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mm[H  TRADE  NEWS 


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October  1,  1957 

JAPANESE  VIEWERS  TO  SEE  WORLD  SERIES  BASEBALL  GAMES  FOR  FIRST  TIME— 
ONLY  ONE  DAY  AFTER  PLAY  DATES  IN  U.S.— VIA  SPECIAL  KINESCOPE 
RECORDINGS  SOLD  TO  TOKYO  STATION  BY  NBC  INTERNATIONAL,  LTD. 


Japanese  viewers  will  see  the  full  1957  World 
Series  baseball  games  on  their  television  sets  for  the 
first  time  --  only  one  day  after  play  date  in  the  U.S,  -- 
via  special  kinescoped  recordings  sold  today  by  NBC  Inter¬ 
national,  Ltd,,  to  commercial  television  station  NTV  in 
Tokyo,  Japan.  Announcement  of  the  important  sale,  the 
first  of  its  kind,  was  made  today  by  Alfred  R.  Stern, 
Chairman  of  the  Board  of  the  wholly-owned  NBC  subsidiary. 

Mr.  Stern  said  that  Japanese  viewers  will  see 
each  game  of  the  Series,  which  begins  tomorrow,  Oct.  2 
(12:45  p.m.,  NYT),  in  its  entirety  starting  with  the 
opener  between  the  New  York  Yankees  and  Milwaukee  Braves, 
Each  telecast  of  the  Series  games  will  be  kine¬ 
scoped  on  the  West  Coast  and  rushed  via  Pan  American  Air¬ 
ways  to  the  Tokyo  station  for  replay  24  clock  hours  later. 

Mr.  Stern  said  that  Japanese  station  NTV  will 
telecast  the  Series  during  prime  evening  hours  rather  than 
in  normal  daytime  hours  because  of  the  Japanese  people's 
strong  interest  in  the  sport. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  World  Series 


In  addition  to  being  seen  in  Japan,  the  United 
States  and  Canada,  the  World  Series  will  be  telecast  live 
to  Cuba  via  the  recently  developed  over-the-horizon  relay. 
Games  one  and  two,  plus  six  and  seven  (if  necessary)  at 
New  York's  Yankee  Stadium  will  be  televised  by  NBC  in  color 
as  well  as  black  and  white.  The  Pall  classic  also  will  be 
broadcast  by  NBC  Radio. 


NBC-New  York,  10/1/57 


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NBC -TV  AND  RADIO  NEWS 


CREDITS  FOR  WORLD  SERIES  COVERAGE  ON  NBC- TV  AND  NBC  RADIO 


SUMMARY: 

TV  and  radio  coverage  of  all  games  of  1957 

World  Series  between  New  York  Yankees 

and  Milwaukee  Braves,  starting  Wednesday, 

Oct.  2.  Games  one  and  two  are  played  in 

Yankee  Stadium,  New  York;  games  three, 

four  and  (if  necessary)  five  in  County 

Stadium,  Milwaukee;  games  six  and  seven 

(if  necessary)  in  Yankee  Stadium.  All 

games  at  the  Yankee  Stadium  will  be  tele¬ 
vised  in  color  as  well  as  black  and  white 

This  is  the  11th  consecutive  year  that 

NBC-TV  has  televised  the  World  Series. 

STARTING  TIMES: 

For  New  York  games  --  12:45  p.m.,  NYT. 

For  Milwaukee  games  --  2:45  p.m.,  NYT. 

TV  COMMENTATORS: 

Mel  Allen  and  A1  Heifer, 

RADIO  COMMENTATORS: 

Earl  Gillespie,  Bob  Neal  and  Bill  Corum. 

TV  PRODUCER: 

Perry  Smith. 

TV  DIRECTOR: 

Harry  Coyle. 

RADIO  DIRECTOR: 

Paul  Jonas. 

SPONSOR: 

Gillette  Safety  Razor  Company  (World  Series 

is  a  feature  of  the  "Gillette  Cavalcade 

of  Sports"  series). 

AGENCY: 

Maxon,  Inc . 

NBC  PRESS  REPRESENTATIVE:  Bob  Goldwater  (New  York). 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/1/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


ELIZABETH  HAGLUND  IS  NAMED  COORDINATOR  OF  PROGRAM  SERVICES 
FOR  NBC  TELEVISION'S  SPECIAL  PROJECTS 

Elizabeth  Haglund  has  been  named  coordinator  of  program  ser¬ 
vices  for  NBC  Television's  Special  Projects,  according  to  an  announce¬ 
ment  from  Henry  Salomon,  who  heads  the  unit.  For  the  past  two  years 
Miss  Haglund  was  public  relations  coordinator  for  the  network's 
"Today,"  "Home"  and  "Tonight,"  She  joined  NBC  in  19^5  as  senior  inter- 
viewer  in  the  Personnel  Department  after  terms  as  special  correspondent 
with  Farrar  and  Rinehart  and  as  advertising  copywriter  with  John  Wiley 
and  Sons.  She  was  NBC  placement  manager  from  1951  until  195^>  when  she 
joined  the  "Home"  unit  as  public  relations  manager.  She  lives  in 
Pelham,  N.Y. 

ANTHONY  A.  CERVINI  JR.  IS  APPOINTED  TO  POST 
IN  NBC  STATION  RELATIONS  DEPT. 

Anthony  A.  Cervini  Jr,  has  been  appointed  a  station  contact 
representative  in  the  National  Broadcasting  Company's  Station  Relations 
Department,  it  was  announced  today  by  Donald  J.  Mercer,  Director  of 
Station  Relations  for  NBC . 

Mr.  Cervini  joined  the  network  Guest  Relations  Department  in 
19^9>  and  in  1951  was  appointed  to  the  company's  sales  traffic  depart¬ 
ment.  A  year  later  he  became  chief  statistician  for  the  department, 
and  in  1953  was  named  a  service  representative.  In  1955  he  was  ap¬ 
pointed  service  representative  supervisor, 

A  native  of  New  York,  Mr.  Cervini  attended  Columbia  Univer¬ 
sity.  He,  his  wife  and  their  son  live  in  New  Hyde  Park,  N.Y. 

- o - 

NBC -New  York,  10/1/57 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 
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PETER  USTINOV,  IN  FIRST  U.S.  TV  PERFORMANCE,  TO  PLAY  TITLE  ROLE 
IN  'LIFE  OF  SAMUEL  JOHNSON'  ON  'OMNIBUS' 

Peter  Ustinov,  British  actor,  author,  composer  and  play¬ 
wright,  will  star  in  the  OMNIBUS  presentation  of  the  "Life  of  Samuel 
Johnson."  His  role  as  Johnson  will  mark  his  first  performance  on 

American  television. 

* 

The  original,  90-minute  treatment  of  James  Boswell's  bio¬ 
graphy  of  Johnson  will  be  written  for  "Omnibus"  by  James  Lee,  who 
wrote  the  of f -Broadway  hit  play,  "Career."  British  actor  Emlyn 
Williams,  as  previously  announced,  will  star  as  Boswell.  The  "Life  of 
Samuel  Johnson"  will  be  telecast  in  December,  the  date  to  be  announced, 
on  "Omnibus"  (NBC-TV,  4-5:30  p.m.,  NYT),  which  is  produced  by  Robert 
Saudek  Associates  and  sponsored  by  Aluminium  Limited  and  the  Union 
Carbide  Corporation. 

Ustinov  will  appear  on  Broadway  this  Fall  in  his  new  comedy, 
"Romanoff  and  Juliet."  Four  seasons  ago  he  performed  in  the  Broadway 
production  of  another  of  his  plays,  the  "Love  of  Four  Colonels," 
Williams,  who  appeared  here  several  seasons  ago  in  an 
impersonation  of  Charles  Dickens,  also  will  be  seen  on  Broadway  this 
Fall  with  his  one-man  show  based  on  the  works  of  the  late  poet  Dylan 
Thomas . 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/1/57 


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NBC 


TELEVISION  NEWS 


CREDITS  FOR  'LUX  SHOW  STARRING  ROSEMARY  CLOONEY'  COLORCASTS  ON  NBC-TV 


TIME: 


STAR: 

FORMAT: 

PRODUCERS : 

DIRECTOR: 

WRITERS: 

GUEST  SEQUENCE  DIRECTOR: 
MUSICAL  DIRECTOR- ARRANGER: 
VOCAL  GROUP: 

CHOREOGRAPHER: 

SPONSOR  AND  AGENCY: 

ORIGINATION: 

ORIGINAL  STARTING  DATE: 

NBC  PRESS  REPRESENTATIVES: 


NBC-TV,  Thursdays,  10  p.m.,  NYT; 

colorcast . 

Rosemary  Clooney 

Musical  variety  featuring  guest  stars. 
Joseph  Shribman  and  Dik  Darley 
Dik  Darley 

Danny  Arnold,  Howard  Leods,  Tom  Waldman. 
Danny  Arnold 
Frank  DeVol 

The  Modernaires  with  Paula  Kelly 
Jack  Baker 

Lever  Brothers  Company,  through  J.  Walter 
Thompson  Company 

Live  in  color  and  black  and  white  from 
Color  City,  Burbank,  Calif. 

Thursday,  Sept,  26,  1957 

Bob  Bowen,  Hollywood;  Walter  Kempley, 

New  York 


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NBC-New  York,  10/1/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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TELEVISION 


NEWS 


CORRECTION  PLEASE: 

The  correct  title  of  Dinah  Shore's  new  Sunday 
series,  which  will  start  on  NBC-TV  Sunday,  Oct.  20 
(9-10  p.m.,  NYT,  in  color  and  black  and  white),  is  THE  DINAH 
SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW.  The  program  name  was  incorrectly  listed 
as  "Dinah  Shore's  Chevy  Show"  in  a  previous  release. 

As  announced,  Dinah's  guest  stars  on  her  premiere 
program  will  be  Danny  Thomas,  Nanette  Fabray,  Dean  Jones 
and  special  guest,  Tab  Hunter. 


o 


NBC-New  York,  10/1/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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JjJTR  FEATURE 

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PEOPLE  BEHIND-THE-SCENES  OF  ’PINOCCHIO' 
("Pinocchio"  will  be  simulcast  ever  NBC-TV  and  Radio 
Sunday,  Oct.  13,  6: 30-7:30  p.m.,  NYT) 


Executive  producer  David  Sugskind  has  produced  many  60- 
minute  video  dramas,  l  movie,  "Edge  of  the  City,"  and  a  Broadway 
play,  "A  Very  Special  Baby"  --  but  hi$  original  ambition  was  to  be 
a  college  teacher. 


* *  *  * 

Yasha  Frank,  creator  and  st'ager  of  this  production  of 
"Pinocchio,"  has  had  a  long  association  with  programs  of  interest 
to  children  of  various  ages.  He  produced  a  marionette  short  for  a 
motion  picture  studio.  He  was  national  consultant  for  Children’s 
Theatre  of  the  Federal  Theatre  Project,  and  wrote  and  directed  three 
plays  for  the  Project.  He  was  a  member  of  the  White  House  Confer¬ 
ence  for  Children  in  a  Democracy  ( 3,9*10-1950) .  He  twice  filled  as¬ 
signments  for  the  Ford  Foundation  ‘studies  of  teaching  problems. 

He  was  state  director  of  Radio  an<l  Television  for  the  Massachusetts 
Parent-Teacher  Association. 


•fc  *  * 


(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAl  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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Producer  Herbert  Moss  has  been  in  radio  and  television 
production  for  20  years,  both  as  writer  and  producer.  He  got  an 
early  start  with  the  Cornell  University  radio  station  while  study¬ 
ing  law  there.  He  received  his  law  degree  but  was  far  too  intrigued 
with  radio  to  practice  law.  His  first  professional  radio  directing 
job  was  with  NBC  Radio. 


*  *  * 

Director  Paul  Bogart  produced  and  directed  a  touring  pup¬ 
pet  theatre  soon  after  his  graduation  from  Northwestern  University, 
and  got  his  first  network  job  with  NBC  as  a  stage  manager.  Since 
then  he  has  directed  some  of  the  network’s  top  dramatic  programs. 

*  *  * 

Choreographer  Hanya  Holm  founded  her  own  school  of  the 
dance  more  than  20  years  ago.  She  toured  the  country  with  her  dance 
group,  created  the  dances  for  the  Broadway  musical,  "Ballet  Ballads" 
and  for  "Kiss  Me  Kate,"  receiving,  for  the  latter,  the  Drama  Critics’ 
Award  for  the  best  choreographer  of  19^9*  She  received  it  again  for 
"The  Golden  Apple."  Other  Broadway  credits  include  "Out  of  This 
World,"  "My  Darlin’  Aida"  and  "My  Pair  Lady."  She  created  the  dances 
for  the  movie,  "The  Vagabond  King."  She  is  founder  of  the  New  York 
City  Dance  Company. 

*  *  * 


(more) 


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Sam  Leve,  scenic  designer,  has  designed  sets  for  68  Broad¬ 
way  plays  including  "Macbeth,"  "Beautiful  People,"  "Mr.  Sycamore," 
"Beat  the  Band,"  "Wallflower"  and  "The  Fifth  Season."  His  Metro¬ 
politan  Opera  credits  include  "The  Warrior,"  "Simone  Boccanegra" 
and  "Tristan  and  Isolde." 


*  *  * 

Costume  designer  Noel  Taylor,  who  has  served  in  this 
capacity  for  all  of  the  Maurice  Evans'  television  productions,  has 
many  stage  credits  too.  They  include  the  current  "Auntie  Marne," 
"No  Time  for  Sergeants,"  "Teahouse  of  the  August  Moon,"  "Alice  in 
Wonderland,"  "Stalag  17,"  "The  Male  Animal"  and  "Dial  'M*  for 
Murder. " 


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FEATURE 


HELPING  TO  PUT  THE  "WORLD"  IN  THE  WORLD  SERIES- - 
THAT'S  ROLE  OF  NBC  TELEVISION  AND  RADIO 

NBC,  through  its  television  and  radio  coverage,  is  helping  to 
put  the  "world"  in  the  World  Series. 

NBC's  telecasts  of  the  entire  Series  are  being  seen  live, 
not  only  in  the  United  States,  but  also  in  Canada  and  Cuba.  Kine- 
scoped  recordings  of  each  game  are  scheduled  in  Japan  only  one  day 
after  play  date.  The  telecasts  are  being  kinescoped  on  the  West  Coast 
and  flown  to  Tokyo  for  replay.  Kinescopes  also  are  flown  to  Honolulu, 
Hawaii;  to  Anchorage  and  Fairbanks,  Alaska,  and  to  Guam  for  later 
presentation. 

NBC  Radio's  broadcasts  of  the  Series  games  are  being  beamed 
via  shortwave  to  service  personnel  overseas  by  the  Armed  Forces  Radio 
Service.  The  play-by-play  report  is  picked  up  by  the  New  York  and  Los 
Angeles  branches  of  the  AFRS  for  relay  overseas,  The  short-wave  broad¬ 
cast  from  New  York  goes  to  ships-at-sea,  Greenland,  Iceland,  Europe, 
the  Mediterranean  area,  Cuba,  Puerto  Rico,  the  Canal  Zone  and 
Antarctica,  Los  Angeles  serves  ships-at-sea,  Alaska,  the  Pacific 
Islands,  Japan  and  Korea. 

Mel  Allen  and  A1  Heifer  are  the  TV  commentators  and  Earl 
Gillespie,  Bob  Neal  and  Bill  Corum  are  the  radio  reporters. 

- o - 

NBC -New  York,  10/2/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


JOHN  SCUOPPO  IS  APPOINTED  MANAGER,  FIELD  EXPLOITATION,  FOR  NBC 


John  Scuoppo  has  been  appointed  Manager,  Field 
Exploitation,  for  NBC,  it  was  announced  today  by  A1  Rylander, 
Director,  Exploitation,  for  the  National  Broadcasting  Company. 

Mr.  Scuoppo  has  served  as  an  exploitation  repre¬ 
sentative  since  he  joined  the  network  in  July  1955.  Before 
that  he  was,  in  turn,  a  publicist  for  United  Artists  Corp. 
for  a  year  and  an  exploitation  representative  for  Columbia 
Pictures  Corp.  for  four  years. 

Born  in  New  York,  he  attended  the  College  of  the 
City  of  New  York.  He  and  his  wife  live  in  Throgg’s  Neck, 

N.Y. 


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TRADE  NEWS 


October  3,  1957 

NBC- TV' S  NEW  REGULARLY  SCHEDULED  EVENING  PROGRAMS  DEMONSTRATE 
OUTSTANDING  INCREASE  IN  SHARE  OP  AUDIENCE  AND 
LEAD  COMPETING  SHOWS  OF  OTHER  NETWORKS 

With  the  1957-58  television  season  well  under  way,  NBC-TV's 
new  regularly  scheduled  evening  programs  have  demonstrated  an  out¬ 
standing  increase  in  share  of  audience  compared  to  shows  presented  by 
the  network  in  those  same  time  periods  a  year  ago.  In  addition,  this 
new  NBC-TV  programming  leads  the  other  networks1  competing  shows. 

More  than  50  per  cent  of  NBC-TV1 s  regular  nighttime  schedule 
(between  7:30  and  11  p.m.,  NYT,  Mondays  through  Sundays)  consists  of 
new  programs  this  season  and  totals  22  new  properties.  To  date,  19 
of  these  programs  have  had  their  premieres. 

According  to  all  available  Trendex  reports  on  show  premieres 
for  the  new  1957-58  season,  12  of  these  19  new  NBC  shows  are  No.  One 
in  their  time  periods  in  share  of  audience,  with  the  second  network 
placing  four  shows  in  the  No.  One  spot  and  the  third  network  only 
three.  By  contrast,  a  year  ago  at  this  time  NBC-TV  did  not  lead  in 
a  single  one  of  these  time  periods,  while  the  second  network  had  12 
No.  One  programs  and  the  third  network  seven. 

A  second  significant  result  of  the  new  season  credits 

NBC-TV's  share  of  audience  in  these  newly  programmed  time  periods  with 

an  increase  of  29  per  cent  compared  to  a  year  ago,  while  the  second 

network  has  declined  21  per  cent  and  the  third  network  eight  per  cent. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  B 


ROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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NBC -TV  also  currently  leads  the  second  network  by  eight  per 
cent  and  the  third  network  by  35  pei"1  cent  in  share  of  audience  during 
these  periods,  whereas  a  year  ago  NBC  trailed  the  second  network  by 
33  per  cent  and  the  third  network  by  four  per  cent. 

Programs  new  to  NBC-TV's  regular  nighttime  schedule  this 
season  are  "Sally,1'  "The  Price  Is  Right,"  "The  Restless  Gun,"  "A 
Turn  of  Fate,"  "Suspicion,"  "The  Mat  'King'  Cole  Show,"  "The  Eddie 
Fisher  Show  Starring  Eddie  Fisher  With  George  Gobel, "  "The  George 
Gobel  Show  Starring  George  Gobel  With  Eddie  Fisher,"  "The  Bob 
Cummings  Show,"  "The  Californians,"  'Wagon  Train,"  'Tic  Tac  Dough, 

"The  Lux  Show  Starring  Rosemary  Clooney,"  "The  Jane  Wyman  Show," 

"Saber  of  London,"  "M  Squad,"  "The  Thin  Man,"  "The  Polly  Bergen  Show," 
"Club  Oasis,"  "The  Gisele  MacKenzie  Show,"  "The  Chevy  Show"  (beginning 
Oct.  20),  "The  Court  of  Last  Resort"  (beginning  Oct.  4)  and  "What's 
It  For?"  (beginning  Oct.  12). 


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NEWS 


October  3 >  1957 


ED  WYNN  TO  STAR  IN  »0N  BORROWED  TIME ' 
ON  'HALLMARK  HALL  OF  FAME'  COLORCAST 
WITH  CLAUDE  RAINS  AS  SPECIAL  GUEST 


HALLMARK  HALL  OF  FAME  will  present  Ed  Wynn  as  star  and 
Claude  Rains  as  special  guest  in  James  Costigan's  adaptation  of  Paul 
Osborn's  Broadway  hit  fantasy,  "On  Borrowed  Time,"  Sunday,  Nov,  17 
(NBC-TV,  in  color  and  black  and  white,  5*30-7  p.m,,.  EST),  Dennis 
Kohler  is  also  cast  in  a  prominent  role. 

This  will  be  the  second  of  six  major  productions  of  "Hall¬ 
mark  Hall  of  Fame,"  on  NBC-TV  during  the  current  season. 

The  original  play,  based  on  a  novel  by  Lawrence  Edward 
Watkin,  made  its  Broadway  bow  Feb.  3>  1938,  and  ran  f°r  l6l 
performances . 

Burns  Mantle,  who  included  it  in  his  selection  of  the  ten 
best  plays  of  the  season,  wrote:  "It  was  enthusiastically  welcomed 
by  the  professional  play  reviewers,  both  for  its  own  sake  and  because 
it  brought  one  of  their  favorite  actors,  Dudley  Digges,  to  stardom 
after  40  years  of  fine  service  to  the  theatre." 

Brooks  Atkinson's  review  in  the  New  York  Times  of  Feb  4, 

1938*  read,  in  part:  "Something  blissful  has  come  to  town,. , a  vastly 

/ 

(more) 

COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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enjoyable  fantastic  drama. . .Nothing  so  original  and  jovial  has  turned 
up  on  our  stage  for  a  long  time." 

Ed  Wynn,  the  veteran  comedian  whose  dramatic  talents  have 
been  winning  wide  acclaim  in  recent  months,  will  portray  Gramps,  the 
elderly  man  who  keeps  Death  up  an  apple  tree  because  he  can‘t  bear  to 
leave  his  little  grandson  defenseless  in  a  bossy  petticoat  environment. 

Rains  will  play  Mr.  Brink,  the  mild  and  obliging  courier  from 
the  After  Life.  Dennis  Kohler  will  be  seen  as  six-year-old  Pud,  the 
appealing  little  boy  who  adores  his  crotchety  grandfather.  Peter 
Miner  was  the  Pud  of  the  original  production. 

A  movie  version  of  "On  Borrowed  Time"  appeared  in  July  of 
1939,  with  Lionel  Barrymore  as  Gramps,  Sir  Cedric  Hardwicke  as  Mr. 

Brink  and  Bobs  Watson  as  Pud.  Frank  Nugent,  reviewing  the  film  in 
the  New  York  Times,  commented:  "The  picture,  like  the  play,  is  a 
tender  thing  and  wistful,  fantastic  in  its  way,  yet  firmly  rooted  in 
human  soil.,.. a  mighty  pleasant  film  with  a  deal  of  warmth  and 
sentiment  and  just  enough  ornery  human  acidity  to  keep  it  off  the 
alkaline  or  mawkish  side." 

The  play  was  revived  on  Broadway  Feb.  10,  1953*  for  78 
performances  with  Victor  Moore  as  Gramps,  Leo  G.  Carroll  as  Mr .  Brink 
and  David  John  Stollery  as  Pud. 

Mildred  Freed  Alberg  is  executive  producer  of  "Hallmark 
Hall  of  Fame"  with  George  Schaefer  as  producer-director.  "Hallmark 
Hall  of  Fame"  is  sponsored  by  Hallmark  Cards,  Inc.,  through  the  Foote, 
Cone  and  Belding  advertising  agency. 

- o - 


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A  SERVICE 


N  E  WS 


October  3*  1957 


NBC  WILL  SEND  FIVE  NEW  PROGRAM  SERIES— VARYING  IN  THEME  FROM  I GY 
TO  MYTHOLOGY  AND  ART- -LIVE  TO  NATION'S  INTERCONNECTED 
EDUCATIONAL  TV  STATIONS  STARTING  OCT.  28 


Five  new  program  series,  ranging  in  theme  from  the  Inter¬ 
national  Geophysical  Year  to  Greek  mythology  and  the  art  it  has 
inspired,  will  be  sent  out  live  to  the  country’s  interconnected 
educational  TV  stations  over  NBC’s  regular  network  facilities  for  a 
10-week  period  starting  Monday,  Oct.  28.  Programs  will  be  telecast 
Monday  through  Friday  from  6  to  6:30  p.m.,  NYT. 

The  five  series  will  comprise  the  second  half  of  the 
Educational  Television  Project  which  NBC  is  undertaking  this  year  in 
partnership  with  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center  at  Ann 
Arbor,  Mich.,  to  link  the  non- commercial  ETV  stations  in  a  live 
network.  The  lineup: 

"IGY:  A  Small  Planet  Takes  a  Look  at  Itself,"  a  wide- 

angle  view  of  the  International  Geophysical  Year  (Mondays, 
beginning  Oct.  28) , 

"MATHEMATICS,  with  Clifton  Fadiman, "  a  venture  designed 
to  convey  the  intellectual  excitement  to  be  found  in  what  he 
terms  "this  vast  and  beautiful  mansion"  (Tuesdays,  beginning 
Oct.  29) . 


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"ARTS  AND  THE  GODS,"  an  account  of  the  art  Inspired 
by  Greek  myths  (Wednesdays,  beginning  Oct,  30) • 

"SURVIVAL:  the  Story  of  Man,  Resources,  and  Civiliza¬ 
tion,"  (Thursdays,  beginning  Oct,  31) » 

"CAMERA  ON  WASHINGTON,"  a  study  of  the  executive  branch 
of  the  Federal  government  (Fridays,  beginning  Nov,  l) . 

The  Metropolitan  Museum  of  Art  in  New  York  will  be  the 
weekly  point  of  origin  of  "Arts  and  the  Gods,"  the  first  TV  series 
ever  to  come  from  there,  "Camera  on  Washington"  will  originate  in 
various  parts  of  the  national  capital.  The  other  three  program 
series  will  be  based  in  NBC’s  New  York  studios.  Guest  rosters  will 
include  leading  scientists,  mathematicians,  government  officials, 
resource  analysts,  art  experts  and  a  dance  theatre. 

New  to  the  Project  will  be  four  of  the  program  hosts:  Frank 
Blair,  Clifton  Fadiman,  Alexander  Scourby  and  Bill  Henry.  Blair,  a 
familiar  figure  to  millions  of  viewers  as  news  editor  of  NBC-TV’s 
"Today,"  will  conduct  "IGY."  Fadiman,  long  a  favorite  TV  and  radio 
master  of  ceremonies,  will  be  charged  with  "Mathematics,  Scourby, 
well-known  stage  and  TV-radio  actor,  will  preside  over  Arts  and  the 
Gods."  Henry,  NBC  commentator  who  has  been  a  ranking  correspondent 
in  the  capital  for  more  than  a  decade,  will  officiate  at  "Camera  on 
Washington,"  Albert  E,  Burke,  director  of  the  American  Institute  of 
Resource  Economics,  Hartford,  Conn.,  who  led  the  Project's  "Geography 
for  Decision"  series  last  Spring,  will  return  to  conduct  "Survival. 

The  Project  is  under  the  general  direction  of  Edward 
Stanley,  NBC  Manager  of  public  service  programs.  Brice  Howard  is  • 
Executive  Producer,  and  Donley  Feddersen  is  the  Center  representative. 

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The  ETV  stations,  all  affiliates  of  the  Center,  now  number 
29.  It  is  expected  that  all  will  carry  the  five  programs.  As  a 
supplementary  service,  NBC  owned-and-operated  stations  and  many  NBC 
network  affiliates  in  areas  which  the  ETV  outlets  do  not  cover  will 
be  furnished,  on  request,  kinescopes  of  the  programs  for  replay  on  a 
sustaining  basis  with  a  minimum  l4-day  delay  from  time  of  the  original 
live  telecast. 

THIS  PLANET  EARTH 

"IGY:  A  Small  Planet  Takes  a  Look  at  Itself”  will  deal 
each  week  with  a  specific  aspect  of  the  International  Geophysical 
Year.  There  will  be  explanation  and  illustration  of  the  most  signifi¬ 
cant  features  of  the  present  body  of  man's  knowledge  of  the  earth, 
description  of  the  many  gaps  in  that  knowledge,  and  account  of  the 
methods  by  which  IGY  scientists  hope  to  fill  in  or  bridge  those  gaps. 
The  format  will  regularly  embrace  film  coverage  of  key  IGY  activities, 
demonstration  with  models  and  use  of  the  Geophysical  Relief  Globe, 
six- feet- three -inches  in  diameter,  most  accurate  and  detailed  repre¬ 
sentation  of  the  earth's  surface  in  existence. 

Noted  scientists  and  leading  IGY  figures  --  one  a  week  -- 
will  be  Prank  Blair's  guests.  Among  them  will  be  Dr.  Joseph  Kaplan, 
chairman  of  the  U.S.  National  Committee  for  the  IGY  and  member  of  the 
department  of  physics  at  the  University  of  California,  who  will  take 

part  in  the  first,  ninth  and  tenth  sessions. 

The  topics,  in  turn,  will  be  (l)  "The  Quest,'  comparison  01 

the  nature  of  the  universe  with  that  of  the  earth,  summary  of  the  fund 
of  unanswered  questions  concerning  the  earth,  outline  of  how  IGY  is 

attacking  these  questions;  (2)  "The  Oceans,”  (3)  "The  Ends  of  the 

Earth”  (The  Antarctic),  (4)  "The  Face  of  the  Land,”  (5)  "The  Tremblinj 

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Earth,"  (6)  "Weather,"  (7)  "The  Air:  Blanket  and  Shield,"  (8)  "The 
Virgin  Sunlight,"  (9)  "Higher  than  the  Blue  Sky"  (ionosphere)  and 
(10)  "The  Newest  Moon"  (The  First  Earth  Satellite) . 

Robert  Rippen  and  E.G.  Valens  will  be  the  co-producers. 
Rippen  also  will  be  the  director,  and  Valens  will  write  the  scripts. 

MATHEMATICAL  BREAK- THROUGILS 

"Mathematics,  with  Clifton  Fadiman"  will  deal  with  the 
great  break-throughs  in  mathematical  thinking,  their  historical  im¬ 
pact  and  their  influence  today,  and  will  hint  at  the  undiscovered 
areas  within  each.  Subjects  will  include  the  discovery  of  number,  the 
contributions  of  men  like  Euclid  and  Newton  and  applications  of  mathe¬ 
matics  in  operations  research  today.  Consultants  will  be  drawn  from 
the  National  Council  of  the  Teachers  of  Mathematics  and  from  the 
Mathematical  Association  of  America.  Fadiman  will  have  each  week  a 
prominent  mathematician  as  guest. 

Program  topics,  in  order,  will  be  (l)  "How  Many,  How  Much?" 
(2)  "There's  More  Than  One  Geometry,"  (3)  "The  Search  for  X,"  (4) 

"The  Space  Pilot,"  (5)  "That's  the  Way  to  Bet,"  (6)  "A  Net  around 
Infinity,"  (7)  "The  Bedrock  of  Logical  Thought,"  (8)  "Collections 
and  Supercollections,"  (9)  "Mind  and  Machine"  and  (10)  "Mathematics 
in  the  Modern  World." 

Fadiman,  who  has  found  reading  about  mathematics  and  mathe¬ 
maticians  a  rewarding  hobby  for  20  years,  is  editor  of  a  soon-to-be- 
published  anthology  titled  "Mathematica  Fantasia."  His  latest  book, 
"Any  Number  Can  Play,"  contains  a  confessional  essay  headed  "Medita¬ 
tions  of  a  Mathematical  Moron." 


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Marilyn  Kaermnerle  will  be  the  producer,,  Lynwood  King  will 
direct  and  William  Welch  will  write  the  scripts, 

THE  GREEK  MYTHS  IN  ART 

"Arts  and  the  Gods"  will  originate  each  week  in  a  gallery 
housing  part  of  the  Metropolitan  Museum  of  Art's  Greek  collection, 
which  is  accounted  one  of  this  country fs  finest.  The  program  will 
deal  with  the  Greek  myths  most  common  in  the  visual  arts  and  in  lit¬ 
erature,  Sculpture,  vase  paintings,  other  objects  of  art  and,  on 
some  occasions,  dancing  will  illustrate  the  subjects.  Curators  and 
others  of  the  museum's  experts  will  serve  as  consultants,  Edith 
Hamilton,  nonagenarian  author  of  "The  Greek  Way,"  "Echo  of  Greece" 
and  "Mythology,"  and  the  Mary  Anthony  Dance  Theatre  will  take  part  in 
the  first  session,  Alexander  Scourby,  as  host,  will  have  other  oc¬ 
casional  guests, 

Scourby,  who  has  narrated  many  of  the  NBC-TV  "Project  20" 
histories-on-film,  has  recorded  more  than  250  books-for-the-blind  for 
the  Library  of  Congress  (including  Plato,  Xenophon,  Homer's  Iliad 
and  "Odyssey"),  has  acted  on  Broadway  in  many  plays  (among  them  a 
Greek- language  production  of  a  modern  Greek  drama  with  Katina  Paxinou) 
and  on  TV  in  many  live  dramatic  productions  (among  them  Anouilh's 
version  of  Sophocles’  "Antigone"  on  NBC  last  season), 

Marilyn  Kaemmerle  will  be  the  producer,  Frank  Pacelli  will 
direct,  and  Blair  Chotzinoff  will  be  the  writer  and  associate  producer. 

The  topics,  chronologically,  will  be  (l)  1  The  Gods  Are 
Born,"  (2)  "Athena  and  Aphrodite,"  (3)  "Apollo  and  Artemis, 


(more) 


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(4)  "Death  and  the  Brides,"  (5)  "The  Trojan  War,"  (6)  "The  Odyssey," 
(7)  "Perseus,"  (8)  "Theseus  and  Bellerophon, "  (9)  "Heracles"  and 

(10)  "The  Richness  of  Mythological  Subjects  in  Art." 

MAN  AND  HIS  RESOURCES 

"Survival:  the  Story  of  Man,  Resources  and  Civilization" 

will  be  produced  in  association  with  the  Conservation  Foundation.  In 
its  approach  to  study  of  man  and  the  resources  he  uses,  it  will  employ 
a  format  that  will  be  largely  lecture  with  visual  aids.  It  will  deal 
with  what  resources  are,  how  man  uses  them,  how  attitudes  and  tech¬ 
nological  achievements  have  affected  the  kind  and  quantity  of  re¬ 
sources  he  uses  and  his  way  of  using  them.  Four  general  areas  -- 
population,  agriculture,  energy  sources  and  mineral  resources  --  will 
be  treated  historically,  with  consideration  of  how  they  have  affected 
primitive  man,  agricultural  man,  industrial  man  and  are  affecting 
technological  man. 

Albert  E.  Burke,  as  program  host,  will  have  guests  on  sev¬ 
eral  of  the  telecasts,  among  them  Dr.  James  T.  Bonner,  biologist  and 
specialist  in  plant-biochemistry,  member  of  the  California  Institute 
of  Technology's  division  of  biology,  and  co-author  of  "The  Next 
Hundred  Years." 

The  topics,  in  turn,  will  be  (l)  Introduction,  (2)  Popula¬ 
tion  #1,  (3)  Population  #2,  (4)  Agriculture  #1,  (5)  Agriculture  #2, 

(6)  Energy  #1,  (7)  Energy  #2,  (8)  Energy  #3,  (9)  Minerals  and  (10) 

Conclusion, 

Dorothy  Culbertson  will  be  the  producer,  and  Frank  Pacelli 
the  director. 


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FOCUS  ON  GOVERNMENT 

"Camera  on  Washington"  v/ill  range  the  nation’s  capital  to 
study  the  functioning  of  the  executive  arm  of  the  Federal  government* 
There  will  be  on-location  pickups  from  a  cross-section  of  the  many 
departments,  agencies,  bureaus  and  commissions  which  make  up  this 
branch.  The  close-up  examination  will  be  designed  to  help  viewers 
see  government  not  as  a  remote  abstraction  but  as  a  cluster  of  con¬ 
crete  processes  which  have  immediate  meaning  in  the  daily  life  of 
every  citizen.  Bill  Henry  v/ill  have  a  distinguished  guest  each  week. 

The  cameras  v/ill  probe  behind  the  scenes  of  the  State  De¬ 
partment,  U.S.  Information  Agency,  Department  of  Defense,  National 
Bureau  of  Standards,  Agriculture  Department,  Treasury  Department, 
National  Institutes  of  Health,  Justice  Department,  U.S.  Weather  Bureau 
and  the  White  House.  (Details  will  be  announced  soon.) 

Joel  O’Brien  will  be  the  producer.  Frank  Slingland  will  be 
the  director,  and  Joan  Seaver  will  write  the  scripts. 

A  list  of  the  ETV  stations  follows: 

W MVS- TV,  Milwaukee,  Wis.;  WHA-TV,  Madison,  Wis.; 
KCTS-TV,  Seattle,  Wash.;  KUED,  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah;  KUHT, 
Houston,  Tex.;  WKNO-TV,  Memphis,  Tenn.;  WQED,  Pittsburgh, 

Pa.;  WHYY-TV,  Philadelphia;  KETA,  Norman  (Oklahoma  City), 

Okla. ;  WOSU-TV,  Columbus,  Ohio;  WCET,  Cincinnati,  Ohio; 

WUNC-TV,  Chapel  Hill,  N.C.;  KUON-TV,  Lincoln,  Neb.;  KETC, 

St.  Louis;  KTCA-TV,  St.  Paul,  Minn.;  WKAR-TV,  East  Lansing, 
Mich.;  WTVS-TV,  Detroit;  WGBH-TV,  Boston;  WYES,  New  Orleans; 
WILL-TV,  Urbana,  Ill.;  WTTW,  Chicago;  WE TV,  Atlanta,  Ga.; 
WTHS-TV,  Miami,  Fla.;  WJCT,  Jacksonville,  Fla.;  KRMA-TV, 

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8  -  Educational  TV 


Denver;  KQED,  San  Francisco;  WAIQ,  Andalusia,  Ala.;  WTIQ, 

Munford,  Ala.;  WBIQ,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

NBC  and  the  Center  are  sharing  costs  of  approximately 
$700,000  to  carry  out  the  Educational  TV  Project  this  year,  NBC  will 
underwrite  the  costs  of  three  of  the  new  series  ("Mathematics,"  "Arts 
and  the  Gods,"  "Survival")  and  the  Center  will  underwrite  the  other 
two  ("IGY, "  "Camera  on  Washington").  The  Center  is  supplying  the 
local  loops  to  connect  the  ETV  stations  with  the  NBC  network  lines  and 
is  consulting  with  NBC  in  designing  all  five  programs. 

The  Project  was  launched  last  March  with  a  series  of  five 
13-week  programs  telecast  live  to  ETV  stations  across  the  country. 

It  marked  the  first  time  that  the  non-commercial  ETV  stations  were 
interconnected  for  live  programming  on  a  national  basis.  From  them 
came  reports  that  the  live  network  shows  stimulated  viewer  interest  in 
their  over-all  program  structures.  Unexpected,  yet  equally  affirma¬ 
tive,  response  came  from  commercial  stations  --  for  which  the  service 
was  not  even  intended.  Many  of  these  stations  --  NBC  affiliates  -- 
were  in  areas  not  covered  by  ETV  outlets  and  requested  kinescopes  of 
the  programs  for  replay  on  a  sustaining  basis. 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/3/57 


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Attention:  Sports  Editors 


NBC  NEV/S  PROVIDES  WORLD  SERIES  RESULTS  FOR  AMERICANS  IN  MOSCOW 

NBC  News  again  is  providing  World  Series  results  to  fans 
among  the  150  Americans  in  Moscow.  It  was  decided  to  cable  the  re¬ 
sults  to  its  Moscow  correspondent,  Irving  R.  Levine,  after  Levine,  in 
a  report  to  NBC  News  yesterday,  recalled  the  popularity  of  the  service 
last  year.  Levine  said  he  telephoned  the  U.S.  embassy  as  soon  as  the 
World  Series  reports  were  received  last  year,  and  they  were  posted  for 
all  to  see.  Otherwise,  Americans  would  have  had  to  try  to  pick  up  the 
scores  from  the  Armed  Forces  Radio  Service  in  West  Germany  --  and 

that  at  a  very  late  hour,"  Levine  said. 

Moscow  papers  don't  carry  a  line  on  the  World  Series,  he 
reported.  "It  just  doesn't  exist  as  far  as  the  Russians  are  con¬ 
cerned,"  Levine  said.  "Not  one  out  of  1,000  Russians  would  know  what 
you  were  talking  about,"  To  a  Russian,  he  said,  the  phrase  World 
Series  means  the  coming  world  soccer  matches  in  Sweden  next  June. 

- o - 

NBC  TRADE  NEWS 

NBC  RADIO'S  "NEWS  OF  THE  WORLD"  WITH  COMMENTATOR  MORGAN  BEATTY 
WILL  BE  BROADCAST  FROM  N.Y.  STARTING  OCT.  7 

NBC  commentator  Morgan  Beatty  will  originate  NBC 
Radio's  NEWS  OF  THE  WORLD  from  New  York  instead  of  Chicago, 
starting  Monday ,  Oct.  7«  The  show  is  broadcast  Mondays 
through  Fridays  from  7:30  to  7:^5  p.m.*  NYT.  During  the 
show,  Mr.  Beatty  calls  in  reports  from  NBC  correspondents 

throughout  the  world. 


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NBC 


TELEVISION 


NEWS 


NBC  COLOR  TELECAST  SCHEDULE 
Oct.  13  -  19  (All  Times  NYT) 


Sunday,  Oct,  13 

3-9  p.m,  --  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW  --  With  guests  Dorothy  Lamour, 

Jon  Hall  and  the  floor  show  from  the  Hawaiian  Room  of  New  York’s 
Hotel  Lexington. 

9-10:30  p.m.  --  THE  STANDARD  OIL  COMPANY  (NSW  JERSEY)  75TH  ANNI¬ 
VERSARY  SHOW  --  Special  anniversary  show  with  the  theme  "Wonders 
of  Today  and  the  Promise  of  Tomorrow, "  with  Tyrone  Power  as  host 
and  spokesman  and  starring  Jimmy  Durante,  Bert  Lahr,  Donald 
O'Connor,  Jane  Powell  and  also  starring  Marge  and  Gower  Champion, 
Brandon  de  Wilde,  Duke  Ellington  and  his  orchestra,  Eddie 
Mayehoff,  Cornelia  Otis  Skinner,  Kay  Thompson.  Production 
staged  by  Cyril  Ritchard.  Kay  Thompson  and  Richard  Avedon  are 
on  creative  staff. 

Monday,  Oct.  l4 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW.  , 

7:30-8  p.m.  --  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT  —  With  emcee  Bill  Cullen. 

Tuesday,  Oct.  15 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Father  Came  Home,"  starring 
Cesar  Romero. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY 


30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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Tuesday,  Oct.  15  (Cont'd) 

8- 9  p.m.  —  THE  EDDIE  FISHER  SHOW  STARRING  EDDIE  FISHER  WITH  GEORGE 

GOBEL  --  Tonight’s  guests  are  Gisele  MacKenzie,  Phil  Harris  and 
Elaine  Dunne. 

Wednesday,  Oct,  l6 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Villa  of  the  Angels." 

9- 10  p.m.  --  KRAFT  TELEVISION  THEATRE  --  "A  Cook  for  Mr.  General," 

starring  Bill  Travers. 

Thursday,  Oct.  17 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "The  Tone  of  Time,"  starring 
Sarah  Churchill. 

7:30-8  p.m.  --  TIC  TAC  DOUGH  --  With  emcee  Jay  Jackson. 

9:30-11  p.m.  --  HALLMARK  HALL  OF  FAME  --  "The  Green  Pastures," 

Marc  Connelly’s  adaptation  of  his  Pulitzer  Prize  "fable  play." 
The  all-Negro  cast  of  60  is  headed  by  William  Warfield,  Eddie 
"Rochester"  Anderson,  Earle  Hyman,  William  Dillard,  Sheila 
Guyse,  Estelle  Hemsley,  Fred  O’Neal,  Muriel  Rahn,  Terry  Carter, 
Richard  Ward,  Rosetta  Lenoire,  Jonelle  Allen,  Michael  Gelford, 
Eric  Herman  and  Rhoda  Boggs, 

Friday,  Oct.  18 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Almost  Any  Man  Will  Do." 


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Saturday,  Oct.  19 

1:15  or  2:15  p.m.  —  NCAA  FOOTBALL  GAME  —  Big  Ten  Game  (Teams  and 
exact  starting  time  to  be  announced.) 

3-9  p.m.  --  THE  PERRY  COMO  SHOW  --  With  tonight1 s  guests  Tony 
Bennett,  Diana  Dors,  Jackie  Miles  and  Benny  Goodman  &  Trio. 
10:30-11  p.m.  --  YOUR  HIT  PARADE  --  With  vocalists  Jill  Corey, 
Virginia  Gibson,  Tommy  Leonetti  and  Alan  Copeland. 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/4/57 


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MUSIC  NEWS 


PRESIDENT  EISENHOWER  AND  VICE  PRESIDENT  NIXON  CONGRATULATE 
SOUTH  BEND  ON  FESTIVAL  FEATURING  NBC  OPERA  COMPANY 

Telegrams  from  President  Dwight  D.  Eisenhower  and 
Vice  President  Richard  M.  Nixon  were  received  by  officials 
in  South  Bend,  Ind,,  relating  to  the  St.  Mary  *  s  College  Fes¬ 
tival  in  connection  with  the  NBC  Opera  Company.  The  festival 
concluded  last  night  (Oct.  3)  with  a  second  performance  of 
Verdi's  "La  Traviata," 

The  NBC  Opera  Company  participation  in  the  10-day 
opera  festival  at  St.  Mary’s  College  in  South  Bend  was  also 
the  beginning  of  the  company's  Second  Annual  Tour  which  will 
take  it  to  63  cities  in  the  next  nine  weeks. 

Following  are  the  texts  of  the  telegrams: 

JOHN  A.  SCOTT,  PRESIDENT, 

SOUTH  BEND  CHAMBER  OF  COMMERCE, 

SOUTH  BEND,  IND. 

THROUGH  CONGRESSMAN  NIMTZ,  I  HAVE  LEARNED  OF  THE 
MUSIC  FESTIVAL  TO  BE  HELD  AT  ST.  MARY'S  COLLEGE  AND 
THE  CELEBRATION  PLANNED  BY  THE  CITIZENS  OF  SOUTH 
BEND  IN  HONOR  OF  THEIR  VISITING  NBC  OPERA  COMPANY. 

THIS  IS  A  SPLENDID  DEMONSTRATION  OF  THE  SPIRIT  AND 
CULTURE  OF  YOUR  COMMUNITY,  AND  I  WISH  YOU  ALL 
SUCCESS . 

DWIGHT  D.  EISENHOWER. 

(more) 

PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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CHAMBER  OF  COMMERCE, 

SOUTH  BEND,  IND. 

MY  FRIEND  JAY  NIMTZ  KINDLY  ADVISED  ME  OF  THE  WEL¬ 
COMING  CELEBRATION  SOUTH  BEND  IS  EXTENDING  TO  THE 
NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  CORPORATION  OPERA  COMPANY. 

I  FEEL  CERTAIN  THAT  THIS  WILL  BE  A  MEMORABLE  OC¬ 
CASION  FOR  ALL  OF  THE  RESIDENTS  OF  SOUTH  BEND  AND 
FOR  THE  MEMBERS  OF  THE  OPERA  COMPANY.  PLEASE 
ACCEPT  MY  CONGRATULATIONS  FOR  THIS  UNIQUE  RECEP¬ 
TION  FOR  ONE  OF  THE  WORLD «S  GREAT  ART  FORMS. 

BEST  WISHES  FOR  A  FINE  CELEBRATION. 

RICHARD  NIXON. 


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NBC -New  York,  10/4/57 


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October  4,  1957 

MOUNTING  ENTHUSIASM  FOR  NBC  OWNED  STATIONS'  "KNOW  YOUR  SCHOOLS" 
PROJECT  EXPRESSED  BY  PUBLIC  OFFICIALS  AND  EDUCATIONAL  LEADERS 

Mounting  enthusiasm  for  the  NBC  Owned  Stations'  "Know  Your 
Schools"  project  has  been  expressed  by  high  government  officials , 
mayors ,  superintendents  of  schools  and  educational  leaders  since  the 
public  service  effort  was  announced  last  week. 

