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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

2-x-h NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 1, 1964 

4 ADVERTISERS BUY INTO 9 PRIME-TIME NBC-TV SHOWS 

Four advertisers have purchased sponsorship in nine NBC-TV 
prime-time programs, it was announced today by Don Durgin, Vice 
President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The sponsors (and their agencies) are National Biscuit Co. 
(McCann-Erickson Inc.), American Home Products Corp. (Grey Advertising), 
Plymouth Division of the Chrysler Corporation (N. W. Ayer & Son Inc.), 
Humble Oil & Refining Co. (McCann-Erickson Inc.). 

The National Biscuit Co. will advertise on the NBC News 
special "The Battle of the Bulge," Dec. 15 and "The Virginian" color 
series. American Home Products will advertise on "Mr. Novak," "The 
Virginian," "Daniel Boone," "International Showtime" and "Saturday Night 
at the Movies." Plymouth has bought into "NBC Sports in Action" 
(premiering Jan. 17), "The Virginian," "Saturday Night at the Movies" 
and "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour." Humble Oil will advertise on "Wednesday 
Night at the Movies," "The Virginian," "Saturday Night at the Movies" and 
"NBC Sports in Action." 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 





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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 1, 1964 

NBC NEWS 1 NANCY DICKERSON TO BE HONORED BY WOMEN’S 
DIVISION OF ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE 

NBC News correspondent Nancy Dickerson will be honored for 
her news achievements by the Women's Division of the Albert Einstein 
College of Medicine, New York City. She was a unanimous choice of the 
awards selection committee. 

The award is made "to women who made an outstanding contribu¬ 
tion to arts, sciences and the professions." Past winners included 
Eleanor Roosevelt, Pearl Buck, Dr. Margaret Mead, Leontyne Price and 
Helen Hayes, 

Presentation of the award to Mrs. Dickerson will take place 
at a Spirit of Achievement Luncheon, marking the 11th anniversary of 
the Albert Einstein College, at the Grand Ballroom of the Waldorf- 
Astoria in New York on April 13. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 













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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 1, 1964 

JULIAN GOODMAN TO JOIN PANEL DISCUSSION ON ELECTION COVERAGE 

Julian Goodman, Vice President, NBC News, will take part in 
a panel discussion on news coverage of the 1964 election at the 55th 
anniversary convention of Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic 
society, Thursday, Dec. 3* at the Hotel Muehlebach in Kansas City, Mo. 

ELIE ABEL TO COVER NATO COUNCIL SESSION IN PARIS 

Elie Abel, NBC News Diplomatic Correspondent, will go to 
Paris to cover the meeting of the NATO Council Dec. 15, 16 and 17. 

Abel will leave Washington, D. C., for Paris on Dec. 11. 
Secretary of State Dean Rusk, Secretary of Defense Robert S. McNamara 
and Secretary of the Treasury Douglas Dillon are among the high 
American officials expected to attend the NATO meeting. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 
















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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 1, 1964 

NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENT C-ECRGE CLAY BURIED 
IN JUNGLE CEMETERY NEAR STANLEYVILLE 

NBC News correspondent George Clay, who was killed last week 
while marching with Congolese government troops toward Stanleyville, 
was buried Sunday (Nov. 29) in a simple military ceremony in a small 
neglected cemetery near Stanleyville that is rapidly reverting to its 
original jungle growth. 

Clay's body, and that of a South African mercenary who also had 
been killed in the ambush, was left in an abandoned truck by the 
advancing column. A helicopter finally was sent Nov. 29, with two air¬ 
planes for cover against rebel sniper fire, to retrieve the bodies. 

Because a coffin was unavailable. Clay's body was wrapped in a 
sheet that had his name written on it with a ballpoint pen. Attending 
the burial ceremonies were a Belgian priest. Major Michael Hoare, who 
commands the mercenary troops, and a platoon of Congolese paracommandos. 

Clay was performing his journalistic duties as usual, this 
time recording sound of the battle, when he was killed. But according 
to a friend, British Broadcasting Corporation reporter Peter Flynn, Clay 
had become disheartened by the Congolese war. 

On the NBC Radio "Monitor" program Nov. 29, Flynn related a 
conversation he had with Clay earlier this year: '"...I've come to the 
end now,' Clay said. 'For a long time I could keep going because of the 
marvelous television it was producing. But a little while ago, on a 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 



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2 - George Clay 


lovely calm night, by Lake Kivu, it was so peaceful, and I suddenly 
felt sick to the heart by the whole thing, by the blood and the 
stupidity, and by me, making a living by putting it down on tape and 
film to divert the wife of the Kansas City milkman for a few minutes’." 

It was, said Flynn on the program, "a moment of wretchedness 
that all foreign correspondents go through occasionally. We know we 
have reported the news thoroughly, but we despair of making people feel 
and understand the story beneath, of which the news is only the visible 
part of the iceberg. Yet with all this delicate insight, George was 
also a lusty buccaneer. A gleam would come into his eyes at the 
prospect of bashing off into the bush. He was never foolhardy, but 
always determined to see the story for himself. He was a good reporter. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/1/64 




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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 1, 1964 

CREDITS FOR 'RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER' 

! 

COLOR SPECIAL ON NBC-TV NETWORK 


Program: 


Time: 


Format: 


Stars: 
Cast: 


Producer: 

Director: 

Co-Producer: 

Music and Lyrics: 
Written by 

Orchestrations: 


"G-E Fantasy Hour" presentation of "Rudolph the Red- 
Nosed Reindeer" 

NBC-TV color special Sunday, Dec. 6 (5:30 to 
6:30 p.m. EST). 

A fully animated color-filmed musical Christmas 

fantasy enacted by puppets "brought alive" 
by "Animagic" (dimensional animation). 

Burl Ives as Sam the Snowman. 

Larry Mann as Yukon Cornelius, Billie Richards as 

Rudolph, and Alfie Scopp, Stan Francis, Paul 
Soles, Janet Orenstein, Paul Kligman, 

Corinne Connely and Peg Dixon. 

Arthur Rankin Jr. 

Larry Roemer 

Jules Bass 

Johnny Marks 

Romeo Mueller from a story by Robert L. May and the 
song by Johnny Marks. 

Maury Laws 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 























































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2 - Credits for Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer * 


Featured songs: 


Produced by 

Sponsor 
(and agency): 

Preempts: 

NBC Press 
Representative: 


1 Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (sung by Burl Ives 
as the Snowman) and seven new Christmas 
songs composed by Johnny Marks: "Holly Jolly 
Christmas" (Ives and chorus), "Silver and 
Gold" (Ives), "We Are Santa’s Elves" (chorus), 
"We’re a Couple of Misfits" (by Soles as 
Hermy and Richards as Rudolph), "Jingle 
Jingle Jingle" (by Francis as Santa Claus), 
"There’s Always Tomorrow" (by Miss Orenstein 
as Rudolph’s girl-friend, Clarice), and "The 
Most Wonderful Day of the Year" (chorus). 

Videocraft International. 

Housewares Division, General Electric Company 
(Maxon Inc.) 

"G-E College Bowl" (5:30-6 p.m. EST) and "Meet the 
Press" (6-6:30 p.m. EST) color programs. 

A1 Cammann (New York). 




NBC-New York, 12/1/64 



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A DEPARTMENT OF NBC NEWS 


December 1, 1964 


CREDITS FOR 


r NBC SPORTS IN ACTION’ m NBC-TV 


Host-Commentator: 
Format: 


Time: 


Producer: 


Jim Simpson 

Full-hour weekly series running the gamut 
of activity in the sports world, with 
emphasis on the individual athletes in 
the drama of competition. Programs, 
a majority in color, will focus on 
championship contests and, at intervals, 
present character studies of outstand¬ 
ing sports figures. 

Sunday, 4-5 p.m. EST, beginning Jan. 17, 
1965. 

Stuart Schulberg 


Field producer: 

Associate producer: 
Writer-reporter: 

Research associate: 
Production assistant: 

Film director: 

Unit managers: 

NBC Press representatives: 


Barney Nagler 

Richard Auerbach 

John Travieso 

Richard Barnett 

Barbara Ann Wendler 

Ray Marsh 

Carl Robinson 
Douglas P. Sinsel 
Jim Schaeffer 

Bob Curran and Bert Burns, New York. 


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PRESS DEPARTMENT. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 
























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JACK TRACY 

R00f4 3 20 

2-X-H NBC TRADE NEWS 

December 2, 1964 

NBC RADIO NETWORK SIX-YEAR PEAK IN 
FOURTH-QUARTER SALES ANNOUNCED 
BY WILLIAM K. MeDANIEL 

"A six-year peak in fourth-quarter sales has been reached 
by the NBC Radio Network," William K. McDaniel, Executive Vice 
President in charge of the NBC Radio Network, announced today. "Busi¬ 
ness already on the books for the fourth quarter of 1964 is 24 per cent 
higher than that recorded for the entire fourth quarter of 1963 ." 

"And the forthcoming year looks like a record-breaker. Sales 
for the first quarter of 1965 are l6 per cent higher than last year 
at this time," Mr. McDaniel reported. 

"Of particular interest," he said, "is the sales success of 
our weekend service, 'Monitor.' Increasingly, advertisers are looking 
upon 'Monitor' as a year-'round advertising vehicle. Every 'Monitor' 
quarter in 1964 exceeds sales in the corresponding quarter of 1963," 
he continued. "'Monitor' sales to date are 22 per cent higher than 
sales for all of 1963, and 'Monitor's' yearly total will be the highest 
sales in its 10-year history." 

A total of $5,400,000 in new and renewal business was signed 
by the network between Oct. 2 and Nov. 25 . 

The new business clients (and their agencies) are: Schick 
(Compton Advertising); Whitman Candy (Gardner Advertising); Pennsylvania 
Grade Crude Oil (Meldrum & Fewsmith); General Mills Inc. (Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample); Shulton (Wesley Associates); Chrysler Corp. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 




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2 - NBC Radio Sales 


(Young & Rubicam); Retail Clerks International Assn. (Robert M. Gamble 
Jr.); Bordon Co. - Aunt Jane’s Pickles (Zimmer, Keller, Calvert); 
Rexall Drug (BBDO); Florist’s Telegraph Delivery Assn. (Campbell- 
Ewald). 

The renewal business clients and their agencies are: 
Christian Reformed Church (Griswold-Eshleman); Wm. Wrigley, Jr. 

(Arthur Meyerhoff); Mennen (Warwick & Legler); Sun Oil Company 
(William Esty Company); American Motors (Geyer Morey Ballard); and 
Standard Brands (J. Walter Thompson). 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/2/64 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 2, 1964 

NBC NEWS APPOINTS ARTHUR H. WAKELEE 
MANAGER, OWNED STATION NEWS 

Arthur H. Wakelee has been appointed Manager, 

Owned Station News, it was announced today by Julian 
Goodman, Vice President, NBC News. He will report to Rex 
R. Goad, Director of News. 

For the past nine months, Mr. Wakelee has been 
Manager of News, West Coast, on a temporary basis. Before 
that, he was Weekend Manager, News, in NBC News' headquarters 
in New York. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 















































NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING'S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 2, 1964 

NBC NEWS ASSIGNMENTS ANNOUNCED FOR TV COVERAGE 
0.F PRESIDENT JOHNSON’S INAUGURATION JAN. 20; 

HUNTLEY AND BRINKLEY WILL BE ANCHOR MEN 

Chet Huntley and David Brinkley will be the anchor men when 
NBC News telecasts the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson from 
Washington on Wednesday, Jan. 20. it was announced today by Chet 
Hagan, producer of the Inauguration coverage. 

NBC News' famous team of correspondents will be stationed at 
the Capitol during the swearing in ceremonies and at Lafayette Park 
during the Presidential review of the Inaugural parade. 

It was also announced that the entire Presidential review of 
the parade will be telecast in color by NBC News, covering a period of 
between two-and-a-half and three hours. Since the review will take 
place after the President takes the oath of office, this will probably 
be in mid-afternoon. 

Other NBC News correspondents and their positions at the 
Inauguration follow: Frank McGee, at Lafayette Park; John Chancellor,at 
the White House; Edwin Newman, at the Treasury Building, on the parade 
route; Ray Scherer, at the Capitol; and Nancy Dickerson and Robert 
Goralski, roving, special assignments. 

Sponsor for this NBC News TV coverage, as announced, is 
Eastern Air Lines Inc. The agency is Young & Rubicam Inc. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 3D ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 






































































NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING'S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 2, 1964 

HOW NBC NEWS OFFERED COMPREHENSIVE TV COVERAGE OF 
BAKER HEARINGS OF THE SENATE RULES COMMITTEE 

NBC was the only television network to present complete live 
coverage of Robert G. Baker’s appearance before the Senate Rules 
Committee this morning (Dec. 2) and was the only network on the air 
with comprehensive live television coverage of committee’s session 
yesterday (Dec. l). 

This morning’s television coverage originated inside the 
hearing room while Baker’s defense counsel* Edward Bennett Williams* 
requested TV coverage be ended before Baker testified. When the 
committee granted the request* NBC-TV cameras focused on the door 
to the Caucus Room while audio coverage of the hearings continued. 

During Baker’s previous appearance before the committee on 
Feb. 25* NBC-TV cameras also focused on the Caucus Room door when TV 
cameras were banned from the room. 

Today's coverage began at 11:24 a.m. and continued until 
12:30 p.m.* at which time the hearing was adjourned until 2 p.m. (all 
times EST). NBC News correspondent Ray Scherer reported from the scene. 

NBC News’ live coverage on Dec. 1 ran almost four hours, 
starting at 2:37 p.m., when the hearings opened in the Senate Caucus 
Room* and continued until 6:28 p.m. 

(more.) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 









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2 - Baker Hearings 


The hearing yesterday was a resumption of an investigation 
begun more than a year ago into the business affairs of Mr. Baker, 
former secretary of the Senate’s Democratic majority. Don B. 
Reynolds, the Maryland insurance man, was the only witness at the 
opening session, which was marked by partisan dispute among committee 
members. 

NBC News will schedule further TV coverage of the hearings 
as developments warrant. 

NBC-New York, 12/2/64 



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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

2-x-h NBC TRADE NEWS 

December 3, 1964 

ROSTER IN TV-Q REPORT SHOWS MANUFACTURERS OF ADULT 

AS WELL AS CHILDREN’S PRODUCTS ARE AMONG LICENSEES 
FOR "FESS PARKER AS DANIEL BOONE" MERCHANDISE 

NBC-TV’s "Daniel Boone" show has added manufacturers of 
other than children’s goods to the roster of Boone licensees largely on 
the results of recent TV-Q, reports, it was announced today by Norman 
Lunenfeld, Manager, Merchandising, Domestic Enterprises, a division of 
NBC Enterprises. 

TV-Q, an independent research organization, reports the 
"Daniel Boone" show is very popular with not only the 6-11 age bracket 
but also with the 12-17 and 18-34 age groups, and the 18-34 group 
contains many of the young married consumers who are responsible for 
much of the nation's buying, Mr. Lunenfeld said. TV-Q measures 
popularity of TV programs. 

Thus, one licensee, Harold Ridenour of Santa Barbara, 

Calif., who specializes in selling end labels to bakers on a cross¬ 
country basis, is able to use the "Fess Parker as Daniel Boone" image 
to appeal to adults. Baking is a regional business because of the 
necessity of local servicing, but the bakery end labels will reach all 
localities, according to Mr. Lunenfeld. A total of 25,000,000 labels is 
in the process of being printed. 

There has been an over-all show of enthusiasm from 
manufacturers in many fields for licenses tied in with Fess Parker as 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 







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’Fess Parker as Daniel Boone’ Merchandise 


Daniel Boone. The products range from canteens and games to iron-on 
labels and pup tents. 

NBC Merchandising has already signed 50 licensees to produce 
"Fess Parker as Daniel Boone" merchandise. An additional 50 or more 
will be brought in by M. Lowenstein and Sons Inc,,, a firm which supplies 
piece goods to the boys’ wear trade. Lowenstein is exclusively 
licensed to make a number of "Fess Parker as Daniel Boone" fabrics and 
will, in turn, make agreements, on a non-exclusive basis, with makers 
of boys’ pajamas, shirts, underwear, and other articles. The 
merchandise is expected to be on retail counters by February, according 
to Mr. Lunenfeld. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/3/64 




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CORRECTION, PLEASE 

In the NBC Daily News Report story 
of Dec. 1 titled "4 Advertisers Buy Into 9 
Prime-Time NBC-TV Shows," the correct advertiser 
on the NBC News actuality special "The Battle 
of the Bulge" Dec. 15 should read American Home 
Products , and not The National Biscuit Co. 


NBC-New York, 12/3/64 







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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



BRIAN EPSTEIN, BRITISH POP MUSIC IMPRESARIO WHO DISCOVERED THE BEATLES, 
TO HAVE WEEKLY SEGMENT ON NBC-TV'S NEW "HULLABALOO" VARIETY HOUR 

British popular music impresario Brian Epstein, discoverer 
of the Beatles and numerous other top-selling vocal groups, will 
present a weekly segment of NBC-TV's new one-hour variety show 
"Hullabaloo," when it makes its debut on the network in January. 

Epstein, for the first time, will appear before the cameras 
introducing various English popular singers, whose performances will 
be taped in London for inclusion in "Hullabaloo." Among the solo 
artists and groups who will appear under Epstein's aegis are Marianne 
Faithful, Jerry and the Pacemakers, Bennett and the Rebel Rousers, 
and Freddie and the Dreamers. The youthful artists' manager, 
considered one of the most important figures on the British entertain¬ 
ment scene today, is credited with being responsible for "the 
English sound," one of the major trends in popular music. 

"Hullabaloo," created and packaged by General Artists 
Corporation, will encompass all facets of the entertainment world 
of interest to young people, with the accent on young performers. 

There will be a guest host each week. The program, other than the 
three-minute and four-minute segments introduced by Epstein, will 
originate in New York at NBC-TV's Peacock Studio in color. 

To be produced by Gary Smith, "Hullabaloo" will be written 
by Frank Peppiatt and John Aylesworth 

-o- NBC-New York, 12/3/64 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


December 3 * 1964 

MIRTH AND MUSIC COME TO FORE WHEN JONATHAN WINTERS WELCOMES 
EILEEN FARRELL* PETER NERO* LOUIS NYE TO DEC. 14 COLORCAST 

Jonathan Winters will extend a warm welcome to Metropolitan 
Opera star Eileen Farrell, pianist Peter Nero and comedian Louis Nye 
who will guest on his one-a-month comedy special* "The Jonathan Winters 
Show*" to be colorcast on NBC-TV Monday, Dec. 14 (9-10 p.m. EST). 

For the second of the six full-hour specials of the season* 
Winters will again portray a "Man Under Pressure" -- this time as a 
company president forced to appear before a board of irate stockholders 
questioning his past management of the firm. He also will be challenged 
by "The Many Things You Can Do With--" category in which he will be 
handed an ordinary prop and asked to demonstrate various uses of it. 
Winters’ hep and irascible Grandma Maude Frickert character will appear 
to peddle Christmas cards which were painted by her. 

Miss Farrell will display her vocal artistry with "Blues in 
the Night" and "Deck the Halls." A new singing team will make its TV 
debut when the soprano star and Winters combine for a duet of "Ebbtide." 

Nero and his trio will do a jazz arrangement of "Get Me to the 
Church on Time" from "My Fair Lady." The 29-year-old pianist also will 
employ his distinctive style in his solo of "Over the Rainbow" with 
full orchestra accompaniment. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 





























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2 


’The Jonathan Winters Show’ 


Nye will portray a prosecuting attorney at a murder trial 
interrogating six witnesses — all played by Winters, including some 
of his more familiar voices and characterizations, such as Elwood P. 
Suggins. In another routine, Nye will depict a Madison Avenue- 
oriented Santa Claus. 

"The Jonathan Winters Show" will be produced by Perry Cross 
and directed by Gordon Rigsby. George Spota is executive producer for 
Wintergood Productions. 

- NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. l4- 

THE JONATHAN WINTERS SHOW: Metropolitan Opera 
soprano Eileen Farrell, pianist Peter Nero and 
comedian Louis Nye are guests in the second 
Winters special of the season. (Color.) 


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NBC-New York, 12/3/64 















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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


December 3, 1964 

ILLNESS FORCES DEAN JAGGER TO QUIT ROLE 
IN NBC-TV'S 'MR. NOVAK' SERIES 

Veteran actor Dean Jagger has been forced, 
by illness to quit his starring role as high school 
principal Albert Vane in the Tuesday night NBC-TV series, 
"Mr. Novak." 

Recurrence of an ulcer condition that first 
flared up last season compelled Jagger, on advice of 
his physicians, to leave the series, in which he co- 
stars with James Franciscus, who plays the title role. 
Jagger has been ordered to take a complete rest. 

The actor's departure will not be apparent 
to viewers for some five or six weeks due to advance 
filming at MGM Studios where the series is produced. 
Efforts will begin immediately, a studio spokesman said, 
to find a replacement. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 



















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DAN BLOCKER (HOSS CARTWRIGHT OF "BONANZA") WILL ATTEND 
PRESIDENT JOHNSON’S DINNER FOR BRITISH PRIME MINISTER 

Dan Blocker (Hoss Cartwright of NBC-TV’s 
"Bonanza" color series) will have dinner with a 
President and a Prime Minister Monday night (Dec. 7)-- 
and it won’t be in front of a camera on a Hollywood 
sound stage either. 

Blocker said* "The proudest moment in my life 
came when I opened that telegram and saw that it was an 
invitation from President Lyndon B. Johnson asking me to 
join him at a White House dinner in honor of England’s 
visiting Prime Minister Harold Wilson." 

Blocker and his wife Dolphia will leave Los 
Angeles Saturday for the state dinner Monday. 

The 290-pound actor is a native-born Texan and 
was an active campaigner in the recent elections. 


NBC-New York, 12/3/64 













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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING'S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 3, 1964 


ROBERT NORTHSHIELD TO VISIT AFRICA FOR STUDY OF NBC NEWS COVERAGE 

Robert Northshield, General Manager of NBC News, will spend 
two weeks in Africa studying the continent’s news-making areas with 
a view to future coverage. He will leave for Africa Dec. 5 and visit 
the Congo, Kenya and the Union of South Africa. 

Mr. Northshield’s trip will include a visit to the grave 
of NBC News correspondent George Clay, who was killed Nov. 24 when 
he was shot down in ambush near Stanleyville in the Congo. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 



























JOHNNY CARSON TO BE GUEST SPEAKER AT AWARDS BANQUET 

OF NATIONAL FOOTBALL FOUNDATION AND HALL OF FAME 

Johnny Carson, of NBC-TV’s late-night comedy and music 
program, "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" (Monday through 
Friday, 11:15 p.m. to 1 a.m. EST, in color), will be the guest 
speaker Tuesday, Dec. 8 at the National Football Foundation and Hall 
of Fame 7th annual awards banquet at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in 
New York. 

Carson is a staunch grid fan (and a devoted follower of 
professional football), and attends all New York home games. 

-o- 

BIG YEAR FOR LORNE GREENE 

This is a big year for Lome Greene. First, the Nielsen 
reports show his NBC-TV color series "Bonanza" still riding the 
Number One spot. Now RCA Victor has advised him his record "Ringo" 
has sold more than 500,000 copies. 


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ROOM 320 

2-x-h NBC TRADE NEWS 

nbc-tv reports daytime sales exceeding 

$4,500,000 FOR SECOND CONSECUTIVE WEEK 

For the second consecutive week. Daytime sales totaling more 
than $4,500,000 have been recorded by NBC-TV, it was announced today by 
James G. Hergen, Director of Daytime Sales, NBC Television Network. 

"During the week ending Nov. 27 — as in the previous week — 
our Dajrtime sales exceeded the $4,500,000 mark," Mr. Hergen said. "This 
continuing sales volume illustrates the advertisers’ confidence in the 
strength and flexibility of the NBC-TV Daytime schedule." 

Eleven advertisers purchased sponsorship in 12 Monday-through- 
Friday programs and in five Saturday morning shows. The programs are 
"You Don’t Say.'" "What’s This Song?" "Jeopardy," "Concentration," "Truth 
or Consequences," "NBC Morning Report--10:55 A.M, News," "Let’s Make a 
Deal," "Moment of Truth," "Say When," "The Match Game," "The Doctors, " 
"Make Room for Daddy," "Underdog," "Hector Heathcote," "Fury," "Fireball 
XL-5" and "Dennis the Menace." 

The advertisers and their agencies are Kimberly-Clark Corp. 
(Foote, Cone & Belding), Shulton Inc. (Wesley Associates Inc.), S. C. 
Johnson & Sons Co. (Needham, Louis & Brorby), The Dow Chemical Co. 
(MacManus, John & Adams Inc.), Bristol-Myers Co. (Doherty, Clifford, 
Steers & Shenfield Inc.), Abbott Laboratories (Tatham-Laird Inc.), Lehn 
& Fink Products Corp. (Geyer, Morey, Ballard Inc,), National Biscuit Co. 
(McCann-Erickson Inc.), Foster-Milburn Co. (Street & Finney Inc.), The 
Nestle Company Inc. (Leo Burnett Co. Inc.), and Mars Incorporated 
(Needham, Louis & Brorby). 

NBC-New York, 12/4/64 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 




























































NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


December 4, 1964 

- 'WALK BESIDE ME' - 

Full-Hour Color Program Filmed in Footsteps of Apostle Paul's 
Missionary Journeys Will Be Repeated 

"Walk Beside Me," the full-hour color program filmed in the 
footsteps of the missionary journeys of the Apostle Paul, will be 
repeated on the NBC-TV Network Saturday, Dec. 26 (2:30-3:30 p.m. EST). 

The program, first telecast May 31, 1964, was made on 
location in Jordan, Israel, Turkey, Greece and Italy by the Southern 
Baptist Convention in cooperation with the Television Religious 
Program unit of NBC News. 

Enthusiastic audience response to the first showing has 
prompted the repeat performance, according to Doris Ann, manager of 
NBC Television religious programs and executive producer of "Walk 
Beside Me." Warmly appreciative letters have come from educators and 
Bible scholars, ministers and priests, as well as from a cross-section 
of television viewers. 

Paul is portrayed in the program as a man of boundless 
vision and ceaseless action. "No figure in the drama of Christianity 
has played a greater role than Paul," says the narrator. "He brought 
the word of God to thousands --in synagogues, in shops, along the 
crowded streets, in airless prisons or before throngs gathered in a 
theatre open to the sun. Wherever he found people, Paul would preach. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 




























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2 


'Walk Beside Me' 


His voice is among the noblest that the world has heard. After 2,000 
years, his words still come to us with undiminished strength and shake 
us to the heart." 

Off-camera voices speak the words of Jesus, Paul, Luke, 
Barnabas and others as recorded in the Bible. Alexander Scourby is 
the narrator and Donald Davis is the voice of Paul. 

Martin Hoade was the producer-director. Dr. Paul M. Stevens, 
director of the Southern Baptist Convention's Radio and Television 
Commission, and Truett Myers, its television consultant, were 
coordinators of the production for that organization. 

Philip Scharper wrote the script, and Ralph Burns composed 
and conducted the original orchestral score. 

- NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 26 -— 

"WALK BESIDE ME" -- The story of the Apostle Paul, 
filmed in the footsteps of his missionary journeys 
in the Near East, Greece and Italy. Alexander 
Scourby is narrator. (Color. Repeat.) 


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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


December 4, 1964 

CHUCK CONNORS, STAR OF UPCOMING 'BRANDED' SERIES, 

TO AID COMMENTATORS AT PARADE OF ROSES COLORCAST 

Chuck Connors, star of "Branded," forthcoming Western series 
on NBC-TV, will join commentators Lome Greene and Betty White in 
describing Pasadena's 76 th annual Tournament of Roses Parade, which 
the network will colorcast live on Friday, Jan. 1 (11:30 a.m. to 
1:45 p.m. EST). 

Connors is the fourth NBC-TV star who will appear as an 
assistant commentator. The others, as previously announced, are 
Fess Parker and Pat Blair of the "Daniel Boone" series and Debbie 
Watson of "Karen." 

"Branded," a series about a West Point officer who, 
wrongfully drummed out of the Army, tries to clear his name, will 
premiere on Sunday, Jan. 24 (8:30 p.m. EST). 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY 1 , 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 














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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 4, 1964 

T RUTH : ROCHESTER, MINN., MAN WINS VIEWERS' "T OR C" CONTEST 
CONSEQUENCES : HE WINS PRIZES AND WILL ATTEND ROSE PARADE 

When Dawn Baker was named Queen of the 76 th annual Tourna¬ 
ment of Roses this week, her smile spread all the way from Pasadena, 
Calif., to Rochester, Minn,, where it lit up the face of Earl L. 

Kidd, a semi-retired real estate broker. 

Kidd had just won a contest held by NBC-TV's "Truth or 
Consequences" (Mondays through Fridays, 12:30 p.m. EST in color) 
giving viewers an opportunity to submit postcards containing their 
name and address. When only seven girls remained in the running for 
Rose Queen, they appeared on "Truth or Consequences" and each drew a 
card from the more than 300,000 received. 

On Dec. 2 the girls returned to the program and Queen Dawn 
and her court made their first national television appearance. Dawn 
revealed the name on her card -- Earl L. Kidd. 

Kidd's prizes include a $3,000 gift certificate, a new 
automobile, a round-trip ticket for two to Los Angeles plus a week's 
stay there, and two tickets to the Rose Parade and the Rose Bowl 
Game, both of which will be colorcast live by NBC-TV Friday, Jan. 1. 

