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LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW- SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



IJJ THE OHLY WEEKLY MU51CAL JOUR.NAL INI THE GREAT WEST jjij 



VOL. XLV. No. 1 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



MEROLA PROVES PERMANENT OPERA A SUCCESS IN SAN FRANCISCO 



Resident Artists in Minor Roles, Orchestra and Chorus Give Excellent Account of Themselves in Distinguished Company. 

Beniamino Gigli a Sensation in Andrea Chenier and Meiistofele — Martinelli Thrills in La Boheme and Tosca — Didur 

Histrionically Unsurpassable in Mefistofele — Queena Mario an Ideal Lyric Soprano — Bianca Saroya a Beauty 

in Art and Person — Doria Fernanda Reveals Great Versatility and Warmth of Voice — Anna 

Young, Rena Lazelle and Lela Johnstone Uphold Local Honors ■fJ'iyo.r 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



2173.S7 



By the time this issue of the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review reaches its large 
circle of readers the grand opera season 
at the Exposition Auditorium, under the 
auspices of the San Francisco Opera As- 
sociation, will have justified the pre- 
dictions of its sponsors concerning its 
artistic pre-eminence. Even as we write 
these lines the consensus of opinion 
among people who really count is unani- 
mous. The writer takes pleasure in 
mingling among the music lovers in the 
lobbies during intermissions at operatic 
performances and thus gather the various 
expressions of opinion. Until this year 
we have never encountered such unanim- 
ity of approval. Even during the seasons 
of the Metropolitan Opera Co., before the 
fire and during more recent appearances 
of the Chicago Opera Association, there 
have always been conflicting ideas re- 
garding the artistic excellence of the 
productions. But this year, even the 
most confirmed skeptics and the most 
energetic fault finders have only words 
of hearty commendation. The only dis- 
gruntled people we have run across are 
those who were unsuccessful in securing 
an engagement among the resident 
artists in the cast and who, much to 
their own disadvantage, if they only 
realized it, are going about swinging a 
little tack hammer to vent their own 
spite. It's of no use; the San Francisco 
Opera Association, with Gaetano Merola 
at the helm, has won a decisive artistic 
victory and. much to the musical benefit 
of the community, permanent opera in 
this city is assured. 

Up to the time of this writing the 
following operas have been presented: 
Wednesday evening. September 26 — La 
Boheme; Thursday evening. September 
27 — Andrea Chenier; Saturday afternoon. 
September 29 — U Tabarro, Suor Angelica 
and Gianni Schicchi; Saturday evening. 
September 29 — La Boheme: Monday eve- 
ning. October 1 — Mefistofele; Tuesday 
evening. October 2— La Tosca. The 
operas to be presented during the re- 
mainder of the week are : Thursday 
evening. October 4 — Romeo and Juliet: 
Saturday afternoon, October 6 — Gianni 
Schicchi and I'Pagliacci; Saturday eve- 
ning. October 6 — Mefistofele The final 
production will take place on Monday 
evening, October 8. and will consist of 
Rigoletto. The operas so far presented 
introduced to us practically all the ar- 
tists in the cast and all of them have 
justified the great expectations which 
we had prior to the opening of this opera 



Again we wish to extend our compli- 
ments to Gaetano Merola. It is one of 
the most difficult things imaginable to 
bring sufficient people together in San 
Francisco to /T^'orl^ for one common pur- 
pose. ThTs paper has discovered long 
ago that in or(J#r to assist this com- 
munity to gain musical prestige and be- 
come a dignifi,ed nwisici center you must 
FIGHT for it. The moment one certain 
^hM^actiaii finds that'anotber faction meets 
L.^.yr itW success in a certain praiseworthy 
BB^fpi^TtrfS'e opposition is begun and every- 
thing done to put obstacles in the way of 
progress. During the twenty-two years 
of his residence in San Francisco the 



writer has waged several battles in be- 
half of musical progress. Instead of ob- 
taining the support and assistance of 
people who directly benefit from musical 
prosperity he is beset with implorations 
to utilize the columns or this paper for 
purposes of extensions of courtesies, but 



g.ve the enterprise its moral and finan- 
cial support, without creating among 
them any friction and at the same time 
maintaining his position as head of the 
enterprise whose ideas and plans must 
be executed whole heartedly, without re- 
gard to individual aggrandizement and 




LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 
Brilliant Young California Pianist Who Will Appear Befo 
Society Next Thursday Evening, October 11, at thi 



actual worth-while support in a manner 
to justify the expense entailed to pub- 
lish this paper has been confined to but 
few people. 

And so Mr. Merola is accomplishing 
the apparently impossible, namely, to 
hold together a sufllcient number of 
music lovers, who are called upon to 



Fail 

with the sole purpose to add lustre to the 
musical annals of the city. It is not 
only necessary to raise a large sum of 
money in order to bring such an enter- 
prise to a successful conclusion. It is 
equally necessary to exercise due ECON- 
OMY. We venture the assertion that 
there is no operatic organization in this 
country or any other where the public 



receives so great an amount of artistic 
value for the money expended. A pro- 
duction such as Andrea Chenier or 
Mefistofele can not be heard anywhere 
in this country for less than eight dollars 
(including war tax). Do San Francisco 
people realize that Gaetano Merola in 
this engagement alone has saved them 
something like $150,000? 

Notwithstanding this economical pol'cy 
the artistic phase of the production does 
not suffer. We have witnessed pro- 
ductions at leading opera houses when 
many flaws could be picked. We already 
reviewed La Boheme in last week's issue. 
It is a pleasure to write something about 
Andrea Chenier. Mr. Merola evidently 
has picked his artists with a view to 
fitting them for special roles. And if 
this is so we can explain why Beniamino 
Gigli has been selected for Andrea 
Chenier. De Luca for Gerard, Didur for 
Mathieu. D'Angelo for Fleville, Paltrinieri 
for L'Abate and L'Incredibile. and Gilette 
for Maestro de Casa and Schmidt. Every- 
one of these artists positively fitted these 
roles like the proverbial glove. We sim- 
ply can not imagine a more effective nor 
more artistic performance of Andrea 
Chenier than we witnessed on this oc- 
casion. Indeed, we are glad to say that. 
although we witnessed this opera several 
times before, we never really appre- 
ciated its true musical and dramatic 
value until we heard it last week. 

Thanks to the effective virility of 
Gigli's histrionic action we almost took 
him for a dramatic instead of lyric tenor 
so vigorous and vital were his vocal and 
dramatic expressions. His voice is one 
of the most beautiful we have heard. His 
deportment is thoroughly in accord with 
the character he represents. His attain- 
ment of vocal climaxes is thrilling and 
his artistry as fine and as characteristic 
as it is possible to be. If we were to 
chose the greatest tenor we have heard 
since Caruso we would give our vote to 
Beniamino Gigli without hesitation. Both 
musically and histrionically he meets all 
requirements. In De Luca we have an- 
other artist of supreme proficiency. 
Thoroughly imbued with the emotional 
depth of the role of Gerard De Luca 
brought to his interpretation every ounce 
of intelligence and emotional coloring at 
hjs disposal. It was a revelation of con- 
trasting moods and sincerity of char- 
acter delineation such as is rarely seen 
upon the operatic stage. And. notwith- 
standing his dramatic intensity, he never 
permitted his vocal art to De sidetracked. 
but sang with strict adherence to vocal 
artistry and sonority of tone and flexi- 
bility of expression. 

Louis D'Angelo, Gion^ano Paltrinieri 
and Albert Gilette enacted their respec- 
tive parts with exceptional force of char- 
acter and fidelity in their portrayal of 
their roles. It is so rarely that these 
imporant roles are interpreted by artists 
of the first rank that we feel gratified 
to. once in our life, find thoroughly 
equipped singing actors undertake to in- 
terpret roles that owing to their inade- 
quate interpretation used to be consid- 
ered of minor importance. One of the 
(Continued on Page 7, Col. 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RFA'IEW 



The DUO-ART in the 
STEINWAY 



The Duo-Art reproducing feature 
may be had only in Steinway, 
Weber, Steele, Wheelock, Stroud 
and Aeolian pianofortes. 

The great fact that the Duo- 
Art can be had in the Stein-way is 
itself an eloquent tribute to the 
Thio-Art. 



Shermanlfiay & Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts.. San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Sacramento - Stockton- Fresno - San Jose 

Portland • Seattle - Tacoma - Spokane 



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MYNAKD S. JONES 



Voral problrmK Ihnrnuichlr dlnKn»Hrd and proper 

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ARHII.I.AGA MISICAL C'OI.I.EGB 

ms Jarkaon St. Pkonr Wcat 4737 

A *tnall Fre For Aodltlona 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
MUNICIPAL ORGANIST OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. ORGANIST 
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 
Piano and Organ Injlruction. Vocal Coach. 
Studio: Firtl Congregational Church, cor. Pott 
and Maion Street!. Tel. Douglas S186. Residence. 
887 Bulh Street. Tel. Prospect 977. 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS AND 
ORGAN RECITALS 



Manning School of Music 



JOHN < . M \>MN<i. Ill,,, 
rt*1 n..aiaxlon Blrm Trlrvto 


nr Kllloiorr 3gr, 


DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

AIIVAXKII IM ril.!l Art-EPTKD 


Krara> 3I.-.I. Ilr.ldrnr, >ludl~. !.-,< 
Mr.. Ilaklaad. Trlrpkoar I'lrd. 


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JULIUS GOLD 

VIOI.IMST— Tlii:olllST— TKA< HER 
Exponent of the ilFHt Tradlllunx of Violin Plarin 
Studied nilh llenrj liolnirn Urrnliord LUIemnn 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 



ARTISTIC STUDIO FOR RENT 

Kl KMSIIr.i) — i;IIA>l> PIAM) 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



Tel. Fllluo 



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MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 

JIST KKTIK.\KD FHIIM El ROPE 
Mudlo: 4U.- Kohier A Chaae lildK., Tel. Kearnr ^M 

Dominican College School of Miuic 

J*A.\ RAFAEI,. CAI.IFORMA 
MOMle C'ooraea ThoroUfEb and I'roKreaaive 
l*nblle School Mnalc. Accredited niploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

>ullr .VMI Kokirr & (banc llldK., 
S. F.I :.VII1 < nllcEc Ave.. Ilrrkrir;. Ilealdence 201 Alia- 
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MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

I'repnrlnv Trnrhrr fnr 

Mil**. 0«*r.\H M \ ■%■•<'■- K I. I>T. Planlat 

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WALLACE A. SABIN 

Orcaolat Temple Emano El, Flral rharch of CkrUt Sel- 
cnliMt. director l.orinK Club. S. I'.. Wed.. Illl.", Siicrninentu 
Street. I'honc W (■»! :t7.V{: Snt.. l-'irNl <-briNlinn Science 
ChDrch, Phone Franklin IStlT; Rea. atndlo, 3142 LenlatOB 
.\Te., Berkeler. Phone Piedmont 242.S. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 



The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Merrltt. Oakland 

Complete Con>er%alory r ourae — Piano, Harp, Violin. 

•fcllo. \olce. foiinterpnlnt. Harmony. Hiatory 

DUKINI VOCAL STUDIO 



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Thoroush Vocal and Dramatic Tralninjc 
Pine .St. Phone Donclaa OHM 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON i. CO., Inc, 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

IM \MST — l>STUI fTOIl 



MADAME WILSON-JONES 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ITThFONL't' WEEKL'r' f.^U^ICAL JOURJ'JAL IK THE QgEAT W£5T 111 
MUSICAL RBTTBW COMPANY 

ALFRF-D METZGER -Prealdent 

C. C. EMERSO> Vice President 

MARCtS L. SAMUELS Secretarr and Tr 



ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

C. C. EMERSON - Business Manager 

Make all checkn, draftn, money orders or other forms of 

remittance pnynhle to 

PACIFIC COAST MISICAL REVIEW 



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Los Aniceles omee 

fllO Southern California Mawlo Co. Bnlldiner. 

Eighth and Broadway Tel.. Metropolitan -1308 

Miss Lloyd Dana In Charge 

VOL. XLV SATURDAY, OCT. 6, 1923 NO. 1 



noil matter at S. P. Postofflce. 



TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 



S. F. OPERA ASSOCIATION 



The unquestionaljle artistic and financial suc- 
cess of the present grand opera season at the Ex- 
position Auditorium justifies the permanent or- 
ganization of the San Francisco Opera Associa- 
tion. In the distrihution of credit during- the 
course of productions like the ones now in the 
course of progress one is incUned to confine one- 
self to artistic achievements and forget quite fre- 
quently the quiet, unassuming, but persistent^ 
efforts of those who are "lost in the crowd." as' 
it were. While everyone agrees that Gaetano 
Merola is the father of the idea of San Francisco 
grand opera such as is being demonstrated at 
present, and while he exhibited the necessary 
patience, tact and convincing power to gather 
around himself the splendid array of men and 
women constituting the San Francisco Opera As- 
sociation, the enterprise could not have been 
brought to a successful conclusion without the 
individual efforts of the officers and members of 
that excellent association. 



We have not sufficient room at this time to 
enumerate the names of those worthy of recog- 
nition. But we can say that Timothy Healy, 
President of the San Francisco Opera Associa- 
tion, must be placed in the front row among those 
whose enthusiasm, loyalty to the cause and per- 
sonal effort proved such a large factor in the 
successful consummation of this wonderful enter- 
prise. Another officer whose work is worthy of 
special recognition is Selby C. Oppenheimer. 
business manager, who selected the personnel of 
the publicity department and who looked after 
the ticket sale, advertising and other details. To 
return to Mr. Healy, we wish to emphasi;^e the 
importance of the numerous addresses he made 
in behalf of the enterprise. Notwithstanding his 
own professional work, w^hich monopolizes his 
time fairh' well, he added to his numerous duties 
this cre'ation of propaganda for the San Fran- 
cisco opera company. And, surely, the influence 
his eloquence exercised in behalf of the cause 
can not be too highl}' estimated, and the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review, in the name of the musical 
profession and the musical public which it rep- 
resents, although unofficially, wishes to extend 
its appreciation of Mr. Healy's remarkable ex- 
ecutive power and tenacity. 



But somehow the excellent orchestra, brought to- 
gether by Walter Ocste.reicher. has not received 
its share of praise. No better illustration of the 
usefulness of an orchestra of symphonic char- 
acter can be cited than the splendid support given 
the operatic productions by this excellent body 
of musicians. In every one of the operas, spe- 
cially in Mefistofele and Romeo and Juliet the 
discriminating phrasing of the various groups of 
instruments was strikingly in evidence. The 
musicians did not play like the usual routine 
opera orchestra. They played like artists, and, 
therefore, enhanced the performance artistically 
in a manner that we never observed at any oper- 
atic production since the pre-fire days. Much of 
the gratitude of those who so thoroughly enjoyed 
these performances is due to the personnel of the 
San Francisco Symphon}- Orchestra, which con- 
stituted almost the entire material of the opera 
orchestra and which Gaetano Merola conducted 
with such skill. And, by the way, the musicians 
of the orchestra are unanimous in their expression 
of appreciation of the invariable courtesy and 
patience of their conductor. 

THE SAN FRANCISCO MUSICAL CLUB CONCERT 

The San Francisco Musical Club gave its first concert 
of the season at the Palace Hotel on Thursday morn- 
ing. September 20. when the following program was 
enjoyed by a large gathering: Composers of the 16th, 
17th and ISth Centuries — Antique Piano Solos: Giro- 
lamo FrescobaUli — Gagliarda in G minor, Passacaglia in 
B major, Fugue in G minor: Francois Couperin — La 
Lutine. Les Petits Moulins a Vent (The Little Wind 
Mills); Francois Dandrieu — Le Caquet (arranged' by 
Godowsky); Jean Philippe Rameau — Rigaudon (ar- 
ranged by Godowsky): Marion de Guerre Steward. 
Corelli — Sonata in D Major, Modesta Mortensen. Mar- 
tha Dukes Parker, at the piano. Haydn — Trio in D 
major, Modesta Mortensen. violin: Dorothy Dukes 
Dimm, cello: Martha Dukes Parker, piano. 

The piano group that introduced the program, and 
which was interpreted by Marion de Guerre Steward, 
revealed the fine artistry of this able pianist combining 
discrimination of phrasing with clear and precise tech- 
nic. Modesta Mortensen's violin playing and Martha 
Dukes Parker's pianistry were in gratifying evidence 
during a most musicianly rendition of Corelli's D major 
Sonata. The ensemble work was specially com- 
mendable. Mrs. Miriam E. Sellander being indisposed, 
Edil Barto Anderson, Consul from Peru, accompanied 
by Mrs. Cecil HoUis Stone, sang a group of songs, in- 
cluding three Spanish folk songs, J'ai pleure en reve by 
Georges Hue and a song by Sibella. Mr. Anderson 
possesses a baritone voice of pleasing, sympathetic 
quality and uses it artistically and intelligently. 

The trio by Hayden was played with regard to beauty 
of shading, delightful ensemble and uniform expression. 
The young ladies constituting the trio are planning 
to organize permanently and are rehearsing twice a 
week. They are justified to stick together from the 
showing they made on this occasion. Mrs. Jessie Burns 
Stoll, president of the San Francisco Musical Club, de- 
livered an address of welcome, prior to the beginning 
of the program, during which she stated that the club 
will try to give programs that are pleasing as well 
as seriously worth while, for the reason that the San 
Francisco Musical Club is essentially a study club. She 
read the names of the personnel of the Board of Di- 
rectors and committees adding that all that was ex- 
pected of the members is large attendance, loyalty, co- 
operation and. if possible, enthusiasm. The latter 
sentiment being a remarkable incentive in fostering a 
genial club spirit. Mrs. Stoll introduced Mrs. Dorothy 
Camm. chairman of the program committee who added 
a few words concerning programs. Mrs. Camm ex- 
plained that the programs are to show the development 
of music chronologically. Thursday. October 4, was 
Founder's Day of which more will be said in the next 



The distinguished visiting artists, our own 
splendid vocalists selected by Mr. Merola, the 
magnificent chorus and everyone else connected 
with the artistic side of the enterprise received 
due recognition in the daily and weekly press. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY'S FIRST CONCERT 

The ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel was crowded to 
the doors on Monday evening. September 24. when the 
Pacific Musical Society opened its new season. Mrs. 
David Hirschler made a few well chosen remarks re- 
garding the purposes and plans of the club and com- 
plimented the incoming ofl5cers and committee mem- 
bers as well as some of the chairmen of committees. 
Mrs. William Henry Banks, the newly elected presi- 
dent, made a brief address which she concluded by 
saying it would be the only one during her admin's- 
tration as she believed in deeds rather than words. 
The program began with the interpretation of a violin 
and piano sonata by Guillaume Lekeu, which was given 
its first presentation in San Francisco by Edouard 
Deru. violinist, and Beatrice Anthony, pianist. 

It is impossible to judge the entire artistic merit of 
this Sonata in one hearing and we would feel inclined 
to be unjust if we gave definite judgment after one 
hearing. It may, however, be said that Mr. Deru gave 
the work unquestionably an authoritative reading. He 
is master of his instrument, plays with assurance and 
authority, possesses a style of his own and combines 
technical facility with intelligent expression. His tone 
is smooth and clean. There are some very effective 
and emotionally vivid phrases in this Sonata and there 
are episodes that at first hearing seem tedious and 
monotonous. But, as we said before, we shall suspend 
judgment until later. Mrs. Anthony played with poise 



and comprehension of the difficult piano part. She was 
in accord with the violinist grasping the spirit of the 
performance and overcame technical and emotional dif- 
ficulties. A group of short violin pieces closed the 
program and Mr. Deru aroused his hearers to special 
enthusiasm by the manner of his interpretations. He 
played with the effectiveness of one used to artistic 
honors and one feeling at home on the concert stage. 
The accompaniments of Mrs. Anthony were artistically 
discriminating and blended with the soloist's able per- 
formance. 

Lillian Hoffmeyer Heyer, contralto, sang a group of 
songs with exceptional warmth of voice and unusual 
regard for expression. She phrased with such intelli- 
gent regard for shading that she made an excellent im- 
pression on her hearers. Henrik Gjerdrum at the piano 
supplemented Mrs. Heyer's artistic expressions^ The 
complete program was as follows: Violin and piano — 
Sonata in G major (Guillaume Lekeu), Edouard Deru, 
violinist, Beatrice Anthony, pianist: vocal — .\h! Ren- 
dimi (Mi trane) (Rossi), Lehn! deine Wang an meine 
Wang (Jensen), Danish Folk Song (August Enna), A 
Memory (Rudolph Ganz), When Your Dear Hands (La 
Forge). Lillian Hoffmeyer Heyer. Henrik Gjerdrum at 
the piano; violin — Aria on the G String (Bach). Minuet 
(Mozart), Berceuse (Faure), Tempo Martiale (Pugnani- 
Kreisler), Edouard Deru. Beatrice Anthony at the 
piano. 



LOEWS WARFIELD THEATRE MUSIC 

During these days when certain motion picture man- 
agers try to fool themselves into the belief that the 
public at large will attend moving picture shows better 
when the worst kind of music accompanies these pic- 
tures it is gratifying to know that the Loew Warfield 
Theatre is sufficiently regardful for public taste and 
intelligence to give the best of music in the best pos- 
sible manner. George Lipschultz and his excellent 
orchestra are playing this week the William Tell 
overture in a manner that evokes the spontaneous and 
prolonged enthusiasm of the public. It is played with 
vim and spirit and unquestionably is enjoyed by the 
large audiences that crowd the theatre. 

In its policy to give the public the best the Loew- 
Warfield is considering the sentiments of serious music 
lovers, and since the pictures shown at this splendid 
palace of entertainment are of an exceptionally fine 
artistic category of late, there is no reason why the 
music lovers who enjoy motion pictures should not 
concentrate their efforts to encourage the management 
to continue its worthy recognition of good music. We 
hear many people remark that they like to go to the 
Warfield on account of the excellent orchestra, under 
the direction of George Lipschultz, and the good music 
they hear there. While occasionally the management 
introduces an occasional "jazz" orchestra as a special 
attraction it usually selects one that does not offend the 
sensibilities of serious musicians. To claim that San 
Francisco does not appreciate good music, but prefers 
"jazz" is an insult to the community and should be 
resented in no uncertain terms. 



A CORRECTION 

-^ 

We regret to announce that in the article "The 
Orchestra in its Relation to the Moving Picture," by 
Mr. Stearns, which has been running serially in the 
"Pacific Coast Musical Review." an unavoidable mistake 
was made in the issue of September 15, which dis- 
torted the continuity considerably. 

The first four paragraphs beginning with "It is of 
course" and ending with ""for parts and score." should 
have followed the section printed in the issue of August 
25. The porton used in the issue of September 15 
should have then begun witht he fifth paragraph of that 
issue in its present form, starting: "No other com- 
position than these eight," etc. 

In the fifth line of this article in the September 15 
issue, the word "vibration" should read "VARIATION." 

We should like to call attention — to professional 
musicans in particular — to the fact that in an early 
issue we shall print in its entirety Mr. Stearns' Library 
Classificaton, which he has adapted from "Dewey's 
Decimal Classification." This is an exhaustive cate- 
gorical classification of all music likely to be used in 
scoring pictures, and should prove of inestimable value 
to all musicians engaged in picture work. To the best 
of our knowledge this is the first time in the history of 
the industry that such classificatory scheme has ap- 
peared in public print. 



Mrs. Scott's Fortnightlys began at the St. Francis 
Hotel last Monday afternoon with the Chamber Music 
Society of San Francisco as the feature. The event is of 
too much importance to be dealt with in that brevity 
which its proximity to publication day and the space 
at our disposal would force us to devote to it today. 
And so we shall be more explicit next week. 

Lincoln S. Batchelder, whose photograph appears on 
the front page of this issue, will be the soloist at the 
Pacific Musical Society on Thursday evening. October 
11. at the Fairmont Hotel. Mr. Batchelder's perform- 
ance has been highly praised by local critics and East- 
ern critics as well. His program wil 1 include the 
Symphonic Etudes by Schumann, the Petrarch Sonette 
No. 123 of Liszt and two modern Russian numbers 
heard for the first time in San Francisco, namely, 
Novelle by Medtner and an Etude by Schlozer. 

Thorstein Jensen Holm, violinist. Otto King, cellist, 
and Henrik Gjerdrum, pianist, were the soloists at a 
concert given by the Norwegian Singing Society who 
celebrated their twentieth anniversaiy on September 
29. A feature of the program was a number of Trios 
for violin, cello and piano played by the artists men- 
tioned. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



LAWRENCE STRAUSS RECITAL 



Those who delight in the unhackneyed will throng 
the Italian Room of the Hotel St. Francis next Tues- 
day evening. October 9. to hear Lawrence Strauss, 
tenor and May Mukle, English lellist, in one of the 
most delightful of programs. Miss Mukle is in the very 
tirsl rank of violomelliBts and Lawrence Strauss Is too 
well known to need rotnnient. Kllen Kdwards. Engl'sh 
l»lanist. will be accompanist for both artists and the 
recital is under the direction of Alice SeckeU. The fol- 
lowing is the unusual program: Suite in E (Valentiull, 
May Mukle; Serenade (Gabriel Grovlez). Chant de 
Ren gnatlon (Darius Milhaud). Le Reveil dc la Mariee 
(Song to a Bride), Greek Folk Song arranged by 




LAWRENCE STRAUSS 

.Maurice Ravel. Le Moulin iThe .Mill) (Gabriel Plerne), 
Traum durch die Dammerung (Dream in the Twilight) 
(Richard Strauss), Zueignung (Devotion) (Richard 
Strauss), Lawrence Strauss; Allemande (unpub- 
lished) (Lully. .\rr by .Mukle). Allegro Spiritoso (Sen- 
allle) (16871730I (Arr. by Mukle), Chant elegiagne 
(Florent Schmitt). Melody (Frank Uridge), La Tzigane 
(Massenet). May Mukle: The Hare (Arthur Bliss). I 
Heard a Piper Piping (Arnold Bax), Chanson de Bar- 
ber. ne (Kugene Goossens). Song (first time) (Antonio de 
Gras-il). Swing Low Sweet Chariot (arr. by H. T. Bur- 
leigh). Little David. Play on Your Harp (arr. by H. T. 
Burleigh). Lord Rendal (arr. by Cecil Sharp). My Father 
Has Some Very Fine Sheep (arr. by Herbert Hughes). 
Lawrence Strauss. 



OPENING SYMPHONY LECTURE 



The opening talk on the S>'mphony. its instruments 
and the themes of the program as presented by the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra under .Mfred Hertz, 
will take place Friday. October 19. at 11 o'clock, at 
SoroBls Club hall. These twelve "Symphony-logues " 
will be given by Victor Lichenstein and are under the 
direction of Alice Seckels. They will be held the Friday 
tnoming of the Symphony concert day and will last 
hut one hour. Tickets for the series are now on sale 
at the Symphony box office, and the Musical Association 
is endorsing this plan to acquaint music lovers more 
fully with the greatest of all forms, the Symphony. 
Each talk will bear upon the program of the day but 
an added interest will attach to the bringing of the 
various Instruments before the audience by the artists 
of the orchestra. Those who are not subscribers to the 
ri'gular series of Symphony concerts will find in these 
Illustrated talks much interest and they will prove ex- 
ceedingly enlightening to all concert goers and 
students. 



RECITAL BY PUPILS OF MR. AND MRS. KRUGER 



Till- concert to be given by pupils of Mr. and Mrs. 
George Kruger on Sunday afternoon. October 14. at 
the residence studio. 283 Thirtieth avenue (Sea Clid). 
promises to be an exceptionally successful one. The 
program is on<* to be looked forward to with pleasurable 
anticipation, revealing as it does the guiding mind 
of a liacher who values artistic results in his pupils. 
The follow Ing generous program will be rendered: 
Menuet in G major. Menuet In G minor (Bach). Marie 
Josepliine Emerson: Rondo alia Turca (Burgmuller), 
Valse liluette (Duvernoyi. FIslelle Stein: Sonatine C 
major (Kuhinu), Jane Cooper; Gondollna (Lack), Valse 
Caprice (Newland). Tilly llerger; Impromptu (Schu- 
b«Ti(, Valse (Chopin). George Gooey: Hungarian 
Rhnpsodle No . 2 (Liszt I. Tiny Puccinelli: Elegie 
(Nollct). Valse Chromaiiqu- (Godardi. Mildred Berg: 
Allegro con graciri (Barglil). Hondo Cappricdoso 
(M<iHl4lg8ohn). Viola Luther; Kannnol Oslrow (Rubin- 
»(eini. Rlgoletlo Kantasie (Liszt). Alice Meyer: Dance 
of the Gnomes (Liszt). Norman Smith; Faust Fantaaie 
(l.lsjt). Edna I.lnkowskI: Concert stuck (Weber). 
Joseph SalvBio. (Orche8(ral part on second piano.) 





CHARLES 


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Oakland. T**!. I'lrdmonl .VITT-J. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By ElJta Muggins 

1605 The Alameda. San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



SA.\ JOSE. Sept. 25.— The local musical season was 
opened Tuesday evening. September 18. by San Jose 
chapter of the American Guild of Organists. Walter 
Keller. F. A. G. 0.% was the artist presented in recital. 
Mr. Keller, who holds a fellowship degree, the highest 
academic honor conferred by the guild, is a composer 
of national reputation. Educated in Europe and Amer- 
ica, he has concertized for many years. He commenced 
his present American lour from Chicago, where he is 
dean of the musical school of Ue Paul University, and 
director of the Sherwood Sc:hool of .Music. The large 
auditorium of the First Methodist church was filled 
tor this opening event. During an intermission it was 
announced by Leroy V. Brant, president of the San 
Jose guild, that a series of other Interesting recitals 
would follow, for which the guild would engage bril- 
liant soloists. This contemplated series will greatly 
enrich San Jose's musical season. 

Miss Marjor>* Marckres Fisher presented her pupil. 
-Miss Esther Talbot, in a viola and violin recital Thurs- 
day evening, Sept. 20. at the Centella Methodist Episco- 
pal church. Miss Catherine Scorsur. pianist was the 
ass'sting artist. The program opened with the Mozart 
Trio VII-E Flat Major, for violin, viola and piano, played 
by Miss TalboL Miss Scorsur and .Miss Fisher. Miss 
Talbot was heard in a viola group and concluded the 
program with a group of violin solos She proved her- 
self a musician of distinctive ability-, reflecting great 
credit upon her teacher. It is to be hoped that the 
viola, held so long in the background, is coming to the 
tore as a solo instrument 

Miss Scorsur, one of .Miss Maude Caldwell's most 
talented pupils, delighted her hearers with her two 
numbers, proving herself an efficient accompanist as 
well. The program in full: Trio VII-E Flat Major. 
Andante. MenueKo, Allegretto, .Miss Talbot, viola. Miss 
Fisher, violin, .Miss Scorsur. piano; Viola solos (a) 
Ballade (Evan-Jones), (bl Gavotte (Rameau), Miss Tal- 
bot; Piano solos (a) At the Convent (Borodin), (b) 



AMERICAS POPULAR 
BALLAD SUCCESSES 



J4^i}1[\K)RLD 15 WAITING FOB THE5(JNRI5[| 

^SMILETHRUYOURTEARS 

JIF WINTER COMES 

j ROSES OFPICARDY 

JSONG OF SONGS 

^. JthE bells of ST. MARYS 

T4SS0ME DAY YOU WILL MISS ME 




Hungarian (MacDowell), Miss Scorsur: Violin solos (a) 
Legende (WIeniawski) (b) Kuiwiak Mazurka (Wieni- 
awski) Miss Talbot. 

Activities of the Conservatory of the College of the 
Pacific will begin next Tuesday evening. Oct 2. when 
the opening faculty recital will be given at 8:15 in the 
college auditorium. Allan Bicon will play a group of 
organ solos. Charles M. Dennis will sing an aria and a 
group of songs, and .Miles A. Dresskell will be heard in 
an interesting group of violin numbers. Miss Miriam 
Burton and Mr. Jules Moulet will be the accompanists 
for the evening. 

Wilson Taylor, tenor, and O. R. Marston. baritone, 
soloists at St. Stephens church in San Francisco, with 
Miss Helen Knapp, contralto, and Mrs. J. Ross Calfee, 
soprano, will be presented in recital by their teacher, 
Henry Bickford Pasmore, Wednesday evening, Sept. 26 
at the Institute of .Music Mr. Taylor will sing a group 
of Schubert's Immortal songs, among them. Who Is 
Sylvia; Impatience: and The Hunter's Serenade Mars- 
ton will s ng a Russian folk song, the Volga Boatman's 
Song, as well as a group of numbers by Ireland. Miss 
Helen Knapp has appeared with repeated success in the 
Greek Theatre in Berkeley, also as soloist for the 
Christian Science church in Richmond, and the Glee 
clubs ot the Tnlverslty of California She wll feature 
compositions of her Instructor, Mr. Pasmore. Mrs. J. 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant. Director 

IIITfr. I nur.ra In til llranrkr» nf Masle at 

All Macra of t d> anrrmi-nl 
• Am JOUK I'AI.IPOR.tilA 



Kohler & Chase 

2Cnabp panos 
SCnabp Ampiro 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 



Avenue, San Jone, CallL 



rSOTRE DAME COLLKUE OF MUSIC 

San Joae. Cal. 
Confer* ItrKTrfm, .AnnrdN Ortlllrnteii, Complele Collece 
ConorrvatorT and Arndrmlc ('<iuri<e> In IMano, Violin, 
Harp, 'Cello. A olrr, llnrmiinr. (onnlri point. Canon and 
KuKne and Hplence of .MuhIc. For partlcularM Applj to 
SiMlpr Superior. 

JOSE MUSIC COMPANY 

.\nderMon HrotherN 

rianoff. PtaonoBrrnphx. RprnrdN. Sheet MonIc, Vlollna. 

MandMliiiN — StudloN at Mtidt-rate Rate* 



WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



Ross Calfee is one of the popular singers of Northern 
California, and will be heard in an aria from Mascagni 
and Nymphs and Fauns (Bemberg). She will also sing 
some of the lighter numbers from modern composers. 

Russell Bodley, bachelor of music of the class of 
1923, Conservatory of the Pacific, has been appointed 
instructor of the courses in melodic and harmonic dic- 
tation and keyboard harmony in the conservatory for 
the coming year. As the holder of the highest number 
of honor points in his class. Mr. Bodley added to his 
reputation as a brilliant student. His piano playing has 
brought him much praise and his pedagogical equip- 
ment assures a successful year as instructor. 

Leda Gregorj" Jackson, soprano, was heard in an 
interesting program in San Francisco Thursday, Sept. 
20. at the Fairmont Hotel, the occasion being the annual 
breakfast of To Kalon club, the big event of their year. 
Mrs. Jackson delighted the large assemblage with Eng- 
lish songs and ballads of the Jenny Lind period. Her 
personal beauty added greatly to the program, being 
costumed in a charming Jenny Lind gown, parts of 
which were over one hundred years old. Mrs Jackson's 
numbers included: Should He Upbraid (Bishop); The 
Dashing White Sergeant (Bishop); Little Tassline 
(Lightwood); When Love is Kind (The Old English); 
Phyliss Has Such Charming Graces (Wilson). Mrs. 
Clyde While of San Francisco was the accompanist. 

Miss Violet Silver, violinisie. was the assisting artist 
Sunday, Sept. 23. when Marshall W. Giselman. organist, 
gave a recital at the Exposition Auditorium. This was 
the final organ recital of the season under the direction 
of the Auditorium Committee of the Board of Super- 
visors .Miss Silver's numbers wt*re Cui's Orienlale, 
and Obertass by W^ieniawski, with Mr. Giselman accom- 
panist. 

Both auditorium and balcony of the First Presbyter- 
ian church were filled Sunday evening for the sacred 
concert given under the sponsorship of the Y. W. C. A. 
John B. Seifert, tenor, of Oregon was the soloist, with 
Mrs. Homer DeWitt Pugh at the organ, accompanist, Mr. 
Seifert is the possessor of an unusually fine tenor voice 
especially adapted to the rendition of sacred music. 
Cnder the direction of Homer HeWitt Pugh, the chorus 
choir sang Haydn's The Heavens Are Telling, which 
was beautifully interpreted. Mr. Seifert 's numbers 
Included: Consider and Hear Me (Woolerl; Over The 
Stars There Is Rest (Abt); The Ninety and Nine 
(Campion); The Sorrows of Death (Mendlessobn) : 
The Publican (Van de Water); The Voice in the Wild- 
erness (Scott); Jesus Lover of My Soul (McDougall). 

Students of the Ehle School of Music are looking for- 
ward to an informal vocal recital lo be given by Victor 
Ehle and Arthur Drake in the early part of October. 
There are also being prepared some excellent quartet 
numbers in which Mrs. Harriet Gomes, soprano, will 
lake the solo part and Mrs. Raymond Bemls the con- 
tralto. 

John McDonald and his orchestra have been one of 
the chief attractions at the Casino as well as on the 
beach at Santa Cruz this summer. This is the third 
consecutive season this organization has appeared in 

(Continued on Page &. Col. 2) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''SoulfuV 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



MAIL ORDERS NOW 



MARY 
CMII 




ONLY RECITAL IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

AUDITORIUM 

SAN FRANCISCO 

SUNDAY afternoon, OCTOBER 21 



GUTIA CASINI. Cellist 
GEORGES LAUWERYNS. Pianist 
— Assisting Artists 

TICKETS— $3, $2, $1 (tax extra) 
Mail Orders with Funds to Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer, care Sherman. Clay & Co. 

Seat Sale Starts Wed. Oct. 10, 9 a. m. 

Management SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER 

Coming— TITO SCHIPA, Tenor 



ARTISTS 
CONCERTS SERIES 

BRILLIA.XT SKASO.V OPENS 

MONDAY NIGHT, OCT. IS. 1923 



QUEENA MARIO 

\.\ RI< (OLORATl RA SOPR.WO 
MI^TROPOI.IT \N OPKRA HOI !!«K 

SUBSCRIBE NOW 



ZA.N-XKTTK W. POTTER 



Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco 

SAN FRANCISCO SERIES 

SIX CONCERTS 

Assisting Artists: 

Horace Britt. Violoncellist 

Ethel Leginska, Pianist 

Erno Dohnanyi, Pianist-Composer 

SCOTTISH RITE HALL 

Tuesday Evening, Oct. 30th 
Tuesday Evening, Nov. 20th 
Tuesday Evening, Jan. 8th 
Tuesday Evening. Jan. 29th 
Tuesday Evening, Feb. 19th 

Tuesday Evening, March 25th 



ison Seat Sale — Six ConcerU — $10.00, 
$7.00, $4.00, at 708 Kohl Building, 
or Sherman, Clay & Co. 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

CURRAN 

MATZENAUER WHITEHILL 

Sunday Matinee, Oct. 14 
MOISEIVITSCH Friday Matinee, Nov. 9 



"IMPRESARIO" 


Friday Matinee. Nov. 23 


Quartet of VICTOR 


ARTISTS Fri. Mat., Dec. 7 


HEIFETZ 


Friday Matinee, Jan. 18 


"COSI FAN TUTTE 


Friday Matinee, Feb. 1 


ROSENTHAL 


Friday Matinee, Feb. 15 


IVOGUN 


Friday Matinee, Feb. 29 


CHAMLEE 


Friday Matinee, March 14 


WERRENRATH 


Friday Matinee, March 28 



SE-4SOX TICKETS O.V S.^LB 
SHERMAX. CLAV & CO. 

Season Prices — <8. $10. $12. J13. t 
10 per cent war ta-K 



"A capital organization this Da3rton Choir. It Deserves Success." 
— James H. Rogers in Cleveland Plain Dealer, Xov. 18, 1922 

CONCERT DIRECTION M. H. HANSON 

437 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK 

Announces the Famous 

Dayton Westminster Choir 

OF D.WTOX. OHIO 



FIFTY MEN AND WOMEN SINGING A-CAPELLA FROM MEMORY 

Director: JOHN FINLEY WILLIAMSON 

WILL TOUR THE PACIFIC COAST 

(THROUGH OKLAHOMA. MISSOURI, TEXAS, ETC.) 

DURING JANUARY-FEBRUARY, 1924 



For Programs in Which Music of American Composers Predomi- 
nates and any other Information, Address the Above Management 




SAN JOSE LETTER 

(Continued from Page 4, Col. 3) 

the surf city, and this has been especially commented 
upon as being the finest he has ever had. Mr. McDonald 
With his orchestra, is returning to San Jose this week. 

ALCAZAR 

More people have seen "Topsy and Eva." the Duncan 
Sisters' stupendous attraction at he Alcazar than any 
other legitimate stage offering which has ever been 
presented in San Francisco. The piece goes into its 
fourteenth week beginning with the matinee October 
7. and all attendance records for either musical comedy 
or straight dramatic productions have been broken. 
The only play which has had a longer run in San Fran- 
cisco than 'Topsy and Eva" was "The First Born," also 
presented at the Alcazar a quarter of a century ago, 
but the small theatre then opposite the Orpheum only 
accommodated three-fourths of the persons who can be 
seated at the present Alcazar, and it is believed that 
approximately 100,000 people saw that classic. To date 
more than 150,000 persons have witnessed "Topsy and 
Eva." 

Thomas Wilkes, who has just returned from New 
York, declares that all of the East is talking about the 
triumph of the Duncan Sisters and are anxiously await- 
ing the production of the musical comedy in that city. 
Wilkes was pleased wth the numerous innovations and 
improvements that have been made in the production 
since his departure and has pronounced it the equal to 
any production now on Broadway and far superior to 
many of them. 



MARIE HUGHES 
MACQUARRIE 



WARFIELD THEATRE 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 



ROSE 


FLORENCE 


CONCERT— VOICE 


PLACING— COACH IN.G 


Studio: 545 Sutte 


r St. 


Telephone Kearny 3598 


Directi 


in M 


ss Alice Seckels 


68 Post St., 


San 


Francisco. California 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANNIE LOUISE DAVID RECITAL 

The coming recital of Annie Louise David. harpl8t, 
fiabrlelle VVoodworth. soprano, with Alice Seclieig at 
the piano, is to be one of unusual Interest. The receipts 
arc to be sent to the Flerkeley tire fund to aid those 
musicians who lost itielr homes In the recent catEis- 
troplie. The concert will be held in the ballroom of the 
Claremont Hotel in Herlteiey, next .Mon. evening. Oct. 8. 
Songs with hari> accoinpaniuicnt and with piano, harp 
and voice will prove a deilKht. for few I^arpisls play 
the dlfhcult accompaniments as written for piano on 
the harp. .Miss David has played with most of the great 
singers. John McC'ormicii. .\nna Case, Francis Aida. 
to mention but a few and is noted for her harp arrange* 
ments. Numerous pieces are edited by .Miss David 
and she has herself published a number of original 
ones. The following program will be given: liarp. Pre- 
lude and Introduction (.\rr. by A L. David); Songs 
with harp. Deep in My Heart a Lute Lay Hid (Aly- 
wardi. Idyl I.MacDowell). Girometta (Sibellal. Tes 
Yeux (Rabey). Chanson Provencal (D'Ozonne); Harp, 
Valse (Brahms), Follets (Hasselinans), Arabian Ser- 
enade (Poulehani. Au Matin (Tournler): Songs with 
Piano. La Ninna-.N'anna della Virglne (Re!.-erl, Alba di 
Luna (Santolipuidoi. (from I Conti della Sera), Chan- 
son D'Amour iL de Pachmann). ".Mustapha" (Daniels):' 
Harp. Kvening Song (Frimll. Orlenuil Dance (Cady). 
Elude IChoplnl, (Arranged by A. L. David); Songs with 
Harp and IMano Nult dKtoiles (Debussy). SI Ics Flcurs 
Avient des Yeux (Massenet), Chant of the Stars (Ho- 
berg) (by request). 



SYMPHONY CONCERTS AT AUDITORIUM 

Interest is very keen in tlie second series of popular 
concerts to be given by the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. Alfred Hertz, conductor, at the Exposition 
Auditorium and the demand for season seats at Sher- 
man, Clay & Company's indicates that the attendance 
will exceed that of the Initial series, The dates are 
Wednesday evening. Octolier 31. and Tuesday evenings, 
December 11. January l.^i, Februai*y 5 and March 11, 
and a reduction of one-fifth the regular price is made 
to the purchasers of season tickets. 

Supervisor J. Emmet Hayden chairman of the Audi- 
torium Committee of the Hoard of Supervisors, direct- 
ing the concerts, announces that Conductor Hertz is 
selecting his programs with great care and that the 
soloists will include vocal and instrumental artists of 
international reputation. Claire Dux. one of Europe's 
foremost sopranos and a member of the Chicago Opera 
Company, will sing at the first concert, and tlie remain- 
ing soloists will be selected from Albert Spaulding, 
America's foremost violinist. Josejih Schwartz, the 
famous baritone. Moriz Rosenthal, the eminent pianist. 
Jean Gerardy. the world-famed 'cellist, and Reinald 
Werrenrath, the American baritone. The season sale 
will continue until Monday morning. October 22. when 
reservations for the first concert may he made singly. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



DAYTON WESTMINSTER CHOIR 



The Dayton Westminster Choir, of Dayton. Ohio, 
will make an extensive concert tour under the manage- 
ment of M. H. Hanson in January and February. 1824. 
This organization of fifty young men and women who 
sing acapeila and from memory only is under the direc- 
tion of John Finliy Williamson and will travel through 
Iowa. Missouri, Oklahoma, Texas and California. The 



MATZENAUER-WHITEHILL CONCERT 

Mme. Margaret Matzenauer. prima donna contralto. 
Metropolitan Opera Company, and Clarence Whltehill, 
leading tenor, also of the .'Vletropolitan. are the artists 
that will appear first on the Elwyn Artist Series at the 
Curran Theatre. Theirs will be a joint recital, in which 
separate and duet groups from Wagner will be featured. 
Matzenauer and Whilehill are considered two of the 
greatest Interpreters of Wagnerian Opera at the Metro- 
politan, and it Is welcome news 'hat Wagner groups 
will be given major attention by the artists in their 
forthcoming recital. The joint recital by Matzenauer 
and Whltehill will be followed by Benno Moiseivitsch. 
.Mozart's Opera Comiques, The Impressario, and Cosi 




THE WESTMINSTER CHOIR OF DAYTON. OHIO 
Which Will Make an Extensive Concert Tour Under the M.inagement of M. 
in January and February, 1924 



choir sang in Pennsylvania, Michigan and Ohio last 
November and the critics In Pittsburg. Detroit. Grand 
Rapids. Cleveland and other mid-Western cities were 
loud in their praise of the Dayton Westminster Choir 
whose successful endeavor they say is the most prom- 
ising awakening of real musical life in our country 
today. .Mr. Williamson has proved himself to be an 
Immensely talented conductor. He believes that choral 
music should be made to serve as an inspiration to the 
congregation and to the minister and that it has an im- 
portant place in the llfp of the church and the nation. 
Their programs are not simple ones for they include 
numerous eighipart compositions. Besides the class- 
ical masters Bar h and .Mendelssohn, the Russian Gret- 
chanlnofT and some modern English composers. Mr. 
Williamson strongly features the works of Americans 
tiKlay. Choral works by R. Nathaniel Dett. Clarence 
Dickinson, PeK-r C. Lutkln and Philip James have been 
pn>Krammed. The Westminster Choir leader says that 
they stand up with the best choral music contemporary 
European composers have produced. The appearance of 
the choir on the Pacific Coast should certainly create 
renewed interest In choral singing in churches. 



OAKLAND CONCERT SEASON 



Miss Zannelte W. Potter. Oakland concert manager, 
announces a very ambitious group of concert attrac- 
tions for her Artists Concerts Scries to be held as 
usual this season in the Oakland Auditorium Opera 
House. The season promises a hrililanl opening with 
Queena Marin. lyric coloratura, on Monday night. Oct- 
ober IS. In a superb concert pri>gram. There are those 
who know and love Mario on the coast who believe 
the charming prima-donna to he as good In concert 
ai In opera, and her appearance In several cities will 
no doubt prove this beyond a doubt. Following Mario. 
Miss Potter has scheduled for the Oakland Series. Tito 
Schlpa. Kmlllo de Gr.Kona. Elena Gerhardt. the Dun- 
can Dancers «llh Max Knhlnou Itsch at the piano. Har- 
old Hauer and Casals In Joint reiltal and Jeanne Oor- 
dpn who win close the season In April 1924. Tickets 
for the season are featured at much reduced rates 
and they may be secured at Sherman Clay's In Oakland. 



Fan Tutte, Quartet of Victor Artists. Olive Kline. Elsie 
Baker, Lambert Murphy and Royal Dadmun, Jascha 
Heifetz, Moriz Rosenthal. Maria Ivogun. -Mario Chamlee 
and Reinald Werrenrath. 

The Matzenauer-WTiitehill Joint recital which opens 
the Elwyn .\rtlst series at the Curran Sunday afternoon, 
October 14, promises a program of unusual variety 
and excellence. We are in receipt of an advance copy 
of the scheduled program which includes: (a) Hans 
Sachs' Monologur Was Duftet doch der Flieder from 
Die Meisterslnger Von Nurmberg. (b) Evening Star 
from Tannhauser (Wagner). Mr. Whltehill; My Heart 
is Weary from Nadeschda (G. Thomas). Mme. Matz- 
enauer; (a) Traum Durch die Dammerung (Strauss), 
(h) Die Beiden Grenadiere (Schumann), (c) The Isle 
(Rachmaninoff), (d) My .N'ative Land (Gretchaninoff ), 
.Mr. Whitehlll; (a) Erda's Warning from Das Rhelngold, 

(b) Traume (Brangane's Call from Tristan und Isolde) 

(c) Schmerzen (Wagner), Mme. Matzenauer; (a) On 
the Road to Mandalay (Speaks), (b) The Next Market 
Day, (c) A Ballynure Ballad, (d) Would God I Were 
the Tender Apple Blossom (Old Irish), .Mr. Whitehlll; 
(a) Over the Steppe (Gretchenlnolf). (h) On Wings of 
Dream (Arenskyl. (cl Estrcllita (Mexican Song), ar- 
ranged by La Forge, (d) Chanson Norveglenne (Four- 
drain), Mme. Matzenauer; Duet from La Favorita 
(Donizetti). Mme. Matzenauer and Mr. Whitehlll; 
George Vause at the piano. 



Madame Anna R. Sprotte, one of Los Angeles' most 
popular concert singers and vocal Instructors, has all 
of her classes In operatic and concert works filled. 
Aside from her busy hours of teaching. Mme. Sprotte 
holds the responsible positions of director of the chorus 
of the Santa .Monica Bay Woman's Club, program 
chalnnan of the American .Music Opiimlsts. head of 
the opera department of the Wa Wan Club and producer 
of operatic programs for the MacDowell Club. With 
engagements In Anaheim. Azusa and Santa Monica and 
sevenil concerts planned for a northi'rn lour. Including 
the cities of San Francisco, Portland. Seattle, and Ta- 
coma. .Madame Sprotte has a closely booked season 
ahead. Her pupils will he presented In recital on 
October 15 In the new Recital Hall of the Southern 
California Music Company building. 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. What Is meant by normal A and why so called? 
G. D. A. . 

A In the second space of the treble staff. So called be- 
cause It is the note (sounded by the oboe) to which an 
orchestra tunes. 

2. What are fiageolet tones on the violin? O. J. 
Flute-like tones produced by merely touching the 

strings with the finger and drawing the bow very 
lightly. They are usually called harmonics. 

3 When was "Andrea Cbenier" first performed? N. N. 

At La Scala, Milan, in 18116. 

4-. Has a musical composition ever been written en- 
titled 'The Creation"? B. K. 

Joseph Haydn's first oratorio is entitled "The Crea- 
tion." 

5. Wliat Is a fiying cadence? H. U. 

A deceptive cadence; that Is. a cadence which, 
instead of terminating on the tonic chord as the ear 
expects, takes one by surprise and closes with an un- 
expected chord. 



FESTIVAL CONCERT 



Miss Zannette W. Potter, Oakland impressario, who 
was asked by the Dons of Peralta to assemble a huge 
chorus for the opening event of Obapesia Week, Sep- 
tember 24 to 29 inclusive, is more than pleased with 
the results obtained this first year of effort along this 
particular line. While it was the original plan to en- 
semble one thousand voices, the outcome fell only a 
little short of this mark tor more than eight hundred 
singers participated In the Festival concert on Mon- 
day night. September 24. In the Oakland .Manicipal 
Auditorium where a delightful program was rendered 
to more than four thousand people. It Is generally con- 
ceded that this concert proved one of the great out- 
standing artistic successes of the entire week's pro- 
gram, and .Miss Potter is to be congratulated on the 
outcome of her untiling efforts in a unique undertaking. 

It was not an easy task and the results obtained 
meant weeks of previous preparation and hard work. 
Chorus units were established in Berkeley. Alameda, 
San Leandro and Oakland which served as convenient 
centers to singers living in the seven cities and towns 
of Obapesia, namely Oakland, Berkely, Alameda, Pied- 
mont, Emeryville. San Leandro and Albany. Those 
who served on the central music committee with Miss 
Potter Included Madame Antonia de Grassi, Wallace 
Sabln. Percy R. Dow. and Edgar Thorpe of Berkeley; 
Mr. D. E. Graves. Mrs. S. C. Ayres, Roy C. Brown. 
Elizabeth Westgate. Hazel B. Hunter and Mr. J. I. 
Tliomas of Alameda; Mrs. Susie Dalzlel of San Leandro; 
and Mr. Glenn H. Woods. Alice Bumbaugh. Lena Car- 
roll Nicholson, Charles Lloyd and Eugene Blanchard of 
Oakland and Piedmont, while Invaluable services were 
rendered by Wallace Sabln. Mrs. Minna Carter. Mr. 
Walter Burdy. Mr. Roy C. Brown and Mr. Herbert P. 
Mee in directing various chorus units preparatory for 
Mr. Glenn H. Woods who led the singers In their final 
concert. 

The chorus was very good and well balanced owing 
to the fact that many soloists volunteered their serv- 
ices and sang throughout the program with many of 
more limited experience, and this was the big, demo- 
cratic idea tliat was uppermost in Miss Potter's mind 
from the inception of the whole plan. 

The program of chorus numbers was well inter- 
spersed with solo and ensemble groups by local and 
visiting artists, which included the gratuitous services 
of Mr. Quinto Maganinl of the New York Symphony 
Orchestra. Madame Irene Le Nolr. local contralto. Mr. 
Harold Klrby, English baritone, Ruth Hall Crandall, 
Mrs. Glenn H. Woods and Miss Margaret .\very, tal- 
ented cellist. An orchestra of ninety jiieces played no 
small part in the evening's program which was as fol- 
lows: Obapesia Hymn. Dons of Peralta (Frances Mont- 
gomery). Orchestrated by Charles Cushlng. Technical 
High School. Dons and .\udience: Festival March 
(Mendelasolin). Orchestra; America The Beautiful 
(Katherinc Irfe Bates), Chorus and Orchestra; Echoes 
of the .Metropolitan (Tohanl). Orchestra; Toreador from 
Carmen (Bizet), Cliorus and Orchestra: The Haban- 
era from Carmen (Bizet), Madame Irene Le Nolr and 
Orchestra; Pilgrims' Chorus from Tannhauser (Wag- 
ner). Chorus and Orchestra; Baritone Solos (a) The 
Windmill (Herbert Nelson), (h) Brian of Glenaar 
(Herbert Graham). Harold Klrby; Italia. Beloved from 
Lucretia Borgia (Donizetti), chorus and Orchestra; 
la) Duet. Serenade (Till). Margaret Avery, Cello, 
Quinto Maganinl, Flute; (hi The Valse of the Stars 
(Maganlnal, (cl The Street of a Bazaar (Maganinl), 
(d) The Cry of the Flute (Maganinl), Solo— Madam Le 
Nolr, Quinto Maganinl. New York Symphony Orchestra; 
Prayer from Cavalleria (Mascagni). Soprano solo San- 
tuzza. .Mrs. Glenn H. Woods. Contralto solo. Lucia Ruth 
Hall Crandall. Chorus and Orchestra; Accompanists, 
Nadlne Shepard, Mildred Randolph; Director of Cho- 
ruses and Orchestra, Mr. Glenn H. Woods, Oakland 
Public Schools. 



In September, at the regular monthly concert for the 
students of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, 
Miss Ada Clement played a group of piano numbers, 
preceded by an explanatory talk on the music rendered. 
These monthly concerts are one of the Important 
educational factors of the Conservatory. 



'■UBLIC LIBRAR 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SAN FRANCISCO ASSURED PERMANENT OPERA 



ed fr. 



most predominating impersonations was 
that oE Matliieu by Adamo Didur. Here 
is an artist of the highest rank who 
never fails to give every ounce of energy 
and genius at his disposal to whatever 
part he has been entrusted with. Make- 
up, mimicry, dramatic action and vocal 
phrasing received at his hands the ut- 
most attention and he made a living 
type of this exceedingly picturesque role. 

Bianca Saroya as Maddalena took 
ample advantage of her opportunity to 
display her vocal powers as well as her 
dignified almost regal bearing. Her voice 
is a rich sonorous dramatic soprano em- 
ployed with excellent judgment and with 
adherence to pitch, color and emotional 
shading. She sang the role with un- 
erring fidelity to the dramatic score and 
■with splendid expression. Her excellent 
artistic qualifications were enhanced by 
her personal charm. Doria Fernanda re- 
vealed her artistry in the role of the 
Countess. She is showing the effects of 
practical experience in association with 
distinguished artists at leading opera 
houses. She has greatly benefitted dur- 
ing her term of apprenticeship and has 
developed into a full-fledged artist. It 
would be unjust to enumerate her among 
resident artists inasmuch as her princi- 
pal occupation is now elsewhere, more 
specifically with the Chicago Grand Opera 
Co. By this we do not wish to infer that 
there is anything to be ashamed of to 
be counted among resident artists, but 
the latter naturally do not claim con- 
temporary association with distinguished 
artists, while Miss Fernanda is at present 
occupying a position among the distin- 
guished operatic ai-tists :n the country. 
Her voice has gained in evenness and 
balance and her phrasing reveals intelli- 
gence and accurate judgment. 

Lela Johnstone and Rena Lazelle up- 
held the honors of the resident artists 
by fitting in snugly among this ensemble 
of experienced operatic stars. In their 
action as well as vocal expression they 
showed special qualifications and in no 
sense of the word did they make the im- 
pression of being novices in their work. 
Their voices sounded smooth, easy and 
accurate and their enunciation was clear 
and exact. Both artists are entitled to 
hearty commendation. The chorus, con- 
sisting of 150 vocal artists and students, 
proved itself thoroughly competent to 
cope with the many difficulties which 
the score demands to be overcome. 
Several unusually tricky passages were 
negotiated with care and precision. In- 
tonation, tone blending and uniformity 
of phrasing were specially gratifying 
and not too much credit can be bestowed 
upon the enthusiasm and ambition of 
the vocalists and the patience and ef- 
ficiency of those who trained them, thus 
making such a splendid performance, 
both from a vocal and dramatic stemd- 
point, possible. 

The orchestra proved itself capable 
and craftsmanlike. Under the splendid 
direction of Gaetano Merola it achieved 
excellent results and the Drilliantly con- 
ceived and effectively scored music was 
given a most adequate and artistically 
well balanced interpretation. Indeed Mr. 
Merola stood out as the dominating force 
of the entire performance. The stage di- 
rection of Armando Agnini is highly com- 
mendable for its precision and accuracy, 
while Natale Corossio's supervision of 
the terpsichorean features spells natural 
grace and prevention of exaggeration. 
Scenic effects and costumes were with- 
in the limits of historical accuracy. It 
was an unforgettable performance. 

The Three Puccini Operas 
Among the features that distinguish 
this season of grand opera under the 
auspices of the San Francisco Opera As- 
sociation, and the general direction of 
Gaetano Merola, is the introduction of 
operatic works which either have not 
been presented in San Francisco before, 
or which have not been heard for a long 
time. Those of us who are constantly 
attending these operatic seasons natural- 
ly become surfeited from listening to the 
same old repertoire time and time again 
and the management that constantly 
gives us the same bill of fare must not 
feel disappointed when we, opera goers 
and critics alike, become wearied and 
blasaic from hearing the same worn-out 
repertoire performed in the same old in- 
different slipshod manner. Thus Gaetano 
Merola is entitled to the gratitude of our 
opera lovers by adding zest to the 



present season through the introduction 
of works that possess the charm of 
novelty. 

Three one-act operas, never heard 
here before, were: II Tabarro (The 
Cloak t, Suor Angelica (Sister Angelica) 
and Gianni Schicchi by Giacomo Puccini. 
These three one-act operas are specially 
noteworthy because of their striking con- 
trasts. The first is intensely dramatic, 
something on the order of Cavalleria 
Rusticana, the second is sombrely re- 
ligious not very unlike an oratorio or 
cantata, while the third is distinctly hu- 
morous in the category of, let us say. 
The Barber of Seville. Both from the 
musical and dramatic standpoint we en- 
joyed the first of these works best. It 
condenses in a comparatively short space 
of time a volume of action and human 
passion. We have here the eternal tri- 
angle — husband, wife and lover. We 
have also here the inevitable result of 
such triangle, namely, death. Strange to 
say we could not. but in rare instances, 
recognize in the music of these operas 
the obvious style of Puccini's music. The 
distinguished composer seems to be here 
in a new role. Where in his other works 
he adhered religiously to the Italian 
style of melody and the introduction of 
sustained arias he confines himself in 
this trilogy to dramatic action backed by 
an orchestral setting. In other words 
he adapts himself to the modern school 
of composition entirely, although he re- 
tains his tendency for melodic invention 
in the orchestral score. 

Artistically, as stated before, we en- 
joyed II Tabarro the most, because it 
concentrates in a brief time, both dra- 
matically and musically, the maximum of 
action. Alfredo Gandolfl in the role of 
Michele, the husband, had an oppor- 
tunity to reveal both his vocal and his- 
trionic powers to their utmost, and he 
certainly took advantage of his oppor- 
tunities. A baritone of unusual smooth- 
ness ad accuracy, a very easy and un- 
forced mode of tone production and vocal 
intensity and a natural manner of en- 
acting severely emotional episodes form 
Mr. Gandolfl's principal artistic assets. 
It would be difficult to give this role a 
more realistic or more impressive in- 
terpretation. Armando Tokatyan in the 
role of the lover, Luigi. had the first 
chance to show us the depth of his ar- 
tistry and he certainly succeeded to 
make a lasting impresison. Possessing 
a smooth, even tenor of clear and pure 
timbre, singing with absolutely abandon- 
ment into the character of the role with- 
out marring his vocal balance and en- 
acting the scenes with a fidelity and 
depth rarely noted on the operatic stage 
Mr. Tokatyan firmly established himself 
in the good graces of his fastidious 
audience. 

Bianaca Saroya interpreted the role 
of Giorgetta specially well from a vocal 
standpoint. She phrased the contrasting 
emotional sentiments with strict regards 
to their sentimental importance, al- 
though dramatically we could have 
imagined the role interpreted by one 
more intense in action. Intensity of 
temperament is not one of Saroya's 
strongest assets. But right here it is 
only fair to say that there is possibly no 
artist in the company that has accom- 
plished such a remarkable feat as Bianca 
Saroya. She studied and successfully in- 
terpreted several new roles which she 
had never seen before and did it in a 
manner well worthy of hearty com- 
mendation. This reveals an enthusiasm, 
industry and love for the art which only 
a born singer can possibly exhibit. Vo- 
cally Miss Saroya is always dependable 
both as to tone quality and accuracy of 
pitch. She represents a most valuable 
type of operatic artist. 

Doria Fernanda also belongs to that 
type of artist who knows no fear for 
work and patience in acquiring knowl- 
edge. She, too, studied several new roles 
of a contrasting nature. Indeed her ver- 
satility, as exhibited during this engage- 
ment, is astounding. Even during the 
presentation of these three Puccini 
operas she had three distinctly different 
roles to perform, and she did it with un- 
erring artistic proficiency. La Frugola in 
II Tabarro required a matter-of-fact wife 
of a commonplace workman. The Prin- 
cess in Suor Angelica represented the 
dignified regal type of an aristocrat in- 
clined to be severely straight laced. La 
Vecchia in Gianni Schicchi was a nag- 



ging, selfish, and sharp-tongued woman. 
Notwithstanding these contrasts Miss 
Fernanda drew a distinct and successful 
character delineation of each one of 
them and backed by her fine pliant and 
judiciously employed contralto voice she 
gave every one pleasure because of her 
successful and artistic delineation of de- 
lightful operatic roles. 

It is indescribably enjoyable to experi- 
ence the allotment of what ordinarily 
are regarded as minor roles to artists of 
distinction thus emphasizing the fact 
that every role in an opera is equally 
important and should be entrusted to 
the very best artist. It is equally a 
source of pleasure to know that this 
company consists of artists of such high 
rank that not one considers it beneath 
his dignity to essay roles of seeming in- 
feriority. Thus we had the rare enjoy- 
ment of hearing artists of such major 
distinction as Giordano Paltrinieri, 
Adamo Didur, Armando Tokatyan. Paolo 
Ananian. Louis D*..Vngelo. .Mbert Gilette 
and even Giuseppe De Luca occasionally 
assume one or two minor roles and in- 
terpret them in a manner to emphasize 
their artistic value and rivet them in our 
memory as important links in a chain of 
artistic eloquence. The artists mentioned 
here took part in two of the three 
Puccini operas. Tokatyan. Paltrinieri 
and Didur in both II Tabarro and 
Schicchi. the others in Schicchi only. 

Among the three one-act works we 
liked Suor Angelica the least. It is really 
not operatic at all .and seems more in 
the nature of a cantata. The characters 
are sisters of a convent and the story 
represents an incident of one of the 
sisters' life. Bianca Saroya in the role 
of Sister Angelica had a chance to dis- 
play her vocal purity in a most effective 
manner and she did so with delightful 
repression and simplicity. She had a 
very tedious task and acquitted herself 
with honor. The same may be said of all 
other participants in this work, Doria 
Fernanda enacting the most important 
part next to the title role and, as already 
stated, doing so with professional dig- 
nity and vocal proficiency. Rena Lazelle, 
Anna Young, Lela Johnstone, T. Monotti. 
Du Blois Ferguson, A. Badger, N. Camp- 
bell and K. Christoph sustained their re- 
spective roles with delightful adherence 
to vocal demands. Histrionically none of 
the roles required any exhibition of un- 
usual temperament. The music is prin- 
cipally orchestral and here there were 
many spots of graceful phrases scored 
with that ingenuity and skill that char- 
acterizes all works of this master of 
operatic composition. The chorus work 
was as usual excellent and the orches- 
tra proved itself as on all occasions, an 
organization of skilled musicians. 

As Suor Angelica sustained the at- 
mosphere of religious sobriety, so did 
Gianni Schicchi represent the humor of 
human weakness. The entire action re- 
volves around the avarice and rapacity 
of a flock of relatives after the death 
of a rich member of the family, and 
frustration of their cupidity by Gianni 
Schicchi. While in Sudr Angelica the 
sombreness of the action resulted in 
tediousness, Gianni Schicchi is alive 
with action and humor. It also showed 
how excellently the company is suppied 
with dramatic material. If you have not 
witnessed De Luca's impersonation of 
Gianni Schicchi you certainly have missed 
one of the most contagious delineations 
of clean humor and wit. Even though 
you do not understand the words vou can 
not help laughing at his style of reading 
the lines and his ever changing facial 
expres^ons. It surely is a pleasure to 
watch him fool his trusting relatives. 
Although all the other roles seem sub- 
ordinate they require considerable skill 
to be interpreted according to artistic 
standards. We can not bestow a greater 
compliment upon the company, which in- 
cluded quite a number of resident artists, 
than to say that we could not find a weak 
spot in this performance. Guiseppe de 
Luca, Armando Tokat.van, Adamo Didur. 
Paolo Ananian, Louis D'Angelo. Giordano 
Paltrinieri. Albert Gilette represented 
somei of the cream of Metropolitan 
artists who accentuated brief roles in a 
manner to make them stand out with 
effective importance. They all empha- 
sized the sense of humor wrilch the work 
calls for. 

Among the resident artists with ex- 
perience at home and abroad who added 
lustre to this production are: G. Frediani, 
Jose Corral, A. Alibertini. Doria Fer- 
nanda, Anna Young and Rene Lazelle. 
Among San Francisco talent, whose first 



experience in operatic expression is 
given on this occasion. Merle Epton is 
included and it was wise on the part of 
Mr. Merola to allot Miss Epton the role 
of Lauretta whose gentleness and self- 
effacement did not require any exhibi- 
tion of dramatic experience. Vocally 
Miss Epton gratified her many friends 
by the exhibition of a flexible soprano 
voice which is noteworthy for its quality 
rather than its quantity but which has 
the elements of future development. It 
is praise for Miss Epton to say that she 
did not mar the ensemble of the per- 
formance by any definite display of 
amateurism, although she might have 
been a little more responsive to the ad- 
vances of her chosen lover. As on every 
occasion the two guiding forces of this 
season, Gaetano Merola in front of the 
curtain and Armando Agnini behind the 
scenes, were evident in no small degree. 
Indeed we have never witnessed such ex- 
cellent stage managment as is revealed 
on every occasion during this short sea- 
son. So far we have not witnessed any- 
thing we could take objection to as re- 
gards the stage direction of these operas. 

Mefistofele 
It anyone had ever told us that it was 
possible to present Boito's Mefistofele 
without a dress rehearsal and with or- 
chestra score almost undecipherable, and 
requiring eflflcient reading with but a 
few rehearsals, we would have positive- 
ly regarded such contention as prepos- 
terous. But seeing and hearing is be- 
lieving, and while it would be stretching 
facts too much to say that this per- 
formance was flawless, it was neverthe- 
less sufficient smooth and effective to 
give the atmosphere of completeness. 
Unless we regard this work first from 
the standpoint of orchestral pre-eminence 
and secondly from the angle of histrionic 
intensity, omitting the importance of the 
purely vocal responsibility of the roles, 
we can not see any operatic value in 
this work. It is really more an amplified 
oratorio than an opera. Boito is mingling 
the first and second parts of Goethe's 
Faust without regard to dramatic con- 
tinuity. He picks out a scene here and 
and a scene there and tacks one on to 
the other without intervening bond of 
action. The opera starts with the Pro- 
logue in heaven, then suddenly changes 
to the market scene, then to the garden 
where Faust makes love to Marguerite 
without having met her before, then to 
the Brocken and Witches' Sabbath, then 
to the Elysian fields, and finally back 
to Faust's study. From a dramatic stand- 
point the work is impossible. 

Orchestrally it is. however, sublime in 
many respects. And here is a chance 
to give due credit to the orchestra. When 
Mr. Merola first told us of his intention 
to give this season and the brief time 
he would have for orchestral rehearsals 
on account of the expense involved 
which would have to be sufficiently low 
to justify popular prices, we asked him 
how he could present operas new to the 
musicians to conquer the difiiiculties in 
such few rehearsals. And Merola said: 
"Ah! I am going to get the best mu- 
sicians I can find. I am going to engage 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra." 
And he did. and the result justifies his 
confidence. A season like the present 
could never have been given five or six 
years ago. before Alfred Hertz had 
trained the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra in a manner to enable it to 
read new and difficult works with artis- 
tic precision. While the individual mu- 
sicians, of whom many had previous ex- 
periences with Eastern orchestras and 
operatic organizations, are individually 
most capable and skillful (indeed if they 
were not they could not be genuine sym- 
phony players), they must have the ad- 
vantage of practical experience in play- 
ing together to get the results they now 
attain. And when you have such excel- 
lent material as this orchestra and at 
the same time have them trained under 
a conductor like Mr. Hertz, then an 
operatic conductor like Merola can ac- 
complish much that seems impossible at 
first glance. And so the achievement of 
the orchestra during this Mefistofele per- 
formance was, as far as we are con- 
cerned, the outstanding artistic triumph 
of the evening in which Mr. Merola 
shared 100 per cent. 

Next to the orchestral victory came 
the excellent dramatic virility of .\damo 
Didur who gave us a Mefistofele that will 
remain alive in our memory, even after 
we hear Chaliapin next spring. It was a 
forceful, vital and commanding portrayal 
of the prince of evil, gloating in his 
(Continued on Page 14, Col. 1) 



r.\riFic COAST musical revif.w 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDG., EIGHTH AND BROADWAY —TEL. METROPOLITAN 4398 
C. C. EMERSON IN CHARGE— BRUNO DAVID USSHER, STAFF CORRESPONDENT 
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LOS A.NGELES. Oil, [1.— Clark S. Shaw, business 
manaKHr of the Chicago Optra Association lias been 
hero to make arrangements for the local season with 
Impresario Behymer. He rarly talks for publication, 
and. while charming to meet, is somewhat laconic. Sa 
much may be said, however, that the Chicago Opera Com- 
pany haa in the real sense, become a civic Institution 
of that community, because It has rot only the support 
of more than 7,000 season ticket holders there, but also 
that of 2300 or more guarantors, who for five years will 
be ready to give from ten dollars up to one thousand dol- 
lars a year. The adoption of this democratic method. 
Instead of the enlistment of Ave hundred men donating 
Jl.OOO each, has made the opera company a community 
Institution. Apropos, already in the first year of the 
present regime, headed by Samuel Insull. president, 
less than the full amount, only 70 per cent of this 
annual guarantee was called for. The procedure is 
that the guarantors are asked to contribute in install- 
ments when needed. Altogether this guarantors" league 
represenu backing of about J3.000.000 during these 
five years. This (und appi es only to the local seasons, 
which this winter will consist of about 85 perform- 
ances. Whatever tours the company undertakes, must 
therefore be self-supporting. Which is an enormous 
task, for as Mr. Shaw pointed out. railroad costs for 
last years tour to the I'acillc Coast amounted to 
$85,000. which is but part of the great overhead ex- 
pense. 

In this connection a few statistics regarding operatic 
cost should prove illuminating, and also explain the 
eternal question: "\\Tiere does the money go?" For 
every dollar taken in during the last season of the 
company in Chicago. $1 547 or more than one dollar and 
one half were expended. Hence the need for guaran- 
tors. The percentage table quoted here is the reply: 

Miscellaneous 5.25 per cent 

Rehearsals 7.83 per cent 

Publicity and administration.. 9.28 per cent 
Repairs scenery and costumel5.68 per cent 

Theatre and warehousing 20 28 per cent 

Orchestra, ballet, chorus, stage 

hands 20.25 per cent 

Artists - 21.96 per cent 

Thus the largest amount Is used for paying princi- 
pals and lesser artists. However, t*iis Is justified, even 
in the instance of very highly paid artists, for it is 
these golden voiced singers who attract the gold to 
flow back into the box office. In a measure, the medium 
priced artists from the point of drawing power are 
really the most expensive to the budget. Speaking of 
cost accounting in opera, as in the instance of great 
symphony orchestras whose personnel includes eminent 
players, the expenses are greater than the income by 
reason of the artistic high cost. Which explains why 
the Chi<agoans spend for each t'ollar received, one 
dollar and fifty-four and seven-tenths of a cent. 




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While the Chicago Opera Company operates at finan- 
cial loss, yet is is run on a very business-like schedule 
which is governed by the various department heads 
and the financial committee with President Samuel 
Insull as the ultimate authority. This budget system 
is based on statistics of the last five years with due 
regard for changes in cost and attendance. Everything 
is prepared and financed on this budget system. For 
instance, if a work given before is to be repeated, the 
estimate of cost is based on earlier statistics. These 
earlier records show that such and such opera has 
been put on with an average of, it may be assumed 
fifty hours of chorus rehearsal, thirty hours orchestra 
rehearsals, and so forth, the various artistic heads, 
conductors, chorus masters, ballet master, stage mana- 
gers, are expected to produce the work within this 
period of hours and this definite sohedule has brought 
about a discipline and honor system among the Chicago- 
ans, so that, as a rule even better records are estab- 
lished, i. e.. better performances aro given with shorter 
rehearsals, hence at less cost, as everybody is giving 
of his utmost with great concentration. Should some 
of those in charge of rehearsals exceed this time limit. 
either by appearing late and keeping the chorus wait- 
ing, or if the rehearsals of this body should produce 
the desired results too slowly the conductor in charge 
is notified. Of course, the time allowed is always ample. 
but in view of the cost, strict economy of time is re- 
quired. Similarly, the time-ledger of the company shows 
that all rehearsals are co-ordinated, so that it is hardly 
ever necessary during ensemble rehearsals to keep 
certain groups waiting by repeating certain passages 
over and over with a principal, or one section of the 
ensemble, thus keeping the others waiting. 

"Once ensemble rehearsals are called every soloist 
and group, be they the chorus, orchestra, ballet, scenic 
or lighting staff are rehearsed to the finish. We can- 
not start at that time individual section rehearsals, 
for in the average we pay fifty dollars a minute or 
nine hundred dollars an hour for rehearsals with an 
average sized cast," Mr. Shaw remarked. 

To what a degree of efficiency in cost estimation 
and due adherence to these estimates, minuteness of 
budget system, possibly highest economy despite high- 
est artiste standards, proper utilJTtation of the entire 
staff President Insull has brought the company, may be 
gathered from the fact, that already during the first 
season of his administration only a very small amount 
of paid for time was not utilized, to quote the actual 
figure, only during $397 worth of time the artistic staff 
of the company was not busy. Indeed a negligible 
amount considering the total cost of the season lasting 
about Ave months. 

It Is this businesslike administration which, however, 
has won full confidence and support from the people 
of Chicago for the present administration. As for Sam- 
uel Insull. he is one of the great business master- 
minds of the country. The flnanc.al rehabilitation of 
the Chicago Oas Company Is one of his best known 
feats as an executive. Though a thorough business 
man. he Is a great music lover and takes deep Interest 
in the welfare of the organization entrusted to him by 
his fellow citizens. There happens hardly a perform- 
ance during which he Is not present part of the time. 
If It be only to get first hand renorts about the box 
offlce receipts. He receives dally reports and meet3 
his staff three or four times a week during the season. 
Although one of the busiest men, he is sixty three and 
starts work at his offlce every morning twenty minutes 
before eight, yot he always finds time for an Immediate 
conference in the Interests of the company. This Is his 
contribution to his community, donating biB services In 
time and executive leadership. 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Loa Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COIVI POSER-PI AN ISTE 
1000 South Alvnrndo Phon 

Spnni^h-Cnlifnrnla Folk SnnirM 
J. Fiitrher. Neiv \ ork. fubUhhem 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 



ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

Tanadar, AVednendnr. Friday Afternoona 
Efcnn School. Phonpa 21N05 or 271330 
13:M SoDth Flsueroa, Loa Anselea 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONfKKT M.*STEH PlIII.Il ARMOMC OKCHESTR.l 



ILYA BRONSON 



nio 'Crillat 
Phllhormonir ilrchrntra 
Trio Intlnae. I.om .^nKelm Trio, PhllharmoDlc 
rlrl. InmrDrlhin. ( hambrr Mnnlr Rrcltrnta 
5415 1^ HIrada — I'honc liollr 3044 



A.KOODLACH 

VIOI.IS MAKER AXn REPAIRER 

ronnolNMOur — Apprnixcr 

BOS Malmtlr Thratre HIdE.. Loa Ans'lra Phone «TO-l>I 



ELINOR REMICK WARREN 


COMPOSER-rLWISTE 


.\iith...rof 


"THE HEART OF A ROSE" 


Three Keys 


Published by Harold Flammcr 


Featured by 


MARGARET MATZENAUER 


and FLORENCE EASTON 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

OLGA STEEB 

Director and Head of the Piano Department 

FANNIE DILLON 

Head of the Department of Theory 

and Composition 

Faculty of Twenty-nine Teachers 

AfiSlialed Teachers in Burbank, Claremont, Holly- 
wood, Los Angeles, Long Beach, Monrovia, Pasa- 
dena, Pomona, Redlands, Riverside, San Diego and 
Santa Monica. 

For Catalog and Full Inlormation 
Address 

OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

453 S- Wilton Place Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone 567294 



Frederic Burr Scholl 



ORGANIST 



Grauman's Hollywood 
Egyptian Theatre 

HOLLYWOOD. CALIF. 



CLARA GERTRUDE OLSON 

TEACHER-ACCOMI"A>IST 
Piano, Harmony, Theory 
Children's Classes a Specialty 
110 Mnslc-Art Studio — S2118] Res. Phone Boyle 



Alexander Bevani 

OPERATIC COACHING 
TONE DEVELOPMENT 
VOICE PRODUCTION 



Suite 612 So. Calif. Music Co. Bldg. 
Phone 822-520 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CVLTURE — COACHING IX REPERTOIRE 



(t(>4 Sherman-Clay Mn 



Phone 2S1-S05 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



LOS ANGELES 
r Boulevard iiSlS Holly n 

nplete Faculty of Artist Tei 



od BouIeTard 



JOHN SMALL MAN 



Shirley TaKgai 



elephone s:;r.01S 
lent only $:L(H> 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 



CONTRALTO School of Vo 



ell Club Rooms) 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Down-ton-n Studio removed to S0« S. Broadway, Room 
G02. Residence Studio, 1147 West 21st St. — Telephone 
West 7707. PIANO, HARMONY, VOICE COACH. DI- 
RECTOR JAMISON QUARTETTE. Ten weeks' normal 
training cour.se begins ■Se»teml>er l.^th. 

CHARLES BOWES 



ANGELO GIUFFRIDA 



FantoOK teapher nf Piano, Viol 
tion. Room No. 711. Southern 4 
BIdK. Kvery Monday and Tiiuf 
4t:30 p. m,, linif liour of Ktrictly 
PupllM of any degre 



-■Vs to the local season of the Chicago forces, March 
3, 4, and 5. (Monday to Wednesday inclu.sive) present 
plans call for Cleopatra with Mary Garden, Boris God- 
ounoff or Mefistofele with Chaliapin. Salome with 
Garden (.Matinee performance); The Jewess with Rosa 
Raisa. 

Fascinating programs will be offered during the com- 
ing season of the Los Angeles Trio, founded by May 
Macdonald Hope, pianist, whose pioneer work along the 
lines of chamber music has vitally contributed to local 
musical development. Calmon Luboviski, violinist, and 
Ilya Bronson, cellist, both of them leading members of 
their profession, will again be assofiated with the Trio, 
same to be managed by France Goldwater. Mendels- 
sohn's D minor trio and the Arensky Trio in D minor, 
with the violin and piano sonata hy Ernest Bloch. the 
latter new here, are to form the first program, Thurs- 
day evening. October IS. The other five concerts will 
take place Thursday evenings, November 22, January 
17, February 29, March 21 and April 11, all at the Fine 
Arts Theatre. 

Edith Lillian Clark, gifted pianist, who was called 
East a little more than two months ago to make piano 
records, has returned and resumed work with her large 
classes. Few Los Angeles pianists so far have been 
asked to make records, ^^^lile East Mrs. Clark has 
been coaching. She has opened studios, together with 
Carolyne Handley. soprano and local pedagogue, at 
707 Southern California Music building, while retain- 
ing her residence studio at 1100 Victoria avenue. 

Winifred Hooke, noted Los Angeles pianist, has re- 
sumed teaching and concert activities after a happy 
summer trip to Europe. 

Wesley Kuhnle. one of our most talented pianists, is 
homeward bound from European music centers and ex- 
pects to arrive here late in October 

Plans for the erection of a Municipal Auditorium 
were discussed Monday evening, when members of the 
Executive Committee of the Civic Music and Art Asso- 
ciation. B. F. Pearson, president, met. This com- 
mittee consists of thirty members, to which a large ad- 
visory committee of prominent citizens is to be added. 
Tentative program suggestions were also presented 
at that meeting for the third annual music week to be 
celebrated here in May. Comprehensive investigations 
have been carried out by a special committee regarding 
the proposed municipal auditorium. 

Frequent premieres of American and foreign works 
will be featured by the Zoellner Quartet during their 
sixth local season at Ebell Club .4-uditorium this winter. 
The Zoellners hold a unique chamber music record both 
for their championship of the moderns, also for their 
nation-wide missionary work as representatives of clas- 
sic chamber music playing. Six performances will be 
given this winter, namely October 29, November 20, 
January 14, February 11, March 10 and .\pril 14, al- 
ways on Monday evenings. .\s previously, guest artists 
will paiiicipate in special program numbers. 

Friday evening the recently formed California Trio 
will make its debut with a chamber music program at 
Ebell Club Auditorium. The personnel includes Leon 
Goldwasser, violinist, Maurice Amsterdam, cellist. Mar- 
guerite d'-\leria, pianist, who will render the Beethoven 
Trio In B flat major, opus 11; Grieg's C minor sonata 
for violin and piano and the D minor Trio by Arensky. 

Mme. Astro, well-known vocal teacher discovered 
a voice of much promise when she heard Faith Hope 
sing at a reception last week. Miss Hope, while a pic- 
ture star, has decided to study voice with Mme. Astro 
under whose guidance she expects to make her public 
appearance as vocalist in the near future. 

Elinor Remick Warren, composer-pianist, Sol Cohen, 
violinist, and Ruth Bressem Payette, soprano, will be 
heard in a charming program Tuesday evening at the 
Clark Memorial Home Auditorium, 336 Loma Drive. The 
concert is sponsored by the Y. W. C. A. 

Ticket sales for Tuesday and Thursday evening Phil- 
harmonic Artist Courses of L. E. Behymer, are very 
lively and indicate excellent attendance. Mr. Behymer, 
to be sure, is offering two courses of extraordinary 
brilliance, indeed record breaking courses. He finds 
that also in the smaller towns musical interest is keen, 
so that the Southwest will again astound the East 
as to concert attendance. Frances Alda. prima donna 
soprano of the Metropolitan, is opening the Behymer 
Course on the 17th, and incidently the entire season 
represents not only a musical but also a social event 
of a conspicuous nature. Four artists of exceptional 
renown will be presented this season by the Fitzgerald 
Concert Direction. George Baklanoff, famous Russian 
baritone, remembered here for his notable appearances 
with the Chicago Grand Opera Company, will open the 
series in November. Edwin Nyiregyhazi, whose sensa- 
tional piano technic astounded Los Angeles last year, 
has been engaged for a return appearance in January. 
New here will be Renee Chemet, French violinist, who 
ranks among the foremost exponents of violin art. Her 
New York recitals proved outstanding successes. Miss 
Chemet is to be in Los Angeles during February. Hosa 
Ponselle, star soprano of the Metropolitan Opera, one 
of the most gorgeous vojces, closes the series In April. 
All of the recitals will be held in Philharmonic Audi- 
torium. 

Many interesting events of appenl to art lovers will 
be held in the Fine Arts Theatre, 730 South Grand Ave- 
nue, which will open its doors, Sunday evening, Octo- 



STEIN WAY 

THE if\/srn.uM£.\'r of the immortals 




M. Jeannette Rogers 

First Flutist Metropolitan 
Theatre 



Available for 

Concert-Recital-Club 
Obbligato 



Address 1354 Laveta Terrace 



MISS FANNIE CHARLES DILLON 

I'lAM-T— TI. VI lli-;il — CII>IIM)SKR 
lio, ::s,-,n l,i-e»vard .Xvenue, i.os .\nKt-lfj,. Plione Drexel 
. ComiiosiT <il >Iany .\unil>ers IMayed l»y FaniouH 



GILDA MARCHETTI 

DI<.\>I-\TIC SOPRANO 
Tt'acher of Voiee and Italian Diction 

Res. Phone .'.as-r>o:! 

ew Stndio: 71:! So. Calif. Muxle Co, Bldfr. 



L. CANTIEN HOLLYWOOD 



syi-holopry 
nine and 
A limited 



Claire Forbes 
Crane 

_ PIANIST=^ 



Head Violin Dept., Colleee of Manic, IT. S. C. — Member 

Philharmonic Orcfaeatra 

3201 S. FliraeroH St., Loa Aaeelea Phone Main 2100 



LANDONIA p. NAYLOR 

Teacher of Piano 

3875 WEST SIXTH STREET 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



LOS ANGELES LETTER 
(Continued from Tago 9. Col. 3) 

ber H. under the management ot France Ooldwater. 
l.eonlil Coronl's Los Angeles debut on that date will 
be thf Inaugural ronrcrt. This young Russian baritone 
has appeared abroad with noted success. Frederick 
Herman, well known \ms Angeles baritone, will appear 
In the same auditorium. Monday evening. October 15. 
with Calmon LubovlskI, as asai»ti'ig artist In violin 
solos.. Additional events announced are Sunday after- 
noon lectures by E. A Cantrell. educator; dance recital 
by JancskI Robenoff. Saturday evening October 27; 
Anna Weltzman Trio. Tuesday evening. October 30; 
Lecture by I'plon Close Wednesday evening. October 
31 ; as well a« the entire concert series of the Los 
Angeles Trio, beginning October 18, offering six pro- 
grams In the course of the season. 

••Musical and Intellectual Germany Is slowly breaking 
up as far as educational institutions are Concerned, for 
the teacher Is unable to earn sullklcnt money where- 
with to eke out a living. Several of the internationally 
famous musical conservatories, such as the one of 
Frankfort rn llie Main, where MacDnwell and Percy 
Uralnger studied had to close their doors." was the 
answer of Professor Karl Leimer. head of the Muni- 
cipal Conservatory of Hanover, ami Chief Examiner of 
Music for the province of Hanover and the Rhineland. 
now on leave of absence. The purpose of his visit to 
America (he Is living with relatives here) Is to recuper- 
ate from the rapacity of coalless vinlers and years of 
underfeeding caused by war and post-war shortage of 
commodities. Leinier. by the way, besides being a peda- 
gogue and concert pianist of note, won wide recognition 
by being the only teacher of Carl Gieseklng. the Iwenty- 
slx-year old German pianist, whom critics in the father- 
land compare with the greatest of the keyboard. Giesek- 
lng. Mr I.*lmer adds, will make his American debut 
next winter. Mr. Relmer arrived from Germany but 
recently. 

"A few figures will convince you why German 
music schools and Institutions of learning are one after 
another closing their doors. To begin with, it was the 
German middle class who supported music The German 
middle class Is starving and cannot (Ind enough money 
for mere necessities with few exceptions. Suppose 1 
give from live to six piano lessons a day. I have earned 
enough to buy a pound of butter. Or 1 arranged with 
my aasialant teachers that I will pay them 2.000.000 
marks a lesson. Tomorrow the contract Is void for 
prices have jumped fifty per cent. You go into a store 
to buy food You pay 2.000,000 marks for an egg. but 
And you have not enough money with you. By the time 
you return with that amount the price may have gone 
up to four millions. And that happens with every article 
of food or clothing. How can a nrisic teacher live In 
Germany If he spends in a week for his living and hous- 
ing as much as a pupil pays hitn in an entire year? 

■'The government? It Is helpless. My relatives occas- 
ionally sent me money. The bank has not enough cur- 
rency at hand to change one dollar bill. 1 own a thirty 
room house in Hanover, but I am now a beggar, for 
even If I was to sell it the money I would receive is 
worthless Oh yes. there still are many concerts, but. 
If you look behind the scenes, you see poverty and 
starvation nearly everywhere. But for state or munici- 
pal subsidies many orchestras am' theatres, especially 
in the provincial cities would have to close. People sit 
at these performances wrapped in furs, and those less 
well ofT. In traveling rugs. I have spent many a cold 
evening In my own drawing room. In a fur coat and 
gloves, for. If there was enough coal. It was i)rohib- 
itlvely expensive. 

This coming winter, Mr. Relmer thinks, will be hard 
for Germany owing to the fantastic prices for coal. Sev- 
enty per cent of the school children In Berlin are with- 
out shirts, and while class rooms will be more than ever 
overcrow<ied. less rooms will be heated, which In cer- 
tain cities means reduced school hours for children. 

•'I exi>ect very little actual result from the cessation 
of passive resistance in the Ruhr, except that the labor 
population and the merchants of that district will be 
restored to better earning capacities and can buy more, 
though not sufficient food. There may be established 
on Independent Rhine Republic, but if so. It will even- 
tually rejoin Prussia Bavaria's action is more serious 
and 1 would not be surprised to sec a break-away of all 
the South-German states from Prussia and possibly Join 
hands with what Is left of Austria, provided France 
will lend Its sanction to this 

■•Of course, there are rich people in Germany, many 
of them profiteers against whom the government seems 
helple^M. Stresemann. the new chancellor? What do I 
think about him? He means well, but 1 am afraid, con- 
ditions will prove stronger than he, I have no Idea as 
to what will happen, except that I know thousands and 
thousands of people In Germany are slowly starving 
to death." 

Two compositions by Arthur Bll«s, his Madame Noy. 
which found such cordial reception last season, and his 
Conversations, will l)e played during the opening con- 
cert of the Los Angeles Chamber i.'usir Socletv Octo- 
ber 26. Two new prin. Ipal players of th.- Philharmonic 
Orchestra will make their debut as chamber music play- 
ers that evening in a Beethoven Quintet. Alfred Brain, 
French horn; and Frederick Morrltz, bassoon. 

EUtelle Heartt Dreyfus, contralto, and I^uls Dreyfus, 
linguist, have opened studios In the new MacDowell 
club rooms, respectively In the new building which 
houses Norma Gould's dancing school. Mr and .Mm. 
Dreyfus have spent the summer in Honolulu, but 
already are rather busy, as ail their (onner pupils have 
returned to them. 



Wednesday. October 24. will be resident composer's 
day at the Wa-Wan Club, when Dr. Frank Nagel will 
play manuscript and published compositions. 



LOS ANGELES PERSONAL BREVITIES 

Elinor Remick Warren, pianist composer, with Sol 
Cohen, violinist and Ruth Payette, accompanist, gave 
a benefit concert on the evening of October 2 at the 
Blue Triangle Club of the Y. W. C. A, 

Marguerite d'Aleria Hungarian pianist, Leon Gold- 
wasser. Russian violinist and Maurice Amsterdam. Hun- 
garian 'cellist, who cotnpose the California Trio, will 
give their (irst concert of the season consisting entire- 
ly of Chamber Music at the Ebell Club on October 5. 
The numbers to be played are Beethoven's Trio In B 
flat major Op. 34; Grieg's Sonata in C minor. Op. 45; 
and Arcnsky's Trio in D minor. Op. 32. This will be a 
program well worth hearing for the artists are among 
the most prominent of the city and the program well 
selected. 

Ruth May Shaffner's popularity as a gifted singer is 
evinced by her numerous recent appearances and re- 
engagements for recital in Santa Barbara and Monte- 
cito. She filled an extended engagement successfully at 
the Hotel Samarkand at Santa Barbara and sang before 
the Rotary, Kiwanis and Exchange clubs of Montecito. 

Alexander Crawford, formerly ot Xew York, and more 
recently of Denver has been concertizing extensively 
through the West and .Middle West. He is reputed to 
be an exceptional musician possessing a fine baritone 
voice and we are assured by Signor Guerrieri, the 
renowned orchestra and opera conductor with whom 
Mr. Crawford has been associated in past years that 
this newcomer will be a creditable addition to the list 
of prominent musicians who are already established 
in Los Angeles. 

The Oratorio Society of Los Angeles, under the able 
direction of John Snialtnian. is reliearsing the mag- 
nificent Caesar Franik number. "Beatitudes," which 
will be presented at the Philliarmonic Auditorium dur- 
ing the ensuing year. 

Ruby Poe, formerly a pupil of Theodore Kosloff, hav- 
ing made her debut in New Y'ork City last year with 
such a favorable impression, was engaged as soloist in 
Oscar Hammerstein's new 9 o'clock Review tor this 
season. The many Los Angeles friends of this talented 
young danier are greatly pleased with her successes. 

The Matinee Musical Club held its first meeting of 
the year at the Ebell Clubhouse. October 4. celebrating 
its fifteenth birthday, when Mrs. James Henry Ballagh, 
founder of the club, was honor guest. Short addresses 
were given by Mrs. J, Spenser-Kelly, president; Mrs. 
J. J. Carter. Mr. J, T. Fitzgerald. Gertrude Ross. Hallet 
Gilberte and J. J. Gilbert. An entertaining program 
of songs was given by Jessie MacDonald Patterson, 
soprano with Miss Marjorie Chapin, accompanist, and 
Philip Tronitz. Norwegian pianist. 

Merle Armitage, manager of the Fitzgerald Concert 
Series, announces the first recital for N-ovember 2 to be 
given by Georges Baklanoff whose fame as an operatic 
baritone makes certain his success in Los Angeles, 
though it is his first appearance here. In January 
Nyiregyhazi, that dynamic pianist who was heard here 
in recital last year will appear again. The greatest 
French violinist of today. Renee Chemet. will be heard 
In February and the radiant Rosa Ponselle. whose 
glorious voice still rings In the hearts and minds of her 
many Los Angeles admirers will appear again to close 
this concert series. 

Mr, and Mrs. Harry Girard gave a lovely studio 
reception from 7 to S:30 o'clock on October 4 at the 
Southern California Music Company building. A pro- 
gram of songs followed when the U. Clef Club and the 
B. P. O, E. Glee Club under the direction of Harrv 
Girard appeared. Ducts by .Mr. and Mrs. Girard and 
solos by Miss Myra Lee. .Miss Leona Hunter and Miss 
Virginia Crawford were enjoyed. The remainder of the 
evening was spent in dancing. 

Irene Burdette, lyric soprano, sang for the Woman's 
Club of Whittler last week when she was accompanied 
by .Mrs. C. W .McKlnley. a prominent pianist of Los 
Angeles. Mrs. Burdette was assisted on her program 
by Faye Hazzard, violinist and Ivan Knox, pianist, 
both members of the faculty ot the Whittler School 
of Music. 

Margaret Halloway Thomas, who recently returned 
from a sojourn in the East where she went for study 
and recreation, has reopened her studio In the Tajo 
building In Los Angeles. 

Leonldat Coroni, the Greek baritone, will give the 
first concert in the new Pine Arts Theatre on South 
Grand avenue. October 14. FVederIck Henman. bari- 
tone, will appear in recital at the same place on Octo- 
ber 15. 

The Sherwood Music School of Chicago has opened 
another new branch at 950 South Vermont street under 
the direction ot Mr. Raymond G. Hand who is assisted 
by a very fine faculty In every branch of music and 
dramatic art. The first faculty recital by the Sherwood 
.Music School win be given Friday evening. October 12. 
at the Recital Hall ot the Southern California .Music 
Company building. The program will be in charge of 
Adele Dorothy Lauth and those appearing are Dr E. 
Winkler, J, Anson Clapperton, OUda .Marchettl. Louise 



Moody. Sarah Gordon, Edith Lillian Clark, Violet Ned- 
derson and Gloria .Mayne. .Ml pupils and friends of 
the school are cordially invited. 

Catherine Collette and Jode Anderson presented their 
pupils in recital October 5 at the Recital Hall of the 
Southern California .Music Company building. Those 
appearing on the program were Rebecca McMillan 
Stcme, Erna Bradshaw. Miriam Mclntyre, Lucille 
Boothe. Ewell Wanlass. Eda Carlin, Bettie Harrington, 
Eunice Abernathy Doi>'ney. 

Homer Grunn, one of the toi-emost pianists of Amer- 
ica and prominent among Los .^ngeIes musicians, will 
give a recital at the Recital Hall ot the Southern Cali- 
fornia .Music Company building on the eve of October 
11. This recital will be one of the seasons finest 
musical events. 

Mme. Alma Stetzler, well known teacher of vocal 
music presented several of her pupils in recital Monday 
evening. October 1. at the Recital Hall of the Southern 
California Music Company building. Those partici- 
pating were Giles Alkire. basso. Hazel Hoffman, 
soprano: .Mable Roberts, soprano; Inez Florita. con- 
tralto; Sarette Manter. soprano; Madelon St. Coomb, 
mezzo-soprano. .\ll were well received and their work 
did credit to their able teacher. 

Florence Middaugh, much admired tor her charming 
personality and lovely contralto voice, opened her new 
residence studio at 332 .North 0.\ford last week and 
has resumed her singing at the Fifth Church of Christ, 
Scientist, after a few weeks of vacation. 

Lucille Gibbs, well known soprano, and Alma Urqu- 
hart. contralto, are furnishing an interesting program 
ot songs at the California Theatre. These young sing- 
ers are artist-pupils of .Myra Belle Vickers and their 
appearance at the California during the past few weeks 
has been attracting large crowds. 

Clara Wilson Stamm presented five of her advanced 
pupils in a medal contest recital last week. Miss Mary 
Elizabeth White was the winner of the gold medal. Miss 
Edith Wall received the silver medal and Miss Marjory 
Brown was accorded honorable mention. The judges tor 
this event were Waldo F. Chase, well known piano in- 
structor ot Los Angeles, Francis Kendig. music critic ot 
the Los Angeles Times, and Jewell Hickox. head of the 
music department of the El .Monte High School. 

Ann Thompson, known as the "pianiste of person- 
ality" gave a concert at the .Masonic Hall in Long' Beach 
last Friday evening under the auspices ot the Southern 
California Music Company. This young artiste is 
booked for several more concerts and recitals for the 
fall season and has a class ot interesting pupils. 

Dr. Frank Nagel announces the soloists who will 
assist in his lecture-analysis of La Boheme at the 
Opera Reading Club of Hollywood. October 1. Vivian 
Strong Heart, colorature soprano. Lora May Lamport. 
IjTic soprano; Raymond Harmon, tenor; and Edward 
Novls. baritone, who are all exceptionally fine singers, 
will lend their voices in illustrating this beautiful 
opera. 

Albert Tufts gave a short organ recital preceding a 
lecture on September 21. at the Second Church of 
Christ, Scientist, w-here he is engaged as organist. 
Nearly fifty friends and admirers of Mr. Tufts were 
delightfully entertained at his residence-studio last 
week when he presented a program of Chopin and Lizt 
with several of his own compositions. Mr. Tufts ability 
as a teacher of piano and organ is evinced by the large 
number of students who have enrolled in his classes 
tor the tall term. 

Maude Reeves Barnard, foremost among women musi- 
cal directors ot Los Angeles, has just signed a new con- 
tract for her thirteenth year with the First United Pres- 
byterian church of Los Angeles as soprano soloist and 
director of music. This is indeed a record to be envied. 
Pupils of Mme. Barnard composing the Euterplan 
Quartette are very much in demand tor club and recital 
programs. 

Mme. Brusko-Hollenbeck, a prominent figure in musi- 
cal circles ot Boston and other Eastern cities, is so- 
journing tor a few months in Los Angeles. Acclaimed 
by tongue and pen as the "Song Painter." possessing 
an extraordinary personality full ot charm with a solid 
foundation ot splendid musical training and a powerful 
voice of unusual beauty, we feel safe in saying Mme. 
Hollenbeck has many ot the requisites ot a truly great 
artist. 

Only on one occasion this summer at the Hotel Mary- 
land. In Pasadena, has her lovely mezzo-soprano voice 
been heard In Siiulhern California. On this program 
Madam Hollenbeck was assisted by Bruno Hubm the 
renowned composer and conductor. Oscar Selling, con- 
cert violinist, and John Steven .McGroarty, California's 
beloved poet and writer who is tamed as the author 
of the Mission Pla.v. 

It is with a feeling of pride that Madame Hollen- 
beck assures us that she has never studied in Europe 
but rather is strictly an American artiste educated in 
America: furthermore she states she has not sung at 
the Metropolitan Opera House Another Interesting 
feature of .Mme Hollenbecks career Is the tact that 
during the last Liberty Loan drive she appeared on 
the same program with Sarah Bernhardt. In Cleveland, 
having been chosen out ot a hundred applicants to sing 
on that occasion. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Aside from her remarkable reputation aa a singer, 
Mme. Hoilenbeck has received no little recognition as 
a composer of songs. We hope to hear more of this 
delightful person. 

Mme. Melba Bassett, who is a teacher of merit, is 
presenting pupils continually in various capacities in 
the city. Miss Aouda Lutz is singin? at the Pico Heights 
Congregational church. Miss Nell Hendricks, lyric 
soprano and Viola Hoover, contralto, appeared in re- 
cital at the Methodist Episcopal Church. South, Friday 
evening. All are pupils of Mme. Bassett. 

Frances Pierson Brumbaugh has opened a piano 
school in the Majestic Theatre building with Miss 
Leah Wood and Miss Helen Peabody as her able assis- 
tants. Mme. Brumbaugh's years of study with the 
renowned Godowsky stands her in good stead as a 
splendid teacher and with a waiting list consisting of 
more than a dozen, her popularity as a pedagogue 
is evinced. 

Frederick Deyerberg, harpist and pianist has opened 
a studio in the Southern California Music Company 
building. 

Sylvain Noack has returned from Venice where he 
and his family have been spending a few months at 
their summer home. Mr. Noack who is concert-master 
with the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra recently 
played a sonata program with Brahm van Den Berg, 
well known pianist, at the summer home of W. A. 
Clark in Santa Barbara. So well were these superb 
artists received that they were immediately engaged 
for a later concert. It will be the privilege of Los 
Angeles concert-goers to hear these artists at an early 
date in an evening of sonatas. 

John Smallman, prominent vocal teacher and director 
of note, began-rehearsals with the Los Angeles Oratorio 
Society on September 19. The coming season promises 
to be filled with interesting musical events and among 
the greatest are the oratories to be presented by this 
society. Mr. Smallman's vocal class has already exceed- 
ed all expectations in registration of pupils. 

Louise Gude is presenting the first of a series of 
Sunday afternoon recitals at three o'clock, September 
30. Two artist pupils, Sarah Heidelberg and Myrna Lynn 
Mummert from the Louise Gude studio will feature 
numbers from Handel, Sinding, Arne, to the more mod- 
ern Hahn, Scott. Beach, Hageman. and Ronald. These 
Sunday recitals should prove popular, for the program, 
as well as the artists, is of the highest standard. 

Mnne. Alma Stetzler, prominent instructor of vocal 
music, will introduce several pupils in recital October 
1. at eight o'clock in the Recital Hall of the Southern 
California Music Company building. The program fol- 
lows: 

Michaela Aria, Carmen (Bizet); Could My Songs 
Their Flight be Winging (Hahn). Sarette Manter; 
Fierce Flames, Trovatore (Verdi); Flower Song, Faust 
(Gounod). Madelon St. Coomb; Lieti Signor, Huguen- 
ots (Meyerbeer); Sing to me Sing (Homer). Mabel 
Roberts; Your Heart Will Call Me Home (Tate); Turn- 
keys Song. Rob Roy (De Koven) ; Armourers Song, 
Robin Hood (De Kovenj. Giles Alkire: The Swallows 
(Cowen): Song of the Soul (Breil), Hazel Hoffman; 
Pale Moon (Logan); I Love You Truly (Bond), Kash- 
miri Song (Woodforde-Finden), Inez Florita. 

William Tyroler, who has labored so diligently and 
efficaciously for three months with the chorus of three 
thousand voices for the rehearsals and production of 
the Wayfarer, has gone to San Francisco for a well 
earned rest before resuming his teaching and coaching. 

David P. Unruh, formerly at the head of the music 
department of Oklahoma City College, has accepted 
the position as director of music at the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Monrovia. Mr. Unruh will spend 
Tuesdays and Fridays in Los Angeles at his studio in 
the Southern California Music Company tuilding. We 
heartily welcome this splendid artist and capable 
leader to our Los Angeles music colony. 

Mme. Ragna LInne has the distinction and satisfac- 
tion of coaching many prominent singers of Los Ange- 
les among whom are Raymond Harmon, well known 
tenor, and Edward Novis, popular baritone of Pasadena. 
Another pupil of Mme. Linne, Miss Caryl Marshall, 
dramatic soprano, recently gave an extensive concert 
in Amsterdam, New York. Both teacher and pupil were 
lauded by the press. 

Philip Trohitz, Norwegian violinist, has opened his 
studio in the Soutbem California Music Company 
Building. 

Z. Earl Meeker is planning to give a very interesting 
recital on the evening of October 8, at the Recital Hall 
in the Southern California Music building. On this 
program he will be assisted by Ann Thompson as 
accompanist and soloist. The many admirers of these 
popular artists are looking forward to a delightful musi- 
cal evening which is always assured when two artists 
combine their talent. 

The Music Teachers* Association of Los Angeles had 
its first meeting Monday evening September 24. at the 
Gamut Club. A banquet preceded an interesting pro- 
gram of music and addresses by some of the best musi- 
cians of the city and speakers of note. Mrs. Jamison 
had charge of the program. The hostess, Mrs. Emma 
Bartlett, was assisted by Mrs. Graham F. Putnam. Miss 
Florence Norman Shaw and Mrs. Grace W. Mabee. 



THE ORCHESTRA IN ITS RELATION TO 
THE MOVING PICTURE 

Moving Picture Orchestras as They Are and as 
They Should Be 

BY OSBORNE PUTNAM STEARNS 

Late Conductor State Theatre Concert Orchestra, Bos- 
ton, Mass., The Academy of Music Symphony Orches- 
tra, New York, N. Y., Olympia Theatre Orchestra, 
New York, N. Y., etc., etc. 



