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JACK TRACY 
) ROOM 320 

2-X- H NBC TRADE NEWS 

October 1 , 1962 

GULF RENEWS SPONSORSHIP OF NBC-TV "INSTANT NEWS SPECIALS" AND WILL 
ALSO SPONSOR "PROJECTION *63," NEWS FORECAST COLOR SPECIAL 

Gulf Oil Corporation has renewed its sponsorship of NBC-TV 
"Instant News Specials" for 1963 and will also sponsor "Projection 
'63," full-hour special forecast of world events, presented each year 
by NBC News, it was announced today by Carl Lindemann, Jr., Vice 
President, Special Projects, NBC. 

"Instant News Specials" make possible thorough and immediate 
sponsored coverage of national and international events hours after they 
occur. The number and length of the programs in the series is determined 
by the news as it breaks throughout the year. 

"Projection ’63," the sixth annual forecast of trends and 
developments in the coming year by NBC News domestic and foreign 
correspondents, will be broadcast in color on the NBC-TV Network 
Sunday, Jan. 6 , 10-11 p.m. EST. This will be the third consecutive 
year of "Projection" sponsorship by Gulf. 

NBC News correspondent Frank McGee is anchorman for the 
"Instant News Specials" series and moderator of "Projection ’63." Chet 
Hagan is producer of both. 

Correspondents for "Projection *63," who will discuss the 
particular problems their areas will face in 1963* will be announced. 

The Gulf order was placed through Young & Rubicam Inc. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 



















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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 1, 1962 

"PROJECTION '63," ANNUAL FULL-HOUR NBC NEWS FORECAST, 

WILL BE BROADCAST IN COLOR SUNDAY, JAN. 6 

__1 

"Projection *63.," the annual full-hour NBC News forecast of 
world events, will be presented in color Sunday, Jan. 6 , 10-11 p.m. EST, 
it was announced tocay by William R. McAndrew, Executive Vice President, 
NBC News. 

Gulf Oil Corporation, through Young & Rubicam Inc., purchased 
sponsorship of the "Projection" program for the third consecutive year. 

"Projection '63," the sixth annual forecast of trends and 
developments in the coming year, features NBC News domestic and foreign 
correspondents discussing the particular problems their areas will 
face in 1963. Correspondents who will participate in the program 
will be announced. 

NBC News correspondent Frank McGee is moderator of 
"Projection ’63." Chet Hagan is producer. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 









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NBC TRADE NEWS 


7A 


October 1, 1962 

A.E. STALEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY TRANSFERS BULK OF ITS 

NETWORK TV ADVERTISING TO NBC, BUYING INTO FIVE PROGRAMS 

A. E. Staley Manufacturing Company, Decatur, Ill,, has 
transferred the bulk of its network television advertising to NBC-TV, 
ordering sponsorship in five NBC-TV programs, it was announced today 
by James Hergen, Director of Daytime Sales, and William Storke, 
Director, Participating Sales, NBC-TV Network. 

The Staley order, one of the company’s most extensive during 
its nine years of network television advertising, is for participation 
in the "Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" and in four NBC-TV day¬ 
time programs: "The Merv Griffin Show," "Your First Impression," 
"Truth or Consequences," and "Loretta Young Theatre." 

The A. E. Staley order was placed through Erwin Wasey, 
Ruthrauff & Ryan, Inc., Chicago. 


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PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 











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from the national broadcasting company 

ihirts Horkejeller I'laza. \etc I ark 20. Y. 


October 1, 1962 

HOW NBC NEWS PROVIDED SWIFT, COMPREHENSIVE TV AND RADIO 
COVERAGE OF MISSISSIPPI INTEGRATION STORY OVER WEEKEND 

NBC News mobilized newsmen from New York, Chicago and New 
Orleans to converge on Mississippi over the weekend for rapid coverage 
of swift-breaking events on efforts to admit James H. Meredith, 29- 
year-old Negro, to the University of Mississippi. 

The results were three television specials Saturday and Sunday 
(Sept. 29 and 30), numerous bulletins on the NBC-TV and Radio networks 
and live reports on NBC Radio's "Monitor '62." 

Handling the three TV specials from New York was Frank McGee. 
The first was broadcast at 11:15 p.m. EDT Saturday. 

This was a 15-minute program that included live news summaries 
from William Ryan in Memphis, Kenneth Bernstein in Jackson, Miss., and 
Robert Goralski in Washington. 

Sunday, at 5^30 p.m. EDT NBC News presented the second TV 
special, a half-hour program with late reports from Ryan and Bernstein. 
McGee outlined steps the Federal Government would take. 

Films showed Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett appealing to 
the fans at the Mississippi-Kentucky football game Saturday night in 
Jackson. Other films showed the staging of Federal forces at Millington 
Naval Air Station outside Memphis. 

In Washington, NBC News correspondents Ray Scherer and Robert 
McCormick discussed the political reverberations of Governor Barnett's 
moves. 

(more) 


PretM Department. Houm .'120 


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in 2019 with funding from 
University of Maryland College Park 





https://archive.org/details/nbctraderelease1962nati_8 


2 - Mississippi 

At 8 p.ra. EDT Sunday, NBC News learned in Washington that a 
peaceful settlement to Meredith’s registration was "imminent." During 
an on-the-air telephone conversation between McGee in New York and 
correspondent Richard Valerian! on the "Ole Miss" campus, Valeriani 
spotted Federal marshals escorting the Negro onto the campus. 

At 10 p.m. EDT on Sunday, the NBC-TV and Radio networks 
carried live President Kennedy’s address to the nation on the 
Mississippi situation. Scherer summarized the President’s remarks at 
10:10 p.m. EDT. 

The Presidential talk delayed for 15 minutes the "Du Pont 
Show of the Week." When it concluded at 11:15 p.m., NBC News presented 
the third TV special of the weekend -- a 15-minute show that summarized 
late events. 

Throughout the weekend, NBC News interrupted both radio and 
television with bulletins on the Mississippi story. 

A small army of NBC News reporters, cameramen and technicians 
was assigned in and around Oxford, Miss. 

Frank Jordan, Manager, NBC News, Chicago, coordinated all 
reports out of' Oxford. Ke was assisted by Valeriani, NBC News’ 
correspondents out of Chicago, cameraman Earl Grotchett of Chicago, and 
James Harper of New York, who handled the TV tape. A mobile TV tape 
unit from WDSU in New Orleans was rushed to Oxford on Sunday. 

In Jackson, Miss., correspondent Kenneth Bernstein and 
cameraman Cal Marlin were on duty. Memphis was being covered by 
correspondent William Ryan, director Charles Sieg and cameraman 
Doug Downs. Leaving for the area early Monday (Oct. l) was reporter 
Robert Farson. 

(more) 



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FROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, A ew York 20, N. ). 


October 1, 1962 


Attention, Sports Editors 

NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFF CHANGES WORLD SERIES DATES 
NBC-TV AND RADIO COVERAGE TIMES LISTED 

The National League pennant playoff between the San Francisco 
Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers, being covered by NBC on TV and radio, 
changes the previously announced schedule for the World Series, also to 
be covered by NBC-TV (in color) and NBC Radio. 

The first coast-to-coast World Series in baseball history 
now will begin Thursday, Oct. 4, in the park of the National League 
pennant-winner — either San Francisco’s Candlestick Park or Los 
Angeles’ Dodger Stadium. The second game is scheduled for the same 
park on Friday, Oct. 5 . 

Games three, four and (if necessary) five will be played 
Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, Oct. 7 , 8 and 9* at Yankee Stadium, home 
of the American League champion New York Yankees. If the best-four- 
of-seven competition has not been decided after five games, play will 
shift back to the West Coast for the sixth game Thursday, Oct. 11. A 
seventh game would be played Friday, Oct. 12. 

The Series schedule calls for open dates for travel on Oct. 6, 
between games 2-3, and on Oct. 10, between games 5-6. 

TV and radio times for Series games in San Francisco would 
be 2:45 p.m. EDT (11:45 p.m. PDT), 15 minutes before game time. Air 
times for Los Angeles games would be 3:45 p.m. EDT (12:45 p.m. PDT). 

Air times for New York games will be 1:45 p.m. EDT on Sunday, Oct. 7 , 

and 12:45 p.m. EDT on Oct. 8 and 9. 

(more) 

Press Department, Room 320 


















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2 - Baseball 


The TV and radio commentators for the World Series will be 
announced soon. 


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Playoff Commentators Announced 
Bob Wolff on television, and A1 Heifer on radio, are the 
commentators for NBC’s dual coverage of the National League playoff. 
Wolff was one of the commentators for NBC-TV’s "Major League Baseball" 
games during the past season, and Heifer announced Houston Colts games. 

Air time for playoff games on TV is 4 p.m. EDT, a few minutes 
before game time (instead of 3:45 p.m. EDT, as previously planned). 
Radio air time is 3:45 p.m. EDT. 

The best two-of-three playoff series started Oct. 1 in 
Ca.ndlestick Park, San Francisco. The scene shifts to Los Angeles' 
Dodger Stadium for the second game Tuesday, Oct. 2 and the third 
game, if necessary, Wednesday, Oct. 3* 

NBC's exclusive TV and radio coverage is nationwide, except 
for the Los Angeles and San Francisco areas. 


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NBC-New York,10/1/62 





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NBC NEWS’ RUSSELL C. TORNABENE IS AMONG GROUP OF EXECUTIVES 
FROM U.S. TO VISIT RADIO FREE EUROPE’S FACILITIES 

Russell C. Tornabene, Manager, NBC News Operations In New 
York, will be among a group of U. S. business executives flying to 
Europe next month to make a first-hand study of the operations of 
Radio Free Europe in penetrating the Iron Curtain. 

The group will leave New York Oct. 12 for a 10-da.y tour of 
overseas facilities that beam a steady flow of free-nation information 
into the Communist satellite nations of Eastern Europe. 

The touring group will inspect facilities in Munich, Germany, 
where Radio Free Europe has its headquarters, and in Lisbon, Portugal, 
where a powerful short-wave transmitting station is located. They will 
also visit West Berlin for a look at the Communist Wall. 

Radio Free Europe is a private, non-profit, non-government 
enterprise founded in 1950. 




NBC-New York, 9/1/62 


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.JACK TRACY 
; ROOM 320 


2-X-H 


NHC TRADE NEWS 


October 2, 1962 


THERE’S A THIRD "NINE" IN NBC-TV COVERAGE OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFFS 
They Are the Advertisers Signed in 21-Hour Period Before First Game 


During the 21-hour period between the end of the Los Angeles- 


St. Louis game Sunday and the start of the Los Angeles-San Francisco 
playoff game Monday, nine advertisers purchased sponsorship in NBC-TV*s 
exclusive coverage of the National League playoff series, it was an¬ 
nounced today by Richard McHugh, Manager, Sports and Special Program 
Sales, NBC Television Network. 


The advertisers and their agencies are: 


Bristol-Myers Co. 


Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield 
Inc. 


Schick, Inc. 


Norman, Craig & Kummel Inc. 


Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. J. Walter Thompson 


Union Carbide Consumer 
Products Co. 


William Esty Co. Inc. 


Chesebrough-Pond's Inc. William Esty Co. Inc. 
Thomas Leeming & Co. William Esty Co. Inc. 


Sterling Drug, Inc. 


Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample Inc. 


P. Ballantine & Sons 


William Esty Co. Inc. 


Kemper Insurance Group 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






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NBC TELEVISION NKTWOHK NKWS 


October 2, 1962 

•REPORT ON MISSISSIPPI,' NBC NEWS TV SPECIAL MONDAY NIGHT INCLUDED 
EXCLUSIVE APPEARANCES BY ATTORNEY GENERAL KENNEDY AND GOV. BARNETT 

Two exclusive appearances, one by Attorney General Robert P. 
Kennedy and the other by Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett, were 
included in a special NBC News program, "Report on Mississippi," on 
the NBC-TV Network last night (Monday, Oct. 1, 7:30-8:30 p.m. EDT). 

Mr. Kennedy said in an interview with NBC News correspondent 
David Brinkley that the rioting on the campus of the University of 
Mississippi was due to the failure of Governor Barnett and other state 
officials to keep their word that they would maintain law and order. 

Governor Barnett said in a taped statement that the fatal 
rioting was the responsibility of "inexperienced, nervous and trigger- 
happy Federal marshals." He said that the only solution to the 
integration was for the Federal Government to remove James H. Meredith, 
a 29-year-old Negro student, from the university. 

NBC News correspondent Frank McGee was anchorman on the pro¬ 
gram, which was produced by Robert Northshield and Gerald Green. It 
included reports by correspondents Bill Ryan in Memphis, Kenneth 
Bernstein in Jackson (Miss.), and Ray Scherer and Robert McCormick in 
Washington. Other segments included an interview by correspondent 
Sander Vanocur with Ralph McGill, publisher of the Atlanta Constitution. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATION 


AL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 
































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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


October 2, 1962 


CREDITS FOR 'THE TONIGHT SHOW STARRING JOHNNY CARSON' 
NBC-TV Color Broadcast Series 


Time: 

NBC-TV color broadcasts, Monday 

through Fridays, 11:15 p.m. to 

1 a.m. NYT (started Monday, 

Oct. 1, 1962) 

Host: 

Johnny Carson 

Origination Point: 

Studio 6 b, RCA Building, New York 

Format: 

Comedy, music, interviews, and 

visiting guest stars each night 

Announcer: 

Ed McMahon 

Musical Director: 

Skitch Henderson 

Producer: 

Perry Cross 

Director: 

Dick Carson 

Assistant Producer: 

John Carsey 

Commercial Producer: 

Perry Massey 

Assistant Director: 

Stan Zapka 

Writers: 

Herb Sargent, Alen Robbin, 

Jim McGee 

Senior Unit Manager: 

Ed Fought 

Unit Manager: 

Doug Skene 

Senior Talent Coordinator: 

Sy Kasoff 

(more) 


PP£SS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20 . NEW YORK 












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2 - 1 The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 1 


Talent Coordinators: 

Assistant to Mr. Carson: 

Set Designer: 

Costumes: 

Technical Director: 

Lighting: 

Audio: 

Property Man: 

Production Assistant: 

Commercial Production Assistants: 
Floor Manager: 

Sponsors: 

NBC Press Representative: 


Shelly Schultz, Bruce Cooper, 
Shirley Wood 
Mike Zinella 
Frank Skinner 
Joe Mostelleer 
Ray Barrett 
Howard Sharrott 
Robert Bugg 
John Day 
Betty Bayer 

Sheila Reilly, Marilyn Roberts 

John Lynch 

Various 

Betty Lanigan (New York) 


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NBC-New York, 10/2/62 




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.JACK TRACY 
| ROOM 320 

FROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Thirty Rockefeller Pinza. Xeir York 20. N. Y. 

October 3* 1962 

SPEED AND COMPLETENESS MARKED NBC NEWS TV AND RADIO 
COVERAGE OF ASTRONAUT SCHIRRA«S ORBIT FLIGHT 

NBC-TV was the only television network today to provide 
continuous live coverage of the first orbit of the space flight of 
Commander Walter M. Schirra Jr. During the day, the network continued 
to present special coverage, including a half-hour program at 12 noon 
EDT and another at 3^30 p.m. EDT. 

NBC News began its television coverage at 7 a.m. EDT and 
continued it for three full hours, to report on preparations for the 
flight, the launching from Cape Canaveral and the problems of tempera¬ 
ture control encountered by Schirra, during his first orbit around the 
earth. The coverage was titled ’’American in Orbit: Stage III." 

New York ratings showed NBC-TV with a greater audience 
than both other TV networks combined during the hours 7-10 a.m. EDT. 

The New York Nielsen figures gave NBC an 8.9 rating and a 46 per cent 
share, CBS a 4.8 rating and a 25 per cent share, ABC a 1.7 rating and 
a 9 per cent share. The New York Arbitron results showed NBC with a 
10 rating and a 47 per cent share, CBS a 6.9 rating and a 33 per cent 
share, and ABC a 1 rating and a 5 per cent share. 

The NBC News coverage not only included comprehensive report¬ 
ing on all aspects of the flight, but exclusive live pickups from the 
home of Schirra*s parents in San Diego, Calif.; the high school the 
astronaut attended in Englewood, N. J., and the U. S. Weather Bureau 
center at Suitland, Md. 

(more) 



Prett Department, Room 320 







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2 - Orbit 


NBC News correspondent Frank McGee served as anchorman in 
New York and correspondent Merrill Mueller as anchorman in Canaveral. 

NBC News’ aerospace correspondent Roy Neal reported from the Cape on 
scientific and technical aspects of the flight. The programming was 
produced by Chet Hagan. It was sponsored by the Gulf Oil Corporation 
as part of the series of NBC Special News Reports. 

Between the special NBC News programs, the TV network 
interrupted regular programs with reports on developments in the flight, 
including bulletins at 11:03 a.m., 1:32 p.m. and 1:37 p.m. EDT. During 
regular programming, NBC News used a "traveling" news sign running 
across the bottom of the television screen to keep viewers informed 
of the progress of Schirra’s mission. 

At 2:25 p.m. EDT, NBC-TV carried the first message from 
space to be broadcast live. The voice was that of Schirra talking 
with astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. at the Port Arguello (Calif.) track¬ 
ing station. NBC News correspondent Merrill Mueller pointed out that 
previous transmissions from space have been taped before being 
broadcast. 

The special program at 12 noon EDT- included interviews with 
experts on important aspects of the equipment and preparations and 
reaction from London transmitted via Telstar. The Telstar coverage, 
taped in New York, presented Londoners being questioned on their 
opinions of the American space attempt. 

In the three-hour program that began the NBC News coverage, 

NBC News correspondent Elmer Peterson interviewed the astronaut’s 
parents, Mr . and Mrs. Walter Schirra Sr., outside their home in San 
Diego. Mrs. Schirra said that she had experienced a new surge of 
confidence during the past few days. 

(more) 



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3 - Orbit 


Correspondent Stephen Flanders reported from Dwight Morrow 
High School in Englewood, N. J., where students were watching the NBC 
coverage on a large screen in the school auditorium. Flanders inter¬ 
viewed a student and a teacher who had served as Schirra's faculty 
adviser when he attended the school. 

NBC meteorologist Frank Field reported from the U. S. Weather 
Bureau in Suitland, Md., outside Washington, on weather conditions 
in the recovery zones around the world. He held an audio interview 
with a U. S. Weather Bureau official in Hawaii on the progress of two 
tropical storms in the Pacific, where the space capsule was to return 
to earth. 

NBC News’ radio coverage of Astronaut Schirra’s orbit flight 
began at 7:05 a.m. EDT with correspondents Peter Hackes and Jay Barbree 
handling the story live from the Cape. 

The coverage continued into the afternoon with other reports 
from correspondents Herbert Kaplow aboard the USS Kearsarge (the 
carrier in the Pacific due to pick up Schirra), Elmer Peterson at the 
home of the astronaut’s parents in San Diego, Calif., Stephen Flanders 
at the high school the astronaut attended in Englewood, N. J.,; Bill 
Paine of KGU in Honolulu, Hawaii; Ray Scherer at the White House, and 
Dr. Frank Field at Weather Bureau Analysis at Suitland, Md. 

Reaction to the flight was also covered with a three-way 
radio hookup between correspondents at the Cape, Moscow and London. 

Ed Gough produced the radio coverage from the Cape and Bill 
Fitzgerald from New York. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/3/62 




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1 TRAVELING 1 NEWS SIGN AT BOTTOM OF TV SCREEN KEPT 

NBC NETWORK VIEWERS INFORMED ON ORBIT FLIGHT 

A "traveling" news sign running across the bottom of the TV 
screen was used exclusively by NBC News today (Oct. 3) to keep 
NBC-TV viewers informed of the progress of the orbit flight of 
Commander Walter M. Schirra Jr. throughout the day. 

The news sign was mounted in front of the desk used by NBC 
News correspondent Frank McGee in NBC-TV*s New York studios. It first 
went into operation shortly after astronaut Schirra was launched into 
orbit and was seen during NBC's live coverage of the event early in 
the morning. 

The moving sign was subsequently superimposed on the 
television screen during NBC-TV's regularly scheduled programs, which 
resumed at 10 a.m. EDT. 

The traveling news sign, developed by the Trans-Lux Corp., 
resembles the famous news sign on the Times Tower in New York’s Times 
Square. 

The sign used by NBC News is seven feet long, contains 840 
light bulbs and operates at 40 words a minute. News is printed on the 
screen within seconds after it is received by the operator. 

The operator, located in the NBC-TV studio, received the 
latest news of the Schirra flight as dictated by an NBC News writer. 
Using a tra.nsci'u.ber with a standard typewriter keyboard, the operator 
then punched holes in a paper tape. The tape was then fed into the 
"flashcaster" panel which translated holes into electronic impulses 
which triggered light in a pattern representing letters on the screen. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 10/3/62 


















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JSTHC TRADE NKWH 


October 3, 1962 

FIVE MORE ADVERTISERS BUY SPONSORSHIP IN NBC-TV’S EXCLUSIVE 
COVERAGE OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFF SERIES 

Five advertisers, In addition to the nine previously 
announced, purchased sponsorship in NBC-TV's exclusive coverage of the 
National League playoff series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the 
San Francisco Giants, it was announced today by Richard McHugh, 

Manager, Sports and Special Program Sa,les, NBC Television Network. 

The five advertisers (and their agencies) are: Noxzema 
Chemical Co. (Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield Inc.), Block Drug 
Co. (Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell and Bayles, Inc.), Dodge Division of 
Chrysler Corporation (Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn Inc.), Hills 
Brothers Coffee Inc. (N. W. Ayer & Son Inc.), and Hormel Meats (Batten, 

Barton, Durstine & Osborn Inc.). 

Advertisers (and their agencies) previously announced are: 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. (J. Walter Thompson) 


Bristol-Myers Co. 


Schick, Inc. 


(Doherty, Clifford, Steers & 
Shenfield Inc.) 

(Norman, Craig & Kummel Inc.) 


Union Carbide Consumer Products Co. (William Esty Co. Inc.) 


Chesebrough-Pond 1 s Inc. 
Thomas Leeming & Co. 


(William Esty Co. Inc.) 
(William Esty Co. Inc.) 


Sterling Drug, Inc. 


P. Ballantine & Sons 


. (Dancer -Fitzgerald-Sample Inc.) 
(William Esty Co. Inc.) 


Kemper Insurance Group 


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PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL 


BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 





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NBC TRADE NEWS 


October 3> 1962 

SPONSORS SWIFTLY SIGNED FOR NBC RADIO'S 
COVERAGE OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFF 

NBC Radio signed an advertiser for its coverage of the 
National League baseball playoffs just 55 minutes before airtime, when 
Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co., through Leo Burnett Company Inc., Chicago, 
purchased one-quarter sponsorship. 

It was I4 minutes before the opening game (Oct. 1), when a mess¬ 
enger delivered the Schlitz copy to Candlestick Park, San Francisco. 

For the second and third playoff games, additional sponsors 
joined Schlitz on a participation basis: E. I. duPont de Nemours & 
Company Inc., through Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn Inc..; Buick 
Motor Division, General Motors Corp., through McCa.nn-Erickson, Inc.; 
Chemical Compounds Inc. (S. T. P. motor oil), through Standart & O'Hern 
Adv. Agency Inc., Kansas City, Mo.; and Studebaker-Packard Corporation, 
through D'Arcy Advertising Company. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 30. NEW YORK 






■ 












NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 3, 1962 


— JULIE HARRIS TO STAR IN COLOR PRODUCTION OF 'PYGMALION'—, 

First TV Presentation of Shaw’s Play to Be Broadcast 
on NBC-TV’s "Hallmark Hall of Fame" 

Julie Harris will star as Liza Doolittle in the first tele¬ 
vision presentation of George Bernard Shaw's "Pygmalion," to be broad¬ 
cast in color on NBC-TV’s "Hallmark Hall of Fame" Wednesday, Feb. 6 , 

1963 (7:30-9 p.m. EST). 

"Pygmalion," most popular of the Irish playwright's works 
-- written in 1912 -- will be produced and directed by George Schaefer 
(for his Compass Productions Inc.) and adapted for television by Robert 
Hartung. This will be the fourth of Shaw's plays to be produced in the 
"Hallmark Hall of Fame" color series over NBC-TV. The others have been 
"The Devil's Disciple" (1955), "Man and Superman" (1956) and "Captain 
Brassbound's Conversion" (i 960 ). 

For Miss Harris, "Pygmalion" will mark her seventh performance 
on "Hallmark Hall of Fame." Last season she won an Emmy award for 
her portrayal of "Victoria Regina." She has also starred in "The Good 
Fairy," "The Lark," "Little Moon of Alban," "Johnny Belinda" and "A 
Doll's House." 

"Mss Harris has great versatility, " Schaefer said. "After 
completing her TV role as the stately Victoria last year, she delighted 
Broadway audiences as the saucy French maid of 'A Shot in the Dark.' 

She will make an ideal Liza." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 30. NEW YORK 




















































2 - ’Pygmalion* 

The TV premiere of "Pygmalion" will come almost 50 years after 
its first stage performance in Vienna (1913)* with Lilly Marberg as 
Liza. In 191^ Mrs. Patrick Campbell played the role in the English 
language production, first in London and then in New York. Later 
notable Broadway performances were given by Lynn Pontanne and Gertrude 
Lawrence. Shaw himself supervised a 1938 British motion picture version 
in which Wendy Hiller played opposite the late Leslie Howard. 

Shaw derived the title of "Pygmalion" from the Latin poet, 
Ovid, whose Pygmalion created a beautiful statue, Galatea, and then fell 
in love with it. Shaw’s Pygmalion is Henry Higgins, an arrogant 
professor of phonetics who attempts, on a wager, to make a fine lady of 
an ignorant flower girl. 

Additional casting and production details for "Pygmalion, " 
which will be an NBC-TV New York origination, will be announced. 
"Hallmark Hall of Fame" launches its 12th season on NBC-TV Friday, 

Oct. 26 (8:30-10 p.m. EDT) with a color production of "The Teahouse of 
the August Moon," starring John Forsythe, David Wayne, Miyoshi Umeki 
and Paul Ford. 

"Hallmark Hall of Fame" is sponsored by Hallmark Cards Inc. 
through Foote, Cone and Belding. 


NBC-New York, 10/3/62 







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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


CREDITS FOR SEASON'S PREMIERE OF "THE DINAH SHORE SHOW" IN COLOR 
A ONE-WOMAN PERFORMANCE, WHICH STARTS HER 12TH CONSECUTIVE 
YEAR ON THE NBC-TV NETWORK SUNDAY, OCT. 14 


Program: 

"The Dinah Shore Show" on NBC-TV Network 

Time and Date: 

Season's premiere Sunday, Oct. 14 (10 to 

11 p.m. EDT) -- the first of nine once- 

a-month color specials. 

Format: 

Dinah Shore's one-woman show, a full-hour 

concert of blues, ballads and spirituals, 

re-creating her highly praised night¬ 
club act at the Eden Roc in Miami Beach 

and the Riviera in Las Vegas. 

Starring: 

Dinah Shore 

Assisted by 

Frank De Vol's orchestra; Ticker Freeman 

at the piano; the Even Half Dozen (Joe 

Pryor, Mark Wilder, W. Earl Brown, Bill 

Brown, Dave O'Hern and Frank Howren) 

Executive Producer: 

Henry Jaffe 

Produced by 

George Schlatter 

Directed by: 

Dean Whitmore 

Written by: 

Mort Lachman 

Music Director: 

Frank De Vol 


Musical Numbers Staged by Nick Castle 


Musical Routines: 

Ticker Freeman 
(more) 


ESS DEPARTMENT NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW Y 


PR 


ORK 20. NEW YORK 











. 


























2 


•Dinah Shore Show’ 


Special Musical Material: 
Music Coordinator: 
Associate Producer: 

Unit Manager: 

Art Director: 

Costumes Designed by 
Makeup: 

Origination: 


NEC Press Representatives: 


W. Earl Brown 
Nat Farber 
Carolyn Raskin 
Sil Caranchini 
Robert Kelly 
Robert Carlton 
Claude Thompson 

Pre-taped before an audience June 11, 
1962 at NEC's Color City, Burbank, 
Calif. 

Bill Faith, Burbank, and A1 Cammann, New 

York. 

