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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


NBC TRADE NEWS 


SUNBEAM BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN 'TODAY' PROGRAM 
AND 'TONIGHT SHOW STARRING JOHNNY CARSON' 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY A.M, NOV. 4 

The Sunbeam Corporation has purchased sponsorship in 
NBC-TV's "Today" program and "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson," 
marking the third consecutive year in "Tonight," it was announced 
jointly today by William F. Storke, Director, Participating Program 
Sales, NBC-TV, and B. H. Melton, Vice President and Director of Sales, 
Sunbeam Corporation. 

Sunbeam will advertise eight products on both programs 
through December, 1963. On the "Today" show, of which Hugh Downs is 
host. Sunbeam is presenting campaigns for its cooker and deep fryer, 
percolator and toaster. On the "Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson," 
Sunbeam's multi-cooker frypan. Lady Sunbeam shaver, carousel rotisserie 
broiler and Sish-kabbober, Sunbeam party grill and Sunbeam shavemaster 
will be advertised. 

The Sunbeam order was placed through Perrin & Associates and 
Foote, Cone & Belding, both of Chicago. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



















































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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



November 1, 1963 


WALTER SLEZAK AND MAUREEN O’HARA TO STAR IN "A CRY OF ANGELS," 
LIVE DRAMA OF CRUCIAL YEAR IN COMPOSER HANDEL'S LIFE, 

IN COLOR ON "HALLMARK HALL OF FAME" 


Walter Slezak will star in the role of composer George 
Frederick Handel in "A Cry of Angels," an original drama to be presented 
live Sunday, Dec. 15 in color on NBC-TV's "Hallmark Hall of Fame" 

(4-5 p.m. EST), producer-director George Schaefer announced. 

Maureen O'Hara also will star, portraying Mrs. Cibber, who 
befriended the composer during a crucial year of his life, in which he 
wrote the monumental religious oratorio, "The Messiah." 

The teleplay, written by Sherman Yellen, tells of the year 
when the noted German composer, on the brink of a total nervous collapse, 
shut himself up with his music. He spent long periods of time in 
religious contemplation and, ultimately, composed his best-known work, 
"The Messiah" -- the story of the life of Christ from birth to death 
to Ressurection. 

Sherman Yellen is a 30-year old New Yorker who has written 
a number of plays for television and the theater. His "New Gods for 
Lovers," based on a court murder during the reign of James I, is 
scheduled for off-Broadway production later this year. 

"A Cry of Angels" will be preceded' in the "Hallmark Hall of 
Fame" drama series by Sidney Kingsley's prize-winning Broadway play, 

"The Patriots," to be telecast in color on NBC-TV Friday, Nov. 15 
(9:30-11 p.m. EST). It will star Charlton Heston as Thomas Jefferson. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 















































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'A Cry of Angels' 


Another 90 minute historical drama, Robert Sherwood's classi 
"Abe Lincoln in Illinois," will be presented Wednesday, Feb. 5, 1964 
(7:30-9 p.m. EST) with Jason Robards Jr. in the title role. 

The "Hallmark Hall of Fame" series is sponsored by Hallmark 
Cards, Inc., (through Foote, Cone and Belding). 

- PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 15 - 

HALLMARK HALL OF FAME: "A Cry of Angels." 

Walter Slezak and Maureen O'Hara star in Sherman 
Yellen's original drama about a crucial year in 
the life of composer George Frederick Handel, 
during which he composes "The Messiah." (Color) 


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NBC-New York, 11/1/63 











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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


November 1, 1963 


ATTENTION, TV EDITORS AND PHOTO EDITORS 

TIME CHANGE FOR «THS ARTHUR GODFREY THANKSGIVING SHOW' 

The NBC-TV color broadcast of "The Arthur Godfrey 
Thanksgiving Show/' originally announced for 5^30 to 
6:30 p.m. EST, has been rescheduled for 10 to 11 p.m. EST, on 
Thursday, Nov. 28. It will preempt "Kraft Suspense Theatre." 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 







































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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 1, 1963 


FIVE SHOWBUSINESS HEADLINERS ADDED AS 
INTRODUCERS FOR 'THE BEST ON RECORD' 

Bob Newhart, Jo Stafford and Paul Weston, Allan 
Sherman and Eddy Arnold will be among the recording artists 
who will serve as introducers on "The Best on Record" -- 
full-hour special saluting past Grammy Award winners on 
NBC-TV Sunday, Nov. 24 (10-11 p.m. EST). 

Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis Jr., Andy Williams, 
Dean Martin and Bing Crosby, all previously announced, 
also will serve as introducers. 

These artists will present 24 of their record¬ 
ing colleagues who will either sing or play the musical 
number for which they won Grammy Awards or with which 
they have become identified. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











































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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza. New York 20, TV. V. 


ROBERT W. SARNOFF TERMS THE FLOWERING OF GLOBAL TV VTA SATELLITES 
AS "EXCITING PROOF" TECHNOLOGY HAS BEEN "MASTERED" FOR INSTANT 
COMMUNICATION OF SIGHT AND SOUND BETWEEN EARTH'S TV SYSTEMS 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, NOV. 4 

BOSTON, Nov. 3 -- The flowering of global television via 
Relay and Telstar was described here today by Robert W. Sarnoff, NBC 
Board Chairman, as "exciting proof" that the technology of instantaneous 
communication of sight and sound between every television system on 
earth has been "mastered." 

Mr. Sarnoff was the speaker at the 83rd Founder's Day 
Convocation of Emerson College. He received an honorary degree of 
Doctor of Literature from Emerson, and in a separate ceremony was given 
the Joseph E. Connor Memorial Award for 1963 by the school's Phi Alpha 
Tau fraternity. 

Successful operation of the communication satellites "gives 
reality to some of the myths and fancies mankind has cherished through 
the ages -- the flying carpet, the crystal ball and the genie in the 
lamp," Mr. Sarnoff declared. 

The rise of television in so many countries, coinciding with 
the perfection of tape and film and the advent of the jet age of trans¬ 
portation, means that "the era of global television is here," he said. 
With it has come the realization that what the medium has already 
achieved in this country "is but a hint of its potential as a great 
force for knowledge in all countries," he added. 

(more) 


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2 - Robert W. Sarnoff 


Expanding on the theme of television world-wide and domesti¬ 
cally, Mr. Sarnoff made these additional points: 

"With the development of television throughout the world and 
the rapid growth of international program exchange, all broadcasters 
are under increasingly heavy responsibility to assure that the re¬ 
sources at their command are used in a spirit of goodwill and wisdom. 

"In our country, where the broadcast media reflect the nature 
of our society itself, the responsibility is not the broadcaster's 
alone but is shared in varying degrees by all who are committed to 
free and open communication among men and nations." 

Turning to another area, the NBC Chairman said that the 
government, in exercising its regulatory power, "must be wary of any 
measure that would impair the interaction of the broadcaster’s freedom 
of expression and the public freedom of choice, or would undermine the 
medium's economic viability." He asserted that government "must en¬ 
courage the broadcaster's journalistic freedom and enterprise by re¬ 
moving existing restraints from the full coverage of political candi¬ 
dates and issues." Similarly, Congress and the courts, he said, "must 
further encourage the medium's role as an instrument of democracy by 
granting it full access to legislative and judicial proceedings." 

In this way, "television can go wherever the public is 
admitted, to bring the eyewitness experience to all," he declared. 

On educational television, Mr. Sarnoff took the view that 
while its current dimensions are relatively small, it has "demonstrated 
hopeful promise as an urgently needed teaching tool and as a medium 
for the detailed development of specialized subjects for small segments 

(more) 



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of the audience to which commercial television, because of its need to 
rely upon wide popular acceptance, can give but limited attention." 

Mr. Sarnoff described commercial and programming aspects 
of broadcasting in this way: "In the manner of the society it serves, 
broadcasting has flourished in a tradition of accommodation. It is 
commercially supported, deriving its economic strength from a society 
that is acquisitive and that places a premium on productive growth. It 
is dedicated to the service of the majority, with due regard for the 
interests of the minority. It speaks to the individual as well as to 
the mass, and thus it must be constantly concerned with the sometimes 
conflicting preoccupations of both. 

"As mass media, the national networks could not perform their 
function if they did not attract massive nation-wide audiences and the 
attention that have spurred the phenomenal growth of all broadcasting 
and encouraged its attainments. 

"The public must recognize television as a function of its 
own tastes and interests and consider that television's flaws and 
fallibilities are to a great degree a reasonable mirror image of its 
own. 

"Television can lead the audience to new tastes and interests 
but its leadership will be effective only to the extent that the public 
responds." 

Mr. Sarnoff had a final word for his Emerson audience, con¬ 
sisting largely of students and faculty: 


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"The increasing importance of modern communications as a 
subject of study in our colleges is a trend that gratifies me as a 
member of the profession. It is important not only in developing the 
professionals of the future but also in providing a deeply needed 
means of interchange between the intellectual community and the communi¬ 
cations industry. 

"A heavy obligation rests upon schools and educators to 
develop for the medium men and women not only skilled in the techniques 
of communications but with a sense of responsibility for the world they 
live in and a keen awareness of their intellectual and spiritual 
heritage. Only through such sense and such awareness can we give di¬ 
rection to the techniques, substance to the forms and purpose to the 
powerful tools that science and technology have given to us." 


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FROM the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza. New York 20, N. Y. 

ROBERT W. SARNOFF RECEIVES HONORARY DEGREE 
AND AWARD AT EMERSON COLLEGE 
Speaks on 'Broadcasting: A Force for Freedom' 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, NOV. 4 

BOSTON, Nov. 3 -- Robert W. Sarnoff, Chairman of the Board of 
NBC, today (Sunday, Nov. 3) received the honorary degree of Doctor of 
Literature from Emerson College at its 83rd Founder's Day Convocation. 
In a separate ceremony, he was given the Joseph E. Connor Memorial 
Award for 1963 by the school's Phi Alpha Tau fraternity. 

Highlights of his address at the convocation, titled "Broad¬ 
casting: A Force for Freedom," follow: 

The successful operation of Relay and Telstar 
communication satellites has provided exciting proof that 
we have mastered the technology of instantaneous 
communication of sight and sound between every tele¬ 
vision system on earth. This indeed gives reality to 
some of the myths and fancies mankind has cherished 
through the ages -- the flying carpet, the crystal ball 

and the genie in the lamp. 

* * * 

The rise of television in so many countries of 
the world, coinciding with the perfection of tape and film 
and the advent of the jet age of transportation, means the 
era of global television is here. With it has come the 
realization that what the medium has already achieved in 
our own country is but a hint of its potential as a great 
force for knowledge in all countries. 

Preit Department, Room 320 * * * 

(more) 






































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2 - Robert W. Sarnoff Honored 


With the development of television throughout 
the world and the rapid growth of international program 
exchange, all broadcasters are under increasingly heavy 
responsibility to assure that the resources at their 
command are used in a spirit of goodwill and wisdom. 

* * * 

In our own country, where the broadcast media 
reflect the nature of our society itself, the 
responsibility is not the broadcaster’s alone but 
is shared in varying degrees by all who are committed 
to free and open communication among men and nations. 

* * * 

Our government in exercising its regulatory 
power must be wary of any measure that would impair the 
interaction of the broadcaster’s freedom of expression and 
the public's freedom of choice, or would undermine the 
medium's economic viability. It must encourage the 
broadcaster’s journalistic freedom and enterprise by 
removing existing restraints from the full coverage of 
political candidates and issues. The Houses of Congress 
and our courts must further encourage the medium's role as 
an instrument of democracy by granting it full access to 
legislative and judicial proceedings, so that television 
can go wherever the public is admitted, to bring the eye¬ 
witness experience to all. 

* * * 

(more) 



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3 - Robert W. Sarnoff Honored 


Educational television, although its current 
dimensions are relatively small, has demonstrated hope¬ 
ful promise both as an urgently needed teaching tool and 
as a medium for the detailed development of specialized 
subjects for small segments of the audience to which 
commercial television, because of its need to rely upon 
wide popular acceptance, can give but limited attention. 

* * * 

Our broadcasting system is the contemporary 
result of man’s age-old determination to reach across 
time and space to communicate with his fellows. Its form 
and character are a reflection of our American society. 

Like our society, it is built upon freedom — free choice, 
free expression, free competitive interests. 

* * * 

The average family spends more time watching 
television than in any other leisure-time pursuit. What 
it sees is a broad range of program offerings, from pure 
diversion to high inspiration, a service that reflects the 
image of our free, pluralistic society. 

# * * 

Individual stations, whether affiliated with 
networks or not, have intensified their efforts to identify 
with the character and interests of their communities in 
a variety of ways -- through local repertory theater 
presentations, panel discussions of municipal issues, 
expanded local news coverage and the broadcasting of 

editorial opinion, to cite just a few. 

* * * 

(more) 



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4 - Robert W. Sarnoff Honored 


The public must recognize television as a 
function of its own tastes and interests and consider 
that television's flaws and fallibilities are to a great 
degree a reasonable mirror image of its own. Television 
can lead the audience to new tastes and interests but its 
leadership will be effective only to the extent that the 
public responds. 

* * * 

The increasing importance of modern communica¬ 
tions as a subject of study in our colleges is a trend 
that gratifies me as a member of the profession. It is 
important not only in developing the professionals of 
the future but also in providing a deeply needed means of 
interchange between the intellectual community and the 
communications industry. 


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Address by Robert W. Sarnoff 
Chairman of the Board 
National Broadcasting Company, Inc. 
At the Emerson College Convocation 
Boston, Massachusetts 
November 3, 1963 


BROADCASTING ;_A FORCE FOR FREEDOM 

I am grateful for the opportunity of sharing with you the 
joy of family reunion and the privilege of honoring the memory of the 
distinguished scholar and teacher who founded Emerson College. 

Charles Wesley Emerson established the institution that bears 
his name upon a belief in the transcendent importance of communica¬ 
tion and self-expression for the individual and the community. As his 
noted relative, Ralph Waldo, observed: "An institution is the 
lengthened shadow of one man." Although techniques of expression and 
communication have undergone spectacular development and change since 
Charles Wesley Emerson's day, the shadow is as distinct today as then, 
the belief more valid than ever. 

Dr. Emerson probably did not foresee that the communication 
techniques he advocated would become rudimentary by today's standards. 
Yet even during his lifetime, scientists and inventors, working 
independently in a number of countries, were developing the devices that 
later would revolutionize the art and science of communication. The 
year Emerson's founder was born, for example, Samuel F. B. Morse, an 
American, designed the first electric telegraph. Twenty-five years 
later, Caselli, an Italian, was the first to transmit a picture by wire. 
The year this institution was established as the Boston Conservatory of 
Oratory, a French inventor named Leblanc discovered the principle of 
photoelectric scanning, and four years later a German, Nipkow, invented 
a whirling-disk scanning device. Marconi’s development of the first 

commercially successful spark-coil radio transmitter came in 1897 . 

(more) 





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These are, of course, but a few of the manifestations of 
genius that have been combined and applied in our modern systems of 
mass communication -- radio and television -- which have developed as 
the most effective purveyors of entertainment and information and the 
most powerful instruments known to man for the communication of ideas. 

I find it an engaging coincidence that the year 1939 , when 
Emerson College dropped the words and the restricting concept ,: of 
Oratory 1 ' from its name and expanded its curriculum into new fields of 
academic endeavor, also marked the formal public introduction of 
television by RCA and NBC at the New York World's Fair. And your 
curriculum has continued to keep pace with the constant progress of the 
communication art. The increasing importance of modern communications 
as a subject of study in our colleges is a trend that gratifies me as a 
member of the profession. It is important not only in developing the 
professionals of the future but also in providing a deeply needed means 
of interchange between the intellectual community and the communications 
industry. 

In some quarters it is often fashionable to regard the 
broadcast media with condescension and even scorn. Sometimes they 
invite such attitudes, but at the very least they deserve to be under¬ 
stood in their full character and purpose. Our broadcasting system 
is the contemporary result of man's age-old determination to reach 
across time and space to communicate with his fellows. Its form and 
character are a reflection of our American society. Like our 
society, it is built upon freedom -- free choice, free expression, free 
competitive enterprise. Its audience represents a wide variety of aims 
and interests. And in the manner of the society it serves, broad¬ 
casting has flourished in a tradition of accommodation. It is 

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commercially supported, deriving its economic strength from a society 
that is acquisitive and that places a premium on productive growth. 

It is dedicated to the service of the majority, with due regard for 
the interests of the minority. It speaks to the individual as well 
as to the mass, and thus it must be constantly concerned with the 
sometimes conflicting preoccupations of both. 

To a real and great degree the character of our free, 
commercial broadcasting system has been determined by a basic principle 
of communication that time and invention have not altered: to 
communicate anything you must first have an audience and second, you 
must have its attention. As mass media, the national networks could 
not perform their function if they did not attract the massive nation¬ 
wide audiences and the attention that have spurred the phenomenal 
growth of all broadcasting and encouraged its attainments. 

In 1926, the infant radio industry, which had blossomed with 
such promise just six years earlier, was on the verge of collapse 
because the sporadic local programming failed to engage the public’s 
interest. That year, the National Broadcasting Company was created to 
meet the pressing needs of the situation by establishing a regular 
program service of appeal and variety, available coast to coast through 
national networking. The effect of the innovation on radio broad¬ 
casting was galvanic. Soon the CBS network followed, and then Mutual. 
Through this initiative, the network service created a large and 
interested audience, supplied means for its own support through 
national advertising and provided a base and a reason for the construc¬ 
tion of hundreds of radio stations across the country. 

The pattern was repeated as we entered the television era. 
When NBC set up the first network in 1947 there were but six stations 
and 14,000 television sets in the country. As year after year NBC and 

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the other networks poured millions of dollars into programming and 
facilities, the new medium took off on the most spectacular growth 
curve in industrial history. By the end of 1948 set circulation 
had leaped to 1,000,000 -- and in successive years, to 4,000,000, then 
10,000,000, then 16 , 000 , 000 . 

Today there are one or more television sets in more than 
51,000,000 American homes -- well over 90 per cent of all the homes in 
the country -- and the average family spends more time watching tele¬ 
vision than in any other leisure-time pursuit. What it sees is a 
broad range of program offerings, from pure diversion to high inspira¬ 
tion, a service that reflects the image of our free, pluralistic 
society. It is a service shaped by the millions of free choices made 
by the audience every day. Its base is entertainment, the reason most 
people originally acquired their sets, and the attraction which draws 
such large audiences and in turn develops the medium’s necessary 
advertising support. But built upon this foundation of entertainment 
is a variety of programming designed to inform and enlighten. 

The essential relationship of entertainment to television’s 
higher calling of communicating information and ideas was described 
with great clarity in a recent column by The New York Times’ 
distinguished television critic. Jack Gould. 

"it has been argued," he wrote, "that television has wrapped 
the nation in an escapist ball of entertaining wool, shielding it 
night after night from the day’s unpleasant realities. 

"But it is not to be overlooked that the self-same offering 
of diversion is also a formidable lure, a bait of greater significance 
than is frequently realized. It is the instrument that has made 
television viewing an ingrained and seemingly unbreakable habit, a 
guarantee of the nightly presence of millions for whatever the 

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broadcaster may choose to put on the air. What television slowly has 
been accomplishing in its news and public service...is the infiltration 
of this body of viewers with presentations of serious content." 

This is in fact a high compliment to the role the networks 
have played in providing a continuing, diversified national program 
service, which creates the audience and offers it extended opportuni¬ 
ties for new cultural and intellectual experience. They have led the 
audience from diversion in comedy and adventure to involvement with the 
great events and issues that affect all of us -- the national political 
conventions, the history and growth of communism, the civil rights 
crisis. 

Drawing upon resources available only to an organization of 
national scope, they have given Shaw and Shakespeare their greatest 
audiences. They have brought the Metropolitan Opera and New York 
Philharmonic, Britain’s Royal Ballet and Russia's Moiseyev Dancers to 
thousands of communities for the first time. They have given the 
American people unparalleled opportunity to become familiar with the 
thinking and character of the leading personalities of our time. 

As the medium has developed, the networks have concentrated 
increasingly on their journalistic function. For example, news and 
information programs account for more than 25 per cent of the total NBC 
Television Network schedule. In addition to equipping the citizen for 
more useful participation in the community, the networks have 
revolutionized the American political process by providing the forum 
for debates between the Presidential candidates within the sight and 
earshot of nearly every voter in the land. 

This progress has by no means been the province of the 
networks alone, although they have been an impelling influence. 

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Individual stations, whether affiliated with networks or not, have 
intensified their efforts to identify with the character and interests 
of their communities in a variety of ways -- through local repertory 
theater presentations, panel discussions of municipal issues, expanded 
local news coverage and the broadcasting of editorial opinion, to cite 
just a few. 

Nor has the progress been confined to commercial broadcasting. 
Educational television, although its current dimensions are relatively 
small, has demonstrated hopeful promise both as an urgently needed 
teaching tool and as a medium for the detailed development of special¬ 
ized subjects for small segments of the audience to which commercial 
television, because of its need to rely upon wide popular acceptance, 
can give but limited attention. 

Until recently, the domestic aspects of television have been 
foremost in any discussion of the medium's role in the communication 
of information and ideas. Now, however, its global prospects demand 
consideration. The medium is expanding rapidly throughout the world, 
and today television is transmitted in 76 countries, by more than 3*300 
stations to well over 130*000,000 sets. More than half the television 
sets in the world are outside the United States, among widely different 
cultures and under every kind of government,* in newly emerging nations 
as well as sophisticated industrial countries. 

In these countries, it can be found in every stage of growth, 
and flourishing in different organizational forms -- private, 
government-controlled, state-chartered, advertiser-supported, viewer- 
supported or varying combinations of these. 

Whatever these differences, television's broad aims everywhere 
are the same -- to transmit entertainment, information and education 
on a scale never before possible. 


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The successful operation of Relay and Telstar communication 
satellites has provided exciting proof that we have mastered the 
technology of instantaneous communication of sight and sound between 
every television system on earth. This indeed gives reality to some 
of the myths and fancies mankind has cherished through the ages -- the 
flying carpet, the crystal ball and the genie in the lamp. 

Intercontinental communication by satellite is still in the 
experimental stage and it will be several years before a system can 
be placed in orbit that will permit instantaneous transmission among 
all areas of the earth. Even then it is difficult to predict the 
extent to which satellites will figure in television programming. But 
whether or not they are used extensively or only occasionally, the rise 
of television in so many countries of the world, coinciding with the 
perfection of tape and film and the advent of the jet age of transporta¬ 
tion, means the era of global television is here. 

With it has come the realization that what the medium has 
already achieved in our own country is but a hint of its potential as 
a great force for knowledge in all countries. No other means of 
communication can equal television’s impact on the human mind or its 
ability to vault the barrier of illiteracy that imprisons vast segments 
of the world’s population, to combat cultural and political isolation, 
to promote the cause of freedom everywhere. 

With the development of television throughout the world and 
the rapid growth of international program exchange, all broadcasters 
are under increasingly heavy responsibility to assure that the resources 
at their command are used in a spirit of goodwill and wisdom. 

The image of each nation will be clearly visible to all. In 
our own country, where the broadcast media reflect the nature of our 

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society itself, the responsibility is not the broadcaster's alone but 
is shared in varying degrees by all who are committed to free and open 
communication among men and nations. 

Our government in exercising its regulatory power must be 
wary of any measure that would impair the interaction of the broad¬ 
caster’s freedom of expression and the public's freedom of choice, or 
would undermine the medium's economic viability. It must encourage the 
broadcaster's journalistic freedom and enterprise by removing existing 
restraints from the full coverage of political candidates and issues. 

The Houses of Congress and our courts must further encourage the 
medium's role as an instrument of democracy by granting it full access 
to legislative and judicial proceedings, so that television can go wher¬ 
ever the public is admitted, to bring the eyewitness experience to all. 

The public must recognize television as a function of its 
own tastes and interests and consider that television's flaws and 
fallibilities are to a great degree a reasonable mirror image of its 
own. Television can lead the audience to new tastes and interests but 
its leadership will be effective only to the extent that the public 
responds. 

Finally, a heavy obligation -- which Emerson clearly 
embraces — rests upon schools and educators to develop for the medium 
men and women not only skilled in the techniques of communications but 
with a sense of responsibility for the world they live in and a keen 
awareness of their intellectual and spiritual heritage. 

Only through such sense and such awareness can we give 
direction to the techniques, substance to the forms and purpose to the 
powerful tools that science and technology have given to us. 


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OM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

rtv Rockefeller Plaza . New York 20, N. Y. 


November 4, 1963 

ROBERT W. SARNOFF ANNOUNCES NBC CONTRIBUTION OF $250,000 
TO COMMUNITY TELEVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 


Robert W. Sarnoff, Chairman of the Board of the National 
Broadcasting Company, announced today that NBC has made a contribution 
of $250,000 to Community Television of Southern California to assist 
in the construction of a UHF educational television station in Los 

Angeles. 

In making the announcement, Mr. Sarnoff stated; 

"NBC has always given strong support to the proper development 
of educational television, both as an urgently needed instrument of 
instruction and as a resource for intellectual and cultural stimulation 
An educational station in the major population center of Los Angeles 
can provide important public values along these lines and NBC is 
pleased to contribute substantial financial assistance toward the 

creation of such a station." 


0 


Prett Department, Room 320 













- 































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: .... /!. * ,7 . j OflJ f 































NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 4, 1963 

JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL LIFE BUYS SPONSORSHIP 
IN 1 HUNTLEY-BRINKLEY REPORT' 

The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co. 
has purchased sponsorship in NBC-TV's expanded "Huntley- 
Brinkley Report," it was announced today by Don Durgin, 
Vice President, NBC Television Network Sales. 

The order (placed through McCann-Erickson 
Inc.) is on an alternate-week basis starting in January, 
1964. The "Huntley-Brinkley Report" (Monday through 
Friday, 7-7:30 p.m. EST) is now 95 per cent sold. 

As previously announced, other sponsors of 
the news series are R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company 
(through William Esty Company Inc.), American Home 
Products Corporation (Ted Bates and Company Inc.), 
American Chicle Company (Ted Bates and Company Inc.), 
Aluminum Co. of America (Fuller & Smith & Ross Inc.), 
the Plymouth Division of Chrysler Corporation (N. W. 

Ayer & Son Inc.), Standard Brands Inc. (J. Walter 
Thompson) and J. B. Williams Company (Parkson 
Advertising Agency Inc.). 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 








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NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 4, 1963 

MILLER BREWING PURCHASES SPONSORSHIP IN 'ESPIONAGE' 

The Miller Brewing Company has purchased sponsorship in 
NBC-TV's "Espionage," it was announced today by Don Durgin, Vice 
President, NBC Television Network Sales. 

The Miller purchase, which begins Jan. 15, was placed through 
Mathisson & Associates Inc. 

"Espionage" is broadcast Wednesdays (9-10 p.m. EST) on the 
NBC-TV Network. 


-o- 

FLORENCE R. RICHMAN OF NBC PARTICIPATES IN CAREER CONFERENCE 

Florence R. Richman, Supervisor, Radio Religious Programs 
and Educational Features for the NBC Radio Network, participated in 
the 1963 St. Lawrence University Career Conference Nov. 2, in Canton, 

N.Y. 

Mrs. Richman was one of two panelists to speak and answer 
questions about radio and television. The other panelist was A1 
Meltzer, an announcer for station WEBR, Buffalo. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



























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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 4, 1963 

HENRY FONDA TO BE HOST AND PERFORMER 
ON'THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS' 

Cast Named, But Program Material (’Full of Barbs 
and Surprises') Remains Very Top Secret 

This is the week that will come into focus on NBC-TV Sunday, 
Nov. 10 (10-11 p.m. EST), when "That Was the Week That Was" -- with 
Henry Fonda as host and performer -- will be telecast. 

Fonda heads a small company that will jest about people and 
events pertinent (or even impertinent) to the events of the day, much 
in the manner of the British series of that title that has become a rage. 

Others who have been signed for Sunday's program (which is 
in the nature of a pilot show for a projected series) include comedian 
Henry Morgan, actress-comedienne Patricia Englund, songstress Nancy 
Ames, the Tarriers (vocal group), actor George Hall, and Charley Manna 
(entertainer who has scored as singer, comedian and writer of special 
material). 

Billy Taylor, jazz recording artist, is music director of the 
program, and will head the orchestra for the telecast's music numbers. 

The program's executive producer Leland Hayward, discussing 
the telecast, said: 

"We hope it will be a vigorous entertainment full of barbs and 
surprises, but above all, we will see that it maintains good taste. It 
will be, by its nature, very timely as to content, and for this reason 
we won't know exactly what we'll try to make you laugh at until as close 
to air time as we can get by with." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 
















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2 - "That Was the Week That Was" 

"And it is understandably a very top secret sort of affair." 

Marshall Jamison is Hayward's producer for "TW3" -- as the 
program is popularly referred to in England -- and Hal Gurnee will 
direct Sunday's program. 

Henry Fonda has been a major name in entertainment in America 
for many years,, having become one of Hollywood's most popular stars 
late in the 1930s. On Broadway, he became firmly established in Hayward’s 
productions of "Mr. Roberts," and repeated the role in the film version. 
He then appeared in "Point of No Return," "Silent Night, Lonely Night," 
"Two for the See-Saw," and "Critic's Choice," and went on to television, 
starring in "The Deputy" for NBC-TV. Again for Hayward, he appeared 
on TV in a special titled "Henry Fonda and the Family" last February. 

Henry Morgan has long been a regular panelist on the TV 
series, "I've Got a Secret," and has appeared as guest on a number of 
other programs on both radio and television. 

Patricia Englund was seen last season on Broadway in 
"The Beauty Part." She has been associated with things theatrical all 
her life, being the daughter of actress Mabel Albertson and writer- 
producer Ken Englund. Her brother George was producer of the film 
"The Ugly American." She has appeared in London as Ado Annie in 
"Oklahoma. 1 " and has been active in television, doing assignments 
from a weather girl role (for WNBC-TV in 1960-61) to parts in major 
TV dramatic series. 

