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THE COMEDY STARS OF DAMES 


IN A BIG HIT ALL THEIR OWN 


i 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot With 


JOAN BLONDELL 
HUGH HERBERT 


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JOAN BL 
Glenda Farrell 


MOTION PICTURE 


DAILY 


eel 


“Kansas City Princess” 


(Warners) 


Ho.titywoop, Aug. 6.—This is hoke comedy, colorful and racy, stack- 


ing up as a satisfactor rogrammer. 


“Oers. 

The story opens in a Kansas City barber shop. 
Blondell, at the urging of her pal, 
powder on Robert Armstrong, a gangster, aft 
ring. Chased by Armstrong, they make New 


boys, Hobart Cavanaugh and T. Roy Barnes. They go off to Paris as 
Armstrong muscles in as bodyguar 


playboys pay their fare. 


1s fast-moving in ac 10n an 


lalogue, well-acted an rected, and built to click with Te ular theatre- 
The yarn majors in po ular entertainment, 


In Paris Herbert seeks to get the goods on his wife, Renee Whitney. 
Detective Osgood Perkins and Gigolo Ivan Lebedeff work a double- 
cross that costs Herbert big dough, but makes marriage for Miss Blon- 
dell and Armstrong possible and tosses Miss Farrell into Herbert’s 


arms. 


The Misses Blondell and Farrell_make ideal foils for the Armstrong: 


SS 


Herbert tomioo aa carrying the snow: erkins,. 
“erenda 1S 


SPR ess Vhitnev, and , Vince 


avanaugh, barnes, 
arnett are effective, while William 


Keighley’s direction takes {ull advantage SP the Manuel Sefm-Sy Bartle“ 


Kansas City Princess 


Warners production and release. _ Di- 
rected by William Keighley. Based on 
story by Sy Bartlett. Screen play by 
Sy Bartlett and Manuel Seff. Photog- 
raphy, George Barnes. Cast: Joan Blon- 
dell. Glenda Farrell, Huch Herbert, Rob- 


ert Armstrong, Gordon Westcott, Osgood’ 


Perkins, Hobart Cavanaugh, Vince Bar- 
nett, Ivan Lebedeff, T. Roy Barnes, Ar- 
thur Hoyt. Previewed at Warners Bev- 
erly Hills, Aug. 4. Running time, 08 
mins. 


‘Kansas Cit Princess'_ig a, di- 
vertin mernge ST Miarious non- 
sense tallored = Tit the well-estabD- 
ished comed Talents of the Joan 
Syondell-Glenda farrell team. Tap- 
pily cast to complement the ex- 
huberance of these two in the 
character of manicurists out for 
one thing spelled three ways — 
dough, jack and lucre—are Rob- 
ert Armstrong and Hugh Herbert. 
Good direction and a capable sup- 
orting cast with a sus enseful 
© tie into, complete 


ut lh stor p 
the favorable box office auspices. 
Picture has b intelli ent Tae 


ing and si owmanly deftness man- 
aged to preserve ovitanty and “verve, 


aged t 

mi character and Situation, des pice 
new censorsnhi abOOS — a rea 
achievement. 

Omedy content is suggested by 
the title. Blondell and Miss Far- 
rel] are not content with the mea- 
gre tips of the nail polishing rac- 
ket, and, under urgence of Farrell, 
decide to step out for larger game. 
Through several novel laugh’ rou- 
tines, they find themselves event- 
ually on a steamer pound for Paris, 
and forced by phoney tears and 


treatment. Running time, 58 minutes. 


eR 


acute wits to accept a loan of pas- 
sage money and a clothes account 
from a pair of fresh strangers. 

Robert Armstrong, 2 tough mug 
whom Joan Blondell has tried to 
ditch after she has allowed an en- 
gagement ring he’s given her to 
be stolen, has followed the girls 
aboard. He forces himself, as a 
body guard, upon Hugh Herbert, 
an unhappy millionaire who seeks 
reconciliation with a flighty wife. 

The millionaire angels the expe- 
dition. In Paris the multiple en- 
tanglement of the quartet, com- 
plicated by the - machinations of 
Osgood Perkins as 4 conscienceless 
detective, come to satisfactory fin- 
ish in an exciting double-cross bou- 
doir compromise situation. 

Miss Blondell and Miss Farrell 
doa swell Joint ob of augh manu- 
Tacture. tron Batter cast 
than he Tas Pech 7 nT ugh beon_of Tate, delivers 
a pip characterizalion an u 


erbert s restraine?¢, iffiden u- 


neem Tosser parts 
or 1S Sure ire. n lesser parts 


se OaETa Cavanaugh, Vince Barnett, 


Arthur Hoyt, Gordon Westcott, 
Ivan Lebedeff, T. Roy Barnes and 
Renee Whitney give good accounts 
of themselves. Osgood Perkins 
does a deft job as the detective. 

William Keighley’s direction hews 
smartly to the light near-farcical 
mood of the excellent continuity 
which Sy Bartlett and Manuel Seff 
have added to the capital enter- 
tainment idea of Bartlett's original 
story. George Barnes’ photography 
is top notch. 


Manicurist Joan 
Glenda Farrell, takes a run-out 


er losing his engagement 
York, meeting two play- 


d to Hugh Herbert, making the 


Stars of “Dames. 
in A Big Hit 
All Their Own 


ONDELL and HUGH 


© Robert Armstrong ° Os 


HERBERT 


good Perkins 


_..The Comedy 


a 


~et, a ¢< 


ath, eet SSS ne ee I 


- EE 


THE “DAMES 
STARS IN 
GAY PAREE! 


What a riot when two man- 
handling manicurists from 
the midwest start trimming 
mugs and polishing suckers 
in the shade of the old 

Eiffel Tower! 


il 
ss 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot with the Comedy Stars of “DAMES” 


JOAN BLONDELL * HUGH HERBERT 


GLENDA FARRELL - ROB’T ARMSTRONG - OSGOOD PERKINS 


THEATRE 


224 Lines 


ec 


Mat No. 8—20c 


Se. A 
WATCH THE “HAVANA WIDOWS” COLLECT THE FRENCH WAR DEBT 


(= y 
=> \ (By oA 


Al- MY 


216 Lines 


...franc by franc—and John by John! J 


\\/ but don’t put rege 
\ ® ® e e 

\’ thing in writing! 

\\W Warner Bros.’ Hit with the 

. Comedy Stars of “DAMES” 


JOAN BLONDELL 
HUGH HERBERT 


GLENDA FARRELL - ROBERT 
E ARMSTRONG - OSGOOD PERKINS 


Mat No. 6—30c 


TWO MAN-EATING MANI-” 


GURISTS ON THE LOOSE! 


Trimming their way from Kansas City to Gay Paree! 

Watch them pick up a millionaire and let down an 

alderman as they collect the French war debt — 
franc by franc and John by John! 


RW Il Fe’, 


yy 
WY 


Py Le 
G/ fer ' 


V9 


My 


Y 


U/l rs 7 
np 7 


(but bring your lawyer with you!) 
Warner Bres.’ Hit with the Comedy Stars of “DAMES” 


JOAN BLONDELL * HUGH HERBERT 


GLENDA FARRELL-ROB’T ARMSTRONG- OSGOOD PERKINS 


244 Lines Mat No. 5—20c 


T WE w(t 


es yg ae eo 
| THE COMEDY STARS. OF “DAMES” 
IN A BIG HIT ALL THEIR OWN! 


KANSAS CITY 
PRINCESS 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot.with 


JOAN BLONDELL*HUGH HERBERT F 


and GLENDA FARRELL 


120 Lines Mat No. 17—20c 


Page Three 


a ee 


Page Four 


98 Lines 


55 , <a : nN 
3 Bs, 


Mat No. 23—10c 


tHOSE HAVANA WIDO 
Gin. SCOUTS Now. 


... doing their daily good 
deed ... and doing him 
good! Just picture the fun 


- when these Merry Mani- 


curists from the Midwest 
hitch-hike to gay Paree! 


Warner Bros.’ Laugh Riot with 
JOAN 


BLONDELL 


Queen of the Gimme Girls 
GLENDA 


FARRELL 


Her Secretary of the Treasury 
HUGH 


HERBERT 


Remember him in “Dames?” 


ROBERT ARMSTRONG 
OSGOOD PERKINS 


279 Lines 


MEN! HEAD FOR THE NEAREST CYCLONE CELLAR! 
THESE PRAIRIE FLOWERS ARE OUT FOR NO GOOD! 


and GLENDA FARRELL 


142 Lines 


The queens of the Gimme Girls officially 
open the man-hunting season as they go to 
work on the playboy papas of gay Paree! 


KANSAS CITY 
PRINCESS 


Warner Bros.’ laugh sensation with the Comedy Stars of “DAMES”’ 


JOAN BLONDELL - HUGH HERBERT 


Mat No. 24——20c 


RIN 


be 
ss Wee 
iy SS 
q a Ze 
A 4 
Yy, 
: y V 
ee ob 
y 
, y 
Y 
/ 


_ | THEY KNOW ALL 
THE ANSWERS 
TO A MAIDEN’S 
PRAYER-MONEY! 
JACK! DOUGH! 


Mat No. 4—30c 


THE COMEDY 
STARS OF 
“DAMES” § 
IN A BIG 

HIT ALL 
THEIR OWN! 


KANSAS CITY 
PRINCESS 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot with 


JOAN BLONDELL 
HUGH HERBERT 


and GLENDA FARRELL 


82 Lines Mat No. 26—10c 


HELP! MURDER! POLICE! THEYRE KILLING US! 


Lay off, Joan! Have a heart, 
Glenda! They simply slayed 


us in “Havana Widows”—and | 


look what they’re up to now 
. - as two man-handling mani- 
curists, trimming mugs and 


polishing suckers in Gay Paree! 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot with The Comedy Stars of “DAMES” 


JOAN BLONDELL + HUGH HERBERT 


GLENDA FARRELL - ROBERT ARMSTRONG - OSGOOD PERKINS 
eee | SRN eee « Wt re crite = 


360 Lines Mat No, 46——-30c 


(This ad illustrated in 2-columns on next page) 


LEE 
WI 


Gb. Z 
Ah GEN 


THE COMEDY STARS OF “DAMES” 
IN A BIG HIT ALL THEIR OWN! 


« 


Warner Bros. Hit with the Comedy Stars of “DAMES” 


JOAN BLONDELL * HUGH HERBERT 


GLENDA FARRELL - ROBT ARMSTRONG - OSGOOD PERKINS 


56 Lines Mat No. 28—20c 64 Lines Mat No. 9—20c 


Page Five 


THE COMEDY STARS OF “DAMES” = 


IN A BIG HIT ALL THEIR OWN 
Hop aboard as they hitch-hike on a 
Convention City special all the way from 
Kansas City to the Eiffel Tower. . ... - 


KANSAS CITY 
PRINCESS 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot with 


JOAN BLONDELL 
HUGH HERBERT 


164 Lines Mat No. 27-206 


HELP! MURDER! POLICE! THEY'RE KILLING US! 


Lay off, Joan! Have a heart, 
Glenda! They simply slayed 
us in “Havana Widows”— and 
look what they’re up to now 
.. . as two man-handling mani- 
curists, trimming mugs and 


polishing suckers in Gay Paree! 


KANSAS CITY _ 
PRINCESS 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot with The Comedy Stars of “DAMES” 


JOAN BLONDELL > HUGH HERBERT 


GLENDA. FARRELL - ROBERT ARMSTRONG - OSGOOD PERKINS 


ae ee ee 


160 Lines Mat No. 20—20c 
(See page 5 for this ad in 3-column size ) 


_ THEY TRIMMED THE JOHNS OF 
-“HAVANA...AND NOW THEY’RE 
. AFTER THE FRANCS OF FRANCE! 


204 Lines 


Mat No. 7—20c 


= Qne Column Slugs = 


THEATRE THE COMEDY STARS OF “DAMES” 


IN A BIG HIT ALL THEIR OWN 


KANSAS CITY 


PRINCESS 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot with 


JOAN BLONDELL + HUGH HERBERT 


LENDA FARRELL-ROB'T ARMSTRONG: OSGOOD PERKINS 


wih 
/ THE COMEDY STARS OF “DAMES” 
IN A BIG HIT ALL THEIR OWN! 


