
case with a glass front. 


soft 


in a cedar 
Mr. 
Havemeyer has built a number 
of ship models, one of his best 


was the ‘“Vikin Ship” described 
and illustrated in the March is- 
sue of the Modelmaker. 
gore he will favor us with de- 


We 


- scriptions of other of his models. 


> 


Mr. William C. Niesen, 45 
Scott Street, Carbondale, Pa., 
would like to get in touch with 
any of our readers living within 
a reasonable distance of his 
town with a view to an occa- 
sional get-together meeting. Mr. 
Niesen is particularly interested 
in Locomotive models. A good 
many heavy coal trains pass 
through his town, which is sit- 
uated in quite a mountainous 
section of Pennsylvania. Some 
of the grades are very excessive 
necessitating the use of two 
heavy freight locomotives as 
pullers ‘and two of the huge 
mallet type mountain locomo 
tives as pushers. Four loco- 
motives being necessary for a 
loaded coal train of about 60 to 
65 cars to surmount the grades. 


104 THE MODELMAKER 





MODEL AEROPLANE ENGINE 


MR. ROY E. McADAMS 


Al ltt ihe hy itealinli t ll leee 


The engine described and illustrated in this article is the out- — 
come of experiments from time to time covering a period of several 
years. 


It is designed especially for the propulsion of model aeroplanes, ~ 
but could no doubt be used for other purposes where an air cooled 
engine of its power output would be suitable. 


The writer does not claim that this engine is the last word in : 
resign, but hopes it may be helpful in stimulating a greater interest ~ 
in model gas engines. As far as the writer can find out, there are © 
very few mcdel makers interested in gas engines. 


The engine is 14%” BORE and STROKE respectively. It is Four — 
Cycle valve in head type. Automatic inlet valves are used while the 
exhaust valves are mechanically operated by over-head rockers and } 
long push rods. 


¥, H.P. is developed at a speed of about 1,500 R.P.M. The weight 
of engine as shown but without propeller is 3% pounds. , : 


As light weight is essential since it is designed for airplane 
models, aluminum alloy was used extensively in its construction. 
The crank case is cast in halves, one-half carrying the timing 
gear housing, and the other half has pads for breather pipe as well 
as oil test cock. Bronze bushes are used throughout for main bear- — 
ings as well as cam shaft and tappets. . 
Brass timing gears are used and the cam shaft and cam is made 
from one piece of tool steel. | 
The crank shaft is turned from the solid and cold rolled steel 
was the material used. This material has been found entirely satis-— 


factory as to strength and wearing qualities, besides being much » 
easier to machine than tool steel. . 


Bronze connecting rods of H section are sed: They are exactly 
similar to rods used in large engines. 


te» 


The cylinders are aluminum castings with air cooling flanges. 
The readers may wonder why the flanges are so few in number and 
why they were cast on instead of being machined from solid. | 

In the first place casting them saved considerable lathe work, and 
the writer has found from experience that flanges spaced very 
closely do not have nearly as good cooling qualities as those more 

: f 


f THE MODELMAKER 105 


_ widely spaced. The heat seems to vibrate back and forth between 
narrowly spaced flanges. 

“4 As aluminum is hardly suitable for the wearing surface of cylin- 
ders, steel liners are shrunk in the cylinder castings and then fin- 
“ished to correct bore. This form of cylinder construction results 
in a very light cylinder of good wearing qualities and the aluminum 
_ radiates the heat faster than other metals. 

Aluminum alloy pistons fitted with three, step cut, cast iron 
- concentric rings are used. 

The pistons follow orthodox piston construction in all details. 
The writer uses two rings in the same groove at the top of piston 
and finds it superior to rings in a separate groove. The wrist pins 
are held from moving by a set screw. 

In the cylinder heads are located the valves and spark plugs. The 
_ heads were made from cast iron as it was feared that difficulty 
might be experienced in holding securely the valve seats if the head 
"was made from aluminum and valve seats cast iron. The valves 
e are made from steel and are of ample size. 
__ The spark plugs are miniature ones of mica type, and are entirely 
satisfactory. They are imported from England by the writer. 
‘ As can be seen from photo a float feed type of carburetor is used. 
_ As it is rather small some difficulty was experienced before one of 
~ correct proportions was evolved. A small copper float is used and 
é two small levers actuate the needle valve the same as in some large 
carburetors. An automatic auxilary air valve takes care of speed 
_ changes. 
= This carburetor is much superior to the simple mixing valve, 
_ which was tried at first. A long curved intake pipe leads mixture 
to engine. 
4 The pads are silver soldered where carburetor fastens to intake 
pipe. The carburetor can be easily taken apart for cleaning and the 
"moving parts are few in number. 
€ The engine is shown fitted with a simple form of timer, which of 
course requires two spark coils. Since photos were made a small 
interrupter and distributer has been constructed. 
- An ordinary Ford coil was at first used, but as it is rather heavy 
: - the writer conducted experiments with small coils, and finally suc- 
ceeded in making a coil which develops a very intense spark, and 
weighs only 8 oz. as against 1% to 2 lbs. for the ordinary coils as 
found on the market. The small coil has been tested along with 
the commercial ones and if anything fires engine better. This is 
probably because of the greater vibrator frequency used. 








106 THE MODELMAKER 


The propellor shown in photo is 20” diameter, 13” pitch and is 
of cast aluminum. As this propellor weighed 1 pound it proved 
to be a little too heavy for engine to swing properly. 

The writer’s good friend, Mr.. Harry Edward Moyer of Lebanon, 
Pa., who is an expert on model aeroplanes, designed and built a 
26” diameter, 16” pitch propellor especially for this engine. It 
weighs only 6 oz. and the engine spins it nicely. From what can be 
seen during bench tests, the propellor shows itself to be highly 
efficient. 

While no exact speed measurements have been made, the engine 
spins the lighter weight propellor at about 1,200 to 1,500 R.P.M. 
which is about right for model airplanes. 

The writer wishes to state that the tuning up of one of these 
engines is somewhat difficult, as such a small engine is very sensi- 
tive to the slightest adjustment. But after properly tuned up it 
runs very nicely provided it is not overloaded. 

Four ounces of gasoline is sufficient for 30 minutes run at full 
speed, and % to 1 oz. of oil suffices for the same. Splash lubri- 
cation is used and has proven satisfactory. 


The principle over-all diMmsnsions of engine might prove of 
interest. 


Over-all width across rocker arms, 1114”. 
Over-all length across carburetor and propellor hub, 8”. 
Height above engine bed 21%”. 


The Annual Model Engineer 
Exhibition will be held this year 
in London opening on Septem- 
ber the 17th and closing Septem- 
ber the 25th. Any of our read- 
ers who are contemplating a 
trip to England this summer 
‘should certainly take in this 
splendid exhibition. It will be 
held at The Royal Horticultural 
Hall, Westminster, London, S.W. 
1. Perhaps some of our men 
would like to enter Models for 
exhibition. Address’ Percival 
Marshall & Co., 66 Farringdon 
St., London E. C. 4, for full par- 
ticulars. 


Model Railway News, contents 


for June. Mr. A. 
Portable ‘“OO” 
Yard. Layout, 
Equipment. Model 


Signalling; 


Gauge 


Railway 


R. Walkley’s — 
Goods © 
Running and 


Junction Interlock- — 


ing of Points and Signals. Light 


Railways as Prototypes, 0—6—0 
Saddle Tank Locomotive. Con- 


struction of an “O” Gauge Model | 


Railway. Mr. N. Evans’ ‘OO” 
Gauge 12-Wheeled Pullman Car. 
Mr. N. Evans’ “O” Gauge L. N. 


W. R. Model Railway. Mr. H. 
M. Lane’s Gauge 1 Clock Work — 
Model N. E. R. 0—4—4. Tank © 


Locomotive. 
Sale and Exchange, etc. 


Our Mailbag. For 


oF Te eee 


THE MODELMAKER 


J 


: done With accuracy, 
and speed. ‘To illustrate let us 
take a cylinder as sketch, Fig. 1, 


‘ficult if 


DRILLING HOLES AT AN 
ANGLE 


By H. J. Coventry, M.E. 


It is often required to. drill 


holes in a definite location and 


angle to a circular surface, such 
for example as ports in a 
cylinder bore and while, to 
attempt to start the drill 
on the angle would be dif- 





not 
spending a little time in making 
a suitable jig the job may be 


impossible, by 


certainty 


which has been bored and faced. 
It is required to drill steam 
ports so that the edge of the 
eclipse formed due to the angle 
Shall be a known dennite di- 


107 


mension. Dimensions: are given 
as illustration of the procedure, 
but the reader will of course 
apply any dimension and angle 
he desires. 

Proceed as follows:—First lay 
out an accurate drawing (either 
on paper, or tin plate) of sec- 


tion of cylinder putting in the 
port at 
position. 


its proper angle and 
Draw the center line 





N 
SE 
Vac: POP BEFORE DRILLING 





of port and continue it across 
the center line of bore. At 
some convenient point below 
center line of bore draw a line 
at right angles to center line of 
hole. xx Fig. 1. From intersection 
of these two lines step off a 
distance ‘“‘d” along xx, such that 
it is a trifle more than half 
diameter of drilled hole. The 
amount is not important, but the 


108 THE MODELMAKER 


above provides the least amount 
of labor in making the jig. From 
“q”’ draw a line vertical to bore 
center line yy. Now we are ready 
to proceed with the jig itself. 
Select a piece of steel a little 
longer than cylinder bore and 
turn it down to a nice close fit 
in cylinder bore and turn outer 
end to a smaller diameter, 
which should be screwed for a 
nut and washer. Don’t forget 
to make the body port say 1/16 
shorter than bore so that the 
cylinder will be gripped between 
the shoulder at one end and the 
washer at other. Part off the 
piece slightly longer than di- 
mension “e’ measured from 
drawing, turn round in chuck 
and face off exactly to dimen- 
sion ‘fe’ from shoulder. Next 
by means of the center square 
scribe a line across the dia- 
meter f.f. Fig. 2 and then with 
the jig lying in a V block on 
surface plate, scribe another 
line at right angle g.g. and from 
the line g.g. scribe another line 
b.h. at a distance from it equal 
tO: ep onsen, 


It is as well to carry line f.f. 
along body by means of sur- 
face gauge and from shoulder 
mark off a distance equal to 
“a,” aS measured from Fig. 1. 
Make a center punch mark here. 
Now file a flat at the correct 
angle to face of end of jig, and 
continue filing till the line h.h. 
is met. The angle may either 
be maintained with the Starrett 
or B & § protractor or alter- 
natively make a template of 
angle from the drawing. Having 
produced the flat satisfactorily 
again lay the jig in the V block 
and with surface gauge mark 
off the distance equal to b from 
line g.g. Turn the jig round 
and scribe through line f.f. part 
of which has been filed away. 
Center punch the intersection 





carefully, this is the center of " 
required hole. To drill it either ; 
hold in a machine vise on drill 
press so that face m.m. is hori- 
zontal, or mount on tool post of 
lathe setting the jig so that the 
pop mark on body is in line 
with tailstock center and center 
pop on angle face is in line with 
line center. Bolt down securely, — 
start with a Slocomb center 
drill and then run right through 
with required size drill. Do not™ 
feed too heavily and the drill 
should break through exactly on 
the dot made on body this will 
indicate the accuracy of your: 
drilling. 

In using the jig make the line 
f.f. which has been continued 
along the shoulder portion reg- 
ister with the location of hole 
in cylinder and in starting to 
drill take light cuts until the 
drill has got well into the metal. 
The more acute the angle of 
hole the more care must be used 
or a broken drill will be the re- 
sult. 

Such a jig can be made in al- 
most less time than it takes to 
write this note and satisfaction 
will be obtained in having the 
holes exactly where wanted and 
moreover the edges of holes on 
inner and outer face will be per- 
fectly clean. 





One of our Brookline, Mass., 
readers writes us that besides 
the Ship Model Exhibit in the 
Old State House, Boston, which 
contains Col. W. F. Spier’s beau- 
tiful model of ‘Old Ironsides,” 
there is quite a collection of 
models of ships in the new home 
of the State Street Trust Com- 
pany, Boston. The finest model 
in this collection is undoubtedly 
the reproduction of Donald Mc- 
Kay’s last ship, “The Glory of 
the Seas,” which, like a number 
of his other vessels, was de- 
stroyed by fire. ; | 


THE MODELMAKER 





: as s ‘ 
# Model Engineer, principal con- 
tents for May 6, 27 and June 3, 
“10, 17. An Extraordinary Old 


x 


Clock and Its Necessary Repairs. . 


‘Practical Experiences with the 
Daniel Cell. A Model Steam 
Road Wagon. Machining the 
Components of a Small Power 
_ Petrol Engine. Simple Drill Jig 
for Screw. Clock Electrical 
Control Apparatus. A Column 
of Live Steam. The Auto-Heat 
Gas Blow Pipe. Model Yacht- 
‘ing Notes and News. An Ar- 
ticulated Steel Rail Motor 
Coach. A Southern Railway 
4—4—-0 Maunsell Locomotive. 
Making Press’ Tools. Small 
Water Power Electric Lighting 
Installations. Keeping an Aq- 
-uarium in Working Order. In 
_the Glow of the Forge. A Petrol 
' Motor for Model Power Boats. 
1%" Bore by 1 5/16” Stroke, 
Weight 3 lbs. 9 ozs. Complete. 
_Atmospheric Electricity. Mak- 
ing Primitive Objective Lenses 
for the Microscope. Fitting 
New Valves and Guides to an 
Old Gas Engine. Electrical Con- 
- densers. Recent Inventions. Air 
' Transport. Model Yachting in 
Natal. Some Notes on Cutting 
Speeds for Various Metals, 
_ Valve Timing for Locomotives. 
An American Model Steam Trac- 
tion Engine. Model Yachting 
- Association Notes and News. 







- Mr. Frank Birch of Highland 
_ Park, Detroit, Mich., has recent- 
‘ly placed on the market some 
four wheeled and some _ six 
_ wheeled trucks for passenger 
and freight cars. Any of our 
readers interested in this work 
should get in touch with Mr. 
Birch and let him know that you 
are interested in this subject. 
You may be able to do some 
_ business together to your mutu- 
al advantage. 








Mr. Louis Marey has been in- 
terested in the construction of 
models for a number of years. 
He has built quite an assort- 
ment: a battle ship 52” long; a 
destroyer 4” to 1’; a clock 
model with a procession of saints 
at certain periods of time, etc. 
His latest desire is to construct 
a Mallet type locomotive. He 
would like to get in correspond- 
ence with any of our readers 
who have built one of these 
locos, or is contemplating the 
construction of such a working 
model. 


Mr. Vincent V. Hubbard, R. F. 
D. No. 1, East Alton, N. H. is 
looking for some information on 
the construction of a 244” gauge 
electric locomotive. He would 
be pleased to hear from any of 
our readers who could give him 
a little information on this sub- 
ject. 


Mr. H. Jaffers, Saginaw, Mich. 
is interested in model steam en- 
gines. He would like to hear 
from any model fans in his dis- 


' trict with a view to an occa-~ 


sional meeting. These little 
friendly gatherings are doing 
much to increase the interest in 
model work not only amongst 
old timers, but amongst the ever 
increasing number of new men 
who are mechanically inclined 
and who would like to get into 
the game. 


When you have finished your 
Model send us a photograph with 
a short description of its con- 
struction and general particu- 
lars. We shall aiways be glad 
to receive such notices because 
what has interested you will 
also interest our readers. 


110 


THE CHICAGO SOCIETY OF 
MODEL ENGINEERS 


Chicago, III. 


The Modelmaker, 
Dear Sirs: 

The Cc. S. M. E. is holding its 
meetings regularly in room 921, 
Kimball Hall, Chicago on the 
second and fourth Thursdays of 
each month. Anyone interested 
in a visit to the Society will be 
cordially welcomed. 

On Saturday, June 5th, the 
members inspected the Craw- 
ford Avenue HElectric Plant of 
the Commonwealth Edison Co. 

We held our annual informal 
picnic to Dunes Park on Sun- 
day, June 20th, and a good time 
was enjoyed by all. 

For our next trip we are plan- 
ning to inspect one of the steel 
mills near Chicago. 

With many good wishes for 
the Modelmaker and model en- 
gineering in general, I remain, 

A. WILLARD, 
905 Linden Ave., 
Wilmette, Il. 





BOOK REVIEWS 


Metal Plate Work by C. T. 
Millis, Fifth Edition revised and 
enlarged viii, 503 pages, 312 il- 
lustrations, 74%” x 5144”, $3.00. 


This is the fifteenth printing 
of this well known work which 
fully covers the subject of lay- 
ing out patterns to all kinds of 
metal work including many un- 
usual forms of patterns for the 
use of tin, iron and zinc plate 
workers. coppersmiths, boiler: 
makers, plumbers and engineer- 
ing students. The Geometri? 
svstem vsed is acknowledzad tc 
be alter years of application the 
test system for laying out this 
kind otf work. 


THE MODELMAKER 


‘Model Engineers Society. 


Mr. George W. Daniels, 


Craig Avenue, Freeport, Long 


98 


>§ 


Island, N. Y. has been very ~ 


much interested in the building 


4 


of models for a number of 
years, especially machines and — 


steam engines. 


He would very — 


much like to get in touch with 


any pf our subscribers within 


easy reach of his home with a 
view to an occasional meeting, © 
and if there are enough men in ~ 
his district interested in this 
delightful pastime it would be 


an 


Engineers Club. 


Mr. David L. 
wood Ave., Toledo, 


for sometime. 
hear from any of our readers, 


. residing near his city with the 


‘excellent opportunity for — 
them to organize a small Model | 


Stine, 233 Scott-— 
Ohio has 
been interested in model making 
He would like to 


fs 


b 


object of having an occasional — 
gathering of gentlemen inter-— 
ested in this subject, with a 


view to the formation of a 
We 
hope he will hear from a good 
many of our readers. 


Another of our siatiges has 


~~ ae era 


: 


sent us the addresses of the fol-— 
lowing places where some fine 
ship models may be seen. The 
Marine Room of the Old State 


House, Washington Street, Bos- 
The Old Dartmouth Mus- 


ton. 


eum of New Bedford, which has 


a half size model of a Whaler, 
50 feet long on deck, 85 feet 
from end of bowsprit to the end 


; 


of spanker boom and 45 feet to 


top of mast. 


It is complete in 


every detail and is so arranged 
that you can walk all around — 


it,-go on board, and go down 


into the after cabin. The Com- 


mercial Museum in Philadelphia 
have also a number of models | 


of ships. . 





THE MODELMAKER 


In the May issue of the Model- 
maker a reference was made to 
the Model Locomotive competi- 
tion. The closing date was 
given as June 1. This has been 
extended to September 30. The 
Silver Cup has been donated by 
Mr. H. O. Havemeyer, Jr. The 
competition is open to members 
of the N. Y. S. M. E. Full par- 
ticulars can be obtained from 
Mr. A. A. Singer, Sec’y, .15 
Moore Street, New York, N. Y. 


Abraham & Straus of Brook- 
‘lyn are featuring an exhibition 
of Model Boats including some 
very fine exhibition Models, one 
of a war ship, a steam yacht and 
a schooner yacht, also a few 
model power boats and a num- 
ber of fine Sailing Yachts and 
small boats. They also show a 
case of silver cups, which this 
‘firm have donated for prizes to 
be raced for on September 11th, 
on the lake in Prospect Park, 
under the Management of the 
Prospect Park Model Yacht Club. 

The following races are open 
to all comers: 

ist race—For Models 30” or 
longer over all. 

2nd race—For models 20” to 
29” over all. 

38rd race—For Models under 
20” over all. 

Sailing Races for members’ 
Boats. 

— 1st Race—Handicap, open to 
all large boats including ‘“B” 
Class, course windward, and re- 
turn, twice around the course. 
» 2nd Race—‘C” Class, triangu- 
lar course, once around. 

8rd Race—For Junior Mem- 
bers, course windward and 
return once around. 

_ This series of races should 
prove very attractive to the 
Model Sail Boat owners and the 
handsome silver cups are cer- 
tainly worth competing for. 


3 
‘ 
4 


> 


ine 


For full particulars write the 
Secretary, Prospect Park Model 
Yacht Club, Prospect Park, 
Brooklyn, New York. 





The last meeting of the New 
York Society of Model Engineers 
was. a very interesting one. 
There were twenty-four mem- 
bers present. Any of our read- 
ers who are not already mem- 
bers should enter their name for 
membership. The dues are only 
$2.00 per annum. There are two 
competitions open for members. 
A silver cup will be presented 
to the winner of each—a Loco- 
motive competition and a Model 
Power Boat competition. The 
Secretary, Mr. A. A. Singer, 15 
Moore Street, New York, shall 





be very glad to. give full 
particulars. 

Mr. Earle M. French, 110 
Monatiquot Avenue, Braintree, 


Mass., is very much interested 
in Modelmaking. He would like 
to get in touch with any Model- 
makers residing in or near Bos- 
ton with a view to a get-together 
meeting in the hope that he can 
find enough enthusiasts to form 
a Model Engineers’ Club. 


We have frequently been 
asked for good drawings of an 
“OO” gauge locomotive. ‘Mr. A. 
A. Singer informs us he has a 
set of three large scale drawings 
to detail of a~ Pacific Steam 
Locomotive “O” gauge, and an- 
other drawing to make the model 
electrically driven instead of 
using steam. The steam type 
loco, but electrically driven, 
seems to be a very popular 
model. 





When writing for information 
please enclose stamped and ad- 
dressed envelope for reply. 


112 


THE MODELMAKER 


WHAT’S IN YOUR GARRET? 





SALE—EXCHANGE—WANTED 


EVERYTHING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters or 


figures count as words, compound words as separate words. 


accompany copy. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 


YQ" Scale Pacific Locomotive 
Castings, newly designed most 
complete set on the market. 
$30.00 including detail drawings. 
Vulcan Freight and Six wheeled 
Pullman trucks in %” scale. 
Vulcan and Passenger trucks in 
“O” gauge. 5 cts for list and 
further information. Boiler fit- 
tings, etc. Frank Birch, General 
Delivery, Highland Park, Mich. 


Four Blue Prints. Model Brit- 


ish S. E. 5, A. single-seater fight- - 


er, full details. Write O. Schu- 
wendt, 1046 Blackstone Avenue, 
Fresno, Calif. 


Learn to be an Aviator buy 


your glider parts from Icken, 
903 Ray Ave., Ridgefield, N. J. 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
» Modelmakers, send for circular, 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Railway Centenary — 1825- 
1925, being an exceedingly in- 
teresting historical account of 
the British Locomotive, cars 
and signalling apparatus during 
a hundred years of develop- 
ment, with many illustrations 
and some larger colored plates, 
124 pages, 11 x 81%” paper bind- 
ing, $1.60 postpaid. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Designing — Working draw- 


ings prepared; calculation of 
strength of materials; for your 
models or actual size; inven- 
tor’s ideas developed. E. H. 
Grafton, 6542 Lincoln Ave., De- 
troit, Mich. 


Locomotive Blue Prints—‘‘O” 
3 sheets, steam, . 


gauge Pacific. 
full details, $2.00. 1 
steam-electric, 75 cents. 
15 Moore St., New York. 
Patrick 4 In. Swing Lathe, 
slide rest, back gear, drilling 
machine, countershaft, grinder, 
1/6 H. P. A.C. motor, 2 vices; 
42 copies 
date, Locomotive 


sheet, 


Model Engineer to 
Cyclopedia, 


Singer, © 


Greenley’s Model Steam Loco- 


motives, Smith’s Advanced ma- 


chine work, Hayward’s ignition 
starting and lighting. First 
$35.00 gets lot. Carter, 224 S. 
Seventh St., Olean, N. Y. 





WANTED 

Models, Railways and Locomo- 
tives, back nos. and Vols. in 
good condition. Box 10, Model- 
maker. 

Drummond 4 In. Screw Cutting 
Bench Lathe—Second hand, in 
good condition. Grafton MclIn- 
nish, P. O. Box 516, Plainview, 
Texas. 





WORK WANTED 
I make patterns, small cast- 
ings and working models. Model- 
making is my trade. James Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 


a 





FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WORKING MODE 


Vol. Ill, No. 8 AUGUST, 1926 





A MODEL ELECTRIC CRANE. MADE BY 
MR. C. HARRY SQUIER 








LEED TEI WS EEN ATES TE ELC E EEDA ELE CELLET SEEGERS LATE ER EVEL GEELL NLS ALE ELE LEDGE NT OES ONS 
4 
~ 


114 THE MODELMAKER 


WADE MODEL MACHINERY 


73 Bench Sole U. S. Agent for the noted Eng- 
4 lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
Lathes = =makers of Model Steam, Gasoline, 








ein ppiecg s ” Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 

Capacity: in dine SAA’ lenety: Trimmings; Electrical Machinery. 

Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 

Winding, Thread Cutting gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 

No. 1 Plain Machine as above.......... $28 and parts, etc. ‘“‘CABLE SERVICE.” 

No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58 . 
SEND FORCERER 16.PAGH Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 
CATALOG 3 Ashland Street 
Shows full details and accessories Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. 8S. A. 
THE GEROLD CO. (Dept. M17) Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
120 Liberty St., N. Y. 1926 Catalogue Just Issued 





THE MODELMAKER 
BOUND VOL. I. 1924. $1.60 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 


BOUND VOL. II. 1925. $2.10 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 of Vol. I. Price 10c each. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. 2. 
Price 10c each. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 


BLUE PRINTS OF PACIFIC ‘‘0” GAUGE LOCOMOTIVE 


FAST POWER BOATS 


32” and 39” CONSTRUCTION SETS 
SCALE MODEL LOCOMOTIVE CASTINGS 
BLOW LAMPS Up to 2 In. Diameter 
FREIGHT AND PASSENGER CARS 
TRACK — “‘O” Gauge, 1” Gauge and 2%’’ Gauge 
MODELS AND BOILERS DESIGNED AND BUILT 
Copper, brass, aluminum and steel rod, tube and sheet cut to size. 
FITTINGS, PATTERNS, MACHINE WORK, CASTINGS 
HEX BOLTS AND NUTS (an assortment in small sizes, Am. threads). 


When writing please state fully your requirements 


A. ALEXANDER SINGER & CO. 


15 MOORE STREET, NEW YORK — 
JUST PUBLISHED 


SHIP MODEL MAKING 


at OM TO MAKE WORTH-WHILE MODELS OF DECORATIVE SHIPS 
By CAPTAIN E. ARMITAGE McCANN 


Price $2.50 


With Colored Frontispiece Profusely Illustrated — Scale iiien 
A PRACTICAL and TIMELY book which tells how any handy person can make 
models of a Picturesque Barbary Pirate Felluca and a Beautiful Spanish Treasure ; 
Galleon, with a few simple tools and almost without expense. 
The author gives full-sized drawings of every part required. This book describes 
how to make them, what material to use, how to fasten together and color them, — 
how to make the spars and rig the ships. The book describes everything in detail. — 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty St., New York 





THE MODELMAKER 


Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, August, 1926 
Vol. Ill, No. 8 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925 at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y. under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


On another page of this issue 
will be found a letter from one 
of our readers asking for the 
speeds attained by the fastest 
Model Power Boat in the U. S. 

We would be glad to hear 
from any of our readers who 
have actually witnessed such 
performances. There have been 
some rather absurd claims made 
to the speeds of certain model 
power boats, but to the best of 
our knowledge no official speed 
results have ever been publish- 
ed. Except in the case of the 
model power boat competition at 
Put-in-Bay in the Fall of 1924 
which was run under the man- 
agement of the officers of The 
Detroit Model Yacht Club. These 
official results were published in 
the September 1924 issue of the 
Modelmaker. Faster time could 
have been made at this particu- 
lar race if there had not been 
such a strong wind and rough 
water. In the January, 1925, 
issue of the Modelmaker is a 
description of an 8 cylinder uni- 
flow model marine engine built 
for a 6 ft. metal model boat. 
It had a very powerful blow 
torch and large _ steel boiler 
which supplied the engine with 


an abundance of steam at 200 lb. 
pressure. It was claimed for 
this boat that it did 25-miles per 
hour, but we are not aware that 
any official time keeper was 
present at the test. Though it 
is quite possible with such a 
powerful installation this speed 
was attained if not even greater 
speed. 

No doubt many of our readers 
would like to see this particular 
boat thoroughly tried out. 


The most satisfactory way 
would be to use the pole and 
100 ft. steel wire and run the 
boat in continuous circles as 
long as the steam would permit. 
This would enable a competent 
man with a stop watch to record 
the actual time consumed on 
one, two, or more, complete 
circles also on the complete run. 
It would then be an easy matter 
to compute the correct distances 
covered in a given time. That 
would officially establish the 
actual performances of this par- 
ticular boat. We believe this 
boat was of the deep keel type 
with a single propellor. With 
such a plant in a hydroplane or 
sea sled type of hull the speeds 
obtained might be quite surpris- 
ing. The size and shape of the 
propellor would have to be care- 
fully considered to get the best 
results. 


116 


Model Engineer, principal con- 
tents, June 24, July 1, 8, 15 and 
22. A 1%” Scale Model Express 
Locomotive 4—6—0. Gauge 
Ring for Boring. “Is B. S.C.” 
Building Locomotive Tenders. A 
Precision Plane. A Model Jet- 
Condensing Table Engine. Build- 
ing a Half Horse “Hartop”’ Gas 
Engine. A Small Scale Cattle 
Steamer. A Cone Grinding Ac- 
cessory. ‘“L. B. S. C.” Gauge 
“O” Pacific Boiler. ‘Model of a 
Man-of-War of about 1750. Boat 
Building and Sailing in South 
Africa. Private Workshops. In- 
structional Model of Walschaerts 
Valve Gear. A Model 90 Twin 
Petrol Engine 11%” Bore 11%” 
Stroke. Making Small Steam 
Cocks and Valves. Stamping 
Fixtures for Small Jobs. High 
Tension Battery Charger. A 
Stationery Steam Engine With 
Some Novel Features. Ejector 
or Steam Jet Pumps. Acetylene 
Welding with Small Shop. Ma- 
chining a Split Bush. Recent 
Inventions. Queries and Re- 
plies. Light Machinery. Yacht- 
ing Notes. Society and Club 
Doings. 





BOOK NOTICES 

Diesel Engines, Marine; Loco- 
motive; Stationary, by David 
Louis Jones. xviit565 pages, 
341 illustrations, 9144x644 in., 
cloth, price $5.00. 

A practical treatise on the 
principle, construction, opera- 
tion and maintenance of the 
Diesel Oil Engine, both Marine 
and Stationary types, with a de- 
scriptive chapter on the latest 
developments in Diesel Locomo- 
tives and Diesel electric drive 
for ship propulsion. Contents 
of Chapters: 1, Elementary 
Thermodynamics. 2, Elementary 
Principles. 3, Comparative Ef- 
ficiencies. 4, Details of Con- 


THE MODELMAKER 


struction. 5, Spray Valves. 6, 
Fuel Pumps; Governors; Fuel 
Systems. 7, Valve Gears; Start- 
ing and Reversing Systems. §8, 
Lubricating and Circulating 
Water Systems. 9, Indicator 
Cards and Engine Testing. 10, 
Operation of Diesel Engines. 
11, Representative Types of 
Engines. 12, A 1,000 Horse 
Power Submarine Diesel En- 
gine. 18, Diesel-Electric Drive 
for Ships. 14, Properties of 
Lubricating and Fuel Oils. 15, 
Marine Rules for Vessels Pro- 
pelled by Diesel-Oil Engines. 
16, Two Hundred Diesel Engine 
Pointers. 17, Diesel Engines 
for Railroad Service. The 
Author has gathered within the 
covers of this book a great deal 
of information that should 
prove of value to all those in- 
terested in this subject. The 
chapters on Marine Diesel Elec- 
tric Drive and on Diesel Hlec- 
tric Locomotives are of especial 
interest at this time. 





Economics of Highway En- 
gineering by ULt.-Col. H. T. 
Tudsbery, M.C., R.E. (T.), 48 
pages, 9 in. x 5% in., cloth. 
$2.00. ‘ 3 

Arranged under the following 
headings. Introduction: Traffic: 
Track: Vehicles: Fundamental — 
Principles: and Index. 





F. H. S.—It is not a difficult 
operation to make a bellows and 
blow torch suitable for brazing 
or silver soldering. In Thatch- 
er’s little book on Simple Solder- 
ing is a chapter that fully de-. 
scribes the construction of such 
a. piece of apparatus. | 





When writing for information 
please enclose stamped and ad- 
dressed envelope for reply. ~ 


a, ee eee eee ae 


THE MODELMAKER 117 


A 4” SCALE MODEL LOCOMOTIVE 


By PAUL REITHMAIER 
‘ Member of the Chicago Society of Model Engineers 


I have just about completed this model, and a short description 
of it might be of interest to the locomotive man. The engine is 
of the 2—8—2, or Mikado type and is a free lance design. The 
reason, I built a freight engine, will explain itself this way. I have 
built several Passenger Engines, but on account of limited space for 
track I could never develop the full speed of those engines, so I 
built this engine with small wheels to get a better run on my 
short length of track. I also reduced the revolutions by increased 
piston travel, that means using a long stroke and a small cylinder 
bore. I am a firm believer in a long piston stroke, as.a model 
locomotive always has a tendency to run too fast. The long 
stroke gives a quick get away and greater starting power for the 
engine. 

