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GODFREY 



LOWELL CABOT SCIENCE LIBRARY 



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BIENNIAL REPORT 



Board of 



State Harbor Commissioners 



Fiscal Years Commencing July 1, 1912, and Ending 
June 30, 1914 



COMMISSIONERS 
J. J. DWYER, President T. S. WILLIAMS JOHN H. McCALLUM 







California 

State Printing Office 

1914 



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^.vx 10 10. S5 



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BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



J. J. DWYER, President _ _ ^ _ _ Commissioner 
T. S. WILLIAMS, ------- Commissioner 

JOHN H. McCALLUM, ----- Commissioner 



LEO V. MERLE, Jr., _______ Secretary. 

JAMES BYRNE, Jr., ------- Assistant Secretary. 

JEROME NEWMAN, Assistant State Engineer. 

DANIEL A. RYAN, ________ Attorney. 



OFFICE: 

UNION DEPOT AND FERRY HOUSE 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



/■- ;\ 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Page 

INTRODUCTION 7 

REPORT OF THE BOARD i 13 

REPORT OF ASSISTANT STATE ENGINEER 31 

REPORT ON TYPES OF PIER CONSTRUCTION Gl 

REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY 67 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF BELT RAILROAD 71 

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY 77 

FINANCIAL STATISTICS . ._ 83 



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LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Page 

Interior of Pier 26 6 

Interior of Pier 28 

Pier 39 — 10 

Pier 26 12 

Piers 26, 28, 30, 32 12 

Pier 28 30 

Piers 30-32 30 

Front of Pier 37 34 

Section 9A Seawall 35 

Section 9B Seawall 3G 

Plan of Pier 39 37 

Plan of New Car Ferry Slips 38 

Plan of South Dolphin Passenger Ferry Slips 39 

Plan of Pier 37 40 

Plan of Pier 35 41 

Plan of Piers 16 and 18 42 

Plan of Pier 46 43 

Plan of Passenger Ferry Slips 7, 8, 9, and 10 44 

•Belt Railroad Locomotive 58 

Belt Railroad Engine House 58 

Rear View of Belt Railroad Engine House 60 

Side View of Belt Railroad Engine House 60 

West Portal Fort Mason Tunnel 64 

East Portal Fort Ma^on Tunnel 64 



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BIENNIAL REPORT 



OP THE 



Board of State Harbor Commissioners. 



San Francisco, California, 

November 1, 1914. 
To his Excellency, Hon. Hiram W. Johnson, 

Governor of the State of California. 
Sir: As required by law, the Board of State Harbor Commissioners 
for the harbor of San Francisco herewith respectfully submits its bien- 
nial report for the fiscal years commencing July 1, 1912, and ending 
June 30, 1914, embracing a full report of all moneys by them received 
and disbursed, describing the improvements made or under way, and 
the general condition of the harbor property. 
We have the honor to be. 

Yours very respectfully, 

J. J. DwYER, President, 
T. S. Williams, 
John H. McCallum, 
Board of State Harbor Commissioners. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 




Interior of Pier 26. 




Interior of Pier 28. 



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INTRODUCTION. 



P«rsonn«l. 

The present Board of State Harbor Commissioners consists of the 
following commissioners : 

John Joseph Dwyer, President; Thomas S. Williams and John H. 
McCallum, all residents of San Francisco. 

Jurisdiction. 
The only harbor under the jurisdiction of the Board of State Harbor 
Commissioners is that portion of the water front on the bay of San Fran- 
cisco around the city and county of San Francisco, from the Presidio, 
the United States military reservation, on the north, thence around the 
bay front to the boundary line between San Francisco and the county 
of San Mateo. This report deals only with the commerce, construction, 
maintenance and operation of this water front. On the other side of 
the bay, at Oakland, Richmond and elsewhere, local bodies administer 
their respective harbor facilities. 

The statistics and other data refer alone to the state property along 
the San Francisco water front, consisting of the seawall, the seawall 
lots behind the same, created by the reclamation of tide lands. The 
Embarcadero, formerly called East Street, and other water front streets, 
. the belt railroad, tugs and dredgers, and all the piers and wharves in 
the city and county of San Francisco, except those belonging to the 
Federal Government at the Presidio and Fort Mason, and some other 
few on private property. 

Towag« and Pilotage. 
The charges for towage and pilotage from the Pacific Ocean into San 
Francisco Bay are in no degree under the jurisdiction of the Harbor 
Board, but are governed by other bodies. 

Public Ownership and Operation. 
Unlike most of the leading seaports of the United States, San Fran- 
cisco enjoys the advantage of a harbor front that is owned and operated 
by the public. The title of the property is in the State of California, 
and harbor affairs are administered by a board of three harbor commis- 
sioners, appointed by the Governor of the state and holding office during 
his pleasure. 

The Harbor Self-Supporting. 

Under the law, the harbor has been self-supporting since its inception. 

All the cost of construction and maintenance of seawalls, buildings, 

wharves, etc., as well as all the operating expenses, are paid out of 

harbor receipts. These are derived from charges imposed upon shipping 



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8 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

and cargoes, in the form of rents, tolls, dockage and wharfage for the 
use of the wharves; switching charges on the belt railroad; from the 
rental privileges of the seawall lots and of the ferry and other buildings 
and for the use of the ferry slips, and other lesser sources. The princi- 
pal and interest of all bond issues must also be paid out of the same 
revenues. San Francisco harbor thus pays its own way, not a dollar 
coming out of the public treasury or taxes. 

The advantage of public ownership to the shipping interests is shown 
by the provision of the law that harbor charges must not exceed the 
amount necessary to meet operating, repair and construction expenses 
and redeem bond issues. Aliens and citizens are treated on equal 
terms. It is estimated that if the present San Francisco harbor front 
and facilities were owned and operated by private interests, they would 
be capitalized at least for the sum of $250,000,000, and handsome returns 
could easily be made on that figure. 

General Characteristics of San Francisco Harbor. 

It is universally acknowledged that the harbor of San Francisco is in 
its natural aspects one of the very finest in the world. In size the bay of 
San Francisco, with its connecting waterways, is one of the very largest 
landlocked bodies of water anyivhere. 

On the San Francisco side, because of the scouring effects of the tide, 
the water is very deep, ranging from thirty-three feet at the seawall, 
which is the minimum required to be maintained by law, to from fifty 
feet to seventy-five feet at the outer ends of the piers. 

It is admirably sheltered against severe storms, the annual damage to 
shipping from this source being but trifling ; its extreme tidal range is 
only about eight feet and the mean less than five feet ; it offers excellent 
anchorage over an immense area in convenient localities, with fine hold- 
ing ground, and, in a word, it is ideal, as far as natural conditions are 
concerned. 

It is the terminal point of four great transcontinental railroad sys- 
tems, and has behind it and directly tributary to it the two immense 
valleys of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers, which drain much 
more than half the productive area of the extensive State of California. 
Likewise, the coast lines north and south of San Francisco are intimately 
connected with the harbor by important transportation systems, steadily 
ramifying into much new territory. 

