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RICH AND POOR, a book by Jim Goldberg, see page 10 



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BABY, IT'S COLD OUTSIDE 
Mr. Jiamon 

"Baby" is, of course, a 
rolled up overcoat or 
backpack, your pillow for 
the night. The cold is 
everywhere. San Francisco 
is a cold city when it is 
cold. 

I was lucky for a couple 
of weeks; a friend had left 
the cab of his miniature 
pick-up truck unlocked for 
me to use when it was dark. 

Five weeks of searching 
for a room in the North 
Mission district was fruit- 
less. There were no vacan- 
cies in the numerous hotels, 
all of them were contracted 
out to the City's "housing 
program", a far more lucra- 
tive and assured way of a 
guaranteed incane on a 2 -day 
basis than frem the elusive 
transients' weekly rate. 

So hotels with up to a 
third of their roans unocc- 
upied had stark NO VACANCIES 
in crudely lettered signs or 



complacently blurted out 
mispronouncements of the 
English language. 

Eventually it got too 
cold, even in the pickup 
cab. And then the rains 
came, dripping methodically 
through the edges of the 
door and the windscreen, 
misting the insides with a 
secondary dampness which no 
amount of stuffed newspapers 
could absorb and no amount 
of blankets could ward off. 
Like an invisible fog, the 
cold settled in your bones. 

Numbed desperation made me 
ring a friend with connec- 
tions into teh City's emer- 
gency shelter programs for 
advice. Like anyone living 
in the Mission I was aware 
of their existence but not 
hew to use than. 

I was lucky. She made a 
number of phone calls and 
in about ten minutes she 
gave me the name and address 
of a hotel where I shoul ’ 
register after work (at 9FK 
continued on page 4 



0 BY BRIAN D00HAN 



"Redevelopment, which con- 
tributed to a 35£ decline in 
residential hotel rooms in 
the city over the past eight 
years, has been another 
factor in the increase in 
homelessness . " 

- from SF proposal for the 
mentally disabled homeless 

The winter winds blow 
bleak and aimless through 
the Civic Center. 

In the days between the 
demolition of the Crystal 
Palace Market and the 
subsequent capture of the 
block at 8th and Market 
Street by such a6 Carol 
Shorenstein, Frank Lembi and 
Angelo Sangiacomo loomed 
Cardboard City, a Brigadoon 
of failure and despair. 

Most downtown homeless 
enclaves have been destroyed 
by development... forever 
gone the colonies in Yerba 
Buena rubble and irate mut- 
terings of the telephone 
company over the "campfires 
of the bums". 



So the homeless have moved 
out into the open, sleeping, 
for example, on the steps 
and in bushes adjacent to a 
squat, one-story structure. 
Terrorists... bent upon sub- 
verting the credibility of 
authority... have fastened 
plastic graffiti to its wall 
above these sighing sleepers 
with their tongues stretched 
out to pavement blotched 
with desiccated chewing gums 
MAYOR'S OFFICE OF HOUSING 
AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 
Over the last thirty years 
the number of the institu- 
tionalized mentally ill has 
fallen from 560,000 to 
125,000. These hundreds of 
thousands roam America's 
streets by day and sleep by 
night in parks, shelters or 
f lophouses . 

Although only IX of the 
estimated two million chron- 
ically mentally ill still 
live in institutions, 70£ of 
the six billion dollars 
spent yearly by government 



6 








2 

= Mail = 

The time has come for 
a last stand in the 
battle between downtown 
interests and the 
neighborhoods. This last 
election when the 
Highrise Freeze issue 
(prop. F) received 41% of 
the vote when all the 
media (including the Bay 
Guardian) called it a 
joke shows that there is 
a broad cross section of 
support for more 
meaningful control of the 
downtown than the 
"Downtown Plan". This 
"Plan" means the end of 
any unsubsidized low 
income folks being able 
to live in San Francisco 
and a quick end to the 
Mission as we now know 
it. This "Plan" allows an 
estimated preapproved 
additional 12-million 
square feet of office 
space to be built with 
just a token amount of 
new housing to absorb the 
associated housing demand 
of the new office 
workers. 

What is at stake is 
debatable since one could 
argue that the already 
existing highrise worker 
housing pressure brought 
about by the 
unprecedented growth of 
high-density office space 
will mean unsurmountable 
housing displacement 
pressure in the years to 
come. However, there is 
still a good possiblility 
of mitigating the 
displacement pressure in 
a way which would also 
mean more balanced growth 
for our beloved city. 

There needs to be one 
simply^-stated ballot 
measure which will call 
for developers to match 
their already approved 
office square footage 
with an equal or greater 
amount of housing square 
footage . 

This same standard 
can apply to new office 
space but the more 
important battle is to 
slow the rate of growth 
of the pre-approved 
square footage. It will 
also be important that 
there be no more than one 
" slow-growth" proposition 
and that it not be open 
to being called "extreme" 
(spelled no-growth). If 
these criteria are met it 
should be possible to win 
a broad cross-section of 
support from progressives 
and conservatives alike 
who do not like the way 
their city is being 
transformed from 
neighborhoods to 
office-worker housing. 

Chris Collins 



The question of neighbor- 
hood improvement has always 
been an issue in San Fran- 
cisco. I feel that it's 
important who is doing the 
improvement . 

The neighborhood? Or the 
City government? The City 
manifests its influence in 
many ways , seme disguised, 
others not. 

The Mission versus SOMA? 
Has it finally ccme to that? 

I believe it has. 

The filth on the streets 
is being blown away by a 
wind. A wind so foul, so 
disgustingly human I cannot 
imagine whose bcwels spawned 
it. 

I have never met Dianne 
Feinstein, but I have heard 
a lot about her. Apparently 
her reign started with a 
bang and she has been 
generating ever since. 

The "Downtown Plan" has 
been spreading, it infected 
and then re-created SOMA as 
we now know it, driving 
artists out, real estate 
prices up, and small busi- 
ness down. 

It is now creeping under 
the 101 and into the 
Mission. . .Check out the maps 
in the new South of Market 
handbook SOMA DIRECT (Prem- 
iere Issue & Free). 

Theater Artaud is being 
surrounded by the new "Gift 
Center District". The real 
estate promo reads like a 
Viking raid! rape, pillage 
and arson. Of course the 
Mission is familiar with 
real estate companies... 
Check out Skyline, Anchor, 
and Landmark Realty. 

But the Mission is 
unfamiliar with city minions 
dressing in trendy clown 
suits, spouting off about 
how much money they can 
raise... Check out Susana 
Montana and the Vats. 

Nor is it familiar with 
self-proclaimed visionaries 
who pretend to support the 
arts but cannot even pay for 
their services... Check out 
Mark Renne and art exhibits 
at Club Nine. 

It is too bad the 
supervisors are not elected 
within districts like they 
used to be. Perhaps it 
would have helped. 

Instead, we have globe- 
trotting toilet inspectors 
who make their activities 
all to obvious every time 
they open their mouths. 

There are two major groups 
in the Mission found in 
greater numbers there than 
anywhere else in the City, 
Latinos and Artists. 

The City stopped the lew- 
riders on Mission Street, 
but it did not stop La Raza 
or the Mission Cultural 
Center. 

SOMA has not laid claim to 
the Latinos but it tries to 
Artists. But whatever 
happened to the Goodman 
Building and Group?... Check 
out the Art space Development 
Corporation . 



Artists are independent, 
they do not form coalitions, 
artistic zoos, or buy clubs. 
Most San Francisco Artists 
can be found in the Mission. 
It has cheap food, cheap 
spaces, good cafes, the 
Roxie and atmosphere. 

Sure there are prostitutes 
in the Mission but unlike 
SOMA, they do not work for 
the City. 

The Mission has a certain 
balance, creative, relaxed 
and even international. But 
not trendy. Small business 
abounds and prospers. 

There are those who 
masquerade and pose, those 
with slimy, unethical and 
hollow-headed little men 
leading them... Check out 
New Generic at 2 Clinton 
Park. 

A lot of them slither 
under the 101 into SOMA 
where there are those stupid 
enough to listen... Check 
out New Generic Productions 
at Martin Weber's Gallery. 

There is no real relation- 
ship between artists and the 
City of San Francisco. 

There is no relationship 
between the Mission and SOMA 
excepting a cannon boundary 
which SOMA, the City, pseudo 
promoters and real estate 
developers seem to want to 
change. 

I do not like what I see 



and smell. 

I do not want the cafes to 
change, small business to 
die. Latinos and Artists to 
leave, and prices to sky- 
rocket. 

The Mission is in trouble, 
in danger of being annexed, 
and SOMA is the enemy. 

Artists are the heart of 
the Mission and small busi- 
ness the brain, each will 
die without the other. The 
onus is on the small busi- 
nesses to organize and set a 
course. The smell of SOMA 
is growing every day. 

It is time the North 
Mission Association was re- 
vitalized, and serious 
thought and action applied 
to keep the Mission unique. 

The Mission is not a hor- 
rible crimeridden eyesore, 
the Mission is the heart of 
independent art in this 
city. 

I appeal to small business 
owners and property owners 
to save and preserve the 
Mission and its art, charac- 
ter, architecture and 
uniqueness. You are the 
only ones who can. 




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4 



Qntlnuad-fm page one 

on that day) and good for 2 
nights. It was the... 

MIRADI HOTEL on Hyde. After 
checking in with what would 
become a familiar stern 
stricture "No guests or vis- 
itors, check-out 8 AM, leave 
your key at desk when you go 
out," I took the elevator to 
the fifth floor. 

A whiff of curry smells 
told me at once that the 
cwners and management were 
vegetarian East Indians. 
Although my foot and heart 
sank in the lush red 
carpeting of this touristy 
"posh" hotel, I was anxious 
to see what my roan offered. 

When I a ecu stoned myself 
to the light switch, I could 
not believe my eyes! 

IWo large single beds, an 
attached bathroan/shower and 
toilet, ample closet space 
and a color TV set! After 
bathing and entering between 
the clean white sheets of 
the comfortable bed, 
stretching my full length 
for the first time in cen- 
turies, it was obvious to me 
that heaven could not hold 
better delights. 

The two nights were over 
too soon. 

The hotel had been 
provided by the Housing Hot- 
line and for my next 
accomodation I would have 
to do my cwn footwork. This 
procedure is worth noting 
for its eccentricities. It 
involves the following: 

1) arriving at 150 Otis 
Street anywhere between 9 
and 11:30AM, depending on 
the frame of mind of that 
day's official. You ask for 
a ticket - a number. 

2 ) You are asked to return 
at 1:30, regardless of 
whether or not you ask for a 
number. This is important 
to remember. You are not 
given one unless you know 
and ask for it. 

3) You arrive at 1:30PM and 
are asked if you have a 
number. If not, you stand 
in line for one. If you 
have one, you join about 60- 
100 people already seated on 
stack-away plastic chairs. 

4) At about 2:30 numbers are 
called out. If you are 
lucky, so is yours. 
Sometimes not. There are 
only so many rooms and 
hotels to be assigned, and 
you are asked to return the 
next day. It is new about 
3:30 PM. 