KANSAS CITY 
eu fel AX 


28 Lines Mat No. 18—10c 


Warner Bros. Laff Riot with 


JOAN BLONDELL>HUGH HERBERT 


and GLENDA FARRELL. 


KANSAS CITY 
PRINCESS 


Warner Br Riot with 


os.’ Laff 
JOAN BLONDELL* HUGH HERBERT 


and GLENDA FARRELL 


44 Lines Mat-No: 25——10c 


15 Lines 


Mat No. 19—10c 


Page Six 


ILLUSTRATIONS ? 


you 


“WE USED THE REGULAR 
WARNER TRAILER 
AND IT WAS A PEACH!” 


—George D. O’Brien, Miller Theater, Woodstock, IIl. 


/ind here’s another ‘peach’: 


The world's champion gold-diggers are back! 
Joan Blondell and Glenda Farrell 

Officially open the man-hunting season 

In their gayest and giddiest hit! 


"Kansas City Princess," A Warner Bros. Laugh Hit! 


Believe it or not! 
Those Havana Widows are Girl Scouts now! 
Every day they do a good deed—for themselves! 


The "Kansas City Princess" 
(and her Secretary of the Treasury) 
Are going to invade Paris! 


Every time she winks her eye— 
Another redskin bites the dust! 


Men! Duck into the nearest cyclone cellar! 
These Prairie Flowers are out for no good! 
"Kansas City Princess" 

with Joan Blondell, Queen of the Gimme Girls 
Robert Armstrong 

And the screen's perfect Lovebirds 

Glenda Farrell and Hugh Herbert 


"Kansas City Princess” 
A Warner Bros. and Vitaphone Comedy Hit! 


ANY SIZE YOU WANT! 


You can reproduce from these ad-cartoons. Put ’em to any use 


want — in the size best fitted for your personal needs. 


CATCHLINES from THE ADS 


The “Dames” Stars In Gay Paree! 
x Xx X 
They’ve Got What It Takes—And How 
They’re ‘‘Taking’’ It! 
XK ¥ * 
Two Man-Eating Manicurists On The 
Loose! 
x x ok 
Watch Them Pick Up A Millionaire And 
Let Down An Alderman As They Collect 


The French War Debt—Franc By Frane 
And John By John! 
ok XK re 
The Comedy Stars Of “‘Dames” In A Big 
Hit All Their Own! 
2 Xe 2 
Watch The ‘Havana Widows’ Collect 
The French War Debt! 
me ne 2 
The Queens Of The Gimme Girls Offi- 
cially Open The Man-Hunting Season As 


They Go To Work On The Playboy Papas 
Of Gay Paree! 


a * x 
Those “‘Havana Widows” Are Girl Scouts 


Now, Doing Their Daily Good Deed— 
And Doing Him Good! 


2 % XK 
They Know All The Answers To A 
Maiden’s Prayer—Money! Jack! Dough! 
2 x X 
More Laughs Than “Havana Widows” 
As Joyous Joan And Glamorous Glenda 


Hitch-Hike Their Way From Kansas City 
To Gay Paree! 


SES TE ES TE EE RS CRE EE ERTS ERTS TT OE 


Page Seven 


Page Eight 


THE “DAMES STARS 
IN GAY PAREE!.... 


What a riot when two man- 


handling manicurists from 
the midwest start trimming 
mugs and polishing suckers 
in the shade of the old 
Eiffel Tower! 


Warner Bros.’ Laff Riot with 


JOAN BLONDELL 


HUGH HERBERT 
_——and GLENDA FARRELL 


THEATRE 


210 Lines Mat No. 30—20c 


Warner Bis 


THEATRE 


170 Lines 


JAM ITS FaCite 


We mean the radio sketch on this picture. All the top- 


notch stations have used the Warner radio sketches and this 


one is right up to the high standard of the others. Written 


for 15 minutes with a laugh a second, it breaks off at a point 


where listeners-in are all keyed up for the rest of the show. Use 


studio cast or invite the school thespians to emote for you. 


Write for it now, to — Merchandising Plan Editor, Warner 
Bros., 321 West 44th Street, New York City. 


ONDELL + Giewnt 
HUGH HeRBep FARRELL 


Mat No. 29—20c 


Junior Ashcraft 


Marcel Paee ss ee ee Bast 


Sent Weiler ei. Sn Re. oe | eae Hobart Cavanaugh 
Pinay, ee de 2 ra oe ee Gordon Westcott 
UEROY SS ee Fai 1. RM CB Vince Barnett 
Dr. Sacha Pilepoy eon ON el Sea aha det 
Jim Cameron ee pln cats eae Td T. Roy Barnes 
Greentitly’ 0 ee lg Arthur Hoyt 


Clever comedy, hilarious situa- 


tions, sparkling dialogue, and 
Joan Blondell, Glenda Farrell, 
Hugh Herbert and Robert Arm- 
strong — that’s “Kansas City 
Princess,” one of the most 
screamingly funny farce comedies 
of the season, and surely one of 
the most capably acted. 

Joan and Glenda are two Kan- 
sas City manicurists. Joan, tak- 
ing the part of Rosie, is half in 
love with Dynamite, a young 
gangster, while Glenda, as Marie, 
is a self-avowed chiseler, “on the 
make” and out to get as much 
as she can. 

Dynamite gives Rosie a big 
diamond engagement ring and, 
goes to St. Louis to do one last 
big job before turning straight. 
While he is away, Rosie flirts 
with Jimmy the Dude, who steals 
he ring. 

Knowing Dynamite, Rosie-and 
Marie decide to beat it for New 
York, getting on a convention 
train as “outdoor girls.” 

Dynamite, returning unex- 
pectedly, boards a plane for New 
York and is at the train when 
they arrive. They elude him by 
leaping into a taxicab with two 
Zanesville aldermen who are en 
route to Paris to meet their 
Wives. 

The Zanesville lads invite the 
girls to get on the boat with 
them, but Dynamite follows, 
stowing away in a lifeboat while 


spon pea ee ee Joan Blondell 
SEER Sinan Cai lineis eso pe Glenda~ farvelt 
ORION oS Sci asm Robert Armstrong 
Hugh Herbert 
Osgood Perkins 


from their aldermanie 
friends. 

Asheraft, Jr., is a multi-mil- 
lionaire whose wife has been in 
Paris for years, ostensibly for 
her nerves. Hugh Herbert por- 
trays the eccentric midas who 
engages Dynamite as a_ body- 
guard. 

Asheraft fears his wife is in 
love with a Russian, Dr. Pilni- 
koff and engages a French de- 
tective, Duryea to find out if he 
is being double-crossed. 

A series of riotous incidents on 
board the vessel ensues. The 
girls are all tangled up with 
the aldermen, Asheraft and Dyna- 
mite, who is looking for revenge. 

Duryea, in league with Pilni- 
koff, decides to frame Ashcraft 
so his wife can get a divorce and 
a lot of alimony, and arranges a 
plot. Marie, thinking she is go- 
ing to frame the Russian, slips 
into Asheraft’s room, and. is 
locked in. Duryea brings Mrs. 
Asheraft in to obtain evidence 
of her husband’s perfidy. Dyna- 
mite, seeing his employer is be- 
ing double-crossed, attacks the 
detective, but Duryea kicks him, 
and knocks him out. 

Mrs. Ashcraft breaks in, and 
gets the goods on her husband, 
who finds that Marie’s arms are 
worth the million his wife will 
cost him. Rosie finds Dynamite, 
brings him back to consciousness 
and consoles him in a fond em- 


boy- 


the girls chisel passage fares brace. 

| ieee ies ecctee IN ARD MSGR. ol Be, William Keighley 
Screen. Play by... palette Poeiee Manuel Seff and Sy Bartlett 
(nisin ey ns a a ee Sy Bartlett 
Pier apn by 3 2 AGI SAS COIS ee George Barnes 
Peer aie ee ere EF William Clemens 
BPE eRar en Ss Seats neh Aa. John Hughes 
Gowns by AMR US bMS See 2 Baal A Orry-Kelly 
Vitaphone Orchestra Conducted by... Leo F. Forbstein 


OFFICIAL BILLIN 


us 


WE DO OUP PART 


“THE KANSAS CITY PRINCESS” 
with 
Joan Blondell — Glenda Farrell 


100% 


75% 


Robert Armstrong——Hugh Herbert—Osgood Perkins 50% 
Hobart Cavanaugh—Gordon Westcott 
Directed by William Keighley 


A Warner Bros. and Vitaphone Production 


LENGTH 


RUNNING TIME —-—« O4@”_-s minutes 


10% 
20% 
40% 


3,889 feet 


- act-name, The Blondells. 


_. cess,” which comes to the 


Joan Blondell 


Joan Blondell, born of theatri- 
cal parents in New York City, 
has been closely associated with 
the theatre all her colorful life. 

Her childhood was spent as a 
trouper, going from place to place 
with her father and mother, who 
for 


vaudeville under the well known 


appeared many years in 


She is 


an all-round athlete and has won 


laurels as a swimmer. 


Graduated from several schools, 


including the John Murray School 
y of the Theatre in New York and 


the College of Industrial Arts, 


she won instantaneous screen 
fame after making her first ap- 
pearance in a small role. Her 
most recent pictures  inelude 
“Dames,” “He Was Her Man,” 
“Smarty,” “Pve Got Your Num- 
her,” “Convention City,” “Hav- 
ana Widows,’ “Footlight Pa- 
rade,” and her current produe- 
tion, “Kansas City Princess,” 
which comes to the 
Theatre on 


Hugh Herbert 


Hugh Herbert is a native New 
Yorker, having been born and 
educated within the shadow of 


‘Times Square. 


Herbert’s natural theatrical tal- 
ent soon led him to the stage, 
and after serving an apprentice- 
ship in road stock companies, the 
Warner Bros. player tried his 
luck on Broadway. His success 
was instantaneous and he earned 
a reputation as one of the town’s 
ablest comedians. 


Brought to Hollywood for pic- 
tures, Herbert proved as funny 
on the screen as he had been on 
stage. Numbered among his 
screen hits are “Dames,” “The 
Merry Frinks,” Easy To Love,” 
“Fog Over Frisco,” “Merry Wives 
of Reno,’ “Fashions of 1934,” 
“College Coach,” “Convention 
City,” “Bureau of Missing Per- 
sons,” “Footlight Parade” and 
“From Headquarters.” Hig latest 
picture is “Kansas City Prin- 


speed ase Theatre on 


Glenda Farrell 


Glenda Farrell born in 


Enid, Oklahoma, and made her 


was 


debut on the stage as Little Eva 
in “Unele 


age of seven. With the exception 


Tom’s Cabin” at the 


of occasional pauses for edueca- 
tion, she has been on the stage 
ever since, spending most of her 
life, 


trunk. 


as she expresses it, in a 


She was a member of the Bris- 
sac Stock Company of San Diego, 
the Morosco Company of Los An- 
geles and the Aleazar in San 
Francisco. From there she went 
to Broadway where she played in 
such successes as “Divided Hon- 
ors,” “Love, Honor and Betray,” 
“The Rear Car” and “Skidding.” 
Her last stage play was “Life Be- 
gins” and her work was so out- 
standing she was selected by 
Warner Bros. to play her same 
role when they made a picture of 
the play. 


Her more recent pictures in- 
clude “The Personality Kid,” 
“Merry Wives of Reno,’ “I’ve 


Got Your Number,” “Heat Light- 
ning,” “Hi, Nellie,” “The. Big 
Shakedown,” “Dark MHazard,” 
“Havana Widows,” “Bureau of 
Missing Persons,” “Mary Stevens, 
M.D.” and her eurrent produe- 
tion, “Kansas City Princess,” 
which comes to the 
Theatre on 


Osgood Perkins 


Osgood Perkins began his pro- 
fessional career with the Film 
Guild in New York City, playing 
minor roles until 1924, when he 
accepted an offer to play with 
Roland Young in the stage pro- 
duction of “The Beggar on Horse- 
back.” 

One of his outstanding stage 
productions was “The Front 
Page.” Other plays in which he 
gave outstanding characteriza- 
tions include “Loose Ankles,” 
and “Tomorrow and Tomorrow.” 