Extent of Seawall and Docks. 
The present water front line of San Francisco in active use is approxi- 
mately four miles in length. On June 30, 1914, there were in existence 
along this line 14,210 feet of completed seawall, twenty-six piers and 
twenty-seven seawall lots of land, having a total area of approximately 



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REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 9 

941,786 square feet, together with the tract of about twenty-five acres, 
leased for fifty years in the year 1900 to The Atchison, Topeka and 
Santa Fe Railway Company. 

The piers and bulkhead wharves offer about nine miles of berthing 
space at the present time, and the system can be expanded, a& the popu- 
lation and commerce demand, until it will cover quite fifty miles. 

State Lands Adjoining. 

By the progressive construction of a permanent seawall around the 
water front on the line fixed by law, important land areas between it and 
the previously existing city front have been reclaimed and become the 
property of the state and have been devoted to harbor uses. 

Many of these have been rented and leased to railroads and ware- 
houses, etc., at remunerative figures, and some have been reserved for 
the use of the state belt railroad in its switching operations. 

In addition to the reports of the Board, there are submitted herewith 
the following departmental reports : 

The reports of the chief engineer, of the attorney, of the superintend- 
ent of the belt railroad, and of the secretary. 

The report of the secretary contains tables giving the receipts and 
disbursements of the Board for the biennial period, and also from the 
year 1863 (in which the Board was created) to June 30, 1914; the status 
of the San Francisco harbor improvement, San Francisco seawall, second 
San Francisco seawall funds, with payments made to and from them ; 
the operation of the belt railroad; the extent and cost of completed 
seawall; the contract work completed since June 30, 1912, and that 
under way June 30, 1914; the revenues and rentals from seawall lots 
and other state property ; the amount of freight handled over the state 
wharves. 

In the shipping statistics, vessels are credited with net tonnage 
throughout, not with gross tonnage, as in some statistical shipping 
reports. 



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PART I. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD. 



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Pier 26. 




Piers 26, 28, 30, 32. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 13 



GENERAL CONDITION OF THE STATE WATER FRONT 

PROPERTY OF SAN FRANCISCO AND 

ITS ADMINISTRATION. 



Development of Docking and Transporting Facilities. 

During the past two years the work of developing and improving 
docking facilities and the belt railroad along the water front of San 
Francisco, and otherwise improving the harbor, has been pushed with 
all the energy at command, under the stimulus, not only of the normal 
increase in the business of the port, but, especially, in the endeavor to 
I)repare for the great increase of trade that will certainly follow the 
completion of the Panama Canal. 

Means for such new and additional work have been furnished by a 
state bond issue of nine million dollars, under the San Francisco Harbor 
Improvement Act of 1909. 

An outline of the work done, or planned, or contemplated, is summar- 
ized below, and engineering data will be found in the report of the 
engineer of the Board. 

New Construction. 

The most notable feature of the past two years has been the rapid 
extension and reconstruction of the pier system. Decayed wharves have 
been demolished and replaced by new ones, and additional new piers 
have been built in new territory. 

Harbor Ready for the Panama Canal Opening. 
A special effort was made to have the harbor ready for the opening 
of the Panama Canal. "When the canal was thrown open to ships of 
a limited draught in July, 1914, we are glad to say that the harbor of 
San Francisco was fit and ready, wdth all the companies seeking berth 
assignments amply provided for. 

A New Harbor Front. 

The present Board of Harbor Conunissioners took office in the spring 
of 1911. Since that time the existing pier system has been very largely 
made over and large additions have been constructed. 

On January 1, 1911, the following twenty-six piers were in existence, 
to wit; 

North of Market Street.— Fiers Nos. 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 19, 21, 23, 
25 and 27. 

Sovth of Market Street.— Piers Nos. 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 34, 36, 38, 
40, 42, 44 and 54. 



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14 REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

The numbers are not consecutive because of changes in past years. 

Of these twenty-six piers, the following fourteen have been continued 
in use, to wit : Nos. 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 12, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44 and 54. The 
following five piers, to wit : Nos. 19, 21, 23, 25 and 27, all with concrete 
supports, have largely gone to pieces, because of the disintegration of 
the concrete, and are being successively rebuilt with creosoted wooden 
piles, because of the impracticability of repairing the concrete ; and the 
following seven piers have been condemned, and have been or are being 
destroyed because worn out and dilapidated beyond repair, to wit : 
Nos. 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 16 and 15. All of these latter except No. 10 were 
old wooden wharves, with wooden pile supports, some of which were 
treated with different kinds of preservatives against the depredations 
of the teredo. Pier No. 10 had concrete supports, which had disin- 
tegrated beyond repair. 

Of the fourteen piers above mentioned as being continued in use, three 
have wooden supports, old and almost used up, and will have to be 
pulled out within the next year or two, to wit: Nos. 3, 5 and 11; and a 
number of the others show such signs of deterioration that they, too, 
will have to be practically rebuilt. 

Nine Million Dollar Bond Issue. 
The foregoing summary of the condition of the pier system shows 
that even without the necessity of additional construction, forced upon 
the harbor by the building of the Panama Canal, the dilapidation of 
the existing pier system was so very general that the bond issue was 
imperatively needed to replace many tottering structures. The ordi- 
nary revenues would not have sufficed by a very wide margin to make 
the necessary renovations. 

New and Additional Piers. 
The six new piers and bulkhead wharves, adjacent or between them, 
referred to in our last biennial report as having been planned and con- 
tracted for by this Board, have been completed and put in commission, 
as follows: 

1. Pier No. 17, at the foot of Union Street, 800 feet long, 126 feet 
wide. 

2. Pier No. 26, near the foot of Steuart Street, 771 feet long, 200 feet 
wide. 

3. Pier No. 28, near the foot of Spear Street, 677 feet long, 150 feet 
wide. 

4. Pier No. 30, near the foot of Spear Street, 720 feet long, 200 feet 
wide. 

5. Pier No. 32, near the foot of Main Street, 807 feet long, 200 feet 
wide. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 15 

6. Bulkhead wharf, 200 feet wide and 222 feet long, connecting piers 
Nos. 30 and 32, and used with them as one system by one steamship 
company. 

Since our last biennial report the following new and additional pier 
has been undertaken and completed and put in commission, to wit : 

Pier No. 39, at the foot of Grant Avenue, about 900 feet long and 140 
feet wide. 

The grain sheds, formerly along the bulkhead wharf near this point, 
have been moved onto this pier, which is now devoted to the uses of the 
grain trade of the port. 

New and Additional Piers Under Contract. 
In addition to the foregoing, contracts have been let, and the work 
is in progress, for the following seven new piers, to wit : 

1. Pier No. 15, at the foot of Union Street, 794 feet long and 90 feet 
wide, designed for coal bunker use. 

Will be completed about January 1, 1915. 

2. Pier No. 35, at the foot of Montgomery Street, 896 feet long:, 
average, and 200 feet wide. 

Will be completed about May 1, 1915, 

3. Pier No. 37, at the foot of Kearny Street, 945 feet long, average, 
and 200 feet wide. 

Will be completed about April 1, 1915. 