Now to come to the construction of the engine. No drawings 

Were made, with the exception of a diagram for the Valve Gear. 
I am one of those fellows who have the gift to design things and 
get them to right proportions while they are being made. I am 
a mechanic by trade and have made the steam locomotive a life 
study, beginning in my early boyhood. 
_ The Driving wheel pattern was taken in hand first, and con- 
sists of a center, drilled and filed out, of a 3%” brass plate; the rim 
was made from an old locomotive brass wheel and is shrunk and 
soldered on. The trailing wheel is also a brass pattern. The 
front wheels are Basset-Lowke castings. 

The cylinder pattern, including the steam chest, is made inter- 
changeable, so it could be used for either piston or slide valve. 
_ These are all the patterns required. The rest of the parts 
such as smoke stack, driving journals, etc., were made out of 
drawn brass stock. 

- The main frames are made from two pieces 5/16” by 2” cold 
drawn steel. This job requires quite a bit of drilling, sawing and 
filing. Great care has been taken to get the pedestals nice and 
Square, and correctly centered. 

§ After mounting the driving wheels, it was found they were 
centered so good that it was possible to interchange the front 
and rear axle coupling rods without any difficulty. 


118 THE MODELMAKER 


The front Truck is of the radial type with swing link centering 
devise. The trailing Truck is also a radial type, and has a wedge 
shaped centering devise. Both trucks are sprung with spiral 
springs. 

The main drivers have regular leaf springs and are equalized. 
Nearly all the weight of the engine is on the drivers and there 
is just sufficient weight on the front and rear truck to keep them 
on the track. 

The cylinders are cast in gun-metal and are without the saddle, 
common to American practice. The reason for that is to keep 
down the condensing of the steam. They are also for the same 
reason made as light and as thin as possible. 

The pistons are made in two parts held together with the 
piston rod and a lock nut on the end. A piston ring 3/16” wide 
provides for steam tightness. For an experiment I provided this 
engine with slide valves. On other engines I have used piston 
valves made of nickel working in brass liners and have had very 
good results with them. The valve travel is %” in full gear and 
will cut off on %” stroke. A relief valve and displacement lubri- 
cator are arranged for each cylinder. 


The Walschaert valve gear is very simple in construction, and 
resembles very much the Maffei type engines of the Bavariam 
railroads. The links work only on one pin of 44,” diam. and turn 
in an extra long bearing. Reversing is operated from a quadrant 
lever in the cab, which has three notches for each direction of 
run, and one center position. The engine works very good linked 
up to the last notch, 


Aba ERO 6 © ye hae Pace ae Spe 


The Boiler 


The boiler barrel, including the smoke box is made from copper 
tubing 22%4” long by 5%” outside diam. and 4%” wall. The outer 
fire box is a 3/32” thick sheet bent around the barrel, and fastened 
to it with a double row of rivets. Throat back and smoke box 
plate are also flanged out of 3/32” copper sheet, but are only single 
riveted. The rivets used are 5/32” diam. and 7/16” spaced apart. 
The flue and back plate of the inner fire box are 14%” thick. The 
crown and sides form a single sheet 3/32” thick. The crown sheet 
is well supported and anchored. The four sides are braced with 
4,” diam. stays of copper, 14%” apart. Nine 5%” and five 34” flues’ 
of 17” in length are screwed in one end and expanded in the other 
end. Two 5/16” brass stays connect the fire box back and smoke 
box plate together. A steam pipe in center, which contains the 


THE MODELMAKER 119 


throttle valve rod serves also as a stay. The same pipe has a short 
connection to the dome, and extends into the smoke box, where 
the throttle valve is screwed on. The throttle valve itself is on 
the order of an engine slide valve, with omission of the exhaust 
and one inlet port. 


All joints are soft soldered with exception of the inner fire box, 
which is silver soldered. 


A superheater has not been made yet, but the five larger flues 
will provide for one. The boiler is lagged with Russian sheet iron, 
and is bolted onto a built-up cylinder saddle in front and rests. 
in back on a vertical sheet, which allows a little radial movement. 

The grate is of the round bar type, but will be replaced by a 
shaking grate. The ashpan has two pockets between the frames 
and two are built around the truck wheels one on each side. 


Fittings of the boiler are two safety valves of 4” capacity, 
water gauge, steam gauge, blower valve and a steam valve for the 
injector. The injector is built to the description of (L. B. S. C.) 
in a column of “Live Steam” in the Model Engineer, and sure 
‘works good. The whistle is mounted on top of the boiler, to get 
as short a steam connection as possible. There are two check 
valves. 


A powerful hand pump is mounted in the tender. The fire 
door is of the butterfly type, and will be arranged later to work 
automatically. ; 


The Tender 


The tender truck frames are of the diamond type, built up of 
cold drawn steel and have cast bronze axle boxes. Spiral springs 
are provided. The under frame is made of 3” by 34” cold drawn 
steel and has two bumpers to bear against the engine, which gives 
a stiff and still flexible coupling to the engine. The tank is of 
galvanized iron sheet, correctly riveted and soldered. 


The engine is equipped with pilot, bell and electric head light. 
I am still experimenting with a small Turbo generator about 1” 
diam. which will be sufficient to light two 1% volt lamps. A sand 
dome will be placed between smoke stack and steam dome, and 
‘another dome behind the safety valve. 


The engine was run several times, but no actual test has been 
made yet. As designed I expected to get 25 lbs. draw-bar pull, but 
: on a temporary test, she pushed the scale to 30 lbs. The steam 
“pressure used was 100 lbs. 


" 





THE MODELMAKER 


120 


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THE MODELMAKER 121 


Fuel used was soft coal, but trouble was experienced with plug- ! 


_ ged flues, so I changed to hard coal with very good results. 
Of course my tracks are not very good and only about 100 feet 
- in length, which is hardly sufficient to get up speed. 
Brakes are badly needed and it will be my next job to equip 
_ the engine and tender, with steam brakes. 


Principal Dimensions 


Length of engine and tender 


rare terse Wuvke sushtsnat 5334 Inches 
Length of engine only...... aE a, na ae 3234 * 
Pee MMO UOINULO I acs g's occ who ein Waveho le'e oieses 2034 iF 
Height of engine to top of smoke stack...... 11% 4 
See a RN ae Mare gc Be oS nvidin sea S978 wislece ai Stee 
Weight of engine only in working order...... 112 lbs. 
eee MT SV OLB is woe hos on wide wc Sioa esa 94..°% 
We ret AON. LTUCK 06 eso. xh ate ies oes ee 8 Se 344% 
pret ee OAL TEUCHK Sos ie. Cs sche a biel oe can TQ a 
PE DMS SS 8 gh gs RRS ee Gb 414 inches 
Pee ATONE WHEGIS 2 eS siete eee olen» Bee, VO a, 
Perel ROR WNCOIS oie AY siise sishe s achcs'srs oce es 234 , 
Pee AVINGO | ADASO. 2 2 hito er ee cle as ca oes 26% of 
vee Ie TI BUTIACE . 055 cee oe ee whe eh ak 481.8 sq. in 
5 eM lk dey ai. oe kh S lnltn B0 Sar cnete 


Stroke 


———~— 


Tender, tank capacity 


ag ag Oe, 


Mr. William Owsley, 1301 
Chickasha Avenue, Chickasha, 
Okla., writes us that he is just 
completing a Model 24 racing 
yacht designed by Mr. A. R. 
Ferris, which was described in 
February 1926 issue of the 
~Modelmaker. He says it makes 
up into a wonderful little model. 
We shall be glad to hear from 


DFP ne ae 
ee as ee ‘ 


eo oe 


made Models themselves from 
designs given in the Model- 
_maker. 





eoereeeereeeeee et eoevoerst sees eevee ee ee 


eee eee Fee eret serves eevee ee 


eer eee eee ee ee eve 


Tender, wheels diam. ....... 
Tender, weight empty ....... 


eee ete eevee eases ee 


DE ib pink pera Pepe 23/16 inches 
te aero ean Aa a 201% Ibs. 


any of our readers who have 


24% gallons 


We have just received a letter 
from another of our readers giv- 
ing us the following addresses 
where models of old-time ships 
may be seen: Max Williams 
Antique Shop, 583 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York; India House, 
Hanover Square and _ Pearl 
Street, New York, and the Mu-. 
seum of the City of New York 
in the old Gracie Mansion at the 
foot of 88th Street, opposite 
Welfare Island, East River, New 
York. 


THE MODELMAKER 


eas 
bo 
bo 


A MODEL ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE 
CRANE 


By C. HARRY SQUIER 


The truck on which the crane is mounted is of a size 5” x12” 
built of 144” brass plate for the top and sides and 4” plate for the 
ends. The wheels are of brass, 314” in dia. with a %” tread, 
forced on 14” diameter shaft axles made of drill rod steel. Solid 
brass bearing blocks are set in the side plates, and the whole 
construction is extremely heavy, and the truck able to carry a 
one hundred pound load without trouble. 

The truck motor is 6-volt, Series wound Knapp type supported 
between the two axles, and driving them through 48 pitch spur 
gearing at a ratio of 96 to one. Geared thus, the motor can move 
the truck at slow speed with any load the crane can handle. This 
motor is controlled by a separate switch in the base of the cab. 

The wheels of the truck were originally flanged for track oper- 
ation, but due to the crane being used so much off the rails, the 
flanges were removed to prevent cutting the floors, and to give 
it a wider range of action. 

The foundation plate of the crane is a circular brass casting 
5” in diameter by 5/16” thick, bored out to give a bearing surface 
36” wide at the outer rim. A %” King bolt in the center, with 
spring collar and lock-nut, anchors it securely to the truck and 
permits free rotation. 

The main frame is a brass casting. Accurately machined all 
over and screwed by screws to the foundation plate. A boss 
being cast integral with the frame for the boom to receive a good 
anchorage. The bearings for the cable drum, and intermediate 
gears are all carried on this frame and are adjustable for wear. 
All gears are of brass 32 pitch of involute form, the ratio from 
motor shaft to cable drum being 132 to one, thereby multiplying 
the power enormously and providing ample power at the hook. 

The boom. is of 1/16” sheet brass, 20” long, built up similar to 
a bridge truss, and is of great strength, showing no signs of 
bending when 40 lbs. is swinging from the hook. Two sheaves 
1” in diameter are used at the boom head, and two at the hook, 
making the total lifting ratio to motor shaft over one thousand 
to one. This ratio gives a lifting speed of about 5 feet per minute © 
with the controller at full speed. The heaviest load is under per- 
fect control at all positions and can raise, or lower, a distance of 
1/64”, or less, without effort. The writer does not know the ulti- 


THE MODELMAKER 123 


mate lifting capacity of this model but the linen cable is the 
weakest link, and in case of an accident where the hook starts to 
pick up the bench instead of the load, it readily snaps before 
stalling the motor. 

The original motor was operated with alternating current at 
100 volts and reversing switch but due to insulation troubles this 
was removed, and a small separately excited 6 volt D. C. motor 
was substituted, enabling the truck and crane motors to both 
draw current from the same bus bars using a push button con- 
troller, the lower voltage avoids all arcing troubles, and also 
prevents the operator getting shocks through his fingers within 
the narrow confines of the cab. 

The cab is built up of 4%” plate aluminum with brass gussets, 
of a size 10” long by 6” high. A solid cast iron roof faced with 
aluminium, acts as a counterweight for the boom load. To further 
increase its stability, massive blocks of steel are secured to, and 
made part of the cab floor, the whole machine weighing in the 
neighborhood of forty pounds. The cab is illuminated by a small 
six-volt lamp fastened to the roof. 

The boom has a movement of 360 degrees and is raised, or 
lowered,. by a small winch within the cab operating through 4 
sheave pulley blocks. A load can be placed in au exact spot 
anywhere within range of the boom, and can be handled as deli- 
cately and with an ease to compare very favorably with the most 
modern type of locomotive crane. All power is furnished by a 
standard 6-volt accumulator, the maximum current required being 
about 8 amperes. 

Mr. A. A. Singer informs us Model Railway News, contents 
that owing to the difficulty of for August. An “O” Gauge Out- 
getting small hex nuts and bolts door System. A New Zealand 


he has made up quite an assort- Rig te ; 
ment of small sizes to standard Exhibition Model Railway. Run- 


- American gauge. These little ning “O” Gauge Clockwork 
items are very essential and add Tyains. A Simple Culvert 
considerably to the finish of a Bridge. Construction of an “O” 


peupcael Gauge Model Railway. A “Keen- 


Mr. Reggie Pink, 2831 Middle- Farrow” Type Water Tank. 
town Road, Bronx, New York, is Automatic Model Signalling. “O” 
considering the construction of Gauge Garden Railway Tips. 
a 74%" Gauge Locomotive and Model “O” Gauge 4_§—4 Type 
Track with cars. He would’ Electric Locomotive. Small Rail- 
very much like to hear from any ways as Prototypes. Gauge ‘“O” 
of our readers who have done ‘Track Layout. Mr. G. P. Arthur’s 
work along this line as sugges- American Type Model Railway. 
_ tions for type of locomotive. Our Mailbag. Club Notes ete. 





124 


The Modelmaker. 
Dear Sirs: 


In reply to your question about 
silver soldering. I bought a book 
describing the methods used, 
but could not make headway 
owing to having only a one-pint 
blow torch as source of heat, 
and of course this would not 
even start to heat a _ boiler 
twelve inches long to the red 
heat necessary to fuse the sil- 
ver. Finally I fixed the boiler 
up on the household gas stove 
directly over the largest bur- 
ner, then arranged tin baffles 
over the boiler to direct the 
gas flames on to it. I then lit 
the jet and in fifteen minutes 
the boiler was at a dull red heat, 
and after applying borax and 
silver in the usual way turned 
the blow torch on the particu- 
lar part I wished to solder and 
this provided the necessary 
extra heat to fuse the silver. 


Of course it is necessary to 
rearrange the boiler and baffles 
for each seam. The thin flues 
were protected from burning 
by slipping iron rods into them, 
leaving half an inch or so pro- 
jecting. The first boiler I made 
was ruined by these rods stick- 
ing in the flues, and in attempt- 
ing to get them out, buckling 
the flues. I imagine it was ex- 
cess borax which caused them 
to stick. However, in later at- 
tempts I selected rods at least 
1/16” less in dia. than the bore 
of the flues and had another rod 
to hand so that the instant the 
brazing was completed I pushed 
the rods out of the fiues, before 
the borax had time to set. 


In silver soldering two parts, 
one of which is much larger 
than the other, it is necessary 
to direct all the heat on the 
large part to get it to the fusing 
point of silver, before playing 
the flame on the actual joint, 


THE MODELMAKER 


otherwise, if the flame is first - 
played on the joint, the small 
part will just melt before the 
large one gets nearly hot 
enough. é 

It is not possible to silver 
solder some grades of phosphor 
bronze as this alloy generally 
melts, or rather crumbles up, 
before the silver melts. In a 
case where the worker has de- 
cided to silver solder bronze 
and take a chance, I suggest 
taking a scrap piece of the 
bronze and a piece of silver 
and heat the two of them to- 
gether to discover which melts 
first. If the silver melts first 
one may reasonably take a 
chance, but watch the job very 
closely and the instant the 
silver melts turn the flame 
away. 

I ‘hope these notes will prove 
to be some. assistance to 
readers. I am not an expert, 
by any means, but the little I 
do know has been learned in 
the expensive school of personal 
experience. 

Yours truly, 
F. G. Carter. 
224 S. Seventh St., Olean, N. Y. 





The Editor 
The Modelmaker. 


Dear Sir:— 

Will you kindly furnish the 
following information? 

1. The fastest recorded speed 
of a 1-metre displacement boat 
either steam or gasoline driven 
in the U. S. A. 

2. Are particulars of hull, pro- 
peller diam. and pitch, engine 


r.p.m., ete, available? And if 
so where? 
B. Read, Jr., 


3230 Euclid Heights Blvd. — 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio. 





Please do not forget to men- 
tion The Modelmaker when 
writing to our advertisers. 


_ Write for particulars. 


THE MODELMAKER 


125 


WHAT'S IN YOUR GARRET? 





SALE—EXCHANGE—WANTED 


EVERYTHING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
_ WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters or ~ 


figures count as words, compound words as separate words. 


accompany copy. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 


One-Half-Inch Scale Pacific 
Castings and full size drawings 
$30.00 complete. 1” x1” Vertical 
or Horizontal Stationary Engine 
Castings. Locomotive drive 


wheels from O Gauge to 1” scale — 


prices quoted. Order direct from 
the designer and manufacturer, 
all goods advertised are carried 
in stock, immediate delivery, 
not weeks of delay. American 
design and made in the U. S. A. 
Price list 5 cents. Frank Birch, 
General Delivery, Highland 
Park, Michigan. 


Practically New Bench Lathe 
with counter shaft, centers, etc. 
Roy Rob- 


- bins, Hamden, Ohio. 


Prototype Drawings of Amer- 
ican Locomotives and tenders: 


Front and side elevations with 
correct dimensions $1.00 each. 
George D. Arthur, Glenbrook, 
- Conn. 





‘Learn To Be An Aijr Pilot, 


make your own glider, Icken, 


903 Ray 
N. J. 


Avenue, Ridgewood, 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
~Modelmakers, send for circular, 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 


Upper Montclair, N. J. 


FOR SALE 


Locomotive Blue Prints—“O” 
gauge Pacific. 3 sheets, steam, 


full details, $2.00. 1 sheet, 

steam-electric, 75 cents. Singer, 

15 Moore St., New York. 
Designing — Working draw- 


ings prepared; calculation of 
strength of materials; for your 
models or actual size; inven- 


tor’s ideas developed. E. H. 
Grafton, P. O. Box 75, North End 
Station, Detroit, Mich. 


Rough Sketching; The Han- 
dy Sketching Book, consisting 
of sectional ruled paper, plain 
eight squares to the inch, with 
some useful tables, size 5 x 8, 


bound in limp card to fit the 


pocket, price $.35, Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 
Railway Centenary — 1825- 


1925, being an exceedingly in- 
teresting historical account of 
the British Locomotive, cars 
and signalling apparatus during 
a hundred years of develop- 


ment, with many illustrations 
and some larger colored plates, 
124 pages, 11 x 8%” paper bind- 
ing, $1.60 postpaid. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


126 THE MODELMAKER 





Price, 35c. Each. 


SMALL ELECTRICAL MEASURING INSTRUMENTS. How to 
Make and Use Them. By Percivat MarsHALi. Contents of 
Chapters:—1. Instruments for testing the presecne of an electric 
current, detectors, galvanometers. 2. Instruments for measuring 
the pressure or quantity of an electric current, amperemeters; 
voltmeters. 3. Instruments for measuring electrical resistance, 
wheatstone bridge. 4. Instruments for measuring static elec- 
tricity. 5. Practical details for construction. 6. The principles 
upon which electrical measuring instruments work. 7. How to use 
electrical measuring instruments. 8. How to choose electrical 
measuring instruments. 90 pages, 59 illustrations. 


PRACTICAL ELECTRICS. A universal handy book on everyday 
electrical matters, including connections, alarms, batteries, bells, 
carbons, induction and resistance coils, dynamos, measuring, micro- 
phones, motors, telephones, phonographs, photophones, etc. 135 
pages, 126 illustrations. 


INVENTIONS. How to Protect, Sell and Buy Them. By 
Freperic B. Wricut. Counsellor in Patent Causes. This book 
is especially written for the use of Inventors, instructing them how 
to place their inventions before an Attorney clearly; the rights given 
them under the Law, Patent specifications, Legal forms, and the 
many points necessary for an Inventor to know to protect himself 
under the American Laws. The most practical and clearly written 
American book on this subject, especially intended for the un- 
initiated. 114 pages, and 1 sample pattern drawing. 


WOODWORK JOINTS. How to make and where to use them. 
A new revised and enlarged edition. Contents of Chapters: 1. 
Mortise and tenon joints. 2. Lap joints. 3. Dove-tail joints. 4. 
“Glue”? joints. 5. Scarfing joints and joints for lengthening 
timbers. 6. Circular work, showing how to make joined woodwork 
frames in the form of ovals and circles. The work describes clearly 
the construction of the principle joints used in carpentry and 
joinery, and shows not only how to set them out, but indicates for 
what purpose they are best suited. 101 pages, 178 illustrations. 


UNIVERSAL TIME CARD MODEL. By setting to the desired 
hour at any one place the movable model will show at a glance the 
actual time of all the other places in the world. Printed on stiff 
card in two colors, size 7 in. by 9 in. 


MODEL STEAM ENGINE DESIGN. A handbook for the De- 
signer of small Model Steam Engines, including original tables and 
calculations for speed, power, proportions of pumps, compound 
engines, and valve diagrams. By RosBrert M. DE ViGNIER. Con- | 
tents of Chapters: 1. Various Types. Speed of Model Engines. 
2. Power Calculations. Materials. 3. Feed Pumps. 4. Com- 
pound Engines. 5. The Valve Diagram. 6. Engine Layout. Pat- 
terns, 102 pages, 34 illustrations, 


Spon & Chamberlain, 120 Liberty St., New York. 


_THE MODELMAKER- 127 


WANTED 
Model Power Boats by Hobbs 
in good condition, Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Small Bench Lathe, perfect 
condition, will consider Wade 
No. 1, Wm. Steffens, 210 Valen- 
tine St., Ridgwood Station, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


WORK WANTED 
Model Machine Work. Small 
Patterns and Castings. Model 
Steam and gas engines built 
from your drawings or from 
ours. Estimates cheerfully 
given. John N. Fenner, 64 

Broad St., Clifton, N. J. 


THE DOMINION TOOLS 
& CASTINGS CO. 


433 Homer St., Vancouver, B. C. 
Western readers will find at the 
above address goods from the fol- 
lowing firms: 
Stuart Turner, Ltd. 
Mills Bros., of Sheffield 
Exe Eng’g Co., Ltd. (Exe lathes) 
Liverpool Castings & Tool Supply, Ltd. 
Leeds Model Co., Ltd. 
Tom Senior (Arth. Firth Castings) 
“Britannia’’ Lathes (Colchester) 
We will be delighted to meet any 
Model Engineers who call upon us 
during their stay in Vancouver. 


~l 


WANTED 


Modelmaker, Volume i, Num- 
ber 6, November, 1924. Model- 
maker Volume 2, Number 5, 
May, 1925. Will send a copy of 
Mechanical Age in exchange, 
Spon, 120 Liberty Street, New 
York. 


American Institute of Elec. 
Engrs. Volumes 1 to 8. Box 4, 
Modelmaker. 


Everyday Mechanics, Nos. 1 2 
and 6 of Vol. 1, Nos. 1 2 and 3 
of Vol. 2. Box 2, Modelmaker. 


WORK WANTED 
I make patterns, small cast- 
ings and working models. Model- 
making is my trade. James Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 


MODEL MAKERS 
HAVE YOU A LATHE? 


If not, let us figure on your work. 
Accuracy Guaranteed 
to within 1/1000th of an inch, and all 


work done by an experienced 
machinist. 


Estimates cheerfully given. 
Prices moderate. 


Motor Generator Service 
P.-O..Box224 
DOVER, NEW JERSEY 








'EGOLF SCALE MODELS 


Complete, with tender, 


ay 120 99 


Reading Rwy. Pacifics crass 


ELECTRIC 


0-GAUGE 6-8 VOLTS 
Take 3-foot radius curves. 
$50 POSTPAID. 


A special device on these models emits 


smoke while running. 


Reverse switch and full valve gear. 


MADE FROM THE RAILWAY’S OWN 
PLANS ON A 
GIVING MAXIMUM POWER. 


PATENTED SYSTEM 


100 WOODSIDE AVE, 
NARBERTH, PA. 


128 THE MODELMAKER 


NaS 


| 


ih 





7) 





SS ale a S22 — 
SSS 

2 MES A SSS eg ee — 
SS — 


Model Makers 


Get this Flexible and Portable 
Shaft Outfit of a Thousand Uses 


This Flexible Shaft Outfit, a precision instrwment, primarily designed | 
for hard service, is indispensable for model makers, mechanics and for 
machine shop use. There’s lots of pep behind it; it’s portable. ; 


Consists of a ball-bearing coupling to connect to any motor or re- 
volving spindle, 3 feet of flexible shafting, and a ball-bearing chuck. 
Operates emery and buffing wheels, reamers, metal drills, files, burrs, 
and many other appliances. Simply place the tool in the chuck and 
the outfit is put to work. Runs as smoothly as a highly jeweled 


watch. / 
P) 


Drilling and reaming holes in metal, wood or composiay 
A Few Uses tion, die-cutting, mold making, engraving; buffing and 
polishing, rectifying dies and punches, cleaning solder joints, etc. A % horse- 
power motor for operating is easily obtainable at small cost. In ordering, state 


size of motor shaft. a 
SPECIAL OFFER —SEND ONLY $5.00 q 


This Flexihle Shaft Outfit regularly sells for $45. As a _ special intro- 
ductory offer from our factory to you, send $5° with order and naa 
postman $20, plus postage, on arrival. Satisfac- 4 
tion guaranteed or money back. Order direct from eT 
this advertisement. a 

The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. 

(Industrial Division)  . 

152 WEST 42nd ST. NEW YORK, N. Y-: 



















SSS ee 


Pe THE 


MODELMAKER 


FOR THOSE  " 'ReRy op 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


WORKING MOOEE% 


Vol. Ill, No. 9 SEPTEMBER, 1926 10 Cents 

















~N OLD-TIME ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE 


MADE BY MR. J. W. NEPTUNE 





ee 4) 
} “3 Lathes 
Capacity: 4” dia. x 18” length. 
Turning, Facing, Boring, Drilling, 
Winding, Thread Cutting 
No, 1 Plain Machine as above.......... $28 
No. 2 Back-Geared, Screw Cutting $58 
SEND FOR FREE 16-PAGE 
CATALOG 


Shows full details and accessories 
THE GEROLD CO. (Dept. M18) 
120 Liberty St., N. Y. 


THE DOMINION TOOLS 
& CASTINGS CO. 


433 Homer St., Vancouver, B. C. 
Western readers will find at the 
above address goods from the fol- 
lowing firms: 
Stuart Turner, Ltd. 
Mills Bros., of Sheffield 
Exe Eng’g Co., Ltd. (Exe lathes) 
Liverpool Castings & Tool Supply, Ltd. 
Leeds Model Co., Ltd. 
Tom Senior (Arth. Firth Castings) 
“Britannia” Lathes (Colchester) 
We will be delighted to meet any 
Model Engineers who call upon us 
during their stay in Vancouver. 


MODEL MAKERS 


HAVE YOU A LATHE? 


If not, let us figure on your work. 
Accuracy Guaranteed 





to within 1/1000th of an inch, and all 
work done by an experienced 
machinist. 


Estimates cheerfully given. 
Prices moderate. 


Motor Generator Service 
P. O. Box 224 
DOVER, NEW. JERSEY 


nh 


THE MODELMAKER 


MODEL MACHINERY 


Sole U. S. Agent for the noted Eng- 
lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
makers of Model Steam, Gasuline, 
Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
Trimmings; Electrical Machinery. 
Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 
gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 
and parts, etc. “CABLE SERVICBE.” 


Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 


3 Ashland Street 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. S. A. 


Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
1926 Catalogue Just Issued 


THE BATHE MFG. CO. 


Model Engines, 
Boilers, Boiler Fittings, Books, 


Model Makers’ Supplies 


Large Illustrated Catalogue 20c. 
(refunded on first order) 


Dept. S.— 5214 Woodland Ave., 
PHILADELPHEAS PA. 


A REAL MODEL OF A 
REAL LOCOMOTIVE 


-4-inch Scale 
Pacific K4 Pennsylvania R. R. 


Get ready now to build this fine model. 
Complete set rough castings only with 
fully detailed prints, $40 F.O.B. 
Complete sets only supplied. 
Terms if Desired 
See Model Maker, Feb. to May 1925 
for description. 


H. J. COVENTRY, M.E. 


4003 CARLISLE AVE., 
BALTIMORE, MD. 





THE MODELMAKER_ 
BOUND VOL. I. 1924. $1.60 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 


BOUND VOL. II. 1925. $2.10 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 8, 4, 5 of Vol. I. Price 10c each. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. 2. 
Price 10c each. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 


— 
Ms 


THE MODELMAKER 
Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, September, 1926 


Vol. 


Ill, No. 9 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925, at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


Last year a very interesting 
book was published in England 
showing the development of the 
Steam Rail Locomotive during 

the past hundred years. From 
the crude products of Stevenson 
and Watt to the powerful pas- 
senger and freight locomotives 
of the present day. 

About 20 years ago some de- 

signers and builders of locomo- 
tives turned their attention to a 
new type, the Gasoline-Electric 
Rail Car, which included the mo- 

tive power, passenger and bag- 
gage compartments complete in 
one unit. A number of these 
rail cars have been built and 
have proved quite successful 
and economical on lines where 
traffic was light. 

| In 1909 a more important ad- 
vance was made in — Russia, 
where a complete design was 
worked out for a Diesel-Electric 
Locomotive, but the actual loco- 
motive was not built. 

In 19138 one of this type of lo- 
comotive was built in Sweden 

and proved quite a_ success. 

Since that time Diesel-electric 

locomotives have been built in 

Russia, Sweden, Hungary, Ger- 

ee France, England and the 
Ss. 


In the past ten years much 
experimental and development 
work has been undertaken and 
today this type, or types, be- 


q 


cause there are many different 
designs, have been: brought to 
the point where they are con- 
sidered a commercial success. 

Locomotive builders have rea- 
lized that in spite of the enor- 
mous increase in size, weight, 
boiler capacity, heating surface 
valve mechanism, and hauling 
power of the modern steam loco- 
motive, they have not been able 
to increase its speed to any ap- 
preciable extent. When it is re- 
called that the Flying Dutchman 
of 50 years ago was able to 
maintain speeds of 60 miles an 
hour hauling a fair sized string 
of passenger cars. 

This question naturally comes 
to these men, “Has the recipro- 
cating steam locomotive reach- 
ed its maximum speed?” 

Much has. been accomplished 
in the development of the elec- 
tric locomotive as a prime mov- 
er and higher speeds have been 
attained, but the investment for 
the initial equipment of the pow- 
er plants, installation of the 
third rail, or overhead feeder 
and upkeep make the cost al- 
most prohibtive for long hauls. 

In thickly populated districts, 
where traffic is heavy and al- 
most continuous, the earnings 
are great enough to warrant the 
initial cost of installation and 
upkeep. But for long hours 
where passenger and freight 


132 


trains are comparatively few, it 
is doubtful if the change from 
the steam locomotive to electric 
would be a profitable specula 
tion. 

There are three elements 
which must also be considered, 
Storms, floods and deep snow, 
which may cause great damage 
to installation and partial, or 
complete, stoppage of service 
for hours, or even days. 

There is a great field for the 
Diesel-Electric Locomotive. The 
initial cost for the Diesel-electric 
power unit would be about the 
same when quantity production 
has been obtained, as for a mod- 
ern high power steam locomo- 
tive, but its advocates claim a 
higher efficiency and less cost 
for fuel, and that when the run 
is finished and power shut down 
no fuel is consumed, until it is 
again in operation and storms, 
floods or snow would have no 
more effect upon its operation 
than they would have upon the 


A suggestion has been made 
in the New York Herald Tribune 
that the Park Board give per- 
mission for the old reservoir in 
Central Park to be used by 
model boat builders to race and 
test out their boats, as the pres- 
ent small boat pond in the Park 
is quite inadequate for this pur- 
pose. This would make an ideal 
model boat lake provided the 
authorities filled it in up to 
about 3 ft. of its high water 


mark. To use it as it is would 
be very dangerous owing to the 
depth of the water. To drain it 
down to a depth of 3 ft. would 
make it useless for a sailing 
lake, as it would then be a lake 
'in a deep hollow. The require- 


of eee 


THE MODELMAKER 


steam locomotive. In fact both 
of these latter types of prime 
movers would be able to oper- 
ate where electric locomotive 
would be at a standstill. 


There is a very interesting il- 
lustrated article on Diesel-Elec- 
tric Locomotive in the August, 
1926 number of Railway and 
Locomotive Engineering which 
we recommend our readers who 
are interested in the construc- 
tion of model locomotives to 
read. 


If any of you are contemplat- 
ing the construction of a loco- 


motive niodel why not build one: 


of the Diesel-Electric Type? 


'The writer believes that in a 
few years we Shall see the Die- 
sel-Electric prime mover replac- 
ing the ponderous. steam loco- 


nt, hia ons ee Seas, 


motive on many of our fast pas- — 


senger long distance runs. 