His pictures include “Madame 
Du Barry,” “Searface,” “The Tar- 
nished Lady” and “Tomorrow and 
Tomorrow” in addition to his cur- 
rent production of “Kansas City 
Princess’ now showing at the 
Theatre. 


The Nation’s Leaders 


Advise 


You to 


“SEE AMERICA FIRST” 


At a private screening in Washington, the 
leaders of the nation’s patriotic and political 
organizations acclaimed the first four of this 


series of thirteen Vitaphone shorts. 


That’s 


the opening gun of a campaign that promises 
to exceed any ever accorded a series of 


shorts. 


Book them now! 


Play ’em up as 


big as your features! These five are ready 


for release: 


**PILGRIM DAYS” 
**HAIL COLUMBIA” 
“ON THE ALAMO” 
*“DIXTELAND”’ 
“BOSTON TEA PARTY” 


Robert Armstrong 


Robert Armstrong was born in 
Mich., but moved to 
Seattle, Wash., at an early age, 


Saginaw, 


and was educated there, later’ at- 
tending law school at the Wash- 
ington University. In his senior 
year he wrote and played in a 
skit which came to the notice of 
a vaudeville producer who offered 
him a job im the skit on his cir- 
cuit. 

The bookings took him to New 
York where his uncle, the late 
Paul Armstrong, took him under 
his wing, giving him small roles 
in his plays. Hig career was in- 
terrupted by the war. Returning 
to America he road-showed in 
“The Man Who Came Back” and 
other plays. 

His biggest hit was on Broad- 
way in “Ts Zat So.” It was while 
playing in this show in Los An- 
geles that he was offered a movie 
contract, his first picture being 
“The Main Event.” His more re- 
cent pictures include “Above the 
Clouds,” “The Hell Cat,” “Man- 
hattan Love Song,’ “She Made 
Her Bed,” “Search For Beauty” 
and his present film, “Kansas City 
which 


Princess,” comes to the 


Theatre on 


JOAN BLONDELL — “Dames,” 
“He Was Her Man,” “Smarty,” 
“ve Got Your Number,” “Con- 
vention City,” “Havana Wid- 
ows,” “Footlight Parade.” 


-GLENDA FARRELL — “The 


Personality Kid,” “Merry 
Wives of Reno,” “Hi, Nellie!”, 
“Heat Lightning,” “The Big 
Shakedown,” “Dark Hazard.” 


ROBERT ARMSTRONG — “The 
Hell Cat,” “Manhattan Love 
Song,” “She Made Her Bed,” 
“Above the Clouds,” “Son of 
Kong,” “Blind Adventure,” “T 
Love That Man,” “King Kong,” 
“Fast Workers.” 

HUGH HERBERT — “Dames,” 
“The Merry Frinks,” “Hasy To 
Love,” “Fog Over Frisco,” 
“Merry Wives of Reno,” 
“Fashions of 1934,” 

OSGOOD PERKINS — “Madame 
Du Barry,” “Scarface,” “The 
Tarnished Lady,” “Tomorrow 
and Tomorrow.” 

HOBART CAVANAUGH —_ 
“Madame Du Barry,” “House- 
wife,” “Wonder Bar, “The 
Key,” “A Modern Hero,” “A 
Very Honorable Guy,” “Harold 
Teen.” 

GORDON WESTCOTT — “The 
Circus Clown,” “Fog Over 
Frisco,” “Registered Nurse,” 
“Side Streets,” “Fashions of 
1934,” “Girl Trouble.” 

VINCE BARNETT—“Registered 
Nurse,” “Prizefighter and the 
‘Lady,” “Man of the Forest,” 
“The Girl in 419,” “Made on 
Broadway.” 

IVAN LEBEDEFF — “The 
Merry Frinks,” “Bombshell,” 
“Laughing at Life,” “Made on 
Broadway,” “Unholy Love.” 

ARTHUR HOYT—“Only Yester- 


day,” “Sing, Sinner, Sing,” 
“Shanghai Madness,” A 
Shriek In the Night,” “Hig 
Private Secretary.” 

WILLIAM KEIGHLEY (di- 
rector) — “Dr, Moniea,” 


“Journal of a Crime,” “Easy 
to Love,” “Qadies They Talk 
About.” 


Page Nine 


Joan Blondel And 
Glenda Farrell In 
Funniest Film Hit 


Joan Blondell and Glenda Far- 
rell, the pair of charming bomb- 
shells who caused explosions of 
laughter in “Havana Widows,” 
and other pictures, again are 
teamed as a couple of chiseling, 
gold digging manicurists in the 
Warner Bros. picture, “The Kan- 
sas City Princess,’ which comes 
tO the. - cceemeetese irs Theatre 
OT ara aE ALA reat hes 

Supporting this comedy pair 
are such famous comedians as 
Hugh Herbert, Robert Arm- 
strong, Osgood Perkins, Hobart 
Cavanaugh and Gordon Westcott, 
which places “The Kansas City 
Princess” high in the ranks of 
riotous fun makers. 

The story is by Sy Bartlett 
and Manuel Seff, and has more 
mad mix-ups and merry love 
triangles crowded into the plot 
than are found in half a dozen 
books. 

The fun starts when Miss Blon- 
dell flirts with the wrong baby 
while her own sweetheart is out 
of the city, the man proving the 
smarter of: the two and getting 
away with the girl’s flashy en- 
gagement ring as well as a little 
loving. 

Knowing her gangster lover, 
Dynamite, and realizing her in- 
ability to explain the loss of her 
ring, she and her pal, Miss Far- 
rell, beat it for New York on a 
convention train as two “out- 
door seout girls.’ They fall in 
with two small town aldermen, 
somewhat worse, or better, for 
Aliness . 


ils = Tee Se By eS Sa 
SSS er aoa 00 soll 
them in a trip to gay Paree. But 
Dynamite is wise and has fol- 
lowed, bent on getting revenge 
and his big sparkler. 

On the boat the girls meet a 
millionaire playboy and in Paris 
they bust right into the alder- 
men’s wives and the philander- 
ing wife of the millionaire and 
her lover, and the fur flies in a 
regular storm of laughter. 

Robert Armstrong has the role 
of Dynamite, Hugh Herbert is 
the dumb, but droll millionaire, 
with Hobart Cavanaugh and T. 
Roy Barnes as the two small town 
aldermen. Gordon Westcott is 
the love thief who steals not only 
the hearts of the ladies but their 
jewels as well, while Osgood Per- 
kins plays the role of a double- 
crossing French detective. 


Pretty Princess 


Blondell, in 
City 


W arner’s 
Princess,” now 


Joan 
**Kansas 
LAVIN RON CUNG se e 


Theatre. Glenda Farrell, Hugh 
Herbert and Robert Armstrong 
contribute to the laughs. 
Mat No. 13—10c. 


Page Ten 


Joan Blondell’s 


Hubby Hugs Double | 


For His Own Wife 


Joan Blondell has a double 
working with her as a stand-in 
for “Kansas City .Princess,” her 
latest Warner Bros. production, 
now showing at the 
Theatre. 


Normade Adoree is the young 
lady and so striking is her re- 
semblance to Joan, both as to 
face and figure, that a comedy 
of errors developed. 


The first day she was on the 
set, dressed in an outfit that was 
an exact duplicate of Joan’s, 
from hat to shoes, Miss Adoree 
was taken for Joan by nearly 
everyone in the company. 


Even George Barnes, Joan’s 
husband and cameraman on the 
picture, was fooled. Norma was 
standing with her back to him, 
somewhat in the shadow, and 
George, wanting to discuss some 
of the details of the next scene 
with Joan, came up behind Miss 
Adoree and put his arm around 
her. 


“Toney!” he began, and then 
Miss Adoree turned on him. To 
say that George’s face was red 
is putting it mildly, for stand- 
ing watching him with baleful 
eyes was friend wife herself. 

“T ‘don’t think,’ remarked 
Joan, “that if pays to have a 
stand-in who looks quite so much 
like me. It gives the husband 
too good an excuse.” 

In “Kansas City Princess,” 
Joan has the role of a gold dig- 
ging manicurist whose escapades 
startle two continents. Others in 
the cast include Glenda Farrell, 
Robert Armstrong, Hugh Herbert, 
Osgood Perkins, Hobart Cava- 
naugh and Gordon Westcott. 

William Keighley directed the 
picture from the sereen play by 
Sy Bartlett and Manuel Seff. 


Entire Film Stage 
Transformed Into 
Giant Ocean Ship 


An entire sound stage at War- 
ner Bros. studios was transformed 
into an ocean liner for the pro- 
duction of “Kansas City Prin- 
cess,” which comes to the 
Anis il eae SEP CARNE Oli yy. . ey. 2 edhe s Me 

A huge multiple interlocking 
set, consisting of the promenade 
deck and the deck above it, the 
lounge and saloons opening off 
the promenade deck, and a per- 
fect maze of corridors and state- 
rooms were’ reproduced with 
amazing realism, for the hilari- 
ous adventures of Joan Blondell 
and her pal, Glenda Farrell, with 
Robert Armstrong, Joan’s sweet- 
heart, Hugh Herbert, a million- 
aire playboy, and Hobart Cava- 
naugh and T. Roy Barnes, two 
Ohio Aldermen on the loose—all 
of whom are bound for Europe 
for different reasons. 

Not the least interesting as- 
pects. of the big liner, to motion 
picture fans who have yet to 
make their first transatlantic 
voyage was the elaborate beauty 
parlor with which such a steam- 
ship is equipped, and the lingerie 
and dress shops, where a passen- 
ger can make as wide a variety 
of purchases as though she were 
on shore. 

“Kansas City Princess” is a 
rollicking comedy romance con- 
cerning the mad escapades of 
two mid-west manicurists on a 
jamboree. It was written by Sy 
Bartlett and Mianuel Seff and di- 
rected by William Keighley. 


A Kansas City Princess and her entire court of royal jesters! 
bers of the all-comedy cast in Warner Bros.’ “Kansas City Princess,’ 
heat econss ss ee eee 


Which all means that these are the mem- 


? which comes to the_________- 


As we name ’em , you pick ’em. Joan Blondell, Glenda Farrell, 


Hugh Herbert, Robert Armstrong, Hobart Cavanaugh, Vince Barnett and T. Roy Barnes. 


Robert Armstrong 
Just Missed Being 
Lawyer By Month 


Robert Armstrong, one of the 
stars of the Warner Bros. produe- 
tion, “Kansas City Princess,” 
which comes to the 
Theatre on 
might have been a successful law- 
yer today, but for one thing. 

Just a month before he was due 
to receive his college diploma, at 
the University of Washington, 
Bob and the dramatic muse went 
into a huddle and the result was 
a vaudeville sketch. It received 
a tryout at a Portland, Ore., the- 
atre, with Armstrong playing one 
of the parts. 

John Considine liked the sketch 
and its young author so well that 
he signed Bob to take the play- 
let to New York. And that was 
the end of Robert Armstrong’s 
budding career as an attorney. 

In “Kansas City Princess,” 
which is a hilarious comedy con- 
cerning the escapades of two 
mid-west manicurists on a mad 
trip to Paris, Armstrong plays 
the role of the gangster sweet- 
heart of Joan Blondell. Other 
memhers of the cast inelude 
Glenda Farrell, Hugh Herbert, 
Osgood Perkins, Hobart Cava- 
naugh and Gordon Westcott. 

William Keighley directed the 
picture from the story and screen 
play by Sy Bartlett and Manuel 
Seff. 


Crosseyed Kittens 
Sent Across Nation 
To Glenda Farrell 


Two Siamese kittens traveled 
across the North American conti- 


nent to join the household of 
Glenda Farrell while the blonde 
actress was playing Joan Blon- 
dell’s pal in the Warner Bros. 
production of “Kansas City Prin- 
cess,’ now showing at the...... 
Dey eine fi ee es | Theatre. 

Opening a box left by an ex- 
pressman, she found two kittens, 
still a bit groggy from their 
3,500-mile journey, but  other- 
wise ready to go places and do 


Mat No. 14—80c. 