4. Pier No. 41, at the foot of Stockton Street, 981 feet long, average, 
and 200 feet wide. 

Will be completed about December 1, 1914. 

5. Pier No. 46, at the foot of Channel Street, 800 feet long and 200 
feet wide. 

Will be completed about September 15, 1914. 

6. Pier No. 16, at the foot of Howard Street, 685 feet long and 140 
feet wide. 

Will be completed about April 1, 1915. 

7. Pier No. 18, between Howard and Folsom Streets, 685 feet long 
and 140 feet wide. 

Will be completed about May 1, 1915. 

New Bull<head Wharves. 
Two new bulkhead wharves have been begun and finished this year, 
to wit; 

Fisherman's Wharf, 60 feet wide by 411 feet long. 

Jones Street to Leavenworth Street, 60 feet wide by 400 feet long. 

Additional Ferry Slips Under Construction. 
The passenger traffic across the bay of San Francisco to nearby coun- 
ties has increased so enormously during the past two years that it has 

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16 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

been found necessary to expand the system of eight ferryboat slips at 
the foot of Market Street up to a total of twelve slips. 

Of the former number, one, No. 7, being out of line and dilapidated, 
has been destroyed, and slip No. 6 is being rebuilt. Additional slip No. 8 
has been finished and work is progressing on additional slips Nos. 7, 9 
and 10. These adjoin the old system on the south. 

Two additional slips on the north of the existing system have been 
planned, but can not be undertaken until other constructions are 
finished. 

Additional Car Ferry Slips Under Construction. 

Two new car ferry slips, for the freight cars ferried from across the 
bay of San Francisco, are in process of building at the foot of Powell 
and Mason streets. When finished, about December 1st next, the 
existing two car ferry slips near the foot of Lombard Street, being worn 
out beyond repair, will be destroyed, and will not be rebuilt, as it is 
designed to occupy their place with a new merchandise pier, to be known 
as pier No. 29. 

New Piers Planned. 

This proposed pier No. 29, together with two others, to be known as 
Nos. 31 and 33, will fill the gap between existing pier No. 27 and pier 
No. 35, now under contract. Before these are undertaken, however, 
the Board has planned to build two other new piers south of Market 
Street, to be known as piers Nos. 22 and 24, between Folsom and Har- 
rison streets, which will take the place of piers Nos. 14 and 16, being 
demolished this year as stated above. 

When pending contracts and these five proposed piers are completed 
the entire water front will have been all filled up with piers and ferry 
slips from Taylor Street on the north to Channel Street on the south, a 
distance of about three miles, with pier No. 54 outlying beyond China 
Basin. 

Increase of Wharf and Pier Area. 

The wharf area of the former piers still retained is 1,535,539 square 
feet, and the wharf area of the new piers built and finished by this 
Board is 1,190,174 square feet, an increase of 77.5 per cent. When the 
piers under construction are finished the increase of wharf area over 
the former extent will have been 1,728,124 square feet, or 112.6 per cent. 

The Embarcadero Widened. 
The Board has condemned the private property situated along the 
southerly line of Harrison Street at its junction with The Embarcadero, 
embracing an area of about 19,657 square feet, in order to widen The 
Embarcadero at this point to the legal width of 200 feet, and this area 
has been made a part of The Embarcadero. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 17 

The purchase price under the judgment in condemnation proceedings 
was $58,597.95, and the same was paid out of the current revenues and 
not out of the bond money. 

This improvement is a great gain in traflSc conditions at this point, 
as the private property in question blocked the extension of Steuart 
Street south to The Embarcadero, and also narrowed The Embarcadero 
so as effectually to block team and belt line traffic around the foot of 
Harrison Street. 

New Sections of the Seawall. 

The only two remaining sections of the seawall in the district from 
Market Street to Channel Street have been contracted for and the 
work is now approaching completion. They are known as sections 9a 
and 9b, aggregating 1,760 feet in length and 60 feet wide, extending 
from Mission to Harrison streets. 

These sections have been built especially strong, of reinforced con- 
crete piles, driven through a loose rock fill, sunk in a deep trench, and 
with steel caps and asphalt deck. 

Additions to the Union Depot and Ferry Building. 
As stated in our last biennial report, two new wings were planned 
for the Ferry Building, but the necessity of using the available funds 
for the more pressing needs of pier and other constructions caused the 
Board to postpone this work till a more favorable time. A one story 
addition of 140 feet long by 127 feet wide is, however, now being built 
on the southern end of the building to accommodate a demand for addi- 
tional baggage room space. 

New United States Post Office. 

The old wooden building, so long occupied by the United States Gov- 
ernment as a ferry post office, and most unfortunately located out in 
the main thoroughfare. The Embarcadero, at the southern corner of the 
Perry Building, will soon cease to be an eyesore and an impediment 
to traffic. 

In its place a new post office, of concrete and brick, will be built 
by the Board, back of the sidewalk line, near the present location. This 
work was undertaken at the most urgent request of the United States 
postal authorities at San Francisco, and the building will become the 
main distributing post office in the business districts of the city, thus 
saving hours of time to the merchants, who have complained bitterly 
of the long delays incident to the present distributing point of the 
mail, far uptown. 

The plans of the new post office are finished. The work will start 
soon and be finished next summer. 

2—14746 

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18 REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

Belt Railroad. 

The development and extension of the state belt railroad have been 
an especial care of the Board. 

San Francisco undoubtedly now has the most complete harbor belt 
line railroad switching system in the country. 

The railroad is located on The Embarcadero, a marginal thoroughfare 
200 feet wide, located just behind the seawall, and the system is intended 
and is used to connect up, for the switching of freight cars, the various 
piers, the yards of other railroads, and private warehouses and indus- 
tries generally. 

The spur track permits for use on city streets fall under the jurisdic- 
tion of the municipal authorities, but the construction, maintenance and 
operation of the belt railroad around the water front are wholly under 
the jurisdiction of the Board. 

Bringing Ship and Rail Together. 
As stated in our former report, few harbor improvements are more 
sought by all ports than the bringing of ship and railroad car close 
together, side by side, if possible, so as to promote despatch and cheap- 
ness in transferring freight. This modem trend finds one of its best 
illustrations on the San Francisco water front. 

Railway Spurs on Piers. 
It has been the policy of the Board not only to equip all new piers 
with spur tracks running the full length of the piers, but also, wherever 
the water slip spaces beside the old piers were sufficiently wide to permit 
of it, to widen existing piers and place spur tracks thereon. 

Railway Spurs on Old Piers. 
In addition to the widening of old piers Nos. 9, 11 and 12, and the 
running of spur tracks along one side of each throughout its full length, 
as stated in our former report, this Board has since widened piers Nos. 
25 and 27 and built spur tracks on one side of each pier, full length. 

Railway Spurs on New Piers. 

On the new piers, spur tracks, full length, have been placed on both 
sides of piers Nos. 26, 28, 30, 32, 39, 41 and 46. On the other piers 
under contract, tracks on both sides of piers 140 feet wide or over, and 
on one side of piers under 140 feet in width, will be placed. 