We shall be glad to hear from 
any of our readers on this 
subject. 


ments of an ideal sailing lake is 
comparatively 
with the surface of the water as 
near the level of the surround- 
ing ground as possible, and free 
from obstructions like buildings 
or heavy trees, which prevent a 
good steady breeze necessary 
for a successful regatta. Per- 


haps some of our influential En- 
gineer friends interested in the. 


development of this delightful 
pastime will work out some plan 
to lay before our City govern- 
ment. 
and hope something can be done 
to make this useless body of 
water of some value to our com- 
munity. 





When writing for information 
please enclose stamped and ad-. 


dressed envelope for reply. 


shallow water, — 


We wish them good luck ~ 





a. ST a 


DP SSOP ET Ae ee ay weet 










THE MODELMAKER 133 


ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVE 


By MR. J. W. NEPTUNE 


Member of The Akron Society of Model Engineers 
I made this Model about 14 years ago when the Electric Loco- 
motive was in its infancy. I realize it must look like an old timer 
when compared with the electric locomotive of today, but I con- 
sidered it a fine Model when it was finished. It worked very well 


indeed considering the fact that it only had one small motor and 


little power. My model was designed from the 0—4—4—0 Electric 
Locomotive built by the Baldwin and Westinghouse Companies for 


the B. & O. and N. Y. CG. R. R. The weight of these locomotives 


was about 160,000 lbs. They were used in the N. Y. C. R. R. yards 


at New York. The original data I worked from has been destroyed, 


but I give the following particulars from memory. 
Gauge, 2 inches. 
Scale, 7/16” excepting the head lights and whistle. 
Motor, 6-8 Volts, 0-34 amps. 
Wheels, 1%”, size over flange 15%”. 
Journals have spiral springs. 
Motor was geared to both sets of wheels. 
Source of power, storage batteries. 
Body of locomoive, built of wood and covered with sheet tin. 


-. Length over bumpers, 12”. 


Width, 3%”. 

Height to top of cab, 6 11/16”. 

Weight about 7 lbs. 
' The locomotive was weighted down with strips of lead. 
- Trucks, motor and pilot were made by the Voltamp Electric Co. 
_ Brass Brads were used for rivets. 

Mica was used for the windows in the cab. The roof of the cab 
Was moveable to enable me to work the starting and reversing lever. 
- Bach head light was fitted with an electric light bulb also one 


electric light bulb in the cab working off a selecting switch. 


Jy had about 100 feet of tin plate track with the third rail fixed 


to the ends of the ties outside of the running rails. This track 
was fastened to a shelf attached to the wall around the basement 


of my house. 


’ Besides the locomotive I had two flat cars and a Caboose. 


134 


THE MODELMAKER 


The Locomotive with the two flat cars, weighted with about 10 
lbs. of iron and the Caboose developed a speed of about 160 feet 


per minute. 


I am now working upon a modern type of electric locomotive, 
one pair of trucks are shown in the illustration attached to the 


rear of the flat car. 


THE SANTA MARIA 

One of the foreign exhibits at 
the Sesqui-Centennial Exposi- 
tion that has attracted consid- 
erable attention is a very fine 
model of The Santa Maria made 
by Models & Mascots Syndicate. 

The Model is built to a scale 
of 7/32”. 

Length, 1’ 93%” O. A. 

Length between  perpendicu- 
lars 1 4-45,¢5 

Hull is of satin walnut planks, 
1/32” thick. 

Wales are rivetted on verti- 
cally to the timbers. 

Masts, fore, main, and mizzen, 
the main mast is bound with 
rope to strengthen it. 

Sails, foresail, mainsail, main- 
topsail, mizzen, lanteen and 
spritsail. 

The Papal Cross is on main- 
sail, the Maltese Cross on fore- 
sail. 

About 5,800 brass rivets, size 
15/1000, length varies %” to 1%4” 
were used in its construction, 
the rivets were staggered to 
make them hold more securely. 

Deck planks are rivetted. 


About 150 blocks and dead- 
eyes made of ebonite were used. 

Rigging is of fine copper wire, 
nearly 1 mile of this wire was 
used for this work. 


Sails are of sterling silver 
beaten to shape. 

One small boat in waste. 

Windlass, bars on 
drums. 


outer 


Anchors of solid copper, in 
two pieces, bound and rivetted 
with copper. 

The rudder is connected to a 
tiller which is operated by a 
whipshaft. 

Steering light, a basket shap- 
ed lantern carried over stern 
rail. 

Painted scrolls and plaques 
placed around both quarters for 
decorative purposes. 

The sea upon which the model 
rests is cast silver and metal. 


Mr. J. W. C. Corbusier, Hud- 
son, Ohio has sent us three 
photos of his latest work. A 
fine model of Donald McKay’s 
famous Clipper Ship “The Fly- 
ing Cloud.” A ship that made 
the fastest time from New York 
to San Francisco during the 
great gold fever in California. 
This is more than a model, it is 
a miniature, because it is sea- 
worthy and sails well in a fair 
breeze. The hull is 2644” L.W.L. 
and the rest in proportion ac- 
cording to drawings. Mr. Cor- 
busier’s next effort will be a 
scale model of another of Don- 
ald McKay’s famous ships “The 
Great Republic,” 
claimed to be the largest clipper 
ship ever built. The Model will 
be 42” L.W.L. This gentleman 


also built a fine working model . 


of the “S.S. Aquitania’’ which 
was described in the Modelmak- 
er for November, 1925. 


which was | 


+l a 
Pere ¥ tS -6 


THE MODELMAKER 


A CHINESE JUNK 
Model by G. B. Douglas 
Last spring there arrived in 
New York a Chinese junk that 
had been built in Amoy and 
‘reached New York via Vancou- 
ver and the Panama Canal. As 


this was the first junk that had 
been here in about 60 years I 
was much interested in visiting 
her and noting the, to me, 
strange ideas in use on the ves- 
ee sel. 

___I determined to add to my list 
- the lines of a junk which I 











135 


found in a book that I had and 
afterward built the model shown 
in the cut from these lines. 

The construction was so dif- 
ferent and the ideas so peculiar 
that I became much interested 
in working out the drawing. 


The original junk was 89 fe. 
over all, 69 ft. on water line, 20 
ft. 9 in. beam and 4 ft. draught. 
At % in. scale this worked out 
a model 22 in. over all. 

The hull was made of a block 
of white pine and dug out to % 
in. thick for lightness. The deck 


136 


was fitted on and the long side 
rail was made: of 4% in. white 
holly and bent to shape and 
fastened to the side of the rail. 
The small perpendicular strips 
on the rail and in the overhang- 
ing sides at the stern were made 
from matches glued in place. 
The long strips were from strips 
bought from a dealer in aero- 
plane supplies. The sails are 
of pongee silk and the battans 
on them are of rattan. 

Aft of the movable rudder 
post the interior of the boat is 


all open as there is an opening 
in the stern through which the 
rudder can be hoisted by a wind- 
lass on deck when the boat goes 
into shallow water. There is a 
watertight thwart ship bulkhead 
inside to prevent the water en- 
tering the main hold of the boat. 
The idea is that the weight of 
the water slowly drains out 
when running in a following sea 
and prevents the vessel from 
pitch-poling, or standing on her 
bed. The rudder is large and 
framed of planks between hori- 
zontal bottons in which holes 
are cut diamond shape to light- 
en the rudder. The rudder is 
large and these holes make it 
easier 


helm over. 


In stepping the masts they put 
in two perpendicular planks and 
cut down the foot of the mast to 
a wedge shape and put it down 
between the planks. The heav- 
ier the mast the tighter it jams 
in between the planks. The 
fore and main masts never go to 
the bottom of the vessel and set 
in mortised blocks as is common 
practice elsewhere. 


The mizzen or last mast is 2 
feet off the centre line of the 


for the helmsman, or. 
more often a woman, to put the 


THE MODELMAKER 


boat and on the junk from Amoy 
it was out on the starboard rail 
so as to be out of the way of 
the long tiller. The sails and 
anchors are raised by wind- 
lasses of logs with cross sticks 
and are at the foot of the masts. 

The anchor is made of a 
heavy wood that sinks, has but 
one fluke and the stock or cross- 
bar is placed just above the 
fluke. 

The cooking is done in two 
kettles over fires on iron or con- 
crete plates on the after deck 
and the overhanging box shop- 


ped affairs are used for storage — 


of kitchen supplies. 

Every junk has an eye painted 
on the bow for a Chinaman says, 
“Boat have no eye, how can see 


—no can see, how can go.” The — 


flag at the formast on a bamboo 
rod is red. At the main is a 
wind gauge and at the mizzen 
the new Chinese flag. 

Some Chinese junks are fast 
sailers, much faster than any 
one would think to look at them. 


The Amoy junk was sailing on ~ 


Long Island Sound doing 10 
knots and standing up, as the 
saying is “like a church.” A 
yacht came along and was lying 
down with her rail in the water 
trying to keep up with her. 


- Mr. Edgar L. Brown, care of 
Schiffman Jewelry Co., Greens- 
boro, N. C. has sent us a photo 


of a fine Model Seagoing Tug- 


boat the “Conestoga” built origi- 
nally for the P. R. R. Co., but 


sold by them to the government 


during the war. The prototype 
was fitted up for service and 
armed with three guns. With a 


crew of 380 men it left Mare — 


Island Navy Yard for Honolulu, 
but was lost with all hands. 





When writing to advertisers — 
please mention the Modelmaker, ~ 





cP eT ee eee ee ey, ee ee ee ene ee 





. 
\a 
2 


ae fe ee a pe 8 


a 


~ 


* ‘ 
ee ee a ee 


PP, os Ss 


THE MODELMAKER 


PHOTOGRAPHING MODELS 
By Wm. Chamberlain 
The satisfaction of having 


completed a Model, whether it 


be of a Locomotive, a Motor- 
boat, Yacht or Flying Machine, 
brings much additional pleasure 
to the maker when he shows it 
to his friends, but friends are 


sometimes far away to whom he 


“model, 


cannot show it. Then he will 


turn to photography to help him. 


In taking a photograph of a 
whether in the work- 
shop or out of doors. The lat- 
ter is best because you have a 


good light overhead, but do not 
let the sun shine on the Model. 
' It is necessary to have a good 
_ background, or screen, prefer- 


: stand. 


ably of a light gray color. The 
model being placed on a table 
or bench and the camera on a 
In taking the picture 
carefully focus on the model al- 
lowing a fair margin of space 


é around the model and use a 


‘ 
be 
a 


@ sure, 
_ taken of moving objects. 


small stop, giving a time expo- 
Snapshots should only be 
Take 


- two or three views of the model, 


and only the model, 


do not let 


any other object appear in the 


_ picture. 
a copy 


Sq 


Taper dine eae IRE a eRe 





Finally be sure to send 
to the Hditor of the 
Modelmaker with a short de- 
_ scription of its construction. 


Mr. B. E. Sundberg, U. S.. Vet- 
erans Hospital 51, Tucson, Ari- 
_ zona, is planning the construc- 
tion of a model sailing ship. He 
would be glad to hear from any 
of our readers who have built 
model ships as to the best kind 


- of wood to use and other ma- 
terials 
such a model. 


required to _ construct 


ns 


-U. §. Schooner-of-War 


‘structed at 


137 


Mr. G. H. Stegmann is hard 
at work on @a fine Model of the 
“Gram- 
pus,’. mounting 10 guns and 
carrying a crew of about 60 
men. This vessel was’ con- 
the Washington 
Navy Yard and launched about 
1821. It was used as a gun boat 
on the coast and in the West 
Indies... She was lost with all 
hands off Charleston in 1848. _ 
Mr. Stegmann’s model is to the 
scale of 44 in. to 1 ft. We ex- 
pect to be able to give a fuller 
description of the construction 
of this model in a future issue. 





Mr. Elmer Wall recently paid 
us a visit on his way back to 
Chicago from his trip through 
Canada and New York. He 
showed us the completed model 
of his single cylinder up-right 
gasoline engine, 1% in. bore by 
1% in. stroke. The cylinder, 
frame and stand is one casting. 
There is no crankshaft as the 
piston rod is direct connected 
to the large fly wheel. It ran 
very smoothly and almost noise- 
less. He is preparing sets of 
castings and blue prints. This 
would be an excellent Model 
for a Manual Training Instructor 
to get for his students to make 
up as part of their class work. 
It will develop about 1% H. P. 





We regret to hear that Mr. J. 
G. Bathe of Philadelphia, who 


has been intimately connected 
with Model Work for a number 
of years, has been ordered by 
his physician to take a trip to 
Bermuda as he has developed 
rather serious eye trouble. We 
hope the rest and change of 
scene will have the desired good 
effect and that he will return 
very much benefited by his trip. 


138 


Dr. A. V. Blom, of Berne, 


Switzerland, claims he has per-. 


fected a process for the manut- 
facture of a special lead paint 
that protects iron from rusting. 
The lead is melted in an elec- 


tric furnace, certain reducing 
gasses and air are blown through 
the molten metal, which forms a 
scale or dross, a finely divided 
lead in yellow lead oxide. This 
is powdered and mixed with a 
specially prepared Linseed oil. 
Ironwork covered with this pre- 
paration has been found to re- 
sist the more severe tests, for 
prolonged periods, without 
showing any signs of oxidation. 
This is a most valuable discov- 
ery as the present practice of 
protecting exposed ironwork by 
the ordinary painting methods 
is both tedious and costly. The 
universal use of this new paint 
should be the means of saving 
millions of dollars annually as 
the losses from oxidation is very 
considerable. 





Mr. Egolf has been designing 
and building scale models for 
a number of years. He has de- 


veloped a special type of loco- 
motive model which we believe 
will interest many of our read- 
ers. He would be glad to send 
full particulars to anyone inter- 
ested in this line of practical 
working models. 





Mr. Bohaboy of the Model Ma- 
chine Shop has made a number 
of experiments with various 


forms of blow lamps for heating 
Model Boilers and has developed 
a model giving very excellent 
results. He has made these 
lamps in various sizes to fit the 
requirements for different sized 
boilers. 


THE MODELMAKER 


Model Railway News, contents 
for September. List of Passen- 
ger Carrying Miniature Railways — 
in Great Britain. An “O” Gauge 
Railway. Kent’s New Miniature 
Railway. Improving the Breed 
of “O” and “I” Model Railways. 
An Automatic Electric Switch 
for Model Goods Yards. Model 
Railway Signalling. Design for 


an Electric Current Collector. 
Model Railway Locomotive Disk 


Codes. Construction of an “O” 
Gauge Mlodel Railway. “OO” 
Gauge Rolling Stock. Color 


Light Signals: Mr. W. E. Hitch- 
cock’s Model “O” Gauge Tank 
Locomotive 2—6—4 (Electrically 
Driven). Mr. T. W. Marsden’s 
“O” Gauge L.N.W.R. Guard’s 
Van. Mr. N. H. Robert’s Gauge — 
“O” South African Country Sta-— 
tion. Our Mailbag. Club Notes. 
Sale and Exchange, etc. 





We. have been advised that 
the management of one of our 
Eastern Railroad Systems have © 


decided to organize their own 
shop for the construction of 
scale model locomotives of ac- 
curate design and fine workman- 
ship. This is another step to- 
wards the development of Sci- 
entific Modelmaking and a prac- 
tical acknowledgment of the 
value of fine models from an 
educational standpoint. 





All of our readers who are in-- 
terested in “OO” Gauge Model 
Railways will be glad to hear — 
the Mr. A. A. Singer and his co- 
worker are making up some very — 
good solid track in sections for 
“OO” Gauge. The rails will be 
rolled in solid metal and as near 
to actual scale that it is possible 
to make them. 


7 ot oe 


THE MODELMAKER 


Mr. A. J. Fisher of Royal Oak, 


- Mich., has a very well equipped 


ie 


little shop where he makes-a 


specialty of Ship Models. He 
is making up a line of Model 
Ship fittings. No doubt some 
of our model yacht builders will 
be glad to get in touch with him. 





Mr. H. J. Coventry is making 
a collection of photos of Model 
Locomotives of American types. 
He would be very pleased to 
hear from any of our readers 
who would care to send him 
photos of the model locomotives 
they have built. 





Mr. Warren B. Crater writes 
us he is working on a half inch 


scale Model of the New Jersey 
Central High Speed Pacific. This 
Model will include the improved 
Delta trailer as used on nearly 
all modern power. He has made 
the drawings himself and is now 
busy on the patterns. 





We frequently get complaints 
from our subscribers that they 
have not received all of the new 
bers of the Modelmaker. Our 
mailing list consists of metal 
stencils printed through a ma- 
chine and all the issue is mailed 
to subscribers at one time. 
There are two causes for non- 
delivery either the subscriber 
has moved and has not notified 
us of his change of address, or 


else it is due to carelessness in 


‘ 


a 
~ 
oe 


the handling and delivery at des- 
tination. Please notify us at 
once if you are not getting your 


numbers regularly and be sure 
to make a complaint at your 


na 
‘i i i 
oj 


a 


» 


local Post Office. Some other 
fellow may be getting some of 
your mail. 


139 


NEW YORK SOCIETY OF 
MODEL ENGINEERS 
The last monthly meeting was 
held Tuesday evening, Septem- 
ber 14, at 15 Moore Street, New 
York. <A large attendance was 
on hand and there was much 
interest taken in deciding on 
the various details and plans for 
ithe Model Power Boat Races 
held September 26 on the Model 
Boat Lake in Central Park, New 
York. The races will commence 
about 7 A. M., as only one boat 
will be run at a time using the 
fixed pole and length of wire. 
The first race will be for mem- 
bers boats only. The cup for 
this race will be donated by Mr. 
F. D. Grimke. All boats must 
be displacement type, not over 
1 metre in length and not more 
than 12 pounds displacement. 
There have been five boats en- 


tered, most of these have been 
specially built for this race. 

The second race will be open 
to iall comers. A Gasoline 
driven boat has been entered 
for this race. This boat has 
shown exceptional speed in its 
trial runs. 

Mr. M. Bowles who has had 


considerable e xperience in. 
Model Power Boat Racing gave 
an interesting talk on _ this 
subject. 

The ,next meeting of the 


Marine Section will be held at 
the above address on September 
28, and the next regular meet- 
ing will be held on October 138 
at 8 P. M. AIl men interested 
in this subject are cordially in- 
vited. Full particulars of mem- 
bership can be obtained from 
the Secretary, Mr. A. A. Singer, 
15 Moore Street, New York. 


140 


BOOK REVIEWS 

Locomotive Superheating and 
Feed Water Heating, 142 pages, 
211 illus., and 4 colored page 
plates, 11% x 8% in., limp card 
covers $2.00. 

The work is arranged under 
the following’ chapter headings. 
ue Theory of Superheated 
Steam. 2. Economics of Super- 
heating. 38. Brief History of 
the Superheater Locomotive. 4. 
Fire-Tube Superheaters (1). 5. 
Fire-Tube Superheaters (II). 6. 
Fire-Tube Superheaters (III). 7. 
Fire-Tube Superheaters (IV.) 8. 
Maintenance of Superheater Lo- 
comotives. While this work is 
based on English practice the 
designer, draughtsman and 
modelmaker will find a great 
deal of practical information 
therein that will be of interest 
to him and may give him sug- 
gestions and pointers for new 
development ‘work. The illus- 
trations and colored plates will 
especially interest him. 


The Editor, 
The Modelmaker 


Dear Sir: 

Since sending in my query re- 
garding the speeds of 1-metre 
power boats in this Country—I 
have run across a description of 
the English boat “Sunny Jim’”— 
published in the “Model Engi- 
neer” for May 22, 1925. 

This hydroplane is 18” from 


bow to step and 24” from step 
aft, and has made the truly re- 
markable speed, for one lap of 
the course ‘of 41.6 m.p.h. 

She is powered with a 2-cyl- 
inder, single acting steam plant, 
7/8” bore x %” stroke, turning 
a 38% x 10” pitch screw. 


THE MODELMAKER 


ee eee ee 


Assuming 40% slip, the en- — 
gine would make 7,320 R.P.M. 
Making the further assumption 
that the boiler pressure is 200. 
Ibs. per sq. in. and cut off 50%, — 
the I.M.E.P. would be about 128 
lbs. per sq. in., which would pro- 
duce 2.1 I.H.P. at above speed. 

Probably at least 25% of this 
is lost in internal friction, driv- — 
ing the pumps, etc., whick would — 
give a B.H.P. of 1.6. , 

I think it a pity that builders © 
of small steam and gasolene en- 
gines do not take the trouble to — 
properly test them. 

It may not be generally known © 
that a suitable fan dynamometer 
is very easy to build and will 
give results within 2-3%, provid- — 
ed the design and mounting are 
correct. Bote 

Yours truly, : 

. B. Read 3 

3230 Euclid Heights Blvd. 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio. | 


Mr. Chas. F. Clark, 111 N. 49th ‘ 
Street, Philadelphia, Pa., has i 
sent us a photo of his Model © 
Sloop. It is of the rib and plank ff 
construction, the ribs are of 44” — 
oak steamed and bent to shape, ~ 
the planking is 1%” with separ- — 
ate pieces cut to fit under the © 
stern, the keel is shaped from 
three pieces of almost equal — 
length. Length of Model 61” — 
O. A., 47” W.L. No doubt there 
are other model boat builders — 
near Mr. Clark who would like : 
to get in touch with him and ~ 
have a chat on model boats. 


ete | 





| 


J z 

In the May 1925 issue of the 
Modelmaker on page 78 a tele- 
phone number is given for Mr, — 
A. A. Singer. He is still at 15 
Moore St., but does not use that — 


telephone number now. te” 3 


A 
By 
=. 


CHICAGO SOCIETY OF 
MODEL ENGINEERS 


Editor of the Modelmaker 
EWear* Sirs— 

The Society has spent a prom- 
ising summer in the interest of 


5S REL ENS 


oe 


THE MODELMAKER 


141 


On July 22nd, a steam test 
of two locomotives was made 
at the home of Mr. John Mat- 
thews. The tests were of an 
Atlantic chassis built by Mr. 
Matthews and a Pacific chassis 





= Modelmaking and those attend- = pyjii by Mr. Reithmaier. The 
_ ing seem to have thoroughly en- steam was obtained from a 
= joyed themselves. ; Model Steam Tractor. Both lo- 
_ The following meetings were comotives did well at this trial 
a the most interesting. - y test. The illustration shows the 
? 

a 


ei HEY Ne : 











On July 8th the Society cele- 
- brated its 12th Anniversary. At 
_ this meeting every member gave 
a brief account of his accomp- 
_ lishments and their various ex- 
_ periences in the field of Model- 
_ making. The older men recall- 
ed days before the war when 
_ comparatively few men were in- 
_ terested in this subject and in 
general entertained the new 
members with their early ex- 
_periences. 









Atlantic chassis under test with 
the builder standing on the ex- 
treme right. 

The C. S. M. E. Annual Exhibit 
will be held some time during 
November. All those having 
models which they would like to 
exhibit should communicate — 
with the Secretary, Mr. S. C. 
Swanson, 7826 Coles Ave., Chi- 
cago, Ills., as soon as possible. 

A. Willard, 

905 Linden Ave., Wilmette, IIl.. 


142 


THE MODELMAKER 





Mr. Harry E. Webber, 29 AI- 
gonquin St., Dorchester, Mass. 
is interested in Model Railways 
and Locomotives. He would 
like to hear from any other 
Model enthusiasts living within 
a reasonable distance of his 
home with a-view to an occa- 
sional get-together meeting. 





We have had inquiries from 
some of our readers for mater- 
ials for large size model 1loco- 
motive castings. Mr2ow ne 
Daney informs us he is prepar- 
ing blue prints and castings ror 
a 7% in. gauge model locomotive 
and will advise us as soon as 
they are ready. 





We understand there are a 
good many real live model- 
makers residing in and near De- 
troit. Someone should take the 
initiative and have a get-to- 
gether meeting with a view to 
forming a Model Engineers Club. 
Such organizations bring men 


together and help greatly to- 
wards the development of 
modelmaking. 


FOR SALE 


Workshop Figures made easy, 
a simple explanation of fractions 
decimals and metric measure- 
ment for the use of Modelmak- 
ers, price 35 cents. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


French Measures and English 
Equivalents by Brook, a com- 
plete set of tables from 1 milli- 
metre to 100 metres, arranged 
in three columns metres, inches 
with decimals, inches with frac- 
tions; and other tables. In limp 
cloth to fit the vest pocket, price 
50 cents. Spon, 120 Liberty St., 
New York. 


Mr. Frank Birch writes that 
he can now supply complete 
sets of castings and blueprints 
of his %” scale Pacific Loco- 
motive 2144” gauge and that he 
has already booked some orders 
for these sets. He has finished 
up one set of castings and the 
engine runs first rate. The 
small photo he sent us looks like 
a fine locomotive. We have ex- 


amined some of his finished lo- 
comotive cylinders, four and six 
wheel car trucks, small nuts and 
bolts, etc. and must say he is a 
finished mechanic. We are not 
surprised to hear he has been 
rushed with orders for nearly a 
year. He deserves all the busi- 
ness he gets because he only 
supplies the best materials, 
gocd clean castings and excel- 
lent workmanship. 


WANTED 


Modelmaker, November 1924, 
May 1925, March 1926. Will 
exchange copy of Mechanical 
Age for any of these numbers 
in good condition. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Model Railway News, January 
1925. Will give 25 cents for 
good clean copy. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Model Power Boats by Hobbs 
in good condition, Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


Everyday Mechanics, Nos. 1 2 — 
and 6 of Vol. 1, Nos. 1 2 and 3 
of Vol. 2. Box 2, Modelmaker. 


Modelmaker, Volume 1, Num- 
ber 6, November, 1924. Model-. 
maker Volume 2, Number 5,. 
May, 1925. Will send a copy of 
Mechanical Age in exchange, 
Spon, 120 Liberty Street, New 
York. 


THE MODELMAKER 


143 


WHAT'S IN YOUR GARRET? 





SALE—EXCHANGE—WANTED 


EVERYTHING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters or 


figures count as words, compound words as separate words. 


accompany copy. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 
Pacific '4” Scale Castings 
$30.00 per set including draw- 
ings. Pullman six wheeled and 
WVulean freight trucks in O 
Gauge and %” scale. O Gauge 
Locomotive cylinder castings 
with drawings $3.00 per pair. 
O Gauge Freight or Passenger 
wheels machined 2 on axle $1.25. 
' Walschearts Valve Gear draw- 
ings %” scale, 75 cts. Prepare 
for the winter evenings, buy 
from the manafacturer and get 
quality and service at reasonable 
prices. Bronze Balls %” dia. up. 
 Hexegen bolts and Nuts 2-56 up. 
Boiler Fittings for Locomotives. 
5 ets. for temporary list. Frank 
Birch, General Delivery, High- 
land Park, Michigan. 
Blow Lamps, for model boilers 
all sizes made to order. Model 
Machine Shop, P. O. Box 5, Sta- 
tion Y, New York, N. Y. 


_ Model 2-Cylinder Steam En- 
_ gine, boiler, torch. Write for 
_ information. Wm. Siesel, Jr., 
» King St., Port Chester, N. Y. 

_ Build Yourself An_ Electric 
Clock! Blueprints and instruc- 
tions for a novel model any- 
body can build, $1.00. Particu- 
"lars free, Albert Deibig, Elec- 
_ trical Engineer, 1690 Park Ave., 
~ New York. 

_ Own a Glider, learn to fly, buy 
_ your parts from Icken, 903 Ray 
_ Avenue, Ridgefield, N. J. 


z 
4 
x 


a 





FOR SALE 


Finished: Pair of Half inch 
scale piston valve Locomotive 
Cylinders, bore 11/16 inches: 
stroke 11% inches, complete with 
Cylinder Cocks, Slide Bars and 
Crossheads. Tested under 125 
lbs. air pressure. Beautiful 
workmanship. Price $50.00 com- 
plete. Address Box 7, Model- 
maker, 120 Liberty Street, New 
York Gity,eN; “Y. 


Ship Model Fittings; Blocks, 
Deadeyes, Anchors, Capstans. 
Send for circular. Fisher, 1002 
Etowah Ave., Royal Oak, Mich. 


Locomotive Blue Prints—‘‘O” 
gauge Pacific. 38 sheets, steam, 
full details, $2.00. 1 sheet, 
steam-electric, 75 cents. Singer, 
15 Moore St., New York. 


Prototype Drawings of Amer- 
ican Locomotives and tenders: 
Front and side elevations with 
correct dimensions $1.00 each. 
George D. Arthur, Glenbrook, 
Conn. 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
Modelmakers, send for circular, 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 





WORK WANTED 


I make patterns, small cast- 
ings and working models. Model- 
making is my trade. James Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 


144 THE MODELMAKER : 





TRADE “MAIN LINE” MARK ~ 
| THREE-FOOT RADIUS CURVES AND SWITCHES 


Interchangeable with O-gauge Toy Electric Straights 
SOLID COPPER THIRD RAIL 


Curved sections, 20 inches long.....: rave sigact sad op eeegerecheaeeemees 65 cents 
6-foot. diameter: circle; +12 = SOCTIONS sc. A seco wstwecpentereaseuse $7.50 

Half sections. for: parallel “SiGim 2S.. cc. csisseccsscgoestoscecss cuad 35 cents 
Switches; rightor: lettin ands i2k7..1,20cesaces. does epee eee $3.00 each 


in Addition to Tin Ones 


160 WOODSIDE AVE 
NARBERTH, PENNA. 


38 Wooden Ties to Every Section, 


EGLOF SCALE MODELS 














ARMATURE STAMPINGS 


Non-magnetic. Clean cut, from charcoal iron. .02 thick. Price per inch. 


Size 2 pole 3 pole 4 pole 6 pole 8 pole 

1 50c 80c 

174" 60c 90c 25¢ postage 10c 
1% 75¢c eA OG 
144” 65c 95¢c $1.10 80c J pune BAP 
15%” ¢ $1.10 $1.10 Rt SLOG 
134” 95¢ $1.15 $1.25 $1.25 $1.30 So L6e 
17%” $1.40 <s 16c 
a $1.30 $1.35 $1.40 “  -18¢ 


Order directly from this list. 
We also make patterns, brass, aluminum and iron castings, do light machine work, 


and carry a line of sheet, rod, and tubing, in modelmakers’ 


sizes. 


Send 5c stamp for our 0 gauge parts list, 


A. ALEXANDER 
15 MOORE STREET 


SINGER & CO., 
NEW YORK CITY 


Please specify your needs plainly. We do not issue a free catalogue. 





Aeronautical Engines 


By F. J. KEAN 
Second Edition Revised 


CONTENTS OF CHAPTERS 


Preface. Dedication. List of Illustra- 
tions. 
I The Nature of the Prob- 
lems. 
II Classification of Aeroplane 
Engines. 


III Relative Advantage of Dif- 
ferent Types of Aero- 
plane Engines. 

IV Choosing the Number of 
Cylinders. 

V Balancing the Sliding Parts 
of the Engine. 

VI Carburation. 

VII Ignition. 

VIII Typical Aeroplane Engines. 


Appendix. Index. 
96 pages, 48 diagrams, 29 page plates 
and 5 large folding plates, 814x5¥% in. 


Cloth, $2.60 Postpaid 
SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 








IF at Jha 1 di 





I Get this Flexible aH Portable 


| | Shaft Outfit of a thousand Uses 


Needed by every modeimaker, me- 
chanic and for machine shop use. 
It’s a precision instrument, consisting 
of a ball-bearing coupling to connect 
to any motor, 3 feet of flexible shaft. 
ing and-a ball-bearing chuck. Oper- 
ates buffing wheels, reamers,. metal 
drills, files, burrs and Pa other 
appliances. Uses a % H. P. motor, 
obtainable at small cost. 
Special Offer — Send Only $5.00 

This outfit sells for $45. As a spe- 
cial offer from our factory to you, 
send $5 with order and pay postman 
$20, plus postage, on arrival. Satis- 
faction guaranteed or money back. 
1 The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. 

(Industrial Division) 
152 W. 42nd St., New York 


ra 


—— 


Hote 








iy a IN MAKING 


“Wade MODELS 


No. 10 OCTOBER, 1926 10— Cents 











e 


MR. H. J. COVENTRY’S PISTON VALVE VERTICAL 
STEAM ENGINE 





146 


A REAL MODEL OF A 
REAL LOCOMOTIVE 
14-inch Scale 
- Pacific K4 Pennsylvania R. R. 
Get ready now to build this fine model. 
Complete set rough castings only with 

’ fully detailed prints, $40 F.O.B. 
Complete sets only supplied. 
Terms if Desired 
See Model Maker, Feb. to May 1925 

. for description. 
H. J. COVENTRY, M.E. 


4003 CARLISLE AVE.,, 
BALTIMORE, MD. 


THE SHIP 
MODEL BUILDERS’ 
ASSISTANT 


By CHARLES G. DAVIS 


A companion volume to his other 
book, describing parts of hull fittings, 
details of spars and rigging, fully 
illustrated with line drawings. 