Nancy Ames was last on Broadway in "Tenderloin" in 1960-61, 
and has sung in supperclubs across the country. 


(more) 






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^ - "That Was the Week That Was" 


She appears frequently in the "Hootenanny" TV series, records 
for Liberty Records, and has three top-selling LPs on the market. 

The Tarriers are also frequent guests on the "Hootenanny" 
series, and are currently appearing in New York's Greenwich Village 
at the Bitter End cafe. They have appeared on many television programs, 
and record for Decc.a. 

The group consists of Eric Wiseberg, Clarence Cooper and 
Marshall Brickman. 

George Hall has a long list of Broadway credits that includes 
"Call Me Mister," "Lend an Ear" and "Touch and Go," and has appeared 
at Upstairs at the Downstairs, the Village Vanguard and the Ruban Bleu, 
supperclubs in New York. 

Charley Manna was a popular comedian at such New York clubs as 
the Blue'Angel and the Versailles during his first year in -showbusiness. 
Ever since he was a child, he had loved to sing and at the age of knew 
most Italian opera arias by heart. In the theatre, he has appeared in 
"Shoestring '57/' and the Hermione Gingold revue, "Sticks and Stones." 

He has been a guest on Jack Paar, Steve Allen, Garry Moore and Ed 
Sullivan telecasts. 

Among the writers contributing to "TWTWTW," in addition to the 
previously announced Robert Emmett, are Earle Doud, Gerald Gardner, Buck 
Henry and the above-mentioned Charley Manna. 

Earle Doud is best known for the record, "The First Family," 
which he wrote for comedian Vaughn Meader. 


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4 ' - "That Was the Week That Was" 

Gerald Gardner wrote the best-selling humor book, "Who's 
in Charge Here?" and its popular sequel, "More Who's in Charge Here 
Today (Nov. 4), his new comic strip, "Miss Caroline," begins in 60 
newspapers across the country. 

Buck Henry is an established comedy writer who has long 
been a contributor to the Garry Moore TV show. 

- PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT -- NOV. 10 - 

THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS: Executive producer 
Leland Hayward's takeoff on people and events in the 
news. Henry Fonda is host. 


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BOOK VERSION OF HIGHLY ACCLAIMED NBC 'PROJECT 20' PROGRAM, 

'THE COMING OF CHRIST,' IS PUBLISHED BY LOOK MAGAZINE 

A book version of "The Coming of Christ," the widely- 
acclaimed NBC "Project 20" television program, is being published this 
week by the Book Division of Look Magazine. 

The program will be repeated in color on the NBC-TV Network 
Sunday, Dec. 22 (7-7:30 p.m. EST), its third presentation on the net¬ 
work. It had its premiere Dec. 21, i960, and was repeated 
Dec. 20, 1961. 

In telling the story of Christ and His ministry, the program 
utilizes the strikingly realistic still-pictures-in-action technique 
which "Project 20" introduced to television. It brings to life some 
300 masterpieces of painting of the late Middle Ages and the 
Renaissance, works drawn from 30 museums and private collections around 
the world. 

The new 192-page volume has l44 pages of full-color re¬ 
productions of paintings used in the TV program -- works of such 
masters as Raphael, Rembrandt, Rubens, Giorgione and Van der Goes, An 
art history supplements the selections, furnishing painters' names, 
dates, owners of the paintings and a biography of each artist. The 
illustrations are coupled with Biblical narration. The foreward is by 
Dr. Ralph W. Sockman. 

According to Donald B. Hyatt, the TV program's producer and 
director, the "Project 20" staff, after about a year of research, 
acquired the greatest collection in the world of reproductions of 
religious art concerning the life of Christ. 

"So great were the response and demands to rerun the TV 
presentation that the editors of Look in conjunction with NBC are now 
producing this book form of 'The Coming of Christ!, a spokesman for 
the magazine said. - 0 - NBC-New York, 11/4/63 




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November 4, 1963 


CREDITS FOR MENOTTI' S OPERA, "LABYRINTH 11 


Gian Carlo Menotti's opera "Labyrinth" will be repeated 
Sunday, Nov. 24 in color on the NBC-TV Network (2-3 p.m. EST), open¬ 
ing the 15th season of the NBC Opera Company. Following are the 
cast and credits: 


CAST 

The Bridegroom. 

The Bride. 

The Spy. 

The Old Chess Player. 

The Executive Director. 

The Astronaut. 

The Manager. 

Manager's Assistant. 

The Bellboy. 

The Italian Opera Singer. 

The Executive Director's Secretary.. 
CONDUCTOR. 


John Reardon, baritone 
Judith Raskin, soprano 
Elaine Bonazzi, mezzo-soprano 
Robert White, tenor 
Beverly Wolff, mezzo-soprano 
Frank Porretta, tenor 
Leon Lishner, bass 
John West, bass 
Nikiforos Naneris, actor 
Eugene Green, bass-baritone 
Bob Rickner, actor 
HERBERT GROSSMAN 


* * * 


CREDITS 


Composer-Librettist: 
Produc er: 

Director for television: 


Gian Carlo Menotti 
Samuel Chotzinoff 
Kirk Browning 


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2 - Credits for 1 Labyrinth 1 


Director: 

Gian Carlo Menotti 

Set Designer: 

Warren Clymer 

Costumes: 

Noel Taylor 

Associate Conductor: 

Fred Popper 

Associate Director: 

Hal Venho 

Graphic Arts: 

Guy Fraumeni 

Audio: 

Phil Falcone 

Audio consultant: 

David Sarser 

Lighting: 

Phil Hymes 

Unit manager: 

Gene Whitlock 

Makeup: 

Bob O’Bradovich 

Origination: 

NBC Press representative: 

NBC Brooklyn studios 
on color tape. 
Leonard Meyers, New 


* * * 

THE STORY 

"Labyrinth,"' is set in a “grand hotel." A bride and groom 
enter. They have lost their key, and seek the desk. They cannot find 
it, and experience many adventures in the hotel. They encounter some 
unusual persons including a spy, an old man, an astronaut and a lady 
executive director. After a series of strange events, the groom, alone, 
his wife gone, finally finds what he has been seeking. 


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_ " 4 NBC TRADE NEWS 

November 6, 1963 

"YOU DON'T SAY.'" TO BECOME TUESDAY NIGHT COLOR FEATURE ON NBC-TV 
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. to Sponsor Show 

' -•— . . . . — --- „ m , i 

"You Don't Say.'" -- a game show based not on what you say but 
on what you don't say -- will be presented in color Tuesdays (8:30 to 
9 p.m. EST) on the NBC-TV Network beginning Jan. 7, 1984. The program 
replaces "Redigo" in the NBC-TV nighttime schedule after that program's 
broadcast of Dec. 31. 

Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp,, which currently sponsors 
"Redigo," will continue to sponsor "You Don't Sayj" The Brown & 
Williamson agency is Post-Keyes-Gardner, Inc. 

"You Don't Sayj" also is presented in color on NBC-TV Monday 
through Friday (3-30-4 p.m. EST). The program, featuring Tom Kennedy as 
emcee, began on the NBC-TV daytime schedule April 1, 1963, and has since 
become one of network television's most successful daytime programs. 

Two teams compete in "You Don't Say.'" Each is composed of a 
guest celebrity and a member of the studio audience, and they try to 
guess the names of famous people by using incomplete sentences as clues. 
For example, a player attempting to convey the name of "Andrew Jackson" 
to his partner might use the following sentences: 

"Folklore tells us that a pot of gold is located at 
rainbow's...(end)." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 












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"The past tense of draw is...(drew)." 

"To raise an automobile off the ground, you use a...(Jack). 

"A female child is a daughter and a male child is a...(son)." 

Clues must consist of single words only. The word must come 
at the end of the sentence and complete it. Proper names will not be 
allowed, and the sentences must not contain any hints other than those 
supplied by the missing word. 

"You Don't Sayi" is co-produced by Bill Yagemann and Ralph 
Andrews, in association with Desilu Productions. It originates in 
Burbank, Calif. 


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NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 6, 1963 

4 ADVERTISERS BUY SPONSORSHIP IN 9 NBC-TV SHOWS 

Four advertisers have purchased sponsorship in 
nine NBC-TV programs during the fourth quarter of 1963 
and the first quarter of 1964, it was announced today by 
Don Durgin, Vice President, NBC Television Network Sales. 

The sponsors are Canada Dry Corporation (through 
its agency, J. M. Mathes Inc.), The Gillette Co. (Maxon 
Inc.), Maybeliine Company (Post-Keyes-Gardner Inc.) and 
The Pillsbury Company (Campbell-Mithun). 

Canada Dry will advertise on "Sing Along with 
Mitch" color series, "The Richard Boone Show," "Espionage," 
"International Showtime," "Temple Houston," "The Lieutenant" 
and "NFL Highlights." Pillsbury has bought into 
"International Showtime," "The Lieutenant" and "Temple 
Houston." Maybeliine will advertise on "The Lieutenant" 
and "Espionage," and Gillette, on "The Joey Bishop Show" 
color series and "Eleventh Hour." 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



























































' 





























NHC TRADE NEWS 


November 6 , 1963 

CYRIL WAGNER IS APPOINTED DIRECTOR, CENTRAL SALES, NBC 

Appointment of Cyril Wagner, Manager, Central Sales, as 
Director, Central Sales, was announced today by Angus Robinson, Vice 
President, Central Sales, National Broadcasting Company. 

Mr. Wagner has been with NBC 10 years, joining the Central 
Sales staff as an account executive. He was named Manager, Central 
Sales, in i 960 . 

Born and reared in Chicago, Mr. Wagner attended Northwestern 
University and the University of Chicago. He began his career on the 
editorial staff of the Chicago Tribune and, in 19^-0, joined the special 
events and public affairs staff of radio station WGN in Chicago. 

He was subsequently publicity director for radio station WLS, 
an editor for Billboard magazine and a TV packager for Mutual Enter¬ 
tainment Company. 

Mr. Wagner joined the American Broadcasting Company's televisioi 
network sales division in Chicago in 19^9, where he was an account ex¬ 
ecutive for four years before joining NBC. 

He is married to the former Dolores Brust of Chicago. They 
live, with their two sons, in Barrington, Ill. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




























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Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 


November 6 , 1963 

CHAIRMAN OF COMMUNITY TELEVISION OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PRAISES NBC 
FOR $230,000 GIFT TOWARD EDUCATIONAL TV STATION IN LOS ANGELES 

Dr. Lee A. Dubridge, Chairman of the Board of Community 
Television of Southern California, has expressed praise for the National 
Broadcasting Company’s $250,000 contribution to the educational tele¬ 
vision station in Los Angeles. 

Dr. Dubridge said the donation would help insure "the financial 
success of our enterprise during the period of construction of the 
necessary television broadcasting facilities." 

Robert W. Sarnoff, Chairman of the Board of NBC, announced 
Monday (Nov. 4) that NBC had made a $250,000 contribution to Community 
Television of Southern California to assist in building the UHF 
educational station. 

In a message to Mr. Sarnoff, Dr. Dubridge said: 

"Community Television of Southern California is greatly in¬ 
debted to the National Broadcasting Company for this generous gift 
toward the establishment of an educational television station in this 
area. This gift, along with others, insures the financial success of 
our enterprise during the period of construction of the necessary tele¬ 
vision broadcasting facilities. We take pleasure in expressing 
appreciation to Mr. Robert Sarnoff, Chairman of the Board, and to the 
Board of Directors of NBC for this generous and timely action." 

-o- 


Prett Department, Room 320 

























































. 



























NBC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 


November 6, 1963 

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS RECEIVES 13 TAPE RECORDINGS OF NBC RADIO I 
SERIES, ‘TOSCANINI--THE MAN BEHIND THE LEGEND” ! 

Maestro's Son Makes Presentation j 

i_ ! 

The Library of Congress today (Nov. 6) accepted from the 
NBC Radio Network audio tape recordings of 13 programs of the current 
broadcast series "Toscanini -- the Man Behind the Legend." 

The presentation was made by Walter Toscanini, son of the 
late maestro. William K. McDaniel, Executive Vice President in Charge 
of the Radio Network Division; Robert Wogan, Vice President, Programs, 
NBC Radio Network; Don Gillis, producer of the program, and Robert 
Hitchens, an NBC Radio executive, attended the presentation in 
Washington. 

Rutherford D. Rogers, Acting Librarian of Congress, accepted 
the material for the library archives. 

The programs contain many of Toscanini’s great performances 
with the NBC Symphony Orchestra as recorded for RCA Victor, many of 
which are out of print. They also include interviews with notable 
personalities who have appeared on the program to discuss Toscanini 
from various points of view. 

"Toscanini -- the Man Behind the Legend" is broadcast on 
the NBC Radio Network Wednesday evenings, and re-broadcast on WNBC 
Sunday evenings. The guests are interviewed by Ben Grauer. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


































. 


. • 












































NBC NEWS' TED YATES TO REPRESENT U.S. TV INDUSTRY 
AT SECOND INTER-AMERICAN SYMPOSIUM IN PUERTO RICO 


NBC News producer Ted Yates will represent the United States 
television industry at the second Inter-American Symposium in Puerto 
Rico Nov. 9-1^-. 

The symposium is a privately sponsored convocation of experts 
in various fields of thought -- art, literature, drama, sociology and 
political science, among others. The purpose is to foster a closer 
understanding among the Western Hemisphere's leaders of thought. 

Among the delegates from the United States, in addition to 
Yates, will be Lillian Heilman, Rodman Rockefeller, James Baldwin, 
Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., Gore Vidal, and Edward Albee. 

Yates currently is co-producer, with Stuart Schulberg, of 
NBC News' David Brinkley TV specials. 

-o-- • 

NBC-New York, 11/6/63 



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NBC NEWS' JOHN RICH, IN U.S. AFTER FIRST-HAND OBSERVATION OF VIETNAM 
UPRISING, REPORTS THINGS BETTER THERE BUT NEW CRISES LOOMING 


Things are better in South Vietnam now that the government of 
Ngo Dinh Diem has been ousted, but other crises are In the offing for the 
Southeast Asian trouble spot. This is the view brought back by NBC News 
correspondent John Rich Monday night (Nov. 4) on his return to this 
country after an on-the-spot view of the coup of last weekend. 

"The key task facing South Vietnam now," said Rich, with vision: 
of the uprising still fresh in his mind, "is to find a civilian government 
to replace the Diem regime. The military men responsible for the coup art 
good soldiers, but they are not trained in the sophistication of govern¬ 
ment ." 

One thing is sure, however," Rich added. "The fall of Presiden 
Diem and his autocratic entourage will make the United States position 
in South Vietnam more tenable, and hopefully will speed up the war agains' 
the Communist Vietccng. 

Rich, who is the NBC News chief correspondent for the Far East, 
arrived in New York after a 36 -hour flight from Saigon. His first report 
via telephone from Idlewild Airport, was carried minutes later on NBC 
Radio's "Evening Report" with Morgan Beatty. Other first-person reports 
were carried on NBC-TV's "Today" and the "Huntley-Brinkley Report." 

Rich's presence in South Vietnam at the time of the coup was 
almost by chance. 

NBC's correspondent long stationed in Saigon has been James 
Robinson. But last Thursday Robinson had embarked on a vacation to 
Hong Kong, and Rich, whose headquarters is Tokyo, had flown into Saigon 
to replace him. The coup, long rumored but never fulfilled, erupted on 
Friday, a scant day after Robinson's departure. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/6/63 



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JACK PAAR BACK IN N.Y. AFTER VISITING 
ALBERT SCHWEITZER IN AFRICA 
Paar's Films of Visit to Be on Upcoming Telecast 

Jack Paar returned to New York Tuesday (Nov. 5) 
after spending three days with Dr. Albert Schweitzer at 
his mission in Lambarene in the newly independent nation 
of Gabon, West Africa. 

Paar, who described the 88-year-old humanitarian 
as "very cooperative," returned with considerable footage 
of film which he took depicting the work of the man who 
has spent half a century at the jungle hospital bearing 
his name. The film will be edited for an early showing on 
"The Jack Paar Program" on NBC-TV. (The Paar series is 
telecast in color Fridays, 10-11 p.m. EST.) 

It took Paar 19 hours to fly to Leopoldville. 

Then he ferried across the river to Brazzaville. From 
there he flew to Libreville, capital of Gabon, and then 
took a bush plane to Lambarene. 


NBC-New York, 11/6/63 










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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



November 6, 1963 

DAVID AND IGOR OISTRAKH, FATHER-AND-SON SOVIET 

VIOLINISTS, TO PERFORM ON 'TELEPHONE HOUR' 

David and Igor Oistrakh, noted father-and-son 
Soviet violinists, who have come to the U. S. for a 
joint concert tour, have been signed to appear on the 
NBC-TV music program the "Bell Telephone Hour." 

Executive producer Barry Wood said their 
performance will be taped in December for showing on 
NBC-TV later in the season. Their concert schedule makes 
this taping necessary on the program, which usually is 
telecast live. This will be the first and only American 
TV appearance for the distinguished violinists. 

("Bell Telephone Hour" is seen on NBC-TV in 
color, alternate Tuesdays, 10 to 11 p.m. EST.) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 










































































4 

. 


























NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



November 6, 1963 

RANDY BOONE TO BE NEW REGULAR PERFORMER 
ON NBC-TV'S 'THE VIRGINIAN' SERIES 

Randy Boone, the young actor who became a TV star 
as the guitar-playing Southern lad on the "It's a Man's 
World" series last season, has been signed to the regular 
cast of NBC-TV's 90-minute "The Virginian" color series 
(Wednesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. EST). 

Boone, unknown In showbusiness before he hitchhiked 
to Hollywood from his home in North Carolina in 1961, will 
join series regulars Lee J. Cobb, James Drury, Roberta Shore, 
Gary Clarke and Doug McClure. 

Frank Price, executive producer of "The Virginian," 
said Boone will make his first series appearance in a drama 
titled "A Matter of Destiny." Airdate will be announced. 

Boone will retain his real first name, Randy, as his 
character name in the series. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 














































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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



November 6, 1963 

TOP STARS OFFER MANY HOLIDAY SPECIALTIES 
IN ’ARTHUR GODFREY THANKSGIVING SHOW' 

Arthur Godfrey will be host to a group of headline guests 
when NBC-TV presents "The Arthur Godfrey Thanksgiving Show" in color 
on Thanksgiving Day, Thursday, Nov. 28 (10-11 p.m. EST). Tony Bennett, 
Carol Lawrence, Shari Lewis, Orson Bean and Liza Minnelli will join 
Arthur in some after-dinner entertainment, ranging from a ballet set to 
the words of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 1 s poem, "Hiawatha," to a 
tambourine-and-spangles minstrel number. 

Songs, comedy and even a little banjo playing are highlights 
of the full-hour variety show produced and directed by Kirk Browning. 
The dances and musical numbers are devised by Danny Daniels. 

"The Arthur Godfrey Thanksgiving Show" will open with the 
entire group in a set representing Godfrey's living room (in NBC-TV's 
Peacock Studio in New York), comparing notes about their Thanksgiving 
menus in a song called "Talking Turkey." 

Then the program will offer a conversation among Godfrey, 
Shari Lewis and Shari's puppet, Lambchop, in which Lambchop is taught 
social graces by Arthur. Together they sing "Happy to Make Your 
Acquaintance." 

Seventeen-year-old Liza Minnelli will amuse the guests by 

describing a hectic existence in a song-dance-comedy number titled "My 

Bay." Then Tony Bennett will sing "This Is All I Ask" and "I've Got 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











































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2 - 'Arthur Godfrey Thanksgiving Show 1 


Just About Everything I Need." As the finale to his contribution 
the Thanksgiving entertainment, Bennett will sing "The Little Boy" with 
Godfrey accompanying on the ukulele. 

Carol Lawrence will dance the role of the Red Deer, Ray 
Kirchner the character of Hiawatha, and Bill Starr the part of the 
Rabbit as Arthur Godfrey narrates a portion of Longfellow’s "Hiawatha." 
The ballet, choreographed by Kirchner, has a musical score by William 
Goldenberg highlighted by a harmonica solo played by Richard Hayman. 
Orson Bean will contribute to the frivolity telling of some historical 
mistakes of the Revolutionary War period centered about famous poems 
and stories. 

Godfrey will return to center stage with "Down By the 
Station," playing the ukulele and singing and dancing along with Shari, 
Liza and Carol. The entire group will then join with the show's six 
dancers in an old-time minstrel show, during which Arthur and Shari 
play a banjo duet and the three girl guest stars do specialty dances. 
The music is a medley of "The Babbit and the Bromide," "Go and Get Your 
Old Banjo" and "Cakewalk Your Lady." For a finale Arthur and all his 
guests will sing "Let's Have an Old Time Thanksgiving." 

"The Arthur Godfrey Thanksgiving Show" will be sponsored by 
Mohawk Carpet Mills, a division of MOHASCO Industries, Inc., through 
the Maxon Inc. advertising agency. (The special color telecast 
preempts "Kraft Suspense Theatre.") 

-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT NOV. 28--- 

f 

THE ARTHUR GODFREY THANKSGIVING SHOW: Godfrey is 
host to a group of holiday guest stars: Tony Bennett, 

Carol Lawrence, Shari Lewis, Orson Bean and Liza 
Minnelli. (Color). 


o 


NBC-New York, 11/6/63 












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INTBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

November 6, 1963 

i ---—---—--- 

35 RECORDING HEADLINERS ON 'THE BEST ON RECORD' 

Stars and Selections Listed for Salute 
to Past Grammy Award Winners 

Thirty-xive recording headliners — the largest group ever 
assembled for a one-hour television program — will appear on "The Best 
on Record/ 1 to be presented on NBC-TV Sunday, Nov. 24 (10-11 p.m. EST). 

This full-hour special, saluting past winners of the record¬ 
ing industry's Grammy Award, will be devoted to entertainment. No 
awards will be presented. 

Twenty-four of the artists on the show will sing or play the 
numbers for which they won their Grammys or with which they are 
identified. The others will serve as introducers, presenting them to 
viewers. 

The program and the roster of recording stars, in order of 
appearance, follow: 

Frank Sinatra introducing: Steve Lawrence and 
Eydie Gorme singing "This Could Be the Start of Something 
Big." 

Bob Newhart introducing: pianist Peter Nero playing 
"Golden Earrings." 

Jo Stafford and Paul Weston introducing: Peter, 

Paul and Mary singing "If I Had a Hammer." 

Allan Sherman introducing: Tony Bennett singing 
"I Left My Heart in San Francisco." 

Sammy Davis Jr. introducing: Vaughn Meader in 
excerpts from his "First Family" album. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 3D ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 








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Andy Williams introducing: Henry Maneini conducting 
the orchestra in a medley of "Elephant Walk," "Moon River" 
and "Theme from Peter Gunn." 

The New Christy Minstrels singing "This Land Is My 

Land." 

Eddy Arnold introducing: Homer and Jethro singing 
"I Got Tears in My Ears from Lying on My Back in Bed Crying 
Over You." 

Dean Martin introducing: Connie Francis singing the 
song of the year, "What Kind of Fool Am I?" 

Bob Hope and Bing Crosby will exchange quips, and then 
Crosby will introduce Mahalia Jackson who will sing "The House 
I Live In." 

Les Brown is the musical director for the Burbank-taped 
program and Joseph Guercio for segments taped in New York. 

Ted Bergmann is executive producer, George Schlatter 
producer, and George Simon associate producer. Dean Whitmore directs. 

"The Best on Record" is a production of Charter Producers 
Corporation and is presented under the auspices of the National Academy 
of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS). The program is sponsored by 
Timex Corp. 

-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT NOV. 24-—.— -. 

i ; 

THE BEST ON RECORD: Thirty-five recording stars in a 
salute for the recording industry's Grammy Award winners 
of the past. 


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CREDITS FOR 'THE BEST ON RECORD' ON NBC-TV 


Title: 

Time: 

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Starring (3 
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Director: 
Writers: 


"The Best on Record" 

NBC-TV Network, Sunday, Nov, 24, 10 to 11 p.m. 
EST t 

A special full-hour broadcast saluting past 
winners of the recording industry's Grammy 
Awards. 

order of Frank Sinatra 

Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme 
Bob Newhart 
Peter Nero 

Jo Stafford and Paul Weston 
Peter, Paul and Mary 
Allan Sherman 
Tony Bennett 
Sammy Davis Jr. 

Vaughn Meader 

Andy Williams 

Henry Maneini 

New Christy Minstrels 

Eddy Arnold 

Homer and Jethro 

Dean Martin 

Connie Francis 

Bob Hope and Bing Crosby 

Mahalia Jackson 

George Schlatter 

Dean Whitmore 

Mort Lachman and Rick Mittleman 
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2 - Credits for 'The Best on Record' 


Musical Directors: 

Les Brown (Burbank), Joseph Guercio (New York) 

Associate Producer: 

George Simon 

Unit Manager: 

Dick Wendelken 

Art Director: 

Lawrence Klein 

Associate Director: 

Tom Foulkes 

Makeup: 

Claude Thompson 

Technical Director: 

Clair McCoy 

Lighting Director: 

Lon Stucky 

Audio: 

Bill Levitsky 

Ass't to Producer: 

Marjorie Luke 

Executive Producer: 

Ted Bergmann 

A production of 

Charter Producers Corporation 

Presented under 
auspices of 

National Academy of Recording Arts and 

Sciences (NARAS) 

Sponsor: 

Timex Corp. 

Advertising Agency: 

Warwick and Legler Inc. 

Origination (on tape): 

NBC Studio 2, Burbank, and NBC Peacock 

Studio, New York. 

NBC Press 
Representatives: 

Bob Bowen (Burbank) and Stan Levine (New York). 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 11/6/63 




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NBC ENDORSES BILL TO PROHIBIT PCC FROM 
REGULATING COMMERCIAL TIME STANDARDS 

WASHINGTON, D. C., Nov. 7 The National Broadcasting Company 
supports legislation that would bar the Federal Communications 
Commission from regulating television and radio commercial time 
standards, Peter B. Kenney, NBC Vice President, Washington, said today. 

In testimony before the Subcommittee on Communications and 
Power of the House Interstate and Foreign Commerce Committee, 

Mr. Kenney said NBC favored a bill introduced by the Subcommittee’s 
Chairman, Rep. Walter Rogers (D-Tex), and companion bills, that would 
prohibit the FCC from making rules governing the number, length and 
frequency of broadcast commercials. 

The two basic reasons for NBC's position, Mr. Kenney said, 
are the beliefs that Congress, in enacting the Federal Communications 
Act, never intended to grant the FCC authority to regulate commercial 
time standards and that FCC action in this area is unnecessary in the 
public interest and would be "an unwise and unwarranted intervention 
in the free enterprise economy of the broadcasting industry." 

Mr. Kenney pointed out that the House Committee drafting the 
Radio Act of 1927, predecessor to the current Communications Act, 
specifically stated that it was "not undertaking to limit advertising 
through this medium" and that the Federal Radio Commission had taken 
the position that if regulation in this field were to be undertaken, it 
would have to be under a grant of specific legislation. He said NBC's 
attorneys had advised him that there is no indication in the House, 

(more) 


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2 - Peter B. Kenney 


Senate or Conierence Reports issued at the time the Communications Act 
was pctSseG. in 193^ that Congress intended to give the FCC jurisdiction 
over commercial time standards. 

"This legislative history/' he asserted, "leads us to the 
conclusion that tne Commission was not intended by Congress to have 
authority to adopt rules governing broadcast commercials. However, 
since the question has now been raised by the Commission*s current 
rulemaking proceeding, we believe that it can best be resolved by 
legislation confirming the Congressional intent, as is proposed by 
H. R. 8316 (Representative Rogers* bill) and its companion bills." 

Regulation by the Commission of broadcast advertising would 
bring the federal government into a field that should be left to the 
responsibility of broadcasters operating in response to audience choice 
in a free market, Mr. Kenney said. He told the Subcommittee that 
complaints about commercials addressed to NBC constitute less than 
one per cent of the total mail comment on the NBC television service. 

Mr. Kenney said the "unfortunate result" of FCC regulation 
of time standards would be "the undermining of the honest efforts at 
self-regulation" in which responsible broadcasters have long engaged. 
"The Commission's proposal to incorporate the commercial time standards 
of the NAB Code into Commission rules," he said, "is based on the 
fallacy expressed by the Commission when it stated that the present 
NAB Codes are the ’culmination of many years of extensive consideration 
and experience.* Indeed the Codes are the result of extensive 
consideration and experience, but they are by no means the 'culmina¬ 
tion* of them." 


(more) 



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In addition, FCC regulation vjould "thrust the Commission 
into the details of individual station operation" and "constitute a 
type of public utility regulation that the Commission has neither 
the authority nor the resources to administer soundly for every 
community and broadcaster in the United States," he declared. 


NBC, 11/7/63 










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NEC TRADE NEWS 


November 7, 1963 

"LET'S MAKE A DEAL," NEW GAME SHOW STARRING MONTY HALL, WILL BECOME 

A DAYTIME MONDAY-THROUGH-FRIDAY SERIES ON NBC-TV 

"Let’s Make a Deal," a new audience-participation game show, 
will start on the NBC-TV Network Monday, Dec. 30 (2-2:25 p.m. EST). It 
will replace "People Will Talk," currently scheduled in that time period, 

"Let's Make a Deal" will be telecast Mondays through Fridays 
and will feature Monty Hall as the Big Dealer. Hall will offer studio 
audience contestants the opportunity to "wheel and deal" for prizes 
ranging from a peanut to a high-priced auto. The program will be pro¬ 
duced in Burbank,Calif. 

The prizes on "Let's Make a Deal" will be disguised so that 
a man or woman who wins a peanut might well find a diamond ring or a 
peanut inside the shell. A garbage can might contain a mink coat or 
just garbage. 