Kidd will appear on the parade colorcast during the first 
15 minutes when he is introduced by "T or C" emcee Bob Barker. The 
parade telecast begins at 11:30 a.m. EST. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 
















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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 4, 1964 

NEW RECORDING OF "AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS," 

MENOTTI 1 S NBC-COMMISSIONED OPERA, IS RELEASED 

A new recording of "Amahl and the Night Visitors," Christmas 
opera by Gian Carlo Menotti which was commissioned by the National 
Broadcasting Company, has been released by RCA Victor Records. The 
recording sessions took place last season after the taping of the all- 
new production of the opera, which will be seen in color on NBC-TV 
Sunday. Dec. 20 (3-4 p.m. EST). 

The cast of the recording, the same as the TV production, 
includes Kurt Yaghjian as Amahl, Martha King as the mother, and John 
McCollum, Willis Patterson and Richard Cross as the Three Kings. 

Herbert Grossman is the conductor of both the telecast and the 
recording. 

The recording was made during the absence from this country 
of the composer-librettist. On his return he listened to the tapes, 
and was highly enthusiastic about the new performance. A recording 
of the original cast was issued by RCA Victor in 1951. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 




















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JACK TRACY 

R 00:4 320 

NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

THIRTY ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

2 - 

ROBERT W. SARNOFF CALLS FOR AN END TO ALL LAWS THAT RESTRICT 
TV IN COVERING POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS, CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES 
NBC Board Chairman Also Opposes Bar on Medium 
In Legislative and Judicial Proceedings 

FOR RELEASE 1:30 P.M. EST MONDAY, DEC. 7 

DETROIT, MICH., Dec. 7 -- Robert W. Sarnoff, Board Chairman 
of the National Broadcasting Company, called today for an end to all 
laws and rules that restrict television journalism in coverage of 
political campaigns, controversial issues and bar the medium from 
legislative and judicial proceedings. 

"Television is now a basic part of the American press," 

Mr. Sarnoff said in an address before The Economic Club of Detroit. 
"With its reach, immediacy and directness, it has unique capabilities 
for informing the public and engaging them in the affairs of their 
society. Yet it is in television's most essential area of information 
service that its capacities are seriously restrained -- in political 
coverage, in dealing with controversy, in reporting on the public 
business. 11 

"Restrictions on any part of the press threaten the principle 
underlying the vitality of all parts of the press," he added. "The 
public's stake in that principle should be supported and protected by 
all news media, not only to safeguard their own rights to freedom of 
speech and the press, but more importantly to protect the public's 
right to learn and to know." 

(more) 


l\J FORMAT Idl'd SERVICES, CORPORATE UNIT-ROOM SIB 



























































2 - Robert W. Sarnoff 


Pointing out that the result of limitations imposed on tele¬ 
vision's journalistic function "has been to bypass the historic right 
of the public to free and full access to information on all matters 
that affect it," the NBC Chairman made these specific proposals: 

!• Establishment of a public policy declaring that the 
institutions of government should be fully open to television coverage, 
limited only by defined requirements of security and due process. 

2 . As part of this policy, abandonment of "discriminatory 
rules" barring television from access to legislative proceedings; and 
formulation of "affirmative standards" to enable television coverage 
of trials and to guide law enforcement officials and counsel in 
divulging information about pre-trial proceedings. 

3. Repeal by Congress of the "equal-time" provision of 
the Communications Act. 

4. Action by Congress to make clear that the Federal 
Communications Commission is not mandated to review the journalistic 
judgment of broadcasters in covering controversial issues. 

Mr. Sarnoff emphasized that his proposals were not designed 
for the benefit of television, but "to protect the public's right to 
unfettered dissemination of views and information." 

"The public in turn," he said, "has a responsibility to take 
an active role to protect its own interest in television’s freedom to 
perform its journalistic function." 

Mr. Sarnoff noted that "the public’s stake in freedom of the 
press applies with particular forcefulness to television journalism." 

To illustrate its special capabilities, he cited its "massive influence, 

(more) 



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with survey results showing that more than half the nation gets most 
of its news from television; its "immediacy” in reporting the swiftly- 
moving events of the Cuban nuclear confrontation; its ability to 
give the public "direct participation in the life of the nation" 
through live, on-the-spot coverage of great national events; and its 
"power to unite the public in spirit and in purpose" as demonstrated 
by the four-day coverage of the developments following President 
Kennedy’s assassination. 

He pointed out that one argument generally offered to justify 
restrictions on television's news function is based on the theory 
that so influential a medium must be regulated to assure its responsi¬ 
bility. This, he said, fails to recognize that "danger does not lie in 
a free news medium but in a regulated one" and that "television's power 
as a communicator is a public asset to be developed, not a public danger 
to be restrained by laws and regulations." 

The second argument, resting on the precept that the "airwaves 
belong to the people," does not justify treating the government's 
licensing authority as "a license to the government to control or 
influence the function of a free press," he declared. "The assumption 
that in the field of journalism, the government can better judge what 
is in the public interest than the press or the public itself" is 
"directly contrary to the Constitutional guarantee that 'Congress shall 
make no law...abridging the freedom of the press'." 

The effect of the "equal-time" restriction, he said, has been 
to reduce presentation of candidates and discussion of campaign issues, 
and to place the Federal Communications Commission "in the unhappy 

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4 - Robert W. Sarnoff 


position of interpreting a statutory control over campaign coverage -- 
a control inconsistent with the aims of democracy." 

On the FCC's policy of reviewing fairness in broadcast 
coverage of controversial issues, Mr. Sarnoff stated: 

No one can argue against the desirability of fairness in 
covering controversial public issues; but one can properly argue 
against the advisability of having the members of a government agency 
and its staff review the judgments of professional newsmen, editors 
and news executives on what is fair news coverage. The danger here 
lies in having an arm of the government that holds the licensing power 
in a position to second-guess the broadcaster’s journalistic judgment 
in reporting on events and issues that at times involve the government 
itself." 

In urging that the doors to public proceedings be opened to 
television, Mr. Sarnoff said that "in this field, official attitudes 
and public policy have not kept pace with television’s emergence as 
a major communications force." 

"In considering television and other media, the goal should 
always be to expand to the maximum the information that can properly 
be made public, not reduce it to the minimum," he stated. 

Turning to coverage of court proceedings, Mr. Sarnoff 
acknowledged that in the reporting of arrest, pre-trial and trial 
proceedings, conflict may arise between the public's right to know 
and the right of the accused to a fair trial. He noted that the 
Warren Commission report had expressed the concern that unrestrained 
coverage of pre-trial activities can impede the judicial process. 

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"In terms both of principle and practicality," he observed, 
"the solution to such a problem does not lie in placing restraints 
on newsmen in reporting available information, but in establishing 
standards to guide officers of the court -- law enforcement officials 
and counsel -- in divulging information that does not prejudice 
judicial process. Similarly, affirmative standards can be established 
to enable television coverage of trials, with such safeguards as may 
be necessary to protect the rights of the accused. 

"In considering these standards and safeguards it should 
always be remembered that the absence of full public information 
about such proceedings can itself lead to infringement of an 
individual’s rights." 

NBC, 12/4/64 



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NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, IIMC. 

THIRTY ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

FOR RELEASE 1:30 P.M, EST, MONDAY, DEC. 7 

Following are excerpts from 

TELEVISION JOURNALISM: THE SHACKLED GIANT, 

an address by Robert W. Sarnoff, 

Chairman of the Board of NBC, 

delivered before The Economic Club of Detroit, 

Detroit, Michigan, December 7, 1964 

Television is now a basic part of the American press. With 
its reach, immediacy and directness it has unique capabilities for 
informing the public and engaging them in the affairs of their society. 
As a consequence, it, too, has taken on the classic responsibility of 
the press to serve as the public's watchdog in relation to the 

activities of politics and government. 

•» * * 

The principle of a free press was established as the 
cornerstone of our democratic society by a generation of men who still 
bore the scars of a tyrant's lash. Its purpose was to protect the 
public's right to unfettered dissemination of views and information so 

the public itself could forever determine the direction of that society. 

* * * 

The public's stake in freedom of the press applies with 
particular forcefulness to television journalism. Yet it is in tele¬ 
vision's most essential area of information service that its capacities 
are seriously restricted — in political coverage, in dealing with 
controversy, in reporting on public business. Paradoxically, these 
shackles -- which do not apply to any other medium -- have been forged 

by government itself in the name of the public interest. 

* * * 

(more) 


INFORMATION SERVICES, CORPORATE UNIT—ROOM STB 









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2 - Robert W. Sarnoff — Excerpts 


One (argument offered to justify restrictions on television 
journalism) is based on fear of television’s power and unique 
capabilities. A medium so influential, it is argued, should be 
regulated to assure its responsibility. This is precisely the theory 
used to argue for repression of the printed press when its force was 
first felt. We have come to recognize, however, that danger does not 
lie in a free news medium, but in a regulated one. A regulated press is 
vulnerable to official pressures, to timidity, to accommodation. A 
free medium of journalism is independent of these forces which can 
threaten its integrity. 

* * * 

In an open society, the greater the freedom of the press, the 
less the danger. And in such a society, television’s power as a 
communicator is a public asset to be developed, not a public danger to 
be restrained by laws and regulation. 

* * * 

The other argument for restriction rests on the circumstance 
that television uses a public resource, the frequency spectrum. 
Restrictions on television’s news function cannot be justified by 
invoking the precept that "the airwaves belong to the people." On the 
contrary, that precept demands that the people’s resource be used in 
their service to provide a free flow of information and ideas unfettered 
by government restraint. 

* * * 

The government’s licensing authority over television, 
designed to promote efficient use of broadcast frequencies in the 
public interest, is not a license to the government to control or 

influence the function of a free press. 

* * * 

(more) 



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The effect (of the "equal-time" restriction) has been to 
restrain broadcasters from presenting serious and major candidates who 
command the public interest, by requiring the same amount of air time 
to be devoted to candidates of splinter and frivolous parties in whom 
the public has little or no interest; and the by-product of this 
mechanistic rule has been less, rather than more, exposure of candidates 
and discussion of issues. 

* * * 

Despite broadcasting’s acknowledged record of responsibility 
and fairness in covering the i960 campaign. Congress this year declined 
to suspend the equal-time provision. As a consequence, a significant 
measure of control over journalistic presentation of the campaign was 
removed from the hands of the broadcast journalist; and a seven- 
member government agency, the FCC, was placed in the unhappy position 
of having to interpret and apply a statutory control over campaign 
coverage. 

# * * 

The most drastic... effect of the equal-time restriction was 
to inhibit the appearance of major candidates in many special programs 
that had been designed to give wide exposure to the principal contenders 
for office, their backgrounds and their views. We may speculate on 
the extent to which this restriction of television’s capacity to 
present the candidates speaking directly to the public contributed to a 
widely noted characteristic of the 1964 campaign -- its failure to 

develop a clear focus on the issues. 

* * * 

No one can argue against the desirability of fairness in 
reporting controversial public issues; but one can properly argue 
against the advisability of having the members of a government agency 

(more) 



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and its staff review the judgments of professional newsmen, editors and 
news executives on what is fa.ip news coverage. 

* * * 

Even though the Federal Communications Commission has 
sought to encourage journalistic enterprise and the coverage of 
controversy by broadcasters, its undertaking to review their perform¬ 
ance in this field weakens the very effort it seeks to encourage. The 
danger here lies in having an arm of the government that holds the 
licensing power in a position to second-guess the broadcaster’s 
journalistic judgment in reporting on events and issues that at times 
involve the government itself. 

* * * 

Originally it was contended, not without reason, that bulky 
broadcasting and lighting equipment would be an awkward intrusion upon 
serious proceedings. Technology can solve that problem. Now it is 
possible for television to report proceedings in legislative chambers, 
hearing rooms and courtrooms with cameras that are not only unobtrusive 
but out of sight. 

* * * 

The result of...restrictions upon television coverage of 
candidates, controversy and huge areas of the public business has been 
to bypass the historic right of the public to free and full access to 
information on all matters that affect it. To safeguard that 
fundamental right, certain specific steps can and should be taken. 
Insofar as they call for Congressional action, the time to act is in the 
coming year, away from the heat and contention of a political campaign, 
when the public policy issues involved can be considered with calm 
reflection. 

* * * 

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The Congress should revise Section 315 of the Communications 
Act to eliminate the equal-time requirement completely and permanently. 
This provision of the law has in fact served a purpose contrary to the 
one anticipated and it discriminates against the medium of information 
best equipped to inform the public on candidates and issues. 

* * * 

The Congress should make it clear that the FCC is not 
mandated to pass on how broadcasters cover public issues in 
controversy. Review by a federal agency of journalistic judgment 
and expression is contrary to the principle of a free press. 

* * * 

The doors to public proceedings should be opened to tele¬ 
vision whenever they are open to other elements of the press, so that 
television can use its special capacities to enable the people to 
witness the conduct of the people's business. This calls for abandon¬ 
ment of existing discriminatory rules barring television from federal, 
state and local legislative chambers and the hearing rooms of 
legislative committees. 

# * * 

What is needed is the establishment of an affirmative 
public policy declaring that the institutions of government should be 
fully open to television coverage, limited only by defined requirements 
of security and due process. In this field, official attitudes and 
policy development have not kept pace with television's emergence as 
a major communications force. In considering television and other 
media, the goal should always be to expand to the maximum the 
information that can properly be made public, not reduce it to the 
minimum. 

* * * 

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There is...one area of the public business — in arrest, 
pre-trial and trial proceedings — where conflicts may arise between 
the public's right to information and right of the accused to a fair 
trial. The Report of the Warren Commission, for example, has 
recently expressed concern that the unrestrained coverage of pre¬ 
trial activities impedes or corrupts the judicial process. In terms 
both of principle and practicality, the solution to such a problem does 
not lie in placing restraints on newsmen in reporting available 
information, but in establishing standards to guide officers of the 
court — law enforcement officials and counsel — in divulging informa¬ 
tion that does not prejudice judicial process. Similarly, affirmative 
standards can be established to enable television coverage of trials, 
with such safeguards as may be necessary to protect the rights of the 
accused. 

* * * 

Restrictions on any part of the press threaten the principle 
underlying the vitality of all parts of the press. The public's 
stake in that principle should be supported and protected by all news 
media, not only to safeguard their own rights to freedom of speech and 
the press, but more importantly to protect the public's right to learn 
and to know. 

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NBC, 12/4/64 




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Address by Robert W. Samoff 

Chairman of the Board 

National Broadcasting Company, Inc. 

At The Economic Club of Detroit 
Detroit, Michigan 
December 7, 1964 

FOR RELEASE 1:30 P.M, EST MONDAY, DEC. 7 

TELEVISION JOURNALISM: THE SHACKLED GIANT 

I am pleased and honored by the invitation to join you today. 
A visit to Detroit is a welcome opportunity for me to renew many 
pleasant professional and personal associations. And it is a privilege 
to address one of your distinguished and stimulating luncheon forums. 

That so many of you busy gentlemen regularly attend these 
meetings is eloquent testimony to their worth. It also testifies to 
the coexistence in this country of the marketplaces of commerce and 
of ideas. This relationship, which is uniquely characteristic of the 
democratic system, is not an accidental phenomenon. For, as history 
has so often shown, enterprise, thought, and creative expression 
thrive in the same climate -- one of freedom and openness. 

These truths apply with significant meaning and impact to 
television, which I want to discuss with you -- not only because it is 
for me a fascinating and favorite subject; but, more importantly, 
because of its vital role in the nation’s social, political, and 
economic complex. 

It was not long ago that some tried to discount the influence 
of television simply by refusing to own a set, or, owning one, by 
ignoring it. One can no more do that today than one can deny the 
social and economic impact of the automobile by declining to use it. 
For, like the automobile, television has run a rapid course from its 
origin as a private novelty to its emergence as a public necessity. 

(more) 





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Text 


At its beginning the primary mission of television, as of 
radio before it, was entertainment, and although it has developed 
far greater dimensions in the intervening years, its spectacular 
growth has been based on the quest of a nationwide audience for 
laughter and fiction and fantasy. 

Fifteen years ago there were 700,000 television homes. 

Today there are more than 52 million. Over the same period, advertisin 
expenditures in the medium have risen from less than $58 million to 
more than $2 billion. And now color has won a firm and growing beach¬ 
head, while America’s appetite for television continues to increase. 
Currently, the average family watches television more than five-and-a- 
half hours a day, in response to the program schedules that have been 
shaped by an aggregate of considerations. Foremost among these have 
been public popularity, the need for a broad base of commercial support 
and the continuous striving of broadcasters for innovation and 
diversity. 

And as an effective instrument for demonstration and sales, 
reaching millions of consumers in their homes every minute, television 
has revolutionized the speed and efficiency of our marketing and 
distribution system -- the core of an expanding economy rich in 
production capacity. 

The warm embrace of its audience and its advertisers has 
not altogether shielded television from the cold blasts of criticism. 
One need go no further than the television columns -- and sometimes 
the editorial columns -- of his daily newspaper to find a constant 
questioning of television's entertainment schedules and a cataloguing 
of its flaws and failings, some real and some imagined. This must be 

(more) 



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expected by a medium that undertakes to meet so many varied — and 
often conflicting tastes within our multiple society. It is often 
constructive criticism and it underscores the importance television has 
achieved in the lives of millions of Americans. 

Valid criticism can serve television, and, more important, 
its audience. It would be a great misfortune for both, however, if a 
debate that turns on the variables of taste in entertainment should 
obscure a most salient fact about television: that it has become the 
foremost medium of news and information for a public that must be 
informed if it is to survive as a free society. 

The massive influence of television journalism is demonstrated 
by survey results showing that more than half the nation gets most 
of its news from television. 

A single news program on NBC, for example -- "The Huntley- 
Brinkley Report" -- reaches more than 36 million people a week. 

In the Cuban nuclear confrontation two years ago, when the 
moves and countermoves of the United States and the Soviet Union 
followed each other with stunning swiftness, television's immediacy 
and constant availability in reporting these critical events placed 
them in prompt and comprehensible order. 

Its live, on-the-spot coverage of great public events -- 
addresses by national leaders, the national political conventions, the 
orbiting of a man in space -- gives our people a means of direct 
participation in the life of the nation no other medium can provide. 

And in four shattering days in November 1963, television 
demonstrated with great distinction its unmatched power to envelop an 
entire population in the details of national crisis and grief and, as 
a further dimension of its singular capacity, to unite the public in 
spirit and in purpose. 


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Television is now a basic part of the American press. With 
its reach, immediacy and directness it has unique capabilities for 
informing the public and engaging them in the affairs of their society. 
As a consequence, it, too, has taken on the classic responsibility 
of the press to serve as the public’s watchdog in relation to the 
activities of politics and government. 

The principle of a free press was established as the corner¬ 
stone of our democratic society by a generation of men who still bore 
the scars of a tyrant's lash. Its purpose was to protect the public's 
right to unfettered dissemination of views and information so the 
public itself could forever determine the direction of that society. 

Our founding fathers insisted that their institutions be 
fully visible, and this visibility so struck the visiting French 
aristocrat Alexis deTocqueville that he wrote in his historic treatise 
"Democracy in America": "The American learns to know the laws by 
participating in the act of legislation; and he takes a lesson in 
the forms of government from governing. The great work of society is 
going on before his eyes, and, as it were, under his hands." 

The American society has grown considerably more intricate 
since deTocqueville wrote those words. Few Americans can know their 
candidates for public office personally, and the town meeting has 
bowed to the voting machine. The operation and scope of federal 
government have removed much of the workings of his nation from the 
individual. The intimate relationship between our people and their 
institutions has been altered by the inexorable force of technological, 
social and political change. 


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The pace of change has had a profound effect, too. Events 
succeed events with overwhelming speed, and time for decision, action 
and reaction has been compressed into history's microseconds. 

In the fanciful world of mythology, the more difficult 
problems were solved by gods and giants. In our own time we have been 
aided by the fortuitous arrival of a communications giant -- television 
-- that cannot solve our problems for us but can assist an entire 
population in understanding them. 

For all these reasons, the public's stake in freedom of the 
press applies with particular forcefulness to television journalism. 

Yet it is in television's most essential area of information service 
that its capacities are seriously restricted -- in political coverage, 
in dealing with controversy, in reporting on the public business. 

Paradoxically, these shackles -- which do not apply to any 
other medium — have been forged by government itself in the name of 
the public interest. Two arguments are generally offered to justify 
them, and both are invalid. 

One is based on fear of television's power and unique 
capabilities. A medium so influential, it is argued, should be 
regulated to assure its responsibility. 

This is precisely the theory used to argue for repression of 
the printed press when its force was first felt. We have come to 
recognize, however, that danger does not lie in a free news medium, 
but in a regulated one. A regulated press is vulnerable to official 
pressures, to timidity, to accommodation. A free medium of journalism 
is independent of these forces which can threaten its integrity. In 
an open society, the greater the freedom of the press, the less the 

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danger. And in such a society, television’s power as a communicator 
is a public asset to be developed, not a public danger to be restrained, 
by laws and regulations. 

The other argument for restriction rests on the circumstance 
that television uses a public resource, the frequency spectrum; that 
it therefore has been licensed by the government to operate in the 
public interest; and that consequently the government should represent 
the people by judging what is in their interest. 

The fallacy here lies in the assumption that in the field 
of journalism the government can better judge what is in the public 
interest than the press or public itself -- an assumption directly 
contrary to the Constitutional guarantee that "Congress shall make no 
law...abridging the freedom of the press." 

The Supreme Court has ruled that broadcasting is included 
in the press whose freedom is guaranteed, and the Federal Communications 
Commission has explicitly acknowledged this. Additionally, the 
Communications Act expressly forbids the Commission from censoring 
radio and television broadcasts. 

Restrictions on television’s news function cannot be 
justified by invoking the precept that "the airwaves belong to the 
people." On the contrary, that precept demands that the people's 
resource be used in their service to provide a free flow of informa¬ 
tion and ideas unfettered by government restraint. The government's 
licensing authority over television, designed to promote efficient 
use of broadcast frequencies in the public interest, is not a license 
to the government to control or influence the function of a free 


press. 


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Although the arguments for regulation do not stand the test 
of principle or logic, there are in the law, in the stated policy of 
the Federal Communications Commission and in the practices of 
legislative and judiciary bodies the elements of an effective control 
over television's journalistic expression. 

Perhaps the best known is the so-called equal-time require¬ 
ment, imposed on political coverage by Section 315 of the Communications 
Act. With stated exceptions, it requires that a broadcaster who 
makes his facilities available to a candidate for political office 
must provide the same opportunity to all candidates for the same 
office -- a requirement that would shock public conscience if it were 
applied to the printed press. 

Its effect has been to restrain broadcasters from presenting 
serious and major candidates who command the public interest, by 
requiring the same amount of air time to be devoted to candidates 
of splinter and frivolous parties in whom the public has little or 
no interest; and the by-product of this mechanistic rule has been 
less, rather than more, exposure of candidates and discussion of 
issues. 

The shackles were eased, on an experimental basis, during 
the i960 Presidential campaign when the equal-time rule was suspended 
for appearances by the Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates. 

The result was the historic television encounters between John F. 

Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon. Equally important was the great variety 
of special programs in which the major candidates were enabled to 
appear. These, together with the debates, were generally credited 
with making an unprecedented contribution to the definition of the 
issues and a stimulation of interest in the campaign and the elections. 

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Despite broadcasting's acknowledged record of responsibility 
and fairness in covering the i960 campaign. Congress this year 
declined to suspend the equal-time provision. As a consequence, a 
significant measure of control over Journalistic presentation of 
the campaign was removed from the hands of the broadcast journalist; 
and a seven-member government agency, the Federal Communications 
Commission, was placed in the unhappy position of having to interpret 
and apply a statutory control over campaign coverage. 

The maintenance of the equal-time restriction had a variety 
of curious results, none serving the public interest. 

Early in the campaign the Commission interpreted the statute 
to mean that the President's traditional nationwide television appeal 
in behalf of the United Community Fund would oblige broadcasters to 
grant equal-time claims by all other candidates for the Presidency. 

Soon after, the Commission ruled that under Section 315* the 
broadcasting of Presidential news conferences would entitle all 
Presidential candidates to claim and receive equal time. 

Later, in a more widely publicized incident, the Commission 
decided that a television address by the President on the removal of 
Premier Khrushchev, the explosion of a nuclear bomb by the Red 
Chinese, and the significance of the British elections did not entitle 
the Republican candidate to equal time. If, as a matter of news 
judgment, the networks had decided to grant Senator Goldwater an 
opportunity to comment on these international developments, they would 
have opened a round of claims for equal time by at least ten minor 
candidates for the Presidency. 


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Beyond these rather visible results, the most drastic, but 
less obvious, effect of the equal-time restriction was to inhibit 
the appearance of major candidates in many special programs that had 
been designed to give wide exposure to the principal contenders for 
office, their backgrounds and their views. We may speculate on the 
extent to which this restriction of television's capacity to present 
the candidates speaking directly to the public contributed to a widely 
noted characteristic of the 1964 campaign -- its failure to develop 
a clear focus on the issues. 

Surely, as these examples demonstrate, a law that requires 
a government agency to direct the manner in which the public may be 
informed in an election campaign is inconsistent with the aims of 
democracy. 

On another, related front, the Commission, through interpre¬ 
tation and policy rulings, has undertaken to review fairness in the 
broadcast coverage of all matters in controversy -- a function it 
identifies with the appealing title of "The Fairness Doctrine." 

No one can argue against the desirability of fairness in 
reporting controversial public issues; but one can properly argue 
against the advisability of having the members of a government agency 
and its staff review the judgments of professional newsmen, editors 
and news executives on what is fair news coverage. 

Such a process compels the regulatory agency, in the 
first instance, to define what is controversial and what is not, on 
matters ranging from major international events to local community 
problems. It places on appointed officials of government the 
obligation to judge, often without firsthand knowledge or expertise, 
whether the issues have been fully and fairly explored in news 


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Text 


Further, it invites individual and special interests to 
use the Commission’s processes for contesting news programs they do 
not favor. For example, over the last two and a half years, the 
Commission has asked NBC to respond to fairness complaints lodged 
by organizations or individuals against news documentaries on social 
welfare practices in the City of Newburgh, New York; fall-out shelters; 
the economic situation on the Caribbean Island of Nevis; Red China; 
medical care for the aged; frauds in highway construction; the 
New York City newspaper strike; race relations and the civil rights 
march on Washington, and poverty in the Lower Rio Grande Valley. 

That is only a partial list, and in these and other similar 
cases, the Commission, after investigation, has presumably been 
satisfied with the fairness of the broadcasts questioned. 

But that is not the issue. For even though the Commission 
has sought to encourage journalistic enterprise and the coverage 
of controversy by broadcasters, its undertaking to review their 
performance in this field weakens the very effort it seeks to encourage. 
The danger here lies in having an arm of the government that holds 
the licensing power in a position to second-guess the broadcaster’s 
journalistic judgment in reporting on events and issues that at times 
involve the government itself. 

The third main area of restriction is the official exclusion 
of television from places where the public’s business is conducted. 

These include the floor of the House of Representatives and its 
Committee rooms; the floor of the Senate; the Supreme Court; all 
Federal courts, and the legislative chambers and the courts of most 
states and localities. 

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Text 


Thus in our open society we have an officially sanctioned 
denial of its principles, and in this area the public’s foremost 
medium of information is confronted with a closed door. 

Originally it was contended, not without reason, that 
bulky broadcasting and lighting equipment would be an awkward intrusion 
upon serious proceedings. Technology can solve that problem. Now -- 
as has been demonstrated by the experience in equipping the United 
Nations for broadcast coverage it is possible for television to 
report proceedings in legislative chambers, hearing rooms and court 
rooms with cameras that are not only unobtrusive but out of sight. 

So the argument has shifted to the expressed concern that 
some legislators or lawyers might take to performing for the cameras, 
rather than for their constituents and clients. If that should 
happen, however, their behavior would be displayed and exposed by 
television itself as the reporter of actuality -- a course that 
should contribute to decorum and responsibility rather than detract 
from it. But even if a few should be stimulated to unseemly behavior, 
that is certainly insufficient reason for denying the rights of the 
many to attend, through television, those occasions where the public's 
business is conducted. 

The result of all these restrictions upon television coverage 
of candidates, controversy and huge areas of the public business has 
been to by-pass the historic right of the public to free and full 
access to information on all matters that affect it. 

To safeguard that fundamental right, certain specific steps 
can and should be taken. Insofar as they call for Congressional 
action, the time to act is in the coming year, away from the heat and 

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12 - Robert W, Samoff 


Text 


contention of a political campaign, when the public policy issues 
involved can be considered with calm reflection. 

First, the Congress should revise Section 315 of the 
Communications Act to eliminate the equal-time requirement completely 
and permanently. This provision of the law has in fact served a 
purpose contrary to the one anticipated and it discriminates against 
the medium of information best equipped to inform the public on 
candidates and issues. 

Second, the Congress should make it clear that the Federal 
Communications Commission is not mandated to pass on how broadcasters 
cover public issues in controversy. Review by a federal agency of 
journalistic judgment and expression is contrary to the principle 
of a free press. 

It is possible that a few irresponsible broadcasters might 
abuse the freedom such actions would give them. I do not believe, 
however, that this possibility warrants throttling a whole communica¬ 
tions medium -- any more than it would warrant imposing similar 
restrictions on the whole newspaper field because of a few irresponsible 
newspapers. 

Third, the doors to public proceedings should be opened to 
television whenever they are open to other elements of the press, so 
that television can use its special capacities to enable the people 
to witness the conduct of the people’s business. This calls for 
abandonment of existing discriminatory rules barring television from 
federal, state and local legislative chambers and the hearing rooms 
of legislative committees. 