266 pp., 280 illus. 6%”x9%”, buckram, 
Price $5.00 
SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120 Liberty Street, New York, N. Y. 


MODEL MAKERS 
HAVE YOU A LATHE? 
If not, let us figure on your work. 
Accuracy Guaranteed 
to within 1/1000th of an inch, and all 


work done by an experienced 
machinist. 


Estimates cheerfully given. 
Prices moderate. 


Motor Generator Service 
P. O. Box 224 
DOVER, NEW JERSEY 





——_____ 





THE MODELMAKER 


“SHIP MODELS—Coupon 


Easy to Build and Sell 


Santa —Mariase.. 
Spanish Galleon. 
Mayflower 


er 





Or mail this Coupon and receive this 
whole set, postpaid, for $1.50. 


M. W. Wade, Lawrenceville, Ill. 


MODEL MACHINERY 


Sole U. S. Agent for the noted Eng- | 


lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
makers of Model Steam, Gasoline, 
Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
Trimmings; Electrical Machinery. 
Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 
gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 
and parts, etc. “‘CABLE SERVICE.” 


Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 


3 Ashland Street 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. 8S. A. 


Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
1926 Catalogue Just Issued 


THE BATHE MFG. CO. 


Model Engines, 
Boilers, Boiler Fittings, Books, 


Model Makers’ Supplies 
Large Illustrated Catalogue 20c. 
(refunded on first order) 
Dept. S.— 5214 Woodland Ave., 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


ARMATURE STAMPINGS 


Non-magnetic. Clean cut, from charcoal iron. .02 thick. Price per inch. 


Size pole 3 pole 4 pole 6 pole 8 pole 

zh 50c 80c { 
14%” 60c 90c 75¢ Postage 10c 
14” 65c 95c $1.10 80c > 12c — 
154” 1.10 $1.10 % 16c 
13%” 95¢ $1.15 $1.25 1,25 $1.30 = l6c 
1%” $1.40 * 16c 
pid $1.50 $1.35 $1.40 18c 


Order directly from this list. 


We also make patterns, brass, 


and carry a line of sheet, rod, and tubing, 


aluminum and iron castings, do light machine work, 


in modelmakers’ sizes. | 


Send 5c stamp for our 0 gauge parts list. 


A. ALEXANDER SINGER & CO., 


15 MOORE STREET 


NEW YORK CITY 


Please specify your needs plainly. We do not issue a free catalogue. 


a orn eee E > Saas - 


THE MODELMAKER 
Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Issued Every Month Annual Subscription, $1.00 
Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, October, 1926 
~ Vol. III, No. 10 
“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925, at the Post Office at 





New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879.” 





OUR FOREWORD 


The writer believes that the 
question “Have you a Work- 
shop” is one that vitally inter- 
ests all of our Modelmakers 
whether they are trained engi- 
neers, mechanics or pure and 
simple amateurs, for without 
tools and a place to use them no 
piece of model work can be con- 
structed. 

Many of our readers reside in 
houses, where there are suitable 
spaces, a light corner in the 
basement, a spare room, or part 
_ of the attic that can be con- 
_ yerted into a real man sized 
workshop. A basement space 


that has good light, is dry and 
airy is preferable if the owner 
contemplates a fully equipped 
- shop, because it has usually a 
_. firm concrete floor, a good foun- 
dation for machines and work 
' benches. It is much easier to 
keep. warm in the winter and 
being near his source of suppy 
(electric, water and gas), he can 


have as many lights as he de- 


gires and the conveniences of 


gas and water connections. A 


corner is best, where there are 
windows on both sides, then 
there will only be two sides to 


- board up, making a nice cozy 


- room. Measure out on the floor 


the size of the space required, 
then get the following lumber: 
two pieces of 38”x6” for floor 
plates; some 2”x4” for uprights, 
and sufficient 8”x1” siding, and 
a door with a good lock. 

Punch four holes in the con- 
crete floor and insert in each 
hole a 6”x%” bolt, head down, 
filling up around the bolt with 
fresh cement; drill two corre- 
sponding holes through each 
floor plate to fasten them down 
securely with nuts screwed tight. 
The siding had better be nailed 
on the inside. This will give a 
finished appearance and a good 
wall space for shelving and 
places to hang up tools. It would 
be easy then to build your work 
benches to these partitions, leav- 
ing the wall spaces with the 
window lights for lathes and 
such like tools. 

The height of your work 
benches should be carefully con- 
sidered, also the question of a 
moveable wooden floor, in sec- 
tions, so that the worker does 
not have to stand directly on the 
concrete floor. Shelving, bins 
and drawers can be built in un- 
der the benches, but leave a 
clear space between the lowest 
shelf and the floor for conven- 
ience of cleaning out. 

The bare rafters overhead will 
make it easy work to fasten 
your wiring so as to have the 


148 


drop lights just where you want 
them, and if you desire any 
overhead pulley or shafting it 
can be securely fixed in place. 

Some men prefer to have their 
workshop out of doors, but that 
entails more expense for ma- 
terials and 
work in its construction, not for- 
getting the question of heating 
for winter use. 


In the case of a Modelmaker 
residing in an apartment house 
he could not have such a com- 
plete equipment as he could have 
in the basement of a_ single 
house. In fact, he might be lim- 
ited to the space of a spare cup- 
board or only a corner in the 
living room. In the latter case 
he could have a combination 
bench and cabinet. One of our 
friends has such an outfit in a 
New York apartment. When 
not in use it looks like a large 
panelled cabinet, the top of 
which lifts up, disclosing a bench 
upon which is. fastened his 
bench lathe and motor. On the 
inside of the top are places for 
an assortment of tools. The 
front opens in two doors, each 
fitted with places to hold tools. 
Below the bench are a number 
of drawers, fcr supplies, mate- 
ria°- and tools. A foot controller 
for his motor he places on the 
floor within easy reach of his 
foot, current is taken from the 
house supply by using a wall 
plug. 

Other men have their “sanc- 
tum” in the attic. We propose 
to publish some articles on “Our 
Modelmakers’ Workshops” and 
would like to receive photos and 
descriptions from any of our 
readers who would kindly send 
us the necessary data. Such 
articles will prove not only help- 
ful, but suggestive to those who 
are considering the question of 
having a workshop of their own. 


considerable more 


THE MODELMAKER 


Mr. H. J. Coventry, Asso. Am. 
Soc. M. E., advises us that he 
has been appointed to take sole 
charge of a model shop for one 
of our large Eastern railroad 


companies. It is being equipped 
with up-to-date machinery as the 
Board of Directors are anxious 
to have some’ very fine scale 
models built representing their 
latest locomotives. We know 
that our readers will congratu- 
late Mr. Coventry and wish him 
every success in his new work, 
and we hope later on that the 
Company will give him permis- 
sion to supply us with descrip- 
tion and pictures of some of the 
models that Mr. Coventry and 
his assistants build. To our 
knowledge this is the third rail- 
road company that has author- 
ized the development of a Model 
Building Department, and it em- 
phasizes the fact that scientific 
modelmaking is coming into its 
own in the United States. Mr. 
Coventry wishes us to say that 
his new work will occupy so 
much of his time that he will 
not be able to do any more model 
work for private customers, ex- 
cept supply complete sets of 
rough castings and drawings. 


Mr. Murray W. Wade is inter- 
ested in the construction of 
Models of Sailing Ships. He has 


the drawings of a number of 
such models; which are made to 
half actual size. As a Director 
of Manual Training he is in the 
position to know just what the 
boys can use to the best advan- 
tage. He can supply sets or 
single blue prints of any of these 
Models. 





When writing for information 


please enclose stamped and ad- — 


dressed envelope. 


“ 
wine 


e351} we alee : ’ 


trials. 


THE MODELMAKER 


149 


THE NEW YORK SOCIETY OF 
MODEL ENGINEERS 


The Members of this Society 
held their first Model Power 
Boat Races on the Model Boat 
Lake, Central Park, New York, 
Sunday Morning, September 26. 
It was a bright sunny day with 
a gentle breeze, but not suffici- 
ent to unduly disturb the lake’s 
surface. 

A pole with fifty feet of fishing 
line attached was used. Mr. 
T. E. Singer, in waders, being 
in charge of the pole in the lake. 
RACE FOR MEMBERS BOATS 


For 
Mr. F. D. Grimke’s Silver Cup 


For displacement boats- not 
over a metre in length and not 
more than twelve pounds dis- 
placement. Course five consec- 
utive laps on a taut cord. Each 
contestant to be allowed two 
The decision of the Jud- 
ges to be final. 

Mr. Habl’s boat was the first 
to take to the water, but owing 
to the hook at the-end of the 
line not being properly fastened 
to the boat, after steaming about 
half a lap, the boat got adrift 
and went ashore. It was stop- 
ped by an onlooker, but unfor- 
tunately the propeller struck the 


bank breaking off one of the 
blades. 

Mr. F. Zimmer’s ‘“‘Kathleen 
IV” was the next boat. It got 
away to a good start and was 
steaming in good shape when 
on the third lap the propeller 


fouled some floating weed and 
the boat stopped. 

Mr. W. Elliott’s “B. G. E. 32” 
was the next contestant. It got 
away in fine shape, but owing 
to the cord not being attached to 
the boat far enough aft it did 
not run with a taut line. 


“Kathleen IV’? then made her 
second, trial, getting away to a 
good start on a taut line and 
completing her five laps in fine 
style. 

Mr. Habl had completed re- 
pairs to his boat and took his 
second trial. She,got away on 
a slack line. On the third lap 
the blow torch went dead. 


“B. G. HE. 32” with torch re- 
filled and boiler replenished took 
her second trial getting away on 
a taut line and ran eight laps 
in splendid style, winning the 
Cup. 

There were four entries for 
this Race, but owing to sickness 
Mr. Thorpe was unable to finish 
his boat in time for the race. 


Result of Members Race for the 
Grimke Cup 

“B.: G. B32; 5. laps,. time. 
min. 38 4-5 secs. Winner of the 
Cup. Fastest lap 18 secs. 

“Kathleen IV,’ 5 laps, time 1 
min. 57 4-5 secs. Second place, 
Fastest laps 22 secs. 

Mr. Habl’s boat was not timed 
for reasons given above. 


THE FREE FOR ALL RACE 
10 Laps 

There were four entries for 

this Race. Mr. Bosshardt’s “Clif- 

ton,” driven by a gasoline motor, 

Mr. Anton Bohaboy’s “Bobo V,” 

a powerful steam driven boat, 





2 1 and 2—Mr. W. Elliott and the Winner “B. G. E. 32” 
3—Mr. Anton Bohaboy’s “Bobo V” } 
4 and 5—Mr. E. Zimmer and “Kathleen IV” 





” 





THE MODELMAKER 


Mr. Johnson’s Hydroplane and 


Mr. Elliott’s 


_ start at a fast pace. 


“B. G. E. 32.” 


“Clifton” got away to a good 
In fact this 
boat made the fastest lap, in 15 
seconds. After running six laps 
spark-plug trouble developed 
stopping the engine. 

“Bobo V” got away with a 
jump on a taut line and ran nine 


laps in 8 minutes then blow 


torch failed. 
“Clifton” took her second trial 


getting off with a rush on a taut 


laps then died out. 


line and ran six and a quarter 
The con- 
necting wire to spark-plug had 


worked loose. 


“Bobo V” came to the start- 


ing line all primed up and got 
_ away on a taut line in fine style 
_ reeling off the laps on 200 lbs. of 


steam. On the tenth lap a sail 


boat fouled the line and it part- 


ed. 


field of action. 


“Bobo V” made a bee line 
for .the shore and although a 
policeman tried his best to stop 


her she hit the bank pretty hard © 


and started some of her planks. 
Mr. Johnson’s Hydroplane was 


- given a trial run, long before any 


of the other boats arrived on the 


which prevented it from partici- 


_ pating in the race. 


Mr. Elliott’s boat did not par- 


P ticipate in the Free for All Race 





: owing to a broken rudder. 


Results of the Second Race 


Free For All—(10 Laps) 
Only two entries. 


“Clifton,” Gasoline power 


plant, 6% laps, time 1 min. 46 4-5 
secs. 


“Bobo V,” Steam power plant, 


3 91% laps, time 2 min. 52 2-5 secs. 


No race, as neither boat com- 


_ pleted the ten laps. 


- compact 


3 However, after . 
circling the lake, the Hydro-- 
plane developed boiler trouble 


151 


In the Free for All Race both 
boats during their trials com- 
pleted five consecutive laps, 
which were used as a basis for 
determining their speeds. 

“Bobo V” made the five con- 
secutive laps in 1 min. 33 secs., 
or 18.6 secs per lap. “Clifton” 
made the five consecutive laps 
in 1 min. 25 secs or 1 lap in 17 
secs. 


PARTICULARS OF BOATS 


“B. G. E. 32,” owner Mr. W. 
Elliott. Displacement 11 Ilbs., 
length 32 in. O. A built up hull, 
speed boat type, single screw, 2 
biaaed pruepeiler. Power plant 
—Russel 2-cylinder, single-act- 
ing piston valve Steam engine. 
Water-tube boiler, with super- 
heating coil and gasoline blow 
torch. A well built model, with 
power plant, very 
steady under steam. | 


“Kathleen IV,’ owner Mr. E. 
Zimmer. Displacement 11 1-8 
lbs. Length 39 in: O. A. built 
up hull, bottom of hull mahogany 
top sides and deck, maple, speed 
boat type, single screw, 2 bladed 
propeller. Power Plant 2-cylin- 
der single-acting piston, valve 


‘steam engine; water tube boiler 


with ‘super-heating coil and gas- 
oline blow torch. A handsome 
model, well balanced with com- 
pact power unit. A very steady 
running boat. 


Mr. Habl’s Boat, 12 lbs. dis- 
placement 393% in. O. A., built 
up hull, speed boat type; single 
screw, 2 bladed propeller. Power 
Plant, Westinghouse type, 2- 
cylinder single-acting piston 
valve steam engine, water tube 
boiler with superheating coil, 
and gasoline blow torch. A 
well built beamy boat. : 

Mr. Johnson’s boat. Built up 
hull, one metre hydroplane 
Power plant, Russell 2-cylinder 


152 


single-acting piston valve steam. 


engine, flash boiler, gasoline 


blow torch. 

“Bobo V,’ owner Mr. Anton 
Bohaboy. Displacement 22 lbs. 
42 in. O. A. Built up hull, speed 
boat type, single screw 2 bladed 
propeller. Power  plant—Boha- 
boy 2-cylinder single acting pop- 
pet valve steam engine, water 
tube boiler with superheating 
coil and a large size gasoline 


THE MODELMAKER 


ignition, Ford coil and dry cells. 
A fine model, good lines and very 
fast. Her forefoot rising well 
out of water when under way. 
Her fastest lap was 15 seconds, 
but for her slight mishaps she 
ought to have reeled off the ten 
laps in record time. 

A good many members and 
their friends were present as 
well as a large number of in- 
terested spectators. 





Mr. Bosshardt’s Gasoline Power Boat 


blow torch. A well balanced 


powerful boat. 


“Clifton,” owner Mr. Boss- 
hardt. Displacement 18 lbs. 37 
in. O. A., beam 9 in., depth 5% 
in., bread-and-butter construc- 
tion hull, power launch type, 
single screw, 2 bladed propeller. 
Power plant—Single cylinder, 
gasoline engine 14%, in bore by 
1% in stroke, 4-cycle, water 
jacketed cylinder, spark-plug 


The official timers for the Cup 
Race were Messrs. Crosley (of 
Motor Boat) and Pope. Messrs. 
Bolles and Zimmer taking the 
watches for the Free for All 
Race. 


The Judges were Messrs. Aga- 
han, C. Johnson and Bolles. 


Official Scorer, W. Edmunds _ 


FysD. 


Spon. 
Official 
Grimke. 


Photographer, 


ieig: bas 


-other book entitled 


THE MODELMAKER 


Mr. Charles G. Davis’ recent 
work, “Ship Models and How 


to Build Them,” while the con- 
tents are excellent as far as 
they go, yet it was seen at once 
that it was lacking in informa- 
tion on a number of very im- 
portant points. The Publishers 
sent out a questionaire to sev- 
eral hundred Model Boat Build- 
ers asking for information. 
Many of these gentlemen replied 


giving considerable data and 
suggestions on the _ subject, 
These replies were carefully 


tabulated and from this and 
other information Mr. Davis had 
on hand he has prepared an- 
“The Ship 
Model Builders Assistant,’ in 
which he has endeavored to sup- 
ply the information not con- 
tained in his other work and 
he certainly seems to have ac- 
complished his object. He has 
prepared a number of drawings 
of details which are very clear 
and explicit. This book is really 
additional information which, 
when used with his other book, 
“Ship Models,” will be found 
exceedingly valuable and _in- 
structive to all those who are 
interested in the construction of 
real Models of Old Time Sail- 
ings Ships. The Ship Model 
Builders Assistant contains 266 
pages, 499 figures, size 6144x914", 
bound in library buckram. This 
work has appeared at the psy- 
chological moment; because 
there are an ever increasing 
number of men taking up this 
fascinating pastime, and now 


that most of the summer sports 


are coming to an end the hob- 
biest is more ready to turn to 
his workshop for his recreation 
during the long evenings of the 
coming winter. 


We acknowledge with thanks 


Mr. F. D. Grimke’s courtesy in 


supplying us with photos of the 


153 


various model power boats 
which competed in the N. Y. S. 
M. E. Power Boat Races. Full 
particulars of these races will 
be found in this issue. 


Model Engineer, principal 
contents for July 29, August 5, 
12, 19, 26 and Sept. 2: Launch 
Building and Model Engineer- 
ing. Small Castings in the 
Foundry. On Electrical Con- 
densers. A Model Blast Fur- 
nace. A Small Stationary Steam 
Engine. Ball Bearings. The 
Science Museum South Kensing- 
ton. Locomotive Prototypes. 
Track Circuit on Railways. 
Making Fine Jet Nozzles. Im- 
proving a Cycle Dynamo. Ross 
Fop--Vaives:_D;-C.- and>Ax.-C; 
Fractional H.P. Motors. Diago- 
nal Paddle Engines for a Six 
Foot Model Paddle Steamer. A 
Long Stroke Automatic Centre 


Punch. In the Glow of the 
Forge. A New Kind of Bearing 
Metal. L. B.S. C. on Boiler Fit- 


tings, Safety Valves and Other 
Oddments. Television, Some 
Attempts to Solve the Problem. 
Locomotive Whistles. Milling 
in the Lathe. A New 3%” 
Double Back-Geared, Gap Bed 
Screw Cutting Bench Lathe. 
Model Yachting Association 
News and Notes. Model Yacht 
International Races. Design for 
a Cool-Working Blow Lamp. A 
Model Ship’s Dinghy. A Column 
of Live Steam. Days in the 
Shop. A Small Grinding Head 
for Use in the Lathe. Mounting 
“O”’ Gauge Boilers. Fittings for 
“OO” Gauge Locomotives. Force 
Pump and Air Chamber. Prac- 
tical Private Telephone Installa- 
tions at Small Cost. On Accumu- 
lators. Recent _. Inventions. 
Queries and Replies. Practical 
Letters. Society and Club Do- 
ings. Light Engineering Equip- 
ment and Supplies. 


154 


STATEMENT OF THE OWNER- 
SHIP, MANAGEMENT, ~ CIRCU- 
LATION, ETC., REQUIRED. BY 
THE ACT OF CONGRESS OF 
AUGUST 24, :1912, OF THE 
MODELMAKER, published monthly 

at New York, N. Y., for Oct. 1, 
1926, 


STATE OF New York : 
County or New York {f 85° 


Before me, a Notary Public, in and 
for the State and County aforesaid, 
personally appeared W. Edmunds 
Spon, who, having been duly sworn 
according to law, deposes and says that 
he is the Editor and Business Manager 
of the MopELMAKER and that the fol- 
lowing is, to the best of his knowledge 
and belief, a true statement of the 
ownership, management, etc., of the 
aforesaid publication for the date shown 
in the above caption, required by the 
Act of August 24, 1912, embodied in 
section 443, Postal Laws and Regula- 
tions printed on the reverse of this 
form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of 
the publishers, editor, managing editor, 
and business manager are: 


Publishers, Spon & Chamberlain, 120 
Liberty St., New York, N. Y. Editor, 
W. Edmunds Spon, 120 Liberty St., 
New York, N. Y. Managing Editor, 
none; Business Manager, W. Edmunds 
Spa, 120 Liberty Street, New York, 

The owners are W. Edmunds Spon, 
120 Liberty St., New York; Wm, Cham- 
berlain, 120 Liberty St., New York. 

3. That the known _ bondholders, 
mortgagees, and other security holders 
owning or holding 1 per cent or more 
of total amount of bonds, mortgages, 
or other securities are: None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next 
above, giving the names of the owners, 
stockholders, and security holders, if 
any, contain not only the list of stock- 
holders and security holders as they ap- 
ear upon the books of the company, 
a also, in cases where the stockholder 
or security holder appears upon the 
books of the company as trustee or in 
any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom 
such trustee is acting, is given; also 
that the said two paragraphs contain 
statements embracing afhant’s ‘full 
knowledge and belief as to the circum- 
stances and conditions under which 
stockholders and. security holders who 
do not appear upon the books of the 
company as trustees, hold stock and se- 
curities in a capacity other than that 
of a bona fide owner; and this affiant 
has no reason to believe that any other 
person, association, or corporation, has 
any interest, direct or indirect, in the 


THE MODELMAKER 


said stock, bonds, or other securities 
than as so stated by him. ; 


W. EDMUNDS SPON, 
Editor and Business Manager. 


Sworn to and subscribed before me 
the 23rd day of September, 1926. 


M. HARLEY, 


J. 
Notary Public, New York Co., New 


York. 
(My commission expires March 30, 
1927.) i 
(Seal) : : 
Certificate filed in New York Co. No. 
301, Reg. No. 7183. 


Mr. Harry Jeffers, Saginaw, 
Mich., is interested in Model Ma- 
rine Steam Engines. He would 
like to get in touch with any of 
our readers in his locality who 
may be interested in model mak- 
ing with a view to an occasional 
get-together meeting. Here is 
another opportunity to form the 
nucleus of a model engineering 
club. 


We expect very soon to have 
copies of the new edition of 
Paint and Color Mixing by A. S. 
Jennings. This has always been 
considered one of the most 
practical works on this subject. 
The new edition, the 8th, will 
contain a good deal of new mat- 
ter, about 64 more pages, includ- 
ing some features not dealt with 
in earlier editions. . The hun- 
dreds of formulas and recipes 
as well as the many colored 
samples add greatly to the value 
of this well known work. If 
you are interested drop us a 
postcard.and we will give you 
fuller particulars. 


Do you want to. get in touch — 
with other Modelmakers in your 
district? If so, send -us your 
name and address stating what 
line of model work you are in- 
terested in and if.-you have your ~ 
own workshop and we will try 
and put you in touch with other 
Modelmakers in your neighbor- 
hood. 


Saee RIE RM 


THE MODELMAKER 


155 


A OR’ x 3%” PISTON VALVE 
VERTICAL ENGINE 


_ By H. J. COVENTRY, Assoc. Mem. Am. Soc. M. E. 


This little engine, while not 
intended to be a model of any 
particular type, is designed 


along lines of modern propor- | 


tions, and of easy construction. 
Before proceeding with a de- 
seription of the construction, at- 


~ tention is drawn to the follow- 


ing points. A piston valve is 


- used, with inside steam admis- 
sion, 
elimination of stuffing box, and 
@ its friction; 
- might leak from the valve end, 


giving the advantage of 


any steam that 


_ would only be exhaust steam, 


~ seal 


and as the steam is very wet, 


the water acts as an effective 
in conjunction with the 
small grooves turned on the 


valve spindle. 


The piston valve also has the 


NM advantage of being balanced 


with the result that irrespective 


of the steam pressure, the work 


_ taken from the engine to move 
' the valve is negligible. Whereas 


a the slide valve with its flat area 


and steam pressure acting on 


_ the area takes quite a consider- 
able amount of work from the 


engine. ? 
- signed models with slide valves 
_ too large absorb so much ener- 


In fact some badly de- 


gy in. driving the valve, that 


- little is left for other purposes. 


Now the feature of this model 


_ is the long neck provided in the 
_ bottom cover of cylinder; this, 
- if made a nice fit to rod, is all 

_ that is required to make the rod 


_ steamtight, while the piston is a 
_ plain, nicely fitting plug, with a 


few small plain grooves turned 


on its edge. 
the same way as the grooves in 





These grooves act 


the piston valve, and are quite 
effective for pressures up to 40 
lbs. per sq. in. These features all 
help to produce a very free run- 
ning and powerful little model. 
The writer has had one of these 


engines running for over 300 
hours, without leakage from 
steam; speed ranging around 


4,000 R. P. M. with 40 lbs. sq. in. 


Passing now to the Construction 

Bedplate is a simple box cast- 
ing, and as the seatings for col- 
umn also bearings are all in the 
same. plane it is only necessary 
to pass a file right across. An- 
other way is to hold the casting 
in the chuck, and face right 
across all seatings. 

Next take the bearing caps, 
which are cast together, and fill 
up flat on bottom, and file up 
the curved portion to dimen- 


sions. Drill for holding down 
screws, and then saw apart. 
Mark the centre line on caps 


and bedplate, then take a small 
square file, and file a small V 
notch on the centre lines on both 
caps and bedplates. Now tin 
the faces with soft solder, and 
sweat cap and bedplates, taking 
care to get the notches of cap 
and bedplate in line. Drill into 
bedplate, the tapping holes for 
2.56, holding down screws, and 
drill through for bearings. 


If a small drill is used first, 
followed by a slightly larger one 
and so on till final 5-16_in., it 
will be found quite an easy mat- 
ter to obtain holes that are in 
line, and exactly half in bed- 
plate, and half in cap, by hand 
without any special rig; because 
the first small drill will follow 


156 


the notches already HSS in cap 
and bedplate. 

Before unsoldering ie caps, 
file up sides inside and out to 
required dimensions, and stamp 
a number, or suitable mark, on 
each. Now they may be de- 
tached and solder wiped off. 


Bearing Brasses—Among the 
castings is a piece of half round 
brass; take this and file up the 
flat face clean, then tin it with 
soft solder, cut in half and lay 
one half over the other. This 
gives a circular piece, which 
may be held in chuck and brass- 
es finished outright. Heat the 
finished brasses and two _ )per- 
fectly fitting halves are obtained 
ready to go in bedplate. A small 
brass pin, say 1-32 in. dia. let 
into brass and bedplate, will 
prevent the brass from turning. 
The top one need not be fixed to 
cap at all. A 3-32 in. hole drill- 
ed in top of each cap completes 
the bearings. 

Next place a piece of 3-16 drill 
rod on bearings, and from the 
side of this, mark off centre for 
front column at the correct dis- 
tance, after deducting 3-32 for 
half diameter of rod. Drill and 
tap hole for front column, tak- 
ing care to get it square with 
bedplate. 

Front Column is of steel turn- 
ed between centres and screwed. 


Back Column.—First file up 
the crosshead, guide face, using 
a narrow pillon file for the slide 
way—or if a milling attachment 
is available, it may be milled 
with an end mill held in the 
ehuck. 

Having produced a flat sur- 
face place the casting on a sur- 
face plate, with the finished 
face down. Now with marking 
gauge scribe a line on top and 
bottom feet, any point will do, 
now turn on its side, and scribe 
a line in centre of feet. Prick 


THE MODELMAKER 


punch the intersection and drill 
with centre drill, mount in lathe 
and face off each end as close 
to centre as possible. A stroke 
or two with the file will clean 
off the “pip” left by centre drill 
and the feet should now be 
square, with guide face. 


Cylinder.—First face off top 
and bottom to proper overall 
height. This may be. done by 
holding it in a chuck. Next 
mark out the centres, then clamp 
on faceplate of lathe and adjust 
till centre is running true. Drill 
and ream from lathe back cen- 
ter. 


Covers.—The castings will 
have chucking lugs so all that is 
necessary is to grip in chuck by 
the lug, face, turn and part off 
at one operation. The bottom 
cover has the piston rodhole 
drilled and reamed at same set- 
ting. A piece of % in. drill rod 
with half filed away to form a D 
bit, and hardened, makes a good 
tool for this operation. 


The hole should be drilled 
first with a No. 31 drill. 


(To be continued) 


We have had inquiries from 
some of our readers for litera- 
ture on the construction of 
American model locomotives. We 
do not know of any book spe- 
cially on this subject, except 
Volume 2 of the Modelmaker,. 
which contains a number of il- 
lustrated articles describing the 
making of model steam and elec- 
tric locomotives of American de- 
sign. The most important of 
these articles were written by 
some of the best Modelmakers 
in the U. S.—A. W. Line, H. J. 
Coventry, J. A. Joslin, Arthur 
Curran, J. H. Guild, W. L. Daney, 
Jas. G. Dunn and others. 

Copies of this Volume can be 
obtained from the Publishers. 


~ workshop with a 


- steps. 


and 


THE MODELMAKER 


OUR MODELMAKERS’ 
WORKSHOPS 


_ Mr. J. W. Neptune 


Member Akron Association of 
Model Engineers 


In reply to your inquiry I am 
sending you a description of my 
photograph, 
which I hope you will be able 
to reproduce satisfactorily. It 
is not as clear a picture as I 
would like to have taken, but I 
think it will give your readers 
a good idea of its arrangement 
showing the variety of tools 
which it contains. 

It,is situated in my basement, 
which fortunately is a dry and 
airy one. I have placed my 
equipment as near together as 
possible to avoid unnecessary 
I have three benches. A 
work bench with a built up back 
upon which are shelves for tools 
and racks to hold wrenches, 
hack-saws, screw drivers, etc., 
all arranged to be easy of access 
when wanted. The face of the 
bench is covered with a 16-gauge 
sheet of steel, which protects 
the wood top and makes it a 
better working surface. I have 
two vises mounted on this bench, 
also some drawers in the side for 
sandpaper, polishing equipment 
and tape for insulating purposes. 
On the right end of this bench 
I have mounted a switchboard 
for testing, containing meters 
and switches for this purpose, 
handling both D. C. and A. C. 
current supplied from a house 
circuit. This board controls in- 
strument for testing armatures 
coils, etc., also magnet 
charging unit. A generator and 
storage batteries are under this 


157 


bench, also some large shelves 
for storage. 

On the large bench in the cor- 
ner under the power meter, [ 
have a large cabinet of drawers, 
all marked, containing such sup- 
plies as screws, nuts, washers, 
etc. To this bench is fixed a 
large vise, also tool heating gas 
fired furnace and furnace for 
heating soldering irons. In the 
rear of this bench are shelves 
for iron and steel stock, paints 
and brushes, also a small cab- 
inet, or nest of drawers for 
drills, reamers, taps and dies, 
and extra lathe tools. Under 
this bench are boxes to store 
belting, pulleys, gears, and elec- 
trical equipment, wire and 
switches, insulators, etc., and my 
compressor tanks for air which 
I use for testing and for> my 
blowpipe. 

Machine tool equipments. My 
machine bench is in rear of my 
work bench. This is very con- 
venient because I only have to 
turn around from my _ work 
bench to get at my machines. On 
this bench I have mounted a 
Goodell Pratt Lathe Number 454 
fully equipped, including a lot 
of extra parts I have made my- 
self. A grinding head, which is 
arranged to handle a variety of 


jobs; such as sanding discs, 
wire brushes, and _ polishing 
tools. Then I have a sensitive 


drill press that will take drills 
up to half an inch. . Under this 
bench I have a countershaft to 
drive the above tools, also a 
D. C. generator and an air com- 
pressor, a heavy duty 4 H. P. 
motor, which gives plenty of 
power when only one machine 
is in use at a time. I have a 
9’ x24" screw cutting back 
geared engine lathe. 

At the right of this bench, but 
not shown in the photo, I have 
a saw table handling 6” saws 





os 
eal 
M 
< 
= 
ic 
a 
a 
O 
a 
fa 
< 
= 





_ and grooving head. I am about 

- to install a South Bend Lathe 
9"x3" 

I have built all the benches, 
cabinets, emory stand ana saw 
table and drill press myself and 
take a great pride and pleasure 
in keeping my little shop clean 
and in order. I feel well repaid 
for all the money, time and ef- 
fort expended in getting this 
equipment in running shape. 
This shop I call my “holy of 





ee 


EIT FAY MAE SMT SB 


NED LI RE 98 


call, always know wnere to find 
me. 

I use motors for power, using 
% H..P. in all. 


_ [We hope this article will in- 

terest our readers and induce 

others to send us descriptions 

and photos of their workshop. 

