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S  0    6-'V-  Y 


RA.OIPIC  COAST 


6an  FRANC15CO.  Oakland.  LosAhgeles.  Portland.  vSeattle 

THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN    THE     GREAT    WEST 
^     PUBLISHED     EVERY    WEEK    C^ 


VOL.  XVII.  No.  1 


SAN  FRANCISCO.  SATURDAY,  OCTOBER  2.  1909 


PRICE  10  CENTS 


MISS    ANITA    MORSE 

A  Brilliant  Vocaliste  and  a  Prominent  Member  of  the  Beringer 

Musical*  Club. 


r  A  ('  I  F  I  ('    ( "  ( >  A  S  T    M  U  R  1  ('  A  L    K  JO  V  I  E  AV 


Entire  Fifth  Floor  of  Sherman,  Clay  &  Go's.  San  Francisco  Store. 
Devoted^to  Steinway  Pianos 


Sherman 


ay  &  Go. 


STEINWAY  AND  OTHER  PTANOS  PLAYER  PIANOS  OF  ALL  GRADES 

VICTOR  TALKING  MACHINES 

Kearny   and    Sutter  Streets,   San   Francisco 
Fourteenth  and  Clay  Streets,  Oakland 

Sacniminto.    Fresno.    San    Jose.    Stockton.    Bakersfield.    Santa    Rosa, 
Portland.  Seattle,  Spokane,  Tacoma,  Etc. 


51798    rA<:;iFic  coast  musical  review 


, ft><s,>  FAOIFIC  COAST 

-JlIufic:al<3Remeu>- 

OSa>-  FRX-SCI^CO.  OAhLAW.  LOS  A.-iiiLLES.  RORTLA>iP.  ^EWTLE 


ALFRED  METZGER 


EDITOR 


DAVID    H.   WALKER   - 
JOSKPH    M.    CAMMING 


AsHistant   Edilo 
Dmmntic  Editu 


San  Francisco  Office 

Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.  Building?.   Kearny  and  Sutter  Sts.,  Mezzanine 

Floor.   Kearny-St.    Side.     Telephone.   Kearny  4000. 

Oakland,    Berl<eley,   and    Alameda    Office 

Sherman.   Clay   &   Co.,    14th   and  Clay   Sts.,   Oakland. 

Miss  Elizabeth  Westgate  in  Charge 


1419  S,  Grand  Ave. 


Los  Angeles  Office 

Helnrich  von  Stein  In  Charge 


Portland  and  Seattle  Office 
375  Sixteenth  St.,  Portland,  Ore,      -      Miss  Edith  L.  Niles  in  Charge 


SATURDAY,  OCTOBER 


The    PACIFIC    COAST   MUSICAL    REVIEW    is    for   sale   at    the 
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One-Half  Inch   (on  Page  13) 75 

Musical    Directory    50 


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MUSICAL  CALENDAR   1909-10. 

Sousa  and  his  Band  (Dreamland  Rink).. Nov.  4  and  7,  aft.  &  eve. 
Mme.  Jean  .Jomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  House  Co.)  .Week  of  Nov.  14 

Dr.  Ludwig-  Wullner Nov.  23,  25  and   2s 

George  Hamlin    (American   Tenor) Dec.    2,   5   and   7 

Fritz   Kreisler Dec.    12.    16   and   19 

Lyric  Quartette   Pop  Concert Com.   iu    January 

Marcella   Sembrich Week   of   Jan.    9 

Myrtle    Elvin    (Pianiste) February 

Teresa   Carreno First    Week   of   February 

Madame  Schumann-Heink Com.   Sunday,   Feb.    13 

Mme.  Tilly  Koenen    (the  famous  Dutch  contralto) March 

Pepito  Arriolo   (the  Spanish  child  Violinist) March 

Maud    Powell April 

Flonzaley   Quartet    (in   Chamber  Music) April 

Damrosch   Symphony  Orchestra  and  Isadora   Duncan May 


THE   MUSICAL   REVIEW'S  NINTH   BIRTHDAY. 

"With  tlii.^  i.ssiu-  the  I'acifle  Coa,><t  Musical  Review 
begins  its  ninth  birthday.  The  f'ai-t  aU)ue  that  a  nuisi- 
cal  journal  was  able  to  weather  eiglit  years  of  exis- 
tence, of  Avhich  the  ffreater  period  was  certainly  a  suc- 
cession of  fireat  obsta(  les,  jn-oves  l)eyond  a  doubt  that 
tlie  ]>aper  lias  come  to  slay  and  is  wliat  is  usually  known 
as  a  successful  Vuisiness  enterprise,  ^\'e  have  so  often 
referred  to  the  hardships  that  confronted  us  during  the 
first  few  years  of  the  jmblication  of  this  paper  that  we 
will  not,  at  this  time,  weary  our  readers  with  a  repeti- 
tion of  These  recitals.  We  are  tlioroughly  convinced 
that  our  readers  know  by  this  time  that  it  was  ex- 
tremely ditticult  to  establish  a  musieal  journal  t)n  this 
Coast  and  the  present  edition  including  twenty-four 
pages  of  reading  matter,  exclusively  devoted  to  the  in- 
terests of  the  music  loving  public  and  issued  every  week. 
is  a  dociiiiientary  jiroof  of  the  final  triumph  or  victory 


of  our  cami)aign  in  the  interests  of  music  and  mnsicians 
ill  the  far  ^^'est.  AA'e  also  desire  to  take  this  occasion 
to  imju-ess  up(ui  tlie  mind  of  our  readers  the  thought 
that  this  difhciilt  la.sk  was  not  undertaken  for  personal 
reasons  onlv. 


Seven  of  tlie  eiglit  years  constituting  the  life  of  he 
Pacific  Coast  Musical  I?eview  were  dilhcult  uiihill  fights 
mostly  earning  a  "from-hand-to-mouth'"  existence  for 
the  editor.  Time  and  time  again  these  hardships  could 
have  been  avoided  by  accepting  temiiting  otters  to  write 
for  daily  papers  or  outside  imisieal  journals  and  permit 
the  pajier  to  die  a  natural  death.  But  when  we  made 
ii]i  our  mind  to  give  the  I'acific  Coast  a  genuine  musical 
journal  \\e  did  not  think  half  .so  much  of  ourselves  as 
we  had  in  mind  the  welfare  of  the  musical  profession 
and  the  musical  public  of  the  far  West  and  the  necis- 
sity  of  a  musical  journil  in  this  territory  at  a  time  of 
(piick  development.  Thei-e  is  nothing  so  conducive  to 
the  success  and  infiuence  of  a  certain  educational  jirob- 
lem  than  publicity.  At  the  time  this  paper  was  found- 
ed hardly  any  daily  paper  in  San  Francisco  jiaid  atten- 
tion to  our  musical  cult.  Local  musical  events  were 
hardly  recorded  and  when  the  editor  of  this  pai)er  (,nce 
asked  the  managing  editor  of  a  daily  pa]ier  of  this  city 
why  so  little  attention  was  ]iaid  to  music  he  rejilied 
tliat  there  was  no  money  in  musicijins  and  that  conse- 
quently the  daily  pajjers  had  no  space  for  the  recording 
of  their  work.  We  then  said  that  we  thought  the  read- 
er interested  in  musical  news  was  just  as  much  entitled 
to  receive  information  that  appealed  to  him  as  the 
reader,  who  was  fond  of  sporting  events,  was  entitled  to 
liave  recorded  those  things  that  ai)pealed  to  his  taste. 
The  managing  editor  re])lied  that,  while  thousands  of 
]ieople  were  interested  in  sporting  events,  only  one  or 
two  cared  anything  about  musical  doings.  We  then 
told  the  managing  editor  that,  if  this  was  the  case,  it 
was  time  a  professional  i)aper  was  established  to  record 
the  musicians"  activity  and  prove  to  the  daily  i)apers 
that  not  only  were  there  thousands  of  ])eople  interested 
in  music  but  tliat  the  musicians  was  willing  to  pay  for 
his  news  ;ind  support  a  ])aper  of  this  kind.  The  manag- 
ing editor  tlit'i-eu|)on  asked  us  \\ho  would  undertake 
such  ;i  hojieless  task  and  ^^■e  stated  that  we  ourselves 
would  do  so.  Thereupon  the  managing  editor  said 
that  we  would  .starve  within  six  months  and  would  re- 
turn to  ask  for  a  position. 

This  incident  happened  now  o\er  eight  years  ago. 
^^■e  have  not  exactly  starved  since.  We  have  never 
asked  for  a  position  on  a  daily  paper  since  editing  this 
publication.  The  daily  jiapers  have  instituted  regular 
weekly  mu.sical  departments.  The  doings  of  our  resi- 
dent musicians  are  given  ample  publicity  and  music 
is  not  regarded  by  the  daily  press  with  that  contempt 
that  it  met  at  the  hands  of  journalists  eight  years  ago. 
There  are  today  thousands  of  jieople  interested  in  music 
where  eight  years  ago  only  hundreds  could  be  interested, 
:uid  here  we  are  not  referring  to  classic  concerts;  but 
To  the  big  events  in  the  (ireek  Theatre  which  could 
never  have  attracted  the  immense  crowds  had  it  not 
been  for  the  success  of  ihe  first  smy])houy  series  which 
really  emphasized  the  utility  of  that  splendid  temple 
more  than  anything  that  took  place  before  that  time. 
But  these  are  matters  really  outside  our  jtersent  course 
of  argument,  ^\'e  desire  to  impress  upon  our  readers 
the  fact  that  realizing  the  immense  benefit  to  be  derived 
from  a  musical  journal  in  the  development  of  a  Iiigher 
musical  taste,  we  are  willing  to  bring  great  sacrifices 
in  order  to  accomplish  something  that  almost  everyone 
believed  to  be  impossible  of  accoiiiiilislnuent. 


PA(MFI(^    COAST    M'USICAL    REVIEW. 


Now  aft(M'  linvinjj  devoted  cifihl  years  of  the  |(i-iiii('  of 
GUI'  life  to  llie  sc'r\icc  ol'  the  iiiiisical  iicojilc  of  llie 
I'acitio  Coast  wo  have  a  riylit  to  deiiiaiid  tliat  the  imisi- 
cal  ])eo|)Ie  assist  us  in  iiiereasiiiji:  the  power  and  inlln- 
eiice  of  tliis  ]»apei-.  We  have  siiown  that  it  is  possihh' 
to  pid)lis]i  a  iiinsical  ])a](ei-  on  this  Coast;  hut  hitlierlo 
we  were  coiiiiielled,  tor  economy's  sake  to  drift  witjiin 
limited  spiieres.  IJeginning  witli  a  monthly  publica- 
tion we  changed  to  a  weelcly  pajier  of  sixteen  pafjes.  In 
this  manner  we  wei-e  able  to  {iive  I'acific  Coast  news 
only  and  were  compelled  to  exclude  all  departments 
referrinfj  to  musical  activities  outside  Pacific  Coast 
territory.  The  time  has  now  come  when  efforts  must 
be  made  to  expand  our  horizon  and  include  in  these 
weekly  records  the  doings  of  musicians  outside  our 
territory.  The  time  has  come  when  from  a  limited 
circle  of  five  thousand  subscribers  we  must  see  to  it 
that  this  ])aper  is  seen  in  every  home  where  music  is 
played.  iMirini;  the  ensuing  season  it  will  he  necessary 
to  double  the  subsci'iption  list  in  California  so  that  at 
least  ten  thousand  ]icople  will  I'ead  this  pa]>er.  This 
will  he  a  following  of  fifty  thousand  i)eopk',  as  five  i)e()- 
ple  read  the  jiajier  of  evei-y  subscriber.  Now,  mind  you, 
we  are  not  asking  this  assistance  for  our  personal  bene- 
fit only,  hut  we  ask  it  for  the  sake  (d'  music  and  its 
develo)»ment  on  the  ]*acili<-  Coast.  Yon  A\ill  find  that 
thei-e  are  certain  musicians  who  do  nut  regard  the  suc- 
cess of  this  paper  with  kindly  eyes,  because  they  have 
a  pcrsoiKil  f/rirrunrc — they  want  this  paper  to  help 
them  fight  their  i)ersonal  battles  and  if  it  does  not  do 
so  they  have  no  use  for  it.  If  yon  find  anyone  who  ob- 
jects to  this  j)aper,  you  will  find  one  \\ho  has  been  un- 
able to  iuHnence  this  ])ai)er  to  help  him  jtei-sonally  gain 
a  certain  end.  We  do  not  jiuhlish  this  paper  for  the 
pin"j)ose  of  especially  booming  one  particular  conservat- 
tory,  one  particular  teacher,  one  particular  symphony 
leader;  but  we  have  made  the  sacrifices  necessary  for 
the  establishment  of  this  ]ia]ier  in  (U-der  to  assist  crcri/ 
conservatory,  crcrij  teacher  and  crrri/  symphony  leader 
of  merit.  The  last  word  especially  must  be  i-ead  with 
jtarticnlar  emphasis.  We  can  only  encourage  those 
whom  we  consider  iiicritoriotiK.  And  here  you  will  also 
find  certain  musicians  o](posed  to  us,  because  their  idea 
of  merit  does  nctt  agree  with  our  idea  of  the  word.  If 
we  can  not  continue  to  publish  this  ])aper  according  to 
(rhr  view  of  merit  and  according  to  our  judgment  as  to 
whom  we  ought  to  encourage  we  would  rather  cease 
publication  of  a  musical  journal  altogether. 


Now  then,  in  our  plans,  lieginning  with  this  issue,  to 
give  the  I'acific  Coast  a  larger,  more  infiuential  and 
more  widely  read  oHicial  organ  we  want  the  assistance 
of  everyone  who  luis  the  general  welfare  of  irtusic,  as  an 
art,  more  at  heai't  than  his  personal  success.  There 
are  certain  big  movements  to  be  started  and  accom- 
])lished  which  re(piire  a  bigger  jiajter  and  bigger  cir- 
culation than  we  lia\e  had  in  the  past.  San  Francisco 
and  Los  Angeles  should  have  [jvrmunent  symi>hony 
oi-chestras.  The  University  of  California  should  have 
a  musical  dei)artment  worthy  of  its  name.  Teachers 
at  public  and  High  schools  should  be  of  the  most  effi- 
cient cliaiacter.  Musical  education  should  be  as  much 
as  ])()ssible  administered  by  competent  educators  only 
and  there  are  many  other  items  among  which  a  big  con- 
cert hall  for  San  Francisco  is  not  by  any  means  one  of 
the  least  things.  We  need  a  legitimate  Pacific  Coast 
Music  Teachers'  Association.  All  these  things  can  be 
accomplished  with  a  musical  joui-nal  that  reaches  every 
home  wliere  music  is  jilayecl  or  ai)i)reciated.  To  ac- 
complish this  some  of  our  jironiinent  teachers  and 
musicians  must  he  willing  to  make  a  fe\v  sacrifices.  The 


gradul  enlargement  r)f  this  ])aper  to  thii-ty-fwo  pages 
i-equii-es  ad<litional  advertising  ])atronage.  There  are 
many  of  (jur  most  efficient  and  most  capable  teacliers 
who  subscribe  to  this  paper  and  i)raise  its  work,  but 
\\]\o  do  not  advertise,  becau.se  tliey  deem  advertising  as 
being  undignified.  Now  a  nuisical  journal  cannot  live 
\\itli()ut  advertising  patronage.  In  this  manner  these 
teachers  think  a  musical  journal  unnecessary.  Still 
most  of  them  desire  recognition  in  its  columns.  Then, 
too,  the  profession  is  given  additional  dignity  by  the 
success  of  a  professional  organ.  If  these  teacliers  wlio 
do  not  believe  in  advertising  could  be  made  to  under- 
stand that  these  advertisements  are  not  only  a  source 
of  publicity,  but  also  an  annual  subscription  toward 
the  su]»port  and  njaintenace  of  their  professioti  at  large, 
they  might  perhajts  look  at  the  matter  of  advertising 
in  a  musical  paper  in  a  dirterent  light. 

We  have  done  our  sliare  toward  the  gradual  growth 
of  this  paper  in  the  i)ast.  A\'e  still  add  to  our  past 
efforts  by  sending  one  thousand  copies  of  this  j)aper 
every  week  to  people  whose  names  are  not  on  our  sub- 
scri]ttion  list,  thus  i-eaching  additional  fifty  thousand 
lieojile  interested  in  music  during  the  season.  We  will, 
for  the  ](resent,  jiay  the  additional  expense  necessary 
for  a  larger  pa])er  out  of  our  own  pocket;  but  then  we 
also  have  a  right  to  ask  of  the  musical  profession  of 
San  Francisco  and  Los  Angeles  some  assistance  in  the 
execution  of  big  ])lans  that  are  just  as  much  intended 
to  benefit  their  interests  as  they  are  to  benefit  us.  With 
this  object  in  view  we  ask  that  the  jtrolession  in  San 
Francisco  and  Los  Angeles  favoi's  us  in  future  with 
more  advertising  patronage  and  that  the  present  sub- 
scribers assist  us  in  gaining  fiftv  per  cent,  more  sub- 
scribers. In  the  issue  of  next  week  will  be  found 
an  annoiHicement  of  a  subscrijjfion  contest  that  should 
ap]ieal  to  every  music  lover.  From  this  it  will  be  seen 
that  we  ask  no  one  to  do  anything  for  nothing.  Surely 
to  eventually  win  a  grand  piano  is  an  object  well  worth 
a  little  exertion  to  obtain.  There  are  other  conditions 
to  this  contest  which  will  reward  those  who  are  willing 
to  work  a  little  in  the  interests  of  this  paper.  During 
the  next  six  months  we  will  give  the  musical  peoide  an 
opportunity  to  support  their  own  paper.  If  this  call 
for  assistance  should  fall  on  deaf  ears  we  will  find 
another  means  to  gain  our  aim.  But  before  making 
this  paper  a  powerful  organ — which  we  will  do  as  sure 
as  we  have  guided  it  during  eight  years  of  useful  exis- 
tence— and  before  we  resort  to  these  other  means  we 
want  to  know  whether  we  can  count  on  the  members  of 
the  profession  in  California  or  whether  we  must  call 
in  outside  assistance.  One  thing  is  certain — and  you 
may  take  this  as  foretelling  the  future — that  the  Pacific 
Coast  Musical  Review  will  continue  to  prosper  and  in- 
crease in  circulation  and  volume  from  now  on.  Do  you 
wish  to  participate  in  this  growth  and  ]irospei-ity,  or  do 
you  prefer  to  stand  aside  and  permit  the  paper  to  con- 
tinue its  fight  unassisted? 


BY    WAY    OF    APPRECIATION. 


At  this  aus|)icious  moment,  Miien  we  look  back  upon 
an  eight  years'  struggle  to  maintain  a  musical  journal 
for  the  Pacific  Coast,  we  would  indeed  be  selfish  did  we 
not  extend  our  lieartiest  thanks  and  heartfelt  senti- 
ments of  appreciation  to  all  those  who  so  kindly  issisted 
us  in  accomplishing  a  feat  that  was  thought  at  first  im- 
possible to  bring  to  a  successful  conclusion.  We  want 
all  tho.se  who  advertise  m  and  subscribe  for  this  paper 
to  know  that  each  and  everyone  of  them  h,is  a  share  in 
the  success  of  this  journal  and  that  we  are  not  forget- 
ting them.    We  desire  especially  to  call  attention  to  tlie 


P  A  O  1  F  I  C    C;  O  A  ST    MUSI  G  A  L    R  K  V  I  F.  ^V. 


adxcrl  isci-s  in  lliis  issue  iiiid  i-ciiiiiid  oui'  rc;i(k'rs  lliuf 
without  them  this  pliiii  to  ji'ive  < "jilitoniia  a  iiiusieal 
jiaper  could  never  have  been  aeconiidished.  As  a  favor 
to  us  read  all  tiie  names  of  the  ad\erlisers  and  iTupress 
iqion  your  mind  those  who  have  done  more  than  anyone 
else  to  make  the  pulilication  of  a  musical  jonrnai  jios- 
sihle. 

There  are  advertisers — especially  anionji  the  music 
houses — who  do  not  use  the  columns  of  this  pajier,  be- 
cause they  believe  they  cannot  actually  sell  ten  times 
as  much  merchandise  thi-ouj;h  its  columns  as  they  T)ay 
out.  They  cannot  be  con\inced  that  the  mere  existouce 
of  a  musical  i)a])er  henetits  their  business  indirectly. 
They  liave  no  sentiment,  no  heart,  no  desire  to  assist  a 
musical  movement,  no  personal  interest  in  the  profes- 
sion, and  in  fact  see  notliinji  ex(e|)t  sell  yoods  ami  make 
money.  From  a  sli-ictly  commercial  |)oint  of  \iew  this 
may  be  all  very  well,  lint  in  this  case  they  must  not 
expect  sentiment  or  sympathy  fi-om  the  public.  And 
yet  these  firms  become  indisimut  when  |)eoph>  object  to 
their  fake  '•<;uessin<i"  contests,  to  their  deceivinj;'  "bar- 
}>ain"  sales,  to  their  misrejirescMital  ions  in  advert  isinj; 
liii>li  fi'rade  jiianos  at  low  ])rices  which  are  nevei-  sold  at 
low  i)rices  and  Ibeii-  many  other  un]irincipled,  illef>iti- 
nnite  and  dishonest  business  methods  which  character- 
ize their  attitude  toward  the  public. 

These  dealers  who  are  so  j(arti<uhir  about  i-eceivinj; 
dollar  for  (hdhn-  in  the  distribution  of  their  advert  isinji 
and  so  ])articuhir  in  tlieii'  policy  to  i-efuse  to  aid  praise- 
worthy musical  enlerjirises  are  not  so  jiarticular  when 
it  comes  to  coax  the  nindjie  dollar  from  the  ])ocket  of 
unsuspectinjj'  patrons.  By  giving''  tliis  paper  more 
jtower  through  its  increasing  circulation  and  volume 
the  readers  have  a  si)lendid  weajxtn  of  defense  against 
such  frauds  for  these  questionable  methods  can  not 
stand  the  glaring  calciuin  of  ]iublicily.  This  jiaper  will 
never  blackmail  a  business  house  that  does  not  adver- 
tise. If  a  business  house  is  guilty  of  defrauding  the 
])ublic,  it  will  b(!  exposed  in  these  columns  whether  it 
advei-tises  or  not.  IS'either  does  this  paper  accept  an 
advertisement  that  it  knows  to  be  a  fraud,  e\'en  if  it  was 
compelled  to  suspend  publication.  ISut  certainly 
cannot  refrain  from  smiling  when  a  business  house 
claims  that  it  cannot  advertise,  in  a  musical  pai)er  be- 
cause it  cannot  make  enough  money  by  such  action. 


The  Los  Angeles  dealers  tell  the  editor  that  they  do 
not  advertise  in  this  paper  because  it  is  ]iublislied  in 
San  Francisco.  Nevertheless  they  kno\\'  that  it  is 
largely  circulated  in  Los  Angeles,  publishe.s  from  two 
to  three  pages  of  Los  Angeles  news  every  week  during 
the  season  and  does  its  unmost  to  make  Los  Angeles 
musicians  know  Ihrougiiout  the  musical  world.  Futher- 
more,  this  jiaper,  reaches  every  city  of  importance  on 
the  Pacific  Coast,  and  as  a  number  of  peoi)le  move  to 
Los  Angeles  from  these  Coast  towns  it  would  not  do 
any  harm,  that  we  can  see,  for  the.se  people  to  know  who 
the  Los  Angeles  dealers  are.  If  Los  Angeles  did  not 
have  so  many  big  music  houses,  conducted  in  a  most 
intelligent  and  honest  manner  we  would  not  be  sur- 
prised at  their  attitude.  But  to  i-efuse  to  advertise  in 
ii  paper  published  in  San  Francisco,  because  it  is  pub- 
lished in  San  Francisco,  is  certainl.v  a  policy  strange  to 
one  who  reads  musical  ](a])ers  ]iubli.shed  in  New  York 
and  sees  therein  adx'ertisemenis  fi'oni  Chicago,  Boston, 
Philadelphia  and  other  Eastern  cities. 


nundxM-s  every  week  to  do  so,  for  our  mind  is  made  uji 
to  give  iios  Angeles  musicians  the  same  o](portunities 
that  San  Francisco  musici.ins  have.  If  music  dealers 
do  not  want  to  advertise  in  this  jtaper  and  liel])  it  along 
because  it  is  |iublished  in  San  Francisco,  we  will  not 
retaliate  by  discontinuing  the  l^os  Angeles  department 
and  devoting  our  attention  to  San  Francisco  and  vicin- 
ity only.  We  have  made  up  our  mind  to  publish  a  I'a- 
citic  Coast  musical  journal  and  to  us  Los  Angeles  is  as 
much  a  Paciti<-  Coast  city  as  San  Francisco.  This 
paper  has  no  favorites.  And  if  Los  Angeles  dealer.v 
and  musicians  do  not  like  this  paper  because  it  is  pub- 
lished in  San  Francisco,  we  certainly  will  continue  to 
like  Los  Angeles  and  its  splendid  musicians  just  the 
same. 


This  paper  has  several  hundred  subscribers  in  Los 
Angeles.  It  will  have  a  thousand  there  before  six 
months  are  over,  if  we  have  to  send  a  thousand  extra 


In  glancing  o\-er  the  advertising  columns  in  lOastern 
musical  journals  we  tin  1  that  Eastern  managers  si)en<l 
tliousun(ls  of  dollars  in  their  announcements  long  be- 
fore the  beginning  of  the  season.  Wo  see  three  of  these 
musical  journals  every  week.  On  the  Pacific  Coast 
there  is  but  on(»  musical  journal  and  several  artists 
ha\-e  l(dd  us  that  they  make  more  money  on  the  Pacific 
Coast  than  at  several  big  Eastern  musical  centers  to- 
gether. Vet  not  one  artist  is  announced  in  the.se  <-ol- 
umns  exce])t  two  week's  Itefore  each  concert.  We  have 
been  able  to  get  along  wilhoul  these  announcements  be- 
fore this  and  \\e  will  get  along  without  them  in  future. 
l!ul  we  ha\('  one  big  objection  to  make.  If  the  musical 
niaujtgers  of  New  S'ork  find  it  un])rofltable  to  use  the 
advertising  columns  ol'  this  papcM-  |)revious  to  the  con- 
certs of  their  artists,  (hey  should  in  all  fairness  not  ask 
us  to  ]ii'inl  their  advance  notices  and  their  anectodes 
and  thus  take  fi'om  us  valuable  space  which  we  can  de- 
vote to  better  advantage.  We  do  not  ask  anyone  to 
advertise  in  these  colunms  and  we  will  nevertheless 
recognize  visiting  artists  with  otic  advance  announce- 
ment and  a  i'e\iew  <>{'  the  concert,  except  an  additional 
announcement  when  ihe  local  nuiuager  advertises. 
Otherwise  we  absolutely  refu.se  to  devote  any  s[)ace  to 
the  appearance  of  any  artist.  \\'e  ha\e  worked  like  a 
sla\('  to  establish  .i  niusi<-al  jouT-nal  during  the  last 
eighl  years  which  reaches  twenty  thousand  readers  in 
California.  We  have  gained  a  certain  intiuence  and 
are  able  to  make  an  artist  known  on  this  Coast.  Wo 
absolutely  know  that  no  musical  journal  published  in 
the  I'^ast  reaches  one  tenth  the  nund)er  of  readers  which 
this  joui'ual  reaches  and  we  do  not  propose  to  be  made 
use  of.  If  the  managi'rs  of  New  York  are  willing  to 
make  money  through  this  j)ai)ei-  fi-om  the  musical  ]iulilic 
of  California,  they  should  be  willing  to  give  it  some  of 
the  su|)poi-t  so  lavishly  bestowed  upon  lOastern  jouTiials. 
If  they  ai-e  not  will  to  do  so.  they  should  not  ask  us  to 
continuously  "boom"  their  artists.  We  are  willing  to 
print  the  news  for  our  i-eaders,  but  we  absolutely  refuse 
to  print  more  than  the  news,  which  is  more  than  the 
announcement  of  certain  artists.  This  paper  has  it  in 
its  power  to  make  artists  who  ai-e  not  known  here  famil- 
iar to  the  thousands  of  people  wlio  read  this  paper. 
These  jieople  in  turn  can  transmit  the  information  to 
more.  There  is  no  excuse  for  any  manager  to  tell  his 
artist  that  he  is  not  known  on  this  Coast.  He  can  make 
him  known  if  he  wants  to  and  it  will  not  cost  him  one 
tenth  as  much  as  it  does  to  make  him  known  in  New 
York.  If  artists  were  advertised  on  the  Pacific  Coast 
as  prominently  as  tliey  are  in  the  east  long  before  the 
beginning  of  the  season,  concert  attendance  would  be 
much  greater  and  numagers  as  well  as  artists  would 
make  more  money.  Put  as  long  as  managers  are  skep- 
tical regarding  this  undisputed  fact,  just  so  lonu'  wiH 
there  be  losses  wlien  their  should  be  profits. 


I'  A  (U  F  1  C    (J  O  A  S  T    M  TJ  S  I  (J  A  I.    R  E  V  I  E  W 


MUSICAL  NEWS  IN  THE   EAST. 

The  following  items  from  the  Musical  Courier  is  of  interest 
to  San  Franciscans  as  Rita  Fornia  is  none  other  than  Rita 
Newman,  who  uses  the  last  two  syllables  of  California  as  her 
nom  de  plume; 

Rita  Fornia,  of  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House  Company,  re- 
turned Thursday  of  last  week  on  the  steamer  Deutschland, 
after  a  two  months'  tour  of  Europe.  Madame  Fornia  was 
welcomed  back  by  many  of  her  admirers.  She  is  in  fine 
health  and  spirits,  and  expressed  herself  eager  to  begin  her 
season.  In  addition  to  her  engagement  at  the  Metropolitan, 
Madame  Fornia  will  fill  concert  engagements  throughout  the 
winter.  She  has  added  new  roles  to  her  repertory,  as  well  as 
new  songs  to  her  concert  lists, 

"Gioconda"  will  open  the  Metropolitan  opera  season,  and 
Massenet's  "Werther  "  is  to  be  the  initial  opera  comique  pro- 
duction at  the  New  Theatre. — Musical  Courier. 

Thomas  Atkinson,  of  Greenfork,  near  Hagerstown,  Ind.,  has 
made  a  violin  constructed  entirely  of  toothpicks,  and  offers  it 
for  sale  at  $3,374.  Comic  comment  on  this  item  of  news  is 
out  of  place. — Musical  Courier. 

[That's  all  right.     We  see  the  points. — Ed.] 

The  fifty-second  Worcester  (Mass,)  music  festival  will  be 
held  September  29  and  30  and  October  1.  The  artists  en- 
gaged are  Corinne  Rider-Xelsey,  Laura  Coombs,  sopranos: 
Gerville-Reache,  Christine  Miller,  Margaret  Keyes,  contraltos; 
Reed  Miller,  Gorge  Harris,  Jr.,  tenors;  Oscar  Seagle,  Fred- 
erick Weld,  baritones;  pianist,  Tina  Lerner;  viola  soloist, 
Emil  Ferir;  conductor,  Dr,  Arthur  Mees;  assistant  conductor, 
Gustav  Strube.  The  works  to  be  given  are  Mendelssohn's 
"Elijah,"  September  29;  Liszt's  "Missa  Solemnis"  (Hrst  com- 
plete presentation  in  this  country)  and  Berlioz's  "Te  Deum," 
September  30.  There  will  be  symphony  concerts  on  the 
afternoons  of  September  30  and  October  1,  and  "Artists' 
Night,"  October  1. — Musical  Courier. 
*       «       * 

The  Philadelphia  Orchestra  will  begin  its  tenth  season  at 
the  American  Academy  of  Music,  Philadelphia,  F'riday  after- 
noon, October  1.^),  and  Saturday  evening,  October  16.  Carl 
Pohlig,  the  most  popular  conductor  the  Quaker  City  ever  had, 
is  to  resume  his  baton  activity  at  the  head  of  the  organiza- 
tion, and  may  be  expected  to  add  to  the  interest  and  financial 
support  his  presence  brought'  the  orchestra  last  season.  He  is 
an  eclectic  scholar  and  a  man  of  human  sympathies  and 
understanding,  and  that  combination  of  qualities  is  exactly  the 
kind  required  to  win  the  complete  confidence  of  the  musical 
public  in  any  American  city.  The  Philadelphia  Orchestra 
plans  twenty-two  consecutive  Friday  afternoon  and  twenty- 
two  consecutive  Saturday  evening  concerts,  from  October  15 
to  March  12,  1910.  The  soloists  (an  attractive  list)  include 
Tilly  Koenen,  Carreno,  Samaroff,  Thaddeus  Rich,  Rachman- 
inoff, Dr.  Wullner,  Kreisler,  Pepito  Arriola,  etc. — Musical 
Courier. 

The  Philharmonic  Orchestra  will  give  thirty-seven  concerts 
in  New  York  this  winter,  the  New  York  Symphony  Orchestra 
is  booked  for  twenty-nine,  the  Boston  Smyphony  Orches- 
tra for  fifteen,  and  there  will  be  at  least  fifteen  more  by  the 
Volpe  and  People's.  The  Philharmonic  dates  at  Carnegie 
Hall  are:  Regular  series,  eight  Thursday  evenings,  Novem- 
ber 4,  November  25,  December  16,  January  6,  January  20, 
February  3,  February  17  and  March  10;  and  eight  Friday 
afternoons,  November  5,  November  26,  December  17,  January 
7,  January  21,  February  4,  February  18  and  March  11;  a  his- 
torical cycle  on  six  Wednesday  evenings,  November  10, 
December  8,  December  29,  January  26,  March  2  and  March  30, 
a  Beethoven  cycle  on  five  Friday  afternoons,  November  19, 
December  31,  January  14,  March  4  and  April  1;  one  extra 
Christmas  concert  and  four  special  Sunday  afternoons,  Feb- 
ruary 27,  March  6,  13  and  27.  Five  more  concerts  in  town 
are  at  the  Brooklyn  Academy  of  Music,  on  Friday  evening, 
December  3;  Saturday  evening,  January  8;  Fridays,  January 
28,  February   11   and   March   18. 


METROPOLITAN    OPERA    PLANS. 


fiedl  are:  Claude  Uebu-ssy,  "La  Chute  de  la  Maison  Usher," 
"Le  Diable  dans  le  Beffroi,"  "La  Legende  de  Tristan."  Paul 
Dukas,  "Ariane  et  Barbe-Bleu."  Wilhelm  Kien/,1.  "Der  Evan-  ' 
gelimann."  Xavier  Leroux,  "La  Reine  Fiamette."  Gustave 
Charpentier,  "La  Vie  du  Poete,  Jean  Nougues,  "Quo  Vadis." 
Maurice  Ravel,  "L'Heure  Espagnole,"  and  Gaston  Salvayre, 
"Solange." 

Among  the  novelties  and  revivals  announced  for  the  coming 
season   (besides  standard  works)   are: 

Auber.  "Fra  Diavolo";  Boleldieu,  "La  Dame  Blanche"; 
Bruneau,  "L'Altaque  du  Moulin";  Converse,  "The  Pipe  of  De- 
sire"; Delibes,  "Lakme";  Donizetti,  "La  Fille  du  Regiment"; 
Flotow,  "Alessandro  Stradella";  Franchetti,  "Germania"; 
(Joetzl,  "Les  Precieuses  Ridicules";  Goldmark.  "The  Cricket 
on  the  Hearth";  Gluck,  "Orfeo";  Humperdinck,  "King's 
Children";  Laparra,  "La  Habanera";  Lecocq,  "La  Fille  de 
Madame  Angot";  Blech,  "Versiegell";  Lehar,  "Amour  des 
Tziganes"  ("Gypsy  Love");  Leroux,  "Le  Chemineau"  (new); 
I.,ortzing,  "Czar  und  Zimmermann";  Maillard,  "Les  Dragons 
de  Villars";  Massenet,  '"Werther";  Offenbach,  "Les  Contes 
d'Hoffmann";  Paer,  "II  Maestro  di  Cappela";  Rossini,  "II  Sig- 
nor  Bruschino";  Suppe,  "La  Belle  Galathee";  Tschaikowsky, 
"Pique  Dame"  (new);  Verdi,  "Otello";  Weber,  "Der  Freis- 
chutz,"  and  Wolf-Ferrari,  "Le  Donne  Curiose"   (new). 

Among  the  men  the  strangers  will  be  Edmond  Clemont,  Leo 
Devaux,  Glenn  Hall,  Herman  Jadlowker,  Wilhelm  Otto,  George 
Regis  and  Leo  Slezak,  tenors;  Henry  Dutillry,  John  Forsell, 
Dinh  Gilly,  Anton  Ludwig,  Clarence  Whitehill,  George  Bour- 
geois, Ferdinand  Gianoli-Galletti,  Marcel  Reiner  and  Andrea 
de  Segurola,  baritones  and  basses.  Ballets  by  Bayer,  Delibes 
and  Glazounow  are  announced.  The  rest  of  the  repertory  will 
be  standard. — Musical  Courier. 


The  official  prospectus  of  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House 
has  been  issued  and  states  that  the  regular  season,  under  the 
management  of  Giulio  Gatti-Casazza  and  Andreas  Dippel,  will 
open  November  15  and  continue  for  twenty  weeks.  At  the 
Metropolitan  there  will  be  120  performances  of  grand  opera, 
and  at  the  New  Theatre  (to  open  November  16),  forty  per- 
formances of  opera  comique  and  lyric  opera. 

The  new  operas  promised  for  production   (dates  not  specl- 


HENRY  HADLEY. 

Henry  Hadley,  who  has  just  been  appointed  conductor  of 
the  Seattle  Orchestra,  was  born  in  Somerville  in  1874,  his 
father,  S.  Henry  Hadley,  being  a  well-known  musician,  conduc- 
tor and  teacher. 

As  a  boy  of  twelve  years  young  Hadley  evinced  a  marked 
originality  in  composition,  and  before  studying  he  wrote 
fluently  in  the  lighter  forms,  as  well  as  short  movements  for 
string  quartettes.  He  pursued  his  studies  with  Stephen 
Emery  at  the  New  England  Conservatory  and  later  with 
George  \V.  Chadwick.  At  twenty  years  of  age  he  composed 
his  first  serious  overture  for  orchestra,  "Hector  and  Andro- 
mache," which  work  was  performed  in  New  York  under  Wal- 
ter Damrosch  at  a  concert  of  the  Manuscript  Society  at  Chick- 
ering  Hall. 

lu  1893  he  made  a  tour  of  the  United  States  as  leader  with 
the  Laura  Schirmer  Mapleson  Opera  Company.  The  follow- 
ing summer,  1894,  Mr.  Hadley  went  to  Vienna  to  continue  his 
counterpoint  studies  with  Eusebius  Mandyzewski.  Here  he 
completed  his  Ballet  Suite  ( N'o.  3),  which  was  first  heard  at  a 
concert  of  the  Manusciipt  Society  under  Adolf  Neuendorf. 
Later,  Mr.  Sam  Franko  brought  out  this  work  with  the  Ameri- 
can Symphony  Orchestra.  The  next  year  finds  Mr.  Hadley  as 
director  of  the  Music  Department  of  St.  Paul's  School.  Garden 
City.  This  position  he  held  for  seven  seasons,  finding  time  to 
finish  his  Symphonies,  "Youth  and  Life"  (first  heard  under 
Anton  Seidl  at  a  concert  of  the  Manuscript  Society  in  1890), 
and  "The  Four  Seasons"  (which  took  the  New  England  Con- 
servatory and  the  Paderewski  prizes  in  1902),  Overture,  "In 
Bohemia"  (first  played  in  Pittsburgh  by  Victor  Herbert),  Over- 
ture, "Herod"  to  Stephen  Phillips's  tragedy.  Cantana,  "In 
Music's  Praise,"  produced  at  Carnegie  Hall  by  the  People's 
Choral  ITnion,  Oriental  Suite  (produced  at  a  Sunday  evening 
concert  at  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House  under  the  composer), 
as  well  as  over  150  songs.  He  also  wrote  incidental  music  to 
two  plays,  "The  Daughter  of  Hamilcar,"  for  Blanche  Walsh, 
and  "Audrey,"  for  Elleanor  Robsou. 

His  second  symphony  in  the  meantime  had  been  performed 
in  London  under  Sir  Villiers  Stanford  and  in  Warsaw  under 
Mvlinaski. 

During  the  years  1905-1909  Mr.  Hadley  went  abroad.  His 
tone-poem,  "Salome,"  a  powerful  work  for  modern  orchestra, 
based  on  the  Oscar  Wilde  tragedy,  has  met  with  universal 
success  in  America  as  well  as  Europe.  Hadley  conducting  it 
in  Berlin,  Cassel,  Warsaw,  Monte  Carlo,  Wiesbaden,  etc.  1908 
finds  him  active  as  Kapellmeister  at  the  Stadt  Theatre,  May- 
ence,  at  which  place  Hadley  brought  out  his  one-act  opera 
"Safie"  (text  by  Edward  Oxenford.  German  translation  by  Dr. 
Otto  Neitzel),  April  6.  1909.  with  Miss  Marguerite  Lemon  in 
the  title  role.  On  his  return  to  America  in  May  this  year  he 
conducted  the  Theodore  Thomas  Orchestra  in  his  new  rhap- 
sody. "The  Culprit  Pay,"  which  work  won  for  him  the  $1,000 
prize  offered  by  the  National  Federation  of  Musical  Clubs. — 
New  Music  Review. 


PACIFIC    COAST    .MUSICAL    KEVIKW. 


MUSICAL    NEWS   ABROAD. 


Letters  received  from  Australia  convey  the  news  that  Melba 
before  making  her  reappearance  at  Covent  Garden  next  sea- 
son, will  spend  a  month  at  Nice,  Cannes  and  Monte  Carlo. 
At  the  close  of  the  London  opera  season,  she  will  in  August 
enter  on  a  four  months'  concert  tour  of  America,  Canada  and 
Mexico,  opening  at  Halifax,  Nova  Scotia.  The  minimum  guar- 
antee for  this  tour  is  said  to  be  $200,000.  In  December  of 
next  year  she  expects  to  rest  in  California,  where  her  concert 
tour  will  end.  and  during  the  following  month  she  will  again 
appear  in  opera  in  New  York.  With  an  orchestra  directed  by 
Landon  Ronald,  she  is  to  be  starred  through  the  English 
Provinces  in  March  and  April,  19n.  Agnes  Murphy,  the 
Irish-American  writer  w'ho  is  well  known  throughout  the 
United  States  and  Canada,  especially  in  the  principal  cities, 
is  the  author  of  the  "Life  of  Melba,"  which  will  be  published 
in  London  and  New  York  during  October.  This  biography 
will  be  profusely  illustrated  and  will  contain  autograph  pages 
in  facsimile  from  the  pens  of  Gounod,  Verdi,  Massenet.  Saint- 
Saens,  Joachim.  Ambroise,  Thomas,  Delibes,  and  other  great 
masters.  Miss  Murphy  has  for  some  years  acted  as  personal 
representative  of  Madame  Melba,  and  is  at  present  with  her 
in  her  tour  through  Australia. — Musical   Courier. 

The  Royal  Opera  in  Dresden  began  its  fall  season  on  Aug. 
8th  with  a  performance  of  "Carmen."  Frau  Nast.  Frl.  Van  der 
Osten  and  Messrs.  Burriah  and  Plaschke  appeared  in  the 
leading  roles.  Malatta  conducted.  During  the  last  week  of 
August  two  successive  evenings  were  reserved  for  Wagner 
operas,  including  the  "Ring." 

Last  week  Puccini's  "Madame  Butterfly"  was  given  tor  the 
first  time  in  Deresden.  No  news  has  as  yet  been  received  re- 
garding the  reception  accorded  it. 

During  this  month  Leo  Blech's  opera,  "Versieglt,"  and  A. 
Schnitzler's  pantomime,  "Der  Schleier  der  Pierette."  music 
by  Dohnahyi,  the  famous  pianist,  will  be  heard  for  the  first 
time  at  the  Dresden  Royal  Opera. 

The  end  of  November  will  see  the  four  hundredth  perfor- 
mance of  "Lohengrin"  in  Dresden. 

*  *       * 

For  the  end  of  the  year  the  Dresden  Opera  announces  a 
revival  of  Boildieu's  "La  Dame  Blanche,"  and  of  Gluck's 
Iphigenia."  The  first  production  of  a  new  opera  by  C. 
Kuhneke,  composer  and  M.  Morris,  librettist,  is  also  booked 
for  the  end  of  December. 

*  *       • 

Arthur  Kevin's  American  opera.  "Poia,"  based  upon  an  In- 
dian story,  will  be  presented  at  the  Royal  Opera  in  Berlin 
during  the  ensuing  season.  It  would  almost  seem  as  if 
American  singers  and  American  composers  were  more  ap- 
preciated in  Germany  than  in  their  native  land. 
«       *       « 

A  new  musical  comedy  entitled  "Else  Klapperzehen,"  by 
Herman  W.  von  Waldershausen,  received  the  premiere  in 
Dresden  recently  but  did  not  score  a  big  success. 

*  *       * 

Another  novelty,  which,  however,  scored  a  success,  was 
Scheidemantel's  arrangement  of  Mozart  "Cosi  Fan  Tutti." 
Regarding  this  arrangement  the  Musical  Courier's  Dresden 
correspondent  says; 

The  next  premiere  was  "Dame  Kobold."  This  is  Scheide- 
mantel's arrangement  of  Mozart's  "Cosi  fan  tutti,"  to  a  new- 
libretto,  taken  from  Calderon's  comedy,  "La  Dama  Duende." 
It  is  well  known  that  a  number  of  attempts  have  been  made 
to  revise  the  text  of  Lorenzo  da  Ponte  (chief  of  which  is  that 
of  Hermann  Levi),  owing  to  its  coarseness,  and  general  un- 
suitability  to  the  noble  music  of  Mozart,  as  well  as  to  the 
gradual  change  in  times,  taste  and  morals.  Because  of  the 
repulsiveness  of  the  first  libretto.  Mozart's  glorious  music 
was  in  danger  of  being  lost  entirely  to  the  operatic  stage. 
Scheidemantel  had  been  long  looking  about  for  a  more  suit- 
able text  for  such  music  and  abandoning  the  idea  of  revision 
(which  has  not  hitherto  been  successful)  and  came  upon  the 
thought  of  adapting  a  wholly  new  text  and  of  rearranging  the 
music.  For  this  it  seemed  to  him  that  Calderon's  comedy 
had  the  requisite  lightness  of  touch  and  tone,  together  with 
moments  of  that  nobility  and  grace,  which  are  characteristic 
of  the  beautiful  music.  Yet  after  all.  to  be  entirely  frank.  I 
find  that  the  music  is  still  far  above  the  text  chosen,  though 
no  one  can  deny  the  extreme  skill  and  versatility  which 
Scheidemantel  has  shown  in  his  wonderful  adaptation  of  the 
music  to  the  new  lines.  Though  he  has  been  compelled  to 
make  some  repetitions,  which  may  not  be  wholly  pleasing  to 
many,  yet  he  has  caught  the  right  spirit  and  character  each 


in  its  place,  while  his  ability  to  adhere  to  the  rythms  as  a 
the   most    beautiful   works   of   .Mozart. 

rule  throughout  is  extraordinary.  Of  course  some  changes 
had  to  be  made  in  the  score,  and  whether  this  is  legitimate  art 
thus  to  tinker  with  Mozart,  or  any  other  great  master,  is  a 
(juestion  that  shall  not  be  discussed  here.  The  fact  remains 
that  the  old  text  was  rendering  this  opera  almost  obsolete, 
and  that  the  new  nonsense  is  not  so  objectionable  as  the  old. 
Listening  to  those  wonderful  ensemble  parts,  the  beautiful 
arias,  which  are  about  unchanged,  and  the  whole  rich  musical 
sentiment  and  feeling  with  which  this  work  is  imbued,  it 
seemed  to  me  on  that  evening,  that  musically  this  is  one  of 
the  most  beautiful   works  of  Mozart. 


-^W- 


HOW  TO  BE  A  PIANIST. 

Marconi  Thumpenhoff,  writing  in  the  R.  C.  M.  Magazine, 
says  that  the  pianist  attracts  audiences  by  personality  and 
hair.  These  granted,  the  next  thing  is  jiu-jitsu,  for  the  piano 
in  many  respects  resembles  a  human  antagonist.  Personal 
charm  must  be  oultixated;  a  lock  of  hair  that  falls  into  the 
right  eye  and  has  to  be  tossed  back  is  a  sure  draw.  The  bow 
consists  in  slightly  inclining  the  head  with  great  deliberation. 
The  smile  is  reserved  until  the  third  recall,  and  must  be 
sparingly  used.  The  public  likes  a  smile  that  it  has  to  work 
hard  for.  It  should  be  the  smile  of  a  sick  man  at  an  indiffer- 
ent joke.  The  neckwear  is  the  only  vita!  point  of  dress.  It 
should  be  gigantic,  spotted  and  flopping.  For  technique  there 
is  nothing  like  the  good  old  English  pastime  of  boxing.  It 
should  be  studied  first  without  and  then  with  the  piano.  The 
knock-out  blow  is  useful  in  climaxes.  The  fairy-like  touch  is 
the  opposite  of  this;  it  should  be  practised  on  a  piano  with 
hot  keys.  Preliminary  exercises  may  be  done  on  the  kitchen 
stove.  The  bouncing  fist  is  also  useful.  To  give  prominence 
to  a  single  note  make  the  whole  arm  rigid  from  the  shoulder, 
rise  slightly  from  the  seat  and  drop  the  whole  weight  of  the 
body  on  the  note.  As  to  gesticulation,  keep  the  hands  as  far 
from  the  keys  as  possible  when  they  are  not  in  contact  with 
them.  The  rolling  head  is  employed  in  expressive  passages; 
in  vigorous  music  jerk  the  head  back  after  each  accent,  being 
careful  not  to  dislocate  the  neck.  When  playing  pp.  assume 
an  attitude  of  listening  intently.  If  the  note  makes  no  sound, 
the  audience  imagines  that  the  sound  of  their  breathing  or  of 
their  whiskers  growing  has  drowned  that  of  the  piano,  and 
sigh  "wonderful."  Shutting  the  eyes  is  a  capital  device, 
though  risky,  but  be  sure  that  your  audience  sees  that  you 
do  it. 


MANHATTAN  OPERA  HOUSE  ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Oscar  Hammerstein  has  announced  the  preliminary  pros- 
pectus of  his  coming  season  of  grand  opera  and  of  opera 
comique.  The  full  list  of  new  artists  engaged  is  withheld  for 
the  present.  But  a  lot  of  other  interesting  data  is  made 
public.  For  instance,  the  opening  performance  will  be  a  nov- 
elty— to  this  country — tor  then  "Herodiade"  will  be  given,  the 
opening  date  being  November  15.  The  cast  for  this  perfor- 
mance will  be  Maurice  Renaud,  Charles  Dalmores,  Hector 
Dufranne,  Lina  Cavaleri  and  .Jeanne  Gerville-Reache. 

Among  the  novelties  the  principal  position  is  held  by 
"Elektra" — which  will  make  heavy  strains  upon  the  forces  of 
the  opera  ensemble.  The  title  role  will  be  sung  by  either 
Carmen  Melis  or  Mine.  Mazarin — two  new  singers  who  are 
being  brought  over  especially  for  that  purpose. 

The  other  novelties  announced  are  Victor  Herbert's  Indian 
opera,  "Natoma,"  the  libretto  by  Joseph  D.  Redding;  Richard 
Stauss'  "Feuersnoth";  and  then  "Griselidis,"  "Sapho,"  "Cen- 
drillon,"  "The  Violin-maker  of  Cremona"  and  "Zaza." 

For  the  rest  of  the  repertoire  of  the  season,  last  year's  and 
previous  season's  productions  will  be  drawn  upon.  And  the 
most  prominent  of  last  year's  principals  will  be  heard  and 
seen  again  this  season. 

In  addition  there  is  a  separate  company  of  twenty-five  prin- 
cipals for  the  giving  of  opera  comique.  The  leaders  of  this 
company  are  Henriette  de  Lorme  and  Henry  De  Vries.  The 
repertoire  of  the  opera  comiqu  company  will  include  "La 
Belle  Helene."  "Chauve  Souris."  "Grand  Duchesse,"  "Le  Jour 
et  la  Nuit."  "Dame  Blanche,"  "Orphee  aux  Enters,"  "Le  Roi 
d'Ys"  and  "Les  Dragons  de  Villars."  No  subscription  for  this 
opera  comique  season  will  be  accepted,  and  the  prices  will 
be  accepted,  and  the  prices  will  range  from  $1..50  to  $3.00. 
These  performances  will  take  place  Tuesday  and  Saturday 
evenings,  with  a  possibility  of  an  extra  Wednesday  matinee. 
The  regular  grand  opera  subscription  nights  will  be  Mondays, 
Wednesdays  and  Fridays,  and  Saturday  matinees. 

Six  conductors  are  engaged  for  both  of  these  companies. 
The  list  is  as  follows;  De  La  Fuente,  Anselmi,  Straram.  Car- 
tier,  Charlier  and  Scognamiglio.  The  stage  manager  will 
again  be  Jacques  Colni. — New  Music  Review. 


r  A  O  I  F  I  ('  O  ()  A  S  'I'  .MUST  C  A  L  ]{  10  \^  I  10  \V. 


THE  INFLUENCE  OF  THE  BOHEMIAN  CLUB. 

Famous  San  Francisco  Fraternal  Organization  That  Cultivates 
a   Higher  Musical  Taste  Among   Its   Members  and   Encour- 
\  ages  Them   to  Test  Their  Own   Creative   Powers. 

BY    ALFRED    METZGER. 

Last  Saturday  evening  The  Bohemian  Club,  amid  ceremo- 
nies characteristic  of  its  unique  spirit,  laid  the  cornerstone  of 
its  new  $2.50,000  edifice  now  in  the  course  of  construction  at 
the  corner  of  Taylor  and  Post  streets.  Four  hundred  mem- 
bers were  present  notwithstanding  the  inclement  weather  and 
as  the  Examiner  said:  "No  rite  of  the  ancients  was  more 
dramatic.  The  spirit  that  has  made  the  club  different  from 
all  others  in  the  world  was  fittingly  portrayed  in  the  midnight 


will  utilize  this  opijortuiiity  to  call  attention  to  the  excellent 
service  this  club  has  rendered  to  music.  While  the  Bohemian 
Club  .Jinks  and  their  subsequent  concerts  are  not  public 
events  in  the  strictest  sense  of  the  word  and  therefore  not  to 
be  included  in  the  regular  curriculum  of  our  official  musical 
season,  they  are,  nevertheless,  of  importance  to  the  musical 
public  inasmuch  as  they  represent,  at  present  at  least,  the 
only  opportunity  for  California  composers  to  have  their  works 
presented  in  an  elaborate  and  advantageous  manner.  Of 
course  there  are  California  composers  who  are  not  members 
of  the  Bohemian  Club,  but  as  far  as  we  can  see,  nothing  pre- 
vents them  from  becoming  such  and  thus  share  in  the  im- 
mense benefits  which  the  club  so  generously  bestows  upon 
genuine  efficiency. 

So  far  the  Bohemian  Club  has  given  at  least  seven  of  its 
members  an  opportunity  to  desplay  their  talent.     These  mem- 


BOHEMIAN   CLUB  JINKS— SUMMER    1909. 
Hundreds   of    Hungry    Members   Ready   For  the   Feast. 


ceremony."  This  paper  can  not  but  take  advantage  of  this 
opportunity  to  publish  a  few  words  of  endorsement  regarding 
the  course  persued  by  the  Bohemian  Club  in  behalf  of  musical 
culture  and  especially  of  its  encouragement  of  California  com- 
posers. 

In  the  past  this  paper  has  occasionally  critised  certain 
Bohemian  Club  concerts  which  did  not  show  merit  sufficiently 
to  deserve  the  praise  of  conscientious  observers.  At  no  time, 
however,  has  this  paper  felt  anything  but  the  kindliest  feel- 
ings toward  an  organization  that  has  accomplished  so  much 
toward  inspring  some  of  its  talented  members  to  give  ven  to 
their  artistic  sentiments.  The  daily  papers  have  done  full  jus- 
tice to  the  ceremonies  attending  the  laying  of  the  cornerstone 
of  the   new   club   house.     The   Pacific   Coast   Musical    Review 


bers  are;  .1.  D.  Redding,  the  composer  of  the  first  Bohemian 
Club  .Jinks;  H.  ,1.  Stewart,  W.  J.  McCoy,  Theodor  Vogt,  Ed- 
ward Schneider,  Arthur  Weiss  and  W.  A.  Sabin.  Mr.  Sabin's 
excellent  jinks  music  was  reviewed  in  these  columns  a  short 
time  ago.  Mr.  Redding  will  compose  next  year's  jinks  and 
much  is  expected  of  him  as  he  is  one  of  the  particular  intel- 
lectual stars  of  the  organization.  While  the  Bohemian  Club 
concerts,  which  have  lately  been  given  as  an  aftermath  to  the 
mid-summer  jinks,  gave  everyone  a  good  idea  of  the  merit  of 
the  book  and  music,  they  really  did  not  convey  an  exact  im- 
pression of  the  wonderful  natural  and  artificial  resources  that 
give  these  jinks  their  fairy-like  splendor  in  the  black  shadows 
of  the  California  forest  where  they  are  presented  under  the 
velvet  canopy  of  a  star-lit  sky.     The  accompanying  portraits 


l'A(MFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


give  but  a  scant  idea  of  the  real  magnificence  of  the  scene, 
but  they  illustrate  in  a  striljing  manner  the  picturesqueness 
and  the  good-fellowship  attendant  upon  the  famous  summer 
outings  of  this  unique  organization. 

This  is  one  of  the  few  clubs  where  the  business  world 
mingles  intimately  with  representatives  of  the  world  of  art 
and  among  the  club's  most  enthusiastic  and  most  faithful 
members  is  Leander  S.  Sherman.  During  the  absence  of  Mrs. 
and  Miss  Slierman  in  Europe,  the  Bohemian  Club  has  been  a 
home  to  him  and  there  is  hardly  anyone  more  competent  to 
judge  the  spirit  of  the  Bohemian  Club  than  he  who  has  seen 
it  in  all  its  varied  conditions.  The  new  clubhouse  will  con- 
tain a  handsome  Steinway  grand  piano,  the  gift  of  Mr.  Sher- 
man, and  we  cannot  conclude  this  brief  tribute  in  a  more  ap- 


others  is  exemplified  beyond  comparison  in  Dear  Old  Bohemia, 
so  that  he  who  participates  in  her  wealth  ot  joy  is  blessed  in- 
deed. 

LEANDER    S.    SHERMAN. 
San    Francisco.    Sept.    25,    1909. 

\% 


A  delightful  musicale  was  given  by  Mrs.  Guy  S.  Millberry 
and  Miss  Marian  Cumming  to  a  few  of  the  members  of  the 
San  Francisco  Musical  Club,  on  Tuesday,  September  21st,  at 
the  home  of  Jliss  Cumming.  The  alfair  was  given  in  honor 
of  Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks  of  New  York,  whose  beautiful  contralto 
voice  was  heard  a  number  of  times  to  great  advantage  in 
songs  from  the  classics.  Mrs.  Oscar  Cushing  and  Miss  Ella 
Atkinson,  both  so  favorably  and  well  known  here,  rendered, 
in  their  usual   finished   style,  piano  and   vocal   selections. 


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BOHEMIAN  CLUB  JINKS— SUMIVIER    1909. 
A  Tableau   From  "St.  Patrick  of  Tara."     Wallace  A.  Sabin,  the  Director  and   Composer,   Is  Seen   Standing   in   Orchestra   Pit, 
and   Sixty-Five    Musicians   Are  Hidden   Under  the   Ferns. 


propriate  manner  than  quote  a  little  sentiment  written  by 
Mr.  Sherman  when  he  was  asked  to  express  his  thoughts  re- 
garding the  Bohemian  Club.  Here  is  what  Mr.  Sherman 
wrote: 

This  day  at  midnight,  following  the  afterglow  dinner,  the  cor- 
nerstone of  our  new  club  building  will  be  laid,  with  ceremonies 
typical  of  the  club. 

To  myself,  the  many  pleasant  hours  I  have  passed  in  the  Bo- 
hemian Club  have  made  it  seem  like  a  second  home. 

The  chib  has  not  only  contributed  to  my  personal  comforts 
in  a  most  satisfying,  luxurious  manner,  but  also  socially, 
musically,  gastronomically  and.  aye.  even  "spirif'ually  the 
inner  man  has  been  gratified,  and  my  mind  treated  to  the 
choicest  wit  and  intellectual  entertainment  ot  the  highest  de- 
gree. 

Giving    the    best    of    one's    self    to    promote    tlie    happiness    of 


MANHATTAN    OPERA    PERFORMANCES. 


"Prophete,"  September  S,  with  Lucas,  D'Alvarez,  Walter- 
Villa,  Laskin,  etc.;  conductor,  Sturani.  "La  Juive."  Septem- 
ber 9,  with  Eva  Grippon  (Rachel),  Walter-Villa  (Eudoxia), 
Russo  (Leopold),  Laskin  'De  Brogni),  etc.;  conductor,  Ni- 
cosia. "Rigoletto,"  September  10,  with  Miranda  (Gilda), 
Gentle  (Maddalena),  Carasa  (Duke),  Beck  (Rigoletto),  Scott 
(Sparafucile),  De  Grazia  (Monterone).  etc.;  conductor,  Stur- 
ani. "Carmen,"  September  11  (matinee),  Sylva.  Lucas.  Vi- 
carino.  Beck,  etc.  "La  Juive,"  September  11,  with  same  cast 
as  on  September  9.  ".\ida,"  September  13,  with  Carasa, 
Soyer,  etc.  "Carmen,"  September  14,  with  same  cast  as  Sep- 
tember 11. — Musical  Courier. 


10 


r  A  O  I  F  I  O    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


MUSICAL    NEWS   ABROAD. 


CECILIA  CHORAL   CLUB'S   PLANS. 


At  the  ninth  concert  of  the  Beethoven-Biahms-Bruckner 
cycle  in  Munich,  August  29  (Ferdinand  Loewe,  conductor),  the 
program  consisted  of  the  "Tragic"  overture  and  the  B  flat 
piano  concerto,  both  by  Brahms,  and  Beethoven's  eighth 
symphony. — Musical  Courier. 

*  *       * 

The  eminent  German  baritone,  Karl  Scheidemantel,  has  de- 
cided finally  to  leave  the  operatic  stage  in  1911  and  retire  to 
his  native  city,  Weimar.  He  has  a  record  of  thirty-three 
years  of  constant  singing  and  the  decision  is  necessarily  most 
natural. — Musical  Courier. 

*  *       * 

Mr.  Fontaine,  the  new  manager  of  the  Flemish  Opera  at 
Antwerp,  announces  that  the  program  for  the  first  two  months 
of  the  coming  season  will  Include  performances  of  "Lohen- 
grin," "Oedipus,"  "Tannhauser,"  "L'Evangeliste,"  "Quentin 
Matsys,"  "La  Walkyrie,"  "Rheingold,"  "Siegfried,"  "Ondine," 
"Nid  d'Aigle,"  "Le  Luthier  de  Bergame,"  "Le  Chien  du  Jar- 
ninier,"  of  Albert  Grisar;  "Fritjof,"  and  "La  Vestale,"  with 
entirely  new  scenery. — Musical  Courier. 

*  *       * 

Leoncavallo  must  be  a  busy  man  at  his  Villa  Brissago,  Lago 
Maggiore,  working  on  the  announced  operas  "Maja"  and  "The 
Red  Shirt,"  for  in  addition  to  these  he  is  also  inditing  a  third 
opera  called  "Malbruck"  (Marlborough)  in  three  acts,  libretto 
by  Nessi,  based  on  a  "comic  mediaeval  fantasy,"  as  reported. 
However,  it  is  not  reported  what  a  "comic  mediaeval  fantasy" 
might  be;  hence  we  must  wait  patiently  and  see. — Musical 
Courier. 

*  •       • 

Notwithstanding  the  recent  revolutionary  disturbances, 
Barcelona  is  as  gay  as  ever.  The  "Arenas"  or  bull  ring,  seat- 
ing 10,000,  has  been  transformed  into  a  temporary  opera 
house  and  on  many  occasions  has  been  obliged  to  put  out  the 
sign  "house  full."  An  Italian  opera  company  is  producing 
"Carmen,"  "II  Trovatore,"  "La  Favorita,"  "Faust"  and  "Loh- 
engrin," the  crowds,  of  course,  being  enormous.  Another 
house,  Del  Bosque,  is  giving  opera  at  one  franc  a  seat  in  the 
parquet  and  the  average  attendance  per  night  is  between 
3,000  and  4,000.  Besides  all  this  the  regular  opera  house,  the 
Liceo,  is  enjoying  a  successful  season. — Musical  Courier. 

Karl  Goldmark  is  at  work  at  a  new  opera.  Its  libretto  is 
taken  from  a  drama  by  Eugen  Madach  called  "The  Tragedy  of 
Mankind." — New  Music  Review. 

*  *       * 

A  new  instrument  has  been  invented  by  Charles  A.  Parsons, 
of  London,  called  the  Auxetophon.  This  is  designed  to  mag- 
nify the  sound  of  string  instruments,  violin,  'cello,  doublebass 
and  harp.  Experiments  have  been  made  with  it  and  the  re- 
sults are  said  to  be  most  promising.  It  is  suggested  that  the 
use  of  these  instruments  in  an  orchestra  will  make  it  possible 
to  reduce  the  number  of  musicians  and  still  not  diminish  the 
volume  of  tone. — New  Music  Review. 

*  *       * 

The  regular  season  of  grand  opera  at  Covert  Garden  con- 
cluded on  .luly  31.  Here  follows  a  list  of  work  performed  and 
numbers  of  performances.  The  season's  success  was  "Sam- 
son and  Dalilah" — the  opera  upon  which  the  censor's  ban  has 
rested  for  so  many  years  and  performance  of  which  was  made 
possible  only  by  the  request  of  the  Queen.  Twenty-one  operas 
were  sung,  as  follows:  "Aida"  was  sung  six  times;  "Arraide," 
one;  "Barber  of  Seville,"  six;  "Boheme,"  six;  "Cavalleria  Rus- 
ticana,"  three;  "Faust,"  five;  "Louise,"  five;  "Lucia  di  Lam- 
mermoor,"  three;  "Madame  Butterfly,"  seven;  "Otello,"  three: 
"Pelleas  and  Melisande,"  three;  "Pagliacci,"  three;  "Rigolet- 
to,"  six;  "Sonnambula,"  four;  "Samson  and  Dalilah,"  nine; 
"Tosca,"  four;  "Traviata,"  six;  "Tess,"  three;  "The  Hugue- 
nits,"  two;  "Die  Walkure,"  two,  and  "Don  Giovanni,"  two. — 
New  Music  Review. 

Puccini  has  finally  decided  upon  a  title  for  him  new  opera, 
the  libretto  of  which  is  fashioned  from  the  Belasco-Long 
drama,  "The  Girl  of  the  Golden  West."  The  opera  is  to  bear 
the  name  of  "Child  of  the  West,"  and  is  to  be  in  three  acts. 
The  composer  frankly  admits  his  adherence  to  the  cause  of 
melody. — New  Music  Review. 

Sergei  Rachmaninoff,  the  Russian  virtuoso  and  composer, 
who  has  been  touring  Germany,  has  returned  and  has  brought 
to  hearing  a  new  composition.  Its  title  is  "Die  Toteninsel," 
and  it  is  a  symphonic  poem,  inspired  by  Bocklin's  famous  pic- 
ture which  the  musician  saw  in  Germany.  The  work  made  a 
favorable  impression,  its  composer  being  praised  for  a  certain 
noble  reticence  and  an  avoidance  of  the  bombastic  and 
theatrical. — New  Music  Review. 


The  Cecilia  Choral  Club,  directed  by  Percy  A.  R.  Dow,  has 
resumed  its  rehearsals  with  an  enthusiasm  which  augurs  well 
for  the  success  of  the  season's  work.  This  enthusiasm  is  in 
part  due  to  the  very  beautiful  and  varied  music  which  will  be 
offered  in  the  three  concerts  of  this,  Cecilia's  fourth  season. 
Two  of  the  principal  works  are  new  to  this  coast  and  com- 
paratively new  to  this  country.  These  are  "The  Cross  of 
Fire"  by  Max  Brueh  and  "The  Pied  Piper  of  Hamlin"  by  C  H. 
H.  Parry.  They  will  be  sung  at  the  first  and  second  concerts 
respectively. 

At  the  third  concert  another  work  first  heard  here  under 
the  direction  of  Mr.  Dow  in  1902-3,  will  be  again  given- — the 
beautiful  romantic  cantata,  "Hiawatha's  Departure"  by  Cole- 
ridge-Taylor. Other  smaller  compositions  of  a  contrasting 
nature  to  the  principal  works  assure  programs  which  will 
make  the  always  enjoyable  concerts  of  the  Cecilia,  of  even 
more  than  usual  pleasure.  The  chorus  now  numbers  one 
hundred  and  fifty  voices,  with  new  applicants  for  membership 
each  week. 

In  Stockton  the  year's  program  will  be:  First  Concert — 
"Pied  Piper,"  of  Hamlin;  second  concert — "Elijah;"  third  con- 
cert— "Cross  of  Fire."  In  Lodi  the  club  will  givp:  first  con- 
cert— "Erl  King's  Daughter"  (Gade);  second  concert — "Fair 
Ellen",  by  Max  Bruch.  At  the  first  San  Francisco  concert 
the  Cecillia  Choral  Club  will  give  the  finest  program  ever  pre- 
sented by  this  organization  and  this  means  a  great  deal.  In 
Stockton  also  the  offerings  will  surpass  any  previous  ones 
including  part  songs  by  Elgar,  Colridge,  Taylor,  Tibbs  and 
others.  The  "Cross  of  Fire"  mentioned  above  is  a  superb 
work  in  every  respect.  The  particular  feature  of  the  Cecilia 
Choral  Club's  announcements  are  the  exquisite  novelties  by 
Elgar,  Taylor,  Parry  and  Bruch,  each  and  every  one  of  which 
is  a  strong  and  valuable  work. 


FERRIS    HARTMAN'S    FAREWELL    WEEK. 


Last  Monday  evening  Ferris  Hartman  began  the  farewell 
week  of  his  present  engagement  with  a  most  enjoyable  pro- 
duction of  "The  Tenderfoot,"  a  musical  comedy  of  extraordin- 
ary merit.  Book  and  lyrics  are  equally  effective,  catchy  jin- 
gles mingling  accurately  with  sensible  lyrics  and  alternating 
spiritedly  with  rollicking  dialogues.  The  humor  of  "The  Ten- 
derfoot" is  not  forced,  but  exhales  that  freedom  of  wit  and 
breezy  comedy  that  flows  readily  from  the  pen  of  a  born 
humorist.  Ferris  Hartman,  being  a  character  student  of  no 
mean  ability,  hits  every  point  of  humor  with  tack-hammer-like 
precision  and  never  fails  to  nail  a  laugh  whenever  the  lines 
give  him  an  opportunity.  Although  the  play  has  been  pre- 
sented here  repeatedly  it  exhibits  new  and  varied  points  of 
interest  at  every  hearing,  and  the  audiences  that  have  laughed 
at  the  quaint  humor  of  this  Western  musical  comedy  during 
the  past  week  surely  spent  a  very  pleasant  evening. 

The  company  backed  Mr.  Hartman  very  ably  in  his  efforts 
to  give  a  smooth  and  pleasing  performance.  Oscar  Walsh 
sang  the  few  ballads  with  excellent  voice  and  expression. 
Walter  De  Leon  essayed  the  role  of  the  magnetic  Parker  with 
the  necessary  vim.  .loseph  Fogarty  looked  and  acted  the 
role  of  the  gambler  in  a  most  characteristic  fashion.  Walter 
Catlett  obtained  an  inexhaustible  lot  of  fun  from  the  semi- 
silent  role  of  the  Chinaman.  Miss  Octavia  Broske  looked  and 
sang  the  part  of  the  heiress  in  happy  unison  with  the  other 
characters.  Muggins  Davis  interpreted  the  "sassy"  Sally  very 
fetchingly.  Josie  Hart  displayed  quite  an  amount  of  dignity 
and  suaveness  in  the  role  of  the  authoress.  Elvia  Rand  por- 
trayed the  unsophisticated  and  not  overcleanly  Patsey  in  a 
most  convincing  manner. 

Chorus  and  orchestra  were  in  excellent  mood  and  the  scen- 
ery and  costumes  matched  the  general  thoroughness  of  the 
production.  Beginning  next  Monday  evening  Ferris  Hartman 
and  his  excellent  company  will  fill  a  two  weeks'  engagement 
at  the  Broadway  Theatre  in  Oakland,  where  they  will  present 
sixteen  performances,  including  "The  Yankee  Consul,"  "The 
Blue  Moon,"  "The  Mayor  of  Tokio"  and  "The  Tenderfoot." 
On  October  16  the  Ferris  Hartman  Company  will  go  to  Los 
Angeles,  where  it  will  stay  fpi  an  extensive  engagement,  pre- 
senting all  the  latest  musical  comedies  and  comic  operas.  The 
theatregoers  of  Los  Angeles  have  always  enjoyed  Mr.  Hart- 
man and  his  clever  company,  and  no  doubt  will  again  welcome 
this  organization  with  open  arms  and  glad  hearts. 


Miss  Georgie  Cope  is  arranging  a  Japanesque  program  to 
take  place  at  the  Liberty  Theatre  on  November  2  for  Fabiola's 
benefit.  Miss  Cope,  Mr.  Carl  Anderson  and  Mr.  Lowell  Red- 
field  will  be  the  chief  soloists,  and  the  chorus  will  include 
members  of  the  Eurydice  and  Orpheus  Clubs. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


SHORT   ITEMS   OF    INTEREST. 


BERINGER    MUSICAL    CLUB'S   TWELFTH    RECITAL. 


At  her  forthcoming  concert  in  Golden  Gate  Commandery 
Hall  on  Thursday  evening.  October  11  th.  Madame  Roma  will 
be  assisted  by  the  following  artists:  Mrs.  R.  E.  Revalk, 
soprano:  Mrs.  J.  Llewelyn  Williams,  soprano:  Mrs.  D.  E.  F. 
Easton,  reader:  B.  Liederman.  tenor:  Harold  Pracht,  baritone; 
Fletcher  Tilton.  organist,  and  Arthur  Weiss,  cellist.  Mrs.  Re- 
valk will  sing  the  "Tea  Songs"  dedicated  to  the  Golden  Gate. 
Sirs.  Easton  will  read  Madame  Roma's  "Nell"  with  a  musical 
setting,  and  Mrs.  Williams  will  sing  the  "Sembrich"  songs. 
Harold  Pracht  will  interpret  "Recompense,"  the  words  of 
which  were  written  by  Judge  Melvin.  JIadame  Roma  has 
been  requested  to  sing  "The  Prayer,"  the  monotone  from  the 
song  cycle,  and  the  one  made  famous  in  Europe  by  the  com- 
poser's own  interpretation  before  Queen  Victoria,  at  Windsor 
Castle.  The  various  clubs  of  which  Madame  Roma  is  a  mem- 
ber will  attend.  Among  these  clubs  are:  The  Papyrus.  Cali- 
fornia. Sorosis  and  Sequoia  Clubs.  Judge  Melvin  and  Harold 
Pracht.  being  members  of  the  Bohemian  and  Family  Clubs,  no 
doubt  members  of  these  organizations  will  attend  as  a  matter 
of  courtesy. 

*       *       * 

Herman  Perlet,  the  distinguished  orchestral  leader  and  com- 
poser, who  has  been  located  in  San  Francisco  for  more  than  a 
j-ear,  has  utilized  the  summer  months  to  complete  a  "Roman- 
tic Operatic  Comedy."  in  two  acts,  which  is  now  being  played 
by  the  Persse-Mason  Company  throughout  the  interior  cities 
of  the  Pacific  Coast.  The  work  met  with  an  instantaneous 
hit  and  has  been  crowding  the  houses  ever  since  its  debut. 
It  is  entitled  "The  Singing  Bandits"  and  the  cast  is  as  follows: 

Romeo,  Tenor;  of  the  Disbanded  Opera  Co.,  Mr.  Thos.  H: 
Persse:  Roberto,  Bass;  of  the  Disbanded  Opera  Co.,  Mr.  Noble 
Grayson:  Leonora,  Contralto;  of  the  Disbanded  Opera  Co., 
Miss  Bernice  Holmes;  Giacomo,  of  the  Singing  Bandits.  Mr. 
Robert  McKim;  Beppo,  of  the  Singing  Bandits.  Mr.  Bert 
Phoenix:  Mateo.  Proprietor  of  the  Inn,  Mr.  G.  Reeves;  Angela. 
His  Wife,  Miss  Georgie  Knowlton;  Lucia,  His  Daughter,  Miss 
Edith  Mason, 

The  plot  of  the  play  takes  place  in  Italy  and  is  based  upon 
an  historical  episode.  The  story  is  told  by  means  of  song 
and  relieved  occasionally  by  sparkling  comedy  and  revolves 
around  the  trials  and  tribulations  of  a  stranded  opera  com- 
pany and  brigands  who  infested  Italy  in  those  remote  days. 
Among  the  musical  features  is  a  splendidly  constructed  climax 
that  has  as  its  objective  point  the  "Lucia  sextette"  and  a 
cleverly  introduced  situation  embodying  the  "Rigoletto  Quar- 
tet." These  adaptations  are  made  excusible  by  reason  of  the 
fact  that  some  of  the  characters  are  members  of  an  Italian 
opera  troupe. 

The  Zech  Orchestra  will  give  its  second  concert  of  the  sea- 
sou  on  Tuesday,  October  26th,  at  the  Novelty  Theatre,  comer 
of  O'Farrell  and  Steiner  streets.  The  program  will  be  as  fol- 
lows: Fingal's  Cave.  (Mendelsohn);  Suite  from  the  Ballet 
"Sylvia."  (Deliebes);  Traumerei  (Wuerst);  Violin  Solo  with 
Accompaniment  for  Strings,  (Miss  Olive  Hyde):  Scotch 
Dances,  No.  1  and  2.  (Otto  Langey) ;  Kaiser  March,  (Wagner). 
The  Orchestra  will  consist  of  about  sixty-five  of  the  best 
amateurs  in  San  Francisco  under  the  direction  of  W.  F.  Zech. 
Further  particulars  regarding  this  concert  will  appear  in  sub- 
sequent issues. 

The  pupils  of  Roscoe  Warren  Lucy  gave  the  following  pro- 
gram at  Century  Hall  on  Saturday.  September  18th:  (a)  In 
the  Church  ( Tschaikowski ) ;  (b)  Danish  Dance  Op.  36  (Gadei. 
Miss  Clara  Poppic:  (a)  Mazurka  Op.  10.  No.  3,  (Moszkow- 
ski);  (b)  Fabliau,  (J.  Raff).  Miss  Hazel  Bond;  Sonate  in  C 
Major,  (Josepifi  Haydn).  Miss  Aileen  Murphy;  Impromptu  in 
G,  (Schubert),  Miss  Ethel  Ostrander:  (a)  Polonaise  in  A  flat, 
(Moszkowski) ;  (b)  Fourth  Mazurka.  (Godard),  Miss  Camille 
Stronach;  (a)  Scherzino  Op.  IS,  No.  2.  (Rachmaninoff),  Miss 
Margaret  Douglas,  (a)  Impromptu  Op.  34,  No.  1,  (Lescheti- 
zky);  (b)  Grand  Concert  Rondo.  (Bartlett),  Miss  Vera  Max- 
well; (a)  Waltz  in  A  flat  Major,  (Karganoff);  (b)  Rigandon 
Op.  204,  (Raff),  Miss  Aileen  Murphy. 

Charles  Dutton  of  Berkeley  announces  one  of  his  interest- 
ing musical  receptions  at  his  studio.  2119  Alkton  Way.  Signor 
de  Grassi  and  Hother  Wismer  will  play  several  duets,  Fred 
\Maurer  will  preside  at  the  piano,  Charles  Dutton  will  play 
several  piano  works.  Miss  Boggs  and  Miss  Dillon  will  contri- 
bute several  harp  numbers.  Miss  Mesow  and  Luther  March- 
and  will  sing.  Mr.  Dutton's  new  studio  seats  over  one  hun- 
dred and  fifty  people  and  is  supplied  with  a  stage,  the  audi- 
torium being  divided  into  a  pit  and  balcony. 

On  her  way  to  her  home  in  Boston,  Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood 
will  give  a  concert  in  Los  Angeles  and  one  in  Flagstaff,  Ariz. 


Organization    of   Ambitious   Students    Astonish    Their   Friends 

With  the  Remarkable  progress   Made  Since  the 

End  of  the   Last   Musical   Season 


The  Beringer  Musical  Club  gave  its  twelfth  piano  and  vocal 
recital  at  Century  Hall,  on  Thursday  evening,  September  23rd. 
The  auditorium  was  crowded  to  the  doors  and  those  who 
attended  had  every  reason  to  feel  gratified  that  they  respond- 
ed to  the  invitation  of  the  club  to  partake  of  its  well  executed 
program.  We  have  attended  few  recitals  of  this  nature  which 
has  given  us  more  satisfaction  and  more  pleasure.  Professor 
and  Madame  Beringer  no  doubt  exercised  their  influence  in 
the  selection  of  the  participants,  for  they  were  all  exceedingly 
talented  and  nothing  marred  the  general  eveness  of  the  pro- 
gram, and,  as  far  as  the  writer  is  concerned,  this  was  the 
most  satisfactory  concert  so  far  given  by  the  Beringer  Musical 
Club.  Performers  as  well  as  teachers  may  justly  feel  proud 
of  the  result. 

Misses  Frances  Westington  and  Sadie  Bultman  opined  the 
program  with  a  "Fantasie  sur  un  air  original,"  by  Gurlitt; 
which  gave  them  an  opportunity  to  exhibit  their  technical 
skill  as  well  as  their  uniform  ensemble  work.  Miss  Zdenka 
Buben  played  Schubert's  "Impromptu  op.  142,  No.  4"  with  a 
remarkable  intellectual  grasp  of  its  musical  attributes  and 
with  a  smoothness  of  digital  facility  that  aroused  the  audience 
to  hearty  applause.  Miss  Irene  de  Martini,  who  sang  Thomas 
Arne's  "Polly  Willis,"  Nevin's  "Ti  Saluto"  and  Stigellis 
"Isolina"  scored  a  well  merited  triumph.  She  certainly  was 
born  with  the  spark  of  genius.  Possessing  a  well  modulated, 
resonant  mezzo  soprano  voice  of  quite  a  matured  timbre  for 
one  so  young  in  years  and  exhibiting  a  temparament  of 
unusual  vivaciousness  and  unforced  directness  this  youthful 
vocalist  gives  every  evidence  of  genuine  talent  which  under 
the  proper  course  of  musical  culture  is  bound  to  blossom  and 
bear  lucious  fruit.  Madame  Beringer  has  reason  to  feel  very 
much  gratified  to  possess  a  pupil  so  responsive  to  the  influ- 
ence of  a  vocal  education. 

Miss  Estelle  McNeil  d'Albert's  "Scherzo  op.  No.  3"  very 
musically  as  well  as  very  satisfactorily  in  so  far  as  its  teach- 
nical  intricacies  were  concerned.  Harry  Bultman,  who  sang 
Molloy's  "Thursday"  and  the  Armourer  Song"  from  "Robin 
Hood,"  is  the  possessor  of  a  genuine  bass  voice  of  a  timbre 
not  often  met  among  vocal  students.  He  sings  with  excep- 
tional feeling  and  reveals  a  range  of  unusual  dimensions.  He 
made  a  very  favorable  impression.  Melton  Mowbray  was  in 
better  condition  than  we  evar  heard  him  before  and  did  full 
justice  to  the  heavy  demand  of  Schubert  Liszt's  "La  Sere- 
nade." His  brilliant  and  ilmpid  technic  was  one  of  the  feat- 
ures of  the  evening.  As  an  encore  Mr.  Mowbray  gave  a  most 
excellent  reading  of  Chopin's  "Funeral  March."  Miss  Sadie 
Bultman  distinguished  herself  with  a  fluently  interpreted  and 
splendidly  phrased  rendition  of  Gluck-St.  Saens'  "Alceste." 

Miss  Anita  Morse  never  showed  herself  to  better  advantage 
than  with  her  impressive  rendering  of  Venzano's  "Grand 
Valse"  and  Saint-Saens'  "My  Heart  at  Thy  Sweet  Voice." 
Her  beautiful,  flexible  lyric  soprano  with  its  bell-like  character 
was  singularly  adapted  for  these  works  and  the  ease  and 
abandon  with  which  she  sang  exercised  a  very  favorable  influ- 
ence upon  her  listeners  who  were  not  backward  in  expression 
their  delight  and  satisfaction.  Miss  Frances  Westington  jus- 
tified her  position  among  the  foremost  executants  of  the  pro- 
gram by  giving  a  very  effective  interpretation  of  Joseph  Ber- 
inger's  pretty  sentiment  '^Tes  Yeux"  and  a  brilliant  rendition 
of  Schulz-Evler's  "On  the  Beautiful  Blue  Danube."  Miss  Alta 
Yocom  played  a  group  of  Chopin  compositions  most  skillfully 
and  gave  evidence  of  the  fact  that  she  had  studied  with  much 
care  and  devoted  that  diligence  and  thought  to  her  work 
which  contributes  toward  an  ideal  comprehension  of  pianistic 
intricacies.  The  program  closed  with  a  vocal  duet  "Calm  as 
the  Night"  by  Goetze.  very  pleasingly  rendered  by  Miss  Anita 
Morse  and  Harry  Bultman. 

The  success  of  this  last  concert  of  the  Beringer  Musical 
Club  reveals  the  fact  that  great  things  may  be  accomplished 
by  persistent  efforts.  The  participants  on  the  program  have 
gained  confidence  and  have  added  much  to  their  knowledge. 
Any  teacher  who  can  show  gradual  improvement  among  his  or 
her  scholars  is  on  the  right  road.  These  occasional  public 
recitals  kill  nervousness  and  bring  the  pupil  to  the  realiza- 
tion of  grave  responsibilities.  Surely  the  Beringer  Musical 
Club  recitals  should  form  a  stimulant  for  its  members. 


Mrs.  Ruth  Childs  Carver,  formerly  a  pupil  of  Hugo  Mans- 
feldt,  announces  that  she  is  prepared  for  professional  engage- 
ments and  has  opened  a  studio  at  1657  Mason  street. 


12 


PAriFK"    COAST    MUSKJAL    K  IC  V  I  K  W. 


MUSIC  AT  ST.   MARY'S,  OAKLAND. 


MUSIC  ACROSS  THE  BAY. 


On  Sunday  evening,  September  19,  at  St.  Mary's,  Seventli 
and  Jefferson  streets,  Oakland,  the  choir  and  orchestra  of  the 
Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music,  under  the  direction  of  Prof. 
Adolf  Gregory,  rendered  excerpts  from  Haydn's  Passion  and 
a  program  of  other  numbers  from  the  works  of  the  great  mas- 
ters. This  was  the  sixth  of  the  series  of  sacred  recitals  given 
by  this  organization  this  season.  During  the  recital  the  fol- 
lowing numbers  were  rendered:  Orchestral  prelude  and 
chorus,  "Father,  Forgive  Them"  (Haydn);  Arioso,  for  con- 
tralto, "Woe  Unto  Them"  (Mendelssohn);  chorus,  "The  Veil 
Was  Rent"  (Haydn);  Aria,  tor  tenor,  "If  With  All  Your 
Hearts"  (Haydn):  chorus,  'It  is  Finished"  (Haydn);  Aria,  for 
baritone,   "Lord   God   of   Abraham"    (Mendelsohn);    Aria,    for 


The  De  Grass!  Concert   Proves  an  Artistic  Triumph  and   Miss 

Anna   Miller  Wood   Sings  to   Crowded    House — 

Other  interesting  Items. 


MISS   GENA   WILKIE 

Solo   Soprano   of   St.    Mary's,     Oakland,     and     Member    of   the 

Faculty  of  the  Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music. 

contralto,  "O  Rest  in  the  Lord"  (Mendelssohn);  chorus, 
"Amen!  In  Sempiterna"  (Rossini).  After  the  sermon:  "In- 
flammatus"  (Rossini).  During  the  benediction:  "O  Salutaris" 
(Handel);  "Tantum  ergo"  (Adolf  Gregory);  Postlude,  Marche 
Romaine  (Gounod).  The  soloists  were  Miss  Gena  Wilkie,  so- 
prano; Miss  Jennie  T.  Yale,  contralto;  Louis  J.  Spuller,  tenor; 
Norman  Wilkie,  bass.  Mrs.  Adolf  Gregory  presided  at  the 
organ.  The  next  evening  recital  will  be  October  ITth,  and 
will  consist  principally  of  excerpts  from  Spohr's  Last  Judg- 
ment. 


ALBERT  ROSENTHAL  SHOULD  GIVE  CONCERT 

ALBERT  ROSENTHAL,  THE  BRILLIANT  YOUNG  SAN 
FRANCISCO  'CELLIST,  WHO  SCORED  A  DECIDED 
TRIUMPH  IN  EUROPE  AND  THE  EAST,  IS  VISITING  HIS 
PARENTS  HERE.  IT  SEEMS  TO  US  MR.  ROSENTHAL 
SHOULD  BE  HEARD  IN  CONCERT  IN  HIS  NATIVE  CITY 
AFTER  HAVING  BECOME  FAMOUS  ABROAD.  HE  TELLS 
US  NO  CALIFORNIA  MANAGER  WANTS  TO  RISK  DIRECT- 
ING A  CONCERT  FOR  HIM.  IS  THIS  A  SUFFICIENT  REA- 
SON WHY  MR.  ROSENTHAL  SHOULD  NOT  BE  HEARD 
HERE?  THIS  PAPER  WILL  DONATE  ALL  ADVERTISING 
SPACE  TOWARD  A  ROSENTHAL  CONCERT.  IS  THERE 
SOMEONE  HERE  WILLING  TO  MANAGE  HIM  IN  CON- 
CERT  IN    HIS   NATIVE  CITY? 

ALFRED   METZGER, 
EDITOR    PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


By  Elizabeth  Westgate. 

Oakla„d,   Sept.  27,   1909. 

The  violin  recital  of  Signor  Antonio  de  Grassi  at  the  Liberty 
Theatre  last  Friday  afternoon  revealed  this  interesting  Italian 
player  in  all  his  moods,  I  believe,  truly.  And  his  program 
was  so  built  as  to  give  full  play  to  all  those  artistic  qualities 
which  his  playing  in  private  had  already  taught  us  were  his 
in  full  measure. 

The  charming — and  moving — Sonata  of  Grieg  gave  oppor- 
tunity for  both  Mr.  Maurer  and  Signor  de  Grassi  to  express 
themselves  individually,  and  if  they  were  blood-brothers  their 
thought  and  instincts  could  not  more  nearly  coincide.'  The 
last  movement  was  played  with  particular  abandon,  and  was 
the  most  thoroughly  satisfying  performance  of  the  entire 
afternoon.  As  the  well-beloved  phrases  reached  the  ear — 
like  old  and  dear  friends  newly-met  after  an  absence — one 
warmed  to  them,  and  welcomed  them,  and  was  glad  that  Grieg 
had  embodied  them  so  that  they  were  walking  before  us  on 
that  good  and  pleasant  day. 

The  well-known  Bruch  concerto  was  Signor  de  Grassi's  oth- 
er large  work,  and  he  played  it  with  full  understanding  and 
a  nobility  of  technic  whicn  one — after  all — is  pretty  sure  to 
tind  in  the  followers  of  Sevcik — when  all  is  said,  one  of  the 
greatest  of  the  technicians.  What  it  is  besides  technique  that 
he  imparts  to  his  disciples — this  Bohemian  master — it  is  hard 
to  say,  for  individuality  cannot  be  imparted.  Yet  all  the  stu- 
dents of  that  Prague  school — now  of  world-moment  no  longer 
since  Sevcik  went  over  to  the  Vienna  Conservatory — show 
vast  distinction  under  all  their  technic,  and  dominating  it. 
If  pupils  not  distinguished  have  come  out  of  that  conservatory, 
the  world  at  large  has  not  heard  of  it. 

Of  the  other  solos,  the  Russian  airs,  of  course,  commanded 
admiration  for  the  boldness,  delicacy,  facility  and  breadth  of 
the  delivery.  The  final  passage  in  harmonies  was  exquisite 
and  flawless,  and  one  was  reminded  that,  since  Kubelik,  per- 
haps no  one  has  played  it  more  nonchalantly  than  this  same 
de  Grassi  of  Oakland. 

Signor  de  Grassi's  compositions  were  melodious  and  pleas- 
ing, and  of  interest  as  well  to  ears  attuned  to  modernity.  They 
were  in  the  smaller  forms,  but  cleverly  accomplished.  Be- 
sides the  works  specifically  mentioned,  these  were  played: 
.■\ndante  Religioso  (De  Angeles),  Fantaisie  (Drdla),  and  Air 
de  Ballet   (Adamowski). 

Mr.  Maurer  was  at  his  very  best,  which  is  good  enough  for 
anybody's  utmost,  and  the  sympathy  between  the  two  was, 
as  has  been  hinted,  quite  perfect. 

The  audience  was  not  large,  but  it  was  discriminating  and 
almost  affectionate,  too. 

•  *       * 

It  was  a  delectable  program  which  Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood 
sang  at  the  Unitarian  Church  in  Berkeley  last  Wednesday 
evening.  The  church  was  filled  with  people  who  quite  evi- 
dently knew  just  how  to  measure  excellence  and  fascination 
equally,  and  to  respond  to  both.  For  Miss  Wood  is  a  singer 
in  the  highest  implication  of  that  misused  word  and  wins  at 
every  point — but  first  and  foremost  by  her  thorough  artistry. 
That  she  has  a  beautiful  voice,  of  satin  and  velvet,  and  that 
she  makes  it  a  vehicle  for  expressing  all  things — these  need 
not  to  be  said,  for  they  are  too  patently  true  to  need  saying. 
Her  program,  with  its  encores,  follows.  Mr.  Maurer  accom- 
panied with  his  unfailing  skill. 

Old  Airs — Hans  Leo  Hassler,  1564-1612,  Tanzlied;  14th 
Century  Air.  Joseph,  lieber  Joseph;  Scarlatti,  1659-1725,  Gia 
il  Sole.  French  Composers — Xavier  Leroux.  Le  Nil.  violin 
obligato  by  Mr.  Hother  Wismer;  Ernest  Chausson,  Les  Papll- 
lons;  Augusta  Holmes,  L'Heure  d'Azur;  Gabriel  Pierne,  lis 
etaient  trois  petits  Chats;  Claude  Debussy,  La  Mandoline. 
American  Composers — Arthur  Foote.  Once  at  the  Angelus; 
Percy  Lee  Atherton,  Beloved,  it  was  April  Weather,  Night 
Song,  M.S.,  'Tis  the  Spring.  M.S..  dedicated  to  Miss  Wood; 
George  Chadwick,  The  Danza;  Foote,  lym  Wearin'  Awa. 
German  Composers — Robert  Fi-anz.  Fruhling  und  Liebe; 
Liebchen  ist  da;  Hugo  Wolf.  Mignon.  By  request — Arthur 
Foote.  On  the  Way  to  Kew,  dedicated  to  Miss  Wood;  Theo. 
Marzials,  Twickenham  Ferry;  A.  Rubinstein,  Good  Night; 
Arthur  Foote,  O  Swallow  Flying  South.  The  Sweetest  Flower 
that  Blows. 

#  *       * 

Mr.  R.  H.  Thomas  will  sing  a  program  before  the  California 
Club  next  Tuesday  afternoon.  Mr.  Thomas  is  one  of  the  lead- 
ing baritones  on   this   side   of  the  bay. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


13 


The  short  violin  recitals  of  Mr.  Alexander  Stewart,  which 
follow  the  sermon  at  the  Oakland  First  Congregational 
Church,  are  causing  much  interest.  Mr.  Stewart's  dignified 
and  finished  playing  of  three  or  more  works  suitable  for 
church  performance,  with  organ  accompaniment,  is  of  musical 
value  to  the  whole  community;  and  it  is  not  too  much  to  say 
that  a  goodly  proportion  of  the  church-going  people  of  Oak- 
land is  present  at  these  services. 

*  «       * 

The  quartet  of  the  Alameda  First  Presbyterian  Church  will 
give  a  regular  first  Sunday  program  next  Sunday  evening. 
The  entire  list  comprises  works  by  Arthur  Foote.  TJie  pro- 
gram follows: 

Pastorale,  organ;  Christ,  our  Passover,  quartet;  Oj  Love 
that  Will  not  let  Me  Go,  tenor;  Offertory — Toccato,  organ; 
When  Wings  are  Raging,  contralto;  Does  the  Road  Wind  Up- 
hill all  the  Way?,  quartet;  My  God,  I  Thank  Thee,  soprano; 
All's  Well,  bass;  Allegro,  Opus  45,  No.  3,  organ. 

The  quartet  consists  of  Mrs.  A.  E.  Nash,  Miss  Edith  Stetson, 
Mr.  Stanleigh  Ward  MacLewee  and  Mr.  Clarence  Wflitney 
Castell.  7 

*  •       * 

The  second  concert  (16th  season)  of  the  Oakland  Orpheus, 
Mr.  Edwin  Dunbar  Crandall.  director,  will  occur  toniorrow 
evening  at  the  Liberty  Theatre.  Miss  Estelle  Franklin  Gray, 
violinist,  is  the  special  soloist.  A  review  of  the  concert  will 
be  given  here  next  week. 

On  Tuesday,  October  5th,  the  third  concert  of  the  Stewart 
Orchestral  Club,  Mr.  Alexander  Stewart,  director,  will  be 
given  at  Maple  Hall.  Miss  Georgie  Cope,  contralto,  just  re- 
turned from  a  course  of  study  in  Europe,  has  been  engaged 
as  the  soloist.  In  answer  to  many  requests,  the 'managers 
have  agreed  to  sell  single  tickets  for  this  particular  concert — 
a  concession  not  hitherto  granted. 

*  *       * 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  M.  F.  Hrubanik  invite  their  friends  to  a 
musicale  at  their  home  next  Sunday  afternoon.  The  partici- 
pants on  the  program  are  Mr.  R.  H.  Thomas,  baritone;  Mr. 
David  MauUoyd,  tenor;  Mr.  M.  F.  Hrubanik,  baritone,  and 
Mr.  Vincert  de  Arrilaga,  pianist. 


A  very  interesting  musical  service  was  given  at  the  College 
avenue  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  in  Berkeley  recently  when 
the  following  excellent  program  was  rendered  under  the  direc- 
tion of  Frank  E.  Wright: 

Morning  Service,  Organ  Prelude — Adagio  from  the  3rd  So- 
nata in  C  minor  (A.  Guilmant)  op.  50;  Te  Deum  in  F  "We 
Praise  Thee  O  God"  (Kotzschmar) — Soli  and  Chorus;  Male 
Quartet — "Built  this  Church  for  God"  (Wright) — Postlude; 
Organ.  At  the  evening  service  the  following  musical  num- 
bers were  given; 

Organ  Prelude — "Prayer  in  G  flat  (F.  J.  St.  Clair,)  op.  36  No. 
1;  Opening  Chorus — "O,  Clap  your  hands  together"  (Turner;) 
Anthem — How  Beautiful  upon  the  Mountains"  (Spinney)  — 
Solo,  Quartet  and  Chorus;  Dedicatory  Anthem — "I  have  surely 
Built  Thee  an  House"  (Dr.  Boyce) — Soli,  trio  and  Chorus;  So- 
prano Solo — "Ave  Maria"  (Bach-Gounod)  Miss  Helen  Mascow; 
Finale  Praise  Chorus — "Praise  the  Lord"  (Randegger;)  Post- 
lude— Organ. 

The  Choir  of  this  church  which  was  dedicated  in  August  22nd 
is  as  follows: 

Quartet — 
I    Miss  Olive  Morrish,  Soprano;  Mrs.  J.  Rollin  Fitch,  Contralto; 
/Ray  Miles,  Tenor;  R.  M.  Sheldon,  Bass. 

Sopranos — 
i     Miss  Ada  L.  Weber,  Miss  Anna  J.  Harrison.   Miss  Lola  N. 
Holton,   Mrs.   A.   M.   Smith,   Mrs.   J.   F.   Wilson.    Mrs.   Chester 
Naramore.  Mrs.  George  C.  Shaw,  Mrs.  Jessie  L.  Taylor,  Mrs. 
F.  W.  Smith. 

Altos — 

Miss  Madge  Woodman,  Miss  M.  Jackson,  Miss  Bernice  Shaw, 
Miss  Mable  Woodman,  Mrs.  James  Wyper,  Miss  Estelle 
Swearingen. 

Tenors — 

W.  W.  Davis,  W.  F.  Barnum,  J.  G.  Garrison. 

Basses — 

H.  I.  Hamilton,  Charles  Thomas,  George  H.  Blacker,  James 
Wyper,  A.  U.  Good,  F.  W.  Smith. 

Male  Quartet — 

Messrs  Miles,  Thomas,  Wright  and  Sheldon. 

Miss  Helen  Mascow,  Soloist. 

Miss  Lola  G.  Gwin,  Organist. 

Frank  E.  Wright,  Director. 


The  Oakland   Conservatory  of  Music 

203-205  Twelfth  St.,  cor.  Jackson,  Oakland,  Calif. 

The  largest,  oldest  established  and  most  thoroughly  equipped  School  of  Genuine  Musical  Instruction  in 
the  We^.  Over  2,000  students  since  its  inception  and  300  this  year.  Faculty  of  18  accomplished 
artists;  all  branches  of  music,  both  practical  and  theoretical.  The  special  advantages  of  the  Conserva- 
tory tuition  are  manifest,  viz.,  the  following  free  privileges:  Ensemble  Classes,  Lectures,  Academnias, 
$10,000.00  Reference  Library  of  Musical  Classics  and  Theoretical  Work,  Examinations  and  Certifi- 
cates of  Ability  and  $4,000.00  worth  of  Free  Scholarships  awarded  annually. 

INFORMAL  ACADEMNIAS  are  held  in  the  Conservatory  the  First  and  Third  Thursdays  in  each  month  for  adult 
students;  for  juniors  the  Second  Saturday. 

ELEMENTARY  ORCHESTRAL  CLASS,  Thursday,  every  week,  at  8:30  p.  m.  ADVANCED  ORCHESTRA 
(Symphony  Class)  every  Monday  at  8:30  p.  m. 

THE  CONSERVATORY  CHORAL  SOCIETY  rehearses  every  Friday  at  8:30  for  the  study  of  the  works  of 
the  great  masters.  The  works  already  rendered  this  season  are  as  follows:  Haydn's  "Imperial,"  Roosini's  "Stabat 
Mater,"  Weber's  "Mass  in  G,"  Handel's  "Messiah,"  Schubert  in  F  and  Haydn's  "Passion."  Tomorrow:  Hammel  in 
E  Flat.  October  17th:  Spoho's  "Last  Judgment."  Other  works  to  be  rendered  during  the  season  by  Cherubini, 
Gounod,  Haydn,  Bach,  Palestrina,  Beethoven,  Dubois,  Schubert,  Meyerbeer  and  Mercadante.  Only  students  who 
are  thorough  sight  singers  admitted  to  this  choir.  SPECIAL  PREPARATION  CLASSES  IN  SIGHT  SINGING 
are  held  throughout  the  season  for  students  wishing  to  become  eligible  as  members  of  this  Society. 

The  monthly  Conservatory  paper,  "THE  MUSIC  STUDENT,"  free  to  all  pupils. 

SPECIAL  LECTURE  COURSE  of  twelve  lectures  commences  this  month;  first  of  the  series,  "The  Modern  Technic 
of  the  Piano-forte,  Its  Origin  and  Development,"  by  the  Director.     Free  to  all  students. 

Full  prospectus  on  application.    Students  ma])  enter  at  any  time.     No  charge  for  entrance  examination  or  for  any  of  the  special  advantages  mentioned  above. 
PHONES:     Oakland  4922;  Home  A-2922 

Fall  Term  Commences  Now  Director,  ADOLF  GREGORY 


14 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


MUSIC   IN   SACRAMENTO. 


Interesting   Forecast  of   Important   Events  Which   Are   Booked 
To  Take  Place  at  the  State  Capital. 


By   Mrs.  Albert   Elkus. 

Sacrament,o,  Sept.  21,  1909. 
The  musical  season  for  1909-1910  is  opening  with  unusual 
activity.  The  McNeill  Club,  again  under  the  efflcient  leader- 
ship of  Robert  Lloyd,  held  its  first  meeting  on  the  13th.  They 
have  planned  the  usual  three  concerts  with  local  and  club 
soloists,  and  will  continue  to  study  the  best  composers.  Mr. 
Lloyd  also  has  charge  of  matters  musical  in  the  organization 
called  "The  Camellians,"  who  hold  monthly  meetings.  He 
will  lecture  at  Elks  Hall  in  October  on  "The  Proper  Use  of 
Voice  in  Speech  and  Song." 

*  4  N< 

The  choir  at  the  Synagogue  is  rendering  excellent  music 
during  the  holidays.  It  has  been  augmented  by  the  voices  of 
Jlrs.  J.  A.  Moynihan  and  Mr.  Homer  Henley.  Mrs.  R.  H. 
Hawley  is  organist  and  leader  of  the  choir. 

The  Saturday  Club  demonstrated  its  appreciation  of  the  two 
years'  service  given  it  by  the  president,  Mrs.  J.  A.  Moynihan, 
by  again  choosing  her  for  a  leader.  The  same  compliment 
was  extended  to  the  other  officers.  These,  together  with  the 
board,  have  held  many  meetings  during  vacation  and  have 
formulated  the  following  plans;  The  work  done  by  active 
members  will  consist  of — Three  miscellaneous  days,  American 
composers,  a  centenary  celebration  which  will  be  devoted  to 
the  works  of  Chopin,  Michael  Costa,  Kucken,  Felician  and 
Ferdinand  David;  a  Rubinstein  and  Rossini  day;  Schumann 
day.  and  a  day  devoted  to  the  Faust  Legend  in  Music.  The 
student  members  of  the  club,  and  the  boys  of  the  city  will 
also  give  their  usual  day.  In  looking  over  this  prospectus  one 
feels  that  all  clubs  should  supplement  the  work  that  is  being 
done  by  the  musical  papers  of  the  country  in  encouraging 
American  composers  and  American  interpreters.  I  would 
suggest  that  the  papers  ask  of  all  clubs  that  at  least  one 
American  composers  day  be  given  each  season. 

The  America  day  which  will  be  given  here  by  the  Saturday 
Club,  on  February  oth.  by  the  talent  of  the  club,  will  be  sup- 
plemented by  the  first  hearing  in  Sacramento  of  the  melo- 
drama, "Lady  of  Shallott,"  by  Albert  1.  Elkus,  rendered  by 
Miss  Alice  Colman  and  Mr.  Elkus  of  San  Francisco. 

*  *       * 

The  season  will  open  on  October  9th,  when  Albert  Rosen- 
thal, also  of  your  city,  who  has  won  honors  in  Europe  and 
the  East,  will  give  a  'cello  recital  with  Albert  L  Elkus  at  the 
piano.  The  program  will  be:  Sonata  (L-Valentine) ;  (a)  Air 
(Bach),  (b)  Andante  (Schumann),  (c)  Rondo  (Boccherini) ; 
3rd  Movement,  Cello  Concerto  (Dvorak);  Fantasie  Linda  de 
Chamounix  (Plutti);  (a)  Chant  triste  (Tschaikowski),  (b)  At 
the  Fountain  (Davidoff);  Rhapsodie  Hongroise  (Popper). 
This  will  be  followed  on  the  14th  by  Mr.  Wilhelm  Heinrich 
of  Boston,  tenor  for  years  in  the  church  of  the  late  Edward 
Everett  Hale.  His  program  given  here  some  five  years  ago  is 
remembered  with  so  much  pleasure.  It  was  called  an  art 
program  and  contained  the  best  songs  of  all  times.  Mr.  Hein- 
rich has  been  blind  since  infancy,  plays  his  own  accompani- 
ments in  most  exquisite  fashion,  also  giving  valuable  historical 
data  about  the  program  as  it  proceeds.  That  Mr.  Heinrich 
has  not  rested  on  his  repertoire  of  five  years  ago  the  follow- 
ing program  of  modern  composers  will  show;  (a)  Les  An- 
gelus.  (b)  L  Echelounement,  (c)  Les  Cloches,  (d)  Mandaline. 
(e)  Le  Jit  d'eau  (Debussy);  from  Tennyson's  Maud:  (a) 
Birds  in  the  High  Hall  Garden,  Catch  not  thy  breath  (Recit), 
(b)  Go  not.  Happy  Day,  (c)  I  have  led  her  home,  (d)  Tears, 
idle  tears  (Tennyson's  Princess);  Benjamin  Whelpley.  from 
Browning's  two  songs  by  Mrs.   Henry   Rogers:    (a)    My  Star, 

(b)  Love  me  Forever;   (a)  Des  Kindes  Gebet,  (b)  Beim  Wetter 

(c)  Strampelchen,  (d)  Hans  and  Grete,  (e)  Minnelied,  (f) 
Schmeichel  Ratzchen  (Max  Reger);  (a)  Rosa,  Rosa  (Blair 
Fairchild,  (b)  A  Farewell  (Elizabeth  Cheney),  (c)  The  Fox- 
glove (Geo.  Chadwick),  (d)  The  Cobbler's  Song  (Felix  Wein- 
gartner),   (e)   The  Lorelei   (Franz  Liszt). 

*  #       * 

November  will  bring  Ludwig  Wullner;  January,  Antonio 
de  Grassi;  February,  Horatio  Connell,  American  baritone  just 
returned  from  an  eight  year's  sojourn  in  Europe,  where  the 
kind  of  art  he  produces  is  well  appreciated;  March  will  bring 
the  Dutch  contralto,  Tilly  Koenen,  and  April,  the  Flonzaley 
Quartet,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Clifford  Lott,  of  Los  Angeles, 
cume  to  us  the  afternoon  of  December  4th,  song  and  piano 
reiital;  Madame  Olga  Brugstorf,  of  New  York,  will  give  an 
afl.'rnoon  of  Folk  Songs  of  Nations,  and  the  afternoon  meet- 
inj^.s  will  close  in  April  with  a  program  given  by  the  Golden 


Gate  Quartet,  consisting  of  Frank  Onslow,  Carl  Anderson, 
John  de  P.  Teller  and  Henry  Perry — a  good  feast  to  look  for- 
ward to. 

It  is  to  be  hoped  that  others  will  follow  the  example  of  Mr. 
Genss  of  your  city,  who  will  appear  here  the  latter  part  of 
October  in  piano  recital,  so  that  the  musical  people  of  our  city 
may  have  opportunity  to  hear  more  than  one  club  can  pro- 
vide us  with.  When  a  larger  auditorium  is  built  the  club 
can  be  enlarged  from  its  present  membership,  which  is  1,200, 
and  more  members  means  more  music. 
*       *       * 

I  regret  to  announce  that  a  most  valuable  member  of  the 
musical  community  will  leave  us  soon.  Mrs.  Lottie  Buck 
Porterfleld,  lyric  soprano,  will  remove  to  Los  Angeles,  and 
our  loss  will  mean  Los  Angeles'  gain.  Her  repertoire  is  very 
extensive  and  her  knowledge  of  matters  musical  so  broad  that 
the  five  years  she  has  been  in  our  midst  has  added  much  to 
the  culture  of  the  community.  The  best  wishes  of  all  her 
friends  go  with  her. 


THE    LORING    CLUB'S   THIRTY-THIRD    SEASON. 


Oldest  and   Most  Successful  Singing  Society  of  San   Francisco 

Announces  New  Season  and  Continues  to  Add 

Lustre   to   Local    Musical    Life. 


A  musical  society  which  has  had  a  continuously  successful 
career  of  thirty-two  years  is  one  which  must  necessarily  be 
founded  on  very  sound  principles,  particularly  so  in  a  city 
like  San  Francisco.  The  Loring  Club,  in  issuing  its  announce- 
ments for  its  thirty-third  season,  the  opening  concert  of  which 
is  set  for  Tuesday  evening,  October  12th,  in  Christian  Science 
Hall,  shows  that  its  managing  committee  and  advisory  board 
are  adhering  to  its  very  highest  standard. 

It  is  now  formally  announced  that  Mr.  Wallace  A.  Sabin 
has  accepted  the  directorship  of  the  club,  and  on  this  the  club 
is  certainly  to  be  congratulated,  for  Mr.  Sabin  has  not  only 
established  his  claim  to  be  recognized  as  a  musician  of  the 
best  type,  but  as  a  practical  director  he  is  unexcelled.  For 
the  coming  season  four  concerts  are  planned,  respectively  in 
October,  December,  March  and  May,  and,  for  these,  programs 
are  now  outlined  containing  some  of  the  very  best  and  also 
some  of  the  most  recent  compositions  for  male  voices  with 
orchestra,   with  piano  and  also  unaccompanied. 

It  has  been  known  to  musicians  for  some  time  that  the 
Loring  Club  of  San  Francisco  ranks  in  the  first  half  dozen  in 
the  United  States,  and  the  standard  of  these,  the  best  male 
voice  organizations  of  the  United  States,  is  not  excelled  by 
any  similar  European  club.  The  Loring  Club  has  reached  the 
stage  of  efficiency  that  the  difficulties  of  a  composition  do  not 
now  have  to  be  considered  by  the  committee  and  the  advisory 
board  when  arranging  the  programs,  so  that  San  Franciscans 
have  the  opportunity  of  hearing  male  voice  music  of  the  very 
highest  type. 

At  this  time  we  will  refer  only  in  detail  to  the  program  for 
the  concert  of  October  12th,  which  contains  a  number  of  com- 
positions to  be  heard  by  a  San  Francisco  audience  on  this 
occasion  for  the  first  time.  Prominent  among  these  are  a 
cycle  of  "Songs  of  the  Sea"  by  the  well-known  English  musi 
cian,  Sir  Charles  Villiers  Stanford.  This  composition  is  for 
chorus  of  male  voices  with  baritone  solo,  and  was  a  brillian 
success  when  first  produced  at  the  Leeds  Festival  of  1904 
In  this  work  the  solo  has  been  entrusted  to  Mr.  John  Carring 
ton,  and  the  accompaniments  will  be  piano,  organ  and  orches 
tra.  Another  novelty  of  great  interest  is  Kremser's  choru: 
for  two  choirs  of  men's  voices.  "Thro'  Whispering  Boughs.' 
G.  W.  Chadwick's  "Lo,  Now  Night  Shadows"  (Ecce  Jam  Noc 
tis),  occupied  a  place  of  honor  on  the  program,  which  also  in- 
cludes "The  Vintage  Song"  from  Mendelssohn's  unfinished 
opera,  "The  Lorelei."  The  club  on  this  evening  will  also  ren 
der  Arthur  Sullivan's  "The  long  day  Closes,"  and  John  Hyat 
Brewer's  "Break,  break,"  with  its  tender  refrain,  "And  Its  A, 
for  the  Touch  of  a  Vanished  Hand,"  which  without  doubt  are 
included  in  the  program  as  an  In  Memoriam  thought  of  the 
late  director,  Mr.  W.  C.  Stadfelt,  who  served  the  club  so  long 
and  so  faithfully,  and  who  was  personally  so  popular  with  all 
the  members. 

The  pianist  will  be  Mr.  Frederick  Maurer,  Jr.,  and  Mr.  Wal- 
lace A.  Sabin  will  direct  the  concert. 


"An  Evening  of  Song"  was  given  in  Berkeley  last  week  by 
a  visiting  baritone  from  Chicago,  Mr.  Thomas  N.  MacBurney. 
Mr.  MacBurney  has  been  in  Paris,  assistant  of  the  famous 
American  vocal  teacher.  King  Clark,  who  is  said  to  be  as 
successful  in  his  profession  as  that  extremely  whalthy 
American  dentist  who  has  attracted  tout  Paris  to  his  elegant 
offices.  Mr.  Hother  Wismer,  violinist,  and  Mr.  Frederick 
Maurer,  accompanist,  assisted. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


15 


WILLIAM  F.  ZECH, 


VIOLINIST 
Musical  Director 


Tht  Zech  Orchrflra  Rfh<!i 
1332  Geary  Street 


5  Every  Monday  Evening 

Phone  West  1603 


California  Conservatory  of  Music 

Now  occupies  its  magnificent  new   building  on 

147  Presidio  Avenue 

Between  Washington  and  Jackson  Streets,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

(Jackson-Sutler  St.  car  terminal  in  hont  of  buildina) 


Largest  Institution  West  of  Chicago 


DIRECTORIUM  : 

HERMANN  GENSS.  President 

DR.  H.  J.  STEWART,    GIULIO  MINETTI,    DR.  ARTHUR  WEISS, 

GEORG  KRUGER 

The  (acuity  further  includes  such  artists  as : 
HANS  KONIG, 
WALLACE  A.  SABIN, 
G.  JOLLAIN, 
LOUIS  NEWBAUER, 
HENRY  B.  BAERMAN. 
MRS.  M.  O'BRIEN, 
MISS  FLORENCE  GUPPY,   and   others. 


Departments  for  Beginners,  Amateurs  and  Professionals 


Pupils  received  at  all  times. 
SEND    FOR   CATALOGUE 


CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC  of  the 
UNIVERSITY  OF  THE  PACIFIC 

PIERRE  TIOUILLET.  T>ean.     SAN  JOSE.  CAL. 
The  oldest  Institution  on  the  Coast — complete  Musical  Education — Advan- 
tages ot  literary  studies  free  of  charge.     Board  and  room    at    moderate    prices 
Send  for  Catalogue. 

Notre  Dame  Conservatory  of  Music 

BOARDING  SCHOOL  FOR  GIRLS 


San    Jose 


California. 


OTARRELL  STREET 
Between  Stockton  and  Po 


ell 


New  Orpheum 

Safest  and  Most  Magnificent  Theatre  in  America. 
Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afetrnoon— MATINEE  EVERY  DAY 

ARTISTIC  VAUDEVILLE 

James   Young  and   Co.   in   the  one-act   College   Yell.   "When 
Love  is  Y'oung":   Mary  Norman  in  "Some  Types  of  Woman"; 
Ed   F.   Reynard.   The   Ventriloquist;    Pilu.   the    Mind    Reading 
Dog,  introduced  by  Sig.  D.  Ancillotti;  Big  City  Quartette;   Les 
Myosotis;   Henry  Clive;   New  Orpheum  Motion  Pictures.  Last 
Week  Edna  Aug,  the  Comedienne  in  "Types." 
Evenins  Prices:     lOc,  25c,  50c  and  75c.     Box  Seats  $1.00 
Matinee  Prices:     (Except  Sundays  and  Holidays)  lOc.  25c.  50c. 
PHONE  DOUGLAS  70 


Mrs.  Oscar  Mansfeldt 


Has  Removed  to  20  1  6  Buchanan  St.,  Bet.  Pine  and  California 

TELEPHONE  WEST  314 

MACKENZIE  GORDON 

TENOR 

T  O  9  P  h  O  P    n  f    Q  I  n  n  i  n  n      In  all  its  brancK»  from  the  rudiments  of  lone  (onnation   to 

I  Cdblltil     01    Oingiliy     .^^  highea    finish   «,d  completion  of  Public   Sin,in, 

ORATORIO— OPERA— CONCERT 


Studio:  2832  Jackson  St. 


By  Appointment  Only 


Telephone:  West  457  i 


JOSEPH  GREVEN 

Voice  Culture  for  Singing  and  Speaking 
Concert.  Oratorio  and  Opera  Repertoire 

Complete  Preparation  for  the  Operatic  Stage 

824  Eddy  St.,  near  Van  Ness.  Telephone  Franklin  367  1 


Joaquin  S.  Wanrell 


BASSO 
CANTANTE 

VOICE  CULTURE  AND  OPERATIC  TRAINING 

Perfedl  Tone  Placing  Italian  School 

Studio — 799  Van  Ness  Ave.,  between  Turk  and  Eddy  Sts. 

Take  Eddy  or  Turk  St.  Cars.  Telephone  Franklin  3432 

ADOLF  GREGORY 

Organist  and  Choir  Director  St.  Mary's,  Oakland 
Director  Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music 
VOICE  PRODUCTION,  PIANO.  HARMONY  AND  COMPOSITION. 

203-205  Twelfth  St.  Cor.  Jackson,  OAKLAND 

Von  Meyerinck  School  of  Music 

ESTABUSHED  1895 
UNDER  THE  DIRECTION  OF  MRS.  ANNA  VON  MEYERINCK 

Classes  in  French.  German.  Musical  Histor>'  and  Sight  Reading  in  progress.  Practice 
lessons  with  specially  coached  accompanists  may  be  arranged  for — also  by  non-students 
of  the  school.  Studio.  818  Grove  St.,  near  Fillmort.  Tel.  Park  1  069. 
In  Berkeley    Tuesday.  2521  Regent  St.       Tel.    Berkeley    3677.     Thursday  al  Snell 


Miss  Elizabeth  Westgate 

Organift  Firil    Presbyterian  Church 

Teacher  of  PIANO  and  ORGAN 


Studio :    1  1  1  7  Paru  St. 


Alameda,  California 


The  Beringer 


CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC. 

E^ablished  1896 
Under  the  direction  of  Prof,  and  Mme.  JOSEPH  BERINGER.  Complete 
Musical  Education — Piano,  Theory,  and  Composition;  Voice  (Italian  Method), 
Opera.  Concert,  Oratorio.  Free  advantages  to  students:  Harmony  Lectures, 
Concerts,  Ensemble  playing.  Sight  reading.  Faculty  of  distinguished  Instructors. 
Send  for  catalogue.      926  Pierce  street,   near  McAllister,   San  Francisco,  Cal. 

FREID   R.  J.   RAU 

Pacific  Coast  Agent  for 

HAWKES  &  SON 

London,  England 

High-Grade    Band   Instruments 

Bargains  in  Second-Hsmd  Instruments 
170  PAGE  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO  Phone  Market  5513 


San  Fraricisco  Coriservatory  of  Music 


Phone  WEST  5972 


E.  S.  BONELLI.  Director 


Cor.  PIERCE  and  CALIFORNIA  STS. 


This  institution  graduates  more  competent  and  successful  teachers  than  any   other  institution  of  its  kind    on  the   Pacific 
Coast.     Special  course  for  those  desiring  to  enter  the  professional  field.     FACULTY  OF  EFFICIENT  INSTRUCTORS. 


16 


r  A  ( ;  1  V  I  ( ;  c  o  a  a  t  m  u  s  i  (J  a  l  r  k  v  i  e  \v. 


MUSIC    IN   SAN  JOSE. 


By  Daisy  Goodman  Sherman. 

San  Jose,  Sept.  29,  1909. 
With  the  coming  of  autumn  the  musical  lite  of  the  Garden 
City  has  swung  back  into  its  accustomed  channels,  and  the 
coming  season  has  much  promise  for  music  lovers  and  stu- 
dents. The  choirs  of  the  various  churches  are  planning  much 
that  is  new  and  interesting,  and  of  artistic  value  to  San  Jose. 
The  private  studios  have  opened  with  full  lists,  not  to  speak 
of  the  larger  institutions,  such  as  Notre  Dame  and  the  Uni- 
versity of  the  Pacific,  which  have  such  an  army  of  new  stu- 
dents that  several  new  instructors  have  joined  the  ranks  of 
each  institution. 

The  Conservatory  of  Music  of  the  University  of  the  Pacific 
opened  its  season  August  24th.  The  number  of  students 
registered  is  greater  than  ever  before  in  the  history  of  the 
Conservatory,  especially  in  the  piano  department,  which  is 
under  the  able  direction  of  Professor  Pierre  Douillet.  In  ad- 
dition to  Professor  Douilet's  assistants,  Professor  Wilbur 
McColI  and  F.  Zimmermann.  the  services  of  Mrs.  Ida  S.  Fog- 
son  and  Mr.  Clarence  Urmy  have  been  engaged. 

Unusual  interest  is  shown  in  the  theoretical  studies  under 
Prof.  William  J.  McCoy,  wliose  classes  are  filled  with  earnest 
students  seeking  to  gain  knowledge  in  the  harmonic  and 
contrapuntal  devices  of  classic  music  and  composition.  No 
lesser  interest  is  shown  in  the  Solfeggio  classes  conducted  by 
Miss  Anna  Belle  Wythe. 

The  vocal  department  is  in  the  hands  of  Miss  Nella  Rogers 
and  Mrs.  Nitalia  Douillet,  the  wife  of  the  dean.  This  depart- 
ment is  so  full  that  another  instructor  will  be  added. 

Prof.  Nat.  J.  Landsberger,  the  noted  violinist  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, heads  the  violin  and  ensemble  playing  classes.  This 
is  his  first  season  at  the  Conservatory,  where  his  students  are 
very  enthusiastic  over  his  genius  as  a  teacher. 

The  chorus  class  of  almost  100  voices,  under  the  direction 
of  Dean  Douillet,  began  its  weekly  rehearsals,  and  promises 
to  give  a  choral  concert  in  the  near  future. 

Dean  Douillet  deserves  great  praise  for  his  untiring  efforts 
in  building  up  a  real  conservatory  of  music  in  the  State  of 
California. 

The  unusually  fine  work  done  by  the  students  of  Notre 
Dame  is  such  a  well  known  fact  that  further  mention  need 
hardly  be  made.  Music  students  who  have  graduated  from 
this  noble  institution  have  gone  forth  into  the  world  to  take 
their  places  as  sincere  and  competent  musicians. 

The  name  of  Carrie  Goebel-Weston,  a  graduate  from  the 
violin  department,  is  already  familiar  to  concert  goers  in  San 
Francisco.  Several  concerts  are  planned  for  the  near  future 
at  Notre  Dame.  Of  special  interest  will  be  the  "Chopin 
Contest,"  in  which  the  graduating  class  will  participate. 

Five  Chopin  etudes  will  be  played  by  each  member,  three 
etudes  out  of  the  five  being  given  alike  to  each  one  upon 
which  to  test  her  skill.  A  reward  will  be  given  to  the  suc- 
cessful contestant  as  a  fitting  symbol  of  artist  success.  The 
public  is  always  certain  to  find  a  sincere  and  gracious  wel- 
come at  the  concerts  at  Notre  Dame  College. 

The  San  Jose  Choral  Society  held  its  first  meeting  of  the 
fall  season  on  Monday  evening,  September  20th.  Interest  is 
keenly  alive,  and  there  is  no  doubt  but  that  this  society  will 
be  a  great  factor  in  the  future,  as  in  the  past,  in  the  educa- 
tional life  of  this  city.  The  aim  of  the  society  is  to  produce 
the  best  works  of  the  masters,  oratorios  as  well  as  lighter 
works.  Mr.  C.  J.  Cromarty  is  the  president  of  this  organiza- 
tion, and  Miss  Linda  Zink  is  the  accompanist.  Professor  G. 
C.  Buebrer,  who  has  charge  of  the  music  at  Stanford  Univer- 
sity, ably  directed  the  choral  last  season  to  its  final  success, 
where  the  members  joined  Prof.  Buehrer's  choral  at  Stanford 
in  giving  Rossini's  "Stabat  Mater"  with  the  Chicago  Sym- 
phony Orchestra.  Professor  Buehrer  will  direct  the  choral 
this  season.  Several  concerts  are  planned  for  San  Jose  dur- 
ing the  winter  months,  and  the  final  concert  for  the  season 
will  be  given  at  Stanford  again,  where  Prof.  Buehrer  expects 
to  give  "St.  Paul,"  with  Damrosch  and  the  New  York  Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

Mr.  Benj.  S.  Moore,  San  Jose's  leading  organist,  will  give 
bi-weekly  evening  recitals  at  the  First  Presbyterian  Church 
during  the  season.  It  is  with  much  pleasure  that  we  hear  of 
this,  for  the  Wednesday  afternon  recitals  given  last  winter  by 
Mr.  Moore  will  long  be  remembered  by  San  Jose  music  lovers. 

On  the  evening  of  Oct.  8th,  in  honor  of  the  sixteenth  anni- 
versary of  the  Presbyterian  Church,  where  Mr.  Moore  is  or- 
ganist, "Hiawaltha's  Wedding  Feast,"  by  S.  Coleridge  Taylor, 
the  negro  composer,  will  be  given  by  a  double  quartet.  The 
soloists  upon  that  occasion  will  be  Mr.  Chester  Herold,  tenor, 


and  Miss  Irene  Quilty,  soprano. 