THE GRAB BAG 



BY ANIL DEER 



r'i fi- 



The pictures were better fitted, and patrons began to 
notice it and remark about it. The surreptitious sub- 
stitution and alteration in the programs was practiced 
until the termination or the writer's engagement, when, 
with a sigh of relief, he swore a solemn oath that never 
again would he work under any such "General Musical 
Director" where he could not score and arrange his own 
program. 

The usual proceedure in scoring a picture might be 
of interest to the layman. The programs are not select- 
ed so much from the various catalogs, as they are 
by means of the "oracle" or reference library. This 
is made up from the scores and directing parts — usu- 
ally piano scores which are filed separately from the 
rest of the parts, each with a number corresponding 
to a similar number on its particular parts. More will 
be said later about the peculiar arrangement and class- 
ification of this reference library. 

In most theatres of better class, a projecting room 
is maintained for the use of the orchestra director in 
scoring films. The feature or film to be scored is run 
off by an operator for the conductor in this small room, 
the picture being screened on a small-sized sheet to 
save space. The conductor views it, assisted by a sten- 
ographer, if he is fortunate to have the use of one; if 
not he makes his own notes. Each situation is timed 
accurately with a stop-watch, important titles, action 
cues and emotional or atmospheric characteristics of 
the various situations being noted. This takes, rough- 
ly, from one to two hours, according to the length of 
the feature being screened. As soon as the notes are re- 
ceived, transcribed, from the stenographer, the conduc- 
tor goes to the music-room, or wherever his reference 
library is kept. The sooner this is done after review- 
ing the picture, the better, before any extraneous in- 
fluences are brought to bear upon him to interfere with 
the continuity of his thought. 

It might be seasonable here, as well as gratifying 
to those interested to give a short portion of the open- 
ing of a cue or score sheet. The only available one 
with both drafts intact is that used for Miss Mae 
Murray's recent picture "Broadway Rose." 

The first draft of this sheet as it comes from the 
stenographer follows: 

Broadway Rose 

Starring Miss Mae Murray, Sept. 1st 

1922 

1 Screening 

In the sheltered garden 
Where did she come from? 
Short of clothes. 
Will she stay? 

AMigorical and Decorative Introduction 
Does she captivate? 
Watch your sympathy? 
City Radios. 

Full grown hits. 

2 minutes 10 seconds. 

2 Spring has come to Manhattan. Story Starts 
Polo Grounds 

Hugh Thompson one of the players. 

Peter Stuyvesant Thompson, father of Hugh. 
Mrs. Peter Stuyvesant Thompson, his wife. 
Barbara Hampton Royce. 
Rosalie Lawrence appears 

Reggie Whitley — This is the dancer who is fasci- 
nating all our men. 
2 minutes. 10 seconds. 

3 Still Playing Polo 

Hugh covers himself with glory. 

Of course just touch my hand and I bring luck. 

But I must be 

It was great of you to come 
WTiy not. 
Run away Hugh 
When did you graduate 
Why don't you give 
No, thank you. I have 

Hugh your Mother and Barbara are waiting 
2 minutes, 45 seconds. 

4 Father I want you 

Action a little more neutral and a little quicker 

Don't make yourself so conspicuous. 

About your attentions 

Now little boys run back to your friends. 

It is a great life. 

Heart! I haven't any. 

1 minute. 23 seconds. 
Part Two 

5 Country flowers grow close to earth 
Interior scene neutral type 

Man and Hugh enter house with dog. 

Card from flowers "Mr. Hugh Thompson I love 

you" 
Perhaps use "Dear Old Pal of Mine" for love theme. 
And who sent the hothouse 
A poor little rich boy 
Colored Maid in kitchen 
Take a look at me 

2 minutes. 

(To Be Continued) 




How thrilling the expectancy to chil- 
dren, when having coaxed a few pennies 
from an indulgent parent or other rela- 
u-^^^m tive equally kind, they invest in the allur- 
r^^l ing mysteries of a grab bag. Seething 
through the mind of the child the 
thought, may be if very lucky the grab 
may contain some long wished for 
article; an article undoubtedly posses- 
sing a value many times that of the 
child's simple investment. The high 
hopes impossible of realization, induced by immaturity 
of the powers of reasoning and logic. The trembling 
anticipation, as eager little fingers untie, or break if 
possible, the aggravating knots, hastening to view the 
enclosed prize. Xo forewarning gleam of reason en- 
lightening as to the improbability of extracting more 
of value than invested. 

On a thorough examination of the contents hopes are 
dashed yet compensation is there in the form of sweets 
and some small trinket. Most valuable of all the child 
has an addition to his knowledge of life and relative 
values. If consistent by nature, will admit receiving the 
equivalent of that which he gave. The lesson learned 
far in excess of the cost. There is a close resemblance 
between the child and his grab-bag and the young vocal 
pupil when selecting a preceptor. Oft times having 
"mis-learned" the lesson in youth they imagine money 
the only standard of worth, and believe by choosing an 
expensive teacher they are sure of ultimate success, 
forgetting that If money be all they are paying the 
price is too meager to win a genuine prize. 

Sacrifice. labor, endurance, perseverance, grit and 
elasticity of mind must be added to the contents of 
their purse, if they would win enduring and satisfactory 
results. The purest gems in art's jewels can not be 
bought by a financial fee alone, invariably they com- 
mand a higher rating and demand those moral quali- 
ties enumerated above. Far too often the pupil expects 
to purchase with the spurious coin of the world's lucre 
the gifts of a higher sphere. 

One will say. "Oh! how I would love to sing." and 
then miss lesson after lesson, for some trivial cause, 
i. e., dancing, bridge or theatre parties, etc., and omit 
with consistency their practice period. Father, who 
was a thorough musician and brilliant pianist, was 
once enthusiastically informed by a young gentleman 
that he, the latter, "would give anything on earth could 
he play as father did." Father regarded him for a 
moment with his dry quizzical smile and asked, "Would 
you give eight hours daily practice?" The young man. 
being candid and honest, sadly replied, "No, I would 
not-" He lacked the genuine coin for the bargain. 

The pupil who invests in a grab of inferior merit 
may not receive a prize commensurate with his outlay, 
yet a prize is there. Though the teacher be incom- 
petent there is always knowledge to be gained, if only 
in what to avoid. A pupil should not expect startling 
results in vocal training if they personally are minus 
two qualities, common sense and a good ear. Neither 
need be at their utmost development originally but 
must be characteristic of the aspiring student. Fortified 
with these no teacher can mislead to any great extent. 
They invariably capture a prize in the grab-bag of 
music. 

The ear informing that the tone produced is harsh, 
out of tune, strained, or the throat feeling dry and irri- 
tated, no sophistic reasoning of the tutor should be 
able to convince the common sense of the pupil that the 
basic principal of his (or her) production is correct. 
Should one awake to the absence of qualities neces- 
sary to an artistic career, common sense would realize 
it is impossible for any teacher, regardless of ability 
and willingness, to exert magic powers and convert one 
into something adverse to natural proclivities. 

Xo preceptor, however noted, ever made an artist; 
rendered invaluable assistance in the process, undoubt- 
edly, and no incompetent one ever ruined a true artist. 
In mid-stream any rock may be made to sen^e as a 
stepping stone. So. step forward, take your chance in 
the artistic grab-bag with the proper coin in your men- 
tal purse you will find a prize in every package. 



Dr. Emil Winkler, instructor in the piano depart- 
ment of Ward-Belmont School, Xashville, Tennessee, 
now at the head of the Highland Park Branch of the 
Sherwood School of Music is featuring Sunday vesper 
musicals at the Sunset Canyon Country Club at Bur- 
bank. At the next recital on September 23. Violet 
Xedderson talented violinist of Santa Ana. Guilda Mar- 
chetti vocalist, with Miss Hillickson as accompanist, 
will present the program. Later the Sherwood Trio, 
composed of Mr. Empke, pianist, Louise Moody, violin- 
ist, and Rhoul Dhossche. flutist will be heard at the 
Sunset Canyon Club vesper service. 

Olga Steeb, one of the foremost pianists of America 
and founder of the Olga Steeb Piano School of Los 
Angeles, will leave for her first concert tour on Xovem- 
ber 15. playing a number of engagements en route to 
New York where she is to play at Aeolean Hall on 
December 6. Miss Steeb's management has already 
booked a second tour to Xew York, including cities in 
Canada, many western states, and another Aeolean Re- 
cital to be given in February. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 



No. 10778 met No. 1062.1 
Yokohama in Scplcmb 
1922, (exact dale u 
It rame about this way. ( 
ing early in the month, 
Lang of San I'Vanri&co foi 
morning mail this telegra 
fir>t steamer No. 10778 
box Codowsky Yokohama." \ 
terse and prosaic telegram, yet ro- 
monce has strange beginnings. 
Twenty-four hours later No. 10778 





AM a piano tuner. 
It i» my bu 



lh.1t one o( them 
1 have made it a point to 
on my way to New York 
the Orient, where for the past year 1 have 
been on tour with Mr. Godowsky as his 
piano tuner. During his three months' 
tour in South America (I was engaged in 
liuenos Aires) we carried Knabe Con- 
cert Grand No. 10623 from their New 
Y'ork store. When we sailed for l)i<- 
Oricnl, Mr. Godowsky considered it :i<l- 
visuhle to add a second piano, knowing 
the extreme difficulties of climate and 
tranr-portation. This one (No. 10778) was 
shipped from San Francisco. It was ii 
wihc decision, for at one time No. 1077H 
was lost in the snows of Manchuria Un 
two months, finally turning up after wh.il 
must have been untold vicissituiles, for 
its traveling case was so badly battered 
that the transportation companies re- 



does not observe, lie 
\\ill notice instantly the 
most minute variation in 
its musical quality, but 
the mechanical and the 
structural elements be- 
hind that quality, it is 
my job to observe for 

have just passed 
u g h an experience 
itii the two most 
came into my charge, 
le from Kohler & Chase, 
them in San Fra 
route from 




was below decks and westward 
bound. At the same timo No. 
J0623 was under way from the west 
toast of South America. Their 
meeting was undemonstrative — 
iillhough ihcy were both from the 
s^ime town, had been brought up 
l«igelher — tended by the same 
hands, and sent into the world 
with the same mission. But at 
Yokohama the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones tell it. 



San FRANctsco, Califobma, May 22, 1923. 
fused to accept it. From the devastating Arctic cold 
of the Manchurian steppes to the blistering heat of 
the Javanese jungles, these two Knabes have been for 
neai^ly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
punishment, including months in the sticky, saturat- 
ing moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
pianoforte. From Hawaii to the Philippines, through 
all the cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Straits 
Settlements, and many of the less frequented by-ways 
of the Orient— I do not believe that the history of 
music records the equal of this unique tour, or the 
ovations accorded this great artist in these music- 
hungry corners of tbc globe, or the equivalent of the 
two pianos that supported him. Days of travel over 
ads of Java, the man-handling of countless 
, the punishment of oriental transportation in 
in trains, in queer conveyances of all kinds— 
ths of it. At times it was heart-breaking, 
truments carry many scars of battle, but 
they have remained steadfast. Outside "some 
rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich,' as 
perfect as the first day Mr. Godowsky 
touched their keys. To me the power of 
resistance of the Knabe piano is almost 
supernatural. I have travelled with many 
artists in all parts of the world; in Eu- 
rope I was familiar with the German 
pianos that are built like stodgy battle- 
ships, but no piano in even ordinary 
continental tours has equalled this per- 
formance. If I had made these two 
Knabes 1 should feel very proud. Inci- 
dentally I am not in any way connected 
with the Wm. Knabe Company— nor do I 
even know them except through the in- 
ternational reputation of their instru- 
■nont. Francis E. Jones, 

London and Buenos Aires. 





Wh. 



Leopold Godowsky 

with rare consideration, concedes to hi-i ni.inn ii>n. 



ideratii 
privilege of telling his own story. 
Godowsky has paid his tribute to the Knabe time and again— 
hut as be himself said in an interview: "Mr. Jones has some- 
thing more interesting to say about those two pianos than I or 
any other artist has ever said. Let him tell it. He deserves it. 
I found him in Buenos Aires and carried him away to the 
Orient because of his unusual qualities." So, thanks to the 

'""'ion of the great artist, we arc able to offer 

rkable piano story ever told. 



the ) 



GODOWSKY 

Master of the masters at whof« 

feel have tal at one time or 

another practically every great 

pianist of our day. 



Incidenlally. bnlh of these inslrumenu are stock pianos 
(not specially made), one from the New York warerooms 
and one from the Kohler S Chase store in San Francisco 



KOHLER* er * CHASE< 

26 0"FARRELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

SACRAMENTO 
SAN JOSE 



KNABE 




AMHCO 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

Mrs. William Henry Banks, the able and efficient 
president ot the Pacific Musical Society, announces a 
most interesting program to be given at' the next meet- 
ing of the society at the Fairmont Hotel. Thursday 
evening, October 11. M:ss Rena M. Lazelle, the soprano 
of the evening, has appeared in opera, both grand and 
light, singing leading roles. She has studied in Victor 
Maurel's opera class for some three years before 
makiBg her first public appearance. She is at present 
connected with the San Francisco Conservatory of 
Music as head of the vocal department. Her voice is 
a clear and brilliant soprano of phenomenal range, and 
is rich and full in the middle register. Her technic is 
amply adequate for any demands that can be made on 
It. Among her songs of the evening will be one by Miss 
Lillian Hodghead. a member ot this society and a co- 
director of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. 
She has a large and varied repertoire of songs and arias, 
both ancient and modern, and a very charming per- 
sonality. Miss Lazelle has been spoken ot in very com- 
plimentary terms by such able and well-known crit'cs 
as Ray C. B. Brown of the San Francisco Chronicle 
Redfern Mason in the San Francisco Examiner. Charles 
Woodman of the San Francisco Call-Post, and Alfred 
Metzger of the Pacific Coast Musical Review. She Is 
a member ot the San Francisco Grand Opera Company. 

The pianist of the evening will be Lincoln S. Batch- 
elder, a member of the faculty and concert staff of the 
University of California Extension Division. This will 
be his first appearance since his return from the East 
where he coached with Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Lhevinne. 
His playing has been spoken of in most glowing terms, 
not only by well known Eastern critics but also by our 
local writers, among whom we might mention Redfern 
Mason ot the San Francisco Examiner. Ray C. B. Brown 
of the San Francisco Chronicle, Alfred Metzger of the 
Pacific Coast Musical Review. His success is marked 
in concert playing and also as a teacher. He has ap- 
peared as soloist and as accompanist in the East as well 
as on the Pacific Coast. 

The Colonial Male Quartet has been recently or- 
ganized by Miss Clare Harrington, a member ot the 
Pacific Musical Society and will be a permanent feature 
of San Francisco's musical lite. This will be their first 
appearance as a quartet although the members have 
sang frequently in concert and opera as soloists. They 
are members of the Colonial Opera Company under 
the direction of .Miss Clare Harrington and will appear 
in the opera Don Pasquale at the Sorosis Club in this 
city the evening of October 12. They are all very gifted 
enthusiasts on the subject ot music. 

Miss Harrington will be the accompanist for the 
quartet. She was educated in this city and in Germany 
and sings in church concert and opera, being hei^elf 
a soprano. The quartet are not her pupils but are 
coached by Miss Harrington. The quartet is composed 
of Louis Leimbach, Lionel Somers, James E. Driscoll 
and Donald Ingraham. 

The program is as follows: (a) Sailor's Song from 
Flying Dutchman (Wagner), (b) Hark! Hark! The 
Lark (Schubert). Colonial Male Quartet— Louis Leim- 
bach. Lionel Somers, James E. Driscoll, Donald 
Ingraham: Etudes Symphoniques (Schumann), Lincoln 
S. Batchelder; (a) Wigmund (SchumannI, (b) Die 
Forelle (Schubert), (c) Le Baiser (Thomas), (d) Les 
Petite Canards (Chabrier), (e) La Pandareta (Alvarez) 
Rena M. Lazelle; (a) Sonnette Del Petrarca (Liszt), (b) 
Novelle (Medtner). first performance in San Francisco 
(c) Etude de Concert (Schlozerl, first performance iii 
San Francisco. Lincoln S. Batchelder: (a) Sheep in 
Clusters (Revolutionary period), (b) Barcarolle (Win- 
ter Watts), (c) A Little Maiden (Clough Leighter) (d) 
A Friend (Lillian Hodghead). (e) Psalm (Ernest Bloch) 
Rena M. Lazelle; (a) A Song ot Araby IProtheroe). (b) 
Chorale of Swords (Faust) (Gounod), Colonial Male 
Quartet. 



Rose Florence, mezzo-soprano, is to give a recital of 
.song on Tuesday evening. October It!, in the Italian 
Room of the Hotel St. Francis. This will be her first 
appearance on the concert stage for two seasons. Since 
last heard here she has filled many concert engage- 
ments and has appeared in a Paris and New York 
recital winning splendid notices from critics. Rose 
Florence is one of the few society giris who foresook 
society for a musical career. Her recital is under the 
direclion of Alice Seckels. Benjamin Moore is the 
accompanist in a program of classics and the added 
feature of Russian and Spanish songs in costume The 
Russian group, comprising songs, by Gretchaninoff, 
Rlmsky-Korsakoff and Moussorgsky. will be sung in the 
costume of "Little Russia" and the Spanish group will 
be represented with two songs by Manuel De Falla 
which have never been given here before. Songs by 
Valverde and Senor Manuel Garcia, father of the famous 
vociil teacher by that name, Horsman's In the Yellow 
Dusk; songs by Hugo Wolf. Richard Strauss. Chausson. 
FVank La Porge, Emerson Whithornc and Mary Can- 
Moore will round out the program. 

John J. McClellan, the famous organist of the Mor- 
mon Tabernacle at Salt Lake City, has been secured by 
the Auditorium Committee of the Board of Supervisors 
for a single recital at the Exposition Auditorium Sun- 
day evening, October 21. He is known all over the 
country as one of the best organists in America and 
has appeared at all of the world's fairs of the past 
twenty-five .vears with great success. As organist of 
the Salt Lake Tabernacle he has played over 4000 
recitals in the past twenty-flve years and he has ap- 
peared in every large city of the United States during 
that lime. There will be no admission fee and no re- 
served seats and the public will be welcome 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



PERSONNEL OF SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Rehearsals of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
commenced last Monday morning under the direction of 
Alfred Hertz and will be held daily until the opening 
concert of the season, which will be given Friday 
afternoon. October 19, in the Curran Theatre. There 
will he few changes in the orchestra's personnel this 
year, the most important one being a new first trumpet 
in Ewald Dietzel, who formerly occupied a similar 
position with the Detroit Symphony. The new violinists 
are P. Marino. W. G. Callinan. Victor Polant. F. Cardona 
and W. Dabelow, while A. Gulterson has been added to 
the double bass section. C. H. Hazlett and J. Sinai are 
returning after a year's absence, the former to the 
clarinet section and the latter to the percussion. The 
complete personnel is as follows: 

First Violins — Louis Fersinger. concert master; Artur 
Argiewicz and Louis Ford, assistant concert masters; 
E. Meriz. R. Mendelevitch, M. Gluschkin. R. Gordohn. T. 
Jensen, W. F. Hoffman. P. Marino, H. Koenig, F. Car- 
dona, Orley See. S. Polak. V. Polant and R. Ruiz. 
Second Violins — J. Koharich. H. Helget. W. Man- 
chester, R. L. Hidden. W. G. Callinan, A. Blaha. J. Gold. 
J. A. Paterson. F. Creitz. A. Heft. W. Sargeant, H. A. 
Dunn and H. H. Hoffman. Violas — Lajos Fenster. E. 
Hahl. F. A. Baker. H. Wismer, B. Purt, E. Weiler. V. 
Lichtenstein. F. Dierich, R. Kolb and W. Dabelow. 
'Celli— \V. V. Ferner, W. Dehe. O. King, W. Villalpando, 
A. Weiss, R. Kirs, J. Schwarzmann and C. Hranek. 
Basses — J. Lahann, S. Greene, W. Bell, A. E. Storch. 
E. Schulze, O. Frederick and A. Gutterson. Flutes — 
Anthony Linden. L. Newbauer. W. Oesterreicher. Oboes 
— C. Addimando, A. Dupuis, V. Schipilliti. Clarinets — 
H. B. Randall. F. Fragale, C. H. Hazlett. Bassoons— E. 
Kubitschek, E. B. La Have, R. Kolb. French Horns — 
W. Hornig, C. E. Tryner. P. Roth, F. E. Huske, R. 
Rocco. Trumpets— E. Dietzel. A. Arriola. Otto Kegal, 
V. Kress. Trombones — F. W. Tait. O. E. Clark. F. N. 
Bassett. Tuba — R. Murray, Harps — Kajetan Attl and 
Barbara Merkley. Tympani — R. E. Wagner. Percus- 
sion — M. Nickel. J. Sinai. A. Vendt and M. A. Salinger. 
Walter Oesterreicher will continue as orchestral man- 
ager and Otto Kegel will act as librarian. 



CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS 

Great interest has been manifested by the public in 
the series of six concerts offered by the Chamber 
Music Society with the co-operation of world distin- 
guished guest artists. Particularly so as the opening 
concert on Tuesday evening October 30. at Scottish 
Rite Hall will present Horace Britt the well-known 
cello virtuoso for the first time since he left us three 
years ago to join the Letz Quartet. Britt, during his 
five years here, as solo cellist of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra and cellist of the Chamber Music 
Society endeared himself, both musically and person- 
ally, to all San Franciscans. He is visiting us for a 



sible for the young people to hear this remarkable 
series at a very low price, easily within their reach. 
This is only one instance of the educational work which 
is being done by the Chamber Music Society and which 
has received the recognition of the United States 
Government. 

MARY GARDEN 

Exceptional personalities employ exceptional methods. 
Two eminent exponents of a special art form will be 
found to show resemblance in major points — resem- 
blances in the manner of reaching certain conclusions, 
for example. Two Americans (one an American by 
birth, the other by adoption — Lillian Xordica. whose un- 
timely death occurred a few years ago, and Mary 
Garden, who is soon to give a recital in San Francisco, 
will take their respective pedestals among famed im- 
mortals as artists who achieved similar ends by simi- 
lar means- 
Equipped with pronounced physical, vocal. mental 
and histrionic parts, each claimed the concert plat- 
form as a field for the exposition of indubitable in- 
dividual talents as vocalists, and each has been identi- 
fied with the desire for the uplift and universal recogni- 
tion of the operatic scheme of her election. Lillian 
Nordica stood for the Wagnerian cult, after having 
victoriously braved and conquered in the arena of 
Italian opera of an older school. 

To Mary Garden must be awarded the palm of es- 
tablishing a definite and definitive status for French 
opera of the modern and most up-to-date groups, the 
Debussian as well as that of Massenet, in the United 
States. If anything. Mary Garden's is a victory greater 
than that recorded for Xordica, because she was prac- 
tically alone in her efforts — requiring the exertion of 
strenuous will power, indeed — to secure recognition 
for a musical form and specialty that had been without 
protagonist until Mary Garden's advent and firm stand 
for its permanent place in this country. French music 
and Mary Garden are inseparably united, and any his- 
tory of the establishment of the first in America must 
include the name of the second. 

Though confessedly partial to music of the French 
school her program is both varied and comprehensive. 
There will be heard the big aria from the second act 
of "Manon Lescaut" (Puccini); Tosti's La Serenade: 
a Strauss song, Zueignung; The Steppe, by Gretchani- 
now; and Serenade, by John Alden Carpenter, a con- 
temporary American composer. 

Miss Garden will be assisted by the young Russian 
cellist. Gutia Casini. who has recently arrived in New 
York, bringing with him a very wonderful cello which 
he has had insured for $15,000. He will be heard in three 
numbers. Georges Lauweryns, accompanist, will play 
Liszt's Paraphrase sur Rigoletto. Miss Garden will 
appear in but one recital in Northern California — at 
the Auditorium on Sunday afternoon, October 21, under 
the management of Selby C. Oppenheimer. 



ALICE SECKELS presents 

MAY MUKLE 

Cellist 

LAWRENCE STRAUSS 

Tenor 

ELLEN EDWARDS at the Piano 

ITALIAN ROOM. HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

TUESDAY EVENING. OCTOBER 9. 1923—8:30 P. M. 

Tickets $1.50 (plus war tax) at Sherman, Clay & Co. 



short period while on a transcontinental tour and his 
appearance with the Chamber Music Society on October 
3Q -will be the first chance that his many friends and 
admirers will have to welcome his homecoming, even 
if for a brief period. Mr. Britt will also appear as 
soloist of the San FVancisco Symphony Orchestra on 
November 2 and 4. 

In Woodstock, New York. Mr. Britt and Mr. Ferner 
scored a brilliant success when appearing, together with 
the Chamber Music Society in a concert there. And 
San Francisco will have an opportunity to enjoy this 
musical treat on October 30 when Mr. Britt will appear 
in the beautiful Schubert Quintet in C major and the 
remarkable Sextet of Arnold Schoenberg which created 
such a sensation in the 1921 season of Chamber Music 
concerts and which will again be heard at this concert 
by overwhelming request of the public. Both of these 
compositions require two cellists of the first rank and 
the public is assured of splendid and authoritative in- 
terpretations of these master works. Immediately after 
his appearances here Mr. Britt will have to leave for 
New York to fulfill his Eastern engagements. 

The coming season of the Chamber Music Society, 
with Horace Britt, Ethel Leginska. the famous English 
pianist, and Erno Dohnanyi, the great Hungarian com- 
poser-pianist, will be a remarkable series of splendid 
performances and will mark a climax in the steady 
succession of successful triumphs which the Chamber 
Music Society has enjoyed. There being an unusually 
heavy demand for seats this year it will be advisable 
to secure season tickets as soon as possible in order 
that patrons may be assured of regular and good places 
for the coming events. 

An announcement of great importance is the fact 
that, acting in co-operation with the Board of Educa- 
tion, the Chamber Music Society has decided to offer a 
limited number of season tickets to bonafide public 
high school students of the City and County of San 
Francisco at special student rates. This has been done 
as an educational feature and in order to make it pos- 



START OF PRINDELL SEASON IN LOS ANGELES 

Musically and socially distinctive was the musical 
soiree and reception held Friday evening, September 
26, at 9 o'clock, in the exclusive surroundings of the 
Los Angeles Athletic Club, inaugurating becomingly 
the season of Madame Newcombe-Prindell, whose man- 
agerial activities on behalf of resident artists is win- 
ning wide attention and support from clubs and the 
general public. In fact, this reception took place in 
token of this esteem and in honor of Mme. Newcombe- 
Prindell, with Mr. and Mrs. Charles Ernfrid Nathhorst 
as sponsors and host, and Dr. Douglas as master of 



After paying due tribute to the guest of honor Mme. 
Newcombe Prindell, bidding the distinguished gather- 
ing welcome. Mr. Nathhorst introduced Dr. Douglas, 
founder of the Los Angeles Opera Club. 

Catherine Jackson, charming young harpist, opened 
the musical program with two delightfully played se- 
lections: Chanson san Paroles by Dubez and Ballade 
by Hosselmans, revealing not only fine technic but 
versatile musical conception. Bonnie Helen Mackin- 
tosh, gifted Scotch soprano, attired in the costume of 
her clan, then gave unique rendition of Scotch songs, 
having to respond with an encore to the cordial ap- 
plause. Eunice Prosser proved herself a splendid violin- 
ist of striking attainments, technic and tone in two 
groups, including selections by Wieniawsky, Rissland. 
Tournier and Boisdeffre, interpreting the selections 
with due regard. Here Miss Jackson added winsome 
harp accompan'ments. Earl Meeker's singing of Vision 
Fhigitive from Manon won him great favor of his audi- 
ence which insisted on hearing again this popular 
baritone. Miss Dow. at last minute substituting with 
an finely shaded accompaniment. Much credit must 
also be given to the two other accompanists. Misses 
Helen Newcombe and Linnie Guess. Altogether the 
evening proved one of much honor to the manager and 
her artists. 



An Artist of Distinct Personality 



Mabel 

Riegeiman 

OPERA AND CONCERT 
SOPRANO 



Will Instruct a Limited Number of 
Sincere Students in 

The 
Art of Singing 



For Appointment Address: 
DOROTHY BROOKS, Secretary 

485 California Street 
San Francisco 



QUEENA MARIO IN RECITAL 

Queena Mario, whose success in the great role of 
Juliet in the Gounod opera Romeo and Juliet led the 
Metropolitan Opera Company to give fifteen perform- 
ances of that opera last season, and who has made noth- 
ing short of a sensation in her rendition of this and 
other roles with the San Francisco company, has ob- 
tained special permission from the Metropolitan of- 
ficials to remain in San Francisco an additional week 
before reporting to them for rehearsals, in order to 
appear at the ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel on 
Monday afternoon. October 22, as the first of the great 
artist series to be given this season as the feature of 
the Alice Seckels Matinee Musicales. This will be Miss 
Mario's only appearance in this city in recital this 
season and will bring to the event hundreds of her 
ardent admirers, many of whom consider her the fore- 
most lyric soprano of the day. Miss Mario, assisted 
by Imogen Peay at the piano has arranged a particu- 
larly attractive program, which includes an old Mozart 
work which has rarely if ever been heard in San Fran- 
cisco. It is called Dans un Bois and is emblematic of 
Mozart at his best. The full list of offerings includes: 
(a) Dans un Bois iMozart). lb) Care Selve (Handell, 
{cl Xeues Lieben. Xeues Leben (Beethoven): (a) Jours 
Passes (Delibesl. (bl Comment Disaient lis (Liszt). 
Id Er Liebete Mich So Sehr (Tschaikowsky). (d) 
L'Oiseau Bleu iDecreus); Aria of Micaela from Carmen 
(Bizeti: lal Lullaby (Kreisler). lb) The Xight Wind 
iRoland Farley), (ci Ah! Love, but a Day I.Mrs. H. H. 
A. Beach), Id) The Song of the Open IFrank La Forge); 
Waltz from Romeo et Juliette (Gounod). 

Other concerts in this series are Josef Lhevinne. 
master pianist. November 19: Elena Gerhardt. "lieder" 
singer. December 17: The Griffes Group on January 14. 
1924, the Metropolitans jolly baritone, Renato Zanelli, 
on March 24: and Ferenc Vecsev, Hungarian violinist, 

April 14. , 

ADA CLEMENT CONCERT 

It is good news to mus;c lovers that Ada Clement 
will be heard in concert on Tuesday evening. October 
23. in the Colonial Ballroom of the Hotel St. Francis. 
This excellent artist appears all too seldom. She has. 
as assisting artist. May Mukle, the English cellist, and 
Alexander Saslavsky, violinist. The recital is under 
the direction of Alice Seckels. The Rebecca Clarke Trio 
will have its first San Francisco presentation and as 
it is a work which won second prize at the Pittsfield 
Chamber Music Festival music lovers will be eager to 
hear it. This year Mrs. Coolidge commissioned Miss 
Clarke to write a cello and piano composition for the 
Pittsfield festival, a rare compliment for the young 
composer. This will be played by May Mukle and Miss 
Clement. The rest of the program will consist of an 
interesting group of piano solos played by Miss Clement 
and a Sonata, probably the Debussy, for cello and 
piano. 



TACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



GRAND OPERA SEASON 

(Conllnueil from Page 7, Col. 4) 
victories and spiterul in his defeats. Beniaminl Gigli 
exhibited his incomparable artistry by enacting the 
role of Faust In a manner to emphasize the vocal pos- 
sibilities of the role beyond its seeming unimportance. 
His pure bel canto and flexible organ was heard to 
great advantage and he added another victory to his 
long array of triumphs since this present season began. 
Bianca Saroya in both the roles of Margherita and 
Elena was vocally most pleasing and effective her ring- 
ing soprano giving unalloyed pleasure to all. Dramatic- 
ally we preferred her impersonation of Margherita 
which seems to He within her scope of histrionic accom- 
plishments being of a sedate and sombre nature. As 
Elena she could have revealed more contrast, but evi- 
dently this part was ni'w lo her and she had no chance 
to study it to the minutest details. Doria Fernanda 
showed much versatility on her portrayals of the giddy 
Marta on one hand and the dignllle{l Pantalis on the 
other. She did some splendid actinK with Didur in the 
garden scene and her fine, resonant voice came to the 
fore In no mean degree. Giordano Paltrinlerl lent im- 
portance to the role of Wagner and sang and acted 
It In a most delightful manner. Again both stage man- 
agement and ballet direction were worthy of commend- 
ation tor thoroughness and picturesque character. 

Like the orchestra the chorus had much to be re- 
sponsible for. and although the young singers had 
several months' preparations the dimculties to be over- 
come were such as to test the spirit of even the most 
experienced chorus singers. We feel justified to add 
our measure of praise lo that of everytme else in re- 




LOUISE LUNO 

The Successful California Contralto Who Has Gained 

Recognition in Europe and Who Will Sing at 

Covent Garden, London, This Season 

gard to the 8plen<lid work accomplislied by this chorus 
and we trust that its Individual members will appre- 
Icatc the untiring efforts of those who trained them 
and will continue to serve their community so that 
their arllsllc qualincations will constantly expand and 
broaden and result in molding them Into the artistic 
ensemble which their natural voices and their appar- 
ent enthusiasm and ambition promises to attain While 
credit is being bestowed we do not wish lo omit Selby 
C. Oppenheimer. the business manager, who had to 
contend with problems with which the public is not 
familiar, but which nevertheless have to be overcome 
If an enterprise of such vast dimensions Is to result 
In successful termination. To take care of thousands 
of opera goers in a manner to make as many friends 
and as few enemies as possible Is a feat which Is note- 
worthy and In Its way as important as the artistic 
achievements, for It necessitates the same object, name- 
ly, the satisfaction of the public. In next week's issue 
wo shall publish a brief resume of the season, and 
reviews of Romeo and Juliet. Pagllacci and RIgoletlo. 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 
Staaio 670 8tli A*«. Phone Barriew S543 



SISTINE CHAPEL CHOIR 

That the Sistlne Chapel Choir will eclipse in America 
the artistic and tinancial success it scored in Australia 
last year Is confidently predicted by Frank W. Healy, 
who is In New York arranging the famous organiza- 
tion's coming tour of the United Stales and Canada. 
This confidence. Healy has Informed his San Francisco 
oflicc. is warranted by the exceptional terms offered 
him for bookings in all the principal cities and numer- 
ous smaller towns and the tliousands of inquiries from 
individuals eager to ascertain the itinerary. In many 
Instances less notable attractions have been cancelled 
in order to give the choir the dates originally allotted 
to them. 

Accommodations for the fifty-four singers have been 
reserved aboard the Italian liner Conle Verde, which 
will leave -Naples In time lo arrive al .New York not 
later than October Hi. The first concert Is scheduled 
for Thursday evening October IS, in Carnegie Hall, and 
Healy reports that every seat has already been sold. 
It Is probable that one or more concerts will be given 
there while the choir Is on Its return trip to Rome. 

At each of its concerts in this country the choir 
will sing some of the unpublished compositions which 
exist only In manuscript and have never been heard 
outside of the Sistlne Chapel. Conductor Rella has 
exclusive right to present any of these works and by 
inducing him to have them sung on this continent 
Manager Healy believes tliat he has succeeded in se- 
curing for America's music lovers a unique opportunity 
to acquaint themselves with some of the greatest 
examples of ecclesiastical harmony Including creations 
by Palestrina and Perosi. 

As the choir's leave of absence from the Vatican is 
confined to twelve weeks and the itinerary includes 
every important city between the two oceans Manager 
Healy has found it impossible to arrange for more than 
three concerts in San Francisco. These are scheduled 
for December 7, 8 and 9, in the Exposition Auditorium, 
and reservations are already being booked at Sherman, 
Clay & Co.'s ticket office. 



FRANCES ALDA TO APPEAR THIS MONTH 

Mme. Frances Alda, prima donna soprano from the 
Metropolitan Opera House, New York, has been en- 
gaged by Frank W. Healy, who is now in that city, to 
give a concert In conjunction with Lionel Terlis, 
famous English viola soloist, the evening of Monday, 
October 29, at Scottish Rite Auditorium. The piano 
accompaniments will be played by Margaret Hughes, a 
San Francisco girl who has won distintcion in the 
Eastern music world. 

San Franciscans who have heard Mme. Alda sing 
know that her voice yields instantly to the require- 
ments of dramatic music and still is quite effective in 
delivery of lyric phrases calling for the smooth, flow- 
ing raezza-voce so rarely found. In song recital she in- 
variably compels admiration of the sort gained by only 
one or two other singers now before the public. She 
is prepared at all times with a repertoire embracing 
the standard arias, oratorios and classic song literature. 

Mr. Tertis has appeared as viola soloist with all the 
leading orchestras of England and continental Europe. 
His tour of this country is due to John McCormack, 
who heard him play at the English home of Maiam 
de Navarro (Mary Anderson) and vi'as so fascinated 
that he immediately cabled his managers suggesting the 
engagement. "I willl slake my reputation," he added, 
"in predicting that he will prove a sensation in 
America." 

Seats can now be had at Sherman. Clay & Company's 
ticket oflice. 



TITO SCHIPA TO SING 

The appearances of Tito Schipa, the eminent lyric 
tenor, at the Columbia Theatre in San Francisco on 
the Sunday afternoons of November 4th and 11th, will 
be extraordinary events Inasmuch as Schipa is counted 
the foremost lyric singer of today. He has attained 
this position through an uninterrupted succession of 
brilliant achievements and is one of the few artists 
whom the public has accepted as worthy of its most 
fiattering support and commendation. 

Schipa possesses certain qualities that invariably 
appeal to the cultured musician as well as to the lay- 
man. His voice Is of a luscious timbre, his art Is pol- 
ished to a high degree, rare interpretative powers en- 
able him to Infuse into a song or aria that Indefinable 
something which we call "heart and soul, " his person- 
ality Is engaging and his method of presentation of the 
vocal masterpieces is delightfully diversified. He is 
a singer of extraordinary gifts, cultivated to a point as 
near perfection as is humanly possible, which, coupled 
with his Innate understanding of human nature, enables 
him to reach the hearts of his audiences no matter what 
the medium— an Italian aria, a Spanish folk song, a 
French chanson or a simple heart song in English. 

Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer, who is bringing 
Schipa to California for the first lime, predicts an un- 
usual and enormous success for this splendid artist, 
who will be the forerunner of a most interesting ser- 
ies of concerts at popular prices on Sunday afternoons 
in the Columbia Theatre. 

In rapid succession will come on November 18, Efrem 
ZImbalist, eminent violinist; on November 25, Josef 
Lhevinne, Russia's great pianist: a Joint recital by Ar- 
thur Rubinstein, pianist, and Paul Kochanski, violinist, 
on December 9. and on December 16. lovely Anna Case, 
lyric soprano. 

FOR RENT 
Studio formerly occupied by Ashley Pettis. Stage, 
Balcony, Kitchenette. Rent. $35.00. Phone Fillmore 
6S50. 818 Grove Street. 



SECOND OF FORTNIGHTLY SERIES 

The second program of the Fortnightlys will feature 
English composers who have risen in the Musical firma- 
ment of England since the war. and promises to be one 
of the most interesting of the series for several reasons. 
Both executants on this program are English born, and 
all of the composers featured: John Ireland, Frank 
Uridge, Eugene Goossens, Percy Grainger and are old 
friends of lioth artists, which will give an added interest 
to the interpretations. Miss Mukle needs no introduc- 
tion to San Francisco. She has been a welcome visit- 
ing artist many times, but this will be Mrs. Edwards 
first concert with her in which she shares the honors. 

Having appeared many times together abroad the 
occasion should be an inspiration to both artists. 

Ellen Edwards Is a recent addition to our resident 
pianists and in the two years she has been here has 
justified the most glowing comments on her work. The 
program follows: Sonata for Violoncello and Pianoforte 
(In two movements) (Frank Bridge): Concertino in E 
minor (Ariosti-Elkus). (1C661749): Pianoforte solos: 
Idylle, Skizze (Albert Elkus): London Pieces: Chel- 
sea Reach, Ragamuffin (John Ireland). Remembrance, 
Valse Caprlcieuse (Frank Uridge): Violoncello solos: 
Sussex mummers' Christmas Carol (arr. by Percy Grain- 
ger) : Chinese Folk tune (arr. by Eugene Goossens); 
Melody (Frank Bridge). 

California composer featured is Mr. Albert Elkus. 

Single guest tickets may be procured from members. 



ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE ACTIVITIES 

The opening recital of the Fifteenth season of the 
Arrillaga Musical College took place in the College 
building, Fillmore and Jackson streets, last week. The 
program was presented by facufty members including 
Mynard S. Jones, basso-cantante. George Edwards, com- 
poser-pianist, and Achille Artigues, organist and Pres- 
ident of the school, and was comprised of modern 
works, including those of two San Francisco composers, 
Wallace A. Sabin and George Edwards. It was followed 
by a reception on the upper floors of the attractive 
College building, in which a large group of socially 
prominent people participated. 

Mynard S.i Jones, basso-cantante, and Raymond 
White, pianist, both well known artist-members of the 
faculty of the Arrillaga Musical College, presented a 
program of songs and piano music at the Greek The- 
atre last Sunday afternoon. The richness of Mr. Jones' 
voice met with hearty enthusiasm on the part of the 
large audience, and Mr. White's exquisite playing re- 
quired an encore consisting of Graziela, a composition 
by SIgnor S. de Arrillaga father of Vincent de Arril- 
laga. the present director of the school. The program 
included compositions of local composers: Sea Fever, 
and The Indian Upon God; songs by Wallace A. Sabin 
and George Edwards, and a piano solo. The Philosopher 
by George Edwards, who has recently joined the teach- 
ing forces of the Arrillaga Musical College. 



JOSEPH GEORGE JACOBSON'S PUPIL RECITAL 



An interesting recital was given by some of the ad- 
vanced class pupils of Joseph George Jacobson at his 
residence-studio last week which was enthusiastically 
applauded by an appreciative audience, and gave credit 
to the teacher. The opening number was the D minor 
Concerto by Mozart, first movement, played by Myrtle 
Harriet Jacobs with intelligent phrasing and flne feel- 
ing, Mr. Jacobson playing the second piano. She was 
followed by Vera Adelstein, who made her first appear- 
ance before the club and made a fine impression espec- 
ially with the rendition of the second number. The 
third number was the Rondo brilliante Op. 22 tor piano 
and orchestra played by .Margaret Lewis with dash 
and good technic. Mr. Jacobson then gave a talk on the 
Sonata and Sonata-form which was followed by the 
Moonlight Sonata by Beethoven played by Gladys 
Ivanelle Wilson. This young girl has made great pro- 
gress and is developing into a good musician. The 
same can be said of .Marian Patricia Cavanaugh, already 
well-known in spite of her years, she played the Rondo 
movement of the C minor Concerto by Beethoven with 
clean technic, style and taste that gave Joy to the 
listeners. Edward Summ came next with Bach's Fan- 
tasia in C minor and Liszt's Lovedream No. 3 In spite 
of his nervousness he revealed a flne singing touch 
and showed versatility and good taste. The last num- 
ber was the F minor Concerto by Weber played by Sam 
Eodetsky. It was brilliantly played shoning that he 
has eloquent musicianship and ample technical equip- 
■lent. 



Elinor Remick Warren, famed for her delightful 
songs which are sung by many renowned artists of 
America, has recently finished a composition for the 
piano called "Frolic of Elves." Ernesto Berumen. to 
whom this number Is dedicated, has Included it on the 
programs for his New York and Boston concerts as 
well as on his entire tour for the fortlicoming season. 



Grace Senior Breariy, pianlste of note from Boston 
and Duluth. appeared before the Los Angeles City Club 
last Friday. She played the Brahms. Rapsodle In D 
Minor, with splendid hearing, markcii musicianship and 
keen understanding. On this program Miss Ingrid Ame- 
son. soprano, who delighted the Hollywood Bowl audi- 
ence this summer, sang In a very pleasing manner. 
One Fine Day. from the opera Madame Butterfly, and 
Star, by Rogers. Other artists scheduled to appear at 
the City Club In the near future are Ettore Campana. 
baritone, and the Bickfords, who are artists of the 
cello and guitar. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RE\'IE\V 




When 
Work Is 
Pleasure 



When health and happiness are present, 
when surrounding^s are cong^enial, when one 
is "making good" in a worth while job, it is 
a pleasure to work. 

For the tj-pist, add to these conditions the 
"SILENT SMITH" typewriter, ball bear- 
ing, easy running and equipped with all the 
time and labor saving devices — then the 
pleasure of work is complete. 

.Send for booklet and folder Form 601. 



L. C. Smith & Bros. Typewriter Co. 

Executive Offices -:- -:- SYRACUSE, N. Y. 

432 Market Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

218 Citizens National Bank Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif. 



HAVE YOU REGISTERED 
in the 

Musical Blue Book 

of 
CALIFORNIA? 

= 1. 

IF NOT, APPLY FOR 

REGISTRATION 

BLANKS 

NOW! 



There Is Still Time to Reserve 
Advertising Space in This 

BLUE BOOK 

The Very Best Musical Adver- 
tising Medium in California. 
Do Not Delay Any Longer, 
But Apply at Once to 

MUSICAL REVIEW 
COMPANY 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
San Francisco 

Room 510 808 So. Broadway 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



KURT VON GRtTDZINSKI 



ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



I. -..IT 



Berkel«7, 



MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of .Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 



DOMENICO BRESCIA 



Madame Charles Poulter— Soprano 



Lizetta Kalova Violinist 

AV.\II.ABLE FOR CO.\CERTS 

ll^SI High Court, Uerkrler; 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE S.AN FR.WCISCO B.WK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY lOlh, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

M ISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICTT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH. W est Ponal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (434) 
per cent per annum was decilared. Interest compounded 
QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



DAISY O'BRIEN 



VltUK — GIIT.VK 



LEILA B. GRAVES 

I.VRIC SOPRANO—VOICE CrLTI'RE 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

Studio: ISO Central .We. Tel. Park IIKM 

MISS WELCOME LEVY 



Laura Wertlieimber 



EDWIN HUTCHINGS 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 

PIANO 
2X33 Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore 348 

ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



SIGMUND BEEL 



studio Bulldin 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

fsdar and 

, F.i Real- 

tn Itoxn .\ve.. Oak- 

SAN 'SaNcSo"wRVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CO.\TR.\l>TO 
Teacher of SInElnE. 32 I-orettn Ave- Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. »on., Kohler « 
Cbase Bldp.. S. F. Telephone Kearny .%4S4. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST- Bet. Clar & Washln^on 
Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. >oah Brandt, Piano 



Mary Coonan McCrea "E^EN COLBURN HEATH 



Soprano SololHt. Temple En 



Tel. OouKlas 4:::iS. Re 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

AnnoDncex the openinf? of her neve Resi- 
dence StDdio. Clark Apts.. Apt. =6 — 138 
Hyde St., San Prnncinco. Phone Prospect 
S031. Prldayit. »02 Kufaler &. Chaae Bldg. 



MME 


ISABELLE MARKS 




CONTRALTO 


Voice Cull 


nre. Suite "C" Kohler & Chase 


Rnlldloe. 


Telephone Kearny .%4.VI. 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOL.A CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

ORGANIST ST. MARY'S CATHBDRAIr 

Piano Departmenti HaHlla S«k(M>l 
Orgmn aad Piano, AnillaKa Moatcal CoUesa 



MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



EVA M. GARCIA 

PIANIST .VND TEACHER 
4l.-,2 Howe St. Tel. Piedmont 400S 

MARY CAKR MOORE- SO>'GS 



ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

violinist and Teacher. Head of Violin Dept., 

S. F. Cons, of Music. 3435 Sacramento 

St., and 121 2Ist Atc- Tel Pae. 1284 



San Francisco Conservatory of Music 



TucHday. Septeniher 11 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 

376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 
149 Rose At., Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 139S 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANDRE FERRIER 

1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3321 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

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LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



IJJ THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR.NAL IHTHE GREAT WESTH 




VOL. XLV. No. 2 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SIXTH PITTSFIELD CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL 



Five Concerts in Three Days Were Thoroughly Enjoyed by Invited Guests 
Representing Foremost Musical Enthusiasts in the Country — Major- 
ity of Artists and Compositions of British Origin — Frank Bridge, 
Eugene Goossens Receive Ovations — London String Quartet 



(Written for the Pacific Coast Musical Review by J. K. L.) 



New York. October 4, 1923. 
The sixth Chamber Music Festival at 
Pittsfield. Mass., was held Thursday. 
Friday and Saturday of last week. There 
were two concerts each day except on 
Thursday when the first occurred at 4 in 
the afternoon. Needless to state again 
that this thrice wonderful event is pro- 
vided through the bounty and love for 
music of Mrs. Frederick Shurtleff Cool- 
idge, whose influence through these an- 
nual festivals has permeated Europe as 
well as America. Her name must be 
mentioned when such patrons of music 
in the United States come to mind as 
Otto Kahn, Clarence Mackay or Harry 
Harkness Flagler, because not only does 
she defray every cent of the expense, but 
the audiences privileged to attend are 
there by her invitation. In past seasons 
she has called her talent from all parts 
of this country and from Europe; she 
has been the inspiration for the creation 
of many chamber music organizations 
each of which bears some signs of her 
interest, as for instance the Elshuco Trio 
represents the first letters of her name. 
Elizabeth Shurtleff Coolidge. This year 
the major portion of artists and composi- 
tions were British, and there was a 
large contingency of English artists and 
composers who came to America to be 
present upon this occasion. Several of 
the composers are Mrs. Coolidge's guests 
during their stay in America. 

A live interest was manifested in Frank 
Bridge, whose sextet was heard on the 
first day. Mr. Bridge is not unknown in 
this country where the London String 
Quartet and the Flonzaleys have played 
his chamber music and many singers 
have used his songs. Rugged, straight- 
forward and delightfully genial is this 
cultured gentleman who made personal 
friends galore as well as admirers of 
his very pronounced gifts as composer. 
Right royal, too. was the reception ac- 
corded the London String Quartet, re- 
turned in its full powers and headed, as 
originally, by James Levey whose seri- 
ous Illness last year w^as deplored from 
coast to coast. It was a cause for re- 
joicing for it was in Pittsfield three years 
ago that they made their first American 
appearance. 

The event was not without the cloud 
of disappointment, however, as Eugene 
Goossens, whose sextet played at the 11 
o'clock concert on Saturday was one of 
the outstanding events of the series, was 
due to arrive on Friday and the Aquitania 
which was bearing him into the country 
was held at quarantine until late Friday 
night. Although he dashed to the Massa- 
chusetts town he arrived just after the 
concert was over and the guests dis- 
persed. His ovation came, however, on 
Saturday evening when according to cus- 
tom Mrs. Coolidge entertained at a mag- 
nificent reception all those who had at- 
tended the festival, making the com- 
posers and the artists the guests of 
honor. Not only because of the great 
beauty of his work heard on the Satur- 
day morning program was the interest in 
this young Englishman so keen, but Mr. 
Goossens is to remain in this country 
to give the first three pairs of concerts 
of the newly formed Rochester Sym- 
phony Orchestra, sponsored by George 
Eastman. While Albert Coates is to have 
the orchestra after January I. the earlier 
events will be directed by Mr. Goossens 
and then my Vladimir Shavitch. husband 
of Tina Lerner, until his arrival. 



Each year Mrs. Coolidge has offered, a 
prize for the best work submitted in a 
prescribed form, but this year she made 



tically "tied" with Ernest Bloch. whose 
sonata for viola and piano was created 
at that time by Harold Bauer and Louis 
Bailly of the Flonzaley Quartet. Later 
Mr. Bloch re-arranged his sonata for viola 
and orchestra, which improved it much, 
and Miss Clarke's work upon several 
performances proved to be very worthy. 
Dealing with the series just over, it 
seemed as though on the whole the con- 
certs of 1923 have not been surpassed 
and the weather, while not as full of 
sunshine as in some seasons past gave 
no occasion for complaint. The South 
Mountain Temple holds about 500 per- 
sons and this year even a few were per- 




He 



the award differently inasmuch as she 
commissioned Eugene Goossens to write 
a sextet and Rebecca Clarke, the Eng- 
lish viola player to write for cello and 
piano. This decision may have been 
reached because two years ago Miss 
Clarke entered the "contest" and prac- 



Knvinble Repntation 

(See Page 10. Coi. It 

mitted to stand. A new quartet made its 
appearance this season and before the 
close of the activities it covered itself 
with glory. The moving spirit and cellist 
was Willem Willeke, a great artst and 
admirable as an organizer; his col- 
leagues were William Kroll, Karl 



Kraeuter and Edward Kreiner and the 
name of the organization is The Festival 
Quartet of South Mountain. It appeared 
on Thursday afternoon to form a double 
quartet with the London String Quar- 
tet in a G minor string quartet, sup- 
posedly by Bach, copied by Carl 
Schroeder from the publications of the 
Bach Society of Leipsic. This was not 
an octet, but merely the doubling of the 
four instruments. The rest of the pro- 
gram consisted of a beautiful perform- 
ance of the Beethoven quartet in F 
major, opus 59, No. 1. and a sextet in E 
flat by Frank Bridge played by the 
"Londoners," Messrs. Kreiner and Will- 
eke. It is a fine vigorous work, sincere 
and intelligent. The second movement 
throbs with beauty, pulse and the six in- 
struments are beautifully voiced. It was 
received with great enthusiasm and the 
composer was called to the platform to 
acknowledge the tribute of an audience 
arising in his honor. 

In the five sessions nothing was finer 
than the Friday morning concert which 
enlisted Myra Hess, piano, and Lionel 
Tertis, the English viola player, conceded 
to be the greatest living artist of his 
instrument, in an opening sonata by 
Brahms and a closing one by Arnold Bax. 
The Brahms work was written for clari- 
net or viola, and was undeniably beauti- 
ful, but the interest centered in the work 
of the Englishman, whose orchestral 
works are known and admired in this 
country. His name is worth remember- 
ing because he is already a towering 
figure in the musical world. The first 
movement is full of atmosphere in the 
piano and broad melodic lines for the 
viola, simple in treatment, yet modern in 
spirit and effect. Later a virile dance 
tune makes its appearnce and its closes 
in mystic mood with a "molto lento" 
movement. The players were rapturous- 
ly applauded, and it is conceded that 
Miss Hess won new distinction and new 
honors. Between these two numbers a 
Mozart trio for piano, clarinet and viola 
and a sextet for violas by B. J. Dale, an 
unfamiliar English composer were heard. 
The first served to present Katherine 
Goodson, the eminent English pianist 
who has not been heard in this country 
for several years, Lionel Tertis. and 
Gustav Langenus, clarinet of Carolyn 
Beebes New York Chamber Music So- 
ciety, while the Dale work astonished as 
well as delighted lovers of novelties. 
There was no monotony of tone, but the 
lights and shades were delightful and 
there was a fine distribution of the in- 
struments. It was a bit reminiscent of 
Wagner, but in a pardonable way. 

The afternoon concert departed from 
usual lines by introducing a program 
of Vocal Chambe r Music delightfully 
sung by Mabel Garrison, Elena Gerhardt. 
George Meader and Reinald Werrenrath, 
sung in German. Miss Gerhardt con- 
tributing a beautiful performance of the 
Schumann cycle Woman's Love and Life. 
There were three lovely duets by Peter 
Cornelius sung by Mabel Garrison and 
Reinald Werrenrath. a group of Schu- 
bert songs by George Meader and the 
quartet sang the Brahms New Songs of 
Love, opus 65, with four hand piano 
accompaniment by Mrs, Coolidge and 
Conraad V. Bos. Kurt Schindler ar- 
ranged the program and played some of 
the accompaniments. 

The "commissioned" numbers were 
heard at the morning concert of the 
closing day and these, both dedicated to 
Mrs. Coolidge, followed the first per- 
formance in America of a string quartet 
by Paul Hindemith. of whom Percy 
Grainger brought the first news to Amer- 
ica. He is a young German, who has 
sprung forth since the war. The work 
has vigor, rhythm and much fine the- 
matic material; it is admirably written 
and is worth being incorporated into the 
standard repertory for chamber music. 
Chief interest, however, rested upon the 
(Continued on Page 7. Co!. 4> 



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Teaching studio is open to visitors 
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UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
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ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RE\IE\V 



^rifir 

III THFONLN' WEEKL-.- MUoICAL JOU?j;AL IK the great W£5T m 
MUSICAI, REVIEW COMPANY 

* LFRTII) MET7.GER _ „Pr«ldeii 

C. C. EMERSON Vice Preslden 

HARms I,. SAMUELS SecretnrT and Treaanre 

SoUe KOI Kohler & Chaae RldE.. 2« O'Farrell St.. Sn 
FranoUco. Cal. Tel. Kearnr 54R4 



great or famous, must reside somewliere and con- 
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world. 



ALFRED METZGER 
C. C. EMERSON 



Editor 
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VOL. XLV 


SATURDAY, OCT. 13, 1923 


NO. 2 












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TWENTY-THIRD YEAR 



ST\TEME>T OF THE OWXERSHIP. MANAGEMENT, 

CIRC! LATION. ETC.. REQl IREIl BV THE ACT 

OF CONGRESS OF AI Gl ST S4. 1013. 

Of Pacific Coast Musical Review, published weekly at San 



Francisco. Californ 
State of California. 
County of San Fr; 



October 1. 1923. 



vho. having been duly 
■ he is the 

nd that the following is. to the best of hi: 
ledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, 
gemcnt (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc.. 



on H3. Postal Lan 



and Regulations 



i. that the names and addresses of the publishe 
)r. managing editor and business managers ; 



n, 26 O'Farrell St.. San Fran 



The Musical Review Company.. 

26 O'Farrell St.. San Franci! 

Alfred Metzger „ 26 O'Farrell St.. San Francii 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and otl 
security holders owning or holding 1 per cent or m^ 
of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securit 



if any. contain not only the list of stockholders 
security holders as they appear upon the books of the 
company, but also, in cases where the stockholders or 
rity holders appear upon the books of the company 
es or in any other fiduciary relation, the name 
?rson or corporation for whom such trustee is 
; given; also that the said two paragraphs con- 
tain statements embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who do not appear 
upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock 
capacity other than that of bona fide 



October. 1923. 

Notary Public in 

Slate of Califor: 

(My comt 



ihcd before 



\pril 25. 1923). 



VICTORY FOR RESIDENT ARTISTS 



Not so very long ago the distinction of being a 
resident artist of ability and reputation did not 
count much among those most likely to present 
opportunities for the dignified public appearances 
of artists who either have resided among us for 
some time or who have chosen this State for their 
place of residence. From the attitude of certain 
clubs, managers, newspapers and musical people 
it would have appeared as if to reside in Califor- 
nia was something to be ashamed of, and to have 
chosen this State for one's place of residence was 
synonymous with being reduced to the rank of a 
"local" artist. It never occurred to these people 
so sneeringly regarding the accomplishments of 
resident artists that an artist, no matter how 



-About two years ago the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review decided to take up the fight for the resi- 
dent artists, after twenty years of steady encour- 
agement of all musical efforts worthy of recogni- 
tion emanating from California. The result of 
this ])ersistent campaign was not at first appar- 
ent, i)Ut up to date we can register the following 
change of conditions : The California Federation 
of Musical Clubs passed a resolution at its recent 
annual convention in Santa Ana suggesting to 
every club belonging to that organization to in- 
clude two artists residing in California in this 
season's itinerary. The San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, under the direction of Alfred Hertz, 
included resident artists as soloists last season. 
Gaetano Merola and the San Francisco Opera 
.Association made one of their strongest appeals 
to the public on the ground that resident artists 
were given opportunities. L. E. Behymer an- 
nounced in the program of the annual convent'on 
of the California Federation of Musical Clubs 
that his bureau is presenting a number of resi- 
dent artists during the season. Miss Ida G. Scot 
has inaugurated a concert course whose principal 
feature is the presentation of resident artists. 
Miss Alice Seckcis has added a resident artists' 
concert course to her bay district concert activi- 



It is true that prior to our persistent fight for 
recognition of the resident artists some of them 
occasionally obtained bookings in tlie State, but 
it was done in a condescending and patronizing 
manner. During the last two years the resident 
artist has gained in prestige. He or she is recog- 
nized on a par with visiting artists. The number 
of engagements and remuneration may not as 
yet be what our resident artists of distinction 
have a right to expect, but we have made prog- 
ress. No reasonable person can deny this. And 
we shall continue with every fibre of energy at 
our command to espou.se the cause of the resident 
artist of ability, until no artist, no matter how 
great, need fear to become "localized," because 
of his decision to make California his home. 



FIRST OF THE FORTNIGHTLYS A SUCCESS 

Chamber Music Society of San Francisco Inaugurates 

Miss Ida G. Scott's Season With a Dignity That 

Speaks Well for Rest of Concerts 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The first ot a series of Fortnightly Concerts featur- 
ing specially resident artists and Amerrcan composers, 
assisted by American artists and lecturers of interna- 
tional fame, was given at the St. Francis Hotel Colonial 
Ballroom on Monday afternoon, October 1. in the 
presence of an audience that would nave been much 
larger had it not been for the fact that the grand opera 
season made the hour (4:30 p. m.) most inconvenient 
for the many music lovers who had decided to attend. 
However, there were sufficient people present to give 
the event the prestige of public approval. Miss Scott 
is entitled to universal commendation and to the hearty 
support of any one seriously interested in music, and 
specially those who desire to make the cause ot the 
American artist popular. 

The Chamber Music Society of San Francisco stands 
in the front rank of our organizations comprised of 
resident artists- And the program selected was com- 
piled from composers recognized as American. It con- 
sisted of the following numbers: Theme and Variations 
for flute and strings op. 80 (Mrs. H. H. A. Beach); 
Deer Dance for String Quartet (Charles Skilton). 
Andantino from Andean String Quartet IDomenico 
Brescia), Serenade in G major (Leo Sowerby) ; Quar- 
tet in C major for piano and strings op. 23 (Arthur 
Foote). By means of a series of annotations the audi- 
ence was made acquainted with the biography ot the 
composers represented, a very excellent idea and one 
most effective in the education of the public toward 
the appreciation of America's distinguished writers. 

The Chamber Music Society was in splendid trim. 
There was notable the musicianly taste of expression, 
the intelligence ensemble playing, the purity of tone 
and intonation and the authority of reading the scores 
iWiich already are so well known. Mr, Hechfs flute 
playing was specially commendable on this occasion 
for he infused that energy and authority into his share 
ot the work which only musicianship coupled with 
practical experience can attain. Messrs. Persinger. 
Ford. Firestone and Ferner made us again acquainted 
with their ingenuity ot obtaining the very finest results 
ti>om any material they chose for expression, and 
while we did not enjoy everything that was plaved. 
more particularly the Deer Dance and the Serenade, 
still the manner in which these works were interpreted 
recompensed anyone for any disappointment in the 
character of the compositions. 

The Theme and Variations o£ Mrs. Beach's revealed 



that strength of creative power and that richness of 
scoring which we alreadv admired on former occasions. 
Mr. Brescia's Andantino gains with closer acquaintance 
and was delightful for its poetic atmosphere and its 
melodic line. The Arthur Foote Quartet belongs to the 
standard works of American musical literature and is 
too well known to require further comment except that 
it represents the higliest form ot musical composition 
and is technically as well as emotionally delightful. It 
was interpreted with masterly skill. This Monday 
afternoon. October 15. May Mukle. violoncellist, and 
Ellen Edwards, pianist, tvill give the second program 
of the Fortnightly Series. 



FOUNDER'S DAY AT S. F. MUSICAL CLUB 

Under the direction of its President. Mrs. Horatio 
Stoll, the San Francisco Musical Club gave a luncheon 
and birthday party at the Palace Hotel on Thursday 
noon. October 4, and the editor of the Pacific Coast 
Mus'cal Review regrets very much that he was unable 
to be present, notwithstanding the courteous and 
thoughtful invitation extended to him. on account of 
Thursday being publication day and the noon hour con- 
flicting with necessary duties. We hear, however, from 
all sourt.es that the occasion was a brilliant success 
and we heartily congratulate the San Francisco Musical 
Club upon its thirty-third birthday and may its officers 
and members experience many returns of the occasion 
; nd celebrate with equal enthusiasm and eloquence as 
they did last week 

The guests of honor included: Miss Bianca Saroya. 
Mrs Gaetano Merola, Miss Dona Fernanda, Miss 
Myrtle Donnelly, Mrs. Wlliam Henry Banks. Mrs. 
George Bates, Mrs. John Sibley, Mrs. John Hoyt. Mrs. 
Martin Molony, Miss H. Stadtmuller, Irrs. E. E. Bruner. 
Miss Maude Wellendorff, Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, Ray 
C. B. Brown, Charles Woodman, Miss Cora Winchell 
and others. There were 465 guests present H. F. 
Stoll. Jr.. wrote a hyjnn to the San Francisco Musical 
Club which was greatly appreciated and delightfully 
sung by club ensemble. 

The complete program, which was excellently ren- 
dered in every respect was as follows; .\ Tale of Long, 
Long .^go (T. H. Bayley). Abbey Cheney .\mateurs, 
Marion Cumming, Ellen Page Pressley. Esther Jarrett 
Malcolm, Miriam Elder Sellander; Another Chapter — 
Chaminade Club, Nada Haley, Marguerite Raas Waldrop, 
Hazel MacKay. ..\deline Bogart Moylan: Ths Lancers 
— .Abbey Cheney Amateurs and Cnaminade Club; 
-Maiden's Prayer (Theckla Badarzewska. Blanche Bald- 
win .McGaw; The Chimes ot St. Patrick's. On the Ferry 
(Emerson Whithorne), -4daline Maude Wellendorff; In 
Happy Moments (W. V. Wallace). Hazel MacKay; In 
Vampish Moments (A Parody), Florence A. Ritter; 
Delight (Isadore Luckstone), Ellen Page Presslev; An 
Old Fashioned Waltz, Ellen Page Pressley. Riidolph 
Able; Dances ot 1923— Marvel Ladd. Rudolph -Able 
(Peters-Wright Dancers), Horatio F. Stoll, Jr., at the 
piano. Hymn to the San Francisco Musical Club (Ho- 
ratio F Stoll. Jr.), Marion Cumming, Naaa Haley, Helen 
Gallagher Kelly. Gertrude Holmes Kierulff. Florence 
King. Ethel Bates Lee. Zoe Blodgett Mott, Hazel Mac- 
Kay. Adeline Bogart Moylan, Esther Jarrett Malcolm, 
Ellen Page Pressley, Florence Ritter. Miriam Elder 
Sellander. Minnie Correa Silva. Elsa Behlow Trautner. 
.Marion Taylor Ulsh, Elizabeth Warden, Marguerite 
Raas Waldrop, Mignon McDonald. Mrs. Cecil Hollis 
Stone at the piano. .Mrs. Charles William Camm, chair- 
man of program committee. 



ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE RECEPTION 

Cards are issued for a reception to M. Edouard Deru. 
eminent Belgian violinist, by the .\rrillaga .Musical Col- 
lege, to the faculty of which M. Deru is a new and 
valued addition. He was until recently official violinist 
to the King and Queen of Belgium, teacher of the Queen, 
and a friend of the late composer. M. Saint Saens, 
many of whose compositions H. Deru played with the 
master in -Ms. The reception will be held at the 
Arrillaga Musical College Friday evening, October 19. 



MUSICIANS' CLUB TO HONOR EDOUARD DERU 

The next dinner of the .Musicians' Club of San Fran- 
cisco will represent a reception in honor of Edouard 
Deru, the distinguished Belgian violin virtuoso, who 
recently came to San Francisco to remain for some 
time. The auspicious affair will take place on Satur- 
day evening. October 20, and will be one of special in- 
terest and no doubt will be attended by many promi- 
nent musicians. During the course of the evening Mr. 
Deru and Raymond \\Tiite. the well-known pianist, 
will play the Cesar Franck Sonata. It is expected that 
one of the largest assemblages of the season will honor 
this occasion. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 



Another mile stone will be passed by the Duncan 
Sisters and their record breaking musical comedy, 
Topsy and Eva at the Alcazar beginning with the mati- 
nee October 14th, when the fifteenth week of that tre- 
mendous success will be inaugurated- Despite the fact 
that this amusing show is in its fourth month at the 
O'Farrell Street Playhouse, the public demand for seats 
is increasing instead of decreasing, and last week all 
attendance records for the engagement were broken. 
Manager Lionel B. Samuel reports increased Interest 
on the part of all of Northern California. Orders tor 
seats have been coming in from many of the smaller 
communities, and the fame of the Duncan Sisters and 
their entertaining vehicle has been broadcasted like 
no other show in the history of San Francisco. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RI-A^F-AV 



CHAMBER MUSIC SEASON 

It Is gratifying to note that musical San Francisco 
has thoroughly awakened to the pre-eminence in Ameri- 
ca o( Its own Chamber Music Society. This ia mani- 
fested by the unusually large subscription this season 
for the series of six concerts. At the present rate of 
response, there will not be a large number of single 
seats available when the sale of single tickets opens on 
October 22nd at Sherman. Day & Company. Until 
October 22nd, season tickets only are available, and in 
view of the six remarkable programs, with the co-opera- 
tion of such world known artists as Horace Brltt. Ethfel 
I.eginska and Erno Dohnanyt, the public demand for 
the seiiHon seats has been large One of the reasons 
for the wonderful smoothness, precision and vitality of 
the performances of the Chamber Music Society is the 
system of rehearsal which has been in vogue for the 
past eight years. 

The organisation assembles each year on July 1st. 
under the direction of Louis Pcrslnger. From that time 
on, until the commencement of the season, daily re- 
hearsals are held, and the entire repertoire for the sea- 
son is carefully studied Individually and collectively 
and intensively prerared Louis Persnger is an ideal 
director and program builder, for he works on the lines 
of development of rerfect cohesion, ensemble, balance, 
etc. without suppression of personal Individuality. This 
gives a spontaneous breadth and enthusiasm to the per- 
formances which vitalzes all the Chamber Music So- 
ciety's rrt^grams Himself a great musical authority, 
and surrounded by artists of preat capacity and thor- 
ough musical understnndlng. constituting a close and 
affectionate unit of warm personal friendship as well. 
It ia no wonder that the crnd t ons surrounding the 
working hours of the Chamber Music Society are such 
as to produce the wonderful results that have made 
them so famous. 

The o| ening concert of the series takes place at Scot- 
tish Rite Hall, Tuesday evening. October 30th. The 
assisting artist will be the well-known and popular vio- 
in cellist Horace Brltt. who will appear here for the 
first time since leaving San Francisco three years ago- 
HIr many friends and admirers will rejoice at the op- 
portunity to greet him on this occasion and welcome 
him home. If only for a fleeting visit. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Huggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



HOUR OF SYMPHONY TALKS CHANGED 

The series of Symphonylogues to lie presented hy 
Victor LIchtensteIn Bt Sorosls Club Hall preceding the 
Friday concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra will be given at 12 o'clock Instead of 11, thus 
allowing the business man an opportunity of attend- 
ing. The opening event will take place Friday, October 
19. at 12 o'clock Miss Seckels announces that many 
requests have come to her to hold these at noon and as 
they will close very promptly by one o'clock, those who 
plan luncheon parties preceding the Symphony will 
still have ample time for this function. Those coming 
from out of town will also be accommodated by this 
later hour for their arrival. This Is the first time 
a series of talks on the Symphony have been given in 
San Francisco, Illustrated by the artists of the orchestra 
and patrons of the Symphony Concerts in San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland are eagerly anticipating these events 
which will he entertaining and instructive without being 
technical and dull Tickets for the single lectures or for 
the series may now be secured at the Symphony Box 
Office at Sherman, Clay & Co. These events have the 
endorsement of the .Musical Association of San Fran- 
cisco ,Mr LIchtensteIn will have the assistance at this 
event of two of the artists of the Symphony, Mr. Addi- 
mondo. oboelst, and Mr. Kubltshek, bassoonist. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY 

For the Concert of the I'aclflc Musical Society on 
Thursday evening, October 2.'ith, at the Fairmont Hotel, 
the esteemed president, Mrs. William Henry Banks, 
has arranged for the Pasmore Trio to appear on the 
program. The Pasmore Trio have not been heard here 
for the past three years. This trio originally was com- 
posed of three sisters, daughters of the well-known 
musician of this city, H. B. Pasmore. They have played 
with success throughout the I'nited Stales and in Ger- 
many, where they studied as well as concerlized. A 
fourth daughter, Uadlanna Pazmor (Harriet Pasmorel 
has been singing with phenomlnal success during the 
last three seasons In Paris. London and Berlin, with 
the famous symphony orchestras, as well as In recital. 



MUNICIPAL ORGAN RECITAL 

The announcement from J. Emmet Hayden, chairman 
of the Auditorium Committee of the Board of Supervis- 
ors, that John J. .McClellan, organist of the Mormon 
Tabernacle at Salt Lake City, has been secured for a 
single recital at the Gxpoalilon Auditorium on Sunday 
evening, Oct. 21, Is one that Is very welcome. F'or 
twenty-five years he has been before the American 
public and he ranks high in his chosen profession. He 
will play Bach's Toccata and Fugue, Boeilman's Suite 
Oothlque and other Interesting numbers and the assist- 
artlit will he Miss Claire Harrington, the favorite 
Francisco soprano The recital will begin at half 
eight, there will be no admission fee and no re- 
ed seats and the public will be cordially welcomed 



San Jose, October 9, 192:i. 
Friday. October 12th, 1923, is a big day In the musical 
history of San Jose. It means that at last we are 
to have our own artists' musical course, the Inaugural 
concert to be given on the evening of this date. Under 
the auspices of our own citizens, the San Jose Musical 
Association will present this year a series of artists 
that has never been equalled In our musical annals. 

Dr Charles M. Richards, head of the Association, and 
also director of the Rlks' Orchestra and the Kichards 
Choral Club, when Interviewed, told how the Associa- 
tion came to he a reality, how our fondest dreams are 
about to be realized. In Dr. Richards' words, "The San 
Jose Musical Association was first suggested by the 
Music Sludy Club of this city, a group of ladies who 
meet regularly for serious musical study, and they 
enlisted (he interest of others outside their circle with 
the result that a meeting was called of representatives 
of all the musical institutions in the community. 

This meeting was remarkably attended and the or- 
ganization of the San Jose Musical Association was 
perfected with the selection of a hoard of governors 
consisting of C. .M. Dennis, acting dean of the College 
of the Paclflc Conservatory; Chester Herold always 
prominent in musical affairs: Dr. W. W Kemp then 
president of the State Teachers' College: D. M Burnett 
prominent attorney and a patron of musical affairs iri 
our city; Mrs. Daisie L. Brinker. then president of the 
Santa Clara Country Music Teachers' Association; Mrs 
Howard Tennyson, our well-known local soprano, and 
Dr. C. M. Richards, always interested in the advance- 
ment of good music. The latter was elected president. 
Owing to the retirement of Dr. Kemp from the State 
•Teachers' College and the departure of Mrs. Tennyson 
there have been elected to take their places on the 
board of governors. Miss Ida Fisher, head of the music 
department of the State Teachers' College, and Robert 
K byer, the attorney, well known as a lover of music. 
"But why have a local organization?" you may ask 
Have we not had artists courses in the last few years'-" 
i es we have and they have been most creditable, but 
ban Jose outgrew long ago the status of having outside 
agencies come in to put on courses. We have been far 
behind our neighboring cities in this. .Now, each agency 
ha.s a certain number of artists on contract with them 
and when this agency puts on a course it presents to 
us onl.v artists from its own list and its choice is natural- 
ly limited. When an independent local organization 
makes up a course they can choose artists from any and 
all bureaus and the choice is naturally much wider It 
through misfortune a certain bureau has a disappoint- 
ment in a number its choice for a substitute Is very 
imited, making it necessary sometimes to substitute 
nferior talent for the original number and the result 
is sure to be a distinct disappointment. With the inde- 
pendent local organization under these conditions they 
can immediately communicate with all bureaus who 
have artists In the vicinity and obtain a substitute num- 
ber of equal value with the one that has failed. 

".\gain the local organization is on a purely non- 
profit sharing basis. Its prices for the course are put 
at the owest figure possible to cover costs. If there 
should be any surplus at the end of the season it will 
be used to put on an additional number free to holders 
nonr'",'",„f", °J '"" '••'''•^"■^'i to "Main more promi- 
nL= "r 'he following season. This plan has made 
It possible for the San Jose Musical Association to pre- 
sent six numbers this year at a ridiculously low price. 
We have asked nobody to act as guarantors, preferr'ng 
.e„e"„ i" "".f ■'"■'"'?''' '^"'"'^ ■■reived' basLs, hence wl 
project by the purchase of season tickets. 

mIZ!!''' m'''"' "■" ■"••'f'" Matzenauer. the incomparable 
Metropolitan contralto; Efrem Zimbalist, the great 

.t»\ ? ! ■ '.^,f "L"" ■"'""''"' baritone on the concert 
with A^f;H■,!''^^''" Francisco Sympnony Orchestra. 
?h«™K 1^ ,"'J' F""''"'^""-. ^ind the San Francisco 

UseiTln.hr'' ^°""''' """"'■ «">" « «""<> P'''™ ""■ 
Itself In the big eastern centers the past season. The 

Yn^l ^K° V'""*' •"""be'-s have never appeared in San 
P«1^' aT. ^^ u^," "PP'"''""'''! 'n San Francisco and even 
Palo Alto, whitlier some of our musical people have 
been compelled to travel to hear them Shame on us 
that we have so long been asleep to the 
rtlsts appearing in our midst, ,we who 



Kohler & Chase 

Knabp panna 
Knabp Ampirn 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



MRS. MILES A. DRESSKELL 



469 Morse Street 

I'h.in,- <i:is2-\\ 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 



SOPUANO 



NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 



ConfferN Defrre 



ril» CiTtlllrnlrii. Complete CoilcKr 



JOSE MJJSIC COiMPANY 



Monilolinn — StudiuM i 



Moderate Ita 



, Violin*. 
California 



WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

ALLIANCE BUILDING 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



Wa 



D. Alle 



suraed 



Ing 



In San J 

value of such _^ „ 

boast of living in an educational center, 
of theTi.h' ■"! *"" ''° r' '■"" P'"-tl<'>'larly for music 
If that should occur, let us buy them because we believe 
It Is good for our city to have these people appear here 

?rle„dl''wb"" ""'"', •" f""'"'"' "' "" "•- fo'tunate 
friends who may enjoy hearing the music 

"What San Francis.o can do In a big way with her 

Grand Opera Association San Jose can do in a smaller 

way with her Concert Course." 



CHARLES HART 



Onkland. TrI. 



< I knar llldK. 
I., I.'MI I •■irn 
■ -•kraldr -6.-.. 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



eRoy V. Br 

• In til llrnnrl 
ncm ot .\dvan 



<'Al.lpllll\tA 



organist at Stanford Iiniversitv. re- 
ekly recitals at the Memorial Church 
Thursday afternoon, October 4th. The initial program 
was repeated Sunday afternoon, October 7th. the follow- 
ing interesting numbers being given: Solemn Prelude 
Gloria Domini (T. Terbius Noblel; Chorale-Prelude Re- 
joice Ye, (Nun freut euch), (J. s. Bach); Two Preludes 
Op. 28, Nos. 20 and 7 (Frederick Chopin I ; Carillon 
(Louis Vierne). Beginning October 7th, the Sunday re- 
citals will be incorporated into, and become a part of 
a vesper musical service, with llie co-operation and 
guidance of the University Chaplain. Dr. D. C Gardner 
Tuesday afternoon at 4.15 Mr. Allen presented the 
following program by American composers: The Adobe 
Mission (H. C. iVearing); Caress (Frederic Groton) • 
la) In Autumn, (bl To a Wild Rose (.MacDowell) ■ Two 
movements from the Second Sonata (a pageaiit tor 
Organ), III La Zingara, IV Cortege (Harry B. Jepson). 
Mr. Allen will give his 380th program on Thursday after- 
noon, October 11th, which will include the following 
numbers: Prelude to Lohengrin (Wagnerl. Little Fugue 
in G minor (Bach); Berceuse from Jocelyn (Godardl- 
Fantaisie Dialoguee (Leon Boellmann, 1882-1897). 

The second Vesper Musical Service of the year will 
be given at 4:00 p m.. October 14th. when Thursday's 
program will be repeated. Thursdav afternoon, October 
IGth, at 4:16. marking his 3Slst program. Mr Allen will 
play Fantaisie in D flat. Op. 101 (Camille St. Saens)- 
Minuet from the Symphony in G minor (Mozart); Adorn 
Thyself With Gladness, u My Soul (Bach); Suite In D 
major (Edward Shippen Barnes). 

Mrs. Miles A. Dresskell, the possessor of a beautiful 
soprano voice, and an active member ot the San Jose 
Music Study Club, has opened a vocal studio. Mrs, 
Dresskell is a graduate of the David Grosch School of 
Mu.sic, Kansas City. For several years she has been 
studying in Cleveland. O.. with Llla Robeson, contralto 
of the Metropolitan Opera Company. Since coming to 
San Jose two years ago with Mr. Dresskell. who heads 
the violin department ot the College of the Pacific Mrs 
Dresskell has returned to Cleveland each summer for 
study with Miss Robeson, Mr. and Mrs Dresskell were 
very active this summer, appearing in many recitals In 

Juan ta Tennyson, coloratura soprano, whose beauti- 
ful voice has won for her an enviable place among art- 
sts ot Northern California, scored a distinct triumph 
last Friday evening when she appeared in a farewell 
concert In the rose room ot the Hotel St. James Mrs 
Tennyson who Is leaving this week for an Indellnlte 
stay in .New York where she will continue her study 
was assisted by Ida Sedgewick I'ogson, pianist, whose 
accompanying always adds greatly to a program. Mrs. 
Pogson, formerly of San Jose, hut residing in Australia 
for the past several years Is in this illy visiting her 
parents and is occupying her old place in the musical 
colony during her stay. 

•Mrs. Tennyson gave an interesting program, which 
IConllnuid on Paitt 6, Col. 2) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''Soulful" 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



MARY 
URKN 




<>M.V RtltlTAI. IN NltUTHIOUX < \LirOUMA 

AUDITORIUM 

SAX FIIA.NCISCO 

SUNDAY afternoon, OCTOBER 21 



Ue 



:ind OperalU* Arias 

GUTIA CASINI, Cellist 
GEORGES LAUWERYNS. Pianist 
— Assisting Artists 
TlfKETS — *;:. $::. ■^X (Jn.v ovtm) 

A'oit on sale at SUerman, CUiy Ct Company 

Coming— TITO SCHIPA, Tenor 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio, 850 Geary Street, Apt. 8 
Tel. Prospect 3071 

A\^AILABLE FOR RECITALS 

Management Alice Seckels 

Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5454 



Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco 

SAN FRANCISCO SERIES 
SIX CONCERTS 
Assisting Artists: 
Horace Britt. Violoncellist 
Ethel Leginska. Pianist 
Erno Dohnanyi, Pianist-Composer 
SCOTTISH RITE HALL 
Tuesday Evening, Oct. 30th 
Tuesday Evening, Nov. 20th 
Tuesday Evening, Jan. 8th 
Tuesday Evening, Jan. 29th 
Tuesday Evening, Feb. 19th 

Tuesday Evening, March 25th 

Season Seat Sale— Six Concerts — $10.00, 

.Si»i-U'l\l, Il.\TK TO men S<'HO(>l. S't'l 1>F..NTS 

$7.00, $4.00, at 708 Kohl Building, 
or Sherman, Clay & Co. 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



LIPSCHl I.TZ AXD M ARFIEI.D MISIC M.%STKRS 
HOMIROOK IIM\X IX 

"THE BAD MAN" 

FR«>M HIS ST.VGE .SICCESS 
FAXCHOX AXI) MARCO 

"IDEAS" 

FEATIIRIXG 
JACK OSTERMAX 

HAROLD STAXTON, TKXOR 

"RlfBE" WOU^^F—aO PEOPLE 



Lillian Hoffmeyer Heyer, mezzo soprano; Homer Wis- 
mer violinist; George KruU. baritone, and Henrik Gjer- 
drum. pianist, gave a most interesting program Septem- 
ber 22 under auspices of the Danish Ladies' Relief So- 
ciety of San Francisco. The concert took place in the 
California Hall, which was taxed to capacity by an en- 
thusiastic audience. Each of the artists had to respond 
with encores after a generous program. 



STENGER VIOLINS 



SAN JOSE LETTER 



ol. 3) 



(Continued from Page 
was divided into five groups. In her last group was 
The Look by Rosalie Hausman, a San Franciscan, who 
is well known for her compositions. In her third group 
Mrs. Tennyson sang I'll Bring You Heartsease (Brans- 
combe). She was obliged to repeat Ma li'l Batteau 
(Strickland) in group four, also adding False Prophets 
(Scott), a charming recall number. The Greatest Wish 
in the World (Del Riego), was given for recall to her 
closing numbers. The program in full: Amarilli, mia 
bella (1546-1614) (Caccini); Aria: Deh vieni noa tardar. 
Le Nozza di Figaro (1756-1791) (Mozart): I've Been 
Roaming (1786-1849) (Horn): Aria: Depuis le jour, 
from Louise (Charpentier) ; L'Heure Silencieuse 
(Staub); J'ai pleure* en reve (Hue); Bergerettes of the 
ISth Century, arranged by Weckerlin; (a) L'amour 
s'envole. (b) Maman. dites-moi. (c) Chantons les amours 
de Jean; IV — In the Silence of Night (Rachmaninoff); 
Songs .My Mother Taught Me (Dvorak); Bayou Songs 
(Strickland). — (a) Mornin" on ze Bayou, (b) Ma li'l 
Batteau, (c) Li'l Jasmine-bud. Do Not Go. My Love 
(Richard Hageman); The Look (Rosalie Hausman); 
Wings of Night (Wintter Watt); Song of the Open 
(Frank La Forge). 



MUSIC AT TEMPLE ISRAEL 



Holiday services at Temple Israel, corner of Cali- 
fornia and Webster strec'ts, were even more elaborate 
and impressive this year than on preceding occasions 
thanks to Cantor Benjamin Liederman's vast experi- 
ence and musical knowledge in selecting capable singers 
and arranging appropriate music. Ilie soloists who 
covered themselves with glory included. Mrs. A J. 
Hill, soprano. Mrs. Blanche H. Fox. contralto; Robert 
Saxe, tenor, and J. Corral, bass. William W. Carruth 
presided at the organ and as usual acquitted himself 
in a most musicianly manner. 

In appreciation of the fact that Cantor Liederman 
has officiated at this teninle for the past eighteen years 
and has endeared himself to his entire congregation 
the board of trustees called a special meeting recently 
and re-elected him for a term of five years at a very 
substantial increase in salary. Mr. Liederman's rich 
tenor voice was even more beautiful than it had been 
during his many years of service. All were most en- 
thusiastic over his various solos and ancient melodies. 
We congratulate Mr. and Mrs. Liederman on their 
many years of activity in the musical sphere and 
wish them continued success. 



MATZENAUER-WHITEHILL RECITAL 

Margaret Matzenauer, prima donna contralto of the 
Metropolitan Opera House, and Clarence Whitehill, bari- 
tone, also of the Metropolitan, will open the Elwyn Art- 
ist Series at the Curran Theatre tomorrow (Sunday) 
afternoon, October 14th, at 2:45 p. m. Mme. Matzenauer 
and Mr. Whitehill gave their first joint recital on the 
Coast at Portland. Oregon. September 2Sth. and reports 
from that city indicates that these two eminent stars 
are more popular than ever. Their joint recital here, 
which will feature a number of excerpts from the music 
dramas of Wagner, will doubtless prove one of the 
musical events of the season. 

Mme. Matzenauer comes direct from her summer va- 
cation in Europe and is accompanied by her 9 year old 
daughter, Adrfenne; a secretary and a maid Adrienne 
is on her first tour of the continent and enjoys it im- 
mensely. Her mother says the girl is a wonderful trav- 
eler. Both are looking forward to their California tour. 

Mr. Whitehill is looking forward to two things: His 
appearance in joint recital with Matzenauer and a good 
game of golf; or rather, several games, as it is well 
known that Mr. Whitehill is a consistent champion of 
the sport. Besides the Matzenauer-Whitehill joint re- 
cital, other attractions of the Elwyn Artist Series will 
include Benno Moisevitsch, Mozart's Opera Comiques 
The Impressario and Cosi Fan Tutte, Quartet of Victor 
Artists— Olive Kline. Elsie Baker, Lambert Murphy and 
Royal Dadmun — Jascha Heifetz, Moriz Rosenthal, Mario 
Chamlee, Reinald Werrenrath and Maria Ivogun. 



SYMPHONY "POPS" AT AUDITORIUM 

As the time draws near for the first of the second 
series of popular concerts by the San Francisco Orches- 
tra, Alfred Hertz, conductor, to take place at the Ex- 
position Auditorium on the evenings of Oct. 31, Dec. 
11, Jan. '5, Feb. 5 and March 11. interest is steadily 
increasing. In fact, according to the announcement of 
Supervise J. Emmet Hayden. chairman of the Audi- 
torium ' .nraittee of the Board of Supervisors, in 
charge I hece important musical events, the sale of 



ALICE SECKELS presents 

ROSE FLORENCE 

Mezzo-Soprano 

BENJAMIN MOORE 

at the Piano 

Italian Room, Hotel St. Francis 

Tuesday Evening 

October 16, 1923 — 8:30 p. m. 

TitrketH «1..'>0 (|i1um war taxi at ShiTiiinn, t'lay & Co. 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 



TEAt'HKR OF PI.V.XO — ACCO.HP.VNI 



Studio: 1000 Vl 



Tel. Pranklln 142 



ROSE FLORENCE 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACH I NG 

tudio: 545 Sutter St. Telephone Kearny 3598 

Direction Miss Alice Seckels 

68 Post St., San Francisco, California 



season seats at this time is more than double that of 
last year, with one week more remaining, during which 
time a substantial reduction is offered to purchasers of 
tickets for the five concerts, at Sherman, Clay and 
Company's. 

Monday morning, Oct. 22. the sale of single tickets 
for the first concert will begin and everything points 
out to a capacity house on the opening night. On ac- 
count of the immense size of the Auditorium it is pos- 
sible to have the price of seats range from twenty-five 
cents to one dollar, and it is safe to say that no where 
else in America can such music be heard at such a 
reasonable rate. Conductor Hertz is preparing a fine 
program for the inaugural, and the soloist of the eve- 
ning will be Claire Dux, a member of the Chicago Opera 
Company and one of Europe's foremost sopranos. 









C3ECIX 

FAKNINC; 

BER.THAND - BA.OWA/ 
PCHSONAL RCPRBSBNTATIVE 
AEOLIAN HALL ■ A/£W YORK 








LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Stndio 670 8th Ave. Phooe Bayriew 5543 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RHVIICW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 



No. 10778 mel No. 10623 ii. 
Yokoliama in Si-|.lcnibcr, 
1922, Icxaci dale unknown). 
Il cumi! uboul ihU way. One morn- 
ing early in the monlli, one Leon 
Lang of San Francisco found in lii- 
morning mail lliis telegram: ".S|ii|r 
Aral alcamer No. 10778 zinc-linnl 
bo» Codotviiky Yokohama." A 
terse and prosaic telegram, let ro- 
manre has strange beginnings. 
Twenty-four hours later No. 10778 





I ha 



rtural elements be- 
I that quality, it is 
job to observe for 

I have just passed 
through an cxperienec 
u ith the two most remark- 
iiint-nls llial ever came into mv charge. 
IkiI i>ne uf ihcni came from Knhler & Chase, 
le it a point to see them in San Francisco 
York en route from 



on my way I 

the Orient, where for the past year I h; 
been on lour with Mr. Godowsky 
piano tuner. During bis three month 
tour in .South America II was engaged i 
Buenos Aires) we carried Knabe Con 
cen Urand No. 10623 from their New 
York store. When we sailed for the 
Orient, Mr. Godowsky considered it ad- 
visable to add a second piano, knowing 
the extreme diflicullies of climate and 
transporlalioii. This one (No. 10778) was 
shipped from San Francisco. It was a 
wise decision, for at one lime No. 10778 
was lost in the snows of Manchuria for 
two months, fnially turning up after what 
must have been untold viri.viiiudes, for 
its traveling case was so badly battered 
thai the transportation companies re- 




was below decks and westward 
bound. At the same lim* No. 
10623 was under way from the west 
coast of South America. Their 
meeting was undemonstrative — 
altliough they were both from the 
>anie town, had been brought up 
lugelhcr —tended by the same 
hands, and sent into the world 
wilb the same mission. But at 
Yokohama the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones tell it. 

San Fbancisco, California, iWoy 22, 1923. 
fused to accept it. From ihe devastating Arctic cold 
of the Manchurian steppes to the blislering heat of 
the Javanese jungles, these two Kiiabes have been for 
nearly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
punishment, including months in the sticky, saturat- 
ing moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
pianoforte. From Uawaii to the Philippines, through 
all Ihe cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Slrails 
Selllcments, and many of the less frequented by-ways 
of Ihe Orient— I do not believe that the history of 
music records the equal of this unique tour, or the 
ovations accorded this great artist in these music- 
hungry corners of the globe, or the equivalent of the 
two pianos that supported him. Days of travel over 
Ihe roads of Java, the man-handling of countless 
coojies, the punishment of oriental transportation in 
boats, in trains, in queer conveyances of all kinds— 
and iiionlhs of il. At times it was heart-breaking, 
llotli instruments carry many scars of battle, but 
musically llicy have remained steadfast. Outside some 
rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich,' as 
perfect as the first day Mr. Godowsky 
touched Iheir keys. To me the power of 
resistance of ibe Knabe piano is almost 
Mipernalural. I have travelled with many 
.rlisls in all parts of the world; in Eu- 
n.pe I was familiar with the German 
pianos that are built like stodgy batlle- 
-inps, but no piano in even ordinary 
■ onlinental tours has equalled this per- 
formance If I had made these two 
IviiaLcs 1 should feel very proud. Inci- 
dentally I am not in any way connected 
with Ihe Wm. Knabe Company— nor do 1 
even know them except through the in- 
ternational reputation of their instru- 
'"•^"t- Francis E. Jones, 

London and Buenos Aires. 





— . «,, .........CI, siiiu JO an inierview; m 

ig more interesting to say about those two p 
any other artist has ever said. Let him tell il. 
I found him in Itueno, Aires and carried him away to the 
Orient because of his unusual qualities." So, thanks to the 
II consideralion of the great artist, we are able to offer 
story ever told. 



irkable 



GODOW.SKY 

Ma.Irr of the masters at whose 

fret hove sat at one lime or 

another practically every great 

pianist of our ilay. 



Inci.l.„,„lly. bolh „l thoe imlr..mem, are .,lock pu,no> 
(not ,,,'-ciallr nmdv). one from the Keiv York warcroom, 
and one from ihe Kohler & Chase store in San Fr 



KOHLERer CHASE 



2o O'hARRELL STREET 
I4lh sntj C)>v Sirrrti 
OAK LAND 

KNABE 




SAN FRANCISCO 



AMTICO 



u 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Headers are invited to seud in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered No 
names will be published. Address, Question Ed-tor 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase BuildiUK 
San Francisco. 

1- What is the Emperor Concerto? — I. R. T. 
Dcethoven's fifth pianoforte concerto, in E flat. Op. 7,1. 
2. Is the Kreutzer Sonata a piece of music or a story? 

Hecihoven's sonata for piano and violin in A Op 47 
dedicated to the violinist. Rodolph Kreutzer. is known 
as the Kreutzer Sonata, Tolstoi wrote a story in which 
an incident is the performance of this sonata The 
story of Tolstoi's is entitled the "Kreutzer Sonata " 

:i. What is the false triad?— B. G, 

The diminished triad. 

4. How do you tune a cello?— A. B. S. 

Tune the first strinK to A on the fifth line of the bass 
staff; then tune downward in fifths, as follows: Second 
string 1), third line of staff, third string G, first line of 
Stan: and fourth string C, second line below the bass 
staff. 

■'. What is the trap action of a piano? — M. E. M. 

The pedals and all the aparatus pertaining thereto. 

QUEENA MARIO 

The Alice Seckels' Matinee .Musicales will start 
auspiciously at the St. Francis' ballroom this season on 
.Monday afternoon. October 22 when CJueena Mario, the 
favorite coloratura soprano of the Metropolitan and 
San Francisco Opera Companies will be the star. San 
Francisco music lovers idolize Queena Mario, and the 
ballroom of the hotel will be crowded to its capacity 
with her legion of admirers. There is little left to say 
of the Mario art. Of the younger sopranos she is un- 
(luestTonalily the most promising. So highly is she re- 
garded in New York that after one appearance at the 
.\It-tropolitan she was immediately engaged for leading 
roles. s:ing fifteen performances at the great Opera 
House during its last season, and has been re-engaged 
for five additional years This is a unique record tor 
an American girl and probably the first time a native 
singer has been given such recognition by the Metro- 
politan directorate. 

Miss .Mario has arranged an especially-unique pro- 
gram for her St. Francis recital where, with Imogen 
Peay at the piano, she will render the following selec- 
tions, (a) Dans un Bois (Mozaitl. lb) Care Selve (Han- 
del): (c) Neues Lieben. Neues Leben (Beethoven)- 
(a) Jours Passes (Delibes): lb) Comment Disaient lis 
ILiszt): (c) Er Liebte Mich So Sehr (Tschaikowsky) - 
(di LOiseau Bleu (Decreus); Aria of Micaela from 
Carmen (Bizet): (a) Lullaby (Kreisler) : (hi The Night 
Wind (Roland Farley): (c) Ah: Ix)ve. but a Day (Mrs 
H. H. A. Beach: (d) The Song of the Open (Frank La 
Forge I: Waltz from Romeo et Juliette (Gounod) 



ROSE FLORENCE'S COSTUME RECITAL 

A program of the classics, a grouiJ of modern Ameri- 
can songs including one by our San Francisco composer, 
i\Iary Carr Moore, with an added touch of color sup- 
plied in two groups sung In the costumes of Russia and 
of Spam respectively, will be the distinctive feature of 
Rose Florence's choice of numbers for her San Fran- 
cisco recital ne.\t Tuesday evening, October 16. in the 
Italian Room of the Hotel St. Francis, under Alice 
Seckels' direction. Benjamin Moore will be the accom- 
panist in tlie following program: Air of Cleopatra 
(■■.lulius Caesar") (Handel). (1685-1759); Verhorgenheit 
(.Morikel (Hugo Wolf). Cacilie (Hart) (Richard 
.siiaiissi; Le Temps des Lilas (Bouchor) (Ernest 
(hausson); Dasons La Gigue (Verlaine) (Poldowski)- 
In thcYellow Dusk (Li Pol (Edward Horsinani- Pier- 
rette and 1 (McCrae) (Emerson Whitliorne): Winter 
i\an Nordeni (Mary Carr Moore); Song of the Open 
(Lowell) (Frank LaForge); The Rose has charmed the 
iNightingale (Nikolai) ( Rimsky-KorsakofT) ; Cradle Song 
(Alexandre GrelchaninifT) : Hopak (Modesta Moussork- 
sky): Madrigal Espanol (Julian Huarte); .Nana (.Man- 
uel De Fallal: El Pano Moruno (.Manuel De Pallo) - 
Estrellita (Manuel M. Ponce); Clavelitos (arr. by Val- 
verdc). 



CONCERT AT UNIVERSITY PLEASES 

The Sigma .\u Music House Society of the I'niverslty 
of California which gives a concert for the benefit of 
the I'niversity students on the second Wednesday of 
every month, presented as their soloist. Miss Augusta 
Hayden the charming lyric soprano who appeared bc- 
Iiire an enthusiastic audience on October 10. Miss Hay- 
den, who was accompanied by Mrs. M. E. Blanchard 
one of our foremost musicians, sang two groups of songs 
exhibiting a well schooled voice of lovely texture and 
Interiiretlng her various numbers with diversity of style 
and musical taste. The program was as follows: Caro 
.Mio Hen (Giordani), Vlllanella (Sibellal Tea Y'eux 
(Rabey). Life (Curran), Spring Night (Schumann). To- 
day (Hcuter). .My I^ve Is a Mulateer (Bauer). 

Madam Dorothy Talbot, noted coloratura soprano 
who IB now In the East doing concert work, will return 
to C allfoi-nin in the near future, Mmc. Talbot has been 
heard in a number of concerts in Chicago and has been 
engaged again for next year. 



^BLIC LISRARY 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



50,000 HEAR S. F. OPERA COMPANY SEASON 

An Average of Five Thousand People Per Performance Attend the First 

Season of the San Francisco Opera Association — Unparalleled Artistic 

Triumph in Years — Gaetano Merola Showered With Appreciation. 

Stars. Resident Artists, Chorus and Orchestra Excellent 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



In a statement given to the daily press 
(it is strange how many well meaning 
people interested in good music com- 
pletely ignor the weekly press with the 
best of intentions) Timothy Healy. chair- 
man of the Opera Association of San 
Francisco, announce that fifty thousand 
people attended the first season of the 
San Francisco Opera Co. during the ten 
performances. This means, of course, 
that fifty thousand tickets were sold and 
that many people attended more than 
one time. It is however, safe to say that 
from twenty-five to thirty thousand dif- 
ferent people attended this opera season. 
During the course of a symphony season 
from thirty to forty thousand different 
people, possibly more, attend the sym- 
phony concerts. Within a radius of twenty 
miles from San Francisco, we have three 
thousand teachers, thirty thousand pupils 
and fifty thousand music lovers, including 
those attending opera, concerts and 
similar events. In other words the music 
element about the bay consists of 100,000 
people. And yet we have certain man- 
agers of motion picture theatres, backed 
by a small number of professional musi- 
cians, who say that the musical element 
is not worth while catering to, and we 
have music lovers and those in charge 
of big enterprises who say that a music 
journal is not worth while paying any 
attention to. 



Of course the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review is going along the even tenor 
of its way continuing to fight for the 
rights of the resident artists, and the 
musical giants who make San Francisco 
and vicinity world renowned, because of 
their genius for organization and perfor- 
mance and if we gain the recognition of 
those worth while we can afford to permit 
the pigmy minds among officials, press 
agents, and managers to stew in their 
own arrogance and conceit. No one can 
imagine how displeasing and disagree- 
able it is for this writer to impress the 
existence of this paper upon the minds 
of those who cannot see any value in a 
music journal by means of disagreeable 
protests. But we have devoted six months 
to propounding the value of necessity of 
the San Francisco opera season, have 
printed pages of reading matter which 
cost in the neighborhood of $200 to set 
up and have really put our shoulder to 
the wheel in the beginning when no one 
believed in the movement and with the 
sole exception of Gaetano Merola. for 
whom we entertain the highest respect 
and admiration, NOT ONE MEMBER OF 
THE OPERA ASSOCIATION HAS EX- 
HIBITED ANY INTEREST IN THIS 
PAPER. If it had not been for Selby C. 
Oppenheimer we would not have received 
any advertising nor any courtesies in the 
way of tickets. And here we have one 
of the reasons why San Francisco is so 
provincial in certain matters. THOSE 
IN CHARGE OF IMPORTANT EVENTS 
ARE SO INDIFFERENT TO CO-OPERA- 
TION that they make it impossible to 
retain one's enthusiasm for an enterprise, 
even though it means a beneficial thing 
for music in general. 



The best evidence that we do not pen 
these lines, because of peevishness or ill- 
humor is found in the fact that notwith- 
standing innumerable rebuffs from those 
in charge of important musical move- 
ments after we had been at the post early 
in the game. WE CONTINUE TO WORK 
HEART AND SOUL FOR THE BEST 
INTERESTS OF THE PROFESSION 
AND THE MUSICAL PUBLIC. Practic- 
ally none of those who have aroused our 
ire in the past are at present in respon- 
sible positions. They usually treat other 
people exactly as they treat us and this 
is eventually their downfall. You can not 
last by always receiving and never show- 
ing any willingness to give. And if to- 
day this! paper were deprived of its 
courtesy privileges or advertising patron- 
age from organisations pretending to 
work for the interest of the people we 
would find a way to buy our tickets and 
continue to publish the paper just the 
same. We only make these periodical 
outbursts of protests, because by ham- 
mering away year after year at this sub- 



ject someone will realize some day that 
we are on the map to stay, and that the 
most discouraging exhibitions of ingrati- 
tude and indifference on the part of 
people who are only public spirited be- 
cause of the notoriety they receive will 
not swerve us one inch from our deter- 
mination to get recognition for our resi- 
dent artists, for our splendid organiza- 
tions whether they be symphonic, opera- 
tic or educational or whether they include 
the difficult phase of chamber music. The 
proudest accomplishment of our career 
rests in the fact that we gave our mead 
of encouragement of many a brilliant pro- 
ject and manv a gifted artist at a time 
WHEN NO ONE ELSE HAD THE 
DECENCY TO LEND A HELPING 
HAND. BECAUSE THERE WAS NOTH- 
ING IN IT, NOT EVEN PUBLICITY. 

But despite this inexplicable indiffer- 
ence and at times antagonism on the 
part of the people who benefited through 
the fights we have made we continue to 
watch the big musical movements we 
start reaching a successful termination. 
That is to say we watch others take up 
projects which we began to discuss and 
finally prove the accuracy of our judge- 
ment by securing public support. We 
have in our possession a list of ten thous- 
and music lovers who repose confidence 
in our judgement and we have yet to dis- 
cover the time when they regretted back- 
ing up our ideas. But unfortunately our 
followers do not always back us up in 
the way of subscriptions and advertise- 
ments. Possibly we have not put them 
to the test, but we shall do this presently. 

We were going to review the closing 
performances of Romeo and JHiliet, 
rPagliacci and Rigoletto, and also La 
Tosca which for some reason or other 
we omitted in last weeks review, but we 
have practically said everything necessary 
about the artists that constituted the 
casts. We only say that Gigli and Mario 
were superb in the Gounod opera, bring- 
ing out the beautiful shades and mezza 
voce portions of the score with splen- 
did refinement of execution. In this 
opera we also wish to call particular 
attention to the excellent solo of Anna 
Young who sang with an ease, style and 
purity of voice that justified the hearty 
ovation accorded her. Martinelli, Mario 
and De Luca gave an exceptional fiine 
performance of Pagliacci, De Luca sur- 
passing himself histrionically as well as 
vocally. The chorus had here a remark- 
able chance to show how really well 
trained it was. It would have been im- 
possible to crowd another person into 
the Exposition Auditorium within range 
of the stage. Every seat was occupied, 
many were standing or sitting in isles 
and some even moved chairs behind the 
partitions hanging from the balcony. 
Hundreds were turned away at the door, 
and possibly a thousand or two wanted 
to purchase seats at the box office and 
were unable to do so. 



It is simply impossible to imagine a 
more delightful performance of Rigoletto 
than the one given on this occasion 
Gigli as the Duke. De Luca as Rigoletto. 
Mario as Gilda. Didur as Sparafucile and 
Fernanda as Maddalena truly interpreted 
the roles with an enthusiasm and artistic 
finesse that will remain unforgettable 
in the memory of everyone who heard it. 
And here is an opportunity to express 
appreciation of the fact that encores 
were omitted. One of the gravest nuis- 
ances of a cheap operatic season is the 
constant repetition of arias, just because 
there is long and loud applause. The per- 
formance is thereby prolonged unneces- 
sarily and the continuity of the opera 
disturbed. Artist, conductor and stage 
director are to be congratulated for their 
determination to continue the thread of 
the story notwithstanding the frequent 
Tociforous demands for repetitions. Truly 
it was a relief to this writer and was a 
sign that a real musical atmosphere is 
about to enter the opera house here as 
it has already entered our symphony hall. 

Notwithstanding the thrilling triumph 
of the artists Monday evening was Merola 
night, after the first act the 



stood up and played a "Tusch," thereby 
expressing their appreciation of the con- 
ductor's executive ability. After the third 
act came the ovation of the audiance. 
Merola was he-wreathed and be-flowered 
and finally was urged to make a speech 
which he did in his precise, brief and con- 
vincing fashion. He emphasized the fact 
that as usual San Francisco broke several 
records. One that the people at large 
made it possible to defray the expenses 
of the season without guarantors and 
another that a volunteer chorus of pros- 
pective artists devoted their time and 
labor during six months for the purpose 
of mastering eight operas of difficult pro- 
portions in a manner to reveal fresh 
young voices and a uniformity of phras- 
ing that a professional chorus rarely em- 
ploys. Mr. Merola endeavours to give 
credit to everybody, but as could not be 
otherwise the case omitted several im- 
portant factors including the press with- 
out which the enterprise could not have 
been done at all. But considering the 
strain and labor Mr. Merola has been 
under during the six months preceding 
the opera season and then again during 
the season itself it is truly mar\'elous 
that he could collect his thoughts even 
long enough to make the telling and 
pithy sentences he did. Surely the press 
knows how valuable Merola's services 
have been and it also knows that he is 
deeply appreciative, which cannot be 
said of every member of the official 
family of the Association. 



And so the first season of the San Fran- 
cisco Opera Association goes into history 
and everyone connected with it has rea- 
son to feel proud of its work. 