5) You are lucky. You have 
been called. You are given 
the name and address of a 
hotel, good for 2 nights. 

6) You have to register at 
the hotel anywhere after 5 
PM, but not later than 6PM 
if you want the roan regard- 
less of your work schedule. 

7) You register at the hotel 
(anywhere f ran the Tender- 
loin to South of Market or 
the Mission) and try and 
return to your night work 
shift. 

8) You wake up early the 
second morning, check out, 
and report to the above for 
your next hotel. 

If you apply for a hotel 
on a Friday morning, again 



depending on your luck and 
teh official's discretion, 
you may be assigned a roan 
for the weekend ie. 3 nights 
and return to the ritual on 
the following Monday. Thus, 
not to be homeless on 
Sunday, it is worthwhile to 
skip Monday and start on a 
Tuesday. 

On the average, you will 
spend over 6 hours for a 
roof over your head for 38 
hours of which you actually 
use it for about 16 hours at 
the maximum. An expensive 
ratio of 3:8 in time, energy 
and stress, not to mention 
uncertainty. 

My next hotel was the . . . 

ANXIOUS ARMS on Folson and 
Sixth. I misheard the name 
as Ancient Arms but no, it 
was Anxious. I wondered 
what canforting arms would 
embrace me. 

This, too, turned out to 
be a pleasant experience in 
spite of the seedy address. 
The hotel was clean and neat 
with a kind of rustic hane- 
liness and little thoughtful 
touches like plastic sealed 
water glasses on your sink, 
soap and fresh towels and 
little wrought/iron tables - 
one even in the bathroom 
with an ash tray on it. 
Pleasant and civilized and 
restful . 

My stay here ended on the 
Friday morning after Thanks- 
giving Day. There were no 
rooms for the weekend... 
Friday being a state holiday 
as well. By and by I wound 
up at the . . . 

EL CAPITAN, Mission near 
20th. This hotel has had a 
notorious reputation over 
years and is usually des- 
cribed as "the jailhouse" by 
knowledgeable locals. 

Entering through steel- 
barred doors on the first 
floor to register confirms 
it, as you cure suspiciously 
buzzed in. This elaborate 
security does not extend to 
the privacy of your room. 
Roan #209 faced the street 
and was noisy and dilapi- 
dated. Shards of a broken 
mirror dislocated your face 
as you stared at it over a 
sink where only one faucet 
worked. The mottled bedside 
rug was askew. 

On the second night, I 
entered my room, where my 
backpack & other belongings 
were clearly on the side 
table, to find a stranger 
fast asleep on my bed. 

Summoning the manager 
brought apologetic explana- 
tions, and an improvised bed 
somewhere in a corridor 
where I lost my bearings and 
my glasses in the early 
morning chill. 

The toilets were unusable 
and without paper. One 
begins to becane a stranger 
to oneself in bed. I left 
early to return around 
midday to pick up my back- 
pack, nonchelantly handed 
over to me by a female desk 
clerk. 

No sign of my glasses. 

(On December 16, under the 
headline "Welfare Man's Plea 
for Decent Housing" by Katy 



Butler was a newspaper story 
about the Dickensian condi- 
tions she and her daughter 
lived in and the systematic 
harassment by the manager. 
It came as no surprise to me 
that the squalor described 
was the El Capitan.) 

After two or three more 
turndowns at the Shelter 
Hotline (no vacancies as 
Christmas came nearer), I 
called my friend again for 
help. I was tiring of this 
perpetual two-day relocation 
in any case. This time, the 
resourceful lady put me in 
touch with the Salvation 
Army shelter, where the min- 
imum stay was for two weeks. 

SALVATION ARMY SHELTER, Eddy 
Street. I quote frem their 
intake leaflet which speaks 
for itself: 

Hours of Operation: 6:00 PM 
to 6:00 AM daily 
Gate Opens: 6PM (you sit in 
an open yard until... ) 



Admission Begins: 8:30 PM. 

You are let in four at a 
time, undress, shower, stash 
your clothes and belongings 
in garbage bags and change 
into pyjamas provided. 
Coffee and sandwiches served 
at 10PM. A raffle held for 
extra sandwiches, usually 
two or three. Lights out at 
10:30. Wake up at 5AM. 
Dress, stand out in the dark 
courtyard for coffee and 
donuts. Wait until 6AM to 
leave. 

It is difficult and unsafe 
to do much in the Tenderloin 
at 6 on a winter morning 
except watch the street 
cleaning trucks. 

Rules are simple: 1) No 
Alcohol or Drugs, 2) No 
smoking or eating in the 
building, 3) No weapons, 4) 
No violence or threats, 5) 
No disruptive behavior. 

Disregarding any of them 



PIZZA WARS 




KJHtN THE 

Teuton . , , THe 1£>U dH 




'on the sunny side of Market Street 

550-8080 

2823 Mission at 24th Street 




would result in instant dis- 
missal. 

The 14-day stay must be 
used consecutively, after 
which there has to be a 90- 
day period before you are 
eligible for entry again. 

Salvation was truly Army 
in style. 

In a longei account , one 
could detail the conversa- 
tions and people one meets 
in this off-street brother- 
hood (you are always on the 
pavement anyway). You 
admire the patience and 
stillness of so many differ- 
ent individuals who have to 
erase time between the 
inevitable lines, the hours 
between one door opening 
after another is shut. 

It is an endless kaleido- 
scope of perpetual inmobil- 



ity. A vei y un-American, 
non-American activity. 

Five days later at mid-day 
I was walking around 16th 
Street paying off bills. It 
was dark when I woke up to 
bright lights and green mas- 
ked figures peering at me. 

I was told I was in the 
intensive care unit in San 
Francisco General Hospital 
being treated for hypother- 
mia. I was covered with 
hotlines everywhere: oxygen 
in my mouth, penicillin in 
arms, several other IVs 
wherever a vein shewed. 

I was told my body temper- 
ature had been down to 65 
degrees Farenheit. 

The hotlines were shelter, 
were life. San Francisco 
General was warm. 



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COMMUNITY HEALTH 

For the past two years, the Integrated Health Studies 
Program at the New College of California has presented a 
series of lectures entitled "FOCUS ON HEALTH". These 
lectures have examined topics in health, disease and 
medicine form the esoteric to the political. 

In response to a student initiated effort, this program 
will now seek to directly involve the ccmnunity in determin- 
ing the subject matter to be rpesented. In this way, the 
Integrated Health Studies Program can best respond to the 
health and health care needs of the ccmnunity in which it is 
located — the Mission. 

The means for soliciting ccmnunity input will be multiple. 
First, on Monday February 3rd, at 7:30PM in the Theatre at 
New College, a Ccmnunity Forum will be held to allcw ccmnun- 
ity members to provide input into the program. People will 
be gathering to discuss possibilities for presentations 
which they consider important for their health and the 
health of the ccmnunity. 

Secondly, a series of workshops will be conducted 
throughout the Spring Semester to ensure continued and 
widespread involvement. Finally, it is hoped that an 
Advisory Board of concerned ccmnunity members can be formed 
to provide continued direction. 

The "FOCUS ON HEALTH" series runs frem February to May. 
The schedule for February has been established. The topics 
are as follows: 



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3: COMMUNITY FORUM: HEALTH IN THE PUBLIC 

INTEREST; 

A meeting to discuss the ccmnunity' s needs and wishes 
for health topics. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10: FANTASY AND IMAGINATION: ITS ROLE IN 

ACHIEVING HEALTH: 

Stan Dale, Author. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 17: SPECIAL PRESENTATION IN HONOR OF BLACK 

HISTORY MONTH: "TRADITIONAL AFRICAN MEDICINE AND ITS IMPLI- 
CATIONS FOR THE HEALTH OF BLACK AMERICANS: 

Presenter: Roland Foulkes, President of ROOTS , Tradi- 

tional Medicine of the African Diaspora. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24: MOVIE/SLIDE SHOW: PROJECT PIAXTIA: 

VILLI GER RUN COMMUNITY HEALTH CARE IN MEXICO. 

Produced by the Hesperian Foundation, publishers of 
DONDE NO HAY DOCTOR , a manual based on the project. 

The Integrated Health Studies program believes that it can 
best "Serve the People" by involving them. We hope to be 
able to make that possible. 

For further information, contact Michael J. McAvoy at New 
College, 777 Valencia, 626-1694. 




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Continual fran page one 
goes to the institutions. 

Conservatives blame the 
ACLU and the labor unions 
for the mess. Liberals fix 
the blame on corrupt or 
uncaring bureaucrats. 

While they hiss and claw 
at one another the mentally 
ill... and the public... pay 
the cost. 

On Sunday, December 1, one 
of these statistics rode the 
N-Judah to the end of the 
line, got off "looking for 
someone to kill", and killed 
an elderly woman. 

According to neighbors, 
Daniel Thornton, a veteran 
of the shuttle between board 
and care homes, prisons, 




©Tfl hOCHG 



VALENTINE’S 

SWEETHEART 

PARTY 

Friday, 

FEB. 11 






hospitals and the street was 
disturbed that his counselor 
was ill and felt nobody 
cared about him. 

"He said he needed help," 
Police Inspector Earl San- 
ders told the Examiner 
(12/2) "and figured this was 
one way to get attention." 

The State of California, 
has responded to the problem 
of the homeless mentally ill 
by authorizing a $20 million 
budget augmentation to the 
Department of Mental Health. 

These funds, divided among 
58 counties, have been targ- 
eted to provide services and 
counseling. In a memo 
drafted by George Peterson 
of the Health Dept, to the 
State on December 6th, a 
broad Interim outline of San 
Francisco's problems and po- 
tentialities can be gleaned. 

The City's share of these 
State monies, counting the 
mandatory 10% matching funds 
will amount to slightly over 
$1.1 million. 

(By comparison, Governor 
Deukmejian claimed that $1.2 
billion already budgeted to 
new prison construction is 
insufficient, and an addi- 
tional $400 to $500 million 
is needed - Exam. 7/17/85.) 

The proposal is an 
interesting one, a blend of 
flaws and opportunities, 
with rather more of the 
latter than usually emanates 
from City Hall. 

Most encouraging is the 
possibility of community 
access to decision making at 
several interim stages. 

According to Peterson, rec- 
ommendations are to first be 
brought before the Health 
Commission then, hopefully, 
before the Board of Supervi- 
sors' Health Committee 
towards the end of February. 

A final plan will go 
before the board in March 
and, if approved and signed 
by the Mayor, the proposed 
services should be opera- 
tional by July. 



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The San Francisco proposal 
i 8 broken down into six 
funding categories. Clinical 
support services presently 
funded by the Robert Wood 
Johnson Foundation will be 
expanded . 

The other five programs 
are new, and include special 
services for addicts and 
alcoholics, seniors and vet- 
erans, and an increase in 
the facilities provided by 
the Tenderloin and South of 
Market clinics. 

The most extensively fun- 
ded (at nearly $400,000) and 
perhaps the most innovative 
proposal is a Community Hou- 
sing, Advocacy and Support 
category including provision 
of such amenities as 
laundry, shower, storage 
and, most importantly, mail 
services . 