* * * 


PROGRAM 

Blues Medley: 

"St. Louis Blues," "Shs.ke, Rattle and Roll," "Blues In the 
Night," "Boogie Blues," "I Got a Man," "Let the Good Times Roll,” 

"Dinella Blues." 

"Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams" 

Hello, Young Lovers." 

Medley: "After You've Gone" and "Please Don't Talk About 

Me When I'm Gone." 

"Without Love." 

"Glory of Love." 

"Ain’t Down Yet." 

"Hi Lili Hi Lo." 

"I Get Along Without You Very Well." 

Spritiual Medley: "Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless 
Child," "Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho," "All God’s Children and 
"Ezekiel Saw the Wheel." -o. NBC-New York, 10/3/62 





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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza. A 'etc York 20, N. Y. 


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ROOM 320 

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2- 


October 4, 1962 


NBC NEWS SCORES WITH COVERAGE OP SCHIRRA ORBIT FLIGHT 
National Arbitron Shows More Than Half TV Audience Tuned to NBC; 

Comprehensive Programming on Space Peat Extended to Second Day 

More than half of the national television audience was 
attracted to NBC-TV, the only television network to provide continuous 
coverage during three critical hours of preparations, launching and 
first orbit of Astronaut Walter M. Schirra Jr., yesterday (Oct. 3). 

That more Americans were tuned to NBC than to both other TV 
networks combined was shown by National Arbitron reports. The figures 
showed that NBC had a 14 rating and a 54 per cent share of the audience, 
while CBS had an 8.1 rating and a 31 per cent share, and ABC a 2.8 
rating and an 11 per cent share. 

NBC-TV continued the coverage into the second day when it 
scheduled a special half-hour program today (Thursday, Oct. 4, 2 to 
2:30 p.m. EDT) to show first films of Schirra’s recovery in the Pacific 

after his six-orbit space mission. 

In all, NBC News presented more than five hours of special 
TV coverage under the title of "American in Orbit. NBC News 
correspondents participating in the coverage included Frank McGee, 
anchorman in New York, and Merrill Mueller and Roy Neal both in Cape 
Canaveral. The coverage was produced by Chet Hagan and sponsored by the 

Gulf Oil Corporation. 

Some highlights of the NBC News coverage: 

(more) 


Press Department, Room 320 


' 

■ 

' 

■ 

. 

■ 

■ 


2 - Orbit Flight 


The first voice transmission from space to be broadcast live 
was carried exclusively on the NBC-TV and Radio Networks. After 
Schirra's voice was heard live, Merrill Mueller pointed out that 
previous transmissions from space have been taped before broadcast. 

Exclusive live pickups from the home of the astronaut's 
parents in San Diego, from the high school he attended in Englewood, 
N.J., and from the U. S. Weather Bureau Center in Suitland, Md., were 
presented on NBC-TV . 

A "traveling" news sign running across the bottom of the 
television screen was used by NBC News to keep viewers informed of the 
progress of the flight during regular programming and coverage of the 
National League pennant playoff game. 

Among the Oct. 3 news specials were two half-hour programs, 
one at 12 noon EDT, and another at 3:30 p.m. EDT. A 13-minute summary 
of the day's space events was presented at 11:15 p.m. EDT. 

Coverage on the NBC Radio Network spanned more than 12 hours, 
from 7:05 a.m. to 7:15 p.m. EDT. Correspondents Peter Hackes and Jay 
Barbree reported the story live from Canaveral. Ed Gough produced the 
coverage from Canaveral and Bill Fitzgerald was producer in New York. 


NBC-New York, 10/4/62 



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NBC RADIO NETWORK NTKWS 


October 4, 1962 

PREMIERE 

'CHET HUNTLEY REPORTS' IS TITLE OF NEW NBC RADIO SERIES 
FEATURING THE NBC NEWS COMMENTATOR SUNDAYS 

Chet Huntley will begin a weekly NBC Radio Network program 
of commentary, interviews and pick-ups from newsmaking areas of the 
world Sunday, Oct. 14. 

Titled "Chet Huntley Reports," the 15-minute show will be 
heard each Sunday, at 6:15 p.m. NYT. It replaces "On the Line with 
Bob Considine, " which concludes Sunday, Oct. 7 . 

Huntley, with NBC News since 1955* currently apeears on 
NBC-TV Monday through Friday on the "Huntley-Brinkley Report," 

Tuesday night on "Chet Huntley Reporting," and on various "NBC White 
Papers" and special TV news programs. 

His NBC Radio assignments include "Emphasis" featues and 
"News-on-the-Hour" weekdays, and news analysis within the weekend 
"Monitor 62 " broadcasts. 




PR£SS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




















October 4, 1962 


SPONSOR PARTICIPATION IN NBC-TV COVERAGE OF NATIONAL LEAGUE 
PENNANT PLAYOFF REACHED SOLD-OUT STATUS BEFORE LAST GAME 


Advertiser participation in NBC-TV’s coverage of the 
National League pennant playoff, which built steadily as the three- 
game series progressed, reached a sold-out status before the final 
game yesterday (Oct. 3), it was announced today by Richard McHugh, 
Manager, Sports and Special Program Sales, NBC Television Network. 

The few remaining participations in the final game were 
purchased by Philip Morris Inc. (through Leo Burnett Co.), Miles 
Laboratories Inc. (Wade Advertising), Standard Brands Inc. (J. Walter 
Thompson Co.), Lewis-Howe Co. (McCann-Erickson Inc.) and Plymouth 
Division of Chrysler Corporation (N. W. Ayer & Son Inc.). 

As previously announced, other sponsors of NBC-TV's coverage 

of the playoff were: 

Liggett 8c Myers Tobacco Co. (J. Walter Thompson Co.), 
Bristol-Myers Co. (Doherty, Clifford, Steers Sc Shenfield Inc.), Schick 
Inc. (Norman, Craig & Kummel Inc.), Sterling Drug Inc. (Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample Inc.), Noxzema Chemical Co. (Doherty, Clifford Steers 
Sc Shenfield Inc.), Block Drug Co. (Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell and 
Bayles, Inc.), Dodge Division of Chrysler Corporation (Batten, Barton, 
Durstine Sc Osborn Inc.), Hills Brothers Coffee Inc. (N. W. Ayer Sc Son 
Inc.), Hormel Meats (Batten, Barton, Durstine 8c Osborn Inc.), and Union 
Carbide Consumer Products Co., Chesebrough-Pond*s Inc., Thomas Leeming 
Sc Co. and P. Ballantine Sc Sons (all through William Esty Co. Inc.), and 
Kemper Insurance Group. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL 


BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 30. NEW YORK 



>. 


NT3C TRADE NEWS 


October 4 , 1962 

SPONSORSHIP OP NBC RADIO'S COVERAGE OF NATIONAL LEAGUE PLAYOFF 
REACHED SOLD-OUT STATUS JUST BEFORE FINAL GAME 

Advertiser participation in NBC Radio's coverage of the 
National League baseball playoff, which built steadily as the three - 
game series progressed, reached a sold-out status shortly before the 
final game yesterday (Oct. 3 ). 

The few remaining participations in the final game were 
bought just before airtime by Aetna Casualty & Surety Co., through 
Remington Advertising Inc., Springfield, Mass.; and Whitehall 
Laboratories, Div. of American Home Products Corp. (Anacin), through 
Ted Bates & Company Inc. 

As previously announced, Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co., through 
Leo Burnett Company Inc., Chicago, was one-quarter sponsor of the entire 
series, and participating sponsors in the second and third games were: 
E.I. duPont de Nemours & Company Inc., through Batten, Barton, 

Durstine & Osborn Inc.; Buick Motor Division, General Motors Corp., 
through McCann-Erickson, Inc.; Chemical Compounds Inc. (S.T.P. motor 
oil), through Standart & O'Hern Adv. Agency Inc., Kansas City, Mo.; 
and Studebaker-Packard Corporation, through D'Arcy Advertising Company. 

-0- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 



























October 4, 1962 


‘MEET THE PRESS' TO MARK IRTH ANNIVERSARY ON NBC-TV 
WITH FIRST 1947 INTERVIEW GUEST: JAMES A. FARLEY 

"Meet the Press" will mark its 15th anniversary on the NBC 
Television Network Sunday, Nov. 11 with an interview with a guest who 
appeared on the first NEO-TV "Meet the Press" Nov. 6, 1947. 

The guest will be James A. Farley, former Postmaster General 
under President Roosevelt and one of the outstanding chairmen of the 
Democratic National Committee of this century. 

He was interviewed on the first televised "Meet the Press" 
in 1947 for his analysis of the election returns as he will be again 
on Nov. 11. 

After a decade-and-a-half on the air, "Meet the Press" is 
today the oldest regular network television series; it is broadcast live 
(with rare exception) and in color every Sunday at 6 p.m. NYT -- usually 
from the NBC-TV studios in Washington. 

Each Sunday, between five and 10 million Americans watch the 
program. It has been filmed and recorded for rebroadcast in many 
nations of the free world: England, Germany, Austria, Australia, 

Belgium and Mexico. The program is also broadcast on the NBC Radio 
Network every Sunday at 6:30 p.m. NYT. 

The program's format has remained simple and unchanged: a 
guest of national or international prominence is questioned by a panel 
of four newsmen. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









- !Oi • 












2 


’Meet the Press’ 


The reporters' questions and the guests’ answers have 
produced Monday-morning headlines week after week, year after year. 

Many of the program’s news scoops have become a part of our recorded 
history. 

Whittaker Chambers appeared on the program in 19^8 and, for 
the first time without the protection of Congressional immunity, 
called Alger Hiss a Communist. The charge initiated a chain of events 
which led to Hiss’ conviction for perjury. 

In 1950, Thomas Dewey, then titular head of the Republican 
Party, appeared on "Meet the Press" and revealed his support for 
Eisenhower for the Presidency. This news break was one of the biggest 
ever to come from a radio or television program. 

Adlai E. Stevenson was interviewed on the program in 1952 
and his appearance is credited with beginning the drive that ended in 
his nomination for President by the Democrats. His campaign strategist, 
Jacob Arvey, said, "Were it not for 'Meet the Press,’ Stevenson would 
never in my opinion have been considered as a candidate for the 
Presidency." 

Senator Walter George, then powerful chairman of the Foreign 
Relations Committee, called for a meeting of heads of state "at the 
summit," as he put it. His plea sparked a series of events that 
resulted in the famed 1955 "summit" conference. 

There was John Foster Dulles assuring a "Meet the Press" 
audience in 1950 with: "There are no Reds in the top ranks of the 
State Department." And in April of 19^9 on a "Meet the Press" program. 
General Walter Bedell Smith revealed that the Russians had the atom 


bomb. 


(more) 



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A list of "Meet the Press" guests reads like a page of current 
history: Jawaharlal Nehru, Fidel Castro, Richard M. Nixon, Joseph 
McCarthy, Robert Frost, Anastas Mlkoyan, Robert A. Taft, Willy Brandt, 
Konrad Adenauer, Robert F. Kennedy, Henry Cabot Lodge, Adlai E. 
Stevenson, Herbert Hoover, Everett M. Dirksen, John L. Lewis, Anthony 
Eden, Habib Bourguiba, Pierre Mendes-France, Madame Chiang Kai-Shek, 

Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, Ayub Khan, Lyndon B. Johnson, Edgar F. Kaiser, 
Carl Sandburg, Mike Mansfield, Robert S. Kerr, Nelson A. Rockefeller, 
James R. Hof fa, George Mea.ney, Dr. Jonas E. Salk, Barry Goldwater, 

George Romney, Robert H. Welch Jr., and Dr. Paul Dudley White. 

President Kennedy appeared on the program eight times before 
his election. 

The guest list includes Republicans and Democrats, liberals 
and conservatives, spokesmen for labor and industry, segregationists 
and anti-segregationists, diplomats, heads of state, military leaders 
and philanthropists. 

All have had a common denominator: they were all "in the 
news" at the time they appeared on the program. 

"We recognized from the first that our job was to inform and 
one of the necessary elements for a successful program was a guest 
important in the news, the right time for him and challenging questions 
by an informed, responsible and fair panel of reporters. We have 

never varied from that formula." 

This is the comment of Lawrence E. Spivak, who started the 
program on radio in 1945 with Martha Rountree. In 1953, he purchased 
her interest and has remained producer and regular panelist ever 
since. In 1955, he sold the program to NBC and continued as producer 

and panelist under a long-term contract. 

(more) 



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4 - 'Meet the Press' 


"What a. man says often is less important than how he says 
it, how he looks when he says it," Spiva.k says. "Each of our tele¬ 
cast press conferences has a single purpose: it seeks to contribute 
some additional understanding to our view about a man or an issue 
with which he is concerned." 

During the past 15 years, "Meet the Press" has retained the 
admiration and respect of both its listening audience and the more 
than 500 guests who have appeared on the program. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/4/62 




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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


October 4, 1962 

-’UPDATE,* WITH NEW FORMAT, STARTS SECOND SEASON OCT. 14- 

Robert Abernethy Continues as On-the-Air Editor 
of NBC-TV Weekly News Program for Teenagers 

J_____ - I 

"Update," NBC-TV’s weekly news program produced especially for 
teenagers, returns for its second season Sunday, Oct. 14 (5-5=30 p.m. 
EDT) with a new streamlined format. 

Robert Abernethy, 34, NBC News Washington correspondent, 
continues as the program’s on-the-a.ir editor. 

As described by William P. Wilson, the series’ new producer, 
each "Update" program will consist of three "filmed essays on current 
happenings in the world, particularly as they relate to the individual." 
Two of the "essays will present a new treatment of important news 
stories," Wilson said. The third will be a feature story. Abernethy 
will narrate each one. 

Each program will open with a "lead story." This will be a 
detailed film report on a major news story, presenting its background, 
the reasons why it is important and what it means to the individual 
viewer. 

The next segment will be the expanded feature story. The 
subjects being considered vary from loneliness in a big city to a 
Hudson River cruise of a boat crammed with folk singers and their 
followers, from touch football to the life of Spanish gypsies. Magnum 
Photos, whose staff includes such noted photographers as Henri Cartier- 
Bresson, Cornell Capa and Ernst Haas, will be among the sources called 
upon to film these features. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 























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An "update" story on an important news event that might have 
been covered previously on the program and which is still making news 
will complete each "Update" broadcast. 

"Update" is a presentation of NBC News and Public Affairs and 
will originate from New York. George A. Heinemann, Manager of NBC 
Public Affairs, is executive producer. 

Wilson last season produced "The Vanishing 400" and "Debutante 
>62," two full-hour NBC News specials on society in America. Before 
joining NBC News, he was executive producer for all of President 
Kennedy's pre-election television programs. 

Don McDonough continues as director of "Update." Feature 
story editor will be Robert Goldman whose TV credits include the 
writing of two "Theatre ’62" NBC specials, producing "The Seven Lively 
Arts" series and serving as associate producer of "Playhouse 90." He 
was also co-author of the books and lyrics for the 1959 Broadway 
musical "First Impressions." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/4/62 




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CREDITS FOR 'UPDATE' ON NBC-TV 

1 - -1 

NBC-TV Network, Sundays (5-5:30 p.m. NYT). 


Second season starts Oct. 14 , 1962 
On-the-air Editor: Robert Abernethy, NBC News' Washington 

correspondent. 

Original Starting Date: Sept. 16, 1961 . 


Format: 

A weekly television news program produced 

by NBC News and Public Affairs 

especially for junior and senior 

high school students. The program 

accents the "how" and "why" of major 

news events to give students a clear 

understanding of national and inter¬ 
national affairs. In the series' 

new format, each program consists 

of three filmed "essays": the lead 

story, a detailed report on a major 

news story ; a feature story, a light 

report on an interesting aspect of 

life today; and the "update" story 

on an important news event which 

might have been covered previously 

but which is still making news. 


Executive Producer: George A. Heinemann 


Producer: 

William P. Wilson 

Director: 

Don McDonough 

Feature Story 

Editor: Robert Goldman 

Unit Manager: 

Hugh Branigan 

Origination: 

NBC-TV's New York studios 


NBC Press Representative: Stan Appenzeller 

_o- NBC-New York, 10/4/62 










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CREDITS FOR WORLD SERIES COVERAGE ON NBC-TV (IN COLOR) 

AND NBC RADIO NETWORKS 


Summary: 


Schedule : 


Air Times: 


TV Commentators: 
Radio Commentators: 


NBC-TV and Radio coverage of all games of 
1962 World Series between San Francisco 
Giants and New York Yankees (starting 
Thursday, Oct. 4, at Candlestick Park, 
San Francisco). All games will be tele¬ 
vised in color. Five color TV cameras 
will be used for games in both San 
Francisco and New York. This is 16th 
straight year that NBC-TV has televised 
the World Series and fourth consecutive 
year for full color coverage. It is the 
sixth straight year that NBC Radio is 
broadcasting the Series. 

Games 1 and 2 at Candlestick Park, San 
Francisco, on Oct. 4 and 5• 

Games 3, 4 and (if necessary) 5 at Yankee 
Stadium, New York, on Oct. 7» 8 and 9* 
Games 6 and 7 (if necessary) in San 
Francisco on Oct. 11 and 12. 

2:45 p.m. EDT (11:45 a.m. PDT) for San 
Francisco games. New York games at 
1:45 p.m. EDT on Sunday, Oct. 7, and 
12:45 p.m. EDT on Oct. 8 and 9. All air 
times are 15 minutes before game time. 
Mel Allen and Russ Hodges. 

Joe Garagiola and George Kell. 


(more) 







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2 - Credits for World Series Coverage 


TV Producer: 

Perry Smith. 

TV Director: 

Harry Coyle. 

Radio Producers: 

Hal Ashby (for San Francisco games) and 

Len Dillon (for New York games). 

Sponsors (and Agencies): 

Chrysler Corporation (Leo Burnett 

Company Inc.) and Gillette Safety Razor 

Company (Maxon Inc.) 

NBC Press representative: 

Bob Goldwater (New York). 


_ 0 _ 


NBC-New York, 10/4/62 





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CREDITS FOR 1 WORLD SERIES SPOTLIGHT 1 ON NBC-TV 


Host: 

Bob Wolff. 

Format: 

15-minute color show on NBC-TV preceding 

each game of World Series, with baseball 

personalities as guests to give their 

views on the game coming up. Filmed 

highlights of the game the day before 

will be shown after the first day. 

Time: 

2:30 p.m. EDT for games in San Francisco; 

1:30 p.m. EDT for Oct. 7 game in New 

York, and 12:30 p.m. EDT for Oct. 8 and 

9 games in New York. 

Origination: 

Taped each morning of a Series game in 

city where that day's game is being 

played. 

Packager: 

Tel Ra. Productions. 

Producer: 

Dan Wise. 

Director: 

Conley Benfield. 

Writers: 

Ron Kentrus and Jon Hilson. 

Sponsors (and Agencies): 

General Mills Inc. (Knox Reeves Advertis¬ 
ing Inc.) and American Tobacco Company 

(Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles 

Inc.). 


- 0 - 

NBC-New York, 10/4/62 







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LIBRARY OP CONGRESS TO GET PRINT OF 1 ORDEAL OP WOODROW WILSON’ 


The Library of Congress is acquiring a print of the NBC 
Special Projects production of "The Ordeal of Woodrow Wilson -- 
A Personal Memoir by Herbert Hoover" for its permanent film 
archives in Washington, D. C. At Mr. Hoover *3 request, the NBC 
unit also is giving a print to the Herbert Hoover Presidential 
Library at West Branch, Iowa. The program was broadcast on NBC- 
TV Sept. 25. 


-o- 

DR. THOMAS E. COFFIN DISCUSSES ’BASIC MEDIA RESEARCH’ 

Dr. Thomas E. Coffin, Director of Research, National 
Broadcasting Company, today (Oct. 4) addressed the Chicago 
chapter of the American Marketing Association at a luncheon- 
seminar in that city. His topic was "Basic Media Research: 
Failure and Promise." 


o 


NBC-New York, 10/4/62 





























CAST AND CREDITS FOR 'THE BETRAYAL,' DRAMA IN COLOR 
ON 'DU PONT SHOW OF THE WEEK' SUNDAY, OCT. 21 


Title: 

"The Betrayal" on "Du Pont Show of the Week" 

Date and time: 

NBC-TV color broadcast Sunday, Oct. 21 

(10 to 11 p.m. EDT). 

Starring: 

Maureen Stapleton, Margaret O'Brien, Burt 

Brinckerhoff, John Abbott and Blanche 

Yurka 

Special guest star: 

Franchot Tone 

Produced by 

Lewis Freedman 

Director: 

Jack Smight 

Written by 

Ernest Pendrell 

Based on 

A novel, "Under Western Eyes," by Joseph 

Conrad 

Associate producer: 

Jim Ambandos 

Unit manager: 

Budd Wilds 

Production associate: 

Wendy Sanford 

Scenic designer: 

Robert Wightman 

Costumes by 

John Boxer 

Make-up: 

Robert Phillippe 

Music selection: 

Phebe Haas 

Graphic arts: 

Stas Pyka. 

Lighting: 

Alan Posage 

Video: 

Mahlon Fox 

Stage ma.na.gers: 

Sam Kirshman and Fred Lights 

* * * 

Origination: 

NBC Color Studios, Brooklyn, N. Y., on 

color tape 

(more) 











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2 - Credits for ’The Betrayal 1 


Sponsor: The Du Pont Company 

Agency: Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn Inc. 

NBC Press representatives: Charlie Gregg, New York, and Bill Kiley, 

Burbank 
* * * 


THE CAST 

The Inspector.Franchot Tone 

Prof. Gretchen Thaelman.Maureen Stapleton 

Elsa Thaelman.Margaret O’Brien 

Carl Richter.Burt Brinckerhoff 

The General.John Abbott 

The Landlady.Blanche Yurka 

Richard Thaelman.John Alderman 

Huberman..Bruce Glover 


Muller. 

The Cafe Boy. 

The Colonel. 

The Cafe Girl. 

* * * 


Brandon Maggert 
Alan Alda 
Otto Simanek 
Carol Gustafson 


THE STORY 

In contemporary East Berlin, a colonel (Otto Simanek) of the 
East German Peoples Police is assassinated by Richard Thaelman (John 
Alderman). Thaelman flees to the apartment of a young non-political 
student, Carl Richter (Burt Brinckerhoff), who believes that "...what 
all men are really after is some form or perhaps some formula, of peace. 
Under threat of torture and death, Richter must choose between betray¬ 
ing Thaelman, the young underground hero, who has exploded his private 
and secure world — or protecting him, at the risk of his own life. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 10/4/62 


















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'ROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 
' hirl\ Rockefeller Plaza. Xew York 20, ;V. )". 

MARION STEPHENSON ELECTED FIRST WOMAN VICE PRESIDENT IN NBC HISTORY 
Her Post Is Vice President, Administration, NBC Radio Network 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, A.M., OCT. 8 

Miss Marion Stephenson has been elected the first woman 
Vice President in the history of the National Broadcasting Company, 
it was announced today by Robert W. Sarnoff, Chairman of the Board of 
NBC. Miss Stephenson was elected Vice President, Administration, NBC 
Radio Network. 

In her new post. Miss Stephenson will have reporting to her 
NBC Radio Network’s business affairs activities, headed by Herbert 
Brotz, Director, and Sales Service and Traffic, headed by Ludwig Simmel, 
Manager. 

Miss Stephenson has been Director of Business Affairs for the 
NBC Radio Network since 1959. She came to NBC in 1944 as a budget 
clerk in the advertising and promotion department. After serving in 
the NBC Radio Network comptroller’s department, she became budget 
manager of the network in 1954. Two years later she was named senior 
operations analyst in the staff budget financial evaluation department. 
Before coming to NBC, Miss Stephenson was on the accounting staff of 
Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. 

She was graduated from Antioch College in 1943 and earned a 
master’s degree in 1948 from New York University School of Business, 
where she received the Marcus-Nadler Award for excellence in finance. 
She lives in Bronxville, N. Y. 


Prett Department, Room 320 


JACK TRACY 
i ROOM 320 

I i s - 
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NIHC: TELEVISION 


NETWORK NEWS 


SEASON’S PREMIERE 


EUROPEAN COMMON MARKET AND ROME’S ECUMENICAL COUNCIL AMONG TOPICS 
AS "THIS IS NBC NEWS" STARTS ITS NEW SEASON SUNDAY, OCT. 14 

The European Common Market, the opening of the Ecumenical 
Council, and a "human management room" where Japanese workers can "let 
off steam," will be the subjects of film reports by NBC News correspond¬ 
ents on "This Is NBC News" Sunday, Oct. 14 (4:30-5 p.m. EDT), when the 
weekly news program begins its 1962-63 season. 

Ray Scherer, NBC News White House correspondent, continues 
as host of the program, which each week will present film reports and 
features by NBC News correspondents around the world. Scherer will open 
each program with a rundown of the latest news. 

With representatives of the six Common Market nations 
negotiating in Brussels with England and other countries over membership 
in the market, "This Is NBC News" will present a film report from that 
Belgian city by NBC News’ Bernard Frizell. In addition, Joseph C. 
Harsch, NBC News’ Senior European correspondent, will report from 
England on the opposition by the Labor Party and other groups to that 
country’s entry into the Common Market. 

From Rome, NBC News’ Irving R. Levine will report on the 
Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church, which opens in the 
Vatican on Oct. 11. The council is to bring together in Rome the entire 
hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church. Protestant reaction to the 
council’s discussions will be reported by NBC News’ Robert Croon in 
Geneva, who will interview officials of the World Council of Churches 
at the group’s headquarters. (more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 

























■ 

' 

■ 

. 





2 


'This Is NBC News' 


In a humerous feature, NBC News' correspondent John Rich will 
report on a "human management room" recently opened by a large Tokyo 
manufacturing plant where employees can relax and let off steam. Among 
such usual equipment as vibrating chairs and a putting range, the room 
also contains punching bags and dummies (which look like the boss) 
that the employees can punch and hit. 

"This Is NBC News" will originate from NBC News' Washington 

studios. 

William B. Monroe Jr., Director of NBC News in Washington, 
is executive producer of the program. Robert Asman is the producer and 
Ralph Peterson the director. 

NBC-New York, 10/5/62 



- . 


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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


SEASON'S PREMIERE 

'UPDATE' TO REPORT ON GROWTH OF DEMOCRACY, ELECTIONEERING, 

DIVIDED BERLIN AND AN AMERICAN DANCER IN RUSSIA 

Electioneering and the growth of representative democracy, a 
feature on a teenage American girl who has grown up in Russia, and a 
background story on divided Berlin will be the subjects for the first 
"Update" program of the new season Sunday, Oct. 14 (5-5:30 p.m. EDT). 

Robert Abernethy, NBC News Washington correspondent, is on- 
the-air editor of "Update," a weekly news program for teenagers. 

With the 1962 elections less than a month away, "Update's" 
lead story will be on the growth of representative democracy from 
ancient Greek times to the present. Abernethy will examine democracy's 
continuous advance, even in recent times, with women suffrage and 
current re-apportionment. 

Some of the "extra" things candidates do while campaigning 
-- such as kissing babies, shaking hands with almost everyone, every¬ 
where, and eating varied foods in varied places -- will also be covered. 

Anastasia Stevens, 19, the first American girl to dance with 
the Bolshoi Ballet in Moscow, will be the subject of the week's filmed 
feature story. Anastasia is the daughter of an American correspondent 
in Moscow. Though she was born in the United States, she has spent 
most of her life in Russia. Some of her typical activities in the 
Russian capital will be shown. 

The Berlin situation will be examined in the "update" section 

of the program. Abernethy will explain how the city came to be divided 

after World War II, the trouble which led to the building of the Berlin 

Wall and its aftermath, and what the city means to all Americans. 

-o- NBC-New York, 10/5/62 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 





. 


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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

October 5 a 19o2 

14 CANDIDATES IN STATE GOVERNOR AND U.S. SENATE RACES 
WILL APPEAR ON »TODAY’ FOR SEPARATE TALKS ON ISSUES 

The gubernatorial candidates in the California, Michigan, 

Texas and Pennsylvania races and the candidates for U. S. Senate 
in Connecticut, Kentucky and Colorado will appear on NBC-TV's "Today" 
in its series of special pre-election reports on campaigns of national 
interest. 

The 14 candidates will discuss the major issues in their 
campaigns in separate interviews with NBC News Washington correspondent 
Martin Agronsky at the studios of the NBC-TV affiliate in their 
respective states. 