Contestants can trade prizes for others offered by the Big 
Dealer in the hope of improving their lot. Prizes can be won by answer¬ 
ing questions asked by the Big Dealer or by bringing items to the studio 
that the Big Dealer will take in trade. 

At the program's conclusion, three contestants will compete 
for a major prize located behind one of three doors on stage. They 
will know what the prize is but not which door it is behind. Thereby, 
they will risk in a trade with the Big Dealer the prizes they have won 
for whatever is behind one of the doors. 

"Let's Make a Deal" is a Monty Hall-Steve Hados production. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




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N33C TRADE NEWS 


November 7 , 1963 

MITCH MILLER, STAR OF NBC'S "SING ALONG WITH MITCH" SERIES, 

WILL BE THE SUBJECT OF 5-CITY AUDIO INTERVIEW SESSION TO 
BE SEEN BY PRESS AROUND COUNTRY VIA CLOSED-CIRCUIT TV 

Mitch Miller, star of NBC-TV's "Sing Along with Mitch" color 
series, will be interviewed Tuesday, Nov. 12 by television editors, 
columnists and reporters in five cities via the network's fourth 
closed-circuit press conference of the season. 

From a New York studio. Miller will be seen by reporters at 
NBC-TV affiliated stations around the country. A two-way audio hookup 
will link Miller with Memphis, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, Nashville and 
Shreveport where newsmen will ask questions. 

The series of interviews, arranged by NBC's Promotion 
Department, has previously presented Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, 
Joey Bishop and members of his cast (Abby Dalton and Mary Treen), and 
Andy Williams and his wife, Claudine. 

Miller will be interviewed between 1 and 2 p.m. EST by Win 
Panning of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Julia Inman of the Indianapolis 
Star, Bob Johnson of the Memphis Press-Scimitar, Tom Mayhew of the 
Nashville Tennessean, Henry Mitchell of the Memphis Commercial Appeal, 
Red O'Donnell of the Nashville Banner, Lynn Rawlings of the Indianapolis 
Times and Charles Staff of the Indianapolis News. Following the inter¬ 
view, the network will feed promos on upcoming "Sing Along with Mitch" 
shows (Mondays, 10-11 p.m. EST' to the owned and affiliated stations. 


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PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 





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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


November 7, 1963 


-- "THE WORLD'S GREATEST SHOWMAN" j- 

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Legendary Career of Cecil B. DeMille Recounted in 90-Minute | 

NBC Color Telecast with Special Appearances by Celebrities 

I 

| And Scenes from Memorable Films of the Famed Moviemaker 

The legendary Hollywood career of the late Cecil B. DeMille 
seen through the eyes of many of his leading stars and illustrated 
by excerpts from his famous movies -- will be recounted in "The World's 
Greatest Showman," 90-minute color special on NBC-TV Sunday, Dec. 1 
(8:30-10 p.m. EST). 

Nine stars will make special appearances. They are Charlton 
Heston, Bob Hope, Gloria Swanson, Yul Brynner, James Stewart, Betty 
Hutton, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. Robinson and Cornel Wilde. 

The Rev. Dr. Billy Graham and Samual Goldwyn will also make 
special appearances. 

Each celebrity will recall a significant phase of DeMille's 
career. All were associated with DeMille -- from Bob Hope's cameo 
appearance in "The Greatest Show on Earth" to Charlton Heston's 
portrayal of Moses in "The Ten Commandments." 

Dr. Graham, a friend of DeMille, relates the religious import 
of the director's biblical movies. Goldwyn (and the late Jesse Lasky) 
hired DeMille at $100 a week to direct his first film, "The Squaw Man," 
in 1913. 

Betty Hutton and James Stewart will re-create scenes from "The 

Greatest Show on Earth." Betty, 11 years after her original performance 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 














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as a big-top aerialist in DeMille 1 s Oscar-winning circus picture, will 
swing once again on the high trapeze for the special telecast. Stewart 
dons his clown makeup again. 

Gloria Swanson, who rose to stardom through her performances 
in seven early DeMille pictures, will reveal the director’s conception 
of the "star image." 

Among numerous film excerpts will be Miss Swanson’s famous 
bathtub scene in "Male and Female" ( 1919 ). 

In nearly a half-century of movie-making, DeMille directed 70 
films that were to establish him as one of Hollywood's most astute 
judges of public taste in movies. His eye for drama coupled with his 
"grand scale" approach, drew over four and one-half billion moviegoers 
to his pictures. 

Sequences from DeMille movies have been selected to illustrate 
DeMille's showmanship. Among silent films represented, in addition to 
"Male and Female" and "The Squaw Man" are "The Cheat" ( 1915 ), "The 
Little American" ( 1917 ), "Manslaughter"(1922), "Feet of Clay" (1923), 
the original "Ten Commandments" ( 1923 ), and "King of Kings" ( 1927 ). 

Such stars as Dustin Farnum, Miss Swanson, Mary Pickford, Fanny Ward, 
Sessue Hayakawa, Vera Reynolds, Rod La Rocque, Ricardo Cortez, Thomas 
Meighan, and Leatrice Joy appeared in these pictures. 

From the DeMille sound era there will be full sequences from 
"Samson and Delilah," "The Ten Commandments" and "The Buccaneer." 

Scenes from DeMille's "Cleopatra" and "The Crusades" will also be 
presented. 

DeMille's appearance as an actor with Miss Swanson will be 
shown in a sequence from "Sunset Boulevard." 

Another highlight will be the "radio voices" of Wallace Beery, 
Clark Gable, Gary Cooper, Ronald Colman, W. C. Fields, Claudette 
Colbert, Barbara Stanwyck, Spencer Tracy, Charles Coburn, and Ray 
Milland from DeMille's "Lux Radio Theatre" days. 

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"The World's Greatest Showman" was created and written by 
Stanley Roberts, co-produced by Roberts and Henry Wilcoxon, and directed 
by Boris Sagal for MGM Television, in cooperation with Paramount 
Pictures and the Cecil B. DeMille trust. 

"The World's Greatest Showman" will be sponsored by 
Eastman Kodak Company through its agency, J. Walter Thompson Company. 

The 90-minute special preempts "Grindl" and "Bonanza" on this 

date. 


- PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 1 - 

THE WORLD'S GREATEST SHOWMAN: The career of Cecil B. 
DeMille is recounted by top stars and illustrated by 
excerpts from his films (1913-1950) in 90 -minute special. 
Celebrities making special appearances include Charlton 
Heston, Bob Hope, Gloria Swanson, Betty Hutton, James 
Stewart, Yul Brynner, Barbara Stanwyck, Edward G. 
Robinson, Cornel Wilde, the Rev. Dr. Billy Graham and 
Samuel Goldwyn. (Color). 


NBC-New York, 11/7/63 












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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



November 7, 1963 

'OF SIGHTS AND SOUNDS' -- FOR THE CHILDREN 

"NBC Children's Theatre" to Present Program in Color 
Introducing Young People to 'Adventure' of Music 

"Of Sights and Sounds," second in the "NBC Children's Theatre" 
programs, will be presented in color on NBC-TV Sunday, Dec. 13 (3 to 
4 p.m. EST). 

Igor Buketoff, conductor of the Fort Wayne (ind.) Philharmonic 
Orchestra, will conduct the NBC Orchestra in a variety of musical numbers 
selected to introduce children to the sound of a large orchestral 
ensemble. 

Lisl Weil, who has illustrated about 40 children's books, will 
draw life-size pictures in color telling the story of Cinderella while 
the orchestra plays Prokofieff's popular orchestral suite, "Cinderella." 

Writer Robert Goldman and Buketoff who, as a conductor, has 
long dealt with young people of varying ages through young people's 
concerts, collaborated on the script for this taped program. As host, 
the maestro will introduce his young audience to the world of music that 
is exciting, that frequently tells a story, or that is funny or romantic. 

Dave Barnhizer, who is director of three programs in this 
series, sums up the objectives of this program: 

"Music is an adventure that you can enjoy all your life, and 
it's unfortunate to come across a child who is denied this adventure. 

In 'Of Sights and Sounds,' we have selected music that tells a story, 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



















































































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2 - NBC Children’s Theatre 


music that may urge you to join in some physical way, music that has 
a riddle or a puzzle, or music that is just fun to listen to." 

"Of Sights and Sounds" begins by introducing its young 
audience to a "very important person" -- the conductor, who then takes 
his viewers into the world of music. The orchestra will play the famed 
"Toreador" song from the Bizet opera, "Carmen"; "The Worried Drummer," 
during which one member of the orchestra plays virtually every percuss¬ 
ion instrument by himself; "The Farm" by Eugene Zador, which has the 
sounds of animals re-created by orchestra instruments; "Under the 
Spreading Chestnut Tree," a song in which each youngster watching can 
take part, and "Cinderella," the suite by Serge Prokofieff, during 
which artist Lisl Weil will draw pictures in color of the story. 

Co-writer Robert Goldman has worked previously in enterprises 
for young people, most recently for "Update" on NBC-TV last season, 
when he produced special film features for that series. He is primarily 
interested in musical theatre. He wrote the lyrics for "First Impress¬ 
ions" on Broadway several seasons back, and was producer for two 
programs in the "Seven Lively Arts" TV series. For the past two years 
he has written the script for TV’s annual "Emmy" presentation ceremonies, 
and recently wrote scripts for two upcoming programs of TV's "The 
Defenders." 

George A. Heinemann, Manager of Public Affairs for NBC News, 
is executive producer of the "NBC Children's Theatre." Merrill Sindler 
is scenic designer for "Of Sights and Sounds." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/7/63 




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ART JAMES VISITING PADUCAH FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN'S TELETHON 


Art James, host of NBC-TV's "Say When" (Monday through Friday, 
10 a.m. EST), will fly from New York to Paducah, Ky., for the "Crippled 
Children's Telethon" on Nov. 23 . James will emcee the telethon, sched¬ 
uled from 10 p.m. Saturday until 1 p.m. Sunday over WPSD-TV, an NBC 
affiliate. 

-o- 


SPOTS (FRECKLES) WIN SPOT (SPEAKING PART) 

FOR SCHENECTADY GIRL IN 'MR. NOVAK' DRAMA 

Nobody has counted all of schoolgirl Mary Lynn Gary's freckles 
yet. Judges in the contest conducted by Teen Magazine tried and conceded 
victory over 8,214 other condidates to the pretty l4-year-old Schenectady 
(N.Y.) student. 

So this week the newly crowned "freckle queen" is in Hollywood, 
where she was flown to collect her prize: A speaking part in NBC-TV's 
"Mr. Novak" series (Tuesdays 7:30-8:30 p.m. EST). She will appear in an 
episode titled "The Boy Without a Country," now being filmed. Airdate 
will be announced. 


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NBC-New York, 11/7/63 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 8, 1963 
SCHICK BUYS INTO * TODAY’ 

Schick Incorporated has purchased sponsorchip 
in NBC-TV’s "Today" series to advertise its electric shaver, 
it was announced today by William F. Storke, Director, Par¬ 
ticipating Program Sales. 

Mr. Storke said the Schick order was the first 
the company has made with "Today" and the first on a net¬ 
work participating program. 

The Schick campaign began Nov. 7 and will continue 
through mid-December. The order was placed through Norman, 
Craig & Kummel. 

"Today," with Hugh Downs as host, is telecast 
Mondays through Fridays, 7-9 a.m. EST. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 































































































NEC TRADE NEWS 


November 8, 1983 

3 ADVERTISERS BUY SPONSORSHIP IN ‘THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS' 

Three advertisers -- Menley & James Labs, Clairol Inc., and 
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., Inc. -- have purchased sponsorship in 
"That Was the Week That Was," the NBC-TV special Sunday, Nov. 10 
that will spoof events of the day, it was announced today by Sam K. 
Maxwell Jr., Director, Special Program Sales, NBC Television Network. 

As previously reported, Henry Fonda will be host and 
performer on the program (10-11 p.m. EST), with Mike Nichols and Elaine 
May as special guest stars. Other performers are comedian Henry Morgan, 
actress-comedienne Patricia Englund, singers Nancy Ames and the 
Tarriers, actor George Hall and singer-comedian and comedy writer 
Charlie Manna. 

Foote, Cone & Belding placed the orders for Menley & 

James, and for Clairol. The agency for Liggett & Myers was J. 

Walter Thompson Co. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




















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NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENT JOHN HLAVACEK IS ONE OF 25 RECIPIENTS 
OF THE 1963 SILVER ANNIVERSARY ALL-AMERICA AWARD 
ANNOUNCED IN SPORTS ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 

NBC News Correspondent John Hlavacek is one of 25 recipients 
of the 1963 Silver Anniversary All-America Award announced this week in 
Sports Illustrated magazine. 

The award-winners played their senior year of college foot¬ 
ball in 1938. The magazine points out that selection for the award "is 
made not on the quality of football the man played 25 years ago, but on 
the nature and extent of the man's performance in his career and the 
way of life in the intervening 25 years. 

Hlavacek, who covers the Caribbean area for NBC News, played 
tackle for Carleton College in Minnesota. He served as a war 
correspondent in China where he was cited for gallantry, and has also 
been a foreign correspondent in India and Pakistan. He covered the Cuban 
crisis for NBC News last year. 

Other winners of the 1963 Silver Anniversary All-America 
Award include such former football greats as Marshall Goldberg 
(Pittsburgh), Davey O'Brien (Texas Christian), Bill Osmanski (Holy 
Cross) and Vic Bottari (California), and a former Oklahoma State gridder 
who went on to big league baseball glory, Allie Reynolds. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, H/8/63 



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NBC FEATURE 
November 8, 1963 

j ■ - “ -- 

DAVID BRINKLEY STARTING 21ST YEAR WITH 

NBC NEWS--AND THAT RECALLS A STORY 

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■—-— - — - -- 

Now It can be told. The secret of David Brinkley's success is 

the ability -- something of a paradox for a TV reporter -- to keep his 
mouth shut. 

Brinkley this month begins his twenty-first year with NBC 

News. But it's been only the last seven that his name has been a by¬ 

word for excellence in TV news at the right end of the hyphen in NBC-TV's 
nightly "Huntley-Brinkley Report." The transformation began shortly 
before the 1956 Presidential elections. 

During his early years with NBC News, Brinkley filled various 
assignments at the network's Washington bureau. He joined the organiza¬ 
tion after experience on newspapers in his native North Carolina, and 
with the United Press. There ensued 13 years of reporting the local 

scene in the nation's capital and news on the network line that had 

international significance. 

A momentous turn in Brinkley's career came when NBC News 
executives were searching for the proper men to anchor the network's 
coverage of the 1956 elections. Chet Huntley already was established as 
one member of the precedent-setting TV team. Who would fill the spot 
on the other end of the hyphen? 

Reuven Frank, executive producer of the "Huntley-Brinkley 
Report" and one of the most responsible for bringing TV's most famous 
news team together, recalls the decision: 

"I'd seen him do the Inaugural Parade in Washington," said 
Frank. "He was one of the few men who knew how to shut up." 

-o- 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

















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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



November 8 , 1963 

1 TWO NEW CREATIONS — DINO THE DINOSAUR AND ELSIE THE COW -- TO SWING 

1 

AND SWAY WITH OTHER HUGE BALLOONS IN MACY’S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE 
NBC-TV to Televise Happy Holiday Event in Color 

L_ _ 

Dino the Dinosaur and Elsie the Cow will be the new creations 
among the mammoth helium-filled balloons in Macy's 37 th annual Thanks¬ 
giving Day Parade, to be televised In color by NBC-TV Thursday, Nov. 28 
(10-11:30 a.m. EST). 

Six of the high-flying giants -- one more than in any previous 
year -- will swing and sway down Broadway. Joining Dino and Elsie will 
be four returning favorites -- Donald Duck, Bullwinkle Moose, Popeye and 
the Happy Dragon. 

Almost 47,000 cubic feet of helium will be used to inflate the 
huge balloons, which have become symbolic of New York’s annual holiday 
procession. About 180 husky handlers will be required to man the guide 
lines to prevent the balloons from sailing up into the clouds. 

With this year's parade saluting the 1964 New York Fair, Dino 
and Elsie, the new soaring celebrities, will serve as advance agents 
for Fair exhibits -- Dino for the Sinclair Oil Corporation and Elsie 
for the Borden Company. 

Dino and Elsie were "born" this past Summer in Litchfield Park, 
Ariz., at the plant of the Industrial Products Division of Goodyear Tire 
& Rubber Company, and received test flights at the Goodyear plant in 
Akron, Ohio. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK QO, NEW YORK 










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2 - Parade 


Goodyear, producer of all the balloons for Macy's parades 
since 1927, also is a co-sponsor of NBC-TV's color telecast this year, 
along with Pood Manufacturers Inc. and Remco Industries Inc. 

Dino, a life-size likeness of the largest creature that ever 
walked the earth, sports some equally large dimensions. Made of 350 
square yards of neoprene-coated nylon, the balloon is 60 feet long and 
four stories high. The dinosaur's body is 20 feet in diameter and his 
tail is 20 feet long. The massive carcass is stuffed with 7,000 cubic 
feet of helium, and is covered with 60 gallons of green paint. 

Elsie, the lovable bovine, will perform as a trapeze-swinger 
suspended from her balloon, which is 27 feet in diameter and uses 10,000 
cubic feet of helium. The balloon is made of 450 square yards of 
neoprene-coated nylon, and is decorated with 55 gallons of blue, yellow, 
white and green paint. Elsie herself is 12 feet tall and is made of 
fiberglas. 

Dino will be the leadoff balloon in the parade, which also 
will include showbusiness celebrities, exotic floats, marching bands 
and singing and dancing groups. Lome Greene, co-star of NBC-TV's 
"Bonanza," and Betty White will be the commentators for NBC-TV's 90- 
minute color coverage. 

The second balloon in the long line of march will be Bullwinkle 
Moose, who made his parade debut two years ago. This king-sized moose 
is 60 feet high, with an antler spread of 3^ feet, and is inflated by 
7,000 cubic feet of helium. 

Next in line is the ever-popular Popeye. A 6,000 cubic-foot 
giant, this high-sailing sailor is 56 feet tall and 32 feet in diameter. 
His famous sailor hat measures 13 feet around, and the equally famous 
pipe, measuring four feet from stem to bowl, could hold 80 pounds of 


tobacco. 


(more) 



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Elsie's trapeze balloon will be the fourth of the soaring 
giants. The fifth will be Donald Duck, last year's new creation. 

Donald measures 60 feet from the tip of his bill to the end of his toes, 
is 30 feet wide at the midriff and is decked out in six colors requiring 
52 gallons of paint. He is kept aloft by 10,000 cubic feet of helium. 

The final balloon will be the Happy Dragon. This 72-foot 
beast will "fly" the parade route on wings extending eight feet from 
each side of his 40-foot belly. The Dragon needs 6,500 cubic feet of 
helium to fill its outsized figure. 


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NBC-New York, II/8/63 




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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

November 8, 1963 

FLYING WALLENDAS FALL FROM WIRE IN SARASOTA ACCIDENT 
PHOTOGRAPHED BY NBC NEWS CREATIVE PROJECTS UNIT 
Special Hour on Troupe to Be Seen on 'Du Pont Show of Week' 

Films of the plunge of the Flying Wallendas as they rehearsed 
their seven-person pyramid aerial act at Sarasota, Fla., this week, 
will be seen as part of a "Du Pont Show of the Week" special on the 
Wallendas, scheduled for NBC-TV later this season. 

NBC-TV cameras have been filming the Wallendas for this 
Creative Projects special of NBC News for the past two-and-a-half 
months, and cameraman Robin Still was at the Sarasota training site 
for what was presumed to be a routine filming when the sudden fall 
occurred. His films of the accident in which six members of the troupe 
were injured will be a dramatic highpoint of the hour-long documentary. 
Irving Gitlin is executive producer of the Creative Projects telecasts. 

The decision to rehearse the dangerous pyramid act was an 
impulsive one on the part of Karl Wallenda, founder and leader of the 
troupe. The Wallendas were to participate in a commemorative ceremony 
at the Circus Hall of Fame in connection with the fatal accident which 
claimed the lives of two troupe members and seriously Injured another 
when they performed the same act In Detroit two Winters ago. 

Various articles from the fatal accident including a smashed 
chair which has been restored, a shoulder bar, and other pieces of 
Wallenda equipment were to be turned over to the Circus Hall of Fame In 
the ceremony. The night before this event, Wallenda made his decision 
to rehearse the act ~~ the first time the troupe had attempted the 
pyramid since the Detroit accident. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 














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'Du Pont Show of the Week' 


While a member of the NBC camera crew prepared for filming 
the Hall of Fame ceremony, cameraman Still set up to record the 
rehearsal at the other end of the city. Despite the shock of seeing 
the troupe plunge from the wire -- the result of slippage of one of the 
cables holding one of the upright poles -- Still kept his camera 
grinding and obtained his dramatic films of the fall. 

A1 Wasserman is producer of the telecast on the Flying 
Wallendas. George Freedland is director. 

Airdate for this telecast on the "Du Pont Show of the Week" 
Sunday (10 to 11 p.m. EST) series will be announced. 

NBC-New York, 11/8/63 





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BILL DANA ADDED TO ROSTER 


OF 'THE BEST ON RECORD' 

Bill Dana, star of NBC-TV's "The Bill Dana 
Show," has been added to the roster of recording 
stars who will appear on "The Best on Record," to 
be presented on NBC-TV Sunday,__Nov._2_4 (10 to 11 p.m. 
EST). 

Dana, who will introduce the New Christy 
Minstrels, will be among 10 recording stars serving 
as introducers for 24 other stars who will entertain. 

(EDITORS: Please add Bill Dana's name to 
story and credits in the NBC Daily News Report 
material dated II/6/63.) 


CORR EC TION FOR "LET'S MAKE A DEAL" 

The name of Steve Hatos was misspelled in the NBC Daily 
News Report dated 11/7/63. Mr, Hatos is co-packager of the new day¬ 
time game show 1! Let's Make a Deal" which will premiere on the NBC-TV 
Network Mond a y, Dec. 3 0 (2-2:25 p.m. EST), 


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ROOM 320 

2-x -h NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

TWO 1 NBC WHITE PAPER' TV PROGRAMS ON U.S. FOREIGN 
POLICY CONCERNING CUBA ARE SCHEDULED: ONE ON 
BAY OF PIGS, THE SECOND ON MISSILE CRISIS 
Telecasts Contrast a Failure and a Brilliant Success 

Two case histories of American foreign policy in action -- 
one resulting in failure, the other in brilliant success -- will be 
presented in two programs of the " NBC White Paper 11 series on the 
NBC-TV Network Sun days, Dec, 8 and Jan . 5 (both 10-11 p.m. EST). Chet 
Huntley will narrate. 

Both programs focus on Cuba. The first, "Cuba: the Bay of 
Pigs," will chronicle events from March 17, i960, when President 
Eisenhower first revealed that he had decided to proceed with plans 
for organizing and training a military force of Cuban exiles, through 
April 20, 1961, marking the total failure of the force which invaded 
Cuba. 

The second, "Cuba: the Missile Crisis," will cover develop¬ 
ments from the first indications of Soviet activity in Cuba early in 
1962 to Oct. 28 of that year when Khrushchev agreed to pull out the 
missiles positioned there. 

Presentations of Creative Projects, NBC News, the programs 
will be produced by Fred Freed, producer of four outstanding programs 
in the "NBC White Paper" series -- "Khrushchev and Berlin,""Red China," 
"The Death of Stalin" and "The Rose of Khrushchev." Irving Gitlin is 
executive producer. 

"In a world in which two nuclear powers are opposed, there 

is a new kind of power struggle going on, involving undercover 

operations," Freed said. "Whether it likes it or not, the U. S. is 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


































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forced to use a secret agency like the CIA and operate secretly. Cur 
first program is the story of one such operation, a wholly unsuccess¬ 
ful one. We document the details and analyze why it failed. Some of 
the reasons had to do with the original concept during the Eisenhower 
Administration, some with the relations between the U. S. and the anti- 
Castro Cubans inside and outside Cuba, some with the new administration 
which came into office at the moment the plan was reaching its climax. 

Our second program describes another kind of crisis in 
this nuclear age. In this case the U. S. was able to move with secrecy, 
speed and sureness. Our purpose is to show what conclusions, can be 
drawn from these two crises." 

Freed said the two programs represent "the most comprehensive 
piecing together of the facts" in the Cuban invasion and the missile 
showdown. Research began 10 months ago. 

Theodore Draper, considered the leading expert on Cuba, and 
Jacques Katel, noted political writer and historian, are consultants 
on the programs. Len Giovannitti is associate producer and director. 



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NBC-New York, 11/11/63 










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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



MITCH MILLER TO RECEIVE AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY’S GOLDEN MIKE AWARD 
FOR "SING ALONG WITH MITCH," NAMED "BEST MUSICAL SERIES" 

Mitch Miller will be presented a Golden Mike Award by the 
American Legion Auxiliary on Nov. 13 at an award luncheon to be held at 
New York's Roosevelt Hotel. The award was voted to Miller's NBC-TV 
color musical series "Sing Along with Mitch" (NBC-TV color, Mondays, 
10-11 p.m. EST) by a million members of the Auxiliary who named the 
program "Best Musical Series." 

The award will be presented by the President of the Auxiliary, 
Mrs. Luther D. Johnson. 

The annual poll, conducted by the Auxiliary through its monthly 
magazine, results in five Golden Mike Awards. The other four are 
for "Best Americanism Series," "Best Adventure Series," "Best Comedy 
Series," and "Most Appealing Commercial." 


NBC-New York, 11/11/63 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



















































PROGRAM CHANGES FOR "THE BEST ON RECORD" 

(NBC-TV Sunday, Nov. 24, 10-11 p.m. EST, Special Saluting Top 

Performers in Recording Industry) 

Frank Sinatra replaces BoP Hope as co-introducer^ 
with Bing Crosby^ of Mahalia Jackson. The Groaner and the 
Crooner will exchange quips before bringing on Miss Jackson, 
who will sing "The House I Live In." 

Les Brown replaces Jo Stafford and Paul Weston to 
introduce Peter, Paul and Mary. Brown, musical director of 
the program, will introduce the folk-singing trio's rendition 
of "If I Had a Hammer." 


NBC-New York, 11/11/63 









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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 






November 11, 19&3 

PERRY COMO AND ’KRAFT MUSIC HALL' CAST OF HEADLINE GUESTS, 
HEADED FOR SAN FRANCISCO-ORIGINATED NBC-TV SPECIAL 

i -—- - 

Perry Como will arrive in San Francisco on Nov. l6 to begin 
rehearsals for the Thursday, Nov. 21 NBC telecast of "Perry Como's 
Kraft Music Hall" (10 to 11 p.m. EST). 

The telecast, second of Como's seven specials this season, 
will originate live in black and white from the stage of the 3,200- 
seat War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco. Guest stars will 
include Victor Borg?. Nanette Fabray and Jose Greco. The guest stars 
and production staff members Mitchell Ayres (musical director), Ray 
Charles (choral director), Frank Gallop (announcer), Mario Lewis 
(producer). Herb Sargent (chief x^riter) and Lee Becker Theodore 
(choreographer) all will arrive this weekend in San Francisco. 

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WILMA SOSS TO PRESIDE AT WOMAN'S INVESTORS CLINIC 


Wilma Soss, whose "Pocketbook News” is broadcast 
each Sunday on NBC Radio (6:05 p.m. EST), will be chairman of 
the Sixth Annual Woman’s Investors Clinic Tuesday, Nov. 12 at 
the New York Hilton Hotel. 

Sponsored by the Federation of the Woman’s 
Shareholder in American Business Inc., which Miss Soss founded, 
the Clinic will consider "The New Climate for Investing." 

Miss Soss will speak on "Changes in the Wall Street Climate 
and Changes in the Social and Economic Climate for Women." 

Mrs. Kathryn O’Kay Granahan, Treasurer of the United 
States, will be a guest speaker at the Clinic, making her 
first address in New York City since she became Treasurer. 
During the proceedings. Miss Soss will interview Mrs. 

Granahan for a future broadcast on NBC Radio’s "Monitor." 


NBC-New York, 11/11/63 









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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



— NBC-TV NETWORK COLOR BROADCAST SCHEDULE — 

For D ecember, 1 963 (All Times EST) 

MONDAYS THROUGH FRIDAYS 

10:30-11 a.m. -- "Merv Griffin's Word for Word" 

11:30 a.m.-12 noon -- "Missing Links" (except Wednesday, Dec. 23) 
12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Your First Impression" 

12:30-12:55 p.m. -- "Truth or Consequences" 

2-2:25 p.m. -- "People Will Talk' (through Dec. 27 only) 

2- 2:25 p.m. -- "Let's Make a Deal' 1 (Dec. 30 and 31. Premieres 

Dec. 30) 

3:30-4 p.m. -- "You Don't Sayl" 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" 
(except Dec. 24) 

Sunday, Dec, 1 

3- 4 p.m. -- "NBC News Encore" 

5- 5:30 p.m. -- "Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. — "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" 

8:30-10 p.m. -- "The World's Greatest Showman" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Du Pont Show of the Week" 

Monday, Dec. 2 

10-11 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 
































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2 - NBC-TV December Color Schedule 


Tuesday, Dec. 3 

10-11 p.m. -- "Bell Telephone Hour" 

Wednesday, Dec. 4 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

Thursday, Dec. 9 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Kraft Suspense Theatre" 

Friday, Dec. 6 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" 
10-11 p.m, -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

Saturday, Dec. 7 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff 'n' Reddy Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

12:30-1 p.m. -- "The Bullwinkle Show" 

1-2 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

9 p.m. to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies" 
Sunday, Dec. 8 

3-4 p.m. -- "NBC News Encore" 

5- 5:30 p.m. -- "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Fress" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m* -- "Bonanza" 

Monday, Dec. 9 

7:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Monday Night at the Movies" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

Tuesday, Dec. 10 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

Wednesday, Dec. 11 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

(more) 















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3 - NBC-TV December Color Schedule 


Thursday, Dec. 12 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Kraft Suspense Theatre" 

Friday, Dec. 13 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

Saturday, Dec. 14 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff 'n' Reddy Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

12:30-1 p.m. -- "The Bullwinkle Show" 

1-2 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

8:30-9 p.m. -- "The Joey Bishop Show" 

9 p.m.-to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies" 
Sunday, Dec. 15 

3- 4 p.m. -- "NBC Children’s Theatre" 

4- 5 p.m. -- "Hallmark Hall of Fame" 

5- 5:30 p.m. -- "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -~ "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Making of a Pro" 

Monday, Dec. 16 

7:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Monday Night at the Movies" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

Tuesday, Dec. 17 

10-11 p.m. — "Bell Telephone Hour" 

Wednesday, Dec, 18 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 


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Thursday, Dec, 19 

9:30.-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Kraft Mystery Theatre" 

Friday, Dec. 20 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" 
10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

Saturday, Dec, 21 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff 'n' Reddy Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

12:30-1 p.m. — "The Bullwinkle Show" 

1 p.m. to conclusion -- Liberty Bowl Football Game 
8:30-9 p.m. -- "The Joey Bishop Show" 

9 p.m. to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies" 
Sunday, Dec. 22 

5- 5:30 p.m. -- "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6 :30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7- 7:30 p.m. -- Project 20 "The Coming of Christ" 
7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Story of Christmas" 

Monday, Dec. 23 

10-11 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

Tuesday, Dec. 24 

10-11 p.m. -- "Bell Telephone Hour" 

11:15 p.m.-12 Mid. -- Special Christmas program. Title and 
details to be announced. 