May Mukle. cellist, and Lawrence 
Strauss, tenor, gave the first of a series 
of concerts introducing leading resident 
artists and distinguished visitors, under 
the direction of Miss Alice Seckels- 
There was a large audience present in 
the Italian Room of the St. Francis Hotel 
who expressed its approval witli en- 
thusiasm. We shall speak in detail of 
this event in the next issue of this 
paper. 



Ingeberg-Latour-Torrup, associated 
with the San Francisco Couservatoi-y of 
Music as an instructor of terpsichorean 
art. gave a Dance Recital in the Colonial 
Ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel on 
Thursday evening, September 21. and de- 
lighted a large and enthusiastic audi- 
ence with the ingenuity of her art and 
the originality of her ideas. 



Antoine de Vally, the well-known tenor 
and vocal instructor, is recuperating 
from an operation, necessitated by the 
condition of his ankle w^hich he hurt 
several years ago. The operation was 
successful and the many friends of Mr. 
de Vally will be pleased to hear of his 
recovery. 



Marguerite Raas-Waldrop, soprano, and 
Uda Waldrop, pianist, assisted by Joelle 
Raas-Allen, mezzo soprano, gave an ex- 
cellent concert under the auspices of the 
Mill Valley Musical Club on Tuesday. 
September IS, at which the following 
program was thoroughly enjoyed by a 
large and demonstrative audience: Duet, 
Barciirolle. from The Love Tales of Hoff- 
mann (0*^enbachi. Marguerite Raas- 
Waldrop and Joelle Raas-Allen; (a) 
Chant Hiadou (Violin Obligato) (Bem- 
berg), (b) Petites Roses (Cesek), (c) 
Orientale (Marion Bauer), Marguerite 
Raas-Waldrop; (a) Andantino (Leraare). 
lb) Dance of the Water Sprites (Wald- 
rop), From the Bohemian Club Grove 
Play Nee Netama, 1914, Mr. Waldrop and 
the Duo-Arl (alternating); (a) Let Us 
Drift and Dream (Farley), (b) Chanson 
Revee (Maurice Pesse). (c) Bless You 
(.Vovello). (di Tally-Ho (Leoni). Joelle 
Raas-Allen. 



The San Francisco Musical Club will 
give the loDowing program at the Palace 
Hotel on Thursday morning, October 18: 
Johannes Sebastian Bach (16S5-1750) — 
Part I — Italian Concerto. Marion Frazer; 
Chaconne. Antonio de Grassi; Part II— 
Christmas Oratorio — Chorus. Christians 
he Joyful. Sopranos — Mrs. Arthur Hill, 
Mrs. Ashley Faull, Mrs. Charles Ayres; 
Contraltos — Mrs. Byron McDonald. Mrs. 
Edward Lichtenberg, Mrs James Kelly; 
Hugh J. Williams, first tenor; Carl E. 
Anderson, second tenor; Lowell M. Red- 
field, baritone; P. H. Ward, basso; Henry 



L. Perry, director. Bass Aria, Mighty 
Lord and King all Glorious. Lowell M. 
Redfield; Choral. Ah! Dearest Jesus, Holy 
Child; Tenor Aria. Haste. Ye Shepherds. 
Hugh J. Williams; Tenor Recit.. And 
Suddenly There Was With the Angel; 
Chorus, Glory to God; Contralto Aria. 
Slumber Beloved, Mrs. McDonald; 
Chorus. Hear. King of Angels; Soprano. 
Echo Aria, Ah! My Saviour. Mrs. Hill 
and Mrs. Gish; Terzett. When Shall We 
See Salvation? Mrs. Faull. Mrs. Mc- 
Donald and Mr. Williams: Recitative, 
My Lord Is King Alone; Choral. This 
Proud Heart; Recitative Soli, O'er Vs 
No More: Choral, Now Vengeance Hath 
Been Taken; Cecil HoUis Stone at the 
piano Mrs. C. William Camm, Chairman 
of Program Committee. 



L-zetta Kalova. the distinguished Rus- 
sian violinist, assisted by Betty Drews. 
soprano, and Martiana Towler. pianist, 
will give a benefit concert for the Berke- 
ley disaster relief committee of the 
National Red Cross tomorrow (Sunday) 
afternoon, October 14. at 3:30 o'clock. 
The event will take place at the Coral 
L. Williams Institute on Arlington ave- 
nue. Berkeley, and the program will be 
as follows: Concerto (Paganini). Lizetta 
Kalova; Schmerzen (Wagner). Feldein- 
samkeit (Brahms). Der Schmied 
(Brahms); Serenade (Strauss). Betty 
Drews: Nocturne (Grieg). Deep River 
(Coleridge-Taylor). Hunting Song (Schu- 
mann-Paganini), Martiana Towler; Deep 
River (Burleigh), Indian Love Song 
(Lieurance). Yesterday and Today 
(Spross). I Would My Song Were Like 
a Star (Maurer). Ouvre Tes Jeux Bleux 
(Massenal). Betty Drews; Serenade 
I Rachmaninow). Minuet (Debussy), In- 
troduction Tarantelle (Sarasate), Lizetta 
Kalova. 



Charles Hart, the nationally known 
pianist and accompanist, who recently 
made San Francisco his home, has been 
playing for Clarence Whitehill at a con- 
cert given in Oakland October 8 for the 
Piedmont High School and will also play 
for this artist in Glendale on October 
12. Air. Hart's services were specially 
asked through the Wolfsohn Musical 
Bureau which organization knew of Mr. 
Hart's residence in this city. 



CHAMBER MUSrC FESTIVAL 

(Continued from Page 1. Col. 4) 
Goossens Phantasy Sextet and in Miss 
Clarke's Rhapsody for piano and cello. 
This was admirably played by May 
Mukle and Myra Hess, who brought out 
of it all the effects that had been 
wrought into it by the composer. It is 
overlong somewhat Oriental and dirge- 
like in character with strongly dramatic 
moments. It is hardly a rhapsody in 
form but it is highly creditable as a 
work. The artists witii the composer 
were recalled many times. 

The Goosens Phantasy was no doubt 
the gem of the newer offerings. He has 
scored it for three violins one viola and 
two cellos and the performance was mag- 
nificent as interpreted by the Festival 
Quartet of South Mountain with Albert 
Spalding as the addUional violin and 
Emmeran Stoeber as the extra cello The 
themes are of great and haunting beauty, 
and while it is unbroken, the shift in 
movements is very obvious. The lyrical 
quality of this very modem piece of 
writing proves how much actual beauty 
it is possible to infuse into music no 
matter how ultra-modern it may be. The 
freedom and facility in Goossens' writ- 
ing, the marvelous atmosphere which he 
succeeds in supplying in addition to the 
substantial musicianship easily give him 
a foremost place among the younger 
writers. It was received with the ut- 
most enthusiasm. The season closed on 
Saturday afternoon when the Festival 
Quartet opened its program with the 
Haydn D major quartet, perhaps to 
effect the greatest possible contrast in 
which it was successful. The Brahms 
quintet with Katherine Goodson at the 
piano spoke the last word and a worthy 
one and between these a charming quar- 
tet by Malipiero had its first perform- 
ance. This Stornelli e Ballate was writ- 
ten for and dedicated to Mrs. Coolidge in 
appreciation for her interest in chamber 
music throughout the world. Malipiero 
w^as awarded a prize two years ago and 
he made this a sequel. The Berkshire 
prize will be awarded next year for a 
chamber composition which shall include 
one or more vocal parts in combination 
with instruments. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RFA'IKW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDC, EIGHTH AND BROADWAY —TEL. METROPOLITAN 4398 
C. C. EMERSON IN CHARGE— BRUNO DAVID USSHER, STAFF CORRESPONDENT 
Notice to Contributor! and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



I.01 Angeles. October 9. 192.'!. 
The Chauvenet Music School lias recently Inaugurated 
a series of concerts to be given from tlie Earl C. 
Anthony Radio Station in conjunction with the Palos 
Verdes project. Last week the iirogram was presented 
by Jean de (hauvenet pianist. Slgnor Le Vove Russian 
baritone, Mme. Chauvenet. soprano and the Foster 
Orchestra. The feature of the program was the song 
"Waiting for You In Palos Verdes." composer by Slgnor 
Chauvenet and sung by Mme. Chauvenet .A talk on the 
be:iutiea of Palos Verdes was given after the program. 

Mme. BruskeHollenbeck, that charming soprano 
who recently gave a most delightful musical evening 
with Ilruno lluhn and Steven .MiGroarty at the Maiy 
land Hotel In Pasadena, will Ih- heard again Octobii 
10 and 11 at Glendale when the musical pantominc 
Dreamland so well received in New York and Boston 
will be presented by the Tuesday Afternoon Club of 
Glendale. Jay Wellington, well-known producer of New 
York, is personally responsible for this performance 
which promises to be one of the most interesting musi- 
cal events of the fall season. 

Vivian Strong Hart, petite, gracious young soprano 
with a radiant voice, is singing a group of songs at the 
Metropolitan Theatre with obligati by charming de- 
mure .leanette Rogers, the first flutist of the orchestra. 
This delightful pair are furnishing a most refreshing 
bit of artistic work at the theatre, being most enthusi- 
astically received. 

The Los Angeles Music School Settlement at 2607 
Mozart street is launching a campaign for 2000 mem- 
bers at only one dollar a year the proceeds from which 
to be used to cancel the indebtedness on the cottage 
where more than 1934 music lessons were given during 
the past year to many deserving and talented pupils 
who are unable to pay more than thirty-flve cents for a 
half-hour lesson. Only organized In 1914 this non- 
sectarian school has been fostered hy a few hard- 
working, far-seeing musical people with Mrs. Henry P. 
Hoffman an an able president. While the facilities are 
neci'ssarily limited In this small cottage, yet the 
standard of the musical training has not been lowered, 
for with such teachers as Mrs. Hinsdale on piano and 
Miss Whittakcr Instructor of violin the children in 
the community have made splendid progress. It is 
gratifying to know that such clubs as the Matinee 
Musical and the Wa Wan are doing their bit with per- 
sonal services and giving financial help in aiding this 
w-orthy enterprise. Mrs. Hoffman has offered a Vose 
and Sons upright piano to be presented to the mem- 
ber holding the lucky number at a general meeting 
during the Christmas season. 

The Hollywood Opera Reading Club held Its first 
meeting at the Masonic Hall in Hollywood last Mon- 
day when Dr. Nagel gave a most interesting discourse 
on the opera La Boheme. The story of the opera was 
flrat related and the music analyzed most carefully 
with Or. .\agel at the piano Illustrating the various 
moods and emotions of the characters In the story with 
the beautiful strains hy Puccini Vivian Strong Hart's 
delightful refreshing voice was heard m the title role. 
supiKirted by Raymond Harmon's soulful tenor in the 
part of itudolpho. while Lora .Mae Lamport and Edward 
Novis were heard to advantage in their respective 
selections. 

Dr. Nagel's lecture-analysis was especially Interest- 
ing for he Is one of the first musicians to give such 
extensive discussion of opera. We have heard many 
lecturers on opera, but none so completely analyze 
(he musical setting, orrhestration and story as does 
this able pianist and lecturer The lack of scenery and 
orchestra in this 'Icllghlfuily melodious opera was 
scarcely missed as the setting was described so care- 
fully, the story so well related by Dr. Nagel, and the 
1 haraclers ao well portrayed by the able assisting 
artists that as a whol<' one felt quite as gratified as If 
nne had witnessed the regular performance of La 
Hoheme. To tell the story at length In this article 
would be useless and an attempt at analysis of the 
■ ii.r.i would be most dllllcult In a few lines but It is 
'h>' I'slre of the writer to convey the most Impressive 
;'-i-' during the program. Not alone from an enter- 
1. : . ilewpoint was this program menionible. but as 
111 iii-tructive dlsiiiurse. Incomparably Illustrated by 
nide.vi.rthy artists we feel any who miss hearing these 
monthly Opera Readings are falling to Improve an op- 
lorlunity which comes rot often. 

Miss Viola Elllt who made such a favorable Impres- 
«lon In the recent Alda production at the Hollywood 
lion I In the role of Ainr.i rl^, 1^ preparing to appear 
a A .. . ua In II Trnv ,i v ,lale. Inder the 

.1 iidance of Al. - the wellknown 

1' "■ch. Mii-1 Ell iing to the front 

1, .|" railc ability and is contralto voice 

and dramatic iiosslblliii.!. w.- pt' diti a splendid future 
for her. 




FITZGERALD'S -For the »^</i 



of S^fuiic 

An Important New Knabe Artist 

DONA GHREY 

—head of Voice Department of Zoell- 
ner Conservatory of Music, ami prom- 
inent concert artist, has recently be- 
come the owner and exclusive user of 
the KNABE. joining the great host of 
accomplished musicians who have 




MUSICCOf 

AT 7S7-729 



Leona Neblett, popular violinist of Los Angeles, will 
give the opening concert for the Venice Polytechnic 
I'nion High Scliool in their handsome new auditorium 
October 9. Miss Neblett, whose enviable reputation 
places her among tlie leading women violinists of 
California, will be assisted by Ruth May Shaffner, 
soprano and Raymond McFeeters, pianist. 'These splen- 
did artists have extensive bookings throughout the 
West for the coming season. in<-iuding i^os Angeles and 
neighboring cities. Miss Neblett is also founder and 
director of the Leona Neblett Violin School in the 
Southern California Music Company building in this 
city. 

Fanny Dillon, well kr.own in Los Angeles music 
circles has the honor and distinction of contributing a 
number of very worth while compositions to the world 
of music. Among several world-famed artists who are 
using Miss Dillon's works on their programs. Percy 
Grainger is certainly not the least eminent During 
his recent tour In Europe he played selections by Miss 
Dilion on more than thirty programs, receiving most 
favorable comment by foreign press Mr. Grainger has 
been using compositions by Gardiner, Carpenter, Cyril 
Scott. Nathaniel Dett. Guion. Oriffes. and Dillon on all 
his programs and says: "1 realized a spontaneity in 
the attitude of the listener which showed me that the 
serious world of music Is as ready to capitulate to the 
English-speaking composer as the 'popular' public of 
the world has to American jazz." 

Z. Earl Meeker, whose quiet pleasing personality 
and lovely musical voice have charmed many Cali- 
fornia audiences, gave a program worthy of the most 
renowned artist on Monday eve, Octboer 8, at the Re- 
cital Hall of the Southern ('alifornia .Music Company 
building. The program comprised old Italian songs by 
Scarlatti and Cesti, Russian songs by Rachmaninoti'. 
which by the way were especially well suited to .\Ir. 
.Meeker's voice, giving scope of range and sad refleition 
of the doleful yet dramatic poems — At Night and Morn- 
ing. A group of German and French songs were also 
noteworthy from the point of diction and the final 
group of modern songs were most interesting while 
the Roundup Lullaby by Gertrude Ross and Eagle Dance 
by Hotner Grumm, both composers of Los Angeles, were 
well received. 

Mr. Meeker was assisted by Ann Thompson as accom- 
panist, who played a very brilliant group of solos, in- 
cluding Valso Oubllee, Liszt; In Eiizabethian Days. 
Kramer; Scherzando Colby; Concert Etude. McDowell. 
Her delicate manner, brilliant technique, and unmis- 
takable musicianship command for her the highest 
esteem. 

May MacDonald Hope, who is founder of the Los 
Angeles Trio, announces the llrst concert of this their 
eighth season to he given at the new Fine Arts Audi- 
torium on Thursday evening. October 18. A busy season 
Is already booked for this well known group who are 
especially famed for chamber music programs. 

A. Rae Condit one of Los Angeles best known com- 
munity song leaders who has charge of a musical pro- 
gram for the employees of Barker Brothers every 
Thursday morning and for Jacohy Brothers each I'ti- 
day has compiled a Community Song Book which is in 
its second hundred thousand circulation There's no 
doubting the popularity of this song leader for every 
day and evening sees some community group singing 
under his able direction. Among a few of these are 
the First Methodist Episcopal Church in, Glendale. 
Thursday eve, Los Angeles V M. C. A.. Friday, Pomona 
College Club, Saturday and al the Soldiers' Home on 
October 18. 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 
705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COMPOSER-PI AN ISTE 



1000 Soufh Aiv:ir»ile 



Phone Sioas 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 



ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

Toeadnr, \\>dnt>NdB>'. Friday Afternoona 
Bjcnn Sobonl. rhon«-H :2IN05 or 271330 
i:iZ4 Sooth FlKueron. Loa AnKelea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCKliT .II.ASTBII 1*11 1 l.ll A It >IOMC OHCHKSTRA 

rnncrro. anil IIeolli>i> 

MaonKrniFnt Mr*. Cnruilni.- C. Smilh, 4:14 Auditorium Bids, 



ILYA BRONSON ,.Mii./rmo„Tc"o^.'i.,..,. 

rnihrr Triu Inllnir, I.e. \ncrlFri Trin. PhllkarmonU 

Ouarlrt In«lru<-rh>n. Chnnibrr Mualc Recllala 

5111.'. I.a .MIrada — Phone Holly 3044 

A.KOODLACH 

VIOI,l\ M\KI:R AM> RFl'AIRER 
CftnnnUMeur — ApiirnUMT 
; MnJfNllr Theatre Bldc-. Lom Aneelra Phone 670-14 




ELINOR 
REMICK 
WARREN 

CUMPUSKH-PI AMKTIi: 



"COUNTRY DANCE" 
"CAPILLOMS" 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

OLGA STEEB 
Director and Head of the Piano Department 

FANNIE DILLON 

Head of the Department of Theory 

and Composition 

Faculty of Twenty-nine Teachers 

ASSlialed Teachers in Burbank, Claremonl, Holly- 
wood, Los Angeles, Long Beach, Monrovia, Pasa- 
dena, Pomona, Redlands, Riverside, San Diego and 
Sania Monica. 

For Catalog and Full Information 
Address 

OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

453 S. Wihon Place Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone 567294 



Frederic Burr Scholl 



ORGANIST 



Grauman's Hollywood 
Egyptian Theatre 

HOLLYWOOD. CALIF. 



CLARA GERTRUDE OLSON 

TEACHER-ACCOSIPAXIST 

Plono, Harnianr. Theory 

Children's Classes a Sprclaltj' 

110 MDslc-.4rt Studio — 821IS1 Res. Phone BoTle »i31 



Alexander Bevani 

OPERATIC COACHING 
TONE DEVELOPMENT 
VOICE PRODUCTION 

•i~ 

Suite 612 So. Calif. Music Co. Bldg. 

Phone 822-520 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CCLTIRE — CO.VCHI.NG IX REPERTOIRE 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



JOHN SMALL MAN 



Shirley Taesai 

Anna Rnzena Sprotte 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



ABBIE INORTON JAMISON 



CHARLES BOWES 



ANGELO GIUFFRIDA 



tlon. Room Xo. 711. Southern Calif. >luNic CiMuiiany 

Bide. Every >1onday and Thursday, from it a. ni. to 

(1:30 p. m., half hour of strictly private lesson. tUI.OO. 

Pupils of any decree acce|>ted. 



Myra Belle Vickers, whose pupils are very much in 
demand tor concert recital and theatre engagements, 
opens her studio at 1812 Morgan Place the first Friday 
in each month when pupils and trends gather tor an 
informal evening of song and pleasure. Otto Ploetz. 
tenor robusto and a pupil ot Miss Vickers is adding to 
the prologue at the new Criterion Theatre a group of 
lovely songs. Other pupils ot this well-known teacher 
composing the Hollywood Girls' Quartette are singing 
at the Maryland Hotel in Pasadena. 

Hallet Gilberte, tamed song writer, has purchased a 
beautiful home in Pasadena wheie, after his return 
from his New York concert tour, he and Mrs. Gilberte 
will be at home to their many California friends. Mr. 
Gilberte is another world-renowned artist who has re- 
cently become a Knabe enthusiast and on his many 
California programs he will use only the Knabe piano. 

Mme. Blombert, formerly of the University ot Paris 
and a teacher of French conversation, has opened a 
studio in the Southern California Music Company build- 
ing where she is conducting classes in French diction, 
interpietation of French songs, and coaching for teach- 
ers Her work is attracting wide attention from many 
ot the best vocal teachers ot Los Angeles and vicinity, 
and recently she has established special classes limited 
to six pupils each. John Smallman. well-known vocal 
teacher says: "I have received more genuine assistance 
in working out French programs with Mme. Blombert 
than with any other person during my 



Flora Myers Efigel has the distinction of having made 
six recordings ot accompaniment rolls tor the Ampico 
during the past year. This charming person, possessing 
a soprano voice of unusual beauty will be heard fre- 
quently during the coming season in recital with the 
Knabe Ampico using her own recordings. 

Bohdan Gillevicz, another newcomer to California, 
is a Polish baritone who will be welcomed by Los 
Angeles music circles as an artist and teacher worthy 
of note as he has had an enviable career. 

Stewart Wille, formerly accompanist for such artists 
as Marie Rappold. Ratalio Diaz and Margaret Romaine 
of the Metropolitan Opera Company, with Reed Miller 
and Nevada Van der Veer on several tours, and three 
seasons with Arthur .Middleton. bass, formerly of the 
Metropolitan, has only recently arrived in Los Angeles 
to take up the woi'k as director of the .\mpico concert 
department of the Fitzgerald Music Company. 

Mr. Wille. aside trom being a gifted pianist and an 
exceptional accompanist, has studied the process of 
reproducing piano compositions at the Ampico New 
York Recording Offices having made eight recordings 
during the past summer of his own interpretation of 
such works as Godowskys Alt Wien. Cyril Scott's 
Lento, Provaznik's The Fountain. Beethoven's German 
Dance, Leschetizky aude Heroique and Grainger's 
Irish Tune. This young pianist has studied extensively 
in New York. Boston and Europe and has gained an 
enviable reputation not only as an artist but teacher 
as well, having been an instructor in Boston tor some 
time. Another great acquisition to the Los .-Angeles 
music colony comes to us in Mr. Wille's arrival. We 
welcome him heartily. 

Calmon Lubovisky, prominent among violinists. 
Flora .Myers Engel, soprano, Stewart Wille, pianist, 
gave a most enjoyable hour ot music at the Highland 
Park Presbyterian church last week. .Mr. Wille was 
heard to advantage in Brahm's Rhapsodie in G minor, 
and Schumann's lovely Romance in F sharp major, 
while his rendition of Leschetizky's Etude Heroique left 
nothing to be desired in tonal effects, power and 
technique. 

Mme. Engel, always a delightful addition to any pro- 
gram, sang especially well Leoncavallo's Ballatella 
(Pagliaccii. Nevin's Oh That We Two Were Maying. 
Ward-Stephens The Nightingale and as an encore, the 
ever lovely Cadman number From the Land of the 
Sky Blue Water. Sarasate's Romanza Andaluza. the 
always popular Beethoven Minuet in G. and Kreisler's 
Tambourin Chinois were rendered with care and pre- 
cision by Calmon Lubovisky whose playing of 
Schubert's .\ve Maria as an encore went straight to 
the hearts of the listeners. 

This group ot popular artists appeared last week 
at the Polytechnic High School Auditorium at Venice 
and again at the City Club ot Los .\ngeles in equally 
interesting programs as that given at Highland Pai-k 
and everyw'here enthusiastically received by large ap- 
preciative audiences. 

The De Lara Grand Opera Company will pi-esent 
Verdi's Opera "Rigoletto" at the Municipal .\uditorium 
in Long Beach on September 25. The distinguished 
Los Angeles artists who will appear in the opera in- 
clude Irmalee Campbell, coloratura soprano, as Guilda. 
Jliguel Laris, tenor, as the Duke; Luis Ferrazzano, 
baritone; Wilhelmina Corson, contralto; Forest Bell, 
basso; and Marjorie Maughlin. ballet director. The 
chorus consists of sixty well trained voices and the 
orchestra is composed ot the best musicians in Los 
.-\ngeles. including soloists trom the Philharmonic 
Orchestra. On September 28 the opera will be pre- 
sented at the Raymond Hotel. Pasadena, with only 
one change in the cast. Conchita Chavez will appear 
as Guilda in the leading soprano role. The same opera 
will be given on September 29 at the Municipal .Audi- 
torium in Ocean Park when Annabel Blackwell will 
sing the leading soprano role with Max Alexander, 
tenor; Luis Ferrazzano, baritone. 



Claramae Wilson Stamm presented an interesting 
piano recital on Saturday afternoon, September 15, at 
the Recital Hall of the Southern California Music Com- 
pany building when her artist pupils appeared in 
classics including modern and ultra-modem works by 
well known composers. This was a contest recital in 
which the participants Mary White. Edith Wall, Rita 
Knight, Marjorie Brown, and William Davis played in 
competition for gold and silver medals, having had 
three months to work on their respective fifteen 
minute pertoi-mances. The judges. Mr. Waldo F. Chase, 
Mr. Francis Kendig, Miss Jewell Hickox will announce 
the winners in the contest at a later date. 



.At the meeting ot the Executive Board ot the Opera 
Reading Club at the home of its president. Mrs. Loren 
B. Curtis, 1622 Vista street, recently, the chairman of 
the various standing committees were named. Mrs. 
L. B. Tannehill will head the membership committee; 
Mrs. A. E. Huntington, hospitality; Mrs. Lynda Hall 
Sims, publicity; Mrs. L. S. Farquhar, the door commit- 
tee; .Mrs. Hector Geiger. Parliamentary and Mrs. Lora 
May Lamport, decoration. A large membership was 
voted in at this meeting and many other applications 
were placed on file to be considered at a special meet- 
ing to be held on Monday. September 24. at the home 
of Mrs. Lora May Lamport, 1781 Orchid street. Because 
ot ill health, Mrs. Harold Ferguson tendered her res- 
ignation as member of the Board and Mrs. J. W. Stod- 
dart was named to take her place. The first general 
meeting of the season will be held October 1 at the 
Masonic Temple auditorium. Dr. Frank Nagel will read 
and analyze "La Boheme." 

Clara Gertrude Olsen has organized her junior piano 
pupils, forming a Music Club for selt-improvement. The 
pupils select their officers and their committees who 
arrange the bi-monthly meetings, planning programs 
and drills in ear-training and sight-reading which is all 
personally supervised by their able teacher. 

Lester Hugo Castle has been singing at the Second 
Church of Christ Scientist during the past month while 
.Mrs. Selby. the regular soloist, has been absent. 

Nouvart Costikyan, pianist and teacher has joined 
the artistic colony at the Southern California Music 
Company building where he has recently opened his 
studio. 



M. Jeannette Rogers 

First Flutist Metropolitan 
Theatre 



Available for 

Concert- Recital-Club 
Obbligato 



Address 1354 Laveta Terrac 



MISS FANNIE CHARLES DILLON 

PI.\MST — TE.VCIIiCR — CO>i POSER 
Studio. 2S.10 l.ee^vard -Vvenue, I.om .Vneelei. Phone Dr 
T:»i!i. (onipo.ir ot .llany .\uniberH Played by Fan 



GILDA MARCHETTI 



DRAMATIC 



nnd lialinn Diction 

one .-..^S-tUct 
Cnlif. MdmIc Co. RldS. 



L. 

the 


CANTIEN HOLLYWOOD 

PIA.VO— ORGAN— HARMO-VV 
Hnllyn-ood ha» made a atudy of the pnyeholORy 
rhildren lietiyeen the aEe» of >lx and nine and 
methods and luaterialt* uned for tiieni. A limited 
iber of normal students will be aroepted. 
Studio: m .North Hill. Pasadena 
Phone Colorado 1:104 



Claire Forbes 
Crane 

_ PI A NTS T 



Hvud MoUn Depl^ Collese of MunIc, U. S. C. — Member 

PhllbnrmoDle Orchenlm 

8201 S. Ftgunoa St., Loa AncelcB Phone HaJn 2190 



PACIFIC COAST .MUSICAL REVIEW 




ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE 

OLDEST AND BEST EQUIPPED CONSERVATORY IN THE PACIFIC WEST 

2315 Jackson Street, San Francisco. Tel. West 4737 

\ . (!.• AKRII.I.ACA. I)ircH-l..r 



JIISKI-II Ul 



S. r. Symphony Orchewlr 



EDOUARD DERU 



Master Classes in Violin Playing 
and Ensemble 



WTOMV lll,AII,\ 
Violin 

i-.'iKuf (Vmscrviitory 



lVi-:>'<'KSI.Aa VII.I.AI.PAXDO 
Vlolinrrllo 

Mexico National Conservatory 
S. F. Syni|>hony Orchestra 



ICUIi. IIAIII, 
VIoln 

Dr. Hocli Co 



AAHOX <;i"n'i':i<*i(iN 

Olio — Double llniM 

Kk-nr Imperial C'on.si-rvatory 



Write or See Miss Shaw, the Secretary, for Tuition and Concert Rates 



Available for 
Concerts 



>iV\Altl> J(I.\K» 



IStlRA 
<tl ■'■'OS. \Ultll,I.ACA 

Soprano 
Spnul,ih I'oiitamc 



To sum up llie '.sior.v" of Je unniiie Rogers, flute vir- 
tuoso anil solo llutlst of the Crauniaii symphony orches- 
tra, now at the Metropolitan Theatre in Los Angeles. 
Los Angeles offers but limited opportunities to women 
musicians. Soiiieliow our titeatre managers and orches- 
tra leaders have not yet realized that there are a num- 
ber of excellent women playi-rs here. Of course, there 
are exceptions, but prnhably the most notable instance 
In this regard offers the unprecedented success of Miss 
Jeaonette Rogers, who. coming from the East, repeated 
the Cesarian feat. Came, was heard and won by Sid 
Grauman. who instinctively discovers when a man or 
woman knows his or her business or art. To cut the 
long story short, when this charming young flute player 
arrived In town It was less than a week when Sid Grau- 
man signed on the coveted dotted line. That was two 
years ago. Since then the beautiful flute playing of 
Miss Rogers has won her such acclaim and popularity 
that Mr. Grauman had her fe^itured either as soloist or 
In obligates during sixty-flve out of seventy-one con- 
certs. Which also bespeaks eloquently the versatility 
and repertoire of this brilliant concert artist, who dur- 
ing all this time has most ably held her position in the 
Grauman Symi^hony Orchestra as flrst flutist, playing 
among men of notable symphonic connections and in 
years greatly her senior. With apologies to Miss Rog- 
ers, she Is very young, but old In musical experience 
and .a flute player, therefore, par excellence, both for 
tone and technlc That winningly graceful appearance 
of bers. quite unstudied, has made her, together with 
her artistic attainments, one of the most popular fig- 
ures, and undoubtedly the best known woman musician 
on the theatrical stage on the Coast. 

There is a photograph In hi-r book of press clippings, 
Bhowlng her as a little girl, hardly tall enough to touch 
the piano keyboard. Itelng the daughter of a profes- 
sional clarinetist, her mother a gifted pianist, she be- 
gan to study piano when she was Ave. At twelve, how- 
ever, she found that the flute Is her flrst and only great 
love and it has remained so As a matter of fact she 
began the study of flute when she was less than nine 
and soon after she became the pupil of the well known 
flutist of Boston, George Hubbard Wilder. Of that time 
dates also a picture of the ,lunlor Orchestra, The Clefs, 
where Miss Rogers gained her flrst and since then so 
admirable ensemble playing experience. George Bar- 
rerc, 'the greatest flutist of all." as Miss Rogers declares 
warmly, became her master at twelve, after she was 
presented by Mr Wilder in concert at New York, given 
under the ausplies of the publishing house of Carl 
Fischer, In the presence of noti-d .New York critics who. 
together with Barrere, marveled at this girl wonder of 
a flutist 

Years of concert travel followed, when Miss Rog- 
ers toured with sucess as a member of concert com- 
panies. To be near her home at Albany, N. Y., she re- 
atrlcted her coniert trips to the Kast, always featured 
B8 soloist. When relatives moved to Los Angeles she, 
loo. followed the lure of the Golden West. As men- 
tioned, .Miss Rogers has been a conspicuous figure In 
the Grauman concerts When the Metropolitan Theatre 
opened Mr. Grauman transferri'd her from his Third 
Street theatre to the larger orchestra in this theatre. 
Hardly a singer of note has appeared in the theatrical 
precinct of the (irauman theatre chain, when Miss 
Rogers wn, n.ii , ,II..,1 upon to Join him with obligates, 
notab' ik'.nicnl of John Steel. Each time 

Cbarli linan was presented he Insisted 

"n .M nchnbd In his numbers. In fact, 

the flu I he Land of the Sky Hluc Waters 

and I II. ar 1 llrii-h at Kve were especially written 
lor .Miss Hnters by the famous music maker. 

This wintir .Mil's Rogers will again be very busy 
within Ihe Grauman ensemble and In personal outside 
engagemenis. WhI. h is not surprising for those who 
have heard her silky, sweet tones will agree, with Ihe 
comm.nt p. nnrd r. . . illy 1,y Carl Brnnson. the noted 

critic .r " her orchestra work. .Miss 

•'/'anil. iiig young flutist of the 

'■raun ,. |s contemplating much 

' "1 ' > ng many outside engage- 

11. r lone Is remarkably free 

iih often mars the effect of this 

iilqui. Is able to meet all the re- 

• 'lilt siore with an ease whi( h Is 

icslful to lie ll»t. uer." 

And hearing Miss Rogers Is enthusiastically agree 
Ing with this veteran critic of the Southwest. 



ADA CLEfVlENT IN BENEFIT CONCERT 

A year ago some of the music lovers of San Francisco 
made arrangemenls with the Ada Clement .Music School 
for the establishmeni of scholarships for the benefit of 
talented pupils who could not otherwise afford to pursue 
their musical studies. The proceeds of a benefit con- 
cert given by the students of the school were contribut- 
ed to the fund and subscrijitions were made by others 
interested in the plan. The concert this year will be 
given by .Miss Ada Clement, pianist and founder of the 
school, assisted by the renowned artists: May Mukle, 
cellist, and Alexander Saslavsky, violinist, on Tuesday 
evening, October 23. in the Colonial Ballroom of the 
Hotel St Francis. The concert is under the direction 
of Alice Seckels. A program comprising seldom heard 
works for the three instruments, a cello and piano son- 
ata and an interesting group of piano solos by Miss 
Clement will round out the beautiful program. 

Four partial and two full scholarships were estab- 
lished last .vear at the Conservatory and awarded to 
three boys and three girls, after examination and one 
public school contest. The examining board consisted 
of Alfred Hertz. Domenico Brescia, Julian Waybur, Ar- 
tur Argiewlcz and Miss Ada Clement and the grading 
of the successful aspirants resulted In four "Artists" 
scholarships, one intermediate and one primary. One 
girl is studying the harp, two boys the violin, one girl 
the flute, and one boy and girl the ])iano. 

These young people are all extremely talented and 
they are deeply desirous of making music their profes- 
sion; moreover, in each case, either it would have been 
impossible, without the scholarship, for the pupil lo 
take lesons at all. or else there would have had to be 
intermittent instruction with Inferior teachers One 
young woman is the daughter of a bandmaster who 
has to support a family of six on a very small salary: 
one girl Is lame but has a true flame of ambition which 
lightens up a background of illness and discouragement 
at home. Two boys are sons of mothers who have to 
leave home each day to help support good sized famil- 
ies. One high school boy. standing well in his studies 
even though he had to work evenings to pay Ills way. 
has been relieved from the strain of late hours and 
given the best of instruction besides. One young woman 
is a university graduate and on the way to becoming 
a superior teacher of music. The facts about these 
young people are full of interest and the splendid re- 
sults of the past year so fully justify the faith of the 
founders that it is a real pleasure for them to appeal 
again to San Francisco for continued and, if possible, 
increased support. 

Contributions should be sent to Miss Lena Blandlng, 
Fairmont Hotel, San Francisco, California. 



SYMPHONY SEASON BEGINS FRIDAY 

Next Friday will mark the opening of the thirteenth 
season of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the ninth under the leadership of Alfred Hertz The 
sale of .season tickets this year has been the largest in 
the history of the organization and next Friday after- 
noon will undoubtedly And the Curran Theatre filled to 
capacity. 

For this event an attractive and well-balanced pro- 
gram has been prepared which is made up of Bee- 
thoven's Symphony No. ;!. the Rhapsodle Espagnole of 
Ravel and Rabaud's Eclogue. The two last named com- 
positions will be given their flrst San Francisco produc- 
tion at this concert Although all of Beethoven's nine 
symphonies are looked upon with reverence by music- 
lovers. Ihe Third or "Eroica" is generally placed next 
to the Fifth in popularity, the second movement, the 
Marcie ^'unebre, being universally recognized as one of 
the master's most Impressive compositions. 

In keeping with the custom of previous seasons 
P'riday's program will he repeated the following Sun- 
day afternoon In the Curran Theatre as the first con- 
cert on the Sunday Symphony series. The first concert 
In the Popular Si'rles will be given a week later, 
Oi lober 28. 



Elsie Ingallt and Karl Heine, two talented pupils of 
Mrs. H. I. Krick, 4711 Forest street, Oakland, played a 
program of thirteen classical piano numbers for Ihe 
Oaklanil Tribune Radio KLX from Hotel Oakland, Tues- 
day evening, October 2, IHL':!. from K to '.i p. m. They 
playeil from (•btipln, Liszt. Crieg. Kowalski. KarganolT, 
Mnszkowski. Mac Dimnell. Schubert, etc. The Tribune 
people wiri. delighted with their playing and said they 
would be glad to have them again. 



The San Francisco Music Teachers' Association held 
the first meeting of Ihe season on Thursday evening at 
the home of -Miss May Sinsli.-imer. the president. Mrs. 
Alvina Heuer Willson. presiding. .After the regular 
business meeting, groups of songs were given by Mrs. 
Camm and Miss .Maude White, with Mrs. Hollis Stone 
and Mrs. Minton accompanying the singers. A group 
of charming piano solos were given by Mr. Kosloff, a 
newcomer in the music world of San Francisco. About 
fifty members enjoyed the evening's entertainment. 



Sigmund Beel, the prominent and widely known vio- 
linist and pedagogue returned from a two weeks' vaca- 
tion in Los Angeles, where he met old friends, includ- 
ing practically all prominent musicians, .\mong those 
who were specially attentive to Mr. Beel were Emil 
Oberhofer and Ossip Gabrilowitsch. Mr. Beel spent two 
delightful weeks in the southern metropolis and had a 
complete rest from his tedious studio work. He Is now 
again busy teaching pupils who come to him from all 
parts of the Pacific Coast. 

Mrs. Pearl Hossack Whitcomb, mezzo-contralto, as 
an accommodation to her Berkeley students, has taken 
a studio in Berkeley this season at 2748 Ashby avenue, 
near Piedmont a\'enue and will be there every Tuesday. 

Four of Mrs. Whitcomb's students gave the Half 
Hour of Music in the Greek Theatre September 2. being 
received with the greatest enthusiasm and many re- 
quests for a repetition of the program soon. Mrs. 
Whitcomb spent the summer studying with the great 
baritone, Louis Graveure, attending tlie master class 
and having private instruction as well. 



MARY GARDEN 



As is to be expected of Mary Garden the program 
she has submitted lo give in San Francisco is one of 
unusual context. "Our Mary.'' whose popularity in this 
country knows no bounds, is nothing if not original. 
Her entire career has been one of constructive build- 
ing in the realm of music. She alone of all the great 
modern priina-donnas has had the courage to introduce 
and expound musical compositions of a school that has 
required more than mere art to present. Were it not 
for the talents, the personality and the brains of .Mary 
Garden American today would know nothing of the 
glorious compositions of Charpentier Massenet. De- 
busy and others of the modern Frenchmen whose works 
have become the vogue since first expounded by her. 

Mary Garden's operatic triumphs in San Francisco 
are too well known for comment, and it is as a re- 
citalist that we are to hear her once, and once only, 
In the Exposition Auditorium on Sunday afternoon, 
October 21., where she is to appear in her only recital 
in Northern California, which will be given under the 
mangement of Selby C. Oppenhelmer. Miss Garden is 
bringing with her as assisting artists the young Rus- 
sian cellist Gutia Casini and Georges Lauweryns. di- 
rector of the orchestra of the Theatre de la Monnaie in 
Brussels and of the Monte Carlo Opera, who will serve 
in the dual capacity of pianist and accompanist. 

The interesting program which will be rendered by 
this trio of stars is sufficiently diverslfled to suit the 
tastes of all classes of music lovers. Miss Garden her- 
self will sing the great arias from Louise. Manon 
Lescaut and Carmen, as well as compositions in Italian, 
German and French The full list of works to be ren- 
dered follows: la) On Wings of Song (transcribed by 
Achron) (Mendelssohn), (b) At the Fountain (Davld- 
offl, Gutia Casini: Aria: Depuls le jour from Louise 
(Charpentier). Miss Garden; Concerto (in one move- 
ment) a Minor (R. Volkman). (Cadenza by Klengel) 
Gutia Casini; (a) Second Act Manon Lescaut (Puccini), 
(b) La Serenade (Paolo Toslll, Miss Garden: Para- 
phrase sur Rigoletto (Liszt), Georges Lauweryns; (a) 
Zuelgnung IR. Strauss), (b) The Steppe {\. Gretchani- 
now), (c) Ouvre tes yeux bleus (J. Massenet). Miss 
Gar<len: (al Valse Triste (Sibelius), (b) Airs Baskyrs 
iPiatti). Gutia Casini; (a) A Romance (G. Faurel, (b) 
Serenade (John Alden Carpenter), (c) SequedlUe Car- 
men (I)izetl, Miss Garden. 

Miss Garden will face a great throng at the Audi- 
torium. .\dvance mail orders received by Manager 
Oppenhelmer intlii'ate that every seat will be occupied. 
The public ticket sale starts at Sherman, Clay & Com- 
pany Wednesday morning. 



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VOICE — t;i ITAII 



—Wednesday 



LEILA B. GRAVES 

LYRIC SOPRANO— VOICE CrLTlTRE 

Available for Concerts and Recital* 

Studio: 150 Central Ave. Tel. Park 1CS4 

MISS WELCOME LEVY 



Laura Werfheimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 

Mtx. Noah Draudt 

2211 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1322 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comiqae, Paris 
Stndlo: :1I07 ^VaKblnKton Street 



SIGMUND BEEL 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPRANO 
Teacher of SlnKine: Studio, Tuesday at 
Friday. Kohler A: Cha^e Uldg.. S. P.; Rew 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of Sloelog. 32 Lorelta Ave., Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Mon., Kohler A 
rhwwe nidg.. S. F. Telephone Kearny r;4M. 



Madame Charles Po«Iter-Soprano ?Jf±^.i«°^3rel"7l?^^^^^^ 



Culti 

tudlo. .-kSS i:7lh Stre 

-Tel. Oakland 2070 



Lizetta Kalova \ lolmist 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS 

StudioM: 1140 High Court, Uerkeley; 



Hide.. San Frai 



2211 SCOTT ST.. Bet. Clay & Washlngtoo 

Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 

Mm. Noah Brandt, Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist, Temple Emana BI. Con- 
cert anil Chnreh Work. Vocal iDHtruc- 
llon. 2.-i30 Cluy St„ Phone Went 4890. 



Mary Coonan McCrea MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



ARTISTIC PI 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 



Hyde St.. S 
6031. Prldo 
Kearny .'>4.VI. 

MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTR.*LTO 
Voire Cnltnre. Suite "C" Kohler & Chnmt 
nnlldlne. Telephone Kearny 5454. 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOLA CANTORUM. 

PARIS 

9RGAWI8T AT. HART'S CATHBDRAtr 

Piano Dcpartneat. Haailla S«h<M>l 
Orsan aad Piano, ArrlllasB Mnalcel Collet* 



Telephone Kearny 5454 
RcN. Tel. Bay^-ieiv 4104 



EVA M. GARCIA 



MARY CAKR MOORE — SONGS 

Dweller In My DreaniH (Tagore) Medium 

Song of a Faun (Fay Van Norden) Soprano 

Pub. AVESLEY AVEBSTER 

750 47th Avenue 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

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St., and 121 2l8t Ave.. Tel Pac 1284 

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KAJETAN ATTL 

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LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 




SariEr <hs^i Iteical %t)Ma 



]| THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR.NAL IHTHE GREAT WEST jj 



VOL. XLV. No. 3 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



NOVELTIES AT SEASON'S SYMPHONY CONCERTS MATZENAUER AND WHITEHILL OPEN SEASON 



Alfred Hertz Tells Editor of Pacific Coast Musical Review Some Inter- 
esting Facts Regarding the New Compositions He Will Introduce 
on the Programs of the Impending Symphony Season. 
All Nationalities Are Represented 



Diva Delighted Large Audience With Her Magnificent Voice and Regal 

Style — Exhibited Vocal Art of Highest Order — Encores Were Far 

Beneath Her Artistic Dignity — Whitehill Retains Art of 

Phrasing and Diction, But Lacked Vocal Pliancy 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



Realizing how much interested many- 
music lovers are in the programs of the 
forthcoming symphony concerts, and 
specially in the novelties Mr. Hertz has 
selected for introduction during the 
course of the season, we thought an in- 
ter\'iew with Mr. Hertz on this subject 
would be an appropriate article at this 
the opening of the new season. We shall 
let Mr. Hertz speak for himself; 

"Before my departure for Europe I had 
already decided to obtain the most in- 
teresting of the recent compositions and 
since my trip took me first to England 
I had my first opportunity to observe 
the trend of things musical in that coun- 
try. I was greatly surprised to note that 
there was in that country a remarkable 
movement on foot in connection with the 
modern school of music. As a matter of 
fact the English people have arrived at a 
point of their musical life where they 
must be considered very seriously as far 
as new music is concerned. 

"Hitherto England had not been re- 
garded as a pathfinding nation in the 
realm of music, but at present there is 
no denying the fact that its composers 
are among the foremost in the newer 
spheres. The compositions of Gustav 
Hoist, for instance, are among the most 
remarkable of the new works. I shall in- 
troduce two suites of this composer, one 
entitled Beni Mora and the other named 
Saint Paul Suite. Eugene Goossens is 
another distinguished English composer 
of the new school who has already been 
introduced to San Franciscans through 
the Chamber Music Society. I have ob- 
tained his symphonic poem entitled Tam 
O'Shanter. Then I secured The Whasps. 
a Suite by R. Vaughn Williams and a 
new work by Arthur Bliss which had 
not yet been printed when I was in Lon- 
don. Among the new works from Eng- 
land I have also included Dance Rhap- 
sodic by Fritz Delius. 

"In Paris I obtained quite a number 
of interesting compositions of which 
some are entirely new and some are only 
new to San Francisco. Among these are: 
Second Symphony by Saint-Saens and 
Carnival of the Animals by the same 
composer. The latter is a work published 
after the master's death and although it 
had been composed some time Saint- 
Saens would never allow it to be pub- 
lished except until after his death and 
never gave his reason for this decision. 
It is written for two piano soli and or- 
chestra and principally of a humorous 
character. The only known number of 
this Carnival of the Animals Suite is The 
Swan, which was originally published as 
a cello solo and has since become very 
popular. 

"Another important French composi- 
tion new to San Francisco is Impressions 
of Italy by Charpentier, a work that con- 
tributed to establish the famous French 
composer's reputation which the opera 
Louise brought to its zenith. In this 
suite the Italian folk songs are treated 
in a most characteristic fashion. Of 
Ravel I secured one of that master's 
most eloquent compositions entitled 
Rhapsodie Espagnol. It is a work couched 
in modern style and shows this composer 
one of the best, if not the best, exponent 
of the French school in his happiest 
mood. Ravel has nothing in common 
with so many of the modern composers 
who worship at the shrine of "Datais- 
mus." I also obtained a charming little 
work entitled Eclogue by Rabaud. 



"From the Flemish-Belgian school I 
selected a Fantasie on Two Malloon 

Christmas Hymns by Joseph Jongen, 
Four Old Flemish Folk Songs by Anton 
de Greef and, last but not least. Carnival 
of the Princess d'Auberge by Blocks. 

"Among the new works of the young 
Italian composers I found a composition 
by Respighi entitled The Fountains of 
Rome and Antiques Dances, a Nocturne 
and Rondo Fantastico by Pick-Mangia- 
galli and Five Sonatas in the Form of a 
Suite by Scarlatti orchestrated by To- 
masini. 

"While the scores obtainable from the 



The regular concert season of San 
Francisco for 1923-1924 began at the Cur- 
ran Theatre last Sunday afternoon 
when Margaret Matzenauer and Clarence 
Whitehill opened the Elwyn Artist Series 
in the presence of a large audience. The 
principal numbers on the program in- 
cluded some of the most important class- 
ics of vocal literature. Clarence White- 
hill had the responsibility to sing the 
introductory number which consisted of 
(a) Hans Sachs' Monologue, Was dufted 
doch der Flieder. from Die Meistersinger 
by Wagner and (b) Evening Star from 
Tannhauser. There was evident through- 




MME. ROSE FLORENCE 

The Inimitable Concert Recitalist Who Scored a Real Artistic Triumph at the 



St. Fr, 



Hotel Last Tuesday Ev 



Russian school were not new composi- 
tions they must be considered novelties 
inasmuch as the scores were not obtain- 
able since the war and are new to San 
Francisco. One of these is The Tempest 
by Tschaikowsky and the other a Suite 
from Czar Saltan by Rimsky-Korsakow. 
Then I have a Gopak (Russian Dance) 
from La Foire de Sorotschintsi by 
Moussorgsky-Liadow. 

"From Austria and Germany I obtained 
the most ambitious work of the season, 
namely, the Second Symphony by Gus- 
tave Mahler, which calls for grand or- 
chestra of over one hundred pieces, 
chorus and soprano and alto soli, organ 
and extra band. One of the symphonies 
new to San Francisco is the Third Sym- 
phony by Dvorak which, though charm- 
(Continued on Page 7, Col. 3> 



out the rendition of these songs that 
proficiency and that artistic finesse which 
characterized Mr. Whitehill's operatic 
achievements and which contributed so 
much to make him an American artist of 
international reputation. 

Mr. Whitehill possesses what in our 
estimation overshadows beauty of voice, 
namely, authoritative interpretation, in- 
tellectual phrasing and a diction the pre- 
cision of which is a delight to witness. 
It does not make any dilference what 
language Mr. Whitehill may sing in he 
enunciates according to the native idea 
and emphasizes the phrases according to 
their poetic or romantic meaning. As a 
Wagnerian interpreter he stands among 
the foremost American artists and justly 
occupies a prominent position among the 
artists of the world. Equally delightful 



from an interpretative standpoint were 
Traum durch die Dammerung (Strauss) 
Die Beiden Grenadiere (Schumann). The 
Isle (Rachmaninoff! and My Native 
Land (Gretchaninoff J, the latter was 
given an especially dramatic accentu- 
ation. 

There was a most enjoyable lilt and 
humor contained in Mr. Whitehill's con- 
ception of the Irish ballads and the much 
used and abused On The Road to Man- 
dalay gained rejuvenated esprit from Mr. 
Whitehill's energetic interpretation. How- 
ever, notwithstanding this exceptionally 
discriminating mode of phrasing and 
easily understood diction Mr. Whitehill's 
voice was not at its best. There seemed 
to permeate it a certain element of 
hoarseness which undoubtedly was the 
result of San Francisco's treacherous 
weather, but as we said before it is not 
as much the voice itself that counts most 
in vocal declamation, although it neces- 
sarily occupies a most important posi- 
tion, as it is what an artist is able to 
do with this voice, and surely anyone 
who heard Mr. Whitehill and was suf- 
ficiently familiar with vocal art to ap- 
preciate his skill, must have admired 
him for the excellent results he obtained 
under the circumstances. 

Mme. Margaret Matzenauer began her 
part of the program with My Heart Is 
Weary from Xadeschka by Thomas, a 
sort of oratorio-like aria necessitating 
considerable sostenuto singing which 
was done with a voice of surpassing 
beauty and flexibility and a warmth of 
resonance that was simply unforgettable. 
Later Mme. Matzenauer sang Erda's 
Warning from Das Reingold, Traume 
which was connected with Brangane's 
Call from Tristan and Isolde and 
Schmerzen. all by Wagner. There really 
is quite a similarity of material in the 
last three compositions which is so pro- 
nounced in the two middle ones that it 
sounds quite appropriate to combine 
them as Mme. Matzenauer did. She sang 
these Wagnerian numbers with a vitality 
and artistic authority that proved posi- 
tively thrilling. She was never in finer 
voice, never sang with more effect and 
assurance, nor did she ever appear to 
greater advantage personally. She wore 
a beautiful gown which even our male 
eyes could not help but admire. 

A group of songs including Over the 
Steppe by Gretchaninoff, On Wings of 
Dream by Arenski, which by the way 
was an exceptionally skilfully scored 
song and most difficult to sing, an ar- 
rangement of a Mexican song by La 
Forge, which made such an excellent im- 
pression that it had to be repeated, and 
a very virile Norwegian song by Four- 
drain. Everyone of these songs was 
given additional charm through Mme. 
Matzenauer's effective interpretation. The 
final number of the program consisted of 
a Duet from La Favorita by Donizetti 
sxmg with finished artistry by Mme. 
Matzenauer and Mr. Whitehill. Alto- 
gether" it surely was a concert worthy 
of the distinguished artists who gave it 
and it should prove a fine introduction 
to the excellent Elwyn Artist Series. 

For some reason or other certain man- 
agers seem to entertain the idea that the 
public wants cheap encores, that is to 
say old time favorites of a popular 
nature. It may be that certain talking 
machine companies also suggest these old 
favorites which are possibly preserved on 

(Continued on Page 7, Col. 3i 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The DUO-ART in the 
STEINWAY 



The Duo-Art reproducing feature 
may be had only in Steinway, 
Weber, Steele, Wheelock, Stroud 
and Aeolian pianofortes. 

The great fact that the Duo- 
Art can be had in the Stein-way is 
itself an eloquent tribute to the 
^Duo-Art. 



Sherman, play & Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourtcentb and Clay Sts.. Oakland 

Sacramento - Stockton- Fresno - San Jose 

Portland - Seattle - Tacoma - Spokane 







MYNARD S. JONES 

Tracker of SInEinc 

Vi>ral ninictiopitlrlaii 

Vocal problem* IlinroaKblr iHaKnoned and proper 

AnniM.AGA MIMICAL I'OI.I.KGC: 
S:ilS Jackxiio *i. rhonc Wcat 4737 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
MUNICIPAL ORGANIST OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. ORGANIST 
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 
Piano and Organ Instruction. Vocal Coach. 
Studio: First Congregational Church, cor. Post 
and Mason Streets. Tel. Douglas 5186. Residence. 
887 Bush Street. Tel. Prospect 977. 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS AND 
ORGAN RECITALS 



Mzmning School of Music 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

AI>V \MKI> PI I'll. t AtTKITKn 

\\ r(ll»«--ila> Nn.l i rltlli7 >lnrnlnt(. nl Sludlo: IMI! 

Kolilrr A < hn-r IIMk., ••Hn I rnnrl«rn. IVIrphoni 

Krarnr .M.'> I. Mrolilf-no«- Sfuillt>: ir.O Moiilr \ l*li 

\«f-.. Oaklnnil. Trlrphitnc rirtlmnnl 7<1<I. 



JULIUS GOLD 



■■■llcd nilh llciirj' llolmcK 
Nile Saurct. 

Telephone Prnn 



llerulinrd L.tNteman 



EMERICH 

< OMKUT riAMST A\D TKAt IIKR 
Kiit'liil \|tlM. Phone llerkt-lpy 2ft71-\V 



xV U G LT S T A H A Y D E N 

SOPRANO 

Avnlliiltlc for roii<><Tl» ami llerllaU 

Adtlroot: -171 :t7th Avvnue 



ARTISTIC STUDIO FOR RENT 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



of operatic Train- 



Dominican College School of Music 

S\\ RAFAKI.. CALIFOHMA 
MuNir roariten Thoroufcb nnil I'roKrrMNlvc 
I'uhlle School MuNlr. \rrredltetl LMplnma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Kohler « > banc llldic.. 



MRS. M. FOULKES 



IHKNK A. MILLIKH 



A<ldrr.>: 1711 link Slreel Tilcphonr llrnilnrk .V. 

PKAIIL IIOSSACK WIIITCOMB 

MR/./.O-) IIM'IIAI.TII 

Ab.olnle llelkod of Voice I pon the llrealk 

Miindar and ThurMlay, im>.% Kohler A I'ha.e llwltdin 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



Phone Went H'T,.i; Sat.. FIr(*( (hriHtlnn .Sch-nee 
Charch, Phone Franklin 1307; llefi. atadlo. 3142 Lewlaloa 
Ave., Derkeley. Phone Piedmont 2428. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 



rritt, llnkland 



The College of the Holy Names 

1 ' ' 

Complete Ton.er 
Tello. Voice. 

DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

DIRECTION l>F MMi:. I,IM.IA\ SI.INKF.V HI KIM 

Ifiilinn M<-lho<l — Vol<'e PInreiiient — Ureathlns 

OiM-rn — 4 hiirrh — Oriilorlo 

H>72 Flliw ^«. Tel. \Ve>tl T.ff.t 

THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 



■11 ir. H 


axhiniston St.. S. T. IMione F-lllniore ni4S 


,. 


JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DOXNA SOPUANO 

ThorouRh Vocal and Dramatic Tralnlns 

Pine St. Phone DoaKlaa 


G0Z4 


521 


MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

Howard Street Phone Douglas 

San Francisco 


4273 


■ to 


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Idence Sludlo IMO fine St.— Tel. I-ro»pecl 
III (1 AHT HOI.I.S 


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rl. Kearnr r.l.M. Kcn. Pho 



12)1. TnrMday At 



noon, Z74N AHhbr Avrnar. Ilerkeler 



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Pkoae nerk. iW-VI 



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PUBLIC LIBRARV 



^riBr fc^llh^imlSirW^ 



THE ONL>' WEEK 



U5ICAL JOUF^NAL [I 



MUSICAL REVIEW COMPANY 

tl.PRRD METZGER _ Prenldrnt 

C. C. EMERSON Vice Prealdent 

ll\H<l.s I.. SAMIIRI.S Srcrctnry nnd Tr»>iorer 

«»lille NOI Ivobler A Chane niflc. 2tt O'Farrell St., San 
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Slake all cheeks. draftN. money ordera or other forma of 

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PACIFIC COAST SIl^SICAI. REVIEW 

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VOL. XLV SATURDAY, OCT. 20, 1923 NO. 3 



tter at S. P. PoatolHce. 



TWENTY-THIRD YEAR 



MUSIC AND THE MUNICIPALITY 



We know of no municipality in this country 
tluit is taking a.s deep an interest in higli class 
music as the present administration of San 
Francisco. And since the management of musical 
atifairs is in the care of the Auditorium Commit- 
tee of the Board of Supervisors, of which Emmet 
Hayden is the chairman, the Pacific Coast Musi- 
cal Review is justified to take advantage of the 
ini|)ending municipal election to put in a good 
word for Mr. Hayden among the thousands of 
musical people who read this paper every week. 
As has already been stated in these columns time 
and time again, we have nothing to gain through 
politics, and when we occasionally deviate from 
our policy to refrain from interesting ourselves 
in anyone running for oflice it is done with the 
conviction that such deviation is due to the fact 
that musical interests are conserved by our 
attitude. 

No one has worked harder, has proved more 
sincere, has appreciated the rights of the musical 
jHiblic to a greater extent, has realized the nu- 
merical strength of our concert goers better than 
J. Emmet Hayden. He has been instrumental in 
inducing the city to give five popular symphony 
concerts in San Francisco every year. He has 
been the guiding star in engaging five distin- 
guished soloists in connection with these con- 
certs. His judgment has been proved absolutely 
correct, for the concerts are attended by an aver- 
age audience of 10,000 people. The symphony 
concerts are being advertised in splendid fashion, 
Phil Hastings, one of our best publicity agents, 
being in charge, and the public receives a return 
for its money which can not be equalled any- 
where. At the maximum rate of one dollar, the 
music loving people of San Francisco can hear 
the magnificent symphony orchestra under the 
leadership of Alfred Hertz, one of the greatest 
symphony conductors in the world, and with a 
world renowned soloist besides. Surely, every 
one of the thirty thousand diflicrent ueople or 
more who attend these Concerts will not only 
vote for Mr. Hayden, but will induce their friends 
to do so. 

Thanks to Mr.. Hayden, every organist of dis- 
tinction, whether he resides among us or whether 
he is a visitor, has a chance to play on the mu- 
nicipal organ. And, furthermore, resident artists 
of worth are given an opportunity to appear as 
Soloists at these organ recitals and arc receiving 
adequate remuneration. Herein the City of San 
Francisco sets a worthy example to many a 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

music club that has not yet learned how to recog- 
nize the talent residing here. But what is more 
important even than Mr. Hayden's whole-hearted 
recognition and remuneration of resident artists 
and institutions is the fact that he has made the 
.symphony concerts SELF-SUPPORTING. Ol 
course, we realize that the Musical .Association of 
San Francisco makes it possible, through its 
financial sustenance of the orchestra, to establish 
a price which makes the reasonable admission fee 
possible. We also realize that .\lfred Hertz 
makes it possible for the orchestra to be in a 
condition wherein rehearsals for these concerts 
are restricted to a minimum. .And we further- 
more understand that the orchestra and Mr. 
Hertz are the drawing power that is responsible 
for making the concerts pay. Nevertheless, Mr. 
Hayden deserves credit for having had the cour- 
age of his convictions and the foresight to put 
his heart and soul into an enterprise which re- 
flects credit upon San Francisco throughout the 
musical world. 



J. Emmet Hayden furthermore is unlike minv 
. people occupying responsible positions in mat- 
ters of music. He lends a willing ear to sugge - 
tions. He listens to professional musicians as 
well as to laymen. He always thinks of the 
PUBLIC. It does not make any difference to 
him to what nationality an artist belongs, nor 
does he pay any attention to bigotry in musical 
aftairs. He only considers whether an artist is 
efficient, and if he is so and he can get him for 
the people of San Francisco he will do so against 
any unjustified opposition. .And the enthusiasm 
that prevails at these concerts, the joy that shines 
in the countenances of many a man or woman 
who formerly was unable to raise the ])rice for a 
concert ticket, and the response to appeals for 
ticket buying proves more than anything else 
that Mr. Hayden is doing a wonderfiil thing for 
the masses of the people. -Music has never been 
as democratic in San Francisco as it is since I. 
Emmet Hayden has had a chance to show everv- 
body what good music really sounds like. 



.Again we want to be statistical. There reside 
within the city limits nearly two thousand teach- 
ers, twenty thousand students, thirty thousand 
sym])hony lovers and forty thousand opera lov- 
ers—nearly 100,000 people, either directly or in- 
directly interested in music. There should lie 
among these 100,000 people more than fifty thou- 
sand voters. The Pacific Coast -Musical Review- 
considers any one of these fifty thousand voters 
who can vote for J. Emmet Hayden and docs not 
do so disloyal to his art or profession and un- 
mindful of the valuable efifect this endorsement 
of good music by the City of San Francisco has 
upon the musical profession and the music trade. 
The editor of this paper will put with great sat- 
isfaction an emphatic "X" opposite the name of 
J. Emmet Hayden at the municipal election on 
Tuesday, November 6. 



CONCERT BY TWO EXCELLENT ARTISTS 

May Mukle, Cellist, and Lawrence Strauss, Tenor, Give 

Introductory Event of Alice Seckels Series With 

Delightful Artistic Results 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

May Mukle, the distinguished English cellist, and 
Lawrence Strauss, the unusually endowed Califoi-nia 
tenor, gave the first of a series of events arranged by 
Alice Seckels at the Italian Room of the St. Francis 
tlotel on Tuesday evening. October 9, in the presence 
of an unusually representative and intelligently demon- 
strative audience. Miss Mukle's opening number of the 
program consisted of an old Suite by Valentini which 
gave her an opportunity to reveal her exquisite taste 
and her thorough undertsanding of the requirements of 
the old classic school. Her tone is so delightfully pliant 
and so rich and virile that it is a delight to listen to it. 
Then, too. Miss Mukle's intelligent musicianship be- 
comes so apparent that her authoritative style of in- 
terpretation proves a source of deep gratitication to any- 
one comprehending the possibilities of the purity of the 
old school of composition. There was vitality and in- 
tellectuality in Miss Mukle's reading of this Suite. Later 
she gave a group of smaller numbers which displayed 
her remarkable versatility anl her grasp of the refining 
possibilities of graceful instrumental interpretations. 

Lawrence Strauss sang two groups of songs and. as 
will be seen, they provel of a wide range and required 
unusual variety of expressiion which the artist proved 
himself thoroughly capable and equipped to obtain and 
transmit to the consciousness of his hearers. Mr. 
Strauss belongs to what we would call the vocal in- 
tellectuals that is to say to a class of artists who actual- 
ly prove of educational importance, for they invariably 



introduce new styles and new types of composition in a 
manner that establishes authoritative standards of in- 
terpretation. Mr. Strauss invariably creates a serious 
atmosphere w^herein he rivets the attention of his audi- 
ence and, having established a certain element of re- 
ceptivity, he is able to deliver his message with ef- 
fective conviction. We know of no artist who does more 
for the modern school of composition than Mr. Strauss 
and the French composers In particular owe him a deep 
debt of gratitude. 

Ellen Edwards at the piano proved one of the im- 
portant features of the evening. She is a musician par 
excellence, plays with intelligence and appreciat'ion of 
sentiment anl bears herself with the dignity of an 
artist. The complete program was as follows: Suite in 
E (Valentinil (In Firemze 16901. May Mukle; Serenade 
(Gabriel Grovlez). Chant de Resignation (Darius Mi- 
Ihaud), Le Reveil de la Marieel Song to a Bride) 
(Greek Folk Song arranged by Maurice Ravel). Le 
Moulin (The Mill) (Gabriel Pierne). Traum durch die 
Dammerung iDream in the Twilight) (Richard Strauss). 
Zueignung (Devotion) (Richard Strauss) , Lawrence 
Strauss: Allemande (unpublished) (LuUy) Arr. by 
Mukle), Allegro Splritoso (Senaille) (1687-1730) (Arr. 
by Mukle), Chant elegiagne (Florent Schmitt). Melody 
(Frank Bridge). La Tzigane (Massenet). May Mukle; 
The Hare (Arthur Bliss). 1 Heard a Piper Piping (Ar- 
nold Bax), Chanson de Barberine (Eugene Goossens), 
Song (first time) (Antonio de Grassi), Swing Low 
Sweet Chariot (Arr. by H. T. Burleigh). Little David, 
Play on Your Harp (Arr. by H. T. Burleigh). Lord 
Rendal (.Arr. by Cecil Sharp). My Father Has Some 
Very F;ne Sheep (Arr. by Herbert Hughes), Lawrence 
Strauss. This program was repeated at Berkeley in 
Wheeler Hall, Wednesday evening. October 10, at 8:15 
p. ni 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

On Thursday evening. October 11, the Pacific Musical 
Society gave one of its two regular programs at the 
Fairmont Hotel Ballroom in the presence of its usual 
large audience. The participants included two soloists 
and a male quartet. The Colonial Male Quartet sang 
the opening and closing number on the program and 
seems to contain elements that may lead it to future 
triumphs in ensemble singing. .\t present there is not 
apparent sufficient balance of tone, blending of voices, 
uniformity of phrasing or accuracy of pitch to justify 
unreserved praise. But there is the material where 
from much may be expected and we trust that the 
Colonial Male Quartet will continue to sing together 
until the members have attained their ambitious goal. 
Miss Clare Harrington played the accompaniments. 

Lincoln S. Batchelder appeared twice on the program 
and revealed an extraordinary element of growth since 
the last time we heard him. He has gained in poise 
and authority of interpretation. He has certainly de- 
veloped in technical skill and plays serious works in a 
serious and craftsmanlike manner. Mr. Batchelder has 
proved to us that he understands the difficulties present- 
ing themselves to a pianist eager to gain a foothold, for 
he has taken advantage of his opportunities under mas- 
terly guidance to add much to his musical knowledge 
and experience. He is not only an artist, but he is a 
student, and we mean this in the most serious sense 
of the terra. He was enthusiastically applauded by a 
critical audience and surely deserved this homage. 

Miss Rena M. Lazelle sang two groups of songs. 
From the standpoint of interpretation Miss Lazelle 
added to her reputation. She sang her songs in a man- 
ner as if she thoroughly comprehended their purpose 
and depth of meaning. Pathos and humor were duly 
emphasized and she has added to her sense of dramatic 
values. After going through six months of chorus re- 
hearing and through the strenuous period of a grand 
opera season Miss Lazell could not possibly have been 
in a sufficiently relaxed physical condition to reveal 
her voice in its most flexible aspect, and naturally, the 
strain of her experience told on this occasion. It would 
be unjust and unfair to Miss Lazelle to permit her 
hearers to remain under the impression that this was 
her best effort. We heard her before and know that 
vocally she can do much greater things, as was proved 
during the opera season and on various private occa- 
sions. Notwithstanding this handicap, she sang with 
smoothness of vocal quality and gratifying intonation. 
She belongs to our most serious and best equipped 
artists. 

Miss Hazel Nichols played Miss Lazelle's accompani- 
ments in a manner to add to her already envious repu- 
tation as a pianist-accompanist of credible calibre and 
one that proves an aid to the soloist. The complete 
program was as follows: Sailors' Song from The Fly- 
ing Dutchman (Wagner), Hark, Hark, the Lark! (Schu- 
bert). Colonial Male Quartet. Clare Harrington at the 
idano; Etudes Symphoniques (Schumann), Lincoln S. ' 
Batchelder; Widmung (Schumann). Die Forelle (Schu- 
bert), Le Baiser (Thomas). Les Petits Canards (Chah- 
rier), La Pandareta (.A.lvarez), Rene M. Lazelle, Hazel 
Nichols at the piano; Sonnetto 123 del Petrarca (Liszt). 
Novelle (Medtner). Etude de Concert (Schlozer). (Two 
and Three, First Time in San Francisco), Lincoln 
Batchelder; Sheep in Clusters (Revolutionary Period), 
Bacarolle (Winter Watts), A Little Maiden (Clough 
Leighter). A Friend (Lillian Hodghead). Psalm 114 
(Ernest Bloch), Rene M. Lazelle, Hazel Nichols at the 
piano; A Song of Araby (Protheroe), Chorale of 
Swords from Faust (Gounod), Colonial Male Quartet, 
Clare Harrington at the piano. A. M. 



Josef Lhevinno, the great Russian p'anist, is scheduled 
for two recitals in San Francisco the coming season. He 
will play a program at the St. Francis ballroom on Mon- 
day afternoon. November 19th, as a number in the 
"Alice Seckels Matinee Musicales," and will give a re- 
cital at the Columbia Theatre on Sunday afternoon, Nov. 
'25th, under Selby C. Oppenheimer's management. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SCHOOL GO SLOW 



BY ANIL DEER 




A hriKlit autumn liay, a new concrete 
cnunlry road, ytmr motor with four good 
tires (and a Bparel plenty of oil and a 
tank full of Kaa: the intoxicating ex- 
hilaration of the fresh cool air and the 
novel s'ghts lo be seen by an observing 
eye while rolling along the varlhued 
foliage of slirnb and tree and the placid 
contentment of the browsing cattle, all 
enjoying that tranquil quietude peculiar 
to the season of the year: insensibly 
lessening the pressure of foot on gas. in order to obtain 
full enjoyment of it all, one scarcely needs the warning 
sgn. •'School Go Slow." 

Arart from its designated use a truly Invaluable sign. 
It the rosy ihi'ekcd youngsters, for whose rrotedlon t 
was erected, also observe and In consequence thereof 
their youthful minds are psycholoBlcally benelltted A 
prize motto tn hang in every vocal practice room, too 
often the favored motto would appear to be. "hurry, 
hurry." True, art is long and life Is short, for that very 
reason one cannot afford to lose any precious time by 
wasteful hurry. The slow, plodding, painstaking pace is 
the one which arrives at the desired goal. When exceed- 
ing the speed limit too many Instructing sgns posts are 
lost s'ght of. their Information consequently disregarded 
at vital turns in the road. 

Vocal students who desire lo study ar as when lack- 
ing in fundamental irintlplcs of voire production, those 
who wish to s ng in many foreign lanwu ipes (none of 
which they understand! before they hive learned cor- 
rect diction in their mother tongue, and those who try 
lo interpret previous to learn ng time and rhythm, all 
these are rushing headon into disaster, a wreck is In- 
evitable. 

As in life, not all pupils need the same lessons, some 
are adept in certain ways a«d lacking in others, no two 
precisely the same. One may require months to cover 
ground that another skims over as liglitly as a bird, 
but — the second will encounter difllculties where none 
exist for the flrst. One point though is certain, until 
one's individual faults are conquered, there is noth ng 
gained by hurrying past and endeavoring to ignore; 
like a punctured tire they insist on being repaired. No 
pleasure or time record possible riding "on the rim." 
Experience teaches that if deficiencies are not con- 
quered in one manner they must be in another, there 
Is no progress until each step has been firmly set. In 
analyzing life's lessons we find, that the particular one 
needed individually, has been drilled and presented In 
numerous, even countless ways by the Orcat Teacher 
and will continue to be. though doubtless diversified. 
until learned and accepted. The vocal pupil will ex- 
perience the same In the charge of a competent in- 
structor. 

On the road of life there is a continuous school with 
perpetual lessons^so In art — there are always un- 
expected obstructions Just around the corner and con- 
stantly changing vistas; to assure your safe progress 
and that of the little tots watching your course so as to 
cross the road with no fear of harm, take your foot off 
the accelerator and heed the mandate, "School. Go 
Slow." 



STARK'S SUCCESS IN IVIOTION PICTURE MUSIC 

The many frienrls and admirers of Ferdinand Stark. 
than whom there is no more able exponent of the lighter 
form of musical composition anywhere, will be happy to 
know that he ha.s made a brilliant del)ut in ttie motien 
picture field. He is directing an excellent orchestra 
for tlie Hunchback of .Notre Dame feature picture at the 
Capitol Theatre. Although new to this phase of musical 
endeavor Mr. Stark Immediately grasped the possi- 
bilities of a musical setting such as that arranged for 
the Hunchback and directs it with the precision as to 
the varying action and the emphasis of specially dra- 
matic or romantic episodes that have earned him the 
admiration of those expert in this business. With his 
well known genius for phrasing and accentuating Mr. 
Stark conducts the orchestra through a long and varied 
period of excellent music and succeeds in adding zest 
to the pictorial display through the medium of his fine 
and appropriate musical selections. The motion picture 
field needs music'ans like Stark, because eventually 
the moving picture theatre will become one of. the 
educatonal ci^nters of musical expression In San Kran- 
cinco as It has alreadyf become elsewiiere. and con- 
ductors like Stark will dignify and add prestige to the 
motion picture theatre, while at the sanii- time pleasing 
the masses with their skill. 



FRENCH PROGRAM AT FORTNIGHTLYS 

The ihini cimrert of the Fortnlghtiys will be a French 
program Inifrpri'ted by Adeline Maude Wellendorf. 
piano, and Marguerite Rans Wuldrop. soprano. .\n at- 
tractive list of compositions has been arranged wliicli 
should form an interesting c-ontraci to the American 
and Knglish programs which have opened the season. 
In addition tn thest- modern French w(»rks will be feat- 





CHARLES 


HART 






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ured compositions by Uda Waldrop. This is in line with 
the plan to give at least one resident composer a hear- 
InK at each concert. So far the works of Domenico 
Etrcscia and Albert BIkiis have been given with such 
success as to prove emphatically that San Francisco has 
reason to be proud of its creative talent. Aside from 
being featured as a composer. Mr. Waldrop will act as 
accompiinist. This concert is of spec.'al interest as the 
entire program Is in the hands of resident artists. 



BRITT WITH CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY 

Horace Ur'tt. the distinguished Belgian violoncellist, 
will appear as assisting artist with the Chamber Music 
Society of San Francisco at their opening concert, at 
Scottish Rite Hall. Tuesday evening, October 30th. Mr. 
Britt will be remembered as the extremely popular vio- 
loncellist of the Chamber Music Society and the solo 
cell St of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for 
five years, during which time he endeared himself to 
the entire musical public of San Francisco. This will 
be Mr. Brltt's first appearance in San Francisco since 
he left here three years ago to join the L(?tz Quartet in 
New York. lie will be heard with the Chamber Music 
Soc'ety In the beautiful Schubert C major quintet and 
also, by general request, in the stupendous Schoenberg 
sextette, which created a sensation when flrst heard 
t.vo vears ago at (me of the concerts of the Chamber 
Music Society. 

The ojen'ng of the Chamber Music series is one of 
the most important musical events of San Francisco 
and the series of concerts given by this organization 
have attracted ^national and internafonat attention to 
San Francisco's high position in the artistic world The 
other aas'stlng artists in the series will be Ethel Legin- 
ska, the famous English pianist, who w!ll appear with 
the Society in a new and inspired Slavic quintet by 
Nandor Zsoldt and Krno Dohnanyi, the (snious Hungar- 
ian composer-pianist, who will create his new E flat 
plane quintet, which will be heard for the first time In 
this city. The latter two artists will appear at subse- 
quent concerts in the series 

The sale of single seats will be open to the public at 
Sherman. Clay & Company on Monday. October 22nd. 
An unusually large sale of season tickets having been 
reserved, it is advisable to secure early reservations. 
The C hamber Mus'c Society is ofTering to bonafide pub- 
lic high school students a reduced rate on season tickets 
in order to allow the younger musical public the edu- 
cationU advantage of hearine; these concerts at an ex- 
tremely reasonable figure. The value of the series of 
concerts by the Chamber Music Soc'ety to San FYan- 
clsco. from an artistic, educational and publicity stand- 
ro'nt. cannot be overestimated. It is a pleasure to 
know that full houses are practically assured. 



Queena Mario — The fourth annual revival of the ever- 
popular Alice Seckels Matinee Mus^cales series at the 
St. Franc's Hotel will begin Monday afternoon when 
every seat in the ballroom of the St. Francis will be 
filled by the hundreds of admirers of the charming lyric- 
coloratura soprano. Queena Mario, who is scheduled to 
give the first recital of that unique series this season. 
As a recitalist Mario displays all of that superior in- 
telTgence and fine musicianship that comes with ex- 
tensive musical education, combining this fine musical 
insight with her glorious vocal achievements her pro- 
grams are an unusual delight to her audiences. 



Harold Stanton is now one of the features of the War- 
field, luxurious Market Street photo-play theatre. Mr. 
Stmton is considered one of the best of the younger 
tenors and his following in San Francsco is a large one. 
Lipscbultz and the WarfieUl Music Masters remain a 
mua'cal fixture with the tlieatre and another musical 
treit Is the addition of Fanchon and Marco "Ideas" 
which has Helene Hughes as prima donna The motion 
picture attraction for the week starting on Saturday 
wlli be Anna Q N'lsson and James Kirkwood in a visual- 
ization of the Cynthia Stockley romance of South 
Africa. "Ponjola " 



Tito Sch'pa, the celebrated tenor of the Chicago Opera 
Company, has just started on his second extensive tour 
of Amer (a. which will bring him to San Francisco for 
the first time on Sunday afternoon. November 4th. when 
he will Inaugurate Manager Selby C. Oppenhe!mer"s 
series of Sunday afternoon concerts at the Columbia 
Theatre. 

While Schira's triumphs abroad In concert have more 
thin equaled h s operatic successes his American debut 
with the Chicago Company brought such continuous de- 
mands for appearances In opera as to make possible 
the acceptance of only a I'mited number of concert en- 
gagements during his flrst two seasons in this country. 
However, the sweeping brilliance and outstanding 
success of these recitals has culminated In an arrange- 
ment through which more of his time henceforth will 
be devoted to the concert field. 

Manager Oppenhelmer has booked Tito Schlpa for 
two recitals at the Columbia on the Sunday afternoons 
of November 4th and llth. He promises music lovers 
a treat that will more than fulfill their fondest hopes 
of hearing the foremost lyric tenor of (he dav. 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LcRoy V. Brant. Oil 



r» of Mu.lr •( 

<'.\i.ikor:«ia 



MRS. MILES A. DRESSKELL 



(■«••< (IM- (>|M-niiiK tif li«- 

469 Morse Street 



Avnilolilr for (i 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 



rxdn 



nd I'riilii 

4'iiMf< 



r,-\\ 






^^^TRK i>ami<: coi.legk of mitsic 

San .loHe. Cat. 
ConriTM DeKreri*. .\ivnrdH r«-rlin«-ntrM. Cnniplrle CollFSe 
ConNt-rvnturr nnd Afndenilc <'ourMPN In IMann. Violin. 
Mnrp, ■Ct-Ilo, Volrr, IlnrnKinT, C'ounlri |ii>inl, < uiion ond 
FuKU« nnd .*irlencc of .^iuNlc. Kor purtloulora -Apply lo 



rior. 



JOSE MllSIC COMPANY 



MnndollnN — Studio 



.Moderate lln 



r. Cnllfornla 



WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

ALFRCoHeKTZ Conductor 

FIRST SUNDAY SYMPHONY 

TOMORROW, 2:45P.M. 

CURRAN THEATRE 



EKOKA SI MriillNV 
KAI'Sonii-: KSI'AfiNO 
KCI.OGl (: 



Next Sunday, October 28 
First "Pop" Concert 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

hki>m;sii\\ i-;\i:\im;. ot t. :ii 

CLAIRE 

DUX 



TIIK F\M<H 
■texcrvrd 



* SOI'llANt). (it KST ARTIJ 
1-atM — •yi. T.'V*-. ZMf and a5c 
(No Wnr Tni) 



n. Clay & Co.' 

Make Checks Payable lo 

Superviiior J. Emmet Hayden 

Iroctinn Auditorium Committee 

Board of Supervisors 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

PRIVATE AND CLASS LESSONS 
LECTURES ON MUSIC APPRECIATION 

San Prancisco, 807 Kohler & Chase BIdg. Tel. 
Kearny 5454. Wednesday from 2-6 p. m. only. 
Berkeley. 20 Brookside (off Claremont Ave.) TeL 
Berkeley 4091. Mornings at Anna Head School. 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



Best Music 
in Town at 
A 1 1 Times 



HAROLD 



STANTON 



KAM'lllIN .V MIIHII ••llli:\S" \M> 

"PONJOLA" 

llttlM < »>llll\ S|IMKI,H»-S MUKI. 

LIPSCHULTZ 

AMI HI!! UAIIKII:l.ll 1IISII tllNTKHM 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''SoulfuV 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 




Concertized h\\ thelDor 

''FALLEN 
LEAF" 

INDIAN LOVE SOUQ BY 
FREDERIC KHiquT LOQAU 

HIGH ME.DIUM 1.0VV 




ds Leadinq Artists -Are 

""E'EN AS «, 
THE FLOWER 

BY 
FREDERIC KNIQHT LOQAN 

MIGM MEOlUn LOW 



Theij In "IJour Repe rtoire? 



''WHEN I'M 
WITH YOU 

BY 
CARSON J.ROBINSON 

HIGH MEDIUM UOW 




FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, Inc., 235 South WabasK Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. 



LEADING CONCERT 
ATTRACTIONS 



MARY GARDEN 

FiiiiKMiH Soiimno — Auditorium 
TOMOHHIIW (Suiiiluy I AFT., 

TITO SCHIPA 



EFREM ZIMBALIST 

(;reat HuKNlnn ViuliniHt 

KirHt Kei'itnl Here in Four ) earN 

Columlila Theatre 

SIMJAV AFT., NOV. ISih 

JOSEF LHEVINNE 



SIM>A\ AFT. 



ARTHUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist 

PAUL KOCHANSKI, Violinist 

ANNA CASE. Soprano 

TirketN on xnle at Sherman. Clay & Co. 



Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco 

SAN FRANCISCO SERIES 

SIX CONCERTS 

Assisting Artists: 

Horace Britt, Violoncellist 

Ethel Leginska, Pianist 

Erno Dohnanyi, Pianist-Composer 

SCOTTISH RITE HALL 

TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 30 

TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 20 
TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 8 

TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 29 
TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 19 
TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 25 



SEASOX SEAT SALE— SIX CONCERTS 

»1I>.00. ¥7.IH). Itl.OII 
Silerlal RnteM to Hif;h School StudentN 
eat» on Sail- al Slirmiiin. Clay & Conipan 



GiGLI, DiDUR, 
DE LUCA«"rf SAROYA 



HIGHLY COMPLIMENT 



Frank Carroll Giffen 



TEACHER OF SINGING 



BENIAMINO GIGLI— Mr. Giffen, you are a master Teacher of 
Singing, and when I say this I want you to believe that I am very 
much in earnest. 

ADAMO DIDUR^I see in your teaching the hand of a master, 
and I want you to feel assured that I am sincere when I wish you 
continued success. 

GIUSEPPE DE LUCA— The work you are doing is what we 
call the old Italian School. So many people despair at the appar- 
ent disappearance of the Art of Bel Canto that we were delighted 
to find in you a living refutation of this conception. 

BIANCA SAROYA — Your tone placing is the result of truly 
great teaching and it will afford me great pleasure to recommend 
you to any vocal students who may seek my advice regarding 
studying in San Francisco. 



STUDIO: 976 CHESTNUT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
TELEPHONE PROSPECT 3320 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 



lAXO — ACCOMPA.MST 
Tel. FranI 



ROSE FLORENCE 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

Studio: 545 Sutter St. Telephone Kearny 3598 

Direction Miss Alice Seckels 

68 Post St., San Francisco, California 



STENGER VIOLINS 



MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

VOCAI> TFACHFR 

dluK rolen with CaruNu and retra7./,ii 

•al and Dramatic Training — 4U4 Coiutu 

Telephone Garfield :i27tt 



Miss !ngeborg LacoUr-Torrup, head of the dancing de- 
partment at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, 
gave a lecture on expressionism in the dance at the 
University of California, Tuesday evening, October 16. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 



No. 10778 met No. 10623 ii. 
VoLohuma in September, 
IV^S, (emcl dale unknown). 
Il rame about ibis way. One morn- 
in( early in ibe montb, one Leon 
Lant of San Francisco round in bis 
morninii mail tbie telegram: "Ship 
first (teanier No. 10778 ziiiclined 
bo» Codowsky Yokobaina." A 
terse and prosaic telegram, yet ro- 
mance ban Blrange beKinning>. 
Twenty-four hours later No- 10778 





was below decks and westward 
bound. At the same tim* No. 
10623 was under way from the west 
coast of South America. Their 
meeting was undemonstrative — - 
although ibey were both from ihe 
same town, had been brought up 
together — tended by the same 
bands, and sent into the world 
with ihe same mission. But at 
Vukohuma the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones lell il. 

Sak Fbancisco, Califokma, May 22, 1923. 
fused to accept il. From the devastating Arctic cold 
of the Manchurian steppes to the blistering heal of 
Ibe Javanese jungles, these two Knalies have been for 
nearly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
ncluding months in the sticky, saturat- 
ig moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
anoforle. From Hawaii to the Philippines, through 
all Ihe cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Straits 
Settlements, and many of the less frequented by-ways 
of the Orient— 1 do nol believe that the history of 
irds the ei|ual of ibis unique tour, or the 
- -ccordcd this great artist in these music- 
hungry corners of the globe, or the equivalent of the 
two pianos that supported him- Davs of travel over 
the roads of Java, the man-handling of countless 
coolies, the punisbment of oriental transportation in 
boats, in trains, in queer conveyances of all kinds— 
and months of il. At times it was heart.breaking. 
Both instruments carry many scars of battle, hut 

'" ■'"> 'I'ey have remained steadfast. Outside some 

rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich,' as 
perfect as the first day Mr. Godowsky 
touched their keys. To me the power of 
resistance of the Knabe piano is almost 
supernatural. 1 have travelled with many 
arlists in all parts of the world; in Eu- 
rope I was familiar with the German 
pianos ihat are built like stodgy battle- 
-bips, but no piano in even ordinary 
ciinlinenlal tours has equalled this per- 
formance. If 1 bad made these two 
Knabes 1 should feel very proud. Inri. 
dentally I am nol in any way connected 
with Ibe ^m. Knabe Company— nor do I 
even know them except through the in- 
ternational reputation of their instru- 
ment. Francis E. Jo.ne.s 

London and Buenos Aires. 



Leopold Godowsky 

.ilh rare consideration, concede, to his piano lun. 
prnil.-g,- of telling his own storv- 

i;..ilin,.k\ has paid bis tribute to the Knabe time and ai 
but u» he bim^rir said in an interview: 

thing more interesting to say about those two pianos than I or 
an. other artist has ever said- Let him tell il. He deserves il. 
I found him in Buenos Aires and carried him away to the 
Orient because of his unusual qualities." So, thanks to the 
iiiiusual consideration of the great artist, we are able to offer 
Ihe most remarkable piano story ever told. 



Incidentally, both of these instruments are stock pianos 

(nol specially made), one front the ,\ew York uvrerooms 

from the Kohler if Chose store in San Francisco 



KOHLERCT*CHASE< 

26 O'FARRELL STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



KNABE 



® 



AMHCO 



MME. ROSE FLORENCE IN COSTUME RECITAL 

Among the many and varied events given in San 
Irancisco during the course of a music season by resi- 
dent artists of distinction none are more refined or cul- 
tured than the only too rare events ia which Mme- Rose 
Florence participates. Once a year .Mme, Florence gives 
a concert of her own and with that instinctive judgment 
which only born artists exhibit she introduces some 
element of novelty which appeals strongly to her de- 
lighted audiences. At the same time Mme. Florence 
pays her respect to the old classics and renders them 
with a fidelity to their type or period of creation which 
reveals the concentrated study of the serious exponent 
of vocal art. 

She opened tlie program with an aria from Handel's 
Cleopatra which enabled the artist to show her depth 
of emotional expression and her splendidly developed 
art of sustained singing, Verhorgenheit (Wolf) and 
Caecilla (Strauss) showed Mme. Florence in her more 
dramatic moments, giving her a chance to prove her 
virilty. notwithstanding the fact that her voice belongs 
more to the lyric than the dramatic type. Le Temps 
de Lilas (Chausson) and Dansons la gigue (Poldowski) 
introduced Mme, Florence as an interpreter of the 
modern French school, the daintiness and grace of 
which were tiuly effectively shown by this excellent 
vocal artist. 

The American composers were not forgotten by Mme, 
Florence, She sang In the Yellow Dusk (Edward Hers- 
mam, Pierette and 1 (Emerson Whithoine), Winter 
(Mary Carr Moore I and Song of the Open (Frank La 
Forge), Although these compositions were of a wide 
range of sentiment, requiring unusual versatility of 
expression to create the correct atmosphere for their 
appreciation on the part of the audience, Mme, Florence 
succeeded in bringing out their distinctive characteris- 
tics. Special interest was shown by the enthusiastic 
audience in .Miss Mary Carr Moore's song, the work of 
a composer of much ingenuity and taste who Is residing 
among us. 

The concluding numbers on the program consisted of 
two groups of picturesque songs of Russia and Spain, 
which were sung in costume and aroused special en- 
thusiasm among the audience. In combining the most 
refined element of vocal expression with a natural per- 
sonal charm and an easy delivery Mine, Florence rep- 
resents the most artistic phase of California's concert 
artists, and a recital, like the one given at the St, 
Francis Hotel on Tuesday evening, October 16th. is 
worthy to be heard by any music club that pretends to 
lay claim to encouraging worthy efforts', Mme, Florence's 
artistic achievements are not conHned to California. She 
scored successes in Europe, is singing every year in 
New York and other Eastern centers and occasionally 
goes to the Northwest and to Southern California for 
concert tours. She is worthy of the heartiest recog- 
nition. The event took place under the management 
of Alice Seckels, 

Benj. S. Moore played the accompaniments with that 
easy style of applying his work to the taste of the solo- 
ist that represents such an important factor in genuine 
accompanying, Il is the ability to refrain from imposing 
h-'s own ideas upon the soloist and fit himself to the 
individuality of the artist that represents an accom- 
panist's greatest asset, and Mr, Moore possesses this 
artistic knack in a highly developed degree. A, M, 



MOISEIVITSCH TO PLAY NOVEMBER NINTH 

It was stated in Australia at the time Benno .Moisei- 
vitsch made his debut in that country, that this Russian 
was the first pianist who had ever arrived unknown and 
instantly became famous. The others who had from 
time to time played on the South Sea continent were 
artists whose reputations through Europe and -America 
had been established for several years and whose names 
for this reaso'n were familiar to the large Australian 
public. With Moiseivitsch it was a remarkable instance 
of greatness recognized at its worth upon the occasion 
of a first appearance, 

Moiseivitsch returns to this country this season after 
another successful Australian season and will again 
tour America from coast to coast. One of the principal 
recitals to be given by Moiseivitsch will be in San Fran- 
cisco Friday afternoon. November 9th, at the Curran 
Theatre as the second attraction of the Elwyn Artist 
Series, The Elwyn Concert Bureau further announces 
on its Series following Moiseivitsch: The Impressario, 
Friday Matinee, -Nov, 23rd: Quartet of Victor Art'sts, 
Friday Matinee. Dec, 7th; Olive Kline, Elsie Baker. 
Lambert Murphy. Royal Dadmun — Jascha Heifetz. Fri- 
day Matinee, January 1 8th: CosI Fan Tutte. Friday 
Matinee, February 1st; Moriz Rosenthal, Friday Mati- 
nee, Feb. 15th; Maria Ivogun. Friday Matinee, Feb. 
29th; Mario Chamlee. FViday Matinee. Mar, Mth; Rein- 
aid Werrenrath. Friday -Matinee. .Mar. 28th 

Of interest to patrons will be the information that the 
Elwyn Concert Bureau has decided to continue the 
season ticket sale for the entire Elwyn Series at a con- 
siderable reduction for the nine remaining concerts. 



Mary Garden, radiant prima-donna soprano whose popu- 
larity is world-wide, will sing for San Franciscans at 
the Auditorium tomorrow. Sunday, The great event will 
be the star's only concert appearance in Northern Cali- 
fornia this season and will mark the first time she has 
appeared In San Francisco as a recltalist in a decade. 
Tomorrow's program will be rich in musical value 
In addition to .Miss Garden's own numbers there will 
be cello selections by Gutia Caslnl, the famous Russian 
player who has been lauded by the most eminent critics 
as a confrere of Casals and Gerardy, and a piano selec- 
tion hy Georges Lauweryns, Chef d'Orchestra of the 
Theatre dc la Monnaie at Brussels and the .Monte Carlo 
opera. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



California's Romantic Musical History 

A Carefully Compiled Record, From the Most Reliable and Au- 
thoritative Sources Regarding the Musical Activities of California 
From 1849 to the Present Day — A Faithful Enumeration of Musical 
Progress From the Days of the Pioneers to the Culmination of 

Ambitious Aspirations. 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



SAN FRANCISCO BEFORE ITS FIRST CONCERT 



Chapter 1 

To actually realize the atmosphere that prevailed in San Francisco at 
the time of the first bona fide concert it is necessary to obtain an accurate 
idea of San Francisco during the period immediately before and during the 
"Days of Forty-nine." Abuut the middle of bS48 the population of the 
entire State of California was only about 14,000 white people and from 
three to five thousand Indians. Even as early as that San Francisco wa^^ 
the most thriving town in the State and its greatness as a future commer- 
cial metropolis was frequently forecast. The first newspaper published in 
San Francisco was printed on January 9. 1847 and named The California 
Star. On May 22. 1847. The Californian was transferred from Monterey. 
where it had been published since 1846. and combined with The California 
Star. On January 4. 1849, the Alta California was estal^lished and continued 
to enjoy much influence and prosperity for many years. 

In 1846 San Francisco had from 20 to 50 buildings, mostly shanties, 
and a population of from 100 to 200. During 1847 the population grew to 
500, and we find in The California Star that this "jiopulation consisted of 
Mormons, backwoodsmen and a few very respectable traders from the 
United States. Very rare it was to see a native." During the course of the 
year 1847 the population grew to 800, including 177 women. The town 
consisted principally of sand hills, and among the resolutions recorded in 
the daily papers was one "Resolved to grade California Street to the Bay 
at a cost of $150." Another resolution decided to fill up the Lagoon at 
Jackson and Montgomer}- Streets. 

The first San Francisco public school was estal>Iished during April 
and May of 1848. The town had then grown to 51 blocks. What is now 
Batter}' Street was then submerged in the Bay, and Montgomery .Street 
was the first complete street nearest the water front. Powell Street was 
the last street toward the West. San Francisco consisted of a square be- 
tween what is now Montgomery Street and Powell and between Bush and 
\'allejo. Its geographical location was its principal claim to beauty. 

During February. 1849, the first sailing vessel arrived in San Fran- 
cisco, its name being The California, and by the middle of November 600 
vessels had arrived in the bay. The gold fever which raged throughout 
the year 1849 brought 40.000 people to the bay. the greater proportion of 
which had to stop in San Francisco and others decided to locate. From 
a population of 2000 in February, 1849, San Francisco increased to 6000 
in August, until it reached 36.000 in 1850. On December 24, 1849. the first 
of a scries of great fires broke out and continued periodically for several 
years. 

At that time the buildings consisted mainly of adobe cottages, shanties, 
a few frame dwellings and a mass of canvas and rubber habitations. The 
latter gave that portion of town the appearance of a camp on sandhills — a 
City of Tents. Kearnj- Street was the retail center, shops being lined from 
Pine Street to Broadway. Portsmouth Square was the amusement center, 
the principal amusement being gambling; such resorts were plentiful 
around this square, and laughter, noise and music burst forth at all hours 
of the day and night. Lots on Kearny Street and the Plaza sold for $40,000. 
During the previous year lots could be had from $15 to $1600. On Market 
and Montgomery Streets lots could be had for S500. 

High prices prevailed everywhere. Coin and gold being plentiful, 
circulation of money was naturally great. Fifty cents was the smallest 
coin paid for any service or article. Circus tickets were S3 and boxes $55. 
Board averaged $8 a day or $30 a week. Meals ranged from $2 to $5. 
Bread was 50 cents a loaf. Boots cost from $40 to $100 a pair. Labor was 
$1.00 an hour. Cleaning articles of apparel cost from $12 to S20 a dozen. 
Carpenters went on strike because they received only $12 a day and 
insisted on being paid $16 a day. Rent of stores was $3000 a month, payable 
in advance. The Parker House, one of the big hotels of the town, paid an 
annual rental of $120,000. and notwithstanding these enormous prices large 
fortunes were made during this period. 

This will give our readers an idea of what conditions awaited the first 

concert ever given in San Francisco. In this mining town dedicated to 

gambling, where crime was prevalent, necessitating the organization of the 

famous Vigilant Committee, where women were in the minority, where the 

search for wealth was the guiding object of everyone, announcement was 

made of a piano recital. t- , - i 

^ ( lo be continued) 



NOVELTIES AT SEASON'S SYM- 
PHONY CONCERTS 

iL'ontinued from I*a&e li 

ing. is practically unknown in this 
country. 

"Of course I have not forgotten the 
American composer and shall give the 
first performance in America of Howard 
Hanson's First Symphony. Mr. Hanson 
was Dean of the College of the Pacific in 
San Jose and is a Prix de Rome winner. 
He is an unusually clever musician and 
is making quite a success. Then I have 
a Symphonic poem by P. Gallico entitled 
Euphorion, and Fred Jacobi's First Sym- 
phony will he given for the first time 
anywhere. Mr. Jacobi is a San Francisco 
composer whose works have been played 
on former symphony programs and who 
is rapidly forging ahead among the suc- 
cessful young American composers. 

"I should like to take advantage of this 
opportunity to say how pleased I am 
with the rehearsals so far. The person- 
nelle of the orchestra is even better than 
it has been and the continued playing to- 
gether naturally adds to the beauty of 
the ensemble from year to year. I am 
looking forward to a very successful 



MATZENAUER AND WHITEHILL 
OPEN SEASON 

(Continued from Page ll 
records to a palpitating posterity and 
which record-breaking preservation may 
be responsible for some of the applause 
their introduction receives. But from an 
artistic standpoint we feel inclined to 
bemourn the commercial spirit that in- 
spires the introduction of these cheap 
melodies. We do not mean to say that 
all of Mnie. Matzenauer's encores be- 
longed to that category, but too many 
for serious artistic purposes. 

The audience was simply overwhelm- 
ing in its cordiality and demanded encore 
upon encore, Mme. Matzeneur singing at 
least tweh'e or more. But no one can tell 
us that this same audience would not 
have enjoyed a few Schumann, Schubert. 
FYanz. Wolf and some of the modern 
French songs or old Bergerettes just as 
well. Mme. Matzenauer is an artist of 
the first rank. She comes to us as a 
representative of all that is highest in 
vocal art. She can not possibly think in 
her own heart that most of the encores 
she sang were worthy of her interpreta- 
tion. And since we want to hear Mme. 
Matzenauer at her best as an artist, and 
not as a salesman for her talking ma- 
chine records, she ought to give us the 
best in her. There are plenty of second 
rate artists who need these cheap songs 
to gain popularity, but an artist like 
Mme. Matzenauer never makes a mis- 
take to maintain her dignity and her 
poise before the musical public. That is 
natural for her and that is the only at- 
titude she should preserve toward her 
audiences. 



Dorothy Dunyon, violinist. Cedric W^right, 
violinist, and Margaret Coif, accompan- 
ist, will give the Half Hour of Music at 
the Greek Theatre in Berkeley tomor- 
row (Sunday! afternoon. October 21st. 
The program will be as follows : Con- 
certo in E minor (Nardini). Kol Nidrei 
(Bruch), Autumn Leaves (Stauss). Call 
of the Plains (Goldmark); Navarra for 
two violins (Sarasate). 



Mme. Charles Poulter sang for the Order 
of the Amaranth early this month a new 
song entitled There's a Song in My 
Heart by Bernard Hamblen. The com- 
posit"!on was well received and for en- 
core Mme. Poulter sang You'd Better 
Ask Me by Lohr, This well known vocal 
artist also sang for the Danish Relief 
Concert, accompanied by her pupil, 
Alfred Poulter, (a) Polonaise from Mig- 
non (Thomas), (b)( The Piper of Love 
(Molly Carew) and for an encore The 
Cuckoo Clock (Schaflfer). Alfred Poulter 
played two piano solos — Prelude Op. 3 
No. 2 (Rachmaninofif) and The Rosary 
(Xevin). 

Marie Hughes Macquarrie will resume 
her concert work, after playing an en- 
gagement of five months with George 
Lipschultz at the Warfield Theatre, with 
the following engagements booked for 
next month: November 1st, soloist San 
Francisco Musical Club; November 4th, 
soloist Oakland Auditorium with Dave 
Rosebrook's Municipal Band : later in 
November withm the McNeil Club of Sac- 
ramento. Mrs. Macquarrie, with Stella 



Hymson. soprano, will also play a solo 
engagement at the new Fox Theatre in 
Oakland in the near future. 

R. C. Durant of Oakland, president of the 
Durant Motor Co. of California, has do- 
nated a sufficient sum of money to en- 
dow fifteen Sunday Afternoon Band Con- 
certs at the Oakland Auditorium under 
the direction of D. C. Rosebrook. These 
events will be entirely free to the public 
and will begin on Sunday afternoon, No- 
vember 4th and continue every Sunday 
thereafter until about the middle or end 
of March. Concerts will be given every 
Sunday except when the Auditorium or 
Theatre are reserved, when the concert 
will take place the following Sunday 
until the fifteen concerts have been 
given. Mr. Rosebrook. who is one of the 
foremost band leaders in the Pacific 
West, has arranged popular programs of 
good music, including Overtures. Waltzes. 
Light and Grand operatic selections. 
Suites and there will be two solos on 
each program. Mr. Durant. who is not 
only a great business man but a splen- 
did lover of music, purchased from Fritz 
Kreisler that master's Guamorius violin 
for $25,000. He is a very accomplished 
cometist and violinist. 

The Arrrtlaga Musical College gave a 
students recital on Friday evening, 
October 5th. the participants of which 
were Miss Tiny Rose, William Lavy and 
Edwin Simon, pianists, pupils of V. de 
Arrillaga. They were assisted by Jean 
Pauhle. vocalist, pupil of Mrs. Isaura Q. 
de Arrillaga. The young musicians ac- 
quitted themselves most creditably and 
were heartily applauded by a large and 
delighted audience. The program was as 
follows: Dance of the Gnomes ( Whelp- 
ley t, William Lavy, first piano. Edwin 
Simon, second piano; Album Leaf, 
Notturno (Grieg), Edwin Simon; Lere 
Arabesque (Debussy), Lotus Land (Cyril 
Scott), William Lavy; Romance (Si- 
belius), Kamraenoi Ostrow (Rubinstein), 
Tiny Rose ; Contredans, In Bahilone 
(Josef Hofmann), Edwin Simon; Rustle 
of Spring ( Binding) . Prelude C sharp 
minor ( Rachmaninoff ) , William Lavy ; 
Vocal Solo — Ideal (Totsi), Jean Pauhle; 
Serenade to the Doll. Golliwog's Cake 
Walk (Debussey), Edwin Simon; Alt 
Wein iGodowsky), Rigaudon (Mac- 
Dowell), William Lavy; Valse Im- 
promptu (Bachmann). Edwin Simon, 
first piano, William Lavy, second piano. 

The Manning School of Music gave a 
pupils' recital on Friday evening, Sep- 
tember 21st when the following program 
was presented in a manner reflecting 
credit on both students and teachers: 
Fantasie C minor (Bach). Paula Ritter; 
Sonate Op. 31, No. 3 (Beethoven), 
Dolores Leonard ; Evening, Fabel, Soar- 
ing (Schumann), Carol Johnson; Two 
Larks (Leschetizky). Dreams of Love 
(Liszt), Norma Mc Williams- Fleming; 
Theme and Variations (two pianos) (von 
Wilm), Mrs.* Woodruff and Mr. Manning. 

The Jenkins School of Music of Oakland, 
gave a faculty concert on Friday evening. 
September 14th before an enthusiastic 
audience of over three hundred music 
lovers at the Oakland Club House. Miss 
Nesbit, pianist. Samuel Savannah, vio- 
linist and Louis Newbauer. flutist, were 
the soloists of the evening- Each one 
played in a very finished and masterly 
way and all were forced to respond to 
several encores. The program was charm- 
ing in its arrangement being very well 
balanced with trios and quartet as may 
be seen from the following: Sonata for 
Flute and Piano (Handel ). Mr. Louis 
Newbauer and Miss Leone Nesbit; Piano 
Soli — (a) Rhapsodic, C major (Doh- 
nanyi ) , ( b ) Nocturne, F sharp major 
(Chopin), (c) Scherzo. B flat minor (Cho- 
pin), Miss Nesbit; Violin Soli — (a) 
Suite, G minor (Franz Ries), (b) Sla- 
vonic Dance, E minor (Dvorak-Kreisler), 
Mr. Samuel Savannah. Miss Cora W. 
Jenkins at the piano; Suite for Flute, Vio- 
lin and Piano (Cesar Cui), Mr. New- 
bauer. Mr. Savannah. Miss Jenkins: Noc- 
turne for Flute, Violin. 'Cello, and Piano 
(Francois Doppler), Mr. Newbauer, Mr. 
Savannah, Mr. Black. Miss Jenkins. 

Adele Lauth, Raymond Hand. Charles 
Pemberton, Ella Hart. Gilda Marchetti, 
and Sarah Gordon, teachers on the 
faculty of the Kherwood School, pre- 
sented their pupils in a recital at the 
Southern California Music Company 
building, September 15. This was the 
first performance given m the new Re- 
cital Hall of the Music Company's build- 
ing, and also the first of a series of noon- 
day recitals to be held by the Sherwood 
School during the season. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RI-.\'IE\V 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDG., EIGHTH AND BROADWAY —TEL. METROPOLITAN 4398 
C. C. EMERSON IN CHARGE— BRUNO DAVID USSHER, STAFF CORRESPONDENT 
Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



LOS ANGELES, October 10— A brilMant season Is In 
store for patrons of the Philharmonic Orchestra, with a 
Hrlntlllanl array of solotstH. a great number of new 
works added to the repertoire, the appearance of a 
distinguished Kueat conductor and the added interest 
due to the prcai-nce of new performers with the Orches- 
tra Itself Conductor WhIkt Henry Rothwell has been 
busily engaKfd during the summer studying new scores 
and some thirty two new works have been added to an 
already <-omi:r»*h»?ns!ve library. 

The soloists will include Claire Dux. new soprano of 
the Chicago Opera Company, who has established her- 
self as one of the great international personages in the 
operatic and concert field; Mme. Olga Samaroff. Ameri- 
can planlste. whose appearances both in this country 
and abroad are notable events; Albert Spalding, Ameri- 
can violinist, who notwithstanding h s coniparat ve 
youth is recognized as one of the masters of his Inslru 
nient; Sophie Braslau. American contralto, of the Melru 
polltan and Chicago Operas, who has capf.vated I-os 
Angeles audiences in former appearances; Sylva'n No 
ack, violinist, the concertmaster and assistant conduc- 
tor of the Philharmonic- Orchestra, a most brilliant solo- 
ittt when he temporarily forsakes the ensemble; Pablo 
Casals, acclaimed on three continents as (he greatest 
living violoncellist; Erno Dobnanyl, the greatest living 
Hungarian composer and pianist, and most notable 
musician to visit us since Kachmaninoff ; Mme. Helen 
Teschner Tas. splendid woman violinist; Joseph 
Schwarz, baritone, with the magnificent Caruso quality 
in h's voice; and Rudolph Ganz. distinguished Swiss 
pianist and conductor of the St. Louis Symphony Or- 
chestra, who will apear in the dual role of piano soloist 
and guest conductor. 