In addition, the New York gubernatorial and Massachusetts 
senatorial contests will be covered on "Today" with films of the 
candidates as they present the issues in the course of their campaign¬ 
ing. Agronsky will also be on hand to discuss these campaigns. 

Agronsky will conclude each report with the predictions of 
the local political experts as to the outcome of the contest. 

The series of special reports will be presented during the 
7:30-8 a.m. NYT segment of "Today" (Monday through Friday, 7-9 a.m. 

NYT) starting Oct. 15. 

Following are the candidates and the dates on which they 
will be seen on "Today": 

Monday, Oct. 15 -- Texas gubernatorial candidates John B. 
Connally (D.) and Jack Cox (R.). 

Wednesday, Oct. 17 -- Kentucky senatorial candidates Thruston 
B. Morton (R.), the incumbent, and Wilson Wyatt (D.). 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 





















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t, ' 











2 - 1 Today 1 


Friday, Oct. 19 -- Michigan gubernatorial candidates John B. 
Swainson (D.) the incumbent, and George B. Romney (R.). 

Tuesday, Oct. 23 -- Colorado senatorial candidates John A. 
Carroll (D.), the incumbent, and Congressman Peter H. Dominick (R.). 

Wednesday, Oct. 24 -- Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidates 
Richard Dilworth (D.) and Congressman William W. Scranton (R.). 

Friday, Oct. 26 -- Connecticut senatorial candidates Abraham 
Ribicoff (D.) and Horace Seely-Brown Jr. (R.). 

Monday, Oct. 29 -- Film reports on New York gubernatorial 
candidates Nelson A. Rockefeller (R.), the incumbent, and Robert M. 
Morgenthau (D.). 

Wednesday, Oct. 31 -- Film reports on Massachusetts senatorial 
candidates Edward M. Kennedy (D.) and George Cabot Lodge (R.). 

Friday, Nov. 2 -- California gubernatorial candidates 
Edmund G. (Pat) Brown (D.), the incumbent, and former Vice President 
Richard M. Nixon (R.). 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/5/62 











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NHC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 


October 5> 1962 

LINCOLN GORDON, UNITED STATES AMBASSADOR TO BRAZIL, IS GUEST PANELIST 
ON HIS MOTHER'S NBC RADIO SERIES: "THE DOROTHY GORDON YOUTH FORUM” 

Lincoln Gordon, United States ambassador to Brazil, is 
guest panelist on his mother's NBC Radio series -- the "Dorothy 
Gordon Youth Forum" -- Sunday, Oct. 14 (network except WNBC, 2:05 p.m. 
EDT; WNBC only, 10:35 a.m. EDT). 

He joins a group of Brazilian students in discussion of 
"Latin America and the Alliance for Progress." The program was 
tape-recorded in Rio de Janeiro. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 30. NEW YORK 

























NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 5> 1962 

DINAH SHORE STARTS 3-WEEK ENGAGEMENT 
AT LAS VEGAS' RIVIERA, SPOT THAT 
INSPIRED HER 'ONE-WOMAN' TV SHOW 

Dinah Shore, whose one-woman performance will be presented 
as the 1962-63 premiere color broadcast of NBC-TV's "The Dinah Shore 
Show" Sunday, Oct. 14 (10-11 p.m. EDT), opened a three-week engagement 
at the Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas today (Oct. 5.)* 

It was at the Riviera earlier this year (March 23) that Dinah 
made her first solo nightclub appearance. Enthusiastic critical 
notices influenced her decision to re-create the show for her TV 
audience. One June 6 she returned to the Riviera for a single night to 
stage her final "rehearsal" for the NBC-TV special she taped several 
days later. 

When Dinah returns to Burbank from Las Vegas at the end of 
October, she will begin rehearsals immediately for her second special 
of the season. Guests will be announced. She will present nine once- 
a-month full-hour programs from October through May under the full 
sponsorship of S&H Green Stamps. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKE F 


LLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 




1 



















October 5, 1962 


--— 

•TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES, f STUNT SHOW WITH ACCENT ON COMEDY, 

NOW IN ITS NINTH SEASON ON NBC-TV NETWORK 

"Truth or Consequences," the fun-filled stunt show with the 
comic questions, the farcical penalties for incorrect answers and a 
quick-witted emcee named Bob Barker, is now in its ninth season on 
NBC-TV (Monday through Friday, 12:30-12:55 p.m. EDT). 

The "consequences" on this audience-participation show range 
from relatively simple parlor game forfeits to elaborate stunts. A 
young lady from the studio audience might be required to dance blind¬ 
folded with three different partners, then attempt to describe each one. 
Or a couple might be whisked off on a motorscotter trip across the 
United States. 

Contestants perhaps find their dignity in momentary jeopardy 
at times, but the penalties they are asked to perform are accepted in 
the spirit of good fun and they are rewarded with valuable prizes. Over 
the years the more than 5*000 pranks, gag-stunts and forfeits have 
brought extensive newspaper, magazine and public attention to this long- 
running show. 

"Truth or Consequences" started as a radio show on NBC 
Aug. 17, 1940, with Ralph Edwards as master of ceremonies. On May 18, 
1954, after enjoying 14 popular years on radio, the program bowed on 
NBC-TV in prime time. Jack Bailey took over as emcee during the 1955-56 
season. On Dec. 31, 1956, the show became a Monday-through-Friday day¬ 
time feature on NBC-TV with handsome Bob Barker as host. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 












. 

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■ . 








2 - 'Truth or Consequences 1 


"T or C" is the only TV and radio program with a city named 
after it. In an unusual tribute to the show’s creator, Ralph Edwards, 
and to the popularity and influence of the program, the town of Hot 
Springs, N. M., in 1950 voted to change its name officially to Truth- 
or Consequences. Each year since then, Edwards and the "T or C" 
production staff have returned to the town for the annual Ralph Edwards 
Fiesta. 

With its flexible format, a. typical "Truth or Consequences" 
program may include a sentimental reunion, a zany stunt and a glamorous 
guest star. (Top personalities appear occasionally and participate in 
the stunts.) 

Contestants are chosen by Barker in a. warm-up before the 
show. The questions usually are wacky riddles with a funny connota¬ 
tion. Typical of those created by the "T or C" staff: 

What is a bulldozer? (A sleepy bull). 

What did Eli Whitney say to his wife? (Get your cotton- 
pickin' fingers out of my gin). 

Is it any wonder that so many contestants have to "pay the 
consequences?" (While winning big prizes, too). 


NBC-New York, 10/5/62 



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CREDITS FOR 

'TRUTH OR CONSEQUENCES' ON NBC-TV 

Program: 

"Truth or Consequences" 

Date and Time: 

NBC-TV, Monday-through-Friday (12:30 to 

12:55 p.m. NYT) 

Format: 

Audience-participation show with comedy- 

stunt "consequences." 

Background: 

This pioneer audience-participation show 

began on NBC Radio Network Aug. 17, 

1940. Ralph Edwards was emcee for 

14 years on radio and one year on TV 

Premiered on NBC-TV Network May 18, 

1954. 

Star-Emcee: 

Bob Barker 

Executive Producer: 

Ralph Edwards 

Producer: 

Edwin Bailey 

Associate Producers: 

Charles Lyon and Dresser Dahlstead 

Director: 

Bob Lehman 

Asst, to Edwin Bailey: 

Barbara Fleming 

Script Supervisor: 

Marilyn Hohmann 

Unit Manager: 

William S. Palmerston 

Announcer: 

Charles Lyon 

Music Director: 

Don Isham 

Production: 

A Ralph Edwards Production 

Origination: 

NBC-TV Studios, Burbank 

Sponsors: 

Various 


NBC Press representatives: Jane Ober, Burbank; Alan Patureau, 

New York 
-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/5/62 










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2-X- H ]STBC TRADE NEWS 

GEORGIA FACIFIC PLYWOOD, IN FIRST NETWORK TV BUY, PURCHASES WEEKLY 
PARTICIPATION IN NBC-TV'S SPORTS INTERNATIONAL WITH BUD PALMER," 

AND ONE-FOURTH SPONSORSHIP OF SUGAR AND SENIOR BOWL GAME COVERAGE 

Georgia Pacific Plywood Corporation, Portland, Ore., making 
its first network television buy, purchased weekly participation in 
NBC-TV's "Sports International with Bud Palmer" and cne-quarter sponsor¬ 
ship of NBC-TV's coverage of the Sugar Bowl and Senior Bowl football 
games, it was announced today by Richard McHugh, Manager, Sports and 
Special Program Sales, NBC Television Network. 

"Sports International with Bud Palmer," a 90-minute sports 
variety series in color, will present out-of-the-ordinary championship 
sports events from sports capitals of the world. The program will be 
broadcast on the NBC-TV Network Saturday, 3:30-5 p.m. NYT, starting 
Jan. 12, 1963. 

NBC-TV* s coverage of the Sugar Bowl football game on New 
Year's Day in New Orleans will begin at 1:45 p.m. NYT. The Senior 
Bowl Game coverage begins at 2 p.m. NYT, Saturday, Jan. 5, in Mobile, 

Ala. 

Robert 0. Lee, Georgia Pacific's public relations and 
advertising director, said "television's ability to present our pro¬ 
ducts and their uses in color and action to the potential consumer in 
the comfort of his home has interested us for some time. We have been 
awaiting the chance to secure a series of programs which have a sparkle 
and news interest...Now we have been able to purchase a group of shows 

which meet the standard we had set up.’ 

The Georgia Pacif ic order was placed through McCann-Erickson, 
Tnr -o- NBC-New York, 10/8/62 


DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 



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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 8, 1962 

TEACHER’S GUIDES FOR CLASSROOM PROJECTS RELATING TO NBC-TV'S 
"EXPLORING," EDUCATIONAL SERIES FOR CHILDREN, ARE MAILED 
TO PRINCIPALS OF 70,000 ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS IN U.S. 

Teacher's Guides suggesting classroom projects relating to 
the material presented on NBC-TV's "Exploring," the new educational 
series for children five to 11 years old, have been mailed to the 
principals of 70,000 elementary schools -- a vast majority of the 
public, parochial and private schools in the United States. 

Upon request, NBC will furnish the schools with any desired 

quantity of these helpful teaching aids. 

"Exploring" will be broadcast in color on Saturdays from 

12:30 to 1:30 p.m. NYT, beginning Oct. 13. The program is designed to 
stimulate the young viewers' interest in five major areas of learning: 
language, music, mathematics, social studies and science. 

The Guides will be mailed well in advance of the air dates, 
so that teachers will have ample opportunity to plan coordinated 
activities. The first Guide covers the Oct. 13 premiere program and 
the second program on Oct. 20. The second Guide and most of the 

following ones will cover three programs. 

The Guides are being prepared by a professional educator 
under supervision of Craig Fisher, producer of "Exploring," and Edward 

Stanley, Director of Public Affairs, NBC News. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 



















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A Guide will cover each segment of each television program, 
setting forth the topic and the aim of that segment, presenting a 
synopsis of its material, giving before-viewing and after-viewing 
teaching suggestions, listing suggested activities, and including a 
bibliography of reference books. 

For example, in the mathematics section of the Guide for 
the Oct. 20 program, the topic is the history of numbers and the aim 
is: "To show how and why men first began to write numbers. To show 
how and why we use a base of 10." The synopsis is: "Animation tells 
the history of numbers from primitive times, and discusses Babylonian 
and Arab systems, as well as the numbers we use today." 

The paragraphs containing teaching suggestions before 
viewing and after viewing ask such questions as "When did men first 
discover they needed to keep a record of things they counted?" and 
"How did the Romans improve upon the Egyptians' numbers?" Each question 
is followed by its answer. 

Suggested activities include making a notching stick 
calendar and keeping a record of the month's days on it, making a paper 
plate clock and putting Roman numerals on it, and starting a scrap¬ 
book of pictures of things that were first invented long ago. 

In some cases, different activities are suggested for early 
grades and intermediate grades. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 10/8/62 




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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 8, 1962 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS, GREER GARSON AND LOIS NETTLETON TO STAR 
IN ’THE SHADOWED AFFAIR,’ ORIGINAL LOVE STORY IN COLOR 
ON ’DU PONT SHOW OF THE WEEK' SUNDAY, NOV. 4 

Douglas Fairbanks, Greer Garson and Lois Nettleton will star 
in "The Shadowed Affair" -- an original Michael Dyne love story set 
against a strange and gripping background -- to be broadcast in color 
Sunday, Nov. 4 (10-11 p.m. EST) on NBC-TV's "Du Pont Show of the Week." 

"The Shadowed Affair" will be directed by Fielder Cook (for 
his Directors Company) and produced by Jacqueline Babbin, with Jan 
Scott as scenic designer and Robert Hopkins as associate director. 

The broadcast will be color taped Oct. 17 in NBC’s Brooklyn, N. Y., 
color studios. 

The focal characters of "The Shadowed Affair" are a seques¬ 
tered Nobel Prize-winning novelist, Hans Harben (Fairbanks); a young 
magazine reporter, Jennifer Graham (Miss Nettleton), who comes to 
interview him, and Juliette (Miss Garson), the novelist's emotionally 
disturbed wife. The storyline centers around the strange bind that 
links Harben with his psychotic wife -- despite this woman's willingness 
to throw her husband at pretty girls. 

Michael Dyne’s many writing credits include original tele¬ 
plays for "Philco Playhouse," "Studio One," "Du Pont Show of the Month," 

"Robert Montgomery Presents" and 'Twilight Zone." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20 NEW YORK 





, 


2 


’The Shadowed Affair' 


Douglas Fairbanks is a distinguished stage, screen and tele- 
vision actor whose many motion picture credits include "Outward Bound," 
"Accused," "The Prisoner of Zenda" and "The Exile." On the London, 
Manchester and New York stage, he has starred in such hit productions 
as "Saturday's Children," "Stephen Steps Out," "Young Woodley" and "The 
Winding Journey." He was producer, host and occasional star of NBC- 
TV's "Douglas Fairbanks Presents" anthology series during 1953-59* 

Greer Garson, who won an Academy Award for her film portrayal 
of "Mrs. Miniver," was last seen on NBC-TV in "Captain Brassbound's 
Conversion" on "Hallmark Hall of Fame." Her many other movie credits 
include "Goodbye Mr. Chips," "Mme. Curie," "Pride and Prejudice" and 
"Sunrise at Campobello," in which she drew critical acclaim for her 
portrayal of Mrs. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. 

Lois Nettleton has starred on Broadivay in "God and Kate 
Murphy" and "Silent Night, Lonely Night." Her many TV credits include 
"Great Ghost Tales," "Frontiers of Faith," "Kraft Mystery Theatre" and 
"True Story." She was nominated for an Emmy Award for her dual 
portrayal of Laura Fairlie and Ann Catheric in "The Woman in White" 
on NBC-TV's "Dow Hour of Great Mysteries." 

"Du Pont Show of the Week" is sponsored by the Du Pont 
Company through Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn Inc. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/8/62 




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l'hirt\ Rockefeller Plaza. Sew York 20, X. ). 


October 8, 1962 

START OP ECUMENICAL COUNCIL IN ROME TO BE FILMED FOR BROADCAST 
ON NBC-TV VIA TELSTAR ON OPENING DAY, OCT. 11 

NBC News will present special TV coverage of the 
opening of the Ecumenical Council in Rome Thursday, Oct. 11, 
with film transmitted via the Telstar communications 
satellite. 

The program, from 9 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. EDT Thursday, 
will originate in New York with news correspondent Merrill 
Mueller as anchorman. 

A 20-minute package of film on the Council activities 
will be sent via Telstar to the U. S. by Radiotelevisione 
Italiana, the Italian TV Network. NBC News' Rome 
correspondent, Irving R. Levine, will narrate the films. 

The communications satellite will be in position 
to transmit the signal from Europe between 8:44 a.m. and 
9:15 a.m. EDT. The special NBC News coverage will be pro¬ 
duced by James Kitchell. 


Press Department, Hoorn 320 









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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 8 , 1962 

PAST LOOKING NECESSARY TO SPOT MITCH MILLER'S MYSTERY GUESTS 

Mitch Miller has consented to reveal the names but 
not the dates for appearances of mystery guests on "Sing 
Along with Mitch" (NBC-TV Network color broadcasts, Fridays, 
8:30 to 9:30 p.m. NYT). 

Jim Backus, William Bendix, Red Buttons, Xavier 
Cugat, Chet Huntley, Jack E. Leonard, Sam Levenson, Hal 
March, Basil Rathbone and Cyril Ritchard are among the 
celebrities who will appear briefly on-camera during the 
shows. 

"Unannounced, they will merely blend in with 
the gang," Mitch said. "It's completely up to the viewers 
to spot and identify the mystery guests. They'll have to 
be quick because each guest will be on the screen for only 
a few seconds." 


PRESS DEPARTME 


NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YOR 








































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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 920 

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a-X-H NHC TRADE NEWS 


October 9* 1962 

LIBBY McNEIL & LIBBY PURCHASE OF ONE-SIXTH SPONSORSHIP MAKES 
NBC-TV’S COVERAGE OF 1952 ELECTIONS COMPLETELY SOLD 


With the purchase of one-sixth sponsorship by Libby, McNeil 
& Libby, NBC-TV's coverage of the 1962 elections is completely sold, 
it was announced today by John M. Otter, Vice President, NBC 
Television Network National Sales. 

NBC-TV’s coverage of the election begins at 7 p.m. EST on 
Tuesday, Nov. 6 , and will feature Chet Huntley and David Brinkley and 
a special NBC News staff of about 1,000. 

Libby, McNeil & Libby joins the Purex Corporation, Lincoln- 
Mercury Division of Ford Motor Company, Lipton Tea, Block Drug 
Company and Carter Products Inc. as sponsors of NBC-TV’s election 
coverage. 

NBC-TV's coverage of the i 960 Presidential election, which 
featured Huntley and Brinkley, was viewed by a larger audience than 
that of the other two networks combined. 

The Libby, McNeil & Libby order was placed through J. Walter 
Thompson Co. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 







. 

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' IS IV •*, 






NBC TRADE NEWS 


October 9* 1962 

’THE MATCH GAME,' GOODSON-TODMAN SHOW IN WHICH PLAYERS THY 
MATCHING WITS IN POKER-PLAYER STYLE, WILL BE NBC-TV 
MONDAY-THROUGH-FRIDAY DAYTIME SERIES IN 1963 

"The Match Game," a new Goodson-Todman game show in which 
audience participants and celebrities try to match their minds like a 
poker player matches cards, will premiere in January* 1963 # as a Monday- 
through-Friday daytime feature on NBC-TV in the 4-4:30 p.m. EST time 
period. 

The new series was announced today by Mort Werner, Vice 
President, Programs, NBC Television Network. Sponsorship will be by 
various advertisers. 

A master of ceremonies and production staff will be announced 
shortly for the program, which will originate in NBC-TV's New York 
studios. "The Match Game" becomes the eighth game show now being 
produced by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman. Others on NBC-TV are "The 
Price Is Right," "Play Your Hunch" and "Say When." 

"The Match Game" mixes exciting elements of mental tele¬ 
pathy and chance. The game is played by two opposing teams, made up 
of three players each -- one celebrity and two teammates selected from 
the studio audience. Their goal: To match each other's answers to a 
given question in a category they have chosen. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 





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For example, "The Match Game" panel might be asked to name 
a President whose likeness appears on a U. S. monetary coin. If all 
three members of one team answer "Washington" (or "Lincoln," etc.), and 
only two members of the other team pick a "Jefferson" (etc.), team No. 

1 wins the round. 

"Make Room for Daddy," will move to the 4:30-5 p.m. EST time 
slot Mondays through Fridays when "The Match Game" debuts in the 4 p.m. 
period. 




NBC-New York, 10/9/62 



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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


October 9* 1962 

SECOND VATICAN COUNCIL TO BE SUBJECT OP NBC NEWS SPECIAL 

FILMED IN COLOR IN THE VATICAN AND ROME 

- --i 

The forthcoming Second Vatican Council, regarded by Roman 
Catholics as the most important meeting of church leaders in centuries, 
will be the subject of an NBC News special to be filmed in color wholly 
in the Vatican and the city of Rome. 

Filming by the network's European production crew, headed by 
George Vicas, started Oct. 4 and will continue for two weeks. The 
program will be broadcast by the NBC-TV Network Tuesday, Oct. 30 from 
10:30 to 11 p.m. EST, with NBC News correspondent Irving R. Levine as 
reporter. 

Pope John XXIII will open the Second Vatican Council (known 
also as the Ecumenical Council) in Rome on Oct. 11. It will cover a 
wide range of ecclesiastical matters ranging from doctrine to 
Christian unity. The sessions will run from Oct. 11 to mid-December, 
and from shortly after Easter (April 14, 1963) to mid-June. Official 
delegate-observers representing most of the major Protestant bodies will 
attend the Rome gathering. 

In addition to the opening of the Council in St. Peter's 
Basilica, sound-film cameras will cover the general setting in Rome and 
the Vatican, the behind-the-scenes activities which go into the 
organization of the Council, the arrival of delegates from all parts of 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 











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2 - Second Vatican Council 


the world, the housing of the delegates in monasteries, homes and 
hotels, and their working agenda. 

In interviews with leading churchmen, the program will cover 
the purpose of the Council, its meaning to the Catholic Church, to 
non-Catholics and Americans, as well as the results that can be expected 
from it and the possibility for unity of Christian churches. 

Paintings and other works of art in the Vatican Library, 
filmed in such a way as to give a sense of movement, will provide 
historicalbackground on earlier Church councils and perspective for 
the coming one. (The Second Vatican Council will be the 21st 
Ecumenical Council. The first Ecumenical Council was held in 325 at 
Nicea, and the First Vatican Council in 1869-70. Ecumenical means 
universal, specifically pertaining to the Christian church throughout 
the world, and the coming Council will be the most inclusive that has 
ever been held). 




NBC-New York, 10/9/62 



' 







October 10, 1962 

•THE 44TH NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE SHOW,' NBC NEWS COLOR TELEVISION SPECIAL 
WITH CHET HUNTLEY, HUGH DOWNS, MERRILL MUELLER AND PAT FONTAINE, 

WILL ORIGINATE IN DETROIT OCT. 21; SPONSOR IS REYNOLDS METALS 

NBC News correspondents Chet Huntley and Merrill Mueller, 
"Today" host Hugh Downs and "Today Girl" Pat Fontaine will take 
viewers on a tour of the 44th National Automobile Show at Detroit's 
new Cobo Hall for a look at the 1963 cars and other advances in the 
auto industry during a special full-hour color program Sunday, Oct. 21 
on the NBC-TV Network (6-7 p.m. EDT). 

"The 44th National Automobile Show" will be a presentation 
of NBC News. It will be produced by Robert Northshield and directed 
by Jim Kitchell. Carl Lindemann Jr., Vice President, Special Projects, 
NBC News, will be executive producer. The program will be sponsored 
by Reynolds Metals Company through Lennen & Newell Inc., New York, 
and Clinton E. Frank Inc., Chicago. 

The National Automobile Show, which is under the sponsorship 
of the Automobile Manufacturers Association, traditionally captures 
the glamour and excitement that surrounds the showing of the new car 
models. 

The theme of this year's show is "America Drives Ahead." All 
the new U. S. passenger cars and most of the new truck models will 
be on display together for the first time in some 22 exhibits in the 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 30, NEW YORK 




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'44th National Automobile Show 1 


new seven-acre exposition hall. Each automotive company has been 
allocated more space to exhibit its products than ever before. 

In addition to presenting next year’s cars and trucks, there 
will be educational exhibits on vehicle safety and problems of air 
pollution. Designs and prospects for future automobiles and industry 
technical advances also will be shown. 

The National Automobile Show is one of the traditions of 
U. S. industry, having started in January of 1900 at New York's old 
Madison Square Garden. It is the opening event of the new model year 
in which it is held. In October, i960, the 43rd National Automobile 
Show opened as the dedication event for Detroit’s new Cobo Hall 
exhibition center and was attended by 1,400,000 visitors in a 10-day 
period. 

The 44th show this year will be open to the public from 
Oct. 20-28. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 10/10/62 






<: • 

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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


\ 



NBC-TV NETWORK COLOR BROADCAST SCHEDULE 
For November, 1962 (All Times EST) 


Thursday and Friday, Nov. 1 and 2 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government" 
10:30-11 a.m. -- "Play Your Hunch" 

11-11:30 a.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

2-2:53 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" 
Thursday, Nov. 1 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m, -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

Friday, Nov. 2 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Pa.ar Program" 


Saturday, Nov. 3 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff and Reddy Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "The Shari Lewis Show" 

10:30-11 a.m. -- "King Leonardo and His Short Subjects" 
12:30-1:30 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

8:30-9 p.m. — "The New Joey Bishop Show" 

9-11 p.m. -- "Saturday Night at the Movies": "Beneath the 12-Mile 
Reef" 

(more) 


PPESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20 NEW YORK 










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2 - NBC-TV Network November Color Schedule 


Sunday, Nov. 4 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "The Bullwlnkle Show" 

6-6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "Du Pont Show of the Week": "The Shadowed Affair," 
with Douglas Fairbanks and Greer Garson. 

Monday through Friday, Nov. 5-9 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government" 
10:30-11 a.m. -- "Play Your Hunch" 

11- 11:30 a.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

2-2:55 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" 
(except Tuesday, Nov. 6, when it will be pre-empted by NBC-TV 
election coverage) 

Monday, Nov. 5 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

10-10:30 p.m. -- "David Brinkley’s Journal" 

Wednesday, Nov. 7 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Perry Como’s Kraft Music Hall" 

Thursday, Nov. 8 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

Friday, Nov. 9 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

(more) 









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3 - NBC-TV Network November Color Schedule 


Saturday, Nov. 10 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff and Reddy Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "The Shari Lewis Show" 

10:30-11 a.m. -- "King Leonardo and His Short Subjects" 
12:30-1:30 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

8:30-9 p.m. -- "The New Joey Bishop Show" 

Sunday, Nov. 11 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "The Bullwinkle Show" 

6-6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "The Danny Kaye Show" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Dinah Shore Show" 

Monday through Friday, Nov. 12-16 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government 
10:30-11 a.m. —"Play Your Hunch" 

11- 11:30 a.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

2-2:55 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 
Monday, Nov. 12 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

10-10:30 p.m. -- "David Brinkley’s Journal" 

Tuesday, Nov. 13 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Laramie" 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Empire" 

Wednesday, Nov. 14 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

9-10 p.m. -- "Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall" 

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4 - NBC-TV Network November Color Schedule 


Thursday, Nov. 13 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

Friday, Nov. 16 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

Saturday, Nov. 17 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff and Reddy Show" 

10- 10:30 a.m. -- "The Shari Lewis Show" 

10:30-11 a.m. -- "King Leonardo and His Short Subjects" 

12:30-1:30 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

3:30-9 p.m. -- "The New Joey Bishop Show" 

9-11 p.m. -- "Saturday Night at the Movies": "White Witch Doctor" 
Sunday, Nov. 13 

2:30-4:30 p.m.-- NBC Opera Company: "Boris Godunov" (Repeat) 
5:30-6 p.m. -- "The Bullwinkle Show" 

6-6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

Monday and Tuesda.y, Nov. 19 and 20 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government" 
10:30-11 a.m. -- "Play Your Hunch" 

11- 11:30 a.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

2-2:55 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

11:15 p.m.-1 a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" 
Monday, Nov. 19 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

10- 10:30 p.m. -- "David Brinkley's Journal" 

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5 - NBC-TV Network November Color Schedule 


Tuesday, Nov. 20 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Laramie" 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Empire" 

Wednesday, Npv. 21 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government" 
10:30-11 a.m. -- "Play Your Hunch" 

11- 11:30 a.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

11:30-12 noon -- "Concentration" 

12- 12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

12:30-1 p.m. -- "Truth or Consequences" 

2 p.m.-2:55 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

3:30-4 p.m. -- "Young Dr. Malone" 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

9 p.m.-10 p.m. -- "Perry Como’s Kraft Music Hall" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" 
Thursday, Nov. 22 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government" 

10 a.m.-12 noon -- "Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and Circus" 
12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

2-2:55 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

5:30-6:30 p.m. -- "The Pat Boone Thanksgiving Special" 
7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Bell Telephone Hour" 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" 
Friday, Nov. 23 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government" 
10:30-11 a.m. -- "Play Your Hunch" 

11- 11:30 a.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

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6 - NEC-TV Network November Color Schedule 


Friday, Nov. 23 (Cont’d) 

2-2:55 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson 
Saturday, Nov. 24 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff and Reddy Show" 

10- 10:30 a.m. -- "The Shari Lewis Show" 

10:30-11 a.m. -- "King Leonardo and His Short Subjects" 
12:30-1:30 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

8:30-9 p.m. -- "The New Joey Bishop Show" 

Sunday, Nov. 25 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "The Bullwinkle Show" 

6-6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

Monday through Friday, Nov. 26-30 

6:30-7 a.m. -- "Continental Classroom" - "American Government 
10:30-11 a.m. -- "Play Your Hunch" 

11- 11:30 a.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

2-2:55 p.m. -- "The Merv Griffin Show" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" 
Monday, Nov. 26 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "The Price Is Right" 

10- 10:30 p.m. -- "David Brinkley’s Journal" 

Tuesday, Nov. 27 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Laramie" 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Empire" 

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Wednesday, Nov. 28 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Perry Como’s Kraft Music Hall" 
Thursday, Nov. 29 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

Friday, Nov, 30 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Shakespeare: Soul of an Age" 
8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 


NBC-New York, 10/10/62 






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NBC TRADE NEWS 
October 11, 1962 

’THE TUNNEL,' 90-MINUTE NBC NEWS TV SPECIAL, WILL REVEAL 
WEST BERLIN STUDENTS 1 PERILOUS TASK TO RESCUE 
59 PERSONS FROM BEHIND THE WALL 

Gulf Oil Corporation Will Sponsor Program 

_____ • . 

— ■ ■ ~ •' " ■■ - - — 

"The Tunnel," a special 90-minute NBC News documentary 
telling the story of a group of West Berlin students who dug a 450-foot 
underground passageway into East Berlin to rescue 59 men, women and 
children from behind the Wall, will be presented on the NBC Television 
Network Wednesday, Oct. 31 (7:30-9 p.m. EST). The program will be 
sponsored by the Gulf Oil Corporation. 