Developed  with  the  cooperation  of  the  U.S.  Department  of 
Health,  Education  and  Welfare  and  the  U.S.  Office  of  Education,  the 
six -week  project  will  concentrate  the  combined  facilities  of  NBC's 
13  radio  and  television  stations  in  eight  major  cities  on  spotlighting 
important  current  issues  in  American  education.  'Know  Your  ochools 
will  be  launched  by  the  NBC  Owned  Stations  on  the  weekend  of  0ct.lc.-13. 
Value  of  time  and  programming  for  all  13  stations  will  exceed 
$1,000,000. 

Following  are  some  of  the  endorsements  of  the  project  which 
have  been  received  by  Thomas  B.  McFadden,  Vice  President  of  NBC  Owned 
Stations : 

(more ) 


publicity  department  9  NBC  Owned  Stations  Division  9  30  Rockefeller  Plaza,  N.  1 .  20,  J\.Y.  9  Cl  7-8300 


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'Know  Your  Schools' 


Senator  Irving  M.  Ives  (N.Y.),  Member  of  the  Senate  Commit¬ 
tee  on  Labor  and  Public  Welfare  --  "You  should  be  commended  highly  for 
this  project.  It  should  do  much  good.  It  is  obvious  that  the  more 
the  citizens  of  a  community  know  about  their  schools,  the  more  they 
are  likely  to  support  efforts  to  improve  them.  In  lending  the  facili¬ 
ties  of  the  NBC  Owned  Stations  to  furthering  this  purpose,  you  are 
performing  a  real  public  service  and  elevating  your  own  standing  in 
the  community.  I  sincerely  hope  that  your  project  will  serve  as  a 
pattern  for  public  service  programs  of  a  similar  nature  throughout  the 
country.  My  heartiest  congratulations  on  this  eminently  worthwhile 
endeavor. " 

Representative  Graham  A.  Barden  (N.C,),  Chairman  of  the 
House  Committee  on  Education  and  Labor  --  "I  am  sure  the  'Know  Your 
Schools'  project  will  be  an  extremely  useful  service  to  the  public. 

This  in  my  opinion  is  a  way  to  make  the  average  citizen,  and  especially 
the  parents,  conscious  of  their  responsibility  for  the  proper  educa¬ 
tion  and  training  of  the  youth  of  our  land.  I  commend  you  for  this 
public  service  undertaking,  and  for  your  intention  to  make  available 
to  other  broadcasters  the  knowledge  which  you  gain  for  using  radio 
and  television  to  inform  the  public  about  the  problems  of  education. 

I.  Keith  Tyler,  director  of  the  Office  of  Radio  Education 
for  Ohio  State  University,  said:  "I  am  sure  that  the  results  of  this 
intensive  project  will  be  most  beneficial  to  the  development  of  educa¬ 
tion.  Certainly  our  schools  are  approaching  a  crisis  and  the  public 
needs  to  be  informed  so  that  adequate  action  can  be  taken." 

Typical  of  the  response  from  cities  in  which  NBC  Owned 
Stations  are  located  is  this  statement  by  Mayor  Richard  J.  Daley  of 


Chicago : 


(more) 


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3  ■  'Know  Your  Schools* 


"I  congratulate  the  National  Broadcasting  Company  for  re¬ 
porting  one  of  the  most  important  and  urgent  problems  of  the  Chicago 
area.  We  are  all  benefited  when  the  attention  and  resources  of  this 
leading  medium  of  public  discussion  is  devoted  to  studying  the  suf¬ 
ficiency  and  quality  of  the  way  in  which  the  community  is  educating 
our  youth." 

Other  endorsements  were  received  from  Dr.  Benjamin  C. 

Willis,  General  Superintendent  of  Chicago  public  schools;  Dr.  Noble 
J.  Puffer,  County  Superintendent  of  Schools  in  Cook  County,  Ill,; 

Msgr,  William  E.  McManus,  Superintendent  of  Schools  of  the  Archdiocese 
of  Chicago;  A.  H.  Kramer,  Superintendent  of  Christian  Education, 
Lutheran  Church- -Missouri  Synod,  Northern  Illinois  District;  Dr.  Mark 
A.  Neville,  Headmaster  of  the  Latin  School  of  Chicago;  Melville  H. 
Hosch,  Director  of  the  Chicago  Regional  Office,  Department  of  Health, 
Education  and  Welfare;  Prank  Balthis,  NEA-IEA  field  assistant;  and 
Earl  H.  Hanson,  president  of  the  Illinois  Education  Association. 

Commenting  on  the  plans  of  Station  WBUF  for  the  project, 
Mayor  Steven  Pankow  of  Buffalo  said:  "I  was  extremely  pleased  to 
hear  of  your  station's  forthcoming  public  service  campaign  aimed  at 
getting  citizens  to  "Know  Your  Schools."  Our  schools  are  doing  a 
great  job  in  educating  the  youngsters  of  our  community,  and  I  cer¬ 
tainly  feel  that  every  effort  in  the  direction  of  acquainting  the 
public  with  that  job  merits  applause.  Your  project  also  should  have 
the  effect  of  awakening  large  numbers  of  our  citizens  to  some  of  the 
problems  the  schools  face  in  achieving  their  goal  of  well-educated 
youth. " 


(more ) 


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4  -  ‘Know  Your  Schools* 


Dr.  Joseph  Manch,  Buffalo  Superintendent  of  Schools,  and 
Msgr.  Sylvester  Holbel,  Superintendent  of  Catholic  Schools,  Diocese 
of  Buffalo,  also  endorsed  the  project. 

In  Philadelphia,  Allen  H,  Wetter,  Superintendent  of  Schools, 
said:  "I  want  to  commend  NBC  and  Stations  WRCV  and  WRCV-TV  for  this 

type  of  responsible  service  to  our  schools.  It  is  always  encouraging 
to  educators  to  know  that  powerful  commercial  organizations  such  as 
yours  are  willing  to  put  time,  money  and  effort  into  worthwhile  public 
service.  You  can  count  on  our  full  cooperation." 

Endorsements  were  also  received  from  Martha  A.  Gable, 
Director  of  Radio  and  Television  Education  of  the  Philadelphia  Public 
Schools;  Frederick  L.  Hipp,  Executive  Secretary  of  the  New  Jersey 
Education  Association;  and  Noryne  E.  Million,  Radio  and  TV  Chairman 
of  the  New  Jersey  Congress  of  Parents  and  Teachers, 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/4/57 


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NBC -TV  AND  RADIO  NEWS 


CAST,  CREDITS,  WHO’S  WHO  AND  SCENES  OF  "PINOCCHIO" 

ON  NBC -TV  AND  RADIO  SUNDAY,  OCT.  13  (6:30-7:30  P.M.,  NYT) 


CAST 


PINOCCHIO . MICKEY  ROONEY 

GEPPETTO  .....•••••• . WALTER  SLEZAK 

BLUE -HAIRED  FAIRY  QUEEN . FRAN  ALLISON 

TOWN  CRIER . STUBBY  KAYE 

RINGMASTER -JOLLY  COACHMAN . JERRY  COLONNA 

FOX . MARTYN  GREEN 

PUPPETS-FISH . . . MATA  AND  HARI 

GEPPETTO1  S  CAT . SONDRA  LEE 

CAT . MATT  MATTOX 

MARIONETTE . . . IMELDA  DE  MARTIN 

PRODUCTION  CLOWN . PAUL  JUNG 

YOUNG  FATHER . TIM  HERBERT 

Beggar  Woman . . . Elaine  Eldridge 

Figurehead . Tere  Dennis 

Rooney's  Double, . . .Carl  Graves 

Man- in-the -Moon . Harry  McKenna 

Extra. . . . . Honey  McKenzie 

Clowns . Joe  Rocco 

Don  Redlich 

Roustabouts . Crandall  Diehl 

Glen  Tetley 


(more) 


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2  -'Cast  and  Credits  —  >Pinocchiot 

CAST  (CONT »D) 


Girl  Dancers. . . . . 

,  .Gene  Hufeisen 

Karen  Sargent 

Normandy  Karr 

Gloria  Kaye 

Male  Singers. . . . . 

,  .Percy  Dove 

Gordon  Clarke 

Jack  De  Low 

Girl  Singers . .  • . . , 

.  .Elizabeth  Howell 

Shirley  Winston 

Adrian  Angel 

Radio  Narrator . . 

.  .Ben  Grauer 

Radio  Announcer . . 

,  .Ed  Herlihy 

*  *  * 


SPONSOR . . 

..The  Rexall  Drug  Co, 

ADVERTISING  AGENCY . 

. .Batten,  Barton,  Durstine 

and  Osborn,  Inc . 

*  *  * 

PRODUCTION  STAFF 


CREATED  AND  STAGED  BY . 

..YASHA  FRANK 

EXECUTIVE  PRODUCER . 

..DAVID  SUSSKIND 

PRODUCER . 

..HERBERT  M.  MOSS 

ASSOCIATE  PRODUCER . 

. .MICHAEL  ABBOTT 

DIRECTOR . 

. .PAUL  BOGART 

CHOREOGRAPHY . 

. .HANYA  HOLM 

ART  DIRECTION . 

SAMUEL  LEVE 

MUSIC . 

.  ALEC  WILDER 

(more) 


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^  -  Cast  and  Credits 


1 Pinocchio  * 


PRODUCTION  STAFF  (CONT'D) 


LYRICS . 

COSTUMES . . 

PRODUCTION  SUPERVISOR. 
PRODUCTION  COORDINATOR 
ASSISTANT  DIRECTOR. . . . 
CONDUCTOR -ARRANGER. . . . 

MAKEUP . . . 

UNIT  MANAGER . 

TECHNICAL  DIRECTOR. . . . 

LIGHTING  DIRECTOR . 

RADIO  DIRECTOR . 

COMMERCIAL  PRODUCER . . . 
COMMERCIAL  DIRECTOR. . . 


WILLIAM  ENGVICK 
NOEL  TAYLOR 
BUDD  WILDS 
BORIS  FRANK 
GORDON  RIGSBY 
GLENN  OSSER 
DICK  SMITH 
,TOM  MADIGAN 
,HEINO  RIPP 
■JACK  FITZPATRICK 
, PARKER  GIBBS 
.EVERETT  HART 
.LEN  VALENTA 


-oooo- 


ORIGINATION 


NBC,  New  York 


*  *  * 


This  is  a  musical  play  based  on  the  famous  old 
"Pinocchio"  legend  of  a  little  wooden  puppet  who,  by  dint 
of  his  own  good  deeds,  eventually  earns  status  as  a  real, 
living  child.  Some  of  the  incidents  are  based,  loosely, 
on  the  book,  "Adventures  of  Pinocchio,"  by  Carlo  Collodi. 


(more) 


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4  -  Cast  and  Credits 


1 Pinocchio 1 


SCENE  RUNDOWN 


SEQUENCE  ONE 

Scene  A 


Scene  B 
Scene  C 


Opening 

Village  Street 

Interior  Geppetto ’s 
Home 


Credits 
"Happy  News" 

Crier  Knocks  at  Doors 

Geppetto  and  Cat  at 
Dinner 


SEQUENCE  TWO 


SEQUENCE  THREE 
Scene  A 


Scene  B 


SEQUENCE  FOUR 
Scene  A 


Scene  B 


Scene  C 


Scene  D 


Scene  E 


Exterior  Apothecary  Shop  Father  and  Crier 
Exterior  Apothecary  Shop  Apothecary  and  Crier 


Interior  and  Exterior 
Geppetto1 s 


Interior  Exterior 
Geppetto1 s  and 
Village  Street 


Carnival  Grounds  and 
Fairy  Limbo 


Carnival  Grounds  and 
Fairy  Limbo 


Marionette  Theatre 


Boobyland  to  Circus 
Tent  and  Fairy  Limbo 


Calliope  and  Carnival 
Grounds 


Geppetto  delivers  Cradle 
He  Makes  Pinocchio 
Pinocchio  Song 
Pinocchio  Lullaby 

Next  Morning  - 
-Get  Up 
-Burn  Feet 
-Fix  Feet 

-Children  leave  for 
school 


Children  at  Carnival 
Beggar  Woman 
Fairy  Queen 

Cat  and  Fox  Number 
Fairy  Queen 
Love  Song 

Pinocchio  Entrance 
Marionette  Ballet 
"Listen  to  Your  Heart" 
and  Pinocchio  exit 

"Jolly  Coachman’s  Song" 
Dotted  Line 

Fairy  Queen  and  Dressing 
Business 

Calliope  -  "Listen  to  Your 
Heart" 

Pinocchio  Drummed  Out 
Parade  to  Cliff 


(more) 


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3  -  Cast  and  Credits  —  Pinocchio1 


SEQUENCE  FIVE 


SEQUENCE  SIX 

Scene  A 
Scene  B 

SEQUENCE  SEVEN 

Scene  A 

Scene  B 

Scene  C 

Scene  D 


The  Cliff 


The  Cliff 


Undersea 

Whale  Interior  and 
Exterior 


Interior,  Exterior 
Geppetto* s  and  Fairy 
Queen  Limbo 


Crier1 s  Bedroom  and 

Moon 

Moon 

Interior  Geppetto* s 
Home  and  Street 


Interior  of  Geppetto *s 
Home 

Fairy  Limbo  and  Crawl 


Pinocchio  Struggle  on 
edge 

Geppetto  Arrives 

Cat  and  Fox 

Geppetto  Diverted 
Pinocchio  Pushed  Off 
Under  Water 


Undersea  Ballet 

Pinocchio  Arrives 

Reunion 

Tour  Whales 

Lullaby 

Escape 


Return  Home 
Beggar  Woman 
Fairy  Queen 
Lullaby 

Lullaby 

Stop  The  Moon 

Moon  and  Lullaby  continue 

Pinocchio  is  Real 
"Happy  News" 

"Birthday  Party  Song" 

New  Sign  -  "And  Son" 
Birthday  Cake 

Crier  and  Jean  Sullivan 
with  Wand 

Fairy  Recovers  Wand 
Fairy  Leads  to  Crawl 
Crawl 


*  *  # 


o 


NBC-New  York,  10/4/57 


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EXCLUSIVE  NASSAR  INTERVIEW  BY  NBC  AND  ASSOCIATED  PRESS 
MADE  NEWS  HEADLINES  AROUND  THE  WORLD 

Interview  with  Egyptian  President  Nasser  by  NBC-TV  and  the 

1 

Associated  Press,  made  news  headlines  around  the  world, 

NBC  correspondent  Welles  Hangen  and  the  AP's  Wilton  Wynn 
conducted  the  exclusive  interview.  In  the  film  (which  was  shown  on 
NBC-TV* s  "Today”  show  Sept.  27 ),  Nasser  took  a  generally  conciliatory 
tone  toward  the  West,  even  suggesting  he  might  meet  with  President 
Eisenhower . 

Here  are  some  of  the  headlines  from  foreign  papers: 

"Col.  Nasser  Sees  a  Meeting  With  President  Eisenhower" 

—  Le  Monde,  Paris. 

"Nasser:  ’I’m  Ready  to  Meet  Eisenhower’"  --  Combat, 

Paris . 

"Nasser  Reviews  Mid-East  for  Radio  and  Press"  — 

Egyptian  Mail,  Cairo. 

"Nasser  Declares  Egypt’s  Policy  --  Abdel  Nasser  Is 
Ready  to  Meet  Eisenhower"  --  Akhbar  el-Yom,  Cairo. 

Soviet  papers  carried  about  a  half-column  on  the  interview. 
Pravda  led  off  with  Nasser’s  comment  that  Egypt  intends  to  continue 
a  policy  of  neutrality. 

Hong  Kong  and  Japanese  papers  emphasized  the  fact  that 
Nasser  was  willing  to  meet  President  Eisenhower  and  interpreted  this 
as  a  hopeful  circumstance. 

The  New  York  Herald  Tribune’s  Paris  edition  headlined: 
"Nasser  for  Talks  With  Eisenhower." 


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(7) 


JH  FEATURE 


TENNESSEE  ERNIE  ATTENDS  GRADUATION  OF  250  SAILORS  IN  COMPANIES 
BEARING  HIS  NAME  AT  SAN  DIEGO  NAVAL  TRAINING  CENTER 

Tennessee  Ernie  Ford  --  the  nation's  No.  1  peapicker  who 
stars  on  NBC-TV’s  THE  FORD  SHOW  --  was  a  recent  guest  of  honor  at  the 
U.S,  Naval  Training  Center  in  San  Diego  during  graduation  ceremonies 
of  four  Tennessee  Ernie  Ford  companies.  Completing  nine  weeks  of 
basic  training  at  the  center  were  250  Tennessee  sailors  who  joined 
the  Navy  to  become  part  of  the  companies  bearing  the  NBC-TV  enter¬ 
tainer's  name. 

Navy  recruit  officials  used  Ernie's  name  in  an  effort  to 
obtain  a  company  of  enlistees  (68  men)  in  Tennessee.  The  response  was 
so  great  that  250  men  joined  up  before  the  offer  was  withdrawn,  result¬ 
ing  in  four  companies  Instead  of  one. 

Prior  to  the  formal  graduation  ceremonies,  Ernie  visited  with 
men  of  the  four  companies  in  their  barracks.  In  one  barracks  he 
strummed  a  guitar  and  sang  a  duet  with  l8-year-old  Roy  Burkhart,  of 
Chattanooga,  who  claimed  the  recruiting  officer  there  promised  him  an 
opportunity  to  sing  on  Ernie's  show  if  he  joined  the  company. 

"I  reckon  now  that  he  was  just  kiddin',"  the  youth  said  after 
the  duet  with  Ernie,  "but  this  is  just  as  good." 

("The  Ford  Show"  is  telecast  on  NBC  Thursday  nights  at 
9:30  p.m.,  NYT.) 

- o - 

NBC-New  York,  10/4/57 


PRESS  D  E  P  A  R  T  M  E  N  T,  N  AT  I  O  N  A  L  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER 


PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


October  7*  1957 

’THE  STRANGE  CASE  OF  THE  COSMIC  RAYS’  TO  BE  COLORCAST 

Scientific  Detective  Story  Is  Produced  by  Frank  Capra, 

Starring  Richard  Carlson  and  Dr.  Frank  Baker 

A  scientific  detective  story  that  ranges  into  outer  space  is 
dramatized  in  THE  STRANGE  CASE  OF  THE  COSMIC  RAYS,  a  full-hour  program 
to  be  presented  on  NBC  Television  Friday,  Oct,  25  (9-10  p.m.,  NYT),  in 
color  and  in  black  and  white.  It  will  be  the  first  of  four  Bell 
Science  Series  programs  which  NBC  will  telecast  during  the  1957-58 
season . 

Frank  Capra  produced  and  directed  the  filmed  program,  which 
stars  Richard  Carlson  and  Dr.  Frank  Baxter.  Baxter,  the  noted 
authority  on  Shakespeare,  portrays  a  research  scientist  on  this 
occasion,  and  Carlson  plays  a  fiction  writer.  In  addition  to  live 
performers,  Capra  has  also  used  animation,  puppets  and  documentary 
science  film  in  combining  entertainment  with  information.  Bil  and 
Cora  Baird  created  the  program’s  puppets. 

The  program  is  being  presented  during  the  International 
Geophysical  Year,  an  l8-month  period  when  scientists  are  cooperating 
in  world-wide  experiments  and  observations  in  the  fields  of  pure 
science.  One  of  the  most  important  of  these  is  cosmic  rays. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


2  -  1  The  Strange  Case  of  the  Cosmic  Rays1 


The  "Strange  Case"  dramatizes  the  patient  detective  work 
performed  by  scientists  all  over  the  world  for  more  than  half  a 
century  in  tracking  down  and  identifying  cosmic  rays.  It  is  a  mystery 
story  that  still  engages  the  best  minds  in  the  scientific  world. 

Capra  has  conceived  of  this  cosmic  ray  research  as  a  detective  story 

whose  scope  is  the  entire  universe. 

Cosmic  ray  research  actually  began  when  scientists  tried  to 
explain  the  dissipation  of  an  electric  charge  when  no  known  factors 
were  present.  An  unknown  radiation  was  found  to  be  responsible. 

Capra  has  cast  it  in  the  role  of  the  culprit  that  scientists  all  over 
the  world  are  trying  to  locate ,  identify  and  "fingerprint." 

Space  fiction  to  the  contrary,  cosmic  rays  are  not  harmful, 
the  program  points  out.  Although  every  living  thing  on  earth  is 
constantly  bombarded  by  cosmic  rays,  they  pass  right  through  without 
harmful  effect.  Scientists  see  no  reason  why  this  should  not  be  as 
true  in  outer  space,  if  man  ever  gets  there,  as  it  is  on  the  earth’s 
surface  or  in  that  part  of  the  atmosphere  that  man  has  penetrated 
so  far. 

Starting  with  observations  of  effects  of  a  mysterious 
radiation,  scientists  worked  back  until  they  established  its  origin  in 
outer  space.  The  effect  of  cosmic  radiation  on  germ  cells  is  thought 
to  have  some  effect  on  the  evolution  of  living  creatures,  but  this 
has  not  yet  been  proved.  Cosmic  ray  research  has  produced  knowledge 
that  is  basic  to  the  development  of  atomic  energy. 

Dr.  Carl  D.  Anderson,  Nobel  Prize  winner  and  professor  of 
physics  at  the  California  Institute  of  Technology,  was  the  principal 
advisor  in  the  production.  Dr,  Bruno  Rossi  of  Massachusetts  Institute  o 

(more ) 


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3  -  'The  Strange  Case  of  the  Cosmic  Rays* 


Technology  and  Dr.  Marcel  Scheln  of  the  University  of  Chicago  were 
associate  advisors.  Scientific  material  in  the  program  was  prepared 
under  general  supervision  of  a  Scientific  Advisory  Board  made  up 
of  nine  leading  representatives  of  major  fields  of  science. 

The  script  is  by  Prank  Capra  and  Jonathan  Latimer. 

Earlier  programs  in  the  Bell  System  Science  Series,  "Our 
Mr.  Sun"  and  "Hemo  the  Magnificent,"  dealt  with  the  sun  and  with  the 
circulation  of  blood. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/7/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


DR.  W.O.  ROBERTS,  NOTED  ASTRONOMER,  TO  DISCUSS  MAN-MADE  SATELLITES 

AND  INTER- PLANETARY  TRAVEL  ON  1  WIDE  WIDE  WORLD' 

Dr.  Walter  Orr  Roberts,  noted  astronomer,  will  discuss  man¬ 
made  satellites  and  inter-planetary  travel  when  "Wide  Wide  World" 
visits  the  High  Altitude  Observatory  of  the  University  of  Colorado 

Sunday,  Oct.  13  (NBC-TV,  4-5:30  p.m.,  NYT). 

The  observatory  stands  two  miles  high  in  a  saddle  in  the 
mountains  near  Climax,  Col.,  protected  from  violent  winds  but  high 
enough  for  a  clear  view  of  the  sky.  It  is  one  of  27  solar  observato¬ 
ries  around  the  world  participating  in  the  International  Geophysical 
Year . 

Dr.  Roberts,  who  is  head  of  the  observatory  believes  that  itu 
eventually  will  travel  to  the  moon  and  possibly  to  the  nearer  planets; 
but  probably  not  much  further.  Even  traveling  at  one-tenth  the  speed 
of  light,  or  18,000  miles  a  second,  he  points  out,  it  would  take  35 
years  to  reach  the  nearest  star.  He  is  convinced,  though,  that  there 
is  life  on  other  planets. 

"Out  there  incomprehensibly  far  beyond  our  sun,  are  a 
thousand  billion,  billion  stars  --  or  more,"  he  says.  "Many  must  be 
very  like  our  sun,  for  our  sun  is  a  most  ordinary  star,  and  it's  very 


(more ) 


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likely  that  they  also  have  planets  like  our  Earth.  If  only  a  few  had 

life,  there  would  still  be  millions  of  such  places." 

Dr.  Roberts  will  appear  in  a  segment  of  "Man  Against  the 

Mountains"  on  "Wide  Wide  World,"  which  is  sponsored  by  General  Motors 

and  supervised  by  executive  producer  Barry  Wood.  The  program  will  be 
produced  by  John  Goetz. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/7/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


JERSEYITE  GUESSES  "PRICE  IS  RIGHT"  SHOWCASE  VALUE  "TO  THE  PENNY" 
1,400,000  VIEWERS  ENTERED  WEEK’S  CONTEST 

Carl  Ripley  of  6  Cooper  Street,  Dover,  N.J., 
estimated  to  the  penny,  the  cash  value  of  the  week’s  show¬ 
case  on  NBC-TV’s  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT,  starring  Bill  Cullen. 
The  results  were  announced  on  the  telecast  of  Friday, 

Oct.  4. 

An  estimated  1,400,000  viewers  wrote  in  to  the 
popular  shoppers’  guessing  game  during  the  week’s  show¬ 
case  competition  and  many  were  close,  but  Ripley  hit  the 
nail  on  the  head  with  a  guess  of  $2,205.17* 

The  showcase  included  a  Polaroid  camera,  My  Sin 
perfume,  a  Sunbeam  shaver,  two  Longines  watches,  a  leather 
handbag,  a  ukulele  and  a  trip  for  two  to  Hawaii  via 
Northwest  Airlines. 

"The  Price  is  Right"  is  seen  daily  over  NBC-TV 
at  11  a.m.,  NYT,  and  Monday  nights  at  7:30,  p.m«,  NYT.  The 
Monday  night  program  is  colorcast. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/7/57 


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October  7>  1957 


NBC -TV  AND  RADIO  SWIFTLY  ARRANGED  MANY  SPECIAL  PROGRAMS 
AND  FEATURES  ON  SOVIET- LAUNCHED  SATELLITE 

NBC  presented  extensive  coverage  of  the  earth  satellite 
story  through  the  entire  Oct*  4-6  weekend,  starting  with  the  first 
report  to  the  nation  of  the  satellite's  sound  signal  at  9  p«m*>  NYT, 
Friday. 

NBC -TV  and  NBC  Radio  put  the  recorded  sound  on  the  air  at 
that  time  --  within  an  hour  after  it  was  picked  up  by  RCA  Communica¬ 
tions,  Inc.  at  Riverhead,  Long  Island,  N.Y. 

NBC - TV  presented  three  special  programs  on  the  Russian- 
launched  satellite  Friday  night  and  two  more  on  Saturday.  On  Sunday, 
NBC -TV's  "Youth  Wants  to  Know"  program  presented  three  leading 
Russian  scientists  connected  with  the  satellite  development  and  the 
network's  "Outlook"  show  included  an  interview  with  Dr.  Joseph 
Kaplan,  head  of  this  country's  International  Geophysical  Year 
program. 

NBC  Radio  --  through  its  weekend  service,  "Monitor"  -- 
devoted  a  minimum  of  five  minutes  out  of  every  broadcast  hour  to 
satellite  developments.  "Monitor"  also  featured  five  special  pro¬ 
grams  on  Saturday,  including  reports  from  NBC  News  Correspondent 
Irving  R.  Levine  in  Moscow  and  interviews  with  top  U.S.  satellite 
experts . 

(more) 


i 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BRO 


ADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  NBC -TV  and  Radio  Special  Programs 


Friday,  9  p.m.  -- 


Here  are  highlights  from  NBC-TV's  weekend  coverage  of  the 
satellite  story  (All  Times  NYT) : 

First  broadcast  of  the  satellite's 
sound  to  the  American  public. 

10:47  p.m.  --  Repeat  of  the  sound  on  network  at 

request  of  scientists  and  stations 
throughout  the  country. 

11:30  p.m.  --  Special  wrap-up  on  day's 

developments  from  Washington. 
Saturday,  2:30  p.m.  --  Special  report  from  Washington 

on  continuing  developments. 

11:15  P.m.  —  Special  interview  by  NBC 

Commentator  David  Brinkley  with 
Dr.  John  Hagen,  head  of  U.S. 
satellite  program. 

Sunday,  2  p.m.  —  Anatoli  A  Blagonravov,  one  of 

Russia's  top  satellite  authorities, 
said  on  "Youth  Wants  to  Know"  that 
Russia  will  launch  a  second 
satellite  "in  the  nearest  future." 
5:30  p.m.  --  Dr.  Kaplan,  I GY  chairman,  told 

NBC  Correspondent  Frank  McGee  in  a 
filmed  interview  on  "Outlook"  that 
the  Russian  satellite  marked  "the 
first  step  toward  anywhere  outside 
the  earth's  atmosphere." 


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3  -  NBC -TV  and  Radio  Special  Programs 


NBC  Radio  brought  the  nation  its  first  live  sound  from 
the  satellite  at  11:14  a.m.,  NYT,  Saturday.  It  used  a  direct  line 
from  RCA  Communications,  Inc.,  to  broadcast  the  sound  as  the 
satellite  passed  overhead, 

"Monitor"  also  featured  special  reports  from  NBC  Cor¬ 
respondents  Levine  in  Moscow  and  Welles  Hangen  in  Cairo,  giving  the 
overseas  reaction  to  the  Russian  accomplishment. 

NBC-TV's  regular  news  roundups  and  NBC  Radio's  "News -on- the- 
Hour,"  "Service  at  30"  and  other  news  shows  carried  full  coverage  of 
the  developing  situation. 


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NBC-New  York,  10/7/57 


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October  7,  1957 


NBC  RADIO  ANNOUNCES  EXTENSIVE  'ROUND-THE-CLOCK  COVERAGE 
OP  VISIT  OP  QUEEN  ELIZABETH  AND  PRINCE  PHILIP 


NBC  Radio  programs  will  give  ’round-the-clock  coverage  to 
the  visit  of  England's  Queen  Elizabeth  and  Prince  Philip  to  Canada 
and  the  United  States  for  10  days  beginning  Oct,  12. 

News  reports  and  special  broadcasts  will  be  heard  on 
"Monitor,"  "Nightline,"  "Life  and  the  World,"  "News-on- the-Hour, " 
"World  News  Roundup,"  "Three  Star  Extra,"  and  "Service  At  Thirty," 
as  well  as  on  the  NBC  Hot  Line  service  (the  insertion  of  important 
news  bulletins  on  regular  programs). 

Newsmen  and  commentators  who  will  report  the  royal  visit 
on  NBC  Radio  include  Bryson  Rash,  Ben  Grauer,  Jinx  Palkenburg,  Peter 
Hackes,  Gabe  Pressman,  Bill  Ryan  and  Merrill  Mueller. 

Following  is  a  schedule  of  NBC  Radio's  coverage  (All  Times 


NYT)  : 


Saturday,  Oct.  12  --  The  Queen's  arrival  in  Ottawa  will  be 
broadcast  on  three  segments  of  "Monitor"  between  4:30  p.m.  and 
6:30  p.m. 

Sunday,  Oct.  13  --  The  Queen's  speech  to  the  Canadian 
people  will  be  heard  on  "Monitor,"  9:07-9:15  p.m. 


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Monday,  Oct.  14  —  Excerpts  of  the  Queen's  speech  at  the 
opening  of  Parliament  in  Ottawa  will  be  heard  on  a  Hot  Line  broad¬ 
cast  at  5:15  p.m*  and  on  "Nightline, " 

Tuesday,  Oct,  15  --  Queen  Elizabeth's  tour  of  Ottawa  and 
ceremonies  at  the  War  Memorial  will  be  described  in  a  Hot  Line 
broadcast  at  5:15  p.m,  and  on  "nightline, " 

Wednesday,  Oct,  1 6  --  The  Queen's  arrival  at  Patrick  Henry 
Airport,  Newport  News,  Virginia,  will  be  covered  by  a  Hot  Line  broad¬ 
cast  at  5:15  p.m.  and  on  "Nightline," 

Thursday,  Oct,  17  --  The  arrival  of  the  royal  party  at 
National  Airport,  Washington,  will  be  described  by  Bryson  Rash,  Ben 
Grauer,  Jinx  Falkenburg  and  Peter  Haclces  (ll:05  a.m,  to  approximately 
11:30  a.m.)  A  press  reception  will  be  covered  at  5:30-6:00  p.m, 

Friday,  Oct,  18  —  Jinx  Falkenburg  will  attend  the  garden 
party  in  the  Queen's  honor  at  the  British  Embassy  in  Washington  and 
will  report  on  it  for  "Monitor," 

Saturday,  Oct,  19  --  "Monitor"  will  report  on  the  Queen's 
reaction  to  the  Maryland- North  Carolina  football  game. 

Monday,  Oct,  21  --  The  Queen's  visit  to  New  York  City  will 
be  reported  by  Gabe  Pressman,  Bill  Ryan  and  Ben  Grauer  (11:30  a.m.- 
noon) .  Excerpts  of  the  Queen's  speech  at  the  UN  will  be  heard  dur¬ 
ing  a  Hot  Line  broadcast  at  5:15  p.m.  and  on  "Nightline"  and  "Life 
and  the  World."  During  "Nightline,"  several  reports  will  be  broad¬ 
cast  from  a  dinner  at  Hotel  Waldorf-Astoria  Hotel,  New  York,  where 
the  Queen  will  be  guest  of  honor.  In  addition,  reports  of  the 
Queen's  tour  of  New  York  will  be  heard  on  regular  news  programs. 

- o - 

NBC-New  York,  10/7/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


FOUR  SHOWBUSINESS  HEADLINERS  NAMED  TO  COMEDY  PANEL 
OF  "WHAT1 S  IT  FOR? "--HAL  MARCH  IS  MODERATOR 

Four  panel  members  have  been  selected  to  appear 
on  the  new  NBC-TV  comedy  panel  show  WHAT’S  IT  FOR?  which 
will  make  its  debut  on  NBC-TV  Saturday,  Oct,  12  (10  p.m., 
NYT) .  They  are:  Betsy  Palmer,  Cornelia  Otis  Skinner,  Hans 
Conried  and  Abe  Burrows.  Hal  March  is  moderator  for  the 
panel,  and  will  introduce  inventors  --  or  descendants  of 
inventors  --  with  their  original,  officially  patented  in¬ 
ventions.  The  panel  will  have  to  guess  the  use  for  which 
the  invention  was  designed.  The  viewing  audience  will  be 
apprised  in  advance  as  to  the  inventions’  uses. 

"What's  It  For?"  is  sponsored  by  Pharmaceuticals, 
Inc.,  through  the  Parkson  Advertising  Agency,  Inc. 


NBC-New  York,  10/7/57 


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IflllijfH  TRADE  NEWS 


October  8,  1957 

JOHNSON  MOTORS  SIGNS  AS  A  SPONSOR  OF  THREE  SPECIAL 

BOB  HOPE  ONE -HOUR  VARIETY  SHOWS  ON  NBC  TELEVISION 

Johnson  Motors  has  signed  as  a  sponsor  of  three  special  one- 
hour  variety  programs  starring  Bob  Hope  over  NBC-TV  this  season,  it 
was  announced  jointly  today  by  W.H.  Jonas,  Director  of  Sales  and  Ad¬ 
vertising  for  Johnson  Motors,  and  William  R.  (Billy)  Goodheart  Jr,, 
Vice  President,  Television  Network  Sales,  for  the  National  Broad¬ 
casting  Company. 

The  Waukegan,  Ill.,  firm  --  the  nation’s  leading  maker  of 
outboard  motors  --  will  join  Timex  in  co-sponsoring  Hope's  highly 
rated  hour-long  shows  on  Thursday,  Feb.  6  (8:30-9:30  p.m.,  EST), 
Sunday,  March  2  (9-10  p.m.,  EST)  and  Saturday,  April_5  (9-10  p.m., 

EST) .  Timex,  as  announced  earlier,  is  the  full  sponsor  of  three 

earlier  Hope  special  programs. 

"With  boating  now  the  nation's  No.  One  family  participation 

activity,"  Mr.  Jonas  said,  "we  are  confident  there  will  be  strong  in¬ 
terest  in  our  pre-boating  season  message  to  the  40,000,000  viewers 
reached  by  the  program." 

Johnson  Motors  is  manufacturer  of  the  famed  "Sea  Horse" 
outboard  engines  and  a  pioneer  in  developing  modern  marine  motors 
that  have  helped  encourage  participation  in  boating  by  the  nation's 
20,000,000  outboard  enthusiasts. 


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PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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EVINRUDE  ORDERS  EXTENSIVE  PARTICIPATION  SCHEDULE  ON  ' TODAY ' 

The  Evlnrude  Motors  Division  of  the  Outboard  Marine  and 
Manufacturing  Company,  has  ordered  an  extensive  participation  schedule 
on  NBC-TV' s  TODAY,  marking  its  third  consecutive  year  as  an  advertiser 
on  the  program,  it  was  announced  today  by  William  R,  (Billy)  Goodheart 
Jr*,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Sales,  for  the  National  Broad¬ 
casting  Company. 

The  new  order  from  Evinrude,  whose  first  advertising  cam¬ 
paign  on  "Today"  ran  in  the  Fall  of  1955*  calls  for  a  total  of  40 
participations  scheduled  over  a  29-week  period  starting  Nov.  11.  It 
was  placed  through  the  Cramer- Kras s el t  Company. 

"Today"  is  telecast  Mondays  through  Fridays,  NBC-TV  net¬ 
work  (except  WRCA-TV)  7-10  a.m.,  NYT,  and  on  WRCA-TV,  7-9  a.m.,  NYT. 

- o - 

NBC  STAFFERS  FEATURED  IN  1  ASK  WASHINGTON, ' 

STORIES  PRESENTED  ON  SELECTED  DATES 

ASK  WASHINGTON,  a  question-and-answer  program,  was  pre¬ 
sented  on  NBC-TV  from  2:30-2:45  p.m.,  NYT,  Sunday,  Oct.  6  by  the  News 
Department  of  the  NBC  Television  Network.  It  will  be  presented  on 
selected  dates  hereafter. 

NBC  Washington  personnel  took  part  in  the  series'  first 
program  of  the  season.  Holly  Wright  was  moderator,  while  the  panel 
was  composed  of  NBC  commentators  Richard  Harkness  and  Bill  Henry  and 
NBC  Reporter  Esther  Van  Wagoner  Tufty.  The  panelists  answered  ques¬ 
tions  on  Washington  affairs  which  they  had  received  recently.  The 
show  originated  in  Washington. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/8/57 


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NBC  RADIO  NEWS 


STATION  WLOS ,  ASHEVILLE ,  N.C.,  TO  BECOME 
AN  NBC  RADIO  NETWORK  AFFILIATE  OCT.  l4 

Station  WLOS,  Asheville,  N.C.,  will  become  an  NBC 
Radio  Affiliate  on  Oct.  l4,  it  was  announced  jointly  today  by 
Harry  Bannister,  NBC  Vice  President  in  charge  of  Station  Rela¬ 
tions,  and  Charles  Britt,  Executive  Vice  President  of  the  Skyway 
Broadcasting  Co.,  which  owns  and  operates  the  station. 

Broadcasting  on  a  frequency  of  1,380  kilocycles, 
Station  WLOS  operates  with  5.000  watts  power  during  the  day  and 
1,000  watts  at  night. 

In  announcing  the  affiliation,  Mr.  Bannister  said:  "We 
are  delighted  to  welcome  WLOS  to  the  NBC  Radio  Network.  Its 
strong  facilities  and  progressive  management  have  made  it  a 
leading  outlet  in  the  excellent  Asheville,  N.C.,  market.  The 
station's  affiliation  with  NBC  Radio  will  enable  it  to  provide 
increased  broadcast  service  to  the  community." 

Mr.  Britt  said:  "Station  WLOS  is  pleased  to  be 
associated  with  the  NBC  Radio  Network,  with  which  it  looks 
forward  to  a  long  and  profitable  association." 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/8/57 


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October  8,  1957 

ROBERT  SADOFF  NAMED  MUSIC  COORDINATOR  FOR 
NBC  RADIO  NETWORK  AND  NBC  OWNED  STATIONS 

Robert  Sadoff  has  been  appointed  to  the  newly  created  posi- 
tion  of  music  coordinator  for  the  NBC  Radio  Network  and  the  NBC  Owned 
Stations,  it  was  announced  today  by  Norman  Livingston,  Director  of 
NBC  Radio  Network  Programs. 

Mr.  Sadoff  will  analyze  the  ratio  of  various  types  of  music 
which  are  broadcast  by  the  network  and  will  coordinate  policies  on 
music  balance  and  selection.  He  will  act  as  liaison  between  program 
producers  and  recording  companies  and  will  provide  material  for  use 

by  announcers  and  disc  jockeys. 

A  veteran  in  the  music  publishing  field,  Mr.  Sadoff  was 

professional  manager  of  Bourne,  Inc.,  from  195^  to  1956.  He  has  been 
accompanist  for  Eddie  Fisher  and  Rosemary  Clooney  and  was  accompanist- 
conductor  for  Jerry  Vale.  As  featured  artist  on  the  piano,  he  recently 
completed  an  instrumental  album  for  VIK  Records,  a  subsidiary  of 
RCA  Victor. 

- o - 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  8ROADCASTING 


COMPANY.  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20.  NEW  YORK 


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IITC  -TV  NEWS 


CAST  CREDITS,  PRODUCTION  DATA  FOR  THE  SUNDAY,  OCT.  13  COLORCAST  OF 
•THE  STANDARD  OIL  COMPANY  (NEW  JERSEY)  75TH  ANNIVERSARY  SHOW1 

( NBC -TV,  9-10:30  P.M.,  NYT) 


CAST 

HOST  AND  SPOKESMAN. . . , . Tyrone  Power 

STARRING . J immy  Durante 

Bert  Lahr 
Donald  O’Connor 
Jane  Powell 

ALSO  STARRING...... . ..Marge  and  Gower  Champion 

Brandon  De  Wilde 
Duke  Ellington  and  his 
Orchestra 
Eddie  Mayehoff 
Kay  Thompson 

AND  INTRODUCING... . . Art  Buchwald 

Ronald  Searle 

SPONSOR . The  Standard  Oil  Company 

(New  Jersey) 

ADVERTISING  AGENCY . McCann -Erickson,  Inc. 

NBC  PRESS  REPRESENTATIVE . Walter  Kempley  (New  York) 

*  *  * 


(more) 


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2  -  ^Standard  Oil  Co.  (N.J.)  75th  Anniversary  Show1 


PRODUCTION  STAFF 

PRODUCED  BY., . McCann-Erickson,  Inc.,  in 


association  with  Showcase 
Productions,  Inc. 

PRODUCERS, . . . . . Terry  Clyne  and  George  Haight 

STAGED  BY . Cyril  Rit chard 


Creative  Staff . Paul  Peigay 

Leslie  Stevens 
Kay  Thompson 


MUSICAL  DIRECTOR . George  Bassman 

DIRECTOR . Gregg  Garrison 

CHOREOGRAPHY.  . . . . John  Butler 

SETS . Jan  Scott 

CASTING, . Bonnie  Novick 

COSTUMES...., . . . Julia  Sze  (consultant) 

Bob  Fletcher 

ORIGINATION........ . . .NBC  Brooklyn  (N.Y.)  studio, 

in  color  and  black  and 
white . 


FORMAT:  This  is  a  show  with  the  theme  of  "Wonders  of  Today  and  the 

Promise  of  Tomorrow"  interpreted  via  original  material  in  song,  dance, 
sketches  and  musical  variety.  The  show  will  be  live  and  in  color, 
except  for  a  12-minute  animated  cartoon,  "Energetically  Yours,"  which 
will  be  an  integral  part  of  the  production.  It  was  created  by 
British  caricaturist-satirist  Ronald  Searle  and  it  traces  the  history 
of  energy.  The  film  portion  is  directed  by  David  Hilberman  and  pro¬ 
duced  by  Transfilm,  Inc. 


NBC -New  York,  10/8/57 


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E  LEVIS  I  O  N  NEWS 


October  8,  1957 

REVISED  SCHEDULE  FOR  NBC -TV  COVERAGE 
OF  QUEEN  ELIZABETH'S  VISIT  ANNOUNCED 

A  revised  schedule  and  list  of  assignments  for  NBC-TV's 
coverage  of  Queen  Elizabeth's  visit  to  Canada  and  the  United  States 
Oct.  12-22  was  released  today  by  William  R.  McAndrew,  Director  of 
NBC  News.  It  supersedes  information  contained  in  a  release  dated 
Sept.  16,  1957 . 

The  schedule  follows  (All  Times  NYT) : 

Saturday,  Oct.  12  —  Kinescope  at  11:15-11:^5  P*m*  of 

Queen's  arrival  at  Ottawa,  Canada, 
made  with  the  cooperation  of  the 
Canadian  Broadcasting  Corp.  (CBC). 

Monday,  Oct.  14  —  Queen's  address  to  Canadian 

Parliament,  3-4  p.m.;  live  feed  from 
CBC. 

Thursday,  Oct.  17  —  Queen's  arrival  at  Washington  Airport 

and  parade  to  White  House,  11  a.m., 
to  12  noon.  Reception  for  press, 
radio  and  TV  with  Queen  at  Hotel 
Statler,  Washington,  5:30-6  p.m. 


(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  C  O  AA  P  A  N  Y ,  3  0 


ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  NBC -TV  Coverage  of  Queen  Elizabeth 


NBC-TV 's  live  network  coverage  will  end  with  the  Washington 
phase  of  the  Queen «s  visit.  Her  Majesty's  stay  in  New  York  Monday^ 
Oct.  21,  will  be  carried  only  locally.  Films  from  the  day's  coverage, 
however,  will  be  used  on  NBC-TV  Network  news  shows. 

A  "Today"  reporter  will  also  accompany  the  royal  party 
throughout  its  Canada-U.S.  trip  and  provide  film  for  use  on  that 
series . 

NBC  News  commentators  Bill  Henry  and  Merrill  Mueller,  Paul 
Cunningham  of  the  "Today"  show,  and  Jinx  Falkenburg  of  NBC-TV' s  "Tex 
and  Jinx  Show"  will  handle  the  on-the-scene  descriptions.  NBC  News 
commentator  David  Brinkley  will  coordinate  the  mobile  coverage  of  the 
Queen's  arrival  in  Washington  from  a  WRC-TV  studio. 

Brinkley  will  also  report  live  from  Canada  on  the  Queen's 
activities  during  NBC-TV' s  "NBC  News"  show  at  6:45  p.m.,  NYT,  Oct.  14 
and  15. 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/8/57 


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STEVE  ALLEN  TO  BE  TOASTMASTER  AT 
NATIONAL  FREEDOM  FUND  DINNER 

Steve  Allen,  star  of  NBC-TV's  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW, 
will  serve  as  toastmaster  for  the  1957  National  Freedom  Fund 
dinner  of  the  National  Association  for  the  Advancement  of 
Colored  People  at  the  Hotel  Roosevelt,  New  York,  Friday, 

Nov,  22. 

The  £lOO-a -plate  dinner  will  honor  Branch  Rickey 
Sr.,  former  general  manager  of  the  Brooklyn  Dodgers,  and 
Duke  Ellington,  orchestra  leader  and  composer. 

The  announcement  of  Allen's  acceptance  as  toast¬ 
master  was  made  by  Jackie  Robinson,  chairman  of  the  NAACP 1 s 
Freedom  Fund  campaign. 

The  dinner,  which  is  expected  to  draw  2,000  people, 
is  intended  as  a  means  of  stimulating  participation  in  the 
NAACP' s  life  membership  campaign.  It  is  also  designed  to 
raise  £100,000  for  the  NAACP  national  budget. 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/8/57 


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SBC  OWNED  STATIONS  DIVISION 


JOHN  J.  MURPHY  IS  APPOINTED  TO  SALES  STAFF 
OF  NBC  TELEVISION  SPOT  SALES 

John  J.  Murphy,  Jr.  has  been  appointed  to  the  sales 
staff  of  NBC  Television  Spot  Sales,  it  was  announced  today  by 
Jack  Ryan,  Eastern  Manager  of  TV  Spot  Sales. 

He  joined  NBC  in  1955  as  a  TV  network  salesman. 