(more) 









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5~ - NBC-TV December Color Schedule 


Wednesday, Dec. 25 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

9- 10 p.m. -- NBC Opera Company -- "Amahl and the Night Visitors" 
Thursday, Dec. 26 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "Kraft Suspense Theatre" 

Friday, Dec. 27 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

Saturday, Dec. 28 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Ruff ‘n’ Reddy Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

12:30-1 p.m. -- "The Bullwinkle Show" 

1-2 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

8:30-9 p.m. -- "The Joey Bishop Show" 

Sunday, Dec. 29 

5- 5:30 p.m. -- "Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney’s Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "Projection 64" 

Monday. Dec. 30 

7:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Monday Night at the Movies" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Sing Along with Mitch" 

Tuesday. Dec. 31 

10-11 p.m. — "The Andy Williams Show" 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/11/63 











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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


2 “ X " H NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 12, 1963 


UNION CARBIDE BUYS INTO THREE NBC-TV PROGRAMS 

The Union Carbide Corp. has purchased sponsorship 
in three NBC-TV programs from May to July, 1964 -- "The 
Jack Paar Program," "The Eleventh Hour" and "Saturday 
Night at the Movies" -- it was announced today by Don Durgin, 
Vice President, NBC Television Network Sales. 

The order was placed through William Esty Co. 

"The Jack Paar Program" is telecast in color 
Fridays, 10-11 p.m. EST. "The Eleventh Hour" is telecast 
Wednesdays, 10-11 p.m. EST. "Saturday Night at the Movies" 
is telecast Saturdays, 9 p.m. EST to conclusion, most films 
in color. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 































INTBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

November 12, 1963 

-'MUSEUMS WITHOUT WALLS'--VIA RELAY SATELLITE- 

Notable Art Will Be Shown in Live TV Exchange Between Louvre 
In Paris and National Gallery in Washington on NBC-TV— 

Program to Be Taped for Repeat Same Day 

"Museums Without Walls,' an NBC News special featuring a 
live exchange via Relay satellite between the Louvre in Paris and the 
National Gallery of Art in Washington, will be presented on NBC-TV 
Sunday, Nov. 17, 12:30-1 p.m. EST (including WNBC-TV). It will be 
taped and repeated the same day 6-6:30 p.m. EST (pre-empting "Meet the 
Press") * 

This unique TV cultural exchange of art masterpieces will also 
be offered live simultaneously to RTF (French TV) and to Eurovision at 
the same time it is being carried live on NBC-TV. 

Herve Alphand, French ambassador to the United States, and 
Mme. Alphand will introduce the segment of the program originating at 
the National Gallery in Washington, and Charles E. Bohlen, U. S. 
ambassador to France, and Mrs. Bohlen, will have in similar roles at the 
Louvre. 

Bernard Frizell, NBC News' Paris correspondent, will be 
anchor man in Paris, and Sander Vanocur, NBC News White House 
correspondent, will be at the National Gallery. Co-producers of this 
event, first of its kind to be presented on television, will be Dan 
O'Connor in Washington and Lucy Jarvis in Paris. 

The National Gallery has indicated that it will reveal 
during the program its acquisition of a distinguished masterpiece. The 
gallery's director, John Walker, will discuss its collection. Other 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



















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works of art in the gallery's Mellon collection to be shown include 
Renoir's "Girl with a Watering Can," the David "Napoleon" and Mary 
Cassatt's "Boating Party." 

The Louvre segment will present the sculpture of "Winged 
Victory, da Vinci's "Mona Lisa," a Poussin self-portrait, James 
McNeil Whistler's painting of his mother and Vermeer's "The Lace- 
Maker." 

At the Louvre, several distinguished museum staff members 
will be introduced, including Germain Bazin, chief curator, and 
Madeleine Hours, curator in charge of laboratories, who will discuss 
the care of paintings and the detection of forgeries in art. M. Jean 
Chatelain, director of Museums of France, also will be introduced. 

The program received the special approval of Andre Malraux, 
Minister of Culture of France, who has given NBC exclusive American 
rights to a special full-hour program on the Louvre's collection to be 
presented in color by NBC News next year. It is also M. Malraux's 
philosophy that "museums without walls" will make the world's great 
masterpieces more accessible to everyone everywhere. 

Robert Priaulx is director of the segment from Paris. 

James Kitchell is the director of the Washington portion of the program. 


NBC-New York, 11/12/63 



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LOU HAZAM WINS GOLDEN GATE AWARD FOR 'RIVER NILE' PROGRAM 


NBC News producer Lou Hazam has won one of the two Golden 
Gate Awards at the San Francisco International Film Festival for his 
program titled "The River Nile." He also won Honorable Mention for his 
"Shakespeare: Soul of an Age." 

Hazam both wrote and produced the two full-hour NBC-TV 
color specials, which won warm critical and popular acclaim. "The 
River Nile" was telecast Oct. 28, 1962, and "Shakespeare: Soul of an 
Age" Nov. 30, 1962. 

His newest NBC News special, "Greece: The Golden Age," will 
be telecast in color T uesday, Nov. 19 (9-10 p.m. EST), with Trevor 
Howard as off-camera narrator. 




NBC-New York, 11/12/63 









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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK ISTEWS 


November 12, 1963 

COMO DOFFS SWEATER FOR TUX IN FORMAL ATMOSPHERE OF SAN FRANCISCO'S 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE FOR "KRAFT MUSIC HALL" SPECIAL WITH 
VICTOR BORGE, NANETTE FABRAY AND JOSE GRECO 

Perry Como deserts his comfortable cardigan sweater for a 
formal dinner jacket in the spirit of the grand opera setting of San 
Francisco's War Memorial Opera House, from which his Thursday, Nov. 21 
"Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall" (H3C-TV, 10-11 p.m. EST) will originate. 
Victor Borge, Nanette Fabray and Jose Greco, as announced, are the 
guest stars for the special live telecast. 

Perry will open the show singing "San Francisco," accompanied 
by the Ray Charles Singers and the Lee Becker Theodore Dancers. Miss 
Fabray will join Perry next to prove to him, with the aid of the Ray 
Charles Singers, how some of Perry's most famous hits can be sung 
"operatic style," as they are blended with the "Anvil Chorus." 

Borge will do a special comedy spot in which he spoofs opera. 
He will be assisted in one portion of his monologue and piano recital 
by the Lee Becker Theodore Dancers. Borge will also provide accompani¬ 
ment for Perry's vocal rendition of "No Other Love." 

Greco and four men from his troupe will dance "Cortijo." Then 
Miss Fabray in Chinese garb will sing and dance "Glow Worm," accompanied 
by the dancers whose costumes add up to a most unusual segmented glow 
worm, in Chinese fashion. 

In a special request spot, Como will answer viewer 
request mail by singing "Maria," "You Do Something To Me" and "I Left 
My Heart in San Francisco." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 







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2 - Perry Como 


The Como Chamber Music Society" (Perry and his guest stars 
and company) will offer a "chamber music" rendition of Chopin's 
Fantasie Impromptu." Perry will close the program singing the 
traditional Thanksgiving hymn "Bless This House." 

:--—-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT NOV. 21-, 

( 

PERRY COMO'S KRAFT MUSIC HALL: From the War Memorial 
Opera House in San Francisco, Como and guests Victor 
Borge, Nanette Fabray and Jose Greco offer songs, dances 
and comedy. 

1 I 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 11/12/63 











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JACK TRACY 

ROOM 320 


2-x-H NBC TRADE NEWS 

November 13 , 1963 

NBC-TV DAYTIME SALES TOTALING MORE THAN $7,000,000 
RECORDED DURING THE LAST TWO WEEKS OF OCTOBER 

Daytime sales totaling more than $7^000,000 were recorded 
by NBC-TV during the last two weeks of October, it was announced today 
by James Hergen, Director of Daytime Sales, NBC Television Network. 

As a result of the heavy concentration of sales during this 
period, record first quarter 1964 daytime sales are assured, sur¬ 
passing the previous record quarters of 1963 . 

One advertiser, Morton Salt Company, is placing its first 
order in network television. Morton, through its agency, Needham, 

Louis & Brorby Inc., has bought sponsorship in "Your First Impression," 
"Missing Links" and "Loretta Young Theatre." 

The Brillo Mfg. Co. Inc. returns to NBC-TV's daytime schedule 
after an absence of several years. Brillo, through J. Walter Thompson 
Co., has bought into "Concentration," "Missing Links" and "Loretta 
Young Theatre." 

Mattel Inc., Toy Manufacturers, renewed sponsorship in three 
shows for one year each starting this Spring: "Dennis the Menace," 

"Fury" and "Sgt. Preston of the Yukon." Mattel's agency is Carson- 
Roberts Inc. 

Other advertisers buying into NBC-TV's daytime schedule 
during this period were Colgate-Palmolive Co. (through Norman, Craig & 
Kummel), National Biscuit Company (McCann-Erickson Inc.), Bristol-Myers 
Co. (Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield Inc.), Armour & Company 
(Foote, Cone & Belding), United Biscuit Company of America (MacManus, 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






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(John & Adams), Heublein Inc. (Fletcher Richards, Calkins & Holden), 
Miles Laboratories Inc. (Wade Advertising Inc.), E. I. Du Pont de 
Nemours and Company Inc. (N. W. Ayer & Son), Pharmaco Inc. (N. W. 

Ayer & Son), Menley & James Labs (Foote, Cone Sc Belding), James 0. 
Welch Company (Chirurg & Cairns Inc.), Johnson & Johnson (Sullivan, 
Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles), Aluminum Co. of America (Ketchum, MacLeod 
& Grove) and Bissell Inc. (N. W. Ayer & Son). 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/13/63 




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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENTS TO RETURN FROM FOREIGN ASSIGNMENTS 
FOR "PROJECTION ’64" TELECAST AND 10-CITY SPEAKING TOUR 


Twelve NBC News correspondents whose assignments cover the 
world will gather in this country next month for a color TV news 
special and a 10-city speaking tour. 

The program, titled "Projection ’64," will originate from New 
York on NBC-TV S unday, Dec. 29 (10 to 11 p.m. EST). The NBC Newsmen 
will discuss conditions in the areas to which they are assigned and 
look ahead to what may be expected in 1964. 

"Projection ' 64" will be the seventh annual program of its 
type to be presented by NBC News. Chet Hagan will be the producer. 

Correspondents participating will be: 

Joseph C. Harsch, London; Bernard Frizell, Paris; Welles 
Hangen, Bonn; Irving R. Levine, Rome; John Rich, Tokyo; James Robinson, 
Hong Kong; George Clay, Africa; Wilson Hall, South America; Elie 
Abel, State Department; Sander Vanocur, White House; Ray Scherer, 
Congress. Frank McGee of NBC News in New York will serve as moderator. 

The cross-country speaking tour will take the correspondents 
to Pittsburgh, Omaha, Detroit, Chicago, Philadelphia, New York, New 
Orleans, Los Angeles, Boston and Washington. Following is the 
schedule: 

Jan. 3 Foreign Policy Association, Pittsburgh. 

Jan. 5 -- University of Omaha. 

Jan. 6 -- Economic Club, Detroit. 

Jan. 7 -- Executives Club, Chicago. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




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'Projection 64 1 


Jan. 8 -- World Affairs Council, Philadelphia. 

Jan. 9 -- Foreign Policy Association, New York. 

Jan. 10 -- Foreign Relations Association, New Orleans. 
Jan. 13 -- The Modern Forum, Los Angeles. 

Jan. 15 -- World Affairs Council, Boston. 

Jan. l6 -- National Press Club, Washington. 

-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 29- 

PROJECTION '64 (10 to 11 p.m. EST) -- NBC Newsmen 
return from foreign assignments for full-hour program 
to discuss conditions in their areas and look forward 


to what 

developments may be expected in 1964. (Color). 




NBC-New York, 11/13/63 









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NBC THADK NEWS 

11 REPORTERS IN 5 CITIES INTERVIEW MITCH MILLER IN CLOSED CIRCUIT 
TV PRESS CONFERENCE BROADCAST TO NBC AFFILIATES, WITH MORE 

EDITORS AND COLUMNISTS ‘SITTING IN' ON QUESTIONING 

Eleven reporters Interviewed NBC-TV star Mitch Miller via a 
closed-circuit press conference Tuesday, Nov. 12, which was broadcast to 
the network's affiliate stations -- where many more TV editors and 
columnists "sat in" on the interview. 

Miller, on closed-circuit TV, was questioned by newsmen in 
Indianapolis, Memphis, Nashville, Pittsburgh and Shreveport, who talked 
with the conductor via two-way audio lines. 

The talk ranged over a variety of subjects: why Miller grew 
a beard, ratings, the "Sing Along" style of singing, folk music, the 
demise of big bands, the success of singer Leslie Uggams on his show 
and how "Sing Along" themes are chosen. 

Titled "Q. and A. Along with Mitch, 1 ' the closed-circuit 
interview was the fourth in a series set up by NBC's Promotion 
Department. It ran from 1 to 2 p.m. EST, with promos being fed to the 
stations following the questioning. 

Miller was in a New York studio. The reporters from the five 
cities who questioned him were Win Fanning of the Pittsburgh Post- 
Gazette, Sharon Hall and Lynnell Jackson of the Carthage (Texas) High 
School Carthaginean, Julia Inman of the Indianapolis Star, Tom Mayhew 
of the Nashville Tennessean, Dave McClelland of TV Key in Shreveport, 
Henry Mitchell of the Memphis Commercial Appeal, Red O'Donnell of the 
Nashville Banner, Lynn Rawlings of the Indianapolis Times, Polly Waldron 
of Radio Station KWKH, Shreveport, and Alice Weston of WIIC, Pittsburgh. 

("Sing Along with Mitch" is telecast in color Mondays, 10 to 
11 p.m. EST.) -o- NBC-New York, 11/13/63 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN'S FIRST STARRING MOVIE IS RELEASED 


Richard Chamberlain's first starring motion picture since 
taking the title role of NBC-TV's "Dr. Kildare" series has opened 
across the country. The M-G-M feature is titled "Twilight of Honor. 
In it Chamberlain has the role of a young defense attorney. Co- 
starring with him in the picture is young Joey Heatherton, daughter 
of bandleader Ray Heatherton. The n Dr. Kildare" series, telecast 
Thursdays (8:30-9:30 p.m. EST), is in its third season. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 11/13/63 


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CREDITS FOR 'GREECE: THE GOLDEN AGE * NBC NEWS SPECIAL,— j 

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ON NBC-TV IN COLOR TUESDAY, NOV. 19 (9-10 P.M. EST) 


Program Title: 

"Greece: the Golden Age" 

Time: 

NBC-TV color program Tuesday, Nov. 19 

(9 to 10 p.m. EST). 

Description: 

An NBC News special designed to bring to 

life the glory that was ancient Greece. 

The program was filmed in color at 

classical sites in Athens, Delphi, 

Olympia, Epidaurus and on the islands 

offshore. The major portion of the 

program is devoted to the Age of 

Pericles (486-430 B.C.), which marked the 

high tide of ancient Greek civilization. 

Written by 

Lou Hazam 

Produced by 

Lou Hazam 

Narrator: 

Trevor Howard (off-camera) 

Directed by 

Ray Garner 

Photographed by 

Brad Kress 

Original music composed and 
conducted by 

George Kleinsinger 

Associate Producer: 

Dan Karasik 

Consultant: 

Dr. Paul MacKendrick, professor of 

classics. University of Wisconsin. 

Supervising Film Editor: 

Constantine S. Gochis 

Production Coordinator: 

Louis Happ 


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Off-camera voices: Norman Rose, Lester Rawlins, Ralph Bell, Mandel 

Kramer, Lawson Zerbe, Roger DeKover, Guy 
Sorel, Karl Weber, Guy Repp, Vera Allen (off- 
camcra). 


NEC News aokowledges 
the cooperation of: 


The Royal Greek Government; the Royal Greek 
Embassy of Washington, D. C.; Acropolis 
Museum, Athens; Ceramicus Museum, Athens; 
National Museum, Athens; Delphi Museum, Delphi 
Olympia Museum, Olympia; Capitoline Museum, 
Rome; Museo delle Terme, Rome; Vatican Museum, 
Rome; Glyptophek Museum, Munich; British 
Museum, London. 


NBC-New York, 11/13/63 




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JACK TRAC'/ 

ROOM 320 

FROM the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

November 14, 1963 

NBC EXECUTIVES WILL MEET IN SAN FRANCISCO WITH 
PROMOTION MANAGERS OF NBC AFFILIATED STATIONS 
Publicity, Promotion and Ad Campaigns to Be Discussed 

Executives of the National Broadcasting Company will 
meet with promotion managers of NBC affiliated stations around 
the country in San .Francisco Sunday, Nov. 17 prior to the annual 
four-day Broadcasters' Promotion Association convention there. 

The NBC officials will review the season’s publicity, 
promotion and advertising campaigns and discuss plans for the future. 

Attending from NBC will be Louis Hausman, Vice President, 
General Executive; Mort Werner, Vice President, Programs, NBC-TV 
Network; Grant Tinker, Vice President, Television Network Programs, 
West Coast; Sydney H. Eiges, Vice President, Public Information; 

A1 Rylander, Vice President, Promotion; M. S. Rukeyser Jr., Vice 
President, Press and Publicity; Lawrence K. Grossman, Vice President, 
Advertising; Robert Northshield, General Manager, NBC News; Ralph 
F. Shawhan, Director, Press and Publicity, West Coast; Gerald E. 

Rowe, Director, Audience Advertising and Promotion; John Scuoppo, 
Director, Promotion; Earl L. Zeigler, Manager, Press and Publicity 
Operations, West Coast; Raymond C. Johnson, Manager, Station 
Promotion, and Morton Fleischmann, Manager, Promotion, West Coast. 

Speakers before the NBC group include Paul W. Sheldon, 
Director of Advertising for the Gulf Oil Corporation. He will 
outline promotion plans for Gulf's sponsorship of NBC's television 

(more) 


Neii Department, Room 320 













































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2 - Promotion Meeting 

and radio coverage of next year’s conventions and elections. 

In addition to his appearance at the NBC meeting, Mr. 

Rowe will be a panelist in a BPA discussion dealing with the 
promotion of movies on television. 

Several NBC-TV stars from the West Coast will make 
appearances at the NBC meeting. They are Joey Bishop, Abby Dalton 
and Corbett Monica of "The Joey Bishop Show," Bill Dana of "The 
Bill Dana Show," James Drury of "The Virginian," Jack Ging of 
"Eleventh Hour," Gary Lockwood of "The Lieutenant," James Franciscus 
of "Mr. Novak" and Jeff Hunter of "Temple Houston." 

On Saturday evening, Nov. 16, the NBC group will meet 
with the NBC Affiliates Promotion Committee, a seven-member 
committee representing all NBC station promotion managers. This 
will be a closed session. Members of the Affiliates Promotion 
Committee, are: Caley Augustine, WIIC, Pittsburgh; Stan Cohen, 
WDSU-TV, New Orleans; Steve Fox, KOA-TV, Denver; Kirt Harris^ 
KPRC-TV, Houston; James Knight, WTRF-TV, Wheeling; Dick Paul, 
WAVY-TV, Norfolk; and Dick Robertson, KRON-TV, San Francisco. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/14/63 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 14, 1963 

SCHICK BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN ’THE LIEUTENANT’ 

The Schick Safety Razor Company Division of 
Eversharp Inc. has purchased sponsorship in NBC-TV’s "The 
Lieutenant," it was announced today by Don Durgin, Vice 
President, NBC Television Network Sales. 

The Schick campaign will begin Jan. 4. The 
agency for Shick is Compton Advertising, Inc. 

"The Lieutenant" is broadcast Saturdays (7:30 to 
8:30 p.m. EST) and stars Gary Lockwood in the title role. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






































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November 14, 1963 


'THIS WAS TOSCANINI' : NEW TEXT-AND-PICTURE BOOK 
TELLS STORY OF THE FAMOUS CONDUCTOR 

A new book, "This Was Toscanini," has been published by 
Vanguard Press, for release in bookstores throughout the country on 
Nov, 27, The book contains both text and photos of Arturo Toscanini. 

Text was written by the late Samuel Antek. Antek had a 
special point of contact with the noted maestro. He was a member of the 
first violin section of the NBC Symphony Orchestra during the years that 
Toscanini and his orchestra were making musical history in their weekly 
broadcasts. Antek was later to become a conductor himself, for several 
years before his untimely death. 

Pictures were taken by Robert Hupka over a period of years at 
rehearsals and recording sessions. Hupka was an employee of RCA Victor, 
Toscanini's recording company, and had special opportunities to 
photograph Toscanini in action. 

A special foreward has been written for the book by the noted 
writer Marcia Davenport, who also enjoyed friendship with the Toscanini 
family. 

In eighty pages of text, Antek analyzes Toscanini's working 
methods and musical points of view. Hs takes readers to actual 
rehearsals, about which he kept notes at the time, bringing alive in his 
book the working sessions that made the memorable concerts possible. 
Toscanini's temper tantrums have been widely written about, but the hours 
of patient rehearsal, which were the general rule, have been passed over 
as less dramatic. 


(more) 






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In Antek's book the reader finds that this is really 
where the great drama took place, in the shaping of the music 
under the watchful eye and baton of Toscanini. As Antek 
says: "Playing with Toscanini was a musical rebirth." 

("Toscanini--The Man Behind the Legend" is a weekly 
feature on NBC Radio.) 


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NBC New York, 11/14/63 




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NBC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 

November 14, I 9 S 3 

f EXPERIMENT IN DRAMA'--SPECIAL NBC RADIO PRESENTATION 
OF TWO RAY BRADBURY SCIENCE-FICTION STORIES--TO CARRY 
REQUEST FOR AUDIENCE VIEWS ON RADIO DRAMA PROGRAMMING 

"Experiment in Drama," a special presentation, will be 
presented Sunday, Nov. 17 (6:30-7 p.m. EST) on the NBC Radio Network 
(including WNBC). The "experiment" in "Experiment in Drama" lies in 
NBC Radio requesting listeners to express their attitude toward 
dramatic programming in radio today. 

For the "experiment," two science-fiction stories by Ray 
Bradbury will be presented: "There Shall Come Soft Rains" and "Zero 
Hour." The former is placed in the year 1985 . It tells of a completely 
automatic house and what happens to it immediately after an atomic 
attack which destroys the population of Earth. 

"Zero Hour" is the story of a Martian invasion of Earth in 
which the children of Earth are enlisted in a child's game called 
"Invasion." 

Listeners will be asked to send their comments on •* 

"Experiment in Drama" to the NBC affiliated stations in their areas, 
or c/o Drama, NBC, New York. 

"Meet the Press," usually broadcast Sundays 6:30-7 p.m. EST, 
will not be presented on this date. 

-RADIO PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT--NOV. 17- 

I 

EXPERIMENT IN DRAMA: Two Ray Bradbury science- 
fiction dramas, "There Shall Come Soft Rains" and 
"Zero Hour," will be heard in this special half- 
hour presentation. 

i 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


















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NBC FEATURE 
November l4, 1963 

HEPP TO BIG STORIES 

Husband-and-Wife Team on African Beat for NBC News 

NBC was awaiting a report via radio circuit from Cyprus one 
day, when a cable arrived: "Sorry can't make circuit...on way to 
hospital to have a baby. 11 

Since the vast majority of NBC overseas reporters are males, 
this was an entirely new reason for not meeting a deadline. 

Phyllis Hepp is the NBC News reporter who sent the cable 
that was five years ago -- to a startled communications center. A 
former New York City schoolteacher, Phyllis and her husband operate as 
a team assigned to the NBC News bureau in Nairobi, Africa. Her husband 
is Louis Hepp, newsfilm photographer and one-time cameraman for the 
royal family of Greece. Hepp's reports have been presented on the 
"NBC White Paper’ 1 series, and other programs. He also is production 
coordinator for the filming of "Greece: the Golden Age," a full-hour 
color special NBC-TV will telecast T uesday, Nov. 19 (9-10 p.m. EST). 

Phyllis was born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Aug. 16, 1932. She 
attended New Jersey's Douglass College and the New York State College 
for Teachers. She had taught at New York's Malvern High School and 
Colonie High School, and went to Athens one Summer as part of the 
Experiment in International Living, representing the city of Albany. 

She was so fascinated by the beauty of Greece that she decided to 
return to Athens permanently. While she was there, teaching in the 
American High School, she met and married Louis in 1957. 

Louis was born in Athens on Feb. 23, 1925. He was educated 
in Athens and Vienna and became interested in film work through his 
father, a film cameraman who still is active in movie production in 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

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2 - Phyllis and Louis Hepp 


Greece and occasionally for NBC News in Athens. Louis has done motion 
picture work for German, Italian and Greek studios, and also had a 
lengthy assignment as cameraman for the activities of the royal family 
of Greece?. 

After their marriage, while Louis was covering the Athens 
scene on film for NBC, Phyllis auditioned as a reporter for the net - 
work, and her first assignment was a feature on Athens which was tele¬ 
cast on the 'Huntley-Brinkley Report." She covered many news stories 
throughout Greece, in i960 reported on the riots in Turkey, and at 
times on events in the Congo. Many of her reports and scheduled on 

the NBC Radio's "Emphasis" series. 

Louis ducked machine-gun fire in Katanga, crawled through the 
brush filming rebel attacks in Angola, and stood up to threatening 
cannibals of the Baluba tribe, in his various newsgathering film 
assignments for NBC. But his narrowest escape was the time that a 
native in Leopoldville dropped an oversized cocoanut from a tree. It 
crashed through Hepp's car, just missing his head. 

In a less harrowing experience, he spent an afternoon with 
President Tshombe, teaching him to say I do not speak English very 
well." Hepp speaks Greek, Italian, German, French and Englisn. 

Little Louis Hepp Jr., whose imminent arrival resulted in the 

aforementioned emergency cable, is now five years old. He has been so 

close to many of his parents' news assignments that he recently was 
given an honorary membership in the United Nations Press Corps in the 
Congo and he even has his own press card. His parents modestly suggest 
that he is perhaps the youngest member of the Congo press corps. 

In November, 1962, Alexander Hepp arrives on the scene -- 

perhaps less spectacularly than his brother, since it was a quiet day in 

Africa and his mother had no urgent news assignment. 

_o_ NBC-New York, 11/14/63 




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CREDITS FOR "THE WORLD'S GREATEST SHOWMAN" 
90-MINUTE NBC-TV COLOR SPECIAL 


Program: 

"The World's Greatest Showman" 

Time: 

NBC-TV, in color, Sunday, Dec. 1 (8:30-10 p.m. 

EST). 

Format: 

The story of Cecil B. DeMille's legendary Hollywood 

career will be reviewed by many of his top stars, 

illustrated by excerpts from his famous movies, 

and depicted by film clips of the director in 

action. Many of the stars will re-enact high¬ 
lights of their association with DeMille. 

Starring as 

Program Guests: 

Yul Brynner, Charlton Heston, Bob Hope, Betty 

Hutton, Edward G. Robinson, Barbara Stanwyck, 

James Stewart, Gloria Swanson and Cornel Wilde. 

Special 

Appearances: 

Samuel Goldwyn, the Rev. Dr. Billy Graham. 

Motion Picture 
Excerpts: 

"The Ten Commandments," "The Greatest Show on 

Earth," "Samson and Delilah," "The Buccaneers," 
"Sunset Boulevard," "The Squaw Man," "The Little 

American," "Manslaughter, "The Cheat, King of 

Kings" and others. 

Writer-Producer: 

Stanley Roberts 

Co-Producer: 

Henry Wileoxon 

Director: 

Boris Sagal 

Producing 

Company: 

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Television, in association with 

Paramount Pictures, and with cooperation of the 

DeMille Trust. 

Music Composed 
and Conducted by 

Elmer Bernstein 

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Director of Photography: 

Philip Lathrop 

Art Direction: 

George W. Davi and Gabriel Scongmaillo 

Production Assistant: 

Berenice Mosk 

Supervising Film Editor: 

John Dunning 

Film Editor: 

Hugh Fowler 

Ass't Director: 

Donald Roberts 

Set Decoration: 

Henry Grace, Frank McKelvy 

Recording Supervisor: 

Franklin Milton, Harold Lewis 

Sponsor (and Agency): 

Eastman Kodak Company (J. Walter 

Thompson) 

NBC Press Representatives: 

Neil Clemans (Burbank), Stan Levine 

(New York). 