Joan Blondel! Gets 
Thrill When Stork 
Whispers Secret 


More than three years ago, be- 
fore she was either famous or 
married, an interviewer, collect- 


ing New Year’s resolutions and 
wishes, asked Joan Blondell what 
it was she wanted the next year 
to bring her. 


“A baby,” she said. 

She has made practically the 
same reply to every similar ques- 
tion since. She has always wanted 
a baby, ever since her younger 
sister, Gloria, grew out of the 
eradle age. 

The 
Miss Blondell while working in 


announcement made by 


the Warner Bros. production of 


“Kansas City Princess,” now 


Bhowiney. ate-the ous... Thea- 
tre, that she and her husband, 


George Barnes, ace cameraman, 
expected an heir to the Barnes- 
Blondell fortunes meant that 
Joan’s oft-repeated wish was to 
be fulfilled. And she added to 
her announcement that she was 
perfectly thrilled. 


In “Kansas City Princess” 
Joan plays the role of a wise 
eracking manicurist whose wild 
adventures and love conquests 
in a mad flight from a mid-west 
town to gay Paree form the basis 
of a hilarious comedy romance. 
Others in the cast include Glenda 
Farrell, Robert Armstrong, Hugh 
Herbert, Osgood Perkins, Hobart 
Cavanaugh and Gordon Westcott. 


things. Both of them proved to 
be eross-eyed and both were 
presents from Robert Riskin, 
screen playwright. 

Glenda took her pets to the 
studio, where they were enthusi- 
astically admired by Joan Blon- 
dell, Robert Armstrong, Hugh 
Herbert, Hobart Cavanaugh. 
Ivan Lebedeff and other mem- 
bers of the cast. She named them 
“Risky” and “Whisky.” 

In “Kansas City Princess” 
Glenda and Miss Blondell are 
wise-cracking manicurists whose 
love episodes startle two con- 
tinents. The picture is a hilari- 
ous comedy romance by Sy Bart- 
lett and Manuel Seff, directed 
by William Keighley. 


Glenda Farrell Is 
Winner In Bottle 
Smashing Contest 


Glenda Farrell, who has a stel- 


lar role in “Kansas City Pree 
, V 


cess,” the Warner Bros. picture 
which comes to the 


NGA tLe ON ee. oe ere. 


GLENDA 
FARRELL 
MatvNo2—= 
10c. 


added bottle 
other accomplishments. 


her 
It is the 
result of her contest with T. Roy 
Barnes to see who could throw the 
most bottles through a porthole 


throwing to 


of a steamer in one of the hil- 
arious seenes of this rollicking 
comedy. 

The situation is a merry fare- 


well party on board a French 
liner, with T. Roy Barnes and 


Hobart Cavanaugh as hosts, and 
Joan Blondell and Glenda as the 
impromptu guests. 

Barnes, aS a small town alder- 


man and ex-baseball pitcher, de- 
cides to show off his twirling 
arm, by picking out the porthole 
in his stateroom as the home 
plate and using a flock of soda 
water bottles as baseballs. 

Glenda becomes involved in the 
marksmanship with sensational 
results to the cabin’s interior. 

The number of takes that di- 
rector William Keighley  con- 
sidered necessary to get the last 
ounce of comedy value out of the 
situation perfected Glenda’s skill 
to such a degree that the last 
three times she had difficulty in 
missing the porthole, as the 
seript required. But she succeeded 
in smashing the most bottles. 

Other important roles in 
“Kansas City Princess” are 
taken by Robert Armstrong, 
Gordon Westcott, Osgood Per- 
kins, Ivan Lebedeff and Vince 
Barnett. Manuel Seff and Sy 
Bartlett are the authors of the 
screen play. 


bs 


i 


(Review ) 


“Kansas City Princess”? is 
Riotous Comedy Romance 


Joan Blondell and Glenda 


Farrell Head Great 


Cast of Stellar Comedians 


eater ema Theatre yesterday where the Warner 


( : ALES of laughter swept through the audience at the 


Bros. comedy romance, ‘‘The Kansas City Princess,’’ 

was shown on the screen locally for the first time. 
In this production Warner Bros. have mixed up a love 
potion of wives and lovers, husbands and sweethearts that is 
the last word in spicy and hilarious comedy. Seldom has 


there come to the sereen a picture 
with such sparkling, wise ecrack- 
ing dialogue and with such novel 
and riotously funny situations. 
The love intrigues and marital 
mix-ups in which two mid-west 


manicurists involve’ themselves 
would task a Philadelphia lawyer 
to untangle. The web is finally 
unwoven, however, after a series 
of unusual incidents that kept 
spectators roaring with laughter. 
based on the 


sereen play by Sy Bartlett and 


The picture, 


Manuel Seff, begins in Kansas 
City with the manicurists loving 
not wisely but too well, and being 
forced to flee the city from a 
gangster lover, whom they know 
will settle such matters as a mis- 
placed kiss with an embrace of 
death. 


Smuggling themselves aboard a 
convention bound train as a ecou- 
ple of girl scouts, they reach New 
York after a series of riotous ad- 
ventures, but neither fooling nor 
ae gangland friend 


= wding their 
- WRo beats them to it-in-a-fast 


plane. Scared pink, the two 
girls pick up a couple of small 
town aldermen and chisel their 
way onto a Paris bound ship. 
Here again they get mixed up 
with a millionaire playboy and 
run afoul of the gangster, piling 
up love tangles until they reach 
Paris where the wives of the two 
aldermen and that of the mil- 
lionaire pop up to complicate 
matters in the fastest and most 
unique and uproarious climax im- 
aginable. 


JOAN 
BLONDELL 


Mat No. 1— 
10c. 


The cast includes some of the 
finest comedians of the screen. 
Joan Blondell and Glenda Farrell, 
as the two gold digging mani- 
curists, never enacted better char- 
acterizations in their careers. 
Miss Blondell is sparkling as the 
over ebullient gangster moll 
whose affections are somewhat 
wandering, while Miss Farrell 
gives a clever performance as the 
cooler and more designing chis- 
eler. 

Never has Hugh Herbert been 
more droll than as the rich play- 
boy whose dumb but ardent love 
for a philandering wife lays him 
open not only to her alimony 
schemes but the machinations of 
the gold digging manicurists. 
Hobart Cavanaugh and T. Roy 
Barnes are consistently funny as 
the clownish small time alder- 
men who are to meet their wives 
in Paris, but try to be playboys 
on the way. 

Others in the cast include Rob- 
ert Armstrong as the strong arm 
gangster, and lover of Miss Blon- 
dell, Osgood Perkins, a double 
crossing Paris detective, Gordon 
Westcott, a dude who steals wom- 
en’s hearts and their diamonds 
at the same time, Vince Barnett, 
Ivan Lebedeff and Arthur Hoyt. 


Giddy Glenda 


Glenda Farrell, that little blonde 
gal with the big sense of humor, 
is appearing with Joan Blondell 
in “‘Kansas City Princess,” the 
Warner Bros. comedy at the 
Cette ane tha Theatre. 
Mat No. t2—10c. 


Whirlwind Of Love 
And Laughter Comes 
jC Reece Today 


Love tangles and marital mix- 
ups form the ingredients of the 
hilarious situations in Warner 
Bros. picture, “The Kansas City 
Princess,” which opens at the 
today. 

The story, by Sy Bartlett and 
Manuel Seff, concerns chiefly the 
love episodes and mad adventures 
of two mid-west manicurists, al- 
though a gangster, a millionaire 
playboy, his wife and her lover 
and two small town aldermen and 
their wives are all mixed up in 
the potpouri of laughter. 

In a swift series of kaleido- 
scopic incidents the picture takes 
the spectator from Kansas City 
to New York by train and air- 
plane, aboard a French liner on 
which riotous scenes occur with 
the two manicurists chiseling 
their way across, and then to 
Paris where the smashing cli- 
max comes with the wildest love 
mix-up and a whirlwind of laugh- 
ter. 

Joan Blondell and Glenda Far- 
rell have the roles of the two 
gold digging manicurists with 
Hugh Herbert as the somewhat 
dumb millionaire, Robert Arm- 
strong as the gangster who is 
chasing his manicurist lady love, 
and Hobart Cavanaugh and T. 
Roy Barnes as the small town 
aldermen. 

Others in the cast include Os- 
good Perkins, a double-crossing 
Parisian detective, Gordon West- 
cott, who steals both hearts and 
diamonds, Vinee Barnett, Ivan 
Lebedeff and Arthur Hoyt. 

The picture, which is rated as 
one of the most screamingly 
funny of the season, was di- 
rected by William Keighley. 


Joan Blondell And 
Glenda Farrell In 
Manicuring Duel 


There have been many freak 
contests of late, dancing con- 
tests, kissing contests, tree sit- 
ting and what-not, but a couple 
of Warner Bros. cuties have 
started a new novelty. 


The two cuties, incidentally, 
are now co-starred, together with 
Robert Armstrong and Hugh Her- 
bert in the Warner Bros. produe- 
tion of “Kansas City Princess,” 
which comes to the......... : 
MMC AUEO SOM rat: «son ltee eta Ji ehe 
two are Joan Blondell and Glen- 
da Farrell. 

In the picture the two play 
the part of a pair of gold dig- 
ging manicurists on a series of 
hilarious adventures that take 
them from a mid-west town to 
gay Paree. 

“A manicurist,” sniffed Glen- 
da. “TI can do as good a job, or 
better, than most of them myself 
and I frequently do my own 
nails.” 

“T learned the art long ago,” 
said Joan, “when I had to do it 
beeause I didn’t have the price 
of a manicure.” 

Then her eyes lighted up. 

“Tell you what,” she said. “T’ll 
bet you the lunch I can do a job 
of manicuring quicker and better 
than you can.” 

Glenda quickly accepted the 
challenge. 

Robert Armstrong and Gordon 
Westcott were selected as the vic- 
tims and William Keighley as 
judge. 

Joan -started work on West- 
cott’s hands and Glenda on Arm- 
strong’s. In twenty-seven min- 
utes flat Joan had completed her 
job. One and a half minutes 
later Glenda had finished. Keigh- 
ley adjudged both jobs of equal 
merit so the wager was won by 
Joan, and Glenda bought the 
lunch. 


Hugh Herbert Gets 
First Screen Kiss 
In 8 Long Years 


“Kansas City Princess,” the 
Warner Bros. production now 
showing at the. 2/2.> : Rea of Ue are 
Theatre, promises to be a mile- 
stone in the life of Hugh Her- 
bert, featured comedian in the 
cast. 

For the first time in eight 
years, Hugh kisses a fair lady in 
front of the camera. 

Moreover, it’s only the second 
time he has kissed an actress 
for picture purposes. 

Hugh broke his long oscula- 
tory fast with Glenda Farrell in 
the final scenes for “Kansas City 
Princess,” while Director Wil- 
liam Keighley fervently exhorted 
him to “make it a good one” as 
the two pairs of lips met. 

There was a hearty smack as 
the two came out of their clinch, 
Keighley called “eut,” and a 
general wave of laughter went 
around the set. 

“That’s better than Scotch!” 
Hugh exclaimed, while Glenda 
blushed becomingly and another 
salvo of laughter greeted the 
comedian’s compliment to his 
blonde vis-a-vis. 

The picture is a hilarious com- 
edy romance of two gold digging 
manicurists on a jamboree. Joan 
Blondell has the stellar role while 
others in the cast include Robert 
Armstrong, Osgood Perkins, Ho- 
bart Cavanaugh and Gordon 
Westcott. 


E 
=o WIFE OF TH 
; ZF: +, CAMERAMAN ar 
Wy S Z ‘GEORGE BARNES- 
or “ gg RECENTLY RECEIVED 

i, Gs iS THROUGH THE MAILS A 
“y le a FORMAL AND EXTREMELY 

eages | COURTEOUS PROPOSAL OF 

: MARRIAGE FROM A 
WEALTHY CH/INAMAN OF 
SHANGHA/ A, 


ESS 


WHO SCOFFS AT 
MICE AND BURGLARS 
Is $0 DEADLY AFRAID 
OF THE DARK THAT 
SHE NEVER GOES 
TO SLEEP WITHOUT 
BURNING ALIGHT / 


TAKE IT OR LEAVE 1/7-- 
MAKES AND EATS 
WITH ZEST ASALAD 
OF ROSE PETALS. 
HE ALSO LIKES THEM 
RAW, RIGHT OFF 
THE BUSH, / 


Mat No. 10—20c. 


against an adversary, much as 
a boxer uses his hands. It is 
done by dropping on the hands 
and kicking backwards like a 
mule. 