Rehearsals are already under way and are even more 
Interesting than usual this year due to the presence of 
some notable acquisitions to the playing personnel of 
the orchestra, Alfred Brain, the new pr'ncipal horn. 
Is an Englishman who has been Identified with the New 
York Philharmonic since coming to this country and 
Is recognized as one of the world's great masters of his 
Instrument. Alexander Roman, of the first violn sec- 
lion, was formerly concert master of the Imperial Or- 
chestra of Moscow and has loured Europe a number of 
limes in solo appearances; he comes to Los Angeles 
from the Eastman Orchestra of Rochester. Fritz Gail- 
lard was formerly first chair violoncellist with Mengel- 
berg's Concertgehouw Orchestra at .Amsterdam. Ben- 
jamin Klatzkin, the new first trumpet, formerly held a 
like position with the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, 
while Frederick Morilz, the new bassoon, makes his 
flrat local appearance after nine years with the best 
organizations of this kind In Germany Including four 
years with the lierlin Philharmonic Orchestra. 

In commenting on the personnel as it now stands with 
the adfiitlons mentioned. Waller Henry Rothwell. the 
dynamic conductor of the Orchestra, was most enthus- 
laRtic. 



SOHMER 




The Sohnicr pusscsscs all 
the (|ualitics of tone and 
touch that artists look for 
in a piano. 

LOS A.NCJKl.lvS 
Kxclusivc SOHMER representatives 




FITZGERALD' S-Foy ihe aidtancmmt of 3^unc 

qA Young Pianiste Who is Making a Name 

LILLIAN CLARK 

.\.s earnestly seekinK th-- best in 
her choice of a piano as she has 
always been in the cultivation of 
her art, Miss Clark has followed 
the example of the world's great 
pianists and made her sole medium 
of expression 

The KNABE 



K 



FITZGEM^,^ 

HILL STREET ^™' 




4MUS1CGQJ 

AT 7Q.7-72.B 



"For the first time since the organization of the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra," said Mr. Rothwell, "I 
feel that perfection, as near as it is humanly possible, 
has been reached in the performing personnel. As it 
now stands, we have procured the finest performers 
available in the I'nited Slates and 1 feel sure that our 
patrons and music lovers of Los Angeles will agree with 
me. after hearing our first program, that the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra as now constituted is the peer of any 
such institution in the world. The first program, too, 
gives a fine opportunity to display to best advantage the 
perfection of the ensemble for it covers a wide range 
musically, opening with Beethoven's Seventh Symphony 
In "A Major, then "The Merry Pranks of Till Eulen- 
Spiegel" by that unconventional and unlrammeled 
genius, Richard Stauss, and closing with Iberia, a most 
excellent example of the beauties of Debussy's work. 

Plans for the attainment of the much needed munici- 
pal auditorium in Los Angeles were brought a step near- 
er realization at the meeting of the executive committee 
of the Civic Music and Art Association. Ben P. Pearson. 
president, Monday evening, Octoberlst. The following 
resolution was presented by Mrs. J. ^. Carter, vice-presi- 
dent of the association and unanimously passed by the 
thirty members of the executive committee present: 

"WHEREAS one hundred and fifty representative citi- 
zens of Los Angeles assembled at a Mus'c Week ban- 
quet at the Elite, May I6th, 1923, unanimously passed a 
resolution authorizing Ben F. Pearson, chairman of the 
Music Week Commiltee. to appoint a Citizens' Commit- 
tee to work out the plan for a Temple of .Music and Art 
and Civic Auditorium as a memorial to our soldiers and 
sailors who sacrificed their lives in the recent world 
war and as a token of deep appreciation of those who 
returned, 

BE IT RESOLVED that the Executive Committee of 
the Civic Music and Art Association which was appont- 
ed by Ben F. Pearson for the purpose of carrying out 
the above mentioned resolution hereby commits itself 
definitely to this objective and, 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that plans be carried 
out at once to arrange for the placing of a bond item 
covering the cost of such an aud.torium on the ballot at 
the Charier election to be held in the month of Mav. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED thai the Special Com- 
mittee on the Temple of Music and Art consisting of 
ten members of the Executive Committee of this organ- 
ization, previously appointed, with the President, be in- 
structed to proceed in the matter of carrying out the 
intent and purpose of this resolution and lo arrange for 
the appointment of a Citizens Advisory Committee rep- 
resenting all the Important groups of citizens in the 
community to act with the Executive Committee of the 
Civic Music and Art Assoclallon In working out the 
plans for the auditorium." 

The Special Conimitiee of the Association appointed 
to carry out the purport of this resolution are the fol- 
lowing: Ben F. Pearson. Chairman; L. E. Behymer, Vice 
Chairman: E. G. Judah, Mrs. Martha Nelson McCan. G. 
Gordon Whilnall, Mrs. J. J. Carter, Roger Andrews, Mrs. 
E. U. Hralnerd, Harold Ferguson. F. G. Leonard and 
E. P. Tucker. Chas. Draa was appointed secretary to 
handle the details In connection with ihe bond election 
campaign. At this meeting plans were presented by 
the chairmen of various sections of the Association for 
the development of music among the foreign born 
groups of the community; the extension of community 
singing and community programs to the various ne'gh- 
borhood sections of the city; the providing of band con- 
certs at the Plaza and In other sections of the city where 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium Bldg.. Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available for ConrcrtM and Hecltala 

Limited dumber of Advonofd Pupils Accepted 

VlollnUl Low AnKeleH Trio 

Studio: :{.t-t MnHlc Krxm Studio BldR. Phooe 100M2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

TaeMdny. WedneNdar. Fridar Afternooaa 
EEOn Scbool. I'honea 21X09 or 271330 
1324 Sooth FlEueroa. Lo> AaKelea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCKHT MASTER rHII.ll AKMIIMC URCHESTRA 

Conrrrln and KerlInU 

ianaicement ^\ra. Caroline C. Sniith, -12-1 Auditorium BIdff. 



ILYA BRONSON ,.h,Ih.rn.'"„To"o!r,'i.,.,r. 

Member Trio Intlmr. l.o« AnicrlFa Trio. PbllharmoaU 

auarlrl. Inalrnrllon. ( hambrr Music llrrltaU 

S»ir> l.a Mlrada — I'bone lloilr 3(M4 



A.KOODLACH 



Mnjr.ll>- Tbralrr llldE.. l.o> AnKeIra PkOBC aTO-ll 




ELINOR 
REMICK 
WARREN 

IMI'OSEH-riAMSTE 



"COUNTRY DANCE" 

b> llr<'lhu«rn 

"PAPILLOMS" 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

OLGA STEEB 

Director and Head of the Piano Department 

FANNIE DILLON 

Head of the Department of Theory 

and Composition 

Faculty of Twenty-nine Teachers 
Affilialed Teachers in Burbank, Claremonl, Holly- 
wood, Los Angeles, Long Beach. Monrovia, Pasa- 
Redlands, Riverside, San Diego and 



San 



Mon 



For Catalog and Full Information 
Address 

OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

453 S. Willon Place Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone 567294 



Frederic Burr Scholl 



ORGANIST 



Grauman's Hollywood 
Egyptian Theatre 

HOLLYWOOD. CALIF. 



CLARA GERTRUDE OLSON 

TE.VCHER-ACCOMPAMST 

Piano, Harmony, Theory 

Children'H ClaMseH a Speolnlly 

110 Music-Art Studio — $21181 Res. Phone Boyle 5S31 



Alexander Bevani 

OPERATIC COACHING 

TONE DEVELOPMENT 

VOICE PRODUCTION 

U 

Suite 612 So. Calif. Music Co. Bldg. 
Phone 822-520 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE ClLTtRE — COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 



804 Shermnn-Clar Music Co. BldB. Piione 2Sl-sori 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS AXGELES 
1250 WIndHor Boulevard 



JOHN SMALL MAN 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CON'TR.\I.TO School of Vocal Ar) 

Stadio: Tahoe Building I ->lacdo\Tell CIqI> Roonm) 

For Infomiatiun Hen. Phnue lAlUA 

MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Don-n-ton-n Studio removed to 800 S. Broadn-ny. Room 
002. Renidence Stndlo. 1147 West 2lHt St. — Telephone 
\Ve»t 7707. PIAXO, HARMO^'Y, VOICE COACH. DI- 
RECTOR JAMISON QUARTETTE. Ten weeks' normal 
training eourwe begins Sentemher mih. 

CHARLES BOWES 



ANGELO GIUFFRIDA 



ingr. Compotti- 



good music is seldom heard; and other plans of com- 
munity music activities. 

May 3rd to May 11th. 1924. was selected as the date 
of Los Angeles' next Music Week in accordance with 
the national observance of Music Week throughout the 
country. Events will be held during the next Music 
Week which will make of the celebration a spring music 
festival for all Southern California. Mrs. Chas. H. Toll. 
District President of the Los Angeles Federation of 
Women's Clubs, was present as a guest and gave a 
brief address expressing the interest and co-operation 
of the Women's Clubs in the work of the Association. 

Reports were rendered by C. C. Draa. Alexander Stew- 
art, J. P. Judah, F. Niece. A. M. Perry, Mrs. J. J. Carter, 
Mrs. A. B. Cook. Rena MacDonald, Mrs. Grace Widney 
Mabee, Mrs. E. McCann, Antoinette Ruth Sabel, Cath- 
ryne Stone. Anne MacPherson. J. G. Farquharson. J. E. 
Lewis, C. P. Raitt. and B. D Ussher. :ileetings of the 
Civic Music and Art Association will be held on the 
evening of every first Monday each month. In keep- 
ing with a country-wide movement to celebrate music 
week simultaneously in many communities, a resolu- 
tion was adopted to hold third Los Angeles Music Week 
May 4-10, 1924, which coincides with National Music 
Week. 

Charles C. Draa, prominent piano pedagogue, who on 
previous occasions of a public nature has rendered ex- 
cellent and indefatigable services, was appointed by 
President Pearson to take charge of the campaign to 
enroll signatures for the initiative petitions with which 
to place the auditorium bond Issue on the ballot of next 
May. Calling for an especial $2,500,000 municipal bond 
issue. Draa will at once form a committee of one hun- 
dred prominent citizens which will act as his executive 
secretaries, thus placing the movement on a city-wide, 
strongly representative basis. In addition the work of 
this committee of one hundred will be supervised by an 
extra committee of men and women known as able or- 
ganizers, aiming at a total enrollment of 100,000 signa- 
tures. Mr. Pearson's choice of Mr. Draa is a good one, 
for the latter has rendered splendid work when an 
executive staflf member of the National War Savings 
Committee in Southern California. He also organized 
and managed the United States Government War Sav- 
ings Concert Bureau, when more than two thousand 
musicians were active at all the war savings mass meet- 
ings in the n'ne counties of Southern California. Read- 
ers of the Pacific Ccast Musical Review will also favor- 
ably remember Mr Draa's devoted work as member of 
the State Board of the California Federation of Music 
flubs, when from 1918-1922 he organized, financed, edit- 
ed and published the State bulletin of the Federation. 
The apEointment of Mr. Draa to ths important office 
in the Municipal Auditorium campaign reflects glory on 
the musical profession. 

Although a debut concert from an ensemble stand- 
point, yet very enjoj-able. was the initial program of the 
recently formed California Trio which elicited warm 
applause from the large audience last week at Ebell Club 
Auditorium. The new Chamber music group was formed 
by Leon Goldwasser. who is well known here as violin 
soloist and ensemble player. Maurice Amsterdam also 
ranks well among cello soloists of the South. New on 
the local concert platform is Mme. Marguerite d'Aleria. 
who gained her facile technic under Leschetitzki and 
Rosenthal. Ensembles, like individual performers, must 
have personality and it would be expecting too much 
to hope for it at a debut concert, yet one noted with 
much pleasure good adaptation among the three per- 
formers, also fine regard for expression. On the whole 
there was not yet the freedom that comes from unity 
bom of long ensemble work, so that one must look to 
the future for this essential of chamber music making. 

Mme. d'Aleria is a player of good equipment to whom 
difficulties evidently mean little. There is fine poise in 
her performance even in complicated passages, so that 
even the stress of the Grieg C minor sonata and more 
so of the Arensky D minor trio found her reading clear. 
She is at her best regarding tone color in episodes of 
lighter weight dynamically. There is bluntness in her 
forte, in a measure a certain sameness of tone quality, 
which may be due to her apparent desire to form more 
of a tonal background for the strings than anyth'ng 
else. One will look forward with pleasure to her future 
appearances for she is eminently in sympathy with this 
musical activity. « 

Leon Goldwasser's playing needs little comment for 
h's technical command of the art of violin music has 
often been commented upon in these columns One 
would wish for greater warmth and flexibility of tone 
and phrasing i which is true also of the pianist) yet 
the solidity of performance makes largely up for this 
lack which, with him too. may be a matter of ensemble 
newness. His playing was most expressive in the Bee- 
thoven Trio in B flat, opus 11 (where the pianist shone 
well during the variation movement), and in the Aren- 
sky trio when his tone was ingratiating. 

Maurice Amsterdam's part, like that of the others, 
showed restrictions first performances have as handi- 
cap, but there always was much warmth and color of 
tone and expression. He is a cellist one has heard not 
often enough, as few players possess qualities as these 
to the degree of Mr. Amsterdam. It was evident that a 
good share of the applause went to him. 



At next Thursdays concert the Los Angeles Trio will 
present the first performance on the Coast of the great 
violin and piano sonata of Ernest Bloch. today one of 
of our foremost composers. This is an exceedingly 
virile and most difficult work but happily in keeping 
with the aims of the trio which has done so much in 
furthering the growth of local ensemble music by spar- 
ing no efforts. The Mendelssohn D minor trio and the 
Smetana trio complete the strong program. 




STEIN WAY 

THE INfSTflUMEXT OF THE IMMQRTAU 



celebrated ariisis. 

allcfvfiom have appear- 
ed in Los<.ingeles this 
seasonuse tiie 

STEIN WAY 
, PIANO 

Dolh in tlieir concert^ 

workamiin Iheirown 

homes 

%c 

STEINWAY 

l^iano and 

^<.DUO-AR.T 

'Repmtiicim/Tiano 



^BIRIvEL 




M. Jeannette Rogers 

First Flutist Metropolitan 
Theatre 



Available for 

Concert-Recital-Club 
Obbligato 



Address 1354 Lavela Terrace 



MISS FANNIE CHARLES DILLON 



I'layed bj Fan 



GILDA MARCHETTI 

DRAMATIC SOPRAXO 

Teacher of Vofee and Italian Diction 

Res. Phone .')58-«0.t 

Xew Stndlo: 711: So. Calif. MuhIc Co. Bids* 



L. 

the 


CANTIEN HOLLYWOOD 

PIANO— ORGAN— HARMONY 
Hollywood has made a study of the psyeholofrr 
Dhildren between the ages of nix and nine and 
methods and materials uwed for them. A limlled 
iber of normal stadentM will be accepted. 
Studio: 771 North Hill. Pasadena 
Phone Colorado 1:104 



Claire Forbes 
Crane 

^=PIANIST 



DA VOL SANDERS ^ '?};',?pS?feS'*'^ 

rad Violin Dpp<^ CoUeer of M 



3201 S, Flgue 



lie, V. S. C. — Member 
Main 21M 



RAYMOND HARMON 



TENOR 
rl — Oratorio — Teaching 
Stndlo Bide., Los .Angeles. Calif. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Los Angeles Tr:o. consisting of May Macdonald 
Hope, pianist. Calmnn LuboTlski. violinist, and Ilya 
Hronnon. cellist. » liose first concert of this, their eighth 
season. Is seheduled tor the Fine Arts Theater. Thurs- 
Uny evenlDK. the ISth Inst., will present the opening 
I oncer! for several of the courses in nearby cities this 
month. They appeared In Pomona at the Pomona Ebell 
flub for their opening of the club year. Friday after- 
noon In San Bernardino they will open the series for 
the Harmonic Club next Tuesday evening. At the Mu- 
nicipal Auditorium on Friday, the 19th Inst . they will 
be the first number of the series of concerts given by 
the Whittier Men's Chorus, and will open the new 



course sponsored by the cities of Redondo, Hennosa and 
Manhattan beaches, at the Redondo High School Audi- 
torium on Monday evening. November 19. They have 
also been engaged for a concert for the Glendale Mus:c 
Club. 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

CURRAN 



MOISEIVITSCH 



Friday Matinee. Nov. 9 



"IMPRESARIO" 


Friday Matinee, Nov. 23 


Quartet of VICTOR 


ARTISTS Fri. Mat., Dec. 7 


HEIFET2 


Friday Matinee, Jan. 18 


••C08I FAN TUTTE 


Friday Matinee. Feb. 1 


ROSENTHAL 


Friday Matinee, Feb. 15 


IVOGUN 


Friday Matinee. Feb. 29 


CHAMLEE 


Friday Matinee. March 14 


WERRENRATH 


Friday Matinee. March 28 



.un TIrkPtM iin Nnlr for Th«'« 
Farthrr Itrdarvil Srair at M 
l*RI('KN flll.WI. |li:t..MI. 91 IJ 



AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY "POPS" 

Interest is keen in the second series of popular con- 
certs to be given by the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra, Alfred Hertz, conductor, under the direction of 
the municipality at the li^xposition Auditorium, the first 
of which will take place Wednesday night, October 31, 
at 8:20 sharp. The season sale of seats now concluding 
at Sherman, flay and Company's for this concert and 
the four othiTs. on Tuesday evenings of Dec. 11. Jan. 
15. Feb. 5 and March U. is much larger than last year 
and Chairman J. Kmmet Hayden of the Auditorium 
Committee of the Board of Supervisors, in charge, an- 
nounces that many prominent citizens and institutions 
are buying blocks of seats for friends and employes, in 
some instances the reservations including several hun- 
dred at a time. The season prices are remarkably small, 
being $1, $2. $3 and $4 for the five concerts, according 
to location. 

Conductor Hertz Is preparing splendid programs for 
these concerts and that of the first will include Dvorak's 
New World Symphony, Rachmanioff's I*rclude in C 
sharp minor, the "Liebesleid" and "Caprice Viennois" 
by Kreisler and arranged for orchestration liy Alfred 
Hertz, and the march from Tannhauser. The guest art- 
ist for the first concert will be Mme Claire Dux. the 
famous soprano of the Chicago Opera Company, who 
w.ll be heard in this city for the first tim.- 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 670 8lb Ave. Phone Bayview 5543 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

For the third concert of the Pacific Musical Society at 
the Fairmont Hotel Thursday evening. October 26th. a 
most artistic program has been arranged by Mrs. 
William Henry Banks for the members Mrs. Banks is 
resolved to give the Society the very best of resident 
artists available and the following program Is evidence 
of the sincerity of her work: Trio A Minor (Ravel). 
Pasmore Trio — Miss .Mary Pasmore. violn. Miss Marie 
Sloss. piano. Miss Dorothy Pasmore. violincello Vocal 
Soli — Air de Beatrix, from Etienne Marcel {(Saint- 
Saensl, Vlllanelle (Sibellal. O Bocca Dolorosa (Sibella). 
The Little Fish's song (Arensky). M'ss Frances Dwight 
Woodbridge. Walter Frank Wenzel at the piano; Trios 
— Serenade (Rachmaninoff). Norwegian Dance (Grieg). 
Kitchen Dance (Severn). Pasmore Trio; Vocal Soli — 
The Shadow of the Bamboo Fence (Fay Foster). Thou 
Art the .\ighl Wind (Gaul). At the Spinning Wheel 
(Saar). Alpine Pastoral (Buzzi-Peccia). Miss Frances 
Dwight Woodbridge. Walter Frank Wenzel at the piano; 
Duniky Trio (Dvorak). Pasmore Trio. 



ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT 

The annual Scholarship Concert for the fund to in- 
crease and maintain the scholarship work being carried 
on by the San Francisco Conservatory of Music will 
take place next Tuesday night. October 16. In the 
Colonial Ballroom of the Hotel St. Francis. The an- 
nouncement that Ada Clement, pianist, will give the 
progi-am. assisted by the eminent English 'cellist. May 
Mukle and Edouard Deru. Belgian violinist, is creating 
widespread interest. Ada Clement is an artist of the 
first rank and she will be welcomed by a host of ad- 
mirers, both for her artistry and for her untiring work 
in organizing and directing the splendid inst'tution 
which means so much to San Francisco — the San Fran- 
cisco Conservatory of Music. 

Mr. Deru will be a welcome addition to the program 
and his kindness will be appreciated as he so gener- 
ously stepped Into the place when Mr. Saslavsky. who 
had planned to appear, was unavoidably delayed in New 
York. The following program will be jiresentcd : .1. S. 
Bach — Sonata for '<-ello and piano in C major. May 
Mukle and Ada Clement; Lillian Horlghead— Two Pre- 
ludes, dedicated to .\da Clement; Chopin — Etude in C 
minor Op. 25, Schumann — Aria, Brahms — Rhapsody in 
G minor, Ada Clement; Rebecca Clark — Trio Piano, Vio- 
lin and 'Cello, -Ada Clement, Edouard Deru and May 

.Mukle. • 

FIRST OF SUNDAY SYMPHONY SERIES 

Tomorrow afternoon in (he Curran Thea(re the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchcstia. under the leadership 
of Alfred Hertz, will give the first concert in its Sunday 
Symphony Series, the program being a repetition of that 
presented yesterday afternoon. The principal item listed 
is the Beethoven "Eroica" Symphony, while two new 
compositions are also included which are being given 
their first San Francisco production at this pair of con- 
certs, the Rapsodie Espagnole of Ravel and Rabaud's 
Eclogue. 

The Rapsodie Espagnole is a splendid example of 
Ravels remarkable virtuosity in instrumentation, he 
having given a glittering display of the full resources 
of a modern symphony orchestra. The work is in four 
movements or what might be termed "Musical Pictures, 
but they aie played without pause, the titles being. 
"Prelude to the Night." ".Malaguena." "Habanera" and 
"La Feria." 

A week from tomorrow, October 28, the first concert 
in the Popular Series will be given, and in keeping with 
the character of these events, an attractive programme 
of light classics has been prepared, which contains as 
a novelty number the Rimsk.v-Korsakow suite of musical 
pictures from "The Tsar Saltan," Other items listed 
are the Raymond Overtuie by Ambroise Thomas. Sme- 
tana's symphonic poem "Vltava." Ravel's "Mother 
Goose" Suite, the overture to Weber's "Frieschultz" 
and Kreisler's popular Caprice Viennois, the latter num- 
ber having been orchestrated by Mr. Hertz while in 
Paris this summer. 



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piAsro 

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CO.\TR.\LTO 
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PARIS 

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violinist and Teacher. Head of A'lolin Dept.. 



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KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST. SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

For Concert Enffasc-iaenta 
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Hecrctarr and Manager of 
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4t Chaae BldK., Nan Franelaco 



Representative of Lyon A Healy Harps 

Tclrpbone DoukUm 1678 



Leslie V. Harvey 

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GEORGE M. LIPSCHULTZ 

SOLO VIOLINIST 
Concert Engagements Accepted 

LOEWS WARFIELD THEATRE 

Musical Director 
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Theatre Phone Prospect 83 

Pupils Accepted 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Kndoraed by Wa^er Swarsc 

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LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



Hji THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JQUI^NAL INI THE GREAT WEST jJIJ 



VOL. XLV. No. 4 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO HAILS NEW SYMPHONY SEASON SYMPHONY SEASON BEGINS IN LOS ANGELES 



Alfred Hertz Receives Prolonged and Enthusiastic Ovation From Audi- 
ence Crowding Every Seat in the Curran Theatre — Stage Banked 
With Fragrant and Richly Colored Flowers — Beethoven's 
Eroica Symphony Given Impressive Interpretation 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



Walter Henry Rothwell's Appearance Signal for Spontaneous Welcome. 
Beethoven's Seventh Symphony Intensely Enjoyed — Public Recep- 
tion Follows Second Concert — Hundreds of People File Past 
Mr. Clark and Mr. Rothwell Expressing Their Pleasure 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



The San Francisco symphony season 
for 1923-1924 began at the Curran Thea- 
tre on Friday afternoon. October 19. 
■when the first concert of the first pair of 
concerts was given under the direction of 
Alfred Hertz. The house was crowded, 
some people even being obliged to stand, 
and the entrance of Alfred Hertz was the 
signal for a demonstration, the enthusi- 
asm, spontaneity and extent of which im- 
pressed everyone Ti'ith the conviction 
that the popularity of the conductor is as 
great, if not greater, today that it was 
during the years past. Mr. Hertz has 
gained the confidence of the music loving 
people. They know him to be a conduc- 
tor who thoroughly understands his mis- 
sion, who does not compromise with 
mediocrity, but insists upon the very 
best either in the selection of his pro- 



under the guidance of a conductor of 
vast artistic resources who understands 
how to obtain the finest results from ex- 
cellent material. 

We can hardly imagine a more effec- 
tive reading of the Eroica Symphony 
than the one we heard on this occasion. 
Especially imposing was the interpre- 
tation of the Funeral March with its 
sombre, deliberate and stirring tribute to 
greatness. Mr. Hertz was specially suc- 
cessful in marking the contrast between 
the sombreness of the second and the 
joy of the third movement, if he had not 
taken these two movements in exactly 
the tempi he did, namely, the first very 
slowly and second with impetuousness, 
the contrast would not have been so de- 
cisively marked and the effect would 
not have been so striking. The finale 



We felt justified to make a special trip 
to Los Angeles to attend the second of 
the first pair of symphony concerts given 
at the Philharmonic Auditorium on Fri- 
day afternoon and Saturday evening un- 
der the direction of Walter Henry Roth- 
well. This is the beginning of the fifth 
season of symphony concerts under the 
present auspices, and W. A. Clark, Jr.. 
has every reason to feel proud of the 
work he is doing for Southern California. 
There were nearly three thousand people 
present on this occasion and, judging 
by the enthusiastic demonstrations, they 
liberally accorded during the course of 
the program the people evidently enjoy 
these concerts thoroughly. Mr. Roth- 
well selected Beethoven's Seventh Sym- 
phony as the introductory number on the 
program. He conducted it in a manner 
to accentuate its classic serenity and its 
bigness of conception. There is no timid- 



the construction of this work that, un- 
less they are presented in a musical 
fashion, they become unadulterated 
noise, but under the guidance of a con- 
ductor like Mr. Rothwell. and interpreted 
by an orchestra of expert musicians, 
they assume certain elements of musical 
dignity. The brass and woodwind sec- 
tion have here specially difficult prob- 
lems to solve and they were overcome 
with an ease and skill that aroused our 
admiration. 

We had heard the Iberia Suite by De- 
bussy from the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, and, notwithstanding Mr. 
Rothwell's singular adaptability for the 
interpretation of ultra modern works, we 
could not find any additional beauties. 
We still find ample tone color effects, at 
times of enchanting beauty, and the per- 
fumes of the night are delightfully ethe- 
real, but we can not follow Debussy in 




Aflernuon. November 9 

gram or in the conscientiousness of their 
interpretation. And thoroughly con- 
vinced that Mr. Hertz understands his 
art, the people are ready to bestow upon 
him the full measure of their esteem and 
admiration. 

The more we listen to modern com- 
positions and the oftener we are con- 
fronted with the fads and fancies that 
seem to permeate latter-day music the 
more we appreciate the grandeur, solid- 
ity and intellectuality that underlies the 
Beethoven works As often as we have 
listened to the Eroica Symphony we al- 
ways find new phases to admire in it. 
and here is another of Mr. Hertz's claims 
to distinction, he constantly finds new 
beauties in these classics and succeeds in 
emphasizing them with excellent judg- 
ment. In the main, the orchestra shows 
that gradual improvement that has 
marked its annual appearances during 
the last eight years. We found just a bit 
of uncertainty among the brass section, 
but this might have been nervousness 
resultant from a first performance of the 
season. But the string section certainly 
showed emphatic artistic improvement. 
By this remark we do not mean to in- 
sinuate that the orchestra was not artis- 
tically satisfactory last season, but we 
mean that it shows every consecutive 
season the results of continuous playing 



AVill Be Guest ArtlNt With the Ch; 
Music Society of San Francisco on Next 
Tuesday Evening 

was played with that dignity and breadth 
which lends all of Beethoven's music 
such grandeur and majesty. 

The program exhibited two novelties. 
The first was an Eclogue by Rabaud enti- 
tled Virgilian Poem for Orchestra. 
While the work contains the familiar fea- 
tures of the modern school, including 
muted strings and brass mingled 
with ample woodwind ornaments, it is 
provided with that element of melodic 
invention which lends such an attractive 
grace to a composition. It certainly is 
poetic and was played with a finesse and 
discrimination in shading and accentua- 
tion which proved exceedingly charming 
and earned the enthusiastic applause 
that rewarded it. The oboe, flute, clari- 
net and harp was given ample oppor- 
tunity to reveal the fine musicianship of 
such artists as C. Addimando, Anthony 
Linden. H. B. Randall and Kajetan Attl. 

The other novelty was Ravel's Rhap- 
sodie Espagnole. and while Ravel be- 
longs to those moderns who appeal to 
our sense of artistic proportions we find 
in this Rhapsodie Espagnole much that 
is grotesquely modern. At times there 
are effects not unlike jazz playing with 
the muted strings and brass, changing 
keys constantly and introducing one 
theme after another without continuity 
(Continued on Page 11, Col. 1) 



VV, A. CLARK, JR. 

id Patron of the Philharmonic 

L-hc»tra of L.o.f Angelen 



ity about Mr. Rothwell's musical utter- 
ance. He first decides what he is going 
to say and then says it with every em- 
phasis at his dispo.sal. In this manner 
certain hearers may regard certain 
phrases somewhat heavy in the Bee- 
thovian sense, but at the same time there 
are plenty of others who like to hear 
their classics presented with ample pom- 
posity and glamor. 

One thing is certain, whatever Mr. 
Rothwell does is done MUSICIANLY. He 
understands his orchestra, he is master 
of the situation, the musicians play with 
precision and spontaneity and the phras- 
ing is done with uniformity and delight- 
ful ensemble effect. We enjoyed spe- 
cially the sustenuto movement and the 
presto. The allegretto might have been 
just a bit more limpid, but these are 
matters of taste that can not be judged 
by well defined standards. 

Mr. Rothwell was at his best in conduct- 
ing Richard Strauss' Till Eulenspiegel, 
from which exceedingly difficult composi- 
tion he obtained every particle of humor 
which this jolly and amusing bit of musi- 
cal thought so amply exhibits. The splen- 
did material of which the Philharmonic 
Orchestra of Los Angeles is constructed 
was here specially in evidence. We do 
not believe that there is a better sym- 
phony orchestra anywhere. There are so 
many bizarre and grotesque effects in 



WALTKH lii:.\HV ROTHWELL, 

Conductor of the PbUharmonie Orchetitra 

of Los Angeles 



most of his fiights into cacaphony and the 
abrupt changes of themes, keys and the 
not infrequent use of unusually confiict- 
ing harmonic combinations, by which 
we mean employment of keys which, 
when played at the same time, seem to 
offend sensitive musical ears. We are 
afraid we shall never he able to adjust 
our sense of artistic proportions to the 
ultra modern style of faithful realism. 
We still prefer to adhere to the old im- 
pressionistic school which gave you a 
chance to employ your own imagination 
in the interpretation of the masters 
ideas If we were to give our impres- 
sions of some of the ultra modern 
thoughts we would need a board of cen- 
sureship to expurgate our articles before 
publication. * 

During the intermission Mr. Rothwell 
had the satisfaction to receive the cor- 
dial approval of his large audience. The 
applause was vigorous, universal and pro- 
longed. He had to appear again and 
again and the orchestra shared this trib- 
ute with him. Evidently there is a large 
portion of the Los Angeles musical pub- 
lic that appreciates and enjoys these con- 
certs. Following the conclusion of the 
program, there was a public reception in 
which the entire audience shared. Hun- 
dreds of people stood in line and shook 
hands with W. A. Clark. Jr., and Mr. 
(Continued on Page 11, Col. 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



After the lights are out 




The Stein way Speaks: 

is/r knew and loved me. Warner 
kmw and loved me. Rubenstcin, 
Hirliiiz and Gounod knew and 
id me. I have been the com- 
panion of genius for two genera- 
tions. My name is the Stcinway Piano. 

What was there about me that caused P'ranz 
I-iszt, forty years ago, to say of me: "You 
afford delight even to my old piano-weary 
fingers?" 

Why did Richard Wagner, writing from 
Bayrcuth in 1879, declare: "Sounds of such 
beauty as those coming from my Steinway 
grand flatter and coax the most agreeable 
tone - pictures from my harmonic melodic 
senses?" 

Why did Gounod, who gave us "Faust," 
write to my makers in 1888, "Mme. Adelina 
Patti joins me in the ecstacy and mutual ad- 
miration of your product ... 1 am overjoyed 
at the consciousness of being the possessor of 
one of your perfect instruments?" And what 
was it that stirred the mighty Dr. Joseph 
Joachim to assert : "Steinway is to the pianist 
what Stradivarius is to the violinist?" 

Companion of genius indeed have I been ! 
Sometimes, when the stage is dark and the lid 
over my strings is down, I brood over my long 
years of such companionship. 

1 see Adelina Patti again, blowing kisses, 



ff'hal tints the Steintvtty /liiiiio think tihoiit, 
U'hen the rurlaiii is dott'n and the lights tire 
out, anil the artist tinti the audience have 
departedf Eloquent enough the Steinwtiy is 
when the moods of others are voiced on its 
wondrous strings. But what are its own 
moods and longings? Listen! It is about to 
speak to us 




and reaching for the flowers that were show- 
ered at her feet, while I rested quietly in the 
background and resolved to do even better in 
her next accompaniment. I see good old 



Franz Liszt again, after a tremendous rhap- 
sody over my ivory keys. I see Edward Mac- 
Dowell, working out his compositions over my 
keyboard. I see the youthful, golden-haired 
Padcrewski of the eighties, the maturer Pade- 
rewski of the nineties, and the world-figure 
and premier of Poland, the Paderewski of to- 
day whose audiences overflow the largest halls 
whenever he plays. And c\cr I am the com- 
panion of all this genius. 

But then 1 realize that the greater, the 
sweeter triumph of my long career is not to be 
found on the concert stage at all. 

The greater triumph awaits me when a 
young couple, starting down the pathway of 
wedded life, choose me to be their lifelong 
companion in a home. 

The sweetest triumph of all shall be when 
first my keys are touched by the fingers of 
some little girl, her printed scales before her, 
and a lifetime of the best in music all ahead. 

Admitted thus to the sacred intimacy of a 
home and fireside, I know that I shall find 
my truest triumph. And I shall strive to be 
faithful to these who trust me. As long as my 
strings endure, I shall strive to render to the 
utmost my measure of abiding charm. 

Sherman Miay& Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Sis., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-ORECO.N-WASIIJNGTO.N' 



ROSE FLORENCE 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

Studio: 545 Sutter St. Telephone Kearny 3598 

Direction Miss Alice Seckels 

68 Post St., San Francisco, California 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department. University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
MUNICIPAL ORGANIST OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. ORGANIST 
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 
Piano and Organ Instruction. Vocal Coach. 
Studio: First Congregational Church, cor. Post 
and Mason Streets. Tel. Douglas 5186. Residence, 
887 Bush Street. Tel. Prospect 977. 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS AND 
ORGAN RECITALS 



JULIUS GOLD 



vlnl.lM! 
Lponcnt of the 
uilletl with Henry Hull 



EMERICH 

<0\rERT PIANIST AND TKACHE:n 

I KiK'lld ApfN. Fhonr llrrkflpy Sf»71-AV 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 



ARTISTIC STUDIO FOR RENT 

Fl IIMMIIi:!) — <iIlAM> I'lAXO 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



iif Operatic Trail 



Manning School of Music 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

AI>V AN('KI» ri ril,^ ACCKITKO 

Wrdnraday and Irldur MomlncM ai Nlmlloi Ito:: 

Kohlrr A < haMr lllds.. <«nn l-'ranrUro. Irlriihnnr 

Hrarny r>*n4. I(r«lilr>nr4- •<tadloi ITtft Mfiiitf \ Inla 

Avf., Oakland. Trirphonr IMrdmnnl 7*141. 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN HAKAKL, ('AI.IFOIINI A 

MuMir ( nuracN Thnrouich and Profrrc-aalve 
Publlr «irh«»l Mnnlr. ArrredKrd Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



r«d« Rnad. Ilrrkrir 

MRS. M. FOULKES 

M f (MIP VMST 
^ olrr. Ini«lruni«-nt<* or KtrntrMiMc 
riioni- \\nl. us:. iTiri ParlHr Av4'.. San Krni 

IKKNK A. MILLIKK 



sol.n I'l wmr-AC'CnMIVVMsT 
rinl IMmiiot ^fuNlflnim' f'hnral KnNfmhlr 



llrnilork tlT.t 



PliARL IIOSSACK WIIITCOMB 



Mnndar and 1'hlir»dnr, IO<».% Kobirr A l'hn«r IliilldIn 

Trl. Krarnr r.i!H. lira, l-hnnr rrnaprrl ISO. ■■'nriMlBr Afir 

nooa. XT«N Aahhr \«rnnr. Ilrrkrlry 



MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 



The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Merrill. Oakland 



DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 



Opcrn — Churrh— Or 



TrI. Wen* BOri 



THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 



:il4.'. Waahlnelnn 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA don:va sophano 

Tbornueh A'oeni iind Drnmnllc Tralninir 
740 Pine SI. Phone Donelaa 6aZ4 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

PI A N I ST — I N NTH ICTOIl 



MADAME WILSON-JONES 



Phone Berk. 40N6-W 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



IIJ THrONLY WEEK^' MU51CAL JQUR>JAL IHTHE GR£AT W£5T Uj 
MUSICAL RBVIBn' COM PA NT 

* LFRT:D METZGER „ J>r«>«ldent 

C. C. EMERSON „ Vice Frealdent 

MAltClS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treannrer 

Suite HOI Kohler A Chase Bids:.. 26 O'Farrell St., San 
FranciHCO. Cal. Tel. Kearny 5454 



H. H. A. Beach), (d) The Song of the Open (Frank La 
Forge); Waltz from Romeo et Juliette (Gounod). Miss 
Imogen Peay played all the accompaniments with 
finished artistry and the high standard which the soloist 
adopted. 



ALFRED METZGER 
C. C. EMERSON 



Editor 
Business Manager 



Make all checkH. drnftx. moner orders or other forma of 

remittance payable to 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Uakland-nerkeley-Alameda Olilce 1117 Para St., Alameda 

Tel. Alameda 155 

MiKK Elixabelh Westgate In Charge 



Seattle Ofllce. 111.% 2::rd Ave. North. Seattle. AVashlngton 
Mrn. Abhie GerriNh-JoneM in Charge 

I.OM Angelea Olflce 

ttIO Southern California MunIo Co. Bnllding, 

Eighth and Droadnay Tel.. Metropolitan 43D8 

M iSN Lloyd Dana In Charge 

VOL. XLV SATURDAY, OCT. 27, 1923 N0.4 



nd-elaBS mall matter at S. F. Poatomc 



TWENTY-THIRD YEAR 



QUEENA MARIO AN IDEAL CONCERT SINGER 

First Event of the Alice Seckels Matinee Musicales> 

Presents an Operatic Soprano Who Possesses 

All Qualifications for Concert Singing 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

Commercially inclined and rapacious managers inflict 
upon the musical public so many artists whose reputa- 
tion rests solely on their operatic successes and who 
are utterly unfit to appear in concert that it is indeed 
gratifying to find an operatic artist who proves herself 
to be a concert singer as well. Such a rare instance 
we found in the appearance of Queena Mario at the 
Colonial Ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel on the oc- 
casion of the first event of the Alice Seckels Matinee 
Musicales. In the first place the program which we 
append herewith is dignified ad worthy of a truly effi- 
cient artist. Then it requires a versatility unusual 
among operatic artists, and yet it includes operatic 
arias of a higher standard. 

We shall not review this event according to the pro- 
gram numbers, but shall confine ourself to the artist 
and her mode of expression. Whatever Miss Mario sang 
was done with a skill and emotional faculty that 
brought out every meaning and shading of the phrases. 
Even in her colorature singing Miss Mario is careful to 
obtain adequate coloring and accents and at no time 
does she sing notes only, she always succeed in putting 
a fixed meaning behind every note, and that is the acme 
of concert singing, The possessor of a clear voice of 
ringing timbre and an adept in the various technical in- 
tricacies that make singing so difficult and yet so de- 
lightful Miss Mario gave us an an example of what a 
genuine concert singer consists of. We never heard a 
finer demonstration of legato or bel canto singing than 
that of Miss Mario. It was only at times when she 
tried to sustain a certain tone beyond a certain length 
that her breath wavered and her intonation became un- 
certain. There were also times when she opened her 
high covered tones temporarily, specially during fortis- 
simo passages, and when the tone, which is actually 
beautiful and pliant, become hard and brittle. If we are 
not mistaken this is purely a habit into which Miss 
Mario has fallen. We can not believe that it is inade- 
quate training. For her singing is otherwise so accurate 
and so high in standard that this little discrepancy 
ought to be easily remedied with a mind so intelligent 
and so artistic as that of Queen Mario. 

We simply can not imagine finer Mozart singing than 
Miss Mario gave. We never heard a more artistic in- 
terpretation of Handel's Care Selve. And Beethoven's 
Neues Lieben. Keues Leben simply could not be sung 
with greater depth nor with finer vitality. And so we 
could go along the whole program and show how splen- 
didly Miss Mario succeeded to delve into the innermost 
depths of' a song and extract from it every particle of 
emotional value and technical skill. It was a revela- 
tion in the art of bel canto, which is so rare and 
which Marcella Sembrich, Miss Mario's teacher, used 
with such splendid effect. Like Sembrich Queena Mario 
reveals the elements of a musician. And if you did not 
hear her you certainly will never hear the following 
program sung in better style and with finer musician- 
ship: (a) Dans un Hois (Mozart), (b) Care Selve 
(Handel), (c) Xeues Lieben. Xeues Leben (Beethoven); 
(a) Jours Passes (Delibes). (b) Comment Disaient lis 
(Liszt), (c) Er Liebte Mich So Sehr (Tschaikowsky). 
(d) L'Oiseau Bleu (Decreus); Aria of Micaela from 
Carmen (Bizet): (a) Lullaby (Kreisler). (b) The Night 
Wind (Roland Farley), (c) Ah! Love, But a Day (Mrs- 



SECOND OF FORTNIGHTLY CONCERTS 

May Mukle, Violoncellist, and Ellen Edwards, Pianist, 

Present Enjoyable Program Principally of Modern 

English Composition 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The second of Ida G. Scott's Fortnightly Concerts 
took place at the Colonial Ballroom of the St. Francis 
Hotel on Monday afternoon, October 15th, when the 
program was given by May Mukle. violoncellist, and 
Ellen Edwards, pianist. The increased number of peo- 
ple in attendance shows the growing interest in these 
events. Miss Scott is doing considerable missionary 
work in endeavoring to convert the musical public to a 
better appreciation of resident artists and native com- 
posers. That she is succeeding is evidenced by the en- 
couragement she gets from prominent society and busi- 
ness people in the way of support of the Fortnightly 
Concerts. 

In selecting May Mukle. violoncellist, and Ellen 
Edwards, pianist, for this event Miss Scott has shown 
excellent judgment, for they represent a high type of 
interpretative artists. They began the program with a 
Sonata for Violoncello and Piano by Frank Bridge, one 
of the most prominent of modern English composers. 
The work is exceedingly craftsmanlike and serious, but 
deals with a phase of modern art whose exact purpose 
the writer has not yet fully fathomed. Technically it 
requires unusual facility and both artists proved them- 
selves competent to cope with the many intricacies 
of the composition. They surely devoted much study 
to this work and interpreted it in a manner to reveal 
its most important characteristics. 

We enjoyed the concertino in E minor by Ariosti- 
Elkus. We had already occasion to comment on this 
work when it was presented before the Pacific Musical 
Society, and a second hearing reveals additional charms 
which the artists participating in this event — Miss 
Mukle and Miss Edwards — succeeded in enhancing with 
their unquestionable finessee and refined performance. 
Miss Edwards played two piano compositions by Mr. 
Elkus in a manner to accentuate their daintiness and 
breeziness. characteristics which Mr. Elkus' composi- 
tions so frequently reveal. Two sketches of a de- 
scriptive nature were Two London Pieces— Chelsea 
Reach and Ragmuffin — by John Ireland. They were 
played on the piano with adherance to their purpose 
emphasizing the local color which the composer infused 
into them. Two compositions by Frank Bridge, entitled 
Remembrance and Valse Capricieuse further demon- 
strated the modern attitude of this composer and Miss 
Edwards succeeded in bringing out the phases specially 
inclined to emphasize Mr. Bridge's ingenuity and 
originality. 

Miss Mukle closed the program with two cello solos, 
namely, Chinese Folk Tune arranged by Eugene Goos- 
sens and Melody by Frank Bridge, both unprentious 
yet delightfully ingeniou.s compositions. The entire 
event was worthy of the enthusiasm bestowed upon it 
by the audience. 



SECOND SYMPHONY-LOGUE 

The second of the Ssonphony-Logues which are being 
given in Sorosis Club Hall on the Fridays of the Sym- 
phony day at 12 o'clock by Victor Lichtenstein, will be 
held next Friday. These talks on the instruments and 
programs of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
met with such favor from music lovers that at the open- 
ing talk the hall was well filled. Miss May Mukle. the 
eminent cellist, will play Bloch's Schelomo, the Hebraic 
Rhapsody which will be given in the afternoon by 
Horace Britt with the orchestra. This is one of the 
greatest compositions of the twentieth century. The 
Symphony to be illustrated will be the Second Sym- 
phony of Saint Saens. also to be given in the afternoon. 
These illuminating talks are under the direction of 
Alice Seckels. 



CECIL FANNING OPENS SEASON IN OHIO 

Cecil Fanning opened his season on September 23 with 
a recital in Findlay. Ohio. "The recital was without 
doubt of the highest artistic merit Findlay has heard 
for some years," according to the Findlay Morning Re- 
publican. "Mr. Fanning seeks the theme of his song 
and interprets it so that the listener cannot help but 
feel its every emotion. His voice is warm and mellow 
and he sings in well rounded smooth tones, making 
every syllable as distinctly and clearly heard as the 
peal of a bell," continues the Findlay reviewer. The 
baritone opened his October tour in Dayton on the 
second, joining H. B. Turpin, his accompanist, there. 
Mr. Fanning and Mr. Turpin will then give recitals 
in Xenia, Wilmington, Fremont, Elyria and Bellefon- 
taine, Ohio, and in Flint, Michigan. 

Miss Myra Palache, one of the best known and most 
accomplished young pianists residing in California, re- 
turned recently from Paris after two years' absence. 
Miss Palache devoted her time to intensive piano study 
at the American Conservatory at Fontainebleau, under 
the tutelage of that distinguished pedagogue and artist, 
Philippe. Miss Palache had the distinction to receive 
two prizes from among four distributed, one for piano 
and one for general musical knowledge. The American 
Conservatory at Fontainebleau gives American students 
an opportunity to study with great masters at moderate 
expense. All music students reside at the Conservatory, 




HAROLD STANTOX 



The DelEghtfnl Ten 



and one of the greatest advantages derived from study 
at this school is the opportunity to hear a series of con- 
certs by some of France's most distinguished artists. 
Since her return. Miss Palache has resumed her studio 
work and has made arrangements to give a concert in 
Berkeley and San Francisco during November. Miss 
Palache has also resumed her class at the Head School 
in Berkeley, and among her plans for the season is 
giving a series of lecture recitals, particulars of which 
she will announce later. 

Mrs. Carrie Emerich, a distinguished pianist having to 
her credit numerous artistic triumphs in Chicago and 
other Eastern music centers, and whose reputation in 
Chicago is most enviable, is among the recent arrivals 
in San Francisco. Prior to her advent in the bay dis- 
trict, Mrs. Emerich spent some time in Southern Cali- 
fornia, where she appeared with much success in re- 
citals before the University of Southern California in 
Los Angeles and at the Hotel Coronado. We have 
before us a number of press comments by well known 
authorities on musical affairs, and every one of them 
speaks of Mrs. Emerich in the highest terms. We 
gather from these sincere comments that Mrs. Emerich 
is a splendid musician, plays with authority and assur- 
ance, has a big, brilliant tone and a facile technic. 
This artist has established a studio in Berkeley, where 
she is accepting a number of advanced students seek- 
ing technical training. 

SIgmund Anker, the successful violin teacher, announ- 
ces three studio recitals by his pupils to be given Sat- 
urday evenings. November 3. December 15 and January 
18. The first of these will take place next Saturday and 
will be part of Music Week. The program for this 
occasion, as well as the others, will appear in subse- 
quent issues of this paper. All recitals will take place 
at 3142 Gough street, near Chestnut. 



Music Week, which begins next Monday and ends Sat- 
urday, November 3. promises to be specially attractive 
this year, and the various men and women entrusted 
with the chairmanships of important committees have 
worked faithfully and loyally in the cause. We received 
detailed information too late for inclusion in these col- 
umns, but shall have more to say regarding this institu- 
tion of musical education in San Francisco next week. 



Mrs. Abbie Gerrish Jones, formerly on the staff of the 
San Francisco office of the Pacific Coast Musical Re- 
view, and now representative of this paper in Seattle, 
Wash., was a visitor in San Francisco last week, shak- 
ing hands with hundreds of friends and colleagues. 
Mrs. Jones has been residing in Seattle during the last 
three years, some of which time she suffered from a 
broken ankle, due to an unfortunate accident. Mrs. 
Jones is meeting with great success as composer, her 
Rhythmic Songs for Children being used by many 
schools, and orders are constantly received from all 
parts of America and Canada and even from other parts 
of the world, including South Africa. Mrs. Olive Wilson 
Dorritt of Berkeley is the business manager, and also 
writes the text and description to Mrs. Jones' music for 
these Rhythmic Songs. Hundreds of letters testify to 
the excellent impression the book is making, and Mrs. 
Jones has had several offers to sell out to prominent 
publishing houses, but her success is such that she is 
justified to refuse all such offers. Mrs. Jones will write 
a bi-monthly letter to this paper from Seattle, letting 
us know what musical people in the Northwest are 
doing. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Muggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose. Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



SAN JOSE. Oct. 16— Margaret Matzenauer. prima 
donna contralto of the Metropolitan Opera House de- 
lighted a large audience Friday evening at the .Morris 
K. Daley Memorial Auditorium of the State Teachers' 
College. Madame Matzenauer was assisted by George 
Vause. accompan'st. who also played a group of three 
modern compositions. 

Too much cannot be said of this wonderful concert. 
It was all that was expected and more. Madame 
.Matzenauer has great personal appeal. Emotional 
values are not slighted, she puts so much lire and dash 
In her song. She feels every phrase What greater 
compliment can be paid? At the close of her first group 
the prima donna was given a massive bouquet of deli- 
cate shaded chrysanthemums which she received with 
gracous res|>onse. placing It upon the piano. 

Each number was a gem, though stress must be 
placed on her German group, it being particularly love- 
ly. Madame Matzenauer changed the order of the pro- 
gram by sing ng My Heart is Weary from Nadeschda. 
first l.ieurances liy the Waters of Minnelonka was 
given for recall The German group followed, wllh In 
the Time of Roses (RelchartI the recall number. Then 
came Mr. Vause s numbers, playing Detts Juba Dance 
for recall. Madame .Matzenauer was obliged to repeat a 
number of her third group, the dashing Estrellita, which 
she gave with full Spanish feeling, followed by De 
Koven's Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes for recall. 
La Forge's To a Messenger was given for recall to the 
last group. 

The program In full: My Heart Is Weary, from 
Nadeschda (G. Thomas); (a) Wldmung (Schumann), 
llil Immer leiser wlrd mein Schlummer (Hrahmsl, (c) 
Nile DInge haben Sprache IK. WolfTl; (d) Zueignung 
(K. Strauss); plano~(a) Ragamuflln from lyondon 
Pieces (John Irelandl. (bl Prelude, from .Modem Suite 
iMacDowell), (c) Humoresque (Rachmaninoff); (a) 
Over the Steppe (Gretchanlnoff), (b) Wings of Dream 
lArensky). (c) EstrelPta (Ponce— arranged by La 
P'orgel (d) En Cuba (Cuban Folk Song— arranged by 
La Forge); (a) Wings of Night (Watts), (b) Take, O 
Take Those Lips Away (La Forge) (c) Lullaby (C. 
Scott), (rt) We'll to the Woods and Gather May (Griffes). 

This was the Initial concert In a course of six to be 
presented during the season of 1923-24 by the San Jose 
.Musical Association. 

Warren D. Allen, organist at Stanford University, 
whose recitals at the Memorial Church attract attention 
far and near, will give the following program Thursday 
afternoon. October 18. at 4:15: Toccata and Fugue in 
D minor (J. S Bach); Dreams, from the Seventh Sonata 
(Alexander Gullmant); Canzone, from the Seven 
Sketches (Edward Shippen Barnes); Chorale from the 
Second Symphony (Louis Vierne). 

At the Vesper Musical Service Sunday afternoon, 
October 21. at 4 o'clock, Thursdays program will be re- 
peated. On Tuesday, October 2,1, at 4:15 p. m., Mr. 
Allen will be heard In the following numbers: Trio- 
Sonata In D minor. Andante— Adagio e dolce (Bach); 
l.'organo Primitive (Pletro A. Yon); Souvenir Poetlque 
(Zdenko Pibich); Finale from the First Symphony 
(Louis Vierne). 

The San Jose Music Study Club ushered In the new 
season Wednesday morning. October 10. at Sherman, 
Clay & Company's recital hall, with Charles Wakefield 
Cadman's Sayonara. a Japanese romance, with words 
by Nclle Richmond Eberhart. Written for two voices, 
Hannah Hetcher Coykendal sang the part of Haru, with 
Mrs. AllM-rt Dutton singing Oguri, the young lover. 
Bits have been taken from this delightful Sayonara 
before, but this was the first time it had been given In 
San Jose in its entirety. The voices of Mrs. Coykendall 
and Mrs. Dutton blend beautifully, and with Mrs. David 
Atkinson at the piano the number was well Interpreted. 
Mrs. Reuben Walgrcn. the possessor of a rich mezzo 
soprano voice, sang a group of three Indian songs, the 
first being Zunl I^overs' Wooing Song ITroyer), (b) 
Lullaby (Lleurance), (c) Long Song (Lleurance, with 
Mrs Daiale L. Drinker at the piano. 

At the conclusion of this Interesting program the 
members and their guests adjourned to the Young 
Women's Christian Association, where in a private 
dining room, luncheon was served at small tables. .Miss 
Nella Rogers, of the faculty of the Conservatory of the 
College of the Pacific, concluded the pleasant event 
with an Interesting account of her experience during 
the summer in San Francisco, having been an auditor 
In tbe Louis Qraveur Master Classes. 



The Saturday afternoon Club of Santa Cruz had a 
brilliant opening of lu l!i23-24 season on Saturday eve- 
ning. October 15 The init al program was given In the 
lobby of the Casa del Rey, about 400 In attendance. The 
California .Mixed Quartet of San Francisco were the 
artists on this occasion. The personnel of the organiza- 



tion Includes Carl Edwin Anderson, tenor and director; 
Marian Hover Brower, soprano Ruth Waterman Ander- 
son, contralto; Henry L. Perry, bass; Beatrice L. Sher- 
wood, accomimnist. The program follows: Dream of 
Love (Llebestraum, No. 3 — Franz Liszt), quartet; VissI 
d'arte e d'amore (La Tosca— Pucdnl). Marian llovey 
Brower; (a) La ci darem la niano (Don Giovanni — 
Mozart), (b) Love Like the Dawn Came Stealing (Cad- 
man). Mr. and Mrs. Anderson; (a) The Land o' the Leal 
(arranged by W. Grlfllth). (b) Duncan Gray (arranged 
by W. Griflltli). quartet; (a) Spring Song of the Robin 
Woman, (b) Recitative and Song from the American 
Opera Shanewls (Charles Wakefield Cadraan). Ruth 
Waterman Anderson; Ave Maria (Bach-Gounod), with 
V olln obligate by Josephine Parker Rittenhouse, quar- 
tet; In a Persian Garden (Liza Lehman), quartet. 

The Conservatory of music at the College of the Pa- 
cific began the new year September 24th with increased 
regislralion, a high degree of talent in the incoming 
class and most of the classes proving too large for the 
class rooms The three scholarships offered by the 
Conservatory were won by the following: Mr. Earl 
Brashear in piano. Miss Ruth Madden In violin and Mr. 
Krerirlc Roehr in voice. 

The opening recital of the year was given by Allan 
Bacon, organist. Miles A. Dresskell. violinist and 
Charles M. Dennis, baritone, assisted by Miriam Bur- 
ton and Jules .Moullet as accompanists. One of the num- 
bers particularly worthy of mention was Pipes o" the 
.North from the pen of Charles M. Dennis. Still In the 
manuscript and sung by the composer, this very musical 
song bold, dashing — virile in style, brought forth much 
favorable comment. 

The program, which was heard by an especially large 
and appreciative audience, follows (a) Toccata in D 
minor (.Max Kegeri. ibi Carillon lEric Delamarlerl. (cl 
Choral— Improvisation (Sigfrld Karg-Elert). Mr. Bacon; 
Vision Fugitive (llerodiade — Massenet). Mr. Dennis; 

(a) Hullamzo Balaton (Hubay), (b) Finnish Romance 
(Palmgran), (c) Pale Moon (Logan) (d) Guitarre 
(Moszkowskl), Mr. Dresskell; (a) Waldweben (Forest 
Murmurs — Richard Wagner), (b) A Joyous March (Lea 
Sowerby), Mr. Bacon; (a) Brown Men (Burt. — Bralne), 

(b) Ivcetle Bateese (Drummond.— O'Hara). (c) Eleglc 
(Whitman. — Campbell-Tipton), (d) Pipe o' the North 
(Mss.— Suttnni C. M. Dennis. 

The second recital of the year will be given October 
23 when Helen Fletcher Riddell. soprano, the new ad- 
dition to the teach ng force, and Jessie S. Moore. 
pianist, will be heard In a joint recital. 

A beautiful and permanent home for the Institute 
of Music has just been purchased, according to LeRoy 
V. Brandt, director of the school. The new building is 
located at 97 South Sixth street, just across the street 
from the campus on which stands the San Jose High 
School, the San Jose State Teachers' College, and the 
San Jose free public library. It stands in the center of 
population of San Jose, as well as in the midst of the 
educational focal points. 

The purchase of the new building has been Inspired 
by the growth of the Institute, and made necessary by 
the fact that the demand for the work of the school 
necessitates a permanent location. 

The building in which (he Institute will now be housed 
is one of the most beautiful in San Jose. It contains 
eleven large teaching rooms, of which the majority on 
the lower floor may be thrown into one for recital 
purposes. The entire place is to be redecorated both 
Inside and out. The recital room will be equipped with 
a Stelnway grand piano, while the other rooms are 
furnished with other standard makes. Rooms for the 
band and violin teachers will be suitably furnished tor 
their line of work. 

It is announced that a series of students recitals 
will be started as soon as the work of remodeling and 
redecorating Is completed, while the winter will also 
see several faculty recitals held. 

Miss Marjory Marckres Fisher left last week for New 
York City where she will continue her study of the 
violin. Miss Fisher plans studying the comi)ositions of 
the modern composers under guidance of the com- 
posers. She will do some work with Cecil Burleigh in 
Chicago, stopping en route to the eastern metropolis. 
Miss Fisher is very active in musical circles and will 
be greatly missed here Among her many activities she 
has gained recognition In the musical world throughout 
the state as diretcor and organizer of the California 
I.,adles' String Quartette. A member of Mu Phi Epsilon. 
an honorary musical sorority, she is both a local and 
state officer, and Is an active member of the San Jose 
Music Study Club. For the past seven or eight years 
Miss Fisher haa been San Jose correspondent for 
Musical America. 

The Santa Clara County branch of the State Music 
Teachers' .Association held (heir initial meeting of the 
year Tuesday evening, October 9, al Sherman, Clay & 
Company. At the conclusion of the business meeting 
Miss Nella Rogers and Charles M. Dennis, both of 
whom were auditors In the Graveur Master Classes held 
In San Francisco this summer, told of their experiences, 
considerable discussion followng their talks. The No- 
vember meeting will be given over to the piano teachers 
who attended summer classes. They will have charge 
of the program and a piano round table discussion will 
be conducted. 



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THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 


LeRoy V. Brant, Director 


Ullrr. < ourara In .Ml llrnn.hra ..1 Mu.lr at 


All Tilasra of .\dt anrrmrni 


»*>• JO«K Ctl.ll'-OnMA 



MRS. MILES A. DRESSKELL 

AniMiunrew thv opt-nlitic or lit?r Nttidlu 

469 Morse Street 

I*hone «.'t^i2-W 
Available fur CunfcrlH and Rrrllalii 



Hannah Fletcher Covkendall 



riila 



r.-u 



ISOTRK DAME COLKKliK OF .Ml'SlC 

San JoHK. Cal. 
ronfera Ut-KrecH, AnnrdM <_V rlin«'«trii. <«niplcic iollm* 
ConHervalorr and Ai-ndrmlo Vaurnen In IMiinn. \ lolln. 
Harp, •Cello. Voice, llorniMnr. O.unlei point. < niton nnd 
KuKur and Science of MunIc. For pnrllrulnrit Ipply <o 



HIjtte 



JOSE MISIC COMPANY 

AnderNon nrntbern 
)«, I'fannnirrnphH. HerordM. Sheet Manic, Vlollnn, 
^landolint — SiudloH at M<»derale Kntei* 

San JoMe. Cnllfornli 



rho 



WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 



SYmp»Y 

ORCHESTRA 

ALrH£DH£KTZ CONDUCTOK. 

NEXT FRIDAY, 3:00 P. M. 

NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P. M. 

Curran Theatre 

HORACE BRITT 

•( i:l.l.lsT 

PROCR.VM 

SVMPHOW NO. 2 - - - - SAINT.SAENS 

SCIii:I,OMO ----- ERMJST ni.ocH 

(Solo 't'ello and Orchi-Kira) 

HOR.*CE URITT 

IMPilR*iSIO\S n'IT\l.lfc: - - nlABPFVTIER 



S.\N FR,\NCISCO 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

ALFRED HERTZ. Tondartor 
FIR.ST I'OIM I. \R CONCERT 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

\\i:i)m:m)av K\i:MN<i. oct. ;ii 

CLAIRE 

DUX 

THK FAMO( S SOrRA\0. (ilEST ARTIST 

RcKened SeatH — 91. 75e. nOe and 25c 

t.\o War Taxi 

Now on Sale at Sherman. Clay & Co.s 
Make Checks Payable to 



Di 



Supervisor J. Emmet Haytlt 
ion Auditoriui 
Board of Supt 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

PRIVATE AND CLASS LESSONS 
LECTURES ON IV1USIC APPRECIATION 



San Francisco. 807 Kohler & Cliase BIdg. Tel. 
Kearny 5454. Wednesday from 2-6 p. m. only. 
Berkeley. 20 Brookside (off Claremont Ave.) Tel. 
Berkeley 4091. Mornings at Anna Head School. 



BEST MUSIC IN TOWN 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



LIPSCHULTZ MUSIC MASTERS 
HAROLD STANTON 

r\\<IIO\ A MARCU 

"IDEAS" 
"HER REPUTATION" 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''Soulful" 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 




^eiv Son^s by Jarries (f-Tljiic Derm id 

^^THO* ^^ ^^ /^TIIFVCMAII I 

SHADOWS FALL 




MEDIUM LOW 



CHARITY 



HIGH MEDIUM LOW 



TNEY SHALL RUN 
ANDNOTBEWEARir 



FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER. Inc. 235 South Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. 




LEADING CONCERT 
ATTRACTIONS 



elby C. Oppenhe 



TITO SCHIPA 

ForemoNl I.yric Tenor — Chiengo 

Oiiera'H Bi»;KeKt Star 

Colnmbia Theatre 

St NDAV AI-'TS., VOV. 4th and Ilth 

EFREM ZIMBALIST 

Grent KuNKinn ViitliniMt 

KhKl Reoitnl Here in Four Year.i 

(olumltia Theatre 

SI M)AV AFT.. \OV. IMh 

JOSEF LHEVINNE 

Ku»s.iiin Pianisllc Genius 
(alumliin Thcatrr 
S1M>AV AFT., XOV. 25lh 
ARTHl R PVII. 

RUBINSTEIN- KOCHANSKI 



Joint Sonata and Solo Recital 
Ru>isi:r.H FainouM Piani.st and Violinin 
(olumlna Theatre 
SI M> W AFT.. iti:c. nth ^_ 

co.>ii.\g: anna CASE, Soprano 
SCHUMANN-HEINK 
SOUSA and His Band 

Tif'ketH on s.-il»- at Sherman, flay & Co. 



MUSIC WEEK CONCERT 

When such well known and efficient artists as Hother 
Wismer and Mrs. William Ritter offer their services 
without charge to the Committee in charge of the San 
Francisco Music Week, the music loving public is prom- 
ised a very elaborate and interesting program in gen- 
eral. These artists have volunteered to give the fol- 
lowing program at the San Francisco Public Library 
on the afternoon of October 31st, and we bel.eve that 
they will be compl.mented with a packed audience on 
that occasion. 

Their program is of the highest class and is as fol- 
lows: Sonata D Minor (Niels Gade), dedicated to Rob- 
ert Schumann. Hother Wismer, violinist, and Mrs. Will- 
iam Ritter, pianist; Slavonic Dance, G M nor (Dvorak 
Kreisler), La Capricieuse (Elgar), La Chasse (Cartier), 
Mr. Wismer and Mrs. Ritter. 

It is expected that other professional talent will fol- 
low the example set by Mr. Wismer and Mrs. Ritter 
and give their best efforts and talent to make the com- 
ing Mus.c Week a glorious success. The Committee are 
indebted to Mrs. William Henry Banks for her success 
in securing the services of the above named artists. 



Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco 

Horace Britt 



SISTING ARTIST 



Tuesday Evening, Oct. 30 

SCOTTISH RITE HALL 



IM, SKATS Rr>F:R\KD 

Six <'<>n<'ertsl — »in,00. »r.OO. «.( 
At Sheriiinn. Clay A: Ci>. 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 

TE.\CHER OF I'I.%.>0 — ACCOMP.IMST 
Ddio; lOOO I nion Street Tel. Franklin 142 



MME. S. P. MARRACCI 



MUSIC WEEK CONCERT AT CIVIC AUDITORIUM 

Through the efforts of the popular president of the 
Pacific Musical Society. Mrs. William Henry Banks, the 
following program will be given on the evening of No- 
vember 1st at the Civic Auditorium with Mrs. Zel.a Vais- 
sade as the contributing artist: Musetta Waltz, La Bo- 
heme, (Puccini), Solvejg's Song (Grieg), May Morning 
(Manney). 

Mrs. Vaissade is a lyric soprano and a pupil of Law- 
rence Strauss the well known vocal pedagogue. She 
also studied with Percy Rector Stephens of New York 
for two summer seasons. She is the soprano solo'st in 
the First Congregational Church in Berkeley, and in 
1921 was the state and district winner in the young art- 
ists contests, held under the auspices of the National 
Federation of Musical Clubs. She is a graduate of the 
University of California. Mrs. Cecil Hollis Stone will 
be the accompanist. George Cochrane, with Miss Gladys 
Boys at the piano, will render the following: Aria Elijah 
(Mendelssohn), Lift Thine Eyes (Logan), on the same 
occasion. , 

Music Week will be celebrated at the Arrillaga Musical 
College by a concert of numbers contributed by mem- 
bers of the faculty, including President Achille Artigues, 
who will play an organ Toccata and Fugue in D Minor 
by Bach; Carl Rollandi pianist, a group including De- 
bussey's Reflections in the Water; George Edwards, 
pianist, in Liszt's St. Francis of Paula Walking on the 
Waters; Raymond White and Mrs. Cecilia Arrillaga 
Plummer with a two-piano duet; a violin group by Emil 
Hahl; and Mynard Jones, basso cantante, in the Pro- 
logue to Pagliacci. The public is cordially invited to at- 
tend. 

The San Francisco Music Teachers' Association will 
open Music Week with a program and reception to the 
Alameda County Music Teachers' Association on Mon- 
day evening. October 29. in the ballroom of the Court 
Hotel. 555 Bush street. The Alameda County Music 
Teachers' Association will present the following pro- 
gram: Piano Duet — For two pianos — Misses Edwards 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

CURRAN 



MOISEIVITSCH 


Friday Matinee, Nov 


. 9 


"IMPRESARIO" 


Friday Matinee. Nov. 


23 


Quartet of VICTOR 


ARTISTS Fri. Mat., Dec 


. 7 


HEIFETZ 


Friday Matinee, Jan. 


18 


"COSI FAN TUTTE 


Friday Matinee, Feb 


. 1 


ROSENTHAL 


Friday Matinee, Feb, 


15 


IVOGUN 


Friday Matinee. Feb. 


29 


CHAMLEE 


Friday Matinee, March 


14 


WERRENRATH 


Friday Matinee. March 


28 



<on TicketK on Sale for These Nine .Vtfractions 
Further Reduced Scale at Sherman. Clay & Co. 

PRICES — 910.OO, si:t.5o. 911-0O. «».oo, 97.00 

(PluH Tax> 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Stadio 670 8th Ave. Phone Bayview 5543 



and Towler; Group of Songs — Lawrence Strauss: Ad- 
dress — Prof. AUoo of the University of California; Trio 
for violin, cello and piano — Messrs. Orley See, W. Vil- 
lalpando and Kosloff. After the conclusion of the pro- 
gram a reception will be tendered the visiting artists 

and members. . 

Ashley Pettis, the brilliant young California pianist, 
who is gaining such marked distinction throughout the 
United States, is now on his way to the Pacific Coast, 
giving concerts in all leading music centers. Mr. Pettis 
is receiving splendid recognition for his artistic achieve- 
ments by leading musical authorities, and he is spe- 
cially commended for giving opportunities to efficient 
American composers on his programs. Indeed, his pro- 
grams are confined to the works of American creative 
artists, among which he includes some from California. 
In a recent issue of the Musical Courier of New York, 
Mr. Pettis 'receives editorial commendation for his 
active defense of the American composer. We shall 
have more to say about Mr. Pettis presently. Be sure 
to hear him when he gives his concert. 




PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 



No. 10778 met No. 10623 in 
Yokohama in September, 
1922. (exact date unknown). 
It come about tbis way. One morn- 
ing early in the month, one Leon 
Lang of San Francisco found in his 
morning mail lbi» telegram: "Ship 
first tlcamer No. 10778 zinc-lined 
box Godowsky Yokohama." A 
lerie and prosaic telegram, yet ro- 
mance has strange beginnings. 
Twenty-four hours later No. 10778 





c. He 

instantly the 

variation in 

quality, but 

mechanicul and the 

I'lural elements be- 

I that quality, it is 

job to observe for 

I have just passed 

through an experience 

with the two most reraark- 

inlo my charge. 

of them came from Kohler & Chase, 

point to see them in San Frai 



Knowing thai 
1 have made 

route fn 

the Orient, where for the past year I have 
been on lour with Mr. Godowsky as hig 
piano luner. During his three months' 
lour in South America (1 was engaged in 
Buenos Aires) we carried Knabe Con- 
cert Grand No. 10623 from their New 
York store. When we sailed for the 
Orient, Mr. Godowsky considered it ad- 
visable to add a second piano, knowing 
the extreme difEcullies of climate and 
transportation. This one iNo. 10 
shipped from San Francisco. It was a 
wise deciftion, for at one lime No. 10778 
was lost in the snows of Manchuria for 
two months, finally turning up after what 
muitl have been untold vicissitudes, for 
itA traveling case was so badly battered 
that the trani^portation companies re- 




was below decks and westward 
bound. At the same time No. 
10623 was under way from the west 
coast of South America. Their 
meeting was undemonstrative — 
although they were both from the 
bitme town, had been brought up 
together — tended by the same 
hands, and sent into the world 
with the same mission. But at 
Yokohama the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones tell it. 



San Francisco, CALiFORNtA, May 22, 1923. 
fused to accept it. From the devastating Arctic cold 
of the Manchurian steppes to the blistering heat of 
the Javanese jungles, these two Knahes have been for 
nearly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
punishment, including months in the sticky, saturat- 
ing moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
pianoforte. From Hawaii to the Philippines, through 
all the cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Straits 
Settlements, and many of the less frequented by-ways 
of the Orient— I do not believe that the history of 
music records the equal of this unique tour, or the 
accorded this great artist in these music- 
rorncrs of the globe, or the equivalent of the 
los that supported him. Days of travel over 
ds of Java, the man-handling of countless 
the punishment of oriental transportation in 
1 trains, in queer conveyances of all kinds — 
lonths of it. At times it was heart-breaking, 
instruments carry many scars of battle, but 
lily they have remained steadfast. Outside some 
rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich, as 
perfect as the first day Mr. Godowsky 
touched their keys. To me the power of 
resistance of the Knabe piano is almost 
supernatural. 1 have travelled with many 
artists in all parts of the world; in Eu- 
rope I was familiar with the German 
pianos that are built like stodgy battle- 
ships, but no piano in even ordinary 
continental tours has equalled this per- 
formance. If I had made these two 
Knabes I should feel very proud. Inci- 
dentally I am not in any way connected 
with the Wm. Knabe Company— nor do I 
even know them except through the in- 
ternational reputation of their instru- 
ment. Francis E. Jones, 

London and Buenos Aires. 



hungry- 



boats, 
and m 
Both 





Ma.t 

feet have ut at o 

another practically every 

pianist of our day. 



Leopold Godowsky 

. with rare conhitleration, concedes to his piano tuner 

lege of telling his own story. 

>wsky has paid his tribute to the Knabe time and agai 
as he himself said in an interview: "Mr. Jones has soi 
g more interesting to say about those two pianos than I 

other artist has ever said. Let him tell it. He deserves 
lund him in Buenos Aires and carried him away to 
^nl because of his unusual qualities." So, thanks to 
kujI consideration of the great artist, we are able to o: 
most remarkable piano story ever told. 



Incidentally, both of these instruments are stock pianos 
(not specialty made), one from the New York tcarerooms 
and one from the Kohler & Chase store in San Francisco 



►KOHLER- er * CHASE- 

J6 O'FARRELL STREET ■ SAN FRANCISCO 

SACRAMENTO 
SAN JOSE 



KNABE 




AMHCO 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address. Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kobler & Chase Building. 
San Francisco. 

1. What operas has Giordano written besides An- 
drea Chenier? — G. W. 

Maia Vita, Regina Diaz, Fedora, Siberia, Madame 
Sans Gene, and Tlie Jest. 

2 What is meant by melisma? — T. S. M. 

This term (a Greek word meaning song) was formerly 
used to designate a tune or melody in distinction from 
a recitative. In modern music it is applied to melodic 
groups of notes sung to one syllable. It is particularly 
employed to give oriental color. Pine examples are to 
be found in Verdi's Aida and in Goldmark's Queen of 
Sheba. 

3. When did Jenny Lind sing in America? — I. B. 
Her first .American appearance was in New York, 

September 11, 1850. She remained in America a little 
less than two years thereafter. 

4. Who wrote the music of Home, Sweet Home? 
— M. A. G. 

The air is a Sicilian«melody of unknown origin, The 
music was adapted to the words by Sir Henry R. Bishop 
and introduced into his opera Clari. or The Maid of 
Milan John Howard Payne, the author of tlie verses, 
and Bishop's librettist for Clari, tells of first hearing 
the air in Italy sung by a peasant girl, writing it down 
from her singing, and sending it to Bishop for adapta- 
tion. Bishop happened to know the air. 

5. When did Rosenthal, the pianist, last appear in 
this country?— R. A. 

In the season of 3906-1907. 



AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

The first of the second series of popular concerts by 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred Heitz. 
conductor, under the direction of the municipality, bids 
fair to crowd the Exposition Auditorium to the doors 
next Wednesday evening, October 31. Successful as was 
last season, the five concerts to come will be even more 
popular, according to the prediction of Chairman J. Em- 
met Hayden of the Auditorium Committee of the Board 
of Supervisors, who states that the advance sale has 
exceeded all expec^tations. 

Conductor Hertz has prepared a program of wonder- 
ful appeal for the opening concert and the various num- 
bers have' been selected with scrupulous care. The 
guest soloist of the evening will be Mile. Claire Dux, 
a .soprano of the Chicago Opera Company and a truly 
cosmopolitan artist. She was born on Polish territory 
and her ancestry represents several nationalities. Al- 
though both of her parents were musical, her mother 
be'ng related to the famous Clara Schumann, wife of the 
great composer, she is the first professional musician 
in her family. Following her debut in Italian and Ger- 
man opera at Milan and Berlin with Caruso, Mile. Dux 
enjoyed a notable London season, where she sang at 
Covent Garden. 

The concert, for which seats range in price from 
twenty-five cents to one dollar, will begin at 8:20 o'clock 
and the program is as follows: Symphony No. 5, From 
the New World (Dvorak); Aria, Deh vieni non tarder, 
from The Marriage of Figaro (Mozart), Mile Dux: Lieb- 
eslied (Kreisler), Caprice Viennois (Both KreJsler num- 
bers orchestrated by Alfred Hertz): Agathe's Aria from 
l)er Freichutz (Weber), Mile. Dux; March from Tann- 
hauser ( Wagner). 



MOTHER WISMER'S ANNUAL RECITAL 

Hother Wisraer will give his annual recital on Friday 
evening. November 9, in the ballroom of the Fairmont 
Hotel. The popular violinist will be ass'sted upon this 
occasion by Benjamin S. Moore, pianist, and Eva Koenig 
Friedhofer, vocalist. Mr. Wismer has chosen an un- 
usually ambitious program, one containing several well 
known classics and a number of novelt'es which have 
never been heard in this city. The following numbers 
will be played: Adagio, Op. 145 (Spohr), Opus 42 (For 
violin alone). (Max Reger): Violin Concerto D Mnor. 
Opus r,8 (Max Bruch). first time in San Francisco. Ho- 
ther Wismer: Songs — Love Forever, serenade (Brnhms). 
Longing at Rest. Cradle Song of the Virgin (Brahms), 
with viola ohligato. Mrs. Eva Koenig Friedhofer; Ro- 
mance. Opus. 42 (Max Bruch), Pastorale (Mary Carr 
Moore), Andnnte Cantabile (Theodore Vogl), San Fran- 
cisco Composers; La Chasse (J. B. Cartier). Mr. Wis- 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

For the concert of the Pacific Musical Society to be 
given on the evening of Thursday. November 8th. at 
the Fairmont Hotel, the president, Mrs. William Henry 
Banks, has arranged a program which will not only 
be entirely different from previous occasions, but will 
prove of derided Interest to those members who arr- 
looking for original presentations from time to tinu 
The artists engaged for the evening are: Kaietan Atd 
the harpist of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestr;i 
Miss Augusta Hayden, lyric soprano, and the Mozart 
sonata for two pianos, to be played by Miss Esther 
Delninger and Mrs. Albert George Lang, both members 
of the board of directors of the society. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



•k 



MABEL RIEGELMAN 



PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 



PUPILS ACCEPTED 



ADDRESS: 485 CALIFORNIA ST.. SAN FRANCISCO 



• 



MARY GARDEN AN ALLURING CONCERT SINGER 

Famous Prima Donna. Assisted by Gutia Casini. Cellist, 

and George Lauweryns. Pianist, Present a Well 

Chosen Program at Auditorium 

By CONSTANCE H. ALEXANDRE 

Selby C. Oppenhelmer opened his concert season for 
1923-1924 by presenting Mary Garden in a song recital. 
She was ass'sted by Gutia Casini. cellist, and George 
liauwerjTis, pianist. This was Miss Garden's first ap- 
pearance in this city after an absence of close on to 
two years. As the prima donna made her entrance upon 
the stage of the Civic Auditorium on Sunday afternoon, 
October 21, exquisitely gowned in a creation such as 
only Mary Garden can wear with grace, the warmth 
and spontaneity of the reception accorded her mani- 
fested the high esteem in which she is regarded by San 
Francisco concert and opera devotees. 

For quite a number of years Miss Garden has puzzled 
some of the most learned musical connoisseurs and 
caused more than one controversy between critics and 
vocal authorities as to whether or not she has a voice; 
whether she is an exponent of bel canto or if she em- 
ploys the more declamatory style of singing. These 
questions still remain unsettled in the minds of many. 
but the fact is obvious that, no matter what her method 
of vocalization is. whether her voice is a good one or 
otherwise, this vocal organ is the medium for express- 
ing the* most profound and varied human emotions. It 
responds to the wishes of its possessor who may be con- 
sidered more of an interpretor than a mere vocalist. 

Miss Garden, who has an innate susceptibility for the 
fine art of nuances as well as to the prevalent atmos- 
phere mood of a song, is enabled through her voice to 
paint a picture or tell a story in tone colors, conveying 
an impression that many another singer, with a more 
naturally beautiful endowment, is unable to accomplish. 
If Mary Garden is a "voiceless" singer, at least we must 
admit she is a brainy one. 

Once again Miss Garden interpreted for us the ana 
Depu-s le jour from Charpentier's Louise the opera 
which, some years ago. brought the name of Mary be- 
fore the Parisian public overnight. This is one of the 
most beautiful and charming arias in the repertoire of 
modern French opera, not only from the melodic point 
of view, but also because of the emotional suggestion 
in which it is steeped. There is no artist more adapted 
to interpret modern music than Miss Garden, for her 
style is typically that of the French school. Never d'd 
I hear her sing this excerpt with lovelier tone quality. 
She colored every mus'cal phrase with delicate lights 
and shades and laid equal stress upon coloring every 
word, thus revealing the dramatic values contained 
therein as well as its poetical import. 

The aria from La Boheme and Habanera from Car- 
men were Miss Garden's other operatic contributions, 
while her songs were of a most diversified character 
To each of these Miss Garden gave the full measure of 
her artistic impetuosity, which means a super-abund- 
ance of imaginative powers, creative skill, musical in- 
telligence and that rare and greatly desired attribute- 
individuality. Miss Garden is and always will be one 
of the most dynamic and fascinating personalities on 
the concert and operatic stage. 



The name of Gutia Casini is not a new one to us for 
his playing made an indelible impression upon those 
who heard him here several years ago when he appeared 
as assisting artist to Madame Marcella Sembrich and 
upon another occasion with Madam Frances Alda. Mr. 
Cas'ni is entitled to be mentioned with the foremost 
contemporary 'cello virtuosi for he is an artist of the 
first magnitude. Mr. Casini is more than an expert 
technician who through diligent work has acquired com- 
plete mastery of his instrument. A musician of unusual 
depth and seriousness of purpose, one who is ent rely 
devoid of mannerisms. Mr. Casini plays with an ex- 
quisitely luscious and brilliant tone, a pol.shed style 
and genuine interpretative instinct. 

Upon receiving our programs at this concert, we d's- 
covered that it contained a detached slip of paper on 
which was printed the words "Corrected Program." It 
would have been a better plan to have had st.ll another 
corrected program, had time allowed for the printing 
of it. as almost every number on the newly arranged 
program was changed. If artists are going to substitute 
one number for another, which after all is their privi- 
lege, why not announce the substitution? Why permit 
those who are not so well versed in the standard opera- 
tic and concert literature imagine that they are hearing 
Mr. Casini play the Rococo Variations by Tschaikowsky 
when in reality he is playing an arrangement of a song 
by Robert Franz, known to vocalists as Es hat die Rose 
sich beklagt Miss Garden did not sing the aria from 
Manon Lescaut, but one from La Boheme, ne.ther did 
she sing A Romance by Faure but Berceaux by that 
composer. It is all very well for those who have for 
years attended concerts and have familiarized them- 
selves with the various classics to recognze these 
changes but for the sake of those not so enlightened it 
is only just that they should know what is being played. 
How can they be expected to recall a number upon a 
second hearing if they don't even know the composi- 
tions correct title upon its initial hearing? 



NEW BASSO-CANTANTE IN CONCERT 



George Shkultetsky, a basso, whose voice is regarded 
by all who have heard it as superb, will be heard in 
concert on Monday evening. November 12, in the Col- 
onial ballroom of the Hotel St. Francis, Mrs. John B. 
Casserly will be the able accompanist and the concert. 
will be under the direction of Alice Seckels. The pro- 
gram is one that will delight Americans and Russians 
alike, for it is replete not only with novelties but con- 
tains arias from successful Russian operas. The voice 
of Shkultetsky has remarkable range descending well 
into the region of profundo. but always pure and musi- 
cal in its upper register displaying a liquid quality 
not usually heard in this type of voice. The news that 
Mr. Shkultetsky will be heard in concert has caused 
unusual enthusiasm from the many who have heard 
him informally since his recent arrival after untoward 
adventures which have already been recorded in 
these columns. He will draw from an extended reper- 
toire numbers by Stolpin, Bleiham. Rubinstein, Rach- 
maninoff. Mussorgsky. Glinka. Tschaikowsky. Glier and 
Rimsky-Korsakoff as well as the beautiful air from the 
Mozart opera, The Magic Flute. 



BIG AUDIENCE AT CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 

The sale of single seats for the opening concert of 
the Chamber Music Socety, Tuesday evening, October 
30, opened Monday morning at Sherman. Clay & Com- 
pany. From the lively demand it is evident that Horace 
Britt. the distinguished violoncellist, who appears at 
this concert as guest artist, will receive a hearty wel- 
come from a capacity house. Th's will be Britt's first 
appearance here, since leaving San Francisco three 
years ago to join the Letz Quartet in New York. He is 
exceedingly popular and much admired by the San 
Francisco musical public. 

The program selected by Louis Persinger for the 
opening is remarkably beautiful and well chosen one. 
The Schubert C major Qu ntet with the two 'celli con- 
tains some of the most entrancingly lovely pages ever 
penned in chamber music, and the Schoenberg sestett 
first played here by the Chamber Music Society with 
May Mukle in the 1921-22 season created such a pro- 
found impression that it has been placed on this pro- 
gram, this time with Horace Britt. in response to a wide 
and general request. 

The opportunity of hearing two such superb cellists 
as Mr. Britt and Mr. Ferner together on the same pro- 
gram is a very rare one and will be much enjoyed. 
Single tickets, as well as season seats, can be obtained 
at Sherman, Clay & Company up to and including the 
concert. ^ «. 

HORACE BRITT A WELCOME VISITOR 

Horace Britt. the distinguished Belgian violoncellist, 
for five years cellist of the Chamber Music Society of 
San Francisco and solo cellist of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, arrived early this week from New 
York preparatory to his appearance at the opening 
concert of the Chamber Music Society on Tuesdav eve- 
ning, October 30th, at Scottish Rite Hall. Britt will also 
appear as soloist with the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra on November 2nd and November 4th. He is 
extremely popular here and has a host of friends. This 
will be his first appearance in San Francisco since 
leaving here three years ago. to join the Letz Quartet 
in New York and he is assured of a heartj' welcome by 
a capacity house at the Chamber Music Society concert 
on October 30th. Mr. Britt expressed himself as de- 
lighted at being in San Francisco again and is greatly 
elated over the profound impression made by the Cham- 
ber Music Society of San Francisco in the east last 
year, concerning which eastern musical circles are still 
talking'. He declared that the Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco is acknowledged, beyond doubt, to- 
gether with the Flonzaley Quartet. London String Quar- 
tet and the Letz Quartet, as being among the leaders in 
chamber music in the world today. 



LOEWS WARFIELD THEATRE 

Harold Stanton is again to be heard with Lipschultz 
and the Music Masters at Loew's Warfield theatre dur- 
ing the coming week when the screen attraction will be 
May McAvoy in Her Reputation. The Fanchon and 
Marco Ideas will present a new blending of music and 
mirth wth Elaine Tickner as the prima donna and 
Helen FYitsche as the dancer. 



PATIENCE AT PLAYERS' CLUB 

On Tuesday evening. October 23, we 
attended a performance of Gilbert & 
Sullivan's opera. Patience, at the Play- 
ers' Club and. as on previous occasions, 
when listening to the performances at 
this institution, we were struck with the 
vivaciousness. enthusiasm and ability 
which characterized the work of the par- 
ticipants. Patience is possibly one of 
the most artistic, both from a musical 
and dramatic standpoint, light operas 
written. While it deals with a fad in 
vogue many years ago, its witticisms and 
musical gems are appreciated today. 

The performance was given under the 
musical direction of Eugene Blanchard, 
whom we had never before seen in the 
role of conductor, and we must confess 
that we thoroughly enjoyed his com- 
mand of the orchestra and chorus and 
his dynamic energy in guiding the per- 
formance through its difficult phases 
without a hitch or tiresom* dragging. 
It was evident that Mr. Blanchard was 
in charge and his baton proved the 
power that put the production into mo- 
tion. 

Benjamin J. Purrington, both from a 
histrionic and vocal standpoint, met the 
requirements of the role of Archibald, 
His acting was natural and unaffected 
and his singing was characterized by 
clear diction and accurate phrasing. 
Ruth Scott Laidlaw. as Lady Angela, 
sang with excellent taste and acted with 
conviction. Blanche Hamilton Fox, as 



Lady Jane, was excellent. Vocally she 
sang with sonorous and resonant voice 
and dramatically she brought out every 
point of humor with refined emphasis. 
J. Wheaton Chambers, as the major: 
Nelson McGee. as the lieutenant, and P. 
H. Ward, as the colonel, interpreted 
their roles in accordance with artistic 
ideals, and the traditions of Gilbert & 
Sullivan. They possess fine voices and 
sang the difficult "patter" songs with 
clear diction and precise emphasis. 

Barbara Blanchard sang the title role 
with clear and true voice, looked charm- 
ing, acted with naturalness and ease 
and, indeed, interpreted the role with 
effective artistry. It was a pleasure to 
listen to her. Peggy Tomson. as Lady 
Saphir. and Helen Saunders, as Lady 
Ella, added to the beauty of the ensemble 
and the proficiency of the cast. The 
chorus sang fine and added life to the 
performance, while the orchestra played 
excellently. Chorus and orchestra are 
worthy to be mentioned in detail on this 
account, as follows: 

Chorus of Rapturous Maidens — Lulu J. 
Algar, Adele Burien, Josephine Clement, 
Marion Clement, Audrey Fossey, Geor- 
giana Foote. Jean Gwynn, Helen Grow- 
ney, Meta L. Klinke. Florence Mosher, 
Martha McAnear, Dorothy Norman, 
Gladys Baimieister, Peggy Shearer, Edith 
Smythe, Sally Thomson. Edith West and 
Leah June Cohn. 

Chorus of Officers of the English Dra- 
goons — Elmer Ahl, Charles Dechent. Fred 
EUenberger, Louis R. Elario, Hobart 



Furman, William Goudie, Jr., Walter H. 
Krieger. Russell Lyman. Max McCarthy. 
Joseph Allen. William C. Rice, Alonzo F. 
Stark. 

Orchestra Under the Direction of Eu- 
gene Blanchard — Piano, Rachel E. Ward; 
violins, Bernice Purrington. Harriet 
French: 'cellist. E. G. Swenson. clarinet, 
Luda Dorillon. 

We almost omitted Reginald Travers 
who. as Reginald Bunthorne, gave a 
somewhat heavy though humorous in-' 
terpretation of this famous role. A. M. 



SAN FRANCISCO MUSICAL CLUB 



The San Francisco Musical Club will 
present the following program at its 
meeting on Thursday morning, Novem- 
ber 1: 

Mozart — Pastorale Variee, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Ritter: Secchi — Lungi dal Caro 
Bene, Lully — Bois Etais (air from Aman- 
dis. 1684), Handel — Ombra Mai Pu (air 
serse). Bach — My Heart Ever Faithful, 
Mrs, Edward Lichtenberg, Mrs. Cecil 
Hollis Stone at the piano: Tartini — An- 
dante Bocchevini — Rondo. Mary Cather- 
ine Sherwood, Maybel Sherburne West 
at the piano: Scarlatti — O Cessate di 
piagarmi, Rinaldo da Capua — Aria-Volo- 
greso Dal sen del caro sposo. Gluck — O 
del mio dolce ardor, Scarlatti— Se Flor- 
indo e fedele. Mrs. Reginald MacKay. 
Maybel Sherburne West at the piano: 
Beethoven — Minuette. Turini — Allegretto, 
Brahms — Valse, Marie Hughes Mac- 
quarrie. 



JOSEPH G. J ACOBS ON'S PUPILS 

On October 26 some of the pupils of 
Joseph George Jacobson will give a re- 
cital in the music hall of the Baldwin 
Piano Company on Sutter street. An- 
other recital will be given November 3 in 
the music room of the Public Library. 
Gladys Ivanelle Wilson has been engaged 
to appear on the program arranged by 
Mme. Vought at the Fitzgerald Memorial 
Church on Bush street November 5. She 
will also play November 1 at the Civic 
Auditorium, at which concert Sam Ro- 
detsky has been engaged to appear. 
Marian Patricia Cavanaugh plaved at 
Ebell Hall in Oakland Octoher IS. Sam 
Rodetsky appeared at the Women's 
Press Club concert and in Colma at a 
recital given by Miss M. Guaraldi. Myrtle 
Harriet Jacobs will play at two of the 
moving picture houses during music 
week. Mrs. .Marion Ford will play at 
the concert of the San Francisco Teach- 
ers' College and Florence Reid at a re- 
cital to be given at the Mission Church. 

Following is the program given Octo- 
ber 26: Festival March, for two pianos. 
Myrtle Waitman and Dorothy Kaas; Ma- 
zurka (Godard) and .March of the Dwarfs 
(Grieg I, Florence Reid: Allegro (BachI, 
Impromptu (Schubert). Dorothy Kaas; 
La Fileuse (Raff), polichinelle (Rach- 
maninoff), Myrtle Waitman; Le Ruisseau 
(Wollenhaupt). Alia Mazurka (Nem- 
crewski), Antoinette Rathman; Murmur- 
ing Zephyrs (Jensen), Pas des Aniphores 
(ChaminadeK Myrtle Jacobs: Valse 
(Chopin), Moment Musical (Moszkowski) 
Marion Ford; Valse (Chopin), Fantasie 
Impromptu (ChopinJ, Margaret Lewis. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDG., EIGHTH AND BROADWAY —TEL. METROPOLITAN 4398 
C. C. EMERSON IN CHARGE— BRUNO DAVID USSHER, STAFF CORRESPONDENT 
Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be In the Lo8 Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



LOS ANGELES, Oct 23, — Frances Alda, prima donna 
soprano of the Metropolitan Opera Company of New 
York, opened L. E. Behymer's Tuesday evening Philhar- 
monic Course auspiciously both In regard to her own 
art as to (he audience nhith well nigh tilled the large 
house. Apropos. Behymer indeed Is offering recital 
courses of unsurpassed quality. Alda sings beautifully. 
Some think that her voice sounded better even than 
when she was here a few years ago. There Is no ques- 
tion that she is a vocalist of exceptional merit who 
wins her audience through sheer quality of tone and 
Interpretation. Alda does not belong to the prima donna 
type of the "singing actress"' type. I have not heard 
her in opera, but on the concert stage she wins her 
success with her voice and what is "back of it." refine- 
ment, musicianship, style. It is, rerhaps. for that reason 
that a group or two of her program went by until the 
singer had fully won the appreciation of her audience. 
Nor does Alda in the building of her serious, worthwhile 
program make any b d for easily-won applause. Her 
encores are. like her program selections, of high 
standard While she does not evoke overwhelming ap- 
plause, yet she sincerely touches the hearts of her 
audience. Barring high notes which will not stand 
heavy dynamic weight and a light cloudiness in the 
middle reg'ster tones in the entire wide range are of 
lovely quality and diction nearly always clear no mat- 
ter what language. 

Superb. Indeed, was her presentation of Marguerite's 
prison scene aria from Boilos Melistofele. It is one of 
the most difficult vocal numbers as it demands dra- 
matic calibre and volatile coloratura quality and Alda 
rose brilliantly to the occasion, emotionally delineating 
the various episodes uf the big aria tellingly. She 
nuances exqu sitely as for instance in the Mozart aria, 
II re pastore. where the finely spun tones of her voice 
could be all the more admired when interlaced with 
the i>erfectly adapted viola solo of Lionel Tertis, of 
whom more anon. Whether she sings Rachmaninoff's 
Soldier's Bride, or Soft Footed Snow by Lie. one can 
always enjoy beautiful shading, unaffected, truly human 
feeling. Little wonder that she had to give as many 
as triple encores. 

As for Lionel Tertis, all the exceptional praise ad- 
vance notices have bestowed on this viola player are 
true. He is a virtuoso as well as deeply-feeling player. 
His tones are almost as sweetly sonorous as if he were 
playing a viola damour. They are round, mellow — 
idealized clarinet tones one might say. There is no 
harshness in his viola. They are sweet as those of a 
violin, lucid, but darker, of a pathos denied to the 
violin. In fact, there is a versatility of characterization 
In the viola playing of Tetris which the sister instru- 
ment does not possess, hence the Tambourin Chinois of 
Krt'isItT becanif doubly quaint His own composition. 
Sunset, bespeaks his temperament, as it is quiet, poetic, 
sympathetically unpretentious. One would really love 
to hear this viola virtuoso in a program of bis own Not 
to forget Miss Margaret Hughes of San Francisco, I be- 
lieve, who accompanies most artistically. 



Young as the season Is we have had a sensation In 
the line of uUramodem music when Calmon Luboviski, 
violinist, and May Macdonald Hope, planlste, afforded 
us the Pacific coast premiere of Ernest Bloch's sonata 
at the I^s Angeles Trio concert. It Is exceedingly dif- 
ficult to write amout harmonically so arbitrary a work 
as this, more difficult yet to comment Intelligently. 
The opus Is atonal to an utter extent. There is no key 
signature. Technically it Is of the same disregard, that 
Im to say. extremely difficult. One must, therefore, at 
the very outset, state two things. Musical Los Angeles 
is greatly Indebted to these two artists who have re- 
hearsed hard In the face of an anticipation that only 
few people would like the work and most people would 
not undertsand It. It was a labor of love for the sake 
of giving the modems the opportunity to which they 
ari" entitled, in order lo provide for us the opportunity 
of preparing us for the day when quarter-lone music 
will be Just the thing. (Who does not think of Mme. 
Pompadour and her Apres mol le deluge — After me the 
deluge). Ik'splle the very difficulties the two players 
succeeded to give an impressive performance, although 
one cannot but feel that the composer spites his own 
efforts by writing in this manner. In many regards a 
compelling work, of almost primitive vigor, In the more 
lyric movement of subtle appeal, there is In this move- 
ment melodic material of decided charm, not unlike the 
musical idiom and subject one admired so strongly in 
the same compOHcr's tone poem. Winter, played here 
under Mr. Itolhuell two seasons qko. On the whole the 
sonata requiret* ttev. nil hearings before a definite Judg- 
ment can be given. Suffir e to say that It Is Ihematically 
and rhythmically much broken up, of nervous energy, 
great big sweeping i limuxes are rare. There Is much 
reiteration o( very brief fraKnienla of themes, rhythmic 
n'petHtnn not unlike that of Stravinsky. One also feels 
the Influence of Slrauss To repeat, the players deserve 
warm recognition for devoting Ihemselves to a work 
of limited appeal and one hopes that the cordial applause 
directed more to them than to the opus will induce them 
to continue their sponitorshlp of the new composers. 




FlTZCERALD'S-FoT the cAdvancement of SMuik 

MARIE SUNDELIUS 

One of the Leading Sopranos of 
Metropolitan Opera Co., who will 
appear in Los Angeles, Nov. 29. 

Possessing a great voice and a 
highly cherished reputation. Miss 
Sundelius advances them both by 
using only the KXABE PIANO. 



HILL STREET 



AT 7S7-72& 



KNABE PIANO USED EXCLUSIVELY 



One can speak briefly of the presentations of the 
Mendelssohn D minor trio and of the Smetana G minor 
trios, for the performance was delightful in every re- 
gard. May Macdonald Hope, notwithstanding recent 
Indisposition (in fact swellings on a finger had to be 
lanced and were not yet healed) played with unusually 
facile technic and well shaded tone quality. Mr. Lubo- 
viski's violin sounded particularly well in the farm 
stains of the Bohemian work, while one always enjoys 
the splendid musicianship of the cellist, Ilya Bronson, 
whose fine poise adds much to the ensemble balance of 
the trio. In conclusion there was much applause after 
each movement of both works, not lo forget flowers for 
the pianiste. 

Including on their programs for the coming season 
numbers for the most unusual instrumental combina- 
tions and numbers of ultra-modern character of the 
most interesting order, the Los Angeles Chamber Music 
Society bids fair to become one of the world's outstand- 
ing organizations of its type. Besides presenting an 
array of the classics of standard order, it is delving into 
a world of music which includes manuscripts of the 
foremost American and European composers of today. 
Arthur Bliss stands as one of the foremost figures in 
English music and on the first program of the twelve 
to be presented during the winter, two of the recent 
compositions of this will be played. "Conversat'on" is 
scored for fiute. oboe, violin, viola and cello. "Madam 
Noy." which was so successfully presented last season, 
will be played again on this program. On the same eve- 
ning a Beethoven Quintet for oboe, clarinet, French 
horn, bassoon and piano, and a Mozart Trio will be 
heard. 

A number by the French composer, Chauson, is "Chan- 
son Perpetuelle" for string quartet, voice and piano 
Gertrude Auld Thomas will be the assisting artist in 
this, taking the soprano part. It is worthy of mention 
that in this number the voice is treated more like an 
orchestral instrument than a soloist with ensemble ac- 
companiment. Another French number to be played is 
by Cermaine Trilleferre, entitled "Image." This is scored 
for strings, flute, clarinet, piano and celeste. This is 
the first time this instrument wilt have been used in 
Los Angeles In any chamber music program. Debussy 
will be represented by a quintet. Menu, also French. 
will likewise have a composition for string quartet 
played. 

Schoenberg's "Verklarte Nacht" (Glorious Night) is 
to be given, and this will be one of the few numbers 
from this composer's pen to be played in California this 
year. The composer has been called "Germany's bad 
boy" because he has broken every rule of the classic 
and romantic composers made a new set for himself, 
and broken these. The Belgian composer, Jongen has 
likewise written chamber music that has never been 
heard here; one of his trios Is to he presented this seas- 
on. A quartet by Hlndermith will also be performed. 

Sylvain Noack. the first violinist. Is arranging an Ail- 
American program which will probably be played in 
January. On this program it Is quite possible that he 
will perform John Alden Carpenter's Violin Sonata. A 
number for string quartet and liarp by Inglebrecht Is 
also listed as one of the season's moderns. Besides 
the compoKitions mentioned, Mozart, Beethoven and 
Mendelssohn, most famous of the standard writers for 
chamber music, will be generously represented. Other 
classicists will likewise find a place on the program. 

On December 21 the Chamber Music Society of San 
Francisco, an organization consisting of Louis Persing- 
er, violinist: Louis Ford, second violin; Nathan Fire- 
stone, vlollst. and Walter Ferner, violoncellist, will be 
guest artists, playing an entertaining recital. One of 
the roost noteworthy events of the season will take 
place on April 11, when the London String Quartet will 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium Bidg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COM POSER-PI AN I STE 
1000 South Alvarndii 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

AvallalllF for Conrprm nnd Krrllala 

Limited Number of Advonoed l*upllM %eoepted 

Vlollnlsl I.a« Xnicele. Trio 

Studio: 334 Muale Arta Studio BldK. I*hooe IOON2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 



1324 Soatb FlKoeroB. Lo» \nfcel» 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCBRT :iIASTKIt 1*1111.11 \ K^10\ U' IIKCHKSTK A 

t oiieerl. nnd lle<'llnl> 

HanuKement Mra. Caroline C. Snillh. VH Auditorium Rldic. 



II YA BRONSON ' "f'"'"' 

IL,IH DIVWIICJWII Phiibnrmonlo (Irrkeatra 

Member Trio Intlme. I.u. AnKi'leii Trio, ■•kllkarmouie 

HDartrl Inalrurtkin. ( hnnihrr >luiilr ilerltala 

Sei.'S La MIrada — Phone Hull; .Hl«4 



A.KOODLACH 

Vi<H.I\ ^1 \KKIt AM> Ki-:r\IKF:R 

Connnlxiieur — A|>|>raUpr 

S03 Hajralle Theatre llldic.. Lo> Ansrlra Phone (TO^H 




ELINOR 
REMICK 
WARREN 

I >lfl>Mill-lM A M STE 



Tno at Her Kerorda Junl lielraaed bjr 
•IKKIi UI'H'IIIIII fllMI'ANV 

"OTHERS" 
GOD OUR REFUGE' 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

OLGA STEEB 

Director and Head of the Piano Department 

FANNIE DILLON 

Head of the Department of Theory 

and Composition 

Faculty of Twenty-nine Teachers 

ABilwIed Teachers in Burbank, Claremonl, Holly- 
wood, Los Angeles, Long Beach, Monrovia, Pasa- 
dena, Pomona, Redlands, Riverside, San Diego and 
Santa Monica. 

For Catalog and Full Information 
Address 

OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

453 S. Willon Place Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone 567294 



Frederic Burr Scholl 



ORGANIST 



Grauman's Hollywood 
Egyptian Theatre 

HOLLYWOOD. CALIF. 



CLARA GERTRUDE OLSON 

TE.\CHER-ACCOMPAMST 

Plnno. Harmony. Theory 

Children'M Clasites a Specialty 

110 MuHlc-Art Studio — 821181 Ren. Phone Boyle 5S31 



Alexander Bevani 

OPERATIC COACHING 
TONE DEVELOPMENT 
VOICE PRODUCTION 

Suite 612 So. Calif. Music Co. Bldg. 
Phone 822-520 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTIHE— CO.\CHI.\G I-V REPERTOIRE: 



804 Sherninn-( lar Music Co. Dlde. 



Phone ::S1-S0.% 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

Viin«uncc.-> that his riaxa ix lined and he nill be 
unable to aecefit any nio:e iiupilM unlil furlher 
notice. JESSIE Me. DONALD IMTTERSO.V, A»»i»t- 
an; Teacher. SHIRLEY T.4GG.*RT, Seetetarf. Tel. 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 



Cll\TR\l,TO School of ». 
udio: Tahoe lluildInK 



For Infor 



ell Clnb Ro 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



ABBIE rsORTON JAMISON 



\Ve«t 7707. PIAXO. HARMONY. VOICE COACH. DI- 
RECTOR JAMISON QIARTETTE. Ten weeks' normal 
training course ln-irins <'ie!>teniber ir.th. 

CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 



ANGELO GIUFFRIDA 



Fanioos teacher of Piano. Violin. Sinfrlng. Composi- 
tion. Room 41H, Music A'-tn IJulldinf:. Every day 
from a. m. to 6 p. ni. Half hour of fttrlctly private 
lesNon. 93.00. Pupils of any degree accepted. 



play. They were heard here last season, but without 
their regular first violinist, James Levy, who will be 
with them this year. Thomas W. Petre. H. Waldo War- 
ner and C. Warwick-Evans are the other artists. 



Two American sonatas for violin and piano were 
played the other evening by Sol Cohen and Edna Gun- 
nar Peterson at the Hollywood Musicians Club when 
works by John Powell and Cecil Burleigh had their local 
premieres. The Sonata Virginianesque by John Powell 
is based mostly on airs and dance tunes of the first 
English colony, including a Virginia reel wh^ch sets 
one's feet a-tappng. Powell, with few exceptions adapts 
his harmonization to the original spirit of the tunes. In 
the first two movements the piano part, while by no 
means easy, for Powell himself is a brilliant piano vir- 
tuoso, is, however, not as interesting as in the last move- 
ment where the composer r'ses to very clever elabora- 
tion of his material in both instruments, rhythmically 
and polyrhonically. Altogether it is a tuneful work, 
never deep, but always appealing to the public in its 
sp'rit and musical flow. 

Cecil Burleigh's Ascension Sonata, heralded by Mr. 
Cohen as "very spiritual," did not give that impression, 
at least on first hearing. If one were not to hear the 
coming of the Saviour, his persecution by the mob and 
his ascension in the music, it might prove more effec- 
tive. As it is, however, it seems, while interesting in 
parts, labored, a rather unsatisfactory technical strug- 
gle to express one of the greatest events in human 
history on two instruments. Burleigh may be gong 
his own way, and even a spiritual path at that, but 
the reviewer, failed to perceive. Sincere thanks are 
due to the two performers, who. despite busy days of 
teaching, found time to tackle these difficult scores, 
thus making a plea for our own composers 

Alice Forsyth Mosher was heard in a group of songs 
includ ng three by Hallette Gilberte. (A Rose and a 
Dream) Mrs. M. Hennion Robinson, (Butterflies) and by 
Sol Cohen. Hers is a lovely soprano which she uses 
with good diction and a well nuanced sotto voce. Mrs. 
Carl Henry Arbens is a good accompanist. 