-o - 

NBC-New York, 11/14/63 





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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 


November 15, 1963 
NBC STARTS ITS 38 TH YEAR 

Today (Nov. 15), marks the 37th anniver¬ 
sary of the first NBC Radio Network program. The 
inaugural broadcast in 1926 originated at New York 
City’s old Waldorf-Astoria Hotel -- with some 
distant remotes — and included an array of top 
stars of stage, concert and music hall over a 
network of 25 stations -- 21 of them charter 
affiliates, four especially added. 

Another NBC anniversary was reached 
last Monday (Nov. 11). On that date -- in 1933 -- 
the company officially opened its Radio City 
studios in the RCA Building of Rockefeller 
Center in New York City. 


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JOEY BISHOP AND HIS NBC-TV CO-STAR, ABBY DALTON, 

TO BE HONORED BY VARIETY CLUB IN PITTSBURGH 

Joey Bishop, star of NBC’s "The Joey Bishop Show," 
and his co-star, Abby Dalton, will be honored by the Variety 
Club Tent Number 1 of Pittsburgh, at the organization’s annual 
banquet Sunday evening, Nov. 24. 

The Pittsburgh Variety Club has chosen Bishop as 
"Comedian of the Year" and Miss Dalton as "Television Mother 
of the Year," the honors being based on their husband-and-wife 
portrayals of Joey and Ellie Barnes. 

Both Bishop and Miss Dalton will attend the 
banquet at the Penn Sheraton Ballroom to accept their awards. 
Arrangements for their accepting the honors in person were 
made by Caley Augustine, Promotion Manager of Station WIIC, 
the NBC-TV affiliate in Pittsburgh. 

("The Joey Bishop Show" is telecast in color 
Saturdays, 8:30 p.m. EST.) 




NBC-New York, 11/15/83 







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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

November 15 , 1963 

HXS&CN BERLE STARS AS ONCE-SUCCESSFUL POLITICAL MANAGER TACKLING 
DIFFICULT CAMPAIGN, ON BOB HOPE'S "CHRYSLER THEATRE" 

First Eugene Burdick Story Written Especially for TV Also Stars 
Dina Merrill, Ruth Roman, Robert Webber and Hope Holiday 

Milton Berle stars in Eugene Burdick's first story written 
especially for television, "The Candidate," a drama that probes the 
integrity of a desperate political campaign manager, on "Bob Hope 
Presents the Chrysler Theatre" color series Friday, Dec. 6 (NBC-TV, 
8:30-9:30 p.m. EST). 

Dina Merrill, Ruth Roman, Robert Webber and Hope Holiday also 
star in the Burdick original, a behind-the-scenes portrait of a veteran 
political "king-maker" who finds himself powerless to stop the dis¬ 
integration of both his professional and personal life. 

Like a fighter down-for-the-count, once-successful campaign 
organizer Parker Hite (Berle) is struggling to secure the gubernatorial 
nomination for Robert Cowley (never seen in the teleplay). Hite is 
frustrated by the belief that Cowley opposes him at every turn. With a 
record of two recent and notable failures, Hite is desperate to prove to 
himself and to his wife (Miss Roman) that he still has the "touch." 

Scant hours before the convention, Cowley becomes involved in a family 
crisis and Hite marshals every available tool at his command to avoid 
defeat. 

(more) 



PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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Dina Merrill appears as Joan Cowley, the candidate's wife; 
Robert Webber portrays Stuart Landsman, Hite's statistical expert; 
and Hope Holiday plays Carol Burlingame, Hite's secretary. 

Stuart Rosenberg directed the drama for producer Dick Berg. 

--PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 6- 

BOB HOPE PRESENTS THE CHRYSLER THEATRE: "The Candidate" 
starring Milton Berle, in a drama about a political 
campaign manager. This is Eugene Burdick's first 
story written especially for TV. 

NBC-New York, 11/15/63 









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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


| COLOR TELECAST i 

:_L 

November 15 , 1963 

NBC-TV STARS AND OTHER TOP PERFORMERS TO JOIN LINE OF MARCH 
IN MACY'S THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE 
Holiday Spectacle to Be Telecast in Color by NBC-TV 

Three NBC-TV stars -- Mitch Miller, Michael Landon and James 
Drury -- and other showbusiness celebrities including Janis Paige, 

Craig Stevens, Troy Donahue, Jack Palance, Allan Sherman, Gene Krupa 
and Ray Bolger will join the line of march in Macy's 37 th annual 
Thanksgiving Day Parade, which NBC-TV will televise in color Thursday, 
Nov. 28 (10 to 11:30 a.m. EST). 

Lome Greene, co-star of NBC-TV's ' Bonanza 11 color series, and 
Betty White will be the commentators for NBC-TV's 90-minute color 
coverage of the procession, which also will feature six huge helium- 
filled balloons, colorful floats, marching bands, and dancing and sing¬ 
ing groups. Many of the entertainers and all of the bands will stage 
exclusive performances before the NBC-TV color cameras in front of 
Macy's, on Broadway at Herald Square. 

The showbusiness stars who will appear in New York's 
traditional holiday spectacle, and some of the chief floats, listed 
according to the tentative order in the parade include: 

The World's Fair float, with a huge replica of the 1964 New 
York World's Fair symbol, the Unisphere, will carry Miss International 
Beauty. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






























































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2 - Thanksgiving Parade 


Michael Landon, co-star of NBC-TV's "Bonanza," and James 
Drury, co-star of NBC-TV's "The Virginian" color series, will ride the 
parade route on horseback, leading a "sheriff’s posse." 

Jack Palance, star of "The Greatest Show on Earth" TV series, 
will be aboard the "Circus" float, along with trampolinists and 
acrobats who will perform when the float reaches the NBC-TV color 
cameras. 

Radio City Music Hall will have a "Showplace" float, with a 
huge replica of the Music Hall proscenium arch accompanied by members 
of the Music Hall's Choral Ensemble. When the float approaches the 
NBC-TV cameras, the theatre's 24-member Ballet Company will join the 
procession for a number, followed by the 36 -girl line of the Music Hall 
Rockettes performing one of their famed precision dances for TV 
viewers. 

Ray Bolger, aboard a horse-drawn circus wagon, will sing 
"L'il Elfy" when he reaches Herald Square. 

Mitch Miller and the 25-man "Sing Along Gang" of NBC-TV's 
"Sing Along with Mitch" color series will ride the "Great Songs of 
Christmas" float. When the float comes into range of the NBC-TV 
cameras, they will sing "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer," and Mitch 
will lead spectators in the grandstand area in a second chorus of the 
song. 

Captain Bob Cottle, host of NBC-TV's "Ruff 'n' Reddy" color 
series, will ride a "Pirate Ship" float. 

The New York City Center Light Opera Company will re-create 
a scene from "Porgy and Bess" with a float that bears a replica of the 
'Catfish Row" set. A chorus will perform excerpts from the musical 
before the NBC-TV cameras. 

(more) 



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TV and film star Troy Donahue will ride in the car 
that pulls the New York City float, with its replica of the 
Statue of Liberty and a separate level for each of the five 
boroughs of the city, which is celebrating its 300 th anniversary. 

Gene Krupa, with drums and a combo, will ride a "Jazz" 
float, with Judy Doll of Akron, Ohio, winner of the "Miss Teen¬ 
age America" title. The jazz group will play when the float 
reaches the NBC-TV cameras. 

Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts will have a 
float that represents the octagonal stages of Shakespearean 
days, with dancers from the Metropolitan Opera Company performing 
for TV viewers. 

Allan Sherman will ride the "Toyland" float, accompanied 
by a group of youngsters. When the float approaches the NBC-TV 
cameras, Sherman will sing "Hello Mudde^ Hello Fadder," from 
his "My Son, the Nut" album. 

A parade within a parade will be the feature of the 
"Here’s Love" float, which will have Janis Paige, Craig Stevens, 
Valerie Lee, Fred Gwinn and Paul Reed from the cast of the hit 
musical and a Broadway street scene during a Thanksgiving Day 
parade. 

And, to climax the parade, as in past years, there will 
be Santa Claus, riding his "Christmas Sleigh" float and waving 
a cheery holiday greeting to one and all. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/15/63 




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BILL MUNDAY, WHO ANNOUNCED 1929 ROSE BOWL GAME FOR NBC RADIO, 
RECALLS FAMOUS WRONG-WAY RUN FOR NEW YORK TOUCHDOWN CLUB 

One of history's most famous detours -- the wrong¬ 
way run of Roy Riegels in the Rose Bowl Game between Georgia 
Tech and California on New Year's Day of 1929 -- was recalled 
yesterday (Nov. l4) by sportscaster Bill Munday at a luncheon 
of the New York Touchdown Club. 

Munday, who announced the 1929 grid contest with the 
late Graham McNamee for the NBC Radio Network, was a guest of 
honor at the luncheon in the Lambs' clubhouse. Munday told 
of the dramatic misplay that combined pathos, comedy and 
suspense. Munday also displayed a rare film clip of the 
wrong-way run. 

The 35th anniversary of that game occurs Wednesday, 

Jan. 1 , and the Rose Bowl contest of that date will be 
covered from Pasadena on the NBC Television Network in 
color, and on the NBC Radio Network (4:45 p.m. EST). 


NBC-New York, 11/15/63 

















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NBC-TV NETWORK PROGRAM 


CESAR ROMERO TO BE HOST-NARRATOR IN 4 POST-FILM 

APPEARANCES ON ’SATURDAY NIGHT AT MOVIES' 

" — — ■ • - — — — — - — 

Cesar Romero will be host-narrator in a series of four 
appearances on NBC-TV's "Saturday Night at the Movies" (9 p.m. EST to 
conclusion). 

He will appear, at the end of each motion picture, in 10- 
minute segments, two of them featuring an interview with a star of that 
night's movie, and the other two showing specially edited film clips 
of such Hollywood greats as Theda Bara, John Barrymore, Dolores 
Costello, Hoot Gibson and Buck Jones. 

Romero will participate first on Saturday, Nov. 23 , after the 
showing of "Imitation General," starring Glenn Ford and Red Buttons. 
Romero will narrate a specially prepared film of early Hollywood. 

For the Saturday, Dec. 7 color presentation of "The Left 
Hand of God," Romero will interview Lee J. Cobb, who stars in the film 
with Humphrey Bogart and Gene Tierney. (Cobb is a star of NBC-TV's 
"The Virginian" series. ) 

On Saturday, Feb. 8, Romero's special short subject will deal 
with more rare films of early Hollywood. "Edge of the City," starring 
John Cassavetes and Sidney Poitier, will be the main feature. 

Romero will conclude his series Saturday, Feb. 29 with an 
interview of Lee Marvin, one of the stars of "Violent Saturday," the 
movie to be presented in color on the date. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/15/63 














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ISHBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 15 , 1963 

N.Y.-LONDON CHAT ON THEATRE SEASON IN TWO CITIES WILL BE 
SEEN AND HEARD LIVE ON 'TODAY* VIA RELAY SATELLITE 

A live transatlantic TV discussion on the New York and 
London theatre season will be performed via the Relay communications 
satellite on NBC's "Today” show Thursday, Nov. 21 (during the 
8:30-9 a.m. segment of the 7-9 a.m. EST program), 

"Today" host Hugh Downs in New York will talk with Bernard 
Levin, noted British drama critic in London. They will compare the 
current drama season in the two cities and discuss the success 
several British shows are having in New York, the types of British 
plays that become popular in the United States, British reaction to 
American plays, and related subjects. 

This international discussion is expected to be the first of 
several television reports from Europe on a variety of topics to be 
presented on "Today" during coming months. 

Relay, designed and built by the Radio Corporation of 
America, was launched into orbit by the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration on Dec. 13* 1962 . 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











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NOTE TO EDITORS 


ADDITION TO CREDITS FOR'GREECE: THE GOLDEN AGE' 

Please add to credits for ''Greece: The Golden Age" 
which appeared in NBC Daily News Report dated 11/13/63* 
SPONSOR: Reynolds Metals 
AGENCY: Lennen and Newell 

(Playdate of this NBC News color television special 
is Tuesday, Nov. 19, 9-10 p.m. EST.) 


NBC-New York, 11/15/63 












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CREDITS FOR 'THAT WAR IN KOREA,' A 'PROJECT 20' SPECIAL 
ON NBC-TV WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20 (7:30-9 F.M. EST) 


Program: 
Time: 


Description: 


Narrator: 

Producer-Director: 

Writer: 

Music Composed and 
conducted by 


"That War in Korea" 

NBC-TV Wednesday, Nov. 20 (7*. 30 to 
9 p.m. EST) 

A 90-minute "Project 20" special dealing 
with what has been termed "the 
strangest war ever fought by man." 

The program, made up of authentic news 
film, will mark the tenth anniversary 
of the agreement (July 27, 1953) that 
brought a cease-fire to the three-year 
conflict. Topically, the program is 
divided into l6 segments: The Japan 
Occupation, North Korean Preparations, 
Portrait of Korea, Outbreak of War, 
Retreat to Pusan, Inchon, Advance 
North, Retreat and Evacuation, General 
MacArthur Goes, Back Home, Back in 
Korea, Peace-Talking, Prisoners -- 
Ours and Theirs, the Cease-Fire, 
Prisoner Homecoming, The War Goes On. 
Richard Boone (Off-camera) 

Donald B. Hyatt 
Richard Hanser 

Robert Russell Bennett 
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2 - Credits for ’That War in Korea 1 


Associate Producer: 

Robert Garthwaite 

Research Director: 

Daniel W. Jones 

Assistants: 

James Sage, Claire Rosenstein, Rhoda 

Grady, Barbara Monks 

Film Editor: 

Silvio D'Alisera 

Assistant Film Editor: 

James Pallan 

Sponsor: 

Xerox Corporation 

Agency: 

Papert, Koenig, Lois Inc. 


-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/15/63 




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NBC BIOGRAPHY 

November 15 , 1963 


MORT WERNER 

Vice President, Programs, NBC Television Network 

Unlike many executives who begin their careers following 
formal education, Mort Werner, Vice President, Programs, NBC Television 
Network, entered the broadcasting industry at the age of 14, selling 
time for a San Francisco radio station. 

From this precocious beginning, Mr. Werner has had a 
comprehensive and colorful career. He has been a bandleader, singer, 
program director. Summer stock manager, station manager, producer of 
radio programs, and producer of television programs. 

He has held varied positions of responsibility with Kaiser 
Industries, the Young & Rubicam advertising agency, and NBC. 

Robert Morton Werner was born May 5, 1916 in San Francisco. 
While still in high school, he was employed part time by KSN, a former 
radio station. His interest in showbusiness as both a singer and 
piano player led to his formation of a danceband. 

His singing brought modest fame on KFRC in San Francisco and 
he became a "personality" with the Columbia-Don Lee Broadcasting 
System in 1932. 

Subsequent years found Mr. Werner with radio station KMTR 
in Los Angeles where he was associated with bandleader Phil Harris. 

He helped develop and was master of ceremonies of KMTR's radio series 
"Sing With Your Favorite Band . 1 

In 1939, Mr. Werner married Martha Wilkerson, a colleague at 
KMTR. A talented scriptwriter, Mrs. Werner has written for several 
leading network programs "(Robert Montgomery Presents," 'Somerset 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK QO, NEW YORK 











































































2 - Mort Werner 


Maugham Playhouse" and "Hollywood Star Theatre") and motion picture 
scripts for Paramount and Columbia. During World War II, Mrs. Werner 
was GI Jill on broadcasts of the Armed Forces Radio Services. 

Mr. Werner was program director for the Office of War 
Information in San Francisco during the war's early years, moving on to 
program director for the Armed Forces Radio Services in 1943. 

When the war ended. Summer stock beckoned and Mr. Werner, 
with some associates, organized a theatre group at Laguna Beach, 

Calif. Following this, he joined a station management group that 
founded radio stations at Eureka and Ventura, Calif., Mr. Werner 
becoming general manager of the latter. 

In 1951, he joined NBC. He played a major role in the 
development of the NBC television series "Today," "Home" and "Tonight," 
becoming executive producer of all three. Mr. Werner also played a 
key role in molding the NBC Radio weekend service, "Monitor." 

Early in 1955, Mr. Werner was named Director of Participating 
Programs, several months later moving up to Director of National 
Programs, and in December, was elected Vice President, National 
Programs. In 1957, he took over the post of Vice President, Daytime 
Television Programs, at NBC. 

This same year, Mr. Werner joined the Kaiser Industries as a 
Vice President in the advertising and broadcasting fields. This led, 
in two years, to a post with Kaiser's advertising agency. Young & 
Rubicam, as Vice President and Director of Radio and Television. He 
became a Senior Vice President in 1959 and was named to Y & R's 
executive committee a year later. 


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Mr. Werner returned to NBC in the Summer of 1961 to hi 
present position. He is also the current President of the 
National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. 

The Werners live in Scarsdale, N. Y. They have 
two daughters, the oldest, Mrs. Carol Tieg, is a professional 
singer, appearing on television, and the youngest, Jill Werner, 
16 , is a high school student. 


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NBC-New York, II/ 15/63 




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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


2-x-h NBC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 


November 18, 1963 


Attention, Sports Editors 

LEN DILLON, NBC RADIO SPORTS EDITOR, CONFERS IN AUSTRIA 
ON PLANS FOR COVERAGE OF WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES 


Len Dillon, sports editor of the NBC Radio Network 
and producer of NBC Radio*s coverage of the Ninth Winter 
Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria, left yesterday (Nov. 17) to 
confer with members of the Austrian Olympic Games Committee about 
radio facilities and arrangements. 

Accompanying Dillon to Austria is sportscaster Jay Miller. 
Miller, Dillon and former Olympic champion Bob Richards will be 
the commentators for NBC Radio's coverage of the Winter Olympics 
action, starting with advance broadcasts Jan. 25 and following 
with reports of all major events when the Winter Games are held 
between Jan. 29 and Feb. 9. 

In addition to visiting the sites of events and checking 
radio facilities, Dillon will tape interviews with Olympic 
officials and members of the Austrian Winter Olympic team. The 
interviews will be heard on NBC Radio’s "Monitor" after he returns 
Nov. 23. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











































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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 18, 1963 

FRENCH MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS MAURICE COUVE DE MURVILLE 
(IN STUDIO IN FRANCE) TO BE 'MEET THE PRESS' GUEST IN FIRST 
INTERNATIONAL INTERVIEW ON SERIES VIA RELAY SATELLITE 

NBC's "Meet the Press" will present its first international 
interview via Relay satellite o n Sunday, Nov. 24, when Maurice Couve de 
Murvilie, France's Minister of Foreign Affairs, will be guest. 

M. de Murville will be in a television studio in France (the 
location of which has not been selected) with Ned Brooks, regular 
moderator of "Meet the Press," and NBC News' Paris correspondent Bernard 
Frizell. 

In NBC's New York studios will be Lawrence E. Spivak, producer 
and permanent panelist on the program; John Oakes of the New York Times, 
and an additional interviewer (to be announced). 

The program will be taped in black and white earlier that day 
and presented on the NBC-TV Network in its regular time period, 6 to 
6:30 p.m. EST, and the NBC Radio Network will broadcast the interview 
6:30 to 7 P.m. EST. 

----—- PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT NOV. 24-— 

MEET THE PRESS: France's Minister of Foreign Affairs, 

Maurice Couve de Murville (in a French TV studio), will 
be guest on this series' first international interview, 
via Relay satellite. 

____ ' 

-o- 

NBC-New York, H/18/63 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






































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. 






































NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



November 18, 1963 

" ■ ’ ——— ■ i 

SIX SISTERS TO 'SING ALONG WITH MITCH’ 

Mitch Miller has signed the Quinto Sisters, 
six girls ranging in age from seven years to fourteen 
years, for six appearances on his NBC-TV color musical 
series "Sing Along with Mitch" (Mondays, 10-11 p.m. EST). 

The girls, daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Giaquinto of Jersey City, N. J., sing four-part harmony 
and also dance. Their initial appearance on "Sing Along 
with Mitch" will be color-taped Nov. 25 and 26 at the 
NBC-TV color studios in Brooklyn, N.Y. The telecast 
dates will be announced. 

They are Frances, l4; Bonnie, 12; Christine, 

11; Elaine, 9; Renee, 8, and Cindy, 7. Within a year, 
it is planned to have Frances go out on her own as a 
"single," when three-year old Sherry will move into 
the spot vacated by Frances. The Giaquinto family has 
eight daughters - and an infant son. The girls were 
taught to sing by their mother. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






















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CREDITS FOR 'THE ARTHUR GODFREY THANKSGIVING SHOW' 




Program: 

"The Arthur Godfrey Thanksgiving Show" 

Time: 

NBC-TV color broadcast, Thursday, Nov. 28, 

10-11 p.m. EST (preempts "Kraft Suspense 

Theatre"). 

Stars: 

Arthur Godfrey, Tony Bennett, Carol Lawrence, 

Shari Lewis, Orson Bean and Liza Minnelli 

Producer-Director: 

Kirk Browning 

Dances and Musical 
Numbers Devised by 

Danny Daniels 

Written by 

Walter Marks 

Music Direction and 
Orchestration: 

Johnny Parker 

Special Material: 

Walter Marks 

Dance Music and 
Continuity Composed by 

William Goldenberg 

Associate Director: 

Roger Wolf 

Designed by 

Mary Dobson 

Costumes: 

John Boxer 

Makeup: 

Joe Cranzano 

Hair Styles: 

Betty De Stefano 

'Hiawatha* Dance 
Choreographed by 

Ray Kirchner 

Shari Lewis Material: 

Saul Turteltaub 

Production: 

An Arthur Godfrey-Ashley Steiner Production 

Sponsor: 

Mohawk Carpet Mills, a division of Mohasco 

Industries, Inc. 

Agency: 

Maxon Inc. 


Point of Origination: NBC's Peacock Studio, RCA Building, New York 

NBC Press Contact: Betty Lanigan (Nev; York) 

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* The Arthur Godfrey Thanksgiving Show 1 


SONGS AND SKETCHES 

1. Opening Song— "Talking Turkey" — Godfrey, Tony 
Bennett, Carol Lawrence, Shari Lewis, Orson Bean and 
Liza Minnelli. 

2. Arthur Teaches Lambchop Social Graces — Arthur 
Godfrey, Shari Lewis and Lambchop (Shari’s puppet). 

Song: "Happy to Make Your Acquaintance." 

3. "My Day" -- song and comedy monologue by Liza Minnelli. 

4. Group of songs by Tony Bennett — "This Is All I Ask," 
"I’ve Got Just About Everything I Need" and "A Little Boy.' 1 

5. "Hiawatha" -- ballet danced by Carol Lawrence, Ray 
Kirchner and Bill Starr with narration by Arthur Godfrey. 
Harmonica solo: Richard Hayman. 

6. My Relatives and the Revolution -- comedy monologue by 
Orson Bean. 

7. Specialty Song and Dance -- Arthur Godfrey, Carol 
Lawrence, Shari Lewis and Liza Minnelli. Song: "Down by 
the Station." 

8. Minstrel Show -- Arthur Godfrey, Carol Lawrence, Tony 
Bennett, Shari Lewis, Orson Bean, Liza Minnelli and six 
dancers. Songs: "The Babbit and the Bromide," "Go and 
Get Your Old Banjo" and "Cakewalk Your Lady." 

9. Finale — Arthur and guests sing "Let’s Have an Old Time 

Thanksgiving." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/18/63 





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NBC FEATURE 


November 18, 1963 

•SING ALONGER' ADRIAN REVERE BECOMES A KENTUCKY COLONEL; 

MITCH MILLER MAKES PRESENTATION IN BROOKLYN STUDIO 

An unusual ceremony took place Friday (Nov. 15) in NBC-TV's 
Brooklyn studios, when Mitch Miller, star of NBC-TV's "Sing Along with 
Mitch" color series (Mondays, 10-11 p.m. EST) made singer Adrian 
Revere an official Kentucky Colonel. Mitch, acting for Kentucky's 
Governor Bert T. Combs, presented white-mustached, distinguished- 
looking Revere with his commission before a cheering cast from 
the musical-variety show. 

Revere's selection as a Kentucky Colonel is the result of 
the admiration of 13-year-old Alice Mayo, daughter of John C. C. 

Mayo, of Ashland, Ky. For months, the youngster has admired the 
handsome appearance made by Revere on "Sing Along with Mitch" and has 
insisted that her father persuade the governor that the singer was 
the ideal prototype for a Kentucky Colonel. 

Presentation of the official credentials took place during 
a rehearsal break. Some comment was heard that there should be 
"juleps all around," but the cast settled instead for coffee. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




























































CAST AND CREDITS FOR REPEAT OF "MR. MAGOO'S CHRISTMAS CAROL" 
FRIDAY , DEC. 13 IN COLOR ON NBC-TV (7:30-8:30 P.M. EST) 


Program: 

Date and Time: 


Format: 


Starring: 


Executive producer: 
Producer: 

Director: 

Adapted by 
Musical setting by 
Music director: 
Production manager: 
Sequence directors: 


"Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol" 

NBC-TV Network color show Friday, Dec. 13 
(7:30-8:30 p.m. EST). Preempts "Inter¬ 
national Showtime" (Repeat) 

Television's first animated cartoon version 
of Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol" 
starring Mr. Magoo as Scrooge. 

(Originally telecast Dec. 18, 1963) 

The voice of Jim Backus as Scrooge. 

Also featuring voices of Morey Amsterdam 
as Brady and James, Jack Cassidy as Bob 
Cratchit, Royal Dano as Marley*s ghost, 
Paul Frees as Old Fezziwig, Joan Gardner 
as Tiny Tim, John Hart as Billings, Jane 
Kean as Belle Fezziwig, Marie Matthews as 
Little Scrooge, Laura Olsher as Mrs. 
Cratchit, and Les Tremayne as Christmas 
Present. 

Henry G. Saperstein. 

Lee Orgel 

Abe Levitow 

Barbara Chain 

Jule Styne and Bob Merrill 

Walter Scharf 

Earl Jones 

Steve Clark, Gerard Baldwin, Duane Crowther. 
(more) 














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2 - Cast and Credits for "Mr. Magoo's Christmas Carol" 


Production design: 

Lee Mishkin, Bob Singer, Richard Ung, 

Corney Cole, Shirley Silvey, Tony Rivera, 

Marty Murphy, Sam Weiss. 

Color styling: 

Phil Norman, Gloria Wood, Bob Inman, Jack 

Heiter, Dave Weidman. 

Animation: 

John Walker, Hank Smith, Xenia, Ed Solomon, 

Tom McDonald, Casey Onaitis 

Editors: 

Sam Hort-a, Earl Bennett, George Probert, 

Wayne Hughes 

Origination: 

Color film, from NBC Color City, Burbank, 

Calif. 

Production: 

UPA Pictures Inc., in association with NBC 

Sponsor (and agency): 

Timex Corp. (through Warwick & Legler Inc.) 

NBC Press Representatives: 

Stan Levine (New York). 


- 0 - 


NBC-New York, H/ 18/63 





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2-X-H NBC TRADE NEWS 

November 19, 1963 

NBC ANNOUNCES START OP PRODUCTION FOR "JOHNNY NORTH," 
TELEVISION’S FIRST TWO-HOUR TELEFILM 
Lee Marvin, Angie Dickinson, John Cassavetes Star in Color 
Film to Be Made at Revue Studios in Association with NBC 

"Johnny North," TV’s first two-hour telefilm, will begin 
production Thursday (Nov. 21), it was announced today by Mort Werner, 
Vice President, Programs, NBC-TV Network. 

Lee Marvin, Angie Dickinson and John Cassavetes will star 
in the color production of George Coon’s teleplay which will be 
produced by Revue Studios in association with the National Broadcasting 
Company. 

Cassavetes will play the title role of a hard-luck racing 
car driver who lets his love for a high-living beauty involve him in 
a million-dollar robbery. Don Siegel will produce and direct the 
action drama. 

"Johnny North" has a four-week shooting schedule -- the 
longest ever for a TV drama. It will be the first of a number of two- 
hour dramas to be produced by NBC and Revue for first-run TV presenta¬ 
tion. 

NBC and Revue will thus mark another milestone in television 
production. They were the first to present a weekly 90-minute TV 
series -- "The Virginian," which was launched last season. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



















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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 


November 19 , 1963 


FIRST TV TRANSMISSION ACROSS PACIFIC-- 
FROM U.S. TO JAPAN--SET FOR FRIDAY 
Program, Produced by NBC and ABC, Will Be 
Sent Via the Relay Satellite 

The first TV transmission across the Pacific Ocean will take 
place Friday, Nov. 22. A 15-minute program, produced jointly by the 
National Broadcascing Company and the American Broadcasting Company, 
will be sent via the Relay communications satellite, from the Mojave 
Ground Station of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in 
California to the new satellite ground station near Tokyo, Japan. 

The experimental transmission is scheduled approximately at 
3:30 p.m. EST, and a portion of it will be broadcast throughout this 
country on the NBC-TV Network. 

President Kennedy has been asked to participate in the program 
with a special message. There also will be statements by James Webb, 
director of NASA, and the Japanese Ambassador to the U. S., Kai Chiro 
Asakaij and taped highlights of programs previously exchanged between 
the U. S. and Europe via space satellites. 

This first transpacific TV program will be only one way — 
from the U. S. to Japan. 

The Relay communications satellite was designed and built 

by RCA. 

The special program to Japan is being produced in cooperation 

with NASA. 

-o- 


Nett Department, Room 320 













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NBC’S WILLIAM R. MeANDREW RECEIVES U.S. CAMERA ACHIEVEMENT 
AWARD ’FOR RAISING BROADCAST JOURNALISM TO NEW HEIGHTS’ 

A U. S. Camera Achievement Award was presented to William 
R. MeAndrew, Executive Vice President in charge of NBC News, by "The 
U. S. Camera Annual, 1964" at a dinner Nov. 19 in Rochester, N.Y. 