Osgood Perkins, as a French 
divorce attorney, turns out to 


French Method Of 
Fighting With Feet °°. rai “gi wil 
Shown In New Film ‘ors _the climax of Kansas 
SES Bones pe Tes 


ity Princess,” having spent a 
month practicing the art with a 
French expert. 

When Robert Armstrong, as 
Hugh Herbert’s bodyguard and 
chauffeur, rushes to his defense 
during the hand-to-hand en- 
counter between Hugh and Per- 
kins, the latter, finding himself 
no match for the heavier Arm- 
strong, turns loose with his 
spatted boots, knocks the wind 
out of Armstrong with a well- 
aimed blow to the mid-section, 

Joan Blondell and Glenda Far- 
rell head the east of this rol- 
licking comedy romance of two 
manicurists on a jamboree. 


That French sport, known as 
“la savate,” is given a _ vivid 
workout in Warner Bros. produe- 
tion of “Kansas City Princess,” 
WANICHECOMOAC ebOrsb Gc et wees. oe 
ene at NOVO lee te eae 
American theatre-goers who have 
never seen the art of “la savate” 
practiced, will get some idea of 
how it works when Osgood Per- 
kins floors Robert Armstrong 
with it. 

“La savate” is a form of fight- 
ing which is peculiar to the 
French, and consists in using the 
feet, both in attack and defense 


A Little Finger Wave 


Considering all the finger waving, you’d think this would be a 

swell spot for a couple of manicurists . «. and it is! The gentlemen 

are Hugh Herbert and Osgood Perkins, the manicurists are Joan 

Blondell and Glenda Farrell, and the picture is Warner Bros.’ latest 
comedy, “Kansas City Princess’’. 


Mat No. 15—20c. 


Page Eleven 


Joan Blondell’s Own Life 
Tops That Of Any Picture 


Star Of “Kansas City Princess’? Has Had Unusual 
Personal Experiences 


mide to most people who have never had an oppor- 


Tina truth is stranger than fiction is a literary bro- 


tunity to test the validity of the old saying. 
There is one actress on the Warner Bros. lot, however, 
who knows just how true the dictum is. That actress is Joan 
Blondell, who has the stellar role in ‘‘Kansas City Princess,”’ 


which comes to the 

Despite the fact that she is 
only in her early twenties, this 
blonde, blue-eyed star has done 


as much globe-trotting as many a 
hardened and aged adventurer. 
There have been few situations 
in any of her pictures which she 
couldn’t top with some parallel 
out of a chapter in her own life. 


One of the leading situations 
in her latest Warner Bros. pro- 
duction, “Kansas City Princess,” 
shows Joan and Glenda Farrell, 
as two meandering manicurists, 
take off from Kansas City and 
before long find themselves on 
the deck of a French liner, bound 
for Europe, without a cent in 
their purses and nothing but 
miles of ocean behind them and 
in front. Thanks to a couple of 
big-hearted Aldermen from an 
Ohio city bound on their first trip 
to gay Paree, and a philanthropic 
millionaire, they manage to 
finance their passage to the Old 
World without being thrown into 
the brig as stowaways or being 
made to work their passage. But 
that’s another story. 

Take it from Joan Blondell, 
that’s not half as awkward as 
being stranded in China, just get- 


ting over-am illness that had laid— 


her up in a hospital, and without 
a stitch of clothes except what 
she wore. 


That was no movie plot. Joan 
was the heroine of that cross- 
section of life, at the age of sev- 
enteen. She had been a member 
of a theatrical company touring 
the Orient when she fell ill and 
was sent to a hospital, while the 
company continued its tour. 
When she was finally well enough 
to be discharged, she prepared to 
overtake her fellow-players and 
had her trunk shipped to the rail- 
road station. Unluckily, all the 
money she had in the world, as 
well as her wardrobe, was in that 
trunk. 

She got to the station just in 
time to see the building going 
up in flames, and with it her cash 
and belongings! 


She extricated herself from 
that situation by working at 
whatever she could find to do— 
such as being a waitress—until 
she could scrape enough money 
together to resume her theatrical 
career. And that’s only one of a 
dozen stories she can tell to prove 
that facts can always outstartle 
fiction. 

In “Kansas City Princess,” 
which is the humorous odyssey 
of a pair of middle western man- 
icurists, the chief accomplices of 
Joan and Glenda in their adven- 


tures are Robert Armstrong, 
Hugh Herbert, Hobart Cava- 
naugh, Ivan Lebedeff, Gordon 


Westcott, T. Roy Barnes and Os- 
good Perkins. 


Acts With Husband 


Joan Blondell, whose new War- 


ner Bros. production, “Kansas 
City Princess,’ comes to the.. . 
See on Bante Theatre sONs. is). 


has her own peculiar method of 
studying a script. She does it 
at home with her husband, George 
Barnes, as her prompter. They 
play the scenes together, and as 
George is also the chief camera- 
man on Joan’s pictures, he works 
out his eamera angles while Joan 
learns the dialogue. 


Page Twelve 


Theatre on 


Where's My Prince Charming? 


Film Players Present 
Actress Bassinette 


The entire company that 
worked with Joan Blondell in 
the Warner Bros. picture, “Kan- 
sas City Princess,’ which comes 


tore theniss ion tae: Theatre 
(Oy eR ME Caer Desee Sattnacn oop , chipped in 
and bought Joan Blondell +a 


beautiful bassinette. This. was 
presented to her on the last day 
of work on the production. The 
donors included her fellow play- 
ers, the prop men on the set, 
electricians, carpenters, the 
mistresses 


seript girl, wardrobe 
and hair dressers. 


So asks Joan Blondell, pretty star of Warner’s “Kansas City Prin- 


cess,” coming to the ________----------- 


eu sual nei Theatre. 


Glenda Farrell 


and Hugh Herbert head the all-comedy cast. 
Mat No. 21—20c. 


Hugh Herbert Keeps His 
Fellow Actors Roaring 


They Just Couldn’t Help Laughing At His Antics 


In “Kansas City Princess’’ 


his performance of a scene they know by heart, and 


W HEN an actor can make his fellow-players laugh at 


which is being done for the second or third time, 

it’s a tribute to his sense of comedy. 
Hugh Herbert, who is playing the role of a dumb, mil- 
lionaire husband in the Warner Bros. production of ‘‘ Kansas 


City Princess,’’ which comes to the 


LG ac 9 RE a cE , does that 
constantly and the sidelines of any 


set on which Hugh Herbert may 
be playing a scene finds every 
member of the company who may 
be working that day in a spot 
where they won’t miss a single 
(expression on Hugh’s face, or 
any of the pantomime with which 
he embellishes his scenes. 


Only an exceptionally tense 
dramatic scene, or a spectacular 
bit of action usually keeps the 
other players crowded around the 
edges of the camera area _ to 
watch a scene being made, over 
and over again. But Hugh Her- 
bert’s professional audience is 
singularly faithful to him. 

Only once during “Kansas City 
Princess” has Hugh Herbert had 
any of his fellow-actors walk out 
on him. 


That was when Joan Blondell, 
the star, watched him, half-way 
through a seene in which Hugh 
was on the set alone, walking up 
and down, with a horsewhip in 
his hand, and lashing out at an 
imaginary wrecker of his domes- 


Theatre 


tic happiness. All without saying 
a word. 

In the middle of it, Joan noise- 
lessly hurried away. When some- 
body asked her later why she did 
it, Joan said: 

“EF eouldn’t stand it any longer. 
Herbert was so excruciatingly 
funny, that if I had stayed there 
a second longer, I’d have shrieked 
out loud, and ruined the scene.” 

And she ecouldn’t go back to 
the set until that scene was final- 
ly approved, and the director had 
begun the rehearsal of something 
less side-splitting. 

Glenda Farrell, Robert Arm- 
strong, Gordon Westcott, Hobart 
Cavanaugh, T. Roy Barnes, Os- 
good Perkins and Ivan Lebedeff 
are the other important members 
of the east of “Kansas City 
Princess.” 

William Keighley directed the 
picture from the screen play by 
Sy Bartlett and Manuel Seff, 
which is a hilarious comedy ro- 
mance of two gold digging mid- 
west manicurists on a jamboree 
in Gay Paris. 


Glenda Farrell Hardest 


Working Screen Actress 


Co-Star In “Kansas City Princess’? Takes Her 
Film Roles Seriously 


Warner Bros. lot has been awarded, by tacit agree- 


Tw palm for being the hardest-working artist on the 


ment on the part of those who know intimately every 
artist’s temperament, to the blonde, wise cracking star, 


Glenda Farrell! 


Her fellow-artists admit it cheerfully. 
That doesn’t mean that the other stars have a careless 


or superficial attitude toward their pictures. 


means that Glenda Farrell—per- 
haps the last person in the world 


one would suspect of rigid, sus- 
tained concentration on every de- 
tail of her performances — tops 
them all in this regard. 

Glenda puts everything she has 
into every scene. That’s why, at 
the end of a day’s work, she goes 
home tired out, glad to do noth- 
ing but go to bed and get ready 
for the next day’s activity. But 
that’s only half of her attitude 
toward a part. 

More often than not there will 
be an interval of two, three or 
four days in the middle of a pic- 
ture, such as her latest one, “Kan- 
sas City Princess,” which comes 
to the Theatre 
(DTG NS teed eae ay ea , during which 
there will be nothing for her to 
do. It’s a chance to rest, to relax, 
to play a bit, which most artists 
take advantage of. 

But not Glenda. She’ll rest, all 
right. But as for relaxing or 
playing, that is banned from her 
daily regime until the picture she 
is working in igs completely fin- 
ished. 

“Once I’ve gotten myself into 
the-mood of a particular char- 
acter she explained during the 
shooting of “Kansas City Prin- 
cess,” as she sat on the side- 
lines of the set one afternoon, 
“T daren’t do anything that would 
spoil that mood until the picture 
is completed. I’m afraid to relax 
for a few days in the middle of a 
production, because Dve found 
from experience that it’s harder 
to get back into the feeling of a 
character the second time than it 
was to create it in the first in- 
stance. 


“Hyen 


though I may not be 
called to the studio on some par- 


Shooting The Works 


It simply 


ticular day, mentally and emo- 
tionally ’m on duty. A change in 
schedule may suddenly cause the 
director to send for me—it has 
happened more than once when I 
thought I had a free day. or two 
—and I’ve found that it’s wise to 
be ready to go into action at half 
an hour’s notice. Then, when the 
last scene hag been approved and 
I know that I am really free, I 
let go completely. That’s the 
kind of relaxation and play that 
counts and builds you up for your 
next picture.” 

During the rehearsals of a new 
stage play, Glenda would work so 
hard and worry so much over her 
part that she invariably lost 
weight. For three days before 
the opening night of the play, 
her appetite would be completely 
gone and she would eat next to 
nothing. Invariably she went 
through the first performance on 
sheer nerve. 

Glenda doesn’t lose her appetite 
any longer at the beginning of a 
new picture, but she rarely ever 
comes through a production with- 
out being several pounds lighter. 


Glenda is in her element oe 
wise-cracking, hard-boiled wt, 


eurist pal of Joan Blondell in 
“Kansas City Princess,” whose 
adventures ultimately land them 
both in Paris. Robert Armstrong 
has the lead opposite Miss Blon- 


dell, while Hugh Herbert as a 
millionaire playboy, becomes 


Glenda’s “big moment.” 

Other important players in the 
drama are Hobart Cavanaugh, 
Gordon Westcott, Osgood Perkins, 
T. Roy Barnes, Ivan Lebedeff and 
Vince Barnett. William Keighley 
directed the production from the 
screen play by Sy Bartlett and 
Manuel Seff. 


