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TRADE NEWS 



July 1, 1954 

TINY NBC-DEVELOPED WIRELESS MICROPHONE IS DEMONSTRATED; 

DEVICE PERMITS FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT FOR TV PERFORMERS 

Midget Transmitter and Aerial Can Be Hidden in Clothing; 
Compactness Achieved by the Use of RCA Transistors 

A tiny wireless microphone that can be concealed on the per¬ 
son of television performers was demonstrated today (July l) by the 
National Broadc- sting Company in a special closed-circuit performance 
headlined by Joan Diener, of the Broadway musical, "Kismet. Comedian 
Cliff Norton and announcer Ben Grauer also participated. 

The NBC-developed microphone, with an accompanying midget 
transmitter and antenna which can also be concealed in the performer's 
clothing, permits freedom of movement on a scale not possible with 

conventional microphones using cables and booms. 

In the demonstration, the microphone was concealed in the top 
of Miss Diener's oriental costume. The transmitter was placed in a 
rear fold of the costume, and the antenna, consisting of a multi-turn 


loop, was worn as a belt 


. 


The demonstration, designed to show the flexibility and 
freedom of motion made possible by the NBC technical development, was 
staged in Studio 3-B in Radio City. 


(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 2 0, NEW YORK 








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2 - Wireless Microphone 


The signal put out by the tiny transmitter is picked up by a 
loop of wire encircling the work area. In the case of outdoor pro¬ 
grams, the loop can be laid on the ground, suspended from trees or 
draped in bushes. 

The entire assembly -- microphone, transmitter with battery, 
and loop antenna -- weighs slightly less than eight ounces. Small 
size of the unit is made possible by the use of fingernail-sized 
transistors, which do the work of vacuum tubes. Eight RCA transistors 
are used in the transmitter. 

The transmitter, when its design is finalize^, will be little 
larger than a pack of king-sized cigarettes. The laboratory model used 
in the demonstration is somewhat larger, in order to facilitate circuit 
development. Eventual dimensions will be 5/S in.x 2 in, x 3-3/^ in. 

The range of reception of the miniature transmission has not 
yet been fully determined, but tests have shown no difficulty in cover¬ 
ing an area of 5*000 square feet, NBC engineers said. They added that 
the system is not vulnerable to most sources of interference, but in 
areas where interference might be a problem, an increase in received 
signal can be achieved by reducing the area covered by the receiving 
loop, thereby improving the ratio of signal to noise. 

The transmitter is powered by an RCA alkaline cell battery 
which is expected to furnish five hours of continuous, reliable 
transmission. The unit develops approximately 50 milliwatts of power 
at about 530 kilocycles, but radiates less than 100 micro-microwatts, 
Because of the low power and low frequency, the transmitter does not 
require licensing, since it is well below the limits prescribed by the 
Federal Communications Commission for such devices. 


(more) 



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3 - Wireless Microphone 


The wireless microphone was built by the NBC engineering 
development group on a directive several months ago from O.B. Hanson, 
then Vice President and Chief Engineer, recently promoted to Vice 
President, Operations Engineering, of the Radio Corporation of America, 
George M. Nixon, manager of the group, supervised the development pro¬ 
ject, which was handled by J.L. Hathaway, assistant group manager, and 
engineer Ray Lafferty. 

Robert E, Shelby, recently appointed Vice President and Chief 
Engineer, presided at the showing and explained the device. 


NBC-New York, 7/1/54 



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TRADE NEWS 


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July 1, 1954 


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PRO BASKETBALL GAMES ON NBC-TV 


NBC to Telecast Contests of National Basketball Association 
On Saturdays throughout 1954-55 Season 


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FOR RELEASE TUESDAY A.M., JULY 6 

A major addition to NBC-TV 1 s lineup of sports presentations 
was made public today (Tuesday, July 6) with the announcement that the 
television network will carry National Basketball Association contests 
each Saturday afternoon throughout the 1954-55 season. The statement 
was made jointly by Thomas S. Gallery, NBC sports director, and Maurice 
Podoloff, president of the NBA. 

The weekly series will begin Saturday, Oct. 30, and will 
immediately follow the NBC-TV telecasts of Canadian professional foot¬ 
ball through Saturday, Nov. 27. '"Viewers thereby will be afforded a 
full afternoon of solid sports entertainment. At the conclusion of 
the football series, the basketball telecasts will begin at 3 p.m., EDT 
Professional basketball, distinguished by high scoring and 
fast-breaking, "fire engine" style of play, enjoys an immense televi¬ 
sion following throughout the United States. NBC-TV plans to telecast 
games from each of the cities which are represented in the nine-team 
league. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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2 - Pro Basketball 


The NBA, an outgrowth of the old Basketball Association ot 
America and the National League, consists of Eastern and Western Divi¬ 
sions. The Eastern circuit includes the New York Knickerbockers, 
Syracuse Nationals, Boston Celtics, Baltimore Bullets and Philadelphia 
Warriors. The Western Division is comprised of the Minneapolis Lakers, 
Rochester Royals, Port Wayne Pistons and Milwaukee Hawks. 

Eastern and Western Division leaders meet in a four-out-of- 
seven playoff at the end of the regular season. Minneapolis, paced by 
the great George Mikan, has won the championship every year but one. 

Last year the Lakers topped Syracuse for the crown. 

The league is loaded with brilliant performers. Philadel¬ 
phia boasts Neil Johnston, the league's top scorer with a 24.4 average 
last season. This season Johnston will be joined by Paul Anzin, lead 
ing NBA scorer three years ago and just recently discharged from the 
Marine Corps. The Boston Celtics are sparked by the fabulous Bob 
Cousy, who does everything with a basketball but eat it. Last year 
Cousy averaged 19.2 points per game and his teammate. Easy Ed Macauley 

followed closely with an 18.9 mark. 

Baltimore, coached by the famous Claire Bee, is mighty prouo 

of dangerous Ray Felix, who was good for a 17.6 average last winter. 
The New York Knickerbockers, who finished on top of the Eastern Divi¬ 
sion last year but lost the subsequent round-robin to Syracuse, count 
on Carl Braun and Dick McGuire. Other league luminaries include 
Larry Foust and Max Zaslofsky of Fort Wayne, Don Sunderlage of Milwau¬ 
kee, Bob Wanzer and Bob Davies of Rochester, and Dolph Schayes, of 

Syracuse• 


NBC-New York, 7/1/54 





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July 1, 1954 


'SPEND A MILLION' FOR FUN ON NBC RADIO 

New Audience-Participation Show with 'Strings Attached' 

Starts July 7; Joey Adams to Be Emcee 

PREMIERE 

SPEND A MILLION, a fun-provoking audience-participation 
radio show with a reverse twist and "strings attached," will begin 
on NBC Radio Wednesday, July 7 (8:30-9 p.m., EDT). 

Comedian Joey Adams will be emcee of the weekly fun-fests, 
which will feature three contestants chosen on the basis of their odd 
occupations. Each contestant will be given $1,000,000 in play money 
which he will try to "spend" during the broadcast. The contestant 
with the least money left will win a prize. The one who goes complete¬ 
ly broke will be awarded a jackpot of valuable merchandise. The 

person with most money remaining will receive a booby prize. 

The money is spent on a series of four questions or pur¬ 
chases of $100,000, $150,000, $250,000 and $500,000 respectively. The 
contestant is asked a simple gag question or is offered a chance to buy 

valuable "properties" which might include the Taj Mahal, a Texas oil 
field or the Empire State Building. If he answers the question 
correctly or decides to buy something, he pulls one of several strings 
which are attached to various cards -- each card bearing instructions 

which either assess the contestant or add to his capital. 

"Spend a Million" is a Lester Lewis Associates production. 

The series will be produced by Lester Lewis, directed by Ken MacGregor 
and written by Albert Miller and Eddie Davis. 


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NBC TRADE NEVIS 


‘GRAND OLE OPRY’ RENEWED ON NBC RADIO 
BY R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY 

GRAND OLE OPRY, popular country music series 
presented on the NBC Radio Network Saturdays, 
(9:30-10 p.m., 2DT; from WSM, Nashville, Tenn., 
has been renewed by the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company, it was announced today by Fred Horton, 
director of sales for the NBC Radio Network. 

The contract for renewal on 93 NBC stations 
for a full 52 weeks starting July 3 > was signed 
through the William Esty Company. Products 
to be advertised on the program are Prince 
Albert Tobacco and Cavalier Cigarettes. 

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NBC-New York, 7/1/5^ 













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NBC-TV NEWS 


CREDITS FOR 'OUT ON THE FARM' ON NBC-TV 


PROGRAM: 

OUT ON THE FARM 

TIME: 

NBC-TV, Sundays, 5-6 p.m., EDT 

PREMIERE: 

Sunday, July 11, 1954 

DESCRIPTION: 

The program, NBC-TV's first 
agricultural series, will 
mirror the activities of a 
farm family. It is designed 
to give both city tind rural 
viewers a completely authentic 
picture of American agriculture 
in terms of people -- the farm 
family, along with a group of 
well-known TV personalities. 

HOST: 

Eddy Arnold 

PARTICIPANTS: 

Wilbert and Bertha Landmeier and 
their four children: Joyce, 14; 
Janet, 12; Judy, 11, and Jimmy, 
seven. Also, Clint Youle, NBC 
weatherman; Don Herbert, NBC- 
TV's "Mr. Wizard," who will ex¬ 
plain the whys and hows of farm 
machinery; John Ott, gardening 
and time-lapse photography ex¬ 
pert; the Mid-States Four, barber 
shop quartet. 

POINT OF ORIGIN: 

The Landmeiers' 160-acre farm 
near Cloverdale, Ill. (The home 
has been equipped for TV pro¬ 
gramming to permit indoor 
operations. Portions of each 
week's program will come from 
the interior of the home; most 
of the program, however, will 
originate in the fields, garden, 
dairy barn and other farm build¬ 
ings . One camera has been 
mounted on a jeep for mobility. 

A 75-root steel tower has been 
erected on the farm to provide 
micro-wave equipment to beam the 
TV signal to receiving equipment 
atop the Kemper Insurance Build¬ 
ing in Chicago, some 30 miles 
away). 

PRODUCER: 

Ben Park 

DIRECTOR: 

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR: 

Don Meier 

Harry Maule 

WRITER: 

Marv David 

AGRICULTURAL ADVISOR: 

Ken Fiske 









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NBC-TV NEWS 


CREDITS 


PROGRAM: 

TIME: 

FORMAT: 


PREMIERE: 

STARS: 

CAST: 


PRODUCER: 

DIRECTOR: 

WRITER: 

PROGRAM CREATOR: 
ORIGINATION: 


FOR ‘FIRST LOVE' ON NBC-TV 


FIRST LOVE 

NBC-TV, Monday through Friday, 
3:30-3:45 p.m., EDT 

A realistic story of a contem¬ 
porary marriage where Laurie 
and Zachary James learn to 
live together and grow to¬ 
gether. Two people trying 
to solve their problems, 
which are complicated by 
the fact that Zachary, a 
brilliant engineer, loves 
Laurie, but finds it diffi¬ 
cult to build his life around 
anything but his work. 

July 5, 1954 

Pat Barry as Laurie; Val 
Dufour as Zachary. 

Frederic Downs as Quentin 
Andrews, Hal Currier as Sam 
Morrison, Henrietta Moore as 
Peggy Gordon, Joe Warren as 
Phil Gordon, Scotty McGregor \ 
as Ruth, Henry Stanton as 
Wallace Grant, John Dutra as 
Mike Kennedy, and Howard 
Smith as Judge Kennedy. 

A1 Morrison 

Joe Behar 

Manya Starr 

Adrian Samish 

Philadelphia 


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NBC-New York, 7/1/54 













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TRADE NEWS 


__July 2, 1954 

ATTENTION SPORTS EDITORS 


NBC TO TELECAST ’DREAM RACE' BETWEEN MILE RECORD-BREAKERS 
JACK LANDY AND ROGER BANNISTER IN VANCOUVER 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY A,M,, JULY 5 

Millions of American televiewers will have a front-row seat 
for what is potentially one of the most dramatic races in track and 
field history Saturday, Aug, 7 , when the National Broadcasting 

Company carries the telecast of the "dream race" between Australia's 
Jack Landy and England's Roger Bannister at the British Empire and 
Commonwealth Games in Vancouver, B*C. The announcement was made by 
NBC Sports Director Thomas S. Gallery. 

The telecast will be seen in the U.S, exclusively on NBC-TV 
between 5 and 6 p.m., EDT. Transmission was arranged in cooperation 
with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Although a CBC-TV crew 
will make the actual telecast, the signal will be beamed from Vancouver 
to Seattle, thence via closed circuit across the United States to 
Buffalo, N.Y. There it will be fed to NBC-TV as well as to the exist¬ 
ing CBC-TV network. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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2 - ’Dream Race♦ 


This classic race involves the only two athletes ever to 
run the mile in less than four minutes. Some truly great competi¬ 
tors -- Jack Lovelock, Glenn Cunningham and Gunder Haegg among them 
have assaulted this seemingly unattainable standard for decades, but 
the immense distinction of being the first to achieve it fell to an 
angular, soft-spoken Oxford medical student named Roger Bannister. 

On May 6, Bannister stepped onto his home track at Oxford -- a track 
he had even helped build -- and, paced by his friend Chris Chataway, 
ran his mile in 3:59.4, a feat acclaimed on front pages the world 
over. 

But Bannister’s glory, as great as it was, proved to be 
short-lived. His performance was officially recognized by the Inter 
national Amateur Athletic Federation less than a week before Landy, 
a 24-year-old runner from Melbourne, shaved 1.4 seconds from it at 
Turku, Finland, on June 21. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/2/54 





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July 2, 1954 


GIs TO QUIZ EXPERTS ON 'NEWS GAME,' NEW FEATURE 
WEDNESDAY NIGHTS ON NBC RADIO 


PREMIERE 

NEWS GAME, a stimulating new panel show In which GIs quiz 
the experts, will be Introduced on NBC Radio Wednesday 3 July 7 
(8 p.m., EDT). 

Ken Banghart, NBC newsman, will serve as moderator of the 
weekly show. The panel will include Inez Robb, United Features syndi¬ 
cated columnist; Walter Kiernan, International News Service columnist 
and Radio-TV personality; Hal Ecyle, Associated Press columnist, 
former war correspondent and Pulitzer Prize winner; and Eloise McElhone, 
a popular panelist and mistress of ceremonies. 

On the initial program, July 7, John Lardner, "Newsweek” 
sports columnist and author, will pinch-hit for Walter Kiernan. 

Each Wednesday hospitalized GIs from Eastern service hospi¬ 
tals will appear as guests on the program to quiz the panelists. 

These veterans of World War II and Korean battles will select the 

(more) 

NOTE TO EDITORS: 

The NBC Daily News Report will not be published 

on Monday, July 5. Publication will be resumed on 

Tuesday, July 6 . 

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NBC TRADE NEWS 


PREMIERE OF 'THE MARRIAGE,* POSTPONED DUE TO ILLNESS 
OF JESSICA TANDY, IS RESCHEDULED FOR JULY 8 

The premiere of THE MARRIAGE, postponed from July 1 because 
of the sudden illness of Jessica Tandy, has been rescheduled for 
Thursday, July 8 (NBC-TV, 10 p.m., EDT). The sudden illness of Miss 
Tandy a few hours before show time July 1 necessitated the change. 

Miss Tandy, who co-stars in the situation comedy series 
with her husband, Hume Cronyn, is recovering at Doctors Hospital, 

New York, and will be able to perform in the TV show July 8. The 
storyline will be that previously announced for the premiere -- lawyer 
Ben Marriott's eye-opening experience at a New York public school. 

This is the first NBC-TV dramatic series to be telecast on 
a regular continuing basis in compatible color. The colorcasts will 
be available on all standard television sets in high quality black 
and white. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/2/54 






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July 2, 1954 

GIs TO QUIZ EXPERTS ON 'NEWS GAME,' NEW FEATURE 
WEDNESDAY NIGHTS ON NBC RADIO 


PREMIERE 

NEWS GAME, a stimulating new panel show in which GIs quiz 
the experts, will he introduced on NBC Radio Wednesday, July 7 
(8 p.m., EDT). 