Where there are tracks on both sides of the pier, the usual practice 
is to make one a surface track, and the other is depressed so as to bring 
the floor of the railroad car on a level with the floor of the pier, thus 
facilitating trucking of certain classes of freight. Our practice is to 
accommodate the proposed tenants in this regard according to their 
preferences. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 19 

Center Traeks Not Favored. 
It was a practice of former Boards to install railway spur tracks down 
the center of the pier. This was done on piers Nos. 34, 36, 38 and 40. 
But experience has demonstrated that the center arrangement is a 
mistake, because it interferes very seriously with teaming and trucking. 
The arrangement of the tracks along the sides of the piers and outside 
the pier sheds is now universally demanded by shippers. This arrange- 
ment has been followed in all our constructions. 

Belt Railroad Connection Across Market Street. 

Our last biennial report referred to the fact that we had begun the 
construction of the necessary link, extending from Folsom to Washing- 
ton streets, and crossing in front of the Ferry Building at the foot of 
Market Street, to connect the northern and southern divisions of the 
belt railroad. 

This important work has been completed and the operation of the new 
continuous line proceeds with perfect satisfaction and without the 
slightest interference with the city street car traflSc. 

South of Market Street the belt line has been extended to Channel 
Street. 

Extension of the Belt Railroad North. 
A large extension has been made to the north and west, more than a 
mile in length, from The Embarcadero, along Jefferson Street through 
the new tunnel under the United States Fort Mason military reservation 
to a connection with the railway tracks of the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition Company, in Beach Street, between Laguna and 
Buchanan streets. 

Purpose of this Extension. 

The main purpose of this extension was to connect up the belt line 
with the United States Army transport docks, situated at the foot of 
Laguna Street, in the northwest corner of the Fort Mason reservation, 
and its completion has directly connected the transport docks by rail 
with the transcontinental railroad systems. 

These docks are the permanent government location for all the trans- 
ports, which convey men and material to the Philippine Islands and 
the other insular possessions. 

Situated so remotely from the termini of the railroads in San Fran- 
cisco, the transport docks were subject to a long and expensive haul 
by truck of all their merchandise and other material, and the army 
representatives in San Francisco urgently requested the Harbor Board 
to extend the belt line railroad to the transport docks, both for com- 
mercial and military reasons. On account of the grades, this could 
only be done by the construction of a tunnel under the Fort Mason 
military reservation. 

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20 REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

Fort Mason Tunnel. 

Authority to the Harbor Board to construct such a tunnel and extend 
the belt line was conferred at the last session of the legislature. (Stats. 
1913, page 383). 

Under this act the tunnel, 1,500 feet in length, 17 feet wide, and 
22 feet high, of concrete throughout, with a single track railway, 
designed for freight service has been built. 

It extends from Van Ness Avenue on the east, opposite the end of 
Jefferson Street, to a point near Beach and Laguna streets on the west, 
running throughout its length under the Fort Mason military reser- 
vation. 

Federal authority to cross the reservation with the tunnel was granted 
by congress to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition Company 
and its assigns, and the exposition company assigned its rights with 
the approval of the government to the Board of State Harbor Com- 
missioners. 

Other Purposes of this Extension. 

Through the tunnel the belt line connects up with the railway switch- 
ing system within the Panama-Pacific Exposition grounds and an 
arrangement has been made with the exposition company whereby 
exhibits on their way to and from the grounds will be carried on the 
belt line. 

Of course, other industries, along the line of this Jefferson Street 
extension, will also be served, and by this means a large new water 
front area of desirable flat land has been made much more available for 
factory and other commercial uses. 

After the exposition closes, it is planned to extend the belt line further 
west to the United States military reservation, known as the Presidio. 

Fort Mason Tunnel and Belt Extension Finished. 
The tunnel and the belt line extension through the same have been 
finished and appropriate dedicatory exercises were held on October 31, 
1914. 

A Continuous Belt Railroad Around Harbor. 
By these constructions and extensions, a continuous belt railroad 
switching system, adequately equipped, is now in full and successful 
operation around the whole active harbor front of San Francisco, from 
the United States transport docks on the north and west to Channel 
Street on the south. It is a tremendous gain to the harbor, and its real 
advantages only become properly estimated when it is recollected that 
even such a great seaport as New York has no harbor belt line. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 21 

Change in Wharf and Pier Riontals. 

When this Board took oflSce, pier rentals of the various companiies 
enjoying definite assignments of wharf and berthing spaces, were based 
on the running foot and fixed at fifty cents per lineal foot. 

This Board, as noted in our last report, reduced this charge ten 
per cent. 

As the rate applied to piers of varying widths, an undue advantage 
was given by this system of rating to the companies having the wider 
piers. 

Consequently, a change of system has been instituted, basing the rental 
charge on pier area. This is fairer because it is uniform. 

Moreover, as the new piers are much better for berthing ships and 
handling cargo than the older piers, a keen competition arose among 
shippers for the superior advantages. 

To equalize matters as far as possible, the Board therefore made a 
distinction between the new piers, that is to say, piers built since March, 
1911, on which the rental was fixed at one and two tenths of a cent 
($.012) per square foot per month, and the old piers in existence at that 
date, on which the rental was fixed at nine tenths of a cent ($.009) per 
square foot per month. This change gave universal satisfaction to the 
shippers. 

Pay Roll. 

The pay roll of the Board is divided into two parts, one applicable 
to the force employed on the new work done under the bond issue and 
the other to the current work and administration of the harbor. The 
former, consisting principally of the pay of inspectors and draughtsmen, 
will progressively diminish as the number of new constructions under 
way become less by completion. 

Day Work in Repairs and Improvements. 

As stated in our last report the Board substituted the day labor system 
in place of the contract system in many classes of repair and other 
work, particularly pile driving. This system has been continued with 
satisfactory results. 

The pay for day work, of course, appears in the pay roll and more 
work means more pay roll. 

Under the previous Board such work was done by contract, and the 
cost thereof necessarily appeared under the head of contracts and did 
not figure in their pay roll. 

No proper comparison can be made between the pay rolls of successive 
boards unless the amount and character of the work done and the opera- 
tions conducted are taken into consideration. 



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22 REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

Increase in Nunnber of Locomotives and in Business. 

The great enlargement of the belt line system and the consequent 
increase in business necessitated the purchase of new locomotives since 
the last report. The Board is now operating seven locomotives, whereas 
the number in use when we took office in 1911 was three. This, of 
course, entails the employment of more crews. The road is operated 
twenty-four hours a day, and, in the crop-moving season, also on Sun- 
days and holidays. 

The belt line business, by the building of the connection across Market 
Street and other extensions, has increased over 100 per cent during the 
past year. 

Other Departments. 
We refer to pages 26 to 28 of our last biennial report as to the con- 
ditions governing the working and administrative forces and the Board 's 
policy with respect to the same. 

Civil Service Law. 

The last legislature passed a civil service employment law, which 
applies throughout the state, including the force under this Board. It 
took effect in August, 1913. 