William R. McAndrew, Executive Vice President, NBC News, who 
announced the program, said it would show the long, difficult, often 
dangerous work that went into the tunnel, which was equipped with 
electric lighting, a telephone line, ventilation and pumping systems 
and a rail-borne cart to remove the earth during the digging. 

NBC News learned of the tunnel early last Summer when it had 
been under construction for about a month and had progressed some 60 
feet toward the Wall. At the invitation of the students, NBC News 
assigned a film crew to cover the operation. The coverage was super¬ 
vised by Reuven Frank, NBC News, assisted by Piers Anderton, NBC News 
correspondent in West Berlin, and Gary Stindt, Chief, NBC News Film, 
Central Europe. 

NBC News covered the operation as closely as possible without 
compromising its secrecy and thus endangering the safety of the 

(more) 


JACK TRACY 
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PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











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'The Tunnel' 


tunnelers and those who hoped to escape. Among NBC Newsmen, the pro¬ 
ject was known only to the cameramen directly involved and to Julian 
Goodman, Vice President, NBC News, in addition to McAndrew, Frank, 
Anderton and Stindt. 

SECURITY STRATEGY 

As a security precaution, the project was never mentioned by 
the newsmen in telephone calls in or out of West Berlin, on the 
assumption that the Communists monitor these circuits as they 
pass through East Germany. To avoid drawing attention to the operation 
producer Frank refrained from visiting West Berlin until the day before 
the expected breakthrough. During the three months of filming, he met 
with Anderton and Stindt elsewhere in Europe -- in London and in Paris. 

The tunnel was conceived by two young Italians studying in 
West Berlin -- Dominico Sesta, an engineering student, and Luigi Spina, 
an art student. They planned it as an escape route for a close friend 
who wanted to leave East Berlin with his mother, his wife and his 
young child. Sesta and Spina were joined by other West Berlin students 
-- from the Berlin Technical University, the Free University of Berlin 
and the Academy of Fine Arts -- most of them with friends or relatives 
who wanted to escape from East Berlin. 

The students had decided to start their tunnel in a heavily 
populated section rather than in one of the many open areas that line 
the Berlin Wall. For its entrance, they selected a spot inside a 
building on Bernauerstrasse, a street which runs along the Vfall for 
about a mile. They managed to obtain a detailed plan of Berlin, 
which they used in laying out the route of the tunnel through the under 
ground maze of sewer lines, water mains and utility cables. 

(more) 




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3 - ’The Tunnel' 


At its entrance, the tunnel went down vertically about 15 
feet, then leveled off in a shaft one yard wide and one yard high -- or, 
as Reuven Frank has pointed out, "not much roomier than a coffin." Only 
one of the students could dig at a time. He had to work lying on his 
back, bending forward to wield a shovel at the square yard of earth at 
the working face of the tunnel. 

NBC NEWS CAMERAMAN FOLLOWED DIGGER 

Once the film coverage had begun, the digger was frequently 
followed by NBC News cameraman Peter Dehmel, a 26-year-old West German, 
who volunteered to film the underground work. Dehmel lay on his back 
just behind the shovel-man, and filmed the digging by holding his camera 
on his shoulder and chest. He, in turn, was followed by his brother 
Klaus, lightman and assistant camercjnan, who aimed his lights through the 
narrow space on either side of the camera. 

The working space was so tight that Peter Dehmel could not 
use the normal 400-foot film magazine on his camera, but instead had to 
use a 100-foot magazine. This meant that he had to change magazines 
after every two-and-a-half minutes of shooting. His job was further 
complicated by the necessity to unwrap and rewrap the entire apparatus 
with a plastic cover with each change of film to keep it free of sand, 
dirt and mud. 

The work went on 24 hours a day, seven days a week, for four 
months. Each day was divided into two 12-hour shifts, and members of 
each shift relieved one another at the toughest job -- digging at the 
tunnel face. To carry the earth to the opening, they laid a single 
steel rail on which they ran a small rope-drawn cart. They shored up 
the passageway with timbers throughout its length, and where it cut 
through sand, rather than clay, they covered its floor and roof 
completely with planking. (more) 




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'The Tunnel' 


The students strung electric lights along the tunnel and 
rigged a telephone line so that those underground could talk with those 
on the surface. (Once they had penetrated beyond the Wall, they dubbed 
their phone line "the only direct telephone connection between East and 
West Berlin.") When the digging had progressed so far that air 
circulation became a serious problem, they bought an air compressor 
and devised a ventilation system that blew fresh air from one end of 
the tunnel to the other. 

Twice the work was impeded by breaks in Berlin's water mains. 
The students fought the first flooding with a hand pump, and managed 
to alert West Berlin officials to the leak without alerting them to 
the tunnel. The second break occurred on the East Berlin side and, 
while waiting for Communist officials to discover it, the tunnelers 
installed an electric pump. 

CHANGE PLANS TO AVOID DISCOVERY 

Because of these delays and because of a mounting fear that 
the tunnel would be discovered by East Berlin police, the students 
changed their plan. They had originally hoped to penetrate two blocks 
into East Berlin before digging to the surface. They now decided to 
make their breakthrough only one block from the Wall. They scheduled 
the breakthrough -- and the escape attempt -- for Sept. 14. 

Reuven Frank and film editor Gerald Polikoff arrived in West 
Berlin the day before. Sept. 13. On the way from the airport, they 
were driven along Bernauerstrasse, and for the first time were told 
where the tunnel lay. They screened film all that afternoon and most 
of the following day. Some 6,000 feet of film had been shot under¬ 
ground by Dehmel and an equal amount by cameraman Harry Thoess, who 
manned a hidden camera covering the Berlin scene at street level, just 
above the tunnel. (more) 




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5 - *The Tunnel 1 


On the evening of Sept. 14, Frank, Anderton, Stindt and 
Thoess gathered in the NBC News Bureau, while the Dehmel brothers 
waited with a camera setup at the tunnel entrance. The breakthrough 
time of 7-30 p.m. came and went without word from the tunnel. At 
11:30 p.m. Frank and Thoess drove down Bernauerstrasse past the site, 
but could see no police activity on either side of the Wall. 

It was not until 1 a.m. the following morning that the 
newsmen heard from the tunnel and learned that the first escapees, a 
young mother and her child, had come through at 5 p.m. the day before. 
They were followed by 57 others, ranging in age from six months to 
70 years, all of them muddy and exhausted after their 450-foot crawl, 
but safe on the West side of the Wall. 

* * * 

(The NBC-TV news special "The Tunnel" will preempt 
"The Virginian" on Oct. 31 only). 


o 


NBC-New York, 10/11/62 




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NHC TRADE NEWS 


October 11, 1962 

BOB HOPE'S SIX NBC-TV SPECIALS FOR 1962-63 SEASON COMPLETELY SOLD 
WITH PURCHASE OF HALF OF SECOND PROGRAM BY KITCHENS OF SARA LEE 

Bob Hope's six 1962-63 specials on NBC-TV are completely 
sold, it was announced today by Sam K. Maxwell Jr., Director, Special 
Program Sales, NBC Television Network. Kitchens of Sara Lee purchased 
one-half sponsorship of the second Hope program, to be presented 
Thursday, Nov, 29, completing sponsorship of this season's "Bob 
Hope Show" specials. 

The Kitchens of Sara Lee order was placed through Hill, 
Rogers, Mason & Scott Inc. As previously announced, Hope's other 
sponsors during 1962-63 are: Timex (through Warwick & Legler Inc.), 
which purchased one-half sponsorship of the six programs; Lever 
Brothers Co. (through Foote, Cone & Belding), which bought one-half 
sponsorship of four programs); and the Chemstrand Corporation (through 
Doyle Dane Bernbach Inc.), which purchased one-half sponsorship of 
one program. 

Bing Crosby, Lucille Ball and Juliet Prowse will be Bob 
Hope's guest stars Wednesday, Oct, 24 (9~10 p.m. NYT), when the first 
"Bob Hope Show" of the season will be broadcast. 

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PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 








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NBC RADIO NETWORK NKWS 


October 11, 1962 

FIVE PROMOTIONS IN NBC RADIO NETWORK ARE ANNOUNCED 

_ _ I 

Five NBC Radio organizational changes were announced today 
by William R. McDaniel, Executive Vice President, NBC Radio Network. 

Howard G. Gardner was appointed Director, Sales Administra¬ 
tion and Development, NBC Radio Network. He formerly was Manager, 

Sales Development, NBC Radio Network. He reports to William F. 
Fairbanks, Vice President, Sales, NBC Radio Network. 

Robert C. Hitchens was named Director, Sales Planning, NBC 
Radio Network, reporting to Mr. McDaniel. He had served as Manager, 
Sales Presentations, NBC Radio Network. 

Appointed Manager, Sales Development, NBC Radio Network, was 
Joseph Kelly, formerly an analyst in the Sales Development Department. 
He reports to Mr. Gardner. 

Jack Bernstein was promoted to Manager, Sales Presentations, 
NBC Radio Network, reporting to Mr. Hitchens. He had been a writer in 
the Sales Presentations Department. 

Herbert Brotz was named Manager, Business Affairs, NBC 
Radio Network, reporting to Miss Marion Stephenson, Vice President, 
Administration, NBC Radio Network. He previously was Manager, Budgets, 
NBC Radio Network. 

Mr. Gardner came to NBC in 1939 after graduation from 
Colgate University, starting as a page and moving thereafter to the 
Research Department. After three years of World War II service in the 
Army, he returned to NBC Research, advancing quickly to manager. In 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



















































2 - NBC Radio Promotions 


1952 he became Manager, Sales Development, NBC Radio Network, acting 
also as Manager, Sales Development, NBC Television Network, until the 
two areas were separated in 1955. 

Mr. Gardner lives with his wife and three children in 
Ridgewood, N.J. 

Mr. Hitchens joined NBC Radio in 1951 as sales presentations 
writer, subsequently advancing to sales promotion supervisor, then to 
Manager, Sales Presentations. He started in radio in 1946 as 
continuity director at Station WEEK, NBC Affiliate in Peoria, Ill. 

(call letters later changed to WAAP). In 1948 he joined WNAL, 

Raleigh, N.C., as program director, moving in 1950 to the post of 
public relations manager for the National Industrial Advertisers 
Association. 

Mr. Hitchens, a graduate of the University of Missouri, 
served in the Navy in World War II. He lives with his wife and teen-age 
daughter in Seaford, Long Island, N.Y. 

Mr. Kelly joined NBC in 1953 as an accountant, first in the 
Facilities Division, then in Traffic and Communications. He moved to 
the Radio Network in 1956, working in the budget area, switching to 
Sales Development in 1957. He served as sales analyst until the 
current promotion. 

Mr. Kelly received a Business Administration degree from the 
evening school of St. John's University, New York, in 1958. He lives 
with his wife and child in Plainview, L.I., N.Y. 

Mr. Bernstein served on the editorial staff of Variety 
(1957-59) before joining NBC as a Press Department staff writer in i960. 
Later that year he moved to NBC Radio Sales Presentations as a writer, 
holding that post until the current promotion. 

(more) 



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3 - NBC Radio Promotions 


Mr. Bernstein graduated from the University of Rochester, 
then served in Europe with the Army 195^-56. He is a bachelor, living 
in Manhattan. 

Mr. Brotz, who soon marks his 10th anniversary with NBC, 
began with the network's New York flagship stations, and was the 
financial analyst, before joining NBC Radio in 1958. He served in the 
Navy during World War II, and graduated from City College of New York 
in 19^9. He lives with his wife and two children in the Bronx, N.Y. 




NBC-New York, 10/11/62 



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NBC INTERNATIONAL ARRANGES FOR NIGERIA'S TELEVISION VIEWERS 
TO SEE FI IMS OF TIGER-FULIMER MIDDLEWEIGHT TITLE BOUT 

NBC International has arranged for television 
viewers in Nigeria to see one of their favorite sons, Dick 
Tiger, challenge Gene Fullmer for the Middleweight Champion¬ 
ship of the World, at a date soon after the Oct. 16 fight in 
San Francisco. 

Films of the scheduled 15-round title bout in 
Candlestick Park will be presented over the Nigerian Tele¬ 
vision Service in Lagos. NBC International is the managing 
agent for this new federal network in Nigeria. 


NBC-New York, 10/11/62 












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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


October 11, 1962 

NBC NEWS, VIA TELSTAR, PROVIDED U.S. TV VIEWERS WITH SWIFT 
COVERAGE OF ROME'S ECUMENICAL COUNCIL OPENING 

Television coverage of the opening of the Ecumenical Council 
of the Roman Catholic Church, transmitted from Rome via Telstar, was pre¬ 
sented on a special NBC News program on the NBC-TV Network: today 
(Thursday, Oct. 11, 9-9**30 a.m. EDT). 

Coverage of the event, including an address by Pope John 
XXIII in St. Peter's Basilica, was taped by the Italian television 
network (RAI) and was transmitted to New York by the communications 
satellite starting at 8:51 a.m. EDT. 

In New York, NBC taped the coverage again and began running 
the tape on the air 10 minutes later, at 9:01 a.m. EDT. Since Telstar 
was still transmitting while the tape playback was in progress, the 
operation required three tape machines -- one to record, one to play 
back on the air, and a third to fill the gaps while segments of tape 
were moved from one machine to another. 

NBC News' Rome correspondent Irving R. Levine reported the 
event via an audio circuit from Rome. Correspondent Merrill Mueller 
served as anchorman in New York. The program was produced and directed 
by James Kitchell. 


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PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKE 


LER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




















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'ROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

r hirl\ Rockefeller Plaza, Sew ) ork '20. S. ) . 

October 11, 1962 

NBC'S SAMUEL CHOTZINOFF TO BE CHIEF SPEAKER 
AT TOSCANINI MEMORIAL PROGRAM 
OF AMERICA-ITALY SOCIETY 

Samuel Chotzinoff, producer of the NBC Opera Company and music 
consultant of the National Broadcasting Company, will be chief speaker 
at the Toscanini Memorial program of the America-Italy Society on 
Wednesday, Nov. 14 (not a broadcast). Chotzinoff’s topic will be "The 
Need for Toscanini." 

His talk will be illustrated with recordings of performances 
and rehearsals and with film clips from television appearances of the 
late maestro Arturo Toscanini and the NBC Symphony Orchestra. It will 
take place in the new Ferris Booth Hall of Columbia University, New 
York City, at 8:30 p.m. 

Toscanini conducted the NBC Symphony Orchestra, formed 
esepciaily for him, from 1937 to 1954, when he retired. The Italian 
conductor was in semi-retirement in 1936, when Samuel Chotzinoff, on 
commission from NBC, went to Italy and persuaded him to return to active 
musical life. Toscanini's activities with the NBC Symphony in broad¬ 
casts, recordings and touring concerts added significantly to America's 
cultural history. 

Chotzinoff's personal friendship with Toscanini preceded by 
many years the formation of the NBC Symphony in 1937- 

The America-Italy Society is a non-profit organization which 
fosters friendship and cultural exchange between the two countries. 

-o- 


Prtti Department, Room 120 










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INTERNATIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM VENTURE WILL PROVIDE TV DRAMATIZATION 
OF A. J. CRONIN'S "SHANNON'S WAY" FOR NBC'S "DU PONT SHOW OF THE WEEK" 
Hour Will Be Taped in London's Associated Rediffusion Studio 
For U.S. Broadcast Dec. 16, and Will Be Seen in Britain, Too 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY A.M., OCT. 15 

An international, cooperative network programming venture -- 
a one-hour television dramatization for English and American audiences 
of A. J. Cronin's best-selling novel, "Shannon's Way" -- was announced 
today by the National Broadcasting Company and Associated Rediffusion 
Limited. 

Mort Werner, Vice President, Programs, NBC Television Network, 
and John McMillan, Controller of Programs, Associated Rediffusion Ltd., 
described the project as "an important step toward the utilization of 
international facilities in bringing quality television drama to world¬ 
wide audiences." 

"Shannon's Way" -- to be produced by Lewis Freedman -- will 
have exteriors filmed on location in Scotland and will be taped Nov. 28 
in the Associated Rediffusion studios at Television House, Kingsway, 
London. 

The drama of a young doctor's need to choose between careers 
of research and medical practice has been adapted for TV by John Keir 
Cross. Freedman is producer of dramas for NBC-TV's "Du Pont Show of 
the Week" and formerly produced such critically acclaimed TV programs 
as "Play of the Week," "Reading Out Loud" and "Camera Three." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



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- "Shannon's Way" 

The program will be presented Sunday, Dec. 16 (10-11 p.m. EST, 
in black and white only) as a "Du Pont Show of the Week" drama over the 
NBC-TV Network -- and will also be broadcast in England, Scotland and 
Wales (on a December date to be announced) over the Associated 
Rediffusion outlets. 

A director for "Shannon's Way" will be selected by Freedman 
and Associated Rediffusion. An American star of distinguished ability 
will be chosen for the role of Shannon. The remainder of the cast will 
be drawn from the ranks of England's foremost television actors. 

Freedman flies to London on Oct. 18 to assist in the 
selection of a director and cast for "Shannon's Way," returning to New 
York on Oct. 23 and flying again to London on Nov. 16 for rehearsals 
which begin on the following day. 

Commenting on NBC's plans for "Shannon's Way," Freedman said: 
"This is a drama that could not have been produced as well in America. 

The characters and generic setting are so completely English that it just 
could not come off as effectively in a New York or Hollywood studio. 

"We hope to tape overseas at least one more drama for 'Du 
Pont Show of the Week' this season, on such a cooperative inter-network 
basis. It is not inconceivable that we are opening up a wholly new 
television expression -- with entertainment programs originating coopera¬ 
tively in the near future all over the world, in France, Italy, Japan, 
Hong Kong, Latin America and even the Soviet Union." 

Casting and added production details for "Shannon's Way" will 
be announced shortly. 

"Du Pont Show of the Week" is sponsored by the Du Pont Company 
through Batten, Barton, Durstine and Osborn Inc. 

-o- NBC-New York, 10/12/62 




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October 12, 1962 

OFFICIAL PRAISE FOR NBC'S GRANT F. WOLFKILL 
Citation Accompanying Medal of Freedom Honors Meritorious Service 
To U.S. While a. Prisoner of Reds In Laos for 15 Months 

The following citation accompanied the Medal of Freedom 
awarded recently to NBC News cameraman Grant F. Wolfkill, held prisoner 
15 months by Communist forces in Laos. 

The award, authorized by President Kennedy, was presented by 
U. S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Earle G. Wheeler. The citation reads: 

"Mr. Grant F. Wolfkill, news cameraman for the National 
Broadcasting Company, distinguished himself by meritorious service 
while a prisoner of hostile forces in Laos from May 1961 to August 
1962. Throughout this period, Mr. Wolfkill demonstrated a devotion 
to the high standards of the Code of Conduct that was in keeping with 
the finest traditions of our nation. 

"His actions, characterized by boldness, tenacity and courage 
in the face of probable execution were evidenced daily as he led 
American military and civilian prisoners in a brilliantly successful 
effort to survive the brutalities of the hostile forces and to 
resist their never-ending efforts at brainwashing. 

"His unquenchable spirit elevated the morale of his fellow 
prisoners and tempered their will to resist until this will had become 
invulnerable. 


(more) 


Press Department, Room 320 










- • . I'. 


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2 - Grant P. Wolfkill 


"His selfless dedication to the principles for which his 
government stands and his consummate courage and coolness under 
pressures and threats did much to prevent hostile forces from making 
propaganda capital at the expense of the United States. 

"His meritorious service to the nation was complemented by 
his personal valor that was genuinely inspiring. His devotion to the 
Code of Conduct in the face of the threat of death, peerless intrepidity 
and unshakable dedication to the cause of his Government marks him as 
a gallant American patriot. Mr. Wolfkill's faithful and exemplary 
conduct while a prisoner of hostile forces reflects great credit upon 
himself, the United States and the Free World." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/12/62 




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CAST AND CREDITS FOR 'THE SHADOWED AFFAIR,« ORIGINAL DRAMA 

\ 

IN COLOR ON 'DU PONT SHOW OF THE WEEK' SUNDAY, NOV. 4 


Title: 

"The Shadowed Affair" on "Du Pont Show 

of the Week" 

Date and Time: 

NBC-TV color broadcast Sunday, Nov. 4 

(10-11 p.m. EST) 

Starring: 

Greer Garson, Douglas Fairbanks and 

Lois Nettleton 

Original teleplay by 

Michael Dyne 

Executive producer: 

Fielder Cook 

Producer: 

Jacqueline Ba.bbin 

Director: 

Fielder Cook 

Associate director: 

Robert Hopkins 

Assistant to the producer: 

Nora Ahern 

Assistant to the director: 

Maureen Hesselroth 

Technical director: 

Jack Coffey 

Scenic designer: 

Jan Scott 

Unit manager: 

Jim Marooney 

Costumes by 

Noel Taylor 

Makeup by 

Robert Phillippe 

Graphic arts: 

Guy Fraumeni 

Lighting: 

Alan Posage 

Video: 

Arnold Dick 

Audio: 

Jim Blaney 

Stage Manager: 

Frank Kaden 

Production by 

The Directors Company 

* * * 

(more) 








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Origination: NBC Studios, Brooklyn, N. Y., on color 

tape 

Sponsor: The Du Pont Company 

Agency: Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn Inc. 

NBC Press Representatives: Charlie Gregg, New York, and Bill 

Kiley, Burbank 

* * * 

THE STORY 

Michael Dyne's original teleplay, "The Shadowed Affair," 
centers around the eternal triangle of love stories — set against a 
strange and gripping background. The locale is the sophisticated New 
York literary world. The time is the present. The focal characters 
are a sequestered Nobel Prize-winning novelist, Hans Harben (Fairbanks); 
a young magazine reporter, Jennifer Graham (Miss Nettleton), who comes 
to interview him; and Juliette (Miss Garson), the novelist's emotionally 
disturbed wife. The story focuses on the strange bond that links 
Harben with his psychotic wife -- and her willingness to throw her 
husband at pretty girls. 


* * * 


Hans Harben 

Douglas Fairbanks 

Juliette Harben 

Greer Garson 

Jennifer Graham 

Lois Nettleton 


* * * 

THE STAR S 

Greer Garson (Juliette Harben), who won an Academy Award for 

her film portrayal of "Mrs. Miniver," was last seen on NBC-TV in 

"Captain Brassbound's Conversion" and "The little Foxes," both on 

"Hallmark Hall of Fame," and in "Reunion in Vienna" on "Producer's 

Showcase." A few of Miss Garson's many movie credits include 

(more) 

















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3 - Credits for 1 The Shadowed Affair* 


"Goodbye, Mr. Chips," "Mme. Curie," "Pride and Prejudice" and, most 
recently, "Sunrise at Campobello," in which she drew critical acclaim 
for her portrayal of Mrs. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. 

Douglas Fairbanks (Hans Harben) is a distinguished stage, 
screen and television actor whose many motion picture credits include 
"Outward Bound," "Accused," "The Prisoner of Zenda" and "The Exile." 

On the London, Manchester and New York stage, he has starred in hit 
productions including "Saturday’s Children," "Stephen Steps Out," "Young 
Woodley" and "The Winding Journey." He was producer, host and star of 
TV's long-running ( 1953 - 59 ) anthology series, "Douglas Fairbanks 
Presents." 

Lois Nettleton (Jennifer Graham) has starred on Broadway in 
"God and Kate Murphy" and "Silent Night, Lonely Night." On NBC-TV, she 
won critical applause for her dual portrayal of Laura Fairlie and Ann 
Catheric in "The Woman in White" on "Dow Hour of Great Mysteries." Her 
many other TV credits include "Great Ghost Tales," "Frontiers of Faith," 
"Kraft Mystery Theatre" and "True Story." 


NBC-New York, 10/12/62 



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October 15, 1962 

NBC NEWS TEAM--FIRST TV CREW PERMITTED ON POLARIS SUBMARINE 
ON EXTENDED MISSION, INCLUDING FIRING OF ITS MISSILES-- 
PREPARES FULL-HOUR COLOR DOCUMENTARY FOR DEC. 19 
Liggett & Myers Purchases One-Half Sponsorship of Program 


A special one-hour color program, filmed by the first tele¬ 
vision crew ever permitted aboard a Polaris submarine during an extended 
mission that included the firing of its missiles, will be presented on 
the NBC-TV Network, Wednesday, Dec. 19 (10-11 p.m. EST). 

A six-man NBC News crew, including correspondent Martin 
Agronsky, spent 16 days aboard the U. S. S. George Washington and filmed 
in detail a realistic exercise climaxed by the launching of missiles 
into the Atlantic missile range. 

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., through J. Walter Thompson Co., 
has purchased one-half sponsorship of the program. 

The program, titled "Polaris Submarine: Journal of an Under¬ 
sea Voyage," is being produced by Lou Hazam. The NBC crew aboard the 
submarine included, in addition to Agronsky: Daniel Karasik, associate 
producer; Tom Priestley, director; Scott Berner, cameraman; John 
Langenegger, sound man, and Robert Gelenter, assistant cameraman. 

The NBC newsmen filmed the Polaris submarine base at Holy 

Loch, Scotland. They then boarded a chartered vessel and made a 

rendezvous with the George Washington, which had just completed a six- 

week patrol and was about to begin its exercise. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 











































































































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2 - Polaris 


Aboard the George Washington, the newsmen filmed daily life 
on a nuclear-powered Polaris submarine -- officers and crew members 
working at their stations throughout the ship, their off-duty moments 
at movie showings, church services, in card games and bull sessions in 
the wardroom and the crew's mess. 

After the submarine had been at sea for about a week, its 
captain. Commander Edward Cooke, set the stage for realism by announcing 
"We have entered the patrol area. We may be ordered to launch missiles 
at any time. I do not plan any drills. If you hear the alarm, you 
know this is a firing run." 

The film shows crew members waiting for the fire message, 
then answering to the order "Battle stations, missile." For the first 
time, it shows the details of a Polaris countdown and finally it records 
the underwater launching of the missiles, whose nuclear warheads had 
been removed. 

In a filmed interview with Agronsky, Commander Cooke dis¬ 
cusses the Polaris system and its relation to over-all U. S. defense 
strategy, the safety precautions to prevent a Polaris missile from 
being fired by mistake, and his own feelings about the ship and its 
firepower -- which is the equivalent of all bombs dropped during World 
War II, including the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. 

Agronsky said at the end of the cruise: "I couldn't find one 
man aboard the George Washington, from the captain to the youngest sea¬ 
man, who is unaware of the awful destructive power he could be commanded 
to unleash." 