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13 - Robert W. Samoff -- Text 


What is needed is the establishment of an affirmative public 
policy declaring that the institutions of government should be fully 
open to television coverage, limited only by defined requirements of 
security and due process. In this field, official attitudes and policy 
development have not kept pace with television's emergence as a major 
communications force. In considering television and other media, the 
goal should always be to expand to the maximum the information that 
can properly be made public, not reduce it to the minimum. 

There is, however, one area of the public business -- in 
arrest, pre-trial and trial proceedings -- where conflicts may arise 
between the public's right to information and the right of the accused 
to a fair trial. The Report of the Warren Commission, for example, 
has recently expressed concern that the unrestrained coverage of 
pre-trial activities impedes or corrupts the judicial process. In 
terms both of principle and practicality, the solution to such a 
problem does not lie in placing restraints on newsmen in reporting 
available information, but in establishing standards to guide officers 
of the court -- law enforcement officials and counsel -- in divulging 
information that does not prejudice judicial process. Similarly, 
affirmative standards can be established to enable television coverage 
of trials, with such safeguards as may be necessary to protect the 
rights of the accused. 

In considering these standards and safeguards, it should 
always be remembered that the absence of full public information 
about such proceedings can itself lead to infringement of an 
individual's rights. For access of the information media to judicial 
proceedings creates a two-way street: the accused, if he should suffer 

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abuse, can reach the public; and the public can be informed as to the 
nature of the proceedings involving the accused. 

In this special area, I am confident that if representatives 
of the judiciary, the bar and journalism joined in a constructive 
examination of the issue, they could develop a meeting ground where 
both public and private rights would be protected and advanced. There 
is an immediate need to define how television access to judicial 
proceedings can be enlarged to the full extent consistent with due 
process. This approach, I believe, holds far greater promise than 
codes designed to formalize restrictions on the gathering of news. 

Restrictions on any part of the press threaten the 
principle underlying the vitality of all parts of the press. The 
public's stake in that principle should be supported and protected by 
all news media, not only to safeguard their own rights to freedom of 
speech and the press, but more importantly to protect the public's 
right to learn and to know. Print journalism and broadcast journalism 
have common interests and responsibilities which transcend their 
competitive endeavors. 

Finally, it must be emphasized that the arguments and 
proposals I have advanced are not designed for the benefit of televi¬ 
sion. They relate directly to television's ability to discharge its 
responsibility to the public. The public in turn, has a responsibility 
to take an active role to protect its own interest in television's 
freedom to perform its journalistic function. 

Individuals and organizations must accept and pursue this 
obligation by insisting that their elected representatives take 
whatever steps are necessary to allow the free flow of ideas, informa¬ 
tion and fact to reach their natural level of service. 

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15 - Robert W. Sarnoff -- Text 


Only then will television be fully able to carry out its 
mission of informing the people to the ultimate limits of its vast 
potential, as an auditor of government for the people, and a great 
force for fuller understanding of ourselves and institutions. Only 
then will we be true to the precepts of Thomas Jefferson who displayed 
an insight that was to prove applicable over the ages when he wrote: 

"I know of no safe repository of the ultimate 
powers of society but the people themselves, 
and if we think them not enlightened enough to 
exercise their control with a wholesome 
discretion, the remedy is not to take it from 
them but to inform their discretion by education." 


NBC, 12/4/64 



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JACK TRACY 
R 00 l 4 320 

from the national broadcasting company 

Thirty Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 10020 

2-X-H 

KING CONSTANTINE OF GREECE HONORS NBC PRESIDENT ROBERT E. KINTNER 
AND PRODUCER LOU HAZAM FOR 'GREAT CONTRIBUTION 
TO INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING' 

Colorcast of 'Greece: The Golden Age' Is Cited 

FOR RELEASE 12 NOON EST TUESDAY« DEC. 8 

King Constantine of Greece has conferred the Cross of Knight 
Commander, Royal Order of the Phoenix, upon Robert E. Kintner, President 
of the National Broadcasting Company, and the Gold Cross of the Royal 
Order of George I upon Lou Hazam, NBC News producer and writer. 

Stavros Costopoulos, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Greece, 
presented the diploma and insignia of these decorations to Mr. Kintner 
and Mr. Hazam at a ceremony at noon today (Tuesday, Dec. 8 ) at the 
headquarters of the National Broadcasting Company in New York City. 

Mr. Costopoulos is currently in New York heading the Greek delegation 
to the General Assembly of the United Nations. 

The decorations were awarded to Mr. Kintner and Mr. Hazam 'in 
recognition of the great contribution they made to international 
understanding by producing and broadcasting 'Greece: The Golden Age,' 
a distinguished television program worthy of the cultural treasures it 
displays." 

The full-hour NBC News special, designed to bring to life the 
glory that was ancient Greece, was colorcast on the NBC-TV Network 
Nov. 19, 1963 . Hazam wrote and produced the program, which was filmed 
on location at such important classical sites as the Acropolis in 
Athens, the ancient theatre at Epidaurus, Olympia, Delphi and the 
islands offshore. 


Press Department , Room 320 


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2 - Honors 


In the presentation to Mr. Kintner, Mr. Costopoulos said: 

"I take great personal pleasure in presenting you, sir, with 
the insignia of the Commander of the Order of the Phoenix. This honor 
was bestowed upon you by His Majesty King Constantine of the Hellenes in 
appreciation of your work in the production of ’Greece: The Golden Age,’ 
a cultural milestone in the short history of television. 

"Such milestones have been characteristic of your career. 

This new medium, this magic box that gives us global vision, could have 
become an evil force, but for the integrity and genius of some men who 
guided this new form of communication and made it a servant rather than 
scourge of mankind. Mr. Kintner is among these men. He ranks high. 

In his field, he is considered a giant. His touch has brought under¬ 
standing where ignorance might have remained, a broadened horizon, 
instead of the narrow view. 

"'Greece: The Golden Age 1 is a perfect example of the great 
good an enlightened television executive can do. The vast resources 
of NBC were put behind a work of art and culture. It was an act of 
service first and foremost, a gift to man, the precious gift of a 
glimpse into his precious heritage, the heritage of Greece's golden age 
which belongs to us all." 

In his response, Mr. Kintner said: 

"I accept this high honor, conferred upon me by Ki^.g 
Constantine of Greece, with deep appreciation. I am mindful of the 
fact that you and your colleagues, who have gathered here, have 
interrupted a busy schedule to make this ceremony possible and for that 

I also am appreciative. 


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3 - Honors 


"Although this honor has been conferred upon me, I would like 
to accept it on behalf of the 800 men and women who make up NBC News, 
the world’s largest broadcast news organization. Mr. Robert W. 

Sarnoff, Chairman of NBC, and I are proud of the leading position 
achieved by NBC News, under the management of Mr. William R. MeAndrew 
and Mr. Julian Goodman, as a news organization of great professional 
skill, energy and creative ability. Among its most distinguished 
members is Lou Hazam, who wrote and produced 'Greece: The Golden Age,’ 
the program which you honor. 

"it was a program that in essence reflected the greatness 
and the glory of the ancient civilization of your nation. The wisdom 
of its philosophers and the splendor of its art and architecture have 
had a profound influence on the civilizations which followed and 
continue to influence all who strive for excellence. 

"The program you are honoring would not have been possible 
without the cooperation accorded to Mr. Hazam by the Government of 
Greece and many generous friends and organizations. For this invaluable 
help, a great debt of gratitude is owed by the millions of viewers in 
this country and abroad who found enjoyment and enlightenment in the 
program; by the critics who praised it as one of television’s greatest 
achievements; and by NBC News which produced the program. 

"Your recognition gives us at NBC great encouragement in our 
dedication to coverage of the news and the production of special 
programs which put in perspective the greatness of the past, the 
challenges of the present and the wonders of the future. 

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4 - Honors 


In presenting the diploma and insignia to Mr. Hazam, Mr. 
Costopoulos said: 

"This medal, the Gold Cross of the Order of George the 
First, awarded by His Majesty King Constantine of the Hellenes to Mr. 

Lou Hazam, pays tribute to a master craftsman, one of those rare 
people who have disciplined their native genius so as to give it 
tangible form and share it with their fellowmen. Mr. Hazam has the 
reputation of nearly always attempting more than the possible and 
nearly always attaining it. He certainly did this in writing and 
producing ’Greece: The Golden Age’ -- a tribute not only to its 
great theme but to the taste, imagination and energy of Mr. Hazam." 

Responding, Mr. Hazam said: 

"Not only for myself, but in behalf of all of those at NBC 
News who shared in the creation of our program, I hope you will convey 
to His Majesty our warmest appreciation for this generous notice. 
Actually, we are doubly honored since we consider ourselves privileged 
merely to have been an instrument in recalling to the world -- through 
the new medium of television -- the ancient heritage of Greece and 
the tremendous cultural debt we owe your great nation." 

The major portion of "Greece: The Golden Age" was devoted to 
the material remains of the age of Pericles, which marked the high tide 
of ancient Greek civilization. The script drew heavily upon the 
writings of Homer, Thucydides, Herodotus, Plato, Pindar, Pausanias and 
other major figures of the great age. A highlight of the program was 
a performance in the theatre at Epidaurus, best-preserved of all ancient 
Greek theatres, of the climactic scene from Sophocles' "Oedipus, the 
King" with actors engaged expressly for the production. Trevor Howard 
was the program's off-camera narrator. The program was generally 
hailed by press and public as one of television's memorable events. 

(more) 



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5 - Honors 


Among those who accompanied Foreign Minister Costopoulos 
at the presentation ceremony at NBC today were Miss Daphnie Costopoulos, 
daughter of the Foreign Minister; Leonidas Papagos, Ambassador Extra¬ 
ordinary and Plenipotentiary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, member of 
the Greek delegation to the U. N. General Assembly; Dimitri Bitsios, 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, permanent representative 
to the U. N.; Aristides Pilavachi, Ambassador Extraordinary and 
Plenipotentiary, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, member of the delegation 
to the U. N. General Assembly; Alexandre Demetropoulos, Minister 
Plenipotentiary, deputy permanent representative to the U. N.; 

Gerassimos Gigantes, Minister for Cultural Affairs, Royal Greek 
Embassy, Washington, D. C., member of the delegation to the U. N. 

General Assembly; George Gavas, Consul General of Greece in New York; 
Dennis Carayannis, Counselor of Embassy, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 
member of the delegation to the U. N. General Assembly; Dimitri 
Velissaropoulos, First Secretary of Embassy, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 
member of the delegation to the U. N. General Assembly; Nicholas 
Katapodis, First Secretary of Embassy, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 
member of the delegation to the U. N. General Assembly; Dimitri 
Petrounakos, First Secretary of Embassy, Permanent Mission to the 
U. N.; Constantine Eliopoulos, Secretary of Embassy; Dimitri 
Makropoulos, Private Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Affairs; 

E. Frangoulis, Attache of Embassy; and Angelos Billis, Press Attache, 
Royal Greek Embassy, Washington, D. C. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/7/64 




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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 7, 1964 

NBC NEWS TO PRESENT YEAR-END REVIEW 

NBC News will present a review of events, developments and 
trends of 1964, here and abroad, as they affected the nation 
politically, socially and economically, Sunday, Dec. 27 on NBC-TV 
(4 to 5 p.m. EST). 

This year-end special, with Prank McGee, will replace the 
regular "Sunday" program. 

In the political area, the program will review the U. S. 
elections and the shifts in world political patterns. The civil 
rights controversy will be examined in films from many parts of the 
country, including the award of the Nobel Prize to Martin Luther King. 

Books, plays and movies will be covered in a digest of 
writings and productions that had maximum impact on public thinking. 
Developments in religion will be accented in reports on Pope Paul's 
trips to India and the Holy Land, the Ecumenical Council*s decisions, 
and the troubles that beset Jordan and Israel. 

Areas of international unrest -- Cyprus, Congo, Vietnam and 
Berlin -- will be discussed. The Warren Commission Report and the 
earthquake in Alaska also will be program topics. 

Sports, reported by NBC sports commentator Joe Garagiola, 
will be represented by films highlighting events in yachting, baseball, 
football, boxing and the Olympics. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 
























































































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2 - NBC News 


A review of the space race to the moon will include films 
of the U. S. Ranger moon pictures, the Russian three-man flight and the 
U. S. Mariner shot. The program will examine Chinese Communism, 
vintage 1964, and the impact of the bomb in that country. 

Producer of the NBC News special will be Craig Fisher. 

r-NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 27-; 

NBC News review of events, developments and trends 
of 1964, here and abroad, as they affected, the . 
nation. Highlights of the year in politics, arts 
and sciences, religion, sports and other fields. 

With NBC News correspondent Frank McGee. 

NBC-New York, 12/7/64 












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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 7, 1964 

•HULLABALOO 1 TO HAVE PREMIERE ON NBC-TV TUESDAY, JAN. 12 
Full-Hour Musical-Variety Show Taking Time Period of 
'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.,’ Which Moves to Mondays 

"Hullabaloo," NBC-TV’s new full-hour musical-variety show 
designed for young adults, will have its premiere Tuesday, Jan. 12 
from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. EST. 

The time period is now occupied by "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." 
which moves to NBC-TV's Monday 8-9 p.m. EST time period effective 
Jan. 11, replacing two half-hour telecasts, "Harris Against the 
World" and "Tom, Dick and. Mary." 

"Hullabaloo," produced by Gary Smith, will originate in 
New York in color, except for weekly segments taped in London and 
presented by Brian Epstein, who will introduce various young English 
entertainers he has discovered. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 











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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 7* 1964 

NBC NEWS CAMERAMAN PEDRO TORRE WOUNDED WHILE COVERING 
A PERONISTA DEMONSTRATION IN ARGENTINA 

NBC News cameraman Pedro Torre received a saber wound on the 
head when mounted police broke up a meeting of Peronists he was cover¬ 
ing in Buenos Aires, Argentina, NBC News learned today. The injury 
apparently is not serious, according to correspondent Ted Ed Scott, 
who was with Torre. 

The Peronista meeting followed the refusal of the Brazilian 
Government to allow Juan D. Peron, Argentina’s former dictator, to enter 
Brazil Dec. 2. Torre and Scott, who are based in Rio de Janeiro, had 
been sent to Buenos Aires to cover possible demonstrations of this 
kind. 

Another NBC News cameraman. Grant Wolfkill, who has been 
covering the war in Vietnam, will enter Swedish Hospital in Seattle 
tomorrow for possible surgery resulting from an injury received when he 
was kicked in the stomach by Vietnamese police in Saigon last year. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

























• • • . . r .'W. 














■ 

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' 










NBC-TV NETWORK PROGRAM 


KATHRYN (MRS. BING) CROSBY ADDED TO STAR CAST 
OF BOB HOPE'S DEC. 18 CHRYSLER COMEDY SPECIAL 


Kathryn (Mrs. Bing) Crosby has been added to the guest star 
lineup for the pre-holiday "Chrysler Presents a Bob Hope Comedy Special 
Friday, Dec. 18 (NBC-TV, 8:30-9:30 p.m. EST in black and white). 

Martha Raye, Nancy Wilson, the Beachboys and special guest 
James Garner with Les Brown and his Band of Renown, as previously 
announced, will share center stage with Hope in his third comedy-with- 
music revue of the season. 

Hope co-starred with Kathryn in last season's comedy, "The 
House Next Door," on the weekly Chrysler-sponsored series. 

Kathryn Crosby pursues her acting career but does not let it 
interfere with being a busy wife, the mother of three children and a 
serious student of psychiatric nursing. The past two Summers she has 
played stock, once in the comedy "Sunday in New York," and once in the 
musical "Damn Yankees." Her movie credits include "Operation Mad 
Ball," "Anatomy of a Murder," "The Big Circus," and "Gunman's Walk," 


among others. 


ii 


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NBC-New York, 12/T/64 












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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 7, 1964 

GEORGE CLAY’S NAME TO BE INSCRIBED ON MEMORIAL 
TABLET AT OVERSEAS PRESS CLUB IN N.Y. 

The name of NBC News correspondent George Clay, 
who was shot and killed last month while covering the 
fighting in the Congo, will be inscribed on the Overseas 
Press Club memorial tablet in New York. 

OPC President Barrett McGurn said that Clay's 
name would be added to the memorial roster of 96 other 
journalists who have died in the line of duty. 

Clay had won an OPC Award last Spring for the 
"Best Radio Reporting from Abroad" for his coverage of a 
previous battle in the Congo. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 



I 



























NBC FEATURE 


December J, 1964 

THAT SCREAM YOU HEARD ON 'TONIGHT* CAME FROM JULIE BENNETT 

Redhaired Julie Bennett has played everything on television 
from Charlie the Tuna's girlfriend to a talking box of detergent, 
neither of which allowed the viewing audience to catch a glimpse of her 
spectacular redhaired good looks. On NBC-TV's "The Famous Adventures 
of Mr. Magoo" she has played the voice behind Maid Marian (when Magoo 
played Robin Hood) the voice of Snow White, Sagebrush Sal and the 
sultry voice of Pepe LePew's girlfriend. It took the "Tonight Show 
Starring Johnny Carson" to summon Julie back on camera with her own 
face showing. She was a guest on the Thursday, Dec. 3 show (NBC color¬ 
cast, 11:15 p.m.-l a.m. EST) and proved conclusively that when it comes 
to selling, Julie is a topnotch saleswoman of her own attractive 
personality. 

Actually, Julie Bennett's television career harks back to the 
days when, as a teenager, she appeared on numerous live TV productions 
done by Albert McCleery, Fred Coe and the other "greats" of early TV. 
(Her first "Philco Playhouse" starring role was done when she was 15.) 
Fiercely ambitious as a youngster, and extremely busy in television, 
radio and in various short-lived Broadway plays, Julie went to-the We3t 
Coast for a brief vacation and made the discovery that "there is more 
to life than just working." She never returned to the radio serial 
drama on which she had a running role. ("The fellow who played my 
husband could have killed me, because they had to write him out once 
they killed me off.") 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 






























r 








. 


2 - Julie Bennett 


Julie continued to work in television, now in the filmed 
variety, appearing on such programs as "Dragnet," the Donna Reed and 
Bob Cummings shows, and various other series. She played everything 
from neurotic wives to femmes fatales. At one point, her voice was 
dubbed in for James Stewart’s "four-year-old grandson" in "The FBI 
Story." The use of her voice alone opened a new career to the versatile 
actress and she entered the field of commercial television. This led 
her to such jobs as providing the voice of Cindy Bear in the "Yogi Bear" 
films and to essaying the aforementioned talking detergent box. 

As she told Johnny Carson on "Tonight," the speaking voices of 
many sultry appearing brunettes in cosmetic commercials are often high, 
squeaky and afflicted with Brooklyn accents. So while the films show an 
alluring girl, her equally alluring voice is courtesy of the redhaired 
Julie. 

Mister Magoo’s "Snow White" chalked up a first on "Tonight" 
when she responded to a request to demonstrate the kind of scream with 
which she won roles in "Dragnet." She raised Carson, Ed McMahon, guest 
Bill Cosby and half of television-watching America a foot off their 
chairs with her blood-curdling rendition. Remarkable girl, that Julie. 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/7/64 




• ■ , 

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NBC FEATURE 


December 7, 1964 

EDUCATORS PRAISE NBC-TV'S "PROFILES IN COURAGE" SERIES 

Educators throughout the country have joined TV critics and 
viewers in commending the NBC-TV Network for the "Profiles in 
Courage" series, produced by Robert Saudek Associates and telecast 
Sundays (6:30-7:30 p.m. EST). 

Some excerpts of their letters follow: 

R.D., Wichita, Kan. -- Things like these need 
the utmost in backing...you have mine. 

M.E., Titusville, Pa. -- Our young people need 
badly to be exposed to personalities that have not been 
afraid to make personal sacrifices for their beliefs and 
convictions. You are making a sizable contribution to 
their inspiration ... 

C.L., Tucson, Ariz. -- NBC is doing an excellent 
job in presenting fine viewing. Keep up the good work. 

W.S., Cincinnati, Ohio -- Keep up the good 
work. We need more shows such as this. 

R.R., Cape Elizabeth, Me. -- The faculty involved 
strongly recommend that the students see this series. We 
are happy to see this type of program started. 

B.D., Woonsocket, R.I. -- It is certainly 
gratifying to see that NBC is performing another public 
service... May this new undertaking prove to be educational 
and profitable to students and adults who certainly need 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 


; • • ■ 










































. 










2 


’Profiles In Courage* 


exemplars of courage if we are to expect mature, 
responsible citizens in America. 

E.C., Waterbury, Conn. -- Programs of this 
nature are worth months of classroom teaching. We are 
indeed most grateful for the program scheduling and 
for the professional help that accompanies it. 

W.H., Providence, R.I. -- Please be assured 
of our deep appreciation to NBC for presenting this 
extraordinary program which undoubtedly will enrich 
the lives of the youth of America as well as promote 
good citizenship in its highest form. 

"Profiles in Courage Teacher’s Guides, issued by the 
NBC Public Affairs Department, were distributed to all high 
schools in the U. S. A. Many teachers who wrote to NBC to 
commend the series requested additional copies. 


NBC-New York, 12/7/64 





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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



NBC-TV NETWORK COLORCAST SCHEDULE 
For January, 1965 (EST) 


MONDAYS THROUGH FRIDAYS 

10:30-10:55 a.m. -- "What's This Song?" 

11:30 a.m.-l2 noon -- "Jeopardy" (except Jan. 1 and 20). 

12 noon-12:30 p.m. -- "Say When" (except Jan. 1 and 20). 

12:30-12:55 p.m. -- "Truth or Consequences" (except Jan. 1 and 20). 
1:30-1:55 p.m. -- "Let's Make a Deal" (except Jan. 1 and 20). 

3:30-4 p.m. -- "You Don't Say!" (except Jan, 1 and 20). 

FRIDAY, JAN. 1 AND M0ND.A7S THROUGH SATURDAYS, JAN. 4-9; 11-16; 18-23 

AND 25-30 

11:15 p.m.-l a.m. -- "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" ( Note: 

The Saturday night programs will be repeats of past shows and will 
begin 15 minutes after the conclusion of "Saturday Night at the 
Movies." 

FRIDAY, JAN. 1 

11-11:30 a.m. — Orange Bowl Parade from Miami, Fla. 

11:30 a.m.-1:45 p.m. -- Tournament of Roses Parade from Pasadena, Calif. 
1:45 p.m.-to conclusion -- Sugar Bowl football game from New Orleans, La. 
4:45 p.m.-to conclusion -- Rose Bowl football game from Pasadena, Calif. 
7:45 p.m.-to conclusion -- Orange Bowl football game from Miami, Fla. 

SATURDAY, JAN. 2 

9:30-10 a.m. — "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "Underdog" 

12 noon-1 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

7:30-8 p.m. -- "Flipper" 

8- 8:30 p.m. -- "The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo 

9 p.m.-to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies 

SUNDAY. JAN. 3 

5- 5:30 p.m. -- "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" „ 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

MONDAY, J.AN. 4 

9-10 p.m. -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 




































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2 - NBC-TV January Colorcast Schedule 


TUESDAY, JAN. 5 

10-11 p.m. -- "Bell Telephone Hour" 

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 6 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

THURSDAY, JAN. 7 
9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall" 

FRIDAY, JAN. 8 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

SATURDAY, JAN. 9 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "Underdog" 

12 noon-1 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

2 p.m.-to conclusion -- Senior Bowl football game from Mobile, Ala. 
7:30-8 p.m. -- "Flipper" 

8- 8:30 p.m. -- "The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo" 

9 p.m.-to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies" 

SUNDAY, JAN. 10 

3:^5 p.m.-to conclusion -- NFL Pro Bowl football game from Los Angeles 
Calif. 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

MONDAY, JAN. 11 

9- 10 p.m. -- "The Andy Williams Show" 

TUESDAY, JAN. 12 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "That Was the Week That Was" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Capitol: Chronicle of Freedom," an NBC News special 
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

THURSDAY, JAN. l4 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m. -- "Kraft Suspense Theatre 

FRIDAY, JAN. 15 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

(more) 














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3 - NBC-TV January Colorcast Schedule 


SATURDAY, JAN. l6 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "Underdog" 

12 noon-1 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

7:30-8 p.m. -- "Flipper" 

8- 8:30 p.m. -- "The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo" 

9 p.m.-to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies" 

SUNDAY, JAN. 17 

N0TE; "NBC Sports in Action" premieres today 4-5 p.m. EST. 

Thirty minutes of the program will be telecast in color. 

5- 5:30 p.m. -- "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" 

9- 10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

MONDAY, JAN. 18 

9- 10 p.m. — "Allan Sherman's Funnyland" a comedy-music special. 
TUESDAY. JAN. 19 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "That Was the Week That Was" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "Bell Telephone Hour" 

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 20 

NOTE: NBC will colorcast the Presidential Inauguration parade. 

The parade is expected to last 2|-3 hours in mid-afternoon, 
immediately after President Johnson takes the oath of 
office. 

8-11 p.m. — "Wednesday Night at the Movies." NOTE: Program is expanded 

one hour tonight due to the length of the film, "The 
Brothers Karamazov." 

THURSDAY, JAN. 21 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "Hazel" 

10-11 p.m. — "Kraft Suspense Theatre" 

FRIDAY, JAN. 22 

8:30-9:30 p.m. — "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

SATURDAY, JAN. 23 

9:30-10 a.m. — "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "Underdog" 

12 noon-1 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

7:30-8 p.m. — "Flipper" „ 

8-8:30 p.m. — The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo 

9 p.m.-to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies 

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4 - NBC-TV January Colorcast Schedule 


SUNDAY. JAN. 24 


4 4:30 p.m. -- NBC Sports in Action" ( NOTE: Program is one-half hour 
in length today. ) 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color" 

9-10 p.m. -- "Bonanza" 

MONDAY. JAN. 25 

9- 10 p.m. -- "The Jonathan Winters Show" 

10- 11 p.m. -- "The Stately Ghosts of England" 

TUESDAY, JAN. 26 

9:30-10 p.m. -- "That Was the Week That Was" 

10-1 p.m. -- "The French Revolution" an NBC News special. 

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27 

7:30-9 p.m. -- "The Virginian" 

THURSDAY, JAN. 28 


9:30-11 p.m. — Hallmark Hall of Fame: - "The Magnificent Yankee" 
FRIDAY, JAN. 29 

8:30-9:30 p.m. -- "Bob Hope Presents the Chrysler Theatre" 

10-11 p.m. -- "The Jack Paar Program" 

SATURDAY, JAN. 30 

9:30-10 a.m. -- "The Hector Heathcote Show" 

10-10:30 a.m. -- "Underdog" 

12 noon-1 p.m. -- "Exploring" 

5-6 p.m. -- "Big Three Golf" ( premiere) . 

7:30-8 p.m. -- "Flipper" 

8-8:30 p.m. — "The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo" 

9 p.m.-to conclusion -- "Saturday Night at the Movies" 

SUNDAY, JAN. 31 


5- 5:30 p.m. — "Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom" 

5:30-6 p.m. -- "G-E College Bowl" 

6- 6:30 p.m. -- "Meet the Press" 

7:30-8:30 p.m. -- "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color 
9-10 p.m. — "Bonanza" 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/7/64 


















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J A C K T R A C Y 

ROOM 320 

5 ♦ f 

2-X-H 

NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

December 8, 1964 

ROGER GIMBEL TO PRODUCE "ALLAN SHERMAN’S FUNNYLAND," 

SECOND NBC-TV "SNEAK PREVIEW SPECIAL" OF SEASON 

Roger Gimbel has been signed to produce "Allan Sherman’s 
Funnyland," NBC-TV's second "sneak preview special" of the 1964-65 
season, it was announced today by Edwin S. Friendly Jr., Vice 
President, Special Programs. 

Allan Sherman will star in this full-hour special, to be 
colorcast on NBC-TV Monday. Jan. 18 (9-10 p.m. EST). 

(This season’s first "sneak preview special" was the highly- 
acclaimed "NBC Follies of 1965" which starred Steve Lawrence.) 

Gimbel, whose most recent TV assignment was NBC-TV's 
Thanksgiving Day special, "Your All-Time Favorite Songs," starring 
Dean Martin, Eydie Gorme and A1 Hirt, has served as producer for many of 
the entertainment world's top names, including Mary Martin, Jack Paar, 
Bing Crosby, Arthur Godfrey, Carol Burnett, Judy Holliday, Dick Van 
Dyke and Tony Randall. 

"Allan Sherman's Funnyland" is envisioned as a possible 
half-hour series for the 1965~66 season. It will originate from the 
NBC Studios in Burbank, Calif. 



o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 







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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 8, 1964 

’BONANZA ' IS THE NUMBER ONE TV SHOW OF SPAIN j 

___ 1 

Spain says "SiJ" to "Bonanza," NBC-TV's bestselling full-hour 
Western series, viewed world-wide every week by 350,000,000 people and 
distributed abroad by NBC International. Television Espanola’s (the 
Spanish TV network's) official publication. Teleradio, named "Bonanza" 
number one in a recent popularity survey. 

The "Dr. Kildare" series of NBC-TV, which is also distributed 
abroad by NBC International, was third on the Spanish preference list. 
Another NBC-TV series, "Walt Disney's Wonderful World of Color," which 
is called "Disneylandia" in Spain, is also in the top ten popularity 
roster. 