As two would be “hard guys,” Robert Armstrong and Vince Barnett 
bring many hilarious moments to “Kansas City Princess,” the 
Warner comedy featuring Glenda Farrell and Hugh Herbert. Others 
in the cast include Osgood Perkins, Hobart Cavanaugh and T. Roy 


Barnes. The film is now playing at the 


2 ot ese. 


Mat No. 11—20c. 


Herbert Contracts 
Case of Bananaphobia 


Hugh Herbert, Warner Bros. 
comedian, is the victim of a 
new disease. 

Hugh ealls it “bananapho- 
bia,” “a fear of bananas.” 

Hugh had his first attack 
after playing a scene in “Kan- 
sas City Prineess,’ which 
comes to the 
Theatre on 
Joan Blondell and Glenda Far- 
rell in the stellar roles. In 


one scene he is called upon 
to eat ten bananas, in rapid 
succession, 

Hugh managed to get away 
the bananas, as well as with 
a slight attack of indigestion. 


Since then he hasn’t been 
able to look a banana in the 
face. The mere mention of 
the fruit nauseates him. And 
he doesn’t expect to recover 
from his “bananaphobia” for 
months, if ever, which is one 
of the penalties of being a 
screen comedian. 


Joan Blondell Does 
Campfire Girl Deed 


Joan Blondell, who plays the 
role of a Campfire Girl in one 
episode of her latest Warner 
Bros. picture, “Kansas City 
Prineess,” which comes to the 
Buc MAG ee hieatneriOn isc), 
proved herself true to the help- 
ful precepts of the Campfire or- 
ganization by doing a good deed 
that brought her a letter of grat- 
itude yesterday. 

With Glenda Farrell, Miss 
Blondell and forty Hollywood 
extras dressed as Campfire Girls 
went to a Los Angeles railway 
station recently to make scenes 


Aon 


: ~—the picture. 
' ean station also, waiting for 


a train to Santa Barbara, 100 
miles away, was a young woman 
obviously sick, distressed and 
desolate. 

Miss Blondell bought luncheon 
for the forlorn traveler, took her 
to watch the making of scenes 
for the picture and gave her $10. 


Armstrong Partial 
To Blue Shirts 


Robert Armstrong, who plays 
the role of a gangster in the War- 
ner Bros. comedy romance, “Kan- 
sas City Princess,’ now showing 
at the Theatre, 
with Joan Blondell in the stel- 
lar role, always manages’ to 
wear a blue shirt in every pic- 
ture he plays in. It’s his favor- 
ite color in shirts and is also a 
superstition. 


Glenda Farrell Learns 
To Wear Monocle 


After ten minutes coaching 
from Ivan Lebedeff on the set 
of “Kansas City Princess,” the 
Warner Bros. picture now show- 
IN abe. wie eke Theatre, 
Glenda Farrell discovered that 
wearing a monocle isn’t nearly 
as hard as it looks. Joan Blon- 
dell, ithe; star, tried.) it, but 
couldn’t keep from laughing at 
herself, so she gave it up. 


Goodbye Suckers! 


And we say “bon voyage” to Joan Blondell and Glenda Farrell, the 
two-timing, gold-digging manicurist heroines of Warner Bros.’ com- 


edy, “Kansas City Princess,” 


COMUNE ALOnt NO eae ee Se 
Theatre one. 


Mat No. 22—20c. 


Joan Blondell’s Lifetime 
Ambition Was Motherhood 


Star Announced Happy Event While Working In 
‘“‘Kansas City Princess” 


OAN BLONDELL jarred Hollywood recently while 
working on the Warner Bros. production of ‘‘ Kansas 


City Princess,’’ which comes to the _ 
, by announcing that she was 


Theatre on 


expecting a visit from the famous nursery bird, the stork. 

Hollywood has long known that Joan, as the wife of 
George Barnes, is an extremely happy person, but Hollywood 
hasn’t known that a visit from the stork fulfills a life- 


long ambition of the blonde star. 

When Joan Blondell was a 
little girl she possessed many 
tomboy characteristics. She was 
athletically inclined and a de- 
votee of outdoor sports, many of 
them a bit too rough for the ordi- 
nary miss. Combined with all 
this, however, she had an innate 
love for dolls. Her love for dolls 
and “play houses” was almost an 
obsession. 

The maternal instinet which 
made itself apparent when Joan 
was so young, has never been 
submerged in her. In the years 
when she was trouping with her 
theatrical parents and _ fighting 
her battle to get ahead in the 
theatrical world, she never lost 
the thought of her childhood am- 
bition, motherhood. 

“Stardom, wealth, screen sue- 
cess—these don’t mean anything 
to me now,” she declared. 

“Perhaps being a mother will 
occupy too much of your time. 
What of that?” she was asked. 

“Oceupy too much time for 
what?” came her response. “It 
may occupy all my time and, if it 


does, that’s all right with me. If 
T find that being a mother doesn’t 
allow time for picture work, well 
—there won’t be any picture 
work! 

“Ym not going to be the kind 
of a mother who leaves the care 
of her baby to a lot of nurses. 
V’m going to watch it grow up 
and see that it gets the proper 
care.” 

Even before news of the stork 
was revealed, Joan and George 
have been looked upon as a ecou- 
ple with a lifetime of happiness 
together before them. Now, with 
this added touch of happiness, it’s 
safe to assume that here is one 
pair that never will be touched 
by the curse of Hollywood di- 
voree. 

In “Kansas City Princess,” 
Joan’s current production, she 
has the role of a mid-west, gold- 
digging manicurist on a hilarious 
jamboree in gay Paris. Others in 
the cast include Glenda Farrell, 
Robert Armstrong, Osgood Per- 
kins, Hobart Cavanaugh and 
Gordon Westcott. 


Travels 7,000 Miles 
To Play In Film 


T. Roy Barnes travelled 7000 
miles to play his role of a small 
town alderman in the Warner 
Bros. picture, “Kansas City Prin- 
cess,” which comes to the...... 
Rats Ae Theatre on 


Paria eet et eet a jee 


Barnes was in New York when 
the wire from the studio reached 
him. He learned enough about 
the role in a long-distance tele- 
phone conversation to know that 
it was right up his alley. He flew 
to Hollywood, finished the pic- 
ture and then boarded a fast 
train east, to begin rehearsals for 
“The Orchid Squad.” 


Hugh Herbert Started 
At 50 Cents A Show 


Hugh Herbert, featured com- 
edian in the Warner Bros. pro- 
duction, “Kansas City Princess,” 
which comes (to thes.) ii. sk 
MUGGLTOHONG. tani. oc Cees , is 
now paid many hundreds of dol- 
lars a week for his famed talents. 
Once, however, his salary was 
fifty cents a performance. 


It was Hugh’s maiden effort 
behind the footlights—and the 
piece was a_ ten-twenty-thirty 
melodrama entitled “Roaring 
Dick.” Hugh was one of a group 
of children who walked onto the 
stage to welcome home. the 
Squire. Maurice Barrymore, 
father of Lionel, Ethel and John, 
was the star of the attraction. 

Joan Blondell has the stellar 
role in “Kansas City Princess,” 
a hilarious comedy romance of 
two manicurists on a jamboree, 


Hugh Herbert Gets 
Chicken For Veal 


Herbert does 
William 
Keighley changed the menu of 


Because Hugh 


not eat veal, director 


the dinner served in the Paris 


sequence of “Kansas City Prin- 
cess,” the Warner Bros. produe- 
tion which comes to the 


Theatre on 


and substituted 
fried chicken. 
Hugh elaims that his dislike 


for veal dates from his second 


role on the stage. He had been 


promoted to a speaking part and 
demanded a dressing-room. The 
irony of Hugh’s victory was ap- 
parent when he discovered that 
his room-mate was a lusty young 
ealf who was also a member of 
the company. 

“From that day,” said Herb- 
ert, “I have never been able -to 
enjoy a mouthful of veal in any 
form.” 


Joan Blondell Gets 
Mail Proposal 


Joan Blondell has had many 
surprises of various kinds in her 
young and busy life. But it 
would be difficult to match the 
one which followed the opening 
of her fan mail one day during 
the making of “Kansas City 
Princess,” the Warner Bros. pic- 
ture now showing at the....... 
© er = ee Theatre. 

The letter contained a rather 
formal and stately proposal of 
marriage from a _ correspondent 
who described himself as a Dutch- 
man by birth, a_ successful 
planter in the East Indies, 30 
years of age and with what he 


considered a very bright-fatwree- 


ahead of him. 


Actor Can Remember 
His Lines For Years 


Hobart Cavanaugh, who plays 
in the 


“Kansas 


a small town alderman 
Warner Bros. picture, 
City Princess,” now showing at 
LETC EMR ERS eee sea Theatre, has an 
unusual memory. 

Without any visible effort, he 
can remember in their entirety 
parts that he played six and 


eight years ago, and_ hasn’t 


thought of since. 

Helen Lowell, playing on an 
adjoining Warner sound stage, 
walked on to the set where Hobie 
was working the other day. A 
number of years ago, Miss Lowell 
and Cavanaugh played together 
in “Mile-A-Minute Kendall.” 
They fell to recalling their ex- 
periences in that production, and 
Hobie both amazed and amused 
Miss Lowell by reeling off one 


speech after another from the 
play. 
Name of Pilnikoff 
Licks Herbert 

Hugh Herbert doesn’t have 
any trouble pronouncing such 


tongue twisters as sarsaparilla 
or millifluous, but there is one 
word that got his goat in “Kan- 
sas City Princess,’ a Warner 
Bros. picture which comes to the 


name of a Russian doctor who 
steals Hugh’s wife in the picture. 
He pronounced it Piklinoff, Pin- 
likoff and a half a dozen other 
ways while Director William 
Keighley swore under his breath 
at the number of retakes. 

“T finally got that word licked,” 


om ~ S , wee ae 
“takes” to do it. 


Hen’s Egg Gets Stuck 
Tight In Actor’s Mouth 


Had To Be Smashed Before Hobart Cavanaugh 
Could Get Rid Of It 


Hobart Cavanaugh. He’s an authority on the subject, 


iz YOU want to know anything about hen’s eggs, ask 


after his experience in an egg juggling scene with T. 
Roy Barnes, which is one of the many humorous passages in 
Joan Blondell’s latest starring picture for Warner Bros., 


‘‘Kansas City Prineess,”’ 


Theatre. 


now showing at the 


Hobart was blissfully unaware that hen’s eggs came in 


different sizes. Eggs were eggs to 
him, and the only difference be- 
tween them, as far as he was con- 
cerned, was that sometimes they 
were fried, and at other times 
poached, .- 


But during the filming of “Kan- 
sas City Princess” Hobart discov- 
ered that one egg may be larger 
than another by getting what 
might be ealled a No. 6 egg into 
his mouth, and then discovering 
that he couldn’t get it out. 

The egg juggling trick, which 
is one of T. Roy Barnes’ best 
little pieces of parlor entertain- 
ment, was the occasion for Ho- 
bart’s startling discovery. 

As two Ohio politicians bound 
for Europe on their first trip 
abroad, Barnes and Cavanaugh 
are playing hosts to Joan Blon- 
dell and Glenda Farrell in their 
steamer stateroom. 

Barnes, as the “life of the 
party,” decides to show the girls 
some of his sleight-of-hand abil- 
ity, after a few cocktails have 
livened up the party. 

And Cavanaugh, good-natured 
simple soul, consents to help him 
with his tricks. 

The egg trick consists of 
Barnes making the egg appear 
and disappear magically, and 
finally taking it out of Hobie’s 
mouth, after having dropped it 


down the back of his neck. 

The first time the trick went 
smoothly, and the egg popped 
out of Cavanaugh’s mouth with 
the greatest of ease. ; 

“Let’s do it once more,” said 
Director William Keighley. What 
happened after that is a matter 
for controversy. Barnes insists 
that he didn’t switch the eggs in- 


tentionally, though admitting 
that he was carrying two in his 
pocket. 


Barnes adroitly slipped the egg 
into Hobart’s mouth and _ pre- 
pared to pop it out again. 

Only this time it didn’t pop. It 
stuck half way and refused to 
budge. Finally Roy Barnes, in 
trying to pry the egg out of Ho- 
bart’s mouth, smashed it. Then 
Hobart was able to get rid of it. 
Both Keighley and Barnes tried 
to persuade Cavanaugh to do the 
scene over again the same way 
with another egg, to be used as 
the climax of the juggling se- 
quence. But Hobart declined. 