(This Dec. 19 NBC News special pre-empts "The Eleventh Hour" 
this date only). 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/15/62 




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October 15, 1962 

SKITCH HENDERSON BAND AND THE MUPFETS ARE ADDED HIGHLIGHTS 
OF ' 44 th NATIONAL AUTOMOBILE SHOW* COLOR SPECIAL ON NBC 

Skitch Henderson and his band, and the Muppets (Jim and Jane 
Henson's humorous hand puppets) have been added to the highlights of 
NBC News full-hour color special, "The 44 th National Automobile Show, " 
on the NBC-TV Network Sunday, Oct. 21 ( 6-7 p.m. EDT). 

NBC News correspondents Chet Huntley and Merrill Mueller, 
"Today" host Hugh Downs and "Today Girl" Pat Fontaine will take 
viewers on a tour of the auto show at Detroit's new Cobo Hall for a 
look at the 1963 cars and trucks and other advances in the auto 
industry. 

( NOTE : The special broadcast will pre-empt "Meet The Press" 
and "McKeever and the Colonel" on this date only.) 

Skitch Henderson will provide the music for the program and 
will also play an original composition giving his musical impression of 
Cobo Hall, one of the largest and most complete exhibition and con¬ 
vention centers in the world. 

The Muppets will provide an entertaining commentary on the 
new cars. For the program, the Hensons have created a new talking car- 
puppet, the 1963 "Crunk." The Muppets, who have their own daily pro¬ 
gram on WRC-TV, NBC's owned station in Washington, D.C., also have 
appeared on NBC-TV's "Today." 

-o- 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 













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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

FROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Thirty Rockefeller I'lazo, \etr York 20. X. ). 

2-X-H 

October 16, 1962 

NBC NEWS’ ELECTION NIGHT COVERAGE WILL STRESS CONGRESSIONAL 
RACES, WITH EXPERTS COMPILING AND ANALYZING 
RETURNS AT SPECIAL 'HOUSE DESK' 

Two approaches to politics -- the journalistic and the 
academic -- will be combined in the NBC News television and radio 
coverage of the contests for seats in the House of Representatives in 
the Nov. 6 elections. 

Elmer W. Lower, General Manager, NBC News, said that the 
election night coverage on NBC-TV would place special emphasis on 
the races for the 435 House seats, and that the returns would be 
compiled and analyzed at a special "House Desk" in NBC's Studio 8H 
in New York. 

0 

"We are giving more attention than ever before to the 
contests in the House, which will test the popularity of the Kennedy 
administration in every section of the 50 states," Mr. Lower said. 

"We will also keep in mind the often-recalled fact that only once in 
modem elections, in 1934, has the party in power gained seats at 
mid-term." 

Two experts will head NBC's House Desk. One, a practical 
authority on Congressional politics, is Joseph McCaffery, an NBC 
consultant and newsman who will draw on his long personal knowledge 
of members of the House and their constituencies to interpret the 
election returns. McCaffery has been covering Congress since 1947 
for newspapers, magazines, radio and television and, since 1954, has 
served as a consultant to NBC News on all national elections. He is 

(more) 


frett Department, Room 320 











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XI i 








r .... 



2 - Election Night Coverage 


author of an Election Guide containing voting data on all 435 
Congressional Districts, which he is updating for use on election night. 

The other expert, whose training and experience lean toward 
the academic, is Dr. Milton C. Cummings, a research associate at the 
Brookings Institution in Washington. Dr. Cummings has degrees from 
Swarthmore College and Oxford University, and took his doctorate at 
Harvard in i960. His thesis dealt with House elections from 1920 to 
I960, and he is currently revising it for a book to be published by the 
Free Press of Glencoe. 

On election night. Dr. Cummings will be assisted at the House 
Desk by his wife, Nancy, who is a physician. In analyzing the returns, 
they will use a system of file cards carrying historical data on 
voting patterns in every Congressional district. The "needle-sort" 
cards are assembled in a container about the size of a shoe-box which 
is, in effect, a kind of hand-operated computer. 

"By inserting a special needle into the box and through holes 
in the cards, we can extract a series of cards that will, for example, 
identify all the districts that voted Democratic in 1950," Dr. 

Cummings says. "Using this kind of information, we believe that early 
on election evening we will begin to spot the voting trends." 

Analytical material produced by Mr. McCaffery and Dr. 

Cummings will be used by NBC News correspondents on both the NBC 
Television and Radio Networks. It will also be supplied to the 
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the British Broadcasting 
Corporation, both of which will originate programs from the NBC News 
election headquarters in Studio 8-H. 

The House Desk will be staffed by six additional statisticians 
and reporters, all engaged in the prodigious job of keeping track of 
the 435 House races. 


o 


NBC-New York, 10/16/62 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


PAUL M. HANCOCK APPOINTED MANAGER, SALES, 

EASTERN OFFICE, NBC RADIO NETWORK 

Paul M. Hancock has been named Manager, Sales, Eastern 
Office, NBC Radio Network. His appointment, effective Oct. 22, was 
announced today by William F. Fairbanks, Vice President, Sales, NBC 
Radio Network. 

Mr. Hancock has been with NBC 13 years as Regional Manager, 
Station Relations. 

He began his broadcasting career in station relations with 
the Mutual network in 19^5* Two years later he founded radio station 
WMID in Atlantic City, N. J., remaining there for one year. He returned 
to Mutual in 1948, and joined NBC the following year. 

During World War II, Mr. Hancock served in the Bureau of 
Overseas Intelligence (OWI). Before the war he worked in Italy as 
assistant to the president of an Italian oil company. (He speaks three 
foreign languages.) 

Mr. Hancock, a graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy and 
Princeton University, is married to actress-singer Evelyn Wyckoff and 
lives with her and their child in Bronxville, N. Y. 

Tennis, golf and gardening are among his favorite pastimes. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/16/62 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 























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NBC TRADE NEWS 


October 16, 1962 

NBC INTERNATIONAL’S PUBLIC AFFAIRS ASSOCIATION 
INAUGURATED IN THE LATIN AMERICA AREA 

NBC International’s Public Affairs Association has been 
inaugurated in the Latin American area. Stations in Argentina, 
Guatemala, Panama, Puerto Rico and Venezuela have joined the plan 
which provides for at least one NBC public affairs program on the air 
each week over member TV stations. 

"Our Public Affairs Association," Alvin Ferleger, Sales 
Manager, NBI, said, "represents another breakthrough in Latin American 
programming from the U. S. The interest in our programs was mostly 
in the field of entertainment. Now, stations, advertisers and viewers 
are recognizing the growing importance of news and public affairs 
programming." 

The Public Affairs Association of NBC International has 
already been activated in Japan (Fuji Broadcasting), Australia 
(TCN Network), the Philippines (Bolinao Network), and Hong Kong 
(Overseas Rediffusion). 

Initiated during the last few weeks, the plan in the 
Latin America area has included sales of news and public affairs 
programs to Cadete in Buenos Aires, Argentina; Radio Caracas in 
Caracas, Venezuela; RPC in Panama City, Panama; WAQ-TV in San Juan, 
Puerto Rico^ and Guatemala TV in Guatemala City, Guatemala. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

October 16, 1962 

FLYING TRIP TO BRITAIN PROVIDES MERV GRIFFIN WITH LINEUP 
OF NOTED OVERSEAS PERSONALITIES FOR HIS NBC COLOR SHOW 

Thanks to the World Series, NBC-TV daytime star Merv Griffin 
and his producer Bob Shanks will get to make a five-day flying trip to 
London Thursday night (Oct. 18) to film some overseas interviews in 
color. 

The conversational stints, with outdoor and indoor areas of 
London as a backdrop, will be broadcast on later dates on the new "Merv 
Griffin Show" color series (Monday through Friday, 2-2:55 p.m. EDT). 

Already lined up for interviews are British comedian Terry- 
Thomas, who will take Merv on a sightseeing trip; Bob Hope, on-location 
at his new movie "Call Me Bwana"; movie stars Anita Ekberg and Robert 
Wagner, and Italian actress Claudia Cardinelli. And he is endeavoring 
to get other prominent names, too. 

Merv termed this a "pilot" trip, and if it proves successful, 
he hopes to take the entire show to Rome and Paris next Spring. 

Normally the "Merv Griffin Show" is broadcast later the 
same day it is taped at NBC-TV’s New York studios. This taping 
schedule was maintained even on three recent days when World Series 
broadcasts from Yankee Stadium preempted Griffin on the network. 

As a result, Griffin has three shows "in the can" -- and 
these will be aired Friday, Monday and Tuesday (Oct. 19, 22, 23) while 
Merv is abroad. 

-o- 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 30. NEW YORK 






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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


NHC RADIO NETWORK NK\\V?X-H 


October 17, 1962 

HIGH-RANKING DIPLOMATS IN SPECIAL NBC RADIO PROGRAM 
COMMEMORATING UNITED NATIONS DAY 

United Nations Acting Secretary General U Thant, United 
States Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson, Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei 
Gromyko, British Foreign Secretary Lord Home and other high-ranking 
diplomats from all parts of the world will be heard on NBC Radio’s 
"United Nations ’62," Sunday, Oct. 21 (8:15-8:30 a.m. EDT). 

Taped in advance, the special program commemorates United 
Nations Day (Oct. 24). Emphasis is given to UN delegates' assessment 
of the organization's work thus far and what hopes they hold for its 
future. 

NBC RADIO REPORT ON SAIGON INSERTED IN CONGRESSIONAL RECORD 

The entire text of an NBC Radio "Ring Around the World" 
report from Saigon has been inserted in the Congressional Record of 
Oct. 4. The report from NBC News correspondent David Hudson on 
American efforts to aid South Viet Nam in its struggle against 
Communist guerrilla forces, ran in the Congressional Record at the 
request of Senator Kenneth B. Keating (R.-N.Y.). It was broadcast by 
NBC Radio Sept. 22. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 
CONGRESSMAN COHELAN COMMENDS NBC FOR FORTHCOMING NBC NEWS 

COLOR SPECIAL, 'SHAKESPEARE: SOUL OF AN AGE' 

Representative Jeffery Cohelan (D.-Calif.) has expressed 
appreciation to the National Broadcasting Company for its forthcoming 
NBC News special, "Shakespeare: Soul of an Age," a full-hour color 
program to be broadcast on the NBC-TV Network Friday, Nov, 30 (7:30 to 
8:30 p.m. EST). 

Sir Michael Redgrave, voicing excerpts from Shakespeare's 
plays, will star in the program, and Sir Ralph Richardson will be 
special guest narrator. Lou Hazam is producer and writer of the 
production, which is being filmed in England, Wales, Scotland and 
France "in the footsteps of Shakespeare and many of the characters of 
his plays." 

Representative Cohelan, in remarks published in the 
Congressional Record, noted that the program will anticipate the 400th 
anniversary (April 23, 1964) of Shakespeare's birth. He said it 
will be "no ordinary presentation of Shakespeare's works, but a 
scholarly as well as entertaining undertaking designed to show what 
remains on earth that recalls Shakespeare's life." 

"I believe it is appropriate," Representative Cohelan 

concluded, "for us to express appreciation to the National Broadcasting 

Co. which, through NBC News, will bring into the homes of millions of 

American families this important television program, a program which 

marks still another of the important contributions to news, public 

affairs and the arts that this network has presented through the years." 

o NBC-New York, 10/17/62 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK vO. NfW YORK 














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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

October 17, 1962 

REVISED CREDITS FOR ‘THE JACK PAAR PROGRAM' COLOR BROADCASTS ON NBC-TV 


Title: 

"The Jack Paar Program" 

Time: 

NBC-TV color broadcasts, Fridays, 10 to 
11 p.m. NYT. 

Star: 

Jack Paar 

Premiere Date: 

Sept. 21, 1962 

Format: 

Informal hour of interviews, discussions 
music and special features. Guest 
stars on each show. 

Produced by 

Jack Paar with Paul Orr and Paul W. Keye 

Directed by 

Hal Gurnee 

Associate Producer: 

Tom Cochran 

Writers: 

Paul W. Keyes, Bob Howard, Robert Orben 

Musical Director: 

Jose Melis 

Scenic Designer: 

Charles Rosen 

Unit Manager: 

Stewart MacGregory 


Associate Director: Peter Fatovlch 


Graphic Artist: 

Guy Fraumeni 

Technical Director: 

Bill Kelley 

Lighting Director: 

Fred McKinnon 

Audio: 

Norman Ogg 

Origination: 

NBC Studios, New York 

Sponsors: 

Various 


NBC Press Representatives: Betty Lanigan (New York) and Doug 

Duitsman (Burbank). 


-o- 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 



































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2-X-H 


NBC TRADE NEWS 


JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 



October 13, 1962 

NORMAN A. LUNENFELD IS PROMOTED TO POST 
OF MANAGER, NBC MERCHANDISING 

Promotion of Norman A. Lunenfeld to Manager, NBC Merchandising, 
was announced today by Morris Rittenberg, Director, NBC Domestic 
Enterprises. Mr. Lunenfeld was Sales and Promotion account executive 
before advancing to his new post. 

Before joining NBC, Mr. Lunenfeld was sales promotion manager 
at the C. J. LaRoche Advertising Agency. Previously, he was executive 
vice president of Promotion House Inc, and director of the Premium 
Center. 

Commenting on Mr. Lunenfeld‘s new appointment, Mr. Rittenberg 
said: "We are fortunate to draw more fully upon the talents of Norman 

Lunenfeld. His thorough experience in all aspects of merchandising, 
and his ability to promote new properties, will ensure the steady 
expansion of NBC Merchandising activity." 

Mr. Lunenfeld, a graduate of Columbia Law School, resides with 
his wife in New York City. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


. 




NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

October 18, 1962 

NBC OPERA OPENS 14TH SEASON SUNDAY, NOV. 18, WITH RE-SHOWING 
OF ‘BORIS GODUNOV' IN COLOR BROADCAST STARRING GIORGIO TOZZI 

The NBC Opera Company will open its l4th successive season 
with a re-showing of Moussorgsky's opera "Boris Godunov" with Giorgio 
Tozzi in the title role Sunday, Nov. 18 (NBC-TV color broadcast, 2:30 to 
4:30 p.m. EST). The two-hour color presentation was given great praise 
in the music and television press when it was first broadcast on 
March 26, 1961 . 

Other principal singers in the cast are Gloria Lane, Frank 
Porretta, Andrew McKinley, Lee Cass, Richard Cross, Richard Torigi, 

Spiro Malas and Jeanette Scovotti. Peter Herman Adler is conductor. 

Modeste Moussorgsky's opera was performed by the NBC Opera 
Company in English, in a translation by John Gutman. The musical 
version by Rimsky-Korsakov was used. 

Set in Russia and Poland in the late 16th century, the opera 
tells the story of Boris' rise to power and his agonized last days, when 
he is driven by conscience for the murder of the Czarevitch Dimitri. 
Boris has ruled well, but the means of his gaining the throne haunts his 
life. 

The production was designed by Ed Wittstein, and the costumes 
by John Boxer. Kirk Browning directed the production. Samuel 
Chotzinoff is producer of the NBC Opera Company. 

(more) 

pp£55 DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 














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2 - NBC Opera 

Two new productions and two other repeat showings also have 
been announced by Chotzinoff for the 1962-63 season of the NBC Opera 
Company on NBC-TV* Ihe repeats are "Amahl and the Night Visitors" by 
Menotti on Sunday, Dec. 23 (3:30-4:30 p.m. EST) and "The Love of Three 
Kings" by Italo Montemezzi Sunday, Jan. 27 (color broadcast, 2-4 p.m. 
EST). The new productions are an untitled opera by Gian Carlo Menotti, 
commissioned by NBC, on Sunday, March 3 (color broadcast, 2-3 p.m. EST) 
and the complete, uncut "St. Matthew's Passion" by Johann Sebastian Bach 
in two two-hour color presentations Saturday, April 6 (1:30-3:30 p.m. 
EST) and Sunday, April 7 (2-4 p.m. EST). 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/18/62 









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NHC RADIO NETWORK NKWS 


October 18, 1962 

'THE UNITED NATIONS AT SEVENTEEN,' SPECIAL DOCUMENTARY PROGRAM 
WITH WORLD HEADLINE PERSONALITIES, SCHEDULED ON NBC RADIO 

NBC Radio will broadcast "The United Nations at 
Seventeen," a special documentary program narrated by actor 
Jason Robards Jr. on M onday, Oct. 22 (10:15-10:30 p.m. EDT). 

It includes commentary by President Kennedy, Acting Secretary 
General U Thant, Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson, U. S. 
astronaut John H. Glenn Jr., Russian cosmonaut Gherman Titov 
and others. 

The program was taped in advance by United Nations 
Radio to celebrate United Nations Week (Oct. 21-28). 

NBC Radio, as previously announced, also will broad¬ 
cast another commemorative program, "United Nations *62" 

Sunday, Oct. 21 (8:15-3:30 a.m. EDT). 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 































JACK TRACY 
, ROOM 320 

OM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

•fv Rockefeller Plaza, Xeiv York 20, vY. Y. 2 ** X — H 

NOTED SPOKESMEN FOR THE TWO MAJOR PARTIES--SEN. HUMPHREY (FOR DEMOCRATS) 
AND SEN. SCOTT (FOR REPUBLICANS)--TO MEET IN NBC TELEVISION AND RADIO 
FULL-HOUR DEBATE ON NATIONAL ISSUES OF 1962 CONGRESSIONAL ELECTIONS 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY A.M., OCT. 22 

NBC will bring together a distinguished spokesman for each of 
the two major political parties in a full-hour debate on the NBC-TV and 
NBC Radio Networks, designed to place in sharp focus the national issues 
of the 1962 Congressional elections, it was announced today by William 
R. McAndrew, Executive Vice President, NBC News. 

The program, to be presented live Monday, Oct. 29 from 8:30 to 
9:30 p.m. EST, will be the first nationwide debate during a mid-term 
election year between two non-office-seeking representatives of the two 
parties. It will originate from NBC’s Washington studios. 

The speakers will be Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota, 
speaking for the Democratic Party, and Senator Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania, 
representing the Republican Party. They were chosen respectively by 
John M. Bailey, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, and 
Representative William E. Miller of New York, Chairman ol the Republican 
National Committee. Neither speaker is a candidate for office in the 
1962 elections. 

The initiative for this unprecedented broadcast came from 

Mr. McAndrew, who invited Mr. Bailey and Representative Miller to 

designate a leading spokesman for each party to join in a debate. I 

earnestly hope you will share our conviction that the program we propose 

affords a fresh opportunity to advance the public interest, both as a 

broadcasting undertaking and as an Innovation in the off-year political 

(more) 


ett Department, Hoorn 120 




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2 - Debate 


campaign process," Mr. McAndrew said in his invitation to the political 
leaders. 

Mr. McAndrew said the program will be patterned after the 
format of the fourth debate in the widely acclaimed "Great Debate" series 
between the Presidential candidates in i960. "It will thus apply the 
resources of broadcasting and the technique of direct confrontation to 
an effort to develop full understanding of off-year elections in terms 
of their national significance," he said. 

The format will consist of an opening statement of eight 
minutes by each spokesman and a closing summary of three minutes by 
each. Between the opening and closing statements, the speakers will 
answer questions from a panel of four NBC News correspondents. Each 
spokesman will be questioned in turn, with opportunity for comment by 
the other. Each answer will be limited to two and one-half minutes 
and each comment to one and one-half minutes. 

The NBC News correspondents participating will be announced 
soon. William B. Monroe, Director of News in Washington, will be 
executive producer of the program. 

Senator Humphrey, Majority Whip, was elected to the Senate 
in 1948 and was reelected in 1954 and i960. He is a member of the 
American Political Science Association, of which he was elected Vice 
President in 1954. He was a Presidential aspirant in i960. 

Senator Scott was elected to the House of Representatives in 
1940 and was reelected for seven additional terms. He was national chair¬ 
man of the Republican Party in 1948-49 and general counsel to the 
Republican National Committee in 1955-60. He was elected to the Senate 
in 1958. 

This special full-hour program pre-empts the NBC-TV "Saints 

and Sinners" episode this date only. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/19/62 




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DRAMA CRITIC RICHARD WATTS JR. WILL REVIEW 
BROADWAY SHOWS IN NEW 'TODAY' FEATURE 

A review of the new Broadway plays by one of New York's leading 
drama critics will become a regular feature on NBC-TV's "Today" show 
starting Thursday, Oct. 25 (7-9 a.m. EDT). 

Richard Watts Jr., New York Post drama critic, will make his 
first appearance that day to discuss the Broadway dramas and musicals 
which have opened so far this season. Watts will appear regularly 
thereafter during the drama season to review and discuss the Broadway 
openings with members of the "Today" cast. 

"Today" producer A1 Morgan said that Watts will be the newest 
member of "Today's" roster of guest authorities who will visit the 
program from time to time to discuss current happenings in their fields 
of interest. Others who appear regularly on "Today" include social 
historian Cleveland Amory, with essays on society; former New York 
Times art critic Aline Saarinen, reporting on art and architecture; 
Skitch Henderson, who has frequently introduced new musical 
personalities and Roland Clement, National Audubon Society staff 
biologist, who reports on bird migrations each season. 


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CAST AND CREDITS FOR 1962-63 PREMIERE OF ’THE BOB HOPE SHOW 
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 24 on NBC-TV NETWORK 



... ^ 

Program: 

"The Bob Hope Show" comedy special. 

Date: 

NBC-TV Network Wednesday, Oct. 24 (9 to 

10 p.m. EDT). 

Starring: 

Bob Hope 

Also Starring: 

Lucille Ball, Juliet Prowse, Les Brown 
and his Band of Renown, with special 
guest Bing Crosby. 

Executive Producer: 

Bob Hope 

Produced by 

Jack Hope 

Directed by 

Jack Shea 

Written by 

Mort Lachman and Bill Larkin; John Rapp 
and Lester White; Charles Lee 

Consultant: 

Norman Sullivan 

Additional Material: 

Gig Henry 

Choreographer: 

Tom Hansen 

Art Director: 

E. Jay Krause 

Costumes: 

Kate Drain Lawson 

Makeup: 

J. Manning Smith 

Associate producer: 

Sil Caranchini 

Associate director: 

Dick Bennett 

Assistant to the producer: 

Onnie Morrow 

Origination: 

NBC Studios, Burbank, Calif., on tape 

Sponsors and agencies: 

U. S. Time Corporation for Timex Watches 
(Warwick & Legler Inc.), and the Chem- 
strand Corporation (Doyle Bane Bernbach 
Inc. 

NBC Press Representatives: 

Bill Faith, Burbank, and A1 Cammann, New 
York. 


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NBC-New York, 10/19/62 









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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


2 - X - H 


October 22, 1962 


WORLD-WIDE ORGANIZATION OF BROADCASTERS TO MEET 
VITAL PROBLEMS AND CHALLENGES OF GLOBAL TV 
IS PROPOSED BY ROBERT W. SARNOFF 
Suggests European Broadcasting Union Form a Study Group 
To Explore Prospect and Pledges NBC’s Full Cooperation 


The creation of a world-wide organization of broadcasters to 
meet the vital problems and challenges of global television was pro¬ 
posed today by Robert W. Sarnoff, Chairman of the Board of the 
National Broadcasting Company. 

Mr. Sarnoff made the proposal at a luncheon given by NBC at 
the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York, in honor of the delegates to the 
first American meeting of the European Broadcasting Union. 

He suggested that the E.B.U. itself, in light of its 
"imposing credentials" in international television, should lead the way 
to the creation of a World Broadcasting Union by forming a Study Group 
to explore the prospect of a global organization of television broad¬ 
casters. He pledged the full cooperation of NBC. 

"I would hope that the Study Group would find it desirable and 
feasible to propose concrete steps for setting up such an organization," 
Mr. Sarnoff said. "This is not a suggestion to enlarge the E.B.U. nor 
to alter its identity or its present course in any way: it is a 
suggestion that envisages the creation of another organization, world¬ 
wide in character, in which the E.B.U. -- as a body or through its 
individual members -- would play a significant role." 

(more) 

Press Department, Room -i'20 


































































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2 - Robert W. Sarnoff 


Mr. Sarnoff asserted that "global television will not come of 
age until it can be met on an organized world-wide basis" and pointed 
to several needs likely to arise that would require attention on a 
world-wide basis. Among them: 

An international "nerve center" from which broadcasters could 
learn what programs were available and register their own program 
requirements; free exchange of specialized information to cope with 
such satellite-created problems as time differentials, scheduling 
clearances and simultaneous translation; close international liaison 
with respect to differing technical standards among various television 
systems; the development of uniform measures affecting artistic, 
business and labor interests. 

Outlining his thoughts on the character of the proposed World 
Broadcasting Union, Mr. Sarnoff said it should be open to broadcasters 
of every nationality, "for its usefulness would rest in large part on 
its universality." It would consist, he said, of broadcasters, rather 
than governments. But he noted that by their very nature some of the 
broadcasters would be direct agencies of national governments, others 
would be private companies, and still others would represent 
independent government-chartered corporations. 

"Whatever these differences," Mr. Sarnoff said, television's 
broad aims are everywhere the same -- to provide entertainment, in¬ 
formation and education to a vast public comprising the largest 
audiences in history." 

Mr. Sarnoff said he would hope that broadcast organizations 
not currently associated with E.B.U. as well as non-European broad¬ 
casters who are associate members would be invited to participate in 

(more) 



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3 - Robert W. Sarnoff 


the Study Group. He also emphasized that the organization that 
eventually would emerge "cannot and should not be political or partisan 
in any sense." 

Although acknowledging that the recommendations of the Study 
Group would be binding upon no one, he expressed the belief that "given 
patient and conscientious deliberations by a genuinely representative 
body of broadcasters, surely the findings upon which they could agree 
would commend themselves to television broadcasters everywhere." 

The NBC Chairman raised several questions that would have to 
be resolved by the Study Group: Would eligibility for membership in 
the World Broadcasting Union be based upon countries, individual 
broadcasting companies, national groups of broadcasters, or a 
combination of the three? What would the relationship be with existing 
regional organizations, such as the Inter-American Association of 
Broadcasters or the E.B.U. itself? What would the new organization do 
about financing, permanent staffing, a headquarters, or methods of 
disseminating information? 

Mr. Sarnoff said he felt it particularly appropriate to 
propose such a world broadcasting organization before members of the 
European Broadcasting Union. 

"To most Americans," he said, "the phrase 'international 
television 1 evokes the future, but for the E.B.U. it also represents a 
distinguished past and present. Over a period of more than eight years, 
Eurovision has televised some 3*200 live programs throughout v/estern 
Europe, and it does so today with the resources of 21 television 
services in 17 countries. In making these exchanges possible, the 
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confront any organization devoted to program exchange on a global basis. 
Uniquely, the E.B.U.'s Eurovision has also exchanged live programs both 
with Intervision, its junior counterpart in the Eastern European 
Communist bloc, and with the broadcasters of the United States and 
Canada." 

Discussing the need for a world-wide broadcasting organization, 
Mr. Sarnoff noted that successful program exchanges via the Telstar 
satellite have provided "exciting proof that we are swiftly mastering 
the means of achieving instantaneous communication between every 
television system on earth." 

"What lies immediately ahead is not only a period for continued 
exchanges through existing facilities," he said, "but a precious inter¬ 
val of planning and preparation for the manifold realities of world¬ 
wide television as it matures. Man's hopes for this era are high; its 
potential is great. But so are its problems and challenges. Indeed, 
they are so complex and far-reaching in terms of practical procedures 
and international cooperation that all of us with a stake in this 
glowing future should lose no time in laying the groundwork for a 
systematic approach to these problems." 


NBC-New York, 10/22/62 




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Address of Robert W. Sarnoff 
Chairman of the Board 
National Broadcasting Company, Inc. 
Before the European Broadcasting Union 
New York, New York 
October 22, 1962 


GLOBAL TELEVISION: A PROPOSAL 

I am greatly honored, in behalf of the National Broadcasting 
Company, to greet the European Broadcasting Union on the opening day 
of your unprecedented visit to the United States. In a sense you 
really made your first appearance here three months ago on the historic 
day when broadcasters on our two continents joined to extend man’s 
sight farther than ever before. 