"Bonanza" is sold in 57 countries and 125 separate markets 
outside the United States. Fan mail reports on the series in the last 
quarter were especially high in Brazil, New Zealand, Portugal, Spain, 
Sweden, Uruguay, and Canada. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COM 


PANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 










































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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 8, 1964 

NBC NEWS CAMERAMAN YUNG SU KWON DIES IN TOKYO 

Award-winning veteran NBC News cameraman Yung Su Kwon died 
today (Dec. 8) in a Tokyo hospital after an illness of several months. 

Kwon joined the staff of the National Broadcasting Company 
during the first stage of the Korean War and covered the fighting 
there from start to finish for the NBC-TV Network. He gained a reputa¬ 
tion as one of the foremost combat cameramen in the business. 

In I960, the Overseas Press Club of New York honored him 
with two of its awards. For his dramatic coverage of the anti¬ 
security treaty riots in Tokyo, he was given the Robert Capa Award 
for bravery and his work was also selected as the best television 
filming of the year. 

During his long career as a cameraman, Kwon photographed 
top news events throughout the Pacific, ranging from the Alaskan 
earthquake to Laos, Burma and Indonesia. 

Kwon was born in Korea Sept. 5, 1913. He is survived by his 
wife Kuyuko and three teenage sons. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

































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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

December 8, 1964 

JACK JONES TO BE HOST OF PREMIERE 'HULLABALOO' COLORCAST 

Nightclub, television and recording 3tar Jack Jones will be 
the first host of NBC-TV's new full-hour musical show for young adults, 
"Hullabaloo," on the premiere colorcast Tuesday, Jan. 12 (8:30 to 
9:30 p.m. EST). He will be the first of a series of big-name stars to 
act as host of the series, which will originate in New York. 

Jones, currently starring at the Persian Room of the Plaza 
Hotel in New York City, has chalked up guest appearances on 20 major 
network shows within the past l6 months. These include NBC-TVs 
"Bell Telephone Hour," "The Jack Paar Program," "The Tonight Show 
Starring Johnny Carson," the Bob Hope Chrysler series, and "The Jack 
Benny Program," as well as appearances with Jerry Lewis, Judy Garland, 

Ed Sullivan, Jimmy Dean, Joey Bishop and Meredith Willson on their TV 
shows. 

Jack Jones, the son of singer Allan Jones and actress Irene 
Hervey, first came to national attention with the hit record "Lollipops 
and Roses." He has made seven long-playing albums and currently has a 
best-selling record in the Henry Mancini tune "Dear Heart." 

The premiere show of "Hullabaloo" will take place three days 
before Jack Jones 27th birthday. It is produced by the 29-year-old Gary 
Smith. Guests on the program for which Jones will act as host and 
master-of-ceremonies will be chosen for their appeal to the young 
audience. 

-o- 



PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 













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NBC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 


December 8, 1964 


-A SWINGING- START FOR 1965- 

’All-Star Parade of Bands’ Across The Land 
Will Greet New Year on NBC Radio 


NBC Radio will give 1965 a swinging start when it presents 
its annual "All-Star Parade of Bands" on New Year’s Eve, Thursday, 

Dec* 31 . 

The New Year will be ushered in at points including Basin 
Street East in New York with Duke Ellington and his orchestra, in 
Chicago with Les Elgart and his crew at the Sherman Hotel, and in 
Hollywood where Lawrence Welk and his orchestra will welcome 1965 at 
the Palladium. The complete schedule for NBC Radio's "All Star Parade 
of Bands" follows (all times EST): 

11:35-11:55 p.m. Duke Ellington and Orch. Basin Street East, New York. 
12:05-12:30 a.m. Woody Herman and Orch. 

12:30-12:55 a.m. Count Basie and Orch* 

Les Elgart and Orch . 

Tommy Dorsey Orch . 

Lionel Hampton and Orch. 

Louis Prima and Orch. 

Lawrence Welk and Orch. 

Les Brown and Orch. 


1-1:30 a.m. 
1:30-2 a.m. 
2:05-2:30 a.m. 
2:30-2:55 a.m. 
2:55-3:30 a.m. 
3:30-4 a.m. 


Birdland, New York. 

Coconut Grove, Los Angeles. 
Sherman Hotel, Chicago. 
Flamingo Hotel, Las Vegas. 
Miramar Club, Columbus, Ohio. 
Hotel Sahara, Las Vegas. 
Hollywood (Calif.) Palladium. 
Hollywood (Calif.) Palladium. 


PRESS DEPARTME 


NT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 




















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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 8, 1964 

'PROJECT 20' PRODUCTION, 'THE COMING OF CHRIST,' TELECAST IN 21 
FOREIGN LANDS; WILL HAVE FOURTH PRESENTATION ON NBC-TV 

The "Project 20" production of "The Coming of Christ," which 
will have its fourth presentation on the NBC-TV Network Monday, Dec. 21 
(8:30-9 p.m. EST, in color), has been telecast to date in 21 foreign 
countries and on all continents but Antarctica, according to a report 
from NBC Enterprises. 

The narration, almost wholly in the words of the Bible, has 
been translated into Italian, German, Spanish and Portuguese, each 
foreign language being heard over the musical and special effects track. 
In countries speaking other non-English tongues, the film is subtitled 
In the appropriate language. 

The program has already been telecast in Italy, Spain, 
Portugal, Cyprus, Switzerland, West Germany, Norway, Denmark, Finland, 
Holland, United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, 
Mexico, Guatemala, Colombia, Argentina, Brazil and Nigeria. 

Donald B. Hyatt produced and directed "The Coming of Christ." 
Richard Hanser wrote the script, and Robert Russell Bennett composed 
and conducted the original orchestral score. Alexander Scourby is the 
English language narrator. The program was first telecast Dec. 21, 

I960. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL 


BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 













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JANUARY COLORCAST SCHEDULE 


REVISION NEWS 


NBC COLOR 


-ADDITION TO NBC-TV NETWOR 

Tuesdays, Jan, 12, 19 and 26 


8:30-9:30 p.m. 


Add 


December 8, 1964 


: "Hullabaloo." ( Program premieres 

Jan. 12 ) I I 


BILL COSBY TO ACT AS ‘TONIGHT' HOST JAN. 4 

| \ 1 / 

fcomedian Bill\Uosby will act as host on NBC-TV 1 s "Tonight 

Show Starring Johnny Carsbn" Monday, Jan. 4 (colorcast 11:15 p.m. to 
1 a.m. ESI 1 ). Cosby, a frequent guest on the late-night comedy, 
conversation and music show, is one of the prominent performers who 
have substituted for Johnny Carson on vacation days. Others include 
Jan Murray, Sammy Davis and Milton Berle. 






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PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL 


BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 

























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>4 DEPARTMENT OF NBC NEWS 


December 8, 1964 


COLORFUL NIGHTCAP 


Orange Bowl Will Be Transformed Into Virtual Color Studio 
For Finale of New Year’s Day 3-Game Grid Schedule on NBC 


The 1965 Orange Bowl game in Miami on Jan. 1 will have 


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more than one historic distinction. Not 
it will be the first such sports e 
in effect, has been transformed 
The Orange Bowl 
football team, Alabama 
will be the nightcap/of a 
NBC-TV. (Its air time is 7 

The others will te t 
Syracuse opposing Louisians 
at Pasadena, pitting Michigan agai 
The Miami classic 

its own. Not only will it 
night, but it will mark the first time that V'night outdoor event, of 

J 

any type, has been colorcast. 

In preparation for the historic sports telecast, the Orange 
Bowl this past Summer was outfitted with a new lighting system that 
practically duplicates the illumination in NBC-TV’s scientifically 

designed studios in New York City. 

The system utilizes more than 500 lighting fixtures, 
with a 1,500-watt lamp, grouped not in the few clusters convention 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 


ir Bowl at New Orleans, with 
:45 p.m. EST)j, and the Rose Bowl 

Oregon State (4:45 p.m. EST). 

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will contain features that are uniquely 
be the fir£t bowl game to be played at 





























































































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to stadium lighting but at 52 locations around the rim of the bowl. 
Like TV studio lights, they are individually aimed to beam only on 
one small section of the playing turf, resul^kfg in uniform, non¬ 
glare illumination of the gridiron and stands. 

One important result of the new Orange Bowl lights will be 
natural color for NBC-TV viewpt's. But there is another effect that 
will gladden the hearts 9^the millions of true football fans who will 
be tuned in. 

"Coached who have worked under other lighting conditions 

■ 

say the game^can be played better in the Orange Bowl," asserts Svend 
Bruun, the New ^prk consultant who worked on the project. 

"The System is better for players, as well as viewers," 
says Mr. Bruun,/ /hpofeuse it helps to eliminate deep shadows and 
reduces glare tb a minimum. It also means the football can be seen 
better against the dark night sky." 


With 


a prefriise of perfect conditions for football and TV 


color receptic a^^ararrdCans are content to ignore another feature 
of the new 1 ijeem as somewhat superfluous. It happens to 
be hinges on lbre w TT!OTTtTn^phles that permit the -di'ghts to be laid 


down 


for safety -- in case of a hurricane. 


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ROOM 320 

2-x-H NBC TRADE NEWS 

HALLMARK TO SPONSOR "AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS" 

Menotti's Opera to Be Colorcast Dec. 20 

The fifteenth presentation of Menotti's Christmas opera "Amahl 
and the Night Visitors" will be sponsored by Hallmark Cards on the 
"Hallmark Hall of Fame" Sunday, Dec, 20 (NBC-TV Network colorcast, 

4-5 p.m. EST). ( NOTE : This program was originally announced for an 
hour earlier on the same date.) 

Hallmark sponsored the opera for its world premiere Dec. 24, 
1951* and returned as sponsor for four additional telecasts. The agency 
for Hallmark is Foote, Cone and Belding Inc. 

"Amahl and the Night Visitors," the tender story of a lame boy 
miraculously cured when he offers his crutch as a gift to the "child" 
during the visit of the Three Kings, won the nation's affection when it 
was first presented. Breaking precedent, newspapers reviewed the TV 
opera on the front pages as a major story. It has since won a wide 
following the world over, having been presented in many languages, 
including Japanese. 

The cast includes Kurt Yaghjian as Amahl, Martha King as the 
mother, Richard Cross, Willis Patterson and John McCollum as the Three 
Kings and Julian Patrick as the page. Herbert Grossman is the conductor. 

This production was taped last season in color with an all-new 
cast, new sets and new costumes. The late Samuel Chotzinoff, who origi¬ 
nally commissioned Menotti to write the opera for NBC, was the producer. 
Kirk Browning was the director. Sets are by Frank Skinner, and costumes 

by Lewis Brown. The choreographer was Donald McKayle. 

-o- NBC-New York, 12/9/64 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 































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NBC TRADE NEWS 
December 9, 1964 

ONE OP LARGEST SINGLE TELEVISION SALES TRANSACTIONS EVER 

COMPLETED WITH SPAIN ANNOUNCED BY NBC INTERNATIONAL; 

PURCHASES BY MANY OTHER LANDS ALSO LISTED 

One of the largest single sales transactions ever completed 
with Spain by NBC International, a division of NBC Enterprises, was 
announced today by George A. Graham Jr., Vice President in charge of 
NBC Enterprises. Spain purchased 137 hours of programming for tele¬ 
casting on Television Espanola (TVE), the Spanish network, Mr. Graham 
said. 

Included in the sale were: 52 hours of "Bonanza" (bringing 
Spain’s total hours of that series to 143), a renewal of news and public 
affairs specials, "The Richard Boone Show," "The Dick Powell Show" and 
"Car 54, Where Are You?" 

The period between Nov. 13 and Dec. 5 was highlighted by 
sales of a wide selection of NBC International’s properties. 

"Bonanza," NBC-TV's globe-girdling Western series, now in its 
sixth year, was bought by Canberra TV Ltd. and Country TV Services Pty. 
Ltd., Australia; Belgische Radio En Televisie, Belgium; Sudan TV; 

Jamaica TV, Bermuda TV; Mauritius TV; Aden TV; and Ethiopia TV. 

Other entertainment shows sold, Mr. Graham said, were: 
"Kentucky Jones," "National Velvet," "Loretta Young Theatre," "Laramie," 
"Temple Houston," "The Jonathan Winters Specials," "The Bob Hope 
Specials," "Harris Against the World," "Tom, Dick and Mary," "Danger 
Is My Business," "Dr. Kildare" and "Profiles In Courage." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 




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NBC News and Public Affairs Specials included "John P. 
Kennedy Remembered," "Shakespeare: Soul of an Age," "Ganges: Sacred 
River," "Greece: The Golden Age," "Amahl and the Night Visitors," 

"The Warren Report," "Japan -- East Is West," "Small Town, U.S.A.," 
and "Victory at Sea." 

An unusually wide sample of the 300 stations in 80 countries 
where NBC International has clients was included in these sales, Mr. 
Graham added. Among them were: Taiwan Television Enterprises Ltd., 
Taiwan; Rediffusion Ltd., Hong Kong; Austarama Pty. Ltd., Australia; 
Montecarlo TV, Uruguay; Radio Caracas TV, Venezuela; Channel 4, Mexico 
City, Mexico; THAI-TV, Thailand; Inter-Island Broadcasting Co., the 
Philippines; Barbados TV, Barbados; Fa. Telepool G.M.B.H., Austria; 
Norsk Rikskringkasting, Norway; Ceskoslovensky Filmexport, Prague, 
Czechoslovakia; Nederlandse Televisie Stichting, Holland; Bulgarian 
TV, Bulgaria; and French CBC, Canada. 


NBC-New York, 12/9/64 



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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 9, 1964 


WHPL REJOINS NBC RADIO NETWORK 

WHPL, Winchester, Va., has become reaffiliated 
with the NBC Radio Network, it was announced today by 
Tom Knode, Vice President, Station Relations, National 
Broadcasting Company. The affiliation became effective 

Dec. 1. 

WHPL is operated by Shenval Broadcasting 
Corporation. Edwin Fischer is the owner and John P. 

Bell Jr. the General Manager. 

The station operates from 5:30 a.m. to 12 
midnight on 500 watts at 6l0 KC. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 



















' 




NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 9, 1964 

- ’THE DECISION TO DROP THE BOMB’ -_-_ 

90-Minute 'NBC White Paper’ Telecast of Jan. 5, Will Review 
Events Leading to Dropping of First A-Bombs 20 Years Ago 

- i 

" — " - - ■ —— ■ . —i ■ - ■ t 

On Tuesday, Jan. 5 (8:30-10 p.m. EST) on the NBC-TV Network, 
NBC News will present a 90-minute special "White Paper" report commemo¬ 
rating the 20th anniversary of the event that initiated the nuclear age, 
the electronic age, the space age, the age of anxiety and all the other 
ages that describe man and his environment today; "The Decision to 
Drop the Bomb." 

William R. McAndrew, Executive Vice President in charge of 
NBC News, said the program will cover all the events leading up to the 
dropping of the first atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, beginning 
with the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt. 

"The Decision to Drop the Bomb" will be the first offering 
in this fifth year of "NBC White Paper" programs. It is the first to 
run 90 minutes. These special programs again will be narrated by NBC 
News correspondent Chet Huntley and produced by NBC News under Irving 
Gitlin, Executive Producer of Creative Projects. 

Producer-writer Fred Freed and associate producer-director 
Len Giovannitti, who combined on the two "White Papers" on Cuba which 
won Brany Awards last year, have teamed up again for "The Decision to 
Drop the Bomb." 

Freed and Giovannitti took their cameras over much of the 
United States, to London, Japan and Berlin to film footnotes to history 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 




















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by some 50 of the persons most responsible for the development and use 
of the bomb for the Allies and the conduct of the Imperial Japanese 
government at the time. 

Together with newsreel footage of the events themselves and 
much hitherto classified information, these 20-years-later afterthoughts 
enable the "NBC White Paper" to present a comprehensive document of the 
hazards and terrific gamble by the Allies in developing the bomb, the 
arguments for and against using it, the final awesome decision by 
President Harry S. Truman to use the weapon without prior warning and 
the now familiar but still terrifying evidence of the holocausts in 
Hiroshima wrecked by the bomb. 

The list of persons who will comment during the course of the 
program indicates the special’s scope and depth of purpose. 

In addition to former President Truman, some of those included 
in the program are Dr. Edward Teller, "father" of the H-bomb; Dr. Leo 
Szilard, one of the physicists who first solved the mystery of the atom 
and who later opposed the use of the bomb; James F. Byrnes, who was 
Secretary of State at the time; Robert Lewis, co-pilot of the Enola Gay, 
the plane that dropped the bomb on Hiroshima; Robert Oppenheimer, the 
physicist who headed the Los Alamos group in the development of the 
bomb, and Lt. Gen. Leslie Groves, who headed the Manhattan Project, 
which was the best kept secret of the war. 

Also on the program are several Japanese ministers and 
officials who recall the atmosphere in Japan at the time and bear out 
President Truman’s assertion that thousands of American soldiers would 
have been killed in an invasion of the Japanese mainland had the bomb 
not been used to end the war. 

(more) 





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The finality of the bomb, punctuated by the complete chaos 
in Tokyo as some military leaders commit suicide and others try to 
isolate the Emperor so a proclamation of surrender cannot be delivered, 
give vivid testimony to the end of not only a war, but of an age, and 
the beginning of an era that is still with us, with its problems not 
only unsolved, but more complex and cataclysmic than ever before. 

- NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT JAN, 5 - 

NBC WHITE PAPER: "The Decision to Drop the Bomb" 

-- NBC News presents a special 90-minute "White 
Paper" report on the events leading to the use 
of the atomic bomb against Japan to end World 
War II. 


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NBC-New York, 12/9/64 










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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 


December 9, 1964 

BOB HOPE'S CHRYSLER COMEDY SPECIAL TO PRESENT PRE-YULETIDE 
MERRIMENT WITH MARTHA RAYE, KATHRYN CROSBY* NANCY WILSON, 

THE BEACHBOYS AND SPECIAL GUEST JAMES GARNER (AS SANTA) 

Spoofs of "Television!and" with Martha Raye and Kathryn (Mrs. 
Bing) Crosby, hit songs by Nancy Wilson and the Beachboys, and an 
adventure with Santa Claus, played by special guest James Garner, will 
be wrapped up as a pre-Yuletide offering on "Chrysler Presents A Bob 
Hope Comedy Special" Friday. Dec. 18 (NBC-TV, 8:30-9:30 p.m. EST, in 
black and white). 

Peter Leeds, Jerome Cowan and Dolores Faith will be featured 
in sketches and Les Brown and his Band of Renown will supply the 
musical background for the full-hour program. Jack Shea directs and 
Mort Lachman is associate producer. 

Hope salutes the holidays in his opening monologue and 
comments on current events at home and around the world. 

In the "Pitiful Place" sketch, life along one of the most 
tear-stained streets in "Televisionland" is lived bravely by George and 
Dorothy Henderson (Hope and Miss Raye) when they learn the truth about 
their daughter Betty (Miss Raye) and her boyfriend Dexter (Hope). 

Another sketch, "Flip-Top Jungle," finds the "king" of 
commercial actors, Rex Unsaturated (Hope), slipping from his throne 
and hiding the fact from his lovely wife, Polly (Kathryn Crosby). 

(more) 

Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 10020 



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2 - Chrysler Presents A Bob Hope Comedy Special 1 


Miss Wilson sings "I’m Beginning to See the Light" and 
"Music That Makes Me Dance" from the Broadway musical "Funny Girl." 

The Beachboys offer their Christmas hit, "The Man with All 
the Toys" and "Dance, Dance, Dance." 

In the final sketch, "Christmas in the Kremlin," Santa Claus 
(Garner) is shot out of the sky over Moscow and his interrogator. Col. 
Borscht (Hope) resorts to using a brainwash expert, exotic Tanya (Miss 
Faith) to keep jolly old St. Nick from his appointed rounds. 

The program was written by Mort Lachman and Bill Larkin, John 
Rapp and Lester White, Charles Lee and Gig Henry with Norman Sullivan 
as consultant. 

--NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 18- 

CHRYSLER PRESENTS A BOB HOPE COMEDY SPECIAL: Bob 
Hope’s pre-Yuletide merriment spotlights Martha 
Raye, Nancy Wilson, the Beachboys and Kathryn (Mrs. 

Bing) Crosby, with special guest James Garner as 
Santa Claus. 


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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


HOLLYWOOD FOREIGN PRESS ASSOCIATION’S GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS 
DINNER WILL BE COLORCAST LIVE ON "THE ANDY WILLIAMS SHOW" 

Movie Star Awards Ceremonies at Los Angeles' Cocoanut Grove Feb. 8 

"The Andy Williams Show" will colorcast the 12th annual Golden 
Globes Award Dinner live from the famed Cocoanut Grove in Los Angeles 
Monday, Feb, 8 (9-10 p.m. EST), as part of its regular series. 

Andy's production company, Barnaby Productions, and producer 
Bob Finkel's Teram Productions recently concluded arrangements for the 
rights to televise the Golden Globe Awards, according to an announcement 
by Alan Bernard, Executive Vice President, Barnaby Productions. 

The Golden Globe Awards, presented by the Hollywood Foreign 
Press Association, are symbolic of star popularity throughout the 
world. The Hollywood membership of the Foreign Press Association 
represents media in 50 countries with a readership of more than 
150,000,000. 

In recent years, probably because more than half of Hollywood' 
motion picture income is derived overseas, the Golden Globe Awards 
have attracted larger turnouts of stars than the Motion Picture Academy 
Oscar Awards. 

Awards to be presented include the C. B. DeMille award -- 
similar to the Thalberg Award of the Motion Picture Academy -- and 
"world favorite male" and "world favorite female" stars both to be 
decided by a poll of readers of foreign newspapers. 

Bob Finkel will produce and Bob Henry will direct. 

o NBC-New York, 12/9/64 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 















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ISTBC TELEVISION NETWORK ISTIDWS 

December 9, 1964 

BURGESS MEREDITH TO PORTRAY NEW PRINCIPAL IN 'MR. NOVAK’ SERIES 
Noted Performer Replaces Ailing Dean Jagger 

Burgess Meredith, stage, film and television star, will 
replace the ailing Dean Jagger in NBC-TV’s "Mr. Novak" series. Jagger 
withdrew by order of his doctor. 

Meredith, an outstanding personality in showbusiness, will 
portray Jefferson High School’s new principal, Martin Woolridge. ("Mr. 
Novak," with James Franciscus in the title role, is presented 
Tuesdays, 7:30-8:30 p.m. EST.) 

Meredith, 55> was born in Cleveland, Ohio, He attended the 
Choir School of the Cathedral of St. John the Devine in New York City; 
preparatory school in Hoosick Falls, N.Y.; and Amherst College, from 
which he holds an honorary Master’s degree. He made his Broadway debut 
in "Little 01’ Boy," had another Broadway role in "She Loves Me Not," 
and then was signed by NBC for title role in the 'Red Davis radio series 

His many screen credits include "Winterset," 'Idiot’s Delight, 
"Of Mice and Men," "The Man on the Eiffel Tower," "The Story of GI Joe" 
and many others. Broadway plays in which he has starred include Winter- 
set," "High Tor" and "The Star Wagon," all written expressly for him by 

Maxwell Anderson. 

Meredith has appeared in many TV drama series including The 
Eleventh Hour," "Sam Benedict," "Naked City" and others. In recent years 
he has turned his talents to directing, and worked in this capacity on 
the film, "The Man in the Eiffel Tower," and in stage productions includ¬ 
ing "Macbeth" and "The Frogs of Spring." 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTIN 


G COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 













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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 


December 9, 1964 

- ’CHRISTMAS CARD TO THE NATION’ WILL BE COLORCAST- 

Sammy Davis, Luboff Choir, Gary Graffman, Jan McArt to Join 
In Holiday Show of Music, Narrative, Performing Toys 

NBC will colorcast its "Christmas Card to the Nation," a jumbo 
holiday show of music, narrative and special features, on Christmas Eve, 
Thursday, Dec. 24 (ll:15 p.m.-12 midnight EST). The talent roster will 
include Sammy Davis, the Norman Luboff Choir, pianist Gary Graffman and 
soprano Jan McArt, Skitch Henderson conducting the NBC Orchestra, and 
Howard Reig as narrator. 

Sammy Davis will read "'Twas the Night Before 
Christmas" to a group of 10 children of United Nations 
personnel. Seven-year-old Tad Holmes will read from the 
Bible. 

Gary Graffman will be soloist with the 
orchestra in a movement, yet to be selected, from a 
Tchaikovsky piano concerto, and Miss McArt will be heard 

in a medley of Christmas songs. 

A large group of old-fashioned toys will perform, 
and Joe Klein at the carillon will play a medley of holiday 
songs ("Christmas Child," "Away in a Manger," "0, 

Tannenbaum" and "Greensleeves"). 

(more) 

Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 10020 










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'2 - ♦Christmas Card to Nation* 


Selections by the Norman Luboff Choir will be a 
holiday medley ("Joy to the World," "0 Little Town of 
Bethlehem" and "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing") and "Drummer 
Boy." 

Skitch Henderson will lead the orchestra in "Have Your¬ 
self a Merry Little Christmas," "Parade of the Wooden Soldiers, " 
"Johnny Has Gone for a Soldier," "The 19th of 
July" and, as finale with the full company, "Silent Night." 

George A. Heinemann will be the executive producer. Richard 
Schneider will be the producer-director, and James Aldrich will write 
the script. 

- NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT DEC. 24 - 

NBC * S "CHRISTMAS CARD TO THE NATION" — Music, 
narrative and special features; with Sammy Davis, 

Norman Luboff Choir, pianist Gary Graffman, 
soprano Jan McArt, performing toys. NBC Orchestra 
conducted by Skitch Henderson. (Color.) 


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NBC-New York, 12/9/64 










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A DEPARTMENT OF NBC NEWS 


December 9, 1964 

FILM CREW GOES TO HAWAII TO SHOOT FINAL FOUR ROUNDS 
OF ACTION IN ’BIG THREE GOLF' COLORCASTS 

A film crew at work: on NBC-TV's "Big Three Golf" series, 
featuring Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Gary Flayer in weekly 18- 
hole matches, moved into Hawaii this week to shoot the final four 
rounds of action. 

The full-hour series will be colorcast over the network for 

eight consecutive Saturdays beginning Jan. 30 (5-6 p.m. EST). 

The first four rounds of the series were filmed last month 

at the famed Firestone Country Club in Akron, Ohio. The final four 
rounds are being filmed at Hawaii's new Mauna Kea Beach golf course 
on the Kona coast. Designed by world-famous golf architect Robert 
Trent Jones, the 7,200-yard championship layout is at the foot of Mauna 

Kea, an extinct volcano. 

Palmer, Nicklaus and Player are engaging in a series of 18- 
hole, medal-play matches, with each gaining one point for every opponent 
he defeats and a half-point for a tie. The golfer scoring the most 
points at the end of the eight rounds will receive $50,000, the runner- 

up $25,000 and the last man $10,000. 

Bob Rosburg, former PGA champion, narrates the series. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, 30 


ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 




















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JACK TRACY 
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2 -x-H NBC TRADE NEWS 

December 10, 1964 

JULIE ANDREWS ENTERS EXCLUSIVE AGREEMENT WITH NBC 

TO STAR IN A NUMBER OF COLOR TELEVISION SPECIALS 

Julie Andrews, who followed Broadway musical successes with 
motion picture hits, has entered into an exclusive agreement with the 
National Broadcasting Company to star on a number of musical color 
specials on the NBC Television Network. 

Announcement of the agreement was made today by Mort Werner, 
Vice President, Programs, NBC-TV Network, who said that the first 
special starring Miss Andrews will be presented in the Spring of 1965 
and the second during the following Fall. 

"NBC is delighted to obtain the services of this most 
versatile star whom we consider to be one of the world’s most talented 
performers," Mr. Werner said. "Miss Andrews’ past rare television 
appearances garnered acclaim from audiences and critics alike and we 
are sure she will have the same success on her new TV specials as she 
has had on Broadway and in Hollywood films." 

The contractual agreements were concluded between NBC and 
Miss Andrews’ representatives, Chasin-Park-Citron agency and Charles 
Tucker of London, England. 

Miss Andrews, the original Eliza Doolittle of Broadway's "My 
Fair Lady," faced her first New York audience at the Royale Theatre 
Sept. 30, 1954, in "The Boy Friend," an imported British musical 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPA 


NY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 



















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2 - Julie Andrews 


lampooning the foibles of the 1920s. Born at Walton-on-Thames in 
1935, Miss Andrews made her professional acting debut in "Starlight, M 
a revue at the London Hippodrome in 1948. She won the role of Polly 
Browne in "The Boy Friend" after her performance in the title role of 
"Cinderella" at the Palladium. Following her "Fair Lady" role. Miss 
Andrews starred in "Camelot" on Broadway. She is currently seen on 
theatre screens starring in "Mary Poppins" and "The Americanization 
of Emily," which will be followed next Spring by "The Sound of Music." 
Miss Andrews’ TV credits include a Carnegie Hall special, a musical 
version of Maxwell Anderson's "High Tor" with Bing Crosby, a musical 
"Cinderella," "The Broadway of Lerner and Loewe" salute with Richard 
Burton, Maurice Chevalier and others; the Ed Sullivan, Dinah Shore and 
Jack Benny shows, and "The Andy Williams Show" of Monday, Nov. 30. 

The dates of NBC’s Julie Andrews color specials will be 

announced. 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/10/64 



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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 10, 1964 

BROWN & WILLIAMSON BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN POUR 
MAJOR BOWL GRID GAMES ON NBC-TV 

The Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corp. has 
purchased sponsorship in four major football Bowl games 
to be televised on NBC-TV, it was announced today by 
Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, 

NBC. 