He  was  previously  a  radio  and  television  time-buyer  at 
Kudner  Agency  (1953-1955)  and  media  buyer  for  Hilton  & 

Riggio  (1952-1953)  and  Young  &  Rubicam,  Inc.  (1951-1952). 

A  navy  veteran  of  World  War  II,  Mr.  Murphy 
attended  Georgetown  University.  He  lives  with  his  wife  and 
three  daughters  in  Syosset,  N.Y. 

- 0 - 


NBC-New  York,  10/3/57 


Wlicity  department  •  NBC  Owned  Stations  Division  •  30  Rockefeller  Plaza,  N.  Y.  20,  N.  Y.  9  Cl  7-8300 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 
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JERRY  LEWIS  GATHERS  OTHER  TOP  HOLLYWOOD  STARS  FOR  CROSS-COUNTRY 
CLOSED-CIRCUIT  SHOW  FOR  LAD  ILL  WITH  MUSCULAR  DYSTROPHY  IN  EAST 

Hollywood,  Oct.  8  —  A  group  of  Hollywood's  brightest  TV 
stars,  headed  by  comedian  Jerry  Lewis,  will  band  together  today  to 
give  a  special  birthday  present  to  a  nine-year  old  boy  in  a  Lakeville, 
Mass.,  sanitarium  stricken  with  an  Incurable  case  of  muscular  dys¬ 
trophy.  A  special  45-minute  closed-circuit  telecast  from  the 
National  Broadcasting  Company's  studios  in  Burbank,  Calif.,  will  be  a 
highlight  of  the  child's  ninth  birthday  party. 

The  lad,  known  only  as  "Francis"  will  be  entertained  by 
Lewis,  George  Gobel,  Eddie  Fisher,  Eddie  Cantor,  Mary  Costa,  Hugh 
O’Brian,  Tennessee  Ernie  Ford,  the  Skylarks  and  Jerry  Lewis’  12-year 
old  son,  Gary.  The  program,  to  be  produced  by  Ernest  Glucksman  and 
directed  by  Jack  Shea  will  be  seen  by  "Francis"  from  5:30  to 
6:15  p.m.,  NYT.  While  the  program  will  be  linked  directly  to  the 
boy’s  room,  it  is  understood  that  he  will  invite  approximately  70 
other  patients  to  see  the  show. 

The  expense  of  the  cross-country  line  charges  will  be 
shared  by  the  Muscular  Dystrophy  Association  and  NBC.  The  program 
will  not  be  available  to  the  general  public,  but  will  only  be  seen 
by  the  boy  and  his  fellow  patients. 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/8/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


ERIC  AMBLER,  NOTED  BRITISH  AUTHOR,  IN  HOLLYWOOD;  WILL  DISCUSS 
ADDED  'SUSPICION'  PLAYS;  HIS  ’EYE  OP  TRUTH'  SIGNED  FOR  SERIES 

Eric  Ambler,  one  of  Britain’s  foremost  suspense 
and  mystery  writers,  has  arrived  in  Hollywood  from  England, 
His  trip  is  in  connection  with  the  purchase  of  his  story, 

"Eye  of  Truth,"  by  Alfred  Hitchcock  for  filming  as  a  SUSPICION 
teleplay  on  NBC-TV's  weekly  suspense-mystery  series  (Mondays, 
10-11  p.m.,  NYT). 

Mr.  Ambler,  who  wrote  "Eye  of  Truth"  in  England 
especially  for  "Suspicion,"  will  discuss  additional  story 
properties  during  his  three-week  stay  in  this  country. 

Famous  Ambler  suspense-mystery  stories  include 
"Background  to  Danger,"  "Cause  for  Alarm,"  "A  Coffin  for 
Demitrius,"  "Journey  into  Fear"  and  "Intrigue," 


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NBC-New  York,  10/8/57 


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N  EWS 


October  9,  1957 

TWO  NEW  ADVERTISERS  JOIN  LIST  OF  ‘TONIGHT'  SPONSORS; 

THREE  MORE  STATIONS  JOIN  COAST- TO- COAST  LINEUP 

Two  new  advertisers  have  joined  the  growing  list  of  sponsors 
on  NBC-TV' s  TONIGHT  show,  starring  Jack  Paar,  and  three  more  stations 
have  been  added  to  the  67  already  carrying  the  late-evening  program 
from  coast-to-coast,  it  was  announced  today  by  William  R,  (Billy) 
Goodheart  Jr.,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Sales,  for  the 
National  Broadcasting  Company. 

The  new  "Tonight"  advertisers  are  The  Seven-Up  Company  and 
the  Evinrude  Division  of  the  Outboard  Marine  Manufacturing  Company. 
Seven-Up  has  ordered  eight  participations  to  be  scheduled  between 
Dec.  5  and  Dec.  30,  and  Evinrude  has  ordered  six  participations  in 
a  pre-Christmas  advertising  campaign.  (Evinrude  previously  had 
ordered  40  participations  on  NBC-TV' s  early-morning  TODAY  program, 
starting  next  month.) 

The  latest  additions  to  the  lineup  of  stations  carrying 
"Tonight"  are  KSD-TV  in  St.  Louis,  a  market  where  the  network's  late 
evening  show  has  never  been  seen  in  its  entire  three-year  history; 
WSOC-TV  in  Charlotte  and,  starting  Nov.  1,  WHDH-TV  in  Boston.  With 
the  addition  of  Boston,  "Tonight"  will  be  seen  in  a  total  of  70 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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markets,  representing  a  169$  increase  in  station  lineup  since 
"Tonight"  began  on  NBC-TV  in  September,  195^. 

The  J.  Walter  Thompson  Company  is  the  agency  for  Seven-Up, 
and  the  Cramer-Krasselt  Company  represents  Evinrude.  Other  adver¬ 
tisers  scheduling  participation  campaigns  on  "Tonight"  during  the 
last  quarter  of  the  year  are  the  Polaroid  Corporation,  General 
Time  Corporation  and  the  Mystik  Adhesive  Products  Company. 

"Tonight"  is  telecast  Mondays  through  Fridays  from 
11:15  p.m.,  to  1  a.m.,  NYT. 


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PRESS 


TELEVISION  NEWS 


October  9 ,  1957 


OUTSTANDING  PERFORMERS  IN  VARIED  FIELDS  WILL  STAR 
IN  GENERAL  MOTORS  50TH  ANNIVERSARY  SHOW— 

A  TWO-HOUR  COLORCAST- -SUNDAY,  NOV.  17 


Don  Ameche,  Pat  Boone,  Eddie  Bracken,  Kirk 
Douglas,  Helen  Hayes,  Patrice  Munsel,  Cyril  Ritchard  and 
Dinah  Shore  are  among  the  outstanding  performers  who  will 
star  in  NBC-TV*s  GENERAL  MOTORS  50TH  ANNIVERSARY  SHOW 
Sunday,  Nov.  17  (9-11  p.m.,  EST,  in  color  and  black  and 
white).  Additional  names  will  be  announced  later. 

The  theme  for  the  two-hour  colorcast  will  be 
related  to  the  pursuit  of  happiness.  The  subject  will  be 
explored  by  a  roster  of  top-name  stars  in  comedy,  drama, 
satire,  song  and  dance. 

Kudner  Agency,  Inc,,  represents  the  General 
Motors  Corporation  on  the  show,  which  will  inaugurate 
the  50th  anniversary  year.  General  Motors  was  founded 
Sept.  16,  1908. 

The  script  for  "The  General  Motors  50th 
Anniversary  Show"  has  been  written  by  a  staff  headed  by 

(more ) 


EPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30 


ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20.  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  « General  Motors  50th  Anniversary  Show1 


Helen  Deutsch.  The  colorcast  will  mark  Miss  Deutsch's 
first  project  under  her  new  contract  with  the  NBC-TV  net¬ 
work,  for  which  she  will  write  one  special  TV  show  a 
year. 

The  anniversary  presentation  will  be  produced  by 
Jess  Oppenheimer,  who  developed  and  produced  "I  Love  Lucy," 
for  which  he  also  was  head  writer.  For  the  past  l8  months 
he  has  served  as  a  major  program  department  executive  with 
NBC  in  Hollywood. 

"The  General  Motors  50th  Anniversary  Show"  will 
originate  from  NBC-TV* s  Ziegfeld  Theatre  in  New  York 
City. 

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TRADE  NEWS 


October  9,  1957 

NBC-TV' S  "THE  LORETTA  YOUNG  SHOW"  STARTS  FIFTH  SEASON  SUNDAY,  OCT.  20, 
WITH  STORY  OF  MANICURIST  DETERMINED  TO  PROVIDE  LIVELIHOOD  FOR  DAUGHTER 

Loretta  Young  will  star  in  "A  Dollar fs  Worth,"  for  her  first 
telecast  of  the  new  Fall  season  of  THE  LORETTA  YOUNG  SHOW  Sunday , 

Oct,  20  (NBC-TV,  10  p.m.,  NYT) . 

"The  Loretta  Young  Show"  is  sponsored  by  the  Procter  and 

Gamble  Company  of  Cincinnati,  through  the  Benton  and  Bowles,  Inc., 

advertising  agency,  of  New  York. 

The  program,  now  going  into  its  fifth  season,  began 
Sept.  2,  1953  on  NBC-TV.  It  has  received  three  "Emmy"  awards  from  the 
Academy  of  Television  Arts  and  Sciences  among  other  honors. 

Guests  set  for  participation  in  the  near  future  include  Mark 
Stevens,  John  Newland,  Gary  Merrill,  Nancy  Gates,  Stephen  McNally  and 

Pat  Crowley.  .  . 

(more) 

EDITORS 

CAST  AND  CREDITS  FOR  "THE  GREEN  PASTURES" 

This  issue  of  the  NBC  Daily  News  Report  contains  cast, 
credits  and  scene  rundown  for  "The  Green  Pastures,  a  HALLMARK 
HALL  OF  FAME  colorcast  Thursday,  Oct.  17  (NBC-TV,  9:30-11  p.m., 
j^yip,  live,  from  NBC's  Color  Studios  in  Brooklyn,  N.Y,  Yellow- 
tinted  paper  is  used  for  your  convenience  and  ready  identification, 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPA 


NY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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•The  Loretta  Young  Show1 


"A  Dollar’s  Worth"  --  the  season’s  premiere  show  --  was 
written  and  directed  by  Richard  Morris.  It  presents  Miss  Young  as 
a  hotel  manicurist  determined  to  provide  everything  needed  by  the 
daughter  she  supports  (played  by  Susan  Seaforth).  Featured  in  the 
supporting  cast  are  Kim  Spalding,  Byron  Foulger,  Phyllis  Kennedy 
and  Joseph  J.  Green. 


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CAST,  CREDITS,  WHO'S  WHO  AND  SCENES  OF  "THE  GREEN  PASTURES" 
ON  NBC -TV  THURSDAY,  OCT.  17  (9:30-11  P.M.,  NYT ) 
COLORCAST  ON  "HALLMARK  HALL  OF  FAME" 


CAST 

DE  LAWD . 

. WILLIAM  WARFIELD 

NOAH . 

. EDDIE  "ROCHESTER"  ANDERSON 

ADAM-HEZDREL . 

. EARLE  HYMAN 

MOSES . 

. FRED  O'NEAL 

GABRIEL . . 

. TERRY  CARTER 

KING  OF  BABYLON.. 

. . . .WILLIAM  DILLARD 

FIRST  GAMBLER. . . . 

. AVON  LONG 

MRS.  DESHEE . 

. . . .ESTELLE  HEMS LEY 

PHARAOH . 

. RICHARD  WARD 

NOAH'S  WIFE...... 

. ROSETTA  LENOIRE 

ZEBA . 

. SHEILA  GUYSE 

ZIPPORAH . 

. MURIEL  RAHN 

STOUT  ANGEL . 

. HELEN  DOWDY 

ISAAC . 

. JOHN  MARRIOTT 

CORPORAL . 

. DOTTS  JOHNSON 

CAIN  THE  6TH. . . . . 

. VAN  PRINCE 

MYRTLE . 

. JONELLE  ALLEN 

(more ) 


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2  -  Cast  and  Credits  -  'The  Green  Pastures' 


(CAST  CONTINUED) 


FIRST  WOMAN . EULABELLE  MOORE 

THIRD  WOMAN . HILDA  HAYNES 

HEAD  MAGICIAN..,,, . MANTAN  MORLAND 

AARON . P.  JAY  SIDNEY 

JOSHUA . ELWOOD  SMITH 

PROPHET . EMERY  RICHARDSON 

I  Others  in  the  cast  are  Michael  Gelford  as  Carlisle,  Eric 

Herman  as  Randolph,  Rhoda  Boggs  as  Cook  ,  Moses  La  Marr  as  Cajey, 
Vinette  Carroll  as  Slender  Angel,  Earl  Sydnor  as  Archangel,  Billie 
Allen  as  Eve,  Elia  Clark  as  Boy  Gambler,  Jacqueline  Andre  as  Second 
Woman,  Bill  Williams  as  Ham,  Leon  Moore  as  Shem,  John  McCurry  as 
Flatfoot,  Margaret  Williams  as  First  Cleaning  Angel,  Wardell  Saunders 
as  Jacob,  Thomas  Anderson  as  the  Master  of  Ceremonies,  John  Bouie  as 
High  Priest.  Children  —  Michelle  Clark,  Vaughn  Fubler,  Claire 
Joseph,  Jozella  Reed,  Perry  Greene.  Girls  —  Mamie  Jones,  Dorothy 
Butts,  Liz  Williams  and  Maria  Costoso.  Young  Men  --  Albert  Popwell, 
Charles  "Honi"  Coles,  Otis  Young,  Rai  (cq)  Tasco  and  Roscoe  Browne. 

Teacher  —  Vereda  Pearson.  Old  Man  —  Earl  Jones. 

*  *  * 

SPONSOR . HALLMARK  CARDS,  INC. 

ADVERTISING  AGENCY . FOOTE,  CONE  AND 

BELDING 

*  *  * 


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3  -  Cast  and  Credits 


‘The  Green  Pastures1 


PRODUCTION  STAFF 


MILDRED  FREED  ALBERG . . . . , 

GEORGE  SCHAEFER . . 

ROBERT  HARTUNG . 

WARREN  BURMEISTER . 

LEONARD  DE  PA  UR . 

TREW  HOCKER . 

NOEL  TAYLOR . 

BOB  LONG . 

BILL  KNIGHT . 

ADRIENNE  LURASCHI. . 

DICK  SMITH . 

SYBIL  TRUB IN . 

ORIGINATION . 

NBC  PRESS  REPRESENTATIVE 


EXECUTIVE  PRODUCER 
PRODUCER -D IREC TOR 
ASSOCIATE  PRODUCER 
UNIT  MANAGER 

MUSIC  ARRANGER  AND  DIRECTOR 
.SCENIC  DESIGNER 
.COSTUME  DESIGNER 
.TECHNICAL  DIRECTOR 
.LIGHTING  DIRECTOR 
.ASSOCIATE  DIRECTOR 
.MAKEUP 

.CASTING  DIRECTOR 
.LIVE  FROM  NBC  BROOKLYN 
COLOR  STUDIOS 
.PRISCILLA  T.  CAMPBELL 


*  *  * 

This  teleplay  was  adapted  by  Marc  Connelly  from  his  own 
Pulitzer  Prize  fable  play.  It  is  the  Biblical  story  of  creation  as 
seen  through  the  eyes  of  an  imaginative,  country-bred  child  in  the 
deep  South  of  a  couple  of  generations  ago. 


SCENE  RUNDOWN  (With  Music) 

The  music  will  be  by  a  mixed  choir  of  21  except  for  the  only 
instrumental  music  which  will  be  in  the  Nightclub  scene  at  the  end  of 


Act  II. 


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4  -  Cast  and  Credits 


'The  Green  Pastures' 


ACT  ONE 

Scene  One  — 

The  Sunday  School .... "Come  to  the  Church  in 

the  Wildwood" 

Scene  Two  — 

A  Fish  Fry.... "Oh  Rise  and  Shine,"  "Saints 

Go  Marchin'  In,"  "My  God  Is  So  High"  and 

"In  Bright  Mansions  Above" 

Scene  Three  - 

-  A  Garden. ...  "Don' t  You  Let  Nobody  Turn  'Roun'," 

Scene  Four  — 

The  Sunday  School ... .Reprise  of  "In  Bright 

Mansions  Above" 

Scene  Five  — 

A  Private  Of f ice . . . . "No  Hidin'  Place  Down 

Dere" 

Scene  Six  — 

A  Roadside. .. ."Zeba's  Blues" ... .Reprise  of 

"No  Hidin'  Place" 

Scene  Seven  - 

-  A  Front  Porch 

Scene  Eight  - 

—  The  Ark  on  a  Hillside .... "De  01'  Ark  a- 

Moverin' " 

Scene  Nine  — 

The  Sunday  School 

Scene  10  — 

The  Ark.... "My  Soul  Is  a  Witness,  Reprise  of 

"In  Bright  Mansions" 

Scene  11  — 

A  Private  Office 

ACT  TWO 

Scene  One  — 

The  Sunday  School .... "Bringing  in  the  Sheaves" 

Scene  Two  — 

A  Private  Off ice... "A  City  Called  Heaven" 

Scene  Three  - 

-  The  Turkey-Berry  Bush.... "Let  Not  One  Lamb 

Be  Lost,"  "Go  Down,  Moses" 

Scene  Four  — 

A  Throne  Room 

(more) 

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5  -  Cast  and  Credits 


•The  Green  Pastures* 


ACT  TWO  (CONT'D) 

Scene  Five  --  Foot  of  a  Mountain. ...  "Noways  Tired,"  "Josl^a 

Fit  De  Battle  of  Jericho" 

Scene  Six  —  The  Sunday  School 

Scene  Seven  --  A  Night  Club  "De  Babylon  Jazz,"  "Hail  De 

King  of  Bab -Bab -Babylon, "  "De  Babylon 
Rock"  (with  trumpet  solo  over  small  combo, 
by  William  Dillard),  "Cryin1,  Oh  Lord" 


ACT  THREE 


Scene  One  — 
Scene  Two  — 

Scene  Three  — 

Scene  Four  -- 


"I  Am  Bound  for  the  Promised  Land" 

A  Private  Off ice.... "A  City  Called  Heaven" 
(Reprise) 

Outside  a  Temple. ... "De  Blin’  Man  Stood  on 
De  Road,"  "March  On" 

A  Private  Off ice .... "Crucifixion, " 
"Hallelujah,  Lord  Jesus" 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


‘OUTLOOK*  TO  SHOW  EXCLUSIVE  ‘FIRST*  FILMS  SHOT 
IN  BULGARIA  BY  FRANK  BOURGHOLTZER 


The  first  movie  films  made  in  Bulgaria  by  a  Western  cor¬ 
respondent  since  World  War  II  will  be  shown  Sunday ,  Oct.  13  on  NBC- 
TV»  s  OUTLOOK  (5:30  p.m.,  NYT,  Sundays). 

NBC  News  Correspondent  Frank  Bourgholtzer  shot  the  ex¬ 
clusive  films.  Bourgholtzer ' s  coverage  includes  pictures  of  Soviet- 
style  department  stores  in  Sofia,  with  moving  stairways  which  baf¬ 
fle  the  peasants,  and  shots  of  Varna,  which  the  Communists  are 
trying  to  make  into  Miami  Beach-type  of  resort  area. 

- o - 

MICHAEL  TODD  IS  ‘YOUTH  WANTS  TO  KNOW*  GUEST 

Michael  Todd,  noted  Broadway  and  Hollywood 
producer,  will  be  the  guest  on  Theodore  Granik‘s  YOUTH 
WANTS  TO  KNOW  program  Sunday,  Oct.  13  (NBC-TV,  3-3:30 
p.m,,  NYT;  and  NBC  Radio  as  part  of  "Monitor,"  10:30- 
11  p.m.,  NYT),  Stephen  McCormick  will  moderate  the 
program  which  will  originate  from  New  York. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/9/57 


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October  9*  1957 


WIDE  VARIETY  OF  SPECIAL  PROGRAMS  FOR  NBC  OWNED  STATIONS  1 
"KNOW  YOUR  SCHOOLS"  PROJECT  SET  FOR  OCT .  12-13  WEEKEND 


On  the  eve  of  launching  their  six-week  "Know  Your  Schools" 
project  during  the  weekend  of  Oct.  12-13*  NBC  Ownfcd  Stations  in  eight 
major  cities  are  preparing  to  broadcast  a  wide  variety  of  specially 
produced  programs,  ranging  from  a  documentary  film  report  on  first- 
grade  pupils  to  a  radio  discussion  of  the  value  of  school  health 

examinations . 

The  public  service  effort,  which  was  developed  with  the 
cooperation  of  the  U.S.  Department  of  Health,  Education  and  Welfare 
and  the  U.S.  Office  of  Education,  will  be  formally  started  on  each 
NBC  Owned  Station  by  the  broadcast  of  messages  from  Secretary  Marion 
B.  Folsom  of  the  Department  of  Health,  Education  and  Welfare;  U.S. 
Commissioner  of  Education  Lawrence  G.  Derthick,  and  Thomas  B. 
McFadden,  Vice  President  of  NBC  Owned  Stations.  Excerpts  of  their 
statements  follow; 


(more ) 


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2  -  'Know  Your  Schools1 


Secretary  Folsom  —  "The  Department  of  Health,  Education 
and  Welfare  is  glad  to  cooperate  in  the  ’Know  Your  Schools’  Project, 

I  wish  it  every  success,  I  know  the  radio-television  industry, 
through  programs  of  education  and  information,  can  make  a  significant 
contribution  to  public  understanding  of  the  problems  and  promise  of 
our  democratic  society.  Your  choice  of  education  as  the  subject  to 
which  you  shall  devote  the  attention  of  the  NBC  Owned  Stations  is  a 
good  one." 

Commissioner  Derthick  —  "One  of  the  greatest  problems  is 
still  the  lack  of  public  interest  in  education.  This  is  where  radio 
and  TV  can  make  a  major  contribution  through  such  programs  as  these 
planned  by  the  National  Broadcasting  Company.  It  is  of  paramount 
importance  in  this  new  era  of  citizen-educator  teamwork  that  we  con¬ 
tinuously  inform  the  public  of  the  problems  we  face  and  the  progress 
being  made  at  all  levels  of  education.  I  wish  every  success  to  the 
’Know  Your  Schools’  project  and  commend  NBC  for  this  effort. 

Mr.  McFadden  --  "With  one-quarter  of  all  our  people  enrolled 

i 

this  year  in  some  kind  of  educational  institution  --  and  the  remaining 
three-quarters  vitally  concerned  with  the  success  of  that  education 
effort  —  it  is  plainly  in  the  interest  of  us  all  to  know  about  our 
schools.  It  is  critically  important  to  the  progress  of  our  free 
society  that  the  general  public  have  a  better  understanding  of  the 
many  pressing  educational  problems.  Consequently,  radio  and  tele¬ 
vision  broadcasters  have  an  opportunity  to  perform  a  much-needed 
public  service  by  throwing  as  much  light  on  the  situation  as  possible, 
by  stimulating  action  and  by  trying  to  broaden  the  base  of  puolic 
interest  in  our  schools." 


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3  -  'Know  Your  Schools 1 


Following  are  some  of  the  special  educational  programs  to 
be  broadcast  on  the  NBC  Owned  Stations  during  the  weekend  of 
Oct.  12-13: 

On  WRCA-TV,  New  York,  a  film  which  was  photographed  from 
the  eye  level  of  a  seven-year-old  to  emphasize  the  child's  viewpoint 
in  elementary  education,  will  be  introduced  by  Charles  Van  Doren. 
Entitled  "The  First  Grader,"  the  film  will  be  shown  on  the  first  of 
six  "We  Deal  in  Futures"  programs.  It  dramatizes  the  experience  of 
a  first  grade  pupil  in  one  of  the  city's  public  schools.  WKCA  (radio) 
will  broadcast  "Decision  in  a  Doorway,"  first  program  in  the  series 
entitled  "It's  Your  Business."  The  documentary  drama  will  probe  the 
problems  of  a  Puerto  Rican  boy  in  a  predominantly  Irish  neighborhood. 

WNBC-TV  and  WKNB  (radio)  Hartford -New  Britain,  will  present 
the  opening  programs  of  two  series  --  "This  Is  Your  World, "  conducted 
by  a  leading  educator,  Prof.  Albert  E.  Burke,  and  "Understanding  Our 
Schools,"  which  is  produced  by  Dr.  Irving  S.  Starr,  chairman  of  the 
education  department  of  Hillyer  College,  WKNB  will  broadcast  its 
first  "Open  Mike"  program  and  its  initial  series  of  spot  announcements 
on  the  "Know  Your  Schools"  theme. 

In  Buffalo,  Station  WBUF  will  telecast  a  new  program, 

"Bored  With  Education?"  dealing  with  matters  of  vital  interest  to  the 
area's  public  and  parochial  schools.  Two  other  programs  --  "Spectrum" 
and  "Notebook"  --  will  make  their  debut  with  special  features  on 
teacher  and  student  problems . 


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4  -  'Know  Your  Schools  1 


Six  universities  in  the  Washington  area  will  combine  their 
efforts  on  WRC-TV  in  the  nation’s  capital  to  present  "The  Twenty-Fifth 
Semester."  This  series  will  probe  the  problems  of  children  who 
enter  grade  school  in  1957  and  will  be  ready  to  enter  college  in  1970. 
On  the  first  program  the  head  of  each  institution  will  explain  the 
background  and  history  of  American  University,  Catholic  University  of 
America,  Georgetown  University,  George  Washington  University,  Howard 
University  and  the  University  of  Maryland. 

WRCV-TV,  Philadelphia,  will  present  the  first  program  in  a 
color  TV  series,  "Dimension,"  in  which  three  young  science  students 
will  be  informed  of  the  latest  progress  in  automation,  "progress," 
winner  of  the  National  Education  Association’s  School  Bell  Award  this 
year,  will  delve  into  the  problem  of  "Classroom  Shortage  --  1957" 
with  film  footage  which  was  shot  in  the  surrounding  communities. 

"Come  Little  Children"  —  produced  in  cooperation  with  the  Roman 
Catholic  Archdiocese  of  Philadelphia  — —  will  discuss  religious  educa¬ 
tion,  and  "Concept"  —  a  colorcast  produced  in  cooperation  with  the 
University  of  Pennsylvania  --  shows  how  the  university  serves  the 
community.  On  WRCV  (radio),  "Your  Doctor  Speaks"  will  assess  the 
value  of  school  health  examinations,  "The  Psychiatrist"  discusses 
students’  emotional  problems,  and  "Why"  will  present  a  student  dis¬ 
cussion  of  a  Summer  science  workshop  camp, 

WNBQ-TV  and  WMAQ,  (radio),  Chicago,  will  broadcast  "Challenge 

Number  One  —  Expansion"  as  the  first  program  in  the  series,  "The 
Critical  Challenges  of  Education  in  Greater  Chicago."  Reporter- 
hostess  Virginia  Marmaduke  will  discuss  overcrowding  in  the  Chicago 
public  schools,  new  school  construction  and  double-service  classes. 

The  program’s  guest  is  Dr.  Benjamin  C.  Willis,  General  Superintendent 

(more) 


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5  -  *Know  Your  Schools1 

of  the  Chicago  Public  Schools.  The  story  of  school  expansion  in 
suburban  Hometown,  Ill,,  which  is  known  as  "the  fastest  growing  city 
in  America,"  will  be  dramatized  by  a  typical  family,  a  public  school 
teacher,  and  the  pastor  of  a  local  parochial  school. 

KRCA-TV  Los  Angeles,  will  present  the  opening  program  of 
its  series,  "Our  Greatest  Resource,"  dealing  with  the  influence  of 
the  small  liberal  arts  college  in  American  life.  The  operation  of  a 
city  school  system  and  of  the  schools  themselves  will  be  the  subject 
of  a  six-week  series,  "Know  Your  Schools."  The  supervisor  of  the  Los 
Angeles  city  school  system  will  appear  on  the  program  and  films  will 
show  the  teachers  and  students  in  action. 

On  KNBC  (radio)  San  Francisco,  the  "Know  Your  Schools" 
campaign  will  begin  with  a  special  broadcast  featuring  Dr.  Roy  E. 
Simpson,  State  Superintendent  of  Public  Instruction.  Activities 
planned  by  the  station  include  an  invitation  to  students  to  operate 
the  facilities  for  one  day;  broadcasts  of  a  series  of  actual  visits 
to  San  Francisco  classrooms,  and  broadcasts  of  spot  announcements  ex¬ 
plaining  the  work  of  UNESCO  and  its  connection  with  local  schools. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/9/57 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


MEL  TOLKIN  AND  NEIL  "DOC "  SIMON  GET  WRITING 
ASSIGNMENT  FOR  JERRY  LEWIS*  OPENING  SHOW 

Veteran  comedy  writers  Mel  Tolkin  and  Neil 
"Doc"  Simon  have  been  signed  to  write  NBC-TV's  JERRY 
LEWIS  SHOW  for  Tuesday,  Nov.  5  (9  p.m. ,  EST,  in  color 
and  black  and  white).  The  full-hour  colorcast  --  first 
show  of  the  season  for  Lewis  who  is  scheduled  to  do  six 
for  NBC -TV  —  will  be  produced  by  Ernest  Glucksman  and 
directed  by  Jack  Shea.  Music  will  be  under  the  direction 
of  Walter  Scharf  and  choreography  will  be  by  Nick  Castle. 
The  show  will  originate  in  NBC's  Color  City  studios  in 
Burbank,  Calif. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/9/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL 


BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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FEATURE 


CALIFORNIA'S  GOV.  KNIGHT  EXPRESSES  BEING  PLEASED  ABOUT  NBC-TV'S 
"THE  CALIFORNIANS"  AND  SERIES'  TALES  OF  THE  VIGILANTES 

Sometimes  it's  necessary  to  take  the  law  into  your  own 
hands  --  but  not  nowadays.  That's  what  California's  Gov.  Goodwin  J. 
Knight  said  in  commenting  on  NBC-TV'S  THE  CALIFORNIANS,  a  series 
dealing  with  the  Vigilante  movement  in  his  state  around  1850, 

The  Vigilantes,  a  group  of  California  citizens,  reigned 
five  years  in  an  effort  to  bring  law  and  order  to  California. 

In  a  letter  to  Robert  Sisk,  executive  producer  of  "The 

Californians,"  Gov.  Knight  said: 

"Although  today  we  do  not  condone  action  by  unauthorized 

citizen  groups  of  this  kind,  in  the  early  days  of  California  they 
furnished  a  form  of  insurance  against  corruption  and  graft  in 
government.  Their  orderly  disbandment  when  their  mission  had  been 
accomplished,  attested  to  their  forthright  motives  in  organizing. 

Gov.  Knight  also  informed  Sisk  that  he  "was  pleased  about 
the  new  television  series  that  will  bring  to  light  one  of  the  colorful 
eras  of  California  history  --  the  days  of  the  Vigilantes." 

"The  Californians"  is  telecast  on  NBC-TV  Tuesdays,  10  p.m., 

NYT. 

- o - 

NBC-New  York,  10/9/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL 


BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


FEATURE 


October  9>  1957 

SONGWRITING  TEAM  OF  DAVID  MACK  AND  JERRY  LIVINGSTON  WILL  CREATE 
MUSICAL  SCORE  FOR  12  TELECASTS  OF  "SHIRLEY  TEMPLE'S  STORYBOOK" 


The  songwriting  team  of  David  and  Livingston  --  lyricist 
David  Mack  and  composer  Jerry  Livingston  —  has  been  signed  to  write 
the  musical  score  for  12  of  the  presentations  in  NBC-TV's  upcoming 
series  SHIRLEY  TEMPLE* S  STORYBOOK. 

The  first  of  the  full-hour  programs,  "Beauty  and  the  Beast" 
will  be  telecast  live  on  Sunday,  Jan.  12  (8  p.m.,  EST)  with  Miss 
Temple  in  the  role  of  "Beauty."  This  will  be  one  of  three  live  tele¬ 
casts  to  be  produced  by  Henry  Jaffe  Enterprises,  under  the  supervision 
of  producer  Alvin  Cooperman. 

For  22  years  David  and  Livingston  have  worked  as  a  top  Tin 
Pan  Alley  team.  Among  their  hit  songs  are  "La  Vie  en  Rose,"  "Cherry 
Pink  and  Apple  Blossom  White,"  "Mairzy  Doats"  and  "Bibbidi,  Bobbidi, 
Boo. " 

The  "Shirley  Temple's  Storybook"  series  will  mark  David's 
TV  debut,  Livingston  having  written  the  score  for  "Jack  and  the  Bean¬ 
stalk,"  which  was  produced  on  NBC  last  season. 


(more) 


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The  13  filmed  presentations  which  will  complete  the  series 
will  be  produced  by  the  Henry  Jaffe  Enterprises  in  association  with 
Screen  Gems,  Inc. 

David  and  Livingston  have  started  work  on  their  initial 
score  in  close  collaboration  with  writer  Joseph  Schrank,  who  is 
writing  the  teleplay  for  "Beauty  and  the  Beast." 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/9/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


QUENTIN  REYNOLDS  TO  NARRATE  ‘BEYOND  REASONABLE  DOUBT, »  SPECIAL 
NBC  RADIO  ' NIGHTLINE »  PROGRAM  OBSERVING  UNITED  NATIONS  DAY 

Writer-reporter  Quentin  Reynolds  will  be  narrator  of 
"Beyond  Reasonable  Doubt, "  a  dramatic  program  NBC  Radio  will  present 
in  observance  of  United  Nations  Day,  Thursday,  Oct,  24  (9:05-10  p.m., 
NYT) ,  Theme  of  the  program,  produced  by  United  Nations  Radio,  will 
be  the  growth  of  law  and  order. 

Dramatic  sequences  will  illustrate  various  periods  in 
world  history  from  the  time  of  the  caveman  to  the  establishment  of 
the  UN  Charter  as  a  force  for  world  morality.  The  actors  will  in¬ 
clude  David  Kingwood,  Richard  Longman,  Norman  Barras,  Olive  Reed- 
Smith  and  Sarah  Burton. 

The  program  will  be  presented  as  part  of  NBC  Radio's  regu¬ 
lar  "Nightline"  presentation. 

- o - 

CONVERSATION  WITH  PABLO  CASALS  TO  BE  TELECAST  AGAIN 

A  conversation  with  cellist  Pablo  Casals,  generally  re¬ 
garded  as  one  of  the  foremost  musicians  of  our  time,  will  be  pre¬ 
sented  on  NBC- TV*  s  weekly  WISDOM  series  Sunday,  Oct.  13  (2:30  p.m., 
NYT) .  In  the  filmed  conversation,  he  speaks  with  his  friend  and 
former  student,  Madeleine  Foley,  the  young  American  cellist,  about 
his  life  and  work  and  plays  two  selections:  a  Bach  bourree  and 
"Song  of  the  Birds,"  a  folksong  of  his  native  Spanish  province  of 
Catalonia. 

The  film  was  first  presented  on  NBC  July  31,  1955*  when 
Casals  was  79.  It  was  produced  by  Robert  D.  Graff  at  Casals'  home  in 
Prades,  France.  Casals  has  since  made  his  home  in  Puerto  Rico. 

- o - 

NBC-New  York,  10/9/57 


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TELEVI  SION 


NEWS 


October  10,  1957 


•HOLIDAY  IN  LAS  VEGAS •  IS  TITLE  OP  GALA  SPECIAL  FROM  NEVADA; 
TOP  PRODUCTION  STAFF  TO  WORK  WITH  ALL-STAR  GUESTS  ON  SHOW 


A  new  title  and  a  top-notch  staff  have  been  selected  for  the 
NBC-TV  Las  Vegas  special  musical  show  of  Saturday,  Nov.  1 6  (NBC-TV, 

8  p.m,,  EST).  The  full-hour  program  from  the  famous  entertainment 
strip  will  be  called  HOLIDAY  IN  LAS  VEGAS.  Composer-conductor  David 
Rose  will  be  musical  director,  and  TV  director  Kirk  Browning  has 
also  been  assigned  to  the  show.  Veteran  writers  Mel  Tolkin  and  Neil 
"Doc"  Simon  will  write  the  script  and  Miriam  Nelson  has  been  signed 
as  choreographer.  Jack  Rayel  is  producer. 

Stars  announced  previously  for  this  festive  program  include 
Ann  Sothern  (who  will  be  mistress  of  ceremonies),  Jayne  Mansfield, 

Tony  Randall,  Sammy  Davis,  Jr., and  Mickey  Hargitay. 

"Holiday  in  Las  Vegas"  is  the  first  of  three  programs  to  be 
offered  this  season  by  NBC-TV  under  the  sponsorship  of  the  Exquisite 
Form  Brassiere  Company.  Dates  for  the  other  two  Las  Vegas  shows  will 
be  announced  later. 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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HAS  U.S.  FAILED  IN  KEEPING  PACE  WITH  WORLD  SCIENCE  DEVELOPMENTS ?  — 
‘NIGHTLINE ’  PROGRAMS  OCT.  15-17  TO  SEEK  ANSWER  TO  THE  QUERY 

"Has  the  United  States  failed  in  its  program  to  keep  pace 
with  world  scientific  development?"  That  will  be  the  subject  of  NBC 
Radio1 s  NIGHTLINE  SPECIAL:  "Whofs  Guilty?"  to  be  presented  in  a 
three-part  series  starting  Tuesday,  Oct.  15,  9:30  to  10  p.m.,  NYT, 
and  continuing  on  "Nightline"  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  Oct,  16  and  17, 
at  the  same  time. 

Leading  educators,  scientists  and  political  leaders  will 
be  queried  as  to  America’s  scientific  position  in  face  of  the  recent 
launching  of  the  Russian  satellite.  Also,  a  report  will  be  given 
on  what  our  universities  are  doing,  what  efforts  the  government  is 
expending  and  what  science  is  uncovering  to  cope  with  international 
scientific  advancements. 

NBC  newsmen  Morgan  Beatty  and  Leon  Pearson  and  "Nightline" 
host  Walter  O’Keefe  will  narrate  the  feature  to  be  produced  by 
"Nightline"  executive  producer,  A1  Capstaff . 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/10/57 


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NBC  RADIO  TO  BROADCAST  TALK  BY  PRESIDENT  EISENHOWER 
ON  "MEDICAL  EDUCATION  AND  NATION'S  HEALTH" 

President  Eisenhower  will  speak  on  "Medical  Education  and 
the  Nation's  Health"  in  a  program  which  NBC  Radio  will  broadcast  live 
on  Tuesday,  Oct,  22  (10:05-10:30  p.m.,  NYT) ,  from  a  dinner  to  be  held 
at  the  Waldorf  Astoria  Hotel,  in  New  York,  under  auspices  of  the 
National  Fund  for  Medical  Education.  S.  Sloane  Colt,  the  organiza¬ 
tion's  president,  will  introduce  President  Eisenhower. 

- o - 

NBC  RADIO  TO  BROADCAST  FORMER  PRESIDENT  TRUMAN'S 
ADDRESS  TO  FUTURE  FARMERS  OF  AMERICA 

Former  President  Harry  S.  Truman's  address  in  Kansas  City, 
Mo.,  at  the  annual  convention  of  the  Future  Farmers  of  America  will 
be  broadcast  by  NBC  Radio  Tuesday,  Oct.  15  (10:05-10:30  p.m.,  NYT). 
The  program  will  be  tape-recorded  earlier  in  the  day  for  presentation 
at  this  time. 


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MATINEE 

THEATER 


October  10,  1957 


•LEST  WE  FORGET,1  DRAMA  SALUTING  HUNGARIAN  FREEDOM  FIGHTERS,  TO  BE 
•NBC  MATINEE  THEATER'  FEATURE  ON  FIRST  ANNIVERSARY  OF  UPRISING 

A  drama  saluting  the  freedom  fighters  of  Hungary  will 
be  offered  on  the  first  anniversary  of  the  Hungarian  Revolution 
Wednesday,  Oct,  23  on  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  (NBC-TV,  3-^  P*m., 

NYT,  in  color  and  black  and  white) . 

The  teleplay,  "Lest  We  Forget,"  was  adapted  by  William 
Schneider  from  the  story  by  Frank  F.  Bukvic,  a  Yugoslav  refugee, 
now  living  in  the  United  States,  The  program  is  being  pre¬ 
sented  in  co-operation  with  the  Crusade  for  Freedom. 

Bukvic,  now  a  factory  worker  in  Connecticut,  lives  in 
Fairfield  with  his  wife  and  two  children.  He  came  to  the  United 
States  six  years  ago  after  having  lived  through  imprisonment  in 
a  Nazi  concentration  camp.  He  holds  a  masters'  degree  in  eco¬ 
nomics,  which  he  received  in  Graz,  Austria,  and  speaks  five 
languages.  At  present  he  is  working  on  a  novel,  based  on  ex¬ 
periences  in  Austria. 


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TRADE  NEWS 


October  11,  1937 

DINAH  SHORE,  RONALD  REAGAN,  BOB  AND  RAY,  EDDIE  ALBERT 
FEATURED  IN  "NIGHTLINE  SPECIAL:  ' HOUSEPOWER ' "  OCT.  1? 

ON  NBC  RADIO;  SPONSOR  IS  EDISON  ELECTRIC  INSTITUTE 

Dinah  Shore,  Ronald  Reagan,  Bob  and  Ray  and  Eddie  Albert 
will  be  featured  in  an  NBC  Radio  half-hour  muSical-variety  show  --  a 
NIGHTLINE  SPECIAL  entitled  "Housepower"  --  Thursday,  Oct.  17  (NBC 
Radio,  8:30  p.m.,  NYT) . 

The  program,  sponsored  by  the  Edison  Electric  Institute, 
will  develop,  through  word  and  song,  the  theme  of  electricity's 
proper  use  in  the  American  home.  Fuller  &  Smith  S:  Ross,  Inc.,  is 
the  advertising  agency  for  the  Edison  Electric  Institute. 

Donald  S.  Kennedy,  president  of  the  Edison  Electric 
Institute,  will  be  heard  in  a  brief  statement.  Walter  O'Keefe  will 
emcee  the  special  show;  Don  Russell  will  be  the  announcer. 

"Housepower"  is  being  produced  by  A1  Capstaff,  executive 
producer  of  "Nightline." 

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PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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October  11,  1957 

SEVEN  EMINENT  U.S.  SCIENTISTS  TO  PARTICIPATE  IN  WEEKLY  TELECAST 
SERIES,  *IGY:  A  SMALL  PLANET  TAKES  A  LOOK  AT  ITSELF' 

IN  NBC  EDUCATIONAL  TELEVISION  PROJECT 


Seven  noted  U.S.  scientists  —  six  of  them  key  figures  in 
the  International  Geophysical  Year  —  have  accepted  invitations  to 
appear  in  the  weekly  series  of  10  IGY  telecasts  to  be  presented  this 
Fall  as  part  of  the  NBC  Educational  Television  Project. 

The  program  series,  "IGY:  A  Small  Planet  Takes  a  Look  at 
Itself,"  will  be  sent  out  live  to  the  country's  interconnected  educa¬ 
tional  TV  stations  over  NBC's  regular  network  facilities  starting 
Monday,  Oct.  28,  from  6  to  6:30  p.m.,  NYT.  It  will  be  one  of  five 
Fall  program  series  in  the  Project,  which  NBC  is  undertaking  in 
partnership  with  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center,  at  Ann 
Arbor,  Mich.  The  programs  also  will  be  presented  (on  a  delayed 
basis)  over  many  NBC-TV  stations  including  WRCA-TV  in  New  York.  No 
dates  have  yet  been  announced. 

The  participating  IGY  scientists  are: 

Dr,  Joseph  Kaplan,  member  of  the  Department  of 
Physics,  University  of  California;  chairman,  U.S.  National 
Committee  for  the  IGY, 

(more) 


PRESS  D  E  P  A  R  T  M  E  N  T,  N  A  T  I  O  N  A  L  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


. 


6 


2  -  Educational  TV 


Dr.  Homer  E.  Newell  Jr.,  executive  vice-chairman, 

U.S.  Committee  for  the  IGY's  Technical  Panel  on  Rocketry 
and  member  of  the  Technical  Panel  on  World  Days  and 
Communications . 

Dr.  Roger  R.  Revelle,  Director,  Scripps  Institution 
of  Oceanography;  member,  Technical  Panels  on  Oceanography 
and  Geomagnetism  for  the  IGY. 

Dr.  Laurence  M.  Gould,  president,  Carlton  College, 

Northf ield,  Minn.;  member  of  the  U.S.  National  Committee 
for  the  IGY  and  USNC  Executive  Committee;  Chairman  of  the 
USNC  Antarctic  Committee;  director  of  the  U.S. -IGY  Antarctic 
Program. 

Dr.  Lloyd  V.  Berkner,  President,  Associated 
Universities,  Inc.;  ex-officio  member  of  the  U.S.  National 
Committee  for  the  IGY;  vice-president  of  Special  Committee 
for  the  IGY. 

Dr.  Walter  Orr  Roberts,  director.  High  Altitude 
Observatory,  Boulder,  Colo.;  chairman  of  the  Technical 
Panel  on  Solar  Activity  of  the  U.S.  National  Committee  for 
the  IGY. 

The  seventh  scientist  will  be  the  Rev,  J.  Joseph  Lynch, 

S.J.,  professor  of  physics  and  mathematics  at  Fordham  University  and 
director  of  the  Fordham  Seismic  Station,  New  York  City. 

Frank  Blair,  on-camera  news  editor  of  NBC -TV's  "Today,"  will 
be  host  of  the  IGY  series,  which  will  deal  each  week  with  a  specific 


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aspect  of  the  International  Geophysical  Year.  There  will  be  explana¬ 
tion  and  illustration  of  the  most  significant  features  of  the  present 
body  of  man's  knowledge  of  the  earth,  description  of  the  many  gaps  in 
that  knowledge,  and  account  of  the  methods  by  which  IGY  scientists 
hope  to  fill  in  or  bridge  those  gaps.  The  format  regularly  will  in¬ 
clude  film  coverage  of  key  IGY  activities  and  demonstration  with 
models . 

What  is  the  IGY  and  what  does  it  set  out  to  do?  In  the 
first  place,  it  is  not  a  year,  for  the  investigations  will  last  for 
18  months  --  from  July  1,  1957  —  and  preparations,  especially  in 
Antarctica,  had  been  in  progress  for  a  considerable  time  before  that. 
It  is  the  successor,  after  a  shorter  interval  of  time  and  on  a  more 
magnificent  scale,  of  two  International  Polar  Years  which  began  in 
1882  and  1932.  Scientists  from  many  different  nations  will  take  part 
in  this  effort  of  international  cooperation. 

The  aim  is  to  study  the  earth  and  its  atmosphere  and  find 
out  more  about  what  goes  on  under  the  earth,  upon  the  earth,  and 
around  the  earth.  Embraced  within  it  are  such  subjects  as  glaciology, 
oceanography,  meteorology,  geo-magnetism. 

The  work  is  being  coordinated  by  a  special  committee  which 
is  the  offshoot  of  the  International  Council  of  Scientific  Unions, 
but  each  nation  has  its  own  committee. 

There  are  many  questions  which  scientists  have  still  to 
answer.  Do  continents  drift  and  at  what  rate?  Is  the  earth's  climate 
--  as  many  believe  --  getting  warmer?  What  is  the  effect  of  great 
ice  masses  upon  the  weather?  Are  ocean  levels  rising?  What  is  the 
source  of  cosmic  radiation?  It  is  believed  that  startling  advances  in 

many  fields  may  result  from  the  IGY. 

(more ) 


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/  _ 


4  -  Educational  TV 


Following  is  the  schedule  of  subjects  and  guests  for  the 

TV  series: 

Oct,  28  —  "The  Quest,”  a  comparison  of  the  nature  of  the 
universe  with  that  of  the  earth,  summary  of  the  fund  of  unanswered 
questions  concerning  the  earth,  outline  of  how  IGY  is  attacking  these 
questions.  Guest:  Dr,  Kaplan. 