The  position  of  organist  in  five  of  San  Jose's  churches  is 
supplied  by  Mr.  Moore's  organ  students.  He  has  also  a  large 
class  in  piano,  and  is  devoting  half  of  his  entire  time  to  his 
class  in  Berkeley,  where  he  is  teaching  both  organ  and  piano. 

Worthy  of  mention  is  the  San  Jose  Orchestral  Club,  under 
the  direction  of  Signor  N.  de  Gorenzo,  who  has  gathered  to- 
gether the  amateurs  as  well  as  professionals  in  an  organiza- 
tion which  is  a  great  factor  in  uplifting  the  musical  taste  of 
the  community.  The  organization  is  two  years  old,  and  is  at 
present  the  only  concert  orchestra  in  San  Jose.  Several  con- 
certs have  been  given  which  have  been  very  successful,  and 
Signor  de  Gorenzo  is  now  rehearsing  and  preparing  the  mem- 
bers for  the  coming  season's  concerts.  Miss  Grace  Barstow 
is  concert-master  and  enjoys  the  unique  distinction  of  being 
the  only  woman  violin  maker  in  the  world. 

Signor  de  Gorenzo  is  the  head  of  the  violin  department  at 
King's  Conservatory.  He  came  to  California  originally  with 
the  company  which  brought  Tettrazini  from  Mexico,  and  was 
a  member  of  the  Tivoli  orchestra  during  that  time.  He  is  a 
pupil  of  B.  Dvorak  and  a  graduate  of  the  Conservatory  of 
Naples. 

*       *       * 

Mr.  Chester  Herold,  who  posseses  a  tenor  voice  of  rare 
beauty,  has  charge  of  the  music  in  the  Christian  Science 
Church  of  San  Jose,  where  he  gives  a  solo  every  other  Sunday 
to  an  appreciative  audience.  Mr.  Herold  is  a  pupil  of  H.  B. 
Pasmore  and  is  well  known  in  San  Francisco,  where  he  sings 
frequently. 


-%%- 


At  three  o'clock  on  Tuesday.  September  28,  Mme.  Sofia 
Neustadt,  but  lately  permanently  in  Oakland,  will  give  a  song 
recital  at  Ebell  Club.  Mme.  Neustadt  often  precedes  her  pro- 
gram with  illuminating  comment  upon  the  works  prepared, 
and  will,  I  presume,  follow  this  course  on  Tuesday. 


MISS    ZDENKA     BUBEN 
A  Skillful  Young  Pianist  and  Member  of  the  Beringer  Musical 
Club. 


P  A  en  F  I  C    C  O  A  ST    MUSI  C  A  h    R  E  ^^  E  W 


17 


Tlie  l;u  t  tliat  nearly  all  iiianos  are  iiuicli  alike  in  ajiiiearance  is.  perhaps, 
tlie  reason   tliat  many  people  select  inferior  grades. 

Tliey  cannol  see  the  ditferenee  between  a  piano  of  doubtfnl  merit  and 
one  of  snperior  (jnality  \\hiih  costs  more. 

C'onseipiently  many  buyers  a<Tept  the  chiiuis  made  for  cheap  instrnments 
under  the  belief  that  they  are  saving  money  and  getting  pianos  (hat  will  give 
1he  same  kind  of  service  that  would  be  ubrained  from  higher  iiriccd  ones. 

The  principle  is  the  same  with  pianos  as  with  shoes,  clothing,  furniture 
or  any  other  merchandise — the  price  is  governed  most  largely  by  the  cost 
of  production.  The  better  the  workmanship  and  material,  and  the  longer 
the  time  required  to  produce  an  instrument,  the  greater  will  be  its  value 
and  the  higher  its  price.  No  dealer  can  sell  a  piano  for  less  than  its  value 
and  conduct  a  profitable  business. 

While  many  low-priced  pianos  are  worth  what  is  asked  for  them,  they 
sjiould  be  bought  wilJi  the  clear  understanding  that  they  are  not  eipial  in 
tone,  construction  or  service-giving  qualities  to  the  higher  grade  instruments 
sold  by  reliable  houses. 

One  advantage  in  buying  at  our  snlesi-ooms  lies  in  the  fact  that  we 
classify  onr  pianos  and  show  ]iros]iecti\'e  jnircliasei-s  just  why  one  is  better 
than  another,  and,  conse(iuently,  higher  priced. 

We  have  eliminated  guess\v<irk  from   the  |irohlem  of  piano  buying. 


Ar/V>^i3^      A>/>l/VO^ 


Wiley  B.  Allen  Building 


135-153  Kearney  and  217-225  Sutter  Sts. 


Oakland — 5 1 0  Twelfth  and  1105  Washington.     Other  Stores — Los  Angeles,  Sacra- 
mento, San  Jose,  San  Diego,  Stockton ;  Phoenix,  Ariz. ;  Reno,  Nev. ;  Portland,  Ore. 


IS 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    ]{  E  V  I  K  W. 


Los  Angeles  and  Southern  California 

Office,   1419  South  Grand   Avenue 

Broadway  3923— Telephones— Home  B572I 
HEINRICH  VON  STEIN,  in  ch.rgt. 

Pkase  address  all  communications  resarding  ihis  d^parlmfnt  to  the  Los  AnjeVs  office. 


Single  copies  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  can  be 
had  at  the  Wiley  B.  Allen  Co.,  Broadway,  between  Fourth  and 
Fifth    streets,    Los    Angeles. 


THE  WEEK    IN    LOS  ANGELES. 


By   Helnrich   von   Stein. 

They  say  that  nothing  is  sure  on  this  earth  except  death 
and  taxes;  here  in  Los  Angeles  another  sure  thing  cropped 
up  some  tew  years  ago.  to  return  with  death  and  tax-like  pre- 
cision every  year,  and  that  is  the  war-cry  for  a  "Grand  Music 
Festival"  in  Los  Angeles. 

This  year  is  no  exception,  they  are  at  it  again,  growing 
more  and  more  enthusiastic  every  minute,  and  it  looks  (so 
far)  as  if  this  year  the  festival-bubble  is  not  going  to  be  pin- 
pricked  at  the  crucial  moment,  because  of  the  fact  that  the 
Gamut  Club  appears  to  have  taken  hold  of  the  project,  which 
in  itself  is  some  guarantee,  that  a  certain  amount  of  good, 
common  sense  is  to  be  used  as  the  basis  for  future  action. 
True,  the  usual  music  committees,  consisting  of  nearly  every 
inhabitant  of  Los  Angeles,  have  already  been  formed,  equally 
true,  that  so  large  a  number  of  cooks  threaten — as  of  yore — 
to  spoil  the  broth,  yet  this  time  the  Gamut  Club,  with  diplo- 
matic suavity,  is  at  the  bottom  of  things,  and  close  at  hand  to 
pacify  those,  whose  ire  has  been  aroused  through  some 
imaginary  slight.  It's  not  going  to  be  all  honey  and  heaven- 
ly harmony,  many  a  choral  director  will  yet  swear  upon  his 
solemn  oath — before  the  first  ticket-purchaser  passes  the 
turnstile — that  some  sinister  combination  of  musical  forces 
has  robbed  him  of  leadership  in  the  festival  (that  is  to  be), 
and  perhaps  the  lucky  or  unlucky  one.  whose  brow  is  to  be 
adorned  with  the  equivalent  of  a  crown  of  thorns,  leadership 
over  the  musical  bodies,  will  yet  wish  that  he  had  given  his 
family  opportunity  to  collect  his  life  insurance  before  the  an- 
nual music  festival  baccillus  had  infested  the  community.  If 
it  is  at  all  possible,  that  warring  musical  factions  can  be  or- 
ganized into  a  comprehensive  whole,  the  Gamut  Club  seems 
to  me  the  only  organization  which  can  wield  the  inevitable 
"big  stick"  in  able  fashion.  A  great  success  can  be  made  of 
such  music  festival,  this  much  has  been  proven  by  San  Fran- 
cisco last  season. 

Wenzel  Kopta  has  come  back  to  us  from  Bohemia,  this 
time  to  stay.  This  is  very  good  news  indeed  for  Los  An- 
geles, because  artists  of  his  type  do  not  wander  into  Cali- 
fornia every  day.  much  less  are  they  inclined  to  stay  here. 
Mr.  Kopta  has  sold  all,  or  nearly  all.  of  his  immense  Bo- 
hemian estate,  and  there  is  now  nothing  to  take  him  away 
from  us  again.  He  will  be  heard  in  concert  this  season,  the 
first  of  which  has  already  been  announced  for  November  at 
Simpson's  Auditorium.  On  this  occasion  we  will  hear  hira 
play  the  Beethoven  concerto  and  Mendelssohn's  immortal 
concerto  for  the  violin.  Besides  his  activities  as  soloist  (Mr. 
Kopta  has  been  secured  as  artist-teacher  by  a  local  college  of 
music)  he  will  devote  part  of  his  time  to  such  students,  who 
show  enough  talent,  ambition  and  advancement  for  solo  play- 
ing. 

Other  musicians  who  are  going  to  be  heard  in  different 
parts  of  Southern  California  this  coming  season  are  Ignaz 
Haroldi.  Lottie  Buisseret.  George  Kruger  and  Mrs.  Mary  Le 
(Jrand  Reed. 

Miss  Margaret  Goetz  has  removed  from  her  bungalow  to  a 
larger  house  nearer  down  town  for  greater  convenience  of 
her  pupils  and  church  work,  719  Ottawa  street,  near  Figueroa 
and  Eleventh  street.  Among  her  artist  pupils  this  summer 
was  Miss  Angela  O'Byrne,  a  native  of  Savannah,  Ga.,  who 
will  spend  winter  at  Tucson,  giving  three  historical  song  re- 
citals, coached  with  Miss  Goetz.  Miss  O'Byrne  has  studied 
with  Bouhy  in  Paris,  Henschel,  London  and  prominent  among 
her  American  teachers  is  Frederick  Root.  Miss  Goetz's  first 
teacher.  In  addition  to  vocal  training,  Miss  Goetz  will  this 
year  have  a  class  in  the  history  of  music,  given  free  to  her 
regular  pupils. 

*       «       « 

Miss  Flora  Wilson,  daughter  of  the  Secretary  of  Agriculture. 
Washington,  D.  C,  will  be  heard  in  concert  in  this  city  some 
time  during  the  month  of  October.  Miss  Adela  Case  is  also 
scheduled  for  a  recital  early  in  the  month,  and  Anna  Miller 
Wood  is  to  give  at  least  one  program  about  October  15th,  and 


will  tr)ur  St)utlu'i-n  California,  singing  before  a  number  of  the 
ladies'  clubs. 

The  work  of  the  Los  Angeles  Symphr^ny  Orchestra  has  been 
sketched  out  by  Director  Hamilton  and  the  program  numbers 
have  been  arranged.  Mme.  .Jeanne  .iomelli  will  be  our  first 
soloist  on  Friday  afternoon,  November  12th,  and  George 
Hamlin,  tenor,  the  second  one  on  Friday,  December  10th.  We 
think  we  are  indeed  fortunate  to  secure  these  artists  so  early 
in  the  season,  and  it  will  undoubtedly  help  our  symphony 
situation  very  much  and  enhance  the  value  of  the  season 
tickets.  Our  prices  will  remain  for  the  year  the  same  as  here- 
tofore. The  membership  of  our  orchestra  will  be  seventy- 
seven,  and  Mr.  Hamilton  promises  some  very  excellent  num- 
bers and  new  compositions. 


The  Music  Study  Club  of  Santa  Barbara  has  taken  for  their 
recital  artists  this  year,  Mme.  Jeanne  Jomelli,  George  Hamlin, 
Mme.  Schumann-Heink  and  Fritz  Kreisler.  The  Amphion 
Club  of  San  Diego  has  engaged  Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner,  Mme. 
.Jomelli,  George  Hamlin,  Mme.  Schumann-Heink,  Mme.  Teresa 
Carreno,  Fritz  Kreisler  and   Mme.   Sembrich. 


The  Tuesday  Music  Club  of  Riverside  has  selected  George 
Hamlin,  Mme.  Schumann-Heink.  Mme.  Carreno  and  Mme. 
.Iomelli.  The  Fresno  Saturday  Music  Club  will  hear  George 
Hamlin.  Mme.  Jomelli  and  Fritz  Kreisler.  The  Spinet  Club 
of  Redlands  has  secured  Mme.  Sembrich.  Fritz  Kreisler  and 
the  Damrosch  Orchestra.  Claremont  College  has  taken 
George  Hamlin  and  Mme.  F  rieda  Langendorff. 
V* 


All  through  the  southwest  people  are  demanding  a  higher 
grade  of  artists,  and  more  artistic  programs,  and  are  figuring 
on  an  addition  to  the  music  interests  in  the  public  schools,  all 
of  which  is  educational,  and  will  work  out  in  a  most  excellent 
manner  many  of  the  problems  that  now  confront  both  the 
local  as  well  as  the  eastern  managers. 


THE     PHILLIPINES     CONSTABULARY     BAND. 

It  will  be  welcome  news  to  all  music-lovers  that  the  Phil- 
lippines  Constabulary  Band,  which  was  received  with  such 
enthusiasm  when  they  played  here  last  February  when  on 
their  way  to  the  inaugaration  of  President  Taft,  will  give  four 
concerts  in  the  Dreamland  Rink  before  sailing  for  Manila 
next  Tuseday.  Since  the  inaugaration  they  have  been  playing 
with  great  success  in  the  principal  cities  of  the  East,  filling 
such  edifices  as  the  Denver  Auditorium,  the  Boston  Smyphony 
Hall,  and  the  New  York  Hippodrome,  and  delighting  thous- 
ands not  only  with  their  rendering  of  Spanish  and  Filipino 
airs,  but  with  their  execution  of  the  most  difficult  classical 
music.  Their  conductor.  Captain  Walter  Howard  Loving,  has 
been  hailed  as  one  of  the  greatest  teachers  and  leaders  in  the 
country,  and  his  achievement  with  men  many  whom  seven 
years  ago  had  never  seen  the  instruments  on  which  they  now 
play  as  masters  has  been  pronounced  little  short  of  marvel- 
ous. The  band  will  give  concerts  in  the  Dreamland  Rink  on 
Sunday.  October  3rd,  and  Monday.  October  4th.  at  3:30  and 
8:15.  For  the  Monday  matinee,  at  which  popular  prices  will 
prevail,  a  novelty  is  promised  in  that  the  first  part  of  the 
programme  will  be  given  by  the  organization  as  a  brass  band 
and  the  second  part  by  the  same  players  acting  as  a  smy- 
phony orchestra. 

Have  You  Heard  the  New  Victor 


Arral 


RECORDS? 
"Bird  Waltz" 
"Traviata" 
"Beggar  Student" 
"El  Bolero  Grande" 
Nightingale  Song  from 
Les  Noces  de  Jeanette" 


The  Great  Coloratura  Soprano 


Von  Stein  Academy  for  Pianists,  Inc. 

15  th  St.  and  Grand  Avenue,  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 
HEINRICH  VON  STEIN,  President 

CstablisKea   1005 


r  A  c  T  F  I  r  CO  A  s  T  .^[  r  s  r  c  a  l  r  e ^'  i  e v,' 


m 


Overland 
Limited 


CROSSES 

High  Sierra 
Great  Salt  Lake 

BY  DAYLIGHT 
Chicago  in  Three  Days 

Electric  Lighted.  Fast  Flying,  Cross-Countr>'  Train. 
Luxuriously  Equipped.  Pullman.  Drawing  Room, 
Stateroom.  Vestibuled  Sleeping  Cars. 

Careful     and     attentive     dining     service.         Parlor 
observation     car    with     library    and    cafe.    Ladies 
Reading  Room.  Gentlemen's  Smoking  Room. 
Daily  News  Bulletins.  Latest  Papers  and  Magazines. 

Southern  Pacific 

TICKET  OFFICES 

Flood  Building  Market  St.  Ferry  Depot 

13th  and  Franklin  Sts.,  Oakland 


Studii 


Abraham   Miller 

TENOR— TEACHER   OF   SINGING 
CONCERT— RECITAL— ORATORIO 

Address  L.  E.  Bch>-iner.  Manager 
342-343    Blanchard   Hall  Building,  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


Member  of 


Faculty  of  the  Conservatorv  of  Music  of  the  University  of  Southern  California 

Harley  Hamilton  o?c\ttJa-wot?n'rorch"lst'^r'' 

\10L1N  INSTRUCTOR 


320  Blanchard  Hall  Building. 


Los  Angeles.  Cal. 


Charles  E.  Pemberton  vioiin  instructor 

Harmony  and    Counterpoint 

Studio:   306-307  Blanchard  Hail  Building Los  .Angeles.  Cal. 

TENOR— VOICE  CULTUFIE  and 
THE  ART  OF  SINGING 
Director:  Ellis  Club.  Temple  Baptist  Choir,  Woman's  Lyric  Club 
Studio:  316-319  Blanchard  Building. Los  Angeles  Cal. 


J.  B.  Poulin 


J.  P.  Dupuy 


TENOR— VOICE  Dlf^CTOR 


Direaor  Orpheus  Male  Club.  Bnar  Brilh  Choir.  Trinity  M.  E.  Church  Choir 
^  .   .\I.  C.  A.  Vocal  Department    and  Euterpean  .Male  Quarlette 
Studio:   3  I  I   Blanchard  Building. Los  Angeles.  Cal. 

William  Edson  Strobridge  ^i^^ 

Room  335  Blanchard  Building  Los  Angeles.  Cal. 


Margaret  Goetz  ^ 


ezzo  Contralto 


Historical  Song  Recitals,  Concerts  and  Musicales 

719  Ottowa  St.  near  10th  and  Figueroa  Los  Angeles.  California 

Estelle  Heartt  Dreyf uss  c»°f^'*» 

CONCERT- PURPOSE  PROGRAM  RECITALS-ORATORIO 
Studio:      Blanchard  Hall  Bmlding Los  Angeles.  Cal. 

Adolf     WillhartitZ  Teacher    of    Piano 

332  So.  Broadway  Los  Angeles 


The  Great 

Bach  Festival 


Spring,  1910 

St.  Matthew's  Passion  and 
B  Minor  Mass 

Under  the  Direction  of 

Dr.  J.  Fred  Wolle, 

Founder  of  the  Bach  Festival  in  America 

An  Orchestra  of  Sixty 
A  Chorus  of  Two  Hundred  and  Fifty 
A  Children's  Choir  of  Five  Hundred 
Soloists    of     the    Highest   Standing 

Associate  Member  Five  Dollars  a  Year, 
Including  Two  Tickets  for  Each  Concert 
Active  Members  No  Dues  and  No  Init- 
iation Fee.  :::::: 

NOTICE  TO  SINGERS 

Rehearsals  for  the  great  Bach  Fe^ival 
are  taking  place  every  Monday  evening 
at  Christian  Church,  Corner  Dana  Street 
and  Bancroft  Way,  in  Berkeley,  and  any- 
one sufficiently  intere^ed  in  the  works  of 
Johann  Sebastian  Bach  to  study  the  same 
thoroughly  and  participate  m  an  Annual 
Festival,  given  in  his  honor,  and  for  the 
purpose  of  permanently  establishing  the 
worth  of  his  great  Music  in  California, 
are  invited  to  become  members  of  the 
Bach  Choir.  Address  Miss  Lillian  D. 
Clark,  Secretary  of  the  Bach  Choir, 
1  522  Spruce  Street.  Berkeley,  Cal. 
Phone  Berkeley  3264. 


IF  THERE  ARE  SUFFICIENT  APPLICATIONS 
FOR  MEMBERSHIP  FROM  OAKLAND  AND 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  REHEARSALS  WILL  BE 
HELD  IN  BOTH  CITIES  EVERY  WEEK. 


20 


r  A  CI  F  I  C  C  O  A  S  T  M  U  W  1  C  A  I>  K  !•:  \'  I  !•:  W. 


IN  THE  REALM  OF  THE  THEATRE 


Edited  by  JOSEPH  M.  GUMMING 


FOR   STORY   READERS. 

To  those  who  like  to  read  novels  from  which  plays  have 
been  dramatized  the  following  will  be  of  interest.  "The  Great 
John  Ganton."  which  comes  to  the  Valencia  soon,  is  a 
dramatization  of  "Ganton  and  Co.."  a  Chicago  business  story 
by  Arthur  Jerome  Eddy;  "The  Man  on  the  Box"  is  from  Har- 
old McGrath's  popular  story  of  the  same  name. 

This  present  season  in  New  York  will  see  quite  a  few  plays 
founded  on  novels,  some  of  which  will  doubtless  be  seen  here. 
Among  them  are  "Arsene  Lupin,"  from  "The  Exploits  of 
Asene  Lupin,"  the  thief  posing  as  a  detective,  by  Maurice  Le 
Blanc:  Margaret  Anglln  will  present  the  dramatization  of 
"The  Awakening  of  Helena  Richie,"  by  Margaret  Deland. 
Viola  Allen  will  be  seen  In  "The  White  Sister,"  from  Marion 
Crawford's  novel:  George  Arliss  will  have  "Septimus,"  from 
W.  J.  Locke's  novel,  "Simple  Septimus";  Kate  Douglass  Wig- 
gins charming  story,  "Rebecca  of  Sunnybrook  Farm,"  will  be 
dramatized,  as  will  "The  Inner  Shrine,"  published  anonymous- 
ly: Meredith  Nicholson's  "Little  Brown  Jug  at  Kildare,"  and 
Rex  Bleach's  story  of  the  North,  "The  Barrier." 

For  a  good  short  story  of  one  phase  of  stage  experience 
read  "The  Great  Scene  of  Act  Two"  in  the  September  "Cen- 
tury." This  amusing  story  by  Edward  Townsend  ("Chimmie 
Fadden")  tells  about  an  author  who  has  his  play  accepted 
largely  on  account  of  his  great  scene  in  act  two  and  what 
happens  to  it  when  a  practical  stage  manager  puts  it  into 
rehearsal. 

"Kicking  Out  the  Great  American  Drama,"  by  a  Professional 
Play-Reader,  in  the  September  Munsey's,  is  a  good  thing  for 
aspiring  playwrights  to  read.  If  most  of  the  plays  submitted 
are  as  fierce  as  those  he  quotes  no  wonder  so  few  are  ac- 
cepted. 

In  July's  "Current  Literature"  will  be  found  a  lengthy  ar- 
ticle descriptive  of  "The  Man  from  Mississippi,"  with  many 
extracts  from  the  dialogue. 

V* 


THE  NEW  THEATRE. 


The  most  important  event  in  the  theatrical  year  will  he  the 
opening  of  the  New  Theatre  in  New  York  on  November  8 
next.  The  building  and  land  represents  an  investment  of 
several  million  dollars,  and  there  is  a  guarantee  fund  sub- 
scribed to  by  a  number  of  wealthy  people.  The  intention  is 
to  have  a  specially  selected  company  of  players,  none  of  whom 
are  to  be  featured  or  starred — the  aim  will  be  rather  to  have 
a  working  stock  company  which  will  present  the  plays  with 
every  part  acted  to  give  the  production  its  fullest  artistic 
effect — a  company,  if  old-timers  are  to  be  believed,  such  as 
this  city  supported  in  the  early  seventies  at  the  old  California 
Theatre.  This  venture  is  treated  with  derision  by  many  and 
looked  on  by  others  as  a  place  where  the  high-brow  library 
(  ?)  drama  will  have  its  long  denied  chance,  but  the  announce- 
ment of  opening  plays  seems  to  indicate  that  the  projectors 
are  not  mere  enthusiastic  dreamers,  but  men  of  practical  ex- 
perience. 

The  opening  play  will  be  Shakespeare's  "Antony  and  Cleo- 
patra," in  w-hich  E.  H.  Sothern  and  Julia  Marlowe  will  ap- 
pear. It  is  the  intention  to  avoid  long  continuous  runs  of  sin- 
gle plays  and  a  few  days  later  a  new  play,  "The  Cottage  in 
the  Air,"  a  fantastic  comedy  by  Edward  Knoblauch,  will  be 
produced.  Following,  there  will  be  given  "The  Nigger,"  a  new 
play  of  the  South  by  Edward  Sheldon,  author  of  "Salvation 
Nell,"  "Strife,"  a  treatment  of  the  struggle  between  Capital 
and  Labor,  by  John  Galsworthy,  and  already  a  London  success, 
and  "The  School  for  Scandal." 

No  matter  how  brief  is  its  career  or  how  disastrous  the 
venture  results  financially,  it  can  not  help  having  a  powerful 
influence  in  uplifting  the  art  of  the  stage.  Let  us  hope  for 
its  success  and  continuance  as  long  as  it  fulfills  its  mission. 
Included  in  the  company  are  Thais  Lawton.  formerly  of  the 
Alcazar,  and  our  old  frienj,  George  Osbourne. 
w 


"The  Melting  Pot,"  Israel  ZangwiU's  play,  has  just  been 
issued  in  book  form.  The  main  character  is  David  Quixans. 
an  Americanized  Russian  Jew,  a  musician  and  a  dreamer,  all 
on  fire  with  his  dream  of  America  as  "The  Melting  Pot,"  in 
which  all  the  races  will  be  melted  together  and  in  which  all 
the  antagonisms  and  prejudices  of  the  centuries  will  dis- 
appear. 


The  book  will  well  repay  reading,  but  considered  as  a  play. 
my  impression  is  that  of  \lan  Dale,  "It  is  the  work  of  a  lit- 
erary rather  than  a  dramatic  man."  I  have  seen  an  inter- 
esting "ad"  of  the  play  in  a  New  York  paper — it  takes  a  dou- 
ble column  and  in  one  column  are  the  favorable  comments 
of  many  critics  and  numerous  prominent  citizens,  and  in  the 
other  column  the  condemnation  of  five  New  York  critics,  and 
the  rest  of  the  column  blank;  at  the  top  is  the  question, 
"Which  do  you  believe?" 

"The  Melting  Pot"  has  not  a  monopoly  of  the  race  preju- 
dice idea  by  any  means.  One  promised  production  is  "Israel," 
by  Henry  Bernstein,  already  played  in  Paris,  in  which  a 
young  man  who  is  extra  violent,  even  for  an  anti-Semite,  pro- 
vokes a  Jewish  gentleman  so  that  a  duel  is  inevitable  when 
he  learns  that  the  man  is  really  his  own  father. 

Still  another  now  playing  in  New  York  is  "The  House  Next 
Door,"  which,  on  account  of  the  playing  of  J.  E.  Dodson  in  the 
part  of  the  poor,  but  proui.  English  baronet,  and  on  account 
of  its  more  intimate  and  appealing  story,  seems  to  be  more 
popular.  Next  door  to  the  baronet  lives  a  wealthy  Jewish 
family,  and  the  son  and  daughter  of  one  family  are  in  love 
with  the  daughter  and  son  in  the  other. 

The  eyes  of  the  theatrical  world  about  this  time  each  year 
are  turned  toward  New  Y'ork,  tor  this  is  about  when  the  new 
season  opens  and  the  suspense  of  guessing  results  is  ended. 
One  noticeable  thing  about  the  season  this  year  is  the  large 
number  of  plays  that  continue  over  from  last  season  or  play 
return  engagements.  "Paid  in  Full"  came  back  for  a  short 
engagement,  and  so  did  Marie  Doro  in  "The  Morals  of  Mar- 
cus." Among  the  plays  that  continue  over  from  last  season 
are,  "The  Man  from  Home.  "  "The  Man  from  Mississippi." 
"The  Easiest  Way,  "  "The  House  Next  Door,"  "The  Climax," 
"Havana,"  and  "The  Third   Degree." 

Pinero's  new  play,  "Mid-Channel,"  in  which  Ethel  Barry- 
more  is  to  appear  in  this  country,  has  recently  been  pro- 
duced in  London.  The  title  has  reference  to  the  rough  and 
stormy  passage  over  the  critical  time  that  comes  in  many 
marriages,  and  it  has  a  tragic  ending  of  the  same  nature  as 
his   "Second    Mrs.   Tanqueray." 

v% 


THE  WEEK'S  ORPHEUM    BILL. 


Henry    Clive's    Burlesque    Sleight-of-Hand    and    Tom    Waters' 
Act  at  the   Piano  the   Best   Numbers. 

While  the  new  acts  at  the  Orpheum  this  week  are  much 
the  stronger  half  of  the  bill,  the  general  average  is  not  up 
to  the  Orpheum's  topmost.  That's  the  trouble  with  being 
educated  up  to  expecting  the  very  best — the  Orpheum  has 
about  spoiled  us  for  putting  up  with  the  merely  ordinary  or 
the  even  very  good. 

Easily  the  best  of  the  new  acts  is  the  number  presented 
by  Mr.  Henry  Clive  designated  as  a  "Smart  Entertainer."  He 
begins  with  a  few  clever  pslming  tricks,  just  enough  to  make 
you  believe  it  is  to  be  one  of  the  usual  sleight-of-hand  per- 
formances, and  then  he  goes  on  with  all  kinds  of  "phony" 
tricks,  some  of  them  far  from  new,  but  all  of  them  done  in 
a  very  amusing  manner;  he  keeps  you  guessing  as  to  how  he 
is  going  to  fool  you,  and  his  running  comments  are  very 
funny. 

Then  come  "Les  Myositis."  a  French  article  to  an  apparent- 
ly Italian  name  and  designating  two  lady  dancers  from  a 
German  theatre:  one  of  them  at  first  is  in  the  usual  ballet 
costume  and  does  some  clever  whirling  on  his  toes;  later 
they  dance  the  "Old  Vienna  Waltz"  in  fancy  costume.  They 
are  both  experts  in  their  art  and  are  very  graceful. 

The  Big  City  Quartet  has  all  four  good  singers,  whose 
voices  blend  very  nicely;  there  is  a  sweet-voiced  tenor  and  a 
good  rumbling  bass.  They  sing  a  mixed  program,  running 
from  "My  Rosary"  to  "Don't  Take  Me  Home." 

Miss  Edna  Aug,  the  comedienne  in  "Types."  is  the  last  of 
the  new  numbers.  She  is  pretty  and  dainty  as  the  show  girl, 
not  very  funny  as  Lena,  the  servant  girl,  and  very  good  in 
her  imitation  of  a  singer  on  amateur  night. 

Of  the  hold-overs,  Tom  Waters  and  his  bewildering  mix-up 
of  monologue,  pianologue  and  danceologue  is  far  and  away 
the  best. 

(Continued  on  Page  22) 


PACMFIC    (.'()A8T    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


21 


t 


Mrs.  Grace  Davis   Northrup 

Soprano  Soloist  First  Congregational  Church,  Oakland 
Concert,    Oratorio   and  Recital  Programs 

TEACHER    OF    SINGING 

Residence  Studio: 
I  333  Bay  View  Place.  Berkeley.  Phone  Berkeley  958 

Oakland  Studio:  65  MacDonough  BIdg.     Tuesday  and  Friday 

ROINIEO  FRICK 

BARYTONE 

Vocal  Inslruiftion  After  Foremofl  European  Methods 

30-31  Canning  Block,  13th  and  Broadway,  Oakland 

Phone  Oak  6454  Phone  Home  a  I  468 


5" 


Paul  Steindorffy 

.StutJio,  2422  STUART  STREE] 
Berkeley,  California 


Mrs.  'William  Steinbach 

VOICE  CULTURE 

STUDIO:    1 528  Broderick  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


H.   D.    MUSkTARip 

Baritone 

Voice  Culture  in  All  its  Branches 

Opera — Oratorio— Concert  1 

Studio,   1548  Haight  St.  Phone  Park  4 1 1 7  j 

HERMAN   PERLET 

Voice  Culture  and  Piano 

Studio:    1451    Franklin  St.  Phone  Franklin  634 

Mrs.  IValter  AVitliam 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 


1380  Sutter  Street 


San  Francisco,  Cal. 


Miss  Helen  Colburn  Heath 

SOPRANO 

Vocal  Instruction,  Concert  Work 
Phone  West  4890  1 304  Ellis  Street 


Wenceslao    Villsilpa  nd  o 
Violoncellist 

Concerts,  Musicales,  Ensemble  and  Inflrudion 
Tel.  Park  5329.  .STUDIO:  746  CLAYTON  ST. 


DELIA    £.    GRISAVOLD 

Contralto 

VOICE   CULTURE 
Phone  Park   1614  Res.  Studio,  845  Oak  St. 


FREDERICK    MAURER,    JR. 

Accompanist 

Teacher  of  Piano- Harmony-Coaching-Singers-Violinifls 
Mondays.  I  32 1  Suiter  St.  San  Francisco.     Tel.  Franklin  2  1 43 
Home  Studio,  1726  LeRoy  Ave.  Berkeley.  Tel.  Berkeley  539 


IMPORTANT    ANNOUNCEMENT. 


Beginning  with  the  issue  of  October 
2,  1909,  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Re- 
view will  be  increased  to  24  pages, 
which  size  will  occasionally  be  aug- 
mented to  32  pages...  This  will  enable 
the  management  to  add  several  new 
departments.  The  theatrical  depart- 
ment will  occupy  two  full  pages,  and 
will  contain  straightforward,  unbiased 
and  honest  reviews  of  every  theatri- 
cal performance  of  merit  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. These  critical  opinions,  which 
will  not  be  controlled  by  the  business 
office,  will  serve  as  a  guide  to  our 
readers  in  Oakland,  Los  Angeles, 
Portland  and  Seattle,  and  all  interior 
cities  of  the  Pacific  Coast,  in  case 
these  cities  should  be  visited  by  com- 
panies first  appearing  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

Besides  this  reliable  theatrical  de- 
partment, the  Pacific  Coast  Musical 
Review  will  contain  a  page  of  late 
European  news,  and  a  page  of  the 
most  important  musical  news  from 
leading  Eastern  musical  centers.  The 
Los  Angeles,  Oakland,  Berkeley  and 
Alameda  departments  will  be  continu- 
ed as  usual,  while  more  attention  will 
be  paid  next  season  to  Portland  and 
Seattle.  Additional  features  of  the  in- 
creased edition  will  be  announced 
later. 

In  the  24-page  issue  advertising 
pages  will  be  limited  to  12  pages,  and 
anyon  applying  for  space  after  these 
12  pages  are  filled  must  wait  until  a 
vacancy  occurs.  Special  advertising 
rates  can  only  be  secured  by  those 
who  keep  their  advertisement  in  these 
coluiTins  during  the  entire  year.  Those 
who  desire  to  withdraw  their  adver- 
tisement during  the  two  summer 
months  must  consent  to  pay  a  higher 
rate.  Rates  on  this  page  will  be  IN 
CASE  OF  ANNUAL  CONTRACTS: 
One  inch,  $1.00;  one-half  inch,  50c, 
and  "Musical  Directory,"  25  cents  per 
issue.  We  are  desirous  of  securing  as 
many  ANNUAL  ADVERTISERS  ns 
possible,  and  hence  will,  during  the 
course  of  a  year,  give  such  annual  ad- 
vertisers repeated  use  of  the  reading 
columns  or  the  front  page.  Those 
who  do  not  advertise  at  all  will  not 
be  entitled  to  advance  notices  for  con- 
certs, insertions  of  pictures,  or  other 
advertising  matter.  They  will  only  re- 
ceive a  notice  after  a  concert. 


William  Hofmann 

Musical  Director  Fairmont  Hotel 


MRS.   A.    F.    BRIDGE 

XeacHer  of  Sii\^ii\^ 

Tel.  West  727'*  2220  Webster  St..  San  Franc 


Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks 

Voice  Culture 

Residence  and  Studio,  265  Parnassus  Ave. 
Telephone,  Park  4190  San  Francisco;  Cal. 


Alfred  Cogswell 

studio:  1531  Sutter,  San  Francisco,  on  loclday 
and  Friday,  and  at  21iq  Durant  St., 
Berkeley,  on  Monday,  Thursday  and  Saturday 


MRS.  OLIVE  ORBISON 

Dramatic    Soprano 

Voice  Culture  Concert  and  Oratorio 

2240  California  St.  — Phone  West  665'i 


Mrs.  Thorougtnan 

Voice  Culture — Dramatic  iSoprano 

CONCERT— ORATORIO— OPERA 

Studio:  Room  109.  91  5  Van  Ness  Ave.      Tel.  Franklin  5254 


MRS.  M.  TROMBONI 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 

Studio,   1531   SUTTER  ST.,  Mondays  and  Thursdays.     At 
Mill  Valley,  Keystone  Building,  Tuesday,  Wednesday,  Friday 


Mrs.    Olive   Reed   Cushman 

VOICE  CULTURE 

Studio,  Maple  Hall.  14th  and  Webster  Sts..  OaUand. 
Tuesday  and   Friday  Phone  Oakland   3453 


EDNA    MURRAY 

Piai\iste 

Concerts  Recitals  Lessons 

Address:     .     .     .     Ross.  Marin  County,  Californi: 


LOUIS  CRE.PAUX 

iMemher  Paris  Grand  Opera) 
Delbert  Block.  943  Van  Ness  at  OTarrell.    Reception  Hou 
I  1:30  to  12,  and  3  to  4  except  Wednesday  and  Saturday. 
Wednesday  in  Oakland.  I  I  54  Brush  Street 


BENJ.  S  MOORE 

(Pianist  and  Teacher     Organist  of  First  Presbyterian  Church) 

Studio:      Rooms  22-23  Alliance  Building.  San  Jose.  California. 

Phone  Brown  316 


Musical    Directory 

PIANO 


SIGISMONDO  MARTINEZ 
1321  Sutter  St.  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


EULA  HOWARD 
239  4th  Avenue  Telephone  Pacific  214 


MISS   ELLA   LAWRIE 
1 088  Fulton  St.,  S.  F.         Phone  West  IXn 


ARTHUR   FICKENSCHER 
1960  Summit  St,  Oakland.     Tel.  Oak.  4206 


MRS.  ALICE  MASON   BARNETT 
129S  Haight  Street  Phone  Park  5831 


MRS.   RICHARD  REES 
817  Grove  Street  Phone  Park  5175 


MISS  CAROLYNE  HALSTEAD  LITTLE 
3621  Bd'way.,Oak.   Phone  Piedmont  1390 


MRS.   ARTHUR  FICKENSCHER 
1960  Summit  St..  Oakland.     Tel.  Oak.  4206 


PROF.  T.  D.  HERZOG 
1813  Ellis  St.  San  Francisco 


MANDOLIN,  LUTE  and  GUITAR 


SAMUEL  ADELSTEIN 
1834  Baker  Street  San  Francisco 


OLD  VIOUNS  and  BOWS 


GEO.   HUNTINGTON 
3366  Sacramento  St.      San  Francisco,  Cal. 


-Have     You     Seen     the     New- 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON  PIANO? 


It  Appeals  Especially  to  Teachers  and  Students 
It  contains  Elegance,  Durability  and   Moderate  Price. 


1^>ENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON 


Kearny  St.  Near  Po^ 

San  Francisco,  Cal. 


1'  A  ( "  I  F  I  C    C  O  A  S  T    -M  f  t  S  I  C  A  L    K  K  Y  I  K  W 


(Conrinufd  From  Paje  20) 

Those  interesting  relics  of  a  bygone  age,  Messrs.  Murray 
and  Mack,  will  be  oft"  the  program  after  this  week.  Yes.  sir, 
some  people  actually  laugh  at  them.  No.  1  deny  that  they 
are  the  worst  ever  seen  on  the  Orpheum ;  I  remember  a  rag- 
time piano  player  a  few  months  ago  who  actually  beat  them 
for  worseness. 

Next  week's  announcement  is  as  follows:  James  Young, 
assisted  by  Lorayne  Osborne  and  Robert  Strauss,  will  present 
a  one-act  college  play  called  "When  Love  is  Young,"  which  is 
said  to  be  a  condensed  version  of  Rita  ,Johnson  Young's  com- 
edy, "Brown  of  Harvard."  Mr.  Young  has  been  starring  with 
great  success  in  "Brown  of  Harvard,"  and  the  vaudeville 
sketch  he  is  to  appear  in  here  is  said  to  contain  most  of  the 
important  and  fascinating  moments  of  that  comedy  of  college 
life.  The  career  of  Mr.  Young  has  been  a  most  interesting 
one.  Some  years  ago  he  was  the  youngest  prominent 
Shakespearian  actor  in  this  country  and  of  late  he  has  been 
the  principal  male  support  of  Viola  Allen  and  other  dis- 
tinguished exponents  of  the  classic  drama. 

Ed.  F.  Reynard,  who  is  included  in  the  new  attractions  of 
next  week,  is  styled  "the  ventriloquist  with  a  production," 
for  he  introduces  an  entire  play  with  the  assistance  of  his 
automatons,  which  totally  eclipses  anything  of  its  kind  pre- 
viously witnessed  on  a  stage.  The  opening  scene  shows  a 
farmyard  in  a  country  village  just  before  dawn.  Then  a  chore 
boy  sititng  on  a  log  starts  the  fun  and  Mr.  Reynard  carries 
his  entertainment  through  the  day  with  his  automatons,  de- 
picting quaint  and  humorous  rural  folk.  There  is  a  fire  run 
and  other  odd  side  features.  The  finals  shows  the  meeting 
and  fighting  of  the  neighbors'  cats  on  the  house  tops  and 
their  untimely  end  at  the  hands  of  the  inhabitants  of  the 
dwellings  whose  slumbers  they  have  rudely  disturbed.  All 
the  characters  are  automatons  to  whom  Mr.  Reynard's  mar- 
velous ventriloquial  powers  appear  to  impart  the  gift  of 
language. 

Miss  Mary  Norman  will  introduce  her  refined  and  clever 
monologue  "Some  Types  of  Woman"  next  week.  It  presents 
incidents  from  the  lives  of  several  actresses  before  the  public 
behind  the  scenes.  Her  tirst  sketch  is  that  of  an  emotion- 
al actress  who  makes  the  companions  of  her  private  life  mis- 
erable by  her  bad  temper  and  then  confronts  the  audience 
with  a  sickly  smile  which  is  supposed  to  convey  the  angelic 
sweetness  of  the  suffering  heroine.  Her  second  impersonation 
is  that  of  a  very  amiable  woman  idolized  by  her  associates  and 
despised  and  detested  by  the  public,  who  only  know  her  as  the 
remorseless  and  unprincipalled  adventuress.  The  last  scene 
illustrates  the  true  heroism  exhibited  by  a  young  actress  who 
acts  the  part  of  a  frivolous  society  girl  when  racked  with  grief 
caused  by  the  receipt  of  a  telegram  announcing  her  mother's 
death.  The  Boston  school  teacher  and  the  society  buds  of 
New  York,  Chicago  and  San  Francisco  are  cleverly,  amusingly 
and  faithfully  caricatured  by  Miss  Norman. 

Pilu  is  the  quaint  name  of  an  extraordinary  dog  brought  to 
this  country  by  Signor  D.  Ancillotti,  a  famous  European  ani- 
mal trainer.  Pilu  will  give  his  so-called  demonstration  of 
mind  reading  next  week.  While  Ancillotti  is  in  the  auditorium 
receiving  questions  from  those  about  him.  this  remarkable 
canine  answers  from  the  stage  without  any  perceptible  ex- 
change of  code  or  signal  from  his  master. 


CORINNE    IS    TOO    STRENUOUS. 


'Mile.  Mischief"  Is  a  Prettily  Costumed  Musical  Comedy  With 
Some  Good   Music,  But  With  an   Inadequate  Cast. 


Last  Sunday  night  a  crowded  and,  to  a  great  extent,  a  very 
appreciative  house,  greeted  the  third  offering  of  the  Shuberts 
at  the  Valencia  Theatre,  the  occasion  being  the  appearance  of 
Corrinne,  the  one-time  child  wonder,  as  Kosette  in  the  Vien- 
nese operetta,  "Mile.  Mischief."  Inquiry  as  to  the  show,  after 
the  usual  "How  was  it?,"  naturally  divides  into  "Is  it  well  put 
on?,"  "How  is  the  music?,"  "What,  about  the  libretto?"  and 
"How  is  Corinne  and  the  support?" 

As  to  the  stage  setting  and  costumes  there  is  nothing  but 
praise  to  offer.  The  last  scone  especially  is  quite  pretty,  and 
for  the  costumes,  there  are  first,  white  gowned  Trilbys  in  the 
artist's  studio,  then  some  girls  attractive  in  a  color  which  I 
think  is  called  cerise,  and  others  in  blue  that  make  a  har- 
monious picture,  and  then  there  are  some  more  in  neat  white 
with  green  belts  and  some  kind  of  green  on  their  hats.  In 
the  last  act  some  of  the  girls  are  exceedingly  attractive  in 
gray  and  red,  and  some  very  swell  gowns  that  look  like  a  lot 
of  money — they  ithe  costumes)  looked  to  me  like  a  revised 
edition  of  the  sheath  gown,  and  certainly  the  girls  in  them 
looked  mighty  swell.  The  chorus  girls  are  an  attractive 
crowd,  very  good  to  look  at:  the  soldiers'  uniforms  are  a 
bright  allractive  color,  and  all  of  the  costumes  and  the  scenery 


have  a  fresh  look,  without  any  marks  of  the  road  on  them. 

The  music,  which  is  by  Carl  M.  Ziehrer.  is  bright  and  spark- 
ling at  times;  there  is  a  very,  very  pretty  dance  in  the  last 
act,  which  is  well  danced  by  the  gray  and  red  girls,  and  which 
was  encored  five  times,  "I'm  looking  for  a  sweetheart"  is  a 
catchy  musical  number  that  suffered  much  in  the  singing. 
The  opening  of  the  first  act,  a  chorus  of  models  and  painters, 
is  well  done  but  for  lack  of  volume.  The  second  act's  open- 
ing chorus.  "The  Army  Corps."  a  tuneful  thing,  is  well  sung 
by  the  male  chorus.  One  of  the  best  numbers  is  "Lonesome," 
a  solo  at  the  beginning  of  the  third  act. 

Since  "The  Merry  Widow"  we  have  an  idea  that  comic 
operas  from  Vienna  all  have  well-defined  and  consistent  plots, 
but  this  time  we  miss  our  guess.  "Mile.  Mischief"  has  the 
barest  excuse  for  a  plot,  as  the  following  will  show.  The  first 
act  opens  in  the  studio  of  ,\ndre  Claire  and  after  an  opening 
chorus  of  models  and  artists  it  develops  that  Andre  is  to 
marry  his  cousin,  but  Rosette  or  Mile.  Mischief,  his  former 
sweetheart,  whose  exact  status  it  was  a  little  difficult  to  de- 
termine, comes  on  the  scene,  and  shortly  after  enters  Million- 
aire Meline  to  arrange  for  his  son's  painting  lessons.  Meline 
is  the  familiar  type  of  a  very  sporty  old  gent  with  a  termagant 
of  a  wife,  and  he  is  a  ready  victim  to  Rosette's  wiles,  to  the 
extent  of  paying  liberally  in  advance  for  his  son's  lessons. 

The  son.  who  comes  next,  is  a  pampered  fool,  who  is  due  to 
report  at  the  barracks  as  a  recruit,  and  who  leaves  his  pocket- 
book  on  the  table.  Rosette,  for  some  reason  or  other,  has 
made  a  bet  with  somebody  that  she  will  spend  twenty-four 
hours  in  the  barracks  disguised  as  a  boy.  She  gets  young 
Meline's  pocketbook  and  papers  and  goes  to  the  barracks  to 
enter  as  young  Freddy  Meline. 

Act  two  is  in  the  barracks.  The  Colonel  has  a  way  of 
hardening  recruits  with  alternate  hot  and  cold  baths,  and 
when  Rosette  arrives  as  Freddy  Meline  and  learns  she  has  to 
take  the  bath  discipline  she  spins  a  tale  to  the  Lieutenant 
that  her  parents  have  been  passing  her  oft  as  a  boy.  The 
Lieutenant  promptly  falls  in  love  with  her  and  the  Meline  mil- 
lions. The  artist  by  a  mix-up  is  taken  for  a  recruit  and  gets 
the  bath  treatment,  old  Meline  is  arrested  for  a  spy,  and  the 
misunderstandings  finally  get  straightened  out. 

Considering  it  then  as  a  mere  musical  comedy  and  not  as  a 
comic  opera,  the  plot  and  the  situations  are  enough,  there  are 
many  bright  lines  in  it,  and  it  would  serve  well  enough  with 
its  attractive  music,  good  settings  and  pretty  costuming,  but 
it  needs  a  very  much  better  collection  of  performers  than  it 
is  fitted  out  with. 

Corinne  was  once  a  "child  wonder."  It's  a  wonder  to  me 
how  any  child  was  allowed  to  stay  on  the  stage  so  long  after 
the  "infant  phenomenon"  period  had  passed  without  showing 
the  least  trace  of  artistic  ability.  Such  eyeing  at  the  audi- 
ence, such  futile  attempts  to  establish  a  feeling  of  good  fel- 
lowship with  you,  such  very  strained  reaching  for  comic  effect 
I  don't  think  I  have  ever  seen.  Some  of  us  are  born  with  a 
sense  of  comedy,  some  of  us  may  achieve  it.  but  Corinne  is 
determined  that  you  are  going  to  have  your  comedy  thrust 
upon  you.  She  is  light  on  her  feet,  her  voice  is  not  unpleas- 
ing.  she  sings  the  song  "Lonesome"  very  acceptably,  and 
that's  about  all  you  can  say  for  her. 

I  have  a  vague  remembrance  of  having  seen  her  before, 
though  I  can't  say  when,  so  I  cannot  join  with  those  I  over- 
heard talking  of  her  great  improvement  over  past  perfor- 
mances. If  this  is  an  improvement,  what  must  she  have 
been  before?  I  said  above  that,  to  a  great  extent,  the  house 
was  very  appreciative,  and  I  must  confess  that  the  general 
verdict  of  the  evening  was  against  me,  and  she  certainly 
had  them  going  the  whole  night  long.  It's  a  good  thing  there 
are  so  many  optimists  in  the  world  who  can  find  good  in 
everything. 

Albert  S.  Howson  is  passable  in  the  rather  unsatisfactory 
part  of  Andre  Claire,  the  artist.  Edward  W.  Cutler  as  Freddy 
Meline.  the  foolish,  pampered  son  of  a  millionaire,  is  quite 
good,  and  his  half-yodling  idiotic  laugh  is  very  funny.  Harry 
Linkey  sings  the  part  of  Lieutenant  Berner  acceptably,  but 
his  acting  is  wooden  enough  to  make  boxes  out  of.  Frank 
Farrington  plays  Sergeant  Dubaer.  a  gruff,  homely  barrack 
room  bully  with  a  good  sense  of  comedy  and  with  telling 
effect.  Lola  and  Mimi,  it's  hard  to  remember  which  was 
which,  are  not  good  enough  to  sing  the  song,  "I'm  looking; 
for  a  Sweetheart." 

Charles  W.  Myer  as  old  Millionaire  Meline,  the  gay  old 
sport,  is  much  above  the  average  of  the  others.  His  song  in 
the  last  act,  "Ladies.  Beware."  is  very  well  done,  and  with  the 
assistance  of  the  girls  in  the  sheath  gowns,  is  one  of  the 
good  things. 

V* 

Charles  Klein's  play  of  police  methods.  "The  Third  Degree," 
which  is  running  successfully  in  the  East,  is  to  be  made  intu 
a  novel  by  Charles  Klein  and  Arthur  Hornblow. 


T^AOIPiC  COAST 


6am  Francisco.  Oakland,  LosAkgeles.  Portland.  vSeaitle 

THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN    THE     GREAT    WEST 
^     PUBLISHED     EVERY    WEEK    C^ 


VOL.  XVII.  No.  2 


SAN  FRANCISCO.  SATURDAY,  OCTOBER  9.  1909 


PRICE  10  CENTS 


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Sousa  and  his  Band  (Dreamland  Rink).. Nov.  4  and  7.  aft.  &  eve. 
Mme.  .lean  Jomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  House  Co.)  .Week  of  Nov.  14 

Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner Nov.   23.  25  and  2S 

George   Hamlin    (American   Tenor) Dec.   2.   5   and   7 

Fritz    Kreisler Dec.    12.   16   and   19 

Lyric  Quartette  Pop  Conce.-t Com.   in    January 

Marcella   Sembrich Week   of   Jan.    9 

Myrtle    Elvin    (Pianiste) February 

Teresa   Carreno First    Week   of   February 

Madaine  Schumann-Heink Com.   Sunday.   Feb.   13 

Mme.  Tilly  Koenen   (the  famous  Dutch  contralto) March 

Pepito  Arriolo   (the  Spanish  child  Violinist) March 

Maud    Powell April 

Flonzaley   Quartet    (in   Chamber  Music) April 

Damrosch   Symphony  Orchestra  and   Isadora   Duncan May 


THE  PUBLIC'S  MUSICAL  TASTE. 

.\nviiiic  who  has  frequent  ofcasion  to  disfuss  musical 
siilijecis  with  i)eo])le  «liose  position  in  the  eoniumuity 
gives  them  a  certain  authority  must  of  necessity  en- 
counter a  jieneral  indignation  regarding  tlie  supposedly 
uniiiusical  asjiect  of  th*^  jiublic  at  large  and  even  of 
those  directly  or  indireclly  interested  in  the  art.  The 
editor  of  the  Pacific  Coast  ilusical  Review  never  fails 
to  grasp  an  opi>ortunity  to  discuss  this  ([uestion  of  the 
musical  or  unmusical  aspect  of  San  Francisco  with 
])eople  in  various  stages  of  our  local  musical  life.  We, 
as  will  have  been  observed  by  careful  readers  of  this 
jiaper.  take  a  very  optimistic  stand  in  regard  to  San 
Francisco's  musical  sentiment.  \\'e  positively  main- 
tained in  the  past,  and  will  ever  maintain  in  future, 
that  this  is  one  of  the  most  musical  communities  in 
the  country,  and  our  discussions  with  various  forces 
who  should  know  what  they  are  talking  about  have 
iiiiliressed  us  with  the  conviction  that  our  ojiinion  is 
sound  and  ba.sed  ujion  actual  coiulitions  of  facts. 


^A'e  have  not  come  to  this  couclusiou  because  all 
these  people  agreed  with  us,  for.  as  a  matter  of  fact, 
they  invariably  challenged  our  contention  and  denied 
that  our  optimism  was  based  upon  solid  grounds.  The 
confidence  in  our  position  was  therefore  not  a  positive 
one — that  is  to  say.  one  gathered  from  the  coincidence 
of  views  among  tliose  addressed  by  us;  but  it  is  based 
solely  upon  a  negative  conclusion,  that  is  to  say,  upon 
that  which  the  people  whom  we  conversed  with  did  iiat 
say.  The  main  reason  advanced  in  these  discussions, 
as  to  whether  or  not  San  Francisco  was  musical,  re- 
volvecl  around  the  contention  that  many  concerts  given 
here  were  not  attended  as  they  should  be  attended,  and 
that  musical  activities,  in  so  far  as  they  appertain  to 
local  institutions  and  artists,  did  not  represent  that 
serious  calibre  which  a  true  musical  community  has  a 
right  to  demand.  In  other  words,  everyone  of  those 
wlio  denied  San  F'rancisco  a  musical  taste  have  taken 
the  outward  phase  of  our  musical  life  as  the  only 
criterion  upon  which  they  based  their  convictions. 


There  are.  however,  two  phases  of  a  musical  commun- 
ity life  which  must  be  taken  into  consideration  when 
it  is  to  be  decided  whether  or  not  a  city  is  musical. 
There  is  the  outer  life  which  is  apparent  to  everyone 
and  which  is  easily  to  be  examined:  and  there  is  the 
inner — or  the  home — musical  life  which  hardly  any- 
one takes  into  consideration  when  making  broad  state- 
ments. It  is  the  inner  musical  life  of  this  community 
which  comes  into  consideration  when  we  desire  to 
speak  u})on  "The  Public's  Musical  Taste."  One  of  the 
most  im])ortant  factors  to  be  considered  in  answering 
this  (piestion,  as  to  whether  or  not  a  coniinunity  is 
musical,  is  the  existence  of  a  genuine  liking  for  the  art, 
and  surely  it  is  but  i-easonable  to  accept  the  study  and 
])ractice  of  music  in  the  home  as  a  criterion  for  f/riniinr 
likiii;/.  ^^'e  have  within  a  radius  of  ten  miles  here 
about  three  thousand  teachers — good,  bad  and  inditt'er 
eut.  The.se  three  thousand  teachers  average  about  five 
pupils  each  ( this  is  a  very  conservative  estimate,  by 
the  way).  We  may  therefore  say,  without  being  ac- 
cused of  exaggeration,  that  at  least  twenty  thousand 
peoi)le  are  within  reacli  of  this  community  who  prac- 
tice and  study  the  art  of  music  and  who,  because  they 
jiractice  and  study  this  art,  must,  as  a  matter  t)f  log- 
ical assumption,  like  music. 


Local  activities,  as  they  stand  today,  give  this  ter- 
ritory of  a  radius  of  ten  miles  the  following  choral 
societies:  The  Cecilian  ('horal  Club,  the  San  Francisco 
Choral  Society,  the  Loring  Club,  the  Treble  Clef  (Miib, 
the  Ladies'  Auxiliary  of  the  Golden  Gate  Commaiidery, 
the  Zech  Orchestra,  the  Eurydice  Club,  the  Orpheus 
Club,  the  Hughes  Club,  the  Stewart  Orchestral  So- 
ciety, the  Oakland  Conservatory  Choral  Society,  the 
Bach  Choir  of  Berkeley,  the  Alameda  Choral  Society, 
the  Ahimeda  Operatic  Society  and  the  San  Kafael  Ora- 
torio Society.  These  fifteen  organizations  include 
about  a  tliousand  people  who,  because  of  their  musical 
activities  must,  as  a  matter  of  logical  assumption,  like 
music,  and  here  we  do  not  include  the  musical  clubs. 
We  know  of  several  homes  where  chamber  music  is 
I)racticed  as  a  matter  of  i)ure  love  for  the  art.  "We 
know  of  a  number  of  homes  where  the  classics  ai'C 
sung  and  played  as  a  matter  of  love  for  the  art.  The 
music  in  the  San  Francisco,  Oakland,  Berkeley  and 
Alameda  churches  is  of  an  exceptionally  high  standard 
and  several  of  our  organists  stand  at  the  head  of  their 
profession.  So  much  about  the  inner  musical  life  of 
this  communitj'. 


PAriFK^  rOAST  MUSICAL  REVIEW 


Till'  I'iijici-iu'ss  lui-  symphony  coiicitIs  adiiiilted  \>y 
\:n-i(nis  |K'o])I('  wIio  jii-e  cxd'cisiiij-  llicir  iufiiu'iice  ill 
]nrseiit  to  fjivt'  this  city  ;i  series  of  syiiiiiliony  coiu'erts, 
and  we  venture  to  jn-ediet  that  one,  if  not  all,  of  these 
movements  will  meet  with  success — provided  that  the 
manajjement  is  in  thoronjihly  competent  hands,  and 
here  is  the  kei-nel  in  the  nut — an  adeipiate  management 
for  oni-  local  affairs.  A\'e  claim  that  it  recpiires  just  as 
miK-li  i^enins  of  a  certain  liind  to  mould  pulilic  taste 
and  puhlic  enerfjy  to  sup]>ort  musical  events  as  it  re- 
(|uires  a  certain  sfiii'i'^  f<>  l)^'  a  truly  gi-eat  artist.  And 
that  comnumity  is  blessed  with  extraordinary  j;ood  for- 
tune «hicli  may  enti-ust  its  niiisica!  welfare  in  the 
hands  of  a  man  who  understands  how  to  arouse  the 
musical  susceptibilities  of  his  fellow  citizens  in  a  man- 
ner to  inrtuence  tliem  to  bring  the  entlmsiasm  which 
they  bestow  upon  events  in  their  home  life  into  the 
|iid)lic  functions.  Such  genius  can  not  be  acifuired. 
It  must  be  inborn  and  must  emanate  from  an  individ- 
uality free  from  pi-ejudices,  lii-oad  of  mind,  liberal  of 
spirit  and  o|)timistic  in  character.  In  order  not  to  be 
misunderstood,  we  desire  to  impress  upon  our  readers 
the  fact  that  we  are  discussing  this  matter  entirely 
uj)on  general  jirinciples,  and  do  not  in  any  way  refer 
to  any  local  conditions  of  nianagemenl.  We  are  mere- 
ly trying  to  lead  up  to  our  contention  that  Ibis  com- 
munity ix  musical  and  that  lack  of  attendance  at  con- 
certs or  iniblic  musical  functions  is  not  the  result  of  a 
lack  of  liking  for  music.  The  teachers  have  the  re- 
s|ionsibiiity  of  moulding  a  musical  taste  and  the  mus- 
ical manager  has  the  responsibility  of  arousing  enthus- 
iasm among  tho.se  musically  inclined.  And  to  arouse 
enthusiasm  a  manager  must  not  only  possess  a  pleas- 
ing personality  and  a  diplomatic  tact  how  to  ajipeal 
to  human  nature,  but  lie  must  be  able  to  inspire  big 
movements,  inspire  confidence  and  att'ection  among 
students  and  teachers,  and  must  establish  for  himself 
a  position  where  excryoiie  siin]iiy  delights  in  attending 
events  given  under  his  direction  on  i)ersonal  grounds, 
.IS  much  as  he  likes  to  listen  to  the  artists  jireseiited 
to  him  u])on  artistic  grounds. 

A  manager  who  possesses  these  attributes  is  a 
genius.  And  one  who  is  such  a  genius  does  not  deserve 
any  credit  for  being  it,  because  he  is  born  that  way. 
.\iid  a  manager  who  does  not  ]>ossess  such  genius 
should  not  be  blamed  or  criticised,  because  he  also 
could  not  hel])  it,  and  he  also  is  born  that  way.  What 
\\e  desire  to  emphasize  with  this  statement  is  that  the 
musical  ])eo|ile  should  not  be  expected  to  do  all  the 
cultivating,  but  nmst,  Mke  students — whether  they  be 
musical  or  jinblic  school  i)upils — be  treated  in  a  man 
nei-  to  cultivate  jiersonal  interest  in  tliose  who  preside 
over  the  musical  events  of  a  city  and  must  not  be 
treated  in  a  manner  to  arouse  their  hostility  and  their 
dislike.  ( "oncessioiis  must  be  made  to  liuinan  nature, 
namely,  tlnit  to  inspire  affection,  good  will  and  jier- 
sonal liking  must  be  meted  out.  And  you  will  find  in 
whate\er  comniunily  there  is  an  ;i])parent  inditference 
in  the  niattei-  of  support  of  public  musical  functions, 
there  is  a  misunderstanding  between  those  who  guide 
the  destinies  of  jniblic  functions  and  those  who  are  ex- 
])ected  to  support  them.  So  yon  see  it  is  not  alto- 
gether a  sign  of  lack  of  musical  taste,  but  an  element 
of  personal  relations  that  influences  the  attendance 
at  concerts.  Once  more  we  desire  to  emiihasize  the 
fact  that  we  are  not  sp'-aking  of  local  conditions  only 
in  tlies<'  last  remarks,  but  (uir  views  should  be  ajiplied 
to  every  comnmnity  in  the  world. 

^^■llile  we  can   not  agree   that   people  should   be  al- 


lowed free  enli-ance  to  concerts,  \\e  at  Ihe  same  time, 
contend  that  a  cei-tain  eh'meiil  of  the  ipi-ofession 
niigiit  be  treated  with  this  courtesy  in  relni-n  for  ser- 
vices, lu  the  largest  musical  centers  of  Ihe  world  it 
is  customary  to  admit  teacliers  of  vast  influence  free 
to  concerts  so  that  they  may  exercise  their  influence  in 
behalf  of  visiting  artists.  Of  course  a  teachei-  should 
do  this  without  coni|)ensation,  but  here  it  is  where  tact, 
diplomacy  and  knowledge  of  human  nature  comes  in. 
Yon  can  not  exi>ect  favors  from  anyone  whom  you  do 
not  do  a  service  in  ttiru.  The  milleniuin  has  not  yet  ar- 
rived, and  so  in  giving  one  or  two  jiasses  to  teachers 
able  to  exercise  their  influence  among  friends  and  stu- 
dents in  the  matter  of  concert  attendance,  a  manager 
is  actually  giving  a  commission  for  services  rendei-ed. 
These  jiasses  can  easily  be  kej)t  track  of  by  inducing 
the  teacher  to  give  everyone  whom  he  recommends  a 
card  entitling  his  pupils  to  a  special  rate.  If  it  turns 
out  that  sucli  teacher  does  not  earn  his  courtesy,  and 
a  manager  \\ants  to  be  mercenary  enough  to  test  his 
integrity,  such  passes  may  be  withdrawn  and  no  harm 
is  done.  For  even  though  such  teacher  should  be  (d- 
fended  there  would  not  be  a  loss,  for  he  never  won  hi 
l)ay  It)  go  to  concerts  anyway,  and  his  failure  to  induce 
i'l-iends  to  attend  a  concert  is  sutticient  evidence  for  his 
inability  to  keej)  them  away.  lint  in  this  manner  a 
certain  good  will  \\ould  be  established  between  man- 
ager and  educator  which  would  certainly  exerci.se  a 
jiowerful  intluence  ui)on  general  concert  attendance. 

The  man  who  attends  church  diligently,  and  who 
makes  public  exhibition  of  his  religious  sentiments,  is 
not  always  the  one  most  sincere  in  his  moral  preten- 
sions. There  are  many  people  wlio  act  according  to 
the  laws  of  religious  priiici]>les  and  who  are  rarely  seen 
in  cluirch.  This  is  eiinally  true  iif  musical  jteople. 
Those  who  attend  all  coiuerts  are  not  always  the  most 
musical  people  in  a  community.  There  are  many  peo- 
ple vastly  more  musical  who  study  and  practice  their 
art  in  the  modest  circle  of  their  home.  And  so  like  the 
minister  must  evercise  his  ability  to  attra<-t  his  con- 
gregation, like  the  music  merchant  must  exercise  his 
skill  in  attracting  iiatroiis.  so  the  artist  and  the  mus- 
ical manager  must  concentrate  their  mental  i-esources 
in  the  acquirement  of  large  audiences.  The  juiblic 
press  is  one  medinin  of  expression  and  the  manager's 
Jiersonal  influence  is  a^iother.  IJoth  can  easily  be  ex- 
ercised to  attract  musical  peojile,  and  they  can  also 
easily  be  exercised  to  la'ep  peojile  away.  And  with 
this  undeniable  statement  of  fact  we  will  close  this 
day's  discourse  and  add  again  the  admonition  tli;it  we 
do  not  desire  to  be  regarded  as  referring  to  local  condi- 
tions onlv. 


Preceding  the  opening  of  the  ensuing  musical  season 
we  find  in  the  various  musical  exchanges  an  account  of 
the  resumjition  of  rehearsals  by  the  various  symjihouy 
orchestras.  Among  these  we  note  that  there  ai-e  smy- 
jiliony  orchestras  in  Los  Angeles,  Seattle.  Tacoma,  Den- 
ver, .Minneaiiolis,  St.  Paul  and  several  other  far  West- 
ern cities.  In  vain  do  we  look  for  a  San  Francisco 
,syini)liony  orchestra.  Is  it  not  a  disgrace  tliat  a  city  of 
nearly  half  a  million  inhabitants  and  a  territory  of 
eight  hundred  thousands  residents  within  a  radius  of 
ten  miles  can  not  boast  ol  a  symjihony  orchestra?  But 
there  .seems  to  be  a  ray  of  hojie.  So  far  we  are  in- 
formed of  at  least  four  inovements.  One  is  I'aul  Steiu- 
dorff's  intention  to  give  three  smyphony  concerts, 
another  is  Dr.  \>'olle's  jiurjiose  to  give  six  smyjihony 
concerts,  a  third  is  Will  L.  (Jreenbaunrs  ju-opositiiui  to 
the  I'romotioii   Committee  for  a   permanent   smyiiliony 


I'ACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    K  E  V  I  E  \A'. 


(irclu'sliM  and  (inaliy  llicrc  is  a  iiioNt'iiii'iil  on  luol  lo 
ivoi^naiiizc  llic  old  San  Fr;iiicisi'o  S,vnn)hon.v  Society 
with  Fi'od  Zt'cli  as  leader.  So  far  tlie  latter  seems  the 
niosl  |ii-(iniisiiij;.  Any\\ay  with  foni-  niovenicnls  on  toot 
lo  seciii-c  synipliony  concci-ls  and  just  cnoiijili  musicians 
I'of  one  orclicsira  we  are  Inwinj;  one  of  the  most  uni(|ne 
situations  excr  conrronliiifi  the  musical  portion  of  any 
community.  IJul  as  loni;  as  this  activity  Uee])s  up  and 
the  matter  is  not  pecmitted  to  {;<•  to  sieej),  there  is  still 
hojie  for  us  and  we  may  yi'i  ha\e  the  satisfaction  to 
atiuouuce  a  series  of  syni|)hoiiy  concerts  hef(M-e  many 
weeks  lia\('  i>assed. 


The  I'acilic  ("oast  .Musical  Keview  lieijs  to  acknow- 
ledj;e  receipt  of  the  Se[)tenihei-  luuuher  of  the  Notre 
Dame  (Quarterly  issued  hy  the  faculty  of  the  .Voire 
Dame  Conservatory  of  .Music  in  San  -Jose.  This  edition 
consists  of  nealy  two  hundred  pajies  and  contains  sev- 
eral iiiosi  interesting;'  arcticles  from  very  etlicient  and 
hrilliani  conti-ibutors.  Much  sjiace  is  devoted  to 
Charles  Stoddard,  the  famous  ("alifornia  ])oet  who  died 
recently.  This  current  number  concludes  the  tirst  year 
of  pulillcatiou  of  this  able  pajter,  and  the  faculty  and 
students  of  llie  Conserx  alory,  have  every  reason  to  feel 
prcMul  of  the  success  of  their  endeavors  to  ^ive  their 
institution  an  orjiaii  that  is  as  dijiuilied  as  il  is  instruc- 
I  ive  and  interestinj;'. 


\\'e  are  informed  that  a  certain  sinj>infi'  teacher  who 
I'ecently  arrived  in  this  city  somewhat  in  need  of  sup- 
poi't  is  now  tlourishini;.  lie  befjan  by  annonnciu};  that 
his  lessons  were  five  dollars  an  hour  or  three  dollars 
for  half  ail  hour.  .\s  he  seemed  to  understand  his  art 
he  atti-aclcd  (lie  attention  of  one  or  two  wealthy  Jewish 
music  loNcis  who  succee<le(l  in  <>ettinj;'  him  |)U])ils. 
Hardly  did  this  newcomei'  taste  the  fi-uits  of  pros])erity 
his  head  bejian  to  swell  and  he  immediately  doubled 
his  ]irice  lor  siufiiiif;-  lessons  so  that  he  chai-j;es  now 
five  dollars  lor  half  an  hour  and  slaudei-s  o\ir  San  l>'ran- 
cisco  leachei-s  into  the  barjjain.  We  ha\e  no  use  for 
any  teacher  who  comes  to  this  city  from  tlie  outside  and 
takes  advantaj;e  of  innocent  students  to  rob  them  of 
their  money,  and  we  lunc  still  less  use  for  any  teacher 
who  endeavours  lo  build  uji  a  reiiulation  for  himself  by 
endeavonriuji  to  belittle  our  own  teachers.  We  have  a 
number  of  vocal  and  instrumental  teachers  liere  who 
cannot  learn  much  from  anyone  who  comes  here  to  jjet 
rich.  Theiv  are  as  competent  teachers  in  San  Fran- 
cisco as  anywhere  else  and  the  sooner  our  citizens  rea- 
\\y.i^   the   truth   of  this   statement   the  sooner   will    they 

escajic  beinfi  imposed  ujion  by  newcomers. 
vv^ 

The  house  of  Bosworth  &  Co.  is  giving  its  chief  attention 
to  teaching  material,  principal  among  which  are  the  author- 
ized edition  of  "Sevcik's  Violin  School"  and  the  great 
book  of  technical  exercises  tjy  Beringer,  of  London.  Here 
are  found  a  very  large  number  of  easy  compositions  for 
violin  and  piano,  and  for  piano  solo.  The  house  is  just 
now  issuing  two  large  works  with  orchestra.  They  are 
Felix  Ptirstinger's  ballade,  "Sea  Wraith,"  for  mixed  chorus, 
solo  and  orchestra,  and  the  tragic  poem,  "Vision  of  Cleo- 
patra," the  op.  15,  by  Havergal  Brian,  of  Stoke-on-Trent. 
The  latter  work  is  to  be  given  at  the  Southport  (England) 
festival  early  in  the  aulum.  The  "Sevcik  Violin  School" 
is  just  coming  into  a  new  edition  under  the  practical  hand 
of  Alfred  Gibson.  The  voluminous  violin  material  by  other 
writers  embraces  the  Franz  Drdla  op.  4.5.  "Rezinka";  his 
op.  30  (eight  Hungarian  dances  on  real  folk  themes);  op. 
34.  four  pieces  in  third  position;  op.  43,  op,  50,  op.  37,  and 
a  tarantella,  op.  42,  tor  two  violins.  Then  there  are  Hans 
Sitt's  souvenir  suite,  op.  105;  two  pupils'  violin  concertos  in 
first  position  by  O.  Rieding,  six  pieces  by  E.  .lenkinson, 
two  by  Viktor  ,Janitzek,  lour  by  Ursula  Williams,  and  a 
berceuse  by  Edward  Watson.  A.  I^.  Sass  has  a  small  book 
on  the  principles  of  violin  playing  on  lines  laid  down  by 
the  Sevcik  school. 


AT    THE    EDITOR'S    BREAKFAST    TABLE. 

The  musical  editor  of  the  New  York  Sun  is  authority  for 
the  fact  that  opera  in  English  is  at  last  proving  a  financial 
success.  Before  commenting  on  this  agreeable  subject  I  will 
quote  the  New  York  Sun: 

opera  in  Knglish  is  .stHl  encouraged  by  the  Moody-Manner.s 
company,  which  has  just  beg-un  a  season  in  London.  Fannv 
Moody  and  her  husband,  Charles  Manners,  are  the  managers 
and  also  the  principal  artists  of  the  company,  which  is  natural- 
ly much  more  important  In  the  provinces  than  in  London. 
Charle.s  Manners  has  recently  given  some  interesting  details  of 
their  company  for  publication,  as  the  companv  regards  itself  as 
something  more  than  a  money-making  enterprise,  and  empha- 
sizes the  educational  phases  of  its  work.  The  audiences  in 
Dublin,  where  the  company  is  able  to  give  a  season  lasting  five 
weeks,  are  the  most  interested  in  opera  and  had  until  recently 
been  fond  of  only  the  Italian  repertoire.  "The  Mestersingers  " 
was  sung  last  year,  however,  and  the  public  supported  Wagner 
enthusiastically.  Even  in  Cork  the  public  supports  music  so 
liberally  that  it  is  possible  to  give  a  two  weeks  seasons.  The 
Scotch  are  the  next  best  suppoiters  of  opera,  although  thev  ex- 
hibit the  idiosyncracy  of  not  caring  for  'Lucia.  '  which  is  sure 
to  draw  a  poor  house.  'Tannhauser"  was  sung  for  the  first 
time  in  Glasgow  to  an  audience  that  represented  only  $70.  Now 
the  admiration  for  Wagnei-  is  so  great  that  the  same  opera  is 
sure  to  draw  $L100.  Glasgow  is  one  of  the  towns  which  have 
been  converted  by  the  visits  of  the  company  from  indifference 
lo   liberal   support  of  opera. 

Birmingliam  and  Manchester  now  support  opei'a  so  poorly 
that  the  seasons  of  the  company  there  are  undertaken  only 
when  there  is  a  definite  guarantee  of  a  certain  amount.  After 
Scotland  the  pottery  towns  are  the  most  liberal  supporters  of 
opera.  Such  places  as  Hanley.  Burton,  Bolton  and  Blackburn 
turn  out  large  audiences,  especially  for  Wagner  operas.  The 
towns  in  which  the  festivals  are  held  are  poor  for  the  visiting 
opera  companies,  just  as  the  towns  in  this  country  which  have 
local  orchestras  are  likely  to  be  least  generous  in  their  support 
of  opera.  The  most  intere.sting  fact  about  this  English  com- 
pany is  the  extent  to  w  liirli  :inuiteurs  are  interested  in  its 
work.  Over  three  thoiisand  p.  is. mis  have  learned  the  operas  of 
their  repertoire,  and  w  h.n  ili.>  want  to  give  amateur  perfor- 
mances teh  company  will  Irmi  ihem  one  or  two  of  the  princi- 
pals. Then  when  the  Moody-Manners  company  is  due  to  ar- 
rive in  a  town  the  amateur  chorus  is  more  than  anxious  to 
sing  in  its  productions.  In  this  way  it  is  possible  to  have  for 
slch  operas  as  "The  Mastersingers"  as  many  as  120  choristers, 
which   is    twice    the    usual    number. 

This  company  opened  its  London  season  with  "Carmen."  and 
Zelie  de  Lussan.  who  has  .always  been  beloved  by  the  London 
public,  had  the  title  role.  Clementine  de  Vere  Sapio.  Gertrude 
Kennyson  and  Beatrice  Miranda  are  the  leading  sopranos  of  the 
company.  The  novelty  of  the  present  season  is  a  one-act  opera 
by  the  English  composer  Alick  MacLean  called  "Maitre  Seiller" 
and  based  tin  a  story  by  Erckmann-Chatrian.  The  composer, 
who  also  conducted  the  work,  has  put  seevi'al  operas  to  his 
credit  already  and  first  attracted  attention  several  years  ago 
by  winning  several  years  ago  by  winning  a  competition.  Maria 
(lav   is  also   to   be  a   member  of   the  company. 

W 

I  never  could  understand  why  the  English  speaking  public 
has  always  insisted  upon  hearing  opera  in  a  foreign  tongue. 
To  me  it  has  always  been  a  source  of  much  amusement  to 
observe  a  thousand  or  two  apparently  sane  people  listen  to  a 
few  people  on  the  stage  playing  ping-pong  with  words  which 
nobody  understood.  And  there  are  among  them  musical  peo- 
ple, who  in  every  thing  are  quite  sane  and  intellectual,  but 
who  upon  the  subject  of  singing  in  English  become  immediate- 
ly observed  with  an  idea  that  it  is  simply  shocking  to  trans- 
late songs  from  a  foreign  tongue  into  English  so  that  the 
people  can  understand  what  all  this  noise  is  about.  For  any- 
one to  witness  an  opera  sinig  in  a  foreign  tongue  is  simply 
missing  half  of  the  performance,  for  the  libertto  is  just  as 
important  as  the  music.  This  is  especially  true  of  the  later 
Italian  and  German  operatic  works.  As  an  instance  1  desire 
to  recall  an  incident  that  happened  to  me  during  a  recent  per- 
formance of  Fedora  by  the  International  Opera  Company  at 
the  Princess  Theatre.  After  the  conclusion  of  the  first  act 
several  people,  prominent  in  musical  circles,  came  to  me 
asking  me  what  the  opera  was  all  about.  I  had  to  repeat  the 
story  so  often  that  I  finally  felt  very  foolish  and  was  under 
the  impression  that  I  was  being  "guyed."  This  was  evidently 
not  the  case,  but  it  impressed  me  so  peculiarly  that  proiuinent 
musical  people  should  sit  for  hours  listening  to  an  opera,  of 
which  a  considerable  part  was  recitative,  without  knowing 
what  it  was  all  about.  And  yet  among  these  very  people  were 
some  who  actually  insist  upon  having  operas  and  songs  pre- 
sented in  foreign  tongues. 

*       *       « 

But  the  most  aiuusing  part  of  this  foreign  text  proposition 
is  that  singers  like  Madame  Langendorff,  for  instance,  sing 
an  aria  from  Samson  and  Delilah  in  German.  Italian  singers 
often  sing  German  opera  in  Italian,  as  an  example  witness 
Avedano  and  Salassa  in  Lohengrin  and  Tannhauser  at  the  old 
Tivoli.  And  indeed  there  is  hardly  any  European  nation  that 
does  not  insist  upon  opera  being  presented  in  the  native 
tongue  of  the  public  before  whom  it  is  given.  Still  there  are 
singing  teachers  and  intelligent  musical  people  who  persist 
in  considering  it  necessary  to  use  a  foreign  tongue  when 
appearing  before  American  or  English  audiences.  To  me  it 
is  just  as  ridiculous  to  sing  to  anyone  in  a  language  incompre- 


r. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    R  E  V  I  E  ^Y 


hensible  to  him  as  it  is  to  give  dramas,  comedies  or  comic- 
operas  before  audiences  who  do  not  understand  a  word  that 
is  said.  There  should  be  a  movement  started  to  inHuenie 
singers  to  sing  in  English  when  they  appear  before  an  Eng- 
lish-speaking public. 


he  put  to  it.  as  this  would  give  it  a  greater  cnance  c_  ---,- 
The  complaint  led  the  fall  Mall  Gazette  to  comment  as  follows. 
"This  is  not  onlv  ■pathetic.'  as  Mr.  Manners  says,  but  extremely 
interesting  as  a"  matter  of  public  taste^  There  seems  to  be  a 
a-eneral  impression  that  the  ordinary  Brown.  Jones  or  KoBln- 
lon  is  an  outrage  upon  the  ensemble  of  melody  and  high  sen- 
timent for  which  opera  is  the  outstanding  medium.  When  the 
British  public  chooses  to  indulge  its  imagination,  it  insists  on 
being  carefully  screened  from  the  commonplace;  so  much  was 
recognized  in  Mr.  Crumintes  green  room,  where  Nicholas  Nic- 
klebv  made  the  acquaintance  of  Miss  Snevellicci.  Miss  Bra vassa 
and  "Miss  Gazingi.  The  British  instinct  is  always  to  look  upon 
art  as  something  a  little  uncanny,  to  which  exotic  trappings 
are  aouronriate.  But  is  there  a  trace  also  of  the  impression 
that  nne  (or  strange)  feathers  make  fine  birds,  and  consequent- 
ly tine  music?"  ^        ^        , 

And  again  I  find  another  paragraph  in  the  New  York  Music 
Review  very  well  in  accord  with  all  this  controversy,  namely; 

We  remember  the  late  Edwaid  MacDowell  once  saying  tliat 
Paissian  composers  were  fortunate  in  their  names,  so  tar  as 
audiences  outside  of  Russia  were  concerned.  There  are  no 
doubt  English  and  American  hearers  who  would  argue  that  a 
composition  by  Balakireff  or  Tschaikowsky  must  necessarily 
be  ffner  or  more  impressive  than  one  by  Lorenzo  »wett  oi  .1. 
B  Hi-"-ins  even  though  no  music  of  the  Russians  had  been 
heard^bv    tiiem   and    the   composers   were   mere    names. 

While  residing  in  Santa  Cruz  I  used  to  know  a  vocal  teacher 
by  the  name  of  Henry  Thomas.  He  had  an  excellent  voice 
and  a  method  that  smacked  of  the  variety  usually  known  as 
"breathing  from  the  spine."  He  really  sang  from  the  spine 
in  the  truest  sense  of  the  word  and  he  needed  a  lot  of  back- 
bone to  appear  in  public.  Well,  Mr.  Thomas  suddenly  was 
taken  with  a  decease  commonly  known  as  "Europitis"  and  he 
fled  to  the  mellow  climes  of  sunny  Italy  to  sit  at  the  feet  of 
the  masters  of  the  genuine,  patented  and  double  distilled 
"bel  cant-o."  He  stayed  six  months  or  a  year,  which  was  suf- 
ficient to  become  a  full  fledged  basso  "disgusto"  and  lo  and 
behold  without  having  been  married,  he  had  changed  his 
name  to  "Enrico  Tomaso."  In  the  eyes  of  the  public  he 
became  at  once  a  finished  singer  and  where  formerly  derisive 
smiles  greeted  the  "bass"  efforts  of  Henry  Thomas,  the  vocal 
gymnastics  of  Enrico  Tomaso  met  with  a  deafening  applause. 
Such  is  fame.  Such  is  the  power  of  a  foreign  tongue! 
** 


M'KENZIE    GORDON'S    NEW    STUDIO. 

Mackenzie  Gordon  is  now  occupying  his  handsomely  ap- 
pointed and  cozy  studio  at  2832  Jackson  street.  Every  effort 
has  been  made  to  arrange  this  studio  in  a  manner  conformant 
with  the  finest  artistic  taste.  A  beautiful  concert  grand 
piano  graces  one  corner,  while  delightful  paintings,  portraits 
of  famous  f.rtists  and  composers  and  pretty  statuary  are 
tastefully  grouped  in  various  parts  of  the  room.  While  Mr. 
Gordon's  studio  is  located  in  what  is  usually  known  as  the 
basement  of  the  house,  tne  location  of  his  residence  raises 
the  basement  high  above  street  level.  A  cozy  little  reception 
room  enablei  students  to  wait  in  comfort  for  their  lessons. 
The  walls  of  the  studio  also  contain  portraits  of  famous 
friends  of  the  popular  tenor  and  teacher. 

During  the  ensuing  season  Mr.  Gordon  will  entertain  his 
artist  friends  who  are  booked  to  appear  here  in  concert. 
\niong  these  will  be  George  Hamlin.  Francis  Rogers,  Fritz 
kreisler  and  Frank  La  Forge.  Henry  K.  Hadley,  who  came 
through  San  Francisco  on  his  way  to  Seattle  where  he  will 
conduct  the  symphony  orchestra  during  the  next  two  years, 
was  also  entertained  by  Mr.  Gordon.  Christine  Nielson,  until 
her  departure  from  San  Francisco  a  pupil  of  Mr.  Gordon's,  has 
won  for  herself  a  schlorship  at  the  Boston  Operatic  School  of 
which  Henry  Russell  is  ihe  director  and  is  now  being  trained 
to  appear  at  the  Boston  opera  house.  The  fact  that  Miss 
Nielson  passed  her  examination  for  her  schlorship  speaks 
well  for  Mr.  Gordon  as  a  te.icher  and  as  a  singer  we  know  him 
well  enough  to  take  his  ability  for  granted.  He  has  begun  the 
season  with  a  large  class  of  pupils  and  he  has  every  reason  to 
look  ahead  with  an  optimistic  spirit. 

[Note— Since  the  above  was  written  news  has  been  re- 
ceived here  that  Christine  Nielsen  has  accepted  a  three  years' 
contract  with  W.  H.  Savage  for  comic  opera.] 


MACKENZIE  GORDON 

The   Successful   Teacher  and   Singer  Who   Will    Entertain    His 

Famous  Artist  Friends   During  the  Coming   Season. 

The  ballet  dancers  of  Paris  have  formed  a  union  to  protest 
against  the  wretched  pay  they  receive.  Six  years  ago  a 
similar  attempt  was  made  but  met  with  no  success.  The 
union  of  the  dancers  is  to  be  added  to  the  organization  which 
includes  the  musicians,  the  chorus  singers  and  the  theatrical 
machinists.  The  average  salary  of  the  dancer  is  $16  a  month. 
The  more  experienced  dancers  that  stand  midway  between 
the  ordinary  and  the  first  dancers  receive  $30  a  month.  They 
are  required  to  furnish  their  tights  and  dancing  skirts  for 
rehearsals.  In  addition  to  the  small  wages,  the  new  union  is 
to  do  something  toward  ending  the  competition  of  the  Span- 
ish, Italian  and  English  dancers  who  are  constantly  coming 
into  France. 

In  Italy  the  same  wreched  system  exists  as  anybody  who 
has  read  "La  Ballerina"  of  Mathilde  Serao  has  seen.  The 
recent  strike  of  the  dancers  at  La  Scala  is  due  to  the  fact 
that  they  receive  salaries  ranging  from  $4  to  $16  a  month,  and 
are  required  to  give  all  their  time  to  the  theatre.  They  must 
dress  in  accordance  with  certain  demands  of  the  management, 
and  are  subject  to  strict  rules  that  often  entail  fines.  Then 
they  receive  nothing  during  the  summer  vacation. — New 
York  Sun. 

It  was  in  the  archives  of  the  conservatory  at  Milan  that 
Renzo  Bianchi  discovered  the  score  of  a  one  act  opera  by 
Rossini,  which  Giulio  Gatla  Cassazza  has  selected  for  produc- 
tion at  the  Metropolitan  next  winter.  It  is  called  "II  Signer 
Bruschino,"  and  has  not  been  sung  in  Italy  for  more  than 
sixty  years.  Half  a  century  ago  Jacques  Offenbach  produced 
the  work  in  Paris  at  the  Bouffes  Parisiennes.  The  opera 
comique  is  in  one  act  and  will  be  sung  this  winter  at  the 
Lirico  in  Milan.  With  this  work  will  be  given  Donizetti's  "La 
Clochette  de  I'Apothecaire"  and  Paer's  "Le  Maitre  de  Cha- 
pelle."  The  programme  will  be  repeated  at  the  Metropolitan 
Opera  House  here. — New  York  Sun. 

Subscribe  for  the  Musical   Review.     $2.00  per  Year. 


r  A  C  I  F  I  C    COAST    M  U  S  I  C  A  L    K  E  V  I  ]•:  \\- 


MUSICAL   NEWS   IN  THE   EAST. 


Those  pianists  who  decry  most  loudly  the  absence  of  new 
compositions  for  the  instrument  often  are  not  able  to  play  the 
old  works. — Musical  Courier. 

*       *       * 

/Opera  in  English!  Oscar  Hammerstein.  the  peerless  pion- 
eer of  things  operatic,  pronaises  "The  Bohemian  Girl."  to  be 
sung  in  our  native  tongue  at  the  Manhattan  within  the  next 
fortnight  or  so.  This  is  cheering  news,  but  a  more  represen- 
tative work  might  well  have  been  chosen  for  the  interesting 
experiment.  It  is  easier  to  fail  with  "The  Bohemian  Girl" 
than  with  ".\ida."  for  instance. — Musical  Courier. 

Max  Fielder,  conductor  of  the  Boston  Smyphony  Orchestra, 
sailed  from  Europe  September  25.  He  promises  to  bring 
with  him  a  large  list  of  orchestral  novelties  this  winter, 
among  them  being  four  worKS  by  Frederick  Delius — "Paris," 
"Appalachia,"  "In  a  Summer  Garden,"  "Brigg  Fair" — and  four 
by  Sibelius — "Swahnevit"  suite,  "En  Saga"  symphonic  poem  I, 
"Night  Ride  and  Sunrise"  (symphonic  poem  I  and  "The  Swan 
of  Tuonela":  Strauss'  "Macbeth."  Other  works  embraced  in 
the  Boston  Symphony  programs  this  winter  will  be  "Don 
Quixote,"  "Sinfonia  Domestica,"  the  first,  second,  fourth,  sixth 
and  ninth  symphonies  of  Beethoven,  the  fourth  of  Brahms, 
the  seventh  of  Bruckner,  Haydn's  in  K  flat,  Mozart's  in  E 
-  flat,  G  minor  and  C  major,  Schumann's  in  B  flat,  Tschaikow- 
sky's  "Manfred"  and  Goldmark's  "Rustic  Wedding." — Musical 
Courier. 

^       *       * 

When  "Electra"  is  produced  in  America  (the  first  perfor- 
mance is  to  be  given  in  Philadelphia  by  Hammerstein,  as  is 
generally  known),  it  is  to  be  in  French,  although  the  text  is 
German.  This  may  be  due  to  the  fact  that  Mary  Garden  is  to 
sing  the  part  of  Electra.  The  Clytemnestra  is  to  be  Reache. 
Such  is  the  report  as  it  emanates  from  Paris. — Musical  Cour- 
ier. 

It  must  have  been  a  curious  concatenation  of  circumstances, 
if  not  something  else,  which  brought  about  the  conjuncture 
of  the  recitals  of  Dr.  Wullner  and  George  Hamlin  on  the  same 
day  in  Chicago  and  of  Madame  Sembrich  and  Frau  Gadski 
on  the  same  other  day  in  Chicago.  It  will  be  -interesting  to 
observe  how  the  patronage  will  be  divided  in  the  double 
instances,  which  will  put  I  he  critics  twice  to  a  most  undesira- 
ble test. — Musical  Courier. 

%% 


CLAQUE. 

The  New  York  World  has  done  a  very  commendable  thing 
in  exposing  the  claque  at  the  Manhattan  Opera  House.  This 
pernicious  system,  which  emanates  from  Europe,  should  not 
be  tolerated  in  America.  In  most  of  the  opera  houses  in 
Europe  there  are  a  set  of  professional  claquers  who  are  paid 
by  the  artists  to  applaud.  It  has  long  been  suspected  that 
this  thing  has  been  in  vo.^ue  at  the  opera  houses  here,  both 
Metropolitan  and  Manhattan.  It  is  a  disgraceful  thing  for 
artists  so  to  lower  their  dignity  as  to  pay  for  people  to 
applaud  them,  in  order  to  make  the  unsophisticated  public 
think  that  it  is  a  genuine  success.  Some  of  these  artists 
have  been  paying  tribute  in  cash  to  these  professional 
applauders  and  frequently  they  have  distributed  a  large  num- 
ber of  complimentary  tickets.  This  nuisance  will  have  to  be 
eliminated.  .Mr.  .Messager.  the  director  of  the  Opera  in  Paris, 
has  put  a  stop  to  this  degrading  thing  and  printed  signs  are 
seen  in  all  the  corridors  of  the  opera  house  stating  that  it 
has  been  interdicted.  No  ,loubt.  this  exaiuple  will  be  followed 
by  other  institutions  in  Europe  in  which  it  has  been  in  vogue 
for  years.  The  people  here  who  received  the  money  and 
other  emoluments  for  the  purpose  of  applauding  are  foreig- 
ners and  the  system  is  one  entirely  introduced  by  foreigners. — 
Musical  Courier. 


-^W- 


BLANCHE   ARRAL'S    AMERICAN    SEASON. 

On  the  list  of  new  musical  artists  to  appear  this  season  is 
Blanche  Arral,  who  will  make  her  debut  before  a  New  "i'ork 
audience  in  Carnegie  Hall,  October  24.  Madame  Arral,  who 
was  to  have  sung  here  last  season,  left  for  Europe  with  but 
a  short  stop  in  New  York,  singing  only  at  San  Francisco  on 
her  way  home  after  completing  a  long  and  successful  tour 
through  Australia.  Her  reception  in  San  Francisco  was  most 
cordial  and  her  recent  concert  in  London  was  equally  success- 
ful. Her  coloratura  work  is  praised  with  great  warmth  by  the 
foreign  press  and  critics,  and  it  is  predicted  that  she  will 
create  a  very  decided  impression  when  she  is  heard  here. 
Her  appearances  in  America  are  limited  to  New  York,  Boston, 


Chicago,  St.  Louis.  Cincinaati.  and  Washington,  after  which 
she  sails  for  Europe,  to  begin  the  study  of  a  role  in  a  new 
opera  which  has  been  written  for  her  and  which  will  be  heard 
for  the  first  time  at  the  Brussels  Exhibition. — Musical  Courier. 


With  the  opening  of  the  Boston  Symphony  concerts.  October 
8.  and  the  new  Boston  Opera  House,  November  8 — one  month 
later — Boston's  quietude  will  have  vanished,  and  one  of  the 
most  brilliant  musical  seasons  in  the  life  of  this  city  will  have 
been  ushered  in;  in  fact,  the  dawn  of  a  new  era.  as  it  were, 
comes  to  Boston  in  the  owning  of  its  Opera  House,  a  higli 
step  in  progress  for  any  city  to  take.  With  the  opening  next 
week  of  the  Institute  of  Technology.  Tufts  College,  Boston 
I'niversity,  Amherst,  Williams,  Smith.  Wellesley.  Radcliffe, 
and  later  Harvard,  comes  the  influx  of  several  thousand  stu- 
dents, who,  it  has  been  found,  are  among  the  most  liberal 
patrons  of  good  musical  things  here — this  must  be  duly  con- 
sidered when  it  comes  to  "Who's  Who?"  in  musical  Boston. — 
.Musical  Courier. 


One  of  the  most  interesting  features  of  the  first  season 
of  the  Boston  Opera  Company  is  Director  Henry  Russell's 
announcement  of  "Aida"  for  the  first  week  of  the  season. 
This  opera  will  be  produced  on  a  scale  never  before  attempted 
in  this  city,  or  even  in  America.  Stroppa,  the  scenic  artist, 
is  creating  a  great  stage  setting,  which  even  now.  in  its  state 
of  incompletion,  is  stupendous.  The  costumes  have  been 
finished — and  present  a  bewildering  array,  as  only  the  richest 
and  rarest  materials  can  go  into  these,  and  tliey  must  be 
historically  pertect  in  every  detail.  At  one  time  on  the  stage 
there  will  be  almost  3U0  people— that  is.  six  principals,  twenty- 
six  priests,  a  crowd  of  twenty-four  men  and  fifty  women;  a 
ballet  of  thirty-two,  stage  band  of  twenty,  110  soldiers,  twelve 
prisoners,  five  men  to  look  after  horses  and  sixteen  throne 
bearers.  Celestina  Boninsegna,  the  Italian  dramatic  soprano, 
will  sing  the  title  role.  The  cast  will  probably  include  Mad- 
ame Claessens  as  Amneris. — Musical  Courier. 


MUSIC   FOR   THE    HUDSON-FULTON    FETE. 

The  music  festivals  during  the  Hudson-Fulton  celebration 
were  an  important  part  of  the  ceremonies.  The  I'nited 
Singers  of  New  York  for  their  concert  in  the  Hippodrome, 
Sunday  evening,  September  26,  secured  Corinne  Rider- 
Kelsey  and  Claude  Cunningham  as  the  soloists.  The  following 
Tuesday  evening.  September  28.  .Madame  Schumann-Heink 
was  the  star  of  the  concert  arranged  by  the  Arion  Society 
for  Carnegie  lail.  with  Frederick  Weld,  baritone,  also  assist- 
ing. On  the  same  evening  the  Liederkranz  gave  its  con- 
cert in  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House,  with  Corinne  Rider- 
Kelsey  as  the  soloist  and  Gary  Schlegel  assisting.  The 
Brooklyn  festivities  included  a  song  recital  by  Madame  Schu- 
mann-Heink at  the  Academy  ol  Music.  Wednesday  evening, 
September  29, — Musical  Courier. 


BOSTON    SYMPHONY    ORCHESTRA. 


The  outlook  is  that  the  Boston  Symphony  Orchestra  will 
have  one  of  the  busiest  seasons  in  its  career,  for  in  past  years 
the  maximum  number  of  concerts  was  106.  while  this  year 
the  total  number,  exclusive  of  a  couple  of  Pension  Fund  con- 
certs, sums  up  113.  The  Boston  season  begins  October  8, 
when  there  will  be  a  public  rehearsal  here  every  Friday  after- 
noon and  a  concert  every  Saturday  evening,  omitting  one 
Friday  and  Saturday  in  each  month  until  April  30.  Cam- 
bridge, Mass..  will  have  eight  concerts  on  Thursday  evenings; 
the  concerts  in  .\ew  York,  Brooklyn,  Philadelphia,  Baltimore 
and  Washington  will  be  given  each  month,  from  November 
to  March,  while  the  balance  come  in  midwinter.  Ffteen 
soloists  are  announced  for  the  Boston  concerts.  Among  the 
singers  who  will  appear  are:  Schumann-Heink.  Louise  Homer, 
Tilly  Koenen.  Geraldine  Farrar,  Madame  Hissem-De  Moss; 
pianists:  Samaroff,  Carreno,  and  Busoni;  violinists:  Kreisler, 
Willy  Hess,  and  Sylvain  Noack,  the  latter  sharing  the  first 
desk  of  the  first  violins  with  Mr.  Hess.  The  programs  of  the 
orchestra,  already  shown,  are  of  exceeding  interest. — Musical 
Courier. 


When  Richard  Strauss's  "Saloiue"  was  in  its  first  success, 
a  young  French  composer  named  Mariotte  produced  at  Lyons 
an  opera  also  founded  on  the  text  of  Oscar  Wilde.  Through 
the  interference  of  Strauss's  publisher  the  performance  was 
prohibited  elsewhere  on  the  ground  that  Strauss  owned  the 
exclusive  rights  to  the  poeiu.  .Vow  the  composer  has  used 
his  influence  with  the  publisher  to  have  the  right  to  perform 
the  work  restored  to  the  French  composer;  so  M.  Mariottes 
work  may  cause  a  new  vogue  for  "Salome." — New  York  Sun. 


1'  A  (^  I  V  I  (1    0  OAST    MUSIC  A  L    l{  10  V  I  K  W. 


MUSICAL  NEWS  ABROAD. 

Augusta  Cottlow,  the  distinguished  young  American  pianist, 
who  has  not  been  heard  in  Berlin  tor  a  decade,  since  she 
linished  her  studies  with  Busoni  there  and  played  with  the 
Philharmonic  Ochestra  while  yet  a  mere  slip  of  a  girl,  will 
make  her  rentree  on  October  26,  in  Bluthner  Hall,  at  the  tirsl 
big  smyphony  concert  of  the  Bluthner  Orchestra,  which  is  to 
be  conducted  by  .Joseph  Frischen,  of  Hannover.  She  will 
later  be  heard  in  recital  .xlso,  and  will  then  make  numerous 
appearances  throughout  Germany.  Miss  Cottlow  will  stay  in 
Europe  during  the  entire  season. — Musical  Courier. 

*  *       * 

Sergei  Kussewitzky  will  be  one  of  the  soloists  in  the  con- 
certs given  with  the  Philharmonic  Orchestra  by  the  Gesell- 
schaft  der  Musikfreunde  under  the  leadership  of  Oskar  Fried. 
Kussewitzky  is  the  only  living  double  bass  virtuoso  who  gets 
engagements  as  a  soloist  with  the  great  smyphony  orchestra. 
— Musical  Courier. 

Two  soloists  who  will  appear  in  London  during  October  are 
Moriz  Rosenthal,  who  has  postponed  his  tour  in  America  until 
next  year,  and  Ysaye,  who  appears  with  the  Queen's  Hall 
Orchestra. — Musical  Courier. 

Mark  Hambourg,  who  has  just  returned  from  a  successful 
tour  in  the  Provinces,  is  now  resting  preparatory  to  starting 
on  a  tour  of  Bngiand  during  October  and  November.  Im- 
mediately after  that  he  sails  for  Canada,  where  a  lengthy  tour 
has  been  arranged  for  this  popular  young  pianist. — Musical 
Courier. 

The  program  during  the  first  week  in  September  for  the 
Leipsic  City  Operas — that  is,  the  opera  and  the  operetta 
ensembles,  were  as  follows:  Opera,  In  new  theatre — Sunday, 
August  29.  "Hoffmann's  Erzahlungen":  Monday,  the  .Johann 
Strauss  operetta,  "Fledermaus,"  given  by  the  grand  opera 
ensemble:  Tuesday,  "Lohengrin":  Wednesday,  "Hoffmann's 
Erzahlungen":  Thursday,  "Magic  Flute":  Friday  "Tiefland"; 
Saturday,  Freitag's  comedy,  "The  .Journalists":  Sunday,  "Car- 
men." The  operetta  ensemble  at  the  Old  Theatre-^Sunday 
matinee,  "Der  Wildschutz":  evening,  Felix  Albini's  new 
"Barfusstanzerin"  (second  given  on  any  stage);  Monday, 
"Dollar  Princess":  Tuesday,  "Wiener  Blut':  Wednesday, 
"Barfusstanzerin';  Thursday,  (farce  premier):  Friday,  "Lus- 
tige  Witwe";  Saturday,  "Barfusstanzerin";  Sunday  matinee, 
"Dollar  Princess";   Sunday  evening,  farce. — Musical  Courier. 

The  two  act  romantic  operretta.  "The  Barefoot  Dancer," 
by  Felix  Albini,  was  given  its  first  performance  on  any  stage, 
August  28,  and  its  success  warrants  about  four  good  houses 
per  week.  The  music  seldom  gets  entirely  away  from  the 
conventional  operetta  spirit,  yet  the  dancer's  principal  song 
has  an  Oriental  flavor  of  agreeable  sadness  and  the  principal 
tenor's  barcarolle  is  of  enough  vitality  to  come  into  strong 
use  as  an  excerpt  for  cafe  and  salon  bands.  The  opening 
chorus  for  the  second  act  is  not  weak,  and  for  a  few  measures 
it  falls  into  a  persistant  marcato  that  suggests  the  Russian. 
An  ensemble  builds  up  later  in  the  act  to  a  great  impulse, 
though  the  theme  does  not  happen  to  be  one  of  the  best  of 
the  evening.  The  waltz  with  which  the  composer  tries  for 
the  evening's  "killing"  answers  the  purpose  of  the  play,  but 
will  probably  not  become  famous  as  one  of  its  class.  There 
is  much  evidence  that  the  large  success  of  the  entertainment 
grows  out  of  its  melodramatic  conception  and  treatment,  and 
the  fact  that  three  male  and  three  female  characters  are  well 
employed  nearly  all  evening.  This  argues  that  it  is  safer  to 
be  a  playwright  than  a  musician.  There  is  a  report  that  the 
work  has  been  engaged  for  production  in  America.  The 
operetta  is  published  in  Leipsic. — Musical  Courier. 

Caruso  will  appear  as  the  Duke  in  "Rigoletto"  at  Nuremberg 
on  October  8.  All  the  seats  were  sold  on  September  1.  He 
will  sing  three  times  in  Frankfurt  and  will  appear  there  also 
as  Canio  in  "Pagliacci."  Munich  has  offered  him  a  sold 
house,  but  he  demands  two. — Musical  Courier. 

*  *       * 

The  Munich  daily  papers  have  been  commenting  with 
severity  on  the  unsatisfactory  solo  performances  and  other 
defective  work  at  the  Price  Regenten  Theatre  series  in  htat 
city,  especially  the  "Tristan"  and  "Meistersinger,"  which  were 
conducted  by  Mottl,  who  seemed  to  be  oblivious  to  the  fact 
that  an  Isolde  sang  the  wnole  role  not  a  half  but  a  full  tone 
sharp  and  a  Walter  von  Stoltzing  sang  throughout  a  half  tone 
flat.  Mottl  appears  to  be  as  lackaisical  as  he  was  here  in 
New  York  as  incumbent  of  the  conductor's  chair.  Where 
are  the  great  Wagnerian  singers  of  today?     They  will  have  to 


draw  on  the  American  contingent  in  Europe;   that  is  the  only 
salvation. — Musical  Courier. 

Beginning  in  November  there  are  to  be  a  series  of  festival 
concerts  at  Buda  Pesth  with  the  assistance  of  the  Royal 
Opera  Orchestra.  Artists  selected  are:  Busoni  (if  he  dosen't 
get  to  America  before  the  date),  Yvonne  de  Treville  (Ameri- 
can), Minnie  Tracey  (American),  Selma  Kurz,  Schmedes, 
Slezka,  Kubelik,  Knote,  and  an  effort  is  on  foot  to  get 
Paderewski  and  to  make  one  evening  a  Massenet  moment 
musicale. — Musical  Courier. 

Mascagni's  directorship  of  the  Costanzi  Theatre,  in  Rome, 
is  expected  to  bring  that  institution  on  a  plane  with  the  other 
progressive  opera  houses  in  Italy.  "Siegfried"  and  "Lohen- 
grin" are  to  be  the  Wagner  additions  to  the  Costanzi  reper- 
tory. "L'Africaine,"  "Don  Carlos,"  and  "Freischutz"  will  be 
some  of  the  revivals,  while  Mascagni  promises  as  novelties 
"Electra,"  "Maja,"  "The  Harvest  Festival"  (by  Don  Fino, 
priest-composer),  and  his  own  "Iris." — Musical  Courier. 
*       *       * 

Mme.  Cosima  Wagner  no  longer  takes  the  important  part 
that  she  did  in  the  administration  of  affairs  during  the  festi- 
vals at  Bayreuth.  but  a  visitor  to  Wahnfried  has  given  an 
account  of  her  daily  regimen  which  shows  how  active  she  was 
until  she  abrogated  in  favor  of  Siegfried  Wagner,  who  now 
has  absolute  control  of  the  arrangements  (or  the  festivals. 
Until  this  year  the  family  met  every  morning  at  the  first 
breakfast,  which  is  very  unusual  in  a  German  household. 
Mme.  Wagner  always  preceded  this  function  by  a  walk 
through  the  gardens  of  Wahnfried.  Here  there  was  general 
discussion  of  the  plans  for  the  day  and  then  Eva  read  to  her 
mother  the  letters  that  had  arrived  with  the  morning  post. 
She  was  accustomed  to  the  task  and  understood  how  to  bring 
to  the  attention  of  Mme.  Wagner  only  those  that  demanded 
immediate  attention.  Then  the  rest  of  the  morning  was 
devoted  to  coaching  the  artists  who  were  to  take  part  in  the 
festivals.  When  they  had  been  sufficiently  trained  in  the 
way  they  should  go  the  private  secretary  of  the  festival  com- 
mittee came  to  Mme.  Wagner  and  discussed  with  her  the 
business  that  had  arisen  in  connection  with  that.  Then,  if 
there  were  no  guests  the  family  gathered  for  the  midday  meal 
at  what  was  called  the  children's  table,  which  means  that  all 
the  members  of  the  household  were  there.  Although  the 
family  had  been  reared  as  vegetarians  by  Wagner,  the  strict- 
ness of  that  diet  had  been  abandoned  to  some  extent, 
although  fruit  and  vegetables  always  formed  the  main  articles 
of  diet. 

Mme.  Wagner  always  walked  about  the  room  as  she  drank 
her  demitasse  after  dinner  in  accordance  with  the  advice  of 
her  physician.  Then  she  took  a  long  walk  or  drive  with  her 
favorite  daughter,  K\ii.  returning  for  .5  o'clock  tea,  which  was 
an  event  not  only  for  the  family  but  for  all  of  Bayreuth  that 
was  on  friendly  terms  with  the  chatelaine  of  Wahnfried. 
Mme.  Wagner  sat  by  the  tea  table,  enthroned  among  her 
friends  and  family,  while  Eva  poured  tea.  Her  secretary 
came  early  in  the  evening  with  letters  and  took  Mme.  Wag- 
ner's dictation,  which  she  always  gave  in  the  language  the 
letter  was  written  in,  whether  it  were  German,  French,  Italian 
or  English.  After  signing  the  letters  she  rejoined  her  family, 
which  spent  a  part  of  every  evening  in  listening  to  the  read- 
ing of  some  serious  book.  Mme.  Wagner  did  not  even  attend 
any  of  the  festival  performances  last  summer.  The  operas 
selected  for  next  summer  are  "Parsifal,"  "Die  Meister-singer" 
and  the  Nibelungen  Ring. — New  York  Sun. 

Emmy  Destinn  has  been  singing  at  the  National  Theatre 
in  Prague,  where  the  ."lOOth  performance  of  "Die  Verkaufte 
Braut"  was  given  the  other  day.  The  Komische  Oper  in  Ber- 
lin has  been  presenting  "Tiefland"  again  with  Maria  Labia, 
while  the  revivals  of  "Les  Contes  d'Hoffmann"  there  have  one 
singer  in  the  three  leading  roles.  This  is  the  way  in  which 
the  opera  was  sung  before  it  passed  into  the  domain  of  near 
grand.  Jeanette  Allen,  who  appeared  as  Olympia.  Antonio 
and  Giuletta,  happened  to  be  an  American  and  met  with  great 
success. — New  York  Sun. 

Carl  Goldmark  has  denied  that  he  will  compose  another 
opera.  He  regards  "A  Winter  Tale"  as  his  swan  song.  Gem- 
ma Bellinciopi  has  been  singing  both  Salome  and  Violetta  at 
the  Gura  Opera  in  Berlin  and  was  congratulated  by  the  Crown 
Prince  for  her  success  in  *he  latter  role.  Mario  Battistini  is 
singing  in  Germany  and  Austria  during  the  coming  season. 
He  will  not  appear  in  Russia  until  March.  Ferdinand  von 
Strantz,  formerly  the  Intendant  of  the  Royal  Opera  House  in 
Berlin,  has  just  passed  his  eighty-eighth  birthday.  He  is  said 
to  take  a  keen  interest  in  operatic  matters  in  Germany. — New 
York  Sun. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


9 


THE    MUSICAL    REVIEW'S   SUBSCRIPTION    CONTES 


^ 


It   Is   Instituted  for  the   Purpose  of  Giving   Students,  Teachers 

and   Members  of  Musical  Clubs  an   Inducement  to 

Spread  Its  Influence. 


By   Alfred    Metzger. 

At  no  time  since  tlie  foundation  of  this  paper  over  eight 
years  ago  have  I  ever  asked  the  readers  a  personal  favor.  It 
has  always  been  a  certain  satisfaction  to  me  to  fight  my  own 
battles,  permit  the  "knockers"  to  ease  their  minds  and  attend 
strictly  to  my  own  affairs  and  prove  by  actual  demonstration 
that  it  is  possible  to  establish  a  successful  musical  journal 
in  California.  Had  this  paper  been  able  to  command  a  certain 
amount  of  capital,  it  would  long  ago  have  been  as  widely  read 
and  as  representative  of  the  interests  of  music  and  musicians 
of  the  far  West  as  it  is  today;  but.  as  it  had  to  be  evolved 
without  financial  assistance  it  took  a  longer  time  to  arrive  at 
its  present  station.  However;  while  the  paper  is  now  a  finan- 
cial success  such  as  to  insure  its  permanency,  it  requires 
still  more  circulation  and  advertising  patronage  to  grow  in  the 
same  ratio  as  it  has  done  in  the  past. 

A  time  has  now  come  when  it  is  impossible  for  one  person 
to  continue  the  improvement.  I  have  tried  in  vain  to  find  a 
subscription  and  advertising  solicitor  who  could  fiill  his  posi- 
tion satisfactorily  and  who  would  not  absorb  all  the  income 
of  the  paper.  Still  there  is  no  reason  why  the  paper  should 
not  grow  more  than  it  has  in  the  past.  And  therefore  I  am 
compelled  at  this  stage  of  me  game  to  ask  the  aid  of  the  music 
lovers  in  the  expansion  and  increase  of  circulation  of  this 
paper.  Inasmuch  as  I  realize  that  no  one  should  be  expected 
to  work  for  nothing  I  have  solved  a  problem  by  means  of 
which  it  is  possible  to  renay  anyone  interested  in  this  cam- 
paign more  than  enough  lor  any  time  or  energy  he  or  she 
may  be  so  kind  as  to  devoce  to  this  cause.  The  one  who  can 
secure  within  the  next  six  months  the  most  subscriptions  for 
this  paper  will  receive  a  grand  piano  to  be  selected  from  the 
"leaders"  of  any  of  the  music  houses  who  advertise  in  this 
paper.  These  houses  are  in  alphabetical  order:  The  Wiley  B. 
Allen  Co.,  (Knabe  Piano  I;  The  Baldwin  Piano  Co..  (Baldwin 
Pianol;  Benj.  Curtaz  &  Son  (Everett  Piano);  Kohler  &  Chase 
(Weber  Pianol:  and  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  (Steinway  Pianol. 
In  order  that  this  paper  does  not  fall  in  danger  of  financial 
loss  it  is  stipulated  that  the  highest  number  of  annual  sub- 
scribers entitling  the  winner  to  a  grand  piano  should  not  be 
less  than  Five  Hundred.  If  it  is  less  than  five  hundred  the 
winner  will  receive  an  upright  piano  of  the  same  make.  The 
grand  pianos  are  worth  from  $800  to  $1,000,  and  the  uprights 
$.")2.^.  Either  prize  is  well  worth  working  for.  Anyone  who 
should  not  be  fortunate  enough  to  win  first  prize,  but  who  has 
devoted  time  and  work  to  the  subject  will  receive  an  order  on 
any  music  house,  advertising  in  this  paper,  for  2'>  per  cent,  of 
the  amount  forwarded  to  this  ofiice.  For  these  2n  per  cent, 
the  winner  can  select  any  article  of  the  value  presented  on  the 
order.  If  the  winner  of  the  capital  prize  should  be  a  violinist  he 
can  select  a  violin  of  the  value  represented  by  the  piano.  If  the 
winner  of  the  2.5  per  cent,  merchandise  order  prefers  to  take 
lessons,  he  can  select  a  teacher  from  the  advertisers  in  this 
paper  and  the  paper  will  give  him  an  order  on  the  teacher 
selected  for  the  amount  he  is  entitled  to. 

Now  you  must  not  forget  that  in  asking  your  friends  to  sub- 
scribe for  this  paper  you  are  not  asking  for  charity.  They 
will  receive  every  cent  worth  for  their  outlay  in  a  paper  that 
gives  them  musical  information  from  all  over  the  world.  They 
will  like  the  paper  and  they  will  be  glad  they  have  subscribed 
for  it.  If  your  musical  club  needs  a  piano,  get  the  members 
together  to  solicit  subscriptions  from  other  members.  If  your 
conservatory  needs  a  piano,  get  the  pupils  together  and  let 
them  win  it.  If  you  like  your  teacher,  get  your  friends 
together  and  win  the  piano  for  him.  If  you  need  a  piano  your- 
self see  whether  you  have  enough  friends  who  like  you  enough 
to  help  you  win  it.  And  mind  you  whether  you  win  the  first 
prize  or  not  you  can  always  get  enough  subscribers  to  get  a 
piano  with  the  25  per  cent,  that  is  surely  coming  to  you.  Now 
let  us  see  how  many  true  friends  this  paper  has  and  how  many 
true  friends  its  readers  have. 


AMBITIOUS    PLANS   OF    VON    STEIN    ACADEMY. 

W^enzel   Kopta  Engaged  as  Head  of  the  Violin  Department  and 

Joint  Concerts  of  Heinrich  Von  Stein  and   Kopta 

Features  of  the  Season. 


The  exceedingly  gratifying  news  reached  this  office  last 
week  that  Wenzel  Kopta  has  accepted  an  offer  from  the  Von 
Stein  Academy  of  Music  in  Los  Angeles,  to  preside  over  the 
excellent  violin  department  of  that  ideal  educational  institu- 
tion.    While  Julius  Bielich,  who  for  several  years  has  proven 


of  inestimable  value  to  the  institution,  never  failed  to  give  the 
utmost  satisfaction  and  under  the  new  regime  retains  his 
position.  It  was  necessary  under  the  new  policy  of  the  institu- 
tion to  begin  its  acquirement  of  artists  of  international  repu- 
tation. This  expansion  of  its  policy  was  made  necessary  by 
announcements  during  the  summer,  and  it  is  gratifying  as 
w^ell  as  surprising  that  Heinrich  von  Stein  has  been  able  to 
formulate  his  plans  in  so  prompt  and  quick  a  manner. 

Wenzel  Kopta's  reputation  as  a  pedagogue  and  artist  is 
too  well  known  in  California  to  require  at  this  time  any  extend- 
ed or  detailed  mention.  Suflice  it  to  say  that  he  stands  second 
to  no  musicians  either  residing  here  or  who  has  visited  us 
from  abroad.  As  a  pedagogue  he  is  beyond  criticism  and  the 
Von  Stein  Academy  for  Pianists  is  indeed  fortunate  to  have 
secured  such  a  prize.  The  Academy  has  now  a  thoroughly 
efficient  string  quartet  under  Wenzel  Kopta's  direction  and 
with  Heinrich  von  Stein's  standing  as  a  pianist  and  an 
ensemble  player  there  will  certainly  be  some  musical  feasts 
in  store  for  the  students  of  the  institution  as  well  as  the 
musical  public,  if  the  latter  is  wise  enough  to  take  advantage 
of  such  a  brilliant  opportunity. 

The  vocal  department  is  now  in  charge  of  Hugo  Kirchhofer 
and  Robert  Eckhard,  two  tenors  of  fine  ability.  An  addition 
to  the  faculty  of  the  piano  department  is  Henry  Immerman, 
during  the  past  six  years  instructor  of  the  Philadelphia  Musical 
Academy,  and  .1.  W.  Moore  of  London,  England,  who  enjoys  an 
enviable  reputation  as  pianist  and  organist.  Mr.  Von  Stein 
is  now  negotiating  to  acquire  a  suitable  site  for  a  more  exten- 
sive conservatory  building  to  be  begun  within  about  six 
months  from  now. 


HEINRICH    VON    STEIN 
The   Indefatigable   Director  of  the   Von   Stein   Academy   For   Pianlsl 


10 


PAriFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


NEW    PUBLICATIONS   OF    1909. 


(From  the  New  York  Musical  Courier.) 
After  much  visiting  and  interviewing  among  the  two  dozen 
music  publishing  firms  here,  it  is  possible  to  submit  a  report 
on  the  new  publication  for  1909;  not  only  of  those  just  in  print, 
but  in  numerous  instances  those  not  yet  otherwhere  an- 
nounced. The  composers'  names  include  not  only  the  majority 
of  known  living  composers,  but  strangely  enough,  Pergolesi 
(died  1736).  Monteverde  (died  164:?).  Gluck  (died  1787),  Haydn 
(died  1809).  and  Mendelssohn  (died  1847)  are  found  to  be 
bringing  out  compositions  never  before  published.  The  fact 
is  not  in  argument  that  dead  men  are  writing  new  tunes,  but 
that  their  old  tunes  live  in  manuscript  a  long  time  after 
them.  Among  living  composers  it  is  agreeable  to  find,  in  a 
number  of  catalogues,  compositions  by  Christian  Sinding, 
whose  output  has  never  been  over  large,  and  who  has  been 
sometimes  dissatisfied  with  himself  because  his  pen  was  not 
more  prolific.  This  year  there  appear  in  Leipsic  a  serenade, 
op.  92.  for  two  violins  and  j)iano;  seven  songs,  op.  8.5  (Peters)  ; 
violin  and  piano  sonata  in  old  style,  op.  99,  two  books  of 
Northern  dancers  and  airs  for  piano  at  four  hands;  a  large 
variation  work  called  "Fatum,"  op.  99,  for  piano  solo  (Breit- 
kopf  &  Hartel):  a  piano  sonata,  op.  91,  and  three  pieces,  op. 
89.  for  violin  and  piano  (Hansen),  and  five  songs  with  piano 
(Robert  Forberg). 

*  *       * 

A  straw  showing  the  vitality  of  the  Reger  cult  is  found  in 
the  fact  that  four  of  Reger's  young  composition  pupils  are 
liberally  represented  in  the  1909  prints.  In  some  instances 
the  published  works  were  those  brought  to  Reger  in  the 
regular  study  classes  at  Leipsic  Conservatory.  The  young 
men  are:  .Josef  Haas  (Munich).  Othniar  Schoeck  (Zurich?). 
Herman  Keller  (Leipsic),  and  Kary  Hasse  (Chemnitz).  The 
first  and  second  named  compose  very  rapidly. 

*  ^.       « 

There  is  Ihe  promise  of  future  large  publishing  operations 
by  a  new  firm,  the  Russisoher  Musik  Verlag,  of  Berlin,  whose 
printing,  however,  is  already  under  way  in  Leipsic.  The  dis- 
tinguished contrabassist.  Sergei  Kussewitzky,  is  a  moving 
factor  and  much  money  is  behind  him.  Friends  of  the  vener- 
able composer.  Felix  Draeseke.  of  Dresden,  will  be  glad  to 
know  of  strong  interest  in  him  for  1909-10,  and  especially  for 
his  "Tragica"  symphony  (Kistner).  Arthur  Nikisch  has  stood 
by  this  symphony  for  years,  because  he  liked  it,  and  now 
others  are  to  follow.  Special  interest  may  attach  to  three 
little  series,  a  total  of  nine  piano  pieces  by  Ferruccio  Busoni 
(Jul.  Heinr.  Zimmermann).  since  that  artist  is  announced  for 
an  .American  season.  Of  course,  the  venerable  Carl  Reinecke 
is  still  composing,  and  there  are  those  who  think  that  he 
always  will  be.  His  principal  new  work  is  a  sonata  for  organ 
(Leuckart).  Two  years  ago  he  finished  a  beautiful  variation 
work  for  two  pianos,  but  if  that  is  in  print  in  Leipsic  it  has 
escaped  notice.  A  curious  fact  in  the  experience  of  Enrico 
Bossi's  publishers  shows  the  poor  state  of  orchestral  efficiency 
in  Italy.  In  two  instances  Bossi's  big  orchestral  variations, 
op.  131,  were  put  in  rehearsal  by  Italian  symphony  orchestras, 
but  on  account  of  supposed  impossible  technical  difficulties  the 
work  was  never  brought  into  concert.  Finally  the  com- 
positions spoken  of  in  this  letter  do  not  nearly  represent 
in  any  case  the  year's  output  of  any  of  the  firms.  These 
are  only  spoken  of  in  a  hurried  glance  through  announce- 
ments and  printing  memoranda. 

Breitkopf  &  Hartel  bought,  in  January  this  year,  two 
violin  concertos  by  Joseph  Haydn.  The  manuscripts  were 
in  these  archives,  unknown  to  the  present  proprietors,  for 
140  years.  The  house  is  bringing  now  the  first  authentic 
edition  of  the  Pergolesi  "Stabat  Mater."  It  had  been 
willed  that  the  manuscript  should  never  leave  the  cloister 
of  Nonte  Casino,  near  Naples.  There  have  been  many 
editions  of  the  work,  but  varying  and  unauthentic,  because 
of  inaccessibility  of  the  manuscript.  The  Italian  Gov- 
ernment came  to  the  rescue  and  supplied  Breitkopf  & 
Hartel  with  a  complete  set  of  photographs  of  the  manu- 
script. These  were  entrusted  to  the  editing  of  Gustav 
Schreck,  cantor  of  the  Thomas  Schule,  in  Leipsic.  The 
work  is  issued  here  in  Latin  and  German  texts,  the  Ger- 
man by  Emmy  Schreck,  wife  of  the  editor.  Of  modern 
compositions  now  in  this  press,  the  chief  is  the  grand 
opera,  "Katharina,"  by  Edgar  Tinel.  It  has  been  given 
in  manuscript  seventeen  times  at  the  Theatre  Monnaie,  in 
Brussels.  The  vorspiel  is  issued  separately  for  concert. 
The  English  composer.  Granville  Bantock.  has  new  inci- 
dental music  to  Sophocles'  "Electra."  The  piano  score 
is  available  and  the  Sophocles  texts  appear  in  Greek  and 
in     English     translation.       Joseph     Holbrooke    has    here    his 


fourth    smyphonic    poem,    called    "Ulalume."        As    indicated 
above,  here  are  Sinding's  op.  94,  98  and  99. 

C.  F.  Peters  is  bringing  out  Max  Reger's  "Psalm  100,"  op. 
106,  for  chorus,  orchestra  and  organ.  This  work,  of  monu- 
mental proportions,  will  have  first  performance  in  Vienna, 
.lanuary,  1910.  It  has  also  English  text.  Then  comes  an 
organ  prelude  and  double  fugue  by  Friedrich  Klose.  author 
of  the  successful  opera  "Ilsebill."  A  most  important  series 
is  one  of  twelve  five-voice  madrigals  by  Monteverde.  never 
before  issued  in  score.  Pfitzner's  piano  quintet,  op.  23; 
Sinding's  serenade  for  two  violins  and  piano,  and  seven 
songs  on  Bierbaum's  "Irrgarten  der  Liebe,"  also  .Moskow- 
ski's  four  piano  solos,  op.  82,  are  other  modern  works  just 
issued.  Violinist  Schering.  of  Leipsic.  has  brought  out  a  most 
valuable  collection  of  thirteen  old  violin  sonatas  and  pieces 
by  Corelli  and  contemporaries.  Emit  Sauer.  of  Dresden, 
contributes  a  book  of  twenty-five  of  the  Scarlatti  piano 
sonatas,  in  his  editing  for  practical  use.  Reger's  violin  con- 
certo, op.  100.  and  his  symphonic  prologue,  op.  108.  are 
among  last  season's  important  works  from  the  Peters  press. 