The Bowl games in which Brown & Williamson 
will advertise are the Sun Bowl, Saturday, Dec. 2 6 ; 
the Sugar Bowl, in color, Friday, Jan. 1 ; the Orange 
Bowl, the first nighttime bowl game, in color, Friday , 
Jan. 1 ; and the Senior Bowl, in color, Saturday, 

Jan. 9 . 

The order was placed through Ted Bates & Co. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 















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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 10 , 1964 

h THE FRENCH REVOLUTION" WILL BE NBC NEWS COLOR SPECIAL 
OPENING NBC NEWS' "OF MEN AND FREEDOM" SERIES 

The French Revolution, a special colorcast about a period 
considered as one of the gateways between medieval and modern times, 
will be presented by the NBC-TV Network Tuesday, Jan. 26 (10-11 p.m. 

EST), William R. McAndrew, Executive Vice President in charge of NBC 
News, announced today. 

The program is a detailed look at the turbulent 12 years 
at the end of the l8th Century that saw the demise of Royalist France, 
the birth of the French Republic and the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte, 
who usurped power and became dictator of France. 

It is the first entry in the NBC News "Of Men and Freedom" 
series, which will attempt to dramatize significant events in history 
that have become the foundations of modern Western man. All the 
programs are being produced by George A. Vicas, head of the NBC News 
European Production Unit, whose documentary, "The Kremlin," gained 
world-wide acclaim last year. 

The Vicas technique in "The Kremlin" has been carried 
further in the filming of "The French Revolution." In the program, NBC 
News correspondent Bernard Frizell will present the prologue and 
epilogue, and actor Michael Redgrave will narrate the body of the story. 
But no actors will be seen. 

Instead, Vicas has made resourceful use of his television 
cameras at all the actual locales where the events took place about 175 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

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years ago to re-create not only the events themselves, but the passions 
and motives of the outstanding leaders of the age and of the mob, 
which often represented the moving force in France at the time. 

Thus, not actors, but the camera and the audience storm the 
Bastille, live the final confusion-filled days of the monarchy and 
experience the beheading of King Louis XVI and the empty itumbrels which 
carried thousands to a similar fate at the guillotine. 

The civil and foreign wars that rocked France, but which 
also forged an empire, are realistically recounted without a single man 
falling in battle before the cameras. 

In like manner, the flavor and philosophies of the succession 
of leaders who ruled France during those days are aptly recaptured by 
descriptions of their actions and quotations of their statements by 
Redgrave, while the camera continues its parallel course through the 
palaces, the meeting halls and the battlefields that are the landmarks 
of the revolution. 

Vicas said that "The French Revolution" six months in the 
making, "dwarfs" his previous productions. He sees it as a fitting 
beginning for the entire "Of Men and Freedom" series, which so far will 
include programs on the Middle Ages, the Reformation and the Spanish 
Armada. 

- NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT JAN. 26- 

"THE FRENCH REVOLUTION" -- NBC News presents a re¬ 
creation of a significant event that has helped 
shape the course and character of modern times. 

(Color. ) j 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/10/64 















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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 


December 10, 1964 

FILM REPORT ABOUT THE BEDSIDE NETWORK, WHICH PROVIDES ENTERTAINMENT 
TO VETERANS 1 HOSPITALS, SCHEDULED ON "TODAY" DAY BEFORE CHRISTMAS 

A film report about the Bedside Network for hospitalized 
veterans, showing the volunteer work of well-known entertainers 
and industry personnel assisting hospital patients record special 
Christmas programs, will be telecast on NBC-TV's "Today" program the 
morning before Christmas, Thursday, Dec. 24 (during the 8:30-9 a.m. 
segment of the 7-9 a.m. EST show). 

The Bedside Network, a year-around project of the Veterans 
Hospital Radio and Television Guild, is a unique service in which 
broadcasters and professional performers volunteer to assist hospitalized 
patients produce weekly radio shows. The programs are recorded and then 
"broadcast" to a network of earphone radios and public-address systems 
in Veterans Administration hospitals to entertain the patients. 

The report, by "Today" reporter Barbara Walters, was filmed 
at Kingsbridge Veterans Hospital in the Bronx, N. Y. Among the 30-odd 
Bedside Network volunteers active the night of the filming, and inter¬ 
viewed by Miss Walters, were actress Barbara Britton, seen assisting 
hospitalized veterans produce and record "The Christmas Carol"; and 

(more) 


Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 10020 




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’Today 1 


singer Kay Elliot and composer-lyricist Dorothy Fields, 
seen leading another group of patients singing Christmas 
carols. The performances by the patients will be replayed 
on the hospital's "bedside network" on Christmas eve. 

Miss Walters also interviewed some of the over 
1,300 patients in the hospital, as well as television 
executive Herb Granath, president of the Bedside Network, 
and singer Jean Tighe, one of the founders of the 16-year- 
old volunteer service. 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/10/64 








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A DEPARTMENT OF NBC NEWS 


THREE GOLF STARS OF NBC-TV’S "BIG THREE GOLF" COLORCASTS 
NAMED IN FIRST ALL-AMERICA SELECTION IN GAME’S HISTORY 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, DEC. 14 


The three golf stars of NBC-TV’s new sports series, 
"Big Three Golf," were named today (Dec. l4) as members of the 
first golf All-America selection in the history of the game. 
They are Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus and Gary Player. 

Balloting by more than 400 members of the Golf 
Writers Association of America, together with sportscasters 
who regularly cover golf on TV and radio, was sponsored by 
Golf magazine. The 1964 All-America roster is announced in 
its current edition. Other outstanding pros similarly 
honored are Bobby Nichols, Ken Venturi, Tony Lema, Julius 
Boros, and Billy Casper. 

Although Gary Player is a native of South Africa, 
he was accorded All-America honors on the basis that he had 
acquired sufficient credits in U. S. tournaments during the 
year. 

"Big Three Golf" will be colorcast on eight 
successive Saturdays, beginning Jan. 30 (5~6 p.m. EST), on 
the NBC-TV Network. Palmer, Nicklaus, and Player will 
compete with each other in the filmed series for prize 
money totaling $85,000. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK. NEW YORK 10020 














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NBC FEATURE 


December 10, 1964 

MEDICINE BOW GENERAL STORE IN 'THE VIRGINIAN' SERIES 
IS OPEN FOR REAL BUSINESS --BUT NOT ON CAMERA 

The Medicine Bow general store seen in the background in 
NBC-TV's "The Virginian" series isn't the sleepy, back-country 
establishment it appears to be. 

Actually it's doing a thriving business and has shown a 
healthy profit during the three years the 90-minute color series 
(Wednesdays, 7:30-9 p.m. EST) has been in production. 

Hidden behind the store's stock of 1890 merchandise are 
counters stocked with candy, soft drinks, magazines and other sundries 
of the modern day. Sliding panels conceal the goods from the camera. 

Executive producer Frank Price conceived the idea of a store 
within a store. Since Medicine Bow is located in the far reaches of 
Universal City Studio's huge backlot, "The Virginian" crew and actors, 
often numbering over 100 persons, are separated from the studio 
commissary by a harbor, several city streets, a few Indian trails, and 
various other sets -- a 10-mile distance. 

To provide the conveniences of modern life to the isolated 
company. Price had the hidden store installed. 

When they say, "The Old West isn't what it used to be," they 
may be talking about Medicine Bow's country store where a tough cowpoke 
can mosey up the counter and order some of those newfangled ice cream 
pops, candy bars or chewing gum. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 













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JACK TRACY ' 

ROOK 320 

2-x-h NBC TRADE NEWS 
December 11, 1964 

SALES TOTALING $l6,000,000--THE LARGEST ONE-MONTH TOTAL IN 
HISTORY OF NBC-TV DAYTIME SALES--RECORDED DURING NOVEMBER 

Sales totaling $16,000,000 (more than half of which 
represents new business) — the largest one-month total in the history 
of NBC-TV Daytime sales — were recorded during November, it was 
announced today by James Hergen, Director of Daytime Sales, NBC Tele¬ 
vision Network. 

"This record-breaking sales month brings to $24,000,000 the 
amount of Daytime sales made in the last eight weeks. A total of 38 
advertisers contributed to this highest daytime total in our history, 
which is clear-cut evidence of increased advertiser recognition of 
NBC-TV’s continuing strong performance in daytime television,” Mr. 

Hergen said. 

The November Daytime sales volume was highlighted by two 
consecutive weeks -- the weeks of the 20th and the 27 th -- during which 
sales totaling over $4,500,000 were recorded. 

Sponsorship orders were placed in "Make Room for Daddy," 
"What’s This Song?" "Concentration," "Jeopardy," "Say When," "Truth 
or Consequences," "Let’s Make a Deal," "Moment of Truth," "The Doctors, 
"Another World," "You Don’t Say’" "The Match Game," and "NBC News 
Morning Report." 

In addition, orders were also placed in six NBC-TV Saturday 
morning programs, "The Hector Heathcote Show," "Fireball XL5* Under¬ 
dog," "Dennis the Menace," "Fury" and "Exploring." 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTIN 


G COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 

































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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 11, 1964 

AUTOLITE DIVISION OF FORD BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN TWO 
NBC-TV PRIME-TIME SHOWS AND IN COVERAGE OF THE 
NATIONAL INVITATIONAL BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

The Autolite Division of Ford Motor Company has purchased 
sponsorship in two prime-time NBC-TV programs for 1965 and in coverage 
of the National Invitational Basketball Tournament, it was announced 
today by Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "Wednesday Night at the Movies," and "Daniel 

Boone." 

The Autolite order was placed through Batten, Barton, Durstine 
& Osborn Inc. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 












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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 11, 1964 

UNION CARBIDE BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN TWO 
NBC-TV PRIME-TIME PROGRAMS FOR 1965 

Union Carbide Corp. has purchased sponsor- 

i 

ship in two prime-time NBC-TV programs for 1965 , it 
was announced today by Don Durgin, Vice President, 
Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "Wednesday Night at the 
Movies" and "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour." 

The Union Carbide order was placed through 
William Esty Company Inc. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATION A 


L BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 












































HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 

December 11, 1964 

BOB HOPE SETTING OUT ON HIS 13TH ANNUAL 'MERRY CHRISTMAS' TOUR 
TO ENTERTAIN AMERICAN SERVICEMEN OVERSEAS; BIG ROSTER OF STARS 
IN HIS TROUPE VISITING SOUTH VIETNAM AND OTHER PACIFIC AREAS 
Highlights to Be Seen in 'Chrysler-Hope Christmas Special' Jan. 15 

Bob Hope will visit another military hot spot this year -- 
South Vietnam -- during his 13th annual "Merry Christmas" tour to 
entertain American troops overseas. 

Hope and his troupe of headliners are scheduled to take off 
Tuesday, Dec. 15 from Los Angeles International Airport for a two-week 
25,000 mile tour of the Far East (Korea), Southeast Asia (Thailand and 
South Vietnam) and the South Pacific (Philippine Islands and Guam). 

Janis Paige, Anita Bryant, Anna Maria Alberghetti, Jerry 
Colonna, John Bubbles, the 1964 Miss World (Ann Sydney), Peter Leeds, 
special guest Jill St. John, and Les Brown and his Band of Renown will 
accompany Hope on this year's Yuletide travelthon. 

Highlights of the overseas performances will be a 90-minute 
telecast, "Chrysler Presents a Bob Hope Christmas Special," on Friday, 
Jan. 15 (8:30-10 p.m. EST). 

Co-sponsored by the Defense Department and the USO, the Hope 
troupe's trek marks the ski-nosed comedian's 24th year of performing 

(more) 


Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York. New York 10020 






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2 - Bob Hope 


for servicemen at home and abroad. Project officers on the trip will be 
Air Force Lt. Colonels Lawrence Glaab and Roland Beasley, of the 
Adjutant General's office in the Pentagon. 

First scheduled stop of the tour will be Korea, where Hope 
plans five shows ranging in location from famed Bayonet Bowl to a 
televised performance in Seoul. 

The troupe will fly Southwest from Korea to Thailand, a first 
visit for world-hopping Hope. Here, performances will be at Karat and 
Bangkok. 

On Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Dec. 26, the troupe will 
be in South Vietnam, another first for Hope, entertaining U. S. 
advisory personnel there. 

No stranger to the firing line, Hope entertained many times 
in combat areas during World War II. In previous Christmas USO trips, 
he took his entertainers to Berlin during the airlift crisis in 1948, 
to the Korean conflict in 1950, and to Guantanamo Bay, after the 
Castro takeover of Cuba in i960. 

From Dec. 27, for three days, the troupe will be in the 
Phillippines first at Clark Field, next at Subic Bay and finally at 
Sangley Point. 

The tour will end on the island of Guam Dec. 30, and the 
troupe will fly back to Los Angeles. 

Jill St. John will be making her first overseas tour with 

Hope. She co-starred with Bob in two of his Chrysler comedy specials, 

"The House Next Door" in 1963 and "Have Girls-Will Travel" in 1964. 

This is Janis Paige’s third such trip, and her second to the Far East 

with Hope. Janis recently completed a long run as star of the 

Meredith Willson musical, "Here's Love" on Broadway. 

(more) 



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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

December 11, 1964 

HIGHLIGHTS OF ANNUAL KING ORANGE JAMBOREE PARADE 
IN MIAMI TO BE PRESENTED ON NBC COLORCAST JAN. 1 
Dennis Weaver to Be Host-Commentator 

Highlights of the annual King Orange Jamboree Parade in 
Miami will be televised in color by NBC-TV Friday, Jan. 1 (ll to 
11:30 a.m. EST), with Dennis Weaver, star of NBC-TV's "Kentucky Jones" 
series, as host-commentator. 

The parade, one of the major features of the 21-day Orange 
Bowl Festival, moves through downtown Miami on New Year's Eve, and the 
taped highlights will be presented the following morning to lead off 
more than 12 straight hours of NBC-TV's holiday color programming. 

The procession will feature 28 marching bands and 52 
brilliantly lighted and decorated floats. TV star Jackie Gleason will 
lead the parade as grand marshal. 

Some of the floats projecting this year's theme of "Famous 
Women" will honor Helen of Troy, Mary Queen of Scots, Queen Isabella, 
Joan of Arc, Marie Antionette, Catherine the Great, Queen Guinevere, 
Amelia Earhart and Betsy Ross. Riding each float will be beautiful 
girls in costumes of that particular era. 

The last float in the line of march is traditionally the 
Queen's float, and will carry the 1965 orange B^wl Queen, Linda Egland, 
and her court of four princesses, Carol Koberlein, Judy White, Sharon 
Jordan and Pam Gardiner. The float also will have six live cockatoos 

(more) 



PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 



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in cages, an orange fountain in the center and beautiful orange and 
shocking pink foliage bathed in orange light. Measuring 80 feet long, 
it is the largest Queen's float ever in an Orange Bowl parade. 

Following the King Orange Jamboree Parade colorcast on 
Jan. 1, NBC-TV will televise, live and in color, the Tournament of Roses 
Parade in Pasadena, Calif. (11:30 a.m. EST), the Sugar Bowl Game in 
New Orleans (1:45 p.m. EST), the Rose Bowl Game in Pasadena (4:45 p.m. 
EST) and the Orange Bowl Game in Miami (7:45 p.m. EST). 

t-—— NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT JAN. 1 - 

] 

KING ORANGE JAMBOREE PARADE -- Taped highlights of 
annual New Year's Eve procession in Miami featuring 
beautiful girls and colorful floats. Dennis Weaver 
is the host-commentator. (Color.) 


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NBC-New York, 12/11/64 














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TSTBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


SERIES PREMIERE 


December 11, 1964 


FIRST WEEK'S STORYLINES FOR 'MOMENT OF TRUTH,' 
MONDAY-THROUGH-FRIDAY DAYTIME DRAMA SERIES 

Dr. Robert Wallace, an associate professor of clinical 
psychology at Carlyle University, differs with his wife, Nancy, on his 
prospects of filling the opening of a full professorship, in the 
premiere episode of NBC-TV's new daytime drama series, "Moment of 
Truth," Monday, Jan. 4 (2 p.m. EST). 

Dr. Wallace has an outside, private practice, and one of 
his patients is Mrs. Leeds, wife of a millionaire who is a member of 
Carlyle's board of trustees. She has marital and age problems. 

Douglas Watson and Louise King star as Robert and Nancy 
Wallace, and Michael Dodds and Barbara Pierce as their children, 

Johnny and Sheila. Mr. and Mrs. Leeds are portrayed by Robert Goodier 
and Lynne Gorman. John Bethune portrays Dr. Gil Bennet, an associate 
who is very jealous of Dr. Wallace and Ivor Barry plays Dr. Wingate, 
head of the psychology department at Carlyle. 

Storylines for the rest of the week are: 

Tuesday, Jan. 5 -- Dr. Wallace receives a call from Mr. 

Leeds and learns that Mrs. Leeds didn't come home after her session. 
Soon after, she arrives at the Wallaces intoxicated. 

Wednesday. Jan. 6 — Dr. Wingate informs Dr. Wallace that 
Mr. Leeds has charged that he is having an affair with his wife, and 
that he has been suspended from the university without a hearing. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


































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'Moment of Truth' 


Thursday, Jan. 7 -- Regardless of the charges, Dr. Wallace 
tells Mrs. Leeds that she can continue as his patient. Meanwhile, 
Wallace learns that his son, Johnny, has been hospitalized with 
tetanus. 

Friday, Jan. 8 -- Johnny's chances for recovery are about 
50-50. The Wallaces' daughter, Sheila, blames her father for Johnny's 
illness because he didn't give him a tetanus shot after he removed the 
fish hook that caused the illness. 

"Moment of Truth" is produced by John Trent. Robert Maxwell 
is the packager of the series that is taped in Toronto, Canada, and also 
scheduled on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's network. 

NBC-New York, 12/11/64 





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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

PRODUCTION APPOINTMENTS ANNOUNCED FOR 1 HULLABALOO 1 

The production staff members of NBC-TV's new full-hour 
musical show for young people, "Hullabaloo," which will be seen on 
NBC-TV in color, Tuesday nights from 8:30-9:30 p.m. EST, beginning 
Jan. 12, were announced today. 

As previously announced, the show will be produced by Gary 
Smith, whose credits include "The Judy Garland Show," several seasons 
as art director of Perry Como telecasts and producer-director of several 
"Bell Telephone Hour" programs and the NBC-TV Summer series of the 
New Christy Minstrels. 

"Hullabaloo" will be directed by Steve Binder, who has been 
director of "The Steve Allen Show," "The Edie Adams Show," the 
syndicated series "The Oscar Brown Show," and "The TAMI Show" (a 
closed circuit production which won favorable mention in the trade 
press). 

The program will be written by Frank Peppiat and John 
Aylesworth, who have worked together on the Judy Garland, Perry Como 
and Andy Williams shows, among others. It will have as its music 
director the conductor-arranger Peter Matz. Choreography will be by 
David Winters and scenic design by Gene McAvoy. Jim Stanley will be 
the associate producer of "Hullabaloo." 

The program will originate in color from NBC-TV's Peacock 
Studio in the RCA Building, New York City. 

-----o - NBC-New York, 12/11/64 



PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


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CREDITS FOR ’HULLABALOO' COLORCASTS ON NBC-TV 


Program: 

’’Hullabaloo” 

Time: 

NBC-TV colorcasts, Tuesdays, 8:30-9**30 p.m. 
EST 

Hosts: 

Various (for the premiere of Jan, 12: 

Jack Jones.) 

Format: 

A full-hour music-and-comedy show, ranging 
from musical comedy to folk music, from 
sophisticated nightclub fare to "big 
beat music" -- all with appeal to young 
people. 

Weekly segment taped in 
London: 

Pop music impresario Brian Epstein, who 

will introduce various British performers 

Producer: 

Gary Smith 

Associate Producer: 

Jim Stanley 

Director: 

Steve Binder 

Writers: 

Frank Peppiat and John Aylesworth 

Choreographer: 

David Winters 

Music Director: 

Peter Matz 

Scenic Designer: 

Gene McAvoy 

Assistant to Producer: 

Lee Miller 

Lighting Director: 

Bill Klages 

Technical Director: 

Heino Ripp 

Audio Director: 

Neal Smith 

Origination: 

NBC-TV's Peacock Studio, RCA Building, 

New York City. 

Sponsors: 

Various 


NBC Press Representative: Betty Lanigan (New York) 

-o- NBC-New York, 12/11/64 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









































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NBC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 


December II, 196 ^ 


CORRECTION, PLEASE 

WHPL, Winchester, Va., joined the NBC Radio 
Network on Dec. 1. ( NOTE: In story released Dec. 9, 

it was incorrectly stated that the station "has become 
reaffiliated" with the network . ) 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 
























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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 11, 1964 

FRANK McGEE TO BE ANCHORMAN OF DEC. 27 NBC NEWS TELEVISION 
SPECIAL REVIEWING 1964 EVENTS; ROSTER OF CORRESPONDENTS 
AND THEIR TOPICS ARE ANNOUNCED FOR HOUR PROGRAM 

NBC News correspondent Frank McGee will be anchorman on the 
full-hour special to be presented Sunday, Dec. 27 (NBC-TV, 4-5 p.m. 
EST), which will review 1964 events and developments on the world 
scene. This program, as announced, preempts the "Sunday" telecast of 
that date. 

Several NBC News correspondents will appear on the program, 
each assigned to a particular area of news that affected Americans' 
lives during the past year. 

Frank McGee, in addition to his anchor duties, will review 
developments in trouble spots throughout the world, and news in the 
area of religion. John Chancellor will be concerned with U. S. 
politics, culminating in the national elections. Edwin Newman will 
discuss books, movies and plays. Bill Ryan's topic is fashions. 
Herbert Kaplow will review civil rights and the law, and Jay Barbree 
will report on developments in science and the space race. 

Aline Saarinen will review culture and the arts, Elie Abel 
will cover world politics, and Joe Garagiola the top sports events of 
the year. 

Craig Fisher will produce the special program for NBC News. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 










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TWO MOVIE ROLES FOR JAY NORTH, TITLE STAR OF T DENNIS THE MENACE' 

Jay North, title star of NBC-TV's "Dennis the 
Menace" (Saturdays, 11 a.m. EST), has completed a starring 
role in the soon-to-be-released movie, "Zebra in the Kitchen." 
Soon, the l4-year-old actor will fly to India, where he will 
co-star with Clint Walker in an adventure story, "Maya the 
Magnificent." Jay's trip to India will be his first outside 
the continental United States. 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/11/64 



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2-x-h NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 14, 1964 

NBC 1 S MIMI HOFFMEIR CHOSEN TO REPRESENT U.S. WOMEN 
IN BBC RADIO SERIES, "ABROAD IS DIFFERENT" 

Mimi Hoffmeir, Manager, Program Analysis, NBC, has been 
chosen to represent the women of the United States for the British 
Broadcasting Corporation radio series, "Abroad Is Different." A 25 - 
minute interview with Miss Hoffmeir has been taped for broadcast on 
the BBC Thursday, Dec. 31. 

"Abroad Is Different" will present interviews with women from 
around the world, who maintain both a career and a home and family. 

The object of the series is to reflect the influence of the society in 
which she lives upon the woman — and also the woman's influence on her 
society. 

BBC’s Douglas Stuart conducts the interview with Miss 
Hoffmeir. Women from four other countries are interviewed in additional 
programs in the BBC series. 

In private life. Miss Hoffmeir is Mrs. Edward Brother. She 
resides in Wilten, Conn., with her husband and two daughters. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 







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NBC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 


December 14, 1964 

KDTH JOINS NBC RADIO NETWORK 

KDTH, Dubuque, Iowa, today became 
affiliated with the NBC Radio Network, it was 
announced by Tom Knode, Vice President, Station 
Relations, National Broadcasting Company. 

F. Robert Woodward. Jr., is General Manager 
of KDTH, which is owned and operated by the Dubuque 
Telegraph Herald. KDTH operates full time on 
1370 KC with power of five kilowatts. 

Mr. Knode said, "KDTH serves a tri-state 
area including Iowa, Illinois and Wisconsin, with 
a retail sales level nearing $300,000,000. We 
welcome the station to the NBC Radio family." 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 
















































































THE PREMIERE COLORCAST OF "HULLABALOO" WILL HAVE WOODY ALLEN 
NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS, JOEY HEATHERTON, ZOMBIES AS GUESTS 


Jack Jones Is Premiere Host; Brian Epstein’s London-Originated 


Segment Also a Highlight of Tuesday, Jan. 12 Hour 


Woody Allen, the New Christy Minstrels, Joey Heatherton, and 
the Zombies have been signed as guest stars on the Tuesday, Jan. 12 
premiere of NBC TV’s color musical show "Hullabaloo" (8:30-9:30 p.m. 
EST). As previously announced, singer Jack Jones will act as host for 
the first show in the series. 

Woody Allen, a comedian with strong appeal to the young 
audience, toward whom "Hullabaloo" is directed, was introduced to the 
network television audience by Jack Paar on the "Tonight Show." 
Subsequently, he has been a frequent guest on NBC-TV's "The Merv 
Griffin Show," "The Jack Paar Program," "The Tonight Show Starring 
Johnny Carson" and "That Was the Week That Was." 

The New Christy Minstrels, one of the nation's most popular 

singing groups, starred in their own NBC-TV series in the Summer of 

1964. Seven men and two girls make up the group which has toured the 

United States and Canada in one-night stands which have taken them 

more than 200,000 miles each year since the group was formed. In 

addition to singing, each member of the New Christy Minstrels plays 

several instruments. Top sellers in the recording field, the group 

entertained at the Washington Armory last January for President Johnson. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






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'Hullabaloo 1 


Joey Heatherton first came to national television prominence 
when she was featured on Perry Como's TV show. A singer, dancer and 
actress, the teenage beauty has since appeared on NBC-TV's "The 
Virginian," Bob Hope's "Chrysler Theatre" series, "Mr. Novak" and "The 
Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson." 

The Zombies are a singing-instrumental quintet (piano, drums, 
two guitars and double bass) from St. Albans, England. Great 
favorites among the young people in England, they came to best-selling 
record prominence with their recording of "She's Not There." Prior to 
that, they had played for local clubs and school dances in the Herts 
area of England, until they won a musical competition sponsored by an 
English newspaper, and with it, a great following among British teen¬ 
agers . 

The segment of "Hullabaloo" which will be produced in London 
by pop impresario Brian Epstein will feature English artists also. 
Their names will be announced later. Epstein, discoverer of the 
Beatles, is probably the most influential figure in popular music in 
Great Britain and is credited with having popularized the "English 
sound." 

"Hullabaloo" will be produced by Gary Smith and directed by 
Steve Binder. It will originate in NBC-TV's Peacock Studio in New 
York. 

_ _NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT JAN. 12-——j 

"HULLABALOO" -- Woody Allen, the New Christy Minstrels, Joey 
Heatherton and the Zombies will be guests, with Jack Jones 
host, on the premiere of the new colorcast musical series 
for young people. Pop impresario Brian Epstein will intro¬ 
duce his regular London-originated segment. 

-o- NBC-New York, 12/14/64 











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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 14, 1964 

SECRETARY OF STATE DEAN RUSK IN FULL-HOUR 
DISCUSSION ON NBC NEWS TV SPECIAL JAN. 3 

Secretary of State Dean Rusk: will participate in an hour- 
long conversation with two NBC News correspondents, Elie Abel and 
Robert Goralski, in a special program Sunday, Jan. 3 (NBC-TV, 4-5 p.m. 
EST). 

This NBC News special replaces the "Sunday" show, regularly 
scheduled at this hour. 

Secretary Rusk will discuss a wide range of situations and 
problems facing the United States around the world. 

Elie Abel is NBC News' diplomatic correspondent. Robert 
Goralski is NBC News'State Department correspondent. 

j——-NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT JAN. 3- 

NBC NEWS SPECIAL -- Secretary of State Dean 
Rusk in an hour-long discussion on problems 
facing the U. S. around the world. With NBC News 
correspondents Elie Abel and Robert Goralski. 

__ ___ __,_I 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK. N. Y. 10020 


























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NBC-TV NETWORK PROGRAM 


'FAMOUS ADVENTURES OF MR. MAGOO' AND 'KENTUCKY JONES' j 

TO EXCHANGE TIME PERIODS STARTING SATURDAY, JAN. 2 j 

I_ _J 

"The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo" and "Kentucky 
Jones," both telecast Saturday nights on the NBC-TV Network, 
will exchange time slots starting Saturday, Jan. 2 . 

"Kentucky Jones," which stars Dennis Weaver in the 
title role and co-stars Rickey Der as Ike and Harry Morgan as 
Seldom Jackson, will be telecast 8-8:30 p.m. EST. "The Famous 
Adventures of Mr. Magoo," starring Jim Backus as the voice of 
Magoo, will be colorcast 8:30-9 p.m. EST. 


NBC-New York, 12/14/64 








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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 

"CELEBRITIES AND THEIR TREES" TO BE SEEN ON "HALLMARK HALL OF FAME" 
FOLLOWING PRESENTATION OF MENOTTI'S "AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS" 

"Celebrities and Their Trees," a special holiday offering, 
will be seen on "Hallmark Hall of Fame" following the presentation of 
Menotti's opera "Amahl and the Night Visitors" on the same NBC-TV 
colorcast Sunday, Dec. 20 (4-5 p.m. EST). 

The feature will include the showing of a score of Christmas 
trees in Hallmark's Fifth Avenue Gallery, which were decorated accord¬ 
ing to the designs suggested by noted people. The exhibition of these 
trees is open to the general public as a salute to the New York 
Children's Aid Society. 