Nov,  4  --  ”The  Oceans,”  a  consideration  of  the  physical 
movement  of  water  (deep  currents,  surface  currents,  tides)  and  of 
the  chemical  and  physical  interchanges  between  the  seas  and  the 
atmosphere.  It  will  also  embrace  investigations  into  the  relationship 
of  the  oceans  to  the  world* s  wealth,  the  world  food  balance  and  the 
distribution  of  heat.  Guest:  Dr,  Revelle, 

Nov,  11  —  "The  Ends  of  the  Earth, "  a  look  at  the  known 
facts  about  the  Antarctic  and  a  summary  of  the  many  unknowns:  its 
relationship  to  the  weather  and  the  water  level  of  the  world,  its 
past  and  present  relationship  with  other  land  masses,  and  other  in¬ 
formation  scientists  hope  to  learn  through  Antarctic  exploration. 

The  subject  of  glaciology  in  general  will  be  an  important  part  of  the 
program.  Guest:  Dr.  Gould, 

Nov,  18  —  "The  Face  of  the  Land,"  an  account  of  the 
appearance  of  the  earth  as  it  was  before  and  after  each  of  the  Ice 
Ages,  of  how  land  masses  probably  achieved  their  present  forms,  of 
what  alterations  in  these  masses  may  be  predicted  with  reasonable 
accuracy  by  scientists.  There  also  will  be  a  demonstration  of  longi¬ 
tude  and  latitude  determination  and  of  the  part  played  in  this 
matter  by  the  moon  camera  and  the  earth  satellite.  Guest:  To  be 
announced. 


(more) 


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Nov.  25  --  "The  Trembling  Earth, "  an  explanation  of 
mountain-building,  earthquakes,  the  composition  of  the  earth’s  crust 
and  the  probable  composition  of  the  earth’s  core.  There  also  will  be 
treatment  of  the  shape  of  the  earth  and  the  action  of  the  earth’s 
tides.  Guest:  The  Rev.  Lynch. 

Dec .  2  --  "Weather,"  a  consideration  of  winds,  storms, 
temperature  changes  and  climatic  variations,  and  explanation  of  the 
nature  and  function  of  the  great  horizontal  and  vertical  currents  in 
the  atmosphere.  Guest:  To  be  announced, 

Dec .  9  —  "The  Air:  Blanket  and  Shield,"  a  description  of 
the  role  of  the  earth’s  atmosphere  in  the  distribution  of  heat  and 
as  a  filtering  shield  against  lethal  radiation  and  meteoric  particles. 
There  also  will  be  an  explanation  of  the  physical  nature  and  chemical 
composition  of  the  air.  Guest:  Dr.  Berkner. 

Dec.  16  --  nThe  Virgin  Sunlight,"  an  account  of  the  nature 
of  the  solar  spectrum  and  the  effects  of  the  sun’s  radiation,  with 
particular  emphasis  upon  present  and  projected  methods  of  determining 
the  composition  of  sunlight  and  specific  effects  of  solar  radiation. 

At  many  points,  the  program  will  illustrate  the  intimate  relation¬ 
ships  existing  between  solar  activity  and  the  ionosphere,  aurora  and 
airglow,  and  the  earth’s  magnetic  field.  It  will  conclude  with  a 
description  of  the  IGY's  world  warning  system  and  its  constant  24- 
hour  watch  on  the  sun.  Guest:  Dr.  Roberts. 

Dec.  23  —  "Higher  than  the  Blue  Sky,"  the  story  of  the 
ionosphere:  what  it  is,  how  scientists  are  investigating  its  prop¬ 
erties  and  what  has  been  discovered  through  soundings  and  by 


(more) 


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charting  its  currents  and  fluctuations.  It  will  close  with 
demonstrations  and  discussion  of  auroras  and  airglow,  the  earth’s 
magnetic  field,  and  cosmic  rays.  Guest:  Dr.  Kaplan. 

Dec.  30  —  "The  Newest  Moon,"  an  account  of  the  first  earth 
satellite  and  summary  of  the  entire  series.  The  program’s  satellite 
segment  will  demonstrate  the  problems  of  launching  and  tracking  the 
earth  satellite  and  the  methods  by  which  wanted  information  is  to  be 
gathered,  directly  and  indirectly.  There  will  be  a  brief  summary 
of  what  is  now  known  about  the  earth  and  a  review  of  the  most 
significant  questions  the  IGY  hopes  to  answer.  Guests:  Dr.  Kaplan 
and  Dr.  Newell. 

Robert  Rippen  and  E.G.  Valens  will  be  the  co-producers  of 
the  TV  series.  Rippen  also  will  be  the  director,  and  Valens  will 
write  the  scripts.  The  Educational  Television  Project  is  under  the 
general  direction  of  Edward  Stanley,  NBC  manager  of  public  service 
programs.  Brice  Howard  is  executive  producer,  and  Donley  Feddersen 
is  representative  of  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center. 

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NBC -New  York,  10/11/57 


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NBC  RADIO’S  BOB  WOGAN  PRODUCES  RECORDING  OP  "NWDA  OPUS  57"  FOR 
NATIONAL  WHOLESALE  DRUGGISTS  ASSOCIATION  ANNUAL  MEETING 

A  novel  musical  composition,  NWDA  OPUS  57* 
will  have  its  world  premiere  at  the  annual  meeting  of 
the  National  Wholesale  Druggists  Association  later 
this  month. 

"NWDA  Opus  57"  is  a  collection  of  radio  jin¬ 
gles  advertising  the  products  of  30  manufacturers  in 
the  drug  and  toiletry  field.  A  recording  of  the  com¬ 
position  will  he  played  at  the  Americana  Hotel  in 
Miami  Beach,  Fla.,  from  Oct,  26  to  Oct.  31*  before 
every  business  session  of  the  National  Wholesale 
Druggists  Association  and  at  various  times  during 

the  group’s  play  hours. 

The  recording  was  produced  under  the  su¬ 
pervision  of  Bob  Wogan,  Manager  of  Program  Operations 
of  the  NBC  Radio  Network, 


o 


NBC -New  York,  10/11/57 


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NBC 


NBC  COLOR  TELECAST  SCHEDULE 
Oct.  20  -  26  (NYT) 


Sunday,  Oct.  20 

6:30-7  p.m.  --  MY  FRIEND  FLICKA. 

8- 9  P.m.  --  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW  --  With  Ginger  Rogers,  the  Hi  Los, 

Lou  Costello  and  the  Globetrotters. 

9- 10  p.m.  --  THE  DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW  --  With  guest  stars  Nanette 

Fabray,  Tab  Hunter,  Danny  Thomas  and  Dean  Jones. 

Monday,  Oct.  21 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Sing  for  Me,"  starring  Ethel 
Waters . 

7:30-8  p.m.  --  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT  --  With  Bill  Cullen  as  emcee. 
Tuesday,  Oct.  22 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Run  for  the  Money!" 

8- 9  p.m.  --  THE  GEORGE  GOBEL  SHOW  STARRING  GEORGE  GOBEL  WITH  EDDIE 

FISHER  --  Hedy  Lamarr  is  tonight's  guest. 

Wednesday,  Oct.  23 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW, 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Lest  We  Forget." 

9- 10  p.m.  --  KRAFT  TELEVISION  THEATRE  --  "Man  in  a  Trance,"  starring 

Julius  LaRosa  and  Farley  Granger. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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Thursday,  Oct.  24 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  —  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "The  Glass  Hill." 

7:30-8  p.m.  --  TIC  TAC  DOUGH  --  With  Jay  Jackson  as  emcee. 

10-10:30  p.m.  --  THE  LUX  SHOW  STARRING  ROSEMARY  CLOONEY  --  Tonight 
guest  is  Ken  Murray. 

Friday,  Oct.  23 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m.  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Out  of  the  Frying  Pan." 

9-10  p.m.  --  THE  STRANGE  CASE  OF  THE  COSMIC  RAYS  --  First  of  four 
one-hour  Bell  System  Science  Series  programs.  A  scientific- 
detective  story  that  ranges  into  outer  space.  Frank  Capra 
produced  and  directed  the  filmed  program,  which  stars  Richard 
Carlson  and  Frank  Baxter. 

Saturday,  Oct.  26 

8-9  p.m.  --  PERRY  COMO  SHOW  --  Tonight’s  guests  will  be  Dale  Evans 
Roy  Rogers,  Edith  Adams  and  Ernie  Kovacs. 

10:30-11  p.m.  --  YOUR  HIT  PARADE  --  With  Jill  Corey,  Virginia 
Gibson,  Tommy  Leonetti  and  Alan  Copeland. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/11/57 


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TE  LEVI  SION 


A  SERVICE 


NEWS 


October  11,  1957 

CINDERELLA -LIKE  STORY  OF  TRISH  DWELLEY:  PHILADELPHIA  GIRL  GOES 
TO  'TONIGHT'  STUDIO,  GETS  ON  SHOW  AND  SLIPPER  OF  SUCCESS  FITS 

A  new  star  was  born  on  NBC-TV's  TONIGHT  last  night 
(Thursday,  Oct.  10).  It  was  a  young,  blonde  Philadelphia  girl  named 
Trish  Dwelley. 

The  17 -year-old  girl  sang  three  songs  on  "Tonight."  And, 
her  fate  and  future  in  showbusiness  now  seems  assured. 

The  Cinderella  story  began  just  a  few  hours  before  show 
time.  Trish  auditioned  for  talent  coordinator  Tom  O'Malley  at  4  p.m. 
O'Malley  was  spellbound. 

He  rushed  Trish  into  the  producer's  office.  The  producer, 
Perry  Cross,  added  his  approval.  She  was  singing  in  his  office  for 
30  minutes. 

About  that  time,  the  star  of  "Tonight,"  Jack  Paar,  wandered 
into  the  producer's  office.  He  listened  and  joined  the  ranks  of 
Trish  fans. 

Jack,  in  fact,  was  so  excited  about  Trish  that  he  asked 
she  be  scheduled  for  the  show  that  very  night.  The  producer  was  in 
full  accord. 

Since  Trish  was  hardly  expecting  such  treatment,  she  was 
completely  unprepared. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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'Tonight 1 


She  had  attended  the  audition  in  a  sweater  and  a  skirt. 

She  had  no  professional  makeup.  But,  all  the  "Tonight"  people  were 
in  full  agreement  --  put  Trish  on  Television  at  once  despite  these 
minor  drawbacks. 

And,  Trish  did  go  on  television  and  was,  as  predicted,  a 
sensation.  She  sang,  "Hello,  Young  Lovers,"  "Around  the  World"  and 
"Tammy. " 

The  NBC  switchboard  was  busy  with  incoming  calls  of 
congratulations.  Hundreds  of  "Tonight"  viewers  wanted  to  wish  Trish 
well . 

Many  Philadelphia  residents  called  newspapers  wanting  to 
know  more  about  Trish. 

Before  showtime,  Trish  was  seated  in  the  studio,  "I  can't 

believe  it's  happening,"  she  said.  "I'm  numb." 

After  singing,  Trish  chatted  with  Paar  on  the  show.  In  the 
course  of  the  chat,  Jack  asked  if  she'd  make  a  return  visit. 

Answered  Trish:  "Will  I!" 

Consequently,  Trish  was  booked  for  the  next  night  and 
negotiations  are  under  way  to  make  Trish  at  least  a  part-time  "regular 
on  the  show. 

("Tonight"  is  presented  on  NBC-TV  Monday  through  Friday, 
11:15  p.m.-  1  a.m.,  NYT.) 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/11/57 


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GOVERNOR  PROCLAIMS  *  WIDE  WIDE  WORLD  DAY'  IN  COLORADO 


Gov.  Steve  McNichols  of  Colorado  has  proclaimed  Sunday, 
Oct.  13,  "Wide  Wide  World  Day"  in  recognition  of  the  programs 
"Man  Against  the  Mountains"  (NBC-TV,  4-5:30  p.m., NYT),  which 
will  be  televised  "live"  that  day  from  the  Rocky  Mountains.  The 
proclamation  reads: 

"Whereas,  the  television  program,  WIDE  WIDE 
WORLD,  one  of  the  most  educational,  informative  and 
interesting  programs  on  the  air  today,  will  originate 
from  within  our  state,  in  Denver  and  in  Aspen,  on  Sun¬ 
day,  Oct.  13,  and 

"Whereas,  this  telecast  will,  in  effect, 
bring  millions  of  our  fellow  Americans  into  our  midst, 
and 

"Whereas,  this  telecast  will  represent  an 
unparalleled  opportunity  to  convey  to  the  people  of 
this  country  the  story  of  the  great  state  of  Colorado, 

"Now,  therefore,  I,  Steve  McNichols,  Governor 
of  Colorado,  do  hereby  proclaim  Sunday,  Oct.  13,  1957 * 
as  ‘Wide  Wide  World  Day1  in  Colorado. 

- o - 

CORRECTION,  PLEASE 

In  the  Daily  News  Report  release  dated  Oct.  9  on  the 
signing  of  the  lyricist  and  composer  for  the  new  NBC-TV  SHIRLEY 
TEMPLE’S  STORY  BOOK  series,  the  lyricist  was  referred  to  incor¬ 
rectly  as  David  Mack.  His  name  is  Mack  David. 


o 


NBC-New  York,  10/11/57 


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N  EWS 


October  14,  1957 

NBC'S  JAMES  A.  STABILE  PROMOTED  TO  POST  OF  DIRECTOR, 

TALENT  AND  PROGRAM  CONTRACT  ADMINISTRATION 

James  A..  Stabile  has  been  promoted  to  the  post  of 
Director,  Talent  and  Program  Contract  Administration,  for  NBC,  it 
was  announced  today  by  James  E.  Denning,  Vice  President,  Talent 
and  Program  Contract  Administration,  for  the  National  Broadcasting 
Company. 

Mr.  Stabile  has  served  as  Manager,  Talent  Negotiations, 
for  the  network  since  he  joined  NBC  in  February  of  this  year  after 
resigning  as  Vice  President  and  General  Counsel  for  ABC. 

He  first  became  associated  with  the  latter  network  in 
December,  1951*  as  an  attorney.  A  year  later  he  became  adminis¬ 
trative  Manager  of  the  Television  Network  Program  Department  and 
in  March,  1954,  was  named  Director  of  Business  Affairs  for  Radio 
and  Television.  He  was  elected  Vice  President  in  charge  of  Busi¬ 
ness  Affairs  in  January,  1956,  and  was  appointed  ABC  General  Coun¬ 
sel  and  Assistant  Secretary  of  ABC-Paramount  Theatres,  Inc,,  the 
following  May, 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


*  o  ' : 


2  -  James  A.  Stabile 


Eefore  joining  ABC  he  was  an  attorney  with  the  William 
Morris  Agency  and,  from  1946  to  1950,  was  an  administrative  assis¬ 
tant  for  the  Authors  League  of  America,  He  left  private  law  prac¬ 
tice  in  194-2  to  serve  as  a  special  agent  with  U.S.  Army  intelligenc 
during  World  War  II. 

Mr.  Stabile  was  born  in  Newark,  N.J.,  and  was  graduated 
from  St.  John’s  University  Law  School,  Brooklyn,  N.Y.,  in  1936  with 
an  LL.  B.  Degree.  He  and  his  wife  live  in  Merrick,  Long  Island, 
N.Y.,  with  their  three  young  sons. 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


NBC-TV  ‘TODAY’  AND  'TONIGHT'  SALES  UPSWING  CONTINUES  WITH 
NEW  PARTICIPATIONS  ORDERED  BY  NATIONAL  CARBON  COMPANY 

NBC-TV' s  TODAY  and  TONIGHT  sales  upswing  con¬ 
tinues  as  the  National  Carbon  Company,  for  its  Prestone 
Anti-Freeze,  ordered  new  participation  schedules  on  the 
two  programs  starting  immediately,  it  was  announced  today 
by  William  R.  (Billy)  Goodheart  Jr.,  Vice  President,  Tele- 

{ 

vision  Network  Sales,  for  the  National  Broadcasting 
Company . 

The  National  Carbon  Company's  order  calls  for  a 
total  of  ten  participations  on  the  early-morning  "Today" 
show  starring  Dave  Garroway,  scheduled  over  a  two-week 
period  ending  Oct.  29,  and  ten  participations  on  the  late- 
evening  "Tonight"  program  starring  Jack  Paar,  to  run 
through  Oct.  25. 

The  William  Esty  Company,  Inc.,  is  the  adver¬ 
tising  agency  for  the  National  Carbon  Company. 


NBC-New  York,  10/14/57 


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TRADE  NEWS 


October  14,  1957 


KEY  AD  MEN  IN  DETROIT  SEE  SPECIAL  NBC  CELLOMATIC  PRESENTATION 
OF  'THE  PICTURE  OF  NETWORK  TELEVISION:  1957-58’ 


A  special  Cellomatic  presentation  "The  Picture  of  Network 
Television:  1957-58"  was  shown  today  by  NBC-TV  at  a  luncheon  for 

more  than  200  key  advertising  executives  at  the  Detroit  Athletic  Club 

in  Detroit,  Mich, 

Network  officials  included  Robert  W.  Sarnoff,  President; 
Robert  E.  Kintner,  Executive  Vice  President,  Programs  and  Sales;  and 
Don  Durgin,  Vice  President,  Television  Sales  Planning,  who  gave  the 
presentation.  Walter  W.  Gross,  Manager,  Television  Sales,  Detroit, 
was  host  of  the  meeting. 

"The  Picture  of  Network  Television:  1957-58"  highlighted 
the  outstanding  advances  NBC-TV  programming  has  achieved  in  audience 
performance  since  the  beginning  of  the  new  1957-58  season.  According 
to  the  advance  October  Trendex  report  (covering  the  week  Oct.  1-7)  to 
be  published  this  week,  NBC-TV  programming  has  pulled  within  nine- 
tenths  of  a  rating  point  of  the  second  television  network's  Monday 
through  Sunday  (7:30-11  p.m.,  NYT)  nighttime  average,  while  main¬ 
taining  the  substantial  lead  of  6.7  rating  points  over  the  third  net¬ 
work.  A  year  ago  in  the  same  time  periods  NBC-TV  trailed  the  second 
network  by  4.9  rating  points. 

- o - 


PRESS  D  E  P  A  R  T  M  E  N  T,  N  AT  I  O  N  A  L  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30 


ROCKEFELLER  P  L  A  Z  A ,  N  E  W  Y  O  R  K  20,NEW  YORK 


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NEWS 


October  14,  1957 

MAJOR  OPERATION  TO  BE  PERFORMED  'LIVE1  ON  NBC  TELEVISION  AS 
'WIDE  WIDE  WORLD'  TELLS  THE  STORY  OF  AMERICAN  DOCTORS 


1 


A  major  operation  will  be  performed  on  "live"  television 
Sunday,  Oct.  27,  when  the  cameras  of  WIDE  WIDE  WORLD  move  into  hos¬ 
pitals,  research  centers  and  homes  across  the  nation  to  tell  the 
story  of  American  doctors, 

"This  will  be  the  human,  personal  story  of  doctors  —  not 
a  documentary  on  medicine,"  says  producer  Ted  Rogers,  "We'll  get 
to  know  a  surgeon,  a  psychiatrist,  and  a  specialist,  but  we'll  focus 
especially  on  a  general  practitioner,  a  public  health  doctor,  and  a 
research  doctor, 

"We'll  see  them  as  men  who  have  to  make  life-and-death 
decisions  every  day.  We'll  try  to  get  answers  to  questions  like 


these  —  What  keeps  a  doctor  going  in  a  field  like  leukemia  where 
there  is  no  known  cure?  How  does  it  feel  to  be  a  surgeon  with  20 
years  of  education  but  making  only  $2,700  a  year?" 

The  program,  "The  House  I  Enter,"  will  be  telecast 
4-5:30  p.m.,  EST,  on  "Wide  Wide  World,"  which  is  sponsored  by 
General  Motors  and  supervised  by  executive  producer  Barry  Wood, 

The  title  is  taken  from  the  Hippocratic  oath,  which  reads  in  part: 
"Whatsoever  houses  I  enter,  I  will  enter  to  help  the  sick," 


(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


2  -  ♦Wide  Wide  World* 

The  operation  will  be  performed  at  University  Hospitals  in 
Cleveland  by  resident  surgeon  Dr.  James  M.  Smith  and  will  be  super¬ 
vised  by  Dr.  William  Holden,  director  of  surgery.  Throughout  its  90 
minutes  of  air  time,  the  program  will  switch  to  the  hospital  periodi¬ 
cally  to  check  the  progress  of  the  operation.  The  nature  of  the 
operation  will  be  announced  soon. 

The  program  will  open  in  a  classroom  amphitheatre  at 
Western  Reserve  University  in  Cleveland  and  viewerb  will  hear  the 
remarks  of  Dr.  John  L,  Caughey  Jr.,  associate  dean  of  the  School  of 
Medicine,  as  he  talks  to  a  group  of  beginning  medical  students.  The 
program  will  then  move  on: 

—  To  the  small  town  of  Overbrook,  Kansas,  where  the 
cameras  will  pickup  Dr,  Charles  0,  Hoover,  a  76- year-old  general 
practitioner,  and  follow  him  into  a  patient’s  home  for  a  bedside 
consultation.  At  Overbrook  viewers  will  also  meet  Dr.  James  Ruble, 
head  of  the  town’s  glistening  new  clinic. 

--  To  Milwaukee  to  talk  with  Dr.  Nicholas  Dallis,  a  top 
psychiatrist,  who  will  take  time  off  from  a  patient  to  discuss  the 
problems  of  mental  illness.  Viewers  will  also  be  taken  to  the 
studios  of  station  WTMJ-TV  in  Milwaukee  where  a  group  of  parents  on 
the  program,  "The  Hot  Seat,"  will  interview  Elwood  W,  Mason,  M.D., 
on  such  questions  as  medical  fees  and  services, 

--  To  a  mental  clinic  in  New  York  City  where  anyone  can 
walk  in  off  the  street  and  get  psychiatric  treatment  for  a  nominal 
charge  of  25  cents.  Viewers  will  meet  Dr.  Predric  Wertham,  one  of 
the  country’s  best-known  psychiatrists,  and  watch  him  at  work  in 
the  clinic. 

(more) 


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--  To  Cleveland  where  Dr,  Herman  K,  Hellerstein,  assistant 
professor  at  V/estern  Reserve  Medical  School,  and  his  team  of  research 
doctors  will  demonstrate  their  cardiac  research  in  the  school  and  at 
a  nearby  steel  mill.  Dr,  Hellerstein  will  compare  the  work  done  by 

a  housewife  with  that  done  by  a  steel  worker. 

--  To  the  U.S.  Public  Health  Service  in  Chamblee,  Ga.,  to 
see  "disease  detectives"  in  action  and  learn  how  they  track  down  an 
epidemic  to  its  source.  Viewers  will  meet  Dr.  Robert  Anderson, 
director  of  the  Communicable  Disease  Center  and,  Alex  Langmuir, 
director  of  the  Epidemic  Investigation  Service.  The  segment  will 
also  include  an  up-to-the-minute  report  on  Asian  flu  and  availability 

of  vaccine. 

--  To  the  City  of  Hope  in  Duarte,  Calif. >  where  a  group 
of  15  doctors  work  around  the  clock  toward  some  means  of  arresting 
or  curing  leukemia.  The  cameras  will  show  stricken  children  and 
their  parents  whose  greatest  hope  is  that  a  cure  will  be  found  in 

time , 

- o - 


NBC- New  York,  10/14/57 


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NBC 


TELEVISION  NEWS 


October  14,  1957 


MINNESOTA  VS.  ILLINOIS- -NBC-TV ' S  "GAME  OF  THE  WEEK"-- 
WILL  BE  COLORCAST  SATURDAY,  OCT.  19 

The  Big  Ten  Conference  clash  between  undefeated  Minnesota, 
one  of  the  nation's  top  teams,  and  Illinois  will  be  the  GAME  OF  THE 
WEEK  which  NBC-TV  will  televise  nationally  in  color  and  black  and 
white  on  Saturday,  Oct.  19.  Telecast  time  is  2:15  p.m.,  NYT  --  15 
minutes  before  the  kickoff.  Lindsey  Nelson  and  Red  Grange  will  be 
the  gridcasters. 

The  contest  will  be  played  in  Memorial  Stadium  at  Champaign, 
Ill.,  and  will  mark  Homecoming  Day  for  the  Fighting  Illini.  This  will 
be  the  25th  game  in  the  series,  with  Minnesota  leading  by  l6  to  9,  with 
one  tie.  The  Gophers  won  last  year,  16-13,  on  a  late  field  goal. 

Coach  Murray  Warmath's  Gophers  are  one  of  the  chief  contend¬ 
ers  for  this  year's  Big  Ten  title.  They  have  won  three  straight,  two 
in  conference  play,  and  rolled  over  Northwestern,  4l-6,  last  Saturday. 
Quarterback  Bobby  Cox,  who  guides  the  split-T  offense,  scored  one 
touchdown  and  passed  for  another. 

Illinois  lost  to  Ohio  State,  21-7,  on  Saturday  and  now  has 
a  1-2  record  for  1957.  Quarterback  Tom  Haller  turned  in  a  fine 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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passing  performance,  completing  10  of  13  tosses  for  183  yards.  Coach 
Ray  Eliot's  outfit  uses  a  T-formation  with  variations. 

This  game  is  the  first  of  four  nationally  televised  contests 
which  NBC-TV  is  presenting  in  color  as  well  as  black  and  white. 

Those  upcoming  are  another  Big  Ten  battle  on  Nov.  2,  the  Oklahoma - 
Notre  Dame  clash  on  Nov.  l6  and  the  Army-Navy  classic  on  Nov.  30. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/14/57 


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NBC 


TELEVISION  NEWS 


’DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW’  PREMIERE  GUEST  LIST  FOR  SUNDAY,  OCT.  20 
INCLUDES  DANNY  THOMAS,  NANETTE  FABRAY,  DEAN  JONES,  TAB  HUNTER 

Guest  stars  Danny  Thomas,  Nanette  Fabray,  Dean  Jones  and 
special  guest  Tab  Hunter  will  be  on  hand  as  Dinah  Shore  offers  a  musi¬ 
cal  variety  bill  on  the  premiere  NBC-TV  DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW  Sunday, 
Oct.  20  (9-10  p.m.,  NYT,  in  color  and  black  and  white), 

Dinah's  solo  selections  will  include  "Sunday,"  "Fascination" 
and  "I’ll  Never  Say  Never,"  a  number  she  recently  recorded.  Nanette 

will  sing  "Papa  Won't  You  Dance  With  Me"  and  then  will  join  Dinah  in 

a  duet.  Other  highlights  will  include  Dinah  in  a  sophisticated 
quartet  with  her  trio  of  male  guests,  Tab  and  Dean  in  duets  and 
teamed  with  Dinah  for  a  rock  »n'  roll  number  and  Danny  Thomas  in 
a  comedy  solo. 

During  the  week  before  each  show  Dinah  will  conduct  a  press 
conference  with  high  school  students  from  two  cities  for  their  favor¬ 
ite  songs  among  the  current  top  hits  which  she  will  sing  on  the  pro¬ 

gram,  The  selections  for  her  initial  show  will  be  the  choices  of 
students  in  Philadelphia  and  Fort  Worth. 

The  "Dinah  Shore  Chevy  Show"  will  be  produced  and  directed 
by  Bob  Banner,  and  written  by  Bob  Wells,  Johnny  Bradford  and  Arnold 
Peyser,  with  music  direction  by  Harry  Zimmerman.  Tony  Charmoli  will 
stage  the  musical  numbers, 

- o - 

NBC -New  York,  10/14/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


NEWS 


October  14,  1957 

CREDITS  FOR  ‘THE  DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW*  PREMIERE 
COLORCAST  ON  NBC  SUNDAY,  OCT.  20 


TIME: 

STAR: 

FORMAT: 

GUEST  STARS: 

SPECIAL  GUEST  STAR: 
PRODUCER -DIRECTOR : 

WRITERS : 

MUSICAL  NUMBERS  STAGED  BY: 
MUSIC  DIRECTOR: 

ART  DIRECTOR: 

ASSOCIATE  DIRECTOR: 

MUSIC  ADVISOR: 

MUSIC  COORDINATOR: 


NBC -TV,  Sunday,  Oct.  20,  9-10  p.m., 
NYT,  in  color  and  black  and  white. 
Dinah  Shore 
Music-variety 

Danny  Thomas,  Nanette  Fab ray  and  Dean 
Jones . 

Tab  Hunter 
Bob  Banner 

Bob  Wells,  Johnny  Bradford  and  Arnold 
Peyser, 

Tony  Charruoli 
Harry  Zimmerman 
Frank  Swig 
Julio  Di  Benedetto 
Ticker  Freeman 
Joe  Hamilton 


(more) 


PRESS 


DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING 


COMPANY,  30  ROCKEF 


ELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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^inah  Shore  Chevy  Show* 


Credits 


ADDITIONAL  MATERIAL: 
COSTUMES : 

TECHNICAL  DIRECTOR: 
UNIT  MANAGER: 

SPONSOR  AND  AGENCY: 

ORIGINATION: 


Earl  Brown 
Bob  Carlton 
Clair  McCoy 
George  Habib 

Chevrolet  Motor  Division  of  General 
Motors  Corp.  (Campbell-Ewald  Co.) 
NBC-TV's  Color  City  Studios,  Burbank, 
Calif. 


PRODUCTION:  Henry  Jaffe  Enterprises,  in 

association  with  NBC. 

NBC  PRESS  REPRESENTATIVES:  A1  Cammann  (New  York);  Joe  Bleeden 

(Hollywood) . 


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NBC -New  York,  10/14/57 


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CLYDE  L.  CLEM  JOINS  BOMAR  LOWRANCE  ASSOCIATES, 

SOUTHERN  REPRESENTATIVES  FOR  NBC  SPOT  SALES 

Clyde  L,  Clem  has  joined  Bomar  Lowrance  Associates,  the 
Southern  representatives  of  NBC  Spot  Sales,  it  was  announced  today 

by  Jack  Reber,  Director  of  NBC  Spot  Sales# 

Mr.  Clem  will  become  a  vice  president  and  assistant  to  the 
president  of  the  organization,  which  is  expanding  the  operations  in 
its  territory.  Formerly  a  radio-television  account  executive  for 
Grant  Advertising,  Detroit,  he  was  previously  national  audience 
promotion  manager  for  the  NBC  Radio  and  Television  Networks  from 
1949  to  1955.  His  extensive  experience  in  the  broadcasting  field 
includes  a  period  as  announcer  and  director  of  sales  promotion  for 

Station  WSOC,  Charlotte,  N.C. 

The  Atlanta  office  of  Bomar  Lowrance  Associates  will  be 

Mr.  Clemls  headquarters. 


o - 

NBC -New  York,  10/14/57 


publicity  department 


NBC  SPOT  SALES 


30  Rockefeller  Plaza ,  N.  Y.  20,  N.  Y. 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


October  14,  1957 


STAR  FROM  TEXAS  (MARY  MARTIN)  CAUSES  MORE  STIR  THAN  RUSSIAN  MOON, 
MIDST  CRITICS*  RAVES  FOR  "ANNIE  GET  YOUR  GUN"  IN  LOS  ANGELES- 
SAME  PRODUCTION  WILL  BE  TWO-HOUR  NBC  COLORCAST  THANKSGIVING  EVE 


"Let  the  Russians  have  their  old  home-brew  moon,  1*11 
settle  for  a  star.  One  that  was  shot  out  of  Texas  some  time  back. 
Called  Mary  Martin,  I  believe." 

Thus  wrote  the  Los  Angeles  Examiner's  Patterson  Greene  when 
"Annie  Get  Your  Gun"  opened  at  the  Los  Angeles  Philharmonic  Audito¬ 
rium  Monday,  Oct,  7  —  at  a  time  when  front  pages  were  filled  with 
news  of  the  Soviet  satellite. 

Since  at  least  one  critic  found  Mary  Martin  more  interesting 
than  the  Russian  moon  and  since  all  the  critics  gave  the  opening  of 
the  show  rave  notices,  quotes  are  hereby  offered  for  the  benefit  of 
NBC -TV  viewers  who  will  see  the  same  show  with  the  same  stars  —  Miss 
Martin  and  John  Raitt  —  in  a  two-hour  Thanksgiving  Eve  colorcast 
Wednesday,  Nov,  27i  (8:30-10:30  p.m,,  EST) , 

Greene,  in  his  comparison  of  Mary  Martin  with  the  globe- 

circling  satellite  continued: 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT, 


NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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'  Annie  Get  Your  Gun1 


"She  can  wallop  out  a  song,  she  can  hurl  herself  through 
a  dance  routine  that  would  leave  a  dolphin  bushed,  she  can  tingle 
your  funny  bone,  she  can  put  a  lump  in  your  throat. 

"And  what  do  the  Russians  get  out  of  all  their  do-it-your¬ 
self  project.  'Beep,  beep.1  That's  what  they  get. 

"Ill  take  Mary  Martin." 

Harrison  Carroll  of  the  Herald-Express  had  this  to  say: 

"In  almost  anything,  Mary  Martin  would  be  a  delight  but 
'Annie  Get  Your  Gun'  is  a  musical  that  this  radiant  performer  makes 
just  as  much  her  own  as  she  does  'South  Pacific.' 

"As  the  sharpshooting  Annie,  she  completely  won  last  night's 
audience  at  the  Philharmonic  Auditorium  and,  needless  to  say,  the  Los 
Angeles  Civic  Light  Opera  Association  has  another  smash  success  upon 
its  hands.  No  star  gives  more  fully  of  herself  than  Miss  Martin... 

She  sings,  dances,  cavorts,  plays  comedy  scenes,  love  scenes  and  for 
a  topper,  rides  a  horse  going  at  a  full  gallop  on  a  treadmill. 

(NOTE:  Mary  and  horse  will  do  likewise  on  NB£>TV.) 

The  Times'  Edwin  Schallert  wrote: 

"Both  delighting  and  dazzling  her  first  audience,  Mary 
Martin  made  new  history  for  the  now  historic  Irving  Berlin  musical, 
'Annie  Get  Your  Gun. '....The  finale  of  the  show  when  Miss  Martin  and 
Raitt  appeared  on  the  second  horse  together  on  the  treadmill  brought 
an  outburst  of  cheers  to  achieve  a  brilliant  culmination ...  Through  all 
this  is  woven  the  web  of  the  fascinating  music  of  songs  like  They 
say  it's  Wonderful';  'My  Defenses  are  Down, *  exceedingly  good  as  done 
by  Raitt  and  a  male  ensemble;  'I'm  an  Indian  Too,'  by  Miss  Martin, 
with  the  rare  eccentric  dance  signalizing  her  being  adopted  by  Sitting 
Bull  and  his  Indians." 


(more ) 


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3  -  'Annie  Get  Your  Gun' 


Raymond  Kendall  of  the  Mirror-News  enthused: 

"There1 ve  been  other  'Annies'  --  on  stage  and  on  film  -- 
but  this  one  tops  'em  all.  My  guess  is  that  when  word  gets  around 
there  won't  be  half  enough  seats  to  satisfy  the  customers .. .Reason 
for  all  this:  Mary  Martin,  first  last  and  foremost,  but  Mary  Martin 
with  big,  handsome  John  Raitt  and  his  honest-to-opera  voice,  a  top- 
drawer  cast,  and  a  lavish  new  production  by  Edwin  Lester  and  Richard 
Halliday.  " 


NBC-New  York,  10/14/57 


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NBC 


TELEVISION  NEWS 


NBC  COLOR  TELECAST  SCHEDULE 
NOVEMBER,  1957 
ALL  TIMES  EST 


THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW  --  1:30-2:30  p.m.  —  Monday 

through  Friday. 

NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  —  3-4  p.m,  —  Monday  through 

Friday.  (For  possible 
black-and-white  dates  consult 
weekly  schedules.) 

Saturday,  Nov.  2 

Time  to  be  Announced  —  NCAA  FOOTBALL  GAME. 

'  8-9  p.m.  —  THE  PERRY  COMO  SHOW. 

10:30-11  p.m.  —  YOUR  HIT  PARADE  —  With  vocalists  Jill  Corey, 
Virginia  Gibson,  Tommy  Leonetti  and  Alan  Copeland. 

Sunday,  Nov.  3 

6:30-7  p.m..  —  MY  FRIEND  FLICKA . 

8-9  p.m.  —  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW  —  Tonight ‘s  guests  are  Charles 
Ruggles  and  Jerry  Lee  Lewis. 

9-10  p.m.  —  THE  DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW. 

Monday,  Nov.  4 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT  —  With  Bill  Cullen  as  emcee. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20.  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  NBC  Color  Schedule 


Tuesday,  Nov.  5 

8- 9  p.m.  --  THE  GEORGE  GOBEL  SHOW  STARRING  GEORGE  GOBEL  WITH  EDDIE 

FISHER,  with  guest  star  Jack  Carson. 

9- 10  p.m.  --  THE  JERRY  LEWIS  SHOW. 

Wednesday,  Nov.  6 

9- 10  p.m.  —  KRAFT  TELEVISION  THEATRE. 

Thursday,  Nov.  7 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  TIC  TAC  DOUGH  —  With  Jay  Jackson  as  emcee, 

10- 10:30  p.m.  —  THE  LUX  SHOW  STARRING  ROSEMARY  CLOONEY  — 
Tonight's  guest  Carol  Channing. 

Saturday,  Nov,  9 

8-9  p.m.  --  THE  PERRY  COMO  SHOW. 

10:30-11  p.m.  —  YOUR  HIT  PARADE. 

Sunday,  Nov.  10 

6:30-7  p.m.  —  MY  FRIEND  FLICKA . 

8- 9  p.m.  —  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW  —  Guests  are  Xavier  Cugat,  Abbe 

Lane,  Tony  Bennett,  Jack  Leonard. 

9- 10  p.m.  —  THE  CHEVY  SHOW. 

Monday,  Nov.  11 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT. 

Tuesday,  Nov.  12 

8- 9  p.m.  —  THE  EDDIE  FISHER  SHOW  STARRING  EDDIE  FISHER  WITH 

GEORGE  GOBEL. 

Wednesday,  Nov.  13 

9- 10  p.m.  —  KRAFT  TELEVISION  THEATRE. 


(more) 


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3  -  NBC  Color  Schedule 


Thursday,  Nov.  14 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  TIC  TAC  DOUGH. 

10-10:30  p.m.  —  THE  LUX  SHOW  STARRING  ROSEMARY  CLOONEY. 

Saturday,  Nov.  16 

2:45  p.m.  to  Completion  —  NCAA  FOOTBALL  GAME  —  Notre  Dame  vs. 
Oklahoma. 

10:30-11  p.m.  —  YOUR  HIT  PARADE. 

Sunday,  Nov.  17 

5:30-7  p.m.  —  HALLMARK  HALL  OF  FAME  —  "On  Borrowed  Time,1'  by 
Paul  Osborn,  adapted  for  television  by  James  Costigan  — 
Starring  Ed  Wynn  with  special  guest  star  Claude  Rains,*  also 
starring  Beulah  Bondi,  with  Dennis  Kohler  and  Margaret  Hamilton. 

8- 9  p.m.  —  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW  —  With  guests  Marie  McDonald 

and  Edward  Everett  Horton. 

9- 11  p.m.  —  GENERAL  MOTORS  50TH  ANNIVERSARY  SHOW  —  Starring  Don 

Ameche,  Pat  Boone,  Eddie  Bracken,  Kirk  Douglas,  Helen  Hayes, 
Patrice  Munsel,  Cyril  Ritchard  and  Dinah  Shore.  Other  stars 
to  be  announced, 

Monday,  Nov.  18 

7:30-8  p.m,  —  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT. 

Tuesday,  Nov.  19 

8- 9  p.m.  --  THE  GEORGE  GOBEL  SHOW  STARRING  GEORGE  GOBEL  WITH  EDDIE 

FISHER,  with  tonights  guest  Charles  Laughton. 

Wednesday,  Nov.  20 

9- 10  p.m.  —  KRAFT  TELEVISION  THEATRE. 

Thursday,  Nov.  21 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  TIC  TAC  DOUGH. 


(more) 


/ 


4  -  NBC  Color  Schedule 


Saturday,  Nov,  23 

8-9  p.m.  —  THE  PERRY  COMO  SHOW. 

Sunday,  Nov.  24 

6:30-7  p.m.  —  MY  FRIEND  FLICKA. 

8- 9  p.m.  —  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW. 

9- 10  p.m.  —  THE  DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW. 

Monday,  Nov.  23 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT. 

Tuesday,  Nov.  2 6 

7:30-9  p.m.  --  THE  PIED  PIPER  OF  HAMELIN  —  Starring  Van  Johnson, 
Claude  Rains,  Kay  Starr  and  Lori  Nelson. 

Wednesday,  Nov.  27 

8:30-10:30  p.m.  —  ANNIE  GET  YOUR  GUN  —  Starring  Mary  Martin  and 
John  Raitt. 

Thursday,  Nov0  28 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  TIC  TAC  DOUGH. 

10- 10:30  p.m.  —  THE  LUX  SHOW  STARRING  ROSEMARY  CLOONEY  —  With 
tonight’s  guest  Marie  Wilson. 

Saturday,  Nov.  30 

1:15  to  Completion  -  NCAA  FOOTBALL  GAME  —  Army  vs.  Navy. 

8-9  p.m.  —  THE  PERRY  COMO  SHOW. 

10:30-11  p.m.  --  YOUR  HIT  PARADE. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/14/57 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


October  15,  1957 

MINUTE  MAID  CORP.  AND  FLORISTS’  TELEGRAPH  DELIVERY  ASSOCIATION  WILL 
AGAIN  CO-SPONSOR  2-HOUR  COLORCAST  OF  TOURNAMENT  OF  ROSES  PARADE 
FROM  PASADENA,  CALIF.,  ON  NEW  YEAR’S  DAY 

The  Minute  Maid  Corporation  and  the  Florists’  Telegraph 
Delivery  Association  will  again  co-sponsor  NBC-TV’s  two-hour  colorcast 
of  the  69th  annual  TOURNAMENT  OF  ROSES  PARADE  from  Pasadena,  Calif., 
on  Wednesday,  Jan,  1,  1958,  it  was  announced  today  by  William  R. 
(Billy)  Goodheart  Jr.,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Sales,  for 
the  National  Broadcasting  Company. 

The  traditional  New  Year’s  Day  parade,  featuring  flower¬ 
decked  floats,  gaily  costumed  marchers  and  numerous  bands,  will  be 
televised  from  11:45  a.m.  to  1:45  p.m.  (EST).  A  15-minute  black  and 
white  program  from  the  parade’s  formation  area  will  precede  the  color 
coverage  of  the  procession  (11:30-11:45  a.m.,  EST). 

Both  advertisers  co-sponsored  the  parade  last  year  and 
Minute  Maid  had  sponsored  it  for  two  years  before  that.  NBC  has 
televised  the  event  since  1952,  and  first  colorcast  it  in  1954. 

Ted  Bates  and  Company,  Inc.,  is  the  agency  for  Minute  Maid 
and  Grant  Advertising,  Inc.,  represents  the  Florists’  Telegraph 
Delivery  Association. 

- 0 - 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT, 


NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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October  15 ,  1957 


12  NBC  NEWS  CORRESPONDENTS  TO  APPEAR  ON  NBC-TV  DEC .  29 
WORLD  REVIEW  AND  FORECAST  PROGRAM,  "PROJECTION  ‘58" 

Twelve  NBC  News  correspondents  will  appear  over  NBC-TV  on 
Sunday,  Dec,  29  to  review  the  significant  events  of  1957  and  project 
the  trend  of  news  into  the  coming  year. 

The  correspondents  —  seven  from  overseas  and  five  from 
this  country  —  will  gather  in  New  York  for  an  hour-long  show 
entitled  PROJECTION  ‘58. 

The  special  program  will  follow  NBC-TV1 s  telecast  of  the 
professional  football  championship  game,  A  starting  time  will  be 
announced  for  "Projection  *58"  after  the  origination  point  of  the 
football  game  has  been  set. 

William  R.  Me Andrew,  Director  of  NBC  News,  said  the  basic 
purpose  of  the  program  will  be  to  relate  the  year’s  significant  events 
—  internationally  or  domestically  --  to  the  American  individual. 

McAndrew  said  the  NBC  staffers  will  also  use  the  signifi¬ 
cant  news  events  of  1957  as  a  springboard  for  projecting  the  trend 
of  news  developments  during  1958. 

Chet  Huntley,  NBC  Commentator  and  Editor  of  "Outlook," 
will  be  the  anchor  man  for  the  roundup. 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROA 


DCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


2 


Projection  ,^8> 


NBC  News  foreign  correspondents  coming  to  New  York  for 
the  telecast  will  be:  Frank  Bourgholtzer  (Vienna),  Leif  Eid  (Paris), 
Joseph  Harsch  (London),  Welles  Hangen  (Cairo),  Irving  R.  Levine 
(Moscow),  Ed  Newman  (Rome)  and  Jim  Robinson  (Tokyo). 

Domestic  correspondents  taking  part  will  be  Martin  Agronsky. 
David  Brinkley,  John  Chancellor,  Robert  McCormick  and  Huntley. 

NBC  News  intends  to  bring  its  correspondents  to  New  York 
about  seven  to  ten  days  before  the  actual  telecast  on  Dec.  29.  The 
newsmen  will  also  make  appearances  on  other  NBC  shows  while  in  New 
York. 

— - — o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/15/57 


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October  15,  1957 


'MATHEMATICS,  WITH  CLIFTON  FADIMAN'  TO  BE  PRESENTED  TEN 
TUESDAYS  ON  NBC  EDUCATION  TELEVISION  PROJECT  SCHEDULE 


Clifton  Fadiman,  long  a  favorite  television  and  radio 
master  of  ceremonies,  is  to  be  host  in  a  TV  venture  designed  to 
convey  the  intellectual  excitement  to  be  found  in  what  he  terms  the 
"vast  and  beautiful  mansion"  of  mathematics.  A  weekly  series  of  10 
telecasts,  MATHEMATICS,  WITH  CLIFTON  FADIMAN,  will  be  presented  this 
Fall  as  part  of  the  NBC  Educational  Television  Project. 

The  program  will  be  sent  out  live  to  the  country's  linked- 
up  educational  TV  stations  over  NBC's  regular  network  facilities 
starting  Tuesday,  Oct.  29 ,  from  6  to  6:30  p.m.,  NYT.  It  will  be  one 
of  five  Fall  program  series  in  the  Project  NBC  is  undertaking  in 
partnership  with  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center,  at 
Ann  Arbor,  Mich.  The  programs  also  will  be  telecast  (on  a  delayed 
basis)  over  many  NBC-TV  stations,  including  WRCA-TV  in  New  York. 

(No  dates  have  yet  been  announced.) 

Fadiman,  who  has  edited  a  soon-to-be-published  anthology 
titled  "Mathematica  Fantasia,"  has  found  reading  about  mathematics 
and  mathematicians  a  rewarding  hobby  for  20  years.  A  confessional 
essay  headed  "Meditation  of  a  Mathematical  Moron"  appears  in  his 
latest  book,  "Any  Number  Can  Play," 

(more ) 


PRESS  D  E  P  A  R  T  M  E  N  T,  N  A  T  I  O  N  A  L  BROADCA 


STING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  ’Mathematics’ 


His  TV  guests  --  one  a  week  --  will  include  leading 
mathematicians  from  Harvard,  Yale,  Dartmouth,  Barnard,  University  of 
Michigan,  State  University  of  New  York,  and  the  Institute  for 
Advanced  Learning,  at  Princeton,  N.J. 

The  program  will  deal  with  the  great  break-throughs  in 
mathematical  thinking,  their  historical  impact,  and  their  influence 
today,  and  will  hint  at  the  undiscovered  areas  within  each.  Sub¬ 
jects  will  include  the  discovery  of  number,  the  contributions  of 
men  like  Euclid  and  Newton,  and  applications  of  mathematics  in 
operations  research  today.  Consultants  will  be  drawn  from  the 
National  Council  of  the  Teachers  of  Mathematics  and  from  the 
Mathematical  Association  of  America. 