In our last report we strongly favored the enactment of such a law 
and since its enactment have cooperated with the State Civil Service 
Commission in applying its provisions to the harbor force. From 
results thus far visible, we have no hesitation in heartily repeating our 
former indorsement of this system of appointment. 

Pier No. 54. 

The defective condition of pier No. 54, occupied by the Santa Fe 
Railroad Company, was noted in our last report (page 29). 

It was due to the fact that a long ledge of rock reaching high above 
the dredge limit had been carelessly left by the engineer of the former 
Board along the north side of the pier, besides other rocky points and 
surfaces in the neighboring water. This defect has been remedied by 
widening the pier ten feet, throughout its length, so as to cover the 
ledge, and the remainder of the rocky outcroppings in the area outside 
thereof have been successfully blasted out. 

Nine Million Dollar Bond Issue. 

The nine million dollar bond issue by the State of California, under 
the San Francisco Harbor Improvement Act of 1909, the proceeds of 
the sale of which constitute what is known as the *^ Second San Fran- 
cisco Seawall Fund, ' ' has all been sold by the State Treasurer. 

As the bonds carry only four per cent per annum and could not 
under the law be sold at a discount below par, great difficulty was found 



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REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 23 

by the State Treasurer in selling them during the financial stringency 
of 1913, and finally sales came to an absolute stop, as some of the leading 
cities of the state were offering in vain at the same time their bonds 
carrying five per cent per annum. 

The last legislature, however, came to the rescue of the harbor bonds 
and by two acts facilitated their sale. (Stats. 1913, page 563, act of 
June 10, 1913; and page 1155, act of June 16, 1913.) 

Under the former act the State Board of Control bought a large part 
of the harbor bond issue. Under the latter act the state loaned the 
Harbor Board not to exceed $500,000, to go as a commission on sale of 
the bonds, the loan to be wholly repaid to the state by the Harbor Board 
out of harbor revenues within five years, in equal yearly installments. 
By the aid of this commission, the State Treasurer was enabled to dis- 
pose of bonds to the amount of $4,767,000. The commission thereon 
amounts to $476,700, which will have to be repaid to the state at the 
rate of $95,340 per year ; the harbor thereby being deprived of the means 
of making improvements out of current revenues to just that extent. 

The financial reports of the secretary will show the present condition 
of this fund. 

Events have shown that such bond issue was vitally needed by the 
port, and that it would have been necessary in order to replace existing 
dilapidated wharf structures by the wholesale, even if the new trade to 
follow the Panama Canal were not in question at all. 

Construction Program When Completed Will Exhaust 
the $9,000,000 Bond Issue. 

None of the bonds of this issue were sold prior to our taking ofiice. 
The first sale was in October, 1911. 

The harbor improvements already completed, those under contract 
now pending, and those planned as above set forth, will all be covered, 
it is estimated, by the nine million dollar issue, but will very nearly 
exhaust it. 

Bond Money Devoted to New Construction. 
Although the terms of the bond act, which authorized the use of the 
money in betterments of all kinds, are sufficiently broad to warrant 
the Board in using the bond money in making any harbor improvement, 
in its discretion, the Board has consistently adhered to the policy of 
devoting the bond money exclusively to new constructions. All repairs 
and, indeed, much wholly new and additional construction work in new 
territory have been paid out of the current revenues, deposited in what 
is known as the **San Francisco Harbor Improvement Fund.'' 



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24 REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

New Construction Paid For Out of Current Revenues. 
Conspicuous illustrations of the Board's success in paying for new 
constructions out of current revenues are the following : 

1. New Pier No. 46 — 200 feet wide, 800 feet long, at the foot 

of Channel street. The entire contract price of the 
work and labor of constructing this pier was paid out 
of current revenues $176,892 13 

2. Rebuilding of Piers Nos. 19, 23, 25 and 27, with new creo- 

soted piles, to take the place of the old disintegrated 
concrete cylinder supports of the same, and also 16th 
street wharf, cost, exclusive of piles 85,826 74 

3. Purchase of land by condemnation, 19,657.69 sq. ft. at the 

foot of Harrison street, to widen The Embarcadero to 

200 feet; cost 58,597 95 

4. New concrete belt line round-house, with seven stalls ; 

cost 37,422 13 

Total $358,739 05 

Ten IMillion Dollar Bond Issue. 

At the suggestion of this Board, contained in its last report, the legis- 
lature of 1913 passed a further bond issue of ten million dollars for har- 
bor improvements, to be voted upon by the people of the state at the 
general election in November, 1914. This was recommended in order to 
provide for any urgent need of abnormally rapid development of addi- 
tional harbor facilities that might possibly be required by an abnormally 
rapid increase of trade upon the completion of the Panama Canal, and 
which the current revenues might be insufficient to provide. 

Of course, no part of the bonds need be sold unless an emergency, such 
as that noted, should arise ; and until sold, no additional interest burdens 
would accrue. 

Owing to the fact that bond issues under the State Constitution must 
be authorized by the people at the general election following the session 
of the legislature submitting them, and that a period of over two years 
must therefore elapse before the bonds would be available for sale, it 
was deemed wise, in view of the great importance of the matter and the 
uncertainties involved as above outlined, to have them ready for sale 
in whole or in part, as circumstances may require. 

Panama Canal. 

The official opening of the Panama Canal is set for the beginning of 
the year 1915. Nevertheless, the canal was sufficiently completed in 
July, 1914, so as to permit of its partial use, by vessels of a limited 
draught. Even so, the growth of shipping in the past few months, 
due to its use, has been so great that it looks very much as if the 
fondest hopes of its great utility are soon to be realized. • 

The great European war makes prophecy in this regard somewhat 
dubious, but the present outlook for an enormous gain in the shipping 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 25 

of the port is most encouraging. The figures at present available indi- 
cate that the trade has about doubled since the canal was opened as 
stated. . 

India Basin and Islais Creek Lands. 

The suit for the condemnation of the Islais Creek lands, begun by 
our attorney, as noted in our last report, is still pending in court. 
There was a delay in proceedings at the suggestion of the Attorney 
General of the state, to await the decision of the State Supreme Court 
on the San Pedro tide land cases, the decision of which, it was thought, 
might affect the question of the ownership of the Islais Creek lands in 
favor of the state and thus save the cost to the state of their purchase 
price. Recently, however, the Attorney General has advised our attor- 
ney to proceed with the condemnation proceedings theretofore insti- 
tuted, and the suit is now actively in hand. It is being stubbornly 
contested by a number of the largest proprietors and progress is thereby 
retarded. 

Drawbridge Over Islais Creek. 
It was stated in our last report that this Board had set in motion 
the necessary legal machinery to compel the construction of a draw- 
bridge over Islais Creek at Kentucky Street, by certain railroad com- 
panies using the roadway of the latter street. This bridge was subse- 
quently contracted for and the work is now in progress. 

Inadequate Fire Insurance. 
In our last report attention was called to the inadequate fire insur- 
ance on the harbor facilities. It is limited by law to a total of $700,000, 
in our judgment an utterly inadequate amount. We again recommend 
that the maximum limit be raised by law to at least the sum of 
$1,200,000. 