The citation to Mr. MeAndrew and the National Broadcasting 
Company reads: 

"For raising broadcast journalism to new heights via the 
motion picture camera specifically, for presenting such special 
programas as f The Kremlin,’ 'The Tunnel,' "Vincent Van Gogh: A 
Self-Portrait,’ ’The River Nile’ and 'The Voice of the Desert’; for 
raising the already high standards of television photography to bring 
to viewers programs which inform, yet stimulate." 

’LOOK' MAGAZINE DEVOTES 3-PAGE PICTURE-STORY TO HUGH DOWNS 

Hugh Downs, host of NBC-TV's "Today" and "Concentration" 
programs, is the subject of a three-page picture-story in the Dec. 3 
issue of Look Magazine, now out. 

Entitled, "Hugh Downs and the Common Man," the article 
shows Dorns on television and also off-camera, engaged in several of 
his many hobbies from flying to playing the guitar, alone and with 
his family. Noting that he rises at 4 a.m. so he can preside over 
"Today" when it goes on the air at 7 a.m.. Downs is quoted as saying, 
"I’m the only man who ever gets 5 o'clock shadow at noon." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/19/63 












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YELLOW PAGES IN FIVE CITIES CAN GUIDE YOU 
TO TELEPHONING 'HUNTLEY-BRINKLEY REPORT' 

If you let your fingers do the walking, you 
% 

will find -- in the Yellow Pages of the upcoming Manhattan 
classified telephone directory -- the new heading of 
"Television News Program Producers" and under it, the 
listing of "The Huntley-Brinkley Report." 

The listing will also be carried in the yellow 
pages of the new telephone directories in Washington (D.C.), 
Philadelphia, Chicago and Los Angeles. The telephone 
number listed in each city will be that of NBC’s owned 
station. 

A1 Rylander, Vice President, Promotion, NBC, 
who made the announcement, said "The Huntley-Brinkley 
Report" would be listed as a trade name. It will also 
include the local station call letters and the information 
"Monday through Friday" plus the local broadcast time. 


NBC-New York, 11/19/63 


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MRS. LUCILE CLIETTE OF NBC TO ADDRESS URBAN LEAGUE 


SPECIAL SECRETARIAL TRAINING PROJECT 

A National Broadcasting secretary, Mrs. Lucile 
Cliette, has accepted an invitation to participate in a 
special session of the Urban League Special Secretarial 
Training Project on Nov. 22 at New York University. 

Mrs. Cliette, secretary to Henry 0. Lumb, Director, 
Salary Administration and Employee Services, is one of four 
secretaries invited from the corporations supporting the 
training program. She will appear before the class to tell 
the major requirements of a secretary in the business world so 
that the participants can better understand their chosen 
careers. 

The Special Secretarial Training Project is carried 
out in cooperation with the Urban League. It is supported by 
the Radio Corporation of America, of which NBC is a 
subsidiary, and five other major corporations. The program 
is designed to provide "qualified non-white personnel 1, with 

high-level secretarial training. 

In addition to RCA, the other corporations supporting 
the project are Socony Mobil Oil, IBM, Western Electric, 

General Electric and Time, Inc. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/19/63 



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Attention, Sports Editors 


NBC'S BOB WOLFF IS CO-AUTHOR OF "ANDY BATHGATE’S HOCKEY SECRETS” 

NBC sportscaster Bob Wolff is co-author with Andy Bathgate, 
captain of the New York Rangers, of a new book, ”Andy Bathgate's 
Hockey Secrets," published this week by Prentice-Hall Inc. 

Bathgate's career in hockey is traced from his years in the 
Canadian minor leagues to his rise to stardom with the Rangers, with 
whom he is now in his 11th season. He is the National Hockey League 
leader in total points over the past seven seasons. 

According to Wolff, who has announced Rangers’ games from New 
York's Madison Square Garden during his sportscasting career, "Andy 
Bathgate's Hockey Secrets" can serve as a guide for the avid hockey fan 
who wishes to know more about the game, as an instruction book for the 
youngster taking up the game and as a reference book for the at-home 
rooter. The book includes many photos of Bathgate and other NHL 
stars, demonstrating the basic techniques of hockey. 

Bathgate discusses the book during an interview with NBC 
Radio sports editor Len Dillon on NBC Radio's "Monitor" Sunday afternoon, 
Nov. 24. 


NBC-New York, 11/19/63 



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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 

November 19 , 1963 

ADDED NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENTS JOINING 
THE "PROJECTION *64" GROUP FOR 
10-CITY SPEAKING ENGAGEMENTS 

An added group of NBC News correspondents will augment the 
sta±f men gathering in New York from their NBC News posts around the 
world for "Projection >64" on NBC-TV and will tour 10 U. S. cities 
for speaking engagements. 

The television presentation "Projection >64," will be 
presented in color 10-11 p.m. EST on NBC-TV Sunday, Dec. 29 . the 
seventh annual program of its kind to be presented by NBC News. Gulf 
Oil Corp. (through Young & Rubicam Inc.) will sponsor the program. 

Assigned to be moderators on the correspondents’ tour are 
Frank McGee, Merrill Mueller, Floyd Kalber, Chet Huntley, Elmer 
Peterson, Sander Vanocur and Ray Scherer. 

Correspondents who x;ill appear on the TV program and later 
make the tour are Joseph C. Harsch (London), Bernard Frizell (Paris), 
Welles Hangen (Bonn), Irving R. Levine (Rome), John Rich (Tokyo), 
James Robinson (Hong Kong), George Clay (Africa), Wilson Hall 
(South America), Elie Abel (State Department), Sander Vanocur (White 
House) and Ray Scherer (Congress). Chet Hagan will produce the 
TV program; Frank McGee will be moderator. 

(more) 


Press Department, Room 320 













* 





























. ' 























2 - “Projection 1 64" 

The following table lists the speaking engagements and 
the correspondents who will serve as moderators: 

Jan. 3 - Foreign Policy Association, Pittsburgh (Frank 

McGee) 

Jan, 5 - University of Omaha (Merrill Mueller) 

Jan. 6 - Economics Club of Detroit (Merrill Mueller) 

Jan. 7 - Executives Club of Chicago (Floyd Kalber) 

Jan. 8 - World Affairs Council, Philadelphia (Merrill 

Mueller) 

Jan. 9 - Foreign Policy Association, New York (Chet Huntley) 
Jan. 10 - Foreign Relations Association, New Orleans 

(Frank McGee) 

Jan. 13 - Modern Forum, Los Angeles (Elmer Peterson) 

Jan. 15 - World Affairs Council, Boston (Sander Vanocur) 

Jan. 16 - National Press Club, Washington (Ray Scherer) 




NBC-New York, 11/19/63 
















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NBC-TV NETWORK PROGRAM 


| 1 CONCENTRATION' OFFERING TRAVEL PRIZES, 

I AND GIFTS AND FUN FROM DIFFERENT LANDS 

In recent weeks, the producers of NBC-TV's daytime 
game show "Concentration" (NBC-TV, Monday through Friday, 

11 a.m. EST) have been saluting various foreign lands by 
awarding trips to selected places, giving prizes made in the 
country-of-the-day and even telling some jokes based on 
the land itself. 

One week, a trip for two to Japan was offered by 
host Hugh Downs to the show’s winners. Another week, Ireland 
was the honored country. Special Irish prizes were presented in 
addition to Irish films of tourist attractions. Producer 
Norman Blumenthal has selected the day after Thanksgiving as 
"See America First" dajr on "Concentration." The prizes on 
Friday, Nov. 29 , will be American-made, the trips will be to 
American beauty spots and the jokes will all be made-in-the- 
U.S.A. 


NBC-New York, 11/19/63 












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November 20, 1963 

NBC CELEBRATING ITS 37TH ANNIVERSARY AND ALSO OBSERVES 30-YEAR 
TENANCY IN RCA BUILDING OF NfY.'S ROCKEFELLER CENTER 

The National Broadcasting Company, which is celebrating its 
37th anniversary this month, also is observing its 30-year tenancy in 
the RCA Building of New York City's Rockefeller Center. 

Over the weekend of Nov. 3-5 in 1933, NBC moved from its 
offices and studios at 711 Fifth Avenue in New York to the RCA Building. 
The quarter-mile transfer took 42 hours and required 365 van loads. 

On Monday, Nov. 6, 1933, nearly 800 employees of NBC began work 
in the RCA Building. On Nov. 19, 1963 -- 30 years later -- NBC's RCA 
Building staff totaled exactly 2,500. 

At 8 p.m. EST, Saturday, Nov. 11, 1933, Radio City went on the 
air for the first time with a blast of trumpets from the top of the RCA 
Building. Then the NBC Orchestra, on stage in Studio 8-H -- now known 
as the Peacock Studio -- played "The Star Spangled Banner.” 

Following the national anthem, distinguished artists and 
speakers gathered before the Radio City microphones for the dedicatory 
broadcast. The inaugural program was presented before a studio 
audience of 1,200 and was broadcast to a nation-wide radio audience. 

Of the 2,113,000 square feet of floor space in the RCA 
Building, NBC occupies 425,147 square feet. The RCA Building is 70 
stories (836 feet) tall and is located between 49th and 50th streets 
on the Avenue of the Americas. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 



November 20, 1963 


'THE STORY OF CHRISTMAS,' SPECIAL COLOR HOUR STARRING 
TENNESSEE ERNIE FORD AS SINGER-NARRATOR* TO PRESENT 
FAMILIAR SIGHTS AND SOUNDS OF HOLIDAY SEASON 

"The Story of Christmas," featuring familiar sights and 
sounds of the holiday season and starring Tennessee Ernie Ford as 
singer-narrator, will be presented in color on the NBC-TV Network 
Sunday, Dec. 22 (10 to 11 p.m. EST), 

An animated art version of the story of the Nativity will 
highlight the last l8--| minutes of the full-hour special. 

The program will feature the Roger Wagner Chorale and 
Orchestra, with music composed and conducted by Wagner. Charles 
Tazewell, author of the modern Christmas classic, "The Littlest 
Angel," wrote "The Story of Christmas." 

As the show opens, Tennessee Ernie is expressing his thoughts 
on the holiday season to youngsters including three groups of eight 
children -- African, Mexican, Oriental -- who sing about the Christ 
Child in their native tongues, backed by the chorale and orchestra. 
Selections include "Xhosa Lullabye," "El Rorro," and "Sa Ku Ra." 

Then Ford moves among them, singing "Some Children See Him," 
which tells how youngsters of different races see the Christ Child in 
their own image. 

Tennessee Ernie shares the stage with a donkey in the next 
scene, underscoring the animal's importance to the Nativity story. 

(more) 

HESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK 20 NEW' YORK 





















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'The Story of Christmas' 


Ford sings "Little Grey Donkey, Tonight," a new Christmas carol, with 
lyrics by Tazewell and music by Wagner, supported by the chorale and 
orchestra. 

The next setting is a colorful English street scene at the 
turn of the century. Tennessee Ernie starts a Christmas song medley 
with "It Came Upon a Midnight Clear." The medley is picked up by 
different groups of the Wagner Chorale, as they go caroling through the 
streets adding "He Is Born," "Deck the Hall," "Go Rest Ye Merry 
Gentlemen," and "Adeste Fideles." 

In another mood, Tennessee Ernie introduces a typical Christmas 
tree buying situation, with Dave Willock and Adele Claire portraying 
a married couple trying to decide which tree to buy from salesman Andy 
Alb in. 

Ernie discusses Christmas trees throughout the world. The 
chorale, forming a "living" Christmas tree that rises 25 feet into the 
air, sings "0, Tannenbaum." 

For the finale. Ford narrates the Nativity story according to 
the Gospel of St. Luke. The accompanying animation sequence was 
created by Eyvind Earle, one of the nation's leading Christmas card 
artists, who was formerly an artist-animator for Walt Disney productions. 
During the sequence the chorale sings "We Three Kings," "What Child Is 
This," "Oh, Little Town of Bethlehem," "Gesu Bambino," "Angels We Have 
Heard on High," "Virgin Slumber Song," and "Joy to the World." 

"The Story of Christmas" closes with narration by Ford and 
the chorale singing "Silent Night." 


(more) 





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3 - 'The Story of Christmas' 


The holiday special, produced by William N. Burch, is 
sponsored by General Mills Inc., which, in keeping with the spirit of 
the show, will use the commercial periods for institutional announce¬ 
ments only. Advertising agency for the sponsor is Doyle Dane 
Bernbach. 

-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 22-—-- 

i 

THE STORY OF CHRISTMAS: Starring Tennessee Ernie Ford 
in special hour featuring songs and sights of holiday 
season. Highlights include animated art version of the 
story of the Nativity. (Color). 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/20/63 











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CREDITS FOR 'THE STORY OF CHRISTMAS' 


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Title: 

Time: 

Starring: 

Featuring: 

Cast: 

Produced and directed by 

Written by 

Music composed and 
conducted by 

Animation sequence 
created by 

Art Director: 

Costumes designed by 

Associate Producer: 

Unit Manager: 

Associate Director: 

Technical Director: 

Lighting Director: 

Animation: 

Audio: 

Video: 

Makeup: 

Production: 

Sponsor (and agency): 

NBC Press Representatives: 


"The Story of Christmas" 

NBC-TV color broadcast Sunday, Dec. 22 
(10-11 p.m. EST) 

Tennessee Ernie Ford 

The Roger Wagner Chorale and Orchestra 
Dave Willock, Andy Albin, Adele Claire 
William N. Burch 
Charles Tazewell 

Roger Wagner 

Eyvind Earle 

Edward Stephenson 

Ray Aghayan 

William Martin 

Don Van Atta 

Tom Foulkes 

Claire McCoy 

John Freschi 

Fred Rice Productions 

Bill Levitsky 

Ray Olsen 

Claude Thompson 

Betford Production 

General Mills Inc. (Doyle Dane 
Bernbach) 

Rolf Gompertz (Burbank); Betty Lanigan 
(New York) 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/20/63 













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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 


November 20, 1963 

PARIS STUDIO WILL BE PICKUP POINT FOR FRANCE 1 S 
MAURICE COUVE DE MURVILLE ON ’MEET THE PRESS’ 

A Paris studio will be the pickup point for French Minister 
of Foreign Affairs Maurice Couve de Murville’s participation in 
the first transatlantic interview of "Meet the Press" Sunday, Nov. 24 
on the NBC Television and Radio Networks. The program, as 
previously announced, will be presented via the Relay communications 
satellite. 

Added to the panel of interviewers who will appear in NBC’s 
New York studios is NBC News’ Edwin Newman. With him will be John 
Oakes of the New York Times and Lawrence E. Spivak, producer and 
permanent panelist of the newsmaking series. 

With M. de Murvllle in the Paris studio will be Bernard 
Frizell, NBC News Paris correspondent, and Ned Brooks, who is 
moderator of "Meet the Press." 

This first international transmission of "Meet the Press" 
will be taped shortly after 7 a.m. EST Sunday, time of the most 
satisfactory pass of Relay, and will be presented on NBC-TV (in black 
and white) at 6-6:30 p.m. EST, and on NBC Radio at 6:30-7 p.m. EST. 


Rreti Department, Room 320 







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JAMES FRANCISCUS^ STAR OF NBC-TV'S 'MR. NOVAK' SERIES HONORED 
BY SOUTHEASTERN STATE EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OF PENNSYLVANIA 

James Franciscus, star of "Mr. Novak," is the recipient 
of an award of the Southeastern State Education Association of 
Pennsylvania. 

The award was given to NBC Station WRCV-TV in Philadelphia, 
for the program's "presenting a true picture of American class¬ 
room teachers. 11 The trophy was flown to San Francisco and 
presented to Franciscus at a broadcasters' meeting in that city. 

The occasion of the award was American Education Week. 

("Mr. Novak" is presented on NBC-TV Tuesdays, 7^30 to 
8:30 p.m. EST.) 


o- 


NBC-New York, 11/20/63 




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NBC FEATURE 


November 20, 1963 


REPLICA OF NEW YORK SUBWAY CAR IS DESIGNED AND BUILT IN 12 DAYS 
FOR 'RIDE WITH TERROR,' COLOR DRAMA IN DU PONT SERIES 

A replica of a New York City subway car has been designed, 
built and painted in 12 days for "Ride with Terror," the drama to be 
presented in color by "Du Pont Show of the Week" on NBC-TV Sunday, 

Dec. 1 (10 to 11 p.m. EST). 

Virtually the entire action of the full-hour drama will take 
place in the subway car, in which 12 New Yorkers find themselves at the 
mercy of two thrill-seeking hoodlums in the early hours of a Sunday 
morning. 

The car, built in NBC's l8th Street Production Design and Art 
Center in Manhattan, will be delivered by truck this week in 24 pieces 
to the network's Brooklyn Studios, where the drama will be taped. 

Although the plan supplied by the New York City Transit 
Authority called for a 51"foot car, the "Ride with Terror" car had to 
be shrunk to 30 feet, according to Merrill Sindler, scenic designer for 
"Du Pont Show of the Week." "The shrinking was necessary because the 
camera lens will elongate the car to look 51 feet," he said. It took 
700 man-hours to build. 

The subway route depicted in the play is an actual one: the 
Lexington Avenue-IRT line. In the play, starting at 170th Street, the 
train stops at 24 stations -- some of them elevated, some of them 
underground -- before it arrives at Grand Central Station. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


























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Besides making a replica of the car, Sindler and his staff 
also have duplicated an elevated-station platform and an underground- 
station platform. ’’During the progress of the drama," Sindler said, 

"we will change the appearance of these basic platforms by changing 
the trim, the candy machines and other details, so all the stops 
look different." 

To further the illusion of movement, the car is on coiled 
springs, so that it rocks on its base. "Everything is on eight-inch 
casters," Sindler said, "including the stations. The stations them¬ 
selves will move, and special lighting effects will add to the illusion 
of movement." 

The train will be complete with car-card advertisements. 

"We don't plug any product," Sindler said. "We got all the public 
service advertising used in the city subway system -- Girl Scouts, 
seat belts, traffic safety, and so on." 

Sindler, an NBC staff scenic designer, last season did the 
sets for "Exploring." He also has designed sets for "Tonight" and 
"Today" since he came to NBC Television five years ago. He is a native 
of Bishopville, S. C # ; attended the Ringling School of Arts in 
Sarasota, Fla.; is a graduate of the University of South Carolina, 
and received an M. A. degree in 1957 from Yale University School of 
Drama, 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 11/20/63 




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NBC FEATURE 


November 19 , 1963 

NEWS--AS IT'S BEING MADE-- 
IS "TODAY" TV ACHIEVEMENT 

On the morning of Nov, 7> New York's Governor Rockefeller 
formally announced his candidacy fcr the Republican nomination for 
President on NBC-TV's "Today" show. 

According to newspaper accounts. Rockefeller especially timed 
his announcement for early-morning so it could be carried on the coast- 
to-coast TV program. 

This was one of many instances when "Today" programs figured 
in big stories. 

During the past year many officials and politicians on local 
and national levels have singled out the program on which to make an 
important statement. 

For example, Adlai E. Stevenson, chief United States 
representative to the United Nations, last December chose the "Today" 
program to rebut a magazine article which discussed his role in last 
year's Cuban crisis. 

Then on March 8 , New York's Mayor Wagner rushed over to 
"Today" after an all-night negotiating session with the city's news¬ 
papers publishers and union representatives to announce the settlement of 
the long newspaper strike. The mayor, wrote Time magazine, won some 
prestige "and he capitalized on it by hurrying right over to the NBC 
television studios to discuss the settlement on 'Today.'" 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






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2 - ’ T jday’ 


Early in July, "Today" was again on the front pages when 
Attorney General Kennedy, interviewed by NBC News Washington correspon¬ 
dent Martin Agronsky, said a Russian couple arrested in Washington on 
spy charges were not American citizens and described them as "illegals." 

In September, Secretary of Commerce Luther H. Hodges revealed 
in an interview with Agronsky that he planned to suggest to President 
Kennedy that the U. S. might expand trade with Communist countries. 

Later that same month. Governor George Wallace of Alabama 
(interviewed in Montgomery by Agronsky) made news when he said "progress 
has been made" in the search for the bomber who blew up a Negro church 
in Birmingham. 

Not all interviews have involved weighty matters, though. Last 
January Representative Hale Bcggs (D.-La.) appeared on "Today" after a 
White House breakfast and criticized the food, particularly the lack 
of chicory in the coffee. Someone in the White House was watching the 
program, and after another White House breakfast the following week, 

Boggs told reporters the food was "greatly improved." Not only was 
there chicory in the coffee, but there was Tobasco on the table. 

In recognition of "Today's" influence, the New York Times’ 

Jack Gould wrote after Rockefeller's appearance that "the NBC program 
has long been a favorite of politicians." 

"For many men in public life," wrote Gould, "including the 
majority of New Frontiersmen, it ("Today") may be the only television 
they have time to watch regularly...Moreover, ’Today’ is something of an 
inter-office memorandum pad in the political community. If a Washington 
official wants to catch the attention of the White House, ’Today’ is one 
means of doing it quickly." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/19/63 





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CREDITS FOR MACY'S 37TH ANNUAL THANKSGIVING DAY PARADE j 
90-MINUTE COLOR TELECAST ON NBC-TV THURSDAY, NOV. 28 

Date: NBC-TV Thursday, Nov. 28 (10-11:30 a.m. 

EST) in color. 

Commentators: Lome Greene of NBC-TV' s "Bonanza" and 

Betty White. 

Parade stars and features: Showbusiness celebrities will include three 

NBC-TV stars -- Mitch Miller (of "Sing 
Along with Mitch"), Michael Landon (of 
"Bonanza") and James Drury (of "The 
Virginian") -- and Ray Bolger, Gene 
Krupa, Troy Donahue, Janis Paige, Craig 
Stevens, Jack Palance and Allan Sherman. 

Six huge helium-filled balloons -- Dino 
the Dinosaur, Elsie the Cow, Donald 
Duck, Bullwinkle Moose, Popeye and Happy 
Dragon. 

21 colorful floats, including floats 

representing 1964 New York World's Fair, 
Radio City Music Hall, New York City 
Center Light Opera Company, Lincoln 
Center for the Performing Arts, "Here's 
Love." Santa Claus on Christmas float 
will conclude parade. 

Telecast will include exclusive perform¬ 
ances before NBC-TV color cameras in 
front of Macy's by Radio City Music Hall 
Rockettes and Ballet Company, Mitch 
Miller and Sing Along Gang, City Center 
Chorus, Metropolitan Opera Ballet Studio 











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2 - Credits for Macy's Parade 


Parade stars and features dancers. Gene Krupa and jazz combo, Ray 
(Cont'd): 

Bolger, Allan Sherman, trampolinists 
and acrobats on circus float, 12 

championship marching bands. 

* * * 


Producer: 

Directors: 

Writer: 

Associate producer: 

Musical director: 

Assistant to the producer: 
Production assistant: 
Technical directors: 

Unit Manager: 

Announcer: 

Origination: 


Sponsors (and agencies): 


NBC Press Representative: 


Ed Pierce 

Lee Tredanari and Bob Hultgren 

Sid Brooks 

Bob Rubin 

Sammy Fidler 

Danny Webb 

June Henoch 

Dan Zampino and Jim Davis 
Roy Hammerman 
Bill McCord 

Live, from Herald Square in New York, 
in front of Macy's Department Store. 

* * * 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company (Young & 
Rubicam Inc.), Food Manufacturers Inc. 
(Ted Bates & Co.), Remco Industries 
Inc. (Webb Associates Inc.). 

Bob Goldwater, New York 


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NBC-New York, 11/20/63 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 

November 21, 1963 

HUMBLE OIL AND REFINING CO. TO SPONSOR 'PARIS: A STORY OF HIGH FASHION/ 
NBC NEWS COLOR TV SPECIAL ABOUT NEW LINE OF COUTURIER CARDIN 

The genesis of a new Paris fashion line, one that has inter¬ 
national influence in the realm of feminine apparel, will be the 
subject of an NBC News color TV special Sunday, Feb. 16 (10 to 
11 p.m. EST). 

Titled, Paris: A Story of High Fashion," the program will 
detail tne creative and manual arts required to produce the new and 
exciting feminine garments that are trend-setters for styles the world 
over. 

The program will be sponsored by the Humble Oil and Refining 
Co. through the McCann-Erickson Inc. agency. The producer is George 
Vicas, head of NBC News' European Production Unit. Vicas produced 
"The Kremlin/ widely-acclaimed NBC News special. 

The setting for the fashion program will be the Paris salon 
of famed couturier Pierre Cardin. The story will be set in the 
virtual cloak-and-dagger atmosphere of the profession of high style¬ 
making. Producer Vicas explains, "For a fashion designer, a presenta¬ 
tion of a winter's collection of new styles is equally as important to 
him each year as an opening is for a theatrical producer. If he 
fails, he may well be out of business for good." 

According to Vicas, when NBC News first proposed filming all 
the stages in the preparation of a Cardin collection and the actual 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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presentation to the press, the couturier was horrified. Cardin 
explained the problems and pointed out that the actual designing and 
final presentation are done under great pressure, nervous tension, 
and ultimate secrecy. 

Basic objections were overcome, however, and secrecy was 
assured. Each member of the NBC News camera crew working on 
"Paris: A Story of High Fashion" signed a pledge of secrecy; the 
exposed film was tagged with a false label and was sent to a laboratory 
chosen to handle classified films of the French government; and when 
the film was finally processed it was locked in a safe until after the 
date of the unveiling of the latest Cardin collection. 

Since fashion magazines play an important part in the success 
or failure of a collection, according to Vicas, interviews were held 
with the editor of Paris "Vogue," Madame Charles-Roux, and the 
influential editor of "Elle," Madame Helen Gordon Lazareff. Madame 
Lazareff’s voice will help to tell the story of the Cardin collection. 

.-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT FEB. l6--- - 

PARIS: A STORY OF HIGH FASHION --An NBC News special | 
describing the genesis of a new fashion line with a 
setting in the salon of couturier Pierre Cardin. 

(Color). 

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P\\I i C TRADE NEWS 


November 21, 1963 

ADVANCE CLOSED-CIRCUIT SHOWING OF 'THE STORY OF CHRISTMAS' 

SET FOR TV EDITORS AND STATION PERSONNEL THROUGH U.S. 

"The Story of Christmas," full-hour color special starring 
Tennessee Ernie Ford, will be broadcast to 180 stations on a special 
closed-circuit over the NBC-TV Network for advance showing to TV 
editors and station personnel around the country on Tuesday, Dec. 10, 
(The closed-circuit feed will run from 1 to 2 p.m. EST.) 

The closed circuit is being arranged by the show's sponsor. 
General Mills Inc., and will include an introduction by Tennessee 
Ernie and a tape of the entire show. 

The color special, as announced, will be broadcast on NBC-TV 
Sunday, Dec. 22 (10 to 11 p.m. EST). On the show, Tennessee Ernie 
features the Roger Wagner Chorale in a program of traditional carols 
and Christmas songs from other lands. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 
































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ISTBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 21, 1963 

RICHARD BLUEL NAMED PRODUCER OF 'TEMPLE HOUSTON' SERIES 
AND LIGHT TREATMENT WILL BE INTRODUCED TO STORYLINES 

Richard Bluel has been named producer of NBC-TV's "Temple 
Houston" series (Thursdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m. EST) and will introduce a 
format change calling for a light treatment of the Western lawyer's 
adventures. 

Bluel, a former Warner Brothers television executive, moves 
from the production staff of NBC-TV's "Bonanza" series to "Temple 
Houston." 

The series stars Jeff Hunter in the title role and co-stars 
Jack Elam as Marshal George Taggart. 

"We are aiming for more humor, more colorful characters, and 
a greater emphasis on the essential flamboyance of Houston's 
character," Bluel said. 

Both Houston and Taggart will become involved in various 
predicaments of a light nature in upcoming scripts, according to 
Bluel. A mayoralty campaign will hang on a chess game, Taggart will 
find himself the surprised owner of an elephant, and Houston will 
acquire, temporarily, a lady law partner whose main skill will be 
getting Houston into trouble. Houston, instead of riding the circuit 
court trail, will hang out his shingle in one town -- Lindley, Tex. 
Recurring characters will appear in the episodes. 

The first show under the new format will be telecast Thursday, 

Dec. 12. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

















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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 21, 1963 

-A NOTABLE ’FIRST' ON ’NBC WHITE PAPER’-, 

i 

Films of Bay of Pigs Invasion, Never Before Seen in U.S., 

Will Be Telecast on Dec. 8 Program 

!_I 

Large segments of films of the Cuban Bay of Pigs invasion 
which have never before been seen in this country will be telecast on 
the "NBC White Paper" program, "Cuba: Bay of Pigs," Sunday, Dec. 8 , 
on NBC-TV (10-11 p.m. EST). 

Producer Fred Freed and his staff obtained these rare films 
from such varied places as Canada, West Germany and East Germany. 

Freed also was offered film by sources inside Cuba for use on the 
telecast, but the material from the other sources was so superior in 
quality that the offer was declined. 

Films will show the 2506 Assault Brigade training in Guatemala 
and the subsequent events of the invasion itself, which resulted in 
destruction of the attacking force. During the battle scenes, Castro 
will be seen taking personal charge and directing his troops, 
flushing some of the invaders out of woods and taking them prisoner. 

In this reevaluation of the Bay of Pigs failure, producer 
Freed begins his report at the time the Eisenhower administration 
decided to create a Cuban exile army. President Eisenhower will be 
shown making the Cincinnati speech in which he revealed for the first 
time that he had approved training a counter-force of Cuban exiles. 

Underground activities in Cuba, like the unsuccessful revolt 
in the Escambray mountains, will be shown. As the report continues. 
Freed will focus on the importance of the period from the time 

(more) 


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President Kennedy took office through his decision on the invasion. 