The  visiting  mathematicians  will  be: 

Dr.  Robert  L.  Swain,  professor  of  mathematics. 

State  University  of  New  York. 

Dr.  S.H.  Gould,  executive  editor.  Mathematical 

Reviews . 

Dr.  Oystein  Ore,  professor  of  mathematics,  Yale 
University. 

Dr.  Edgar  Lorch,  chairman,  department  of 
mathematics,  Barnard  College,  New  York  City. 

Dr.  Frederick  Mosteller,  chairman,  department 
of  statistics.  Harvard  University. 

Dr.  R.L.  Wilder,  research  professor  of  mathe¬ 
matics,  University  of  Michigan. 

Dr.  Paul  Richard  Halmos,  Institute  for 
Advanced  Study,  Princeton,  N.J. 


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3  -  'Mathematics' 


Dr.  John  G.  Kemeny,  chairman,  department  of 

mathematics  and  astronomy,  Dartmouth  College. 

Dr.  Brockway  McMillan,  Systems  Engineering, 

Bell  Telephone  Laboratories,  New  York  City. 

Following  is  the  schedule  of  subjects  and  guests: 

Oct.  29  --  "How  Many,  How  Much?,"  an  account  of  the 
discovery  of  number,  how  man  developed  concepts,  what  number  is, 
what  different  kinds  of  number  are,  what  systems  other  than  10 
might  be  used,  the  binary  code  of  the  automatic  computer.  Guest: 

Dr .  Swain . 

Nov.  3  --  "There's  More  Than  One  Geometry,"  a  consideration 
of  Euclidian  and  Non-Euclidian  Geometries,  including  the  development 
of  axiomatic  treatment  at  the  time  of  Euclid  and  the  challenging  of 
the  axiom  at  the  time  of  Boylai,  Gauss,  and  Lobachevski.  Guest: 

Dr.  Gould. 

Nov.  12  --  "The  Search  for  X,"  a  treatment  of  algebraic 
equations  during  the  Italian  Renaissance,  including  the  contribution 
of  the  unscrupulous  Girolamo  Cardan.  Guest:  Dr.  Ore. 

Nov.  19  --  "The  Space  Pilot,"  a  view  of  Descartes  and 
coordinate  geometry,  the  union  of  algebra  and  geometry,  and  use  of 
algebra  now  as  pilot  for  all  study  of  space,  with  attention  to  its 
role  in  air  navigation.  Guest:  Dr.  Lorch. 

Nov.  26  --  "That's  the  Way  to  Bet,"  a  look  at  the 
development  of  the  theories  of  probability  and  statistics,  starting 
with  Pascal  and  the  solving  of  gambling  problems.  Guest:  Dr. 
Mosteller . 


(more ) 


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4  -  ’Mathematics’ 


Dec.  3  --  "A  Net  Around  Infinity,"  a  consideration  of 
Newton  and  Leibniz,  development  of  the  calculus,  and  the  first  effort 
to  use  the  infinite.  Guest:  To  be  announced. 

pec.  10  --  "The  Bedrock  of  Logical  Thought,"  a  treatment 
of  the  axiomatization  of  subjects  and  of  mathematics  become  a  purely 
abstract  subject.  Guest:  Dr.  Wilder. 

Dec.  17  --  "Collections  and  Super-Collections,"  an  account 
of  the  theory  of  sets,  their  meaning,  value  and  importance,  in¬ 
cluding  the  work  of  Georg  Cantor  and  the  "N  Bourbaki"  school,  and 
the  role  of  sets  as  basis  of  contemporary  topology,  algebra, 
geometry  and  analysis.  Guest:  Dr.  Halmos. 

Dec.  24  --  "Mind  and  Machine,"  an  explanation  of  logic 
and  computing,  with  consideration  of  mathematical  logic  and  its 
relation  to  the  decision  control  of  the  modern  computing  machine. 
Guest:  Dr.  Kemeny . 

Dec.  31  —  "Mathematics  in  the  Modern  World,"  a  survey  of 
mathematics  in  operations  research  --  the  20th  Century  revolution 
utilizing  mathematics  as  model  of  industrial  set-up.  Guest:  Dr. 
McMillan. 

Marilyn  Kaemmerle  will  be  the  producer,  Lynwood  King  will 
direct,  and  William  Welch  will  write  the  scripts.  The  Educational 
Television  Project  is  under  the  general  direction  of  Edward  Stanley, 
NBC  manager  of  public  service  programs.  Brice  Howard  is  executive 
producer,  and  Donley  Feddersen  is  representative  of  the  Educational 
Television  and  Radio  Center. 

- o - 

NBC -New  York,  10/13/57 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 


i 

JAPANESE  AMBASSADOR  ON  ’YOUTH  WANTS  TO  KNOW’ 

The  Japanese  Ambassador  to  the  U.S.,  Koichiro 
Asakai,  will  be  the  guest  on  Theodore  Granik’s  YOUTH  WANTS 
TO  KNOW  program  Sunday,  Oct.  20  (NBC-TV,  3-3:30  p.m.,  NYT; 
NBC  Radio  as  part  of  "Monitor,"  10:30-11  p.m.,  NYT).  Steve 
McCormick  will  moderate  the  program  which  will  originate  in 
Washington,  D.C.  Ambassador  Asakai  will  be  questioned  by 
teenagers  from  the  Washington  area.  The  Ambassador  was  pre 
viously  scheduled  to  be  on  the  program,  Oct.  6. 


NAT  ’KING’  COLE  TO  BE  HONORED  AT 
FRIARS’  BANQUET  IN  HOLLYWOOD 

Nat  "King"  Cole  star  of  NBC -TV’s  NAT  ‘KING’  COLE  SHOW 
(Tuesdays,  7:30  p.m.,  NYT)  will  be  the  Friars  Club  guest  of  honor 
when  a  large  group  of  top  entertainment  personalities  pays  tribute  to 
him  at  a  banquet  in  Hollywood  on  Monday,  Oct.  21, 

Cole  is  being  honored  for  outstanding  work  he  has  done  for 
charitable  organizations  throughout  the  country  and  for  giving  his 
time  when  called  upon  to  perform  for  worthy  causes. 

Among  those  who  will  pay  tribute  to  Cole  are:  George  Jessel, 
(toastmaster  for  the  Friars),  Frank  Sinatra,  Jack  Benny,  George  Burns, 
Art  Linkletter,  Maurice  Chevalier,  Bing  Crosby,  Parkyakarkus ,  Johnny 
Mercer  and  Glenn  Wallachs,  President  of  Capitol  Records,  for  whom  Nat 
records . 

The  proceeds  from  the  banquet  will  go  to  the  people  of  the 
Motion  Picture  Relief  Home  and  to  former  vaudeville  actors. 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 


TIME: 


CREDITS  AND  CAST  FOR  ‘STOVER  AT  YALE’  ON 
THE  PREMIERE  OF  ‘OMNIBUS'  ON  NBC -TV 

NBC -TV,  Sunday,  Oct.  20,  4-5:30  p.m., 
NYT. 


EXECUTIVE  PRODUCER: 
DRAMA  CONSULTANT: 
MASTER  OF  CEREMONIES; 
DIRECTOR: 

FEATURE  EDITOR: 
ADAPTATION  BY: 
CHOREOGRAPHY: 
ORCHESTRATION: 
PRODUCED  BY: 

SPONSORS: 

AGENCIES: 

FORMAT : 


Robert  Saudek 
Walter  Kerr 
Alistair  Cooke 
Richard  Dunlap 
Mary  V.  Ahern 
Douglass  Wallop 
John  Butler 
Phillip  Lang 

Robert  Saudek  Associates. 

Aluminium  Limited  and  Union  Carbide 
Corporation. 

J.  Walter  Thompson  Company  and  J.M. 
Mathes,  Inc. 

An  original  90-m.inute  play-with-music 
based  on  the  serial  by  Owen  Johnson 
which  appeared  in  McClure ‘s  Magazine 
during  the  early  1900‘s. 


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2  -  ’Stover  at  Yale1 —  Credits 


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CAST: 


Bradford  Di liman 

as 

Dink  Stover 

Peter  Benzoni 

as 

Tillman 

Wayne  Maxwell 

as 

McNab 

Wynn  Pearce 

as 

Regan 

Larry  Hagman 

as 

McCarthy 

Jim  Congdon 

as 

Bob  Story 

Rory  Harrity 

as 

LeBaron 

Berkeley  Harris 

as 

Reynolds 

Jim  Costigan 

as 

Clay 

Isabelle  Hoopes 

as 

Mrs.  Story 

Tod  Patterson 

as 

Brockhurst 

Bob  Manders 

as 

Swazey 

Wallace  Rooney 

as 

Tompkins 

Evans  Evans 

as 

Chloe 

Richard  Striker 

as 

Wookey 

NBC  PRESS  REPRESENTATIVE: 


Bob  Brown  (New  York) 


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TRADE 


N  EWS 


>:-h 


October  16,  1957 


ETHEL  BARRYMORE  TO  MAKE  'TEXACO  COMMAND  APPEARANCE' 
AS  HONORED  STAR  ON  NBC-TV  FULL-HOUR  SALUTE  NOV.  23; 
MANY  OTHER  TOP  STARS  WILL  BE  FEATURED  ON  SHOW 


Ethel  Barrymore  --  often  termed  the  queen  of  the  American 
theatre's  royal  family  --  will  be  the  honored  star  on  the  second 
TEXACO  COMMAND  APPEARANCE  Saturday,  Nov.  23  (NBC-TV,  10-11  p.m., 
EST). 

The  full-hour  telecast  will  be  a  "celebration  of  the 
theatre"  in  the  form  of  a  party  for  Miss  Barrymore.  It  will  feature 
top  name  stars  in  addition  to  Miss  Barrymore. 

Each  performance  will  coincide  with  a  facet  of  the  58- 
year  stage  career  of  Miss  Barrymore. 

The  program  will  be  produced  by  Henry  Jaffe  Enterprises, 
Inc.,  in  association  with  the  American  Theatre  Wing. 

The  Ethel  Barrymore  salute  is  the  second  of  a  series  of 
full-hour  special  programs  honoring  "all-time  great"  performers. 

The  first  "Texaco  Command  Appearance"  this  season  was  a  salute  to 
Ed  Wynn. 

The  show  will  be  sponsored  by  the  Texas  Company,  repre¬ 
sented  by  the  Cunningham  &  Walsh,  Inc.,  advertising  agency. 

- o - 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


ra  TRADE  NEWS 


October  16,  1957 

NBC  RADIO  EMERGES  AS  UNDISPUTED  AUDIENCE  LEADER  AMONG 
RADIO  NETWORKS  IN  NEW  NIELSEN  MEASURING  METHOD 

The  NBC  Radio  Network  has  emerged  as  the  undisputed 
audience  leader  among  radio  networks  in  the  new  Nielsen  method  of 
measuring  advertising  campaigns. 

By  measuring  the  cumulative  audience  of  a  campaign,  the 
Nielsen  ratings  reveal  the  impact  of  an  advertiser’s  message  in  terms 
of  homes  reached  over  an  extended  period. 

In  ratings  covering  a  period  of  four  weeks  ending  Sept.  7* 
NBC  Radio  far  outranked  other  networks.  On  a  weekly  basis,  NBC 
advertisers  comprised  the  first  seven  on  the  list  of  campaigns  de¬ 
livering  the  greatest  cumulative  audience,  it  was  announced  by  Matthew 
J.  Culligan,  Vice  President  of  the  NBC  Radio  Network. 

"This  success  further  establishes  NBC’s  lead  in  the  radio 
network  business,"  Mr.  Culligan  said.  "It  justifies  our  insistence 
on  the  weekly  and  monthly  cumulative  audience  approach  to  radio 
audience  measurement  and  emphasizes  the  flexible  dispersion  buying 
opportunities  on  NBC." 

(more) 


CRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  NBC  Radio  Ratings 


The  latest  Nielsen  ratings  show  that  the  seven  leading 
radio  campaigns,  in  terms  of  unduplicated  accumulated  audience  on 
weekly  basis,  are  all  on  NBC  Radio:  Brown  &  Williamson,  Lever 
Brothers,  Bristol-Myers,  California  Packing  Corp.,  General  Mills, 
Equitable  Life  Assurance  Co.,  and  Time,  Inc. 

The  four  leaders  on  a  monthly  basis  and  the  number  of 
different  homes  they  reach,  are:  Brown  &  Williamson  (14,445,000), 
Bristol-Myers  (11,902,000),  Time,  Inc.  (10,766,000),  and  General 
Mills  (9, 955*000) . 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/16/57 


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IjJJlljfH  TRADE  NEWS 


October  16,  1957 

ADVERTISING— ESPECIALLY  RADIO  AND  TV  ADVERTISING --HAS  HELPED  BRING 
U.S.  ECONOMY  TO  PRESENT  HIGH  LEVEL,  NBC'S  WILLIAM  S.  HEDGES 
STATES  AT  BOSTON  UNIVERSITY  "COLLOQUIUM  ON  COMMUNICATIONS" 

Advertising,  especially  radio  and  television  advertising, 
has  been  responsible  in  large  measure  for  bringing  the  American  econ¬ 
omy  to  its  present  high  level  and  has  made  vast  contributions  to  the 
advancement  of  the  business  of  the  nation,  William  S.  Hedges,  Vice 
President,  General  Services,  for  NBC,  said  today  in  an  address  at 
Boston  University. 

Mr.  Hedges  spoke  at  the  "Colloquium  on  Communications'1  held 
by  the  University's  School  of  Public  Relations  and  Communications. 

In  noting  that  television  will  be  the  No.  One  advertising 
medium  in  1957,  Mr.  Hedges  also  cited  radio's  comeback  as  an  ad¬ 
vertising  medium.  "This  is  a  most  significant  thing,  to  see  the 
wonderful  comeback  being  made  by  radio,  which  had  been  written  off  as 
dead  and  buried  by  everyone  except  millions  of  listeners  and  a  few 
hard-hitting  imaginative  broadcasters  whose  faith  in  radio  has  been 
more  than  justified  by  the  resurgence  of  recent  months."  He  added 
that  NBC  Radio  alone  now  has  31  of  the  nation's  100  biggest  advertisers 
as  sponsors  and  the  1957  billings  are  up  50  per  cent  over  last  year. 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


2  -  -William  S.  Hedges 


In  concluding  his  address,  Mr.  Hedges  reviewed  some  of  the 
recurring  problems  in  the  field  of  broadcasting.  These  included 
the  scarcity  of  radio  channels  in  1920  and  the  scarcity  of  television 
channels  today;  experiments  in  pay  radio  in  the  late  1920’s  and  the 
current  experiments  in  pay  television,  and  the  recurring  legislative 
activity  and  regulation  in  the  area  of  radio  and  television. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/16/57 


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NBC  RADIO  NEWS 


1,000  LISTENERS  IN  35  STATES  WRITE  FOR  UN  BOOKLET 
OFFERED  BY  NBC  RADIO'S  PAULINE  FREDERICK 

More  than  1,000  requests  for  a  United  Nations  pamphlet  have 
been  received  from  35  states  by  the  National  Broadcasting  Company  as 
a  result  of  an  offer  made  two  weeks  ago  on  PAULINE  FREDERICK  AT  TIIE 
UN  (NBC  Radio,  Wednesdays,  10:05-10:30  p.m.,  EDT). 

The  requests  were  received  after  Miss  Frederick  suggested 
to  her  listeners  that  those  interested  in  knowing  more  about  the 
United  Nations  could  obtain  the  booklet  by  writing  to  her  at  NBC. 
Among  the  responses  were  the  following  comments  about  the  program: 

Arlington,  Va.  --  "Your  broadcast  is  informative  and  stimu¬ 
lating  and  a  highlight  in  both  radio  and  TV  newscasting." 

Des  Moines,  Iowa  —  "I'd  like  to  thank  you  for  your  clear, 
concise  reports.  I  think  your  programs  are  excellent." 

St.  Louis,  Mo.  —  "Your  broadcasts  help  one  to  feel  per¬ 
sonally  involved  in  the  process  of  considering  important  issues  from 
varied  points  of  view." 

Yonkers,  N.Y.  —  "May  your  voice  continue  on  the  air  waves 
to  inform  the  multitude  in  these  days  of  perplexity." 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/16/57 


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October  17,  1957 


NBC  RENEWS  AGREEMENT  WITH  JACK  PAAR  AHEAD  OF  NORMAL  OPTION  TIME 
DUE  TO  "TONIGHT"  SHOW’S  CRITICAL  ACCLAIM,  SURGING  SALES 
AND  OUTSTANDING  AUDIENCE  AND  STATION  ACCEPTANCE 


Because  of  the  unprecedented  critical  acclaim,  surg¬ 
ing  sales,  outstanding  audience  and  affiliated  station  accept¬ 
ance  for  the  only  live  network  entry  in  the  late-evening  time 
period  --  TONIGHT  on  NBC-TV,  (11:15  p.m.-l  a.m.,  NYT,  Mondays 
through  Fridays)  --  the  National  Broadcasting  Company  has  re¬ 
newed,  several  weeks  in  advance  of  normal  option  exercise^  its 
agreement  with  comedian  Jack  Paar  to  star  in  the  program  during 
the  coming  months  of  1958. 

Announcement  of  the  agreement  was  made  today  by 
Robert  F.  Lewine,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Programs, 
for  NBC* 

Mr,  Lewine  pointed  out  that  since  the  new  "Tonight" 
began  on  the  network  July  29,  television  critics  across  the 
country  have  hailed  Jack  Paar  and  "Tonight"  as  the  television 
sensation  of  the  year.  In  addition,  the  upswing  in  "Tonight" 
sales  since  the  program’s  start  at  the  end  of  July  has  repre¬ 
sented  more  than  a  46  per  cent  increase* 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  '  Tonight* 


Mr.  Lewine  said  that  by  Nov*  1  the  program's  station 
line-up  will  total  76,  the  largest  number  ever  to  televise  the 
program  in  its  three-year  history.  Such  stations  as  WSM-TV, 
Nashville;  KSD-TV,  St.  Louis;  WHDH-TV,  Boston;  WSOC-TV,  Char¬ 
lotte,  N.C.;  WINR-TV,  Binghamton,  N.Y.;  WCYB-TV,  Bristol,  Va.- 
Tenn.;  WBOY-TV,  Clarksburg,  W.Va.;  WICU-TV,  Erie,  Pa.;  WLEX, 
Lexington,  Ky,,  and  WTVO,  Rockford,  Ill,,  will  be  carrying  the 
program  in  another  two  weeks. 

This  November,  1957>  line-up  will  represent  a  near- 
tripling  in  "Tonight"  stations  since  the  show  first  began  on 
the  network  in  September,  1954, 


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MATINEE 

THEATER 


October  17,  1957 


•NBC  MATINEE  THEATER'  TO  MARK  THIRD  ANNIVERSARY 
AND  500TH  TELECAST  ON  THURSDAY,  OCT.  31 

The  third  anniversary  and  the  500th 
performance  of  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  will  coincide 
on  Thursday,  Oct.  31  (NBC-TV,  in  color  and  black 
and  white,  p*m.,  EST) ,  For  this  milestone 
performance,  executive  producer  Albert  McCleery 
has  chosen  the  play  "Elementals"  by  Pulitzer 
Prize  winning  author  Stephen  Vincent  Benet. 

Tom  Tryon  will  play  one  of  the  three  starring 
roles . 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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October  17,  1957 

NBC  REPRESENTED  WITH  6  OUT  OF  12  PROGRAMS  COMPRISING  BOOK 
OF  'THE  PRIZE  PLAYS  OF  TELEVISION  AND  RADIO,. 1956' 

The  National  Broadcasting  Company  is  represented  with  six 
out  of  12  television  and  radio  programs  selected  by  the  Writers  Guild 
of  America  as  "The  Prize  Plays  of  Television  and  Radio  .  .  1956,"  to 
be  published  in  book  form  on  Oct,  22  by  Random  House, 

Four  of  the  six  NBC  programs  were  dramatic  presentations, 
one  was  a  comedy-variety  show,  the  other  a  radio  documentary.  Two 
of  the  six  were  presented  on  "Kraft  Television  Theatre," 

Clifton  Fadiman,  in  his  foreword,  writes,  .  "These  12 
shows  supply  a  fairly  clear  bird's-eye  view  of  an  important  area  of 
radio-TV  as  it  has  developed  to  date." 

The  NBC  shov/s  selected  are: 

"Goodbye,  Gray  Flannel,"  by  J.  Harvey  Howells. 
Category:  Television  Comedy  (appeared  on  "Robert  Montgomery 

Presents" ) . 

"A  Night  To  Remember,"  by  George  Roy  Hill  and 
John  Whedon.  Category:  Television  Documentary  (appeared 
on  "Kraft  Television  Theatre"). 

(more) 


CRESS  DEPARTMENT.  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


V  -  - 


2  -  Prize  Plays 


"She  Walks  In  Beauty,"  by  Kenneth  Kolb.  Category: 
Television  Episodic  Drama  (appeared  on  "Medic"). 

"Paper  Foxhole,"  by  James  Elward,  Category: 
Television  Comedy- -  honorable  mention  -  -  (appeared  on 
Kraft  Television  Theatre), 

"The  George  Gobel  Show,"  by  Hal  Kanter,  Howard 
Leeds,  Harry  Winkler,  Everett  Greenbaum.  Category:  Tele¬ 
vision  Comedy- Variety, 

"Decision  for  Freedom,"  by  Robert  S.  Greene. 
Category:  Radio  Documentary. 


o 


NBC-New  York,  10/17/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


"NIGHTLINE"  HOST  WALTER  O’KEEFE  TO  GET  "OS CAR- OF- INDUS TRY" 

AT  ANNUAL  AWARDS  BANQUET  OF  FINANCIAL  WORLD  MAGAZINE 

Walter  O’Keefe,  host  of  NBC  Radio’s  NIGHTLINE,  will 
receive  a  bronze  "Oscar-of-Industry"  award  for  "the  funniest 
annual  report  of  the  year"  at  the  Annual  Awards  Banquet  of 
Financial  World  magazine,  to  be  held  Oct,  28  at  New  York’s 
Hotel  Statler, 

O'Keefe  will  also  serve  as  toastmaster  of  the  ban¬ 
quet,  an  annual  affair  which  is  attended  by  hundreds  of 
business  and  industrial  leaders.  Previous  recipients  of  the 
award  he  will  receive  have  included  Herb  Shriner,  George 
Jessel,  Bobby  Hackett,  Eddie  Mayehoff,  Robert  Q.  Lewis  and 
Ernie  Kovacs, 


o 


CAST  CHANGE 

Cast  change  for  "Stover  At  Yale"  on  the  premiere 
of  OMNIBUS  Sunday,  Oct,  20  (NBC-TV,  4-5:30  p.m.,  NYT) : 

The  role  of  Brockhurst  will  be  played  by  Edwin 
Sherin  (instead  of  Tod  Patterson,  as  previously  announced) . 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/17/57 


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IS  THIS  HILL  A  PEAK  OR  A  PEEK? 


When  WIDE  WIDE  WORLD  crews  moved  into  the  Rockies  to  tele¬ 
vise  "Man  Against  the  Mountains"  (Sunday,  Oct.  13),  they  found  a  near¬ 
perfect  relay  point  --  a  mountain  that  stood  13,500  feet  high  and  had 
a  commanding  view  of  a  wide  area  some  70  miles  southwest  of  Denver. 

Using  tractors,  they  hauled  transmitters,  monitors  and 
gasoline-driven  generators  to  the  top  of  the  mountain  and  set  up  a 
station  to  relay  the  video  signal  from  pickups  at  Climax  and  Aspen 
back  to  Denver.  The  audio  signal,  it  turned  out,  could  be  transmitted 
direct . 

On  the  day  of  the  program,  which  is  sponsored  by  General 
Motors,  the  video  came  through  without  a  hitch.  But  when  the 
engineers  sat  down  to  write  their  report  of  the  operation,  they  found 
that  the  mountain  had  no  name.  In  a  burst  of  good  feeling  they  gave 
it  a  name  --  Mt.  Tevo,  which  stands  for  "television,  video  only." 

- o - 

NBC-New  York,  10/17/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


NBC  TRADE  NEWS 

FRANK  LOVE JOY,  STAR  OF  NBC'S  "MEET  McGRAW," 

IS  SURPRISED  GUEST  OF  "THIS  IS  YOUR  LIFE" 

Frank  Love joy,  who  plays  the  hard-boiled  star  of  NBC- TV's 
MEET  McGRAW  series  (Tuesdays,  9  p.m.,  EDT) ,  proved  to  be  a  softie 
in  real  life  when  he  was  surprised  by  host  Ralph  Edwards  as  the 
principal  subject  of  THIS  IS  YOUR  LIFE  Wednesday,  Oct.  1 6  (NBC-TV, 

10  p.m.,  NYT). 

Love joy,  who  had  been  in  the  NBC  studios  to  make  a  closed 
circuit  talk  to  salesmen  of  his  NBC-TV  show,  was  surprised  by  Edwards 
and  led  across  the  hall  through  a  double  row  of  Little  Leaguers  who 
assembled  to  pay  tribute  to  one  of  their  best  supporters. 

Highlights  in  the  career  of  the  stage,  screen,  radio  and 
TV  star  were  told  by  a  group  of  showbusiness  friends. 

Among  those  on  hand  to  salute  Love joy  were  James  Edward 
(actor  whom  Love  joy  had  aided  in  preparing  his  portrayal  for  the  war 
film  "Home  of  the  Brave"),  Axel  Gruenberg  producer  of  "This  Is  Your 
Life"  (who  was  director  of  many  daytime  radio  serials)  and  several 
friends  from  Love joy's  boyhood  years. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/17/57 


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TRADE  NEWS 


October  18,  1957 

NBC *S  HUGH  M.  BEVILLE  IS  A  FEATURED  SPEAKER  AT  ANNUAL 
MEETING  OF  AUDIT  BUREAU  OF  CIRCULATION  IN  CHICAGO 

Hugh  M.  Beville  Jr.,  Vice  President,  Planning  and  Re¬ 
search,  for  the  National  Broadcasting  Company,  was  a  featured 
speaker  today  at  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Audit  Bureau  of  Circu¬ 
lation  at  the  Drake  Hotel  in  Chicago. 

Mr.  Beville* s  talk  was  entitled  "Yes,  We  Have  No  ABC" 
and  was  delivered  as  part  of  a  panel  discussion.  Mr.  Beville  ap¬ 
peared  as  the  only  broadcasting  representative  on  the  four-man 
panel,  made  up  of  representatives  from  advertising  agencies  and 
publications . 

- o - 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


'TODAY*  TO  ORIGINATE  IN  BALTIMORE  OCT.  31  AND  NOV.  1 

The  NBC-TV  TODAY  show,  whose  tours  during 
the  past  five  years  have  carried  it  the  length  and 
breadth  of  the  United  States,  packs  its  luggage  for  a 
trip  to  Baltimore,  Md«,  for  the  programs  on  Thursday 
and  Friday,  Oct.  31  and  Nov.  1. 

With  the  assistance  of  NBC-TV  affiliate  sta¬ 
tion  WBAL-TV,  "Today"  will  originate  programs  at  two 
of  Baltimore's  famed  landmarks:  Federal  Hill  on 
Oct.  31>  and  Fort  McHenry  on  Nov.  1.  The  latter  site 
is  the  place  where  Francis  Scott  Key  wrote  "The  Star 
Spangled  Banner." 

("Today"  is  telecast  Monday  through  Friday, 
7-10  a.m.,  NYT,  on  the  NBC-TV  Network,  except  WRCA- 
TV;  WRCA-TV  only,  7-9  a.m.,  NYT.) 


NATO  OFFICIAL  PAUL-HENRI  SPAAK  ON  'YOUTH  WANTS  TO  KNOW' 

Paul-Henri  Spaak,  Secretary  General  of  the  North  Atlantic 
Treaty  Organization,  will  be  the  guest  on  Theodore  Granik's  YOUTH 
WANTS  TO  KNOW  Sunday.  Oct.  27  (NBC-TV,  3-3:30  p.m.,  EST;  NBC  Radio 
as  part  of  "Monitor, 11  10:30-11  p.m.,  EST).  Steve  McCormick  will 
moderate  the  program  which  will  originate  in  Washington,  D.C.  Mr. 
Spaak  will  be  questioned  by  teenagers  from  the  Washington  area, 

- - o - 


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October  18,  1957 

‘ARTS  AND  THE  GODS ‘ --SERIES  ON  GREEK  MYTHOLOGY  AND  ART  IT  INSPIRED-- 
WILL  BE  WEDNESDAY  OFFERING  OF  NBC  EDUCATIONAL  TV  PROJECT ;  PROGRAMS 
WILL  ORIGINATE  FROM  METROPOLITAN  MUSEUM  OF  ART  IN  NEW  YORK 

The  first  TV  series  ever  to  originate  from  the  Metropolitan 
Museum  of  Art  in  New  York  City  will  have  its  premiere  Wednesday, 

Oct.  30. 

The  program,  ARTS  AND  THE  GODS,  will  be  devoted  to  Greek 
mythology  and  the  art  it  has  inspired.  It  will  be  one  of  five  Fall 
program  series  in  the  Educational  Television  Project  that  NBC  is 
undertaking  in  partnership  with  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio 
Center,  at  Ann  Arbor,  Mich.  All  will  be  sent  out  live  to  the 
country’s  interconnected  educational  TV  stations  over  NBC's  regular 
network  facilities  for  a  10-week  period  starting  Monday,  Oct.  28. 
Programs  will  be  telecast  Monday  through  Friday  from  6  to  6:30  p.m., 
EST.  (They  also  will  be  telecast,  on  a  delayed  basis,  over  many 
NBC-TV  stations,  including  WRCA-TV,  in  New  York  City;  dates  will  be 
announced  soon.) 

Weekly  host  on  "Arts  and  the  Gods"  will  be  Alexander 
Scourby,  well-known  stage  and  TV-radio  actor.  His  guests  on  the 
first  telecast,  "The  Gods  Are  Born,"  will  be  Edith  Hamilton,  the 
90-year-old  American  classicist,  and  the  Mary  Anthony  Dance  Theatre. 

(more) 


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2  -  !Arts  and  the  Gods* 


Miss  Hamilton,  author  of  "The  Greek  Way,"  "Echo  of  Greece"  and 
"Mythology,"  was  decorated  last  August  by  King  Paul  of  Greece  in  the 
amphitheatre  under  the  Acropolis  and  made  an  honorary  citizen  of 
Athens . 

The  series,  dealing  with  the  Greek  myths  most  common  in 
the  visual  arts  and  in  literature,  will  draw  upon  the  Metropolitan 
Museum  of  Art’s  Greek  collection,  which  is  accounted  one  of  this 
country's  finest.  Illustrating  the  themes  will  be  sculpture,  vase 
paintings,  other  objects  of  art  and,  on  some  occasions,  dance. 

Museum  experts  will  serve  as  consultants. 

Following  is  the  schedule  of  subjects: 

Oct.  30  —  "The  Gods  Are  Born,"  an  account  of  the  earliest 
Greek  myths  from  Chaos  to  the  12  Olympians;  brief  character  sketch 
of  the  major  gods  as  seen  on  Greek  vases  and  as  statues;  the  story 
of  Prometheus.  Guests:  Edith  Hamilton  and  the  Mary  Anthony  Dance 
Theatre. 

Nov,  6  —  "Athena  and  Aphrodite,"  a  discussion  of  the  two 
goddesses  with  special  attention  to  their  Olympian  functions  and 
characteristics  as  they  appear  in  mythology;  stories  of  Aphrodite's 
birth,  Venus  and  Adonis,  Aphrodite  and  Eros  and  Psyche,  Athena  and 
Arachne . 

Nov,  13  —  "Apollo  and  Artemis,"  a  consideration  of  the 
functions  of  the  Olympian  twins,  their  birth  and  connection  with  the 
sun  and  the  moon;  stories  of  Apollo  and  Daphne,  Apollo  and  Marsyas, 
Artemis  and  Actaeon,  and  Artemis  and  Callisto,  Guests:  the  Mary 
Anthony  Dance  Theatre. 

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Nov,  20  --  "Death  and  the  Brides,"  a  treatment  of  back¬ 
ground  material  on  the  gods  of  the  earth.  Demeter,  Dionysus;  the 
story  of  the  abduction  of  Persephone  to  the  underworld  and  Demeter’s 
mourning;  the  role  of  Triptolemus;  the  story  of  Orpheus’  journey  to 
the  underworld  to  rescue  Eurydice,  his  bride. 

Nov,  27  --  "The  Trojan  War,"  a  look  at  the  political 
situation  at  the  start  of  the  trouble,  the  jealousy  that  set  it  off, 
and  the  stories  of  Individual  conflicts  as  reported  in  Homer’s 
"Iliad." 

Dec ,  4  --  "The  Odyssey,"  a  tracing  of  Odysseus’  adventure- 
filled  journey,  starting  at  the  close  of  the  Trojan  War;  discussion 
or  showing  of  the  major  incidents  chronicled  by  Homer.  Guests:  the 
Mary  Anthony  Dance  Theatre. 

Dec.  11  —  "Perseus,"  an  account  of  the  hero’s  life  from 
the  time  of  Zeus*  visit  to  Perseus’  mother,  Danae,  through  Perseus’ 
slaying  of  the  Gorgon,  Medusa,  and  the  rescue  of  the  Princess 
Andromeda.  Guests:  the  Mary  Anthony  Dance  Theatre. 

Dec.  18  —  "Theseus  and  Bellerophon, "  a  consideration  of 
the  great  hero  of  Athens,  Theseus,  and  his  adventures  and  occasional 
meetings  with  other  heroes;  the  story  of  Bellerophon  and  his  winged 
horse,  Pegasus.  Guests:  the  Mary  Anthony  Dance  Theatre. 

Dec.  25  —  "Herakles,"  an  account  of  the  legendary  strong¬ 
man’s  birth,  childhood,  12  labors  and  death, 

Jan.  1  —  "The  Richness  of  Art  on  Mythological  Subjects," 
a  consideration  of  the  stories  of  Zeus’  loves;  Atalanta  and  Meleager; 
Procris;  why  the  myths  have  survived  in  art;  brief  summation  of 
series.  Guests:  the  Mary  Anthony  Dance  Theatre. 

(more) 


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4  -  ’Arts  and  the  Gods’ 


Marilyn  Kaemmerle  will  be  the  producer,  Frank  Pacelli 
will  direct,  and  Blair  Chotzinoff  will  be  the  writer  and  associate 
producer.  The  Project  is  under  the  general  direction  of  Edward 
Stanley,  NBC  manager  of  public  service  programs,  Brice  Howard  is 
executive  producer,  and  Donley  Feddersen  is  the  Center  representative. 

Alexander  Scourby,  the  program  host,  has  narrated  many  of 
the  NBC-TV  "Project  20"  histories-on-f ilm  and  has  recorded  more  than 
250  books-for-the-blind  for  the  Library  of  Congress,  including  Plato, 
Xenophon,  Homer’s  "Iliad"  and  "Odyssey."  He  has  acted  on  Broadway 
in  many  plays,  among  them  a  Greek-language  production  of  a  modern 
Greek  drama  with  Katina  Paxinou,  and  on  TV  in  many  live  dramatic 
productions,  including  Anouilh’s  version  of  Sophocles’  "Antigone"  on 
NBC  last  season, 

A  list  of  the  educational  TV  stations  follows: 

WMVS-TV,  Milwaukee,  Wis.;  WHA-TV,  Madison,  Wis.; 

KCTS-TV,  Seattle,  Wash,;  KUED,  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah;  KUHT, 

Houston,  Tex,;  WKNO-TV,  Memphis,  Tenn.;  WQED,  Pittsburgh, 

Pa.;  WHY Y -TV,  Philadelphia;  KETA,  Norman  (Oklahoma  City), 

Okla . ;  WOSU-TV,  Columbus,  Ohio;  WCET,  Cincinnati,  Ohio; 

WUNC-TV,  Chapel  Hill,  N.C.;  KUON-TV,  Lincoln,  Neb.;  KETC, 

St,  Louis;  KTCA-TV,  St.  Paul,  Minn.;  WKAR-TV,  East  Lansing, 

Mich.;  WTVS-TV,  Detroit;  WGBH-TV,  Boston;  WYES,  New  Orleans; 
WILL-TV,  Urbana,  Ill.;  WTTW,  Chicago;  WETV,  Atlanta,  Ga.; 

WTHS-TV,  Miami,  Fla.;  WJCT,  Jacksonville,  Fla.;  KRMA-TV, 

Denver;  KQED,  San  Francisco;  WAIQ,  Andalusia,  Ala.;  WTIQ, 

Munford,  Ala.;  WBIQ,  Birmingham,  Ala. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/18/57 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


NBC  COLOR  TELECAST  SCHEDULE 
Oct.  27-No v.  2 
All  Times  EST 


Sunday,  Oct,  27 

6:30-7  p.m.  --  MY  FRIEND  FLICKA  —  "The  Recluse." 

8- 9  p.m.  —  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW  —  William  Bendix,  Jerry  Vale, 

Janice  Harper  and  Shelley  Berman. 

9- 10  p.m.  --  THE  DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW  —  With  special  guest 

Robert  Cummings,  Gale  Storm  and  Boris  Karloff. 

Monday,  Oct.  28 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW  —  Special  guest  June 
Christy. 

3-4  p.m.  —  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  —  "The  Last  Stop." 

7:30-8  p.m.  —  THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT  —  With  Bill  Cullen  as  emcee. 
Tuesday,  Oct.  29 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  --  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m,  —  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  —  "The  Weak  and  the  Strong." 

8-9  p.m,  —  THE  EDDIE  FISHER  SHOW  STARRING  EDDIE  FISHER  WITH  GEORGE 
GOBEL  —  Tonight1 s  guests  are  Betty  Grable,  Mary  Kaye  Trio 
and  Elaine  Dunne. 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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Wednesday,  Oct,  30 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  —  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW , 

3-4  p.m*  —  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "Nine-Finger  Jack." 

9- 10  p.m.  —  KRAFT  TELEVISION  THEATRE  —  "Gun  at  a  Fair  One,"  by 

Bruce  Bassett,  starring  Ben  Piazza  and  Nancy  Malone, 

Thursday,  Oct,  31 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  —  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW  —  Guest  is  Conrad  Hilton 
3-4  p.m.  —  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  —  "Elementals . " 

7:30-8  p.m,  —  TIC  TAC  DOUGH  --  Jay  Jackson  is  emcee. 

10- 10:30  p.m.  —  THE  LUX  SHOW  STARRING  ROSEMARY  CLOONEY  --  Tonight 
guest  is  Boris  Karloff. 

Friday,  Nov.  1 

1:30-2:30  p.m.  —  THE  HOWARD  MILLER  SHOW. 

3-4  p.m,  --  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  --  "A  Plumber  in  Paradise," 
Saturday,  Nov,  2 

1:15  or  2:15  p.m,  —  NCAA  FOOTBALL  GAME  (Time  and  teams  to  be 
announced) . 

8-9  p.m.  —  THE  PERRY  COMO  SHOW  --  Guests  are  Ed  Wynn,  Sal  Mineo 
and  Dorothy  Collins. 

10:30-11  p.m,  —  YOUR  HIT  PARADE  --  With  vocalists  Jill  Corey, 
Virginia  Gibson,  Tommy  Leonetti  and  Alan  Copeland, 

— - — o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/18/57 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


GEORGE  GOBEL  A  "PRIZE"  HIMSELF  BRINGS  OTHER  GIFTS,  TOO,  TO  OHIO 
CONTEST  WINNER  AND  THERE'LL  BE  A  BIG  TIME  IN  CINCINNATI  NOV,  21 


FOR  RELEASE  A,Mt,  Wednesday,  Oct,  23 

The  author  of  the  winning  letter  on  the  topic  "Why  I  Would 
Like  to  Win  George  Gobel  for  My  Home  Town"  is  Mrs,  Fred  J,  Schneider, 
1548  Wittekind  Terrace,  Cincinnati  24,  Ohio,  Mrs,  Schneider,  in  addi¬ 
tion  to  "winning  the  NBC-TV  comedian"  for  her  town  for  one  day,  won 
a  21-inch  RCA  Victor  color  television  set  and  an  RCA  Whirlpool 
Freezer,  both  of  which  will  be  delivered  by  Gobel  himself  on  the 
morning  of  Nov,  21, 

The  announcement  of  Mrs,  Schneider's  prize  was  made  by 
Gobel  yesterday  (Tuesday,  Oct,  22),  on  the  colorcast  of  THE  GEORGE 
GOBEL  SHOW  STARRING  GEORGE  GOBEL  WITH  EDDIE  FISHER.  It  was  repeated 
by  Dave  Garroway  this  morning  (Oct,  23)  on  the  NBC-TV  TODAY  show, 
since  it  was  on  "Today"  that  the  offer  to  ’win*  Gobel  was  made  first, 
Mrs,  Schneider,  who  wrote  in  her  prize-winning  letter  that 
she  "would  like  to  share  his  charm  with  all  of  Cincinnati,"  will  turn 
Gobel  over  to  city  officials  once  he  has  delivered  her  other  prizes, 
Gobel  will  tour  the  city,  making  spot  appearances  in  key  areas  and  on 
the  night  of  Nov.  21  will  stage  a  variety  show  for  the  citizens 
of  Cincinnati,  at  which  Vaughn  Monroe  also  will  appear, 

Gobel  will  arrive  in  Cincinnati  on  the  evening  of  Nov,  20 

in  order  to  be  ready  for  duty  bright  and  early  on  the  21st. 

- o - 

NBC-New  York,  10/21/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


*  TODAY'  REPORTER  DICK  McCUTCHEN  ON  ONE-MONTH  ASSIGNMENT 
TO  SOUTH  AFRICA  FOR  FILM  REPORT  ON  SEGREGATION  PROBLEM 


TODAY  reporter  Dick  McCutchen  has  left  on 
a  one-month  assignment  in  the  Union  of  South  Africa 
where  he  will  do  a  filmed  report  on  that  country's 
segregation  problem. 

One  of  McCutchen' s  most  recent  assign¬ 
ments  with  "Today"  was  as  writer  of  the  program's 
special  one-hour  report  on  integration  in  the  United 
States  —  a  report  which  drew  much  critical  praise 
as  an  example  of  objective  reporting. 

McCutchen' s  South  African  report  is  ten¬ 
tatively  scheduled  to  be  presented  on  "Today"  in 
late  November. 

("Today,"  which  stars  Dave  Garroway,  Jack 
Lescoulie,  Frank  Blair,  Helen  O'Connell  and  Kokomo 
Jr.,  is  telecast  Monday  through  Friday  7-10  a.m,, 
NYT,  on  the  NBC-TV  Network,  except  WRCA-TV;  WRCA-TV 
only,  7-9  a.m.,  NYT.) 


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October  21,  1957 


'SURVIVAL:  THE  STORY  OF  MAN,  RESOURCES  AND  CIVILIZATION'  WILL  BE 
THURSDAY  10 -WEEK  SERIES  IN  NBC  EDUCATIONAL  TELEVISION  PROJECT 

Man  and  the  resources  he  uses  will  be  the  subject  of  a  10- 
week  TV  study  the  NBC  Educational  Television  Project  will  offer  this 
Fall. 

Albert  E.  Burke,  director  of  the  American  Institute  of 
Resource  Economics,  Hartford,  Conn.,  who  led  the  Project's  "Geography 
for  Decision"  series  last  Spring,  will  return  to  conduct  the  new 
program,  SURVIVAL:  THE  STORY  OF  MAN,  RESOURCES,  AND  CIVILIZATION. 

The  program  will  be  transmitted  live  to  the  country's 
linked-up  educational  TV  stations  over  NBC's  regular  network 
facilities  starting  Thursday,  Oct.  31  *  from  6  to  6:30  p.m.,  EST. 

It  will  be  one  of  five  Fall  program  series  in  the  Project  NBC  is 
undertaking  in  partnership  with  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio 
Center,  at  Ann  Arbor,  Mich.  (The  programs  also  will  be  telecast,  on 
a  delayed  basis,  over  many  NBC-TV  stations,  including  WRCA-TV  in 
New  York.  Dates  will  be  announced  soon.) 

"Survival"  will  be  produced  in  association  with  the  Con¬ 
servation  Foundation.  It  will  deal  with  what  resources  are,  how  man 
uses  them,  how  attitudes  and  technological  achievements  have  affected 
the  kind  and  quantity  of  resources  he  uses  and  his  way  of  using  them. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  Educational  TV  Project  -  Resources 


Four  general  areas  --  population,  agriculture,  energy  sources  and 
mineral  resources  --  will  be  treated  historically,  with  consideration 
of  how  they  have  affected  primitive  man,  agricultural  man,  industrial 
man,  and  are  affecting  technological  man. 

The  format  will  be  largely  lecture-style  with  visual  aids. 
Burke,  as  program  host,  will  have  guests  on  several  of  the  telecasts, 
among  them  Dr.  James  T.  Bonner,  biologist  and  specialist  in  plant 
biochemistry,  member  of  the  California  Institute  of  Technology's 
division  of  biology,  and  co-author  of  "The  Next  Hundred  Years,"  and 
Eugene  Ayres,  authority  on  sources  of  energy  and  co-author  of  "Energy 
Sources . " 

The  topics,  in  turn,  will  be: 

Oct.  31  --  "From  Adam  to  Atom." 

Nov ,  7  --  "Cave  Dwellers  to  Cliff  Dwellers,"  first  of  two 
consecutive  weekly  programs  on  population. 

Nov.  14  --  "Standing  Room  Only." 

Nov.  21  --  "Tale  of  Two  Plants,"  first  of  two  consecutive 
weekly  programs  on  agriculture.  Guest:  Dr.  Bonner. 

Nov.  28  --  "Land  for  Living's  Sake." 

Dec .  5  --  "A  Fuel  There  Was,"  first  of  three  consecutive 
weekly  programs  on  energy. 

Dec .  12  --  "From  Fossils  to  Fission." 

Dec.  19  --  "Energy,"  Guest:  Eugene  Ayres. 

Dec,  2 6  --  "Minerals." 

Jan.  2  --  "Conclusion." 


(more ) 


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3  -  Educational  TV  Project  -  Resources 

Dorothy  Culbertson  will  be  the  producer,  and  Prank  Pacelll 
the  director.  The  Educational  Television  Project  is  under  the  general 
direction  of  Edward  Stanley,  NBC  manager  of  public  service  programs. 
Brice  Howard  is  executive  producer,  and  Donley  Feddersen  is  repre¬ 
sentative  of  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center, 


NBC -New  York,  10/21/57 


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EoTABLISHMENT  OP  PAY-TV  WILL  GIVE  VIEWER  NO  CHANCE  TO  CHOOSE 
BETWEEN  TOLL  AND  FREE  TV,  STATES  ROBERT  W.  SARNOFF 


NBC  President,  in  Pittsburgh  Talk,  Holds  Emergence  of  Pay  Method 
Means  We,  Like  the  Public1  Will  Have  to  Follow  Pay  Tide 

FOR  RELEASE  WEDNESDAY,  P.M.,  OCT.  23 


ro  roj.±ow 


PITTSBURGH,  PA.,  Oct.  23  --  The  establishment  of  pay- 
television  --  whether  wired  or  wireless  —  will  not  depend  on  public 
choice  because,  once  either  system  is  launched,  the  viewer  will  be 
left  no  opportunity  to  decide  between  pay  and  free  television,  Robert 

W,  Sainoff ,  President  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company,  said 
today. 

Pay- television  can  succeed  only  by  devouring  the  substance 
of  free  television,  Mr.  Sarnoff  declared.  Thus,  the  viewers  will 
become  its  victims,  and  with  their  freedom  of  choice  gone,  he  said, 
they  will  pay  for  the  entertainment  they  now  receive  free  and  in  the 
process  lose  all  other  benefits  of  free  television. 