The  F.  E.  C.  Leuckart  Press  may  be  said  to  be  in  a  state 
of  eruption,  so  voluminous  is  its  output  of  modern  works. 
These  are  the  Emil  Paur  A  major  symphony,  Frederick 
Delius'  orchestral  "Nachtstuch,"  a  Richard  Mandl  sym- 
phonic poem  for  soprano,  female  chorus  and  large  orches- 
tra; Richard  Stohr  suite  for  strings,  G.  Schjelderup's  sym- 
phonic poem,  "Sunrise  in  the  Himalayas";  Xaver  Schar- 
wenka's  F  minor  piano  concerto,  Reinecke's  organ  sonata, 
op.  284;  Hugo  Kaun's  string  quartet,  op.  74;  Joseph  Haas' 
organ  suite  and  other  works.  Hermann  Roth's  (Leipsic) 
organ  prelude,  chaconne  and  fugue;  Heinrich  Zollner's 
(now  at  Antwerp)  battle  song  for  male  chorus  and  or- 
chestra. Choral  works  vith  orchestra  are  I'lrich  Hilde- 
brandt's  "Calvin  Cantata."  George  Schumann's  secular  can- 
tata, "Ruth"  (also  English),  probably  to  be  given  in  Chi- 
cago; Ludwig  Hess's  own  orchestration  of  his  song  "Don 
Fadrique,"  and  Louis  Koemmenich's  (Philadelphia) 
"MorgenhyiTime"  for  male  chorus  and  orchestra.  Mixed 
choruses  are  by  R.  Tobias  (Leipsic);  sacred  choruses,  Ar- 
nold Mendelssohn;  sacred  choruses,  Matthieu  Neumann 
and  Theodor  Koschat.  Male  choruses  are  by  Othegraven 
(prizes  in  Frankfort,  1909),  Julius  Roentgen's  "Jung 
Volker,"  Wilh.  Kienzl,  Hugo  Kaun,  Friedrich  Hegar  ("Des 
Geiger's  Heinikehr")  and  two  other  choruses,  Zollner's 
two  a  capella  ballads.  Viktor  Zack,  Rudolph  Heine  (Indi 
anapolis).  Matthieu  Neumann's  "Warning  vor  dem  Rhein" 
(New  York,  1909).  Reinhold  Becker's  choruses.  Solo  songs 
with  piano  are  those  by  Rich.  Mandl.  Jos.  Hass  (seven), 
H.  von  Vigneau  (also  English).  Paul  Ertel  (English), 
ZoUner.  Ludwig  Hess,  and  the  op.  33  and  op.  40  (also  Eng- 
lish) by  the  late  Heinrich  van  Eyken.  some  of  these  to  be 
sung  in  America  by  Tilly  Koenen.  Instrumental  works  fur- 
ther include  ten  concert  pieces  by  Haas,  for  children,  R.  von 
Mojsisovic's  pieces  for  violin  and  organ,  .Alex  Winter- 
berger's  Oriental  dance  ("Kismet")  for  piano  solo,  two 
piano  ballads  by  Adolph  Brune  (Chicago),  harp  pieces  by 
Johannes  Snoer,  and  many  organ  compositions  for  church 
service,  by  Uso  Sieferi.  As  if  that  were  not  enough  to 
keep  busy,  the  Leuckart  house  is  bringing  a  number  of 
large  music  literary  works,  such  as  a  new  edition  of  the 
Kothe-ForchhtUiiraer  "Fuhrer  durch  die  Orgel  Litteratur," 
the  fourth  volume  of  the  Ambros  musical  history  in  reprint 
(this  volume  on  the  period  1.5ii0-1660).  also  a  reprint  of 
Wilhelm  Weber's  book  on  the  Beethoven  "Missa  Solemnis," 
a  much  called  for  work  which  had  been  out  of  print  for  a 
long  time. 

Two  new  pieces,  also  gauged  to  teaching  and  house, 
are  by  Christian  Schafer  (nine),  G.  Marchisio  (London), 
Oskar  Nedbal,  Gabriel  Marie.  Carl  Leon,  A.  Tellier,  W. 
Aletter.  A.  Sartorio,  Carl  Reinecke  (twenty  pieces  formerly 
published  in  America).  Leo  Norden,  J.  E.  Heidenfelder 
(four  hands),  Donald  Heins,  Arthur  Somervell  (five  books 
for  youth), J.  Harold  Henry,  Joseph  Heller,  George  Mawes 
(four  Christmas  pieces),  J.  H.  Fouldes  (holiday  sketches, 
also  in  editions  for  salon  and  large  orchestra).  For  reed 
organ  there  are  small  preludes  and  pieces  by  Casimir  Meis- 
ter.  and  Sir  Frederic  Bridge  has  set  four  Schumann  sketches 
for  the  same.  E.  W.  Taylor  brings  a  set  of  exercises  for 
playing  from  figured  bass.  There  are  male  choruses  by  Rich- 
ter,  Kutscherra,  Dobler,  Keldorfer,  Krannig.  Pfirstinger  and 
Berr.  The  house  has  many  compositions  for  concert  and 
smaller  orchestras. 

(To  Be  Continued   Next   Week.) 


P  A  r-  I  F  r  <  •    (■  OAST    .AI  U  S  I  C  A  L    K  E  \-  I  E  V,\ 


11 


SAN    FRANCISCO    CONSERVATORY    RECITAL. 


One  who  listened  carefully  and  without  prejudice  to  the 
recital  recently  given  by  the  pupils  of  the  San  Francisco  Con- 
servatory of  Music  of  which  E.  S.  Bonelli  is  the  able  director, 
must  have  been  struck  with  one  particular  fact.  This  fact, 
which  at  the  same  time  points  a  moral,  consisted  of  a  universal 
selection  of  compositions  within  easy  reach  of  the  student  and 
still  imbued  with  sufficient  technical  importance  to  bring  them 
outside  the  commonplace  class.  There  was  also  a  gratifying 
lack  of  inharmonious  and  accrobatic  classical  intricacies  which 
do  not  mean  anything  to  a  youthful  mind  and  which,  if  the 
truth  were  known,  bore  the  audience  half  to  death.  We  do  not 
mean  to  content  that  severe  classical  works  should  not  form 
part  of  a  pupil's  repertoire,  but  we  certainly  affirm  that  a 
young  student,  beginning  to  enter  upon  a  course  of  tuition, 
should  not  be  given  works  beyond  his  ken  or  beyond  his 
capability  to  satisfactorily  expound  them. 

We  must  congratulate  Professor  Bonelli  upon  the  wisdom 
he  displayed  in  the  selection  of  the  program  as  well  as  in  the 
distribution  of  tasks  among  students  who  were  fully  equipped 
to  do  them  justice.  In  this  manner  he  not  only  avoided 
unpleasant  impressions,  but  he  caused  a  feeling  of  ease  among 
his  audience  that  packed  Golden  Gate  Commandery  Hall  to 
the  very  doors  on  Wednesday  evening.  September  29th.  and 
that  went  home  thoroughly  satisfied  of  having  spent  a  nleas- 
ant  evenine. 

The  first  part  of  the  program  revealed  two  piano  students  of 
particularly  commendable  qualities.  One  of  these  was  Miss 
Atha  Gutman,  who  made  a  most  excellent  impression  by  reason 
of  her  brilliant  technic  and  her  vigorous  touch  coupled  with 
finer  musical  instincts  and  Miss  Alma  Jensen  whose  deliberate 
phrasing,  expressive  coloring  and  firm  attack  evoked  the  plaud- 
its of  her  hearers.  The  important  features  of  the  second  part 
were  two  concertos,  one  by  Hummel  and  one  by  Mendelssohn 
which  were  particularly  well  rendered.  Both  concertos  were 
played  upon  two  pianos  assisted  by  a  string  quartet.  The 
Hummel  concerto  was  interpreted  on  the  pianos  by  Mrs.  Alex- 
ander Gutman  and  Miss  Atha  Gutman  and  was  a  feat  of  techni- 
cal and  musical  skill  upon  which  both  executants  and  their 
instructor  may  look  with  justifiable  pride.  Mrs.  Gutman  in 
particular  proved  to  be  a  matured  musician  who  had  grasped 
her  duty  well  and  who  certainly  acquitted  herself  with  much 
credit  in  every  way. 

Miss  Grace  Morrill  gave  an  excellent  interpretation  of 
Lavellee"s  "Papillon."  which  afforded  her  an  opportunity  to  dis- 
play a  limpid  digital  smoothness  that  forced  her  hearers  to 
admire  her  and  reward  her  with  prolonged  applause.  Miss 
Aline  Lang  revealed  herself  as  a  pianiste  of  much  physical 
force,  purity  of  technic  and  sane  musical  reading.  A  string 
quintet  and  piano,  the  personel  of  which  may  be  found  in  the 
appended  program,  gave  an  excellent  account  of  itself  in  a 
musical  interpretation  of  Bendix's  "In  Beauty's  Bower.' 

Miss  Maud  Lang  played  a  violin  solo  with  quite  an  emotional 
phrasing.  Mrs.  Le  Page  sang  an  aria  from  an  Italian  Opera  in 
splendid  voice  and  with  an  intelligence  very  gratifying  to  a 
careful  connoisseur.  Miss  Edith  Coffee.  Miss  Mary  Wolch. 
Miss  Sarah  Thorold.  Miss  A.  Echeveria  and  G.  Didier  added  to 
the  pleasure  of  the  evening.  A  most  delightful  incident  of  the 
evening's  procedures  was  the  presentation  of  a  beautiful  gold 
headed  ebony  cane  presented  by  the  pupils  of  E.  S.  Bonelli  to 
their  teacher  as  a  token  of  affection  and  esteem.  Professor 
Bonelli  was  justly  moved  by  this  unselfish  tribute  to  his  adapt- 
ibility  as  an  educator  and  the  spirit  in  which  the  gift  was  pre- 
sented rather  than  its  intrinsic  value  gave  it  a  most  precious 
aspect  in  his  heart. 

The  program  was  as  follows: 

Part  One — Raff  op.  8.5.  (Piano  Soloi.  Miss  Edith  Coffey:  Men- 
delssohn— Duetto,  op.  38  Xo.  6.  (Piano  Solo  I.  Miss  Mary 
Wolch:  Pinsuti — "The  Book  of  Prayer."  (Vocal  Solo  I.  Miss 
Sarah  Thorold:  Violin  Obligato.  Miss  A.  Echeverria.  Accom- 
panist Sig.  F.  Ziliani:  Beethoven — Op.  2.  1st  and  2nd  Move- 
ments, (Piano  Solo  I.  Miss  Atha  Gutman:  Fa  villa — "Souvenir  de 
Paris",  (Violin  Solo),  Miss  Maud  Lang:  Accompanist  Miss 
Aline  Lang;  Mendelssohn — Op.  14.  (Piano  Soloi.  Miss  Alma 
Jensen:  Gomes — Solo  Soprano  from  Opera  "Guarany. "  (Vocal 
Soloi.  Mrs.  Le  Page.  Accompanist  Sig.  F.  Zilliani. 

Part  Two — Hummel — Concerto  op.  8.5  1st  Movement  (2 
Pianos  and  Quartet  l  1st  Piano.  Mrs.  Alexander  Gutman.  2nd 
Piano  Miss  Atha  Gutman:  Lavalle — "Le  Papillon"  (Piano 
Soloi.  Miss  Grace  Morrill:  Bendix — "In  Beauty's  Bower" 
(Strings  and  Piano i.  Violins.  Miss  Marie  Abeille.  Miss  Adelia 
Valentino,  and  Mr.  C.  Swansen,  Viola.  Mr.  N.  Kinell.  Piano. 
Miss  May  Coffey.  Cello.  Mr.  Chas.  Kuss:  Mendelssohn — Con- 
certo op.  25.  1st  Movement  12  Pianos  and  Quartet).  1st  Piano, 
Mr.  Harry  Lowenstein.  2nd  Piano.  Miss  Aline  Lang:  Ziliani — 
"Un  Bacio  d'  Amore"  (Vocal  Duet  I.  Miss  A.  Echeverria  and 
Mr.  G.  Didier:  Beethoven — Op.  13  1st  Movement  i Piano  Soloi. 
Miss  .\line  Lang. 


Elaborate 

Holiday 

Number! 

gn  THE  P.ACIFIC  CO.AST  MUSICAL 
^J  RE\  EIW  IS  now  preparing  a  large  and 
^  handsomely  illustrated  New  ^  ears  Edition 
which  will  be  published  on  Saturday.  December 
25th,  1909.  Besides  containing  a  Retrospective 
Re\iew  of  San  Franciscos  Musical  Life  since 
April  1  8.  1  906.  the  paper  will  contain  speaal  ar- 
ticles about  Los  .Angeles  Musicians  and  California 
.Musical  Clubs. 

M  II  THOSE  who  do  not  advertise  regularly  in 
^J  this  paper  will  find  the  Holiday  Number  of 
^  the  "Pacific  Coast  Musical  Re\-iew"  an  ideal 
.Advertising  Medium  as  it  will  consist  of  an  edition 
of  not  less  than  Ten  Thousand  Copies. 

M  II  REGL  L.AR  advertisers  in  this  paper  who 
\\\  have  Annual  Contracts  are  entitled  to  a 
^  complimentarv'  article  containing  200  words 
each;  and  if  thay  pay  for  cuts  at  the  rate  of  I  5c  a 
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Regular  advertisers  desiring  to  take  advantage  of 
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cepted. 

SINGLE  COPIES  OF  THE   HOLIDAY 
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For    Particulars    Address: 


PACIFIC  COAST 
MUSICAL  REVEIW 

Sherman  Clay  &  Co.  Building 
Sutter  and  Kearny  Sts.  San  Francisco 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


THE    NILE    CLUB   JINKS. 


Tlie  following  is  an  example  of  the  excellent  lyrics  written 
for  this  occasion: 

The   Desert's  Smile. 
The  desert's  smile  is  one  of  gold 
A  smile  that  lures  men  ever  on 
To  search  tor  care;  to  seek  for  pain; 
To  reach  into  the  womb  of  down 
For  day  again. 
That  crimson  stain 

Which  falls  upon  a  world  of  mourning, 
A  blistered  curse  that  hangs  o'er  head 
And  warps  the  soul  that  went  forth  earning 
Release  from  life  that  means  but   bread. 
A  coat  the  cut  of  which  makes  bold 
Ambition — whether  bought  or  sold. 

The  desert's  smile  is  amethyst, 

A  smile  that  urges  men  away 

To  distant  peaks  'neath  azure  sky, 

To  where  the  gods  create  the  day. 

Where  vultures  ply. 

And  dangers  lie 

Among  the  mountains  o'er  the  valley 

In  which  no  tree  may  crave  to  grow, 

No  stream  can  dare  a  sudden  sally. 

Where  Life  and  Death  forever  throw 

The  dice  for  those  who  race  with  zest 

To  reach  the  goal,  perpetual  rest. 

The  desert's  smile  is  purple  deep. 

No  moon  shines  down,  no  stars  appear. 

The  chill  wind  moans  across  the  sage. 

Within  the  heart  comes  sudden  fear. 

In  silent  rage 

This  land  does  age: 

It  bears  the  curses  of  creation 

Which  spent  its  force  ere   well   begun 

The  moulding  of  forbidding  heap 

From  odds  and  ends  of  worlds  that  sleep. 

The  desert's  smile  is  drab  and  gray. 
It  watches  hearts  o'ertlow  with  hope. 
It  marks  the  brave  among  the  brave 
Grow  weak  with   terror  as  they  grope 
Like  beaten  slave 
For  deepest  grave 
To  shelter  from  a  past's  grimaces; 
To  hide  them  from  the  leering  nights 
That  tread  upon  the  year's  fair  faces. 
Where  time's  dread  heel  in  glee  alights 
And  stamps  upon  the  brow  of  day 
The  marks  of  pain  as  from  a  fray. 

The  desert's  smile  is  but  a  leer 

That  steeps  the  heart,  yet  draws  men  down 

On  bended  knee  to  seek  the  light 

That  lies  behind  those  masks  that  frown 

On  wrong,  on  right. 

On  peace,  on  fight. 

On  rust  of  ages  long  past  knowing. 

On  dust  of  sages  long  forgot — 

They  had  their  day  and  staid  their  going 

Until   assured  all   else   would   rot 

But  their  own  Truth,  which  stands  out  clear. 

And  wins  for  epitaph,  a  sneer. 

The  desert's  smile  is  solitude. 

It  echoes  silence  through  the  years 

As  caverns  deep  the  roar  of  seas. 

It  lifts  on  high  its  dead  men's  tears 

And  prays  at  ease 

Like  priest  on  knees 

A  prayer  of  scorn  that  baffles  heaven. 

Then  scatters  peace  upon  the  bones 

That  whitened  lie,  by  Time  engraven. 

Mere  leggates  tossed  'mid  sculptured  stones — 

The  bones  no  more  their  hopes  intrude. 

The  desert  weeps  its  gratitude. 


DEATH    OF    SAUL    LIEBLING. 

Saul  Liebling.  pianist,  and  head  of  the  well  known  Concert 
Direction  .lules  Sachs,  of  Berlin,  Germany,  died  of  heart  failure 
very  suddenly  at  his  home  in  that  city,  Thursday,  September 
16.  Saul  Liebling  was  one  of  the  brothers  of  the  well  known 
Liebling  family  of  pianists.  Born  in  Posen,  Germany,  April 
(j,  1859,  he  toured  at  a  very  early  age  as  a  child  prodigy,  and 
later  studied  with  Bendel  and  KuUak,  in  Berlin,  and  will 
Liszt,  at  Weimar.  Coming  to  America  in  1875  he  appeared 
frequently  at  the  famous  Koster  &  Bial  concerts  in  New  York, 
and  subsequently  toured  for  several  years  with  the  Theodore 
Thomas  Orchestra  (with  which  he  gave  the  first  American 
performance  of  the  Grieg  concerto),  Camilla  Urso,  Clara 
Louise  Kellogg,  Ole  Bull,  Emma  Thursby,  etc.  Returning  to 
Berlin,  in  1883,  Saul  Liebling  settled  there  and  founded  the 
Neues  Konservatorium  der  Tonkunst.  A  silent  partnership 
with  Jules  Sachs,  the  imnresario,  was  ended  by  the  latter's 
sudden  death,  and  Mr.  Liebling  found  himself  forced  to  take 
entire  charge  of  the  business,  which  he  thereafter  conducted 
with  pronounced  success.  Among  the  artists  managed  by  the 
Sachs  Bureau  recently  and  brought  to  Berlin  were  Mascagni, 
Saint-Saens,  Sousa,  Grieg,  and  a  host  of  celebrated  concert 
virtuosi.  The  firm  also  arranged  lectures  of  the  most  import- 
ant kind,  and  had  Lieutenant  Shackleton  and  Dr.  Cook  under 
contract  for  appearances  in  Berlin  this  winter. 

Saul  Liebling  was  Court  Pianist  to  several  reigning  houses 
in  Europe,  and  had  been  decorated  with  a  number  of  high 
orders.  He  was  persona  grata  at  the  Courts  of  Rouraania. 
Coburg-Gotha,  and  Saxony,  and  during  the  later  years  of  Bis- 
marck's life  had  the  honor  of  being  his  personal  friend  and 
spending  many  days  every  season  at  Friedrichsruhe  as  the 
Iron  Chancellor's  guest. 

His  published  compositions  consist  of  several  hundred  piano 
pieces,  and  represent  graceful  products  of  the  best  salon 
style.  He  is  survived  by  a  widow  and  son,  a  sister,  and  his 
brothers  Max,  Emil,  Oscar  and  George. — Musical  Courier. 

[The  obituary  above  quoted  is  in  a  way  interesting  to  San 
Franciscans  as  it  touches  the  career  of  Miss  Mary  Carrick 
who  appeared  in  concert  in  Berlin  under  Mr.  Liebling's  direc- 
tion. After  Miss  Carrick's  successful  concert  Mr.  Liebling 
cabled  the  good  news  to  this  city  and  afterwards  wrote  to 
Hugo  Mansfield  the  young  artist's  teacher  in  the  most 
enthusiastic  terms  of  her  playing,  predicting  a  brilliant  future 
for  her.  It  was  Miss  Carrick's  intention  that  Mr.  Liebling 
should  manage  another  tour  for  her  in  Europe,  and,  being  a 
classmate  of  Hugo  Mansfeldt's,  when  both  were  studying 
under  Liszt  at  Weimar,  he  was  anxious  that  the  young 
pianiste  should  enter  upon  a  tour  through  Austria  and  Ger- 
many, especially  since  the  last  time  Miss  Carrick  was  obliged 
to  interrupt  her  plans  on  account  of  her  mother's  illness — Ed.] 
V* 


Madame  Blanche  Arral  will  open  the  season  with  the  assis- 
tance of  the  Volpe  Symphony  Orchestra  in  New  York  on 
October  24th.  to  be  followed  by  another  concert  on  November 
4th  with  the  assistance  of  the  Russian  Smyphony  Orchestra, 
under  the  direction  of  Altschuler.  Since  hearing  Madame 
Arral  sing  Mr.  Volpe  became  so  enthusiastic  about  her  that 
he  made  her  an  offer  to  appear  as  soloist  with  his  orchestra 
on  December  4th. 


REGARDING   FREE    RECITALS. 

(From  the  Musical  Courier,  Sept.  15.  1909.) 
Among  those  subjects  that  have  occupied  much  of  the  time 
and  space  of  this  paper  for  years  past  is  the  practice  of  musi- 
cians to  sing  anl  play  free  of  charge,  a  habit  condemned  by 
this  paper  on  the  general  principle  so  epigrammatically  put 
by  Ibsen,  that  a  thing  for  which  nothing  is  paid  is  worth  noth- 
ing. We  also  are  opposed  to  the  practice  because  it  lowers 
the  professional  standing  of  the  musician  and  it  also  is  an 
injustice  to  those  musicians  who  insist  upon  receiving  pecun- 
iary recognition  for  their  services.  It  therefore  reads  well  to 
reproduce  the  following  short  notice  from  the  well-known 
London  Era; 

Charitable  Performances. 
The  furniture  dealer,  the  butcher,  and  the  florist  of  the 
parish  are  not  expected  to  send  goods  gratis  to  be  sold  at 
bazaars:  why  should  actors  and  actresses  be  expected  to 
give  their  artistic  efforts,  free  of  charge,  to  one  of  these 
entertainments,  the  result  of  their  good  nature  being  to 
"make  themselves  cheap"? 

Here  it  is:  To  make  themselves  cheap.  Why  should  any 
musician  make  herself  or  himself  cheap  by  supplying  a  de- 
mand without  charging  for  it?  Will  the  European  visiting  ar- 
tist do  it  in  America?  How  can  any  one  expect  a  remunera- 
tive line  of  engagements  who  sings  or  plays  free  of  charge, 
particularly  when  it  is  probable  that  other  musicians  had  al- 
ready refused  to  do  so?  It  has  been  the  ruin  of  many  artistic 
careers,  this  charitable  work.  Besides,  if  a  singer  or  musi- 
cian is  engaged  for  money  the  probability  is  that  the  enter- 
tainment will  be  more  largely  attended  because  of  the  fact 
that  the  artist  charges.  In  that  manner  the  receipts  are  in- 
creased. Every  one  connected  with  the  charitable  enterprise 
will  proclaim  the  value  of  the  artist  then  and  people  will  be 
anxious  to  hear  her  or  hiiU.  But  to  sing  or  to  play  free  of 
charge  is  suicidal  and  no  one  need  expect  to  make  a  career 
who  indulges  in  that  extravagance. 


PACIFIC    C  O  xV  S  T    MUSI  C  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  W. 


13 


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14 


P  A  r;  r  F  I  O    COAST    MUSI  C  A  h    R  E  V  I  K  W 


A   VITAL   QUESTION. 


A    Most    Interesting    Discussion   of   a   Very    Important    Subject 

Which  Should  Be  of  Surpassing  Interest  to  Every  Student 

Who  Is  Told  To  Go  To   Europe  to  Study. 


A  prominent  San  Francisco  teacher,  none  other  than  Mrs. 
Oscar  Mansfeldt.  gave  the  editor  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical 
Review  the  following  extract  from  the  Berlin  German  Times 
of  September  23rd.  1901,  which  is  as  interesting  as  this  late 
day.  as  it  was  eight  years  ago,  at  the  time  of  its  first  pub- 
lication.    The  article  is  worthy  of  a  verbatim  reproduction: 

"For  six  years,  the  length  of  ray  residence  in  Europe,  I 
have  been  asking  myself  the  Question.  I  have  put  it  to  oth- 
ers, too.  Most  of  them  lacked  the  answer  even  as  I  did. 
Some  few  knew,  but  they  spoke  not.  Once  I  tried  to  answer 
the  Question  myself.  Then  those  who  knew  said  that  I  was 
wrong.     But  they  said  nothing  else,  and  left  me  unknowing. 

"Last  week  there  came  here  from  the  strenuous  city  of 
New  York  the  one  man  who  could  answer  the  Question  fully, 
freely,  and  fearlessly.     To  him  I  resolved  to  go  and  ask. 

"He  calls  himself  Marc  A.  Blumenberg.  I  have  often  heard 
him  referred  to  as  the  Napoleon  of  musical  affairs  in  the 
United  States.  I  have  heard  that  he  dictates  musical  con- 
ditions there.  I  have  heard  that  he  fixes  the  market  value 
of  artists.  And  I  have  heard  him  called  all  the  names  with 
which  all  successful  men  are  favored  by  distanced  competi- 
ors  and  empty-handed  friends. 

"For  a  very  successful  man  is  this  Blumenberg,  a  man  who 
knows  not  only  how  to  win  success,  but  understands  also  how 
to  retain  it.  A  man  is  he  who  has  thoroughly  mastered  his 
chosen  field;  a  chessplayer  who  knows  his  board  and  its  every 
figure.  He  plays  the  game  scientifically.  No  move  without 
cause,  and  no  cause  without  effect,  might  be  his  motto.  A 
man  is  he  of  keen  vision  and  wide  range,  a  man  of  today  by 
all  means,  but  one  who  understands  yesterday  and  divines  to- 
morrow. 

"Because  he  is  all  this,  and  incidentally.  Senior  Editor  of 
the  New  York  Musical  Courier,  I  went  to  him  with  my  Ques- 
tion. 1  found  him  coming  from  the  Dresdener  Bank — a  good 
sign — and  just  about  to  step  into  his  waiting  cab. 

"  'I  have  a  Question  to  ask' — I   began. 

"'.Tump  in;  I've  an  appointment  to  keep,  with  Manager 
Pierson  of  the  Opera.     Vorwarts,  Kutscher.     Now  fire  away.' 

"He  fixed  his  keen  eyes  on  me,  and  I  asked  the  Question. 

"  'You  wish  to  know.'  he  repeated  slowly,  as  one  given  to 
accurate  weighing  of  details,  'what  becomes  of  the  thousands 
of  Americans  who  come  to  Germany,  Austria,  England.  Italy, 
France  and  Belgium,  to  study  music?  That  is  to  say,  the 
thousands  of  Americans  who  have  come,  those  who  are  here 
now,  and  those  who  will  come?  What  becomes  of  the  young 
pianist,  the  young  singer,  the  young  violinist,  the  young  com- 
poser, the  young  violoncellist,  the  mature  teacher  and  the 
middle  ?aged  organist,  who  for  a  decade  have  been  traveling 
eastward  in  endless,  religious  procession,  with  rapt  eyes  fixed 
on  the  musical  Mecca  of  their  own  making?' 

"  'That's  what  I  would  like  to  know,'  I  replied,  modestly  ac- 
cepting this  elaborate  amendment  to  the  Question. 

"  'By  Stcherbatcheff,  so  would  I,'  cried  out  my  wise  man, 
bringing  down  his  umbrella  with  a  terrific  whack  onto  the 
floor  of  the  cab.  'That  is  to  be  taken  relatively;'  he  con- 
tinued, calm  at  once,  'for  I  know  what  becomes  of  them.' 

"  'What  ?'  I  ventured. 

"  'The  pianist  becomes  the  powerful  and  purse-proud  Presi- 
dent of  a  gigantic  Trust,  the  singer  marries  him  and  organizes 
a  local  Musical  Society;  the  violinist  goes  West,  just  in  time 
to  reach  the  bed  of  a  dying  miner  who  hands  him  a  paper, 
sere  and  yellow,  and  apparently  worthless,  which  soon  after 
proves  the  violinist  to  be  the  sole  and  undisputed  owner  of 
the  richest  gold-mine  ever  discovered  in  America' — 

"  'But"— 

■'  'The  young  composer  becomes  the  trusted  partner  of  the 
fortunate  violinist.  The  violoncellist  is  raved  over  at  New- 
port by  seven  of  the  richest  heiresses  in  the  Four  Hundred. 
Seven  enthusiastic  papas  press  the  young  man  to  marry,  and 
he  finally  weds  the  very  richest  of  the  seven  maidens,  who  is 
also  marvelously  beautiful.  The  mattire  music-teacher  at 
once  upon  his  return  goes  into  the  banking  business,  and  finds 
his  chief  pleasure  in  making  Wall  street  trouble.  The  mid- 
dle-aged organist — ' 

"  'I  don't  believe  all  that.  You  are  making  fun  of  me,'  I 
interrupted. 

"  'You  are  shrewd,'  said  .Mr.  Blumenberg;  'you  have  guessed 
that  I  was  joking.  .\ow  I  will  tell  you  the  truth.  The  painful 
fact  of  the  matter  is  that  the  pianist  has  no  need  to  become 
a  Trust  President,  for  he  gives  many  recitals  each  season 
that  attract  vast  audiences  of  his  admiring  countrymen.  The 
money  pours  into  the  box-office,  and   Paderewski  realizes  at 


last  that  he  has  met  his  match  in  America.  The  singer  is 
secured  by  a  cast-iron  contract  to  Grau.  who,  happy  that  at 
last  he  can  pay  an  American  more  than  his  foreign  artists, 
literally  loads  her  with  money.  The  public  listens  only  when 
she  sings,  and  the  critics  come  to  learn.  The  violinist  causes 
duels  among  the  managers,  who  fight  for  the  privilege  of  en- 
gaging him.  The  composer  sends  boxes  to  his  friends  for 
each  new  production  of  his  immerous  grand  operas.  Grau 
mounts  them  at  fabulous  exjjense  to  his  privy-purse.  The 
critics  snarl  because  all  our  symphony-concerts  are  addicted 
to  the  works  of  the  young  American  composer,  and  absolutely 
ignore  the  efforts  of  talented  foreigners  like  Tschaikowsky, 
Beethoven.  Strauss  and  Brahms.  Quartet  societies  play  his 
works  ad  nuseara.  The  programs  of  all  our  piano-recitals 
look  like  a  publisher's  list  of  his  compositions.  And  the  ma- 
ture music-teacher!  Lessons  at  ten  dollars  the  half  hour  are 
laughed  at.  Fifteen  dollars,  or  you  go  to  one  of  his  seven 
assistants.     He   has  a  suite  at  the   Waldorf — ' 

"  'I'm  afraid  you're  in  a  jesting  mood  tod-day.  I  see  you 
won't  answer  the  Question.' 

"  'You  wish  to  know  what  really  becomes  of  nearly  all  your 
compatriots  who  study  music  here?' 

"  'Yes.' 

"  'Nothing — absolutely.  Nothing  that  warrants  the  sacrifice 
of  time,  money,  and  health,  laid  on  the  altars  of  European 
teachers,   by  these   misguided   students,  these — ' 

"'Why  misguided?' 

"  'Because  half,  three-quarters  of  them  have  no  right  to 
enter  the  musical  profession,  and  even  fewer,  to  practise  it. 
The  pianist,  the  singer,  the  violinist,  the  organist,  the  violon- 
cellist, they  all  become  teachers.  There  are  too  many  teach- 
ers now.  And  the  majority  of  them  are  absolutely  incompe- 
tent.    That  is  because  they  have  been  insufficiently  educated." 

"  'But  the  conservatories  here — ' 

"  'They  offer  no  academical  training.  There  are  no  grad- 
uates proper,  and  those  who  have  studied  in  them  for  a  year 
or  two  consider  themselves  finished  musicians.  There  is  no 
authoritative  institution,  no  University  of  Music  that  makes 
our  musicians  as  our  doctors,  lawyers,  engineers,  and  archi- 
tects are  made.' 

"  'But  those  things  are  done  by  the  Government.  Naturally 
enough,  public  safety  demands  that  a  doctor  be  legally  en- 
titled to  practise;  you  can't  expect  a  Government  to  interest 
itself  seriously  in  such  a  comparatively  unimportant  subject 
as  music,  a  subject — ' 

■'  'And  do  you  mean  to  tell  me  that  an  incompetent  singing- 
teacher  is  not  a  menace  to  public  welfare?  Does  he  not  ruin 
throats,  and  chests,  and  muscles,  and  larynxes,  and  lungs? 
Does  he  not  time  and  again  cause  pathological  conditions? 
Have  therapeautics  never  corrected  the  crimes  of  singing 
teachers.' 

"  'But  instrumental  teachers' — I  protested. 

"  '.Just  as  bad.  They  ruin  the  ear,  and  the  sense  of  touch, 
and  the  wrist,  and  the  muscles,  and  the  shoulders.' 

"  'But,  granting  all  that,  is  not  Europe  the  home  of  music?" 
I  asked,  making  a  wide  detour  and  avoiding  the  corner  into 
which  I  was  being  driven;  'and  if  nobody  had  ever  come  here 
to  study,  how  could  we  have  hoped  to  possess  teachers  in  our 
own  country?' 

"Not  at  all  nonplussed,  Mr.  Blumenberg  promptly  replied: 
'Of  course  our  musical  young  men  came,  and  they  returned 
home  and  taught.  But  their  pupils  came  here,  and  their 
pupils'  pupils.  Now,  if  this  thing  has  been  going  on  for  years 
and  is  going  on  to-day,  of  what  use  is  the  priceless  knowledge 
that  can't  be  imparted  to  others?  Why  come  to  Europe  for 
the  same  thing  that  can  be  had  much  cheaper  and  as  good 
at  home?  For  instance,  to  make  my  logic  clear.  Thirty 
years  ago  there  were  some  great  teachers  of  piano,  like 
Liszt.  Tausig  and  Kullak.  They  had  many  pupils,  American, 
German  and  all  nationalities.  The  pupils  of  them  are  the 
teachers  of  to-day.  Did  the  Americans  learn  less  than  the 
Germans?  Are  they  less  receptive?  Strange,  that  a  people 
who  are  not  usually  slow  in  proclaiming  its  citizens  quick  of 
intellect,  should  draw  the  line  at  its  musicians,  and  believe 
that  of  all  the  disciples  who  sat  at  the  feet  of  those  great 
masters,  the  American  learned  and  understood  least.  And  so 
with  singing,  and  violin,  and  composition.' 

"Again  I  tacked,  and  drove  home  what  I  considered  a  fatal 
shaft.  'But  how  about  almost  the  last  words  of  our  lamented 
President  McKinley,'  I  asked;  'did  he  not  tell  us  that  we 
must  not  expect  to  live  on  ourselves  alone,  that  we  must 
import  from  other  countries,  that  reciprocity' — 

"'Reciprocity?  Yes,  indeed,  we  want  reciprocity,  but 
where  is  the  reciprocity  in  this  wholesale  annual  emigration 
of  our  young  blood  and  energy  to  Europe,  where  the  reciproc- 
ity in  this  pouring  of  millions  of  dollars  into  foreign  countries, 
for  board,  and  clothes,  and  lessons,  and  music,  and  instru- 
(Continued  on  Page  16.) 


r  A  V  I  F  I  C    C  ()  A  S  T    MUSI  C  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  W. 


15 


WILLIAM   F.  ZECH, 


VIOLINIST 
Musical  Director 


The  Zcch  Orchefflra  Rthe; 
1332  Geary  Street 


i  Every  Monday  Evening 

Phone  We«t  1603 


California  Conservatory  of  Music 

Now  occupies  its  magnificent   new   building  on 

147  Presidio  Avenue 

Between  Washington  and  Jackson  Streets,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 
(Jackson-Suiter  St.  car  terminal  in  front  of  buildinn) 


Largest  Institution  West  of  Chicago 


DIRECTORIUM  ; 

HERMANN  GENSS,   President 

DR.  H.  J.  STEWART,    GIULIO  MINETTI,    DR.  ARTHUR  WEISS, 

DR.  ERNEST  HORSTMANN 

The  (acuity  further  includes  such  artists  as  : 
HANS  KONIG. 
WALLACE  A.  SABIN. 
G.  JOLLAIN, 
LOUIS  NEWBAUER, 
HENRY  B.  BAERMAN. 
MRS.  M.  O'BRIEN, 
MISS  FLORENCE  GUPPY,    and    others. 


Departments  for  Beginners,  Amateurs  and  Professionals 


Pupils  received  at  all  times. 
SEND    FOR   CATALOGUE 


CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSiC  of  the 
UNIVERSITY  OF  THE  PACIFIC 

PIERRE  "DOUILLET.  "Dean.     SAN  JOSE.  CAL. 

The  oldest  Institution  on  the  Coast — complete  Musical  Education— Advan- 
tages ol  literary  studies  free  of  charge.  Boaid  and  room  at  moderate  prices 
Send  for  Catalogue. 

Notre  Dame  Conservatory  of  Music 

BOARDING  SCHOOL  FOR  GIRUS 


San    Jos© 


Cal  If  ot-n  la 


IVT-.-    _     /^M,-.  1-.  J-.-,  ,  trti-t.     Of  ARRELl  STREET 
l^C^r       Vyrpil6Ulll     Between  Stockton  and  Powell 

Safest  and  Most  Magnificenl  Theatre  in  America. 
Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afelrnoon -MATINEE  EVERY  DAY 

ARTISTIC  VAUDEVILLE 

\'alei'ie  Befgei-e  &  Co.,  in  "The  Sultan's  P''avorite";  Tuscany 
Troubadours;  Ed  F.  Reynard,  Ventriloguist ;  Six  Glinserettis; 
("arlin  &  Clark;  Mary  Norman.  The  Society  Caricaturist;  Pilu, 
the  Mind  Reading  Dog.  introduced  by  Sig.  Ancillotti:  New 
Orpheum  Motion  Pictures.  Last  week — .lames  Young  &  Co.. 
in  "Wanted  a  Sister." 

Evening  Price*:     10c,  25c,  50c  and  75c.     Box  Seats  $1.00 
Matinee  Price*:     (Except  Sundays  and  Holidays)  10c,  25c,  50c. 
PHONE  DOUGLAS  70 


Mrs.  Oscar  Mansfeldt 


Has  Removed  to  20  1  6  Buchanan  St.,  Bet.  Pine  and  California 

TELEPHONE  WEST  3M 

MACKENZIE  GORDON 

TENOR 

Tpaphor    ni    Qinninn      In  all  its  branches  from  the  rudiments  of  tone  formation  to 
I  tJdbner     Ul    Oinyiliy     ,1,,  ^ishen    l.nish    and  Compl^Uon  0/  Public    Sm,in, 

ORATORIO— OPERA— CONCERT 


Studio:  2832   Jackson  St. 


By  Appoinlment  Only 


Telephone:  West  457 


JOSEPH  GREVEN 

Voice  Culture  for  Singing  and  Speaking 
Concert.  Oratorio  and  Opera  Repertoire 

Complete  Preparation  for  the  Operatic  Stage 

824  Eddy  St.,  near  Van  Ness.  Telephone  Franklin  3671 


Joaquin  S.  Wanrell 


BASSO 
CANTANTE 

VOICE  CULTURE  AND  OPERATIC  TRAINING 

Perfe<5l  Tone  Placing  Italian  School 

Studio — 799  Van  Ness  Ave.,  between  Turk  and  Eddy  Sts. 

Take  Eddy  or  Turk  St.  Cars.  Telephone  Franklin  3432 

ADOLF  GREGORY 

Organist  and  Choir  Director  St.  Mary's,  Oakland 
Director  Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music 
VOICE  PRODUCTION,  PIANO.  HARMONY  AND  COMPOSITION. 

203-205  Twelfth  St.  Cor.  Jackson,  OAKLAND 

Von  Meyerinck  School  of  Music 

ESTABLISHED  1895 
UNDER  THE  DIRECTION  OF  MRS.  ANNA  VON  MEYERINCK 

Classes  in  French.  German.  Musical  Hislory  and  Sight  Reading  in  progress.  Practice 
lessons  with  specially  coached  accompanists  may  be  arranged  for — also  by  non-students 
ofiheschool.  Studio,  818  Grove  St.,  near  Fillmore.  Tel.  Park  1 069. 
In  Berkeley    Tuesday.  2521  Regent   St.       Tel.    Berkeley    3677.     Thursday  at  Snell 

Miss  Elizabeth  Westgate 


Organi«  Finll    Piesbylerian  Church 

Teacher  of  PIANO  and  ORGAN 


Studii 


I  7  Paru  St. 


Alameda,  California 


T\\t^   Rarmnaw  CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC. 

1  lie      JL»C1  lUgCl  Established   1896 

Under  the  direction  of  Prof,  and  Mme.  JOSEPH  BERINGER.  Complete 
Musical  Education — Piano,  Theory,  and  Composition;  Voice  (Italian  Method), 
Opera,  Concert,  Oratorio.  Free  advantages  to  students:  Harmony  Lectures, 
Concerts,  Ensemble  playing.  Sight  reading.  Faculty  of  distinguished  Instructors. 
Send  for  catalogue.      926  Pierce  street,   near  McAllister,   San   Francisco.   Cal. 

FREID   R.  J.   RAU 

Pacific  Coast  Agent  for 

HAWKES  &  SON 

London,  England 

High-Grade    Band   Instruments 

Bargains  in  Second-Hand  Instruments 
170  PAGE  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO  Phone  Market  5513 


Sari  Fraricisco  Conservatory  of  Music 


Phone  WEST  5972 


£.  S.  BONELLI,  Director 


Cor.  PIERCE  and  CALIFORNIA  STS. 


This  institution  graduates  more  competent  and  successful  teacfiers  than  any   other  institution  of  its  kind    on  the   Pacific 
Coast.     Special  course  for  those  desiring  to  enter  the  professional  field.     FACULTY  OF   EFFICIENT  INSTRUCTORS. 


1G 


rArlFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


(Continued  from  page  14.) 
ments.  and  amusements.  What  do  we  get?  Where  is  the 
return  demanded  hy  the  simplest  rule  of  political  economy? 
We  get  musical  instruction,  which  we  impart  to  others  so 
successfully  that  they  too  must  exile  themselves  before  they 
in  turn — bah!  what  a  hideous,  roaring  farce.  What  with  his 
lack  of  proper  academical  training  and  authorization,  and  his 
self-confessed  inadequacy — just  proved  conclusively  by  me- 
lt is  no  wonder  that  the  American  musician  has  no  standing 
in  the  community.' 

"I  began  to  feel  that  somehow  Mr.  Blumenberg  and  I  had 
changed  positions.  He  was  the  inquisitor,  and  1,  who  had 
come  as  a  harmless  interrogator,  suddenly  stood  forth  as  the 
unwilling  champion  of  a  cause  in  which  I  did  not  believe. 
I  cared  not  to  fight  further  such  a  one-sided  battle.  I  had 
heard  enough,  and  was  fearful  of  more  truths.  All  this  en- 
couraging information  was  destined  for  the  readers  of  the 
musical  department  of  the  German  Times,  nearly  all  of  whom 
are  music-students.     For  them  as  much  as  for  myself  I  have 

"'Ah!  here  we  are,'  announced  the  Inquisitor  cheerily,  as 
we  stopped  before  the  Intendantur  in  the  Dorotheen  Strasse; 
•if  you'd  care  to  wait  in  the  cab,  I  could  give  you  some 
further   points — ' 

"  'No,  thank  you,  I  think  I  have  enough.  You've  answered 
the  Question,  you  know.' 

"As  I  walked  away  it  suddenly  struck  me  that  he  hadn't, 
after  all.     I   wonder  if  anybody  can?     Leonard  Liebling." 


winner  should  be  outside  the  musical  cult  this  offer  becomes, 
of  course,  void.  This  contest  differs  from  others  in  so  far 
that  every  contestant  is  bound  to  win  something.  Those  who 
do  not  win  the  capital  prize  are  entitled  to  an  order  of 
twenty-tive  per  cent,  of  their  remittances  to  either  a  music 
house"  or  to  a  music  teacher  for  lessons.  If  anyone  comes 
close  to  the  first  prize  he  or  she  may  have  turned  in  enough 
money  to  secure  an  upright  piano.  The  distribution  of  votes 
is  made  so  easy  that  it  is  possible  to  turn  in  six  months' 
subscriptions  at  one  dollar  and  have  them  counted.  Now  let 
us  see  whether  there  is  enough  energy  among  members  of 
musical  clubs,  teachers  and  students  to  exert  themselves  a 
little  in  trying  to  earn  a  grand  piano  and  incidentally  assist 
the  Pacific  Coast   Musical  .Journal   to  extend  its  influence. 

THE    EDITOR    IN    LOS    ANGELES. 


MISS    MAUD    FAY    VISITS    SAN     FRANCISCO. 


Brilliant   California    Prima    Donna    Soprano    Who    Has    Distin- 
guished   Herself   in    Europe    Is   on    a    Visit   to    Relatives 
Here,   but   Will    Not   Be   Heard   in   Public. 

Miss  Maud  Fay,  the  exceedingly  gifted  and  handsome  Cali- 
fornia cantatrice,  who  kept  the  musical  public  of  Munich, 
chattering  during  the  last  few  years,  arrived  in  San  Francisco 
on  Thursday  evening,  September  30th,  on  a  visit  to  her  rela- 
tives. Bound  by  an  ironclad  contract  with  the  management 
of  the  Royal  Opera  in  Munich,  she  is  unable  to  appear  in 
public  while  in  uer  native  city;  but,  no  doubt,  the  now  famous 
operatic  soprano  will  be  heard  by  a  few  fortunate  friends 
in  one  or  two  private  functions.  In  an  interview  with  t.ie 
San  Francisco  Chronicle  Miss  Fay  said: 

"  I  shall  be  here  not  quite  a  month.  I  must  be  in  Munich 
to  sing  on  November  13th,  and  shall  leave  San  Francisco  on 
October  29th.  Am  I  glad  to  be  back?  Well,  words  cannot 
express  the  feeling.  I  am  simply  overcome  and  cannot  talk 
about  it.     San  Francisco  always  will  be  my  home. 

The  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  has  repeatedly  recorded 
Miss  Fay's  triumphs  in  Munich,  one  of  the  most,  if  not  the 
most  conventional  and  fastidious  community  in  Germany  as 
far  as  music  is  concerned.  Under  the  wing  of  Madame  Gadski 
(that  is  at  the  diva's  behest).  Miss  Fay  appeared  before 
the  examination  board  of  the  Munich  Opera  and  "made  good." 
Her  ambition,  tenacity  and  genius  did  the  rest,  and  it  is  safe 
to  assert  that  the  young  San  Franciscan  is  now  well  on  the 
road  to  fame.  Her  contract  in  Munich  will  expire  in  another 
three  years,  and  it  is  possible  that  she  then  tnay  appear  at 
the  Metropolitan  Opera  House  in  New  York,  which  no  doubt, 
has  already  made  her  an  offer,  as  the  directors  are  now  look- 
ing around  for  American  artists  who  have  gained  fame 
abroad. 

For  years  the  management  of  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House 
has  spirited  away  most  of  Germany's  distinguished  artists  on 
the  operatic  and  concert  stage.  Germany  revenged  herself 
in  the  most  unique  manner,  namely,  of  raising  young  Ameri- 
can singers  to  the  pinnacle  of  fame  and  now  the  manage- 
ment of  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House  when  it  needs  brilliant 
artists,  must  go  to  Germany  and  take  back  the  American 
singers  whom  Germany  has  discovered  and  trained  for  their 
American  debut.  Miss  Fay  is  one  of  these  fortunate  dis- 
coveries and  that  she  is  a  credit  to  her  native  City  and  State 
cannot  be  denied  by  those  thoroughly  conversant  with  musi- 
cal affairs  at  home  and  abroad. 


THE    SUBSCRIPTION    CONTEST. 


Upon  another  page  in  this  issue  you  will  find  the  initial 
announcement  of  a  subscription  contest  which  will  end  on 
May  1st,  1910.  Now  we  want  all  Musical  Clubs,  Music 
Schools,  Teachers  and  Students  to  put  their  shoulder  to  the 
wheel  and  try  to  win  this  grand  piano.  In  addition  to  the 
piano  we  will  donate  to  the  winner  the  front  page  of  the  first 
issue  in  May,  1910,  together  with  a  biographical  sketch  of  his 
or  her  career.  If  the  winner  should  be  a  music  school  or 
musical    club    the    same    privilege    will    be    accorded.     If    the 


During  the  current  week  (October  4th  to  October  11th),  the 
editor  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  is  spending  in 
Los  Angeles  in  order  to  obtain  a  personal  idea  of  the  South- 
ern California  Metropolis'  outlook  for  the  season.  Next  issue 
will  contain  a  faithful  record  of  his  impressions  and  will  also 
contain  a  more  definite  mention  of  the  possibilities  of  a 
music  festival  for  Southern  California  next  Spring.  Begin- 
ning with  October  luth,  the  editor  will  resume  his  regular 
office  hours  which  are  suspended  during  the  summer,  and  in 
next  week's  issue  will  be  found  a  standing  announcement  as 
to  the  time  of  day.  As  the  Musical  Review  has  now  entered 
upon  a  vigorous  campaign  for  expansion  it  is  to  be  hoped  that 
all  those  interested  to  see  a  musical  paper  assume  a  com- 
manding position  on  this  Coast,  will  take  advantage  of  these 
oflnce  hours  to  present  their  ideas  and  their  opinions  regard- 
ing the  requirements  of  the  Pacific  Coast  in  regard  to  its 
musical  life. 


MISS    MAUD    CARRICK 

Whose    Plans  To   Tour    Europe     Under    the     Direction   of   Saul 

Liebling    Were    Temporarily    Shattered    by    the    Death 

of  the   Impresario.      (See   p.    lli.  I 


P  A  C  I  F  I  C    ('  OAST    M  U  S  I  0  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  W 


1? 


The  Most  Beautiful  Piano 
Store  in  America 

Above  is  show  11  a  [dioto  c'lijtraviiiy  ol'  oui-  bij;  new  store.  1 1  is  conceded  ]>y  the  wlioie  iiuisic  woiid 
to  be  the  l)est,  ami  tlie  most  pei-feetly  appointed  liome  of  any  lioiise  in  tlie  world.  Tiie  picture  shows 
but  a  part  ol'  our  main  floor  and  a  i)ortion  only  of  the  ^reat  sto(  k  of  more  tlian  tilly  <;rand  jiianos — a 
stock  five  times  larger  than  is  carried  by  any  other  house  on  ilie  Coast,  .hist  al  this  time  about  ti\(' 
hundred  jiianos  of  leading  makes  are  shown;  a  disjjhiy  which  is  worth  your  time  to  see. 

Twenty  specially  built  rooms  are  occupied  by  our  great  stock,  making  the  opportunity  lor  compaii 
son  better  than  is  ottered  at  any  other  store,  while  in  j)rice  and  finish  every  individual  jiuise  and  taste 
may  be  satisfied. 

Our  new  talking  machine  department  on  the  Sutter  street  side  surpasses  in  poini  of  location,  airi- 
ness, convenience,  comfort,  and  es])ecially  in  the  magnitude  of  its  stock,  and  the  conrleous  ser\ice 
ottered,  any  similar  department  in  the  West.  All  the  finest  in  Talking  Machines,  and  all  llie  latest 
recoi'ds  all  the  time  is  the  nioKo,  and  it's  lived  u|)  to. 

The  Wiley  B.  Allen  Co. 

Wiley  B.  Allen  Building,  135-153  Kearney  and  217-225  Sutter  Streets. 

Oakland:  510  Twelfth  and  1105  Washington. 

Othei-  Stores — T.os  Angeles,  Sacramenht,  San  .lose,  San  Diego,  Stockton,  I'lioenix,  .Vriz.,  Keno,  Nev., 
Portland,  Ore. 


18 


r  A  c  I  V I  c  <:;  o  a  s  t  music  a  t.  li  e  \^  i  e  w. 


ORPHEUM. 


A  programme  almost  entirely  novel  and  con- 
tainins  acts  which  have  never  been  surpassed  on 
the  vaudeville  stage  is  announced  for  next  week 
at  the  Orpheum.  The  most  brilliant  of  the  com- 
ing constellation  of  stars  will  be  the  favorite 
actress  Valerie  Bergere,  who  has  been  too  long 
absent  from  this  city.  With  the  assistance  of  a 
clever  little  company  which  includes  Herbert 
Warren,  Lawrence  Morton.  Charles  Melville  and 
Emma  Campbell,  she  will  present  a  one-act 
comedy  by  Edgar  Allen  Woolf,  entitled  "The  Sul- 
tan's Favorite."  which  is  certainly  up-to-date  for 
the  author  has  based  it  on  the  exodus  of  the  Sul- 
tan's Harem  during  the  recent  revolution  in  Tur- 
key. The  skit  is  pronounced  novel  and  enter- 
taining throughout  and  the  role  of  Morgiana.  the 
"Pride  of  the  Harem,"  exhibits  Miss  Bergere  at 
her  very  best  and  every  playgoer  knows  how 
good  that  must  be. 

The  Tuscany  Troubadours,  a  sextette  of  mag- 
nificent singers  will  furnish  a  rare  bit  of  popular 
grand  opera.  They  will  sing  scenes  from  "Rigo- 
letto,"  "Faust,"  "Carmen,"  "Tannehauser"  and 
other  lyric  masterpieces.  Their  production,  which 
is  in  two  scenes,  is  beautifully  staged  and  cos- 
tumed. The  first  represents  a  thoroughfare  in 
Little  Italy.  New  York  City,  where  an  Italian 
Street  Singer  and  his  wife  are  despondent  over 
lack  of  patronage.  A  little  newsgirl  also  finds 
herself  in  a  similar  predicament,  but  they  forget 
their  misery  in  meeting  with  a  fellow  countryman 
who  is  trying  to  establish  himself  in  life  by  ped- 
dling fruit.  A  stranded  comic  opera  manager  and 
his  star  who  have  walked  their  way  back  to  New 
York  from  Podunk,  hear  the  quartette  of  unfor- 
tunates singing  and  seize  on  the  opportunity  to 
re-organize  their  company,  holding  their  rehearsal 
on  the  spot. 

Ed  F.  Reynard,  who  will  appear  for  next  week 
only,  is  styled  "The  Ventriloquist  with  a  Produc- 
tion," for  he  introduces  an  entire  play  with  the 
assistance  of  his  automatons  which  totally  eclipses 
anything  of  its  kind  previously  witnessed  on  a 
stage. 

The  Six  Glinserettis  who  will  contribute  to  this 
splendid  bill  need  no  introduction  to  San  Fran- 
cisco audiences,  although  several  years  have 
elapsed  since  they  were  last  seen  here.  They 
are  in  a  class  by  themselves  among  European 
novelty  gymnasts  and  have  recently  arrived  from 
Vienna,  where  they  were  for  many  months  the 
leading  sensation  at  Ronachers  famous  resort. 

Carlin  and  Clark,  two  German  comedians,  quite 
as  well-known  and  popular  in  the  East  as  Weber  and  Fields 
or  Max  Rogers,  are  sure  of  success.  For  many  years  they 
have  been  identified  with  the  most  successful  musical 
comedies  and  are  today  without  doubt  the  most  laughable 
"distorters"  of  the  English  language  in  their  own  peculiar 
branch  of  theatricals. 

Next  week  will  be  the  farewell  one  of  Mary  Norman,  the 
Society  Caricaturist,  Signer  Ancillotti  and  his  marvelous  dog 
Pilu  and  James.  Young  and  his  clever  little  company  in  the 
laughable  skit  "Wanted  a  Sister."  A  new  series  of  recently 
imported  motion  pictures  will  conclude  a  performance  that 
cannot  fail  to  afford  complete  enjoyment. 


VALERIE  BERGERE 

The   Distinguished   Actress   Who  Will   Appear  in   Edgar  Allen 

Woolf's  Comediette,  "The  Sultan's  Favorite,"  Next 

Week   at   the   Orpheum. 

Have  You  Heard  the  New  Victor 


Rieter-Biedermann  (Edmund  Astor  &  Son)  are  bringing 
out  an  oratorio  by  Albert  Fuchs,  op.  48,  for  chorus,  soprano, 
baritone  and  orchestra.  By  Enrico  Bossi  there  are  a  missa 
pro  defunctis  for  mixed  chorus  and  organ,  five  piano  solos 
and  his  collection  of  organ  works  by  old  masters.  Last 
year  the  firm  brought  out  Bossi's  orchestral  variations,  op. 
131,  on  an  original  theme.  Ferdinand  Theriot.  of  Hamburg, 
has  here  his  op.  88,  a  concerto  for  three  violins.  Karl 
Hasse,  pupil  of  Max  Reger  and  Karl  Straube,  has  varia- 
tions, op.  1,  for  two  pia.aos,  variously  played  last  season 
by  Reger  and  Paul  Aron.  Also  Hasse's  twelve  choral  vor- 
spiels,  op.  4,  for  organ;  a  serenade,  op.  5,  for  strings,  and 
three  fantaisies  and  fugues,  op.  6.  for  organ.  Herman  Kel- 
ler, another  Reger-Straube  pupil,  is  represented  by  an  organ 
fantasie,  op.  1.  The  Bossi  orchestral  variations  of  last 
year  were  given  in  Karlsruhe  by  Georg  Gohler.  in  Holland 
three  times  by  Mengelberg,  and  in  Budapest  by  Conductor 
Korner.  Gohler  will  give  them  in  Leipsic  this  season  with 
the  Bluthner  Orchestra,  of  Berlin.  Among  new  solo  songs 
in  this  press  are  six  for  contralto,  by  Edouard  Kreuzhage. 
and  seven,  the  op.  47,  by  Louis  Victor  Saar,  of  Cincinnati. 


Arral 


RECORDS? 
"Bird  Waltz  ' 
"Traviata" 
"Beggar  Student" 
"El  Bolero  Grande" 


'^^   Nightingale  Song  from 
Les  Noces  de  Jeanette" 


The  Great  Coloratura  Soprano 


Von  Stein  Academy  for  Pianists,  Inc. 

1  5  th  St.  and  Grand  Avenue,  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

HEINRICH  VON  STEIN,  President 

£stablishea   ic>05 


ARNOLD  KRAUSS      "^^^.^^^L 

Concert    Master    ol    the    Los    Angeles    Symphony    Orchestra 
1»1  W.  ISTU  ST..  LO.S    AXGELES  PHOSE  HOME  93833 


P  A  C  I  F  I  C    C  O  AST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


Ifl 


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observation  car  with  library  and  cafe,  Ladies' 
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Daily  News  Bulletins,  Latest  Papers  and  Magazines. 

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Flood  Building  Market  St.  Ferry  Depot 

13th  and  Franklin  Sts.,  Oakland 


Abraham   Miller 

TENOR— TEACHER   OF   SINGING 
CONCERT— RECITAL— ORATORIO 

Address  L.  E.  Behymer,  Manager 
Studio:     342-343  Blanchard  Hail  Building,  Los  Angeles,  Cal.     Member  of 
Faculty  of  the  Conservatory  of  Music  of  the  University  of  Southern  California 

Conductor  Los  Angeles  Symphony 
Orchestra — Woman's  Orchestra 
VIOLIN  INSTRUCTOR 


Harley  Hamilton 


320  Blanchard  Hall  Building, 


Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


Charles  E.  Pemberton  "^^^^ 


Instructor 


Harmony  and    Counterpoint 

Studio:   306-307  Blanchard  Hall  Building Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

JD       D^,.l:^    TENOR— VOICE  CULTURE  and 
.    O.     r  Omin  THE  ART  OF  SINGING 

Director:  Ellis  Club,  Temple  Baptist  Choir,  Woman's  Lyric  Club 
Studio:  316-319  Blanchard  Building. Los  Angeles  Cal. 


J.  P.  Dupuy 


TENOR— VOICE  DIRECTOR 


Direflor  Orpheus  Male  Club,  Bnar  Bnlh  Choir,  Trinity  M.  E.  Church  Choir 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  Vocal  Deparlmenl    and  Eulerpean  .Male  Quartette 

Studio:  3  I  I  Blanchard  Building. Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

William  Edson  Strobridge  ^i^^ 

Room  335  Blanchard  Building  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


Margaret  Goetz 


Mezzo  Contralto 


Historical  Song  Recitals,  Concerts  and  Musicales 
Tel.  Home  51485.     719  Ottowa  St.  near  1 0th  and  Figueroa,  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Estelle  Heartt  Dreyf uss  ^»°*'-»'t«> 

CONCERT— PURPOSE  PROGRAM  RECITAL-S-ORATORIO 
Studio:     Blanchard  Hall  Building  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Adolf     WillhartitZ  Teacher   of    Piano 

332  So.  Broadway  Lo«  Angeles 


The  Great 

Bach  Festival 

Spring,   1910 

St.  Matthew's  Passion  and 
B  Minor  Mass 


Under  the  Direction  of 

Dr.  J.  Fred  Wolle, 

Founder  of  the  Bach  Festival  in  America 

An  Orchestra  of  Sixty 
A  Chorus  of  Two  Hundred  and  Fifty 
A  Children's  Choir  of  Five  Hundred 
Soloists    of     the    Highest   Standing 

Associate  Member  Five  Dollars  a  Year, 
Including  Two  Tickets  for  Each  Concert 
Active  Members  No  Dues  and  No  Init- 
iation Fee.  :::::: 

NOTICE  TO  SINGERS 

Rehearsals  for  the  great  Bach  Fe^ival 
are  taking  place  every  Monday  evening 
at  Christian  Church,  Corner  Dana  Street 
and  Bancroft  Way,  in  Berkeley,  and  any- 
one sufficiently  intere^ed  in  the  works  of 
Johann  Sebastian  Bach  to  study  the  same 
thoroughly  and  participate  in  an  Annual 
Festival,  given  in  his  honor,  and  for  the 
purpose  of  permanently  establishing  the 
worth  of  his  great  Music  in  California, 
are  invited  to  become  members  of  the 
Bach  Choir.  Address  Miss  Lillian  D. 
Clark,  Secretary  of  the  Bach  Choir, 
1522  Spruce  Street.  Berkeley,  Cal. 
Phone  Berkeley  3294. 


IF  THERE  ARE  SUFFICIENT  APPLICATIONS 
FOR  MEMBERSHIP  FROM  OAKLAND  AND 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  REHEARSALS  WILL  BE 
HELD  IN  BOTH  CITIES  EVERY  WEEK. 


lio 


PAOIFIO    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


IN  THE  REALM  OF  THE  THEATRE 


Edited  by  JOSEPH  M.  GUMMING 


RANDOM   NOTES. 


BERNARD   SHAW    SET   TO    MUSIC. 


.\  short  while  aso  there  was  an  advertisement  in  an  East- 
ern dramatic  iiaper  of  a  man  who  revises  plays  tor  beginneis; 
he  advertised  himself  as  the  author  of  "The  Synthetic  Prin- 
ciples of  Play  Construction"  or  some  such  title.  Never  hav- 
ing heard  of  the  book  and  finding  no  record  of  it  in  cata- 
logues, I  wrote  the  author  and  received  this  surprising  reply: 
"The  Synthetic  Principles,"  etc.  is  being  published  on  the 
subscription  plan  at  $50  a  copy.  It  will  not  be  ready  for 
some  years.     Would  you  like  a  copy?" 

It  is  hard  work  to  keep  up  with  all  of  the  theatrical  news 
that  is  being  published  now-a-days.  Besides  such  established 
papers  as  "The  Clipper,"  "N.  Y.  Dramatic  Mirror,"  "Theatre," 
to  say  nothing  of  the  English  papers,  and  the  Sunday  N.  Y. 
"Telegraph,"  there  are  papers  especially  devoted  to  vaudeville 
and  I  just  struck  a  new  one,  "The  N.  Y.  Review,"  a  twenty- 
four  page  Sunday  paper.  The  other  day  I  picked  up  the 
"Police  Gazette"  on  a  boot-black  stand  and  noticed  a  page  of 
theatrical  news,  among  which  was  a  statement  that  Nat 
Goodwin  was  going  into  vaudeville  at  a  salary  of  $3,500  a 
week,  and  that  he  would  play  the  old  English  farce,  "Lend 
Me  Five  Shilings." 

The  N.  Y.  World  contest  for  best  scenario  closes  this 
month.  The  prize  is  $500  for  the  best  scenario  of  a  modern, 
serious  play,  in  which  a  woman  is  the  leading  part.  The 
winner  is  allowed  to  finish  the  play  and  a  production  by  a 
New  York  manager  is  guaranteed  within  a  year  with  royal- 
ties to  author,  or  divided  in  case  winner  has  to  have  assist- 
ance to  complete. 

The  above  is  too  late  for  any  one  to  take  advantage  of 
now,  but  the  following  announcement  of  the  Actor's  Society, 
taken  from  the  N.  Y.  "Dramatic  Mirror,"  may  be  of  interest: 

"The  committee  is  now  ready  to  receive  fresh  manuscripts 
and  all  such  addressed  to  the  Play  Reading  Committee.  Ac- 
tor's Society  of  America,  133  West  Forty -fifth  street.  New 
York,  will  receive  careful  reading  and  consideration.  From 
the  enormous  quantity  received  during  the  time  the  commit- 
tee has  been  in  existence  several  manuscripts  have  been  so 
favorably  considered  that  the  committee  is  now  attempting 
to  have  them  placed  with  the  proper  managers." 

Realistic  Shakespeare. 

The  "Illustrated  London  News,"  of  September  4th,  gives 
the  following  with  two  pages  of  photographs: 

"A  peculiarly  interesting  and  unique  performance  of 
Shakespeare's  "Macbeth"  was  given  last  Saturday  at  the 
Abbey  of  St.  Wandrille,  near  Caudebec,  the  home  of  the 
famous  author,  M.  Maurice  Maeterlinck,  who  wrote  "Pelleas 
et  Melisande."  "The  Life  of  the  Bee,"  etc.  His  wife,  Mme. 
Maeterlinck,  who  before  her  marriage  was  well  known  as  an 
actress  under  the  name  of  Georgette  Leblanc,  took  the  part 
of  Lady  Macbeth,  while  that  of  Macbeth  was  assumed  by  the 
well-known  Parisian  actor,  Severin  Mars.  The  version  of  the 
play  used  on  this  occasion  was  a  prose  translation  in  French 
made  by   M.   Maeterlinck  himself. 

The  special  feature  of  the  performance,  which  rendered  it 
different  from  any  other,  was  the  fact  that  it  was  played, 
not  on  a  stage,  but  in  different  parts  of  the  old  abbey,  which 
formed  an  admirable  and  appropriate  setting.  The  audienci, 
which  was  limited  to  fifty  people,  who  each  paid  £8  for  the 
privilege  of  attending  the  performance,  had  to  move  about 
from  one  part  of  the  building  and  grounds  to  another,  in  pur- 
suit of  the  dramatis  personae,  according  as  the  scene  changed, 
and  in  all  they  had  to  traverse  a  mile  or  two  in  this  way. 
During  their  peregrinations  in  the  rehearsals,  Banquo  and 
Macduff  constantly  lost  their  way,  and  the  prompter  had  to 
be  concealed  by  extraordinary  stratagems,  being  in  one  scene 
hidden  in  a  huge  flower-pot." 


The  Examiner  one  day  last  week  printed  a  review  by  .\lan 
Dale  of  John  Drew's  latest  play,  "Inconstant  George."  The 
review,  which  is  in  Alan  Dale's  best  sarcastic  vein,  deals 
principally  with  the  one  act  in  which  the  immaculate  .John  is 
dressed,  or  rather  undressed,  in  pajamas. 
w 

Max  Figman  is  playing  in  New  Orleans  in  a  dramatization 
of  "The  Old  Curiosity  Shop,"  the  novel  by  Charles  Dickens, 
in  which  Figman  is  Dick  Swiveller. 


"The  Chocolate  Soldier,"  a  comic  opera  based  on  Bernard 
Shaw's  comedy,  "Arms  and  the  Man."  with  music  by  Oscar 
Strauss,  is  now  being  performed  in  New  York.  In  the  play, 
which  was  presented  here  a  while  ago  by  Kalherine  Grey,  it 
will  be  remembered  that  the  soldier  of  fortune,  after  taking 
refuge  in  the  young  lady's  room,  is  sent  away  disguised  in 
her  father's  coat,  into  which  she  has  slipped  her  photograph 
and  which  he  never  finds:  he  brings  back  the  coat  just  when 
the  father  demands  it  and  the  father  finds  the  picture.  In 
the  opera,  the  mother,  daughter  and  servant  all  fall  in  love 
with  the  soldier,  each  one  slips  her  photograph  into  the  coat 
and  when  it  is  returned  each  woman  tries  to  get  back  her 
picture,  but  gets  one  of  the  others — of  this,  Alan  Dale  says: 
"It  is  about  the  sanest  and  most  intelligent  situation  I  have 
ever  seen  in  comic  opera." 

The  New  York  "Dramatic  Mirror"  says:  "The  music  is 
most  agreeable.  Though  several  duets  and  a  half-dozen 
marches  recorded  a  number  of  encores,  the  music  is  of  too 
high  an  order  to  be  popular.  The  thread  of  one  beautiful 
waltz  runs  through  the  entire  opera."  Alan  Dale  praises  it 
unstintedly,  especially  for  its  "deliriously  fascinating"  music 
and  for  the  entire  absence  of  farce  comedy  from  the  libretto. 
Practically  all  of  the  reviews  praise  the  music  warmly. 
w 


FOUND    IN    THE    MAGAZINES. 


The  October  number  of  "Current  Literature."  in  its  depart- 
ment of  Music  and  Drama,  gives  quite  an  extended  account 
of  Charles  Klein's  play,  "The  Third  Degree,"  now  playing  its 
second  year.  A  murder  is  apparently  committed  and  the 
police  have  the  unlucky  suspect,  on  whom  the  police  captain 
exercises  the  terrors  of  "The  Third  Degree"  till  between  tue 
badgering  and  brow-beating,  the  physical  exhaustion  and  the 
captain's  hypnotic  power  the  innocent  man,  after  seven  hours 
of  the  inquisition,  signs  a  confession  of  the  crime.  The  way 
this  is  done  is  shown  in  this  month's  issue  with  portions  of 
the  actual  dialogue,  as  are  also  shown  in  the  same  way  how 
the  devoted  wife  clears  her  husband. 

Another  matter  discussed  in  the  same  issue  is  the  resigna- 
tion of  William  Winter  as  dramatic  critic  of  the  New  York 
Tribune,  after  more  than  forty  years'  connection  with  the 
paper.  It  seems  that  Mr.  Winter  took  exception  to  his  writ- 
ings being  cut  by  the  editor  and  some  tart  correspondence 
followed.  The  editor  objected  that  Winter  had  written  mat- 
ter designedly  to  injure  the  business  of  theatrical  advertis- 
ers, and  Winter  replied  with  some  heat  that  he  most  cer- 
tainly had  and  would  continue  to  write  in  condemnation  of 
plays  that  in  his  judgment  should  be  condemned.  So  far 
Mr.  Winter  had  the  best  of  it,  but  with  advancing  age  he 
has  become  rather  bitter  in  some  things,  and  it  seems  that 
among  the  matter  he  objected  to  having  cut  out  were  un- 
pardonable sarcasms  concerning  the  religious  beliefs  of  some 
of  the  managers,  .\nother  interesting  article  in  the  same 
number  is  one,  "The  German  Invasion  of  the  American 
Stage,"  in  which  it  says  that  the  German  Theatre  in  New 
York  lias  a  great  influence  on  American  drama,  that  man- 
agers seeing  German  plays  produced  there  are  able  to  judge 
whether  they  will  stand  transferring,  and  that  two  of  the 
theatre's  stars,  Hedwig  Reicher  and  Marietta  Oily,  have  left 
it  to  act  in  English.  A  further  German  influence  is  being 
exerted  by  the  large  number  of  musical  comedies  from  Berlin 
and  Vienna. 

The  November  "Cosmopolitan"  has  an  article  on  "David 
Belasco.  The  Man  and  His  Work,"  by  H.  A.  Harris.  Belasco's 
interesting  personality  has  been  pretty  thoroughly  written 
about,  but  this  article  has  some  entertaining  stories  about 
him.' 

"The  Saturday  Evening  Post,"  of  October  2,  has  an  article 
by  Franklin  H.  Sargent  on  "Who  Should  Go  on  the  Stage 
and  Who  Should  Not."  If  you  are  over  twenty-seven  and  still 
hope  to  go  on  the  stage  this  article  will  dampen  your  en- 
thusiasm. It  is  a  very  interesting  article,  written  by  one  who 
speaks  with  knowledge,  and  some  of  the  incidents  are  per- 
sonal experiences. 

w 


Henry   Miller  is   playing  "The   Great   Divide"  in    London. 


I'ACIFK"    COAST    :\[  U  S  I  C  A  L    R  i:  V  I  E  W, 


21 


Mrs.  Grace  Davis   Northrup 

Soprano  Soloisi  First  Congregational  Church.  Oatland 
Concert.    Oratorio    anj  Recital  Program! 

TEACHER    OF    SINGING 

Residence  Studio: 
I  333  Bay  View  Place.  Berkeley,  Phone  Berkeley  958 

O.kland  Studio:  65  MacDonoiiBh  Bldg.     Tuesday  and  Frida- 

ROMEO  FRICIv 

BARYTONE 

Vocal  Instrud^ion  Aher  Foremoit  European  Methods 

30-31  Canning  Block.  I3lh  and  Broadway,  Oakland 

Phone  Oak  6454  Phone  Home  a  M6P 

Paul  Steindorff 

Studio,  2422  STUART  STREET 
Berkeley,  California 

Mrs.  "William  5teinbach 

VOICE  CULTURE 

STUDIO:    1  528  Broderick  Si..  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

H.   D.    MUSTARD 

Baritoxie 

Voice  Culture  in  Alt  its  Branches 

Opera — Oratorio  -  Concert 
Studio.    1S48  Haight  St.  PhonePark4ll7 

HERMAN   PERLET 

Voice  Culture  and  Piano 

Studio:    1451   Franklin  St.  Phone  Franklin  b34 

Mrs.  "Walter  W^itHam 

TE.XCHER  OK  SINGING 

Studio; 

1380  Sutter  Street  San  Fiancisco.  Cal. 

Miss  Helen  Colburn  Heath 

SOPRANO 

Vocal  Instruction.  Concert  Work 

Phonr- W«t  4890  1304  Ellis  Street 

AVenceslao    Vill  ei  Ip  a  nd  o 
Violoncellist 

Concerts,  Musicales,  Ensemble  and  In^iudion 

Tel,  Park  5329, STUDIO:  746  CL.A'i  TON  ST, 

DELIA.    E.     CRISMTOLD 
Contralto 

\01CE   CULTURE 
Phone  Park   1614  Res.  Studio.  845  Oak  St. 

FREDERICK    MAURER,    JR. 

Accompanist 

Teacher  of  Piano- Harmony-CoachingSingers-Niolinifls 
Mondays.  1321  Suiter  St    San  Francisco.     Tel.  Franklin  2143 
Home  Studio.  1726  Le  Rov  Ave,  Berkeley.  Tel.  Berkeley  539 


IMPORTANT    ANNOUNCEMENT. 


Beginning  with  the  issue  of  October 
2,  1909,  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Re- 
view will  be  increased  to  24  pages, 
which  size  will  occasionally  be  aug- 
mented to  32  pages.  .  This  will  enable 
the  management  to  add  several  new 
departments.  The  theatrical  depart- 
ment wall  occupy  two  full  pages,  and 
will  contain  straightforward,  unbiased 
and  honest  reviews  of  every  theatri- 
cal performance  of  merit  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. These  critical  opinions,  which 
will  not  be  controlled  by  the  business 
office,  will  serve  as  a  guide  to  our 
readers  in  Oakland,  Los  Angeles, 
Portland  and  Seattle,  and  all  interior 
cities  of  the  Pacific  Coast,  in  case 
these  cities  should  be  visited  by  com- 
panies first  appearing  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

Besides  this  reliable  theatrical  de- 
partment, the  Pacific  Coast  Musical 
Review  will  contain  a  page  of  late 
European  news,  and  a  page  of  the 
most  important  musical  news  from 
leading  Eastern  musical  centers.  The 
Los  Angeles,  Oakland.  Berkeley  and 
Alameda  departments  will  be  continu- 
ed as  usual,  while  more  attention  will 
be  paid  next  season  to  Portland  and 
Seattle.  Additional  features  of  the  in- 
creased edition  will  be  announced 
later. 

In  the  24-page  issue  advertising 
pages  will  be  limited  to  12  pages,  and 
anyon  applying  for  space  after  these 
12  pages  are  filled  must  wait  until  a 
vacancy  occurs.  Special  advertising 
rates  can  only  be  secured  by  those 
who  keep  their  advertisement  in  these 
columns  during  the  entire  year.  Those 
who  desire  to  withdraw  their  adver- 
tisement during  the  two  summer 
months  must  consent  to  pay  a  higher 
rate.  Rates  on  this  page  will  be  IN 
CASE  OF  ANNUAL  CONTRACTS: 
One  inch.  $1.00:  one-half  inch,  SOc, 
and  "Musical  Directory,"  25  cents  per 
issue.  We  are  desirous  of  securing  as 
many  ANNUAL  ADVERTISERS  ns 
possible,  and  hence  will,  during  the 
course  of  a  year,  give  such  annual  ad- 
vertisers repeated  use  of  the  reading 
columns  or  the  front  page.  Those 
who  do  not  advertise  at  all  will  not 
be  entitled  to  advance  notices  for  con- 
certs, insertions  of  pictures,  or  other 
advertising  matter.  They  will  only  re- 
ceive a  notice  after  a  concert. 


Alfred  Cogswell 

studio:   1531  Sutter,  San  Fnnciico.  on  lacsday 
and    Friday,  and    at   211Q  Durant  St., 

Berkeley,  on  Monday,  Thuriday  and  Saturday 


William  Hofmann 

Musical  Director  Fairmont  Hotel 


MRS.    A.    F.    BRIDGE 

Xeacher  of  .^ing'in^ 

el.  West  727'*  2220  Webster  St  .  San  Frai 

Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks 

Voice  Culture 


MRS.  OLIVE  ORBISON 

Dramatic    Soprano 

Voice  Culture  Concert  and  Oratorio 

2240  California  St.  — Phone  U  est  663V 

Mrs.  Thoroxig'man 

Voice  Culture—Dramatic  Soprano 

COVCERT— OR.ATORIO— OPER.A 

Studio:    Room  \(f.  915  Van  Ness  .Ave,       1  el.  Franklm  5254 

MRS.  M.  TROMBONI 

TE.\CHER  OF  SINGING 

Studio.   1531   SUTTER  ST..  Monday,  and  ThutKlays.     At 
Mill  Valley,  Keystone  Building.  Tuesday.  Wednesday.  Friday 

Mrs.    Olive   Reed   Cushman 

VOICE  CULTURE 

Studio.  Maple  Hall.  I  4th  and  WehsVr  Su,.  Oakland 
Tue-vlay  and    Fnd.v Phone  Oakland   3453 

EDNA    MURRAY 

Pianiste 

Concerts  Recitals  Lessons 

.\ddress:     .     .     .     Ro.ss.  Marin  County.  California 

LOUIS  CRE.PAUX 

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Delbert  Block.  943  \an  Nes..  at  O  Farrell.    Reception  Hours 

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BENJ.  S  MOORE 

(Pianirl  and  Teacher     Organist  of  First  Presbyterian  Church) 

Studio:      Rooms  ll-li  .Alliance  Building,  San  Jose,  aiifornia. 

Phone  Brown   316 


>fusical    Directory 

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rACIFIO    00  A  ST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


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Thanks  to  the  kindness  of  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  14th  and 
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enabled  to  announce  that  it  has  now  a  permanent  Oakland 
office  in  that  beautiful  edifice.  All  Oakland  readers  of  this 
paper  may  leave  announcements  at  this  new  office.  Miss 
Elizabeth  Westgate  is  In  charge  of  the  trans-bay  office.  The 
Editor  will  be  in  the  Oakland  office  every  Tuesday  and  Satur- 
day afternoon.  Single  copies,  subscriptions  and  advertising 
contracts  can  be  secured  at  this  Oakland  office. 


NEWS    NOTES    FOR    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 

The  question  is  often  asked  "why  is  Sousa's  Band  so  much 
finer  than  any  other  that  tours  the  country?"  The  answer  is 
a  simple  one.  Mr.  Sousa  wants  the  very  best  and  is  willing 
to  pay  for  it.  He  engages  his  musicians  from  among  the  same 
class  the  Metropolitan  and  Manhattan  opera  companies  do. 
While  the  union  price  for  bandsmen  is  $3.5  per  week  Mr. 
Sousa  pays  a  minimum  rate  of  $4.5  and  many  of  his  men  get 
$60.  $75  and  even  higher,  his  solo  cornetist  getting  close  to  the 
$200  mark.  Outside  of  the  big  permanent  symphony  orches- 
tras of  the  East.  Sousa's  Band  is  the  most  expensive  organiza- 
tion maintained  in  this  country. 

Manager  Will  Greenbaum  announces  that  he  has  received 
a  wire  from  the  "March  King,"  in  which  he  states  that  he  is 
preparing  special  programs  for  his  San  Francisco  and  Berke- 
ley concerts,  made  up  of  the  gems  from  the  forty  odd  pro- 
grams he  recently  played  at  Willow  Grove  Park. 

He  will  also  introduce  a  new  descriptive  "Suite"  and  a 
typical  Sousa  march. 

Mme.  Jeanne  .lomelli  will  not  be  the  only  star  at  her  own 
concerts,  for  she  will  have  the  assistance  of  Miss  Marie 
Nichols,  one  of  the  greatest  of  the  women  violinists.  It  need 
only  be  mentioned  that  Miss  Nichols  played  twice  in  Boston 
and  eight  times  on  the  road  with  the  Boston  Symphony  Or- 
chestra to  establish  the  fact  that  she  is  an  artist  worthy  of 
our  consideration.  Miss  Nichols  also  scored  successes  with 
the  Lamoureaux  Orchestra  of  Paris,  the  Berlin,  Leipsic  and 
Dresden  Philharmonic,  and  with  the  Pittsbrg,  Theodore 
Thomas  and  other  orchestras  of  this  country. 

Another  artist  with  this  combination  is  Mme.  Magdalen 
Worden,  the  composer,  who  will  officiate  as  accompanist. 
Mme.  Jomelli  will  sing  some  of  Mme.  Worden's  songs. 

Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner  is  breaking  all  records  as  a  drawing 
card.  Hitherto  few  artists  have  been  warranted  in  making 
two  long  tours  of  this  country  in  successive  seasons.  Many 
predicted  that  after  WuUner's  one  hundred  and  forty  concerts 
last  season  (he  came  over  for  sixty)  his  management  was 
making  a  great  mistake  in  bringing  him  right  back  again,  but 
it  is  evidently  not  so,  for  about  every  date  is  already  taken 
and  most  of  them  in  the  same  places  where  he  appeared 
before.  There  must  be  something  genuinely  marvelous  in  a 
man  who  can  attract  such  audiences,  especially  singing  only 
in  German.  We  shall  have  a  chance  to  judge  for  ourselves  in 
a  few  weeks. 

Conrad  V.  Bos,  the  famous  accompanist,  will,  as  usual, 
assist  Dr.  Wullner. 

Manager  Greenbaum  has  signed  definite  contracts  for  the 
first  appearance  in  this  city  of  the  world-famous  American 
violiniste.  Mme.  Maude  Powell.  Mme.  Powell,  by  the  way, 
will  be  the  soloist  at  the  opening  concerts  of  the  Theodore 
Thomas  Orchestra  this  season,  afterward  appearing  with  the 
newly  re-organized  New  York  Philharmonic  under  Mahler. 

yf  *  * 

Pepito  Arriola,  the  Spanish  prodigy,  who  will  play  here  this 
season  in  place  of  Rosenthal,  recently  played  the  Beethoven 
Concerto  No.  3  with  the  Queen's  Hall  Orchestra  of  London. 
The  papers  say  that  it  was  worth  the  price  of  admission  just 
to  see  the  way  the  twelve-year-old  lad  conducted  himself  to- 
wards the  orchestra  of  one  hundred  grown  men  surrounding 
him.  He  simply  carried  them  right  with  him  in  every  mood 
in  the  great  classic. 


be  unable  to  fulfill  his  contract  on  the  Pacific  Coast.  The 
demands  in  the  east  for  his  time  have  been  enormous,  and  he 
is  forced  to  accept  these  engagements  instead  of  these  scat- 
tered ones  offered  by  the  Pacific  Coast. 

There  are  several  noted  pianists  coming  to  America  this 
season,  whose  time  is  equally  well  filled,  but  who  are  new 
to  this  section  of  the  country,  and  they  desire  to  become 
known  to  the  Pacific  Coast,  and  this  is  an  incentive  to  can- 
celling their  eastern  engagements  and  accepting  a  guarantee 
with  the  various  managers  west  of  Denver. 

Among  these  artists  may  be  mentioned  Busoni,  whose  suc- 
cess last  season  throughout  the  east  was  phenomenal.  Ga- 
brilowitsch  is  an  applicant  for  time,  but  his  recent  tour  of 
the  West  will  carry  him  over  until  next  season  before  he  will 
be  heard  again  in  this  section.  Harold  Bauer,  recognized  as 
one  of  the  most  sane  of  the  modern  artists,  is  very  desirous 
of  showing  his  many  friends  and  admirers  the  wonderful 
progress  he  has  made  in  his  chosen  art,  during  his  recent 
tour  of  South  Ameria  and  Europe,  while  Hoffman,  who  has 
always  been  a  genuine  favorite  for  the  last  eleven  years,  is 
wanting  to  extend  his  Mexican  tour  as  far  north  as  Van- 
couver before  returning  east  for  his  engagements  with  the 
symphony  orchestras  of  that  section. 

In  addition  to  these  artists,  Madame  Carreno  is  already 
booked  for  an  extensive  tour,  so  the  loss  of  Rosenthal  will  un- 
doubtedly result  in  the  bringing  of  an  equally  famous  artist 
here  later  in  the  season. 


-w- 


Mme.  Marcella  Senibrich  has  a  book  in  which  she  has 
recorded  every  performance  she  has  given  on  the  operatic 
stage.  Over  the  date  of  one  entry  there  stands  written  the 
word  "Fiasco."  That  unusual  oescription  of  an  incident  in  a 
career  so  triumphant  always  causes  a  request  for  an  explana- 
tion. 

Mme.  Sembrich  had  closed  an  engagement  in  Madrid,  and 
had  gone  to  sing  in  Barcelona,  which  possesses  a  very  exact- 
ing and  somewhat  uproarious  operatic  public.  Mme.  Sem- 
brich made  a  triumphant  debut  in  "La  Traviata,"  and  was 
next  to  appear  in  "Lucia  di  Lammermoor."  Singing  with  her 
was  a  new  baritone,  who  had  never  faced  a  Barcelona  audi- 
ence. He  began  badly,  and  as  the  opera  progressed  his  nerv- 
ousness increased  until  it  was  all  but  impossible  for  him  to 
sing.  Although  the  audience  received  Mme.  Sembrich  with 
cordiality,  it  was  manifestly  hostile  to  the  tenor.  During  the 
second  act  she  and  the  luckless  baritone  had  their  first  scene 
together.  He  sang  his  share  ot  their  duet  in  a  manner  that 
awakened  a  storm  of  noisy  disapproval.  The  audience  hissed 
and  shouted.  Without  a  second's  hesitation  Mme.  Sembrich 
left  the  stage,  went  to  her  dressing  room,  and  prepared  to 
return  to  her  hotel. 

"The  public  has  no  more  right  to  be  rude  than  an  individ- 
ual," she  told  her  distracted  manager.  "If  it  cannot  remember 
the  respect  due  a  lady,  it  cannot  expect  me  to  sing." 

She  left  the  opera  house.  The  next  morning  she  returned 
to  Madrid  and  wrote  in  her  journal  the  black  "Fiasco." 


ROSENTHAL   NOT   COMING. 


Musical  Review  Rules  That  Will  be  Enforced. 


Every  advertising  bill  must  be  paid  on  the  first  day 
of  each  month.  If  not  paid  on  or  before  the  fifteenth 
of  each  month  advertisement  will  be  discontinued.  If 
not  paid  on  or  before  the  first  day  of  the  month  follow- 
ing account  will    be  turned  over  to  collector. 

All  subscriptions  must  be  paid  two  weeks  after  date 
of  expiration  notices  mailed  from  this  office.  If  not 
paid  paper  will   be  promptly  discontinued. 

Only  advertisers  are  entitled  to  insertion  of  advance 
notices  of  concerts,  pictures,  studio  removal  notices, 
etc.     Bona   fide   news   items   are   always   solicited. 

This  paper  will  establish  a  list  of  California  artists 
and  church  choir  singers.  Anyone  desirous  of  appear- 
ing on  this  list,  which  will  be  forwarded  to  anyone  like- 
ly to  engage  artists,  may  send  in  his  or  her  name.  No 
charge  will  be  made  for  such  entrance  nor  any  com- 
mission charged  in  case  an  engagement  is  secured.  If 
artist  is  not  known  to  the  editor  by  reputation  he  or  she 
must  satisfy  him  as  to  required  competency.  No  charge 
is   made  for  such   examination. 


Managers    Behymer   and    Oreenbamn's    attention    has    been 
called  by  wire  to  the  fact  that  Morilz  Rosenthal,  pianist,  will 


Subscribe  for  the  Musical  Review.  $2.00  per  year. 


■AOIPIC  CQA3T 


6An  FRANCI5CO.  OAKLAhD,  LOSAMGELES.  PoRTLAxMP.  6eAITLE 

THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN    THE    GREAT    WEST 
^     PUBLISHED     EVERY    WEEK    C^ 


VOL.  XVII.  No.  3 


SAN  FRANCISCO.  SATURDAY.  OCTOBER  16.  1909 


PRICE  10  CENTS 


MRS.    LUELLE    MAYNE    WINDSOR 

The  Cultured  California  Lyric  Concert  Soprano  Who   Is  Now   Upon  an 

Eastern    Tour   of   Three    Months    Duration. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


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ALFRED  METZGER      EDITOR 


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San  Francisco  Office 

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S.\TURDAY.  OCTOBER  16.   1908 


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Musical    Directory    50  .25 

MUSICAL  CALENDAR   1909-10. 

Sousa  and  his  Band  (Dreamland  Rink).  .Nov.  4  and  7.  aft.  &  eve. 
Mme.  Jean  Jomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  House  Co.)  .Week  of  Nov.  14 

Dr.  Ludwig  WuUner Xov.  23,  25  and  2S 

George  Hamlin    lAmerican  Tenor) Dec.   2,   5   and   7 

Fritz   Kreisler Dec.   12.   16   and   19 

Lyric  Quartette  Pop  Concert Com.   io    January 

Marcella   Sembrich Week   of  Jan.    9 

Myrtle    Elvin    (Pianiste)  . February 

Teresa   Carreno First   Week   of   February 

Madame  Schumann-Heink Com.   Sunday,   Feb.   13 

Mme.  Tilly  Koenen   (the  famous  Dutch  contralto) March 

Pepito  Arriolo   (the  Spanish  child  Violinist) March 

Maud    Powell April 

Flonzaley   Quartet    (in   Chamber  Music) April 

Damrosch   Symphony  Orchestra  and  Isadora  Duncan May 


THE   NEW  YORK   MANAGER   AND  THE   PACIFIC   COAST. 


The  imisieal  public  of  the  Pacific  Coast  is  quite  fre 
qiieiitly  tlie  toftic  of  discussiou  in  the  managerial 
ofliies  of  New  York.  In  the  majority  of  instances  the 
remarks  passed  regarding  the  musical  capacity  of  tlie 
far  Western  music  lovers  is  not  at  all  of  a  flattering 
nature,  and  we  dare  say  that  in  the  opinion — the  priv- 
ate opinion  only,  of  course — of  the  metropolitan  im- 
presario the  residents  of  the  far  Western  districts  do 
not  enjoy  a  very  enviable  position.  We  do  not  receive 
our  information  from  the  Xew  York  managers.  In- 
deed, we  have  reason  to  distrust  information  received 
from  headquarters,  as  reports  prepared  for  publication 
usually  do  not  coincide  with  reports  based  upon  exist- 
ing facts.  We  have  patiently  accumulated  our  infor- 
mation from  among  reliable  sources,  of  whose  integ- 
rity, trustworthiness  and  veracity  we  are  thoroughly 
convinced.  And  from  tlie.se  sources  we  have  drawn 
our  conclusions  tliat  in  the  private  opinion  of  the  Xew 
Y'ork  manager — no  matter  how  much  he  may  protest 


against  this  accusation  in  public — the  musical  public 
of  the  Pacific  Coast  represents  a  very  unmusical  set 
of  people. 

Now  let  us  see  why  the  New  York  manager  has  come 
to  this  conclusion.  He  is  in  this  concert  business  for 
the  purpose  of  earning  a  living.  He  wants  to  make  as 
much  money  as  possible  from  the  commercial  side  of 
the  art  of  music.  Consequently  he  gauges  his  opinion 
of  the  musical  or  unmusical  status  of  a  community 
upon  the  financial  support  such  community  gives  to 
his  enterprises.  If  the  people  crowd  the  concerts  of 
his  artists  and  enable  him  to  take  back  home  a  purse 
well  lined  with  far  Western  gold,  he  chuckles  to  him- 
self and  talks  loudly  about  the  gi'eat  musical  taste  pre- 
valent on  the  Pacific  Coast.  If  the  concerts  of  his  ar- 
tists are  not  well  attended  he  shakes  his  fist  in  the  di- 
rection of  the  .setting  sun  and  bemoans  the  sad  lack  of 
musical  appreciation  on  the  Western  coast  of  America. 
Now,  if  the  musical  magnates  of  New  York  were  al- 
ways careful  in  the  selection  of  their  artists  we  might 
stretch  a  point  and  i-eally  regard  the  numerical  extend 
of  concert  attendance  as  a  criterion  for  either  lack  or 
abundance  of  musical  taste.  But  the  New  York  man- 
ager is  not  satisfied  to  permit  the  public  to  judge  as  to 
which  artist  is  worthy  of  jiatronage.  but  he  desires  to 
force  upon  our  public  every  artist  whom  he  manages 
and  no  matter  how  inferior  such  artist  may  be.  still 
the  New  York  manager  wants  the  Pacific  Coast  public 
to  support  him  or  her. 


When  we  occasionally  in  a  letter  suggest  to  a  New 
York  manager  that  we  only  support  the  very  best  ar- 
tists, we  receive  an  indignant  reply  stating:  "I  handle 
nothing  but  the  best  artists  and  such  remarks  are  en- 
tirely uncalled  for."  But  the  facts  in  the  past  have 
proven  that  such  contentions  on  the  part  of  a  New  Y'ork 
manager  are  bosh  and  bluster,  and  that  the  truth  re- 
mains to  the  effect  that  we  are  expected  to  take  the  man- 
ager's word  for  his  artists,  which  we  refuse  to  do.  be- 
eau.se  we  have  been  fooled  too  often.  Now.if  we  refuse  to 
pay  money  for  an  inferior  artist,  who  is  pronounced  "tlie 
greatest  in  the  world"  by  a  New  York  manager's  am- 
bitious press  agent,  we  are  immediately  put  down  as 
being  unmusical.  Fortunately,  concert  attendance  is 
not  necessarily  a  sign  of  the  existence  of  musical  cul- 
ture in  a  community,  A  great  many  people  who  at- 
tend concerts  are  not  musical,  and  a  great  many  mus- 
ical people  do  not  attend  concerts,  although  a  musical 
education  is  not  complete  without  a  diligent  concert 
attendance  and  a  bowing  acquaintance  with  the  inter- 
pretations of  the  world's  great  artists.  But  while  we 
deny  the  truth  of  the  New  York  manager's  broad  state- 
ment that  our  far  Western  communities  are  not  mus- 
ical, we  are  willing  to  concede  the  fact  that  many 
deserving  artists  are  not  pati-onized  as  well  as  they 
should  be.  This  is  also  the  fault  of  the  New  York 
manager,  and  we  will  proceed  to  prove  this  contention. 


When  you  pick  up  a  musical  journal  published  in 
New  York  or  Chicago  you  will  find  therein  extensive 
announcements  regarding  the  artists  who  appear  dur- 
ing a  season.  Every  reader  of  the  paper  is  thus  sti-ik- 
ingly  confronted  with  the  personnel  of  an  ensuing  con- 
cert season.  Week  after  week  he  .sees  these  names  in 
bold,  black  type.  Week  after  week  he  reads  notices  ac- 
companied by  pictures  telling  all  about  tlie.se  artists. 
You  may  go  among  the  teachers  and  students  of  an 
Eastern  musical  center  and  before  the  sea.son  opens 
they  are  thoroughly  cont-ersant  with  the  names  of  the 
artists  whom  thev  will  be  able  to  hear.     What  is  the 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


i-diiditiou  on  tlie  racilic  Coast?  No  Eastern  manager 
aiinonnces  liis  artists  in  advance  in  the  otlicial  musical 
journal.  Tlie  readers  do  not  see  a  striliingly  effective 
ainionncement  containing  tlie  names  of  the  artists  who 
are  to  apjjear  liere  during  tlie  season.  No  explanatory 
articles,  accomi»anied  by  portraits,  meet  the  eye  of  the 
teacher  week  after  week.  The  result  is  that  you  do  not 
meet  one  in  a  hundred  people  who  can  tell  you  off- 
hand at  the  dawn  of  a  new  sea.son  who  the  artists  are 
that  will  make  their  appearance  in  the  respective  com- 
munities. News  items  are  all  very  well  in  their  place, 
but  they  are  soon  forgotten.  A  legible  announcemenl 
carrying  the  names  of  artists  in  bold,  black  type  and 
appearing  with  regular  precision  week  after  week,  is 
the  only  po.ssible  method  by  which  to  .sti'engthen  and 
retain  the  mind  of  the  reader.  If  the  New  York  man- 
ager desires  to  have  the  people  of  the  Pacific  Coast 
support  his  artists  in  the  same  ratio  as  the  public  of 
Eastern  centers  is  doing,  he  must  appeal  to  the  public 
in  the  same  manner.  And  if  he  wants  to  increa.se  his 
income  from  Pacific  Coast  centers,  he  must  increase  his 
expenditure  in  the  same  manner  as  lie  does  in  the  East. 
Cur  Western  public  has  not  that  iiersonal  interest  in 
Eastern  musical  journals  which  it  entertains  for  its 
own  paper.  Neither  have  the  Eastern  musical  journals 
that  circulation  in  home  circles  in  this  territory  which 
the  Pacitic  Coast  i)aper  has.  And  yet  in  spite  of  their 
persistence  in  ignoring  this  territory  regarding 
adequate  advertising  appropriations  throughout  the 
year,  the  New  York  managers  expect  the  public  to  rush 
to  their  box  oflices  and  leave  their  dollars  like  good 
little  children. 


There  is  another  phase  to  this  lack  of  enthusiasm  on 
the  part  of  our  people  to  rush  to  concerts  of  outside 
attractions.  We  could  hardly  state  the  matter  better 
tlian  a  Western  musical  manager  who  wrote  to  the 
editor  of  a  New  York  musical  jiaper  as  follows: 

"The  voracious  eastern  manager,  however,  who  wishes  to 
hog  the  game  all  for  his  own  people  (and  I  guess  that's  what 
he's  in  the  business  for),  is  Interfering  quite  a  bit  with  the 
success  that  should  be  obtained  by  the  eastern  people.  They 
are  endeavoring  with  five  or  six  of  the  eastern  managers  in 
the  field  to  each  give  us  four  or  five  artists  apiece,  which 
would  mean  the  coming  of  at  least  thirty  competitive  Euro- 
pean and  eastern  soloists  and  instrumentalists  to  the  Pacific 
Coast.  When  you  divide  120  dates  between  30  people,  it 
means  but  (our  dates  in  this  western  territory  for  each  artist, 
and  if  six  would  come  out  each  year,  and  the  eastern  manager 
would  be  content  to  divide  the  field  up  between  these  six,  each 
visitor  would  have  20  dates,  which  would  make  it  possible  for 
them  to  make  the  right  kind  of  a  tour,  so  you  see  we  are 
working  under  difficulties  when  you  consider  these  conditions. 

"I  am  very  sorry  it  is  this  way,  because  it  means  that  the 
eastern  managers  are  rapidly  undoing  the  good  work  already 
established  in  the  west.  Another  thing,  they  charge  us  a  cer- 
tain figure  for  their  people,  and  then  in  many  instances  cut 
under  us  in  the  price  quoting  in  our  own  territory  values  that 
we  cannot  secure  even  at  a  wholesale  rate.  They  do  this  at 
the  close  of  their  negotiations,  so  as  to  get  a  few  additional 
dates,  over  and  above  what  we  have  been  able  to  secure  at  a 
higher  price.  This  demoralizes  conditions  and  makes  it  much 
harder  for  us  to  do  business. 

"One  or  two  eastern  managers  visited  in  this  section  last 
season,  and  were  not  content  with  the  amount  of  business 
which  we  were  giving  them,  but  insisted  on  loading  up  towns 
like  Santa  Barbara,  Palo  Alto,  El  Paso  and  San  Jose  with 
more  material  than  they  could  possibly  carry,  simply  by  per- 
suasive eloquence,  and  then  left  us  local  managers  to  meet 
the  proposition  alone.  We  know  the  situation  and  would  not 
give  to  a  town  like  Palo  Alto,  out  of  four  artists,  two  pianists. 
We  know  that  the  piano  game  is  the  hardest  one  of  them  to 
work,  and  so  we  are  forced  to  take  over  at  a  loss  the  Palo 
Alto  deal.  We  know  the  territory;  we  do  not  insist  on  over- 
loading them,  the  eastern  manager  says  we  are  not  doing  the 
work  correctly. 

"The  result  of  this  overloading  this  year  is  the  absolute 
refusal  of  the  Palo  Alto,  Santa  Barbara,  Pacific  Grove,  and 
Santa  Cruz  managers  to  take  anything  musical  whatever,  so 


the  eastern  managers  who  came  through  this  section  last  year 
and  interfered  with  our  business  have  not  only  killed  their 
own  prospects,  but  the  prospects  of  other  managers,  and  set 
back  our  work  locally  at  least  five  years.  They  may  know 
New  York  City,  Boston  and  vicinity,  but  they  are  not  ac- 
quainted with  the  Far  West,  and  a  trip  of  thirty  days,  cover- 
ing 3000  miles,  and  a  visit  to  30  or  40  cities,  does  not  give 
them  a  sufficient  insight  into  this  section  to  justify  them  in 
overriding  the  men  and  women  who  have  devoted  the  last 
fifteen  years  to  the  upbuilding  of  the  territory,  which  is  cir- 
cumscribed, but  which  has  shown  by  energetic  work  in  con- 
nection with  the  local  managers,  a  lucrative  territory  un- 
equalled in  America. 

"If  the  eastern  manager  is  going  to  run  the  West,  then  it 
is  only  a  question  of  a  year  until  the  west  will  be  dead  mus- 
ically, and  the  fight  will  have  to  be  done  all  over  again.  We 
are  already  feeling  the  effect  of  overloading,  and  can  only  say 
that  the  local  manager  and  the  artist  is  the  sufferer,  and  not 
the  eastern  man  who  sits  in  his  office  and  thinks  he  knows 
the  west.  Our  experience  has  cost  us  money,  and  the  New 
York  manager  has  never  paid  any  portion  of  it." 


While  the  above  letter  is  in  .some  respects  a  little 
pessimistic,  it  is  in  other  respects  based  upon  actual 
conditions.  The  campaign  which  this  paper  has 
waged  lately  for  the  local  artist  is  beginning  to  bear 
fruit.  Far  more  money  is  being  spent  for  local  events 
than  useil  to  be  the  ca.se  several  years  ago.  The  people 
ai'e  beginning  to  realize  that  in  spite  of  the  sneers  of 
New  Y'ork,  and  even  certain  Western  managers,  there 
are  a  number  of  most  efficient  artists  residing  in  our 
midst.  Their  merit  is  beginning  to  be  recognized  at 
its  full  value  and  while  lOasteru  managers  and  Euro- 
I)ean  artists  are  charging  prohibitive  prices,  the  mus- 
ical public,  musical  clubs  and  other  elements  look  to 
the  resident  artists  for  their  musical  supply.  We  ven- 
ture to  predict  that  unless  the  New  York  manager  as- 
sumes a  more  liberal  attitude  in  his  expenditure  in 
distribution  of  advertising  patronage  tipon  an  equal 
basis  between  East  and  West,  he  will  lose  this  territory 
altogether  eventually,  as  the  same  will  be  controlled  by 
intelligent  local  managers  who  will  book  local  artists 
and  thus  act  independently  from  the  New  York  office 
and  independently  from  any  organization  that  wants  to 
have  the  "whole  hog"  or  notliiug. 


Upon  another  page  in  this  pa])er  will  be  seen  a  col- 
umn announcement  of  Manager  L.  E.  Behymer  of  Los 
Angeles,  who  presides  over  the  musical  destinies  of  the 
great  Southwest  and  the  major  portion  of  California. 
You  will  find  that  this  announcement  includes  foreign 
and  Eastern  artists,  as  well  as  resident  California  ar- 
tists. This  is  a  condition  of  affairs  which  this  paper 
has  been  fighting  for,  although  JIanager  Behymer  has 
directed  the  tours  of  Southern  California  artists  pre- 
vious to  the  campaign  inaugurated  by  this  paper.  But 
this  is  the  first  time  in  the  history  of  music  in  Califor- 
nia that  an  impresario  of  influence  and  authority  has 
published  the  names  of  foreign.  Eastern  and  California 
artists  side  by  side.  This  could  only  be  made  possible 
by  a  hone  fide  musical  journal,  and  the  fact  that  Mr. 
Behymer  recognizes  the  value  of  such  an  announce- 
ment should  be  cause  for  deep  gratification  among  the 
musical  public  and  the  musical  profession.  It  was  the 
intention  of  tlie  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  to  ignore 
the  appearance  of  foreign  and  Eastern  artists  until  the 
time  of  AVill  L.  Greenbaum's  regular  announcements, 
but  Mr.  Behymer's  generous  recognition  of  the  official 
status  of  this  paper  causes  us  to  change  our  policy  in 
such  a  manner  that  any  announcements  forwarded  by 
Mr.  Behymer  regarding  the  artists  under  his  control 
will  receive  recognition  in  these  columns.  As  Mr. 
Behymer  has  entered  into  an  agreement  with  this 
jtaper  to  publish  his  announcements  throughout  the 
year,  he  will  have  quite  an  advantage  in  his  territory. 


1'  A  O  1  F  I  O    C  O  A  S  T    51  U  S  I  C  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  W. 


As  this  is  a  Pacific  Coast  music:!  1  joiiriial  auil  not  a 
paper  of  local  dimensions  only,  Mr.  lieliymer  will  reaj) 
considerable  benefit.  W'a  will  now  see  wlietlier  this 
]>aper  is  able  to  imitrove  ct)ncert  attendance  in  Call 
loruia  or  not. 


The  San  Francisco  Center  of  the  American  Mnsic 
Society  is  now  entering  npon  its  first  season.  It  is 
within  the  power  of  its  ofHcers  to  make  it  either  a 
powerfnl  organization,  including  in  its  membershiji 
everyone  who  lays  claim  to  being  prominent  in  the 
musical  affairs  of  the  bay  cities,  or  it  has  it  in  its 
power  to  run  the  organization  into  oblivion  by  means 
of  incomi)etent  and  undignified  government.  In  order 
to  make  the  organization  thoroughly  effective  all  the 
officers  must  woi'k  harmoniously  tt)gether,  they  must 
attend  all  meetings  an<l  give  the  welfare  of  the  organ- 
ization their  enthusiastic  suiiport.  They  must  induce 
the  members  to  receive  new  recruits  so  tliat  by  the  time 
of  the  first  concert  tlie  oi-ganization  must  number  at 
least  one  thousand  members.  The  officers  must  steer 
clear  of  New  York  commercialism  and  must  not  use 
the  influence  of  their  office  to  solicit  subscriptions  for 
a  New  York  musical  journal.  This  paper  has  sup- 
ported this  society  in  the  jiasl  and  will  support  it  in 
future  without  making  any  conditions  of  any  kind,  but 
it  must  remain  an  independent  organization,  tlie  pur- 
pose of  which  is  to  encourage  American  composers  and 
present  their  works.  Now  tlie  members  must  become 
enthusiastic  and  begin  to  work.  We  sincerely  hope 
that  after  tliis  auspicious  beginning  we  will  not  be 
called  upon  to  regret  our  attitude  in  this  matter.  This 
organization  has  it  in  its  power  to  build  up  One  of  the 
greatest  musical  clubs  in  the  United  States.  Let  us 
see  whether  there  are  enough  enthusiasts  in  this  city 
to  bring  this  splendid  dream  to  an  actual  realizatiou. 

We  want  everyone  in  California  who  is  interested  in 
music  to  participate  in  the  subscription  contest  just 
launched  by  this  paper,  and  the  particulars  of  which 
nuiy  be  found  upon  another  page.  We  are  anxious  to 
see  this  contest  a  complete  success,  and  that  it  will 
result  in  introducing  the  I'acific  Coast  Musical  Keview 
in  five  thousand  more  musical  homes  in  California. 
This  anxiety  is  not  so  much  due  to  an  eagei-ness  for 
financial  gain  (for  the  more  papers  we  print  the  more 
money  does  it  require  to  print  them,  and  the  profit  on 
subscriptions  is  very  scant),  but  we  want  to  see  tlie 
various  reform  movements  in  behalf  of  musical  culture 
brought  to  the  attention  of  the  general  musical  public 
as  well  as  to  the  members  of  tlie  profession  and  the 
music  students.  The  cause  of  music  can  not  be  served 
more  advantageously  than  by  inducing  the  people  mus- 
ically inclined  to  become  interested  in  the  art  in  a 
measure  so  as  to  attend  concerts  and  read  musical 
journals.  We  promise  to  do  our  part  in  making  the 
paper  so  interesting  that,  when  anyone  musically  in- 
clined sees  it,  he  or  she  will  want  to  read  it  all  the 
time,  and  if  our  readers  will  do  their  share  by  assisting 
us  in  introducing  the  paper  in  as  many  musical  homes 
as  i)ossible,  the  musical  problem  will  easily  be  solved. 
We  desire  to  mail  as  many  sample  copies  as  possible  to 
musical  people  within  the  next  six  months,  so  our 
readers  will  confer  a  favor  by  mailing  us  names  and 
addresses  of  friends  who  are  interested  in  a  musical 
journal. 

The  visit  of  the  President  of  the  Ihiited  States  to 
the  Pacific  Coast  is  as  interesting  and  as  important 
to  the  musical  portion  of  the  population  as  it  is  to  any 
other  class.     President  Taft,  by  reason  of  his  dignity. 


mingled  w  itii  all'Mhilily,  has  made  a  most  favorable  im- 
pression ti|ioii  everyone.  His  speeches  contained 
exiiclly  tliiit  inl'ornuitiou  which  everyone  w;inted  to 
know,  and  his  promises,  which  most  assuredly  will  be 
kejit,  will  result  in  the  future  prosperity  of  this  terri- 
tory. Moi-eover,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Taft  are  very  musical 
and  far  nu)re  inclined  toward  a  proper  api)recia1ion  of 
the  art  than  any  of  their  predecessors. 


The  Portola  Festival  is  rapidly  approaching  and  the 
next  week  will  see  us  in  the  midst  of  the  festivities 
Los  Angeles  will  contribute  its  share  toward  the  cele 
bration  by  sending  several  bands  and  a  big  delegation 
of  the  ]']lks,  utilizing  a  special  train  for  this  purpose. 
An  official  jirograni  appeal's  upon  another  jiage  of  this 
paper.  Tlios(>  of  our  readers  who  live  in  interior  towns 
should  not  miss  an  oiiportunity  to  witness  this  magni- 
ficent spectacle.  Several  hundred  thousand  dollars 
have  been  expended  on  electrical  illumination,  fire- 
w(n-ks  and  Hoafs,  and  the  pageant  will  jirove  the  most 
magnificent  spectacle  ever  witnessed  here.  Ivike  the 
famous  Vosemite  N'alley,  it  will  come  up  to  the  "biag."" 
Anyone  who  fails  to  attend  will  be  disappointed,  for 
the  committee  realizes  that  it  must  make  the  festival 
a  brilliant  alfair,  thoroughly  conformant  with  its  prom- 
ises, or  else  sntl'ci-  I  he  iyiiomiiy  of  ])ublic  wrath. 


THE  EDITOR'S  PRIVATE  NOTEBOOK 


A  CHAT   WITH    MARY   ADELE  CASE. 

Ambitious   California   Contralto   Soloist   Who   Is   On   the    Road 
To  a    Brilliant  Career  on   the   Concert   Stage. 


BY  ALFRED  METZGER. 

The  daily  papers  have  devoted  so  much  space  to  Miss  Mary 
Adele  Case's  romantic  aspirations  or  respirations  that  I  feel 
in  duty  bound  to  give  this  subject  a  wide  berth  and  restrict 
myself  solely  to  Miss  Case,  the  ambitious  conqueror  of  the 
world  of  music.  My  meeting  with  Miss  Case  was  so  unique 
and  so  out  of  the  ordinary  that  I  do  not  believe  the  readers 
of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  will  take  it  amiss  if  I 
impose  a  personal  atmosphere  in  this  interview.  Anyway,  I 
do  not  take  kindly  to  interviews,  leaving  this  sort  of  thing  to 
the  writers  for  the  daily  papers,  who  warn  an  artist  before- 
hand that  he  is  being  interviewed  and  then  let  the  person 
interviewed  prepare  certain  expressions  for  publication, 
weighing  each  word  carefully,  lest  the  management  may  take 
offense  at  something  they  may  say.  Besides,  an  artist  under 
the  calcium  of  an  interview  is  too  self-conscious  to  say  any- 
thing of  real  importance  and  quite  frequently  drifts  uncon- 
sciously into  banalities  or  prevarications. 

Now,  Miss  Case  did  not  know  that  she  was  being  inter- 
viewed. At  least  I  never  revealed  my  intention  to  her.  Nor 
was  our  meeting  arranged  beforehand.  It  was  purely  acci- 
dental. A  week  or  two  ago  Lawrence  Strauss,  the  well-known 
tenor,  asked  me  whether  I  would  like  to  meet  Miss  Case  and 
listen  to  her  sing.  I  expressed  myself  as  being  delighted  to 
make  the  young  lady's  acquaintance,  and  Mr.  Strauss  prom- 
ised to  arrange  a  meeting.  Believing  that  Miss  Case  would 
remain  in  San  Francisco  for  some  time  as  the  guest  of  her 
friends  and  relatives,  the  conversation  escaped  my  mind.  On 
Monday  evening,  while  waiting  for  the  car  to  take  me  to  the 
Southern  Pacific  depot  on  my  way  to  Los  Angeles,  a  young 
man  hailed  me,  and  who  should  it  be  but  Lawrence  Strauss, 
who  expressed  his  satisfaction  at  the  coincidence  which  caused 
a  meeting  which  he  tried  in  vain  to  bring  about  by  means 
of  telephonic  communication  with  my  office.  The  young  lady 
who  undergoes  constant  tests  of  patience  at  the  business  end 
of  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co's.  private  exchange  told  Mr.  Strauss 
that  I  had  left  for  Los  Angeles  and  would  not  return  until  the 
following  Monday.  As  Miss  Case  was  to  leave  for  New 
York  on  the  Sunday  preceding  there  could  have  been  no  meet- 
ing between  us. 


6 


PACIFIC    COAST    M  U  S  I(J  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  VV 


Now,  as  a  matter  of  irrelevant  explanation,  I  desire  to  con- 
fess that  previous  to  Mr.  Strauss'  advent  upon  the  scene  my 
attention  was  attracted  by  a  tastefully  gowned  young  lady, 
whose  picture  hat,  graceful  figure  and  elt-like  vivacity  in 
motion  appealed  strongly  to  my  sense  of  the  beautiful.  I 
tried  to  watch  the  lady  while  she  stepped  from  a  cross-town 
car  without  being  rude  enough  to  permit  my  scrutiny  to  be 
"caught  in  the  act"  by  the  fair  object  of  my  attention.  Now, 
you  can  imagine  my  delight  when  Mr.  Strauss  asked  me 
whether  I  would  like  to  meet  his  companion,  who  happened  to 
be  Miss  Case.  Would  I  like  to  meet  Miss  Case!  If  Mr. 
Strauss  had  only  known  the  absurdity  of  his  question.  Well! 
I  met  Miss  Case.  And  while  this  paragraph  begins  like  a 
chapter  from  a  romantic  story  it  ends  just  as  abruptly  without 
creating  any  pleasant  or  unpleasant  consequences  and  yours 
truly,  while  richer  in  the  acquaintance  with  a  charming  per- 
sonality, is  still  heart-whole,  independent,  unmarried,  satisfied 
and  ready  to  meet  other  charming  disciples  of  the  art. 

After  the  usual  ceremonies  of  introduction,  I  dicovered  that 
Miss  Case  was  on  her  way  to  Palo  Alto,  where  she  was  to 
give  a  concert  on  Friday,  October  8.  In  this  way  we  were 
destined  to  pass  a  pleasant  hour  on  the  train.  Here  was  an 
ideal  opportunity  to  have  an  interview  without  letting  Miss 
Case  know  my  intentions.  She  had  no  idea  she  was  talking 
for  publication,  for  she  never  warned  me  not  to  say  certain 
things. '  Of  course,  I  shall  only  refer  to  those  matters  of  in- 
terest to  readers  of  a  musical  journal.  The  favorable  im- 
pression made  upon  me  by  Miss  Case,  before  becoming  ac- 
quainted with  her,  was  enhanced  while  listening  to  her  ripp- 
ling chatter,  that  flowed  merrily  on  like  a  crystal  brook 
wending  its  way  down  a  green  mountain-side.  A  blind  man 
could  tell  that  Miss  Case  was  young — very  young,  from  the 
undercurrent  of  optimism  prevalent  throughout  her  conversa- 
tion. And  her  sincerity  and  enthusiasm  in  her  chosen  career 
is  so  apparent  that  one  involuntarily  is  forced  to  admit  that 
such  determination  and  tenacity  will  surely  receive  its  just 
reward. 

*  *       * 

"Next  Sunday  I  will  leave  for  New  York,  where  I  expect  to 
make  arrangements  with  Loudon  Charlton  for  an  initiatory 
series  of  concerts,"  said  Miss  Case,  among  other  things.  "I 
have  studied  very  consistently  and  industriously  during  the 
last  two  and  a  half  years  in  Paris.  Indeed,  I  applied  myself 
so  consistently  to  study  in  this  time  that  I  verily  believe, 
without  intending  to  exaggerate,  that  I  have  crammed  six 
years  of  information  into  these  two  and  a  half  years  of  study. 
During  my  sojourn  in  Paris  I  appeared  twice  in  public  and 
was  soloist  at  Harold  Bauer's  concert.  Mr.  Bauer  was  very 
kind  to  me  and  was  indeed  very  generous  regarding  his  pre- 
dictions about  my  future  career.  Mr.  Bauer  is  very  conscien- 
tious and  very  frugal  in  his  praise  and  any  encouragement 
from  him  may  easily  be  accepted  as  well  merited  without  self 
consciousness.  I  have  met  Madame  Gadski  and  found  her  one 
of  the  most  charming  and  refined  artists  I  ever  had  the  pleas- 
ure to  become  acquainted  with. 

*  *       * 

"Since  I  am  told  by  connoiseurs  that  I  possess  a  splendid 
voice  and  artistic  adaptability,  I  am  determined  to  test  this 
judgment.  I  just  adore  being  an  artist  and  can  hardly  wait 
until  the  time  comes  when  I  shall  have  extended  opportuni- 
ties to  put  my  faculties  to  the  test  and  discover  .whether  my 
ambitions  will  ever  be  realized.  I  am  so  sorry  you  could  not 
hear  me  sing,  as  I  should  so  have  liked  to  hear  your  opinion. 
Mr.  Greenbaum  heard  me  and  was  very  kind  in  his  expres- 
sions of  approval.  Mr.  Behymer  in  Los  Angeles  was  very 
enthusiastic  about  my  work  and  told  me  that  I  was  one  of 
the  most  brilliant  and  most  delightful  artists  he  had  ever 
managed.  But  I  should  not  talk  like  this  about  myself.  You 
better  ask  Mr.  Behymer  yourself  and  find  out.  (While  in 
Los  Angeles  I  saw  Mr.  Behymer  and  he  confirmed  Miss  Case's 
statement  in  every  particular,) 

*  *       * 

"No  doubt  you  enjoy  meeting  artists.  Do  you  enjoy  their 
company?  Do  you  like  to  associate  with  them?  *  *  *  But 
here  are  the  livery  stables  and  hotels,  a  sure  indication  that 
this  is  Palo  Alto,  and  I  must  get  off.  I  am  so  glad  to  have 
met  you,  and  I  hope  we  shall  soon  meet  again."  The  desire 
is  mutual  and  next  time  we  meet  I  trust  Miss  Case  will  have 
achieved  her  ambition.  A  backward  glimpse  assured  me  that 
Miss  Case  was  in  care  of  her  relatives — and  life's  running 
picture  machine  extinguished  one  of  its  most  delightful  views 
and  the  impromptu  interview  came  to  an  abrupt  end,  leaving 
me  musing  on  mj^  headlong  rush  to  Los  Angeles — the  City  of 
the  Angels. 


MISS  ANNA   MILLER   WOOD'S   RECITAL. 

Refined   California   Contralto    Soloist    Delights   Cultured    Audi- 
ence With  Well  Selected  Program  of  Vocal  Gems  From 
the  Pen  of  Well   Known  Masters. 


San  Francisco  clubdom,  as  far  as  it  includes  the  fair  sex, 
was  well  represented  at  the  song  recital  given  by  Miss  Anna 
Miller  Wood  of  Boston  at  the  First  Unitarian  Church  on 
Thursday  afternoon,  October  7th.  The  Pacific  Coast  Musical 
Review  contained  a  criticism  of  Miss  Wood's  delightful  work 
from  the  pen  of  its  editor  after  the  cultured  concert  artiste's 
recital  last  year  with  Mrs.  Beatrice  Priest  Fine.  There  re- 
mains very  little  to  be  added  to  what  has  been  said  last  year, 
and  as  the  absence  of  the  editor  from  San  Francisco  at  the 
time  of  this  year's  concert  made  his  personal  attendance  im- 
possible, he  can  not  express  his  views  regarding  the  two  ap- 
pearances. However,  Miss  Wood  has  attained  a  maturity  of 
artistic  emulation  where  an  improvement  is  hardly  possible 
and  her  ideas  of  phrasing  and  tone  coloring  have  been  so 
thoroughly  planted  in  fertile  vocal  soil  that  a  retrogressive 
movement  is  equally  unlikely,  and  so  we  may  safely  reiterate 
the  impressions  recorded  in  these  pages  last  year  as  being 
well  applicable  to  last  week's  event. 

Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood  belongs  to  that  enviable  coterie  of 
artists  who  constantly  study  the  art  of  song  from  all  its 
multitudinous  angles  and  ever  seek  to  discover  new  emo- 
tional depths  and  to  create  new  impressions  of  the  purest 
sentiment.  We  are  of  the  opinion  that  music  being  a  spiritual 
rather  than  material  art,  it  is  impossible  to  fathom  the 
thoughts  responsible  for  the  creation  of  a  composition.  In 
other  words,  we  believe  it  impossible  for  anyone  to  define 
with  certainty  what  the  composer  intended  to  convey.  This 
is  especially  true  of  instrumental  works  which  are  really 
etherial  and  strictly  evolutions  of  the  imagination.  Anyone 
who  tries  to  tell  you  what  Wagner  meant  to  say  when  he 
composed  a  certain  phrase  is  suffering  from  "egonomania," 
for  only  Wagner  could  tell  what  he  felt  when  composing  his 
music.  Anyone  else  can  only  give  his  impression  of  what  he 
thinks  Wagner  meant,  which,  after  all,  does  not  amount  to 
much,  nor  heed  anyone  worry  about  what  someone  may  think 
about  what  a  composer  thought  when  under  the  influence  of 
artistic  inspiration.  It  will  always  be  found  that  an  instru- 
mental composition  affects  various  people  in  various  ways. 
It  all  depends  upon  the  adaptability,  mood  or  susceptibility  of 
the  listeners. 

The  vocal  literature  differs  from  instrumental  literature, 
in  so  far  as  it  contains  words  that  gave  the  composer  a  fixed 
canvass  upon  which  to  paint  his  tone  picture.  While  this 
may  not  be  as  pure  an  ideal  of  genuine  music  as  instrumental 
composition,  it  makes  itself  clearer  and  easier  to  grasp. 
Still  proper  interpretation  of  songs  depends  largely  upon  the 
manner  of  conception  and  upon  how  the  vocalist  is  impressed 
by  certain  emotions  like  passion,  love,  sorrow,  religious  ardor, 
loyalty  and  the  many  other  sentiments  and  sentimentalities 
embodied  in  vocal  works.  Various  interpreters'  ideas  regard- 
ing the  character  of  interpretation  of  these  emotions  vary 
with  the  artists'  own  character,  and  so  we  find  Miss  Anna 
Miller  Wood  interpreting  her  songs  with  a  refinement  and 
delicacy,  and  with  a  thoroughness  of  emotional  intensity  that 
reveals  to  us  a  deep  and  serious  nature  completely  immured 
in  the  pure  spirit  of  the  work.  We  can  not  give  a  better  il- 
lustration of  Miss  Wood's  artistic  pre-eminence  than  quote 
the  following  program,  which  is  redolent  with  silent  elo- 
quence : 

Old  Airs— Hans  Les  Hassler  (1564-1612),  Tanzlied;  14th 
Century  Air,  Joseph,  lieber  .Joseph;  Scarlatti  (1659-1725),  Gia 
11  Sole.  German  Composers — Johannes  Brahms,  Wie  hist  du, 
meine  Konigin?  Robert  Franz,  Fruhling  und  Liebe,  Liebchen 
ist  da;  Hugo  Wolf,  Mignon  (Kennst  du  das  Land?!.  American 
Composers — Arthur  Foote,  Irish  Folk  Song,  violin  obligato, 
Mr.  Wismer,  Once  at  the  Angelus;  Percy  Lee  Atherton,  Be- 
loved, it  was  April  Weather;  Walter  Morse  Rummel,  Across 
the  Hills,  Ecstasy.  French  Composers — Xavier  Leroux,  Le 
Nil,  violin  obligato,  Mr.  Wismer;  Reynaldo  Hahn.  Les  Cygnes; 
Gabriel  Pierne,  lis  etaient  trois  petits  Chats  Blancs;  Cecile 
Chaminade,  Chanson  Espagnole.  By  Request — Arthur  Foote, 
On  the  Way  to  Kew,  dedicated  to  Miss  Wood;  John  Metcalf, 
Night  Song,  dedicated  to  Miss  Wood;  Wm.  Amies  Fisher, 
Gae  to  Sleep;   Claude  Debussy,  Mandoline. 


Wallace  A.  Sabin  and  Mollyneux  Worthington  have  opened 
a  handsome  city  studio  in  the  building  corner  of  California 
and  Polk  streets.     They  have  quite  a  class  here  now. 


Abraham  Miller,  the  very  highly  esteemed  tenor  of  Los 
Angeles,  reports  a  most  promising  outlook  for  the  ensuing 
season.  He  was  again  elected  choir  director  of  the  First  M. 
E.  Church  of  Pasadena,  this  being  his  third  year  in  the  same 
place.  Mr.  Miller  continued  his  teaching  throughout  the  sum- 
mer, with  the  exception  of  two  week's  vacation,  which  he 
spent  at  Camp  Baldy.  Mr.  Miller  is  delighted  with  the  finan- 
cial aspect  of  his  classes. 


PACIFIC    C  O  A  S  T    51  r  S  I  C  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  V\-. 


THE  MUSICAL  OUTLOOK  FOR  LOS  ANGELES 

Definite  Plans  Presented  for  a  Monster  May  Musical  Festival  and  Hearty  Support 
and  Encouragement  for  all  Resident  Arties 

BY  ALFRED  METZGER. 


The  musical  outlook  in  Los  Angeles  is  so  encouraging  and 
so  pregnant  with  artistic  promises  that  I  am  justified  to  de- 
vote to  it  several  pages  of  this  edition,  feeling  assured  that 
everyone  of  my  San  Francisco  readers  will  feel  deeply  inter- 
ested in  the  musical  prosperity  of  the  Angel  City.  Several 
forces  are  responsible  for  this  excellent  condition  of  affairs  in 
Southern  California.  There  is.  above  all,  the  Gamut  Club,  which 
organization,  under  the  presidency  of  Charles  Farwell  Edson, 
is  accomplishing  a  great  deal  of  good  by  means  of  co-opera- 
tion. Then  there  is  L.  E.  Behymer.  who  by  judicious  manage- 
ment, unites  the  artistic  forces  of  both  visiting  and  resident 
artists,  and  presents  them  in  the  most  favorable  light  to  an 
enthusiastic  public.  Then  there  is  the  Von  Stein  Academy 
of  Music,  with  its  splendid  educational  facilities,  and  last,  but 
by  no  means  least,  are  the  excellent  teachers  whose  names 
are  found  upon  another  page  of  this  paper,  and  some  of  whom 
have  not  only  large  classes,  but  appear  as  soloists  in  splendid 
concerts.  Of  course  the  Symphony  Orchestra,  under  Harley 
Hamilton's  efficient  leadership,  and  the  choral  societies,  under 
the  direction  of  J.  B.  Poulin  and  J.  P.  Dupuy.  are  also  big 
factors  in  the  musical  life  of  Southern  California. 