Ken Banghart, NBC newsman, will serve as moderator of the 
weekly show. The panel will include Inez Robb, United Features syndi¬ 
cated columnist; Walter Kiernan, International News Service columnist 
and Radio-TV personality; Hal Beyle, Associated Press columnist, 
former war correspondent and Pulitzer Prize winner; and Eloise McElhone, 
a popular panelist and mistress of ceremonies. 

On the initial program, July 7 , John Lardner, ’’Newsweek" 
sports columnist and author, will pinch-hit for Walter Kiernan. 

Each Wednesday hospitalized GIs from Eastern service hospi¬ 
tals will appear as guests on the program to quiz the panelists. 

These veterans of World War II and Korean battles will select the 

(more) 

NOTE TO EDITORS: 

The NBC Daily News Report will not be published 

on Monday, July 5» Publication will be resumed on 

Tuesday, July 6. 

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questions, which will be based on the news, and can be either general 
or a sound effect connected with a prominent news story. As the 
guest stymies a panelist, he will receive a prize and advance up the 
ladder from "printer’s devil" to "publisher." Prizes in cash and mer¬ 
chandise will be awarded. 

Merrill Mueller, NBC news commentator, will be executive 
producer for the series. 


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NBC-New York, 7/2/5^ 








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TRADE NEWS 



July 6, 1954 

NBC ’MEMO’ STRESSES NETWORK RADIO AS BEST COMPLEMENTARY 
MEDIUM TO GIVE TV ADVERTISER PULL NATIONAL COVERAGE 


Network radio -- specifically NBC Network Radio -- is the 
best medium for a television advertiser anxious to complement his TV 
advertising in order to receive full national coverage. 

This is the highlight of a new promotion booklet just pre¬ 
pared and now being distributed by NBC. Entitled "Memo To: A 
Television Advertiser; From: The NBC Radio Network/' the booklet 
in simple, graphic terms points up: 

That the advertiser using only network TV must complement 
this advertising for full national coverage. 

That NBC Radio provides for every budget the largest 
potential complementary audience, the largest delivered complementary 
audience, the lowest duplication of the TV audience — and all of these 
at the lowest cost of any other medium. 

The booklet concludes by offering, at no cost to the tele¬ 
vision advertiser, a complete Nielsen analysis of the firm's TV 
advertising, combined with a recommended complementary schedule over 
NBC Radio. 

"Memo To a Television Advertiser" points out that even the 
television advertiser with a full TV network, with his show watched 
by every home with television, still misses 17 > 100,000 non-TV homes -- 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 























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or 37 per cent of the total 47,560,000 homes in the country. 

How can these additional, non-TV homes best be reached? 

"Through network radio, the medium with the largest un¬ 
duplicated addition to television advertising, at the lowest cost," 
the booklet states.. 

For example, NBC Radio, with 200 stations covering 98 per 
cent of the homes in the United States, can provide eight times the 
unduplicated circulation of non-TV homes that a leading weekly 
picture magazine provides, and more than four times the unduplicated 
circulation offered by a leading Sunday newspaper supplement. 

In 47 radio-television program combinations studied recently 
by A.C. Nielsen, average duplication of radio-TV coverage for all 47 
shows was only 1.9 per cent, and the highest delivered audience 
duplication for any one combination was only 4,3 per cent. 

The presentation also noted that non-TV homes are still a 
major market in television’s own front yard. In the 165 top 
metropolitan markets, there are 6,426,000 non-television families — 
or more than one out of every four homes in the country’s leading 
markets. 

The booklet was prepared by the NBC Radio Network sales 
development group, under the supervision of Howard Gardner, director, 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/6/54 




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TELEVISION 


NEWS 


NBC COLOR TELECASTS FOR WEEK 
(July 11 - 17) 


(NBC-TV Network including WNBT) 

Wednesday, July 14 

11 a.m.-12 Noon, EDT on HOME — An 8-to-15 minute 
pickup by NBC color mobile unit from Mount Vernon, 
Va., the home of George Washington. 

Thursday, July 15 

10-10:30 p.m., EDT on THE MARRIAGE, starring Hume 
Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. 

Friday, July 16 


7-9 a.m., EDT and CDT, on TODAY, and 
11 a.m.-12 Noon, EDT, on HOME — An 8-to-15 minute 
pickup by NBC color mobile unit from General Lee’s 
Mansion in Arlington, Va. 


(WNBT Only) 


* * * 


Monday, July 12 through Friday, July 16 

1:30-2 p.m., EDT on HERE’S LOOKING AT YOU, with 
Richard Willis. 




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NBC-New York, 7/6/5^ 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 2 0, NEW YORK 




















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NBC TRADE NEWS 


ATTORNEY GENERAL BROWNELL TO ’MEET THE PRESS 


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Attorney General Herbert Brownell Jr. will MEET THE PRESS 
Sunday, July 11 (NBC-TV, 6 p.m,, EDT; NBC Radio, 10:30 p.m., EDT). 

He will be interviewed by May Craig of the Portland (Maine) 
Press-Herald, Richard Wilson of Cowles Publications and Peter Edson of 
Newspaper Enterprise Association. Ned Brooks of the NBC Washington 
News Bureau will be moderator. 

"Meet the Press" will originate in NBC studios at’-: Sheraton 
Park Hotel, Washington, D.C. 


S. MARTIN SAMIT JOINS NBC ADVERTISING AND PROMOTION 
STAFF AS RADIO NETWORK COORDINATOR 



S. Martin Samit, former assistant to the publisher and 
research director for Everywoman’s Magazine, has joined the staff of 
the NBC Advertising and Promotion Department as Radio Network 
coordinator# Jacob A. Evans, director of national advertising and 
promotion for NBC, announced today. 

Samit will maintain liaison with Radio Network clients and 
agencies and assist in the creation of direct mail and program presen¬ 
tations. He has been in advertising, promotion and research work for 
more than 10 years, and before joining Everywoman’s Magazine was with 

Time, Inc. He is married and lives in Jamaica Estates, N.Y. He has a 
bachelor of arts degree in marketing and psychology from Wayne 

University and a master’s degree in psychological services from 

Columbia University. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/6/54 















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TRADE NEWS 


July 8, 1954 




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NBC. LEADS THE FIELD IN TOP RADIO RATINGS FOR EVENING SHOWS 






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A near-sweep of the top three rankings of evening radio pro¬ 
grams is accomplished by NBC Radio in the latest national Nielsen Radio 
Index, 


NBC Radio has the top-ranked once-a-week evening program, 
the third-ranked weekly evening show, and the top two evening multi¬ 
weekly programs. 

Highest ranked of all evening radio programs, according to 
the Nielsen report. Is NBC's YOU BET YOUR LIFE, with a 7.2 rating and 
3*359,000 homes reached. The show, which stars Groucho Marx, is heard 
on Wednesdays (9-9:30 p.m., EDT), 

Running one-two in evening multi-weekly ratings are NBC 
Radio's NEWS OF THE WORLD (Monday through Friday, 7:30-7:45 p.m., EDT), 
w3,th a rating of 3.5, and FIBBER McGEE AND MOLLY (Monday through Friday, 
10-10:15 p.m,, EDT), with a 3.1 rating. 

Completing the picture of NBC's radio leadership is BIG 
STORY (Wednesday, 9:30-10 p,m,, EDT), which is ranked third in weekly 
evening programs with a rating of 5.4* 

Comparing all evening sponsored programs in homes reached 
during the average minute, the Nielsen Radio Index shows that NBC Radio 

leads the second network (CBS) by 11 per cent. During the average 
minute, NBC reaches 1,446,000 homes, compared to 1,306,000 for the sec¬ 
ond network, 980,000 for the third network, and 606,000 for the fourth 
network, 

—--o- 


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NBC-TV NEWS 


CREDITS FOR THE *BOB SMITH SHOW* ON NBC-TV 


TITLE: 

TELECAST: 

STAR: 

CAST: 

FORMAT: 

PRODUCER: 

DIRECTORS: 

WRITERS: 

MUSIC DIRECTOR AND ARRANGER: 
ORIGINATION: 

STARTED: 


BOB SMITH SHOW 

NBC-TV, Mondays through Fri¬ 
days, 12 noon to 12:30 p.m., 
EDT 

Bob Smith 

Clark Dennis, vocalist; The 
Honeydreamers, vocal quintet 
Bobbie Nicholson and his 
orchestra. 

Variety, with audience partici 
pating in "memory quiz." 

Roger Muir 

Bobby Hultgren 

Howard Davis 

Willie Gilbert 

Jack Weinstock 

Bobbie Nicholson 

"Live" from New York 

Monday, July 5* 1954 


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CREDITS FOR ’DOCTOR SIXGUN’ ON NBC RADIO 


PROGRAM? DOCTOR SIXGUN 

TIME: NBC Radio network (except VJNBC), 

Thursdays, 8:30-9 p.m., EDT. 

STARS: Karl Webber and Bill Griffis 

FORMAT: Western dramatic series based on 

the adventures of Grey Matson, 
MiD. , a gun-toting doctor who 
practiced in the rugged 
"Territory" during the l870s, 

WRITERS: George Lefferts 

Ernest Kinoy 

DIRECTOR:. Fred Weihe 

ORIGINATION: "Live" from New York. 

STARTED: July 1, 195^ 

-o- 

SENATOR LEHMAN GUEST ON ’YOUTH WANTS TO KNOW’ PROGRAM 

Senator Herbert H. Lehman (D.-N.Y.), member of the Senate 
Banking and Currency Committee and of the Senate Labor and Public 
Welfare Committee, will be the guest on Theodore Granik’s YOUTH WANTS 
TO KNOW program when it moves to a new time segment on the NBC-TV 
network Saturday, July 10 , 7*30 p.m., EDT, The program will be 
rebroadcast on the NBC Radio network Sunday, July 11, 2:30 p.m., EDT. 

Senator Lehman will be questioned by teen-age students 
in the NBC studios at the Sheraton Park Hotel in Washington, D.C, 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/8/5^ 












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TRADE NEWS 


July 9, 1954 

•tt---— X 

‘GREATEST MOMENTS IN SPORTS' RECALLING CLASSIC THRILLS, 

TO BE NEW FRIDAY NIGHT FEATURE ON NBC-TV 
Mutual of Omaha to Sponsor Series 

-*v? 

Bobby Thompson's pennant-winning home run,,,Native Dancer's 
heart-breaking Kentucky Derby defeat.,,the fabulous Army football 
team's streak-ending loss to inspired Columbia — these are all classic 
thrills in the history of American sport. Many have heard or read 
about these spectacularly dramatic events, but few actually witnessed 
them. 

These and countless other thrills will be re-lived by millions 
of U,S. television sports fans through an exciting new program entitled 
GREATEST MOMENTS IN SPORTS, which will start on the NBC-TV network 
Friday, July 30 (10:30 p.m., EDT). The series will be sponsored by 
Mutual of Omaha. 

Walter Kiernan, veteran reporter and popular TV personality, 
will be host on the show, which will feature live interviews with fa-- 
mous guests, as well as film clips of memorable moments in every major 
sport from hockey to horse racing. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 2 0, NEW YORK 


















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"Greatest Moments in Sports" will be a regular Friday night 
feature on NBC-TV, Throughout the Summer, the program will be seen at 
10:30 p.m., EDT, with the possible exception of Aug. 20, when it will 
be aired immediately after the telecast of the Bobo Olson - Rocky 
Castellani middleweight championship bout. 

The Friday night fights will return to NBC-TV on a regular 
weekly basis Sept. 3. This will mean, of course, that "Greatest Mom¬ 
ents in Sports" will be of varying length. The fight telecast begins 
at 10 p.m,, EDT. In the event of an early knockout, "Greatest Moments 
will come on at 10:30 p.m., and run until 11. Should the fight go the 
distance, the new program may be as brief as six or seven minutes. 

This means that those producing the show must be prepared 
for either a half-hour program or a "quickie." 

NBC-TV has assembled a first-string lineup to put this show 
on the air. Supervising the production is Lindsey Nelson, NBC’s as¬ 
sistant sports director and popular sportscaster. He did the color 
on last Fall’s telecasts of collegiate football. The producer is 
Jerry Franken and the director is Marty Hoade, who directed the Bob 
Considine news shcUy which also was sponsored by Mutual of Omaha. 
"Greatest Moments in Sports" will be written by Barney Nagler, "Morn¬ 
ing Telegraph" columnist. Boxing fans will recall his brilliant bio¬ 
graphy of Joe Louis which appeared in Life magazine several years ago. 

« 

Walter Kiernan is singularly well suited for the assignment 
of interviewing guests and serving as narrator on "Greatest Moments 
in Sports," for he has spent his life traveling and meeting persons in 
all walks of life. He knows kings and clowns, statesmen and sandhogs, 
athletes and actors, generals and GIs. 


(more) 










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3 - 1 Greatest Moments in Sports 1 


He began a somewhat incredible career some 40 years ago in 
New Haven, Conn, where he was born. His youth was "a blur of odd 
jobs," including a stint as a professional pallbearer ("a mistake," 
he declares). He became a cub reporter, then a columnist, on the New 
Haven Register, and the next jump was to the Associated Press in New 
York, There he made hundreds of friends and established a reputation 
as a political reporter. 

"I interview big shots the same way I talk to the cop on the 
corner," Kiernan says, "I give them the red flannel test my father 
taught me. Whenever I come face-to-face with famous people, I forget 
their names and think of them dressed in long-handled underwear. It 
works. First time I tried it was when I met President William Howard 
Taft. Meeting VIPs has been easy ever since," 

Aa a star reporter for the AP and International News Service, 
Kiernan traveled all over the world. He swapped toasts with King 
George VI on the King's birthday and spent a wartime New Year's Eve 
with Winston Churchill. Kiernan recently confided to Churchill's 
actress daughter, Sarah, "Your father's a great conversationalist, but 
he's no New Year's Eve date!" His other experiences as a world travel¬ 
er and bon vivant include breakfasting with Marlene Dietrich (A won¬ 
derful way to start the day"). 

For a number of years, Kiernan wrote a column, "One Man's 
Opinion," which appeared in newspapers from Maine to California, He is 
the author of a biography of Dwight D. Eisenhower and co-authored with 
Damon Runyon a biography of Eddie Rickenbacker. 

Kiernan is vice president of the Catholic Actors Guild, a 
former president of the Circus Saints and Sinners Club, and a member 
of the governing board of the American Federation of Television and 
Radio Actors, In addition to "Greatest Moments in Sports," he also is 
seen as host on the popular NBC-TV panel show, "Who Said That?" 

; o-. NBC-New York, 7/9/54 




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NBC-TV NEWS 


-X* 




CREDITS FOR ’GREATEST MOMENTS IN SPORTS' ON NBC-TV 

GREATEST MOMENTS IN SPORTS 


PROGRAM; 

DATE AND TIME; 

NARRATOR; 
PREMIERE DATE; 
FORMAT; 


PRODUCTION SUPERVISOR; 
PRODUCER; 

DIRECTOR; 

WRITER; 


NBC -TV, Fridays, 10;30 p.m., 
EDT 

Walter Kiernan 

Friday, July 30, 195^ 

Live interviews with famous 
sports personalities and 
film clips of memorable 
moments in sport. 

Lindsey Nelson 

Jerry Franken 

Martin Hoade 

Barney Nagler 


•35* 




NBC-New York, 7/9/5^ 
















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NBC-TV NEWS 


NBC SCORES WITH 8 OP 10 TOP TV SHOWS IN NIELSEN INDEX 


Continuing its leadership in the major rating surveys, NBC- 
TV has walked off with 8 of the top 10, ranked shows in the latest 
national Nielsen Television Index, for the two weeks ending June 12. 

This latest near-sweep by NBC follows closely the announce- 
ment of the newest Nielsen Radio ratings, in which NBC Radio has the 
first and third ranked weekly evening shows, and the top two 

evening multi-weekly programs, 

The country's 10 most popular television programs, as 

spelled out by Nielsen, are: 



PROGRAM 


RATING 

1 

-- I Love Lucy 


50.9 

2 

-- DRAGNET 

(NBC) 

45.7 

3 

-- THE BOB HOPE SHOW 

(NBC) 

44.3 

4 

-- COLGATE COMEDY HOUR(NBC) 

39.7 

5 

-- FORD THEATRE 

(NBC) 

37.0 

6 

-- THIS IS YOUR LIFE 

(NBC) 

35.8 

7 

-- YOU BET YOUR LIFE 

(NBC) 

34.8 

8 

-- Jackie Gleason Show 

34.8 

9 

-- BUICK-BERLE SHOW 

(NBC) 

34.6 

10 

-- YOUR HIT PARADE 

(NBC) 

33.7 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/9/5^ 














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*--* 

NBC TRADE NEWS 
*---* 


NBC HOST TO MEMBERS OF NATIONAL SCHOOL PUBLIC RELATIONS GROUP 

It 

1 

About 60 members of the National School Public 
Relations Association visited the facilities of the National 
Broadcasting Company in New York on Thursday, July 8, 

The educators, representing state education associa¬ 
tions and departments of education, are in New York for a five- 
day seminar on applying communication techniques to school 
public relations. 