Trie live program you sent us, ranging from the Arctic Circle 
to the warm shore of Sicily, will live in the memory of the millions 
upon millions who saw it. Yet, there is still something to be said for 
live appearances of the old-fashioned kind, and I know I speak for all 
my American colleagues when I say it is delightful to have you among 
us in the flesh, secure in the knowledge that you will not disappear 

over the horizon in 20 minutes. 

The visit that begins today cannot compare in visibility, 
spectacle or sheer excitement with the one we exchanged by satellite 
three months ago, but I hope that in the long run it may prove almost 
as significant a. milestone in the development of intercontinental 
television. Toward that end, I want to take this occasion to offer 
a proposal for your consideration -- a proposal intended to prepare 
the world’s broadcasters to move together most effectively into the 
era of global television. 

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Any such proposal must be considered against the background 
of the unique nature of this revolutionary medium of communication and 
the role it is assuming on every continent. The universal scope of 
television is implicit in its very nature. For it brings into tangible 
reality some of the myths and fancies mankind has cherished through the 
ages -- the flying carpet, the crystal ball, the occult feat of being 
in two places at once. This is the essential power of television as it 
exists in a single country or even a single community -- the power that 
inspired the widespread phrase, "a window on the world." Small wonder 
that the whole world is crowding up to this window. 

Television has taken root almost everywhere -- in widely 
different cultures and under every kind of government; in newly 
emerging nations as well as sophisticated industrial countries. It 
can be found in every phase of growth, from the planning period to 
enterprising beginnings, from dramatic boom to the steady expansion of 
highly developed broadcasting services. It flourishes in different 
organizational forms -- private, government-controlled, state-chartered, 
advertising-based, viewer-supported and varying combinations of these. 

Whatever these differences, television's broad aims are 
everywhere the same -- to provide entertainment, information and 
education to a vast public comprising the largest audiences in history. 
Today television is transmitted in some 80 countries by 3^000 stations 
to more than 120 million sets. And everywhere it has endowed our 
generation and those who follow us with the most vivid and powerful 
means man has ever devised for the extension of his senses. 

The far-flung spread of television as a world-wide phenomenon 
has coincided in 1962 with exciting proof that we are swiftly master¬ 
ing the means of achieving instantaneous communication between every 

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television system on earth. Successful program exchange via Telstar, 
such as the recent orbital flight or the opening of the Ecumenical 
Council, has dazzled the world with the sense of a new era. It takes 
nothing from this achievement to remind ourselves that it is largely 
symbolic -- that several years will still be required to develop and 
place into orbit a satellite system that will provide instantaneous 
transmission to every populated area of the earth at any hour of the 
day. 

Even then it is difficult to predict to what extent satellite 
transmissions will figure in regular television fare. But whether or 
not satellites will be used only sparingly and on a specialized basis 
for program transmission, the rise of television in so many countries 
around the world, coinciding with the perfection of tape and film, 
means that the age of global television is upon us. 

What lies immediately ahead is not only a period for 
continued exchanges through existing facilities but a precious interval 
of planning and preparation for the manifold realities of world-wide 
television as it matures. Man's hopes for this era are high; its 
potential is great. But so are its problems and challenges. Indeed, 
they are so complex and far-reaching in terms of practical procedures 
and international coordination that all of us with a stake in this 
glowing future should lose no time in laying the groundwork for a 
systematic approach to these problems. A number of broadcasters have 
perceived this need in recent years and months; it wa3 touched upon in 
a speech in New York only a few weeks ago by Newton Minow, the Chairman 
of our Federal Communications Commission. 

Clearly, we are faced with a difficult task of organized 
international cooperation. Part of this task -- an indispensable 

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though limited part -- can be assigned to an organization already in 
existence. Within the framework of the United Nations, the Inter¬ 
national Telecommunications Union serves as a clearing house for 
agreements on frequency allocations and technical standards. This 
organization, with its specialized agencies, has a vital basic role to 
play. It has scheduled a special conference in Geneva next year to 
allocate frequencies in space communications. 

But the I. T. U. is an organization of governments, not 
broadcasters, and the functions it performs -- vital as they are -- do 
not deal with the myriad of new operational problems that will con¬ 
front the world's growing number of broadcasters as technology draws 
them closer together. The experience of the E. B. U. within Western 
Europe has demonstrated the need and effectiveness of joint inter¬ 
national efforts in programming, legal and technical matters. The need 
for similar cooperative arrangements among broadcasters of different 
regions is already being felt; it will grow year by year, and global 
television will not come of age until it ca.n be met on an organized 
world-wide basis. 

What are some of the needs that are likely to arise? One 
certainly is a need for authentic and readily available information 
about programs -- a nerve center from which any broadcaster could learn 
what programs are available to him from all foreign sources. Such a 
center could maintain an up-to-date catalogue of such programs in every 
category -- entertainment, information and education -- and of every 
type -- live, film or tape. At the same time it could compile a 
continuing record of what kinds of programs are needed or desired by 
various broadcasters, particularly in countries of limited production 
resources where television is in early stages. Prompt awareness of 
these requirements should in turn stimulate attempts to meet them, not 

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only by the few countries now actively engaged as program suppliers to 
the world market but by many others which have barely or not yet 
entered it. 

The developing exchange of live programs by satellite will 
pose a need for more specialized information as well, since these 
transmissions must cope with such factors as time differentials, 
scheduling clearances and simultaneous translation. Ultimately, as 
we approach a world-wide television network -- or even networks -- 
comparable to the Eurovision network, international programming will 
involve major long-range planning as well as day-to-day coordination. 

One of the most vital needs of the global television era 
will be to promote the closest international technical liaison. Where 
technical standards are r.ct uniform, we must seek constantly better 
means of overcoming the differences. Another need can be served 
through personnel exchanges and training courses in all aspects of 
television to make the skills and experience of advanced broadcasters 
available to their newer counterparts abroad. Still another field 
for collaboration is in the development of uniform measures affecting 
artistic, business and labor interests and rights in connection with 
internationally televised material. 

To meet all these and other needs will require an international 
organization of broadcasters, global in scope, which does not yet exist. 

I propose that we set about creating a World Broadcasting Union. How 
can we best make a start in this direction? The question could not be 
put before any forum as qualified or appropriate as the European 
Broadcasting Union. 

To most Americans, the phrase "international television" 
evokes the future, but for the E. B. U. it also represents a 
distinguished past and present. Over a period of more than eight 

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years, Eurovision has televised some 3*200 live programs throughout 
Western Europe, and it does so today with the resources of 21 
television services in 17 countries. In making these exchanges 
possible, the E. B. U. has tackled and mastered many of the very 
problems that will confront any organization devoted to program 
exchange on a global scale. Uniquely, the E. B. U.'s Eurovision has 
also exchanged live programs both with Intervision, its Junior counter¬ 
part in the Eastern European Communist bloc, and with the broadcasters 
of the United States and Canada. 

In the light of these imposing credentials, I respectfully 
suggest that the European Broadcasting Union form a Study Group to 
explore the prospect of a global organization of television broad¬ 
casters. I would hope that the Study Group would find it desirable and 
feasible to propose concrete steps for setting up such an organization. 
This is not a suggestion to enlarge the E. B. U. nor to alter its 
identity or its present course in any way; it is a suggestion that 
envisages the creation of another organization, world-wide in 
character, in which the E. B. U. -- as a body or through its individual 
members -- would play a significant role. 

Through your clear record of leadership in international 
television, the E. B. U. has earned the right, and indeed perhaps 
incurred the duty, to lead the way to the formation of a World Broad¬ 
casting Union. And you would be acting fully in harmony with the 
goals set forth in Article 2 of the E. B. U. statutes; especially these 

two: 

"(b) to promote and coordinate the study of all questions 

relating to broadcasting, and to ensure the exchange of information 

on all matters of general interest to broadcasting services; 

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"(c) to promote all measures designed to assist the 
development of broadcasting in all its forms." 

The procedure I have suggested -- the formation of a 
Study Group -- is, of course, in accordance with Article 14 of the 
Statutes, providing for the creation and functioning of such groups. 

Having presumed to set this idea before you, let me 
presume briefly to offer some thoughts on the character of a world 
broadca.sting organization and the task of an E. B. U. Study Group 
exploring how it might work. 

The kind of organization I have in mind would consist of 
broadcasters rather than governments per se. In some instances, of 
course, the broadcasters would be direct agencies of national govern¬ 
ments, while in others, they would be private companies and in still 
others, independent government-chartered corporations. It would be 
an organization open to broadcasters of every nationality on earth, for 
its usefulness would rest in large part on its universality. 

Among the questions to be resolved is just how eligibility 
for membership would be based. Would it be by countries, by individual 
broadcasting companies, by national groups of broadcasters -- or a 
combination of these? What would the relationship be with existing 
regional organizations, such as the InterAmerican Association of 
Broadcasters and the E. B. U. itself? What would the new organiza¬ 
tion do about financing, permanent staffing, a headquarters, methods 
of disseminating information? These are only some of the questions 
that suggest themselves. 

Since television broadcasters in all parts of the world 
are vitally concerned, I would hope the E. B. U. would see fit to 
invite appropriate participation in its Study Group by broadcast 
organizations not currently associated with the E. B. U. as well as 

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non-European broadcasters who are associate members. I can pledge to 
you the full cooperation of the National Broadcasting Company in such 
a project. 

The recommendations of a Study Group in this field would be 
binding upon no one. But given patient and conscientious deliberations 
by a genuinely representative body of broadcasters, surely the find¬ 
ings upon which they could agree would commend themselves to tele¬ 
vision broadcasters everywhere. 

The organization that would eventually emerge cannot and 
should not be political or partisan in any sense. But I believe the 
nature of the broadcasting profession itself as well as the inter¬ 
national character of the undertaking should commit it to the spirit 
of free expression a.nd open channels between nations. In the last 
analysis, it seems to me, whatever television may be able to achieve 
on a global scale, that is the very least the world should rightfully 
expect from the custodians of this great medium. 

In its short life so far, television has demonstrated a 
power more compelling than the written or spoken word alone to hold 
men fascinated, to influence their minds and shape their conduct. 

Its impact upon society has been enormous -- on culture, politics and 
the economy, on the way in which scores of millions of individuals 
order their daily lives. 

In modern industrial society, television has become as 
ubiquitous as the weather. Sometimes it seems almost as much a subject 
of complaint. It would be unrealistic and unpersuasive to see tele¬ 
vision as an unmixed blessing. Yet, on balance, with all its short¬ 
comings and fallibility, and in the remarkably brief span in which it 
has spread so far, television has vastly enriched the lives of growing 

(more) 



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9 - Text - Robert W. Sarnoff 


millions of people by opening their horizons to a range of experience 
and learning opportunities unknown to any earlier generation. We may 
be far from fulfilling our potential, but again and again, we have 
demonstrated how great that potential can be. 

And now we face the challenge of bringing this great potential 
to a whole new dimension of service. For all its technical 
virtuosity, the feat of transmitting television signals around the 
world will be an empty irony without the good will and wisdom with which 
men decide what to transmit. To the extent that those of us in this 
room will determine what to transmit -- and it is a considerable 
extent — we must dedicate ourselves to be equal to this vast 
responsibility. Our first task, however, is to develop a practical 
means of using the wondrous new communications tools that await our 
grasp. 

We are on the point of winning a gift that history has seldom 
yielded and never on such a scale. For centuries, men have dreamed of 
a universal language to bridge the linguistic gap between nations. In 
some measure, it existed in the fourth century before Christ when 
Alexander the Great spread one tongue from Greece to the borders of 
India. The expansion of Rome made Latin the universal language of 
Western Europe. It was the universality of Greek and Latin In their 
day that enabled Christianity to spread over so much of the world in a 
single generation. In the modern era in which Europeans alone speak 
40 different languages, man's efforts to create a new universal 
language go back more than 300 years. They have resulted in such 
linguistic inventions as Esperanto, Interlingua and Romanal. 

Man will find his true universal language in television, 
which combines the incomparable eloquence of the moving image, instantly 

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Robert W. Sarnoff 


transmitted, with the flexibility of ready adaptation to all tongues. 
It speaks to all nations and, in a world where millions are still 
illiterate and semi-literate, it speaks as clearly to all people. 
Through this eloquent and pervasive universal language, let us 
strive to see, in the words inscribed over the portals of the BBC, 
that "Nation Shall Speak: Peace Unto Nation." 

NBC-New York, 10/22/62 



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-* - - 




NBC-TV NETWORK PROGRAM 


FOUR NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENTS WILL COMPRISE PANEL TO QUESTION 
SENATORS HUMPHREY AND SCOTT IN DEBATE ON NBC-TV AND RADIO 

Edwin Newman Will Be Moderator 


NBC News correspondents Elie Abel, Merrill Mueller, Sander 
Vanocur and Robert McCormick will form the panel of questioners for the 
full-hour debate between Senator Hubert H. Humphrey of Minnesota and 
Senator Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania Monday, Oct. 29 on the NBC-TV and 
NBC Radio Networks (8:30-9:30 p.m. EST). NBC News correspondent 
Edwin Newman will be moderator. 

As announced in the NBC Press Daily News Report of Oct. 19, 
the program will be the first nationwide debate during a mid-term 
election year between two non-office-seeking representatives of the 
two major political parties. It will be broadcast live from NBC's 
Washington studios. Senator Humphrey, who will speak for the Democratic 
Party, and Senator Scott, who will represent the Republican Party, 
were chosen by the national chairmen of the two parties. 

One change has been made in the format originally announced 
for the program. The opening statement by each speaker will be four 
minutes instead of eight minutes. 

The role of moderator is familiar to Newman. He was 
moderator on NBC-TV’s debate series. The Nation's Future, from 
June 10, 1961, through the rest of the 1961-62 season. 

Abel is NBC News’ State Department correspondent, Vanocur 
White House correspondent and McCormick Congressional correspondent. 
Mueller, who is based in New York, is a veteran of the political 
scene. He was a key reporter at the national conventions in 1952, 

’56 and ’60 and in NBC’s election night coverage for many years. 

NBC-New York, 10/22/62 










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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

UNIFORM STUDIO DESIGN PROVIDED AT NBC-OWNED TV STATIONS 
IN FIVE CITIES FOR NBC NEWS' ELECTION NIGHT COVERAGE 

Uniform studio design at NBC-owned TV stations in New York, 
Washington, Philadelphia, Chicago and Los Angeles will be provided 
for NBC Nevis’ Election Night coverage Tuesday, Nov. 6 (The NBC-TV 
election reports will start at 7 p.m. EST). 

The special sets at these stations were designed by Hjalmar 
Hermanson, who also created the massive NBC New3 Election Central in 
Studio 8-H in the RCA Building, New York City. The stations are 
WNBC-TV, New York; WRC-TV, Washington; WRCV-TV, Philadelphia; WNBQ, 
Chicago, and KRCA, Los Angeles. 

This three-tiered series of platforms and electronic totalizers 
will be topped by Chet Huntley and David Brinkley at their central 
new 3 desk. When the five local stations cut away for reports on local, 
state and regional races, local newsmen will appear before election 
boards identical in design to those at the Election Central in New York. 

The floor of Election Central is semi-circular. High on the 
west side of the studio is a platform from which Huntley and Brinkley 
will command a view of the four curved bays of election boards. 

The four bays cover the East, South, Midwest and Far West 
states with Sander Vanocur, Frank McGee, Merrill Mueller and John 
Chancellor reporting for each division respectively. 

Closeup TV cameras for each bay will be locked into position 
so that every state board is equidistant from the camera as it pans the 
returns. The electrically operated digital displays will report figures 
from various state races in numerals three inches high and two-and-one- 
half inches wide. - 0 - NBC-New York, 10/22/o2 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMP/ 


O ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




. • 

. 

■ 



NBC RADIO NETWORK NKWS 


October 22, 1962 


t -"PRIMARIES '62--FINAL REPORT"- 

NBC Newsmen to Report on Important Issues and Races 

In Special Radio Program Election Eve 

_ - -1 

I - - - -- - - - - — ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ 

A special election eve report on the important issues and 
contests to be decided on Election Day, and their significance in 
connection with the 1964 Presidential election, will be presented on 
the NBC Radio Network Monday, Nov. 5 (9:05-10 p.m. EST). 

NBC News correspondents Morgan Beatty and Robert McCormick will 
be anchormen for the special program, entitled "Primaries '62 -- Final 
Report: Election Eve." Beatty and McCormick will also be anchormen for 
NBC Radio's election night coverage, which will begin at 7 p.m. EST. 

The election eve broadcast will include reports by the four 
NBC News regional correspondents who will also be heard on NBC Radio 
election night. They are Leon Pearson in the East, Jim Hurlbut in the 
Midwest, William Fitzgerald in the South and Edward Gough in the West. 
Political experts in various states also will participate in the pro¬ 
gram, analyzing the major contests in their areas. 

Among the campaigns in this year's elections which will have 
an important bearing on the 1964 national elections, and which will be 
given special attention during the broadcast, are the gubernatorial 
races in New York, California, Michigan and Pennsylvania where the 
Republican candidates are considered possible Presidential aspirants 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTIN 


G COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 































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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

October 22, 1962 


NOTED PERSONALITIES PRAISE ‘MEET THE PRESS' 

"For many years, "Meet the Press' has been a feature which 
I have viewed with great regularity every Sunday. 

"I think it is valuable to permit the nation to have an 
opportunity to see public figures under questioning from the press, as 
it gives our people an opportunity to assay their leaders that they 
cannot receive through any other news media.." 

This comment is from Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, 
congratulating Lawrence E. Spivak, producer of "Meet the Press" on the 
program's 15th anniversary on the NBC Television Network. 

On Sunday, Nov. 11, "Meet the Press" will observe this 
anniversary with James A. Farley as guest. Mr. Farley, former Post¬ 
master General and an outstanding Democratic leader for many years, 
appeared on the first televised "Meet the Press" Nov. 6, 19^7. 

("Meet the Press" is broadcast every Sunday at 6 p.m. NYT 
on the NBC-TV Network, in color and 6:30 p.m. EST on the NBC Radio 
Network.) 

Other comments to Mr. Spivak from prominent national and 
international figures who have appeared on the program over the past 


15 years follow: 

Newton N. Minow, Chairman of the Federal Communications 

Commission: "As the oldest network TV program, 'Meet the Press' has 

earned its longevity by providing public service programming of a 

consistently high order. Broadcasting can make no higher contribution 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, ' 3 0 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 90. NEW YORK 











. 

. 













2 


'Meet the Press' 


to the public interest than the lively presentation of controversial 
issues. 

"Your high standards have brought to the nation a greater 
awareness and understanding of the critical issues of the day." 

Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney General of the United States: 

"The past 15 years have been a difficult period with the issues 
confronting the American people so complex and changing so rapidly 
that your efforts to develop and explore the problems facing this 
country have been invaluable." 

Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt : "It is one of the few programs I try 
to see. Being informative and instructive I think its impact has been 
stimulating and beneficial." 

The Rev. Dr. Billy Graham: "You have helped not only to keep 
America informed, but you have helped the American people make some of 
the gravest decisions of history during this continual post-war crisis." 

Adlai B. Stevenson, U. S. Ambassador to the United Nations: 

"As one of the 'victims' of the merciless inquisition one encounters 
on 'Meet the Press,' I want to voice my congratulations on its 
fifteenth anniversary on television. The program is indeed informa,- 
tive and interesting but most of all it serves a purpose of bringing 
to the public the views of leading figures when they are most 
pertinent to issues of the day. May you continue to keep the air waves 
hot for many years to come." 

George Meany, President, AFL-CIO: "It is not really a 
surprise to me that "Meet the Press" is now the oldest network TV 
program. I can testify that just a half-hour of it can age a man 10 
years...I personally enjoy "Meet the Press" very much -- but, in 

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3 - ’Meet the Press* 


candor, I must add: when I am a viewer more than when I am a 
guest." 

Edward R. Murrow, director. United States Information 
Agency: "To speak the praises of *Meet the Press* without being 

prolix is something of a task, but perhaps I can liken the program 
to the pepper that heightens the flavor of a well cooked meal. 'Meet 
the Press' provides the seasoning, as indeed an appearance on it 
seasons its guests to the rigors of examination. 

"But it is that very process of examination as applied to 
people and policies that helps keep the country on its public toes." 

Willy Brandt, Mayor of West Berlin: "I congratulate our 
American friends on this series 'Meet the Press' which has become a 
firmly established feature of the life of their country and is like¬ 
wise achieving lasting success in Germany." 

Thomas E. Dewey: "‘Meet the Press' has become a great 
national institution. It is lively, informative and a valuable part 
of our political system." 

Edgar F. Kaiser , president, Kaiser Industries Corporation: 
"The program...was the real pioneer in this type of public service 
effort. It has become one of the prime examples of one of our great 

freedoms -- Freedom of Speech." 

Lucius D, Clay , General, U. S. Army (ret.) "As a participant 
(on the program) I like the 'give and take' atmosphere which insures 
frank and open discussion of the important questions of the day. 


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NBC-New York, 10/22/62 









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MICKEY ROONEY TO STAR FOURTH TIME ON 'DICK POWELL SHOW' 


Mickey Rooney has been signed for his fourth 
starring role on NBC-TV's "Dick Powell Show" (Thursdays 
8:30-9:30 p.m. EST). 

Rooney won an Emmy nominationa for his 
portrayal of a lonely merchant seaman in a drama last 
year, "Somebody’s Waiting," on the series. He began 
work today (Oct. 22) in "Everybody Loves Sweeny (cq)," 
a drama about the downfall of a small-time night club 
comic. 


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NBC-New York, 10/22/62 





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— 







JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

-ROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

I'hirtv Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 2 “ X 

October 23, 1962 

HOW NBC NEWS OFFERED COMPREHENSIVE TELEVISION AND RADIO COVERAGE 
OF PRESIDENT'S SPEECH AND OTHER EVENTS RELATED TO CUBAN CRISIS 

Within 14 hours after President Kennedy's critical message to 
the nation outlining the "quarantine" of Cuba, NBC News presented almost 
three hours of special network TV coverage as well as running reports 
on the NBC Radio Network. 

A 45-minute TV special last night (Monday, Oct. 22), entitled 
"Of Highest Urgency," at 11:15 p.m. EDT, included foreign and domestic 
reaction to the President's message. 

The entire two-hour "Today" show (7-9 a.m. EDT) this morning 
(Tuesday, Oct. 23) was devoted to the Cuban crisis. It included 
interviews with experts on Cuba and Russia and reports from NBC News 
correspondents on reaction to the U. S. move. 

Following the President's address last night (broadcast at 
7 p.m. EDT on the NBC Television and Radio networks), Frank McGee in 
New York and White House correspondents Ray Scherer and Sander Vanocur 
in Washington summarized on NBC-TV the President's key points. 

From 7**30 until 11 p.m., NBC News cut into the TV network six 
times with reports by NBC News correspondent Edwin Newman in New York. 

At 10:05 p.m. EDT, NBC News Washington correspondent Herbert 
Kaplow was anchorman for a 25-minute radio special recapping Cuban 
developments, including reaction to the President's speech. NBC Radio's 
"News-on-the-Hour" kept pace with the story throughout the evening. 

(more) 


Press Department , Room 320 







. 






2 - Cuban Crisis 


McGee was anchorman in New York for the TV special "Of 
Highest Urgency" at 11:15 p.m. EDT. Jerome Jacobs was producer. 

The program, sponsored by the Gulf' Oil Corporation, featured 
reports from the following NBC News correspondents: Sander Vanocur at 
the White House, John Hlavacek in New York, Peter Hackes at the Pentagon, 
Richard Valeriani at WCKT in Miami, Leon Pearson in New York, Elie Abel 
and Robert Goralski in Washington, and audio reports from Prank 
Bourgholtzer in Moscow and Joseph C. Harsch in London. 

Vanocur broadcast live in front of the White House where TV 
cameras showed lights still burning in the President’s office. Hackes 
spoke live from the steps of the Pentagon where activity was obvious in 
the background, TV cameras showing lights in Defense Secretary Robert 
S. McNamara's office. 

In New York, Hlavacek (who was in Cuba as late as last week), 
pointed out on a map where the Cuban missile installations were most 
likely located. 

Also on the broadcast, Pearson discussed the nation's diplomatic 
moves expected the next day at the United Nations. Abel in V/ashington 
reported on the U. S. role at the Organization of American States 
meeting, and Goralski discussed Congressional reaction to President 
Kennedy's moves. 

Audio reports from Bourgholtzer and Harsch touched briefly 
on reaction in Moscow and London respectively. 

The "Today" show this morning began where "Of Highest 
Urgency" concluded, with reports from foreign correspondents on reaction 
to the President's action. 

Harsch reported the British Cabinet had been summoned into 
emergency session. Hugh Downs, the program's host and NBC News' 

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Richard Harkness (in Washington) both interviewed Senator Albert Gore 
(D.-Tenn.) in New York. Senator Gore is a member of the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee. 

Harrison Salisbury of the New York Times, an authority on 
Soviet Russia, was interviewed on the program. Salisbury felt this 
"quarantine" would not bring nuclear war and that Russia would divert 
her ships from the blockade. 

Scherer reported from Washington on the Pentagon's aerial 
photos which showed missile installations on Cuban soil. He was followed 
by Elie Abel who updated European reaction and strategy for the O.A.S. 
meeting later in the moring. 

Eleven "man-in-the-street" interviews were conducted on the 
program by "Today" panelists Jack Lescoulie and Pat Fontaine. Only 
one person interviewed disagreed with the President's course of action. 

The program concluded with an interview with Senator John L. 
McClellan (D.-Ark.) who also revealed his reactions to the Cuban crisis. 

* * * 

Live pickups from the special meeting of the Organization of 
American States in Washington on developments there and a report on 
Russia's reaction to the U. S. stand on Cuba were presented in five 
special NBC News bulletins on the NBC-TV Network this morning (Tuesday, 
Oct. 23). 

The first reaction from Moscow, more than 12 hours after 
President Kennedy's speech, was reported in a bulletin at 9*30 a.m. 

EDT. The special announcement quoted the Russians as warning that the 
U. S. has taken on itself a grave responsibility for peace or war. 


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The first of four special reports from the O.A.S. meeting at 
the Pan American Building in Washington, where an NBC News mobile unit 
was stationed, was presented at 10 a.m. EDT. NBC News correspondent 
Herb Kaplow reported from the meeting. 

At 11 a.m., NBC News correspondent Robert Goralski, also at 
the O.A.S. meeting, said that the delegates were expected to approve a 
resolution introduced by Secretary of State Dean Rusk calling for the 
withdrawal of offensive weapons from Cuba. 

The U. S. request that the council adjourn until afternoon 
(so that delegates could receive instructions from their governments 
before voting on the U. S. resolution), and the subsequent adjournment, 
were reported in special bulletins at 11:32 and 11:43 a.m. EDT. 


NBC-New York, 10/23/62 



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FROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Vhirt\ Rockefeller Plaza. Sew York 20, S. Y. 


October 23, 1962 

In view of the critical international 
situation that has developed in the last 24 
hours, the National Broadcasting Company has 
concluded in its own judgment that this is 
not an appropriate time to broadcast its docu¬ 
mentary program showing the construction of a 
tunnel under the Berlin Wall and the escape of 
East German refugees. Accordingly, the broad¬ 
cast of the program, scheduled for Oct. 31, 

7:30-9 p.m. EST, is being postponed. 

At no time has the State Department 
asked NBC to refrain from broadcasting "The 
Tunnel" program and announced last Friday that 
it does not intend to do so. 

-o- 


Preis Department, Room 320 











I ■ • ■ 

' : 

. i ■’ 










NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


October 23, 1962 

YOUR VOTE MAY BE USED BY NBC NEWS EARLY ON ELECTION NIGHT 
TO 'PROJECT’ RESULTS FOR NBC-TV'S COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 

Will your vote, after you have cast it on Nov. 6, show up 
somewhere on the television screen? 

It almost certainly will show up in the Election Night cover¬ 
age of NBC News, which expects to tabulate more than 95 per cent of the 
vote from the time the NBC-TV coverage starts at 7 p.m. EST until it is 
completed in the early morning hours of the following day. 

Your vote may even be used early on election evening to 
"project" the final results -- if you happen to vote in what NBC News 
calls a "barometric precinct." This is a precinct that accurately 
reflects a larger voting trend -- for the nation as a whole, for a single 
state, or for a group such as the labor or farm blocs. 

Suppose, as an example, you vote in a barometric precinct in 
Detroit. An NBC News vote collector will be on hand at your precinct 
when the polls close and the count is taken. He will telephone the 
total, including your own vote, first to a special NBC News center in 
Detroit, then to the RCA 501 Systems Center at Cherry Hill, N.J. 