Among the celebrities to be seen on the program with trees 
they have designed are the Rev. Dr. Norman Vincent Peale and Julie 
Harris, with Roddy McDowall acting as host. Msgr. Timothy Flynn will 
represent Francis Cardinal Spellman, who has a tree in the collection. 
Trees with designs by Ogden Nash, Helen Hayes, Phyllis McGinley, Carol 
Burnett and Jonathan Winters also will be shown. 

As previously announced, the color presentation of "Amahl and 
the Night Visitors" will be the 15th showing of the opera on NBC-TV. 

The work was commissioned for the NBC Opera Company by the late Samuel 
Chotzinoff, NBC's General Music Director. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/14/64 


Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 10020 




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NBC FEATURE 
December 14, 1964 

SELECTED SHORT SUBJECTS COME TO NBC-TV 
Latest Will Be "Big Day ' 65 " Following "Wednesday Movie" Dec. 23 

Selected short subjects once made in Hollywood for the movie 
bills of another day are again being made in Hollywood for TV's movie 
bills of today. 

Now in production at NBC-TV is a 10-minute short-shot called 
"Big Day ' 65 ," starring Chuck Connors, Chick Hearn, Rose Bowl Queen Dawn 
Baker, Orange Bowl Queen Linda Egland and Sugar Bowl Queen Lynn 
Baughman. 

"Big Day ' 65 " is scheduled to air on NBC-TV Wednesday, 

Dec. 23 (10:50-11 p.m. EST) immediately following the "Wednesday Night 
at the Movies" presentation of "Atlantis, the Lost Continent" (9 to 
10:50 p.m. EST). 

Taped in color, except for black and white film clips, the 
short presents a kaleidoscopic glimpse of activities around the nation 
on New Year's Day, highlights of the 1964 football season leading to 
bowl bids at six colleges and sportscaster Hearn's forecast of bowl 
game scores. William Bennington is producer-director and Art Weingarten 
the writer. 

The program is the second in a series of 10 being made by the 
network to round out two-hour time blocks after the telecasting of 
feature films of shorter running time. 

First of the selected shorts was a 17-minute nighttime version 
of "The Match Game," starring Michael Landon and Dennis Weaver with 
Gene Rayburn as host. It was telecast Dec. 5 following presentation of 
the feature, "Bad Day at Black Rock." 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 




' : 

















CREDITS FOR ’MOMENT OF TRUTH’ ON NBC-TV 

Time: 

NBC-TV Mondays through Fridays (2-2:30 p.m. EST), 

premiering Jan. 4, 1965 . 

Stars: 

Louise King, Douglas Watson, Ivor Barry, Michael 

Dodds and Barbara Pierce. 

Format: 

Half-hour dramatic series, set in Carlyle 

University, a medium-sized Midwestern university, 

dealing with the problems of a psychology 

professor at the university and in his private 

practice. The main characters are Mrs. Nancy 

Wallace (Louise King); Dr. Robert Wallace, 

associate professor of psychology (Douglas 

Watson); Dr. Russell Wingate, head of Carlyle’s 

psychology department (Ivor Barry); and Johnny 

and Sheila Wallace, the Wallaces' children 

(Michael Dodds and Barbara Pierce). 

Packaged by 

Robert Lawrence Productions, Canada. 

Producer: 

John Trent 

Director: 

James Gatwood 

Writer: 

Claire Kennedy 

Production 
Assistant: 

Diane Chamberlain 

Sponsors: 

Various 

Unit manager: 

Peter Eliot 

Video Editor: 

Keith Bennett 

Audio: 

Ron Pledger 


Lighting Director: Chris Holmes 

NBC Press 

Representative: Fred Espy (New York) 


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NBC-New York, 12/14/64 










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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 


December 14, 1964 

YULETIDE REMINISCENCES OF HOLLYWOOD AND BROADWAY 
STARS TO BE BROADCAST ON NBC RADIO'S "MONITOR" 

Yuletide reminiscences of Hollywood and Broadway personalities 
will be broadcast on NBC Radio's "Monitor" throughout the weekend of 
Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 19 and 20 . 

Among celebrities to be heard are Bob Hope, Jack Benny, Victor 
Borge, Deborah Kerr, Anthony Quinn and Robert Morley. 

Also, Van Johnson, Leslie Caron, Lome Greene, Joseph Cotten, 
Julie Andrews, Robert Preston, Tony Randall, Connie Francis, Tony 
Bennett, Leo Durocher, Billy Daniels, Steve Lawrence, Alan King, Anna 
Maria Alberghetti, and Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne. 

-o- 


Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 10020 










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JACK TRACY 
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2-x-H NBC TRADE NEWS 

December 15, 1964 

CHEVROLET BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN NBC-TV WEDNESDAY NIGHT PROGRAMS, 

•THE VIRGINIAN’ AND ’WEDNESDAY NIGHT AT MOVIES’ 

The Chevrolet Division of the General Motors Corporation has 
purchased sponsorship in NBC-TV’s popular Wednesday night programs, 

"The Virginian" and "Wednesday Night at the Movies," it was announced 
today by Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, 

National Broadcasting Company. 

Chevrolet cited two major reasons for placing the order In 
NBC-TV’s Wednesday night schedule, Mr. Durgin said. 

"The principal reason is color programming," Mr. Durgin 
stated. "’The Virginian’ and the majority of ’Wednesday Night at the 
Movies' are broadcast in color, and Chevrolet has found the presentation 
of color commercials to be one of their most effective advertising 
vehicles." 

"Secondly, Chevrolet sought to further balance its weekly 
network television announcements. With exclusive sponsorship of NBC-TV’s 
colorcasts of ’Bonanza’ on Sundays, and sponsorship in two Wednesday 
night programs on NBC-TV, plus exposure on another network on Thursdays, 
Chevrolet has developed a schedule providing a smooth flow of informa¬ 
tion to precede the most active selling periods -- weekends — at 
Chevrolet dealers across the country." 

The Chevrolet order was placed through Campbell-Ewald. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK. NEW YORK 10020 





















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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 15, 1964 

NEW CONCEPT IN MERCHANDISING--COMBINING TIME SALES WITH PROMOTION-- 
ANNOUNCED BY NBC DOMESTIC ENTERPRISES FOR 'ASTRO BOY' SERIES 

A new concept in merchandising -- combining time sales with 
promotion -- was announced today by Norman Lunenfeld, Manager, 
Merchandising, NBC Domestic Enterprises. NBC Merchandising is offer¬ 
ing, on a city by city basis, a package promotion to be tied in with 
NBC Enterprises’ "Astro Boy" series. 

Cards bearing illustrations of planets will be sold to local 
sponsors of the series. The cards will then be inserted both in sponsor 
merchandise and other goods exclusively licensed to bear "Astro Boy" 
Identification. Appropriate chain store and certain other retail out¬ 
lets will also be offered the cards to be given away as traffic builders. 

Holders of a set of four different cards will be eligible 
for a prize and those collecting a five-card set will be entitled to a 
prize of greater value. Six different cards will give the bearer a 
chance at a drawing for which the grand prize will be a trip to Cape 
Kennedy for a visit to the Astronauts. 

A reciprocal benefit will be provided both to the local station 
and to the local sponsors. The local station is able to include a 
package promotion with its time sales, and the local sponsor has no need 
to design his own exclusive promotion. 

NBC Merchandising will provide a number of compatible display 
pieces to the local retailers and chains which will tie in with the 
promotion. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 



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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 15, 1964 
GENERAL CIGAR BUYS INTO 6 PRIME-TIME NBC-TV SERIES 

General Cigar Co., Inc. has purchased sponsorship 
in six prime-time NBC-TV programs for 1965, it was announced 
today by Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network 
Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.," "That 
Was the Week That Was," "The Virginian," "Daniel Boone," 
"International Showtime" and "Kentucky Jones." 

The agency for General Cigar is Young & Rubicam. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 
































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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING'S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 15, 1964 


NBC NEWS ANNOUNCES TV COVERAGE 
OF THE INAUGURAL BALL JAN. 20 

NBC News will cover the Inaugural Ball in Washington, 
following complete TV coverage of the Inaugural ceremonies 
Wednesday, Jan. 20, it was announced today by Chet Hagan, 
producer of the network’s Inauguration telecasts. 

Anchor team for the Inaugural Ball, which will go 
on the air at 11:15 p.m. EST, will be NBC News correspondents 
John Chancellor and Aline Saarinen, with correspondents 
Nancy Dickerson and Ray Scherer participating. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK. N. Y. 10020 














































NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 15, 1964 

NATIONAL POLITICS, COVERING PRIMARIES, CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS, 
RATED AS 1964'S MOST IMPORTANT STORY IN POLL CONDUCTED 
BY THE NBC NEWS SYNDICATION SERVICE 

National Politics, covering the broad area of primaries, 
campaigns and the elections, rated as the top news story of 1964 In 
a poll conducted by the NBC News Syndication service. 

Results of the poll among NBC News executives, editors, 
domestic and foreign correspondents, and clients of NBC News Program 
Service were announced today. Burroughs Prince, Manager of NBC News 
Syndication, conducted the survey. 

A half-hour television program based on the results of the 
survey will be taped Dec. 20 for release to NBC-TV affiliate stations 
Dec. 21. 

The top news stories in the order of their selection follow 

1. National Politics 

2. Civil Rights 

3. Small Scale Wars 

4. Changes in World Leadership 

5. The Cold War 

6. Aftermath of the Assassination of President Kennedy. 

7. Disasters 

8. The Space Race 

9. The Supreme Court Order on Reapportionment 

10. Religion. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. v 10020 


















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2 - Poll 


The top sports story of the year, was the Olympics, held in 
Japan and covered by NBC Sports, in the opinion of these who responded 
to the poll. 

Civil Rights, rated second, included the passage of the Civil 
Rights Law, rioting in the North, violence during the registration drive 
(including murders and bombings in Mississippi,), and the attempts at 
integration in the South. 

Small Scale Wars, ranked third, included the conflict in 
Vietnam, the confrontation in the Tonkin Gulf, the Congo and Cyprus. 

Changes in World Leadership embraced the dismissal of 
Khrushchev, the installation of new Soviet leaders, the elections in 
Britain, and the death of Nehru, followed by the change in leadership 
in India. 

In the consideration of the Cold War, major factors were the 
ideological conflict between the Soviet Union and Red China, China's 
development of the bomb, and the nation* s growing hostility, and the 
U. S. vis-a-vis Cuba. 

The Aftermath of the Assassination included news of the trial 
of Jack Ruby, the impact of the Warren Report, and the nation-wide 
observation of the first anniversary of President Kennedy's death. 

In the category of Disasters, interest focused upon the 
Alaska earthquake, plane disasters, floods, drought, and the Portuguese 
train wreck. 

Two major developments dominated the Space Race -- the U. S. 
Ranger hit on the moon, and the Soviet feat in putting three men in 
one capsule into orbit. 


(more) 



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3 - Poll 


The Supreme Court order on reapportionment and its effect on 
political lineups in several states placed ninth in the list. The 
tenth choice, Religion, accented the Ecumenical Council's citing 
Catholicism's current movement of "aggiernamento," or "getting in tune 
with the times." Other major events were Pope Paul's trip to India 
and the election of the first Negro moderator by the Presbyterian 
Church. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/15/64 






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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 15* 1964 

i 

PAUL ANKA TO BE HOST OF SECOND 
‘HULLABALOO 1 COLORCAST ON NBC 

Recording 3tar, nightclub entertainer, composer and actor 
Paul Anka will be the host for NBC-TV*s second "Hullabaloo" colorcast 
on Tuesday, Jan. 19 (8:30-9:30 p.m. EST). 

Anka, still in his early twenties, has been a consistent top 
recording artist for the past seven years. Among his best-selling 
records are "Diana," "Put Your Head on My Shoulder," "Summer's Gone" 
and "You Are My Destiny." In addition to composing many of his own 
hit tunes, Anka has written songs for other performers. 

As an added string to the versatile performer's bow, he has 
been very successful as a panelist on television game shows, including 
NBC-TV's "The Match Game." 

"Hullabaloo" a one-hour musical program designed for the 
young audience will have its premiere on Jan. 12, with Jack Jones as 
its initial host. The program will be produced by Gary Smith and 
directed by Steve Binder. Guest performers for the show of Jan. 19 will 
be announced. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20. NEW YORK 





























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NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 


( December 15, 1964 

THE SWINGLE SINGERS--CHORUS THAT SINGS SWINGING BACH--TO PRESENT 
TWO-HOUR MUSICAL PROGRAM ON 1 TODAY* NEW YEAR'S MORNING 

The Swingle Singers, an eight-voice chorus that sings swinging 
Bach accompanied by the jazz rhythm of a string bass and drums, will 
offer selections from their hit record albums when they prsent a two- 
hour musical program on NBC-TV*s "Today" show New Year’s morning, 

Friday, Jan. 1 (7-9 a.m. EST). 

The group, which was organized in Paris two years ago by 
Alabama-born Ward Swingle, sings fugues and preludes by vocally 
approximating the sounds of chamber-music instruments. All the 
singers are French, except for Swingle, and all are classically trained 
musicians. Swingle, a graduate of Cincinnati's College Conservatory 
of Music, will be interviewed by "Today's" Hugh Dowxis and Jack 
Lescoulie about the group and its music. 

Their two albums, "Bach's Greatest Hits" and "Going Baroque," 
have sold more than 250,000 copies and won for the singers this year's 
Grammy Award as the best new recording artists. Last May they 
performed at a Presidential concert at the White House. 

Their "Today" performance, taped before the singers returned 
to France after their first U. S. tour, will include the following 
selections by Bach: "Prelude for Organ" ("Sleepers Awake"), the Largo 
from the "Concerto in F Minor Harpsichord," the Bouree from the 
"English Suite No. 2," Sinfonia from the "Partita No. 2," the Aria 
from the "Suite in D Major," the Fugue in D Minor from "The Art of the 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 







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2 - ♦Today 1 


Fugue," and the Prelude No. 9 and Prelude in C Major (both from the 
"Well Tempered Clavier, Second Book"). 

They will also offer the "Allegro" from Handel's "Concerto 
Grosso, Op. 6 No. 4," a Fugue by Vivaldi as transcribed by Bach, and 
three selections by Mozart: the First Movement from the Piano 
Sonata in C Major, the Last Movement of "Eine Kleine Nachtmusik," and 
the composer's arrangement of the traditional "Twinkle, Twinkle 
Little Star." 

NBC-New York, 12/15/64 



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NBC-TV NETWORK PROGRAM 


ROBERT VAUGHN, 'MAN PROM U.N.C.L.E.' STAR, ADDS VISIT 
TO HOLY LAND TO SCHEDULED RUSSIAN VACATION 

While the rest of the country observes Christmas, 
NBC-TV's Robert Vaughn will be on his way to the Holy Land 
-- by way of Moscow. 

Vaughn, star of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." series, 
has added a journey to Israel to his scheduled Russian 
vacation. 

The Moscow trip, which came about when Vaughn 
met Valery Brumel, Russia's Olympic high jump champion, 
while the Soviet athlete was touring with the U.S.S.R.'s 
track and field team in Southern California last Summer, 
will be topped off with a flight to Israel and a visit to 
Jerusalem. 

Vaughn, who will fly from Los Angeles on 
Christmas morning, will spend four days in Moscow, and 
five days in Israel, before returning to Hollywood to 
resume the role of U.N.C.L.E. agent, Napoleon Solo on 
Jan. 5. 

( NOTE : Now seen on Tuesdays, 8:30-9:30 p.m. 

EST, "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." will be presented in a 
new time period -- Mondays 8-9 p.m. EST -- starting 
Jan. 11.) 


NBC-New York, 12/15/64 











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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 16 , 1964 

TOP HOLLYWOOD PERFORMERS TO BE JOHNNY CARSON’S GUESTS 
DURING TWO WEEKS OF "TONIGHT" ORIGINATIONS IN BURBANK 

"The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" will originate in 
NBC-TV’s Burbank, Califcolor studios during the first two weeks in 
February, it was announced today by Mort Werner, Vice President, 
Programs, NBC Television Network. 

During the weeks of Feb. 1-5 ana Feb. 8-12 (NBC-TV color, 
Monday through Friday, 11:15 p.m.-l a.m. EST), the comedy, music and 
conversation which are the ingredients of "Tonight" will be presented 
by a California-based Johnny Carson, his announcer Ed McMahon and the 
show’s music director Skitch Henderson. 

According to Producer Art Stark, the program will present top 
Hollywood performers, just as it did on the highly successful initial 
visit of "Tonight" to California in February, 1963. At that time, such 
celebrities as James Stewart, Mayor Sam Yorty of Los Angeles, Phyllis 
Diller, George Burns, Laurence Harvey, Lee J. Cobb, Betty Hutton, and 
many others appeared with Carson. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 







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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 


December 16, 1964 


CAST CHANGE 


BALLET STAR SONIA AROVA TO BE SEEN 
IN CHRISTMAS MUSIC PROGRAM OF 
THE ‘BELL TELEPHONE HOUR’ 

Sonia Arova will be seen in the Christmas music 
program of the "Bell Telephone Hour" on Tuesday, Dec. 22 
(NBC colorcast, 10-11 p.m. EST) in place of Violette Verdy. 
Miss Verdy had to withdraw because of a leg injury. 

Miss Arova, a world renowned ballet star, will 
appear with Edmund Novak in a pas de deux from the Toy 
Shop Scene of the ballet "Coppelia." Novak choreographed 
it based on the original by Saint-Leon. Music is by 
Delibes. Miss Arova has been seen on the "Bell Telephone 
Hour" twice previously. 

Maureen O'Hara is singing hostess of the program. 
Guest stars include Martha Wright, Phyllis Curtin, Howard 
Keel and the Columbus Boychoir, in addition to the ballet 
duo. Donald Voorhees conducts the orchestra. 

-o- 


Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 10020 










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; 


















JACK TRACV 
ROOM 320 

2 - X - H 

NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 

December 17, 1964 

TREVOR HOWARD WILL STAR AS NAPOLEON BONAPARTE IN 

'HALLMARK HALL OF FAME' COLORCAST OF AN ORIGINAL 
TV DRAMA BY MILLARD LAMPELL, 'EAGLE IN A CAGE' 

An original television drama, "Eagle in a Cage," starring 
Trevor Howard in the role of Napoleon Bonaparte, will be taped in color 
by NBC-TV's "Hallmark Hall of Fame" in February for presentation at a 
date yet to be announced. 

The original television drama by Millard Lampell, novelist, 
poet, playwright and author of the television cantata "The Lonesome 
Train" (based on the funeral procession of Abraham Lincoln), was 
commissioned by Hallmark. The play will tell the story of Napoleon from 
1815 to 1819 when he was in exile on the island of St. Helena. 

According to producer-director George Schaefer, who will 
produce "Eagle in a Cage," the drama tells the story of the humanizing 
influence which a very young English schoolgirl and an Irish doctor 
exert on the man who set out to rule the world, when they regard him 
not as an emperor but as a friend. 

Trevor Howard, who won an Emmy Award two seasons ago for his 
portrayal of Benjamin Disraeli in the "Hallmark Hall of Fame" production 
of "The Invincible Mr. Disraeli," is one of Great Britain's most 
distinguished actors. He has appeared in such motion pictures as 
"Bridge on the River Kwai," "Mutiny on the Bounty," "Father Goose" with 
Cary Grant and Leslie Caron, and "Von Ryan's Express" with Frank 
Sinatra. (more) 



PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 





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JSfJ 


2 


'Hallmark Hall of Fame' 


Millard Lampell has won numerous awards for his work, includ¬ 
ing a Peabody Award for a drama titled "Sometime Before Morning," and 
the Sidney Hillman Award for last season’s "East Side/West Side" drama 
"No Hiding Place." 

"Eagle in a Cage" will go into rehearsal in New York in 
January for taping in NBC's Brooklyn color studios in February. 

The next color presentation of the "Hallmark Hall of Fame" 
will be the 15th NBC telecast of "Amahl and the Night Visitors," 
Menotti’s Christmas opera, on Sunday, Dec. 20. The following month, 
on Thursday, Jan. 28, Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne will star in the 
Emmet Lavery drama, "The Magnificent Yankee." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/17/64 






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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 17, 1964 

RICHARD D. CASPER BECOMES NBC RADIO ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE 

Richard D. Casper has joined the NBC Radio Network as an 
account executive, it was announced today by Robert G. Baal, Director 
of Sales, NBC Radio Network. 

Casper previously headed his own advertising and sales 
promotion company, Richard D. Casper Inc. He also had been an account 
executive at WCBS-TV in New York and at WNTA-TV in New Jersey. 

Earlier, he was director of advertising for Ringling Bros. & Barnum & 
Bailey Circus. 

Casper is a graduate of Bowling Green University in Ohio. He 
lives in Manhattan with his wife and two children. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 
































* 

. 

■ 




NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 17, 1964 

ROBERT McCORMICK TO BE ANCHOR MAN FOR NBC NEWS' 

RADIO COVERAGE OF THE INAUGURAL BALL 

NBC News correspondent Robert McCormick will be the anchor 
man for the coverage of the Inauguration Ball in Washington, Wednesday, 
Jan, 20 , on NBC Radio. Also participating will be correspondents Wilson 
Hall, Peter Hackes, Richard Harkness, Morgan Beatty, Charles Quinn and 
Ron Nessen. NBC Radio will broadcast activities at the ball from 
11 p.m. to 12 midnight, EST. 

McCormick, Harkness and Quinn will be at the Sheraton Park 
and Shoreham Hotels, which will be connected by a canopy on the night 
of the Inauguration to create the effect of one area of festivities. 

Hall and Beatty will be in the National Guard Armory and Hackes and 
Nessen in the Hotel Mayflower, two additional ball locations. 

Preparations are in readiness for NBC Radio to pick up 
interviews with President Johnson, who is expected to be at the 
Sheraton Park and Shoreham affair between 11 p.m. and 12 midnight EST. 

The NBC-TV Network, as previously announced, is also 
scheduling comprehensive NBC News coverage of the Inaugural Ball. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

















. 




. 

. 

. 








HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 

December 17, 1964 

ART JAMES TO SING IN PUBLIC FOR FIRST TIME AS HOLIDAY 
SURPRISE ON CHRISTMAS PROGRAM OF 'SAY WHEN'; 

SONG WRITTEN BY ASSOCIATES 

l — — .. . - - ■ .... ■ ■■ ■ .. . 

Art James, star of NBC-TV's game series, "Say When," will 
provide a Yuletide surprise when he sings for the first time in public 
on the show's Christmas program to be colorcast Thursday, Dec. 24 
(12 noon to 12:30 p.m. EST). 

A bass baritone who has been taking vocal instruction for 
the past year, James will sing an original composition, "It's 
Christmas Again," which is the first creative effort of a new song¬ 
writing team. 

"It's Christmas Again" has lyrics by "Say When" Associate 
Producer Ron Kweskin and music by Music Director Carmen Mastren. 
Mastren, a guitarist who played with the Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey 
orchestras during the heydey of the big bands in the 40s, also 
will provide the musical accompaniment for James. The lyrics.are: 

"It's Christmas Again" 

Snow flakes and holly. 

Good will toward men. 

Can only mean that it's Christmas again. 

(more) 


Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 10020 

























" 










2 


’ Say When 1 


Trees all a-glitter 
In every den, 

Each one announcing it’s Christmas again. 

Beautiful voices from out of the night 
Sing of a season that’s filled with delight. 

And for the children. 

The moment is when 

Santa returns and it’s Christmas again. 

Mistletoe hanging above every door. 

Stealing a kiss and then asking for more. 

And though the season must finally end,* 

Next year will come and it’s Christmas again. 

("Say When" is colorcast Monday through Friday, 12 noon 
to 12:30 p.m. EST on the NBC-TV Network.) 




NBC-New York, 12/17/64 



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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 17 , 1964 

-EDUCATED PREDICTIONS- 

Past Performances Indicate NBC Newsmen Will Call Shots 

Correctly Among Their "Projection ’65" Forecasts 

If past performance is indication, then viewers of NBC News' 
annual year-end review and forecast, "Projection '65," will get a peek 
at the future through some educated predictions on world events by key 
NBC News correspondents. 

As in past years, a highlight of "Projection ‘65," to be 
colorcast on NBC-TV Tuesday, Dec. 29 (10-11 p.m. EST), will be 
predictions for the following 12-months in world affairs. Over the 
years, many of these forecasts have come true. Following are some of 
the projections made by NBC Newsmen last year, which events have since 
borne out. 

John Rich, NBC News’ correspondent in Tokyo, was one of the 
few to predict Soviet Premier Khrushchev's ouster. "During 1964," said 
Rich, "Peking will speak for most of the world’s Communist parties, 
except those in Europe. She will use that voice to try to bring about 
the downfall of Nikita Khrushchev in Russia." 

"Britain’s year ahead will be divided by a general election," 
said Joseph C. Harsch, NBC News’ Senior European correspondent. 

"Before it happens, Tories will unleash prosperity and woo Russians. 
After it happens, the winner will curb prosperity and woo Germans... 

The likeliest winner will be Labor." 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

































* 













2 


"Projection ’65" 


"In 1964," predicted Bernard Frizell, Paris bureau chief, 
"President de Gaulle will achieve an operational atomic force vhich he 
will wield as a nuclear fist to beat the U. S. into agreement that 
France have a greater voice in Alliance decisions." 

NBC News’ Bonn correspondent Welles Hangen predicted that, in 
1964, "the Berlin Wall will become slightly more porous, but the 
division of Germany will remain." 

Wilson Hall, who last year covered South America, stated that 
"Brazil cannot make it through another year of economic and political 
chaos. In 1964 the military will oust President Goulart." 

Elie Abel, NBC News’ Diplomatic correspondent said there will 
be no major East-West crisis in Europe next year, and added: "President 
Johnson will carry forward the Kennedy effort to reach limited agree¬ 
ments with the Soviet Union. A foreign minister's conference is 
possible, but no summit." 

In national affairs. Congressional correspondent Ray Scherer 
predicted: "President Johnson will get a tax bill...(and) a civil 

rights bill." 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/17/64 




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NBC FEATURE 


December 17, 1964 

HOW 'PROFILES IN COURAGE' PRODUCER SAUDEK LOCATED 
THE SPOKEN WORDS OF JOHN F. KENNEDY THAT 
CONCLUDE EACH DRAMA ON THE SUNDAY SERIES 

On "Profiles in Courage" over NBC-TV Sunday evenings (6:30 to 
7:30 p.m. EST) the late President Kennedy's voice is heard speaking 
words he never got a chance to tape. 

The explanation for this seeming paradox lies in a chain of 
events that goes back to 1957. 

At that time, John F. Kennedy was a Senator and -- more to 
the point — an author. He had just written that year's Pulitzer Prize 
winning book, "Profiles in Courage," stories of Americans who had 
risked their careers and popularity in unusual displays of personal 
courage. 

Because of his book. Senator Kennedy was invited by Robert 
Saudek, producer of the television series, "Omnibus," to narrate one of 
the series' programs, "Call It Courage." 

This was the first meeting between these two men, but not the 
last. They met next in 1961. By this time the Senator had become the 
President. And by this time the President had chosen Saudek to bring 
"Profiles in Courage" to television. 

In the producer's initial conversation with President Kennedy 
on the latter's role in the series, it was agreed that the President 
should not be seen. Also, it was agreed that he also would not be 
heard, as narrator, except for one possibility. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 





















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2 - Profiles in Courage* 


Saudek hoped that each drama in the series could end with 
the President’s narration of the book’s closing paragraph: 

"The stories of past courage can teach, they can offer hope, 
they can provide inspiration. But they cannot supply courage itself. 

For this each man must look into his own soul." 

The producer’s plans to record this narration were 
shattered by the President’s assassination. 

Before the start of the series, Saudek, for no particular 
reason, felt moved to rerun his kinescoped recording of the 1957 
program. To his utter surprise, because he had completely forgotten it, 
the program closed with the paragraph in question. And in the voice 
of John F. Kennedy. 

Now each episode of "Profiles in Courage" ends with John F. 
Kennedy speaking the words he never got a chance to tape. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/17/64 






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HOLIDAY NEWS FROM NBC 


December 21, 


A Merry 

Christmas 

T o 

All, 

And 

to All 

A Go 

o d Year 


NBC Press Dep 


TRACY 

320 


2 - X - 


1964 


a r t m e n t 


Press Department, National Broadcasting Company Thirty Rockefeller Plaza New York, New York 100 u 20 







































































NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 21, 1964 

CARNATION BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN 4 NBC-TV PRIME-TIME SHOWS 

Carnation Company has purchased sponsorship in four prime¬ 
time NBC-TV programs for 1965, it was announced today by Don Durgin, 
Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "Daniel Boone," "Wednesday Night at the 
Movies," "Saturday Night at the Movies" and "Mr. Novak." 

The Carnation order was placed through Erwin Wasey, 
Ruthrauff & Ryan Inc. 

CARTER PRODUCTS BUYS INTO 'SATURDAY NIGHT AT MOVIES' 

Carter Products Inc. has purchased sponsorship in "Saturday 
Night at the Movies" during the 1965 season, it was announced today 
by Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The Carter order was placed through Sullivan, Stauffer, 
Colwell & Bayles Inc. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 















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' 







NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 21, 1964 

WHO'S WHO IN NBC NEWS 


William R. MeAndrew 

Executive Vice President in charge of 
NBC News 

Julian Goodman 

Vice President, NBC News 

Robert J. Northshield 

General Manager, News 

Carl Lindemann Jr. 

Vice President in charge of NBC Sports 

Rex Goad 

Director, News 

Donald Meaney 

Director, News Programs 

Eugene Juster 

Director, News Film 

James A. Jurist 

Director, Business Affairs 

Edward Stanley 

Director, Public Affairs 

Jerry Madden 

Director, Special News Projects 

William B. Monroe Jr. 