First  Annual  Music  Festival  Association — At  the  meeting 
before  last  of  the  Gamut  Club,  a  motion  was  made  to  the 
effect  that  a  committee  of  five  be  appointed  to  act  in  con- 
junction with  two  members  of  the  Music  and  Art  Committee 
of  the  Chamber  of  Commerce,  and  a  representative  from  the 
Merchants'  and  Manufacturers'  Association,  the  Orpheus 
Club.  Ellis  Club.  Dominant  Club.  Lyric  Club.  Treble  Clef  Club. 
Friday  Morning  Club.  Ebell  Club.  Ruskin  Art  League.  Los 
Angeles  Center  of  the  American  Music  Societj-.  Board  of  Edu- 
cation. High  School.  Polytechnic  High  School,  grammar 
schools  and  other  musical  organizations  of  Southern  Califor- 
nia, relative  to  making  arrangements  for  an  annual  music 
festival  association.  This  motion  was  unanimously  adopted 
by  the  Gamut  Club,  and  on  Sept.  7th  President  Edson  ap- 
pointed the  following  committee:  Prof.  J.  A.  Stamm,  George 
Derby.  Andy  Francisco.  C.  E.  Pemberton  and  L.  E.  Behymer 
(chairman I.  to  act  in  behalf  of  the  Gamut  Club. 

On  the  following  Monday  this  committee  met  and  the  forma- 
tion of  the  festival  idea  was  discussed  at  length,  resulting  in 
the  forming  of  a  letter,  which  was  mailed  to  the  various  or- 
ganizations as  suggested,  and  a  meeting  called  for  such  repre- 
sentatives and  the  Gamut  Club  committee  on  Wednesday. 
Sept.  22d,  where  further  discussion  on  the  subject  took  place. 
At  this  meeting  the  following  organizations  were  represented; 
Board  of  Education,  by  F.  J.  Stilson.  permanent  appointee: 
Polytechnic  High  School.  Mrs.  Gertrude  Parsons,  permanent 
representative:  L.  A.  High  School.  Miss  Frye.  permanent  rep- 
resentative: grammar  department.  Miss  Stone,  permanent: 
M.  &  M.  Association.  A.  E.  Geissler:  Ellis  Club.  George 
Steckle;  Ebell  Club.  Mrs.  Wm.  Jamison:  Friday  Morning  Club. 
Mrs.  Jules  Kauflmann:  Women's  Lyric  Club,  Miss  Mary 
Commins:   American  Music  Society.  Miss  Zerbe.  permanent. 

The  festival  idea  was  very  thoroughly  discussed,  and  a 
committee  on  organization  was  partially  formed  and  partially 
appointed  with  a  recommendation  that  such  committee  be 
completed  and  a  further  meeting  held  on  Monday  evening. 
Oct.  4th.  On  this  committee  were  appointed  Mr.  Geissler. 
Mrs.  Parsons.  Mr.  Stamm.  Mr.  Derby.  Mr.  Behymer.  and  four 
further  appointments  held  open,  it  being  understood,  however, 
that  Mr.  Charles  Edson  and  Mr.  Francis,  of  the  Polytechnic 
High,  were  to  be  two  of  the  four  names  added.  This  com- 
mittee is  still  open,  and  the  names  under  consideration  to- 
wards its  final  completion  include  such  men  as  Judge  Hervey. 
Perry  Weidner.  Dr.  Moore,  of  the  public  schools,  Mr.  Koepfli, 
Willis  Boothe,  Guy  Cochran,  Mr.  Patterson  of  the  First  Na- 
tional Bank.  C.  C.  Parker.  Dr.  Barlow.  T.  E.  Gibson,  W.  S. 
Bartlett.  Mr.  Frazier  and  Joe  Scott. 

Of  the  ladies'  names  suggested  are  Mrs.  Solano.  Mrs.  Wil- 
loughby  Rodman,  and  Jlrs.  Shirey  Tolhurst.  The  idea  is  this: 
that  if  possible  one  representative  of  society  and  one 
of  the  financial  world  should  be  added  to  complete  the  or- 
ganization committee.  All  of  these  names,  however,  are  ex- 
pected to  come  up  for  consideration  to  be  added  to  the  execu- 


tive committee,  which  is  to  be  constituted  of  the  representa- 
tives of  the  organizations  as  suggested  in  the  original  Gamut 
Club  resolution.  Out  of  this  executive  committee,  which  is  to 
be  the  controlling  body  of  the  annual  festival  association,  are 
to  be  elected  the  officers  of  such  association,  the  finance  com- 
mittee, music  committee,  program  committee,  and  other 
committees  necessary  to  the  conducting  in  a  business  like  and 
artistic  manner  the  functions  of  the  organization. 

It  is  proposed  to  raise  $10,000  for  the  carrying  out  of  the 
festival  association  plans,  to  utilize  as  far  as  possible  the 
singing  societies  of  Southern  California,  a  massed  chorus  in 
conjunction  with  the  Los  Angeles  Symphony  Orchestra,  the 
Woman's  Symphony  Orchestra,  and  to  give  five  or  seven 
events  of  which  two  or  three  are  to  be  afternoon,  and  three 
or  four  evening  concerts,  respectively.  The  $10,000  to  be 
raised  by  popular  subscription,  or  ten  days  before  the  first 
concert,  as  a  guarantee  fund  for  the  furtherance  of  the  an- 
nual music  festival,  with  the  idea  that  if  the  sale  of  seats 
more  than  equalizes  the  expenses,  this  money  is  to  be  re- 
funded to  the  guarantors,  and  any  profit  which  may  be  made 
is  to  be  placed  as  a  sinking  fund  for  future  festivals. 

At  the  close  of  the  meeting  Oct.  4th.  it  was  decided  that  a 
letter  would  be  sent  to  each  of  the  organizations  first  con- 
sidered, that  the  representative  already  appointed  by  such  or- 
ganizations be  confirmed  and  placed  immediately  upon  the 
executive  board  as  a  permanent  member  of  the  governing 
board,  and  suggesting  to  such  clubs  interested  in  the  work 
that  if  they  have  not  already  appointed  such  a  representative, 
to  do  so  at  once,  communicating  with  the  organization  com- 
mittee the  name  of  such  representative.  On  such  suggestion 
the  Ebell  Society  have  reported  their  hearty  co-operation  and 
elected  their  president  as  the  permanent  representative  of 
such  organization.  Mr.  Stilson.  of  the  Board  of  Education, 
was  nominated  by  Dr.  Moore:  Mrs.  Parsons,  of  the  Polytech- 
nic: Mrs.  Frye.  of  the  L.  A.  High:  Miss  Stone,  of  the  gram- 
mar grades,  and  Miss  Zerbe,  of  the  American  Music  Society, 
and  have  been  appointed  and  accepted  from  their  respective 
organizations  as  members  of  the  executive  board. 

Practically  every  club  appealed  to  has  said  at  their  first 
meeting  they  would  elect  a  member,  and  each  and  all  concur 
heartily  in  the  support  of  this  measure.  Many  of  the  business 
men  have  been  consulted,  and  say  that  for  the  first  time  in 
the  history  of  music  in  Los  Angeles  definite  plans  are  being 
taken,  a  proper  financial  and  artistic  goverimient  suggested, 
and  that  they  are  ready  to  give  not  only  their  moral  support, 
but  their  financial  support  as  well. 

At  the  last  meeting  of  the  general  committee  this  sugges- 
tion was  made:  three  nights  and  two  matinees  be  consid- 
ered: that  the  name  be  known  as  "The  Annual  Los  Angeles 
Music  Festival";  that  the  three  nights  be  divided  into  one 
night  part  songs  and  selections  from  Los  Angeles  and  Ameri- 
can composers:  one  night  be  known  as  operatic  night  with 
soloists  and  operatic  chorus:  one  night  devoted  to  oratorio. 
but  that  short  and  upto-date  works  be  used  instead  of  such 
compositions  as  "The  Messiah."  "Elijah."  etc.  That  the 
Lahman  compositions  and  similar  eft'ective  works  be  used. 
It  has  also  been  suggested  that  for  one  event  the  Ellis  Club 
sing  two  numbers,  the  Orpheus  Club  two.  the  Lyric  Club  two, 
under  their  respective  directors,  and  that  these  three  organ- 
izations having  rehearsed  at  their  own  rehearsals,  two  other 
numbers,  that  they  unite  on  such  two  numbers  for  the  final 
one-fourth  of  the  evening  in  one  massed  body. 

For  the  afternoons,  one  atternon  is  to  be  devoted  to  the 
symphony  work  entirely,  with,  however,  overtures  and  other 
compositions  dividing  the  time;  the  second  afternoon  being 
devoted  to  a  children's  chorus,  that  the  general  massed  chorus 
be  composed  of  500  voices,  all  selected  under  the  direction  of 
an  examining  board:  no  voice  to  be  admitted  otherwise;  that 
for  the  children's  chorus  SOO  voices  be  selected,  and  that  an 
orchestra  of  from  60  to  TO  pieces  be  engaged  for  the  series. 
An  additional  suggestion  has  been  made  that  if  three  after- 
noons and  four  nights  be  used,  that  the  last  day  be  placed 
at  such  a  time  as  the  visit  of  Damrosch  or  the  Russian  Or- 
chestra, and  that  an  afternoon  and  evening  be  taken  in  con- 


I'  A  C  1  F  I  C    C  O  A  S  T    M  U  S  1  G  A  L    K  E  V  I  E  W 


junction  with  them,  the  association  buying  outright  their  two 
performances,  and  malting  it  a  grand  finale  for  the  series. 

You  must  understand  that  these  are  mere  suggestions  and 
nothing  definite  has  been  acted  upon.  As  to  soloists,  there 
have  been  two  suggestions  made;  one  to  use  local  and  San 
Francisco  soloists  to  the  exclusion  of  all  others;  the  other 
that  one  afternoon  and  evening  be  devoted  to  outside  soloists, 
that  would  draw  a  sufficient  income  to  make  it  profitable. 

As  to  the  expense  account,  the  following  estimates  have 
been  given:  To  the  director  and  his  work  for  the  period  of 
time  from  now  until  the  last  week  in  April,  or  the  first  week 
in  May,  $1,200;  for  the  advertising  and  printing,  $1,000;  for 
the  rent  of  rehearsal  halls,  salary  of  pianist,  and  such  in- 
cidental expenses,  $800;  for  the  children's  chorus  and  ex- 
penses, $.500;  for  a  Damrosch  or  Russian  Symphony,  or  out- 
side soloist,  afternoon  and  evening,  $1,700;  for  the  business 
management,  mimeographing,  stamps,  tickets,  sale  of  seats, 
and  all  the  ramifications  of  the  business  end,  $1,200;  for  the 
rent  of  auditorium,  $900;  for  the  orchestra  for  three  days, 
$1,800;  for  platform  and  stage,  $600,  making  a  total  of  $9,700, 
with  incidentals  probably  covering  $300  more,  which  would 
take  up  the  $10,000  considered. 

If  one  afternoon  and  evening  was  discounted,  the  cost 
would  be  proportionately  less.  As  to  the  income,  3000  season 
tickets  at  $5.00  each  would  mean  $15,000,  or  3000  seats  at 
$3.00  per  ticket  would  be  $9000,  and  2000  seats  at  $2.00  per 
season,  $4,000,  equivalent  to  $13,000.  This  is  understood  that 
all  the  seats  in  Shrine  Auditorium  could  be  sold.  If  part  of 
these  events  were  held  at  Temple  Auditorium,  different  prices 
could  be  obtained,  and  similar  results  obtained  by  reserving 
a  larger  number  of  single  seats  at  an  increased  price,  but 
making  the  festival  idea  practically  just  the  same. 

These  figures  and  estimates  have  been  seriously  consid- 
ered, the  object  and  methods  may  all  be  considered  practical, 
and  are  left  open  for  consideration  and  discussion.  No  action 
has  been  definite,  but  a  meeting  is  to  be  called  during  the 
coming  week,  at  which  time  the  committee  on  organization 
will  have  its  report  complete,  each  member  appointed  by 
these  different  organizations  as  a  member  of  the  permanent 
executive  board  will  be  present,  and  final  action  taken  to 
complete  the  organization  and  start  active  work. 
*       *       * 

The  Orchestra  Situation  In  Los  Angeles — The  orchestra 
situation  in  Los  Angeles  is  in  very  good  shape  this  season, 
the  guarantees  are  practically  for  the  next  two  years,  the 
personnel  of  the  orchestra,  which  will  number  77  men,  se- 
lected, and  the  first  rehearsal  took  place  on  Tuesday,  Oct. 
12th.  The  opening  concert  is  slated  for  Friday  afternoon, 
Nov.  19th.  with  Madame  Jeanne  Jomelli  as  soloist.  Mr.  Ham- 
ilton has  again  been  elected  conductor,  and  the  business  man- 
agment  remains  in  the  hands  of  L.  E.  Behymer.  This  is  the 
thirteenth  season  of  symphony  work  in  Los  Angeles.  All  the 
boxes  and  loges  in  Temple  Auditorium  have  been  sold  and  at 
least  fifty  per  cent  of  the  seating  capacity  subscribed.  Mr. 
Hamilton's  trip  East  last  summer  allowed  him  to  secure  some 
valuable  compositions  and  musical  information  which,  when 
applied,  will  increase  the  effective  work  of  his  men. 

Mr.  Behymer  also  secured  some  business  ideas  which  will 
bring  the  financial  situation  into  better  shape  and  give  to 
Southern  California  the  best  series  of  symphony  concerts 
heard  in  the  West.  Mr.  Hamilton  has  again  been  re-elected 
as  the  conductor  of  the  Woman's  Symphony  Orchestra,  a 
body  of  players  numbering  sixty-three,  representing  the  social 
and  musical  ladies  of  that  city.  This  organization  has  been 
in  existence  for  seventeen  years,  under  the  baton  of  the  same 
conductor.  They  propose  to  give  three  concerts  with  soloists 
this  year,  and  will  unite  with  the  men's  orchestra  and  par- 
ticipate in  the  first  annual  musical  festival  to  be  held  in  Los 
Angeles  during  the  latter  part  of  April  or  the  first  part  of 
May. 

These  organizations  mean  much  to  the  music  life  of  the 
capital  of  the  southwest,  and  sohws  what  perseverance  and 
united  effort  on  the  part  of  men  and  women,  together  with 
the  active  and  untiring  efforts  of  a  capable  conductor  and  a 
hard  working  business  manager,  backed  by  an  appreciative 
public,  can  accomplish  in  a  city  of  three  hundred  thousand 
inhabitants.  The  itinerary  for  the  symphony  season  just  an- 
nounced by  Harley  Hamilton  is  as  follows: 

Friday  afternoon,  Nov.  19 — Fifth  Symphony  in  E  minor. 
New  World  (Dvorak);  Ah  Perfido  (Beethoven);  Symphonic 
Poem,  "Zorahayda"  (Svendsen);  Prayer  and  Aria,  "Der  Frei- 
schutz"  (Weber);  Overture,  Lustspiel  (Busoni);  Soloist,  Mme. 
Jeanne  Jomelli. 

Friday  afternoon,  Dec.  10 — Third  Symphony  in  E  Flat, 
Eroica  (Beethoven);  Overture  to  The  Ruins  of  Athens 
(Beethoven);  Bacchanale,  Samson  and  Delilah  (Saint-Saensl ; 
Soloist,  Mr.  George  Hamlin. 


Friday  afternoon.  Jan.  7,  1910 — First  Symphony  (Tschai- 
kowsky);  Overture  Fantasie,  Romeo  and  Juliet  (Tschaikowe- 
ky);  Sketches  from  the  Caucassus  (Ippolitow-Ifanow) ;  Solo- 
ist, Mr.  Arnold  Krauss,  Violinist. 

Friday  afternoon,  Feb.  11,  1910— 39th  Symphony  in  E  Flat 
(Mozart);  Overture  to  William  Ratcliffe  (Mascagni);  Sym- 
phonic Dances  (Grieg);  Albumblatt  (Wagner);  Soloist,  Mme. 
Teresa  Carreno.  Pianist. 

Friday  afternoon,  March  4,  1910 — Seventh  Symphony  in  C 
(Schubert);  Overture  in  Fruhling  (Goldmark);  Indian  Suite 
(MacDowell);   Soloist  to  be  selected. 

Friday  afternoon,  April  1 — 1  Symphony  in  C  Minor  (Men- 
delssohn); Overture  to  the  Bartered  Bride  (Smetana);  Ballet 
Music  from  Lakme  (Delibes);   Soloist  to  be  selected. 

*  *       * 

Local  Artists — Determined  to  do  all  in  his  power  to  create 
a  musical  atmosphere  and  culture  in  Los  Angeles,  by  assist- 
ing the  various  local  musical  enterprises  to  public  hearing 
this  season.  Manager  Behymer  announces  that  he  finds  local- 
ly more  capable  artists  than  have  ever  been  known  in  the 
history  of  the  music  life  of  Los  Angeles.  In  club  work  much 
activity  is  displayed  by  the  Ellis,  Orpheus  and  Lyric  clubs 
in  their  early  rehearsals  and  in  the  selection  of  excellently 
arranged  program.  They  will  continue  in  their  special 
spheres  as  usual.  Arnold  Krauss  is  completing  three  pro- 
grams, and  promises  the  same  number  of  violin  recitals  dur- 
ing the  winter.  Harry  Clifford  Lott  and  his  talented  wife 
are  arranging  special  programs  for  evenings  devoted  to  folk 
songs  and  special  compositions  by  local  and  foreign  compos- 
ers. With  Miss  Kavanaugh.  the  monologist,  one  evening  will 
be  devoted  to  songs  and  folk  tales  of  Ireland.  One  is  to  be 
a  Scandinavian  night  and  one  devoted  to  the  German. 

Jules  Koopmann.  violinist,  and  Maurice  Koopman,  cellist, 
member  of  the  Richter  Orchestra  of  London,  will  open  the 
season  in  an  early  October  concert.  It  is  the  intention  of 
Georg  Kruger,  a  talented  pianist  from  Berlin,  to  give  a  series 
of  recitals,  and  Herr  Ignaz  Haroldi,  the  violinist,  has  ar- 
ranged for  three  events  during  the  season.  Mrs.  Mary  Le- 
Grand  Reed,  a  most  talented  singer,  will  come  before  the 
public  early  in  November.  Estelle  Heartt  Dreyfus  has  three 
programs  well  under  way.  Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood,  of  Bos- 
ton, will  probably  appear  in  concert  in  October,  Signor  De 
Grassi,  violinist,  of  San  Francisco,  early  in  January;  Miss 
Adele  Case,  a  contralto,  of  New  York,  some  time  during 
March,  and  the  Passmore  Trio  have  promised  a  visit  in 
February. 

*  *       * 

An  Attractive  Season — Considering  the  list  of  artists  en- 
gaged for  the  coming  musical  season  in  Los  Angeles,  we  see 
that  city  is  assured  of  a  wonderfully  attractive  program,  and 
one  which  in  some  respects  will  be  the  most  varied  that  it 
has  so  far  enjoyed.  The  Great  Philharmonic  Course,  which 
stands  for  the  best  in  music  in  Los  Angeles  and  Southern 
California,  will  still  be  the  star  attraction  musically  for  the 
year,  and  will  place  within  the  reach  of  all,  at  a  very  reason- 
able season  ticket  price,  the  greatest  artists  in  the  musical 
world  of  today. 

Considering  it  first,  its  opening  attraction  will  be  the  com- 
ing of  one  of  the  best  known  singers  of  the  Manhattan  Opera 
Company,  Mme.  Jeanne  Jomelli;  she  has  had  immense  suc- 
cess as  soloist  with  the  leading  symphony  orchestras  and 
choral  societies  of  the  east.  With  Mme.  Jomelli  will  appear 
Miss  Marie  Nichols,  a  young  violin  virtuosa.  and  Miss  Mag- 
dalene Worden,  accompanist.  As  Miss  Nichols  is  said  to  be 
an  artist  of  exceptionally  high  talent,  the  combination  prom- 
ises to  be  a  very  strong  one.  Early  in  December  Los  Angeles 
will  have  an  opportunity  of  hearing  George  Hamlin,  the  cele- 
brated American  tenor,  who  introduced  Richard  Strauss' 
songs  in  this  country.  He  is  a  general  favorite  in  Germany 
and  England,  as  well  as  his  own  country,  where  he  is  re- 
garded as  one  of  the  best  of  the  concert  artists. 

Also  in  December  will  be  offered  the  greatest  attraction  of 
the  entire  season — Mme.  Marcella  Sembrich,  prima  donna 
soprano,  who  will  be  heard  perhaps  for  the  last  time,  as  this 
is  the  farewell  professional  tour  of  that  great  singer,  whose 
splendid  musicianship  gave  her  the  unquestioned  first  place 
among  the  leading  artists  in  today's  world  of  music.  She  will 
be  assisted  by  the  well  known  baritone,  Francis  Rogers,  and 
also  by  the  popular  young  pianist.  Frank  La  Forge,  who  has 
been  a  pleasing  feature  of  the  Gadski  recitals. 

The  next  offering  of  this  course  for  the  year  of  1909  will 
he  Fritz  Kreisler,  one  of  the  most  interesting  and  magnetic 
violinists  of  today,  who  comes  late  in  December.  Early  in 
the  New  Year,  as  a  fitting  number  for  this  course,  will  be  the 
re-appearance  of  the  greatest  of  all  contraltos,  Mme.  Schu- 
mann-Heink,  the  one  woman  who  has  been  able  to  pack  the 
largest  auditoriums  in  Los  Angeles  from  two  to  three  times 
(Continued  on  Page  18.) 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


ZECH    ORCHESTRA'S    SECOND   CONCERT. 

Ambitious  Organization   of  Skillful   Amateur  Musicians  Again 

Announce   a    Program   of   High   Class   Compositions 

For  Their  Many  Subscribers. 


The  Zech  Orchestra,  one  of  the  most  efficient  and  ambitious 
organizations  of  clever  young  amateur  musicians  ever  appear 
ing  before  the  San  Francisco  musical  people,  will  give  tli 
second  concert  of  its  second  season  at  the  Novelty  Theatn 
on  Tuesday  evening.  October  26th.  William  F.  Zech,  the  bril 
liant  director  of  this  successful  body  of  young  musicians,  has 
conducted  the  rehearsals  with  much  care  and  serious  atten- 
tion to  refined  artistic  details,  and  has  finally  succeeded  to 
bring  his  splendid  orchestra  upon  a  basis  of  thorough  niusi 
cianly  calibre.  The  immense  audiences  that  attended  pre 
vious  events  of  this  organization  will  no  doubt  await  with 
eager  anticipation  the  advent  of  this  new  concert.  The  youn- 
ladies  and  gentlemen  constituting  this  institution  are  so  eager 
and  so  earnest  in  their  endeavors  to  give  adequate  expression 
to  their  musical  sentiments  that  anyone  interested  in  orches- 
tral music  will  find  it  an  unalloyed  pleasure  to  spend  an  even- 
ing with  the  Zech  orchestra. 

The  organization  now  numbers  about  sixty  players,  and 
every  group  of  instrument  necessary  for  a  complete  symphony 
orchestra  is  represented.  It  is  perhaps  the  most  complete 
amateur  orchestra  ever  organized  in  this  city.  Miss  Olive 
Hyde,  whose  splendid  violin  playing  has  been  admired  before, 
will  again  play  a  solo  with  that  artistic  skill  which  earned 
her  already  the  admiration  of  large  audiences.  The  charac- 
ter of  the  program  is  such  as  to  appeal  to  every  enthusiast 
of  genuine  music,  and  when  William  Zech  takes  the  baton  in 
hand  to  give  the  signal  for  the  opening  number  a  crowded 
house  will  surely  be  there  to  give  him  a  well  deserved  ova- 
tion. The  complete  program  will  be  as  follows:  Overture. 
"Fingal's  Cave"  (Mendelssohn),  the  orchestra;  Suite  from  the 
Ballet  "Sylvia"  (Delibes),  orchestra;  Traumerei  (Wuersti. 
violin  solo  with  accompaniment  for  strings,  Miss  Olive  Hyde; 
Scotch  Dances  Nos.  1  and  2  (Otto  Langer),  orchestra;  Kaiser 
March   ( Wagner  1,  orchestra. 

** 


SPANISH    MUSIC   FESTIVAL  TO   BE   FEATURE  OF 
PORTOLA  WEEK. 


Music  has  been  well  taken  care  of  during  the  Portola  Fes- 
tival, which  will  begin  in  this  city  next  Tuesday,  October  19th. 
But  surpassing  every  other  feature  in  musical  character,  as 
well  as  in  uniqueness,  will  be  the  great  Spanish  Music  Fes- 
tival which  will  be  given  under  the  direction  of  G.  S.  Wanrell 
in  Dreamland  Rink  on  Thursday  afternoon,  October  21st. 
While  everyone  of  us  admires  the  classics  of  the  masters  and 
duly  appreciates  the  great  masterpieces  of  the  theoretical 
musical  literature,  there  exists  a  certain  class  of  music  whose 
composers  are  either  not  known  at  all  or  are  so  unfamiliar 
to  the  average  music  lover  that  their  names  have  remaiiuil 
obscure.  In  this  class  of  music  belongs  the  beautiful  folk 
lore  of  European  countries  which  contains  a  number  of  vocal 
gems  as  brilliant  and  as  precious  as  any  and  as  dearly  be- 
loved by  the  people  who  have  brought  them  down  to  a  grate- 
ful posterity  than  the  known  classics  have  endeared  them- 
selves to  the  connoisseurs. 

Every  country  in  Europe  has  its  folk-lore,  and  Spain  is  not 
an  exception  to  the  rule.  But  while  nearly  all  of  us  are  fa- 
miliar with  the  German,  old  French,  old  English,  Russian  and 
other  folklore,  we  are  sadly  deficient  in  our  knowledge  of  the 
real  Spanish  folklore  as  occasionally  sung  by  such  artists  as 
Emilio  de  Gorgorza.  Mr.  Wanrell's  idea  to  enhance  the  in- 
terest of  the  Portola  Festival  with  a  concert  which  is  to  give 
us  exclusively  the  caressing  folklore  of  the  people  of  Spain 
was  certainly  an  excellent  one,  and  will  lend  the  festival  an 
atmosphere  of  local  color  which  perhaps  surpasses  anything 
to  be  offered  during  the  week. 

Royal  Spanish  March,  Cassara's  Orchestra;  The  Star 
Spangled  Banner  (M.  Vogrich),  Miss  Fay  Carranza,  the  pop- 
ular California  lyric  soprano,  full  chorus  and  orchestra;  ad- 
dress, Hon.  George  H.  Cabaniss;  Gloria  a  Espana  (J.  H. 
Clave),  full  chorus  and  orchestra;  address  in  Spanish,  re 
marks  about  the  "Discovery  of  San  Francisco  Bay,"  by  Prof. 
Joseph  Hidalgo  of  the  State  University  of  California;  solo, 
"La  Partida,"  "1  he  Farewell"  (Alvarez),  Senor  Don  Joaquin 
Sastre  Wanrell,  Cassara's  Orchestra;  Ay  Que  Risa  (T.  .\ 
Clave),  full  chorus  and  orchestra;  Spanish  Dance  in  Aragoii. 
Senorita  A.  Dulce  and  E.  Ortiz;  Military  Chorus  Honra  a  los 
Bravos  (Clave),  full  chorus  and  orchestra;  solo,  Los  Ojus 
Negros  (T.  A.  Clave),  full  chorus  and  orchestra;  El  Primer 
Amor  (T.  A.  Clave),  full  chorus  and  orchestra;  Las  Galas  de 
Cinca  (T.  A.  Clave),  Walls  Jota  Choreada,  full  chorus  and 
orchestra.     E.  M.  Schmitz  at  the  piano. 


10 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


MUSICAL    NEWS   ABROAD. 


ALBERT  ROSENTHAL  TO  GIVE  CONCERT 


Augusta  CotUow  has  secured  several  excellent  engagements 
in  Europe  for  the  coming  season.  On  October  21st  she  will 
play  with  the  Bluthner  orchestra.  During  the  winter  season 
she  will  appear  twice  in  England  on  two  separate  tours.  She 
has  also  several  applications  for  teaching,  and  will  accept 
only  a  few  pupils,  as  her  concert  engagements  will  not  permit 
her  to  teach  a  big  class. 

Among  the  artists  who  appeared  in  London  at  the  beginning 
of  the  musical  season  of  1909-10  which  began  on  September 
18th  with  a  concert  by  Caruso,  assisted  by  the  Beecham  Or- 
chestra, were:  De  Pachmann,  Sept.  25th  (with  a  program  con- 
taining eight  Chopin  numbers  and  compositions  by  Schumann, 
Weber-Hanselt,  Mendelssohn,  Liszt  and  Walter  Imboden,  and 
Kreisler  on  October  2d. 

*  •       • 

Beginning  with  Monday,  September  20th,  the  Promenade 
Concerts  in  London  entered  upon  their  fifth  successful  week. 
The  first  concert  of  that  week  was  devoted  to  Wagner,  and 
the  soloists  were  Edith  Avans  and  Joseph  Reed.  The  feature 
of  Tuesday's  program  was  the  initial  performance  in  England 
of  Max  Reger's  "Symphonic  Prologue  to  a  Tragedy."  The 
novelty  on  Wednesday  evening's  program  was  the  maiden 
performance  of  Paul  Graener's  new  symphonic  poem  "From 
Valleys  and  Heights."  Other  interesting  numbers  on  this 
program  were  compositions  by  Bach,  Boccherini  and  Saint- 
Saens,  written  for  the  viola  da  gamba  and  interpreted  very 
skillfully  by  Jacques  Renard.  A  new  vocal  scene  by  Webster 
Millar,  entitled  "St.  Paul,"  was  also  among  the  most  ap- 
preciated numbers  of  the  Wednesday  program.  On  Thursday 
the  piece  de  resistance  was  the  first  English  presentation  of 
Paul  Scheinpflug's  "Overture  to  a  Comedy  of  Shakespeare." 
Another  novelty  were  Eric  Coates'  "Four  New  Shakespearian 
Songs,"  sung  by  Mrs.  Wood.  On  Saturday,  September  25th, 
a  concerto  for  four  violins  by  Ludwig  Mauer  was  heard. 

Gertrude  Rennyson,  the  talented  American  dramatic  prima 
donna  soprano,  who  became  known  while  a  member  of  Henry 
W.  Savage's  English  grand  opera  company,  and  lately  was 
prima  donna  at  the  opera  in  Brussels,  is  now  among  the  lead- 
ing artists  of  the  Carl  Rosa  Opera  Company,  which  will  open 
an  engagement  at  Covent  Garden,  London,  next  Monday,  Oc- 
tober 18. 

*  *       * 

Among  the  novelties  announced  for  the  repertoire  of  the 
Brussels  opera  are;  Strauss'  "Electra,"  Puccini's  "Madam  But- 
terfly," De  Bruille's  "Eros"  and  Radoux's  "Ondalette."  At 
least  one  of  these  is  not  a  novelty  to  us. 

There  is  a  rumor  abroad  to  the  effect  that  nothwithstanding 
De  Pachmann's  published  decision  regarding  his  last  Ameri- 
can appearance,  he  has  been  heard  to  say  that  he  expects  to 
again  tour  the  United  States  during  the  season  1910-11.  In 
time  he  may  be  the  rival  of  Patti  in  regard  to  farewell  per- 
formances. 

*  *       * 

Thomas  Beecham,  leader  of  Beecham's  London  Symphony 
Orchestra,  will  give  a  season  of  opera  at  His  Majesty's 
Theatre,  London,  beginning  next  January.  The  repertoire  will 
contain:  "The  Magic  Flute  (Mozart),  "The  Seraglio  (Tschaik- 
owsky),  "The  Pique  Dame"  (Moussorgsky ),  "Thais"  (Massen- 
et), "Le  Chemineau"  (Leroux),  and  "Muguette"  (De  Missal. 
The  works  by  English  masters  to  be  included  in  the  presenta- 
tions will  be  "Village  Romeo  and  Juliet"  (Delius),  "Dylan" 
(Holbrook),  "Cinderella"   (Forsyth). 

A  concerto  for  two  oboes,  string  quintet  and  piano  by  John 
Hendon,  an  old  English  composer  (1690-1755),  was  found  in 
the  British  Museum  a  few  months  ago  and  presented  for  the 
first  time  in  public  since  the  composer's  demise  in  1755. 

*  *       * 

The  Quebec  Symphony  Orchestra  of  sixty-five  musicians, 
under  the  direction  of  Joseph  Vezina,  will  resume  its  concerts 
during  the  ensuing  season. 

The  musical  season  in  Quebec,  Canada,  opened  on  Septem- 
ber 15  with  a  vocal  concert  by  Abel  Godin,  a  tenor,  just  re- 
turned from  a  thorough  musical  course  in  Paris.  On  Septem- 
ber 17th  Sousa's  Band  appeared  there. 

Between  Friday,  September  10th  and  Tuesday,  September 
14th,  occurred  the  first  German  Brahms  Festival  in  Munich. 
The  five  programs  included  all  of  the  great  master's  most 
important  compositions. 

Subscribe  for  the  Musical  Review.  $2.00  per  year. 


IN  THE  PAFICIC  COAST  MUSICAL  REVIEW  OF  OCTO- 
BER 2D  I  CALLED  ATTENTION  TO  THE  FACT  THAT 
ALBERT  ROSENTHAL,  A  YOUNG  SAN  FRANCISCO  'CELL- 
IST, WHO  HAS  ACHIEVED  FAME  ABROAD,  WAS  VISIT- 
ING HIS  PARENTS  HERE  AND  WAS  UNABLE  TO  GIVE 
A  CONCERT  BECAUSE  NO  PROFESSIONAL  MANAGER 
WOULD  RISK  TO  GIVE  A  CONCERT  FOR  HIM.  I  OF- 
FERED ADVERTISING  SPACE  IN  THIS  PAPER  TO  ANY- 
ONE WILLING  TO  MANAGE  MR.  ROSENTHAL  IN  A  CON- 
CERT. I  AM  GLAD  TO  SEE  THAT  THE  APPEAL  PROVED 
SUCCESSFUL.  DR.  ERNEST  HORSTMAN  HAS  ASSUMED 
THE  RESPONSIBILITY  OF  THE  CONCERT  AND  AN- 
NOUNCES THAT  THE  SAME  WILL  TAKE  PLACE  AT 
LYRIC  HALL  ON  TUESDAY  EVENING,  NOVEMBER  3D. 
THIS  PAPER  WILL  STAND  BY  ITS  AGREEMENT  TO 
DONATE  THE  ADVERTISING  SPACE,  AS  IT  BELIEVES  IN 
GIVING  CALIFORNIA  ARTISTS  THE  NECESSARY  OP- 
PORTUNITY TO  SHOW  TO  THEIR  FELLOW  CITIZENS 
WHAT  IT  MEANS  TO  BECOME  FAMOUS.  I  TRUST  THAT 
ALL  THOSE  INTERESTED  IN  THE  ENCOURAGEMENT  OF 
CALIFORNIA  ARTISTS  WILL  BE  PRESENT  TO  DO  HON- 
OR TO  ALBERT  ROSENTHAL,  AND  TO  SHOW  THEIR  AP- 
PRECIATION TO  DR.  ERNEST  HORSTMAN,  WHO  WAS 
WILLING  TO  RISK  THE  MANAGEMENT  OF  A  CONCERT 
BY  A  YOUNG  SAN  FRANCISCO  ARTIST  WHO  HAS  BEEN 
HONORED    BY   EUROPEAN    AUDIENCES. 

ALFRED  METZGER, 
EDITOR    PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 
w 


Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks  and  Miss  Marion  Cumming  entertained 
the  guests  of  Mrs.  Joseph  Dupuy  Hodgen  at  her  home,  38.38 
Clay  street,  on  the  afternoon  of  October  1st  with  an  inter- 
esting musical  program.  Miss  Tonks,  with  her  beautiful 
voice,  gave  an  intelligent  interpretation  to  selections  from 
Beethoven,  Liszt,  Grieg,  Mac  Dowell.  Nevin  and  Minetti.  while 
Miss  Cumming  sang  in  most  delightful  manner  a  group  of 
French  and  Scotch  songs.  Mrs.  Grey  Stillman  Millberry  was 
at  the  piano. 


-%%- 


MUSICAL  NEWS  FROM  THE  EAST. 


The  Musical  Courier  is  authority  for  the  statement  that 
Paderewski  is  writing  a  new  opera  entitled  "Sakuntala."  The 
paper  further  comments  on  this  news  item  by  facetiously 
remarking:  "That  is  fortunate,  for  Goldmark's  overture  of 
the  same  name  could  be  used  as  an  introduction  with  unfail- 
ing effect.  This  is  one  of  the  most  popular  works  in  the 
whole  symphonic  literature. 

*       *       * 

The  famous  Worcester,  Mass.,  Music  Festival  will  take 
place  this  year  on  September  29,  30  and  October  1.  These 
festivals  have  now  been  held  during  a  period  of  more  than 
fifty  years  and  may  be  regarded  as  some  of  the  leading  events 
in  American  musical  history.  It  is  about  time  that  California 
follows  suit  in  the  matter  of  these  music  festivals. 

A  very  interesting  article  appears  in  the  Musical  Courier 
of  September  29,  entitled  "Music  in  New  York  in  the  Days 
of  Fulton,"  from  the  pen  of  Esther  Singleton.  The  article  is 
no  doubt  published  on  account  of  the  Hudson-Fulton  celebra- 
tion and  contains  matters  of  interest  to  musical  people 
throughout  the  world.  Here  in  San  Francisco  we  will  cele- 
brate the  Portola  Festival  next  week  and  an  article  on  the 
subject  of  "Music  in  San  Francisco  in  the  Days  of  Portola" 
would  be  in  place,  but  would,  for  obvious  reasons,  occupy 
very  little  space. 

According  to  the  Musical  Courier,  Roy  J.  Harding  broke  the 
world's  record  at  Richmond,  Ind.,  on  September  22,  for  con- 
tinuous piano  playing,  in  a  contest  that  lasted  thirty-six 
hours,  thirty-six  minutes  and  seven  seconds,  which  beats  the 
previous  best  time  by  four  minutes  and  three  seconds.  The 
N'ew  York  Sun  reports  the  magnificent  achievement  and  re- 
assures an  anxious  musical  world  by  adding:  "Harding  was 
almost  a  wreck  when  the  test  ended,  but  it  is  believed  he 
will  not  suffer  permanent  ill  effects." 

( However,  it  is  an  ominous  token  that  the  Sun  refrains 
from  reporting  the  condition  of  the  audience. — Ed.) 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


11 


The  Great 

Bach  Festival 


Spring,  1910 

St.  Matthew's  Passion  and 
B  Minor  Mass 

Under  the  Direction  of 

Dr.  J.  Fred  Wolle, 

Founder  of  the  Bach  Festival  in  America 

An  Orchestra  of  Sixty 
A  Chorus  of  Two  Hundred  and  Fifty 
A  Children's  Choir  of  Five  Hundred 
Soloists    of     the     Highest   Standing 

Associate  Member  Five  Dollars  a  Year, 
Including  Two  Tickets  for  Each  Concert 
Active  Members  No  Dues  and  No  Init- 
iation  Fee.  :::::: 

NOTICE  TO  SINGERS 

Rehearsals  for  the  great  Bach  Fe^ival 
are  taking  place  every  Monday  evening 
at  Christian  Church,  Corner  Dana  Street 
and  Bancroft  Way,  in  Berkeley,  and  any- 
one sufficiently  intere^ed  in  the  works  of 
Johann  Sebastian  Bach  to  study  the  same 
thoroughly  and  participate  m  an  Annual 
Festival,  given  in  his  honor,  and  for  the 
purpose  of  permanently  establishing  the 
worth  of  his  great  Music  in  California, 
are  invited  to  become  members  of  the 
Bach  Choir.  Address  Miss  Lillian  D. 
Clark,  Secretary  of  the  Bach  Choir, 
1 522  Spruce  Street,  Berkeley,  Cal. 
Phone  Berkeley  3294. 


IF  THERE  ARE  SUFFICIENT  APPLICATIONS 
FOR  MEMBERSHIP  FROM  OAKLAND  AND 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  REHEARSALS  WILL  BE 
HELD  IN  BOTH  CITIES  EVERY  WEEK. 


' 

Elaborate 

Holiday 

Number! 

JTTTHE    PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL 
^      REVIEW  is  now  preparing    a    large    and 
^    handsomely  illustrated  New  Year's    Edition 
which  will  be  published  on    Saturday,    December 
25th,   1909.     Besides  containing  a  Retrospective 
Review  of    San    Francisco's    Musical    Life    since 
April  1  8,   1 906,  the  paper  will  contain  special  ar- 
ticles about  Los  Angeles  Musicians  and  California 
Musical  Clubs. 

^ '    THOSE  who  do  not  advertise  regularly   in 
^      this  paper  will  find  the  Holiday  Number    of 
^    the  "Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review"  an  ideal 
Advertising  Medium  as  it  will  consist  of  an  edition 
of  not  less  than  Ten  Thousand  Copies. 

M  II   REGULAR  advertisers  in  this    paper    who 
^      have  Annual  Contracts  are  entitled  to  a 
^    complimentary  article  containing  200  words 
each;  and  if  they  pay  for  cuts  at  the  rate  of  1  5c  a 
square  inch  such  article  may  be  illustrated  with  pic- 
ture; the  cut  not  to  exceed  3x4  inches  (two  dollars). 
Regular  advertisers  desiring  to  take    advantage    of 
this  complimentary  write-up  and  picture  should  send 
m  their  requests  and  copy   before    December    1  st. 
After  that  date  no  write-ups  can  be  ac- 
cepted. 

SINGLE  COPIES  OF  THE   HOLIDAY 
NUMBER  WILL  BE  25  CENTS. 

Send   copies    away   to    friends    and    show     them 
what  California  is  doing  for  Music.     '     .     '     .     . 

For    Particulars    Address: 

PACIFIC  COAST 
MUSICAL  REVEIW 

Sherman  Clay  &  Co.  Building 
Sutter  and  Kearny  Sts.            San  Francisco 

12 


!•  A  C  I IM  O    COAST    MUSICAL    K  E  V  I  E  W. 


MUSIC   ACROSS  THE    BAY. 


Rehearsals     For     Bach     Festival      Progressing      Rapidly     and 
Orpheus   Club   Concert    Proves   Successful. 


By    Elizabeth   Westgate. 

Oakland,  October  11,  1907. 

It  is  hoped  that  a  sufficient  number  of  Oakland  and  Alameda 
singers  may  wish  to  study  the  St.  Matthew  Passion  of  Bach, 
that  a  chorus  may  be  formed  to  rehearse  in  Oakland.  Dr. 
Wolle  will,  of  course,  conduct  this  hoped-for  body  of  singers. 
The  B  Minor  Mass  is  also  to  form  a  part  of  the  two  day  festi- 
val next  May.  One  hundred  and  fifty  singers  are  now  in  the 
Berkeley  chorus,  and  an  associate  membership  already  prom- 
ises financial  security.  No  dues  and  no  initiation  fees  are  now 
required  from  active  members,  the  only  expenditure  being  for 
copies  of  the  required  books. 

Singers  who  have  studied  in  Berlin,  London  and  Boston,  as 
well  as  everywhere  on  this  Coast  have  already  joined  the 
Bach  choir,  which  increases  by  ten  or  twelve  each  rehearsal. 
Miss  Clark's  enthusiasm  does  not  diminish,  and  she  hopes  for 
two  large  organs,  one  at  each  side  of  the  great  stage  at  the 
Greek  Theatre,  and  two  choruses  singing  antiphorally,  and  a 
thousand  public  school  pupils  for  the  childrens'  chorus  in  the 
St.  Matthew  Passion. 

Tomorrow  evening,  under  the  broad  wings  of  the  Berkeley 
Piano  Club,  Wilhelm  Heinrich,  the  Boston  tenor,  will  give  a 
recital  which  promises  quite  wonderfully.  Twenty-three  songs 
including  five  by  Debussy  and  six  by  Max  Reger,  are  the  offer- 
ings. Mr.  Whelpleys  settings  of  four  of  the  portions  of 
Tennyson's  Maud  are  included. 

The  Club  is  essaying  to  give  a  series  of  concerts  of  a  high 
class,  bringing  artists  to  Berkeley  for  the  purpose  of  creating 
a  real  musical  center  there.  The  aim  of  the  Club  is  truly 
commendable,  and  will,  it  should  be  hoped  meet  with  success. 
There  is  no  large  hal  available  in  Berkeley — more's  the  pity. 
Unity  Hall  is  cosy  and  pleasant,  but  scarcely  large  enough. 

The  rehearsals  of  Mr.  John  Leechman's  Cantata,  the  Captive 
Maiden,  are  going  on  apace  under  Mr.  Roscoe  Warren  Lucy's 
enthusiastic  direction.  Mr.  T.  P.  Wickes  is  to  sing  the  bass 
solos,  and  his  voice  is  said  to  be  a  full  and  sonorous  one,  and 
therefore  well  adapted  to  the  part  of  the  Prophet.  The  public 
performance  will  be  in  the  first  week  in  November. 

*  *       * 

The  Melodrama  of  Hiawatha,  tor  piano  and  reader,  by  Saidee 
Knowland  Coe,  is  to  be  given  by  a  pianist  and  Miss  Lucy 
Knowland  (reader),  at  Adelphian  Hall,  Alameda,  on  the  even- 
ing of  November  2nd.  The  event  is  given  as  a  compliment 
to  the  music  section  of  the  club.  Mrs.  A.  E.  Nash,  soprano 
and  Stanleigh  Ward  MacLewee,  tenor,  are  each  to  sing  two 
Tuni  Indian  songs,  harmonized  by  Charles  Wakefield  Cadma. 
Mrs.  Coe's  piano  setting  of  Longfellow's  poem  is  a  unique  and 
an  impressive  work,  and  employs  genuine  Indian  melodies  as 
motifs  with  remarkably  telling  effect. 

Miss  Ethel  Preble's  concert  of  Indian  songs,  collected  with 
infinite  pains  by  Charles  Troyer,  which  she  sang  in  costume 
last  Friday  evening,  at  a  private  studio  in  Berkeley,  was  well 
attended,  and  of  intense  interest.  Miss  Preble  honored  Signer 
de  Grassi  by  giving  his  setting  of  seven  of  the  quatrains  from 
the  Rubaiyat.     The  recital  was  carefully  prepared,  and  greatly 

enjoyed. 

*  *       * 

The  annual  memorial  service  of  the  N.  S.  S.  W.,  was  given 
in  the  Oakland  Unitarian  Church  yesterday  afternoon  before 
a  very  large  audience.  The  program,  one  of  the  best  ever 
heard  at  these  exercises  was  as  follows: 

Organ  prelude,  "Ase's  Death  "Peer  Gynt"  (Grieg),  Wallace 
A.  Sabin;  Invocation,  Rev.  William  Day  Simonds;  Opening 
remarks.  Philip  M.  Walsh;  Quartet,  "Lead  Kindly  Light"  (Dud- 
ley Buck),  A.  E.  MacMillan,  Clement  Rowlands,  J.  F.  Veaco, 
C.  W.  (iastell;  Piano  solo  Selected,  Eugene  Blanchard; 
Soprano  solo,  "These  Are  They"  (Gaul),  Mrs.  Carolyn  Crew 
Rasor;  Memorial  address,  George  W.  Frick;  Duet,  "The  Cruci- 
fix" (Faure),  C.  P.  Rowlands  and  J.  F.  Veaco;  Violin  solo, 
"Elegie"  (Old  Italian),  Miss  Estelle  Franklin  Gray;  Eulogy, 
Phil  M.  Carey;  Barytone  solo,  "Prayer"  (Tosti),  Carl  Volker; 
Piano  sole,  (Selected),  Eugene  Blanchard;  Quartet,  "The  Long 
Day  Closes"  Arthur  Sullivan;  Benediction,  Rev.  L.  Potter 
Hitchcock;  Postlude  in  C,  Henry  Smart. 

*  *       * 

Mrs.  Carolyn  Crew  Rasor,  soprano,  has  just  returned  from 
a  stay  of  five  months  in  Los  Angeles.  This  accomplished 
singer  was  heard  yesterday  morning  at  the  services  of  the 
Oakland   First   M.   E.   Church.     Carl   Anderson    has    resigned 


from  that  choir  to  take  a  position  at  St.  Luke's,  San  Fran- 
cisco, where  a  double  quartet  of  men  has  been  formed.  Her- 
bert Smith  arrived  from  the  East  just  at  the  psychological 
moment,  and  has  taken  Mr.  Anderson's  place  in  the  Oakland 
choir,  a  place  which  Mr.  Smith  filled  with  vast  acceptance  for 
several  years  before  living  in  the  East. 

The  concert  of  the  Oakland  Orpheus  last  Monday  evening, 
was  almost  the  best  as  to  the  concerted  work  of  the  club, 
ever  given  by  this  notable  organization.  Only  lack  of  space 
prevents  detailed  notice  of  every  number,  for  its  surpassing 
excellence  as  to  shading,  balance,  attack,  interpretation — all 
those  virtues  which  make  first  rate  chorus  singing  an 
aesthetic  delight.  Mr.  Crandall's  rather  quiet  baton  does 
great  things  with  his  sixty  singers,  and  there  are  few  things — 
I  know  of  none  really;  which  they  may  not  venture  to  do,  and 
be  sure  of  success. 

Miss  Estelle  Gray,  violinist,  and  Mr.  Bulotti,  tenor,  were 
the  soloists,  and  were  received  with  every  evidence  of  satis- 
faction. Miss  Gray's  advancement  during  her  year  of  study 
in  the  East  is  marked.  Mr.  Bulotti's  voice  is  of  a  beautiful 
quality,  though  he  does  not,  at  the  very  first  "create  an 
atmosphere"  for  his  song,  as  we  say.  That  he  is  capable 
of  doing  this  was  however  proven  by  his  singing  of  the  little 
lyric,  "A  Bowl  of  Roses,"  one  of  the  encores  he  vouchsafed. 
Mrs.  Hughes  accompanied  with  a  fine  discrimination. 

*  *       • 

The  last  concert  of  the  first  series  of  the  Stewart  Orchestral 
Society,  brought  out  the  largest  audience  of  any  of  the  series, 
a  fact  which  augurs  well  for  a  second  season.  Maple  Hall  was 
crowded  to  hear  the  fine  program  which  was  printed  here  last 
week.  The  improvement  in  the  ensemble  playing  is  very 
noticeable,  and  the  Mirella  Overture  in  particular  was  worthy 
of  the  highest  commendation.  The  Haydn  Symphony,  which 
opened  the  program  gave  evidence  of  thorough  study,  and 
throughout  the  program  Mr.  Stewart's  good  taste  and  his 
unusual  skill  in  handling  a  large  body  of  players  was  given 
full  exposition.  It  was  a  concert  of  which  Oakland  may  well 
be  proud. 

*  *       * 

Miss  Georgia  Cope  made  her  first  public  appearance  since 
her  return  from  four  years  in  the  East  and  Europe,  and  sang 
several  delightful  songs  including  Dost  Thou  Know,  in  Italian 
(from  "Mignon")  with  much  art,  bringing  out  the  various 
charming  qualities  of  her  voice.  Eugene  Blanchard  gave  the 
Weber  Concert-piece  with  orchestra,  displaying  as  he  always 
does,  a  clear-cut,  manful,  brilliant  technique.  Mr.  Blanchard 
played  besides  the  well-known  B  fiat  Minor  Scherzo  or  Chopin — 
without  orchestra  of  course.  His  unlucky  lapse  of  memory  in 
the  Weber  piece  was  more  than  atoned  for  by  his  other  work. 
«       «       « 

Sevcik  In  Vienna,  is  accepting  only  twelve  private  pupUs 
this  season,  and  Cedric  Wright,  the  young  Alameda  violinist, 
is  one  of  these.  Mr.  Wright  was  a  Sevcik  disciple  at  Prague, 
where  the  great  Bohemian  Master  taught  until  this  year. 

*  *       * 

Signor  de  Grassi  is  to  give  violin  recitals  in  San  Jose  and 
Sacramento,  during  the  present  season. 

*  *       • 

Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood  after  two  or  three  successful 
recitals  on  both  sides  of  the  Bay,  will  leave  for  the  East  next 
Wednesday,  giving  several  concerts  on  her  way. 

*  *       * 

The  half-hour  at  the  Greek  Theatre  yesterday  was  given 
by  Miss  Helen  Shields,  contralto,  of  Pittsburg,  and  Los 
Angeles.     Five  thousand  persons  heard  the   program. 


THE   FUHRERS   MAKE  A  GENUINE    HIT. 

Hardly  anyone,  least  of  all  the  management,  expected  that 
the  Brahms  Quartet,  summoned  by  telegraphic  communication 
from  Los  Angeles  to  fill  a  gap  in  the  San  Francisco  Orpheum 
program  on  Sunday  afternoon,  would  drive  the  audience  fran- 
tic with  noisy  demonstrations  of  approval.  Hardly  any  act — 
even  the  most  extravagantly  announced,  created  a  more  satis- 
factory impression.  It  is  a  most  gratifying  testimonial  to  the 
good  taste  of  the  Orpheum  audience  (from  pit  to  gallery)  that 
four  unpretentious  young  ladies  should  arouse  them  to  pro- 
longed enthusiasm  by  the  simple  means  of  good  music  well 
performed.  Of  course  the  future  of  the  Brahms  Quartet  is  as- 
sured, as  their  success  was  so  decided  that  it  forms  an  im- 
portant feature  in  the  Orpheum's  history.  This  brilliant  ar- 
tistic conquest  is  of  special  interest  to  San  Francisco  and 
Los  Angeles  readers  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review,  as 
among  its  members  are  Miss  Bessie  Fuhrer,  violinist;  Miss 
Lucy  Fuhrer,  cellist;   Mrs.  J.  D.  Walker,  vocalist  and  pianist. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


13 


A  STANDARD 


Grand  Piano  Free 

BALDWIN,  EVERETT,  KNABE,  STEINWAY  or  WEBER 

The  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  will  give  a  Grand  Piano  worth  from  Eight  Hundred  to  One 
Thousand  Dollars  to  any  Musical  Club,  Musical  Conservatory,  Music  Teacher  or  Music  Student  who 
will  secure  for  it  the  largest  number  of  subscribers  (not  less  than  five  hundred)  before  May  1st,  1910. 

If  the  contestant  who  secures  the  largest  number  of  subscribers  should  not  exceed  Five  Hundred,  he  or  she  will  be 
entitled  to  an  Upright  Piano,  of  the  above  named  make,  of  the  value  of  not  less  than  Five  Hundred  Dollars. 


Subscriptions  Will  Be  Creditec 

in  Votes  as 

Follows : 

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One  Dollar 

. 

500  Votes 

One  Year's  Subscription     -        -        -        - 

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. 

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Six 

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Seven 

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The  Highest  Number  of  Votes  Represents  the  Largest  Number  of  Subscribers 


RULES   OF   CONTEST 


Any  musical  person  in  California  is  eligible 
to  enter  this  Contest.  The  First  I'rize  will  be 
aAvarded  to  the  one  securing  the  largest  num- 
ber of  votes  (which  is  equivalent  to  the  largest 
number  of  subscribers).  Anyone  not  winning 
the  First  Prize  will  receive  a  Merchandise  Or 
der  representing  2.5   per  cent,   of   the  amount 

Contest  ends 


forwarded    to    this    paper.     ALL    SUBSCRIT 
TIONS  MUST  BE  PAH)  IN  ADVANCE. 

A  Coupon  that  will  be  published  in  each 
issue  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  is 
equivalent  to  Five  Votes.  It  is  limited  to  one 
week  after  date. 

Only  New  Subscriptions  will  be  counted. 
May  1,  1910. 


NOMINATION  COUPON 

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Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.  Building, 

San    Francisco. 

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in  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review's  Grand 

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GRAND  PIANO  CONTEST 

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Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review, 


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Co.  Building. 


San  Francisco 


14 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


IN  THE  REALM  OF  THE  THEATRE 


Edited  by  JOSEPH  M.  GUMMING 


GEORGE    FAWCETT'S    FINE    ACTING. 


THE    BRITISH    PLAY   CENSOR. 


In  the  Title-role  of  "The  Great  John  Ganton"  He  Gives  a  Great 
Representation  of  a   Modern  Captain  of  Industry. 


When  Mr.  George  Pawcett,  on  the  opening  night  of  "The 
Great  John  Ganton"  at  the  Valencia  Theatre,  responded  to  the 
customary  demand  for  a  speech  from  the  star  he  very  grace- 
fully and  tactfully  told  us  that  he  had  looked  with  considerable 
fear  on  his  appearance  here  because  San  Francisco  audiences 
were  such  fine  judges  of  acting;  that  there  were  three  cities 
that  had  the  highest  judgment — London,  possibly  New  York 
and  San  Francisco;  and  with  a  few  more  complimentary 
remarks  he  concluded  a  very  pleasant  little  speech. 

How  very  fine  it  would  be  if  Mr.  Fawcett's  good  opinion  of 
us  were  true,  but  is  it?  Of  course  each  one  of  us  thinks  that 
he  or  she  knows  good  acting  when  it  is  presented,  but  take 
our  audiences  as  a  whole  do  they  appreciate  it?  Would  an 
audience  that  appreciates  fine  acting  halt  the  action  of  a  play 
just  to  applaud  some  bit  of  sickly  sentimentality  or  some  loud- 
voiced  pyrotechnics?  Take  the  very  audience  Mr.  Fawcett 
was  addressing — in  the  second  act,  John  Ganton's  son  and 
daughter,  without  his  knowledge,  are  dining  at  a  golf  club 
with  what  he  considers  questionable  company;  as  the  old  man 
dicovers  them,  it  is  a  moment  of  suspense  as  you  wait  for 
the  explosion,  but  the  over-appreciative  audience  burst  into 
loud  and  prolonged  applause.  Again,  in  the  last  act,  when 
the  old  lion,  the  fighter  who  has  downed  every  adversary 
save  sickness,  totters  on  the  scene  with  pain  written  in  every 
line  of  his  face  that  brilliant  audience  seemed  to  think  it  the 
time  for  hilarious  laughter.  No,  Mr.  Fawcett,  very  kind  of 
you,  but  not  altogether  true. 

Not  having  read  the  book,  "Ganton  and  Co.,"  from  which  the 
play  was  dramatized  by  J.  Hartley  Manners,  I  can  not  say 
how  closely  he  has  followed  it.  It  doesn't  make  much  differ- 
ence anyway.  Since  "The  Lion  and  the  Mouse"  started  the 
style,  the  formula  is  about  this:  a  big,  domineering,  success- 
ful business  man  who  has  trampled  on  everybody  and  every- 
thing on  his  way  up  the  ladder  of  success  is  unabe  to  cope 
with  his  own  children's  love  affairs,  some  beautiful  and  inno- 
cent young  creature  fiercely  denounces  him  and  "The  miser- 
able System  of  which  you  are  the  head"  and  immediately  he 
sees  a  great  light  and  all  ends  happily.  In  this  particular 
play  the  young  denunciatress  springs  the  Christian  Science 
or  New  Thought  idea  that  "Thoughts  are  things"  when  she 
tells  old  John  Ganton  that  all  his  tyranny  and  his  wicked 
thoughts  have  entered  into  his  body,  become  part  of  his  tis- 
sues and  are  racking  him  with  physical  pain. 

Having  delivered  myself  of  a  long-standing  grouch  against 
people  who  will  applaud  or  laugh  at  the  wrong  time,  and 
having  expressed  the  above  opinion  of  the  play,  it  is  about 
time  to  get  cheerful.  After  all  it  isn't  often  that  you  can  get 
a  combination  of  an  A-1  play  and  a  topnotch  actor  and  any- 
way a  man  like  George  Fawcett  makes  you  forget  the  play  in 
admiration  of  his  superb  acting. 

John  Ganton  is  a  mixture  of  John  Burkett  Ryder  in  "The 
Lion  and  the  Mouse."  the  character  of  the  father  in  David 
Graham  Phillips'  story,  "The  Second  Generation"  and  with  a 
great  deal  of  Old  Gorgon  Graham,  the  old  pork-packer  in 
"The  Letters  of  a  Self-made  Merchant  to  his  Son."  Business, 
business,  always  business,  domineering,  tyrannical,  ruthless 
and  unscrupulous  in  getting  results,  with  a  grim  sense  of 
humor  and  under  all  a  really  tender  heart.  That's  the  kind 
of  a  man  that  George  Fawcett  realizes  in  the  flesh  and 
apparently  he  does  not  resort  to  make-up  at  all;  his  round 
head,  his  thick  neck  and  heavy  jaws  give  the  feeling  that  here 
is  a  man  of  power  and  his  manner  of  holding  his  head  and 
half  closing  his  eyelids  gives  still  further  the  impression  that 
he  is  one  of  the  lions  of  Chicago's  "Jungle." 

Most  of  the  support  is  good.  Fanchon  Campbell  as  May 
Keating  rises  to  the  denunciation  scene  very  well,  and  besides, 
she  dresses  prettily.  Very  good  work  is  done  by  Lucius  Hen- 
derson as  Laurence  Delaney,  a  stock-broker  with  a  shady 
reputation.  He  handled  the  goody-good  lines  of  a  too-late 
repentance  quite  cleverly. 

To  sum  ui) — the  superb  acting  of  Mr.  Fawcett  and  his  good 
support  more  than  make  up  for  the  inferior  play,  and  the 
show  is  well  worth  seeing. 


Apropos  of  the  suggested  censoring  of  our  local  theatres  on 
account  of  a  recent  play  that  was  beyond  the  limit  of  decency 
it  is  of  interest  to  consider  the  time  they  are  having  in  Eng- 
land on  the  question  of  abolishing  the  censoring  of  plays  that 
exists  there.  The  "King's  Reader  of  Plays"  is  one  of  the 
relics  of  former  years  who  still  flourishes  even  stronger  than 
ever.  Originally  his  job  was  to  see  that  nothing  was  pro- 
duced that  might  injure  the  reigning  monarch  in  the  eyes  of 
the  people,  but  about  two  hundred  years  ago,  Henry  Fielding, 
one  of  the  geniuses  of  England's  literature,  turned  his  dramatic 
pen  on  the  corruption  of  the  British  Parliament  with  the 
result  that  the  censorship  was  made  not  only  a  royal,  but  a 
parliamentary  institution,  and  which  it  still  remains.  George 
Bernard  Shaw  in  one  of  his  brilliant  prefaces  to  his  plays 
points  out  that  Fielding,  deprived  of  the  right  to  express  him- 
self freely  as  a  dramatist,  took  to  novel  writing,  and  that 
thereafter  the  English  novel  became  one  of  the  glories  of 
literature,  while  the  English  drama  has  been  its  disgrace. 

To-day,  before  a  play  can  be  produced,  it  must  be  read  by 
the  Censor,  if  more  than  one  act  long  he  receives  a  fee  of 
two  guineas,  and  if  in  his  opinion  it  is  not  improper  o'r 
immoral,  it  is  licensed,  otherwise,  if  it  is  produced,  everyone 
from  manager  to  stagehand  is  liable  to  arrest  and  fine.  There 
is  no  appeal  from  the  prohibition  of  the  censor. 

In  recent  years  the  Censor  has  prohibited  plays  of  Ibsen. 
Sudermann,  Hauptmann,  D'Annunzio  and  Tolstoi.  He  has 
even  prohibited  Maeterlinck's  beautiful  "Monna  Vanna,"  the 
ancient  Greek  masterpiece  of  Sophocles.  "Oedipus  Rex"  and 
Shelley's  "The  Cenci"  and  has  allowed  all  sorts  of  other 
trashy  indecency  to  pass. 

Every  time  he  has  prohibited  any  meritorious  work  like 
"Manna  Vanna"  the  English  papers  have  taken  the  matter 
up  and  finally  the  objections  have  become  so  strong  that  a 
parliamentary  commission  has  been  appointed  to  investigate 
the  matter. 

The  commission  has  had  many  sittings,  and  has  heard  any 
amount  of  evidence,  both  for,  and  against  abolition.  Nearly 
all  of  the  authors  have  spoken  for  abolition,  the  most  promin- 
ent exception  being  W.  S.  Gilbert  of  Gilbert  and  Sullivan  fame. 
Anyone  in  Great  Britain  can  print  anything  he  pleases,  but  if 
it  is  libellous  or  indecent  he  risks  prosecution,  but  he  does 
not  have  to  ask  permission  first ;  and  the  very  plays  that  are 
prohibited  from  production  can  be  published  the  same  as 
anything  else.  The  authors  claim  the  same  right  to  have 
their  plays  produced  without  depending  on  the  whim  or  preju- 
dice of  any  one  man. 

While  this  claim  seems  unanswerable,  British  politicians 
are  just  as  much  afraid  of  the  voters  as  any  other  politicians, 
and  there  is  still  a  large  class  of  people  in  England  who  regard 
the  theatre  as  one  of  the  special  properties  of  the  Evil  One, 
and  in  the  interest  of  morality — their  morality — it  must  be 
bound  as  rigidly  as  possible. 

Because  we  have  had  one  indecent  play  here  do  we  need 
anything  like  this? 

Here  is  another  instance  of  the  restrictions  they  practice 
in  England.  There  are  a  great  many  music  halls  in  London, 
which  cut  very  much  into  the  patronage  of  the  theatres. 
These  music  halls  are  very  similar  to  our  vaudeville  houses, 
but  they  are  not  permitted  to  produce  "sketches"  or  little 
plays.  A  while  ago  one  of  them  made  the  attempt,  and  the 
theatre  managers  at  once  began  action  against  it.  It  seems 
that  the  theatres  are  licensed  by  the  Lord  Chamberlain,  the 
only  authority  to  do  so,  and  the  music  halls  are  licensed  by 
the  County  Council  for  a  general  variety  entertainment.  So 
after  a  trial  the  music  hall  lost  and  had  to  pay  a  fine. 


--W- 


There  is  a  play  on  the  boards  in  New  York  at  the  present 
time  called  "The  Intruder."  The  title  refers  to  the  new  wife 
of  a  divorced  man  and  the  pay  deals  with  the  struggle  of  the 
step-mother  to  win  her  step-daughter's  affection  as  against  the 
influence  of  the  girl's  own  mother.  The  newspaper  advertise- 
ment of  the  play  one  Sunday  was  a  good  one.  It  said  that 
step-parents,  step-children  and  divorced  people  would  natural- 
ly be  interested  in  the  play,  so  it  set  aside  different  days  of 
that  week,  one  day  for  step-fathers  to  receive  free  admission 
on  application  at  the  box  office,  one  day  for  step-mothers,  one 
for  step-daughters,  one  for  divorced  women  and  one  for  di- 
vorced men. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


15 


WILLIAIYI      r.     ZASLK^rlf      musical  director 

The  Zech  Orcheftra  Rcbcarses  Every  Monday  Evening 

1332  Geary  Street  Phone  West  1603 


California  Conservatory  of  Music 

Now   occupies  its   magnificent  new   building  on 

147  Presidio  Avenue 

Between  Washington  and  Jackson  Streets,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

(Jackson-Sutter  St.  car  temuDal  in  front  of  building) 


Largest  Institution  West  of  Chicago 


DIRECTORIUM  : 

HERMANN  GENSS,  President 

DR.  H.  J.  STEWART,    GIULIO  MINETTl,    DR.  ARTHUR  WEISS, 

DR.  ERNEST  HORSTMANN 

The  facuhy  further  includes  such  artists  as ; 
H.ANS  KONIG, 
\V.A.LL.ACE  A.  SABIN, 
G.  JOLLAIN, 
LOUIS  iNEWBAUER, 
HENRY  B.  B.AERMAN, 
MRS.  M.  O'BRIEN, 
MISS  FLORENCE  GUPPY, 


nd    othe 


Departments  for  Beginners,   Amateurs  and  Professionals 


Pupils  received  at  alt  times. 
SEND    FOR   CATALOGUE 


CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC  of  the 
UNIVERSITY  OF  THE  PACIFIC 

PIERRE  'DOUILLET.  Dean.     SA.X  JOSE,  CAL. 
The  oldest  Institution  on  the  Coast — complete  Musical  Elducation — Advan- 
tages of  literary  studies  free  of  charge.     Board  and  room    at    moderate   prices 
Send  for  Catalogue. 

Notre  Dame  Conservatory  of  Music 

BOARDING  SCHOOL  FOR  GIRLS 


San    Jose 


Cal  if  onn  la 


O'f ARRELL  STREET 
Between  Stockton  and  Pom 


New  Orpheum 

Safest  and  Most  Magnificent  Theatre  in  America. 
Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  AfeUnoon— MATINEE  E\'ERY  DAY 

ARTISTIC  VAUDEVILLE 

George  Bloomquest  and  Co..  in  'Xerve":  Howard  and  How- 
ard, "The  Messenger  Boy  and  the  Thespian";  Martinettie  and 
Sylvester.  "The  Boys  with  the  Chairs";  Ballerini's  Canine 
Tumblers;  Tuscany  Troubadours;  6-Glinserettis-6;  Carlin  and 
Clark;  New  Orpheum  Motion  Pictures.  Last  Week — Valerie 
Bergere,  who  will  present,  by  special  request,  "Billie's  First 
Love." 

Evening  Pricet:     10c,  25c,  50c  and  75c.     Box  SeaU  $1.00 
Matinee  Prices:     (Except  Sundays  and  Holidays)  lOc,  25c,  50c. 
PHONE  DOUGLAS  70 


Mrs.  Oscar  Mansfeldt 


Has  Removed  to  20  I  6  Buchanan  St.,  Bet.  Pine  and  California 
TELEPHONE  WEST  314 

MACKENZIE  GORDON 

TENOR 

Tpaphpr    nf    ^inninn      lo  all  iu  branches  from  the  rudiments  of  tone  fonnation  to 

I  edtimr  ui  oingiiig  ,(,,  Kighca  fimsh  «id  completion »/  PubUc  smgim 

OIRATORIO— OPERA— CONCERT 


Studio ;  2832   Jackson  St. 


By  Appointment  Only 


Telephone:  West  457 


JOSEPH  GREVEN 

Voice  Culture  for  Singing  and  Speaking 
Concert.  Oratorio  and  Opera  Repertoire 

Complete  Preparation  for  the  Operatic  Stage 

824  Eddy  St.,  near  Van  Ness.  Telephone  Franklin  3671 

BASSO 
CANTANTE 

VOICE  CULTUF^  AND  OPERATIC  TRAINING 

Perfeifl  Tone  Placing  Italian  School 

Studio — 799  Van  Ness  Ave.,  between  Turk  and  Eddy  Sts. 

Take  Eddy  or  Turk  St.  Cars.  Telephone  Franklin  3432 


Joaquin  S.  Wanrell 


ADOLF  GREGORY 

Organist  and  Choir  Director  St.  Mary's,  Oakland 
Director  Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music 
VOICE  PRODUCTION.  P1..VNO.  HARMONY  AND  COMPOSITION. 

203-205  Twelfth  St.  Cor.  Jackson,  OAKLAND 

Von  Meyerinck  School  of  Music 

EST.ABLISHED  1895 
UNDER  THE  DIRECTION  OF  MRS.  ANNA  VON  MEYERINCK 

Classes  in  French,  German.  Musical  History  and  Sight  Reading  in  progress.  Practice 
lessons  •w\\\\  ipecially  coached  accompanists  may  be  arranged  for — also  by  non-students 
oftheschool.     Studio.   818   Grove    St..  near  rillmore.    Tel.  Park  1 069. 

In  Berkeley  Tuesday.  232 1  Regent  St.  Tel.  Berkeley  3677.  Thursday  at  Snell 
Seminar>' , 

Miss  Elizabeth  Westgate 

Organiil  Firfl   Prejbylenan  Church 

Teacher  of  PIANO  and  ORGAN 


Studio :    1  1  1  7  Paru  St. 


Alameda,  California 


The  Bering 


^y  CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC. 

Cl  Established  18% 

Under  the  direction  of  Prof,  and  Mme.  JOSEPH  BERINGER.  Complete 
Musical  Education — Piano,  Theory,  and  Composition;  \  oice  (Italian  Method), 
Opera,  Concert,  Oratorio.  Free  advantages  to  students:  Harmony  Lectures, 
Concerts,  Ejisemble  playing.  Sight  reading.  Faculty  of  distinguished  Instructors. 
Send  for  catalogue.     926  Pierce  street,   near  McAllister,   San  Francisco,  Cal. 

FREID   R.  J.   RAU 

Pacific  Coast  Agent  for 

HAWKES  &  SON 

London,  England 

High-Grade    Band   Instruments 

Bargains  in  Second-Hand  Instruments 
170  PAGE  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO  Phone  Market  5513 


Sari  Francisco  Conservatory  of  Music 


C  S.  BONELLI,  Director 


Cor.  PIERCE  and  CAUFORMA  STS. 


This  institution  graduates  more  competent  and  successful  teacfiers  than  any   other  institution  of  its  kind    on  the  Pacific 
Coast.     Special  course  for  those  desiring  to  enter  the  professional  field.     FACULTY  OF   EFFICIENT  INSTRUCTORS. 


16 


PA(UF10    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


MAGNIFICENT    PROGRAM    FOR    PORTOLA    WEEK    AT 
THE    ORPHEUM. 


Portola  week  will  be  most  delightfully  celebrated  at  the 
Orpheum.  The  theatre  will  be  brilliantly  illuminated  and 
tastefully  and  appropriately  decorated  within  and  without  and 
the  programme  to  be  presented  next  week  will  be  one  of  the 
most  enjoyable  incidents  of  the  coming  festivities. 

George  Bloomquest,  one  of  the  most  popular  light  comedians 
that  have  appeared  in  this  city,  and  now  a  full-fledged  head- 
liner  in  vaudeville  will  appear  in  a  sketch  expressly  written 
for  him  by  Victor  H.  Smalley,  called  "Nerve."  Mr.  Bloom- 
quest  will  be  supported  by  a  capital  little  company  which 
includes  Rubyn  Thorpe,  Earl  D.  Dwire  and  Thomas  Broom. 
He  has  scored  a  great  hit  in  all  the  theatres  he  has  appeared  in. 

Eugene  Howard  and  Willie  will  present  their  immensely 
successful  act  "The  Messenger  Boy  and  The  Thespian."  They 
are  both  capital  vocalists  with  a  popular  selection  of  songs, 
and  their  comedy  places  them  in  a  class  by  themselves.  The 
Hebrew  Messenger  Boy  of  Willie  Howard  brims  over  with  fun 
and  there  is  not  a  dull  moment  in  their  entire  act. 

Martinettis  and  Sylvester,  two  exceptionally  strenuous  and 
agile  comedians  who  are  often  called  "The  Boys  with  The 
Chairs"  will  introduce  a  novelty  in  acrobatics  entitled  "An 
Attempt  At  Suicide."  While  Joe  Sylvester  is  a  famous  clown, 
Clark  Martinettie  is  a  remarkable  athlete.  Probably  no  pan- 
tomlmist  has  succeeded  in  the  art  of  "falling"  of  "breaking  a 
fall"  as  Sylvester  has,  and  in  many  of  his  surprising  tumbles 
it  would  seem  that  he  had  broken  every  bone  in  his  body. 
All  this  is  done  with  fine  comedy  effect,  and  the  audience  will 
readily  agree  that  the  act  is  appropriately  called  "An  Attempt 
At  Suicide." 

Ballerini's  Canine  Tumblers  will  give  a  most  wonderful 
exhibition  of  animal  sagacity.  Not  a  command  is  given  or  a 
whip  used  to  them.  Each  has  learned  his  part  perfectly  and 
exhibits  the  consciousness  of  his  ability  by  a  certain  air  of 
pride  and  self  satisfaction.  These  little  dogs  are  apt  pupils 
and  with  them  is  associated  a  kitten  in  whom  Mr.  Ballerini 
takes  a  special  pride.  Their  performance  is  a  delightfully 
interesting  one  to  children.  Next  week  will  terminate  the 
engagement  of  that  glorious  Sextette,  The  Tuscany  Trouba- 
dours, the  marvelous  Six  Glinserettis  and  those  diverting 
German  comedians  Carlina  and  Clark.  It  will  be  also  the  last 
of  the  gifted  and  popular  actress  Valerie  Bergere,  who  in 
response  to  a  numerously  expressed  wish  will  revive  for  the 
first  time  here  in  several  seasons  the  charming  comedietta 
"Billie's  First  Love,"  which  in  the  opinion  of  many  is  her 
greatest  vaudeville  triumph.  A  new  series  of  motion  pictures 
particularly  suited  to  the  occasion  will  terminate  the  enter- 
tainment. 


Musical  Review  Rules  That  Will  be  Enforced. 


FRICK    PUPILS    IN    GREEK   THEATRE. 


Four  professional  pupils  of  Romeo  Frick,  the  Oakland  vocal 
teacher,  presented  the  "Half-Hour  of  Music"  at  the  Greek 
Theatre,  Sunday,  Sept.  26th. 

Although  clouds  threatened  the  first  part  of  the  program, 
a  large  audience  (five  to  six  thousand)  gathered  to  listen, 
showing  the  interest  taken  in  the  work  of  Prick  pupils. 

The  program  given  was  as  follows:  "La  Dove  prendre" 
(Mozart);,  Miss  Lucy  Van  de  Mark  and  Miss  Amelia  Laviosa; 
"Parla"  (Ardite),  Miss  Edna  Riley;  "11  Balen"  (II  Trovatore) 
(Verdi),  Thomas  Walker;  Aria,  "St.  Paul"  (Mendellsohn), 
Miss  Van  de  Mark;  Aria,  "Luisa  Miller"  (Verdi),  Miss  La- 
viosa; Trio,  "Attila"  (Verdi),  Miss  Van  de  Mark,  Miss  Riley 
and  Mr.  Walker.     Accompanist,  .lohn  Hartigan. 

Mr.  Amies,  of  the  University  Dramatic  Committee,  stated: 
"The  work  of  the  Frick  pupils  was  of  a  high  standard.  Each 
soloist  sang  as  an  artist.     It  was  not  the  work  of  pupils." 

The  San  Francisco  Chronicle  wrote:  "The  program  was  one 
of  the  most  successful  of  the  season  from  a  musical  point  of 
view." 


Mascagni  is  going  to  do  the  best  he  can  in  Rome  at  the 
Teatro  Consanzi.  He  is  going  to  give  a  kind  of  a  review 
repertory,  the  first  period  including  Monteverde,  Peri,  Cavalli; 
the  second,  Paesiello  and  Cimarosa,  while  the  third  will  be 
devoted  to  Rossini,  Verdi,  Bellini  and  the  neo-Italians.  He 
says,  very  wisely;  "I  admit  all  expressions  of  art  so  long  as 
their  form  is  architectural.  A  work  which  is  devoid  of  archi- 
tecture is  not  even  to  be  discussed."  And  we  may  add  that 
among  those  musical  works  which  have  an  architectural 
structure  in  this  sense,  none  is  more  perfect  than  his  own 
"Cavalleria  Rusticana." — Musical  Courier. 


Every  advertising  bill  must  be  paid  on  the  first  day 
of  each  month.  If  not  paid  on  or  before  tine  fifteenth 
of  each  month  advertisement  will  be  discontinued.  If 
not  paid  on  or  before  the  first  day  of  the  month  follow- 
ing account  will   be  turned  over  to  collector. 

All  subscriptions  must  be  paid  two  weeks  after  date 
of  expiration  notices  mailed  from  this  office.  If  not 
paid  paper  will  be  promptly  discontinued. 

Only  advertisers  are  entitled  to  insertion  of  advance 
notices  of  concerts,  pictures,  studio  removal  notices, 
etc.     Bona  fide   news   items   are   always   solicited. 

This  paper  will  establish  a  list  of  California  artists 
and  church  choir  singers.  Anyone  desirous  of  appear- 
ing on  this  list,  which  will  be  forwarded  to  anyone  like- 
ly to  engage  artists,  may  send  in  his  or  her  name.  No 
charge  will  be  made  for  such  entrance  nor  any  com- 
mission charged  in  case  an  engagement  is  secured.  If 
artist  is  not  known  to  the  editor  by  reputation  he  or  she 
must  satisfy  him  as  to  required  competency.  No  charge 
is  made  for  such   examination. 


Studios  for  Musicians 

KOHLER  &  CHASE  BUILDING 

Rooms  large  and  sunny,  separated  by  sound- 
proof partitions;  especially  adapted  to  the  use  of 
musicians  and  teachers  of  music ;  ready  for  occu- 
pancy December  1 ,  1 909. 

FOR  PLANS  AND  RESERVATIONS.  APPLY 

SPECK,  PASCHEL  &  CO.,  Agents 

228  Montgomery  St.,  Mills  Building 

Telephone  Kearny    1642 


"Harper's  Weekly"  of  October  2,  has  pictures  of  the  per- 
formance of  "Macbeth"  in  Maurice  Maeterlinck's  castle  in 
France.  The  pictures  are  about  the  same  as  those  of  the 
"London  Illustrated  News"  referred  to  last  week. 


GRAND  SPANISH 

MUSIC  FESTIVAL 

Under  the  Auspices  of  the  PORTOU  COMMITTEE 

G.  S.  WANRELL.  Director 

Chorus  of  100  Voices 

Cassassa's  Orchestra 

Efficient  Soloists 

DREAMLAND  RINK 

STEINER  STREET  near  SUTTER 
Thursday  Afternoon,  Oct.  21,  at  3  o'clock 

The  Program  will  contain  exclusively 
Spanish  Compositions  for  Voice  and  Or- 
chestra, and  will  include  several  Famous 
Spanish  Dances. 


P  A  (11  F  I  C    C  O  A  S  T    MUSIC  A  L    K  E  V  I  E  \\' 


The  Most  Beautiful  Piano 
Store  in  America 

Above  is  shown  a  photo  engraving  of  our  big  new  store.  It  is  conceded  by  the  whole  music  worhl 
to  be  tlie  best,  and  the  most  perfectly  appointed  home  of  any  house  in  tlie  world.  The  picture  shows 
but  a  part  of  our  main  floor  and  a  portion  only  of  the  great  stock  of  more  than  fifty  grand  pianos — a 
stock  five  times  larger  than  is  carried  by  any  otlier  house  on  the  Coast.  Just  at  this  time  about  five 
hundred  pianos  of  leading  makes  are  shown ;  a  disjilay  which  is  worth  your  time  to  see. 

Twenty  specially  built  rooms  are  occupied  by  our  great  stock,  making  the  opportunity  for  compari- 
son lietter  than  is  ottered  at  any  other  store,  while  in  price  and  fiuish  every  individual  purse  and  taste 
may  be  satisfied. 

Our  new  talking  machine  department  on  the  Sutter  street  side  surpasses  in  point  of  location,  airi- 
ness, convenience,  comfort,  and  especially  in  the  magnitude  of  its  stock,  and  the  courteous  service 
offered,  any  similar  department  in  the  West.  All  the  finest  in  Talking  Machines,  and  all  the  latest 
records  all  the  time  is  tlie  motto,  and  it's  lived  up  to. 

The  Wiley  B.  Allen  Co. 

Wiley  B.  Allen  Building,  135-153  Kearney  and  217-225  Sutter  Streets. 

Oakland:  510  Twelfth  and  1105  Washington. 

Other  Stores — Los  Angeles.  Sacramento,  San  Jose,  San  Diego,  Stockton,  Phoenix,  Ariz..  Reno,  Nev., 
Portland,  Ore. 


18 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


(Continued   from   Page   8.) 
at  each  visit,  and  turn  hundreds  away.     The  closing  event  of 
the  Philharmonic  Course  is  the  coining  of  Mme.  Teresa  Car- 
reno,  the  greatest  of  all  women  pianists,  who  will  be  heard 
in  concert  early  in  February. 

In  addition  to  these  artists,  Manager  Behymer  is  bringing 
late  in  November  the  much  talked  of  Dr.  Ludwig  WuUner, 
the  great  lieder  interpreter,  who  seems  to  be  more  in  demand 
for  his  second  season  in  the  East  than  he  was  for  his  first, 
which  was  certainly  a  most  successful  one.  He  is  considered 
today  the  best  paying  musical  attraction  in  this  country.  In 
March  Mme.  Tillie  Koenen,  the  famous  Dutch  contralto,  will 
be  a  new  personality  to  concert  goers.  Her  forthcoming  tour 
will  be  her  first  visit  in  America,  although  she  has  been  ex- 
ceedingly successful  in  Russia,  Germany  and  England.  Dur- 
ing the  same  month  a  decided  novelty  will  be  offered  in  con- 
certs by  a  Spanish  wonder,  a  child  pianist,  little  Pepito  Ar- 
riola,  aged  ten,  who  has  been  astonishing  Europe,  and  is  said 
to  be  a  rarely  gifted  prodigy. 

For  April  the  Flonzaley  Quartet  has  been  secured.  This  is 
reputed  to  be  the  finest  quartet  in  the  world;  it  is  a  Swiss 
organization,  and  for  the  last  eight  years  has  played  nothing 
but  ensemble  music,  the  members  not  being  permitted  to  play 
in  orchestras,  to  teach,  nor  to  appear  with  any  other  organiza- 
tion. The  season's  final  attraction  will  be  the  Walter  Dam- 
rosch  Orchestra  and  the  famous  dancer,  Isadora  Duncan, 
whose  success  in  the  East  and  in  Europe  has  been  nothing 
short  of  sensational.  Her  classic  dancing,  with  which  she 
interprets  the  musical  compositions  of  the  masters,  has  been 
the  talk  of  the  day,  so  full  is  it  of  exquisite  beauty  and  poetry. 

The  reserved  seat  sale  for  the  Great  Philharmonic  Course, 
whose  prices  will  remain  the  same  as  heretofore,  will  com- 
mence at  the  Behymer  office  in  the  Bartlett  Music  Company's 
store  on  Monday,  October  18th.  The  first  three  days  of  the 
week  will  be  devoted  to  the  re-reservation  of  the  season  ticket 
holders  of  last  year,  and  the  regular  seat  sale  will  open  to 
the  public  on  Thursday,  October  21st. 


THE  GAMUT  CLUB. 


The  Gamut  Club.— The  Gamut  Club  of  Los  Angeles  held 
its  regular  monthly  meeting  at  Gamut  Club  Hall,  on 
Wednesday  evening,  October  6th.  There  was  a  very 
large  attendance  and  the  finest  kind  of  good  fellow- 
ship prevailed  throughout  the  evening.  As  usual  the 
regular  session  was  preceded  by  a  dinner,  accompanied 
by  the  liquid  refreshments,  without  which  a  genuine 
musicians'  feast  would  be  incomplete,  and  after  the  inhar- 
monious rattle  of  dishes  had  subsided  President  Charles  Far- 
well  Edson  opened  the  artistic  proceeding  by  calling  upon 
Henry  Balfour  to  entertain  the  members  with  an  aria  from 
"La  Boheme."  Mr.  Balfour  used  to  be  a  resident  of  Los 
Angeles  several  years  ago,  but,  according  to  the  proverbial 
fate  of  the  local  prophet,  he  had  to  seek  recognition  else- 
where, and  after  the  well  known  vicissitudes  of  the  American 
artist  seeking  engagements  without  the  assistance  of  a  million- 
aire, Mr.  Balfour  finally  found  his  opportunity  and  immediate- 
ly conquered.  He  is  now  under  contract  for  thirty  concerts 
throughout  the  Southwestern  territory.  Mr.  Balfour  is  worthy 
of  every  encouragement  and  every  support  that  may  be  ten- 
dered him.  He  possesses  a  tenor  of  splendid  timbre  and 
pleasing  flexibility  and  he  sings  with  an  emotional  judgment 
and  an  artistic  abandon  that  reveals  the  genuine  spark  of 
artistry  imbedded  in  his  heart.  That  such  an  artist  has 
lived  in  California  for  so  long  without  gaining  the  popular 
recognition  which  surely  would  reward  him,  if  he  only 
received  adequate  opportunities  to  be  heard,  once  more  proves 
our  contention  that  there  is  something  radically  wrong  some- 
where on  this  Coast  in  the  matter  of  giving  opportunities  to 
resident  artists.  Once  more  the  necessity  of  a  musical  journal, 
that  calls  attention  to  these  facts,  has  been  demonstrated, 
and  we  will  not  rest  until  our  Pacific  Coast  artists  will 
receive  the  same  attention  that  any  other  artist  meets  with, 
if  we  have  to  struggle  and  fight  years  to  attain  such  aim. 

Mr.  Balfour  aroused  his  audience  to  the  highest  pitch  of 
enthusiasm  Matured  musicians  and  men  beyond  the  age  of 
easily  aroused  sentiments  shouted  their  approval  and  reward- 
ed the  artist  with  an  ovation  the  like  of  which  is  rarely  wit- 
nessed even  at  the  Gamut  Club.  Our  heart  grew  light  under 
the  influence  of  these  genuine  music  lovers  who  place  the 
ability  of  an  artist  above  his  name  and  fame.  If  we  had 
an  organization  like  the  Gamut  Club  in  San  Francisco  (and 
the  American  Music  Society,  provided  our  musicians  take  a 
hold  of  it,  is  likely  to  be  just  such  an  organization),  many 
musical  problems  could  be  solved  without  difficulty  and  with 
certainty  of  success.  Mr.  Colby,  one  of  the  leading  organists 
and  piano  teachers  of  Los  Angeles,  accompanied  Mr.  Balfour 
with  that  musicianly  judgment  for  which  all  his   colleagues 


respect  him.  Mr.  Balfour's  brilliant  effort  was  succeeded  by  a 
recitation  by  Mr.  Fanning,  an  original  song  by  Mr.  Hill 
accompanied  by  Mr.  Stebbins,  and  a  piano  solo  by  Mr. 
Stebbins. 

The  musical  part  of  the  program  having  come  to  a  suc- 
cessful conclusion,  the  President  called  upon  various  members 
and  guests  for  remarks.  Isidor  Dockweiler,  a  prominent  at- 
torney of  the  Angel  City,  made  quite  an  oration  regarding  the 
necessity  of  the  Gamut  Club,  and,  blending  humor  with  pathos 
in  referring  to  his  financial  connection  with  the  Dobinson 
Auditorium,  which  is  now  the  Gamut  Club  Auditorium,  he 
retained  the  attention  of  his  hearers  to  the  end  and  evoked 
a  salvo  of  applause  at  the  conclusion  of  his  brilliant  flight  of 
oratory. 

The  editor  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  took  as  his 
theme  the  Music  Festival  now  being  launched  in  Los  Angeles, 
and  stated  that  such  events  can  only  then  be  successful  when 
those  interested  in  them  believe  in  them  and  cause  their 
remarks  to  carry  conviction.  Unless  anyone  espousing  the 
cause  of  a  deserving  movement  is  able  to  inspire  confidence  in 
those  people  whom  he  addresses  no  interest  can  be  awakened 
in  any  cause  and  such  cause  can  never  assume  gigantic  pro- 
portions and  universal  recognition.  He  asserted  that  the 
Annual  Los  Angeles  Music  Festival  must  be  something  magni- 
ficent, something  so  far  .above  the  ordinary  that  it  rises 
as  an  isolated  peak  above  every  other  endeavor  so  far  at- 
tempted in  the  metropolis  of  Southern  California.  And  unless 
this  Festival  is  being  arranged  with  this  big  point  in  view, 
and  is  carried  out  by  a  group  of  people  who  are  themselves 
convinced  of  the  magnitude  of  the  event,  and  thus  inspire 
enthusiasm  among  all  those  whom  they  come  in  contact  with, 
thus  arousing  the  spirit  of  energy  and  ambition  among  their 
fellowmen,  the  Annual  Los  Angeles  Music  Festival  can  never 
come  to  a  successful  end. 

President  Edson  then  called  upon  the  committee  appointed 
to  make  arrangements  for  ihe  next  jinks  and  E.  E.  Salyer  and 
W.  E.  Strobridge,  committee  members  who  were  present,  sug- 
gested a  plan  of  such  unique  proportions  that  the  members 
enthusiastically  approved  the  plan.  Then  the  President  asked 
Mr.  Behymer  whether  the  committee  who  had  the  preliminary 
plans  for  the  big  festival  in  hand  were  ready  to  offer  any 
suggestions  and  Mr.  Behymer's  able  report  is  found  at  the 
head  of  this  article.  The  meeting  then  adjourned  to  be 
resumed  on  Wednesday,  November  3rd. 

(Continued  on  Page  20.) 


Margaret  Goetz 


Mezzo  Contralto 


Historical  Song  Recitals,  Concerts  and  Musicales 
ne  51485.     719  Ottowa  St.  near  10th  and  Figueroa,  Los  Angele 


Cal. 


Contralto 


ARNOLD  KRAUSS 


Estelle  Heartt  Dreyf uss 

CONCERT— PURPOSE  PROGRAM  REC1TAL3— ORATORIO 
Studio:     Blanchard  Hall  Building Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Adolf  Willhartitz  ^"""^^"^  °^  P'^"° 

332  So.  Broadway  Los  Angeles 

VIOLIN   SOLOIST 
AND    TEACHER 
Concert    Master    of    the    Los    Angeles    Symphony    Orchestra 
491  ■SV.  18TII  ST.,  LOS    ANGELES  PlIONEIIOME  a.">.S-2:! 

I-I  a  vl  **T7     l-I  n  m  i  1  f  nn     Conductor  Los  Angeles  Symphony 
jnariey     n.anilllOn    orchestra— woman's  orchestra 

VIOLIN  INSTRUCTOR 
320  Blanchard  Hall  Building.  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Charles  E.  Pemberton  vj"""  instructor 

Harmony  and    Counterpoint 
Studio:  306-307  Blanchard  Hall  Building Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

TENOR— VOICE  CULTURE  and 
THE  ART  OF  SINGING 
Director:  Ellis  Club,  Temple  Baptist  Choir,  Woman's  Lyric  Club 
Studio:  316-319  Blanchard  Building. Los  Angeles  Cal. 


J.  B.  Poulin 


J.  P.  Dupuy  T^oR 


—VOICE  DIRECTOR 


Dircaor  Orphcu.  Male  Club,  Bnar  Brilh  Choir,  Trinity  M.  E.  Church  Choir 
Y.  M.  C.  A.   Vocal  Deparl^ienl   and  Euterpean  Male  Quarlelle 

Studio:  3  1 1  Blanchard  Building.  Los  Angel 


ianist 


William  Edson  Strobridge  — 

Room  335  Blanchard  Building  Los  Angeles,  Ca 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


19 


VON  STEIN 

Academy  of  Music 

Phones:    Broadway  39Z3.    Home  25721 


1419  So.  Grand  Ave. 


LOS  ANGELES 


HEINRICH   VON   STEIN,   President  and   Director 
WENZEL    KOPTA,    Director    Violin    Department 


FACULTY 

PIANO — Heinrich  Von   Stein,   Henry  Immerman,  J.   W. 

Moore,  Miss  Juliet  Von  Stein,  Herman  Hilburg,  Miss 

Virginia  Swearingen,  Miss  Nina  L.  Barber  and  Miss 

E.  E.  Pritchert. 
VIOLIN — Wenzel  Kopta,  Julius  Bierlich,  Ferdinand  Von 

Grofe. 
VOICE — Hugo  Kirchhofer,  Robert  Eckhardt. 
CELLO — Mrs.  Elsa  Von  Grofe-Menasco. 
ORGAN — J.  W.   liloore. 
HARIVIONY,  THEORY  and  COM  POSITION— Miss  Juliet 

Von  Stein. 


Strongest  Faculty  Ever  Organized   in 
Southern  California 


F.  \V.  BLANCHARD.  Prn.  and  Mar. 
Contains  200  Studios  Rented  Exclusively  to 

Musicians,  Artists  and  Scientists 

LOS  ANGELES,  CALIFORNIA 

Abraham   Miller 

TENOR— TEACHER   OF   SINGING 
CONCERT— RECITAL— ORATORIO 

Address  L.  E.  Bchymer.  Manager 
Studio:     342-343   Blanchard   Hall   Building,   Los  Angeles,  Cal.      Member  of 
Faculty  of  the  Conservatorv  of  Music  of  the  University  of  Southern  Cahfornia 

Charles  Farwell  Edson 

BASSO 

Studio  :    2020  Toberman  Street  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Telephone  23919 


Have  You  Heard  the  New  Victor 


4  I    RECORDS? 

i\  f*]^Q  I    "Bird  Waltz" 
^^£  I  Cll    "Travlata" 

"Beggar  Student" 
■l"I"l"I"I"l"I' ■!■ 'FT    "^^  Bolero  Grande" 

Nightingale  Song  from 

"Les  Noces  de  Jeanette" 


The  Great  Coloratura  Soprano 


L.  E.  BEHYMER 

Western  Manager 
Musical  Artists 


Main  Office:    LOS  ANGELES,    California 

Booking  Musical  Attractions   from    Denver  West,   California 
and  the  Southwest  on  GUARANTEES  and  PERCENTAGE 


REPRESENTS    THIS    SEASON: 

Madame  Marcella  Sembrich 
Madame  Schumann-Heink 
Madame  Frieda  Langendorff 
Madame  Jeanne  Jomelli 

Madame  Teresa  Carreno 
Miss  Marie  Nichols 

Miss  Tilly  Koenen 

Ellen  Beach  Yaw 

Madelen  Worden 
Dr.  Ludwig  Wuellner 

George  Hamlin,  Tenor 

Fritz  Kreisler,  Violinist 

Pepija  Arriola,  Pianist 

The  Flonzaley  Quartette    and   the 

Damrosch  Orchestra,  with  Isadora 

Duncan,  Dancer,  and  other 

Well  Known  Artists. 

SUPPLYING  ALSO  THE  PACIFIC  COAST  ARTISTS: 

Mackenzie  Gordon 
Antonio  De  Grassi 
Anna  Miller  Wood 

Dr.  J.  F.  Wolle  in  Organ  Recitals 
Univ.  of  California  Glee  Club 
Georg  Kruger,  Pianist 

IGNAZ  Edouard  Haroldi,  Violinist 
Mary  Le  Grand  Reed,  Soprano 
Harry  Lott,  Baritone 
Herr  Arnold  Krauss,  Violinist 
Helen  Goff,  Soprano 
The  Los  Angeles  Symphony  Orches- 
tra— 77  Men. 
The  Woman's  Symphony  Orchestra — 
63  Women. 


Catering  to  the  leading  Music  Clubs,  Colleges, 

Hotels,    Women's    Clubs,    Private 

Schools  and  Homes  with 

"THE  BEST  IN  MUSIC" 

And    Playing  Artists 
Direct    in    the    Leading   Cities  of    the    West 

Especially  Low    Rates    made    to    Music   Clubs   of   California 


20 


1*  A  (J  1  F  I  0    CO  A  S  T    M  U  «  1  C  A  L    It  E  V  I  E  W. 


(Continued  from  Page  18.) 
Music  in  the  Public  Schools. — In  the  same  manner  as  Los 
Angeles  supports  a  unique  musical  organization  that 
is  doing  things  in  behalf  of  musical  progress  in  the 
Gamut  Club,  so  this  city  is  entitled  to  more  than 
ordinary  recognition  in  the  manner  in  which  it  introduced 
good  music  among  the  public  school  children.  There  is  no 
surer  way  to  establish  a  genuine  musical  atmosphere  in  a 
community  than  by  enabling  school  children — the  rising 
generation,  to  partake  of  a  healthy  musical  bill  of  fare.  And 
to  enable  these  children  to  take  advantage  of  good  musical 
offerings,  it  is  absolutely  necessary  to  bring  the  price  of 
admission  down  to  bedrock,  so  that  every  child,  be  it  ever  so 
humble,  should  be  able  to  receive  an  advantage  from  this 
opportunity.  Should  any  school  child  be  so  destitute  as  to  be 
unable  to  afford  even  a  very  modest  price  of  admission  then 
there  should  be  someone  to  see  to  it  that  such  child  receives 
sufficient  support  to  enable  it  to  partake  of  the  same  advan- 
tages which  are  accorded  to  its  fellow  students — provided 
there  exists  in  the  mind  of  the  child  a  real  craving  to  hear 
music.  Charles  Farwell  Edson  had  the  splendid  inspiration 
to  give  the  public  school  children  in  Los  Angeles  and  other 
Southern  California  cities  exactly  such  an  opportunity.  In 
order  to  make  the  prices  right  he  suggested  to  engage  only 
resident  artists  and  there  are  a  number  of  resident  artists  in 
Los  Angeles  thoroughly  efficient  to  give  these  children  a 
splendid  idea  as  to  what  good  music  stands  for.  In  this 
manner  the  children,  by  paying  their  ten  and  twenty- 
five  cent  pieces,  secured  a  musical  education  of  great  value 
and  the  resident  artists,  by  being  paid  with  several  hundred 
of  these  little  ten  and  twenty-five  cent  pieces,  had  no  reason 
to  complain  regarding  adequate  remuneration  for  their  ser- 
vices. Here  was  a  plan  by  which  the  rising  generation  bene- 
fitted through  the  ability  of  its  own  fellow  citizens.  Is  this 
not  a  splendid  proposition? 

*       *       * 

But,  Mr.  Edson's  plan  included  an  advantage  which  even  he 
perhaps  did  not  suspect  and  this  advantage  consists  in  pre- 
senting to  the  student  the  limited  number  of  efficient  artist? 
residing  in  California,  and  thus  implant  in  the  youthful  mind 
a  loyalty  and  faith  in  these  artists  and  prevent  these  children 
from  falling  into  the  error  of  their  elders  and  consider  them- 
selves needful  of  constant  changes  of  artists.  This  desire 
for  constant  changes  engenders  fickleness  and  puts  musical 
taste  upon  a  basis  of  insecurity  and  frailty,  which  it  can  never 
stand  upon  with  confidence.  "Once  an  artist — always  an 
artist"  should  be  the  slogan  of  every  music  lover,  and  it  should 
afford  as  much  enjoyment  and  pleasure  to  hear  the  same 
artist  in  various  programs  as  to  hear  various  artists  in  the 
same  programs.  We  are  thoroughly  convinced  of  the  fact 
that  children  will  be  far  more  benefitted  musically  it  they 
hear  competent  resident  artists  interpret  extensive  repertoires 
during  a  succession  or  series  of  annual  concerts,  than  if  they 
listen  to  great  artists  whose  language  they  do  not  understand, 
whose  philosophic  musical  sentiments  are  beyond  their  child- 
ish comprehension,  and  whose  greatness  and  aloofness  to  them 
obscures  the  value  of  the  musical  impression  made  upon  the 
youthful  mind.  And  so  we  claim  that  the  only  way  to  bene- 
fit school  children  with  concerts  is  to  give  them  local  artists 
of  ability  to  interpret  the  works  of  the  masters,  for  with 
these  local  artists,  who  should  appear  often,  the  children  will 
become  acquainted,  feel  at  ease  and  hence  will  be  more 
receptive  to  the  musical  influence,  and  less  likely  to  be  con- 
fused by  the  personal  influence  of  greatness. 
«       •       • 

And  naturally  Mr.  Edson's  splendid  scheme  was  a  success. 
Financially  it  was  nothing  to  brag  about.  It  was,  however, 
not  a  loss  and  the  children  gave  evidence  that  they  enjoyed 
it  thoroughly.  But,  like  in  the  case  of  the  Bach  Festivals  in 
Berkeley,  which  through  Dr.  Wolle  attracted  thousands  of 
people  from  the  very  kernel  of  the  masses,  and  thus  afforded 
a  welcome  opportunity  to  those  who  usually  do  not  attend 
concerts,  there  arose  a  clique  who  envied  Mr.  Edson  his  suc- 
cess, and  the  hue  and  cry  arose  that  Mr.  Edson  tried  to 
monopolize  music  in  the  public  schools  and  was  making  more 
money  out  of  the  scheme  than  he  should.  Surely  humanity 
is  still  a  very,  very  weak  and  narrow  piece  of  creation  when 
the  only  thing  people  can  see  in  a  man's  successful  endeavours 
in  behalf  of  the  multitude  is  the  direct  gain  that  may  accrue 
to  him  from  such  an  enterprise.  Will  the  time  ever  come 
that  an  undertaking  will  be  accepted  for  its  moral  value 
rather  than  for  its  intrinsic  value?  Suppose  Mr.  Edson 
should  monopolize  this  phase  of  music  in  the  public  schools 
and  should  be  the  only  one  through  whose  efforts  these  child- 
ren are  able  to  cultivate  a  musical  taste  why  should  there  be 
any  objection?  What  is  there  criminal  about  Mr.  Edson's 
work  that  Mr.  Moore  of  the  public  schools  should  attack  him 
in  the  public  press?  Must  a  musician  who  is  endeavouring  to 
accomplish   something   valuable    for   his   community   be    con- 


stantly subjected  to  abuse  and  slander  because  someone  else 
wants  to  do  the  same  thing  he  is  doing?  Why  in  the  name 
of  all  that  is  sensible  can  Mr.  Moore  not  regard  this  plan 
from  the  standpoint  of  the  school  children?  It  seems  to  us 
they  are  the  most  important  factor  in  this  controversy.  If 
they  receive  the  necessary  concert  by  local  artists  and  they 
are  satisfied  and  happy,  why  should  there  be  any  quarrel  about 
the  person  who  makes  them  happy?  Why  must  there  be 
always  put  at  the  door  of  the  genuine  reformer  dishonest 
motives  and  selfish  ends.  If  the  world  should  be  guided  by 
such  principles  nothing  decent  could  be  accomplished  and  an 
obstacle  would  be  put  in  the  way  of  those  desiring  to  introduce 
beneficial  reforms. 

*       ...       * 

We  do  not  know  who  influences  Mr.  Moore  in  his  hostile 
attitude  toward  Mr.  Edson,  neither  do  we  care  to  know,  but 
we  certainly  suggest  to  these  people  that  they  cannot  serve 
the  cause  of  music  by  venting  their  spite  and  their  jealousy 
on  any  fellow  human  being.  If  they  are  anxious  to  bring 
resident  artists  before  the  school  children  why  do  they  not 
work  hand  in  hand  with  Mr.  Edson  or  anyone  else  who  has 
this  cause  at  heart?  Why  do  they  not  all  join  hands  and 
work  harmoniously  toward  one  common  good?  Of  one  thing 
we  are  certain,  if  any  efforts  are  made  to  bring  great  artists 
before  the  children  nothing  good  from  a  musical  point  of  view 
can  be  accomplished,  for  in  the  first  place  the  small  admission 
prices  demanded  of  children  is  not  conformant  with  world- 
wide fame;  and  secondly,  the  halo  of  heroworship  for  a  great 
name  will  absolutely  destroy  any  possible  advantage  to  be 
derived  from  the  musical  part  of  the  performance.  Let  the 
school  children  attend  the  regular  concerts  of  great  artists 
at  reduced  prices  if  they  want  to  hear  them,  but  for  the  sake 
of  all  that  is  reasonable  do  not  crowd  the  resident  artist  from 
his  rightful  sphere  and  permit  him  to  be  sandbagged  into 
oblivion  by  the  great  artist. 

To  give  an  idea  what  has  been  accomplished  in  the  Los 
Angeles  public  schools  last  year  we  quote  a  few  of  the  pro- 
grams presented: 

Popular  Concerts  Grade  Schools — Series  1908-1909.  Song 
Recital  by  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry  Clifford  Lott,  Temple  Auditor- 
ium, November  2.5th,  1908.  Organ — (a)  Consolation  (Men- 
delssohn); (b)  Largo  (Handel).  Songs:  (a)  Serenade  (Schu- 
bert); (bl  Evening  Star  "Tannhauser"  (Wagner):  (c)  The 
Two  Grenadiers  (Schumann);  (d)  Slumber  Song  (DacDowell); 
(e)  A  Maid  Sings  Light  (MacDowell).  Organ:  Pilgrim's 
Chorus  "Tannhauser"  (Wagner).  Song:  The  Toreador  Song 
(Carmen)  (Bizet).  Songs:  (a)  The  Little  Irish  Girl  (Lehr); 
(b)  The  Drum  Major  (Newton);  (c)  Off  to  Philadelphia  (Old 
Irish). 

Entertainment  Polytechnic  High  School  Auditorium.  Thurs- 
day, November  12th,  1908.  The  Krauss  String  Quartet — Ar- 
nold Krauss,  first  violin;  Oscar  Selling,  second  violin;  Julius 
Bierlich,  viola;  Ludwick  Opid,  cello.  Program:  Quartette 
Op.  44,  No.  3,  Molto  Allegro  Vivace  (Mendelssohn):  (a)  Trau- 
merei  (Schumann);  (b)  Canzonetta  (Victor  Herbert);  (c) 
Menuet  (Boccherini) ;  Death  and  the  Maiden  (Schubert);  (a) 
To  a  Wild  Rose  (MacDowell);  (b)  Menuet  (Beethoven);  (c) 
Serenata  (Moszkowski) ;  (a)  Au  bord  de  la  mer  (Dunkler); 
(b)   Humoreske   (Dvorak);    (c)   The  Been  (Francis  Schubert). 

Los  Angeles  High  School — Song  Recital,  Presented  by 
Charles  Farwell  Edson,  assisted  by  Mrs.  JI.  Hennion  Robin- 
son, pianist  and  accompaniste.  Program:  Love  me  or  Not 
(Secchi);  Rest  I've  None  by  Night  or  Day  (Mozart),  from  Don 
Giovanni;  The  Lass  With  the  Delicate  Air  (Arne);  The  Jester 
(Bantock);  To  Russia  (Homer);  Sweet  Eileen  (Greene); 
Rolling  Down  to  Rio  (German);  Indifferent  Marriner  (BuU- 
ard);  Go  Make  Thy  Garden  (Lynes);  On  the  Road  to  Manda- 
lay  (Irevannio);   Song  of  the  Sword-Tofana  (Cough-Leighton). 

Third  Recital  Grade  Schools — Simpson  Auditorium,  Wednes- 
day, January  20th,  1909,  by  Charles  Farwell  Edson,  basso  and 
Mrs.  M.  Hennion  Robinson,  pianiste.  "Rest  I've  None  by  Night 
or  Day,"  Don  Giovanni  (Mozart);  "Drink  to  Me  only  with 
Thine  Eyes,"  Philostratus  (Mozart);  "Life  and  Death,"  Whit- 
man (Neidlinger) ;  "Lass  with  the  Delicate  Air"  (Arne):  "To 
Russia,"  Joaquin  Miller  (Homer);  "Nancy  Lee,"  F.  E. 
Wheatherly,  M.  A.  (Adams);  "Believe  Me,  if  AH  These  En- 
dearing Young  Charms"  (Moore);  "The  Watch  on  the  Rhine," 
Schneckenberger  (Wilhelm);  Consolation:  "Spring  Song" 
(Mendelssohn);  Piano,  Mrs.  M.  Hennion  Robinson;  Scarf 
Dance  (Chaminade);  "Go  Make  Thy  Garden"  (Lynes);  "Three 
Little  Chestnuts"  (Page);  "Oh,  That  We  Two  Were  Maying," 
Kingsley  (Nevin);  "Rolling  Down  to  Rio,"  Kipling  (Ger- 
man); "Mother  Mine,"  Kipling  (Edson);  "Molly,"  Tesche- 
macher"  (Lohr);  "Armorer's  Song,"  Harry  B.  Smith  (De 
Koven). 

Fifth  Popular  Concert — Grade  Schools — Simpson  Auditorium. 

Wednesday,  March  24th,  1909.     Blanche  Ruby,  soprano;  W.  F. 

(Continued   on   Page   22.) 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


Mrs.  Grace  Davis  Northrup 

Soprano  Soloist  First  Congregational  Church,  Oaltland 
Concert,    Oratorio   and  Recital  Programs 

TEACHER    OF    SINGING 

R<^Md<^n<:c  Studio: 
I  333  Bay  View  Place,  Berkeley.  Phone  Berkeley  958 

Oakland  Studio:  65  MacDonough  BIdg.     Tuesday  and  Friday 

ROIVIEO  FRICIv 

BARYTONE 

Vocal  Instru<aion  After  ForemoA  European  Methods 

30-31  Canning  Block,  13th  and  Broadway.  Oakland 

Phone  Oak  6454  Phone  Home  a  1468 

Paul  Steindorff 

Studio,  2422  STUART  STREET 
Berkeley,  California 


Mrs.  'William  SteinbacH 

VOICE  CULTURE 

STUDIO:    1 528  Broderick  Si..  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


H.   D.   MUSTARD 

Baritone 

Voice  Culture  in  All  its  Branches 

Opera— Oratorio-Concert 
Studio,    1548  Haight  St.  Phone  Park  4117 


HERMAN   PERLET 

Voice  Culture  ai\<l  Piai\o 

Studio:    1451   Franklin  St.  Phone  Franklin  634 


Mrs.  "Walter  'WitHam 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 

Studio: 

1380  Sutter  Street  San 


Miss  Helen  Colburn  Heath 

SOPRANO 

Vocal  Instruction.  Concert  Work 
Phone  West  4890  1304  Ellis  Street 


'Wenceslao    V  illsi  1  pan  d  o 
Violor&cellist 

Concerts,  Musicales,  Ensemble  and  In^rudtion 
Tel.  Park  5329.  STUDIO:  746  CLAYTON  ST. 


DELIA.    B.    GRISM^OLD 

Contralto 

VOICE    CULTURE 
Phone  Park   1614  Res.  Studio.  845  Oak  St. 


FREDERICK    MAURER,    JR. 

A.ccoin  palmist 

Teacher  of  Piano- Harmony-Coaching-Singers-Violinifls 
Mondays.  1321  Sutter  St.  San  Francisco.     Tel.  Franklin  2143 
Home  Studio.  1726  LeRoy  Ave.  Berkeley.  Tel.  Berkeley  539 


FredericK  Stevenson 

Harmony  and  Composition 
Voice 

417  Blanchard  Hall  Los  Angeles,  Cal 


IMPORTANT    ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Beginning  with  the  issue  of  October 
2,  1909,  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Re- 
view will  be  increaseti  to  24  pages, 
which  size  will  occasionally  be  aug- 
mented to  32  pages...  This  will  enable 
the  management  to  add  several  new 
departments.  The  theatrical  depart- 
ment vvrill  occupy  two  full  pages,  and 
wrill  contain  straightforward,  unbiased 
and  honest  reviews  of  every  theatri- 
cal performance  of  merit  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. These  critical  opinions,  which 
will  not  be  controlled  by  the  business 
office,  will  serve  as  a  guide  to  our 
readers  in  Oakland,  Los  Angeles, 
Portland  and  Seattle,  and  all  interior 
cities  of  the  Pacific  Coast,  in  case 
these  cities  should  be  visited  by  com- 
panies first  appearing  in  San  Fran- 
cisco. 

Besides  this  reliable  theatrical  de- 
partment, the  Pacific  Coast  Musical 
Review  will  contain  a  page  of  late 
European  news,  and  a  page  of  the 
most  important  musical  news  from 
leading  Eastern  musical  centers.  The 
Los  Angeles,  Oakland,  Berkeley  and 
Alameda  departments  will  be  continu- 
ed as  usual,  while  more  attention  will 
be  paid  next  season  to  Portland  and 
Seattle.  Additional  features  of  the  in- 
creased edition  vnW  be  announced 
later. 

In  the  24-page  issue  advertising 
pages  will  be  limited  to  12  pages,  and 
anyon  applying  for  space  after  these 
12  pages  are  filled  must  wait  until  a 
vacancy  occurs.  Special  advertising 
rates  can  only  be  secured  by  those 
who  keep  their  advertisement  in  these 
columns  during  the  entire  year.  Those 
who  desire  to  withdraw  their  adver- 
tisement during  the  two  summer 
months  must  consent  to  pay  a  higher 
rate.  Rates  on  this  page  will  be  IN 
CASE  OF  ANNUAL  CONTRACTS: 
One  inch,  $1.00;  one-half  inch,  50c, 
and  "Musical  Directory,"  25  cents  per 
issue.  We  are  desirous  of  securing  as 
many  ANNUAL  ADVERTISERS  as 
possible,  and  hence  will,  during  the 
course  of  a  year,  give  such  annual  ad- 
vertisers repeated  use  of  the  reading 
columns  or  the  front  page.  Those 
who  do  not  advertise  at  all  will  not 
be  entitled  to  advance  notices  for  con- 
certs, insertions  of  pictures,  or  other 
advertising  matter.  They  will  only  re- 
ceive a  notice  after  a  concert. 


William  Hofmann 

Musical  Director  Fairmont  Hotel 


MRS.   A.   F.    BRIDGE 

Xeacher  of  Singing 

Tel.  West  7279  2220  Webster  St..  San  Francisco 


Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks 

Voice  Culture 

Studio:  Room  35.  Gaffnev  Bids  ,  376  Sutter  St.,  Wednes- 
days.   Res.:265Pamassus.^ve.  Tel.  Park  4190.    S.  F..  C.l. 


Alfred  Cogswell 

studio:  I  S3 1  Suiter,  San  Francisco,  on  luciday 
and  Friday,  and  at  21ic>  Durant  St., 
Berkeley,  on  Monday,  Thursday  and  Saturday 


MRS.  OLIVE  ORBISON 

Dramatic    iSoprai^o 

Voice  Culture  Concert  and  Oratorio 

2240  California  St.  — Phone  West  665V 


Mrs.  THorou^tnan 

Voice  Culture — Dramatic  iSonrano 

CONCERT— ORATORIO— OPERA 

Studio:   Room  109.  915  Van  Ness  Ave.      Tel.  Franklin  5254 


MRS.  M.  TROMBONI 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 

Studio.    1531    SUTTER  ST..  Mondays  and  Thursdays.      At 
Mill  Valley,  Keystone  Building.  Tuesday.  Wednesday.  Friday 


Mrs,    Olive   Reed   Cushman 

VOICE  CULTURE 

Studio.  Maple  Hall.  14th  and  Webster  Sts..  Oakland 
Tuesday  and    Friday  Phone  Oakland  3453 


EDNA    MURRAY 

Pianiste 

Concerts  Recitals  Lessons 

Iress:     .     .     .     Ross.  Marin  County.  Californi: 


LOUIS  CRE.PAUX 

(Member  Paris  Grand  Opera) 
Delbert  Block.  943  Van  Ness  at  O  Farrell.    Reception  Ho. 
I  1  :30  to  I  2.  and  3  to  4  except  Wednesday  and  Saturday 
Wednesday  in  Oakland.  I  I  54  Brush  Street 


BENJ.  S  MOORE 

t  and  Teacher     Organist  of  First  Presbyterian  Church) 
Rooms  22-23  Alliance  Building.  San  Jose.  California. 


Musical    Directory 


PIANO 


SIGISMONDO  MARTINEZ 
V.i-n  Sutter  St.  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


EULA  HOWARD 
239  4th  Avenue  Telephone  Pacific  214 


MISS   ELLA   LAWRIE 
1088  Fulton  St.,  S.  V.         Phone  West  7331 


ARTHUR   FICKEXSCHER 
1960  Sunnuit  St..  Oakland.    Tel.  Oak.  4206 


MRS.  ALICE  MASON   BARNETT 
1298  Haight  Street  Phone  Park  5831 


MRS.  RICHARD  REES 
817  Grove  Street  Phone  Park  5175 


MISS  CAROLINE  HALSTED  LITTLE 
3621  Bd'way.,Oak.   Phone  Piedmont  1390 


MRS.   ARTHUR   FICKENSCHER 
1960  Summit  St..  Oakland.     Tel.  Oak.  4206 


VIOUN 


PROF.  T.  D.  HERZOG 
1813  Ellis  St.  San  Francisco 


MANDOLIN,  LUTE  and  GUITAR 


SAMUEL  ADELSTEIN 
1834  Baker  Street  San  Francisco 


OLD  VIOUNS  and  BOWS 


GEO.   HUNTINGTON 
3366  Sacramento  St.      San  Francisco,  Cal. 


-Have     You     Seen     the     New- 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON  PIANO.? 


It  Appeals  Especially  to  Teachers  and  Students 
It  contains  Elegance,  Durability  and   Moderate  Price. 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON 


Kearny  St.  Near  Po^ 

San  Francisco,  Cal. 


22 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


(Continued  from  Page  20.) 
Skeele,  organist.  Euterpean  Quartet,  Normal  Scliool  Glee 
Club;  Mary  Burnham  Orcutt,  accompanist.  Program:  (a) 
Largo  (Handel),  (b)  Melody  in  F  (Rubinstein),  Mr.  Skeele; 
Star  of  Love  (Dudley  Buck  I.  Euterpean  Quartette;  Spring 
(G.  Henschel).  Miss  Blanche  Ruby;  The  Marseillaise — Words 
and  music  Claude  Rouget  de  Lisle,  Mr.  Dupuy  and  Euterpean 
Quartette.  1st  verse  in  French,  2nd  verse  in  English;  (a) 
Evening  Star.  "Tannhauser"  (Wagner),  (b)  Pilgrims'  Chorus, 
"Tannhauser"  (Wagner),  Mr.  Skeele;  (a)  You  and  I  (Liza 
Lehmann),  (b)  May  Morning  (Denza),  Miss  Blanche  Ruby; 
The  Old  Kentucky  Home  (Foster),  Euterpean  Quartette;  (a) 
A  June  Day  (C.  Whitney  Coombs),  (b)  A  Little  Dutch  Lullaby 
(Patty  Stair),  Normal  School  Glee  Club;  Overture — Tradella 
(Plotow). 

Sixth  Recital — Grade  School  Series — Simpson  Auditorium, 
Wednesday,  April  21st,  1909,  Los  Angeles  Woman's  Orchestra 
Harley  Hamilton,  conductor.  Program:  Grand  March  from 
"Aida"  (Verdi);  Finale  from  First  Symphony  (Beethoven); 
Selections  from  "II  Trovatore"  (Verdi);  (a)  Opening  of 
Second  Act  (Anvil  Chorus);  (a)  Prison  Scene  from  Fourth 
Act;  Humoreske  (Dvorak);  Sextette  from  "Lucia"  (Donizetti); 
Overture  to  "William  Tell"  (Rossini). 
*       *       * 

Now  the  above  will  give  an  idea  of  what  these  concerts  at 
the  public  schools  in  Los  Angeles  represented.  In  the  case 
of  the  song  recitals,  the  English  words  were  printed  in  con- 
nection with  the  program.  Everything  was  sung  in  English, 
thus  getting  the  youthful  audiences  accustomed  to  hearing 
their  own  language  sung  in  concerts.  On  every  program  was 
a  biographical  sketch  of  the  composer  whose  works  were 
presented,  thus  giving  the  students  regular  lessons  in  musical 
history.  Eye  witnesses  tell  us  that  the  children  were  exceed- 
ingly enthusiastic,  very  happy  and  very  fond  of  the  best  in 
music  as  was  revealed  by  their  judicious  demands  for  encores 
of  certain  things.  Now  Mr.  Moore  and  those  who  influence 
him  want  to  change  this  exceedingly  satisfactory  plan,  intro- 
duce therein  the  foreign  element  of  the  visiting  artist  and 
ruin  an  otherwise  beneficiary  educational  course,  because  they 
are  afraid  that  a  man  who  has  planned  all  this  might  get  a 
little  personal  advantage  from  it.  Surely  human  nature  is  a 
small  thing  and  needs  clarifying  pretty  badly 

The  Municipal  Band  Plans. — The  Supervisors  of  the  City 
and  County  of  Los  Angeles  have  voted  the  sum  of  $10,000 
to  be  expended  on  a  municipal  band  during  the  ensuing 
season.  The  Mayor  of  Los  Angeles  has  appointed  a 
commission  for  the  purpose  of  presenting  plans  how 
to  spend  this  money.  This  commission  consists  of  A. 
M.  Salyer,  representing  the  Chamber  of  Commerce;  E.  A. 
Geisler,  representing  the  Merchants  and  Manufacturers  Asso- 
ciation; Charles  F.  Edson,  representing  the  Gamut  Club;  F. 
W.  Blanchard,  representing  the  Art  Association;  and  Mr. 
Edminsten,  representing  the  Musicians'  Protective  Union.  So 
far  the  commission  has  decided  to  present  a  report  suggesting 
an  expenditure  of  at  least  $15,000  for  the  present  year  which 
would  enable  them  to  give  two  concerts  a  week  during  this 
season.  At  the  same  time  the  commission  will  suggest  that 
next  year  $25,000  should  be  devoted  to  the  cause  and  thus 
give  concerts  throughout  the  year.  Of  course  the  pivot 
around  which  the  entire,  contention  revolves  is  the  band 
leader.  One  faction  desires  to  see  Mr.  Hamilton  or  Mr. 
Ohlmeier,  both  resident  musicians  in  the  saddle,  while  another 
faction  wants  to  get  Leandro  Campanari  for  the  job.  It  is 
possible  that  Mr.  Hamilton,  by  reason  of  the  dignity  conferred 
on  him  as  leader  of  the  Los  Angeles  Symphony  Orchestra,  will 
decline  to  lead  a  Municipal  Band  at  the  same  time.  Anyway 
such  acceptation  might  hamper  his  symphony  plans.  This 
would  leave  the  choice  between  Mr.  Ohlmeier,  a  competent 
local  musician  and  Leandro  Campanari,  an  interloper  of  the 
most  vicious  type. 

It  is  needless  to  prove  that,  if  any  man  is  appointed,  a  local 
musician  should  receive  the  preference.  We  are  not  making 
any  suggestions,  but  simply  express  our  opinion  from  the 
standpoint  of  the  policy  of  a  California  paper  which  stands  up 
for  California  musicians.  Mr.  Campanari  has  no  right  to  this 
position,  because  in  the  first  place,  he  has  never  proved  to  be 
an  accomplished  band  leader;  and  in  the  second  place,  he  has, 
ever  since  his  advent  in  Los  Angeles,  sneered  at  local 
musicians,  brazenly  pronounced  his  superiority  and  done  every- 
thing possible  to  sow  discord  in  local  musical  circles.  He  has 
endeavoured  to  deprive  deserving  musicians  of  organizations 
which  they  have  built  up  in  years.  He  has  endeavoured  to 
belittle  artists  whose  reputation  has  been  established.  He 
has  done  everything  possible  to  wrest  positions  from  local 
people  who,  by  right  of  possession,  were  entitled  to  them.  He 
has  tried  to  do  this,  even  to  the  extent  of  trying  to  obtain  the 
symphony  orchestra  leadership  under  the  plea  that  deserving 


artists  who  locate  in  a  city  should  receive  the  advantage  of 
progressive  spirit.  In  our  opinion,  Mr.  Campanari  is  not  eflR- 
cient  enough  nor  great  enough  to  be  entitled  to  this  privilege, 
and  if  the  citizens  of  Los  Angeles  cannot  distinguish  between 
a  foreign  braggart  and  a  meritorious  fellow  citizen  they 
deserve  to  reap  the  consequences  of  their  gullibility. 
(To  Be  Concluded  Next  Week.) 
V* 


MADAME  MAYNE  WINDSOR'S  CONCERT  TOUR. 

Delightful   Concert   Soprano    Has   Been    Booked    By   a   Chicago 

Bureau   and   Will   Tour   Eastern   Cities   Until   the 

End  of  This  Year. 


The  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  is  in  receipt  of  a  hand- 
somely illustrated  announcement  containing  press  comments 
and  the  repertoire  of  Madame  Mayne  Windsor,  the  brilliant 
concert  soprano  of  Los  Angeles.  Mme.  Windsor  left  for  Chi- 
cago last  Thursday,  October  7th,  in  order  to  resume  a  con- 
cert tour,  under  the  direction  of  the  Redpath  Lyceum  Bureau, 
including  about  forty  engagements.  The  tour  will  extend  until 
December  20th  of  this  year.  In  this  tour  Mme.  Windsor  will 
be  associated  with  May  Shumway  Enderly,  the  eloquent  and 
versatile  monologuiste,  and  both  will  appear  upon  the  regular 
Lyceum  courses,  as  well  as  before  leading  Women's  Clubs 
and  under  regular  theatrical  managers,  wherever  such  man- 
agement may  be  convenient.  Among  more  important  musical 
centers  to  be  visited  by  Mme.  Windsor  will  be  Chicago,  Kan- 
sas City,  Denver,  Salt  Lake  City,  Colorado  Springs.  Council 
Bluffs  and  Marshalltown.  In  Chicago  the  two  artists  will 
appear  before  the  Press  Club. 