While at NBC, they toured the studios in the RCA 
Building, saw a film on production techniques, and heard talks 
by Sydney H. Eiges, NBC Vice President in Charge of Press and 
Publicity, and Edward Stanley, manager of public service 
programs. 

The National School Public Relations Association 
is a department of the National Education Association. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/9/5^ 




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COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


:-20 



,, __ _-* 

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NBC COLOR TELECASTS FOR WEEK 
(July 18-24) 


(NBC-TV Network including WNBT) 

Thursday, July 22 

10-10:30 p.m., EDT: THE MARRIAGE, starring 
Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. 


Friday, July 23 

7-9 a.m., EDT and CDT, on TODAY, and 
11 a.m. - 12 Noon, EDT, on HOME: An 8-to-15 
minute pickup by NBC color mobile unit from 
B & 0 roundhouse in Baltimore, Md. 


* * * * * 


(WNBT Only) 

Monday, July 19 through Friday, July 23 

1:30-2 p.m., EDT: HERE'S LOOKING AT YOU, with 

Richard Willis. 

***** 

(Correction, Please -- July 14 and July lo: Color 
Mobile Unit presentations will be seen on both . 
HOME and TODAY instead of HOME only). 


NBC-New York, 7/12/54 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 














































. 




... 











NOTED CONDUCTORS AND SOLOISTS TO PARTICIPATE 
IN 'HOLLYWOOD BOWL* CONCERTS ON NBC RADIO 




The fifth annual series of HOLLYWOOD BOWL 
CONCERTS on NBC Radio will start Monday, July 26 
(8-9 p.m., EDT), The one-hour transcribed concerts 
featuring leading conductors and soloists will be 
an eight-week series, taking the time period of the 
"Best of All" program. 

The Summer concerts of the Hollywood Bowl draw 
many thousands of listeners to hear the great vocal 
and instrumental artists appearing with distin¬ 
guished guest conductors. Among the artists to be 
heard in the broadcast portions of these programs 
will be Eleanor Steber, Jan Peerce, Dorothy Kirsten, 
William Primrose, Tony Martin, Robert Merrill, Ethel 
Merman, Lily Pons, and Liberace. The conductors will 
include Sir Adrian Boult, Andre Kostelanetz, Johnny 
Green, William Steinberg and Pierre Monteux. 

The program will be prepared and edited in 
Hollywood. 

-o- 

I 

_______—--tt 


NBC-New York, 7/12/5^ 











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NBC TRADE NEWS 


‘HOME’ TO ORIGINATE JULY 19 TELECAST IN JORDAN MARSH 
DEPARTMENT STORE IN BOSTON, NEW ENGLAND’S LARGEST 

X - # -X -# 

NBC-TV’s full-hour morning television program for women, 

HOME, (Mondays through Fridays, 11 a.m.-12 noon, EDT) will originate 
its Monday, July 19 telecast entirely from the Jordan Marsh depart¬ 
ment store in Boston, Mass. 

The program will be ;£he second in a series, of presentations 
of the "Home" show to be telecast directly from key department stores 
throughout the country. The first, from Gimbel’s department store in 
Philadelphia, was presented last May. 

i 

The series, which establishes a unique cooperation between 
the stores an^ the television network, provides an opportunity to 
inform the "Home" viewers on how to buy in department stores, how 
to avail themselves of all the store's services, and the part these 
stores play in the life of the community. 

Helping to bring viewers the story of Jordan Marsh, the 
fourth largest department store in the country and New England's 
largest store, whose charge accounts list residents of all the 
48 states, will be "Home's" editor-in-chief, Arlene Francis; Hugh 
Downs, man-about "Home"; Eve Hunter, fashion editor; and Kit Kinne, 
cooking editor. 

As Miss Francis is a native of Boston, her visit there will 

also be a homecoming celebration. 

The program, which will be telecast through the facilities 

of NBC affiliate WBZ-TV in Boston, will include a back-to-school 


(more) 












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2 - ’Home 1 


fashion show, a presentation on make-up techniques, and a feature 
from the store’s decorating department showing the making of 
furniture and possible furnishing changes in a room. Kit Kinne will 
prepare a famous New England lobster dish. The Jordan Marsh 
anniversary shop, a special collection of gifts for wedding 
anniversaries from the first to seventy-fifth year, will provide 
background for an interview with Barbara Brooks, the Jordan Marsh 
gift consultant. The Story of the Day, by Hugh Downs, will center 
around the Jordan Marsh Century Club, an organization founded in 
1922 and composed of members who have spent at least 50 years as 
Jordan Marsh employees. 

In addition, the sponsors of "Home” will have special 
displays all through the store during the week of July 19. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/12/54 




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COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



NBC-TV*S THREE SERIES OF COLOR *SPECTACULARS’ COMPLETELY 
SOLD OUT—HAZEL BISHOP, REYNOLDS METALS AND 
SUNBEAM TO SPONSOR SUNDAY SHOWS 

NBC-TV T s three series of color "spectaculars" are SRO -- 
completely sold out two months before the first of the widely heralded 

90-minute extravaganzas takes to the air. 

Completion of the client roster of the three series became a 
fact today with the announcement by George H. Frey, NBC Vice President 
in charge of Television Network Sales, that three advertisers -- Hazel 
Bishop Inc,, Reynolds Metals Company and the Sunbeam Corporation -- 
will sponsor the network’s Sunday night "spectaculars," to be seen 
every fourth Sunday from 7:30-9 p*m., EDT, beginning Sept. 12. 

Hazel Bishop Inc,, and the Sunbeam Corporation each will 
sponsor 45 minutes of each of 10 programs, while Reynolds Metals Company 

will sponsor three complete programs. 

The Sunday night "spectaculars" will be produced by Max 
Liebman, brilliant showman who for five years was instrumental in 
making NBC-TV’s "Your Show of Shows" a Saturday night institution on 
television, Liebman has signed vivacious Betty Hutton to make her 
television debut as star of the Sept. 12 spectacular, and plans to 
present Broadway, Hollywood and television stars of equal magnitude on 
each of the succeeding shows. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COM PA NY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 2 0, NEW YORK 

























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spectaculars’ 


The advertising agency for Hazel Bishop Inc. is Raymond 
Spector Company Inc.; for Reynolds Metals Company, Russel M. Seeds 
Company; and for the Sunbeam Corporation, Perrin-Paus Company. The 
NBC account executives are William Martin on the Hazel Bishop account, 
John Dodge on the Reynolds Metals account, and Edward Stockmar on the 

Sunbeam Corporation account. 

In addition to the Sunday night "spectaculars," NBC-TV will 
present a series of 13 color "spectaculars" on Saturday nights, pro¬ 
duced by Liebman. and sponsored by the Oldsmobile Division of General 
Motors Corporation, and another series of 13 on Monday nights, pro¬ 
duced by Leiand Hayward and sponsored by the Ford Motor Company and 

the Radio Corporation of America. 

The "spectaculars" will be presented in RCA compatible color 

television, and will be fully viewable on the country’s black 

and white sets. 

-o 



NBC-New York, 7/13/5^ 






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July 13 , 1954 


AVI ARDS TO FINALISTS IN FISHER BODY CRAFTSMAN’S GUILD 
MODEL CAR COMPETITION TO BE TELECAST BY NBC 

The national awards ceremony of the 1954 Fisher Body Crafts¬ 
man's Guild model car competition will he telecast from Detroit by 

NBC-TV Tuesday, July 20 (9:30 p.m., EDT). 

Forty-one regional finalists will show their dream cars. 

The finalists already have received $150 each for winning first place 
in their home states. Eight of these regional winners, during the 
telecast, will be announced as grand national winners and will be 
awarded university scholarships with a total value of $20,000. 

Appearing on the telecast will be James E. Goodman, president 
of the Craftsman’s Guild and General Motors vice president in charge 
of the Fisher Body Division; C.F. Kettering, GM research consultant and 
noted inventor; and distinguished educators, scientists and industrial¬ 
ists who will be guests at the awards banquet. 

More than 3,500,000 boys have competed for awards by the 
Craftsman’s Guild since its inception in 1930. The Guild so far has 
awarded 123 university scholarships valued at $400,500, and more than 
10,000 boys have shared in state and regional awards. 

(This special program will cancel "Top Plays of 1954 this 

I 

date only). 


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V 


NBC TRADE NEVIS 


W.W. PARISH NAMED SUPERVISOR OF NBC PUBLIC SERVICE PROGRAMS 

William White Parish, supervisor of the NBC Story Division 
since he joined the network in 1951* has been named a supervisor of 
public service programs for NBC, He will assume his new post on 
July 19 and will report thereafter to Edward Stanley, NBC manager of 
public service programs. 

Parish was born in Evanston, Ill,, and has spent most of his 
life in New York City, From 1942 to 1945 be was in the Army Air Force 
and served as a fighter pilot in the Mediterranean Theatre. From 1946 
to 1949 he attended Columbia University and took a B.S. degree in 
professional writing in the university 1 s School of General Studies. 

After graduation. Parish joined Simon and Schuster, Inc., 
as assistant to the president, Richard L. Simon, and later was New York 
City salesman for the new combined sales force of Simon and Schuster 
and Pocket Books, Inc. He left Simon and Schuster to join NBC, He hao 
been guest lecturer on TV writing at New York University and on pub¬ 
lishing at Columbia University. He wrote and produced half-hour pro¬ 
grams for the WNBC radio series, "Life in New York," in cooperation 

with Time, Inc. 

Parish lives in Manhattan. His wife is Eleanor Parish, 
associate science editor of Life Magazine. They have a year-old son. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/13/54 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


STATION WIKK JOINS NBC RADIO NETWORK 

Radio Station WIKK in Erie, Pa., will join 
the NBC Radio Network on Aug. 1, Harry Bannister, 
NBC Vice President in Charge of Station Relations, 
announced today. 

WIKK is owned by the Community Service Broad¬ 
casting Company and operates on a frequency of 
1330 kilocycles with a power of 5*000 watts from 
6 a.m. to Midnight, EDT, daily including Sunday. 
Ben McLaughlin is general manager of the station. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/l^/5^ 







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July 14, 1954 

^Co - — - --- - ——- 

'COMMENT' PROGRAM TO BECOME NBC RADIO FEATURE 

■A - -A -A - "A 

COMMENT, the NBC News Department's weekly television program 

of news analysis by noted commentators and correspondents, will become 
an NBC Radio feature also starting Monday, July 1 9 (NBC Radio network 
except WNBC, 10:30-11 p.m., EDT). "Comment" will continue on NBC-TV 
(network including VJNBT) Mondays, 8:30-9 p.m., EDT, 

The topic for July 19 will be "Communism — the menace home 
and abroad." The participants on the half-hour Radio and TV program 
will be Raymond P. Brandt, chief Washington correspondent for the St. 
Louis Post Dispatch, commenting on "The American Communist"; Joseph C. 
Harsch, NBC Washington correspondent, talking on "The International 
Conspiracy"; Jim Robinson, NBC Far Eastern correspondent, who will fly 
in from Hanoi, Indo China, to discuss "A Case History of the Red Ag¬ 
gression in the Far East"; and Henry Cassidy, NBC commentator and 
former correspondent in Russia, commenting on "Communist Roots in the 
Kremlin." 

"Comment" has been praised by critics and public for 
"news coverage and analysis in depth" and for "news significance, not 
merely facts." It is produced by the NBC News Department under the 
overall supervision of William R. McAndrew, manager of NBC News and 
Special Events, and originates in the NBC studios at the Sheraton Park 
Hotel, Washington, D.C. 


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PRESS DEPARTMENT 


NBC-TV AND RADIO PROGRAMS 
SENATOR FULBRIGHT TO ’MEET THE PRESS’ 


Senator William Fulbright (D.-Ark.), a member of the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee, will MEET THE PRESS Sunday, July 18 (NBC- 
TV, 6 p.m., EOT; NBC Radio, 10:30 p.m., EOT) . Ha will be interviewed 
by a panel of newsmen including Richard Wilson of the Cowles Newspaper 
publications and May Craig of the Portland (Maine) Press-Herald. Ned 
Brooks of the NBC Washington News Bureau will be moderator. 

-o- 

PROGRAM CHANGE : SENATOR FLANDERS ON 'YOUTH WANTS TO KNOW' 

Senator Ralph E. Flanders (R.-Vt.), member of the Senate Armed 
Services Committee and the Senate Finance Committee, will be interviewed 
by teen-age students on Theodore Granik's YOUTH WANTS TO KNOW program 
Saturday. July 17 , 7 = 30 p.m., EDT on NBC-TV; and Sunday, July .^S, 

2:30 p.m., EOT, on NBC Radio. Senator Flanders will appear in place of 
the previously announced guest, Attorney General Herbert Brownell Jr., 

who will visit the program at a later date. 

-o- 

SENATORS TO DEBATE PRESIDENT'S FARM PROGRAM 

"Should Congress Adopt the President's Farm Program?" will be 

the question to be debated by two prominent senators on Theodore 

Granik's AMERICAN FORUM OF THE AIR Sunday, July l8_(NBC-TV, 4 p.m., 

EOT; and NBC Radio, 6 p.m., EDT). 

They are Senator George D. Aiken (R.-Vt.), chairman of the 

Senate Agriculture and Forestry Committee and member of the Senate For¬ 
eign Relations Committee, and Senator Clinton P. Anderson (D.-N.M.), 
member of the Senate Agriculture and Forestry Committee and the Senate 

Interior and Insular Affairs Committee. 

* * # 


(The programs will originate in Washington, D.cj 

-o-- _ NBC-New York, 


7/1V5^ 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


































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TRADE NEWS 


July 15, 1954 

-— # 

ARMOUR AND PET MILK TO ALTERNATE AS SPONSORS OF NEW 

SATURDAY NIGHT COMEDY SHOW STARRING GEORGE GOBEL 

-if-*5? - # 

Armour and Company and the Pet Milk Company have signed as 

alternate week sponsors of a bright new NBC-TV Saturday night program 
starring comedian George Gobel, George H. Frey, NBC Vice President in 
charge of Television Network Sales, announced today. 

The show, which will be slotted three out of four Saturdays 
in the 10-10:30 p.m., EST time spot starting Oct. 2, joins a power- 
packed Saturday night line-up of new and established hit programs that 
NBC has scheduled for the Fall. 

Foote, Cone & Belding is the agency for Armour and Company, 
and Gardner Advertising Company is the agency for the Pet Milk Company. 

Here is how NBC-TV’s Saturday night schedule shapes up to 
offer the most exciting viewing for that evening in the history of TV: 

7:30-8 p.m., EST -- ETHEL AND ALBERT, domestic situation 
comedy starring Peg Lynch and Alan Bunce, which became a pop¬ 
ular feature in this time spot on NBC-TV last season. 

8-8:30 p.m., EST -- THE MICKEY ROONEY SHOW, a new comedy 
series starring the youthful veteran of the movies, starting 
Aug. 28, 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANT, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 








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2 - George Gobel 


8:30-9 p.m., EST — To be announced. / 

9- 9:30 p.m., EST -- THE IMOGENE COCA SHOW, in which the 
impish co-star of the old "Your Show of Shows" will be star¬ 
red in a new comedy series of her own, starting Oct. 2. 

(Three out of four Saturdays). 

9:30-10 p.m., EST -- Completely new comedy shows star¬ 
ring Jimmy Durante and Donald O'Connor on alternate weeks, 
starting Oct. 2. (Three out of four Saturdays). 

10- 10:30 p.m., EST -- A new comedy series starring 
George Gobel, starting Oct. 2. (Three out of four Satur¬ 
days) . 