It is impossible to pin 
down the number of people 
whom, because of homeless- 
ness, are denied State and 
Federal benfits to which 
they are legitimately 
entitled . 

A few of the more "fortu- 
nate", Peterson declared, 
have been receiving mail 
through shelters, including 
such hotels in the Contract 
Compliance program as are 
described in this month's 
NMN articles "Baby, It's 
Cold Outside" and "Complaint 
Department" . 

Where innumerable clients, 
some mentally confused, are 
being shuttled through the 
shelters, their mail service 
has a potential for 
misunderstandings . 

Moreover, public assis- 
tance laws do not look with 
kindness on the policy of 
receiving welfare checks by 
post office box. The con- 
cern is a legitimate one. 

Peterson indicated a need 
to draft a process balancing 
the entitlement rights of 
the homeless with taxpayer 
concern about fraud. 

He indicated that the leg- 
islature, which motivated 
the grant, may have the 
capacity to resolve this 
contradiction. "We'll have 
to work things out." 

A more nebulous problem is 
in the number and location 
of such facilities a6 are 
proposed in the project. 

"The problem with services 
is that they're concentrated 
in the central city," stated 
Bob Prentiss of the Health 
Department . 

And Peterson admitted that 
some neighborhoods with a 
high homeless population 
would probably remain devoid 
of the targeted services. 
The Haight, despite its 
proximity to the vast unof- 
ficial shelter of Golden 
Gate Park is unlikely to 
benefit by the grant. The 
Mission is also problemati- 
cal; although persons who 
are not elderly, confused or 
sick will probably be able 
to walk to services in the 
Tenderloin or South of 
Market . 

Centralization of homeless 
facilities downtown will, 
sooner or later, conflict 





7 




LINDA WILSON’S GRAFFITI JOURNAL #1 



with "revitalization" plans 
encouraged by the Mayor and 
Chamber of Commerce. 

In a special Chronicle 
feature on the gentrifica- 
tion of SOMA (2/18/85), 
Police Captain Robert Farni 
declared: "I spoke to some 
people who put a million and 
a half bucks into a garage 
at 7th and Harrison they 
want to turn into a Studio 
54-type after-hours place. 

"In five years you won't 
recognize this neighborhood 
at all. The down-and-outers 
on 6th St. will be pushed up 
to 16th St. and, after that, 
way out into the Mission. “ 

"Why do so many people now 
believe that homelessness is 
a psychiatric problem?" re- 
plies Thomas Szasz, a critic 
of psychobureaucracy. "Be- 
cause they want to treat 
homeless people as if they 
were insane." 

"If you don't eat and 
don't sleep," advises Howie 
Harp of Berkeley' 8 Indepen- 
dent Living Project, "you go 
crazy. Anyone would." 

The bad news, accordingly, 
is that the San Francisco 
plan allocates 86, 88, 93, 
100, 96 and 1007. of State 
funds for its six programs 
to mental health profession- 
als (to at least keep these 
educated and important citi- 
zens sheltered from winter's 
chill). 

The good is that Peterson 
and Prentiss, unlike many of 
those who accept a City 
paycheck, are cognizant of 
the contradictory policy of 
hurling psychiatrists at 
economic problems. 

"It's going to be tough," 
Peterson responded to the 
prospect that, if the State 
funds help the homeless get 
their act together, hundreds 
or even thousands of such 
"success stories" will enter 
the already brutal competi- 
tion for the remains of the 
City's affordable housing. 

Homelessness, he explains, 
"wears on the psyche". Each 
of us has a breaking point, 
a quota of days or week6 or 
months of cold and hunger 
after which the manifesta- 
tions, if not the reality, 



of mental illness takes 
hold. For some, this eco- 
nomic illnecs precipitates a 
decline which will never be 
reversed . 

Coincidentally, the Plan- 
ning Department's recently 
issued Residential Hotel 
Status Report reveals that 
rents for single rooms have 
nearly doubled in the last 
four years. 

If the housing isn't there 
these people will go right 
back to shuttling between 
Cardboard City and expensive 
jails and hospitals. One 
questions the mental status 
of those who propose and 
maintain such a system. 

A suggestion frequently 
voiced is that vacant 
properties be acquired and 
rehabilitated as community- 
based shelters 

But there are still four 
opportunities for the 
Mission to speak out against 
official madness: 

1) Community Advisory Board 

- meets Jan. 27 and Feb. 17. 
Information 558-2564. 

2) Mental Health Adv. Board 

- meets Feb. 5th, City Hall 
Room 2c (basement) 7PM. In- 
formation 558-5533. 

3) Health Commission 

- meets Feb. 4th and 18th. 
Information 558-3348 

4) Supervisors' Health Comm. 

- meets Feb. 11th & March 11 
(Walker -chair, Britt, Ward) 

Thereafter, the proposal 
will be brought before the 
Supervisors, five of whom 
will be up for election in 
November . 

Ironically the inclusion 
of mail service may have a 
bearing on that contest, for 
recent court decisions have 
affirmed the right of the 
homeless to register and 
vote. 

**************************** 

* "Fire and Gold" by Brian * 

* Doohan is an examination * 

* of the links between San * 

* Francisco's slumlords, * 

* gentrifiers, developers * 

* and politicians. Parts * 

* have appeared in the NMN * 

* and copies will be given * 

* to anyone making a dona- * 

* tion of at least $5 to * 

* the North Mission Assn. * 



Quan Yin 
Acupuncture 
& Herb Center 

of San Francisco 

A community-oriented healing center offering 
Acupuncture, Chinese Herbs, Shiatsu massage, 
and Classical Homeopathy in a supportive 
environment. Sliding fee scale. 

Monday 2-7 

Tuesday through Friday 9-7 
Saturday 9:30- 2 Drop-ins welcome. 

513 Valencia at 16th 861-1101 




AIDS AND THE FOCR 

- by Misha Cohen 

As we have discussed pre- 
viously in this column, AIDS 
is a disease of alienation. 

The people who have been 
diagnosed with AIDS are 
primarily gay men, intra- 
venous drug users, Africans 
in parts of Africa, Haitians 
and black people (especially 
in Florida) and all of these 
groups have a combination of 
living in a society which 
does not accept them. 

Self denial, self-hatred 
and alienation associated 
with international society's 
view and unsanitary living 
conditions (especially among 
“blacks, Africans, Haitians 
and intravenous drug users), 
along with increased expo- 
sure to the virus HTLVIII 
exists within each group. 

I mention black people 
here because recent stati- 
stics shew black pecple to 
be 25% of those contracting 
AIDS in the U.S. while black 
people comprise 13-14% of 
the total population. 

The increase of AIDS among 
blacks is growing faser 
while among the gay (mostly 
white) population it is 
slewing down. 

AIDS, as of the beginning 
of January, has be cane the 
leading cause of death for 
young men in New York, Los 
Angeles and San Francisco. 

Use of intravenous drugs 
now accounts for a large 
proportion of the increase 
in AIDS. The primary popu- 
lation using intravenous 
drugs are poor, alienated 
people - particularly blacks 
and others such as Latinos 
who are forced by our 
society into drug addiction. 

According to the chronicle 
of Jan. 8, 1986, "AIDS has 
become an affliction largely 
of the poor, ethnic minpri- 
ties in such Eastern cities 
as Newark and New York City 
where its spread among in- 
travenous drug addicts is 
outpacing AIDS increases 
among gay men." 



Yet poor blacks, latinos 
and other poor people cannot 
afford health care and are 
filling the wards of city- 
run hospitals. 

The alternative programs 
of nutritional supplements , 
meditation, personal coun- 
seling, acupuncture and 
herbs are often out of reach 
even in the most affordable 
of conditions (see previous 
AIDS article). 

We in the AIDS alternative 
healing project also find 
that there is great 
opposition among many 
medical doctors (in City 
hospitals especially) to 
using alternative treatment, 
leaving those who want to 
try on their cwn to also pay 
on their cwn. 

While the solution in 
general is to build a 
society in which health care 
is for people, not for 
profit, in the meantime we 
encourage practitioners to 
offer their services at a 
lew cost. We also encourage 
people with AIDS to ask 
practitioners to work with 
them on a lower scale or 
take Medi-Cal if they have 
limited funds. 

The AIDS alternative 
healing project is also 
offering very inexpensive 
support groups for people 
working with holistic meth- 
ods and a positive view. 
The AAHP offers three hour 
groups on a sliding scale of 
$2 - $5, not refusing anyone 
for lack of funds. 

One group is clsoed 
because it is full and 
another is almost closed. 
Hcwever, more groups can be 
started if needed. 

Some acupuncturists and 
other alternative healers 
will take Medi-Cal or lower 
fees. People with AIDS or 
AIDS related conditions need 
to check around. 

Contact the AIDS alterna- 
tive healing project by 
calling Misha Cohen at Quan 
Yin at 861-1101 or Alan 
Brickman at 668-1611. 



Manufacturer of the Daikon Shield, A. H. Robins, has filed 
for bankruptcy. If you have had a Daikon Shield IUD in the 
past and had injuries, you must file claim by April 30, 
1986. This date is an extension recently granted if 
you need to file claim or want information call Action Alert 
for Warren at 436-4500 or 1-800-DS-ALERT, or write P.O. Box 
4796-94101, San Francisco, CA 94101. 





GAMES 



- by Nick Homsfelt 

Imagine my surprise last 
week when I pulled my '73 
Vega into what had been Ed's 
Body & Combustion Shoppe to 
find a new sign proclaiming 
Ed's Brace & Bite Repair - 
Three Chairs, No Waiting! 

When I found Ed with both 
hands in the mouth of a lady 
who had met Morpheus aided 
by a nearby bottle of Wild 
Turkey, he explained: 

"I'll tell ya, ya might 
have begun to suspect after 
13 years of my working on 
your car as a mechanic, I 
leave a mite to be desired, 
and I always had a hankerin' 
to go into dentistry so here 
I am, a dream carte true." 

With that, the lady seemed 
to rally and started scream- 
ing bloody hel-l, so I beat a 
hasty retreat. 

I can't blame Ed, after 
all he's only following the 
lead of that august body of 
civic leadership, the Board 
of Supervisors. 

Over the past few weeks, 
while funding ran out for 
teh Senior Escort Service 
that aided thousands of 
elderly residents, and the 
security guards almost left 
Rosa Parks Apartments to the 
mercy of thugs. Board mem- 
bers spent days dabbling in 
international politics - 
South Africa and its "mor- 
ally repugnant system of 
apartheid practiced by that 
country's white government". 

Apartheid is hot press! 

Harry Britt and Willie 
Kennedy and Doris Ward put 
together the proposal that 
would be discussed at the 
December 11th Finance Com- 
mittee meeting. 

In a nutshell (where it 
seems to have ccme from in 
the first place) the legis- 
lation would strike down 
apartheid by "prohibiting 
city government as a whole 
from investing or depositing 
money, contracting for any 
services, or buying any 
merchandise from businesses 
with ties to South Africa". 