Mme.  Windsor  has  selected  a  particularly  choice  program 
to  be  presented  on  this  tour.  The  repertoire  will  include 
arias  from  "Lucia,"  "Rigoletto,"  "La  Tosca,"  "La  Boheme," 
"Magic  Flute,"  a  number  of  English,  German.  French  and 
Spanish  songs,  and  as  a  novelty  this  efficient  cantatrice  will 
present  several  of  the  Indian  songs  arranged  by  Troyer. 
Mme.  Windsor  sings  these  songs  in  the  Yuni  language  and 
they  have  been  received  enthusiastically  in  Los  Angeles  and 
other  Southern  California  towns  where  Mme.  Windsor  had  an 
opportunity  to  present  them.  Previous  to  her  departure  from 
Los  Angeles  Mme.  Windsor  gave  a  most  successful  afternoon 
of  song  before  the  Crescent  Bay  Club  of  Ocean  Park. 


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THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN    THE    GREAT    WEST 
^     PUBLISHED     EVERY    WE.EK    C^ 


VOL.  XVII.  No.  4 


SAN  FRANCISCO.  SATURDAY.  OCTOBER  23.  1909 


PRICE  10  CENTS 


ALBERT     ROSENTHAL 

The  Successful  San  Francisco  Cello  Virtuoso,  Who  Will  Give  a  Concert 

at  Lyric  Hall  on  Wednesday  Evening,  November  3d,  After 

Many  Triumphs  in   Europe  and   America. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    It  E  V  I  E  W 


Entire  Fifth  Floor  of  Sherman,  Clay  &  Go's.  San  Francisco  Store. 
Devoted  to  Steinway  Pianos 


Sherman  liiay&  Co. 

STEINWAY  AND  OTHER  PIANOS  PLAYER  PIANOS  OF  ALL  GRADES 

VICTOR  TALKING  MACHINES 

Kearny  and    Sutter  Streets,   San   Francisco 
Fourteenth  and  Clay  Streets,  Oakland 

Sacramento.    Fresno,    San    Jose,    Stockton,    Bakersfield,    Santa    Rosa, 
Portland.  Seattle,  Spokane,  Tacoma,  Etc. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


-_  PAOI FIG  COAST 

Musical  <l^ei?ieu>' 


its    tliousaiids    or   ;i(liiiiiiii<i    visiiors    in    a    inaiiiier    as 
only  Sail  Fniucisco  c-au  entertain  lliein. 


ALFRED  METZGER 


EDITOR 


DAVID    H.   M^VLKER    - 
JOSEPH    M.    CUMMING 


Assistant   Eillto 
Dramatic   Editn 


San  Francisco  Office 

Shernnan,  Clay  &  Co.  Building,  Kearny  and  Sutter  Sts..  Mezzanine 

Floor.   Kearny-St.   Side.     Telephone.   Kearny  4000. 

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SATURDAY.  OCTOBER  23.   190B 


The    PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW    Is    for    sale   at    the 
sheet-music  departments  of  all  leading  music  stores. 

Entered  as  second-class  mail  matter  at  the  San  Francisco  Postofnce. 


SUBSCRIPTIONS — Annually  In  advance,   Including   postage: 

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IMPORTANT    NOTICE 
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and  Saturdays.     In  case  of  unforeseen  absence  of  editor  during  office 
hours,  leave  note  on  desk  making  appointment.     Always  leave  name 
and  address  or  telephone  number. 

ADVERTISING    RATES: 

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One  Inch    (on   Page   21) 1.50  1.00 

One-Half    Inch     (on    Page    21) 75  .50 

Musical    Directory    50  .25 

MUSICAL  CALENDAR   1909-10. 
Sousa  and  his  Band  (Dreamland  Rink).. Nov.  4  and  7.  aft.  &  eve. 
Mme.  Jean  Jomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  House  Co.)  .Week  of  Nov.  14 

Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner Nov.   23,  25  and  28 

George   Hamlin    (American   Tenor) Dec.   2,   5   and   7 

Fritz   Kreisler Dec.   12,   16   and   19 

Lyric  Quartette   Pop  Concert Com.   in    January 

Marcella   Sembrich Week   of   Jan.    9 

Myrtle    Elvin    (Pianiste) February 

Teresa   Carreno First    Week    of   February 

Madame   Schumann-Heink Com.   Sunday,   Feb.   13 

Mme.  Tilly  Koenen   (the  famous  Dutch  contralto) March 

Pepito  Arriolo   (the  Spanish  child  Violinist) March 

Maud    Powell April 

Flonzaley   Quartet    (in   Chamber  Music) April 

Damrosch   Symphony  Orchestra  and  Isadora   Duncan May 


THE    PORTOLA    FESTIVAL. 

Notwitlistanding  tlie  fact  that  the  historical  reason 
for  this  week's  Portola  Festival  is  the  discovery  of  tlie 
Bay  of  San  Francisco  in  177(),  the  actnal  basis  upon 
which  the  celebration  rests  is  the  restoration  of  San 
Francisco  after  virtually  complete  destruction  in 
the  fire  of  April  18,  1900.  Indeed,  had  it  not 
been  for  the  fact  of  this  wonderful  recujieration  after 
one  of  the  oreatest  disasters  the  world  has  ever  simmi, 
(iaspar  de  I'ortola,  the  first  (tovernor  of  California, 
would  never  have  been  thought  of  and  hardly  any 
resident  of  San  Francisco  could  ever  have  told  you 
the  year  in  which  the  Bay  of  San  Francisco  was  dis- 
covered. And  so,  we  siipjiose,  tiie  excuse  of  the  dis- 
covery of  this  l?ay  serves  as  well  as  any  other  to  tell 
the  world  at  large  that  a  rejuvenated,  richer,  more 
ambitious  and  more  optimistic  San  Francisco  than 
ever  has  taken  her  place  among  the  world's  great 
metropolitan  centers  and  is  again  ready  to  entertain 


And  in  the  same  si)irit  in  which  we  accept  the  dis- 
covery of  the  Bay  of  San  Francisco  as  an  excuse  to 
celebrate  the  city's  apotheosis  we  may  accept  the 
S]mnish  national  colors,  in  the  decorations,  the  foreign 
atmosphere  in  the  nomenclature,  and  indeed  all  the 
glitter  of  royalty  and  matters  e(iually  foreign  to  the 
spirit  of  American  national  character  and  American 
Statehood.  While  we  might  have  preferred  some- 
thing more  typical  of  the  modern  spirit  of  California 
and  the  romantic  symbolism  that  has  ever  graced  this 
(lolden  State  and  its  atmosphere  of  Sunsliine,  Fruit 
and  Flowers,  we  may  as  \\ell  bury  individual  o]>inion 
beneath  the  ever  insjiiring  and  almost  marvelous  evolu- 
tion from  chaos  into  order,  from  despair  into  lia])pi- 
ness,  from  destitution  into  lu-osjierity,  and  while  not 
exactly  enlightened  as  to  (Jaspar  de  I'ortola's  respon- 
sibility in  these  wonderful  changes,  we  will  gladly 
grasp  the  old  gentleman's  hand  and  exclaim  witii 
beaming  countenance:  "Well,  old  IVIlow,  we  are  mighty 
glad  to  see  you.  \\'e  don't  know  why  you  have  come 
Iiere  and  A\hy  we  are  so  glad,  but  we  are  glad  to  see 
you  just  the  same,  and  bid  you  welcome." 

And  wi/h  the  same  good  natured  acceptance  of  old 
Caspar's  introduction  into  the  restoration  of  San  Fran- 
cisco, we  welcome  (^ueen  \'irgilia.  We  do  not  exactly 
know  what  Queen  she  rei>resents  and,  being  told  that 
she  rei)resents  the  (^ueen  of  Spain  we  are  jiuzzhMl  as 
to  the  relation  between  the  (^ueen  of  Sjiaiii  and  the 
restoration  of  San  Francisco,  we  take  the  I'ortola  Coiii- 
mitlee's  word  for  it,  and  are  as  glad  to  welcome  (^ueen 
\'irgilia  as  we  are  to  pronounce  I'ortola  with  the  ac- 
cent on  the  last  syllable,  and  would  even  pronounce 
Alamed.-i  in  the  same  way  if  Chairman  1'.  T.  Clay  of 
the  I'ortola  Committee  would  ask  it  of  us  with  that 
engaging  smile  of  his. 

AVe  care  naught  about  the  past.  The  present  and 
tlie  future  is  our  object.  We  realize  the  wcinderful  re- 
construction of  this  beautiful  metro])olis.  A\'(>  are 
liappy  that  it  has  lecuiierated  from  its  temporary  in- 
disposition. \\'e  rejoice  in  the  uni(nie  t'uture  in  store 
for  the  Stale  and  city.  We  are  happy  that  we  live  in 
a  community  so  ju-ogressive,  so  ambitious,  so  optimis- 
tic, so  proud  and  so  artistic  as  this,  and  our  joy  is 
given  materialization  by  the  pageants,  the  colors,  the 
electric  lights,  the  fireworks,  the  ceremonies  and  every- 
thing rei)resented  in  the  carnival  spirit.  And  if  Gas- 
par  de  I'ortola  and  the  (^uen  of  Spain  have  nothing 
to  do  with  modern  California  enter[U'ise  no  one  cares 
a  rap — at  least  we  don't — do  you'.' 

w-^ 

DECLINE    IN   THEATRE   AND  CONCERT   ATTENDANCE. 


If  the  'I'lieatrical  .Managers'  Association  of  San  Fran- 
cisco believes  that  the  jiresent  decline  in  attendance  at 
theatrical  ])erformauces  is  only  a  temporary  condition, 
the  gentlemen  c(uistitutiiig  that  organization  are  sadly 
mistaken.  The  public's  gradual  disinclination  to  ex- 
pend large  amounts  of  money  to  gratify  the  greed  for 
wealth  among  a  few  men  who  have  virtually  monopol- 
ized the  amusement  market  of  the  Ciiited  States  of 
America  has  evolved  from  a  series  of  circumstances 
that  opened  the  eyes  of  the  people  to  the  effect  tluit  they 
have  been  im])osed  ujion.  The  old  saying  that  "you 
can  fool  all  of  the  people  some  of  tlie  time,  some  of 
the  people  all  of  the  time,  but  you  can't  fool  all  of 
the  people  all  of  the  time,"  has  been  strikingly  verified 


P  A  C  I  F  I  (J    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


in  this  gnuhial  but  ijei-inaneut  disiiu-lination  on  the 
part  of  the  people  to  pay  unreasonable  admission  prices 
for  performances  whose  merit  is  not  in  conforniance 
with  the  glowing  promises  made  bv  ambitious  jiross 
agents  and  greedy  managers. 


We  are  thoroughly  convinced  that  the  American  pub- 
lic is  gradually  becoming  enlightened  in  the  siinie  man- 
ner as  the  European  ])ublic  has  long  ago  become  en- 
lightened regarding  the  true  intrinsic  value  of  theatri- 
cal and  musical  performances.  A  few  years  ago  it  was 
not  considered  unreasonable  on  the  part  of  a  manager 
to  charge  two  dollars  for  a  theatrical  perfornuince  on 
the  plea  that  it  was  produced  in  the  so-called  leading 
theatre,  that  it  came  from  the  East,  and  tiiat  it  had 
seen  several  hundred  performances  in  New  York  or 
Chicago.  Today  the  attitude  of  the  public  is  altogether 
different.  A  production  must  be  sensationally  adver- 
tised to  crowd  a  hou.se,  and  even  then  this  abnormal 
entliusiasm  would  be  found  sadly  lacking  if  a  jiroduc- 
tion  iiisi)iring  the  same  would  make  another  bid  for 
supi)ort  in  the  same  community.  Jlr.  Savage,  for  in- 
stance, very  skillfully  aroused  the  curiosity  of  the 
American  people  in  regard  to  the  "Merry  Widow"  and 
succeeded  in  gaining  for  it  a  spasmodic,  abnormal  and 
unhealthy  enthusiasm,  which  cannot  under  any  pos- 
sible stretch  of  the  imagination  be  of  any  jirolonged 
duration,  because  the  very  insistence  with  which  it 
was  crammed  down  the  throat  of  a  palpitating,  gasp- 
ing multitude  carried  with  it  the  inevitable  nausea  at- 
tendant upon  an  overloaded  stomach,  be  the  same  of 
intellectual  or  physical  character. 

And  this  is  the  sort  of  theatrical  diet  with  which  the 
American  public  has  been  fed  of  late — sensational  suc- 
cesses cleverly  advertised  by  exaggerating  press  agents 
and  forced  into  popularity  by  reason  of  one  or  two  ad- 
vantageous features  sufficiently  clever  to  please  the 
masses.  In  this  manner  we  find  a  musical  comedy  of 
the  Eddy  Foy-Frank  Daniels-De  Wolf  Hopiier-Jimmy 
Powers  type  enjoy  spasmodic  prosperity  until  the  i)ub- 
lic,  thoroughly  satiated,  has  had  enough  of  the  swindle 
and  stays  at  home  hugging  its  hard  earned  dollars. 
Then  we  have  that  most  disastrous  of  all  evils — the 
star  system.  An  actor  or  actress  who  has  gained  popti- 
lar  favor  through  the  exposition  of  a  role  particularly 
suited  to  his  or  her  capabilities  is  immediately  picked 
up,  put  upon  a  jtedestal  and  uuirked  "Star."'  Then  a 
I)laywright  is  commissioner  to  write  a  play  bringing 
out  the  best  jtoints  of  the  star's  peculiar  talents.  Then 
a  company — mostly  a  cheap  road  company — is  selected 
to  support  the  star,  and  pains  are  taken  to  engage  peo- 
ple inferior  to  the  well  advertised  central  figure  so  that 
the  latter 's  favorable  points  may  be  enij)hasized  and  so 
the  public  is  asked  to  witness  a  play  written  to  order, 
presented  by  a  man  or  woman  with  a  limited  ability 
and  supported  by  a  cast  as  near  the  mediocre  line  as 
possible.  This  u.sed  to  be  the  Xat  (Joodwin — John 
Drew— E.  H.  Sothern— Maxine  Elliott— William  Gil- 
ette — Henry  Miller — Margaret  Anglin  and  others  like 
these — type  of  play.  During  the  last  two  weeks  we 
Iiave  had  an  example  of  such  a  play  and  star  in  the 
P>illie  P.urke  engagement.  Here  is  a  young  woman 
who  made  a  success  as  an  ingenue  in  John  Drew"s 
company,  and  because  of  it  she  was  jiicked  up,  a  play 
written  ai-ound  her,  and  what  would  have  made  a  de- 
lightful ingenue  in  a  sjilendid  company  was  ruined  by 
an  insatiable  desire  to  rake  in  the  dollars  by  means 
of  the  star  system.  But  these  written  loorder  and 
".star"  performances  have  also  become  largely  a  mailer 
of  inditterence  to  the  public,  and  instances  of  united 


sui)port  in   their  inlcrcsts  are  Itecoming  less  and   less 
apparent. 

And  so  we  ha\('  shown  how  musical  extravaganzas, 
comic  operas,  written-to-order  comedies  and  dramas 
lia\e  gradually  been  so  tlioronghly  over-produced  that 
even  a  popular  actor  or  actress  elevated  to  star.ship 
can  not  arouse  for  them  even  a  pa.ssing  interest.  And 
now  we  come  to  the  third  point  resi)onsible  for  this 
declination  of  public  interest  in  the  high-priced  theatre. 
The  vaudeville  circuit,  the  moving  jiicture  shows  and 
similar  entertainments  have  awakened  in  the  public 
mind  the  conviction  tliat  in  order  to  be  entertained  it 
is  not  necessary  to  pay  two  dollars  a  seat.  It  is  pos- 
sible nowadays  to  spend  a  pleasant  evening  at  a  place 
of  amusement  for  a  jirice  of  admission  ranging  from 
five  cents  to  seventy-five  cents.  There  is  no  use  arguing 
with  the  public  on  the  variety  in  quality  of  these  per- 
formances. We  know  of  very  intelligent  people  wlio 
consider  a  performance  at  the  Orpheum  far  .superior 
to  most  of  the  jierformances  at  the  Van  Xess  Theatre. 
And  in  most  instances  these  jieople  are  right.  At  the 
Orpheum  they  often  may  listen  to  comic  opera,  comedy, 
burlesque,  drama,  concert  and  witness  athletics  dur- 
ing one  evening.  At  the  Van  Xess  Theatre,  while  pay- 
ing over  twice  as  much  money,  they  can  only  listen  to 
one  kind  of  a  performance.  The  consequence  is  that 
at  the  Ori)heum  packed  houses  are  the  rule,  while  at 
the  ^'an  Xess  Theatre  ])itifully  empty  seats  spread 
desolation  among  the  handful    of    people    assembled. 


Of  course  tlie  theatrical  managers  will  not  continue 
to  stand  idly  by  and  let  the  public  attend  cheap 
theatres  while  the  leading  theatres  remain  vacant. 
There  is  only  one  way  of  meeting  such  competition, 
and  that  is  by  bringing  the  i)rices  down  to  the  wishes 
of  the  people  and  raising  the  character  of  the  perfor- 
mances by  securing  good  plays,  written  for  a  complete 
cast  of  efficient  players,  and  thus  meet  the  public  de- 
mand for  evenly  balanced  performances  of  a  certain 
artistic  merit.  In  order  to  achieve  this  result  it  will 
become  necessary  to  cut  out  the  nuisance  of  extrava- 
gant salaries  for  stars  and  engage  competent  people 
at  fair  compensation,  from  the  leading  man  down  to 
the  "super."  Xothing  in  the  nature  of  freak  perfor- 
mances could  attract  anything  like  monster  support 
in  Europe,  and  gradually  America  is  settling  down  to 
this  same  condition  of  demanding  evenly  balanced  pro- 
ductions of  an  un(iuestionably  literary  or  musical 
merit  at  a  price  of  admission  within  the  reach  of 
evervbodw 


It  must  not  be  forgotten  that  the  two  dollars  charged 
for  each  seat  is  not  all  the  expenditure  connected  with 
a  theatrical  or  musical  entertainment.  There  is  fre- 
quently an  after-theatre  luncheon,  which  quite  frequent- 
ly brings  a  four-dollar  entertainment  up  to  eight  or 
ten  dollars.  A  good  many  jieople  consider  the  after- 
theatre  luncheon  as  a  part  of  tlie  evening's  entertain- 
ment, and  would  not  dream  of  doing  without  one  or 
the  other.  X"ow,  if  eight  or  ten  dollars  is  too  much 
money  to  spend  on  one  evening,  the  people  will  cut  out 
one  or  the  other.  At  present  they  cut  out  the  Van 
Xess  Theatre  and  attend  the  Orpheum,  Alcazar,  Prin- 
cess, \'alencia  or  Garrick,  wli(»r(»  they  can  listen  to  a 
delightful  i)erformance  at  less  than  two  dollars.  And 
this  will  continue  just  so  long  as  the  Van  Xess  Theatre 
jtresents  disgracefully  inefficient  productions  at  top- 
notch  prices.  Some  day  the  management  will  wake  up 
and  recognize  the  truth  of  these  assertions,  and  we 
hope  by  that  time  it  will  not  be  too  late. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


THE  EDITOR'S  PRIVATE  NOTEBOOK 


A  CHAT  WITH    MAUD  FAY. 


Distinguished    San    Francisco    Diva     Talks     Interestingly     and 

Convincingly  of  Vocal   Study  and  the   Efficiency  of   Her 

First  Teacher  IVIadame  Anna  von   Meyerinck. 


The  ordinary  interview,  as  it  appears  in  tlie  Sunday  news- 
papers, is  usually  the  result  of  an  at  random  selection  among 
the  various  actors  or  actresses  appearing  on  the  local  stages 
during  the  current  week.  Inasmuch  as  hardly  at  any  time  there 
may  be  found  among  these  people  anyone  sufficiently  promi- 
nent or  sufficiently  intelligent  to  justify  devoting  an  entire 
page  to  a  chat  which  should  contain  valuable  information,  it 
is  but  reasonable  to  conclude  that  these  interviews  are  most- 
ly a  waste  of  space.  I  am  certain  that  the  average  reader 
very  rarely  takes  the  time  to  read  an  interview,  and  the  truly 
competent  newspaper  man  despises  it  as  he  would  the  plague. 
It  has  become  as  much  of  a  nuisance  as  the  comic  picture 
section,  and  is  apparently  only  retained  because  the  business 
manager  possesses  the  erroneous  conviction  that  the  readers 
want  such  stuff.  The  fallacy  of  the  daily  newspaper  inter- 
view is  easily  apparent  when  an  artist  of  real  merit  comes 
to  San  Francisco,  and  when  this  artist  may  be  interviewed 
in  such  a  manner  as  to  divulge  information  not  only  inter- 
esting to  the  average  reader,  but  exceedingly  instructive  and 
valuable  to  those  students  of  art  who  look  upon  a  great  artist 
as  one  who  has  conquered  a  world,  and  thereby  has  achieved 
a  victory  which  they  themselves  are  eager  to  attain.  In  other 
words,  a  great  artist,  victorious  in  his  or  her  battles,  has 
many  things  to  say  that  would  eagerly  be  perused  by  thou- 
sands of  hungry  souls.  And  so  we  find  the  condition  among 
the  daily  newspapers  of  San  Francisco  so  deplorable  that 
when  an  artist  who  has  achieved  such  brilliant  triumphs  as 
Maud  Fay,  prima  donna  soprano  of  the  Royal  Opera  in 
Munich  (and  a  San  Franciscan),  that  the  whole-page  Sunday 
interviews  are  devoted  to  the  Valerie  Bergeres  of  Orpheum 
fame  and  the  Billie  Burkes  of  ingenue  reputation.  Neither 
of  these  two  are  really  worthy  of  an  entire  page  in  a  big 
daily  newspaper,  because  neither  of  these  two  lias  anything 
valuable  to  tell  the  public. 

It  is  true  one  or  two  daily  newspapers  gave  Maud  Fay  cer- 
tain space,  giving  information  about  her  arrival,  the  length 
of  her  visit,  her  success  in  Munich  and  additional  personal 
matters.  At  no  time,  however,  did  these  reports  contain  in- 
formation of  that  value  to  music  students  and  to  music  lovers 
which  a  successful  artist  like  Miss  Fay  could  divulge  were 
she  permitted  to  tell  them  in  print.  We  know  positively  that 
Miss  Fay  says  enough  in  a  half  hour's  conversation  to  give 
an  intelligent  writer  enough  material  for  two  pages  in  a  daily 
paper.  And  so  having  noticed  this  deplorable  lack  of  infor- 
mation gathered  by  the  reporters  of  the  daily  newspapers 
from  Miss  Fay,  we  thought  it  but  a  duty  to  the  readers  of 
this  paper  to  discover  personally  whether  Miss  Fay  had  really 
nothing  to  say  or  whether  the  reporters  had  not  sufficient  in- 
telligence to  differentiate  between  that  which  is  valuable  and 
that  which  is  less  inclined  to  wet  the  reader's  appetite  for 
news.  And  so  we  took  the  necessary  steps  to  arrange  an 
appointment  with  Miss  Fay,  and  as  we  supposed  the  diva 
tells  innumerable  little  things  which  are  of  inestimable  value 
to  students  and  to  music  lovers,  but  which  the  reporters 
evidently  did  not  consider  sufficiently  important  to  introduce 
in  their  articles. 

Before  the  actual  commencement  of  the  interview  I  could 
tell  that  Miss  Fay  really  has  become  a  great  artist.  In  the 
first  place,  she  does  not  rise  until  the  noon  hour,  and  in  the 
second  place,  she  has  everyone  around  her  paying  that  hom- 
age which  a  King  or  Queen  (be  it  of  song  or  politics)  usually 
receives  from  everyone.  I  have  known  Miss  Fay  in  her  pre- 
European  days,  and  even  then  she  had  that  regal  carriage 
and  that  superior  mental  attitude  that  divides  the  genius 
from  the  commonplace,  and  so  my  anticipations  prevented 
either  awe  or  surprise.  If  you  should  meet  Miss  Fay  now, 
after  her  big  success,  you  will  find  her  the  same  in  her  hand- 
some, strikingly  commanding  personality  and  in  her  direct, 
straight-from-the-shoulder  views  of  conditions  and  people. 
With  a  ringing  and  penetrating  voice  of  musical  modulation 
she  hammers  her  ideas  into  your  mind  with  tack-hammer-like 
force,  and  by  splendid  arguments  she  rivets  them  on  the  other 
side  so  that  you  cannot  fail  to  retain  them  and  recognize  their 
value.     I  could  listen  to  Miss  Fay  for  days  and  weeks  without 


becoming  weary,  because  she  talks  incessantly  such  a  volume 
of  common  sense,  such  a  series  of  logical  conclusions  and 
matter-of-fact  conditions  that  merely  listening  to  her  con- 
vinces one  that  she  has  not  only  studied,  but  that  she  has 
devoted  a  great  deal  of  her  time  to  self-education,  to  the  dis- 
section of  human  nature,  and  above  all,  to  the  study  of  all 
those  things  that  combine  to  make  art  a  noble  and  magni- 
ficent intellectual  power. 

*  *       « 

"The  trouble  with  the  young  American  student,  and  es- 
pecially the  young  women,"  said  Miss  Fay,  "is,  that  they  are 
too  ambitious.  They  seem  to  think  that  all  they  have  to  do 
is  to  go  abroad  for  a  year  or  two,  take  lessons  from  a  promi- 
nent teacher  and  then  go  on  the  stage  or  upon  the  concert 
platform  and  earn  thousands  of  dollars.  There  is  no  art  in 
existence  that  puts  such  strenuous  demands  upon  the  student 
as  the  vocal  art.  And  the  most  important  feature  of  this  art 
is  the  correct  placing  of  the  voice.  As  a  matter  of  fact,  it 
takes  several  years  to  bring  the  voice  in  that  condition  where 
it  is  no  effort  to  sing,  where  vocal  declamation  becomes  as 
easy  as  talking,  and  where  all  danger  is  passed  as  to  sudden 
loss  of  voice  or  frequent  stubbornness  of  the  vocal  chords. 
Indeed,  unless  the  voice  is  properly  placed  no  singer  can  ever 
hope  to  become  permanently  successful.  The  placing  of  the 
voice  is  an  art  in  itself,  and  only  few  teachers  have  mastered 
it.  If  the  student  really  is  serious  regarding  his  or  her  artistic 
triumphs  it  is  necessary  to  undergo  a  long  and  strenuous 
period  of  voice  placing  and  of  getting  the  vocal  chords  in  that 
condition  which  brings  them  under  the  command  of  the 
singer's  mind.  .Any  student  who  desires  to  study  singing 
upon  the  get-rich-quick  plan  can  never  accomplish  much  in 
the  world  of  art. 

*  *       * 

"I  can  not  emphasize  too  strongly  the  fact  that  I  could 
never  liave  succeeded  as  quickly  as  I  did  had  I  not  had  the 
proper  foundation  right  here  in  San  Francisco,  before  going 
abroad.  Had  Mrs.  von  Meyerinck  not  trained  me  in  a  way 
that  was  according  to  the  principles  of  correct  music  study 
I  could  never  have  continued  where  I  stopped  here,  but  would 
have  been  compelled  to  devote  a  long  time  to  learn  many 
things  all  over  again.  In  Europe  the  teacher  takes  it  for 
granted  that  the  student  possesses  higher  intellectual  powers 
than  he  actually  does.  It  the  teacher  tells  the  pupil  a  cer- 
tain technical  fact  connected  with  singing  he  expects  such 
pupil  to  understand  what  he  means  and  without  giving  the 
reason  why  such  a  fact  exists.  Unless  a  vocal  student  is  told 
why  such  and  such  a  thing  is  the  case  he  can  never  fix  it  so 
thoroughly  in  his  mind  as  he  can  when  a  reason  is  given  him 
for  every  technical  point.  Many  vocal  students  with  splendid 
material  are  ruined,  because  the  teacher  assumes  that  they 
have  more  intelligence  than  they  actually  possess  and  that 
they  grasp  a  meaning  far  readier  than  they  actually  do.  In 
this  manner  teacher  and  student  misunderstand  each  other 
and  the  teacher  is  always  blamed  for  the  incapacity  of  the 
student,  when  as  a  matter  of  fact  quite  often  the  lack  of 
application  and  absorption  on  the  part  of  the  student  is  re- 
sponsible for  his  failure  to  imitate  the  teacher's  illustration. 
And  so  Mrs.  von  Meyerinck  had  prepared  me  in  a  manner 
where  I  could  readily  grasp  what  was  told  me  by  Madame 
Orgeni  without  asking  unnecessary  questions  and  without  be- 
ing injured  by  a  system  that  demands  merely  following  in- 
structions and  not  asking  reasons  why. 

*  *       * 

"And  with  all  my  preparation,  with  all  my  years  of  study, 
it  still  required  three  months  of  technical  instruction  before 
Madame  Orgeni  would  even  think  of  permitting  me  to  begin 
repertoire  study.  When  the  placing  of  the  voice  is  complete 
then  begins  the  battle  of  the  study  of  repertoire,  which  in  it- 
self is  a  very  long  and  hard  struggle.  Here,  too,  Madame  von 
Meyerinck  had  prepared  me  advantageously  and  saved  me  a 
long  period  of  unnecessary  worry.  As  a  rule  when  students 
sing  for  European  masters  they  select  a  florid  operatic  aria. 
They  could  not  commit  a  graver  error.  A  truly  great  teacher 
will  immediately  tell  them  to  stop  and  will  regard  them  in 
disgust.  What  a  serious  musician  in  Europe  demands  is  a 
knowledge  of  classic  songs,  and  here  I  came  to  Europe  with 
a  repertoire  of  one  hundred  and  twenty-two  songs  which,  at 
that  time,  proved  of  immense  benefit  to  me,  for  I  knew  how 
to  sing  them  correctly,  to  the  satisfaction  of  all  the  people  1 
sang  for,  and  which  even  now  I  use  in  my  concert  programs. 
I  not  only  knew  how  to  sing  those  songs,  but  I  had  learned 
them  by  heart,  which  always  makes  a  deep  impression  upon 
the  musical  scholar. 

*  *       * 

"The  benefit  of  my  tuition  in  San  Francisco  extended  even 
as  far  ahead  as  my  stage  career.  In  Europe  you  have  no 
opportunity  to  study  ensemble  singing.  You  are  taught  your 
roles  and  your  songs,  but  you  never  sing  together  with  any- 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


one  else.  The  result  is  that  in  the  event  of  a  public  perfor- 
mance you  are  asked  to  meet  an  entirely  new  condition  at  a 
time  when  you  are  already  unstrung  and  when  your  nerves 
are  at  high  pitch.  Still  you  are  expected  to  sing  in  ensemble 
in  the  same  manner  as  you  sing  your  solo.  So  that  in  the 
event  of  operatic  performances  you  never  sing  with  orchestra 
and  chorus,  and  all  the  scenic  and  technical  effects  until  the 
evening  of  the  performance.  Here  Mrs.  von  Meyerinck's  ex- 
cellent method  of  ensemble  study  proved  of  inestimable  value 
to  me,  and  I  could  never  be  too  grateful  for  having  had  that 
experience.  Furthermore,  the  study  of  harmony,  which  no 
"But  there  is  one  particular  point  that  can  only  be  gained  in 
America,  and  which  is  impossible  to  achieve  in  Europe,  and 
that  is  thorough,  conscientious,  vigorous  character  training. 
This  cannot  be  done  any  better  anywhere  than  in  America.  If 
a  young  girl  leaves  her  home  in  this  country  before  having 
undergone  a  satisfactory  course  of  character  training  result- 
ing from  her  freedom  of  action,  her  independence  from  con- 
ventionalities, her  association  with  men  of  her  own  age  and 
views,  and  the  perfect  ease  in  her  deportment  as  long  as  she 
adheres  to  proprieties — that  is  something  which  Europe  can 
never  give  her,  and  if,  as  1  said  before,  a  young  girl  leaves 
her  country  before  she  has  had  the  advantage  of  this  charac- 
ter training  and  comes  within  the  influence  of  European  con- 
ventional life,  she  will  be  lost  and  will  not  be  able  to  retain 
her  social  and  moral  standing.  Too  many  American  girls  go 
abroad  before  they  have  learned  how  to  take  care  of  them- 
selves, and  although  an  American  girl  is  forgiven  for  a  great 
many  things  because  she  is  'merely'  an  American,  it  becomes 
necessary  to  convince  the  European  mind  that  'merely'  an 
American  means  a  great  deal,  and  although  such  an  American 
may  take  liberties  and  may  shock  conventionalities  she  can, 
as  I  have  reason  to  know,  command  the  respect  and  esteem 
of  every  European  lady  and  gentleman,  provided  she  has 
learned  how  to  deport  and  carry  herself  through  a  course  of 
stringent  character  training  in  her  own  country,  before  leav- 
ing tor  foreign  shores.  But  that  girl  deserves  to  be  pitied 
that  is  permitted  to  go  broadcast  in  a  European  musical  cen- 
ter without  having  learned  to  be  mistress  of  her  own  actions." 


THE  ALBERT  ROSENTHAL  CONCERT. 


THE  SOUSA  CONCERTS. 


John  Philip  Sousa.  the  most  widely  known  American  musi- 
cian, and  the  man  who  has  written  marches  that  have  in- 
spired the  armies  of  every  civilized  country,  will  again  be 
with  us  on  Thursday,  Nov.  4.  with  his  magnificent  band  of 
fifty-five  players.  Eight  concerts  will  be  given  at  Dreamland 
Rink,  four  being  matinees  and  four  evening  concerts. 

At  the  concert  of  Friday  night,  Nov,  5,  a  number  from  W. 
.7.  McCoy's  "Hamadryads"  will  be  given.  Complete  programs 
of  these  concerts  may  be  obtained  at  the  box  office,  which 
opens  at  Sherman.  Clay  &  Co.'s,  Monday,  Nov.  1.  at  9  a.  m. 
Popular  prices  will  prevail,  viz.,  50  cents  to  $1.00,  and  chil- 
dren half  price  at  the  matinees.  Monday  afternoon  and 
night,  Nov.  8,  special  programs  will  be  given  at  the  Greek 
Theatre  of  the  University.  In  case  of  rain  or  cold  weather 
the  concerts  will  be  given  in  the  Harmon  Gymnasium.  Seats 
will  be  on  sale  at  Sherman.  Clay  &  Co.'s,  both  Oakland  and 
San  Francisco,  and  at  Tupper  and  Reed's,  "The  Sign  of  the 
Bear,"  and   'The   Co-Op   Store"  on  the   campus. 


A  very  enjoyable  and  successful  musicale  was  given  on 
Saturday  night'  by  the  pupils  of  Mrs.  M.  Venjohann  Prugh. 
assisted  by  Miss  Lillian  Nagel  and  Mr.  Prugh,  violinists, 
and  Miss  Beth  Van  Haltren  and  Miss  Nagel,  vocalists.  The 
affair  was  held  at  the  beautiful  home  of  Mrs.  Geo.  Van  Halt- 
ren, 5,52  Merrimac  street,  which  was  tastefully  decorated 
for  the  occasion.  Among  those  present  were  Mr.  and  Mr. 
Geo.  Van  Haltren,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Prugh.  Mrs.  Venjohann.  Mrs. 
Mark  Everson,  Mrs.  Cougga.  Miss  Tilda  Schalitz,  Miss  Alice 
Schalitz,  Miss  Eleanor  Brown.  Miss  Lillian  Nagel,  Miss  May 
Bolger,  Miss  Anita  Couzza,  Miss  Genevieve  Couzza,  Miss 
Alice  Sanford,  Miss  Alice  Morgan.  Miss  Beth  Van  Haltren. 
Miss  Dorothy  Van  Haltren,  Miss  Ruth  Everson,  Miss  Marie 
Pohl,  Mildred  Smith,  Maxine  Shell  and  Master  Phillip  Nagel. 
Selections  were  rendered  from  Von  Weber,  Grieg,  Schubert, 
Schumann,  Godard  and  Wagner. 


Miss  Delia  Griswold  created  an  excellent  impression  when 
singing  two  contralto  solos:  "Dolly  Shall  Be  Mine"  (Harold 
Fraser-Simson),  and  "Flower  Song"  from  "Faust"  (Gounod) 
at  a  concert  given  during  the  session  of  the  Convention  of 
the  .ludges  of  the  Juvenile  Co\irt,  the  Probation  Committees 
and  the  Probation  Officers  of  California  at  the  California  Club 
Hall  on  October  loth  and  16th,  Miss  Griswold's  pupils  will 
give  their  second  recital  on  Wednesday  afternoon,  November 
8d,  at  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.'s  Hall. 


Albert  Rosenthal,  the  brilliant  young  San  Francisco  cello 
virtuoso,  who  scored  remarkable  successes  in  Europe  and  the 
East,  has  just  appeared  in  Sacramento  and  made  an  excellent 
impression,  as  will  be  seen  from  our  Sacramento  letter  by 
Mrs.  Albert  Elkus  in  this  issue.  Mr.  Rosenthal's  San  Fran- 
cisco concert  will  take  place  at  Lyric  Hall  on  Wednesday 
evening,  November  3d,  under  the  direction  of  Ernst  Horstman, 
and  it  is  to  be  hoped  that  our  musical  cult  will  be  well 
represented  to  do  honor  to  this  successful  young  San  Fran- 
ciscan. 

Mr.  Rosenthal  studied  with  such  masters  as  Anton  Hek- 
king,  David  Popper  and  Mr.  Becker,  the  foremost  pedagogue 
of  the  cello  in  Europe,  and  his  concert  in  Berlin  was  one  of 
the  most  atristic  successes  which  have  ever  been  witnessed 
in  Germany's  fastidious  metropolis.  Owing  to  the  success  of 
this  concert.  Mr.  Rosenthal  received  flattering  olters  from 
prominent  New  York  managers,  and  he  appeared  in  several 
concert  tours  in  this  country  until  a  month  or  two  ago,  when 
he  interrupted  his  travels  to  pay  a  visit  to  his  parents  in 
this  city. 

Mr.  Rosenthal  has  a  host  of  admirers  and  friends  in  this 
city  who  are  anxious  to  hear  him  and  everyone  seriously 
interested  in  music  should  make  it  a  point  to  attend  this 
concert,  not  only  because  it  is  a  meritorious  event,  but  also 
because  a  young  artist  living  in  this  city  and  making  such 
splendid  headway  should  be  honored  by  his  fellow  citizens. 
The  program,  which  is  an  exceedingly  interesting  one,  con- 
sists of  the  following  numbers: 

L.  Valentini — Sonate  (17th  Century);  Bach — Air:  Schu- 
mann— Andante:  Boccherini — Rondo;  Dvorak — 2d  Movement 
(violoncello-concerto);  Piatti — Fantasie  "Linda  de  Chamoun- 
ix";  Tschaikowsky — Chant  Triste;  Davidoff — At  the  Foun- 
tain;   Popper — Hungarian  Rhapsody. 


It  is  promised  that  music  lovers  will  enjoy  a  distinct  treat 
in  the  presentation  of  Amy  Woodforde-Finden's  "Pagoda  of 
Flowers,"  which  is  scheduled  for  production  at  Ye  Liberty 
Playhouse.  Oakland.  Tuesday  evening.  November  2,  in  con- 
junction with  an  elaborate  entertainment  given  for  the 
benefit  of  Fabiola  Hospital.  This  tuneful  composition  which, 
for  want  of  a  better  name,  may  be  termed  a  music-drama, 
will  on  that  occasion  be  given  its  first  production  in  costume 
and  dramatic  setting.  It  has  been  sung  with  great  success  in 
concert  in  London  and  New  York  during  the  past  two  seasons. 
The  work  is  exceedingly  interesting  and.  in  some  respects, 
is  said  to  remind  one  of  Puccini's  "Madame  Butterfly."  "The 
Pagoda  of  Flowers"  is  being  staged  under  the  direction  of 
Miss  Georgie  Cope,  an  Oakland  girl,  who  has  but  recently 
returned  from  two  year's  study  in  Europe,  and  who  will  sing 
the  contralto  role.  Other  soloists  will  be  Mrs.  Grace  Davis 
Northrup,  Carl  Anderson  and  Lowell  Redfield.  The  choruses 
will  be  sung  by  men  from  the  Orpheus  Club  and  a  number  of 
Eurydice  Club  girls.  Paul  Steindorff  will  conduct.  The  cos- 
tumes will  be  Burmese,  for  the  scene  is  laid  in  Burmah,  and 
are  said  to  be  extremely  beautiful.  Seats  for  the  benefit  are 
now  on  sale  at  Kohler  &  Chase  and  Sherman.  Clay  &  Com- 
pany music  stores  in  Oakland. 


THE  ZECH  ORCHESTRA  CONCERT. 

The  second  concert  of  the  season  1909.  to  be  given  by 
the  Zech  Orchestra  at  the  Novelty  Theatre  next  Tuesday 
evening,  promises  to  be  one  of  the  most  delightful  events  of 
the  season.  The  young  musicians  have  rehearsed  diligently, 
and  there  is  no  reason  why  the  program  should  not  be  pre- 
sented with  that  energy  and  that  inusicianly  temperament 
which  one  has  a  right  to  expect  of  the  Zech  (Drchestra.  Wil- 
liam F.  Zech,  the  director,  is  very  conscientious  and  would 
not  permit  any  number  to  be  presented  unless  it  had  been 
behearsed  sufficiently,  and  thus  would  be  enjoyable  to  most 
conscientious  music  lovers. 


Manager  Will  L.  Greenbaum  announces  that  he  has  secured 
the  Novelty  Theatre  for  many  of  his  concerts  this  season, 
the  location  being  far  more  convenient  than  Christian  Science 
Hall,  and  the  acoustics  being  better.  There  will  be  quite 
a  few  musical  affairs  given  at  this  house,  and  Mr.  Greenbaum 
is  prepared  to  rent  it  for  concerts,  lectures,  amateur  per- 
formances, etc. 


John  Morrisey,  the  well-known  and  well-liked  resident  man- 
ager of  the  San  Francisco  Orpheum.  returned  from  St.  Louis 
last  Monday,  where  he  spent  a  week  devoted  to  business  and 
pleasure  combined.  Mr.  Morrisey.  as  could  hardly  be  other- 
wise expected,  enjoyed  himself  thoroughly,  and  was  the 
recipient  of  all  those  courtesies  which  his  numerous  friends 
in  all  parts  of  the  country  are  always  eager  to  extend  to  him. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


THE    MUSICAL    OUTLOOK    FOR    LOS    ANGELES.  Y 

Von    Stein   Academy's   Ambitious    Plans,   J.    P.    Dupuy   and    His 

Wortt,   J.    B.    Poulin    and    His   Choral     Societies,    Frederick 

Stevenson's      Latest      Compositions,      the      Organists' 

Association,    And   the    Plans   of   Various    Southern 

California   Musical   Clubs. 


BY    ALFRED    METZGER. 

(Continued  from  last  week's  issue.) 
In  last  Saturday's  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  I  spoke  at 
length  of  the  big  movements  now  in  progress  in  the  metrop- 
olis of  Southern  California.  I  pointed  out  the  organization 
of  a  committee  to  further  the  plans  of  the  big  Music  Fes- 
tival to  take  place  next  spring.  I  referred  to  the  orchestral 
situation,  the  advantages  to  be  derived  by  local  artists,  the 
pleasure  in  view  for  the  musical  public  from  the  engagement 
of  visiting  artists  by  L.  E.  Behymer,  the  indefatigable  im- 
presario, the  good  work  of  the  Gamut  Club,  the  excellent 
plans  prepared  for  the  public  school  children,  and  the  plans 
now  under  consideration  for  the  permanent  establishment  of 
a  Municipal  Band.  Today  we  will  conclude  this  review  by 
referring  to  plans  by  private  institutions  and  individuals,  thus 
proving  that  in  Los  Angeles  the  inner  home  life  and  the 
public  life  of  music  harmonize  well  and  creat  what  is  termed 
a  musical  atmosphere.  There  can  not  be  any  doubt  regard- 
ing the  fact  that  in  Los  Angeles  this  so  called  musical  atmos- 
phere is  far  more  apparent  than  it  is  in  San  Francisco,  and 
it  could  be  established  in  Northern  California  just  as  well, 
if  the  musicians  and  the  musical  organizations  would,  like  in 
Los  Angeles,  work  side  by  side  instead  of  against  one  an- 
other. But  let  us  resume  our  discussion  of  Los  Angeles 
musical  plans. 

THE  VON  STEIN  ACADEMY.— The  management  of  the 
Von  Stein  Academy  of  Music  announces  very  ambitious  and 
artistic  plans  for  the  coming  season.  This  institution  will 
give  regular  monthly  faculty  recitals  at  Gamut  Club  Audi- 
torium. The  first  of  these  recitals  will  take  place  at  Gamut 
Club  Auditorium  on  Thursday  evening,  October  28,  and  after 
this,  one  recital  will  be  given  at  the  same  place  once  a 
month.  The  participants  will  be  artist  members  of  the 
faculty  only,  and  all  pupils  of  the  institutions  will  be  admit- 
ted tree  of  charge.  Admission  to  outsiders  will  be  twenty- 
five  and  fifty  cents,  and  school  children  will  have  a  special 
rate  of  ten  cents,  thus  receiving  the  advantage  of  a  musical 
education. 

There  will  also  be  given,  under  the  auspices  of  the  Von 
Stein  Academy  of  Music,  two  or  three  chamber  music  con- 
certs by  a  very  eflicient  organization,  consisting  of  Wenzel 
Kopta,  first  violin:  Julius  Bierlich,  second  violin;  Robert 
Eckhardt,  viola;  Mrs.  Elsa  von  Grofe  Menasco,  cello.  These 
concerts  will  be  principally  subscription  events,  and  will  be 
conducted  upon  that  highly  artistic  basis  for  which  Wenzel 
Kopta  has  long  since  been  known  to  every  serious  musician 
on  the  Pacific  Coast.  The  Von  Stein  Academy  of  Music  and 
Los  Angeles  are  very  fortunate  to  have  in  their  midst  a 
musician  of  such  fine  calibre  as  Wenzel  Kopta. 

There  will  also  be  given  a  violin  and  piano  recital  by  Hein- 
rich  von  Stein  and  Wenzel  Kopta.  some  time  during  Novem- 
ber. Mr.  von  Stein  is  an  excellent  pianist  and  ensemble 
player.  He  possesses  a  refined  musical  temperament,  is 
quite  a  scholar  in  the  matter  of  virtuoso  performances,  and 
may  be  classed  as  a  pianist  in  the  same  category  that  Wen- 
zel Kopta  belongs  as  a  violinist.  A  concert  by  two  such 
eminent  musicians  should  be  attended  by  colleagues  as  well 
as  students,  and  Los  Angeles  can  not  demonstrate  its  title 
to  being  considered  a  musical  community  more  emphatically 
than  by  making  these  concerts  worth  while  giving. 

During  my  sojourn  in  Los  Angeles  I  attended  one  of  the 
weekly  pupil  recitals  of  the  Von  Stein  Academy,  and  again 
bore  witness  to  the  splendid  training  accorded  the  disciples 
of  this  ideal  school  of  music.  The  pupils  played  the  various 
compositions  upon  the  appended  program  with  a  surety  and 
an  intelligence  that  would  have  done  honor  to  anyone  who 
had  been  especially  prepared  for  them.  I  have  never  at- 
tended a  pupil  recital  in  San  Francisco  that  was  superior 
to  this  Von  Stein  recital,  and  I  have  attended  quite  a  number 
of  musical  affairs  in  this  city  (professional  and  amateur) 
that  were  in  certain  points  considerably  inferior  to  the  week- 
ly musicales  of  the  Von  Stein  Academy  of  Music  in  Los 
Angeles.  If  you  consider  that  fifty-two  of  these  recitals  are 
given  during  the  year  without  rehearsals  and  without  the 
pupils  being  aware  that  they  will  be  called  upon  you  may 
be  certain  that  here  is  something  worth  while  accomplished. 
The  fact  that  none  of  the  students  know  what  they  are  called 
upon  to  play,  and  whether  they  are  asked  to  play  or  not  was 


evidenced  on  this  occasion,  when  two  pupils  of  two  different 
teachers  played  the  same  composition,  as  will  be  seen  upon 
the  appended  program; 

Menuet  (Xaver  Scharwenka),  Miss  Rose  Obenhaus; 
Scherzo  ( Wollenhaupt),  Edward  Wickern;  Polonaise  (Sei- 
fert),  Henry  Wheeler;  Impromptu  G  flat  (Reinhold),  Miss 
Dora  Brown;  Prelude  B  flat  (Chopin),  Miss  Nellie  Brigham; 
Prelude  B  flat  (Chopin),  Miss  Blanche  Skelton;  Souvenir 
(.Jadassohn),  Victor  Nemechek;  Souvenir  (Jadassohn),  Miss 
Loretta  Payson;  Reverie  (Tschaikowsky),  Raymond  Schout- 
en;  Mazurka  (Godard),  Miss  Mona  Newkirk;  Impromptu  B 
flat  (Schubert),  Polonaise  A  major  (Chopin),  Clarence 
Bates;  Ballade  G  minor  (Chopin),  Valse  A  major.  Op.  17 
I  .Moszkowsky),  Miss  Clara  Russakov.  Ensemble  numbers — 
Ballet-Scenen  (Edwin  Schulz),  two  pianos,  four  hands.  Miss 
Mona  Newkirk  and  Clarence  Bates;  Symphony  C  major 
(Schumann),  two  pianos,  eight  hands. 

*  *       * 

J.  P.  DUPUY'S  ENTERPRISES.— Besides  his  large  vocal 
class,  Mr.  Dupuy  is  in  charge  of  the  vocal  department  of  the 
Y.  M.  C.  A.  and  a  Glee  Club,  which  was  organized  a  little 
over  a  year  ago,  and  which  scored  a  brilliant  success  from 
the  time  of  its  organization.  The  Glee  Club  numbers  now 
thirty-five  members,  and  in  conjunction  with  the  Y.  M.  C.  A. 
Orchestra  will  give  three  concerts  during  the  coming  season. 
The  Orpheus  Club,  one  of  the  best  male  choruses  on  the 
Pacific  Coast,  will  give  three  concerts  this  year.  It  has  now 
forty-five  voices  and  its  membership  being  limited  to  forty- 
eight  voices,  the  club  will  soon  be  inaccessible  to  applicants 
unless  they  consent  to  he  put  upon  a  waiting  list.  Mr.  Dupuy 
is  very  careful  regarding  the  material  in  his  club,  and  even 
now  certain  voices  are  constantly  rejected  because  of  their 
inadequacy.  The  last  concert  of  the  Y.  M.  C.  A.  Glee  Club, 
of  thirty-five  voices,  will  have  the  assistance  of  the  Trinity 
Choir  of  thirty-five  voices  and  thirty  ladies  from  the  Y.  W. 
C.  A.,  making  a  total  chorus  of  one  hundred  voices,  under 
the  direction  of  J.  P.  Dupuy.  The  Euterpean  Quartet,  a  male 
quartet  of  superior  artistic  faculties,  under  Mr.  Dupuy's  di- 
rection, will  begin  its  twentieth  season  next  December.  This 
quartet  has  had  only  one  change  in  its  personnel,  and  that 
was  twelve  years  ago.  Having  sung  together  for  so  many 
years  the  members,  as  may  naturally  be  expected,  sing  like 
one  individual. 

J.  B.  POULIN'S  CHORAL  CLUBS.— The  three  big  choral 
societies  under  the  direction  of  J.  B.  Poulin  have  begun  their 
regular  rehearsals  for  the  coming  season  with  great  enthus- 
iasm, and  a  determination  to  advance  still  further  on  the 
road  to  success.  In  number  they  exceed  the  membership  of 
all  previous  seasons,  and  there  are  considerably  luore  than 
two  hundred  voices  rehearsing  under  Mr.  Poulin's  leadership 
at  least  once  each  week.  The  Ellis  Club  have  already  plan- 
ned their  four  public  performances  with  programs  of  unusual 
worth  and  dignity.  Some  favorites  of  former  seasons  will  be 
repeated,  such  as  "Frithiof"  by  Max  Bruch.  "The  Lord  of 
Dunderberg"  (Brewer),  "St.  John  of  Patmos"  (DuBois).  and 
others.  Of  new  works  the  club  will  perform  quite  a  number, 
among  theiu  "Nideros,"  by  Protheroe,  which  is  already  being 
rehearsed.  At  least  two  of  the  concerts  will  have  the  ac- 
companiment of  a  full  orchestra. 

The  Woman's  Lyric  Club,  of  one  hundred  voices,  will  per- 
form the  following  cantatas:  "The  Fate  of  Princess  Piyo"  by 
Henry  K.  Hadley,  "A  Ballad  of  Loraine"  by  Hammond,  "The 
Veranda"  by  Koechlin,  as  well  as  the  usual  quantity  of 
lighter  works. 

The  Temple  Baptist  Choir,  of  seventy  voices,  will  render, 
in  addition  to  the  regular  weekly  chorus  services,  several 
larger  works  for  special  occasions.  Among  these  will  be 
"The  Nativity"  by  Dr.  H.  J.  Stewart  for  Christmas,  "The  Holy 
City"  by  Gaul  and  Gounod's  "Gallia,"  and  an  Easter  cantata. 
Mr.  Poulin  never  anticipated  a  winter's  work  with  so  much 
pleasure  as  he  does  this  year,  for  he  feels  that  with  the 
good  results  of  previous  seasons  to  their  credit,  the  clubs 
may  safely  count  on  the  support  of  the  general  public,  which 
is  ever  ready  to  patronize  and  encourage  any  movement  in 
behalf  of  musical  progress  and  art  culture. 

*  #       * 

FREDERICK  STEVENSON'S  COMPOSITIONS— The  Oliver 
Ditson  Company  has  compiled  a  series  of  circulars  setting 
forth  Mr.  Stevenson's  most  important  works.  There  is  one 
particularly  interesting  announcement  which  groups  a  num- 
ber of  these  works  in  paragraphs  suited  for  particular  sea- 
sons. As  many  of  our  readers  are  interested  in  good  church 
music  we  will  quote  these  for  their  especial  benefit. 

Festival  and  Thanksgiving — The  Lord  is  King,   Praise  the 

Lord,  O  Jerusalem,  Behold  Thou  Shalt  Call  a  Nation,  Hear, 

(Continued   on    Page   18.) 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    K  E  V  I E  W 


METROPOLITAN   OPERA    HOUSE   PROSPECTUS. 


The  Metropolitan  Opera  House  of  New  York  has  issued  its 
prospectus  for  the  season  extending  from  November  ITilh, 
1909,  to  April  2d,  1910.  According  to  this  prospectus  Giulio 
Gatti-Casazza  will  be  again  the  general  manager,  while  An- 
dreas Dipple  once  more  assumes  the  position  of  administra- 
tive manager.  There  have  been  engaged  this  year  not  less 
than  eighty-one  soloists,  among  whom  are  21  soprani,  16  alti, 
19  tenorl,  14  baritoni  and  11  bassi.  There  will  be  six  con- 
ductors, eight  assistant  conductors  and  two  chorus  masters. 
There  have  also  been  engaged  one  technical  director,  three 
stage  managers  and  one  assistant  stage  manager.  There 
will  be  two  ballet  masters,  three  premiere  danseuses  and 
one  premier  danseur.  The  repertoire  to  be  selected  from 
consists  of  seventy  operas,  and  four  ballets  will  be  presented. 
Stage  setting  and  costumes  will  be  particularly  elaborate,  no 
expense  having  been  spared  to  secure  the  best.  The  or- 
chestra will  contain  over  one  hundred  musicians.  The 
chorus  will  consist  of  180  members.  The  corps  de  ballet  will 
consist  of  sixty  dancers, 

*  *       ♦ 

The  repertoire  will  be  selected  from  the  following  standard 
operas:  Beethoven — "Fidelio";  Bellini — "La  Somnarabula"; 
Bizet — "Carmen":  Boito — "Mefistofele";  Donizetti — "Don 
Pasquale,"  "L'Elisir  d'Amore,"  "La  Favorita,"  "Lucia  di  Lam- 
mermoor";  Flotow — "Marta";  Gounod — "Faust,"  "Romeo  et 
Juliette";  Humperdinck — "Hansel  und  Gretel";  Leoncavallo 
— "Pagliacci";  Mascagni — "Cavalleria  Rusticana";  Massenet 
— "Manon";  Meyerbeer — "Les  Huguenots";  Mozart — "Don 
Giovanni,"  "Le  N'ozze  di  Figaro";  Ponchielli — "La  Gioconda"; 
Puccini — "La  Boheme,"  "Madama  Butterfly."  "La  Tosca"; 
Rossini — "II  Barbiere  di  Siviglia";  Smetana — "The  Bartered 
Bride"  (Prodana  Nevesta);  Thomas — "Mignon";  Verdi — 
"Aida,"  "Un  Ballo  in  Maschera,"  "Palstaff,"  "Rigoletto,"  "La 
Traviata,"  "II  Trovatore";  Wagner — "Der  Fliegende  Hol- 
lander," "Lohengrin,"  "Tannhauser,"  "Tristan  und  Isolde," 
"Die  Meistersinger  von  Nurnberg,"  "Das  Rheingold,"  "Die 
Walkure,"    "Siegfried,"    "Gotterdammerung,"    "Parsifal." 

Among  the  novelties  and  revivals  will  be:  Auber — "Fra 
Diavolo"  (revival);  Blech — "Versiegelt"  (new);  Boieldieu — 
"La  Dame  Banche  (revival);  Bruneau — "L'Attaque  du  Moul- 
in" (new);  Converse — "The  Pipe  of  Desire"  (new);  Delibes — 
"Lakme"  (revival);  Donizetti — "La  Fille  du  Regiment"  (re- 
vival); Flotow — "Alessandro  Stradella"  (revival);  Pranchetti 
— "Germania"  (new);  Goetzl — "Les  Precieuses  Ridicules" 
(new);  Goldmark — "The  Cricket  on  the  Hearth  (new); 
Gluck — "Orfeo"  (revival);  Humperdinck — "King's  Children" 
(new);  Laparra — "La  Habanera"  (new);  Lecocq — "La  Fille 
de  Madame  Angot"  (revival):  Lehar — "Amour  des  Tziganes" 
(Gypsy  Love)  (new);  Leroux — "Le  Chemineau"  (new); 
Lortzing — "Czar  und  Zimmermann"  (revival);  Maillard — 
"Les  Dragons  de  Villars"  (revival);  Massenet — "Werther" 
(revival);  Offenbach — "Les  Contes  d'Hoffmann"  (revival); 
Paer — "II  Maestro  di  Cappela"  (new);  Rossini — "II  Signor 
Bruschino"  (revival);  Suppe — "La  Belle  Galathee"  (revival); 
Tschaikowsky — "Pique  Dame"  (new);  Verdi — "Otello"  (re- 
vival); Weber — "Der  Freischutz"  (revival);  Wolf-Ferrari — 
"Le  Donne  Curiose"   (new). 

*  *       * 

The  following  ballets  will  be  presented:  Bayer — "Wiener 
Walzer"  (new),  "Die  Puppenfee";  Chopin-Glazounow — "Les 
Sylphides"  (new);  Delibes — "Coppelia,"  "Sylvia";  Divertisse- 
ments, etc.,  etc. 

*  *       * 

The  personnel  of  the  company  will  be  as  follows:  Soprani 
— Frances  Alda,  Bella  Alten,  Anna  Case  (new).  Vera  Court- 
enay  (new),  Emmy  Destinn,  Geraldine  Farrar.  Rita  Fornia, 
Olive  Fremstad,  Johanna  Gadski,  Alma  Gluck  (new),  Isabelle 
L'Huillier,  Lucrette  de  Lievin  (new),  Lydia  Lipkowska 
(new),  Berta  Morena,  Alice  Nielsen  (new),  Lillian  Nordica, 
Jane  Noria  (new),  Jane  Osborn-Hannah  (new),  Bernice  de 
Pasquali,  Lenora  Sparkes,  Rosina  Van  Dyck.  Mezzo-Soprani 
and  Contralti — Mariska-Aldrich  (new),  Elizabeth  Clark 
(new),  Marie  Delna  (new),  Marianne  Flahaut,  Louise  Homer, 
Clara  Koch-Boehm,  Helen  Mapleson,  Marie  Mattfield.  Jeanne 
Maubourg  (new),  Anna  Meitschik  (new),  Matja  von  Niessen- 
Stone,  Lilla  Snelling,  Henrietta  Wakefield,  Florence  Wick- 
ham  (new),  Paula  Woehning.  Tenori — Georg  Anthes,  Angelo 
Bada,  Julius  Bayer,  Alessandro  Bonci,  Carl  Burrian,  Enrico 
Caruso,  Edmond  Clement  (new),  Leo  Devaux  (new),  Glenn 
Hall  (new),  Hermann  Jadlowker,  Carl  Jorn,  Walther  Koch, 
Riccardo  Martin,  Wilhelm  Otto  (new),  Georges  Regis  (neiv), 
Albert  Reiss,  Umberto  Sancarli  (new),  Leo  Slezak 
(new),        Giuseppe       Tecchi.  Baritoni — Amato      Pasquale, 

Bernard     Begue,      Henry      Dutilloy      (new),      John      Forsell 
(new),     Dinh      Gilly      (new).      Otto     Goritz,      Armando     Le- 


comte,  Anton  Ludwig  (new),  Edoardo  Missiano,  Adolf 
Muhlraann,  Vincenzo  Reschiglian  (new),  Antonio  Scotti, 
Walther  Soomer,  Clarence  Whitehill  (new).  Bassi — Paul 
Ananian,  Robert  Blass,  Georges  Bourgeois  (new),  Adamo 
Didur,  Fernando  Gianoli-Galletti  (new),  Antonio  Pini-Corsi, 
Marcel  Reiner  (new),  Giulio  Rossi,  Andrea  P.  de  Segurola 
(new),  Herbert  Witherspoon,  Conductors — Max  Bendix 
(new),  Alfred  Hertz,  Gustav  Mahler,  Vittorio  Podesti  (new), 
Egisto  Tango  (new),  Arturo  Toscanini  Assistant  Conductors 
— Richard  Hageman,  Johannes  P.  Heidenreich  (new),  Ernst 
Jokl  (new),  Hans  Morgenstern,  Jos.  Pasternack  (new),  Fran- 
esco  Romei,  Giulio  Setti,  Tulio  Voghera.  Chorus  Masters — 
Giulio  Setti,  Hans  Steiner.  Technical  Director — Edward 
Siedle.  Stage  Managers — .\nton  Schertel,  Jules  Speck.  Kurt 
Stern  (new).  Assistant  Stage  Manager — Norbert  Zulkes 
(new).  Ballet  Masters — Ottokar  Bartik  (new),  Lodovico 
Sarracco.  Premiere  Danseuses — Ivy  Craske  (new),  Gina 
Torriani,  Anna  Pavlowa,  special  star  attraction  (new). 
Premiere  Danseur — Michael  Mordkine  (new).  Librarian — 
Lionel  Mapleson.  Chorus  School — Leader,  Hans  Morgenstern. 
*  *  * 
From  the  above  will  be  seen  that  quite  a  number  of 
American  singers  are  included  in  the  casts,  and  even  among 
the  conductors  the  Americans  has  not  been  forgotten.  The 
repertory  includes  several  comic  operas,  and  it  is  gratifying 
to  see  these  splendid  works  revived.  When  we  read  these 
itineraries  for  opera  we  cannot  help  thinking  of  the  old  Tivoli 
Opera  House,  and  wish  that  the  management  could  see  its 
way  clear  to  revive  the  days  of  San  Francisco's  annual  opera 
season. 


-*v- 


The  Boston  Symphony  Orchestra,  with  ninety-eight  musi- 
cians and  with  Max  Fiedler  as  conductor,  announces  twenty- 
four  concerts  from  October  9,  1909,  until  April  30.  1910,  to- 
gether with  twenty-four  public  rehearsals.  Among  the  im- 
portant works  to  be  performed  will  be  the  following.  Those 
marked  with  a  star  are  novelties:  Brandenburger  Konzert, 
No.  3,  for  strings  (Bach);  Comedy  overture.  The  Pierrot  of 
the  Minute*  (Bantockl;  Grosse  Quartettfuge  for  strings 
(Beethoven);  Symphonies,  Nos.  1,  2,  4,  6,  9  (Beethoven); 
Scene  d'Amour  and  scherzo.  Fee  Mab  (Berlioz);  Overture, 
Rob  Roy*  (Berlioz);  Symphony  No,  7  (Bruckner);  Symphony 
No,  4  (Brahms);  Tragic  Overture  (Brahms);  Concerto  for 
violin  and  cello  (Brahms);  Epilogue  to  a  Tragedy*  (Boehe); 
Impressions  d'ltalie  (Charpentier) ;  Overture.  Abenceragen 
(Cherubini);  Petite  Suite*  (Debussy);  Paris*  (Frederick 
Delius);  Appalachia  (Frederick  Delius);  In  a  Summer  Gar- 
den (Frederic  Delius);  Brigg  Fair  (Frederick  Delius); 
Variations  (Elgar);  Suite,  The  Wand  of  Youth*  (Elgar); 
Symphony  (Cesar  Franck) ;  Symphony,  Rustic  Wedding 
(Goldmark);  Suite,  Au  Moyen  Age*  (Glazounoff);  Duo,  La 
Chant  du  Destin*  (Glazounoff);  Concerto,  D  major,  for  strings 
(Handel);  Symphony,  E  flat  major  (Haydn);  In  a  Moorish 
Cafe  (Humperdinck);  Symphony,  Faust  (Liszt);  Symphonic 
poem,  Tasso  (Liszt);  Villanelle  du  Diable  (LoefHer);  Mort 
du  Tintagiles  (Loeffler);  Symphonies,  E  flat  major,  G  minor, 
C  major  (Mozart);  Symphonic  poem.  The  Cliffs*  (Rachman- 
inoff); Variations  (Reger);  Symphonic  Prologue  to  a  Trag- 
edy, op.  lOS*  (Reger);  Capriccio  Espagnol  (Rimsky-Korsa- 
koff);  Symphony,  D  major.  No.  2  (Sibelius;  Symphonic  poem. 
En  Saga*  (Sibelius);  Suite,  Swahnevit,  op.  54*  (Sibelius); 
Symphonic  poem.  Night  Ride  and  Sunrise,  op.  55*  (Sibelius); 
The  Swan  of  Tuonela*  (Sibelius);  Rondo  Infinito*  (Sinding); 
Reverie*  (Scriabine):  Rouet  d'Omphale  (Saint-Saens) ;  Danse 
Macabre  (Saint-Saens):  Symphony,  B  flat  major  (Schumann); 
Overture,  Genoveva  (Schumann);  Overture.  Manfred  (Schu- 
mann); Macbeth*  (Strauss);  Don  Quixote  (Strauss);  Dance 
from  Salome*  (Strauss);  Sinfonia  Domestica  (Strauss); 
Suite  for  wood-wind*  (Strauss);  Thus  Spake  Zarathustra 
(Strauss),  to  be  repeated  by  request;  Symphony,  Manfred 
(Tschaikowsky) ;  Serenade  for  strings,  op.  48  (Tschaikows- 
ky) ;  Overture,  Romeo  and  Juliet  (Tschaikowsky) ;  Symph- 
onic poem,  Francesca  da  Rimini  (Tschaikowsky) ;  Overture, 
Faust  (Wagner). 


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101    POST   STREET,   SAN    FRANCISCO. 


W.  J.  McCoy's  "Naiad's  Idyl"  from  the  "Hamadryads"  ap- 
pears on  one  of  the  Sousa  programs. 

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PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


The  Great 

Bach  Festival 


Spring,  1910 

St.  Matthew's  Passion  and 
B  Minor  Mass 

Under  the  Direction  of 

Dr.  J.  Fred  Wolle, 

Founder  of  the  Bach  Festival  in  America 

An  Orchestra  of  Sixty  Musicians 
A  Chorus  of  Two  Hundred  and  Fifty 
A  Children's  Choir  of  Five  Hundred 
Eight  Soloists  of  the  Highest  Standing 

Aieociate  Member  Five  Dollara  a  Year, 
Including  Two  Tickets  for  EUich  Concert 
Active  Members  No  Dues  and  No  Init- 
iation Fee. 

NOTICE  TO  SINGERS 

Rehearsals  for  the  great  Bach  Fe^ival 
are  taking  place  every  Monday  evening 
at  Christian  Church,  Corner  Dana  Street 
and  Bancroft  Way,  in  Berkeley,  and  any- 
one sufficiently  intereAed  in  the  works  of 
Johann  Sebastian  Bach  to  study  the  same 
thoroughly  and  participate  in  an  Annual 
Festival,  given  in  his  honor,  and  for  the 
purpose  of  permanently  establishing  the 
worth  of  his  great  Music  in  California, 
are  invited  to  become  members  of  the 
Bach  Choir.  Address  Miss  Lillian  D. 
Clark,  Secretary  of  the  Bach  Choir, 
1 522  Spruce  Street.  Berkeley,  Cal. 
Phone  Berkeley  3294. 


IF  THERE  ARE  SUFFICIENT  APPLICATIONS 
FOR  MEMBERSHIP  FROM  OAKLAND  AND 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  REHEARSALS  WILL  BE 
HELD  IN  BOTH  CITIES  EVERY  WEEK. 


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10 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


RECITAL  OF  CARO  ROMA'S  COMPOSITIONS. 

Distinguished  California  Cantatrice  and     Composer     Presents 

Varied    Program   Of   Her   Own   Compositions,   Assisted    by 

Efficient  Artists,  Before  An   Appreciative   Audience. 


BACH    CHOIR    PROGRESSES    SPLENDIDLY. 


'A  select  audience  filled  the  larger  part  of  Golden  Gale  ("oni- 
mandery  Hall  last  .Monday  evening,  when  Caro  Roma  pre- 
sented a  program  of  her  own  compositions,  assisted  by  a 
number  of  competent  artists  from  this  city.  The  works  ren- 
dered on  this  occasion  demonstrated  that  Madame  Roma  has 
mastered  the  art  of  vocal  composition  to  a  nicety,  and  has 
not  only  grasped  the  various  emotional  phases  of  which  a  duly 
trained  voice  is  capable,  but  has  solved  the  problem  of  vocal 
literature  in  a  manner  which  inspires  her  to  shun  all  at- 
tempts at  coarse  popularity  aiid  restrict  herself  to  the  more 
refined  class  of  song  compositions.  And  here,  too,  Madame 
Roma  does  not  fall  in  the  error  of  too  severe  classicism,  but 
happily  blends  true  musicianship  with  a  light  melodic  vein 
as  pleasing  to  the  ear  as  it  is  to  the  severe  judge  of  correct 
theory.  The  extent  of  the  program  attached  hereto  reveals 
Madame  Roma  in  a  varied  position.  We  have  here  instru- 
mental works,  ballad  form,  song  cycle  dimensions,  dramatico- 
musical  reading  and  romantic  songs. 

Madame  Roma's  vocal  ability  is  too  well  known  in  San  Fran- 
cisco to  require  any  detailed  mention  thus  late  in  the  day. 
Suffice  it  to  say  that  she  is  endowed  with  the  same  faculties 
that  made  her  famous  in  the  operatic  world.  Her  voice  still 
reveals  that  volume  and  timbre  which-  thrilled  her  audiences 
and  her  musical  intelligence  is  as  ever  prevalent  throughout 
her  interpretations.  Madame  Roma  was  assisted  by  Mrs. 
Revalk.  who  is  the  possessor  of  a  magnificent  lyric  soprano, 
with  somewhat  of  a  dramatic  timbre,  and  she  phrases  with 
splendid  taste  and  good  artistic  judgment.  B.  Liederman, 
tenor,  exhibited  the  mellow  and  delightful  quality  of  his 
beautiful  tenor  voice  to  excellent  advantage,  while  Harald 
Pracht  came  well  up  to  his  reputation  as  one  of  San  Fran- 
cisco's leading  baritone  soloists.  Mrs.  Margaret  Weinmann 
revealed  herself  as  a  pianiste  of  superior  technical  and  ar- 
tistic faculties,  and  Arthur  Weiss  and  Fletcher  Tilton  did  jus- 
tice to  the  cello  and  organ  parts.  Mrs.  D.  E.  F.  Easton 
proved  to  be  a  veiy  effective  reader.  The  complete  program 
was  as  follows:  i 

Organ-^Decoratibh' Day  at  Sea  (from  Sea,  Songs),  Mr.  Til- 
ton:  Soprano-^ («)  Legacies,  (b)  Good  Night  (new)  froim 
"Shadow.s,"  (c»  ;;'Tia'you.  Sweetheart,  I  miss  (new),  Mrs. 
Williams:  Baritone — (a)  Thinking  of  Thee,  (b)  RecompenBe 
(new),  from  "Shadows,"  Mr.  Pracht:  Soprano — (a)  I  Kiss  the 
Little  Flower  You  Wore,  (b)  Oh  I  Sea  (from  Sea  Songs),  Mrs. 
Revalk:  Tenor — (al  Love's  Messenger,  (b)  Thy  lips  are  like 
twin  roses,  (cl  The  iJewSls,  Mr.  Liedermann:  Cello— (a I  Lul- 
laby of  the  Waves  (frotn  Sea  Songs),  (b)  Violets.  Mr.  Weiss: 
Soprano — (a)  The  Prayer  (monotone  from  "Wandering  One"), 
(bl  Separation,  (cl  Forbidden,  Caro  Roma:  Reading  of  Roma's 
"Nell,"  assisted  by  Miss  Weinmann,  pianist,  Mrs.  D.  E.  F. 
Easton:  Tenor — (a)  My  one  hour,  (bl  Faded  Rose,  (c)  Golden 
Chain.  Mr.  Liedermann:  Cello — (a)  Ligltthouse  Lullaby  (from 
Se^a  Songs),  (b)  Dreaming,  Mr.  Weiss;  Soprano — (a)  Your 
tetider  voice,  (b)  Resignation,  (c)  The  Return  (from  "Wan- 
d&lring  One"),  Mrs.  Williams;  Baritone — (a)  Thou'rt  like  unto 
a  flower,  (b)  Sometimes,  Mr.  Pracht:  Soprano — (a)  The  Let- 
ter (from  "Wandering  One"),  (b)  Rejoice  with  me,  Oh  Sea 
(from  Sea  Songs),  Mrs.   Revalk. 

The  same  program  presented  by  the  same  artists  was  given 
at  Ebell  Auditorium  in  Oakland  on  Tuesday  evening  last. 


Some  time  ago  the  papers  were  full  with,  the  inforrnation 
that  Melba  was  forced  to  tour  Australia  because  she  needed 
the  money.  We  at  that  time  refused  to  give  credence  to  this  re- 
port, as  it  was  known  that  Melba  promised  the  people  of 
Australia  that  she  would  some  time  sing  for  them  and  on 
her  tour  visit  the  more  or  less  important  towns  of  that  con- 
tinent. She  has  now  fulfilled  this  promise,  and  we  consider 
it  a  noble  work.  Now  a  Melbourne  paper  publishes,  under 
date  of  September  20,  this  itemi  "Madame  Melba  has  regis- 
tered her  colors  with  the  Victorian  Racing  Club  and  will 
shortly  have  horses  running  on  the  Australian  turf.  Her  col- 
ors are  olive  green,  mauve  sash  and  white  cap."  Surely  the 
diva  can  not  be  very  destitute  when  she  can  afford  the  ex- 
pense of  race  horses. 


Mrs.  Marie  Withrow  gave  a  reception  to  Miss  Billie  Burke, 
who  is  a  former  pupil  of  her's,  at  her  residence,  2016  Pine 
street  last  Thursday  afternoon.  There  was  a  large  number 
of  the  friends  and  admirers  of  the  clever  young  actress  in 
attendance,  and  all  were  pleased  with  the  charming  personal- 
ity of  the  recepient  of  Mrs.  Withrow's  hospitality. 


Rapidly  Increasing  Choral     Organization     Gains     Steadily     in 

Membership    From    All    Bay    Cities,    and    Enthusiasm 

Augments  With   Every  Succeeding  Rehearsal. 

The  Bach  Choir,  under  the  direction  of  Dr.  .J.  Fred  Wolle, 
iSi  now  well  upon  the  road  to  its  eventual  triumph  next 
spring.  All  the  members  have  taken  a  lively  interest  in  the 
rehearsals  and  are  bringing  constantly  new  singers  who  are 
sufficiently  interested  in  the  cause  of  this  grand  music  to 
davote  to  its  exposition  all  the  energy,  all  the  enthusiasm, 
all  the  ability  which  they  have  at  their  command.  The  in- 
crease of  new  members  at  every  rehearsal  is  indeed  gratify- 
ing, and  it  is  surprising  how  well  San  Francisco,  Oakland 
and  Alameda  singers  are  realizing  the  importance  of  their 
co-operation,  and  if  this  influx  from  the  various  bay  cities  con- 
tinues. Dr.  Wolle  will  soon  be  able  to  call  special  rehearsals 
in  the  respective  cities  around  the  bay.  The  nearer  the  date 
of  the  great  festival  approaches  the  more  mmbers  will  be 
eager  to  partake  of  the  victory.  But  it  should  be  borne  in 
mind  that  the  serious  study  of  this  wonderful  music  requires 
time  and  energy,  and  should  not  be  postponed  until  the  last 
mjnute.  Those  who  really  desire  to  become  serious  advocates 
of  Bach's  immense  works  should  become  members  now  at 
this  time,  when  they  can  devote  every  minute  of  spare  time 
to-  a  thorough  study  of  the  compositions.  If  they  enter  too 
late  they  might  do  more  harm  than  good,  and  so  we  advise 
everyone  sufficiently  musical  to  appreciate  the  importance  and 
grandeur  of  these  events,  to  attend  rehearsals  now  and  be- 
come thoroughly  familiar  with  all  their  technical  intricacies. 

And  here  we  desire  to  say  a  word  about  the  soloists.  Even 
though  the  choir  may  have  diligently  and  patiently  studied 
its  part  and  at  the  time  of  public  performance  may  be  letter 
perfect  in  ensemble  as  well  as  interpretative  faculty,  the 
soloists  may  ruin  the  entire  work  by  superficial  and  slip-shod 
reading.  There  is  no  composition  created  that  requires  such 
careful  study  and  such  strict  adherence  to  real  musical  phras- 
ing as  these  grand  works  of  Johann  Sebastian  Bach.  Indeed, 
it  requires  brains  to  sing  these  works,  and  it  requires  the 
exercise  of  all  the  intellectual  machinery  of  these  brains  to 
bring  out  the  finer  artistic  shadings  of  the  B  Minor  Mass 
and  the  St.  Matthews  Passion.  Unless  strict  attention  is  paid 
to  the  emotional  side  of  these  solos,  the  music  becomes  tire- 
some and  much  that  would  be  enjoyable  under  proper  con- 
ditions becomes  wearisome  and  ponderous.  And  so  we  sug- 
gest that  the  soloists  should  be  willing  to  attend  as  many 
rehearsals  as  possible  in  order  that  they  may  thoroughly 
familiarize  themselv'es  with  the  musicianly  character  of  their 
task  and  become  en  rapport  with  the  choir,  thus  establishing 
an  ensemble  of  such  nicety  and  precision  that  choir  and 
soloist  become  one  huge  instrument  swayed  by  the  magic 
wand   of  the   director's   inspiration. 

Those  who  attended  the  first  Bach  Festival  at  the  Greek 
Theatre  last  April  did  not  receive  as  concise  an  impression 
of] the  real, .grandeur  of  this  music,  because  like  every  first 
attempt,  there  crept  in  little  discrepancies  that  could  not  be 
avoided.  We  are  certainly  not  backward  in  predicting  that 
the  second  Bach  Festival  will  be  so  much  superior  to  the 
firtt  one  that  anyone  who,  by  reason  of  lack  of  comprehen- 
sic^n,  might  have  departed  with  the  notion  that  the  music  is 
tirlesome,  will  change  his  mind  to  such  extent  that  he  will 
become  as  enthusiastic  about  the  magnificence  of  these  works 
as!  he  was  indifferent  before.  It  is  impossible  to  give  a  de- 
scription of  the  music  that  could  be  understood  by  the  aver- 
ag^  reader.  It  must  be  heard  to  be  appreciated.  The  Pas- 
siojn  music  is  so  intensely  dramatic  and  so  gigantic  in  its 
architectural  beauty  that  it  can  only  appeal  by  means  of  oral 
detnonstration.  This  passion  music  requires  a  double  chorus, 
a  (iouble  orchestra,  a  children's  chorus  and  an  organ.  Dur- 
ing the  tremendous  dramatic  climaxes  the  combined  forces 
unite  to  give  the  periods  their  necessary  fervor  and  no  de- 
scription can  be  adequate  enough  to  be  equal  to  the  actual 
effect  of  these  vocal  structures. 

Rehearsals  are  being  held  every  Monday  evening  in  Berke- 
ley, commencing  at  7:30  o'clock  in  the  First  Christian  Church, 
corner  Dana  street  and  Bancroft  way.  Anyone  knowing 
singers  sufficiently  interested  in  musical  culture  to  take  ad- 
vantage of  study  in  these  works  will  assist  the  cause  of  music 
immensely  by  sending  names  and  addresses  to  the  secretary 
of  the  Bach  Choir.  Anyone  desiring  to  become  an  associate 
member  of  the  choir  may  do  so  by  forwarding  five  dollars, 
entitling  him  to  two  season  tickets  for  the  festival.  All  ap- 
plications should  be  sent  promptly  to  Miss  Lillian  D.  Clark, 
1522  Spruce  street,  Berkeley.     Telephone  Berkeley  3294. 

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PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


LORING  CLUB  GIVES  DELIGHTFUL  CONCERT. 


DELIGHTFUL  STUDIOS  FOR  TEACHERS. 


Old   Organization   Charms   Big   Audience  at   Christian   Science 

Hall,  and  Wallace  A.  Sabin  Sustains  His  Position 

As  a   Virile    Director. 


Tuesday  evening  last  having  been  a  most  strenuous  even- 
ing in  the  matter  of  musical  attractions  on  both  sides  of  the 
bay,  it  was  impossible  for  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review 
to  be  represented  at  the  Loring  Club  concert.  However,  we 
feel  in  duty  bound  to  give  our  readers  a  report  of  the  event, 
and  so  we  reprint  the  account  published  in  the  San  Francisco 
Chronicle  last  Wednesday: 

That  the  Loring  Club  is  a  tried  and  trustworthy  friend  with 
whom  companionship  never  proves  disappointing  nor  ever 
lacking  in  interest,  again  was  proven  last  evening  at  Chris- 
tian Science  Hall,  where  to  a  delighted  audience,  filling  the 
house  to  overflowing,  the  chorus  organization  gave  the  first 
concert  of  a  new  series. 

With  a  program  replete  with  beautiful  numbers  and  all  pre- 
sented with  abundant  spirit,  splendid  coloring  and  artistic 
finish,  the  evening's  entertainment  seemed  but  one  more  of 
the  many  testimonials  to  the  merits  of  a  club  that  now  is 
entering  upon  no  less  than  its  thirty-third  season.  And  too, 
the  concert  forcibly  demonstrated  the  splendid  musicianship 
of  the  director,  Wallace  A.  Sabin,  whose  unassailable  taste 
and  ideal  and  never-lagging  tempos  keep  a  program  as  fresh 
and  interesting  at  the  close  as  at  the  beginning. 

"Break,  Break!"  by  John  Hyatt  Brewer,  and  ''The  Long 
Day  Closes,"  by  Arthur  Sullivan,  were  sung  in  memoriam  to 
the  beloved  director,  W.  C.  Stadtfeld.  Adamant  would  be  a 
heart  that  could  have  withstood  the  fervor,  tenderness  and 
pathos  with  which  the  eloquent  voices  imbued  these  lovely 
numbers.  "Songs  of  the  Sea."  by  C.  Villiers  Stanford,  proved 
a  delightful  work,  full  of  clever  ideas  and  abundant  in  color- 
ing as  well  as  in  excellent  musical  construction. 

Under  Sabin's  able  direction  the  club  gave  it  a  splendid 
rendition.  Impressive  was  the  opening  song,  "Drake's  Drum," 
with  its  marked  rhythms,  and  touching  was  the  second  part, 
"Outward  Bound,"  with  its  tender  and  flowing  style,  so  ad- 
mirably suited  to  the  half  sad  thoughts  that  fill  the  heart 
when  the  time  for  parting  comes.  Dramatic  and  gripping  was 
"Devon,  O  Devon,  in  Wind  and  Rain,"  and  admirably  descrip- 
tive of  a  ship  on  a  storm-tossed  sea.  But  of  all  "Homeward 
Bound"  was  the  song  that  charmed  the  senses.  With  beau- 
itful  phanges  of  key  and  a  subtlety  of  music  that  enhanced 
the  iQvely  picture  presented  in  the  poetry  itself,  this  number 
easily  was  the  gem  of  the  entire  work. 

Joi\n  Carrington  sang  the  solos  throughout  the  work  in  ex- 
celleijt  style  and  received  vigorous  applause  as  his  reward. 
Seldojn  has  he  been  heard  to  such  good  advantage.  The  Sec- 
ond Hungarian  Rhapsody  of  Liszt,  and  also  the  "Dance  of  the 
Hours,"  from  "La  Gioconda,"  were  rendered  by  the  orchestra 
under  Bernat  Jaulus.  Several  other  numbers  were  included 
in  the  excellent  program. 

%% 


EURYDICE  CLUB  CONCERT. 


Successful   Oakland   Women's   Choral   Organization    Will    Give 

the  First  Concert  of  the  New  Season  on  the  Evening 

of   October  Twenty-Sixth. 


The  Eurydice  Club  of  Oakland,  under  the  direction  of  Mrs. 
Grace  Davis  Northrup,  is  beginning  the  new  season  with 
more  enthusiasm  and  a  larger  active  membership  than  at 
any  time  in  its  history.  This  successful  organization  is  pre- 
paring a  splendid  program  to  be  presented  on  Tuesday  even- 
ing, October  26th,  at  the  Ebell  Auditorium  in  Oakland.  The 
feature  of  the  program  will  be  a  beautiful  cantata  by  Mrs. 
Beach,  entitled  "The  Chambered  Nautillus" — a  very  ambitious 
and  gratifying  work.  Miss  Susan  de  Fremery,  the  violinist, 
who,  has  but  recently  returned  from  New  York,  where  she 
has  been  studying  for  a  number  of  years,  is  to  be  the  soloist, 
and  will  be  accompanied  by  her  sister.  Miss  Virginie  de 
Fremery. 

This  afternoon  (October  16th)  Mrs.  Northrup  is  giving  one 
of  her  informal  musical  afternoons  with  her  vocal  pupils. 
Only  those  studying  with  Mrs.  Northrup  are  invited  to  these 
recitals,  as  they  are  given  solely  for  the  purpose  of  enabling 
the  young  ladies  to  gain  experience  in  singing  for  others 
before  they  appear  in  public.  Among  those  who  will  partici- 
pate in  the  rendition  of  the  program  are:  Miss  Ruth  Thomp- 
son, Miss  Edith  Benjamin,  Miss  Ethel  Ostrander,  Miss  Edith 
Pennington,  Miss  Agnes  Thomsen,  Miss  Katherine  Sullivan, 
Miss  Edith  Hibberd,  Miss  Bessie  Patton,  Miss  Esther  Bow- 
man, Miss  Mabel  Smith,  Mrs.  Frederick  C.  Lee,  Miss  Aida 
Reeder  and  others. 


A  Prominent   Real   Estate  Firm  of  San   Francisco   Has   Leased 

Two  Floors  of  the   Kohler  &  Chase  Building  and   Rents 

Out   Studios   For  Teaching   Purposes. 


The  following  announcement  sent  out  by  Speck,  Paschel  & 
Co.  should  be  of  great  interest  to  all  teachers,  for  it  touches 
a  subject  dear  to  the  heart  of  every  energetic  San  Francisco 
musician: 

We  take  pleasure  in  announcing  to  the  musicians  of  San 
Francisco  that  the  two  upper  floors  of  the  new  ten-story, 
"class  A"  KOHLER  &  CHASE  BUILDING  have  been  divided 
into  studios  especially  adapted  to  the  use  of  musicians  and 
teachers  of  music,  and  the  accommodation  provided  in  this 
building  for  the  members  of  this  profession  will  be  superior 
in  point  of  convenience,  equipment  and  desirability  to  any 
heretofore  offered  in  the  city.  The  building,  situated  on  the 
northwest  corner  of  O'Farrell  street  and  Bagley  place,  at  the 
junction  of  Market  and  O'Farrell  streets  with  Grant  avenue, 
is  easily  accessible  from  ail  parts  of  the  city.  The  building  is 
a  "class  A"  structure,  insuring  safety  and  a  low  fire  insurance 
rate,  is  equipped  with  every  modern  convenience,  presents  a 
handsome  appearance  architecturally,  and  is  one  of  the  most 
prominent  buildings  in  that  section  of  the  city.  The  studios 
are  large,  sunny,  and  well-lighted,  and  are  separated  by  ab- 
solutely sound-proof  partitions.  The  interior  finish  is  of 
hazelwood,  the  floors  of  maple,  and  each  studio  is  provided 
with  music  and  clothes  closet,  wash  basin  supplied  with  hot 
and  cold  water,  electric  clock  (Observatory  time)  and  tele- 
phone connection  with  private  exchange.  'There  will  be  fur- 
nished to  the  tenants,  without  charge,  light,  heat,  janitor 
service,  elevator  service,  hot  and  cold  water,  an  attendant 
to  receive  messages  and  make  appointments,  and  the  name 
of  each  tenant  will  be  displayed  in  the  Directory  of  the  build- 
ing. We  call  especial  attention  to  the  fact  that  there  will  be 
on  the  second  floor  of  the  building  a  large  Recital  Hall,  with 
a  seating  capacity  of  four  hundred  and  fifty  persons,  and  spe- 
cial arrangements  will  be  made  by  the  management  with  such 
of  the  tenants  of  the  building  as  may  desire  to  make  use  of 
this  hall  for  recitals  or  other  entertainments. 

The  studios  will  be  ready  for  occupancy  about  December 
1st,  and  the  floor  plans  can  be  seen,  and  reservations  be 
now  made,  at  our  office. 

SPECK,  PASCHEL  &  CO., 
228  Montgomery  Street,  Mills  Building. 
%% 


Mme.  Jean  Jomelli  who  will  be  the  first  vocalist  to  appear 
in  recital  this  season,  will  devote  her  entire  season  to  con- 
cert work.  She  has  been  secured  for  principal  dramatic  so- 
prano at  the  great  Maine  Music  Festivals,  Geraldine  Farrar 
being  the  lyric  soprano.  After  that  she  goes  to  Boston  as 
principal  soloist  with  the  Handel  and  Hadyn  Society,  the 
eldest  and  most  important  choral  organization  in  the  country. 
Then  she  comes  direct  here  to  open  the  season  of  the  St. 
Francis  Musical  Art  Society's  events  and  to  give  public  re- 
citals both  in  this  city  and  Oakland  in  conjunction  with  Miss 
Marie  Nichols,  the  eminent  violin  virtuosa.  Miss  Nichols  is 
one  of  the  few  American  women  who  have  appeared  with 
the  Berlin  and  London  Philharmonic  Orchestras.  She  is  one 
of  the  really  fine  violin  players  before  the  public,  and  the 
combination  of  these  two  stars  forms  a  tower  of  musical 
strength.  The  accompanist  at  these  concerts  will  be  Miss 
Magdalen  Worden,  the  New  York  composer. 
V* 


On  many  programs  of  late  the  name  Edwin  Schneider  has 
appeared  as  a  composer  of  charming  songs.  Mme.  Jomelli 
has  one  or  two  of  his  on  her  list  of  offerings.  Mr.  Schneider 
will  come  to  this  city  with  George  Hamlin,  the  tenor.  With 
Coenraad  V.  Bos  with  Dr.  Wullner,  Magdalen  Worden  with 
Jomelli,  Frank  LaForge  with  Sembrich  and  Edwin  Schneider 
with  Hamlin,  we  are  to  hear  some  great  accompanists,  as 
well  as  soloists,  this  season. 


Mme.  Maud  Powell  has  been  engaged  for  the  first  concert 
of  the  Theodore  Thomas  Orchestra  this  year,  and  later  she  is 
to  play  two  concerts  with  the  New  York  Philharmonic  under 
Mahler.  Mme.  Powell  Is  to  play  three  concerts  in  this  city 
under  the  Greenbaum  management,  and  will  most  likely  be 
the  principal  instrumental  soloist  at  his  annual  Easter  fes- 
tival concert. 


Herman  Perlet  is  to  make  his  debut  here  as  an  or- 
chestral conductor  at  the  first  of  the  St.  Francis  musical  art 
events.  Mr.  Perlet  has  often  conducted  light  operas  in  this 
city,  but  never  a  concert  program.  He  is  to  play  the  classic 
music  for  the  terpsichorean  interpretation  of  Miss  Inez  Dib- 
bles, who  is  said  to  be  in  the  Isidora  Duncan  and  Lois  Fuller 
class. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


13 


VON  STEIN 

Academy  of  Music 

Phones :     Broadway  3923,    Home  25721 


1419  So.  Grand  Ave. 


LOS  ANGELES 


HEINRICH   VON   STEIN,   President  and   Director 
WENZEL    KOPTA,    Director    Violin    Department 


FACULTY 

PIANO — Heinrich  Von  Stein,  Henry  Immerman,  J.  W, 
Moore,  Miss  Juliet  Von  Stein,  Herman  Hilburg,  Miss 
Virginia  Swearingen,  Miss  Nina  L.  Barber  and  Miss 
E.  E.  Pritehert. 

VIOLIN — Wenzel  Kopta,  Julius  Bierlich,  Ferdinand  Von 
Grofe. 

VOICE— Hugo  Kirehhofer,  Robert  Eckhardt. 

CELLO — Mrs.  Elsa  Von  Grofe-Menasco. 

ORGAN— J.   W.   Moore. 

HARMONY,  THEORY  and  COMPOSITION— Miss  Juliet 
Von  Stein. 


Strongest  Faculty  Ever  Organized   in 
Southern  California 


Dreamland  Rink 

4  Afternoons  and  4  Nights 

Commenc'g  Thursday,  Nov.  4th 


Sousaius^Band 

Over  half  a  hundred  splendid  players,  assi^ed  by 
Misses  Frances  and  Grace  Hoyt,  vocal  duettiils. 
Miss  Florence  Hardeman,  violinist,  and  Herbert  L. 
Clarke,  cornetist,  and  ten  in^rumental  soloists,  fl 
Seats  50c,  75c  and  $1.00,  at  Sherman,  Clay 
&  Co.  Ready  Monday,  Nov.  I .  Address  mail 
orders  to  WILL  L.  GREENBAUM. 


CREEK    THEATRE,    BerRelex 

Monday  Afternoon  and  Evening,  Nor.  8th 

STANFORD  UNIVERSITY 

Wednesday  Evening,  November  1 0th. 


Coming; — Mme.  Jomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  Company)  in 
conjunction  with  Marie  NichoU,  violiniste,  and  Magdalen 
Worden,  composer. 


Musical  Review  Rules  That  Will  be  Enforced. 

Every  advertising  bill  must  be  paid  on  the  first  day 
of  each  month.  If  not  paid  on  or  before  the  fifteenth 
of  each  month  advertisement  w/ill  be  discontinued.  If 
not  paid  on  or  before  the  first  day  of  the  month  follow- 
ing account  will  be  turned  over  to  collector. 

All  subscriptions  must  be  paid  two  weeks  after  date 
of  expiration  notices  mailed  from  this  office.  If  not 
paid  paper  will  be  promptly  discontinued. 

Only  advertisers  are  entitled  to  insertion  of  advance 
notices  of  concerts,  pictures,  studio  removal  notices, 
etc.     Bona   fide   news   items   are   always   solicited. 

This  paper  will  establish  a  list  of  California  artists 
and  church  choir  singers.  Anyone  desirous  of  appear- 
ing on  this  list,  which  will  be  forwarded  to  anyone  like- 
ly to  engage  artists,  may  send  in  his  or  her  name.  No 
charge  will  be  made  for  such  entrance  nor  any  com- 
mission charged  in  case  an  engagement  is  secured.  If 
artist  is  not  known  to  the  editor  by  reputation  he  or  she 
must  satisfy  him  as  to  required  competency.  No  charge 
is  made  for  such   examination. 


Studios  for  Musicians 

KOHLER  &  CHASE  BUILDING 

Rooms  large  and  sunny,  separated  by  sound- 
proof partitions;  especially  adapted  to  the  use  of 
musicians  and  teachers  of  music;  ready  for  occu- 
pancy December  1 ,  1 909. 

FOR  PLANS  AND  RESERVATIONS.  APPLY 

SPECK,  PASCHEL  &  CO.,  Agents 

228  Montgomery  St.,  Mills  Building 

Telephone  Kearny    1642 


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14 


PAOIFK^    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


NEW    PUBLICATIONS    FOR    1909. 

Interesting   and  Complete   List  of     Novelties     Published     and 
Purchased   by   Leading   German   Publishing   Houses. 


[By  the  Alusical  Courier's  Leipsic  Correspondent.] 

(Continued  from  Last  Week.) 
The  first  concerted  "work"  in  the  list  of  Frau  Kistner  novel- 
ties is  a  "Lebersmesse"  for  eight  voice  chorus,  solo,  children 
chorus  and  orchestra,  by  Jan  van  Gilse,  of  Rotterdam.  The 
vorspiel  is  issued  separately  as  a  concert  number.  Then 
comes  Karl  Bleyle's  op.  II,  called  "Mignon's  Beisetzung,"  for 
boy  voices,  mixed  chorus  and  large  orchestra.  Hermann  Hut- 
ter  (Munich)  has  an  elegy,  "Volkergebet,"  for  male  chorus 
and  orchestra,  as  have  Hugo  .lochimsen  and  Ernst  Wendel. 
.Josef  Haas  has  a  string  trio.  op.  22,  male  chorus  a  capella, 
op.  17.  .Jos.  Schmid  (Munich)  has  a  sonata  for  cello  and 
piano.  While  the  Kistner  list  for  1909  embraces  many  other 
valuable  works,  the  firm  is  enjoying  the  interest  shown  in 
Draeseke.  most  of  whose  large  works  are  published  by  them. 
The  Richard  Metz  Kleitz  overture,  played  last  year  in  the 
Gewandhaus  and  in  Berlin,  maintains  strong  interest  for  the 
coming  season.  As  to  Draeseke,  performances  are  contem- 
plated by  Conductors  Pfitzner,  Mengelberg,  Hutschenruyder, 
Weingartner,  Sauer  (Bonn),  and  Pohlig,  of  Philadelphia. 
Kistner  is  also  interested  in  Michael  Berr,  whose  third  sym- 
phony was  prize  winner  this  year  at  the  Berlin  Hochschule. 

*  *       * 

The  German  agency  for  the  Russian  house  of  Belaietf  rests 
with  Fr.  Kistner.  in  Leipsic.  The  Belaieff  novelties  include 
Glazounow's  eighth  symphony,  his  dramatic  overture,  called 
"Chant  du  Dessin,"  and  Sabaniew's  symphonic  organ  tran- 
scriptions of  the  Glazounow  piano  prelude  and  fugue,  op.  62. 
The  Scriabine  third  symphony,  op.  43,  called  "The  Divine 
Poem,"  also  his  "Poem  of  Ecstasy,"  op.  54,  and  six  piano 
pieces,  op.  56,  57,  are  included.  Furthermore,  there  are  Blum- 
enfeld's  symphony,  op.  39,  and  piano  suite,  op.  40,  B.  Kala- 
fati's  piano  quintet,  op.  11;  Maximilian  Steinberg's  string 
quartet,  op.  5;  Liadow's  music  to  the  Maeterlinck  play,  "Sis- 
ter Beatrice";  Rimsky-Korsakow's  terzet,  op.  53,  for  female 
voices,  chorus  and  orchestra,  also  his  "Nymphs,"  a  soprano 
melody  with  orchestra;  furthermore,  J.  Wihtol's  "Lied"  for 
soprano,  mixed  chorus  and  orchestra,  and  a  fantastic  ballet 
by  Tscherepnine. 

Hansen  (Copenhagen)  has  an  entirely  complete  branch  in 
Leipsic,  also  controlled  by  the  Kistner  personnel.  An  exam- 
ination of  the  firm's  new  books  show  Sinding  and  Halvorsen 
as  leading  composers,  and  both  in  Christiania.  Georg  Hoe- 
berg  has  a  grand  opera,  "Wedding  in  Katakomberne."  The 
Sinding  works  are  the  G  minor  piano  sonata,  op.  91,  and  three 
pieces,  op.  89,  for  violin  and  piano.  In  1908  Hansen  had  pub- 
lished the  same  composer's  dozen  songs  and  the  ten  piano 
sketches,  op.  82.  In  fact,  most  of  Binding's  works  are  pub- 
lished by  the  Danish  house.  Halvorsen's  new  works  are 
three  orchestral  suites — "Tordenskjold,"  "Gurre,"  and  "Der 
Konig,"  respectively  op.  18,  17  and  19.  Some  seasons  ago 
Halvorsen  set  the  Handel  passacaglia  for  violin  and  viola. 
Now  Michael  Press  has  re-treater  Halvorsen's  work  for  violin 
and  cello.  Halvorsen,  last  year,  wrote  a  violin  concerto  for 
Kathleen  Parlow,  a  fact  then  reported  from  this  office.  Emil 
Sjogren's  new  works  at  Hansen's  are  a  piano  theme  and 
variations,  op.  48,  and  an  organ  prelude  and  fugue,  op.  49. 
There  is  an  organ  passacaglia  by  P.  Matthison-Hanson.  Louis 
Glass  brings  a  second  sonata,  op.  29,  for  violin  and  piano. 
Axel  Heine's  op.  9  is  a  melodic  suite  for  piano  trio.  K.  Stecn- 
den's  op.  5  is  of  two  books  of  lyric  pieces  for  violin  and  piano, 
and  Hilda  Sehestad  brings  fantasie  pieces  for  cello  and  piano. 
Other  piano  compositions  are  Viggo  Brodersen's  five  pieces, 
op.  3;  Alfred  Tofft's  three  "Stimmungsbilder,"  op.  46;  F.  Hen- 
riques'  twenty  easy  pieces  are  his  op.  30.  Five  composers 
are  represented  by  new  songs,  among  which  are  Christoph 
Barnekow's  editing  of  old  sacred  songs  with  organ,  these  by 
Joh.  Christian  and  Ph.  Em.  Bach,  and  Job.  A.  P.  Schulz.  Orig- 
inal songs  include  Per  Lassen's  from  "Stamme  Asra";  Otto 
Mailing's  group,  called  "Mirza  Schaffy,"  op.  69;  Jacob  Fabri- 
cius'  three  "Ernste  Lieder"  for  medium  voice;  M.  Schjelder- 
up's  two  groups,  comprising  his  op.  62  and  op.  63. 

*  *       * 

The  intention  of  the  Russischer  Music  Verlag  (Berlin)  is  to 
establish  a  press  largely  for  compositions  of  Russian  compos- ' 
ers.  The  business  organization  is  that  of  a  limited  stock 
company.  The  first  actual  work  of  music  printing  is  being 
conducted  in  Leipsic,  through  the  firm's  agent,  Kistner. 
Though  a  full  list  of  their  compositions  in  work  is  not  avail- 
able, it  is  known  that  there  are  a  piano  quintet  by  Katoire.  a 
piano   sonata,   op.   53,   by   Scriabine,   and   a   piano   sonata   by 


Goedicke.     Some  time   may  yet  elapse   before   the   new   firm 
comes  into  market. 

*       *       * 

D.  Rahter  has  just  issued  a  complete  300  page  catalogue, 
whose  last  sixty  pages  classify  the  works  issued  for  the  de- 
cade 1900-1910.  Just  now  appearing  for  orchestra  is  Bala- 
kirew's  Oriental  fantasie.  "Islamey,"  and  W.  Braunfels'  sym- 
phonic variations  on  a  child  song  of  the  Old  French.  Wilhelm 
Berger  shows  three  ballads  for  baritone  and  orchestra,  Sieges- 
mund  Hausegger  a  work  called  "Weihenacht,"  for  mezzo 
voice,  solo  violin  and  small  orchestra.  Theodor  Podbertsky 
brings  male  choruses  in  larger  forms.  There  is  an  easy 
quartet  (house  music)  for  piano  and  strings,  by  Fred  Seitz. 
The  English  organists,  I^emare,  Silver  and  Goss-Custard,  have 
set  a  half  dozen  Tschaikowsky  pieces  for  their  instrument. 
W.  H.  Pommer  (Cincinnati)  has  five  salon  pieces  for  violin 
and  piano,  Hans  Hermann  six  miniature  piano  solos  for  chil- 
dren, Ed.  Podini  a  piano  suite,  called  "Kleines  Dekameron," 
and  Emil  Kronke  (Dresden)  three  books  of  modern  piano 
studies.  Mr.  Rahter  has  planned  four  composition  concerts 
for  Leipsic  in  October,  November  and  December.  The  first 
will  be  of  songs,  given  by  Mme.  Bohm  van  Endert  (Dresden) 
and  Kase,  of  Leipsic;  the  second,  of  new  Slavonian  music, 
played  by  Ignaz  Priedraann,  S.  Bortkiewicz  and  tenor 
Scheiness;  the  third,  a  concert  and  reception  for  Wolf  Fer- 
rari, on  the  occasion  of  his  "Vita  Nuova,"  being  given  in  the 
Gewandhaus,  and  the  fourth  will  be  a  children's  concert  of 
house  music.  The  "Vita  Nuova"  will  be  given  in  Baltimore 
in  February,  under  Conductor  Joseph  Packer.  Other  concerts 
under  Rahter  protection  will  be  eight  in  October,  given  along 
the  Rhine  by  Willy  Rehberg.  who  will  also  talk.  The  Hugo 
Kaun  symphonic  poems,  "Hiawatha"  and  "Minnehaha,"  will 
be  given  in  Berlin  under  Conductor  Langs;  the  Kaun  piano 
quintet,  op.  39,  at  a  Kaun  concert  in  Krefeld  in  November. 
The  same  composer's  piano  concerto  was  played  in  Cologne 
and  Dortmund  by  Madame  Saat-Weber,  and  at  a  Kaun  con- 
cert in  Wildung  in  July,  chamber  music,  songs  and  the  sym- 
phony were  performed.  The  fine  Schellings  fantastic  piano 
suite  of  1907  is  in  the  Rahter  catalogue,  where  it  still  shows 
signs  of  life. 

George  Merseburger's  (Carl  Merseburger)  principal  publish- 
ings  of  books  and  works  for  musical  instruction,  but  he  has 
just  taken  over  a  number  of  compositions  by  Rudolph  Swints- 
cher.  They  were  formerly  published  in  commission  by  the 
late  Franz  Jost.  The  works  are  a  "Dithyramb"  and  a  very 
large  cycle  "In  Italy,"  for  baritone  and  piano;  furthermore, 
seven  songs.  The  firm's  new  books  include  the  fourth  revised 
edition  of  Emil  Vogel's  "Cremona,"  on  Italian  violin  masters, 
the  book  including  a  catalogue  of  the  known  Strads  and  their 
owners.  There  is  a  new  edition  of  F.  L.  Schubert's  "Vorschule 
zum  Komponiren,"  now  by  Karl  Kipke.  A  former  book  from 
the  Merseburger  press  was  Albert  Fuchs'  "Taxe  der  Streichin- 
struments,"  wherein  the  author  tried  to  help  fix  values  on  all 
old  instruments.  For  years  this  house  has  been  publishing 
the  so-called  "orchestra  studies."  with  evercises  containing 
difficulties  analogous  to  those  found  in  the  accustomed  orchest- 
ral repertory.  The  books  are  for  every  orchestral  instrument, 
and  each  year  finds  several  new  volumes.  Besides  these  the 
autumn  brings  original  solo  works  for  harp  alone,  and  for 
harp  and  piano,  by  Edmimd  Schuecker,  of  Boston. 

The  Julius  Heinrich  Zimmermann  influence  is  primarily 
known  in  Leipsic.  Riga.  St.  Petersburg  and  in  all  Russia,  as 
a  musical  merchandise  firm.  The  Leipsic  house,  under  a  son, 
Eugene  Zimmermann,  carries  probably  the  largest  ready  stock 
of  Instruments  in  the  world.  They  have  the  Russian  agency 
for  the  Steinway  and  Blutbner  pianos,  which  they  market 
successfully.  Their  publishing  of  good  music  began  only  a 
few  seasons  ago.  Their  chief  work  for  this  year  is  the  launch- 
ing of  S.  Kasanlis'  grand  opera  "Milranda"  in  St.  Petersburg, 
where  the  work  will  be  given  in  the  Imperial  opera.  Zimmer- 
mann published  late  in  1908  Balakirew's  second  symphony. 
For  1909  the  firm  is  bringing  the  same  composer's  (ihopin 
suite  for  orchestra,  built  on  four  Chopin  piano  pieces.  The 
work  is  designed  for  the  Chopin  birth  centennial  at  Warsaw 
in  February,  when  a  Chopin  monument  will  be  also  unveiled. 
Next  in  importance  is  Tor  Aulin's  "Meister  Olaf"  suite,  op.  22, 
for  orchestra,  also  his  third  violin  concerto  first  played  at 
Hamburg-Altona  and  to  be  played  in  Berlin  by  Marteau  early 
in  the  autumn.  The  prime  interest  among  piano  novelties 
will  rest  with  the  nine  pieces  by  Feruccio  Busoni.  They  are 
supposed  to  be  for  youthful  musicians,  but  nobody  believes 
that  the  youth  will  be  able  to  reach  them  without  a  step  lad- 
der. Liapounow  has  here  a  humoresque.  op.  34,  and  six 
divertisements,  op.  35.  for  piano.  Josef  Hofmann  has  a 
series  of  piano  pieces  dedicated  to  Godowsky.  Among  the 
year's  early  output  were  a  piano  "Solitude"  by  Sapellnikoff, 
and  piano  pieces  by  Constantin  von  Sternberg,  of  Philadelphia. 


PACIFIC    COAST    5IUSICAL    REVIEW. 


15 


W  1  L Li  1 A IVl      r.     ZitLK^rlf       musical  director 

The  Zech  OrcheSra  Rehearses  Every  Monday  Evening 

1332  Geary  Street  Phone  West   1603 


California  Conservatory  of  Music 

Now  occupies  its  magnificent   new   building  on 

147  Presidio  Avenue 

Between  Washington  and  Jackson  Streets,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

(Jackson-Suller  St.  car  terminal  in  front  of  building) 


Largest  Institution  West  of  Chicago 


DIRECTORIUM  : 

HERMANN  GENSS,   President 

DR.  H.  J.  STEWART,    GIULIO  MINETTI,    DR.  ARTHUR  WEISS, 

DR.  ERNEST  HORSTMANN 

The  faculty   further  includes  such  artists  as : 

HANS  KONIG, 

WALLACE  A.  SABIN, 

G.  JOLLAIN. 

LOUIS  NEWBAUER, 

HENRY  B.  BAERMAN, 

MRS.  M.  O'BRIEN, 

MISS  FLORENCE  GUPPY,   and   others. 


Departments  for  Beginners,  Amateurs  and  Professionals 


Pupils  received  at  all  limes. 
SEND    FOR    CATALOGUE 


CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC  of  the 
UNIVERSITY  OF  THE  PACIFIC 

PIERRE  'DOUILLET.  "Dean.     SAN  JOSE.  CAL. 

The  oldest  Institution  on  the  Coast — complete  Musical  Education — Advan- 
tages of  literary  studies  free  of  charge.  Board  and  room  at  moderate  prices 
Send  for  Catalogue. 

Notre  Dame  Conservatory  of  Music 

BOARDING  SCHOOL  FOR  GIRLS 


San    Jose 


Cal  If  orn  la 


New  Orpheum 


OPARREIL  STREET 
Between  Stockton  and  Po 


Safest  and  Most  Masn, 
Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afel 


enl  Theatre  in  .America. 

oon— M.a.TINEE  EVERY  D.AY 


ARTISTIC  VAUDEVILLE 

llUe.  Bianci  in  her  repertory  of  Classical  and  Novelty  Danc- 
ing; Hal  Godfrey  &  Co.:  Keno.  Walsh  and  Melrose:  "Gen- 
eral" Edward  La  Vine:  Howard  and  Howard;  Martlnettie  and 
Sylvester;  Ballerini's  Canine  Tumblers;  New  Orpheum  Motion 
Pictures.  Last  Week — Great  Success,  George  Bloomquest  & 
Co..  in  "Nerve." 

Evening  Price.:     lOc,  25c.  50c  and  75c.     Box  Seals  $1.00 
Matinee  Prices:     (Except  Sundays  and  Holidays)  lOc,  25c,  50c. 
PHONE  DOUGLAS  70 


Mrs.  Oscar  Mansfeldt 


Has  Removed  to  2016  Buchanan  St.,  Bet.  Pine  and  California 
TELEPHONE  WEST  314 

MACKENZIE  GORDON 

T£N  O  R 

Tpflrhpr    nf    ^inninn      in  all  its  branches  from  the  rudiments  of  tone  (. 
I  BdOMBI     Ul    Ollltjlliy     ,j,^  1,;^^^^   j„„h   and  CompUlion  of  Publ, 

ORATORIO— OPER.A— CONCERT 


Studio:  2832   Jackson  St. 


By  Appointment  Only 


Telephone:  West  457 


JOSEPH  GREVEN 

Voice  Culture  for  Singing  and  Speaking 
Concert.  Oratorio  and  Opera  Repertoire 

Complete  Preparation  for  the  Operatic  Stage 


824  Eddy  St.,  near  Van  Ness. 


Telephone  Franklin  3671 


Joaquin  S.  Wanrell 


BASSO 
CANTANTE 

VOICE  CULTURE  AND  OPERATIC  TRAINING 

Perfe(5l  Tone  Placing  Italian  School 

Studio — 799  Van  Ness  Ave.,  between  Turk  and  Eddy  Sts. 

Take  Eddy  or  Turk  St.  Cars.  Telephone  Franklin  3432 

ADOLF  GREGORY 

Organist  and  Choir  Director  St.  Mary's.  Oakland 
Director  Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music 
VOICE  PRODUCTION,  PIANO,  HARMONY  AND  COMPOSITION. 

203-205  Twelfth  St.  Cor.  Jackson,  OAKLAND 

Von  Meyerinck  School  of  Music 

ESTABUSHED  1895 
UNDER  THE  DIRECTION  OF  MRS.  ANNA  VON  MEYERINCK 

Classes  in  French.  German.  Musical  History  and  Sight  Reading  in  progress.  Practice 
lesions  with  specially  coached  accompanists  may  he  arranged  for — also  by  non-students 
oflheschool.  Studio.  818  Grove  St..  near  Fillmore.  Tel.  Park  1 969. 
In  Berkeley    Tueiday.  2521  Regent  St.       Tel.    Berkeley    3677.     Thursday  at  Snell 


Miss  Elizabeth  Westgate 

Organiit  Fir^   Piejbyterian  Church 

Teacher  of  PIANO  and  ORGAN 


Studio  :    111  7  Paru  St. 


Alameda,  California 


The  Beringer 


CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC. 

Eftablished  1896 
Under  the  direction  of  Prof,  and  Mme.  JOSEPH  BERINGER.  Complete 
Musical  Education — Piano,  Theory,  and  Composition;  Voice  (Italian  Method), 
Opera,  Concert.  Oratorio.  Free  advantages  to  students;  Harmony  Lectures, 
Concerts,  Ensemble  playing.  Sight  reading.  Faculty  of  distinguished  Instructors. 
Send  lor  catalogue.     926  Pierce  street,  near  McAllister,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

FREID   R.  J.   RAU 

Pacific  Coast  Agent  for 

HAWKES  &  SON 

London,  England 

High-Grade    Band   Instruments 

Bargains  in  Second-Hand  Instruments 
170  PAGE  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO  Phone  Market  5513 


San  Francisco  Conservatory  of  Music 


Cor.  PIERCE  and  CALIFORNIA  STS. 


Phone  WEST  5972  E.  S.  BONELLl,  Director 

This  institution  graduates  more  competent  and  successful  teachers  than  any  other  institution  of  its  kind    on  the  Pacific 
Coast.     Special  course  for  those  desiring  to  enter  the  professional  field.     FACULTY  OF   EFFICIENT  INSTRUCTORS. 


16 


r  A  C  I  F  I  C    (J  O  A  S  T    MUSICAL    R  E  V  I  E  W. 


GABRILOWITSCH    BECOMES   BENEDICT. 


CHARLES  DUTTON'S  STUDIO  EVENING. 


Famous  Pianist  IWarries  Daughter  of  America's  Brainiest  and 

Most   Popular   Humorist,   Herself  an   Artiste   of 

Superior  Achievements. 


(Thomas  Nunan  in  the  S.  F.  Examiner.) 

The  marriage  of  Ossip  Gabrilowitsch,  the  famous  Russian 
pianist,  exceedingly  popular  in  San  Francisco,  and  Miss  Clara 
Clemens,  the  daughter  of  Mark  Twain,  is  not  altogether  a 
surprise  to  the  San  Francisco  people  who  keep  in  touch  with 
the  music  news  of  the  world.  Last  winter  Mr.  Gabrilowitsch 
was  the  guest  of  Mark  Twain  and  his  family  for  several  weeks 
at  Redding.  Conn.,  and  it  was  there  that  the  attachment  be- 
gan to  grow.  On  December  20,  1908,  Miss  Clemens  and  Mr. 
(jabrilowitsch  were  sleigh  riding  near  the  Clemens  home, 
driving  a  spirited  Italian  horse  which  Miss  Clemens  had 
brought  to  this  country  some  time  before.  They  were  going 
along  at  a  lively  rate  when  Mr.  Gabrilowitsch,  who  was  driv- 
ing, turned  off  the  road  and  started  down  the  steep  incline 
toward  another  road  a  short  distance  across  the  country.  Miss 
Clemens  told  her  companion  that  she  thought  the  way  was 
dangerous,  but  the  Russian  pianist  said  the  snow  was  deep 
enough  and  he  seemed  to  have  a  great  deal  of  confidence  in 
his  own  knowledge  of  sleigh  riding. 

Suddenly  the  sleigh  hit  a  boulder  beneath  the  snow,  and 
both  were  thrown  out,  as  afterwards  related  by  Miss  Clemens 
herself.  Mr.  Gabrilowitsch  was  hurled  several  yards  ahead 
of  the  sleigh,  but  he  held  to  the  reins  and  was  dragged  along 
the  ground  as  the  horse  bolted.  He  managed  to  get  to  his 
feet  and  succeeded  in  stopping  the  frightened  animal  before 
many  rods  had  been  run. 

"He  was  very  quick,"  said  Miss  Clemens,  admiringly,  in  the 
account  she  afterwards  gave  of  the  adventure.  "I  do  not 
know  just  how  it  was,  but  I  fell  beneath  the  sleigh  as  it  cap- 
sized and  when  the  horse  ran  the  sleigh  was  dragged  over 
me.  Neither  of  us  was  seriously  hurt,  but  we  were  more  or 
less  bruised.  Mr.  Gabrilowitsch  had  his  neck  strained.  As 
soon  as  he  stopped  the  horse  he  came  back  and  picked  me  up. 
I  guess  I  was  stunned  a  bit,  for  I  couldn't  get  up  myself. 
Some  persons  passing  on  the  road  came  to  our  assistance 
and  turned  the  sleigh  upright  again.  We  were  able  to  drive 
home  after  a  few  minutes." 

When  the  Russian  pianist  became  ill  at  New  York  last 
spring  after  the  American  tour  in  which  he  played  here,  he 
was  attended  in  the  New  York  hospital  by  Miss  Clemens. 
Now  it  may  be  hoped  that  the  influence  of  the  Yankee  bride 
will  make  Mr.  Gabrilowitsch  an  American  citizen.  America 
needs  him.  The  pianist  is  exceedingly  fond  of  this  country, 
and  he  likes  the  freedom  of  the  llnited  States  in  comparison 
with  the  conditions  that  exist  in  Russia.  This  is  true  to  such 
an  extent  that  he  has  preferred  to  live  in  Berlin  than  in  his 
native  land.  The  daughter  of  Mark  Twain  is  distinctly  and 
thoroughly  an  American,  and  she  would  rather  live  in  this 
country  than  anywhere  else  on  earth.  There  seems  to  be 
little  doubt  that  Ossip  Gabrilowitsch  is  coming  to  head  the 
great  school  of  American  pianists.  There  could  not  be  a  bet- 
ter man  for  that  work.  Miss  Clemens  is  a  singer,  with  a 
beautiful  contralto  voice,  and  she  has  won  success  on  the 
concert  stage. 


At  the  regular  monthly  Service  of  Song  in  the  First  Con- 
gregational Church  on  Sunday  evening,  October  3d,  the  fol- 
lowing program  was  delightfully  presented  under  the  direction 
of  Samuel  D.  Mayer,  the  efficient  organist  and  choir  director: 
Organ  Prelude;  Choir.  "The  Lord's  Prayer";  Anthem,  "Sanc- 
tus"  (Gounod);  Contralto  Solo,  "The  Evening  Prayer,"  Eli 
(Costa);  Duet,  "The  Widow  and  Elijah,"  Elijah  (Mendels- 
sohn); Offertory,  "Hear,  O  My  People"  (Stevenson);  sermon 
by  Rev.  George  C.  Adams,  D.  D.,  topic,  "The  National  Songs 
of  the  Ancient  Hebrews";  Duet,  "Faint  Not,  Fear  Not,  God  is 
Near"  (Smart);  Organ  Prelude  (Gounod). 


The  following  program  was  successfully  rendered  at  an  in- 
formal academia  in  the  Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music  on 
Wednesday  afternoon,  Sept.  22:  Piano  Solo,  Premiere  Bal- 
lade (Chopin),  Prelude  in  C  Minor  (Rachmaninoff),  Miss 
Madge  Caulfield;  Ballads,  Contralto,  "My  Dear  Love,"  "Sun- 
shine," "Evening  Song"  (Niedlinger),  Miss  C.  Loewen;  Arie, 
Violin  and  Piano,  Two  Melodies  (B.  Tours),  Mr.  F.  C.  Rock- 
ingham; Recitation,  "Wolsey  to  His  Secretary"  (Shakespeare), 
"Cats  and  Rats"  (Jerome),  Horace  Hare;  Ballads,  Soprano, 
"Because"  I  D'Hardelot),  "Southern  Song"  (Ronald),  Mrs. 
George  Carter;  Piano  Solo.  "Rondo  Brillante"  (Clementi), 
"Erl  King"  (Liszt-Schubert);  Bass  Ballads,  "Come  to  Me" 
(Denza),  "A  Dream"  (Bartlett).  Remarks  on  the  importance 
of  a  ready  repertoire  by  the  director. 


(From  the  Berkeley  Independent.) 
The  past  week  has  been  anything  but  musically  stupid. 
Sunday  evening  came  Chas.  Dutton's  brilliant  reception  in 
his  new  studio.  Some  two  hundred  guests  enjoyed  one  of 
Mr.  Dutton's  most  successful  salon  evenings.  Assisting  him, 
Mr.  Dutton  gave  us  Miss  Dillon,  Miss  Boggs,  Mr.  Marchant, 
Miss  Wood,  Miss  Mesow  and  Signor  de  Grassi  in  a  bewilder- 
ing program.  First,  Mr.  Dutton  did  one  of  his  own  composi- 
tions, variations  on  a  theme,  most  interesting,  to  be  followed 
by  his  characteristic  reading  of  Heller's  "Harp  Etude."  One 
grows  to  associate  this  delightfully  delicate  bit  with  Mr.  Dut- 
ton, there  seems  no  one  who  handles  it  as  he  does.  Miss 
Dillon  and  Miss  Boggs  both  did  harp  solos.  It  is  seldom  one 
hears  this  difficult  instrument,  seldom  indeed  played  as  it 
was  Sunday  evening.  Mr.  Marchant,  who  came  next  on  the 
program,  has  gained  much  in  study  with  Miss  Withrow.  His 
beautiful  baritone  grows  more  flexible,  his  tone  production 
much  purer,  his  voice  under  better  control.  One  sometimes 
feels  that  Mr.  Marchant  would  be  heard  to  better  advantage 
in  less  ambitious  numbers  than  the  Messenet  "Vision  Fugi- 
tive." The  Hills  and  Forest,  from  Franz,  which  Mr.  March- 
ant did  later  in  the  evening,  is  much  better  suited  to  his 
voice. 

Signor  de  Grassi  was  delightful,  seemingly  inspired  and 
played  with  even  more  effect  than  at  his  many  brilliant  con- 
certs. Miss  Helen  Mesow,  although  suffering  from  a  severe 
cold,  did  admirable  work.  Her  soprano  is  faultless,  her  tone 
production  of  an  unusual  purity,  and  her  technique  easy  and 
adequate.  Isn't  it  Fiona  Macleod  who  speaks  of  "A  Pleiads 
of  Pearls"?  Nothing  so  admirably  suggests  Miss  Mesow's 
beautiful  tones.  Even  so  great  an  authority  as  Miss  With- 
row is  quoted  as  saying  "one  of  the  purest  voices  I  have 
heard." 

Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood  sang  again  the  Rubinstein  "Good 
Night,"  Xavier  Leroux's  "Le  Nil,"  and  Hugo  Wolf's  "Mignon." 
These  three  are  perhaps  the  most  acceptable  of  all  Miss 
Wood's  many  songs.  Of  the  three  the  Nile  song  is  the  most 
interesting,  giving  Miss  Wood  rare  opportunities.  Frederick 
Maurer  at  the  piano  gave  his  soloists  the  intelligent  support 
we  have  grown  to  expect  from  him.  Although  Mr.  Dutton 
has  generously  given  us  many  brilliant  evenings,  last  Sunday 
establishes  a  precedent  even  he  will  find  difficutly  in  surpass- 
ing. 


SOUSA'S  GREAT  PROGRAMS. 


The  lack  of  symphony  concerts  in  this  city  makes  wel- 
come the  news  that  we  are  at  least  to  hear  some  of  the 
novelties  of  modern  composers  by  Sousa  and  his  admirable 
band.  While  one  does  not  always  get  the  coloring  intended 
by  the  composer,  the  renditions  by  this  remarkable  band  are 
certainly  a  splendid  substitute  and  give  one  an  excellent  idea 
of  the  works  for  a  band  that  is  capable  of  playing  accompani- 
ments to  such  works  as  the  Mendelssohn  violin  concerto  and 
other  standard  works,  for  the  violin  soloist  can  certainly 
make  good  effects  even  with  orchestral  compositions. 

Here  are  just  a  few  of  the  good  things  promised  by  Man- 
ager Greenbaum  at  the  Sousa  concerts,  which  will  be  given 
at  Dreamland  Rink  commencing  Thursday  afternoon.  Nov.  4, 
and  for  which  one  can  get  a  good  seat  for  as  low  as  fifty 
cents:  Overtures — "The  Bartered  Bride"  (Smetana),  "Frau 
Luna"  (Paul  Lincke),  "Le  Roi  d'Ys"  (Lalo),  and  "Tutti  en 
Mascheri"  (Pedretti).  "Welsh  Rhapsody"  (Edward  German), 
"Rhapsodie  Slavonia"  (Friedman),  Tone  Poem,  "Finlandia" 
(Sibelius),  "Rhapsodie  Espagnole"  (Chabrier).  A  work  of 
particular  interest  will  be  the  Prelude  to  the  Russian  drama 
"Crime  and  Punishment."  by  Rachmaninoff,  who  is  to  travel 
as  a  pianist  and  conductor  in  this  country  during  the  coming 
season. 

Each  of  the  eight  programs  contains  interesting  works,  and 
Mr.  Sousa  will  introduce  to  us  his  new  "Suite  Bacchanalian." 
which  he  gives  the  sub-title  "People  Who  Live  in  Glass 
Houses."  The  work  contains  four  movement  characterized 
as  follows:  (a)  The  Champagne,  (b)  The  Rhine-wines,  (c) 
The  Whiskies,  (d)  The  Cordials,  which  seem  almost  as  ex- 
pressive as  the  usual  classic  names,  for  the  first  movement 
certainly  would  seem  to  indicate  a  jolly,  bubbling  tempo; 
the  second  a  "Lente"  or  "Andante";  the  third  a  sort  of 
"Scherzo,"  and  the  last  a  dainty,  brilliant  and  effective  end- 
ing. We  shall  also  hear  the  latest  Sousa  march,  "The  Glory 
of  the  Yankee  Navy." 

Instead  of  the  usual  vocal  solo  at  each  concert  there  will 
be  duets  by  Miss  Frances  Hoyt.  soprano,  and  Miss  Grace 
Hoyt.  mezzo-soprano.  Complete  programs  will  be  ready  a 
week  in  advance. 


r  A  ( '  I  F  I  ( '  <;  ( )  A  s  T   M  r  s  I  c  a  l  k  e  y  i  e  \v 


The  Most  Beautiful  Piano 
Store  in  America 

Above  is  shown  a  photo  eugraviug  of  our  big  new  store.  It  is  coueeded  by  the  whole  music  world 
to  be  the  best,  and  the  most  perfectly  appointed  home  of  any  house  in  the  world.  The  picture  shows 
but  a  part  of  our  main  floor  and  a  portion  only  of  the  great  stock  of  more  than  flftr  grand  pianos — a 
stock  five  times  larger  than  is  carried  by  any  otlier  house  on  the  Coast.  Just  at  this  time  about  five 
hundred  pianos  of  leading  makes  are  shown :  a  display  which  is  worth  your  time  to  see. 