Mr.  Sarnoff  added  that  if  pay-television  does  emerge  as  a 
replacement  for  free  broadcasting,  "we,  like  the  public,  will  have  no 
choice  but  to  follow  the  pay  tide." 

The  NBC  President  spoke  at  a  luncheon  given  in  his  honor 
by  William  Block,  publisher  of  the  Pittsburgh  Post-Gazette,  at  the 
Duquesne  Club,  The  Post-Gazette  is  owner  of  WIIC,  NBC's  new  tele¬ 
vision  affiliate  in  Pittsburgh. 

(more) 


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While  the  prospect  of  an  annual  pay-TV  take  that  could 
reach  hundreds  of  millions  of  dollars  might  appear  tempting  to  a  net¬ 
work  organization  such  as  NBC  which  is  "strongly  positioned"  to 
participate  in  it,  NBC‘s  opposition  arises  from  its  conviction  that 
pay-TV  is  against  public  interest,  Mr.  Sarnoff  emphasized. 

"Of  course,  this  view  may  not  prevail  and  the  pressures 
behind  pay-TV  may  succeed  in  putting  it  over  on  the  public,"  he  said. 
"If  it  does  eventually  develop  as  the  replacement  for  free  broad¬ 
casting,  we,  like  the  public,  will  have  no  choice  but  to  follow  the 
pay-TV  tide.  With  the  prime  television  attractions  bought  away,  with 
little  left  to  hold  a  national  mass  audience,  the  free  broadcasting 
audie*ffi-e-  would  wither  away. 

As  far  as  practical  effects  on  the  public  are  concerned, 
there  is  no  difference  between  the  wired  and  wireless  systems  of 
pay-TV,  Mr,  Sarnoff  pointed  out.  Revenues  obtained  from  the  public 
would  enable  either  pay-TV  system  to  outbid  free  television  for 
programs,  even  if  the  pay  audience  were  much  smaller,  he  explained. 
Free  television,  its  principal  attractions  siphoned  away,  would  thus 
be  forced  into  a  downward  spiral  and  might  eventually  disappear 
altogether,  he  said. 

The  argument  of  pay-TV  proponents  that  if  it  succeeds  it 
will  be  only  through  free  choice  crumbles  under  examination,  Mr. 
Sarnoff  asserted.  As  an  example,  he  cited  the  plans  of  the  Brooklyn 
Dodgers  and  the  New  York  Giants,  in  moving  to  the  West  Coast,  to  put 
their  home-games  telecasts  on  a  pay  basis. 


(more) 


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3  -  Robert  W.  Sarnoff 


"If  these  games  are  taken  over  by  pay-TV,  the  viewer  who 
wants  to  see  them  at  home  will  have  no  choice  between  pay-TV  and 
free-TV,"  Mr.  Sarnoff  said.  "Either  he  pays  or  he  doesn’t  watch  the 
game  —  hardly  a  free  choice." 

Such  examples,  he  continued,  can  be  multiplied  to  cover  all 
the  key  attractions  of  television  today.  Once  they  are  taken  over  by 
pay-TV,  the  only  choice  left  to  the  public  will  be  pay-or-you-don1 t- 
see,  he  asserted. 

If  the  public  is  not  alert  to  the  danger,  Mr.  Sarnoff  said, 
wired  pay-TV  could  start  developing  on  a  small  scale  in  various  cities 
and  then  mushroom  ahead  "as  it  gorges  itself  on  the  substance  of  free 
television."  Once  the  cities  are  wired,  it  would  take  only  existing 
intercity  circuits  to  create  a  national,  centralized  system,  he 
continued, 

"If  that  happens,  you  can  toll  the  bell  for  the  end  of  free 
broadcasting  as  we  know  it  --  not  only  television,  but  radio  as  well." 

The  NBC  executive  expressed  optimism,  however,  over  the 
future  of  free  television.  He  said  that  each  year  more  Americans 
spend  more  time  viewing  it,  and  that  products  advertised  on  it  con¬ 
tinue  to  pour  forth  in  increasing  abundance. 

"This  is  a  vibrant,  strong  and  growing  industry  in  which 
you  are  now  participating,"  he  told  Mr.  Block.  "With  the  support  of 
an  informed  public,  the  free  system  will  continue  to  flourish  and 
your  fine  new  station  will  flourish  with  it  in  serving  the  people  of 
Pittsburgh. " 

- o - 


NBC-10/22/57 


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Address  by: 

Robert  W.  Sarnoff,  President, 
National  Broadcasting  Company, 
At  Duquesne  Club, 

Pittsburgh,  Pennsylvania, 

Oct.  23,  1957 


TELEVISION  AT  THE  CROSSROADS 

FOR  RELEASE  WEDNESDAY  P.M.  OCT.  23 

The  broadcast  association  between  NBC  and  Pittsburgh  began 
with  the  start  of  networking  itself.  The  first  radio  network  broad¬ 
cast  came  from  NBC  in  New  York  in  October,  1926,  and  Pittsburgh  was 
one  of  25  American  cities  to  participate  in  our  inaugural  program. 

This  network/ beginning  31  years  ago/' triggered  the  whole  great  cycle 
of  broadcasting  development,  first  radio,  then  television. 

Today  we  celebrate  the  renewal  and  strengthening  of  our 
association.  One  of  America's  eminent  newspapers,  the  Post  Gazette, 
has  created  one  of  America's  most  modern,  most  completely-equipped 
television  stations  and  has  placed  it  in  the  NBC  family  of  200  tele¬ 
vision  affiliates.  When  WIIC  began  operating  Sept.  1,  Mr.  Block  and 
his  associates  wrote  off  Pittsburgh's  unhappy  distinction  of  being 
the  last  major  population  center  with  single  commercial  VHF  service. 

As  a  result,  your  community  now  benefits  from  a  broadened  freedom  of 
program  choice,  which  is  the  essence  of  broadcasting  as  in  another 
sense  it  is  the  essence  of  democratic  living. 

(more) 

MESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  Address  by  Robert  W.  Sarnoff 


From  civilization's  beginning,  the  act  of  giving  birth  has 
been  the  occasion  for  joyousness  and  festivity.  But  today,  in  cele¬ 
brating  WIIC's  birth,  I  propose  to  flout  all  civilized  custom  and 
tradition.  I  propose  to  discuss  a  development  that  could  ultimately 
sweep  away  the  nation's  free  broadcasting  system,  which  now  includes 
WIIC,  469  other  television  stations  and  three  national  television 
networks.  If  this  prospect  shocks  you,  Mr.  Block,  I  can  only  add 
that  it  shocks  me  too,  and  I  am  sure  that  neither  of  us  shocks  easily. 

The  development  is  pay  television.  It  is  a  subject  of 
personal  significance  to  41  million  American  families  which  own  tele¬ 
vision  sets  and  use  them  an  average  of  more  than  six  hours  daily  to 
enjoy  a  broad-based  service  of  free  entertainment  and  information. 

It  is  a  subject  of  concern  to  American  business,  including  the  great 
steel,  aluminum  and  glass  industries  of  Pittsburgh  which  have  employed 
television  so  effectively  to  carry  their  product  and  institutional 
messages  to  the  consuming  public.  It  is  a  subject  that  occupies  the 
increasing  attention  of  the  Congress.  It  has,  in  fact,  become  a  major 
national  issue,  an  issue  which  places  the  broadcasting  service  of  this 
country  at  a  crossroads,  an  issue  of  sufficient  gravity  to  merit 
resolution  by  the  public  itself  —  after  the  public  has  become  ac¬ 
quainted  with  what  is  at  stake. 

There  are  two  fundamental  methods  of  providing  a  pay  tele¬ 
vision  system  —  wireless  and  wired.  Both  methods  would  require  the 
set  owner  to  pay  a  fee  to  watch  the  program  offered.  In  the  wireless 
method,  the  program  would  be  transmitted  by  a  television  station  over 
its  regular  air  channel;  in  the  wired  method,  it  would  be  fed  from  a 
central  studio  by  wire  lines  direct  to  the  television  set  in  the  home, 
eliminating  the  need  for  the  television  station. 

(more) 


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3  -  Address  by  Robert  W,  Sarnoff 


The  issues  arising  from  pay- TV  have  little  surface 
visibility,  because  they  involve  some  familiarity  with  the  complex 
economic  structure  of  free  broadcasting,  and  because  they  have  been 
caught  up  in  a  whirlpool  of  controversy.  Thus  far,  attention  has 
been  centered  on  wireless  pay- TV,  Since  it  proposes  the  use  of  tele¬ 
vision  channels  set  aside  for  free  broadcasting,  it  requires  govern¬ 
ment  approval.  Meantime,  wired  pay- TV,  which  is  presently  not  under 
government  scrutiny,  is  being  actively  promoted  in  an  effort  to 
attract  the  millions  of  dollars  needed  to  launch  it. 

Today,  I  want  to  outline,  as  dispassionately  as  I  can,  the 
reasons  why  we  believe  that  wireless  pay-TV  would  be  detrimental  to 
the  public  interest,  and  then  explore  the  probable  consequences  of 
wired  pay-TV  if  it  became  a  reality.  In  doing  so,  I  will  first  ask, 
and  then  attempt  to  answer,  two  questions  on  which  all  of  the  basic 
issues  pivot i 

First,  will  pay-TV  offer  the  public  programs  which  it  wants 
but  which  are  not  available  on  free  television?  In  other  words,  will 
it  provide  a  distinctive  new  service? 

Second,  if  pay-TV  develops,  can  free  television  coexist 
with  it  and  preserve  the  values  of  the  present  system? 

These  are  the  two  questions  which  the  public,  if  it  is  to 
judge  intelligently,  must  begin  to  ask  itself  and  answer  for  itself. 

It  is  our  belief  that  the  answers  need  not  be  speculative,  for  they 
are  rooted  in  the  economic  realities  of  television,  pay  or  free. 

These  realities  dictate  that  the  types  of  programs  to  be 
expected  on  pay-TV  must  be,  with  few  exceptions,  precisely  the  same 
types  of  programs  now  offered  on  free  television.  The  financial 
success  of  either  system  hinges  squarely  on  its  ability  to  attract  the 

(more) 


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4  -  Address  by  Robert  W.  Sarnoff 


largest  available  audience.  This  means  offering  the  most  popular 
shows  and  stars,  the  very  shows  and  stars  which  free  television  has 
developed  and  continues  to  develop. 

What  better  or  different  programs  would  pay- TV  furnish? 
Sports?  Free  television  has  baseball  today;  it  has  fights,  including 
the  majority  of  the  championship  bouts;  it  has  the  golf  championships, 
the  tennis  championships,  collegiate  football  and  professional  foot¬ 
ball,  the  Rose  Bowl,  the  Cotton  Bowl,  basketball  and  hockey  and 
rodeos  and,  of  course,  the  World  Series  which  you  just  saw  this  month. 
Will  these  events  become  more  desirable  programming  if  the  public  is 
required  to  pay  for  them? 

In  the  field  of  drama,  what  better  dramas?  Better  than 
Maurice  Evans  in  Shakespeare’s  "Twelfth  Night"  which  we  are  presenting 
this  month,  or  "Dial  M  for  Murder"  in  April?  Or  the  Old  Vic 
Theatre’s  "Romeo  and  Juliet"  of  last  season?  Better  Broadway  plays? 
Better  than  Mary  Martin  in  "Annie  Get  Your  Gun"  over  NBC  next  month? 
Better  variety  and  musical  shows?  Better  than  Steve  Allen  or  Ed 
Sullivan,  Perry  Como  or  Dinah  Shore?  Better  cultural  offerings? 

Better  than  the  NBC  Opera  Company's  telecast  of  Puccini's  "Butterfly" 
last  season,  or  Gian-Carlo  Menotti's  new  opera  this  season,  com¬ 
missioned  by  NBC? 

A  succinct  answer  to  this  question  came  from  the  chairman 
of  the  Federal  Communications  Commission,  Mr.  John  C,  Doerfer,  Asked 
in  a  recent  interview  with  Newsweek  Magazine  what  pay- TV  could  do  for 
the  people,  Mr.  Doerfer  responded,  "Nothing  more  or  less  than  tele¬ 
vision  does  now." 

Mr.  Philip  Minoff,  one  of  New  York's  leading  television 

critics,  recently  examined  in  the  theatrical  magazine  Cue  all  the 

promises  of  superior  pay  television  programming  and  concluded: 

(more) 


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f5  -  Address  by  Robert  W,  Sarnoff 


"I  haven’t  even  seen  much  in  the  way  of  ’promises'  that 
isn't  already  being  fulfilled  under  our  current  system  of  free,  old- 
fashioned  programming.  With  the  exception  of  first-run  movies,  there 
is  precious  little  in  the  'golden  era'  prospectus  that  we  don't  get 
now.  I  have  a  horrible  vision  of  some  disenchanted  pay- TV  booster 
summing  it  all  up  in  a  column  written  three  or  four  years  hence. 

'Alas,'  he  might  conclude,  'the  programming  we're  getting  now  is  just 
like  the  programming  we  were  getting  back  in  1957.  There  is  just  one 
difference:  Now  it  can  be  tolled.'"  Tolled  spelled,  of  course, 
T-O-L-L-E-D. 

So,  in  answer  to  the  first  question,  we  believe  that  the 
development  of  pay- TV  must  be  marked  by  a  movement  of  the  major 
attractions  from  free  to  pay  television..  Instead  of  being  available 
to  everyone  without  charge,  the  programs  would  be  available  only  to 

- 

the  minority  of  the  public  willing  and  able  to  pay  for  them. 

Where  would  this  leave  free  television  and  the  public's 
stake  in  it?  Box-office  revenue  would  enable  pay- TV  to  outbid  free 
television  for  programs,  even  if  the  pay  audience  were  much  smaller. 
Thus  free  television,  its  principal  attractions  siphoned  off,  would 
be  forced  into  a  downward  spiral.  The  inevitable  shrinkage  of  its 
audiences  would  lead  to  a  disintegration  of  its  advertising  effective¬ 
ness  and  the  destruction  of  its  economic  base.  Possibly,  it  could 
maintain  some  sort  of  utility  service  on  a  marginal  level.  Possibly, 
it  would  go  under  completely.  Certainly,  it  would  be  unable  to 
continue  new  program  development  and  the  public  services  which  have 
made  free  television  such  a  vital  force  in  American  life. 


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6  -  Address  by  Robert  W,  Sarnoff 


The  proponents  of  pay-TV  have  argued  that  if  it  succeeds, 
it  can  succeed  only  through  free  public  choice.  This  argument 
crumbles  under  examination,  and  let’s  turn  to  sports  --  a  prime 
objective  of  the  pay  group  —  to  illustrate.  The  Brooklyn  Dodgers 
and  the  New  York  Giants,  in  announcing  their  moves  to  the  West  Coast, 
have  both  emphasized  plans  to  have  their  home  games  telecast  on  a 
pay  basis,  I  do  not  criticize  the  gentlemen  who  run  these  organiza¬ 
tions  for  such  plans.  I  merely  point  out  that  if  these  games  are 
taken  over  by  pay-TV,  the  viewer  who  wants  to  see  them  at  home  will 
have  no  choice  between  pay-TV  and  free-TV,  Either  he  pays  or  he 
doesn’t  watch  the  game  —  hardly  a  free  choice. 

To  move  closer  home,  suppose  —  and  this  is  a  pleasant 
thought  —  suppose  the  Pittsburgh  Pirates  move  from  the  cellar  into 
first  place  and  into  a  World  Series  berth  next  year.  Suppose  the 
National  Broadcasting  Company,  which  has  the  World  Series  television 
and  radio  rights  for  the  next  four  years,  were  in  a  position  —  which 
it  isn’t  —  to  broadcast  the  games  at  Forbes  Field  on  a  pay  basis. 

If  the  Series  moved  from  free  to  pay-TV,  what  choice  would  the  people 
of  Pittsburgh  and  the  rest  of  the  country  have?  Their  choice  would 
be  to  pay  or  not  to  see  the  Pirates  on  television  —  again,  hardly 
a  free  choice.  The  examples  could  be  multiplied  to  cover  all  the  key 
attractions  of  television  today.  Once  they  are  taken  over  by  pay-TV, 
the  only  choice  left  to  the  public  will  be  Pay-or-You-Don’ t-See , 

These  considerations  have  led  us  to  the  conclusion  that 
pay-TV  will  not  add  to  the  present  service,  for  it  can  succeed  only 
by  devouring  the  substance  of  free  television.  Thus,  without  any 


(more) 


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7  -  Address  by  Robert  W,  Sarnoff 


choice,  the  public  would  have  to  pay  for  entertainment  attractions 
now  free;  and  in  the  process  might  lose  all  the  other  benefits  of 
free  television. 

We  have  already  presented  these  conclusions  in  relation  to 
VlTJrj-Jr.s.3  pay- TV  to  various  government  bodies  considering  that  subject. 
While  there  is  no  government  forum  presently  concerned  with  wired 
pay- TV,  we  have  also,  within  NBC,  earnestly  and  objectively  sought  to 
analyze  the  probable  consequences  of  such  a  system. 

We  recognize  the  technical  and  philosophical  distinctions 
between  the  two  types  of  operation.  The  wire  system  does  not  involve 
the  use  of  television  channels  dedicated  to  free  broadcasting,  which 
removes  one  of  the  philosophical  objections.  Its  operation  would  not 
automatically  black  out  a  free  program,  and  this  removes  one  of  the 
technical  objections.  But  as  far  as  the  practical  effects  on  the 
public  are  concerned,  we  see  no  difference  between  the  two  systems. 

If  either  becomes  established,  the  end  result,  I  believe,  would  be 
the  replacement  of  a  broad-based  free  service  by  a  narrower  service 
with  a  price  tag  on  it. 

Thus  far,  the  principal  proponents  of  wired  pay- TV  have 
offered  little  except  a  decoder  gadget,  a  paper  plan  and  an  oppor¬ 
tunity  for  others  to  risk  money  to  test  their  plan.  The  astronomical 
sums  required  to  launch  such  ventures  on  a  large  scale  are  seen  in  an 
estimate  of  $200  million  to  wire  up  the  sets  in  metropolitan  New  York 
and  $1.5  billion  to  cover  all  262  United  States  metropolitan  county 
areas.  These  amounts  double  when  the  cost  of  installing  the  col¬ 
lecting  devices  is  included.  These  built-in  box-offices  are  the 
instruments  for  recouping  such  huge  costs  from  the  public.  For,  as 

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8  -  Address  by  Robert  W.  Sarnoff 


stated  by  an  official  of  one  of  the  principal  pay- TV  groups:  "A 
monthly  bill  might  never  get  paid,  but  with  a  coin  box  to  take  the 
money  in  advance  we  can  nickel-and-dime  them  to  death  and  they'll 
never  notice." 

If  the  public  and  its  representatives  are  not  alert  to  the 
danger,  wired  pay- TV  could  start  developing  in  various  cities,  first 
on  a  small  scale,  then  mushrooming  as  it  gorges  itself  on  the  sub¬ 
stance  of  free  television*  Once  the  cities  are  wired,  it  would  take 
only  existing  intercity  circuits  to  create  a  centralized  system  on 
a  national  basis,  and  if  that  happens,  you  can  toll  the  bell  for  the 
end  of  free  broadcasting  as  we  know  it  --  not  only  television,  but 
radio  as  well. 

Again,  let  me  stress  that  once  this  process  is  launched, 
the  viewers  become  its  victims,  their  freedom  of  choice  gone.  For 
the  pay-TVers  have  seized  upon  an  important  discovery:  the  realiza¬ 
tion  that  some  people  would  pay  for  television's  key  attractions  if 
that  were  the  only  way  of  viewing  them.  If  this  discovery  is  fully 
exploited,  it  could  eventually  start  a  golden  flow  to  pay- TV;  even 
if  only  25$  of  the  set  owners  paid  to  watch,  the  annual  take  could 
reach  hundreds  of  millions  of  dollars. 

Such  a  revenue  prospect  might  seem  tempting  to  a  network 
organization  like  NBC.  Our  business  involves  heavy  commitments 
and  high  risks  in  maintaining  a  rounded  national  program  service  on 
a  continuing  basis,  whether  the  costly  entertainment,  news  and  public 
service  programs  are  sold  or  not.  It  is  therefore  conceivaole  that 
pay- TV  might  ultimately  provide  profits  larger  and  more  stable  than 
a  network  can  realize.  And  we  are,  after  all,  strongly  positioned  to 

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9  -  Address  by  Robert  W,  Sarnoff 


participate  in  pay-TV  in  a  major  way,  with  the  studio  facilities, 
the  programs  and  stars,  the  accumulated  know-how  of  a  pioneer 
television  company. 

So  our  attitude  toward  pay-TV  is  not  wholly  a  matter  of 
self-interest;  indeed,  if  self-interest  were  the  prime  consideration, 
we  might  well  be  hedging  by  laying  out  a  stake  in  pay-TV  ourselves; 
or  at  least  by  adopting  a  non-committal  position.  Our  view,  however, 
is  born  of  the  conviction  that  pay-television  --  whether  wired  or 
wireless  —  is  hostile  to  the  public  interest. 

Of  course,  this  view  may  not  prevail  and  the  pressures 
behind  pay-TV  may  succeed  in  putting  it  over  on  the  public.  If  it 
does  eventually  develop  as  the  replacement  service  for  free  broad¬ 
casting,  we,  like  the  public,  will  have  no  choice  but  to  follow  the 
pay  tide.  With  the  prime  television  attractions  bought  away,  with 
little  left  to  hold  a  national  mass  audience,  the  free  broadcasting 
enterprise  would  wither  away. 

This  is  a  prospect  of  concern  not  only  to  the  public  but  to 
American  business,  which  relies  so  heavily  on  the  advertising  impact 
of  television  to  sell  its  goods  and  services.  It  is  no  coincidence 
that  television's  first  10  years  as  an  advertising-supported  medium 
parallel  the  10  years  of  America’s  greatest  economic  growth.  During 
this  decade,  advertising  and  merchandising  have  come  to  the  forefront 
as  the  economy's  prime  movers;  and  among  all  merchandising  media, 
television's  growth  has  been  the  greatest. 

We  can  only  speculate  mournfully  on  what  might  happen  if 
television's  powerful  advertising  voice  were  stilled  or  reduced  to  a 
whisper.  For  even  though  it’s  likely  that  pay-TV  will  seek 


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10  -  Address  by  Robert  W,  Sarnoff 


advertising  revenue,,  it  is  inconceivable  that  it  will  be  able  to 
deliver  an  audience  of  tens  of  millions  hour  after  hour,  as  tele¬ 
vision  now  does;  and  without  such  a  continuing  mass  audience, 
television  will  cease  to  exist  as  a  primary  national  advertising 
medium. 

The  effects  which  the  development  of  pay- TV,  wired  as  well 
as  wireless,  would  have  on  the  public  and  the  economy  must  surely 
concern  the  officials  of  government.  Yet,  it  is  ironic  that  with 
such  basic  issues  posed  for  resolution,  the  principal  government 
preoccupation  with  broadcasting  is  devoted  to  searching  for  faults 
in  the  methods  by  which  television  stations  and  networks  operate 
together  in  providing  a  free  broadcasting  service.  It  is  also  ironic 
that  after  two  years  of  laborious  investigation,  a  government  study 
staff  has  concluded  that  although  networks  perform  "a  major  public 
service,"  they  should  be  barred  from  operations  which  most  experi¬ 
enced  broadcasters  feel  are  essential  to  the  network  function, 

I  believe  the  preservation  of  free  broadcasting  calls  not 
only  for  alertness  against  external  threats  like  pay-TV,  but  for 
caution  in  tampering  with  the  delicate  mechanisms  of  the  broadcasting 
structure.  The  heart  of  that  structure  is  the  network  operation, 
and  the  maintenance  of  strong  and  effective  national  networks  is  the 
key  to  a  strong  and  effective  free  broadcasting  system.  If  it 
weakens  or  fails,  pay-TV  will  not  falter  in  talcing  over. 

Public,  government  and  business  interest  in  the  develop¬ 
ments  I  have  discussed  is  unquestionably  shared  by  the  great  majority 
of  broadcasters.  With  stations,  in  particular,  the  emergence  of 
wired  pay-TV  might  pose  a  very  real  question  as  to  their  future 


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11  -  Address  by  Robert  W.  Sarnoff 


usefulness.  A  wired  system  would  not  only  take  over  the  programs 
supplied  to  stations  by  networks  and  others,  but  would  bypass  the 
stations  completely  in  transmitting  programs  to  homes.  This  would 
seem  to  leave  the  station  little  choice  other  than  to  become  a 
broadcast  museum  or  a  public  library. 

But,  Mr.  Block,  before  you  place  your  fine  new  station, 

WIIC,  on  a  bargain  basement  counter,  may  I  offer  these  concluding 
thoughts : 

The  growth  of  free  television  continues  with  enormous 
vitality.  Each  year,  more  Americans  devote  more  time  to  the  free 
television  service.  Products  advertised  on  it  continue  to  pour  in 
increasing  abundance  from  the  factories  of  Pittsburgh  and  of  all 
America. 

This  is  a  vibrant,  strong  and  growing  industry  in  which 
you  are  now  participating.  With  the  support  of  an  informed  public, 
the  free  system  will  continue  to  flourish  and  your  fine  new  station 
will  flourish  with  it  in  serving  the  people  of  Pittsburgh. 

I  thank  you,  Mr,  Block  and  Mr.  Schloss,  for  inviting  me 
here,  I  appreciate  the  warmth  of  this  reception.  I  hope  I  will  be 
able  to  return  to  Pittsburgh  many  times  in  the  years  ahead  to  join 
you  in  celebrating  the  continuing  association  of  WIIC  and  NBC  in 
presenting  the  finest  of  news,  information  and  entertainment  programs 
--  and  in  presenting  them  free! 

— - o - 


NBC-10/22/57 


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*  POSTMAN*  PETE  MARTIN  CALLS  ON  DINAH  SHORE 

"I  Call  on  Dinah  Shore"  is  a  feature  article  by  Pete 
Martin  in  the  current  issue  of  the  Saturday  Evening  Post.  The 
article  is  illustrated  with  color  pictures  of  Dinah  at  home  and  at 
work  for  the  NBC-TV  DINAH  SHORE  CHEVY  SHOW  colorcasts. 

Martin  tells  how  the  "first  lady  of  the  blues"  picked  her 
husband  (George  Montgomery)  from  a  movie  screen,  and  discusses  her 
own  movie  experiences.  Dinah  also  answers  Martin’s  question:  "Just 
what  exactly  is  a  female  personality?" 

Martin  concludes  his  story  with  the  "confession:"  "I 
would  like  to  have  called  this  article  'To  Dinah  With  Love,'  be- 
cause  she’s  so  genuinely  likable,  but  this  is  part  of  a  series  which 
carries  the  running  title,  'I  Call  On,..'  so  I  couldn't.  I  just  want 
her  to  know." 

S 

. 0 - 

JUDY  CANOVA  JOINS  GUEST  LIST  FOR  'STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW' 

Judy  Canova  has  been  added  to  the  guest  list  for  the  NBC-TV 
colorcast  of  THE  STEVE  ALLEN  SHOW  Sunday,  Oct.  27  (8  p.m.,  EST) . 

Other  guests,  previously  announced,  are  William  Bendix, 
singers  Jerry  Vale  and  Janice  Harper  and  comedian  Shelley  Berman, 

I 

{  - o - 

NBC-New  York,  10/22/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  SO,  NEW  YORK 


■  '  -  '  -  . 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 


CREDITS  FOR  "THE  HOUSE  I  ENTER" 
ON  NBC-TV'S  "WIDE  WIDE  WORLD" 


TIME: 

Sunday,  Oct.  27  4-5:30  p.m.. 

NYT 

SPONSOR: 

General  Motors 

(For  entire  series) 

AGENCY: 

McManus,  John  &  Adams,  Inc. 

EXECUTIVE  PRODUCER: 

Barry  Wood 

PRODUCER: 

Ted  Rogers 

HOST: 

Dave  Garroway 

DIRECTOR: 

Van  Fox 

WRITER: 

Harold  Azine 

MUSIC  COMPOSER  AND 

David  Broekman 

CONDUCTOR: 

EXECUTIVE  STAFF: 

Arch  Robb,  Ed  Fought,  Ed  Wilbur 

TECHNICAL  SUPERVISOR: 

Bob  Daniels 

ASSOCIATE  WRITER: 

Gene  Wyckoff 

SYNOPSIS: 

For  "The  House  I  Enter,"  the 

cameras 

"Wide  Wide  World"  will  enter  hospitals, 
research  centers  and  homes  across  the 
nation  to  tell  the  human,  personal 
story  of  American  doctors.  Viewers 
will  meet,  among  others.  Dr.  James  M, 
Smith,  who  will  perform  a  major  opera¬ 
tion  at  University  Hospitals  in  Cleve¬ 
land;  Dr.  John  L.  Caughey,  Jr.,  who 
will  offer  advice  to  a  group  of  begin¬ 
ning  medical  students  at  Western  Reserve 

University  in  Cleveland; 

(more ) 


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Credits 


SYNOPSIS:  Dr.  Charles  0.  Hoover,  who  will  show  a 

(CONT'D) 

doctor's  view  of  the  small  town  of 
Overbrook,  Kansas;  Dr.  Nicholas  Dallis, 
who  will  discuss  the  problems  of  mental 
illness;  Dr.  Fredric  Wertham,  who  will 
demonstrate  the  methods  used  in  his 
psychiatric  clinic  in  New  York;  Dr. 
Elwood  W.  Mason,  who  will  answer 
questions  on  medical  fees  and  services; 
Dr.  Herman  K.  Hellerstein,  who  will 
show  the  results  of  his  work  in  cardiac 
research;  Dr.  Alex  Langmuir,  who  will 
put  his  "disease  detectives"  through 
their  paces  at  the  epidemiology  center 
in  Chamblee,  Ga.;  and  Dr.  Howard  R. 
Bierman,  who  will  show  how  his  team  of 
doctors  fights  against  time  at  the  City 
of  Hope  in  Duarte,  Cal.,  to  find  a  cure 
for  leukemia . 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/22/57 


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MONIT 


THE  NBC  WEEK-END  RADIO  SERVICE 


IT'S  NEVER  TOO  FAR  OR  TOO  COLD  FOR  "MONITOR"  PROMOTION 

NBC  Radiol  MONITOR  has  claimed  a  lot  of  firsts,  gone  a 
lot  of  places  and  done  innumerable  things... but  what  roving  re¬ 
porter  and  "Monitor"  assistant  managing  editor  Dick  Jennings  is 
attempting  to  do  this  week,  could  quite  possibly  create  an  inter¬ 
national  sensation  —  well  almost t 

1  Jennings  flew  out  of  New  York  City  via  Pan  American  Air¬ 

ways  this  past  week  on  the  first  commercial  airplane  flight  to  the 
South  Pole.  He  accompanied  a  group  of  American  IGY  scientists  and 
Navy  personnel  bound  for  McMurdo  Sound  in  the  Antarctic  Circle, 
Dick,  as  the  only  radio  network  broadcaster  aboard,  will  make  tape 
recordings  of  the  entire  flight,  the  preparations  for  entering  sub¬ 
zero  weather  and  interview  the  scientists  and  men  stationed  at  this 
southernmost  point  of  the  world. 

I  But  the  real  purpose  of  his  trip,  engineered  by  "Monitor" 

executive  producer  A1  Capstaff,  is  to  plant  the  blue-and-white 
"Monitor"  flag  on  a  snow  heap  and  claim  the  South  Pole  for  NBC’s 
week-end  programl 


NBC-New  York,  10/22/57 

NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20.  NEW  YORK 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


ROYAL  ESCORT 

Two  children  of  members  of  the  TODAY  staff  recently 
were  taken  on  a  tour  of  the  United  Nations  by  no  less  than  a 
Prince . 

The  children  were  Mary  Blair,  11,  daughter  of 
"Today"  news  editor  Frank  Blair,  and  Walter  Michaels,  9,  son 
of  "Today"  reporter  Joe  Michaels.  The  Prince  was  Wan 
Waithayakon  of  Thailand,  former  president  of  the  UN  General 
Assembly.  "Today"  filmed  the  tour  for  presentation  Thurs¬ 
day,  Oct,  24,  the  date  of  the  United  Nations  anniversary. 

("Today"  is  telecast  Monday  through  Friday  7-10 
a.m.,  NYT,  on  the  NBC-TV  Network,  except  WRCA-TV;  WRCA-TV 
only,  7-9  a.m.,  NYT.) 

- o - 

‘BAD  B0Y‘  MAKES  GOOD 

Eight-year-old  Barry  Gordon,  who  has  played  the 
part  of  a  mischievous  Italian  street  urchin  in  NBC-TV‘s 
SALLY,  has  cashed  in  on  being  a  "bad  boy."  In  fact,  he 
is  best  known  for  his  rendition  of  "I*m  Getting  Nuttin* 
for  Christmas  Because  I‘ve  Been  Bad."  It  sold  over  a 
million  records! 


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NBC -New  York,  10/22/57 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


NBC 


October  23,  1957 

ERNEST  BORGNINE,  CLAUDETTE  COLBERT  AND  DAN  DAILEY  JOIN  ROSTER 
OF  STARS  FOR  GENERAL  MOTORS  50TH  ANNIVERSARY  SHOW 

Three  noted  Hollywood  personalities  --  Academy  Award  winner 
Ernest  Borgnine,  actress  Claudette  Colbert  and  actor-dancer  Dan  Dailey 
--  have  joined  the  top-name  performers  who  will  star  in  the  GENERAL 
MOTORS  50TH  ANNIVERSARY  SHOW  Sunday,  Nov.  17  (NBC-TV  colorcast, 

9-11  p .m. ,  EST) . 

They  will  participate  with  a  cast  of  more  than  100  including 
these  previously  announced  performers:  Kirk  Douglas,  who  will  be  the 
narrator j  Don  Ameche,  Pat  Boone,  Eddie  Bracken,  Helen  Hayes,  Patrice 
Munsel,  Cyril  Ritchard  and  Dinah  Shore.  Others  will  be  announced  soon. 

The  special  two-hour  show  will  present  a  kaleidoscope  of 
drama,  comedy  and  satire,  interlaced  with  song  and  dance,  in  a  theme 

related  to  the  pursuit  of  happiness. 

Jess  Oppenheimer,  producer  of  the  special  program,  describes 
the  script  as  "a  sort  of  light-hearted  treatise  which  investigates  the 
pursuit  of  happiness  in  a  series  of  dramatic,  comic  and  musical  case 
histories."  In  presenting  the  basic  theme,  the  script  quotes  Thornton 
Wilder's  line:  "Realize  life  while  you  live  it,  every,  every  moment." 

The  two-hour  production  will  inaugurate  General  Motors' 

Golden  Anniversary  Year. 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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TRADE  NEWS 


October  23,  1957 

SOFT  GOODS  IS  LATEST  FIELD  TO  BE  REPRESENTED  ON  GROWING  LIST  OF 
U.5.  MANUFACTURERS  USING  NBC  RADIO  NETWORK  MERCHANDISING  PLAN 

An  increasing  number  of  national  manufacturers  are  using  the 
NBC  Radio  Network  Merchandising  Plan  to  stimulate  sales  of  their 
products  by  local  distributors* 

The  soft  goods  field  --  which  h*is  traditionally  shied  away 
from  the  use  of  all  broadcast  media  --  is  the  latest  manufacturing 
area  to  add  to  the  list  of  sponsors  on  NBC  Radio,  it  was  announced 
today  by  George  A.  Graham  Jr*,  Director  of  Sales  Planning  of  the  NBC 
Radio  Network. 

Typical  of  the  soft  goods  advertisers  to  take  a  schedule  is 
A,  &  M.  Karagheusian,  Inc.,  for  Gulistan  Carpets,  which  signed  for 
ten  five-minute  Bob  and  Ray  segments  weekly  on  "Monitor"  for  its 
Spring  campaign.  The  campaign  will  be  launched  in  mid-March  by  a 
special  merchandising  closed  circuit  broadcast  of  the  company’s  top 
officials  and  NBC  executives.  Gulistan  dealers,  listening  to  the 
broadcast  at  the  stations  of  NBC  Radio  Affiliates,  will  participate 
in  a  nation-wide  "sales  meeting."  The  agency  for  Gulistan  is  Fuller 
&  Smith  &  Ross. 

Working  closely  with  each  advertiser,  the  NBC  Sales  Planning 
Division  creates  a  complete  merchandising  and  promotion  kit  which  is 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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supplied  to  all  local  dealers.  The  kit  contains  window  streamers, 
counter  cards,  publicity  releases,  photographs  of  stars,  and  recorded 
commercials  for  local  use.  An  identical  kit  is  sent  to  the  local  NBC 
Radio  affiliate,  which  approaches  the  retailer  and  points  out  the 
many  advantages  of  buying  time  on  the  station. 

Another  soft  goods  firm  which  has  taken  a  schedule  on  NBC 
Radio  is  the  Waverly  Fabrics  Division  of  F.  Schumacher  &  Co.,  makers 
of  decorative  drapery,  upholstery  fabrics  and  wallpapers.  Waverly 
has  contracted  for  a  13-week  campaign  of  10  participations  weekly  on 
"Monitor,"  starting  Jan.  4.  The  agency  is  Ehrlich,  Neuwirth  and  Sobo. 

Previously  announced  sponsors  in  the  soft  goods  field  are 
Princeton  Knitting  Mills,  maker  of  Princeton* s  Mutation  Fabrics,  and 
the  American  Institute  of  Men*  sand  Boys'  Wear,  which  took  an 
extensive  schedule  for  a  series  of  men's  fashion  reports. 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/23/57 


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October  23,  1957 


WILLIAM  R.  MC  ANDREW,  DIRECTOR  OF  NBC  NEWS,  WILL  VISIT 
LONDON  TO  CONFER  WITH  NETWORK'S  CORRESPONDENTS  AND 
DISCUSS  "PROJECTION  '58"  YEAR-END  TELECAST 

William  R.  McAndrew,  Director  of  NBC  News,  leaves 
for  London  Tuesday,  Oct,  29  to  confer  with  NBC  News  corres¬ 
pondents  concerning  PROJECTION  '58,  the  forthcoming  year-end 
roundup . 

Mr.  McAndrew  will  meet  with  NBC  newsmen  from  Europe 
and  the  Mideast  to  discuss  plans  for  the  hour-long  show.  It 
will  be  seen  Sunday,  Dec,  29  on  NBC-TV.  Joining  him  for  the 
talks  will  be  NBC's  Irving  Levine  (Moscow),  Welles  Hangen 
(Cairo),  Frank  Bourgholtzer  (Vienna),  Leif  Eid  (Paris), 

Joseph  Harsch  (London)  and  Ed  Newman  (Rome). 

The  NBC  News  chief  will  be  the  guest  of  honor  at  a 
reception  for  some  250  radio,  press,  TV  and  government 
officials  during  his  stay. 

Besides  the  "Projection  '58"  conferences,  Mr. 

McAndrew  will  also  handle  other  NBC  News  business.  He  will 

talk  with  BBC  and  ITA  (international  Television  Authority) 

officials  about  news  film  arrangements.  And  NBC  News 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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Correspondents  Gary  Stindt  and  John  Rich  from  the  Berlin  bureau  will 
confer  with  him  on  general  coverage  topics. 

"Projection  1 58"  will  present  12  NBC  News  correspondents 
in  a  roundup  of  the  year‘s  significant  events  and  a  projection  of 
trends  into  the  coming  year. 

A  time-spot  for  the  show  will  be  set  after  arrangements 
are  made  for  NBC-TV!s  telecast  of  the  professional  football  cham¬ 
pionships  that  afternoon. 

NBC  News  commentator  Chet  Huntley  will  "anchor"  the  show 
which  will  originate  from  the  NBC  studios  in  New  York. 

The  other  NBC  correspondents  participating  will  be  Jim 
Robinson  (Tokyo);  Martin  Agronsky,  David  Brinkley  and  Robert  McCormick 
(all  of  Washington) ,  and  John  Chancellor  (Chicago). 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/23/57 


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October  23,  1957 

PETER  HACKES  ASSIGNED  TO  1  WORLD  NEWS  ROUNDUP' 

ON  NBC  RADIO  NETWORK  MONDAYS  THROUGH  FRIDAYS 

Peter  Hackes  of  NBC  News,  Washington,  has  been  assigned  to 
the  Monday-through-Friday  WORLD  NEWS  ROUNDUP  over  NBC  Radio 
(8  to  8:15  a.m.,  EST)  effective  Nov,  18.  In  this  role,  he  will 
present  news  summaries  and  "call  in"  NBC  foreign  correspondents 
via  shortwave, 

Henry  Cassidy,  who  handles  the  seven-day-a-week 
roundup  at  present,  will  head  the  show  (starting  Nov,  23)  on 
Saturdays  (7:30-7:45  a.m,,  EST)  and  Sundays  (9:05-9:15  a.m., 

EST) ,  The  shift  enables  Mr,  Cassidy  to  handle  other  assign¬ 
ments  for  NBC  News,  including  spot  reports  for  the  "World  News 
Roundup . " 

Mr.  Hackes  will  be  honored  this  week  by  his  alma  mater, 
Grinnell  College  in  Grinnell,  Iowa,  for  "outstanding  achievement 
and  services,"  The  award  will  be  made  at  a  three-day  convocation, 
Oct.  25-27,  dedicated  to  "American  Culture  at  Mid-Century," 

The  33-year-old  NBC  newsman  was  a  member  of  the  Class  of 
1948  at  Grinnell,  He  joined  NBC  News  in  Washington  in  1933  after 
having  spent  four  years  with  CBS  in  that  city,  Mr.  Hackes  and 
his  wife,  Mary  Ellen,  have  three  children. 

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TELEVISION  NEWS 

A  SERVICE  OF 

October  23,  1957 

MARGARET  TRUMAN  RETURNING  TO  TV  WITH  WO  NBC  APPEARANCES 
IN  NOVEMBER- -A  DRAMATIC  ROLE  ON  ‘NBC  MATINEE  THEATER' 

AND  A  SONG-AND-DANCE  ROUTINE  WITH  GISELE  MacKENZIE 

"I'd  never  planned  to  quit  television.  It's  just  that  I've 
been  a  little  busy  with  a  husband  and  baby."  It  was  with  those  words 
that  Margaret  Truman  Daniel  announced  her  return  to  showbusiness . 

The  daughter  of  former  President  Harry  S.  Truman  has  okayed 
two  television  appearances  on  NBC-TV  in  November.  One  will  be  a 
dramatic  role  on  the  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  colorcast  of  Thursday, 

Nov,  14,  (3-4  p.m.,  EST)  and  the  other  will  be  a  song- and- dance 
guest  visit  on  THE  GISELE  MacKENZIE  SHOW,  Saturday,  Nov.  23 
(9:30-10  p.m.,  EST). 

"My  husband  (Clifton  Daniel  Jr.,  assistant  to  the  managing 
editor  of  the  New  York  Times)  is  agreed  that  I  should  make  a  few 
appearances,"  said  Mrs.  Daniel.  "Of  course,  I  wouldn't  return  if  he 
didn't  agree." 

"Both  shows  will  originate  live  from  Hollywood.  I'll  be 
gone  about  two  and  a  half  weeks.  My  only  regret  is  that  I  won't  be 
with  my  husband  and  baby  for  that  time." 

The  Daniels  live  in  New  York. 

Mss  Truman  last  appeared  on  television  in  the  spring  of 
1956,  shortly  after  her  marriage.  She  made  a  guest  appearance  on 
NBC-TV* s  "The  Steve  Allen  Show," 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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The  upcoming  show  on  "NBC  Matinee  Theater"  is  the  fourth 
attempt  by  the  show's  producer,  Albert  McCleery,  to  present  Miss 
Truman.  On  three  previous  occasions  something  had  prevented  her 
appearance . 

The  third  time  came  in  May  of  1956  when  she  was  to  star  in 
"Autumn  Crocus."  But,  a  throat  infection  and  her  marriage  later  that 
same  month  forced  her  cancellation  in  the  role. 

Her  Nov.  14  appearance  on  "NBC  Matinee  Theater"  will  present 
Miss  Truman  in  the  title  role  of  "Iris,"  an  original  teleplay  by 
Philadelphia  writer  Arnold  Rabin.  Miss  Truman  will  be  portraying  a 
marriage -hungry  spinster. 

On  "The  Gisele  MacKenzie  Show"  Nov.  23,  she'll  do  both  songs 
and  dances  with  Miss  MacKenzie. 


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NEWS 


October  23,  1957 


SECRETARY  DULLES  TO  BE  CHIEF  COMMUNICATOR  IN  FIRST  TELECAST 
OF  'CAMERA  ON  WASHINGTON, 1  10-WEEK  SERIES 
IN  NBC  EDUCATIONAL  TV  PROJECT 


Secretary  of  State  John  Foster  Dulles  will  be  the  chief 
communicator  in  the  opening  session  of  the  NBC  Educational  Television 
Project's  study  of  the  functioning  of  the  executive  arm  of  the  Federal 
government. 

The  program,  CAMERA  ON  WASHINGTON,  will  begin  Friday,  Nov.  1 
with  a  live  telecast  from  the  New  York  State  Department  Building.  The 
session,  dealing  with  the  Mutual  Security  Act,  will  show  the  evolution 
and  implementation  of  a  broad  State  Department  function.  In  addition 
to  Mr.  Dulles,  other  participants  in  this  telecast  will  be  Robert 
Barnes,  Special  Assistant  for  Mutual  Security  Affairs,  and  James  Smith, 
Director  of  the  International  Cooperation  Administration. 

"Camera  on  Washington"  will  be  one  of  five  Fall  program 
series  in  the  Project  which  NBC  is  undertaking  in  partnership  with  the 
Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center,  at  Ann  Arbor,  Mich.  All  will 


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be  sent  out  live  to  the  country* s  interconnected  educational  TV 
stations  over  NBC*s  regular  network  facilities  for  10  weeks  starting 
Monday,  Oct.  28.  Programs  will  be  telecast  Monday  through  Friday 
from  6  to  6:30  p.m.,  NYT.  (The  programs  also  will  be  telecast, 
delayed,  over  many  NBC-TV  stations,  including  WRCA-TV,  in  New  York. 

Dates  will  be  announced  soon,) 

NBC  mobile  units  with  live  cameras  will  range  the  national 
capital  during  the  run  of  "Camera  on  Washington."  There  will  be  on- 
location  pickups  from  a  cross-section  of  the  many  departments, 
agencies,  bureaus  and  commissions  which  make  up  this  branch.  The 
close-up  examination  will  be  designed  to  help  viewers  see  government 
not  as  a  remote  abstraction  but  as  a  cluster  of  concrete  processes 
which  have  immediate  meaning  in  the  daily  life  of  every  citizen. 

Points  of  call  will  be,  in  turn,  the  State  Department,  U.S 
Information  Agency,  Department  of  Defense,  Bureau  of  Standards, 
Department  of  Agriculture,  Treasury  Department,  National  Institutes 
of  Health,  Justice  Department,  U.S.  Weather  Bureau  and  the  White 
House . 

Weekly  host  of  "Camera  on  Washington"  will  be  Bill  Henry, 
NBC  commentator  who  has  been  a  ranking  correspondent  there  for  more 
than  a  decade.  He  will  have  each  week  one  or  more  guests. 

Joel  O’Brien  will  be  the  producer.  Frank  Slingland  will 
direct,  and  Joan  Seaver  will  write  the  scripts. 

Following  is  the  weekly  schedule  of  subjects  and  guests: 
Nov.  1  --  "The  State  Department,"  a  telecast  from  the  New 
State  Department  Building.  The  session  will  deal  with  the  Mutual 
Security  Act  and  will  be  designed  to  show  the  evolution  and  implemen 

(more) 


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tation  of  a  broad  function  of  the  State  Department.  Guests:  Secre¬ 
tary  of  State  John  Foster  Dulles,  Robert  Barnes,  Special  Assistant 
for  Mutual  Security  Affairs,  and  James  Smith,  Director  of  Inter¬ 
national  Cooperation  Administration. 