Concrete and Creosoted Wood Construction. 

The harbor engineer's report will show the character and type of 
pier construction in detail. But it is proper here to note that some dis- 
cussion has arisen over the comparative merits of concrete and other 
character of supports for wharf structures, and to state the Board's 
policy in this regard. 

The Board's policy has been simply to follow in each particular 
instance the best engineering opinion available. This being a tech- 
nical question it should be decided on technical considerations, and in 
every case we have adopted the particular type of construction recom- 
mended by the harbor engineer. 

The water front varies greatly in its foundations. In a few places 
it is rocky or hard. In most places, the mud is very deep and in cer- 
tain sections extremely soft. Most of it is filled ground, and fre- 



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26 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

quently localities near each other differ greatly because of the jutting 
out of rock ledges from the hills formerly or now along the front. 
The engineer suits his plans, necessarily, to the natural conditions, and, 
of course, regard must be had to the engineering cost as well as to 
the engineering possibilities. 

On the better foundations, the engineer has recommended concrete 
supports, and in the muddy places different types of construction, 
according to circumstances. 

Where the engineer has recommended concrete supports, the Board 
has adopted the same, and accordingly the following piers, to wit: 
Nos. 26, 28, 30 and 32, are wholly supported by reinforced concrete 
columns of from three to four feet in thickness going down to the bot- 
tom of the bay, which was never done with concrete before in these 
waters. This was possible because of the firm foundation in that 
particular locality. 

In other localities, pier No. 17 and pier No. 39 have been built with 
concrete supports, sunk deep into the mud, but resting ultimately on 
wooden piles driven below the mud line. Here it was simply impossi- 
ble, consistently with the factor of engineering cost, to go down to a 
solid foundation. Indeed, in many localities, no solid foundation has 
ever been reached by the longest wooden piles ever driven, over 115 
feet in length. 

Similar conditions governed the type of construction used by the 
engineers of the United States transport docks at Fort Mason, San 
Francisco. Nominally, these docks are commonly referred to as having 
concrete supports, but, as in the case of our pier No. 39, the concrete 
columns under these docks rest at bottom on wooden piles driven into 
the mud. 

An entirely new type is being tried in pier No. 35, now under con- 
struction. There, reinforced concrete piles made on shore are being 
driven in place by a steam hammer. No wood will be used under 
them. Such construction has recently been employed for the supports 
of ** skyscrapers" in San Francisco. We have also used it in the 
supports of the ferry slip aprons, and also in the seawall. 

In other localities, of deep mud foundations, the engineer has used 
creosoted wooden supports, to wit, in piers Nos. 15, 16, 18, 22, 24, 46, 
37 and 41. This type is very commonly used over the country. 

Creosoted wood construction, it is estimated, will last in these waters 
from fifteen to twenty years. With our present revenue system, all 
such piers will out of their surplus of earnings provide a fund for their 
replacement when worn out, and they are, therefore, in effect perpetual. 

Whether or not concrete piers will last practically forever, as claimed 
by some of their advocates, or even as long as creosoted wood, is entirely 



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REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 27 

a matter of experiment and experience. They are comparatively of 
very recent use in the United States and, therefore, necessarily, experi- 
ence will have to be awaited before results can be stated with posi- 
tiveness. 

All concrete is not the same. The concrete wharves and piers built 
by previous boards of harbor commissioners have been for the most 
part costly failures. 

As pointed out above, piers Nos. 19, 21, 23, 25, 27 and 10, all had 
concrete supports, and all of them disintegrated inside of fifteen years. 
No. 27 was built in 1907, only seven years ago, and was as bad as 
the rest. Concrete supports of modern construction cost about three 
times as much as creosoted wood. 

A committee of three engineers of repute, appointed by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce to investigate and consider this ques- 
tion, made a written report, which entirely coincides with the policy 
recommended by our own engineer and adopted by this Board, and for 
record purposes we append the same. 

Materials Furnished Contractors. 
The policy of the Board has been to buy and test its cement by its 
own force, and to supply the same and also the creosoted piles to the 
contractors, who furnish the work and labor in pier and other con- 
structions. The same policy has been followed in the purchase of 
steel rails for the belt railroad. 

New Seawall Lots and Blocks Added. 

By the building of new sections of the seawall and filling up the 
water-lots behind the same within the past two years very valuable 
additions have been made to the state owned harbor lands, and the 
new and adjacent streets have been improved in accordance with munici- 
pal regulations. 

The following is a list of such lands : 

1. Lot No. 18, at the northeast comer of Spear Street and The Em- 
barcadero, area 26,793 square feet. 

2. Lot No. 19, bounded by The Embarcadero, Main and Bryant 
streets, area 14,623 square feet. 

3. Lot No. 20, bounded by The Embarcadero, Beale, Bryant and Main 
streets, area 93,668 square feet. 

In addition, the Board is reclaiming by the filling process two water 
blocks north of Jefferson Street, between Jones and Leavenworth streets, 
each 275 feet by 412^ feet, and the reclamation is now about half 
completed. 

The filling in of all this property was effected with but little expense 
to the Board, by establishing free dumps for the use of contractors and 
property owners generally throughout the city of San Francisco, our 



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28 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

only expense being the pay of the necessary inspectors of the material 
dumped and a few laborers. 

Street Improvements. 

Nearly every large city in the country with a water front suffers from 
wretched street conditions in the neighborhood of its water front. San 
Francisco has been no exception, but in the past two years gratifying 
progress has been made by the municipality on the streets under its 
jurisdiction, and the Harbor Board has consistently followed out the 
policy, where the dividing line of the two jurisdictions runs down the 
center line of a street, of improving the state half of the street in prompt 
cooperation with the improvement of the city half. 

Besides, the pavement of The Embarcadero has been largely repaired, 
and the new stretches obtained by the reclaiming process have been 
nearly all improved, some delays being unavoidable because of the lapse 
of time necessary to permit of the necessary settling. 

Under the law, the entire cost of street improvements on The Embarca- 
dero and the neighboring streets under the state jurisdiction comes 
upon the Harbor Board, as well as the cost of maintenance and cleaning. 

The cleaning is done by contract at an expense to the Board o£ about 
$14,000 annually. 

The particulars of street improvements are mentioned in the engi- 
neer's report. 

New Sidewalks. 

The sidewalks along the water front throughout its whole extent, with 
slight exceptions, were wooden and much deteriorated. Within the past 
two years the Board has steadily replaced them with new asphalt side- 
walks and the work is still in progress. 

New System of Street Lighting. 

The electrical department under the Board has been particularly 
active with many improvements, especially in the matter of street 
illumination, and a line of handsome new electroliers has been installed 
on The Embarcadero throughout nearly its whole extent. 

The water front is now one of the best lighted portions of San 
Francisco. 

Wires Placed Underground. 

No feature of large cities is more detrimental to appearance and, 
indeed, more dangerous, than the overhead wire system of public utility 
companies, for telegraph, telephone, gas, power and lighting purposes, 
etc. A beginning has been made in San Francisco to place them under- 
ground. 