Twenty  specially  built  rooms  are  occupied  by  our  great  stock,  making  the  opportunity  for  compari 
son  better  than  is  offered  at  any  other  store,  while  in  price  and  finish  every  individual  purse  and  taste 
may  be  satisfied. 

Our  new  talking  machine  department  on  tbe  Sutter  street  side  surpasses  in  point  of  location,  airi- 
ness, convenience,  comfort,  and  especially  in  the  magnitude  of  its  stock,  and  the  courteous  service 
offered,  any  similar  department  in  the  West.  All  the  finest  in  Talking  Machines,  and  all  the  latest 
records  all  the  time  is  the  motto,  and  it's  lived  up  to. 

The  Wiley  B.  Allen  Co. 

Wiley  B.  Allen  Building,  135-153  Kearney  and  217-225  Sutter  Streets. 

Oakland:  510  Twelfth  and  1105  Washington. 

Other  Stores — Los  Angeles.  Sacramento,  Sau  Jose,  San  Diego.  Stockton,  Phoenix.  Ariz..  Reno.  Xev.. 
Portland.  Ore. 


18 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


(Continued  from  Page  7.) 
O  My  People,  The  Lord  Hath  Done  Great  Things,  To  Deu)ra 
and  Benedictus  in  F  (Festival). 

Advent — Benedicite  (varied  and  full  text),  I  Sought  the 
Lord,  Listen,  O  Isles.  Hear,  O  Lord,  The  Lord  Shall   Reign. 

Christmas — The  Angel  Gabriel.  Now  When  .Jesus  Was  Born, 
The  Merry  Bells  Now  Ring  (Carol),  Te  Deura  and  Benedictus 
in  F  (Festival),  The  Lord  Shall  Reign. 

Lent — Benedicite  (varied  and  full  text).  Behold  the  Master. 
Thou  Art  My  Shield,  Hear,  O  Lord,  Follow  Me,  It  is  I,  Far 
From   My   Heavenly   Home. 

Easter — Easter  Eve  and  Morn  (cantata,  10  numbers),  The 
Lord  is  King,  Praise  the  Lord,  Very  Early  in  the  Morning, 
The  Lord  Hath  Done  Great  Things,  I  Sought  the  Lord,  The 
Lord  Shall  Reign,  Te  Deum  and  Benedictus  in  P   (Festival!. 

Ascension — The  Lord  is  King,  Praise  the  Lord,  Behold,  Thou 
Shalt  Call  a  Nation,  Te  Deum  and  Benedictus  in  F  (Festival). 
The  Lord   Shall   Reign. 

Whitsuntide — The  Lord  is  King,  Praise  the  Lord,  Behold 
Thou  Shalt  Call,  Wherewithal  Shall  a  Young  Man. 

Offertory  and  General — Let  Your  Light.  While  We  Have 
Time,  Honor  the  Lord.  The  Lord  Hath  Done. 

General — Te  Deum  and  Benedictus  (Service  in  F).  Te  Deum 
(Quadruple)  (Varied  and  full  text).  Hear.  O  My  People.  Be- 
hold. The  Master.  I  Sought  the  Lord.  Listen.  O  Isles.  Thou 
Art  My  Shield,  There  is  None  Holy,  Far  From  My  Heavenly 
Home,  Behold,  Thou  Shalt  Call  a  Nation,  The  Lord  is  King, 
Praise  the  Lord,  Hear,  O  Lord  (Octavo).  The  Salutation  of 
the  Dawn.  The  Ninety  and  Nine.  The  New  Jerusalem.  Incline 
Your  Ear.  Wherewithal  Shall  a  Young  Man.  Hear.  O  Lord 
(duet). 

As  Mr.  Stevenson  is  one  of  the  foremost  American  com- 
posers, and  a  critic  of  ideal  faculties,  we  will  reprint  a 
biographical  sketch,  also  published  by  the  Oliver  Ditson  Com- 
pany, which  should  prove  of  interest  to  every  genuine  music 
lover: 

"Mr.  Frederick  Stevenson  was  born  in  Newark.  Nottingham- 
shire. England,  and  at  seven  years  of  age  was  in  the  famous 
Paris  Church  Choir  and  Choir  School  under  Dr.  Dearie.  While 
still  quite  young  he  studied  organ  with  Dr.  Edward  Thirtle  of 
Boston  Parish  Church,  and.  Itaer.  with  Mr.  Samuel  Reay,  a 
fine  organist  of  the  old  school.  During  the  whole  of  his  col- 
lege course  of  three  years  at  St.  John's.  Hurstpierpoint,  he 
was  a  solo  member  of  the  fine  choir.  Two  ritualistic  choral 
services  each  week  day  and  three  on  Sunday,  and  the  in- 
variable noonday  practice,  gave  exhaustive  training  in  Epis- 
copal music  and  churchly  method.  Fifteen  years  of  active 
professional  work  in  London  followed,  during  seven  years  of 
which  he  was  organist  and  choirmaster  of  Trinity  Church, 
Forest  Hill,  and  eight  years  of  the  Blackheath  Congregational 
Church.  Harmony  with  Dr.  Macfarren,  the  Professor  at  Cam- 
bridge, and  Counterpoint  with  Dr.  Bridge  of  Westminster  Ab- 
bey, led  to  assiduous  composition,  the  most  notable  work 
being  'Cyrus.'  an  oratorio  of  twenty-five  numbers.  Up  to  the 
time  of  leaving  London,  in  1883.  Mr.  Stevenson  was  conductor 
of  three  choral  societies,  those  of  Blackheath,  Catford  and 
Belvedere,  and  professor  of  voice  and  theory  in  the  Black- 
heath Conservatory  of  Music.  Being  offered  the  important 
post  of  Precentor  of  St.  John's  Cathedral,  Denver,  he  accepted 
and  came  out  to  that  position  in  1883.  Seconded  by  the  able 
coadjutorship  of  Mr.  Walter  B.  Hall.  F.  R.  C.  O..  now  of  Trin- 
ity. Pittsburg,  the  services  speedily  attained  the  pre-eminence 
unhesitatingly  accorded  them  by  Mr.  Joseph  Bennett  in  his 
critical  reports  to  the  London  Telegraph  and  Musical  Times 
on  the  standard  of  church  music  in  America.  The  closing 
words  of  Mr.  Bennett's  second  notice  well  deserve  quotation. 
'The  Denver  Cathedral  Choir  as  I  heard  it  in  (December) 
1884.  would  easily  hold  its  own  with  the  cathedral  choirs  of 
England.'  Later  Mr.  Stevenson  became  organist  and  choir- 
master of  the  new  St.  Mark's  Church,  director  of  the  Denver 
Conservatory  of  Music  and  conductor  of  the  Concert  Choir, 
In  February.  1894.  he  removed  to  Los  Angeles.  Cal..  where 
he  has  been  director  of  the  Ellis  and  Treble  Clef  Clubs,  or- 
ganist and  choirmaster  of  St.  John's  and  Christ  Church  and. 
concurrently,  of  the  Jewish  Temple,  and  where  he  now  re- 
sides, devoting  himself  chiefly  to  composition  and  to  the  in- 
culcation of  harmony  and  theory  in  general.  Under  a  long 
contract  with  the  Oliver  Ditson  Company  a  list  of  over  flrty 
works  in  many  varied  forms  has  already  resulted,  and  the 
number  is  being  steadily  augmented.  Mr.  Stevenson  is  a 
resident  member  and  past  President  of  the  University  Club, 
and  an  enthusiastic  golfer  of  the  Country  Club  of  his  city." 

L.  E.  BEHYMER'S  ACTIVITY.— Through  the  energy  of  L. 
E.  Behymer  the  following  clubs  of  Southern  California  cities 
have  engaged  a  number  of  artists:  The  Spinet  Club  in  Red- 
lands — Dr.  Wullner.  the  Flonzaley  Quartet  and  Tilly  Koenen, 
Mrs.  Mary  Le  Grand  Reed,  Mr.  and  Mrs.   Harry  Lott,  Ignaz 


llaroldi.  Miss  Eleanor  Wad  worth  and  Mrs.  Heartt  Dreyfus, 
tlio  last  five  being  resident  artists;  the  Tuesday  Musical  Club 
in  Riverside  engaged  as  visiting  artists — Fritz  Kreisler,  Flon- 
zaley Quartet,  Madame  Jomelli,  Marie  Nichols,  and  as  resi- 
dent artists.  Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Harry 
Lott,  Ignaz  Haroldi,  Georg  Kruger  and  Miss  June  Terry;  the 
Amphion  Club  of  San  Diego  engaged  as  soloists  the  following 
California  artists — Miss  Anna  Miller  Wood.  Ignaz  Haroldi, 
(Jeorge  Kruger.  Bruce  Gordon  Kingsley.  and  as  visiting  ar- 
tists, Ellen  Beach  Yaw.  Frieda  Langendorff  and  Carrie  Jacobs 
Bond. 

Hi  *  « 

THE  ORGANISTS'  ASSOCIATION.— The  Organists'  Asso- 
ciation of  Southern  California  held  its  first  meeting  and  dis- 
cussion of  the  season  at  the  Hollenbeck  recently.  The  at- 
tendance included  President  Ernest  Douglas  of  St.  Paul's  Pro- 
cathedral;  T.  E.  Welde  of  St.  Vincent's  Church.  Edw.  Heyes 
of  the  Church  of  Our  Lady  of  Loretto.  Morton  F.  Mason  of 
the  Pasadena  Presbyterian  Church.  A.  J.  Stamm  of  Holly- 
wood. W.  F.  Skeele  of  the  First  Congregational.  Archibald 
Sessions  of  Christ's  Episcopal.  J.  M.  Spaulding  of  the  Imman- 
uel,  Presbyterian.  Frank  H.  Colby  of  St.  Vibiana's  Cathedral, 
Ray  Hastings  of  the  First  M.  E.  Church,  H.  L.  Pierce  of  the 
Boyle  Heights  Presbyterian,  P.  S.  Hallett  of  All  Saints.  Pasa- 
dena; Vernon  Howell  of  St.  Stephens.  Hollywood;  H.  E. 
Weaver.  Waldo  F.  Chase  of  St.  John's  Episcopal,  and  Rev. 
Charles  Murphy  of  St.  Athanasius  Church  and  Trinity  Chapel. 
The  Organists'  Association  of  Southern  California  is  the  only 
association  of  its  kind  on  the  Pacific  Coast  and  is  the  largest 
society  west  of  New  York  City.  With  the  Gamut  Club  and 
the  Dominant  Club  its  forms  one  of  the  three  organizations 
giving  distinction  to  Los  Angeles  throughout  the  musical 
world. 


Ha,rmony  Olass 

Dr.  H.  J.  STEWART  Begs  to  announce  that  he  has  organ- 
ized a  class  for  the  study  of  elementary  harmony.  The  first 
meeting  will  be  held  on  Friday  Afternoon,  October  29th. 
For  particulars  address  the  studio.   1420  Franklin  street.  ^  Q 


'Oello   Ooncert 


TO  BE  GIVEN  BY 


ALBERT  ROSENTHAL 

— AT— 

Lyric  Hall,  513  Larkin  St. 

SAN  FRANCISCO,  CAL. 

Wednesday  Evening,  November  3,  1909 

at  8:15  o'Clock.     Admission,  $1.00 

Tickets  for  sale  at  Sherman.  Clay  &  Co..  Kohler  &  Chase.  Benj. 
Curtaz  &  Son.  at  the  Manager's  office.  147  Presidio  Ave.,  and  at 
the  box  office  at  Lyric  Hall. 


Zech  Orche^ra 

Wm.  F.  ZECH,  Director 

Second  Concert  Season,  1909 

NOVELTY  THEATRE 

O'Farrell  and  Steiner  Sts. 

Tuesday  Evening,  Oct.  26,  at  8:15  o'Clock 

TtcKets,  50  Cents 

For  sale  at  Wm.  F.  Zech.  1332  Geary  St..  St.  Francis  Hotel  News 
Stand.  Kohler  &  Chase,  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  Christophe  Music  House. 
2390  Mission  St..  or  any  of  the  members. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 

Have  You  Heard  the  New  Victor 


19 


Arral 


RECORDS? 
"Bird  Waltz" 
"  Praviata" 
■'BeKKHi'  Student" 
"El  Bolero  Grande" 
Nightingale  Song  from 
'Les  Noces  de  Jeanette" 


The  Great  Coloratura  Soprano 


llanrlrari  ^nii  Btuhm  Iml^tmii 

F.  W.  BLANCHARD.  Pres.  and  Mgr. 
Contains  200  Studios  Rented  Exclusively  to 

Musicians,  Artists  and  Scientists 

LOS  ANGELES.  CALIFORNIA 


Abraham   Miller 

TENOR  — TEACHER   OF   SINGING 
CONCERT— RECITAL— ORATORIO 

Addies!  L.  E.  Behym«.  Manasf  r 

Studio:     342-343  Blanchard  Hall  Building,  Los  Angeles,  Cal.     Member  of 
Faculty  o(  the  Conservatorv  of  Music  of  the  University  of  Southern  California 

Charles  Farwell  Edson 

BASSO 

Studio  :    2020  Tobertnan  Street  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Telephone  23919 


Margaret  Goetz 


Mezzo  Contralto 


Historical  Song   Recitals,  Concerts  and   Musicaies 
Tel.  Home  51485.     719  Ottowa  St.  near  lOth  and  Figueroa.  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Estelle  Heartt  Dreyf uss  ££e!^ 

CONCERT-  PURPOSE  PROGRAM  RECITALS-ORATORIO 
Studio:      Blanchard  Hall  Building Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Adolf  Willhartitz  ^^^"^^"^  ^^  ^'^"° 

332  So.  Broadway Los  Angeles 

ARNOLD  KRAUSS      ---  ---« 

Concert    Master    of    the    Los    Angeles    Symphony    Orchestra 
tot  W.  ISTII  ST..  LOS    AXGEI.K.S  I'lIONEIIOME  •>>.->S->  :! 

Harley  Hamilton  8rht;:-wotltorcTet"^ 

VIOLIN  INSTRUCTOR 

320  Blanchard  Hall  Building. Los  Angeles.  Cal. 

Charles  E.  Pemberton  ^'""°  '"^t^'^t"'- 

Hannony  and    Counterpoint 

Studio:  306-307  Blanchard  Hall  Building  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


JD       Prxi,K«    TENOR— VOICE  CULTURE  and 
.    D.     r  OUlin  THE  ART  OF  SINGING 

Director:  Ellis  Club,  Temple  Baptist  Choir,  Woman's  Lyric  Club 
Studio:   316-319  Blanchard  Building.  Los  Angeles  Cal. 


J.  P.  Dupuy 


TENOR— VOICE  DIRECTOR 


Dire,5lor  Orpheus  Male  Club,  Bnar  Bnlh  Choir,  Trinily  M.  E.  Church  Choir 
5.  J-  ail  r^l^-  V-  jn'^-iY""'  ^'P""-"^"'  '"d  Eulerpean  Mai.  Quarlcte 
bludlo:   3  I  1   Blanchard  Building.  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


William  Edson  Strobridge  ^i^^ 

Room  335  Blanchard  Building  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


L.  E.  BEHYMER 

Western  Manager 
Musical  Artists 


Main  Office:    LOS  ANGELES,    California 


Booking  Musical  Attractions    from    Denver   West,    California 
and  the  Southwest  on  GUARANTEES  and  PERCENTAGE 


REPRESENTS   THIS   SEASON: 

Madame  Marcella  Sembrich 
Madame  Schumann-Heink 
Madame  Frieda  Langendorff 
Madame  Jeanne  Jomelli 

Madame  Teresa  Carreno 
Miss  Marie  Nichols 

Miss  Tilly  Koenen 

Ellen  Beach  Yaw 

Madelen  Worden 
Dr.  Ludwig  Wuellner 

George  Hamlin,  Tenor 

Fritz  Kreisler,  Violinist 

Pepita  Arriola,  Pianist 

The  Flonzaley  Quartette   and   the 

Damrosch  Orchestra,  with  Isadora 

Duncan,  Dancer,  and  other 

Well  Known  Artists. 

SUPPLYING  ALSO  THE  PACIFIC  COAST  ARTISTS: 

Mackenzie  Gordon 
Antonio  De  Grassi 
Anna  Miller  Wood 

Dr.  J.  F.  WOLLE  in  Organ  Recitals 
Univ.  of  California  Glee  Club 
Georg  Kruger,  Pianist 

IGNAZ  Edouard  Haroldi,  Violinist 
Mary  Le  Grand  Reed,  Soprano 
Harry  Lott,  Baritone 
Herr  Arnold  Krauss,  Violinist 
Helen  Goff,  Soprano 
The  Los  Angeles  Symphony  Orches- 
tra— 77  Men. 
The  Woman's  Symphony  Orchestra — 
63  Women. 


Catering  to  the  leading  Music  Clubs,  Colleges, 

Hotels,     Women's     Clubs,    Private 

Schools  and  Homes  with 

"THE  BEST  IN  MUSIC" 

And    Playing  Artists 
Direct    in    the    Leading   Cities  of    the    West 

Especially  Low    Rates    made    to    Music    Clubs    of   California 


20 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


IN  THE  REALM  OF  THE  THEATRE 


Edited  by  JOSEPH  M.  GUMMING 


•THE    THIRD    DEGREE"    A    GREAT    PLAY. 


Charles   Klein's   Remarkable   Dramatic   Effort  Ably   Played   By 
A  Very  Capable  Company. 


If  "Tlie  Third  Degree"  is  going  to  liave  tlie  same  effect  on 
other  playwriters  as  Charles  Klein's  "The  Lion  and  the 
Mouse."  the  poor  police  are  in  for  a  most  unhappy  time,  and 
they  will  realize  as  never  before  the  truth  of  that  humorous 
song  in  "The  Pirates  of  Penzance"  entitled,  "A  Policeman's 
Lot  is  not  a  Happy  One." 

When  "The  Lion  and  the  Mouse"  appeared  it  struck  just 
the  right  psychological  moment,  and  the  force  of  its  story 
overcame  the  technically  poor  way  of  its  telling  and  made  it 
a  tremendous  success.  Since  that  time  we  have  been 
satiated  with  trust-busting  and  wealth-denouncing  plays,  so 
much  so  that  the  success  of  Wilton  Lackaye  in  "The  Battle" 
has  been  attributed  by  some  to  the  fact  that  it  takes  the 
side  of  the  much  berated  capitalist  and  attempts  to  show 
that  the  faults  of  our  economic  system  are  not  entirely  his. 

So  with  "The  Third  Degree,"  and  its  powerful  denunciation 
of  police  methods,  we  may  expect  all  kinds  of  stage  attacks 
on  the  unhappy  guardians  of  the  peace,  and  doubtless  some 
one  will  be  moved  at  the  right  time  to  present  the  police 
side  of  the  question.  A  play  like  this  is  most  encouraging  to 
those  who  hold  the  theory  that  the  function  of  the  stage  is 
something  more  than  merely  to  entertain  the  tired  business 
man.  and  that  the  play  which  thoughtfully  and  forcefully  por- 
trays life  is  reasonably  certain  of  success. 

But  to  the  play — The  curtain  rises  on  the  rooms  of  Robert 
Underwood,  selling  agent  for  tapestries  and  other  works  of 
art;  he  is  desperate  for  money  and  faces  exposure  for  em- 
bezzlement; enter  his  college  friend,  Howard  Jeffries,  Jr.,  son 
of  a  wealthy  and  excessively  proud  father,  but  disinherited 
for  marrying  a  waiter  girl;  Jeffries,  who  is  rather  weak  men- 
tally, and  at  the  time  intoxicated,  wants  to  borrow  money 
from  Underwood.  He  goes  off  into  a  drunken  sleep,  while 
his  step-mother  calls  on  Underwood,  to  whom  she  was  once 
engaged.  He  has  written  her  that  if  she  withdraws  her 
patronage  it  means  ruin  to  him  and  he  threatens  to  commit 
suicide.  She  denounces  his  crooked  dealings,  refuses  to  help 
him  and  leaves.  He  steps  into  the  next  room,  a  shot  Is  heard 
and  the  curtain  falls. 

The  curtain  rises  after  a  supposed  lapse  of  ten  hours,  and 
young  Jeffries  is  being  given  "The  Third  Degree"  by  the 
burly  and  brutal  Police  Captain  Clinton;  he  is  a  nervous 
wreck  after  the  long  strain  and  finally  succumbs  to  the  Cap- 
tain's brutal  strength  and  will  power,  and  is  hypnotized  into 
confessing  to  the  murder. 

Then  comes  the  wife,  the  despised  waiter  girl,  the  only 
one  who  believes  him  innocent,  his  selfish  obstinate  fool  of  a 
father,  convinced  of  his  guilt,  will  not  help  him  and  the  brave 
girl  makes  the  fight  alone.  This  father,  by  the  way,  is  the 
only  part  of  the  play  that  seems  untrue  to  life.  It  is  incon- 
ceivable that  a  father  who  is  continually  talking  of  the  dis- 
grace of  the  whole  affair  will  do  nothing  to  save  himself,  for 
purely  selfish  reasons,  from  the  still  further  disgrace  of  his 
son's  execution. 

To  do  justice  to  this  admirably  built  play  would  require  a 
detailed  account  of  how  the  friendless  girl  storms  the  lawyer's 
office,  compels  him  to  defend  the  boy,  even  commits  perjury 
to  shield  her  husband's  step-mother  and  to  the  end  faces 
calumny  and  possible  loss  of  her  husband  after  she  has  saved 
his  life.  The  play  is  compactly  built,  the  story  unfolds 
naturally,  the  interest  never  flags  and  the  tenser  moments 
are  admirably  relieved  with  delightful  humor.  Klein  ob- 
tained the  idea  for  the  play  from  an  anecdote  related  by 
Professor  Hugo  Munsterberg  in  his  work  on  the  credibility 
of  testimony  entitled  "On  the  Witness  Stand,"  and  Professor 
Munsterberg  says  that  the  play  might  be  actually  a  transcript 
from  life. 

The  performance  given  by  the  excellent  company  of  play- 
ers at  the  Van  Ness  confirms  the  Munsterberg  opinion  most 
emphatically.  The  whole  presentation,  save  where  the  im- 
possible father  appears,  grips  one  with  the  feeling  that  this 
isn't  a  play  at  all,  but  real  life,  that  is  being  lived  before 
your  eyes.  The  part  of  Annie  Jeffries  is  most  convincingly 
played  by  Fernanda  Eliscu,  who  lays  bare  before  you  the 
quivering   soul  of  the   poor,   humble   waiter   girl,   devoted   to 


the  weakling  of  a  husband,  willing  even  to  give  him  up,  even 
trying  to  force  him  lo  give  her  up  if  she  stands  in  his  way, 
but  brave  as  a  lion  when  it  comes  to  fighting  to  clear  him. 
The  part  is  full  of  opportunity  to  overact,  but  she  plays  it 
in  just  the  right  key. 

The  young  husband  is  very  well  played  by  Ralph  Ramsey, 
who  manages  to  make  his  drunken  scene  quite  amusing,  and 
is  most  excellent  when  he  is  being  toured  into  a  confession  by 
the  bullying  of  the  brutal  Captain  Clinton.  Alfred  Moore 
looks  the  part  of  the  brute  Captain  and  portrays  the  type 
admirably. 

Paul  Everton  plays  the  part  of  Richard  Brewster,  the  emi- 
nent lawyer  whom  the  wife  finally  works  into  defending  her 
husband  despite  the  threats  of  his  rich  client,  the  boy's  fath- 
er. He  gives  a  good  impression  of  a  well-drawn  character. 
The  one  other  female  part  besides  the  young  wife  is  that  of 
old  Jeffries'  second  wife,  well  played  by  Margaret  Drew,  who 
wears  some  very  swell  gowns.  "To  conclude,  it  is  a  remark- 
able play,  exceedingly  well  played. 
*  *  * 
Another  One  of  Shaw's  Plays. 

George  Bernard  Shaw,  the  irrespressible.  has  recently  pub- 
lished in  book  form  his  play,  "The  Admirable  Bashville," 
which  is  a  dramatization  of  one  of  his  novels,  "Cashel  Byron's 
Profession."  It  is  preceded  by  one  of  Shaw's  characteristic 
prefaces,  in  which  he  explains  w'hy  he  wrote  it  in  blank  verse. 
He  says  that  the  British  copyright  law  is  such  that  any  one 
could  have  dramatized  his  novel  and  that  he  would  have  been 
debarred  from  all  right  to  do  the  dramatizing  himself,  and 
as  he  learned  that  some  one  was  about  to  do  so  he  had  to 
hurry,  and  as  he  only  had  a  week  to  write  the  play,  he  did 
it  in  blank  verse,  whereas  if  he  had  to  write  it  in  prose  it 
would  have  taken  a  month.  This  gives  him  the  chance  to 
elaborate  on  one  of  his  pet  theories — that  blank  verse  is  so 
much  easier  to  write  than  prose.  He  claims  quite  seriously 
that  he  has  often  written  much  better  blank  verse  than 
Shakespeare, and  he  says  in  this  preface  that  whenever 
Shakespeare  was  in  a  hurry  he  used  blank  verse  as  a  short 
cut  and  wrote  such  stuff  as  "To  Be  or  Not  To  Be,"  or  "The 
Seven  Ages,  '  but  that  when  he  had  time  he  wrote  such  ex- 
quisite prose  as  the  first  scones  of  "As  You  Like  It"  or  Ham- 
let's chaffing  with  Rosencrantz  and  Guildenstirn.  When  you 
read  "The  Admirable  Bashville"  you  find  it  is  one  of  Shaw's 
jokes.  As  he  says  in  the  preface,  he  has  followed  the  best 
models  of  the  present-day  stage,  made  virtue  triumphant  and 
united  the  lovers;  when  you  have  finished  this  delicious  bur- 
lesque it  does  begin  to  shake  your  belief  in  the  superior 
ability  required  to  write  blank  verse. 


CHARLES  FROHMAN  ON  FRENCH  PLAYS. 


In  last  week's  issue  reference  was  made  to  a  magazine 
article  on  "The  German  Invasion  of  the  American  Stage"  in 
which  it  is  claimed  that  German  plays  are  coming  more  and 
more  into  favor  with  us.  A  very  different  version  is  held  by 
Charles  Prohman  in  a  very  interesting  article  in  last  Satur- 
day's San  Francisco  "Bulletin." 

He  says  that  the  superior  craftmanship  of  the  French  play- 
wrights accounts  for  their  popularity — to  quote  directly,  "The 
typical  French  domestic  drama  is  facinating  from  the  point 
of  view  of  workmanship.  Its  chief  virtue  is  economy.  The 
influence  of  the  concise,  compactly  built  domestic  drama  of 
France  can  be  seen  on  all  sides  of  America." 

He  points  out  that  the  rightly  written  American  play  will 
always  be  more  popular  than  the  best  French  play,  for  the 
reason  that  French  plays  are  written  for  an  older  civilization, 
and  aim  to  reach  the  heart  through  the  mind  whereas  in  this 
younger  civilization  we  reach  the  mind  through  the  heart.  He 
says  further:  "The  wise  American  playwright  is  the  one  who 
takes  the  dramatic  material  that  is  true  to  American  life  and 
clothes  it  with  as  much  of  France's  or  Europe's  excellence  in 
technique  as  will  not  rob  that  material  of  one  iota  of  its 
strength.  Technical  excellence  of  French  playwriting  com- 
bined with  the  great  emotional  or  optimistic  strength  in 
American  playwrighting  would  seem  to  be  a  perfect  product." 
The  rest  of  the  article  is  an  amusing  account  of  French 
theatres  and  theatre  customs." 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


21 


Mrs.  Grace  Davis   Northrup 

Soprano  Soloist  First  Congregational  Church,  Oakland 
Concert.    Oratorio   and  Recital  Programs 

TEACHER    OF    SINGING 

Residence  Studio: 
1 333  Bay  Vif w  Place.  Berkeley.  Phone  Berkeley  958 

Oakland  Sludio-.  65  MacDcnough  BIdg.     Tuesday  and  Friday 

ROJMEO  FRICK 

BARYTONE 

Vocal  !n9tru(^on  After  Foremofl  European  Methods 

30-31  Canning  Block,  13th  and  Broadway.  Oakland 

Phone  Oak  6454  Phone  Home  a  1468 

Paul  Steindorff 

Studio,  2422  STUART  STREET 
Berkeley,  California 


Mrs.  'William  iSteinbach 

VOICE  CULTURE 

STUDIO:    1 528  Broderick  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


H.   D.   MUSTARD 

Baritone 

Voice  Culture  in  All  its  Branches 

Opera— Oratorio-Concert 
Studio,    1548  Haight  St.  PhonePark4n7 


Studio: 
1380  Sutter  Street 


San  Francisco,  Cal. 


HERMAN  PERLET 

Voice  Ctxlttxre  and  Piaii^o 

Sludio:    1451  Franklin  St.  Phone  Franklin  634 

Mrs.  Walter  V^itham 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 


Miss  Helen  Colburn  Heath 

SOPRA.NO 

Vocal  Instruction.  Concert  Work 
Phone  West  4890  1304  Ellis  Street 


M^enceslao   Villalpando 
Violoncellist 

Concerts,  Musicales,  Ensemble  and  In^rudtion 
Tel.  Park  5329. STUDIO:  746  CLAYTON  ST. 

DELIA    C    GRIS^rOLD 

Contralto 

VOICE   CULTURE 
Phone  Park   1614  Res.  Studio.  845  Oak  St. 

FREDERICK    MAURER,    JR. 

Accompanist 

Teacher  of  Piano- Harmony-Coaching-Singers- Violinists 
Mondays.  I  32  1  SuMer  St.  San  Francisco.     Tel.  Franklin  2  1 43 
Home  Sludio.  1  726  Le  Roy  Ave.  Berkeley.  Tel.  Berkeley  539 


FredericR  Stevenson 

Harmony  and  Composition 

Voice 

417  Blanchard  Hall  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


RICHARD  FERBER 

Composer  and  Teacher    Piano  and  Harmony 

1350  OTARRELL'ST.       SAN  FRANCISCO 


MISS  EDNA  MONTAGNE 

(Pupil  o(  Mrs.  Hugo  Mansleldl) 
Xeacher    of   Piano 

Res.  Studio:    1218  Telegraph   Ave.,   Oakland,  Cal. 


•Sig'nor  Antonio  de  Grassi 

Violinist 

Concerts  Arranged  — Vwlin  and  Harmony  Taught 

Winifred  June  de  Grassi.  Assiflanl 

Sludio:     130  PRESIDIO  AVE.         SAN  FRANCISCO 


IMPORTANT   ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Beginning  with  the  issue  of  October 
2,  1909,  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Re- 
view has  been  increased  to  24  pages, 
which  size  will  occasionally  be  aug- 
mented to  32  pages.  This  enables  the 
management  to  add  several  new  de- 
partments. The  threatrical  depart- 
ment occupies  two  full  pages,  and  con- 
tains straightforward,  unbiased  and 
honest  reviews  of  every  theatrical 
performance  of  merit  in  San  Francis- 
co. These  critical  opinions,  which  are 
not  controlled  by  the  business  office, 
will  serve  as  a  guide  to  our  readers  in 
Oakland,  Los  Angeles,  Portland  and 
Seattle,  and  all  interior  cities  of  the 
Pacific  Coast,  in  case  these  cities 
should  be  visited  by  companies  first 
appearing    in   San    Francisco. 

Besides  this  reliable  theatrical  de- 
partment, the  Pacific  Coast  Musical 
Review  contains  a  page  of  late  Euro- 
pean news,  and  a  page  of  the  most  im- 
portant musical  news  from  leading 
Eastern  centers.  The  Los  Angeles, 
Oakland,  Berkeley  and  Alameda  de- 
partments are  continued  as  usual, 
while  more  attention  is  being  paid 
this  season  to   Portland  and   Seattle. 

In  this  24-page  issue  advertising 
pages  will  be  limited  to  12  pages,  and 
anyone  applying  for  space  after  these 
12  pages  are  filled  must  wait  until  a 
vacancy  occurs.  Special  advertising 
rates  can  only  be  secured  by  those 
who  keep  their  advertisement  in  these 
columns  during  the  entire  year.  Those 
who  desire  to  withdraw  their  adver- 
tisement during  the  two  summer 
months  must  consent  to  pay  a  higher 
rate.  Rates  on  this  page  will  be  IN 
CASE  OF  ANNUAL  CONTRACTS: 
One  inch,  $1.00;  one-half  inch,  50c, 
and  "Musical  Directory,"  25  cents  per 
issue. 


William  Hofmann 

Musical  Director  Fairmont  Hotel 


MRS.   A.   F.    BRIDGE 

Teacher  of  Singing 

Tel.  West  7279  2220  Webster  St..  San  Francisco 


Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks 

Voice  Culture 

Studio:  Room  35.  GaSney  Bide  .  376  Suiter  St.,  Wednes- 
jays.    Res.:265ParnassusAve.  Tel.  Park  4190.    S.  F..  CI. 


Alfred  Cogswell 

studio:  1531  Suiter,  San  Francisco,  on  Tncsday 
and  Friday,  and  at  211Q  Durant  St., 
Berkeley,  on  Monday,  Thursday  and  Saturday 


MRS.  OLIVE  ORBISON 

Dramatic    Soprano 

Voice  Culture  Concert  and  Oratorio 

2240  California  St.— Phone  West  6659 


Mrs.  THorotigman 

Voice  Culture— Dramatic  Soprano 

CONCERT— ORATORIO— OPERA 

Studio:  Room  109.  915  Van  Ness  Ave.      Tel.  Franklin  5254 


MRS.  M.  TROMBONI 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 

Studio.   1531   SUTTER  ST..  Monday,  and  Thundav.      At 
Mill  Valley.  Keystone  Building.  Tuesday.  Wedned.v    Friday 


Mrs.    Olive   Reed   Cushman 

VOICE  CULTURE 

Studio.  Maple  Hall.  14th  and  Webster  St...  Oakland 
Tuesday  and    Fnd.y Phone  Oakland  3453 


EDNA    MURRAY 


Concerts  Recitals  Lessons 

Address:    .    .    .     Ross.  Marin  County,  Californi: 


LOUIS  CRFPAUX 

(Member  Paris  Grand  Opera) 
Delbert  Block.  943  Van  Ness  at  OTarrell.    Reception  Hou 
1  1  :30  to  1  2,  and  3  to  4  except  Wednesday  and  Saturday 
Wednesday  in  Oakland,  1  1  54  Brush  Street 


BENJ.  S  MOORE 

(Pianist  and  Teacher    Organist  of  First  Presbyterian  Church) 
Studio:     Rooms  22-23  Alliance  Building.  San  Jose,  California. 


Musical    Directory- 


PIANO 


SIGISMONDO  MARTINEZ 
1321  Sutter  St .  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


EULA  HOWARD 
i39  4th  Avenue  Telephone  Pacific  214 


MISS   ELL.\   LAWRIE 
1088  Fulton  St.,  S.  F.         Phone  West  7331 


ARTHUR   PICKENSCHER 
1960  Summit  St.,  Oakland.    Tel.  Oak.  4206 


VOCAL 


MRS.  ALICE  MASON  BARNETT 
1298  Haight  Street  Phone  Park  5831 


MRS.  RICHARD  REES 
817  Grove  Street  Phone  Park  5175 


MISS  CAROLINE  HALSTED  LITTLE 
3621  Bd'vvay.,Oak.   Phone  Piedmont  1390 


MRS.   ARTHUR   PICKENSCHER 
I960  Summit  St.,  Oakland.    Tel.  Oak.  4206 


VIOUN 


PROF.  T.  D.  HERZOG 
1813  Ellis  St.  San  Francisco 


MANDOLIN,  LUTE  and  GUITAR 


SAMUEL  ADELSTEIN 
1834  Baker  Street  San  Francisco 


OLD  VIOUNS  and  BOWS 


GEO.   HUNTINGTON 
3366  Sacramento  St.      San  Francisco,  Cal 


lave     You     Seen     the     New- 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON  PIANO.? 


It  Appeals  Especially  to  Teachers  and  Students 
It  contains  Elegance.  Durability  and   Moderate  Price. 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON 


Kearny  St.  Near  Po^ 

San  Francisco,  Cal. 


22 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


THE    ORPHEUM'S    NEW    ACTS. 


Mile.  Bianci,  who  comes  to  the  Orpheum  next 
week  with  her  company  of  terpsichorean  artists, 
is  the  leading  exponent  of  the  classic  dance  in 
Europe.  This  is  her  first  American  tour  and  the 
patrons  of  the  Orpheum  can  rely  on  a  rare  treat. 
Mile.  Bianci  has  been  associated  as  premiere 
danseuse  with  nearly  every  great  grand  opera  pro- 
duction in  Europe  in  several  years.  For  her  en- 
gagement in  this  city  she  has  designed  four  num- 
bers which  exhibit  her  grace,  skill  and  versatility 
to  the  greatest  advantage.  She  has  named  them 
"The  Dresden  China  Dance."  "Egyptian,"  "La 
Danse   En   Volant"   and   "Satanella." 

Hal  Godfrey  and  his  company  will  appear  next 
week  at  the  Orpheum  in  the  character  skit,  "A 
Very  Bad  Boy,"  which  was  one  of  the  greatest 
successes  ever  presented  at  the  Tivoli  Music 
Hall,  London,  where  it  created  a  perfect  furore. 
The  clever  little  play  was  written  by  Mr.  God- 
frey, who  is  a  dramatist  of  prominence  and  an 
exceptionally  clever  character  comedian. 

Keno,  Walsh  and  Melrose,  famous  comedy 
gymnasts,  who  are  included  in  next  week's  Or- 
pheum bill,  can  always  be  depended  upon  to  pro- 
vide something  distinctly  novel.  This  season 
they  are  appearing  in  what  they  term  "The  Re- 
volting Arch." 

"General"  Edward  La  Vine,  who  will  be  at  the 
Orpheum  next  week  with  his  unique  comedy 
juggling  act,  is  styled  "The  Man  Who  Has  Sol- 
diered All  His  Life."  The  stage  setting  for  his 
act  is  a  battlefield,  and  in  his  burlesque  of  a 
soldier,  preliminary  to  his  juggling,  he  is  ex- 
cruciatingly  funny. 

%% 


Mary  Adele  Case,  the  magnificent  contrail  o 
singer  whose  success  at  her  Portland  concert  was 
tremendous  and  who  intended  departing  at  once 
for  the  East  and  Europe  has  been  induced  to 
postpone  her  journey  in  order  to  give  her  friends 
and  the  music  lovers  of  this  vicinity  an  oppor- 
tunity to  judge  of  the  great  strides  she  has 
made  in  her  career.  Two  concerts  have  been 
arranged  at  the  Novelty  Theatre,  the  dates  be- 
ing Friday  evening,  Nov.  19  and  Sunday  after- 
noon, Nov.  2L  F.  M.  Bigerstaff.  a  local  pianist, 
who  is  heard  altogether  too  infrequently,  will 
be  the  accompanist  for  Miss  Case. 
vv 


Dr.  Wullner,  the  great  lieder  singer,  is  meet- 
ing with  as  great  success  this  season  as  he  did 
last.  Every  date  is  already  taken  from  Oct.  15 
to  May  1,^  and  Manager  Hanson  has  been 
obliged  to  refuse  dozens  of  offers.  Will  Greenbaum  con- 
siders himself  very  fortunate  in  securing  four  Wullner  con- 
certs which  will  be  given  in  this  city  and  Oakland  during  the 
week  of  Nov.  22.  Coenraad  V.  Bos  will,  as  usual,  be  the  ac- 
companist. 


"^  "^ 

'  \ 

s?iS^ 

^      ■ 

^ 

<  ■ 

i 

■I 
i 

i 

■j 

-*;(l 

By  the  way,  we  are  to  hear  some  great  accompanists  this 
season  in  Coenraad  Bos,  Frank  La  Forge  and  Edwin  Schneid- 
er. The  latter  comes  with  George  Hamlin,  the  tenor.  His 
songs  are  becoming  very  popular,  and  Mr.  Schneider's  name 
is  another  of  an  American  composer  who  is  winning  his 
laurels. 


THE   SHUBERT   REGIME    IN    LOS   ANGELES. 


Temple  Auditorium,  the  largest  and  most  up-to-date  con- 
crete building  west  of  Chicago,  used  for  theatrical  purposes, 
will  house  this  season  the  Sam  S.  and  Lee  Shubert  attrac- 
tions. The  policy  of  the  house  is  that  of  "open  house  to  all 
first-class  traveling  attractions." 

Most  of  the  dramatic  stars,  including  Julia  Marlow,  Maxine 
Elliott,  Nance  O'Neil,  Mary  Mannering,  Madame  Nazimova, 
Mme.  Fiske,  Lulu  Glaser,  Marguerite  Clarke,  Gertrude  Elliott, 
E.  H.  Sothern,  .John  Mason,  James  T.  Powers,  Eddy  Foy,  and 
many  others  will  appear  at  this  theatre,  presenting  many  of 
the  successful  dramas  and  comedies  of  the  past  and  present 
seasons. 

Two  weeks  will  be  devoted  to  most  of  these  combinations, 
and  only  the  high  grade  successes  will  be  booked.  The  man- 
ager is  L.  E.  Behymer,  and  his  success  with  Mme.  Bernhardt, 
the  Metropolitan  Opera  Company,  Ben  Greet  and  similar  at- 
tractions  guarantees   the   carrying   out   of   the   policy   of   the 


JOHN    PHILIP    SOUSA 

The    March    King,    Who    Will    Appear     at     the     Head     of     His 

Famous  Band  at  Dreamland   Rink  on  Thursday,   Nov.  4. 

Shuberts,  and  a  careful  consideration  of  the  desires  of  the 
public  and  an  attention  to  detail  that  will  bring  satisfactory 
results. 

Most  of  the  big  musical  attractions  will  be  played  at  this 
house;  a  grand  opera  season  is  planned,  and  the  Auditorium 
is  to  become  a  center  of  art  and  music.  The  bookings  have 
been  arranged  so  that  several  well  known  local  events  given 
by  the  social  world  will  be  permitted  to  run  in  behalf  of  local 
charities,  and  all  of  the  Behymer  musical  stars,  like  Mme. 
Sembrich,  Mme.  Schumann-Heink.  Mme.  Carreno,  Mme.  Jom- 
elli.  will  find  their  home  in  this  edifice. 

The  Shuberts  have  outlined  forty  weeks  of  plays  which  are 
worth  while,  and  will  hold  their  house  open  to  any  new 
American  play  by  an  American  author  to  encourage  a  dram- 
atic literature  of  our  own. 

The  policy  of  the  Auditorium  management  will  be  to  serve 
the  local  public  in  a  polite  manner,  anticipating  their  wants, 
a  fairness  and  a  squareness  in  all  their  deals,  a  business  at- 
titude towards  producer  as  well  as  public,  and  to  raise  the 
standard  of  the  dramatic  offerings  in  the  southwest. 

The  Shuberts  have  added  many  theatres  to  their  already 
heavy  holdings  in  the  west,  and  are  paying  strict  attention  to 
the  week  stands  where  it  is  possible  by  augmented  patronage 
to  give  elaborate  scenic  productions  with  the  best  stars  sur- 
rounded by  specially  engaged  companies,  presenting  high 
royalty  which  insures  perfect  satisfaction  to  the  patron. 


:z\3QO 
3RARY 


^^?5!«^S>ACIFIC 


Musical  JRet?ieu)  - 

6an  FRANCI5CO,  Oakland,  LosAwgeles,  £prtland.  Seattle 

THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN    THE    GREAT    WEST 
^     PUBLISHED     EVERY    WEEK    Cf_ 


VOL.  XVII.  No.  5 


SAN  FRANCISCO.  SATURDAY.  OCTOBER  30.  1909 


PRICE  10  CENTS 


JOHN    PHILIP   SOUSA 
Who   in    Conjunction    With    His    Peerless    Concert     Band     Will     Give     a 
Series    of    Excellent    Concert   Programs     Commencing     Next 
Thursday,    November   4. 


P  A  (M  F  I  ('    ('  ()  A  S  1'    MUSIC  A  I.    R  E  V  I  E  W 


Entire  Fifth  Floor  of  Sherman,  Clay  &  Go's.  San  Francisco  Store. 
Devoted  to  Steinway   Pianos 


Sherman 


ay  &  Go. 


STEINWAY  AND  OTHER  PIANOS  PLAYER  PIANOS  OF  ALL  GRADES 

VICTOR  TALKING  MACHINES 

Kearny   and    Sutter  Streets,    San   Francisco 
Fourteenth  and  Clay  Streets,  Oakland 

Sacramento.    Fresno.    San    Jose.    Stockton.    Bakersfield.    Santa    Rosia. 
Portland,  Seattle,  Spokane.  Tacoma.  Etc. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


-  PAOIFHC  COAST 

THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN   THE    GREAT    WEST 


ALFRED  METZGER 


EDITOR 


DAVID    H.    WALKER    - 
JOSEPH    M.    Cl'MMIXG 


Assistant  Edito 
Dramatic  Edito 


San  Francisco  Office 

Sherman.  Clay  &  Co.  Building,   Kearny  and  Sutter  Sts.,  Mezzanine 

Floor.   Kearny-St.   Side.     Telephone,   Kearny  4000. 

Oakland,    Berkeley,   and   Alameda   Office 

Sherman.   Clay   &   Co..    14th   and   Clay   Sts..   Oakland. 

Miss  Elizabeth  Westgate  in  Charge 


1419  S.  Grand  Ave. 


Los  Angeles  Office 

Helnrlch   von  Stein  in  Charge 


SATURDAY,  OCTOBER  30.   1909 


The    PACIFIC   COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW    is   for   sale    at    the 
sheet-music  departments  of  all  leading  music  stores. 

Entered  as  second-class  mail  matter  at  the  San  Francisco  Postofflce. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS — Annually  In  advance,  Including   postage: 

United   States    J2.00 

Foreign  Countries    3.00 

IMPORTANT    NOTICE 
Office  Hours  from  3  to  5  o'clock  every  afternoon  except  Tuesdays 
and  Saturdays.     In  case  of  unforeseen  absence  of  editor  during  office 
hours,  leave  note  on  desk  making  appointment.     Always  leave  name 
and  address  or  telephone  number. 

ADVERTISING     RATES: 

Annual  Contract 

One  Time  Per  Week. 

Front  Page   $30.00 

Inside   Pages    20.00  $15.00 

One-Halt   Page    12.00  S.OO 

One-Quarter  Page    8.00  r,.no 

One  Inch    (on  Page   15) 2.00  1.50 

One  Inch    (on  Page   21) 1.50  1.00 

One-Half    Inch    (on    Page    21) 75  .50 

Musical    Directory    50  .25 


MUSICAL  CAI.ENDAR   1909-10. 

Albert   Rosenthal.   Cellist Lyric   Hail.   Nov.   3 

Sousa  and  his  Band  (Dreamland  Rink).  .Nov.  4  and  7.  aft.  &  eve. 
Mme.  Jean  Jomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  House  Co.)  .Week  of  Nov.  14 

Marv  Adele  Case.  Contralto Novelty  Theatre.  Nov.  19.   21 

Dr.  Ludwig  WuUner Nov.   23,  25  and  2S 

George  Hamlin    (American   Tenor) Dec.   2,   5   and   7 

Fritz   Kreisler Dec.    12.    16   and   19 

Lyric  Quartette  Pop  Concei't Com.   in    lanuary 

Marcella   Sembrich Week   of   Jan.    9 

Myrtle    Elvln    (Planiste) February 

Teresa   Carreno First   Week   of   February 

Madame   Schumann-Heink Com.   Sunday,   Feb.    13 

Mme.  Tilly  Koenen   (the  famous  Dutch  contralto) March 

Pepito  Arriolo   (the  Spanish  child  Violinist) March 

Maud    Powell April 

Flonzaley   Quartet    (in   Chamber  Music) April 

Damrosch   Symphony  Orchestra  and   Isadora   Duncan May 


FIGHTING  FOR  THE  CAUSE, 


Tlic  social  cMilnticjii  of  the  world  at  larj-o  fi-oiii  a 
cDiujiaratively  uiK-ivilized  conditiuii  t(j  a  very  high 
l)hase  of  intellectual  capacity  arose  fi-oin  a  series  of 
fireat  causes.  These  causes  originated  partly  in  polit- 
ical, coiniiiercial  and  religious  problems  and  partly 
they  were  the  outcome  of  educational  and  artistic  con- 
ditions. Each  (if  these  causes,  however,  no  matter  to 
whar  class  they  may  belong,  needed  defenders,  disci- 
ples :uul  leaders  in  order  to  guide  them  to  that  point 
of  destination  wheie  they  arrested  tlie  attention  of  the 
world  and  gradually  forced  themselves  into  the  life- 
blood  of  the  liody  jiolitic.  Had  it  not  been  for  the 
■'tighters  in  the  cause"  the  social  scale  of  community 
life  would  today  still  remain  upon  a  very  crude  foun- 
dation. There  are  many  who  believe  because  our 
economical  and  educational  jiroblems  have  been 
bi-ought  to  a   much   higliei-  ]ilaiu'   than   was  tlieir  fate 


centui-ies  ago,  that  tighting  for  the  cause  has  become 
a  sujiertliious  a])iilicalion  of  energy,  and  that  these 
Jiroblems  will  gradually  adjust  themselves,  maintain 
Their  high  position  and  still  further  develop  from  their 
own  a<coi-d  without  any  physical  effort  on  the  part 
of  those  eager  to  .see  evolution  continue  on  this  earth. 


No  greater  mistake  can  be  made  than  this  assumji- 
tion  of  geiiei-al  satisfaction  about  the  educational  con- 
dition of  things,  and  in  no  other  respect  is  the  adage 
that  lack  of  pi-ogression  meau.s  retrogression  more 
strikingly  applicable  than  in  this  instance.  And 
among  all  the  great  mo\ements,  be  they  coiumei'cial, 
(lolitical  oi"  moi-al.  none  of  them  is  in  sorer  need  of 
Hghtei's  for  the  cause  than  the  art  of  music,  which 
seems  to  have  ari'ived  at  an  eminence  whereupon  noth- 
ing but  super-musrcians,  with  a  knack  of  creating  as 
much  noise  as  possible,  seem  to  attract  the  concen- 
trated attention  of  the  world.  But  it  is  not  our  pur- 
pose to  iiiono]iolize  these  pages  for  a  futile  attempt  to 
prove  that  the  so-called  music  of  the  future  is  a 
musical  degenei-acy  of  such  a  condition  of  unhealthy 
ideas  that  the  vei-y  character  of  their  construction  and 
mechanical  airhitectui-e  prevents  them  from  attaining 
an  everlasting  gri])  u]ion  human  imagination.  We 
can  not  agree  that  works  like  Salome  and  its  kindred 
coni]iositioiis  i-epi-esent  the  essence  of  musical  concep- 
tion, not  because  they  do  not  conform  with  musical 
rhetoi-ic  or  harmonic  and  theoretical  laws  and  regula- 
tions, but  just  because  they  iire  solely  based  upon  me- 
chanical and  ai-ithmelical  fundaments  and  lack  the 
vei-y  assciilials  <>(  iniisical  laws,  namely,  the  elegance 
of  melody  and  il  i'  ]iiiiity  of  subject  matter. 


W'c  consider  only  iluil  nmsical  composition  of  value 
lo  lliose  susceptililc  to  the  hypnotic  spells  of  the 
language  of  sound  which  lepresents  only  that  which 
is  beanliriil — only  that  which  is  moi-ally  jiure — only 
that  which  appeals  to  higher  ideals  and  to  all  the 
good  that  is  in  manliood.  We  can  not  listen  with 
pleasure  to  c(Miimonplaces  set  to  music,  nor  can  we 
adjust  our  .sense  of  hearing  to  ugly  and  coarse  subjects 
ti-eated  with  the  tender  melodies  of  sound.  We  do 
not  cai-e  how  intelligent,  how  skillful  and  how  self- 
conscious  a  com])(iser  may  be,  he  can  not  make  an 
ugly  and  vulgai-  thought  assume  beauty,  nor  can  he 
clothe  a  conriionplace  idea  successfully  in  an  ermine 
of  beaiitiful  melody.  These  are  such  logical  impos- 
sibilities that  we  are  surpi-ised  that  there  exist  in  the 
World  of  nnisic,  men,  supposed  to  be  in  authority,  who 
can  call  crimes  against  the  pui-ity  of  the  art  the  music 
of  tlic  riitiire.  1 1  may  lie  true  tliat  fine  feathei's  make 
fine  birds.  Inn  no  matter  how  beautiful  the  feathers 
the  humming  bird  will  kill  flies  and  thus  become  de- 
structive and  ra]iacious..  So  the  laws  of  harmony, 
theoi-y  and  counterpoint  which  may  be  compared  to 
tlie  feathers  of  a  bird  may  be  able  to  hide  vulgar  and 
coar.se  thmigbts,  but  they  can  never  change  them  into 
beatitiful  ideals.  And  we  are  certain  that  Providence, 
in  its  gi-eat  wisdom,  has  never  intended  that  the  en- 
ti-anciiig  lie;nit.\-  of  the  universal  language  should  be 
utilized  to  (lerpetuate  coarse  and  vulgar  ideas,  and 
conse(piently  if  I'rovidence  did  not  intend  to  have  one 
of  its  most  wonderful  conceptions  misapprojjriated,  it 
is  safe  to  assume  that  such  misappropriation  will  not 
stand  the  test  of  time. 


I>uf  as  long  as  there  are  composers  who  clothe  their 
vulgar  thouglits  in  apjiai'ently  musical  habiliments, 
as  long  as  musicians  and  teachers  look  upon  the  art 
inerelv  as  a  means  to  earn  monev  and  nothing  else,  as 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


long  as  pupils  study  iinisic  iH'caiise  llicir  iiei<;lil)i)i's 
fhildi-en  study  it  or  liccaiisf  lla^y  want  to  be  as  jjical 
as  soiiieonc  else,  and  licncc  desire  to  enter  the  shrine 
of  the  muses  heeause  of  cuvy  and  jealousy,  so  lon}> 
will  it  be  necessai-y  to  have  tifiiiters  for  the  cause  who 
prove  by  (heir  example  (hat  only  (hose  can  really  un 
derstanil  the  mysterious  beauties  of  the  art  of  music 
who  recognize  that  it  can  only  be  executed  and  prac- 
ticed aft(>r  years  of  scir-sacritice,  lailhrul  service  and 
f^enuine,  irresistible  atfecdon  lor  i(.  When  we  rcc 
ommend  younji'  students  (o  attend  concerts  and  listen 
to  the  yenius  of  men  and  women  blessed  with  a  jjreat 
gift  of  transmittins'  musical  ideas  in  a  manner  mos( 
comprehensive  even  to  (hose  nnac(piainted  with  (ccli 
nical  regulations,  we  do  so  because  we  consider  such 
attendance  a  most  imjiorlant  ])hase  of  a  musical  edu- 
cation. Any  student  who  considers  himself  so  far  ad- 
vanced in  musical  education  that  he  or  she  imagines 
it  inijuissible  to  gain  additicmal  informaticm  from  a 
great  artist  will  never  make  a  genuine  musician.  One 
reallv  gifted  with  genius  ]ierlectly  knows  of  his  own 
accord  that  it  is  imi>ossil.le  to  fathom  all  there  is  to 
be  learned  in  music  during  a  lifetime,  and  that  infor- 
mation and  knowledge  may  be  gathered  from  the  most 
unexi)ec(ed  sources  and  in  the  most  unexpected  ways, 
for  lessons  may  be  learned  from  fine  examples  as  well 
as  from   incompetent  executants. 

And  so  we  repeat  that  as  long  as  the  concert  hall 
is  not  always  crowded,  as  long  as  teachers  refrain 
from  urging  their  pujdls  to  attend  concerts,  as  long 
as  great  movements  in  behalf  of  musical  progress  are 
sought  (o  l)e  l)locked  by  jealous  rivals,  so  long  do  we 
need  fighters  for  the  ('ause.  How  many  people  read 
these  lines  who  possess  that  enthusiasm  and  that  true 
affection  for  the  art  as  to  devote  years  of  their  life 
toward  the  fulfillment  of  a  great  ]iuri>ose  in  the  in- 
terests of  music?  riow  many  readers  are  within  the 
reach  of  our  voice  who  can  undei'stand  us  and  who 
are  able  to  respond  to  our  plea  for  concentrated  action 
in  behalf  of  the  ceration  of  a  pure  musical  atmos 
phere?  Do  you  believe  that  the  iirincijdes  set  fordi 
in  these  columns  are  worthy  of  emulation?  l>o  you 
believe  that  we  are  sincere  and  straightforward  in  our 
attempts  to  fight  for  the  cause?  Are  you  convinced 
that  our  pui'poses  are  unselfish  and  that  we  have  clung 
to  this  i)aper  for  years  in  order  to  sow  the  seed  of 
artistic  ])urity  among  as  many  souls  as  we  could 
reach?  If  you  believe  this,  and  if  you  trust  in  our 
integrity,  are  you  then  willing  to  assist  )is  in  bringing 
these  ])rinciples  to  the  attention  of  everyone  who  can 
be  reached  through  our  combined  inHueuce?  If  you 
do,  you  can  become  a  fighter  for  the  cause. 


I'pon  another  page  you  will  find  an  announcement 
setting  forth  various  conditions  under  which  you  may 
be  able  to  earn  a  grand  ]>iano  or  other  prices,  and  at 
the  same  time  accomjilish  the  \ery  thing  necessary  to 
imi)rove  mnsical  conditions  on  the  Pacific  f'oast.  It  is 
true  yon  will  thereby  increase  the  circulation  of  this 
paper  and  at  the  same  time  increase  its  income.  This 
is  the  selfish  way  of  looking  at  it.  This  paper  shows 
its  love  of  fair  play  by  giving  the  one  who  gains  the 
largest  number  of  subscribers  a  grand  piano,  worth 
from  eight  hundred  to  one  thousand  dollars,  and  gives 
everyone,  not  winning  the  first  jtrize,  twenty-five  per 
cent,  of  any  amount  that  may  be  turned  into  this  office. 
So,  you  see,  we  do  not  ask  anyone  to  work  for  noth- 
ing. ^\e  consider  everyone's  services  worth  some  re- 
muneration, and  therefore  we  are  willing  to  pay  any- 
one who  participates  in  Ibis  contest  the  same  amount 


which  we  would  be  compelled  to  i)ay  a  solicitor  for 
secni-ing  subscriptions  foi'  us.  I'.ut  we  jii-efei"  to  dis- 
tribute wlia(e\er  money  we  can  spend  among  the  pro- 
fession. Because  of  this  jjreference  we  buy  the  grand 
piano  fi-om  a  local  music  house — that  is,  a  California 
music  house — we  give  for  these  twenty-five  per  cent, 
oi-ders  (o  buy  anything  from  an  uj)right  jjiano  or 
\i(din  to  a  talking  machine  or  music  lessons  from  any 
luusic  dealer  or  music  teachei-  who  advei-tises  in  these 
columns.  So  you  see.  we  not  only  give  the  ])aper  for 
one  year,  but  each  one  who  secures  a  subscriber  will 
be  aide  to  give  twenty-flve  per  cent,  of  all  nujney  paid 
into  this  office  to  California  music  dealers  or  members 
of  the  musical  |)rolession  rei)resented  in  the  advertis- 
ing columns  of  this  [(ajiei-.  This  is  a  ])lan  of  reciproc- 
ity which  we  dearly  cherish  and  which  should  aj^jieal 
to  anyone  faii--minded  enough  to  i-eali/.e  its  justice. 


Hut,  after  all,  this  is  only  the  commercial  side  of 
this  campaign.  The  moral  asi)ect  of  this  cause  is  an 
entirely  different  one.  San  Francisco  is  sadly  in  need 
of  a  conceit  hall.  A\'e  also  need  a  I'acific  Coast  ilusic 
Teachers"  Association.  We  must  necessiii-ily  perpet- 
uate the  idea  oC  ("aliforiiia  Music  Festi\als.  And  we 
also  need  a  ('onservat(u-y  of  Music  affiliated  with  the 
State  iTiiversity.  which  will  make  it  ]iossible  to  segre- 
gate efficient  musical  educators  from  incompetent 
teachers.  Finally,  it  is  necessary  that  our  teachers, 
musical  institutions  of  merit  and,  above  all,  our  own 
local  artists  should  be  recognized  throufihout  the  land. 
These  conditions  can  only  then  be  secured  if  this  pa])er 
can  be  circulated  anu)ng  i^xi'vy  musical  home  on  this 
coast.  I'nless  everybody  intei-ested  in  music  will  be 
able  t(»  read  this  paper  there  is  no  ])ossible  chance  to 
attain  for  music  that  recognition  and  that  respect 
which  it  deserves.  You,  who  have  read  this  j)aper  for 
eight  or  more  years  understand  what  we  mean.  Have 
you  been  foi'cibly  imjiressed  with  the  arguments  made 
in  these  columns?  llave  these  arguments  sometimes 
set  you  to  thinking?  Have  yon  agreed  with  us  in  the 
exi)osition  of  great  jjrinciples  and  moral  questions? 
And  if  you  have  been  so  affected  as  to  write  us  en- 
thusiastic letters  of  approval,  do  you  think  that  others 
can  be  ecpmlly  impressed  with  these  arguments?  And 
if  they  can  be  affected  as  you  have  been  affected,  do 
you  tliink  that  the  cause  of  music  will  be  benefitted 
if  ten  times  as  many  people  read  the  jiaper  as  are 
doing  so  at  this  time?  If  you  really  think  so,  then  it 
is  your  duty  as  a  good  musician,  as  a  faithful  disciple 
of  a  noble  art,  to  become  a  fighter  for  the  cause  and 
assist  this  ]ia])er  in  sjireading  great  musical  principles 
throughout  the  homesteads  of  the  I'acific  Coast. 


MARY  ADELE  CASE'S  CONCERT. 

Mary  Adele  Case  will  give  two  concerts  at  the  Novelty 
Theatre,  the  dates  being  Friday  evening,  November  tilth,  and 
Sunday  afternoon.  November  21st.  Frederic  Biggerstaff  will 
be  the  accompanist.  Miss  Case  is  preparing  two  splendid 
programs,  which  will  be  shortly  announced.  Among  the 
worlis  to  be  given  is  the  rearly  heard  Grand  Aria  from 
"Romeo  and  Juliet"  by  Vaccajone.  one  of  the  old  Italian 
masters.  It  is  said  to  be  a  test  piece  for  any  contralto  and 
but  few  attempt  it  in  public.  Prices  for  the  Adele  Case  con- 
certs will  be  $1..50  and  $1.00,  and  mail  orders  may  now  be 
sent  to  Manager  Will.  L.  Greenbaum  at  Sherman,  Clay  & 
Co.'s.  People  who  have  heard  Miss  Case  in  private  predict 
a  sensational  success  for  her.  as  her  voice  possesses  a  cer- 
tain rarely  found  quality  which  seems  to  reach  the  very 
hearts  of  her  auditors.  Let  everybody  attend  these  concerts 
and  give  encouragement  to  a  Pacific  Coast  artist. 


Subscribe  for  the   IVIusical    Review.     $2.00  per  Year. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


THE  EDITOR'S  PRIVATE  NOTEBOOK 


THE  MUSIC  OF  THE  PORTOLA  FESTIVAL. 


With  a  gigantic  and  bewildering  flourish  of  the  Queen's 
scepter,  the  curtain  was  rung  down  over  the  most  successful 
and  the  most  brilliant  spectacle  San  Francisco  has  ever  wit 
nessed.  Not  too  much  credit  and  praise  can  be  bestowed 
upon  the  gentlemen  of  the  Executive  Committee,  upon  whose 
shoulders  rested  the  heavy  responsibility  to  satisfy  the  great 
anticipations  aroused  by  the  glowing  newspaper  accounts,  and 
still  forever  the  wagging  tongues  of  those  pessimists  who 
are  ever  ready  with  tales  of  splendor  seen  somewhere  else 
surpassing  any  event  in  their  native  city,  no  matter  how  suc- 
cessful. It  is  but  well  merited  tribute  to  the  energy,  tenac- 
ity and  enthusiasm  of  the  Portola  Committee  to  freely  admit 
that  the  wildest  expectations  were  surpassed  and  for  once  the 
most  pessimistic  tongues  failed  to  wag  derisively.  Surely  I 
am  viewing  the  sentiment  of  everyone  within  reach  of  my 
pen  when  I  state  positively  that  the  Portola  Festival  was 
"up  to  the  brag."  The  gentlemen  whose  efforts  were  respon- 
sible for  this  signal  success  are;  P.  T.  Clay  (Chairman  Ex- 
ecutive Committee).  Milton  H.  Esberg  (Vice-Chairman),  Louis 
Sloss  (Treasurer).  Homer  Boushey  (Secretary),  Governor  J. 
N.  Gillett.  A.  M.  McCarthy.  Edgar  D.  Peixotto.  Jas.  A.  John- 
ston, Dent  H,  Robert,  Chas.  De  Young,  Mayor  E.  R.  Taylor. 
John  A.  Hammersmith.  Paul  T.  Carroll.  \V.  D.  Fennimore.  C. 
W.  Hornick.  S.  Fred  Hogue.  Robert  A.  Roos,  James  Rolph,  Jr.. 
Vincent  Whitney  and  J.  H.  Crothers. 

There  were  so  many  features  connected  with  this  glorious 
celebration  that  a  musical  journal  can  only  refer  to  them 
very  briefly.  The  weather,  which  at  the  beginning  was  dis- 
appointingly threatening,  soon  took  pity  on  us  all  and  through- 
out the  week  there  developed  a  series  of  those  bright  and 
sunny  days  for  which  California  has  become  famed  through- 
out the  world.  Never  before  was  San  Francisco  attired  in 
such  brilliant  festal  array  as  during  this  week,  when  gaily 
colored  banners  fluttered  merrily  in  the  balmy  breeze  and 
created  a  multicolored  canopy  above  the  crowded  thorough- 
fares. At  night  the  city  was  ablaze  with  thousands  upon 
thousands  of  electric  lights  that  changed  the  nights  into  days. 
Multicolored  globes  adorned  stately  buildings  and  a  monster 
bell  hung  majestically  over  the  intersection  of  Market,  Third. 
Kearny  and  Geary  streets.  Upon  the  ocean  the  blacK  night 
was  pierced  by  illuminated  warships  of  five  foreign  nations. 
and  upon  Union  Square  entrancing  pieces  of  fireworks  were 
burned  every  night.  Surely  the  decorations  and  illuminations 
will  forever  be  remembered  by  those  who  witnessed  them. 
*       *       * 

The  various  parades  and  pageants  were  also  remarkable 
for  their  thoroughness  and  originality.  The  entrance  and  re- 
ception of  Don  Portola  on  Tuesday  was  truly  impressive. 
The  military  character  of  the  procession  proved  inspiring, 
and  the  sailors  from  the  international  fleets  gave  the  parade 
a  dignified  and  formal  character.  The  big  Portola  Parade, 
with  its  vari-colored  uniformed  native  sons  and  daughters, 
its  handsomely  designed  floats  and  its  exceedingly  luxurious 
and  unique  Cuinese  and  Japanese  section,  was  a  spectacle 
never  to  be  forgotten.  Thousands  of  dollars  were  represented 
in  the  Oriental  section  that  glittered  with  gold  embroidery 
and  velvet  and  satin.  The  Masquerade  Ball  on  Thursday 
evening  was  a  dazzling  event,  and  the  historical  and  electric 
Carnival  Parade  and  electrical  floats  on  Saturday  evening 
was  the  climax  of  a  feast  of  color  and  revelry.  Add  to  all 
this  dazzling  spectacle  hundreds  of  thousands  of  people  pack- 
ing the  streets  to  suffocation  and  you  have  a  faint  idea  of 
the  immensity  of  San  Francisco's   Portola  Festival. 

But  this  paper  has  more  to  do  with  the  musical  feature  of 
the  festival  than  with  its  spectacular  atmosphere  and  here. 
I  am  sorry  to  say.  there  was  revealed  an  element  of  weak- 
ness for  which  neither  the  Executive  Committee  nor  the 
general  conditions  could  be  held  responsible.  There  were 
above  all  the  bands  in  the  various  parades.  While  it  would 
be  unfair  to  expect  a  unanimity  of  excellence,  it  would  be 
but  reasonable  to  suppose  that  a  much  more  competent  array 
of  musicians  could  be  selected  from  the  ranks  of  the  Musi- 
cians Union,  i  did  not  hear  one  band  that  could  have  passed 
muster  before  an  efficient  jury  of  serious  musicians.  Not 
one  band  was  there  that  thrilled  you  with  the  vibrating  force 
of  a  martial  spirit.  There  was  no  crashing  of  trumpets,  no 
flaring  of  brass  which  set  your  blood  dancing  in  your  veins. 
Barring  the  Stars  and  Stripes  Forever  March,  there  was  no 


composition  played  that  was  in  accord  with  the  spirit  of  the 
festival.  Is  it  possible  that  the  various  leaders  of  these 
bands  could  not  afford  to  buy  a  few  inspiring  marches  and 
rehearse  them  adequately  for  this  glorious  occasion?  It 
seems  to  me  the  members  of  the  Musicians  Union  should 
consider  it  a  matter  of  pride  to  appear  before  several  hun- 
dred thousand  people  to  their  best  advantage.  And  I  know 
they  can  do  better  than  they  did  last  week.  Surely  there  was 
enough  money  spent  for  music  to  cause  a  little  more  en- 
thusiasm and  obliterate  some  of  the  ordinary  commercial 
spirit.  The  libraries  of  our  local  bands  need  replenishing 
very  badly. 

The  afternoon  and  evening  concerts  of  fifty  musicians,  un- 
der the  leadership  of  Paul  Steindorff,  kept  Union  Square 
crowded  with  a  pleased  multitude  throughout  the  rendition  of 
the  programs.  Mr.  Steindorff  had  a  very  strenuous  time  of 
it  and  no  doubt  had  a  good  sleep  after  it  was  all  over.  An 
orchestra  of  fifty  musicians  under  Fred.  Eppstein's  leader- 
ship furnished  the  music  tor  the  masquerade  ball,  and  Mr. 
Eppstein  was  the  recipient  of  hearty  congratulations  by  many 
members  of  the  committee  for  his  dashing  style  and  his  ex- 
cellent programs.  Mr.  Eppstein  had  particular  reason  to  be 
proud,  as  this  was  his  debut  as  a  genuine  conductor,  never 
having  wielded  the  magic  baton  before.  On  Saturday  even- 
ing eight  bands  gave  concerts  in  central  locations  throughout 
the  business  section  of  the  city,  and  in  several  places  danc- 
ing was  indulged  in  by  masked  people  until  early  morning. 

*  *       * 

The  most  important  musical  feature  of  the  festival  was 
Signor  0.  S.  Wanrell's  Spanish  Music  Festival,  and.  strange 
to  say,  notwithstanding  the  adequacy  and  efficiency  of  this 
event,  the  press,  so  lavish  in  its  employment  of  adjectives, 
brushed  it  aside  as  if  it  failed  to  pay  toll.  I  heard  strange 
tales  about  certain  vultures  that  hovered  over  Mr.  Wanrell's 
head  and  were  waiting  to  pounce  upon  him  for  the  pound  of 
flesh  usually  demanded  by  the  "grafter."  We  are  not  ready 
to  publish  the  results  of  our  investigation  at  this  time,  but 
should  we  do  so  certain  personages  high  in  journalistic  cir- 
cles would  be  branded  as  extortionists.  However,  we  will 
leave  this  disagreeable  phase  of  the  Spanish  festival  for  a 
future  time  and  devote  our  space  to  the  merit  of  the  per- 
formance only.  The  program  included  Spanish  compositions 
only  and  was  therefore  in  thorough  accord  with  the  atmos- 
phere of  the  festival.  For  two  months  Mr.  Wanrell  and  his 
singers  worked  hard  to  achieve  brilliant  results,  and  when  the 
evening's  work  was  done  not  less  a  personage  than  the 
Marquis  Villalovar.  Minister  Plenipotentiary  from  Spain  to 
America,  expressed  his  surprise  and  gratification  to  Mr.  Wan- 
rell and  his  brave  singers  for  the  excellence  of  their  vocal 
efforts,  as  well  as  their  use  of  the  Spanish  language,  which 
he  thought  could  not  have  been  successfully  accomplished  in 
eight  months,  much  less  in  two  months. 

*  *       * 

Thanks  to  various  intrigues  which  it  is  not  necessary  to 
show  up  at  this  time,  Mr.  Wanrell's  Spanish  Music  Festival 
was  not  a  financial  success,  but  its  artistic  pre-eminence  re- 
mains unchallenged.  Particular  praise  is  due  to  the  following 
singers,  without  whose  assistance  Mr.  Wanrell  could  never 
have  accomplished  his  purpose:  Tenors — Messrs.  Mesmer, 
Huber  and  Braun;  Sopranos — Mrs.  Napoleoni.  Misses  Arnold, 
Smith,  Lauckmann  and  Bradley;  Altos — Mrs,  Harper  and  Mrs. 
Hardley;  Basses — Messrs.  Napoleoni.  Whalin.  Clending  and 
Woodrijff.  The  four  basses  and  Mr.  Mesmer,  Mrs.  Napoleoni 
and  Mrs.  Harper  were  particularly  energetic  in  their  efforts 
to  make  the  event  a  signal  success.  This  excellent  idea  to 
introduce  genuine  Spanish  folklore  on  the  Pacific  Coast  is 
worthy  of  the  heartiest  endorsement,  and  we  hope  that  Mr. 
Wanrell  will  not  feel  discouraged  by  this  experience  regard- 
ing financial  opposition,  but  will  form  a  society  which  occa- 
sionally will  give  an  event  typical  of  the  beautiful  character- 
istics of  Spanish  national  music.  I  certainly  congratulate 
Mr.  Wanrell  upon  the  originality  of  his  plan,  as  well  as  the 
excellence  of  its  materialization. 

Another  brilliant  musical  feature  of  the  festival  was  Miss 
Estelle  Carpenter's  remarkable  chorus  of  five  thousand 
school  children.  Miss  Carpenter  has  every  reason  to  feel 
proud  of  her  efforts,  which  resulted  in  five  thousand  youth- 
ful voices  singing  with  the  precision  and  accuracy  of  one 
huge  instrument. 


Miss  Eula  Howard  has  returned  from  a  very  successful  trip 
to  the  Northwest.  She  gave  concerts  in  Seattle,  Wash.,  and 
Grants  Pass,  Ore.  The  success  of  the  former  was  already 
recorded  in  these  columns,  and  the  result  of  the  latter  will 
be  recorded  in  next  week's  paper. 


PACIFIC    CO  A  S  '1'    MUSI  CJ  A  L    R  IC  V  I  10  ^^■ 


OAKLAND    SECTION    OF    BACH    CHOIR. 


Increase    of    Singers    From    Oakland    Make    It    Necessary    To 

Give  Special   Rehearsals  For  the   Benefit  of  a  Complete 

Oakland  Section. 


There  has  been  such  interest  shown  by  ambitious  singers 
from  Oakland  in  the  work  of  the  Bach  Choir  that  it  has  be- 
come necessary  to  give  special  rehearsals  for  the  benefit  ot 
all  those  who  desire  to  participate  in  the  great  Bach  Festival 
next  spring.  The  first  Oakland  rehearsal  took  place  at  Maple 
Hall  last  Thursday  evening,  October  28th,  under  the  personal 
direction  of  Dr.  J.  Fred.  Wolle.  Rehearsals  will  henceforth 
be  given  regularly  in  Oakland  every  Thursday  evening,  thus 
giving  every  genuine  lover  of  choral  music  residing  in  Oak- 
land a  splendid  opportunity  to  study  the  wonderful  music 
of  Johann  Sebastian  Bach  as  they  ought  to  be  studied. 

Surely  this  influx  of  Oakland  singers  in  the  Bach  Choir  is 
gratifying,  for  it  proves  that  people  across  the  bay  fully  real- 
ize the  immensity  and  grandeur  of  these  Bach  Festivals. 
There  really  does  not  exist  any  movement  exactly  like  this 
in  this  country,  and  even  in  Europe  we  do  not  know  of  any 
music  festivals  devoted  exclusively  to  the  works  of  Bach  and 
commanding  exactly  the  same  atmosphere  and  the  same 
gigantic  dimensions  as  are  noticeable  in  these  events  at  the 
Greek  Theatre.  It  must  be  a  source  of  great  satisfaction  to 
Dr.  Wolle  to  know  that  the  singers  of  the  towns  across  the 
bay  understand  the  magnitude  of  his  plans  and  are  willing 
to  work  with  him  shoulder  to  shoulder  toward  the  attain- 
ment of  a  grand  musical  aim. 

It  is  strange  that  there  do  not  exist  sufficient  admirers  of 
great  choral  works  in  San  Francisco  to  come  forward  and 
demand  special  rehearsals  in  this  city.  Are  the  vocal  stu- 
dents here  merely  singing  for  fun,  or  do  they  undergo  the 
hardships  of  a  musical  education  for  the  purpose  of  acquiring 
knowledge?  And  if  they  desire  to  add  to  their  musical  in- 
formation are  they  satisfied  with  a  repertoire  of  songs  and 
arias  or  do  they  realize  that  the  works  of  Bach  must  form 
part  of  the  entire  repertoire  of  a  well  schooled  singer?  It 
should  never  be  forgotten  that  a  music  student  can  never  learn 
too  much,  and  surely  the  opportunity  to  study  ensemble  sing- 
ing under  a  master  like  Dr.  Wolle,  and  with  material  like  the 
gigantic  works  of  Bach,  is  altogether  too  rare  to  be  over- 
looked. And,  mind  you,  it  does  not  cost  a  cent.  All  Dr. 
Wolle  requires  is  diligent  attendance   at   rehearsals. 

Any  vocal  student  who  does  not  already  belong  to  a  choral 
society  should  take  advantage  of  this  splendid  opportunity 
to  add  to  his  or  her  musical  education.  Music  study  is  not 
child's  play.  It  means  serious  and  constant  work  and  unless 
a  student  "looks  upon  music  study  in  this  light,  he  or  she  will 
never  amount  to  much.  So,  let  it  be  hoped,  that  this  splendid 
example  set  by  the  singers  of  Oakland  will  be  initiated  by 
the  vocal  students  of  San  Francisco,  and  that  Dr.  Wolle  will 
be  enabled  to  announce  special  rehearsals  for  the  San  Fran- 
cisco section  of  the  Bach  Choir  within  the  next  few  days. 


THE    BERINGER    MUSICAL   CLUB    IN    VALLEJO. 


The  Beringer  .Musical  Club,  which  achieved  great  success 
at  the  concert  given  at  Centuary  Hall  last  month,  gave  a 
piano  and  vocal  recital  at  the  Ascension  Guild  Hall,  under  the 
auspices  of  St.  Rose's  Guild,  in  Vallejo  last  Saturday  even- 
ing, October  16.  Mrs.  H.  J.  Widenmann,  also  a  member  of 
the  Beringer  Musical  Club,  and  prominent  in  Vallejo  society, 
contributed  to  the  program.  She  is  the  possessor  of  a  rare 
contralto  voice  and  her  selections  were  a  charming  addition 
to  the  program,  which  in  full  was  as  follows: 

Piano — "Impromptu,"  op.  142,  No.  4,  F  minor  (Schubert). 
Miss  Zdenka  Buben;  Vocal — (a)  Fiore  che  Langue  (Rotoli), 
(b)  "Isoiina"  (Stigelli),  Miss  Irene  De  Martini;  Piano — "La 
Serenade  (Schubert-Liszt),  Melton  Mowbray;  Piano — (a) 
Three  Preludes  (Chopin),  (b)  Intermezzo  (Rich.  Strauss). 
Miss  Alta  Yocom;  Vocal — (a)  Grande  Valse  (Venzano),  (b) 
"My  Heart  at  Thy  Sweet  Voice,"  from  "Samson  and  Deliah  " 
(Saint  Saens),  Miss  Anita  Morse;  Piano — "Alceste,"  Airs  de 
Ballet  (Gluck-St.  Saens),  Miss  Sadie  Bultman;  Vocal — Creole 
Lovers'  Song  (Dudley  Buck),  Mrs.  H.  .J.  Widenmann;  Piano — 
Arabesques  on  the  theme  of  Joh.  Strauss'  Waltz,  "On  the 
Beautiful  Blue  Danube"  (Schulz-Evler),  Miss  Frances  West- 
ington;  Vocal — (a)  "Thursday"  (MoUoy),  (b)  Armourer's 
Song  from  "Robin  Hood"  (DeKoven),  Harry  Bultman;  Piano 
— "Scherzo,"  op.  16,  No.  3  (Bug.  d'Albert),  Miss*  Estella  Mc- 
Neil; Vocal — Duet,  "Calm  as  the  Night"  (Goetze),  Miss  Anita 
Morse  and  Harry  Bultman. 


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MAGDALEN    WORDEN 

Composer-Pianist,    With    Mme.    Jomelli    and    Miss    Nichols 

Warren  D.  Allen,  the  efficient  pianist  and  organist  who  left 
recently  for  Europe,  has  arrived  in  Berlin,  and  has  begun  his 
studies.  While  abroad  he  will  write  letters  for  the  Pacific 
Coast  Musical  Review  regarding  the  doings  of  musical  people 
in  the  German  raetroiiolis. 


THE  JOMELLI   CONCERTS. 


As  the  opening  attraction  of  an  important  musical  season 
Manager  Will.  L.  Greenbaura  announces  Mme.  Jean  Jomelli, 
the  Dutch  soprano  from  Covent  Garden  and  the  Hammerstein 
Manhattan  Opera  of  New  York.  This  artist  is  said  to  possess 
a  marvelously  beautiful  voice,  which  she  uses  like  a  true 
artist,  and  the  result  is  a  concert  that  appeals  to  every  lover 
of  song.  Last  season  Mme.  Jomelli  filled  more  concert  en- 
gagements than  any  singer  touring  the  country,  with  the  ex- 
ception of  Dr.  Ludwig  WuUner.  This  year  she  has  been  en- 
gaged for  every  available  date  from  October  1st  to  June  1st, 
the  reason  being  simply  that  she  gave  so  much  pleasure  and 
satisfaction  last  season  that  no  less  than  eight  festival  so- 
cieties have  re-engaged  her  for  this  year,  besides  which  she 
has  been  re-engaged  by  a  number  of  the  symphony  orches- 
tras. With  Mme.  Jomelli  another  great  star  will  appear  in 
the  person  of  Miss  Marie  Nichols,  an  American  violiniste  who 
has  won  her  laurels  in  France,  England,  Germany  and  Italy, 
as  well  as  in  her  native  land.  Miss  Nichols  will  play  some 
rarely  heard  numbers,  including  a  sonata  by  Franceur  and 
other  works  by  old  French  and  Italian  masters,  besides  some 
of  the  modern  standard  numbers.  Miss  Magdalen  Worden, 
who  will  be  "at  the  piano,"  is  a  composer  of  considerable 
repute. 

Three  concerts  will  be  given  at  the  Novelty  Theatre,  the 
dates  being  Friday  night,  November  12,  Sunday  afternoon. 
November  14th,  and  Tuesday  night,  November  16th.  On 
Wednesday  afternoon,  November  ITth.  at  3:15,  a  concert  will 
be  given  in  Oakland  at  Ye  Liberty  Playhouse,  after  which 
the  artists  will  leave  on  the  Owl  train  for  Los  Angeles,  where 
Mme.  Jomelli  opens  the  season  ot  the  Los  Angeles  Symphony 
Society.  Reports  from  Steers  and  Coman  in  the  Northwest 
are  that  Jomelli  is  really  a  great  artist,  and  has  more  than 
given  satisfaction  as  substitute  for  Emma  Eames,  whose  tour 
was  cancelled  and  who  was  replaced  by  Jomelli. 


r  A  C  I  F  I  r    COAST    MUSICAL    R  E  \'  I  E  W. 


AN    EFFECTIVE    CONCERT    BAND. 

Why   Sousa's    Band    Can    Interpret   the    Works    of    the     Great 

Masters  With   Satisfactory    Results    Not   Unlike 

An    Orchestra. 


Manv  of  the  so-called  "high-brows"  shrug  their  shoulders 
at  the"  idea  of  a  military  band  playing  selections  composed 
for  the  orchestra.  While  it  is  not  claimed  that  the  effect  is 
just  the  same,  the  modern  band  is  so  arranged  that  very 
satisfactory  performances  of  the  works  can  be  given  and 
without  distorting  the  ideas  of  the  composer.  In  Sousa's 
Band  there  is  almost  the  identical  instrumentation  of  a 
symphouv  orchestra  as  far  as  the  brass  and  reeds  go.  There 
are  four"  French  horns,  the  trombone  and  trumpet  section. 
and  in  the  reeds  there  are  the  flutes,  oboes,  bassoons,  etc. 
The  violins,  however,  are  replaced  by  clarinets,  and  the  other 
strings  bv  saxophones,  bass  clarinets,  and  tubas.  If  one 
wants  to  get  an  idea  of  what  a  band  like  this  can  accomplish 
let  them  listen  carefully  to  the  accompaniments  to  the  violin 
solos,  etc.  It  is  not  claimed  that  a  band  can  take  the  place 
of  a  symphony  orchestra,  but  if  you  want  to  hear  some  very 
important  new  works  rendered  in  a  manner  that  will  give 
you  great  pleasure  and  musical  satisfaction,  do  not  miss 
hearing  a  Sousa  concert. 

*       *       * 

On  Monday  morning,  at  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.'s,  the  sale  of 
seats  will  open  for  the  concerts  to  be  given  by  Sousa  and 
his  band  at  Dreamland  Rink,  commencing  Thursday  after- 
noon, November  4th.  Eight  concerts  will  be  given,  and  at 
each  an  entirely  different  program  will  be  presented.  These 
offerings  are  full  of  modern  novelties  and  so  interesting  that 
Manager  Will  Greenbaum  has  issued  a  program  booklet  con- 
taining the  entire  list,  with  interesting  annotations,  and  these 
may  be  obtained  in  advance  at  the  box  office.  Just  to  show 
that  interesting  programs  can  be  made  with  a  splendid  band 
and  a  good  library,  we  publish  those  of  the  opening  day: 

Thursday  afternoon,  November  4,  at  3 — Overture,  "Le  Roi 
D'Ys  (Lalo);  Solo,  "The  Debutante"  (Clarke);  Suite,  "Look- 
ing Upward"  ( Sousa i;  Duet,  "Come  to  Arcadie"  (Edward 
German),  Misses  Frances  and  Grace  Hoyt;  Fugue  and  Grand 
March  from  "Damnation  of  Faust"  (Berlioz);  Staccato  Etude 
(Rubinstein);  (a)  Idyl  ((Amina"  (Paul  Lincke).  (b)  March, 
"The  Fairest  of  the  Fair"  (Sousa);  Violin  Solo,  "Zigeuner- 
weisen"  (Sarasate);   Rhapsody,  "Espagnole"  (Chabrier). 

Thursday  night — Overture,  "Spring"  (Goldmark);  Cornet 
Solo,  "Showers  of  Gold"  (Clarke)  Bacchanalian  Suite,  "People 
Who  Live  in  Glass  Houses"  (Sousa);  Duet,  "Barcarolle," 
Contes  D'Hoft'manu  (Offenbach),  Misses  Hoyt;  Prelude  to 
(he  Russian  Drama  "Crime  and  Punishment"  ( Rachmaninoff' I  ; 
Allegro  from  Fourth  Symphony  (Tcshaikowsky ) ;  Entr'  Act 
(Helmsberger),  (b)  March.  "The  Glory  of  the  'Yankee  Navy" 
(Sousa);  Violin  Solo,  "Fantasie  on  Romeo  and  Juliette" 
(Alard-Gounod) ;   Rhapsodie  "Slavonic"  (Friedman). 

On  Friday  night  the  entire  program  will  be  devoted  to  a 
Wagner-Sousa  program.  Seats  for  the  Sousa  concerts  are 
■')0c,  7oc  and  $1.00,  and  at  matinees  children  will  be  given 
seats  for  25c  and  -^Oc.  Two  special  programs  will  be  given 
in  Berkeley  at  the  Greek  Theatre  on  Monday  afternoon  and 
night.  November  8th.  Seats  for  these  may  be  secured  at 
Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.'s  in  San  Francisco  and  Oakland,  and  at 
the  usual  places  in  Berkeley.  In  case  of  rain  the  concerts 
will  be  given  in  the  Harmon  Gymnasium. 


Ashley  Bennett  Pettis,  pianist,  pupil  of  Charles  P.  Dutton. 
assisted  by  James  D.  Maddrill.  baritone,  gave  a  concert  in 
Ukiah  on  Friday  evening,  October  l.'ith,  and  rendered  the 
following   program   excellently; 

Prelude  and  Fugue  in  C  minor  (Bach),  Mr.  Pettis;  (ai 
Where'er  You  Walk,  "Semele"  (Handel),  (b)  The  Lark  now 
Leaves  his  Wat'ry  Nest  (Horatio  Parker),  (c)  Sing  Me  a 
Song  of  a  Lad  that  is  Gone  (Sidney  Homer),  Mr.  Maddrill; 
Woodland  Sketches  (Mac  Dowell) — To  a  Wild  Rose,  Will  o' 
the  Wisp.  At  an  Old  Trysting  Place,  In  .A.utumn,  From  an 
Indian  Lodge,  To  a  Water  Lily,  From  Uncle  Remus.  A  De- 
serted Farm.  By  the  Meadow  Brook,  Told  at  Sunset,  Mr. 
Pettis;  Arias  from  "St  Paul"  (Mendelssohn) — (a)  Consume 
them  All,  (b)  But  the  Lord  is  Mindful  of  His  Own,  (c)  O, 
God  Have  Mercy,  Mr.  Maddrill;  (a)  Etude  for  Left  Hand 
Alone  (Josef  Hotmann),  (b)  Prelude  (Rachmaninoff),  Mr. 
Pettis;  (a)  O  Thou  Sublime  Sweet  Evening  Star  "Tannhaus- 
er"  (Wagner),  (b)  Du  Bist  wie  eine  Blume  (Schumann),  (c) 
Ectasy  (Mrs.  H.  H.  A.  Beach),  Mr.  Maddrill;  (a)  Flight 
(Mendelssohn),  (b)  Widmung  (Schumann-Liszt),  Mr.  Pettis; 
(a)  Pilgrim's  Song  (Tschaikowsky ),  (bl  Israfel  (Oliver 
King).  Mr.  Maddrill;  Toccata  (Schumann),  Mr.  Pettis; 
Scherzo.  C  sharp  minor   (Chopin),   Mr.   Pettis. 


MISSES   FRANCES  AND  GRACE    HOYT 
Who   Sing    Duets   With   Sousa's   Band,    Dreamland    Rink,   Com- 
mencing   Nov.  4th,  and   Greek  Theatre,   Berkeley. 

Signor  Antonio  de  Grassi  has  taken  a  house  in  San  Fran- 
cisco at  130  Presidio  avenue,  near  Jackson,  and  will  be  ready 
to  receive  pupils  on  the  violin  and  in  harmony  and  orchestra- 
tion at  the  above  address  on  November  1.  Madame  de 
Grassi  will  also  receive  pupils  on  the  violin.  Since  deciding 
to  remain  in  California,  for  some  time,  Signor  de  Grassi  has 
been  making  concert  dates  for  the  interior  of  the  State,  but 
these  are  so  planned  as  not  to  interfere  with  his  teaching 
days.  Pupils  who  wish  to  eventually  work  up  to  the  stan- 
dard required  by  the  Signor,  can  prepare  with  Madame  de 
Grassi.  herself  certificated  by  Prof.  Sevcik  to  teach  his 
method  that  has  so  revolutionized  violin  study.  In  his  letter 
the  great  Maestro  says  that  Madame  de  Grassi  (then  Miss 
Winifred  June  Morgan)  practised  under  him  "with  patience, 
diligence,  and  excellent  success,"  and  he  heartily  recommends 
her  as  a  teacher  of  his  own  method.  Signor  de  Grassi  was 
the  first  assistant. (0  Prof.  Sevcik  in  Prague,  after  a  two  years 
course  under  Joachim,  in  Berlin.  Before  this.  Signor  de 
Grassi  had  taken  his  degree  at  Milan  in  violin,  piano  and 
harmony.  He  also  studied  harmony  privately  at  Leipsic  un- 
der Jadassohn. 


THE   SUBSCRIPTION    CONTEST. 


We  are  glad  to  announce  that  interest  in  the  subscription 
contest  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  is  increasing 
every  day.  So  far  two  big  institutions  have  entered  the  con- 
test, naruely.  the  Notre  Dame  Conservatory  of  Music  in  San 
Jose  and  the  Von  Stein  .Academy  of  Music  in  Los  Angeles. 
Evidently  musical  people  outside  of  San  Francisco  are  more 
enthusiastic  regarding  the  winning  of  a  grand  piano  for  the 
privilege  of  assisting  this  paper  to  be  introduced  in  every 
home  where  music  is  practiced  than  San  Francisco  readers, 
who  really  gain  more  benefits  through  this  paper  than  anyone 
else. 

However,  w'e  are  just  as  pleased  to  see  our  readers  in  in- 
terior California  cities  in  this  grand  piano  contest  than  read- 
ers residing  in  San  Francisco.  Adolf  Gregory,  director  of  the 
Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music,  has  also  expressed  his  con- 
viction that  the  three  hundred  pupils  of  his  excellent  institu- 
tion will  soon  be  heard  from.  No  doubt  as  the  time  pro- 
gresses San  Francisco  will  also  fall  in  line,  but  we  hope  that 
by  that  time  the  others  will  not  have  rushed  ahead  beyond 
reach. 


P  A  C I F I r  COAST  M  M  K I C  A  L  R  E  V  I E  W 


'WE  QUARREL?  ABSURD!"  SAY  PRIMA  DONNAS. 


And  Mme.  Gadski  and  Mme.  Sembrich  Embraces  on  Steamship 
To   Prove   It. 


(From  the  New  York  Herald.) 

Mme.  Marcella  Sembrich  and  Mme.  .Johanna  Gadski  ar- 
rived here  yesterday  on  the  Kronprinzessin  Cecilie,  of  the 
North  German  Lloyd  line.  The  latter  comes  to  make  a  con- 
cert tour  before  the  season  at  the  Metropolitan  Opera  begins. 
Mme.  Sembrich,  who  sang  her  farewell  in  opera  at  the  Met- 
ropolitan Opera  House  last  season,  is  here  for  an  extended 
concert  tour.  With  Mme.  Gadski  came  her  husband,  Hans 
Tauscher,  her  daughter  Lottie,  a  miss  of  sixteen,  and  a  pro- 
tege, Miss  Reita  Faxon.  Professor  Wilhelm  Stengel,  her  hus- 
band, accompanied  Mme.   Sembrich. 

Because  they  are  to  sing  on  the  same  night  in  Chicago, 
October  10,  and  because  Mme.  Sembrich  had  engaged  Mme. 
Gadski's  pianist,  Frank  La  Forge,  of  Illinois,  who  also  was  a 
passenger,  a  report  was  industriously  circulated  that  the 
opera  singers  were  no  longer  friends. 

"Why,  the  idea,"  exclaimed  Mme.  Gadski  regarding  the 
first  tale.  "From  what  I  can  learn  those  dates  conflict  be- 
cause of  a  fight  between  two  managers  in  Chicago,  and 
neither  of  us  knew  about  it  or  had  anything  to  do  with  it, 
did  we?"  And  she  put  her  arm  around  Mme,  Sembrich 
caressingly, 

"No,"  replied  the  latter,  "not  the  least  little  bit." 

Mme.  Gadski  said  that  she  did  not  blame  Mr.  La  Forge  for 
going  with  Mme.  Sembrich,  because  he  would  be  engaged  all 
season  instead  of  the  four  weeks  she  was  to  sing  in  concert. 

In  introducing  Miss  Faxon,  Mme.  Gadski  said:  "Miss  Faxon 
has  been  studying  for  four  years  with  my  old  teacher  and 
now  she  comes  home  to  get  married.  Don't  you  think  she  is 
treating  me  badly?" 

Which  brought  up  the  reported  remarks  of  Mme.  Olive 
Fremstand  that  a  woman  could  not  be  a  great  singer  and  a 
mother  al   the  same  time. 


ALBERT    ROSENTHAL'S    CONCERT. 


The  cello  concert  to  be  given  by  Albert  Rosenthal  at  Lyric 
Hall  next  Wednesday  evening,  November  3d,  should  be  at- 
tended for  several  reasons.  In  the  first  place,  Mr.  Rosenthal 
is  really  an  efficient  artist,  who  has  conquered  for  himself 
an  enviable  reputation  in  the  world  of  music,  both  at  home 
and  abroad,  and  secondly,  he  is  a  native  son  of  this  city  and 
State,  thus  entitling  him  to  the  congratulations  of  his  fellow 
citizens.  Surely  if  the  music  lovers  thousands  of  miles  away 
from  home  wax  enthusiastic  over  Mr.  Rosenthal's  genius  his 
own  people  should  be  eager  to  discover  why  this  young  artist 
has  aroused  the  approval  of  serious  musicians. 

The  editor  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  has  followed 
the  career  of  Mr.  Rosenthal  very  carefully  during  the  last 
few  years,  and  he  has  read  with  interest  the  various  opinions 
about  his  playing,  published  by  European  and  American  crit- 
ics. These  expressions  of  opinion  were  so  sincere  and  were 
written  with  such  evident  knowledge  of  the  subject  that  we 
do  not  hesitate  to  recommend  to  our  readers  to  attend  Mr. 
Rosenthal's  concert  by  all  means  and  hear  him  play  the  cello 
with  that  finesse  and  that  artistic  temperament  which  places 
this  splendid  instrument  in  a  unique  class  by  itself.  Mr. 
Rosenthal  will  be  assisted  in  his  concert  by  Albert  Elkus,  the 
skillful  young  California  composer  and  pianist,  and  those  who 
have  heard  Mr.  Elkus  before  will  realize  that  he  will  be  quite 
an  artistic  feature  of  the  already  delightful  program.  The 
compositions  to  be  presented  next  Wednesday  evening  will 
consist  of :  Sonate  (17th  Century),  (L.  Valentini)  ;  Air  (Bach); 
Andante  (Schumann);  Rondo  (Boccherini) ;  Second  Move- 
ment of  the  Violoncello  Concerto  (Dvorak)  ;  Fantasie  "Linda 
de  Chamounix"  (Piatti);  Chant  Triste  (Tschaikowski)  ;  At 
the  Fountain   (Davidoft);    Hungarian   Rhapsodie    (Popper). 

As  will  be  seen,  this  is  an  unusually  interesting  program 
for  a  cello  concert,  and  anyone  seriously  interested  in  music 
can  not  afford  to  miss  it.  Tickets  are  $1.00  each  and  are 
now  on  sale  at  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  Kohler  &  Chase,  and 
Benj,  Curtaz  &  Son. 

w^ 

Will  L.  Greenbaum  is  in  receipt  of  a  letter  from  Godfrey 
Turner,  husband  of  Maud  Powell,  stating  that  he  had  just 
returned  from  Fritz  Kreisler's  first  New  York  concert,  and 
that  he  now  more  than  ever  considered  Kreisler  the  greatest 
violinist  of  them  all.  This  is  certainly  a  splendid  tribute 
from  a  man  of  Mr.  Turner's  authority.  Fritz  Kreisler  will 
appear   here   under  Greenbaum's   management  on   Dec.   12. 


Subscribe  for  the   Musical   Review.     $2.00  per  'Vear. 


SINGING    IN    ENGLISH. 

San   Francisco,  Oct.   i:Uh,   mofl. 
To  the   Editor  of   Pacific  Coast   Musical   Review: 

Dear  Sir:  Allow  me  to  say  amen  to  your  criticism  of  the 
English  speaking  public,  in  insisting  upon  hearing  opera  in  a 
foreign  tongue  (as  appearing  on  page  five  of  your  issue  of  (he 
ninth  inst.). 

The  stand  you  have  taken  is  strictly  in  accord  with  my 
view  of  that  subject.  As  an  humble  worshipper  at  the  shrine 
of  Apollo,  I  have  been  abused  time  and  again  for  my  lack 
of  musical  taste  in  not  being  able  to  appreciate  foreign  songs. 
Whenever  I  was  compelled  to  listen  to  a  lot  of  songs  in  a 
foreign  tongue,  the  only  pleasure  I  derived  was  in  the  execu- 
tion and  tone  production.  As  I  could  not  understand  a  word 
that  was  being  sung,  1  had  no  interest  in  the  performance 
except  a  vocal  exercise. 

If  it  were  not  for  the  synopsis  of  the  opera,  as  usually 
printed  on  the  program,  I   would  attend   very  few  oreras. 

And  going  one  step  further,  it  seems  that  no  concert  artist 
ever  attempts  a  song  recital  without  giving  foreign  son^s  the 
most  attention  and  the  major  part  of  the  program,  just  as 
if  there  were  no  song  compositions  in  the  English  language 
worthy  of  their  attention.  Now  I  contend  that  there  are 
more  truly  meritorious  songs  in  English  (dramatic  and  other- 
wise)   than   any  artist   will   ever  attempt  to   render. 

In  conclusion,  I  want  to  leave  the  suggestion  that  the  gen- 
eral public  is  so  deceitful  in  these  matters  that  preference 
is  given  to  the  foreign  article  because  of  the  insane  idea 
that  by  so  doing  thy  are  at  once  lifted  to  a  class  of  exclusives. 

Apropos  to  the  above,  I  was  asked  to  take  part  in  a  playlet 
recently  wherein  a  trio  was  to  be  rendered  in  Italian.  I  com- 
mitted to  memory  a  short  sentence  and  made  that  do  for 
the  entire  song — (the  soprano  and  tenor  did  likewise) — and 
upon  my  word  the  audience  gave  the  foreign  song  the  most 
applause. 

Yours  truly, 

L.   A.   LARSEN. 
V* 


OPERA    IN    ENGLISH. 


In  answer  to  the  article.  "Opera  in  English"  in  The  .Musical 
Leader  and  Concert  Goer  of  October  7,  may  I  add  a  few  words? 
Until  vocal  music  in  England  and  America  is  based  upon 
English  we  can  not  have  a  national  musical  art  in  either 
country.  We  do  not  go  to  Berlin  to  hear  French,  to  Austria 
to  hear  Italian,  nor  to  Italy  to  hear  German  sung.  But  in 
England  and  America  we  hear  everything  but  English.  It  is 
now  the  duty  of  our  public  to  insist  upon  our  vocal  music 
being  in  English,  and  the  duty  of  all  artists  and  teachers  to 
recognize  and  encourage  the  same  on  every  occasion.  L'ntil 
the  public  understands  what  it  hears,  musical  art  can  only 
amuse,  it  cannot  educate.  In  most  of  our  concert  programs 
we  hear  only  groups  in  foreign  tongues,  with  a  small  (and 
usually  insignificant)  group  of  native  writers  at  the  end,  "to 
lighten  up"  the  program,  as  they  tell  us!  When  we  sing 
abroad  we  have  to  learn  the  language  of  the  country  in  which 
we  sing  and  we  should  demand  the  same  of  singers  coming 
to  this  country,  for  the  best  English  should  not  be  too  good 
for  us  if  we  are  to  thoroughly  enjoy  and  understand  our 
music.  If  the  French,  Germans  or  Italians  can  adapt  a 
Shakespearian  or  other  standard  work  to  a  musical  setting 
(in  translations)  we  English-speaking  composers  can  certainly 
do  the  same  in  English,  for  we  have  composers  in  England 
and  America  who  have  proven  themselves  worthy  of  the  name. 
All  we  import  is  not  of  necessity  better  than  our  own!  If  a 
just  study  of  our  own  writers  were  insisted  upon  of  the  ar- 
tists who  come  to  this  country  (apart  from  any  commercial 
spirit)  they  could  but  find  art  here  worthy  of  their  attention. 
I  feel  our  public  is  weak  in  not  demanding  a  better  knowledge 
of  our  native  works.  Those  of  us  who  write  cannot  be  ag- 
gressive in  this  matter.  We  must  submit  and  wait.  But  the 
time  is  at  hand  and  vocal  music  to  the  best  English  must 
soon  be  a  necessity  with  us  if  our  art  is  to  prosper. — Eleanore 
Everest  Freer,  in  the  Musical  Leader  and  Concert  Goer. 
w 


How  the  business  world  outside  San  Francisco  regarded  the 
spirit  of  the  Portola  Festival  may  be  gathered  from  the  fol- 
lowing telegrams  sent  to  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.  of  this  city 
by  Stein  way  &  Sons  of  New  York: 

New  York,  "Oct.  21,  '09. 
Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.,  San  Francisco.  Calif. 

Anent  the  celebration  of  the  Portola  Festival  in  commem- 
oration of  the  rebuilding  of  your  great  and  beautiful  city. 
We  send  you  hearty  greetings  and  best  wishes  for  unprece- 
dented prosperity  of  your  city  and  state  such  as  the  country 
has  every  reason  to  expect  from  the,  sturdy  and  dauntless 
citizens  of  San  Elrancisco. 

STEINWAY  &   SONS. 


P  A  C  IF  IV    C  O  A  S  T    .M  U  S  I  C  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  W 


The  Great 

Bach  Festival 

Spring,  1910 

St.  Matthew's  Passion  and 
B  Minor  Mass 


Under  the  Direction  of 

Dr.  J.  Fred  Wolle, 

Founder  of  the  Bach  Festival  in  America 

An  Orchestra  of  Sixty  Musicians 
A  Chorus  of  Two  Hundred  and  Fifty 
A  Children's  Choir  of  Five  Hundred 
Eight  Soloists  of  the  Highest  Standing 

Associate  Member  Five  Dollars  a  Year, 
Including  Two  Tickets  for  Each  Concert 
Active  Members  No  Dues  and  No  Init- 
iation Fee.  :::::: 

NOTICE  TO  SINGERS 

Rehearsals  for  the  great  Bach  Festival 
are  taking  place  every  Monday  evening 
at  Chnstian  Church,  Corner  Dana  Street 
and  Bancroft  Way,  in  Berkeley,  and  any- 
one sufficiently  interested  in  the  works  of 
Johann  Sebastian  Bach  to  study  the  same 
thoroughly  and  participate  in  an  Annual 
Festival,  given  in  his  honor,  and  for  the 
purpose  of  permanently  establishing  the 
worth  of  his  great  Music  in  California, 
are  invited  to  become  members  of  the 
Bach  Choir.  Address  Miss  Lillian  D. 
Clark,  Secretary  of  the  Bach  Choir, 
1522  Spruce  Street.  Berkeley,  Cal. 
Phone  Berkeley  3294. 


IF  THERE  ARE  SUFFICIENT  APPLICATIONS 
FOR  MEMBERSHIP  FROM  OAKLAND  AND 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  REHEARSALS  WILL  BE 
HELD  IN  BOTH  CITIES  EVERY  WEEK. 


Elaborate 
Holiday 
Number! 


^  THE  PACIFIC  COAST  MUSICAL 
^J  REVIEW  is  now  preparing  a  large  and 
^  handsomely  illustrated  New  Year's  Edition 
which  will  be  published  on  Saturday,  December 
25th,  1909.  Besides  containing  a  Retrospective 
Review  of  San  Francisco's  Musical  Life  since 
.April  I  8,  I  906,  the  paper  will  contain  special  ar- 
ticles about  Los  Angeles  Musicians  and  California 
.Musical  Clubs. 

M  11  THOSE  who  do  not  advertise  regularly  in 
^J  this  paper  will  find  the  Holiday  Number  of 
^  the  "Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  "  an  ideal 
.Advertising  Medium  as  it  will  consist  of  an  edition 
of  not  less  than  Ten  Thousand  Copies. 

M  II  REGUL.AR  advertisers  in  this  paper  who 
^J  have  Annual  Contracts  are  entitled  to  a 
-il  complimentary  article  containing  200  words 
each;  and  if  they  pay  for  cuts  at  the  rate  of  1  5c  a 
square  inch  such  article  may  be  illustrated  with  pic- 
ture: the  cut  not  to  exceed  3x4  inches  (two  dollars). 
Regular  advertisers  des.nng  to  take  advantage  of 
this  complimentary  write-up  and  picture  should  send 
in  their  requests  and  copy  before  December  1st. 
After  that  date  no  write-ups  can  be  ac- 
cepted. 

SINGLE  COPIES  OF  THE  HOLIDAY 
NUMBER  WILL  BE  25  CENTS. 


Send    copies    away   to    friends    and    show 
what  California  is  doing  for  Music.     '     . 


the 


For    Particulars    Address: 


PACIFIC  COAST 
MUSICAL  REVEIW 

Sherman  Clay  &  Co.  Building 
Sutter  and  Kearny  Sts.  San  Francisco 


10 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


MUSICAL  NEWS  ABROAD 


The  Komisclie  Oper  in  Berlin  will  present  a  number  of 
novelties  during  this  season.  Among  these  new  works  are: 
"Resurrection,"  a  free  adaptation  of  the  Tolstoi  novel  of  the 
same  name  in  a  musical  setting,  by  Frank  Alfano,  a  young 
Italian  composer;  "Das  Veilchenfest"  (The  Feast  of  Violets), 
by  Brandt-Beys:  "The  Valley  of  Love,"  by  Oscar  Strauss, 
who  wrote  the  "Waltz  Dream"  (which  proved  even  a  greater 
triumph  in  Europe  than  the  over-advertised  "Merry  Widow") 
and  "Lord  Piccolo,"  by  Berenzi. 

*  *       * 

It  seems  that  all  comic  opera  composers  who  have  made 
recent  successes  will  bring  new  works  into  the  forthcoming 
season.  Lehar,  who  has  shaken  a  dozen  or  so  comic  operas 
from  his  sleeve  during  the  last  few  years,  will  present  "Das 
Purstenkind"  at  the  Operetten  Theatre  in  Berlin.  Leo  Fall, 
whose  "Dollar  Princess"  proved  a  brilliant  triumph,  will 
bring  out  a  new  work,  "The  Divorced  Wife,"  at  the  Theatre 
des  Westens.  All  these  comic  operas  mentioned  her  are  of 
a  risque  and  very  broad  character,  and  according  to  the  Cali- 
fornia Club  of  San  Francisco,  would  be  unfit  for  production: 
but  in  Berlin  people's  minds  do  not  run  in  channels  that 
make  risque  productions  subject  to  police  interference.  Th« 
public  there  knows  what  they  are  about  to  hear.  If  thsir 
sentiments  are  too  refined  to  be  put  to  the  test  they  simply 
refrain  from  attending  these  performances.  If  they  feel  as 
if  they  wanted  amusement  of  this  kind  they  will  go  there 
without  the  government  interfering  with  their  free  will.  And 
mind  you,  Germany  is  not  a  free  country,  either. 

*  «       * 

The  Frankfurt  String  Quartet  will  present  a  new  work  by 
Ms,2  Reger,  which  will  be  his  op.  109.  The  same  composer 
has  also  written  a  male  chorus  entitled  "To  Zeppelin."  hereby 
showing  an  admiration  for  the  king  of  airships.  While  this 
work  may  be  rather  flighty  in  its  character,  it  should  be  as 
air  tight  as  some  of  Richard  Strauss's  works,  but  we  trust 
that  the  string  quartet  number  will  not  put  the  Frankfurt 
players  as  much  up  in  the  air  as  the  Zeppelin  invention  does 
its  master.  Anyway,  Max  Reger  is  one  of  the  most  fertile 
composers  in  Germany  today.  His  works  are  characteristic 
and  contain  a  certain  element  of  originality  unmarred  by  a 
superhuman  effort  to  make  musicians  work  like  woodchop- 
pers,  which  latter  desire  seems  to  be  the  favorable  pastime 
of  the  modern  German  composer. 

*  *       * 

During  the  current  season  of  the  Berlin  Philharmonic  Or- 
chestra, under  the  direction  of  Arthur  Nickisch,  Sir  Edward 
Elgar's  "A  flat  symphony"  will  be  performed.  This  would 
inspire  one  with  the  conviction  that  the  strained  feeling  be- 
tween England  and  Germany  has  not  reached  the  musical 
circles.  This  is  just  as  little  likely  as  that  the  strained 
feeling  between  Los  .\ngeles  and  San  Francisco,  which  is  due 
to  political  conspiracies,  can  affect  the  musicians  of  these  two 
great  cities. 

*  *       * 

It  is  gratifying  to  hear  that  Madame  Emma  Calve  will  not 
visit  America  during  this  season,  and  no  doubt  many  a  man- 
ager who  was  "soaked"  for  $L500  guarantee  by  this  ambi- 
tious cantatrice  will  breathe  easier  when  he  hears  this  gratify- 
ing news.  The  concert  stage  would  not  lose  much  if  Calve 
would  decide  to  forsake  it  forever.  She  will  remain  at  Nice 
this  year,  where  she  is  scheduled  to  create  the  role  of  Marie- 
des-Angers  in  Gabriel  Dupont's  opera  "La  Glu."  This  work 
is  entitled  a  "lyric  drama  in  four  acts,  with  libretto  by  Henri 
Cain."  We  trust  that  Madame  Calve  will  not  raise  Cain  witli, 
the  libretto,  as  she  does  not  play  the  title  role,  which  has 
been  allotted  to  Mile.  Vix  of  the  Opera  Comique  in  Paris. 
Madame  Calve's  role  is  that  of  a  Mother,  and  she  ought  to 
be  pretty  good  in  this  role,  for  she  has  been  mother  to  so 
many  proteges  who  never  "proteged"  that  she  should  be  used 
to  it  by  this  time.  Otherwise,  her  motherly  virtues  seem  to 
be  few  and  far  between. 

On  October  liith  was  presented  at  the  Opera  Comique  in 
Paris  for  the  first  time  Lalo's  "Roy  d'Ys."  Grand  opera  is 
being  given  at  both  the  Opera  Comique  and  at  the  Gaite- 
Lyrique,  the  grand  opera  not  having  as  yet  opened  its  doors. 

*  *       * 

Willy  Burmester,  the  famous  German  violinist,  will  tour  the 
United  States  in  the  season  1910-11.  It  is  to  be  hoped  that 
this  time  this  splendid  virtuoso  will  visit  the  Pacific  Coast. 
At  none  of  his  former  visits  to  this  county  were  any  attempts 
made  to  book  him  here.  The  New  York  managers  only 
then  book  artists  for  the  coast  when  they  have  exhausted 
their  drawing  powers  in  the  East,  or  after  they  have  not 
been   financially  successes,   and   thus   in   many   instances   the 


Pacific  Coast  has  made  artists  for  New  York.  Nevertheless, 
we  are  sneeringly  referred  to  as  the  wild  and  wooly  West 
every  time  an  artist  does  not  draw  as  the  New  York  manager 
in  his  snug  office  expects  him  to  draw. 

»       »       » 

Offenbach's  "L,ove  Tales  of  Hoffmann"  was  given  tor  five 
hundred  times  at  the  Royal  Opera  in  Berlin  during  the  last 
■four  years.  Pagliacci  received  its  2.">0th  performance  recent- 
ly. The  Musical  Courier  correspondent  comments  on  this  fact 
as  follows:  "It  required  thirty-eight  years  for  such  a  popular 
opera  as  Mignon,  for  instance,  to  reach  the  250th  perfor- 
mance. It  took  even  Weber's  Freischutz  seventy-five  years 
and  Mozart's  Don  .Juan  ninety-seven  years  to  reach  this  figure 
in  Berlin  at  the  Royal  Opera."  We  wonder  when  this  figure 
will  be  reached  in  New  York  and  San  Francisco.  No  doubt 
by  that  time  people  will  fly  to  the  theatre  in  airships. 

*  *       * 

Arthur  Nikisch  will  conduct  performances  of  "Don  Juan" 
and  "Rienzl"  at  the  Hamburg  Opera  on  the  26th  and  28th  of 
this  month. — Musical  Courier. 

*  *       * 

Mme.  Arthur  Nikisch  has  completed  the  text  and  partitur  to 
an  operetta  entitled  "Meine  Tante,  Deine  Tante,"  which  will 
be  given  its  first  performance  on  May  1,  1910.  in  the  New 
Operetta  Theatre  of  Berlin.  Nikisch  will  conduct  the  pre- 
miere, which  will  be  the  occasion  of  his  first  appearance  as 
conductor  in  a  Berlin  theatre. — Musical  Courier. 

*  *       * 

A  novelty  in  quartet  singing  will  be  heard  in  Berlin  this 
season  in  the  offerings  of  the  newly  formed  Russian  Vocstl 
Quartet,  an  organization  of  Russian  opera  singers,  who  will 
introduce  the  lieder  and  songs  of  the  Siberian  prisoners,  as 
collected  by  Professor  Gartefeld,  of  St.  Petersburg.  The 
quartet  will  be  made  up  of  excellent  and  well  schooled  voices 
and  to  make  their  performances  more  dramatic  they  will  be 
dressed  in  the  long  gray  cloaks  worn  by  the  banished  offen- 
ders, the  men  with  gray  caps  and  the  women  with  white 
cloths  over  the  head.  They  will  be  accompanied  by  the  Rus- 
sian balalaika  and  some  of  the  songs  by  the  rattling  of  chains. 
This  is,  indeed,  a  day  of  realism. — Musical  Courier. 

The  Caruso  concert  at  the  Royal  Albert  Hall.  London, 
broke  all  records,  both  as  to  numbers  present  and  to  money 
taken  in.  The  great  building  contained  l."),000  people,  and 
was  sold  out  four  days  in  advance.  It  is  stated  on  the  best 
authority  that  4.000  applicants  had  to  be  refused,  representing 
$10,000.  So  pleased  is  Signor  Caruso  with  his  tour  that  he 
says  openly  he  has  never  in  his  life  been  so  happy  as  with 
Mr.  Quintan,  and  as  long  as  Mr.  Quintan  cares  to  represent 
him  he  will  be  pleased  to  call  him  his  English  impresario. — 
Musical  Courier. 

V%^ 


THE  CLEMENS-GABRILOWITSCH   WEDDING. 


Clara  Clemens,  the  contralto,  and  Ossip  Gabrilowitsch,  the 
pianist,  were  married  last  Wednesday  noon  at  the  home  of 
Samuel  L.  Clemens  (Mark  Twain),  the  father  of. the  bride,  in 
Redding  Conn.  The  beautiful  Italian  villa,  with  jts  splendid 
natural  surroundings,  made  an  ideal  spot  for  a  country  wed- 
ding, and  the  interior  of  the  house,  decorated  profusely  with 
autumn  leaves  in  all  their  splendor  of  color,  added  immeasur- 
ably to  the  picturesqueness  of  the  occasion.  The  ceremony, 
performed  by  the  Rev.  Dr.  Twitchell.  of  Hartford,  Conn.,  was 
a  very  simple  one,  there  being  no  attendants  except  the 
bride's  sister,  Jean.  Miss  Newcomb  played  the  wedding 
march  on  the  piano.  Mark  Twain  wore  his  famous  Oxford  cap 
and  gown  over  his  proverbial  suit  of  spotless  white  flannel. 

About  fifty  guests  were  present  at  the  wedding  and  the 
breakfast  that  followed,  among  them  being  Richard  Watson 
Gilder,  Mrs.  Gilder  and  three  daughters,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  A.  M. 
Wright  of  Boston,  Lillian  Burbank,  Marie  Nichols,  Mrs.  John 
B.  Stanchfield,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  F'rank  J.  Sprague,  Miss  Foot, 
Miss  Comstock.  Mary  Lawton,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Theodore  Gaill- 
ard,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  Hapgood,  Leonard  Liebling,  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Albert  Bigelow  Paine  and  Ethel  Newcomb,  all  of 
New   York. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gabrilowitsch  will  go  abroad  on  October  16, 
and  after  a  short  tour  in  Italy  will  settle  permanently  in  Ber- 
lin.    Mrs.  Gabrilowitsch  will  not  sume  her  successful  activity 
on  the  concert  stage. — Musical   Courief,   Oct.   13,   '09. 
** 


The  Hofmann  String  Quartet  will  give  three  chamber 
music  concerts  during  the  season  at  the  Kohler  &  Chase. 
Hall.  The  members  of  the  quartet  are:  William  Hofmann, 
first  violin;  Walter  Manchester,  second  violin;  Rudolph  Sei- 
ger,  viola;  Albert  W.  Nielsen,  cello.  Inasmuch  as  every 
member  of  the  quartet  is  an  excellent  musician,  artistic 
treats  may  be  expected. 


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}•  A  C  I  V  I  ('    0  O  A  S  r    ^i  Ti  S  T  C  A  T.    II  10  V  I  E  \\. 


MUSICAL  NEWS  FROM  THE  EAST 


Fritz  Kieisler  sailfd  from  Rreiiien  on  Tuesday,  October 
12,  and  arrived  in  New  York  on  Tuesday,  October  Iflth  aboard 
the  steamer  Kaiser  Willielm  der  Grosse,  accompanied  by  Mrs. 
Kreisler  and  Haddon  Squire,  his  pianist.  Kreisler  came  di- 
rect from  his  vacation,  which  he  spent  at  Gastein,  and  opened 
his  tour  with  a  recital  in  Carnegie  Hall  last  Saturday  after- 
noon,  October   23. 

Reinald  Werrenrath  in  his  recital  in  Mendelssohn  Hall,  New 
Yorli,  on  Tuesday  afternoon,  October  26,  sang  a  group  of 
songs  by  Miss  Harriet  Ware,  the  young  American  composer, 
who  played  the  accompaniments  for  this  group.  Another 
group  in  his  program  comprises  five  songs  by  Grieg,  wliich 
Mr.  Werrenrath  sang  in  the  Norwegian  language.  He  has 
been  singing  the  past  week  in  the  Maine  State  festivals  and 
after  a  short  tour  through  tlie  New  England  cities  returned 
to  New  York. 

Rachmaninoff,  tlie  distinguished  Russian  composer-pianist. 
arrived  in  this  country  on  October  26  aboard  the  Kronprinz 
Wilhelm.  He  left  immediately  for  Boston,  where  he  conducts 
the  Boston  Symphony  Orchestra  on  October  29  and  30.  His 
first  New  York  appearances  will  be  with  the  Boston  Symph- 
ony Orchestra  on  November  13  and  in  his  own  recital  in 
Carnegie  Hall  on  November  20,  at  which  time  his  new  sonata, 
op.  20,  will  be  included  in  his  program. 

The  American  debut  of  Yolanda  Mero  has  been  pushed  for- 
ward several  days  to 'allow  the  famous  Hungarian  pianiste  to 
accept  a  number  of  orchestral  concerts  out  of  New  York  that 
have  been  offered  to  her  through  the  failure  of  another  fa- 
mous pianist  to  visit  this  country.  These  include  appearances 
in  Chicago  with  the  new  Philharmonic  Society  and  in  St.  Paul 
with  the  St.  Paul  Symphony  Orchestra.  The  positive  date 
for  Yolanda  Merc's  American  debut  has  been  set  for  Wednes- 
day evening,  November  3,  in  Carnegie  Hall,  when  she  will 
have  the  assistance  of  the  Russian  Symphony  Orchestra, 
Modest  Altschuler,  conductor. 

Oscar  Hammerstein's  preliminary  season  of  grand  opera 
at  popular  prices  at  the  Manhattan  has  drawn  to  a  close. 
The  last  wek  was  signalized  by  the  addition  of  another  nov- 
elty to  the  preliminary  season's  repertoire,  making  fifteen 
operas  in  all.  Special  interest  was  attached  to  the  announce- 
ment of  "The  Bohemian  Girl  '  for  Wednesday,  as  it  was  sung 
in  English — the  first  opera  s\ing  in  the  vernacular  in  the  Man- 
hattan Opera  House. 

Handel,  Schumann,  Schubert  and  Liszt  were  represented 
on  the  program  for  George  Hamlin's  recital  at  Carnegie  Hall, 
New  Y'ork,  Sunday  afternoon,  October  17.  But  German  Lieder 
did  not  preponderate.  There  was  an  old  Italian  song  of 
Buonocini,  a  Shakespearian  and  Elizabethan  group  by  Roger 
Quilter,  a  "Hmyn  to  the  Night,"  by  Campbell-Eipton,  and  "The 
Last  Taschastas,"  by  Carl  Busch.  A  request  number  was  Ed- 
win Schneider's  "Flower  Rain,"  which  proved  so  popular  at 
Mr.  Hamlin's  Carnegie  Hall  recital  last  season. 

Friends  of  the  Symphony  Society  of  New  York  will  be  in- 
terested in  the  completed  list  of  novelties  and  lesser  known 
works  for  the  season,  which  has  now  been  prepared  by  Wal- 
ter Damrosch.  The  list  is  as  follows:  "Pagan  Poem,"  after 
an  eclogue  of  Virgil,  for  orchestra,  piano  and  three  trumpets 
off  the  stage,  by  Charles  Martin  Loeffler;  dramatic  overture, 
"Paolo  and  Francesca,"  Arne  Oldberg;  "Czar  and  Sultan."  a 
suite  of  musical  pictures,  op.  57,  by  Rimsky-Korsakoft; 
scherzo,  op.  45,  Carl  Goldmark;  "Troisleme  Suite,"  by  Mosz- 
kowsky;  "Le  Printemps,"  op.  34,  by  Alexander  Glazounow. 
A  Debussy  program  will  be  given,  Including  a  new  "marche 
eccossaise"  and  a  suite  "Au  coin  des  enfants."  Other  novel- 
ties will  be  a  ballade  by  Liadow,  written  throughout  in  the 
five-four  time,  first  popularized  by  Tschaikowsky  in  his  "Sym- 
phonie  Pathetique":  ballet  music  to  the  pantomime  "Les 
petits  riens,"  by  Mozart,  and  a  concerto  by  Rameau,  arranged 
by  Felix  Mottl.  Elgar's  symphony,  which  made  such  a  re- 
markable success  last  winter,  will  be  repeated,  as  well  as 
symphonies  by  Fieethoven,  Brahms,  Dvorak,  Haydn  and  Schu- 
bert. 

*       *       * 

Gustav  Mahler,  who  sailed  for  this  country  from  Europe 
on  October  12,  called  a  first  rehearsal  of  the  New  York  Phil- 
harmonic Society  soon  after  his  arrived  in  New  York,  October 
19th.  One  of  the  interesting  changes  to  be  noticed  this  sea- 
son in  the  reorganization  of  the  orchestra  will  be  in  the 
wood-wind   choir,    where   only   two   of  last   year's   players   re- 


main. Most  of  the  newcomers  in  this  dei)arlment  are  either 
of  the  P'rench  or  Belgian  school,  three  Hute  players,  three 
oboes  and  the  same  number  of  clarinets  being  I"''renchmen. 
In  the  brass  section  there  will  be  noticed  this  season  but  three 
musicians  formerly  with  the  Philharmonic,  while  all  the  per- 
formers on  the  tympani  and  percussion  instruments  are  new 
here.  Theodore  Spiering,  who  makes  his  debut  in  New  York 
,  as  concertnieister,  was  for  many  years  a  first  violinist  in  the 
Chicago  Orchestra.  Leo  Schultz  remains  first  'cellist,  but 
there  will  be  a  new  face  at  the  stand  with  him,  Horace  Britt, 
who  was  first  '(cellist  with  Victor  Herbert.  Other  newcomers 
among  the  'cello  players  are  I.  Herner,  who  as  at  the  first 
desk  of  the  Manhattan  Opera  House  orchestra  last  year; 
Paul  Morgan  of  New  York  and  Alexander  Heindl  of  Boston. 

*  #       « 

Miss  Carolyn  Beebe  and  Edouard  Dethier  will  give  their 
second  series  of  sonata  recitals  for  piano  and  violin  at  the 
Plaza  Hotel,  New  York,  on  the  afternoon  of  Monday,  Novem- 
ber 15,  and  Monday,  November  22,  at  3:30  o'clock,  and  Mon- 
day evening,  November  20,  at  8:30  o'clock. 

For  the  first  time  at  his  Sunday  night  concerts  at  the  New 
York  Theatre  Victor  Herbert  played  Lortzing's  much  neglec- 
ted "Festival  Overture,"  Sunday  evening,  October  17th.  It 
led  a  program  containing  a  well  selected  list  of  orchestral 
numbers  that  met  the  ready  approval  of  the  clientele  this 
popular  composer-conductor  has  acquired.  By  request  Saint- 
Saen's  suite  "Algerienne,"  with  a  solo  for  viola.  "Reverie  du 
sole,"  was  another  orchestra  feature  of  the  first  portion  of 
the  program,  together  with  Bach's  "Air"  for  the  strings, 
Moszkowski's  "Malaguena"  and  Stahlberg's  "Al  Mercedita." 
In  the  part  devoted  to  Mr.  Herbert's  own  music  several  of  his 
isolated  numbers,  "Fleurette,"  "The  Fairies'  Revel,"  etc., 
found  a  place  among  the  selections  from  his  operas.  The 
principal  soloist  was  John  M.  Spargur,  violin,  who  played 
D'Ambrosio's  "Canzonetta,"  a  Berceuse  by  Townsend,  and  a 
composition  of  his  own,  "Souvenir." 