This would mean no new 
contracts with IBM, Xerox, 
GE, Kodak, Exxon, Mobil, 
Chevron, GM, Ford, Goodyear, 
Firestone, Uniroyal, Coke, 
PRpsi, Dr. Pepper, Gillette, 
Revlon, Kraft, Kellogg's 
Carnation, Band-aid, Ameri- 
can Express, B of A, Anacin, 
Reader's Digest, or the city 
accounting firm Peat, Mar- 



yick, Mitchell & Co., just 
to name a few. 

Now you and I might get by 
without these guys, but 
imagine a city without spare 
parts for buses, cars, gas, 
tires, banks, office equip- 
ment, and the Mayor without 
makeup! ! 

On December 11th, ties 
were tightened, panty hose 
hiked up, and the doors of 
the Finance Canmittee opened 
to the public. 

Citizens quoted St. Thomas 
Aquinas, implored that this 
matter be left to the 
voters , and one member of 
the chamber of catmerce was 
very practical and asked "If 
a South African wants to buy 
a $75,000 painting in a San 
Francisco gallery, hew can 
the deal be closed?" The 
kind of thing I lose sleep 
over myself. 

On the moral battlefield 
of finance, some of the 
greatness of our Board 
showed through when they 
questioned representatives 
of the big corporations 

Nancy Walker: 

"I am concerned about how 
this (bill) will affect 
credit card use." 

Louise Renne, trying to 
understand how Arthur 
Anderson sets up its 
international accounting 
offices in various cities: 
"It's like a McDonald's 
franchise?" 

And the winner of the 
Board Blooper of the week, 
Louise Renne again with: 
"Look, we're going to pass 
this anyway, but can someone 
tell me what in the hell is 
a 'corresponding banking re- 
lationship'?" 

This lady sits on the Fin- 
ance Canmittee! 

Quentin kept quiet and 
Hongisto arrived an hour and 
forty minutes late. The 
bill passed the Finance Com- 
mittee to go on to the Board 
for January 7th vote. 

The press quotes changed 

tone 

Sup. Molinari: 

"It would be a zoo around 
here- an economic disaster." 

So? This would be a dif- 
ference? 

Chamber of Canmerce Execu- 
tive Director John Jacobs 
observed: 

"The Board ' s measure does 
more damage to the City than 
to South Africa." 

What a great motto for the 
Board, "Damage is our Busi- 
ness" ! 

On January 7th, the Board 
refused to deal with the 
issue because 3 of the 11 
members were absent, giving 
themselves time to drop this 
hot potato somewhere else. 

' The outcome? Well, every- 
one got their names in the 
papers. 

As for the Senior Escort 
Service or permanent funding 
for security at senior hous- 
ing, San Francisco seniors 
of all races face the pros- 
pect of "township" life 
where if they dare to go out 
at all, they won't go far. 

Apartheid is an evil, but 
then so is apathy and we 
seem to have apathy in our 
own front yards. 



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■ The Bull 



In this issue of the North Mission 
News you will find several articles on 
what life is like when you are poor in 
San Francisco In fact it is not very 
different being poor in this city than in 
any other city in America. And the way 
we treat our poor people is a direct 
consequence of the way the United 
States conducts its economic business, 
both here and in the rest of the world 

In the U S. we have constructed a 
myth of rugged individualism and 
boot strap economics. Poor people are 
poor because they want to be poor or 
are too lazy to take advantage of the 
opportunities America offers. People 
are homeless for the same reason 

Starting with the depression in the 
30's, the election of FDR and 
continuing through the term of Jimmy 
Carter, the US government 
acknowledged, if half-heartedly, its 
responsibilities to the poorest people of 
this country and enacted various laws 
and programs to assist poor people 

Except for social security these 
programs were not universal the 
welfare system had (and has) as its 
basic assumption that poor people were 
stupid, lazy and dishonest A direct 
result of those assumptions was the 
imposition of onerous conditions of 
eligibility on potential welfare 
recipients. 

In order to get welfare a person had 
to give up many rights that we take for 
granted For example in order to 
receive welfare checks a person had to 
allow periodic checks of their home in 
order for the government to make sure 
that the recipient didn't have any 
possessions that weren't absolutely 
necessary for life. 

And the welfare system never 
provided the amount of money 
necessary for families to sustain more 
than a mean existence, bounded by a 
harping bureaucracy and petty rules 
that seemed designed more for 
inflicting the maximum amount of 
humiliation than providing for the 
sustenance of a family. 

After all if we are going to give money 
to stupid, lazy good-for-nothings then 
we are damn well going to make them 
pay for the privilege. pay in the 
currency of humiliation, abuse, denial 
of rights and invasion of privacy. 

To this day the welfare system in 
this country is a travesty; more a 
caricature of how to help people than a 
viable system of delivering benefits to 
needy people There is still no limit to 
how poor you can get This country has 
never seen fit to proclaim that all of its 
citizens are entitled to certain basic 
minimum requirements, food to eat, a 
place to live, decent clothes to wear and 
adequate medical care 

It is as if we were afraid that if 
everyone was guaranteed a basic 
minimum survival level then no one 
would work Why work when you can 
get a free place to stay and free food 
This reasoning also seems to drive the 
meanness of the welfare system 

Now, with the election of Donald 
Reagan and the coming of the so-called 
new conservatism, even the meager 
subsistence we provided to our poorest 
citizens has been cut. 

If you read the papers or watch the 
tv news you have seen the ghastly 
statistics on who is poor in this 
country Mostly it is women and 
children. 

Over the past ten years we have 
seen a massive shift in the pattern of 
poverty We have shifted resources 
from the young to the old We have 
raised most of the old people in this 




country above the so-called poverty 
line and pushed many women and 
children below it 

Social Security, the main engine 
pulling this transfer of resources 
remains off limits to cuts. The reason 
for social security remaining 
sacrosanct is easily 

discerned — everyone is eligible for 
social security and it has become 
political suicide to target social 
security for changes. 

Despite attempts to convince us 
otherwise, social security is not much 
different from Aid to Families With 
Dependent Children (AFDC). Money 
is being transferred from one segment 
of the population to another. 

My aim here is not to question the 
social security program but rather to 
point out that enriching one group 
while impoverishing another is one 
consequence of the way the American 
economy operates. The creation of an 
economic underclass is an inevitable 
result of a system that allocates the 
greatest resources to its greediest 
citizens. 

There is simply no excuse for one 
person to have billions of dollars in 
assets while millions of others do not 
even have a place to live. 

I am always amazed when I find 



people who are surprised when 
businesses do things like dump toxic 
chemicals on the highways, or sell 
products they know are dangerous. 
The American economic system 
actively encourages this type of 
behavior by providing greater benefits 
to the purveyors of death than it exacts 
in penalties. ^ 

Even more telling in the last twenty' 
years is the war that has been waged 
against government. The people who 
were preaching the evils of government 
in the background have, with the 
ascendancy of Ronald Reagan, been 
brought to the forefront. 

We have been treated to a constant 
barrage about how the government is 
wasteful, the people who work for the 
government are slothful and nothing 
the government does works. This 
unremitting assault has left us with a 
government filled with people who 
don't seem to care Bureaucrat has 
become an epithet and the people who 
work for the government are the 
victims of unending vituperation. 

We are further told that the "private 
sector" can better solve the problems 
the government couldn't. 

What a crock of shit. Are we really 
going to entrust our country to the 
people who gave us Bhopal, the pinto 



and the Firestone 500. Give me a 
break. We need government to 
protect us from those people 

Moreover, close examination reveals 
that the manner in which America 
treats its poor people fits into a 
continuum with the way the United 
States interacts with the rest of the 
world, especially the poorer countries 
Several years ago the debt crisis of 
the third world made headlines 
everywhere Poor countries had been 
encouraged to borrow money, mostly 
from American banks When the world 
economy hit the skids these countries 
were hardpressed to make the 
payments The danger that was 
stressed was not the danger faced by 
these developing countries but rather 
the danger that American banks would 
be destroyed. 

To the rescue rushed the 
International Monetary Fund (IMF) 
But in order to get more money the 
developing nations had to accept the 
IMF's conditions. "In this case the IMF 
acted (and acts) as an enforcer (Hey, 
you dpn't pay the vigorish. Okay we 
break your legs.) And in every case the 
conditions imposed further 
impoverished those citizens least able 
to bear a further cut in their standard 
of living. 




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FEBRUARY 11 1986 

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"Rich and Poor" is a new 
photodocumentary book by Jim 
Goldberg, which contains 
black and white photos of 
San Francisco's rich and 
poor, accompanied by com- 
ments frcm the participants 
themselves . 

Photographed in their own 
surroundings, be it palatial 
mansion or transient hotel, 
the human vulnerability of 
the individual emerges. 

"A picture is worth a 
thousand words , " goes the 
old proverb that comes to 
mind when reviewing Jim 
Goldberg's photo essay book 
"Rich and Poor". 

Some photos leave you 
speechless as deep emotions 
of anxiety emerge seeing 
people at the margin of 
society full of despair. 
In this book, Jim has 
brilliantly exposed the 
lives of people who live in 
the transient hotels of the 
city. There are people who 
we see every day in the 
streets, ambulating with no 
place to go. Through his 
work, he has brought us to 
their hotel roans. 

In the same fashion, he's 
brought us to the hones and 
mansions of the rich, 
showing us how they view 
themselves. What one sees 
f ran the rich is contentment 
with their wealth and the 



privilege that goes with it. 
They lead protected lives 
against the crude life 
outside and the wealth they 
must preserve. 

With the wave of a magic 
wand, rich and poor are 
humanized. What is most 
revealing is not the 
difference between those who 
are rich and poor, but their 
similarities. 

Among the children of the 
poor one boy , upon looking 
at his photograph, said of 
himself, "I think I'm stu- 
pid. I always do something 
wrong." His brother wrote 
"... I look scared", and the 
other brother says "... the 
hotel is rotten, I want to 
move . " 

This is contrasted with a 
rich kid who says "I like 
living incognito. People 
are envious of my wealth. I 
can't help having been bom 
with money. I try to ignore 
the hurt and hide it all 
away where I don't have to 
deal with it. I can't 
escape being a Zellerbach." 

What one sees is a society 
where the illusion of class 
mobility is replaced with a 
caste system where one who 
is bom into it remains! 

Can one not make the 
connection "where there are 
rich there are poor" or, 
"without poor, there can be 
no rich"? These ideas begin 



to surface as one reviews 
this book. 

What else does one observe 
from this book? The 
disarray of the lives of the 
poor, the disorder, squalor, 
general lack of control over 
their lives... whereas the 
rich have a highly organized 
and structured living with 
full control over their 
lives . 

One can argue that both 
are unhappy and dissatis- 
fied, but the poor hat their 
situation and want a better, 
more dignified life. 

Another revealing photo- 
graph is of a middle aged 
poor woman. Her name is 
Dorothy. She writes "My 
face shows the intensity of 
a pained woman. I've been 
ask for this mess. This 
(photograph) makes me look 
like a bum - I am not. I am 
fantastic Dorothy, a popular 
personality, the nicest 
person in the hotel." 

Her statement shows how 
she had been victimized by 
violence. Although she 
admist she appears like a 
"bum", she rejects that 
concept - she is crying out 
I did not choose to end up 
this way, I am the opposite! 