Do not hesitate because your 
- outfit may seem small and in- 
significant in comparison with 
Mr. Neptune’s. We all have to 
make a start. Mr. Neptune is 
evidently an old timer and a 
_ first-class mechanic.—Kd. ] 


Mr. F. W. Icken advises’ us 
- that owing to press of business 
he is not able to devote any 
time to making up parts for the 
Morgan Glider, and requests us 
to notify our readers according- 
ly. He appreciates all the busi- 
ness they have sent him and 
hopes to get some other firm to 
attend to this matter for him. 





our subscribers that our stock of 
_ back numbers of the Model- 
maker is getting very low. We 
- would suggest they look through 
_ their numbers and if their Vol- 
- umes are not complete to let us 
know what they are short be- 
_ fore our stock is exhausted. 
_ Back numbers are only 10 cents 
~ each. 





THE MODELMAKER 


holies” and the boys, when they . 


Just a few words to remind’ 


159 


FOR SALE 


A Real American 14” Pacific 
Locomotive. Castings and 
Drawings, $30.00. Bronze Balls 
1%” dia. up. Small Cylinder 
drain cocks $1.25 per pair. Dis- 
placement lubricators $1.25 each. 
pressure gauges %4” and 11%” 
dia. $3.00 and $4.00. Look for 
special advertisement next 
month. Frank Birch, General 
Delivery, Highland Park, Mich. 


Constructional Blueprints — 
24” Model Racing Yacht, as il- 
lustrated in February Model- 
maker. 1 sheet, $2.25. Perry’s 
Flagship, the brig Niagara, 3 
Sheets, $5.00. These blueprints 
give all details necessary to 
build above models. A. R. Fer- 
ris, 284 Hast 151st Street, Cleve- 


jand, O. 


Blue Prints of Ships. for 
Modelmakers, send for circular, 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Blow Lamps, for model boilers 
all sizes made to order. Model 
Machine Shop, P. O. Box 5, Sta- 
tion Y, New York, N. Y. 


Locomotive Blue Prints—“‘O” 
gauge Pacific. 3 sheets, steam, 
full details, $2.00. 1 sheet, 
steam-electric, 75 cents. Singer, 
15 Moore St., New York. 





WANTED. 


Model Railway News, January 
1925. Will give 25 cents for 
good clean copy. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 





WORK WANTED 
I make patterns, small cast- 
ings and working models. Model- 
making is my trade. James Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 


160 THE MODELMAKER 





FOR SALE WANTED 

French Measures and English Model Power Boats by Hobbs 
Equivalents by Brook, a com- in good condition, Spon, 120 
plete set of tables from 1 milli. Liberty Street, New York. 
metre to 100 metres, arranged: - r y Ta 
in three columns metres, inches = ee ae Au ie 
with decimals, inches with frac- |i cl Al i 
tions; and other tables. In limp ih Ae } 
cloth to fit the vest pocket, price . 
50 cents. Spon, 120 Liberty St. Ne Ni) 
New York. i rnc 

Get this Flexible an and 4 Portable 


ps j 

















WANTED 
Model Railway News, January | Shaft Outfit of a thousand Uses 
1925. Will give 25 cents for [ Needed by every modeimaker, me- 
good clean copy. Spon, 120  chanic and for machine shop_ use. 
Liberty Street, New York. ; It’s a precision instrument, consisting 


of a ball-bearing coupling to connect 
to any motor, 3 feet of flexible shaft- 


ing and a ball-bearing chuck. Oper- 
THE DOMINION TOOLS ates buffing wheels, reamers, metal 





m @6=>- drills, files, burrs. and many other 
& CASTINGS CO. appliances. Uses a 4 H. P. motor, 
433 HOMER STREET obtainable at small cost. 
Bye tte B ao ce Special Offer — Send Only $5.00 
IVER, B. C., CANADA This outfit sells for $45. As a spe- 
We carry a stock of goods from the {f Cial_offer from our factory to you, 


send $5 with order and pay postman 


followin British firms: 3 
3 Seah bane ope ees $20, plus postage, on arrival. Satis: 


Stuart Turner, Ltd. 


A faction guaranteed or money back. 
Mills Bros.. of Sheffield €\ The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. 
Liverpool Castings & Tool Supply, Ltd. ‘1 (Industrial Division) 
Leeds Model Co., Ltda. a 152 W. 42nd St., New York 
Economic Electric, Ltd. As) 





Jackson Rigby, Ltd. (of Shalford) 





THE WADE BENCH LATHES 











No. 2 
Back Geared . 
Screw Cutting 





Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” or 18’’ length. 
TURNING — FACING — BORING — DRILLING 
WINDING — THREAD CUTTING 
Nove? SP AeG at al oe eoioscaneeine $28.00 No: 2 Back -Geared 4” %-127... $58.00 
No. 1 ee GIES OES te Ns odeshceisreee BOLO, No. 2 ra aa hl ee ST ee $65.00 


Catalogue showing details and accessories on request. 


THE GEROLD COMPANY (DEPT. M 19) 
120-122 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 






THE 


NODELMAKER 


FOR THOSE 
INTERESTED IN MAKING 


| WORKING MODELS 


Vol. Ill. No. 11 NOVEMBER, 1926 10 Cents 





Poe eel ae ee 








4” GAUGE 4—4—0 LOCOMOTIVE 
MADE BY MR. C. C. HELMICK 





162 THE MODELMAKER ae ie 





No. 1, 56” x %4” 
PISTON VALVE 
VERTICAL ENGINE 


Complete set Rough Castings, Mate- 
rials, Screws and Print for construct- 
ing this model now ready. Price $7.50 
per set, postpaid. See article starting 
in October issue of The Modelmaker 
for details of construction. 


H. J. COVENTRY 
3601 Windsor Mill Road 
Baltimore, Md. 





THE DOMINION TOOLS 
& CASTINGS CO. 


433 HOMER STREET 
VANCOUVER, B. C., CANADA 


We carry a. stock of goods from the 
following British firms: 
Stuart Turner, Ltd. 

Mills Bros. of Sheffield 
Liverpool Castings & Tool Supply, Ltd. 
Leeds Model Co., Ltd. 
Economic Electric, Ltd. 
Jackson Rigby, Ltd. (of Shalford) 








Per 6-Foot Dia, Circle, $7.50. 


SHIP MODELS—Coupon 


Easy to Build and Sell 


Santa aiviatia ccs 
Spanish Galleon. 
Mayflower ..... 
Pirate: y vi geenteusteacte 





Total 


Or mail this Coupon and receive this 
whole set, postpaid, for $1.50. 


M. W. Wade, Lawrenceville, Ill. 


MODEL MACHINERY 


Sole U. S. Agent for the noted Eng- 
lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
makers of Model Steam, Gasoline, 
Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
Trimmings; Electrical Machinery. 
Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 
gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 
and parts, ete. “CABLE SERVICE.” 


Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 


3 Ashland Street 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. S. A. 


Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
1926 Catalogue Just Issued 


EGOLF SCALE MODELS 
100 Woodside Avenue 


Narberth, Pa. 





Reading Railway Pacifics O Gauge 
wees Ot 
Smoke Device, Hand Reverse, Full Gear, 
With Tender, 


201’ Classes, Electric Drive, 


Postpaids ssf aeea eta $50 





“Main Line” 3-Foot Radius Curves & Switches 
Solid Copper, 


Central Third Rail 
Switches, $3 Each. 





THE MODELMAKER 


BOUND VOL. I. 


1924. $1.60 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 


BOUND VOL. II. 


1925. $2.10 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 of Vol. I. Price 10c each. 
We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. 2. 


Price 10c each. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 


THE MODELMAKER 


Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 


120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Editor—W. Edmunds Spon 


Dated Bevery Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, November, 1926 


Vol. Il. 


No. 11 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925, at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879,” 





OUR FOREWORD 


Another wonderful Exhibition 
of fine models comprising exam- 
ples of Modelmaking in all 
branches of this art has just 


-been held in London, England, 


and from the particulars given 
in recent issues of the Model 
Engineer it will go down in his- 
tory as one of the most complete 
and successful exhibitions of 
modelwork. 

Modelmaking has reached a 
high stage of perfection in Great 
Britain, where it embraces a 
very large following drawn from 
all walks of life. 

The interests which contrib- 
uted to this great Show may be 
classified under four Sections. 


1. The Loan Section, a valua- 
ble collection of Models of all 
kinds both old and new. 

2. The Trade Section, includ- 
ing models, supplies, tools and 
accessories. 

3. The Societies and Clubs. 

4. The Competition Section 


comprising the individual work 


of nearly 200 private Model- 
makers. 
Besides these four sections 


were. many other attractions, 


two especially deserving special 


mention. Major Phillips series 


of demonstrations of Wireless 


’ control of model railways and 


The Model Engineer Movies. 


Although the actual place of 
Exhibit was beyond the reach of 
most of our readers, it is quite 
possible that some of our Ameri- 
can modelmakers were on the 
spot and able to fully enjoy it 
from actual observation. 


The interest in Modelmaking 
is growing rapidly in the U. S. 
and Canada and it is to be hoped 
the time is not far distant when 
it will be possible to arrange for 
a similar Annual Exhibition of 
Models in one of our great cen- 
tres, where Models from ail 
parts of this country can be 
shown, and competitions for 
awards aranged for, and where 
our friends in the trade can dis- 
play the, materials they spe- 
cialize in. 

The Chicago Society of Model 
Engineers have given an annual 
exhibition for about ten years, 
and they are planning another 


_ Exhibit this month. 


The New York Society of 
Model Engineers are _ also 
making: arrangements for their 
first public exhibition of model 
work. 

The Akron Association of 
Model Engineers have a growing 
membership, including a num- 
ber of experienced modelmakers 
who have constructed quite a 
few fine models. It would help 
them to increase their member- 


164 


ship if they could arrange a pub- 
lic exhibit of their work. 

The Toronto Society, The 
Canadian Model Engineers Club, 
have made several very credit- 
able exhibits of model work at 
the Canadian National Annual 
Exhibition at which no doubt 
they will be represented this 
year. 

Detroit and its environs house 
a good many interested in this 
Hobby. No doubt they will be 
able in the near future to stage 
a public exhibit of their Work 
and by this publicity get to- 
gether sufficient supporters to 
organize a Model Engineers 
‘Club. 


4” GAUGE LOCOMOTIVE 
4 4-—-) 
Mr. C. C. Helmick 
Member Akron Assoc. M. BE. 


This working model Locomo- 
tive was constructed by Mr. 
Helmick and is an exact repro- 
duction from the original 1900 
that hauled President McKin- 
ley’s Funeral Train on the N. Y. 
C.R. R. We produce it not only 
for its historical value, but as 
an example of a fine piece of 
scale model work. 

Data 

Length, 41” 

Height, rail to cab top, 10%” 

Gauge, 4” 

Wheels Drivers, 5” dia. 

Wheels Pilot Truck, 144” dia. 

Wheels Tender, 14%” dia. 

Cylinders, 1” bore by 15%” 
stroke. 

Boiler, copper tube. 

Tubes, 144” copper. 

Number of tubes, 5. 

Boiler Pressure, 125 Ibs. 

Fuel, coal. 


THE MODELMAKER 


a, | 2 + ao 
at, T=", i 





Our greatest obstacle to united 
action is the. fact that: our 
Modelmakers are scattered over 
a vast extent of territory, but 
if the various groups could each 
put over a small public exhibit 
annually the way would eventu- 
ally open up for an Annual Na- 


NE Et. is i ie a aaa 
; “4 Ss < 5 2 





tional Show that would do jus- — | 


tice to the skill and workman- 
ship of the American Model- 
maker. d ; Fie 

Pass the good word along, 
boys, and see what your town 
can do in this matter. 

We shall be glad to hear par- 
ticulars from any club who have 
held an Exhibit this year. 


Tender Capacity, 2 qts. water. 
Tender Capacity, 2 lbs. coal. — 
Couplers, M—C—B Automatic. 
Air brakes working on all 
wheels except pilot truck. 

Cab contains the regular 
equipment including throttle on 
locking quadrant. Reversing 
lever, locking in any position. 

Bell, whistle and headlight 
work. 

Feed pump in tender. 


Dummy injector in Cab. 


Now that Christmas is draw- 
ing near most of our readers 
will be thinking of Christmas 
Gifts. An annual subscription 
to your favorite magazine, a 
lathe, some necessary tools, or 
practical handbooks are items 
that might go down on your list. 
It may be a welcome suggestion 
not only to make up your lists 
early, but to place your orders 
as soon as possible to ensure 
prompt delivery. 


i 
_ > 


THE MODELMAKER 165 


MODEL OF THE CLIPPER SHIP 
- FLYING CLOUD 


BUILT BY MR. J. W. C. CORBUSIER 


I am sending you two pictures of my Model of the Clipper Ship 
“Flying Cloud,’ Donald-McKay’s famous Clipper Ship. She made 
the record run of 89 days from New York to San Francisco. This 
record has never been surpassed by any sailing vessel, and only 
equalled by one, the “Andrew Jackson.” The “Flying Cloud” was 
built by McKay in East Boston in 1851. Length 225 ft., breadth 
40 ft. 8 in., depth 21 ft. 6 in. Tonnage 1783. 


My Model was made from drawings by the Boucher Co., and most 
of the rigging from drawings by Mr. G. B. Douglas. 


The hull is 26144” L. W. L. and the rest in proportion according 
to the drawings. She sails very well under a moderate breeze 
and would go under a stiff breeze if it could be reefed, but it is 
too small for that. 

+The rigging is all fish lines of different sizes and all sails will 
turn to catch the wind from one side or the other; the lower yards 
are hauled same as on the actual boat, but the others are run from 
one end of the yard through a block fastened at the proper place 
to the other end of the same yard, the fake ropes run from this 
block to the pins. 

All blocks and deadeyes are made from celluloid knitting needles, 
bored and grooved as real blocks are. — 

Most of the deck houses and fittings are made out of cardboard 
to lighten the weight, as I have found it hard to have a boat draw 
the proper amount of water and not have it top heavy. The wheel 
is made from a piece of brass clock wheel. 


Details and Measurements 

Scale, 144”=1—0” 

Length, O. A., 2834” 

Length, L. W. L., 2614” 

Depth Main Deck to Keel, 34%” 

Beam, Midships, 514” 

Hull, 4-piece bread and butter type, hollow, walls 14” thick 

Dimensions of for’ard deck house, 3” by 514”, height 3 1/16” 

Dimensions of aft deck house, 19/16” by 2%”, height 31/16” 
Dimensions of aft companionway, %” by 15/16”, height 14” 


166 THE MODELMAKER 





Height of top of bulwarks from deck, 11/16” 


Material for rigging, fishlines of various sizes, small 4% test, . 


medium 6 test, large 14 test. 
Number of deadeyes for lower masts rigging, 144 
Number of deadeyes for topmasts rigging, 44 
Number of deadeyes for topgallant masts rigging, 16 





Number of blocks used, 121 

Number of small boats, 5 

Blocks, owing to their smallness none of them have sheaves, 
but they-are pierced with 1, 2 and 3 holes to act as single, double 
and triple blocks. Blocks are 3/32”4 large way of oval and as 
small as can be made in width necessary for 1, 2 or 3 holes. 


Blocks and Deadeyes are made from celluloid knitting needles 
as wooden oneg are too prone to break. 


Deadeyes, 4%” round, 1/16” thick. 


—— 


me THE MODELMAKER 167 


Dimensions of Masts and Spars 


dia. 
Length of dia. at heel thin end 
SPU OUILS task acl eee. y ees ‘ 74" 7/32" 3/16” 
Bowsprit, exposed ...... 314" 11/16” 9/16” 
Lower foremast,fromdeck 74%” 34" 5/16” 
Pocetowmast. sits .-...'. 514” 3/16” 8/16” 
Foretopgallant mast .... 734" 1" 1/32” 
Main mast, from deck... 8%" 34" 36" 
EADY CO DINER LCC. oak a.m 0 0's 6” 3/16” 3/32” 
Main topgallant mast.... 814" ie" 1/32” 
Mizzenmast, from deck.. (& a tf LO! 
Mizzen topmast ........ 454" Ya" 3/32” 
Mizzen topgallant mast. . 614" 3/32" 1/32" 
Yards, foremast dia.at middle — dia. at ends 
(AVN AW Ca Sasa oa RI a 834" m4" 3/32" 
ODN tierce ain ses 67%” 3/16” a) se 
at Dee IE oS eels, 5 5B" 3/16” 1/16” 
|Sla N29 SRS A eee re 4” 5/32” 11 Ole 
LIDNSE ROY al or. 8 254" yy" 1/32” 4 
Yards, mainmast 
NEU es eeW es Se 1036” MNO 3h 3/32” 
POPS a rede gait cous. 8” 7/16” 3/32"— 
Topgallant: ac. Se taas 614” 5/32” 1/16” 
ROY Greater wheter the a's tek 5 a 8 43Q" 1g" 1/16”— 
WppereRoeyalc 5 oi. af Le" 1/32” 
Yards, mizzenmast 
LAG TR SUG fl Ae nee 8” 3/16” 1/16” 
EOF ah SIGE BY es Aaa ane 634” 5/32” 1/16”— 
Topgallant Siehive see) o%S sar 434" 1" 1/32”. 
PROV EN poe tei cece ck 314": yn 1/32” 
Upper Royal. 3.5... 234" 3/32" 1/32"— 
dia.atheel dia. thin end 
MAINDOONY ses asC.c c'e 6s 67%” 3/32” 1/16” 
(E297 one COR ea ie oe 47%" 3/32" — 1/16”"— 


Where the + sign is given it indicates a little over the measure- 
ment, and where the — sign a little under the measurement. 


168 


THE MODELMAKER 





AKRON ASSOCIATION OF 
MODEL ENGINEERS 


Mr. J. W. Neptune. 


The members gathered at the 
home of Mr. Yost on Wednesday 
evening, October 20th. The 
business session was very in- 
teresting. A number of letters 
were received asking for infor- 
mation about this Association, 
also applications for member- 
ship, some of which were voted 
upon. 

There were Visitors present 
who brought some models for 
inspection. 


The President, Mr. C. H. Lea, 
brought his “O” Gauge Locomo- 
tive, 2—6—0, and steamed her 
up. She worked fine. 


Mr. Yost’s Single Acting 
Marine Type Steam Engine was 
also tested out; a fine piece of 
work. 


Mr. Bans showed a 2-cylinder 
Marine Engine which he has un- 
der construction. 


Mr. Brickley and Mr. Pinpley 
each have a locomotive under 
construction. 


I have been delayed in my 
own work waiting for a new 
South Bend Lathe, but when I 
get it installed I will make the 
shavings fly. 


Our next meeting will be on 


Sunday afternoon, October 31st. 
We have decided to hold our 
meetings, in future, on Sunday 
afternoons to accommodate our 
out-of-town members and others 
who work on night shifts. 

After the business session was 
over our wives were admitted 
and we sure had a fine time. 

We shall be glad to welcome 
anyone interested in model work. 
Just send your name and ad- 
dress to me at 130 Paul Court, 
Akron, Ohio. 


I also enclose a photo of Mr. 
Helmick’s Locomotive with some 
data. 


The San Francisco Model 
Power Boat Club seems to be 
a real live organization. 
Secretary is Mr. Harry Cook, 
1806 Laguna St., San Francisco, - 
Calif. All of our Californian 
readers interested in model 
power boats should get in touch 
with this gentleman and ask for 
particulars of membership. 





The American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers have issued 
a small eight-page pamphlet en- 
title Rules for the Construction 
of Miniature Boilers, Section V, 
A. S. M. E. Boiler Construction 
Code. They make a charge of. 
10 cents. We think this pam- 
phlet will interest any of our 
readers who are contemplating 
the designing of a boiler. 





One of our advertisers draws 
our attention to a slight misun- 
derstanding on the part of some 
of his customers. When they 
purchase a complete set of cast- 
ings and drawings they think it 
also includes materials. He asks 
us to make a little explanation 
as follows: a complete set of 
castings and drawing does not 
include materials. The word 
materials may cover a host of 
items, such as nuts and bolts, 
odd pieces of metal, standard 
rod, sheet metal and all kinds 
of finished fittings. To cover all 
of this the advertisement would 
read as follows: Complete set 
of castings, all parts, nuts and 
bolts, finished fittings and blue- 
prints. We trust our readers 
will clearly understand the dis- 
tinction as drawn above. 


The | 





rt ‘THE MODELMAKER 


169 





Valve chamber is turned from 
- % in. brass rod drilled and 
~ reamed 3-16 in. The outside 
 ghould be turned an easy fit in 
_ cylinder, as it will eventually be 
tinned and sweated in. The 
steam passages may either be 
- milled down with end mill, or a 
flats may be filed, if milling is 
~ not possible. 
; The steam ports are drilled 
; taking care that they are ex- 
actly the correct distance apart. 
- It is perhaps better to drill the 
- ports before completely finish- 
ing the flats, filing just sufficient 
flat to start the drill true and 
_ then deepen the flat after drill- 
ing. The top end of chamber 
is tapped out for screw: cover 
~ plug, run the 3-16 in. reamer 
through to clean out any burrs 
from drilling the ports and the 
chamber is ready for cylinder. 


Now make a little jig for drill- 
- ing the port in cylinder (Instruc- 
- tions for this were given in my 
- note in July Modelmaker “Drill- 
ing Holes at an Angle’”’), bolt it 
in cylinder and drill the ports 
into the 7-16 in. valve chamber 
hole. If everything is done 
right, when the valve chamber is 
placed in cylinder the flats, or 
- recesses, in chamber should line 
up with the drilled ports in cy- 
linder. Now tin the chamber 
with soft solder, heat up the cy- 
_linder, and tin the inside of 7-16 
‘in. hole, finally push the cham- 
ber in with a_ reciprocating 
and rotary motion and let it set, 























_ Well in line, this can be ensured 


taking care that the ports are 





A 5%” x 4” PISTON VALVE 
: | VERTICAL ENGINE 
By H. J. COVENTRY, Assoc. Mem. Am. Soc. M. E. 


(Continued .from page 156) 


by a mark scribed on top of the 
chamber and cylinder before 
finally fitting. 


Piston may be now turned to 
a nice sliding fit in cylinder bore 
and hole for piston rod drilled, 
at same setting. 


Piston Rod is of drill rod and 
therefore true to start with, so 
hold the piece in self-centering 
chuck and turn down the small 
shoulder to a tight fit in piston, 
leaving a small amount for 
riveting over. This latter must 
be done carefully and evenly by 
holding the rod in a vise between 
copper clamps and close up to 
piston. With light blows and 
using the ball pean end of the 
hammer tap around the edge of 
the piston rod end. 


Crosshead is the next item. 
First file up the sides and slip- 
per edges and face, square and 
flat. Now take the bottom of 
cylinder cover, and screw down 
to top of column at the right dis- 
tance from center line, place 
crosshead in guide and clamp it 
to guide close up to cover. Us- 
ing the piston rod hole as a jig 
it is easy to drill the crosshead 
for piston rod. 


_ Piston Valve is a plain turn- 
ing job made of Phosphor, or 
Tobin, bronze turned to a nice 
close, but free running, fit to 
valve chamber. Before remov- 
ing from lathe the scribe line 
should be made with a sharp V 
tool. This line is used in the 
sitting of valve. 

Eccentric rod should be filed 
up clean all over and bored out 


170 


x 
. ee ee 


THE MODELMAKER 





in chuck. The fork end should 
be drilled first, then the opening 
made with a warding file. Tap 
one side and open the hole on 
opposite side to admit valve rod 
pin. 

Eccentric is made in two 
pieces, one a plain disc with a 
single flange and the other a 
cheek with boss to receive a set 
screw. The flanged piece is 
held in chuck, turned all over to 
dimensions, and parted from the 
chucking piece. Then the hole 
for shaft carefully marked off 
from center and drilled to suit 
shaft. 

The other part of eccentric is 
turned by holding in chuck by 
the flange, and taking a truing, 
cut on the chucking lug, then re- 
move from chuck, and hold by 
the lug and turn the outside dia- 
meter and face right across, thus 
cutting off from the Jug. Mark 
the center for shaft also the hole 
for driving pin. Hold against 
the drill pad in back center and 
drill for shaft. Now make a 
smali short mandrel and drive 
the casting on. Hold mandrel, 
in chuck and turn the boss, also 
a light finishing cut may be 
taken over face of flange se a2 
to ensure the shaft hole and face 
being square. Finally drill hole 
for the driving pin, and drill and 
tap boss for set screw. 


Now take the two pieces of 
the eccentric and place them on 
the shaft, or a piece of drill rod, 
get the flanges in line, and then 
drill a tapping hole in the 
flanged dise piece for the driving 
pin. 

Crankshaft is cut from CR 8 
T flat bar % in x 5-16 in. Mark 
out with the square, also center 
the ends for shaft and crank. 
Then saw away the metal be- 
tween the webs. Mount in lathe 
on the crank center and turn 
the crank pin, also inside faces 


of webs, taking light cuts, and 
using a narrow tool. When this 
is done saw away the metal 
from shaft portion, and lightly 
drive a piece of hard wood be- 
tween the web cheeks. This 
must not be jammed in too tight, 
or the shaft will be sprung out 
of true. Now mount in lathe 
centers and turn the shaft one 
end at a time. A few strokes of 
a file will finish the web edges. 


Flywheel should be chucked 
with outside jaws gripping the 
rim, face boss and drill for shaft 
Turn a short piece of steel to 
a tight fit in boss and drive 
wheel on. Hold the mandrel in 
chuck using inside jaws and fin- 
ish the wheel outright. 


Connecting Rod—The first op- 
eration is to saw off the big end 
cap, file the surface flat, also the 
rod end, tin both with solder 
and sweat together. Now clean 
up the sides of fork end, also a 
few strokes with a file from end 
to end will accomplish this. 
Mark out the center of big end 
exactly on the joint, and with 
the dividers scribe the cross 
head wrist pin center, from the 
big end center. Prick punch 
and drill big end for crank shaft, 
fork end must be drilled tapping 
size. Next lay the rod on a flat 
surface, and mark the centers 
at each end. Drill with a small 
center drill, mount between 
lathe centers and turn body of 
rod, also the fillet of big end 
and radius at fork end. 


Drill and tap big end for bolts, 
unsolder the cap and clean up 
the joint. A 3-16 in. mandrel 
must now be made a tight fit in 
big end so that the connecting 
rod may be gripped tight on it 
by means of the cap bolts. Mount 
the mandrel between both cen- 
ters and with light cuts face up 
each side of fork and big end at 


same time bring down to di- 


ange fF 


THE MODELMAKER 


mensions, and centralizing about 
the body of rod. 


The next operation is to drill 
the fork end laterally and saw 
down, then finish up with file to 
form the fork. Open one side 
of fork with a clearance drill 
and tap the other side for wrist 
pin. 

Fitting—We are now ready 
for erecting: 


1lst—-Screw front steel column 
into bedplate. 


2nd—Mount bottom cover, 
which has already been screwed 
to the back column, and put nut 
on top of front column. The 
back column should now seat 
nice and square on bed plate, if 
everything has been done cor- 
rectly. Tighten down the front 
nut. 


3rd.—Drill through foot of 
back column into bedplate and 
tap for screws. 

4th.—Put piston in rod 
through bottom cover and cross- 
head on the rod. If it is tight, 
place a little powdered glass and 
oil on the guide face and work 
up and down. This will produce 
a good bearing and nice sliding 
fit. 

When this is satisfactory drill 
a hole right through crosshead 
and piston rod and fit a small 
taper pin. A piece of 20 G wire, 
or a thin nail, filed slightly 
tapered while revolving in the 
lathe will make a good pin. 

5th—Crankshaft and connect- 
ing rod may now be fitted in, 
and before proceeding further, 


-- revolve the crank shaft to see 


that piston rod, cross head and 
connecting rod are all free run- 
ning. 


6th.—Take bottom cover off, 
line up on cylinder and tap for 
screws. Make the joint with a 
thin brown paper gasket soaked 
in boiled oil. Do the same with 


Lin 


top cover. When the cylinder 
with piston rod in it may be 
screwed back into columns. 


7th—Revolve the crank again 
to see that the piston works 
freely and then assemble the 
valve gear. First slide the 
flange disc part of the eccentric 
on crankshaft, then the eccentric 
rod is slipped over the eccentric 
finally the boss portion of ec- 
centric is attached to its com- 
panion by means of the driving 
screw. The eccentric must now 
be located at the correct angle 
from crank. Set the crank on 
top dead center and twist the 
eccentric till it is the correct 
angle behind the crank. 


With an inside steam admis- 
sion piston valve the eccentric 
lags behind the crank, instead 
of being in advance of the crank 
as when a slide valve is used. 
A simple way of setting the ec- 
centric is to take a piece of 
sheet material and set out the 
angle. Drill a hole at the cen- 
ter, so that the templet can be 
slipped on the crankshaft. 


Now set one line of the angle 
vertical or parallel, with column 
and bring the highest point of 
eccentric down to register with 
other lines. 


Tighten the screw in boss. 


8th.—Put the valve in cham- 
ber and bring the scribe line on 
it level with the end of chamber. 
Now adjust the screw eye till 
the eccentric rod pin can be 





slipped into place. Lock the 
eye with the nut. 
9th—Screw in the _ valve 


chamber plug mount the fly 
wheel and screw in the steam 
pipe. 


10th.—The engine may now 
be tested with air, or steam, first 
oiling up all running parts and 
putting a good dose of oil on 
top of piston valve. If every 


172 


thing is O. K. the screw in ec- 
centric boss may be sunk a little 
in shaft by drilling a counter 
sink for end of screw to bear in. 
lith—The cylinder may be 
lagged with asbestos and finish- 
ed off with sheet iron lagging; 
held on with a narrow polished 
steel band top and bottom. The 
ends of bands may be held to- 
gether with a touch of solder, 
and the joint filed off flush. 


Mr. HE. H. Grafton, Detroit, 
Michigan, writes us he has 
started on a design of a Model 
Pacific Type Steam Locomotive 
1144” Secale and when he has com- 
pleted this model and tested it 
out he will send us some par- 
ticulars. 





Mr. C. H. Hill, 560 South Pearl 
Street, Denver, Colo., is inter- 
ested in the construction of a 
Model Locomotive. He would 
like to get in touch with any 
Modelmakers in his _ locality 
with a view to an occasional 
get-together meeting. 





Our subscribers can help us 
very much if they will kindly 
favor us with the renewals of 
their subscriptions for our maga- 
zines as soon as possible. The 
compilation of the new subscrip- 
tion Lists for 1927 is a consider- 
able undertaking, and an early 
reply to this request will be ap- 
preciated. 


% 





Mr. William Lewellyn, 1617 
Church St., Galveston, Texas, is 
building: a. Model of-an Inter- 
Urban Electric Car, scale 3%”, 
or Gauge 1, the current to be 
taken through a trolley from an 
overhead conductor. He would 
like to get in touch with some 
of our readers who have built 


similar cars or a multiple-unit 


aw a ae ee eee ieee tes 


THE MODELMAKER 


electric car, as there is some 
information that he would like 
to get. We hope that some of 
our readers will be able to help 
out a fellow Modelmaker who is 
so far away from the erent cen- 
ters. 





Mr. J. W. Hoelzer, 98 Ave. D, 
Rochester, N. Y., has been for 
a number of years interested in 
the construction of model steam 
engines and boilers, locomotives 
and machinery. As a reader of 
the Modelmaker he would like 
to get in touch with any one in 
his locality interested in model- 
work with a view to forming a 
club for mutual advice and en- 
couragement. 
gentleman will hear from a 
number of our readers and that 
it will not be long before Roches- 
ter has its own Model Engineers 
Society. 





Mr. G. A. Knapp, 1824 Mans- 
field Ave., Spokane, Wash., 
writes us he is a “model-craft” 
enthusiast, and would like to 
form a club or society locally for 
the purpose of stimulating and 
promoting interest in various 
classes of model work. 


his district to get in touch with 
this gentleman either personally 
or by letter with a view to help- 
ing him along in his good work. 





When writing to us about your 


change of address we would ask © 


that you kindly mention not only 
your new address, but your old 


address, also state which maga- — 


zines you subscribe for. Our 
subscription cards and stencils 
are all classified under states 


alphabetically. Compliance with — 


the above request will simplify 
our work in looking up subscrip- — 
tion cards, 


We hope this | 


We 
would ask any of our readers in 


_  - . 


4 
. 
q 
x 
4 
4 
‘ 
a 


~~ 
F, 


“ee Te 


Ratio, 5:1 
-x7/16” S. 


THE MODELMAKER 


MODEL POWER BOAT 
RECORDS 


Compiled by 
Frederic Drayton Grimke 
for his own personal use. 

| ENGLISH RECORDS. 


SUNNY JIM III.—41.6 M. P. H. 
Displacement unknown. O. A. 
length 42”, beam 9”. Hydroplane, 
one step, wood sides, metal bot- 
tom. Engine, piston valve, 2- 
cylinder, single-acting, %” B. x 
3%” §. Flash Boiler, 35’—0” 
5/16” tubing. Blow torch, nozzle 
2” dia. x 6’ long. Gas tank, 100 
lbs. pres. Propellor 344” dia. 
10” pitch. 2 blades. Water 
pump, phe Bix var..ta %". = 
Oil pump, 5/32” B 
Ratio: 10:1, driven 
from water pump shaft. M. BE. 