The NBC News center in Detroit will relay the figure to NBC in 
New York. At Election Central in Studio 8-H in New York, the number will 
be noted down by one of a staff of tabulators -- part of an over-all 
election staff of more than 3,700. It will then be passed on to the 
technicians operating the electronic vote-counting boards. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 










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2 - Election Night 


They will add it to the Michigan totals and it will stand out 
on the boards in lighted numbers that can be picked up by the television 
cameras and can be seen by Chet Huntley and David Brinkley from their 
"anchormen" vantage point inside the studio. 

Meanwhile, the Detroit figure will also have been received at 
the RCA 501 Systems Center, where a special RCA team has been working 
with a system of five RCA 501 and 301 computers for the past year to 
prepare them for their Election Night role. 

The team consists of some 300 specialists in the fields of 
computer programming, statistics, mathematics, political science and 
sociology. Their task has been a highly complex one, but essentially it 
is the process of analyzing past elections to find the key to those of 
the future. 

The first step is to accumulate masses of information on pre¬ 
vious elections -- data on the voting record of the country as a whole, 
of individual states, counties and even precincts. This voting data is 
correlated with other information that bears on election results -- the 
economic well-being of the country, the population growth in certain 
areas, the patterns of voter education, income, employment, religion and 
many other factors. 

All this information is analyzed and compared and finally 
distilled into what the computer specialists call a 'mathematical model" 
-- a series of formulas which express the nation's voting patterns in 
mathematical terms. 

These formulas, which fill page after page in the voluminous 
records of the RCA election team, are fed into the memory of the computer 
system. There they await the actual Election Night returns, which will 

(more) 



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3 - Election Night 


be measured against the mathematical model to determine how the voting 
varies from past elections. 

For example, those afore-mentioned returns from a single 
precinct in Detroit may fill in a key element in the model. As more of 
these elements are filled in, the voting patterns emerge more and more 
clearly until at last the results of the election can be projected with 
assurance -- many hours before all the actual vote has been counted. 

The RCA computer system will be used throughout the evening, 
starting with the first returns from the East and ending with the last 
returns from the West. Among its more difficult tasks will be projecting 
and analyzing the gubernatorial races in New York, Michigan and 
California -- each one of them a tougher job than the i 960 Presidential 
contest. 

Early in the evening of Election Day, the RCA computers will 
also be asked these questions: By what margin will the Democrats maintain 
control of the Senate, and will the House of Representatives be 
Republican or Democratic for the second half of President Kennedy's four- 
year term -- and by what margin? 

One other question: does the computer system really work? The 
answer, RCA specialists point out, was stated clearly and affirmatively 
early in the evening of Election Day, I960, when an RCA 501 computer 
projected a Kennedy victory within one-tenth of one percentage point of 
the vote as it was finally counted next day. 


NBC-New York, 10/23/62 



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October 24, 1962 

NBC NEWS ADDS TWO iMONDAY-THROUGH -FRIDAY 5-MINUTE TV REPORTS 
THROUGH PERIOD OF CUBAN CRISIS; GULF OIL IS SPONSOR 

NBC News has added two Monday-through-Friday 
five-minute news reports -- at 12 noon and 3:55 p.m. NYT 
-- to its schedule of four such programs on the NBC-TV 
Network. The two additional programs began today 
(Wednesday, Oct. 24) and will continue for the duration of 
the Cuban crisis. 

The two new broadcasts are sponsored by the 
Gulf Oil Corporation through the Young and Rubicam Inc. 
advertising agency. 

The broadcasts bring to six the number of 
Monday-through-Friday five-minute NBC News reports on 
NBC-TV. The others (all times NYT) are: "NBC News Morning 
Report" (10:25 a.m.), "NBC News Day Report" (12:55 p.m.), 

"NBC News Early Afternoon Report" (2:55 p.m.) and "NBC News 
Afternoon Report" (4:55 p.m.). 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 
















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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Pinza. Xeu’ York 20. X. 

October 24, 1962 

TELEVISION AND RADIO BROADCASTS OF ADLAI E. STEVENSON'S U.N. ADDRESS 
INCLUDED IN SECOND DAY’S COVERAGE OF CUBAN CRISIS STORY BY NBC NEWS 

NBC News presented live TV and radio coverage of the 
address of Adlai E. Stevenson to the U. N. Security Council Tuesday, 

Oct. 23. Ambassador Stevenson, the U.S.A.'s chief representative to 
the U.N., spoke more than an hour, outlining the growth of Soviet 
influence in Cuba and the U. S. resolution calling for the dismantling 
of offensive weapons on Cuban soil. 

The TV program entitled "U.N. Special" ran from 4 to 5:45 p.m. 
EDT. Frank McGee was anchorman. 

Taped scenes were also shown of critical votes taken at the 
Washington meeting of the Organization of American States. Delegates 
from Latin American countries were seen voting in support of the U. S. 
position. 

NBC News correspondents Herbert Ka.plow and Robert Goralski 
reported from the O.A.S. meeting. NBC News’ U. N. correspondent 
Pauline Frederick summarized the highlights of Ambassador Stevenson’s 
speech from the U. N. meeting in New York. 

The program also included a report from correspondent Ray 
Scherer at the White House. Scherer said a press conference was in 
progress inside the executive mansion and that President Kennedy was 
expected to issue a formal proclamation on the Cuban quarantine 
shortly. 

McGee concluded the program with a late report that Russian 
ships were currently en route to Cuba. 

^ (more) 













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2 - Cuban Crisis 


"U. N. Special" brought to four hours the special TV cover¬ 
age NBC News devoted Tuesday to the Cuban crisis. 

The "Today" show (7-9 a.m. EDT) brought reaction from 
abroad as well as several pertinent interviews. Throughout the day, 
NBC News interrupted radio and TV programs with bulletins and brief 
special reports. 

NBC News 1 radio coverage included live reports from the 
O.A.S. meeting and the White House as well as the U. N. In addition. 
News-on-the-Hour" broadcasts kept radio listeners informed of the 
Cuban crisis, and bulletins kept pace with fast-breaking developments. 

President Kennedy's address to the nation Monday night was 
taped by NBC News and transmitted to Europe via Telstar early the next 
day. Some 12 nations of the European Broadcasting Union received the 
TV transmission. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 10/24/62 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


October 24, 1962 

HERBERT P. SOLOW IS NAMED DIRECTOR, DAYTIME PROGRAMS, 

WEST COAST, NBC TELEVISION NETWORK 

Herbert P. Solow has been named Director, Daytime Programs, 
West Coast, NBC Television Network, it was announced today by Mort 
Werner, Vice President, Programs, for the network. 

"Mr. Solow will work on all aspects of NEC-TV Daytime 
Programming, West Coast, and he will report to Grant Tinker, Vice 
President, Program Operations, West Coast," Mr. Werner said. 

Before joining NBC, Mr. Solow was Director, Daytime Programs 
Hollywood, Columbia Broadcasting System, since August, i960. He was 
Program Director, California National Productions, in New York and 
Los Angeles from 1956 to i960. 

Mr. Solow was a talent agent, representing television 
program producers and packagers, with the William Morris Agency in 
New York from 1953 to 1956. 

Mr. Solow is a graduate of Dartmouth College. He is married 
to the former Maxine Turner of Mount Vernon, N. Y. They reside in 
Pacific Palisades, Calif., with their three daughters. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 





FROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Thirl > Rockefeller Pinza. A etc York 20. N. )’. 


October 24, 1962 

NBC NEWS SETS UP REPORT SYSTEM BY COUNTIES AND (IN SOME CASES) TOWNS 
FOR TV AND RADIO ELECTION NIGHT RETURNS IN KEY RACES OF 14 STATES 

NBC News will use a county-by-county and -- in some cases -- 
a town-by-town system of reporting key races in 14 states for its 
Election Night coverage on the NBC Television and Radio Networks 
Tuesday, Nov. 6 (7 p.m. EST to conclusion). 

Elmer W. Lower, General Manager, NBC News, who is supervising 
the coverage, said that a reporter has been assigned to every county 
in each of 12 states -- New York, Pennyslva.nia, Maryland, Ohio, 

Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Kentucky, Missouri, Kansas 
and California. 

In Connecticut and Massachusetts, where the vote is by town 
rather than county, NBC News will have a reporter in most towns -- 
covering about 80 per cent of the vote in the two states. 

The coverage in the 14 states will require some 1,000 report¬ 
ers, who will be part of an over-all NBC News election staff totaling 
more than 3,750 reporters, correspondents, editors and technicians. 

The county reporters in each state will report the vote to 
a news bureau headed by a state election manager. The bureaus will 
then phone the totals every 20 minutes to NBC News’ Election Central in 
New York. 

The state election managers have been planning and organizing 
the coverage over the past six months. Following are their assignments 
and election bureau locations: 


Preti Ue/jartrnenl, Room 320 


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2 - NBC News 


Ed Edwin (New York State), NBC, New York 

Richard Kellerman (Connecticut), NBC, New York 

Robert Shaefer (Pennsylvania), WRCV-TV, Philadelphia 

William Corrigan (Maryland), WRC-TV, Washington 

William Lindsey (Ohio), KYW-TV, Cleveland 

Richard Yoakum (Indiana), WFBM-TV, Indianapolis 

Robert Mulholland (Illinois), WNBQ, Chicago 

Frank Jordan (Michigan), WWJ-TV, Detroit 

Jack Krueger (Wisconsin), WTMJ-TV, Milwaukee 

Robert Lissitt (Kentucky), WAVE-TV, Louisville 

James Harden (Missouri and Kansas), WDAF-TV, Kansas City, Mo. 

John Thompson (California), KRCA, Los Angeles 

Dean Brelis (Massachusetts), Boston Globe, Boston 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 10/24/62 




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320 


NBC TELEVISION N-KTWOHK NEW&x-H 


October 25, 1962 


90-MINUTE NBC NEWS TV PROGRAM TO DEAL WITH CUBAN CRISIS 

A special 90-minute NBC News program dealing with 
the background and late developments in the Cuban crisis will 
be presented on the NBC Television Network Wednesday, Oct. 31 
(7:30-9 p.m. EST). 

The program, titled "Clear and Present Danger," 
will be produced by Reuven Prank. It will pre-empt "The 
Virginian." 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 

















■ 













FROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Vhirt\ Hockefeller I'laza. \etr York 20, X. Y. 

October 25, 1962 

-——---t 

CONTINUED TV AND RADIO COVERAGE OF CUBAN CRISIS OFFERED BY NBC NEWS 

NBC News continued special coverage of the Cuban crisis 
Wednesday, Oct. 24 with running reports on the NBC-TV and Radio net¬ 
works that included an "instant news" TV program and bulletins almost 
every half-hour on both mediums. 

From early Wednesday through noon today (Thursday), there 
were 43 special or regular news reports on NBC-TV, keeping pace with 
Cuban developments. NBC Radio’s "News-on-the-Hour" broadcasts, plus 
bulletins throughout the day kept radio listeners informed. 

At 11:15 p.m. EDT Wednesday, the Gulf Oil Corporation 
sponsored "Cuban Crisis: Third Day." The 15-minute TV special, 
with Frank McGee as anchorman, featured live reports from the following 

- NBC News correspondent Peter Hackes at the Pentagon 

with a run-down on military reaction. 

- Richard Valerian!, temporarily assigned to Miami, 

narrated film of military movements in the Florida area. 

- Pauline Frederick, NBC News’ United Nations correspondent 

summarized the day’s events there. A tape of the proposal of U Thant, 
Acting Secretary General, to the U. S. and Russia for a suspension of 
actions was also shown. 

- NBC News correspondent Ray Scherer spoke from the front 

of the White House, outlining Washington reaction to late Cuban 
developments. 

McGee reviewed the entire day’s events as the program ended. 

(more) 


Prett Department. Hoorn 320 














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2 


'Cuban Crisis' 


Besides the four regular news segments on "Today" this 
morning (7-9 a.m. EDT), the following special features on the program 
dealt with the Cuban crisis: 

Interviews with two U. S. Senators -- Senator Kenneth 
B. Keating (R.-N.Y.) and Senator Vance Hartke (D.-Ind.), by NBC 
News correspondent Martin Agronsky. 

A film report about U. S. military buildup in Key West, 
Fla., and the surrounding area. 

- An interview by NBC News correspondent Peter Hackes with 

Dr. Ralph E. Lapp, noted nuclear physicist and author of "Kill and 
Overkill." a book dealing with the destructive power of atomic weapons. 

Between the end of the "Today" show and noon, NBC News 
interrupted the TV network for a report at 11:30 a.m. EDT. The 
regular TV news report at 10:25-10:30 a.m. EDT also brought current 
developments. 


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NBC-New York, 10/25/62 




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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEW S 


October 25, 1962 


MACY'S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE AND CIRCUS WILL BE 
TWO-HOUR NBC-TV COLOR BROADCAST FROM NEW YORK 
Remco Industries and Food Manufacturers to Sponsor Network Coverage 

Donald Duck makes his debut as a parade celebrity and 
Bullwinkle Moose makes a return appearance in Macy 1 s Thanksgiving Day 
Parade and Circus, to be televised in color in its entirety on the 
NBC-TV Network Thursday, Nov. 22 , from 10 a.m. to 12 noon EST. 

Helium-filled versions of the two stars of NBC-TV Sunday 
color cartoon series will be among the five mammoth balloon in Macy's 
36 th annual parade. Donald Duck will be this year’s new creation 
among the huge balloons, which symbolize New York's traditional 
holiday event. Joining Donald and Bullwinkle will be Popeye, the 
Happy Dragon and the Flying Trapeze Balloon. 

Other parade highlights will include numerous TV, film and 
stage celebrities, many scenic floats, a dozen colorful marching bands 
from different parts of the country and various singing and dancing 
groups. Santa Claus, in his sleigh at the end of the procession, will 
wave his customary holiday greeting to the millions of video viewers 
and sidewalk spectators. 

Many of the entertainers and all of the bands will put on 
special performances when they reach Macy's grandstand area at Herald 
Square, between 3^-th and 35th Streets. NBC-TV will locate five color 

cameras in the Herald Square area, where the circus portion of the 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 30, NEW YORK 



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2 - Parade 


two-hour color show also will be staged. NBC-TV will present 
exclusive coverage of the circus and will be the only network to 
televise the entire parade. 

Ed Pierce, who produced the Thanksgiving Day Parade program 
on NBC-TV the laBt three years, again will be the producer. This 
will be the third straight year of color coverage, and the 15th time 
since 19^5 that NBC has televised the parade, either nationally or 
locally. 

Remco Industries Inc., through Webb Associates Inc., and 
Food Manufacturers Inc., through Ted Bates & Co., will sponsor 
NBC-TV coverage of the parade portion of the two hours. Remco will 
sponsor the network’s coverage of the circus portion. 


NBC-New York, 10/25/62 



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October 25, 1962 

MISSOURI 'TIGER' AND KANSAS 'JAYHAWKER' HIT IT OFF 
HARMONIOUSLY ON NBC NEWS' ELECTION COVERAGE 

A "Tiger" from Missouri and a "Jayhawker" from Kansas will 
be working closely together on NBC News’ coverage of 1962 election 
results Tuesday, Nov. 6 . 

The alliance will not be new for Elmer W. Lower, a native of 
Kansas City, Mo., and a graduate of the School of Journalism of the 
University of Missouri, at Columbia, and Richard Harkness, an alumnus 
of the University of Kansas, at Lawrence. In spite of the traditional 
rivalry of these schools and states, the two newsmen have an 
association in political reporting that goes back 30 years. 

On Election Night, Lower, General Manager of NBC News, will 
supervise the coverage on the NBC Television and NBC Radio Networks 
(7 p.m. EST to conclusion). Harkness, a Washington correspondent, will 
broadcast the findings of the RCA computers being used to determine 
voting trends. Lower will be in NBC's huge studio 8-H in New York, 
where the operation will be centered, and Harkness will be at the RCA 
Systems Center at Cherry Hill, N.J. Although separated by distance, 
they will be linked by direct communications lines. 

They first worked together in the United Press bureau in 
Kansas City, Mo., handling Missouri and Kansas returns in the election 
that gave Franklin Delano Roosevelt his first term as President. 

In 1935, Lower took over Harkness' job as bureau manager for 
UP in Jefferson City, Mo., after Harkness was transferred to the wire 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 












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2 - Lower-Harkness 


service's Washington staff'. Two years later. Lower followed him to 
Washington and they again worked together on elections. 

Their paths separated for a number of years but converged 
again after Lower joined NBC News in 1959 (Harkness has been with NBC 
News since 19^2). Their roles in the coverage of the i960 elections 
were substantially the same as they will be this year. 

Harkness is not a native Kansan, but he strengthened his ties 
with that state by marrying the former Daz Suiter of Macksville. In 
i960, the University of Kansas awarded him its highest honor, a 
Citation for Distinguished Service. 


NBC-New York, 10/25/62 



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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

October 25, 1962 

33 U.S. SENATORS PRAISE ‘MEET THE PRESS' AND PRODUCER SPIVAK 

--- -1 

Thirty-three members of the United States Senate have 
praised NBC's "Meet the Press" and the series' producer, Lawrence E. 
Spivak, as the program approaches its 15 th TV anniversary. 

The series started its NBC-TV run Nov. 6, 19^7. It Is now 
presented Sundays at 6 p.ra. NYT in color on the NBC-TV Network, and at 
6:30 p.m. NYT on the NBC Radio Network. 

Senator Mike Mansfield (D.-Mont.), the Senate Majority 
Leader, wrote: "Your panel has been one of constant high caliber and 
you, as anchor man, have helped to make the program the scintillating 
success it has been." 

Minority Leader, Senator Everett M. Dirksen (R.-Ill.), wrote 
"This is indeed a record for a program of this kind and is a testament 
to the quality of the program and to the skill with which it is 
managed." 

Comments from other Senators follows: 

Senator J. W. Fulbrlght (D.-Ark.): "..I have always been 
impressed with the effort you and other panelists have made to present 
a critical and fair examination of your guests." 

Senator Barry Goldwater (R.-Ariz.):"'Meet the Press' has 
consistently met the highest standards of fair and penetrating news 
coverage and from personal experience I can attest to the program's 
objectivity." 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 30. NEW YORK 
























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2 


'Meet the Press' 


Senator Hubert H. Humphrey (D.-Minn.): "Without question, 
the American people have gained a greater insight into the major issues 
of the day through this provocative and informative series." 

Senator Clifford P. Case (R.-N.J.): "During these years, I 
have watched the growth of your program, both as a participant and as 
a viewer, and I congratulate you on the high standards of timeliness 
and fair play which you have attained." 

Senator Stuart Symington (D.-Mo.): "Over the past 15 years it 
('Meet the Press') has performed a service priceless to democracy -- 
keeping the people informed on the major issues of the day.." 

Senator Richard B. Russell (D.-Ga.): "Through your- program, 
literally millions of our citizens have had the opportunity to come 
face to face with the leaders of every level of our society, not only 
in this country, but the leaders of almost every nation in the world." 

Senator Estes Kefauver (D.-Tenn.): "...an outstanding job of 
being hardnosed and tough with public officials. I can attest to the 
toughness from having appeared as a guest a number of times." 

Senator John L. McClellan (D.-Ark.): "These programs have 
contributed greatly to a. better informed public, and thus to the 
strengthening of our democracy and system of government." 

Senator Paul H. Douglas (D.-Ill): "...one of the best 

opportunities in the country for basic facts and judgments on public 
affairs to be aired..." 

Senator Thomas J. D odd (D.-Conn.): "'Meet the Press' has 
given us an example of the ideal television can achieve in serving both 
the needs of entertainment and the requirements of the public interest." 

Senator Albert Gore (D.-Tenn.): "...comments of the leading 
personalities who have appeared on the program taken together reflect 

(more) 













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the thoughts and sentiments of the American public which have shaped 
national policies." 

Senator Robert S, Kerr (D.-Okla): "...a great contribution 
to our democratic society by giving newsmakers and newsmen an 
opportunity to discuss significant problems before a vast audience." 

Senator Wayne Morse (D.-Ore.): "'Meet the Press' has 
demonstrated that radio and television programs can be great educa¬ 
tional forces when handled in an enlightened and effective manner." 

Senator Homer E. Capehart (R.-Ind.): "...an excellent job 
of bringing directly to the people the opinions of our public 
officials..." 

Senator Warren G. Magnuson (D.-Wa,sh.): "...the listener and 
viewer is the best judge... judging from his response in faithfully 
tuning in each week, the program ranks high in his estimation too." 

Senator Bourke 3. Hickenlooper (R.-Iowa): "You have main¬ 
tained the highest level of journalistic ability..." 

Senator J. Strom Thurmond (D.-S. C.): "I feel that it 
does much good in stimulating public interest in and knowledge of 
public affairs. I try to watch it every Sunday." 

Senator Frank Church (D.-Idaho): "Many an answer has come 
forth on 'Meet the Press' that otherwise would have remained unspoken 
and unread." 

Senator Ru ssell B. Long (D.-La.): "I have always felt your 
program was doing an effective job in bringing ....an insight into 
the important issues that are facing our nation." 

Senator Henry M. Jackson (D.-Wash.): "This program has 
provided the best of television since its beginning November 6, 

1947, and it has never wavered from its high standards. 

(more) 


11 













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4 - 'Meet the Press' 


Senator John J. Sparkman (D.-Ala.) : "...one of the out¬ 
standing discussion and information programs to be found anywhere in 
the world." 

S enator William Proxmire (D.-Wis.): "Sunday evening has 
become a time for a. nation-wide lesson of civic responsibility in our 
country. The opportunity for citizens to watch responsible and lead¬ 
ing public officials interrogated in depth by competent newspapermen 
is invaluable." 

Senator Vance Hartke (D.-Ind.): "...in the true spirit of 
pure journalism, the search for truth will always keep 'Meet the 
Press' in its vital communications role." 

Senator John G. Tower (R.-Tex.): "...your recognition as 
senior network IV program...is not measured by mere chronological 
continuity... but by the genuine wealth of hard news your programs 
have developed..." 

Senator Spessard L. Holland (D.-Fla.): "...'Meet the Press' 
has contributed largely to the 'coming of age' of radio and tele¬ 
vision ..." 

Senator Karl E. Mundt (R.-S.D.): "...'Meet the Press' 
deserves an important niche in history (for) portraying the activities 
of Congressional investigations and the tedious processes by which our 
Government has endeavored to protect itself..." 

Senator Sam uel J. E rvi n Jr. (D.-N.C.): "The long tenure of 
'Meet the Press' is overwhelming evidence of its contribution to our 
American way of life and its impact on the American people." 

Senator Joseph S. Clark (D.-Pa.): "No one who is interested 
in public affairs....can fail to appreciate the importance of 'Meet 
the Press.'" 


(more) 












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5 - 'Meet the Press * 


Senator Herman E. Talmadge (D.-Ga,.): "A 'Meet the Press' 
interrogation is the most effective test of a public official's worth 
ever devised." 

Senator George D. Aiken (R.-Vt.): "Over the years this 
program has been a valuable stimulant to increased public interest in 
current affairs..." 

Senator Hugh Scott (R.-Pa.): "The impact of 'Meet the Press' 
on American public opinion is probably greater than that of any other 
public affairs panel show...No wonder millions of Americans tune in 
regularly." 

NBC-New York, 10/25/62 






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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

• *'• * ' i > ’ 

:l- * ‘ * 

a-X-M NBC THAI)E NEWS 


October 26, 1962 

COMPLETE SPONSORSHIP ANNOUNCED FOR TWO NBC NEWS COLOR TV SPECIALS: 

'THE NILE 1 AND 'POLARIS SUBMARINE: JOURNAL OF AN UNDERSEA VOYAGE’ 

Complete sponsorship of two NBC News color TV specials -- 
!, The Nile" and "The Polaris Submarine: Journal of an Undersea Voyage" 
-- was announced today by Sam K. Maxwell Jr., Director, Special 
Program Sales, NBC Television Network. 

Bristol-Myers Co., through Young & Rubicam Inc., purchased 
one-half sponsorship of "The Nile," to be broadcast Sunday, Oct. 28 , 
10-11 p.m. EST. Westinghouse Electric Corporation, through McCann- 
Erickson, purchased one-half sponsorship of the program about the 
Polaris submarine, to be presented Wednesday, Dec. 1$> » 10-11 p.m. EST. 

As previously announced, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., 
through J. Walter Thompson Co., purchased one-half sponsorship of both 
color programs. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 











; 










NBC TRADE NEWS 


October 26, 1962 

NBC INTERNATIONAL SELLS EIGHT TV SERIES TO NETWORK 
OF NEW ZEALAND BROADCASTING COMMISSION 

Eight television series, including four that are 
now seen on the NBC-TV Network, have been sold by NBC 
International to the network of the New Zealand 
Broadcasting Commission. 

"Dr. Kildare," "The Dick Powell Show," 

"Bonanza," and "The Loretta Young Show," now on 
NBC-TV, are included in the group sale. The four 
former NBC-TV shows which complete the transaction, 
the biggest to date between NBC International and the 
New Zealand Broadcasting Commission, are "87th Precinct," 
"Hopalong Cassidy," "Shirley Temple Specials," and "The 
Americans." 




PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 








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from the national broadcasting company 

I'hirt y Rockefeller Plaza. A etc York 1 20 , X. Y. 


October 26, 1962 

NBC NEWS SPECIAL AND REGULAR PROGRAMS CONTINUE TO BRING 
DEVELOPMENTS IN CUBAN CRISIS TO TV AND RADIO AUDIENCES 

Developments in the Cuban crisis were covered by NBC News 
from noon (NYT) Thursday, Oct. 25., to noon (NYT) today, Friday, 

Oct. 26, in 26 special and regular programs on the NBC-TV Network, as 
well as numerous bulletins, special programs and regular programs on 
the NBC Radio Network. 

The special coverage included live pickups from the United 
Nations of U. S. Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson's speech and the reply 
by Soviet Ambassador Valeria Zorin late Thursday afternoon. It also 
included "Cuban Crisis: Fourth Day," a 15-minute TV special Thursday, 
at 11:15 p.m.(NYT). This program, with Frank McGee as anchorman, 
summarized and updated the day’s events. It was sponsored by the Gulf 
Oil Corporation. 

NBC News correspondents Bill Ryan, in New York; Pauline 
Frederick, at the UN; Ray Scherer and Sander Vanocur, at the White 
House; Peter Ha.ckes, at the Pentagon; Robert Goralski and Robert 
Abernethy, also in Washington; and Floyd Kalber, in Chicago, 
participated in the running reports of the Cuban situation. 

-o- 


Press Department, Room 320 











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■■ 









from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Pinza. Sew York 20, S. Y. 


October 26, 1962 

"WHAT DO THE RETURNS MEAN?" IS QUESTION THAT POSES KEY 
TO ELECTION COVERAGE ORGANIZED FOR TV AND RADIO 
BY ELMER W. LOWER, GENERAL MANAGER, NBC NEWS 

When the i 960 national election ended, Elmer W. Lower began 
preparing for the 1962 national election. 

As General Manager, NBC News, Lower has organized a staff of 
more than 3*700 election reporters, special state correspondents, 
workers in key precincts around the country, telephone operators and 
tabulators -- all for Election Night coverage on NBC-TV and Radio 
Tuesday, Nov. 6 (starting at 7 p.m. EST). 

This staff will be more than three times larger than the one 
in i 960 when NBC News' swift and accurate reporting attracted an NBC-TV 
audience greater than that for both other TV networks combined. 

Lower joined NBC News in 1959. He has since played a key 
role in most of the network's major news projects: the i 960 conventions 
and elections. President Kennedy's Inauguration, Soviet Premier 
Khrushchev's arrival in Washington in 1959* and the three-network 
planning for the first TV broadcast of a Presidential news conference 
and first live transatlantic TV exchange via the Telstar satellite. 

A graduate of the School of Journalism of the University of 
Missouri, Lower also holds a masters degree in public law and govern¬ 
ment from Columbia University. His master's thesis dealt with broad¬ 
casting and American elections. The University of Missouri also 
awarded him a medal for distinctive service to journalism in 1959 - 

(more) 


Press Department. Room 320 















. 

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2 - Elmer W. Lower 


Lower has worked, during his 30-year news career, with two 
newspapers, three wire services, two national magazines and two major 
networks. 