What Jim Goldberg elo- 
quently demonstrates in his 
book "Rich and poor" are the 
casualties of American capi- 
talism, those who lost the 



struggle and the victors, 
those who inherited and 
maintained their wealth. 

It's victors vs. van- 
quished; American dream vs. 
American nightmare. Surely 
an image that Reagan would 
prefer to deny exists. 

The paradox of all this is 
that these are not even the 
poorest of the city, there 
are approximately 10,000 
haneless, those who sleep in 
walkways, abandoned 

buildings like Poly High 
School . See for yourself ; 
go at daybreak where the 
truly unlucky ones live, 
where irony and reality meet 
on 13th Street and Bryant 
underneath the freeway 
overpass and see the 
haneless emerge fran their 
nightmares to begin their 
lifeless day. 






Someone told me that 
Martin De Porres was a black 
saint. I didn't know there 
were any black saints but 
then I'm pretty confused 
about the whole concept of 
saints. 

In theory, you have to die 
before you officially become 
a saint, isn't that the way 
it goes? Seems a weird kind 
of reward system to me. All 
I know is that there are 
quite a few living saints of 
all races and creeds working 
as volunteers at Martin de 
Porres' "House of Hospi- 
tality", a super soup 
kitchen on 23rd and Bryant 
in the heart of the Mission. 

It was there that I was 
educated about saints by one 
of the guests as I ladled 
out a delicious rabbit soup 
the first day they opened 
after the Christmas holi- 
days. 

I had originally spoken to 
John Moore who, along with 
Barbara Cal j p*' he.-^ i team 
of volunteers mio 
run the soup kitchen. I 
called him up because I'd 
heard that Martin de Porres 
might have to close due to 
eviction. 

Apparently .the building is 
owned by the man who owns 
the laundromat next door and 
he wants to expand. 

I talked with John about 
all the relevant facts on 
the phone, but then he said 
"well if you really want to 
get a feel for the place you 
should cane and volunteer" 
and I thought "good idea" 
and immediately went over 
for the lunch-time stint. 

A lot of people have never 
heard of Martin de Porres: 
they only know about St. 
Anthony's, and I was one of 
them. 

What I learned was that 
"Martin's", as it is affec- 
tionately kncwn , serves free 
breatfast Monday through 
Friday 6 - 7:30 AM and free 
dinner from 12-3 Tuesday 
through Saturday. Free 
brunch is served on Sunday 
from 9 - 10:30 AM. 

Smaller and more persona] 
than St. Anthony's, it was 
part of the Catholic Worker 
movement which was begun by 
Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin 
in 1933, but you don't have 
to be religious to either 



eat there or help out. 

The house philosophy is 
that eating is a right, not 
a privilege, and that 
feeding the hungry is a 
matter of justice, not of 
charity. 

Martin's has been serving 
the hungry there for 15 
years with no church or 
government funds, just indi- 
vidual donations of food or 
money. 

As John said, "we never 
know what is going to be on 
the menu until we get there, 
it's creative cooking frcm 
donations." He had made the 
rabbit soup that day himself 
and I can vouch that it was 
one of the best soups I've 
ever tasted. 

Not only is the quality 
impressive, but the quantity 
is unrestricted. Guests can 
eat as much as they need. 
No Oliver TVists there! 

Also, people can stay as 
long as they like while the 
restaurant is open. No one 
is hustled out. On the con- 
trary, I noticed that the 
guests are treated with in- 
finitely more respect and 
care than are the paying 
clients at Jack-In-The-Box 
where those awful "Security" 
thugs pressure you to get 
out before you've virtually 
swallowed your last bite. 

The atmosphere at Martin's 
is relaxed and friendly and 
guests relate on a first 
name basis. 

The kitchen is spotless 
and all the volunteers wear 
freshly laundered green or 
red aprons. Everyone seems 
to have fun and I'd give 
credit to John's leadership 
for creating the positive 
easygoing atmosphere on that 
particular day. 

I thoroughly enjoyed 
working there and found it 
one of the most gratifying 
volunteer gigs I've ever 
done. I felt I got back as 
much as I gave and I have 
every intention of going 
back if Martin's is still 
there. 

But this very special 
little free restaurant in 
danger of closing! 

Martin de Porres has io 
move from 2826 23rd Strec 
by March 31. They netc 
$300,000 to buy new premises 
so. they can continue to 



serve the 1,000 or so meals 
they've supplied for the 
last fifteen years. 

Tbey need help! 

Donations of money, 
however small, are desper- 
ately needed to maintain 
this vita] lifeline. Food 
and clothes are also always 
welcomed but right now money 
is the number one priority 
because without the kitchen 
there can be no soup. 



ii 

So please, in this land ot 
plenty where the irony of 
millions of dollars being 
spent on weight loss diets 
frcm too much food by same 
contrasts sadly with mass 
malnutrition and hunger for 
others, let's take care of 
those in our ccmmunity who 
are struggling with basic 
survival . 

For further info, call 
John or Barbara at 550-9091. 

BY CLARE KNIGHT 



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• 572 Valencia 
863-9933 



NORTH MISSION’S 

FIRST GENERAL BOOKSTORE 

Jan .8-Feb. 13 
Rupert Jenkins 
Photographs of 
Buffalos 

Private 
libraries 
always wanted 

Mon-Sat 
11-6 





f ust around the Corner ...» 
It’s fust a matter of TIME. 



Trouble Will* &!o°J? 



Every Monday night for the 
past nine months, local 
filmmakers working fever- 
ishly on a cure for this and 
other problems facing the 
"McLuhan generation" have 
given the public an opportu- 
nity to view the results of 
their research , absolutely 
free, at a nightclub on the 
corner of 16th Street and 
Albion appropriately named 
The 16th Note. 

"The Filrnnakers' Showcase" 
was started last spring by 
two shadowy figures known, 
it seems, only by the 
monikers "Shawn" and "Jean- 
Louis". 

I was unable to track them 
down for an interview in 
time for this article, but 
while Kelly McKlusky (one of 
the three people currently 
working on the Showcase) was 
untangling equipment, I was 
able to talk to the other 
two members of the team, 
program coordinators Karin 
Nordh and Peter Weiselmann. 

Under their direction, the 
program is expanding to 
include special showings by 
particular fi lnmakers such 
as Donna Cameron on February 
17th and Dominic Anger ame on 
March 10th. Plans are afoot 
to host opening night par- 
ties for special events at 
the Roxie Cinema, just down 



the street from the 16th 

Note. , . 

Grants have been applied 
for to purchase more 
advanced equipcment such as 
a video system, and Peter is 
working out arrangements 
with Canyon Cinema , one of 
the largest independent, 
underground and experimental 
film libraries in the coun- 
try, to bring in works from 
outside the Bay Area. 



at 9PM. 

This should come as a 
welcome relief for those 
students and independents 
whose careers and aspira- 
tions have been continually 
frustrated by the institu- 
tional gauntlet. 

As a result of this open- 
door policy, nude people 
made entirely of Leggo 
blocks are allowed to 
explain things about our- 
selves that we really may 
not want revealed, in terms 




For these special events, 
there will be a two dollar 
cover charge . The rest of 
the Monday night showings 
will remain admission free. 

They asked me to stress 
that during the regular cpen 
nights that "There is no 
screening process here! All 
you have to do to get your 
film (and possibly video by 
spring ) shown is to walk in 
the door with it." Prefer- 
ably before the show starts 



that only an audience built 
of Leggo blocks could 
comprehend . 

Many are left shocked and 
dismayed as they realize at 
the end of another film that 
all the characters have the 
same nose. 

In case you're one of 
those people that must have 
everything spelled out for 
you, a film is shewn in wich 
beautiful female dancers in 
tights slowly descend a 



chromium spiral staircase, 
explaining it all in a 
timeless red light with per- 
fectly studied gestures of 
their bodies and limbs. 

The audience roars as a 
purse snatcher meets a 
bizarre fate trying to 
extricate his hand from a 
curious old woman's handbag. 

Are these the Tobe Hoopers 
and Roger Cormans of tomor- 
row? Francesca, co-owner of 
the 16th Note doesn't think 
so. 

She does, however, like 
thinking that she may 
discover one day that she 
drank saki with and helped 
foster the career of a 21st 
century Fellini or Zeffer- 
elli. 

Filmmakers, themselves, 
should enjoy the unique 
forum her club provides for 
them to meet and mix with 
their audience in a pelasant 
dimly lit environ that lends 
itself both to uninhibited 
(occasionally drunken) soc- 
ializing and/or voyeur- 
istic anonymity 

"There is so much more 
than just music," says Fran- 
cesca, who maintains an 
eclectic repertoire of dance 
ensembles, theater troops, 
divergent forms of music and 
any or all of the above in 
combination . 

by Alabama Street 




4>' 

❖V 



FROM 

1975 

GARTLAND PIT 
FIRE 



The Spark 
That May 



TO 

1985 ^ 

DOLORES PARK 

Cause a Fire rapes 



NORTH MISSION NEWS 



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I'lii'lo In ( htirlt i KcwuirJ 







(tory by Htria idrr rtd Mlchaal Pag* 



Director Ray ration (left) and student-artists Eduardo Jurado and Barbara Duncan are 
proud to show off the results of their efforts at a Creativity Explored workshop 



Creativity 
2511 24th 
550-0828/29) 



Explored 
Street (phone 



Impossible dreamer 



You are invited to visit 
San Francisco's first 
full-time visual arts 
center for the 
developmental ly disabled. 



We recognize 
this aspect 



with pride 
of Mission 



Culture . 
arts and 
studio , " 
Pat l£n , 
promote 
disabled 
is as 
found 



"This is not an 
crafts busy-work 
clarifies Ray 
director. "We 
the art of the 
which we think 
valuable as work 
in major 



galleries . " 
his staff 
encouraging 
environment 



Patlan says 
provide an 
unstructured 
where the 



artist-students can give 
free reign to their 
expression . 

The goals of the center 
include the prevention 
of institutionalization 
of one of our most abused 
and neglected members of 
our community. Vitality 
itself is promoted in 
this well-equipped 
studio. Development and 
inner personal growth is 
achieved in this relaxed 
and stimulating 
environment . 



Classes in Muralism, 
History, Design and 
Technique with muralist 
Juana Alicia are being 
given thanks to La Raza 
Graphics (648-0930) and 
C.A.C. Latino youth are 
encouraged to apply. 



Today is 
King day. 



Martin Luther 



Assembly at City Hall. 
We went to see Martin 
Luther King, Jr. School 
put on a play. Third- 
world kids crowded into 
the rotunda with teachers 
pushing out the memory of 
King. We sat through a 
lovely little chorus of 
essay contest, model 
minority choral reading 
The kids return with a 
washed-out liberal 
sentiment of being proud, 
and welcomed in the Halls 
of Justice. Their 
performance was a rip 
off,- being used as proof 
of great gains when human 
rights are still at the 
heart of our daily 
struggle. It is the 
events like these, like 
the huge marches and 
rallies, that are the 
mainstreaming of us we 
watch on T.V. The 
'system' destroys 
people's culture. What 
happens in America is a 
fear of differences, a 
demorepublikan wash, the 
T-V-isa.tion of us. 