The Board has adopted a similar policy on The Embarcadero, and 
ordered all overhead wires to be placed underground. Much of this 
work has been completed and the rest is steadily in progress. The 
improvement in the appearance of the street is most noticeable. 



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PART II. 

REPORT OF ASSISTANT STATE 
ENGINEER. 



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Pier 28. 




Piers 30-32. 



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Report of Assistant State Engineer. 

San Francisco, July 1, 1914. 

To the honorable Board of State Harbor Commissioners, San Francisco, 
California. 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to submit herewith my report as 
assistant state engineer, assigned to your honorable Board for the term 
beginning July 1, 1912, and ending June 30, 1914, during which the 
work was under my direction from August 8, 1912, Mr. A. V. Saph 
having been in charge until the latter date. 

At the end of the last biennial period, June 30, 1912, four contracts 
had been awarded for the construction of five new piers numbered 
respectively piers 17, 26, 28, 30 and 32. At the time of my appoint- 
ment, active work had been begun on pier 17 and the twin piers 
30 and 32 only, the former being 24 per cent and the latter 4 per 
cent completed. All these piers have since been finished essentially as 
planned and placed in service, the only modification having been in the 
design of the outer portion of pier 17, by the substitution of cement 
grout as a filling between the wooden piles and the concrete cylinders 
enclosing them in place of sand as originally planned. 

The layouts which had been tentatively adopted for the improvement 
of the northern portion of the water front from Lombard Street to 
Fisherman's Wharf and of the southern portion between Mission and 
Harrison streets were revised and formally adopted and the preparation 
of plans in accordance therewith was carried on, but owing to unfavor- 
able financial conditions and the impossibility of disposing of the bal- 
ance of the bond issue, construction could not be commenced with vigor. 
A few contracts were let, but the general plan of improvement could 
not be taken up in earnest until the beginning of 1914 ; since that time, 
however, the work has been pressed and an energetic effort is being made 
to put the water front in condition to handle the expected large increase 
in traffic consequent upon the opening of the Panama Canal. 

As the engineering department embraces several subdivisions, it will 
be necessary to report on the work of each separately, as follows : 

1. Construction, seawall, piers and wharves. 

2. Maintenance and repairs. 

3. Belt railroad. 

4. Ferry slips and buildings. 

5. Street work and maintenance. 

6. Electrical department. 

7. Dredging. 

8. Testing department. 

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32 REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

1. Construction. 

Seawall, Sections 9A and 9B, Section 9A of the seawall is 990 feet 
long and extends southerly from the end of section 8 near the foot of 
Mission Street to the foot of Folsom Street ; section 9B is 780 feet long, 
extending from the southerly end of section 9A, at the foot of Folsom 
Street to the northerly end of section 9 at the foot of Harrison Street. 

Both these sections are of the same type and differ in several respects 
from sections 8 and 9. The crest of the rock wall is higher and is 
placed at the curb line of The Bmbarcadero, 60 feet back of the water 
front line, instead of 27 feet as in section 9, giving greater depth of 
water at the edge of the bulkhead, and, as the concrete retaining wall 
is located at the crest of the rock embankment, affording the additional 
advantage of a uniform foundation for the bulkhead pavement. This 
uniform foundation will prevent the unequal settlement which has been 
observed in bulkheads built on the type of section 9 in which the outer 
27 feet of the pavement rests on the concrete slab and the inner 33 
feet on an earth fill. 

The concrete retaining wall is much smaller in section than those 
used in sections 8 and 9 and is carried down to 13 feet below city base 
instead of 30 feet, as in the two latter sections, making it possible to 
deposit all concrete in the dry instead of placing some of it under 
water, as was necessary in sections 8 and 9. The bottom rests on 
wooden piles cut off at low water and surrounded by rock and con- 
sequently not liable to decay or attack by marine borers. 

The deck is supported by reinforced concrete piles sixteen inches 
square, driven through the rock embankment ; in order to avoid shatter- 
ing the tips, it was found necessary to shoe the piles. 

On account of the mud bottom on which the rock wall rests, it vras 
considered advisable to make provision for possible future settlement 
by constructing the deck of the bulkhead wharf of steel beams carrying 
a plank and asphalt pavement ; the deck can later be raised if neces- 
sary, the steel concreted and the planking replaced by a concrete slab. 

Section 9A is 76^ per cent completed at the present time and it is 
expected that both sections will be finished by January 1, 1915. When 
completed there will be a continuous line of seawall from Mission Street 
to the north line of Channel Street extended and as stipulated in the 
China Basin lease the outer 100 feet of the thoroughfare along China 
Basin will be placed under control of the state. 

Piers and Bulkhead Wharves. Before proceeding with the prepara- 
tion of plans for new piers, the question of the proper class of con- 
struction to be employed was thoroughly discussed and it was decided 
that the use of creosoted piling in certain cases would be preferable to 
the exclusive use of reinforced concrete, which latter has been used, 
where deemed practicable. There were several reasons for making this 



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BEPOBT OF BOABD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 33 

decision^ viz : the great depth of iniid along the water front from the 
foot of Harrison Street to the foot of Grant Avenue, entailing exces- 
sive cost of construction in concrete on account of the depth and diflS- 
culty of foundations, the urgent necessity of being prepared for the 
opening of the Panama Canal in the very near future, the constant 
changes in vessels and freight handling methods bringing with them the 
possible need of early reconstruction to meet new conditions, coupled 
with the great expense of such reconstruction in a concrete pier and 
last but not least, the uncertainty among engineers regarding the prob- 
able life of reinforced concrete structures in sea water. It may be 
remarked that the choice of creosoted pile construction in certain locali- 
ties agrees with the recommendation to the Maritime Affairs Committee 
of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce by a commission of engi- 
neers appointed by it for the purpose of examining conditions and 
reporting thereon. A copy of the latter report, as a matter of engineer- 
ing interest is appended hereto. 

Observations at the northern portion of the front disclosed the fact 
that there was a strong tidal current at this point, which might endanger 
wooden pile structures and it was decided to build the three most 
exposed piers of the seven contemplated for this section of concrete, 
to act as breakwaters and to deflect the current eastward away from 
the shore. For this reason piers 29, 35 and 39 have been designed as 
reinforced concrete piers, piers 29 and 39 as concrete cylinder piers, 
resting on wooden piles below the mud line, and pier 35 as a pile pier ; 
and the completion of pier 39 has demonstrated that the object has 
been attained. 

Wherever possible, shipping men were consulted on the most advan- 
tageous arrangement of piers, location and character of tracks, sizes 
of doors, width of slips, etc., and designs were prepared in accordance 
with their suggestions. All new piers are provided with at least one 
track and where width permits with two, one surface and one depressed, 
the latter being generally placed on the northerly side, and provision 
is made for the possible future installation of cranes for handling 
freight by building the substructure and shed columns heavy enough 
to carry them. Doors are of ample size, usually twenty-two feet high 
and twenty feet wide and are equipped with steel rolling shutters which 
possess the advantages of easy operation, durability and low main- 
tenance cost. 