Director, News, Washington 

Leonard Allen 

Director, News Operations, Washington 

Chet Simmons 

Director, Sports 

Malcolm R. Johnson 

Manager, NBC News 

Russell C. Tornabene 

Manager, News Operations, New York 

Prank Donghi 

Weekend Manager, News 

Arthur Wakelee 

Manager, Owned Stations .News 

Burroughs H. Prince 

Manager, Syndication (National Program 

Service) 


(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 



























■ 























«. 








• "■ 

» 

' ' i- 



2 - Who's Who in NBC News 


Richard Kellerman 
George Heinemann 
Frank Jordan 
Dick Kutzleb 
James Harper 
William A. Corley 
Robert Shafer 
A1 Burchard 
Doris Ann 
Leslie Vaughan 
John S. Klaric 
Robert Loweree 
Lefferts McClelland 
David Klein 
John Krumpelbeck 
Reuven Frank 
Irving Gitlin 
Milton Brown 


NEW YORK 
Chet Huntley 
Edwin Newman 
Frank McGee 
Merrill Mueller 
Frank Blair 


Manager, News Planning 

Manager, Public Affairs 

Manager, Election Planning 

Manager, Local Radio and Television News 

Night Manager, NBC News 

Manager, News, Chicago 

Manager, News, West Coast 

Manager, News, San Francisco 

Manager, Religious Programs 

Manager, Administration, New York 

Manager, Administration, Washington 

Supervisor of Film Editing 

Manager, News Film 

Manager, Newsfilm Facilities 

Manager, Film Procurement 

Executive Producer, NBC News 

Executive Producer, Creative Projects 

Coordinator, NBC News Information Services 

NBC NEWS CORRESPONDENTS 


Pauline Frederick 
Bill Ryan 
Joseph Michaels 
Morgan Beatty 
Robert Teague 


Gabe Pressman 
Jim Hartz 
Wilson Hall 
Geoffrey Pond 
Charles Quinn 


(more) 







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4 - Who's Who in NBC News 


PARIS 


Bernard Frlzell 

Correspondent, Bureau Chief 

Frank Bourgholtzer 

Correspondent 

Claude Favler 

Cameraman 

John Peters 

Cameraman 

Louis Hepp 

Manager, Paris Office 


ROME 


Irving R. Levine 

Correspondent 

John Drake 

Cameraman 


TOKYO 


John Rich 

Correspondent 

Jack Fern 

Producer 


HONG KONG 


James Robinson 

Correspondent 

Grant WoIfkill 

Cameraman 


RIO DE JANEIRO 


Tom Streithorst 

Correspondent 

Pedro Torre 

Cameraman 


SAIGON 


Garrick Utley 

Correspondent 

Drew Pearson 

Cameraman-Correspondent 


ATHENS 


Henry Toluzzi 

Cameraman 


BEIRUT 


Dean Brelis 

Correspondent 

(more) 












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5 - Who 1 s Who In NBC News 


WASHINGTON 
John C. Klaric Jr. 
Harry Griggs 
Jack Perkins 
George Allen 
John Travieso 
Fred Montague 
Robert Gelenter 
Leroy Anderson 
Bradford Kress 
George Sozio 
David Wiegman 
William Richards 
John Langenegger 
John Hofen 
John Levy 
Charles Hoagland 
Lewis Bernhardt 
Leo W. McDonald 
Sheldon Fielman 
CHICAGO 
James Harden 
Floyd Kalber 
Neill Boggs 
Earle Crotchett 
Bruce Powell 


NATIONAL NEWS BUREAUS 


Administrative Manager 

Assistant Desk Supervisor 

Writer 

Writer 

Writer 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Supervisor, News, Chicago 
Correspondent 
Correspondent 
Cameraman 
Cameraman 
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6 - Who's Who in NBC News 


CHICAGO (CONT'D) 


George Lussow 

Cameraman 

James Holder 

Cameraman 

Charles Boyle 

Cameraman 

Hal Kluhe 

Soundman 

Richard Oakes 

Soundman 

Paul Allen 

Soundman 

Charles Baker 

Writer 

John Erp 

Writer 

Walt Grisham 

Writer 

Les Crystal 

Writer 

Luke Hester 

Writer 

Robert G. Cram 

Writer 

Ralph Myers 

Writer 

E. Robert Lissit 

Writer 

Richard Fisher 

Writer 

John Gibbs 

Writer 


LOS ANGELES 


Ed Conklin 

Editor, NBC News, West Coast 

Bruce Cohn 

Manager, News Operations, Pacific 
Division 

Roy Neal 

Correspondent 

Elmer Peterson 

Correspondent 

Tom Pettit 

Correspondent 

Fred Rheinstein 

Producer-Director 

James Dooley 

Writer 

Ray Cullin 

Writer 

Robert Goggin 

Writer 

Ed Adler 

Writer 7 


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LOS ANGELES (CONT'D^ 

Edwin Haaker 

Dexter Alley 

Gene Barnes 

Richard Smith 

Tom Brannigan 

Jack Courtland 

Jim Coughey 

Gene Coffee 

Ted Mann 

BOSTON 

Arthur Gaskill 
George McAleenan 
MIAMI 
Ed Arnow 
Cloyd Taylor 
DALLAS 

Maurice Levy 
Henry Kokajan 
Clarence Risser 
Irvin Gans 
OKLAHOMA CITY 

Scott Berner 

Gerald Green 
Chet Hagan 
A1 Morgan 

Ted Yates (Washington) 


Writer 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Cameraman 

Soundman 

Correspondent 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Cameraman 

Soundman 

Soundman 

Cameraman 

PRODUCERS 

George Vicas (Europe) 
A1 Wasserman 
Frank DeFelitta 
John J. Sughrue Jr. 
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8 - Who *s Who in NBC News 


Lou Hazam (Washington) 

Stuart Schulberg (Washington) 


PRODUCERS (CONT’D) 
Craig Fisher 
Fred Freed 


Robert Asman (Washing!;on) 

Ed Scherer 


George Murray 

Doris Ann 


Don Herbert 

Lawrence E. Spivak 

Daniel O’Connor 

Eliot Frankel 

(Europe) 

Lucy Jarvis 

DIRECTORS 


James Kitehe11 

Jack Dillon 


Robert Priaulx 

Fred Rheinstein (Los Angeles) 

Thomas Priestley 

Robert Doyle 

(Washington) 

Frank Pacelli 

Ralph Howard 

Peterson (Washingtc 

Martin Hoade 

Charles Jones 

i (Washington) 

Marvin Einhorn 

Larry Owen 


Jim Gaines 

Lynwood King 


Don McDonough 

NEW YORK WRITERS 


James Aldrich 

Larry Ganger 

Ric Ballad 

James Boozer 

Dan Grable 

Leonard Probst 

Dick Bruner 

Richard Graf 

Alan Smith 

William J. Boyle 

Robert Farson 

Douglas Stone 

Kenneth Brodney 

Ray Hasson 

Barbara Walters 

Charles Coates 

James Holton 

Thomas M. Tomizawa 

Dennis Dalton 

William Hoth 

Robert Toombs 

Donald M. Dixon 

Mort Hochstein 

Sumner Weener 

James Courtney 

Frank Kelley 

Henrik Krogius 

Ken Donoghue 

David Lent 

John Starkey 

David Englander 

Leonard Leddington 

Raymond Weiss 


(more) 






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9 - Who*8 Who In NBC News 



NEW YORK WRITERS (CONT’D) 

Lamar Falkner 

Peter Ochs 

Eugene Farinet 

Harrison Lilly 

William Fitzgerald 

Jerry Jacobs 

John Lord 

Walter Littell 

Helen Marmor 

Alan Mohan 

Robert McCarthy 

Robert E. Mack 

James Quigley 

Joseph Mehan 

Russ Willis 

Walter Millis 

Arthur Still 

NEW YORK CAMERAMEN. TECHNICIANS 

Cameraman 

Simon Avnet 

Cameraman 

Nathan Cohen 

Cameraman 

Gerald Yarus 

Cameraman 

Michael Clark 

Cameraman 

Eugene Broda 

Cameraman 

Robert Donahue 

Cameraman 

Doug Downs 

Cameraman 

Frank Follette 

Cameraman 

Joseph Vadala 

Cameraman 

Richard Bombard 

Cameraman 

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Cameraman 

Jerome Gold 

Soundman 

A1 Schuster 

Soundman 

Jose Valle 

Soundman 

John Singleton 

Soundman 

James Geraghty 

Soundman 

Charles Hipszer 

Soundman 

Jonathan Oakley 

Soundman 

(more) 





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10 - Who *s Who in NBC News 


NEW YORK CAMERAMAN, TECHNICIANS (CONT'D) 


Hiram Brown 

Soundman 

Marvin Wolff 

Soundman 

Henry Makrin 

Soundman 

James Zoltowski 

Soundman 

William Baer 

Film Processing Coordinator 

"THE HUNTLEY-BRINKLEY 

NBC NEWS PROGRAM STAFFS 

REPORT" 

Chet Huntley 

Correspondent 

David Brinkley 

Correspondent 

Reuven Frank 

Executive Producer 

Eliot Frankel 

Producer for Europe 

William B. Hill 

Associate Producer (N.Y.) 

Robert Mulholland 

Regional News Manager (Midwest) 

Don Roberts 

Regional News Manager (West Coast) 

William Corrigan 

Associate Producer (Washington) 

Jack Fern 

Associate Producer (Far East) 

Irwin Safchik 

News Editor 

Walter Kravetz 

Director (N.Y.) 

Ray Lockhart 

Director (N.Y.) 

Charles Sieg 

Director (N.Y.) 

Frank Slingland 

Director (Washington) 

Richard Hunt 

Writer (N.Y.) 

Wallace Westfeldt 

Writer (N.Y.) 

David Teitelbaum 

Writer (N.Y.) 

Pat Trese 

Writer (N.Y.) 

(more) 







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11 - Who's Who in NBC News 


"THE HUNTLEY-BRINKLEY REPORT" 

(CONT'D) 

Jack Perkins 

Writer (Washington) 

Henry Griggs 

Writer (Washington) 

Stanley Rotkewicz 

Program Manager 

Gerald Polikoff 

Supervising Film Editor 

"TODAY" 


Hugh Downs 

Host 

Jack Lescoulie 

Panelist 

Frank Blair 

Panelist 

A1 Morgan 

Producer 

Paul Cunningham 

Associate Producer 

Jim Gaines 

Director 

Larry Owen 

Director 

John Dunn 

Editor 


"MEET THE PRESS ' 11 


Lawrence E. Spivak 

Producer 

Betty Cole 

Associate Producer 

Ned Brooks 

Moderator 

Frank Slingland 

Director 


"NBC WHITE PAPER" 


Irving Gitlin 

Executive Producer 

A1 Wasserman 

Producer 

Fred Freed 

Producer 

Len Giovannitti 

Associate Producer 

William Quinn 

Production Manager 

(more) 








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12 - Who's Who In NBC News 


"SUNDAY” 

Prank Blair 

Nancy Dickerson 

Ray Scherer 

Aline Saarinen 

Edwin Newman 

Joe Garagiola 

Craig Fisher 

"GULF INSTANT SPECIALS 

Frank McGee 
Chet Hagan 
Jerry Jacobs 
Karl Hoffenberg 
Robert Priaulx 
Eugene Farinet 
"EXPLORING" 

Dr. Albert Hibbs 
Ed Scherer 
Lee Miller 
Don McDonough 
LOU HAZAM NEWS UNIT 

Lou Hazam 
Daniel Karasik 
Constantine Gochis 
Bert Ivry 


Host 

Reporter 

Reporter 

Reporter 

Reporter 

Reporter 

Producer 

Correspondent 

Producer 

Associate Producer 
Associate Producer 
Director 

News Editor-Writer 

Host 

Producer 

Associate Producer 
Director 

Producer 

Associate Producer 
Supervising Film Editor 
Production Supervisor 


NBC NEWS EUROPEAN PRODUCTION UNIT 

George Vicas 


Warren Trabant 


Producer 

Production Supervisor 
(more) 








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13 - Who t s Who in NBC News 


"WATCH MR. WIZARD 11 


Don Herbert 

Producer-Host 

Frank Pace Hi 

Director 


NBC RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS 


Doris Ann 

Executive Producer 

Martin Hoade 

Producer-Director 

Frank Pacelli 

Director 

Mary James 

Associate Producer 


"NBC NEWS SATURDAY REPORT" 


Charles Jones 

Producer 


ELECTION PLANNING UNIT 


Frank Jordan 

Manager 

I.A. Lewis 

Administrator 


SPORTS DEPARTMENT 


Chet Simmons 

Director 

David Kennedy 

Coordinator 

Peter Molnar 

Executive Producer 

Lou Kusserow 

Producer 

Barney Nagler 

Producer 

Harry Coyle 

Director 

Ted Nathanson 

Director 

Leonard Dillon 

Sports Editor, "Monitor" 

Roy J. Silver 

Newswriter, "Monitor" 

0 NBC-New York, 12/21/64 









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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


2-x-H NBC TRADE NEWS 

December 22, 1964 

FIRST PROGRAM SERIES DESIGNED EXPRESSLY FOR NBC OWNED TV STATIONS, 
"EVERYTHING’S RELATIVE," TO BE LAUNCHED IN FEBRUARY 

The first TV series designed especially for the NBC Owned 
Television Stations, and the debut of the series in early February 1965, 
were announced today by Raymond W. Welpott, Executive Vice President in 
charge of the NBC Owned Stations and Spot Sales Division. 

The series is "Everything’s Relative," a new concept in 
family programming in which two families of four compete for prizes. 

The program will be broadcast five days a week at midday by each of the 
NBC Owned Stations: WNBC-TV, New York; WRCV-TV, Philadelphia; WRC-TV, 
Washington; KNBC, Los Angeles; and WMAQ-TV, Chicago, where it will 
originate. 

Mr. Welpott said the new program is a development stemming 
from the efforts of the newly-formed Market Services Department, which 
explores new program sources for the NBC Owned Stations. He added that 
he expects a continuous flow of programs and ideas from the department 
to fill the need for developing new program sources, as he emphasized 
last Fall. 

"Everything’s Relative" will feature Jim Hutton, popular 
television personality from Minneapolis-St. Paul, as host and quiz¬ 
master. The series will be produced by the NBC Owned Stations 
Division in association with New Merritt Enterprises, whose principals, 
E. Roger Muir and Nick Nicholson, devised the program format. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK. NEW YORK 10020 















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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 22, 1964 

S. C. JOHNSON BUYS SPONSORSHIP IN 3 PRIME-TIME NBC-TV PROGRAMS 

S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc., has purchased sponsorship in 
three prime-time NBC-TV programs for 1965, it was announced today 
by Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "Flipper," "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." and 
"Wednesday Night at the Movies." 

The order was placed through Benton & Bowles, Inc. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 


























NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 22, 1964 

GERBER PRODUCTS CO. BUYS INTO 3 PRIME-TIME NBC-TV SHOWS 

Gerber Products Co. has purchased sponsorship in three prime¬ 
time NBC-TV programs for 1965* it was announced today by Don Durgin, 
Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "Mr. Novak," "Flipper" and "Karen." 

The Gerber order was placed through D'Arcy Adv. Co. Inc. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 
































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■ 










NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



BILL COLLERAN OF TV AND MOVIES WILL BE CO-DIRECTOR OF NBC-TV'S 
"MARY MARTIN PRESENTS EASTER AT RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL" 


Bill Colleran, who has been associated with leading television 
and motion picture projects, will he co-director of NBC-TV's holiday 
special, "Mary Martin Presents Easter at the Radio City Music Hall." 

Miss Martin will star as performer and hostess of uhe 90- 
minute colorcast, which will be taped in New York next March. The air 
date will be announced. The special will feature the famous Music Hall 
Rockettes and ballet company, a 20-voice chorus, specialty acts, and 
will show the splendor of the Music Hall in imaginative production 
numbers. 


Gower Champion will be producer-director of the program, as 
previously reported. 

Colleran ! s TV credits include directing assignments on "Your 
Hit Parade" from 1951 to 1955, and on TV specials which starred Perry 
Como, Debbie Reynolds, Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Burl Ives. He 
was executive producer of last season’s "The Judy Garland Show" and 
producer-director of the "Polly Bergen Show" in 1957-58. 

Colleran recently directed the Electronovision production of 
the Broadway presentation of "Hamlet," starring Richard Burton, which 
was released nationally by Warner Bros, in films, he worked on "13 Rue 
Madeleine," "Boomerang," "Lost Boundaries" and "Windjammer." 

Colleran and his wife, actress Lee Remick, formed their own 
independent company, which produced the film, "Experiment in Terror," 
starring Miss Remick. 




NBC-New York, 12/22/64 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 































■ 




























NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 22, 1964 

NBC NEWS FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS WILL RETURN TO U.S. 

FOR "PROJECTION >65" AND 10-CITY SPEAKING TOUR; 

DATES, CITIES, MODERATORS ARE LISTED 

1 -- 

A 10-city cross-country tour by NBC News foreign 
correspondents, to address prominent groups about important news 
developments in their assigned areas, will begin Monday, Jan. 4, 
in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

The correspondents are returning to the U. S. to appear on 
"Projection ’65," NBC News’ annual year-end review and forecast, to be 
colorcast on NBC-TV Tuesday. Dec. 29 (10-11 p.m. EST). The program 
also will be broadcast on the NBC Radio Network (including WNBC 
11:05 p.m. to midnight). 

The correspondents who will appear on "Projection '65" and 
then go on the tour are: Joseph C. Harsch from London, Bernard Frizell 
from Paris, Welles Hangen from Bonn, Irving R. Levine from Rome, James 
Robinson from Hong Kong, Frank Bourgholtzer from Paris (he was Moscow 
correspondent until the Soviets closed that bureau, and he recently 
returned there to cover the change in Russia’s leadership), Tom 
Streithorst from Rio de Janeiro, and Dean Brelis from Beirut. Robert 
Goralski, NBC News’ State Department correspondent, will join them on the 
tour. Other NBC News' correspondents will serve as moderators in each 

city. 

Following are the dates, cities, host groups and moderators: 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 





























. 





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2 - Correspondents tour 


Monday, Jan. 4 — World Affairs Council at the Pitt-Hilton 
Hotel, Pittsburgh. Frank McGee moderator. 

Tuesday. Jan. 5 -- World Affairs Council at the Hilton Hotel, 
San Francisco. Elmer Peterson moderator. 

Wednesday, Jan. 6 — World Affairs Council at the Biltmore 
Hotel, Los Angeles. Elmer Peterson moderator. 

Thursday, Jan. 7 -- Texas Christian University and Station 
WBAP at the Will Rogers Auditorium, Fort Worth. Elie Abel moderator. 

Friday, Jan. 8 World Affairs Council and Station KSD at 
Kiel Auditorium, St. Louis. Merrill Mueller moderator. 

Monday, Jan. 11 — World Affairs Council at the Sheraton 
Hotel, Philadelphia. Merrill Mueller moderator. 

Tuesday, Jan, 12 — Foreign Policy Association at the 
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, New York City. Chet Huntley moderator. 

Wednesday, Jan. 13 -- The National Press Club at the Press 
Club, Washington, D. C. John Chancellor moderator. 

Thursday, Jan. 14 — The Executives Club of Chicago at the 
Sherman Hotel, Chicago. John Chancellor moderator. 

Friday, Jan. 15 -- World Affairs Council at Harvard 
University*s Sanders Theatre, Boston. Merrill Mueller moderator. 

In each city, the correspondents will summarize developments 
during the past year in the area to which they have been assigned, and 
then will answer questions from the audience. 


o 


NBC-New York, 12/22/64 














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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


2-x-H NBC TRADE NEWS 


December* 23, 1964 

COMPLETE SPONSORSHIP IS ANNOUNCED FOR NBC-TV’S 
COLORCASTS OF 3 BOWL GAMES JAN. 1 

Complete sponsorship of NBC Sports color coverage of three 
Bowl games on New Year's Da y was announced today by Richard N. McHugh, 
Manager, Sports and Special Program Sales, NBC Television Network. 

Sponsors (and their agencies) of the three sold-out Bowl game 
telecasts Friday, Jan. 1 are: 

Sugar Bowl (Syracuse vs, L.S.U., 1:45 P.M. EST) : Sponsored 
by United Motors Service Division of General Motors Corp. (Campbell- 
Ewald Co.),* Colgate-Palmolive Co. (Ted Bates & Co.); Aetna Life 
Insurance Co. & Affiliated Companies (Remington Advertising); and 
Georgia-Pacific Corp. (McCann-Erickson Inc.). 

Rose Bowl (Michigan vs. Oregon State. 4:45 P.M. EST) : 
Sponsored by Chrysler Corp. (Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn) and 
The Gillette Co. (Maxon Inc.). 

Orange Bowl (Alabama vs. University of Texas, 7»4p P.M. EST) : 
Sponsored by Chrysler Corp. (Batten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn); 
Bristol-Myex’S Co. (Doherty, Clifford, Steers & Shenfield Inc.); Brown & 
Williamson Tobacco Corp. (Ted Bates & Co.); Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. 
(Young & Rubicam Inc.); Pabst Brewing Co. (Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc.); 
Lewis-Howe Co. (McCann-Erickson Inc.); and Carter Products Inc. 
(Sullivan, Stauffer, Colwell & Bayles Inc.). 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 









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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



CREDITS FOR NBC-TV NETWORK'S COLOR COVERAGE 
OF 76TH ANNUAL TOURNAMENT OF ROSES PARADE 


Time: NBC-TV colorcast Friday, Jan. 1, 11:30 a.m. 

to 1:45 p.m. EST. 

Origination: Pasadena, Calif. 

Commentators: Lome Greene (of NBC-TV's ’’Bonanza") and 

Betty White, assisted by Stanley Hahn, past 
president of Tournament of Roses Associa¬ 
tion, and NBC-TV stars Fess Parker and Pat 
Blair of "Daniel Boone," Debbie Watson of 
"Karen" and Chuck Connors of "Branded." 

i 

Announcers (Pre-parade 

activities): Lome Greene and Roy Neal. 

Format: On-the-spot coverage of the 76 th annual 

Tournament of Roses Parade, with five coior 
cameras placed at strategic locations along 


Producer: 

Director: 

Associate Producers: 

Unit manager: 

Sponsors (and Agencies): 

NBC Press 

Representatives: 


the parade route. 

Bill Bennington 
Dick McDonough 

Howard Ross and Art Weingarten. 

Jack Watson 

Minute Maid Corp. (McCann-Erickson Inc.) 

and Hi-C (Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample). 

Doug Gordon (Burbank) and Bob Goldwater 
(New York). 

_ NBC-New York, 12/23/64 

ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NAT.ONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 













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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 24, 1964 

NBC NEWS TO REVIEW OUTSTANDING EVENTS AND CEREMONIES 
OP INAUGURATION IN SPECIAL TV PROGRAM 

I 

"inauguration ’65," a half-hour review of the outstanding 
events and ceremonies of Inauguration Day, will be presented that 
evening, Wednesday, Jan. 20, by NBC News on NBC-TV, with correspondent 
Frank McGee (7:30-8 p.m. EST). 

The special broadcast will summarize NBC News* complete 
comprehensive coverage of the Inauguration of President Johnson. 
Coverage of the Inaugural Ball will be broadcast later that night 
(11:15 p.m. EST to 1 a.m. EST). 

For the Inauguration coverage, NBC News’ anchor men Chet 
Huntley and David Brinkley will be stationed at the Capitol during 
the swearing-in ceremonies and at Lafayette Park during the 
Presidential review of the Inauguration Parade. Other NBC News 
correspondents and their positions at the Inauguration follow: 

Ron Nessen, parade correspondent; John Chancellor at the White 
House, Frank McGee at Lafayette Park, Ray Scherer at the Capitol, 

Edwin Newman at the Treasury, Robert Abernethy, covering Vice 
President-Elect Hubert Humphrey; Nancy Dickerson, Herbert Kaplow 
and Robert Goralski, special assignments. 

In covering the Inaugural Ball, NBC News will use four 
of its key correspondents who are familiar with all facets of 
this colorful event. They will be: 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 





























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"Inauguration *65" 


John Chancellor, NBC News White House correspondents; 
Nancy Dickerson, who drew critical acclaim for her work at the 
national political conventions; Aline Saarinen, noted for her 
reports on art, architecture and the mores of our time; and Ray 
Scherer, a veteran correspondent in the nation’s capital. 

"Heretofore," said producer Chet Hagan, "the Inaugural 
Ball has been looked upon primarily as a social event. We feel, 
after researching Inaugurals of the past, that it is a major news 
story and we are going to be covering it as such." 

"Inauguration ’ 65 ," will be sponsored by Eastern Air 

Lines Inc. 




NBC-New York, 12/24/64 



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NBC NEWS 

_BROA DCASTING'S LA R GEST NEWS Q RGA NIZAT IGN_ 

PROGRAM COMMEMORATING AND RE-CREATING HISTORIC LEWIS-AND-CLARK 
EXPEDITION THAT OPENED WAY TO AMERICAN NORTHWEST 
WILL BE FULL-HOUR NBC NEWS COLORCAST 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, DEC, 28 

"Lewis and Clark," a special full-hour colorcast commemorat¬ 
ing and re-creating the historic Lewis-and-Clark expedition of 1804-06 
that opened the way to the American Northwest, will be presented by NBC 
News Tuesday, Feb, 23 (10-11 p.m. EST), William R. McAndrew, Executive 
Vice President in charge of NBC News, announced today. Lome Greene, 
co-star of NBC-TV’s "Bonanza," will be the narrator. 

In telling the story of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark 
and the band of 43 soldiers and civilian volunteers who set out from 
St. Charles, Mo., in May, 1804, producer Ted Yates covered much of the 
same ground and waterway himself. With his crew and cameras, and making 
use of a huge keelboat and specially constructed pirogues and canoes 
similar to those used by Lewis and Clark l60 years ago, Yates re-created 
many of the incidents that are reported in the official journal of 
the trip — the meetings with the Indians, the descriptions of the 
terrain and the wonderment at such marvels as grizzly bears, antelope, 
buffalo and prairie dogs discovered in the uncharted Northwest 
Territory. 

By using Lewis and Clark’s own words, and coupling them with 
color camera shots of much of the same territory today, Yates has 
prepared a film document on the vastness and richness and ruggedness of 

the thousands of miles of land that had been acquired in 1803 with the 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 



















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2 - Lewis and Clark 


Louisiana Purchase by President Thomas Jefferson, and on the mold of 
men who later surged across the continent to tame it, forerunners of 
the Westward migration. 

It was a wild and magnificent country that the Lewis and 
Clark party ventured into, and it tested them often to their physical 
and mental limits before it allowed them to pass through -- up the 
Missouri to the "great falls," over the Continental Divide and down the 
rapids of the Columbia River until they came, finally -- 18 months 
after they had begun -- to the Pacific Ocean. 

Their ultimate triumph, as the program points out, also 
meant final doom to another age-old dream of man -- that of finding a 
water passage that would connect the Atlantic to the Pacific and a 
shortened trade route to the treasures of the Far East. This, in 
fact, was the underlying purpose of the Lewis and Clark expedition. 

But as the pioneers listened to the tales of Indians they met en route, 
stories that later were borne out by their own trail-blazing, the 
dream that the separation between the navigable portions of the 
Missouri and the Columbia constituted little more than "a simple one 
day’s portage" vanished forever. 

By combining the words of the official Journal and other 
histories of the expedition with pictures of the country itself, Yates 
said he tried to illustrate the spirit that civilized the country and 
then made it great. 

Yates made two shooting trips to the far West, once last 
February for Winter scenes of the high plains and mountains, and again 
for six weeks in early Autumn for a major recreation of parts of the 
j ourney. 

NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT FEB. 23 
"LEWIS AND CLARK" — NBC News presents a special one-hour 
colorcast re-creating the historic Lewis and Clark expedition 
that opened up the Northwest Territory. (Color.) 

-o- NBC-New York, 12/24/64 





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A DEPARTMENT OF NBC NEWS 


ARA PARSEGHIAN, NOTRE DAME GRID COACH TO BE COMMENTATOR 
FOR NBC-TV'S COVERAGE OF SENIOR BOWL GAME 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, DEC. 28 

Ara Parseghian, Notre Dame football coach, will serve as 
expert commentator for NBC-TV' s coverage of the Senior Bowl gridiron 
game Saturday, Jan. 9, it was announced today by Chester R. Simmons, 
NBC*s Director of Sports. 

The game in Mobile, Ala., will be colorcast on the NBC-TV 

Network beginning at 2 p.m. EST. 

Parseghian gained national prominence this grid season as 
mentor of the Notre Dame "Cinderella" eleven which fought its way from 
pre-season insignificance to a rating as one of the strongest teams in 
the country. In recognition of his work, he was voted Coach of the 
Year" recently by the National Football Writers Association. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 















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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 24, 1964 

PRESIDENT JOHNSON'S "STATE OF THE UNION” ADDRESS 
TO BE ANALYZED IN SPECIAL NBC NEWS PROGRAM 

NBC News will be present a special program of background 
reports by its correspondents relevant to President Johnson's "State of 
the Union" address Monday, Jan. 4 (NBC-TV 9:30-10 p.m. EST). 

The special program, with John Chancellor as anchor man, 
will be telecast immediately after NBC's broadcast of the President's 
address, and will include analyses by NBC News correspondents in 
Washington and overseas of the President's report to the nation. 

The sponsor of the special program will be the Gulf Oil 
Corporation (through Young and Rubicam). 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

























































colorcast! 