Within a few months, the Cuba situation which in the 
beginning seemed to concern only the United States and Cuba, became 
a confrontation between the United States and the Soviet Union. 

This critical period in American foreign policy will be documented 
by producer Freed, on the second "NBC White Paper" on Cuba ... "Cuba: 
the Missile Crisis," to be telecast Sunday, Jan. 5 (10-11 p.m. EST) 
on NBC-TV. 

Both "Cuba: Bay of Pigs" and "Cuba: the Missile Crisis" 
will be produced and written by Fred Freed. Len Giovannitti is 
associate producer and director. The programs are a presentation of 
Creative Projects, NBC News; Irving Gitlin, Executive Producer. 

-—PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT--DEC. 8- 

i 

NBC WHITE PAPER: "Cuba: Bay of Pigs". Films of 

Bay of Pigs invasion never before seen in U.S.; 

underground activities; Assault Brigade in training. 

Chet Huntley narrates. 

t 


NBC-New York, 11/21/63 









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NBC FEATURE 


HOW THE PRESIDENT IMPRESSED THREE ILLUSTRATORS 

President Kennedy is not the easiest subject to draw or 
photograph in the opinion of three noted illustrators who discussed 
their experiences with the President on NBC-TV’s "Today" series 
recently. 

Artist Norman Rockwell found other Presidents were easier 
subjects. "For instance," said Rockwell, "I did Mr. Eisenhower. He is 
a cinch....He's an outgoing person and has a big, broad smile. Mr. 
Kennedy is rather tense." 

Photographer Philippe Halsmann noted a similar difference 
between the two Presidents. "One is much more cerebral than the other, 
said Halsmann. "President Eisenhower is an extrovert and he doesn't 
think about how he looks. He just simply is himself. And the President 
(Kennedy), when he knows that the camera is scrutinizing his face, he 
tries to bring it under control and we have then a self-consciousness 
and we know, looking at this face, that this face knows it is being 
photographed or being observed and that is the difficulty." 

Though cartoonist Milt Caniff didn't have the same problem, he 
has noticed that President Kennedy always wants to look trim. Caniff 
also found the President's appearance quite deceptive. "He has a broad 
Irish face, but he's a tall, lean man. He's lean as a bean, you know, 
this man is not fat. But most cartoonists have drawn him in the early 
stages as a heavy man because of the thick face. They've never seen 
him in person. He's tall and slender and startles you..." 

All agreed that President Kennedy was an attractive man. "As 
a matter of fact," observed Halsmann, "he would have made a marvelous 
career as a model." _o- NBC-New York, 11/21/63 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

















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November 22, 1963 

NBC NEWS' COVERAGE OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY'S ASSASSINATION 

NBC News dispatched some 70 newsmen and technicians 
to Dallas, Washington and Boston today (Nov. 22), minutes 
after an assassin shot President Kennedy in Dallas. The 
NBC crews were sent from Los Angeles and New York. At the 
same time, the NBC Television and Radio Networks and NBC's 
owned stations canceled programming and all commercials on 
their schedules to provide for the special news coverage. The 
newsmen traveled by chartered planes. 


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November 22, 1963 

j 

MORE THAN 3,000 LISTENERS SENT COMMENTS ON 
’EXPERIMENT IN DRAMA' TO NBC RADIO NETWORK 

1 

The NBC Radio Network has received more than 3,000 
letters and postcards commenting on "Experiment in Drama," two 
science-fiction stories presented on the network Sunday, Nov. 17 
(6:30-7 p.m. EST). 

More than 1,500 messages have been read,- all praising the 
program. The network research department is analyzing the response 
to the dramas. 

"Experiment in Drama" was broadcast as the result of a 
late preemption of "Meet the Press" on that date only. 

Listeners were asked to send in comments about the show 
to NBC, New York, or to their local NBC station. Radio-TV critics 
around the country have written favorably of the program. 

The two stories, written by Ray Bradbury, were "There 
Shall Come Soft Rains" and "Zero Hour." The first dealt with an 
atomic attack in 1985 and the second, a Martian invasion of earth 
with children enlisted to help the spacemen. 

-o- 


Yrett Department, Room 320 













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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


November 22, 1963 

HSRMIONE GINGOLD AND HURD HATFIELD JOIN 
STARRING CAST OF ’A CRY OF ANGELS' 

ON 'HALLMARK HALL OF FAME* 

Hermione Gingold and Hurd Hatfield have been signed for star¬ 
ring roles in "A Cry of Angels" on the Sunday, Dec. 15 color production 
of "The Hallmark Hall of Fame" (NBC-TV, 4-5 p.m. EST). As previously 
announced, the original drama by Sherman Yellen will star Walter Slezak 
and special guest star Maureen O'Hara. 

Miss Gingold will be seen as Princess Caroline, daughter of 
King George II, who befriended George Frederick Handel during a period 
when he had fallen out of favor with the English people. Hatfield 
will have the role of Frederic, Prince of Wales, whose hatred for the 
composer evolved from the Prince's association with an opera singer for 
whom Handel had Indicated contempt. 

Slezak will be seen as Handel and Miss O'Hara as Mrs. Cibber, 
an actress and singer who appeared in the initial presentation of 
Handel's "The Messiah." 

"A Cry of Angels" will be produced and directed by George 

Schaefer. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 












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ROOM 820 



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November 25, 1963 


HOW NBC-TV AND RADIO NETWORKS COVERED EVENTS SINCE 
ASSASSINATION OP PRESIDENT KENNEDY 


NBC TV was the only television network to present live cover¬ 
age throughout Sunday night, Nov. 24, and this morning (Nov. 25) of 
the tnousands of mourners who viewed President Kennedy*s bier in the 
Great Rotunda of the United States Capitol. 

When the doors of the Capitol closed to visitors, NBC News 
continued its coverage as the funeral procession led to the White 
House, on to St. Matthew’s Cathedral for the pontifical requiem Mass, 
and then to Arlington National Cemetery. 

NBC News’ four-day comprehensive coverage of events after the 
President’s assassination started on the NBC-TV Network at 1:45 p.m. 
EST Friday, Nov. 22. Television coverage has been continuous since 
8 a.m. EST Sunday. The NBC Radio Network coverage began at 1:39 p.m. 
EST Friday, and also continued throughout the weekend and today. 

Millions of television viewers watching NBC saw the fatal 
shooting of Lee H. Oswald, accused of assassinating President Kennedy, 
as it happened, in a live telecast at 12:20 p.m. (EST) Sunday. NBC 
was the only network on the air with this scene at the moment. The 
scene was repeated on tape at 12:25 p.m. EST and frequently thereafter. 

NBC News mobilized 300 newsmen and technicians to give the 
American public complete coverage on television and radio of develop¬ 
ments in Washington, Dallas, Boston and Hyannis Port. The personnel 
assigned to this running story included a dozen mobile live camera or 
tape units, 18 sound-film crews and eight silent-film cameramen. 

(more) 


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At 2:10 p.m. (EST) Friday, NBC announced that its television 
and radio networks would carry only news relating to the President's 
death until further notice. 

The coverage included an expanded edition of "The Huntley- 
Brinlcley Report" Friday night, which ran one hour and 45 minutes; a 
special three-hour "Today" program Saturday morning, and a two-^nd-one 
half-hour "Today" program from Washington this morning. 

A full-hour memorial program from the Los Angeles Sports 
Arena, where President Kennedy was nominated during the i960 Democratic 
Convention, was presented Sunday night. NBC-TV on Sunday night also 
carried a taped British television program entitled "A Tribute to 
John F. Kennedy." The 19-minute British program, a special presenta¬ 
tion of the show "That Was the Week That Was," was scheduled to be 
shown again tonight at 6 p.m. EST. NBC received more than J00 phone 
calls of approval after its first showing. 

Also scheduled for tonight (Nov. 25) are two special programs 
of 90 minutes each. The first of these, at 7^30 P.m. EST, will present 
readings of poetry and prose, including President Kennedy's own 
philosophical writings, by distinguished actors. It will be produced by 
Don Hyatt, Director of Special Projects. The second 90-minute program, 
at 9 p.m. EST, will be a biography and evaluation of President Johnson. 
It will be titled "LBJ Report No. l" and will be produced by NBC News 
producer Gerald Green. 

NBC-TV will resume its regular daily program schedule 
Tuesday, Nov. 26, with the "Today" show (7-9 a.m. EST). On Wednesday, 
Nov. 27, NBC News' coverage of President Johnson's address before a 
joint session of Congress will be carried live on the NBC-TV and NBC 
Radio Networks. This address is scheduled for 12:30 p.m. EST. 

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NBC News' coverage of President Kennedy's coffin arriving 
at Andrews Air Force Base in Washington on Friday (Nov. 22) was shown 
in Moscow Saturday (Nov. 23), in what the Reuters news agency said was 
Soviet television's first communication satellite broadcast. About 11 
minutes of coverage of events following the President's death was 
transmitted by NBC to Europe via Relay satellite. Five minutes' 
coverage was shown in Moscow, Reuters said. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/25/63 






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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

November 25, 1963 

NBC'S TV TRANSMISSION OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY'S FUNERAL PROCESSION 
CARRIED LIVE BY 23 TRANSATLANTIC NATIONS VIA RELAY SATELLITE 

Europeans -- those in the Free World and those behind the 
Iron Curtain -- joined Americans today (Nov. 25) via Relay communica¬ 
tions satellite in uatching on television the funeral procession of 
President John F. Kennedy. The telecast was transmitted through 
the facilities of the National Broadcasting Company. 

The historic transatlantic telecast was scheduled to be 
carried live by 23 countries, the largest number ever to transmit live 
satellite pictures simultaneously and the largest television network 
ever assembled. East Germany and Yugoslavia recorded the telecast 
for later presentation. 

Gathered in NBC's Peacock Studio in New York were eight 
reporters from Europe narrating in their own languages the description 
of the procession, carried by radio or cable to their countries 
simultaneously with the Relay satellite picture transmission. 

The correspondents in the Peacock Studio were from England -- 
both BBC and Independent Television -- and Ireland, France, West 
Germany (two networks), Denmark, Holland and Sweden. 

Additionally, the entire Eurovision network, and the 
Intervision (Communist countries) network, were receiving the NBC pool 
feed from Relay. 

The Eurovision countries participating were Belgium, Holland, 
Portugal, Spain, Great Britain, Ireland, Monte Carlo, Austria, 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 
















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2 - Relay 


Finland, Norway, Italy, France, Yugoslavia, West Germany and 
Switzerland (in three languages). Intervision countries were Russia, 
Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Bulgaria, Romania and East Germany. 
Algeria, too, received the Eurovision transmission. 

The satellite feed began at 11:36 a.m. and continued until 
12:05 p.m. EST. 

Europeans saw the funeral cortege arriving at the White 
House, showing members of the late President’s family emerging from 
their car. 

Throughout the half-hour Europeans were able to see the 
following highlights: 

Family and dignitaries in the procession from the White 
House to St. Matthew's Cathedral, a group that included President 
Lyndon B. Johnson, Britain's Prince Philip, France's President 
Charles de Gaulle and others. NBC News correspondents David Brinkley 
and Chet Huntley provided the voice description of this procession. 
There was also a segment picking up the pipers of the Black Watch 
from Scotland. The procession continued to the interior of the 
cathedral. 

Each of the eight reporters covering the event was in a 
separate ''studio," set up in shallow cubicles along one wall of the 
Peacock Studio. Each newsman was provided with a television monitor 
and an NBC technician to assist in the transmission. 

Immediate response from the relay points in Europe indicated 
that picture quality was excellent and the transmission was completed 
without difficulty. The immediate report from Geneva termed the 
relay coverage “magnificent -- overwhelming!" 

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Later in the clay, NBC fed two transmissions to Japan via 
a later pass of the Relay satellite -- the first from 2:05 p.m. to 
2:20 p.m. EST covering the Arlington Cemetery ceremonies live, and 
later from 5**50 to 6:05 p.m. EST, reviewing earlier events in 
Washington. 


-o- 


NBC-Nev; York, 11/25/63 



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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 25, 1963 

MILLIONS OF VIEWERS WITNESSED LIVE NBC TELECAST 
OF FATAL SHOOTING OF LEE H. OSWALD 

Millions of viewers saw the live NBC telecast yesterday 
(Nov. 24) of the fatal shooting -- as it happened --of Lee H. 

Oswald, accused of the assassination of President Kennedy. 

This was the first time in television’s 15-year history that 
a real-life homicid.e occurred in front of live cameras, 

NBC-TV cameras were trained on Oswald, flanked by detectives, 
as he stepped onto a garage ramp in the basement of the Dallas city 
jail for transfer into an armored truck. 

Suddenly, out of the lower right corner of the TV screen, came 
the back of a man. A shot rang out and Oswald was heard gasping as he 
started to fall, clutching his side. 

NBC News correspondent Tom Pettit, at the scene, reported with 
restrained urgency: 

"He’s been shot! He’s been shot! Lee Oswald has been shot! 
There is absolute panic. Pandemonium has broken out." 

Viewers saw the police swarming over the back of the assailant. 
Jack Ruby, a Dallas nightclub operator. Minutes later Pettit interviewed 
a police officer who said he knew the assailant as a local man who was 
frequently at the police station. 

The entire scene was repeated by tape five minutes later, at 
12:25 p.m. EST and again shortly afterward. 

(mojce ) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 












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2 - Oswald 


Before the dramatic shooting, NBC-TV had switched back to 
NBC News correspondent Prank McGee, anchorman in New York, after a 
remote pickup from Hyannis Port, Mass., on the condition of the late 
President’s father, Joseph P. Kennedy. 

Meanwhile, in a nearby control room, pictures from Dallas were 
being viewed over a closed-circuit monitor. Then, just before Oswald 
was due to come onto the garage ramp, NBC News director-producer Fred 
Rheinstein, in a mobile unit at the scene, flashed word to New York that 
Oswald was about to come out. 

On-the~air producer Chet Hagan, in the New York control room, 
immediately ordered the network coverage to shift to Dallas. As a 
result, NBC-TV viewers saw the shooting as it happened. 

Pettit, 32, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and grew up in 
Waterloo, Iowa. He was graduated from Iowa State Teachers College in 
1953 and received an M. A. in American Studies at the University of 
Minnesota in 1998. 

He joined NBC News in New York in i960 after assignments with 
stations KCRG, Cedar Rapids, and WRCV, in Philadelphia. He has worked 
for NBC News in Los Angeles since 1961. Pettit lives with his wife 
and four children in Woodland Hills, a suburb of Los Angeles. 


NBC-New York, 11/25/63 



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PERSONAL REACTIONS OF NBC NEWSMEN 

Following are excerpts from views of NBC Newsmen reflecting 
their reactions on events following President Kennedy’s assassination. 
The views were expressed during coverage of the events on the NBC 
Television and Radio Networks. 

Chet Huntley: "There is in this country, and there has been 
for too long, an ominous and sickening popularity of hatred. The body 
of the President, lying in Washington, is the thundering testimonial 
of what hatred comes to and the revolting excesses it perpetrates... 
You and I have heard, in recent months,someone say, ’Those Kennedys 
ought to be shot.’ A well-known national magazine recently carried an 
article saying Chief Justice Warren should be hanged. In its own 
defense it said it was only joking...It might be the hope and the 
resolve of all of us that we have heard the last of this kind of talk, 
jocular or serious; for the result is tragically the same." 

E dwin N ewman: "The main point that emerges from the day's 
events is that the United States is still a country of violence. 
Violence plays a part in our political life, and not only through 
assassination. We have seen that in the last three years, and the 
years before that...We shall hear much in the next few days about 
the need to bind up the wounds of the nation, about the need for all 
Americans to stand together. We may treat those i^ords as empty 
slogans or as real needs to be genuinely met. Whatever we do, there 
can be no guarantee that what happened today will not happen again. 

But what is within our power, we should do. It is within our power to 
be more serious about our public life." 

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Da vid Brinkley: "There is seldom any time to think any 
more, and today there was none. In about four hours, we had gone from 
President Kennedy in Dallas alive to back in Washington dead, and a 
new President in his place. There is...really no more to say except 
thatwhat happened has been just too much, too ugly and too fast." 

Robert Abernethy; "it is so humbling. We think it could 
happen in a new country or one just learning democracy, it happened 
to us...One thinks of the future of all of us: Will we now walk with 
a little less arrogance, a little more consciousness of how ephemeral 
are those things that command most of our time? And can we, in some 
way, in the name of John Kennedy, devote ourselves anew to that 
business that is so unfinished, the creation of a race of men who can 
live together?" 

Martin Agronsky: "We are a democracy, but there is a 
continuity to the office of the Presidency that is not unlike the 
inexorable law of royal succession. In our system of government, the 
axiom of democracy is no different than that of monarchy -- the 
President is dead; long live the President. It was this that was 
implicit in a simple, yet dramatic and harshly realistic housekeeping 
chore that was performed this afternoon (Friday) in the White House. 

It was witnessed by and deeply moved the Senate majority whip, Hubert 
Humphrey of Minnesota. Mr. Humphrey by chance was standing in the 
corridor outside the door of the President's Oval Room office in the 
White House just a few minutes after it was confirmed that John 
Fitzgerald Kennedy was dead....As he leaned against the wall, one of 
Mr. Kennedy's secretaries walked slowly into the Oval Room. She stood 
for a moment before the Presidential desk. Then methodically she began 
to remove the personal knicknacks and mementos ranged along the desk 
top...It was, of course, a meaningful and symbolic chore. It cleared 

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the desk in this material fashion for the man who must take up the 
unfinished affairs of state which fate, in the form of an assassin's 
bullets, has ordained that John Kennedy shall never finish." 

John Chancellor (reflecting on a mass memorial meeting in 
West Berlin): "The giant bell of the city hall, called the Freedom 
Bell, a gift to Berlin from the people of the United States, rang 
deeply for about a minute when Mayor Willy Brandt stopped speaking. 

After the tolling of the bell, the meeting ended, but the 40,000 
people stood in their places for a moment or two of absolute, dead, 
total silence. It was an uncanny moment as all those people stood 
there in complete silence thinking of John Kennedy and what he and the 
United States meant to them." 

Joseph Peters in Belgrade: "Crowds gathered around radio, 

TV, and newspaper offices hoping to learn the news was untrue. 

Even I received telephone condolences from high and low." 

John Rich in Tokyo: "The hammer and sickle flag flew at 
half mast over the Soviet embassy in Tokyo...and this unusual sight 
somehow didn't seem out of place at all to Americans here. The Asians 
among whom we thousands of Americans live made touching efforts to 
share the...grief." 

Wilson Hall in Rio de Janeiro: "People going home from work 
stopped at the American embassy to ask if the news could be true... 

Rio radio and TV, which were off the air today because of a strike, went 
back to work 'to inform the nation of the world's tragedy. 1 Church 
bells are tolling in Brazil." 


NBC-New York, 11/25/63 








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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, Sew York, N. Y. 10020 


November 25, 1963 

NBC’S TV AND RADIO NETWORKS RESUMING REGULAR PROGRAMMING 
AFTER SPECIAL COVERAGE OF STORY OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY’S 
ASSASSINATION AND FOLLOWING EVENTS 

The NBC-TV Network will resume its regular daily program 
schedule Tuesday, Nov. 2o, with the "Today" show (7-9 a.m. EST). 

Programs, pre-empted by NBC.-TV’s extensive special coverage 
of events following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, 
will be rescheduled for later dates. 

NBC's special TV coverage of the assassination story began at 
1:53 p.m. EST, Friday, Nov. 22, and scheduled programming and commercials 
were canceled for the special coverage that followed. 

Any changes for programs, previously announced to be telecast 
after Nov. 26, will be announced on an individual basis. 

The NBC Radio Network will resume its regular daily program 
schedule Nov. 26, with the "News on the Hour" broadcast at 7 a.m. EST. 

NBC Radio’s special coverage of events following the assassina¬ 
tion of President Kennedy began Friday, Nov. 22 and will conclude with 
the network’s sign-off tonight (Nov. 25). All scheduled NBC Radio 
programming and commercials were canceled for the special coverage. 

-o- 


Reest Department, Room 320 




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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 






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November 26, 1963 


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HOW NBC GAVE EXTENSIVE TELEVISION AND RADIO COVERAGE TO STORY 
OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY'S ASSASSINATION AND ITS AFTERMATH 

NBC-TV's comprehensive coverage of events following the 
assassination of President Kennedy totaled 71 hours and 36 minutes -- 
more coverage than was presented on any other television network. 
NBC-TV remained on the air continually for the last 4l hours and 18 
minutes of this period -- from 8 a.m. EST Sunday, Nov. 24, until 
1:18 a.m. EST today (Tuesday, Nov. 26). 

The NBC Radio Network carried 68 hours and 11 minutes of 
coverage of the national tragedy and its aftermath. 

Coverage of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s address before a 
joint session of Congress will be carried live on the NBC-TV and NBC 
Radio Networks Wednesday, Nov. 27. The address is scheduled for 
12:30 p.m. EST. 

The NBC News coverage, which spanned four days, began 
Friday, Nov. 22, at 1:39 p.m. EST on radio and six minutes later on 
television. From then on, normal programming was canceled until 
today. 

In addition to this special coverage, NBC-TV's "Today" show 

devoted half its time to the President’s death after resuming regular 

programming this morning (7-9 a.m. EST). Highlights of President 

Kennedy’s funeral Monday were presented in "Today’s" news segments. 

In Washington, NBC News correspondent Martin Agronsky interviewed 

Senators Paul Douglas (D.-Ill.) and Clifford Case (R.-N.J.) on what 

effect the President’s death may have on civil rights and other 

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2 - Coverage 


legislation. Reaction in New York to the President's death was 
reported by host Hugh Downs, Jack Lescoulie and Pat Fontaine. 

NBC News mobilized more than 4oo newsmen and technicians for 
its vast coverage operation, sending correspondents, camera crews and 
other personnel to Dallas, Washington, Boston and Hyannis Port as the 
story developed. 

In covering the President’s funeral Monday, Nov. 25, NBC-TV 
used 44 cameras in more than 65 locations. Twenty-three of these NBC 
cameras were used for pool coverage by the three networks and 21 were 
employed in NBC’s own coverage. To augment its Washington facilities, 
NBC sent scores of newsmen, cameramen and engineers to that city from 
New York and other places. 

NBC-TV’s continuous live coverage of the President’s funeral 
began at 10 a.m. EST Monday with the departure of Mrs. Kennedy and 
members of the family and White House staff in a seven-limousine 
cavalcade for the Capitol. The cameras covered successively the 
removal of the President’s casket from the Capitol, the return of the 
cortege to the White House, the heads of state and other dignitaries 
joining Mrs. Kennedy and family members in procession on foot to St. 
Matthew’s Cathedral, the pontifical low mass said by Richard Cardinal 
Cushing of Boston, the procession to Arlington Cemetery and the 
graveside services. 

A poignant scene in the solemn ceremonies, which NBC alone 
carried live, was a view of three-year-old John Kennedy saluting as 
the President’s casket was carried from St. Matthew’s Cathedral. 

Coverage of the funeral procession was transmitted to Free 

World and Iron Curtain countries around the globe via the Relay 

satellite. The historic transatlantic telecast, transmitted through 

the facilities of the National Broadcasting Company, was scheduled 

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3 - Coverage 


to be carried live by 23 countries, the largest number ever to show 
live satellite pictures simultaneously and the largest television 
network ever assembled. In addition. East Germany and Yugoslavia 
recorded the telecast for later presentation. 

Eight reporters in separate announce booths in NBC's 
Peacock Studio in New York described the procession in their own 
languages. Their words were carried by radio or cable to their 
countries simultaneously with the Relay satellite picture transmission. 

Within a few hours after the Relay transmission, praise for 
it began arriving in New York. The favorable reaction came first 
from France and England. It was reported that Soviet citizens huddled 
around an estimated 7,000,000 TV sets to watch the funeral ceremonies. 
Altogether, a potential audience of about 300 million were believed 
to have been joined through the combined Eurovision and Eastern Europe 
Intervision networks. In Japan, where the ceremonies were received 
from a later pass by Relay, an estimated 95 million were expected to 
view the special programming. 

Since Friday afternoon, NBC International has made live, 
taped and filmed highlights of NBC-TV's coverage available to l4 
countries around the world. These highlights total about 15 hours. 

NBC-TV's coverage Monday night included two 90-minute 
special programs. One of these, "LBJ Report No. 1," a biography and 
evaluation of President I^ndon B. Johnson, included a taped interview 
with veteran news commentator H. V. Kaltenborn by News Director Bill 
Gordon of Station WPTV in Palm Beach, Fla. After the program. 

President Johnson called Kaltenborn to thank him for the kind words he 
had said. 


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The other 90-minute special program, "in Memoriam," 
presented readings of poetry and prose, including some of President 
Kennedy’s own writings, by distinguished actors Howard Lindsay, 

Maurice Evans, David Wayne, Jason Robards Jr., Hume Cronyn and 
Christopher Plummer. Interspersed with these readings, scenes of the 
United States were shown, accompanied by appropriate music. 

"Requiem," a full-hour special program Monday night, 
presented silent film footage of the funeral ceremonies as Brahms’ 
"Requiem" was played. This was followed by a memorial concert, also 
a one-hour program, from Constitution Hall in Washington. The concert 
was given by the National Symphony Orchestra, Howard Mitchell 
conducting. 

At 6:45 p.m. EST Monday night, NBC-TV carried a repeat 
telecast of a taped British television program entitled "A Tribute 
to John F. Kennedy." This 19-minute program was a special presenta¬ 
tion of the show "That Was the Week That Was." It was first shown on 
NBC-TV Sunday night. NBC has received more than 1,000 telephone calls 
from viewers expressing high praise for this program. 

Monday’s programming also included live coverage of the 
reception by President Johnson for foreign dignitaries at the State 
Department Building in Washington. 

NBC-TV was the only television network to present live cover¬ 
age throughout Sunday night and Monday morning of the thousands of 
mourners who viewed President Kennedy’s bier in the Great Rotunda of 
the United States Capitol. 

At 12:20 p.m. EST Sunday, millions of viewers watching NBC 
saw the fatal shooting of Lee H. Oswald, accused of the President’s 
assassination, as it happened, in a live telecast. NBC was the only 
network on the air with this scene at the moment. 

-o- NBC-New York, 11/26/63 






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FROM: THE AMERICAN POLITICAL SCIENCE ASSOCIATION 
1726 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 6, D.C. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. -- The American Political Science 
Association, conducting a study under a grant from the National 
Broadcasting Company, announced earlier this year by Robert W. Sarnoff, 
NBC Board Chairman, has received more than 400 recommendations for 
ways of improving the Presidential Debates on radio and television 
in 1964. These were in response to an APSA request for proposals 
from the national and state party chairmen, from Congressmen and 
Governors. 

The grant was made after Mr. Sarnoff had reiterated last 
March, in testimony before a Congressional Committee, NBC's intentions 
again to carry debates between political candidates. Mr. Sarnoff 
pointed out that although there had been general recognition of the 
value of the broadcast debates of i960, questions had been raised about 
their format. "We should start now," he said, "to refine the format 
of these televised encounters, seeking even more effective ways of 
assisting the American voter to make an informed choice." 

The political leaders' recommendations for the form of such 
debates represent about a 75 per cent response to a letter sent by a 
nine-man Special Committee of APSA. 

Evron M. Kirkpatrick, APSA’s Executive Director, said the 
response was the "heaviest I have ever experienced and demonstrates the 
widespread interest in perfecting this instrument of enlightenment." 

Mr. Kirkpatrick said some of the suggestions took the form 
of presentations running to 11 pages. "All of them," he said, "will 
receive the thoughtful attention of the committee." 

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In making the grant, Mr. Sarnoff said NBC had chosen the 
APSA, the nation’s major professional organization devoted to the 
study of government and politics. 

The Special Committee is headed by Dr. Carl J. Friedrich, 

1962-63 APSA President and Eaton Professor of the Science of Government 
at Harvard University. 

Dr. Friedrich said the Special Committee would make known 
its recommendations for conducting future Presidential Debates early 
next Spring. 

Other members on the Special Committee are: Mr. Kirkpatrick; 
Harold Laswell, Professor of Law and Political Science, Yale University; 
Richard Neustadt, Professor of Government, Columbia University; Peter 
Odegard, Professor of Political Science, University of California at 
Berkeley; Elmo Roper, Senior Partner, Elmo Roper and Associates; 

Gerhart Wiebe, Dean of the School of Public Relations and Communications, 
Boston University; Charles A. H. Thompson, Rand Corporation; and 
Telford Taylor, Columbia University Law School. 


Nov. 26, 1963 


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-ROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 

November 26, 1963 

NBC INTERNATIONAL PROVIDED 14 NATIONS' WITH COMPREHENSIVE TV 
COVERAGE OF EVENTS FOLLOWING PRESIDENT'S ASSASSINATION 

Since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy 
last Friday (Nov. 22), NBC International has provided the most 
complete coverage of the subsequent events of any network -- making 
available live, taped and film highlights to a total of 14 countries. 

This is in addition to the special feed to eight European 
countries via Relay satellite, cable and radio with voice description 
of yesterday's (Monday's) funeral procession. Reporters from both 
British networks, the Netherlands, France, Denmark, West Germany, 

Ireland and Sweden broadcast from special studios at NBC. 

NBC also fed from the pooled coverage of the funeral to 25 
European countries, including the Communist Intervision nations. Two 
special Relay transmissions were made of yesterday's highlights to 
Japan. 

After the assassination Friday, arrangements were made through 
NBC International with both the CBC and CTV networks in Canada for live 
and taped feeds from the NBC-TV and NBC Radio Networks, which continued 
throughout the day. 

Telesistema Mexicana, Mexico's television network, carried 
live coverage from NBC-TV through special lines set up from affiliate 
WBAP-TV (Fort Worth-Dallas) on Friday and again for most of the day 
Sunday and Monday. This coverage was with network sound, interspersed 
periodically with comments in Spanish, and included the shooting of 
Lee H. Oswald on Sunday. 