Southern California band contest plans were fur- 
thered when leading band masters met under the aus- 
pices of the Civic Music and Art Associat'on. A. M. 
Perry, Assistant Dean College of Music, U. S. C, acting 
as chairman of the association committee on band. E. B. 
de Groot. chief executive of Boy Scouts, directing 
chairman of the consulting committee About seventy 
bands, numbering approximately 4,000 players, are ex- 
pected to partic'pate in. the contest, not counting thous- 
ands of their friends who will accompany their home 
bands. Two or three days during National Music Week, 
to be held here May 4-11, 1924. will be given over to the 
greatest band contest held in the Pacific West The 
territory from which competing bands will be admitted 
reaches north to Santa Barbara and Bakersfield. in the 
northeast to Bishop, in the south to San Diego, includ- 
ing these communities. Valuable cash prizes and tro- 
phies will be awarded. 

No professional bands will participate in the contest, 
the purpose of which is to stimulate active interest in 
volunteer bands, while in view of public interest ar- 
rangements will be made to secure the entries from 
army, navy and national guard bands, letter carriers, 
firemen's and poP-ceraen's bands. Two or three contest 
classes will be established for school bands, foremost 
h'gh school bands, concertizing and marching. Another 
group will include industrial bands and fraternal, also 
a separate unit for college bands. 

Numerous band entries are expected from smaller 
towns throughout Southern California. Alexander 
Stewart, Pacific Coast community music organizer for 
Community Serv'ce. Inc., and executive secretary of the 
Civic Music and Art Association arranging the contest, 
is opening negotiations with various Southern California 
Chambers of Commerce to finance transportation of 
their local bands to Los Angeles for the contest. In- 
quiries about the Southern Calfomia band contest will 
be answered by E. B. de Groot. Boy Scout Headquarters, 
telephone. University 0414, 930 West 39th Street, who 
is collaborating with A. M. Perry. FYank Carruthers, 
Dr. E M. Hinman. Charles B Moore. George Isbell, 
Alexander Stewart, who also attended yesterday's com- 
mittee meet-ng. Another consultation of the committee 
will be held in two weeks. 



All music organizations '"n Los Angeles may be com* 
bined into one central body to be known as the Los 
Angeles County Music Federation as a result of a 
meeting to be held at the Chamber of Commerce, 
October 30, at 3:30 p. m. Th-'s meeting was arranged 
by representatives of the leading music organizations, 
and the Chamber of Commerce, at a gathering this 
week, which was called and presided over by Mrs. 
Bessie Bartlett Frankel. first vice-president of the Na- 
tional Federation of Music Clubs. Detailed working 
plans for the new organization, it was stated today, will 
be arranged at the coming meeting. 

Mrs. Frankel. when seen after the meeting, gave the 
following details regarding the proposed federation: 
"The Los Angeles County Music Federation is to act 
as a musical clearing house. It will bring into working 
relation within the county all organizations directly or 
indirectly interested in music, thus developing and 
maintaining a higher standard of music. The federation 
will further the interests of all organizations and favor 
none while correlating activities and eliminate duplica- 
tion of purposes. It will work for the musical good of 
Los Angeles. 

"The general consensus of opinion of those present 
as expressed in a resolution adopted shows that the 
need for such an organization is recognized. Each club 
will have one delegate only no matter what its size of 



membership. Of course, the vote taken this noon is not 
binding upon the organizations represented, but the 
various club presidents will lay the matter before their 
board. Only organizations, not individuals, are eligible 
for membership. No, we did not discuss any specific 
aims of the federation nor have we any definite measure 
beyond the resolution of organization." 

Ben F. Pearson, president of the Civic Music and Art 
Association of Los Angeles, was among those who in- 
dorsed the principle of the proposed Los Angeles County 
Music Federaton. "There should be the closest possible 
relationship between the proposed Los Angeles County 
Music Federation and Civic Music and Art Association 
of Los Angeles formed during Music Week last May. 

"Membership in our association is open to individuals 
as well as to organizations, inasmuch as the Civic 
Music and Art Associat'on aims at the development 
of higher citizenship through music, thereby uniting 
various groups heretofore divided by racial, social and 
industrial misunderstandings. The work done by our or- 
ganization has thus proven mutually beneficial. 

■Regarding the proposed Los Angeles County Music 
Federation it would be a wonderful achievement if an 
organization were formed to guarantee to the Civic 
Music and Art Association support in the furtherance 
of its civic ideals toward higher citizenship through 
art, to enable the people of Los Angeles to become the 
creators of their own artistic enjoyment by lending 
their support to the great public-spirited art enter- 
prises of this community, as well as to provide them- 
selves the mean for such recreation on a larger scale 
by the erection of a Municipal Auditorium." 



M. Jeannette Rogers 

First Flutist Metropolitan 
Theatre 



Available for 

Concert-Recital-Club 
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GILDA MARCHETTI 



L. 

of ' 
the 


CANTIEN HOLLYWOOD 

PI A NO— ORGAN— HARMON V 
Hollywood has made a Mlndy of the pwycholopy 
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iber of normal KludentK nil! be aeceiited. 
Studio: 771 North Hill. Pasadena 
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Phllhnrnionle Orchenlra 
II S. PlKoeroa St., Loa ADEel< 



Phone Main 21M 



RAYMOND HARMON 



studio Bide.. Los Ansele>. CalM. 



€ 



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LOS ANGELES LETTER 

iConllnu.d fi..m I'.Tii- :•! 

Mrs. J. J. Carter, founder and prime (actor toward 
tbe continued success ot the Hollywood Bowl open- 
air symptiony season, will, when this reaches the 
readers, be on her transcontinental trip to study orches- 
tral and comTuunity music conditions in important 
cities Mrs. Carter, following the phenomenal success 
of the second season, has received numerous invitations 
from the middle west and the east to address civic 
organizations on niusic.il community problems which 
she solves so well. The journey will also be for re- 
cuperation to pive the musical godmother of the people 
a little relief from the many and trying duties which 
rest on her when she is in Los Angeles. Mrs. Carter 
has long ceased to be only a community worker for the 
suburb of Hollywood She is one of the prominent 
figures in tbe musical life of this city and with this 
wider sphere of activities her constructive vision of 
music for all the people has grown. As this goes to 
press "1-ady Carter" will have spoken to various musical 
and civic bodies in San Francisco. Los Angeles wishes 
her godspeed and a happy return, because it can under 
no circumstances be said of her that "she never will 
be missed." much as Mr. Gilbert of light opera fame 
may be quoted otherwise 



WAGNER CONCERT OPENS NEW SERIES 

By Nelle Gothold 

When that great adventurous spirit. Claudio Monte- 
verde, nearly three hundred years ago made himself 
responsible for the first feeble utterances of an or- 
chestra that tried to sty something for itself, his revela- 
tion of the charm that lies in exploring the resources of 
instrumentation made ro.'*sihle such glorious presenta- 
tions as an evening of Wagnerian Music Drama which 
thrilled the vast audience that crowded the Philhar- 
monic Auditor'um last Monday evening. The concert 
offered a combination of orchestral and vocal selections 
with Margaret Matjienauor. El'zabeth Rothwell. and 
Clarence Whilehill as solo'sts. supported by the mar- 
velous ensemble of the PhMharmonlc Orchestra. 

The opening number from one of Waener's best 
known Lyric Operas was "Overture" from Rienzi. which 
was rendered with excellence and splendid spirit by the 
orchestra under the baton of Walter Henry Rothwell. 
who directs without superfluous flourishes this group of 
skilled musicians. The Introduction to Act III from 
Lohengrin was another brilliant and dazzling accom- 
plishment for the orchestra 

Mme. Rothwell. wife of the director of the orchestra, 
was most enthusiastically received in her group of 
Bonrs. "Im Tre'bhaus." "Traume." and "Schmerzen." 
In which she gave evidence of thorough understanding 
of the text as well as keen Intellect In using her clear 
nbrant voice Numerous floral tributes were given 
both Mme Rothwell and Mme Matzenauer. Perhaps 
the greatest ovation ever accorded any artist in Los 
Angeles was ih.it given Mme Matzenauer. who sang 
Erda's Warning from Das Re'nsoM and Rrangiine's Call 
from Tristan and Isolde. So great was the storm of ap- 
pliuse that she was obliged to repeat her second num- 
IXT, which was the only encore offered during the 
evening, the other artists being recalled many times 
but not responding With her luscious rich full tones 
and an abundance of reserve force, dramatic Interpreta- 
tion comb'ned with grace and power, her singing proved 
most satisfying. 

In Wolfram's Address to the Nobles from Tannhauser. 
Clarence Whitehlll displayed much depth of feeling and 
•rtistry. While his voire at times seemed somewhat 
lacking In proportion to the dramatic significance of the 
selettlon. yet In WoUn's Farewell from Die Walkure, 
he manifested perfect undersUndlng of text and remark- 
able vocal ablllly 

With the concluding number comprising the first and 
second scones from Act II of I»hengrln. the ensemble 
give full sway to dramal'c Intensity and authoritative 
interpretation. Much credU is due the orchestra and 
Mr Rothwell for their splendid support of these superb 
soloists In this the brilliant opanlns of the new Audi- 
torium Series. 



SCHIPA TO SING HERE 

Tito Schlpa. the famous tenor of the Chicago Opera 
Association, will be the next great concert star to ap- 
pear in San Francisco. Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer 
having arranged for two recitals for this peerless artist 
at the Columbia theatre on the Sunday afternoons of 
November 4th and "11th Schipa. whose successes in 
this country have been unusually great, in concert as 
well as in opera, first came to America two years ago, 
lauded by the Italians and by the enthusiastic music 
lovers of South Amer ca. as one of the world's foremost 
lyric tenors. His debut with the Chicago Opera Com- 
pany confirmed this, and so immediate was his success 
with the operatic organization that for a time his entire 
time was consumed in inierpreting his many operatic 
roles, but last year he finally found time for a few con- 
certs, and so quickly was he recognized by the most emi- 
nent writers in New York and Chicago, as a recitalist of 
the first rank, that his managers, Evans and Salter, who 
also direct the tours of Calli-t urci I.hevinne and other 
noted artists, induced him to shorten his operatic con- 
tract in Chicago and devote a large part of his time to 
recitals, hence his present transcontinental tour, which 
is proving a sensation in every way. 

Following Schlpa in this series will come Efrem Zim- 
balist. the famous Russian violinist, who is extremely 
popular in San Francisco, and who on November 18th 
will appear in the first rec tal that he has given in this 
city in many years, his previous appearance having been 
confined for some time to symphonic solo engagements. 
Zmbalist of all present-day violinists has come to the 
front by steady and sure strides, and today his place in 
the sun is assured. 

Josef Lhevinne. the ever-popular pianist, will appear 
at the Columbia on Sunday afternoon, November 25th, 
in a special program. Lhevinne will also play in the 
ballroom of the St. Francis on Monday afternoon, No- 
vember 19th as the second artist in the Alice Seckels 
series, and these two events will be only appearances 
of the Russian player in San Francisco this season. 
An event of extraordinary importance will be the joint 
recital scheduled for Arthur Rubinstein, pianist and 
Paul Kochanski. violinist on Sunday afternoon. Decem- 
ber 9th. These fine artists of the Russian school are 
leaders in their sphere, and a sonata recital, in which 
solo numbers will be included is unusual for the west, 
and has already gained much attent on Anna Case, the 
beautiful, comes on Sunday afternoon, December 16th. 
Season reservations for the entire series, which will 
be extended to cover the Sunday afternoons during 
1924, with artists of equal rank to the above, are now 
being made at the Oppenheimer ticket office at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co '8. 



MOISEIVITCH AND HEITFETZ RESEIklBLANCE 
Admittedly the Elwyn Art st Series "got oft to a 
good start" two weeks ago with the Matzenauer-Wh'te- 
hill joint recital, and it was said that if the standard 
was upheld, the series would be a financial as well as 
artistic success. Yhat this standard will be consistently 
held is seen In the announcement that the second at- 
traction will be the return to this city in recital of Ben- 
no Moiseivitsch, noted Russian pianist, on the Elwyn 
Artist Series at the Curran Friday matinee November 9. 
Compared most frei|uently with only the masters of 
the piano-forte, and in manner and style to the incom- 
parable violinist, Heifetz, Moiseivitsch has earned for 
himself a prodigious reputation. Comparison of a pian- 
ist with a violinist may appear vague, but this particu- 
lar comparison is often made by reason of the fact that 
lleifotz and Mo'seivitsch have so much in common. 
Both are young men. Both accomplished the rare feat 
of achieving almost Instant recognition in this countr>'. 
Both are noted for a phenomenal agility in finger work, 
and for a technique so facile that It seems almost to 
disappear. In other words, technique with these men 
is so perfect that It is only a means of expression and 
not a goal. 

Other attractions on the Elwyn Artist Series which 
follow Moiseivitsch are: Jascha Heifetz. Moriz Rosen- 
thal, Mario Chamlee. Quartet of Victor Artists — Olive 
Kline, Elsie Baker. Lambert Murphy. Royal Dadmun— 
.Mozart's Opera Comiques The Impresario and CosI 
Fan Tulle. Rcinald Werrenrath and Maria Ivogun For 
the nine events, including Moiseivitsch, that remain on 
the Elwyn Artist Series, there are still available a limit- 
ed number of season tickets which represent a substan- 
tial saving as compared with single admission prices. 



FIRST "POP" AND SECOND REGULAR SYll^PHONY 

Tomorrow afternoon in the Curran Theatre the San 
Ftancisco Symphony Orchestra, under the leadership 
of Alfred Hertz, will give the first concert in its Popular 
Series, an attractive program of light numbers having 
been arranged for the occasion. The Popular Concerts 
are so-called not only because of the character of the 
programs presented, but also because of the public re- 
sponse, sold-out houses being the rule at each of these 
events. 

Sunday's program will consist of the overture to 
Raymond by Thomas, Smetana's symphonic poem, 
Vltava, the orchestral suite from Rimsky-Korsakow's 
opera The Tsar Saltan. Ravel's Mother Goose Suite, the 
well known Kreisler Caprice Viennois orchestrated by 
Hertz, and the overture to Weber's Der Freischutz. The 
Rimsky-Korsakow number is new in the orchestra's 
repertoire and will be given its first San Francisco 
hearing at this concert. 

For the second pair of regular sjTnphony concerts to 
he given next Friday and Sunday afternoons at the 
Curran, Horace Britt, former solo 'cellist with the 
s>Tuphony. will appear as soloist, and judging from box 
office reports, capacity audiences will be on hand to 
greet him on both occasions. Britt will also appear with 
the Chamber Music Society next Tuesday evening, and 
music lovers will no doubt enthusiastically welcome the 
opportunity to greet him on these three occasions At 
the symphony pair he will perform Ernest Bloch's 
Schelomo, a Hebrew Rhapsody for solo 'cello and or- 
chestra, a work which he introduced to San Francisco 
during the 1918-19 season. The purely orchestral por- 
tion of next weeks' program will consist of the Saint- 
Saens Symphony No 2 in X minor, and Charpentier's 
suite. Impressions d'ltalie, two new works in the or- 
chestra's repertoire. 



SYMPHONIC ENSEMBLE CONCERTS 

Alexander Saslavski. director of the Symphonic En- 
semble of San Francisco, which is to beg'n a series of 
twelve concerts on Tuesday evening, November 13, in 
the Bohemian Club jinks room, returned a few days ago 
from New York, where he was purchasing music and 
engaging artists. The concerts are to be distinctive 
from any others presented here this season, owing to 
the instrumental combinations to be employed. 

"It will be a symphony in miniature, without Infring- 
ing on the domain of the symphony orchestra, as ii 
will never exceed fourteen instruments." said Saslavski 
recently. "The compositions we will present are the 
larger forms of chamber music — combinations of wood- 
wind and strings, brass and strings, piano with harp 
and woodwind, etc." 

Saslavski has secured a large number of interesting 
scores and will direct the ensemble in w-orks that have 
never been heard here. Among works that he found in 
New York are four Stravlnski settings of folksongs 
and Saint-Saens' "Carneval des Animaux." scored for 
two pianos, two violins, viola, cello, ba^s. liule. clarinet, 
harmonica and xylophone. Max Gegna. the Russian 
cellist, will arrive in a few days to begin rehearsals. 



HALF-HOUR OF MUSIC AT GREEK THEATRE 



For the half-hour of music In Greek Theatre Sunday 
afternoon a program will be presented under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. MackayCantell. The artists will be Eva 
Koenig Friedhofer. mezzo. Mary Groom Richards, con- 
tralto, L>'man Hull North, tenor, and Irene Miller, pian- 
ist, who will appear in the following program: Piano — 

(a) Nocturne, op. 9. No. 1 (Chopin), lb) Mazurka, op. 
30. No. 4 (Chopin). Irene Millier; Tenor soil— (a) Beau 
Soir (Debussy), (b) The Spirit Flower (CampbellTlll- 
ton), (cl TTiere Is No Death (O'Hara), Lyman Hull 
North: Contralto soil— (a) Until (Wilfred .Sanderson), 

(b) Rachem (Manna Zucca), (cl Inter nos (MacSa- 
byen), (d) The Fields of Beleclair (Florcnt Turner 
Maley), .Mary Groom Richards: Piano — (a) Japanese 
sketch (MackayCantell). (b) Geisha Dance (Mackay- 
Cantell), Irene Millier: Mezzo soli— (a) June (Mrs. H. 
H. A. Beach), (b) Sleeping Princess (Borodine). (o 
Herziges Magdelein (Dargomishsky). Eva Koenig Fried- 
hofer: Duet— Voyagers (Wilfred Sanderson). This will 
be the final concert of the season. The half-hour pro- 
grams will open again the first Sunday in April, 1924. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



S. F. SYMPHONY CONCERT 
(Continued from Page I. Col. 2) 

and without rhyme or reason There 
is occasionally a distinct characteristic 
Spanish color and the rhythm is unques- 
tionably decisive and exhilarating Spe- 
cially enjoyable is an occasional violin, 
cello and harp solo, excellently inter- 
preted by Louis Persinger, Walter Fer- 
ner and Kajetan -Attl, and the celeste is 
used quite frequently. But somehow it 
seems to us that Mr. Ravel, like so many 
ultra modern composers, makes much 
ado about nothing, investing these sim- 
ple Spanish tolk melodies, as it were. 
with an overwhelming array of contra- 
puntal and harmonic combinations that 
practically bury their simplicity beneath 
their heavy and noisy score. However, 
tastes differ and, no doubt, most people 
thoroughly enjoyed the novelty of the 
treatment. 

The audience took advantage of the 
close of the first part of the program to 
bestow upon Mr. Hertz the full measure 
ot its affection. He was called out time 
and time again, and with his well known 
fairness asked the orchestra to share in 
the tribute. Numerous floral pieces were 
banked upon the stage, reflecting the 
special admiration of prominent music 
lovers, and altogether Mr. Hertz has rea- 
son to thoroughly enjoy another artistic 
tritmiph. We hear upon good authority 
that the Sunday concert was also crowd- 
ed and the enthusiasm duplicated. It is 
a good sign for any city when the mu- 
sical public shows up in sufficient num- 
bers_ and displays sufficient enthusiasm 
to prove that symphony concerts attract 
constantly increasing numbers and do 
not tire the people. 



LOS ANGELES SYMPHONY CONCERT 

(Continued from Page 1. Col. 4) 
Rothwell and expressed to both their 
heartfelt appreciation of what is being 
done for them in the way ot higher 
music. The writer was glad to be among 
those present for he noticed that both 
iMr. Clark and Jlr. Rothwell enjoyed this 
experience, although their hands, no 
doubt, must have been pretty well worn 
out by the time two thousand people 
had shaken them. 

After the concerts the audience par- 
took of refreshments in the lobby of the 
theatre, which part of the reception was 
under the supervision of Mrs. Caroline 
E, Smith, secretary-manager of the Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra. It was a public re- 
ception with a vengeance, for the lobby 
adjoins the sidewalk, than which there 
is nothing more public in any community. 

Mr. Clark and Mr. Rothwell have rea- 
son to feel gratified with the result of 
this first pair of concerts of the fifth sea- 
son. Notwithstanding the fact that musi- 
cal activities continue in Los Angeles 
during the summer, the attendance of 
these winter concerts are always increas- 
ing, which proves that there is a de- 
mand for regular symphony concerts in 
the Southland. Mr. Clark is willing to 
give the people of Los Angeles these con- 
certs at great personal expense, and we 
feel that this generous gift should be ap- 
preciated with gratitude, unless someone 
else were willing to relieve Mr. Clark 
from his financial responsibility in this 
respect. 



Warren D, Allen, organist of Stanford 
University, will present the following 
programs at Stanford Memorial Church: 
Thursday, October 25, at 4:15 p. m. — 
Prelude, Fugue and Variation (Cesar 
Franck) : Marche Xuptiale (.\lex, Guil- 
mant): Litany — "Rest in Peace, All 
Souls Departed" (Franz Schubert I: Alle- 
gro Deciso (Henri Dallier). Sunday, 
October 28, at 4 p. m. — Vesper Musical 
Service — Thursday's program will be re- 
peated. Tuesday, October 30, at 4:15 p, 
m, — Fugue in A minor (J, S. Bach); 
Canon in B minor (Schumann) Sunset 
Shadows (George W. Andrewsl: Fiat 
Lux! (Let There Be Light!) (Th. 
Dubois). 



William Andrew Clark, Jr., who is 
founder of the Philharmonic Orchestra 
of Los Angeles, has extended the time 
for the submitting of compositions to be 
judged for the prizes offered by him, un- 
til January 1, 1924. All other conditions 
governing the contest remain the same; 
for the best symphony or syphonic poem 
$1000 is proffered and for the best cham- 
ber-music composition the prize is J500. 



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SAVINGS COM.VIERCIAL 

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One of the Oldest Banks la California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
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LEILA B. GRAVES 

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Available for Concerta and Recitals 

Studio: 150 Central Ave. Tel. Park 1034 

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Laura Wertheimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 

Mm. .Voah llrandt 

2311 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PUNO 
Kokler « Ckai 
KearDT ^4!i4 

Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



SIGMUND BEEL 

Master ClasiteM for Violin 

Studio Building^, 1373 Ponf Street 

Tel. Protfpect 757 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

SOPRANO 
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Friday. Kohler A Chase Uldg., S. F.; Resi- 
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liind. I'hune Huniboidt 1!H. 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



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Lizetta Kalova Violinist 

.AVAILABLE FOR CO.VCERTS 

Studiott; 1141) Hif^h Court. Derkelerj 

Heine Olds.. San Francisco 

Telephone B ;!}I42-J 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

AnDonncea the opening^ of her new Resi- 
dence Studio. Clark Apts.. Apt. 26 — 138 
Phone Proapect 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 
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Bnlldlne. Telephone Kearny &454. 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOLA CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

OROAVTIST IIT. MARY'S CATHBDBAI/ 



2211 SCOTT ST» Bet. Clay & Washln^o 
Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. Noah Brandt, Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist. Temple Emana El. Con- 
cert and Church \\ ork. Vocal Instruc- 
tion. 2.'>.^9 Clay St^ Phone West 4S»0. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



Rea. TeL Bayvle 



• Kearny 5454 



EVA M. GARCIA 

PI.VNIST .VXD TE.VCHER 
4152 Hone St. Tel. Piedmont 4»0S 

MARY CARR MOOBE — SONGS 



Pub. AVESLEV WEBSTER 



ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

violinist and Teacher. Head of Violin Dept., 



MYNARD S. JONES 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
.ARRILLAG A MrSIC.*.L COLLEGE 
2315 Jackxou St. Tel. We»t 4 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



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2201 Scott St. Phone West 134T 

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HARP SOLOIST AND 
TEACHER 



Hotel Claremont 



Berkeley 9300 



AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS 

UNTIL DECEMBER 1 

Management Selby C. Oppenheimer 

68 Post St., San Francisco 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



For Coacrrt KaaaKrairala 
and Inatrurtlon Apply to 
Spcrrtary and Mnnajcrr of 
K. \(tl. Room lUO-l Knhirr 
A Chaae llldK.. San FranrUro 

Representative of Lyon S, Healy Harps 
Trirpkonr DoUKlaa IS7S 



GEORGE M. LIPSCHULTZ 

SOLO VIOLINIST 
Concert Engagements Accepted 

LOEWS WARFIELD THEATRE 

Musical Director 
Residence Phone Prospect 8686 

Theatre Phone Prospect 83 

Pupils Accepted 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 



Paplla prrparrd fo 



llprra. Oratorio, Chn 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



ELIZABETH MMPSON, Piano 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

After October 1st Under the Management of S. Hurok, Inc., Aeolian Hall, New York 



America's Greatest 

Contribution to the Musical 

Arts 

illieoiu^-IJamlin 

PIANOS 

It is impossible to convey in words an ade- 
quate idea of the surpassing tonal quality of 
the Mason & Hamlin Piano. 
To say that the piano is made as well as possi- 
ble, and priced afterward — that does not tell 
the story. No description of the Tension 
Resonator can adequately explain its impor- 
tance in terms of tonal results. Even the mar- 
shalled names of artists who have chosen the 
Mason & Hamlin Piano for their public and 
private use can only indirectly show its 
excellence. 

And yet, that which is difficult to put into 
words is a very real thing. If you should play 
the Mason & Hamlin Piano you would know. 
Listening to it would tell more than a thou- 
sand words, as a glance at the "Woman 
Weighing Pearls" tells more of Vermeer's 
artistry than page after page of description. 
We invite you to play and hear this extraordi- 
nary piano. 




TWO tVTRANCES 

135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts 
victor talking .machines 




^''Wiley^B.Allen® ra 

TT «_/ J-\. V-^ ^RCCOBDSV 



MASON a HAMUN PIANOS 



Oakland — I20<J Washington STREn 

San Jose — 199 South First 

sheet music 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



IJJ THE QHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JQUI^NAL INI THE GREAT WEST jJiJ 



VOL. XLV. No. 5 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



LOS ANGELES TO HAVE A TEMPLE OF MUSIC 1,500 APPLAUD CHAMBER MUSIC PROGRAM 



Three Hundred Members of the Civic and Arts Association and Represen- 
tatives of Numerous Civic, Social, Business and Welfare Organiza- 
tions Inaugurate a Campaign for a Bond Issue at the 
Municipal Election Next Spring to Build a Memorial 
Auditorium, Music and Arts Temple 



Scottish Rite Auditorium Crowded at Opening Concert of Season — Horace 

Britt Receives Enthusiastic Ovation — Schubert Quintet and Schoen- 

berg Sextet Given Exceptionally Intelligent and Artistic 

Interpretation — Organization in Fine Form 



BY BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



BY ALFRED MET'ZGER 



LOS ANGELES. Oct. 30.— Inau^rat- 
ing the campaign for a bond issue at the 
municipal election next spring to build 
a memorial Auditorium-Music and Arts 
Temple, more than 300 members of the 
Civic Music and Arts Association and 
representatives of numerous civic, social, 
business and welfare organizations met 
in the Elite banquet hall last night to 
discuss means and formulate plans. 

B. F. Pearson, president of the Civic 
Music aod Arts Association, was chair- 
man of the meeting. The procedure was 
characterized by a joyous, whole-hearted, 
co-operative spirit. Patriotism was the 
keynote. Alexander Stewart, executive 
director, aptly expressing the movement 
as a "citizenship program through 
music." 

'"Los Angeles needs an auditorium 
seating not less than 15.000 and if possi- 
ble 20,000 people, which will make the 
city not only the first convention city on 
the coast, but the foremost convention 
city of the United States." Ben F. Pear- 
son, president of the Civic Music and 
Art Association, declared amidst rousing 
applause last evening at the Elite ban- 
quet hall, where representatives of thirty 
leading organizations met under the 
auspices of the Civic Music and Art As- 
sociation to launch a city-wide campaign 
for a municipal auditorium and war 
memorial, bonds for which are to be 
placed on the ballot next May. 

"We have not made any plans where 
this auditorium is to be located. This 
will be decided by a committee of rep- 
resentative citizens. It has been sug- 
gested to build the auditorium in such a 
manner that by means of sliding walls 
it can be reduced to a seating capacity 
of four to five thousand for concert and 
opera performances." said Mr. Pearson. 

Organizations represented at the meet- 
ing and favoring the suggestion were: 
Chamber of Commerce, Men's City Club, 
Friday Morning Club. Ebell Club. Gamut 
Club, Ellis Club. Orpheus Club. Lions 
Club, Rotary Club. Musicians' Mutual 
Protective Union. American Legion, Na- 
tipnal Guard of California. Association 
of the Armies of the United States. 
Hollywood Community Chorus, Holly- 
wood Musicians Club, Los Angeles Music 
School Settlement Association. Com- 
munity Music Department, International 
Institute of tha Y. W. C. A., High 
School Music Departments of Los An- 
geles. Music Trades* Association of 
Southern California, Los Angeles City 
Teachers* Club, Boy Scouts. American 
Guild of Organists. City Music Depart- 
ment of the Elementary and Inter- 
mediate Schools. Los Angeles Music 
Teachers' Association. Dominant Club, 
Matinee Musical Club. Los Angeles 
Oratorio Society. 

One phase of the educational value of 
music toward citizenship was strikingly 
brought to mind by Mexican Consul L. 
Garza Leal, who, speaking in behalf of 
108,000 Mexican residents, declared that 
"music was in the soul of the Mexican 
people, and that whether the question 
were one of international relationship or 
of patriotic unity, music would prove an 
important factor in the communion." 

The speakers and their subjects were 
as follows: Mrs. George H. Clark, chair- 
man International Committee of the Y. 
W. C. A., and member of the Los An- 
geles Board of Education, on "Music as 
a Medium of Peace'*; Mrs. J. J. Carter 



on "Community Spirit''; F. Carothers, of 
the Musicians' Mutual Protective Asso- 
ciation, on "Music: A Medium in In- 
dustry"; "Leandro Garza-Leal, Consul 
for Mexico, on "International Good Will 
Through Music": Dr. Edgar F. Magnin, 
Rabbi of B'Xai B'rith Temple, on "Music: 
The Universal Xote in Religion"; Rev. 



Scottish Rite Auditorium was crowded 
to the doors last Tuesday evening. Oc- 
tober 30th. when the Chamber Music 
Socie'ty of San Francisco, with Horace 
Britt as guest artist, made its initial bow 
before the musical public of San Fran- 
cisco at its opening concert of the 
seventh season. We know of no city 




Unusually Endo 
the Bay Regie 



ASHLEY PETTIS 
ed Young California Pianist Who Will Give Two Concerts 
After Establishing for Himself a National Reputation 



J. Whitcomb Brougher, pastor of Temple 
Baptist Church, on "Community Sharps 
and Flats,'* and Col. Richmond. United 
States Army, on "Music: A Tribute to 
Service and Courage." 

Arrangements for the banquet were 
made by Charles C. Draa, prominent 
pianist and teacher. He is secretary of 
the organization's campaign committee 
in the matter of the bond election. He 
said that he would appoint a committee 
of one hundred representative citizens, 
who in turn would each designate a 
committee of ten or more to foster the 
campaign. 

Chairman Pearson in his introductory 
remarks said he could conceive of no 
greater or more fitting memorial to the 
service men of the World War than a 
temple dedicated to music and art and 
that such a monument would lend itself 
to the educational and commercial 
growth of Los Angeles, artistic progress 
(Conlinued on Page 11> 



anywhere, and w-e have asked many who 
are thoroughly familiar with these things, 
which supplies such large audiences for 
chamber music concerts as San Fran- 
cisco does. An average of over one 
thousand people a concert during the 
course of a chamber music season is 
surely something to be proud of, for it 
shows beyond a doubt the high musical 
standard maintained by the musical pub- 
lic of San Francisco. It is because of this 
regard for the very best in music that 
the San Francisco musical public fre- 
quently fails to support meritorious 
events that do not touch the high water 
mark in its demands for musical pre- 
eminence. Many a vocal or instrumental 
artist has to suEEer from inadequate at- 
tendance, because our musical public has 
not been convinced that such artist is 
worthy of its united patronage. 

It was gratifying to note the whole- 
hearted enthusiasm with which Horace 
Britt's appearance was greeted. This 



splendid artist deserved the compliment 
of the ovation accorded him. Further- 
more he demonstrated subsequently, dur- 
ing the interpretation of the program, 
that our recollection of his superior 
faculties had not been at fault, but that 
he still maintains that prominent posi- 
tion among the foremost cellists which 
he so justly occupies in this country. His 
three years' absence from this city have 
not dimmed the lustre of his accomplish- 
ments, nor have they affected the beauty 
of his tone or the judgment of his phras- 
ing. Again we noted the delightful dis- 
crimination in the expression of refined 
musical thoughts; again we admired the 
clarity and sonority of the pizzlcati; 
again we revelled in the incomparable 
freedom of bowing; again we cherished 
the warmth of expression and irresistible 
singing quality of tone. More than ever 
are we convinced that Mr. Britt is not 
only a finished artist, but truly a master 
of his instrument. Both in the ensemble 
as well as solo passages he proved him- 
self thoroughly competent to cope with 
the most intricate and delicate nuances 
of uncompromisingly artistic cello inter- 
pretation. 

The beauty of an efficient chaml)er 
music performance lies in the purity of 
the art that is presented. In almost any 
other form of musical interpretation 
there are opportunities for artistic 
"trickery" or for chances to stoop to 
"popular" taste. Chamber music pro- 
grams, however, require the acme of 
musicianship if they are to be interpreted 
in a serious and craftsmanlike manner. 
Either a chamber music concert is ar- 
tistic or it is not. There is no middle 
way. And this first concert given by the 
Chamber Music Society of San Francisco 
belonged to the artistic phase of reading 
works of classic beauty. Louis Persinger. 
Louis Ford. Nathan Firestone and Walter 
Ferner matched the artistry of their 
guest in a manner to send thrills of 
artistic gratification down, the spinal 
column of anyone appreciative of true 
art. 

It would have been difficult to select a 
work worthier to begin our chamber 
music season with than the Schubert 
Quintet in C major. Op. 163 for two 
violins, viola, and two violoncelli- 
Throughout the turmoil of musical re- 
generation, modernism, futurism and 
cacaphonism the masters of the classic 
period survive in their priestine splendor. 
And while the intricacies of th§ modern 
school may easily be overcome by any- 
one who possesses the patience to con- 
quer their technical difficulties, the 
artistic conquest of the classics rests up- 
on successful accentuation of the beauty 
of simplicity, and that is the supreme 
test of genuine musicianship. And be- 
cause the Chamber Music Society is able 
to pass this test of giving us a reading 
of Schubert wherein breadth of con- 
ception alternates with sprightliness of 
cheerful moods, and wherein every 
succeeding nuance of sentiment is pre- 
sented with simple appreciation of its in- 
herent message we regard it as one of 
our greatest assets in the cultural prog- 
ress of the community. 

Schoenberg's Verklaerte Nacht was 
evidently written before this writer ven- 
tured into the mazes of confusing futur- 
ism. It sounds even more effective upon 
repeated hearing than before. It is re- 
dolent with passion and charged with 
(Continued on Page 11) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



After the lights are out 




The Stein way Speaks: 

is/T knew nnd loved me. Wauner 
kiuw and loved mc. Rubenstcin, 
Hirlioz and Ciounod knew and 
cil me. I have been the com- 
p:iniiin of genius for two (icnera- 
tions. .My name is the Steinway Piano. 

What was there about me that caused Kranz 
Lis/t, forty years ago, to say of mc: "You 
afford delight even to my old piano-weary 
(ingers?" 

Why did Richard Wagner, writing from 
Bayreuth in 1879, declare: "Sounds of such 
beauty as those coming from my Steinway 
grand flatter and coax the most agreeable 
tone - pictures from my harmonic melodic 
senses?" 

Why did Gounod, who gave us "Faust," 
write to my makers in I8S8, "Mme. Adelina 
Patti joins me in the ecstacy and mutual ad- 
miration of your product ... I am overjoyed 
at the consciousness of being the possessor of 
one of your perfect instruments?" And what 
was it that stirred the mighty Dr. Joseph 
Jo.ichim to assert : "Steinway is to the pianist 
what Stradivarius is to the violinist?" 

Companion of genius indeed have I been ! 
Sometimes, when the stage is dark and the lid 
over my strings is down, I brood over my long 
years of such companionship. 

I see Adelina Patti again, blowing kisses, 



Jl'hal dues the Steinway piano think about, 
when the curtain is down and the lights are 
out, and the artist and the audience have 
defiartedf Eloquent enough the Steinway is 
when the moods of others are voiced on its 
wondrous strings. Hut what are its own 
moods and longings? Listen! It is about to 
speak to us 




and reaching for the flowers that were show- 
ered at her feet, while I rested quietly in the 
h.ickground and resolved to do even better in 
her next accompaniment. I see good old 



Franz Liszt again, after a tremendous rhap- 
sody over my ivory keys. I see Edward Mac- 
Dowell, working out his compositions over my 
keyboard. I see the >*outhful. golden-haired 
Paderewski of the eighties, the maturcr Pade- 
rcwski of the nineties, and the world-figure 
and premier of Poland, the Paderewski of to- 
day whose audiences overflow the largest halls 
whenever he plays. And ever I am the com- 
panion of all this genius. 

But then I realize that the greater, the 
s«'eeter triumph of my long career is not to be 
found on the concert stage at all. 

The greater triumph awaits me when a 
young couple, starting down the pathway of 
wedded life, choose me to be their lifelong 
companion in a home. 

The sweetest triumph of all shall be when 
first my keys are touched by the fingers of 
some little girl, her printed scales before her, 
and a lifetime of the best in music all ahead. 

Admitted thus to the sacred intimacy of a 
home and fireside, I know that I shall find 
my truest triumph. And I shall strive to be 
faithful to these who trust me. As long as my 
strings endure, I shall strive to render to the 
utmost my measure of abiding charm. 

Sherman Mlay & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-ORECON-WASHINCTON 



ROSE FLORENCE 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

Studio: 545 Sutter St. Telephone Kearny 3598 

Direction Miss Alice Seckels 

68 Post St., San Francisco, California 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department. S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
MUNICIPAL ORGANIST OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. ORGANIST 
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 
Piano and Organ Instruction. Vocal Coach. 
Studio: First Congregational Church, cor. Post 
and Mason Streets. Tel. Douglas 5186. Residence, 
887 Bush Street. Tel. Prospect 977. 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS AND 
ORGAN RECITALS 



Manning School of Music 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

%nVAM KI> IM F'll.H ArrKI»TKI» 

U r(ln«->..la7 nntl I rlrln; MornlnRN m oiihIIo: IMK 

Knktrr A ( ha»r lllds.. ^nii IranrUfA. Irlrpliont 

Kparor SISI. Itr«ldrarr Mtiillo: I.Vl Mntilr \ U(i 

\\r.. Kaklnnd. Trlrphanr IMrilmont TWI. 



CHARLES HART 

Two Si 

Thumdar f- ^l- Ho 

Trl. Kenrnr A-f.VI. Wpdn 

St.. corner Hth SI.. Oakland. Tel. I.akei»lde 70 

Hea., T,:m\ -llMt St.. Oakland. Tel. Piedmont .^.tTT., 



EMERICH 

f ONCKRT PI.WIST AM> TKAfHER 
Kurlld \|itM. I'hone llerkeley :M»71-AV 



AUGUSTA HAY DEN 

SOPRANO 

Avnllnhlr for ( iinrrrli nnd Recllala 

AilUrrMMi 471 .'ITIh .\\enue 

Tel. rne. IU2 

ARTISTIC STUDIO FOR RENT 

II HMSllKIl — <;Il.VM) I'lANO 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

t'ontmllo 

mplete < ourar of Operatic Trala- 

>l. h'lllmure 4r>.'>3. 

Dominican College School of Music 
»*A.\ n.\r\i-:i.. r*i,ipoHM.\ 

Mnair (our Men ThoroafEh and PruKreanlve 
I'nblle School MohIc. Aeeredlted niploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite .%06 Kohirr A Thaae Bldc„ 
%. V.x Z.'Un 4'olleKe Ave.. lierkeler. Healdenrc 291 Alva- 
rado Road. Rerkeley. 

MRS. M. FOULKES 

\ ol<o, InMlriimrnlM <t I :n»fnit>l«- 



IRENE A. MILLIEH 

si»I.O I'lAMST-ACrdMI' IM^r 

iimt-lnl rinnlMl MiiNlrlan*' t horni i:n>rnil>lr 

AildroN! 1711 nnk sircrt Ts-lephone llcMilnrk T, 

PKAHI, IIOSSACK AVIIITCOMB 

MF,/7.n-rO\THAI.TO 

AhNolnfe Method of Voire I pon the Rrenfh 

Mondnr and Thnradny. KHir. Kohler A I hnNe llnlldin 

Tel. Kearnr M-VI. Re*. I*hiine PniMpert 1341. rae«dn> Afir 

noon. U74** \»hUj \ienue. Ilerkele? 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

OrsanLit Temple Bmana El. Flrat Church of C'hrUt Set- 



MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 



207 Chrrrr St., Hn. Waiihlncton /t rinr Tel. P«e. »30« 

The College of the Holy Names 

Lake >lerrltt. Onkland 



DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

DIRKCTIOX OF MME. LILLIAN SLINKKV m'RIXI 

imllan Method — Voire Placement — Breathing 

Opera — t hurch — Oratorio 

H>7'J KIHm St. TeL Went 595 

THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 



.114.% WnHbineton St. 



i*hone Fillmore AltO 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA nOXX.\ SOPR-%XO 

TborouEb Vocal nnd Dramallr Tralninc 

740 Pine St. Phone DooElaa 6624 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ. ERICKSON & CO.. Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST — INSTRI <TOH 



MADAME WILSON-JONES 



l>ll \M \TI< SI»PltA 
I *>lnclnK. r 
ria. Marrhe«l 
■Zr, Ouraot Ave 
Phone llerk. 40A«.W 



Teacher of llenutifiil *>lnclnK. Pnpll of Lampertl. 

(.nrrla. Marcbe«l 

Rea. Studio. ::()::.'. Ouraot Ave.. Dcrkelcy 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THFONLY weekly MU510uL J0URJ-1AL1N.THEGEEAT WE5T III 
MUSICAL RBT1BW COMPANT 



_..VIce President 

HARCl S L. SAMVELS....; Secretary and Treaiinrer 

Suite KOI Kohler A ChaMe Blde» 2« O'Parrell St.. San 
PranclKCO. Cal. Tel. Kearny S454 



ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

C. C. EMERSON - Business Manager 

Make all checks, drnftN. money ordera or other forma of 

remittance payable to 

PACIFIC COAST MISICAL REVIEW 

Oakland-Derkeley-Alameda Office 1117 Para St.. Alameda 

Tel. Alameda 155 

MlHH BIfzabeth WeHtgrate In Cfaarse 



I.oa Anfcelen Office 

AID SoDthern California SIoslc Co. Balldlns. 

Eishtb and Broadway Tel- Metropolitan 4398 

MUs Lloyd Dana In Charge 

VOL.XLV. SATURDAY, NOV. 3, 1923 No. 5 



Entered as 



■ at S. P. Poatofflc 



srescBiPTioNS 

Annnally In Advance Incladlns Poataffet 

Pnlted States 

ForelR-n Conntrlen _ - 



TWENTY-THIRD YEAR 



MUSIC WEEK GENERALLY OBSERVED 

San Francisco's third Music Week proved another suc- 
cess, hundreds of concerts being given during a period 
of unprecedented musical activity. It seems to us that 
the proper time for Music Week should be that part of 
the year when musical activity is somewhat slack and 
when the public is in need of musical entertainment. 
This year's Music Week could not have come at a 
more inappropriate time as far as the encouragement 
of local events was concerned. The season had just 
opened with an array of big events. The San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra alone gave six concerts during 
eight days. Sunday afternoon. October 2S. was the first 
Pop concert at the Curran Theatre, rt'ertnesday night 
was the first Auditorium concert under the auspices of 
the City of San Francisco. Thursday night the orches- 
tra played in Berkeley. Friday afternoon was the first 
of the second pair of regular symphony concerts at 
the Curran Theatre. This (Saturday) evening the or- 
chestra plays in Oakland, and tomorrow (Sunday) after- 
noon will be the second of the second pair of regular 
concerts at the Curran Theatre, and all of them prac- 
tically crowded. 

Monday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Uda Waldrop ap- 
peared at the Colonial Ballroom of the St. Francis 
Hotel as one of the attractions of the Ida Scott Fort- 
nightly events, together with Miss Maud Wellendorf. 
Monday evening Frances Alda and Lionel Tertis, with 
Margaret Hughes as accompanist, gave a concert at 
Scottish Rite Auditorium. Tuesday evening the Cham- 
ber Music Society of San Francisco opened its season 
at Scottish Rite Hall, all in addition to the symphony 
concerts above mentioned. Tomorrow (Sunday) after- 
noon Titto Schipa will appear at the Columbia Theatre. 
All of these events are regular concerts of the season, 
having no connection with Music Week. 

The Music Week will be reviewed briefly in nest 
week's issue as the paper goes to press before it is 
possible to pay attention to the entire program. It 
seems to us that Music Week should be given after 
the conclusion of the regular season in April or May. 
The National Music Week will be given in May, and it 
would have been the proper thing to celebrate this 
occasion in conjunction with all other cities in the 
United States. The present arrangements did not only 
work a hardship on artists and the musical public 
which wanted to hear the regular events scheduled, but 
specially on the writers, who already had more to do 
than they could properly take care of. However, every- 
thing prior to the paper going to press went off accord- 
ing to schedule, and no doubt enough people were 
present to make the Music Week events interesting and 
enjoyable. We reserve further comment until next 
week. 



FRANCES AUDA-LIONEL TERTIS RECITAL 

Enthusiastic Audience Applauds Artists for Enjoyable 

Rendition of Varied Program — Margaret Hughes 

Plays Excellent Accompaniments 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

An audience that made up in enthusiasm what it 
lacked in numbers attended the concert given by Fran- 
ces Alda and Lionel Tertis at Scottish Rite Auditorium 
last Monday evening. October 29. The program, which 
will be appended to this article, presented nothing of a 
sufficiently impressive nature to require detailed re- 
view. The compositions were not of a character that 
were notable either because of their novelty nor their 



special importance from the standpoint of concert 
works. The only two major works interpreted were two 
operatic arias, one Mozart's II Re Pastore and the other 
the prison aria from Boito's Mefistofele. Neither of 
these revealed Mme. Alda in her special forte. 

We have heard this excellent artist on previous occa- 
sions and noted that she was not in as clear a voice as 
usual, nor did she give every ounce of artistic energy 
she possesses. Still, her work was sufficiently enjoyed 
by the audience to earn her spontaneous, enthusiastic 
and prolonged applause. She certainly looked very 
charming in a handsome gown of silver brightness and 
exhibited sufficient of her art to reveal the special 
features of her vocal distinctions. She was generons 
with her encores and in the main her selections were 
dignified. In conformity with the times, she interpreted 
a few songs by American composers, among which 
The Song of the Open, dedicated to the artist by Frank 
La Forge, was not by any means one of the least en- 
joyable. There can not be any question but that Mme. 
Alda scored a decided personal triumph and she has 
every reason to feel gratified with her San Francisco 
success. 

Of course, the surprise and delight of the concert 
was Lionel Tertis, the associate artist and violist 
of exceptional merit. He draws a big. rich and resonant 
tone, plays with unerring adherence to deep emotional 
expression and commands a technic of remarkable flu- 
ency and accuracy. Indeed, he succeeded in playing 
many a phrase on the viola which some violinists would 
find difficult to play on a violin, and yet the viola is a 
most difficult instrument to play. The compositions he 
interpreted were principally arrangements, transcrip- 
tions or violin works. We did not recognize one impor- 
tant work specially written for the viola, and yet there 
surely are some compositions dedicated to this noble 
instrument. True, they may be somewhat heavy and 
difficult to appreciate by laymen, but a musician of 
-Mr. Tertis" standing should have extended us the cour- 
tesy of playing at least one noteworthy and character- 
istic viola composition. There were enough of our pro- 
fessional musicians in the audience to justify such 
action. Nevertheless, Mr. Tertis' playing aroused just 
enthusiasm. He is a master of his instrument and the 
one he plays is one of the most beautiful we ever 
listened to. 

Margaret Hughes accompanied both artists and re- 
vealed her artistic growth in no small degree. She 
played with a tone of delightful quality, a fluency which 
is marked for its assurance and a care in phrasing and 
adaptability to the soloist's style which only a few 
accompanists possess in quite that degree. Her accom- 
paniments certainly stood out nobly in such distin- 
guished company. Mrs. Hughes belongs to those artists 
for whom we are waging continuous battle for recogni- 
tion. Fortunately for her, she has conquered for her- 
self a commanding position on the American musical 
firmament. 

The complete program was as follows: (a) Sara- 
bande (Sulzer), (hi Tampodi di Minuetto (Grazioli), 
(c) Fugue (Tartini). Mr. Tertis: (a) A Christmas Carol 
(15th Century) (Arranged by Bax). (b) Amarilli (Cac- 
cinil, (c) Quelle Souffrance (Lenormandl, (d) The Sol- 
dier's Bride (Rachmaninoff), (e) Chanson Xorvegienne 
(FourdrainI, Mme. Alda: Aria II Re Pastore (Mozart), 
Mme. Alda and Mr. Tertis; (a) Elegie (Faure), (b) 
Dance of Satan's Daughter (Rebikoff), (c) Allegretto 
( Wolstenholme), Mr. Tertis: Aria Mefistofele (Bolto), 
Mme. Alda; (a) The Londonderry Air (Arranged by L. 
Tertis). (b) The Answer (Wolstenholme). (c) Sunset 
(L. Tertis), (d) Tambourin Chinois (Kreisler), Mr. 
Tertis: (a) Wings of Night (Winter Watts), (b) Falter- 
ing Dusk (Kramer), (c) Soft Footed Snow (Lie), (d) 
The Singer (written for and dedicated to Mme. Alda) 
(Maxwell), (e) The Song of the Open (written for and 
dedicated to Mme. Alda) (LaForge), Mme. Alda. 



TWO POPULAR SYMPHONY CONCERTS CROWDED 

San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Under Direction of 

Alfred Hertz, Enthuses Twefve Thousand Music 

Lovers at Two Big Concerts 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The season of Popular Symphony Concerts opened at 
the Curran Theatre last Sunday afternoon. October 28, 
before a crowded house, which again showed its enthu- 
siasm by giving Alfred Hertz the third big ovation since 
the music season opened. The program was chosen 
with that fine sense of taste which Mr. Hertz always 
displays in the selection of his numbers. It began with 
the Raymond Overture by Thomas, the graceful melo- 
dies and invigorating rhythms of which created a ting- 
ling sensation in the ears of all music lovers present. 
It was interpreted with that spontaneous virility and 
abandon which has endeared both conductor and or- 
chestra to the hearts of the people. 

Smetana's Symphonic Poem Vltava, with its realistic 
description' of the famous river and the introduction of 
a number of charming Bohemian folksongs, delighted 
the audience greatly, while selections from Rimsky- 
Korsakow's opera. Tsar Saltan, in the form of a suite, 
emphasized the beauties and richness of harmoniza- 
tion identified with the works of the latter-day Russian 
composers. Ravel's Mother Goose Suite represented 
the ultra-modern school of composition and pleased 
those who revel in the impressionistic and realistic 
idiom of the new writers. Kreisler's Caprice Viennois, 
so skillfully arranged by Alfred Hertz for orchestra, 
aroused the greatest enthusiasm of all. and upon in- 
sistent demand had to be repeated. Mr. Hertz's ar- 
rangement of this graceful gem is specially effective 
inasmuch as he retains the lightness of the composition 
where the composer meant to attain an effect of feath- 
ery daintiness, white he emphasized the broader epi- 
sodes with beautiful re-enforcement of the celli. It 
proved an exceptionally ingenious arrangement and 



was worthy of the enthusiasm it aroused. The con- 
cluding number was one of those classics of orchestral 
literature. Weber's Freichutz Overture, which, when 
played like the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
does it under Mr. Hertz's direction, never fails to awake 
unadulterated joy in the hearts of music enthusiasts. 

The Exposition Auditorium housed one of the biggest 
audiences ever assembled there when Conductor Alfred 
Hertz raised his baton to give the signal for the begin- 
ning of the program on Wednesday evening, October 
31. Dvorak's New World Symphony was the introduc- 
tory number and it was given in masterly fashion. The 
tempi were in the main given with greater deliberation 
than has been the case in the past, unless the writer is 
greatly mistaken. This was specially true of the largo 
and scherzo movements. Somehow this avoidance of 
even the least sign of impetuosity added beauty to the 
well turned phrases. It was one of the most impressive 
readings of this work we have heard, and the audience 
was visibly impressed with the splendid musicianship 
displayed by conductor and orchestra. Brasses and 
reeds vied with the strings to interpret the haunting 
melodies and ever changing sentiments with careful and 
evenly balanced coloring. 

After the intermission, Claire Dux, a soprano new to 
us in the Pacific West, sang Deh vieni non trardar from 
Mozart's Marriage of Figaro and later on the program 
Agathe's Aria from Weber's Freichutz. The artist gave 
evidence of unquestionable mastery of vocal expression. 
Her voice, particularly in the hight tones, is of a flexi- 
ble and velvety quality, and she sings with consummate 
artistry. Her beautiful legato singing, the exquisite 
manner in which she covers her high tones, the delight- 
ful expression she introduces in her phrases and her 
splendid diction combine to make her a vocalist of su- 
preme proficiency. Only the finest kind of an artist can 
sing Mozart's arias satisfactorily, and Mme. Dux sang 
this aria more than satisfactorily; she sang it entranc- 
ingly. Possessing a lyric soprano voice, the beauty of 
which lies in the middle and high tones, there were 
phases of the interpretation of the Freichutz aria where- 
in the low tones might have been uttered with more 
resonance and sonority, but from the interpretative 
standpoint Mme. Dux's rendition of this work could not 
he foimd fault with. It was a most enjoyable perform- 
ance. On both occasions the orchestra played the ac- 
companiments with refined finish. Mme. Dux received a 
well-earned ovation, obliging her to come time and time 
again before the audience. After the conclusion of the 
first aria, in deference to established custom, Mme. 
Dux did not sing an encore, but after the second aria 
she sang Schubert's Ave Maria and Chanson Indou, 
with Uda Waldrop at the piano. The latter shared in 
the artist's triumph and is entitled to a hearty recogni- 
tion for his excellent performance. 

Kreisler's Liebesleid and Caprice Viennois, both ar- 
ranged for orchestra by Alfred Hertz, proved two favor- 
ites with the audience, and again the last named had 
to be repeated. We reiterate — a more effective arrange- 
ment of these delightful gems than these of Mr. Hertz 
can not be imagined. The exuberant character of both 
compositions is retained and their grace is not marred 
by top-heavy instrumentation. The ever inspiring Tann- 
hauser .March, interpreted as only Hertz can do, closed 
the program that will linger in the minds of all who 
heard it. 

J. Emmet Hayden, chairman of the Auditorium Com- 
mittee of the Board of Supervisors, and one of the 
forces responsible for the success of these concerts, ex- 
tended greetings to the audience in the name of Mayor 
Rolph, who was absent on account of his son's accident, 
and congratulated the people upon their support of 
these concerts, which he said was one hundred per cent 
greater than last year, and this means a great deal. 
Mr. Hayden was heartily applauded for the share he has 
taken in musical development in San Francisco. 



FRANK CARROLL GIFFEN JUSTLY PRAISED 

The many friends and admirers of Frank Carroll 
Giffen are no doubt delighted to hear of the well- 
merited tribute paid him by some of the leading artists 
of the San Francisco Opera Company, who recently 
scored such a brilliant artistic triumph here. The un- 
qualified praise bestowed upon the thoroughness and 
excellence of. his teaching by such artists as Beniamino 
Gigli, Adamo Didur, Giovanni DeLuca and Bianca 
Saroya and reproduced elsewhere in this issue, cer- 
tainly proves beyond a doubt that occasionally a com- 
petent teacher receives credit for the splendid work 
he accomplishes. There are times, after all, when the 
prophet is rewarded in his native environment. Since 
these expressions were uttered in the presence of 
others and since they breathe the spirit of sincerity, 
Jlr. Giffen has every reason to feel proud of such uni- 
versal approval. 

The comments were the result of hearing some of 
Mr. Giffen's advanced students sing, and evidently 
these artists hear many aspiring singers, but their 
recognition of Mr. Giffen's pedagogical advantages 
justifies the assumption that not all students they hear 
reflect such credit upon their teacher as those who sang 
for them at Mr. Giffen's studio. 



Miss Ada Clement and Miss Lillian Hodghead, directors 
of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music, will leave 
this city on November 20 for an extended tour of the 
East to play in ensemble concerts with Rebecca Clark 
and May Mukle. They will feature Miss Clark's Trio 
for piano, violin and cello. Miss Clement and Miss 
Hodghead will visit as well the leading music schools 
and colleges throughout the East to gain new ideas 
for their local conservatory. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THE DETOUR 

BY ANIL DEER 



How afigravatlnK. when on a liithortn enjoyable auto 

tour, to pncounter a biirrlcailc formed of rough boards. 

supported on saw horses, decorated with 

tred danger lantenia and bearing the 
sign, "road closed, turn to right for best 
temporary route to somewhere.'' 
Should touring be a new joy the abrupt 
change, from a smooth road to a rocky 
bumpy one. will only be regarded as a 
misfortune, but. If It has become a mat- 
ter of routine, philosophic thoughts will 
give consolation. 
The first are of the mechanical abili- 
ties of the machine driven: knowledge that the springs 
are in good order and well oiled, the engine hitting on 
all cylinders, rings tight, valves have been ground and 
compression is great: oh I fine, good treads on all the 
tires, no doubt of pulling through, no matter how 
numerous the ruts or deep the saiid. 

Reassured a.s to the powers of locomotion the new 
road may be regarded as a novel experience, and enjoy- 
ment extracted between bumps. Off the beaten path 
are found the rarest and most beautiful sights. If in the 
abode of nature, usually and erroneously referred to as 
"wild." compensation is received, no matter how 
bumped or dusty the traveler. 

Vocalists pursuing their studies are frequently com- 
pelled to make detours, like the novice at driving, the 
first met with Is apt to be unjustly viewed as a calamity 
One who has neglected to gain adequate control of 
breath, either through lack of knowledge or energy, 
win find an Insurmountable obstacle In their path. In- 
sulllclency of breath prohibiting correct phrasing, tone 
devoid of correct brilliancy: and the red danger lantern, 
failure to stay true to pitch A detour on the path 
of breath development Is compulsory. If regarded from 
a true angle, enjoyable. Improvement of health will be 
immediately noticed; control of the Instrument in place 
of the Instrument controlling the singer, will give an 
added Inner poise which Is delightful to the owner. 

Another will find that neglect of vowel and consonant 
training has erected a harrier on the road of progress: 
diction poor, therefore true reading of the words of the 
poetry impossible. Again a forced detour, as ever 
pleasurable. New fields of beautiful thoughts in poesy 
will be revealed when the inner path is traversed. 

Realization that memory needs training will cause 
a detour. Thoughtful Interpretation impossible when 
hampered by the restriction of a necessity to see the 
music. This detour brings joy which must be experi- 
enced to be realized. 

How often the remark is passed, "I have learned a 
wrong method and must begin all over." This is a 
mistake, it Is not beginning again, it is only a detour. 
When touring one does not return to starting place, be- 
cause of an obstruction in the road, one goes on. over, 
around, or even under that which hinders. In the course 
of a short trip one may never meet with a detour but 
on a long journey there are many. 

The student who alms at perfection has a long road 
to go and must expect, eventually learn to enjoy, de- 
lours. Ever bearing in mind the salient fact, a detour 
Is not a retracing but is the "best temporary route" to 
the Ini'-ndcd destination. 



HORACE BRITT SOLOIST WITH SYMPHONY 

Tomorrow afternoon In the Curran Theatre the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, under the leadership 
of Alfred Hertz, will give the second concert of its 
Sunday S>-niphony Series with Horace Britt again ap- 
pearing as soloist. The program will be a repetition of 
that presented Friday afternoon. Britt. who formerly 
occupied the solo 'cello position with the Symphony 
here, has for the past three years been with the famous 
Let! Quartet of New York, and the announcement of 
his reappearance with the orchestra has been greeted 
with great enthusiasm by music lovers. At this pair of 
concerts he is performing the dldlcult "Schelomo" of 
Ernest Bloch, a work which he Introduced to symphony 
patrons several years ago. and which has since become 
a favorite on concert programs throughout the East and 
In Europe. The balance of this week's program consists 
of two works new in the orchestra's library, the Second 
Symphony in A minor of SalniSaens and Charpentier's 
suite. Impressions d'ltalle. The latter number is a de- 
lightfully descriptive composition In five movements. 
Serenade. At the Fountain. On Muleback. On the Sum- 
mits, and Naples. 

For the second Popular Concert, which is scheduled 
for next Sunday afternoon in the fiirran. a program of 
the more popular light classics will be presented, the 
principal feature of which will be the first performance 
of an Elegy to an I'nknown Hero by Paul Martin of 
Oakland. Other Items announced are the prelude to 
Wagner's Masteraingers. the second L'Arleslenne Suite 
of Bliet. CrlegB Heart Wounds and Last Spring, the 
Lulglnl Aubade for wind instruments and harp, and 
Ooldmark's Sakuntala Overture. 



MUSICALE-TEA 



Lorraine Ewlng. pianist and teacher, presided at a 
moBlcale-tea at her stuilin on Ashbury street last Satur- 
day afternoon. A delightful and Informal program was 
presented by her adult pupils. In<-luding the Misses 
Winifred Drown. Sophie and Helen Jachert. Mesdames 
Trttngove and Wheeler and Ml»s Ewlng closing the 
program with two attractive numbers. Dainty refresh- 
ments added to the pleasure of the afternoon. 



SCHIPA WILL SING TOMORROW 

Selby C. Oppenheimer will inaugurate his series of 
Sunday "Pop" concerts auspiciously at the Columbia 
Theatre tomorrow afternoon when that pretty play- 
house will be filled to its capacity in anticipation of one 
of the most attractive song recitals of the early season. 
Tito Schlpa. the famous lyric tenor of the Chicago 
Opera Company, will be the artist, and the noted 
operatic star who is known as one of the best redtalisls 
in the country today will be the magnet that will draw 
the throng. 

Pierre V R. Ke.v. the well-known musical authority, 
whose national letter on New York musical conditions 
Is read by thousands across the land, in his last review 
covering Schipa's New York concert, stated: "His 
smooth, aristocratic voice made an instantaneous im- 
pression. His musicianship and charming straightfor- 
ward style made him many friends. He was in high 
humor and voice, and that facility he possesses for 
spinning out the tone to a gossamer thread of fineness 
was in good working or<ler. What a satisfaction to 
hear a legato such as is amongst the resources of this 
artists, and such distinction in interpretation. His 
audience applauded him with encores until it became 
almost an imposition." 

Schlpa will be introduced to San Franciscans In a 
specially-interesting program and Manager Oppenheim- 
er. who is bringing him to the West, predicts a glorious 
success for tomorrow's recitaJist. With Frederick Lon- 
gas at the piano the following numbers will be given: 
Amarilli (Caccini). Nina Pergolese). Mr. Schipa: 
Manon (The Dream) (Massenet), Mr. Schipa: Romanza 
(Schumann). La Calesa (Goyescas) (Granades). ,\lr. 
I^ongas: Ave Maria (Schipa). .\t Parting (Rogers). 
Suzanne (Calcavecchla). Mr. Schipa: Princesita (Pa- 
dllla). Harlequin's Serenade (from Pagliacci) (Leon- 
cavallo). Chi se ne scorda cchlu (Barthelemy). Mr. 
Schipa; Danza V (Granados). Zapateado (Longas). Mr. 
Longas: Granadinas (Barrera). Ay-ay-ay! (Perez- 
Freire), Mr. Schipa: Elisir d'Amore (A further tear) 
(Donizetti). Mr. Schipa. 

On Sunday afternoon. November 11, Schipa will be 
heard in the same theatre in an entirely different list 
of compositions. 

The second artist in the Oppenheimer "Pop" series 
will be the famous violinist Efrem Zimbalist, who 
though he has visited here often in the last several 
years has not appeared as a recitalist in San Francisco 
for many seasons. Zimbalist was the first of the 
famous Auer group of Russian violinists to electrify 
America. Twelve years ago the young violinist created 
a sensation when, unheralded, he appeared as soloist 
with the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Since then the 
name of Zimbalist has been a household word among 
music lovers. His colossal art and fine musical seri- 
ousness are second to none, and as a popular favorite 
Zimbalist stands in a class by himself. Zimbalist will 
appear but once in San Francisco on his coming tour — 
in the t^olumbia Theatre on Sunday afternoon. Novem- 
ber 18th. His excellent program will include the Lalo 
Symphonic Espagnole. Bach Prelude. Beethoven's Ro- 
mance. Saint-Satns Havanaise, Zimbalist's own arrange- 
ment of the Rimsky-Korsakoff Coq d'Or. Auer's ar- 
rangement of the Tschaikowskl Andante Cantabile. and 
by special request the Zigeunerweisen of Sarasate. 
Emmanuel Bay will play the accompaniments ,for 
Zimbalist. 

On Sunday afternoon. November 25th. Josef Lhevinne 
will be Oppenheimer's Columbia attraction. The great 
pianist has been absent from the west for several years 
and his return will be welcome. A program of colossal 
proportions, including the Beethoven Op. 26 Sonata, a 
Chopin group, important works by Liszt, the Schulz- 
Evler arrangement of the Blue Danube and many other 
splendid compositions will be the Lhevinne offering. 

On December 9th. Oppenheimer will present a unique 
sonata and solo recital for violin and piano in which 
the celebrated Russian musicians. Paul Kochanski and 
Arthur Rubinstein, will be the participants, and on 
December IGth, in this series. Anna Case, the beautiful 
and popular soprano, will be the last attraction before 
the holidays. 

This series of events is in realty a "Pop" series in so 
far as the artists Included are all national favorites and 
Oppenheimer has made the admission price so low that 
every music lover may enjoy these fine artists. Tickets 
can be secured for any of the above events at Sherman. 
Clay & Co. now, at a scale as low as 50 cents, and no 
higher than $2. 



GREAT PIANISTS COMING 

February. 1924. will be a great month planistlcally 
for San Francisco for Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer 
has concluded arrangement to bring to this city at that 
time two of the greatest pianists of the present day. if 
not of all time. On Thursday night. February 7th. 
Vladimir de Pachmann. tlie erratic Pole, will play a 
program in the Exposition Auditorium, his only appear- 
ance here during the season, and on Friday night. Feb- 
ruary 2!t(h. the great PadcrewskI likewise will make his 
only appearance in northern California In San Fran- 
cisco's Auditorium. 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant. Director 

On^rm I «ur«r« In All llrnnrlif-> of >lu«lp at 

All Xlacra of .(dvani-rmrnl 
■ AN JOSe I'AI.IFOIIKIA 



MRS. MILES A. DRESSKELL 

SOI'llAMI 
AiiniMini-i-H Iht- ciiii-nliiK uf lif-r NtiKllo 

469 Morse Street Phone 6382-W 

Hannah Fletcher Coykendali 

SOIMI.4NO 
Turadny and Kridn>>— ll.". Ilanrhrit Ao-niir. •inn Joi 
<nlirtirni«. I'liitni- :t.12.'-\\ 

>'OTHK I>AMK C.OI.l.EtiE <}F MI'SIC 

Snii .liiNr, Cnl. 
Oonfrm OrKrfrM, \»nrdF< f-«.rtlfl«-nlrp<. Complete Cnllr 



JOSE Ml SIC COMPANY 

AnderKon Urulhero 

PlanoM. PhonnKraphM. Ilecorda. Sheet >iUKlc, Vlollna, 

Mandi>lln« — Sludlun at illoderale Halea 

OS So. Serond Street Saa JoMe, CnllforBla 

WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

ALLIANCE BUILDING 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



SYmp»Y 

ORCHESTRA 

ALFReoHeKTz Conductor. 

TOMORROW. 2:45 P, M. 
Curran Theatre 

HORACE BRITT 



i>ii'iii<:ssiti\s ii'iT vi.ii-: - . f'iiARiM-:%Tii-:ii 

Second "Pop" Concert Sunday, Nov. 11th 



ELWYN ARTIST SERIES 

Curran 



MOISEIVITSCH 



Friday Matinee, Nov. 9 



?!!eiiKon TickriK nn Snlc for Theivr Mne Attrnclionii 

at a Fnrfher Rediic-od Scale nX Slif rnian, Clar &. Co. 

PUIC'KS — VKt.OU. (ti:t.5fl. yil.lMt, 9ft.O«, VT.OO 



"IMPRESARIO" 


Friday Matinee, Nov. 23 


Quartet of VICTOR 


ARTISTS Fri. Mat., Dec. 7 


HEIFETZ 


Friday Matinee, Jan. 18 


"COSI FAN TUTTE 


Friday Matinee, Feb. 1 


ROSENTHAL 


Friday Matinee. Feb. 15 


IVOGUN 


Friday Matinee, Feb. 29 


CHAMLEE 


Friday Matinee, March 14 


WERRENRATH 


Friday Matinee, March 28 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

PRIVATE AND CLASS LESSONS 
LECTURES ON MUSIC APPRECIATION 



San Francisco, 807 Kohler & Chase BIdg, Tel, 
Kearny 5454. Wednesday from 2-6 p. m. only. 
Berl<eley. 20 Brookside (oft Claremont Ave.) Tel. 
Berkeley 4091. Mornings at Anna Head School. 



BEST MUSIC IN TOWN 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



LIPSCHULTZ MUSIC MASTERS 
HAROLD STANTON 

l'\N< HON A. M \MrO 

"IDEAS" 

III -I r.li Ki: \ iii\ 

In ill. vu|..'r-l ..1,1,. I, I ,„M,r,- of ).,nn|[ 

"HOSPltALITY" 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



"Soulful" 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

ADOLPH "kNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif 





Concerlized b^ IhelDor 

''fallen 

LEAF" 

INDIAN LOVE SOKQ BY 
FREDERIC KHiquT LOQAU 




d's Leddinq Artists -Are 



**E'EN AS ,, 
THE FLOWER 

BY 
FREDERIC KNiqUT LOQAN 



Theij In IJour Repertoire? 

'WHEN TM 
WITH YOU 



BY 
CARSON J.ROBINSON 

HIOH MCDIUM UOW 



FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER, Inc. 235 South WabaA Avenue, CHICAGO. ILL. 



LEADING CONCERT 
ATTRACTIONS 



■lliy C. Opiienheinie 



['olumhia Tlientre 

SI NDAV AFTS.. NOV. 4th and 11th 



TITO SCHIPA 

I'-nreiiioril I.j rlr Tenor — ( 
Olirrn's UiRKe»t Star 
<'<tluiiil>ia 'I'lieatre 

EFREM ZIMBALIST 

Ort'iil Riisninn Violinist 

First Rei'ilal Here in Four Vrars 

t'olunihia Theatre 

SIVDAV AFT.. MIV. Islh 

JOSEF LHEVINNE 

Columbia Theatre 
SINDVV AFT., NOV. 2.-.th 
ARTHI R P\M, 

RUBINSTEIN- KOCHANSKI 

Joint .Sonata and Solo Recital 
Russia's Famous PianLst and Violinist 
t'oiumhia Theatre 
SIXDAV AFT.. DEC. Jtlh 
TIekets on sale at Sherman. Ciny & Co. 

co.>ii>(;: ANNA CASE, Soprano 
SCHUMANN-HEINK 
SOUSA and His Band 



SYMPHONIC ENSEMBLE OF 
SAN FRANCISCO 



BOHEMIAN CLUB JINKS ROOM 
Opening Concert Nov. 13 

rieneral Season Tieket ill: interehnn^eahle 

liekets. kooiI for cuests and all concertsl )I24.0<I 

SU Tickets — alternate concerts — :; seats tUII.UO 

(In Sale Nu^T at Sherman. Clay &. Co.'m or 

Ity mail from Alice Seckcls. ^1.^., Its Post St. 



CONCERT EXTRAORDINARY! 

GEORGE SHKULETSKY 

IIASSO CANTA.XTI-: 

St. Francis Hotel Colonial Ballroom 
Monday Evening, Nov. 12 

AdiniMMion — $1.00. 9:^.00. 9'.i'M-, BoSfN. %'IT, nnd 9.10 

TieketN on Sale at Shermnn. Clay & Co. 

Managenient Alife Seokeis 



VLADIMIR SHAVITCH AS CONDUCTOR 

Vladimir Shavitch. the distinguised pianist, husband 
of Tina Lerner. whose skill and artistry is so well 
known on the Pacific Coast, has recently been added to 
the faculty of the famous Eastman College in Roches- 
ter, Xew York. In addition to his pedagogical faculties 
he will conduct the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra 
in a number of concerts. This orchestra, for which 
ambitious plans have been made, is expected to de- 
velop rapidly under the able direction of the triumvirate 
of conductors who will guide its destinies this year — 
Albert Coates, Eugene Goossens and Vladimir Shavitch. 
Mr. Shavitch scored decided triumphs as conductor in 
South America and Germany during the last few years, 
and his successes abroad have obtained for hira this 
splendid call to Rochester. Mr. and Mrs. Shavitch ar- 
rived in America some time ago and are now residing 
in Rochester, where their artistic duties will retain 
them for the present. 



IRENE 
MEUSSDORFFER 

SOPH WO 

CONCERT - OPERA - ORATORIO 
VOICE CULTURE 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio, 850 Geary Street, .Vpt. 8 
Tel. Prospect 3071 

A\'AILABLE FOR RECITALS 

ilanagement Alice Seckels 

Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5454 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 



MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

VOCAL TtlACHKR 
ntX lending; roles with Caruso and Tetrazzinl — Thor- 

eh Vocal and Dramatic Trainlni; IIU Columbus Ave. 

Telephone Gartteld S'27ti 



MOTHER WISMER'S CONCERT 

Much interest is being manifested in the forthcoming 
violin recital to be given by Mother Wismer in the 
Concert Room of the Fairmont Hotel on Friday eve- 
ning. November 9. An excellent program has been pre- 
pared with that care and taste which always accom- 
panies an event given by Mr. Wismer. The assisting 
artist will be Eva Koenig Friedhofer. mezzo soprano, 
who will sing a number of Brahms songs with that 
finish which characterizes all her work. Benjamin S. 
Moore will be the accompanist, and it is hardly neces- 
sary to add that he will prove a most enjoyable addition 
to the event. The complete program will be as follows: 
Louis Spohr — Adagio Op. 145. Max Reger — from Sonata, 
Op. 42, (for violin alone); Max Bruch — Violin Concerto 
No. 3. in D Minor. Op. 58. Mother Wismer. first time in 
San Francisco: Songs — Love for Ever. Serenade. Long- 
ing at Rest. Cradle Song of the Virgin, Op. 91, with 
viola obligato. (Johannes Brahms I, Eva Koenig Fried- 
hofer: Max Bruch — Romance, in A Minor, .Mary Carr 
Moore — Pastorale. Theodore Vogt — Andante Cantabile, 
Jean B. Cartier — La Chasse. Mother Wismer. 



h^ritone 



FAKKINCi 

BER.TP.AND - Bft-OVi/H 
PERSONAL REPRESeHTATIVE 
ASOLIAN HALL - NEW YORK 



STENGER VIOLINS 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 



No. 10778 met No. 10623 in 
Yokohama in Srplcmbcr, 
1922, (unci dale unknown). 
ll came aboul this way. One morn* 
ing early in ihe month, one Leon 
Lang of San Francisco found in hirt 
morning mail this Iclcgrum: "Ship 
firil iteamer No. 10778 zinc-lineil 
box Godowsky Yokohama." A 
terse and prosaic telegram, yet ro- 
mance has strange bcginningi^. 
Twenty.four hours later No. 10778 





I 



Hi 10 



and to kn 



ihingn about the 
a roiicert artist that even 
lie dues not observe. lie 
will notire instantly the 
most minute variation in 
lis niusiral quality, but 
Ibe merhaniral and ibe 
structural elements he- 
bind ibul f)uali(y, it is 
my job to obser\e for 

1 b:ive just passed 
bro u ph an experience 
riib ibc two most remark- 
came into my charpe. 
of ibrm came from Kohler & Chase, 
point to see them in 
way lo Wew York en route fr< 
Mil, where for the past year 1 h;i 
I tour with Mr. Codow»ky as I 
uncr. During his three moni 
South America (I was enpuged 



ied Knahe 



rert Grand No. 10623 from their New 
York store. When we sailed for the 
Orient, Mr. Codowsky considered it ad- 
visable to add a second piano, knowing 
the extreme difficulties of climate and 
transportation. This one (No. 1U778) was 
shipped from San Francisco. It was a 
wi»e deribion. for at one time No. 10778 
was lo5t in the snows of Manchuria for 
two months, finally turning up after what 
mu'tt have been untold vici8^itudes, for 
its traveling case was so badly battered 
thai the IranKporialion companies re- 




.was below decks and westward 
bound. At the same lim* No. 
10623 was under way from the west 
coast of South America. Their 
meeting was undemonstrative — 
although they were both from the 
i^ame town, had been brought up 
togetlicr — tended by the same 
hands, and sent into the world 
with the same mission. But at 
Yokohama the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones tell it. 



N FiiANCisco, California, May 22, 1923. 
pt it. From the devastating Arctic cold 
of the Manchurian steppes to the blistering beat of 
the Javanese jungles, these two Knabes have been for 
nearly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
punishment, including months in the sticky, saturat- 
ing moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
pianoforte. From Hawaii to the Philippines, through 
all ihe cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Straits 
Seltlenu'iits, and many of the less frequented by-ways 
of the Orient— 1 do not believe that the history of 
music records the equal of this unique tour, or the 
ovations accorded this great artist in these music- 
hungry corners of the globe, or the equivalent of the 
Iwo pianos thai supported him. Days of travel over 
the roads of Java, the man-handling of countless 
coolies, the punishment of oriental transportation in 
boats, in (rains, in queer conveyances of all kinds — 
and months of it. At times it was heart-breaking. 
Both instruments carry many scars of battle, but 
' ally they have remained steadfast. Outside some 
rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich, as 
perfect as the first day Mr. Godowsky 
touched their keys. To me the power of 
resistance of the Knabe piano is almost 
supernatural. I have travelled with many 
arti(,t8 in all parts of the world; in Eu- 
rope 1 was familiar with the German 
piiitios that are built like stodgy batlle- 
?bips, but no piano in even ordinary 
continental tours has equalled this per- 
formance. If I had made ihese two 
Knabes I should feel very proud. Inci- 
dentally I am not in any way connected 
with the Wni. Knabe Company— nor do I 
even know them except through the in- 
ternational reputation of their instru- 
ment. Francis E. Jones, 

London and Buenos Aires. 





Leopold Godowsky 



to hit 



the 



"Mr. Jo 



es has some- 
os than I or 
deserves it. 



G(>|)OW>KY 
Mu-Irr of ihe maMer» al whose 

anoihrr practically every great 
pionitt of our day. 



with rare con^ide^ation, concedes 

'ge of telling his own story. 

v.<<ky has paid his tribute to the I 
he himself said in an interview 

mure interesting to say about iho 

lirr artist has ever said. Let him tell it. 

id him in lluenos Aires and carried him away to the 
cause of bis unuxual qualities." So, thanks to ihe 
:tnhideralion of the great ariisl. we are able to offer 
emarkable piano story ever told. 



Invidentally, both of these instruments are stock pianos 
(not speciaity made), one from the !S'ew York warerooms 
and one from the Kohler & Chase store in San Francisco 



KOHLER-er CHASE' 



26 O'FARRELL STREET- SAN FRANCISCO 
I4lh ind Cl.y Sl'xli ySy^ SACRAMENTO 
SAN JOSE 



OAK LAND 



KNABE 




AMPICO 



SYMPHONIC ENSEMBLE OF SAN FRANCISCO 

With the return a few days ago of Alexander Saslav- 
sky. who is the director of the newly organized Sym- 
phonic Ensemble, comes the announcement of a most 
interesting list of works which are to be presented by 
him this spuson. Beginning Tuesday evening. November 
I?.. Mr. Saslavsky will direct the first of twelve evening 
concerts at the Bohemian Club in the Jinks Room and 
between now and next May, when the series will be 
concluded, instrumentation will be heard in a more 
varied form than San I^ancisco has experienced in her 
music history. The multifold combinations of wood' 
winds, strings, brasses with their accompanyiai 
tympani and percussions, promise the most acceptabli 
of literature and Mr. Saslavsky has announced seve: 
numbers now in preparation. Many are novelties an^ 
others of so rare a performance as to be fresh even 
in a repeated hearing. Schoenberg's "Sextet" was first 
played in America by Mr. Saslavsky at Denver in 1915 
and he will play It here. The Chausson "Concerto" for 
violin and piano, with string quartet acc-ompaniment. 
will be played by himself and Miss Herma Month 
who appeared recently at the Hollywood Bowl as pianist 
with the symphony orchestra under Conductor Emil 
Oberhofer. 

Korngold will be represented by his Sextet and 
novelty. Much Ado About Nothing, for strings, wood- 
winds and horns. Dvorak will be heard through his 
Sextet for strings and an arrangement of his Waltzes 
for strings, woodwinds and brass. Brahms' Songs will 
also have the latter arrangement and a Boccherinl 
Quintet will be revived. The list also comprises the 
Paderewski Sonata for violin and piano, a Beethoven 
Septet. .Max Reger's Quintet for clarinet and strings, 
Jongen's Quartet, a novelty; a Mendelssohn Octet, a 
Schubert Octet for strings, accompanied by clarinet, 
bassoon and horn. Gade's Quartet for strings, a Wolf- 
Ferrari piano Quintet and symphony for strings, wood- 
winds and horn, and a Beethoven Duet for violin and 
piano. Mr. Saslavsky has spoken highly of Max Gegna, 
cellist, who is anxious to come to California in spite of 
permanent New York engagements. This series is being 
directed by Alice Seckels. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 



Considerable time has elapsed since the music-loving 
public has had an opportunity of hearing Mr. Kajetan 
Attl as solo harpist and his appearance with the Pacific 
Musical Society will be received with the greatest of 
pleasure by the members. Mrs. Banks, the president,' 
deserves great credit for her display of wisdom in 
selecting and engaging Mr. Attl for the next concert. 
Mr. Attl enjoys a high reputation as harpist, both in 
Europe and in America. Bom in Prague, he studied 
piano and harmony under the great Dvorak, and the 
liarp under Hanus Trnecek, accounted the greatest 
teacher for this instrument. In America, his adopted 
country, and in Canada Mr. Attl has won anew the fame 
that came to him in the concert halls of the old world. 
His playing is of a fine virtuosity, distinguished for a 
bell-like quality of silver tone. Mr. Attl has received 
high 'praise by each of the local musical critics. 
Attl shows the wonderful possibilities of the harp, its 
beautiful smoothness and the broad tones, and is con- 
sidered by many one of the finest living harpists. 

Miss .\ugusta riayden is a local resident and has been 
identified with numerous concerts given in the city. 
She has received a great many complimentary criti- 
cisms in regard fo her beautiful voice. She is a lyric 
soprano, and sings with a great deal of sympathy ; 
style. 

Miss Esther Deininger and Mrs. Albert George Lang 
will play the beautiful sonata, one of the few works, 
which is. especially written for two pianos. Mrs. Horatio 
Stoll wiii be an excellent accompanist. The program 
is as follows: Sonata in D major for two pianos (Mo- 
zart), Miss Esther Deininger and Mrs. Albert George 
Lang: Legende (d'apres les Elfes de Leconte de Lisle) 
(H. Reniel. Kajetan Attl. solo harpist: (al Lunge del 
Caro Bene (Secchi), (b) The Little Shepherdess 
(Sibella), (cl Tex Yeux (Rabey). (d) Consecration 
IManney). Miss Augusta Hayden. Mrs. Horatio F. Stoll 
at the piano; Bohemian Folk Songs (Attl). by request, 
Kajetan .\ttl. solo harpist; suite. Opus 15. for two 
pianos (Arensky). Mrs. Lang and Miss Deininger. 



MOISEIVITSCH TO GIVE FINE PROGRAM 

In his recital on the Elwyn Artist Series at the Curran 
Theatre. Friday Matinee, November 9th, Mr. Benno 
Moiseivilsch. the distinguished Russian pianist, will 
play the following program; (a) Prelude in C major 
(l)ach), Ibl Sonata in C major (Waldsleinl. opus 53 
(Beethoven); Ktudes Symphoniques, opus 13 (En 
Forme de Variations) (Schumann); (a) Fantalsie Im- 
promtu in C sharp minor, opus (16, (b) Wallz in C sharp 
minor, Xo. 2. opus 64 (c) Prelude in \ major. No. 7. 
opus 28. (d) Prelude in C minor. .No. 20, opus 28. (e) 
Prelude in F major. .No. 23. opus 28. (f) Prelude in B flat 
minor. No. 1(1. opus 2.S. (g) Ballade in A flat, opus 47, 
Chopin; (a) Prelude La (llle aux Cheveux de lin (De- 
busey), (b) Bird Song, (c) Finnish Dance, (d) Kare- 
lian Dance (Palmgrenl, (e) Hark! Mark! The Lark! 
(Schuberl-Llszt). (fl March Militaire (Schubert- 
Tuusig). 

The next attraction to be presente<l on the Elwyn 
Anisl Series will bo William Wade Hinshaw's produc- 
tion of Mozart's light opera. "The Impresario," with an 
all-star cast. Including Percy llemus. The date for this 
attraction will be Friday Matinee, November 23. at the 
Curran Theatre. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



PASMORE TRIO TRIUMPHS AT CLUB CONCERT 

Large Audience Attending Pacific Musical Society's 

Second October Program Enjoy Excellent 

Ensemble Playing 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The Pacific Musical Society gave its second October 
program at the Fairmont Hotel on Thursday evening, 
October 25th. in the presence of the usually large audi- 
ence. The feature most interesting to the music lovers 
of this city was the reappearance of the Pasmore Trio 
after several years absence from the local concert plat- 
form. Judging from the artistic success that attended 
this reappearance it was indeed well worth waiting for. 
The Pasmore Trio consists now of the following mem- 
bers: Miss Mary Pasmore, violin; Miss Marie Sloss, 
piano, and Miss Dorothy Pasmore. violoncello. Suzanne 
Pasmore, who is now Mrs. Brooks, is unable to travel 
on account of her domestic responsibilities and there- 
fore has given way to Miss Sloss. although she has not 
become disassociated from musical affairs. 

One of the remarkable incidents at this concert was 
the fact that Miss Mary Pasmore forgot the violin part 
of the Ravel Trio and did not realize this loss until the 
trio was ready to begin. Without any further loss of 
time Miss Pasmore began to play the violin part by 
heart and continue to do so until the conclusion 
of the trio without missing a note. If this is not a re- 
markable feat, even for the nipst experienced and most 
gifted musician, we know not what it is to do something 
extraordinary fine. Indeed this would have been 
worthy of comment if it regarded a well-known com- 
position of the usual trio character, but it was specially 
notable because of the difficulties encountered in a 
Ravel Trio that bristles with intricacies and unusual 
harmonic and theoretical combinations. 

The three members of the quartet gave this Ravel 
Trio a very excellent interpretation, bringing out its 
various unique characteristics with striking precision 
and ensemble effects. The Dumky Trio by Dvorak was 
interpreted with verve and vitality and its electrifying 
rhythmic phrases were negotiated with explosive pre- 
cision spontaneity. Rachmaninoff's Serenade and 
Severn's Kitchen Dance also brought out the suave 
phrasing, fine shading, unity of expression and genuine 
musicianship of the three artists. Miss Marie Sloss was 
specially noticeable because of her excellent piano in- 
terpretations. A genuine ensemble pianist is indeed 
rare and the Pasmore sisters were fortunate to find 
Miss Sloss able to occupy the vacancy left by Suzanne 
Pasmore Brooks. 

Prances Dwight Woodbridge was the vocalist of the 
occasion. It is always the purpose of Pacific Coast Musi- 
cal Review to aid resident artists in their endeavor to 
obtain an impartial hearing. And many a time we offend 
the sensibilities of some of our friends by favorably 
commenting upon the work of a singer or player who 
does not conform to the standard set by fastidious 
music lovers. In the case of Miss Woodbridge we had oc- 
casion in the past to comment favorably upon her work 
when she confined herself to a program intended to 
serve as an entertainment instead of a serious concert 
program, and in the character of entertainer Miss Wood- 
bridge exhibited certain notable advantages. But as a 
participant in a serious program such as is demanded 
by members of the Pacific Musical Society Miss Wood- 
bridge was not in her element. There are certain 
features of her singing, notably a pleasing quality of 
voice and evident sincerity of expression, but the de- 
viation from the true pitch is too frequent and too 
apparent to be overlooked even though we would prefer 
to be more encouraging and more complimentary. But 
it would neither be of benefit to Miss Woodbridge. nor 
just to other artists to overlook so serious a drawback, 
and if Miss Woodbridge wishes to gain recognition 
among serious music lovers she should find means to 
rid herself of this feature of her work which possibly 
does not impress her as being sufficiently pj-onounced 
to demand correction. 

Miss Woodbridge sang two groups of songs and was 
accompanied by Frank Wenzel. The complete program 
was as follows: Trio A Minor (Ravel); Pasmore Trio; 
Vocal — Air de Beatrix, from Etienne Marcel (Saint 
Saens), Villanella^(Sibella), O Bocca Dolorosa (Sibella), 
The Little Fish's Song (Arensky). Frances Dwight 
Woodbridge: Walter Frank Wenzel at the piano; Trios: 
Serenade (Rachmaninoff), Kitchen Dance (Severn), 
Pasmore Trio; Vocal — The Shadow of the Bamboo 
Fence (Fay Foster). Thou Art the Night Wind (Gaul), 
At the Spinning Wheel (Saar), Alpine Pastoral (Buzzi 
Peccia). Frances Dwight Woodbridge; Walter Frank 
Wenzel at the piano; Dumky Trio (Dvorak), Pasmore 
Trio. 



LORING CLUB OPENS SEASON AUSPICIOUSLY 

Scottish Rite Auditorium was crowded to the doors 
on Tuesday evening, October 23rd, when the Loring 
Club gave the first concert of its forty-seventh season. 
As usual the delighted audience gave frequent evidence 
of its pleasure by spontaneous demonstrations of ap- 
proval and demands for repetitions generously accorded 
by the club and its able director, Wallace A. Sabin. 
There is always a certain thrill in listening to a male 
chorus directed by a musician who kilows how to ob- 
tain the maximum of effect with the minimum of effort. 
And Mr. Sabin is exactly such a director. 
- The first concert of the season always benefits from 
the period of rest that preceded it and the voices of 
these men who are banded together to rejoice in song 
and to give happiness to their friends with the en- 
thusiasm of their efforts rang out with freshness, 
resonance and tonal balance. Their interpretations 
were intelligent and exhibited those contrasts of emo- 
tional sentiments which the variety of the program 
called for. It was an unusually interesting program 



GiGLI, DiDUR, 
De LUCA«"rf SAROYA 



HIGHLY COMPLIMENT 



Frank Carroll Giffen 



TEACHER OF SINGING 



BENIAMINO GIGLI— Mr. Giffen, you are a master Teacher of 
Singing, and when I say this I want you to believe that I am very 
much in earnest. 

ADAMO DIDUR — I see in your teaching the hand of a master, 
and I want you to feel assured that I am sincere when I wish you 
continued success. 

GIUSEPPE DE LUCA— The work you are doing is what we 
call the old Italian School. So many people despair at the appar- 
ent disappearance of the Art of Bel Canto that we were delighted 
to find in you a living refutation of this conception. 

BIANCA SAROYA — Your tone placing is the result of truly 
great teaching and it will afford me great pleasure to recommend 
you to any vocal students who may seek my advice regarding 
studying in San Francisco. 



STUDIO: 976 CHESTNUT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
TELEPHONE PROSPECT 3320 



which contained choruses that are not only rich in 
melody, but in words that carry a fixed meaning and 
present an intelligent story. The diction of the mem- 
bers of the Loring Club is clear and the audience 
relishes to listen to the lines with added pleasure. Mr. 
Sabin conducted with splendid musicianship and with 
the authority that comes from practical experience 
backed by natural ability. It was an enjoyable event. 

The guest artist of the occasion was Willem Dehe 
who played two cello numbers with a skill and virtu- 
osity that justified the ovation accorded him. Mr Dehe 
is a natural born artist who succeeds in obtaining from 
his instrument every angle of emotion that any com- 
position may prescribe. His tone is smooth and ex- 
pressive and his phrasing is indeed musicianly and ef- 
fective. The complete program was as follows: Hunt- 
ing Song {H. J. Stewart), dedicated to the Loring Club; 
Murmuring Zephyrs (Adolph Jensen); My Love's an 
Arbutus (Irish Melody); soloist Edwin Holton; Violon- 
cello solos — (a) Chant du menestrel (Glazounow). (b) 
Grave and allegro (Valentini), from the tenth sonata, 
Willem Dehe; Two Chorales— 1. Now All the Woods 
Are Sleeping, 2. My Soul, Awake and Render (Bach); 
Forest Hai-ps (Edwin Schultz), soloist G. A. Rogers; 
My Bonny Lass (Thomas Moreley); This Is She (James 
H. Rogers); Violoncello Solos — (a) Andante Cantabile 
(Cui), (b) The Fountain (Davidoff), Willem Dehe; Ho. 
Jolly Jenkin (Arthur Sullivan), from the opera Ivan- 
hoe, soloist L, H. McCoy; Lo, Now Night's Shadows 
(G. W. Chadwick). 



ASHLEY PETTIS TO GIVE TWO CONCERTS 



Ashley Pettis, the distinguished pianist, who is to 
give recitals in San Francisco and at the University 
of California in Berkeley in November, gives unusual 
prominence to American composers upon his programs. 
Californians will be interested to know that three com- 
positions are by musicians who were born in this 
State. They are Albert Elkus. Frederick Jacobi and 
Miss Rosalie Housman. Few. if any, musicians in the 
United States are better informed than Mr. Pettis con- 
cerning the work that American composers are doing. 
His interest in the subject is so widely known that 
manuscripts are constantly being sent to him from all 
parts of the country. 

Mr. Pettis has already had some interesting experi- 
ences with his "all-American" program. "I prepared two 
other programs of the conventional type." he said, 
"but nearly everywhere people prefer to hear the 
American compositions. I am not offering this recital 
in order to be sensational, but to give music lovers a 



chance to hear some characteristic specimens of the 
new." 

Mr. Pettis explains what he means by new music, as 
follows: "Xew music looks to the future as opposed 
to compositions based on ideas long current. People 
nowadays are often confused when they try to appre- 
ciate the new works, by not distinguishing between 
those that are the sincere expressions of new musical 
conceptions and those that have the mannerism and 
superficial style of the modern school yet lack genuine 
originality. I have chosen for my program compositions 
which, after careful analysis, seem to be the honest at- 
tempts of musicians to say something in music which 
has not already been said many times. The public is the 
final judge of success in such matters and I can there- 
fore often tell, even after a single performance, from 
the indefinable response an audience gives to a piece 
whether the composition has vitality and genuine 
character. 

"Sympathetic criticism is rare even among critics. 
Too often people go to a concert with preconceived 
ideas of the way a composer should have written a 
piece or an artists should interpret it. They are deaf to 
what the composer is undertaking to do and they do 
not relax their prejudice long enough to catch an ink- 
ling of his idea. An example of this the frequent asser- 
tion that the new music has no structure. Yet a casual 
analysis of works by such composers as Albert Elkus 
or Frederick Jacobi reveals the injustice of this criti- 
cism. In my own case. I memorize these works by the 
aid of their structural plan. They do not lack form. 
They simply happen to have a different form from 
works to which we have ■ grown accustomed. One 
might as reasonably say that modern English prose 
does not have form because it does not show the 
periodic structure of ancient Greek. It is furthermore 
asserted that the new music strives to me unmetodious. 
This again is absurd, for no composer would ever throw 
away a good tune." 

The recitals of Mr. Pettis are to take place on Tues- 
day evening. November 13, Wheeler Hall, University of 
California, Berkeley, and Friday evening. November 16, 
Colonial Room, St. Francis Hotel, San Francisco. The 
program is as follows: Choral Fantasie and Fugue 
(Albert Elkus); Prelude (Deems Taylor). Dusk (On a 
Texas Prairie), The Jester. (Viola Beck-van Katwijk), 
A Gringo Tango (Eastwood Lane); Prelude. Burlesque 
(Frederick Jacobi), Triptich (Iridescences) (Rosalie 
Housmann), The Tide. Indian Pipes. Prelude (Marion 
Bauer); Sonata Eroica (Edward MacDowellJ. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RF.VIFAV 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDG.. EIGHTH AND BROADWAY -TEL. METROPOLITAN 4398 
C. C. EMERSON IN CHARGE— BRUNO DAVID USSHER. STAFF CORRESPONDENT 
Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



I,()S ANGEI.K.S. Oi I :!» — Thurailay eveninB I.cs An- 
gclos will hear the lirsi allMexlran band concert at the 
Flaza when the nnenily formed Mexican band makes 
its first public appearance. ProRrams will be played 
regularly at the I'laza Thursday and Saturday evenings, 
appearances at v:irious parks l>elng under arrangement. 
The band numbi^rs fifty pieces with .Manuel l.ucero, 
well-known Mexican bandmaster, directin«. Organiza- 
tion of Ihis Ihe only all. .Mexican band began several 
months ago by the Civic Music and Art Association 
through Henry C. .VIece. chairman of the Inlernatlonal 
section of this association. A survey made of the musi- 
cal talent among Mexicans living here brought a per- 
sonnel of fifty players together within a week Re. 
hearsals held during (he past few weeks prove that 
Los Angeles will be enriched by an excellent band 
very shortly for every one of the volunteer players are 
bom musicians. Final rehearsals held yesterday for a 
program of characteristic .Mexlcnn music, fantasies 
from Verdi operas, marches and dances sounded very 
well 

"Fcirmalion of this .Mexican band is part of the com- 
munity work carried out by the Civic .Music and Art 
Association," Ben F. Pearson, president of the associa- 
tion commented. Kncouraged by the participation of 
our foreign-born citizens In the Music Week programs 
of last .May we are endeavoring, through the means of 
music to bring our foreign-horn citizens closer into the 
communlly life at large. The work of this Mexican 
band will make for good feeling and better .American 
citizenship among our .Mexicans here, while it also 
should bring about heller understanding on the part 
of our American citizens toward our soulhern sister 
republic In the welfare of which this city as a town 
of commerce Is so vitally interested." 

Mary Garden gained another triumph over her host 
of admirers here in a second recital which, too, was 
excellenlly attended. The diva was most Impressive 
in French operatic arias. However, she wins not only 
In numbers of heavy dramatic calibre, but she can 
likewise build a nilnialure drama from a simple song 
revealing deep art of voice and singing. Incidentally 
Mary Garden was in lovely voice. 

Despite the lure of glorious weather a large and en- 
thusiastic audience attended the first Sunday afternoon 
concert of the Philharmonic Orchestra under nirecior 
Willi, r Henry Rolhwell. They were fully rewarded for 
'' hcstra played with that same brilliance and flue 

n which ushered In Ihe symphony season so 
iv'Iy last week. Meyerheers Coronation March 
I rii I .• Propheie lo the tonal opulence of which each 
Mi.ll.ru e seems to respond, was fcdlowed by the Sylvia 
li.illet sulle by Dellbes. One lould especially enjoy Mr. 
.Maijuarre's flute and Mr. Brain's horn in the hunting 
i-.ene of the Brst movement. The Pizzicato v.ilse had 
lo be given twice, and the audience would have liked 



SOHMER 

Reproducma Grana 



T/irSohmrr 

.\tat„ 

Ihr World 

Mnitfri 

l.ivr F.lrmal 



Words cannot depict the irt- 
itriitablc performance of the 
Sc.hmer Reproclucing Piano. 
Itt playing is comparable 
tiiily lo that ni the matters 
whose music an.l tcchnif|ue 
it stimulates nith such fiilel- 
ity. In one superb instru- 
ment is presented to vou the 
finest of the world 
possibilities --- enjovmeni 
the full of your favn 
•elections. 




Sa^'k^Sn^- 



I.OS ANtJF.LF.S 
Exclusive SOIIMER rcprrsrntatives 



OLGA STEEB 




KNABE ARTISTE 



Eminent Pianiste acknowledges Knabe's great part in her success 

She says: '"riie essential part played in my success by the piann I use 

has leil me In use only the Knabe. Its incomparable tone and touch 

fullil! the hi^'hest rc(|uirenicnts of musicianship." 

HII.l'STREET XP'^AT 7Si7-72i) 

LOS ANGELES 



to hear again the very colorful Procession of Dacchus. a 
suite in itself of musical dance pictures in which 
Conductor Rolhwell showed that he had a faculty of 
his own to draw from his players their fullest powers 
of rhythm and resonance. This is a brillianlly orches- 
trated piece, with a most ingratiating second theme of 
luscious warmth. 

Fine playing was heard also during the Sketch of the 
Steppes of Central Asia by Borodin, which the oflener 
one hears It the longer a sketch it seems, especially 
where the composer seems to depict the members of the 
caravan bent on singing. There are episodes in this 
"sketch" which make it a masterpiece of descriptive 
music, as for instance at the outset where one can 
almost picture the sandy vastness of the steppes, the 
sun beating down through a fine mist of dust that seems 
to undulate infinitesimally. Ilya Bronson, cello and 
Alfred Brain, French horn, had to how repeated thanks 
after their incidental solos after Rubinstein's melody in 
F, played in the Vincent d'Indy arrangement. Of Lia- 
dow's Intermezzo and .Music Box the latter had to be 
repealed. The program reached its artistic climax wllh 
Weber's Oberon overture finding a reading of lovely 
tone quality and phrasing. 

I.lllian Bowles was the soloist in the Balatella from 
Leoncavallo's Pagliacei, singing as her second group, 
prettily gowned a la Jenny Lind. Solveig's Song by 
Grieg and the Norwegian Echo Song of Thrane (Ihe lat- 
ter elfeclively orchestrated by Alard de Ridder). Miss 
Bowles possesses good material which she uses with 
lovely effect both dramatically and in coloratura parts. 
The tone quality Is often lovely in the high and middle 
register, though not always true lo pitch in the flrsl. 
and of less resonance in the lower register, all of which 
may be a matter of voice production and therefore due 
much to the dllliculty most singers experience when 
they have the alltoo-rare opportunity of singing with 
a large, and In this instance a very large, orchestra. 
.Miss Bowles was very well liked by the public who 
was Impressed by the sympathetic freshness of her in- 
terpretation and personality. 

This week's symphony programs, Saturday evening, 
consists of Tschalkowsky's Fourth Symphony, Fee Mab, 
the orchestral scherzo by Berlioz and the Dance of 
Salome by Glazounow. Claire Dux, celebrated soprano 
of the Chicago Opera, will be soloist In Dch vieni non 
lardar from Mozart's Marriage of Figaro and songs by 
Strauss and Reger. This Is her first appearance here 
and should prove delightful. 

Cornelia Rider Possart will play the Mozart B flat 
piano icmierio ai the next Sunday afternoon concert. 
November 11 .Massenets Scenes Plttoresques. and Cui's 
Miniaiure Suit.', both new here. Tschalkowsky's Andante 
Canlablle and Wagner's Rieuzi overture complete the 
program. 

Extreme opposltes of musical idiom were happily 
brought together under the Intimacy of ensemble music 
when Ihi- l.os Angeles Chamber Music Society opened 
their series of twelve programs with works scored 
(hiefly for combinations of bow and woodwind instru- 
ments and piano. The program included the E flat trio 
by Mozart for viola, clarinet and piano; Conversations 
by Arthur Bliss, his song Mme. Noy and the Beethoven 
Quintet. Opus 16. Blanche Rogers I.ott, artistic director 
of the Chamber music society was again at the piano, 
the personnel of the performers consisting of Sylvaln 
Noack. violin; Emll Ferir. viola; Ilya Bronson, cello; 
Henri de Busscher. oboe: .\ndre Maquarre, flute: Pierre 
Perrier. clarinet; Alfred Brain, French horn; Freder- 
ick Morllz. bissoon; Alfred Kastner, harp and Monnle 
Hayes Hastings as soprano soloist. 

Interest centered on the two Bliss compositions. Mme. 
Noy wrlten for soprano, harp, flute, clarinet, bassoon. 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COM POSER-PI ANISTE 



\arh. I'lltilt. 



CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 



ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

TueidiiT, \Vrdnpi>da]. Kridnr Afternoona 
Efciin School. l*lioni*N Ztsur. or 27i:i:iO 
i:<24 South PtKurran, I.oa .\nErlea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCKUT MASTKK IMIII.IIAIIMOML' OltClli': 



ILYA BRONSON ,.h„h„;'.',;;:„',?',"Vh,„r. 

.Membrr TrI.. tnltiac. l.os \nir>-tF« iri.i. Phltharmonle 

(tuarlrl. in>lrui'll.in. ( hamt><-r Miialc llvrilala 

.%<tl.% La ^llrndn — I'hone llf.llr .'{Oil 

A.KOODLACH 

vioi.i> M\Ki:it \M» Ki'.i* \iiti:i< 

<'i>riM<>iH<.iMir — A|>|)r:ilNcr 
SO:t MaJrMlle Thrntrr IIIiIk.. I.<*i* Aiiki-I>m I'honr 070-I>3 




ELINOR 
REMICK 
WARREN 



■ I.OIIV TO (:i.ORV*< 



hy Mil 



old V\i 



Harry Kaufman Is a young pianist well worthy of men- 
tion. He Bavo a well-balanced proRram in a masterly 
style. Kxquisite coloring, clear, crystal-like technique, 
together with a musielanly understanding, made it an 
Interesting recital indeed. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

OLGA STEEB 

Director and Head of the Piano Department 

FANNIE DILLON 

Head of the Department of Theory 

and Composition 

Faculty of Twenty-nine Teachers 

Affiliiileil Teaihers in Burbank, Claremonl, Holly- 
wood, Los Anpeles, Long Beach, Monrovia, Pasa- 
dena, Pomona, Redlands, Riverside, San Diego and 
Santa Monica. 

For Catalog and Full Information 
Address 

OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

453 S. Wihon Place Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone 567294 



Frederic Burr Scholl 



ORGANIST 



Grauman's Hollywood 
Egyptian Theatre 

HOLLYWOOD. CALIF. 



CLARA GERTRUDE OLSON 

TKAtHEH-VCCOMIMMST 

I-luno. Uarnionr. Thcor;^ 

Children'x Classen a Speclallr 

110 >luNlc-Art Studio — ><21IS1 ReH. riione Borle 5831 



Alexander Bevani 

OPERATIC COACHING 
TONE DEVELOPMENT 
VOICE PRODUCTION 



Suite 612 So. Calif. Mudc Co. Bid 
Phone 822-520 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOItlO CI l-TL UK— «,<>Atm.V<i l\ KIOrKllTOIRID 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

AnniiuiiccN tiKif lii% clasx is fillcil and lie ivill iic 
nnalilr to ai-ceiit any mn.-p imiiils iin 11 fiirihi-i' 
notice. JIC.SSIIO Me. Dt>\ Ai.ll i-.\TTI<:RSO\. Asxiat- 
anl Teac-itei. SillKLl^V TAGti.VRT, Semftury. Tel. 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 



l'lt\l,TO Scbo 



( llllCllOMcll till 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Donrn-tnwn Sludio removed to 80lt S. Broadway. Room 
G02. ReMidenee Studio. 1147 ^Vc»t ::iNt St. — Telephone 
West T'OT. PIANO. HARMOW. VOICE COACH. DI- 
UKCTOR JA5IIS<>\ O.rAUTLiTTK. Ten weeks* normal 



CHARLES BOWES 



Prof. A. GIUFFRIDA 

PIAXO. VIOI-IX, SI>'GI\G, COMPOSITIO:f 

E^oropenn fninouN sy.steiii: »45 for (H) leKNOtiK; thuN: 
.HO MtriellT privntc U-NKons and Hit eliiMw lesMoiiM. 
half-hour eni-h. Register at onee. 233 So. Broad- 
nay. Room 41S. Phone SSI-lSl. 



viola and violoncello had its American premiere last 
season at one of these concerts and was on that oc- 
casion reviewed in this column. The compositions again 
appealed immensely as Bliss well translates the quaint 
archaic spirit and humor of the ballad-like verses taken 
from Meyerstein's Witchery -Poems. His invention is 
ingenious hut never labored. The melodic material 
is distinct and used in the manner of the leit-motif if 
such a comparison may be applied to a song. There is 
an indefinable mysterious air about this music w^hich 
at one time in syncopated rhythm tells picturesquely 
that "old Mamdame Noy hath stolen forth to the church 
on the sand dunes" near the sea, "for a deed of magic 
she meant to do" to prevent the skipper from returning 
to his sweetheart. All this is related by the ensemble 
with the extremely diffcult vocal part which owing 
to its taxing intervals makes for balladesque "speech- 
song.'' Then the bone which he has locked up knocks 
against the cupboard door, one hears the clock strike 
midnight. She throws the bone out of the window and 
as it "falls with a whistling sound, when all of a sud- 
den the moon rose big. and over the sea a black-sailed 
brig, and she curses the bone and her luck in despair, 
but beneath comes a low mocking laugh on the air." 
Here is a fascinating imaginative fancy, creating pic- 
tures, but emphasizing the mood as much as the action. 