10:30-11 p.m., EST -- YOUR HIT PARADE, ever popular, 
long established and prize-winning production reviewing the 
nation’s hit tunes of the week. 

And every fourth Saturday from 9-10:30 p.m., EST, NBC- 
TV will present one in a series of color "spectaculars," in 
which producer Max Liebman will offer the top stars of Broad¬ 
way, the films and television in 90-minute extravaganzas 
ranging over the entire field of entertainment. 

As the latest addition to this line-up, comedian George Gobel 
is one of the most widely-heralded young comics to come along in years. 
A scries of seven guest appearances on NBC-TV's "Saturday Night Revue 
during the Summer of 1953 first brought him to the attention of the 
country's TV viewers, and since then he has made several appearances 
on other NBC-TV programs, including "Colgate Comedy Hour, The Spike 
Jones Show" and "Who Said That?" His emergence as star of his own 
show has been eagerly anticipated by critics and public alike. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/15/54 






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NBC TRADE NEWS 


STANDARD BRANDS BUYS MONDAY TIME SPOT ON 'HOWDY DOODY' 

Standard Brands, Inc., of New York, one of the veteran 
sponsors of NBC-TV's high-rated daytime show for youngsters, HOWDY 
DOODY, will be back again on the program in the Fall. 

Announcement was made today that Standard Brands has 
bought the 5:30-6 p.m., EDT period on Mondays for 39 weeks, starting 
Sept. 20. Products to be advertised are Royal Gelatin and Puddings, 
and Blue Bonnet Margarine. The order was placed through Ted Bates 
& Company. William Martin is the NBC account executive. 

Starring Bob Smith, "Howdy Doody" is seen Monday through 

Friday from 5:30-6 p.m., EDT. 

-o- 

WGR-TV TO GO ON AIR AUG. 14 AS BASIC AFFILIATE OF NBC 

Station WGR-TV, Channel 2 in Buffalo, N.Y., is scheduled 
to start commercial operations on Saturday, Aug. 14, as a basic 
affiliate of tie National Broadcasting Company's television network. 

The new station will go on the air with 100,000 watts 
power, offering outstanding coverage and service to 365,000 tele¬ 
vision homes in the important Niagara frontier market, which in¬ 
cludes Buffalo and Niagara Falls. George F. Goodyear is president 
of Niagara Frontier Amusement Corp., owner of the station. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/15/54 










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NBC-TV NEWS 


PAUL MacALISTER, NOTED INTERIOR ARCHITECT AND DECORATOR, 

TO APPEAR ON 'HOME* AS ADVISOR TO VIEWERS 

Interior decorator and architect Paul MacAlister will ap¬ 
pear regularly on the HOME show (NBC-TV, Mondays-Fridays, 11 a.m.- 
12 noon, EDT), beginning the week of Aug. 9, as consultant an the 
subjects of architecture, interior design and color in the home. 

MacAlister's series of appearances on "Home” is planned 
to offer direct help to viewers in crystalizing their own ideas about 
what they want to accomplish in decorating a house or a room. He 
will show how to work out plans for decoration and how to carry out 
these plans; how to choose color schemes, arrange furniture, build 
furniture, make lighting arrangements and select wallpaper, draperies 
and room accessories. 

Twice national president of the Industrial Designers 
Institute and now a Fellow of that organization, MacAlister is a 
graduate of the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia 
School of Industrial Art, Yale School of Architecture and the Ecole 

des Beaux Arts at Fontainebleau, France. 

Head of his own designing firm, first in New York and more 
recently in Chicago, MacAlister produced the first regularly 
scheduled television program devoted entirely to home planning over 
station WNBT, New York, prior to World War II, and again in 1946 
following the war. In 1949 he had two programs -- "Plan a Room" 
and "interior Decoration" -- over WGN-TV in Chicago, In 1952 he 
created the program, "Rooms for Improvement," on WNBQ in Chicago, 
and a series titled "Planning Your Home" was aired over WBKB 
early this year. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/15/54 














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NBC RADIO NEWS 


NBC RADIO TO BROADCAST TALK BY GENERAL RIDGWAY 
AT FIRST SESSION OF AMERICAN ASSEMBLY 

Gen. Matthew Ridgway's address before the opening session of 
the American Assembly's three-day conference at Arden House, Harriman, 
N.Y., on Friday, July 30 , will be broadcast by NBC Radio (network ex¬ 
cept WNBC) from 10:30 to 11 p.m., EDT. 

The theme of this year’s conference will be "The United 
States’ Stake in the U.N." General Ridgway’s talk will deal with 
this country’s position in the world today from a defensive and 
strategic viewpoint. 

The American Assembly, a non-partisan conference and research 
program dealing with national problems, was established at Columbia 
University in 1950 by President Eisenhower, then president of the 
University. At this year's conference, about 70 leading citizens 
from all sections of the country will examine the potentialities for 
good or bad in the proposal for a United States Charter Review Confer¬ 
ence. Such a proposal will automatically be placed on the agenda of 
the U.N. General Assembly in 1955> 10 years after ratification of 
the original charter. 

General Ridgway's address will be recorded earlier i: - : the 
evening for presentation at 10:30 p.m., EDT. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/15/54 









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NBC-TV NEWS 


TEEN-AGERS ORCHESTRA (13 BOYS AND A GIRL) WINS 

1 AMATEURS OF THE YEAR 1 TITLE 

^,___——— -<5^ 

The Charles Masters* Teen-Agers, an orchestra composed of 14 

high school students of Dureyea, Pa., today were named ’’amateurs of 

the year" by a nationwide vote. 

The Teen-Agers - 13 boys and £ girl, a trumpeter — were 

among the outstanding amateur performers who competed in the annual 

"Battle of Champions" at Madison Square Garden on Saturday, June 19, 

sponsored by TED MACK*S ORIGINAL AMATEUR HOUR. 

A half-hour of the two-and-a-half-hour Garden program was 

televised in the "Amateur Hour’s" regular time spot on NBC-TV (Satur 
days, 8:30 to 9 p.m., EDT). 

Six acts competed on the air for the honor of being selected 

"amateurs of the year." The televiewing audience all over the country, 

through telephone and written votes, which have finally been tabulated, 

decided that the "Teen-Agers" were the outstanding act, entitled to 

the $2,000 cash prize award and the title. 

Organized in September, 1952, by Charles Masters, music 

instructor in Duryea public schools for 27 years, the band first 
appeared on the "Original Amateur Hour" Jan. 16, 1954, and was 
an immediate hit with the program’s nationwide audience. It won first 
place on the program three weeks in succession to qualify for the 

'^Battle of Champions" at the Garden. 

Jimmy Stevens, a tap dancer, of 699 Ellicott Street, Buffalo, 

N.Y., was second prize winner, and Michael McCarthy, tenor, a member 
of the New York police department, was voted third prize winner. 


NBC-New York, 7/15/54 










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PR-20 



TELEVISION NEWS 

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EXPANDED STUDIO FACILITIES IN NEW YORK AND HOLLYWOOD 
WILL ENABLE NBC NETWORK TO SCHEDULE 500 HOURS 

OF TV COLOR PROGRAMMING NEXT SEASON 

# - # # - # 

FOR RELEASE TUESDAY A.flL, JULY 20 

As the next major step in its drive toward a full national 
color television broadcast service, the National Broadcasting Company 
is developing additional studio facilities which will permit, by next 
Fall, the production of 12 to 15 hours of live color programs weekly. 
This will enable NBC, at capacity, to schedule more than 500 hours of 
color programming throughout the season, and will give the network 
color broadcast facilities surpassing by at least 300 per cent those of 
any other network. 

Already scheduled are 33 color "spectaculars" -- 90-minute 
high-budgeted productions ranging across the entire field of entertain¬ 
ment and embracing the most distinguished of writers, producers and 
stars. The "spectaculars" alone will provide 49? hours of top-flight 
programming through the season. 

In addition, other live commercial programs will be produced 
in color on a regular or intermittent basis. The NBC color mobile 
unit, with its outdoor color shows, will play an important role in the 
Fall schedule, and a substantial number of color film programs will be 
telecast. 


(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

















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2 - TV Color Programming 


The network’s color plans for the Fall were described by 
Sylvester L. Weaver Jr., President of NBC, as "a major part of the 
network's master blueprint for the quick development of commercial 
color television.” At the half-way mark in color's Introductory Year, 
Mr. Weaver pointed out, NBC, alone among the networks, has been muster¬ 
ing all of its facilities to translate color television from a promise 

to a reality for the American people. 

The FCC decision of Dec. 17, 1953, which authorized compati¬ 
ble color television, followed by less than two weeks the appointment 
of NBC’s new management team of Mr. Weaver as President and Robert W. 
Sarnoff as Executive Vice President. One of the first Weaver-Sarnoff 
orders was for full speed ahead on color. 

Out of that order have come these significant accomplishments 

in color television: 

1. NBC color programs are being broadcast over 31 af¬ 
filiated stations across the United States. By October, 
with further progress in the color-conversion of network 
lines, 64 stations will be broadcasting in color, making 
colorcasts available in areas comprising 78 par cent of the 
nation's television homes. 

2. By September, NBC will have expended $15,000,000 in 
research funds earmarked for making a commercial broadcasting 
reality of the compatible color system pioneered and devel¬ 
oped by NBC’s parent company, the Radio Corporation of 
America. This figure is in addition to the $25,000,000 al¬ 
ready spent by RCA in the development of the system, on which 
present all-industry FCC standards are based. 

(more) 



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3 - TV Color Programming 


3. NBC, which for years earlier had been producing pro¬ 
grams in compatible color, either on the air with temporary 
FCC authorization or on a "dry run" basis, was the only net¬ 
work ready when FCC approval came. Major commercial programs 
were put on the air at the average rate of more than two a 
week, with the purpose of giving all NBC programs at least 
one exposure in color as part of the Introductory Year plan 
activated by Mr. Weaver and Mr. Sarnoff. NBC presented more 
than 80 color programs during the first six-month period. 

4. Commercial programs are being, and have been, pro¬ 
duced in color on a rotating basis. This rotational schedule 
was designed to give all NBC production units an indoctrina¬ 
tion in color, and to acquaint clients and advertising agen¬ 
cies with the potentialities of compatible color television. 

5. NBC was the first network to transmit a color pro¬ 
gram from coast to coast, with the New Year’s Day pickup 
from Pasadena, which was viewed in full color in 21 cities 
from coast to coast. 

6. Commercial clinics have been held for advertising 
agencies, to acquaint their creative staffs with the power 
of the new medium as a selling tool. More than 35 agencies 
participated in these clinics, and more than 200 products 
were handled in the building of test commercials in color. 

7. Indoctrination seminars were held for personnel of 
NBC and its affiliates, for the purpose of making available 
to the entire network the techniques developed by the NBC 
color corps in the areas of staging, lighting, costuming, 
makeup and scenic design. 

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4 - TV Color Programming 


8. Special demonstrations and seminars were also held 
for various groups, such as film producers and package 
designers, to acquaint these groups with standards developed 
by NBC research in color. NBC’s undisputed leadership in 
color production was underlined when the network was invited 
to send its color team to conduct a color television workshop 
of the Radio and Television Executives Society. 

9. An NBC mobile color unit, custom-designed by NBC 
engineers, has been rolling around the United States picking 
up various events in color. Its first use was in the color¬ 
cast of the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena on Jan. 1, 

195^. Subsequently it has covered such a variety of subjects 
as the cherry blossoms in Washington, prize fights in Madison 
Square Garden, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Grant’s Farm, 

the famed Busch estate in St. Louis, Whitnall Park in Milwaukee, 
and the Governor's Mansion in Columbus, Ohio. 

The backbone of NBC's Fall color schedule will be the 
"spectaculars." Produced by Leland Hayward and Max Liebman, these 
super-productions will bring into the home a series of entertainment 
features of a scope never before undertaken in television on a regular 
basis. 

These spectaculars, which will rotate among Saturday, Sun¬ 
day and Monday on a three-out-of-four-week basis, will begin on 
Sept. 12 with Betty Hutton making her television debut. As a special 
vehicle for Miss Hutton, producer Max Liebman has commissioned the 
writing of a musical comedy with an original book. 


(more) 





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<5 - TV Color Programming 


The NBC color mobile unit is now on a "Color Caravan" tour 
of 10 cities. This Fall it will bring a series of special events of 
entertainment and cultural interest from all parts of America. 

Color film programs will use recently developed color film 
projectors. NBC has carried on an intensive research program on color 
film, and from this research have come standards which have been made 
available to the entire film industry. Both theatrical color film and 
specially-produced color-television film will be broadcast, as dic¬ 
tated by NBC program requirements. 

Rapid expansion of NBC colorcasting facilities is now under 
way in New York and Hollywood. In New York, the huge Brooklyn studios 
acquired from Warner Brothers will be fully equipped for color by 
September and will carry a large part of the color production load. 

In Hollywood, a new color studio is being built and equipped at a cost 
of $3,600,000 and will be ready by Jan. 1, providing an added color 
production capacity. 

Existing color studio facilities in New York are the Colonial 
Theatre, world’s first fully equipped compatible color studio, and 
Studio 3-H in Radio City. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/16/5^ 









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’BIG STORY* EXPOSE TO HELP 50,000 EMPLOYES 
IN DEPARTMENT STORES TO SPOT SHOPLIFTERS 






The BIG STORY dramatization of a newspaperwoman's expose 
of shoplifting methods proved so informative that a kinescope of the 
NBC-TV telecast has been purchased by the Associated Merchandising 


Corporation for the enlightenment of 50,000 department store 

employes throughout the country. 

The actual experience of Trudy Prokop, at that time 
woman's editor of the Philadelphia Daily News, was presented on 

i "Big Story" Friday, Feb. 26, 195^ (9 P»ni., EST). It was seen by 
executives of the Merchandising Corporation, who felt that it 
could provide many useful tips in helping department store sales 


personnel to spot shoplifters. 

The kinescope will be used jointly by protection 

1 managers and training directors of 26 department stores all over 
the country. Miss Prokop, who is much interested in the project, 
plans to make personal appearances at some of the showings of 
the kinescope. 

"Big Story," now on Summer vacation, will return to 
NBC-TV Friday, Sept, 10 (9 P.m.j EDT). It regularly presents 
dramatizations of authentic experiences of newspaper reporters 
and editors in covering their most outstanding assignments. 


NBC-New York, 7/l6/5^ 
















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TRADE NEWS 


July 19 j 1954 


* 


■Mr 


SPONSORS ORDER 153 MORE PARTICIPATIONS IN 'TODAY 
- ft - 






Five new orders and one renewal for a total of 153 parti¬ 
cipations were announced Monday, July 19> f° r TODAY, as NBC-TV s 
pioneering early morning news and special events program continues to 

add to its already impressive list of clients . 

Grove Laboratories Inc. of St. Louis, maker of Fitch Shampoo, 

has ordered 78 participations, beginning Oct. 4, through Harry B. 

Cohen Advertising Co., Inc., of New York. 

Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corp. of New York, manufacturer of 

textile products, ordered 17 participations, starting Sept. 13j 

through McCann-Erickson Inc. of New York, 

The American Express Company of New York ordered 15 parti¬ 
cipations, starting July 21, through Benton & Bowles Inc. of New York. 

Prince Gardner Company, Inc., of St. Louis, maker of leather 
wallets and billfolds, ordered 12 participations, starting Nov. 26, 

through Grey Advertising Agency Inc. of New York. 

Campbell Soup Company of Camden, N.J., ordered five parti¬ 
cipations, starting Nov. 1, through Grey Advertising Agency Inc. of 

New York, 

The renewal came from Coast Fisheries Division of the Quaker 
Oats Company of Wilmington, Calif., for 26 participations, starting 
Aug. 24, through Lynn Baker Inc. of New York. 

"Today” stars Dave Garroway and is seen Monday through Fri¬ 
day from 7-9 a.m., EDT and CDT. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 












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NBC-TV NEWS 


NBC-TV TO CARRY HERBERT HOOVER'S 80TH BIRTHDAY ADDRESS 

An address by former President Herbert C. Hoover 
on the occasion of his 80th birthday will be telecast 
by NBC-TV Tuesday, Aug. 10 (5:30-6 p.m., EDT), from a 
celebration to be given in his honor at his birthplace 
in West Branch, Iowa. The address will climax an all- 
day series of anniversary events which have been planned 
by a committee of Iowa's leading citizens. 