Mme.  Blanche  Arral  made  her  metropolitan  bow  at  Carnegie 
Hall  Sunday  afternoon,  October  24th.  Mme.  Arral  appeared 
with  the  Volpe  Symphony  Orchestra,  the  program  being  as 
follows:  Overture,  Anacreon  (Cherubini).  Volpe  Symphony 
Orchestra:  Air  d'Ophelie,  Hamlet  (Ambroise  Thomas  I,  Mme. 
Arral  with  orchestra;  Le  Rouet  d'Omphale  (Saint-Saens), 
Volpe  Symphony  Orchestra:  Vol  che  Sapete,  Le  Xozze  de  Fi- 
garo (Mozart),  Au  Cour  le  Reine  (Massenet),  Mme.  Arral  with 
orchestra:  Second  Suite,  Peer  Gynt  (Grieg I,  Volpe  Symphony 
Orchestra;  Plus  grande  dans  son  obscurite.  Queen  of  Sheba 
(Gounod),  Mme.  Arral  with  orchestra;  Mignon,  (a)  Overture, 
(b)  Romance,  (c)  Cantabile,  (d)  Gavotte,  (e)  Polacca  (Am- 
broise Thomas),  Mme.  Arral  with  orchestra. 

*  *       * 

Mme.  .Tohanna  Gadski  will  give  her  annual  Carnegie  Hall 
recital  Sunday  afternoon,  October  31st.  Her  accompanist  in 
New  York  will  be  Isidore  Luckstone,  who  will  likewise  ap- 
pear with  the  prima  donna  in  Boston,  November  3rd. 

.lascha  Bron,  the  young  Russian  violinist,  makes  his  debut 
at  Mendelssohn  Hall,  New  York,  November  8.  He  will 
then  proceed  to  Philadelphia,  where  he  plays  on  the  10th  and 
return  to  New  Y'ork  for  the  Rubinstein  Club's  concert  at  the 
Waldorf-Astoria  on  Saturday  evening,  the  13th.  On  Sunday 
evening,  November  28,  he  plays  at  the  Metropolitan  Opera 
House  with  Pepito  Arriola,  with  whom  he  is  also  to  be  as- 
sociated in  a  concert  at  Columbus,  Ohio,  on  the  Thursday 
preceding.  Early  in  December  he  will  go  West  to  fill  engage- 
ments, which  include  appearances  In  Chicago  and  Indianapolis. 

Pepito  Arriola,  the  eleven-year-old  pianist  who  has  been  one 
of  the  sensational  attractions  of  the  last  London  season,  will 
make  his  American  debut  Friday  afternoon,  November  12,  at 
Carnegie  Hall. 

Mme.  Blanche  Marchesi,  who  will  be  in  America  for  a  short 
season  this  fall,  will  give  her  only  New  York  recital  at  Men- 
delssohn Hall,  Thursday  evening,  November  18,  after  which 
she  makes  a  tour  of  about  thirty-five  concerts. 

*  *       * 

Mme.  Nordica  will  give  her  only  New  York  recital  of  the 
season  at  Carnegie  Hall,  Thursday  afternoon.  November  11th. 
immediately  following  her  appearance  in  "Giaconda"  at  the 
opening   of   the    Boston   opera   season,    November   8. 


-*v- 


Robert  Lloyd,  the  director  of  the  McNeill  Club,  recently 
lectured  at  Elk's  Hall  on  "The  Correct  l^se  of  the  Voice  in 
Speech  and  Song."  The  lecturer  explained  and  demonstrated 
the  proper  methods  of  breathing,  and  the  evening  was  both 
instructive    and    pleasant. 


r  A  ('  I  F  T  C    C  OAST    M  U  S  I  T  A  T.    R  E  ^'  I  E  ^^' 


13 


VON  STEIN 

Academy  of  Music 

Phones:    Broadway  3923,    Home  25721 

1419  So.  Grand  Ave.  LOS  ANGELES 


HEINRICH    VON    STEIN,    President   and    Director 
WENZEL     KOPTA,     Director    Violin     Department 


FACULTY 

PIANO — Heinrich   Von   Stein.   Henry   Immerman.   J.   W. 

Moore.  Miss  .luliet  Von  Stein.  Herman  Hilburg.  Miss 

Virginia  Swearingen.  Miss  Nina  L.  Barber  and  Miss 

E.  E.  Pritchert. 
VIOLIN — Wenzel  Kopta.  .Julius  Bierlicli.  Ferdinand  Von 

Grote. 
VOICE — Hugo  Kirchliofer.  Robert  Ecldiardt. 
CELLO — Mrs.  Elsa  Von  Grofe-Menasco. 
ORGAN — .1.   W.   Moore. 
HARMONY,  THEORY  and  COMPOSITION— Miss  .Juliet 

Von  Stein. 

Strongest  Faculty  Ever  Organized   in 
Southern  California 


SousamsBand 

Assisted  by  the  Misses  Frances  and  Grace 
Hoyt,  duettists.  Miss  Florence  Hardeman, 
violinist,  and  Mr.  Herbert  L.  Clarke,  cornetist 

DREAMLAND    RINK 

8  Concerts  —  Afternoons  and  Evenings  of  Nov.  4,  5,  6,  7, 
Friday  Night  Wagner-Sousa  Program.  Seals  ready  Nov.  1 . 
at  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.'s,  where  a  complete  program  may  be 
obtained.  Prices  $1.00,  73c,  50c.  General  admission  50c. 
Greek  Theater,  Berkeley,  Monday  Aft.  and  Night,  Nov.  8th. 
Seats  at  usual  places. 


E  X  T  R  A 


MME. 
JEAN 


JOMELLI 

PRIMA  DONNA  SOPRANO 

Covent  Garden,  Hammerstein's.  etc.  in  conjunction  with 

Miss  Marie  Nichols,  Violin  virtuosa 
Miss  Madalen  Worden,  Composer — Pianiste 

Novelty  Theater 

Friday  Eve,  Nov.  12,  Sunday  Afternoon 
Nov.  14,  and  Tues.  Eve,  Nov.  16. 

Seats,   $1.00,  $1.50  and   $2.00.     Ready  November  9th. 
Oakland — Ye  Liberty,  Wednesday  Afternoon,  Nov.   1  7th. 
Coming— MARY  ADELE  CASE,  Contralto 


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NEW    PUBLICATIONS    FOR    1909. 

Interesting  and  Complete   List  of     Novelties     Published     and 
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[By  the  Musical  Courier's  Leipsic  Correspondent.] 
(Continued  from  Last  Week.) 
Otto  Junne  publishes  two  works  for  large  orchestra,  tlie 
symphonic  peora  "Hero  and  Leander"  by  Paul  Brtel  (Berlin), 
and  a  tone  poem  by  the  Altenburg  conductor,  Theodor  Blunier, 
whose  "Carnivalscenes"  was  given  in  the  Gewandhaus  last 
year.  The  Ertel  poem  was  given  in  manuscript  in  Berlin  by 
the  Bluthner  Orchestra  under  Carl  Pauzner,  and  it  was  strong- 
ly approved.  Solo  songs  here  include  Alex  Schwartz's  settings 
of  poems  by  Carmen  Sylva,  also  songs  by  H.  Erler  and  Jos. 
Doebber.  There  are  male  choruses  by  Schwammel  (Inns- 
bruck) and  P.  Nowowiejski's  "Mer  ein  Wortchen,"  which  has 
become  a  repertory  piece  of  the  Berliner  Lehrergesangverein. 
Liturgical  music  includes  Emil  Wagner's  organ  variations, 
"Vom  Himuiel  hoch"  and  his  "Vaterunser"  motet  for  mixed 
chorus.  Further,  ten  organ  pieces,  op.  81,  by  Moritz  Nogel 
(Leipsic),  Br.  Dost's  "Ps.  CIII"  for  mixed  chorus,  and  Joh. 
Diebold's  third  book  of  modern  organ  masters.  The  Diebold 
book  contains  forty-five  compositions,  of  which  the  last  eight 
have  obligatos  of  some  stringed  instruments.  Other  pieces 
for  organ  are  by  Jos.  Beringer  (San  Francisco),  Th.  A.  Romer 
(Magdeburg)  and  H.  Daftner,  of  Dresden.  Dalfner  brings  also 
a  piano  trio,  his  opus  10. 

Far  the  most  important  work  now  in  the  press  of  Gebruder 
Hug  &  Co.  is  Fritz  Volbach's  B  minor  symphony,  which  was 
strongly  approved  upon  its  manuscript  rendition  at  the  June 
festival  in  Stuttgart.  Fritz  Steinbach  will  conduct  the  sym- 
phony at  a  Gurzenich  concert  in  Cologne.  Next  comes  the 
orchestral  "Apostaten  Marsch,"  with  male  chorus,  the  op.  2. 
by  Rudolph  Siegel,  og  Munich.  This  work  also  created  a 
strong  impression  at  the  Stuttgart  festival.  The  text  is  a 
spiteful  political  poem  written  in  1844  by  Gottfried  Keller.  The 
orchestral  score  is  not  merely  an  accompainment,  but  an 
independent  work.  The  young  composer  pupil  of  Mrs.  Reger. 
Othmar  Schoeck  is  represented  by  a  sonata  for  violin  and 
piano,  and  no  less  than  fifty-seven  solo  songs  with  piano. 
This  firm  brought  last  year  the  same  composer's  three  move- 
ment orchestral  serenade  for  strings,  which  was  played  as  a 
Prufung  work  by  the  Leipsic  Conservatory  student  orchestra. 
Hans  Huber  is  in  press  with  his  sonata,  op.  130,  for  cello  and 
piano,  and  Volkmar  Andrae  by  his  second  piano  trio,  op.  14. 
Andrae  brings  also  fourteen  songs,  his  op.  10  12  and  1.5. 
Wilhelm  Berger  (Meiningen)  has  on  a  capella  male  chorus 
ballade  entitled  "Pharaoh."  It  is  of  about  the  scope  of  the 
Hegar  ballades.  Hug  &  Co.  still  maintain  lively  interest  in 
Volbach's  "Am  Siegfried  Brunnen,"  a  mood  picture  for  male 
chorus  and  orchestra,  published  in  1907. 

*  *       w 

Ernst  Eulenberg's  catalogue  of  miniature  scores  is  enlarged 
by  those  of  Max  Reger's  second  string  quartet,  op.  109;  Jan 
Sibelius'  quartet,  op.  56;  the  Richard  Strauss  piano  quartet, 
op.  13;  the  Brahms  academic  festival  and  the  tragic  overtures, 
also  Brahm's  (orchestral)  variations  on  the  Haydn  theme. 
The  house  is  bringing  out  the  symphonic  poem  "Fruhling,"  by 
Vincenz  Reifner,  of  Teplitz,  in  Bohemia.  Stephan  Krehl's 
piano  trio,  op.  32:  Hans  Sitt's  three  violin  pieces,  op.  102,  and 
a  dozen  songs  by  Bruno  Hinze-Reinhold  are  among  the  new 
works  to  appear.  Large  interest  attaches  to  Felix  Mottl's 
instrumentation  of  a  Bach  secular  cantata  for  soprano,  basso 
and  orchestra,  with  choral  finale.  The  cantata,  "Mer  han  en 
neue  Oberkett,"  was  in  honor  of  the  coming  of  a  new  owner  of 
the  Klein  Zschocher  estates  at  the  edge  of  Leipsic.  The 
work  in  Mottl's  arrangement  has  fe-^w  given  by  the  Bachverein 
of  Heidelberg  under  Dr.  Wolfrum.  The  male  chorus  litera- 
ture is  enlarged  by  Victor  Keldorfer's  setting  o  ffour  famous 
dance  melodies  by  Josef  Strauss  (1827-1870),  brother  to 
Johann  Strauss.  The  Reger  quartet,  op.  will  be  played  here 
in  November  by  the  Bohemians.  The  Reifner  symphonic 
poem  was  variously  given  in  manuscript  last  season  in  Aus- 
trian cities. 

*  *       * 

Max  Brockhaus'  catalogue  never  brings  anything  but  operas 
and  incidental  music  to  dramatic  works.  Siegried  Wagner's 
opera  "Banadietrich"  is  now  on  the  press,  also  Humperdinck's 
opera  of  "Die  Konigskinder."  Humperdinck's  first  music  on 
the  subject  was  only  incidental  to  a  fairy  play,  but  last  sea- 
son the  work  was  enlarged  and  performed  as  a  full  blooded 
opera.  The  Brockhaus  Press  is  still  busied  with  Humper- 
dinck's music  to  other  plays,  a  part  of  which  music  was 
issued  last  year.  It  includes  music  for  actual  use  with  "The 
Merchant  of  Venice,"  "Tempest."  "Winter's  Tale,"  "As  You 
Like   It,"   and    now   for    Ibsen's   "Fest   auf   Solhaug."     .\mong 


the  numerous  live  operas  in  this  catalogue  is  the  Karl  Weis 
"Revisor,"  first  played  as  comedy,  but  finely  successful  as 
comic  opera  when  issued  so  in  1901.  It  had  translation  and 
performance  in  five  languages. 

«  «  * 
C.  F.  \V.  Siegel  (R.  Linneniann)  is  publishing  a  number  of 
large  works  by  the  late  Erich  Wolf  Degner,  who  was  at  the 
time  of  his  death  director  of  the  Weimar  Musik  Schule.  The 
works  are  a  symphony  for  orchestra  and  organ,  a  serenade 
for  eight  wind  instruments  and  strings,  a  legende  entitled 
"Maria  und  die  Mutter,"  for  contralto  and  baritone  solo,  mixed 
chorus  and  orchestra;  also  a  set  of  choral  variations  for  violin 
and  organ.  There  are  two  previously  unpublished  humorous 
skeches  for  double  male  chorus,  by  Felix  Mendellsohn,  printed 
from  manuscripts  in  the  Royal  Library  at  Berlin.  Other 
works  for  chorus  are  Othegraven's  "Bauernaufstand,"  for 
male  chorus  and  orchestra;  also  works  by  C.  Kuhnhold,  E. 
Erdelmann,  Hermann  Stephani,  Stephan  Krehl '(Leipsic  Con- 
servatory), Hans  Grisch  (Krell  pupil,  also  in  conservatory 
faculty),  Th.  Podbertsky,  Gerhard  Schjelderup  (twelve  Nor- 
wegian folk  themes),  Louis  Victor  Saar  (Cincinnati),  also  F. 
Nagler's  male  chorus  operetta  "Eye  of  the  Law,"  and  Josef 
Fiber's  one  act  singspiel  "Die  Liebspeis,"  for  solo,  mixed 
quartet  and  piano  or  orchestra.  Saar's  string  quartet,  op. 
39;  his  sonata  for  piano  and  violin,  op.  44,  and  some  three 
voice  women  choruses  were  issued  here  some  seasons  ago. 
New  concerted  music  includes  Em.  Moor's  violin  suite,  op. 
73,  newly  set  for  orchestra.  Saar's  string  quartet,  op.  39; 
his  sonata  for  piano  and  violin,  op.  44,  and  some  three  voice 
women  choruses  were  issued  here  some  seasons  ago.  New- 
concerted  music  includes  Em.  Moor's  violin  suite,  op.  73, 
newly  set  for  orchestra.  His  fourth  violin  concerto,  op.  72; 
double  concerto  for  cellos,  op.  69;  triple  concerto,  op.  70,  for 
piano,  violin  and  cello,  were  issued  last  season.  'The  1909 
crop  further  includes  Moor's  op.  73  and  op.  74,  a  suite  and  a 
sonata  for  piano  and  violin;  Hans  Grisch's  octet  for  wind  in- 
struments and  strings  is  available,  also  his  eight  minatures 
for  piano  solo.  Krehl's  three  piano  pieces,  op.  30,  are  in 
work.  New  songs  and  duets  are  by  R.  von  Mojsisovicz,  A. 
Sandberger,  Grisch,  Gerhard  Stehmann  and  Van  der  Stucken. 
Max  Meyer-Olbersleben  has  three  songs  for  high  voice  and 
orchestra.  Of  these  the  "Totentanz"  is  said  to  be  especially 
strong.  Last  year  Siegels  issued  Rich.  Wagner's  sketches 
for  "Meistersinger,"  "Tristan"  and  "Parsifal,"  and  for  two 
or  three  seasons  they  have  been  publishing  a  series  of  strik- 
ing engravings  on  Wagnerian  characters  and  scenes.  The 
drawings  are  by  Hugo  L.  Braune,  of  Munich.  The  house  has 
just  brought  out  Dr.  Arthur  Prufer's  devised  and  enlarged 
edition  of  "Das  Werk  von  Bayreuth."  The  matter  was  first 
a  set  of  lectures  of  1899,  but  much  material  is  now  added. 
It  has  to  do  with  the  Bayreuth  staging  of  all  the  Wagner 
festival  performances  in  their  turn.  Dr.  Prufer  is  a  lecturer 
at  Leipsic  University. 

The  Gebruder  Reinecke  publish  now  for  the  very  first  time 
Ch.  W.  Gluck's  solo  cantata  "I  Lament!  d'Araore"  for  soprano 
violins,  viola,  cello  and  contrabass.  The  work  is  edited  by 
Joseph  Liebeskind,  of  Leipsic,  who  owns  this  and  many  other 
valuable  manuscripts  by  Gluck  and  Dittersdorf.  The  prepon- 
derance of  works  now  in  the  Reinecke  press  are  male  chor- 
uses, incltiding  op.  25,  op.  26,  op.  27  and  op.  28  by  Georg 
Henschel,  the  op.  44  by  Arthur  Seybold.  a  Carl  Reinecke  set- 
ting of  a  Kerner  poem,  also  Richard  Fricke's  three  songs,  op. 
51,  for  mixed  chorus,  and  his  editing  of  a  "Geistliches  Wie- 
genlied"  from  the  "Seraphisch  Lustgart"  of  1635,  here  given 
for  two  part  chorus  and  organ.  Then  there  are  a  children's 
operetta,  "Traumfriedel,"  op.  278,  by  Carl  Reinecke;  his  cello 
romanza  (concertstuck)  with  orchestra,  three  books  of 
"Flower  Songs"  for  piano,  a  barcarole  for  violin  and  piano, 
his  setting  of  the  Beethoven  G  major  violin  rondo  of  1792 
for  piano  solo,  fujthermore  his  piano  solo  setting  of  a  Mozart  ■ 
orchestral  menuet,  gavot  and  humoresque.  The  firm  has  a 
little  booklet  called  "Die  Ulktrompete."  It  is  a  collection  of 
bona  fide  yarns  of  musicians. 

*       *       * 

The  publishing  by  J.  Schuberth  &  Co.  has  been  principally 
that  of  simplified  and  transcribed  arrangements  of  the  classic 
and  operatic  literature.  Within  the  last  years  they  have  had 
success  with  the  August  Stradal  solo  piano  transcriptions  of 
twelve  Handel  organ  concertos  and  twelve  concertos  by  Wilh. 
Friedemann  Bach,  also  other  material  by  Buxtehude,  Pachel- 
bel,  Frescobaldi  and  J.  S.  Bach.  Their  output  for  1909  em- 
braces Stradal's  piano  setting  of  Phil.  Em.  Bach's  D.  E  flat 
and  F  major  symphonies,  J.  S.  Bach's  G  major  "Brandenburg" 
concerto  and  an  F  major  chaconne  originally  written  for 
organ  by  Henry  Purcell.  Other  novelties  are  excerpts  from 
modern  operettas  and  ballets  by  Ludwig  R.  Chmel  and  Georg 
Miekle. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


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10 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    H  E  V  I  E  W. 


MUSIC    IN    THE    ENGLISH    LANGUAGE. 


(llai-uld  Kurd  iu  the  Piolietic  Review.) 

Speech,  to  be  effective  and  agreeable,  must  be  partially 
sung.  That  is  to  say.  if  a  speaker  is  to  be  heard  and  under- 
stood, his  utterance  must  be  partly  musical,  and  the  more 
numerous  his  audience  the  larger  his  auditorium,  and  the 
greater  the  area  over  which  his  voice  has  to  travel  the  more 
musical  must  that  utterance  be.  Cicero,  no  mean  authority 
on  the  subject,  gives  due  recognition  to  the  fact  in  his  dictum: 
■Est  in  dicendo  etiam  quidam  cantus  obscurior"  (there  is 
moreover  in  oratory  a  certain  element  of  music) — a  truth 
which  is  attested  by  the  experience  of  every  successful  public 
speaker.  Our  language  is  often  reproached  as  being  harsh 
and  rugged.  This  reproach  had  been  deserved  if  cast,  not 
upon  the  language,  but  upon  those  who  misinterpret  and 
abuse  it. 

Certain  it  is  that  if  justice  were  but  done  to  the  musical 
element  in  our  language  it  would  not  be  found  wanting  in 
full  beauty  and  melody  of  sound. 

Why  is  Italian  pre-eminently  the  language  of  song?  Chiefly. 
no  doubt,  because  of  the  superabundance  of  vowels  which 
characterizes  it.  Why  is  the  speech  of  an  Italian  more 
euphonious  than  that  of  an  average  speaking  p^nglishman? 
Partly  for  the  same  reason  and  partly,  also,  because  his  for- 
mation of  the  vowels  is  fuller,  more  perfect  and  more  sonor- 
ous than  ours.  He  directs  the  waves  of  sound  to  the  front 
of  the  mouth:  we  to  the  back  part  of  the  throat  and  against 
the  teeth,  hence  the  fascinating  tones  of  the  one  and  the 
guttural,  harsh  and  unattractive  sounds  of  the  other. 

The  vowels  are  the  music  of  speech,  as  the  consonants  are 
the  noises,  and  music  will  extend  over,  and  be  appreciable  at, 
far  greater  distances  than  mere  noise.  This  fact  is  attested 
by  the  intuitive  utilization  of  this  penetrant  power  of  music 
in  the  "nature-prompted"  utterances  of  the  street  crier,  whose 
wish  is  to  be  heard  as  far  and  as  effectively  as  possible. 

"Take  care  of  the  consonants,  the  vowels  will  take  care  of 
themselves."  is  an  oft-repeated  maxim.  But  in  this,  as  in 
many  other  maxims  of  an  antithetic  character,  the  truth  is 
sacrificed  to  the  forced  embodiment  of  a  pointed  antithesis. 

The  too  common  use  of  this  false,  pernicious  rule  of  sup- 
pressing or  ignoring  the  vowel  element  in  oral  language  is 
the  direct  cause  both  of  defective  utterance  and  that  absence 
of  charm  without  which  speech  were  bereft  of  its  power, 
beauty  and  grace.  I  grant  that  articulation  becomes  propor- 
tionately indistinct  as  the  consonants  are  suppressed  or  im- 
perfectly uttered.  But  why  give  pre-eminence  to  those  ele- 
ments which  have  no  individual  phonetic  existence  of  their 
own  and  practically  ignore  those  upon  whose  formation  is 
wholly  dependent  the  production  of  sound  and  consequent 
audibility,  as  also  the  expression  of  the  emotions? 

Despise  the  vowels  and  you  at  once  divest  speech  of  beauty 
as  of  expression.  They  are  the  flesh  and  blood  of  speech, 
without  which  the  consonants  are  but  dry  bones — void  of 
beauty  as  of  life. 

How  important  a  part  they  play  in  oral  language  is  at  once 
apparent  when  we  remember  that  it  is  only  through  the 
vowels  that  we  can  develop  the  voice  in  regard  to  Its  purity, 
sweetness  and  strength,  equally  in  speech  as  in  song:  that 
we  can  give  expression  to  emotional  feeling;  that  a  speaker 
makes'himself  audible,  and  so  in  part  intelligible;  and  that 
they  are  the  sole  elements  admitting  of  inflection  and  modula- 
tion of  voice. 

Now  we  who  speak  English  have  contracted  a  habit  which 
in  its  influence  has  marred  the  natural  beauty  of  our  language 
and  shorn  it  of  its  own  peculiar  charm,  namely,  that  of  speak- 
ing too  much  with  the  teeth  compressed.  We  thus  reduce  to- 
minimum  the  sonority  of  the  vowels,  impair  the  quality  of 
voice,  reduce  its  power,  and  lessen  its  extent  of  reach-effects 
which  are  the  immediate  result  of  our  wholly  disregarding  I  he 
utility  of  the  vowels. 

The  voice  will  find  emission  through  the  mouth  or  nasal 
passages;  the  more  purely  It  does  this  through  the  former  the 
more  will  it  approximate  to  vowel  tone,  and  in  proportion  will 
be  its  purity,  sweetness  and  strength. 

Our  endeavor,  therefore,  must  be  to  introduce  into  our 
speech  as  much  music  or  vowel-tone  as  we  can.  This  will 
suggest  the  expediency  of  separating  the  teeth  to  form  per- 
fectly the  vowels  and  of  sustaining  the  voice  upon  them  as 
long  as  is  consistent  with  their  just  and  perfect  utterance, 
as  also  for  the  purposes  of  inflection.  At  the  same  time  we 
must  avoid  a  prolongation  of  the  vowels  into  a  drawling  and 
sing-song  expression,  depriving  speech  of  its  charm,  dignity 
and  grace. 


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THE  BOSTON  OPERA  SEASON. 

Boston.  Oct.  16. — Final  announcement  of  the  season's  plans 
for  Boston's  first  opera  house  has  just  been  made.  The  reg- 
ular season  is  to  open  on  November  8th  witli  a  performance 
of  "La  Gioconda,"  which  will  make  a  draft  on  the  forces  of 
the  Metropolitan  Opera  House,  with  which  the  local  institution 
is  allied. 

Singing  in  both  the  new  opera  house  and  the  Metropolitan 
in  New  York  are  Lillian  Nordica.  who  was  long  a  stockholder 
in  the  San  Carlo  Opera  Company  brought  to  this  country  by 
Henry  Russell,  manager  of  the  new  Boston  Opera  House; 
Lydia  Lipokouska,  Alice  Nielsen,  .Jane  .\oria.  Antonio  Pini- 
Corsi,  Fernando  Gianoli-Galletti  and  Enzo  Leliva. 

The  season  has  been  divided  into  two  parts,  the  first  con- 
tinuing from  November  8th  to  .January  1st.  and  the  second 
from  February  7th  to  March  20th.  There  will  be  during  the 
whole  season  sixty  regular  subscription  performances  to  be 
given  after  the  New  Yoj-k  fashion  on  Mondays,  Wednesdays. 
Fridays  and  on  Saturday  afternoons.  Then  there  will  be 
Sunday  evening  concerts  and  popular  priced  opera  on  Satur- 
day evenings,  in  which  the  members  of  the  opera  school  will 
have  a  chance  to  appear.  The  Boston,  like  all  other  well  ap- 
pointed opera  houses,  will  have  an  opera  school  and  rear  its 
own  artists  under  glass  in  the  back  yard. 

Mr.  Russell,  who  has  a  reputation  as  a  discoverer  of  good 
singers,  has  been  in  Europe  off  and  on  for  the  last  year  search- 
ing for  talent  for  the  new  company.  He  has  organized  a 
chorus  of  12.5  voices,  of  which  about  forty-five  are  American 
girls  who  have  been  studying  the  chorus  parts  of  the  various 
operas  for  the  last  year.  The  foreign  recruits  were  selected 
by  Giulio  Setti.  the  chorus  master  at  the  Metropolitan  Opera 
House  in  New  York.  In  pursuance  of  the  plan  to  unite  for- 
eign and  native  talent  in  the  administration  of  the  opera  house 
Arnaldo  Conti  and  Wallace  Goodrich  will  divide  the  duties  of 
the  first  conductor.  The  costumes  and  scenery  were  made  in 
Italy,  and  the  season  will  be  in  the  main  Italian  in  every  par- 
ticular, since  no  German  operas  are  to  be  sung  and  there  are 
only  live  operas  to  be  sung  in  French  out  of  a  repertoire  of 
twenty-seven.  The  principal  singers  besides  those  mentioned 
before  are  Celestina  Bonin  Segna.  who  made  a  success  at  the 
Metropolitan  several  years  ago  in  spite  of  her  limited  oppor- 
tunities; Fily  Dereyne.  who  refused  to  come  back  to  the 
Metroplitan  two  seasons  ago  because  she  was  not  promised 
the  leading  role;  Emma  Hoffman,  Matilda  Lewicka,  Elena 
Kirmes,  Evelyn  Parmell,  Maria  Claessens,  Maria  Gay,  Bettin 
Freeman,  Elvira  Livorini,  Anna  Mutschick  and  Anna  Row- 
skowski. 

Among  the  men  singers  in  the  company  are  a  number  of 
new  artists  from  whom  much  is  expected.  Foremost  among 
these  are  Enzo  Leliva.  the  Polish  tenor  who  has  made  a 
career  in  Italy;  George  Baklanoff.  a  Russian,  and  Guglielmo 
Balestrino.   a   young   Italian   tenor. 

The  repertoire  will  consist  chiefly  of  standard  works.  "An- 
ton." by  Galootti,  a  modern  Italian  composer,  will  be  the 
absolute  novelty,  while  Pergolesi's  "Serva  Padrona"  and 
Paer's  "Maestro  Cappella"  will  be  the  two  notable  revivals 
of  old  operas. — New   York  Sun. 

\% 


A  song  recital  by  the  pupils  of  Romeo  Frick  was  given  at 
the  studio  on  Thursday  evening.  October  14th.  The  program 
was  as  follows;  "Knowest  Thou  the  Land"  (Beethoven),  Miss 
Alice  Miller;  Aria  from  "II  Pagliacci"  (Leoncavallo),  Alwin 
Spencer;  Siebel's  Song  from  "F'aust"  (Gounod),  Mrs.  Chas. 
DeWitt;  "Slumber  Boat"  (Gaynor).  Miss  Marjorie  Borkheim; 
"A  .Jolly  Good  Song"  (Geibel),  Geo.  Allen;  "O'  Sole  Mio" 
(Capua).  Miss  Margaret  Centini;  "I  Hid  -My  Love"  (D'Harde- 
lot).  -Miss  H.  L.  Chamberlain:  "All  Through  the  Xight"  (Old 
Welch).  Fred  A.  Xassie;  "Faith  of  Spring"  (Schubert).  Miss 
Vina  Wiley;  "Sleep.  Dear  Heart"  (Porter).  Miss  Dollie  Leon- 
ard; Aria  from  "Rigoietto"  (Verdi).  Carl  Vinther;  "My 
Home"  (Little),  Miss  Marion  Peters:  "Forbidden  Music" 
(Gastaldon),  Geo.  H.  Hagy;  "Without  Thee"  (D'Hardelot). 
Harold  McDonald;  "Mignon"  (D'Hardelot),  Miss  Mabel 
Hatchwell;  "Doris"  (flute  obligato)  (Nevin),  Miss  Freda 
Sauerman;  "Still  wie  die  Nacht"  (Bohm),  Paul  Foothill; 
"The  Starling"  from  "Bird  Songs"  (Lehmann).  Miss  Martha 
Smith;  "Only  You"  (Tirindelli),  Thos.  Walker;  Aria  from 
"II  Trovatore"  (Verdi).  Miss  Gertrude  Brain;  accompanists — 
Miss  Mary  Coffey  and  Miss  Hazel  Reek. 


-w- 


IF  YOU  WANT  COMPLETE  PROGRAMS  AND  AN- 
NOUNCEMENTS OF  ALL  THE  BIG  MUSICAL  EVENTS 
SENT  YOU  BY  MAIL  ALL  YOU  HAVE  TO  DO  IS  TO  SEND 
YOUR  NAME  AND  ADDRESS  TO  WILL.  L.  GREENBAUM, 
101    POST    STREET.    SAN    FRANCISCO. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    R  IC  \'  I  E  W 


The  Most  Beautiful  Piano 
Store  in  America 

Above  is  sliowu  a  pliuto  eiijiniviug  oT  oui-  big  uew  store.  It  i.s  conceded  by  the  whole  music  world 
to  be  the  best,  and  the  most  perfectly  appointed  home  of  any  house  in  the  world.  The  picture  shows 
but  a  part  of  our  main  floor  and  a  portion  only  of  the  great  stock  of  more  than  fifty  grand  pianos — a 
stock  five  times  larger  than  is  carried  by  any  other  house  on  the  Coast.  .Inst  at  this  time  about  five 
hundred  pianos  of  leading  makes  are  shown;  a  display  which  is  worth  your  time  to  see. 

TAveuty  specially  built  rooms  are  occupied  by  our  great  stock,  making  the  opportunity  for  compari- 
son better  than  is  offered  at  any  (tther  store,  while  in  price  and  finish  every  individual  i)urse  and  taste 
may  be  satisfied. 

Our  new  talking  machine  department  on  the  Sutter  street  side  surpasses  in  point  of  location,  airi- 
ness, convenience,  comfort,  and  especially  in  the  magnitude  of  its  stock,  and  the  courteous  service 
offered,  any  similar  department  in  the  West.  All  the  finest  in  Talking  JIachines.  and  all  the  latest 
records  all  the  time  is  the  motto,  and  ifs  lived  up  to. 

The  Wiley  B.  Allen  Co. 

Wiley  B.  Allen  Building,  135-153  Kearney  and  217-225  Sutter  Streets. 

Oakland:  510  Twelfth  and  1105  Washington. 

other  Stores — Los  Angeles,  Sacramento,  San  Jose,  San  l>iego,  Stockton,  I'lioenix,  Ariz.,  Reno,  Nev., 
I'ortland,  Ore. 


18 


P  A  C  1  P  1  C    (1  O  A  ST    M  U  S  I  C  A  L    R  E  V  I  E  W. 


DEATH    OF    DUDLEY    BUCK. 


Famous  and    Prolific   American   Composer    Dies    Suddenly    of 

Heart  Disease,   Leaving  a  Vacancy   in   American 

IVIusical   Ranks. 


(From  the  New  York  IVIusical  Courier.) 
Dudley  Buck,  the  well  known  American  composer  of  sacred 
music,  organist  and  choirmaster,  died  suddenly  of  heart  dis- 
ease last  Wednesday,  October  6,  at  the  home  of  his  son, 
Dudley  Buck,  Jr.,  in  West  Orange,  N.  .1.  The  deceased  was 
seventy  years  old. 

Born  at  Hartford,  Conn.,  March  10,  1839,  Dudley  Buck  came 
from  an  old  New  England  family.  He  entered  Trinity  College, 
Hartford,  and  showing  a  preference  for  music,  became  organ- 
ist of  St.  .John's  Episcopal  Church  at  the  age  of  sixteen. 
Previously,  he  had  studied  with  a  Hartford  musician  named 
Babcock.  At  the  age  of  eighteen  Dudley  Buck's  parents  took 
him  out  of  college  and  sent  him  to  Europe,  where  he  entered 
the  Leipsic  Conservatory  in  18.')8,  and  continued  his  musical 
education  under  Hauptmann,  Richter,  Rietz,  Moscheles,  and 
Plaidy.  At  Leipsic  the  young  student  met  and  associated  with 
Sir  Arthur  Sullivan,  Carl  Rosa,  .John  Francis  Burnett,  S.  B. 
Mills,  Madeline  Schiller  and  others.  Later,  Buck  went  to 
Dresden,  where  he  did  organ  work  under  Schneider.  A  year 
in  Paris  wound  up  the  period  of  training  abroad. 

In  1862  Dudley  Buck  returned  to  America  and  was  at  once 
appointed  organist  of  the  North  Congregational  Church  at 
Hartford,  where  he  remained  until  his  parents  died,  in  ISGit, 
when  he  turned  his  path  westward  and  settled  in  Chicago,  as 
as  the  organist  of  St.  James'  Protestant  Episcopal  Church. 
The  great  fire  in  October,  1871,  destroyed  the  Buck  church 
and  his  home.  He  went  to  Boston  and  accepted  charge  of  the 
organ  in  St.  Paul's  Church  there,  later  assuming  a  similar 
position  at  the  Boston  Music  Hall.  In  1875  Theodore  Thomas 
invited  him  to  remove  to  New  York  as  assistant  conductor  of 
the  Thomas  orchestral  concerts  at  Central  Park  Garden,  prior 
to  which  removal  Mr.  Buck  accompanied  his  chief  to  Cincin- 
nati as  organist  of  the  May  festival  of  that  year.  Cincinnati 
wanted  Mr.  Buck  to  take  permanent  charge  of  her  new  music 
hall  in  1878.  but  he  previously  had  decided  to  accept  a  call 
from  Holy  Trinity  Church,  Brooklyn,  to  become  the  organist 
and  musical  director,  and  this  was  the  beginning  of  his  long 
musical  career  in  Brooklyn  as  organist  and  as  director  of  the 
Apollo  Club  of  Brooklyn.  He  took  charge  of  the  music  in 
Plymouth  Church  in  May,  1902,  after  a  service  of  twenty-two 
years  at  Holy  Trinity.  "He  resigned  from  Holy  Trinity  be- 
cause of  limitations  set  upon  his  selection  of  the  music,"  says 
a  report  upon  that  happening.  Since  then  he  divided  his  time 
between  Europe  and  America,  residing  while  abroad  chiefly 
in  Dresden,  a  city  of  which  he  was  especially  fond. 

The  best  known  of  the  Buck  compositions  are  his  cantata. 
"The  Centennial  Meditation  of  Columbia"  (written  for  tlie 
Centennial  Exposition),  his  setting  of  Longfellow's  "Golden 
Legend"  (which  won  a  $1,000  prize  offered  by  the  Cincinnati 
Musical  Festival  Association),  "The  Legend  of  Don  Munio." 
a  dramatic  cantata,  a  setting  of  the  Forty-sixth  Psalm  for 
solos,  chorus  and  orchestra,  symphonic  overture  to  Scott's 
"Marmion"  (led  by  Theodore  Thomas  at  a  Brooklyn  Philhar- 
monic concert),  "The  Light  of  Asia"  and  "The  Voyage  of 
Columbus,"  both  choral  works,  also  sonatas,  marches,  an  im- 
promptu, a  rondo  caprice,  transcriptions,  etc.,  for  the  organ, 
and  a  comic  opera,  "Deseret." 

Mr.  Buck's  earlier  compositions  were  for  the  church,  and  it 
is  in  this  field  that  perhaps  he  is  most  widely  known.  The 
"First  Motet  Collection"  appeared  in  1864,  followed  a  few 
years  later  by  the  "Second  Motet  Collection."  Others  of  his 
church  works  are  a  series  of  four  short  cantatas,  "The  Coining 
of  the  King,"  "The  Story  of  the  Cross,"  "Christ  the  Victor" 
and  "The  Triumph  of  David."  In  this  class  also  belongs  the 
"Midnight  Service  for  New  Year's  Eve."  Much  of  his  male 
voice  music  was  written  for  the  Apollo  Club,  notably  "Twi- 
light," "The  Nun  of  Nidaros,"  "King  Olaf's  Christmas," 
"Chorus  of  Spirits  and  Hours,"  "On  the  Sea"  and  "Paul  Re- 
vere's  Ride,"  besides  a  long  list  of  part  songs.  His  songs 
and  ballads  number  upward  of  forty,  and  among  them  are 
"Sunset,"  "When  the  Heart  is  Young,"  "The  Tempest,"  "The 
Silent  World  is  Sleeping,"  "The  Bedouin  Love  Song,"  "The 
Creole  Lover's  Song,"  to  name  only  a  few.  In  many  of  Mr. 
Buck's  works  he  was  his  own  librettist;  in  "Don  Munio," 
"Columbus"  (English  and  German),  "Festival  Hymn"  and 
"On  the  Sea,"  the  words  are  original  with  the  composer. 

Dudley  Buck's  literary  works  include  a  "Dictionary  of  Mus- 
ical  Terms"  and   "Influence  of  the   Organ   in   History." 

He  is  survived  by  his  wife,  who  was  Miss  Mary  E.  Van 
Wagner,  and  to  whom  he  was  married  in  1865  at  Hartford; 
two    sons.    Dr.    Edward    T.    Buck,    of    Indianapolis,    Ind.,    and 


Dudley  Buck.  .)r.,  the  singer,  and  one  daughter,  Mrs.  Francis 
Blossom,  of  Orange,  l'.  J.  The  funeral  took  place  from  Grace 
('hurch.  Orange,  N.  J. 

In  an  editorial  paragraph  the  Musical  Courier  adds  the  fol- 
lowing; The  late  Dudley  Buck,  whose  detailed  obituary  will 
be  found  on  another  page  of  this  issue,  was  an  American  com- 
poser by  virtue  of  his  nativity  here,  but  not  through  any  dis- 
tinctively national  trait  in  his  music,  or  any  touch  of  individ- 
uality that  might  have  suggested  his  American  birth  and  an- 
cestry. This  is  not  disparagement  of  Mr.  Buck,  for  the  same 
thing  may  be  said,  and  has  been  said  by  The  ^Musical  Courier, 
about  most  of  the  composers  who  claim  this  land  as  their  own 
but  have  studied  abroad  and  lay  stress  on  the  title  of  "Amer- 
ican composer."  Dudley  Buck  received  his  musical  education 
at  Leipsic  and  lived  in  that  city  at  a  time  when  the  students 
at  its  Conservatories  were  apt  to  follow  slavishly  in  the  foot- 
steps of  the  professors  and  regard  the  musical  forms  and 
ideals  then  supreme  as  the  final  boundary  of  progress  in  tonal 
art.  Mendelssohn,  Reinecke,  David,  Moscheles — those  were 
the  musical  influences  strongest  in  Mr.  Buck's  student  career 
and  they  remained  apparent  in  even  his  very  latest  composi- 
tions. He  made  no  attempt  to  strike  out  in  the  newer  musical 
forms  or  to  employ  the  modern  idioms,  and  he  certainly  ac- 
complished nothing  in  the  way  of  composition  which  has  in  it 
any  suggestion  of  Americanism,  any  sort  of  departure  from 
the  set  ideas,  ideals  and  methods  of  the  comfortable  old  mid- 
dle period  of  German  pedantry.  The  religious  music  of  Dud- 
ley Buck  is  a  mixture  of  German  counterpoint  with  English 
hymnal  modes  due  to  his  familiarity  with  the  established 
Episcopalian  church  service.  Mr.  Buck  had  contrapuntal  gifts 
of  no  mean  order  and  possessed  also  the  ability  to  create 
dignified  and  pleasing  melody,  but  as  far  as  adding  any  works 
of  ethnological  value  to  American  musical  literature  was  con- 
cerned, he  flight  just  as  well  have  been  born  in  his  beloved 
Dresden  as  to  have  been  native  to  the  State  of  Connecticut 
or  resident  for  decades  in  Brooklyn.  Dudley  Buck  was  in  the 
strictest  critical  sense,  a  German  composer,  and  so  is  many 
another  of  Columbia's  musical  sons  who  studied  in  the 
Fatherland. 


'Cello    Concert 


TO  BE  GIVEN  BY 


ALBERT  ROSENTHAL 

— AT^ 

Lyric  Hall,  513  Larkin  St. 

SAN   FRANCISCO,  CAL. 

Wednesday  Evening,  November  3,  1909 

at  8:15  o'Clock.     Admission,  $1.00 

Tickets  for  sale  at  Sherman.  Clay  &  Co.,  Kohler  &  Chase,  Benj. 
Curtaz  &  Son,  at  the  Manager's  office,  147  Presidio  Ave.,  and  at 
the  box  office  at  Lyric  Hall. 


CIIART^ES  DLTTOIV 

Presents  His  Pupil 

Mr.  Ashley  Pettis 

IN  A 

PIANO    RECITAL 

At  Mr.  Dutton's  Studio 

2119    ALLSTOIV    WAV 

Above  Shattucic  Ave.     (Old  Commerci.l  High  Sctiool  Bldg.  1 

Tuesday  Ev©.,   Nov.  9th,  at  8:15  P.  M. 
ADMISSION  FIFTY  CENTS 


P  A  ('  1  F  I  C    C  O  A  .S  T    MUSICAL    R  E  V  I  E  ^' 


19 


Have  You  Heard  the  New  Victor 


Arral 


RFXORDS? 
"Bird  Waltz" 
"  Iraviata" 
"Beggar  Student" 
"El  Bolero  Grande" 
Nightingale  Song  from 
'Les  Noces  de  Jeanette" 


-The  Great  Coloratura  Soprano 


F  \^    BLANCHARD.  Pr«.  and  Mgr. 
Contains  200  Studios  Rented  Exclusively  to 

Musicians,  Artists  and  Scientists 

LOS  ANGELES.  CALIFORNIA 


Abraham   Miller 

TENOR— TEACHER   OF   SINGING 
CONCERT— RECITAL— ORATORIO 

Address  L.  E.  Beh>-mer,  Manaaer 
Studio:     342-343   Blanchard   Hall   Building.   Los  Angeles.  Cal.      Member  of 
Faculty  of  the  Conservatorv'  of  Music  of  the  University  of  Southern  California 

Charles  Farwell  Edson 

BASSO 

Studio  :    2020  Toberman  Street  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Telephone  23919 


Margaret  Goetz  ?l!Ei 


Contralto 


Historical  Song  Recitals,  Concerts  and  Musicales 

Td.  Home  51485.     719  Ottowa  St.  near   lOth  and  Figueroa.  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Estelle  Heartt  Dreyf uss  ^°°traito 

CONCERT-  PURPOSE  PROGRA.M  RECITALS^OR.ATORIO 
Studio:      Blanchard  Hall  Building Los  Angeles.  Cal. 

Adolf     WillhartitZ  Teacher   of    Piano 

332  So.  Broadway  Los  Angeles 

ARXOLD  KRAUSS      ™-  --- 

Concert    Master    ol    the    Los    Angeles    Symphony    Orchestra 
i>4  1  W.  l.STH  ST..  LOS     ANGEF.KS  I'lIONKHOME  -'.->«•->;; 

rnavl^ir     I-^o  w«il4-.<-^'a«     Conductor  Los  Angeles  Symphony 
nariey     namiltOn    Orchestra-Wom^sOrch^tra 

\10LIN  INSTRUCTOR 
320  Blanchard  Hall  Bu.lding. Los  Angeles.  Cal . 

Charles  E.  Pemberton  ^'°''°  '"^tructor 

^     „     ,  Harmony  and    Counterpoint 

Studio:   306-307  Blanchard  Hall  Building  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

JR       Prkiilin    TENOR— VOICE  CULTURE  and 
.    L9,     r  OUlin  THE  ART  OF  SINGING 

e    J-  ^■^^o"!-,!-'!'?  '-'"''■  '^'^'"P''=  ^^P''='  Choir.  Woman's  Lyric  Club 
Studio:   318-319  Blanchard  Building.  Los  Angeles  Cal 


J.  P.  Dupuy  I^^R: 


VOICE  DIRECTOR 


Dir^aor  Orpheu,  Male  Uub.  Boar  Brilh  Choir,  TrilUly  M.  E.  Church  Choir 
5.  J-  3ri  Di  1  TVP  ,  ,  °*^  Departmenl  and  Eulerpean  Male  Qjartelle 
Slud.o:  311   Blanchard  Building. Los  Angeles.  Cal. 


William  Edson  Strobridge  ^^ 

Room  335  Blanchard  Building 


ist 

Los  Angeles.  Cal 


L.  E.  BEHYMER 

Western  Manager 
Musical  Artists 


Main  Office:    LOS  ANGELES,    California 

Booking  Musical  Attractions    from    Denver   West,    California 
and  the  Southwest  on  GUARANTEES  and  PERCENTAGE 


Dr. 


REPRESENTS   THIS    SEASON: 

Madame  Marcella  Sembrich 
Madame  Schujmann-Heink 
M.ADAME  Frieda  Langendorff 
Madame  Jeanne  Jomelli 

Madame  Teresa  Carreno 
Miss  Marie  Nichols 

Miss  Tilly  Koenen 

Ellen  Beach  Yaw 

Madelen  Worden 
Ludwig  Wuellner 
George  Hamlin,  Tenor 

Fritz  Kreisler,  Violinist 

Pepita  Arriola,  Pianist 

The  Flonzaley  Quartette   and   the 

Damrosch  Orchestra,  with  Isadora 

Duncan,  Dancer,  and  other 

Well  Known  Artists. 

SUPPLYING  ALSO  THE  PACIFIC  COAST  ARTISTS: 

Mackenzie  Gordon 
Antonio  De  Grass: 
Anna  Miller  Wood 

Dr.  J.  F.  WoLLE  in  Organ  Recitals 
Univ.  of  California  Glee  Club 
Georg  Kruger,  Pianist 

IGNAZ  Edouard  Haroldi,  Violinist 
Mary  Le  Grand  Reed,  Soprano 
Harry  Lott,  Baritone 
Herr  Arnold  Krauss,  Violinist 
Helen  Goff,  Soprano 
The  Los  Angeles  Symphony  Orches- 
tra— 77  Men. 
The  Woman's  Symphony  Orchestra — 
63  Women. 


Catering  to  the  leading  Music  Clubs,  Colleges, 

Hotels,     Women's    Clubs,    Private 

Schools  and  Homes  with 

"THE  BEST  IN  MUSIC" 

And    Playing  Artists 
Direct    in    the    Leading   Cities  of    the    West 

Especially  Low    Rates    made    to    Music    Clubs    of    California 


P  A  C  I  F  I  C    C  ()  A  ST  M  U  S  T  G  A  L  K  K  V  I  IC  \V. 


IN  THE  REALM  OF  THE  THEATRE 


Edited  bv  JOSEPH  M.  GUMMING 


"BECKY    SHARP"    ADMIRABLY    PRESENTED. 

The  Alcazar  Company  Gives  a  Most   Excellent  Performance — 
The  Thackeray  Atmosphere   Is   Delightfully    Real. 

If  you  got  to  see  "Becky  Sharp"  at  the  Alcaflar  this  week 
your  opinion  of  the  play  will  necessarily  depend  on  whether 
you  have  ever  read  that  most  delightful  novel  of  Thackeray's 
"Vanity  Fair." 

If  you  have  never  enjoyed  that  masterpiece  you  will  take 
a  great  deal  of  pleasure  in  a  finely  costumed  and  highly  in- 
teresting play  with  a  good  many  more  characters  than  is 
customary  in  modern  plays.  You  will  be  entertained  by  sev- 
eral episodes  that  seem  to  be  brought  in  without  sufficient 
preparation,  you  will  carry  away  the  impression  I  hat  Becky 
was  a  cunning  schemer,  but  that  she  was  dreaming  of  a  good 
deal  of  sympathy  after  all,  and  your  general  impression  will 
be  that  the  Alcazar  people  have  added  another  success  to 
their  numerous  triumphs. 

But  if  you  know  Thackeray's  exquisite  work  of  art  your 
pleasure  will  be  immeasurably  increased  at  the  marvelous 
way  the  playwright  has  condensed  the  rambling  story  and 
caught  the  atmosphere  of  the  heartless,  selfish  society  which 
Thackeray  so  wonderfully  portrayed;  you  will  enjoy  the 
episodes  alluded  to  most  keenly  as  you  see  .Joseph  Sedley's 
comic  terror  at  the  approach  of  the  French  army,  and 
Becky's  humiliation  of  the  haughty  Lady  Bareacres:  forgot- 
ten bits  of  the  story  will  come  back  to  you  vividly  as 
when  Becky  tells  of  how  .Joseph  Sedley  called  her  his 
"Diddly-diddly  darling,"  and  when  she  speaks  of  "How  to  live 
on  nothing  a  year."  You  will  renew  your  pity  for  poor  old 
Briggs,  your  amused  contempt  for  selfish  old  Miss  Crawly, 
your  loathing  of  the  Marquis  of  Steyne,  your  impatience  with 
that  shallow  simpleton,  Amelia  Sedley,  and  your  disgust  with 
the  conceited  dandy,  George  Osborne. 

Miss  Vaughan's  task  is  too  great  for  any  actress  in  any 
stock  company.  I  am  inclined  to  think  that  all  of  the  stories 
we  have  read  of  certain  actors  who  have  not  played  certain 
characters  till  they  have  pondered  over  them,  absorbed  them 
and  lived  them  for  months  or  even  years,  are  press  agents' 
fiction,  but  Becky  Sharp  really  is  a  character  that  requires 
ever  so  much  more  thought  than  any  stock  actress  could  pos- 
sibly have  time  tor.  No  one  with  the  slightest  imagination 
could  read  "Vanity  Fair"  without  forming  his  own  mental 
image  of  the  tricky,  scheming,  grafting  Becky,  and  it  would 
be  impossible  to  expect  Miss  Vaughan  to  realize  all  our  con- 
ceptions— she  is  entirely  too  god-looking  for  my  Becky  Sharp, 
and  her  voice  is  too  sympathetic,  but  there  is  no  law  to  com- 
pel her  to  make  her  Becky  the  Becky  of  the  book. 

Granting  her  right  to  play  it  as  she  pleases,  she  makes 
the  character  interesting  always,  and  In  her  struggles  to 
escape  the  clutches  of  the  old  libertine,  the  Marquis  of  Steyne, 
and  her  part  of  the  great  scene  where  her  husband,  Rawdon 
Crawley,  surprises  the  Marquis  in  her  room,  she  rose  to  the 
occasion  nobly.  This  is  the  great  scene  that  Thackeray, 
when  he  finished  it,  exclaimed  in  self-admiration,  "By  God! 
I  am  a  genius." 

My  judgment  is  that  the  best  work  in  presenting  the  char- 
acters as  Thackeray  wrote  them  is  done  by  Will  Walling  as 
Rawdon  Crowley:  E.  L.  Bennison  as  the  Marquis  of  Steyne, 
and  Adele  Belgarde  as  Miss  Crawley.  Walling's  farewell  to 
Becky  on  the  even  of  Waterloo  was  a  most  excellent  piece 
of  simple,  unaffected  pathos.  Bennison's  Marquis  of  Steyne, 
both  as  to  make-up  and  acting,  couldn't  have  been  better,  and 
Miss  Belgarde  is  in  her  element  in  such  characters  as  selfish 
old  Miss  Crawley.  The  worst  characterization  was  Charles 
Do  Clark  as  old  Pitt  Crawley.  Perhaps  the  dramatist  wrote 
it  for  low  comedy,  but  while  Sir  Pitt  Crawley  is  a  doddering 
old  fool  and  an  ill-mannered  boor,  he  ought  to  talk  more  like 
a  country  squire  than  a  modern  Cockney. 


ORPHEUM. 


A  simple  announcement  of  the  names  of  the  artists  in  next 
week's  Orpheum  program  is  sufficient  to  convince  all  conver- 
sant with  theatricals  t'hat  the  entertainment  to  be  presented 
will  reach  the  highest  standard  of  vaudeville. 

Miss  Minnie  Seligman  and  William  Bramwell  will  appear 
in  Gerald  ViUiers  Stuart's  powerful  one-act  play,  "The  Drums 
of  Doom,"   which   created   quite   a  sensation   when   originally 


produced  in  London  by  Mrs.  Beerbohm  Tree  and  Lewis 
Waller.  It  deals  with  a  most  fearful  and  thrilling  event  in 
the  lile  of  an  American  politician,  to  whom  his  wife  gives  a 
great  and  abiding  love  in  his  darkest  hour.  Miss  Seligman,, 
who  plays  the  wife,  is  afforded  a  splendid  opportunity  for 
the  display  of  that  emotional  ability  which  has  caused  her 
to  be  recognized  as  one  of  the  greatest  actresses  in  this 
country,  while  Mr.  Bramwell,  who  represents  .Judge  Delaney, 
a  western  lawyer,  maintains  his  reputation  as  a  sterling  and 
faithful  exponent  of  leading  characters.  "The  Drums  of 
Doom"  is  a  play  that  grips  the  audiences  from  the  very  be- 
ginning and  maintains  that  grip  till  the  very  end.  Anything 
in  the  way  of  a  description  of  its  story  is  purposely  avoided 
in  order  not  to  dull  that  absorbing  interest  which  it  never 
fails  to  excite.  i 

One  of  the  cleverest  and  agile  acrobatic  acts  in  vaudeville 
is  the  performance  to  be  given  by  the  Bounding  Gordons.  The 
work  of  this  trio  is  most  gracefully  executed  and  the  young- 
est is  a  "bounding  wonder."  With  the  aid  of  a  flexible  mat 
he  throws  backward  and  forward  somersaults  alighting  on 
the  shoulders  of  his  companion  in  a  pyramid  position. 

Katchen  Loisset,  a  very  recent  Orpheum  importation,  will 
appear  for  the  first  time  in  this  city.  Her  offering  will  be  a 
very  novel  one.  She  begins  with  English  and  German  songs, 
after  which  she  introduces  her  trained  pigeons  and  a  remark- 
able mimic  dog  called  "Honey,"  who  she  dresses  to  represent 
different  types  of  men.     The  effect  is  most  laughable. 

The  Bootblack  Quartette,  consisting  of  Master  Elliott, 
Adam,  Weber  and  Hayes,  will  indulge  in  an  ensemble  of 
melody  and  fun.  In  characteristic  street  urchin  garb  they 
divert  with  song,  dance  and  witticism.  Their  voices  are  par- 
ticularly  good   and   biend   harmoniously. 

Next  week  will  be  the  last  of  Hal  Godfrey,  who  will  be 
seen  in  an  entirely  new  comedy  of  New  York  life  by  Edmund 
Day,  entitled  "The  Liar."  It  will  also  be  the  final  one  of 
Keno,  Walsh  and  Melrose,  "General"  Edward  La  Vine  and 
of  that  delightful  votary  of  terpsichore.  Mile.  Bianci,  whose 
repertoire  of  classic  dances  has  scored  a  great  artistic 
triumph.  A  series  of  motion  pictures  of  unusual  interest  will 
be  a  fitting  termination  to  a  delightful  performance. 


ORGAN    RECITAL. 


Frank  E.  Wright,  director  of  music,  announces  that  the 
official  opening  of  the  new  pipe  organ  recently  installed  in  the 
College  Avenue  M.  E.  Church,  Berkeley,  was  given  on  Thurs- 
day evening,  October  18th,  at  eight  o'clock.  Professional 
talent  was  secured  exclusively  for  this  occasion,  the  organ 
numbers  being  interspersed  with  several  songs.  The  pro- 
ceeds from  the  concert  were  devoted  to  the  church's  depart- 
ment of  music.  The  recital  was  given  under  the  direction  of 
R.  F.  Tilton,  who  presided  at  the  organ.  The  program  fol- 
lows: Organ,  "March  Pontifical"  (Lemmens),  R.  F.  Tilton: 
Soprano,  "Carissimo"  (Arthur  A.  Penn),  Edna  Luke;  Bass, 
"The  Lost  Chord"  (Sullivan),  Frank  W.  Thompson:  Organ. 
"Gavotte  in  A  flat"  (Silas),  R.  F.  Tilton;  Contralto,  (a) 
"Requiem"  (Homer),  (b)  "L'esclave"  (Lalo),  Ruth  Weston: 
Tenor,  (a)  "My  own  Hour"  (Caro  Roma),  (b)  "Faded  Rose" 
(Caro  Roma),  B.  Liederman;  Organ,  "Theme  and  Variations" 
(Motti),  R.  P.  Tilton;  Duet,  "Parting"  (Neidlinger),  Misses 
Luke  and  Weston:  Bass,  (Selected),  Frank  W.  Thompson; 
Organ,  Postlude  (Smart),  R.  F.  Tilton.  Mrs.  W.  J.  Batchel- 
der,  accompanist. 


BLANCHE  ARRAL  GREATEST  SENSATION  IN  YEARS. 

The  following  telegram  was  received  by  the   Pacific  Coast 
Musical  Review  from  New  York  last  Monday: 

Musical  Review,  San  Francisco,  Calif. 

Blanche  Arral   debut   Carnegie   Hall     tremendous     ovation. 
This  new  artist  creates   greatest   sensation   in  years. 

BASSETT. 
w 


ZECH  ORCHESTRA  CONCERT. 


The  second  concert  of  the  season  1909  of  the  Zech  Orches- 
tra took  place  at  the  Novelty  Theatre  last  Tuesday  evening, 
and  proved  to  be  a  brilliant  success  in  every  way.  A  detailed 
account  of  this  event  will  appear  in  next  week's  Issue. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    R  E  V  I  E  W. 


21 


Mrs.  Grace  Davis   Northrup 

Soprano  Soloist  First  Congregational  Church.  Oakland 
Concert,    Oratorio   and  Recital  Programs 

TEACHER    OF    SINGING 

Residence  Studio; 
I  333  Bay  View  Place.  Berkeley,  Phone  Berkeley  958 

Oakland  Studio:  65  MacDonough  BIdg.     Tuesday  and  Friday 

ROMEO  FRICIv 

BARYTONE 

Vocai  lnstru<^on  After  Foremofl  European  Methods 

30-31  Canning  Block,  t3th  and  Broadway.  Oakland 

Phone  Oak  6454  Phone  Heme  a  I  4b8 

Paul  Steindorff 

Studio,  2422  STUART  STREET 
Berkeley,  California 

Mrs.  'William  Steinbach 

VOICE  CULTURE 

STUDIO:    1528  Broderick  St..  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

H.   D.   MUSTARD 

Baritone 

Voice  Culture  in  All  its  Branches 

Opera  — Oratorio  -  Concert 
Studio,    1548  Haight  St.  Phone  Park  4117 

HERMAN   PERLET 

Voice  Culture  ai^d  Piano 

Studio:    1451   Franklin  St.  Phone  Franklin  634 

Mrs.  "Walter  W^itliam 

TEACHER  OK  SINGING 

Studio; 

1380  Sutter  Street  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

Miss  Helen  Colburn  Heath 

SOPRANO 

Vocal  Instruction,  Concert  Work 
Phone  West  4890  1  304  Ellis  Street 

M^enceslao   Villalpando 
Violot^cellist 

Concerts,  Musicaies,  Ensemble  and  In^rudllon 
Tel.  Park  5329. -STUDIO;  746  CLAYTON  ST 

DELIA    E.    GRISMrOLD 

Contralto 

VOICE   CULTURE 
Phone  Park   1614  Res.  Studio,  845  Oak  St. 

FR.EDERICK    MAURER,    JR. 

Accomparkist 

Teacher  oi  Piano- Harmony    Coaching-Srngers-Violinifls 
Mondays.  I  32 1  Su  ter  St.  San  Francisco.     Tel.  Franklin  2  1 43 
Home  Studio.  I  726  Le  Roy  Aye.  Berkdey.  Tel.  Berkeley  539 


FredericK  Stevenson 

Harmony  and   Composition 

Voice 

417  Blanchard  Hall  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


RICHARD  FERBER 

Composer  and  Teacher    Piano  and  Harmony 

I350OTARRELL  ST        SAN  FRANCISCO 


MISS   EDNA  MONTAGNE 

iPupilofMrs.  Hugo  Mansfeldl) 
Teacher    of   Piano 

Res.  Studio:    1218  Te'egraph  Ave.,  Oakland,  Cal. 


Signor  Antonio  de  Grassi 
Violinist 

Concerts  Arranged -\iol,n  and  Harmony  Taught 
Winifred  June  d-  Grassi.  Assistant 

Studio:     130  PRESIDIO  A\  F..         SAN  FRANCISCO 


IMPORTANT    ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Beginning  with  the  issue  of  October 
2,  1909,  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Re- 
view has  been  increased  to  24  pages, 
which  size  will  occasionally  be  aug- 
mented to  32  pages.  This  enables  the 
management  to  add  several  new  de- 
partments. The  threatrical  depart- 
ment occupies  two  full  pages,  and  con- 
tains straightforward,  unbiased  and 
honest  reviews  of  every  theatrical 
performance  of  merit  in  San  Francis- 
co. These  critical  opinions,  which  are 
not  controlled  by  the  business  office, 
will  serve  as  a  guide  to  our  readers  in 
Oaklanid,  Los  Angeles,  Portlanii  and 
Seattle,  and  all  interior  cities  of  the 
Pacific  Coast,  in  case  these  cities 
should  be  visited  by  companies  first 
appearing    in    San    Francisco, 

Besides  this  reliable  theatrical  de- 
partment, the  Pacific  Coast  Musical 
Review  contains  a  page  of  late  Euro- 
pean news,  and  a  page  of  the  most  im- 
portant musical  news  from  leading 
Eastern  centers.  The  Los  Angeles, 
Oakland,  Berkeley  and  Alameda  de- 
partments are  continued  as  usual, 
while  rrore  attention  is  being  paid 
this  season   to    Portland  and   Seattle. 

In  this  24-page  issue  advertising 
pages  will  be  limited  to  12  pages,  and 
anyone  applying  for  space  after  these 
12  pages  are  filled  must  wait  until  a 
vacancy  occurs.  Special  advertising 
rates  can  only  be  secured  by  those 
who  keep  their  advertisement  in  these 
columns  during  the  entire  year.  Those 
who  desire  to  withdraw  their  adver- 
tisement during  the  two  summer 
months  must  consent  to  pay  a  higher 
rate.  Rates  on  this  page  will  be  IN 
CASE  OF  ANNUAL  CONTRACTS: 
One  inch,  $1.00:  one-half  inch,  50c, 
and  "Musical  Directory,"  25  cents  per 
issue. 


William  Hofmann 

Musical  Director  Fairmont  Hotel 


MRS.    A.    F.   BRIDGE 

TeacHer  of  Sin^in^ 

el.  West  7279  2220  Webster  St..  San  Fra 


Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks 

Voice  Culture 

1  35.  Gaffney  Bids  ,  376  Sutter  St..  Wednes- 
Ave.  Tel.  Park  4190.    S.  F..  C.l. 


Alfred  Cogswell 

studio:  153 1  Sutter.  S«n  Franciico,  on  luesday 
and  Friday,  aiid  at  21lq  Durant  St., 
Berkeley,  on  Monday,  Thunday  and  Saturday 


MRS.  OLIVE  ORBISON 

Dramatic    iSoprano 

'       9iZ^  ir         o  Concert  and  Oratorio 

2240  California  St.  — Phone  West  665V 


Mrs.  Thoroug'man 

Voice  Culture— Dramatic  Soprano 

CO\CeRT— ORATORIO-OPEPA 

Studio;  Room  109.  915  Van  Ne»s  Ave.      Tel.  Franklin  5254 


MRS.  M.  TROMBONI 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 

Studio     1531    SUTTER  ST.,  Monday,  and  Thursdays      Al 
M.ll  Valley.  Keystone  Building,  Tuesday,  WedneS!?  Friday 


Mrs. 


Tuesday  and   Frid, 


Olive   Reed   Cushmaii 

VOICE  CULTURE 

Maple  Hall.  1  4th  and  Webler  Sts     OaU.nd 

Oakland  3453 


EDNA    MURRAY 

Pianiste 

Concerts  Recitals  Lessons 

Address:     .     .     .     Ross.  Marin  County.  Califor 


LOUIS  CREPAUX 

(  Memher  Paris  Grand  Opera) 

Delbert  Block    943  Van  Ness  at  OTarrell.    Reception  Hou 

I  l;30  to  12    and  3  .lo  4  except  Wednesday  and  Saturday. 

Wednesday  in  Oakland.   I  1  54  Brush  Street 


BENJ.  S  MOORE 

(Pianist  and  Teacher     Organist  of  ."^irst  Presbyterian  Church) 
Studto;     Rooms  22-23  Alliance  Building.  San  Jose.  California. 


Musical    Directory 


PIANO 


SIGISMONDU  MARTJ.N'EZ 
1321  Siitt  1-  St.  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


KULA  HOWARD 
239  4th  Avenue  Telephone  Pacific  214 


MISS   ELLA   LAWRIE 
Fulton  St.,  S.  F.         Phone  West  7331 


ARTHUR   FICKEXSCHER 
1960  Summit  St.,  Oakland.     Tel.  Oali.  4206 


VOCAL 

MRS.   ALICE  MASOX   BARNET'F 
1298  Hai,ght  Street  Phone  Park  5831 


MRS.  RICHARD  REES 
817  Grove  Street Phone  Park  5175 


MISS  CAROLINE  HALSTED  LITTLE 
3621  Bd'way.,Oak.   Phone  Piedmont  1390 


MRS.   ARTHUR   FICKEXSCHER 
1960  Summit  St.,  Oakland.     Tel.  Oak.  4206 


PROF.  T.  D.  HERZOG 

1813  Ellis  St.  San  Francisco 


MANDOLIN,  LUTE  and  GUITAR 


SAMUEL  ADELSTELM 
1834  Baker  Street  San  Franci.scr 


OLD  VIOUNS  and  BOWS 


GEO.   HUNTINGTON 
3366  Sacramento  Pt.      San  Francisco,  Cal. 


-Have    You     Seen     the     New- 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON  PIANO? 


It  Appeals  Especially  to  Teachers  and  Students 
It  contains  Elegance,  Durability  and   Moderate  Price. 


BKXJ.  CURTAZ  cfe  SON 


Kearny  St.  Near  Po^ 

San  Francisco.  Cal. 


r  A  C  I  F  I  O  C  O  A  ST  MUSICAL  R  E  V  I  !■:  \\. 


ALBERT  ROSENTHAL  IN  SACRAMENTO. 


Distinguished  Young  San  Francisco  Cellist  Creates  a  Sensation 

in   the   State   Capitol   and   Will   Appear   in    His   Native 

City  on   Wednesday   Evening,   November  Third. 


BY    IVIRS.  ALBERT    ELKUS. 

Sacramento,  Cal.,  Oct,  111,  \'.>m. 
On  Saturday  afternoon.  October  !),  the  Saturday  Club  opened 
its  season  with  a  cello  recital  by  Albert  Rosenthal.  It  seems 
strange  that  San  Francisco  should  hear  of  this  San  Franciscan 
from  outside  criticism.  Something  must  be  wrong  with  the 
musical  atmosphere  in  your  city,  as  I  understand  this  artist 
has  been  heard  all  over  his  native  State,  except  in  his  native 
city.  His  reputation  comes,  of  course,  from  Kurope  and  the 
East.  A  depth  of  temperament,  combined  with  a  remarkable 
technic  of  his  instrument,  makes  Rosenthal  notable  among 
cellists.  The  program  was  enthusiastically  received  by  the 
club,  which  had  looked  forward  to  this  concert.  The  Valen- 
tine Sonata  and  the  Dvorak  Adagio  were  the  program's  gems. 
The  sonata  shows  all  the  unaffected  naiviety  of  the  dainty  old 
Italian  style  (Valentini  was  born  but  a  few  years  before  the 
eighteenth  century  rolled  operatic  glory  into  Italy).  It  was 
in  strog  contrast  to  the  depths  of  the  Bach  air,  where  one 
felt  profundity  in  its  architectural  form,  which  contrasted 
well  with  obviousness  and  cleverness  of  the  sonata.  The 
Dvorak  Adagio  from  the  Concerto  was  a  decided  novelty  and 
made  a  sober  and  masterful  impression.  The  Ciatti,  David- 
off,  and  Popper  numbers  showed  the  wide  facility  of  the 
artist  in  handling  his  instrument.  The  program  in  full  was 
as  follows:  L.  Valentini — Sonata:  Bach — Air;  Schumann — 
Andante:  Boccherini — Rondy;  Dvorah — Second  IVlovement 
(violincello,  concerto);  Ciatti — Fantasie  "Linda  de  Chamoun- 
ix";  Tschaikowsky — Chant  Toiste;  Davidoff — At  the  Foun- 
tain; Copper — Hungarian  Rhapsody. 
*       *       * 

On  October  14  Wilhelm  Heinrich  appeared  at  the  second 
recital  of  the  club's  season.  This  wonderful  man  is  not  a 
stranger  to  our  club,  where  not  only  the  man's  art  but  his 
personality  makes  him  always  persona  grata.  The  lecture — 
song  recital  consisted  entirely  of  modern  songs — or  rather 
contemporary  songs,  except  the  Lovelei  of  Liszt  who,  as 
Heinrich  Sazo,  forsaw  the  modern  song  tenderness.  Such  a 
program  as  this  presents  more  of  interest  than  esthetic  en- 
joyment. It  is  interesting  to  see  the  various  tendencies  of 
the  tiem  and  the  possibilities  of  the  future.  No  doubt  many 
of  the  songs  on  that  program  will  disappear,  some  will  sur- 
vive— and  some  of  us  might  be  surprised  which.  Debussy 
and  Seger  were  made  the  two  poles  of  the  prograb  and 
the  heavy  calculating  songs  of  the  latter  certainly  contrasted 
with  the  gauzy  impressionistic  lyrics  of  the  former.  It  is 
impossible  sometimes  to  forget. the  adding  machine  element 
in  Seger.  Besides  these  giants,  there  were  songs  of  Whelp- 
ley,  Cheney.  Rogers,  Pairchild  and  Chadwick.  It  is  to  be 
hoped  that  this  wonderful  artist  will  be  with  us  in  California 
soon  again. 


SAMUELS  AND  BERINGER   IN  SANTA   ROSA. 


Mr.  Harry  Samuels  and  Prof.  .Joseph  Beringer  were  the 
principal  executants  of -the  program  given  at  the  third  annual 
alumnae  concert  last  Sunday  afternoon  at  the  Ursuline  Col- 
lege at  Santa  Rosa.  Their  program  numbers  were:  Beethov- 
en's "Kreutzer  Sonate"  for  violin  and  piano;  violin  solo, 
Ernest's  Otello  Fantasie,  Minuet  by  Beethoven,  Gavotte  by 
Gossec,  and,  as  a  novelty.  Prof.  Beringer's  latest  composition, 
"Tes  Yeux,"  recently  arranged  by  the  composer  for  violin  and 
piano.  Prof.  Beringer  played  a  Romance  "A  lui"  by  Raff,  and 
Grieg's  master  composition  tor  piano,  "Aus  Holberg's  Zeit." 


ASHLEY    PETTIS'    RECITAL. 


Ashley  Pettis,  a  very  talented  pianist  and  pupil  of  Charles 
M.  Button  of  Berkeley,  will  give  a  piano  recital  at  Mr.  Dut- 
ton's  studio.  2119  Allston  way,  on  Tuesday  evening,  November 
9th.  Everyone  who  has  heard  Mr.  Pettis  play  regards  him 
as  a  genuine  artist,  and  those  who  attend  will  no  doubt  enjoy 
thoroughly  the  following  program:  (a)  Bach — Prelude  and 
Fugue  in  C  Minor,  (b)  Rachmaninoff — Prelude;  (a)  Schu- 
mann— des  Abends,  (b)  Schumann — Grillen,  (c)  Schumann — 
Auf  Schwung,  (d)  .Josef  Hofman  (new) — Etude  for  the  left 
hand  alone;  (a)  Mac  Dowell — Wooland  Sketches;  (a)  Pader- 
ewski  (new) — Love  Song,  (b)  Schumann — Toccata;  (a) 
Schumann  Liszt — Widmung,  (b)  Chopin — Scherzo — C  sharp 
minor. 

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MUSIC    ACROSS    THE    BAY. 

Caro    Roma's    Recital    a   Success — Testimonial    Concert   to    Mr. 

Solano — Commemoration   of   Dudley   Buck's   Death   by 

Choir   of   First    Presbyterian    Church,   Alameda. 


Oakland.  October  24th,  1909. 
The  recent  death  of  Dudley  Buck,  that  prolific  composer  of 
pleasant-sounding  music,  is  to  be  commemorated  by  the 
quartet  of  the  Alameda  First  Presbyterian  Church  on  their 
regular  first  Sunday  service  in  November.  A  festival  Te 
Deum  and  many  other  works  will  be  given. 

*  ^       * 

F'ritz  Warnke,  an  Alameda  boy,  who  plays  the  violin  and 
exhibits  great  talent  in  that  direction,  has  lately  composed 
a  military  march  which  is  said  to  be  meritorious. 

*  *       * 

Mme.  Caro  Roma's  recital  of  her  own  compositions  at 
Ebell  Hall  last  Tuesday  night  attracted  a  large  audience, 
which  received  the  former  Californian  with  enthusiasm.  Her 
compositions  show  variety,  and  the  melodic  gift,  and  were 
well  given  by  Mrs,  Revalk,  soprano:  Mrs.  Llewellyn  Williams, 
soprano;  Mrs.  D.  E.  Raston.  reader;  Miss  Weinman,  pianist; 
Mr.  Liedermann,  tenor;  Mr.  Pracht.  baritone,  and  Mr.  Weiss, 
violincellist. 

A  testimonial  concert  to  Mr.  Solano,  the  well-known  harp- 
ist, and  teacher  of  harp,  piano  and  violoncello,  is  to  be  given 
at  Adelphian  Hall,  Alameda,  on  November  6th.  Those  assist- 
ing on  the  program  are  Miss  Mary  Anderson,  .soprano;  Miss 
Edith  Stetson,  contralto;  Miss  Mary  Sherwood,  violoncellist; 
Stanleigh  Ward  MacLewee,  tenor;  R.  H.  Thomas,  baritone; 
Vincent  Arrilaga,  pianist;  Samuel  Adelstein,  lutist;  the  Stew- 
art Violin  Quartet,  and  others. 

*  «       * 

A  studio  centrally  located  in  Oakland,  and  containing  a- 
grand  piano,  is  for  rent  to  a  teacher  of  piano  or  voice  tor 
two  days  in  each  week.  Inquiry  may  be  made  of  the  writer 
of  this  department. 

One  of  the  compositions  for  children  by  C.  H.  McCurrie  of 
Alameda  was  chosen  to  be  sung  by  the  5,000  school  children, 
under  the  direction  of  Miss  Estelle  Carpenter,  as  a  part  of  the 
Portola  celebration. 

Sousa  is  to  give  two  concerts  at  the  Greek  Theatre  on  the 
afternoon  and  evening  of  November  8th. 

*  *       * 

Yesterday  Carlo  Gentile,  pianist,  gave  the  Half-Hour  at  the 
Greek  Theatre,  presenting  a  conventional  program  of  par- 
ticularly well-known  works  to  the  great  satisfaction  of  the 
usual  large  audience. 

In  the  number  of  Musical  America  for  October  16th  ap- 
pears an  eloquent  article  descriptive  of  the  Bohemian  Club 
High  Jinks  of  1909.  written  by  Arthur  Farwell.  and  illustrated 
with  unusual  and  very  interesting  half-tones.  Mr.  Farwell's 
poetic  nature  was  deeply  impressed  by  the  surroundings  in 
the  famous  grove,  and  he  declares  the  evening  not  an  event 
but  an  experience.  The  whole  magazine  is  especially  good 
in  this  issue.  The  Society  for  the  Promotion  of  American 
Music,  of  which  David  Bispham  is  president,  and  in  whose 
behalf  Mr.  Farwell  made  his  visit  to  this  coast,  speaks 
through  Musical  America.  .John  C.  Freund,  a  veteran  writer 
on  music,  is  the  editor. 

Persons  giving  concerts  on  this  side  of  the  bay.  and  who 
desire  their  announcements  to  appear,  must  have  such  an- 
nouncements in  the  hands  of  the  writer  of  this  column  not 
later  than  the  Saturday  preceding  the  issue  of  the  Review. 
Such  are  the  exigencies  of  a  weekly  paper,  that  this  corre- 
spondence must  be  mailed  in  Sunday  night  preceding  the 
Saturday  of  publication.  If  no  notice  is  received,  naturally, 
no  announcement  can  be  made,  although  this  column  is  main- 
tained for  no  purpose  save  to  give  publicity  to  musical  events 
in  Alameda  county. 


The  Italian  Opera  Company  suspended  animation  at  the 
Academy  of  Music.  New  York,  during  the  week  of  Oct.  4,  for 
which  much  regret  is  felt.  The  organization  was  of  excep- 
tional merit  and  had  it  not  been  for  the  internal  dissensions 
there  is  no  doubt  that  the  enterprise  would  have  been  success- 
ful. It  is  said  that  the  company  will  be  reorganized  to  be 
taken  on  the  road,  while  other  rumors  are  to  the  effect  that 
Signor  Jacchia,  the  best  part  of  the  organization,  has  been 
engaged  by  Hammerstein. — Musical  Leader  and  Concert  Goer. 


PUBLIC  L 


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THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN    THE    GREAT    WEST 
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VOL.  XVII.  No.  6 


SAN  FRANCISCO,  SATURDAY.  NOVEMBER  6.  1909 


PRICE  10  CENTS 


MME.    JOMELLI 
The   Dutch    Prima   Donna  Soprano  at   Novelty   Theatre,   Friday    Evening, 
Sunday    Afternoon,    and    the   following   Tuesday    Evening. 


P  A  (M  F  I  C    ( '  O  A  S  '1'    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


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The  Soundest  Piano  Investment 

The  STEINWAY  will  outlast  two  other  pianos,  each  of  which  will 
cost  you  nearly  as  much  as  a  Steinway.  No  other  piano  can  ap- 
proach the  Steinway  in  the  satisfaction  derived  from  its  owner- 
ship. 

We  can  sell  you  other  pianos — less  expensive  but  thoroughly  re- 
liable. You  will  want  a  Steinway  some  day,  however,  and  when 
you  do,  we  will  take  back  the  less  expensive  piano,  allowing  for  it 
the  full  purchase  price  paid  us,  anytime  within  three  years  from 
date  of  original   purchase. 

IVIonthly  payments  on  the  Steinway  or  any  of  our  pianos  if 
desired. 


®l|p  Utrtor-HtrtrDla 

The  VICTOR-VICTROLA  is  the  perfect  musical  instrument — 
absolutely  accurate,  noiseless  in  its  mechanism,  beautiful  in  its 
cabinet  and  without  the  cumbersome  horn. 

The  VICTOR-VICTROLA  produces  the  sweetest  and  most  wonder- 
ful tones  ever  heard — positively  natural  and  easily  regulated  in 
volume. 

Two  Styles,  $200  and  $125 


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MUSICAL  CALENDAR    1909-10. 
Sousa  and  his  Band  (Dreamland  Rink) .  .Nov.  4  and  7,  aft.  &  eve. 
Mme.  Jean  Jomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  House  Co.)  .Week  of  Nov.  14 

Mary  Adele  Case.  Contralto Novelty  Theatre.  Nov.  19.   21 

Dr.  Ludwlg  Wullner Nov.   23,  25  and  28 

George   Hamlin    (American   Tenor) Dec.   2,   5   and  7 

Fritz   Kreisler Dec.   12,   16   and   19 

Lyric  Quartette   Pop  Conce:-t Com.   ia    .January 

Marcella   Sembrich Week   of   Jan.   9 

Myrtle    Elvin    (Pianiste) February 

Teresa   Carreno First   Week    of   February 

Madame  Schumann-Heink Com.   Sunday,   Feb.   13 

Mme.  Tilly  Koenen   (the  famous  Dutch  contralto) March 

Pepito  Arriolo   (the  Spanish  child  Violinist) March 

Maud    Powell April 

Flonzaley   Quartet    (in  Chamber  Music) April 

Damrosch  Symphony  Orchestra  and   Isadora  Duncan May 


ABOUT  TIME  TO   WAKE    UP. 


The  San  Francisco  Center  of  the  American  ^Insic 
Society  has  now  been  organized  durino-  a  period  of 
several  months.  The  membership  has  grown  nntil  it 
has  now  reached  a  number  in  the  jiroxiniity  of  the  two 
hundred  mark.  Applications  are  coming  in  every  day. 
and  there  i.s  every  reason  to  suppose  that  we  have 
before  us  an  organization  healthy  in  numbers,  vigorous 
in  material,  substantial  in  its  purposes  and  worthy  of 
encouragement  in  its  work.  An  excellent  array  of 
officers  has  been  wisely  selected,  an  ideal  executive 
board  has  been  chosen,  and  in  this  manner  the  admin- 
istration of  the  affairs  of  this  rapidly  growing  and 
l)romising  organization  seems  to  be  in  most  efficient 
hands.  And  yet  the  meetings  are  but  slinily  attended, 
interest  in  the  affairs  of  this  newly  organized  society 
does  not  seem  to  extend  over  and  above  a  desire  lo 
give  three  concerts  a  year,  and  even  the  officers  do  not 


Xow,  Gentleineii !  (Jentlenien !  This  will  never  do. 
This  is  not  the  way  to  give  San  Francisco  a  musical 
club  to  be  ])roud  of.  In  this  manner  it  will  never  be 
possible  to  achieve  the  aim  of  the  society  to  reach  the 
thousand  mark  within  this  year.  Bestir  yourselves  and 
see  whether  yon  can  not  suinmon  up  sufficient  energy 
and  aggressiveness  to  make  good,  to  fulfill  the  tasks 
that  you  have  set  yourself,  to  make  the  San  Francisco 
("enter  of  the  American  Music  Society  an  organization 
that  accomplishes  things — that  will  make  the  "people 
"sit  u])  and  take  notice."  If  this  indifference  in  the  mat- 
ter of  attendan(^e  at  meetings  continues,  tliis  effort  to 
bring  order  out  of  chaos  in  the  matter  of  musical  socia- 
bility in  this  city  will  be  one  of  those  futile  attempts 
witli  which  we  ar(!  so  familiar  in  San  Francisco.  Surely 
I  he  officers  of  the  society  are  gentleman  whose  faculties 
arc  sufficiently  alive  to  consider  worth  while  taking 
ample  advantage  of  this  brilliant  opi>ortunity  to  or- 
ganize the  best  elements  in  our  musical  cult  and  bring 
them  into  close  .social  relation  with  one  another. 


There  certainly  is  sufficient  excuse  at  this  time  to 
give  this  society  an  impetus  that  would,  with  one  great 
jumji,  land  it  upon  that  stage  of  prominence  where 
it  would  attract  universal  attention.  During  this  sea- 
son San  Francisco  will  be  visited  by  an  array  of  artists 
whose  standing  in  the  world  of  music  entitles  tliem 
to  official  recognition.  Can  the  San  Francisco  Center 
of  the  American  Music  Society  afford  to  miss  such  an 
o])]iortunity  to  do  homage  to  genius,  and  for  once  in 
the  history  of  music  in  this  city  impress  our  visiting 
artists  with  the  conviction  that  we  have  prominent 
musicians  in  this  city  sufficiently  brilliant  in  artistic 
and  social  faculties  to  serve  as  hosts  to  an  array  of 
great  men  and  women.  How  long  will  tlie  musicians 
of  San  Francisco  sit  in  their  Morris  chairs  at  home 
and  watch  the  blue  smoke  of  their  dreams  without 
taking  part  in  the  evolutionary  life  of  the  community  I 
How  long  will  it  lake  to  make  our  musical  leaders  in 
this  city  realize  the  fact  that  as  such  leaders  they  owe 
our  growing  generation  certain  duties  and  certain 
work!  The  time  has  come  when  experiments  must 
cease  and  actual  facts  and  conditions  must  take  their 
place.  Surely  the  officers  and  board  of  directors  of 
the  San  Francisco  ('enter  of  the  American  Music  So- 
ciety are  real  men — men  of  mental  strength  and  in- 
tellectual power.  Have  they  accepted  these  nomina- 
tions and  elections  in  a  spirit  of  playfulness  or  have 
tJiey  accepted  them  as  a  sacred  trust  which  they  owe 
to  their  fellow  citizens  and  to  tiieir  colleagues? 


It  .seems  to  us  there  should  be  a  general  stir  in  the 
official  circles  of  the  American  Music  Society.  There 
should  be  an  extraordinary  meeting  called  as  soon  as 
jiossible.  There  should  be  an  investigation  begun 
whether  or  not  tiie  members  are  willing  to  give  an 
official  reception  and  luncheon  to  several  of  the  great 
artists  who  will  visit  us  this  season.  There  should  be 
matters  discussed  tending  to  supjiort  the  concerts  of 
tlu\se  artists,  and  there  slum  Id  be  immediate  steps 
taken  to  formulate  idans  for  the  flrst  monster  orches- 
tral and  solo  concert  to  be  given  under  the  auspices 
of  this  society  before  the  beginning  of  the  New  Year. 
A\e  do  not  desire  to  interfere  with  the  plans  of  any 
organization  in  this  city  and  prefer  to  leave  the  method 
of  its  administration  to  those  entrusted  with  it,  but  we 
can  not  sit  by  month  after  montli,  week  after  week,  day 
after  day,  and  .see  valuable  time  slip  by  without  some- 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


thins  iK'iiiK  done  to  brins  fit"  orf-aiiizatioii  once  and 
for  all  to  llie  attention  ot  flie  people  of  San  Fianeisco. 
The  writer  is  a  member  of  this  society.  He  has  in- 
duced a  number  of  people  to  become  members.  And 
with  them  he  feels  that  the  time  has  arrived  when  it 
should  be  dertnitely  settled  whether  (he  society  intends 
to  plav  an  active  ri.le  in  our  musical  hislDry  or  whether 
it  prefers  to  die  a  natural  death  without  havin-  accom- 
plished anvthinji.  If  the  former,  it  is  time  to  go  to 
work  and  iiestir  ourselves;  if  the  latter,  the  sooner  we 
know  it  the  better  it  will  be  for  us. 


MR.   HANSON'S  COMPLIMENT  TO  THE   FAR   WEST. 

I'pon  another  i)ane  will  be  found  a  biji  announce- 
ment by  Mr.  .M.  H.  Hanson,  the  distinguished  New 
York  impresario,  who  takes  these  means  to  bring  be- 
fore the  musical  people  of  the  I'acitic  ("oast  the  per- 
sonnel of  the  artists  whom  he  intends  to  present  in  the 
far  West.  With  a  neat  courtesy  that  makes  a  most 
charming  impression,  :Mr.  Hanson  includes  in  this  an 
nouncemeut  the  names  of  the  Pacitic  Coast  impresarios 
whom  he  lias  entrusted  with  his  people.  In  this  man- 
ner .Mr.  Hanson,  through  the  medium  of  the  I'acitic 
Coast  Musical  lieview.  bestows  ui)ou  the  musical  pub 
lie  of  the  I'acitic  <"oast  the  compliment  of  regarding 
it  with  the  same  dignity  and  seriousness  with  which 
he  regards  the  musical  public  of  the  lOast.  The  other 
managers  consider  it  suHicient  to  speak  to  the  musical 
public  of  the  I'acitic  ("oast  through  the  medium  of  the 
New  York  and  ( 'hicago  musical  papers.  Mr.  Hanson 
is  the  first  New  York  impresario  who  has  recognized 
the  musical  imblic  of  the  I'aciHc  ("oast  through  its  offi- 
cial organ.  Now  we  deem  it  only  just  to  Mr.  Hanson 
to  return  his  courtesy  by  showing  him  what  the  mus- 
ical public  of  the  I'acitic  ("oast  is  able  to  do  when  it 
is  approached  in  the  right  way.  The  Pacific  Coast 
Musical  Review  is  so  much  more  eager  to  show  to  Mr. 
Hanson  the  wisdom  of  his  actions  as  the  artists  he 
sends  to  us  this  year  are  worthy  of  the  most  e.xteusive 
patronage.  First  of  them  is  Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner  and 
his  jincomiiarable  accompanist,  ("oenraad  Hos,  of 
whom  you  will  find  particulars  in  other  parts  of  this 
issue,  and  with  whose  excellent  faculties  we  will  have 
to  treat  everv  week  from  this  time  on. 
w 

THE   PSYCHOLOGY  OF  THE  SINGER. 


Long  ago,  in  the  days  when  the  world  was  young. 
King  Solomon  discovered  that  "as  a  man  tliinketh  in 
his  heart,  so  he  is!"  and  that  sentence  is  the  founda- 
tion, the  sum  and  substance  of  the  science  of  p.sychol- 
ogy  as  it  is  known  and  practiced  today.  The  ability 
to"^"get  under  the  skin"  of  a  ])art,  to  be  able  to  portray 
adequately  a  character  and  intelligence  wholly  foreign 
to  one's  own,  to  make  an  audience  of  strangers  see 
vividly  and  understand  your  conce])tion  of  what  an- 
other totally  different  individual  meant  when  he 
created  such  and  such  a  character,  an  incident,  a  sit- 
uation— that  is  what  Dr.  ^^'ullner  means  when  he  re- 
fers to  a  rosinic  /jxi/i-lioUxji/  as  the  ground  work  of  his 
wondrous  interpretations. 

"To  be  able  to  understand  the  motives,  the  feelings, 
the  emotions,  of  another  human  being  is  in  itself  a 
gift  that  is  given  to  the  few.  To  be  able  to  give  that 
understanding  out,  in  other  words,  to  expres.s  it  in- 
telligently to  an  audience,  that  is  art.  You  must  be 
able  to  put  yourself  into  the  same  frame  of  mind,  the 
same  train  of  thought  as  was  the  poet  when  he  wrote 
the  words.  Then  when  you  have  put  yourself  under 
his  skin,  so  to  speak,  you  are  able  to  understand  the 


words  in  their  every  import,  you  take  upon  yourself 
the  ihsychology  of  that  poet;  and  you  are,  in  a  sense, 
his  (ttlier  self  when  you  give  his  work  to  the  public. 
You  cannot  fail  to  make  live  the  si)irit  of  the  words 
when  you  have  accomjilished  this. 

"To  musicians  more  than  to  any  other  mortals  is 
given  this  curious  dual  psychology.  The  musician  is 
himself  and  he  is  also  anotiier  at  the  one  and  the  same 
nuunent.  l>o  not  go  away  with  the  idea  that  the 
singer  lo.ses  his  own  identity  in  what  he  sings.  He 
does  not,  for  it  is  u|)on  his  own  identity  that  he  de- 
])ends  for  the  transmission  of  both  the  poet's  and  the 
musician's  thoughts. 


"As  a  Doctor  of  Science,  when  1  lectured  at  the  Uni- 
\ei-sity  ))sycliology  always  attracted  me  immensely; 
and  in  all  of  my  work  of  the  later  years  it  is  the 
psychology  of  the  i)art,  whether  it  were  a  da.ssic 
dramatic  character,  a  folk  song,  or  even  a  little  nursery 
nonsense  rhyme,  1  always  .seek  to  get  into  the  mind 
that  pi-onijited  its  making,  the  spirit  that  moves  it  to 
be  what  it  is.  For  the  moment,  for  the  time  being, 
I  am  myself  that  charactei-;  but  it  is  through  me  that 
it  finds  ex])ression." 

V* 

.Mr.  Jose])h  .M.  ("nmniing,  dramatic  editor  of  the 
Pacific  ("oast  .Musical  Review,  and  Secretary  of  the 
.Mechanics  Institute,  ap])eai-ed  before  the  Board  of  Su- 
pervisors last  Tuesday  to  protest  against  an  oi-dinance 
that  came  uj)  for  consideration  which  was  intended  to 
establish  a  censorship  of  jilays  in  San  Francisco.  In 
other  words,  the  theatre  going  public  of  San  Francisco 
was  to  be  treated  like  a  crowd  of  school  children  wlio 
could  not  ditferentiale  as  to  the  moral  atmosjihere  of 
their  entertainment.  Surely  a  more  prejjosterous  in- 
fringement on  j)ersonal  liberty  could  hardly  be  pre- 
sented, and  we  are  glad  that  there  was  at  least  one 
nuin  in  San  Francisco  sutticiently  conscious  of  the  cour- 
age of  his  convictions  to  stand  uj)  in  defense  of  inde- 
pendence of  action  and  freedom  of  personal  views.  The 
public  should  be  the  sole  judge  of  its  attitude  toward 
the  theatre  and  there  are  sufficient  laws  already  taking 
care  of  objectionable  ])erformances.  Surely  we  would 
be  in  a  most  unenviable  jxisition  in  this  city  if  one 
portion  of  the  public  were  jiermitted  to  tell  another 
portion  of  the  public  which  theatrical  perforumnces  it 
should  or  should  not  attend.  Mr.  ('umming  is  entitled 
to  the  thanks  of  the  theatre-going  public  of  San  Fran- 
cisco for  preventing  the  legalization  of  a  nuisance. 

■ V* 

"TOGETHER-WORK"    OF    WULLNER    AND    BOS. 


One  writer  quaintly  refers  to  the  ctiarming  "together 
work"  oif  Dr.  Wullner  in  song  and  his  co-artist,  C.  V.  Bos. 
at  the  piano: 

"Many  of  the  numbers  on  Dr.  Wullner's  program  are  really 
duets,  duos  for  the  voice  and  the  piano,  and  the  one  per- 
former has  quite  as  much  responsibility  for  the  effect  as  the 
other.  It  is  not  that  the  singer  is  supreme,  the  accompanist 
a  secondary  matter;  the  giving  of  those  little  'music-dramas' 
demands  as  much  artistry  on  the  part  of  the  pianist  as  on 
that  of  the  vocalist.  While  Dr.  Wullner  is  supreme  in  his 
interpretative  work,  in  giving  the  soul  of  the  song  as  its 
writer  knew  and  felt  it.  the  interpretation  of  the  singer  is 
heightened  and  enhanced  by  the  marvelous  'together-work' 
of  the  artist  at  the  piano,  C.  V.  Bos.  He  does  for  the  music 
what  Dr.  Wullner  does  for  the  song.  He  gives  the  heart,  the 
soul  of  it;  and  one  forgets  that  there  are  two  men  on  the 
platform,  one  forgets  that  there  are  both  a  voice  and  a  piano; 
one  hears,  one  knows  but  one,  the  two  artists  are  marvelous- 
ly  blended  into  one  work,  one  personality." 


--*v- 


Frederic  Maurer,  the  well-known  pianist  and  accompanist, 
has  opened  a  San  Francisco  studio  at  1849  Pine  street,  where 
he  teaches  every  Monday  afternoon. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


MISS  CAROLINE    HALSTED   LITTLE'S    RECITAL. 


Authoritative    Concert    Soprano    Delights    a    Very    Large    and 
Discriminating   Audience   With    Her   Intellectual    Interpre- 
tation of  a  Classical   Program. 


BY  ALFRED  METZGER. 

Maple  Hall  in  Oakland  was  well  patronized  on  Wednesday 
evening.  October  27th.  when  Miss  Caroline  Halsted  Little 
appeared  in  a  song  recital  which  proved  one  of  the  most 
instructive  and  artistic  musical  events  I  have  attended  in  this 
vicinity.  The  main  feature  of  Miss  Little's  vocal  interpre- 
tations consists  of  an  intellectual  grasp  of  the  subject  matter 
at  hand,  and  thus  reveals  the  result  of  thorough  study  and 
thorough  knowledge  of  the  technical  as  well  as  musicianly 
'qualities  of  genuine  vocal  culture.  Miss  Little  gives  undis- 
puted evidence  of  the  fact  that  she  has  not  only  undergone 
a  thorough  course  of  vocal  training  under  the  most  efficient 
tutors,  but  that  she  has  cultivated  an  artistic  taste  of  her 
own  which  adds  to  the  advantages  of  her  instruction,  the 
inborn  talent  of  the  true  singer. 

Her  voice  consists  of  an  evenly  balanced  firm  and  mellow 
soprano,  which  slie  uses  with  such  discrimination  as  to  attain 
the  finest  sentiment  contained  in  a  composition.  Her  diction 
is  clear  and  precise,  enabling  the  auditor  to  understand  every 
word,  and  thus  she  achieves  that  rare  effect  of  intertwining 
the  music  with  the  poetry,  creating  an  ensemble  effect  of 
words  and  music  which  represents  the  true  inwardness  of 
the  art  of  song.  Her  German  pronunciation  is  exceptionally 
satisfactory,  and  her  phrasing  evidences  that  she  has  solved 
the  problem  of  romanticism,  so  much  apparent  in  composi- 
tions of  the  Schumann.  Schubert  and  Brahms  type. 

In  this  manner  Miss  Little's  recital  was  not  only  enjoyable 
from  the  purely  musical  point  of  view,  but  it  was  equally  de- 
lightful by  reason  of  the  intellectual  power  demonstrated 
throughout  its  duration.  It  may  be  said  without  becoming 
too  enthusiastic  that  it  was  possible  to  be  instructed  by 
listening  to  Miss  Little,  and  that  is  more  han  I  can  say  of  the 
majority  of  vocal  recitals  I  am  called  upon  to  attend  during 
the  course  of  a  season.  Miss  Little  was  very  effectively  as- 
sisted by  Miss  Louise  Hilgard,  accompaniste,  and  William 
Leimert,  cellist.     The  program  was  as  follows; 

(a)  Schoene  Fremde  (Schumann),  (b)  Die  Forelle  (Schu- 
bert), (c)  Mondnacht  (Schumann);  (a)  Mit  Myrthen  und 
Rosen  (Schumann),  (b)  Heiden  Roselein  (Schubert);  (a) 
Maedchenlied,  (b)  An  eine  Aeolsharfe  (Brahms);  Aria  from 
"Der  Preischutz"  (von  Weber);  (a)  When  Myra  Sings  (A.  L.), 
(b)  The  Minstrel  (Hildach),  cello  obligato  by  Mr.  Leimert; 
(a)  The  Ingleside  (Old),  (b)  Red,  Red  Rose,  (c)  .Jock  o'Habtel- 
deen  (Scotch);  (a)  Veneziana  (A.  L.).  (b)  Chanson  d'Amour 
(Hollman).  cello  obligato  by  Mr.  Leimert. 


EULA    HOWARD'S   SUCCESS    IN    OREGON. 

Delights   Large  Audiences  With   Her   Equisite  Chopin   Playing 

and   Receives   Unqualified    Eudorsement   in   the   Leading 

Daily  Papers. 


Previous  to  her  departure  for  California.  Miss  Howard  gave 
a  piano  recital  in  Grant's  Pass.  Oregon,  which  proved  quite 
an  artistic  and  financial  success.  Here  are  several  of  the 
press  comments. 

Rouge  River  Courier — Miss  Howard  is  always  the  finished 
musician.  With  a  technic  so  brilliant  that  every  note  stands 
out  clear  and  distinct;  she  combines  a  quality  of  tone  won- 
derfully round  and  full.  She  has  the  soul  of  the  true  artist. 
Her  appreciation  of  the  great  masters  was  compelling,  and 
revealed  in  every  note  a  rare  individuality. 

Pacific  Outlook — It  is  perhaps  the  Chopin  numbers  that 
Miss  Howard  shows  to  the  best  advantage,  and  she  unfolds 
the  weird  intricacies  of  harmony  with  a  warmth  and  abandon 
that  reveals  the  poetic  instinct.  One  would  naturally -expect 
the  petit  performer  to  possess  a  touch  of  the  utmost  delicacy, 
but  what  is  most  surprising  is  that  she  also  takes  the  heavy 
octave  passages  and  full  chords  with  all  the  boldness  and 
strength  of  a  masculine  hand.  To  those  who  appreciate  the 
higher  class  of  piano  production,  her  interpretations  are  a 
surprise  and  a  delight. 

The  evening's  program  was  most  agreeably  varied  by  three 
vocal  numbers  from  Miss  Marjory  Kinney,  whose  full  con- 
tralto was  brought  out  to  the  best  advantage  in  an  aria  from 
"Samson  and  Delilah,"  by  Saint-Saens.  Miss  Kinney  also 
shows  the  effect  of  careful  training  in  the  development  of  a 
contralto  of  unusual  range.  Both  young  ladies  had  to  res- 
pond to  enthusiastic  encores,  and  both  were  the  recipients  of 
many  handsome  floral  offerings. 


MISS    ELLA    R.    ATKINSON 
A  Talented   Pupil   of   Mrs.  A.   F.   Bridge,   Who   Will   Appear  in 
Concert  at  Golden  Gate  Commandery  Hall   Next 
Monday    Evening. 

Samuel  Adelstein  is  now  teaching  at  the  Associated  Studios, 
in  Berkeley,  where  he  instructs  pupils  in  the  mandolin,  guitar 
and  lute  every  Wednesday.  He  is  announced  to  play  lute 
solos  this  evening  at  a  benefit  concert  to  be  given  for  M. 
Solano,  in  Alameda,  and  he  will  also  play  at  the  concert  of 
the  Harmonie  Gesangverein.  at  Golden  Gate  Hall,  of  this  city 
tomorrow  evening. 

•       *       » 

A  very  catchy  Spanish  Dance  has  been  published  by  .J. 
Lombardero,  of  this  city,  who  has  written  both  the  words  and 
music.  It  is  entitled  "La  Chula."  and  is  endowed  with  that 
peculiar  charm  that  permeates  all  the  typical  music  of  sunny 
Spain.  It  is  very  melodious,  contains  the  characteristics  of 
the  romantic  school,  and  should  form  a  favorite  among  those 
who  love  to  combine  popular  melodious  effects  with  the  more 
approved  phrases  of  true  musical  theory. 
%% 


PAOLO   LA  VILLA'S  SUCCESS. 


Paolo  La  Villa,  who  resided  several  years  in  San  Francisco, 
where  he  was  quite  successful  as  a  vocal  instructor,  is  now 
associated  with  the  management  of  the  Johnson  School  of 
Music,  in  Minneapolis.  He  is  also  organist  of  the  Lawry  Hill 
Church,  of  that  City.  He  has  recently  organized  a  choral 
club  for  mixed  voices,  which  is  now  studying  such  works  as 
"Orpheus,"  by  Gluck;  "Norma."  by  Bellini;  "Stabet  Mater." 
by  Pergolesi;  "Rataplan,"  by  La  Villa  and  "The  Legend  of 
Winona."  by  Sausone. 

Mr.  La  Villa  has  recently  published  a  number  of  new  songs; 
among  these  are:  "Down  by  the  Moonlit  Shore,"  and  "Dear 
Life  of  Mine."  Both  songs  are  published  either  with  or  with- 
out violin  obligato.  At  a  recent  pupil  recital  of  the  Saint 
Paul  College  of  Music.  Miss  Erailie  Barron,  a  pupil  of  Mr.  La 
Villa,  sang  her  teacher's  composition  "Napolitaine."  and 
received  salvos  of  applause  by  reason  of  her  excellent  voice 
as  well  as  her  dash  and  spirit. 


-%%^ 


Miss  Edna  Murray,  a  most  talented  and  brilliant  young 
])ianiste,  played  with  great  success  before  the  Mill  Valley 
Outdoor  Art  Club,  on  Thursday  afternoon.  October  28th.  The 
program  included  "Polonaise."  in  E  major,  (Liszt);  "Taren- 
telle  Op.  27,"  (Moskowsky),  and  "Witche's  Dance,"  (Mac- 
Dowell).  Miss  Murray  also  played  in  Sausolito,  on  October 
30th,  and  will  play  there  again  r>n  Thanksgiving  Eve. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


ZECH  ORCHESTRA  AROUSES  ENTHUSIASM. 


Second    Concert    of   Season    1909    Proves    Another 
Artistic  Triumph  For  This  Splendid  Organiza- 
tion   of    Efficient    and    Ambitious 
Instrumentalists. 


BY    ALFRED    METZGER. 

The  Zech  Orchestra,  under  the  virile  leader- 
ship of  William  F.  Zech,  gave  its  second  concert 
of  the  season  1909  at  the  Novelty  Theatre  on 
Tuesday  evening,  October  26th,  in  the  presence 
of  a  very  large  audience.  This  organization  of 
exceedingly  competent  players  surpasses  the 
ordinary  amateur  orchestra  in  a  great  many  re- 
spects. It  approaches  the  professional  organiza- 
tion in  several  points.  Among  these  may  be  cited 
its  spontaneous  attack,  its  unusually  satisfactory 
intonation  and  its  harmonious  unity  in  ensemble 
work.  The  difficulties  under  which  Mr.  Zech  la- 
bors, when  he  is  called  upon  to  mould  an  organ- 
ization of  unprofessional  players  into  acceptable 
musical  form,  can  only  be  appreciated  by  those 
who  have  experience  in  this  phase  of  musical  cul- 
ture. And  even  though  Mr.  Zech  possessed  all 
the  advantages  of  a  skillful  instructor  and  born 
leader  he  could  not  altogether  accomplish  his 
task  if  he  had  not  under  his  baton  an  array  of 
intelligent  young  people,  who  are  able  to  compre- 
hend his  explanations.  We  have  then  in  this 
Zech  Orchestra  an  intelligent,  highly  gifted 
musician  on  one  side  and  a  receptive,  willing 
and  enthusiastic  body  of  students .  on  the  other 
and  such  a  combination  can  not  fail  to  attain  the 
most  satisfactory  results. 

It  is  no  doubt  due  to  this  harmonious  attitude 
or  relation  between  leader  and  players  that  there 
is  attained  a  certain  dash  and  spirit  generally 
lacking  in  an  organization  of  this  character.  Both 
Mr.  Zech,  as  well  as  the  members  of  the  orches- 
tra, are  therefore  entitled  to  hearty  congratula- 
tions for  their  excellent  efforts  and  the  genuine 
and  well  sustained  applause  that  shook  the  raft- 
ers of  the  Novelty  Theatre  on  this  memorable 
occasion  was  but  a  natural  consequence  of  a 
noble  duty  well  performed.  Where  there  was 
such  general  excellence  of  execution,  it  would  be 
folly  to  go  into  detailed  description  of  the  various 
works  performed,  and  we  will  simply  content  our- 
selves with  the  decision  that  the  second  concert 
of  the  present  season  maintained  the  Zech  Or- 
chestra in  its  enviable  position  of  forming  the 
leading  society  of  this  nature  in  this  vicinity. 
Mrs.  Grace  Eleanor  Dutcher  sang  her  solos  with 
a  fine  soprano  voice.  Miss  Olive  Hyde  played  the 
Wuerst  Serenade  with  that  abandonment  into  the 
spirit  of  the   composition   and   that   adherence   to  Director 

clear  technic   which   evidences   true  musicianship  at  th 

and  Miss  Corinne  Goldsmith  played  the  accompaniments  with 

refined  artistic  judgment.     The   program   was  as   follows: 
Overture,    "Pingals   Cave"    (Mendelssohn);     (a)    Standchen 

(Richard  Strauss),  (b)  Am  Meer  (Schubert),  (c)  Dort  in  den 
Weiden  (Brahms),  Mrs.  Grace  Eleanore  Dutcher;  Suite,  "Bal- 
let   Sylvia"      (Delibes);      Serenade      for      String     Orchestra 

(Wuerst),   violin  obligato.   Miss   Olive   Hyde;    Scotch   Dances 

(Langey);   Kennst  du  das  Land  (Liszt),  Mrs.  Grace  Eleanore 

Dutcher;   Kaiser  March  (Wagner). 


DR.    WULLNER    RECITALS. 


WILLIAM    F.   ZECH 
of  the  Zech  Orchestra,  Which  Gave  a  Successful  Concert 
e  Novelty  Theatre,  on  Tuesday  Evening,  October  26. 

Miss  Tilly  Koenen,  interrupting  her  Western  tour  just  long 
enough  to  get  back  to  New  York  for  a  single  day,  gave  a 
special  song  recital  at  Mendelssohn  Hall  on  Tuesday  after- 
noon, November  2nd.  Manager  M.  H.  Hanson,  in  response 
to  a  large  number  of  requests  from  those  who  were  unable 
to  hear  Miss  Koenen  on  the  day  of  her  debut,  cancelled  a 
concert  at  Omaha,  and  bringing  Miss  Koenen  on  the  Twen- 
tieth Century  Limited  from  Chicago  direct  from  her  recital 
at  Orchestra  Hall,  will  start  her  to  resume  her  Western  tour 
immediately  after  this  request  recital. 

V* 


Dr.  Ludwig  WuUner  will  sing  here  three  times,  the  dates 
being  Tuesday  night,  Nov.  23rd,  Friday  night,  Nov.  26th  and 
Sunday  afternoon,  Nov.  28.  As  many  of  our  music  teachers 
and  students  have  expressed  a  desire  to  hear  all  the  pro- 
grams that  this  marvelous  man  will  interpret,  Mr.  Green- 
baum  announces  that  he  will  now  receive  applications  for 
season  tickets  at  the  following  rates:  $2.00  seats,  $4.50  for 
the  course;  $1.50  seats,  $:3.00  for  the  course,  and  $1.00  seats, 
$2.25.  Apply  at  the  office,  101  Post  street,  corner  of  Kearney 
in  the  Koenig  Building,  or  by  mail,  care  of  Sherman.  Clay  & 
Co.'s. 


The  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  is  in  receipt  of  a  postal 
card  from  Hugo  Mansfeldt,  written  in  Tunis,  North  Africa, 
and  inscribed:  "Greetings  from  the  Land  of  the  Arabian 
Nights,  24th  day,  Ramadan,  1327,  Hugo  Mansfeldt. 


A  delightful  musicale  took  place  at  the  residence  of  Charles 
W.  Fay,, on  Grove  street,  in  honor  of  Miss  Maud  Fay,  previous 
to  her  departure  for  New  York,  en  route  to  Germany.  Among 
the  musical  people  present  were:  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mackenzie 
Gordon,  Roy  M.  Pike,  Dr.  Harry  Weil,  Vail  Bakewell  and 
Harald  Pracht.  A  most  interesting  program  was  presented 
among  the  features  of  which  were  a  duet  from  "La  Forza  del 
Destine,"  by  Messrs.  Pracht  and  Gordon.  Miss  Fay  was  also 
heard  at  a  musicale  in  her  honor  at  the  residence  of  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  M.  H.  DeYoung,  on  which  occasion  Herbert  von  Mey- 
erinck  delighted  the  listeners  with  his  excellent  baritone 
voice.  Those  who  have  heard  Miss  Fay  are  enthusiastic 
about  the  brilliancy  of  her  voice  and  her  effective  display  of 
temperament. 

Subscribe  for  the   Musical   Review.     $2.00  per  Year. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW, 


CALIFORNIA  CONSERVATORY  ACTIVITY. 


EURYDICE    CLUB    AGAIN    VICTORIOUS. 


The  California  Conservatory  of  Music  announces  the  en- 
gagement of  the  distinguished  violin  virtuoso.  Madame  Eileen 
O'Moore,  for  its  violin  department.  Madame  O'Moore  studied 
in  Leipzig  with  Hans  Sitt.  and  was  awarded  the  Mendelssohn 
scholarship  of  the  Conservatorium.  From  there  she  went  to 
Brussels  and  became  a  pupil  of  the  celebrated  Ysaye,  final- 
ly finishing  her  studies  with  Sevcik  in  Prague.  She  began 
her  concert  career  in  Leipzig,  playing  at  the  Gewandhaus 
under  N'ikisch  with  great  success,  and  toured  in  Germany, 
England,  India  and  Australia.  Ysaye  gave  her  the  follow- 
ing testimonial:  "I  am  happy  to  state  that  Madame  O'Moore 
is  one  of  my  best  and  most  cherished  pupils;  she  has  studied 
with  me  for  a  long  time,  and  I  have  kept  the  best  impression 
and  the  greatest  admiration  for  the  talent  of  the  artist  as 
well  as  for  the  character  of  the  charming  woman  that  she  is. 
Madame  O'Moore  has  done  wonders  in  solo  work;  she  will 
accomplish  the  most  talented  results  in  teaching  and  I  shall 
always  be  happy  and  proud  to  have  been  her  teacher  and 
friend."  Prof.  Sevcik  wrote  about  her:  "Madame  O'Moore 
is  a  distinguished,  highly  gifted  violinist,  has  a  very  extra- 
ordinary mastery  of  technique  and  broad  and  beautiful  tone, 
and  her  playing  is  characterized  by  great  'temperament,' 
warmth,  feeling  and  dignity.  She  is  therefore  most  warmly 
recommended  as  a  remarkable  soloist,  as  well  as  fitted  to 
impart  instruction  on  the  violin  according  to  the  method  of 
the  undersigned."  Madame  O'Moore  will  be  presented  by 
the  California  Conservatory  of  Music  at  the  third  concert, 
which  will  take  place  on  Friday,  November  12th,  at  the  hall 
of  the  Conservatory,  147  Presidio  avenue. 

This  concert  offers  the  following  attractive  program: 
Schumann — Faschingsschwank  in  Wien,  op.  26  for  piano; 
Hermann  Genss — Songs  for  Tenor;  Bendel — Wie  beruhrt 
midh  wundersani;  Gade — Lebe  wohl,  teures  Gretchen;  Beck- 
er— Fruhlingszeit;  Charles  Bulotti — Concert  for  Violin  by 
Paganiui-Wilhemj,  Madame  O'Moore;  Canon  for  two  So- 
pranos and  Alto  by  Rossini,  Misses  Hazel  and  Myrtle  Wood 
and  Miss  Grace  Brown;  Spohr — Adagio  from  Concerto,  No.  9, 
and  Sarasate — Zigeunerweisen,  for  violin,  Madame  O'Moore. 


Splendid  Women's  Choral  Society,  Under  the  Efficient  Leader- 
ship of  Mrs.  Grace  Davis  Northrup,  Gives  the  First 
Concert  of  Its  Seventh  Season. 


The  Eurydice  Club  of  Oakland  (Mrs.  Grace  Davis  North- 
rup, director),  gave  the  first  concert  of  its  seventh  season  at 
Maple  Hall.  Tuesday  evening,  October  26th,  in  the  presence 
of  a  very  large  and  enthusiastic  audience.  It  really  did  not 
require  this  latest  brilliant  effort  on  behalf  of  this  "excellent 
society  to  convince  the  musical  public  of  the  trans-bay  cities 
that  the  Eurydice  Club  is  a  most  important  factor  in  the 
musical  life  across  the  bay.  This  undisputable  fact  has  long 
ago  been  established  throughout  a  continuous  array  of  artis- 
tic triumphs  during  a  period  of  seven  successful  seasons. 
This  latest  musical  victory  simply  added  another  laurel  leaf 
to  the  rapidly  increasing  wreath  of  successes  achieved  by  this 
exemplary  organization  under  the  sane  guidance  of  Mrs. 
Grace  Davis  Northrup. 

The  most  impressive  and  most  artistic  feature  of  the  varied 
and  well  executed  program  was  Mrs.  H.  II.  Beach's  cantata, 
"The  Chambered  Nautillus,  set  to  *'it-  words  of  Oliver  Wen- 
del!  Holmes'  splendid  poem  of  the  same  name.  The  stre"''*h 
of  the  Eurydice  Club  lies  in  iib  effective  application  of  deli- 
cate tone  coloring,  and  at  times  it  achieves  remarkable  re- 
sults in  the  way  of  climactic  finr.!e«  '  i"he  Chambered  Nau- 
tillus" gave  the  club  particularly  fine  opportunities  to  display 
its  most  prone jneed  qua.ities,  and  both  Mrs.  Davis,  as  well 
as  her  enthusiastic  singers,  took  splendid  advantage  of  these 
opportunities.  The  works  contains  solos  for  soprano  and  con- 
tralto, which  were  satisfactorily  and  artistically  interpreted 
by  Mrs.  William  Ketcham  and  Miss  Ruth  Waterman,  re- 
spectively. The  well  known  waltz,  "By  the  Beautiful  Blue 
Danube,"  was  so  splendidly  rendered  that  the  audience  would 
not  rest  until  an  encore  had  been  granted.  Miss  Mary  Pas- 
more,  violinist;  Miss  Souzanne  Pasmore,  pianiste,  and  Miss 
Mildred  Turner,  accompanist,  added  to  the  artistic  atmos- 
phere of  the  event. 


CONCERT-DIRECTION  M.  H.  HANSON.  NEW  YORK 

...  announces  the  first  appearance  on  the  Pacific  Coast  of ... 


DR.  LUDWIG  WULLNER,  the  singer  of  German  Lieder 
with  his  accompanist,  COENRAAD  V.  BOS 

NOVEMBER— DECEMBER—  1 909 


TILLY    KOENEN,  the    Holland  Contralto,  with 
her  accompanist,  BERNARD  TABBERNAL 


MARCH 


1910 


The  Coast  Management  of  ihese  distinguished  artists  has  been  entrusted  to  the  care  of : — 
MR.  WILLIAM  L.  GREENBAUM,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

MR.  L.  E.  BEHYMER,  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

The  MISSES  STEERS  &  COMAN,  Portland,  Ore. 


P  A  (M  F  T  C    C  O  A  ST    MUSICAL    R  E  V  I  E  W 


BERINGER     CLUB     THRILLS     AUDIENCE     AT     VALLEJO. 


Talented    Young    Musicians    Attract    Throng    of    Eager    Music 

Lovers  to  Their  Recital  and  Arouse  Them  to  Prolonged 

Enthusiasm. 


[Prom  the  Vallejo  Daily  Times,  Octoljer  liltli.] 
One  of  the  most  enjoyable  musical  programs  given  in  this 
city  for  a  number  of  years  was  that  rendered  last  Saturday 
evening  at  Ascension  Guild  Hall,  by  the  Beringer  Musical 
Club  of  San  Francisco.  A  large  audience  of  appreciative 
musical  people  was  present,  and  judging  from  the  encores 
given  each  number  on  the  program  the  concert  proved  a 
treat  to  all.  The  members  of  the  musical  club  are  all  pupils 
of  Professor  and  Mrs.  Beringer.  and  it  is  understood  that 
many  of  them  are  planning  to  complete  their  musical  educa- 
tion in  Europe. 

The  young  pianists.  Misses  Buben,  .locom.  Bultman,  West- 
ington,  McNeil  and  Mr.  Mowbray,  played  their  classical 
selections  with  considerable  artistic  taste  and  temperament, 
and  were  forced  to  respond  to  encores.  In  vocal  selections, 
the  singing  of  Miss  Irene  De  Martini  and  Mr.  Harry  Bultman 
are  worthy  of  espec'al  mention;  also  the  solo,  "My  Heart  at 
Thy  Sweet  Voice,"  from  "Samson  and  Deliah,"  by  Miss  Anila 
Morse. 

One  of  the  enjoyable  number's  of  the  evening's  program 
was  the  vocal  solo,  "Creole  Lover's  Song,"  by  Mrs.  Henry  .1. 
Widenmann  of  this  city.  It  is  to  be  hopea  that  this  excellent 
musical  organization  may  be  induced  to  appear  again  in  the 
near  future  with  another  program  of  classical  ^elections,  as 
such  entertainments  prove  to  be  not  only  of  an  enjoyable 
nature  to  musicians,  but  also  of  an  educational  value  to 
musical  students. 


-w- 


The  "Press  Democrat"  of  Santa  Rosa  had  the  following  to 
say  about  the  concert  given  recently  at  the  Ursuline  College 
in  the  Sonoma  city:  "The  music  lovers  of  this  city  who 
failed  to  attend  the  third  annual  alumni  musical  in  the  con- 
cert hall  of  Ursuline  Academy  Sunday  afternoon  missed  one 
of  the  finest  instrumental  concerts  ever  given  in  this  city. 
The  rendition  of  Beethoven's  "Kreutzer  Sonate"  by  Harry 
Samuels  on  the  violin,  and  Professor  Joseph  Beringer  at  the 
piano,  was  simply  elegant.  Their  unison,  time  and  expres- 
sion were  marvelous,  and  those  who  heard  them  in  this  and 
their  several  other  selections  were  quite  expressive  in  their 
appreciation.  Professors  Samuels  and  Beringer  also  rendered 
Othello  Fantasie  by  Ernst,  Beethoven's  Minuet,  Beringer's 
'Tes  Yeaux,'  and  Gossec's  Gavotte.  Prof.  Beringer  captivated 
the  audience  with  his  piano  solo  work  in  rendering  Raff's 
Romance  "A  lieu'  and  Grieg's  'Aus  Holberg's  Zeit."  " 
V* 


THE    FINAL   SOUSA   CONCERTS. 


.John  Philip  Sousa  and  his  splendid  band  will  be  heard  for 
the  last  time  this  season  at  Dreamland  Rink  this  Saturday 
afternoon  and  night  and  tomorrow  (Sunday)  afternoon  and 
night.  The  program  for  the  Saturday  night  concert  will  in- 
clude Mr.  Sousa's  beautiful  suite  descriptive  of  "The  Last 
Days  of  Pompeii,"  a  new  tone  poem  called  "Finlandia"  by 
Sibelius,  the  rarely  heard  Liszt's  "Fourteenth  Hungarian 
Rhapsody,"  and  several  other  novelties.  At  the  Sunday  mat- 
inee Wagner's  glorious  "Rienzi"  overture,  Sousa's  charming 
suite,  "Looking  Upward,"  and  the  splendid  "Scenes  Histor- 
ical— Sheridan's  Ride,"  will  be  the  specially  attractive  works. 
For  the  farewell  concert  on  Sunday  night  Liszt's  "Les  Pre- 
ludes," Edward  German's  "Welsh  Rhapsody"  and  other  in- 
teresting works  are  promised,  and  by  special  request  Mr. 
Sousa  will  give  his  comic  fantasy,  "The  Band  Came  Back," 
and  repeat  his  new  suite,  "People  Who  Live  in  Glass  Houses." 

The  sale  of  seats  on  Sunday  will  open  at  Dreamland  Rink 
at  half  past  nine  and  phone  orders  will  receive  most  careful 
attention.  On  Monday  afternoon  at  three  and  at  eight  Sousa 
and  his  forces  will  occupy  the  Greek  Theatre  of  the  Univer 
sity  at  Berkeley,  under  the  auspices  of  the  Faculty  Commit- 
tee. In  case  of  inclement  weather  the  concerts  will  be  given 
in  the  Harmon  Gymnasium,  which  is  quite  easy  of  access 
from  the  car  lines.  Two  special  programs  have  been  pre- 
pared for  these  events,  including  several  works  not  played  at 
the  other  concerts.  Tickets  at  the  usual  places  across  the 
bay,  as  well  as  the  box  office  at  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.'s. 


-w- 


Emmy  Destinn  recently  reappeared  at  the  Royal  Opera 
House  in  Berlin,  singing  in  "Carmen,"  and  it  was  said  that 
her  voice  showed  a  loss  of  freshness,  presumably  to  be  attri- 
buted to  her  engagements  in  this  country.  She  later  suc- 
ceeded in  bringing  about  the  production  of  Smetana's 
"Dalibor"  at  the  Berlin  opera.- — New  York  Sun. 


MRS.    FRANCES    THOROUGHMAN 
Who  Made  an  Excellent  Impression  With    Her   Fine 
Dramatic  Soprano  at  the  Greek  Theatre    Reecntly. 

Mrs.  Frances  Thoroughman.  a  most  efficient  dramatic  con- 
cert soprano,  who  has  recently  established  herself  in  San 
Francisco,  as  a  vocal  instructor,  gave  the  half  hour  of  music 
at  the  Greek  Theatre,  on  Sunday  afternoon,  October  17th,  in 
the  presence  of  about  five  thousand  people.  She  charmed 
everyone  with  her  splendid  voice  and  her  brilliant  declama- 
tory ability.  She  is  exceedingly  musical,  possesses  fine  ideas 
regarding  artistic  interpretation,  and  seems  to  be  endowed 
with  that  rarest  of  all  gifts — temperament.  Fred  Maurer  was 
the  accompanist  and  naturally  only  added  to  the  excellence  of 
the  event. 


Miss  Ella  R.  Atkinson,  soprano,  pupil  of  Mrs.  A.  F.  Bridge, 
will  give  her  initial  recital  at  Golden  Gate  Commandery  Hall. 
Sutter  street,  Nov.  8th.  Her  assisting  artists  will  be:  Hother 
Wismer,  violin:  Louis  Newbauer,  fiute,  and  Frederick  Maurer, 
Jr.,  accompanist.  Miss  Atkinson  possesses  a  beautiful  so- 
prano voice  of  wide  range  and  noticeable  flexibility,  which 
her  well-selected  program  will  demonstrate.  For  two  years 
she  has  been  a  much  sought  after  society  singer  for  teas  and 
receptions,  and  has  also  become  a  well  established  church 
singer.  In  entering  upon  a  professional  career  one  cannot 
help  but  predict  a  brilliant  career  for  the  young  singer. 


Miss  Edna  Montague,  pupil  of  Mrs.  Oscar  Mansfeldt,  will 
give  a  recital  at  Century  Hall,  Tuesday  evening,  November 
9th.  The  program  will  be  as  follows:  Sonata  B  flat,  (Beet- 
hoven); "Forest  Scenes,"  (Schumann):  "Ballade,"  F  major. 
(Chopin):  "Nocturne,"  (Chopin);  "Fantasie,"  (Chopin); 
"Cracovienne  F'antastique,"  (Paderewski) ;  Andante  Finale 
"Lucia  de  Lammerraoor,"  tor  the  left  hand  alone — (Donizetti- 
Leschetitzkil  ;  Magic  Fire  Scene  from  Die  Walkure,"  (Wag- 
ner-Brassin  I  :  Tarantelle  "Venezia  e  Napoli"  (Liszt). 


MARY   ADELE   CASE   CONCERT. 