The composer's faculty for instrumental treatment 
which, while extraordinarily independent never jars, is 
of absolute blending and never burdens the vocal part. 
Bliss is a creator of atmosphere, when for instance 
Mme. Xoy "to the cupboard hath pressed her head, and 
clear as a hell, there again comes that moan, and the 
whisper 'give back that bone!'" As the opus is rhy- 
thmically very intricate. Mr. Noack directed the per- 
formance which was delightful tonally and as to spon- 
taneousness of interpretation. 

Equally captivating in most parts is the suite Con- 
versations by Arthur Bliss for flute, violin, viola, and 
violoncello, heard for the first time in this country. I 
believe. The Committee Meeting is a bit of sarcastic, 
insistent cacophonic chattering, not disagreeably dis- 
sonant, in which the various themes pompously, ob- 
stinately, one drawling, the other apologetically, for 
instance exchange and reiterate their thematic remarks, 
all of "raising their voices" as the meeting progresses. 
It is an instrumental parody on such a session, where 
every one persists, talks incessantly and means to have 
the last word. With an "I said so" the viola and the 
violin end the piece. In the Wood is of sweet poetic and 
delicate coloring charm. Bird voice, the fragrance of 
nature can be sensed. Soliloquy for oboe alone is an 
exquisite piece and was exquisitely rendered by Henri 
de Busscher. In it Bliss unites something of the Pas- 
torale, of Bach-like figuration and striking chromatic 
character. The forceful contour of his themes was par- 
ticularly evident in this solo piece. Least interesting 
in the suite are In the Ballroom and In the Tube at 
Oxford Circus. They are episodic, intermingling real- 
ism and impressionism and not as clever as the Com- 
mittee Meeting from a point of musical fun. The last 
one 's music rhythmically very vigorous, almost boister- 
ous. It also is free in form, but thematically consistent 
and therefore not hard to follow. 

Summing up. Bliss possesses a remarkable gift for 
co-ordinating his themes, harmony, rhythm and orches- 
tration. Especially interesting is his choice of certain 
instruments for certain themes. His music is not of 
the intellectual sort, but rich in melody and color of 
flowing virility. Unique is his alternating and at times 
simultaneous use of diatonic and chromatic phrases. He 
is one of the musically independents endowed with 
much creative imagination. 

As to playing, the compositions of Bliss as well as 
those of the two classics left nothing to be desired. 
Tlrey were more than well rehearsed for the perform- 
an'-es radiated the spirit of the music. 

Gliere's String Quartet in A major. Opus 2. will be 
premiered on the coast at next Friday's program of the 
Los Angeles Chamber Music Society concert in the 
Gamut Club. It will be played by the Philharmonic 
Quartet: Sylvain Noack. first violin; Henry Svedrofsky, 
second violin ; Emil Ferir, viola ; Ilya Bronson, cello. 
Another novelty will be two movements from a quartet 
by Pierre Menu. The lovely Schumann piano quintet 
closes the program with Conielia Rider Possart at the 
keyboard. 

The coming season will find the Zoellner Quartet ap- 
rearing in, new surroundings for they have decided to 



M. Jeannette Rogers 


First Flutist Metropolitan 
Theatre 


.0^ 


Available for 


Concert-Recital-Club 
Obbligato 


j& 


Address 1354 Lavcta Terrace 



sieinwAy 

THE INSTRUMENT_QF THE !MMQ[iTAL5 




hold their annual series of six concerts in the music 
room of the new Biltmore Hotel. This is significant for 
the Zoellners as no doubt many people staying at the 
new hostelry heard this internationally known quartet 
in their world travels. Many novelties are promised 
us by this organization who have probably more than 
any other quartet cultivated the chamber music field 
extensively. From ancient and time-honored classics to 
futurists numbers of "first time in America" presenta- 
tions they are presenting to Angelenos as fine chamber 
music as can be heard in America. 

Among these will be a quartet by Jarvach Op. 15, Max 
Reger Quartet Op. 121. "Noveletten" by Frank Bridge, a 
trio for two violins and piano by Heinrich Noren, piano 
Quintet Op 1 by Dohnanyi which despite its youthful 
opus number is a work of outstanding maturity. Miss 
Ralston, a member of the Zoellner Conservatory faculty 

MISS FANNIE CHARLES DILLON 

PIAMST — TEACHER— COMPOSKR 
Studio. 2M50 Leeward Avenue, Los AngeleN. Phone Drexel 
7309. Composer o( Many Xumberi* Played by FaiuouH 



GILDA MARCHETTI 





\e« Studio: 71. 


So. Calif. Music Co. nidp. 






L. 

Mr. 

of 

the 


CANTIEN HOLLYWOOD 

Pl.\_\0 — ORGAN' — H.*.RMO\V 
Hollyn-uod has made a study of the psyeholopy 
[■hildren between the ages of six and nine and 
methods and materials used for them. A limited 
iber of normal students will be accepted. 
Studio: 771 \orth Hill. Pasadena 
Phone ( olorado i;{04 





Claire Forbes 
Crane 

—PIANIST 



DA VOL SANDERS ' '?!;',?pf,?t;S"'^ 



H?ad Violin Oept. 



of MumIc. U. 



C — Member 



RAYMOND HARMON 



TEX OR 
rt — Oratorio — Tenehin^ 
Studio RldiBT-t LoM Angele 



€ 



EleanorWoodford 



I.\TIC SOPR.WO 

-prf.«L'nted by 
CE M. STIVERS 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



win :il»o have a hearing with a quartet now in manu- 
script. The last and biggest of the Mozart Quartets will 
be played as well as his quintet for strings and clarinet. 
Thus tils Opus 108 will be given with the assistance of 
Mr. Kuehne who will play tlte wind instrument. And, of 
coursf. there are no finer Iteeilioven interpretations 
than those which the Zoellner tiuartet have given over 
ttie length and breadth of tliis :ind other countries. The 
first concert at the Biltmore will be on .Monday evening. 
-Vovember 19. AM the concerts of the series will lie on 
Monday evenings on llie following dates: December 10, 
January 14. February 11. March 17. April 21. With as- 
sisting artists at every concert and a large list of pa- 
trons the Zoellners have a brilliant season before them. 

Prom Nino M^iri.lli. the gifted composer, who Is 
doing such exc'-INrii work as head of the high scliooi 
music and orcliisiia department in San Diego, I hear 

that plans an ler consideration which will give to 

that Southern ('allfomia city a Civic Orchestra and 
Oratorio Society of Its own. Although Mr. Marcelll in 
his usual retiring manner writes very little about It, I 
understand that he is one of the prime movers and 
the same source of information gives me to under- 
stand that they are hoping to win this splendid young 
musician for the double position of orchestral and choral 
maestro Those "who are familiar with Mr. Nino Mar- 
celli's work will agree that San Diego music lovers are 
fortunate in their choice. Marcelll is one of. best and 
most rellned musicians in the west. As a composer, too. 
he has by far more than won his spurs. It will be re- 
membered that his Aniacanian Suite won the first prize 
offered by the New York Concert Stadium composition 
contest committee. Considering the fact that more than 
five Imndred manuscripts were submitted from every 
part of the country and that ail the scores were signed 
with a nom de plume which kept the identity of the 
composer hidden, the honor bestowed on Nino Mar- 
celll Is one of decided significance as to his creative 
merits. In the meantime -Marcelll is lontinuing his 
constructive work in training young instrumentalists 
The orchestra of the San Diego High School is one of 
the best trained in the country a prominent New 
Yorker told me the other day, a word of praise borne 
out by the splendid Impression these young musicians 
made also at the last convention of tlie Federation of 
Music Clubs. 

Speaking of Nino Marcelll reminds me to say a few 
words about his equally gifted brother, l*lderico Mar- 
celll. likewise endowed with brilliant creative and 
conductorial gifts. Ills advent as director of music at 
Grauman's Metropolitan Theater gave to this house a 
musical prestige of higliest order. Since then bid 
Graunian has transferred him to his "pet" theater, the 
Egyptian Theater In Hollywood, nationally noted for its 
elaborate productions and long runs. 1 attended the 
presentation of The Covered Wagon a few days ago and 
was deeply impressed with the fine work tlle orchestra 
Is accomplishing under I'lderico Marcellis baton. Mar- 
celll makes the score into a dramatic symphony of 
gripping force, though the music, written by Paul 
Rivsenfeld of New York, is not all one would wish for. 
I am not sure, hut It seems to me that the inclusion of 
occasional jazz music is an anachronism In a film score 
the subject of which dates back nearly eighty years. 
However, this Is not Marcellis fault who has an over- 
ture of his own of dramatic verve. What impressed me 
greatly was the expressiveness which .Marcelll puts into 
his conduiting and which Is reflected in the convincing 
playing of his orchestra. All of which speaks well for 
bis artistic Intensity for they have played the music 
nearly two hundred times and It is that very quality, 
musical enthusiasm In which some of our best artists 
are lacking, especially when they come to repeat certain 
selections or programs. I'lderico Marcelll, I must add. 
Is now working at a dance suite drawing on folk dances 
of various countries. Ills Indian dance of the Burning 
Arrow, as 1 staled at the end of the Hollywood Bowl 
season won a most cordial reception when bis own con- 
ducting made a strong Impression, both on the public 
and the musicians. 

There can not he any longer any doubt that Ix)s 
Angeles Is a really metropolitan music city for your 
scribe, like the critics of New York, will frequently 
have to flit from one concert hall to another in the 
course of the evening, hear what he can anil gather the 
rest as he can with the help of those that have not the 
111 luck to become a chronicler of the season 

Of Frederick Herman's vocal recital 1 could hear only 
part of a song group and the aria %'lsion fugitive from 
Massenet's opera llerodlade. The songs, by Robert 
F'rani and Schulx-rl, were Interpreted in the fashion as 
one enjoys it with few exceptions only In the land of 
their composers, where, by the way, Mr. Herman spent 
years of study and presumably acquired his appealing 
lleder style. Apropos, this was Mr Hennans debut as 
a singer, announced as basso cantante, being heretofore 
known only as pianist, and pedagogue of that instru- 
ment and vol,... Vocally 1 can say little in praise of 
the singer's voice which is best In the middle register, 
otherwise limited and not very vibrant. Whether It was 
the emotional strain a debut always has in Its course, 
or a permanent condition, but It would seem that the 
tonal production is restrained and results in too little 
resonance. However this may be .Mr. Herman succeeded 
In fully winning the sympathy of his public, himself de- 
livering his selei tion In that quiet, svmpatbetic manner 
for which he is known. The aria did not seem his best 
medium of expression, lacking warmth The artistic 
program Included also old Italian and modern Ameri- 
cans. 

Calmon Luboviski, the welbknown hrllllani violinist, 
was not at his best In Si hubert Wllhemj's Are Maria 
and Krelsler's Lleb<-srreud 1 1 had to leave before the 

2amlK>urln Chlnoia.i He plays usually with much bet- 
■r tone and greater finish of lechnic. 
>M«y Macdonald Hope accompanied with fluency of 



the facile planlste she is, both in the violin numbers 
and the lleder. She loves these songs and one could 
sense It In her playing. Leaving the Fine Arts Theater 
I made haste for the fJaniut Club where the Los Angeles 
music teachers btjld their program meeting. 

GEORGE SHKUTETSKY'S CONCERT 

George Shkutetsky. a Russian baritone of exceptional 
voice and artistic accomplishments, who recently ar- 
rived In thfs city, will give a vocal recital In the Colo- 
nial Ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel on Monday eve- 
ning. .November 12. Mr. Shkutetsky possesses a voice 
of unusual fiexibility and sonority and sings with an 
Intelligence and artistic judgment rarely found. He is 
particularly proficient in the interpretation of Russian 
music, and the program to be rendered on this occasion 
will consist exclusively of Russians arias and songs. 
Mr. Shkutetsky Is an artist whom any music lover and 
specially vocalist will enjoy, and his program has been 
compiled with much taste and judgment. Mrs. John 
Casserly, one of San Francisco's ablest music patrons 
and a musician of splendid taste and ability, will be 
at the piano and add unquestionably to the artistic 
character of the event. The concert will be under the 
management of Alice Seckels. The complete program 
will be as follows: .-Mr (Pimenl from opera Boris Go- 
dounow (.Mussorgsky I. Floods of Spring (Rachmanin- 
6(tl, .Mr (Sobakin) from opera Tzar Bride (Rimsky- 
Korsakoffl, Autumn Leaves (Olierl, At the Ball (Tsch- 
aikowskyt: .\ir (SusaninI from opera Life for the 
Tzar (Glinkal. On the Old Hill (Kaiinnikoff I, The 
Night (Tschaikowsky). Do .Not Sing .My Beauty (Kau- 
ka's Melody) ( RachmaninofTi, .-Vir from opera Demon 
(Rubinstein): Air from opera The Magic Flute( Mozart), 
Silent Lips (Bleihman), Azra (Rubinstein), Doubt — Ro- 
mance (Glinka), Two Giants (Stolipin). 



BAUMGARTNER'S VIOLIN TECHNIC READY 

The first copies of John Baumgartner's Violin Tech- 
nic, consisting of five volumes and published by C. F. 
Kahnt of Leipsic, Germany, were received a short time 
ago and are on sale at Henry drobe's in the Wiley B. 
Allen Co. store, i:'.5 Kearny street. The second part of 
this work will arrive later. Although these copies have 
been on sale but a short time, the work is so compre- 
hensive and fills such a longfelt want that numerous 
violin enthusiasts are spreading the news about its ex- 
cellence. Judging from this preliminary interest there 
is no question but that this technic will enjoy great 
vogue and will be in such demand that orders will be 
diflScult to fill. 

Mr. Baumgarlner devoted many years of his life as 
an expert musician to the compilation of this work, and 
the result is such a simplification of violin technic and 
the rudimentary knowledge of violin playing that study- 
ing and practicing is made a pleasure instead of a 
drudgery. It is beyond question the most complete and 
thorough violin technic ever published and is specially 
compiled to acquire an easy and fluent finger and arm 
technic. It is arranged in such a manner as to develop 
every muscle needed for facile violin playing and is of 
special value to advanced students and artists who wish 
to acquire a perfect technic It is unusually easy to 
study this work inasmuch as explanations are concise 
and simple and therefore readily comprehended by 
anyone reading English. We have never seen a work 
that is quite as valuable from a violinists' standpoint 
than this recent addition to educational musical litera- 
ture. 



Karl Rackle, pianist and question editor of the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review, and Edwin Holton. tenor, will 
give a recital at Native Sons' Hall in Hayward on Tues- 
day evening. November 13. The artistic qualifications of 
both these young musicians justify the prediction that 
the event will be an unusually worthy one. 

The Soroptlmist Club, an organization of business wo- 
men, gave a luncheon at the Italian Room of the St. 
Francis Hotel on .Monday, October 22, which was de- 
voted to the Development of .Musical California. Mrs. 
Lillian Harris Coftln, President of the club, did the 
honors as toastmlstress in splendid fashion, and there 
were a number of honor guests, including people promi- 
nent In musical affairs and the various critics of the 
daily papers. Excellent addressses were made by Mrs. 
Agnes Ray, member of the Slate Board of Education: 
.Mrs. Lillian Birmingham. President of the California 
Federation of .Music Clubs: Mrs. Aivina lleuer-Wilson. 
President of the San Francisco Music Teachesr' .\sso- 
ciatlon: Frank Carroll Giffen. Director of the San Fran- 
cisco Music Teachers' Association: Vincent de Arril- 
laga. F'resident Musicians' Club of San Francisco, and 
Professor AUoo of the Inlverslty of California. Alfred 
Metzger. editor of the Pacific Coast Musical Review, put 
in a good word for the resident artists. 



The San Francisco Trio, an ensemble organization 
which made such an excellent impression during the 
last two seasons, announces its third season. The Trio 
consists of Elsie Cook Hughes, pianist: William F. 
Laria, violinist, and Wlllem Dehe. cellist. Three con- 
certs will he given in the Italian Room of the St. 
Francis Hotel, as follows: Tuesday evening, Novem- 
ber 27: Tuesday evening, January 22, and Tuesday eve- 
ning, .March 18. Specially Interesting programs have 
been prepared. Subscription tickets, two for each con- 
cert, are five dollars, and single tickets, one dollar. 
They are now for sale at Sherman. Clay & Co. 

Mrs. Clyde N. Seal and Ml» Janie Johnston of San 
Jose, two pupils of Mme. Rose Florence, will take part 
In a iirogram to be given for the benefit of the Palo 
Alto Veterans at (he California Club (m Thursday eve- 
ning. November 8. These young artists will sing the 
following duets: Calm as the Mghl (Goetzel and It 



Was a Lover and His Lass (Walthew). Mrs. Edwin 
Newhall. Jr.. will be the accompanist. 

Sigmund Anker will give the first of three studio pupils' 
recitals at :il42 Cough street this (Saturday) e\ening, 
when the following program will be presented: Minuet 
in (Beethoven). Dolores .Mherton; Indian Lament (F. 
Kreisler). Doris Malitz: Der Sohn Der Haide (Kela 
Bela). Roy Haus: Remembrance (Vogt). David Sclinei- 
der (5 years of age): Concerto in A minor (Accolay). 
Bertha Schwartz: Spanish Dance (Rehfeld). Donna 
Anderson: Serenade (Drigo-Auer). Esther Heller; 
Concerto In G minor (Max Bruch). Eunice Jurgens; 
Mazurka-Dudiarz (H. Wieniawski). Israel Rosenbaum; 
Mazurka de Concert (O. Musin). Maxine Conrad: 
Gypsy Dance (H. Ernst). Sarah Marks: Faust Fantasie 
(Alard). Tlllie Brown: Introduction — Rondo Capricioso 
(S. Saens). Sarah Kreindier: Hymn to the Sun (R. Kor- 
sakof-Kreisler). John Reznik. 

Suzanne Pasmore gave an excellent piano recital under 
the auspices of the Woodland Music Club on Saturday 
e^'ening. October 27. Her playing was characterized by 
a full singing tone, brilliant technic and remarkable 
shading and interpretative powers. Her assistant, 
Therese Zahnatyn. delighted the discriminating audi- 
ence with the sympathy, purity and sheer beauty c 
voice, together with with a plentitude of power. Th 
welcome absence of the "tremolo stop" was noted. 1 
was remarked by some of those present that not sine 
Alma Gluck visited Woodland had such singing been 
heard. Mr. Pasmore's two songs. The Shi Liu Tree and 
The Mountains, were her favorite vocal numbers. 
Pasmore accompanied the vocal numbers. The program 
was as follows: As When the Dove. O Sleep. Why Dost 
Thou Leave Me (Handel): Prelude. No. 20. Prelude, 
No. 17. Waltz, E Minor (Chopin): Musetta's Valse Song, 
from La Boheme (Puccini). O Mio Babbino Caro. from 
Gianni Schicchi (Puccini). .4 Pastoral, from Rosalinda 
(Veracini): Gavotte (Sgambati). Barcarolle (Schar- 
wenka). Polish Dance (by request) (Scharwenka) ; The 
Shi Liu Tree (words and theme from the Chinese) 
(Pasmore). The Mountains (Pasmore), Duna (McGill); 
Arabesque (Debussy), Orientale (Amanil, Water Wag 
Tail (Cyril Scott), En Autonne (Moszkowski). 

Mme. Rose Florence, the excellent concert soprano, 
sang at both services of the First Congregational 
Church, of which Dr. Gordon is pastor, last Sunday, 
October 28'. During the evening service the church was 
packed to the doors, people standing wherever they 
could find room. The artist sang Jesus Lover of My 
Soul by Tours at the morning service and Crossing the 
Bar by Dudley Buck and When the Mists Have Rolled 
Away at the evening service. Uda Waldorp presided at 
the organ in a manner to add to the artistic enjoy- 
ment of these solos. 

Miss Rena Lazelle, head of the vocal department of the 
San Francisco Conservatory of Music, will present 
twelve pupils in recital on Friday evening, November 
9. She will also present seventeen less advanced pupils 
on Saturday afternoon, November 17, at 3 o'clock. Both 
these concerts will be given in the hall of the school, 
343.5 Sacramento street, and are open to the public. 

Mrs. Albert George Lang and Miss Esther Delninger» 
two excellent pianists residing in San Francisco, who 
will appear at the next concert of the Pacific Musical 
Society, belong to those rare artists who study and 
play for the sake of artistic enjoyment They belong, 
therefore, to the most gifted element among our yotmg 
artists. They will interpret a Mozart Sonata and an 
Arensky Suite on two pianos. Miss Deininger studied 
in Europe for a number of years, while Mrs. Lang was 
a disciple of Oscar Weil and is at present continuing 
her studies under the able supervision of .-Mbert Elkus. 
We do not doubt for a moment but that both these 
artists will give an excellent account of themselves. 

Mme. Isabelle Marks, one of San Francisco's most 
successful and ablest vocal pedagogues will give a 
pupils' recital In the Gold Room of the Palace Hotel 
next Friday evening, November 9th. It is always a 
pleasure to listen to Mme. Mark's pupils and the follow- 
ing program promises to be one of the most successful 
events of the many delightful recitals given under the 
able supervision of Mme. Marks: None e ver (Mattel), 
Chanson Indone (Rimaky-Karsakow).), Mrs Florence 
.MacDonald; Nymphs anti Fauns (Bemberg), Lo Hear 
the Gentle Lark (Bishop). Lea Ross; Sing, Smile Slum- 
ber (Gounod). Ave .Maria (Gounod). Mable Lee; Char- 
mant Oiseau (David). La Paloma (Yradier). Mabel 
Uroz: Voce de donna. Gioconda (Ponchielli). Slave 
Song (Del Riago). Mrs. Lillian Hiity Carnes: Waltx 
Song — Romeo and Juliet (Gounod). Sunshine Song 
(Grieg), Mrs. B. M. Morris: Er der herlichste von Allen 
(Schumann), My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice (Saint- 
Saensl, Ellen Deeley; Swiss Echo Song (Echert). Caro 
MIo Ben (Glordianll, Mrs Venice E. Tobin; Vol La 
Sapete (Mascagni), Moonlight (Schumann), Marie 
Rhoads: Coiinais tu Mignon (Thomas), Rest (Golson), 
Frances Levy: Aria Ernani (Verdi), Amarilla (Cacclnl). 
Nina Tomlinson: Caro Nome Rigoletto (Verdi), The 
Sw'allows (Del Aqua), Adele Nicholas: Aria II 'Trova- 
tore (Verdi), The Star (Rogers). Violet Boyle; Carnival 
of Venice (Benedict), Summer (Chamlnade), lia Mc- 
intosh: Rachem (Manna Zucca), Erl King (Schubert), 
Mrs. Belle Jacob Lewis. 

Jean Gerardy, the distinguished Belgian cello vir- 
tuoso, and George McManus, the brilliant California 
pianist, who Is his accompanist, recently concluded an 
Australian lour consisting of ninety concerts all of 
which proved lo be a tremendous success both financial- 
ly and ariistically. Mr. Gerardy. accompanied by Mr. 
McManus. will reach San Francisco some time this 
month and will appear In concert In this city. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



LOS ANGELES TO HAVE A TEMPLE 
OF MUSIC 

(Continued from Ta^e 1 > 

and citizenship. A telegram from Im- 
presario Behymer urging united action 
was enthusiastically received. 

Musical selections were given by a 
quintet representing the Musicians' Pro- 
tection Association complimentary to the 
Civic Music and Arts Association, and by 
the Orpheus Four, the latter a well- 
known vocal quartet. The song feature 
by the Orpheus Four was "My Golden 
California." text by Elizabeth W. Wilbur, 
music by Grace Adele Freebey. dedicated 
to Mrs. J. J. Carter, vice-president of the 
Civic Music and Arts Association. 

The association has pledged itself to 
co-operate with the Los Angeles branch 
of the Association of the Army of the 
United States in the latter organization's 
plan for a memorial monument to service 
men to be erected in Pershing Square. 

It has organized a band composed of 
Mexican residents of Los Angeles con- 
sisting of fifty players under the di- 
rection of flannel Lucero. Representa- 
tives of more than twenty Los Angeles 
bands are comprised in a section of the 
association with Arthur M, Perry as 
chairman. Plans have been made for 
band concerts, community singing, chil- 
dren's choruses, song festivals and Music 
Week celebrations. 

On the temple of music and arts com- 
mittee are L. E. Behymer. E. G. Judah. 
Mrs. Martha Nelson McCan. C. Gordon 
Whitnall and members of the adminis- 
tration committee which includes Presi- 
dent Peason. Mrs. J. J. Carter, Roger 
Andrews, Mrs. E. R. Brainerd, Harold 
Ferguson. F. G. Leonard and E. P. 
Tucker. ^ 



.-(1 fr 



conflicting emotions. It is scored with 
attention to solidity of instrumentation 
and vigorously proclaims the intense 
phrases which the composer so prodigal- 
ly conceived. The Chamber Music So- 
ciety, this time with Lajos Fenster's 
luscious and seductive viola tones blend- 
ing charmingly with the ensemble, suc- 
ceeded in extracting every particle of 
sensuousness and romantic beauty from 
this vigorous composition. The blood 
and sinew which the composer so suc- 
cessfully moulded into this work was ac- 
centuated with skill and intelligent dis- 
crimination by the six musicians who 
seemed to submerge their individualities 
into the maelstrom of human emotions 
which Schoenberg so convincingly 
created. 

No wonder the audience rose to the 
occasion and gave vent to its feelings by 
repeated explosions of spontaneous ap- 
plause intermingled with occasional 
cheers. It was a great occasion worthily 

recognized • 

DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS HONORED 

One of the most interesting receptions 
of the week was the "at home"' held in 
honor of Miss May Mukle and Horace 
Britt, the two world-renowned artists, on 
Friday evening. Xovember 2. at the San 
Francisco Conservatory of Music, of 
which the Misses Ada Clement and Lil- 
lian Hodghead are the directors. The 
most prominent members of the musical 
and social sets were present, and the 
gathering included guests invited from 
the bay cities and the Peninsula. On the 
receiving committee. assisting the 
Misses Clement and Hodghead, were 
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Baldwin. Mr. and 
Mrs. H. D. McCoy. Mr. and Mrs. O. K. 
Gushing, Dr. and Mrs. William Ophuls, 
Mrs. Charles X. Felton. Mrs. X. C. Por- 
ter and Miss Lena Blending. 



J. Bernard Katz, fourteen-year-old piano 
student of Louis Felix Raynaud, playing 
this week at Loew's Warfield Theatre, is 
scoring an artistic success. This young 
pianist has been much in demand re- 
cently, playing at three different func- 
tions for the Teachers' Institute last 
week. His selections at the Warfield in- 
cluded Chopin's Polonaise Militaire. 
Godard's Second Waltz and Beethoven's 
Marche Turque. His performance was 
virile and decisive, hacked by an excel- 
lent technic which justifies predictions of 
rapid artistic development and a bright 

future. 

Marjorie Saytes, lyric soprano, pupil of 
Frank Carroll Giffen. sang with much 
success on the opening program of 
Mfisic Week at the Exposition Audito- 
rium on Tuesday evening, October 30. 
Miss Sayles is a public teacher and her 
singing proved her to he not only the 
possessor of a delightful voice, but an 
intelligent interpreter as well. 



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TeL Prospect 757 

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mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. .>lon., Kohler & 
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Madame Charles Pouller -Soprano Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



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Mary Coonan McCrea 

TBACHER OF SINGING 
Studio 3S GalYner Uulldiug, 37t{ Sutter St. 
Tel. OouelBB 4:KI3. Res. Tel. Kearny 2349 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



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MME 


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GR-iDlATE OF SCHOL.* C.<.\TORUM, 



2211 SCOTT ST„ Bet. Ciar « Waahlngtoa 
Mr. Xoah Brandt, Violin 
91rn. Xoah Brandt, Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist, Temple Emann El. Con- 
cert and Chnrcb Work. Vocal Inatrae- 
floa. 2S39 Clay St., Phone Weal 4Sgo. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



EVA M. GARCIA 



MARY CARR MOORE — SONGS 



ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

Violinist and Teacher. Hcnd of Violin Dept., 

S. F. Cons, of Mu.slc. 343.% Sacramento 

St.. and 121 Slst A-re.. Tel Pac. 1284 

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J. B. ATWOOD 

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MISS LORRAINE EWING 
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MARGARET WHITE COXON 

149 Rose Av.. Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
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DOROTHY PASMORE 
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MACKENZIE GORDON 
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ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 134T 

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THE STUDY SERVICE SHEET ;:„XV'.-: '.T 

<iur>< lu iilnnii Irai'tai-rx. II lrll> » HAT niti>il<' (u unr nnil HOW 
nnnir on our Irr,. innllliii:-il»t ! ir nol. Kriid It In Kidn) In either 

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KAJETAN ATTL 

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GEORGE M. LIPSCHULTZ 

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LOEWS WARFIELD THEATRE 

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Theatre Phone Prospect 83 

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MR. ANDREW BOGART 
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Pnpll* prrpared fur Uprra. (tratorlo, Ckorch and 

New Addrraa— HKIXR ni.DG.. 40S STOCKTON ST. 

DouiclaM DS30 



Leslie V. Harvey 

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ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

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After October 1st Under the Management of S. Hurok, Inc., Aeolian Hall, New York 



America's Greatest 

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PIANOS 

It is impossible to convey in words an ade- 
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sheet MUSIC 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



H^fir (hs^iWx^kdWiMit 



J THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUI^NAL IK THE GREAT WE5T llj 



VOL. XLV. No. 6 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



NOVELTIES AT SECOND SYMPHONY CONCERT TITO SCHIPA'S IDEAL ART OF BEL CANTO 



Saint-Saens' Second Symphony and Charpentier's Impressions of Italy 
Cordially Received by Large Audience — Horace Britt Enthusi- 
astically Received and Heartily Applauded for His 
Excellent Interpretation of Bloch's Schelomo 



Distinguished Italian Lyric Tenor Arouses His Hearers to Rapturous 

Expressions of Enthusiasm With His Flexible Voice and Finished 

Technical Skill — Enunciation Also Worthy of Commendation 

Program Did Not Contain Representative Classic Numbers 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



Again it may be recorded that the con- 
cert goers of San Francisco filled the 
Curran Theatre on the occasion of the 
second pair of symphony concerts last 
Friday and Sunday afternoons. Novem- 
ber id and 4th. Special interest was 
manifested in the appearance of Horace 
Britt. formerly solo cellist of the or- 
chestra and during the last three years 
cellist with the Letz Quartet of New York. 
Mr. Britt received a very enthusiastic 
welcome when he made his appearance 
and a certain element of humor was in- 
jected in the welcome by a young lady 
who took sufficient interest in the 
cellist's welfare to fear for his safety, 
expressing her lack of confidence in the 
little platform upon which Mr. Britt tried 
to find a comfortable adjustment for 
his chair by an exclamation which 
caused a ripple of laughter in her im- 
mediate neighborhood and some puzzle- 
ment among the orchestra members, in- 
cluding Mr. Hertz. However, the young 
lady was soon convinced that Mr. Britt 
was safely esconced and was not in dan- 
ger of falling from his perch and the 
"children" having had their little fun Mr. 
Britt and the orchestra began Ernest 
Bruch's Schelomo 

This is the third time the writer has 
heard this vigorous symphonic poem, or 
Rhapsodie as the composer terms it. 
Some of the musicians of the orchestra, 
and also Mr. Britt. consider this work 
as the greatest achievement of latter- 
day musical literature in certain re- 
spects. And we gladly subscribe to this 
opinion with a few reservations. From 
an orchestral standpoint, that is from the 
angle of scoring and instrumentation we 
know of no composition quite as effective, 
at least among the new works we have 
heard during the last few years. Further- 
more it is emotional to the very last de- 
gree. Mr. Bloch understands how to 
stretch the heartstrings at times almost 
to the breaking point, and when he 
wants to describe wailing and weeping 
he creates a veritable orgy of anguish. 
Indeed this composition contains a prodi- 
gality of suffering as expressed in music 
which we have not seen equalled. There 
are also periods of poetic calm and gen- 
tleness which form a delightful contrast 
to the phases of demonstrative sorrow. 
Whether this disregard for suppression 
of suffering and this utter carnival of 
pain is representative of artistic refine- 
ment is questionable, but beyond doubt 
it is realistic and characteristic of the 
subject which the composer has chosen 
for his vehicle of expression. 

At times is contains those conflicting 
discords and dissonances which affect 
our ears so unpleasantly, but there is 
recognizable throughout the presentation 
of the work a certain continuity of 
themes and ideas which we can not find 
in most of the ultra modern works. After 
all it is rhapsodic, and surely Mr. Bloch 
has not failed to make it so. Mr. Britt 
played with that depth of emotional ac- 
centuation and that knack of interpret- 
ing the composer's thoughts which rep- 
resents so large a proportion of this 
artist's skill and interpretative faculties. 
His finesse was specially notable in 
those phrases where the composer ex- 
pressed the wailing of a multitude and 
where repeated portamentos could easily 
create a sense of monotony, but Mr. 
Britfs skillful manipulatiou of these 
phrases robbed them of any vestige of 
being commonplace. It was a brilliant 



performance. The orchestra under Mr. 
Hertz's masterly guidance played with 
fire and abandon and showed its steady 
improvement by the uniformity of ex- 
pression and the ease with which almost 
unbelievable obstacles were overcome. It 
was a most enjoyable performance, and 
notwithstanding certain episodes of al- 



It w'as gratifying to note such a large 
audience at the Columbia Theatre last 
Sunday afternoon when Tito Schipa 
made liis first San Francisco appearance, 
and furthermore it was pleasing to watch 
the enthusiasm with which this audience 
followed the progress of the event. Al- 
though Mr. Schipa was evidently labor- 




EFRKM ZniB.\LIST 



most Satanic fury the originality of the 
work and its masterly arrangement left 
a lasting impression. 

Neither the Saint-Saens second sym- 
phony nor the Charpentier Suite seem 
to belong to a deeper phase of musical 
literature. They were both of light char- 
acter and. while evidently the result of 
skillful writing and masterly orchestra- 
tion, they can not be regarded as in- 
spirational. The symphony does not be- 
long to Saint-Saens' best efforts. It is 
almost light enough to be regarded as a 
symphonic suite, although at times intri- 
cate scoring and ingenious instrumenta- 
tion add to its value. The Charpentier 
Suite is admittedly programmatic and 
contains some Italian folk songs very in- 
telligently arranged for orchestra. Dur- 
ing the Serena de Lajos Fenster played 
the viola soios in STTIlanner to earn him 
(Continued on Page 11, Column 1) 



ing under a disadvantage resulting from 
a slight cold his voice was sufficiently 
clear and free to justify admiration for 
its flexibility and pliancy. It was special- 
ly delightful in the high tones and Mr. 
Schipa proved himself artist enough not 
to abuse the possibilities of these high 
tones. Technically Mr. Schipa has solved 
every law established by vocal science. 
His scales are smooth and clean. His in- 
tonation is pure and precise. His diction 
is distinct and correct. He covers his 
tones at the exact places where needed 
and he occasionally breaks into almost 
dramatic vigor when the occasion de- 
mands. 

But Tito Schipa's strongest point is 
his absolute command of what is known 
as the bel canto. He never permits his 
voice to be strained unnecessarily. He 
always retains a beautiful tone. He pays 
the minutest attention to legato singing. 



and his breathing represents a lesson in 
itself. He also obtains alternating ef- 
fects in humor and pathos It is. there- 
fore, natural, being an ideal lyric tenor 
whose art possesses those elements of 
refinement which the genuine bel canto 
singer must reveal, that Mr. Schipa lacks 
somewhat in virility and spirit. And 
since an artist can not be both robust 
and lyric to an equally perfect degree 
Mr. Schipa deserves praise for concen- 
trating his artistic energies upon the 
bel canto phase of his art. Not since we 
heard Bonci in his prime did we enjoy 
such elegance of style in what is known 
as the Italian school of singing as Schipa 
exhibits. 

The ordinary operatic tenor does not 
worry about refined artistry. If he has a 
big voice he usually shouts. If he has 
high tones he usually exhales them with 
an explosive energy and holds on to them 
until his breath gives out. If he has a 
lyric tenor he usually tries to force his 
tones to a dramatic volume. But Schipa 
is an exception to the ordinary operatic 
singer. He is an artist on the concert 
platform as well as on the operatic stage. 
And no vocal student or teacher can af- 
ford to miss hearing him, for he repre- 
sents a type of artist that is only too 
rare. He deserved the big ovation which 
a grateful audience so cheerfully be- 
stowed upon him. 

In Frederic Longas Mr. Schipa pos- 
sesses an excellent accompanist. With- 
out imposing himself too prominently 
upon his hearers he obtains delightful 
results thoroughly in accord with the 
soloist's example. He simply caresses 
the ivories in an endeavor to obtain from 
them the essence of musical expression. 
In his solos, too, Mr. Longas has adopted 
the "lyric" style in contrast to the 
"dramatic" and sings his phrases in a 
manner to gain poetic effects. This is 
specially true of his Chopin interpreta- 
tions. He made an excellent impression 
on his audience and deservedly so. There 
was prevalent a certain unity of purpose 
among these two artists which was not 
one of the least pleasing of the program. 

The program, which has already been 
published in this paper more than once, 
could not be termed an ideal concert 
program. It did not contain one number 
that could be regarded as distinctly char- 
acteristic of concert literature. There 
was not one of the more important 
French. Russian or German songs with- 
out which no concert program is com- 
plete, and since Mr. Schipa confines him- 
self to the lighter form of song litera- 
ture he rightfully belongs among the 
artists better known as ballad singers 
to which John McCormack also belongs. 
However, vocally Mr. Schipa surpasses 
most tenors we have heard in concert, 
but his repertoire is not that of a great 
concert singer. It is just possible that 
Mr. Schipa feels he is best fitted to 
express himself in this lighter vein of 
vocal literature, if so he deserves credit 
for knowing what he can do best and 
then confine himself to doing this only. 
That is a lesson which many an artist 
has still to learn. 

There is no publication which is more 
eager to encourage the works of Ameri- 
can composers than the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. There is no writer less 
snobbish when it comes to singing en- 
cores of a more popular character than 
(Continued on Pa^t- 11. Culumn li 



I'ACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



After the lights are out 




The Stein way Speaks: 

is/T knt'W and lo\fd inc. AVa^incr 
knew and Io\'fd me. Rubenstcin, 
Hcrlioz and Gounod knew and 
liivcd me. I have been the com- 
panion of genius for two genera- 
tlnns. .My name is the Steinway Piano. 

\Vhat was there about me that caused Franz 
Liszt, forty years ago, to say of me: "Y'ou 
afford delight even to my old piano-weary 
fingers?" 

Why did Richard Wagner, writing from 
Bayreuth in 1879, declare: "Sounds of such 
beauty as those coming from my Steinway 
grand flatter and coax the most agreeable 
tone - pictures from my harmonic melodic 
senses?" 

Why did Gounod, who gave us "Faust," 
write to my makers in 1888, "Mme. Adelina 
Patti joins me in the ecstacy and mutual ad- 
miration of your product ... I am overjoyed 
at the consciousness of being the possessor of 
one of your perfect instruments?" And what 
was it that stirred the mighty Dr. Joseph 
Joachim to assert : "Steinway is to the pianist 
what Stradivarius is to the violinist?" 

Companion of genius indeed have I been! 
Sometimes, when the stage is dark and the lid 
over my strings is down, 1 brood over my long 
years of such companionship. 

I see .Adelina Patti again, blowing kisses, 



If'llill lines the Sliinu'uy piano ihini about, 
triirn the eurlain is down and the lights are 
out, and the artist and the audience have 
departed/ Eloquent enough the Steinway is 
when the moods of others are voiced on its 
wondrous strings. Rut what are its own 
moods and longings f Listen! It is about to 
speak to us 




and reaching for the flowers that were show- 
ered at her feet, while I rested quietly in the 
b-ackground and resolved to do even better in 
her next accompaniment. I see good old 



Kranz Liszt again, after a tremendous rhap- 
sody over my ivory keys. I see Edward Mac- 
Dowcll, working out his compositions o\er my 
keyboard. I see the youthful, golden-haired 
Paderewski of the eighties, the maturer Padc- 
rewski of the nineties, and the world-figure 
and premier of Poland, the Paderewski of to- 
day whose audiences overflow the largest halls 
whenever he plays. And ever I am the com- 
panion of all this genius. 

But then I realize that the greater, the 
sweeter triumph of my long career is not to be 
found on the concert stage at all. 

The greater triumph awaits me when a 
young couple, starting down the pathway of 
wedded life, choose me to be their lifelong 
companion in a home. 

The sweetest triumph of all shall be when 
first my keys are touched by the lingers of 
some little girl, her printed scales before her, 
and a lifetime of the best in music all ahead. 

Admitted thus to the sacred intimacy of a 
home and fireside, I know- that I shall find 
my truest triumph. And I shall strive to be 
faithful to these who trust me. As long as my 
strings endure, I shall strive to render to the 
utmost my measure of abiding charm. 

Sherman play & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
C A LI FORNIA-OREGOX-WASH I XCTON 



ROSE 


FLORENCE 


CONCERT— VOICE 


PLACING— COACHING 


Studio: 545 Sutte 


r St. 


Telephone Kearny 3598 


Directi 


>n M 


ss Alice Seckels 


68 Post St., 


San 


Francisco, California 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
MUNICIPAL ORGANIST OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. ORGANIST 
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 
Piano and Organ Instruction. Vocal Coach. 
Studio: First Congregational Church, cor. Post 
and Mason Streets. Tel. Douglas 5186. Residence, 
887 Bu«h Street. Tel. Prospect 977. 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS AND 
ORGAN RECITALS 



Manning School of Music 



JOHN I . M \\M> 



CHARLES HART 

PIANIST-TK ACHKR 
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ThufHdar I*. M., Itnoni I(M>2, Koliler & Chaite Bldie:. 
T^^l. Kearny r>J.74. WfdncMdar V. M.. i:WI Can 



ROSA HONYIKOVA 

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AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for <'on<-rrt> and KreKaia 

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itt Optrntir Traln- 



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PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



MRS. M. FOULKES 






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DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

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noon. 3TtH XnMtj Airnnr. tlrrkrlf-r 



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The College of the Holy Names 

LAKt: MKHIUTT. OAKl-AMI 



Complete 



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DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 

DIRt^rTlON OF MHE. I.IM.IAN SLINKKV IHHIM 

Italian .Method — Voice I-lacement — nrratklne 

Opera — Church — (Irnlorlo 

1073 F.IIU SI. Tcl. WcKt rSDB 

THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 

\ 14 T(»lt I.K II'II:NSTF,I\. I»lr4<il<>r 

rrom Itvelnnins; lu I'rofi-HMUmal Ai-<i«llr 

:tMr. MaxlilnKlon M., S. F. I'lmnf- Fllliiiore UMft 



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rum A i»o\N\ soriiwo 

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740 I'lae SI. Phone llouclaa 6624 



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521 Howard Street Phone Douglaa 4273 

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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



fir THrc^L-.' WEEKL-. MJ^C:^ JOUEmt IN THE OgEAT WE3T 111 
MI-SICAL REVIEW COMPAW 

ALFRED METZGER PreKident 

C. C. EMERSO> A'ice-PreHldent 

MARCrS L. SAHI ELS Secretary and Treasurer 

Snile XOl. Kohler & Chaiie BIdK.. 2« O'Parrell !it.. 
San Kraneiseo, Calif. Tel. Keara;^ r>4.%4 



ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

C. C. EMERSON - Business Manager 

M.Ike nil checks, drnfts. money order-s nr olher formfl of 

remittance |>n?al>le to 

PAflFIC COAST MUSICAL RE^'IEW 

Uakland-Derkeler-Alatneda Office 1117 Paro St., Alameda 

Tel. Alameda 155 

.lllNH Elizalielb \^'eatf;ate in Charge 



l.os AnKelea Offlce 

mo Sonthern California Ma«lc Co. BnlldlnE. 

ElEhth and DroadTray Tel.. MetropolKan 4398 

SlIsH Lloyd Dana In Charge 

VOL.XLV SATURDAY. NOV. 10, 1923 NO. 6 



Entered as Necond-claa 



all matter at S. F. Poatofflce. 



Iniled Slate» »»•»» 



TWENTY-THIRD YEAR 



MUSICAL BLUE BOOK OF CALIFORNIA 



The editcir of the Pacific Coast Musical Review 
has been asked .so many questions lately regard- 
ing; the impending publication of the Musical 
Bkie Book of CaHfornia that we deem it ex- 
pedient to write these lines in explanation of this 
enterprise. During the last ten years the editor 
of the Pacific Coast Musical Review has carried 
around in his mind a certain plan to concentrate 
the musical activities of California and those re- 
sponsible for them in a manner to make them 
accessible to anyone who can read. We wanted 
to show the world what California is doing musi- 
cally, and we wanted to show this without brag- 
ging, without belittling anyone else, without 
grossly exaggerating and without being ridiculed 
by those residing elsewhere. The result of this 
determination to bring the musical facts of Cali- 
fornia before the musical world is The Musical 
Blue Book of California. 



The Musical Blue Book of California will be 
nothing but a plain statement of facts, and, since 
facts and figures are the most convincing evi- 
dence of certain conditions, no better argument 
for the tremendous musical progress made in 
California recently can be presented to the musi- 
cal public of the country than this collection of 
facts contained in this volume of several hun- 
dred pages. 

For the present the Musical Blue Book is tak- 
ing the place of the Musical Review's Annual 
Edition. The financial burden of publishing 
these annual editions was too heavy, because 
every advertiser insisted upon reading articles of 
a news character. Frequently an artist took a 
column advertisement, but gave us two columns 
of news about his activities. It is obvious that 
editions published under such restrictions could 
not prove financially successful. The Musical 
,Blue Book of California will not contain any 
articles of news about advertisers. There will be 
display advertisements, artists' cards and a bio- 
graphical section, but all advertisements will be 
accepted under the condition that they set forth 
reliable and accurate facts about the artists who 
.reserve the same. Names of teachers, artists, 
musical organizations, music schools, music 
'clubs, music houses and indeed everything repre- 
iSented in musical endeavor will be registered 
'WITHOUT CHARGE. During the course of a 
year many people come to our office asking us 
various questions regarding the musical condi- 
tions in California. .\11 these questions will be 
answered in a number of articles devoted to one 
particular phase of music at a time. There will 



be a brief resume of the past year's musical events 
of importance and a short forecast of the coming 
season. The Musical Blue Book of California 
will be a treasure trove of information. IT WILL 
BE THE OXLY BOOK OF ITS KIND EVER 
PUBLISHED. NOTHIXG LIKE IT HAS 
EVER BEEN PRINTED BEFORE. It repre- 
sents every angle of information in the musical 
life of California. 



We and our associates have been working on 
this Musical Blue Book for nearly a year. The 
State is very large. It requires time to cover this 
huge territory. It requires at least $10,000 to 
print this work. Unless this book is complete it 
has no value. During the first year our task is 
the most difticult. .-Vfter this we shall know bet- 
ter how long it takes to complete this book. It 
is printed specially to re-enforce our campaign 
to encourage resident artists of reputation and 
merit. The best time for the announceni'-nts of 
such artists is when managers and music clubs 
start to make their bookings for the new season. 
Therefore, the best time to publish such a book 
is early in the new year. The publication is 
partly financed by the Musical Review Com- 
pany and partly by those who advertise and re- 
serve their space by means of advance payments. 
-Since the Pacific Coast Musical Review has been 
published for twenty-two years and since during 
twenty-one years it has always published its 
annual editions, those of our friends who patron- 
ize the Musical Blue Book have no reason to 
doubt our ability and integrity to publish this 
work as soon as we have secured all information. 
To publish the book before it is complete is 
almost as bad as not to publish it. and since it 
takes time to collect all information and also the 
necessar)- patronage to pay the expenses, it takes 
time to set the publication dav. ONE THING 
IS SURE, IT WILL BE PUBLISHED AT A 
TIME WHEN THE AD\-ERTISERS WILL 
DERIVE THE MOST BENEFIT FRO.M IT. 
At a rough estimate, and from present indica- 
tions, we should say that the date of publication 
of the Musical Blue Book of California should 
be on or before January 15, barring unexpected, 
delays in the printing shop, over which, of course, 
we have absolutely no control. 



At present the Musical Blue Book of California 
is representative principally of Southern Cali- 
fornia. Our artists, teachers and musical organi- 
zations of Northern California are, as usual, timid 
in taking advantage of spreading the triumphs 
of their enterprise. Also, as usual, we will be 
overwhelmed with protests and criticisms when, 
after this beautiful book is published, the musical 
world will find the activities of Southern Cali- 
fornia heralded in striking fashion, while North- 
ern California will be famous for its lack of rep- 
resentation. 

There is no compulsion to reserve space in this 
Blue Book, but if artists are indifferent to the 
advantages to be derived from being represented 
in such a volume, they should not afterwards feel 
aggrieved at finding others not so deaf to their 
opportunities. Therefore, when representatives 
of the Blue Book of California ask you for an 
appointment, do not refuse to see them. .\t 
least, give them a chance to tell you about the 
work. Everyone is entitled to publication of 
name and address without charge, the only rea- 
son for additional publicity is to publish details 
about your activities. The book will be in every 
library, music club and most of the studios and 
musical homes. It will be an invaluable adver- 
tising medium, for it will be perpetual. It will be 
handsomely bound and rich in design and picto- 
rial appearance. If you want to realize the mod- 
esty of the expenditure you must divide the 
amount by 365. for it will work for you an entire 
year, or even longer. Figure out the amount per 
day and you will see how little you have to 
spend to make your work known among thou- 
sands of people directly interested in you, for 
everyone interested in music — professionals 
and laymen alike — will need this book frequently 
during the course of a year. Some will refer to it 
almost every day. No one can really afford to 
be not represented in its pages. 



FRENCH PROGRAM FEATURE AT FORTNIGHTLY 

Mr. and Mrs. Uda Waldrop and Adaline Maude Wellen- 

dorff Delight Select Audience With Their Art' Stic 

Interpretations 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The third of a series of events given under the di- 
rection of Ida G. Scott at the Colonial Ballroom ol 
the St. Francis Hotel under the title of Fortnightlys 
took place last Monday afternoon, October 29tb. The 
artists selected for this occasion were. Adaline Maude 
Wellendorfl. pianist. Marguerite Raas Waldrop. soprano, 
and Uda Waldrop at the piano. The program consisted 
principally of modem French compositions, most of 
them of an ultra modern character, but also including a 
few of Uda Waldrop's most effective works Miss 
Wellendorff confined herself to the modern French 
school. Ravel and Debussy being her principal choice. 
The writer has always appreciated Miss Wellendorff's 
seriousness of purpose, her skill in pianistic expression, 
her brilliant technical accomplishments and her deep 
scholarship. All of these qualifications were in evi- 
dence on this occasion and netted the artist the full 
measure of her audience's approval. But when our 
artists stray into the far reaches of the ultra modern 
school of composition they are putting our critical facul- 
ties to a severe test, for they lead us into spheres with 
which we have neither sympathy nor for which we pos- 
sess the necessary qualifications to judge impartially. 

Far be it from us to claim that this modem art has 
no merit. It is rather the writer's fault that he can 
not find himself sufficiently well equipped to appreicate 
beauties that seem so apparent to ottiers. But how can 
we retain the confidence of our readers if we should 
stultify ourselves by praising something which we do 
not understand. We would have preferred to hear 
Miss Wellendorff in some of the standard works of 
piano literature, even though they are in the eyes of 
our modernists old-fashioned and behind times. We 
continue studying this modern trend and some day we 
may find an artist who can convert us. Until then we 
simply must be regarded among the musical "re- 
actionaries." 

We thoroughly enjoyed Mrs. Waldrop's renditions of 
French songs and some of Mr. Waldrop's simple 
melodies. There is nothing more delightful to our ears 
than simple musical thoughts simply expressed and it 
is to our way of thinking far more difficult to secure, 
like Mrs. Waldrop did. certain definite emotional effects 
from apparently simple musical phrases than to unravel 
the most bizarre and intricate combinations of modern 
theoretical perplexities. Mrs. Waldrop's interpretations 
are chic and refined. They breathe the air of gentility 
and taste. Her charming appearance, her easy deport- 
ment, her dignified bearing, her delightful simplicity of 
expression, all combine to make her an artist with an 
individuality and a style all her own. 

Uda Waldrop. both as composer and accompanist, im- 
pressed himself firmly upon the consciousness of his 
hearers. His pianistic art is self-effacing and yet im- 
portant, his touch is gentle yet firm, his phrasing is 
characteristic yet suited to the pace set by the soloist. 
That artist is indeed fortunate to have Mr. Waldrop to 
depend upon when he is. like he was last Monday, in 
his best artistic mood. His compositions are rich in 
melodic line, tastefully scored and easily singable. They 
fit in neatly with the style of Mrs. Waldrop. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

The Pacific Musical Society, of which Mrs. Henry 
Banks is the president, have announced a most interest- 
ing program for their next concert. November 22. 
Marion Frazer. a young pianist of unusual merit, will 
be the instrumentalist, while the vocalist will be August 
Johnson, bass-baritone. Mrs. Henry Banks announces 
that the Board of Directors of the Pacific Musical So- 
ciety have unanimously elected Madame Rose Relda 
Cailleau as chairman of the program committee for 
the rest of the season. 

The Pacific Musical Society will have a tea at the 
Fairmont Hotel on November 20 which will be pre- 
ceded by a program. Mrs. Herman Lissauer will sing 
songs in costume. Miss Farwell will render flute solos 
and Gladys Schoemaker will conduct a Chinese band, 
also in costume. The entire program will be an Oriental 
one and the decorations and tea will be characteristical- 
ly in keeping. Mrs. David Hirschler will be the accom. 
panist for the singer and flutist. 

Under the direction of Mrs. Frank E. Wilson the 
second section of the Junior Auxiliary of the Pacific 
Musical Society will give their first recital in the Red 
Room of the Hotel Fairmont, on November 17. The 
young people ranging from fourteen to eighteen years 
of age will participate. Mrs. Victor Lichtenstein will 
be the assisting artist on this occasion. 

During Music Week the Social Service Department 
of the Pacific Musical Society gave twenty-four con- 
certs for the "Shut Ins." Mrs. L. M. Spiegl is the chair- 
man of this "Shut Ins"' branch. 

Madame E. Tromboni, one of the foremost vocal in- 
structresses in this city, is presenting two of her artist 
pupils. Norma Garrett and Beatrice B. Hein in a pro- 
gram of songs by Mary Carr -Moore the well-known 
and popular California composer. The affair is to take 
place in the studio of Mme. Tromboni on Friday eve- 
ning, November 16. Both young vocalists will be accom- 
panied by Mary Carr Moore which will be an added in- 
spiration to the singers. 

Mme. Tromboni is giving a series of studio programs 
this season when she will feature composition only by 
California composers. The next concert of this nature 
will be given by Signor Antonio De Grassi, violinist and 
composer. 



TACIMC COAST MUSICAI, REVIEW 



New York Musical Review 

BY ANNA SCHULMAN 



NEW YORK. Oct. 17 — The curtain has risen on New 
York's musical season, with Ha thousand and one re- 
citals, symphonies and operas. Both the aspiring young 
talent, eager to get a hearing, and the mature artist, 
assured of an admiring audience, are hastening to the 
city that h:i8 become the musical center of the world. 

Zimbalist, the em'ncnt Russian violinist, opened the 
season at CameKle Miill. One always feels his playing is 
authentic. Poise, which comes only to the mature, is 
his in full measure, although he is still a young man. 
It is the outsliiiiding feature of his artistry, in con- 
Junction with ■■' beautiful, clear and flowing tone. He 
played on his recently acquired Strad. the purchase 
price of which was »33.n00. 

Challapin, the King of Raritones. opened the season at 
the Manhattan Opera House. He was assisted by 
Rudolph I'olk. violinisl. and Feodor Koenemann. com- 
poser-pianist. Challapin. as always, announced his 
songs from the stage and sang in his characteristic 
and inimitable style. His audiences seem to grow more 
enthusastic with each recital and clamor for encores 
until the lights are turned out. lie will be heard again 
In both concert and orera. 

Anna Paviowa, the Incomparable, is with us again and 
her dancing Is a Joy to behold. She holds one spell- 
bound with her delicate grace, beauty of pose, and the 
cxqulKlte movement of her expressive hands and feet. 
Her trip to the Orient and to Egypt was productive of 
charming results, for she brought back with her two 
new groups of dances — Orlenlal and Egyptian. She sur- 
rounds herself with a splendid company, who do much 
to enhance the Joy of the beholder. 

De Paehman, the 7o-year-oId veteran of the keyboard, 
proved a magnet for the curious and the old-timers who 
remembered when he was at his height. Ths was his 
first recital here In twelve years, and he had the pleas- 
ure of facing a well-tilled house. He has lost none of 
his eccentric mannerisms, but the soul of a great artist 
Is always evident though he lacks the dash and spirit 
which were his in his younger days. 

The Marine Band, with Ina Bourskaya. mezzo-soprano, 
as soloist, offered a program that ventured on the 
border of the symphonic at Carnegie Hall. This was. 
Indeed a llurok week, for all the artists listed above are 
umler bis minagemenl. 

The San Carlo Opera Company has been enjoying large 
audiences for the past five weeks at the Century The- 
atre Twenty-one operas were heard during Ibis period. 
The tour to the coast has started, with many engage- 
ments scheduled between New York and San Francisco. 

The New State Symphony Orchestra, under Joseph 
Stransky. opened .New York's long orchestral season at 
Carnegie Hall. It was very well received. 

Schuman-Heink, the beloved of the people, gave a varied 
program of classical and modem American songs. One 
expects a great deal from this artist and receives it hi 
full measure. The audience was most enthusiastic and 
Mme. Schuman-Heink was very generous in the matter 
of encores. San Francisco will have the please of hear- 
ing her this winter. She was assisted by Florence 
Hardeman, violinist, and Katherine Hoffman, pianist, 
both of whom are entitled to a word of praise. 

John McCormick. the pure and flawless tenor, has al- 
ready given two programs this season, the first of which 
was for charity. The programs consisted of groups of 
lr;sh Folk songs and the works of Bach and Schubert 
To Galli-Curci. the queen of ('oloraturas. belongs the 
hon'>r nf opiMiing the series of the .Metropolitan Opera 
House concerts. Her program included airs from 
Traviala. I'earl of lirazll. Puritan! and Dinorah. She 
was most enthusiastically received. Homer Samuels, 
her husband accompanist, assisted her, as did Manuel 
llerenguer, flutist. 

Among other artists heard during the week may be 
mentioned John Charles Thomas, tenor, Mischakoff, a 
young Russian violinist making his debut, and Inga 
Orner, soprano, formerly of the .Metropolitan Opera 
Company 



ZImballst's Violin Bowa — Fine violin bows are almost 
as rare and nearly as necessary to the virtuoso as are 
flno old violins, though little Is ever said about them 
and their fame. It seems absunl that such a simple 
thing as a bow should he worth four or live hundred 
dollars, or as In siime cases as much as a thousand dol- 
lars, but a great deal beside the wood and (he hair go 
Into the making of a reaily-goiKl bow. without which 
the artist Is helpless. In a tonal sense, and greatly hanili- 
capped technicully. no matter how excellent his violin 
This is why Kfrem Zimbalist. the world-famous Rus- 
sian violinist whom Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer is 
bringing to San Francisco for the Arst recital he will 
play here in many years and which will be given at the 
Columbia Tln-atre on Sunday afternoon. November ISth. 
has been so careful In his scan h for hows as in his 
collecting of rare violins, of which he possesses many 
of the best in America, ini luding the /amous "Titian," 
one of the four finest In the world Several of i5im- 
balist's violin bows have cost him many hundreds of 
dollars and are not for sale at any price 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Hoggins 

1605 The Alameda. San Jose. Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



MRS. MILES A. DRESSKELL 



SAN JOSE. .November 6. — A special service for 
Armistice Day will be given at Stanford University in 
the Memorial Church. Sunday, November 11, at 4 p. m. 
Mr. Warren D. Allen, University Organist, will be as- 
sisted by Miss Winifred Estabrook, soprano, and The 
Stanford Glee Club. The program: Symphonic Poem, 
My Country, first movement. Tabor (Smetana). This 
work has been called the noblest musical monument of 
the great Bohemian Reformation. The llrst movement 
Is called Tabor, after Zlska's armed camp on the top 
of Mt. Tabor, whioh gave its name to a whole section 
of Hussite believers, the Taborltes. Hymn 350, America. 
Prayer, improperla (Palestrlna). The text of the Im- 
properla (Reproaches), written partly in Latin and 
partly In Greek, is designed to Illustrate the sorrow- 
ful remonstrance of Our Lord with His people, concern- 
ing their ungrateful return for the benefits bestowed 
upon them. Palestrina's simple settings of these re- 
sponses rank among the most beautiful passages in 
sacred music. A Prayer for Peace (Paul Held), a poig- 
nantly expressive composition written during the late 
war by a gifted young .New York organist. Soprano Aria 
from The Messiah (Handel) How beautiful are the feet 
. of them that preach the gospel of peace and bring glad 
tidings of good things. Symphonic Poem. My Country — 
second movement) Filanik (Smetana I. The second move- 
ment Is called Blanik after Mt. Blanik, within which, 
legend says, the old Bohemian King Wenceslas sleeps 
through the centuries, to be awakened some day when 
his country's need is greatest and to come to its succor. 
But Smetana has not used in this movement the Wences- 
las chorale, but the Russite chorale, in the conviction 
that only through Protestant Christianity can Bohemia 
be saved. The peformance of this composition is now 
forbidden in Bohemia. 

Tuesday afternoon. November 1.'). at 4:15, Mr. Allen 
will present the following program, his 389th: Symphonic 
Poem Tabor (Smetana); Lamentation in D minor (Guil- 
mant). Written in memory of the Abbe Henri Gros. 
killed during the bombardment of Paris during the war 
of IS70: Scenerellgleuse (arranged by Clarence Dicken- 
son) (.Massenet). The last part of this number is fa- 
miliarly known as the song Elegie. The song was an 
afterthought, the original an Instrumental composition 
for cello and orchestra. Marche Lervlgne (arranged for 
organ by .Mex Guilmant) (St. Saens). 

Helen Fletcher Riddell, soprano, and Jessie S. Moore, 
pianist, both members of the Conservatory faculty, gave 
a recital of unusual interest Tuesday evening, October 
23. at the College of the Pacific. An audience which 
taxed the seating capacity of the auditorium greeted 
the artists. In this, her first ai)pearance before San 
Jose music lovers. Miss Riddell disclosed a voice of 
lovely quality, exceptional flexibility, wide range, and a 
great responsiveness. Her diction was exceptionally 
clear and in the Shakespeare songs particularly, she 
exhibited an intelligent musicianship which captivated 
her auditors. Miss Moore, whose graceful playing is well 
known to San Jose audiences, gave splendid interpre- 
tation In two widely contrasted groups with surety of 
technique and interesting pianistic effects. Jules Moul- 
let added to his already fine reputation as a perfect 
accompanist. The program In full: Songs from Shakes- 
peare — (a) Where the Bee Sucks, from The Tempest 
(Dr. Thomas Arne) : (b) The Cuckoo Song — from Love's 
Labor Lost (Dr. Thomas .Arne): (c) She Never Told 
Her Love— from Twelfth Night (Franz Joseph Haydn): 
(d) It Was a Lover and His Lass— from As You Like 
It (Thomas Morley); (e) If Music Be the Food of Love, 
Play on— from Twelfth .Night (John C. Clifton); (f) 
Over Hill. Over Dale— from A Midsummer Night's 
Dream (Thomas Simpson Cook). Miss Riddell; (a) 
Choral Prelude No. 3 Ich ruf zu dir. Hcrr (Bach), 
(hi Ballade No. 1 In D minor (after the Scotch Ballad 
Edward) (Brahms). Miss Moore; Aria del ^loelll (Faust) 
(Charles Gounod). Miss Riddell; (a) Meditation 
(Tschaikowski), (b) Ballade IDebussy), (c) Rhapsodle 
In E Flat Minor (l)ohnanyi). Miss .Moore: (a) The Two 
Magicians (Pearl Curranl. (b) Charity (Richard Hage- 
manl: (c) The Answer (Robert H. Terry); (d) The 
False Prophet (John Prlndle Scott); (e) Sheep and 
I^mbs (Sidney Homer) (f) Life (Pearl Curran), iSllss 
Riddell. 

Jessica Colbert, who first undertook to pioneer the 
cause for the best In music In San Jose four years ago. 
and whose concerts have grown steadily In patronage 
until the Colbert Concert Course is now an established 
factor in San Jose's musical life. Is olTering her sub- 
scribers a new and unique program for the season of 
1923-24. Three of her artists are coming to California 
for the first time in concert. 

Mme Georgette Leblanc. first wife of the noted Bel- 
glum author. Maurice Maeterlinck, opens the series 
Thursday evening, .November IBth. She portrays, in 
gorgeous costume, roles inspired by her and written 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 



»»n jnsK 



(l.ll'OIIMA 



SOI'llANO 
he openliic of her Nfucllo 

Phone 6382-W 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 



III Friila 






NOTRE DAMK COLLEGK OF MUSIC 

San Jnse. Cnl. 
ronfera DeKrera. Anarda Orllflenlea. rompletr ColIeK* 
fonaervalory and Arndemie t'ouraca In Piano. Violin. 
Harp, 'Cello, Voice, llnrmonT, t'ounler|iolnl. Canon aad 
KuKae and Srienre of .Mualr. Kor pni'llenlara Appir to 



JOSK Ml'SIC COMPANY 

Anderaon nrothera 

Planoa, Phonocrnpha. Ileeorda. Sheel Maale, Viollna, 

Mandollna — >>liidliia nl Moderate Ralea 

an Joae, California 



sina 



WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

ALLIANCE BUILDING 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



SYMphoMY 

ORCHESTRA 

ALrKCDHtltTZ CONDUCrOlt 

NEXT FRIDAY, 3 P. M, 

NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P, M, 

Curran Theatre 

IMtl><;il.V^I 
SVMPilOM Ml. 4 - - . . BRAIIMM 

KUl H UI.I> Fl.l-:>il*ilf KOI.K.NONGS - VtK, (iXlV.V.V 
K.»NT\.«IA — "THE TK.MPEST" - TSCH.IIKOWSK V 



SCOTTISH RITE HALL 

ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 

Mile, CLAIRE DUX 



ONE RECITAL ONLY 
MONDAY, NOV. 12, at 8:15 



PHU'K.s— 4t2.(K>. fii.r.n, yi.oo ipiux taxt 

rki-lH iin Sole at Sherman. Clny A Cnmimnr 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

PRIVATE AND CLASS LESSONS 
LECTURES ON MUSIC APPRECIATION 



San Francisco, 807 Kohler & Chase BIdg. Tel. 
Kearny 5454. Wednesday from 2-6 p. m. only. 
Berkeley, 20 Brookside (off Claremont Ave.) Tel. 
Berkeley 4091. Mornings at Anna Head School. 



BEST MUSIC IN TOWN 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



"BEST MUSIC IN TOWN" 

LIPSCHULTZ MUSIC MASTERS 
HAROLD STANTON 



"IDEAS" 

IIINSTAMI-; Ttl.llMlliK 
In n llonini < ed^ 

TheDangerousMaid' 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



"SoulfuT' 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 



Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



'0^ 



r 



M^^^^^^^.^^^^^sm^smnm 



j\tetv Son^s by Carries (f.Tl^cDermid 
* Ttiti* »» "THEYSHAURUN 

ANDNOTBEWEAinr 



MEDIUM LOW 




ii 



SHMmS FAU 



CHARITY 



HIGH MEDIUM LOW 



FORSTER MUSIC PUBLISHER. Inc. 235 South WabasK Avenue, CHICAGO, ILL. 




LEADING CONCERT 
ATTRACTIONS 



Selliy C. Oppenhelme 



EFREM ZIMBALIST 

Grpnt ItuNNian VioliniNt 

FirNt Ki'citnl Here in Four YenrH 

Columhia Theatre 

srM>AV AFT.. >OV. ISih 

JOSEF LHEVINNE 



SIXD.VV AFT.. .NOV. 25fh 
ARTHIR PAl I. 

RUBINSTEIN- KOCHANSKI 

Joint Sonata and Solo Recital 

RuNMia'N FaniouK PianiMt and Viollniiit 



ANNA CASE 

Mo.s( I>o|>ular American Soprano 
lolumltia Theatre 
SlMJ.VV AFT., Um:. Uith 
Tickets* on snle at Sherman. Clay & Co. 

coming: SOUSA and His Band 
SCHUMANN-HEINK 
PAVLOWA and Her Ballet Russe 



SAN JOSE LETTER 

'Continued from Page 4. Column i; ) 
for her by Maeterlinck. In her recital she will also 
sing operatic roles in which she has become famous. 
A reception will follow her recital. The second concert 
will be on December 6th, when Mme Marie Sundelius, 
Swedish-American prima donna soprano, of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company will be heard. This will mark 
the first concert tour of California of this artist. 

Paul Althouse, tenor of the Metropolitan Opera Co., 
and Arthur Middleton will appear in concert January 
31st. Their joint appearance is one of the great musical 
events in California. 

Mme. Renee Chemet, greatest woman violinist in the 
world today, will be heard in fourth concert. February 
28. This young French artist, here for her lirst California 
recital, plays the violin used by the lale Maud Powell 
in her concert tours and willed by the latter at her 
death to go to the first woman violinist acclaimed as 
the world's greatest. That was three years ago, and last 
spring the honor fell to Mme. Chemet. 

These concerts are to be given in the Morris Daley 
Auditorium of the State Teachers' College. Miss Na- 
thalia Walker, business manager for the series, has an 
office in Sherman, Clay & Company's. 



SECOND CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 

Fourteen hundred enthusiastic people heard the open- 
ing concert of the Chamber Music Society at Scottish 
Rite Hall. This is another feather in the artistic cap of 
San Francisco, for no other large city in the United 
States can boast of such attendance at Chamber Music 
Concerts. The next concert of the series will be held 
Tuesday evening. November 20th, at Scottish Rite Hall 
when the Brahms string quartet. Op. 67. and Dohnanyi 
string quartet, Op. 15, will be presented. Between 
these big works, Mr. Hecht and Mr. Persinger will play 
the charming and delightful short sonatas of Benedetto' 
Marcello in G major and Haendel in A minor for flute 
and piano. These works although dating from the 
eighteenth century are as fresh and spontaneously 
melodic as the day they were written. They are rarely 
heard and always keenly enjoyed. Owing to the heavy 
subscription to the series, the number of single seats 
available is limited and early application will be neces- 
sary to secure good locations. 



All 



Esther Houk Allen, contralto, was heard in 
program recently, in the following numbei 
Robin Woman Song, from Shenawis (Cadn 
Through the Night (Old Welsh); Last Night (Kjerulf); 
Negro Spiritual (Burleigh); The Day Is Ended (Bart- 
lett). with violin obligato by Elizabeth Peirce. Miss 
Peirce also played a group of violin solos. Mr. War- 
ren D. Allen was the accompanist. 



SYMPHONIC ENSEMBLE 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 



BOHEMIAN CLUB"'jiNKs"ROOM 

OPENING CONCERT 
NEXT TUESDAY EVE., NOV. 13 

General Sea..*on Tirket tl'2 interchangeable 
tickelK, EOOd for euexta and all eoneer«»(. »24 

Six TIcketi* — alternate ooneertt* — ^2 seats *at» 

Six TicketK. Alternate Coneerts, 1 Seat, »10 
Single KvenI 'riekct. »2.50 
Season and Single TIekets at SlieVman. Clay & <.'< 
»I.I<E SECKEI.S. Manager 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



SCHIPA'S FAREWELL CONCERT 

Tito Schipa, the Chicago grand opera lyric tenor who 
came to San Francisco last week for the first time and 
immediately conquered music lovers (by ,the sheer 
beauty of his voice and art, will make his final appear- 
ance in tliis city for this season at the Columbia Theatre 
tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon, the recital starting at 
2:45. Selby C. Oppenheimer. under whose management 
Schipa is singing, states definitely that the great artist 
will not appear here again this year, his bookings being 
such that he must return immediately to operatic 
duties in Chicago. 

With Frederick Longas. the excellent pianist, in the 
dual capacity of accompanist and soloist, tomorrow's 
program will be as follows: Caro mio ben (Giordani), 
La Farfalletta (Anon). Mr. Schipa: Martha — M'appari 
(Like a Dream) (Flotow), Mr. Schipa: Preludio (Cho- 
pin). Menuet (Paderewski), Mr. Longas: Where'r You 
Walk (Handel), At Parting (Rogers), Panis Angelicus 
(Franck), Mr. Schipa; A Granada (Palacios). Pesca 
d'Ammore (Barthelemy), Aime-moi! (Bemberg). Mr. 
Schipa; Granada (Albeniz), Jota (Longas), Mr. Longas; 
Amore, amor (Tirindelli). Bonjour Suzon (Delibes). Mr. 
Schipa; Mignon — (Aria from third act) (Thomas), Mr. 
Schipa. 



\1,ICK SECKKI>S FRESFXTS 

GEORGE SHKULTETSKY 

RISSIAV nASSO-CAXTAME 

MRS. JOHN B. CASSERLY 

At the Piano 

COLONIAL BALLROOM 

Hotel St. Francis 

MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 12, 

at 8:30 

nd at Door 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 



TEACHER OF 
udio: 1*>00 I nion Stre« 



MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

VOCAL TEACHER 
Sane leading roles with CaruHo and Tetrazzini — Thor' 
ough Vocal and Dramatic Training: — 4«4 Columbus Ave 



Josef Lhevinne, the great Russian pianist whom Max 
Smith in the New York American claimed was the 
greatest of living players, will come to San Francisco 
under the Oppenheimer management to appear twice. 
On Monday afternoon. November 19th. in the ballroom 
of the St. Francis he will play such splendid works as 
the Schumann "Carnival," Liszt's Liebestraum and 
Campanella, a selected Chopin group, and attractive 
compositions by Ravel, Debussy and Tausig. And on 
Sunday afternoon, November 25th. he will be the at- 
traction in the Columbia Theatre "Pop" series featuring 
the Beethoven Opus 27 Sonata and important selections 
by Chopin. Ponce, Liszt, and Schulz-Evler arrangement 
of the Strauss Blue Danube Waltz. 



STENGER VIOLINS 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 



No. 10778 met No. 10623 in 
Yokohama in September, 
1922, (exart djio unknown). 
It came about ibi^ wuy. One morn* 
ing early in ihe month, one Leon 
Lang of San Iruncisco found in h'\» 
morning mail this telegram: **Ship 
first bleamtr No. 10778 zini-line.l 
box Godowhky Yokohama." A 
leroe and prosaic telegram, yet ro- 
mance has strange beginiiingH. 
Twenty-four hours later No. 10778 





I AM a piano tuner. 
It is my businesH to 
bce and to know 
things about the piano of 
a concert artiftl that even 
he does not observe. He 
will notice instantly the 
most minute variation in 
juality, but 
al and the 



-tural elements 
bind that <|uality, 
job to observe 



1 have just passed 
through an experience 
uilh ibe two nio6t remark- 
that «ver came into my charge. 
Knowing that one of them came from Kohler & Chase, 
i have mode it a point to see them in San Franc; 
on my way to New York en route from 
the Orient, where for the past year 1 have 
been on tour with Mr. Godowsky as bis 
piano tuner. During his three months' 
tour in .South America (I was enpup'd i" ^^ 
Buenos Aires) we carried Knabc < -n (^^ 
cert Grand No. 10623 from their N .^^ u^ 
York store. When we sailed for il.. ^ 
Orient, Mr. Godowsky considered il ad- 
visable to add a second piano, knowing 
the extreme difficulties of climate and 
transportation. This one (No. 10778) was 
shipped from San Francisco. It was u 
wise derision, for at one time No. 10778 
was lost in the snows of Manchuria for 
two monlhH, finally turning up after what 
must have been untold viciii^iiudcs, for 
its traveling case was so badly haltered 
that the Irun^portalion lonipanieH re- 




was below decks ai 
bound. At the same tim* No. 
10623 was under way from the west 
coast of South America. Their 
meeting was undemonstrative — 
although they were both from the 
same town, had been brought up 
together — tended by the same 
hands, and sent into the world 
with the same mission. But at 
Yokohama the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones tell it. 



San Fkancisco, California, May 22, 1923. 
fused to accept it. From the devastating Arctic cold 
of the Mancburian steppes to the blistering beat of 
ibe Javanese jungles, these two Knabes have been for 
nearly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
punishment, including months in ihe sticky, saturat- 
ing moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
pianoforte. From Hawaii to the Philippines, through 
uU the cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Straits 
Selllementfl, and many of the less frequented by-ways 
of the Orient — I do not believe that the history of 
music records the equal of this unique tour, or the 
ovations accorded this great artist in these music- 
hungry corners of the globe, or the equivalent of the 
two pianos that supported bim. Days of travel over 
the roads of Java, the man-handling of countless 
coolies, the punishment of oriental transportation in 
boats, in trains, in queer conveyances of all kinds — 
and months of it. At times it was heart-breaking. 
Both instruments carry many scars of battle, but 
Ily they have remained steadfast. Outside some 
rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich, as 
perfect as the first day Mr. Godowsky 
touched their keys. To me the power of 
rt-sisiance of the Knabe piano is almost 
Mipernatural. '1 have travelled with many 
;irtiMs in alt parts of the world; in Eu- 
rope I was familiar with the German 
pianos that are built like stodgy battle- 
bhips, but no piano in even ordinary 
continental tours has equalled this per- 
formance. If I had made these two 
Knabes I should feel very proud. Inci- 
dt;iitally I am not in any way connected 
with the Wm. Knabe Company — nor do I 
even know them except through the in- 
ternational reputation of their instru- 
ment. Francis E. Jones, 

London and Buenoa Aires. 





Wb. 



Leopold Godowsky 



edes to his piano tuner the 

nd ogain- 
has some- 
9 than I or 



(.()IMIM>KV 

Ma>l.'r of ih.: iiu^lcr.'. al ulio.c 

fcFl buvc ul III one lime or 

■ nollipr pranirullv every great 

pi.ni>l of our day. 



(rodowKky bus paid his tribute lo the Knabe time 
but as he himself said in an interview: *'Mr. Jone 
tiling more interesting to say about those two pian( 
any other artist has ever said. Let him tell it. lie deserves it. 
I found him in Buenos Aires and carried him away to the 
Orient because of bis unusual qualities." So. thanks to the 
unusual consideration of the great artist, we are able to offer 
ibe most remarkable piano story ever told. 



Inr'ulfntally, both of thae instruments are stock pianos 
(not specialty made), one from the I\'ew York warerooms 
and one from the Kohler & Chase store in San Francisco 



KOHLERCr* CHASE 

26 O'FARRELL STREET • SAN FRANCISCO 



KNABE 



® 



AMnco 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Headers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
AiionyTnous communications cannot Ije answered. No 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Koiiler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 



1. In what key should the part of a B flat clarinet 
ho written when the composition is in E flat? Please 
explain how to figure it out. — O. T. K. 

In the key of F. The IJ fiat clarinet, or any instru- i 
nicnt in that key, is so called because when the note 
C is played upon it the sound of B flat is produced. In 
other wonls the note played is always a whole tone 
above the actual sound given out by the instrument. 
Hence, the part of an instrument in B flat must be 
written a whole tone higher than the key of the com- 
position. 

2. Wliat is the tuner's octave? — D. W, 

The octave grouped around middle C from F on the 
second line of the bass staff to F in the first space of 
Ihe treble. . 

3. Can you tell me where the following quotation 
comes from: "Music when soft voices die, vibrates In 
the memory?" — I. B. 

These are the first two lines of a short posthumous 
poem of two stan:ias by Shelley. It is included in Pal- 
grave's Golden Treasury. 

4 Is there any connection belween a gigue and 
a jig?— A. H. .T. 

No doubt both words come from the same root, 
though their origin is uncertain. Gigue is an old French 
form of the word and was universally used In the 
classical period of music to signify a brisk movement 
in a rhythm of triplets. The same movement could 
with propriety be called a jig. though the latter term 
usually refers to the dance which the music may ac- 
company. 

5. What is the seating capacity of the Wagner The- 
ater at Bayreuth? — G. W. 

One thousand three hundred and forty-four. 



CLAIRE DUX IN CONCERT 

The Elwyn Concert Bureau announce that for her 
concert at Ihe Scottish Rite Hall Monday evening, 
November 12. Mile. Claire Dux, soprano, guest artist 
of Chicago Opera .Association, after two appearances 
here already an established favorite witli San Francisco 
music lovers, has arranged the following program : Vol 
che sapete from "The Marriage of Figaro" (MozartI, 
O del mio dolce ardor (Gluck), So tu m'ami fPergolesi), 
Pastorale (Old English) (Lane Wilson): Du bist die 
Rub (Schubert), Ave Maria (by request) (Schubert). 
W'ohin -(Schubert), Wiegeniied (Reger), Standohen 
(Strauss); Aria from "Les Pocheurs de Perles (Bizet); 
Do Not Go. My Love (Hageman), At the Well (Hage- 
man). When I Bring to You Colored Toys (John A. Car- 
penter). Spring Fancy (Densmore); Aria from "Hor- 
mani" (Verdi). Tickets are now on sale for the Dux 
concert and all Elwyn Concert Bureau attractions at 
Sherman Clay & Co. 



NEW YORK STRING QUARTET THIS IVIONTH 

The New York String Quartet, a chamber music 
ensemble, founded four years ago by Mr. and Mrs. 
Ralph Pulitizer, will be presented in concert by Elwyn 
Concert Bureau, at Scottish Rite Hall, Monday evening. 
November 19th. 

The quartet consists of Ottar Cadek, first violin; 
Jaroslav Siskovsky, second violin; Ludwig Schwab, 
viola, and Bedrich Vaska. 'cello. Mr. Cadek received 
his tutelage from his father, Willem de Boer in Zurich 
and Leopold Auer in tliis country. Jaroslav Siskovsky 
studied with Sevcik and Auer and played with the 
famous Tokunsller Society in Vienna. Ludwig Schwab, 
it will be remembered was accompanist for Kubelik for 
a period of fourteen years Mr. Schwab's first love, 
however, was a string instrument, and after many 
years of accompanying he returns to the fiddle and the 
bow as viola player in the ensemble. He is a pupil of 
Seviik. Bertriih Vaska was first 'cellist of the Warsaw 
Symphony Orchestra, and later toured for eight years 
with the Sevcik String Quartet. He has been profes- 
sor of 'cello at the Prague Conservatory and has won 
great distinction as a performer of ensemble music. 

Numerous press comments attest the distinction of 
the quartet as a strictly chamber organization, as wit- 
ness the following from the New York World: "The 
new quartet has a future. The players have flne tone 
and color: their balance is excellent and their sense of 
design and grasp of musical content is exceptional"; 
and this from the New York Herald: "The performance 
of the new organization was very warmly received by 
a large audience. The artists showed admirable spirit 
and intelligence in their Interpretations." 

Tickets for this and all Elwyn attractions on sale 
Symphony Box Office, Sherman, Clay & Co. 



.\ series of concerts will be given by the San Fran- 
cisco Conservatory of Music on the second Monday of 
every month over the KPO. radio station at Hale's. 
The scries will cover the history of music from the 
earliest times to Ihe most modern compositions. The 
first concert will be given on Monday, November 12, and 
the entire program will be Folk Music. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MOZART'S OPERA COMIQUE SOON 

It is probably not too much to say. in view of cor- 
roborative testimony to sustain the contention that the 
production here of Mozart's opera comique. The Im- 
presario, under the personal direction of Mr. William 
Wade Hinshaw, will prove one of the really distinctive 
music events of the current season in San Francisco. 
The attraction will be presented on the Elwyn Artist 
Series at the Curran Theatre, Friday afternoon, Novem- 
ber 23rd. 

A very good idea of this production may be gathered 
from the following comment in the Chicago Daily News 
of Monday. December 4th. following the Hinslaw pre- 
sentation there with the same cast that will play here. 
headed by the eminent baritone Mr. Percy Hemus. "An 
amusing opera comique. as it is called, 'The Impresario.' 
was given its first performance in Chicago yesterday 
afternoon at the Selwyn theatre by Percy Hemus. the 
celebrated American baritone, assisted by Hazel Hunt- 
ington, Lottice Howell. Thomas McGranahan. Francis 
Tyler and Gladys Craven. 

" The Impresario' is founded on an episode in the 
life of the immortal composer, Wolfgang Amadeus 
Mozart, and his music is utilized for the musical num- 
bers of the "Singspiel" (singing play). 

"It is an amusing tale of the troubles of an opera 
impresario with prima donnas, and it is extremely 
clever. The work was given in English with the trans- 
lation adapted by Henry E Krehbiel of New York. 

"Percy Hemus as Schickaneder, Mozart's librettist 
and friend, is not only a fine actor, a comedian of 
unctuous gifts, but also a singer of artistic talents. He 
was a host in himself. Thomas McGranahan. as Mozart 
exhibited a light tenor voice of good quality and of fine 
texture. He made a rather aristocratic impersonation 
of the composer. 

"Hazel Huntington as Madame Hofer is a clever 
actress and also a soprano whose voice has much flexi- 
bility and an uncommonly high range. The same must 
be said of Miss Howell, who was the EKirothea Uhlic. 

"Mr. Tylor as the nephew and Miss Craven as the 
accompanist were not only capable but helped complete 
the cast ably. Miss Craven especially deserves com- 
mendation for her good piano accompaniments. The 
piece was staged and costumed tastily and in keeping 
with the story." 

Tickets on sale for this and all Elwyn attractions at 
Symphony box office. Sherman, Clay & Company. The 
next attraction offered on the Elwyn- Artist Series 
course at the Curran Theatre will be a quartet of 
Victor Artists, including Olive Kline, soprano: Elsie 
Baker, contralto; Lambert Murphy, tenor; Royal Dad- 
mun, baritone. The quartet will be presented at the 
Curran Theatre Friday afternoon, November 23rd. 



RUSSIAN BASSO TO BE INTRODUCED HERE 

When George Shkultetsky steps upon the platform 
next Tuesday night in the Colonial Ballroom of the 
Hotel St. Francis he will commence his American tour 
which will take him to New York. This will be his first 
concert in America and will be under the direction of 
Alice Seckels. Mrs. John B. Casserly will add dis- 
tinction to the program by her able support of the singer 
as accompanist. Mrs Casserly has not been heard pub- 
licly for several seasons and she will be welcomed by a 
host of admirers. Few musicians devote so much time 
to furthering the careers of artists as does Mrs. 
Casserly. 

The arrivad here recently of George Shkultetsky from 
Japan carries with it the history of a singer whose vicis- 
situdes have finally landed him in America. Mr. Shkul- 
tetsky is a Russian basso, born in Riga, entering the 
Moscow Imperial Academy when sixteen, pursuing the 
study of law with his vocal work, and graduating from 
the University of Moscow at the outbreak of the war. 
Sent to the front he was wounded many times, and 
when the Reds claimed power he was miraculously res- 
cued by the Japanese army, just as Russian authority 
was seeking his life. He said recently. "It is so strange 
here in America — you are all so happy. I hear always 
people laughing. I heard myself laugh the other night 
and my voice was strange in my ears.'' 

Shkultetsky is the personification of modesty, appar- 
ently unconscious that his is a great story of achieve- 
ment through suffering. His is a great gift; a voice of 
unusxial range and quality and ranging from D two 
octaves below middle C to F above, without the least 
break between registers. The following is the pro- 
gram: Air (Pimen) from opera Boris Godounow (Mus- 
sorgsky), Floods of Spring (Rachmaninoff). Air (So- 
bakin) from opera Tzar's Bride (Rimsky-Korsakoff), 
Autumn Leaves (Glier). At the Ball (Tschaikowsky) ; 
Air (Susanin) from opera Life for the Tzar (Glinka). 
On the old Hill (Kalinnikoff). The Night (Tschaikow- 
sky). Do Not Sing My Beauty (Kaukas's melody) (Rach- 
maninoff), Air from opera Demon (Rubinstein) ; Air 
from opera The Magic Flute (Mozart). Silent Lips 
(Bleihman), Azra (Rubinstein), Doubt — R o m a n c e 
(Glinka), Two Giants (Stolipin). 



SYMPHONIC ENSEMBLE 

The inauguration of the Symphonic Ensemble of San 
Francisco will he an event of the coming Tuesday eve- 
ning, November 13. in the jinks room of the Bohemian 
Club, beginning at 8:45 o'clock. Sprung from last sea- 
son's Peoples' Symphony Orchestra, with Alexander 
Saslavsky, conductor, the ensemble of twelve pieces has 
as its object the giving of much music literature not 
possible of a hearing by other music bodies, either on 
account of their expansiveness, such as a symphony 
orchestra, or the restrictiveness of a purely chamber 
music body. Woodwinds will be freely heard in the 
■ensemble and Director Saslavsky has assembled a 



DOROTHY BLANEY 



Studied with the great Josef 
Lhevinne of New York, 
who has. predicted a mar- 
velous future for this 
young American 

Available as soloist 

or co-artist for 

clubs, hotels, 

receptions 




Concert Pianist 
and Accompanist 

Miss Blaney's work has been 
a great pianistic triumph 
and audiences quickly 
enthuse over her 
electrifying 
emotionalism 
and technic 



Schools, 
churches 



Exclusive Management, MME. NEWCOMBE PRINDLE 
804 MAJESTIC THEATRE Phones 64293-872414 



BILLIE CORSON, Contralto 



Altho very young. Miss Cor- 
son possesses a most splen- 
did voice of wide range and 
depth — It is noticeable for 
its brilliancy 

Available for Clubs, 
Hotels, 




Specializing in the arias from 
opera, for which she is ad- 
mirably suited, yet able to 
satisfy with the modern 
numbers 



Theatres, Lodges, 
Receptions 



Exclusive Management, MME. NEWCOMBE PRINDELL 

804 MAJESTIC THEATRE Phones 64293-872414 



library of liberal nature, from which he will select 
works of note, many to be introduced to San Francisco 
for the first time. In that respect they will be novel- 
ties, otherwise they come well under the head of clas- 
sics or standard, though the combining of certain in- 
struments will be entertaining and enlightening to 
many of the local music colony, active and auditors. 

Max Gegna, 'cellist; Semions Patchouck, violist. and 
Miss Muri Silba. pianist, are all here, the two former 
to be permanent members of the ensemble, with Miss 
Silba assisting artist the opening night. Max Gegna 
is not a stranger here and his experience has given him 
highest praise from critics in music centers. He has 
been associated with Caruso. Titta Ruffo and Mme, 
Luisa Tetrazzini on various concert tours and from 
these stars, alone, has received expression of their 
highest respect for his art as technician and interpreter. 

Mr. Patchouck. also Russian, born in Odessa, is better 
known in Europe, although a member for some time of 
the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, but was chosen by 
Mr. Saslavsky in New York from a large group of 
violists as being the most desirable. Miss Silba. a pupil 
of Scharwenka and Leschetiszky, comes with high 
recommendation as an artist. She will be heard next 
Tuesday night with Mr. Saslavsky in a piano and violin 
"Sonata." The program in full follows: "Septet," op. 
65 (Saint-Saens). for trumpet, two violins, viola, 'cello, 
contrabass and piano: 'cello solo, "Rhapsody Hongroi 
(Popper-Liszt), Mr. Gegna; "Sonata" for piano and 
violin. Miss Silba and Mr. Saslavsky: "Octet" (Mendels- 
sohn)' four violins, two violas and two 'cellos. 

The ensemble comprises the following: Violins, 
Alexander Saslavsky, J. Koharich. Robert Gordon, Mo- 
desta Morttensen; violas, Semions Patchouck, Emil 
Hahl; 'cellos. Max Gegna, Dorothy Pasmore; contra- 
bass, Alexander Guterson; trumpet. Emil Dietzel; 
piano. Charles Hart; oboe, Cezare Addimando, also 
ensemble manager. 



The San Francisco Musical Club will hold its regular 
meeting on Thursday morning. November 15. in the 
Ballroom of the Palace Hotel at 11:30 instead of 10:30. 
on account of several members of the San Francisco 
.Symphony Orchestra participating on the program. An 
unusually fine Beethoven program will be given and 
one of the outstanding features will be the seldom 
heard Beethoven Quintet scored for piano, horn and 
woodwind instruments. The program will be: Bee- 
thoven— 1770-17S2—O Could I But My Johnny Love, 
Faithful Johnnie, The Enchantress (airs arranged by 
Beethoven for voice, piano, violin and 'cello, Mrs. 
Charles Stuart Ayres; Mrs. Josephine Crew Aylwin, 
piano. Mrs. George E. Chambers, violin. Miss Mary 
Elizabeth Sherwood, 'cello; Rondo op. 51, Blanche Ash- 
ley; Wonne der Wehmuth, FreudvoU und Le:dvoll, 
With a Pointed Ribbon, Louise E. Massey, Mrs. William 



Ritter at the piano; Quintet for piano, oboe, clarinet, 
horn and bassoon. Miss Adeline M. Wellendorff. and 
the following members of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra: C. Addimando, H. B. Randall, H. Hornig 
and E. Kubetchek. Mrs. Charles Wm. Camm, chair- 
man of the program. 

Wm. E. Ooley, one of the most successful and accom- 
plished vocal artists and pedagogues of Los Angeles, 
who has conducted a vocal studio in the Music and Arts 
Building for some time, has decided to leave for the 
East, where he has offers for appearances at leading 
theatres. Mr. Ooley was director and tenor soloist of 
the First Baptist Choir and director of the Occidental 
Club. He belongs among the best known and most- 
sought tenors in Southern California. There is no ques- 
tion but that his departure will be much regretted by a 
host of friends who will miss his splendid voice and by 
many students who will miss his excellent guidance. 

Irving Krick, the well known and talented boy pianist, 
will be the soloist on Monday evening, November 19, 
broadcasting a program from Hale's in San Francisco. 
His selections will be from MacDowell, Chopin, Rach- 
maninoff and Liszt. 

The Minetti Symphony Orchestra will give one of its 
excellent concerts at Scottish Rite Auditorium on 
Thursday evening, November 22d. Giulio Minetti, di- 
rector of the orchestra, and one of the most successful 
musicians residing in the West, has prepared a very 
ambitious and representative program for this occasion. 
The soloist will be Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, contralto, 
whose reputation and artistry is too well known to re- 
quire detailed mention at this time. Harriet French, an 
excellent violinist and pupil of Mr. Minetti's, will play 
the Introduction and Adagio from Vieuxtemps' D minor 
violin concerto. Josephine Finnell is concert master of 
the orchestra and. thanks to her proficiency and pains- 
taking industry, proves quite an asset to that institu- 
tion. The complete program will be as follows: Sym- 
phony in C minor No. 5 (Beethoven); Songs, Mrs. Lil- 
lian Birmingham; (al Love Song (Wright), (b) Marche 
Triomphale (Kriens), Orchestra; Introduction and 
Adagio from Violin Concerto in D minor (Vieuxtemps), 
Harriet French; Dors mon Enfant Loret, for strings 
(Minetti); Songs, Lillian Birmingham; Overture. Magic 
Flute (Mozart), Orchestra. 



Bessie Knox Kintner a young violinist of promise, will 
be heard in Theme with Variations (Corelli), Liebes- 
freud (Kreisler), and Tambourine Chinoix (Kreisler) 
at the November recital given by the Sherwood School 
of Music when she will assist in Mme. Lauth's pupils 
recital. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDG., EIGHTH AND BROADWAY— TEL. METROPOLITAN 4398 
C. C. EMERSON IN CHARGE— BRUNO DAVID USSHER, STAFF CORRESPONDENT 
Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



I.OS ANIiELKS, NOvomlitT '.— Trovers of choral music 
spent a pleasInK .v.nlnK »hen Iht; Kills Club, our 
oldest male chorus, n-nilered the first concert of their 
season with the usual appeal of tonal beauty and 
warmth of singing which assures this organization al- 
.vavs of such large and appreciative audiences. As it 
1^ the Ellis Club, for years has had such a large follow- 
ing that no tickets are on sale publicly. The entire 
house is taken up on a subscription basis and 1 under- 
stand thai there arc few changes among the ticket 
holders which loo proves the popularity of the club 
and their gifted director. J. It Poulln. In tlUs connec- 
tion I mav be permitted to say with all due respect for 
the flne standard of the chorus that perhaps this very 
supporl of the public they are enjoying should stimu- 
late them to greater musical endeavors, to programs 
which lo full measure will exhibit their art of singing, 
one would like to see this chorus undertake larger and 
more pretentious works. Oranling that the program 
given was probably kept in a lighter mood as it fell on 
llullowe-en night, yet speaking in a retrospective way 
as to the Kills Club programs of years past, the choice 
of selerlions has not quite kept pace with their musical 
growth as a performing body. This is a matter for the 
program committee to consider. 

As on previous occasions one could greatly enjoy the 
line shading and general good tone quality, above all 
good precision with which the singers respond to Con- 
ductor Pouiins direction Diction was not as clear al- 
ways than on other occasions. Yet the chorus had to 
respond lo enthusiastic applause with several encores. 
Most important on the program were the Serenade by 
Frederick Converse, an American. This is an intricate 
niece of vocal music, tlnding an impressive performance. 
Much in It is of striking charm and very effective 
in its combination of voice and small orchestra, the 
latter consisting of members of the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. The Hunting Song from Music, an Ode. by 
Hadley. too is a difficult work In which a chorus can 
reveal musical alertness. 

Barbara Miller Blanchard. soprano, of San Francisco, 
1 believe, is a singer of pleasing attainments, and a 
voice of charming lyric quality, whch lends Itself best to 
effects of intimate character. Miss Blanchard was heard 
in Pleurez Mes Yeux from Massenet's Cid and a group 
of songs. She found excellent support from Mrs. M. 
Hennlon Kobinson at the piano who as accompaniste 
also shares honors with the chorus. 

Abbie Norton Jamison and her Singing Quartet are 
In the midst of another busy season. This refined 
musician, composer and pianist, has built up an un- 
usually good vocal ensemble whose members are In 
nne sympathy with their dlreclor-pianlsl. Mrs. Jamison, 
herself one of the most sympathetic personalities 
among our artists The ensemble consists of Hazel Jean 
Col well Houghton, Bryson Anderson, sopranos, Edna 
Churchill Vorhees, I>asle Littlefleid Pridcau, alto. Be- 
sides this concert work Mrs. Jamison is also rather busy 
teaching voice, theory and piano and finds time to 
work unselflshly for musical good of all. being an officer 
In several of our leading musical organizations. 

L. E. Bchymer will present two artists of stellar 
rank this month: Tito Schlpa. leading lyric tenor of 
the Chicago Opera Tuesday, November 13, and Josef 
Lhevlnne, Russian giant of the piano, Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 21, also at Philharmonic Auditorium. Schipa Is one 
of the few great Italian tenors before the public today. 
His very position with the Chicago Opera permits 
anticipation of an exceptional artistic experience when 
he makes his first appearance here. Originally trained 
as a concert pianist, Schlpa combines eminent musi- 
cianship with a voice of exceptional beauty. Suffice to 
«ay that his concert work In the east has made him 
the occasion of soldout houses. 

Lhevlnne hardly needs any Introduction. 

Four concerts of the Sistlne Chapel Choir, known also 
as the Papal Choir, have likewise been announced by 
Impresario Behymer. This Is the first tour undertaken 
by tills famous body of singers who have never before 
had the permission of the Pontin to exhibit their art 
before the general public. Monslgnorc Rella who is the 
head of the musical consistory of the Pope and who 
dIr.-iiB the choir only on the highest festival days will 
condui t the four programs, all of which will be dltTerenL 
The Slsiine Chapel Choir sings frequently without ac- 
companiment, a tradition dating back into the early 
Middle Ages. This Is a vocal art nowadays largely 
neglected, but kept by the Roman singers at a standard 
of perfection which is nothing short of marvelous, as 
they achieve tonal color effect comparabh* only to the 
organ. The concerts will take place Sunday afternoon. 
Decemlier 2, and the Monday. Tuesday and Wednesday 
evenings at Philharmonic Auditorium. 

Clarence Gusllln. first vlcepresidenl of the California 
Federaton of Music Club, has relumed to his Santa 
Ana home. He has visited many of the Important music 
club centers In the East and Middle West In his capac- 
ity as vice-chairman of the publicity committee ot the 




NYIREGYHAZI 



FITZGERALD'S ■ For the Adrancemeni of Music 

NYIREGYHAZI 

A Giant Among Geniuses 

Authoritative judge of pianos and exacting 
artist that he is, Nyiregyhazi insists always on 
the exclusive use of the Knabe Piano. 
( )nly on this instrument, .>;o marvelously sensi- 
tive to every artistic demand, does Nyiregyhazi 
attain his full powers, he says in enthusiastic 
tribute. 




HILL STREET ^^r AT 727- 

LOS ANGELES 



National Federation of Music Clubs. Mr. Gustlin is also 
very active along state federation work and has 
brought his own Orange County Federation. His fine 
work has been recognized once more from national 
headquarters as he has been appolntel chairman of 
American opera for the Western District. Mr. Gustlin 
is eminently happy about the excellent report sub- 
mitted by Eva Frances Pike, state federation chairman 
for extension work. When chatting with the writer be 
also paid warm tribute to Mr. Charles Keeler, president 
of the Berkeley Chamber of Commerce, whose pre- 
liminary work for the state federation convention is 
promising a very productive session. 

Mr Gustlin was greatly impressed with the remark- 
able work done at Peterborough, the MacDowell colony 
which has become a mecca tor many American artists 
of every calling. He met Mrs. MacDowell. widow of the 
composer, who told bim that she would visit the coast 
if ten or twelve lecture recital engagements would be 
guaranteed. This Mr. Gustlin hopes to accomplish. Mrs. 
MacDowell fully sanctions the establishment of a 
similar artists' colonv in California but advises not to 
name it MacDowell colony so as not cause any con- 
fusion in the minds of the public. In fact she very 
much favors such an undertaking which is all the more 
advantageous as the California climate permits a twelve 
months' sojourn at the colony, whereas the original 
MacDowell colony owing to the New Hampshire climate 
functions only during the summer. Mrs. MacDowell has 
quite recovered from her accident she suffered last 
winter, Mr. Gustlin was happy to report. 

Those who love the flute and music of the wood-wind 
Instruments will be interested in the annual concert the 
I>os Angeles Flute Club will hold free to the pubic 
Friday evening, November 16, at Dovard Auditorium, 
Cniversity of Southern California The program again 
is unique, offering music for various combinations of 
woodwind instruments, including a Quintet of Rimsky 
Korsakow for piano, flute, clarinet, oboe and French 
horn. The club has a most interesting repertoire which 
Includes compositions for sixteen flutes and music of 
this instrument employed in practically every type of 
scoring. The purpose of the concert is entirely altruis- 
tic, purely eduiational as is the aim of the club. i. e. to 
acquaint the music-loving public better with the great 
possibilities the flute and woodwind Instruments in gen- 
eral possess, which were somewhat forgotten during 
the last hundred years, but Judging from modern 
chamber music tendencies are again being exploited. 
All the players donate their services, as to the guest 
artists, Ruth Hutchinson, soprano, and Homer Grunn. 
pianist. 

Siegfried Wagner, son of the Master of Bayreuth, will 
arrive in New York soon after Christmas to direct 
there the Amercan premiere of his opera "The Baeren- 
haeuter" (The Man with the Skin of a Bear, to translate 
the title verbatim) which will be given by the Wag- 
nerian Opera Company on the occasion of their second 
visit to this country. Wagner will then make a tour of 
this country directing special Wagnerian orchestra con- 
certs for the benefll of the Wagnerian Festival Theater 
In Bayreuth which is doomed with flnanclal disaster 
owing to the money situation in Germany. The New 
York Phliliarmonlc, New York Symphony, New York 
State Orchestra, the symphony orchestras of Detroit, 
Cincinnati. .Minneapolis and San Francisco have been 
placed at the disposal of Wagner. Schumann Heink, 
Frida Hempcl, Michael Bohnen, Barbara Kemp and 
other artists will donate their services al these con- 
certs which are lo feature works of Richard Wagner, 
Franz Uszl and Siegfried Wagner, The Metropolitan 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

TOi Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

C t>«l'OSi:n-IM A.MSTK 

1000 South Alv«rn€l« Phone .1I0«3 

*>unniMh-C»llft>riiia Fulk Soiikm 

J. KiNchcr, >etv \ urk. PuhliMhem 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Avallnble tor ConcertH and Rvcltala 

Limited IVnmber of Advanced PoplU Aeeeptcd 

VIollnUt l.o« .tnKelea Trio 

SlDdloi 334 Masle Arta Studio BIdK. Fkone 10082 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

TueMday. Wednesday, Friday .\flernoonH, Hgnn School 

i-bonex ::isu.-, ur ::7i:i:ia 

i:iS4 South KlEUel€>n, l.o« AiiBele». fallf, 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCKHT MASTKK PHII.H A HHOMC OUCHKSTRA 



ILYA BRONSON , ,.„";;;'^„|,'-V.rehe.tr 



Menihrr I' 



-ill IndMie. I.»> AnKelen Trio, Phliharmonic 
let Instruetion. Clianilier 1lu»ie KeeltaU 
TMtr. ■.,-■ >l>rada. l-hone Holly :lolJ 



A.KOODLACH 

VIOI.I.'V MAKlIlt AMI UHI'MIIER 

<-onnal>aeur — A|i|irnlaer 

50.1 Majealle Theatre UldE.. l.o» AnEeIra Phone 870-111 

MISS FANNIE CHARLES DILLON 



730U. t'umpoacr ul .Many .\uniberM IMayed by Fnmoiia 



r-' 




ELINOR 
REMICK 
WARREN 

JMfOHKII-Pl.lMSTii: 



"KKOM i:i.<>llt Tt> tii.ORV" 

<Hy Kllnor It. mlck Warren) 
I'ub. by HHrnlil Flammer 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

OLGA STEEB 
Director and Head of the Piano Department 

FANNIE DILLON 

Head of the Department of Theory 

and Composition 

Faculty of Twenty-nine Teachers 

Affiliated Teachers in Burbank, Claremont, Holly- 
wood, Los Angeles, Long Beach, Monrovia, Pasa- 
dena, Pomona, Redlands, Riverside, San Diego and 
Sanla Monica. 

For Catalog and Full Information 
Address 

OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

453 S. Willon Place Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone 567294 



Frederic Burr Scholl 



ORGANIST 



Grauman's Hollywood 
Egyptian Theatre 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 



CLARA GERTRUDE OLSON 

TEACHER-ACCOMPAMST 

Piano, Hornionj. Theory 

Children's Claxsea a SpeclallT 

110 Mn>lc-Arl Studio — 8211S1 Res. Phone Doyle 5S31 



Alexander Bevani 

OPERATIC COACHING 
TONE DEVELOPMENT 
VOICE PRODUCTION 

Suite 612 So. Calif. Music Co. Bldg. 
Phone 822-520 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE ClILTCRE — COACHING IX REPERTOIRE 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



plete Facoltr of 



tint Teache 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

.\nnounreN (hnt hiN clasn U filled and he will lie 
unable to accept any more iiupilK unlil fnrlher 
notice. JESSIE Mc. DONALD PATTERSON. AHsifit- 
nnt Teacher. SHIRLEY TAGGART, Secretary. TeL 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTRALTO School ol \ucal Art 

Studio: Tahoe lluifdlnK^ iMncdowell Club Rooma) 

For Infornintion Kex. I'huiic 74llt-l 

MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Donrn-ton-n Studio 
002. Re»iidence Stui 
West 7707. PIANO, HARMONY. VOICE COACH. DI- 
RECTOR JAMISON aiAKTETTE. Ten weeks' normal 
training course heginw Seittenilier ir.th. 

CHARLES BOWES 



Prof. A. GIUFFRIDA 

PIANO. VIOLIN, SINGING, COMPOSITION 



Opera of New York, the Chicago Opera, and the Wag- 
nerian Opera Association of New York will turn over 
their baton to Siegfried Wagner to direct music dra- 
matic performances for the same purpose, to perpetuate 
the work of his immortal father. Considering the fact 
that Alfred Hertz and the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra already have assured the visit of Siegfried 
Wagner to the coast, one is anxious to know whether 
Los Angeles will be one of the honor cities. 