***** * * 

The Mission Cultural 
Center at 2451 Harrison 
also offers excellent 
cost-free Drawing and 
Screen printing classes 
open to the public. 
Pueblo, aproveche ! 



Isa Mura is a flamenco 
dancer who traces her 
roots from both the 
Mission and Latin 

America. She can tell 
you about living with her 
four children in one room 
and about her love for 
her work and appreciation 
for her position as a 
teacher, performer, 

choreographer and mother. 

The Mission was suffering 
when she left it 25 years 
ago. There just wasn't 
the day-to-day means. 
People were living 2 or 3 
families to one house and 
trying to get their 
relatives from El 

Salvador, Mexico or other 
places. She says that 
there was not the 
possibility then for the ' 
psyches fo these people 
to relax enough to take 
part in cultural or 
artistic things. She 
also admits, while 

hitting her fists 

together, that the stress 
and strain of her career 



- 



Isa Mura began teaching 
Ballet and Tap in her 
mother's garage at 9 
years old and loves to 
teach, ??? passing of 
strict self-discipline, 
good posture and the 
heritage she understands 
as part of the Mission 
community's Latin 
American identity. She 
has never been to Spain, 
but taught in the 70s at 
La Raza Community Center 
at 362 Capp and has 
achieved notoriety in the 
Bay Area and Los Angeles. 
Her goals as of now are 
"limitless as long as the 
life force is running 
thru jne." Through the 
Mission Cultural Center, 
she wants to realize 
performing with her 
company involving more 
Spanish musicians and men 
and children and bring 
other artists from Spain 
and elsewhere to give 
master classes. 

Isa has submitted a grant 
proposal to the 
California Arts Council 
to continue her work. 
Latin women artists are 
statistically one the 
most ignored groups when 
it comes to getting major 
art financial support. 
She uses her creativity 
that there be no 
deficiency. And that the 
Mission have a vital 
culture and we all» are 
more active and more at 
peace in ourselves as a 
result .! 



When we break out of the White Man's T.V. one-way culture imposed 
upon us, we develop within as we search for solutions. We become 
stronger, healthier, more patient, more at peace with ourselves 
and others as we use more of our inner powers. 



A Pesar de Todo -- Redoblando Esfuerzos 
En TiemDos Cada Dia Mas Dificiles — Creatividad Mas Tenaz 



Si nos cortan los medios de expresion nos estan cortando la vida 
misma! We all have the potential to be artists en la medida que 
nos expresamos . 



\ 








14 

NEIGHBORS 



LYNN JOHNSON 




Clarion Cafe 



New year, new beginnings, 
and the plum tree in front 
of my house began to show 
tiny blossom buds before the 
15th. This is the earliest 
I can remember my personal 
harbinger of spring showing 
its face. 

New beginnings, new 
growth, nice things to think 
about at the beginning of a 
year. One beginning I'd 
like to see is the transfer 
of 6ome energy in our neigh- 
borhood . 

I'd like to be able to 
drain off some of the money- 
making energy pervading our 
neighborhood (sky-rocketing 
rents that continue to force 
individual neighbors and 
neighborhood businesses out 
of our community) and pump 
that energy into the 
citizens of the community to 
enable us to effect more 
positive changes in our 
lives as individuals and as 
a cohesive community. 

What would "more positive 
changes" be? There's a book 
titled Life After Life that 
recounts the experiences of 
many persons who have 
technically died and then 
come back to life. One of 
the insights common among 
these people privileged to 
an outside perspective of 
this life we live is that if 
there are any goals in this 
life, they are LEARNING and 
LOVING. 

If we could each increase 
our learning and our loving 



at the rate that rents 
increase and megacorporation 
junk-food palaces invade our 
neighborhood, we'd form a 
pretty wonderful community 
in a very short time period. 

If you have access to a 
garden (and I see an awful 
lot of unused backyards in 
our neighborhood) or even 
window boxes, January is a 
good time to prune. The 
rainy season is also a great 
time for fertilizing since 
the rains wash it down into 
the earth. 

It '8 a great time to get 
some cuttings from your 
neighbors even for 
houseplants. I stick cut- 
tings in a dark green glass 
container with water and 
Vitamin Bl transplant 
starter and let them root , 



and then stick them in the "a 
garden or in a new pot. o 
Getting your hands down in g* 
teh dirt (potting soil ^ 
included) and helping things q- 
grow is a really pleasant, ^ 
grounding experience. 

1986 6eems a good year to o, 
think about learning and ^ 
loving and thi6 is a good 
time to start. There are 
many avenues of learning in ^ 
our neighborhood including -s 
classes nad libraries and ^ 
new activities and just 
talking to more of your 
neighbors . 

Loving is something we 
increasse by doing. Be 
conscious of how you live 
your life and what you do 
with your time. Dedicate 
one day or one day each week 
to noticing what you do and 
how you do it. 

With each activity ask 
yourself, "Is this a loving 
thing to do and a loving way 
to do it?" "Is this loving 
of myself?" (never forget to 
be loving to yourself). "Is 
this loving to my neighbors 
and my environment?" "Is 
this for the best benefit of 
all or just for my own ego 
enrichment ?" 

I think we're already a 
pretty wonderful community, 
but under the current na- 
tional and local administra- 
tions all growth and change 
is measured by dollar 
increases for the few who 
own and manipulate, and this 
kind of change is all too 



prevalent in our neighbor- 
hood . 

As a few make more and 
more money and rents 
continue to increase, each 
of us is forced to become 
more competitive and less 
cooperative just to maintain 
residence in the neighbor- 
hood we love. 

Now there's another McDon- 
ald's at 16th and Mission 
(rumor from the advertising 
agency has it that the owner 
who also owns the Mac's at 
24th and Mission is a vege- 
tarian) and there's a Carl's 
Jr. proposed for 20th and 
fission. And why do we sup- 
port these megacorporations? 
Because the television tells 

U8 tO? 

There are certainly more 
nutritious, less expensive 



fast food restaurants in our 
neighborhood. My current 
favorite is P ANCHO VILLA 
TAQUERIA at 3071 16th St. 
Super-clean, staffed by 
friendly neighbors, and they 
serve healthy foods in big 
portions at really low 
prices . 

TAQUERIA EL FAROLITO #2 at 
2092 Mission is another good 
one. ANDREAS IMPORTS AND 
DELI at 3091 16th Street is 
great for Greek specialties. 
MING' S GARDEN RESTAURANT has 
great nourishing Chinese 
food at really low prices at 
2172 Mission Street, CAFE 
PI CARO at 3120 16th St. is 
good, and the CLARION at 
2118 Mission is great. 

"Another new favorite 
Mexican restaurant for me is 
LA PERLA jn at 1198 Treat 
Street (by 25th). 

Remember that the megacor- 
poration hamburger stands 
are also undermining the 
ecologies of other countries 
as their demand for beef 
forces more and more clear- 
ing for cattle production. 

Rumor has it that the 
CORONA bar at 16th and 
Guerrero is trying to open 
the old Industrial Club 
across the street as a 
social service community 
club. Supposedly the police 
are against it because of 
two citations in November 
for selling drinks after 
hours , and supposedly the 
ABC is against it because of 
12 protests about another 
bar in this area. 

Personally, the CORONA has 
been on my blacklist ever 



2118 Mission 

since I walked in one night 
and ordered a scotch and 
soda, and it took the bar- 
tender ten minutes to figure 
out how to make it. 

While we're gossipping I 
heard that Kush tried to get 
the VALENCIA ROSE (that 
sounded great), but now 
INTERSECTION is trying for 
it. I hope that whoever 
gets it continues the tradi- 
tion it maintained of a 
great community arts and 
presentation center. 

Even more rumors: the 

ROXIE THEATRE has received 
ominous, perhaps even threa- 
tening calls about its up- 
coming showing of "Hail 
Mary". Just the rumor makes 
me want to see the film. 

THE EYE GALLERY (758 
Valencia Street) and Cable 
Channel 25 present a 
screening on February 16th 
at 8PM which examines one of 
post-modern society's most 
undervalued resources Public 
Access Television. Tapes 
drawn from Channel 25' s past 
and present will be shown in 
a celebration of the 
diversity and vitality of 
Public Access. 

The SAN FRANCISCO INSTI- 
TUTE OF MAGICAL AND HEALING 
ARTS has an impressive list 
of classes, workshops, and 
intensives for this spring. 
For more information, you 
can call 821-7145. 

In connection with the SAN 
FRANCISCO AIDS ALTERNATIVE 
HEALING PROJECT I will be 
leading a support group for 
People with AIDS or ARC 
beginning in February on 





Sister Christine 3ol2 16th st. 




Friday mornings from 8:30 to 
11:30. The cost will be $2 
- $5 sliding scale. 

This group is only for 
people with AIDS or ARC who 
want to use or are already 
using alternative healing 
methods. There are still a 
few spaces available. 

In March, on my own, I 
will be beginning a support 
group for the Worried Well 
(members of the community 
who are healthy now, but 
terrified of contracting 
AIDS). For more information 
on either group, call 626- 
6565. 

THE MISSION CULTURAL CEN- 
TER invites you to discover 
a new world of learning thi6 
winter. Among the variety 
of music/dance classes being 
offered are flamenco, samba, 



Friday Februai) 28th at 8PM. 

The Noh Oratorio Society 
pre8ents"Saints and Singing" 
by Gertrude Stein on Sunday, 
February 16th at 3PM at 
STUDIO EREMOS (PROJECT 
ARTAUD) , 401 Alabama Street. 

If you're a man who hits 
your wife or lover, you're 
not alone. Male violence is 
a problem in more than half 
of all adult relationships. 

You can stop being abusive. 
The men at MEN OVERCOMING 
VIOLENCE (MOVE) are current- 
ly accepting new clients for 
group and individual coun- 
seling. MOVE is a nonprofit 
agency that has been helping 
men in the Bay Area for the 
last six years. 

At MOVE, men are working 
together to find alterna- 
tives to violence. Services 




Carlos 



Mexican folkloric ballet, 
Congolese drumming, tradi- 
tional Aztec dance and capo- 
iera... the unique Brazilian 
martial art and dance. 

Screen painting and design, 
figure drawing and graphics 
courses and a film produc- 
tion workshop are also being 
offered. Some courses are 
absolutely free but enroll- 
ment is limited, so stop by 
the Center soon at 2451 
Harrison Street or call 821- 
1155 for more information. 

Topical songsmith8 with 
music to inspire and empower 
you will be at MODERN TIMES 
BOOKSTORE Saturday, February 
8th at 8PM, and at ARTEMIS 
CAFE , Valencia and 23rd, 



are provided on a sliding 
scale. For more informa- 
tion, or to begin counseling 
right away, call 626-MOVE. 

If you're a woman over 40 
and need job information 
tailored to your needs, 0P- 
TIONS FOR WOMEN OVER 40 
offers unique services to 
mature women looking for 
work. You can stop in their 
offices in the WOMEN ' S BUIL- 
DING, 3543 18th Street, or 
call 431-6405. 

The blossoms in front of 
my house are reminding me 
that this is a good time of 
year to plan what you'd like 
to grow. 