. Volume 50, page 574. 


_ Displacement 13—14 lbs. 


minum bottom. 


DB top O e+ bok 
type flash boiler, 33’ 


BULLRUSH III.—38 M. P. H. 
O. A. 
length 39”, beam 14144”. Hydro- 
plane, one step 3-ply wood, alu- 
Engine, slide 
single-acting, 
%”" §S. Twin coil 
pao yn 


valve, 4-cylinder, 


and 12’—0” 5/16” tubing. Blow 


torch, 2 nozzles, 14%” dia. 


A geehnnas a 


ee pump, %4” 





Gas 
tank and pressure data unknown. 


Propeller, 334” dia., 12” pitch, 2 


blades. Water pump, D. A. 
5/16” B x %” S., Ratio 10:1. Oil 
Bx 3,” S. Ratio 66:1. 
. E. Volume 49, page 606. 


CHATTERBOX III.—37 M. P. 


H. Displacement 13 Ibs. 14 oz. 
0. A. length 395%”, 
draught 1”. 

step, tin plate. 
der single-acting, 
_§., type of valve unknown. Flash 
type boiler 40’ 
Blow torch, 2 nozzles, 1%” dia., 


beam 12”, 
Hydroplane, one 

Engine, 2-cylin- 
IR" B. se Ik" 


—0” 4%” tubing. 


178 


2” dia. x 8” long. Gasolene tank, 
75 lbs. pres. Propeller 37/16” 
dia., 10” pitch, 2 blades. Water 
pump, 3” B. x 7/16” S., Ratio 
4:1. 


CHATTERBOX II.-—36 M. P. 
H. Displacement 14 lbs. O. A. 
length 3934”, beam 10”. Hydro- 
plane, one step, tin plate. En- 
gine, %” piston valve, 2-cylinder 
single-acting, %” B. x %” §S. 
Flash type boiler, 30’—0”, 5/16” 
and 10’—0” 4%” tubing. 
torch, 2 nozzles, 15%,” dia., and 
2%” dia. x 9” long. Gasolene 
tank, 75 lbs. pres. Propeller 
35/16” dia., 10” pitch, 2 blades. 
Water pump 3” B. x 9/16” § 
Ratio 4:1. Oil pump 3/16” B. x 
C/16" 25. Rai. O08): Mio. 
Volume 49, page 549. 


MYSTERY.—30 M. P. H. Dis- 
placement 12 lbs. Hydroplane 
type hull, further data unknown. 
Engine, 2-cylinder, single-acting. 
Further data unknown. Flash 
type boiler 32’—0” tubing, size 
unknown. No more data on this 
boat available. M. E. Volume 
45, page 315. ° 


EVIL SPIRIT.—26 M. P. H. 
Displacement 8 lbs. 10 oz. O. A. 
length 3934”. Modified V hull, 
mahogany and aluminum. En- 
gine, 2-cylinder  single-acting 
13/16” B. x %” S. Flash type 
boiler 13’—0”, %4.” and 7’—0” 
5/16” tubing. No data on torch. 
Propeller, 3144” dia., 3” pitch, 2 
blades. Water pump 34” B,., 
stroke variable. Ratio 5:1. Oil 
pump 3/16” B. x stroke variable. 
Ratio 120:1. 


BULLRUSH II.—15 M. P. H. 
Hull data unknown. Engine, 
slide valve 2-cylinder single-act- 
ing 13/16” B. x %” S. No fur- 
ther data known. 


(To be continued) 


Blow | 


174 


THE MODELMAKER 





MODEL ENGINEER Vol. 7. 





How to Become an Electrical Engineer. 

How to Make a Lever Switch.’ Illustrated. 

How to Ilake a Model Battleship. Detail Drawing. 

Bow. to fake an Air Compressor, for Driving Model Engines. Detail 
rawings. 

How to set a Simple Slide Valve. Illustrated. 

How to Make a Simple Model Steamer. Diagram. 

How to Make an Electrical Indicator. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Model t lectric Launch. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Gramaphone. Detail Drawings. 

How to Test Sma 1! Engines and Boilers. Diagrams. 

How to Make Clock Work Locomotives Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Model Vertical Marine Engine. Detail Drawings. 

How to [ake a Built-Up Horizontal Steam Engine. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a 40-Ampere-Hour Accumulator. Illustrated. 

How to Make a Model Steam Travelling Crane. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a1 ‘10H. P. tlectric Motor. Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Small Lathe from * Scrap.’’ Ilustrated. 

How to flake a Power Fretsaw Detail Drawings. 

How to Make a Spring Lathe Chuck. Diagrams. 

Model ‘‘ Willians’’ C.ntral Valve Engine. Detail Drawings. 

Two Simp'e Forms of Resistance. Illustrated. 

The Motor Bicycle: Its Design, Construction and Use. Many Detail Draw- 


ings. 

The Rating of Model Yachts. With Diagrams. 

‘jal “tuart Compound Vertical Engine. Complete Detail Drawings. 

Construction of Dug out Model Yachts. Detail Drawings. 

Construction of 1 2H. P. Water Motor. Hlustrated. 

Mr. Taylor’s Model Launch Engine. Illustrated 

The Pitmaston-Moor=Green Model Railway. Illustrated. 

Model Tank Locomotive. Detail Drawings. 

Mr Willis’ Model Steam Launch Hlustrated. 

Original Designs for 750-watt Direct Coupled High Speed Steam Engines. 
and Dynamos with Fu!l Details. 

A Four Inch Screw Cutting Lathe. Illustrated. 

Detail Drawings for 80-watt Multipolar Dynamo. 

Design for 100-watt Manchester Type Dynamo. 

Model Electric Railway. ‘‘ Three Rail System,’’ with Diagrams. 

Models made without a Lathe. Some Notes ona Large Static Machine. 

The Castelli Coherer for Wireless Telegraphy. Illustrated. 

A Cheap Petrol Carburetter for Small Gas Engines. Illustrated. 

A Neat Model Electric Launch. 

A Water-Regulating Resistance for a 1-in. to 2-in. Spark Coil. Diagrams. 

A Carbon Electrolytic Interruptor Illustated. 


With many pagesof Short Articles, Practical Letters, Notes, Questions and 


Answers, Book Notices, Yachting Notes, New Tools, Supplies, &c. 


286 pages, 311 Diagrams, 107 Half-Tones, 17 Full Single 


Page and Two Double Page Scale Drawings. 
Price B2.OO, Net. 


Price. 


Copies Mailed to any part of the World on Receipt of 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 


120-122 LIBERTY STREET NEW YORK CITY 





THE MODELMAKER 


175 


WHAT'S IN YOUR GARRET? 





SALE—EXCHANGE—WANTED 


EVERYTHING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters or 


figures count as words, compound words as separate words. 


accompany copy. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 


Model Loco, Lionel Number 
251, almost new, ten dollars; 
Lionel curved track, ten cents, 
straight track, three feet for a 
quarter. Other supplies all for 
O Gauge, J. A. Baker, Darien, 
Conn. 


Buy a Set of Birch 14” Pacific 
Locomotive castings, 80 pieces 
in the set, $30.00 complete with 
full-size drawings. An ideal 
Christmas present. Half-inch 


scale Locomotive fittings,. such 


as Air Pump, Headlight, also 
Power Reverse Gear, Headlight 
Turbo-Generator, realistic in ap- 
pearance and to scale. Frank 
Birch, General Delivery, High- 
land Park, Michigan. 


14" Scale Atlantic Locomotive, 

steam, $100.00. Horizontal En- 
gine, oscillating 1” bore 3” 
stroke, $18.00. Enclosed Marine 
engine, %” x %”, $15.00. Real 
Bargains. John Nielson, 131 
Elza Avenue, West, Royal Oak, 
Mich. 


Ship Model Fittings; Blocks 
Deadeyes, Anchors, Capstans. 
Send for circular. Fisher, 1002 
Etowah Ave., Royal Oak, Mich. 


Drummond Lathe M Type, 7” 
swing, length of bed 2 ft. 8 in., 
brand new, a splendid precision 


3 tool, suitable for all kinds of 


modelwork, $155.00 f.o.b. New 
York, Box 13, The Modelmaker. 


FOR SALE 


Blow Lamps, for model boilers 
all sizes made to order. Model 
Machine Shop, P. O. Box 5, Sta- 
tion Y, New York, N. Y. 


Designing — Working draw- 
ings prepared; calculation of 
strength of materials; for your 
models or actual size; inven- 
tor’s ideas developed. E. H. 
Grafton, P. O. Box 75, North End 
Station, Metroit, Mich. 


Blue -Prints of Ships’ for 
Modelmakers, send for circular, 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


A BC of The Steam Engine, 
describing a high speed single 
cylinder, double acting, hori- 
zontal steam engine and auto- 
matic governor, with large draw- 
ings, price 35c. Spon, 120 Lib- 
erty Street, New York. 





WANTED 


Modelmaker, November 1924, 
May 1925, March 1926. Will 
exchange copy of Mechanical 
Age for any of these numbers 
in good condition. Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 





WORK WANTED 


Light Machine Work Wanted. 
Let us estimate on your require- 
ments. Miniature Railways (for- 
merly Motor Generator Service), 
Box 224, Dover, N. J. 


176 


THE MODELMAKER 





WANTED 


“Designing Engineer with 17 
years’ experience in Automobile 
industry desires financial sup- 
port in formation of small com- 
pany to manufacture steam and 
internal: combustion models on 
a production basis. Might con- 
sider taking ‘an interest in an 
established concern.” Box 9, 
Modelmaker. 


WANTED 


Round Head Brass Machine 
Screws, 0x80, Lengths, 14”, 3/16”, 
4%”, under head. Modelmaker, 
Box 7. 


THE BATHE MFG. CO. 


Model Engines, 

Boilers, Boiler Fittings, Books, 
Model Makers’ Supplies 
Large Illustrated Catalogue 20c. 
(refunded on first order) 
Dept. S.— 5214 Woodland Ave., 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. | 


WORK WANTED 

I make patterns, small cast- 
ings and working models. Model- 
making is my trade. James Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 
a ee ee 


a 1G) y q 


MBs 


7 


: 


SES i 


] 


“Ta! 









I Get this a Portable 
ieew Outfit of a thousand Uses 


Needed by every modeimaker, me- 
chanic and for machine shop. use. 
It’s a precision instrument, consisting 
of a ball-bearing coupling to connect 
to any motor, 3 feet of flexible shaft- 
ing and a ball-bearing chuck. Oper- 
ates buffing wheels, reamers, metal - 
drills, files, burrs and ee other 
appliances. Uses a 4% H. P. motor, 
obtainable at small cost. 

Special Offer — Send Only $5.00 
This outfit sells for $45. As a spe-— 
cial offer from our factory to you, 
send $5 with order and pay postman 
$20, plus postage, on arrival. Satis: 
faction gwaranteed or money back. 





\'The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. 
(Industrial Division) 
a 152 W. 42nd St., New York 


THE WADE BENCH LATHES 


ve AN IDEAL XMAS GIFT 






Capacity: 


Screw Cutting — 


4” dia, x 12” or 18’’ length. 


TURNING — FACING — BORING — DRILLING 


WINDING — THREAD CUTTING 


No. 2 Back Geared 4” x 12”... 
No. 9 “sé 6é 


No. 1 Plain 47% X 12” ..cccccerccreesse $28.00 
Now 1 4M KALB ec ececeenone voeee 30.00 


+» $58.00 
ft x 18”......$65. 00 


Catalogue showing details and accessories on request. 


THE GEROLD COMPANY (DEPT. M20) 


120-122 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 


205 aS ee _” Si ae ad 
ay see 


NYO 
vy~ \ 


TRE 


MODELMAKER 


FOR THOSE ph 
INTERESTED INMAKING =, 


WORKING MODELS. 


Vol Ill, No. 12 DECEMBER, 1926 10 Cents 














ss BG YLINDER DOUBLE-ACTING STEAM ENGINE 
F MADE BY MR. W. H. BUCKLEY 


>= &. 


——- 





178 THE MODELMAKER 
: 
. | ‘ 
SHIP MODELS—Coupon | MODEL MAKERS 
Easy to Build and Sell in WOOD xa 
Santa Maria.... .60 on SHIPS" 
Spank Bence oe = on WAGONS ' 
Pirate eee 185 EAN on RAILROAD CARS 
Viking ........ .45 Sy 


_Interested in Teaching Positions 
in Private Schools 





OAL K's ence npeko 
Or mail this Coupon and receive this 


whole set, postpaid, for $1.50. ~ Write EDWARD YEOMANS, 
M. W. Wade, Lawrenceville, Ill. Ojai, Calif. 


For More Speed, Accuracy and Pleasure in Model Making 


ack Ms GET NEW IDEA | 


BATES MOTOR SAW 
— 6 SAWS IN1— | 
Does the work of band-saw, rip-saw, 
cross-cut, miter, bevel and scroll-saw. 
A wonder worker for the home shop. 
Direct drive! Can’t stick! Cuts 2” 
wood. Most amazing variety saw 
ever invented. Does more, costs less! 
Not a toy. Write for circular., 
BATES MOTORCRAFT CO, ee 
Dept. K, 28 N. Clinton, Chicago, Ill. : 












SCALE MODEL O GAUGE ELECTRIC 
READING RWY. PACIFICS “120” Class 
Built from the Railway’s Plans ~- 


Prototype pulls the ‘‘Boardwalk Flyer,” 
fastest train in the world. 





Patented construc'ion makes possible 


PRICE OF $9 POSTPATD COMPLETE, 
WITH TENDER 


Fittings include smoke device and many other ex- 
clusive features. Most powerful commercial motor 
for O gauge A. C. or D. C. Cuts show these 
models in operation on our ‘‘Main Line” curves | 

and switches. 


EGOLF SCALE MODELS) "“\,79023D" SENNA 














THE MODELMAKER 
Published by SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 


120-122 LIBERTY ST., NEW YORK, N. Y. 
Editor—W. Edmunds Spon 


Issued Every Month 


Annual Subscription, $1.00 


.Copyright by Spon & Chamberlain, December, 1926 


Vol. 


Ill, No. 12 


“Entered as second-class matter Mar. 27, 1925, at the Post Office at 
New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879,” 





OUR FOREWORD 


In looking back over 1926, the 
past year has been full of good 
work done and promises for 
greater successes in the future. 

Without question Model Boats 
_ have held the center of the stage 
and of this class of models the 
sailboat takes the first place. 
Hundreds of these have been 
built and sailed during the sea- 
son. 

Although a great many have 

been of the simple fin type 
sloop, some very fine sailing 
models of sloops and schooner 
yachts have been finished. 
- The construction of models of 
old-time Sailing Vessels takes 
second place. This kind of work 
appeals more to the matured 
model enthusiast than to the 
beginner, as it requires a greater 
amount of knowledge, skill, 
sustained perseverance and 
money than would be required 
in the construction of a simple 
sailing boat. This group of en- 
thusiasts is composed princi- 
pally of professional men, such 
as lawyers, doctors, engineers, 
architects, dentists and business 
men, who derive great pleasure 
and recreation in the pursuit of 
their hobby. 


Model Power Boats are in a 
class by themselves and _ al- 
though a goodly number have 
been constructed in the past 
year. More might have been 
built but for the expense en- 
tailed and the greater amount 
of mechanical skill required, 
not only in the designing and 
building, but in the operation 
and maintenance. 

In other classes of Models 
the Locomotive takes the lead. 
Quite a number of them have 
been finished and run and many 
more are in course of construc- 
tion. The steam locomotive 
seems to be more favored than 
the electric locomotive. 

There is a greater fascination 
in the operation of a steam loco- 
motive and string of cars over 
a well-planned model railway 
system than perhaps could be 
obtained in the operation of any 
other type of working model. 
The electric loco is very popu- 
lar. It does not require the 
same care and attention as the 
steam type. 

In other classes may be men- 
tioned Marine and Stationary 
Steam Engines, Gasoline and 
Aero Engines; the making of 


- tings, houses, etc. 


180 


THE MODELMAKER 


Ce ee he ee ROR a re ce 
y “ ete Qf. . 7 £ - “ 





equipment and tools; the laying 
out and equipment of the work- 
shop; drafting of sets of scale 

drawings, pattern-making, boiler 
‘ making, blow torches, and many 
other minor accessories. 

The Societies all seem to have 
had an active year and two new 
ones have been added to the 
list. The New York Society of 
Model Engineers and the Akron 
Association of Model Engineers, 
both composed of groups of real 
live wires, doing excellent work 
in their own communities. 

Many private individuals have 
been heard from and in a num- 
ber of cases little groups of en- 
thusiasts are meeting in private 
homes, some of which, in the 
near future, will be organized 
into regular societies. 

The interest in Modelwork is 
growing steadily and the true 
value of miniature engineering 
is coming to be more fully ap- 
preciated. 

Quite a few men of practical 
and mechanical ability have en- 
tered the field from a _ profes- 
sional standpoint for the pur- 


Mr. M. Bollés, 119 E. 19th St., 
New York, N. Y., is considering 
the construction of a real scale 
model of Donald McKay’s fa- 
mous Clipper Ship “The Flying 
Cloud,” considered the fastest 
sailing ship of her day. He-has 
blue prints of the lines and sail 
- plans, but wishes to get ac- 
curate data as to her deck fit- 
He would be 
glad to hear from any of our 
readers who can supply him 
with this information. He has 
examined several models of this 
ship, but in each case the deck 
fittings and positions of the 
deck houses varied. Can any- 
_ one supply this data? 


pose of supplying model cast- — 
ings and parts, blueprints and ~ 
accessories based upon Ameri- — 
can practice. 

Several new books have been 
added to. the 3 
Modelmaking, The Ship Model — 
Builder’s Assistant, by Charles © 
G. Davis; Ship Model Book, by — 
George B. Douglas, and Ship — 
Model Making, by Captain E. — 
Armitage McCann. Our old 
friend the Model Engineer and 
its younger Companion, The 
Model Railways News, have — 
kept well up_ to ee high 
standard. 

Before closing we wish to 
thank our many contributors for 
their valuable assistance in sup- 
plying information and illustra- 
tions. To our friends “in the 
trade for their advertising 
patronage and to our large body 
of subscribers for their support. 

We wish you one and all a 
Merry Christmas, and may the 
New Year bring you all in- 
creased enthusiasm and enjoy- 
ment in the pursuit of your 
favorite hobby. 


Egolf Scale Models have sent 
us the following table of “O” 
gauge train speeds for insertion 
in the Modelmaker, as they be- 
lieve it will interest our Model © 
Railway enthusiasts: 


Scale Actual Speed of. 

Speed Model Trains 
10-M. Px 18 ft. per sec. 
20°: Mi SPi eee 36 ft. per sec. 
30): Mo oe Sowa 55 ft. per sec. 
40-M: Pict 73 ft. per sec. 
50° MP AH Aaa 92 ft. per sec. 
60-M;* Ps see 110 ft. per sec. 


Other speeds in multiple. 


It will be seen that in 4” 
scale 110 ft. is 1 mile. 


literature on 





THE MODELMAKER 


181 





VERTICAL MARINE ENGINE 
Mr. Frank Birch © 


I enclose a photo of my ver- 
tical Marine Engine. This was 
made up specially for Mr. Harry 


Jeffers of Saginaw, Mich., and 
tested out under 125 lbs. air 
pressure ran very smoothly, and 
under a head of 50 lbs. of steam 
it gave excellent results. This 
engine is just right for a boat 
of about 4 ft. long. It also runs 





very steadily as a_ stationary 
unit driving a small dynamo. 


The following parts are of 
cast iron: cylinder, top and bot- 
tom covers, valve chest and 
cover, standard, bedplate, fly- 


wheel and eccentric sleeve. 


Bronze parts: piston and valve 
glands, crosshead connecting 
rod, eccentric strap with rod, 
main bearing brasses, slide valve 
and valve rod guide. 


182 


THE MODELMAKER 





Dimensions and Data 
Cylinder, 1” bore x 1” stroke 
Base, 4” long x 2” wide. 
Height of engine, including 

lubricator, 814” 
Width of engine, including fly- 
wheel, 3144” 
Flywheel, 3144”, width of face, 
34" 
Flywheel, weight, finished, 1 
b. 
Single cylinder, double-acting, 
with slide valve 


Weight of engine complete, 5 
lbs. 


Approximate speed on 50 Ibs. 
steam, 3000 R.P.M. 


Would require a multitubular 


boller;: 4" dia x14" high=for 
stationary work 
Rating, = 46° HPs on: 60--1bs: 


steam pressure. 

This engine under tests of 
only 3 lbs. of steam ran very 
smoothly at a fair speed, which 
speaks well for the design and 
materials of which it is made. 

All of the castings could be 
machined on a small lathe hav- 
ing a 4” swing. I also have the 
necessary castings to make it 
into a horizontal engine. 


Model Engineer, contents for 
October 7, 14, 21 and 28: The 
Placing of Guide Pulleys. 
Making Three-Part Commuta- 
tors. 
Drill. Working Model Traction 
Engines. Shop Shed and Road. 
The Model Engineer Exhibition 
of 1926. Locomotive Prototypes. 
The Mandrels of Small Lathes. 
A Model Vertical Steam En- 
gine. Model Marine Notes. 
Yachting Associations. Clock- 
Making and the Small Lathe. 
A 1%” Scale Australian Rail- 
way. Making and Using Bows 
and Arrows. Six-foot Model 


A Useful Stand for Hand. 


Steam Yacht Fitted with Com- 
pound Engines. A Small Pump- 
ing Plant for Real Work. 
Double-Seale Volt Meters: their 
Construction and Use. Queries 
and Replies. Practical Replies. 
Society Notes. The article de- 
scribing the M. E. Exhibition, 
London, is continued through 
these four numbers. 





Model Railway News, contents 
for November: New Shunting 
Engines for the “K” Lines. The 
Battle of the Gauges. The Ash- 
ville “O” Gauge Model Railway. 
Canadian National Railways Oil 
Electric Cars. Extensions to an 
“O” Gauge Electric System. 
The Layout of Country Stations. 


Making “O” Gauge _ Corridor 
Connections. A Simple Station 
Indicator. “O” Gauge Level 


Crossing Gates. Simple Lami- 
nated Loco Springs. The Steam 
Locomotive Under the Micro- 
scope. Six Coupled Side Tank 
Locomotive. Rail Mlotor Car. 
Mr. G. D. Arthur’s “O” Gauge 
Line, Showing His Model Ameri- 


can Prairie Type 2—6—2 Loco- > 


Clubs 
For Sale and 


motive. Our Mailbag. 
and Societies. 
Exchange, etc. 





It gives us pleasure to state | 
that Mr. Bathe’s trip to Bermuda 
benefited him very much and 
that his eyesight is greatly im- 
proved from the change. We 
hope that he will soon have fully - 
recovered from his eye trouble. 


A CORRECTION 


In the issue for September of. 
the Modelmaker on page 137 re- 
ferring to Mr. Elmer Wall’s Gas 
Engine we stated it was a half- 
horse power. This is incorrect. 
He writes it is one-fourth horse 
power for steady pulling. 


POSITION FOR CRANK-PINS 
ON LOCOMOTIVE DRIVING 
WHEELS. 


Mr. F. D. Grimke gives the fol- 
lowing solution, which is an an- 
swer to an inquiry from one of 
our readers. We believe it will 
also prove of interest to others 
who are building model locomo- 


SIDE VIEW 


FRONT VIEW 


THE MODELMAKER 183 


Drill holes for axle a. and 
crank-pins c. Place wheels on 
axle by hand and fasten wheel 
A. A. on axle. ‘Now place the 
axle on the Vee block so that 
the wheels clear the surface 
plate, Fig. 2. Take the try 
square and turn the axle so that 
the centre line A. A. is 90°, or 





SIDE VJ/EW 


Ligure peas 


tives. -The finding of the right 


3 position of the two crank-pins 


on a pair of locomotive driving 
wheels. 


Take a wheel, which previ- 
ously has been rough turned, a 
scribe and a centre gauge and 
place them as in Fig. 1, hold the 
centre gauge firmly against the 
flange of the wheel and scratch 
a light center line A. A. Repeat 
the process on the other wheel 
atB=B; 


perpendicular, to the plane of 
the surface plate Fig. 2. Measure 
the total height of wheel from 
surface plate, Fig. 3, t1, subtract 
from this the diameter of the 
wheel, Fig. 3, #2, and that leaves 
the remainder, dimension #8. 
Halve the diameter #2 and add 
to it dimension $3. This last fig- 
ure is the height of the point of 
the surface gauge scribe from 
the surface plate, 


184 


THE MODELMAKER 





Suppose the wheel diameter 
t2—314" 

The total height from surface 
plate #1—=5” 

Then 
#12223 or 5”—34%4"=1%4" 
2=3144"=138x44=15%"” 

2.2 4 

Then 
#3442 or 15474156” =356" 


2 
33%” is the dimension D. Fig. 2. 


Clamp axle so that it can’t 
roll and see that A. A. is perpen- 
dicular to the surface plate. Set 
the scribe of the gauge to 33%” 
above the surface plate. If the 
B. B. crank is $0° to A. A. the 
scratched line coincides with 
the scratch made by the surface 
gauge. If not, adjust the wheel 
so that the two lines will coin- 
cide B. B. and the scratch. 
When they do, drive wheel home 
with a wooden mallet. Mount 
Wheels and axles in lathe and 
take finishing cuts. 





————— 


Mr. Harry Cook, Secretary of 
the San Francisco Model Power 
Boat Club, 1806 Laguna Street, 
San Francisco, writes us that 
four of their members have new 
boats under construction, and 
that he will send us more par- 
ticularg of their year’s activities 
later. 


When writing to advertisers 
please mention the Modelmaker 
and don’t forget a stamped and 
addressed envelop for a prompt 
reply. 


A GERMAN RECIPE FOR THE 
ELECTROLYTE OF DRY 
CELLS 


The following recipe was is- 
sued during the war by the Ger- 
man Government for the infor- 
mation of manufacturers, who, 
owing to wartime restriction, 
found it difficult to obtain. the 
materials usually employed in 
making dry cells. 

Take 140 grammes of pow- 
dered sal-ammoniac, 40 grammes: 
of zine chloride, 10 grammes of 
ammonium ‘sulphate, mix to- 
gether in a porcelain bowl with 
10 grammes of thick refined 
glycerine. Cover this mixture 
in small quantities with distilled 
water at a temperature of 40° 
C., and: stir energetically until 
the materials are dissolved into — 
a concentrated solution. This 
mixture is allowed to soak into 
the binding material (which 
may be either wheat or rye flour, 
glass-wool, gelatine, starch, saw- 
dust or Kieselguhr), and the 
paste so formed is filled into the 
cells, which are closed with a 
parafined card top sealed with 
wax. In the cover two small 
glass tubes are provided for the 
escape of such gases as are gen- 
erated in the cell. In com- 
pounding the electrolyte, cal- 
cium acetate can be mixed to 
advantage with equal parts of 
the sal-ammoniac. The mixture 
possesses excellent conductivity, 
is hygroscopic and does not 
crystallise or creep.—The Model 
Engineer. 


One of our subscribers would 
like to know if any of our 
readers could supply all the out- 
side measurements of the stand- 
ard rails from 85 lbs. per yard 
to 127 lbs. per yard. If so, please 
send the information to the — 
Editor of the Modelmaker. 


rs 





THE MODELMAKER 


MODEL POWER BOAT 
RECORDS 


Compiled by 
Frederic Drayton Grimke 


(Continued from page 173) 
ENGLISH RECORDS. 


THUNDERBOLT.—12.47 M. P. 
H. Displacement unknown. V 
bottom, beam 9”. No further 
hull data. Engine, aie 
single-acting, 53/64” B. x %” S 
No further engine data. Smithies 
pouer, No further data avail- 
able. 


EDYTHE IV.—10.02 M. P. H. 
Displacement unknown. O. A. 
length 41%”, beam 101%”. V 
bottom. No further hull data. 
Engine, 2-cylinder single-acting, 
me” B. x %” S. Scott type boiler. 
No further data available. 


“RAINBOW.—8.22 M. P. H. 
O. A. length 42”, beam 8%”. V 
bottom. Further hull data un- 
known. Engine, 2-cylinder sin- 
gle-acting, %” B. x %” S. Fur- 


ther engine data unknown. 
Scott type boiler. Further data 
unknown. 


PEP IlJ.—Speed not recorded. 
Displacement unknown. O. A. 
length 42”, beam 9”. V bottom. 
Further hull data unknown. 
Engine, 2-cylinder single-acting, 
7" B. x %” S. Further engine 
data unknown. Smithies boiler. 
Further data unknown. 


BLUEBELL.—Speed not re- 
corded. Displacement unknown. 
O. A. length 42”, beam 9”. V 
bottom. Further hull data un- 
known. Engine, 2-cylinder sin- 
gle acting, %” B. x 4%” S. Fur- 
ther engine data unknown. Cen- 
_ ter flue boiler. Further data 

- unknown. 


185 


SPORT IlI.—Speed not re- 
corded. Displacement unknown. 
O. A. length 42”, beam 9”, V 
bottom. Further hull data un- 
known. Engine, 2-cylinder sin- 
gle-acting, %” B. x %” S. Fur- 
ther engine data unknown. 
Scott type boiler. Further data 
unknown. 


HAWK.—17 M. P. H.  Dis- 
placement unknown. Ora 
length 44”, beam 12”. Metal 
hull, runabout lines. Further 
hull data unknown. Engine, 
slide valve, 2-cylinder. Water 
tube boiler. Further data un- 
known. 


BLUEBIRD II.—16.2 M. P. H. 
Displacement unknown. O. A. 
length 44”, beam 11”. Hull 
made of planked mahogany. 
Further hull data unknown. 
Engine, poppet valve, 2-cylinder, 
single-acting, 13/16” B. x %” S. 
Water tube boiler, 20 tubes. 
Blow torch. Further data un- 
known. 

PUG.—15 M. P. H. Displace- 
ment unknown. O. A. length 38”, 
beam 11”. Hull, planked ma- 
hogany. Further hull data un- 
known. Engine, poppet valve, 
8-cylinder single-acting, 5%” B. 

x %” S. Boiler U-shaped water 
he 36 dia., with steam drum. 
Further data unknown. 

GREYHOUND.—Speed not re- 
corded.. Displacement unknown. 


O. A. length 46”, beam 12”. 
Hull, runabout lines, sheet 
metal, Engine, slide valve, sin- 


gle-cylinder, doubt-acting, %4” B. 
x %” §. Water tube boiler. 
Further data unknown. 

FIREFLY.—Speed not re- 
corded. Displacement unknown. 
O. A. length 46”, beam 12”. Hull, 
runabout lines, sheet metal. En- 
gine, slide valve, single-cylinder, 
double acting, 4%” B. x %” S 
Water tube boiler. Further data 
unknown. 


186 


BLUEBIRD I.— Displacement 
type hull. No further data 
available. 


MARGUERITE.—Hypdroplane 
type hull. No further data 
available. 


AMERICAN .RECORDS 


ELMIRA.—30 M. P. H. (Never 
been officially clocked.) 
placement 14 lbs. O. A. length, 
3934”. Hydroplane, single step, 
mahogany and aluminum. Fur- 
ther hull data unknown. En- 
gine, 2-cylinder' single-acting, 
%” B. Further engine data un- 


known. Water pump, 4” B. x 
eet 9/16" UrS5 7 RAO 1D pa Ou 
pump, 4” B x &"—¥Yy" S§., 


Ratio 100:1. 
GADFLY.—22 M. P. H. Dis- 


placement unknown. LO Rowse 
length, 40”, beam, 10”. Dis- 
placement type hull, planked 
mahogany. WBHngine, 2-cylinder, 


27/32” B. x %” S. Further en- 
gine data unknown. Water tube 
boiler with 20 tubes. Further 
data unknown. 


TORTOISE I.—7 M. P. H. Dis- 
placement 6 lbs. O. A. length 
24”, beam 5”. Hydroplane, one 
step, wood and metal. Engine 
poppet valve, 2-cylinder, single- 
aeting uniflow, 7/16” B. x 1%” S. 
Flash type boiler. 6’—0”. 3/16” 
and 2’—0” %” tubing. Blow 
torch, single nozzle, 2” dia. x 4” 
long. Gas tank 15 to 20 lbs. pres. 
Propeller 134” dia., 6” increasing 
pitch, 3 blades. Water pump 
7/16” B. x adjustable stroke. 
Ratio. 22> 


SUNNY JIM.—12 M. P. H. Dis- 
placement unknown. ate b 
length 393”. Hull data unknown. 
Engine piston valve, 2-cylinder 
opposed. 5” B. x %” S. Scott 


Dis-— 


THE MODELMAKER 


type boiler. 12 34” tubes, 314” 
x 10”. -Blow torch and propeller 
data not known. Water pump 
i _B, X= 36"-S.> Ratiowa en 
pump 3/16” B. x 5/16” S. Ratio 
66:1. . 