NBC TELEVISION NETWORK NEWS 

December 24, 1964 


GERRY AND THE PACEMAKERS (FROM ENGLAND) AND JOCELYNE (FROM 
FRANCE) JOIN GUEST STAR ROSTER FOR ’ HULLABALOO 1 PREMIERE 

England’s Gerry and the Pacemakers, and France’s Jccelyne, 
have been added as guest stars for the premiere of NBC-TV's musical 
show, "Hullabaloo," to be colorcast Tuesday. Jan. 12 (8:30-9:30 pjn. EST) 
As previously reported. Jack Jones will be host and Woody 
Allen, the New Christy Minstrels, Joey Heatherton and the Zombies also 
will be guest stars on the premiere program. 

Pop impresario Brian Epstein will introduce Gerry and the 
Pacemakers, a vocal and instrumental group, for the first "Hullabaloo, 
London' segment, which will be a regular weekly feature on the program. 
The youthful group stars Gerry Marsden of Liverpool, England, who sings 
and plays lead guitar. He is accompanied by an instrumental trio. 

Gerry will sing his latest recording hit, "I’ll Be There" on the program 
Jocelyne Is a l4-year-old French singer whom "Hullabaloo" 
producer Gary Smith describes as a "cross between Edith Piaf and Brenda 
Lee." 

Steve Binder will direct "Hullabaloo," which will originate 
In NBC-TV’s Peacock Studio in New York. 

- NBC-TV PROGRAM HIGHLIGHT JAN. 12 - 

HULLABALOO — Jack Jones will be host, and Woody 
Allen, the New Christy Minstrels, Joey Heatherton, the 
Zombies and Jocelyne will be guests on the premiere 
of the new musical series for young people. Impresario 
Brian Epstein will introduce Gerry and the Pacemakers 
for the "Hullabaloo, London" segment. (Color.) 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 










































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JACK TRACY 

ROOM 320 

NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 
NBC NEWS’ FOREIGN CORRESPONDENTS TO COVER 80,000 MILES FROM DISTANT 
POINTS TO NEW YORK--AND RETURN--FOR "PROJECTION ' 65 " 

TELECAST AND COAST-TO-COAST SPEAKING TOUR 

NBC News' foreign correspondents will travel nearly 8,000 
miles next month when they cross the country on a 10 -city coast-to- 
coast speaking tour. 

But this will be the short leg of their journey. Together, 
their round-trip mileage between their assigned countries and New York 
will total almost 80,000 miles. 

The eight correspondents, who will also participate on NBC- 
TV's "Projection ’ 65 " colorcast Tuesday, Dec. 29 (10-11 p.m. EST), 
will tour the country for two weeks starting Jan. 4 to speak before 
prominent groups in Pittsburgh, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Fort 
Worth, St. Louis, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, D. C., Chicago 
and Boston. 

The longest trip will be made by James Robinson, who covers 
Southeast Asia. His round-trip mileage between New York and Hong Kong 
totals just over 16,000 miles. Dean Brelis' travels to and from 
Beirut will make him a close second with just over 13,500 miles to his 
credit. 

Tom Streithorst will cover 9^00 miles traveling between Rio 
de Janeiro and New York. Rome correspondent Irving R. Levine and Bonn 
correspondent Welles Hangen will travel 8,500 miles and 8,000 miles, 
respectively. Bernard Frizell and Frank Bourgholtzer will both be 
coming from Paris, a round-trip of 7,200 miles each. The shortest 
trip of all will be made by Joseph C. Harsch, who is stationed in 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

London. He will travel just under 7,000 miles. 

-o- NBC-New York. 12/28/64 














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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 28, 1964 

CORRECTION, PLEASE, FOR "WHO'S WHO IN NBC NEWS" 

Please substitute the following under "Sunday" on page 
of "Who's Who in NBC News," released Dec. 21, 1964: 


Frank Blair 

Host 

Craig Fisher 

Producer 

John Lord 

Associate Producer 

Lynwood King 

Director 

Bill Bales 

Writer 

Bob Allison 

Writer 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, -NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 



















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JACK TRACY 
R00:4 320 


2-X-H NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 29, 1964 

COLGATE-PALMOLIVE BUYS INTO 8 PRIME-TIME NBC-TV SHOWS 

The Colgate-Palmolive Co. has purchased sponsorship 
in eight prime-time NBC-TV programs for 1965 , it was announced 
today by Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, 
NBC. 

The programs are "The Man from U.N.C.L.E.," "The 
Alfred Hitchcock Hour," "The Andy Williams Show," "The Jonathan 
Winters Show," "Hullabaloo," "Wednesday Night at the Movies," 
"Flipper" and "Saturday Night at the Movies." 

The order was placed through Norman, Craig & Kummel 

Inc. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA. NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 









NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 29, 1964 

5 ADVERTISERS BUY SPONSORSHIP IN ’HULLABALOO’ 

Five advertisers have purchased sponsorship in the 
new NBC-TV color series, "Hullabaloo," it was announced today 
by Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, 

NBC. 

"Hullabaloo," a full-hour musical variety show 
designed for young adults, premieres Tuesday, Jan. 12 
(8:30-9:30 p.m. EST). 

The sponsors (and their agencies) are: Colgate- 
Palmolive Co. (Norman, Craig & Kummel Inc.), Beecham Products 
Inc. (Kenyon & Eckhardt Inc.), Plough Inc. (Lake-Spiro- 
Shurman Co.), Sunbeam Corp. (Foote, Cone & Belding Inc.), 
and Caryl Richards Inc. (Hockaday Associates). 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK. NEW YORK 10020 






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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 


December 29, 1964 

KAYE BALLARD, JONATHAN MILLER, SLIM PICKENS AND CARMEN McRAE 

IN "SATURDAY NIGHT 'TONIGHT SHOW.!," STARTING REPEAT 
SERIES OF OUTSTANDING 'TONIGHT' TELECASTS 

"The Saturday Night 'Tonight Show'," repeats of the most 
amusing, interesting and stimulating programs from NBC-TV's "Tonight 
Show Starring Johnny Carson" will be presented for the first time 
Saturday, Jan, 9 (11:15 P.m.-l a.m. EST in color). 

The first of the weekly series will be a program starring 
comedienne Kaye Ballard, English humorist Jonathan Miller, character 
actor Slim Pickens, singer Carmen McRae and animal trainer Alberta 
Messick, owner of a "talking dog." The program was presented 
originally Jan. 15, 1964. 

Carmen McRae sings "Blue Moon" and "You Don't Know What Love 
Is," accompanied by Skitch Henderson and the NBC Orchestra. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTIN 


G COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 










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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



December 29, 1964 

DELETIONS FOR NBC-TV NETWORK JANUARY COLORCAST SCHEDULE 

The following programs will be pre-empted: 

Monday. Jan. 4 

9-10 p.m. — "The Andy Williams Show." 

Wednesday. Jan. 20 

10:30-10:55 a.m. -- "What's This Song?" 

11:15 p.m.-1 a.m. — "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny 
Carson." 

Saturday. Jan. 23 

8:30-9 p.m. — "The Famous Adventures of Mr. Magoo." 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COM 


PANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 























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NBC RADIO NETWORK NEWS 


December 29, 1964 

NBC'S MARION STEPHENSON TO ADDRESS PHILADELPHIA ADVERTISING WOMEN 

Marion Stephenson, Vice President, Administration, NBC 
Radio Network, will address the Philadelphia Club of Advertising 
Women Tuesday, Jan. 12 at the Poor Richard Club in Philadelphia. 

Miss Stephenson's address, titled "What Am I Working For," deals with 
executive opportunities for women with ability and ambition. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTI 


NG COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 











































































NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



"MISS QUINCY," WEATHER GIRL, WILL RIDE CITY'S FLOAT 
IN TOURNAMENT OF ROSES PARADE JAN. 1 

Patricia Ann Henthorn, weather girl for NBC-TV affiliate 
WGEM-TV in Quincy, Ill., is hoping she will be able to report a warm, 
sunny day in Pasadena, Calif., for New Year's Day. 

Patricia, who is majoring in elementary education at Culver- 
Stockton College in Canton, Mo., while performing on WGEM-TV, is a 
beauty, and holds the title of Miss Quincy. 

Recently she entered another beauty contest -- the Quincy Rose 
Bowl Queen contest -- and won that, too. Patricia's main prize for 
winning is an all-expense-paid trip to California, where she will ride 
on Quincy's float entry in the 76 th annual Tournament of Roses parade 
(which will be colorcast live by NBC-TV Friday, Jan. 1 (ll:30 a.m. to 
1:45 p.m. EST). The float, titled "Quincy, All-American City," is long, 
and features a large likeness of the State of Illinois resting against a 
huge cluster of yellow roses. A blue star indicates Quincy's 
geographical location within the state. A path of red roses leads 
from the "map" to a l 6 -feet-long replica of an old-time Mississippi 
paddle-wheeler churning up a "wake" of white flowers. 

Quincy Mayor Wes Olson, said the float entry is one of many 
ways in which Quincy is celebrating its 125th anniversary. He and his 
wife will accompany Patricia to Pasadena for the Parade. 

"I wish I could determine the weather," said Patricia, 

"instead of just reporting it. Then it would be a nice day for sure. 

-o- NBC-New York, 12/29/64 


PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 






























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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 


NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 30, 1964 

CARYL RICHARDS, IN ITS FIRST SPONSORSHIP BUY ON NBC-TV, 
WILL ADVERTISE IN SEVEN PRIME-TIME PROGRAMS 

Caryl Richards Inc., in its first sponsorship 
purchase on NBC-TV, will advertise on seven prime-time 
programs during 1965* it was announced today by Don Durgin, 
Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "Karen," "The Andy Williams 
Show," "The Jonathan Winters Show," "That Was the Week That 
Was," "Hullabaloo," "The Jack Paar Program" and "Saturday 
Night at the Movies." 

The Caryl Richards Inc. order was placed through 
Hockaday Associates. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 




































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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING'S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 30, 1964 

PRESIDENT JOHNSON'S STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS 
WILL BE BROADCAST LIVE BY NBC-TV AND RADIO 

NBC Radio and Television will broadcast live President 
Johnson's State of the Union address Monday, Jan. 4 , beginning at 
9 p.m. EST. 

After the speech, NBC Radio will present a special news 
report of summary and analysis by NBC News correspondents Robert 
McCormick, Robert Abemethy and Richard Valeriani. 

NBC Television, as previously announced, also will present 
a special news program, with correspondent John Chancellor as anchor 
man. This program, featuring reports from NBC News correspondents 
in Washington and overseas, will continue until 10 p.m. EST. It 
will be sponsored by the Gulf Oil Corporation. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 







































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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 


December 30, 3.964 

NBC NEWS SPECIAL PROGRAM JAN. 4 WILL SUMMARIZE 
HIGHLIGHTS OF OPENING SESSION OF CONGRESS 

NBC News will present a special program Monday, Jan. 4 live 
from Washington on NBC-TV (4:30-5 p.m. EST) summarizing the highlight 
of the opening session of the 89 th Congress. 

NBC News correspondent Ray Scherer will be anchor man, and 
Robert Abernethy will report from Capitol Hill. Reports will include 
three areas of conflict expected to develop in connection with the 
opening of Congress -- the struggle for House Republican leadership 
control between Representatives Gerald Ford of Michigan and Charles 
A. Halleck of Indiana, the contest for the post of Senate majority 
whip left vacant by the election of Hubert Humphrey to the Vice 
Presidency; and the challenge of the Freedom Democratic Party of 
Mississippi on the seating of Mississippi's Congressional delegation. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 




























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A DEPARTMENT OF NBC NEWS 


December 30, 1964 

NBC-TV WILL USE NEW ’INSTANT SPOTLIGHT COLOR CAMERA' TECHNIQUE 
FOR FIRST TIME IN COVERAGE OF ROSE BOWL AND ORANGE BOWL GAMES 

A new "instant spotlight color camera" technique will be 
used for the first time in NBC-TV’s coverage of the Orange Bowl and 
Rose Bowl football gs.mes on New Year’s Day, it was announced today by 
Carl Lindemann Jr., Vice President, NB<? Sports, 

The technique, which permits an immediate tape replay of 
significant action, will provide viewers with a greater insight to the 
important plays during the game, Mr. Lindemann said. It will be the 
first time the technique has been applied with color cameras, he added. 

NBC-TV’s precedent-setting triple header grid colorcasts 
Friday, Jan. 1 will begin with the Sugar Bowl (Syracuse vs. L.S.U.) at 
1:45 p.m. EST; continue with the Rose Bowl (Michigan vs. Oregon State) 
at 4:45 p.m. EST; and wind up with the Orange Bowl (Alabama vs. Texas) 
at 7:45 p.m. EST. 

To permit color coverage of the three bowl classics and the 
Rose parade in Pasadena and the Orange parade in Miami, NBC Sports has 
assigned mere than 100 of its personnel and a record total of 30 color 
cameras. Mr. Lindemann said this will be the largest concentration of 
color cameras ever assigned to a specific project. 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 






































































NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 30, 1964 

NBC GUIDE TO 1965 PRESIDENTIAL INAUGURATION 
DISTRIBUTED TO 100,000 HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 

To familiarize students with the significance, bachground and 
the history of American Presidential Inaugurations, NBC has distributed 
to 100,000 teachers in 30*000 high schools a special Issue of the NBC 
Teacher’s Guide, titled "The 1965 Inauguration." 

The Guide is intended for use by teachers as an aid in class¬ 
room discussion on the meaning of the American Presidency. NBC Guides 
will reach every high school in the United States, encompassing a total 
of more than 10,000,000 students. They are directed to teachers in the 
language arts and social studies. 

To implement classroom discussion, the Guides offer teaching 
suggestions and questions on the history of the Presidency, as well as 
activities planned to sharpen students’ responses as they view the 
Inauguration on television. Another objective is to inspire students 
to engage, after the broadcasts, in further research of their own on 
American history. 

The NBC Teacher’s Guide is edited by Gloria Kirschner, under 
supervision of Edward Stanley, NBC Director of Public Affairs. Similar 
Guides are prepared for the NBC programs "Exploring" and "Profiles in 
Courage." 

NBC News' complete coverage of the Inauguration Wednesday, 
Jan. 20 will be followed by students in high schools throughout the 
country. 

Sponsor of the Inauguration coverage is Eastern Air Lines. 

PRESS DEPARTMENT. NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 


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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING'S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

CREDITS FOR NBC NEWS SPECIAL JAN. 5 
"NBC WHITE PAPER: THE DECISION TO DROP THE BOMB" 


Program: 

"NBC News White Paper: The Decision to 
Drop the Bomb" 

Time: 

NBC-TV Network. Tuesday, Jan. 5 
(8:30-10 p.m. EST"). 

Narrator: 

Chet Huntley 

Format: 

Special NBC News documentary revealing 
the behind-the-scenes activities by 
American, British and Japanese 
leaders that resulted in the first 
wartime use of the atomic bomb. 

Produced by 

Fred Freed 

Written by 

Fred Freed 

Directed by 

Len Giovannitti and Fred Freed 

Associate producer: 

Len Giovannitti 

Film editors: 

John Teeple, Robert Garland and 

Ken Bauer 

Chief researcher: 

Morris Calden 

Researcher: 

Joan Cummings 

Cameramen: 

Joseph Vadala, Leroy Anderson and 
Gerald Yarus 

Consultant: 

Herbert Feis 

Special Consultants: 

Michael Amrine and Gar Alperovitz 

Special correspondent: 

John Rich, NBC News, Tokyo 

Production supervisor: 

Bill Quinn 

Unit manager: 

John Padovano 

Translator: 

Sho Onodera 

Executive Producer: 

Irving Gitlin 

NBC Press Representative: 

Jerry Beigel(New York) /Qn/a 

o __ NBC-New York, 12/30/64 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING 

COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 











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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 30, 1964 


-_ TEST YOURSELF -: 

NBC News Compiles Unusual and Little-Known Facts 
About Inaugurations of American Presidents 

Unusual and little-known facts about the inaugurations of 
American Presidents since George Washington took office in 1789 have 
been compiled by NBC News, which is now planning TV and radio coverage 
of the inauguration of President Johnson on Jan. 20, 

To test your knowledge of this area of American history, it 
might be interesting to discover how many of the following questions 
you can answer: 

1. Which President made the shortest inaugural address, and 
what was its length? 

2. Who was the first President to take the oath of office 
outdoors in Washington, D. C.? 

3 . Who was the first bachelor President to be inaugurated? 

4. Whose inauguration was the first to be recorded on 
motion picture film? 

5. Who was the youngest President to be inaugurated? His age 

6. Which President dispensed with the traditional Inaugural 
Ball as "too frivolous?" 

7 . Who was the only President to be given the oath of office 
by his father? 

8. Which President issued a mandate that made homb u rg hats an 
inaugural "must" in place of the traditional black top 

hats? 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

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2 - Test Yourself 


9. Which President's inauguration was the first to be 
colorcast? 

10. Who was the first President to wear a beard? 

* * * 

ANSWERS TO 'TEST YOURSELF' INAUGURATION QUESTIONS 

1 . George Washington. 135 words. 

2. James Monroe. 1817 . 

3. James Buchanan. 1857 . 

4. William McKinley. 1897- 

5 . Theodore Roosevelt. 1901. Age: 42 years, 322 

days. 

6 . Woodrow Wilson. March 4, 1913. 

7 . Calvin Coolidge. 1923. 

8 . Dwight D. Eisenhower. 1957* 

9. John F. Kennedy. 1961 . By NBC News. 

10. Abraham Lincoln. l 86 l. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 12/30/64 





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JACK TRACY 
ROOM 320 

TELEVISION NETWORK NI 2-x 

- PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT UNMATCHED IN TV HISTORY_ 

31 New NBC-TV Series Now in Active Development 
For 1965 - 66 , Mort Werner Announces 

FOR RELEASE MONDAY, JAN. 4 

Thirty-one new series -- the largest array ever assembled by 
any network for a year-ahead schedule -- are in active development for 
the 1965-66 season on NBC-TV, it was announced today by Mort Werner, 

Vice President, Programs. 

Ranging from comedy and drama filmed in New York, Hollywood 
and overseas, to new forms of lavish, live-on-tape musical variety, the 
series represent a program development commitment unmatched in tele¬ 
vision history. Twenty-five pilot films have already been completed. 

"NBC now finds itself in a uniquely advantageous position," 

Mr. Werner said. "Quite apart from the consistently high quality of 
the programs themselves, the real breakthrough has come from advance 
planning. With the wealth of fine programs already in our hands -- 
more than eight months before premiere date — we now have the luxury 
of time. Next year's schedule will be a combination of the strongest 
holdovers of this season, plus the cream of our 31 series now in 
development." 

NBC's current operation, Mr. Werner forecasts, will set the 
industry pattern for the future. "Having an inventory of completed 
programs on hand," he said, "means that, first, we can pick from the 
'best of the best.' Second, once having made our selections, we have 

(more) 


NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMF 


ELLER PLAZA, 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, 


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the lead time to work closely with producers in turning out the very 
finest possible programs for broadcast next Fall." 

The 31 programs in development for next season’s schedule 
on NBC-TV include "The Dean Martin Show," a full-hour color extravaganza 
featuring America’s top entertainers as guest stars; and "I Spy," the 
Sheldon Leonard production, filmed on location around the world and 
starring Robert Culp and Bill Cosby. Other series in development will 
be announced shortly. 

-o- 


NBC-New York, 12/31/64 





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NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING'S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 31, 1964 

NBC NEWS PLANS COMPLETE COVERAGE OF JOHNSON INAUGURATION 
WITH RECORD STAFF AND TECHNICAL FACILITIES 

3-Hour "Today” Show to Offer Pre-Inaugural Features 

NBC News' complete coverage of the Inauguration of President 
Johnson Wednesday, Jan. 20, with the largest staff of veteran reporters 
and technical facilities ever assembled for this traditional event, 
will begin at 10 a.m. EST. This coverage will be preceded by the 
"Today" show, which will be expanded to three full hours (7-10 a.m. EST) 
and devoted entirely to pre-inauguration features and interviews. 

Chet Huntley and David Brinkley, NBC News' noted anchor team, 
will be stationed at the Capitol to cover the swearing-in ceremonies, 
and later at Lafayette Park, from which point the Presidential review 
of the Inauguration Parade will be telecast in color. This segment of 
the program, expected to cover a period of from two-and-a-half to three 
hours, will mark the second time that NBC News has brought the added 
dimension of color to an Inauguration. The first time was in 1961, 
at the Inauguration of President Kennedy. 

For the expanded "Today" show, Hugh Downs, Jack Lescoulie, 
and Barbara Walters will be stationed outside the Capitol, while Frank 
Blair will be in New York. The program will include interviews with 
Alfred Dale Miller, chairman of the 1965 Inauguration Committee, and 
with Congressional leaders. Other features will be pickups of parade 
units and bands, historical films and timely news coverage. 

(more) 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. V. 10020 


















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2 - NBC News 1 Coverage of Inauguration 


As previously announced, "Inauguration ’ 65 ," a review of the 
outstanding events and ceremonies of Inauguration Day, will be presented 
by NBC News, with correspondent Frank McGee, Jan. 20 (7:30-8 p.m. 

EST). The special broadcast will climax NBC News' coverage of the 
day's Inauguration activities, except for the Inaugural Ball, which, as 
announced, will be broadcast from 11:15 p.m. EST to 1 a.m. EST. 

NBC Radio's coverage of the Inauguration, with Russ Ward as 
anchorman, will begin at 10 a.m. EST, Jan. 20. NBC Radio broadcasts 
of the Inaugural Ball, as announced, are scheduled for 11 p.m. to 
12 midnight, EST, with NBC News correspondent Robert McCormick as anchor¬ 
man. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/31/64 





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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 31, 1964 

4 ADVERTISERS JOIN SPONSORSHIP LIST OP 'HULLABALOO' 

Pour advertisers have been added to the sponsorship list of 
the new NBC-TV color program, "Hullabaloo," which premieres Tuesday, 
Jan, 12 (8:30-9:30 p.m. EST), it was announced today by Don Durgin, 

Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The new advertisers (and their agencies) are: Chesebrough- 
Pond’s Inc, (William Esty Co. Inc.); Bristol-Myers Co. (Grey Adv. Inc); 
The Coca-Cola Company (McCann-Erickson Inc.); and The Procter & Gamble 
CO. (Grey Adv. Inc.). 

-o- 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY. 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 100-20 
















































































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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 31, 1964 

GENERAL MILLS MAKES EXTENSIVE PURCHASE IN ’FLIPPER 1 

General Mills Inc. has made an extensive sponsor¬ 
ship purchase in the "Flipper" color series on NBC-TV for 
1965, it was announced today by Don Durgin, Vice President, 
Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The General Mills order was placed through Dancer- 
Fitzgerald-Sample Inc. 


o 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL 


BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 1CCRO 


















: . 







NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 31, 1964 

AMERICAN HOME PRODUCTS BUYS INTO 5 PRIME-TIME NBC-TV SHOWS 

American Home Products Corp. has purchased sponsorship in 
five prime-time NBC-TV programs for 1965* it was announced today by 
Don Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

The programs are "The Alfred Hitchcock Hour," "Daniel 
Boone," "International Showtime," "Flipper" and "Saturday Night at 
the Movies." 

The American Home Products Corp. order was placed through 
Ted Bates & Co. Inc. 




PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 































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NBC COLOR TELEVISION NEWS 



FOR RELEASE MONDAY, JAN. 4 

I LORNE GREENE AND ANGIE DICKINSON WILL HEAD GUEST ROSTER 
FOR "SNEAK PREVIEW" OF "ALLAN SHERMAN'S FUNNYLAND" 

-- -—i 

Beauty, brawn and buffoonery will take over when Lome 
Greene, Angie Dickinson and Jack Gilford are guests on NBC-TV's "Allan 
Sherman’s Funnyland" to be colorcast Monday, Jan, 18 (9-10 p.m. EST). 

The Ray Charles Singers also will be featured. 

Allan Sherman will star in this full-hour program, the 
NBC-TV Network’s second "sneak preview special" of the 1964-65 season. 
The comedian, who says his singing voice sounds like "a strangling 
mynah bird," also will serve as executive producer and will supervise 
the preparation of the script. 

Greene, star of NBC-TV's top-rated "Bonanza" color series, is 
currently in his sixth season as the tall, vigorous patriarch of the 
Cartwright clan. A versatile performer, Greene was a radio star in his 
native Canada, has leading film roles in "The Silver Chalice" and "Tight 
Spot," participated in the Shakespeare Festival at Stratford, Conn., 
and starred with Katharine Cornell in "The Prescott Proposals" on 
Broadway. 

The lithe and beautiful Miss Dickinson has demonstrated talent 
for both comedy and dramatic roles in motion pictures. She played 
opposite John Wayne in "Rio Bravo," starred with Frank Sinatra in 
"Oceans ll" and had the title role in "The Sins of Rachel Cade." She 
also starred in "Captain Newman, M.D.," "Rome Adventure" and "Jessica. 

(more) 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK 20, NEW YORK 









































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- "Allan Sherman*s Funny-land” 

Jack Gilford has scored triumphs with his comedy and dramatic 

portrayals on Broadway, in TV and even at the Metropolitan Opera House. 

He has appeared in such Broadway hits as "The Diary of Anne Frank," 

"A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," "The Tenth Man" and 
"Romanoff and Juliet." For several seasons he played the comedy 
pantomime role of the jailer in the "Met" production of "Die Fledermaus. 

This TV program will be produced by Roger Gimbel and directed 

by Greg Garrison. Ray Charles will be choral director and Lou Busch 

musical director. 

"Allan Sherman's Funnyland" is envisioned as a possible half- 
hour series for the 1965-66 season. It will originate from the NBC 
Studios in Burbank, Calif. 

This season's first "sneak preview special" was the highly- 
acclaimed "NBC Follies of 1965," which starred Steve Lawrence. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/31/64 




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NBC TRADE NEWS 


December 31* 1964 

FULL SPONSORSHIP OF NBC-TV*S COVERAGE OF INAUGURATION BALL 

IS PURCHASED BY CLAIROL INC. 

Full sponsorship of NBC-TV , s coverage of the Inauguration 
Ball was purchased by Clairol Inc., it was announced today by Don 
Durgin, Vice President, Television Network Sales, NBC. 

NBC-TV's entire coverage of the Inauguration events on Jan. 20 
is completely sold. Eastern Air Lines purchased sponsorship of NBC-TV 
coverage of the ceremonies, plus a special 30-minute nighttime summary 
of the day's highlights, as previously announced. 

NBC-TV's coverage of the Inauguration Ball will begin at 
11:15 p.m. and conclude at 1 a.m. 

The Clairol order was placed through Foote, Cone & Belding. 


PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10020 



















































































NBC NEWS 

BROADCASTING’S LARGEST NEWS ORGANIZATION 

December 31, 1964 


‘THE COMPLETE RUN OF THE PLACE*--THE U.S. CAPITOL 


"We had the place to ourselves at night -- we and the 
cleaning personnel and a skeleton protection force," says Tom Priestley, 
who directed on-location the full-hour NBC News color television 
special, "The Capitol: Chronicle of Freedom." 

The program, a Lou Hazam production, will be telecast Tuesday, 
Jan. 12 (10-11 p.m. EST), spotlighting the United States Capitol as 
a monument to freedom, a symbol of democratic government and a national 
art treasure. It marks the first time in history that motion picture 
or TV cameras were ever allowed inside the walls of the Chamber of the 
U. S. Senate. 

Virtually all of the program was filmed at night, according 
to Priestley, because the Senate was in daily session and the public 
tours regularly stream through the building from 9 a.m. to 5 p.ni. 

"One of the working conditions set for us was that we could not clutter 
up the hallways with our lights and cables, with all those people walking 
through," Priestley says. "We had to wait until the Senate adjourned 
for the day -~ and sometimes they went on until 8 or 9 p.m. -- before 


we could move in with all our gear." 

As a result, Priestley and his camera crew worked through the 
night until at least 2 a.m. sometimes until 6 a.m. Logistically, the 
big task was the building of 80-foot-high scaffolding in the Rotunda 
built every evening and dismantled every morning. Also, the crew had 
yards and yards of cable run up from the cellar to the roof, across the 
building, and down the other side. _ 

PRESS DEPARTMENT, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY, 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA NEW YORK, N. Y. 10020 

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2 - ’The Capitol: Chronicle of Freedom* 


"At first the authorities were reluctant to have us go in 
any place at all," Priestley says, "but when they saw how carefully we 
were working they left us alone and we had the complete run of the 
place." 

In addition to the previously restricted Senate Chamber and 
the Rotunda, the NBC crew filmed the House Chamber, the old Supreme 
Court Chamber, the Brumidi Corridor, the Statuary Hall and other 
locations that evoke the story of the United States as a nation. 

Hazam first began talking about doing a TV show in the Capitol 
back in 1949* but other tasks interfered. It took him six months to 
get permission to do the program, working through the Senate Rules 
Committee, Speaker of the House John McCormack and George Stewart, 
architect of the Capitol. 

Priestley has been associated with Hazam as a director for 
the past three years. Among the Hazam productions he directed are 
"Orient Express," "Polaris Submarine: Journal of an Undersea Voyage," 
"American Spectacle" and, as co-director, *'U.S. #1: American Profile." 
He was director of photography for "The Louvre," produced by Lucy 
Jarvis. 

Raymond Massey will be off-camera narrator for "The Capitol: 
Chronicle of Freedom." Eddy Manson composed and conducted the original 
orchestral score. 

-o- 

NBC-New York, 12/31/64 




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