Book 



Center 





VMOCff ME W ////// 
OW NERSH/P // . . 



WaRRCn l*ee cmspensimo optician 

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16 

POETRY CONTEST UPDATE 

The North Mission Poetry Contest has received over 500 
entries. The judges have been diligently piling through 
these but it has proven an enormous task. Therefore, we are 
forced to delay announcing a winner until our next issue 
which will be published March 1, 

At this time, the judges have narrowed it down to 60 
poems. The NMN wishes to thank all of the entrants who made 
the contest a success and ask for your continued patience 
for another month at which time we will have a winner. 




TALL GIRLS 



TALL GIRLS 

- by Susan and the Monkey 

We had the pleasure of 
seeing "TALL GIRLS" at the 
New Performance Gallery on 
December 7. "TALL GIRLS", 
known on the street as Jill 
Daly, Harriet Garf inkle and 
Marcia Paulsen, were very 
good and we hope to see more 
of them in the New Year. 

This four year old troupe 
which explores popular cul- 
ture staged a series of five 
short pieces which ranged 
from good to excellent. We 
were particularly impressed 
by the props and staging, 
which were perpetrated like 
a performance themselves. 

The New Performance Gal- 
lery complemented TALL GIRLS 
and their production; it's 
one of the best performance 
spaces in the Mission. 

Themes and material were 
drawn from familiar sources. 
The first piece, "Tricera- 
tops", was the most 
abstract . Choreography by 
Harriet Garf inkle seemed 
rushed and packed each bar 
of music, which was by Lori 
Anderson. The dancers 
ocncentrated on getting all 
the moves in as opposed to 
expression and grace. 

The overall effect seemed 
harried and the theme 
undeveloped . Triceratcps is 
a 3-homed dinosaur. 

"Trash Cash" also a 
premiere, was produced by 
Doug Skinner. We did not 
like it. 

Its Be-Bop for "small 
change" was very average. 
It did make excellent use of 
plastic and those pennies 
everyone collects. Jill 
Daly was very good in this 
piece despite what she had 
to work with. 



At this point the show 
took a major turn and the 
pieces became less experi- 
mental and much more effec- 
tive. 

"Pink Camouflage", again a 
premiere, was dynamite; its 
choreography by Marcia 
Paulsen was terrific and the 
theatrical aspect was very 
well done. The music by 
Stewart Copeland, the dance, 
the feeling were all 
developed and everything 
worked. 

It was an endearing piece 
and had none of the female 
buffoonery of "Trash Cash". 

"45RPM" followed and was 
the highlight of the night 
and good clean fun. 

Jill Daly's piece about a 
woman coming home and 
listening to music by the 
temptations, the Ronettes 
and Aretha Franklin was 
superb. The visitations 
were cleverly done with many 
surprises. Jill Daly 
displayed good comic sense. 

The last piece, which came - 
much too soon, also choreo- 
graphed by Jill Daly, was 
entitled "Tall Girls Wear 
High Heels". Music by Bob 
Lesoine worked well with 
this piece, as did the good 
costumes. The "Cosmo-girl" 
image, while we hope becom- 
ing a cliche, still affords 
many laughs. 

This piece was enjoyable 
and we hope that the TALL 
GIRLS develop and create, 
taking their themes about 
popular culture a step 
further. 

Worth noting was the 
dancing of Pamela Boucher. 
It was very good. We both 
will make a point of seeing 
more of the TALL GIRLS as 
they rise above the group. 
You should also. 




BULLETINS 



loss than a month after MUNI fares rose by 25%, City Hall 
now has unleashed a proposal to cut several lines and to 
reduce service on the 47 and 14L, two critical Mission 
routes. Turns out that 90% of the fare increase goes into 
the General Fund (a political pork-barrel) and not to MUNI. 

Such outrages are not unknown, but never have the politi- 
cians expressed their contempt for the public so overtly and 
so rapidly. They're counting on the chance that no one will 
call them to account. Will you? 



THE U.S. STEEL BUILDING 

MUNI i 8 planning to take 
over the U.S. Steel Building 
at 16th and Folsom Street. 

The building will house 
MUNI's articulated coaches, 
those accordian style twin 
buses. MUNI hopes to move 
in by the fall of 1987. 

MUNI i 8 planning to build 
a parking garage for its 
employees at the corner of 
Alameda and Harrison Street. 
One must wonder what will 
happen to the parking spaces 
on Folsom Street. 

CARL'S JR. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
COMIC BOOK CO. 

Telephone hot cine 
WAYNE SANTOS 
GARY ARLINGTON 
UNCLE OON 
'4IS» 5509158 
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Another fast food fran- 
chise in the Mission? 
Perhaps . 

On Thursday, Jan. 23, the 
Planning Commission consid- 
ered a request for condi- 
tional use at 2401 Mission 
Street (at the southeast 
corner of 20th). Carl's Jr. 
would like to build a 
restaurant with seating 
capacity for 83 people. 

In a letter to zoning ad- 
ministrator Robert Passmore, 
North Mission Association 
President Dave Spero opposed 
Carl's Jr., calling instead 
for a one year moratorium on 
fast food chains. 



"Let' 8 take a look at the 
economic impact of fast food 
chains on our local restau- 
rants . " 



VETERINARY ACUPUNCTURE 
A more holistic approach 

C Schwartz, D.m 
415-282 5960 



House Calls or Office Hours 

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n Fri • Jan 31 -Thurs • Feb 13 

Jean-Luc Godard's 

HAIL MARY 

(JE VOUS SALUE MARIE ) 

Hail Mary is simply Ihe latest chapter in the ongoing autobiography that 
Godard is wnlmg on film 01 course it isn't always easy to understand 
lust what he* reporting in any one film but each film represents another 
report from the front, that is, from a restless mind that has something of 
the shark about it It can only breathe, stay alive by remaining in motion, 
constantly moving on It seems lo be completely serious in its concerns, 
which, in this case, have to do. I believe, with the ultimate expression of 
faith and with the ultimate expression ot feminism" —Vincent Canby. N Y 
Timet Mane* boyfriend is Joseph a taxi driver, appropriately enamored 
ot his divinely -destined lover, even though she's not quite his lover Through 
no fault of Joseph's, Mary becomes pregnant with a little help from the 
clouds, the sea and a Character who doesn't get screen creou Mane a 
soon bound in the outrageous cosmogony of her plight while Joseph all 
loo human, fumes at Ihe bizarre turn of events Godard offers a lively table 
replete with symbonsn and theological iiioge it « perhaps because of 
Godard* geniie pokes at the myths that have swayed a civilization that 
the censors are most in arms Audacious Godard endows Mary with 
a nobility of spirit the ideas and images are provocative A ser ous mone 
by one ot the cinemas most important and innovative directors —William 
Wolf With the extraordinarily erotic Mynem Roussel as Mary, Thierry Lacoste, 
Philippe Lacoste »n French Color 35mm 1985 




cinema 



3117 16th Street 






17 



COMPLAINT DEPT. 




LANDLORDS! 

Ever since the Patels here 
in my hotel were forced by 
the S.F. fire inspectors to 
quit chainlocking the rear 
grill gate after 10:00 pm, 
here canes the same gang of 
acne scarred, hobo faced 
whores with their junk 
habits and middle class 
dates who can't get what 
they want from their wives. 
Even Howdy Doody with wooden 
brains could see what kind 
of traffic, muck and mire 
this brings in. 

That's more than I can say 
for this hotel's management. 
It seems to me that all that 
is important is rent, rent, 
rent! 

The Man son gang could move 
in here and set up shop and 
they wouldn't even knew it. 
They won't scrutinize 
renters because they're not 
interested and even paying 
rent is difficult. 

They put the wrong dates 
on my rent receipts and send 
some of my mail to other 
rooms. This I can prove. 
I've got the rent receipts 
to show it . I've got two 
people who will attest to 
the fact that my mail was 
slide under their door even 
though my name and room 
number were on the envelope. 

If someone ever pulls a 
Gartland number dewn here I 
hope I'm at my mother's 
house watching the wrestling 
matches on TV. Not here. 

The insane asylums are 
packed so we get the 
overflow and in knowing 
that, you don't know what 
kind of people move in and 
we have the Patels running 
this leaky boat that sinks 
deeper each day. 

POACHES! 

So what if I did 2 years 
in the low 8th at Horace 
Mann Jr. High on Bartlett 
Street! So what if this 
typer I'm using doesn't rip 
it all out for you! So what 
if I got into a fist fight 
with Carlos Santana in James 
Lick's schoolyard and the 
gym teachers had to break it 
up! 

So what! 

Why do only the good 
people in hotels die? Why 
don't the bad ones? Not to 
say that I wish death on the 



bad people but it seems that 
real good folks die quicker 
than the lawbreakers and the 
rest. Strange... don't you 
think? I guess we can't 
help it any. 

Last week I was sleeping 
soundly, alone for a change, 
and when I awoke I couldn't 
hear out of one ear so I 
went to an EN&T doc on 
Mission St. and after exam- 
ining my ear he extracted a 
big copper colored roach ! ! ! 

That's right. Yeah man, A 
Big One ! 

I drank a few nightcaps 
and went to bed. It hap- 
pened in my sleep or some- 
thing when the roach got 
into my ear. Close to the 
drum, as the doctor said. 

I showed some of the 
medical forms to the Patels 
who run the place and got a 
dumb response. I asked them 
if the Rose Exterminator 
still has a contract with 
this place. 

All I got in return was 
sane gobbly-gook that was a 
bit in-understandable. No 
offense please. 

To all you readers out 
there that are enjoying this 
column, if you ever spray or 
stemp on a roach (especially 
if you live in a Patel hotel 

like this one) I send my 
blessings . 

3) COPS! 

My last complaint for this 
month took place outside my 
hotel. It's about something 
that took place up in 
Dolores Park, the biggest 
park in the Mission Dist. 

Me, TJ, T. Bones, our 
galfriend Hurricane and two 
bearded hippies were sitting 
on the benches enjoying out 
the afternoon of the park. 
TJ had his big-ass Doberman 
Pincer tied up at one end of 
the bench and I had mine 
tied up at the other end. 
Stereo Dobes. 

After a while I went to 
the store and got us all a 
big jug of Calistoga Mineral 
Water. Here's the kicker. 
A police paddy wagon came 
cruising down the pathway 
and stopped. 

It stopped! 

It stopped right in front 
of all six of us sitting 
there drinking pure water 



right frem the bottle. We 
were all taken in for 
drinking in a public park. 

Mineral water! 

T. Bones had the mineral 
water in his hands when the 
cop wagon came and when we 
got to the station they 
called him "Kid Calistoga". 
We all got four hours 
detention at the station and 
then were cut loose. 

I was called an "asshole" 
and a "punk". I didn't even 
open my mouth. 

I'm one lucky Irishman. I 
can control my temper. 

In the paddy wagon we were 
all cuffed together... 
except for TJ. He had one 
free hand and our hippies 



had seme cannabis buds so TJ 
was able to take the buds 
and disseminate them in our 
mouths, just like holy cxm- 
munion at church. 

The heat in the holding 
tank was awful, at least 150 
degrees. I could hear the 
oops asking Hurricane what 
her name was. At the regis- 
tration center, she answered 
"Hurricane". 