A NEW SONG-BIRD CHARMS MUSIC LOVERS 
By Nell Gothold 

One seldom hears a more finished artist in any land 
than Mile. Claire Dux whose gracious presence and 
glorious voice made entree into the hearts of Angelenos 
at Philharmonic Auditorium on Friday afternoon and 
Saturday evening. Fresh from a season of Opera and 
concert in Europe. Mile. Dux arrived in America only 
a short while ago for her second American tour, this, 
however, being her first Pacific coast series. 

The gods were kind to this fair Polish artist endow- 
ing her with a superb, liquid soprano voice of pure 
smooth and equal quality throughout its entire large 
compass. She combiner feeling with that artistic 
understanding which regulates it and in her Mozart aria 
Deh vieni non Tardar from the Marriage of Figaro she 
displayed her finest vocal attainments; her pianissimo 
passages delicately warm yet most vibrant. It would be 
hard to discriminate in her Strauss numbers, but Mile 
Dux was perhaps "more at home" in "Morgan" than in 
Staendschen. Silvain Xoak was given acknowledgement 
by a hand clasp from the singer for the fine work done 
in the passage in which the violin part stands out so 
prominently in the accompanying orchestra. Both songs 
by the beloved poet-musician Strauss were beautifully 
rendered; her diction and pronunciation at all times 
perfect. But for sheer exquisite beauty and restfulness 
Mile Dux's interpretation of "The Virgins Lullaby" by 
Reger left nothing to be desired. Her presence and 
poise are consummate in the graceful simplicity of man- 
ner all of which bespeak genuine musical culture rest- 
ing on a foundation built of painstaking care, and con- 
secrated zeal which is of far higher and more enduring 
value than the dazzling feats of display made by some 
artists which show lack of solid intrinsic vocal support. 

The orchestra gave splendid accompaniments. Mr. 
Rothwell allowing the singer first consideration, always, 
even in the most delicate and pianissimo passage her 
voice carried its message above the instruments. There 
seems to be nothing more of praise remaining to be 
said of the orchestra for its splendid personnel, its fine 
technique and its estimable director, though they thrill 
us anew each time we listen and each time they seem 
to convey to us more vividly their interpretations. 

The Tschaikowsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor Op. 
30 in true Russian spirit was intensely dramatic. In 
this number is interwoven the history of the composer's 
very unhappy marriage. Every motif brings out con- 
tinuous yearning and sorrowing themes which seem 
ever changing yet ever steadily more agitated to the 
finale which at times rises to tempestuous bursts of 
passion. This was interpreted exquisitely and evoked 
much applause from the audience. 

In the Scherzo. Queen Mab from the dramatic sym- 
phony "Romeo and Juliet,'' Op. 17 by Berlioz, that fa- 
mous French exponent par excellence of program music, 
the very soul of romance was portrayed. Many new and 
startling tonal effects in combining instruments occur 
in this number adding lustre to the changing though 
not altogether melodious theme. The orchestra was 
probably at its best in this number, while the concluding 
Introduction and Danse de Salome, Op. 90. by Glazanow, 
gave full sweep to the orchestra resources in tone 
and color. 

Wonderful is the power of instrumental music with- 
out words, that conveys impressions, deep and lastingl 
Once more we are grateful to the Philharmonic Orches- 
tra and Walter Henry Rothwell and their management 
for a real soul feast. 



Bogdan Gillewicz, who has been in America only a very 
short time, and has recently opened a studio in the 
Southern California Music Company building, will be 
heard in concert and recital during the coming season. 
Mr. Gillewicz comes to Los Angeles from Moscow hav- 
ing been educated in the government university there, 
where Tie has also appeared in the leading role of many 
standard Italian. Russian and French operas. 



M. Jeannette Rogers 

First Flutist Metropolitan 
Theatre 



Available for 

Concert-Recital-Club 
Obbligato 



1354 Laveta Terrace 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL CHAT 

By Nelle Gothold 



Edith Lillian Clark and Carolyn Handley presented 
their most advanced pupils in a very enjoyable recital. 
October 27th. at the Southern California Music Com- 
pany Recital Hall. Those who appeared in song where 
Ethel Patton. Eugenie Bradl, Ida Schutz. Lilah Carlson. 
Rose Victoria Johnson, and Lois Moon with Emily 
Archibald as accompanist. Betty McCluer, Ramona 
Baker. Carolyn Wright, lone Gilbert, and Emily Archi- 
bald gave piano selections. 

Olga Steeb, internationally known pianist and founder 
of the Olga Steeb Piano School, presented a number 
of her pupils in the first regular monthly recital, at the 
Ebell Club House. October 25th. This event was well 
attended and much interest was shown in the numbers 
rendered by the following participants: Bernice Hall, 
Frances Hall, Margaret Copeland. Frances Mullen. Iris 
Kuhneley. Elizabeth Copeland, Paul Sauer and Margaret 
Crist- Miss Steeb gave a recital at Fitzgerald's Recital 
Hall in Long Beach, October 26th. Her program on this 
occasion, as always, was delightfully and masterfully 
executed and comprised the following: Concert Etude 
{ MacDowell) ; Waltzes in F major and A flat. Im- 
promptu (Chopin); Caprice. Paganini-Liszt ; Rhapsodic 
(Brahms); Variations C minor (Beethoven); On Wings 
of Songs. Capriccio Brilliante (Mendelssohn). 

Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte has had a most remarkable 
career as a singer and a teacher both in America and 
Europe. Her glorious contralto voice has been heard on 
many occasions locally and she has had the distinction 
of appearing as soloist with the largest and best known 
orchestras in two continents. Recently she was heard 
at the City Club with Evelyn Paddock Smith at the 
piano, in Glendale at the First Methodist Church and 
in Pasadena at the Community Sing under Arthur 
Farweirs direction. In December. Mme. Sprotte will 
appear with the Los Angeles Oratorio Society in the 
presentation of Handel's Messiah with John Smallman 
directing. Several of Mme. Sprotte's pupils were pre- 
sented in recital last week when they were assisted by 
Mr. Harry Baxter, well-known flutist. An outstanding 
feature on the program was the aria (for soprano and 
flute) The Song and the Flute by John Densmore which 
was given by Mrs. James Dumas and Mr. Baxter. 
Others appearing on this program were Ruth Davis. 
Mrs Shelley Hanson, Otile Macintosh, Evelyn Ross, 
Dorothy Grey, Mr. A. Buley and Pauline Hanna. 

Miss Lillian Steeb has just returned from New York 
where she has been since last March coaching with the 
famous musician and pedagogue, Paolo Gallico. She 
accompanied the Galileos on their vacation trip into the 
Adirondacks and spent two months continuing her 
study in th ideal environment of the beautiful moun- 
tains near Lake Placid. Lillian Steeb is well known 
in Los Angeles as a pianist and is assisting her sister, 
Olga Steeb in the Olga Steeb Piano School, which is 
located at 453 South Wilton Place. 

Gertrude Ross, known throughout America for her 
beautiful songs left Los Angeles October l)th for the 

GILDA MARCHETTI 



DRAMATIC SOPRANO 




Tencher of Voir« and Italian Die 




Re». Phone ms.imw 




IV S«adlo: 712 So. Calif. Music Co 


Bids 



L. CANTIEN HOLLYWOOD 



Claire Forbes 
Crane 

PI A NIS T 



DAVOL SANDERS ' ".•l-.i^.S^J^S"'' 

Head Violin DiDt.. ColleKf «f Mujsie. I . S. C. 
Member I'hilhuriiKinic On-he.str.i 
)I S. Fipuerua J^t- Lux An»;eleN Phone Main 

RAYMOND HARMON 

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E:aat where she atlendecl the preview and opening of 
the Charles Ray picture. "The Courtship ot .Miles 
Slandlsh" for which she arranged and composed the 
musical score. Mrs. Ross has deviated from her usual 
vein In writing a semi-popular song as a feature se- 
lection called "Why Don't You Speak for Yourself. 
John?" She has also written all the incidental music 
and entr'acts for Charles Kay used in the spoken drama. 
"The Girl I Loved." which had its initial performance 
In San Diego October 8th. and in which Mr. Ray is tour- 
ing. 

Loren Robinson who has been appearing in the prologue 
of the "Covered Wagon" at Grauman's Kgyptlan Theater 
in Hollywood for the past six months has been in de- 
mand at many aflairs recently, among them a delightful 
Sunday afternoon tea at the home of W. W. Welfer in 
Hollywood and the Hollywood Kiwanis Club. 

Mme. Mlianea Astro, a recent arrival in Los Angeles 
with her studio in the Southern California Music Com- 
pany building, will soon begin a series of very interest- 
ing lectures, with personal demonstrations, on the 
speaking and singing voice before various clubs and in 
the public schools of the city. These lectures will prove 
to be of educational v;vlue, for Mme. Astro is known 
extensively as an authority on voice culture. 

Alice Lohr, contralto soloist at the Temple Baptist 
Church, has undergone a very serious operation and 
while now apparently out of danger and resting quiet- 
ly at her home, it will probably be several weeks before 
Miss Lohr can resume her singing. Her many friends 
and admirers are hoping for her speedy recovery. 

Constance Jeanette Shirley, the six-year-old pianist- 
composer, has made a most phenomenal exhibition of 
musical talent for one so young in her recent program 
given at the studio of the Times Radio Station, when 
she played compositions of her own and other difficult 
numliers Baby Constance has been termed the "Re- 
incarnation of some great old master." and Mr. G. W. 
Vandergrlft adds further that "this child's work has not 
been learned in these six short years of her life, but 
must be (he spirit of some Mozart or Chopin within 
her tiny soul." 

The Los Angeles Biltmore Hotel announces their first 
annual scries of six delightful concerts to be given by 
distinguished artists of international fame such as 
Arthur Rubinstein, master pianist and Paul Kochanski. 
poet of the violin, who will appear In December; the 
Griffes Group, Including Edna Thomas, mezzo contralto. 
Olga Steeb. pianist. Sascha Jacobinoff. violinist, who 
perform In January; Joseph Schwarz. heroic baritone 
In February; the Duncans, classic dancers and Max 
Rabinowitch. pianist, also scheduled for February: 
Josephine Lucchene. coloratura soprano in March and 
in April to close the series will be heard the renowned 
Russian pianist-composer. Osslp Gabrilowitsch. The 
season tickets are being distributed by a committee 
who are inviting only a limited number of persons to 
hear this wonderful course at the reasonable rate of 
1:^5 for the season. 

Or. Frank Nagel has engaged several of the best local 
singers to assist in Illustrating his lecture analysis of 
the opera. Lucia di Lammermoor at the next regular 
meeting of the Hollywood Opera Reading Club, on No- 
vember .Mh. This opera affords many splendid oppor- 
luniiles for the display of vocal achievements and Dr. 
Nagel will be furnished ample s<*oi(e for his usual ar- 
tistic accompanlmonls. Irmaiee Campbell will sing the 
role of Lucia with Ruth Pinkerton, contralto, Raymond 
Harmon, tenor. Fred Wilson, baritone, and Leslie Brig- 
bam, bass, assisting on the program. 

Regnald Heber has recently opened a studio In the 
Southern California Music Company building where he 
is lea<hing scienlltlc voice culture and dramatic art. 
He Is a tenor singer and has done much coaching In 
opera and concert reperlolre. as well as having pro- 
duced some of his own works including light operas 
and musical comedies, which have evoked favorable 
xmimenls from leading crilics throughout America. Mr. 
Heber has also established a vocal and dramatic bureau 
»hi-re tuleni may be procured for club, recital and draw- 
ing room affairs. 



FOURTH FORTNIGHTLY CONCERT 

The fourth event of the Forlnlghtlys in the Colonial 
Ballroom of the St. Francis will take place Monday, 
November 12th. at the usual hour. 4;;!0 in the afternoon. 

Henry Eichhelm, a musician, composer and critic of 
distinction will give a talk on comparisons ot oriental 
and occidental music. Mr. Eichheim is perfecfly 
equipped for his task as he has spent many years in 
the Far East making intensive studies of Korean. 
Cliinese. East Indian and Burmese music. His composi- 
tions based on Oriental themes have been given in all 
the important cities of the TTnited States and have met 
everywhere with an enthusiastic recognition. 

He is at present a resident of California, This oc- 
casion should be of special interest to San Francis- 
cans since contact with any form of oriental art is one 
of the city's chief cultural assets. The illustrations will 
include piano compositions based on oriental themes 
and played by Ethel Roe Eichheim. and an exhibition 
of several oriental instruments. The popularity of these 
Monday recitals grows with each succeeding event. 
The results have so far more than justified the claim 
that abundant talent is to be had in San Francisco for 
distinguished entertainment. 



BELLE BENNETT AT ALCAZAR 

Belle Bennett. San Francisco's favorite star, comes 
home next Sunday night, November llth, at the Alcazar 
in a brand new play, called "Half a Chance." An en- 
thusiastic reception is awaiting the clever little actress 
when she makes her appearance after two years' ab- 
sence at the theatre where she played for ninety-seven 
consecutive weeks. 

.\s a medium for her opening Thomas Wilkes selected 
"Half a Chance." described as a dramatic jewel and 
written by Mrs. Blanche ITpright of this city. Filled 
with thrills and a good measure of comedy the offering 
is said to be ideally suited to Miss Bennett, who. since 
leaving here has been starred in several Broadway pro- 
ductions, and has been recognized as an actress of 
great ability and unusual talent. 

"Half a Chance" deals with a little girl of the slums 
whose mother is a circus performer and who is adopted 
into a friendly household, later achieving prominence 
before the footlights, 

Wilkes has given Miss Bennett a capable company 
of players, headed by Ivan Miller, who will be the 
leading man throughout her engagement. Miller is tall 
and dark, and has had large experience as leading man 
in other cities. New in San Francisco he is expected 
to be a pronounced favor. The other members of tiie 
supporting company includes Henry Shumer. Thomas 
Chatterton. Mary Duncan. James Edward. Fanchon Ever- 
hart. Frederick Green. Helen Pitt. Fred Cummings, 
Ethel Martelle and George Webster. 

Addison Pitt has been brought here from New Y'ork 
to direct the production. He is well known in San Fran- 
cisco and his talents as a producer are exceptional. 



IRENE HOWLAND NiCOLL IN NEW YORK 

The many friends of Irene Howland Nicoll will be 
Interested and dellKhled to hear of a most successful 
debut in New York on Tuesday afternoon, October 30th, 
at Aeolian Hall. .Ml of the critics were unanimous as 
to the sincerity and artistry displayed in a versatile 
program, and commended the use of a voice wide in 
range and rich in quality. Mrs. Nicoll has been coaching 
wilh Frank La Forge who is very enthusiastic about 
her future as a concert singer. 

8. F. CONSERVATORY'S VOCAL NORMAL COURSE 
That earnest students appreciate the value of a teach- 
er who is herself a professional singer, is shown by the 
fact that although Rena Lazelle has been in this city 
only a year, her teaching time is practically filled, and 
she is starting a Normal Class In Voice, in order to pre- 
pare assistant teachers for her Studio. As a profes- 
sional. Miss Lazelle realizes the value of public ap- 
pearances for young singers, and her pupils are always 
In demand. 

.Mrs. Stanley Hiller is singing in two concerts in San 
Jose this week. Miss Florence Sexton will sing In Odd 
Fellows Hall Thursday evening, Oct. ISth. and Emillo 
Cavilan will sing for the Vitlorin Colona Club October 
27th. Twelve of Miss Lazelle's pupils sang In the San 
Francisco Grand Opera Chorus. Miss Lazelle will give 
» a pupil's recital In the near future. 



KRUGER'S FIFTH STUDENTS' RECITAL 
Mr. and .\lr.s. George Kruger gave a very interesting 
piano recital in their charming residence studio. 283 
.■JOth .\ve. (Sea Cliff), on Sunday afternoon, October 
14th. The students who participated showed artistic 
taste in tlie numbers given by them, marking the steady 
progress of their work, Mr. and .Mrs. Kruger and tlie 
pupils gaining the warm praise of those in the audience. 
The program was opened ijy Mary Josephine Emersoil 
who played two menuets by Bach in a dainty manner. 
Estelle Stein, followed with a itondo by BurgmuUer and 
a Valse by Duvernoy, executed clearly and rhythmicalljt 
Miss Jane Cooper showed a good deal of talent in re- 
gard to touch and finish in tiie rendition of Kuhiau's 
Sonatina in C major. Tilly Berger played the Gondolina 
by Lack and a Valse Caprice i)y Newland, the first piece 
being specially well phrased. George Goody surprised 
the audience wilh h's interpretative ability. He suc- 
ceeded in creating the proper mood in Schubert's Im- 
promptu and Chopin's Valse. Miss Mildred Berg played 
the Eiegie by Nollet and the Valse Chromatique by 
Godard effectively and with style. Miss Tiny Puccinelll 
made a good impression with Liszt's Hungarian Rhap- 
sodic. .Miss Alice Meyer interpreted Rubinstein's 
Kamenoi Ostrow and the Rigoletta Paraphrase by Liszt 
with good understanding, clearness and shading Miss 
Viola Luther g.ive Bargiel's allegro con gracia and Moz- 
art's C minor Sonata with an ease and facility that 
showed unquestionable talent. Endowed with musical 
talent and temperament to a marked degree, Norman 
Smith displayed remarkable musicianship in the rendi- 
tion of Saint-Saens Rhapsodie d' .\uvergne and Liszt's 
Dance of the Gnomes. I-Iis runs and octaves were seem- 
ingly devoid of technical difficulties and took on the 
brilliancy of a tonal cascade. Joseph Salvato concluded 
the program with Weber's Concertstuck (George Krug- 
er at the second piano). This young man has rapidly 
risen to the artist class. He possesses a beautiful touch 
and has temperament and ample technic to overcome 
the most difficult passages with apparent ease. These 
recitals serve as splendid opportunities in preparing the 
students for the concert stage and Mr. Kruger is to be 
congratulated for the fine results he accomplishes. 

The program was as follows: Menuet in G major, 
Menuet in G minor (Bach), Marie Josephine Emerson; 
Rondo alia Turca op. 68, No. 3 (Burgmullerl. Valse, 
Bluette op. 272, No. 1 (Duvernoy), Estelle Stelny 
Gipsy Rondo (Haydn). AUemande (Hadyn). Victorii 
Gillmeister: Sonatina C major (Kuhlau), Jane Cooper^ 
Gondolina (Lack), Valse Caprice (Newland), Tilly Ber 
ger; Impromptu (Schubert). Valse G fiat major (Cho 
pini. George Goody; Elegle (Nollet), Valse Chromatlqud 
(Godardl, Mildred Berg; Hungarian Rhapsodie (Liszt)J 
Tiny Puccinelll; Kamenoi Ostrow (Rubinstein), Para-| 
phrase from Rigoletto (Liszt), .Alice Meyer, Allegro con 
Gracia (Bargiell. Rondo Capriccioso (Mendelssohn), 
Viola Luther. (Pupil ot Mrs. George Kruger): Faus^ 
Fantasie (Liszt). Edna Linkowski; Dance of the Gnome 
(Liszt). Norman Smith; Com ert Stuck F minor (Well 
er), Joseph Salvato. (Orchestra part on second piano.) 



SISTINE CHAPEL CHOIR 
.\n interesting bit of cabled news in connection with 
the coming tour of the Sistine Chapel Choir is to the 
effect tiiat .Monsignor Lorenzo Perosi the eminent com- 
poser of church music, has accepted an invitation to 
visit the Tnited States and intends to remain about two 
months. He was conductor of the famous choir until 
about eight years ago. when a nervous breakdown in- 
capacitated him for that exacting service, and since 
then he has been in seclusion. His leadership was as- 
sumed by Monsignor Antonio Rella. who will conduct 
the organization's concerts in the United States and 
Canada, opening at Carnegie Hall. New York City, on 
October 18. and at the Exposition Auditorum, San 
FYancisco, December 7. 

As a composer Perosi has been very prolific, and his 
finest works will be sung by the Slstlne Chapel Choir in 
America. His first published composition, a "Tantum 
ergo," was succeeded by a number of oratorios, in- 
cluding "i'assion ot Christ," "Transfiguraton. " "Resur- 
rection of Lazarus," "Resurrection of Christ," "Na- 
tivity." ".Murder of the Innocents." Entry of Christ 
into Jerusalem," ".Moses " and "Last Judgment. " all of 
which have In-come classic. But his best product ions 
were written for and have been sung only by the Sisline 
Chapel Choir, among them "Tu es Pelrus." "Lux 
Aetcma," "Qui Operatus." "Cantate Domino," ".N'eve 
non Tocca.'' "O Salutaris Hostia." "Benedictus" and an 
"Alleluia" for two choirs widely separated. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



(Continued from Page 1) 

we, but there should be a line drawn be- 
tween light and cheap compositions. Mr. 
Schipa. no doubt influenced by people 
who do not have his interests at heart, 
sings one or two very inferior and cheap 
songs as encores. It is not necessary for 
us to tell him what they are. Why mar 
the dignity of one's art by singing com- 
positions entirely out of tune with a con- 
cert program. Why not let the cheap 
songs remain on moving picture pro- 
grams or similar entertainments. Let us 
retain the concert platform in its artistic 
dignity. Concert goers certainly do not 
like cheap songs as a rule, and those 
who go to concerts enjoy themselves 
just as much without them. Of course, 
there were many among Mr. Schipa's 
auditors who are not regular concert 
goers, but they applauded the good songs 
just as enthusiastically, at times even 
more so for they wanted them repeated, 
than the cheap songs. Then why sing 
cheap songs? 



(Continued from Page 11 

the hearty approval of the audience. 

The orchestra showed itself thorough- 
ly proficient to give the most effective 
interpretation of these works. Mr. Hertz 
had an excellent opportunity to prove his 
versatility by showing the contrast be- 
tween the dramatic character of the 
Bloch work and the delightfully lyric 
character of the symphony as well as the 
suite. Again it was noted that the mem- 
bers of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra play like artists, that is to say 
they phrase and accentuate and bow 
like an artist would do. and not like rou- 
tine musicians usually play without pay- 
ing attention to coloring and shading of 
the phrases. Mr. Hertz, thanks to numer- 
ous and tedious rehearsing is able to at- 
tain these splendid results, we know of 
no symphony conductor of distinction 
who would take the pains to get these 
results in quite such finished manner. 
Surely San Francisco deserves to be con- 
gratulated upon having a conductor who 
takes as much pride during the ninth 
year of his engagement as during the 
first. 



KARL RACKLE IN HAYWARD 

The following article, which appeared 
in a Hayward paper, will be of interest 
to many of Mr. Rackle's friends in San 
Francisco: The appearance of Karl 
Rackle in Hayward is scheduled for Na- 
tive Sons' Hall. Tuesday evening, Xo- 
vember 13th. at 8 o'Icock. The program 
promises to be of great interest and 
variety and includes, besides Mr Rackle's 
piano numbers, songs by Erwin Holton. 
tenor, and readings by Rosalie Harrison, 
writer gf original stories in verse. Mr. 
Rackle's ability as a pianist has been 
highly lauded by connoisseurs, and local 
music lovers are looking forward with 
eagerness to hearing him play. 

Mr. Holton is a singer of exceptional 
talents. His voice is warm and sym- 
pathetic and more than hints of baritone. 
He has made many appearances in vari- 
ous cities of California and always de- 
lights his hearers with his lovely voice, 
dramatic fervor, and pure and beautiful 
diction. 

Miss Harrison is a personality of 
whom California can well be proud. She 
is the author of a book entitled "Original 
Stories in Rhyme." published by the 
East Bay Printing Co.. of Oakland, and 
just about to come from the press. These 
stories, written by Miss Harrison in 
quaint verse, deal with early nioneer and 
mining days in California and Nevada. 
Hayward people will have the pleasure 
of hearing selections from this book 
given by the author herself on the Rackle 
program. 

The program in full is as follows: 
Fantasia (Bach), Fantasie (Mozart), 
Sonata Op. 78 (Beethoven). Mr. Rackle; 
O. Sleep, Why Dost Thou Leave Me 
(Handel). Passing By (Purcell). I At- 
tempt from Love's Sickness to Fly (Pur- 
cell), Mr. Holton; The Girl That Wore 
the Bright Red Hood). Gamblin" Nell. 
Miss Harrison; Mazurka (Leroux). Ro- 
mance (Tschaikowsky), The Sea (Palm- 
gren). The Lark (Balakirev). Mr. Rackle; 
A Rose in Autumn (Eric Coates), Where 
My Dear Lady Sleeps (Boeville-Smith>, 
The Ships of Arcady (Michael Head), 
Mr. Holton: Jes' Pardners, Jes' Neigh- 
bors. Miss Harrison; Spring Song (Men- 
delssohn). Tristitia (Rackle). Hungarian 
Rhapsody No. 8 (Liszt). Mr. Rackle. 



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. Berkeley. Cal. 



MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO end HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

n05 Kohler & Ciiase Bid. Tel. Satter 73S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAX FR.AXCISCO B.AXK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY lOth, 18«8. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by metgers or consolidations with other Banlfs. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal, 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

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HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haigbl and Belvedere Sueels 

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A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4}:^) 

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QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



DAISY O'BRIEN 

VOICE — GlIT.Vlt 

242S Milvia St. Berkeley 771i,-.J 

706 Kohler * Chase — n'ednesday 

LEILA B. GRAVES 

I.VRIC SOPRANO— VOICE CILTLRE 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

Stndio: 150 Central Ave. Tel. Park 1024 

MISS WELCOME LEVY 



Laura AVertlieimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrs. .Noah Brandt 

2311 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera ComUiue, Paris 

Studio: :{107 \\ ashine^lim Street 

■ ■hone Fillmore 1^47 

SIGMUND BEEL 



adio Duildii 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 



Friday. Kohle 



Lhase Uldg.. S. F.; Re 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

(Ada Clement MunIc School) 
3435 Sacra mento ^t. Phoae FlUmpre 898 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher «f Sint^tiiK- -i- Loretta Ave.. Pied- 
mont. Tel. I'iedniont :{04. ^lon.. Kohler & 
IIldK.. S. F. Telephone Kearny 54.V* 



Madame Charles Pouller-Soprano g^^^j^^^ Conservatory of Music 



Voice Cal 
Residence Studio, M-S 27th Street 
Oakland — Tel. Oakland 2079 

Lizetta Kalova Violinist 



211 Scott Street. Uet. Clay A: \\'ashin^to 
Mr. .Noah Brandt. Violin 
Mtn. Noah Brandt. Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 



irano SnIoiNt. Temple 
t and Church Work. 

2r.:{» cia 



EI. Con- 



^^'■I™"!"i^.f5^'"^^ MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



TEACHER OF SINGING 

tudio: :Ui Gaflney Ituildine, 37« Sutter St. 

cl. UoukIiis 42;t;{. Res. Tel. Kearny 234!» 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 



FranciMco. Phone Prospect 
IH>2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 



EVA M. GARCIA 

PIANIST -VXD TEACHER 
41.72 Howe St. Tel. Piedmont 490S 

MARY CARR MOOHK- SONGS 



ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 



Id 121 21«t Ave. Tel. Pac. 1284 

MYNARD S. JONES 

TIEACHER OF SIXGIXG 

ARR11.I..\GA >II"SIC.1L COLLEGE 

2315 Jacksou St. Tel. West 4737 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

HENRIK GJERORUM 

2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 

149 Rose Av.. Oakland Piedmont 160S-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West U95 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANDRE FERRIER 
1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3322 

MME. M. TROMBONI 

601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5464 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Phone Pac. 33 



JULIUS HAUG 
798 Post St. Tel. Pros. 9269 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6454 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 
432 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore llJl 



SIGMUND ANKER 
3142 Gough Street Near Chestnut 

No artist or teacher can become known 
without publicity. No paper can give 
you more dignified publicity than the 
Pacific Coast Musical Review. Subscrip. 
tion price $3 per year. 



I'ACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RFAIEW 



Joseph Greven PAUL STEINDORFF 

■^ ( MASTER COACH 



Voice Culture; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

8741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayvlew 5278 



ASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languagea 

302 Broadway .... Oakland 



Mrs. William Steinbach 

\ ot< I': it i.-ri III': 



!':",' l".r",^:.':"snr.i;r,r;" ""-SHOULD know at once 

ADOLF WEIDIG'S EPOCH MAKING WORK 

IIVIIMIIMC >I\TKI(IAI. AM) IT« I SKS 
\ IIAIMIOM Ihiil li'lN "Wilt" nnil «li<i»» "IIIIU" to unilrr^mnd llnriiioii) fr< 
Iht- *,luti(l|i(>in( (if till. iiiiisl<-ltin. JUMt |>utillNb<.|l hy Cliirton K. Numniy <'o., <'falrfl| 
I'"4ir Sill*. Ilj- 

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extend courtesies it should be worth 
while to subscribe for. 



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HARP SOLOIST AND 
TEACHER 



Hotel Claremont 



Berkeley 9300 



AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS 

UNTIL DECEMBER 1 

Management Selby C. Oppenheimer 

68 Post St., San Francisco 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYIV1PH0NY ORCHESTRA 



mil ItlnniiErr <> 


K. Alll. Itn 


U<M Huhlrr * 


rhliM- llullill 


Nnu Kranrl.i 


•>, CalUurnlii 



Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 

Tfleiihune nouelnii 1«7N 



GEORGE M. LIPSCHULTZ 

SOLO VIOLINIST 
Concert Engagements Accepted 

LOEWS WARFIELD THEATRE 

Musical Director 
Residence Phone Prospect 8686 

Theatre Phone Prospect 83 

Pupils Accepted 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

KmliirKfil I.} Hiiis.r S.vnjnr 

Sperlol .Vorninl Culiriir (<>r T<-a<'li>-r>. Ilapird iin 

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After October 1st Under the Management of S. Hurok, Inc., Aeolian Hall, New York 



America's Greatest 

Contribution to the Musical 

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the Mason & Hamlin Piano. 
To say that the piano is made as well as possi- 
ble, and priced afterward— that does not tell 
the story. No description of the Tension 
Resonator can adequately explain its impor- 
tance in terms of tonal results. Even the mar- 
shalled names of artists who have chosen the 
Mason & Hamlin Piano for their public and 
private use can only indirectly show its 
excellence. 

And yet, that which is difficult to put into 
words is a very real thing. If you should play 
the Mason & Hamlin Piano you would know. 
Listening to it would tell more than a thou- 
sand words, as a glance at the "Woman 
Weighing Pearls" tells more of Vermeer's 
artistry than page after page of description. 
We invite you to play and hear this extraordi- 
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LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



^ffifir (hs^t Hi^ical %Mifa 



IJJ THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR.NAL IHTHE GREAT WEST I Jj 



VOL. XLV. No. 7 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



CLAIRE DUX IS AN ARTIST PAR EXCELLENCE L A. PHILHARMONIC GIVES FINE PROGRAM 



Beautiful Voice of Velvety Flexibility Is Re-enforced by Immaculate 

Technic and Exact Intonation and Amplified by Splendid Emotional 

Expression Arouses Audience to Heights of Enthusiasm. 

Benjamin Moore Proves Accompanist of Great Merit 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



Under Direction of Walter Henry Rothwell, Great Organization Presents 

Excellent Program — Educators Formulate Plans to Obtain Closer 

Relationship Between Philharmonic Orchestra and Southern 

California Schools and Colleges — Community Orchestra 



BY BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Those who did not attend the concert 
of Claire Dux at Scottish Rite Audi- 
torium last Monday evening certainly 
failed to hear one of the very greatest 
vocal artists ever appearing in San Fran- 
cisco. Among the concert artists making 
their initial bow to California audiences 
since the beginning of the war in 1914 
we remember not one that could be 
placed on a par with this ideal exponent 
of all that is worthy in that difficult 
phase of musical expression known as 
the art of singing. We had almost given 
up hope that new artists were still ap- 
pearing who could act as worthy suc- 
cessors to those distinguished banner 
hearers of the muses who, after a bril- 
liant reign must eventually lay down 
their scepter and make room for some 
one else. 

While no artist of distinction can pos- 
sibly be replaced the vacancies he or 
she may leave can be filled, but they can 
only be occupied by those who dispense 
the same Ideals, the same thoroughness 
of artistic expression, the same purity 
of technical execution which the great 
ones of past generations have dissemi- 
nated before an admiring world. Nothing 
less than greatness can take the place 
of greatness, and we regret to say that 
many a vacancy left by the departure 
from life or the retreat from activity 
of a great artist is still lacking an oc- 
cupant. In the advent of Claire Dux. 
however, we have not only the privilege 
of admiring a truly great singer, but 
in some respects an artist unique and 
superior to some of the greatest we have 
heard. She is beyond a question one of 
the most brilliant luminaries that have 
graced the horizon of art in many a 
decade. 

Claire Dux does not only possess a 
beautiful voice of singular flexibility and 
velvety smoothness, but her intonation 
is so immaculate that it represents one 
of the rare joys we experienced during 
our attendance at concerts. Her breath- 
ing is something to marvel at and her 
attacks are so sure and correct that one 
would be inclined to term them mechan- 
ically perfect were it not for the fact 
that the artist mingles with this per- 
fection an element of the deepest emo- 
tion. Miss Dux reveals one special qual- 
ity in vocal expression which we never 
heard in any other artist to that pro- 
nounced degree. Notwithstanding the 
fact that her tones are exclusively pro- 
duced somewhat far back :n her throat 
they remain clear, free and bell like. It 
merely goes to show that nothing is im- 
possible in the way of artistic execution. 
Before we heard Mme. Dux we would 
bave thought such a feat utterly impos- 
sible. 

To hear Miss Dux attack her high 
tones, even to the highest is an experi- 
ence which is indescribably pleasant. 
Indeed it is thrilling. Furthermore the 
original and intelligent manner in which 
she interprets the phrases of the classics 
both old and modern is the acme of gen- 
uine musicianship, for Mme. Dux is not 
only a great singer, but in her interpreta- 
tion she is also a great musician. She 
obtains certain artistic effects which no 
other artist has so far been able to show, 
and even in the interpretation of the 
modern songs, like those of Hageman 
and Carpenter, she succeeds in revealing 
entirely new and pleasant shadings and 
colorings. Her endurance is simply un- 
believable. In addition to fifteen songs 



she sang seven operatic arias, including 
those from Manon, La Boheme, Rigoletto, 
La Tosca. Marriage of Figaro. Pearl 
Fishers and Ernani. Of course, four of 
these were encores. This is surely a 
prodigious feat for any vocal artist. 



LOS ANGELES, Nov. 12.— Thoroughly 
enjoyable was the last Popular Concert 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra when Di- 
rector Rothwell and his players verily 
radiated musical enthusiasm, making 
music with a warmth of expression and 




SIGMUND BEEL 



Benjamin Moore was the accompan- 
ist and he certainly distinguished him- 
self. Every one of his accompaniments 
to the various songs and arias was a 
gem. And when it is considered that 
several of these accompaniments were 
exceedingly difBcult and that Mr. Moore 

(Continued on Page 11. Column 1) 



eloquence of phrasing which literally 
transported the writer into a state of 
happiness. Conductor Rothwell always 
has things "at his fingers' ends." the 
orchestra often sounds indescribably 
beautiful. But rarely have all the means 
of expression come to be so fully the 
"end." These were two brilliant hours 



for conductor, performers and listeners, 
and to reiterate, it was brilliancy of 
spirit, and ardour of expression. Hence 
there were well deserved ovations from 
the public, which again filled all but 
few seats. Conductor Rothwell. indeed, 
has given us vitally interesting programs 
on Sunday afternoons, and so much of 
his best in musicianship and enthusiasm 
that one may predict a most popular 
series of popular concerts. 

Space does not allow me to speak with 
as much detail as I feel urged to do in 
regard to this program. It opened with 
the French Military March from the 
Algerian Suite by Saint-Saens. This is 
one of the most beautiful concert 
marches, for it contains as much martial 
spirit as it offers richness of melodic 
development. It was brilliantly done. 
Then followed Scene Pittoresques by 
Massenet, suave and tuneful as all music 
of this composer. The Air de Ballet with 
its charming cello theme accompanied 
by pizzicato strings had to be repeated. 
In the Angelas movement composer and 
director painted a vision of a late after- 
noon in a little town. Mr, Rothwell, in- 
deed, achieved captivating tonal effects. 
The tolling of the bells sustained French 
horns and cello pizzicato; then, as it 
were, children's voices coming from a 
nearby church (flutes, clarinets and 
violas like women's voices, later on oboe 
in a theme of religiousness in which the 
ascetic and musically sweet were blend- 
ed), again the fullness of sound when the 
whole orchestra intoned as if the organ 
chanted. Director Rothwell entered 
wholly into the spirit of this rather 
simple tone picture and created a lasting 
impression. 

Of Mme. Cornelia Rider Possart's solo 
in the Mozart B flat concerto. No. 15, 
suffice to say, that she proved herself a 
Mozart interpreter of exceptional quality. 
She is eminently musical, endowed with 
a rare sense of style, and uses her technic 
in a manner which caused even the pub- 
lic to forget the fact that the lengthy 
concerto well bears shortening. The in- 
sistently demanded encore was the 
Gavotte by Eugene d'Albert. 

Cesar Cui's Miniature Suite found the 
large orchestra finely adjusted to the 
delicacy of the opus which is charming- 
ly light and not without warmth as in 
the Berceuse and rhythmicaly pleasing 
in the Rustic Dance that forms a good 
climax. This Russian opus (not always 
typically Russian, somewhat in the man- 
ner of lighter German classic of the 
eighties) like the Massenet and the 
Mozart had not been heard here before. 
Magnificently dramatic was the closing 
number, Wagner's Rienzi overture. It 
was a surpassing climax to a concert 
so radiant with musical feeling. The 
public realized it, too, and instead of 
rushing for the doors, as is their habit 
when a concert is ended, they gave to the 
maestro and his fellow artists an ovation 
which gave the director cause to beckon 
his players to rise in acknowledgment 
of this equally spontaneous tribute. 

One of the most significant indica- 
tions of the rapidly growing realization 
of the cultural value of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra to all of Southern California 
was the organization last week at the 
second fortnightly luncheon at the Cali- 
fornia Club of the University Presidents 
of Southern California of the Intercol- 
legiate Philharmonic Orchestra Associa- 

(Continutd on Page 11. Column 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RI-:\li;\V 



After the lights are out 




The Steinway Speaks: 

s/i knew and lovij me. AVajjncr 
knew and loved mc. Rubenstcin, 
Ucrlloz and Gounod knew and 
Irivcd me. I have been the com- 
panion of (jenius for two ijencra- 
namc is the Steinway Piano. 

What w;is there about me that caused Kranz 
Liszt, forty years ago, to say of me: "You 
aflord delight even to my old piano-weary 
fingers ?" 

Why did Richard Wagner, writing from 
Bayreuth in 1S79, dechirc : "Sounds of such 
beauty as those coming from my Steinway 
grand flatter and coax the most agreeable 
tone - pictures from my harmonic melodic 
senses?" 

Why did Gounod, who gave us "Faust," 
write to my makers in 1888, "Mmc. Adclina 
Patti joins mc in the ecstacy and mutual ad- 
miration of your product ... I am overjoyed 
at the consciousness of being the possessor of 
one of your perfect instruments?" And what 
was it that stirred the mighty Dr. Joseph 
Joachim to assert: "Steinway is to the pianist 
what Stradivarius is to the violinist?" 

Companion of genius indeed have I been! 
Sometimes, when the stage is dark and the lid 
over my strings is down, 1 brood over my long 
years of such companionship. 

I see Adelina Patti again, blowing kisses. 



// lifit (toes the Steinway pianrj think about , 
when the curtain is tioivn and the lights are 
nut, anil the artist anil the audience have 
de/>arted.' Kliiquent enough the Sleinuay is 
when the moods of others are voiced on its 
wondrous strings. Hut what are its own 
moods and longings f Listen! It is about to 
speak to us 




and reaching for the flowers that were show- 
ered at her feet, while I rested quietly in the 
background and resolved to do even better in 
her next accompaniment. I see good old 



Franz Liszt again, after a tremendous rhap- 
sody over my ivory keys. I see Edward Mac- 
Dowell, working out his compositions o\'er my 
keyboard. I see the youthful, golden-haired 
Paderewski of the eighties, the maturer Pade- 
rcwski of the nineties, and the world-figure 
and premier of Poland, the Paderewski of to- 
day whose audiences overflow the largest halls 
whenever he plays. And ever I am the com- 
panion of all this genius. 

But then I realize that the greater, the 
sweeter triumph of my long career is not to be 
found on the concert stage at all. 

The greater triumph awaits me when a 
N'oung couple, starting down the pathway of 
wedded life, choose me to be their lifelong 
companion in a home. 

The sweetest triumph of all shall be when 
first my keys are touched by the fingers of 
some little girl, her printed scales before her, 
and a lifetime of the best in music all ahead. 

Admitted thus to the sacred intimacy of a 
home and fireside, I know that I shall find 
my truest triumph. And I shall strive to be 
faithful to these who trust me. As long as my 
strings endure, I shall strive to render to the 
utmost my measure of abiding charm. 

Sherman play & Co. 

Kearny and Sutttr Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-ORECON-WASHIN'CTON 



ROSE FLORENCE 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

Studio: 545 Sutter St. Telephone Kearny 3598 

Direction Miss Alice Seckels 

68 Post St., San Francisco. California 



ROSA HONYIKOVA 

SIneInK < nn II.- » uur MimMuiii of ICiiircKslnii. I C»n 

■Iel|> tou i'liid Ihi- War "I Vour Volrf. Studio! 

INIMI Urove 8(re«t. Trlrphone llnyvlew lOStI 



OrKiinlfit Tempi' 
rntUt. Dirrclor I. 
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le Kmanu El, Flmt Church of Ckrliit Scl- 1 



: Club. S. F.. Wed.. 11115 S« 
:t7.-3: SnI.. Klr«l Chrlntlan Seleoi 
Church, rhune Krnnklln 1.".07; Ren. Studio, .'III:: Lenlnto 
.\ve., Berkeler. I>hone Pledniont 24ZS 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Pfione Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



AUGUSTA HAY DEN 



207 Cherrr St.. Ret. \\ uNblntrtan A (In 



Tel. Pile, oaoa 



AtiareNN; -171 :t7tli 



ARTISTIC STUDIO FOR RENT 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



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UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
MUNICIPAL ORGANIST OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. ORGANIST 
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 
Piano and Organ Instruction. Vocal Coach. 
Studio: First Congregational Church, cor. Post 
and Mason Streets. Tel. Douglas 5186. Residence, 
887 Bush Street. Tel. Prospect 977. 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS AND 
ORGAN RECITALS 



Dominican College School of Music 

S\N U\l-'AI-:i,. C%l.lFOIlMA 



PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



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MRS. M. FOULKES 

\C('IMir WIST 

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The College of the Holy Names 

i.AKi-: >ii':iiHiT'r. oaki.and 

'oniplete ConHcrviitor; ( ourne — I'lnno. Hnrp, Vlalln 
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DURINI VOCAL STUDIO 



THE LICHTENSTEIN VIOLIN SCHOOL 



rhooe I'lllmore OMO 



Manning School of Music 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

All\ tM KI> ri IMI.H AUfEPTKn 

\% rdnraday anil \'r\t\nj Morn Ins* nt *«tiiUI<ii »o; 

K»lilrr A ( hn%f 1114*.. ••■n I'mnelaen. Telrphon< 

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noon.-J7lN \Mhl>y \veniie. Ilerkelry 

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out: WIST 

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JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

pnniA iiii.N.VA soruANo 

ThoroUEh Vornl mid llrnninlle TrnlnlOK 
I'Inr St. Phoue DouKlan 6«24 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

PI AM NT — I>HTnUrTt»li 



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Teaehrr of lleaulirul sinitlnic. I*upll of l.amp'TtL <iarcla 

Mnrvhrxl. lien. «4Mldlo. 'JiVir* llurant A%e.. Ilerkeley. 

rhfme llrrkeler -lOHlI-U 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



nrT THlTONLY WEEKLY MUSICAL JOUKNAL IK THE Oe£AT WE5T 111 
ml'SICAL REVIEW COMPANY 

ALFRED MET2GER President 

C. C. EMERSON VIce-PreKldent 

MARCt'S I,. SAMl ELS Secretary nnd Treonurer 

Suite ISni. Kohler & rhaae BIdE.. 20 O'Furrell St., 
San FranriKeo, Calir. Tel. Kearny M.'S4 



ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

Make all clieckN. drafts, money orders or other forniM of 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 
Uakland-Oerbeley-Alaraeda Oinee 1117 Para St.. Alameda 



Seattle OIHce, 1115 2.1rd Ave. North, Seattle. AVaNhlngton 
Mrs. Abble Gerrlsh-Jones In Cbarse 

LoH Aneeles Offlee 

nin Southern California Music Co. BulIdInK, 

Elshth and Droadnay Tel., Metropolitan 4388 

Miss Lloyd Dana In CharEe 



VOL. XLV SATURDAY, NOV. 17, 1923 



Entered as Hecond-clnsN mall matter at S. F. Poatofflce. 



TWENTY-THIRD YEAR 



W. A. CLARK, JR.'S, SERVICE TO MUSIC 



During' the last few mcmth.s we have been re- 
peatedly asked to express our opinion regarding 
the continuous interest which W. A. Clark, Jr., 
of Los Angeles, is taking in the musical welfare 
of his community and upon the effect it has upon 
the musical development of the great Southwest. 
As a basis for this discussion we wish to remind 
our readers that Mr. Clark is spending during the 
course of five years the huge sum of one million 
dollars, and only a short time ago he renewed his 
determination to spend another million during 
the five succeeding years to give Los Angeles the 
best symphony orchestra West of Chicago. Now 
let us see what far-reaching eft'ect this generosity 
has on the music of the Southwest. 



In the first place, it attracts to Los Angeles a 
number of the foremost orchestral musicians re- 
siding in America. The influence of such musi- 
cians in the community wherein they reside and 
wherein they participate in all kinds of functions, 
including the occasional establishment of a class 
of students, is, of course, impossible to estimate. 
Were it not for the presence of such musicians in 
Los .Vngeles, the suminer concerts in the Holly- 
wood Bowl could not be given, for there would 
not be sufficient funds to import such an orches- 
tra specially for the summer. Furthermore, the 
Philharmonic Orchestra, by traveling in sur- 
rounding cities, spread the gospel of good music 
everywhere, thus swelling the number of people 
interested in good concerts of all kinds, in fine 
grand opera seasons and in efficient teachers. 



The material value of a symphony orchestra, 
such as the Philharmonic Orchestra in Los An- 
geles, can not be determined. But if the music 
houses have found an increase of trade, if teach- 
ers have discovered an increase of pupils, if man- 
agers have increased their attendance at concerts, 
if there are demands for greater musical e.xpan- 
sion, the foundation of such improvements must 
be traced back to the Philharmonic Orchestra, 
which is giving the impetus for all that is best in 
musical appreciation. Wherever there is a sym- 
phony orchestra there are created differences of 
opinion concerning the style of directing such an 
orchestra. The conductor becomes always a cer- 
tain bone of contention among opposite factions. 
Those who prefer a poetic style of conducting 
without emphasis of the dramatic will criticize a 
conductor inclined to vigorous prosecution of 
climaxes. If music lovers prefer a deliberate 
tempo to an accelerated tempo, they will criticize 
the conductor who endeavors to go slowly. In- 
deed, any musician who has a preconceived idea 
of how a composition ought to be played, or who 



depends for his taste upon other conductors 
whom he has admired in the past expects a con- 
ductor to interpret standard compositions accord- 
ing to his ideas. But, after all, the essential point 
is whether or not a conductor understands his 
business, whether he has had practical experi- 
ence, whether he knows the traditions and studies 
his scores, whether he dominates his orchestra so 
that the attacks and phrasing are precise, or 
whether he reads the classics with intelligence 
and musicianship. All else is beside the mark. 
Matters of personal opinion have lio place when 
the common good is concerned. 



In San Francisco one thousand guarantors and 
sixty thousand people contribute the finances 
necessary to support the symphony orchestra. 
Consequently, these people furnishing $200,000 
have a right to say which conductor they prefer. 
In Los .\ngeles, Mr. Clark alone furnishes $200,- 
000, and the public whatever is rejiresented in 
the sale of tickets. Therefore, Mr. Clark and the 
people who spend their money on the concerts 
have the say as to which conductor they prefer. 
As long as Mr. Clark is convinced that Walter 
Henry Rothwell is the right conductor, as long 
as the public buys season tickets and single ad- 
mission tickets when Mr. Rothwell conducts, so 
long is Mr. Rothwell the right conductor for Los 
.•\ngeles, and no one is entitled to any s.iy in such 
matters unless he or she is able to defray the 
expenses necessary to gratify an\' taste regarding 
the style of conducting he or she prefers. The 
writer regards Mr. Rothw'cll as an efficient musi- 
cian, a conductor of proved ability and experi- 
ence, a leader who trains and directs with pre- 
cision and who has built up the orchestra to a 
point where it may justly rank with the leading 
organizations of its kind in the country. We 
congratulate Mr. Clark upon his musical phila- 
thropy and upon his judgment to select a con- 
ductor like Mr. Rothwell, who shows such excel- 
lent discrimination in engaging the finest musi- 
cians he can find. We fear there are musical peo- 
ple residing in Los Angeles who even now do not 
realize the immense musical benefit which the 
Southwest derives from W. A. Clark, Jr.'s mu- 
nificent generosity. 



BLOSSOM TIME A DELIGHTFUL PLAY 

Excellent Cast, Beautiful Music, Picturesque Scenery, 

Refined Acting, Droll Comedy and Appealing Pathos 

Leading Features of the Performance 

By ALFRED JIETZGER 

There is a refreshing atmosphere surrounding the 
performance of Blossom Time at the Curran Theatre 
this weeli, and those who attend this slcillful bit of 
romance will unquestionably come away from the thea- 
tre happier for their experience. Those who admire 
Schubert's music will find many old and dear acquaint- 
ances among the music, the Serenade and Unfinished 
Symphony forming important factors throughout the 
course of the play. There are a number of very pleas- 
ant voices which are used to interpret some of the 
most beautiful songs, not one of the least being the 
Love Song. We heard snatches of Die Forelle. Ave 
Maria and other gems, but would have enjoyed all this 
magnificent music just a bit more it it had been taken 
at a slower tempo and not rushed ahead in jazz-like 
velocity. 

It would be difficult to imagine a finer cast than the 
one interpreting this excellent bit of musical fantasie. 
Specially able and ingenious is Mollis Davenny's im- 
personation of Franz Schubert. Both in make-up and 
deportment, he reflects the traditions that we all asso- 
ciate with this master of song. He acts convincingly, 
sings with a beautiful, ringing baritone voice of excep- 
tional timbre and charm and never forgets the atmos- 
phere wherein he moves. He is positively convincing. 
Our old friend. Teddy Webb, has one of the very best 
roles in his career as Kranz. It is impossible to listen 
to Mr. Webb without chuckling happily at his irresisti- 
ble display of wit and humor. He always knows just 
exactly how to obtain the greatest elJect from a comical 
situation and never allows coarseness or vulgarity to 
mar the sentiment of his lines. Even in the tipsy 
scenes he retains a certain amount of dignity and gen- 
tility, notwithstanding the rather uncultured phase of 
society the character represents. Mr. Webb's imperson- 
ation was a masterpiece of the rarest kind. 

Gertrude Lang as Mitzi looked charming and sang 
pleasantly. Ralph Soule exhibited a delightful lyric 
tenor voice and fitted in snugly among this fine cast. 
Halina Bruzovna as the Countess was most realistic in 
her acting and personal appearance. Ruth Meier 
danced very gracefully to the ever-delightful melody of 
the Moment Musicale, while all the other characters 
proved themselves worthy of the company they were 
part of. -\ndre Dore. musical director, "acted" and 
conducted with considerable eclat and musical effect. 
Costumes, scenery, chorus and orchestra added greatly 
to the ensemble effect and rounded out one of the 
most delightful and refreshing musical comedies we 
have ever attended. 



MOISEIWITSCH VERITABLE PIANISTIC POET 

Distinguished Russian Pianist Reveals Extraordinary 

Faculty of Expressing a Variety of Sentiments 

With Unerring Accuracy 

By ALFRED METZGER 

Benno Moiseiwitsch was the attraction at the second 
concert of the Elwyn Series in the Curran Theatre on 
Friday afternoon. November 9th. and although there 
was a large audience in attendence we have a sufficient 
number of teachers and students residing in the bay 
region to positively crowd at least two concerts of an 
artist like Moiseiwitsch. That our piano students and 
teachers do not co-operate to attend an event of such 
artistic magnitude is evidence for a condition in cer- 
tain musical circles which is not exactly flattering to 
either students or teachers. Radical improvement is 
necessary before piano students and teachers attain 
the same standard of musical taste as our general 
musical public which attends symphony concerts, cham- 
ber music concerts and grand opera performances in 
far greater proportion than our vocal, piano and violin 
students attend the concerts in which they should be 
specially interested. 

Moiseiwitsch retains his eminent position among the 
poets of the piano. He is painstaking in retaining a 
mellowness and softness of tone that appeals caressing- 
ly to sensitive musical ears. Even in his most effective 
climaxes he does not sacrifice tone quality to volume of 
sound. His phrasing is characterized by the utmost 
delicacy and varying shades of sentiment in accordance 
with his conception of the intentions of the composers. 
Technically Mr. Moiseiwitsch attains astounding re- 
sults. Xothing is too difficult for him and the most 
puzzling intricacies and apparently most inexecutable 
digital feats are overcome by him with an ease and 
velocity that leaves the hearer gasping with astonish- 
ment. 

Whether Mr. Moiseiwitsch's ideas regarding the art 
of repression as practiced in his interpretation of such 
compositions as the Tannhauser Overture, or his rapid- 
ity of technical execution as employed during his read- 
ing of Chopin, comply with the preconceived notions of 
certain elements in the musical profession or laity is a 
question that is at least open to debate. Differences 
of opinion will exist as long as human beings entertain 
their present divergence, but one thing is positively 
certain, namely, that Benno Moiseiwitsch is one of the 
leading exponents of pianistic art before the musical 
world today. The complete program was as follows: (al 
Prelude in C major (Bach), (b) Waldstein Sonata 
(Beethoven); (a) Capriccio in B minor (Brahms), (b) 
Variations (Paganini-Brahmsl ; (a) Ballad in A flat, (b) 
Prelude in A major, (c) Prelude in C minor, (d) Pre- 
lude in F major, (el Prelude in B flat minor, (fi Waltz 
in G flat major (ChopinI, (g) Prelude La fllle aux 
Cheveux de lin (Debussy) I, (h) Toccata (Ravel). (First 
performance in San Francisco) ; (a) Liebestraum 
(Liszt) (b) Tannahauser Overture (Wagner-Liszt). 



RUSSIAN BASSO PLEASES LARGE AUDIENCE 

George Shkultetsky Interprets Russian Program Very 

Effectively — Mrs. John B. Casserly Proves 

Exceptionally Fine Accompanist 



By ALFRED METZGER 

A large and representative audience attended the 
concert of George Shkultetsky, Russian Basso Cantante 
in the Colonial Ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel on 
Monday evening. November 12th. This was Mr. 
Shkultetsky's first appearance before the musical public 
of San Francisco in a recital of his own and judging 
from the cordial reception he received the impression 
he made was decidedly favorable. He possesses a fine 
resonant voice of flexible timbre and of wide range 
which he uses with good judgment and excellent tech- 
nical skill. His program consisted exclusively of Rus- 
sian composition and for this reason did not give the 
hearer a chance to judge of the versatility of this artist 
in so far as it appertains to songs of other nations. But 
it was evindent that he possesses in addition to a 
beautiful voice an intelligent comprehension of the 
purpose of a composition and the interest with which 
his audience followed his interpretation is ample proof 
of the invidualism of his phrasing. 

One of the specially artistic features of this program 
was the unquestionable musicianly accompaniments of 
Mrs. John B. Casserly. Here is a deep student of music 
and a pianist who is sufficiently sincere and consistent 
to play with every ounce of soulful abandon into the 
work of the composer. Mrs. Casserly, notwithstanding 
the many difficulties that beset her in her interpreta- 
tions of these Russian works, succeeded to invest her 
playing with that adherance to artistic details and 
emotional phrasing without which an accompanist is 
a hindrance to the singer, but with the assistance of 
which the singer has reason to regard such pianistic 
expressions as a safe background for his efforts. The 
complete program was as follows: Air (Pimen) from 
opera Boris Godounow (Mussorgsky), Floods of Spring 
(Rachmaninoff), Air (Sobakin) from opera Tzar's Bride 
(Rimsky-Korsakoff), .\utumn Leaves (Glier). .\t the 
Ball (Tschaikowsky) : Air (Susanin) from opera Life 
for the Tzar (Glinka). On the old Hill (Kalinnikoff), 
The Night (Tschaikowsky). Do Not Sing My Beauty 
(Kaukas's melody) (Rachmaninoff). .\ir from opera 
Demon (Rubinstein! ; Air from opera The Magic Flute 
(Mozart), Silent Lips (Blelhman), Azra (Rubinstein), 
Doubt — Romance (Glinka), Two Giants (Stolipin). 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



A MIRAGE 

BY ANIL DEER 




Bitter the eiperlence of a wanderer, lost In a torrlil 
arid desert Sweltering with heat, tongue parched, 
swollen and painful, mouth fliled with 
the ta.ste of »and. which confronts him 
on every turn: sand Is before him. In 
the rear, seemingly miles under, appear- 
ing to the sufferer, endless. Hatred is 
arousetl to a maniacal degree, which 
sometimes terminates with the victim 
throwing himself on the sand and In 
K .^ frenzy endeavoring to dig through the 
fT'M Ut implacable enemy, eating It and dying in 
extreme agony, physical and mental. 
Rate may be kind and extricate him before a fatality 
occurs. Some searching party or other travelers may 
fortunately find and rescue him. What a blissful happy 
state his then, to And company, human companionship. 
In the midst of suffering loneliness. His only previous 
companions loathsome vultures hovering overhead, 
hideous prophets, foretelling and gloating over the end 
seen to be. Hallucination possess such a wanderer long 
before meeting with the extreme. Dazed and weary, 
suffering excruciating thirst, he suddenly perceives, 
apparently before him — water — a body of water, sur- 
rounded by cool sheltering palms, a Joyful happy sight, 
which he runs to meet with eager outstretched arms. 
Disappointment, cruel and agonizing awaits. Reaching 
the spot where he believed it to be. finds it has vanish- 
ed, and realizes he has been tricked by a mirage. .An- 
other cruelty in the inexhaustable stock of the desert. 
Yet cruel as It shows Itself to be to the inexperienced. 
HI equipped travelers, the desert is loved by those 
who know it best and have conquered its difliculties. 
These claim it one of the moat desirable spots on earth, 
with wonderful beauties on all sides; they will return 
year after year, hoping In the end their final moments 
may pass there. 'Tis like the thistle which lightly fear- 
fully touched will prick and bring blood, but fearlessly, 
roughly grasped, is handled with impunity. 

A desert with its mirage has somewhere concealed a 
true oasis, where real water and sheltering palms, such 
as visualized by a mirage, truly exist. 

Singers who set forth to travel the artistic route are 
prone to vision a mirage as their ultimate objective. 
Thoughts of riches to be secured, at the end of quest; 
furs, fine raiments.. Jewels and chauffeured. high 
powered cars; high honors and the final humiliation 
of all those who have in any way proved antagonistic 
or doubtful of the superiority of the aspirant. Such 
baubles fill the mind to the exclusion of real true facts; 
they are mirages, which can only bring disillusion- 
ment. Not that they don't exist, but, they fail to give 
the expected bliss when finally gained. As water, often 
found in the desert, they are salt and acrid to the taste. 
impossible to drink. Never intended to slake thirst. 

An oasis, which typifies the real, as a mirage the 
false. Is to be found by those who search, fortified with 
knowledge. True success In a singer's career means 
loving service; giving pleasure to others, lightening 
the burden of those heavily laden with cares of life, 
passing on the high spiritual calm and peace earned 
by artistic attainment, delving into hidden mines ex- 
tracting their precious jewels of musical and poetical 
thoughts, and casting these treasures broadcast to be 
enjoyed by all. There lies no mirage with heartbreak- 
ing chimerical illusion, but a true green oasis, with cool 
sparkling waters to be quaffed and found satisfying to 
the thirst. 



THIRD SUNDAY SYMPHONY CONCERT 

For the third concert in the Sunday Symphony Series. 
to be given tomorrow afternoon in the Curran Tlieatre, 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, under the 
leadership of Alfred Hertz, will repeat yesterday's pro- 
gram, which is made up of the Brahms Symphony No. 
4 In E minor, the Four Flemish Folk Songs of Arthur 
de Greef and Tschaikowsky's brilliant fantasia. The 
Tempest. 

The announcement of a Brahms symphony Is always 
eagerly welcomed by symphony patrons, while the 
Flemish folk songs and the Tschaikowsky work, both 
of which are new In the orchestra's repertoire. Indi- 
cate a well-balanced program which should prove to be 
unusually enjoyable. The Tempest, which Is a musical 
portrayal of Shakespeare's play of the same name, is 
one of Tschaikow8k)'*s earlier works, but because of 
difficulties In obtaining the parts it has never been pro- 
duced by the Symphony. However. Mr. Hertz expects 
that It will soon win a place for itself In popular favor 
beside the March Slav and Italian Caprice. 

For the Popular Concert to be given a week from 
tomorrow afternoon in the Curran an unusually at- 
tractive program of established favorites has been 
prepared. A new item is announced in the ballet suite 
from Massenet's Herodiade. the balance of the pro- 
gram lielng made up of Glinka's "Russian and Ludmllla" 
Overture, the symphonic poem. Le Rouet d'Omphale by 
Salnt'Saens. Grieg's Norwegian Dances and Norwegian 
Bridal Prtjcesnlon. the Borodin sketch On the Steppes 
of Middle Asia and Glazouoow's brilliant Valse de Con- 
cert Opue 47. 

At the fourth pair of regular symphony concerts to 
be given Friday and Sunday afternoons, November 30. 
and December 2. Louis I'ersinger. concert master of 
the orchestra, will make his first appearance this season 
as solol«t p'rtcirming the Lalo F minor concerto. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY'S FINE CONCERT 

Kajefan Attl. Harpist. IVIrs. Albert George Lang and 

Miss Esther De nrnger. Pianists, and Miss Augusta 

Hayden, Soprano, Interpret Excellent Program 

By ALFRED METZGER 

I'nquestionably one of the most interesting and en- 
joyable concerts ever given by the Pacific Musical 
Society took place in the ballroom of the Fairmont 
Hotel on Thursday evening. November Sth. in the pres- 
ence of one of the largest audiences ever assembled at 
one of these delightful events. An especially enjoyable 
feature were two compositions for two pianos in- 
terpreted by Miss Esther Deininger and Mrs. Albert G. 
I^ang. One of these was a Sonata in D major by Mozart 
and the other a Suite opus 15 by Arensky. Both pro- 
digious works were played entirely by heart by both 
young artists. It was a feat of which these capable 
pianists had reason to feel very proud. 

There Is nothing more difficult than the artistic in- 
terpretation of compositions for two pianos. There Is 
nothing in the way of musical achievement that re- 
quires greater study, more industrious application, a 
higher ideal of ensemble playing and more patience 
than interpreting by heart the few worth while 
gems of pianistic literature written for two pianos. 
And when we say that -Miss Deininger and Mrs. 
Lang responded to the demands of the severest re- 
quirements of this peculiar art our readers will re- 
ceive an Idea as to how thoroughly enjoyable the per- 
formance of these two ambitious artists really was. 

The phrasing was uniformly even and intelligent The 
technical portion of the composition exhibited all the 
elements of facility and accuracy. There was no dis- 
crepancy of any notable importance. The two works 
had evidently been studied and digested with careful 
observance of their artistic purpose. The tone of both 
artists was equally bell-like, neither one nor the other 
predominating unduly. The Mozart composition ex- 
hibited that gentility and suavity which is peculiar to 
the works of that master. The work of Arensky was 
brilliant and charged with grace and buoyancy Indeed 
there is nothing we could say that would reward suf- 
ficiently the labor of love and aftection for music in its 
purest form which Miss Deininger and Mrs. Lang so 
cheerfully and so successfully donated on the altar of 
education as exemplified by the concerts of the Pacific 
Musical Society. 

Kajetan Attl. solo harpist of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra, played two groups of compositions, 
namely. Legende by Renie and Bohemian Folk Song 
by Attl. Our musical public has already learned to ad- 
mire Mr. Attl's silver tone and his exceptional ability 
to draw the most tender sentiments from the pliant 
strings of his instrument. The two works he played 
on this occasion gave him ample opportunity to wield 
the scepter of his art. He practically "sang" the folk 
songs and told the Legende with an expression of poetic 
color that appealed strongly to his listeners. Mr. Attl 
represents, according to our humble opinion, all that is 
worthy in adequate utilization of an instrument most 
difficult to handle. 

Miss Augusta Hayden. soprano, occupied the responsi- 
ble position of asserting herself in such distinguished 
company and she succeeded admirably. Her clear, ring- 
ing soprano voice was heard in the following group of 
songs: (a) Lunge del caro bene (Secchi). (b) The 
Little Shepherdess (Sibella). (c) Tes Yeux (Rabey). 
(d) Consecration (Manney). The singer succeeded in 
investing these songs with their respective charac- 
teristics and in a gentle, unassuming way emphasized 
their poetic or romantic meaning, as the case might be. 
Her enunciation was clear and her phrasing musical. 
She unquestionably made a very fine impression on her 
audience which was not hesitant in according her the 
full measure of its approval. Mrs Horatio F. Stoll 
played the accompaniments in a manner to serve as a 
pleasing artistic background to the accomplishments 
of the soloist. 



GOOD MUSIC AT THE WARFIELO THEATRE 

The musical public of San Francisco can not appreci- 
ate too highly the services rendered to art by the 
management of the Loew Warfield Theatre in giving 
its patrons the best of music by an orchestra of suitable 
size under the direction of that able musician, George 
Lipschultz. The selections are always dignified and 
representative. The orchestra is conducted in an able 
and effective manner and the entire atmosphere of the 
musical part of the program is pleasing to the most 
fastidious music lover. There is such a thing as over- 
doing showmanship and insulting the intelligence of 
serious musical people by making monkeys of those 
selected to Interpret music. The Loew Warfield Thea- 
tre management does not stoop to such clownish dis- 
tortion of a serious art. 

In these days of circus-like exaggerations of musical 
performances with the sole purpose of extracting an 
extra nickel from the reluctant pockets of the masses 
of theatregoers, it Is a relief to find a management that 
has at least some respect for the feelings and senti- 
ments of those of us to whom music is dear and to 
whom a desecration of the art represents an insult. It 
is. therefore, our duty to assist and encourage those 
who actually refuse to become Innoculaled with the 
germ of greed and give some of us credit for good taste 
by catering to our likes. 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 





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MRS. MILES A. DRESSKELL 

SOPH.WO 
AnnnilnopH the openlDK of her Htiiflio 

469 Morse Street Phone 6382-W 

Avnll.tilf for Cnnrort. nnj HrrlmN 

Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 



TarHdaT-M 



SOPRANO 
-IdarN — 14.% llniK 
nllfornln. Phonr 



NOTRE DAMK COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
San Jose. Cal. 
Confera DeKrrea. Awards Crrtllleatrn. Complrtr CollcK« 
Conaervatorr and Aradrmlc Couraea In Piano. Violin, 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice, iiarnionr, Counlei point, Calion nnd 
Fnicae and Science ol Hoalr. For paitlculara Apply to 

JOSE Mil SIC COMPANY 



Phone 2J.%.1 



HnalF. Vlollna. 
le Ratea 
n Joae, California 



WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

ALLIANCE BUILDING 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

ALrruoHeftTz Conductor. 

Sunday Afternoon, November 25 

POPULAR CONCERT 

Curran Theatre 

■i:K, P. M. 

PKOCinAnHB 

RUKMlan and l.udmilla Overture Glinka 

l.e Roaet d'Omphale „ Saijit-Saenx 

Herodiade Ballet Suite Hannrnel 

.Vorweirlnn Bridal ProecaaloB GrIeK 

■r>vo >oriTFKian Danrea GrieE | 



ex of )llddle .Aaia.. 



..Dorodin 



.MO.ND.AA' EVKMNfi. XO^'E^MIIER 10 

Scottish Rite 

tlNK HKCITAI. OM.^" 

N. Y. STRING QUARTET 

( IIAMIICK MISIC KN'<EMI1I.E 
Founded hy ^Ir. and Mrs. Ralph Pulitxer 

FRIDAV MATIM-:K. \<ll EHBER 33, at 2:43 

Curran 

M'Uliani Made llinKh.-i\T'» Production. 
MOZART'S OI'FHV (IIMIItlE 

"THE IMPRESARIO" 

AVIth Percy IIcmium .ind All Star Cast 



MOXDAt EVEM 



l)E< EMBER 



Scottish Rite 
SOPHIE BRASLAU 



Manncirenient Kl^vyo to 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

PRIVATE AND CLASS LESSONS 
LECTURES ON MUSIC APPRECIATION 



San Francisco, 807 Kohler & Chase BIdg. Tel. 
Kearny 6454. Wednesday from 2-6 p. m. only. 
Berkeley. 20 Brookside (off Claremont Ave.) Tel. 
Berkeley 4091. Mornings at Anna Head School. 



BEST MUSIC IN TOWN 



LOEWS WARFIELD 



••BEST MUSIC IN TOWN" 

LIPSCHULTZ MUSIC MASTERS 
HAROLD STANTON 

F\\< HON A M.Mlra 

"IDEAS" 

The "llprcnx' M.M l.lurc of the ^ ear 

Pleasure Mad! 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco 



IAS HECHT, 



SCOTTISH RITE HALL 

Tuesday Evening,Nov.20 



BRAHMS, MARCELLO, HAENDEL 
DOHNANYI 

Attendance at Firxt t onrerl Was 1400 



LEADING CONCERT 
ATTRACTIONS 



JOSEF LHEVINNE 

Russian Pianisllc Genius 
Columbia Tlieatre 
SIVDVV AFT.. XOV. 25tli 

ARTHUR PAII. 

RUBINSTEIN- KOCHANSKI 



ANNA CASE 

Popular America 



Culunilii 

sr\r 

Tickets 



nd VlulinlMt 



Clay * Ce 



lll>G — 

SOISA .\XD HIS RAM) 
SCHl MA\X-HEIXK 

PAVI.OW A A>D HER B AI.LET RISSK 
De PACHMAXX — PADEREWSKI 
THE ISADORA Dl'.NCAX DANCERS 
CHIC,4GO GRAND OPI-'RA COMP.VW 
GOGORZA— CHALIAPIV 
ETC., ETC„ ETC 



Song Book for Very Little Children in 
the Kindergarten and Home 
Illustrated in Color 

Songs for the Littlest Ones 

Words and Music by Cora W. Jenkins 

(Pulilished by The UoMon Music Co.l 

Composer of The Whirlwind, Rushing 

Stream and Other Charming 

Children's Pieces 

»n Sale at All Music Stores. Morcom-s Art Store. 
CaiKvclls. Paul Elder's. The White House 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 



2636 UNION STREET 

SAN I'RANCISIO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 



BY APPOIXTMEXT 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 

TEACHER OF PIA\0 — ACCOMPANIST 
Studio: 1000 Union Street Tel. Franklli 



ZIMBALIST AT COLUMBIA TOMORROW 

The popularity of the Selby C. Oppenheimer Colum- 
bia Theater Sunday Pop Great Artist Series has become 
immediate, and with the local manager presenting 
many of the foremost artists in the world as features 
of these events the Columbia promises to be musically 
a most popular rendezvous on Sunday afternoons during 
the coming season. Tomorrow's artist will be the 
famous Russian violinist, Efrem Zimbalist. than whom 
there is no finer exponent of the fiddleistic art. Zim- 
balist brings with him his famous Titian violin, said to 
be the finest example of Stradivarius construction in 
the world today. The young Russian paid $33,000 for 
his instrument, which he has insured with Lloyds for 
$100,000. so highly does he prize and value this precious 
violin. 

San Franciscans know Zimbalist too well for extended 
comment on his abilities and they rate him, as is proper, 
among the half dozen of the world's very greatest. To- 
morrow's recital will be Zimbalist's only appearance in 
San Francisco this season, and with Emanuel Bay at the 
piano he will render the following important and im- 
pressive program: (a) Prelude (Bach), (b) Symphonic 
Espagnole ILalo) : (a) Romance (Beethoven), (bl 
Havanaise (Saint-Saens), (c) Fantasy on Rimski- 
Korsakoff's Coq d'Or (Zimbalist); (a) Andante canta- 
bile (Tschaikowski-Auer), (b) Zigeunerweisen (Sara- 
sate). * 

W. A. Clark, Jr., founder and patron of the Los Angeles 
Philharmonic Orchestra, and at present the most dis- 
tinguished musical philanthropist in the world, was a 
visitor in San Francisco this week and a most welcome 
caller at the Musical Review office The editorial in this 
issue regarding Mr. Clark s splendid services in the 
cause of music was written before we had the honor of 
this call, and is a result of our attendance at the first 
pair of concerts of the Philharmonic Orchestra this 
season. 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio, 850 Geary Street. Apt. 8 
Tel. Prospect 3071 

AVAII.AIILE FOR RKCITVI.S 

S. F. CONCERT DEC. 14, 1923 



(ES PoNt Stri 



Phone UouKlnN 724(7 



h^rilone 



EAKNINq 

BER.TP.A,ND - Bft-OWN 
PeHSONAL RBPRESeNTATIve 
AeOLlAN HALL ■ NaW YORK 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 

Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



LHEVINNE NEXT 

Monday afternoon in the ballroom of the St. Francis 
Hotel Josef Lhevinne will make his first appearance in 
this city in a number of years. The great Russian, who 
like Zimbalist, his violinistic confrere, ranks with the 
best pianists the world has to offer, has specially se- 
lected the two programs he will play on his San Fran- 
cisco visit. The Monday list of works includes Schu- 
mann's Carnaval. a Chopin group consisting of Noc- 
turne op. 9 B majoar. Valse A flat major op. 64. Ber- 
ceuse, and Polonaise A flat; Ravel's Une barque sur 
I'ocean and Debussy's Minstrels; Liebestraum and 
Campanella by Liszt; and Tausig's Ungarische Zigeu- 
nerweisen. 

At his farewell recital here. Sunday afternoon, No- 
vember 25th, Lhevinne is scheduled to play the follow- 
ing; Sonata quasi una fantasia op. 27 (Moonlight) 
(Beethoven). Prelude D flat major. Impromptu C sharp 
minor. Nocturne F sharp major. Valse D flat (Chopint; 
Mexican Folk Songs (a ) Estrellita ( Ponce) , ( b) La 
golondrina (harmonized) (La Forge); Ricordanza 
(Reminiscence), Campanella (Liszt); The Blue Danube 
(Schulz-Evler). 

On Sunday afternoon, December 9th. in this Columbia 
series, the highly unusual attraction will be a joint re- 
cital by the eminent Russian pianist, Arthur Rubinstein, 
and Paul Kochanski. violinist. Rubinstein, already a 
favorite in San Francisco, is being keenly awaited, 
while Kochanski, although new to local music-lovers 
is well known by reputation, and the promise that the 
twain will render an unusual program is serving to at- 
tract considerable attention to their only local appear- 
ance. The artists have promised to play the great 
Sonata in D minor, op. 108, by Brahms, and an im- 
pressive list of solos for their instruments. Anna Case 
will come on December 16th — the last of the Sunday 
"Pop" artists until after the Christmas holidays. 



SECOND CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 

The concert of the Chamber Music Society of San 
Francisco, on Tuesday evening. November 20th, next, 
offers a rich and varied program. The Brahms String 
Quartet in B flat major. Opus 67, with which the con- 
cert opens, is one of the biggest works of this master. 
In this work Brahms' genius has ripened to full ma- 
turity and there are very few beautiful moments in 
music than those contained in the slow movement of 
this great string quartet. 

The older school of instrumental bel canto will be 
represented by two charming and dainty sonatas for 
flute and piano, one by Benedetto Marcello. the great 
Italian contra puntalist and contemporary of Bach; the 
other by George Frederick Haendel. the great German- 
English composer. The G major sonata of Marcello 
is one of a group of four and is considered the finest 
and most dainty of these remarkable works. Haendel 
wrote seven sonatas for flute and piano, of which the 
A minor sonata, to be given at this concert, is con- 
sidered the gem. Both of these works are not only 
of extreme beauty and charm, but are of considerable 
interest because they are very rarely heard. 

The concert will conclude with the famous string 
quartet of Erno Dohnanyi in B flat major, for the in- 
terpretation of which the Chamber Music Society has 
a widespread fame. It is a big. dramatic and colorful 
work and is always received with enthusiastic demon- 
strations of approval 

The rule adopted this year by the Chamber Music 
Society of beginning its concerts promptly at 8:15 has 
met with widespread approval of the public. This 
brings the concerts to a conclusion before 10 o'clock 
and enables the suburban patrons to be in their homes 
at a reasonable hour. After playing once starts, no one 
will be seated except between movements. 



MILL VALLEY MUSICAL CLUB CONCERT 

The October Concert of the Mill Valley Musical Club 
was an event of unusual interest- The following well- 
known artists took part: Lillian Hoffmeyer-Heyer, 
mezzo soprano; Heinrik-Gjerdrum. pianist; Hother 
Wismer. violinist, and Mrs. William Ritter. pianist. 
Mr. Wismer. with Mrs. William Ritter at the piano, 
played the Gade Sonata in D minor and a group of 
shorter numbers. She was enthusiastically encored. 
Lillian Hoffmeyer-Heyer sang Ah Rendiml by Rossi and 
two groups of songs. She won her audience immedi- 
ately with her beautiful voice and charm. Heinrik Gjer- 
drum played for Mrs. Heyer and also contributed a 
group of piano solos. He is well known to the club and 
was heartily welcomed by the large and enthusiastic 
audience. 



STENGER VIOLINS 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 

TVTO. 10778 met No. 10623 




It can 

ing early in i 
Lang of San F 
morning mail lb: 
first kleamer No. 1077 
box Godowsky Yokob; 
tprse and pro«jic telegram, >el ro- 
mance bas cirange beginnings. 
Tweoly-four bours later No. 10778 



AM a piano tuner. 

It is my busineh^ to 

free and to know 

rigii about tbe piuno of 

onrert artist that even 

He 



11 notice instantly tbe 

jht minute variation in 

rauoical quality, but 

banical and tbe 

I elements be- 

I ibnt quality, it is 

job to observe for 

NX '^ i ~ iM I bave just passed 

^^^^^^^^^^^r I b r o u g b an experience 
""^^"^^^^^^^ \%iib the two nio6t remark- 
able inMrumeniH that ever came into my charge, 
knowing that one of them came from Kobler & Chase, 
1 bave made it a point to see them in San Francisco 
on my way to New York en route from 
tbe Orient, where for tbe past year I bave 
been on tour with Mr. Godowsky as his 
piano tuner. During biis three months' 
lour in South America (I was engaged in 
Uuenos Aires) we carried Knabe Cn 




cert Grand No 
York Ktore. Wb 
Orient, Mr. Godo 



10623 from their Ncns j^j 
mailed for llu- ^. 



»ky considered it ad- 
cond piano, knowing 
tbe extreme difficulties of climate and 
transportation. This one i.No. I0778f wuk 
shipped from San Francisco. It was .> 
wise decision, for at one time No. 107:^; 
was lost in the snows of Manchuria for 
two months, finally turning up after whui 
mui>t bave been untold \ i<'i!»>itude9, for 
iis traveling case wa* so badly battered 
that the lran»porlultun ronipanJe^ re- 



was below decks and 
hound. At the same tim* No. 
10623 was under way from the west 
roast of South America. Their 
tiiceling was undemonstrative — 
alihough ibey were both from the 
i-jme town, had been brought up 
together — tended by the same 
bund^, and sent into the world 
with the same mission. But at 
Yokohama the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones tell it. 



San Francisco, Califurma, May 22, 1923. 
fused to accept it. From the devastating Arctic cold 
of the Mancburian steppes to the blistering heat of 
the Javanese jungles, these two Knabes have been for 
nearly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
puni^hment, including months in the sticky, saturat- 
ing moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
pianoforte. From Hawaii to the Philippines, through 
all the cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Straits 
Settlements and many of the less frequented by-ways 
of the Orient— 1 do not believe that tbe history of 
music records the equal of this unique tour, or the 
ovations accorded ibis great artiM in these music- 
hungry corners of the globe, or tbe equivalent of the 
two pianos that supported him. Davs of travel over 
the roads of Java, the manhandling of countless 
coolies the punishment of oriental transportation in 
boats, in trains, in queer conveyances of all kinds— 
and months of it. At times it was heart-breaking. 
Both instruments carry many scars of battle, but 
musically they have remained steadfast. Outside some 
rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich, as 
perfect as the lirst day Mr. Godowskv 
touched their kevs. To me the power of 
of the Knabe piano is almost 
supernatural. I have travelled with many 
artists in all parts of the world; in Eu- 
rope I was familiar with the German 
that are built like stodgy battle- 
but no piano in even ordinary 
al tours has equalled this per- 
If I had made these two 
1 should feel very proud. Inci- 
y connected 
Company — nor do I 
ept through tbe in- 
putation of their instru- 

Fhincis E. Jones, 
London and Buenos Aires. 





Leopold Godowsky 

^ lio. with rare consideration, concedes to bis piano tuner i 

privilege of telling bis own story. 

(>odow!<ky has paid his tribute to the Knabe time and agaii 



hut as he himself said in an inler\icw 
thing more inierestinfE to say about tho 
uu\ other artist has ever said. Let him 
1 found him in Buenos Aires and ca 
Orient l.r< au^e of his unusual qualili 
Ullu^ual ronsideralion of the great arti 
the mo-il remarkable piano story ever t 



Mr. Jo 

^e two pianos than I or 
tell it. He deserves it. 
-ried him away to the 
"s.** So, thanks to the 



(.olMiW -KV 

Ma-l.-r ..( Ihr n)..->.r. ;il ^^\ 

feel have ul at one limr or 

another practiciilly every great 

pianist of our day. 



Incidrnlatty, holh of these instruments are stock pianos 
(not siHTtatly made), one from the Aeu) York warerooms 
and one from the Kohler ^ Chase store in San Francisco 



KOHLER- er ♦ CHASE' 

26 O'FARRELL STREET ■ SAN FRANCISCO 



KNABE 



® 



AMHCO 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. Xo 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor. 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. What are by-tones? — M. B. R. 
Overtones or harmonics. 

2. What does alia zoppa mean? — H. E. 

Literally, "in a limping manner." This expression 
signifies a syncopated rhythm in which the bar-accent 
conies on the second beat. It is a characteristic rhytlim 
of Magyar or Hungarian music. 

3. What is the Emperor Quartet? — O. J. 
Haydn's quartet. Op. 76. No. 3. in which variui 

on the Emperor's Hymn are introduced. 

4. What is a partita? — J S. 

This is an. early name for what was later call' 
suite. It was a collection of instrumental dance n- 
all in the same key to be played one after another. 

5. What instrument did Bach invent? — P. B. 

The viola pomposa. called also the violoncello piccolo. 
It was a small cello of ordinary pitch but with an ;id 
ditional treble E string. Bach introduced it in several 
of his cantatas, but it never came into general use and 
soon became obsolete. 



THE NEW YORK STRING QUARTET 

The .New York String Quartet, by all reports, one of 
the most representative chamber music organizations 
in America, will be heard here in recital at the Scottish 
Rite Hall, Monday evening, November 19th. The Quar- 
tet was founded four years ago by Mr and Mrs. Ralph 
Pulitzer, and the personnel indicates the authenticity 
of this ensemble as being strictly chamber music 
calibre The Quartet consists of Ottar Cadek, first 
violin: Jaroslav Siskovsky. second violin: Ludwlg 
Schwab, viola, and Bedrich Vaska, cello. Mr. Cadek re- 
ceived his first instruction from his father and has 
studied with Willem de Boer in Zurich and with I^opold 
Auer in this country. His performances in chamber at- 
tracted the attention of the founders of the Quartet and 
won for him the^ distinction of being chosen as first 
violin. Chattanooga, Tenn.. is the birthplace of .Mr 
Cadek, who served in the army for a year in the World 
War. 

.laroslav Siskovsky is also an American, having been 
boTn in Cleveland, Ohio. He studied with Sevcik and 
Auer and played with the famous Tokunstler Society 
in Vienna. His success as an ensemble artist led to 
his engagement for the New York String Quartet Dur- 
ing the war Mr. Siskovsky served tor two years in the 
army and acted as bandmaster. Ludwig Schwab will be 
familiar to many concert goers as accompanist for Jan 
Kubelik, with whom he played for fourteen years. Mr. 
Schwab's flret love was. however, a string instrument 
and after many years of accompanying he returns to 
the fiddle and the bow as viola pLiyer in the ensemble. 
He is a pupil of Sevcik. , 

Bedrich Vaska was first 'cellist of the Warsaw Sym- 
phony Orchestra and later toured for eight years with 
the Sevcik String Quartet, He has been professor of 
'cello at the Prague Conservatory, and has won great 
distinction as a performer of ensemble music. The next 
Elwyn attraction at Scottish Rite Hall, will be a re- 
cital by Sophie Braslau. celebrated contralto. Monday 
evening, December 10. The Quartet program includes: 
Beethoven — Quartet in C minor, opus IS: Bridge — Irish 
Melody. Suk— Intermezzo from Quartet in B flat major, 
Suk — Meditation of an old Bohemian Choral: Dvorak — 
Quartet in P major, opus 96. 



IVIARCEL DUPRE TO PLAY AT AUDITORIUM' 

Chairman J. Emmet Hayden of the Auditorium Com- 
mittee of the Board of Supenisors announces that 
Marcel Dupre. organist of Notre Dame Cathedral. Paris, 
who created such a profound impression here when he 
played on the great municipal organ a year ago. is 
making another transcontinental tour and has been se- 
cured for a single recital at the Exposition .Auditorium, 
on Thursday evening, December 6 M. Dupre, who is an 
acknowledged master of his chosen instrument, is pre- 
paring an exceptionally fine program for this occasion, 
and reserved seuts will be ready at Sherman. Clay ani 
Company's Monday morning. November 26. The prices 
will range from 25 cents to Jl. with no war tax. 



SECOND AUDITORIUM CONCERT 

In order that those who desire to avail themselves of 
the season sale rate for reserved seats for the second 
series of Popular Concerts of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchesta. now in progress at the Exposition 
Auditorium, bookings may still be made at Sherman. 
Clay and Company's, where the prices for the four re- 
maining concerts are but 80 cents, tl 60, 12.40 and }3 20, 
or 20. 40. 60 and 80 cents a concert, war tax exempted. 
Supervisor J. Flmmet Hayden, chairman of the Audi- 
torium Committee of the Board of Supervisors, is 
anxious that the public take adv.intage of this remark- 
able offer, whereby Conductor Hertz and his splendid 
instrumentalists may be heard at such a nominal fee. 
The next concert will lake place Tuesday evening, De- 
cember 11. when Albert Spaulding, America's foremost 
violinist, will be the soloist. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



^ 

• 



MABEL RIEGELMAN 



PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 



PUPILS ACCEPTED 



ADDRESS: 485 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 






NEW COMPOSITION AT SYMPHONY "POP" 

Paul Martin's Elegie Cordially Received— Wagner's 

Mastersingers Prelude Arouses Enthusiasm — 

Goldmark's Sakuntala Closes Program 

By ALFRED METZGER 

The second popular concert of tlie season 1923-1924 
given by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, under 
the direction of Alfred Hertz, which took place last 
Sunday afternoon, November Uth. at the Curran The- 
atre in the presence of the usual large audience, in- 
troduced as its opening number a new work by Paul 
Martin, an Oakland composer, entitled Elegy to an Un- 
known Soldier and no doubt played by reason of the fact 
that on this day Armistice Day was observed. In ac- 
cordance with the spirit of the composition its rever- 
ence was noticeable and in regard to richness of orches- 
tration and sonority of thematic treatment it proved a 
meritorious work. It is conceived in the conventional 
style of musical composition and Mr Martin evidently 
has not wasted his time in grasping the elements that 
combine to enable an ingenious musician to write for 
the orchestra. 




of the San fmuvlitco Trio 



That incomparable and effective work Prelude to The 
Mastersingers steadily gains in vitality and vigor with 
every additional hearing and Alfred Hertz seems to 
invest it with new spots of beauty whenever he brings 
it to our attention. It is sufficient to say that cheers 
rang out over the house when the orchestra concluded 
this brilliant work. Bizet's ever charming L'Arlesienne 
Suite No. 2 was again admired because of the melodious 
strains and the effective rhythms. Two compositions 
for string orchestra by Grieg — Heart Wounds and Last 
Spring — proved most enjoyable because of their atmo- 
sphere of romance, while Luigini's Aubade gave the 
wind instruments and harp a chance to reveal the fine 
material included in this section of the orchestra. 
Goldmark's dramatic and vigorous Sakuntala Overture 
formed a worthy conclusion to a program that was 
thoroughly enjoyed by everybody. 



MOTHER WISMER'S ANNUAL VIOLIN RECITAL 

One of the largest audiences ever attending the con- 
cert of a resident artist assembled in the ballroom of 
the Fairmont Hotel on Friday evening. November 9th. 
when Hother Wismer gave his annual violin recital. 
Indeed. Mr. Wismer's concerts are always attended by 
large audiences, a condition which can only be recorded 
at very few functions of a local nature. Mr. Wismer 
also introduces at all his concerts works that are rarely 
heard in public and that represent the highest phase of 
musical creative art. On this occasion he played Adagio 
op. 145 by Louis Spohr and allegro energico and presto 
assai from Max Reger's Sonata op. 42. Both works are 
for violin alone and Mr. Wismer brought to their in- 
terpretation the full vigor of his musical energy and 
the consentrated enthusiasm of his affection for his art. 
It was a performance that received the justified recog- 
nition of his hearers who included many leading pro- 
fessional musicians. 

Another worthy composition interpreted by Mr, Wis- 
mer was the always refreshing Max Bruch concerto No 
3 in D minor, op 58, in which the artist had the valuable 
co-operation of Benjamin Moore, than whom there 



is no superior ensemble player residing among us. Both 
artists interpreted this work with reverent recognition 
of its musical worth ^nd its technical seriousness. Eva 
Koenig Friedhofer, mezzo soprano, sang wih rich and 
mellow voice and with artistic recognition of their emo- 
tional values a group of Brahms songs, including Love 
Forever, Serenade, Longing at Rest and Cradle Song of 
the Virgin. The difficulties underlying an adequate 
interpretation of Brahms are only fully known to the 
artists themselves and the fact that -Mrs. Friedhofer 
sounded the depths of these compositions and there- 
by divested herself of her inherent musicianship is 
ample proof of her right to interpret works that put 
upon the interpreter such heavy responsibilities. 

Two resident composers were represented in Mr. Wis- 
mer's closing group, namely, Mary Carr Moore with 
Pastorale and Theodore Vogt with .\ndante C'antabile. 
Both compositions pleased the hearers and showed 
melodic invention and theoretical efficiency. Romance 
in A minor by Bruch and La Chasse by Cartier were 
the other two numbers in this group ably interpreted 
by Mr. Wismer and which, together with several en- 
cores, formed a most noteworthy program. Again Mr. 
Wismer has added a conquest to his numerous artistic 
triumphs. 



Mme. Rose Relda Cailleau, the prominent San Fran- 
cisco vocal teacher, has had the satisfaction to record 
the success of a number of her advanced students on 
various public occasions recently. Martin O'Brien, 
tenor, met with success as a member of Firefly Com- 
pany at the Capitol Theatre a short time ago. Myrtle 
McLaughlin, a sixteen-year-old soprano, sang before the 
Pacific Musical Society and also for Mme. Alda who 
complimented her highly and predicted a brilliant fu- 
ture for her Five of Mme. Cailleau's pupils gave an 
Hour of Music at the Public Library during Mus'c 
Week. They included: Mrs lane Webb, Miss Kathrin 
Smith, Miss Alice Wilson. Miss Beula ^asterson and 
Mi^s Corrine Keefer. Miss Kathrin Sm:th sang over 
the radio at Hale Bros. Miss Alice Wilson, soprano, has 
been engaged to sing one of the principal roles in the 
Prince of Pilson to be given presently at Scottish Rite 
Auditorium. Miss Margaret Mack will sing over the 
radio at Hale's on November 17th, 



The San Francisco Trio, consisting ot Elsie Cook 
Hughes, piano; William Laraia, violin: Wellera Dehe. 
cello, will give its first concert of the present season on 
Tuesday evening, November 27th. in the Italian Room 
of the St. Francis Hotel. This organization is now 
in its third season, ample evidence that it has con- 
quered for itself a permanent place in the musical life 
of the community. The concerts of the San Francisco 
Trio are always looked forward to with keen interest. 
Last season this organization played before capacity 
audiences at each of their events. On this occasion the 
San Francisco Trio will play: Trio G major, op 1 No. 
2 (Beethoven I. Ballade A flat major, op. 47 (Chopin), 
Elsie Cook Hughes: Trio F minor, op. 65 (Dvorak I. 



SIGMUND BEEL GREATLY IN DEMAND 

Sigmund Beel, the distinguished California violin 
virtuoso and pedagogue is kept very busy from the 
beginning to the end of a season. Both as artist and 
teacher he is constantly in demand and his time is com- 
pletely occupied throughout the busy months. His class 
of advanced pupils, although already very large and 
constantly growing, pupils coming to him from afl parts 
of the Pacific Coast. He instructs a select number of 
artist pupils to whom he imparts valuable artistic 
knowledge regarding important violin compositions, in- 
cluding some of the foremost concertos written. Last 
season the Ellison White Conservatory of Music offered 
Mr. Beel a lucrative position conducting a summer 
session in violin study, but he was unable to accept 
this flattering proposition because he did not wish to 
interrupt his classes in San Francisco. This year he 
again has been asked to come to Portland tor a sum- 
mer session, but has not yet decided whether to leave 
this city or not. He feels that his classes in the bay 
region deserve all his energy and time and he also 
is demonstrating that it is not necessary for ambitious 
students to leave their home city or state to acquire the 
knowledge necessary to make them efficient players. 



SECOND SYMPHONIC ENSEMBLE CONCERT 

The Symphonic Ensemble ot San Francisco, which 
initiated its series at the Bohemian Club last Tuesday 
evening, will give the second concert Tuesday evening, 
November 27, in the jinks rooms which is to be the 
setting for the entire series of twelve. The following 
will he the program, directed by Alexander Saslavsky: 
Quartet. F major (Mozart), oboe, violin, viola, cello, 
with Addimando. Saslavsky, Patchouck, Gegna, Chan- 
sons Plaisantes (Stravinsky I, four humorous Russian 
folk songs for basso, accompanied by strings, flute, 
oboe, clarinet, bassoon, George Schkultetsky, Russian 
basso; Carneval des Animaux (Saint-Saens), two 
pianos, strings, clarinet, harmonica (a mouth organ!, 
xylophone. Mr. Schkultetsky will be the guest artist 
a'nd Mrs. John B. Casserly assisting artist, playing the 
second piano in the Carneval. 



THE SISTINE CHOIR 

To avert any question that might arise as to the 
status of the Sisline Chapel Choir now touring America 
under his conductorship, Monsignor Antonio Rella has 
anounced that it is the only organization officially 
authorized to carry on the musical work and traditions 
which have been identified with its title during the last 
sixteen centuries. Monsignor Rella, who has been its 
actual director since ill health compelled retirement 
of his predecessor, the celebrated Perosi, is exclusively 
privileged to use the unpublished manuscripts of Pales- 
trina and other early composers. 

"Perosi and I alone represent the Sistine Chapel 
Choir," Monsignor Rella states, "and since he became 
ill, about eight years ago, as perpetual vice-director of 
the organization 1 have been its only conductor and sole 
possessor of authority to use the unedited music and 
private repertoire which has been accumulating in the 
Vatican Library from the time of Palesirina to that of 
Perosi himself. These compositions were never heard 
outside of Rome until we sung them in -Australia during 
our visit there two years ago. There is no Sistine 
Chapel Choir other than the one now in this country." 

The latter assertion is substantiated by the fact that 
the Choir's present lour is under the patronage of this 




M.VRIOV FRAZCIt 



country's leading Catholic prelates, including Arch- 
bishop E. J. Hanna of San Francisco, who are con- 
versant with the organization's history and would not 
be likely to sponsor it if its genuineness were in doubt. 
Meanwhile the touring continues to be a series ot 
ovations, capacity-taxing audiences greeting the Choir 
wherever it has sung. Standing room only will be pro- 
curable in the Exposition Auditorium when it appear 
there the evening of December 7, and the advance sale 
for the two succeeding concerts indicate that there will 
be few, if any. vacant seats. 



ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE ENTERTAINS 

An unusual tea was given at the Arrillaga Musical 
College by its student body this afternoon at which the 
full enrollment was present to play host The recital 
hall was decorated very charmingly in soft lights and 
colors and refreshments were served by the young 
ladies who so capably carried out the arrangements of 
preparing for this event. There were several specialties 
put on by the pupils which met with hearty applause, 
some of which were the following: Julio and Elviria 
Valdez in Spanish Dances, Jack Dalton in Russian 
Dances, The Dutch Band, and Harry H. Lake, the 
popular United States Veteran who has won great 
popularity with his playing on novel and strange in- 
struments invented by himself. The faculty was de- 
lighted with the afternoon and it gave all the partici- 
pants an opportunity to get better acquainted with each 
othe 



DERU AND LHEVINNE IN JOINT RECITAL 

M. Edouard Deru, famous Belgian viol-nist, who dur- 
ing his indefinite residence in San Francisco is heading 
the Violin Department of the Arrillaga .Musical College 
will appear jointly with Joseph Lhevinne, pianist, in 
the auditorium of the Piedmont High School the eve- 
ning of November 23rd. Other dates for M. Deru in the 
near future will be Visalia, November 19th, and San 
Rafael, November 20th, besides assisting in opening the 
season of the Fresno Male Chorus early in December. 



PACIFIC COAST -MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDG., EIGHTH AND BROADWAY— TEL. METROPOLITAN 4398 
C. C. EMERSON IN CHARGE— BRUNO DAVID USSHER, STAFF CORRESPONDENT 
Notice to Contributors and Advertisers; All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



LOS ANGELES. .Nov 5.— Deflnlle formation of a 
"musical clearing lioiisp" to be known as the Los Aii- 
gelna .Vtusic Keilenillcin. Indorsed by the Chamber of 
Commerce, actine :is a co-oiioralivc body supporting 
equally all enUeaviirs toward musical betterment of this 
community, were completed this morning, according 
to Ruth Antoinette Sahel, secretary of the newly found- 
ed organization and director of the Industrial Bureau of 
.Music of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Impetus to the formation of this musical clearing 
house was given by Mrs. Bessie Hartlett Frankel. first 
vice-president of the N'alional Federation of Music 
Clubs and founder-president enjerilus of the California 
Federation of .Music Clubs, who called a meeting of 
presidents of clubs and organizations directly or In- 
directly active musically was held October 18 at the 
Alexandria Hotel. Mrs Frankel and the Los Angeles 
-Music Federation was formed to coordinate musical ac- 
tivities In Los .\ngeles with the aim to eliminate duplica- 
tion of efforts on the b:i.sis of equal support for all 
musical organizations. Each organization will have one 
delegaie as member of the .Music Federation. 

Miss Sabel summed up proposed activities of the 
Los Angeles Music Federation, which will have head- 
quarters at the Chamber of Commerce as follows: 

Registr:ttion for the sake of public Information of all 
concert dates, of teaihers. soloists, nuisic stores, lec- 
tures on music, music clubs, music sections of non- 
musical clubs, concert bureaus, music schools; to en- 
tertain visiting artists, sreakers' bureau to cooperate 
with Chamber of Commerce organization: service de- 
partment to establish music derarlment in Southern 
California Chamber of Commerce: speakers' depart- 
ment to stimulate music clubs to bigger endeavors: to 
organize greater Los Angeles music festival; civic 
orchestra: municipal band; to entertain biennial dele- 
gates en route; to promote activities and programs of 
all musical organizations: all chamber music societies, 
all choral organizations, all bands: to co-ordinate the 
work of music societies in order to avoid unnecessary 
duplication and overlapping; to distribute free tickets 
to worthy music lovers; municipal opera promotion. 

Oflicers of the Los Angeles Music Federation are: 
Honorary president, Mrs. Cecil Frankel; president, 
Arthur Bent: first vice-president. R H. Ballard; sec- 
ond vice-president, Mrs Oscar A. Trippet; secretary. 
Miss Amonette Kuth Sabel; treasurer, Marco Ilellman; 
auditor. James Warren. Directors at large — \V. A. 
f lark. .Ir.. George Barnes. Mrs. William Oscar Howard. 
O. Alien Hancock. .Mrs. Edith Wing Hughes Organi- 
zation represented to date: Philharmonic Orchestra, 
Los Angeles Trio. Los Angeles Oratorio Society, Gamut 
Club, Orpheus Club, Ellis Club. Civic Music and Art 
Association. Fitzgerald Concert Bureau, Behymer Con- 
cert Bureau, Auditorium Concert Bureau, llarmonia 
Club. St. Cecilia Club. WaWan Club. MacDowell Club. 
Music Trades. Boar I of Education, Los Angeles Cham- 
ber of Commerce, Upllfters, 



SOHMER 

Gupid Cji 




The Sohmer Is dislin- 
KUlshcd for the perfect 
evenness of its scale— 
for Its round, smooth 
lone, large in volume, 
rich in qualily-and for 
the irelile which, has 
resonance and singing 
quality to the upper- 
most note. 



Saj'kerSfvs. 



LOS ANGELES 
Kxclusivc soHMFR rcprcseiuativcs 



FITZGERALD'S - For the Advancement of Music 

ROSA PONSELLE 

oW etropolitan Opera Company 

This famous operatic singer, \vhose rav- 
ishingly beautiful voice captivated Los 
Angeles last year, will be heard here in 
April. Her choice of the Knahe Piano 
for all accompaniments is a tribute of 
highest character. 




Exclusive 

Knabe 

Artist 




HILL STREET ^^^ AT 72.7-72.0 

LOS ANGELES 



Greater musical Los Angeles has been strengthem-d 
by two new organizations. John Smallniau. director of 
the Los Angeles Oratorio Society, together with Mrs 
Mattesson B. Jones, president of the Glendale Music 
Club have formed a Glendale Oratorio Society. Mr. 
Smalluian already has more than sixty voices under his 
baton. Mrs. Jones has been the leading spirit in 
making Glendale a musical community. Mr. Smallnian's 
local successes with the Los Angeles Oratorio Society 
and as director of music at the First Congregational 
Church indicates that Glendale choral singers have 
chosen wisely. 

Organized but a few days ago was the Bay Cities' 
Musical Association, inaugurated by Mrs. Joseph Zuck- 
erman, whose ability as music club executive was well 
proved while a founder-president of the American 
Music Optimists The purpose of the new club is to 
supplement musically the work of the Santa Monica Bay 
Woman's Club. An opera study section has already 
been formed with Fulgenzio Guerieri as instructor- 
conductor as the new club proposes to give operatic 
programs with prominent resident artists as soloists. 
The club will meet each Monday, particulars regarding 
membership and other club activities may be obtained 
from the president, Mrs. Joseph Zuckerman, 35 Breeze 
avenue, Venice. 

Grace Wood Jess, whose artistic folk-song programs 
in costumes of period and country have won her many 
admirers here, is meeting with what seems hearty re- 
sponse from public and press while on a tour now 
through Canada. Mme. Jess has filled a good number 
of return engageftients in the Pacific Northwest and 
will at the close of her Canadian tour, concertize in the 
P'ast, returning to Los Angeles after Christmas. 

Frances Berkova. another Los Angeles artist, is meet- 
ing with conspicuous success in Berlin. Miss IJerkovu 
obtained her early training from Sigmund Beel, one 
time concert master of the Los Angeles Symphony, 
now in San Francisco, and Christian Timmner, well 
known Los Angeles violin pedagogue. Kfrem Zimbalist, 
the Russian virtuoso heard Miss Berkovu play and in- 
duced her parents to send the young girl to Leopold 
Auer. After three years with the master-violin teacher 
Miss Berkova went to Berlin to coach under Carl 
Klcsch. eminent concert violinist and noted as a dis- 
ciplinarian off aspirants to the concert stage. Under 
his guidance the fortner I-os Angeles girl has won pro- 
nounced recital successes in the German capital. If 
political conditions permit Miss Berkova will not re- 
turn to Los Angeles until early next spring. 

Modern Organ Playing, a Scientific Treatise, is the 
title of a recent publication by C. Albert Tufts, the 
brilliant Los Angeles Organist. It is rather satisfying; 
to find one of our musicians delving so minutely into 
the technical details of his art from a creative angle 
rather than spend his time on writing compositions 
which sound more or less like those of others. This is 
not a reflection on American composers and music- 
makers of this city, but I cannot but think that our 
own composers produce too quickly, or should I say 
publish too quickly so as to make their mark through 
quality above anything else. 

Tufts' treatise is replete with technical detail which 
must necessarily be skipped in these columns, but 
which should offer interesting suggestions to the church, 
con<'ert and theater organist. In fact the little book 
is packed with observations and analytical remarks as 
to the achievement of greatest musical articulation on 
the organ It Is a trt'atlse which should interest any 
musician because much of Mr. Tufts' comment Is strong- 
ly coocclved musical aesthetics practically applied, Ilav- 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

I inifi,si:ii-i'i v\i>Ti-; 

IUO(» Soiilh AlMirsHlo l*hi>nir 5IU 

S|inni>ih-rsilir<>rnln I'olk SniiEx 

,1. I''i«<<hi-r. ><.» lurk, ■■ulillnhcra 

CALMON LUBOVISKl 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Avnllalilp for I'onccrlM nnd KevKala 

Limited Number of .\dvnnceil l*n|illii .Accepted 

VlollnlNt \MH Aneelen Trio 

!i(udlo: :t.t4 !tluiiic Arttt Studio Ulde. I'hone 100N2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

TucMd»>-. \\ filni-sdn.t, I'lid.iy \f l4-rn<>onN. IvKiin Seho 



i:::m Soutb v\ 



u« AnK*ICH. (nllf. 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

co.\C'i-:itT .^lAsTRit niii.ii \it^ioM(- (iitcHi-:s'rii.4 

tunt'crtH an<l Ilrrllnln 
MannermrnI >lri<. Caroline C. Smilh, VH ituilltorlum illdic. 

ILYA BRONSON ,.MII.„rmS.;!..*'orVl.,..r„ 
Mriiihrr TrIci liiliiiiv. I.4i> AliKf-Irn Trio. I'hllllarnianlr 

(tiiarlt-l liiHiriit-ii Cliniiibcr lliiHfr lleollain 

.'liir, 1.11 >lir.-iila. i*lion«* Holly :tOII 

A.KOODLACH 

VIOLIN IMKKIt .\M) UKI'VlltlCR 

roiiiioisNeiir — .\|i|iritiNer 

nO.f MtiJeNtie Tlienlie llltlc. I.on AiiKeleN I'hone 07O-!>2 

MISS FANNIE CHARLES DILLON 

I'lAMST — TKAfllllK— 1 »IMro**i:H 
Studio. ::s.'.(> l.iT«viird \i«-nue. I. oh \nKeleM. rhone llrexel 
7:UI1I. C'liiuiioNiT of >liiuy \uinberN I'lnyed by l-'niuouN 




ELINOR 
REMICK 
WARREN 

mroM:i{-ri \m>ii; 



ruh. Iij Harold Kla 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

OLGA STEEB 

Director and Head of the Piano Department 

FANNIE DILLON 

Head of the Department of Theory 

and Composition 

Faculty of Twenty-nine Teachers 

Affilialed Teachers in Burbank, Claremonl, Holly- 
wood, Los Angeles, Long Beach. Monrovia, Pasa- 
dena, Pomona, Redlands, Riverside, San Diego and 
Sania Monica- 

For Catalog and Full Information 
Address 

OLGA STEEB PIANO SCHOOL 

453 S. Willon Place Los Angeles, Calif. 

Phone 567294 



Frederic Burr Scholl 



ORGANIST 



Grauman's Hollywood 
Egyptian Theatre 

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF. 