“How do I know he wouldn’t 
use an ostrich egg the next time,” 
he demanded. 

The picture is a hilarious com- 
edy drama of two Kansas City 
gold digging manicurists on a 
trip to Gay Paree, written by Sy 
Bartlett and Manuel Seff. 


Page Thirteen 


VOTING CONTESF - 


There’s still life in the 
popularity voting contest, 
especially if you haven’t con- 
ducted one in a long while. 
This time you’re looking for 
the most popular manicurist 
in town. That ought to get 
the gals and lads in the bar- 
ber shops rooting for their 
favorites—and the picture. 


(Publicity Story) 


Vote for the Most 
Popular Manicurist 
In New York Gity 


Who is the most popular mani- 
CUPIStelts Ae ee net kare (city)? 


Whoever she is, there are valu- 
able prizes waiting for her, as 
well as other signal honors which 
will be her’s as soon as the read- 
@rse Of “theap.n: ere rrr (news- 
paper) choose her. 


A voting coupon is published 
today on Page . ‘..: of this news- 
paper, and will be repeated daily 
for the rest of the week. 


Clip out the coupon, fill in the 
name and address of your favor- 
ite manicurist and deposit the 
coupon in the voting box in the 
lobby Of thier. tage Theatre, 
where “Kansas City Princess,” a 
side-splitting story of two mani- 
curists on the make, at home and 
abroad, and their strange adven- 
tures and thrilling romances, will 
open on 

Joan Blondell and Glenda Far- 
rell, that inimitable team of fem- 
inine wise crackers and go-get- 
ters head an all star Warner 
Bros. cast. Those two girls are 
some manicurists, and trim a good 
deal more than cuticle. 

The most popular manicurist 
1 Seema oan (city) “eed not 
be as glamorous as either Joan 
Blondell or Glenda Farrell. She 
certainly won’t be the kind of 
girl these two comediennes por- 
tray. But she will have that cer- 
tain something that will win for 
her not only the valuable prizes 
offered, but the distinction of 
being introduced from the stage 
OLE ete... Theatre on the 
opening night of “Kansas City 
Princess”. 

The contest ends 
Prizes are as follows (insert list). 


YOUR TREAT 


Through a tie-up with 
local department store or 
cosmetic manufacturer you 
might secure a quantity of 
lip-sticks or samples of face 
powder for giveaways. 
Wrappers containing the 
gifts plug the picture and 
the product. 

Another angle is to hand 
out the cosmetics as gifts to 
women attending matinees. 
Idea can be extended for 
regular matinee feature, giv- 
ing different beauty aid 
products on different days. 


TAGGING ALL CARS 


Ch MEMO MRIE NAGIMES MOE WEd se eg 
“KANSAS CITY PRINCESS” ° 
MN acuta snnceemoia ve araue e Or 1Netc 


: a 
Local printer can make up 
paper streamers reading, “We're 
on our way to see ‘Kansas City 
Princess’ at the Strand.” Have 
your friends paste them on the 
rear window of their cars. A 
couple of passes to the taxi 
company, and all the cabs in 
town will plug for you. 


Page Fourteen 


MANICURISTS GO CUTE-ICLE 


Since Glenda Farrell and Joan Blondell are manicurists 
in this film, they, and all other manicurists have to hear the 
same spiel from every fellow they manicure. Print a card 
with copy below. Girls hand to each lad before they start 
to file away. A pass to the girl or the owner of the shop, 
ought to square it. Reverse side of card can carry ad for 
cooperating barber shop. Here’s the copy: 


Yes, I know I have lovely eyes. But they’re just to see 


your nails with, my dear! 


they should be. I paid plenty for them! . 


. . . Pretty white teeth? 


Well, 
. . And what 


would your wife say if she heard you ask for a date? Oh, 
your wife she went to the country. Well, she'd better get 


back fast, or you’re going to be plenty lonely . . 


- No, I 


can’t see you tonight. My boy friend’s taking me to the 


movies . 


. . Wouldn’t I rather go dancing with you? Or- 


dinarily I would, but “Kansas City Princess” is at the 
Strand Theatre tonight, and I wouldn’t miss it for the 
world ... Why? Well, I hear it’s swell, and then Joan 
Blondell and Glenda Farrell are in it, so I know it must 


be . . . Some other night? Oh, sure! 


But I'll probably 


want to see “Kansas City Princess” again. You know it’s 
there all this week. 


DEALER TIE-UP 
STILLS 


Exhibs keep writing in 
for the Warner tie-up 
stills, and say they’re easy 
to plant. If you haven’t 
used them yet, start now. 
If you’ve used them be- 
fore, you shouldn’t have 
any difficulty with this 
selection. Stills are 10c. 
each. Order from Mer- 
chandising Plan Editor, 
Warner Bros., 321 West 
44th Street, N. Y. C. 


Furniture — GF Pub A32; 
GF Pub A33; GF Pub A34. 


Magazines — GF Pub A47. 

Books — GF Pub A30. 

Florists — BL613; GF Pub 
A249, 

Perfume—GF Pub A22; GF 
Pub A23. 


Sporting Goods — BL Pub 
A60; BL727; GF Pub A13; 
GF Pub Al4; GF Pub 
Al5; GF Pub A117; GF 
Pub A211. 


Women’s Accessories — BL 
708; BL294; GF137; GF 
Pub V. 


Pets — GF Pub O; GF203; 
GF209; BL682; BL771; 
BL772. 


Toys — BL Pub A19; 
Pub A. 


Hat Shops — BL816; 
230; GF231; GF232; 
233. 

Furs — GF172; GF232. 

Dress Shops — BL652; 
655; BL718; BL719; 
138; GF139; GF 161; 
169; GF171; GF211; 
215; GF217; GF221; 
223; GF224; GF226; 
227; GF229. 

Jewelry — GF163. 

Cadillac Auto—BL Pub A42. 

Norge Refrigerator — BL 


GF 


GF 
GF 


BL 
GF 
GF 
GF 
GF 
GF 


Pub A354. 

Beauty Shops — BL733: 
KP7. 

Musical Instruments — KP 


Pub C; KP Pub D. 


HERBERT’S ANTICS 


Hugh Herbert has a hilari- 
ous type of humor, all his 
own. If you remember, in 
each picture he introduced a 
particular funny antic which 
he used throughout the pic- 
ture. In ‘‘Fashions,’’ he did 
tricks with his fingers; in 
‘‘Wonder Bar’’ he laughed 
with a high, falsetto titter. 
Run a contest for the best 
suggestions for ‘‘Hugh Her- 
bert’s <Antics’’. Winning 
suggestions will be forward- 
ed to Hugh Herbert, if you 
send them to Editor, Mer- 
chandising Plan, Warner 
Bros., New York City. 


NOVEL CUT-OUT 


Still 


above, 


KP 209, 


can be 


illustrated 
converted for 
Make blowups 
and then cut-outs of them, for 
display 


many purposes. 


in ‘gas stations, road- 
houses, front and lobby. Also 
good for display in department 
store windows for price cards, 
and other tie-ups. Use _ tie-in 
copy in space indicated. 


If yowre in a football town, 
be sure to have at least one 
blowup adorning the stadium on 
the Saturday before and during 
your run. That'll mean a free 
ad which thousands will see. 


LOCAL “PRINCESSES” 


There’s enough lure in this 
newspaper tie-up to give 
your showing substantial 
advance publicity. Story 
covering the idea explains 
all. Follow-up stories can be 
run along same lines, re- 
printing some of the letters 
sent by contestants. 


(Publicity Story) 


What Would You Do 
If You Were Made 
Princess of This Gity 


If YOU, by some sudden quirk 
of .fate were made Princess of 
craig ay SHA aR ae (name of city) and 
endowed with all the powers that 
a princess of old held over her 
subjects, what would you do? 

Do you remember how Francois 
Villon sang “If I Were King” 
and what happened when a 
prankish potentate made his 
dream come true? 


Here’s a chance to dream, and 
have your visions win for you 
two free tickets to the......... 
Theatre where Warner Bros. 
merry comedy of two manicurists 
on the make and in love, at home 
and abroad, will open on........ 


Joan Blondell and Glenda Far- 
rell, who head the all star cast, 
wielded no temporal powers over 
Kansas City, but that has noth- 
ing to do with the contest. 


What would you do if you were 
a Princess or Prince? Remember, 
your will is law. You can fire 
the chief of police or have your 
boss beheaded if you wish. You 
can change the laws, close the 
schools, or declare a moratorium 
on debts. 

Prizes, however, will be award- 
ed not for the most fantastic 
ideas, but for the most helpful 
ones. 

Simply write down what you 
would do, if you were Princess, 
or -rince, Of... ae (eity), 
keeping your letter within 100 
words, and send it to the Contest 
Editor of the (newspaper ) 
before The best five 
letters will win for their writers 
two tickets to the 
Theatre to see 
Princess”. 


“Kansas 


GARTER CARDS 


Promote a supply of gar- 
ters, attach them to cards, 
copy reading, ‘‘You GAR- 
TER see us in ‘Kansas City 
Prineess’. It’s even got 
more snap than this. Signed, 
Joan Blondell and Glenda 
Farrell.’’ 


STUNT TO AID OPENING 


FEMALE HELP WANTED 


MANICURISTS: 
Theatre. 


to to work in Strand 
Girls must be attractive. Apply 


tomorrow morning 1o to 12, Manager. 


That’s the ad you run in the papers. Girls are put to 
work in your lobby to service customers with free mani- 
cures. You pay the girls two dollars per day and they keep 


all the tips. 


Your angle is that you are providing work for unem- 
ployed manicurists. Besides the word-of-mouth advertising, 
the stunt ought to get newspaper breaks with pictures and 


story. 


Copy plugging this free service ought to tie-in with your 
showing. Use stills KP 7 and KP 8 for illustrations. 


GETTING FREE PLUGS 


The girls in the beauty 
parlors and barber shops will 
like this show. Since they’re 
always in a position to pass 
a good word along to their 
customers, invitations to a 
selected list of manicurists 
ought to bring good returns. 


PRACTICAL JOKES 


Two drunks in the picture 
are continually playing 
practical jokes and getting 
a big kick out of it. Your 
paper might go for a con- 
test for the best letters on 
practical jokes, which were 
pulled on, pulled by, or told 
to, the sender. 


DOUBLES 


This contest idea can be 
conducted with cooperation 
of dance halls, beauty par- 
lors and department stores. 
Local paper runs the story 
below. You display the con- 
testants’ photos in the lobby 
to jack up interest. 


(Publicity Story) 


Doubles of 2 Noted 
Screen Stars Will 
Be Awarded Prizes 


What girl in 
looks most like Joan Blondell? 

Which one bears the closest re- 
semblance to Glenda Farrell? 

Almost every famous 


screen 
star has a double in nearly every 
city. The doubles of these two 
stars of Warner Bros. hilarious 
romance of manicurists on the 
make, at home and _ abroad, 
“Kansas City Princess,” will be 
chosen by the audience of the 
RIS. Theatre when that merry 
comedy opens on 

Study the published photo- 
graphs of Miss Blondell and Miss 
Farrell. 

Do you know anyone who 
could be mistaken for either of 
them ? 


If you do, mail a photograph 
tothe manager ofthe saciree sn: 
Theatresbetore.. /).. 36 20k ees es 

The three girls most closely 
resembling either Miss Blondell 
or Miss Farrell, six in all, will 
be honor guests at the....... aes 
Theatre and the final winners 


will be selected by the audiens=—™ . 


Prizes are as follows (ins*<” 
list of prizes): MS 


28 x 42 BLOWUPS 


Black and white, $2.25 each. 
Set of three, $6.00. 
Full colors, $3.50 each. 

of three, $10. 


Set 


Order from ; 
NATIONAL STUDIOS, Ine. 


226 West 56th Street 
New York City 


Soy? 


, 


———— 


After looking through mile after mile 
(or so it seemed) of entries in the 
“Circus Clown” Exploitation Contest, 
we've picked a number of real good 
stunts, which are adaptable to this and 
future comedies. 