Prior to joining NBC, he was with CBS News for six years, 
his last post being that of Director of Operations. 

Before joining CBS, Lower worked for Life Magazine; Time-Life 
(in Paris, Los.-_Angeles and Tokyo), United Press International, 
Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, the Louisville 
(Ky.) Herald-Post and the Flint (Mich.) Journal. 

During World War II, he was a field representative for the 
Office of War Information in Cairo, Algiers, Naples and London. He 
also served as chief of the Information Division of the U. S. High 
Command for Germany. 

The 1961 elections, which Lower organized for NBC News, drew 
this review by Jack Gould of the New York Times: "The News Department 
of the National Broadcasting Company ran away with the coverage of 
last night's election returns...It was an example of a model of 
public service, one that explains NBC’s deserved reputation in the 
news field." (This election coverage highlighted the races for mayor 
of New York City and governor of New Jersey.) 

Lower approaches coverage of election returns as a study in 
time and motion. But once the figures are in hand, he turns the 
staff into a search for the answer to the question: "What do the 
returns mean?" 


NBC-New York, 10/26/62 



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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 26, 1962 

MILT KAMEN WILL REVIEW BROADWAY PLAYS 
AND MOVIES ON *MERV GRIFFIN SHOW* 

Milt Kamen, nightclub comedian and raconteur who appeared 
frequently on the "Tonight" show, has been signed as a reviewer of 
motion pictures and Broadway plays on NBC-TV’s new ,! Merv Griffin Show" 
color series (Monday through Friday, 2-2:55 p.m. EST). 

Kamen will offer his five-to-eight-minute critiques once a 
week on a regular basis beginning the week of Nov. 5-9, producer Bob 
Shanks said. During that week, on a day to be announced, Kamen will 
review the new film, "Mutiny on the Bounty," starring Marlon Brando. 
Future Kamen reviews will include the new Broadway play, "Who's 
Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" and the new movie, "The Chapman Report." 

Kamen first appeared on the "Merv Griffin Show" Oct. 22, when 
he reviewed "The Longest Day." He returned Oct. 26 with comment on 
"Barabbas" and "Requiem for a Heavyweight." 

"Mr. Kamen really impressed us with his humorous, incisive 
and sophisticated reviews, and we're delighted to get him on a regular 
basis," Shanks said. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 













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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

( ROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Thirty Rockefeller Pinza. New York 20, N. Y. g — X ** H 

October 29, 1962 

FROM KENNEDY TALK MONDAY TO KHRUSHCHEV ANNOUNCEMENT SUNDAY, 

NBC NEWS KEPT ON TOP OF CUBAN CRISIS STORY FOR TV AND RADIO 

From President Kennedy’s historic speech Monday, Oct. 22, 
outlining the Cuban blockade, until Premier Khrushchev’s Sunday, 

Oct. 28 announcement that the Cuban missile bases would be dismantled, 
NBC News kept on top of the story with bulletins, special reports and 
special programs on TV and radio. 

In some cases, bulletin followed bulletin by only minutes. 

One NBC newsman was on the air four seconds after running from a White 
House briefing. 

Special live TV programs showed developments at the U. N. and 
a view of lights burning late in the windows of President Kennedy’s 
quarters at the White House. 

In all, there were 94 TV bulletins between Monday and Sunday. 
Some lasted but a minute; others ran 10 or 15 minutes as developments 
warranted. 

NBC News presented a total of 13 TV specials dealing with the 
crisis during this period. These amounted to eight hours and 40 
minutes in air time. The specials ranged from the entire two-hour 
"Today" show Tuesday to two 15-minute programs at 11:15 p.m. NYT 
Wednesday and Thursday, recapping the days’ events. 

NBC Radio’s "News-on-the-Hour" broadcasts utilized frequent 
bulletins. In one instance, Robert Goralski, one of NBC News’ 

Washington correspondents, found himself on the air with just four 
seconds of preparation. 

(more) 

Presi Department, Hoorn 320 

















. 







2 - Cuban Crisis 


Open telephone lines between the White House, the NBC News 
desk in Washington and the news desk in New York had been set up 
Sunday (Oct. 28) at noon. 

While a "News-on-the-Hour" program was in progress, Goralski 
was at a White House briefing. When the briefing concluded, Goralski 
was to rush to a phone and shout, "No bulletin" or "Bulletin. Give me 
the air." 

Rushing from the briefing room, Goralski gave the latter 
cry. For the next minute, he was on the air, reading a statement just 
issued. 

Chronologically, the week’s coverage on NBC-TV included 
these highlights (all times NYT). 

Monday, Oct. 22: At 12:19 p.m. NBC News gave the bulletin 
that President Kennedy would speak at 7 that night. He spoke for 18 
minutes, starting at 7 p.m., his talk carried on the NBC-TV and Radio 
networks. Six TV bulletins were carried after the speech and the 
coverage culminated with a 45-minute TV special at 11:15 p.m. 

Tuesday, Oct. 23: The entire "Today" show (7-9 a.m.) was 
devoted to the Cuban crisis. There were 18 bulletins throughout the 
day in addition to the four regular five-minute news programs. Live 
pickup from the United Nations Security Council meeting ran from 4 p.m. 
to 5:45 p.m. and the "Chet Huntley Reporting" program this night 
( 10 : 30-11 p.m.) also covered the story. 

Wednesday, Oct, 24: There were 22 bulletins this day. At 
11:15 p.m., a special 15-minute program, "Cuban Crisis: Third Day" 
recapped developments. 


(more) 






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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



October 29, 1962 

ELITE ROSTER OF PROFESSIONAL AND NON-PROFESSIONAL TALENT HIGHLIGHTED 
IN NBC NEWS COLOR SPECIAL ON NATIONAL CULTURAL CENTER IN WASHINGTON 

Entertainment typical of the wide range of professional and 
non-professional talents which will eventually perform at the proposed 
National Cultural Center in Washington will be featured on the NBC News 
full-hour filmed special about the project to be broadcast in color on 
NBC-TV Sunday, Nov. 11 (4:30 p.m. EST). 

Sander Vanocur, NBC News White House correspondent, will be 
host for the special. John J. Sughrue Jr. is producer-director. 

Among the individual performers and groups which will be seen 
during the "National Cultural Center" program are the following: 

Danny Kaye, who was one of the speakers at the ceremony last 
month in Newport, R.I., at which a model of the center was unveiled by 
Mrs. John F. Kennedy. Portions of the comedian’s remarks will be 
presented. 

Gospel singer Mahalia Jackson will offer the spiritual 
"Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho." 

Poet Robert Frost will read his poem, "The Outright Gift." 

Emlyn Williams and Albert Dekker will be seen in excerpts of 
the prize-winning Broadway drama "A Man for All Seasons." 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra, directed by Erich Leinsdorf, 
will play the Third Movement from Walter Piston's "Symphony No. 7." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 



















• . 






















. 

. 
















. 

















2 - ’Cultural Center’ 


The Bolshoi Ballet Company, featuring prima ballerina Maya 
Plisetskaya, will perform a segment of "The Little Humpback Horse," 
a ballet based on the classic Russian fairytale. 

The Mormon Tabernacle Choir of more than 300 will be heard 
singing a portion of Mozart’s "Gloria in Excelsis Deo." 

The Catholic University (in Washington, D. C.) Players will 
perform an excerpt of Shakespeare’s "Othello." 

The University of Minnesota Players will do a scene from "Rip 
Van Winkle." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/29/62 




•• 

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NBC NEWSMAN JAMES ROBINSON ORDERED TO LEAVE VIET NAM 


The Vietnamese Interior Ministry has ordered NBC News' Far 
East correspondent James Robinson to leave Vietnam "in the shortest 
delay." 

Robinson, in messages to NBC from Saigon on Oct. 25 and 
26 , said that the expulsion order was based on his "lack of deference 
towards the regulations and laws" of Vietnam. He said the expulsion 
order came directly from Madame Nhu, Vietnam's "first lady." 

Robinson reported that a United States embassy spokesman 
expressed "outrage" over the expulsion order and advised him not to 
leave the country until Monday, Oct. 29. This morning (Oct. 29 ), 
however, Robinson reported he had been allowed to stay until Thursday, 
Nov. 1, as a result of Embassy efforts. The embassy is fighting the 
ouster order. Other correspondents in Saigon were also protesting 
on his behalf, said Robinson. 

He said that the Vietnamese government has long been angry 
at the foreign press, especially the American press. The Americans 
have often been publicly attacked by government officials, Robinson 
added. 

The correspondent also stated that the U. S. embassy spokes¬ 
man agreed that the expulsion order was obviously designed to attempt 
pressure against news coverage which might not agree with the govern¬ 
ment line. 

The Vietnamese government, said Robinson, has long been angry 
with NBC over a film he, Robinson, made which they thought did not 
depict their President in a proper light. 


NBC-New York, 10/29/62 










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October 29, 1962 

DESIGNED TO FIGURE OUT ELECTION RESULTS 

i__ __— 

Hjalmar Herrnanson is a pipe-smoking scenic designer for NBC 
News who knows a good figure when he sees one. 

His present concern is a number, one to zero, three inches 
high and two-and-one-half inches wide. 

Figures of that size will report the nation’s voting in the 
50 states for a variety of races -- governors, senators, congressmen -- 
on NBC-TV’s Election Night coverage Tuesday, Nov. 6 (beginning at 
7 p.m. EST). 

Herrnanson explains that his Election Control studio design 
is radically different from TV entertainment shows: "On entertainment 
shows, we are selling a personality, an atmosphere. 

"We design for that person -- singer, dancer, comedian. But 
for Election Night, the star of the show is a figure, a. number." 

Hermanson’s Election Night design is being constructed in 
NBC-TV’s Studio 8-H in New York City. When completed, four curved 
banks of electrically operated totalizers will report returns from key 
races in the East, Midwest, South and Far West. 

The three-by-two-and-one-ha.lf figures were selected because 
they are large enough to be seen from some 50 feet away. The NBC 
News anchormen, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, will be sitting on a 
platform just about 50 feet from Hjalmar's figures. 

-o- 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 

















. ; ■ 1 


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■ 





TITLE ROLE PLAYERS CHOSEN FOR ’WIDE COUNTRY' EPISODES 


Ray Danton went before the cameras in Hollywood recently a 
guest star in the title role of "The Bravest Man in the World," on 
NBC-TV’s "Wide Country" series (Thursdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m. EST). The 
episode is being directed by Ted Post and produced by Frank Telford. 
A playdate will be announced. 


* * * 

Edgar Buchanan has been cast by producer Frank Telford in 
the title role of the "Good Old Uncle Walt" episode of NBC-TV’s 
"Wide Country," now filming at Revue Studios in Hollywood. Earl 
Holliman and Andrew Prine star in the Thursday night series (7:30 to 
8:30 p.m. EDT), a Ralph Edwards production. 


o 


NBC-New York, 10/29/62 











• . • ■' 


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• • ■' . * . 1 " 



CORRECTION, PLEASE: 

A repeat broadcast of "Change of life," a "Purex Special 
for Women," will not be presented Wednesday, Nov. 14 (3-4 p.m. EST), 
as announced in the NBC Daily News Report of Oct. 26. 


NBC-New York, 10/29/62 




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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


'ROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

'liirl\ Rockefeller I’laza. \ etc York 20. i\. 


October 31* 1962 

HOW NBC NEWS WILL OFFER COMPREHENSIVE COVERAGE 
OF ELECTION RESULTS ON TELEVISION AND RADIO 

From 7 p.m. EST Tuesday, Nov. 6 until the early hours of 
Wednesday, Nov. 7* NBC News will broadcast on the NBC Television and 
Radio Networks its comprehensive coverage of contests for 435 House 
seats, 39 Senate seats and 35 governorships. 

In races of important national interest in six states, NBC 
News will employ a new vote-gathering system named "Dewline" -- a term 
borrowed from the military (Distant Early Warning Line). 

The races in these six states are for governor and senator 
in New York, for governor and senator in California, for governor in 
Michigan, for governor in Texas and for senators in Connecticut and 
Massachusetts. 

With reporters at precinct levels in each state, "Dewline" 
reports will be tabulated within an hour after polls close. 

The "Dewline" will complement other reporting techniques to 
be used by NBC News. The Election Night staff numbers more than 3*700. 
Reporters will be gathering returns in every state (in 14 key states, 
they will be reporting from every county.) 

All returns will funnel to Election Central, in Studio 8-H in 
the RCA Building in New York. Overlooking activity in this large 
studio will be TV anchormen Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, sitting at 
an "X" shaped desk 10 feet above four curved billboard-like structures 
that will display the returns from 50 states. 

(more) 


Rrett Department. Room 320 




. • .. ■ :• 

■ 





2 - Election Coverage 


These four bays will in turn be anchored by four news 
correspondents, each responsible for the voting in about a dozen states 
representing a geographical area. 

Sander Vanocur will cover the East, Frank McGee the South, 
Merrill Mueller the Midwest and John Chancellor the Far West. Ray 
Scherer will handle reports from the "Dewline 11 board. 

Telephones, teletypes, typewriters, reporters, tabulators, 
copy boys, TV cameras, radio newsmen, a "crisis desk,"a "victory desk" 
and a maze of special equipment will be in 8-H. 

A "victory desk" will determine the winning candidates in tight 
races. This desk will be headed by news producer Chet Hagan. ( EDITORS: 

A separate story on the "victory desk" is in today's Daily News Report.) 

The "crisis desk" will be utilized if a major development in 
international or national news occurs during the election coverage, NBC 
News' State Department correspondent Elie Abel will man this desk, 
prepared to broadcast on NBC-TV or Radio. 

Outside Election Central, TV cameras will be set up at the RCA 
Systems Center at Cherry Hill, N. J., where computers will analyze 
returns and project results in the races for governorships in 
California, New York and Michigan, and for the House and Senate. 

Other remote video locations will include the headquarters of 
the Republican and Democratic National Committees in Washington, the 
headquarters of Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller and his Democratic opponent 
Robert M. Morgenthau in New York, Michigan's Gov. John B. Swainson and 
George B. Romney, his Republican rival; and California, Gov. Edmund G. 
Brown and Republican candidate Richard M. Nixon. 

(more) 




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3 - Election Coverage 

Reuven Frank will produce the NBC-TV coverage and Russell 
Tornabene, the NBC Radio coverage. The NBC News election coverage was 
organized by Elmer W. Lower, General Manager, NBC News. 

The entire Election Night coverage will be under the super¬ 
vision of William R. McAndrew, Executive Vice President, NBC News, and 
Julian Goodman, Vice President, NBC News. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/31/62 




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October 31* 1962 


NBC NEWS* "VICTORY DESK" IS GEARED TO NAME ELECTION WINNERS 

, 

EVEN BEFORE CANDIDATES THEMSELVES CONCEDE BALLOTING RESULTS 
' ■■ ■ ...... — . - - ---- -- - - .... - ■■ --- ■■ .. ..— 

"We won't be predicting who will win the races for Governor 
and Senator. We will stat3 it, definitely, even before the candidates 
themselves may claim victory or concede defeat." 

This is the way Chet Haga.n describes the function of the NBC 
News "Victory Desk" on Election Night. Hagan will man the "Victory 
Desk" in Election Central in Studio 8-H, headquarters in New York for 
NBC News' Election Night coverage on NBC-TV and NBC Radio, Tuesday, 

Nov. 6 (starting at 7 p.m. EST). His decisions will go directly to the 
anchormen for election coverage. 

"There isn't any mumbo jumbo involved in making these 
decisions," Hagan explains. "And we don't guess. It's a careful 
judgment based on a thorough knowledge of each state's politics, 
combined with quick reports on the returns in key districts. In certain 
states, less than 10 per cent of the vote is enough for me to name 
which gubernatorial or senatorial candidate is the winner." 

The NBC News election staff of more than 3*700 (including 
reporters, correspondents, editors and technicians) will assure Hagan 
of the latest voting figures. He will also have direct lines to key 
people behind the scenes of election activities in various states. 

But it will be up to Hagan himself to make the important 
decision as to who has won. In preparation for his vital role, Hagan 
has been studying this year's political picture since early Summer when 
he compiled NBC News’ 700-page "Election Handbook." The book contains 

(more) 


Press Department, Roam 320 













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2 - victory Desk 1 


information on every race for governor, senator and representative, 
including important background material on each candidate. One hundred 
copies of the handbook were distributed in July to NBC News 
correspondents and editorial personnel who will have it at hand 
on Election Night. 

"Though I have been constantly working on the manual up¬ 
dating it, " says Hagan, "I will read each page again before election 
night." 

Hagan has traveled from coast to coast for a first-hand look 
at the campaigns in Ohio, Pennsylvania, California, Massachusetts, 
Connecticut, Illinois and Nebraska. He has also produced seven of the 
eight programs in NBC News' "The Campaign and the Candidates" series of 
pre-election specials on NBC-TV. 

If Hagan's past record is any indication, his "Victory Desk" 
will be providing NBC-TV viewers with early and accurate reports on 
trends and results across the country. 

The "Victory Desk" was first used during NBC News' coverage of 
the i 960 Presidential election. Though the race was close, Hagan 
correctly stated how 49 out of the 50 states would vote. 

"We were wrong only in Hawaii," Hagan recalls. 

This past Sept. 18, Hagan also called the results of the 
Massachusetts Democratic primary. Just 20 minutes after the polls 
closed, he declared Edward M. Kennedy would win the Senatorial 
nomination by a landslide over Edward J. McCormack. 

As the saying goes, "It's easy if you know how." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/31/62 




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NBO PEATUHK 
October 31* 1962 

;--EXPERT TO ‘ICEPICK* ELECTION RETURNS- 

• — — — 

Dr. Milton C. Cummings Jr., Using Own Coded Card System, 

, To Report Vote Trends During NBC Election Coverage 

When Dr. Milton C. Cummings Jr. sits at the NBC News "House 
Desk" on Election Night, Nov. 6, he will have at hand an icepick-like 
instrument and a stack of 435 cards, each representing one of the 
nation's Congressional districts. 

As the returns come in from around the country and are 
tabulated by NBC News, Dr. Cummings will periodically insert his "ice¬ 
pick through holes in the edges of the cards and in that way select 
certain groups of districts. 

Comparing the returns with information on the cards, he will be 
able to detect trends in the voting -- a change, for example, in the 
labor or farm votes. He will relate such trends to the number of House 
seats that either party can be expected to gain or lose. 

Dr. Cummings has been assembling the data on his cards for 
many years. Each card has information about the district -- the 
strength of labor, the racial and ethnic composition, voter registration 
and voter turnout in previous elections, past winners in House races, 
their margin of victory and many other factors. 

The cards are coded so that the "icepick" can quickly select 
certain districts with similar characteristics. In addition. Dr. 

Cummings has "pre-selected" a number of precincts -- including those 
that are traditional strongholds of either party and those with large 
labor, farm or foreign populations. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 











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2 - 'Icepick* 


Dr. Cummings will use these pre-selected precincts as 
benchmarks to spot national trends. His findings will be passed along 
to Chet Huntley, David Brinkley and other NBC News correspondents for 
their on-the-alr reports. 

Dr. Cummings has impressive credentials for his Election 
Night task. He was graduated from Swarthmore College in 1954, went to 
Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar to study political science, then to Harvard, 
where he earned a Ph. D. 

At Oxford, he helped cover the British general elections of 
1955 for the BBC. At Harvard he wrote a thesis on "Congressmen and the 
Electorate," which he is updating for a book to be published by the 
Free Press of Glencoe. 

He is now a research associate specializing in governmental 
studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington, a private organiza¬ 
tion that conducts research on public problems. 

On Election Night, Dr. Cummings will be assisted by his wife, 
Nancy, a physician now doing medical research. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 10/31/62 




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COOK COUNTY COUNTDOWN 

League of Women Voters Cooperating with NBC News in Gauging Election 
Results in Illinois County Accounting for Half of State's Votes 

One county accounts for half the vote in Illinois, and NBC 
News has taken unprecedented steps to count the votes in that giant 
county. (Election Night coverage on the NBC-TV and Radio Networks 
Tuesday, Nov. 6, will start at 7 p.m. EST). 

With the cooperation of the non-partisan League of Women 
Voters, NBC News will tabulate by telephone 1,300 Chicago suburban 
precincts in Cook County. 

Some 1,300 women under the direction of the Cook County 
Council of the league will be stationed in suburban precincts Election 
Night. Each of them will phone the vote from her precinct to a 
special NBC News tabulation center. 

In this way, NBC News expects to tabulate the Cook County 
vote with unprecedented speed. 

Cook County includes the city of Chicago. The city returns 
always are tabulated swiftly but until this year the tabulation of 
suburban returns always has lagged three to five hours behind. 

Combined with the NBC News county-by-county tabulation in 
Illinois, the special Cook County tabulation will give the NBC Election 
Night audience the fastest accounting in the senate race between 
Republican minority leader Everett Dirksen and his Democratic opponent, 
U. S. Representative Sidney Yates. 

The League of Women Voters tabulation in suburban Cook 
County will be an exclusive feature of NBC's Election Night coverage. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/31/62 









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NBC FEATURE 


October 31, 1962 

r ■ 1 ■ — ■■■■ —— —. ■. - . ■ . .— 

NBC NEWS ELECTION NOTES 

Some facts and figures on NBC News’ election night coverage: 

--Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, TV anchormen for the 
election coverage, will sit at a formica-topped table shaped like the 
"X" used to mark a ballot. The "X" desk was designed by Hjalmar 
Hermanson, who also designed the entire studio setup for Election Night. 

--Huntley and Brinkley will be sitting on a semi-circle 
platform called the "Huntley-Brinkley Deck" some 10 feet above the 
studio floor. 

--There will be 700 telephones in use at NBC News’ Election 
Central, involving some 60,000 miles of private telephone circuits link¬ 
ing Election Central with reporters around the country. This is more 
than twice the number of phones used for the i960 Presidential election. 

--NBC will have 180 affiliate stations receiving election night 
coverage from NBC-TV. 

--Twelve TV cameras will cover Election Central on election 
night. Ten will scan the boards displaying returns and two other 
cameras will cover Huntley and Brinkley on their "deck." 

--More than 250 high-powered spot lights will illuminate 
Election Central. 

-Decorating the massive election returns display called for 

more than 50 gallons of paint. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 














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2 - Election Notes 


--Studio 8-H (the Election Central site) was opened in 1933. 
It was built to provide an area large enough to stage a three-ring 
circus. During the 1930 , s and 19^0*s, Arturo Toscanini conducted the 
NBC Symphony Orchestra in concerts each week from this studio* then 
used for radio. The studio* re-named "Peacock Theatre*" is equipped to 
handle color TV programs. 

(NBC News will start its Election Night coverage, Tuesday* 
Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. EST,) 


NBC-New York* 10/31/62 











NBC PROTESTS TO SOUTH VIET NAM ON ATTEMPT 
TO EXPEL NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENT ROBINSON 

William R. McAndrew, Executive Vice President, NBC News, 
said he was "greatly shocked" by the expulsion of NBC News correspondent 
James Robinson from South Viet nam and has requested that the South 
Viet nam government reconsider the action. 

In a message sent to President Ngo Dinh Diem of South 
Viet nam last night (Oct. 30), Mr. McAndrew also demanded to know the 
reason for the expulsion and its intended duration. 

Mr. McAndrew said that Mr. Robinson's expulsion is "incompre¬ 
hensible" in view of the many NBC programs that have depicted South 
Viet nam’s efforts to stop the spread of communism in Southeast Asia. 

The NBC executive also said it would be difficult for NBC 
to continue to present the true story of South Viet nam's fight against 
communism if NBC's representative is to be barred from the country. 

Mr. Robinson, NBC News' Far East correspondent, was ordered 
by the Vietnamese Interior Ministry on Oct. 25 to leave Viet nam "in 
the shortest delay." Through the efforts of the United States Embassy 
in Saigon, which is fighting the ouster order, Mr. Robinson has been 
allowed to remain in South Viet nam until Nov. 1. 

The reason given for the order was Mr. Robinson's "lack of 
deference towards the regulations and laws" of Viet nam. However, 
the correspondent said the U. S. Embassy spokesman agreed that the 
order was obviously designed to attempt pressure against news 
coverage which might not agree with the government line. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 10/31/62 



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CAST AND CREDITS FOR ‘CYRANO DE BERGERAC,* 

90-MINUTE 'HALLMARK HALL OF FAME* COLOR BROADCAST 

ON NBC-TV THURSDAY, DEC. 6 (9:30-11 P.M. EST) 
i--- - - -L 

CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER HOPE LANGE 

in 

EDMOND ROSTAND'S 
'CYRANO DE BERGERAC’ 

Translated by Brian Hooker 
Television Adaptation 
by 

ROBERT HARTUNG 
Also Starring 

DONALD HARRON and GEORGE ROSE 


Scenery by. 

Costumes by. 

Associate Producer. 

PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY... 

* * * 

Sponsor. 

Agency. 

THE CAST 

Cyrano de Bergeract 
Roxane: 

Christian: 

Ragueneau: 

Comte de Guiche: 

Le Bret: 

Ligniere: 


.Warren Clymer 

.Noel Taylor 

.Robert Hartung 

.GEORGE SCHAEFER 

.Hallmark Cards Inc. 

.Foote, Cone & Belding 

Christopher Plummer 
Hope Lange 
Donald Harron 
George Rose 
John Colicos 
William Hutt 


(more) 


Paul Sparer 

















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2 - Credits for Cyrano de Bergerac 1 


Vicomte de Valvert: 

Gordon Pinsent 

The Cut Purse: 

Jack Merigold 

Montfleury: 

Eric Christmas 

The Meddler: 

Louis Edmonds 

Duenna: 

Nan McFarland 

Officer: 

John Irving 

First Cadet: 

John McKay 

Second Cadet: 

Ion Berger 

Third Cadet: 

Carl Harms 

Fourth Cadet: 

Leigh Wharton 

Officer: 

John Irving 

Capuchin: 

Robinson Stone 

Sentry: 

Len Birman 

The Nun: 

Toni Darnay 

Footman: 

Clifford Cothren 

Comedian: 

Bill Hinnant 


ADDITIONAL CREDITS 


Executive Assistant: 

Sybil Trubin 

Production Associate: 

Joan Frank 

Make-up by 

Bob O'Bradovich 

Production Coordinator: 

Gordon R. Wynne Jr. 

Production Secretary: 

Janet S. Gibson 

Program Assistant: 

Joyce Meckler 

Hair Stylist: 

Ernest Adler 

Assistant Costume Designer: 

George Sullivan 

Unit Manager: 

Dick Diorio 

Technical Director: 

0. Tamburri 

Lighting Director: 

Alan Posage 

Audio: 

Jim Blaney 

Video: 

Arnold Dick 




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3 - Credits for Cyrano de Bergerac* 


Graphic Arts: 

Music Selections: 

Sound Effects: 

Special Effects: 

Stage Managers: 

* * * 

Origination: 

NBC Press Representatives: 

* * * 


Stas Pyka 
Phebe Haas 
William Brinkmeyer 
Richard Aimone 

Norman Hall and Dick Auerbach 

NBC Color Studios, Brooklyn, 
N. Y., on color tape 
Charlie Gregg, New York, and 
Bob Bowen, Burbank 


THE STORY 

Rostand’s verse tragedy, which has also been called a prime 
example of swashbuckling romantic theatre, is set in Paris of 1640. 

The action opens in a theatre where Cyrano (Christopher Plummer), a 
fiery Gascon poet with an extraordinary nose, is insulted by Valvert 
(Gordon Pinsent) and conducts a duel with him while simultaneously 
composing a ballad. On the last line, he strikes down his opponent. 
Roxane (Hope Lange), a beautiful lady, witnesses this performance and 
sends for Cyrano, who has long been in love with her. But at their 
meeting Roxane confesses she actually loves Christian (Donald Ha.rron), 
a young cadet in Cyrano’s company. True to his gallant nature, Cyrano 
takes Christian in hand and sponsors the cadet's affair with the woman 
Cyrano himself loves. He even substitutes for Christian in a balcony 
serenade. Later, Christian is killed in battle. After 15 years, 
Cyrano visits Roxane in a convent; he reads her some letters of 
Christian, and she recognizes the voice as that of the lover who sang 
to her from beneath her balcony. Cyrano dies content in the knowledge 
that Roxane is at last aware of his love -- although she can never 
accept it. 

-o- NBC-New York, 10/31/62 




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