XXXXXX.—21 M. P. H. Dis- 
placement 6% lbs. O. A. length 
393g”. Further hull data un- 
known. Engine, rebuilt simplex 
apr. 21/21l, Flash boiler, further 
data unknown. Torch data un- 
known. Propeller, 3” dia., in- 
creasing pitch, 2 blades. Pump 
data unknown. Ratio 3:1. M. E. 
Volume 45, page 30. 


DAISY.—21 M. P. H. Displace- 
ment 15% lbs. O. A. length 
393g”. Hydroplane, single step 
type hull, wood, beam 10”, depth 
2”, Engine, poppet Valve, 2-cylin- 
der single-acting, 4”x%”. Flash 
type boiler, 28’—0”, %4” tubing. 
Blow torch, single burner, 2” 
nozzle, 2144” dia. x 6” long. Gas 
tank 80 Ibs. pres. Propeller 
2%" dia., 94” pitch, 2 blades. 
Pump %” B. x 5%” S. Ratio 4:1. 


BAGIETTO XX.—16.3 M. P. H. 
Displacement 13 lbs. 3 oz. O. A. 
length 39°34”. Hydroplane, one 
step, type hull, mahogany; beam 
10”, depth 1%”. Engine, piston 
valve, 2-cylinder uniflow type, 
1," B, = 33-94" So aes 
boiler, 20’—0” tubing, size un- 
known. Blow torch, nozzle 2” 
dia. x 6” long. Gas tank 80 lbs. 
pres. Propeller 3 5/16” dia., 10” 
pitch, 2 blades. Water pump 
Ye By eR Var: 1629 eo 
5:1. Oil pump 3/16” B. x var. 
to %” S. Ratio 100:1. 


T. N. T.—Speed not recorded. 
Displacement unknown. O. A. 
length 36”, beam 84”. V_ bot- 
tom. Further hull data un- 
known. Engine, one-cylinder 
double-acting, 13/16” B, x %” S. 
Smithies type boiler. Further 
data unknown. 


THE MODELMAKER 


187 





For N. Y. 8. M. E. Boats see 
Modelmaker for October, 1926. 


For records of Bluebird II, 


Pug, Gadfly, Hawk, Greyhound, 
Firefly, Bluebird I, and Mar- 
guerite, see Modelmaker . for 
September, 1924. 


Cannot vouch for the remain- 
‘der of the timing of American 
Model Power Boats. 


All English Power Boats were 
officially timed. 


SUNNY JIM.—Particulars of 
the power plant will be found in 
the Model Engineer as follows: 
Engines, Volume 54, page 423; 
Boilers, Volume 52, page 154; 
Pumps and Torch, Volume 53, 
page 109. \ 

All the data relating to the 
English Power Boats was found 
in the Model Engineer. 


If any of our readers can sup- 


ply us with data lacking in the, 


above records, or data regarding 
other Model Power Boats not 
mentioned, we shall be very 
glad to insert the information 
thus supplied in a future issue 
of the Modelmaker, giving the 
author full credit for the same. 


——— 


“QO” GAUGE TRACK, CURVES 
AND SWITCHES 


“Main Line” writes: We are 
bringing out curves and switches 
for the man who has a quantity 
of O-gauge track, yet wishes to 
operate scale models over it. 
By this means the Model en- 
thusiast can keep his toy O- 

gauge electric straight track, 
simply using our curves and 
switches, which are _ inter- 
changeable with toy track. 

Our switches are constructed 


according to proper railway 
practice; that is, they are of 
the true “knife” pattern, the 


movement being through the 
spring of the blades. A regular 
railway type frog is fitted. The 
third rails are so arranged that 
with our special wide shoe it is 
impossible to stall or short-cir- 
cuit an engine at any point on 
them (which cannot be said of 
the toy variety of switch). 


Our track resembles regular 
toy tinplate track, but has three 
wooden ties per section, which 
form the base for supporting 
the third rail. In addition there 
are six tin ties. The third rail 
is solid copper, and joins by a 
simple spring action. 

We are recommending that 
customers installing the track 
on a permanent foundation, such 
as shelving, sprinkle chicken grit 
along it for “ballast.” There is 
one grade of chicken grit (€ob- 
tainable at pet shops) that 
closely resembles regular rock 
ballast when correctly sprinkled 
along the track. In this way 
the rather unconventional ties 
of tinplate track can be con- 
cealed, and a roadbed approxi- 
mating conventional practice 
obtained. 

We are supplying switches 
with either a hand lever, or a 
right-angle crank for working 
from signal boxes. 





An accurately ruled sheet or 
two of cross section paper is 
often found very useful when 
anyone wants to make a quick 
sketch of a piece of machinery 
or some castings, or other de- 
vice. The Handy Sketching 
Book is just the thing to carry 
in your portfolio for such odd 
sketches, as it is accurately 
ruled 8 squares to the inch, 
printed in blue ink on both sides » 
of the payer, size of page, 5”x8”. 


188 


THE MODELMAKER 





LIST OF 
CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 


Akron Association of Model 
Engineers, Sec., Mr. R. W. 
Jacobs, 115 North 16th St., Ken- 
more, Ohio. 


Boston Society. of Model En- 
gineers, Mr. J. L. Brackett, 13 
Charles Street, Wakefield, Mass. 


Boys’ Steam Locomotive Club, 
Mr. Bill Neisel, 56 Tennis Place, 
Forrest Hills, L. I. 


Canadian Model Mncinoorine 
Club, The Sec., 122 Pacific, To- 
ronto, Ontario, Canada. 


Canadian Model Engineering 
Club, Montreal Branch, Mr. F. 
L. Lewis, 139 Dobie Avenue, 
Mount Royal, Montreal, P. Q., 
Canada. 


Central Park Model Yacht 
Club, Mr. H. Griffith, 609 West 
147th Street, New York, N. Y. 


Chicago Society of Model En- 
gineer, Sec., Mr. S. C. Swanson, 
7826 Coles Ave., Chicago, III. 


Detroit Model Yacht Club, Mr. 
J. H. Hinchman, Dept. of Recre- 
ation, 504 Elmwood Street, De- 
troit, Mich. 

Elveron Speed Boat Club, 13 
Bentley Avenue, Jersey City, 
i a Be 

Model Boat Club, Washington, 
DG. 


Model Sailing Yacht Club, 
Providence, R. I. 


Montclair Model Engineers’ 
Club, Sec., Mr. J. B. Rettallack, 
65 Dunnell Road, Maplewood, 
N. J. 


Prospect Park Model Yacht 
Club. 


New York Society of Model 
Engineers, Sec., 
ger, 15 Moore Street, New York, 
NYS ; 


Any reliable 


Mr. A. A. Sin-- 


San Francisco Model Power 
Boat Club, Sec., Mr. Harry Cook, 
1806 pater St., San Francisco, 
Calif. 


Saint John Model Boat Club, 
Mr. Harry Ervine, Telegraph 
and Times Office, Canterbury 
Street, St. John, N. B., Canada. 


Toledo Model Yacht Club, Mr. 
G. A. Heinle, c/o Meilink Steel 
Safe Co., Toledo, Ohio. 


We would like to receive the. 
names and addresses of the 
Secretaries of any of the above 
clubs where they are lacking, 
also any corrections or altera- 
tions to the above list as well 
as the names with the secre- 
taries and their addresses of 
any new clubs or older organiza- 
tions that we have not listed. 
information our 
readers can send us will be very 
much appreciated, as we wish 
to make this list complete and 
up-to-date for the benefit of all 
concerned. 


Mr. Isaac 7762 
Windsor - Street, 
couver, B. C., Canada, writes us 
that he has been getting to- 
gether a number of gentlemen 
interested in model engineering, 
and they are planning to or- 
ganize a Model Engineers So- 
ciety. Any of our readers resid- 
ing within a reasonable distance 
of this gentleman should get in 
touch with. him, either person- 
ally or by correspondence, and 
get all the particulars about this 
new Society. We hope Mr. — 
Purington will have a good many 
supporters in this good work. 


Purington, 


If there is any information — 
you wish to get, write to the 
Editor. 


South Van- © 





THE MODELMAKER 


2-CYLINDER DOUBLE ACTING 
HORIZONTAL STEAM 
ENGINE 


This little Engine was built 
by our old friend, Mr. W. H. 
Buckley of Guysborough, N. S. 
He is quite a genius in making 
working models out of odds and 
ends from his scrap box. The 
design is his own. 


The top of wooden base is 
10’ by 434”. 

The two cylinders are pieces 
of smooth brass tube %” bore 
with a stroke of 1%”. The 
cylinder heads are pieces of 
sheet brass fastened on with 
small screws and made steam 
tight. The two cyinders are se- 
curely attached to a thick piece 
of brass. Four pieces of strip 
brass are fastened to the cylin- 
ders, the ends of which are bend 
at right angles to make firm 
supports, there are screwed to 
the wooden base. T'wo pieces 
of small brass tube, with stuf- 
fing boxes attached, are secured 
to the cylinders for the piston 
rods to work in. 


The slide valve ports are built 
up. The steam chests are dug 
out of two brass bolts, with 
pieces of small brass tubes in- 
serted at each end of each cylin- 
der for the valve rods to work 
in. The piston guide rods are 
supported by two pillow blocks. 
The crankshaft-is made from a 
stiff piece of iron wire carefully 
bent to give the proper throw. 


The flywheel is 4%” in dia. 
of cast zinc and lead, with iron 
band bent around the outside 
of the rim. 


The supports for the flywheel 
are each built up from two 
pieces of thick brass and fitted 
with lubricators. 


The Engine has been under 
steam running a small dvnamo 


189 


and worked very well indeed. 
In the November 1924 issue of 
the Modemaker is a description 
of a Model Paddle Wheel En- 
gine built by Mr. Buckley. 


The Gerold Co. have taken up 
the sole selling control of the 
following Light Machinery suit- 
able for the Modelmaker’s 
Workshop. Universal Ball Bear- 
ing Bench Circular Saw table 
14”x18” taking saws up to 9” 
dia.; also a larger size with a 
table 18”x22” taking saws up to 
12” dia., operated by A.C. elec- 
tric motor from house lighting 
circuit. Foot, or Power, driven 
Scroll Saw for almost any kind 
of work; just the thing for 
model boat hull shaping out. An 
ingenious new combination tool 


for grinding, buffing, polishing 
and drilling. It consists of a 
double-ended spindle _ electric 


motor with attachments to ac- 
complish the variety of work 
mentioned above; also base 
stand, wheel guards and tool 
rests. The advantage to the 
Modelmaker is that he can pur- 
chase the motor and any attach- 
ment to suit his special require- 
ment. 


When writing to us about your 
change of address we would ask 
that you kindly mention not only 
your new address, but your old 
address, also state which maga- 
zines you subscribe for. Our 
subscription cards and stencils 
are all classified under states 
alphabetically. Compliance with 
the above request will simplify 
our work in looking up subscrip- 
tion cards. 


The three bound volumes of 
the Modelmaker contain many 
articles on American Model- 
making. They would make ex- 
cellent Xmas gifts to those in- 
terested in this work. 


190 





THE MODELMAKER 





MODEL ENGINEER, 
VOL. 29 


Model Enginer, principal con- 
tents of Volume 29. Model 
Yacht Minerva. Grinding, Pol- 
ishing and Lacquering for Model 
Engineers. Clock Repairing. 
Tesla Coils. Model Power Boat 
Building. Locomotive Notes. 
Model Beam Engine. The De- 
sign of Small Dynamos. Ex- 
hibits from the Model Engineer 
Exhibition. A Simple Method 
of Projecting Sun Dials. An 
Automatic Wind Electric Plant. 
A Model Railway System. N. 
E. R. %” Scale Locomotive. File 
Handles and Holders. Auto- 
matic Expansion Gear for Model 
Engines. Electric Welding. 
Marine Models. Forging Smal} 
Tongs. An Under Type Steam 
Engine with Boiler. How to 
Build a Model Hydro Aeroplane. 
Grinding Lawn Mower Cutters 
in the Lathe. Model Yacht 
Racing. The Utilization of Our 
Natural Sources of Energy. 
Hints on Painting Model Boats. 
Southport Miniature Railway, 
15” Gauge. A Scale Model Rail- 
road Turn Table. Construction 
of Bellows for Blow Torch. 
Some Attachments for a Small 
Planer. 2—6—0 Caledonian Rail- 
way Locomotive. Small Gyro- 
scopic Mono Railways. Model 
of G. W. R. Cross Channel Pas- 


senger Steamer. Ornamental 
Glass Grinding. Backing off 
Milling Cutters in the Lathe. 


The Construction of Mr. W. J. 
Daniels’ Half-Rater “Onward.” 
15” Gauge 4—6—2 Locomotive 
“Gigantic” Pacific Type. <A 5- 
cylinder Rotary Petrol Engine. 


The Length of Lathe Driving 
Belts. A Model Beam Engine. 
Design for Weight-Driven Petrol 
Air Gas Plant. A 3” Center Back 
Gear Lathe. An Automatic 
Electric Striking and Chiming 
Gear. Model of Steamship 
“Great Eastern.” The Propor- 
tions of a Pantograph. Motor- | 
cycle Notes. Methods of Sup- 
porting Line-Shafting. A Cheap 
Grinder for the Lathe. 4%” Scale 
Tank Locomotive. Microscope 
Accessories—Lamps. The Di- 
vining Rod—Finding Water. The 
Measurement of H. P. and Brake 
H. P. Vise, Clamps, and Fittings. 
Speed Boat Designs. Turning 
Cranks on the Lathe. Torpedo 
Destroyer “Petrol.” The “A. Mi 
R.” Model Railway. A Simple 
Type of Ignition for Small Sta- 


tionary Petrol Engines. <A 15” 
Gauge . Atlantic Locomotive. 
Some New Gyrostats. Super- 


heated Tank Locomotive 4—6—2: 
A  Steam-Driven Monoplane. 
Model Atlantic Type Locomo- 
tive. Expanding Locomotive 
Boiler Tubes. New Type of 
Tank Engine with 3 cylinders. 
Standard Locomotive Stoker. 
Model Horizontal Engine and 
Boiler. A complete Electric 
Lighting Plant with half H. P. 
Gasolene Engine. A Model Motor 
Car. Gyroscopic Stability. A 
Model Tramp Steamer. A 1144"x 
14%” Single Acting Steam En- 
gine. An 8-ft. Wind Mill. Breaks 
for Spark Coil. The Gordon 
Model Railway. Taper Turning 
Attachment for Engine Lathe. 
Articles on Wireless. Many 
Miscellaneous Subjects. Society 
and Club Doings. Book Re- 
views. News of the Trade. Title 
Page and Index. 628 pages. 
Hundreds of illus. 


Send us a stamped and ad- 
dressed envelope for list of Am. 
Model Supply houses. 


\ 


THE MODELMAKER 


MODEL BOILERS 


To the Editor, “Modelmaker.” 


Dear Sir: Since this country 
has taken up and is progressing 
in Modelmaking and in which 
all of us wish: to cooperate in 
brotherly fashion, I take leave 
to append my views briefly on 
the above subject and as fol- 
lows: 


We as a body are not merely 
Model enthusiasts, but have 
some claim to science, and with 
this in mind, how can we con- 
scientiously condone to brass 
boilers and steel stays, or even 
steel boilers, bearing in mind 
that a Model boiler spends 90% 
of its life lying idle and there- 
fore supremely prone to corre- 
sion on the inside, no matter 
how carefully treated. 


There is only one safe and 
sound material for Model boilers, 
namely copper, and the trum- 
pery plus cost of this material 
is insignificant in these little 
boilers, copper is ductile, easy 
to manipulate, and once made 
into shape is practically immune 
from deteriorations in a per- 
son’s lifetime. 


Brass tubing, on the other 
hand, has been known to be 
laminated and boilers made of 
this material are a questionable 
proposition. 


To make a boiler to sell and 
to make one for real safe and 
serviceable use are two different 
things; but we as a body should 
not lay ourselves open to criti- 
cism by departing from scien- 
tific facts embraced in engin- 
eering to date—but rather fol- 
low strictly upon _ scientific 
lines and show people that we 
aim at something higher than 
mere “toy modellers.” 


191 


To the Trade. 


In my opinion Modelmaking 
in the U. S. is only in its in- 
fancy. European Modelmaking 
firms, despite bad times, have 
built up enormous businesses. 
The Trade must cooperate with 
the buyer and not be too eager 
for quick profits—that will come 
in due time. 


Yours cordially, 


P. W. WILSON, 
1222 West Clifton Blvd., 
Lakewood, Ohio. 


BOOK REVIEWS 


Workshop Operations and Lay- 
outs for Economic Engineering 
Production. By Philip Gates. 
200 pages; ill.; cloth, $2.50. 


This book is very easy read- 
ing, and the principles are clear- 
ly illustrated. To facilitate the 
use of this book it is divided 
into twelve chapters. These 
chapters illustrate just how 
economic operations can be per- 
formed on automatic machines, 
drilling and tapping machines, 
milling machines and milling op- 
erations, press work, rechucking 
automatic work, turret work, 
continuous vs. station milling, 
multiple drilling and wmulti- 
spindle work, cylindrical and 
surface grinding, broaching and 
broaches vs. reamers. The pro- 
duction manager and engineer 
will also find in this book what 
can and what can not be expect- 
ed of machine tools. Also there 
will be found guidance in deter- 
mining the necessary quality, 
materials, modifications neces- 
sary to facilitate machine shop 
production, and all the data re- 
quired for keeping track of 
costs, time sheets and records 
of various sorts. 


192 


K. H. B.—yYes, there is con: 
siderable difference between 
Wood Alcohol (pyroligneous 
acid, Methylated Spirits, ag it is 
known abroad) and Ethyl alco- 
hol (or white spirit), which is 
a distillate from grain, potatoes, 
molasses, sugar cane _ refuse, 
fruits and other farm produce. 
A very extensive and expensive 
plant is required for the manu- 
facture of Wood Alcohol, while 
Ethyl Alcohol can be made in 
simple apparatus. Both will 
burn equally well under the 
boiler of your locomotive or 
steam engine, or as fuel to run 
an internal combustion engine. 


Immense quantities of Ethyl 
Aleohol are used in the Indus- 
tries yearly; as a solvent for 
most of the drugs used in medi- 
cine and other medical prepara- 
tions; with a suitable denaturant 


added in the manufacture of 
rubber goods, fine varnishes, 
paints, lacquers, textile indus- 


tries, tobacco manufacture, and 
many other uses. It is also be- 
ing used abroad for motor fuel. 
On some of the Sugar Planta- 
tions in Cuba it is being made 
from the crushed cane refuse at 
about 4 cents a gallon, and is 
used in the small gasoline loco- 
motives for hauling the cars of 
sugar cane. 


One of the largest distilleries 
in Illinois made the White Spirit 
from grain at a cost of less 
than 5 cents per gallon and the 
refuse mash was dried and com- 
pressed into cakes for winter 
food for cattle. Wrights book 
on the Manufacture of Industrial 
Alcohol fully describes and il- 
lustrates the various processes. 


With the ever-increasing de- 
mand for gas engine fuel and 
the present high price for gaso- 
line there should be a big field 
for white spirit for power pur- 


BM et ae = ide Wd Ooo eat 


eye 
‘ 


THE MODELMAKER 


poses. It can safely stand a 
much greater compression than 
gasoline as its flash point is 
about 135°F, while the gasoline 
flash point is between 68-75°F, 
according to its quality. 


White Spirit gives a beautiful 
white light (very actinic) when 
burned in a suitable table lamp 
having a Wellsback mantle. 


It can also be used for cook- 
ing. It is a much less hazardous 
fire risk and safer to transport 
than gasoline. As it is manu- 
factured from produce that can 
be continuously produced in 
any part of the world in unlim- 
ited quantities there is never 
any likelihood of there being a 
shortage of raw materials from 
which it is made. On the other 
hand, the demand for gasoline 
in the last few months has been 
considerably greater than the 
amount of oil obtained from the 
wells during that period, and in 
a number of cases many wells 
have given out. 


Mr. A. Willard, Chicago So- 
ciety of Model Engineers, writes 
that the Society will hold. their. 
Annual Exhibition of Models at 
846 Rush Street, Chicago, IIL, 
on December the ist to the 
4th inclusive. We hope that all 
our Chicago friends will make 
a point of attending one of these 
days and getting acquainted 
with the boys. The members 
of the C. S. M. E. have produced 
some fine specimens of model 
work, so we believe a visit to 
the coming exhibition will well 
repay those that make the effort. 


When writing for information — 
please enclose stamped and ad- 
dressed envelope. 








THE MODELMAKER 193 
TWO CANADIAN MODEL 
POWER BOATS 
BUILT BY MR. RALPH SKINNER 
I enclose photos of two Model torch aft of the boiler. I have 


Power Boats I have built. Hach 


of these models took six months 





to construct, including’ the 
power plants. The hulls are 
both of the hydroplane type. 
One has a straight stem with 
a sharp bow, the other a punt 
bow. In both cases I have placed 
the engines for’ard and the blow 


had a good deal of enjoyment 
in their construction (the two 


propellers were the only parts 
I did not make) and give the 
following particulars and data 
in the hope that it will prove of 
value to some other reader who 
is planning the construction of 
a Model Power Boat. 


194 THE MODELMAKER 





No. 1—Minnie Mary 


Length on deck, 36” 

Beam, midship, 8” 

Length from bow to step, 17” 

Length from step to rudder 
post, 49% 

Hull, built up of pine, 3/16” 
thick 

Engine, 2-cylinder, single-act- 
ing, slide valve 

Cylinder, %4” bore x %4” stroke 

Displacement lubricator 

Steam gauge on steam line 

Flash steam boiler, 18’—0” 
44” copper tubing 

Length of boiler, 10” 

Width of boiler, 354” 

Height of boiler, 354” 

Steam pressure, about 40 lbs. 

Fired with blow torch 

Feed water pump, %” dia. 
runs off of tail shaft with 4 to 
1 gears 

Capacity of fuel tank, 1 pint 

Boat will run about 25 minutes 
on one charging. 

Stern bearings, brass 

Size of propeller, 3” 

Size of rudder, 2”x2”, Russian 
iron. 


No. 2—Mary Minnie rs 


Length on deck, 37” 

Length W. L., 3814” 

Beam midships, 84%” 

Length from bow to step, 19” 

Length from step to stern, 
2014" 

Hull built up of pine 3/16” 
thick 

Engine, 2-cylinder, single act- 
ing, piston valve 

Crankshaft, built up, 3/16” dia. 

Cylinders. 11/16” bore x. %” 
stroke 

Cylinders of steel 

Pistons, aluminum, 
rings 

Steam -hggt, cast iron 


brass 


Tobin bronze valve 

Engine has aluminum base 

Displacement lubricator 

Boiler, water tube, 1/16” cop- 
per 

Boiler tubes, 4’—2” 14” cop- 
per tube, brazed. on bottom 

Stay rod through center of. 
boiler m 

Boiler, fittings, safety valve, 
throttle 

Steam gauge 

Filling plug 

Length of boiler, 914” 

Width of boiler, 314” dia. 

Width of boiler casing, 4” 

Height of boiler shell, 54%” 

Fired with blow torch 

Boiler capacity, 1 pint 

Fuel tank capacity, 1 pint 

Steam pressure, 50 lbs. 

Boat will run 30 minutes on 
one charging 

Propeller, 3” dia., 2-blade 

Size of rudder, 2”x2”, Russian 
tron 

Both of these boats steam 
well, but I have not made any — 
records of their speeds. 


Mr. Thomas Bray informs us 
he has-been fully occupied for 
the last few weeks with the con- 
struction of a %” Seale P. R. R. 
K. 4s 2144” Gauge Steam Locomo- 
tive, with Walschaert valve 
gear; also a 44” scale B. & O. 
Mountain Type 4—8—2 Steam 
Locomotive 2144” gauge, with the 
Baker Valve Gear. 





Mr. Jesse Menendez, 239 E. 
13th Street, New York, and a 
few other friends, who have all 
been students in the Baron de 
Hirsch Trade School, are work- 
ing up a little Modelmakers’ 
Club. He would be glad to hear 
from any readers in his district 
interested in this work. 






QUESTION BOX 


Please address replies to Edi- 
tor of the Modelmaker. 


_ F. W. §.—Would like to know 
: where he can get plans for the 
construction of historic ships 


for ornamental purposes. 


- H. S:—Would like to know 
Where he can get small com- 
pressed air engines for model 
aeroplanes. 


| W.L. M—I am an instructor 
in High School teaching Elec: 
~tricity and would like to hear 
from some firm which can sup- 
ply motor stampings, parts, etc., 
in quantity lots. Would also 
like to get a drawing to detail 
of a 280 Mogul Locomotive with 
Walschaert Valve gear and pis- 
ton valve for an amusement 
park. 


Mr. J. W. C. Corbusier, Hud- 
son, Ohio, has all the lines and 
sail plans for a model of the 
Great Republic, but he lacks the 
_plans and details of deck-houses, 
-boats and other deck fittings. If 
any of our readers can supply 
the information required, it will 
be very much appreciated. 





The Editor, the Modelmaker. 


Dear Sir: In reply to Mr. B. 
Read, Jr., of 3230 Euclid Heights 
Blvd., Cleveland Heights, Ohio, 
I am enclosing with this letter 
a record of Model Power Boats, 
both American and English. 

When finished, please return 
record to me, as it is taken from 
my own personal files. 

Trusting that this answers 
Mr. Read, Jr., I beg to remain, 


F. D. GRIMKE, 
987 Madison Ave., 
New York, N. Y. 


When writing to advertisers 
please mention The Modelmaker. 


_ 


Pane 


THE MODELMAKER 


195 


FOR SALE 


The Model Engineer, Vol. 29, 
in numbers, price $2.50 post paid. 
Spon, 120 Liberty St., New York. 


PAINT AND COLOR MIXING 
By A. S. Jennings 


eA practical handbook for 
painters, decorators, paint manu- 
facturers, artists, and painr 
mixers. 

Containing over 300 colored 
samples of oil and water paints 
and water colors of various 
colors, and upwards of 1,500 re- 
ceipts for color mixtures. 


Extract from Preface 


In preparing a new edition or 
this book, many important ad- 
ditions have been made, includ- 
ing a chapter on the “Propor- 
tions of Pigments and Thinners 
in Paints’—a subject of great 
interest both to the painter and 
paint manufacturer. There are 
also new chapters,’ Hints on 
Choosing Color Harmonies,” “An 
Exhaustive List of White, Black 
and Colored Pigments with 
Their Properties, Principal Uses 
and Alternative Names” and 
“Color Glazing.” 

The book has been carefully 
revised throughout and the text 
has been brought up-to-date by 
the inclusion of pigments, colors 
and methods not well known 
when the earlier editions were 
published. 

There are also included de- 
scriptions and illustrations of 
most of the latest types of ma- 
chines used in paint grinding 
and paint mixing. 

Seventh edition, revised and 
considerably enlarged. 341 pages, 
illustrated, cloth, size 7°4x5%4 
in., $5.00. 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN 
120 Liberty St., New York 


THE MODELMAKER 
WHAT’S IN YOUR GARRET? 


SALE—EXCHANGE—WANTED 


EVERYTHING HAS A VALUE—SOME OTHER FELLOW 
WANTS IT IF YOU DO NOT 


196 








Advertisements under this Head 5 cents a word minimum 10 words, letters or 


figures count as words, compound swords as separate words. 


accompany copy. 


Remittance to 


We reserve the right to refuse any or all advertisements. 


FOR SALE 


Blow Lamps, for model boilers 
all sizes made to order. Model 
Machine Shop, P. O. Box 5, Sta- 
tion Y, New York, N. Y. 


Blue Prints of Ships for 
Modelmakers, send for circular, 
G. B. Douglas, 165 Summit Ave., 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 


Gears and Model Supplies of 
every description. Catalog 5 
cents. Experimenters Supply 
House, Box 10, Station Y, New 
York City. 


Ship Model Fittings; Blocks 
Deadeyes, Anchors, Capstans. 
Send for circular. Fisher, 1002 


Etowah Ave., Royal Oak, Mich. 


Designing — Working draw- 
ings prepared; calculation of 
strength of materials; for your 
models or actual size; inven- 
tor’s ideas developed. E. H. 
Grafton, P. O. Box 75, North End 
Station, Detroit, Mich. 


Wade #2 Lathe. 
equipment, except chucks, A-1 
condition. Call or write, F. L. 
Homan, 143 Quincy Street, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


Drummond Lathe M Type, 7” 
swing, length of bed 2 ft. 8 in., 
brand new, a splendid precision 
tool, suitable for all kinds of 
modelwork, $155.00 f.o.b. New 
York, Box 13, The Modelmaker. 


Complete 


FOR SALE 


4" Scale Pacific Locomotive 
Castings with drawings, $30.00, 
most complete on the market; 
an Atlantic or Mountain Type 
can be built from the same set. 
Head Lights, Air Pumps. Alco 
Power Reverse. Turbo-Genera- 
tors, all in %” scale. Sudden 
Service. State your wants. List 
and Photo, 5 cents. Frank 
Birch, General Delivery, High- 
land Park, Mich. 


Constructional Blueprints. 24” 
Racing Yacht, $2.25. 36” two- 
mast Schooner, 3 sheets, $5.00. 
Above are fine sailing models. 
Perry’s Flagship, the brig Ni-. 
agara, 3 sheets, $5.00. . This 
square-rigged model is very easy 
to build. These blueprints show 
full-size details of the hull, 
spars, rigging and templets for 
carving the hull, thus eliminat- 
ing all further drawing work. 
A. R. Ferris, 284 East 151ist St., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 


Castings for Model Engineers, 
Over-type engine and _ boiler, 
1912 design. List free. John 
Luby, 447 Coggeshall St., New 
Bedford, Mass. 7 





WORK WANTED 
Light Machine Work Wanted 
Let us estimate on your require 
ments. Miniature Railways (fot 
merly Motor Generator Service; ; 
Box 224, Dover. N. J. 


ae 


ote oe 






FOR SALE 


_ I—H. P 2-cylinder Steam En- 
gine, automatic governor, Wes- 
tinghouse type, fine model, make 
‘offer, R. Rearick, R. F. D. 58, 
‘Sharon, Pa. 


_ The Gas Engine in Principle 
and Practice, A. H. Goldingham. 
Contents: Introductory; various 
type of engines; valves and 
‘valve motions; governors, igni- 
tors, self-starters, and other de- 
‘tails; testing; various oils, fuels 
‘and gasses; gas producers, in- 
stallation; operation and correc- 
tions. A very practical well il- 
lustrated handbook, 200 pages, 
eo published price $1.50; our 
price while they last, 75 cents. 
‘Spon, 120 Liberty. Street, 
‘York. 


5 
e- 
ed 


New 


Diagram of Corliss Engine. A 
Longitudinal section of the Cor- 
liss Engine Cylinder, showing 
relative positions of the Piston, 
Steam Valves, Exhaust Valves 
and Wrist Plates when cut-off 
takes place at % stroke for each 
15 degrees of the circle. With 
full particulars. Reach-rods and 
Rock Shafts. The Circle ex- 
plained. Wrist-plates and Ec- 
centrics. Explanation of Fig- 
ures, ete. Size of sheet 13 in. x 
19 in., price 35 cents. 


THE MODELMAKER 






197 

















FOR SALE 
Model Steam Traction Engine. 
Cylinder 2 inch bore, 214 inch 
stroke, Steel boiler 2 ft. 6 inches 
long, 7 inch diameter, barrel, 80 
lbs. steam pressure, with Pump, 


and all fittings, 200 dollars. 
Edward Jones, Box 55, Cardiff, 
Maryland. 


FOR SALE 
Rough Sketching; The Han- 
dy Sketching Book, consisting 
of sectional ruled paper, plain 
eight squares to the inch, with 
some useful tables, size 5 x 8, 


bound in limp card to fit the 
pocket, price $.385, Spon, 120 
Liberty Street, New York. 


‘BLUE PRINTS and 
CASTINGS 


OF THE 


LORD BALTIMORE 


The Largest Passenger tly in the 
World. 3%” or %” scale. 


W. A. FALMER 
Specializing in Miniature Working 
Models 
3413 PARK HEIGHT AVE. 
BALTIMORE, MD. 


THE MODELMAKER 
~BOUND VOL. I. 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 


BOUND VOL. II. 


1924. _ $1.60 60 


1925. $2.10 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 


BOUND VOL. III. 1926. $2.10 


or return your numbers to us with $1.10 and we will mail you a new bound copy. 


We still have a few copies of Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 of Vol. I. Price 10c each. 
We still have a few copies of Nos, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 of Vol. 2. 


Price 10c each. 


ie ye ae rat 
a y 


-SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Liberty Street, New York 


198 


THE MODELMAKER 


* (oe. oe ae - S. "fs 
SS an a ee > 

x “ a 

; = 

> 4 

= 





BOOKS FOR MODEL MAKERS 


MODEL ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES AND 
RAILWAYS, by Henry Greenly. -Design, devel- 
opment, construction and running, including 
equipment. The latest word on this scientific 
patie y 313 pages, 325 ilius., 8% x 5% in., cloth, 


MODEL STEAM LOCOMOTIVES, their details 
and practical construction, by Henry Greenly. 
Considered the very best work on the subject. 
316 pages, 377 illus. and detailed drawings, 8% 
x 5% in., cloth, $2.50. 