The special telecast will cancel ’’Howdy Doody" 
on this date only. 


-o- 

AN NBC TV AND RADIO PROGRAM 

TEEN-AGE STUDENTS TO QUESTION SENATOR MORSE 
Senator Wayne Morse, Oregon Republican who prefers to sit 
as an Independent in the Senate, will be interviewed by teen-age 
students on Theodore Granik's YOUTH WANTS TO KNOW program Saturday, 
July 24 , 7:30 p.m., EDT on NBC-TV; and Sunday, July 25, 2:30 p.m., 

EDT on NBC Radio. The program originates in the NBC studios in 
Washington, D.C. 

Senator Morse will be questioned On foreign policy, chances 
of a GOP victory in the November elections and other current issues. 
The unrehearsed questions will be asked by Washington area high school 
students who will participate in the program under auspices of the 
American Legion. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/19/54 

















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TRADE NEWS 


July 20, 1954 

ATTENTION, SPORTS EDITORS 


NBC TO TELECAST FULL-HOUR SPORTS SHOW, FROM NEW YORK 
AND VANCOUVER, WITH BANNISTER-LANDY MILE 
'DREAM RACE' AS MAIN EVENT 

NBC-TV will frame its exclusive telecast of the Roger 
Bannister-Jack Landy "dream race" at the British Empire Games in 
Vancouver, B.C., on Saturday, Aug. 7, with a full-hour program 
originating in both New York and Vancouver and featuring some great 

names in American sport (5 to 5 p.m., EDT). 

Ben Grauer, veteran NBC commentator, will open the program 
in New York, playing host to a distinguished group of guests. These 
will include Kenneth (Tug) Wilson, president, and Asa Bushnell, 
secretary, of the U.S. Olympic Committee; Wes Santee, America's 
champion miler, now stationed at the Marine Corps Base in Quantico, 
Va.; and Jesse Abramson, track and field expert for the New York 

Herald Tribune. 

Santee, "the Kansas Comet," himself is regarded a serious 
threat to the four-minute mile, as he has been clocked in 4:00.6. 
Bannister, now a doctor, became the first man in track history to 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 















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break the four-minute mile mark when, on May 6, he ran the distance at 
Oxford in 3:59.4. Landy, a 24-year-old Australian, shaded 1.4 
seconds from this world record in Turku, Finland, on June 21, when 

he was clocked in an amazing 3 : 58 . 

Films of both these remarkable performances will be shown 

on the New York portion of the program. 

The arrival at the British Empire Games of the Duke of 
Edinburgh, Queen Elizabeth’s official representative, will immediately 
precede the running of the mile. As soon as the Duke arrives at the 
stadium, NBC-TV will switch to Vancouver and commentator Steve Douglas, 
formerly an NBC sportscaster in Washington, D.C. 

Bannister and Landy, despite the immense distinction each 
bears as a competitor, will not have the track to themselves, by any 
means. Many experts feel that New Zealand’s Murray Halberg, who al¬ 
ready has a 4:04.4 mile to his credit, represents a very serious 
threat. 

Transmission of the telecast, which will be seen in the U.S. 
exclusively on NBC-TV, was arranged in cooperation with the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation. Although a CBC-TV crew will make the actual 
telecast, the signal will be beamed from Vancouver to Seattle, thence 
via closed circuit across the U.S. to Buffalo. There it will be fed 
to the NBC-TV and CBC-TV networks. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/20/54 








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Attention: Sports 'Editors 




sf __ __ . ——-- - - 

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$2f>,000 PRIZE FOR AN ACE ON THE LINKS 

Top Golfers to Compete in ’Today's 1 Second Annual Hole-in-One 
Contest at Tam 0 Shanter Club; Other Prizes Offered 

. _ ft # —-- * 

A prize of $25,000 will be offered by NBC-TV's TODAY pro¬ 
gram to the golfer who sinks an ace in the program's Second Annual 
Hole-in-One Golf Tournament, to be held Monday morning , Aug. 9 at 
Chicago’s Tam 0 Shanter Country Club. 

In addition to the hole-in-one money, the George S. May Co. 
of Chicago will put up $5,000 prize money to be divided among golfers 
hitting closest to the pin with the best of two shots* Thirty-six 
top professional golfers will try for the ace from approximately 150 
yards on the l6th hole at Tam 0 Shanter. They include 24 leading 
American male money winners of this year, among them Ed Furgol, 
National Open champ; Lloyd Mangrum, host pro at Tam 0 Shanter, 

Julius Boros, Proky Oliver and Bob Toski* Six top American golfers 
and six outstanding foreign golfers will round out the card. 

First prize for the shot closest to the pin will be $2,000, 
Second money will be $1,000, with successive prizes in a descending 
scale of $500, $400, $300, $200 and $100. The remaining $500 will be 
held in reserve to be given as $25 awards to golfers landing a ball 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, 


NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 


30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YOR 

















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within a 12-foot circle around the cup. Thus it is possible for a 
contestant to win a total of $27,025 - for sinking an ace, taking 
first prize money and picking up $25 for being within the 12 -foot 

circle• 

The 1953 tournament was won "by Jay Hebert of Woodmere, 

L.I., N.Y«, whose second shot rolled to within three feet, siyv inches 
of the pin, for a $2,000 prize. The contest is popular with name 
golfers, who have only to rise earlier than usual to compete in the 
televised event for a chance to win the kind of money they usually 
pursue through four days and 72 holes of high tension tourney golf. 

"Today," the early morning news and special feature 
program on which the Hole-in-One event will be telecast, is seen 
Monday through Friday, 7-9 a.m., EDT and CDT, over the NBC-TV 

network. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/20/5^ 





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• 20 


COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


NBC COLOR TELECASTS FOR WEEK 
(July 25-31) 

(NBC-TV Network Including WNBT) 

Wednesday, July 28 

7-9 a.m., EDT and CDT, on TODAY, and 

11 a.m. - 12 Noon, EDT, on HOME; An 8-to-15 minute pickup by 
NBC color mobile unit from Philadelphia rookie fire demonstration, 
Thursday, July 29 

10-10:30 p.m., EDT: THE MARRIAGE, starring Hume Cronyn 
and Jessica Tandy, 

Friday, July 30 

7-9 a.m., EDT and CDT, on TODAY, and 

11 a.m,-12 Noon, EDT, on HOME: An 8-to-15 minute pickup by 

NBC color mobile unit from Philadelphia Art Museum. 

* * * * 

(WNBT only) 

Monday, July 26 through Friday, July 30 

1:30-2 p.m., EDT: HERE'S LOOKING AT YOU, with Richard 
Willis. 



o 


NBC-New York, 7/20/54 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 2 0, NEW YORK 













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GALA BON VOYAGE PARTY MARKS START OF 
J, FRED MUGGS' TRIP AROUND WORLD 


J. Fred Muggs, the world-traveling chimpanzee from NBC-TV's 
TODAY program,took off last night (July 20) on the first leg of his 
junket. Accompanied by his co-owners, Roy Waldron and Bud Mennella; 
Mary Kelly of the "Today" staff and cameraman Si Avnet, the simian 
star departed from New York's International Airport via Pan American 
World Airways "Clipper" at 6 p.m., EDT, 

I Muggs was cheered on his way by a bon voyage party attended 

by the press, the "Today" production staff and Lilo, the French musi¬ 
cal comedy star. The group, numbering well over 100, assembled at the 
airport. Amid the popping of flash bulbs and the whirring of movie 
cameras, Muggs and Lilo got their heads together while the French star 
told the chimp star how to comfort himself on what has come to be 
known as the "Chimps Elysees," 

In the best of showbusiness tradition, the "Today" program 
this morning (July 21) carried on without Muggs, consoled by the knowl- 

I edge that soon the exclusive film stories of Muggs' adventures in 
exotic places will be winging back to the U.S.A, These films will be 
shown on "Today" for all the Muggs fans who are following the progress 
of his global circuit. 

The early morning news and special feature program is seen 

{ Monday through Friday, 7-9 a.m., EDT and CDT, over the NBC-TV network. 

NBC-New York, 7/21/54 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 















NBC TRADE NEWS 


'MISS FRANCES' TO PRODUCE 'DING DONG SCHOOL' 

#- -3C- -# 

Dr. Frances Horwich will take over active production of NBC- 

TV's DING DONG SCHOOL on Aug. 2 in addition to continuing as the pro¬ 
gram's "Miss Frances." 

At that time Leonard Salvo Jr. will become the program's 
director. Reinald Werrenrath Jr., who has been the producer-director, 
will devote his attention to other Chicago-originated NBC-TV shows. 

-o- 

DRAMA-DOCUMENT TO MARK FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF KOREAN 
ARMISTICE PACT, WITH FREDRIC MARCH AS NARRATOR 

Film and stage star Fredric March will be narrator for "The 
Long Walk," a drama-documentary to be broadcast by NBC Radio Tuesday, 
July 27 (network except WNBC, 10:30-11 p.m., EDT), in observance of 
the first anniversary of the signing of the Korean armistice agreement. 

The script tells a true story of what has happened in Korea, 
what is happening now and what perhaps is going to happen. It under¬ 
scores the work of the United Nations Korean Reconstruction Agency. 

Its title comes from "Arrirang," a folk song that has been a tradition 
in Korea for centuries and is today a symbol of the country's fight 
for freedom and a united independent homeland. 

"The Long Walk" will be produced in cooperation with United 
Nations Radio. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/21/5** 













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HAL CRANTON IS APPOINTED SENIOR WRITER 
OF NBC-TV NETWORK SALES PRESENTATIONS 

Hal Cranton, formerly assistant director of national pro¬ 
motion for the Broadcast Advertising Bureau, Inc., has been appointed 
senior writer of NBC-TV network sales presentations, David H. Hedley, 
manager of NBC-TV sales presentations, said today. In his new 
post, Cranton will be assigned to write presentations exclusively 
for account executives of NBC's Eastern Sales Division. 

Before working for BAB, Cranton was a presentation writer 
for CBS Radio spot sales. He also was an advertising and promotion 
writer for ABC, and in 1950 was writer and director of "The Bobby 
Benson TV Show" on WOR-TV in New York. 

Cranton, his wife and their four-year-old daughter, Nina, 
live in the Bronx, New York. 

-o- 


SENATOR CAPEHART TO 'MEET THE PRESS' 

IV 

Senator Homer Capehart (R.-Ind.), a member of the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee and the Senate Banking and Currency Com¬ 
mittee, will MEET THE PRESS Sunday, July 25 (NBC-TV, 6 p.m., EDT; NBC 
Radio, 10:30 p.m., EDT). 

He will be interviewed by newsmen Richard Wilson of the 
Cowles Newspapers Publications, May Craig of the Portland (Maine) 
Press-Herald and Lawrence Spivak, producer and regular panel member 
of "Meet the Press." Ned Brooks of the NBC Washington News Bureau will 
be moderator. The program will originate in the NBC studios of the 
Sheraton Park Hotel in Washington, D.C. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/21/54 










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TELEVISION 


NEWS 


MARY MARTIN WILL STAR IN FIRST LELAND HAYWARD MONDAY NIGHT 
COLOR EXTRAVAGANZA ON NBC-TV IN NOEL COWARD DRAMAS OCT. l8 


Three ’Tonight at 8:30' One-Act Plays Will Have David Niven, 
Joseph Cotten, Cyril Ritchard in Roles Opposite Miss Martin 

Mary Martin will star in the first of Leland Hayward’s 
Monday night color extravaganzas on NBC-TV, Oct, 18 (8-9:30 p.m,, 

EST), playing the lead in three playlets of Noel Coward’s "Tonight at 
8 : 30 ." 

David Niven, Joseph Cotten and Cyril Ritchard have been 
cast opposite Miss Martin in "Red Peppers," "Still Life" and "Shadow 
Play," the threc playlets Hayward has chosen from the nine one-act 
plays which comprised the original "Tonight at 8:30." 

"Red Peppers" is the story of an interlude, between acts, 
of a quarrel-picking, husband-and-wife dance team, George Pepper 
(Cyril Ritchard) and Lily Pepper (Miss Martin). 

Ritchard, an Australian stage star and director, is compara¬ 
tively new to the American scene. He appeared with Katharine Hepburn 
in George Bernard Shaw’s "The Millionairess," and is currently star¬ 
ring with Miss Martin in "Peter Pan" in San Francisco. Ritchard also 
directed Shaw’s "Misalliance," "The John Murray Anderson Almanac" and 
the Metropolitan Opera version of "The Barber of Seville." 

In "Red Peppers" Miss Martin portrays a petulant, caustic- 
tongued wife. "Still Life," later adapted as the movie hit, "Brief 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











2 - Leland Hayward 


Encounter," casts her in the role of a respectable English housewife 
who suddenly finds herself in love with a physician (played by Joseph 
Cotten). Cotten is noted for his performances in the Broadway play, 
"Sabrina Fair," and the motion pictures, "Citizen Kane" and "Shadow 
of a Doubt." 

"Shadow Play" is told in the fantastic dream of a socially 
impeccable wife (Miss Martin), whose husband (David Niven) has unex¬ 
pectedly announced his desire for a divorce. In her dream, she 
re-lives her courtship and marriage and strives to understand the rea¬ 
sons for her husband’s divorce demands, Niven’s great motion picture 
triumphs include the hits, "Stairway to Heaven" and "Dodsworth." 

"Tonight at 8:30" brings Miss Martin back to the nation’s 
television screens in a presentation of the magnitude of Hayward’s 
unforgettable "Ford Anniversary Show." The selection of Miss Martin, 
veteran stage and screen actors Niven and Cotten and,the newcomer 
Ritchard, are in keeping with Hayward’s promise to bring new and 
established show personalities to the television audience in fresh and 
exciting vehicles. 

Coward’s "Tonight at 8:30" was a sensational hit in London 
and New York, opening in New York in 1936, with the late Gertrude 
Lawrence starred in "Red Peppers," "Still Life" and "Shadow Play." 
Coward played the male leads in all of the one-act series. 

Scenery for the color extravaganza will be designed by Cecil 
Beaton, famed British interior decorator, and executed by William 
Molyneux, NBC scenic designer. 

Music will be under direction of Jay Blackton, who conducted 
the orchestra for such hits as "Annie Get Your Gun," "Oklahoma,*", "Wish 

(more) 





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You Were Here" and "Call Me Madam." He currently is working on the 
movie version of "OklahomaJ" 

The Hayward series of 13 shows will he seen every fourth 
Monday, beginning Oct. 18. The shows will originate in compatible 
color from NBC’s Brooklyn Studio, world’s largest color television 
studio, and will be seen in black and white on the nation’s monochrome 

sets. 


Richard Whorf will be the associate producer for the Hayward 
productions, 

The Ford Motor Company and the Radio Corporation of America 

will share sponsorship -- 45 minutes each -- of the 13 programs. The 

agency is Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. 

The Hayward series schedule: 

Oct. 18 
Nov. 15 
Dec. 13 
Jan. 10 
Feb. 7 

March 7 
Apr. 4 
May 2 
May 30 
June 27 
July 25 
Aug. 22 

(One additional 
date to be announced) 


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NBC-New York, 7/22/54 




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TRADE NEWS 


July 22, 1954 

NBC RADIO'S 'BOB HOPE SHOW’ RENEWED BY AMERICAN DAIRY: 

SERIES TO BE HEARD IN NEW THURSDAY TIME-SPOT 

The American Dairy Association, Inc., has renewed THE BOB 
HOPE SHOW for the 1954-55 season on the full NBC Radio Network, it 
was announced today. The new contract calls for moving the Hope night¬ 
time stanzas from Friday to Thursday nights in the 8:30 to 9 p.m., 

EST, time-spot, starting Oct. 28. 

The program, which marks Hope's 17th season on the air, will 
be used to promote the increased use of all dairy products. The ad¬ 
vertising agency is Campbell-Mithun Inc., of Minneapolis. 

Hope, who is under exclusive radio and TV contract to NBC, 
has long reigned as one of the great comedy personalities in show- 
business . 

The comic first broke into radio in 1932. On Sept. 27, 

1938, he began his own NBC radio series, which for years has rated 
among the top programs in radio. He made his TV debut over NBC on 
Easter Sunday, 1950. 