CLARA GERTRUDE OLSON 

TEACHER-.VCXOMPANIST 

Pinno. Harmony. Theory 

Children^ ClnNNes a Speelxlty 

110 MuMlc-Art Studio — 8:^1181 Res. Phone Itoyle 5S31 



Alexander Bevani 

OPERATIC COACHING 
TONE DEVELOPMENT 
VOICE PRODUCTION 

.h 

Suite 612 So. Calif. Music Co. Bldg. 
Phone 822-520 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTURE — COACHING l.\ REPERTOIRE 



Suite (i04 So. Cnllf. Miisit.- Co. BIiIk. Phone 2SI-NOr> 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Complete Faculty of 



tJHt TencherN 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

\nnounfes that his elaNs is ttileil and he »ill he 
unahle to aeeeiit any more piiimIm until further 
notlee. JESSIE Mc. DONALD PATTERSON. ANsiHt- 
nnt Teuc'hcr. SHIRLEY TAGGART, Seeretnry. Tel. 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 



CONTRALTO School of \< 
Studio: Tahoe lluilUInfc <Maeilou 
For Inforniation Re*.. Phu 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Don-n-town Studio removed to 800 S. DrondwaT. Room 

1102. Realdenee Studio, 1147 West 21iit St Telephone 

We«t 7707. PIANO, HARMONY, A'OICE COACH. DI- 
RECTOR JAMISOX O.li.^RTETTE. Ten rnels»' normnl 



CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 



Prof. A. GIUFFRIDA 

PIANO. VIOLIN, SINGING. COMPOSITION 

I leNNonn; thUM: 
eInNH leMHonH, 
•233 So. Broad- 



ing evidently made a long and keenly searching study 
of the organ, organ playing of his own and others Tufts 
comes to conclusions of surprising finesse and in- 
tricate detail. He may not find herein agreement of all 
his colleagues and in all likelihood Tufts does not 
expect it. On the other hand famous organists such as 
Clarence Eddy and Pietro Yon, for instance, to men- 
tion only two from may commendations support warmly 
much of Mr. Tufts' treatise. 

Thus Tufts rightly points to the fact that today there 
is a tendency among organists of playing too fast. In- 
deed the whole chapter on "Criminal Faults in Musical 
Expression." obvious as much of it seems, is very well 
taken. There is much in what Mr. Tufts says when 
speaking about hymn playing that the organist should 
"think vocal music." Altogether this chapter contains 
a good deal of food for thought. There is also an 
illuminating chapter on touch which really is a chapter 
on the possibilities of tonal values of the organ. There 
is also a very detailed consideration of accent. Tufts 
does not overlook the elements of concert and theater 
playing and shares generously from his large and suc- 
cessful experience along these lines and should there- 
fore interest also the progressive theater organist. 
Summing up here is a treatise in which technic is not 
treated merely as means to the end but as ever re- 
newed creative action in music. 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL CHAT 

By Nelle Gothold 



Adele Lauth. who is the director of the piano depart- 
ment of the Sherwood School of Music has the very great 
honor of having been an assistant teacher to the re- 
nowned master Leopold Godowsky in Berlin. On No- 
vember 10th, Mme. Lauth will present five of her ad- 
vanced pupils in recital, with Bessie Knox Kiutner, 
violinist, assisting. 

Frederick North has many talented singers in his vocal 
training classes and on November 9tth an opportunity 
will be given to his many friends to hear the splendid 
results of his work, when several of his advanced pupils 
will sing. 

Homer Grunn, pianist and teacher of recognized su- 
perior ability, introduced one of his intermcdiiite pu- 
pils on the program given by the Educational Depart- 
ment of the Southern California Music Company. Satur- 
day. November 3rd. This was a novel and interesting 
departure in music study, the program consisting of 
a series of piano duets with the Victrola. Appearing 
with Miss Pauline Neuman was Miss Billie Burke, who 
is a pupil of Adele Lauth. 

Mme. Newcomb Prindell, manager of local artists, will 
present Howard Paxton in recital, Sunday afternoon. 
November 18th. Just the mere announcement of thi^ 
popular tenor's appearance undoubtedly w 
well-filled auditorium. 



The Ame 

regular i 
Californi; 



-ican Music Optimists Club v 

leeting on November 16th 
Recital Hall. 



Mario Rubini. a recent arrival in Los Angeles, has been 
engaged for six months' singing at Grauman's Egyptian 
Theatre in the prologue for the "Ten Commandments." 
He has a fine lyric tenor voice and has been a protege 
of the renowned Bonci, and is a second cousin of the 
famous violinist, Jan Rubini. 

Mme. Cornelia Rider Possart is announced as soloist for 
the Popular concert with the Philharmonic Orchestra 
November 11th. Mme. Pnssart needs no introduction 
to Los Angeles concert goers for she has appeared 
many times here as well as elsewhere in America and in 
Europe as concert artist and soloist with leading or- 
chestras and her artistry is widely praised. 

George Leslie Smith will present Mozart's Opera 
comique, "The Impresario," as the next attraction on 
the Auditorium Artist Series November 26th. 



Eleanor Woodford, whose unprecedented success and 
popularity is due primarily to her dramatic soprano 



M. Jeannette Rogers 

First Flutist Metropolitan 
Theatre 



Concert -Recital 'Club 
Obhligato 



Address 1354 Laveta Terrace 




voice of warmth and power was heard to particular 
advantage before the Friday Morning Club at the Phil- 
harmonic Auditorium recently when she appeared in a 
program of Russan folk songs in costume. These se- 
lections were from Rachmoninoff, Tschaikovski, Aren- 
sky. Mme. Woodford was assisted by Alexander Dobro- 
hotov, artist performer on the balalaika whose num- 
bers included his own arrangements of Russian folk 
melodies and several original compositions. As a clos- 
ing group Mme Woodford presented several modern 
numbers, well suited to her voice displaying to advan- 
tage her dramatic qualifications. 

Louise Gude, moulder of beautiful voices, presented 
two advanced pupils in An Hour of Music at the South- 
ern California Recital Hall, Friday evening. October 
26th. Hazel Henderson sang selections by Brahms, 
Strauss and modern composers, including Cyril Scott. 
Kreisler, Gilberte and "Evening" written by Rosel Hill 
who acted as accompanist during the program. Jean 
Douglass gave a group of Russian songs and three 
songs by Charles Wakefield Cadman. These young sing- 



GILDA MARCHETTI 





New Studio: 71^ 


So. Calif. Musi 


Co. nidK. 




L. 

Mr. 

of 


CANTIEN HOLLYWOOD 

IMA\<J— OHGAN— H.\H1H)>» 

llollyivooil has U- a «luil} or the |i»5cIio1ok> 

hilllieii hvovcrii Ihc 1IB<» of nix and nine anil 
nletllod.-. nnd iilnteiialH uxvA for flieni. .\ liniileil 
liter of normal MtiidenfM will he aeeepted. 
Sludio: 771 .\orlh Hill. I-a»adeiia 
■•hone f'olorndo 1:!04 



Claire Forbes 
Crane 

=^ PI A NTS T 



DAVOL SANDERS *",•!;',^■o'sKu "' 

lle:id \ iiilin IHiit.. ( .illeue of Mu«le. l. S. C. 

Member I'liilliun ie Oreliestra 

11 S. I'iKUeron St.. I.oi. Anueles I'lione tlaln :illia 

RAYMOND HARMON 

TKNOK 

Coneerl — Oratorio — TcaehlnK 

:H.- Musle .Vrt Studio nidc. l.o» Aneeles. Calif. 



#. 



EleanorWoodford 



l»K.\MATIt SOI'll \.> 



:;it \c i: M. stivkr?- 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ers are proving themselves popular in their pleasing 
presentations of song. Assisting the singers were two 
pupils ot Rosel Hill, Margaret and Elizabeth Collins, 
who played Andante Fifth Symphony, Beethoven: Peer 
Gynt Suite, Greig and Prelude. C sharp minor, Rach- 
moninoff. 

Margaret Goetz will present in concert form Mozart's 
opera comique, "The Impresario," at the Hotel Am- 
bassador Theatre on Saturday afternoon, November 17. 
Artists who will assist Miss Goetz are Miss Ruth Hutch- 
inson, Irene Wadey, Harold Shugart. A. J. Kisselbergh. 
Leslie Brigham, Vivian Hart and Miss Eleanor Warren. 
This promises to be a delightful musical and social treat 
and tea will be served after the lecture. 

Harry Girard, Dr E. Winkler. Morton Mason, Fred 
Youngfelt, Raymond Hand, Ella Hart, Daisy Mauer, 
Anson Clapperton. and .\dele Lauth; all teachers of 
the Sherwood School of Music will present pupils in 
recital at the Southern California Music Company build- 
ing on November 24th. 

Mesdames Chandet and Nickerson and the Misf:es 
Bokenkrager. Burton. Copeland. Frazier, Ingham, Light- 
cap and Sharle. teachers of the Olga Steeb Piano School 
presented pupils in an informal recital on Saturday 
aftcrnoou in the home of Miss Steeb at 45o South 
Wilton street. 

Carii O. Elinor, well known and admired for his artistic 
interpretations and interesting arrangements of or- 
chestral music at the California Theatre, is offering a 
splendid musical program especially selected to supple- 
ment the picture program featuring Emmett .1. Plynns 
presentation of F. Marion Crawford's romantic love 
story, "In the Palace of the King" The numbers pre- 
sented by the orchestra are "Slavische Rhapsodic." 
Friedemann, "Serenade" Titl, "Raymond Overture," 
Thomas and Syncopated Impressions arranged by Mr. 
Elinor. Solb numbers are being given by William Van 
Deevan, Flutest, Nicolas Ocki Albi, Cellist and Charles 
Calkins, Marimbaphone. 

Merle Armltage of the Fitzgerald Concert Management 
is presenting Marie Sundelius of Metroiiolitan Opera 
fame in concert at the Philharmonic .-Vuditorium on 
Thursday evening, November 21tth. 

Myron Blckford, one of the greatest masters of stringed 
instruments, recently became afliiiated with the South- 
ern California Sherwood School of Music with his 
talented wife. Vahdah Alcott Bickford as his assistant 
teacher. Mr. and Mrs. Bickford were for years asso- 
ciated with the late William H. Sherwood in his sum- 
mer classes at Chautauqua, N. Y., and will prove a 
valuable asset to tlie local school. 

Bertha Winslow Vaughn announces a series of morn- 
ing musicales to be given in Chickering Hall at SOS 
South Broadway. 

Clifford Lett, well-known for his artistic singing and 
successful teaching, has just received notice, so we are 
informed, of his election to the American .\cademy of 
Teachers of Singers. This is conceded to be a very 
high honor as this organization is limited to forty mem- 
bers, among whom are Oscar Saenger, Herbert Wither- 
spoon, Yeatman Grinith and other notable teachers. 

Ann Weitzman's Trio consisting of Lucy Fuhrer Center. 
cellist, Mildred Pray, pianist, assisted by Robert Bias, 
baritone, will present an interesting program at the 
Southern California Recital Hall on .Monday evening, 
November I2th. The program includes the Lalo "Trio 
in C Minor" (Allegro .Moderate, Romance, Scherzo and 
Finale movements) which will be heard for the first 
time by a Los Angeles audience and the Mendelssohn 
"Trio in D minor" {.Molto Allegro, .\ndante. Scherzo 
and Finale). Mr. Bias will sing "II Lactrato Sprito," 
Verdi "Stille Wie die Nacht" Bohm. "Le Cor. " Flegier 
and Tschaikowski's "Pilgrims Song." 

Alice Seckels of San Francisco who is the founder 
and producer of the Alice Seckels Matinee Musicales 
which are now being given at the St. Francis Hotel for 
the fourth consecutive year, has been in Los Angeles 
arranging for a similar series^in the large hotels. The 
first number of the Pasadena Course will open with 
Arthur Rubinstein, Polish Pianist at the Hotel Vista del 
Arroyo. 

Alma Stetzler, greeted by a capacity audience at the 
Southern California Recital Hall on November 1st, 
added new laurels to her already splendid list of achieve- 
ments. .\Hide from her success in coaching of opera and 
teaching she ha.s a mezzo soprano voice of rare beauty, 
and a notable feature of her singing was her perfect 
enunciation and pronounclation. Her program included 
songs and arias by the old Italian and German com- 
posers and In her modern group were songs from Homer 
Grunn. Scott. Huhn and Homer. Assisting Mme. Stetzler 
was .Miss Raley Moore, pianist whose numbers from 
Brahms, Chopin and Liszt deserve special mention for 
the brilliant and accurate technique which she exhibited. 

Jules Lepske, violinist; Earl Bright, cellist, and Alfred 
Kaslner, harpist, who compose the Philharmonic Trio, 
recently lllled successful engagements in Santa Ana. 
Long Beach. Glendale and elsewhere, and are hooked 
for concerts in Riverside. Santa Monica, Covina and 
Uplands. 

Gllda Marchetti has set .Vovember 23rd as the dale for 
her concert In the Recital Hall of the Southern Cali- 
fornia .Music Company building. This young dramatic 
soprano has had a noteworthy career as a teacher, as 



well as concert artist, having many prominent pupils 
who are being heard frequently ou various occasions. 
Miss Marchetti began her music studies at an early 
age in Italy and is continuing her coaching in Italian 
opera with Maestro Querrieri and German opera with 
Mme. Elizabeth Rothwell and with many years ahead 
of her. for she is still in her twenties, she has a very 
promising future. Marguerite d'Aleria. Hungarian 
pianiste, Morris Amsterdam, cellist and Elsie Marion, 
violinist, will assist Miss Marchetti on this event which 
will be well worth hearing. 

Abble Norton Jamison, with her assistants Miriam West- 
Hyatt and Elsie L. Carlson presented their piano 
students in recital recently in the Southern California 
Recital Hall, They were assisted on the program by 
the Jamison Quartette which is composed of Jean Coi- 
well Houghton, first soprano; Hazel Anderson, second 
soprano; Edna Churchill Voorhees, first alto; Daisy 
Prideaux, second alto. This interesting ensemble was 
organized and coached by Mrs. Jamison and are doing 
instructive and entertaining programs throughout 
Southern California. 



ELFIE VOLKMAN TO APPEAR IN RECITAL 

An interesting bit of news which is being welcomed 
by local concert goers is the announcement that Miss 
Elfie Volkman, one ot California's most popular so- 
pranos, will appear in recital on Monday evening, De- 
cember 3, under the management ot Miss Alice Seckels. 
The concert will take place in the Italian Room of the 
Hotel St. Francis. As this will be Miss Volkman's 
first recital here in several seasons, it is a foregone 
conclusion that the hall will be filled to its capacity by 
the many friends and admirers ot the young arfst. 

For quite a number of years Miss Volkman studied 
abroad with no less famous a vocal pedagogue than 
Aiigust Eisser. ot Dresden and Vienna. Wliile in Europe 
Miss Volkman appeared both in concert and opera 
where the beauty of her voice along with her other artis- 
tic qualities attracted the attention ot musical connois- 
seurs in the various musical centers where she sang. 
With her musical education and her complete command 
ot the most profound works in vocal literature Miss 
Volkman's program will contain many ot the classics, 
and operatic arias as well as songs ot the modern 
composers. 

Benjamin S. Moore will accompany Miss Volkman at 
this impending event. 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Albert Elkus and Miss Ellen Edwards will carry on 
the work ot Miss Ada Clement and Miss Lillian Hodg- 
head at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music dur- 
ing the absence ot the latter on a tour ot the East. Miss 
Clement and Miss Hodghead are leaving San Francisco 
on November 20th to give a series of concerts with 
Rebecca Clark and May Mukle, the English cellist. One 
ot the features of their recitals will be Miss Clark's 
Trio tor piano, violin and cello, which created wide dis- 
cussion, because of its ultra modernism, when given its 
premiere in this city recently. Miss Clement and Miss 
Hodghead will also visit the leading musical colleges 
throughout the East for the purpose ot gaining new 
ideas tor their Conservatory. They will return about 
Jantiary 1st. 



RENA LAZELLE PRESENTS FOURTEEN PUPILS 

Miss Rena Lazelle, head ot the Vocal Department of 
the San Francisco Conservatory, presented fourteen 
pupils in recital Friday evening, November 9th, at the 
Conservatory. The recital demonstrated very clearly 
why — although Miss Lazelle has been in this city only 
a year, she already has her teaching time almost en- 
tirely filled. 

It was an excellent pupils' recital from every stand- 
point. In a short talk, Miss Lazelle announced that she 
would give two series ot pupils' recitals this season; 
informal affairs on Saturday afternoon for the less ad- 
vanced pupils, and those lacking experience in ap- 
pearing before audiences, and Art Programs in the eve- 
ning for more advanced pupils. Miss Lazelle has several 
pupils training to act as assistant teachers in the de- 
partment, and will start a regular Normal Vocal Course 
after Christmas. 

The first ot the afternoon recitals will be given Satur- 
day afternoon. November 17th. The program ot the 
evening was as follows: Chi vuoi la Zingarella (Pai- 
siello), Sheeps and Lambs (Homer), .Miss Florence Sex- 
ton; Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes (Cristl. Miss Alice 
Talcott; Let Miss Lindy Pass (Rogers). Would God I 
Were the Tender Apple Blossom (Irish), Mr. Jack 
Garry; The Brownies (Leoni), The Big Brown Bear 
(.Maria Zuzza), Mrs. Zoe Peterson; Duet, Spring Song 
(Lassen). Miss .\lice Talcott, Miss Tlorence Sexton; 
Snow Bells (Schumann), He, the Noblest (Schumann)', 
Mrs. Margaret Hogan; A Birthday (Woodman). Aria, 
These Are They, from The Holy City (Gaul), Mrs. 
Annable Turner; Mexican Song (Ponce), A Granada 
(Alvarez), .Mr. Emilio Gairlan; Duets. Wanderer's Night 
Song (Rubinstein), Folk Song (Jadassohn), .Misses Rose 
and Leta Coghlan; Aria from Nadeshda (Goring 
Thomas), Mrs Lotus Anderson; Come Love Across the 
Sunlit Fields (Griffes), Magic (Watts), A Star (Rogers), 
.Mrs. Stanley Hiller; Recitative and Aria from The 
Messiah Why Do the Nations (Handel), Mr. Andrew 
Robertson. Accompanists, Miss Lazelle, Mr. Herbert 
Jaffc. 



MOZART'S THE IMPRESARIO 

So many questions are asked concerning the real 
nature of Mozart's opera comique, The Impresario, as 
compared with other operas, that a description ot its 
proper category may prove helpful to those who will 
attend the production at the Curran Theatre on the 
Eiwyn Artist Series, Friday afternoon, November 23rd. 

The Impresario is not an opera, though it is habitually 
spoken of as such and is even listed with operas in the 
books. The music which is properly associated with 
The Impresario (or Der Schauspieldirektor, which is its 
original title) consists of an overture, two airs, a trio 
and a final ensemble in the nature ot a tag or epilogue. 
This music was composed by Mozart as incidental to a 
drama descriptive of the perplexities ot a theatrical 
manager who is engaging a company to "put on the 
road." as the slang ot today would have it. "The Beg- 
gar's Opera" and the ballad operas for which it set a 
model, had taught the people to like comic operas which 
they could understand, and they have continued in that 
liking ever since. 

The Impresario in its pi-esent form is a comedy with 
music. Its dialogue is spoken, but is consistent in that 
its dialogue merges into and emerges from the musical 
numbers which are illustrative and expressive ot the 
dramatic sentiment. Its success in New York led Mr. W. 
W. Hinshaw to purchase it and attempt an experiment 
in musical culture with it. Last season he sent it on 
tour, giving performances before schools and musical 
clubs. The experiment proved to be remarkably suc- 
cessful throughout a large territory, and led him to 
reorganize his company for another tour this season. 
For this tour he already has bookings which fill twenty 
weeks — so keen, it seems, is the desire to hear Mozart's 
music combined with drama in the vernacular. His 
singers are Hazel Huntington, Percy Hemus. Charles 
Massinger, Francis Tyler and Lottice Howell. The ac- 
companiments are played on the pianoforte by Gladys 
Craven. 

A Quartet of Victor artists— Olive Kline. Elsie Baker, 
Royal Dadmun, Lambert Murphy — will be the next at- 
traction offered on the Elwyn Artist Series, at the 
Curran Theatre, Friday afternoon, December 7th. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

Mrs. William Henry Banks, president, with Mme. 
Rose Relda Cailleau, chairman of the Program Com- 
mittee of the Pacific Musical Society, have arranged a 
most attractive and interesting program for the next 
meeting of the society on the evening ot Thursday, 
November 22nd. at the Fairmont Hotel, which we know 
will make instant appeal to the members who appre- 
ciate the efforts ot the officers in engaging for their 
pleasure the best talent available tor each concert. The 
program include the names of such artists as May 
Mukle, Ellen Edwards, Marion Frazer and August John- 
son. Here is the program for the evening: Sonata opus 
102. No. 2 in D (Beethoven). Violoncello— May Mukle, 
Piano — Ellen Edwards; Aria (Simon Boccanegro) 
(Verdi), Love Song (Swedish) (Arlberg), Call Me No 
More (Cadman), August Johnson, basso; Henrlk 
Gjedrum at the piano; Rhapsody Opus 13 (Eugene Goos- 
sens). May Mukle, Ellen Edwards at the piano; Piano 
Solo— Italian Concerto (J. S. Bach). Marion Frazer; 
Five Short Pieces (Purcell Warren). An Absent One, A 
Little Cradle Song, Whims, So Seems It in My Deep 
Regret, A Sunday Evening in Autumn, May Mukle, 
violoncello, Ellen Edwards at the piano 



OPERA COMIQUE AT PLAYERS CLUB 

Madame Beauclair, formerly leading soprano at the 
Opera Comique Paris, who is now conducting a School 
ot Opera at her studio, 244 Laurel street, is announcing 
a series of operatic performances during the season. 
The first of the series will be given three evenings, 
November 22d, 23rd and 24th at the Players Theatre, 
1757 Bush street. The program to be presented is a 
scene from Tales of Hoffman, a scene from Mlgnon, fol- 
lowed by Leoncavallo's Pagliacci. 

Madame Beauclair has been rehearsing these for 
some four months past, and announces her cast tor the 
first program will be as follows: Edward Sullivan. 
Jose Robinson. Marion Beauclair, .\lexa McDonald 
Anna Nettleman, Paula Scholz, N. Pederson. Madame 
Beauclair is directing and staging tlie opera. All the 
operas will be sung in Englsh. and it is the intention 
ot Madame Beauclair to give local singers an oppor- 
tunity to appear under proper training in parts suited 
to their ability. Other operas in preparation are Cavel- 
leria Rusticana. Hansel and Gretel, Carmen, Mignon 
and Tales of Hoffman. 

Prices of admission will be $1 r,0. plus 15 cents war 
tax, total $1.65. Seats are reserved and may be se- 
cured through Madame Beauclair at her studio, 244 
Laurel street, or at the box office ot the PlayersThe- 
atre, 1757 Bush street, which will be open daily after 
November 19 from 1 to 5 p. m. and from 7 until 9:30 p. m. 



Anil Deer announces the happy recovery of her pupil, 
.Miss Zoe Herndon. mezzo soprano, a soloist at St. 
Brigid's church. Miss Herndon has been 111 for a year 
as an aftermath of the fiu, but has now resumed her 
studies and public work. Anil Deer has been her only 
teacher. 



LETTERS AND PAPERS OF OSCAR WEIL 

The Letters and Papers ot Oscar Weil is being pub- 
lished privately by the Book Club of California. The 
book is edited by Flora J. Arnstein, Albert I. Elkus and 
Stewart W. Young and is being printed by E. and R. 
Grabhorn, The edition is a limited one of 400 volumes 
ot which 125 are available for public subscription. The 
price of the book is $10 and the edition will be ready 
for distribution the first week in December. Copies may 
be subscribed for by applying to the Secretary of the 
Committee on Publication, Room 804 Bank of Italy 
building, 5i>0 Montgomery street, San Francisco. Tele- 
phone Sutter 1321. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REX'IEW 



CLArRE DUX IS AN ARTIST PAR 
EXCELLENCE 



(Continued fr 



Page 1) 



did not have too much time to prepare 
them it was an accomplishment worthy 
of more than ordinary praise. His tone, 
his phrasing, his coloring and the ac- 
curacy of his technical execution com- 
bined to make these accompaniments a 
noticeable feature of the concert and 
that is indeed an exceptional accomplish- 
ment in the company of an artist of such 
magnitude as Mme. Dux. The fact that 
Mme. Dux had to come to San Fran- 
cisco to acquaint us with the greatness 
of her art is regrettable, for if we had 
known the extent of her artistry before 
hand she would surely have been able to 
give several concerts before crowded 
houses, but owing to a lack of appre- 
ciation of the necessity of publicity on 
the Pacific Coast her New York man- 
agers neglected to take advantage of her 
Eastern triumphs to let people in the 
Pacific West know what a truly great 
artist she was. Perhaps the Elwyn Con- 
cert Bureau will be able to do in future 
what New York managers have refused 
to do in the past. 

The complete program interpreted by 
Mme. Dux was as follows: Voi che 
sapete from The Marriage of Figaro 
(Mozart), O del mio dolce ardor (GluckK 
Se tu m'ami (Pergolese). Pastorale (Old 
English) (Lane Wilson); Du bist die Rub 
(Schubert), Ave Maria (by request) 
(Schubert), Wohin (Schubert). Wiegen- 
lied (Reger). Standchen (Strauss): 
Aria from Les Pecheurs de Perles 
(Bizet); Do Not Go. My Love (Hage- 
man). At the Well (Hageman), When I 
Bring to You Colored Toys (John A. 
Carpenter), Spring Fancy (Densmore); 
Aria from Emani (Verdi). 



L. A. PHILHARMONIC GIVES FINE 
PROGRAM 



tion, under the chairmanship of Dr. E. C. 
Moore, of the University of California, 
Southern Branch. 

Ambitious plans for a closer relation- 
ship between the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra and the students of the various 
Southern California institutions of higher 
education are in process of formulation 
and it is only a question of a little time 
until the Philharmonic Orchestra will 
become as much a part of the student 
life as is the case now at the University 
of Chicago where the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra plays quite a lengthy season 
of concerts with the entire seating ca- 
pacity spoken for far in advance. 



Formation of a Los Angeles Com- 
munity Orchestra is planned by the Civic 
Music and Art Association, which is en- 
deavoring to interest more people in 
music through actual participation in 
musical activities. Such an orchestra 
will give opportunity for instrumental 
practice to many proficient adult ama- 
teur and professional players who lack 
such an opportunity at the present time. 
Graduate high school orchestral talent 
will also find an orchestra of this kind 
a splendid opportunity to continue the 
orchestral training received while stu- 
dents in high school. Many business and 
professional men will find the Com- 
munity Orchestra an incentive to resume 
instrumental work which they have 
dropped after entering upon an active 
business career. 

This new orchestral organization will 
supplement the work of the Los Angeles 
Symphony Club. Ilya Bronson. Director, 
and the Hollywood Community Orches- 
tra, J. B. Plowe. Director, both of which 
organizations are doing very excellent 
work. The Band and Orchestra Com- 
mittee of the Civic Music and Art As- 
sociation. Arthur M. Perry. Chairman, is 
undertaking a survey of available talent 
for such an orchestra with the intention 
of commencing rehearsals immediately 
after the Christmas holidays. Players 
who might like to join such an orchestra 
may communicate with Arthur M. 
Perry, 3201 South Figueroa street, phone 
Beacon 4185, or with the other members 
of the special committee which com- 
prises Dr. E. M. Hiner, E. B. de Groot, 
George Isbell, F. Carothers, and Louis 
Curtis. Applicants should state the in- 
struments they play, the character and 
extent of their musical studies, their ex- 
perience in orchestral work, as well as 
name, address and phone number. 



Musical Blue Book 

OF 
CALIFORNIA 

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Dedicated to Resident Artists, 
Composers, Pedagogues, Music 
Clubs, Concert Managers, Cho- 
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Pbone llerkeley UOOO 

MRS. ZAY BECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
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PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
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non Koblrr A Chniie Bid. Tel. Sntter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

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Studio: 003-604 Kohler & Chase Building 

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the Assets of which have never been increased 
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VOICE — GIIT.\R 

242S Milvla St. Berkeler 77I1.-.J 

70a Kohler & Chase — Wednendar 

LEILA B. GRAVES 

LYRIC SOPRANO— VOICE CULTURE 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

StQdio: ISO Central Ave. Tel. Park 1U24 

MISS WELCOME LEVY 

VOCAL INSTRUCTION FOR DBGINNBRS 
Phone. Prospect 420 Studio, 861 Salter St. 

Laura Wertheimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrs. Noah Drandt 

2211 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Phone Kearny 54^4 

Joseph George Jacobson 

PIANO 
283.1 Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore IM.t 

ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlque, PariM 



SIGMUND BEEL 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 



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OF MUSIC 

(Ada Clement Music School) 
343S Sacratneoto *>t. Phone Fillmore 89f! 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Madame £harbjonlter-~-Soprano g^^^j^,^ Conservatory of Music 



Cul 

Renidence Studio, .VtlS 27th Street 
Oakland — Tel. Onkland 2079 

Lizetta Kalova Violinist 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS 

SttidioN: mil High Court, Berkeler; 

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Telephone B 3842-J 



, Bet. Clay .V « as 
ih Brandt. Violin 
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Soprano Soloist. Temple Bmanu El. Co 
cert and Church Work. Vocal InstructU 
2S.tO Clay Street. Phone West 4H]I0 



'^**:y .9„**°"!!"i^5f ''^^ MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



Tel. Douglas 4'23^. Res. Te 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

SOLO PIAMST .%\D TEACHER 

Advanced Pupils Accepted 

Studio: 1:18 Hyde St. Apartment 27 

I'faone Prospect 15^11 

MME. ISABELLE MARKS 



Building. Tel. Kearny M54 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

Graduate of Schola Cantorum, Paris. O 

ganist St. Mary's CathedrnL Piano D 

partnient. Hamlin School. Orfiran ai 

Piano, Arrlilaea Musical College 



ARTISTIC PIA>'0 INSTRUCTION 

Studio: lOOtt Kohler X Chase Bldg. 

Telephone Kearny 5454 

Res. Tel. Bayvlew 4104 



EVA M. GARCIA 



MARY CARR MOORE SOISGS 

.My Dr 



ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 



St. and 



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MYNARD S. JONES 

TEACHER OF SINGI.NC 
ARRILLAG.l MISICAL COLLEGE 
5 JackHOU St. Tel. n'est 4' 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
37fi Sutter Street Phone Douglaa 869 

HENRIK GJERORUM 
2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St Phone Park 1974 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 
149 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St. Tel. Bayview 6008 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1»9S 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St- Phone West 1311 

ANDRE FERRIER 

1470 Washington St. Tel. .Franklin 332J 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

ADELE ULMAN 
178 Commonwealth Ave. Phone Pac. 33 



JULIUS HAUG 
798 Post St. Tel. Pros. 9269 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 64S4 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

432 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore llJl 



SIGMUND ANKER 
3142 Gough St. Tel. Fill 



STUDIO TO LET 

( ompetely Furnished. Avaihihie Mondayw. 
TuesdnyK, \VedneNdnys. 'ml Kohler S:. 
Ch»<ie BldK. All communlcatJonH addreKHCii 
to T. Z. n ., SOI Kohler JL ChaMe Illdg., :»! 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL RE\TE\V 



Joseph Greven I PAUL STEINDORFF 



Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 



MASTER COACH 

ORATDRIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

302 Broadway .... Oakland 



Mrs. 



William Steinbach 

VOICK CI l,ri HE 



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Every PniKreNKlve 
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ADOLF WEIDIG'S EPOCH MAKING WORK 

HARIIOMC MATKRIAL AND ITS VSKS 
A HARMOW tbnt tells "WHV" nncl Mho«VH "HOW" to iiiiderstaml Han 
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For Sale By 

HENRY GRQBE. 135-153 Kearny St., San Francisco 



If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



If a Music Journal is worth while to 
extend courtesies it should be worth 
while to subscribe for. 



Annie Louise David 



HARP SOLOIST AND 
TEACHER 



Hotel Claremont 



Berkeley 9300 



AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS 

UNTIL DECEMBER 1 

Management Selby C. Oppenheimer 

68 Post St, San Francisco 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



For 


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Telephone DoDRlas 1678 



GEORGE M. LIPSCHULTZ 

SOLO VIOLINIST 
Concert Engagements Accepted 

LOEWS WARFIELD THEATRE 

Musical Director 
Residence Phone Prospect 8686 

Theatre Phone Prospect 83 

Pupils Accepted 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 
Teacher of Singing 

PnpllM Prepared for Opera. Oratorio. 
Chureh and Conrerl 
IddrenN! HEINK B1.DG_ 4«M STOCKTOV ST. 
Tel. DouElas ajaK 



THE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL 
REVIEW 

HAS FOIGHT FOR THE RESInENT ARTIST 
DlRIXf; THE I.AST TWE.NTi-TWO YE,\RS— IS 
'insCRIBING FORf 
»XGER. 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 



St.. Berkelej-- 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Exclusive Management of S. Hurok, Inc., Aeolian Hall, New York 



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iiasim^^amliii 

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PUBLIC L' 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW-SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



^A (hi^i 




Hi THE OHLY WEEKLY MU51CAL JOUI^NAL INI THE GREAT WESTH 



VOL. XLV. No. 8 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



MUSIC CLUB PRESIDENTS IN CONFERENCE BRAHMS SYMPHONY RECEIVES IDEAL READING 



Chief Executives of Southern California Music Clubs Assemble in Inter- 
esting Conference at Los Angeles — Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, 
President of the California Federation of Music Clubs, 
Chats Interestingly About Her Duties 



Alfred Hertz Sustains His Reputation of Conducting Brahms' Works in a 

Masterly Manner — De Greef's Four Flemish Folk Songs Delights 

Large Audience — Tschaikowsky's Tempest Does Not Add 

Much to the Eminent Composer's Reputation 



BY BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



By ALFRED METZGER 



LOS ANGELES. Xov. 17.— To run a 
state federation of more than 10.600 
members on an allowance of a little 
more than $500 for ail expenses during 
the year is not an easy task, but Mrs. 
Lillian Birmingham, well-known San 
Francisco singer, president of the Cali- 
fornia State Federation of Music Clubs, 
seems to manage on that budget not only 
well, but has made California the state 
with the largest membership in the coun- 
try. This is a remarkable record inas- 
much as some of the eastern states have 
a much larger total population than ours. 
Mrs, Birmingham who is spending a few 
days here on the occasion of a confer- 
ence of Southern California music club 
presidents has done it, and smilingly, 

"Of course, it means that I am doing a 
great deal of the corresponding con- 
nected with the presidential office my- 
self, and it is getting more and more for 
we are preparing for the state conven- 
tion April 27 to May 1 at Berkeley. The 
last day will be San Francisco day. We 
hope that W. A. Clark, Jr.. will send the 
Philharmonic Orchestra north to play a 
festival concert during convention. Also 
we are looking forward to have leading 
artists and speakers from Los Angeles 
and other Southern California cities on 
the program. Everything points to a 
highly successful meeting, particularly 
as the Berkeley Chamber of Commerce 
and the state university are helping us 
greatly. 

"Moreover we have added twenty-four 
music clubs in Northern California to the 
state federation, so that we are justified 
to expect a large gathering from mem- 
bers and delegates from the 111 clubs 
forming the California federation." 
"Birmie" as friends name her with a 
smile that, as growth of the state or- 
ganization proves it, is positively "win- 
ning." 

School music days were discussed at 
the presidents' conference here. School 
music days are days respectively hours 
OHce a week when parents are welcomed 
to attend programs given by public 
school music students in the schools. 

"This should stimulate public interest 
in what our schools are doing for music. 
And they are doing work which compares 
very favorably with that accomplished in 
the east. What Mrs. M. Emma Bartlett. 
your federation chairman for the public 
school music committee tells me about 
musical activities here in the schools is 
really marvellous," this San Francisco 
artist admitted with cordial genuineness. 

"I wish I could stay down here longer. 
These meetings with the presidents of 
the clubs are like family gatherings and 
they do so much to bring statewide in- 
terests together. However, I have a 
family of my own, and I am sorry that 
this has been only a flying trip. But as 
soon as flying will be cheaper a lot of 
San Franciscans will take many "flying' 
trips down here. Hope to see you at the 
convention." 

Mrs. Birmingham hoped that musical 
organizations in the Southland would 
avail themselves of the opportunity to 
have reports of their activities published 
in the federation bulletins. These stories 
should be sent to the editor, Mrs. Harold 
Wilson, Fairmont Hotel. San Francisco. 

Announcement was also made at the 
presidents' conference that Mrs. R. A. 
Patrick, president of the Lyric Club. 
Long Beach, had been appointed associ- 
ate extension chairman for the state. 
The following organizations were rep- 



resented at the conference: Los Angeles 
Chapter American Guild of Organists 
(Dr. Roland Diggle). Woman's Lyric 
Club, Long Beach (Mrs. R. A. Patrick). 
Harmonia Club (.Mrs. W. G. Cross), Wn 



Another large audience attended the 
third pair of symphony concerts which 
was given at the Curran Theatre on 
Friday and Saturday afternoons. Novem- 
ber IHth and ISth and judging from the 




MISS GILDA MARCHETTI AS "CARMEN" 
The Brilliant Young Los Angeles Dramatic Soprano Who Gives Early 
Becoming Prominently Identified with Grand Opera 



Wan Junior Auxiliary Club (Miss Mar- 
garet Anderson), Woman's Choral Club. 
Pasadena (Mrs. C. A. Eggleston), Holly- 
(Conilnuea on Page 11, Column 1) 



enthusiasm that prevailed Alfred Hertz 
and !iis excellen.t organization of mu- 
sicians succeeded to delight the musical 
taste of the hundreds of serious music 



lovers in attendance. The most artistic 
feature on the program was Symphony 
No. 4 iu E minor by Brahms. We had 
frequent occasion to point out the fact 
that according to our personal taste 
Alfred Hertz succeeds in satisfying us 
more with his Brahms reading than any 
other conductor we have heard and on 
this occasion there was no exception to 
the rule. There is both an intellectual 
and emotional phase predominating 
throughout these Brahms symphonies 
and unless these distinct characteristics 
are given adequate emphasis Brahms re- 
mains a sealed book to the listener. 

Alfred Hertz is singularly successful 
in emphasizing these factors in the 
Brahms symphonies bringing out their 
principal beauties with unerring plastic- 
ity. The orchestra responded effectively 
to the demands of the conductor. There 
are among the worshipers of ultra mod- 
ern music a number who try to convince 
you that there is melody in this style of 
music when you really must summon up 
all the imaginary powers in your pos- 
session to discover these melodies. But 
in a Brahms symphony, such as this 
fourth, no one is required to point out 
the melodious values. They are so evi- 
dent that anyone with a musical ear can 
hear them. 

Mr. Hertz is specially well equipped to 
accentuate these melodies and make 
them stand out from a cleverly arranged 
instrumentation which notwithstanding 
its occasional intricate character does 
not mar the simplicity and grace of these 
melodious musical thoughts. The spon- 
taneous and universal enthusiasm with 
which the audience responded to the 
musicianly interpretation of these 
phrases is ample evidence for the artistic 
success derived from the reading of 
these truly splendid gems of symphonic 
literature. 

Arthur de Greef's Four Old Flemish 
Folk songs were indeed cordially re- 
ceived and delighted because of their un- 
adulterated joy and buoyancy. The sim- 
ple strains of their flowing melodies 
were interwoven with most ingenious 
and effective orchestration. Humor al- 
ternated v.'ith sentiment and the fourth 
one seemed to us particularly delightful. 
One could hear the wooden shoes tap 
rhythms to the invigorating strains and 
the drums and trumpets added fervor to 
the breezy tunes. These songs were in- 
terpreted with splendid elegance and 
gracefulness. 

Tschaikowsky's Fantasia The Tempest 
closed the program. Although exhibiting 
the well-known richness of scoring 
which this eminent composer sustains in 
all his works there is not that depth of 
emotionalism apparent which gives such 
dignity and charm to the master's other 
works. The Tempest seems to be purely 
and simply a descriptive piece mostly 
representative of the fury of the ele- 
ments and only occasionally permitting 
a strain of poetic sentiment to peep 
through. However, the noise predomi- 
nates and the storm howls incessantly 
for long periods. Nor does Tschaikowsky 
employ any particularly original ideas 
regarding the description of a storm, but 
keeps himself strictly to the conventional 
acceptation of a tempest. It is an ingeni- 
ously scored work, but musically it does 
not give us that thrill which so many of 
Tschaikowsky's works are able to do. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



After the lights are out 




The Steinway Speaks: 

j]ls/.T knew and loved me. Wagner 
knew and loved me. Rubenstein, 
Berlioz and Gounod knew and 
loved me. I have been the com- 
panion of genius for two genera- 
tions. My name is the Steinway Piano. 

What was there about me that caused Pranz 
Liszt, forty years ago, to say of me: "You 
afiford delight even to my old piano-weary 
fingers?" 

Why did Richard Wagner, ivriting from 
Bayreuth in 1879, declare: "Sounds of such 
beauty as those coming from my Steinway 
grand flatter and coax the most agreeable 
tone - pictures from my harmonic melodic 
senses?" 

Why did Gounod, who gave us "Faust," 
write to my makers in 1888, "Mme. Adelina 
Patti joins me in the ecstacy and mutual ad- 
miration of your product ... I am overjoyed 
at the consciousness of being the possessor of 
one of j'our perfect instruments?" And what 
was it that stirred the mighty Dr. Joseph 
Joachim to assert: "Steinway is to the pianist 
what Stradivarius is to the violinist?" 

Companion of genius indeed have I been ! 
Sometimes, when the stage is dark and the lid 
over ray strings is down, I brood over my long 
years of such companionship. 

I see Adelina Patti again, blowing kisses. 



It'luil does the Steinway piano ihink about, 
when the curtain is down and the lights are 
out, and the artist and the audience have 
de/tartedf Eloquent enough the Steimray is 
when the moods of others are voiced on its 
wondrous strings. But what are its own 
moods and longings? Listen! It is about to 
speak to us 




and reaching for the flowers that were show- 
ered at her feet, while I rested quietly in the 
background and resolved to do even better in 
her next accompaniment. I see good old 



Franz Liszt again, after a tremendous rhap- 
sody over my ivory keys. I see Edward Mac- 
Dowell, working out his compositions over my 
keyboard. I see the youthful, golden-haired 
Paderewski of the eighties, the maturer Pade- 
rewski of the nineties, and the world-figure 
and premier of Poland, the Paderewski of to- 
day whose audiences overflow the largest halls 
whenever he plays. And ever I am the com- 
panion of all this genius. 

But then I realize that the greater, the 
sweeter triumph of my long career is not to be 
found on the concert stage at all. 

The greater triumph awaits me when a 
young couple, starting down the pathway of 
W'edded life, choose me to be their lifelong 
companion in a home. 

The sweetest triumph of all shall be when 
first my keys are touched by the fingers of 
some little girl, her printed scales before her, 
and a lifetime of the best in music all ahead. 

Admitted thus to the sacred intimacy of a 
home and fireside, I know that I shall find 
my truest triumph. And I shall strive to be 
faithful to these who trust me. As long as my 
strings endure, I shall strive to render to the 
utmost my measure of abiding charm. 

Sherman Hay & Co. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
CALIFORNIA-OREGON- WASHINGTON 



ROSE FLORENCE 

CONCERT — VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

tuiJio: 545 Sutter St. Telephone Kearny 3598 

Direction Miss Alice Seckels 

68 Post St., San Francisco, California 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ORGANIST 
MUNICIPAL ORGANIST OF SAN FRANCISCO. 
ORGANIST AND MUSICAL DIRECTOR FIRST 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH. ORGANIST 
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL 
Piano and Organ Instruction. Vocal Coach. 
Studio: First Congregational Church, cor. Post 
and Mason Streets. Tel. Douglas 5186. Residence, 
887 Bush Street. Tel. Prospect 977. 

AVAILABLE FOR CONCERTS AND 
ORGAN RECITALS 



Manning School of Music 



JOHJi C. M.\>'NI.\«. Dlrrclor 



a»2 WaahlDKli 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

ADVANCED Pl'PII.S ACCEPTED 

WrdnrNclnr nnd rrliliiy >lnrnlnK» nt Htuillo: no; 

Knhlrr JL I hn»r llldK.. Sun Krnnrlaro. Trlrnbonc 

Hrarnj .M.1I. Ilraldrnt^ Sludlo: 1.10 Montr VUli 

.\vf-.. Itnklnnd. Telephone I'ledmonl Tfltt. 



SIDONIA ERKELY 



lAMST AND COACH 



ROSA HONYIKOVA 

SInglne Can Ue Tour Medium of Kxprension. I Can 

Help Von Find the Ker of Your Voice. Studio: 

181)0 Grove Street. Telephone Barvleiv 1020 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



AUGUSTA HAY DEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Coneertv and Recitals 

Addrexa: 471 :!7th Avenue 

Tel. Pnc. «;t2 

ARTISTIC STUDIO FOR RENT 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN HAF.\i;i„ CAI-IFOHMA 

MuhIc < ourxes Thoroush and Proerexxlve. Public School 

ItlUHlc. Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Siille r>Oli. Kohler A: ChnMe Bide-, ^inn KrnncNro 



MRS. M. FOULKES 



Phone Wnl. 



IRENE A. MILLIER 

SOI.O PIAMST-ACCOMPAMST 

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VOL. XLV SATURDAY, NOV. 24, 1923 NO. 8 



Entered as second-class mall matter at S, F. Postofflec. 



TWENTY-THIRD YEAR 



SYMPHONY IN OAKLAND 



The sympliony situation in Oakland is very 
frankly stated by Miss Zannette \V. Potter, Oak- 
land impresario, in a circular letter addressed to 
the patrons of this seasons concerts givcnin Oak- 
land by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 
under the direction of Alfred Hertz, in part as 
follows ; 

To Lovers of Music and Patrons of Symphony in Oak- 
land : 

The delightful "pop" program which opened the sec- 
ond season of Symphony in Oakland on Saturday night, 
November 3. showed a season patronage about equal to 
last year, while it should have registered a perceptible 
increase. 

Last season we ran $1900 behind, which indebtedness 
I assumed personally rather than credit the Symphony 
situation in Oakland with failure — that the season was 
an artistic success goes without saying. This season I 
am asking that the burden of responsibility be shared 
by a greater number of those who love symphony and 
who are willing to support an east bay series. 11 is not 
too late to save the situation — nine splendid concerts 
remain of the series. . . . Some 300 seat reservations 
need to be disposed of at once and I am writing to ask 
if you will be responsible for the sale of at least one 
set of these tickets? Does not your joy in the concerts 
impel you to put forth a supreme effort?. . . . 

Relying upon your full and immediate assistance, I 
*^"^. Yours sincerely, etc. 

\\'hile it is the lot of managers to gain on one 
concert and lose on others at times, it does not 
seem quite fair that the entire burden of the sym- 
phony concerts in Oakland be borne by Miss 
Potter herself. Either a musical association 
should be formed, with Oakland as the center, 
or someone found, like Mr. Clark of Los Angeles, 
to sponsor the series financially from year to 
3ear. 



Miss Potter has-Iabored long and hard in the 
east bay for the recognition of music and has 
built up a great following to first-class musical 
attractions through the j-early events known as 
the Artists' Concerts Series, but symphony is an- 
other matter and a great problem with numerous 
concerts both in San Francisco and Berkeley. 
However, a concerted effort is now on to build 
up the attendance, and Mr. Hertz is doing his 
share by rendering matchless programs to de- 
lighted audiences. The third concert of the sea- 
•son takes place on Saturday night, December 1, 
in the Auditorium Opera House, which theater, 
by the way, is the best one acoustically west of 
Chicago, according to Mr. Hertz. 

Last week an over-crowded hall greeted Roy 
Harrison Danforth in the first symphony talk 
of the season, when Dvorak's New World was 
mo.st entertainingly explained, with piano illus- 
trations, by Nadine Shepard. The program for 
next Saturday night follows: Overture, "Sakun- 



tala" ("Goldmark) ; Le Rouet d'Omphale (Saint- 
Saens) ; "L'Arlesienne" Suite, No. 2 (Bizet) ; 
Heart Wounds, Last Spring (for string orches- 
tra) (Grieg) ; Norwegian Bridal Procession 
(Grieg); (a) Spring Song, (b) Spinning Song 
(Mendelssohn); Overture. Fra Diavolo (Auber). 

MARCEL DUPRE TO PLAY HERE AGAIN 

Great interest attaches to the first and only appear- 
ance here this season of Marcel Dupre, organist of 
Notre Dame Cathedral. Paris. Thursday evening, De- 
cember 6, at the Exposition Auditorium. When he lost 
appeared in San Francisco, a year ago, he created a 
furore, and Chairman J. Emmet Hayden of the Audi- 
torium Committee of the Board of Supervisors, under 
whose direction Dupre will appear, considers it very 
fortunate that he could again be secured. This remark- 
able artist startled the musical world in 1920 by the 
almost incredible feat of playing the complete organ 
works of Bach from memory, in a series of ten recitals 
at the Paris Conservatory. This accomplishment in- 
volved the memorizing and playing of more than 200 
different pieces, included in 2000 printed pages of music, 

Dupre conceived the project as a labor of love, pre- 
senting the recitals to the students and professors of 
the Conservatory by special permission of the line .'krts 
Ministry, .As the recitals preceded with ever increasing 
enthusiasm, the artistic world flocked to the Conserva- 
tory, until the audience numbered practically every 
Paris'an musician of note and the artistic cognoscenti 
as well. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



1. Who wrote the Golden Sonata?— V. H. 
Henry Purcell. 

2. Is there a musical instrument called the King? 
If so. please describe it. — S. A. 

Yes. The King is a Chinese instrument consisting of 
stone plates (jade or agate) suspended by cords from a 
frame and struck with a mallet. 

3. What does volante mean? — H. T. S. 
Flying: moving with light rapidity. 

4. Has "Lalla Rookli" ever been used as material for 
an opera? — L. P. Y. 

Felicien David brought out an opera in 1862 called 
"Lalla Rookh." Spontini's "Nurmahal,"' Rubinstein's 
"Feramors," and Stanford's "Veiled Prophet," all deal 
with the material of Moore's poem. 

5. Where was Dohnanyi educated? — A. G. 

At the Royal Hungarian Academy of Music in Buda- 



The San Francisco Trio, which consists of Elsie Cook 
Hughes, pianist, William F. Laraia, violinist and Willem 
Dehe, 'cellist, have announced three concerts to be 
given during this season. The first concert scheduled 
for Tuesday evening. November 27. will take place in 
the Italian room of the Hotel St. Francis when a well- 
selected program of chamber music compositions will 
be rendered. Mrs. Hughes will be heard in a solo, her 
choice being the Ballade A flat major, Op. 47 (Chopin). 
This composition will afford I\Irs. Hughes the opportu- 
nity of displaying her brilliant technique, musicianly in- 
stinct and intelligent interpretative powers. Mrs. 
Hughes' pianistic skill has earned for her an enviable 
reputation in this community and the very fact that 
she will appear as soloist on this occasion is arousing 
the interest of the public. 



GREAT ENTERTAINMENT AT WARFIELD 

Starting on Saturday, November 24th, the Warfield 
theatre w-ill have for its screen attraction the lovable 
boy. Jackie Coogan, in the Mary Roberts Rinehart 
modem romance. Long Live the King. There will be 
other attractions, including the third of the Californians. 
Inc.. travel series. San Francisco, City of Hills and 
Romance, the Fanchon and Marco Idea will have Carl- 
son, Murray and De Bruin in songs and Lipschultz and 
his Music Masters will again be heard in concert. 



YOUNG SOPRANO PROMISES GREAT CAREER 

Already noted for her beautiful dramatic voice and re- 
markable musicianship. Miss Gilda Marchetti, only in 
her twenties, gives promise of being a prominent oper- 
atic star before many years elapse. Being a native of 
Florence, Italy, where she received her early musical and 
general education under the careful supervision of her 
father, who is a well known grand opera impresario of 
Europe and America, Miss Marchetti has had many 
great advantages in her preparation for a notable career. 

Miss Marchetti, aside from training under famous 
masters, Italian, German and French, including the dis- 
tinguished Paola Giorza, has spent the past two years 
coaching for German opera with Mme. Elizabeth Roth- 
well, and for Italian opera with Maestro Guerierri in 
this city. Her extensive repertoire covers many operatic 
roles, classics and modern works. Among the latter are 
compositions by local musicians. 

Critics have said her voice Is full, free and colorful, 
portraying excellent training; her personality very 
pleasing and her di-amatic ability decidedly marked in 
her emotional roles. Hers is a lovely voice and she is an 
artist despite her youth. We may also add. Miss Mar- 
chetti has won an enviable reputation as a teacher in 
Los Angeles through her truly Italian manner of sing- 
ing, which aids her in imparting to others the simplest 
finest method of voice production. 



GREEK BARITONE TO GIVE RECITAL 

Leonida Coroni, a baritone of unquestionable distinc- 
tion, will be heard in recital at Scottish Rite Hall, 
Tuesday evening, December 4, under the direction of 
Alice Seckels. Mr. Coroni was born in Greece and from 
childhood he went to Russia, where he obtained his 
education. In 1912 he enlisted in his country's Army, 
serving during the Balkan and World War for eight 
years. During his services he offered his artistic talent 
in behalf of different humanitarian purposes. Being 
honorably discsharged in 1919, he went to Italy, where 
he perfected his studies and appeared in different cities 
there in operatic performances. Arriving in New York 
less than a year ago, the young singer won laurels for 
himself in New York, Boston and Pittsburgh, where the 
critics gave him unstinted praise for his gorgeously rich 
and dramatic voice. Besides his beautiful voice. Mr. 
Coroni possesses a dramatic temperament and mag- 
netic personality, which plays no little part in his tri- 
umph as a singer of great power and extraordinary 
quality. 

Charles Hart, pianist, will be assisting artist. Mr. 
Hart has recently arrived in California after touring 
for three years as accompanist with Jacques Thibaud, 
the famous French violinist. Mr. Hart is pianist of the 
newly organized Symphonic Ensemble under Alexander 
Saslavsky. He will play the "Berceuse Op. 75 (Chopin), 
"Isoldens Liebestod." Wagner-Liszt, and "Allegro de 
Concert," von Sternberg. Mr. Coroni will sing Aria from 
Andrea Chenier (Giordano), Visione Veneziana (Brogil, 
Arioso De Denvenute (Diaz), Henry VIII (Saint-Saens). 
Figue Dame (Tschaikowsky). Christ Resurrected (Rach- 
manlnow). You Whom I Loved (Xanthopoulo), and 
Gero-Demos (Carelli). 



The San Francisco Musical Club gave a most interest- 
ing program at their last meeting which was held in 
the ballroom of the Palace Hotel on November 15th. 
It was a Beethoven program which opened with the 
Scott'sche Lieder scored for voice, piano, violin and 
•cello interpreted by Mrs. Charles Stuart Ayres, Mrs. 
Josephine Crew Aylwin, Mrs. George -E. Chambers and 
Miss Mary Elizabeth Sherwood. The work was well 
presented and received enthns'astic commendation from 
the members of the club. R. Vivian Dent, a visitor in 
this city from Shanghai, China, made a most emphatic 
impression upon the audience with his piano playing 
of a most distinguished character. Rachmaninoff's 
Prelude No. 5, Glazanow's Gavotte D Major were Mr. 
Dent's contributions. 

Louise E. Massey, soprano, accompanied by Mrs. 
William Ritter sang Wonne der Wehmuth and Freud- 
voll und Leidvoll revealing a voice of pleasing quality 
and an art of considerable charm. Mrs. Ritter provided 
accompaniments of a high nature which proved of in- 
valuable aid to the vocalist. The last number of this 
program was the Quintette for piano, oboe, clarinette, 
French horn and fagott. Miss Adaline Maude Wellen- 
dorff was the pianist while the instrumentalists were all 
members of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 
namely: Messrs. C. Addimando, H. Horning, H. Randal 
and E. Kubitchek. The number was played with dig- 
nity, refinement and musicianship. 

The Mansfeldt Piano School have announced a program 
which the junior members of the school will give on 
Friday evening, November 30, in the ballroom of the 
Faii-mont Hotel. The following program will be render- 
ed: (a) Troika (Tschaikowsky). (b) Lullaby (Kjerulf), 
(c) Military Polonaise (Chopin), (d) Rhapsodie Hon- 
groise (Liszt), Miss Margaret Smooke; (a) Ballade A 
flat (Chopin), (b) Nocturne (Schumann), (c) Spinning 
Song from Flying Dutchman (Wagner-Liszt) , (d ) 
Dreams from Tristan und Isolde (Wagner), (e) Rondo 
brillant (Weber), Miss Gretchen Spitzer; (a) Heroide- 
Elegiaque (Liszt), (b) Caprice (Cecil Cowels), (c) Valse 
D'Amour (Moszkowski), (d) La Jongleuse (Moskowski), 
(e) Crescendo (Per Lasson), (f) Intermezzo en Octaves 
(Leschetizky), Miss Frances Marshall. 

Gaetano Merola, who became a victim to nervous pros- 
tration, immediately following the conclusion of the 
grand opera season and who was confined to a hospital 
for several weeks, has returned from San Diego where 
he spent a few weeks of complete rest. Mr. Merola will 
no doubt announce his plans for the summer and next 
season presently. The distinguished conductor's nu- 
merous friends are no doubt glad to hear of his recovery 
and will follow with interest his preparations for next 
season. 

L. E. Behymer, the intrepid California impresario, was 
again a visitor in San Francisco recently and expressed 
himself most enthusiastic about prospects of the present 
musical season, Mr. Behymer is greatly interested in 
the success of the San Francisco Opera Association and 
is contemplating, in conjunction with Alexander Bevani, 
and the co-operation of Gaetano Merola, to give Los 
Angeles its own opera season next year. We shall 
presently induce Mr. Behymer to give us an interview 
regarding his plans for Los Angeles next season. 



SECOND AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 

At the Popular Concert of the San Francisco Orches- 
tra. Alfred Hertz, conductor, under the direction of the 
municipality at the Exposition Auditorium, Tuesday eve- 
ning. December 11, the Symphony will be Schubert's 
Unfinished, in B minor. Bizet's "L'Arlesienne" Suite 
and the Overture to Sakuntala will be the other orches- 
tral number and the numbers of Alfred Spaulding, the 
American violinist who will be the guest artist, will be 
Weniawski's Concerto for Violin, in D minor, and a 
group of his own violin solos. The sale of seats is pro- 
gressing at Sherman. Clay and Company's, both for the 
single concert and for the remainder of the season, with 
a large demand. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



IMPENDING SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Massenet's Herodiade Suite at Third Popular Concert — 

Persinger Soloist at Next Regular Symphony Concert 

Resident Artists Featured for Fifth 

Symphony Pair 

Under the direction of Alfred Hertz the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony Orchestra will give the third concert 
in itB Popular Series tomorrow afternoon in the Curran 
Theatre, and in keepinp; with the character of these 
events a program of well-known light numbers has been 
prepared. As the novelty of the occasion, the orchestra 
will present for the first time at these concerts the 
ballet suite from Massenet's Rihlical' opera. Herodiade. 
consisting of five characteristic dances. Other items 
scheduled are Glinka's Russian and Ludmilla Overture, 
the Saint-Saens symphonic poem. Le Rouet d'Omphale. 
the Norwegian Bridal Procession and opus 35 Nor- 
wegian Dances of Grieg. Borodn's descriptive sketch. 
On the Steppes of Middle Asia, and the brilliant Glazou- 
now Valse de Concert. 

At the pair of regular symphony concerts, to be 
given next Friday and Sunday afternoons in the Curran. 
Louis Persinger, the popular concert master of the 
orchestra, will make his first appearance this season 
in the capac'ty of soloist. The present season is Per- 
s'nger's ninth as concert master and assistant con- 
ductor of the Symphony, and during this time he has 
won for himself a permanent place in the afTection and 
admiration of San Francisco music lovers. His solo per- 
formances are always eagfrly looked forward to by 
music lovers, and judging by advance reservations at 
the box office, large audences will be in attendance at 
lioth concerts At this par of concerts Pers'nger will 
])erform the Lalo F minor Violin Concerto, which will 
be somewhat in the nature of a novelty as it has not 
been heard on the symphony programs for more than 
ten years. The balance of next week's program will 
consist of the Rachmaninoff Symphony No. 2 in E 
minor and the melodious Arensky Variations on a 
Theme of Tschaikowsky, arranged for string orchestra. 

Mus'c lovers will, no doubt, be interested to know of 
the engagement of Allan Bier and M'ss Ellen Edwards, 
two prominent local pianists, to assist the Symphony 
in its production of the startling Saint-Saens. Carnival 
of the Animals, at the fifth pair of regular symphony 
concerts on December 14 and 16. This remarkable com- 
position, which is in fourteen movements or "zoological 
pictures" contain two very important and difficult piano 
parts which have been placed in the hands of Miss 
Edwards and Mr. Bier. Rehearsals of the work have 
been in progress for the past three weeks, and accord- 
ing to Conductor Hertz, symphony patrons must expect 
to be greatly surprised or even shocked at the hu 
and ironical character of the compostion. 



FOUR NOTED ARTISTS TO BE HEARD 

Your favorite phonograph records will come to life. 
as it were, on Friday afternoon. December 7th. at the 
Curran Theatre, when four of the most famous record- 
ing artists will appear here in concert, on the Elwyn 
Artists Series. They are Olive Kline, soprano; Elsie 
Baker, contralto; Lambert Murphy, tenor and Royal 
Dadmun. baritone, and they will offer an attractive 
program of solos, duets, Irios and quartets, including 
many of the selections which you doubtless have on 
your phonograph, sung by these very artists. 

The Quartet of Victor Artists will have a long tour 
this season, ranging from coast to coast, but their 
records, if laid end to end. would stretch many miles 
further, according to some statisticians. Millions of 
records by these artists have been sold. Each of these 
artists is identified with the best music and each is a 
master interpreter. As an ensemble, they form one of 
the most important musical units before the American 
public today. 

Next attraction offered on the Elwyn Artist Series 
will be Jascha Heifitz. Reservations for the Heifitz date 
are now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Company, as well 
as tickets for the Victor Quartet and all Elwyn at- 
tractions. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY PROGRAM 

The members of the Pacific Musical Society cannot 
appreciate too highly the services of their president, 
Mrs. William Henry Banks and Mme. Rosa Relda Call- 
leau. the chairman of the Program Committee. As the 
s(*ason progresses the standard of the programs make 
a growing appeal to the members to attend every con- 
cert given. For the evening of Thursday, December 
13th, a costume program with ai>propriate musical 
numbers has been arranged, each costume fitting in with 
the period and the nationality of the composer. Charles 
Wakefield Cadman's Japanese romance, entitled 
Sayonara. will be interpreted by Mrs. Philip Victor Heln 
and Abraham Levin with Japanese settings. Miss Helen 
Colhurn Heath, the well-known soprano, will contribute 
a list of French songs. Miss Margaret Mack appears in 
Irish songs. Miss Mary Carr Moope, in a Mother Goose 
costume, will render her own compositions, called 
Children's Songs. The solo pianist of the evening will 
be Miss Elsa Naess. A very enjoyable evening's enter- 
tainment may be expected. 



M»ry Carr Moore, the noted California composer and 
singer, gave two programs during the Music Week fes- 
tivities, one of which took place at the Protestant 
Orphanage and the other at the Children's Hospital. 
.Mrs. Moore also appeared before the Dames of the 
Loyal Legion in a recital which took place at Lincoln 
Hall, Civic Auditorium. Both Mrs. Moore's composi- 
tions and her singing were deeply appreciated at these 
various affairs where she was the recipient of hearty 
demonstrations of approval. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Huggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



SAN JOSE, Nov. 13. — Efrem Zimbalist played before 
a capacity house Friday evening. November 9. in the 
Morris E. Dailey Memorial Auditorium. The appre- 
ciation and understanding of the audience was evi- 
denced by the silence during the numbers and the great 
ovation after. It is doubtful it tliere has ever been an 
artist more warmly received by a San Jose Audience 
than Zimbalist. The work of Emanuel Bay. at the piano, 
was flawless. Mr. Bay is accompanist plus (with apolo- 
gies ta Edna Ferber). 

Mr. Zimbalist gave extra delight with his recall num- 
bers, playing those selections from his records which 
are familiar to all. Elgar's Salut D'.\mour was given for 
the first group. Five numbers composed the second 
group. It was here the virtuoso was extended the 
greatest ovation. The second number. Humorcsque 
(York Bowen). received with deafening applause, was 
repeated. The piano score of this superb number is par- 
ticularly worthy of mention. Saint-Saens' Le Cygne was 
given for recall for this second group, which was not 
enough, and was followed by The Zephyr (Jeno Huhayl. 
A Sarasate group concluded the program, with the 
well-known Souvenir of Drdla played for recall. The 
program in full: (a) Prelude (Bach), (bl Concerto 
(Vieuxtemps); (a) Romance (Beethovenl. (b) Hu- 
moresque (York Bowenl. (c) Berceuse (Tor Aulinl. (d) 
Serenata (d'Ambrosio. (e) Tambourin Chinois (Kreis- 
lerl; (a) Spanish Dance (Sarasate), (b) Introduction 
et Tarantelle (Sarasate). This was the second offering 
of the newly organized San Jose Musical Association. 
The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred Hertz, 
director, will be the January attraction, with the Cham- 
ber Music Society of San FYancisco, Harold Bauer and 
Reinald Werrenrath the remaining events. 

Warren D. Allen, Stanford University organist, will be 
heard in the following programs at Stanford University 
Memorial Church, Thursday, November ir», at 4:15, and 
Sunday, November IS at 4 o'clock. Mr. Allen will pre- 
sent the same program, which includes Largo from the 
New World Symphony (Dvorak). At the Sunday Ves- 
per Service, Hymn No. 23 will be sung. Paradise, op. 56, 
No. 3 (Zdenko Fibich. 1850-1900); In the Church, from 
the Slovak Suite (Vitezslav Novak); Symphonic Poem. 
Blanik (Smetana). Tuesday, November 20, at 4:15, 
Two Dramatic Pedal Studies — la) In the Handelian 
Style, lb) Violoncello Solo (MacDougall) ; Praeludium 
in F (Jarnefelt); Evening Song (Schumann); Toccata 
from the Fifth Organ Symphony (Wirtor). 

Two recitals of interest are scheduled at the College 
of the Pacific the coming week. Anna Lucille Mayo, a 
special student in the Conservatory, will give an organ 
recital Sunday afternoon at the vesper hour. Tuesday 
evening. November 20. Jean Madsen. pianist, and .\gnes 
Ward, violinist, both of the class of 1923, will appear 
in a joint recital in the College Auditorium at S;15. 
Both these young women were among the outstanding 
pei^ormers of last year's class and their many ad- 
mirers will be out in force. The A Cappella Choir, under 
the direction of C. M. Dennis, is preparing its annual 
program of Christmas Carols. San Jose has come to 
look upon these concerts as among the leading musical 
' events of the year and already eight appearances are 
scheduled for December. The Choir is to make its first 
appearance of the year at tlie County Teachers Institute 
November 26 when a twenty-minute program of ancient 
and modern Carols will be presented. 

Santa Cruz had many interesting events for Music Week. 
Saturday evening, November 3, the new parish house 
of Calvary Episcopal Church was formally opened with 
a musicale which featured the new concert grand piano, 
just acquired by the Parish Guild for the hall. Marie L. 
Cain, Hope Swinford and Otto Kunitz were the pianists 
assisting, with vocal numbers given by Mesdames Adolph 
Falk and Duncan Macdonald. 

Sunday night, November 4, was marked by a musical 
service at the First M. E. Church, H. N. Whitloek, di- 
rector, with Mrs. Eleanor Mae Edson at the organ. The 
same evening there was choral evensong at Calvary 
Church, under the direction of Hope Swinford. organist. 
The November meeting of the Monday Musical Club was 
held on November 5. with an unusually interesting pro- 
gram. Mendelssohn and von Weber were represented 
in the study of the German Romanticists. Otto Kunitz 
and Vera McKenna Clayton were heard in von Weber 
piano numbers. Josephine Ritteuhouse gave the first 
two movements of the great Mendelssohn violin con- 
certo. Mr. Kunitz and Hope Swinford played the piano 
arrangement of the overture to the Midsummer Night's 
Dream, and Mrs. A. G. Falk and Mrs. E. C. Falkenberg 
sang I Waited for the Lord. Mrs. Falk sang the two 
solos. Hear Ye Israel and On Wings of Song. The same 
night Leo Rice gave a recital at the First M. E, 
Church. 

The Institute of Music is now installed in its new and 
permanent home at the corner of Sixth and San Fer- 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 

Offers <:-our««-« in All llroncfaPN nt Munic at 

All Stncr» of Advancrnirnt 
8AN JOSK CAI.IFOKMA 



MRS. MILES A. DRESSKELL 

SOPR..\>0 
Annniinci>n Ihc openlnK of her ««inlio 

469 Morse Street Phone 6382-W 

Avr»llnhl<- for Cnnfyrtn niul ItepitniN 

Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 



Tuvxiln 



n<I Fridn 
< illlf 






NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

San Jose. Cat. 
Confern Defirreeii, AnardM Cerfinoafen. Complete College 
ConNcrvatorr and Acaclenile CourMeiH in I'lanu. Violin, 
Ilar|>. 'Cello. Voloe. Harmony, ConnlFipolnl. Canon and 
Fuf^ue and Science of >IUNic. For partlculara Apply to 



JOSE MUSIC COMPANY 

Andemon Itrotheni 

rinnoK. PhonoerniihM. Rccordn. Sheet MunIc, VIollna. 

^laadollan — Studlox nt Moderate RateH 

62 So. Second SIrcct San Jo»e. California 

Phone 24.'.:i 

WORCESTER SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

ALLIANCE BUILDING 
SAN JOSE CALIFORNIA 



SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 

ALFRCoHeRTz Conductor. 

NEXT FRIDAY. 3:00 P. M. 

NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P. M. 

Curran Theatre 

o.s- LOUIS PERSINGERv.oLiN 



MOND.iV i;VKM>f;. VOVEMIIER 1» 

Scottish Rite 

om: ri-:cit.\i. om.v 

N. Y. STRING QUARTET 

<h\miii-:k >i( sir cNSEMnLK 

Fniindrd liy Mr. nnd Mrs. Itnlph PulilKcr 
[•'RIDAV MATINKi:, XOVK.MIIKR 'Zi, at 2:4.-. 

Curran 

WUIinm AVnrte Hinshaw's Prndncilon. 
MOZART'S OPKR V TOMIUl E 

"THE IMPRESARIO" 

A\ilh IVrcJ Himus nnd All Star Cant 

.MOM}\i i.:\i.;M\f;. iiKCF.^lllKll l» 

Scottish Rite 
SOPHIE BRASLAU 



TIrketH on Sale at Shermnn. Clay •& Ci>.*»< 
e«. Above Attraeli»iis— 92, !|lI..-.0. #1 ipltiH 



Myra Palache 

PIANIST 

PRIVATE AND CLASS LESSONS 
LECTURES ON MUSIC APPRECIATION 

San Francisco, 807 Kohler &. Chase BIdg. Tel. 
Kearny 5454. Wednesday from 2-6 p. m. only. 
Berkeley, 20 Brookside (off Claremont Ave.) Tel. 
Berkeley 4091. Mornings at Anna Head School. 



"BEST MUSIC IN TOWN" 

LOEWS WARFIELD 



stahti.m; s.vtirijav. xoVF:.iiBEn 24 

JACKIE COOGAN 

IN M VIM HOillMti's m\I.If\l(T-i 

>i(»i>i:it \ iciMi \ \t 1: 

''Long Live The King" 

FAXniON * MARCO 

"IDEAS" 

WITH Ml ltR\). Ill: Itltl IN WD (ARI.NOX 
IN SON<iS 

LIPSCHULTZ MUSIC MASTERS 



.■PUBLIC LltJnAll ■ 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''Soulful'* 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



PERFORMED AT THE CONCERTS OF AMERICAN MUSIC, 
PARIS JUNE 1923 


FREDERICK JACOBI'S 


THE EVE OF SAINT AGNES 

Colonne Orchestra, Lazare Saminsky, Conducting 


* Two Preludes Helen Teschner Tas, Violinist 


** Roundel Raymonde Delaunois, Soprano 


* Composers' Music Corporation 
** G. Schirmer, Inc. 



nando streets, just across from the High School and 
Teachers' College. Leroy V. Brant, director of the 
school, announces that the property at that location has 
been purchased for the institute. The new quarters are 
much more beautiful, commodious, and better adapted 
for the purpose than the old. There is an arrangement 



LEADING CONCERT 
ATTRACTIONS 

Mnniit^eiiient Selliy C. Oppenheinier 
ARTHI R Pill, 

RUBINSTEIN- KOCHANSKI 



Ru 



PianLst 



Columbia The 



olo Re 
Sl.NDAV AFT., DEC. 9tli 

ANNA CASE 

^lost I'oiiular -\iiierii-un Soprano 

('oliiiiihiu Thfatre 

SI \DAV AI"T., UEC. lUth 

Ticketa on sale at Sherman. Clar & Co. 



SClll >1A\ N-IIi:iMv 

l"\VI,ll« A AM) IIKR BALLET UVSSE 

De l'V(ll>I \\\ — I'AIJEREWSKI 

TIIK ISAl>OKA i>|IXfAX DAXCERS 

CHKAGO GRAM> OPERA COMPAXV 

GOGORZA— t'HALIAPIN 

ETC., ETC., ETC., 



LEONIDA 

CORONI 

Baritone 
i'lIARLES H.\RT, Pianist 

Scottish Rite Auditorium 
Tuesday Evening, Dec. 4 

•Merved SeatN — 91.(H), «]..'>0. 9:£.0U tplu 

lax) at Slierman, Clay & Co.'h 

ManaKcincnt Alice Seclcels 



BENJAMIN 

MOORE 

2636 UNION STREET 

SAX FKAXCISCO 

Telephone Fillmore 1624 

BV APPOIXTMEXT 



BEATRICE ANTHONY 

TEACHER OF PIANO — ACCOMPANIST 
Stadio: lOOO I nion Street Tel. Franklin 14^ 



whereby several of the teaching rooms on the lower 
floor may be opened into a large and beautiful recital 
hall. The recital room is equipped with two grand 
pianos. Both the exterior and the interior of the build- 
ing has been redecorated. Series of lectures and recitals 
have been planned. The different departments will be 
represented from time to time. There now exist de- 
partments in the school for ■jjiano, voice, violin, viola, 
violoncello, organ, all band instruments, theory, history 
of music, vocal ensemble, and instrumental ensemble. 



HEAR 

SYMPHONY IN OAKLAND 

"Pop" Concert 

Delightful Program 

SATURDAY NIGHT, DEC. 1, 1923 

Auditorium Opera House 

8:30 p. m. 



TICKETS XOH 


SEI,I,IXG 


price's. -Oc tn «1 
lanasenirnt Znnne 


F. Oalilanil. Calif 
te H . Poller 



Exposition Auditorium 

TIIIRSDAY EVEXIXG, DECEMBER «. AT Si20 

Only San FranclMco Appearance ThlM 
Senium of 

Marcel Dupree 



thedral. Varis. 



A Program of Rare Excellence, Including 
His Own Improvisations 



in now on Hale at Sherninn. Cla 
m Auditorium Coniniittee. Doa 
vLsorN, J. Emraett Hayilen. C'ha 



LINCOLN 

BATCHELDER 

Pianist -- Accompanist 



Studio 412 Cole St. : Phone Hemlock 368 



The opening of the 1923-1924 season of the Colbert 
Concert Course on Thursday evening of this week gives 
promise of being one of the most interesting recitals 
presented here. It will introduce Mme. Georgette 
Leblanc, the first Mme. Maurice Maeterlinck, who is 
making her initial tour of California. She will be as- 
sisted by Ellen Edwards. An open reception to be held 
immediately following the concert will be a feature of 
the opening of the series, which will take place in the 
Morris Bailey Memorial .\uditorium of the State Teach- 
ers' College. 

The San Jose Music Study Club held an open meeting 
Wednesday at the First Presbyterian Church. The pro- 
gram of American compositions was given by Katherin 
Gail Morrish, soprano, and Mrs. Homer De Witt Pugh. 
organiste and accompaniste. The numbers showed a 
great variety, and both Mrs. Morrish and Mrs. Pugh pre- 
faced their groups with explanatory remarks. The pro- 
gram: la) Cry at Dawn (Cadman) (b) The Heart of a 
Rose (Warren), (c) Children of the Moon (Warren), (d) 
Constancy (Barnett). Katherine Gail Morrish: (a) 
Festival March (Frysinger), (b) Evening (Dudley 
Buck) (c) In a Chinese Garden (Stoughton) (d) The 
Land of the Sky Blue Water ( Cadman-Eddy >, Mrs. 
Homer DeWitt Pugh: (a) O Golden Sun (Freeby) (b) 
Delight of the Out of Doors (Ross) Mrs. Morrish; (a) 
Far Off I Hear a Lover's Flute (Cadman). (b) God Is 
a Spirit (Ross), Mrs. .Morrish: On a Mountain Top, from 
California Suite (Digglel, Mrs. Pugh. 



There will be no organ recital on Thanksgiving Day 
or Sunday afternoon. December 2, in the Memorial 
Church at Stanford University. The regular weekly re- 
citals will be resumed on Tuesday, December 4. War- 
ren D. .\llen. University organist, will be assisted by 
the Stanford Glee Club at the Thanksgiving Vesper 
Service, Sunday, November 25, at 4 p. m. The unusually 
fine program given at this service will include the fol- 
lowing numbers. A. D. 1620, from the Sea Pieces 
(Edward MacDowell) : Hymn 421; O Lux Beata Trinitas 
(Sarum Plainsong, fourth century) ; Toccata on a 
Gregorian Theme, from the Symphonic, op. 18 (Edward 
Shippen Barnes); (al Dawn, (b( O'er Still Meadows, 
(c) Twiight Memories, from Rural Sketches, a Suite for 
organ (Gordan Balch Nevin) ; Choral, Now Let Every 
Tongue Adore Thee (Bach). 

Tuesday, November 27, at 4:15, Mr. Allen will play 
the following program: Festal Procession (Gordon B. 
Ne\in); (a) .\doration. (b) Roulade I Seth Bingham): 
Idyl, from the South (James R. Gillette); Hosannahl 
Chorus magnus (Th. Dubois). 



SOPHIE BRASLAU TO BE HEARD AGAIN 

The Elwyn Concert Bureau announces one recital by 
Sophie Braslau. distinguished American contralto, at 
Scottish Rite Hall, .Monday evening, December 10th. 
Miss Braslau has for a number of years been considered 
a favorite with San Francisco music lovers and her 
return at this time will be w^elcome news to her many 
admirers. 

m:ss Braslau has appeared with all the leading sym- 
phony orchestras many times and the demand for her 
as soloist with orchestras continues as great as ever. 
.\I1 the principal festival organizations have sought her 
services, for there are few singers in public today who 
can so realize the best traditions of oratorio singing. 
Yet brilliant as her achievements have been in the 
broader fields of music, in opera, in oratorio and with 
orchestras, she finds her greatest joy. realizes her 
highest artistic ideals in the more intimate, the much 
more dilBcult field of song recital. 

As an interpreter of songs she has few equals. Here 
not only are displayed the many beauties of her voice, 
but the singing of songs where the artist stands alone, 
shorn of the glamor and glitter of opera, the impressive 
environment of oratorio, brings out the finer traits of 
musicianship, the play of imagination, the individuality 
of the singer herself. Miss Braslau's song recitals have 
now for several years past been among the most im- 
portant features of the musical season wherever music 
in its higher forms is cultivated. Her annual appearance 
in Carnegie Hall, New York, is always a signal for an 
outpouring of the most distinguished public of that city. 



KARL RACKLE 



IXSTRUCTOR 



STENGER VIOLINS 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Travels of No. 10778 and No. 10623 

An Amazing Story of a Triumph Over Tremendous Odds 

N 



ing early 
Lang of Sn 



first fitcani 
box God 



0. 10778 met No. 10623 in 
Yokohama in September, 
1922, (exact dale unknown). 
i about this way. One morn- 
iiomh, one Leon 
Uco found in his 
telegram: "Ship 
10778 zinc-lined 
Yokohama." A 
telegram, yet ro- 
ige beginnings, 
later No. 10778 



the 



terse and prosait 
Twenty-four hou 





I It is my business to 
-^ see and to know 
things about the piano of 
a concert artist that even 
he does not observe. He 
will notice instantly the 
most minute variation in 
its musical quality, but 
the mechanical and the 
structural elements be- 
hind that quality, it is 
my job to observe for 

[ have just passed 
through an experien 



rout 
the Orient, where for the past year 1 have 
been on tour with Mr. Godowsky as his 
piano tuner. During his three months^ 
tour in South America (1 was engaged in 
liueuos Aires) we carried Knabe C.o.i. 
cert Grand No. 10623 from their N.iv 
York store. "When we sailed for llie 
Orient, Mr. Godowsky considered it ad- 
visable to add a second piano, knowing 
the extreme difliculties of climate and 
transportation. This one (No. 10778) was 
(•hipped from San Francisco. It was a 
wise decision, for at one time No. 1U778 
was lost in the snows of Manch 
two months, finally turning up after what 
must have been untold vicissitudes, for 
ils traveling case was so badly battered 
that the transportation companies re- 




was below decks and westward 
bound. At the same time No. 
10623 was under way from the west 
coast of South America. Their 
meeting was undemonstrative — 
although they were both from the 
same town, had been brought up 
together — tended by the same 
hands, and sent into the world 
with the same mission. But at 
Y'okohama the real story begins — 
and let Mr. Jones tell it. 

San Francisco, California, May 22, 1923. 
fused to accept it. From the devastating Arctic cold 
of the Manchurian steppes to the blistering heat of 
the Javanese jungles, these two Knabes have been for 
nearly a year subjected to every kind of climatic 
imnishment, including months in the sticky, saturat- 
ing moisture of the tropics, invariably fatal to a 
pianoforte. From Hawaii to the Philippines, through 
all ihe cities of Japan, China, Java, even the Straits 
Settlements, and many of the less frequented by.ways 
of the Orient— I do not believe that the history of 
music records the equal of this unique tour, or the 
ovations accorded this great artist in these music- 
hungry corners of the globe, or the equivalent of the 
two pianos that supported him. Days of travel over 
the roads of Java, the man-handUng of countless 
coolies, the punishment of oriental transportation in 
boats, in trains, in queer conveyances of all kinds— 
f it. At times it was heart-breaking. 
Uolh instruments carry many scars of battle, but 
musically they have remained steadfast. Outside some 
rust on the bass strings, they are today as 
perfect mechanically and structurally, as 
clear in tone, as beautiful, as rich, as 
perfect as the first day Mr. Godowsky 
touched their keys. To me the power of 
resistance of the Knabe piano is almost 
supernatural. I have travelled with many 
artists in all parts of the world; in Eu- 
rope 1 was familiar with the German 
pianos that are built like stodgy battle- 
ships, but no piano in even ordinary 
coiilinenlal tours has equalled this per- 
formance. If I had made these two 
Knabes I should feel very proud. Inci. 
dentally I am not in any way connected 
with the Wm. Knabe Company— nor do I 
even know them except through the in- 
ternational reputation of their instru- 
ment. Francis E. Jones, 

London and Buenos Aires. 





Who, with 1 



Leopold Godowsky 



sideration, concedes to h'u 



tuner the 



Master 

feet have sat at o 

anollier practically 



Godowsky has paid his tribute to the Knabe time and again— 
but as he himself said in an interview: "Mr. Jones has some- 
thing more interesting to soy about those two pianos than I or 
any other artist has ever said. Let him tell it. He deserves it. 
1 found him in Buenos Aires and carried him away to the 
Orient because of his unusual qualities." So, thanks to the 
unusual consideration of the great artist, we are able to offer 
the most remarkable piano story ever told. 

IncideiUally, bolh of these inslruments are slock pianos 
(not specially made), one from the New York uiarerooms 
and one Irom Ihe Kohler & Chase store in San Francisco 



KOHLERCr CHASE< 

26 O'FARRELL STREET- SAN FRANCISCO 



KNABE 




AMHCO 



LHEVINNE PLAYS SUNDAY 

The Columbia Theater should be crowded Sunday 
afternoon in anticipation of an unusual recital of piano 
music. Joseph Lhevinne, the famous Russian player, at 
his appearance in the St. Francis ballroom last Monday 
afternoon completely captivated his audience and 
elicited the most enthusiastic praise from the press re- 
viewers that it has been the good fortune of a pianist 
to receive in San Francisco in many years. 

Lhevinne's recital at the Columbia Sunday, under 
Selby C. Oppenheimer's management, will be his final 
appearance in San Francisco this season. By special 
request he will play the lovely Moonlight Sonata of Bee- 
thoven, which has not been played in this city in a 
number of years by a visiting virtuoso. Lhevinne's con- 
ception of this idealistic work is said to be superlative, 
as is his playing of Chopin, who will lie represented on 
Sunday's program with the Prelude in D flat major. 
Impromptu in C sharp minor, the F sharp major Noc- 
turne, and the lovely Valse in D fiat. By way of variety 
Lhevinne will include two Mexican Folk Songs — Estrel- 
lita, by Ponce and La Golondrina, arranged by La 
Forge. He will then play the Ricordanza and Campa- 
nella of Liszt and the Schulze-Evler arrangement of 
Strauss Blue Danube Waltzes. In addition to the pro- 
grammed numbers Lhevinne has promised encore num- 
bers in profusion. 



RUBINSTEIN AND KOCHANSKI 

A joint recital which Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer 
has arranged for the celebrated Russians, Arthur Rubin- 
stein, pianist, and Paul Kochanski. violinist, will be the 
only appearance of these famous players in San Fran- 
cisco this season. They are scheduled to present an 
unusual program at the Columbia Theater on December 
9th as one of the attractions in the delightful Sunday 
afternoon "Pop" Concert Series, which will make a spe- 
cial appeal to music lovers. It is too rare, indeed, that 
tours of musicians of the rank of Rubinstein and 
Kochanski converge at Si-.n Francisco enabling them to 
present the important sonatas tor viplin and piano in 
this city. 

Rubinstein, who is already a popular favorite in this 
section and whose appearances several years ago estab- 
lished him as one of the outstanding pianists in the 
world today, and Kochanski, who is perhaps the fore- 
most of the many younger artists who have recently 
blazed their way into prominence, have given many 
joint recitals throughout the world and are well 
equipped to interpret such a great work as the Brahma 
D minor Sonata, op. lOS, which will be presented at 
their recital here. From boyhood these young Russians 
have been intimately associated, each possessing ideals 
aptly fitting them for the joint presentation of impor- 
tant compositions. 

In addition to the Bral:ms Sonata the artists will be 
heard in groups of solos. Kochanski is scheduled to 
play the Nachez arrangement of the Vivaldi A minor 
Concerto, Wagner-Silhelmj I»reislied , Sarasate's Jota, 
Brahms' Waltz in A major, and Wieniawski's Carnaval 
Russe, while Rubinstein's dexterity will be exhibited in 
a Chopin group consisting of the C sharp minor Scherzo, 
Berceuse, and Polonaise op. 53, in Albeniz Triana, de 
Falla's Fire Dance, and the Schubert-Taussig March 
Militaire. Music lovers will come from tar and wide to 
avail themselves of this important event. 



ANNA CASE 



Looming large on the musical horizon is the only 
appearance in San Francisco this season of the ever- 
popular Anna Case who will furnish the final number of 
the Selby C. Oppenheimer Columbia Theater Sunday 
"Pop" series before the holiday season, on Sunday 
afternoon, December 16th. There is little left to be said 
of the art, the beauty, the charm and the talent of lovely 
Anna Case. In opera and in concert she has blazed the 
trail for the recognition of American artists. In San 
Francisco she is idolized by thousands of music-lovers 
who throng to her concerts whenever she appears here. 
Miss Case will present a glorious program, in which she 
will be assisted by the celebrated composer-pianist, 
Charles Gilbert Spross. 



ELFIE VOLKMAN'S RECITAL 

Elfle Volkman, the gifted California Soprano, who will 
give her first San Francisco recital in several seasons 
Monday evening. December 3, studied under the emi- 
nent Professor August Iffert of Dresden and Vienna for 
six years. Some of the world's greatest singers have 
graduated from Professor Iffert's school. Miss Volk- 
man is a San Franciscan by birth and returned from 
Europe several years ago after having had experience 
in opera and concerts with splendid results. Since her 
return to San Francisco. Miss Volkman has appeared 
repeatedly in concert with instantaneous success. She 
has established for herself an enviable reputation and 
has a large number of friends who admire her per- 
sonally as well as artistically. The concert is under the 
management of Miss Alice Seckels. 

She will be heard in the following splendid program 
with Benjamin Moore at the piano: Vieni non tarder' 
from The Marriage of Figaro (Mozart): Die Gebusche 
(Schubert). Botschaft (Brahms), Du meines Hergens 
Kronelein (Strauss), Heimkehr (Strauss), Wer hat dies 
Liedlein erdacht? (Mahler): Aria from William Tell 
(Rossini): L'esclae (Lalo). Fantoches (Debussy) Tes 
leux (Rabeyl, L'olseau blue (B. Dalcroze); Bitterness 
of Love (Dunne), Snowdrop (Gretschaninoff), Wings of 
Night (Winter Watts), The Singer (Maxwell), Claveli- 
tos (Valverde). 



PACIFIC COAST ^lUSICAL REVIEW 



•MABEL RIEGELMAN** 



PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO CHICAGO AND BOSTON GRAND OPERA COMPANIES 



ADDRESS: SECRETARY, 485 CALIFORNIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 



ASHLEY PETTIS ENTHUSIASTICALLY RECEIVED 

Brilliant California Pianist. Who Scored Artistic 

Triumphs in the East, Conquers His Home Cities 

With the Eloquence of His Appeal 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

Ashley Pettis, the bright luminary who has made 
his appearance on the pianistic firmament of America 
during the last year or two, appeared at the Colonial 
Ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel on Friday evening, 
November 16. under the auspices of the University of 
California Extension Division in the presence of an 
audience including many of the most prominent musi- 
cians. Mr. Pettis has gained distinction because of his 
defense of the American composer and modern music. 
Because of this missionary, work he justly receives the 
backing of everyone interested in the recognition of 
American composers and modern music. 

Mr. Pettis is specially to be commended for the fact 
that he selects the works of composers who not always 
have opportunities to present their works before the 
public, at least before the public of such a wide field 
as the entire United States, and therefore in his present 
transcontinental tour he includes composers known to 
us locally, and also occasionally recognized by dis- 
tinguished artists, but not consistently included in a 
program given throughout the country as Mr. Pettis 
has done on this occasion. 

And so we find the program beginning with Albert 
Elkus' Fantasie and Fugue, a work of distinct merit re- 
vealing solid musicianship and builded upon decidedly 
conventional lines, for which the Lord be praised. We 
doubt whether Mr. Pettis could have found a more dig- 
nified nor more happily conceived composition to in- 
troduce his all American program than this Elkus work 
and he played it with a breadth of vision and deliberate- 
ness of execution that brought out its inner musical 
thoughts with definite emphasis and virility. Another 
composition in which our readers are specially inter- 
ested was Frederick Jacobi's Prelude and Burlesque 
both of which are written in that facile and graceful 
style which is such a delightful feature of all Mr. 
Jacobi's works. There is a certain element of modernity 
in both these works, but there is no futurism so called, 
and they express the sentiments which their title infers. 
Mr. Pettis played them with sincerity of style, easy 
and concise technic and depth of poetic sentiment. 

Another composer who enjoys personal interest here 
is Rosalie Housman whose Triptich (Iridescences) was 
selected by Mr. Pettis for interpretation. This work 
seems to be representative of the ultra modern school 
and, aside from its beautiful phrases of tone shadings, 
has not yet awakened any response in our conscious- 
ness as to its exact intentions. But Mr. Pettis played it 
in a manner to bring out its most effective nuances and 
thereby exhibited unusual skill in shading and coloring 
of phrases. 

Marion Bauer was represented by three works, name- 
ly, The Tide. Indian Pipes and Prelude, all of which 
proved delightful. There is a certain directness in Miss 
Bauer's compositions that appeals to us. She knows 
what she wants to say and says it in the simplest most 
direct fashion without too many intricacies. She also 
has the gift of melody and employs it most effectively. 
Mr. Pettis played these numbers with fine intelligence 
and an unmistakable grasp of their poetic possibilities. 

There were compositions by Deems Taylor. Viola 
Beck-van Katwijk and Eastwood Lane, all of which 
proved enjoyable and were impressively interpreted. 
The program concluded with MacDowell's powerful 
Sonata Eroica which but few pianists can interpret to 
our satisfaction and which Ashley Pettis played with 
absolute understanding of its innermost purpose. Tech- 
nically as well as emotionally it was a brilliant per- 
formance and Mr. Pettis has reason to feel proud of the 
ovation accorded him by his friends, fellow musicians 
and the musical public. He has certainly become iden- 
tified with America's prominent pianists. The above 
mentioned program was given with equal success in 
Wheeler Hall. University of California, Tuesday ere- 
ning, November 13th. 



The Jenkins School of Music of Oakland. California. 
has issued several hundred invitations to a Boys Con- 
cert which will take place at the school on Friday eve- 
ning, November 16. Most of the young participants are 
High School and University students and with the ex- 
ception of the accompanist the entire concert will be 
given by young men. A most diversified program has 
been planned and will be as follows: Violin Trios, un- 
accompanied — (a) Gavotte (Binding), (b) Serenade 
(Schytte). (c) Berceuse (Gade). Ralph Brandt. Maurel 
Hunkins. Charles Cushin^; Violin Solos— (a) Berceuse 
(Arensky), (b) Entree (Leclaire-Moffatt), Charles Gush- 
ing; Cello Solo— Variations (Boellman), Belmont Stolz, 
accompanied by Miss Helen Lehmer; Quartette for 
four Flutes, unaccompanied. Adagio Op. 77 (Wonters), 
Austin Armer, Everett Hull. Stephen Fiske. Hilliard 
Collins; Piano Solos — Young Boys from eight to eleven 
years of age; Flute Solo — Concertino (Chaminade), Aus- 
tin Armer; Violin Solos— (a) Farewell to Cucullain 
(Kreisler), (b) Guitarre (Moszkowski-Sarasate). Ralph 
Brandt; String Quartette — (al Romance from Nacht- 
musik (Mozart), (b) Serenade (Lalo). Maurel Hunkins, 
Ralph Brandt, Charles Gushing. Derrick Lehmer. 



SAN FRANCISCO ENJOYS MANY FINE CONCERTS 

Week Beginning November 18 Is Exceptional in 

Excellent Musical Events — Distinguished Artists 

Give Splendid Programs— Chamber Music 

Occupies Prominent Place 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



The San Francisco musical season has begun with 
such unusual energy that the number and character of 
the events demand so much attention that it is impossi- 
ble to devote to each that space and thought which is 
actually its due. And so in order to give them all space 
we are obliged to group them in the following article: 
Efrem Zimbalist. — Among all the distinguished violin- 
ists we hear during the course of a concert season 
none appeals to us more than Efrem Zimbalist. who ap- 
peared al the Columbia Theatre last Sunday afternoon. 
There is prevalent in his artistic expressions such a 
sincerity of musicianship, such seriousness of thought 
and such accuracy of all technical requirements that 
the most sensitive artistic susceptibilities are gratified. 
Then, too, Mr. Zimbalist's programs are always digni- 
fied and contain works of recognized standards and 
emotional beauty. Among the characteristics which we 
admire most in Mr. Zimbaliet's playing are pliancy and 
flexibility of tone, smoothness of technic. intensity of 
emotional phrasing and intellectuality of conception. 

For instance, the Bach Prelude and Lalo Symphonie 
Espagnole were interpreted with delightful breadth ot 
style. The phrases, charged with deep sentiments, were 
"sung" with splendid tone color effects and the frequent- 
ly difficult technical intricacies were solved with ease 
and craftsmanship. Mr. Zimbalist's interpretations ex- 
hale the essence of genius, for they emphasize a certain 
individuality and originality of conception which re- 
spond to the most refined musical ethics. The entire 
program, which was published before in these columns, 
was interpreted in a manner to arouse the large aud- 
ience to the highest pitch of enthusiasm and the artist 
was most generous in his willingness to add 



Josef Lhevinne — The piano recital given by Josef 
Lhevinne at the Colonial Ballroom of the St. Francis 
Hotel on Monday afternoon. November 19th, as one of 
the Alice Seckels Matinees was beyond a question one 
of the very finest events of its kind ever given in San 
Francisco. It was the best program rendered in the 
most artistic fashion by Lhevinne himself and we 
know of no other pianist who could surpass him in 
artistry and musicianship. It is many a year since we 
have heard a piano program rendered with equal finish. 
Mr. Lhevinne in the first place never forces his tone. He 
plays forcefullly and yet does not pound the keyboard. 
His sense of tone color and emotional shading is superb 
and his versatility of expression, specially during his 
rendition of the Schuman Carnaval, is the last word in 
pianistic virtuosity. 

-\t the same time Lhevinne interprets Chopin with 
splendid poetic instinct and anyone who tells you that 
the old masters are becoming old-fashioned and tire- 
some should hear Lhevinne infuse new vitality in a 
Chopin composition. It is impossible to describe to es- 
sence of poetic shading which Lhevinne introduces dur- 
ing the course of his interpretations. At the same time 
he treats the modern composers as interestingly as the 
old. He does not restrict himself to mere tone color 
effects, but in such works as Ravel's Une barque sur 
I'ocean and Debussy's Minstrels he ontains meanings 
which no other pianist has been able to transmit to us. 
We are almost under the impression that it Lhevinne 
were to play certain of the modern works that are a my& 
tery to us. we might yet find some intelligent excuse for 
their existence. 

We never heard such enthusiasm at these music mati- 
nees as on the occasion of the Lhevinne concert and such 
was indeed well justified. Piano interpretations such as 
Lhevinne exhibited on this occasion are among the rar- 
est experiences in our career, and it Sunday's concert 
of Lhevinne is not crowded to the doors by eager stu- 
dents and teachers, such negligence to take advantage 
of the presence of a great artist ot matchless virtuosity 
will be absolutely inexcusable. 

The New 'Vork Strng Quartet— An unusually large aud- 
ience assembled at Scottish Rite Auditorium last Monday 
evening. November 19th. when the New York String 
Quartette made its first San Francisco appearance. 
Judging from the spontaneous applause and requests for 
encores the New Yorkers made an excellent impression 
upon our chamber music audience. They proved them- 
selves to be excellent musicians who have played to- 
gether with intelligent appreciation of their individual 
capabilities and who have subordinated their individ- 
ualities to the principles of ensemble playing. 

The personnel of the New York String Quartet is as 
follows: Ottakar Cadek. first violin; Jaroslav Siskovsky, 
second violin; Ludvik Schwab, viola; Bedrik Vaska, 
cello. We received the impression that the viola and 
cello were specially fine, that the second violinist is 
an excellent musician drawing a fine, rich tone, and 
that the first violinist, whether due to the instrument 
or anything else, has a rather small tone which is acA 
always true to pitch and which seems to interfere some- 
what with the perfect ensemble of the organization. 



The opening number consisted of the Beethoven 
Quartet in C minor, opus 18, No. 4. The New York 
String Quartet gives this work somewhat of a delicate 
reading. We have been used to hear Beethoven inter- 
preted in a broader fashion and with more virility, but 
the New York String Quartet has a right to its own in- 
terpretation which was enjoyed by those in attendance. 
Besides this is one of Beethoven's earlier opuses and it 
is justified to give it a more delicate reading. Specially 
effective was the Scherzo and Minuet which was in- 
deed a gem of ensemble performance. A little group ot 
compositions including An Irish Melody, by Bridge, 
wherein the distinguished English composer uses a great 
deal of intricate embellishments to express a simple 
thought, an Intermezzo by Suk and a Meditation on an 
old Bohemian Choral by Suk, both of which were most 
enjoyable music, brilliantly performed. 

The program ended with Dvorak's F Major Quartet, 
op. 96, wherein the musicians showed tliat vitality and 
power which we failed to observe during the rendition 
ot the opening number. It was a splendid interpreta- 
tion and enthused the audience. This work with its 
beautiful melodies and rhythmic spirit is specially 
grateful when so excellently interpreted as the New 
York String Quartet succeeded in doing. There is no 
question but that this organization will occupy a prom- 
inent place in our recollections ot the pleasant musical 

events of this season. 

Chamber Music Society — The Chamber Music Society 
of San Francisco gave the second concert ot the season 
1923-1924 at Scottish Rite Auditorium last Tuesday eve- 
ning, November 20th. in the presence of another large 
audience, numbering considerably over a thousand peo- 
ple. The opening number consisted of the Brahms String 
Quartet in B flat major, op. 67, and while this eminent 
master of composition is in excellent mood in this en- 
semble work it does not exhibit that robustness of 
style which forms such an inspiring characteristic ot 
most ot his works, including his songs. When therefore 
the opening number seemed somewhat monotonous in ex- 
pression, this was not due to the members of the Cham- 
ber Music Society, whom we enjoyed just as much as 
ever and who certainly played with skill and unusual 
uniformity of phrasing, but it was solely due to the com- 
position itself which, notwithstanding its beauties, does 
not exhibit those contrasts and that richness ot scor- 
ing which other works ot Brahms reveal. Indeed in a 
number of places we found the scoring specially "thin" 
and not inclined to bring out the richness of ensemble 
string performance. It is not our intention to find fault 
with Brahms, but we are merely jotting down personal 
impressions, which, ot course, are not intended to serve 
as universal facts. 

The best proof tor our contention that the Chamber 
ftlusic Society of San Francisco is in an excellent form 
as ever must be apparent to those who heard the Dohn- 
anyi String Quartet in D flat major, op. 15. Here we 
had that virility, that pliancy, that buoyancy and that 
smoothness of tone which forms such a remarkable fea- 
ture ot this organization. It was indeed a pleasure to 
hear the artists express themselves so vividly in music 
and to discover them so rapidly advancing toward their 
goal. Messrs. Persinger, Ford, Firestone and Ferner 
represent the best and finest material ever brought 
together in such a purpose to perpetuate the classics 
ot the highest order. They can not be possibly com- 
pared with any other organization just because they 
must be themselves in order to be worthy of recognition, 
and being themselves, and interpreting the works ot 
the masters according to their own well studied and well 
worked out ideas, they stand on their own feet and are 
worthy of our admiration because of the splendid results 
they have obtained during the period of their artistic 
progress. 

Elias Hecht was the soloist of the occasion, as it were. 
He played two flute sonatas — one by Marcello Bendetto 
and another by Haendel. To play one flute sonata is a 
most difficult artistic feat: to play two flute sonatas is 
therefore extraordinarily diflicult. And when we ask: 
"What is worse than one ftute sonaia?" and reply: 
"Two." we do not refer to Mr. Hechts playing ot them, 
but to their technical and musical difficulties necessary 
to interpret them. We admire Mr. Hecht for the en- 
thusiasm and the tenacity with which he has main- 
tained the high standard of his ideals. He has given 
San Francisco one of the finest chamber music societies 
in the world and incidentally he has satlsBed his am- 
bition to participate personally in these chamber music 
events. 

His interpretation of the flute sonatas justify him to 
continue his work in this direction. He has temper- 
ament, the faculty to expres emotional depths, and 
technical facility. We enjoyed specially his interpre- 
tation of the first ot the two sonatas, while during his 
rendition of the second his endurance seemed to be put 
to a test wherein his breathing did not produce that 
ringing tone which he obtained during the flrst num- 
ber. Nevertheless, Mr. Hecht is entitled to commendation 
tor the prodigious work necessary to prepare these two 
sonatas, and he sustained his position as one ot the 
few flutists here who take advantage of the opportuni- 
ties to acquaint the musical public with the excellent 
works written for this instrument. 

Louis Persinger played the piano part to these sonatas 
with fine tone, artistic shading and exemplary ensem- 
ble effect. It was another excellent event added to the 
series of delightful chamber music concerts given by 
the Chamber Music Society ot San Francisco. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

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LOS ANGELES. Nov. 20.— Ambiguous programs! By 
this 1 am referring to a had habit in which our own 
and visiting artists indulge when making ambiguous 
program announcements. Pianists, for instance, an- 
nounce among other pieces "three valses by Chopin" or 
"Praeludium and Fugue' by Bach, as it Chopin and 
Hach had not written a large number of compositions 
in this style. Or the advance notice tells of a Brahms 
Sextet, although there are two by this composer. Grieg 
has written three sonatas for violin and piano. Chamber 
music works quite often are announced without key 
signature or opus number, both of which have their 
silnilicance needless to e.vplain. 

It is the exact knowledge of what will be played which 
will attract the serious music lover, teacher or student 
who may be particularly interested in the authoritative 
performance of certain works. 

Most regrettable is the indefinite manner in which 
programs are printed. There was Efrem Zimbalist, 
for instance, whose program merely mentioned Pre- 
lude by Bach, instead of Prelude from the E major 
sonata, considering tlie number of preludes by Bach. 
The same artist merely mentioned Romance by Bee- 
thoven, without adding the distinctive "in G major," 
for there are two HeetUoven Romances. It is an act 
of indifference toward the general public and forget- 
fulness of the fact how much these little data might 
mean to the student. New York managers or their 
artists will send in programs which are positively per- 
functory in that regard. The New York managers are 
less to blame for to them the whole matter is an affair 
of "selling" artists. However, the artists should remem- 
ber that in their student days, they wanted to know 
exactly the contents of the program, studied it before 
the concert, took the niusic to the concert hall and 
read it while listening. Perhaps it is owing to this 
vagueness of program announcement that one sees so 
few concert goers following the performance with the 
music. .More seriousness in program announcements, 
also the addition of English translation of foreign 
language titles will make for more serious interest 
among every class of music lovers. 

Gliere's String Quartet, opus 2 had its first per- 
formance during the program played by the Philhar- 
monic Quartet (Sylvain Noack. first violin; Henry 
Svedrofsky. second violin; Emile Ferir. viola, and Ilya 
Bronson, cello, under the auspices of the Los Angeles 
Chamber Music Society. As the opus number indicates, 
it is an early work, but already finuely matured in form 
and clarity of melodic expression. In the latter regard 
the composer draws to a measure what may seem folk- 
song material of his people. On the whole the opus 
would mark him as one of the so-called cosmopolitan 
composers of Russia. That is to say, he writes not a 
a little in the manner characteristic of the musical 
school which has in Schumann and Brahms their 
greatest exponents. Gliere is as much 'a romantic as he 
is classicist. There is a theme in the first movement 
which is very Russian, with Oriental inclination in the 
manner of Rimsky-Korsakoff, with whom the composer 
studied. The scherzo is charming because of its 
rhythmic animation. 

Very modern were the two movements — Very Quiet 
and Very Lively of .1 sonatine for string quartet by 
Pierre Menu, whose music has all the earmarks of 
musical progessivism, but at least on first hearing, does 
not show the inventiveness of his prototype Ravel. The 
first somewhat pensive movement strikes deeper, but 
on the whole Menu offers little that arrests the memory. 
The quartet deserves warm recognition for giving the 
work its first local hearing, and incidentally afford 
music lovers such acquaintance, because, after all is 
said, the new men must be heard, else we might. miss 
much which is valuable. 

Robert Schumann's piano quintet, with Cornelia Rider 
Possart at the keyboard as guest artist, found a satisfy- 
ing, if not especally colorful reading. The first move- 
ment shows how deeply this composer has influenced 
Brahms. The "Poco Largamento" of the second move- 
ment sounded particularly well. It is specifically roman- 
tic music. During moonlight on the lake, Mr. Ferirs 
viola stood out agreeably. Smetana, composer of the 
Moldau tone poem, too, seems to have come strongly 
under the influence of the Immortal Robert The 
fughella of the final movement was strongly played. 
Mere is form which is of equally much expression. 

Next Friday's program of the Chamber Music Society 
brings the debut of a new ensemble, L'Ensemble 
Classique. performed by Blanche Rogers Lott. pianiste, 
Henry Svedrofsky. violin, and Fritz Gaillard, cello. The 
trio will play the Robert Schuman Opus 65, and Trio 
Opus 5, by Wolff-Ferrari, the composer of The Jewels 
of the .Madonna Clifford Lott. baritone, will be guest 
artist In the Beethoven arrangements of British and 
Welsh folksongs with trio accompaniment. 

Arthur Alexander, former director of the Rochester 
Symphony Orchestra, organist, all-round musician of 
profundily and artistic refinement, delighted a small 
audience of friends at the Gamut Club Theater in a self- 
accompanied song recital. Few singers have united this 



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"The Knabe is Ideal for Concert" 

Enthusiastically Writes 

EDITH LI L L IAN 

CLARK 

—one of the Pacific Coast's ablest con- 
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uses the Knabe exclusively in studio and 
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double faculty with full success. Tone production and 
quality cannot be at their best in a sitting position, con- 
strained by the arms engaged in varying postures at the 
keyboard. Mr. Alexander places his tones, it would 
seem far back, and having spent years at the organ 
console on the conductor's stand has probably not found 
time to retain a wide range of color in his voice. How 
ever, he sings with a fervor as well as delicacy of ex- 
pression which amply compensates these shortcoming