The cops said "what's your 
real name?" She replied 
"Hurricane". 

The cops said "If they put 
you in the same tank as 
those idiots, they'd prob- 
ably pull a train on you", 
and she said, "I'd love it." 
by Billy Badd 



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RECOLLECTIONS OF THE PAST 
GOLDEN GATE VALLEY 

The San Francisco Public 
Library on the corner of 
Green and Octavia Streets is 
called the Golden Gate 
Valley branch, and thi6 is 
the only place I know of 
where this name is still 
evident. The unofficial 
name for the whole, general 
area is, and always wa6, 
"Cow Hollow" but, in the 
beginning, the early-day 
city government named it 
Spring Valley in order to 
describe the place. 

There were any number of 
good springs along the 
steep, south slope of the 
district and they caused 
little meadows and ponds to 
form which attracted early 
dairymen. For a number of 
years there were small dairy 
herds dotted here and there 
all the way from polk Street 
to the Presidio. They lay 
in a kind of hollow because 
of the natural hills to the 
east, south and west, and 
the great sand dunes along 
what is now Chestnut, 
Francisco and Bay Streets as 
far out as the Fillmore. 

As part of the industrial- 
ization of the north shore, 
the dunes were graded out 
and leveled; the material 
being dumped in the large 
salt water lagoon, centered 
around the present block of 
North Point, Beach, Pierce 
and Steiner Streets, or 
whatever they call the 
streets down there now. 

"Cow Hollow" was a natu- 
ral, descriptive name which 
has stuck with us common 
folk all through the years, 
but most of the people 
living over there now call 
it the Marina. To me, 
having been raised there, 
the Marina district is, and 
always was, the area north 
of Chestnut Street where, in 
1915, the beautiful Panama 
Pacific International Expo- 
sition stood. 

Much of the land had to be 



filled and r; ijed to proper 
grade levels in order to 
form a base for this 
marvelous extravaganza. Some 
of the fair sat on the 
former Virginia Vanderbilt 
Marina Tracts, and that is 
the earliest usage of the 
word "Marina". 

Around the time I was 
born, there were docks for 
small boats about where 
Scott and Jefferson Streets 
are now, just inside the 
sea-wall as it was then, but 
they were known as 
Fisherman's Wharf! So, 
because of the confusion 
brought on by our Spring 
Valley Water Company, the 
water program adopted about 
1875 which used San Mateo 
County sources for the City, 
the name "Spring Valley" was 
dropped and the whole 
district north of Broadway 
and west of Larkin Street to 
the Presidio Wall became 
Golden Gate Valley, and that 
may still be the official 
name. I don't know. 

For a time, the northern 
6hore area was called Harbor 
View. Old-timers, like 
myself, will remember the 
Harbor View Baths, a hot 
salt water spa at Baker and 
Jefferson Streets, across 
from Stone's shipyard and 
the big Fulton Iron Works, 
and just north of the fresh 
water lagoon which was 
cleaned out and used as the 
beautiful frontage for the 
Palace of Fine Arts. 

The reason I know all this 
is because, by accident, I 
grew up in Cow Hollow. 

The 1906 Earthquake and 
Fire was the accident which 
forced U6 off our perch at 
the top of Russian Hill near 
Union and Leavenworth 
Streets where I was born, 
and sent us scurrying to the 
safety of the Presidio. We, 
my Father, Aunt, Uncle, 
Grandmother and I, lived in 
a kind of tent city there 
and were well fed and 
treated kindly by the Army 
for a time, until we could 
be moved to the Sherman 
school on Union Street 
between Franklin and Gough. 

There, we were bedded down 
in a classroom and the 
grown-ups did all their 
cooking out at the street 
curb. I was 8 years old 
then, and I learned we were 
living in what had been the 
old Spring Valley school 
which had grown from a one- 
room schoolhouse built in 



1852 and which, through its 
early years, depended mainly 
on the support of the 
farmers and dairymen in the 
valley for their children's 
educat ion . 

After a short time there, 
we moved into our own little 
"cottage" in Lobos Square 



much exposure, hunger and 
confusion in those first 
weeks and months following 
the 1906 disaster. 

We later moved into a 
semi-permanent residence on 
Lombard and Laguna Streets 



(now Moscone 
when Chestnut 
st i 1 1 a dirt 
had, at first, 



P layground ) 
Street was 
road. This 
jus t been a 



good distribution center in 
a large tent, but "refugee 
shacks" were set up as 
quickly as possible and now 
we could do our own indoor 
cooking! 

The name, Lobos Square, 
was later changed to Funston 
Park and for good reason. 
The organizational abilities 
of Major-General Frederick 
Funston are well worth 
mentioning here; the cool- 
ness of this man avoided 




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where my father had managed 
to get two shacks connected, 
and even added a kitchen! 
This was 1774 Lombard, where 
my grandmother 6et out a 
nice flower garden and my 
father put up a picket fence 
to protect it. These were 
still only temporary buil- 
dings so, at a later time, 
we moved to a flat at 1807 
Union Street. 

Looking back now, it seems 
that I spent all my youth 
moving from place to place 
in Cow Hollow. My last 
residence in the hollow was 
2052 Union, near Webster 
Street, and next door to the 
old Cudworth home which is 
#2040 and, I am told, is now 
an antique and gift shop. 
That house was built back in 
the 1860's or 70's, but 
before I talk about the 
Cudworth family I should lay 
a little groundwork. 

Elijah Ward Pell was a 
farmer. He and about 240 
other Mormons headed by Sam 
Brannan rounded the Horn and 
landed in Yerba Buena in the 
summer of 1846. It is said 
that this party of settlers 
off the good ship "Brooklyn" 
just about doubled the 
population of this village, 
which changed its name to 
San Francisco the next year. 

Mr. Pell, in his search 
for a place to farm, learned 
that the whole eastern half 
of what is now Cow Hollow 
was claimed by Thomas Lark- 
in, the American Vice-Consul 
to California at Monterey. 
Since the United States was 
now at hostilities with 
Mexico, Larkin probably felt 
he could get away with 
grabbing this huge tract of 
land, previously a Diaz 
claim. 

Pell wrote to Larkin with 
a description of a choice 
piece and received a price 
quote of $100 for a good 
plot for farming. Thi6 
measured 200 x 100 yards at 
about where Laguna and Green 
Streets are now. So Mr. and 
Mrs. Pell became the first 
American settlers in Cow 
Hollow. 

About three years later, 
James and Abel Cudworth came 
here and approached Mr. Pell 
for the purpose of renting 
the northwest corner of the 
property to set up a dairy. 
The rent wa6 fixed at one 
quart of milk each day and 
all the cow manure for the 
Pell farm. 

The name Pell disappeared, 
but his daughter, Hettie 
Green, became well publi- 
cized for many years as the 
claimant to several large 
chunks of land around here; 
she was in and out of court 
frequently. 

James Cudworth went on to 
found the "Dairy Delivery 
Ranch". This name shows up 
much later, in my time, used 
by the Haley Brothers who 
expanded this business and 
finally sold out to Borden's 
in the 308 . 

Early on, Cudworth exer- 
cised "Squatters' Rights" on 
various pieces of meadow 
land in the area, and so, 
could increase his herd of 
dairy cows. This common 



practice in early San 
Francisco was done by merely 
fencing land not in use and 
laying claim to it in court. 

It sounds easy, but 
squatters caused many fights 
and even some murders. 
Since most people carried 
guns in those years, a 
squatter had better know 
what he was doing! 

Ir. 1853 James Cudworth got 
title to his first piece of 
fenced land. A few years 
after he built his house, 
that still stands at 2040 
Union, he built the "Wedding 
Houses" for two of his chil- 
dren, and they still stand 
at 1980 Union Street. His 
youngest son Emory was born 
in 1880 and, after the turn 
of the century, became the 
one to deal with for the 
extensive Cudworth pro- 
perties . 

Ephraim Burr built a house 
at Van Ness and Filbert in 
1852. He probably 
discovered that he was too 



close to Washer Woman's 
Lagoon, which lay in an area 
about where Filbert and 
Lombard intersect Franklin 
and Octavia Streets today, 
and was already beginning to 
suffer from pollution. In 
1853, he bought two parcels 
up on Vallejo Street between 
Franklin and Gough, and 
built a fine house which is 
still standing at #1772. 

The stench from slaughter 
houses, tanneries and hog 
farms in the valley worsened 
every year and, in 1855, he 
started a campaign to have 
them and the dairies moved 
out of the city. In 1856 he 
took leave of his presidency 
of his Clay Street Bank and 
ran for mayor and won, 
serving one three-year term. 
He did this because a son 
had died in a cholera 
epidemic in Cow Hollow, 
which he believed was caused 
by the rank pollution in the 
pond6, creeks and rivulets 
in the Hollow. 



Burr got some rulings from 
the courts against the un- 
wanted industries, but they 
didn't move to Hunters Point 
until 1870. The dairies 
were finally legislated out 
in 1902. 




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177 Valencia Street 
San Francisco, CA 94103 




MISSION LOCKSMITH CO. 

COMPLETE LOCK AND SAFE SERVICE 
DOOR CLOSERS 
PANIC HARDWARE 
ELECTRIC DOOR OPENERS 





Guido Kaminski 




ANDREAS IMPORTS & DELI 

“Greek Specialties” 



DAVE PINKOWSKI 



305 VALENCIA STREET & 
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94103 



ANDREAS TRIPLIS 
431-7010 



3091 16th Street 
S.F., CA 94103 




CASTRO STREET GARAGE 

Fuel Injection • Air Conditioning *4X4 
General Auto Repairing • Brake & Tune-Ups 



751 Valencia St. Bet 18th & 19th 
San Francisco, CA 94110 



626-1346 5 
626-1347 & 



San Francisco’s Independent Left Bookstore £ 

MODERN TIMES I 

BOOKSTORE | 

968 VALENCIA STREET | 
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 941 10 | 
(415) 282-9246 

Moo-Sat 11-6:30 ^ 
HOURS Sunday 11-5 ^ 
Thursday til 9 
s&ssssss&z&i 






1009 VALENCIA ST 
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94110 
(415) 821-4675 



Feminist Writers 
Political Information 
Non-sexist & Bilingual 
Children s Books 
Books by & about Third 
World. Lesbian & 
Working Class Women 
Bulletin Boards 

TUES-FR1 11-7 
THURS1II9 
SAT 4 SUN 11-6 
MONDAYS CLOSED 



DOOR SERVICE 



«888888i*»s8a 



T# 



CARPENTRY 
LOCK REPAIR 



511 VALENCIA AT 18TM 
SAN FRANCISCO. CA 94110 




FURNITURE RESTORATION center 

§§»£§» n 



COMPLETE STRIPPING 
FINISHING & 
REPAIR SERVICES 




2652 Harrison St 
(between 22nd & 23rd Sts 
San Francisco CA 94 no 



415 - 550-0774 



HAIR HAIR 

AND 

HOLLIDAY'S BARBER SHOP 




Lorena - Norma - Don 

JACQUELINE 

821-9420 2351 MISSION