A movie star with many top pictures to his credit, Hope has 
also starred in Broadway musicals and on the vaudeville stage. English 
by birth, he is a naturalized American citizen and calls Cleveland 
his hometown. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 





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2 - Hope 

A master of the quick gag and fast repartee, Hope made his 
first professional stage appearance as half of a male dance team in 
a Fatty Arbuckle show in Cleveland. He and his partner, George 
Byrne, played in vaudeville, musical comedy road shows and on Broad¬ 
way. During a theatre engagement, Hope was asked to announce the 
following week's show. He gagged the announcement with some funny 
remark of his own and the audience roared with laughter. That ended 
his career as a dancer. 

He developed a solo song-and-comedy act, working first in 
vaudeville circuits and later in New York, where he hit the big time 
in such Broadway musicals as "Ballyhoo," "Ziegfeld Follies" and "Red, 
Hot and Blue." Hope is married to the former Dolores Reade. They 
have four adopted children. 


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NBC-New York, 7/22/54 





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TRADE NEWS 


July 22, 1954 

ALLIS-CHALMERS RENEWS ’FARM AND HOME HOUR’ 

ON NBC RADIO FOR TENTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR 

The Allis-Chalmers Manufacturing Company will begin its 
tenth year of sponsorship of the NATIONAL FARM AND HOME HOUR Saturday , 
Sept, 4 (l p,m., EDT), it was announced today by the National Broad¬ 
casting Company, 

The 52-week contract renewal by the makers of tractors and 
farm equipment is for the full NBC Radio Network, The renewal was 
placed through the Bert S, Gittins Advertising Agency, 

The program, in its 26th continuous year on the air, 
emphasizes service and information. It presents on-the-spot agricul¬ 
tural features, farm news and market reports from the U.S, Department 
of Agriculture in Washington, and musical entertainment. 

There are many "firsts" credited to the program including: 
first NBC network program from Chicago; first farm program aired on 
a national network; first program to use extensive remote pickups, 
and first commercial program produced in cooperation with a govern¬ 
ment agency. Secretary Benson is the seventh U,S, agriculture chief 
to use the "National Farm and Home Hour" microphones, 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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In its 25 years on the air, the program has broadcast 
eye-witness reports from hundreds of agricultural events, with 
regular annual visits to such major shows a3 the International 
Livestock Exposition* In recent years the program has presented 
short-waved and recorded farm features from abroad --many reported 
by Everett Mitchell, host of the program, during his world tours* 

A regular feature on the program is a report on farm news and 
markets by Ken Gapen, radio chief of the USDA in Washington. Behind 
the scenes of the veteran farm program are Milton Bliss, NBC's 
agricultural representative, and Herbert Lateau, production 
director. 


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NBC TRADE NEWS 


CONGRESSMEN TO DEBATE ON SESSION’S ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

"What Has the 83 rd Congress Accomplished?" will be the ques¬ 
tion to be debated by two prominent Congressmen on Theodore Granik’s 
AMERICAN FORUM OF THE AIR Sunday, July 25 (NBC-TV, 4 p.m., EDT; and 
NBC Radio, 6 p.m,, EDT). 

They are Representative Hugh Scott (R.-Pa.), member of the 
House Rules Committee, a key figure in the 1952 Eisenhower campaign 
and former chairman of the National Republican Committee; and Repre¬ 
sentative John W. McCormack (D.-Mass.), minority whip of the House 
and member of the Government Operations Committee. The program will 
originate in NBC studios in Sheraton Park Hotel, Washington, D.C. 

-o- 

CLAUDE TRAVERSE TO ADDRESS NORTHWESTERN-NBC TV INSTITUTE 

Claude Traverse, color TV unit manager for NBC, will be the 
principal speaker at the Northwestern University-NBC Television 
Institute banquet at Merchandise Mart, Chicago, Friday, July 30. 

Traverse will discuss the progress made in color TV during 
the past year, and will outline network color programming for the 
coming year. The Institute includes members of the television teach¬ 
ing profession and public relations and advertising executives. 


NBC-New York, 7/22/54 










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TRADE NEWS 


July 23, 1954 

ft —-----_____ 

PERSONS WHO ESCAPED FROM BEHIND THE IRON AND BAMBOO CURTAINS 
TO BE INTERVIEWED ON NEW NBC RADIO SERIES, ’THE WITNESS' 

Dramatic First Person Stories to Be Revealed in Exclusive 
Interviews by NBC Commentator Pauline Frederick 

Exclusive interviews with persons who escaped from behind 
the Iron and Bamboo Curtains will be presented in a new weekly series, 
THE WITNESS, which starts on NBC Radio Sunday, Aug, 1 , 1-1:30 p.m., 
EDT. 

Scientists, diplomats, government officials, army officers, 
all fleeing to America from Communism in their homelands, will offer 
the heretofore untold stories of persons and events in that "other 
world." 

The guests (jnany of whom will have to use pseudonyms to pre¬ 
vent reprisals against family and friends still behind the Iron and 
Bamboo Curtains) will be interviewed by NBC commentator Pauline 
Frederick, winner of the 1953 Alfred I. DuPont Award for Journalism. 

Among the escapees from Communism to appear will be a former 
French officer who spent several months as house guest of Chou En Lai, 
premier of Red China; a Russian electronic expert who taught at 
Moscow's Military Institute of Foreign Languages, scene of training 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YOR 





































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2 - The Witness 


for Russian espionage agents; a German scientist who helped develop 
the Russian MIG fighter-plane; several students who traveled and 
studied in the inner provinces of Russia and Manchuria; and the former 
chief of Harbin, Manchuria, and later the top police official in 

Nanking, China, under the Red regime. 

Wade Arnold will be producer of "The Witness," which will 

originate in the NBC New York studios. 

-o- 



NBC;-New York, 7 / 23/5 ^ 
















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NBC-TV NEWS 


'AMERICAN INVENTORY' HONORED BY AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION 
WITH BL/XESLEE AWARD FOR 'MECHANICAL HEART' TELECAST 


The American Heart Association has honored an NBC television 
program for outstanding reporting on heart and blood vessel diseases. 

The association has named AMERICAN INVENTORY as the tele¬ 
vision winner of its second annual Howard W. Blakeslee Awards, es¬ 
tablished in memory of the late science editor of the Associated 
Press. The awards this year are in four categories -- newspapers, 
magazines, television and books. Each of the four awards is accom¬ 
panied by a $500 cash prize. 

"American Inventory" was cited for "The Mechanical Heart," 
a documentary television program presented on NBC-TV from Harper 
Hospital, Detroit, on Feb. 15* 1953. The program was produced by 
William Hodapp and Robert Wald, and directed by Laurence Schwab Jr., 
with the assistance of the staff of WWJ, Detroit, and the cooperation 
of the General Motors Corporation and the Michigan Heart Association. 

The awards will be presented on Tuesday evening, Sept. 14, 
at a banquet to be held in conjunction with the Second World Congress 
of Cardiology and the 27th scientific sessions of the American Heart 
Association, which will convene in Washington, D.C., Sept. 12-17. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/23/54 











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RCA BUYS SCHEDULE OF SPOTS AND PARTICIPATIONS IN SIX MARKETS 

The Radio Corporation of America has contracted for a series 
of participations and one-minute spots on radio and television for its 
products and services. The campaign starts in six major markets on 

August 2nd, 1954. 

The contract was placed through NBC Spot Sales by Kenyon & 
Eckhardt, advertising agency for RCA. The six markets include: 
WNBC-WNBT, New York; WRC-WNBW, Washington, D.C.; WTAM-WNBK, Cleveland; 
WMAQ-WNBQ, Chicago; KNBC, San Francisco; and KNBH, Los Angeles. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/23/5^ 


publicity department NBC 0 & 0 Stations Division • 30 Rockefeller Plaza, N. Y. 20, N. Y. Cl 7-8300 




















LISSANCE JOINS NBC SPOT SALES 

Appointment of Daniel M. Lissance as manager of sales 
development and research for NBC Spot Sales was announced today by 
H.W. Shepard, manager of new business and promotion. 

"Lissance will be responsible for all research activities 

and for all sales presentations," Shepard said. "He brings to NBC 
Spot Sales a rich background in sales promotion techniques and market 

research." 

Lissance came to NBC Spot Sales from the Emil Mogul Company, 
where he was assistant director of research. For two years before 
that he was research account executive with Grey Advertising (1952- 
1954) and from 1950 to 1952 was with Facts, Inc., as director of 
marketing research. From 1946 to 1950, Lissance was study director 
with the Market Research Company of America, and in 1945-1946 was 
with Columbia University’s Bureau of Applied Social Research. Lissance 
graduated from the College of the City of New York in 1949 with a 
degree in psychology and social science, and did graduate work at the 
New School of Social Research. He is married and lives in New York. 


NBC-New York, 7/23/54 


vhlicity department NBC 0 & 0 Stations Division • SO Rockefeller Plaza, N. Y. 20, N. Y .« Cl 7-8300 





















TRADE NEWS 



July 26, 1954 

HAZEL BISHOP INC. TO SPONSOR MARTHA RAYE SHOWS ON NBC-TV 

Comedienne to Star in Once-a-Month Tuesday Night 
Variety Series During 1954-55 Season 

Hazel Bishop, Inc., of New York, has signed to present 
dynamic comedienne Martha Raye in a series of once-a-month, full-nour 
Tuesday night variety shows to be seen on NBC-TV during the 1954-55 
season, George H. Frey, NBC Vice President in charge of Television 
Network Sales, said today. 

The series, scheduled for the 8-9 p.m. Tuesday time-spot, 
will kick-off Sept. 28 and will be seen every fourth Tuesday there¬ 
after throughout the season. 

Raymond Spector Company, Inc., of New York is the agency 
for Hazel Bishop, Inc., and William Martin is the NBC account execu¬ 
tive . 

The new series will mark Miss Raye’s fourth season as one of 
NBC’s leading comedy stars. During this time, she nas establiohed 
herself as one of the most versatile comic personalities in television, 
to add to her already impressive reputation as an outstanding night¬ 
club and film performer. Until the 1953-54 season, she appeared about 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


















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once a month on NBC-TV's "All Star Revue" series, rotating with other 
name comics. However, the tremendous acclaim from critics and public 
alike prompted NBC to drop the "All Star Revue" title last season for 
her appearances and to present the voluble comedienne in a show of her 
own on a regular basis. 

Her shows for Hazel Bishop color cosmetics will be seen on 
Sept. 28, Oct. 26, Nov. 23, Bee. 21, Jan. 18, Feb. 15, March 15, 

April 12, May 10 and June 7 . 

Milton Berle will star in 20 other shows in that time period 
for the Buick Motor Division of General Motors Corporation, and Bob 
Hope in six for General Foods Corporation. 


-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/26/54 





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July 26, 195 ; 4 


•MY UTOPIA' IS SUBJECT FOR NBC PRESIDENT WEAVER, PROF. BARZUN 
AND PLAYWRIGHT CONNELLY ON NBC RADIO'S 'CONVERSATION' 

Sylvester L. Weaver Jr., President of NBC; Jacques Barzun, 
author and professor of history at Columbia University, and Marc 
Connelly, the noted playwright, will join host Clifton Fadiman in 
CONVERSATION Sunday, Aug. 1 (7i30 p.m., EDT), on NBC Radio. Their 
general theme will be "My Utopia.” 

"Conversation" is a weekly program dedicated to the art 
of good talk. Since its bow on the NBC Radio Network a month ago, 
the talk has turned to what makes us laugh, pet gripes and grouses, 
the compensations of middle age, and American women. Among the 
guest conversationalists have been Bennett Cerf, author-publisher; 
Dr. Bergen Evans, Northwestern University professor of literature; 

A1 Capp, the cartoonist; and humorists H. Allen Smith, Steve Allen 
and Sam Levenson, 


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NBC RADIO TO PRESENT CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
IN POUR CONCERTS, WITH FRITZ REINER CONDUCTING 


FOR RELEASE SUNDAY, AUG, 1 -- 

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra will he heard in four broad¬ 
casts on the NBC Radio network in the 1954-55 season under direction 
of Fritz Reiner, conductor and music director of the orchestra. The 
four concerts will be broadcast on Saturday evenings at 8:30 p.m,, 

EST on Oct. 23, Nov. 20, Dec. 11 and Feb. 12. 

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra broadcasts will be part ofa 

symphonic series of concerts on Saturday evenings which will feature 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 2d concerts, starting Oct. 9 a nd 
continuing -- except for six weeks -- until May. Orchestras for the 

concerts on Jan, 15 and March 12 will be announced. 

Dr. Reiner was appointed regular conductor and music direc¬ 
tor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in the Fall of 1953• He had 
previously been conductor at the Metropolitan Opera, the Pittsburgh 
Symphony, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Cincinnati Symphony and the 
NBC Symphony. Dr. Reiner had a brilliant career in Europe before com 
ing to this country in 1922, He became an American citizen in 1928, 

The Chicago Symphony Orchestra is one of America’s most dis 
tinguished symphonic organizations. It was founded in 1891 by 
Theodore Thomas, making it the nation’s third oldest symphony 
orchestra. 

The broadcasts will originate in Chicago’s Orchestra Hall 
and will be transmitted through Chicago station WMAQ. 

-0- 

NBC-New York, 7/26/54 




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Ann Sothern will star in the first of Max Liebman’s Saturday 
night series of 90-minute color productions when she plays the lead¬ 
ing role in "Lady in the Dark," on NBC-TV, Sept. 29 (9 p.m., EDT). 

Miss Sothern will play the role of Jenny made famous in the original 
musical comedy by Gertrude Lawrence. 

Best-known for her light comedy portrayal of the role of 
Maisie in motion pictures and the title role in the television comedy 
series "Private Secretary" (NBC-TV, Saturdays, 10:30 p.m., EDT), Miss 
Sothern began her theatrical career as a musical comedy actress in 
motion pictures. 

Early films included such musicals as "Let’s Pall in Love" 
and "Melody in Spring." Later her career expanded to include dramatic 
roles such as one of the wives in the highly successful "Letter to 
Three Wives," after which she returned to musical comedy roles in such 
pictures as "Words and Music" and "Nancy Goes to Rio." 

"Lady in the Dark," Moss Hart’s story of a magazine editor 

whose personal unhappiness and confusion lead her to seek solace and 

recovery in psychoanalysis, has a musical score composed by Kurt Weill 

with lyrics by Ira Gershwin. It is a "musical play" as opposed to 

"musical comedy" and was presented originally on Jan. 23* 19^1* at the 

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Alvin Theatre in New York City. In addition to Miss Lawrence, the 
original cast included Macdonald Carey, Victor Mature and comedian 
Danny Kaye, all of whom used the show as a springboard to national 
fame and success in motion pictures and the legitimate theatre. 

Brooks Atkinson of the New York Times commented following 
opening night of "Lady in the Dark," that it had "the finest score 
written for the theatre in years" and that Moss Hart "tells a compas¬ 
sionate story triumphantly." 

The leading role in the production is an extremely taxing 
one since it calls for great variety of mood as well as a wide range 
of age portrayals. During the meditative sequences, the magazine 
editor returns in her memories to her girlhood, followed in immediate 
sequence by a return to maturity. 

The motion picture version of "Lady in the Dark" starred 
Ginger Rogers in the Jenny role. 

Producer Liebman has not yet announced the other cast mem¬ 
bers for his production of "Lady in the Dark." 

The program will be sponsored by the Oldsmobile Division, 
the General Motors Corporation. The agency is D.P. Brother and Co. 

Liebman*s Saturday night series will be presented on: 


Sept. 

25 

Oct. 

23 

Nov. 

20 

Dec. 

18 

Jan. 

15 

Feb. 

12 

Mar. 

12 

Apr. 

9 

May 

7 

June 

4 

July 

2 

July 

30 

Aug. 

27 


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COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


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NBC COLOR TELECASTS FOR WEEK (August 1-7) 

(NBC-TV Network including WNBT): 

Thursday, Aug, 5 , 10-10:30 p.m., EDT -- 
THE MARRIAGE - starring Hume Cronyn and 
Jessica Tandy. 