Nov.  8  --  "U.S.  Information  Agency,"  a  telecast  from  the 
main  control  room  of  the  Voice  of  America  studios.  The  session  will 
show  the  machinery  and  far-flung  activity  of  the  U.S. I. A.,  concen¬ 
trating  mainly  on  the  Voice  of  America.  Guests:  Robert  Button, 
Director  of  the  Voice  of  America;  C.  D.  Jackson,  Vice  President  of 
Time,  Inc,;  and  various  newscasters. 

Nov.  15  --  "Department  of  Defense,"  a  telecast  from  the 
TV  studio  in  the  Pentagon.  The  session  will  deal  with  manpower  cuts 
in  the  three  armed  services  and  will  be  designed  to  show  the  flow  of 
decision  and  implementation  of  a  broad  function  of  the  Department  of 
Defense.  Guests:  W,  H.  Francis  Jr.,  Assistant  Secretary  for  Man¬ 
power,  and  seven  members  of  the  Manpower  Council. 

Nov.  22  --  "Bureau  of  Standards,"  a  telecast  from  its  High 
Voltage  Laboratory.  The  session  will  show  through  actual  demonstra¬ 
tions  the  major  functions  of  the  Bureau  of  Standards  as  stated  in  the 
Constitution,  and  the  direct  benefits  derived  by  the  country  at  large. 
Guests:  Dr.  Robert  Huntoon,  Assistant  Director  for  Physics;  Dr.  L.  S. 
Taylor,  Chief  of  Radiation  Physics;  Dr.  Herbert  Broida,  Associate 
Director  of  Energy  Studies;  Dr.  Samuel  Alexander,  Chief  of  Data 
Processing. 

Nov.  29  —  "Department  of  Agriculture,"  a  telecast  from  the 
Experimental  Farm  at  Beltsville,  Md.  The  session  will  explore  the 
main  functions  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture  and  their  relation  to 

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better  and  more  efficient  productivity.  Guests:  Layne  Beaty, 
Director  of  Television  and  Radio  Information;  Dr,  J.  P.  Olsen,  Head 
of  Poultry  Division. 

Dec .  6  —  "Treasury  Department,"  a  telecast  from  the  Bureau 
o  ^  Printing  and  Engraving,  The  session  will  show  our  currency  in  the 
making  and  explain  in  simple  terms  the  abc’s  of  government  finance 
and  of  inflation.  There  also  will  be  an  examination  of  the  regula¬ 
tory  functions  of  the  Federal  Reserve  Board,  Guests:  George  Miller, 
Director  of  Printing;  Gabriel  Hauge,  Special  Assistant  to  the  Presi¬ 
dent  for  Economic  Affairs, 

Dec*  13  --  "National  Institutes  of  Health,"  a  telecast  from 
the  N.I.H,  Clinic,  Bethesda,  Md*  The  session  will  show  the  work  of 
the  N.I.H.  in  three  basic  areas  of  medical  research  and  the  relation 
of  this  work  to  science  and  the  nation.  Guests:  Dr,  James  Shannon, 
Director  of  National  Institutes  of  Health;  Dr.  Joseph  Bunim,  Director 
of  Institutes  of  Metabolic  Disease;  Dr.  G.  Burrows  Mider,  Associate 
Director  of  the  Cancer  Institute;  Dr.  Robert  Huebner,  Director  of 
Infectious  Diseases. 

Dec ,  20  --  "Justice  Department."  (Details  to  be  announced.) 

Dec*  27  --  "U.S.  Weather  Bureau,"  a  telecast  from  the 
Weather  Bureau  and  the  Civil  Aeronautics  Installations  at  the 
National  Airport.  The  session  will  show  the  tremendous  machinery 
thrown  into  motion  at  the  approach  of  severe  weather,  the  continuing 
work  and  research  of  the  Weather  Bureau,  and  the  relationship  between 
the  Weather  Bureau  and  the  C.A.A,  Guests:  Norman  Hagan,  Chief  of 
Public  Information;  George  Ashley,  Chief  of  Tower  Control  (C.A.A.); 
Rhinehardt  Schmidt,  Chief  Meteorologist, 


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Jan,  3  --  "The  White  House,"  a  telecast  from  the  Executive 
Offices  of  the  White  House,  The  session  will  show  the  tremendous 
growth  in  the  office  of  the  Presidency  since  the  time  of  George 
Washington,  consider  the  "new  look"  of  the  Cabinet,  and  sum  up  the 
series.  Guests:  Sherman  Adams,  Assistant  to  the  President;  Bernard 
M,  Shanley,  Secretary  to  the  President;  Maxwell  M,  Rabb,  Secretary 
to  the  Cabinet;  and  (on  film)  several  Cabinet  secretaries. 

The  Project  is  under  the  general  direction  of  Edward 
Stanley,  NBC  manager  of  public  service  programs,  Brice  Howard  is 
executive  producer,  and  Donley  Feddersen  is  the  Center  representative 
A  list  of  the  ETV  stations  follows: 

W MVS -TV,  Milwaukee,  Wis,;  WHA-TV,  Madison,  Wis.;  KCTS-TV, 
Seattle,  Wash,;  KUED,  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah;  KUHT,  Houston,  Tex,; 
WKNO-TV,  Memphis,  Tenn,;  WQED,  Pittsburgh,  Pa.;  WHYY-TV,  Philadelphia 
KETA,  Norman  (Oklahoma  City),  Okla.;  WOSU-TV,  Columbus,  Ohio;  WCET, 
Cincinnati,  Ohio;  WUNC-TV,  Chapel  Hill,  N.C.;  KUON-TV,  Lincoln,  Neb,; 
KETC,  St,  Louis;  KTCA-TV,  St.  Paul,  Minn,;  WKAR-TV,  East  Lansing, 
Mich,;  WTVS-TV,  Detroit;  WGBH-TV,  Boston;  WYES,  New  Orleans;  WILL-TV, 
Urbana,  Ill.;  WTTW,  Chicago;  WETV,  Atlanta,  Ga.;  WTHS-TV,  Miami, 

Fla,;  WJCT,  Jacksonville,  Fla.;  KRMA-TV,  Denver;  KQED,  San  Francisco; 
WAIQ,  Andalusia,  Ala,;  WTIQ,  Munford,  Ala.;  WBIQ,  Birmingham,  Ala, 

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NBC  RADIO  NEWS 


‘NBC  BANDSTAND'  SONGSTRESS  DOROTHY  OLSEN  RECORDS 

ALBUM  OP  ‘LULLABIES  FOR  SLEEPYHEADS' 

An  aid  to  modern  mothers  in  the  form  of 
musical  recordings  hit  the  stores  this  week  when  NBC 
BANDSTAND's  Dorothy  Olsen  introduced  her  new  RCA  Victor 
Bluebird  album  "Lullabies  for  Sleepyheads." 

The  long-play  disc  presents  the  former  school¬ 
teacher  singing  14  selections  scored  to  help  mothers 
with  the  problem  of  getting  their  children  off  to 
dreamland . 

Miss  Olsen's  songs,  such  as  "Hush  Little  Baby," 
"Rock-a-Bye  Baby,"  "Kentucky  Babe,"  "Lavender's  Blue"  and 
"Raisins  and  Almonds,"  are  given  her  distinctive  vocal 
treatment  to  the  accompaniment  of  Marty  Gold  and  his 
Orchestra. 

Dorothy  Olsen  is  heard  on  "NBC  Bandstand," 
Monday  through  Friday  (10:30  to  11  a.m.  and  11:05  to 
12  Noon,  NYT),  over  NBC  Radio. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/23/57 


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WILLIAM  ANDERSON 
ROOM  320 


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TRADE 


NEWS 


X-H 


October  24,  1957 

KRAFT  RENEWS  ADVERTISING  SCHEDULES  IN  FOUR  DAYTIME  SHOWS 
ON  NBC-TV  FOR  GROSS  BILLINGS  EXCEEDING  $2,000,000 

Kraft  Foods  Division  of  National  Dairy  Products  Corporation 
has  renewed  its  extensive  advertising  schedules  on  four  NBC-TV  daytime 
programs  for  52  weeks,  it  was  announced  today  by  William  R.  (Billy) 
Goodheart  Jr.,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Sales,  for  the 
National  Broadcasting  Company. 

The  renewals,  effective  immediately,  amount  to  more  than 
$2,000,000  in  gross  billings.  They  call  for  Kraft  Foods  to  continue 
sponsoring  the  following  program  segments  every  Thursday:  the  first 
quarter-hour  of  TIC  TAC  DOUGH  (12  noon-12: 30  p.m.,  NYT) ,  two  participa¬ 
tions  in  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  (Colorcast,  3-4  p.m.,  NYT),  MODERN 
ROMANCES  (4:45-5  p.m.,  NYT)  and  the  first  15-minute  segment  of  COMEDY 
TIME  (5-5:30  p.m.,  NYT) . 

Kraft  Foods  also  recently  renewed  for  another  year  its 
sponsorship  of  KRAFT  TELEVISION  THEATRE  (colorcast  on  NBC-TV  Wednesdays, 
9-10  p.m.,  NYT),  the  longest  continuously  running  dramatic  program 
on  network  television. 

The  J.  Walter  Thompson  Company  is  the  advertising  agency  for 
the  Kraft  Foods  Division  of  National  Dairy  Products  Corp . 

- o - 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


SIX  NEW  ADVERTISERS  JOIN  GROWING  LIST  OF  SPONSORS 
FOR  'NAT  KING  COLE  SHOW'  ON  NBC-TV 

Six  new  advertisers  have  Joined  the  growing  list  of 
sponsors  presenting  NBC-TV's  NAT  KING  COLE  SHOW  on  a  cooperative 
basis,  and  two  more  current  cooperative  advertisers  have  extended 
their  sponsorship  of  the  program  to  additional  markets,  William  R. 
(Billy)  Goodheart  Jr.,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Sales,  for 
the  National  Broadcasting  Company,  announced  today. 

The  latest  orders  bring  to  21  the  number  of  advertisers 
sponsoring  the  nationally  televised  program  in  a  total  of  22  leading 
markets.  Advertisers  placing  the  new  orders  for  the  "Nat  King  Cole 
Show”  (Tuesday  evenings,  7*30-8  p,mt,  NYT)  and  the  stations  on  which 

they  will  present  the  show  are: 

Edward  J.  Mankin  (home  builders),  KOB-TV,  Albuquerque, 

N.M.j  Charles  S.  Nacol  (jewelers),  KPAC-TV,  Beaumont,  Texas;  McLean's 
Department  Store,  WINR-TV,  Binghamton,  N.Y.;  E  and  B  Brewing  Company, 
WWJ-TV,  Detroit;  Wilen  Wine  Company  (currently  sponsoring  the  program 
over  WRCV-TV,  Philadelphia)  WJAC-TV,  Johnstown,  Pa.;  Regal  Beer 
Company,  WDSU-TV,  New  Orleans;  Gallo  Wine  (currently  co-sponsoring 
the  program  over  KRCA-TV,  Hollywood)  KSBW-TV,  Salinas,  Cal~f»;  and  a 
local  Dodge  automobile  dealer,  KFSD-TV,  San  Diego.  All  these  orders 
are  effective  immediately  except  those  for  stations  KPAC-TV  and 
WINR-TV,  which  will  begin  later  thi3  month  when  the  stations  go  on 
the  air,  and  the  E  and  B  Brewing  Company  order,  effective  Oct.  25, 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/24/57 


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CREDITS  FOR  ‘THE  STRANGE  CASE  OF  THE  COSMIC  RAYS’  ON  NBC-TV 


TIME: 

Friday,  Oct.  25  (NBC-TV  colorcast, 

9-10  p.m.,  NYT). 

STARS : 

Richard  Carlson  and  Dr.  Frank  Baxter. 

SUPPORTING  CAST: 

Marionettes  of  Bil  and  Cora  Baird. 

ANIMATION  BY: 

Shamus  Culhane  Productions 

DIRECTOR: 

Frank  Capra 

PRODUCER: 

Frank  Capra 

WRITERS : 

Frank  Capra  and  Jonathan  Latimer. 

CAMERAMEN: 

Harold  Wellman,  Ellis  Carter. 

SPECIAL  PHOTOGRAPHY: 

Edison  Hoge 

FILM  EDITORS: 

Frank  P.  Keller  and  Raymond  Snyder. 

MUSIC  SUPERVISOR: 

Raoul  Kraushar 

PRINCIPAL  ADVISOR: 

Dr.  Carl  D.  Anderson  of  California 

Institue  of  Technology. 

ASSOCIATE  ADVISORS: 

Dr.  Bruno  Rossi  of  Massachusetts  Institute 

of  Technology  and  Dr.  Marcel  Schein  of 

University  of  Chicago. 

ANNOUNCER: 

Tom  Shirley 

SPONSOR: 

Bell  Telephone  Company 

AGENCY: 

N.W.  Ayer 

NBC-New  York,  10/24/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROAD 


CASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 


"MOUNTIES"  NAB  GISELE  MacKENZIE  AND  SHE’S  "THIS  IS  YOUR  LIFE"  GUEST; 

JACK  BENNY,  EDGAR  BERGEN  JOIN  IN  TELECAST  SALUTE  TO  HER  CAREER 

The  Mounties,  who  always  get  their  man,  proved  that  they 
can  capture  a  woman,  too.  They  demonstrated  this  prowess  in  nabbing 
Gisele  MacKenzie  for  principal  subject  of  THIS  IS  YOUR  LIFE 
Wednesday,  Oct.  23  (NBC-TV,  10  p.m.,  NYT) ,  Emcee  Ralph  Edwards 
and  comedian  Jack  Benny  joined  forces  to  stage  a  mock-arrest  of 
Miss  MacKenzie  by  two  actors  dressed  as  Mounties,  as  she  drove  past 
the  theatre  where  "This  Is  Your  Life"  was  being  staged. 

She  was  brought  onto  the  stage  --  which  had  been  made  to 
resemble  her  home  in  Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  Canada  --  to  be  greeted  by 
her  parents,  Dr.  and  Mrs,  Georges  La  Fleche,  her  sister,  Hugette 
(Mrs.  Paul  Lord),  her  sister  Janice  (Mrs.  Hector  Moreau)  and  her 
brothers,  Jacques  and  Georges  Edward  La  Fleche, 

Edwards  told  how  Gisele* s  early  plans  to  become  a  concert 
violinist  were  thwarted,  when  her  violin  was  stolen.  Jack  Benny 
related  how  he  first  saw  her  perform  in  Las  Vegas,  and  stars  Bob 
Crosby  and  Edgar  Bergen  related  incidents  of  her  early  radio  and  USO 
career. 

Other  participants  in  the  singer's  life  story  were  her  man¬ 
ager,  Bob  Shuttleworth;  her  first  violin  teacher,  and  her  roommate  at 
the  Royal  Conservatory  of  Music  in  Toronto. 

Gisele  is  currently  starring  in  NBC-TV* s  "Gisele  MacKenzie 
Show,"  Saturdays  (9:30  p.m.,  NYT). 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/24/57 


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MATINEE 

THEATER 


October  24,  1957 

500TH  TELECAST  OF  ‘NBC  MATINEE  THEATER ‘  ON  THIRD  ANNIVERSARY 
POINTS  UP  AMAZING  STATISTICS  OF  FIVE -A -WEEK  FULL-HOUR  DRAMAS 

NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  could  come  under  review  by  statisticians 
as  well  as  TV  critics  when  the  Monday-through-Friday  daytime  series 
colorcasts  Stephen  Vincent  Benet’s  "Elementals"  as  its  50Qth  per¬ 
formance  —  and  third  anniversary  show  — Thursday,  Oct.  31  (3-4  p.m., 
EST). 

For  the  presentation  of  this  "live,"  full-hour  drama  will 
mark  new  industry  highs  in  the  astronomical  totals  already  piled  up 
by  this  series. 

Conrad  Nagel,  movie  and  TV  headliner,  has  been  signed  to 
co-star  with  Tom  Tryon  in  "Elementals."  In  this  story,  Nagel  will 
play  the  professor  who  taunts  his  young  aide  (Tryon)  into  enduring 
starvation  to  possibly  win  a  $10,000  bet. 

When  the  last  word  is  spoken  in  the  final  set  of 
"Elementals,"  "NBC  Matinee  Theater's"  five  RCA  color  cfmeras  will  have 
been  used  for  a  total  of  18,500  hours,  more  than  12,500  costumes  will 
have  been  made  or  fitted,  more  than  3,500  groups  of  props  will  have 
been  created  and  8,500  scenes  will  have  been  televised, 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


2  -  ‘NBC  Matinee  Theater1 


Exactly  535  scripts  have  been  purchased  to  date.  Including 
the  many  copies  of  each  that  are  required  for  casts  and  staffers,  they 
have  filled  3*500,000  pages  that  weigh  two  and  one-half  tons. 

The  series1  casting  department  has  had  more  than  20,000 
interviews  with  actors,  actresses  and  agents.  Out  of  this,  they  have 
filled  almost  6,000  acting  roles. 

Among  the  500  plays  that  these  roles  have  been  part  of, 
there  have  been  238  contemporary  dramas,  89  comedies,  42  period  dramas, 
22  melodramas,  22  comedy  dramas,  19  classics,  19  period  comedies,  11 
suspense  dramas,  seven  romantic  dramas,  four  romantic  comedies,  three 
science  fiction  plays,  three  mystery  dramas  and  a  few  miscellaneous 
categories,  including  two  Westerns. 

Heading  this  huge  undertaking  is  Albert  McCleery,  executive 
producer  of  the  series.  And  he,  too,  has  accounted  for  a  few 
statistics.  For  one  thing,  he  has  traveled  388,500  miles  in  making 
60  round  trips  to  New  York,  plus  a  12,000-mile  visit  to  Sir  Winston 
Churchill  in  Europe  on  showbusiness .  Churchill  authored  the  movie 
"Savrola,"  which  was  adapted  for.  "NBC  Matinee  Theater"  with  his 
daughter,  Sarah  Churchill,  as  star. 

John  Conte,  as  host  of  the  series  has  been  on  camera  7*250 
minutes  —  not  counting  his  eight  starring  roles  on  the  show.  And  he 
and  his  wife  Ruth  (his  substitute  host)  have  received  a  great  amount 
of  fan  mail  comparable  in  volume  to  the  32,500  letters  received  by 
the  series. 

The  "NBC  Matinee  Theater"  claim  to  fame  is  not  all  on  the 

quantity  basis,  however.  Quality-wise,  the  series  has  won  12  awards 

--  including  an  "Emmy,"  a  Syl vania  Award  and  two  Fame  Poll  Awards  — 

for  being  the  best  daytime  show  in  television. 

- o - 

NBC -New  York,  10/24/57 


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WILLIAM  ANDERSON 
ROOM  320 


I 


TRADE 


N  EWS 


X  -H 


October  25,  1957 

NBC  AND  ITS  RADIO  AFFILIATES  EXECUTIVE  COMMITTEE  ANNOUNCE  HIGHER 
RATINGS,  INCREASED  SALES  AND  MORE  COMPENSATION  TO  STATIONS 

Higher  ratings,  increasing  sales  volume  and  more  station 
compensation  --  plus  steps  for  a  further  increase  in  compensation  -- 
were  announced  today  by  Robert  W.  Sarnoff,  President  of  NBC,  and 
George  Harvey,  Chairman  of  the  NBC  Radio  Affiliates  Executive  Com¬ 
mittee,  following  a  regular  meeting  between  the  Committee  and  NBC 
officials . 

The  new  Nielsen  report,  reflecting  accumulative  weekly  and 
monthly  audience  levels,  showed  a  dramatic  increase  in  share  of 
audience  for  NBC  in  morning,  afternoon  and  evening  programming. 

This  evidence  of  improvement  in  programming  strength  was 
coincident  with  the  big  increase  in  sales  volume  during  the  past  year 
which  was  accompanied  by  substantial  increases  in  station  compensation 
Comparing  September,  1956,  with  September,  1957,  NBC  Radio  Network 
sponsored  hours  increased  40  per  cent,  gross  billings  were  up  70  per 
cent,  while  aggregate  station  compensation  increased  200  per  cent, 
with  a  300  per  cent  increase  for  stations  carrying  NBC’s  full  com¬ 
mercial  schedule. 

In  commenting  on  these  developments,  Mr.  Sarnoff  said:  "The 

substantial  upward  trend  in  program  ratings  and  sales  volume  are 

such  encouraging  signs  for  the  future  that  we  have  undertaken 

(more) 

PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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to  establish  additional  compensation  increases,  with  one  of  these 
steps  effective  Oct.  1,  1957#  and  another  April  1,  1958,  We  are 
also  delighted  to  adopt  the  compensation  formula  developed  by  the 
Affiliates  Committee  which  will  further  streamline  the  accounting 
mechanics  in  making  payments  to  stations." 

George  Harvey,  Chairman  of  the  Affiliates  Committee,  com¬ 
mented:  "The  Affiliates  Committee  wholeheartedly  joins  with  NBC  in 

endorsing  the  new  compensation  plans  which  reflect  the  improvement 
that  has  already  taken  place  on  the  network  and  NBC's  faith  in  the 
future  of  network  radio.  Joe  Culllgan  has  our  complete  confidence 
and  the  progress  made  under  his  leadership  in  programming  and  sales 
is  a  splendid  achievement." 

In  reporting  specific  rating  improvements  in  the  brief 
period  between  the  September  and  August  Nielsen  reports,  Matthew  J. 
Culligan,  Vice  President  in  charge  of  the  NBC  Radio  Network,  pointed 
out  substantial  gains  in  the  network's  morning,  afternoon  and  evening 
programming.  In  the  10:00  a.m.  to  noon  period  NBC's  share  of  audience 
increased  by  37  per  cent  with  "My  True  Story"  showing  a  51  Pe^  cent 
gain  in  share  for  10:00  to  10:30  and  "NBC  Bandstand  improving  its  share 
by  approximately  30  per  cent  from  10:30  to  noon  (all  times  NYT) , 

During  the  2:30  to  3:30  p.m,  time  period  NBC  shows  a  12  per 
cent  advantage  in  share  of  audience  over  the  next  network.  The  NBC 
share  for  the  2:00  to  3:00  p.m.  period  is  up  40  per  cent  over  a  year 
ago  when  the  period  was  being  programmed  locally  as  station  time. 

NBC  Radio  continues  to  lead  the  next  network  in  share  of 
audience  for  nighttime  programming  both  in  the  weekly  average  and  for 
five  out  of  seven  nights. 


(more) 


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3  -  Radio  Affiliates 


Members  of  the  Affiliates  Executive  Committee  present  at 
the  meeting  were: 

George  W.  Harvey ,  Vice  President  and  General  Manager, 

Station  WFLA,  Tampa,  Fla.,  Chairman;  Ray  Welpott,  Manager,  Station 
WKY,  Oklahoma  City,  Okla . ,  Vice  Chairman;  Douglas  Manship,  President, 
Station  WJBO,  Baton  Rouge,  La.,  Secretary-Treasurer;  David  M. 

Baltimore,  President  and  General  Manager,  Station  WBRE,  Wilkes-Barre, 
Pa.;  William  Grant,  President,  Station  KOA,  Denver,  Colo.;  Kenneth 
Hackathorn,  Vice  President  and  General  Manager,  Station  WHK,  Cleveland, 
Ohio;  Harold  Hough,  Director,  Station  WBAP,  Forth  Worth,  Tex,,  and 
Willard  Schroeder,  General  Manager,  Station  WOOD,  Grand  R.pids,  Mich. 


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TRADE  NEWS 


October  25,  1957 

NBC'S  THOMAS  B.  McFADDEN  ANNOUNCES  FTC'S  INITIAL  DECISION 
ON  MEDIA  MERCHANDISING  DOES  NOT  AFFECT  OWNED  RADIO 
STATIONS'  CURRENT  "CHAINED  LIGHTNING"  PLAN 

The  initial  decision  of  a  Federal  Trade  Commission  hearing 
examiner  on  media  merchandising  does  not  affect  the  current  "Chain 
Lightning"  plan  of  the  National  Broadcasting  Company's  owned  radio 
stations,  it  was  announced  yesterday  by  Thomas  B.  McFadden,  Vice 
President  in  charge  of  NBC  Owned  Stations  and  NBC  Spot  Sales. 

Mr.  McFadden  referred  to  an  FTC  initial  ruling,  issued  by 
hearing  examiner  Abner  E.  Lipscomb,  which  would  prohibit  manufacturers 
from  participating  in  merchandising  plans  of  media  which  give  free 
advertising  to  retail  stores  in  return  for  point-of-sale  displays. 

The  plans  on  which  the  ruling  was  based  made  available  free  time  to 
certain  chain  stores  but  not  to  smaller  merchants,  according  to  Mr. 
Lipscomb . 

"Mr.  Lipscomb's  ruling  related  to  an  earlier  form  of  the 
'Chain  Lightning'  plan  which  has  been  superseded  by  a  broadened  plan 
offering  participation  opportunities  to  all  food  retailers  regardless 
of  type  or  size,"  Mr.  McFadden  said. 

"The  current  'Chain  Lightning'  plan  offers  its  promotional 
benefits  to  any  food  retailer  who  desires  to  participate  on  an  exact 
proportional  basis,  without  discrimination  of  any  kind. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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"A  typical  example  of  NBC's  'Chain  Lightning'  is  in  the 
New  York  metropolitan  area,  where  WRCA  is  operating  the  plan  with  more 
than  3*300  individual  participating  stores,"  he  noted,  "Of  this 
number,  35  per  cent  are  independents  and  cooperatives  and  45  percent 
are  chain  stores. 

"Our  attorneys  advise  us  that  since  the  current  'Chain 
Lightning'  plan  gives  every  food  store  an  equal  opportunity  to 
participate,  it  meets  all  legal  requirements  set  forth  in  Mr. 
Lipscomb's  decision,"  Mr.  McFadden  emphasized. 

NBC-New  York,  10/25/57 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


BENN  SQUIRES  IS  NAMED  TO  NEW  POST  OF  COORDINATOR 
OF  PROGRAM  DEVELOPMENT  FOR  NBC  RADIO  NETWORK 

Benn  Squires  has  been  appointed  to  the 
newly-created  position  of  Coordinator  of  Program  De¬ 
velopment  for  the  NBC  Radio  Network,  it  was  announced 
today  by  Norman  Livingston,  Director  of  NBC  Radio  Net¬ 
work  Programs . 

Squires  has  been  active  in  television  pro¬ 
gramming  and  production  for  more  than  10  years.  As 
senior  producer  and  director  at  WRCV-TV,  Philadelphia, 
he  wrote,  produced  and  directed  more  than  6,000  tele¬ 
vision  programs  including  "The  Nature  of  Things," 
"Recital  Hall"  '  and  "Melody,  Harmony  and  Rhythm" 
network  series.  On  the  NBC  Radio  Network,  he  has 
worked  with  "Nightline"  and  "Life  and  the  World." 

He  is  a  member  of  the  Screen  Directors  Guild, 
Radio  and  Television  Writers  Guilds,  and  the  Academy 
of  Television  Arts  and  Sciences. 


NBC-New  York,  10/25/57 


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October  25,  1957 

11  ADVERTISERS  PLACE  NEW  BUSINESS  EXCEEDING  $1,000,000 
IN  NET  REVENUE  ON  NBC  RADIO  NETWORK  IN  WEEK 

New  business  amounting  to  more  than  $1,000, 000  in  net  revenue 
was  placed  with  the  NBC  Radio  Network  by  11  advertisers  during  the 
past  week,  it  was  announced  today  by  William  K.  McDaniel,  Vice 
President,  NBC  Radio  Network  Sales. 

This  latest  sales  upswing  includes  orders  calling  for  one- 
quarter  sponsorhip  of  NBC  Radio's  NEWS -ON -THE -HOUR  and  for  extensive 
participation  campaigns  in  MONITOR,  NBC  BANDSTAND  and  several  daytime 
drama  programs . 

Advertisers  placing  the  new  orders  and  their  agencies  are: 

Reader's  Digest,  through  the  J.  Walter  Thompson  Company, 
has  ordered  one-quarter  sponsorship  of  NBC  Radio's  NEWS -ON -THE -HOUR 
broadcasts . 

Carling  Brewing  Company,  for  its  Red  Cap  Ale,  through  Benton 
and  Bowles,  Inc.,  has  ordered  l8  five -minute  MONITOR  program  segments 
a  month  over  a  one -year  period  starting  in  November. 

Lever  Brothers  Company,  for  its  Pepsodent  Tooth  Paste, 
through  Foote,  Cone  and  Belding,  has  ordered  a  total  of  100  six-second 
participations  to  be  scheduled  over  two  separate  two-week  periods,  the 
first  period  starting  Nov.  11  and  the  second  starting  Jan.  3,  1958. 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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Renuzit  Home  Products  Company,  through  Arndt,  Preston, 

Chapin,  Lamb  and  Keen,  Inc.,  has  ordered  seven  one -minute  participa¬ 
tions  weekly  in  NBC  BANDSTAND  for  eight  weeks  starting  March  1,  1953. 

Standard  Brands,  Inc.,  for  its  Chase  and  Sanborn  Instant 
Coffee,  through  Compton  Advertising,  Inc.,  has  ordered  nine  one -minute 
and  ten  30-second  participations  a  week  for  five  weeks  in  the  follow¬ 
ing  daytime  programs:  NBC  BANDSTAND,  TRUE  CONFESSIONS,  THE  AFFAIRS  OF 
DR.  GENTRY  and  FIVE  STAR  MATINEE.  The  campaign  starts  immediately. 

The  Seven-Up  Company,  through  the  J.  Walter  Thompson 
Company,  has  ordered  a  total  of  nine  one -minute  participations,  to 
run  over  a  three-week  period  starting  Nov.  lo,  in  the  following 
programs:  PEPPER  YOUNG'S  FAMILY,  ONE  MAN'S  FAMILY  and  WOMAN  IN  MY 

HOUSE . 

Best  Foods,  Inc.,  through  Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample,  Inc., 
has  ordered  a  total  of  eight  six-second  participations  in  NBC  Radio's 
daytime  schedule  from  Nov,  22  through  Nov.  26. 

The  Whitehall  Pharmacal  Company,  for  its  Anacin,  through 
Ted  Bates  and  Company,  Inc.,  has  ordered  two  one -minute  participations 
scheduled  during  a  Saturday  afternoon  football  broadcast  this  month. 

In  addition,  three  major  advertisers,  to  be  announced 
shortly,  have  ordered  heavy  advertising  scheduled  in  NBC  Radio's 
weekend  and  daytime  programs  during  the  last  quarter  of  this  year 
and  the  first  quarter  of  1953. 


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October  25,  1957 

ADDRESS  BY  BRIG.  GENERAL  DAVID  SARNOFF  AT  MEETING  OF  ASSOCIATION 
OF  THE  UNITED  STATES  ARMY  WILL  BE  BROADCAST  BY  NBC  RADIO 

Brig.  General  David  Sarnoff,  Chairman  of  the  Board 
of  the  Radio  Corporation  of  America,  will  speak  on  "The 
Importance  of  Allies  in  Their  Relation  to  United  States 
Strategy  and  Policy"  in  an  address  to  be  broadcast  by  NBC 
Radio  Tuesday,  Oct.  29  (10:05-10:30  p.m.,  EST)  from  the  annual 
meeting  of  the  Association  of  the  United  States  Army,  in  the 
Sheraton  Park  Hotel,  Washington,  D.C. 

The  program  will  be  tape-recorded  earlier  in  the 
day  for  presentation  at  this  time. 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAl  BROADCASTIN 


G  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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NBC  TRADE  NEWS 


HOUSEWIFE  WINS  'KITCHEN  SHOWCASE'  ON  'THE  PRICE  IS  RIGHT' 
WITH  ONLY  CORRECT  VALUATION  AMONG  1,500,000  ENTRIES 


A  New  Jersey  housewife  today  became  one  in  a  million  -- 
actually,  Mrs.  Edward  Zizik  of  390  2nd  Ave.,  Newark,  is  one  in  a 
million  and  a  half. 

Of  more  than  1,500,000  entries  submitted  estimating  the 
value  of  this  week's  "Kitchen  Showcase"  on  NBC-TV's  THE  PRICE  IS 

RIGHT,  only  Mrs.  Zizik' s  estimate  was  correct.  The  "Showcase," 

* 

which  Mrs.  Zizik  correctly  valued  at  $2,562.64,  includes  a  built-in 
oven  and  range,  a  refrigerator  and  freezer,  a  washer-dryer  combina¬ 
tion  and  an  appliance  center. 

Bill  Cullen  is  host  of  "The  Price  Is  Right,"  which  is 
telecast  at  11  a.m.,  EST,  Monday  through  Friday  (in  black  and  white) 
and  colorcast  Monday  nights  at  7:30  p.m.,  NYT, 

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October  28,  1957 


RED  FOLEY  TO  STAR  IN  OWN  COUNTRY  MUSIC  SHOW  ON  NBC  RADIO 


PREMIERE 

Red  Foley  --  "America's  Favorite  Country  Gentleman"  -- 
brings  his  country  music  to  NBC  Radio  when  THE  RED  FOLEY  SHOW  pre¬ 
mieres  Saturday,  Nov,  2  (12:30  to  12:55  p.m.,  EST) . 

The  show,  originating  "live"  from  the  Jewell  Theatre  in 
Springfield,  Mo.,  is  sponsored  by  Dow  Chemical  Company,  represented  by 
MacManus,  John  and  Adams,  Inc. 

Foley  has  been  a  headliner  since  he  made  his  debut  on  NBC  27 
years  ago  as  star  of  the  "National  Barn  Dance,"  with  his  guitar-strum¬ 
ming  and  folk-singing.  He  was  featured  on  NBC  Radio's  "Grand  Ole 

Opry"  for  eight  years  (1944  to  1952). 

Little  Jimmie  Dickens  --  four  feet,  11  inches  tall  --  will 
be  Foley's  special  guest  on  the  premiere  show,  along  with  show  "re¬ 
gulars"  Suzi  Arden  and  "Bouncin'"  Bobby  Lord.  Joe  Slattery  is  the 
announcer . 

Foley  (Born  Clyde  Julian  Foley)  gained  his  nickname  before 
his  hair  turned  its  present  shade  of  sandy  gray.  In  1949* 


(more ) 


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scored  with  his  first  recording  to  pass  the  million  sales  mark, 
"Chattanooga  Shoe  Shine  Boy."  His  most  recent  hit  was  in  1956 
with  the  recording  of  "Peace  in  the  Valley"  --  one  of  two  sacred 
selections  in  record  history  to  sell  a  million  copies. 

"The  Red  Foley  Show"  is  a  RadiOzark  Enterprises,  Inc., 
with  production  directed  by  Bryan  Bisney. 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/28/57 


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October  28,  1957 


MOSCOW  CORRESPONDENT  IRVING  R.  LEVINE  REPORTS  ZHUKOV  SEEMS  ON  WAY  OUT, 
IN  ONE  OP  SIX  SPECIAL  NBC  NEWS  PROGRAMS  ON  RUSSIAN  TURN  OF  EVENTS 

NBC  News  put  out  six  special  programs  on  the  Zhukov  re¬ 
moval  over  the  weekend  --  including  Moscow  Correspondent  Irving  R. 
Levine's  exclusive  transmission  that  Zhukov  seems  on  the  way  out. 

NBC  Radio  and  TV  broke  into  their  regular  schedules  with 
the  first  bulletin  at  3  p.m.,  NYT,  Saturday.  Within  three  hours, 
NBC  News'  Bob  Abernethy  in  London  was  on  the  air  with  a  British 
Foreign  Office  evaluation  --  that  Zhukov  was  probably  out.  His 
report  was  contained  in  a  "Monitor"  special  at  7:05  Pcm,,  NYT, 

NBC-TV  put  on  a  special  one-minute  report  on  the  devel¬ 
oping  story  at  7:30  p.m.,  NYT,  Saturday.  Correspondent  Levine's 
early  report  from  Moscow,  heavily  cut  by  censors,  was  heard. 

At  11:15  p.m.,  NYT,  Saturday,  NBC  News  presented  a 
special  15-minute  wrapup  over  NBC-TV.  Frank  McGee  anchored  the 
program  which  originated  from  Washington. 

On  this  program,  NBC's  Richard  Harkness  reported  that 
Washington  intelligence  officials  seem  to  feel  that  Zhukov  may 
be  heading  for  the  premiership.  Joseph  C.  Harsch,  reporting  from 
London,  said,  however,  that  a  top  expert  on  Russia  there  felt  that 
both  Zhukov  and  Khrushchev  may  be  out. 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  C  O  AA 


PANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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Levine's  exclusive  report  from  Moscow  that  Zhukov  was 
probably  sacked  by  Khrushchev  was  carried  Sunday  by  NBC  Radio  and 
NBC -TV. 

The  television  network  presented  a  special  three-minute 
program  at  1:27  p.m.,  EST,  featuring  Levine's  report.  Levine  got 
through  censors  the  statement  that  "external  evidence  lends 
credence"  to  the  theory  that  Zhukov  was  removed  by  Khrushchev. 

The  marshal  was  replaced,  Levine  said,  while  he  was 
away  and  "with  no  opportunity  to  organize  any  opposition  to  the 
decision."  Khrushchev  has  thus  "increased  his  independence"  and 
eliminated  the  army  as  a  political  factor,  Levine  said. 

#  *  * 

NBC  Correspondent  Irving  R.  Levine  was  cut  off  repeat¬ 
edly  today  (Monday,  Oct.  28)  by  Moscow  censors  when  he  tried  to 
speculate  on  the  relative  importance  of  pictures  in  the  Nov.  7 
anniversary  day  parade. 

Levine  tried  to  say  that  there  could  be  potential  sig¬ 
nificance  in  the  position  which  Marshal  Zhukov's  picture  occupies 
in  the  parade.  He  was  cut  off,  however,  each  time  he  tried  to 
continue.  The  parade  will  mark  the  40th  anniversary  of  Communist 
Revolution. 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


CREDITS  FOR  'THE  JERRY  LEWIS  SHOW'  COLORCAST  ON  NBC 


TUESDAY, 

NOVo  5  (9-10  p. m.,  EST) 

STAR: 

Jerry  Lewis 

GUEST  STARS: 

Susan  Silo,  the  Mellow  Larks,  the 

Nick  Castle  Dancers 

PRODUCER: 

Ernest  D„  Glucksman 

DIRECTOR: 

Jack  Shea 

WRITERS: 

Mel  Tolkin,  Neil  "Doc"  Simon 

CHOREOGRAPHER: 

Nick  Castle 

MUSICAL  DIRECTOR: 

Walter  Scharf 

COSTUMES: 

Bob  Campbell 

SPONSOR: 

The  Oldsmobile  Division  of  General 

Motors . 

AGENCY: 

D.P,  Brother  Co,,  Inc. 

POINT  OF  ORIGINATION: 

NBC  Color  City  Studios,  Burbank, 

Calif. 

PRODUCTION: 

York  Pictures  Production 

NBC  PRESS  CONTACTS: 

Joe  Bleeden-Hollywood;  Betty 

Lanigan-New  York. 

NBC-New  York,  10/28/57 


CAST  FOR  'ON  BORROWED  TIME'  ON  'HALLMARK  HALL  OF  FAME' 
COLORCAST  OF  SUNDAY,  NOV.  17  ON  NBC  (5:30-7  P.M.,  EST) 

George  Schaefer,  producer-director  of  the  HALLMARK 
HALL  OF  FAME  colorcast  of  "On  Borrowed  Time,"  Sunday,  Nov,  17 
(NBC -TV,  5:30-7  p.m.,  EST),  has  set  the  following  cast: 

Ed  Wynn  as  Gramps,  Claude  Rains  as  Mr.  Brink,  Beulah 
Bondi  as  Granny,  Dennis  Kohler  as  Pud,  Margaret  Hamilton  as 
Aunt  Demetria,  William  A.  Lee  as  Mr.  Grimes  (head  of  a  mental 
hospital),  Larry  Gates  as  Mr.  Pilbeam  (Gramps*  lawyer), 

William  LeMassena  as  Dr.  Evans  (Gramps*  family  physician),  and 
Frank  Tweddell  as  the  Sheriff , 

Also  Mildred  Trares  as  Marcia  (the  young  woman  who 
looks  after  Gramps  and  Granny),  G.  Wood  as  Jim  and  Dorothy 
Eaton  as  Susan  (Pud's  parents),  Schuyler  Larsen  as  a  boy  who 
steals  apples,  and  Robinson  Stone,  David  Leland  and  George 
Sullivan  as  workmen  who  fence  in  the  fatal  apple  tree. 


NBC-New  York,  10/28/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20.  NEW  YORK 


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FIVE  NBC  EXECUTIVES  TO  DISCUSS  COLOR  TV  PROGRAMMING  AT 
N.Y.  FORUM  OF  ACADEMY  OF  TELEVISION  ARTS  AND  SCIENCES 

Color  Television  programming  will  be  discussed  by  a 
panel  of  five  NBC  Television  executives  at  the  Academy  of 
Television  Arts  and  Sciences  (New  York  Chapter)  Forum  on 
Wednesday,  Oct.  30  at  8:15  p.m.,  EST,  in  NBC's  Studio  6a,  30 
Rockefeller  Plaza,  New  York  City. 

NBC  executives  participating  in  the  Forum  are: 

Robert  F.  Lewine,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Programs; 
Carl  Stanton,  Vice  President,  Color  Television  Coordination; 
Norman  H.  Grant,  Director,  Operations  Control  and  Planning; 
Reid  R.  Davis,  Manager,  Color  Control  and  William  Burr  Smidt, 
Color  Coordinator. 

The  panel  will  explain  how  a  color  television  pro¬ 
gram  is  put  together  and  will  illustrate  the  talk  with  a  live 
color  television  demonstration.  New  developments  and  future 
color  programming  plans  also  will  be  discussed. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/29/57 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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October  29,  1957 


NBC  OPERA  COMPANY  WILL  OPEN  1957-58  SEASON  WITH  COLORCAST 
MARKING  TV  PREMIERE  OF  POULENC'S  NEW  OPERA, 
"DIALOGUES  OF  THE  CARMELITES" 


The  television  premiere  performance  of  Francis  Poulenc's 
opera,  "Dialogues  of  the  Carmelites,"  will  open  the  1957-58  season 
of  the  NBC  OPERA  COMPANY  Sunday,  Dec.  8  (NBC-TV,  color  and  black  and 
white,  2-4  p.m.,  EST).  This  will  be  the  company's  ninth  successive 
season  on  television. 

Heading  the  cast  of  this  new  opera  will  be  Elaine  Malbin, 
Leontyne  Price,  Patricia  Neway,  Rosemary  Kuhlmann,  Judith  Raskin, 
David  Lloyd  and  Robert  Rounseville.  Peter  Herman  Adler,  the  music 
and  artistic  director  of  the  company,  will  conduct.  Kirk  Browning 
is  director  and  Samuel  Chotzinoff  is  producer.  Trew  Hocker  is  set 
designer.  The  opera  will  be  presented  in  the  English  translation 
by  Joseph  Machlis. 

Francis  Poulenc,  one  of  France's  leading  contemporary 
composers,  wrote  his  musical  score  to  a  text  based  on  the  play  by 
Georges  Bernanos.  It  was  inspired  by  a  novel  of  Gertrude  von  Le  Fort 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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and  a  scenario  by  Philippe  Agostini  and  Rev.  Pr.  Bruckberger.  The 
opera  was  written  with  the  authorisation  of  Emmet  Lavery. 

The  opera’s  world  premiere  performance  in  Italian  on 
Jan,  26,  1957  at  La  Scala  Opera  in  Milan  was  hailed  by  the  critics 
and  the  public.  Some  of  the  critics  noted  that  the  opera  eschews 
many  of  the  technical  difficulties  of  modern  opera  composition, 
making  it  more  easily  understandable  for  the  listener.  Its  success 
in  Milan  was  repeated  when  the  opera  was  given  last  month  in  English 
in  San  Francisco,  with  praise  by  American  critics  and  public. 

The  story  of  the  opera  is  set  in  Prance  during  the  period 
just  before  and  during  the  French  Revolution  of  1789.  The  stories 
of  the  group  of  Carmelite  nuns  and  their  martyrdom,  and  the  personal 
story  of  Blanche  de  la  Force,  who  seeks  to  come  to  grips  with  a 
life  she  fears,  are  interwoven  in  this  delicate  work.  The  mood  is 
one  of  devotion  and  piety  leading  to  the  moment  of  final  renunciation 
and  martyrdom. 

The  ninth  NBC  Opera  season  also  will  include  Verdi’s  opera 
"Rigoletto,"  in  February,  and  Wagner’s  "Die  Meistersinger, "  which 
will  be  given  in  two  parts  on  successive  weeks  in  March  and  April. 

All  of  the  operas,  as  is  the  NBC  Opera  custom,  will  be  given  in 
English. 

The  NBC  Opera  Company  tour  now  in  its  second  season  is 
currently  giving  performances  of  "La  Traviata,"  "Madam  Butterfly" 
and  "The  Marriage  of  Figaro"  in  63  cities. 

- o - 

NBC -New  York,  10/29/57 


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VAN  JOHNSON  AND  CLAUDE  RAINS  STAR  IN  » THE  PIED  PIPER  OF  HAMELIN, 1 
COLORCAST  VERSION  OF  CLASSIC  FOLK  LEGEND  ON  NBC  NOV.  2 6 
WITH  MUSIC  ADAPTED  FROM  WORKS  OF  EDVARD  GRIEG 


THE  PIED  PIPER  OF  H AMELIN,  a  musical  version  of  the  classic 
folk  legend  starring  Van  Johnson  and  Claude  Rains,  will  be  colorcast 
by  NBC  Tuesday,  Nov.  26  (7:30-9  p.m.,  EST).  The  producer  is  Hal 
Stanley. 

The  color  special  also  features  Kay  Starr,  Lori  Nelson  and 
Jim  Backus. 

"The  Pied  Piper  of  Hamelin, "  with  music  adapted  from 
Edvard  Grieg  (principally  his  "Peer  Gynt"  Suite)  is  an  embellishment 
by  Producer  Stanley  and  writer  Irving  Taylor  of  the  Robert  Browning 
poem.  Sponsor  is  the  Liggett  and  Myers  Tobacco  Company,  through 
McCann-Erickson,  Inc.,  for  its  three  brands.  Chesterfield,  L&M,  and 
Oasis  Filter  Cigarettes. 

(more ) 

•PIPER1  AND  1  ANNIE •  ON  SUCCESSIVE  NIGHTS 

On  Tuesday,  Nov.  26  (7:30  to  9  p.m.,  EST),  NBC-TV 
will  present  THE  PIED  PIPER  OF  HAMELIN,  starring  Van  Johnson. 

The  following  night  (Wednesday,  Nov.  27),  Mary  Martin  will 
star  in  ANNIE  GET  YOUR  GUN  (8:30  to  10:30  p.m.,  EST),  co- 
starring  John  Raitt.  Both  p re -Thanks giving  shows  will  be 
colorcast. 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  'Pied  Piper  of  Hamelin* 


With  a  12th  Century  Bavaria  setting,  "Pied  Piper,"  filmed 
at  California  National  Studios  in  Hollywood,  employs  a  cast  of  more 
than  100.  Costumed  brightly  by  Berman  of  London,  the  production  also 
boasts  some  of  television's  most  extensive  sets.  They  were  designed 
by  Arthur  Lonergan,  long-time  motion  picture  art  director. 

After  two  TV  showings  within  a  year,  "Pied  Piper"  will  be 
released  as  a  motion  picture,  principally  aimed  at  the  foreign 
market,  says  Stanley,  It  is  the  first  venture  of  its  type,  being 
processed  by  Technicolor  for  both  TV  and  movie  release. 

Browning's  poem  presented  the  Pied  Piper  as  a  bitter 
vengeful  man.  It  has  been  said  the  poet  was  expressing  his  dis¬ 
approval  of  excess  tariffs  when  he  wrote  it  in  the  l830's.  Stanley's 
version,  too,  is  a  pointed  denunciation  of  two  human  failings  -- 
greed  and  selfishness  --  but  ends  on  a  far  more  hopeful  note,  with 
deep  moral  overtones. 