GENE CURTIS and KEN FINLAY, 
those two fast-stepping lads of the Palace 
Theatre in Montreal, had several of the 
larger florists displaying 22” x 28” theatre 
cards, with copy reading, “On or off the 
screen, Joe Brown says ‘Say It With Flow- 
ers’.”” (Theatre imprint.) Still BL 613 can 
be used for illustration in tie-up with “Kan- 
sas City Princess”. 


—Are You Using Vitaphone Shorts ?— 


J. L. STALLMAN of Philadelphia’s 
Circle Theatre, promoted an empty store 
window. His artist built a replica of a giant 
fountain pen, which was placed at the bottom 
of a big sign, to give the impression of just 
having written the copy. Sign was written in 
large hand-written letters and read, “It takes 
a pen this big to tell you about the funniest 
picture to hit town this year,... ” 


—Tell Us About Your Stunts— 


BILL HENDRICKS, of the Warner 
Theatre, down in Memphis, Tenn., yowsah, 
arranged to have Neon letters of his title and 
theatre, placed on a plane, which flew low 
over town at night. Bill modestly reports 


i sites 
Sa that- it-was the most effective and unusual 


aerial flash ever used in Memphis. 


—Are You Using The Swell Warner Trailers ?— 


BARNEY GURNETTE, Santa Cruz 
Theatre’s head man, out in sunny California, 
pulled a pip of a newspaper tie-up. Local 
paper awarded two tickets for the theatre, to 
anyone subscribing to the paper. Stunt 
pulled full three column ads daily, most of 
which was given to the theatre attraction. 
And all it cost was a handful of passes. 


—Get Set Now For a “Warner Winter’— 


H. J. ARNOLD, of the Indiana Theatre 
in Terre Haute, pulled a cooperative stunt 
with local newspaper that not only did his 
picture a lot of good, but also relieved the 
unemployment situation in town. Newspaper 
offered free pass to anyone who gave a man 
a job through the “Situations Wanted” col- 
umn of the paper. Theatre nabbed a free 
box daily and loads of good will at the same 
time. 


—Go to Town Exploiting This Picture— 


BILL LEGGERIO, manager of San 
Bernadino’s Ritz Theatre, out in California, 
pulled this prize publicity stunt. His ushers 
went out on strike, parading the streets with 
signs reading, “Ritz Theatre’s ushers out on 
strike. We demand that the management stop 
showing ‘Circus Clown’... We can’t work! 
The laughs are killing us! ... Our sides ache 


.. « « We ean’t stand it! You will sympathize 
ymp 


with us when you see ‘Circus Clown’.”? Stunt 
made all the papers with stories and photos, 
the town getting a big kick out of it. Same 
might go in your town on this picture. 


—Book The Series Of 13 “See America First’? Shorts— 


BEFORE WE CLOSE, there’s one thing 
we noticed about most of the good campaigns 
and that was their trailer presentation. Most 
of them spent a little time and money on 
a novelty to preceed the trailer and _ re- 
port satisfying results. A little comic stage 
presentation that ties in with it, or a spotlight 
shining on a gag sign before trailer, and 
you’d be surprised at the amount of atten- 
tion it will get, and, of course, the picture. 
Keep stunting it, and soon you’ll have the 
whole town talking about your trailers. 


GAL BALLY 


Your best bet for a street 
bally is to put two or three 
pretty girls in a brand new 
touring car. Copy on the car 
to read, ‘‘We’re going to the 
Strand Theatre to be the 
guests of ‘Kansas City Prin- 
cess’’, with Joan Blondell 
and Glenda Farrell.’’ Car can 
drive all around town, with 
a trick horn or loud noise 
maker to attract attention. 


GAG GOOD DEEDS 


Scouts — good deeds; 
they’re almost synonymous. 
And Mesdames Farrell and 
Blondell, in stills KP 28 and 
29, appear in girl scout cos- 
tumes. Tie in with the idea, 
offering guest tickets td pa- 
trons submitting the funniest 
good deeds they ean think 
of. Needn’t be true, as long 
as they’re entertaining. 

As an example, you can 
tell them that in the picture, 
Joan, a manicurist, is doing 
customer’s nails when she 
sees a couple of crooks eye- 
ing a diamond stick-pin her 
friend is wearing. Rather 
than let him be victimized 
by the dishonest gentlemen, 
she swipes the pin herself. 
That was her good deed for 
that day. 


DIALOGUE LINES 


Here are nine real funny 
catch lines from a real funny 


picture. Action stills ith 


strate each line. Make a dis- 

play of the stills with accom- 

panying lines for your front 
or lobby. Lots of exhibs 
make blowups of the stills. 

They make a grand flash 

that way. 

Robert Armstrong: Quincy, I’m 
in love. I can’t eat! I can’t 
sleep! I can’t even play pool 
no more—That’s love. (Still 
KP 1) 

Glenda Farrell: It?s a date—that 
is, if the moth balls haven’t 
chewed up my evening gown. 
(Still KP 8) 

Robert Armstrong: I bought this 
ring! That’s what I think of 
you. (Still KP 21) 

Joan Blondell: I can’t get over 
what a perfect match these 
diamonds are; they fit each 
other like ham and eggs. 
(Still KP 13) 

Joan Blondell: Kind of lone- 
some, eh? Well mister, this is 
a barber shop—not the Lone- 
ly Hearts Club. (Still KP 5) 

T. Roy Barnes: I carry this bag 
myself—Our farewell party’s 
in there. (Still KP 36) 

Joan Blondell: Pardon me—I’ve 
got to give a Chinaman a 
roller skating lesson. (Still 
KP 6) 

Joan Blondell: You kissed my 
hand forty times. When you 
hit fifty, I’m gonna sell. 
(Still KP 65) 

Joan Blondell: This must be 
merry-go-round stuff — two 
drinks and you’re spinning. 


(Still KP 41) 


PUT ’EM IN LIGHTS 


Names from “Dames” 
and other comedy hits. 
Display them big! Not 
one, not two, but ALL: 


JOAN BLONDELL 
HUGH HERBERT 
GLENDA FARRELL 
ROBERT ARMSTRONG 


OSGOOD PERKINS 


GAG MEMBERSHIP CARDS 


Distribute membership cards like this to all the girls: 


( NAME ) 


ieia Mee mb e:r cost “tare 


“ROYAL ORDER OF PRINCESSES” 
OUR MOTTO: GO OUT LIKE A QUEEN .. . LIVE 


LIKE A KING... ALWAYS HAVE A PRINCE OF 


Avge ME: 


. AND MAKE YOUR BOY FRIEND 


SPEND HIS JACK BY TAKING YOU TO SEE 
“KANSAS: CITY “PRINCESS”. “AT “THE STRAND. 


(Signed) 


CAMP FIRE GIRLS 


Joan Blondell and Glenda 
Farrell join the Camp Fire 
Girls in the picture. If you 
have an organization in 
town, try to get them to 
make Joan and Glenda hon- 
orary members. This should 
be done by mailing member- 
ship cards, buttons and all 
that goes with it to Holly- 
wood. And let the reporters 
in on the business. 


GETTING PERSONAL 


Start plugging the picture 
a week ahead with this cost- 
less stunt. Have your cashier 
write little notes, which she 
hands to patrons with their 
change. Note reads: 

Hello! Will you meet me 
here again next Friday, when 
“Kansas City Princess” opens? 
Joan Blondell and Glenda 
Farrell have loads of laughs 
for you. 

Mary Smith, Cashier, 
Strand Theatre. 


CROSS-WORD PUZZLE PLANT 


bagel a 


Puzzle and Solution Available in Mat No. 3—20c 


Across 

1. Large city in Kansas__.KANSAS CITY 
11. King’s daughter _____.___. PRINCESS 
12. Box Office 
4. Shrines ~ 220 
15. King of Bashan 
27. Covet sears oe 
19. Period before Easter _________-- LENT 
OT Phas hath te | eile Sop ea SS ELF 
21. Miscellaneous collection ___--- OLIO 
23. Scandinavian literature _____.. EDDA 
25. ‘Letter. followingo M32 ee N 


26; Hewing: ‘tool === 
273 (Publicanotice 32 
28. Letter before S 
992 (Five hundred 2.22222 
30. French article 
31. Spanish. yee ne. ee ee ee 

32:—L etter following Qo =—2-— R 


$3: Level 2. ee ee __..EVEN 
35. Head in French _...TETE 
RR Ver ios ese Coe See LID 
Be Aarippled: 2. ee LAME 
AS) DRC BIR ica, ee oe re SOL 
44: Pouistand. “202 ses. eee LA 
45. Desires viciously __----------- COVETS 
47. Hebrew name for God ___----- EL 
49. Live-wire money-hunter, GOGETTER 
SO ALOT te ene ak ee MOTE 
5d -AOSeNES oie ie eee AWAY 
Down 
ts better, preceding 22... ee K 
2: Associated (Press: ee AP 
3. National Recovery Act -_.-----.. NRA 
4, Door-step ledge --.-------------------- SILL 
5. Before the beginning ----------. ANTE 
6. To examine closely --------------- SCAN 
7. Slang for certainly -___----------- CERT 
8. Abbreviation of issue -___------------ Iss 
Oo Pablo SGU ips. a eae Ts 
10. Y. M. C. A. abbreviated ________..--. yy 
12. Last name of female star, 
BLONDELL 


TAS BRN TRIN 2017 | aaa a eee ae, a ODT! OIL 
DAs Pay: 2"; aie Se i se ea ORR 2 Se RET AGED 
16. Initial and last name of 

female star --.2202 G. FARRELL 


18° Operated: dial: -- a 
20. 5W lirlpools: ji aes. oxt ee Hel oan 
22. More than one ox 


SA. iy aay) OF 5 Pn VIA 
STU Distt 2 eS Whe eae 

39. Part of theatre seats LOGE 
LO AE Eo AVE 


41. Came together 


42. Girl’s name ______._.________. 
45. Small house poetic ____...____. COT, 
46. To fasten with thread __._____ 


a6. Depart 22 oh ed 
49. Egyptian sun god ______.. 


moc! 
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Page Fifteen 


tion is in full color on blue-green background. Credits are black on blue-green background. (Note cut-out possibilities of illustration. ) 


Sliding Scale of Prices for Accessories 


1-SHEETS WINDOW CARDS 


Tito Oy cee es 15¢e each 1 to 500 __--------- Te each 
Sisto a LOO: ee Se 6c each 


SP son lOO.5 os. ee 13c each Obie 100 Ces 5M%e each 


Over’ 100). oS Se lle eaeh 
INSERT CARDS 


PtOve os ee 25c each 


24 S ped i ET DESCRIPTION: Title is violet-blue with yellow outline. Caption is dark green. Star names are in orange. Background is white. I[lustra- . 


3-SHEE'15 OA TRS ToT | ee ae See 22¢ each 
Bato 200. 22 ee 20c each 
1 to 25 -._.--..------------ 40c each Over 100° 2.050 225 19¢ each 
CQVEr 20. woe er 36c each 
HERALDS 
1M to 5M ___.------ $3.00 per M 
6-SHEETS Over 5M ____-..----- 2.75 per M 
ol lume ences ape each LOBBY DISPLAYS 
11 to 20 _..._________. 70c each 11 x 14 Photos _______---- 75e a set 
Overe20r © ee 65c each (8 in set—colored) 
22 x 28 Photos ____..-_.. 80c a set 
(2 in set—colored) 
24-SHEETS Sige) 2. eee 15c¢ each 
Sts ee 10c each 
Up 3 at8 ae $2.00 each Midget Window Cards.4¢ each 
Over 25° 2 ee 1.75 each Merchandising Plans ____ Gratis 


(These prices apply to U. S: only) 


INSERT CARD THREE-SHEET 


JOAN BLONDELL - GLENDA FARRELL — 


SLIDE 


ONE-SHEET 
WINDOW CARD 
SIX-SHEET MIDGET CARD 


Printed in U. S. A. 


Scanned from the United Artists collection at the 
Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research, 
with support from Matthew and Natalie Bernstein. 


for Film and Theater Research 


http://wcftr.commarts.wisc.edu 


MEDIA 
HISTORY 


DIGITAL LIBRARY 


www.mediahistoryproject.org