* *■ * 

(WNBT only): 

Monday, Aug. 1 through Friday, Aug, 6 , 

1:30-2 p.m., EDT — 

HERE’S LOOKING AT YOU - with Richard 
Willis. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/27/54 



PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

































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TRADE NEWS 


l 


July 28, 195^ 

- — - 

‘MICKEY ROONEY SHOW’ ON NBC-TV SATURDAYS STARTING AUGUST 28 

STARS YOUTHFUL ACTOR IN ROLE OF PAGE IN WEST COAST STUDIOS 

As Mickey Rulligan, a Lad With Aspirations in Many Directions, 
Rooney Prompts the Legend: ‘There’s No Holding This Boy' 

ft— - # # - 






A showbusiness prodigy at the age of one, a star at five, 
the "hottest thing in pictures" at 20, and now -- at 33 -- a veteran 
of 32 years as an entertainer, the fabulous Mickey Rooney launches 
his own television program, THE MICKEY ROONEY SHOW, on NBC-TV Saturday , 
Aug, 28 (8-8:30 p,m., EDT), 

Rooney, who will be projecting his many talents at a greater 
audience than he has ever reached before, plays the role of Mickey 
Mulligan, an indefatigable page at a West Coast broadcasting company, 
in this situation comedy series. 

Mulligan's job is merely a means to an end, a vehicle to 
greater things. Mostly, Mulligan wants to be an actor, but not in¬ 
frequently there are other times when he considers himself a 
potentially great writer -- or even a detective. Some people, 
specifically his employers, co-workers and the staff of the dramatic 
school he attends nightly, take a dim view of his varied ambitions — 

(more)' 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



















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2 - Mulligan 


but they just don't know the irrepressible Mulligan. There's no 
holding this boy* 

Mulligan lives with his mother and dad, played by Claire 
Carleton and Regis Toomey. His mother is a former burlesque star 
and occasionally her past catches up with her present. His dad 
is a cop, about as nice a guy who ever pounded a beat, and whatever 
his son's misadventures -- Pop is ready to back him up. 

Mickey's girlfriend Pat, a secretary at the broadcasting 
studios, is played by Carla Balenda. John Hubbard plays the role 
of his boss, Mr. Brown. Joey Forman is Mickey's pal in the series. 

"The Mickey Rooney Show," which will be sponsored on 
alternate Saturdays by Pillsbury Mills and Green Giant Peas, will be 
produced by Joseph Santley and directed by Leslie Martinson. The 
series will be written by John Fenton Murray and Benedict Freedman. 
It is filmed at General Service Studios in Hollywood. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/28/5^ 




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-o- 


ue\3s\T w9H-oaw 




July 28, 1954 


NBC HAS OVERWHELMING LEAD OVER ALL COMPETITION IN 
BILLBOARD'S TV FILM PROGRAM AND TALENT AWARDS 

Jack Webb (Best Actor) and Loretta Young (Best Actress) 

In Long List of Major Honors to NBC Shows and Stars 

The Billboard's Second Annual TV Film Program and Talent 
Awards, announced today, gave NBC an overwhelming lead over all compe¬ 
tition for the 1953-54 season, 

NBC's DRAGNET swept to victory as the "best series" on TV 
film ("regardless of its age, program type or how sold"). 

The syndicated version of "Dragnet," distributed by the 
NBC Film Division as "Badge 714," was easily returned as the "best 
non-network TV film series." 

Jack Webb made a clean sweep as "best actor." The star of 
"Dragnet" (and "Badge 714") was named best actor in any film show, 
best network actor in any film show, best network mystery film actor, 
best syndicated mystery film actor, best actor in any syndicated film 
show. 

Loretta Young was named "best actress" for her work on the 
filmed LORETTA YOUNG SHOW presented on NBC-TV, She won three first- 
place awards: best actress on a network film series of any kind, best 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 















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actress in any film series, best actress in a network dramatic film 
series. 

Other NBC first-place winners were: FORD THEATRE (NBC-TV), 
best network dramatic film series, GREATEST FIGHTS OF THE CENTURY 
(NBC-TV), best miscellaneous network film series; VICTORY AT SEA (NBC 
Film Division), best non-network documentary film series, LIFE OF 
RILEY (NBC Film Division), best non-network comedy film series; William 
Bendix, star of "Life of Riley," best actor appearing regularly in a 
non-network comedy film series; Lilli Palmer (NBC Film Division), best 
non-network women 1 s film series; DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS PRESENTS (inter- 
state TV-NBC Film Division), best non-network dramatic film series. 

Five categories of voters took part in this all-industry 
selection of the past season’s outstanding programs and personalities 
in TV film: TV stations, TV film producers, TV film distributors, 
advertising agencies, and advertisers. 

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--o- 


NBC-New York, 7/28^54 




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i'cV :\Y Y weM-Oan 





NBC-TV NEWS 



CASEY SHAWHAN IS APPOINTED DIRECTOR OP PRESS 
AND PUBLICITY FOR NBC IN HOLLYWOOD 

The appointment of Casey Shawhan, city editor of the Los 
Angeles Mirror, as director of press and publicity for the National 
Broadcasting Company in Hollywood, was announced by Syd Eiges, 

Vice President for Press and Publicity, Shawhan assum^/his new 

post with NBC on Aug, 23. Les Raddatz is manager of the department 
which Shawhan will head, ; j 

Beginning his newspaper career in Los Angeles in 1926, 
Shawhan worked as a reporter with the Herald-Express, Examiner and 
Times and then in 1943 joined the publicity department at 20th Century 
Pox. In 1948 he left 20 th.Century Fox to become the first city editor 
of the Mirror under Virgil Pinkley, editor and publisher. 

Shawhan will be in charge of an expanded publicity operation 
for NBC programs originating on the West Coast. These include for 
this Fall the weekly 90-minute Leland Hayward and Max Liebman color 
spectaculars, some of which will originate in Burbank upon the 
completion of 1.3C’s new color studios there; "Today,” NBC’s morning 
news and information program which extends to the West Coast on Sept. 
27; "Medic," an entirely new concept in television programming which 
is being filmed in Hollywood and will be seen Morday nights following 
the Sid Caesar show; the "Lux Video Theatre" and "Lux Radio Theatre 
programs; and "It’s a Great Life," starring Michael O’Shea, James Dunn 
and William Bishop, Also, the Mickey Rooney, George Gobel, Donald 
O’Connor and Jimmy Durante programs, all new Saturday night television 
attractions, 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/28/54 






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NBC TRADE NEWS 


FIVE CLIENTS ORDER 115 PARTICIPATIONS ON ’TODAY’ AND ’HOME’ 

* - * *-—* 

Orders from five clients for a total of 115 participations 

on NBC-TV’s TODAY and HOME programs are announced today* 

Ralston-Purina Company, maker of Ry-Krisp, has ordered 

20 participations on "Today" starting Oct. 4, and 19 on "Home" 

starting Oct. 21. The orders were placed through Gardner Advertising 

Co, 

Armour and Company ordered 10 participations on "Today 
during the pre-Thanksgiving and pre-Christmas seasons for its 
poultry. The order was placed through John W. Shaw Advertising. 

Nebraska Consolidated Mills, for Duncan Hines mixes, 
ordered 23 participations on "Today" starting Sept. 29, to be seen 
in the Central Time Zone only. This order was placed through 
Gardner Advertising Co. 

The Maytag Company, through McCann-Erickson, Inc., ordered 

28 participations on "Today," starting Aug. 4. 

And Swift and Company, for its poultry products, ordered 
five participations on "Home" during the pre-Thanksgiving period. 

The order also was placed through McCann-Erickson, Inc. 

"Today," NBC-TV’s early morning news and special events 
program, stars Dave Garroway and is seen Monday through Friday from 
7-9 a.m.j EDT and CDT. 

"Home," the network’s daily service program for women, stars 
Arlene Francis as editor-in-chief, and is seen Monday through Friday 
from 11 a.m.-12 noon EDT. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/28/54 











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jj NBC-TV NEWS 

60 PROTESTANT CLERGYMEN TO ATTEND NBC CLINIC 
IN RELIGIOUS TV AND RADIO BROADCASTING 

Sixty Protestant ministers from all sections of the country 
will attend an all-day clinic in religious television and radio broad¬ 
casting to be held by NBC in New York on Aug. 2. The clinic will be 
staged as part of a two-week Religious Radio and TV Workshop to be 
held at Union Theological Seminary, New York, from July 26 to Aug. 6. 

The morning session, devoted to technical aspects of broad¬ 
casting, will meet at RCA Institutes in the Americas Building. The 
afternoon session, in the Johnny Victor Theatre, will be given over to 
talks by NBC personnel. Kinescope clips illustrating various formats 
used on the NBC-TV religious program, '‘Frontiers of Faith," will be 
shown, and an NBC-TV studio rehearsal opened to the clinic members. 

The group will hear at the afternoon session Edward Stanley, 
manager of NBC public service programs; Doris Ann, supervisor of 
religious programs for NBC-TV; Marilyn Kaemmerle, supervisor of 
religious programs for NBC Radio; Martin Hoade, director of "Frontiers 
of Faith"; Ed Bennett, who will speak on TV design, costumes and 
graphic arts, and Bob Smith, who will speak on TV makeup. 

The Religious Radio and TV Workshop is sponsored by Union 
Theological Seminary, the National Council of Churches of Christ in 
the U.S.A., the Protestant Council of the City of New York, and the 
World Committee for Christian Broadcasting. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/28/54 








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i- .’\ 8 s\T » 3 i r i- ■/ wsw-oaw 





NBC RADIO NEWS 


CREDITS FOR ’LISTEN TO THE WITNESS’ ON NBC RADIO 


PROGRAM: LISTEN TO THE WITNESS 

STARTING DATE: Aug. 1, 1954 


TIME: NBC Radio, Sundays, 

1-1:30 p.m., EDT 

FORMAT: Interviews with persons 

who escaped from behind 
the Iron and Bamboo 
curtains; exclusive re¬ 
ports from emigres who 
fled Communism. 


COMMENTARY: 


PRODUCER: 

CONTINUITY: 

ORIGINATION: 


NBC commentator Pauline 
Frederick, 1953 DuPont 
Award Winner for Jour¬ 
nalism. 

NBC Public Affairs, under 
supervision of Wade 
Arnold. 

Pauline Frederick, Arthur 
Small, Robert Cenedella. 

New York studios NBC. 




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NBC-New York, 7/28/54 












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NBC TRADE NEWS 


& 

LT. EDWARD COUGHLAN IS NAMED NBC FIRE MARSHAL 

Lt. Edward Coughlan, for 28 years a member of the New 
York City Fire Department, has been appointed NBC fire marshal 
in New York^William S. Hedges, NBC Vice President in charge 
of Integrated Services, announced today. 

As NBC fire marshal, Coughlan's primary responsi¬ 
bility will be to make certain that all steps necessary are 
taken to prevent fires, to safeguard NBC employes and others per¬ 
forming in NBC studios and theatres, and to provide for the safety 
and comfort of NBC's guests. Hedges said. 

During the last 12 years of his service with the New 
York City Fire Department, Lt. Coughlan was an official of the 
Division of Licensed Places of Public Assembly and in that capa¬ 
city supervised the inspection of theatres, dance halls, motion 
picture houses, baseball parks, and radio and television studios. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/28/54 








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TRADE NEWS 



July 29, 1954 


NBC-TV TO LAUNCH 'TONIGHT, 1 MAJOR NEW LATE'EVENING NETWORK SHOW 
STARRING COMEDIAN STEVE ALLEN, MONDAYS THROUGH FRIDAYS 

Emphasis Will Be on Entertainment in 'Live' Series Designed 
As 'Logical Evening Extension' of 'Today' and 'Home' 


TONIGHT, a new program designed to generate greater excite¬ 
ment in late evening television, will be launched Mon' ay. Sept. 27, on 
the NBC Television Network, Sylvester L. Weaver Jr., NBC President, 

said^ 

Starring the widely acclaimed young humorist, Steve Allen, 
"Tonight" will offer for the first time on any network a "live 1 ' late 
evening show of outstanding entertainment and service features. The 
program will be seen Monday through Friday from 11:30 p.m.-l a.m., 

EST, and from 11 p.m.-12 midnight, CST. 

"The scheduling of 'Tonight' marks another major step by 
NBC in opening up additional hours of the day to network television, 
Mr. Weaver said. "Just as NBC pioneered the way into early morning 
television more than two years ago with 'Today,' into women's service 
information programs on network TV with 'Home,' we are now going to 
stimulate new interest and enthusiasm in late evening viewing with 


the 


'Tonight' 


show. 



(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











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"’Tonight, ’ in fact, is the logical evening extension of 
’Today’ and ’Home.’ Where these two programs, as prime examples of 
the magazine concept of television, showed the way for smaller 
budgeted national advertisers to use network TV, ’Tonight,’ with the 
same highly flexible sales plan, will make big league nighttime TV 
available to the client who might otherwise not be able to afford 
Class A network time." 

The primary emphasis of "Tonight" will be on entertainment, 
and in this connection a permanent cast of top performers is being 
signed to support Allen. Supplementing the entertainment sections of 
the show will be complete coverage of latest news, sports and weather, 
with the worldwide news gathering facilities of NBC channeling the 
material for these service features. 

At a time of the night when the Great White Way of Broadway 
is at its most glamorous, the cameras of "Tonight" will bring the 
Crossroads of the World to viewers across the country. There will be 
numerous pick-ups from Times Square, center of Manhattan’s entertain¬ 
ment belt. Acting as "stage-door Johnny" for millions of viewers, 
"Tonight" will chat with the stars of Broadway's biggest hits shortly 
after the curtains drop on evening performances. The important first 
nights of the theatre will receive extensive "Tonight" coverage, with 
interviews with the critics and other playgoers. Stars and featured 
entertainers at New York's smartest nightclubs will be frequent 
visitors to the "Tonight" set. 

Mr, Weaver stressed that "Tonight," will not confine its 
originations to the New York scene. There will be mobile unit-remote 
pick-ups from various points across the country -- Chicago, Hollywood, 

(more) 






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ft - tonight* 


Cleveland, New Orleans, wherever there is entertainment and news of 
interest. 

The program will be sold under the same sales plan as 
"Today" -- that is, there will be four one-minute commercials sold 
per half hour on the show. This sales policy, introduced on "Today," 
has proved highly successful as an attraction for both small and large 
advertisers, with commercial insertions ranging from one-time buys to 
long-term contracts. In 1953 "Today" had 83 different sponsors, 
ranging from General Motors to Appian Way Pizza Pie Mix. 

The new program has been offered to all NBC basic stations 
as far west as Omaha. There will be five-minute segments during each 
half-hour period for local news, sports and weather. 

Mr. Weaver pointed out that while 'Tonight" has been on 
NBC-TV’s planning boards for several years, the final initiative to 
schedule it came from the affiliates, who expressed eagerness for a 
major "live" late evening network show. 

Steve Allen, who will star in "Tonight," is one of the true 
native wits to spring into prominence in recent years, a man referred 
to by Groucho Marx as "the best Allen since Fred," His dry humor, 
off-beat story telling, agile ad-libs and musical talents have made 
him a favorite of many television and radio programs since his arrival 
in New York in 1950 from California, where he had won a huge regional 
radio and TV audience. The 32-year-old humorist has been starred for 
the past year on "The Steve Allen Show," late evening variety series 
seen Monday through Friday on WNBT, NBC-TV’s flagship station in New 
York. 


(more) 





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4 - tonight* 


The executive producer of "Tonight" will be Richard A.R, 
Pinkham, who has been largely responsible for the great success of 
"Today" and "Home," NBC-TV f s daytime service program for women. 

Pinkham came to NBC in 1951 as manager of planning for the 
television network. He took over as executive producer of ’Today in 
August, 1952, leading that show to the top in both ratings and bill¬ 
ings. When "Home" went on the air last March, it was natural that 
Pinkham would be executive producer of this program, too. The 
40-year-old Pinkham was circulation manager and a member of the board 
of directors of the New York Herald Tribune before joining NBC. He 
also has been advertising director of James McCreery Co., and has had 
wide advertising agency experience. 


o 


NBC-New York, 7/29/54 




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PR-20 



TELEVISION 


NEWS 


BETTY HUTTON TO STAR IN ORIGINAL MUSICAL COMEDY 
ON FIRST NBC-TV COLOR'SPECTACULAR', SEPT. 12 


"Satins and Spurs" Will Launch 26 High-Budgeted Programs Produced 
By Max Liebman in 90 -minute Saturday and Sunday Periods 

"Satins and Spurs," an original musical comedy starring 
Betty Hutton, will be the first of the National Broadcasting Company's 
high-budgeted, 90-minute color TV "Spectaculars" series, beginning 
Sunday, Sept. 12 

Max Liebman, the man who changed and then sustained the 
nation's Saturday night entertainment habits for five years with "Your 
Show of Shows," will produce 2S of the 39 extravaganzas, including 
"Satins and Spurs." All but six will be in color. 