The  producer  chose  to  reach  into  public  domain  for  his 
musical  score  because  he  felt  familiar  music  would  enhance  his 
production.  In  addition  to  the  "Peer  Gynt"  suite,  Stanley  and  his 
musical  conductor,  Pete  King,  also  adapted  the  composer's  "Concerto 
in  A  Minor"  and  "Elegy."  Lyrics  are  by  Stanley  and  Taylor. 

Illusory  special  effects  by  Jack  Rabin  were  used  to  in¬ 
dicate  the  hordes  of  rats  being  led  to  their  destruction  by  the  Pied 
Piper,  rather  than  showing  the  rodents.  "We  hope  to  entertain  people, 
not  frighten  them,"  said  Stanley. 

The  principal  set  used  in  the  production  --  that  of 
Hamelin's  town  square,  market  place  and  main  gates  --  occupied  a 


(more ) 


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(  C-no  ;;  ) 


3  -  ' Pied  Piper  of  Hamelin 1 


vast  sound  stage  at  the  studio  and  imparted  the  feeling  of  an  entire 
community.  Because  of  the  quality  of  fantasy  in  the  story,  plus  the 
bright  costumes  of  the  era,  Lonergan  kept  his  sets  realistic  and  in 
the  natural  wood  and  stone  colors  of  the  day  as  a  means  of  "keeping 
our  feet  on  the  ground." 

Van  Johnson's  versatility  is  spotlighted,  not  only  in  his 
handling  of  a  dual  role  (as  both  the  Pied  Piper  and  Truson  the 
teacher)  but  in  his  singing  and  dancing  as  well.  One  number  sung 
by  Johnson,  "How  Can  I  Tell  You,"  a  ballad  written  to  the  music  of 
Grieg's  Concerto  in  A  Minor,  is  a  predicted  hit,  along  with  "Film 
Flam  Floo,"  a  bright  ditty  already  recorded  by  Kay  Starr. 

Another  unusual  feature  of  the  film  is  the  conversion, 
after  more  than  40  years  as  a  straight  dramatic  actor,  of  Claude 
Plains  into  a  song-and-dance  man.  He  displays  a  forceful  voice  and 
surprising  agility  in  "Prestige,"  a  number  sung  by  Hamelin 's  avari¬ 
cious  mayor. 

Also  in  the  cast  are  comedian  Doodles  Weaver,  Stanley  Adams, 
and  Rene  Korper  --  an  eight-year-old  German-born  boy  now  regarded  as 
one  of  Hollywood's  most  promising  child  actors. 

The  basic  story  of  "Pied  Piper"  is  familiar  to  all.  The 
Pied  Piper  agrees  to  rid  Hamelin  of  its  plague  of  rats  for  a  fee,  but 
when  the  mayor  and  his  councillors  use  chicanery  to  avoid  "paying 
the  piper"  the  mystic  musican  pipes  Hamelin' s  children  away. 

However,  in  the  new  treatment  laced  with  comedy,  Stanley's 
Pied  Piper,  aided  by  the  schoolmaster,  inspires  redemption  of  man 
through  love,  setting  the  stage  for  the  program's  hopeful  climax. 

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NBC-New  York,  10/29/57 


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IRVING  R.  LEVINE  REPORTS  RED  BAN  ON  SHIPMENT 
OP  TV  MOVIE  FILM  FROM  MOSCOW 

NBC  News  correspondent  Irving  R.  Levine  in  Moscow 
cabled  today  that  Soviet  customs  officials  will  no  longer 
permit  shipments  of  TV  movie  film  from  Moscow,  either  devel¬ 
oped  or  undeveloped. 

The  officials  told  Levine  that  there  was  no  reg¬ 
ulation  permitting  customs  to  pass  the  film  for  shipment. 
When  Levine  pointed  out  that  he  had  been  doing  this  for  two 
years  and  three  months,  an  official  replied,  "This  has  been 
some  mistake  by  custom  officials." 

Levine  said  correspondents  were  told  of  the  ban 
last  week  when  they  tried  to  air-freight  film  out  of  the 
country.  They  waited,  however,  to  appeal  to  the  government’s 
press  department,  which  accredits  correspondents.  The  de¬ 
partment’s  negative  reply  was  given  today. 

Correspondents  speculate  on  two  possible  reasons 
for  the  action,  Levine  said.  One  could  be  that  TV  film  is 
uncensored,  whereas  news  stories  and  broadcast  scripts  are 
closely  watched.  Another  might  be  that  the  Soviets  would 
use  the  resumption  of  shipments  as  a  bargaining  point  in 
current  Russian-U.S.  talks  in  Washington  over  radio-TV 
exchanges . 


NBC-New  York,  10/29/57 


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October  29 ,  1957 


EDITOR-IN-CHIEF  HENRY  R.  LUCE  AND  OTHER  TIME,  INC.,  EXECUTIVES 
IN  1  OMNIBUS  *  BEHIND-SCENES  FEATURE  ON  LIFE  MAGAZINE 

Henry  R.  Luce,  editor-in-chief,  and  other 
top  executives  of  Time,  Inc.,  will  take  part  in  a 
behind-the-scenes  look  at  Life  Magazine  on  NBC-TV*s 
OMNIBUS,  Sunday,  Nov.  3  (4-5:30  p.m.,  EST) . 

Participating  in  the  "Staff  of  Life"  fea¬ 
ture  will  be  Roy  E.  Larsen,  president  of  Time,  Inc.; 
Andrew  Heiskell,  publisher  of  Life,  and  Edward  K. 
Thompson,  managing  editor  of  Life. 

"Omnibus"  will  also  present  Part  I  of 
"American  Trial  by  Jury,"  which  will  trace  the  de¬ 
velopment  of  jury  trial  through  the  ages.  The  fea¬ 
ture  will  be  conducted  by  Joseph  N.  Welch, 


SS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEWYOR 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 


CREDITS  AND  CAST  FOR  ‘AMERICAN  TRIAL  BY  JURY1  AND  THE  ‘STAFF 

OF  LIFE  *  ON  NBC-TV‘S  "OMNIBUS" 


TIME: 


EXECUTIVE  PRODUCER: 
DRAMA  CONSULTANT: 
MASTER  OF  CEREMONIES: 
FEATURE  EDITOR: 
PRODUCED  BY: 

SPONSORS; 

AGENCIES: 

FEATURES : 


NBC -TV ,  Sunday,  Nov.  3,  4-5:30  p.m., 
EST. 

Robert  Saudek 
Walter  Kerr 
Alistair  Cooke 
Mary  V.  Ahern 
Robert  Saudek  Associates 
Aluminium  Limited  and  Union  Carbide 
Corporation. 

J.  Walter  Thompson  Company  and 
J.M.  Mathes,  Inc. 

"American  Trial  by  Jury"  (Part  I), 
a  dramatic  search  through  the 
origins  of  jury  trial  conducted 
by  Joseph  N.  Welch,  written  by 
Andrew  McCullough  and  directed 
by  Richard  Dunlap,  with  the 
following  cast: 


(more) 


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2  -  Credits  for  ‘Omnibus* 


Fritz  Weber 

as 

Molway 

Mike  Kellin 

as 

Berrett 

Humphrey  Davis 

as 

Clerk 

Harry  Bannister 

as 

Judge 

A1  Leberfeld 

as 

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Felix  Deebank 

as 

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Norman  Barr 

as 

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Lawrence  Fletcher 

as 

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Jay  Lanin 

as 

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Tom  McAlinney 

as 

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Fred  Stewart 

as 

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David  King-Wood 

as 

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Pirie  McDonald 

as 

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Barnard  Hughes 

as 

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Basil  Langton 

as 

James  I  and 

Bus he 11 

Michael  Wager 

as 

the  Baron 

(court  of  King 

John)  and 

Demosthenes 

Jane  McArthur 

as 

Saint  Joan 

"Staff  of  Life,"  a  look  behind  the 
scenes  at  the  modern  photo¬ 
journalism  of  Life  Magazine. 

Among  those  participating  will  be 


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3  -  Credits  for  ‘Omnibus* 


FEATURES:  Henry  R,  Luce,  editor-in-chief 

(C0NT‘D) 

of  Time,  Inc,;  Roy  E.  Larsen, 
president  of  Time,  Inc,;  Andrew 
Heiskell,  publisher  of  Life 
Magazine;  and  Edward  K,  Thompson 
managing  editor  of  Life  Magazine 
The  feature  will  be  written  by 
Alistair  Cooke  and  directed  by 
Clay  Yurdin, 


NBC -New  York,  10/29/57 


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NBC  RADIO  NEWS 


CREDIT  SHEET  FOR  NBC  RADIO'S  "THE  RED  FOLEY  SHOW" 


TIME: 

Saturdays,  12:30  to  12:55  p.m.,  EST, 

starting  Nov.  2,  on  NBC  Radio. 

FORMAT: 

A  variety  program  featuring  country 

music,  novelty  and  spiritual  songs. 

Top  Western  talent  will  make  weekly 

guest  appearances. 

STAR: 

Red  Foley 

ANNOUNCER: 

Joe  Slattery 

PRODUCED  BY: 

RadiOzark  Enterprises,  Inc. 

DIRECTOR: 

Bryan  Bisney 

SPONSOR: 

Dow  Chemical  Company 

AGENCY: 

MacManus,  John  and  Adams,  Inc. 

ORIGINATION: 

Jewell  Theater,  Springfield,  Mo. 

NBC  PRESS  REPRESENTATIVE: 

A1  Busse  (New  York) 

_ _ 

NBC -New  York,  IO/29/57 


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TELEVISION  NEWS 


October  29,  1957 


PROMINENT  SCIENTISTS  AND  EDUCATORS  HAIL  LAUNCHING  OF  TV  STUDY 
OF  INTERNATIONAL  GEOPHYSICAL  YEAR  BY  NBC  IN  CONJUNCTION 
WITH  EDUCATIONAL  TELEVISION  AND  RADIO  CENTER 


Leading  U.S.  scientists  and  educators  hailed  the  launching 
of  a  live  TV  study  of  the  International  Geophysical  Year  yesterday. 

The  telecast  was  the  first  in  a  Monday  series  of  10  weekly 
sessions  to  be  devoted  to  the  concentrated  l8-month-long  investigation 
of  the  earth  by  scientists  from  64  nations. 

The  IGY  program,  titled  "IGY:  A  Small  Planet  Takes  a  Look 
at  Itself,"  will  be  one  of  five  new  program  series  to  be  sent  out  live 
to  the  country's  interconnected  educational  TV  stations  over  NBC's 
regular  network  facilities  for  a  10-week  period.  The  five  series  will 
comprise  the  second  half  of  the  Educational  Television  Project  which 
NBC  is  undertaking  this  year  in  partnership  with  the  Educational  Tele¬ 
vision  and  Radio  Center,  at  Ann  Arbor,  Mich.,  to  link  the  non¬ 
commercial  ETV  stations  in  a  live  network.  (Programs  will  be  telecast 
Monday  through  Friday  from  6  to  6:30  p.m,,  EST. ) 

Dr.  Edward  Teller,  University  of  California  physicist  who 
was  prominent  in  the  planning  and  prediction  of  the  functioning  of  the 
atomic  bomb,  said:  "I  am  happy  to  hear  about  the  joint  programs  of 
NBC  and  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center.  It  is  more 

(more ) 

PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


2  -  Project. 

■  — 

necessary  than  ever  before  that  the  public  be  interested  in  those 
topics  on  which  our  civilization,  our  progress,  and  even  our  security 
rests.  Educational  television  is  one  of  the  few  tools  by  which  this 
most  important  purpose  can  be  accomplished." 

Dr.  Arthur  H.  Compton,  educator  and  physicist,  said:  "NBC 
and  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center  will  be  in  a  position 
to  perform  an  important  and  worthwhile  service  to  ETV  viewers  with  the 
new  series  of  I GY  programs.  Nothing  could  be  more  timely.  Please 
accept  my  personal  congratulations." 

Dr.  Glenn  T.  Seaborg,  Nobel  Prize  winner  in  chemistry  in 
1951j  now  of  the  University  of  California,  said:  "Congratulations  to 
educational  television  and  Radio  Center  and  NBC  on  the  new  IGY  series. 
Skillful  sharing  of  the  story  of  new  scientific  advances  is  an 
important  step  in  assimilation  which  will  make  them  valuable  to 
society.  Undoubtedly  these  programs  will  be  worthwhile  contributions 
to  educational  television." 

Guest  on  the  opening  session  of  the  IGY  series,  of  which 
Frank  Blair  of  NBC-TV's  "Today"  is  weekly  host,  was  Dr.  Joseph  Kaplan, 
chairman  of  the  U.S.  National  Committee  for  the  IGY  and  member  of  the 
University  of  California's  Department  of  Physics. 

Dr.  Kaplan  said  during  the  telecast  that  the  IGY  reflects 
"in  human  terms"  the  basic  fact  that  "the  earth  as  a  whole  belongs  to 
mankind  as  a  whole;  its  shocks  and  tremors,  and  winds  and  tides, 
respect  no  boundaries."  Events  like  earthquakes  or  solar  flare  spread 
their  effects  across  the  entire  planet,  he  said,  and  the  effects  must 
be  recorded  at  hundreds  of  stations  at  the  same  moment. 


(more ) 


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"This  was  not  possible  five  years  ago,"  he  said.  "What  the 
world  needed  was  no  less  than  hundreds  of  new  weather  stations;  scores 
of  new  earthquake,  magnetic  and  gravity  observatories;  a  dozen  major 
bases  in  the  Antarctic,  motion  picture  coverage  of  auroras  and  the  sun 
itself,  five  dozen  scientific  ships  at  sea  to  record  currents  in  the 
air  and  ocean,  hundreds  of  rockets  to  measure  radiation  and  tempera¬ 
ture  in  the  upper  atmosphere,  and  seven  or  eight  thousand  scientists 
to  handle  these  various  projects  simultaneously  over  all  the  earth  for 
a  considerable  period  of  time.  All  these  the  world  has  today,  thanks 
to  the  International  Geophysical  Year." 

Dr.  Kaplan  said  the  nations  and  the  men  involved  have  set 
up  a  network  of  communications  "unique  in  extent  and  unique  in  kind." 
He  termed  it  "communication  in  a  common  language,  embracing  all  the 
world. " 

Aside  from  the  "improbable  event  of  life  itself,"  he  said, 
"the  most  unlikely  fact  I  know  is  that  any  form  of  life  should  ever 
learn  as  much  about  the  earth  as  man  already  knows." 

Of  the  role  of  the  U.S.  in  satellites,  Dr.  Kaplan  said: 

"Our  first  American  satellite  will  measure  the  ultra-violet  light 
that  creates  the  lowest  region  of  the  ionosphere,  as  well  as  meteor 
hits  and  density  of  the  thin  upper  air.  Other  satellites  will  soon 
be  clocking  cosmic  rays  and  magnetism." 

Seven  noted  U.S.  scientists  --  six  of  them  key  figures  in 
IGY  --  have  accepted  invitations  to  appear  in  the  series  of  10  IGY 
telecasts,  which  each  week  will  deal  with  a  specific  aspect  of  the 
IGY.  There  will  be  explanation  and  illustration  of  the  most  signifi¬ 
cant  features  of  the  present  body  of  man*s  knowledge  of  the  earth, 

(more ) 


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4  -  Project 


description  of  the  many  gaps  in  that  knowledge,  and  account  of  the 
methods  by  which  IGY  scientists  hope  to  fill  in  or  bridge  those  gaps. 

The  format  regularly  will  include  film  coverage  of  key  IGY  activities 
and  demonstration  with  models. 

In  addition  to  the  IGY  series,  the  Project  programs  will  be: 

"Mathematics,  with  Clifton  Fadiman,"  Tuesdays, 
beginning  Oct.  29. 

"Arts  and  the  Gods,"  an  account  of  the  art  inspired 
by  the  Greek  myths,  to  be  telecast  from  the  Metropolitan 
Museum  of  Art  in  New  York  Wednesdays,  beginning  Oct.  30. 

"Survival:  the  Story  of  Man,  Resources  and  Civili¬ 

zation,"  Thursdays,  beginning  Oct.  31. 

"Camera  on  Washington, "  a  study  of  the  executive 
branch  of  the  Federal  government,  Fridays,  beginning  Nov.  1. 

(As  a  supplementary  service,  NBC  owned-and-operated  stations 
and  many  NBC  network  affiliates  in  areas  which  the  ETV  outlets  do  not 
cover  will  telecast  the  programs  with  a  minimum  14-delay  from  the  time 
of  the  original  live  telecast.  WRCA-TV,  in  New  York,  will  telecast 
"Survival:  the  Story  of  Man,  Resources  and  Civilization"  on  Saturdays, 

from  4:30  to  5  p.m.,  EST,  starting  Nov.  23,  and  "IGY"  on  Sundays,  from 
12  noon  to  12:30  p.m.,  EST,  starting  Nov.  24.  Dates  for  the  other 
three  Project  programs,  which  WRCA-TV  will  carry  later,  will  be 
announced  soon.) 

Comments  from  other  educators,  civic  leaders  and  broadcasters 

today: 

Arthur  S.  Adams,  president,  American  Council  on  Education: 
"May  I  express  appreciation  of  the  joint  enterprise  of  the  NBC  and  the 

(more ) 


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Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center  in  producing  for  the  second 
time  a  varied  series  of  live  programs  for  distribution  on  educational 
television  stations.  With  best  wishes  for  continued  success  in  this 
project , " 

Dr.  William  Friday,  president.  University  of  North  Carolina: 
"The  Project  which  is  being  conducted  by  NBC  and  the  Educational  Tele¬ 
vision  and  Radio  Center  gives  further  evidence  of  the  important  role 
TV  can  play  in  education,  I  congratulate  these  two  organizations  for 
this  venture  and  wish  them  every  success.  They  IGY  series  is 
particularly  timely  and  should  prove  most  beneficial  to  ETV  audiences. 

It  should  dramatically  alert  our  citizens  to  the  significance  of 
current  scientific  developments." 

Mayor  De  Lesseps  S.  Morrison  of  New  Orleans:  "My  sincere 
compliments  to  NBC  and  the  Educational  TV  Radio  Center  on  the  very 
outstanding  programs  produced  for  presentation  this  Fall.  We  are 
looking  forward  to  seeing  them  over  WYES -TV  in  New  Orleans  with  the 
knowledge  that  local  viewers  will  find  them  interesting,  stimulating, 
and  enjoyable." 

Rufus  C.  Harris,  president  of  Tulane  University:  "I  wish 
to  extend  congratulations  and  best  wishes  to  the  Educational  Television 
and  Radio  Center  and  to  the  National  Broadcasting  Company  for  the 
educational  programs  which  are  being  prepared  for  release  this  Fall. 

The  advance  information  on  the  programs  promises  much  for  the  advance¬ 
ment  of  educational  television." 

Dr.  Earl  A.  Dimmick,  superintendent  of  the  Pittsburgh  (pa.  ) 
public  schools:  "The  new  series  of  programs  should  provide  stimulating 
after-school  viewing  for  Pittsburgh  youngsters.  NBC  and  the  Educa¬ 
tional  Television  and  Radio  Center  are  to  be  congratulated  for  their 
choice  of  programs."  (more) 


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6  -  Project 


James  F.  Redmond,  superintendent  of  the  New  Orleans  public 
schools:  "Best  wishes  to  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center 

and  NBC  on  the  pioneering  of  their  new  Fall  series  to  be  viewed  over 
WYES-TV  beginning  Oct,  28,  I  am  sure  the  subject  matter  will  prove 
both  timely  and  interesting  to  New  Orleans  ETV  viewers." 

Frank  E.  Schooley,  director  of  broadcasting,  University  of 
Illinois:  "Congratulations  to  NBC  and  the  Center  for  the  new  series 

of  educational  television  programs  starting  Oct.  28.  These  series 
will  give  to  WILL-TV  excellent  programs,  aiding  us  greatly  in  our 
educational  endeavors," 

Ralph  Lowell,  president,  the  Lowell  Cooperative  Broadcasting 
Institute:  "I  wish  to  extend  congratulations  to  NBC  and  the  staff  of 

the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center  on  the  new  segment  of  live 
programs  which  the  two  organizations  are  presenting  this  Fall  for 
educational  stations.  The  choice  of  IGY  as  a  subject  for  one  of  the 
series  is  excellent." 

John  F.  White,  general  manager,  WQED,  Pittsburgh,  Pa.:  "We 
congratulate  NBC  and  the  Educational  Television  and  Radio  Center  upon 
the  excellent  choice  of  the  programs  which  appear  on  our  air  beginning 
Nov.  28.  This  series  has  been  an  important  element  in  providing  for 
Pittsburghers  an  interest-significant  educational  television  program 
for  1957." 


(more ) 


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Henry  P.  Chadeayne,  executive  director,  St.  Louis  Educa¬ 
tional  Television  Commission:  "KETC  Channel  Nine  is  again  delighted 
to  be  able  to  present  the  second  series  of  NBC  educational  programs 
live  to  the  greater  St.  Louis  community.  The  choice  of  programs  is 
excellent.  The  series  of  the  International  Geophysical  Year  is 
especially  timely.  Heartiest  congratulations  to  NBC  and  to  the  Educa 
tional  Television  and  Radio  Center  for  this  very  significant  contribu 
tion  to  education  and  to  television." 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/29/57 


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NBC-TV  NEWS 


"TODAY’S"  HELEN  O’CONNELL  AND  WIVES  OF  THREE  PROGRAM  STAFFERS 
WILL  MODEL  MATERNITY  CLOTHES  ON  TELECAST  OF  NOV.  6 

Helen  O'Connell,  Dave  Garroway’s  wife  Pamela  and 
three  wives  of  TODAY  staff  members  will  star  in  one  of  the 
most  unusual  maternity  fashion  shows  ever  staged  on  television, 
on  Wednesday,  Nov.  $, 

The  five  women,  who  will  model  a  new  complete 
maternity  wardrobe,  are  all  expecting! 

Besides  Miss  O'Connell  (wife  of  Novelist  Tom  T. 
Chamales)  and  Mrs.  Garroway,  the  models  will  be  director  Bill 
Healion's  wife  Patricia,  stage  manager  Shelly  Schwartz's  wife 
Ellen,  and  production  assistant  Palmer  Shannon's  wife  Betty  Ann. 

In  addition  to  the  fashion  show,  "Today"  also  will 
hold  a  stork  shower  for  Miss  O'Connell. 

Undisturbed  by  all  the  "fuss"  over  the  maternity  show 
is  news  editor  Frank  Blair  --  the  father  of  eight  children. 

("Today"  is  telecast  Monday  through  Friday,  7-10  a.m., 
EST,  on  the  NBC-TV  Network,  except  WRCA-TV;  WRCA-TV  only, 

7-9  a.m.,  EST.) 


NBC-New  York,  10/29/57 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 


CREDITS  FOR  'THE  JOHN  DARRO  STORY'  ON  'WAGON  TRAIN' 


Cast  list  and  credits  for  "The  John  Darro  Story," 
drama  of  a  couple  who  try  desperately  to  keep  their  son 
from  learning  of  his  father's  secret  past,  on  NBC -TV's  WAGON 
TRAIN  Wednesday,  Nov.  6  (7:30-8:30  p.m,,  EST): 

Starring  Ward  Bond  as  Seth  Adams  and  Robert  Horton 
as  Flint  McCullough. 

Special  guest  star  Eddie  Albert  as  John  Darro, 

With  Margo  as  Aline  Darro,  and  Edgar  Buchanan  as 

Briscoe . 

Featuring  Kim  Charney  as  Tommy  Darro,  Don  Durant 
as  Lucas,  Terry  Wilson  as  Hawks,  Malcolm  Atterbury  as  Bixby, 
Irene  Corlett  as  Mrs.  Hawks,  Norman  Leavitt  as  Spartan, 

Ellen  Hardies  as  Wooster. 

"The  John  Darro  Story"  was  written  by  Adrian  Spies, 
directed  by  Mark  Stevens  and  produced  by  Richard  Lewis, 

- o - 


NBC -New  York,  10/29/57 


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TELEVI  SION 


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NEWS 


October  30*  1957 

"THE  FABULOUS  INFANT,"  THE  STORY  OF  NETWORK  TV,  WILL  BE 
PRESENTED  ON  "WIDE  WIDE  WORLD"  WITH  MONTAGE  OF  MAJOR 
STARS  OF  NBC,  CBS  AND  ABC  IN  INDUSTRY’S  FIRST  DECADE 

« 

"The  Fabulous  Infant,"  the  story  of  network  television,  will 
be  presented  on  NBC-TV's  WIDE  WIDE  WORLD  Sunday,  Nov.  10  (4-5:30  p.m., 
EST). 

The  program  marks  a  television  milestone  in  that,  for  the 
first  time,  the  three  major  networks  --  NBC,  CBS  and  ABC  --  are 
cooperating  to  provide  historic  program  excerpts  of  the  great  moments 
of  TV's  first  10  years.  Some  40  stars  from  all  three  networks  will 

be  included  in  the  program's  flashbacks. 

"We're  going  after  the  stars  and  events  that  have  attracted 
millions  of  people  to  their  TV  sets,"  says  producer  Herbert  Sussan. 
"We'll  meet  the  people  behind  the  scenes  whose  varied  talents  are 
joined  to  create  television  programs.  We'll  enter  the  world  of  the 
television  star,  and  we'll  attempt  to  gain  some  insight  into  much- 
debated  questions  about  the  needs  and  promises  of  network  television." 

"Wide  Wide  World"  is  sponsored  by  General  Motors  and  super¬ 
vised  by  executive  producer  Barry  Wood.  "The  Fabulous  Infant  feature 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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will  include  "live”  segments  from  New  York,  Hollywood,  Washington, 

Las  Vegas,  San  Francisco,  Boston,  Omaha,  Detroit,  Cincinnati,  and 
Springfield,  Mo. 

Television's  first  decade  will  be  presented  in  a  montage  of 
such  events  as  the  TV  coverage  of  the  political  conventions,  inaugura 
tions,  the  Kefauver  and  Army-McCarthy  hearings,  and  atomic  bomb  tests 
Great  moments  of  entertainment  from  all  three  networks  will  be  in¬ 
cluded  in  the  montage,  and  the  program  is  seeking  approval  from  shows 
and  personalities  including  Dinah  Shore,  Perry  Como,  Lucille  Ball, 
Jack  Benny,  "Disneyland,"  Frank  Sinatra,  and  many  others. 

Milton  Berle,  "Mr.  Television"  himself,  will  appear  on  the 
show  for  his  first  major  "live"  performance  in  two  seasons.  In  NBC's 
studio  6b  in  New  York,  which  was  built  expressly  for  him,  Berle  will 
take  a  long  and  serious  look  at  the  problems  of  a  TV  star. 

Others  to  appear  on  the  program  include  Ernie  Kovacs,  who 
will  tell  how  a  "big  break"  before  the  television  audience  changed 
his  career  overnight;  and  Jack  Webb,  who  will  reveal  how  television 
has  affected  Hollywood  and  how  TV  films  like  his  "Dragnet"  are  pro¬ 
duced.  Dave  Garroway,  host  of  "Wide  Wide  World,"  will  tell  of  his 
early  years  in  the  "Chicago  school"  of  TV. 

Viewers  will  be  taken  to  Hollywood  for  a  segment  to  be 
called  "The  Fantasy  Factory"  --  a  look  at  the  people  and  things  that 
go  together  to  create  a  TV  program.  They  will  also  attend  rehearsals 
of  "NBC  Matinee  Theater,"  with  Sarah  Churchill  in  a  starring  role, 
and  the  General  Motors  50th  anniversary  show,  which  will  feature  a 
dozen  of  the  country's  top  stars. 


(more ) 


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3  -  1  The  Fabulous  Infant1 


The  program  will  "visit"  TV  stations  in  San  Francisco, 
Boston,  Detroit,  Omaha,  Cincinnati  and  Springfield,  Mo.,  for  a  look 
at  the  local  station  as  a  source  of  new  talent  and  new  ideas.  To 
illustrate  TV's  unique  power  of  "immediacy"  and  the  role  of  mobile 
television,  viewers  will  be  taken  to  Washington  to  witness  full-dress 
ceremonies  in  honor  of  the  182nd  anniversary  of  the  U.S.  Marine  Corps. 

As  a  summation  of  the  first  10  years,  four  TV  critics  and 
a  number  of  viewers  will  be  asked  to  speak  their  minds  on  the 
question:  "Has  television  fulfilled  its  promise?"  The  program  will 

then  present  TV  shows  from  stations  throughout  the  world  as  a  preview 
of  the  "Wide  Wide  World"  of  the  future. 


- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/30/57 


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N  EWS 


October  30,  1957 

HARRY  T.  FLOYD  IS  NAMED  MANAGER,  TV  NETWORK  SALES, 

WESTERN  DIVISION,  FOR  NBC 

Harry  T.  Floyd  has  been  named  Manager,  Television  Network 
Sales,  Western  Division,  for  NBC,  it  was  announced  today  by  William 
R.  (Billy)  Goodheart,  Jr.,  Vice  President,  Television  Network  Sales, 
for  the  National  Broadcasting  Company.  Mr.  Floyd  will  report  to 
Charles  R.  Abry,  Manager,  Eastern  Sales. 

Mr.  Floyd  has  served  as  a  television  network  salesman  since 
he  first  joined  NBC  in  November,  1947.  Before  that  he  was,  in  turn, 
sales  manager  of  the  Princeton  Film  Center  in  Princeton,  N.J.,  Eastern 
Sales  Manager  of  the  Commercial  Film  Division  of  Walt  Disney  Produc¬ 
tions  in  New  York,  product  director  and  assistant  to  the  vice  presi¬ 
dent  in  charge  of  merchandising  of  Johnson  &  Johnson  in  New  Brunswick, 
N.J.j  advertising  manager  of  Interwoven  Stocking  Co.  (New  Brunswick, 
N.J.)  and  advertising  and  sales  promotion  manager  for  Washer  Bros, 
department  store  in  Fort  Worth,  Tex. 


.(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAl  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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He  was  born  in  Salina,  Kan.,  and  attended  Kansas  State 
College.  He  and  his  wife  and  daughter  live  in  Plainfield,  N.J.  Mr. 
Floyd  is  a  member  of  the  Radio-Television  Executives  Society,  Beta 
Theta  Pi  fraternity,  the  Plainfield  Country  Club,  and  an  elder  and 
past  chairman  of  the  board  of  deacons  of  the  Crescent  Ave.  Presby¬ 
terian  Church  in  Plainfield. 

In  his  new  position,  Mr.  Floyd  will  be  headquartered  at 
NBC‘s  Hollywood,  Cal.,  offices.  He  and  his  family  will  make  their 
home  in  Pasadena. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/30/57 


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NEWS 


October  30,  1957 


«  TWENTY -ONE'  SCOUTING  NATION  FOR  QUIZ  CONTESTANTS 


NBC-TV's  TWENTY-ONE  program  is  scouting  for  quiz  contestants 

from  all  sections  of  the  country. 

A1  Freedman,  producer  of  the  show,  is  spending  this  week  in 
Denver  and  Los  Angeles,  interviewing  prospective  contestants.  One  of 
his  assistants  conducted  similar  interviews  in  Boston  and  Washington, 
D.C „ ,  last  weekend. 

"Anyone  may  apply,  of  course,"  points  out  Freedman,  "but 
candidates  must  be  well  vorsed  in  a  wide  variety  of  subjects  --  not 
just  in  a  single  field." 

"Twenty-One"  utilizes  more  than  100  different  categories  for 
its  questions  asked  by  quizmaster  Jack  Barry.  If  a  person  winds  up  a 
contestant  on  the  program,  he  may  be  asked  detailed  queries  on  Latin 
America,  Lincoln,  mythology,  current  events,  presidents,  queens, 
baseball,  comic  strips,  fairy  tales,  Shakespeare,  boxing,  show  music, 
art,  geography  or  astronomy  --  to  name  a  few  of  the  categories. 

And  of  course  the  rewards  for  a  triumphant  contestant  are 
well  worth  the  effort.  Charles  Van  Doren,  the  Columbia  University 

(more ) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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English  instructor  who  became  an  international  celebrity  while  winning 
$129,000  on  the  show,  has  also  become  a  roving  reporter  on  NBC-TV's 
"Wide  Wide  World."  Public  relations  consultant  Hank  Bloomgarden 
wound  up  with  $98,500.  Only  two  Mondays  ago,  dairy  farmer  Harold 
Craig  walked  off  with  $106,000  after  a  record  18  appearances,  amid 
speculation  that  he  might  run  for  Congress  from  his  upstate  New  York 
district.  His  conqueror,  consumer  research  psychologist  David  Mayer, 
has  already  won  $3^*500. 

"Twenty-One"  is  televised  Mondays  from  9  to  9:30  p.m.,  EST. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/30/57 


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NBC -TV  NEWS 


NAT  KING  COLE  TELECAST  OF  NOV.  5  WILL  MARK  HIS 

FIRST  ANNIVERSARY  AS  REGULAR  NBC-TV  STAR 

NAT  KING  COLE  will  mark  his  first  anniversary  as 
a  regular  NBC-TV  star  on  his  program  Tuesday,  Nov.  5  (NBC-TV, 
7:30  p.m.,  EST).  THE  NAT  KING  COLE  SHOW  started  as  a  quarter- 
hour  show  on  Nov.  5,  1956.  It  originally  was  scheduled  to  run 
several  weeks,  and  was  extended  repeatedly.  On  Sept.  17  of 
this  year  it  was  scheduled  in  its  present  time-spot  as  a 
half-hour  program. 

Nat  will  take  his  viewers  on  a  behind-the-scenes 
trip  to  the  making  of  "St.  Louis  Blues,"  the  Paramount  film 
on  the  life  of  W .  C.  Handy  in  which  he  is  currently  working. 
This  will  be  Cole‘s  biggest  dramatic  role  to  date.  Two  of 
the  sets  from  the  movie  will  be  brought  to  the  NBC  studios 
to  serve  as  colorful  backgrounds  for  this  musical  preview. 

A  Dixieland  band  including  the  following  artists 
will  be  heard:  Ted  Buckner  on  the  trumpet,  Barney  Bigard  on 
the  clarinet,  George  Washington  on  the  trombone,  Lee  Young 
on  drums.  Red  Callender  on  bass  and  the  singing  Cheerleaders. 
Musical  numbers  for  Nat  will  include  "Who  Cares?"  "Careless 
Love,"  "When  I  Fall  in  Love"  and  "St.  Louis  Blues." 

Nelson  Riddle  directs  the  orchestra  and  Bill  Henry 
is  producer-director. 


NBC -New  York,  10/30/37 


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NBC  NEWS  CORRESPONDENT  HERB  KAPLOW  WILL  BE  ABOARD  TRANS-U.S.  JET 
AND  WILL  ATTEMPT  LIVE  VOICE  REPORT  ON  'TEX  AND  JINX'  TELECAST 

NBC  News  correspondent  Herb  Kaplow  will  attempt  to  broadcast 
two  live  voice  pick-ups  to  NBC-TV's  TEX  AND  JINX  SHOW  from  an  Air 
Force  jet  streaking  toward  the  East  Coast. 

Kaplow  will  make  the  attempt  on  Friday,  Nov.  1  sometime 
between  1-1:30  p.m.,  EST  --  the  show's  regular  time. 

The  NBC  correspondent  will  be  aboard  a  four-jet  KC-135 
tanker  attempting  an  unofficial  speed  record  from  Seattle  to  Andrews 
Air  Force  Base  outside  Washington.  The  Boeing  craft  —  a  military 
version  of  the  Boeing  707  commercial  airliner  --  has  a  cruising  speed 
of  600  m.p.h. 

Kaplow  will  leave  Seattle  at  approximately  11:30  a.m.,  EST, 
on  the  flight.  He  will  also  tape  stories  prior  to  the  take-off  for 
use  by  NBC  News  on  TV  and  Radio. 

His  broadcasts  from  the  plane  will  be  made  via  its  radio  to 
Andrews  AF  Base,  then  piped  to  Station  WRC  in  Washington  and  relayed 
to  NBC  New  York.  While  his  voice  is  on  the  TV  screen,  films  of  the 
KC-135  in  flight  will  be  shown.  Kaplow 's  broadcasts  will  take  place 
from  a  point  approximately  over  Sioux  City,  Iowa. 


NBC-New  York,  10/30/57 


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October  31,  1957 

NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY  ACQUIRES  OWNERSHIP 
OF  RADIO  STATIONS  WJAS  AND  WJAS-FM,  PITTSBURGH 


The  National  Broadcasting  Company  today  acquired  ownership 
of  Pittsburgh  radio  stations  WJAS  and  WJAS-FM,  it  was  announced 
jointly  by  Thomas  B.  McFadden,  Vice  President  of  NBC  Owned  Stations 
and  NBC  Spot  Sales,  and  H.  Kenneth  Brennen,  President  and  General 
Manager  of  Pittsburgh  Radio  Supply  House,  Inc.,  previous  owner  of 
the  stations. 

The  documents  transferring  ownership  of  the  stations  were 
signed  today  in  NBC  headquarters  in  New  York.  NBC  was  represented 
by  Joseph  V.  Heffernan,  Staff  Vice  President,  and  Mr,  McFadden.  The 
seller  was  represented  by  Margaret  Brennen,  Treasurer  and  Assistant 
Secretary,  and  Harry  Stehman,  Vice  President  and  Secretary.  The 
change  of  ownership  is  effective  Nov.  1. 

In  making  the  announcement,  Mr.  McFadden  said:  "We  welcome 
the  opportunity  to  return  the  full  NBC  Radio  Network  service  to  the 
Pittsburgh  area.  WJAS  listeners  will  soon  have  available  the  com¬ 
plete  schedule  of  NBC  Radio  programs  as  well  as  the  services  of  the 

(more ) 


publicity  department  0  NBC  Owned  Stations  Division  0  30  Rockefeller  Plaza,  N.  1 .  20,  N.Y.  0  Cl  <-8300 


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network’s  world-wide  news-gathering  facilities.  In  addition,  the 
station  management  will  make  every  effort  to  provide  its  audience 
with  the  finest  local  news  coverage  and  programming  which  serves 
the  community." 

Mr.  Brennen,  representing  the  stations’  previous  ownership, 
said:  "We  are  gratified  that  Pittsburgh’s  pioneer  radio  station, 

WJAS,  has  become  a  member  of  NBC’s  family  of  stations.  We  are 
confident  that  under  the  leadership  and  direction  of  the  nation’s 
outstanding  network,  the  listeners  of  WJAS  will  continue  to  receive 
the  best  in  entertainment,  music  and  news  programs." 

Station  WJAS,  which  was  established  in  1921  and  is  one  of 
the  oldest  commercial  radio  stations  in  the  nation,  operates  on  a 
frequency  of  1,320  kilocycles  with  power  of  5^00°  watts.  WJAS-FM 
operates  on  a  frequency  of  99*7  megacycles  with  power  of  24  kilowatts. 

In  addition  to  WJAS  and  WJAS-FM,  the  NBC  Owned  Stations 
now  include:  WRCA  (Radio);  WRCA-FM  and  WRCA-TV,  New  York;  WNBC  (TV) 
and  WKN3  (Radio),  Hartford -New  Britain;  WRCV  (Radio)  and  WRCV-TV, 
Philadelphia;  WBUF  (TV),  Buffalo;  WRC  (Radio),  WRC-FM  and  WRC-TV, 
Washington;  WMAQ  (Radio)  WMAQ-FM  and  WNBQ  (TV),  Chicago;  KRCA  (TV) 

Los  Angeles;  and  KNBC  (Radio)  and  KNBC-FM,  San  Francisco. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/31/57 


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NEWS 


October  31*  1957 

•HOWDY  DOODY'  REACHES  TENTH  BIRTHDAY  IN  DECEMBER; 

MANY  SPECIAL  ANNIVERSARY  OBSERVANCES  PLANNED 

The  star  of  the  oldest  continuous  network  children’s  TV  show 
is  approaching  his  10th  anniversary,  but  to  his  devoted  viewers,  he 
hasn’t  aged  a  day.  On  Saturday,  Dec.  28,  a  perky,  freckle-faced 
puppet  named  Howdy  Doody  will  be  10  years  old. 

Howdy  was  created  by  Bob  Smith,  who  (with  producer  Roger 
Muir)  launched  the  puppet’s  fabulous  career  on  Dec.  27,  19^7.  Since 
then  Howdy  has  racked  up  an  impressive  record  of  continuous  perform¬ 
ances  that  now  is  over  the  2,100  mark. 

Smith,  "Buffalo  Bob"  to  millions  of  kids,  and  producer  Muir 
are  still  with  their  famed  puppet  and  look  to  an  extensive  career 
ahead  for  all  the  inhabitants  of  "Doodyville . " 

One  of  the  major  "firsts"  achieved  by  the  show  is  in  the 
field  of  TV  merchandising.  The  first  program  to  jump  into  that  field 
with  both  feet,  Howdy  Doody  products  —  notably  toys,  records,  books 
and  clothing  —  are  now  manufactured  by  over  50  firms .  More  than  600 
Howdy  Doody  items  have  been  placed  on  the  market.  All  Howdy  Doody 
merchandising  is  handled  by  California  National  Productions, 

Birthday  celebration  plans  include  a  gala  anniversary  show, 
a  contest  to  find  the  child  with  the  most  winning  smile  in  America, 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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and  a  tour  of  15  major  cities  throughout  the  country  with  Clarabell 
the  clown  leading  the  tour. 

A  manhunt  has  been  instituted  to  find  the  eight  original 
members  of  the  show‘s  “peanut  gallery"  (youngsters  attending  the  show) 
and  plans  are  to  bring  them  (now  quite  grown  up)  to  the  show  to  help 
celebrate  the  birthday. 

The  HOWDY  DOODY  program  is  seen  on  NBC-TV  Saturdays  at 
10  a.m.,  EST. 


NBC-New  York,  10/31/57 


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October  31*  1957 

"PROJECTION  58 1 "--NBC  NEWS  *  YEAR-END  REVIEW  AND  FORECAST-- 
WILL  BE  PRESENTED  ON  BOTH  RADIO  AND  TV  SUNDAY,  DEC.  29 

NBC  News *  PROJECTION  ‘58  —  previously  announced  for 
NBC -TV  —  will  also  be  heard  on  NBC  Radio  Sunday,  Dec.  29.  Time- 
spots  for  the  separate  telecast  and  broadcast  have  not  yet  been 
decided. 

"Projection  r58"  is  a  year-end  roundup  featuring  12  NBC 
News  correspondents  assembled  in  New  York.  NBC  News  commentator  Chet 
Huntley  will  "anchor"  the  full-hour  presentation.  Seven  overseas 
and  five  domestic  NBC  News  staffers  will  participate. 

NBC  Radio* s  presentation  will  be  taped.  It  will  consist  of 
portions  of  the  NBC-TV  program  and  additional  material. 

The  program  will  review  news  developments  in  1957  and 
project  trends  into  the  coming  year. 

NBC  News  foreign  correspondents  taking  part  are:  Frank 
Bourgholtzer  (Vienna);  Leif  Eid  (Paris);  Joseph  C.  Harsch  (London); 
Welles  Hangen  (Cairo),  Irving  R.  Levine  (Moscow),  Ed  Newman  (Rome) 
and  Jim  Robinson  (Tokyo). 

Domestic  correspondents  will  be  Martin  Agronsky,  David 
Brinkley,  John  Chancellor,  Robert  McCormick  and  Huntley. 

- -0 - 


PRESS  D  E  P  A  R  T  M  E  N  T,  N  AT  I  O  N  A  L  6ROADCA 


STING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  2  0,  NEW  YORK 


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NEWS 


October  31,  1957 

* WIDE  WIDE  WORLD'  STORY  OF  TV  INDUSTRY  WILL  SHOW  HOW  LOCAL 

STATIONS  ARE  DEVELOPING  NEW  TALENT  AND  PROGRAM  IDEAS 

!  _ _ 

WIDE  WIDE  WORLD  will  travel  across  the  country  Sunday, 

Nov.  10  (NBC-TV,  4-5:30  p.m.,  EST)  to  show  how  local  television 
stations  help  develop  new  talent  and  new  program  ideas. 

The  cross-country  sweep  will  be  part  of  "The  Fabulous 
Infant,"  the  story  of  network  television  to  be  telecast  on  "Wide  Wide 
World,"  which  is  sponsored  by  General  Motors. 

The  program  will  start  in  New  York  and  switch.... 

To  station  KRON-TV  in  San  Francisco,  where  the 
cameras  will  show  rehearsals  for  a  program  combining  the 
talents  of  three  Japanese  dancers  and  a  Japanese  brush- 
painter.  . . . 

To  station  KMTV  in  Omaha  to  look-in  on  two  public  ser¬ 
vice  programs,  for  children  —  "The  Hawk"  and  "Popeye"  — 
and  to  see  how  they  are  produced.... 

To  station  KYTV  in  Springfield,  Mo.,  to  look  behind 
the  scenes  of  a  program  featuring  the  "Jigalongs,"  a  group 
of  young  square  dancers,  and  Susie  Arden,  a  ballad  singer.... 

(more) 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK 


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2  -  ‘Wide  Wide  World* 


To  WBZ-TV  in  Boston,  to  visit  the  program  ”2000  A.D." 
emceed  by  Prof.  Jonathan  Karas  and  see  the  exclusive  film  of 
the  Sputnick,  with  which  WBZ-TV  scored  a  major  news  beat.... 

To  WLW-TVin  Cincinnati  and  the  studios  of  "Bob 
Braun »s  Bandstand,"  a  leading  teenager  show,  to  watch  a 
group  of  drum  majorettes  rehearse  their  routine  and  sit 
in  on  a  rock  *n*  roll  jazz  session..,. 

To  WW J -TV  in  Detroit  to  view  "The  Arbitrator,"  a 
public  service  program  in  which  public  controversies  are 
mediated  before  the  television  cameras. 

- o - 


NBC-New  York,  10/31/57 


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MATINEE 

THEATER 


October  31,  1957 

SEVEN  AUTHORS  OF  SCRIPTS  IN  BOOK,  'BEST  TELEVISION  PLAYS,  1957, *  WILL 
RECEIVE  HARCOURT,  BRACE  AWARDS  ON  'NBC  MATINEE  THEATER'  COLORCAST 

Awards  to  seven  prize-winning  television  playwrights  will  be 
made  on  the  NBC  MATINEE  THEATER  colorcast, Thursday,  Nov,  7  (NBC -TV, 

3-4  p.m.,  EST).  William  Jovanovich,  president  of  Harcourt,  Brace  and 
Company,  publishers,  will  present  the  awards  given  by  his  firm  each 
year,  in  recognition  of  original  and  superior  television  drama. 

The  writers  to  be  honored  include,  first,  the  three  top 
prize-winners:  Rod  Serling  for  "Requiem  for  a  Heavyweight,"  Steven 

Gethers  for  "Cracker  Money"  and  Tad  Mosel  for  "The  Five  Dollar  Bill." 
The  remaining  writers  are  Alvin  Boretz,  Alfred  Brenner,  Alvin 
Sapinsley  and  Mac  Shoub.  Shoub's  play  "Thank  You,  Edmondo"  was 
originally  presented  on  "NBC  Matinee  Theater."  In  addition  to  a  prize¬ 
winner  among  the  top  seven,  NBC  Matinee  Theater  also  had  four  plays  in 
the  honorable  mention  list. 

The  seven  plays  are  printed  in  the  newly  published  book 
"Best  Television  Plays,  1957n  edited  by  William  I.  Kaufman,  an  NBC 
sales  representative.  All  of  the  writers  will  appear  on  the  show  to 
accept  their  awards  from  Mr.  Jovanovich  and  from  John  Conte,  the 
program's  host. 

- o - 


PRESS  DEPARTMENT,  NATIONAL  BROADCASTING  COMPANY,  30  ROCKEFELLER  PLAZA,  NEW  YORK  20,  NEW  YORK