MODEL RAILWAY HANDBOOK, by W. J. 
Bassett-Lowke. <A practical guide to the in- 
stallation and purchase of the equipment of a 
model railway. 6th ed. ravines rae pages, 
214 illus., 9% x 6 in., boards, $1.0 


MODEL RAILWAYS, their design, details and 
practical construction, rolling stock, operation and 


maintenance, by H. Greenly, 315 pages, 399 illus., 
8% x 5% in., cloth, $2.50. 


MODEL ENGINEERING. Describing tools and 
equipment, how to use the tools, and to execute 


~the numerous processes involved. Giving the 


details of steam, gas, and electric models. Show- 
ing the functions of the various parts and ex- 
plaining step by step the actual workshop 
methods of building them. Including the con- 
struction of boilers, locomotives, &c., &c. By 
Henry Greenly. VII + 407 pages, 809 illustrations, 
84% x 5% in., cloth, $3.50. 


MODEL SAILING YACHTS, how to rig, 
build and sail them, by P. Marshall. The most 
practical handbook covering the latest de- 
signs. 112 pages, 59 illus., 7% x 5 in., limp 
boards, 75 cents. 


MODEL SAILING BOATS, their design, 


building and sailing. By E. W. Hobb. The 
best work on this subject. 319 pages, 352 
fllus., and working drawings, 8% x 5% in., 
cloth, $2.50. 


VIOLIN MAKING AND REPAIRING, by R. 
Alton. <A practical handbook. 152 pages,- 61 
illus., 7 x 4% in., paper, 75 cents. 


THE MICROSCOPE. The Beginners’ Guide to, 
with a section on mounting slides, by C. 
Heath. An excellent guide book for the be inner. 
120 pages, 46 illus., 7 x 4% in., boards, 75 cents. 


PRACTICAL BOOKBINDING, by W. Pearce. 
A text book intended for those who take up 
the art of bookbinding, giving full instruc- 
tions describing the various operations. 104 
pages, 92 illus, 7% x 5 in., limp boards, 76 
cents. 

THE BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO CARPEN- 
TRY, by H. Jarvis. A practical handbook giv- 
ing illustrations of tools and how to use them 
and how to lay out work. 99 pages, 99 illus., 
7% x 5 in., limp boards, 75 cents. 


WORKSHOP WRINKLES AND RECEIPTS, 
by P. Marshall. <A collection of useful work- 
shop hints in mechanics and electricity. 72 
pages, 46 illus., 7% x 5 in., limp boards, 75 
cents. 


THE MODELMAKER 


ELECTRICITY 


AUTOMOTIVE MAGNETO IGNITION, its 
principle and application with special refer- 
ence to aviation engines. By M. E. Toepel. 
2nd edition. 146 pages, 90 illus., 74% x 4% 
in., limp cloth, $2.00. 


ELECTRICAL RECREATIONS. Experi- 
ments in electricity and magnetism with di- 
rections for making the necessary apparatus. 
By V. E. Johnson. 158 pages, 85 illus., 84% x 
5% in., cloth, $2.00. 


ELECTRICAL APPARATUS MAKING FOR 
BEGINNERS, by A. V. Ballhatchet. A prac- 
tical handbook for home and school work- 
shops, giving full particulars for making dif- 
ferent kinds of apparatus. 164 pages, 60 illus., 
ax “D2 in; cloths $125: 

MORE ELECTRICAL APPARATUS MAKING, a 
continuation of Electrical Apparatus Making for 
Beginners, by A. V. Ballhatchet. 168 pages, 85 
illus., 7% x 5 in., limp, $1.25. 


ELECTRIC CLOCKS AND CHIMES. A prac- 
tical handbook giving complete instructions for 
the making of successful electrical time pieces, 
synchronised clock systems, and chiming me- 
chanisms. The best book on the subject, 159 
pages, 154 diagrams and illustrations, 74 x 5 
in., cloth, $1.50. 


PRACTICAL ELECTRICS. The universal 
handy book on everyday electrical subjects. 
Hee pages, 126 illustrations, 7% x 5 in., cloth, 

cents. 


THE WIMSHURST MACHINE. How to 
make and use it, by A. W. Marshall. With 
complete detailed drawings. Second edition. 
rE pages, 30 illustrations and drawings, cloth, 

cents. 


MAGNETS AND MAGNETISM SIMPLY 
EXPLAINED, by A. W. Marshall, A practical 
treatise without mathematics, including the 
principles of both permant and electro mag- 
nets. $0 pages, 49 illustrations, cloth, 75 
eents. 


ELECTRICAL MEASURING INSTRUMENTS, 
Maintenance and Repair, with explanation of the 
principles of operation, by H. G, Yarril. 178 
Ae Sa 7 plates and 14 illus., 74% x 5 in., paper, 


ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENTS AND TEST- 
ING. By N. H. Schneider. Fourth edition, 
greatly enlarged. XXIV + 288 pages, 133 illus- 
trations, 7144 x 5 in., cloth, $1.50. 


PRACTICAL ELECTROPLATING, by G. 
Gentry. A handbook on the apparatus and 
processes employed in the electro deposition 
of metal. 73 pages, 41 illus., 7% x 5 in., limp 
boards, 75 cents. 

ELECTRIC GAS IGNITING, How to Install 
Gas Lighting Apparatus. By H. S. Norrie. VIII 
+ 101 pages, 57 illustrations, 7% x 6 in., cloth, 
75 cents. 

DYNAMO DESIGN, SCHEDULES FOR. 
These sheets are for carrying out dynamo de- 
signs according to the method laid down by 
S. P. Thompson. Five sheets to a set; size 
10% in. x 8 in. Per set, 25 cents. Special 
price on a quantity. 


199 








200 THE MODELMAKER © 





ELECTRICITY 


HOW TO INSTALL ELECTRIC BELLS, 
ANNUNCIATORS AND ALARMS, including 
battery, wiring, ete. By N. H. Schneider. 
Second edition, considerably enlarged. XII + 
83 pages, 70 illustrations, 7% x 5 in., cloth, 75 
cents. 


WIRING HOUSES FOR THE ELECTRIC 
LIGHT. By N. H. Schneider. Second edition, 
revised and enlarged. VIII + 112 pages, 45 
illustrations and 9 page plates, 7% x 6 in., 
cloth, 75 cents. : 


LOW VOLTAGE ELECTRIC LIGHTING 
WITH THE STORAGE BATTERY. Showing 
latest Amaerican types and complete outfits. 
By N. WW. Schneider. Second edition, revised 
wend enlarged. X + 94 pages, 31 illustrations, 
7% x 6 in., cloth, 75 cents. 


THE AB C OF DYNAMO DESIGN, by A. H. 
Avery. 4th ed. revised and enlarged. Giving 
general principles of dynamo desi with 
complete instructions and drawings for mak- 
ing a 30-Watt, a 500-Watt, and a 2 Kilowatt 
dynamo. With notes on dynamo construction 
and winding. 140 pages, 70 illus., 7% x 6 in., ~ 
cloth, $1.26. 


INDUCTION COILS. How to make and use 
them, A practical handbook on the construc- 


CUS ee a ae ae ee ee eT eh ee ee ee eee 


tion and use of medical and spark coils, by 4 
P. Marshall. Revised and enlarged. 70 pages, ; 
35 illustrations, cloth 75 cents. 3 


PRACTICAL INDUCTION COIL CON- , 
STRUCTION, by John Pike. <A handbook of 3 
constructive details and workshop methods, ~ 
used in building and repairing modern spark i : 
coils. 96 pages, 36 illus., 7 x 5 in., limp aa 
boards, 75 cents. ; 

INDUCTION COILS, How to Make and Use > Sa 
Them, including Ruhmkorff, Tesla and Medi- 
cal coils. By H. S. Norrie. Second edition, 
revised and enlarged. XVI + 269 pages, 79 
illustrations, 74% x 5% in., cloth, $1.50. 


MAGNETO TELEPHONE. Its construction, 
fitting up, and use. By N. Hughes. VII + 80 
pages, 23 illustrations, cloth, 75 cents. 


TELEGRAPHY FOR BEGINNERS. The 
standard method with lessons. By W. H. 
Jones. Second edition, revised; VI + 68 pages, 
19 illustrations, cloth, 75 cents. 


PRACTICAL ALTERNATING CURRENTS 
AND POWER TRANSMISSION. By N. Harri- 
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OS tlhe: 172 illustrations, 74% x 5% in.,, cloth, 


ALTERNATING CURRENTS SIMPLY EX- 
PLAINED. An elementary handbook on gen- 
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Marshall. 90 pages, 33 illustrations, cloth, 75 ve 
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SELENIUM CELLS. Design, construction and 
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ings and half-tones. 90 pages, 7% x 5 in., cloth, ee, 
by T. W. Benson, $1.50. 

THE LEAD STORAGE BATTERY, by H. 
G. Brown. A practical handbook. 162 pages, 
60 illus., 83% x 5% in., cloth, $2.00. 


nS 


THE MODELMAKER 


MODEL LIBRARY SERIES. 


All these books are fully illustrated, 7% x 5 in, 
paper covers. Price, 35 cents each. 


Electricity for Beginners.—Schneider. 
Dry Batteries, How to Make. 
Electric circuits and Diagrams, pt. I—Schneider. 
Electric Bells and Alarms.—Schneider. 
Modern Primary Batteries.—Schneider. 
_ Experiments with Induction Coils.—Norrie. 
Electric gas Igniting.—Norrie. 
Small Accumulators.—Marshall. 
Model Steam Engine Design.—De Vignier. 
10. Practical Electrics. 
11. Inventions, How to patent them.—Wright. 
12. Woodwork Joints. 
13. Fireman’s Guide to Care of Boilers.—Dahlstrom 
14. The Slide Valve. 
15. The Magneto-Telephone. 
16. The Corliss engine. 
17. Making Wireless Outfits.—Harrison. 
18. Wireless Telephone Construction.—Harrison. 
19. The Wimshurst Machine. 
20. Simple Experiments in Static Electricity, 
21. Small Electric Measuring Instruments. 
22. Electric Circuits and Diagrams, Part 2.—Schneide’. 
23. Induction Coils. How to make and use. 
24. Model Vaudeville theatres.—Schneider. 
25. Alternating Currents, Simply explained.—Marsha. 
26. How to Build a bi-plane glider.—Morgan. 
27. A BC of the steam engine.—Lisk. 
28. Simple Soldering and Brazing.—Thatcher. 
29. Telegraphy for beginners.—J ones. 
30. Low voltage lighting with batteries. 
31. Gas and oil engines.—Lieckfield. 
82. Wireless Telephone Construction-Pt. 2 
33. Wiring Houses for Electric Light. 
34. Magnets and magnetism.—Marshal:. 
36. Windmills and Wind Motors. 
37. Wireless telegraphic sets, pt. 1.—Collins. 
38. Wireless telegraphic sets, pt. 2.—Collins. 


TWELVETREES, R. Marking out for Machinists, pap. .35 
Practical “Hand Forging, pap...:....-s.esce 035 
Fitting, Adjusting, Bearings, pap........... aK) 


Peis 


Neha it 








THe MopetMAKer. An American monthly 
magazine devoted to the development of Scien- 
tific Modelmaking. Featuring descriptions of the 
construction of American model locomotives, 
marine and stationary steam and oil engines, sail 
and power boats, etc., etc., fully illustrated, pub- 
lished monthly. Annual subscription $1.00, post- 
paid. 

Vol. 1, 1924, 112 pages, illus., cloth gilt, $1.60. 

Vol. 2, 1925, 204 pages, illus., cloth gilt, $2.10. 

Vol. 3, 1926, 208 pages, illus., cloth gilt, $2.10. 


~GaLvanizinc. A _ theoretical and _ practical 
treatise by Heinz Bablik including hot galvanized 
coatings; electro-galvanized coatings; Sherard- 


ized coatings; and the Schoop process. Rust and 


its prevention. Testing and judging galvanized 
coatings. Index, 168 pages, 84 illus., 954x6 in., 
cloth, $5.00. 


201 


202 THE MODELMAKER 








THE “MODEL ENGINEER” SERIES 
OF HANDBOOKS 


Price, 35 Cents Rack 


Electric Bells and Alarms. 3 
Telephones and Microphones. 4 
Electric Batteries. “3 
Model Boiler Making. , 
Metal Working Tools and their Uses. “ 
Simple Electrical Working Models. ; 
Simple Mechanical Working Models. 
Smal DIneaes and Motors: How to Make and Use 
em 
Model Steamer Building: Hulls and Deck Fittings. % 
Machinery for Model Steamers. 4 
Small Electric Motors. 
Simple Scientific Experiments, 
Meteorological Instruments. 
The Locomotive: Simply Explained. 
Mechanical Drawing: Simply Explained. - 
Electric Lighting for Amateurs. 4 
Model Steam Turbines. 
The Beginner’s Guide to the Lathe. 
Gas and Oil Engines: Simply Explained. 
A Guide to Standard Screw Threads and Twist Drills 
(Small Sizes). 
Model Steam Engines. . 
Simple Photographic Experiments. 
Simple Chemical Experiments. 
Electrical Apparatus: Simply Explained. 
Optical Instruments: Simply Explained. 
Wireless Telegraphy: Simply Explained. 
Micrometers, Slide Gauges, and Calipers: Their Con- 
struction and Use. 
Electric Hand and Cycle Lamps: Their Construction 
and Uses. ; 
A Small Power Electric Light Plant. x4 
Milling in Small Lathes. ; ; 
Magneto: Simply Explained. 
Hardening and Tempering Engineers’ Tools 
Model Petrol Engines 
Planing and Shaping 
Fifty Useful Tools . 
Soldering, Brazing and the Joining of Metals. 4 5 
How to Read a Workshop Drawing. 3 
Pattern Making. 
Brass and Iron Founding. 
How to Build a Bicycle. 
Soft Woods and Colonial Timbers. 


7 


AERONAUTICAL ENGINES. A critical 
survey with special reference to the balanc- 
ing of inertia are By F. J. Kean. 101 
pages, 31 plates, 8 x 5% in., cloth, $2.50. 2a 


HOW TO BUILD A TWENTY-FOOT BI- A 
PLANE GLIDER, by A. P. Morgan. A prac- $ 
tical handbook on the construction of one of 
these machines, with full detailed drawings. 

60 pages, 31 illustrations, cloth, 75 cents. 


SOARING FLIGHT. ‘A simple mechanical so- 
lution of the problem, by Lieut.-Col. R. > 
Villamil. 48 pages, 1 page illus., 7% x 4% in., >i 
paper, 50 cents, b ac” 





' 


THE MODELMAKER 


STEAM ENGINEERING 


HOW TO START MARINE ENGINES IN A 
COLD ‘SHIP, by W. J. Woodcock. Full instruc- 
tions for setting all the valves and operating 
single and cross-compound turbines, triple ex- 
pansion engines, semi-diesel friction drive and 
full diesel electric drive; giving the latest types 
of American Marine Engines in American ships. 
158 pages, 10 colored plates and 4 black plates, 
7% x 4% in., limp cloth, $3.00. 


HOW TO RUN ENGINES & BOILERS. 
Practical instruction for young engineers and 
steam users. By E. P. Watson. X + 160 
pages, 31 illus., 74 x 5 in., cloth, $1.50. 


STEAM ENGINES AND BOILERS. An ele- 
mentary textbook on, for the use’ of students. 
By J. H. Kinealy. Sixth edition, VIII + 269 
pages, 107 illustrations, 8vo., cloth, $2.00. 


THE FIREMAN’S GUIDE. By J. P. Dahl- 
strom. <A practical handbook on the eare of 
steam boilers, IV + 28 pages, 7 x 6 in., cloth, 
75 cents. 


THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL AMMO- 
NIA REFRIGERATION. A practical hand- 
book for engineers interested in the manage- 
ment of ice and refrigerating machinery. By 
I. I. Redwood. IX + 146 pages, 14 illustra- 
tions, 7% x 5 in., cloth, $1.50. 


SLIDE VALVE SIMPLY EXPLAINED. By 
W. J. Tennant. Revised and enlarged. By J. 
H. Kinealy. A practical handbook for engineers. 
VII + 83 pages, 41 illustrations, 7% x 6 in., 
cloth, 75 cents. 


MECHANICAL DRAFT. A practical hand- 
‘book for engineers and designers for power 
plants. By J. H. Kinealy. 156 pages, 13 page 
plates, 6% x 4% in., cloth, $2.00. 


LOW PRESSURE STEAM HEATING. A 
series of charts on heavy folding card. By J. 
H. Kinealy. Size 13 x 9% in., $1.00. 


LUBRICANTS, OILS & GREASE. Giving 
practical information regarding their composi- 
tion, uses and manufacture. By I. I. Redwood, 
IX + 54 pages, 3 folding plates, 8% x 5% in., 
cloth, $1.75. 

ALGEBRA SELF TAUGHT, by W. P. Higgs. 
For the use of home students, mechanics and 
young engineers. 104 pages, 7% x 6 in., eloth, 
75 cents. 

ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS SIMPLY 
EXPLAINED, by H. H. Harrison. Com- 
mencing with simple Algebra and leading up 
step by step to calculus with numerous ex- 
amples worked out. 172 pages, 62 illus, 7% 
x 65 in., cloth, $1.00. 

PRACTICAL LESSONS IN METAL TURN- 
ING AND SCREW CUTTING, by P. Marshall. 
A very practical handbook, plainly written, 
giving a variety of examples of work in a 
Stee 217 pages, 220 illus., 7% x 5 in., cloth, 
1.25. 


THE HANDY SKETCHING BOOK, ruled 
plain, 8ths to one inch, printed on both sides, 
size 5 x 8 in., limp card back, 35 cents. 


203 





204 THE MODELMAKER 


PAINTING AND LETTERING 


DECORATION AND RENOVATION OF 
THE HOME, by A. S. Jennings. With a chap- 
ter on period furniture from a decorative 
point of view by H. E. Binstead. 220 paee 
14.colored plates and other illus., 11% x 
in., cloth, $5 00 


PAINTERS’ AND DECORATORS’ MATERIALS, 
describing their sources, properties and distinguish- 
ing tests, by R. W. Cooper. 157 pages, 19 illus., 
81%, x 6% in., cloth, $2.00. ; 


THE PERIODS IN INTERIOR DECORA- 
TION. A practical guide. By H. Jeans. With 
a chapter on the progress of paper hanging. 
127 pages, 6 illus., 34 page plates. 7% x5 in 
cloth, $1.50. , } 

PAINT AND PAINTING DEFECTS, their F. 
Detection, Cause and Cure, by J. Cruickshank A: 
Smith. An exceedingly useful book for the : 
painter. 174 pages, 7% x 6 in., cloth, $1.50. $ 


PAINTING TROUBLES AND THEIR REME- ; E 
DIES, > 
By Andrew Millar. These notes are arranged he 

alphabetically, including distempers, wall : 

papers and hangings. Full of practical infor- . 

mation. 112 pages, 71%4x5 in., cloth, $1.50. ' 


THE PAINTER’S POCKETBOOK, by A. S. : 
Jennings. A practical reference guide to 3 
everyday work. 244 pages, illus, 64 x 3% j 

4 





— wea 


aA ee a i Ve" 1s 


in., cloth, $1.50. 


PAINT AND COLOR MIXING, by A. S. 
Jennings. A practical handbook for painters, 
decorators, artists and paint manufacturers. 
With 1,500 different color mixtures and hun- ; 
dreds of color samples. 6th ed., partly rewrit- ; 
ten. X + 243 pages, a age 14 color plates, a 
8% x 5% in., cloth, $5.0 > sem 


PAINTING AND piso by S. W. New- 
comb. A _ practical little handbook for the be- 
ginner, including coloring in distemper. 63 pages, 
15 illus., 744 x 4% in., paper, 35 cents. 


DECORATORS’ SYMBOLS, EMBLEMS AND es he 
DEVICES. Seals 
By G. C. Rothery. Illustrating and describing aa 

a number of emblems frequently used by the 

decorator. 131 pages, 19 page plates, 74%4x5 

in., cloth, $1.50. 

MOTOR AND CARRIAGE PAINTING, by A. 

Bates. Describing the different processes neces- 

sary for good work. 2nd edition enlarged, 218 2B of 

pages, illus., 8% x 5% in., cloth, $2.50. 
STENCILS AND STENCILLING, for all 

purposes, Artistic and Decorative, by A. L. 

Duthie. 162 pages, with Petes) and 

many designs, 7% x 5 in., cloth, $1.5 Rs 
SCUMBLING AND COLOR GLAUING? “py ALS “ 

Millar. A practical handbook for house painters, 

coach painters and others. New edition, 100 pages, 


cpowae of color san ples, 8% x 5% in., cloth, oan 
PAINTING BY IMMERSION AND BY eet 
COMPRESSED AIR, by A. S. Jennings. A oe 
practical handbook covering dipping, and ay 
painting by compressed air. For out door and <a 
; q 


factory use. XV 272 pages, 149 illus., and 
designs, 8% x 5% in., cloth, $3.00. 





THE MODELMAKER 


205 





MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS 


STAINING, VARNISHING AND ENAMELING, 
by J. H. Galloway. The making and using 
ot stains and varnishes for new and old work, 
and enameling. 122 pages, 74 x 5 in., cloth, $1.50. 

PRACTICAL GILDING, BRONZING AND 
LACQUERING, by F. Scott-Mitchell. 175 
pages, illustrated with some color plates, 
% x 5 in., cloth, $1.50. 


A SYSTEM OF EASY LETTERING, by J. 
H, Cromwell. Consisting of about 40 alphabets 
23 aos designs. Twelfth edition, 84% x 5% 

cents. 


DISTILLATION OF ALCOHOL, A practical 
handbook on the, from farm products, also the 
process of denaturing alcohol. By F. B. 
Wright. Second edition. 281 pages, 62 illus- 
ene. and 8 folding plates. 7% x 6 in., cloth, 


SODA FOUNTAIN FORMULAS. A practi- 
cal receipt book of nearly 500 formulas for 
druggists, confectioners and vendors of soda 
water. By G. H. Dubelle. Fourth edition, 161 
pages, 7% x 5 in., cloth, $1.50. 


THE MANUFACTURE OF CHOCOLATE, 
and other cacao preparations, by Dr. Paul 
Zipperer. 3rd ed. revised and partly re-writ- 
ten. Considered the most practical work on 
this subject. X -+ 333 pages, 102 illus., and 
3 folding plates, 9% x 7 in., cloth, $7.50. 

NEW AND ORIGINAL MAGIC. Comprising 
a number of novel and entertaining effects; a 
fund of information for the artist and his 
younger brother the amateur, by Edward M. 
Massey. 205 pages, 28 pages plates, 11 illus., 
8% x 5% in., dark blue fabricoid, with elaborate 
gold cover stamp, $3.00. 


LATEST MAGIC, by Prof. Hoffmann. Being 
Original Conjuring Tricks, including new ap- 
pliances, novel application of Black Art, card 
tricks, miscellaneous tricks, patter, use of the 
wand, a few wrinkles. The Author’s Latest 
Work. 232 pages, 42 illus., 8% x 5% in., cloth 
gilt, $2.00. 

MORE PAPER MAGIC. A collection of enter- 
taining and amusing models, toys, conjuring tricks, 
mostly made of paper. 124 pages, 239 illus., 
boards, 80 cents. 


THE ATMOSPHERE, ITS CHARACTER- 
ISTICS AND DYNAMICS, by F. J. B. Cordeiro. 
VIII + 129 pages, $5 illustrations, 10% x 7% 
in., cloth, $2.50. 

THE GYROSCOPE; Theory and Practice, by 
F. J. B. Cordeiro, the most complete treatise 
on this subject. VII + 105 pages, 8% x 6% 
in., cloth, $1.50. 

BAROMETRICAL DETERMINATION OF 
HEIGHTS. A practical method of barometri- 
cal levelling and hypsometry. By F. J. B. 
Cordeiro. Second edition, revised and enlarged, 
6 x 4 in., limp cloth, 50 cents. 


NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. Principles of. 
By F. J. B. Cordeiro. In this book, the action 
ne the tidal couple in changing the axial in- 
clination of a planet, is rigorously demon- 
strated. vi. 113 pages, 25 diagrams, 8% x 6% 
in., cloth, $2.50. - : 


206 


THE MODELMAKER | 


MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS 


LAMINATED SPRINGS, by T. H. Sanders. 
Calculations, Design and Manufacture for 
locomotive, automobile and trolley cars. 8% 
x 5% in., cloth, $9.00. 


THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF OIL 
ENGINES, by A. H. Goldingham, 5th ed. with 
140 pages of new matter. Devoted to Modern 
High Compression Itngines. The balance of the 
work treats on HWarher types of Low Compres- 
sion Oil Engines. With full directions for test- 
ing, installing, operating and repair. 480 Prses, 
200 illustrations, 7% x 5% in., cloth, $2.50 


GAS ENGINE, IN PRINCIPLE AND PRAC- 
TICE. Two-cycle and four-cycle types, with 
description of various design. With notes on 
gas producers. By A. H. Goldingham. 195 
pages, 107 illustrations, 9% x 6% in., cloth, 76 
cents, 


PRACTICAL ENGRAVING ON METAL, in- 


cluding hints on Saw Piercing, Carving, In- 
laying, ete., by G. A. B. 3rd edition revised, 
161 pages, 100 illus., 7% x 5 in., boards, 80 
cents. 


ORNAMENTAL LATHE WORE FOR AMA- 
TEURS, by C. H. C. A practical handbook 
on the execution of simple ornamental turning 
and decorative inlaying on an ordinary lathe. 
A very fascinating and beautiful art. 121 
aie with 22 page plates, 7% x 5 in., cloth, 


SIMPLE SOLDERING. Both hard and soft, 


with directions for making home-made appara- 
tus. By E. Thatcher. VIII + 76 pages, 62 
illustrations, 74 x 5 in., 75 cents. 


FRENCH MEASURES AND ENGLIS#F 
EQUIVALENTS. Giving equivalents in inches, 
and decimals of an inch, of from 1 to 1000 
milimetres, and 1 to 100 metres, and table of 
fractional parts of an inch with corresponding 
decimals. By J. Brook. 80 pages, 4 x 3 in., 
limp cloth, 50 cents: 


MOLESWORTH METRICAL TABLES, con- 
taining linear. square, cubic and capacity 
measures; weights; combinations; prices; elec- 
trical, ete.; heat. 95 pages, 5 x 3 in., cloth, 
75 cents. 

BUCHANAN’S TABLES OF SQUARES. 
Containing the square of every foot, inch, and 
sixteenth of an inch between 1/16 of an inch 
and 50 feet. By E. E. Buchanan. 11th 
edition, 7 x 4 in., limp cloth, $1.25. 


CERAMIC GLAZES. Arranged for heat of 
the soft porcelain kiln. By H. Rum Bellow. 
Series A, Leadless Sanitary Glazes for hard 
waterproof glazed brick and stone; porcelain 
enamelled fire-clay sanitary ware; soft porce- 
lain; strong clay ware. From the seven charts 
formulas for any admixture of glazed ma- 
terials can be obtained. Folio, cloth, $10.00: 


CONCRETE DAM CONSTRUCTION. The 
Caisson as a new element in Concrete Dam 
Construction. By O. G. Aichel. 32 pages, 2 
diagrams, 6 large folding plates, 9% x 7% in., 
paper, $1.00. 








THE MODELMAKER 


207 





Industrial Alcohol, the Manu- 
facture of, from farm produce, 
by F. B. Wright, plainly written, 
describing and illustrating the 
various processes. 271 pages, 
cloth bound, $2.50. Spon & 
Chamberlain, 120 Liberty St., 
New York. 


Shop Practice 


For Home Mechanics 


By RAYMOND FRANCIS YATES 
Giving practical and useful infor- 
mation concerning the various phases 
of work that are included in amateur 
mechanics, such as the use of mis- 
cellaneous tools, drilling and ream- 
ing, lathe work, pattern making, 
hardening and tempering of steel, 
soldering and brazing, the construc- 
tion of a small power driven press, 
general information, etc. 320. pages, 
304 illus. 8% x 5’, cloth, Price $3.00 
SPON & CHAMBERLAIN | 
120 Liberty St. New York 


Slide Valve Chart. A diagram 
showing position of the crank 
pin, eccentric, and piston, at the 
point of admission, lead, full 
feed port opening, cut off, re- 
lease, full exhaust port opening 
and compression, with descrip- 
tive notes. <A _ blueprint, size 
10” x 14”, price 35 cents. 


THE DOMINION TOOLS 
& CASTINGS CO. 


433 HOMER STREET 
VANCOUVER, B. C., CANADA 


We carry a stock of goods from the 
following British firms: “a 


Stuart Turner, Ltd. 

Mills Bros. of Sheffield 
Liverpool Castings & Tool Supply, I.td. 
ae Leeds Model! Co., Ltd. : 

Economic Electric, Ltd. 

Jackson Rigby, Ltd. (of Shalford) 


TIME OF THE WORLD AT A GLANCE 


This adjustable chart printed on heavy card will show you how to 
find the tme of any place from any place you may happen to be 


in by just a slight movement of the sector. 


The illustration shows 


the following example: While New York is.12:30 P. M..,. it is: 


7:07 A.M.at Honolulu. 


7:15 A.M. at San Francisco. 


10:25 A.M. at Denver. 

11:05 A.M. at Galveston. 

11:28 at New Orleans or St. 
Louis. ‘ 

12:17 P. M. at Washington, 
bb fab x : 

5:03 P.M.at Dublin, Ireland. | 

5:25 P.M. at London, Eng- ¥° 
land. any 

Size, of Card, -9x7 in.,., wit 

movable Sector in two col- 

ors. 35 Cents Postpaid. 


et eu 


SPON & CHAMBERLAIN, 120 Libe 


Oe av 






4 2 ‘ ie 


iy Se, New. York 


208 


WANTED 

Model Railway News, January 
1925. Will give 25 cents for 
good clean copy. Spon,::120 
Liberty Street, New York. © 


THE MODELMAKER 


Is WORK WANTED 

I make patterns, small cast- 
ings and working models. Model- 
making is my trade. James. Koch, 
103 Summit Ave., Linwood, Pa. 





MODEL MACHINERY 


Sole U. S.: Agent for the noted Eng- 
lish Engineers, Stuart Turner, Ltd., 
makers of Model Steam, Gasuline, 
Gas Engines, Boilers, Fittings and 
Trimmings; Electrical | Machinery. 
Horizontal and Marine Engines, Sin- 
gle to Triple Expansion. Castings 
and parts, etc. “CABLE SERVICE.” 


Alfred Paul & Son, Engineers 


3 Ashland Street 4 
Melrose Highlands, Mass., U. 8S. A. 


Catalogue 25c, Coin or Post Office Order 
1926 Catalogue Just Issued 


THE BATHE MFG. CO. 
. Model Engines, 

Boilers, Boiler Fittings, Books, 
Model Makers’ Supplies 
Large Illustrated Catalogue 20c. 

) (refunded on first order) 
Dept. S.— 5214 Woodland Ave., 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


i 


WA: Al 





I Get this Flexible and Do rk ble 
| Shaft Outtit of a Pati ieee 


Needed by every modeimaker, me- 
chanie and for machine shop use. 
It’s a precision instrument, consisting 
of a ball-bearing coupling to connect 
to any motor, 3 feet’ of flexible shaft- 
ing and a ball-bearing chuck. Oper- 
’ ates buffing wheels, reamers, metal 
drills, files, burrs and we other 
_ appliances.’ ~ Uses awyH - motor, 
obtainable at small cost. 
Special Offer — Send Only $5.00 
This outfit sells for $45. As a spe- 
_ cial offer from our factory to you, 
_ send $5 with order and pay postman 
$20, plus postage, on arrival. Satis: 
a faction guaranteed or money back. 
C1 The S. S. White Dental Mfg. Co. 
‘4 ‘(Industrial Division) 
rh 152 W. 42nd St., New. York 


a\ 


MM 








THE WADE BENCH LATHES. 





_— 


~ AN IDEAL XMAS GIFT 












sais No. 2. 
- Back Geared: 
Screw Cutting 





~ Capacity: 4” dia. x 12” ‘or 18’" length. 


TURNING — FACING | — BORING — DRILLING #| > 
é aie — THREAD CUTTING - 


No. 1 Plain 4" x 12”... 
No. 1. “ 


«$28.00 


No. 2 Back Geared 4” x ‘t2°.. $88. 00 
No. Bins ta 4 fs Rag es x 18” cree OD, 4 


‘Catalogue showing ‘aetails and’ accessories’ ‘on request. 


THE GEROLD COMPANY (DEPT. M21) 
120-122 LIBERTY STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Y rs 7 i Fadi nal _~s r = 


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