The  greatest  interest  is  being  displayed  in  the  concerts 
to  be  given  by  Mary  Adele  Case,  the  contralto,  at  the 
Novelty  Theatre  on  Friday  night,  Nov.  19th,  and  Sunday 
afternoon,  Nov.  21st.  Miss  Case  is  being  entertained  exten- 
sively by  our  musical  set  and  making  warm  friends  and 
admirers  on  all  sides.  A  contralto  voice  like  Miss  Case's  is 
indeed  rare,  and  she  will  surprise  many  of  the  music  lovers 
when  they  hear  what  she  can  do  with  it.  The  complete  pro- 
gram will   be   published   next  week. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


The  Great 

Bach  Festival 

Spring,  1910 

St.  Matthew's  Passion  and 
B  Minor  Mass 


Under  the  Direction  of 

Dr.  J.  Fred  Wolle, 

Founder  of  the  Bach  Festival  in  America 

An  Orchestra  of  Sixty  Musicians 
A  Chorus  of  Two  Hundred  and  Fifty 
A  Children's  Choir  of  Five  Hundred 
Eight  Soloists  of  the  Highest  Standing 

Associate  Member  Five  Dollars  a  Year, 
Including  Two  Tickets  for  Each  Concert 
Active  Members  No  Dues  and  No  Init- 
iation Fee.  :::::: 

NOTICE  TO  SINGERS 

Rehearsals  for  the  great  Bach  Festival 
are  taking  place  every  Monday  evening 
at  Christian  Church,  Corner  Dana  Street 
and  Bancroft  Way,  in  Berkeley,  and  any- 
one sufficiently  mtere^ed  in  the  works  of 
Johann  Sebastian  Bach  to  study  the  same 
thoroughly  and  participate  in  an  Annual 
Festival,  given  in  his  honor,  and  for  the 
purpose  of  permanently  establishing  the 
worth  of  his  great  Music  in  California, 
are  invited  to  become  members  of  the 
Bach  Choir.  Address  Miss  Lillian  D. 
Clark,  Secretary  of  the  Bach  Choir, 
1 522  Spruce  Street.  Berkeley,  Cal. 
Phone  Berkeley  3294. 


IF  THERE  ARE  SUFFICIENT  APPLICATIONS 
FOR  MEMBERSHIP  FROM  OAKLAND  AND 
SAN  FRANCISCO,  REHEARSALS  WILL  BE 
HELD  IN  BOTH  CITIES  EVERY  WEEK. 


Elaborate 
Holiday 
Number! 


^-TTTHK         PACIFIC        COAST         MUSICAL 
■J    REVIEW   is   now    preparing   a   large   and 

1 1  handsomely  illustrated  New  Year's  Edition 
whicli  will  be  published  on  Saturday,  December 
2.5th,  1909.  Besides  containing  a  Retrospective 
Review  of  San  Francisco's  .Musical  Life  since 
April  18,  lfl06,  the  paper  will  contain  special  ar- 
ticles about  Los  Angeles  Musicians  and  Cali- 
fornia Musical  Clubs. 

^TT THOSE  who  do  not  advertise  regularly  in 
■J    this  paper  will  find  the  Holiday  Number  of 

J I  the  "Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review"  an  ideal 
Advertising  Medium  as  it  will  consist  of  an  edi- 
tion of  not  less  than  Ten  Thousand  Copies. 
^TT  REGULAR  advertisers  in  this  paper  who 
■  have  Annual  Contracts  are  entitled  to  a 
TJ  complimentary  article  containing  200  words 
each:  and  if  they  pay  for  cuts  at  the  rate  of  15c 
a  square  inch  such  article  may  be  illustrated 
with  picture;  the  cut  not  to  exceed  3x4  inches 
(two  dollars).  Regular  advertisers  desiring  to 
talie  advantage  of  this  complimentary  write-up 
and  picture  should  send  in  their  requests  and 
copy  before  December  1st.  After  that  date  no 
write-ups  can  be  accepted. 

Single    Copies    of    the 

Holiday  Number  will 

be  25   Cents 

Send   copies   away   to   friends   and    show   them 
what  California  is  doing  for  Music. 


For  Particulars  Address ; 


Sherman  Clay  &  Co.  Building 
Sutter  and  Kearny  Sts.  San  Francisco 


10 


rACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


MUSICAL  NEWS  ABROAD 


MUSIC    IN    BERLIN. 


Twelve    Hundred   Concerts   Are     Announced     For    the     Berlin 
Season  and  More  To  Be  Heard  From. 


BY   WARREN    D.   ALLEN. 

Berlin,  October  6,   l'.l01). 

The  concert  season  is  well  under  way  here  now.  and  gives 
promise  of  a  very  busy  and  interesting  winter  in  musical  cir- 
cles. Only  one  thing  is  wanting  to  make  the  happiness  of 
an  enthusiastic  Berlin  concert-goer  complete,  and  that  is  the 
ability  to  be  in  more  than  one  place  at  the  same  time. 

Already  twelve  hundred  concerts  are  billed  for  the  season, 
which  will  average  six  to  eight  performances  every  evening, 
to  say  nothing  of  the  three  grand  opera  companies  that  are 
always  busy.  At  the  Royal  Opera,  Emmy  Destinn  is  a  lead- 
ing light,  until  her  departure  for  America.  On  October  22 
Caruso  will  begin  an  engagement  here,  singing  in  Carmen, 
La  Boheme  and  Pagliacci. 

At  the  Komische  Oper  last  week  I  had  the  pleasure  of 
hearing  Maria  Labia  in  a  splendid  production  of  Tosca,  and 
on  another  evening  D'Albert's  opera  "Tiefland,"  the  music  of 
which  is  reminiscent,  in  many  places,  of  Bizet,  Wagner  and 
sometimes  Grieg,  but  most  interesting  on  account  of  its 
dramatic  vividness  and  color. 

Dr.  Ludwig  WuUner  and  his  no  less  gifted  colleague, 
Coenraad  Bos,  gave  us  the  first  treat  of  the  season.  The 
Philharmonic  was  packed  to  the  doors,  and  the  program  was 
selected  from  Weber,  Beethoven,  Schubert,  Wagner,  Wolf, 
Brahms.  Rosa,  Strauss,  'Sinding,  et  al.  The  modern  songs 
were  particularly  interesting,  and  the  evening  was  a  very 
delightful  one,  which  will  soon  be  repeated  in  San  Francisco, 
I  suppose.     Don't  miss  hearing  them. 

On  the  following  evening  Marteau  and  Dohnanyi  played 
violin  and  piano  sonatas  from  Brahms,  Schumann  and  Cesar 
Franck.  Both  artists  are  very  popular  here  and  deservedly 
so,   for  their  ensemble  is  well-night  perfect. 

Madame  Carreno  was  to  have  played  Monday  last,  but  was 
taken  suddenly  ill,  leaving  a  clear  coast  for  Rudolph  Ganz  in 
his  concert  with  the  Philharmonic  Orchestra.  Many  and  flat- 
tering have  been  the  comments  upon  this  artist's  work 
wherever  he  has  played,  and  his  work  on  that  evening  fully 
entitles  him  to  a  place  in  the  front  rank  of  the  world's  key- 
board magicians.  In  the  Beethoven  E  fiat  Concerto  he 
showed  himself  to  be  a  scholar  of  admirable  intellectual 
poise;  his  reading  of  the  Chopin  E  minor  Concerto  was  very 
satisfying,  both  from  a  tonal  and  technical  standpoint,  and 
in  the  Liszt  Hungarian  Fastasia  he  revealed  himself  as  a 
technician  of  almost  diabolical   ingenuity. 

1  speak  more  at  length  of  Mr.  Ganz,  not  only  because  of 
the  impression  he  made  upon  me,  but  because  his  playing 
is  one  of  the  good  things  yet  to  be  heard  on  the  Pacific 
Coast. 

Tuesday  I  had  the  pleasure  of  hearing  the  Royal  Capelle 
under  the  direction  of  Dr.  Strauss  himself.  It  is  almost 
worth  the  trip  across  the  ocean  to  hear  Richard  Strauss'  in- 
terpretation of  the  5th  Symphony  of  Beethoven.  One  who 
has  heard  it  on  many  previous  occasions  is  astonished  at 
the  new  beauties  revealed. 

On  the  following  evening  it  was  my  good  fortune  to  hear 
Tristan  and  Isolde  at  the  Royal  Opera.  A  most  wonderful 
production  of  the  opera  of  operas  was  given,  with  Dr.  Muck 
at  the  baton.  Frau  Kurt,  a  newcomer,  gave  a  most  excellent 
account  of  herself,  and  sang  the  Liebestod   beautifully. 

Come  ye  to  Berlin,  all  that  are  music-hungry. 


Arthur  M.  Abell,  the  Berlin  correspondent  of  the  New  York 
Musical  Courrier,  writes  of  Pepito  Arriola,  the  wonderful 
Spanish  child  pianist  in  the  following  enthusiastic  vein: 

Pepito  Arriol  is,  by  all  odds,  the  most  marvelous  prodigy 
of  our  times.  Yesterday  I  heard  this  tiny  twelve  year  old 
Spaniard,  whose  hands  are  so  small  that  he  has  to  have  a 
specially  constructed  piano  with  narrower  keys,  play  the 
Tschaikowsky  concerto,  the  Chopin  A  flat  polonaise,  Rubin- 
stein's "Valse  Caprice,"  and  the  Liszt  E  Hat  concerto.  It  was 
not  the  playing  of  a  precocious  child;  it  was  the  playing  of  a 
great  artist — it  was  really  marvelous.  I  never  heard  any- 
thing to  compare  with  it  for  early  development  on  the  piano. 
Every  pianist  knows  what  demands  these  pieces  make  on  the 
player.  Technically  it  was  all  child's  play  to  little  Pepito. 
What  was  far  more  astonishing  than  his  virtuosity  was  his 
insight  into  the  compositions,  his  mental  grasp  and  his  well 


sounded,  artistic,  soulful  delivery.  With  what  ease  and  sure- 
ness  he  attacked  that  old  war  horse,  the  Liszt  E  flat  concerto, 
and  how  grandly  he  played  the  polonaise.  So  must  the  boy 
Franz  Liszt  have  played  for  Beethoven.  Alberto  .Jonas  has 
reason  to  be  proud  of  having  turned  out  a  pupil  like  little 
Pepito  Arriola.  If  the  child  keeps  on  developing,  who  can 
predict  to  what  heights  he  will  climb?  His  pianistic  ability 
and  his  musical  talent  are  of  the  same  astonishing  order.  No 
lover  of  piano  playing  should  neglect  to  hear  this  little  marvel 
on  his  forth-coming  American  tour. 

Inasmuch  as  Pepito  will  be  heard  on  the  Pacific  Coast  dur- 
ing the  current  season  under  the  management  of  Will  L. 
Greenbaum,  L.  E.  Behymer  and  the  Misses  Steers  and  Coman, 
the  above  item  proves  of  particular  interest. 

*  *       * 

Dr.  Ludwig  Werllner  gave  the.  initial  concert  of  the  Berlin 
season  on  Wednesday  evening,  September  29,  and  created,  as 
usual  frenzied  enthusiasm. 

*  *       * 

Henri  Marteau  and  Ernst  von  Dohnanyi  gave  their  first 
sonato  evening  at  the  Philharmonie  in  Berlin  during  the  last 
week  in  September.  The  program  was:  Sonata  in  A  major 
(Brahms);  Sonata  in  A  minor  (Schumann);  Sonata  in  A 
major  (Cesar  Franck).  The  pitifully  small  attendance  proved 
that  chamber  music  is  not  more  popular  in  Berlin  than  it  is 
in  San  Francisco. 

*  *       * 

The  most  important  events  in  Berlin  during  the  week  begin- 
ning October  4th,  were:  Piano  recitals  by  Teresa  Carreno 
and  Rudolph  Ganz,  a  symphony  concert  by  the  Royal  Sym- 
phony Orchestra  under  the  direction  of  Richard  Strauss,  a 
vocal  concert  by  Tilly  Koenen,  the  first  symphony  concert  of 
the  new  season  by  the  Philarmonic  Orchestra  under  the  direc- 
tion of  Arthur  Nickisch,  and  the  first  performance  of  Sme- 
tana's  opera  "Dalimor."  at  the  Royal  Opera. 

America  is  well  represented  in  opera  in  Paris  and  has  been 
for  several  years.  At  present  Clarence  Whitehill  is  singing 
Wagnerian  roles  at  the  Opera,  and,  of  course,  Mary  Garden 
has  been  heard  on  a  number  of  occasions;  indeed  in  the 
Comedia  there  was  a  long  article  in  regard  to  the  usurpation 
by  foreign  artists  of  the  opera  stage. 

Still  another  bit  of  news  anent  recent  creative  activity  of 
Strauss  is  a  composition  for  wind  instruments,  bearing  the 
title  of  "Feierlicher  Einzug."  It  is  intended  for  use  on  the 
occasion  of  the  annual  investiture  of  the  Knights  of  the  Order 
of  St.  John,  a  ceremonial  celebrated  with  great  pomp  and 
splendor  in  the  Berlin  residence  of  the  German  Emperor. 
During  the  recent  manoeuvers  of  the  German  army  the  work 
was  heard  for  the  first  time  and  is  said  to  have  made  a  deep 
impression  upon  the  composer's  royal  patron  and  the  officers 
of  his  staff. 

One  of  the  notable  out  of  door  musical  performances  in 
Prance  of  the  last  month  included  the  production  of  the 
musical  spectacle  "Bacchus,"  for  which  Henri  Cain  wrote  the 
text  and  Camille  Erlanger  composed  the  music.  Among  the 
singers  to  take  part  were  Mmes.  Litvinne  and  Chenal  and  M. 
Muratore.  There  was  a  chorus  of  six  hundred  voices  and  as 
many  more  figures  in  the  pageantry,  which  showed  episodes 
in  the  life  of  the  god  of  wine  and  the  later  incarnations  of 
the  same  divinities.  There  was  an  audience  of  22,000  persons 
to  hear  the  music.  The  fete  is  of  annual  occurrence  and  cele- 
brates the  end  of  the  vintage  at  Bordeaux. — New  York  Sun. 

*  *       * 

Mary  Garden  and  Maurice  Renaud  in  "Thais"  have  been 
the  principal  success  of  the  autumn  season  at  the  Opera  in 
Paris  and  have  brought  to  this  historic  opera  house  larger 
and  more  enthusiastic  audiences  than  it  has  held  in  years. 
The  present  popularity  of  Massenet  opera  is  all  but  incompre- 
hensible to  those  who  remember  the  comparative  neglect  in 
which  it  slumbered  for  so  many  years.  Possibly  the  ability  of 
its  present  interpreters  was  responsible  for  the  different  place 
it  holds  in  public  esteem.  It  was  sung  first  in  1894  at  the 
Opera,  with  Sibyl  Sanderson  and  .Jean  Delmas  in  the  two 
leading  roles.  Then  its  success  did  not  lead  to  its  perfor- 
mance in  other  countries.  It  was  revived  four  years  later  at 
the  Opera,  with  Mile.  Berthet  and  M.  Delmas.  but  its  great 
popularity  began  three  years  ago  with  the  appearance  of 
Maurice  Renaud  as  the  mystic.  Artists  from  the  Metropoli- 
tan's forces  are  also  appearing  in  the  Paris  opera  houses. 
Clarence  Whitehill  recently  sang  "Wolfram"  at  the  Opera, 
while  Mme.  Flahaut  appeared  as  "Azucena  in  the  production 
of  "II  Trovatore"  at  the  Gaiete  Lyrique.  Miss  Courtenay  has 
been  appearing  at  the  Opera  Comique  in  "Mireille,"  "Manon" 
and  "La  Traviata." — New   York  Sun. 


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1*  A  C  I  r  10    C  O  A  S  T    MUSICAL    It  K  V  I  E  W. 


MUSICAL  NEWS  FROM  THE  EAST 


The  program  for  the  last  week  of  Mr.  Hammerstein's  sea- 
son of  opera  at  low  prices  at  the  New  York  Manhattan  Opera 
House  was  as  follows:  Monday,  Oct.  25th,  "Tosca,"  Mme. 
Sylva,  Messrs.  Carasa  and  Beck.  Tuesday  and  Friday,  "The 
Bohemian  Girl."  Wednesday,  "Cavalleria  Rusticana"  and 
Pagliacci"  with  Mme.  Sylva  in  both  operas,  together  with 
Messrs.  Carasa  and  Zerola.  Saturday  afternoon,  "The  Tales 
of  Hoffmann."  Saturday  night,  "Pagliacci,"  the  third  act  of 
"Carmen,"  third  act  of  "II  Trovatore"  and  the  coronation 
scene  from  "Le   Prophete,"  the  program   introducing  all   the 

principal  singers. 

*  *       * 

Although  Rachmaninoff,  the  Russian  composer-pianist,  who 
is  to  make  his  first  appearance  in  New  York  with  the  Boston 
Symphony  Orchestra  on  Saturday  afternoon,  November  13, 
has  been  compelled  to  delay  his  sailing  so  that  his  appear- 
ance in  Boston  has  been  postponed,  he  will  arrive  in  this 
country  in  ample  time  to  fulfil  his  engagement  with  the  Bos- 
ton Symphony.  Under  these  unexpected  conditions,  however, 
it  is  a  question  whether  he  will  be  able  to  conduct  any  of  his 
own  works  owing  to  lack  of  time  for  rehearsal,  and  he  will 
probably  simply  appear  as  piano  soloist. 

*  •       • 

The  advent  of  Mme.  Louise  Homer  as  a  recital  singer  gives 
added  interest  to  a  series  of  star  song  recitals  to  be  given 
before  the  opening  of  the  opera  season.  Commencing  with 
Mme.  Gadski  on  October  31,  Schumann-Heink  on  November 
6,  Sembrich  on  November  9,  and  Nordica  on  November  IG, 
chief  interest  lies  in  the  coming  of  Mme.  Homer,  who  will 
be  heard  in  a  program  of  her  husband's  compositions  in  the 
Lyceum  Theatre  on  Monday  afternoon,  November  1.  Long 
admired  for  her  work  as  a  member  of  the  opera  company,  it 
is  not  until  now  that  New  Yorkers  have  an  opportunity  of 
comparing  her  with  those  already  established  in  the  recital 

field. 

*  *       * 

Schumann-Heink  is  receiving  as  enthusiastic  a  welcome 
everywhere  on  her  present  tournee  as  she  did  a  year  ago 
when  Germany  acclaimed  her.  With  her  many  European 
triumphs  still  fresh  in  the  minds  of  her  fellow  citizens  they 
seem  determined  to  overshadow  them  with  the  attentions 
showered  upon  her  in  every  city  she  visits.  In  Detroit  last 
week  she  was  given  the  freedom  of  the  city  by  Mayor  Breit- 
mayer,  and  on  Sunday  last  in  Chicago  both  Mme.  Nordica  and 
Mme.  Gadski  led  the  applause  of  a  jammed  house  at  her  re- 
appearance there.  Columbus,  Cleveland,  Cincinnati  and 
Buffalo  all  turned  out  big  audiences  welcoming  her.  Schu- 
mann-Heink will  give  only  one  recital  in  New  York  this  sea- 
son, in  Carnegie  Hall,  on  Saturday  afternoon,  November  (1. 
Many  numbers  in  her  program  will  be  new  to  the  public. 
lit       *       * 

Fritz  Kreisler  gave  his  second  recital  in  Carnegie  Hall,  New 
York,  on  Saturday  afternoon,  October  30.  This  was  the  last 
recital  he  gave  there,  as  following  his  appearance  with  the 
New  York  Symphony  Orchestra  on  November  14  and  16  he 
vi'ill  leave  for  the  Pacific  Coast,  to  be  gone  until  the  end  of 
.January.  The  following  was  the  program  for  this  concert: 
Suite,  E  minor  (Bach) ;  Prelude  and  Gavotte,  E  major  (Bach) ; 
Andantino  (Padre-Martini);  Scherzo  (Dittersdorf) ;  Menuet 
(Porpora);  Sicilienne  et  Rigaindon  (Francoeur);  Variations 
on  a  Gavotte  (Tartini) ;  Menuet  (Debussy) ;  Havanaise 
(Saint-Saens) ;  Caprice  Viennois  (Kreisler);  Tambourin 
Chinois  (Kreisler);  Twenty-fourth  Caprice  (Paganini);  Airs 
Russe  (Wieniawski). 

*  w  * 

At  Victor  Herbert's  concert  at  the  New  York  Theatre  Sun- 
day evening,  October  24.  Horace  Britt  resumed  his  place 
as  first  'cellist  of  the  orchestra.  To  celebrate  his  return  he 
was  the  principal  soloist  of  that  night,  playing  Gabriel-Marie's 
"Serenade  Badine"  and  Mr.  Herbert's  "Pensee  Amoureuse." 
Of  the  orchestral  selections  an  entr'acte  number  from  Gou- 
nod's "Philemon  et  Baucis"  aroused  interest  on  account  of  the 
promised  revival  of  this  musical  gem  at  one  of  the  New  York 
opera  houses.  This  selection  is  one  of  a  number  from  the 
standard  operas  which  Mr.  Herbert  intends  offering  during 
the  present  season.  Accompanying  it  on  the  programme  was 
Goldmark's  overture  to  "Sakuntala,"  Massenet's  suite  "Esclar- 
monde,"  Strauss's  "Moto  Perpetuo"  and  an  excerpt  form 
Ivanow's  "Caucasian  Sketches,"  containing  obligatos  for  viola 
and  English  horn.  The  latter  half  of  the  programme  was 
made  up  as  usual  of  Mr.  Herbert's  own  compositions. 


The  recital  wliich  Mme.  Gadski  gave  at  Carnegie  Hall.  New 
York,  Sunday  afternoon,  October  31,  was  the  prima  donna's 
only  New  York  appearance  outside  of  her  regular  jjerfor- 
mances  at  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House  and  the  New 
Theatre.  Her  recital  programme  consisted  of  Brahms  and 
Schubert  songs  for  the  first  two  groups  and  concluded  with  a 
number  of  songs  in  English,  among  them  MacDowell's  "The 
Swan  Bent  Low,"  Sidney  Homer's  "Children  Songs"  and  Edwin 
Schneider's  "Unmindful  of  the  Roses."  Isidore  Luckstone 
assisted  at  the  piano. 

*  *       • 

Pepito  Arriola,  the  boy  pianist  who  has  been  heralded  in 
Europe  as  the  most  wonderful  example  of  musical  development 
of  the  century,  comes  to  America  by  the  steamship  New 
York,  due  November  6.  His  debut  will  be  made  in  recital  at 
Carnegie  Hall,  November  12. 

*  *       * 

Mme.  Marcella  Sembrich  will  give  her  annual  Carnegie  Hall 
recital  Tuesday  afternoon,  November  9.  The  prima  donna  is 
now  on  tour,  her  appearances  this  week  including  concerts  in 
Poughkeepsie,  Bridgeport  and  Cincinnati,  while  her  schedule 
for  the  coming  week  includes  St.  Louis,  Indianapolis  and 
Louisville.  Mme.  Sembrich's  accompanist  is  Frank  La  Forge, 
her  other  assisting  artist  being  Francis  Rogers,  barytone. 

*  *       * 

Of  rare  interest  will  be  one  of  the  events  planned  by  the 
Symphony  Society  in  New  York  for  the  celebration  of  Walter 
Damrosch's  twenty-fifth  year  as  conductor.  This  will  be  an 
exact  reproduction  of  the  first  concert  of  the  society  which 
Walter  Damrosch  ever  conducted  and  which  took  place  on 
March  27,  1885,  immediately  after  the  death  of  his  father, 
Leopold  Damrosch.     The  programme  was  as  follows: 

Franz  Schubert,  Symphony  in  C  major;  Camille  Saint-Saens, 
Barcarolle,   (For  small  orchestra  and  harp);    Carl  Maria  von 
Weber,  Concertstuck  for  pianoforte,  (Miss  Fannie  Bloomfield) ; 
Franz  Liszt,  Symphonic  Poem,  Die  Hunnenschlact. 
w 


The  Philharmonic  Society  of  New  York  has  issued  its  an- 
naul  prospectus.  Gustav  Mahler  will  conduct  all  the  con- 
certs.    The  first  series  of  concerts  will  be: 

Eight  Thursday  evenings  and  eight  Friday  afternoons,  as 
follows:  Thursday  evenings,  November  4  and  25,  December 
16,  January  6  and  20,  1910,  February  3  and  17  and  March  10;. 
Friday  afternoons,  November  5  and  26,  December  17,  Jan- 
uary 7  and  21,  1910,  February  4  and  18  and  March  11. 

The  second  series  of  concerts,  ^  entitled  an  "Historical 
Cycle,"  will  be  six  Wednesday  evenings,  as  follows:  Novem- 
ber 10,  December  8  and  29  and  January  26,  1910,  March  2 
and   March   30. 

The  third  series  will  be  a  Beethoven  cycle  on  the  follow- 
ing five  Friday  afternoons:  November  19,  December  31,  Jan- 
uary  14,   1910,   March  4  and   April   1. 

The  fourth  series,  which  will  include  five  Sunday  after- 
noons, follows:  November  21,  December  12,  January  16,  1910, 
February   13   and  March   6. 

The  soloists  for  the  season  as  announced  in  the  prospectus 
are:  Teresa  Carreno  (first  New  York  appearance  this  sea- 
son), Ferruccio  Busoni  (his  first  New  York  appearance  this 
season),  Fritz  Kreisler,  Maude  Powell,  Theodore  Spiering, 
Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner,  Tilly  Koenen,  Corinne  Rider-Kelsey, 
Janet  Spencer,  Daniel  Beddoe,  Herbert  Watrous  and  others 
to  be  announced  during  the  winter.  The  program  for  the 
first  pair  of  concerts,  November  4  and  5,  is  appended: 

Overture,  The  Consecration  of  the  House  (Beethoven); 
Symphony,  No.  3,  Eroica  (Beethoven);  Symphonic  poem, 
Mazeppa    ( Liszt  1;    Till   Eulenspiegel    (Richard   Strauss). 

The  program  for  the  first  concert  in  the  historical  series, 
Wednesday  evening,  November  10,  follows:  Concerto  Grosso, 
B  minor.  No.  12  (Handel):  Suite  (overtures).  No.  XXX,  1 
(Bach);  Aria,  Quanto  Dolci  (Handel),  Madame  Rider-Kelsey; 
Rigaudon  (Rameau);  Aria,  Madame  Rider-Kelsey;  Overture 
to  Iphigenie  en  Aulide  (Gluck). 

Here  is  the  program  for  the  first  concert  in  the  Beethoven 
cycle,  Friday  afternoon,  November  17:  Overture,  "Fidelio," 
Second   Symphony,   Leonore   Overtures,   Nos.   1,   2   and   3. 

The  first  program  for  the  fourth  series,  Sunday  afternoon, 
November  21,  will  be:  Overture,  Leonore,  No.  3  (Beethoven); 
Symphony,  No.  3,  Eroica   (Beethoven);    Prelude,  Tristan  and 
Isolde    (Wagner)  ;    Prelude,  Die  Meistersinger   (Wagner). 
w 


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Located  on  the  Second  Floor  of  the  new  Kohler 
&  Chase  Building,  OTarrell  near  Market  Street 

Seating  Capacity  450 

Fitted  with    ample    Stage,    Retiring  Rooms   and 
Complete     Heating     and     Ventilating     Systems 

Reservations  now  being  made 


For  Afternoon  and  Evening  Recitals.  An 
Attractive  Rate  of  Rental  has  been  made  for  the 
Opening  Season.  Special  Rates  for  Pupils' 
Recitals  ::::::: 


FITZPATRICK  &  NORWOOD 

(LESSEES  ) 

40  O'Farrell  Street 

Phone  Kearny  5454 
Office  Hours :    IM  to  12  A.  M. 


Overland 
Limited 

CROSSES 

High  Sierra 
Great  Salt  Lake 

BY  DAYLIGHT 
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Electric  Lighted.  Fast  Flying,  Cross-Country  Train. 
Luxuriously  Equipped.  Pullman,  Drawing  Room. 
Stateroom.  Vestibuled  Sleeping  Cars. 

Careful  and  attentive  dining  service.  Parlor 
observation  car  with  library  and  cafe.  Ladies 
Reading  Room,  Gentlemen's  Smoking  Room. 

Daily  News  Bulletins,  Latest  Papers  and  Mageizines. 

Southern  Pacific 

TICKET  OFFICES 

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13th  and  Franklin  Sts.,  Oakland 


14 


PACIFIC    (^  O  A  S  T    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


DR.    LUDWIG    WULLNER'S    UNIQUE    ART. 


By  Henry  T.  Finck  in  the  New  York  Evening  Post. 
(Reprinted  by  Request.) 

Dr.  Liulwig  WuUner,  the  sensation  of  the  last  musical  sea- 
son throughout  the  country,  has  made  classical  German  songs 
"catch  on"  like  musical  comedy  "hits."  He  affected  audiences 
like  a  religious  revivalist,  like  an  orator  at  a  fervent  political 
meeting.  He  got  as  much  applause  as  Caruso,  though  he  is 
very  far  from  having  a  Caruso  voice.  He  came  to  give  a 
score  of  concerts  and  gave  four  score.  He  proved  that  con- 
certs can  be  made  to  pay  after  all,  and  that,  too,  without  the 
slightest  concession  to  those  who  like  the  vulgar  and  trivial 
music.  Luckily,  he  is  coming  again  next  season,  and  there 
can  be  no  doubt  that  his  success  will  continue  to  grow  here, 
as  it  does  in  European  countries.  We  are  so  fortunate  as  to 
be  able  to  offer  our  readers  the  following  autobiogra])hic 
sketch  of  his  career,  not  before  printed: 

"As  a  matter  of  course  I  sang  from  my  earliest  childhood. 
As  a  boy  I  had  a  high  soprano  voice  of  agreeable  quality,  and 
often — especially  when  I  was  alone  out  in  the  open — I  indulged 
in  the  most  extraordinary  warblings  and  improvisations.  When 
my  voice  changed,  I  continued,  I  regret  to  say,  in  spite  of  all 
protests,  to  sing;  I  forced  my  tones  as  long  as  I  could,  till 
hoarseness  set  in,  and  thus  I  spoiled  my  voice  for  years.  When 
I  was  instructor  at  the  University  of  Munster  (1884-1887),  I 
sang  a  great  deal  privately  and  also  at  concerts,  but  of  course 
only  to  please  myself  and  others,  or  to  give  vent  to  my  feel- 
ings. Then  when  I  became  a  musician  (1887-1889)  I  also 
studied  singing,  but  my  instructor  at  that  time  did  not  suc- 
ceed in  teaching  me  over-much  about  tone  emission,  nor  did 
I  yet  enter  what  subsequently  became  my  proper  domain:  the 
German  'lied.' 

"To  that  I  began  to  devote  myself  during  the  time  I  was  an 
actor  at  Meiningen  (1889-1895).  At  that  time  Fritz  Steinbach 
was  conductor  of  the  Meiningen  Orchestra,  and  Brahms  used 
to  go  there  frequently  as  friend  and  guest  of  the  Duke  of  Mein- 
ingen. Whenever  that  happened  I  was  at  once  excused  from 
all  theatrical  rehearsals  and  performances  and  asked  to  appear 
at  the  castle.  I  sang  only  songs  at  that  period,  and  Brahms 
took  great  pleasure  in  what  I  did,  which  made  me  feel  proud 
and  happy.  Brahms  called  my  attention  to  many  neglected 
but  precious  Schubert  songs,  and  now  and  then  1  was  per- 
mitted to  sing  some  "lieder"  of  his  own  that  was  off  the  beaten 
path  and  which  no  one  else  had  ever  sung  for  him.  Above 
all  things,  Brahms  never  wearied  of  having  me  sing  the  'Ger- 
man Folksongs'  edited  by  him. 

"Encouraged  by  all  these  experiences,  I  gave,  early  in  Oc- 
tober, 189.") — when  I  was  still  an  actor  at  Meiningen — my  first 
song  recitals  in  Berlin,  and  these  made  such  an  impression, 
stirred  up  so  much  feeling  for  and  against  me,  that  I  left 
Meiningen  a  few  months  later  and  once  more  changed  my 
vocation  by  becoming  a  professional  'lieder'  singer.  I  said 
to  myself:  'Of  good  German  actors  there  are  plenty,  but  in 
the  realm  of  song  interpretation  you  have  brought  something 
new  which  heretofore  has  not  existed — at  any  rate,  not  in 
the  same  degree.  Here  your  strength  will  perhaps  be  more 
needed  than  on  the  stage.' 

''I  may  well  say  that  the  effect  I  created  was  a  surprise  to 
myself;  I  had  not  suspected  that  so  much  that  was  new  could 
be  done  in  this  direction.  It  so  happened  that  I  had  never 
heard  any  of  the  older  great  'lieder'  singers,  such  as  Julius 
Stoekhausen,  Eugen  Guj'a;  only  Georg  Henschel  I  had  heard 
once,  as  a  boy;  I  therefore  fancied  that  all  these  vocalists 
rendered  songs  in  my  manner,  or  similarly.  What  is  this 
manner?     Let  me  try  to  explain. 

"I  cannot  regard  the  'lied'  from  a  merely  musical  point  of 
view;  it  means  more  to  me  than  an  aria,  a  purely  vocal 
piece.  A  'lied'  must  always  seem  like  the  expression  of  a 
profound,  soulful,  personal  feeling  (die  Areusserung  einer 
tiefen  seelischen  Selbstbefreiungl.  The  hearer  must  get  the 
impression  that  the  person  who  sings  this  or  that  song  at 
this  special  moment  sings  it  not  because  he  wants  to  do  so 
or  wishes  to  please  others,  but  because  he  'must,'  because  he 
cannot  do  otherwise,  but  must  express  himself,  must  give 
vent  to  his  feelings.  That  alone  is  to  me  true  lyric  art. 
Thus  the  mood  (often  also  the  content)  of  every  song  be- 
comes associated  with  some  actual  occurrence  in  the  singer's 
own  life.  In  this  way  the  'lied'  becomes  an  improvisation; 
it  is,  as  it  were,  born  anew  each  time  from  within — that  is 
what  I  try  to  do.  It  is  self-evident  that  in  this  procedure  the 
tonal  musical  form  must  not  be  in  the  least  neglected — for 
the  form  is  here  often  the  soul! 

"This  is  the  manner  in  which  I  have  been  endeavoring 
these  last  thirteen  or  fourteen  years  to  sing  German  lieder. 
At  the  bginning,  I  admit,  I  not  seldom  broke  the  form,  which 
I  realized  later.     But  perhaps  that  also  had  to  be  as  it  was. 


To  this  day  some  of  my  ojiponents  lind  my  method  of  utter- 
ance 'tlieatrical,'  nay,  even  'decadent' — I  cannot  judge  that,  of 
course.  At  any  rate,  I  had  not  in  the  first  years  gained  such 
control  of  vocal  technique  as  I  have  now.  I  aimed  only  at 
expression,  regardless  of  lone,  and  thus  there  was  some  basis 
to  the  report  that  I  was  'a  singer  without  a  voice' — one  who 
'declaims  and  speaks'  rather  than  sings.  This  label  will 
probably  always  cling  to  me  more  or  less.  But  I  must  say 
that  I  have  subjected  the  tone,  too,  from  year  to  year  to  a 
more  and  more  severe  criticism,  and  have  labored  indus- 
triously to  acquire  technical  facility  in  tone  emission.  I 
have  endeavored  to  have  and  to  develop  whatever  of  tonal 
quality  was  to  be  got  out  of  my  no  longer  young  and  often 
abused  throat;  and  while  I  know,  of  course,  that  in  my  case 
tonal  charm  can  never  be  the  main  thing,  I  nevertheless 
hope,  despite  my  age,  to  make  some  little  progress  in  this 
direction,  above  all  in  the  art  of  saturating  the  consonants 
with  a  musical  quality  without  interfering  in  the  least  with 
distinctness  of  enunciation.  Mood,  expression,  inwardness — 
all  those  things  come  to  me  spontaneously;  they  are  gifts  for 
which  I  can  never  be  sufficiently  grateful  to  fate;  it  is  only 
on  the  side  of  tone  emission  that  I  need  to  work,  and  my 
endeavor  is  to  make  the  tone  quality,  if  not  more  beautiful, 
at  any  rate  more  capable  of  variation  and  richer  in  color." 
So  far  Dr.  Wullner. 

Edward  MacDowell,  in  speaking  of  his  fourth  sonata, 
wrote;  "I  have  made  use  of  all  the  suggestions  of  tone- 
painting  in  my  power — just  as  the  bard  would  have  rein- 
forced his  speech  with  gesture  and  facial  expression."  Dr. 
Wullner,  too,  like  the  ancient  bards  who  swayed  the  hearts 
of  the  people,  makes  some  use  of  gesture  and  facial  expres- 
sion, but  never  to  excess.  What  impresses  one  most  in  look- 
ing at  him  is  an  expression  of  absence — he  is  like  one  in  a 
trance,  with  eyes  closed,  his  individuality  merged  in  the  story 
of  the  song.  He  is  the  medium  through  whom  the  poet  and 
the  composer  speak  to  the  audience. 


SATURDAY    CLUB    PROSPECTUS— 1909-10. 

We  arc  in  receipt  of  the  prospectus  for  1909-10  published 
by  the  Saturday  Club  of  Sacramento.  It  is  a  pamphlet  of 
which  officers  and  members  may  well  be  proud,  as  it  presents 
an  establishment  of  musical  taste  in  a  community  which  with- 
out the  Saturday  Club  would  hardly  lay  claim  to  musical 
importance.  The  officers  at  present  presiding  over  the 
destinies  of  this  excellent  organization  are:  Mrs.  J.  A. 
Moynihan,  President:  Mrs.  Louise  Gavigan,  First  Vice-Presi- 
dent; Mrs.  T.  Frankland,  Second  Vice-President;  Mrs.  Fran- 
ces Moeller,  Secretary;  Miss  Frances  Connelly,  Treasurer; 
Executive  Committee — Mrs.  Egbert  A.  Brown,  Miss  Zuelettia 
Geery,  Mrs.  Rosa  Geiser,  Mrs.  J.  William  James,  Miss  Lillian 
Nelson,  Mrs.  Eugene  H.  Pitts  and  Mrs.  W.  H.  Porterfield : 
Mrs.  Albert   Elkus,   Honorary   President. 

The  total  membership,  beginning  with  season  May  1,  1908. 
was  1,081.  Gain  in  membership  during  season  1908-09  was 
22.  The  total  membership  of  the  season  1908-09  was  1,103. 
There  are  fifteen  artists'  days  and  ten  home  days.  The  total 
average  attendance  per  meeting  was  721.  There  were  8,240 
separate  communications  forwarded  by  mail.  The  receipts 
during  the  season  1908-09  were  $7,285.38.  The  disbursements 
are  .$6,902.54,  of  which  $3,791.00  were  spent  for  artists.  The 
hall  fund  is  now  $1,298.25. 

The  programs  announced  for  1909-10  are:  Oct.  9th,  Cello 
Recital.  Alhert  Rosenthal;  Oct.  23d,  Miscellaneous,  Class  A; 
Nov.  6th,  Miscellaneous,  Class  B;  Nov.  20th,  Miscellaneous, 
Class  C;  Dec.  4th,  Song  Recital,  Harry  Clifford  Lott;  Dec. 
18th,  Boys'  Day;  Jan.  8th,  Faust  Legend  in  Music,  Class  D; 
Jan.  22,  Song  Recital,  Golden  Gate  Quartet — Frank  Onslow, 
Carl  Anderson,  John  De  P.  Teller  and  Henry  L.  Perry;  Feb. 
5,  American  Composers,  Class  A,  including  a  Melodrame, 
"The  Lady  of  Shalott"  (Tennyson),  by  Albert  I.  Elkus,  Miss 
Alice  Colman  and  Mr.  Elkus;  Feb.  19,  Sir  Michael  Costa, 
Frederich  Wm.  Kucken,  Felician  David,  Ferdinand  David. 
Frederic  Chopin,  1810-1910,  Class  B;  Mar.  5,  Folksongs  of 
Nations,  Mme.  Olga  Burgtorf;  Mar.  19,  Student  Members'  Re- 
cital; Apr.  2,  Miscellaneous,  Class  C;  Apr.  16,  Schumann, 
Class   D. 

The  programs  for  the  evening  recitals  during  the  season 
1909-10  will  be:  Oct.  14,  Song  Recital,  Wilhelm  Heinrich; 
Nov.,  Song  Recital.  Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner;  Jan.,  Violin  Recital, 
Antonio  De  Grassi;  Feb.,  Song  Recital,  Horatio  Connell; 
March,  Song  Recital,  Tilly  Koenen;   April,  Flonzaley  Quartet. 


Among  the  twelve  private  pupils  which  Sevcik  is  accept- 
ing in  Vienna  this  season  is  one  of  J.  Bond  Francisco's  in 
Los  Angeles.  This  is  certainly  a  compliment  to  this  efficient 
instructor  on  the  violin. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


15 


W  ll_il_il  AiVl      f  •     iLILv^ri)      musical  director 

The  Zcch  Orchestra  Rehearsei  Evcr>-  Monday  Evening 

1332  Geary  Street  Phone  West  1603 


California  Conservatory  of  Music 

incorporated  September.  1907 
Now  occupies  its  magnificent   new   building  on 

147  Presidio  Avenue 

Between  Washington  and  Jadcson  Streets,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 
(JacLson-Suner  St.  car  terminal  in  front  of  buijding} 


Largest  Institution  West  of  Chicago 

DIRECTOR  ; 

HERMANN    GENSS 

General  Manager:  DR.    ERNEST  HORSTMANN 


The  faculty 


dudes  such  artists  as : 

MADAME  EILEEN  O'MOORE 

HANS  KONIG, 

WALLACE  A.  SABIN. 

G.  JOLLAIN, 

LOUIS  NEWBAUER, 

HENRY  B.  BAERMAN, 

MRS.  M.  O'BRIEN, 

MISS  SETA  STEWART 

MISS  CH.ARLOT  HOPPERSTEAD 

MISS  FLORENCE  GUPPY,   and   others. 


Departments  for  Beginners,  Amateurs  and  Professionals 


Pupils  received  at  all  times. 
SEND    FOR    CAT.ALOGUE 


CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC  of  the 
UNIVERSITY  OF  THE  PACIFIC 

PIERRE  TtOUILLET,  "Dean.     SAN  JOSE.  CAL. 
The  oldest   Institution  on  the  Coast — complete   Musical  Education — Advan- 
tages of  literary  studies  free  o(  charge.     Board  and  room    at    moderate   prices 
Send  for  Catalogue. 

Notre  Dame  Conservatory  of  Music 

BOARDING  SCHOOL  FOR  GIRLS 


San    Jose 


Cal  If  orn  la 


N?m  ©rphntrn 


OTARRELL  STREET 
Between  Stockton  and  Pom 
Phone  Douglas  70 


Satesi  and  Most  Magnificent  Theatre  in  America. 
Week  Beginning  This  Sunday  Afternoon— MATINEE  EVERY  DAY 

ARTISTIC  VAUDEVILLE 

"Our  Boys  in  Blue":  Lulu  :\IcConne!l  and  Grant  Simp- 
son; Tempest  and  Sunshine  Trio;  Bobby  Paiidor  and 
Brother;  Last  Week — Minnie  Seligman  and  William  Bram- 
well  in  "The  Drums  of  Doom";  The  Bounding  Gordons; 
Bootblaek  Quartet;  New  Orpheum  Motion  Pictures.  Last 
Week — Charles  the  First,  the  Marvelous  Xearly  Human 
Chimpanzee,  who  does  everything  but  talk.  Introduced 
by  Charles  .ludge. 

Evening  Price*:     lOc.  25c,  50c  and  75c.     Box  Seats  $1.00 
Matinee  Prices:     (Except  Sundays  and  Holidays)  lOc,  25c,  50c. 


Mrs.  Oscar  Mansfeldt 


Has  Removed  to  2016  Buchanan  St.,  Bet.  Pine  and  California 
TELEPHONE  WEST  314 

MACKENZIE  GORDON 

TENOR 

TpflPhpP    nf    ^Innlnn     1"  all  in  branches  from  the  rudiments  of  tone  fi 
I  CdLIICI     Ul    Olliyiliy     ,h^  ^j^ea    finish    and  Comp/e/ion  of  Publ. 

OFIATORIO— OPERA— CONCERT 


Studio:  2832   Jackson  St. 


Telephone:  West  457 


JOSEPH  GREVEN 

Voice  Culture  for  Singing  and  Speaking 
Concert.  Oratorio  and  Opera  Repertoire 

Complete  Preparation  for  the  Operatic  Stage 

824  Eddy  St.,  near  Van  Ness.  Telephone  Franklin  3671 

BASSO 
CANTANTE 

VOICE  CULTURE  AND  OPERATIC  TRAINING 

Perfetfl  Tone  Placing  Italian  School 

Studio — 799  Van  Ness  Ave.,  between  Turk  and  Eddy  Sts. 

Take  Eddy  or  Turk  St.  Cars.  Telephone  Franklin  3432 


Joaquin  S.  Wanrell 


ADOLF  GREGORY 

Organist  and  Choir  Director  St.  Mary's,  Oakland 
Director  Oakland  Conservatory  of  Music 
VOICE  PRODUCTION,  PIANO,  HARMONY  AND  COMPOSITION. 

203-205  Twelfth  St.  Cor.  Jackson,  OAKLAND 

Von  Meyerinck  School  of  Music 

ESTABLISHED  1895 
UNDER  THE  DIRECTION  OF  MRS.  ANNA  VON  MEYERINCK 

Qasses  in  French.  German.  Musical  History  and  Sight  Reading  in  progress.     Practice 
lessons  with  specially  coached  accompanists  may  be  arranged  for — also  by  non-students 

oftheschool.    Studio,   818   Grove    St  ,  near  Fillmore.    Tel.  Park  1 069. 

In  Berkeley   Tuesday.  2521  Regent  St.       Tel.    Berkeley    3677.     Thursday  .1  Snell 
Seminary. 

MISS  ELIZABETH  WESTGATE 

Piano,   Organ,  Theory 


Organist  and  Musical  Director  Fir 

Suite:  52  Macdonough  Bldg..  Oakland 

Telephone  / 


t  Presbyterian  Church.  Alameda 

Home  Studio,  1117  Paru  St.  Alameda 


T\\a  IKt^rmaixv  CONSERVATORY  OF  MUSIC. 

1  lie      LICI  IllgCI  Established  1896 

Under  the  direction  of  Prof,  and  Mme.  JOSEPH  BERINGER.  Complete 
Musical  Education — Piano.  Theory,  and  Composition;  Voice  (Italian  Method), 
Opera,  Concert,  Oratorio.  Free  advantages  to  students:  Harmony  Lectures, 
Concerts,  Ensemble  playing,  Sight  reading.  Faculty  of  distinguished  Instructors. 
Send  for  catalogue.     926  Pierce  street,  near  McAllister,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

FREID   R.  J.   RAU 

Pacific  Coast  Agent  for 

HAWKES  &  SON 

London,  England 

High-Gracie    Band   Instruments 

Bargains  in  Second-Hand  Instruments 
170  PAGE  ST.,  SAN  FRANCISCO  Phone  Market  5513 


San  Francisco  Conservatory  of  Music 


C  S.  BONELLI,  Director 


PIERCE  and  CALIFORNIA  STS. 


This  institution  graduates  more  competent  and  successful  teachers  than  any  other  institution  of  its  kind    on  the  Pacific 
Coast.     Special  course  for  those  desiring  to  enter  the  professional  field.     FACULTY  OF  EFFICIENT  INSTRUCTORS. 


16 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


RICHARD   FERBER,   COMPOSER. 


As  evidence  that  there  are  residing  in  our  midst  musicians 
of  national  and  international  reputation  may  be  cited 
such  men  as  Richard  Ferber,  who  has  lived  here  for  more 
than  two  years  without  the  large  majority  of  our  musical 
cult  being  aware  of  his  importance.  Mr.  Ferber,  previous  to 
his  sojourn  on  the  Pacific  Coast,  was  organist  of  the  St. 
Patrick's  Church  in  Eau  Claire.  Wis.,  but  a  too  strenuous 
abandonment  to  his  duties  resulted  in  paralizing  one  or  two 
fingers  of  his  right  hand,  thus  forcing  him  to  abandon  organ 
playing  and  resume  teaching  of  piano,  harmony  and  com- 
position. 

But  Mr.  Ferber's  importance  as  a  musician  is  not  so  much 
the  result  of  his  virtuosity  or  pedagogic  supremacy  as  it  is 
his  standing  as  a  composer  among  leading  authorities.  He 
studied  in  Stuttgart  and  Geneva,  in  which  latter  place  he  had 
the  privilege  to  be  befriended  by  and  play  piano  with  Rubin- 
stein. He  also  had  the  good  fortune  to  study  orchestration 
with  Berlioz.  Theodor  Presser,  the  well-known  Philadelphia 
publisher,  has  published  most  of  Mr.  Ferber's  works,  and 
many  of  his  compositions  are  known  to  pianists  and  vocalists. 
His  overture,  Gloriana  is  frequently  played  by  Damrosch  with 
his  New  York  Symphony  Orchestra.  Here  Is  a  list  of  Mr. 
Ferber's  best  known  compositions  published  during  the  last 
few  years: 

Piano — Impromptu,  A  .lolly  Sleigh  Ride,  Gipsy  Queen, 
Dance  of  the  Sirens,  Album  Melodies,  (Fifty  instructive 
Pieces),  The  Boston  Templar,  Hungarian  Life,  Little  Lovers, 
On  the  Rio  Grande,  Humming  Birds,  Lotus  Flowers,  (eight 
romantic  pieces),  La  Charmeause,  Laughing  Rillet,  Rondo 
Capriccioso. 

Vocal — My  Love's  Dear  Eyes,  I  Thought,  Love  Reaches  Up 
to  Heaven,  O  Lullaby,  My  Baby,  I  Love  You,  Dear,  Shepherd's 
Lullaby,  Two  Lilies,  We  Said  Good-Bye,  Your  Voice,  My 
Heart's   Secret,  Ave   Maria. 

Orchestra — Gloriana,  Overture;  From  Childhood  Days,  Ov- 
erture; Thou  Lovely  Maid,  Overture;  Pride  of  the  West, 
Overture;  Boston  Templar  March,  Elk's  Carnival  March,  The 
Dictator  March,   Li   Hung  Chang  March. 

Chorus  with  Solis  and  Organ — Missa  Brevis,  published  by 
1.  Fisher  Bros.,  New  York. 

Of  his  latest  work,  "New  Songs  Without  Words,"  Theodor 
Presser  said  in  the  Etude  of  January,  1908:  This  is  posi- 
tively the  last  month  in  which  this  unique  volume  may  be 
purchased  at  a  nominal  rate.  There  are  very  few  works  in 
which  we  have  had  so  much  interest  as  in  this  one.  Every 
number  of  this  volume  is  a  creation,  and  we  feel  that  in 
many  respects  the  author  has  surpassed  Mendelssohn,  al- 
though the  pieces  are,  in  their  nature,  intended  to  be  prep- 
aratory to  Mendelssohn's  Songs  Without  Words.  There  have 
been  In  the  past  a  number  of  these  printed  in  The  Etude, 
which  have  met  with  very  great  success,  and  no  doubt  the 
volume  itself  will  become  standard.  It  is  one  of  those  vol- 
umes of  modern  lyrics  that  the  progressive  teacher  loves  to 
place  in  the  hands  of  a  pupil.  No  pupil  can  pass  through 
the  study  of  a  volume  of  this  kind  without  its  leaving  its  im- 
press of  taste  and  refinement  on  the  player.  This  is  the  pur- 
pose of  all  good  music.  We  should  be  very  glad  to  see  a 
very  wide  circulation  of  this  volume. 

Emil  Liebling.  the  well  known  Chicago  pianist,  said  of  Mr. 
Ferber's  compositions:  "I  have  seen  quite  a  number  of  your 
works.  They  evince  fine  creative  talent  and  thorough  musi- 
cianship." Mr.  Ferber  received  first  prize  in  a  composition 
contest  of  Con.  Krez's  beautiful  poem,  "Au  mein  Vaterland" 
(To  My  Fatherland).  The  judges  were  Theodor  Thomas  and 
Hans  Balatka. 


MUSIC    IN    GOLDFIELD. 


Mrs.  Leonore  Gordon  Harrison  gave  a  concert  in  Goldfleld 
recently  which  proved  quite  a  vocal  triumph.  One  of  the 
papers  had  this  to  say  of  the  event: 

With  the  largest  advance  sale  for  the  season,  the  Harrison 
concert  at  the  Lyric  last  evening  promised  to  be  the  biggest 
financial  success  In  the  history  of  this  popular  playhouse. 
The  continual  downpour  of  rain,  however,  was  responsible 
for  a  small  attendance,  $100  worth  of  tickets  having  been 
cancelled  between  6  and  S  o'clock. 

Mrs.  Leonore  Gordon  Harrison,  the  soprano  soloist,  capti- 
vated the  audience.  Her  repertoire  showed  splendid  selec- 
tion, and  the  rendition  of  her  every  number  was  in  keeping 
with  the  high  standard  of  excellence  for  which  she  is  noted. 
Mrs.  Harrison  was  in  good  voice  and  sang  easily.  Goldfleld 
is  indeed  fortunate  in  the  possession  of  such  a  talented  and 
pleasing  vocal  star. 

Mr.  Earle  R.  Clemens,  the  "desert  tenor."  made  his  first 
appearance   before   a   Goldfleld   audience.       He   was   given   a 


royal  ovation  and  won  merited  applause,  responding  with  two 
encores,  and  the  audience  calling  for  more.  His  voice  is  un- 
usually strong  and  of  exceptional  brilliance  in  the  high  reg- 
ister, and  his  interpretations  are  pleasing  and  forceful.  Mr. 
Milton  C.  Ish  proved  himself  an  artist  with  the  violin,  respond- 
ing to  generous  encores.  Miss  Ethel  Murphy,  accompanist, 
handled  her  part  of  the  program  with  her  usual  dignity  and 
grace.  In  the  rendition  of  "Inflammatus,"  from  Rossini, 
"Stabat  Mater,"  Mrs.  Harrison  won  a  storm  of  applause,  and 
was  well  supported  by  a  chorus,  comprising  Miss  Ruby  Eu- 
band  and  Mrs.  Milton  C.  Ish,  sopranos;  Miss  Irene  Raush, 
Miss  Pearl  Raush,  Miss  .1.  S.  Post  and  Miss  Mabel  Harrison, 
contraltos;  E.  R.  Clemens,  George  N.  Wills  and  Roy  Stack- 
pole,  tenors;  Milton  C.  Ish,  R.  H.  Downer  and  Frank  Harri- 
son, bassos.  The  chorus  sang.  "Sweet  and  Low"  as  an  en- 
core. The  entire  program  will  be  repeated  tonight  at  the 
Lyric,  commencing  at  8  o'clock,  which  will  allow  sufficient 
time  to  visit  other  social  functions  this  evening  after  the 
concert  is  over.  Many  sa,y  that  this  is  the  best  concert  ever 
given  in  Goldfleld.     The  entire  program  was  a  hit. 


TO  ACQUIRE  BIG  ORGAN. 


Conservatory  of  Music  of  the  University  of  the  Pacific  In  San 

Jose  To  Have   Larger  Organ  Than   Any  Conservatory 

of  Music  West  of  Chicago. 


The  great  and  growing  need  of  well-trained  organists  for 
the  churches  of  our  country,  and  the  confessedly  inadequate 
means  for  competent  instruction  justify  the  effort  of  the  Con- 
servatory of  Music  of  the  University  of  the  Pacific  in  San 
Jose  to  provide  the  facilities  necessary  to  enable  music  stu- 
dents to  prepare  themselves  fully  for  the  responsible  work 
to  which  a  church  or  concert  organist  is  called. 

A  contract  between  the  University  of  the  Pacific  and  a  San 
Francisco  Music  Co.  has  been  closed  for  an  order  of  a  large 
and  exceptionally  fine  organ  of  three  manuals  and  pedals  with 
all  modern  mechanical  attachments  and  combinations,  and 
run  by  electricity,  from  an  organ  factory  in  Chicago,  and 
will  be  installed  in  the  large  and  handsome  auditorium  of  the 
university  about  next  May.  This  organ  will  be  larger  than 
any  one  possessed  by  any  Conservatory  of  Music  west  of 
Chicago. 

The  plan  of  instruction  will  provide  for  a  thorough  tech- 
nical training  in  all  that  pertains  to  a  mastery  of  the  organ 
music  for  churches,  solo  concert  work,  the  art  of  accompani- 
ment and  improvisation.  The  course  of  study  will  be  also 
especially  arranged  to  give  a  knowledge  of  different  denom- 
inational church  services  and  schools  of  organ  music  as  rep- 
resented by  the  best  composers  in  each. 

The  organ  students  will  have  advantages  in  the  other 
musical  branches  of  study,  which  the  conservatory  offers, 
such  as  studies  of  harmony,  counterpoint,  composition,  sol- 
feggio, choir  training,  etc.  Also  in  literary  studies  of  the 
college  of  liberal  arts  of  the  University  of  the  Pacific  if  de- 
sired. 


The  pupils  of  Miss  Delia  E.  Griswold  gave  their  second 
recital  at  Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.  Assembly  Hall  last  Wednes- 
day afternoon.  The  following  program  was  delightfully 
presented:  Bellenghi — Profumo  Oriental,  William  Dodd 
(Serenade) — 'Awake  Beloved!"  Mrs.  Stanton;  Old  Irish — 
Kitty  Tyrrell,  Albert  Mildenberg — The  Violet.  Mrs.  Hilde- 
brecht;  Puccini  ("La  Boheme") — Waltz  Song,  Canton  Sorren- 
tino — "Carmela,"  Miss  Fitzgibbon;  Brahms — "Saphische 
Ode."  Spanish  Song  (Selected) — Lullaby,  Mrs.  Alvarez; 
Trios:  Mozart — Lullaby,  Eduardo  Marzo — Starry  Night.  Miss 
Fitzgibbon,  Mrs.  Stanton,  Miss  Griswold:  Thomas  (Aria 
"Mignon" — Je  suis  Titania,  Miss  Fitzgibbon;  Duets:  Reinecke 
— "O  Beautiful  Violet,"  Rossini  (Opera  "Semiramide") — "AUe 
piu  calde  immagini,"   Miss  Fitzgibbon,   Miss  Griswold. 


There  is  nothing  that  the  French  so  dearly  love  as  a  sym- 
posium to  determine  which  is  really  their  most  popular  singer 
actor.  A  late  one  brought  forth  the  fact  that  of  thirty-two 
lyric  sopranos  the  most  popular  was  Selma  Kurz,  who  got 
14,846  votes,  as  agains  8,979  for  Lina  Cavalieri.  Mme.  Calve, 
who  probably  never  suspected  before  that  she  was  a  dramatic 
soprano,  got  14,476,  as  against  14,933  for  Lucienue  Breval.  M. 
Muratore  got  15,045  votes  as  the  most  popular  tenor,  against 
a  paltry  7.875  for  a  certain  Italian  named  Caruso. — New  York 

Sun. 

*       *       * 

The  publishing  house  of  Arthur  Furstner  in  Berlin  is  now 
printing  Richard  Strauss'  first  music  drama  "Guntram"  and 
also  Arthur  Nevin's  opera  "Poia." 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 


17 


The  Most  Beautiful  Piano 
Store  in  America 

Above  is  shown  a  photo  eugraviug  of  oui'  big  new  store.  It  is  conteded  by  the  whole  music  world 
to  be  the  best,  and  the  most  perfectly  appointed  home  of  any  house  in  the  world.  The  picture  shows 
but  a  part  of  our  main  door  and  a  portion  only  of  the  great  stock  of  more  than  fifty  grand  pianos — a 
stock  live  times  larger  than  is  carried  by  any  otlier  house  on  the  Coast.  Just  at  this  time  about  five 
hundred  pianos  of  leading  makes  are  shown ;  a  disi)lay  which  is  worth  your  time  to  see. 

Twenty  specially  built  rooms  are  occupied  by  our  great  stock,  making  the  opportunity  for  compari- 
son better  than  is  offered  at  any  other  store,  while  in  price  and  finish  every  individual  purse  and  taste 
may  be  satisfied. 

Our  new  talking  machine  department  on  the  Sutter  street  side  surpasses  in  point  of  location,  airi- 
ness, convenience,  comfort,  and  especially  in  the  magnitude  of  its  stock,  and  the  courteous  service 
offered,  any  similar  department  in  the  West.  All  the  finest  in  Talking  Machines,  and  all  the  latest 
records  all  the  time  is  the  motto,  and  it's  lived  up  to. 

The  Wiley  B.  Allen  Co. 

Wiley  B.  Allen  Building,  135-153  Kearney  and  217-225  Sutter  Streets. 

Oakland:  510  Twelfth  and  1105  Washington. 

Other  Stores — Los  Angeles,  Sacramento,  San  Jose,  San  Diego,  Stockton,  Phoenix,  Ariz.,  Reno,  Nev., 
Portland,  Ore. 


IS 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


Los  Angeles  and  Southern  California 

Office,   1419  South  Grand  Avenue 

Broadway  3923 — Telephones — Home  B372I 

HEINRICH  VON  STEIN,  in  chars.:. 

Please  address  all  communicalions  regarding  this  deparlmenl  to  the   Los  Angeles  office. 


Single  copies  of  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review  can  be 
had  at  the  Wiley  B.  Allen  Co.,  Broadway,  between  Fourth  and 
Fifth   streets,    Los   Angeles. 


FERRIS    HARTMAN    PACKS    THE    HOUSES. 


BY   HEINRICH   VON   STEIN. 

Los  Angeles  is  loyal  to  her  favorites,  and  since  Ferris 
Hartmna  became  a  favorite  tiirough  his  splendid  comic  opera 
performances  last  season,  it  was  to  be  expected  that  full 
houses  would  greet  him  upon  his  return  to  this  city,  which 
took  place  two  weeks  ago.  He  returned  to  us  with  a  com- 
pany strengthened  in  every  respect,  with  a  splendid  reper- 
toire and  a  better  orchestra.  Little  wonder,  then,  that  on 
five  nights  during  last  week  the  sold-out  sign  adorned  the 
front  of  the  box  office,  and  just  as  your  representative  was 
talking  to  Mr.  Kavanagh,  the  energetic  manager  of  the  Hart- 
man  company,  a  messtjiger  boy  arrived  with  a  telegram  from 
Santa  Paula,  which  ordered  five  box  seats  reserved  for  the 
following  night.  As  to  the  performance  itself,  which  on  this 
occasion  was  George  Ade's  "Sultan  of  Sulu,"  Ferris  Hartman, 
as  well  as  his  company,  were  at  their  very  best.  For  the 
following  week,  "The  Blue  Moon,"  has  been  selected  as  the 
attraction.  Mr.  Hartman  is  much  enthused  over  Los  Angeles 
and  tells  me  that  he  is  here  to  stay,  that  he  intends  to  build 
his  own  theatre  (it  is  badly  needed,  by  the  way),  that  he  does 
not  know  how  soon  he  will  have  the  new  theatre,  but  that  he 
will  surely  have  it  sooner  or  later. 

To  the  Fitzgerald  Music  Company  this  city  is  indebted  for 
a  week's  engagement  of  Sousa  and  his  band.  Sousa,  being 
a  national  character,  always  draws  well,  and  I  doubt  very 
much  if  the  phenomenal  attendance  during  this  last  engage- 
ment could  have  been  possible  without  the  magnificent 
proganda  made  on  behalf  of  this  matchless  musical  organiza- 
tion by  Mr.  J.  T.  Fitzgerald.  This  little  instance  once  more 
proves  that  musicians  and  musical  organizations  are  entirely 
mistaken  if  they  look  upon  liberal  advertising  as  something 
undignified. 

Mrs.  Estelle  Heartt  Dreyfuss,  contralto;  Jay  Plowe,  flutist; 
Mary  L.  O'Donoghue  and  Mrs.  Horace  Camdee,  accompanists, 
and  Anne  Kavanaugh,  elocutionist,  gave  an  Evening  of 
Music,  Stories  and  Song  at  the  Wilcox  Auditorium,  Los  An- 
geles, on  Thursday  evening,  October  21.  The  event  was  a 
most  successful  one  and  the  following  program  delighted  the 
critical  audience  in  attendance:  Chanson  D'Amour  (Doppler); 
Tales  of  Manhattan;  (a)  Far,  Far  Across  the  Desert,  (b)  If 
in  the  Great  Bazaars,  (c)  How  Many  a  Caravan;  Breezes 
from  the  West;  (a)  Nocturne  (Francois),  (b)  Serenade 
Bodine  (Gaboni-Marie) ;  Italian  Mosaics;  (a)  La  Zingerella 
(Paisilello),  (b)  L'Esclave  (Lalo),  (c)  Dodo  (Pyrenees  Folk 
Song),  (d)  Daisies  (Manny);   Echoes  from  Halstead  Street. 

The  Dominant  Club  elected  the  following  officers  for  the 
ensuing  year:  President,  Miss  Mary  L.  O'Donoughue;  vice- 
president,  Mrs.  Ada  Marsh  Chick;  secretary.  Miss  Beresford 
Joy;  financial  secretary,  Mrs.  Maria  Thresher  Webb;  treasur- 
er. Miss  Clara  Boshyshell;  social  committee,  Mrs.  Edmund 
Shank;  membership  committee.  Miss  Jennie  Winston,  chair- 
man. Miss  Margaret  Goetz,  Mrs.  Harry  Clifford  Lott;  program 
committee,  Mrs.  W.  H.  Jamison,  chairman,  Mrs.  Gertrude  Par- 
sons, Mrs.  Bertha  Vaughn. 

An  orchestra  of  sixty  musicians  under  the  direction  of 
Harley  Hamilton  rendered  the  following  program  during  the 
Taft  banquet  on  Monday  evening  October  11th:  Introduction, 
"Polonaise  Militaire"  (Chopin) ;  "Grand  Festival  March  and 
Hymn  to  Liberty,"  introducing  national  hymn  (Hugo  Kaun) ; 
"Overture  to  Orpheus"  (Offenbach);  "Pecheur  Napolitain  et 
Napolitaine"  (Rubinstein);  "Fantasie  on  Favorite  Melodies" 
(Grieg);  "Introduction  to  Third  Act  of  Lohengrin"  (Wagner); 
Waltz,  "Wine,  Woman  and  Song"  (Strauss);  "Scarf  Dance" 
(Chaminade) ;  "Overture  to  Rienzi"  (Wagner). 
*       *       * 

P.  W.  Blanchard,  chairman  of  the  decoration  committee,  and 
L.  E.  Behymer,  member  of  the  reception  committee,  are  too 
well-known  members  of  the  Los  Angeles  musical  cult  who 
figured  prominently  during  President  Taft's  visit  in  Los 
Angeles.     Mr.   Blanchard   in   particular   was   the   recipient   of 


well    merited   praise    for   his   artistic   taste   displayed    in    the 
decorations  of  the  streets  as  well  as  the  banquet  hall. 

*  *       * 

Mrs.  Blanche  Rogers  Lott  says  in  the  Los  Angeles  Graphic 
of  October  16th:  It  is  not  often  that  a  fine  musician  and 
painter  of  acknowledged  high  rank  are  members  of  the  same 
family,  and  when  these  two  endowments  are  found  centered 
in  the  same  person,  it  is  more  than  unusual,  it  is  almost 
unheard  of.  Los  Angeles  has  a  violinist  who  is  also  a  painter. 
When  J.  Bond  Francisco  decided  to  devote  more  time  to  the 
brush  than  to  the  bow,  the  concert-going  public  suffered  a  dis- 
tinct loss.  However,  Mr.  Francisco  is  not  devoting  all  his 
time  to  painting,  even  though  he  has  not  appeared  in  concert 
for  some  time,  but  he  has  set  aside  a  certain  period  each 
week  for  teaching,  this  year  as  in  all  past  years.  Two  talent- 
ed pupils  of  Mr.  Francisco  went  to  Europe  last  spring,  Miss 
Bessie  Chapin,  who  is  studying  in  Vienna,  and  Pasquale  De 
Nubila,  who  decided  upon  Berlin.  Louis  Angelotty,  his  pupil, 
who  went  several  years  ago,  has  had  excellent  success  and 
has  never  returned. 

The  Ellis  Club  of  Los  Angeles,  will  give  its  first  concert  of 
the  season  on  Tuesday  evening  November  9th,  at  Simpson 
Auditorium.  Musical  director  J.  B.  Poulin  has  prepared  a 
particularly  artistic  program  for  this  occasion.  Mrs.  Mary 
Le  Grand  Reed,  soprano,  will  be  the  artist. 

*  *       * 

Miss  Ana  Miller  Wood  has  given  several  recitals  in  South- 
ern California  during  the  last  few  weeks.  She  met  with  well 
merited  success  in  every  instance.  Her  tour  is  under  the 
direction  of  L.  E.  Behrmer. 

*  *       * 

The  Los  Angeles  center  of  the  American  Music  Society  will 
give  its  first  concert  of  the  season  at  Simpson  Auditorium  on 
Thursday  evening,  December  2nd.  Those  who  have  consented 
to  participate  in  this  concert  are;  The  Woman's  Lyric  Club 
(J.  B.  Poulin,  director),  Edwin  House  and  Ernest  Douglass, 
organists;  Mrs.  Clara  Henley  Bussing,  soprano;  Miss  Alice 
Coleman,  pianist;  the  Dominant  Club  Woman's  Quartet,  and 
the  Lott-Krauss  trio. 

Miss  Blanche  Ruby,  soprano;  Roland  Paul,  tenor;  and  Miss 
Hariet  Johnson  pianist  gave  a  most  successful  concert  at 
Ebell  Auditorium  on  Friday  evening,  October  loth.  A  large 
audience  was  in  attendance  and  the  following  program  was 
enthusiastically  applauded:  Piano  (a)  Rubinstein,  Barcarolle 
in  A  minor;  (b)  Moszkowski,  Liebes  Waltzer,  Miss  Harriet 
Johnson.  Verdi,  Garden  Scene  (Rigoletto),  Gilda,  Miss 
Blanche  Ruby;  Duke  of  Mantua,  Mr.  Roland  Paul.  Verdi,  La 
Donna  e  Mobile  (Rigoletto),  Mr.  Paul;  Piano  (a)  Chopin.  Pre- 
lude, (b)  Chopin.  Ballade  in  G  minor.  Miss  Johnson;  Thomas 
Polonaise  (Mignon),  Miss  Ruby.  Leoncavallo,  Canio's  Scena 
(Pagliaccil,  Mr.  Paul.  Piano,  Laidow,  Valse  Badinage  (Music 
Box);  Godard,  En  Route,  Miss  Johnson;  Gounod,  Boudoir 
Scene  (Romeo  and  Juliet),  Juliet,  Miss  Ruby;  Romeo,  Mr. 
Paul. 

Manager  L.  E.  Behymer  will  open  his  Philharmonic  course 
at  the  Auditorium  on  Thursday,  Nevember  ISth.  with  Madame 
Jean  Jomelli.  On  Friday  afternoon.  November  19th,  Madame 
Jomelli  will  be  the  soloist  with  the  Los  Angeles  symphony 
orchestra. 

*  *       * 

Sousa  Band  gave  twelve  concerts  at  the  Temple  Auditorium 
in  Los  Angeles  during  the  week  beginning  Monday,  October 
25th. 

«       «       « 

Mrs.  Harry  Clifford  Lott,  pianiste,  aroused  much  enthusiasm 
with  her  excellent  artistic  performance  at  the  first  musical 
evening  of  the  Y.  M.  C.  A.  on  Monday  evening,  October  25th. 
Mrs.  Lott  was  ably  assisted  by  her  husband,  Harry  Clifford 
Lott,  baritone  and  Ralph  Giersberg,  the  brilliant  young  violin- 
ist and  pupil  of  Arnold  Krauss,  who  has  on  former  occasions 
evoked  well  merited  applause.  The  program  was  as  follows: 
Songs:  "Annie  Laurie"  (Lady  Douglass  Scott),  "The  Message" 
(Allitsen),  "Mirage"  (Liza  Lehmann),  "The  King  is  Dead" 
(Margaret  R.  Lang) ;  violin,  a  Romance,  b  Berceuse,  c  Mazur- 
ka (Mrs.  H.  H.  Beach);  pia  two  pieces.  Fugitive  (Clara 
Schumann),  Humoresque  (Atalhie  Riu  kor  Grondahl);  songs 
with  violin  obligato,  "Surles  Branches'  (d'Hardelot),  "Under 
the  Still  White  Stars"  (Helen  Hopekirk) ;  songs,  "The  King 
of  Denmark's  Ride"  (Mary  Carmichael),  "Fan  Fitzgerald" 
(Alicia  Needham). 

The  date  for  the  first  coutert  of  the  Municipal  Band  under 
the  direction  of  Harley  Hamilton,  took  place  at  Central  Park 
last  Thursday.  Nove-  ber  4th.  Concerts  will  take  place  twice 
a  week;  on  'i'uesdr  ys  and  Thursdays. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW 

Have  You  Heard  the  New  Victor 


19 


Arral 


RECORDS? 
"Bird  Waltz" 
"  Traviata" 
"Beggar  Student" 
"El  Bolero  Grande" 
Nightingale  Song  from 
Les  Noces  de  Jeanette" 


The  Great  Coloratura  Soprano 


llmtdiari  l^all  ^titiita  Iml^tu^ 

F.  W.  BLANCHARD,  Pres.  and  Mgr. 
Contains  200  Studios  Rented  Exclusively  to 

Musicians,  Artists  and  Scientists 

LOS  ANGELES.  CALIFORNIA 

Abraham   Miller  U^~ 

TEACHER  OF  VOICE  CULTURE  AND  SINGING 
Studio:     342-343  Blanchard  Hall  Building,  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Charles  Farwell  Edson 

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Studio  :    2020  Toberman  Street  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Telephone  23919 


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Historical  Song  Recitals,  Concerts  and  Musicales 

Tel.  Home  51485.     719  Ottowa  St.  near  lOth  and  Figueroa,  Los  Angeles.  Cal. 


Contralto 


Estelle  Heartt  Dreyf uss 

CONCERT- PURPOSE  PROGRAM  RECITALS-ORATORIO 
Studio:      Blanchard  Hall  Building  Los  Angeles.  Cal. 

Adolf  Willhartitz  I^^shfi^L_Pi£n2 

332  So.  Broadway  Lot  Angeles 

ARXOLD  KRAUSS      ''"'^"'  '°^°"'' 

-i-i-i-m.^-,  v^j_ji^     A».A».^i.  v/ K-^K./  ^^^    TEACHER 

Concert    Master    o(    the    Los    Angeles    Symphony    Orchestra 
941  AV.  18TII  ST..  LOS     AXGKLKS  I'ho"es  ^  1  SmiTet  ^^\«'-^-, 

HawliilT'     l-laiYlllfrxn     Conductor  Los  Angeles  Symphony 
IlallCy     I  larnillOIl    Orchestra— Womans  Orchestra 

VIOLIN  INSTRUCTOR 
320  Blanchard  Hall  Building.  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 

Charles  E.  Pemberton  ^'°"°  J^^fa-uctor 

Harmony  and    Counterpoint 

Studio:   306-307  Blanchard  Hall  Building  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


JR       P^iilin    TENOR— VOICE  CULTURE  and 
.    D.     I   OUlin  THE  ART  OF  SINGING 

Director:  Ellis  Club.  Temple  Baptist  Choir,  Woman's  Lyric  Club 
Studio:   318-319  Blanchard  Building.  Los  Angeles  Ca 


J.    P.    DupUy   TENOR— VOICE  DIRECTOR 

Direflor  Orpheu,  Male  Club,  Bnar  Brilh  Choir,  Trinity  M.  E.  Church  Choir 
c  J'  1  ■  ■  r.1  1  ■  ,  vr*:,  v."'''  Deparlmeni  and  Eulerpean  Male  Quartelle 
btudio:  3  I  I  Blanchard  Buildmg.  Los  Angeles.  Ca 


'ianist 


William  Edson  Strobridge  - 

Room  335  Blanchard  Building  Los  Angeles,  Ca 


L.  E.  BEHYMER 

Western  Manager 
Musical  Artists 

Main  Office:    LOS  ANGELES,    California 

Booking  Musical  Attractions    from    Denver    West,    California 
and  the  Southwest  on  GUARANTEES  and  PERCENTAGE 


REPRESENTS   THIS    SEASON: 

Madame  Marcella  Sembrich 
Madame  Schumann-Heink 
Madame  Frieda  Langendorff 
Madame  Jeanne  Jomelli 

Madame  Teresa  Carreno 
Miss  Marie  Nichols 

Miss  Tilly  Koenen 

Ellen  Beach  Yaw 

Madelen  Worden 
Dr.  Ludwig  Wuellner 

George  Hamlin,  Tenor 

Fritz  Kreisler,  Violinist 

Pepita  Arriola,  Pianist 

The  Flonzaley  Quartette   and   the 

Damrosch  Orchestra,  with  Isadora 

Duncan,  Dancer,  and  other 

Well  Known  Artists. 

SUPPLYING  ALSO  THE  PACIEIC  COAST  ARTISTS: 

Mackenzie  Gordon 
Antonio  De  Grassi 
Anna  Miller  Wood 

Dr.  J.  F.  WOLLE  in  Organ  Recitals 
Univ.  of  California  Glee  Club 
Georg  Kruger,  Pianist 

Ignaz  Edouard  Haroldi,  Violinist 
Mary  Le  Grand  Reed,  Soprano 
Harry  Lott,  Baritone 
Herr  Arnold  Krauss,  Violinist 
Helen  Goff,  Soprano 
The  Los  Angeles  Symphony  Orches- 
tra—77  Men. 
The  Woman's  Symphony  Orchestra — 
63  Women. 


Catering  to  the  leading  Music  Clubs,  Colleges, 

Hotels,     Women's     Clubs,    Private 

Schools  and  Homes  with 

"THE  BEST  IN  MUSIC" 

And    Playing  Artists 
Direct    in    the    Leading   Cities  of    the    West 

Especially  Low    Rates    made    to    Music    Clubs   of    California 


20 


P  A  <J  I  F  I  C    COAST    MUSICAL    R  E  V  I  E  W. 


IN  THE  REALM  OF  THE  THEATRE 


Edited  by  JOSEPH  M.  GUMMING 


MAGAZINE  ARTICLES  ON  THE  STAGE.— "Current  Lit- 
erature" for  Novemlier  has  an  article  on  Channing  Pollock's 
"Sucli  a  Little  Queen,"  which  is  now  having  a  successful  run 
in  New  York.  The  author  has  cleverly  twisted  the  "Prisoner 
of  Zenda"  aiid  "Graustark"  idea  around  so  that  instead  of  the 
usual  Briton  or  American  setting  a  kingdom  by  the  ears  he 
exiles  Anna,  the  young  Queen  of  Herzegovinia.  to  a  Harlem 
Hat  and  a  job  in  a  New  York  business  office.  Her  betrothed 
husband,  the  King  of  Bosnia,  is  also  exiled  to  New  York  and 
a  job  in  the  same  office.  In  the  end  the  royal  lovers  are 
united  and  restored  to  their  kingdoms  and  the  noble  Amer- 
ican lover  takes  his  defeat  like  a  man.  The  extensive  por- 
tions of  the  dialogue  which  are  given  in  the  article  read 
entertainingly.  The  article  says  of  Elsie  Ferguson,  who  plays 
the  queen.  "Her  voice  has  the  charming  irresistible  note  of 
pathos  and  her  enthusiastic  admirers  detect  in  her  acting  a 
loveliness  akin  to  that  of  Maude  Adams." 

Another  article  in  the  same  number  is  on  "Good  and  Bad 
Effects  of  Mental  Suggestion  in  the  Theatre."  The  article 
alludes  to  another  article  by  a  writer  of  the  New  Thought 
School,  who  says  that  when  the  emotions  are  played  on  in 
the  theatre  the  mind  is  strongly  susceptible  to  suggestion, 
and  while  some  people  are  at  times  brought  even  to  sympath- 
ize with  stage  criminals  in  their  fight  against  detection  and 
justice,  still  he  holds  that  the  evil  effects  are  negligible  as 
compared  with  the  ready  acceptance  of  moral  suggestions  in 
the  better  class  of  plays.  The  opinion  of  a  New  York  judge 
is  quoted  to  the  effect  that  stage  crime  incites  to  real  crime, 
and  also  the  emphatic  dissent  of  David  Belasco  and  Harrison 
Grey  Fiske  from  the  judge. 

An  interesting  article  on  Clyde  Fitch  deplores  the  fact  that 
Clyde  Fitch  did  not  take  himself  seriously,  with  the  result 
that  his  plays  are  not  appreciated  at  their  full  value.  Had 
he  set  himself  up  on  a  pedestal  and  posed  more  as  a  great 
dramatist,  the  writer  asserts  that  his  countrymen  would  have 
a  higher  regard  for  his  achievements. 

"The  Century"  for  November  has  an  article  by  Brander 
Matthews  on  "The  Dramatist  and  the  Theatre."  He  states 
that  the  technique  of  every  dramatist  from  the  Greeks  to  the 
present  time  has  been  governed  very  largely  by  the  kind  of 
theatre  for  which  he  wrote.  It  is  illustrated  by  many  pic- 
tures of  theatres  of  different  periods.  The  article,  which  is 
as  readable  as  everything  by  Brander  Matthews,  has  much 
that  is  in  his  book  "The  Development  of  the  Drama." 

"Everybody's"  for  November  has  an  interesting  article  by 
Hartley  Davis  on  "The  Business  Side  of  the  Theatre."  When 
one  realizes  the  enormous  size  of  the  business,  as  he  will 
when  he  reads  that  Charles  Frohman  pays  out  $3,750,000  a 
year  in  salaries,  and  has  10,000  people  on  his  pay  roll,  and 
that  the  Shuberts  spend  $150,000  a  year  to  maintain  their 
general  offices  in  New  York,  he  is  inclined  to  agree  with  the 
writer  of  the  article  that  while  "Art  for  art's  sake"  may  be 
a  very  nice  thing  to  talk  about,  it  requires  the  ablest  kind  of 
business  management  to  handle  the  theatrical  business  of  this 
country. 

"Colliers"  for  October  23  is  a  dramatic  number,  not  as  good 
as  some  of  the  former  dramatic  numbers  of  this  weekly. 
There  is  an  article  on  the  New  Theatre  by  its  director, 
Winthrop  Ames,  and  an  amusing  article  by  Richard  Harding 
Davis  on  the  difficulties  of  theatre-going  in  London.  The 
best  thing  in  it  is  an  article,  "The  Girl  and  the  Stage — the 
Truth  Which  Lies  Behind  the  Footlights,"  by  Charles  Bel- 
mont Davis.  It  is  full  of  good  advice  to  the  girl  who  wants 
to  go  on  the  stage,  and  has  an  interesting  account  of  the 
methods  of  one  dramatic  school  which  is  doing  good  work. 

The  "Saturday  Evening  Post,"  of  October  23rd  and  3Uth, 
has  articles  by  Charles  Burnham  on  "The  Front  of  the 
House."  The  first  tells  of  his  experiences  as  an  employee 
of  Augustin  Daly;  the  second  \vhile  with  John  Stetson. 
Stetson,  though  an  able,  was  an  uneducated  man,  and  some 
of  his  stories  about  Stetson's  malapropisms  are  very  funny. 
— %\ 


ORPHEUM. 


eye  can  scarcely  follow  the  various  evolutions.  The  regula- 
tion army  manual  of  arms  is  also  well  executed  and  a  pyra- 
mid of  seventeen  men  is  formed  in  less  than  a  minute  and 
the  men  are  back  in  the  ranks  in  the  same  space  of  time. 
An  artillery  drill  follows,  which  includes  the  simple  manual 
of  that  corps.  At  the  sound  of  "taps"  the  bag  is  lowered 
and  the  drill  merges  into  the  evening  bivouac,  with  guards 
in  regular  formations.  Here  begins  the  spectacular  part. 
A  miniature  battleship  which  has  been  seen  signalling  in  a 
realistic  sea,  approaches  the  fortifications  and  opens  fire. 
Immediately  the  camp  is  alive  and  the  men  in  furious  action 
when  the  Red  Cross  nurse  dashes  to  the  succor  of  the 
wounded.  A  daring  feat  in  wall  scaling  is  then  successfully 
accomplished,  the  men  mounting  the  fortress  tower  with  a 
wall  fourteen  feet  high  in  less  than  two  minutes.  As  a 
climax  of  the  spetacle  the  colors  are  shot  from  the  wall 
and  rescued  by  the  nurse,  who  is  then  hoisted  to  safety  by 
the  soldiers,  clinging  to  the  flag  she  has  rescued. 

Lulu  McConnell  and  Grant  Simpson  will  delight  with  a 
bright  little  comedy  called  "A  Stormy  Hour,"  by  Lester  Loner- 
gan.  It  was  written  as  a  vehicle  for  the  full  display  of  Miss 
McConnell's  ability,  and  enables  her  to  excel  in  charming 
comedy,  songs  and  mimicry.  The  little  play  depicts  the 
domestic  misunderstanding  of  a  newly  wed  pair  and  a  foolish 
quarrel  between  them.  It  abounds  in  fun  and  introduces  Mr. 
Simpson  in  a  congenial  role  as  the  young  husband. 

The  Tempest  and  Sunshine  Trio,  consisting  of  Florence 
Tempest,  Little  Sunshine  and  ,Iunie  Ijames,  will  be  a  par- 
ticularly attractive  incident  of  the  coming  bill.  This  trio  of 
fascinating  young  beauties  was  a  feature  of  Ziegfeld's  first 
revue,  "The  Follies  of  l!t07,"  and  last  year  they  were  with 
the  original  production  of  "Little  Nemo"  at  tne  New  Amster- 
dam Theatre,  New  York.  Miss  Tempest  is  a  clever  boy  im- 
personator on  the  order  of  Vesta  Tilly  and  her  "chappy" 
delineations  are  always  a  decided  hit. 

These  wonderful  Russia-Roumanian  gladiators,  Bobby 
Pandor  and  Brother,  appropriately  styled  "The  Modern 
Hercules,"  will  present  a  series  of  athletic  poses  on  a  special- 
ly constructed  cabinet,  having  for  a  background  a  black 
cycloramic  curtain.  They  conclude  .their  performance  with 
some  clever  gymnastic  work,  which  illustrates  their  marvel- 
ous staying  power. 

Next  week  will  conclude  the  engagements  here  of  Minnie 
Seligman  and  William  Bramwell  in  their  highly  successful 
drama,  'The  Drums  of  Doom."  the  Bounding  Gordons  and  the 
Bootblack  Quartet.  It  will  also  positively  be  the  last  of  the 
marvelous  chimpanzee,  Charles  the  First,  who  does  everything 
but  talk,  and  who  has  created  one  of  the  greatest  sensations 
ever  known  in  vaudeville.  A  new  series  of  motion  pictures 
will  interestingly  finish  the  performance. 


EDDIE  FOY  IS  FUNNY  AS  EVER. 


The     Popular     Fun-Maker     Delighting     the     Audiences  at  the 
Valencia  Theatre, 


The  Orpheum  program  for  next  week  will  have  as  its  chief 
attraction  "Our  Boys  in  Blue,"  a  military  spectacle  which 
introduces  seventeen  men  and  one  woman.  The  latter  ap- 
pears as  a  Red  Cross  nurse,  while  the  men  represent  Uncle 
Sam's  soldiers.  The  act  opens  with  an  infantry  drill  that 
is  wonderful  in  its  precision  and  is  done  so  rapidly  that  the 


Eddie  Foy  is  just  Eddie  Foy  and  that's  about  all  there  is 
to  it.  He  doesn't  seem  to  be  changed  a  bit  from  when  I  saw 
him  make  his  entrance  from  the  dog-kennel  in  "Sinbad"  at 
the  Grand  Opera  House  somewhere  about  twenty  years  ago. 
He  has  the  same  husky  voice,  the  same  .characteristic  walk 
and  the  same  way  of  making  little  side  remarks.  He  is  just 
as  funny  as  ever  and  I  laughed  just  as  hard,  but  I  must 
confess  to  a  disappointment  in  finding  that  he  was  just 
exactly  the  same.  With  at  least  twenty  years  of  this  kind 
of  fooling  one  would  like  to  think  that  by  this  time  there 
would  have  crept  into  his  clowning  something  that,  while  not 
detracting  from  the  fun  of  it  all,  would  yet  have  shown  that 
his  genius  had  ripened  into  something  better  than  the  same 
old  tomfoolery,  enjoyable  as  it  is.  But  then  it  must  be  remem- 
bered that  maybe  his  audiences  wouldn't  let  him  change  and 
maybe  he  has  just  had  to  stick  to  the  same  old  line. 

He  plays  the  part  of  .Joey  Wheeze,  late  clown  of  Bunk  Bros. 
Circus,  and  with  his  trained  bear  he  blows  into  a  summer 
resort  in  the  Adirondacks,  flat  broke.  The  landlord  has  been 
disappointed  at  the  non-arrival  of  an  actor  who  is  to  play 
Hamlet  at  a  lawn  party,  and  .loey  agrees  to  pose  as  the  actor 
and  play  Hamlet.  Add  any  amount  of  girls,  most  of  them 
mighty  good  looking,  who  work  hard  enough  on  the  stage, 
(Continued  on  Page  22, J 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


21 


Mrs.  Grace  Davis   Northrup 

Soprano  Soloist  First  Congregationa]  Church,  Oakland 
Concert,    Oratorio   and  Recital  Programs 

TEACHER    OF    SINGING 

Ruidcncc  Studio: 
1 333  Bay  View  Place.  Berkeley.  Phone  Berkeley  958 

Oakland  Studio:  65  MacDonough  BIdg.     Tuesday  and  Friday 

ROMEO  FRICK 

BARYTONE 

Vocal  lostrucflion  After  Foremoift  European  Methods 

30-3 1  Canning  Block,  1 3lh  and  Broadway.  Oakland 

Phone  Oak  6454  Phone  Home  a  I  468 

Paul  Steindorff 

Studio,  2422  STUART  STREET 
Berkeley,  California 


Studio: 

1380  Sutter  Street 


Phone  Franklin  2227 

San  Francisco,  Cal. 


Mrs.  'William  SteinbacH 

VOICE  CULTURE 

STUDIO:    1528  Broderick  St.,  San  Francisco,  Cal. 

H.   D.   MUSTARD 

Baritone 

Voice  Culture  in  All  its  Branches 

opera — Oratorio  — Concert 
Studio.   1548  Haight  St.  Phone  Park  41  17 

HERMAN   PERLET 

Voice  Culture  and  Piano 

Studio;    1451  Franklin  Si.  Phone  Franklin  634 

Mrs.  W^alter  AVitham 

TEACHER  OF  SINGING 


Miss  Helen  Colburn  Heath 

^      SOPRA.NO 

Vocal  Instruction.  Concert  Work 
Phone  West  4890  1 304  Ellis  Street 


M^enceslao   Villalpando 
Violoncellist 

Concerts.  Musicales.  Ensemble  and  In^rudlion 
Tel.  Park  5329. .STUDIO:  746  CLAYTON  ST. 

DELIA    E.    GRISWOLD 

Contralto 

VOICE   CULTURE 
Phone  Park  1614  Res.  Studio,  845  Oak  St. 

HA.RA.LD  PRACHT 
BARITONE 

Soloist  Grace  Church  and  Temple  Israael 

CONCERT  and  ORATORIO 

1  1 23  Devisadero  Si.  Phones  |  ^^^  ^^8 


FredericK  Stevenson 

Harmony  and  Composition 
Voice 

417  Blanchard  Hall  Los  Angeles,  Cal. 


RICHARD  FERBER 

Composer  and  Teacher    Piano  and  Harmony 

1350  O'FARRFXL  ST.       SAN  FRANCISCO 


MISS   EDNA  MONTAGNE 

(Pupil  of  Mrs.  Oscar  Mansfeldt) 

Xeacher    of   Piano 

Res.  Sludio:    1218  Telegraph  Ave..  Oakland,  Cal. 


Signor  Antonio  de  Grassi 

Violinist 

Concerts  Arranged- Violin  and  Harmony  Taught 
Winifred  June  de  Grassi,  Assistant 

udio:     1 30  PRESIDIO  AVE.         SAN  FRANCISCO 


IMPORTANT   ANNOUNCEMENT. 

Beginning  with  the  issue  of  October 
2,  1909,  the  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Re 
view  has  been  increased  to  24  pages 
which  size  will  occasionally  be  aug 
mented  to  32  pages.  This  enables  the 
management  to  add  several  new  de 
partments.  The  threatrical  depart 
ment  occupies  two  full  pages,  and  con 
tains  straightforward,  unbiased  and 
honest  reviews  of  every  theatrica 
performance  of  merit  in  San  Francis 
CO.  These  critical  opinions,  which  are 
not  controlled  by  the  business  office, 
will  serve  as  a  guide  to  our  readers  in 
Oakland,  Los  Angeles,  Portland  and 
Seattle,  and  all  interior  cities  of  the 
Pacific  Coast,  in  case  these  cities 
should  be  visited  by  companies  firs 
appearing    in    San    Francisco. 

Besides  this  reliable  theatrical  de 
partment,  the  Pacific  Coast  Musica 
Review  contains  a  page  of  late  Euro 
pean  news,  and  a  page  of  the  most  im 
portant  musical  news  from  leading 
Eastern  centers.  The  Los  Angeles, 
Oakland,  Berkeley  and  Alameda  de- 
partments are  continued  as  usual, 
while  more  attention  is  being  paid 
this  season  to   Portland  and  Seattle. 

In  this  24-page  issue  advertising 
pages  will  be  limited  to  12  pages,  and 
anyone  applying  for  space  after  these 
12  pages  are  filled  must  wait  until  a 
vacancy  occurs.  Special  advertising 
rates  can  only  be  secured  by  those 
who  keep  their  advertisement  in  these 
columns  during  the  entire  year.  Those 
who  desire  to  withdraw  their  adver- 
tisement during  the  two  summer 
months  must  consent  to  pay  a  higher 
rate.  Rates  on  this  page  will  be  IN 
CASE  OF  ANNUAL  CONTRACTS: 
One  inch,  $1.00;  one-half  inch,  50c, 
and  "Musical  Directory,"  25  cents  per 
issue. 


William  Hofmann 

Musical  Director  Fairmont  Hotel 


MRS.    A.   F.    BRIDGE 

TeacHer  of  Sin^in^ 

.  West  7279  2220  Webster  St..  San  Francis 


Miss  Olive  J.  Tonks 

Voice  Culture 

Studio:  Room  35.  Gaffney  Bldg..  376  Suiter  St.,  Wednes- 
days.   Res.:265ParnassusAve.  Tel.  Park  4190.    S.  F.  C.l. 


Alfred  Cogswell 

studio:   IS3I  Sutler,  S»n  Francisco,  on  lucsday 
and   Friday,  and    at   2110  Durant  St., 

Berkeley,  on  Monday,  Thursday  and  Saturday 


MRS.  OLIVE  ORBISON 

Dratmatic    Soprano 

;e  Culture  Concert  and  Oratorio 

2240  California  St.— Phone  West  665'i 


Mrs.  Thoroughman 

Voice  Culture— Dramatic  Soprano 

CONCERT— ORATORIO— OPERA 

Studio:  Room  109.  91  5  Van  Ness  .Ave.      Tel.  Franklin  5254 


MRS.  M.  TROMBONI 

TEACHER  OF  SINGINC; 

Studio.    1531    SUTTER  ST.,  Mondays  and  Thursdays      At 
Mill  Valley.  Keystone  Building.  Tuesday.  Wednesday,  Friday 

Mrs.    Olive   Reed   Cushman 

VOICE  CULTURE 

Studio.  Maple  Hall.  14th  and  Webster  Sts..  Oakland 
Tue.sday  and    Friday  Phone  Oakland  3453 


EDNA    MURRAY 

P^aniste 

Concerts  Recitals  Lessons 

ircss:    .     .    .     Ross.  Marin  County.  Californi: 


LOUIS  CREPAUX 

(Member  Paris  Grand  Opera) 
IJelbert  Block.  943  Van  Ness  at  OTarrell.    Reception  Hou 
1  1  :30  to  12.  and  3  to  4  except  Wednesday  and  Saturday 
Wednesday  in  Oakland,  1  I  54  Brush  Street 


BENJ.  S  MOORE 

(Pianist  and  Teacher     Organist  o(  First  Presbyterian  Church) 

Studio:     Rooms  22-2  J  Alliance  Building.  San  Jose.  California 

Phone  Brown  316 


Musical    Directory 

PIANO 


SIGISMONDO  MARTINEZ 
13l.'l  Sutter  St.  San  Francisco,  Cal. 


EULA  HOWARD 
239  4th  Avenue  Telephone  Pacific  214 


ARTHUR   FICKENSCHER 
1960  Summit  St.,  Oakland.    Tel.  Oak.  4206 


VOCAL 


MRS.   ALICE  MASON  BARNETT 
129S  Haight  Street  Phone  Park  5831 


MRS.  RICHARD  REES 
817  Grove  Street  Phone  Park  5175 


MISS  CAROLINE  HALSTED  LITTLE 
3621  Bd'wav.,Oak.   Phone  Piedmont  1390 


MRS.   ARTHUR   FICKENSCHER 
1960  Summit  St.,  Oakland.    Tel.  Oak.  420H 


GILBERT   REEK 
l.'io7  Fourth  Avenue,  Oakland. 


PROF.  T.  D.  HERZOG 
1813  Ellis  St.  San  Francisco 


MANDOLIN,  LUTE  and  GUITAR 


SAMUEL  ADELSTEIN 
1834  Baker  Street  San  Francisco 


OLD  VIOLINS  and  BOWS 


GEO.   HUNTINGTON 
3366  Sacramento  St.      San  Francisco,  Cal. 


-Have     You     Seen     the     New- 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON  PIANO? 


It  Appeals  Especially  to  Teachers  and  Students 
It  contains  Elegance,  Durability  and   Moderate  Price. 


BENJ.  CURTAZ  &  SON 


Kearny  St.  Near  Po^ 

San  Francisco,  Cal. 


22 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


(Continued  from  Page  20.) 
but  ever  so  much  harder  behind  the  scenes  getting  in  and 
out  of  the  bewildering  number  of  costumes,  and  you  have 
the  play.  One  time  they  g4t  out  of  the  costumes  all  right, 
but  they  don't  get  into  very  much  of  any  other  before  they 
come  on.     No.  the  boating  chorus  is  just  a  "leetle"  bit  daring. 

As  for  the  music,  there  is.  plenty  of  it  and  very  well  sung 
too.  The  liveliest  thing  is  "Down  where  the  Watermelon 
Grows,"  with  a  lot  of  the  chorus  cutely  dressed  as  little  girls, 
with  a  foot-tapping  lilt  to  it  and   with   Eddie  at  his  best. 

The  Hamlet  burlesque  is  funny,  but  Eddie  takes  off  his 
clown  make-up  and  appears  in  his  natural  face,  and  surprises 
you  with  his  really  fine  features.  Altogether,  if  you  like 
good  horse-play,  lively  music  and  all  that  sort  of  thing,  you 
will  enjoy  it  immensely. 

%\ 

THE    JOMELLI    CONCERTS. 


Our  music  lovers  will  this  week  have  the  opportunity  iif 
hearing  a  singer  who  has  appeared  with  phenomenal  success 
at  more  concerts  during  the  past  year  in  the  East  than  any 
visiting  artist,  with  the  single  e.xception  of  Dr.  Ludwig  Wull- 
ner.  Furthermore,  this  artist  has  been  re-engaged  at  over 
twenty  places  where  she  sang  last  season.  This  artist  is 
Mme.  Jeanne  .lomelli,  who  has  appeared  with  the  leading 
opera  companies  of  Europe  and  New  York  and  who  is  again 
to  tread  the  operatic  boards  next  season.  She  is  said  to 
possess  a  really  beautiful  voice,  which  she  uses  like  a  con- 
summate artist. 

As  an  additional  temptation,  Mr.  Greenbaum  offers  in  con- 
junction with  .lomelli,  Miss  Marie  Nichols,  an  American 
violiniste  who  has  won  her  laurels  with  the  great  symphony 
orchestra  of  Boston,  Chicago,  Paris,  Dresden,  Berlin,  etc. 
Miss  Magdalen  Worden,  who  accompanied  these  artists  on 
their  tour,  became  very  ill  in  Portland  and  was  compelled 
to  abandon  the  trip,  and  our  own  reliable  Frederick  Maurer 
has  come  to  the  rescue. 

The  first  Jomelli  concert  will  be  given  next  Friday  night, 
Nov.  12th,  at  the  Novelty  Theatre,  on  O'Farrel  and  Steiner 
streets,  and  the  following  program  will  be  given:  Sonata, 
Op.  13  (first  movement).  Grieg),  Miss  Nichols  and  Mr. 
Maurer;  Grand  Aria,  "Thais"  (Massenet),  Mme.  Jomelli: 
Violin  Solo,  (a)  Adagio  (Beethoven),  (b)  Allegro  assai  (from 
Concerto  in  E  major),  (Bach),  Miss  Nichols;  (a)  Nymphs  and 
Sylvains  (Bemberg),  (b)  Indian  Song  (Makefield  Cadman), 
(c)  Flower  Rain  (Edwin  Schneider),  Mme.  Jomelli;  (a) 
Chant  Russe  (first  time  here),  (Lalo),  (b)  Spanish  Dance 
(Sarasate),  Miss  Nichols;  (a)  Du  bist  Ruh  (Schubert), 
(b)  L'Ete  (Charainade),  (c)  Longing  (Magdalen  Worden), 
Mme.  Jomelli;  Ave  Maria  (with  violin  obligato),  (Bach- 
Gounod). 

The  program  for  Sunday  afternoon  is  even  more  interest- 
ing, Mme.  Jomelli's  offerings  being  the  Aria  from  "La  Tos- 
ca"  and  songs  by  Bemberg,  Richard  Strauss,  Spross,  Hugo 
Wolf,  Carl  Loewe  and  "Le  Nil"  by  Leroux,  one  of  the  new 
French  composers. 

Miss  Nichols  will  on  this  occasion  play  an  old  French 
Sonata  by  Francoeur  (1698-1787),  which  has  never  been 
printed.  Her  master,  De  Brut  of  the  Paris  Conservatory, 
copied  it  from  a  manuscript  owned  by  a  monk  in  a  monastery 
in  Southern  France.  It  is  said  to  possess  a  rare  charm  of 
beauty  like  some  of  the  old  works  made  known  to  us  by 
Fritz  Kreisler. 


BOOK   REVIEWS. 


EDWARD  MACDOWELL,  BY  LAWRENCE  GILMAN. 
JOHN  LANE  COMPANY,  NEW  YORK,  PUBLISHERS.  Price 
$1.50. — The  first  impression  one  experiences  when  reading 
this  most  interesting  biographical  narrative  is  the  easy,  clear 
and  crisp  style  in  which  the  author  has  enveloped  his  phrases. 
He  tells  his  facts  with  unerring  accuracy  and  reveals  a  fa- 
miliarity with  his  subject  that  impresses  one  with  the  convic- 
tion that  the  book  is  not  a  eulogy,  but  a  true  and  reliable  ac- 
count of  the  life  of  a  most  important  personage  in  the  mus- 
ical annals  of  America,  Mr.  Gilman  refrains  from  using  florid 
passages  and  superlative  adjectives,  and  attains  sympathy 
for  the  object  of  his  treatment  by  reason  of  his  elegant  use 
of  plain  language.  The  book  is  divided  in  two  parts,  namely, 
"The  Man"  and  "The  Music  Maker."  and  contains  valuable 
information  which  every  student  of  musical  literature  can 
not  afford  to  be  without.  Of  especial  interest  to  Californians 
is  that  part  of  the  book  which  refers  to  Mr.  MacDowell's  diffi- 
culties in  bringing  order  out  of  chaos  in  the  musical  depart- 
ment of  the  Columbia  University.  We  Californians  are  now 
confronting  a  condition  very  much  alike  to  the  one  Mr.  Mac- 
Dowell  experienced,  and  it  would  be  well  for  those  interested 


MARIE     NICHOLS 
Violin    Virtuosa    With     Mme.    Jomelli. 

in  the   music   department  of  the  University  of  California  to 
read  about  the  vissitudes  of  Mr.  MacDowell. 

HANDEL,  BY  R.  A.  STREATFEILD.  JOHN  LANE  COM- 
PANY, NEW  YORK,  PUBLISHERS.  Price  $2..50— Quite  a 
number  of  works  have  been  published  in  this  subject,  but  we 
have  not  come  across  anyone  that  is  so  exhaustive  and  so 
reliable  as  this  work  just  from  the  press.  It  not  only  keeps 
accurate  tap  on  Handel's  various  periods  of  residential 
changes  and  the  immense  obstacles  which  he  had  to  over- 
come, but  the  writer  touches  an  entirely  original  vein  in  his 
delineation  of  the  great  man's  character  and  his  influence 
upon  musical  history  of  his  own  time  as  well  as  the  future. 
Particular  pains  have  been  taken  by  the  author  to  delve  into 
the  inner  recesses  of  the  master's  musical  phantasies  and 
rescue  therefrom  the  gems  of  his  personal  advantages  as 
well  as  disadvantages  and  strike  herewith  the  keynote  of  true 
character  delineation  by  means  of  dissection  of  musical  con- 
ceptions. Mr.  Streatfeild  has  succeeded  in  thus  giving  an 
allegorical  word  painting,  asit  were,  that  includes  man  and 
musician  in  one  huge  canvass  and  presents  him  in  a  manner 
that  makes  him  lovable  for  his  faults  as  well  as  his  virtues. 

NEW  GROUP  OF  SONGS  BY  CARO  ROMA,  under  sugges- 
tive title  of  "Shadows."  PUBLISHED  BY  M.  WITMARK  & 
SONS.  Mme.  Roma  on  Pacific  Coast. — "Shadows"  is  the 
mysteriously  suggestive  title  of  a  group  of  five  new  songs  by 
Caro  Roma,  the  accomplished  author,  composer  and  singer, 
which  have  just  been  issued  by  M.  Witmark  &  Sons,  who 
publish  all  Mme.  Roma's  numbers.  The  titles  of  the  songs 
are  "Dreaming,"  "Ghosts,"  "Night,"  "Recompense"  and 
"Weaving."  "Dreaming"  relates  the  vision  of  a  lost  love. 
"Ghosts"  tells  of  the  chamber  of  each  heart  where  shattered 
hopes  sadly  abide.  "Night"  is  a  premonition  of  approaching 
death.  "Recompen-se"  is  a  sweet  song  of  solace  to  one 
afllicted.  "Weaving"  is  an  appeal  to  the  fates  to  restore  the 
past  to  which  cling  so  many  happy  memories.  The  words  of 
the  songs  are  wedded  to  music,  distinctive  in  its  melody  and 
arrangement,  and  it  is  evident  that  considerable  will  be  heard 
of  "Shadows"  during  the  season. 

Caro  Roma  is  at  present  on  the  Pacific  Coast,  where  she  is 
giving  recitals  of  her  own  compositions  to  large  audiences 
and  with  considerable  success. 


pup; 


RAXZIFiC  COAST  ,^^^ 

«5am  FRANCI5CO.  Oakland,  LosAjigeles.  Portland.  Seattle 

THE   ONLY    MUSICAL   JOURNAL    IN    THE    GREAT    WEST 
^     PUBLISHED     EVERY    WEEK    C^ 


VOL.  XVII.  No.  7 


SAN  FRANCISCO.  SATURDAY.  NOVEMBER  13,  1909 


PRICE  10  CENTS 


To  the  Musical  Public  of  the  Pacific  Coast 


The  appearance  of  Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner  is  of  more 
than  ordinary  importance  to  the  musician  and  music 
student.  This  giant  of  the  vocal  art  stands  unique 
among  latter-day  artists,  having  solved  a  problem 
entirely  new  in  the  exposition  of  the  art  of  song. 
For  this  reason,  we  deem  it  necessary  to  attract  the 
attention  of  our  readers  to  this  artist  in  more  than 
ordinary  fashion,  lest  in  their  absorption  of  every- 
day duties  they  may  forget  that  here  is  an  artist 
whom  no  one  interested  in  the  art  can  afford  to 
miss.  We  therefore  desire  to  call  the  attention  of 
the  readers  of  this  paper  to  the  concerts  of  Dr.  Wull- 
ner, which  take  place  at  the  Novelty  Theatre,  San 
Francisco,  Tuesday  and  Friday  Evenings,  November 
23d  and  26th,  and  Sunday  Afternoon,  November 
28th.  Dr.  Wullner  will  appear  at  Ye  Liberty  The- 
atre, Oakland,  on  Wednesday  Afternoon,  Decem- 
ber 1st. 

ALFRED  METZGER, 
Editor  Pacific  Coast  Musical  Review. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    R  E  V  I  K  W 


teintuap 


The  Soundest  Piano  Investment 

The  STEIN  WAY  will  outlast  two  other  pianos,  each  of  which  will 
cost  you  nearly  as  much  as  a  Steinway.  No  other  piano  can  ap- 
proach the  Steinway  in  the  satisfaction  derived  from  its  owner- 
ship. 

We  can  sell  you  other  pianos — less  expensive  but  thoroughly  re- 
liable. You  will  want  a  Steinway  some  day,  however,  and  when 
you  do,  we  will  take  back  the  less  expensive  piano,  allowing  for  it 
the  full  purchase  price  paid  us,  anytime  within  three  years  from 
date  of  original   purchase. 

Monthly  payments  on  the  Steinway  or  any  of  our  pianos  if 
desired. 


®l|e  Itrtor-lltrtrflla 

The  VICTOR-VICTROLA  is  the  perfect  musical  instrument — 
absolutely  accurate,  noiseless  in  its  mechanism,  beautiful  in  its 
cabinet  and  without  the  cumbersome   horn. 

The  VICTOR-VICTROLA  produces  the  sweetest  and  most  wonder- 
ful tones  ever  heard — positively  natural  and  easily  regulated  in 
volume. 

Two  Styles,  $200  and  $125 


Sherman  B^y  &  Go. 

STEINWAY  AND  OTHER  PTANOS  PLAYER  PIANOS  OF  ALL  GRADES 

VICTOR  TALKING  MACHINES 

Kearny  and    Sutter  Streets,    San   Francisco 
Fourteenth  and  Clay  Streets,  Oakland 

Sacramento,    Fresno.    San    Jose.    Stockton.    Bakersfield.    Santa    Rosa. 
Portland,  Seattle,  Spokane,  Tacoma,  Etc. 


DR.   LUDWIG   WULLNER 

The   Musico-Dramatic   Interpreter  of  the  Very  Best  Vocal  Literature  in  a  Unique  and   Impressive  Style, 

and   His   Equally  Great  Accompanist,  C.  V.   Bos. 


rACIFIC    00  A  ST    MUSICAL    REVIEW. 


^_/;'JX      l^ACIFHCfCXDAST    ^^^^^ 


ALFRED  METZGER EDITOR 


DAVID    H.   WALKER    - 
JOSEPH   M.   GUMMING 


AHHiMtant   Eflltor 
Drnmatlc  Editor 


San  Francisco  Office 

Sherman,  Clay  &  Co.  Building,  Kearny  and  Sutter  Sts.,  Mezzanine 

Floor.   Kearny-St.    Side.     Telephone,   Kearny   4000. 

Oal<land,    Berkeley,   and   Alameda   Office 

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Los  Angeles  Office 

Helnrlch  von  Stein  In  Charge 


SATURDAY,  NOVEMBER  13.   1908 


The    PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    REVIEW    is    for   sale    at    the 
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IMPORTANT    NOTICE 
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MUSICAL,  CALENDAR   1909-10. 
Mme.  Jean  .Tomelli  (Manhattan  Opera  House  Co.)  .Week  of  Nov.  14 

Marv  Adele  Case.  Contralto Novelty  Theatre,  Nov.  19,   21 

Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner Nov.   23,  25  and  28 

George  Hamlin    (American   Tenor) Dec.   2,   5   and  7 

Fritz   Kreisler Dec-  12.    16   and  19 

Lyric  Quartette  Pop  Concert Com.   la    January 

Marcella   Sembrich Week   of   Jan.    9 

Myrtle    Elvin    ( Pianiste) February 

Teresa   Carreno First    Week    of   February 

Madame   Schumann-Heink Com.   Sunday,    Feb.   13 

Mme.  Tilly  Koenen   (the  famous  Dutch  contralto) March 

Pepito  Arriolo  (the  Spanish  child  Violinist) March 

Maud    Powell AP""!; 

Flonzalev   Quartet    (in   Chamber  Music) April 

Damrosch  Symphony  Orchestra  and  Isadora,  Duncan May 

THE   SIGNIFICANCE  OF  THE   WULLNER   CONCERTS. 


As  will  se  speu  bv  our  readers,  we  are  making  par- 
ticular efforts  to  cause  interest  in  the  torthcoiuing 
recitals  on  the  I'acific  Coast  of  Dr.  Ludwig  Wullner, 
who  rei)resents  a  jiarticular  phase  of  the  vocal  ait  that 
should  be  carefully  investigated  by  everyone  who  makes 
a  serious  attempt  to  solve  the  various  proltlems  that 
combine  to  make  the  art  of  singing  a  scieutitic  as  well 
as  an  artistic  factor.  It  is  only  too  well  known  a  fact 
that  there  does  not  exist  a  phase  of  musical  education 
that  is  more  misused  and  that  is  practiced  by  more  in- 
competent teachers  than  vocal  education.  There  is  no 
possible  way  of  educating  the  general  public  to  the  real- 
ization of  cliarlatanism  excei)t  by  listening  to  artists 
who  understand  how  to  impress  their  hearers  with  the 
force  of  their  ailislic  faculties.  Any  intelligent  hearer 
can  thus  easily  acciiimilate  certain  knowledge  as  to  how 
a  thing  should  be  done  and  as  to  what  should  be  avoid 
ed.  An  unintelligent  hearer  who  can  not  differentiate 
between  that  which  is  correct  and  that  which  is  incor- 


rect will  never  make  a  genuine  musician  nor  an  ellicient 
vocalist.  \\'e  lia\('  ((iiiie  to  this  cunclusion,  because  he 
who  can  not  comprehend  by  listening  to  an  artist, 
whetiier  the  i)erformance  is  based  upon  strictly  artistic 
principles  or  not,  will  never  be  able  to  comprehend  a 
teacher,  no  matter  how  plainly  artistic  principles  may 
be  propounded  to  him. 

^^'e,  therefore,  appeal  to  tlie  intelligent  portion  of 
this  community  to  attend  the  concerts  of  J)r.  AVullner. 
We  have  not  yet  had  the  pleasure  to  listen  to  this  giant 
of  the  vocal  art,  but  we  have  read  intelligent  treatises 
on  the  character  of  his  iierformance,  and  we  have  gath- 
ered therefrom  the  information  that  he  is  i)articularly 
careful  to  combine  the  musical  setting  of  a  composition 
with  the  jioetry  that  represents  its  in.spiratiou.  I'ast 
experience  has  taught  us  that  there  iire  so  many  artists 
who  s(^em  to  regard  the  words  of  a  song  so  indifferently 
that  in  most  cases  it  is  impossible  to  understand  a  sin- 
gle syllable  of  the  text.  While  Dr.  Wullner,  according 
to  the  testimony  of  those  able  to  judge,  does  not  possess 
exactly  a  voice  of  wonderful  brilliancy  or  timbre,  he  is 
nevertheless  endowed  witb  sufiicient  vocal  material  to 
present  the  musical  setting  of  a  song  in  a  most  sati.s- 
factory  manner.  In  addition  to  his  splendid  musical 
faculties,  Dr.  ^^'ullner  is  rejiorted  to  be  an  elocutionist 
of  the  highest  attainments.  His  dramatic  temperament 
has  swayed  huge  audiences.  His  intensity  of  feeling 
has  swept  multitudes  to  their  feet.  We  have  conversed 
with  several  of  the  world's  greatest  singers,  among 
them  .Madame  (Jadski,  who  state  that  Dr.  Wullner's 
art  was  thrilling  and  worthy  of  the  most  enthusiastic 
endorsement.  In  fact,  there  is  something  about  Dr. 
Wullner  which  no  other  artist  can  give,  and  this  fact 
alone  should  attract  everyone  interested  in  art  culture 
and  art  evolution  to  the  recitals  soon  to  be  given  in 
this  territory. 


Every  member  of  the  musical  cult  who  claims  to  be 
worthy  of  his  avocation  cannot  afford  to  stay  away 
from  the.se  concerts.  Every  one  of  us,  no  matter  how 
prominent  our  position  in  the  world  of  music  may  be. 
can  always  leain  something  we  have  not  known  befoi'e. 
We  can  even  learn  something  from  artists  far  removed 
from  the  zenith  of  the  "stardom."  How  much  more 
may  we  learn  from  artists  of  such  tremendous  force 
and  majesty  as  Dr.  ^\'ullner  belongs  to.  Here  is  an 
artist  who  has  a  message  to  deliver  and  who  stands 
pat  upon  that  undisputable  principle  that  while  the 
musical  setting  of  a  song  is  surely  a  most  important 
and  indeed  the  most  important  feature  of  a  vocal  com- 
jtosition,  still  there  remains  the  poetic  or  dramatic 
feature  that  should  be  given  as  much  prominence  in 
study  and  execution  as  the  musical  feature.  There  is 
no  better  way  to  inculcate  the  truth  of  this  conviction 
than  by  actual  illustration  and,  to  us,  there  does  not 
exist  any  excu.se  for  anyone  active  in  the  musical  pro- 
fession or  the  musical  amateur  circles  to  remain  at 
home  when  an  artist  like  Wullner  is  among  us.  The 
simple  fact  resolves  itself  into  this;  Either  you  are  a 
real  musician  and  music  lover,  in  which  case  your  in- 
stinct will  compel  you  to  hear  a  man  of  Wullner's  force, 
or  you  are  an  indift'erent  musician  and  student,  in 
which  case  you  will  find  some  excuse  to  stay  at  home. 
Inasmuch  as  artists  like  Wullner  visit  us  very  rarely 
indeed,  it  is  very  easy  to  make  arrangements  to  hear 
him.  If  anyone  considers  his  everyday  duties,  that 
can  easily  be  so  arranged  as  not  to  contiict  with  a  con- 
cert attendance  more  important  than  adding  to  his 
knowledge,  he  certainly  has  chosen  a  wrong  vocation 
when  he  selected  music  as  his  life  work. 


PACIFIC    COAST    MUSICAL    K  E  V  I  E  W. 


THE    UNRELIABILITY  OF  THE    NEW   YORK   CRITICS. 

On  various  occasions  I  have  been  endeavoring  to  prove  to 
my  readers  that  the  criticisms  that  appear  in  the  New  York 
papers  can  not  be  depended  upon.  On  the  occasion  of  Adele 
Verne's  debut  in  New  York  we  found  that  the  men  who  wield 
the  critical  pen  on  the  various  daily  papers  were  so  blinded 
by  prejudice  as  to  print  opinions  that  glittered  with  false- 
hoods and  decisive  deviations  from  the  artistic  facts  such 
as  the  people  of  California  found  them  during  Miss  Verne's 
first  visit  to  this  coast.  The  most  convincing  way  in  which  I 
can  demonstrate  the  correctness  of  my  contention  that  New 
York  daily  newspaper  criticism  is  not  to  be  depended  upon,  is 
to  quote  opinions  regarding  artists  whom  we  have  heard  on 
the  Pacific  Coast,  and  of  whose  artistic  qualities  we  possess 
personal  knowledge.  By  comparing  the  opinions  of  those  who 
sit  in  judgment  in  New  York  with  the  conclusions  we  our- 
selves have  drawn  we  are  best  enabled  to  watch  the  peculiar 
revolutions  of  the  minds  of  those  whose  megalomania  has 
taken  such  complete  possession  of  their  senses  that  they  have 
come  to  the  conclusion  that  they  represent  the  axis  around 
which  the  musical  world  revolves. 
«       »       * 

The  trouble  is  that  the  majority  of  people  upon  whom  fate 
has  bestowed  the  privilege  of  expressing  their  opinions  in 
print  possess  too  extravagant  a  notion  of  their  position  in  this 
world.  They  cultivate  an  idea  that  they  are  blessed  with 
superior  mental  faculties,  that  their  personal  opinions  are 
preferable  to  any  other,  and  that  they  must  act  solely  upon 
fixed  principles  of  their  own  conception  without  paying  any 
attention  whatever  to  the  opinions  of  people  of  equal  intel- 
lectual capacity,  but  unfortunately  not  in  a  position  to  put 
their  views  in  writing.  Inasmuch  as  fixed  personal  opinions 
are  as  varied  as  the  colors  of  a  rainbow  and  largely  dependant 
upon  the  mood  in  which  a  person  may  be  at  the  time  of  his 
inspiration,  we  find  among  the  critical  opinions  expressed  in 
the  New  York  daily  papers  such  a  variety  of  contradicting 
statements  of  incontrovertible  artistic  facts  that  it  becomes  a 
mystery  to  us  how  four  or  five  writers  can  possibly  differ  in 
such  vital  questions.  A  good  deal  of  this  contradictory  style 
of  criticism  is  cleared  up  when  we  are  informed  upon  ex- 
cellent authority  that  most  of  the  critics  review  a  concert 
from  the  bar  of  the  Grenoble  Hotel,  in  the  vicinity  of  Carnegie 
Hall.  Between  drinks  these  gentlemen  of  the  quill  sometimes 
drop  in  to  hear  a  number  on  the  program,  and  according  to 
the  taste  of  the  refreshment  they  have  been  imbibing  before, 
or  to  the  extent  of  their  spiritual  condition,  or  according  to 
the  impression  made  upon  them  by  the  one  number  they 
heard,  they  base  the  character  of  their  entire  criticism.  In 
this  manner  much  that  is  contradictory  in  the  quotations  from 
the  reviews  on  Madame  Blanche  Arral's  concert,  printed 
here  later  on,  may  be  easily  explained. 

I  do  not  claim  to  be  a  patron  of  the  Hotel  Grenoble  bar, 
nor  is  it  my  ambition  to  ever  write  for  a  New  York  paper, 
but  there  appear  statements  in  one  or  two  of  those  notices 
that  are  absolutely  opposed  to  actual  facts  as  I  see  them. 
For  instance,  the  Times  critic  says  that  "It  is  not  a  voice 
in  the  first  freshness  of  youth,  nor  of  beautiful  quality,  nor 
is  it  one  of  many  refinements  of  shading  and  emotional  col- 
oring." And  also,  "In  music  of  a  more  sustained  sort  that 
requires  perfection  of  phrasing,  a  fine  legato,  an  equable  poise 
of  the  subtler  resources  of  vocalization,  she  is  less  at  home," 
and  still  further  on,  "The  disagreeable  purist  might  also  find 
fault  with  her  treatment  of  certain  of  the  vowel  sounds  of 
both  French  and  Italian."  These  three  assertions  are  delib- 
erate falsehoods  and  I  could  prove  them  to  be  such  to  the 
writer  of  the  above  article,  I  do  not  care  whether  a  man 
writes  for  a  paper  in  New  York  or  in  Buxtehude.  He  is  a 
man.  And  such  a  man  can  not  hear  any  more  than  I  can 
hear.  I  have  had  somewhat  of  a  musical  education,  and  1 
have  studied  to  advantage  and  I  say  the  man  who  wrote  the 
above  lines  either  lied  deliberately  or  does  not  possess  the 
rudimentary  knowledge  of  voice  culture. 


If  Madame  Arral's  voice  is  anything  at  all  it  is  fresh  and 
youthful  in  quality.  It  is  pliant  and  mellow.  It  is  most  as- 
suredly one  of  many  refinements  of  shading  and  emotional 
coloring.  And  I  do  not  need  lo  tend  bar  at  the  Grenoble 
Hotel  to  know  this  much  about  singing.  Madame  Arral  does 
not  require  any  perfection  of  phrasing,  and  her  fine  legato 
and  equable  poise  are  so  evident  that  only  one  who  heard 
her  from  the  Hotel  Grenoble  bar  could  have  missed  them. 
.\s  to  her  enunciation  of  French  and  Italian,  my  readers  will 
remember  that  I  called  particular  attention  at  the  time  she 
sang  here  to  her  remarkable  facility  in  that  direction  and  I 
defy  anyone,  whether  he  writes  for  a  New  York  paper  or 
not,  to  prove  the  contrary. 

The  writer  on  the  Tribune  gives  himself  away  right  in  the 
beginning  of  the  article  when  he  states,  "It  is  already  obvious 
that  the  campaign  of  education  for  which  the  people  of  New 
York  were  enlisted  nearly  two  months  ago  is  not  to  be  con- 
fined to  the  opera  houses.  A  change  of  standard  is  to  be 
wrought,  and  a  revolution  made  of  the  elements  which  enter 
into  all  the  departments  of  singing.  The  public  must  learn 
to  forget  what  it  has  been  in  the  habit  of  enjoying  for  a  great 
many  years,  or  if  it  can  not  do  that,  at  least  to  remember 
with  as  little  heartburning  as  possible,  and  accept  inferior 
offerings  with  gratitude."  Here  is  the  trouble  in  a  nutshell. 
The  writer  is  evidently  an  old  foggy  who  has  been  permitted 
to  peg  along  for  years  in  the  same  old  drudgery,  is  still  em- 
ploying the  school  master  kind  of  criticism  which  Wagner 
embodied  so  eloquently  in  his  Beckmesser,  and  because  he 
is  not  held  any  more  in  that  awe  and  veneration  which  his 
flimsy  position  used  to  conquer  for  him,  and  now  when  the 
public  and  the  managers  and  the  artists  are  becoming  suffi- 
ciently emancipated  not  to  ask  his  advice  about  things,  he 
becomes  squeamish  and  peevish,  and  says  that  everything 
artistic  is  going  to  the  demnition  bow-wows.  By  the  public 
he  means  himself  and  any  campaign  of  education  which  he 
does  not  lead  is  not  good  for  the  public,  meaning  himself. 
Here  is  the  trouble.  Madame  Arrall  no  doubt  failed  to  grease 
itching  palms  and  cow-tow  to  critics  who  have  become  so 
imbued  with  the  germ  of  megalomania  that  they  have  become 
absolutely  proof  against  merit  in  anyone  who  dares  to  do 
things  without  consulting  them.  They  are  losing  their  old 
friends  of  the  Metropolitan  Opera  House  who  used  to  make 
them  presents  and  loans,  which  were  not  to  be  repaid,  and 
now  because  a  campaign  of  education  is  being  inaugurated, 
which  does  not  believe  in  bribery,  they  whine  and  squirm  and 
yell  about  "inferior  offerings."  Bah!  Such  rubbish  is  not 
worth  the  paper  it  is  printed  on. 

This  same  writer  who  finds  fault  with  Madame  Arral  be- 
cause of  her  facial  and  histrionic  gestures  went  into  estacies 
over  WuUner  and  Tilly  Koenen  for  the  same  reason.  I  have 
the  criticisms  here  to  prove  this.  What  is  the  use  paying 
attention  to  such  incompetent  trivle.  The  balance  of  the 
write-ups  squarely  contradict  the  above  statements  of  the 
"Times"  writer  in  their  essential  points.  As,  for  instance,  says 
the  critic  of  the  New  York  Press:  "The  ear  detected  im- 
mediately a  voice  of  much  natural  beauty,  clear  vibrant  and 
flexible.  The  audience  felt  the  charm  of  her  personality  and 
the  sympathetic  appeal  of  her  voice.  Her  tones  sounded 
fresh,  limpid  and  tenderly  expressive."  And  finally,  "Madame 
Arral  has  a  well  equalized  voice."  .lust  compare  this,  if  you 
please,  with  the  "Times"  critic's  broad  falsehood:  "It  is  not 
a  voice  in  the  first  freshness  of  youth,  nor  beautiful  quality, 
nor  is  it  one  of  many  refinements  of  shading  and  emotional 
coloring."  We  may  not  be  in  a  position  to  write  for  a  New 
York  paper,  and  have  not  become  petrified  in  the  service, 
but  we  have  warm  blood  in  our  veins.  We  are  still  able  to  see 
some  good  in  an  artist.  And  yet  people  have  written  me  long, 
long  letters — which  I  have  answered — in  which  they  tried  to 
defend  these  rinkled  old  hypocrites;  because  I  refuse  to  quote 
their  egotistical  opinions  in  a  clean  paper,  read  by  young  girls 
and  boys  who  desire  to  know  the  truth  and  be  educated  in 
music  afar  from  bribery  and  prima  donna  friendships,  and 
who,  through  the  Musical  Review,  love,  revere  and  venerate  a 
man  and  woman  who  has  become  great  in  this  world.  Yes. 
We  may  be  here  in  the  wild  and  woolly  West,  but  we  have  not 
shattered  our  ideals,  we  have  no  vinegar  on  our  tongues,  and 
we  only  apply  the  whip  to  hypocrites  and  impostors,  be  they 
newspaper  writers  or  artists.