(more) 

Nets Department, Room 320 










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2 - NBC International 


Latin American television networks — in Venezuela, 

Panama, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Uruguay and Colombia -- received 
from NBC International a two-and-one-half-hour edited film of 
Monday's funeral procession -- 15 hours of film tape of the same 
coverage was flown last night to Brazil. 

Monday night's tribute, "in Memoriam," and "LBJ Report 
No. 1," shown on NBC-TV--three hours of programming -- were flown to 
Mexico, Japan, Australia and elsewhere in the Far East, as was a 
"hot kine" of first events following Friday’s assassination, which 
were recorded by NBC on the West Coast. The same areas, including Hon? 
Kong and the Philippines, received film yesterday of two and one-half 
hours of the funeral procession—about 10 hours of filmed material. 

Arrie Kleywegt, one of the Netherlands' most popular tele¬ 
vision news reporters, flew to New York to cover Monday's funeral 
procession, leaving last night with a film to be shown today on NTS, 
Holland's television network. He viewed NBC-TV coverage in an NBC 
International office in New York throughout the day, making notes, and 
edited his comments preparatory to the broadcast of the coverage there 
today. 

Kleywegt, who was one of eight foreign correspondents 
describing the funeral procession from monitors set up at NBC 
yesterday, had last been here to cover the late President Kennedy's 
inauguration. 

NBC International worked on a 'round-the-clock basis from 
NBC News headquarters throughout the weekend, providing -- for all 
foreign TV making requests -- highlights of the coverage from Friday 
through Monday afternoon. 

-o- NBC-New York, H/ 26/63 



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from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 


November 26 , 1963 

PRESIDENT JOHNSON PHONES H.V. KALTENBORN TO EXPRESS APPRECIATION 
FOR COMMENTATORS' REMARKS ON "LBJ REPORT NO. l" TELECAST 

President Lyndon B. Johnson called veteran news commentator 
H. V. Kaltenborn last night to express his appreciation for the 
comments made by Kaltenborn on the NBC News television special, "LBJ 
Report No. 1." 

The 90-minute program, telecast at 9 p.m. EST, Monday 
(Nov. 25 ), was a biography and evaluation of President Johnson. 
Kaltenborn’s remarks were taped earlier at station WPTV, Palm Beach, 
Fla., by the station’s news director. Bill Gordon. 

On "LBJ Report No. l" Kaltenborn said that the nation was 
"most fortunate to have a strong man follow a strong man" and that 
President Johnson was "the type of man we like to see come through 
in an emergency." 

In the telephone call following the telecast, said 
Kaltenborn, President Johnson, expressing himself in a friendly 
fashion, said how much he appreciated the newsman’s comments, 
especially coming at this time. 

Kaltenborn also said that President Johnson "invited me to 
call on him when I come to Washington for he would like to chat with 
me and get to know me better." 

"That the President of the United States took the trouble to 
call me, just a reporter, on a night such as last night," said 


Nets Department, Room 320 


(more ) 




















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2 - Kaltenborn 


Kaltenborn, "shows something of his character. I was surprised that 
he even took! the time to tune in. to the program " 

"I was more flattered on this occasion than the last time 
a President paid me a particular comment," added Kaltenborn referring 
to former President Truman’s famous imitation of him after his 
election in 1948. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 11/26/63 







■ 












NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 26, 1963 

PRAISE REACHES NEW YORK FROM OVERSEAS .FOR TRANSMISSION 
OF KENNEDY FUNERAL PROCESSION VIA RELAY SATELLITE 

Praise for Monday’s Relay Satellite transmission of the 
late President Kennedy’s funeral procession began arriving in New 
York early Monday evening. 

Reaction to the historic transatlantic telecast, trans¬ 
mitted through the facilities of the National Broadcasting Company 
to Relay satellite, came first from France and England: 

"One could sense that throughout the transmission that 
viewers in France were taking part in the grief and the emotion of 
the United States. The program made a tremendous impact on the 
French people. In the streets people crowded round set's in shop 
windows and cafes to watch. Here in Radio Transfusion Francaise, 
staff members left their work to find the nearest monitor. We were 
deeply impressed and moved.(Signed Georges Croses, in charge of 
international programmes for RTF in Paris.) 

"This deeply moving transmission was successfully received 
by the BBC. We are extremely grateful for this most memorable 
programme." — (from BBC.) 

"Please pass this message to all responsible in the United 
States for today’s satellite transmission. You enabled all Britain 
to participate directly in the deeply moving farewell to this great 
man." — (Signed Geoffrey Cox, Editor, ITN in London.) 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 












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2 - Satellite 


Other reports had Soviet citizens huddled around TV 
sets (an estimated seven million) to hear a description of the 
Washington ceremonies received from Relay. This in turn was seen 
in East Germany, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria and 
Romania. 

The government-owned Japan Broadcasting Corp., which 
received the ceremonies at Arlington from a later pass by Relay, 
said the reception was perfect. Japan planned to run tapes later 
in the day(the ceremonies were received live in Japan at 4:05 a.m. 
Japan time). An estimated 95 million were due to see it later in 
the day on the taped re-run in Japan. 

A potential audience of about 300 million was believed 
to have been joined through the combined Eurovision and the eastern 
Europe Intervision networks. 


o 


NBC-New York, 11/26/63 




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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


West German Chancellor Ludwig Erhard will go ahead with 
his plans to appear as guest on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday, Dec. 1, 
as previously announced by NBC. 

The program will be taped in Washington by NBC today 
(Nov. 26) after Chancellor Erhard pays his first visit to President 
Lyndon B. Johnson. He will depart for his return to West Germany 
tonight. 

The program will be presented on NBC-TV in color Sunday, 
6-6:30 p.m. EST and will be broadcast on NBC Radio 6:30-7 p.m. EST. 

The chancellor had originally been scheduled to pay his 
first visit to the late President Kennedy this week and had planned 
to tape his "Meet the Press" appearance Nov. 27. 

Members of the panel who will interview him include Marquis 
Childs of the St. Louis Post Dispatch, James Reston of the New York 
Times, Peter Lisagor of the Chicago Daily News and Elie Abel of NBC 
News. Lawrence E. Spivak, producer of the program, will be moderator. 

The "Meet the Press" program with French Minister of Foreign 
Affairs Maurice Couve de Murville, which was to have been broadcast 
last Sunday (Nov. 24) via Relay satellite between New York and Paris, 
will be presented on a date to be announced. 

-o- 



November 26, 1963 

WEST GERMANY'S CHANCELLOR ERHARD PROCEEDS 
WITH INTERVIEW ON "MEET THE PRESS" 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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NBC FEATURE 


November 26 , 1963 

REPRESENTATIVE JAMES ROOSEVELT, IN REMARKS 
IN CONGRESSIONAL RECORD PRAISES UPCOMING 
"WORLD'S GREATEST SHOWMAN" TELECAST 
Color Special Honors Career of Cecil B. DcMille 

Representative James Roosevelt (D.-Calif.) paid tribute in 
the Congressional Record to NBC-TVs upcoming program, "The World’s 
Greatest Showman." The ninety-minute color special, a study of 
Cecil B. DeMille’s motion picture career, will be telecast Su nday, 

Dec. 1 (8:30-10 p.m. EST). 

Concluding his remarks to his colleagues in the House of 
Representatives, Mr. Roosevelt said the nation is indebted to Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Television for "the distinguished production of 'The 
World’s Greatest Showman,’ the legend of Cecil B. DeMille, which will 
be presented as a 90-minute spectacular on the NBC TV Network...with 
many of movieland’s past brightest stars contributing their services in 
tribute to a truly great American." 

The following is the complete text of Mr. Roosevelt’s 
remarks, printed in the Congressional Record: 

Mr. Speaker, it has been my privilege, since coming 
to Congress, to represent a part of the great motion picture 
industry of California. No one will deny that in the 20th 
century it has contributed to the swift development of 
California as well as to our Nation in many recorded and 
unrecorded ways. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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2 - DeMille 


This phenomenon runs a close parallel to the birth and 
growth of its motion picture industry which has nurtured and 
helped build radio and television as supplementary mass 
media of entertainment and information. Amongst the 
companies in my district which have been outstanding in 
leadership in this area is Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, whose roar¬ 
ing lion has become a national symbol. There is no single 
person to whom this achievement owes more than to the man 
known around the globe as "The World’s Greatest Showman" -- 
Cecil B. DeMille. Although he was born in l88l near 
Ashfield, Mass,, California is proud to claim him as its 
son --- even if by adoption, for without his pioneering 
efforts one doubts whether Hollywood and its environs, such 
as Culver City, ever would have become the world’s 
entertainment capitol. 

I deem it a privilege to bring to the attention of 
my colleagues in Congress the fact that we are approaching 
the 50th anniversary of the first full-length motion 
picture, "The Squaw Man," produced by DeMille at a cost of 
$15,000 from a barn which he had rented in a little-known 
suburb of Los Angeles called Hollywood. 

History designates DeMille as the world's most success¬ 
ful producer-director whose films have grossed over $1 
billion. In 1923, he produced his first big silent movie 
spectacular, "The Ten Commandments," and in 1956, DeMille 
brought out its second version this time in color . 
and with sound. The evangelist, Billy Graham, has 
referred to him as "a prophet in celluloid who 
had the privilege in bringing some of the word 

(more) 



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of God to more people than any other man." DeMille also 
will be remembered as the owner and developer of the first 
commercial airline in the United States -- the man who took 
complete charge of the Hollywood bond drive in World War II 
-- the man who designed the regulation uniforms in use 
today at the Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs. Whether 
he was filming a Bible drama, the story of the Union Pacific, 
Cleopatra or "The Plainsman," whatever DeMille did, he 
did profitably with distinction and honor. His career of 
^5 years in turning out movie spectaculars may well serve as 
an example of what a citizen’s enterprise and dedication to 
work can accomplish in a democracy such as ours. 

That is why I believe the Nation is indebted to Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer Television for its distinguished production of 
"The World’s Greatest Showman," the legend of Cecil B. 

DeMille, which will be presented as a 90 -minute color 
spectacular on the NBC-TV Network, Sunday, Dec. 1, with many 
of movieland’s past brightest stars contributing their services 
in tribute to a truly great American. 


NBC-New York, 11/26/63 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 27, 1963 


ELGIN AND SCRIPTO TO SPONSOR PULL-HOUR NBC-TV NETWORK SPECIAL, 
’JONATHAN WINTERS PRESENTS: A WILD WINTERS NIGHT* 

Art Carney and New Christy Minstrels Will be Winters* Guests 


The secret ingredient will be versatility when Jonathan 
Winters gets together with his guests Art Carney and the New Christy 
Minstrels on his hour-long special, "Jonathan Winters Presents: A 
Wild Winters Night," Thursday, Feb, 20 (NBC-TV, 7:30-8:30 p.m. EST). 

The Elgin National Watch Co* and Scripto will sponsor the 
show through McCann-Marshalk. 

The program will feature comedy sequences filmed on location 
in addition to segments which will be taped at the NBC studios in New 
York. 

Winters is an inventive comedian with an extensive range of 
vocal characterizations and he can change characterizations at the 
drop of a hat. In fact, one of his specialties is to do a series of 
instant improvisations by utilizing various hats to set the stage for 
his comedic portrayals. 

The comedian has donned many showbusiness hats in his 
career. This season Winters is committed to a series of 10 exclusive 
TV guest appearances on NBC-TV*s "The Jack Paar Program" -- the only 
exception being his own special. Also, he is a regular on NBC Radio’s 
"Monitor Comedy Time." 

Winters is one of the stars of the recently released comedy 
motion picture, "it’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World." He has appeared on 
the Broadway stage in John Murray Anderson's "Almanac." Currently, 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






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2 - Winters 


he has five record albums available -- "The Wonderful World of Jonathan 
Winters," "Down to Earth with Jonathan Winters," "Here’s Jonathan," 
"Another Day, Another World" and "Humor Seen Through the Eyes of 
Jonathan Winters." 

In previous video seasons. Winters starred in a Summer 
replacement series, "And Here’s the Show," on the "NBC Comedy Hour" 
and a weekly series, "The Jonathan Winters Show," all on NBC-TV, as 
well as having appeared with Garry Moore, Arthur Godfrey, Andy Williams 
and others. 

Guest star Art Carney also has demonstrated his penchant for 
versatility by wearing the twin masks of comedy and tragedy. In TV 
comedy, he created the memorable role of sewer worker Ed Naughton in 
Jackie Gleason’s "Honeymooners" sketches and starred in "Harvey," "Art 
Carney Meets Peter and the Wolf," and "Charlie’s Aunt." In TV drama, 
he starred as an alcoholic in the one-man teleplay, "Call Me Back," as 
a South Seas recluse in "Victory" and as the last comedian on earth in 
"The Triumph of Gerald Q. Wert." His Broadway credits include the 
dramatic "The Rope Dancers" and the comedy, "Take Her, She’s Mine." 

Versatility, but in the field of music, denotes the folk¬ 
singing New Christy Minstrels. The performers, who describe them¬ 
selves as singers-instrumentalists, play a wide range of musical 
instruments including guitar, banjo, bass viol, harmonica and fife. 

"Jonathan Winters Presents: A Wild Winters Night" will be 
produced by George Schlatter. The director will be Dwight Hemion, who 
is also directing this season’s eight NBC-TV Perry Como specials. 

George Spota will be executive producer for Wintergood Inc., the concern 

(more) 



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packaging the show. Phil Shukin will be head writer, but Winters 
will contribute much of his own material. 

This special program pre-empts "Temple Houston" on this date. 


-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT FEB. 20- 

JONATHAN WINTERS PRESENTS: A WILD WINTERS NIGHT. 

Art Carney and the New Christy Minstrels will be 
guests of Jonathan Winters in a full-hour special. ! 


o- 

NBC-New York, 11/27/63 









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- 























from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 

November 27, 1963 

Attention, Sports Editors 

NBC-TV TO COVER 8 POST-SEASON FOOTBALL GAMES IN DECEMBER 
AND JANUARY--5 GAMS TO BE TELECAST IN COLOR 
NBC Radio Will Broadcast 4 Games 

Eight post-season football games will be televised by the 
NBC-TV Network during December and January, and five of them will be 
presented in color, according to Carl Lindemann Jr., Vice President, 
NBC Sports. 

The NBC Radio Network will broadcast four of the games 
between Dec. 28 and Jan. 1. NBC will carry more post-season football 
on television and radio than any other network. 

The eight-game schedule on NBC--TV follows (air times are 

listed): 

Saturday, Dec. l4 (4 p.m. EST) -- 18th annual 
Junior Rose Bowl Game at Pasadena, Calif. 

Saturday, Dec, 21 (in color, 1 p.m. EST) -- Fifth 
annual Liberty Bowl Game at Philadelphia Stadium. 

Saturday, Dec. 28 — (4:45 p.m. EST) — 39th 
annual East-West Shrine Game at Kezar Stadium, San 
Francisco. 

Sunday, Dec. 29 -- 30th annual National Football 

League Championship Game, in park of Western Conference 

titleholder (time to be announced). 

Wednesday, Jan. 1 (in color, 1:45 p.m. EST) — 30th 

annual Sugar Bowl Game at New Orleans. 

(more) 


Rrets Department, Room 320 










































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2 - Football 


Wednesday, Jan. 1 (in color, 4:45 p.m. EST) -- 50th 
annual Rose Bowl Game at Pasadena, Calif. 

Saturday, Jan. 4 (in color, 2 p.m. EST) -- 15th annual 
Senior Bowl Game at Ladd Memorial Stadium, Mobile, Ala. 

Sunday, Jan. 12 (in color, 4 p.m. EST) -- l4th annual 
Pro Bowl Game of the National Football League at Los 
Angeles Coliseum. 

The East-West, NFL Championship, Sugar Bowl and Rose Bowl 
games will be covered by NBC Radio as well as NBC-TV, Air times on 
radio will be the same as on television. The air times of these four 
games will be 15 minutes before kickoff. 

This is the 13th consecutive year that NBC will televise 
football*s oldest bowl classic, the Rose Bowl Game. It is the ninth 
straight year on NBC-TV for the NFL Championship and East-West games, 
the seventh straight for the Sugar Bowl, Senior Bowl and Pro Bowl 
games, and the fifth straight for the Liberty Bowl Game. This will be 
the first time the Junior Rose Bowl Game is being televised nationally. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 11/27/63 









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ROM THE NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 

'forty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 


November 27, 1963 


MORE THAN 300 MEMBERS OF THE NBC NEWS TEAM POOLED EFFORTS 
FOR COVERAGE OF EVENTS SURROUNDING KENNEDY ASSASSINATION 

More than 500 members of the NBC News team here and around 
the world pooled their efforts to provide extensive TV and radio cover¬ 
age of the events surrounding the death of President John F. Kennedy. 

The group included reporters, producers, directors, and other 
staff men assigned to editorial duties, plus engineers, technicians, 
sound and camera personnel, and others assigned to technical operations. 
All were under the supervision of William R. McAndrew, Executive Vice 
President in charge of NBC News. 

From 1:45 p.m. EST, on Friday, Nov. 22, until early Tuesday 
morning, Nov. 26, the full force of NBC News was assigned to coverage of 
the assassination and its aftermath. 

Live camera coverage began at 1:53 p.m. EST, in NBC's "instant 
news central" on the fifth floor of the network's headquarters in New 
York City. Frank McGee, Bill Ryan, Chet Huntley, David Brinkley, and 
Merrill Mueller were the pivotal men around whom the NBC News team 
operated throughout the eventful four days. Special reports from the 
centers of news were supplied by Edwin Newman, Sander Vanocur, Ray 
Scherer, Elie Abel, Robert Goralski, Martin Agronsky, Nancy Dickerson, 
Herbert Kaplow, Peter Hackes, Bryson Rash, Richard Harkness, Robert 
Abernethy, and Russ Ward, among other reporters stationed in the U. S. 
Reports from abroad came from John Chancellor, Bonn; Joseph C. Harsch, 
London; John Rich, Tokyo; Welles Hangen, Berlin; Bernard Frizell, Paris; 
Irving R. Levine, Rome, and other NBC foreign correspondents. 

(more) 


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2 - Coverage 


Chet Hagan, Reuven Frank, and Craig Fisher served as 
producers, alternating three production teams each day. 

Within minutes after the shooting, the first live reports 
originating from Dallas were on the air. A mobile unit of WBAP-TV, 
the NBC affiliate in Fort Worth-Dallas, already was on the streets 
covering the parade for the President when the assassination took 
place. WBAP-TV reporter Charles Murphy supplied the network with the 
first on-the-scene reports. In addition, NBC correspondent Robert 
MacNeil and cameraman David Weigman, who had accompanied the 
Presidential party from Washington, provided film and voice reports. 

To augment the Dallas complement, NBC News correspondent 
Tom Pettit and producer Fred Rheinstein were ordered to the Texas city 
from their regular posts in Los Angeles. 

Meanwhile, back in New York, a Pan American 707 jetliner 
was chartered by NBC News, and a group of 35 newsmen, writers, 
production men, and others was ordered to fly to Dallas. Because of 
the swift return of the President’s body to Washington, the flight was 
diverted to the nation’s capital and the group joined the regular staff 
of the NBC News bureau there for the remainder of the coverage. 

According to William H. Trevarthen, NBC’s Vice President, 
Operations and Engineering, a total of 33 mobile units, containing 
from one to six cameras each, was brought into operation to cover 
the story. They included four that were built in Washington by 
transforming station wagons and passenger cars into emergency TV 
studios. 

Mobile units were moved to Washington from Philadelphia, 
Norfolk and Pittsburgh. Units also were ordered to Boston and 
Hyannis Port. 


(more) 





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3 - Coverage 


Trevarthen said there were 13 mobile units in operation in 
Washington alone, and 44 NBC cameras in use just in New York and 
Washington. NBC provided 23 cameras, almost half, for the three- 
network pool coverage in Washington. 

Twenty-two tape recorders were used in the four-day cover¬ 
age. More than 1,000 miles of tape were made. 

In addition, NBC facilities were used in transmitting a 
report of President Kennedy’s funeral on Monday to Europe and North 
Africa via the Relay communications satellite. From 11:36 a.m., to 
1:0.5 p.m. EST, 23 countries across the Atlantic, including most 
nations in Western Europe and all but Albania behind the Iron 
Curtain, received the telecast. 

Working under Mr. MeAndrew to coordinate the NBC News 
operation were Julian Goodman, Vice President, NBC News; Robert 
Northshield, General Manager, NBC News; Rex Goad, Director, NBC News; 
Malcolm R. Johnson, NBC News Manager; Donald Meaney, Director NBC 
News Programs; Russell C. Tornabene, Manager, NBC News Operations; 
and Arthur Wakelee, Weekend Manager, NBC News. 

NBC-New York, 11/27/63 



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NBC TRADE NEWS 


November 27, 1963 

RONALD S. FRIEDWALD IS NAMED MANAGER, RATINGS, NBC 

Ronald S. Friedwald has been named Manager, Ratings, for the 
National Broadcasting Company, it was announced today by Paul L. 

Klein, Manager, Audience Measurement, 

Mr. Friedwald joined the network this month after 13 years 
with three advertising agencies in New York City, After service in the 
Army during World War II, Mr, Friedwald completed studies toward a 
degree from New York University in 1950. 

He then joined Grey Advertising Inc., later working for the 
Emil Mogul Company, then Doyle Dane Bernbach, and most recently, Mogul, 
Williams & Saylor Inc., where he was media director. This last agency 
was formed from the Emil Mogul Company. 

Mr. Friedwald and his wife, the former Mary Etta Nelson of 
Bon Secour, Ala., live at Croton-on-Hudson, N. Y. They have a son, 
Ronald, 9. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



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NBC FEATURE 


November 27, 1963 

AN NBC PAGE HONORS MEMORY OF PRESIDENT KENNEDY 


Chris Wallace, a page at NBC in New York was so moved by 
the television scenes of Americans passing by the draped casket of 
President Kennedy, that he wrote a personal tribute which was read on 
NBC-TV by Bill Ryan. 

This was Wallace’s tribute: 

A MAN PASSED OUR WAY 


A man, with twinkling eye, tousled hair and 
ready smile, passed our way. 

A man, with faith and compassion, and whose only 
hatred was directed toward injustice, passed our way. 

A man, with learning, memory and foresight, 
passed our way. 

A man, with appropriate words and ideas at 
appropriate times, passed our way. 

A man, with goodness and vision and friends 
and cheerfulness and love, passed our way. 

And as he passed, he touched us all -- 

And as he touched us all, he took a part of us 
with him] a vital part. 

And as he took this part of us, he left a part of 
himself; it, too, was a vital part. 

A man, with courage, who took our heart, 
passed our way. 

As he is sustained in our heart. 

So are we sustained in his courage. 

Wallace, is a native of Delaware, Ohio, and a graduate of 
Ohio Weslyan University. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



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November 29, 1963 


'RETURN TO OZ, ’ ORIGINAL ANIMATED MUSICAL FANTASY 
(BASED ON BAUM 'OZ' CLASSIC), WILL BE NBC-TV 

COLOR SPECIAL. SPONSORED BY GENERAL ELECTRIC 


“Return to Oz," an animated musical fantasy featuring nine 
new songs, will be a full-hour color special presented by General 
Electric on NBC-TV Sunday, Feb. 9 (5-6 p.m. EST). 

The filmed program will pre-empt two half-hour color series 
— "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" (5-5:30 p.m. EST) and "G-E College 
Bowl" (5:30-6 p.m. EST). 

The original script of "Return to Oz" was written by 
Romeo Muller, based on L. Frank Baum's classic story, "The Wonderful 
Wizard of Oz." Original lyrics and music were composed by James Polack, 
Edward Thomas and Gene Forrell. 

The story concerns the adventures of Dorothy who receives a 
letter in Kansas supposedly from her friends — Socrates the Strawman, 
Dandy Lion and Rusty the Tinman — imploring her to visit them. 

Donning her magic slippers, she is whisked to Munchkinville, where 
Glinda the Good Witch reveals the letter was actually written by 
Dorothy's nemesis. The Wicked Witch of the West. Dorothy sets out 
for the Emerald City to appeal to the Wizard for help, with Dandy, 
•Socrates and Rusty joining her along the way. But the Wicked Witch, 
using her evil arts, places many dangerous pitfalls in their path* 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











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2 - Return to Oz 


The enchanting fantasy is interlaced with these songs: 

"I Wanna Go Back" and "Moonbeam" sung by Dorothy; "Everywhere in Oz" 
sung by the choir; "We’re Munchkins, Naturally" sung by Dorothy and 
the Munchkins; "He’s a Dan, Dan, Dandy Lion" sung by Dandy; "I'm 
Heartless Through and Through" sung by Rusty; "You Can't Buy a Brain" 
sung by Socrates; "I'm a. Wise Old Whiz of Wizard" sung by the Wizard; 
and "The Wickedest, Wicked Old Witch" sung by the Wicked Witch of the 
West. 

Voices for the animated characters will be supplied by 
Susan Conway, Susan Morse, Larry Mann, Carl Banas, Alfie Scopp and 
Pegi Loder. 

"Return to Oz" will be produced by Videocraft International 
in New York City with Arthur Rankin Jr. as producer and Jules Bass 
as co-producer. 

t-PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT -- FEB. 9---- 

i 

I RETURN TO OZ: Original animated musical fantasy-- 
(based on L. Frank Baum’s "The Wonderful Wizard 
of Oz"), featuring nine new songs, tells of 
Dorothy's return to Munchkinville and her 
adventures with Dandy Lion, Socrates the Straw- 
man and Rusty the Tinman. (Color.) 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 11/29/63 









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NBC FEATURE 


NBC NEWS NOTES ON COVERAGE OF THE PRESIDENT KENNEDY 
ASSASSINATION STORY AND SUBSEQUENT EVENTS 

Perhaps the first television program Lyndon Johnson saw 
as the President of the United States was an NBC panel discussion 
of the institution of the Presidency and the personality of President 
Johnson. 

Martin Agronsky reports that columnist William S. White, 
one of the panelists, had dinner with President Johnson after 
taping the program Sunday night and they watched the program to¬ 
gether. Other panelists were Senator Eugene J. McCarthy (D.-Minn.) 
and Sidney Hyman, historian. 

* * * 

Robert MacNeil accompanied President Kennedy on his 
Texas trip. When the President was shot, MacNeil sped from the press 
bus, leaving his typewriter, briefcase and overcoat. His luggage was 
on the press plane. On Wednesday, MacNeil was still in Dallas minus 
all his belongings. 

* * * 

For filming President Kennedy’s cortege and the ceremony 
in Arlington Cemetery, NBC had to bring into Washington 20 special 
lenses for distance shots. NBC Washington ordinarily has one such 
lens. The critical camera photographing Richard Cardinal Cushing 
delivering the service at Arlington was 250 feet away from him, so 
as not to intrude on the dignity of the service. A special, 80- 

inch telephoto lens was flown from Japan for this task. 

* * * 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









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2 - NBC News Notes 


NBC correspondent Nancy Dickerson, was the first reporter 
to have the story on the first three letters written by President 
Johnson -- to JFK Jr., Caroline Kennedy and to the Secret Service 
commending officer Rufus Youngblood who threw himself over the then 
Vice President to protect him from the shooting. 

* * * 

Elie Abel, NBC State Department correspondent, had just 
returned from Honolulu where he covered Dean Rusk’s talks on Viet 
Nam. He had had little or no sleep during the period of the 
conference and had been in bed for exactly one hour when his wife 
woke him with news of the assassination. Abel reported to work at 
NBC immediately and followed and reported developments deep 
into the night. 

Herbert Kaplow had just returned from Caracus, Venezuela, 
to be honored by his Alma Mater, Queens College, N. Y. On landing 
he immediately reported to work. 

* * * 

Twelve mobile units were called to Washington from 
points as distant as Philadelphia, Pa., and Norfolk, Va. 


NBC-New York, 11/29/63 



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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


November 29, 1963 


Attention 1 Sports Editors 

ORANGE COAST COLLEGE AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA A & M i 
ARE CHOSEN TO PLAY IN JUNIOR ROSS BOWL GAME 

NBC-TV Network to Carry Dec. l4 Contest 
i 

Orange Coast College of Costa Mesa, Calif., and Northeastern 
Oklahoma A & M of Miami, Okla., have been selected to play in the 
lSth annual Junior Rose Bowl Game in Pasadena, Calif., Saturday, 

Dec. 14 . The game will be televised national^ by the NBC-TV Network 
starting at 4 p.m. EST. 

The selection was announced by the Junior Rose Bowl 1 s Board 
of Management, consisting of six junior college administrators from 
the California State Athletic Commission and five members of the 
sponsoring Pasadena Junior Chamber of Commerce. 

Both Orange Coast and Northeastern Oklahoma have completed 
nine-game schedules with undefeated and untied records. Both also 
have won 17 and lost one during the past two regular seasons. 

This will be Orange Coast College’s first trip to the Junior 
Rose Bowl Game, and Northeastern’s third appearance. They will be 
competing for the National Junior College Football Championship. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


























































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2 - Junior Rose Bowl Game 


Coach Diclc Tucker, in his second season at Orange Coast, 
directed the Pirates to their conference championship. This Fall 
his team scored 309 points to 43 for opponents. 

Coach Red Robertson, completing his 19th season at 
Northeastern, saw his Golden Norsemen win the Oklahoma State JC 
crown and also defeat the No. One teams of five states -- Oklahoma, 
Colorado, Texas, Michigan and Kansas. The Norsemen scored 291 points 
to 72 for their opponents. 

t- -PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT --DEC. l4 ---, 

18TH ANNUAL JUNIOR ROSE BOWL GAME -- Orange Coast 
College of California and Northeastern Oklahoma 
A 8c M clash for National Junior College Football 

Championship in Pasadena, Calif., bowl contest. 

1_ : _i 


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