Liebman has already signed such stars as Judy Holliday, 

Ann Sothern, Steve Allen, Jeanmaire, Dick Shawn, Nanette Fabray, 

Henry Fonda, Frank Sinatra, Janet Blair, Bil and Cora Baird, Jack 
Lemmon, Jack Buchanan, Jean Carson, Eileen Barton, Rod Alexander and 

Bambi Linn and Jacques Tati. 

"Satins and Spurs," written especially for television by 
Liebman and Billy Friedberg, will mark Miss Hutton's TV debut. Music 
and lyrics are by Jay Livingston and Ray Evans, whose song hits, 
"Buttons and Bows" and "Mona Lisa," won for them the Academy of Motion 

Picture Arts and Science "Oscars." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPAN 


Y 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






















* 








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2 - Liebman 


Liebman’s productions will be seen every fourth Sunday 
(7:30-9 p.m., EDT), beginning Sept. 12, and every fourth Saturday 
(9-10:30 p.m., EDT), beginning Sept. 25. 

The first Saturday night "colorama" will star Ann Sothern 
in M Lady in the Dark," a hit of earlier days. The show originally 
starred Gertrude Lawrence and Danny Kaye. 

Another Liebman show will feature film and stage star Judy 
Holliday, NBC-TV's Steve Allen, and Dick Shawn, young comedian, in a 
musical revue woven around a central theme. 

An original musical comedy, scheduled for late Fall pro¬ 
ductions, will focus on the talents of Jeanmaire, French ballet 
dancer and star of "The Girl in Pink Tights.” 

The Liebman color presentations will originate in NBC’s 
Brooklyn Studio, world’s largest color television studio, and will be 
seen in black and white on the nation’s monochrome sets. 

Hazel Bishop Inc. and the Sunbeam Corporation will share 
sponsorship -- 45 minutes each -- of each of 10 Sunday night 
"Spectaculars," including "Satins and Spurs." The Reynolds Metals 
Company will sponsor three of the 13 shows. The advertising agency 
for Hazel Bishop Inc. is Raymond Spector Company Inc., Perrin Paus 
Company for the Sunbeam Corporation, and Russel M. Seeds Company for 
Reynolds Metals Company. 

Liebman's 13 Saturday night extravaganzas will be sponsored 
by Oldsmobile Division of General Motors Corporation. The agency 
is D.P, Brother & Company. 


(more) 



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The Liebman 

schedule: 

Saturdays 

Sundays 

Sept. 25 

Sept. 12 

Oct. 23 

Oct. 10 

Nov. 20 

Nov. 7 

Dec. 18 

Dec. 5 

Jan. 15 

Jan. 2 

Feb. 12 

Jan. 30 

March 12 

Feb. 27 

April 9 

March 27 

May 7 

April 24 

June 4 

May 22 

July 2 

June 19 

July 30 

July 17 

Aug. 27 

Aug. 14 


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'TELEVISION RECITAL HALL' TO OFFER FOUR PROGRAM SERIES 


NBC's TELEVISION RECITAL HALL will return to the 
air on Monday, Aug, 9 (9 p.m., EDT). The music pro¬ 
gram, widely praised by critics and public each time it 
has been presented in the past several years, will be 
offered on four dates: Aug. 9, 16, 30 and Sept, 6. 

The series features leading recital artists in pro¬ 
grams of their own choosing. It is presented as it 
would be in a concert hall, with no special production 
or camera work. 

The artists scheduled for the programs 
Aug, 9 , Maro and Anahid Ajemian, piano and violin duo; 
Aug. 16, Ania Dorfmann, pianist; Aug. 30 » Tossy 
Spivakovsky, violinist; and Sept. 6, Thomas Brockman, 
pianist. 

The telecasts will originate in the Colonial 
Theatre in New York before an invited audience. Charles 
Polacheck again will be producer and Kirk Browning 
director, Robert Denton will be the announcer. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/29/54 

















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^Cw'AV , 3 l* 10 Y i'l 



























NBC-TV NEWS 


_-5'c 

JIM CROV.LEY, FOOTBALL GREAT AS PLAYER AND COACH, 
WILL BE COMMENTATOR FOR NBC TELECASTS 
OF CANADIAN PRO GRID GAMES 


One of the great names in American football -- that of James 

Harold ("Sleepy Jim") Crowley -- will be the commentator on NBC-TV’s 

telecasts of Canadian professional football games, Thomas S. Gallery, 

NBC sports director, announced today. 

The NBC-TV series, featuring Eastern Big Four teams 

(Montreal, Ottawa, Hamilton and Toronto) of the Canadian Professional 

Football League, will start Saturday, Aug. 28, with the Toronto- 

Ottawa contest at Toronto. Lindsey Nelson, NBC's assistant sports 

director, will handle the play-by-play. 

"Sleepy Jim" — a nickname won at Notre Dame — nas been a 

football byword ever since he was a member of the fabulous Four Horse¬ 
men of 1924. This senior backfield -- the other members were Don 
Miller, Harry Stuldrener, and Elmer Layden -- was the most famous 
ever fielded by the great Knute Rockne. 

Crowley, who was born in Chicago on Sept. 10, 1903* was the 
left halfback in that great unit and his stellar performances won him 
All-American honors. After graduation in 1925 > served as back- 

field coach at the University of Georgia until 1928. From 1929 
through 1932 he was head coach at Michigan State, and in 1933 signed 
on at Fordham. 

It was at Fordham that Crowley won real fame as a coach and 

brought to the Rose Hill campus its greatest gridiron glory. From 
1933 until 1941, Crowley’s Rams won 56, lost 13 and tied seven. And 
they played the toughest teams in the country, at that, 

(more) 









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2 - Jim Crowley 

Crowley led the Rams to two bowl games during his tenure 
at Fordham. On Jan. 1, 1941, the Rams lost a 13-12 decision to Texas 
A. & M* in the Cotton Bowl at Dallas. Exactly one year later, Fordham 
beat Missouri, 2-0, in the Sugar Bowl at New Orleans. Crowley’s 
all-time coaching record includes three seasons in which he lost three 
games, three in which he lost two, seven in which he lost one, and 
one in which he lost none. 

In 1942, Jim enlisted in the Navy and later served on 
Admiral Halsey's staff in the South Pacific. Following his discharge 
in 1945, he was named commissioner of the newly-organized All-America 
Football Conference. He served in this capacity for two years and in 
1947 became general manager and coach of the Chicago Rockets. 

In 1948 Crowley entered private business, and now is 
general manager and vice president of Station WTVU in Scranton, Pa. 

He resides there with his wife and two sons, aged 14 and 15. 

Crowley's television background and vast football experience 
make him a "natural" for his new assignment, that of commenting on 
this exciting, souped-up version of America's favorite Fall sport. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/29/54 





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NBC-TV NEWS 


CREDITS FOR 

PROGRAM: 

DATE AND TIME: 

PREMIERE DATE: 
STAR: 

REGULAR CAST: 

FORMAT: 
PRODUCER: 
DIRECTOR: 
WRITERS: 

ORIGINATION: 

SPONSORS: 

AGENCY: 


♦THE MICKEY ROONEY SHOW' ON NBC-TV 


THE MICKEY ROONEY SHOW 

NBC-TV, Saturdays, 8-8:30 p.m., 
EDT 

Aug. 28, 1954 

Mickey Rooney 

Regis Toomey, Claire Carleton, 
Carla Balenda, John Hubbard, 
Joey Forman. 

Situation comedy; filmed. 

Joseph Santley 

Leslie Martinson 

John Fenton Murray and Benedict 
Freedman 

Hollywood 

Pillsbury Mills, 

Inc. 

Green Giant 
Company 

Leo Burnett Company, Inc., 
Chicago, for both sponsors. 


o 


alternate weeks 


NBC-New York, 7/29/54 















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TRADE NEWS 

July 30, 195^ 




POLAROID IS FIRST SPONSOR TO SIGN FOR NBC-TV’S ‘TONIGHT’] 

BUYS 8 PARTICIPATIONS STARTING WITH SEPT. 27 PREMIERE 

TONECHT, exciting new program with which NBC-TV will pioneer 
the way into late evening network television, has already received 
its first commercial order from a client. 

The Polaroid Company of Cambridge, Mass., manufacturer of 
the Polaroid Land Camera, has ordered eight participations on the 
show beginning Monday, Sept. 27* the night on which "Tonight will 
make its debut. Announcement of the Polaroid order comes just a day 
after details of the "Tonight" program were revealed by Sylvester 
L, Weaver Jr., NBC President. 

In addition to being the first sponsor to order participa¬ 
tions on "Tonight," Polaroid is also the first to be associated with 
all three of NBC-TV 1 s daily magazine concept programs. The company is 

a frequent advertiser on "Today," NBC-TV’ s early morning news and 
special events program, and also was a first-day sponsor on Home, 

the network’s women’s service show. 

The Polaroid order was placed through Doyle-Dane-Bernbach, 
Inc., of New York, Richard Soule is the NBC account executive. 

"Tonight," which will star Steve Allen, will be seen Monday 
through Friday from 11:30 p.m.-l a.m., EST, and from 11 p.m.- 
12 midnight, CST. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


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I NBC TRADE NEWS 
*-* 

NBC PRESIDENT WEAVER TO ADDRESS CLERGYMEN 
ATTENDING RELIGIOUS RADIO-TV WORKSHOP 

Sylvester L« Weaver Jr*, President of the National Broad 
casting Company, will officially welcome a group of 60 Protestant 
ministers attending an all-day clinic in religious television and 
radio broadcasting to be held by NBC on Monday, Aug, 2, 

Mr, Weaver's address of greeting will be given at a 
luncheon at Toots Shor's restaurant in New York. 

The ministers, who are from all sections of the country, 
will attend the clinic as part of a two-week Religious Radio and 
TV Workshop being held at Union Theological Seminary, New York, 
from July 26 to Aug. 6, The Monday morning session, devoted to 
technical aspects of broadcasting, will be held at the RCA 
Institutes in the Americas Building. The afternoon session, in 
the Johnny Victor Theatre, will be devoted to talks by NBC 
personnel. 


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NBC-TV NEWS 


SATURDAY REVIEW’S SECOND ANNUAL AWARDS GIVE NBC 
ALMOST 2-T0-1 MARGIN OVER ANY OTHER NETWORK 

Pour NBC-TV shows, one NBC Radio program and an NBC cultural 
advertising campaign have been cited for distinguished achievement 
in the public interest by the Saturday Review. 

The five NBC Radio and TV programs honored give the network 
an almost two-to-one margin over any other network in number of shows 
receiving citations from the Saturday Review. In addition, NBC is 
the only broadcasting company among the 26 advertisers who won the 
Saturday Review’s Second Annual Awards for distinguished advertising 
in the public interest. 

Following are the award-winning NBC-TV programs: 

NBC-TV OPERA THEATRE -- "For distinguished presentation 
of fine music by fine artists.” 

DING DONG SCHOOL -- "For genuinely motivated and 
socially constructive pre-school age show," 

FORD DOTH ANNIVERSARY SHOW (seen on NBC-TV and 
another network) -- "For superb taste in presenting, 
light, entertaining Americana on a national scale with 
no overt commercials.” 

HALLMARK HALL OF FAME ("Hamlet," "Amahl and the ^ 

Night Visitors" and other individual productions).-- For 
giving talented producers and players an opportunity to 
create serious and impressive works, original or classic; 
for honorable successes and for honorable mistakes. 

The NBC Radio program honored was the NBC SYMPHONY, "for 

distinguished presentation of fine music by fine artists. 

The NBC advertising campaign saluted by the Saturday Review 
was a campaign outlining the cultural achievements of the radio and 
television networks. It was cited for "contributing to the develop¬ 
ment or appreciation of our nation's educational and cultural 
resources," 


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NBC-TV NEWS 


AMERICAN LEGION GROUP HONORS 'INHERITANCE* PROGRAM 
AND COMMENDS NBC FOR COMMUNITY SERVICE 

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An American historical drama series broaderst weekly by NBC 

Radio has been honored by the American Legion's Suffolk County (N.Y.) 

Organization and the network has been commended for its meritorious 

work in the field of community service." 

The program, INHERITANCE, was the subject of a resolution 
adopted unanimously at the organization's recent convention at Green- 
port, L.I., N.Y. The resolution lauded the network for "its many 
community service programs and for its outstanding work in the field 

of good, wholesome entertainment." 

"Inheritance," broadcast Sundays at 10 p.m., EDT, in cooper¬ 
ation with the national organization of the American Legion, was 
designed to build deeper public understanding of the heritage and 
character that underlie the nation's freedom. The dramatizations are 
concerned chiefly with great turning points in American history and 

great decisions along the road to freedom. 

The network was notified of the resolution by John R. 

Hewlett, county adjutant of the Suffolk County Organization. In 
acknowledging the honor to the program and the network, William H. 
Fineshriber Jr., Vice President in charge of the NBC Radio Network, 
wrote: 

"I assure you that NBC is proud to have this recognition of 
the service we are performing with the American Legion in presenting 
the 'Inheritance* series. 

"It is our conviction that programs of this nature perform 
an outstanding public service in depicting the positive values of the 
American way, and we are happy indeed to be associated with the 
American Legion in this endeavor. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 7/30/5^ 














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MEMO FOR BROADCAST : 

ASSIGNMENT: 'AMERICAN DEFENSE’ 




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NBC News Department staff. 


FROM: 


William R. McAndrew, manager NBC News and Special 


Events, and J.O. Meyers, manager NBC Central News Desk, 
ASSIGNMENT: Another of our intensive jobs of "depth" reporting. 

To examine and analyze the present state of American 


defense in an effort to determine how we measure up 
to the Russians and those in the U.S,S,R, orbit, 
RESULTS: To be presented on the NBC Radio Network in a special 

HEART OF THE NEWS broadcast Tuesday, Aug,.3 * 

10:15-11 p.m., EDT, 

SPECIAL ASSIGNMENT: (To supersede other work.) 

Henry C. Cassidy, NBC New York, as on-the-air editor, 
Richard Harkness, NBC Washington, to examine the state 


of American progress in nuclear weapons, to attempt to 
determine whether the Russians have either outdistanced 


us or are about toj additionally, Richard Harkness will 
investigate and report on stories of Soviet Union all- 
out efforts to finalize intercontinental guided missies, 
Leif Eid, NBC Washington News, to examine our military 
budget and compare it with past budgets. Are we 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 
























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ORIGINATION! 


risking our national neck to save money in light of 
recent international developments? A pro and con 
approach as to whether the budget is practical and 
realistic in this light* 

Joesph C. Harsch, NBC Washington news analyst, to 
discuss the pros and cons of the so-called "preventa¬ 
tive war” philosophy, 

David Brinkley, NBC Washington TV News, to check on 
the state of Civilian Defense today in an effort to 
determine whether practical and feasible in light of 
bomb damage as we now know it. Two aspects to be 
thoroughly and specifically examined: the radar 
network screen and its effectiveness, and latest pro¬ 
gress in plans for evacuation of cities. 

NBC, New York City and Washington, D.C. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/30/5^ 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


IRA WOLFF JOINS NBC AS SALES PRESENTATION WRITER 
FOR TV SHOWS IN PARTICIPATION SALES PLAN 

Ira Wolff, formerly a copy writer for Dancer-Fitzgerald- 
Sample, Inc., has joined NBC as a sales presentation writer for 

II 

television shows sold under the participation sales plan** David 
Hedley, NBC-TV manager of sales presentations, said today. 

Before working for Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, Wolff for 
two years was with the U.S. Army Recruiting Publicity Center on 
Governor's Island, New York. Prior to that, he was assistant ad¬ 
vertising manager of the Brooklyn (N.Y.) Paint and Varnish Company. 
He was graduated from New York University with a bachelor of science 
degree, is single and lives in Brooklyn. 

NBC-TV has four shows being sold under the highly flexible 
participation sales plan — "Today," "Home," "The Pinky Lee Show" 
and the recently announced "Tonight" program. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 7/30/54 




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