Wherever necessary, the contract for a new pier has included the 
reconstruction of the adjacent bulkhead wharf either in timber or con- 
crete, depending on circumstances. The wharf connecting with pier 
46 is of creosoted piling, those at piers 15, 30 and 41 are of reinforced 
concrete, 

3—14746 

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REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 45 

Creosoted pile fenders protected by untreated Oregon pine sheathing 
have been employed in place of the untreated fender lines heretofore 
used and wood block pavements in the driveways of wooden piers have 
been substituted for planking. A large percentage of the total cost 
of repairs is expended on fenders and planking and it is certain that 
even with the increased first cost, the above changes will result in 
materially decreased annual cost, the creosoted piling having ten to 
twelve times the life of untreated piles and the block pavement four to 
five times that of planking. 

To add to the attractiveness of the front, the old ugly type of shed 
front was abandoned and the pier fronts south of Market Street are 
to be built in modified mission style, those north of Market Street being 
{designed on the lines of the Chelsea piers in New York. 

Pier 39. This pier is 140 feet wide, its length on the westerly side 
being 879 feet and on the easterly side 938 feet, the difference in the 
lengths of the sides being due to the inclination of the pier at an angle 
to the seawall. The substructure consists of reinforced concrete 
cylinders three feet and three and one half feet in diameter, carried 
down from ten to fourteen feet below the dredge line and supported 
on wooden piles. The deck construction is of the usual transverse girder, 
longitudinal beam and slab type with a center driveway and a railroad 
•track on each side of the pier, the easterly one being flush and the 
: westerly one depressed. The pavement is Ohio wood blocks in the 
driveway and asphalt on the remainder of the deck. The fenders are 
of the suspended type, the same as those used on the new piers at the 
, south end. 

In addition to the pier, the contract included the construction of 
;two adjacent sections of reinforced concrete bulkhead wharf, 44 feet 
wide and extending back of the pier and 144 feet westerly and 175 feet 
easterly therefrom. The rock wall at this point, having been built in 
1878, and being consequently thoroughly compacted without danger 
of further settlement, was repaired where necessary and concrete piles 
driven through it, supporting a reinforced concrete deck paved with 
asphalt. The retaining wall is 16 inches thick and is carried down to 
nine feet below city base. 

Plans for a two story steel and concrete shed with a bulkhead build- 
ing projecting to within fifteen feet of the curb line have been pre- 
. pared ; this shed is arranged with offices, waiting rooms, baggage chutes, 
elevators, etc., for the accommodation of passengers, for which service 
the pier may ultimately be used. For the present it will be used for 
the grain sheds. 

Pier 39 was completed May 7, 1914, and a contract was let for 
moving the grain shed from the bulkhead wharf near by to serve as a 
temporar}^ shed on this pier until the permanent structure is erected. 



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46 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

Pier 46, This pier is 800 feet long by 200 feet wide and is con- 
structed of creosoted piling, carrying a timber deck with two surface 
tracks. The design is of the ordinary type and there are no features 
of special interest. 

The pier shed is of timber with sliding wooden doors, 22 feet high 
and 20 feet wide and with a center driveway. The deck planking con- 
sists of a layer of Oregon pine with a wearing surface of cedar. 

In connection with this contract considerable work has been done in 
placing the adjacent bulkhead wharf in good condition. 

Pier 46 was 46 per cent completed on June 30, 1914, and is expected 
to be entirely finished about September 15. 

Pier 54. This pier was built in 1910 on a rock ledge extending under 
a part of the pier and the northerly and southerly slips, and it was found 
necessary before the structure was completed and accepted to blast the 
rock on the northerly and southerly sides to the dredge line in order to 
afford suflBcient depth to accommodate vessels berthing alongside. A 
contract for the blasting had been let in June, 1910, and this was car- 
ried on while the pier was building, a work attended with much diffi- 
culty and some danger to the outside row of cylinders supporting the 
pier. It was finally decided to leave a ledge six feet wide outside the 
north row of cylinders where the rock was hard and chisel out the rock 
beyond this ledge until a sufficient distance had been reached to render 
blasting safe ; the entire area over which the rock was present was then 
blasted out to the dredge line. 

On account of the ledge which was left on the north side, it was not 
possible to dock vessels with safety and an extension ten feet wide was 
built along the entire length of this side, this extension being supported 
on reinforced concrete piles set on the rock ledge for the outer 441 feet 
and on creosoted piles driven into the mud for the inner 339 feet. The 
deck on the concrete pile section consists of reinforced girders and 
beams carrying a slab and that on the creosoted pile section is of timber 
covered with plank. The deck on both sections is securely bolted to the 
original structure and the entire area is paved with asphalt. 

The extension was completed on June 30, 1914. 

Pier 41, This pier is 200 feet wide, its length on the westerly side 
being 881 feet and on the easterly side, 1081 feet. It is supported on 
creosoted piling, has a timber deck with two surface tracks, and is 
paved along the driveway in the center with bituminous concrete and 
on the sides in the cargo space with asphalt. The fender line consists 
of creosoted piles protected by untreated Oregon pine sheathing extend- 
ing to below low water. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 47 

This pier is an open one and it is not intended to erect a shed on 
it. It is intended to be used for lumber, steel beams and all kinds of 
bulky cargo. 

In connection with the pier there is to be constructed under the same 
contract a section of reinforced concrete bulkhead wharf back of the 
pier and 149 feet easterly therefrom; this is identical in design with 
the wharf adjoining pier 39. 

Pier 41 was 21 per cent completed on June 30, 1914, and is expected 
to be finished about December 1, 1914. 

Pier 15. This pier, which is to replace the old one at the same place, 
condemned on account of its dangerous condition, is 794 feet long and 
90 feet wide. It is a creosoted pile pier with timber deck having one 
surface track located near the center to serve the coal bunkers on the 
southerly side, with a pavement of cedar plank on the driveway under 
the coal bunkers and of bituminous concrete outside the bunkers. The 
fender line is constructed of creosoted piles with untreated Oregon 
pine sheathing. 

The northerly half of the pier is to be built first and the coal bunk- 
ers moved temporarily to this portion when completed, after which 
the southerly half will be constructed and the bunkers then moved to 
their permanent location on this portion. There will be no shed, none 
being needed. 

The contract for this pier includes the building of a section of rein- 
forced concrete bulkhead wharf back of the pier and 101 feet northerly, 
having a width of 41 feet and supported on reinforced concrete piles 
driven through the old rock seawall. There is a concrete retaining 
wall at the inside, carried down to thirteen feet below city base and 
resting on wooden piles also driven through the seawall. The deck is of 
the usual girder, beam and slab type and is paved with asphalt. 

Pier 15 was six per cent completed on June 30, 1914, and will prob- 
ably be finished about January 1, 1915. 

Pier 27, An extension twelve feet wide was constructed along the 
entire northerly side of this pier for the purpose of carrying a surface 
track. This extension is supported on creosoted piles and has a 
planked timber deck. Under the same contract, extensive repairs were 
made to this pier and the adjacent bulkhead wharf which will be 
described under '* Maintenance and Repairs." 

The extension to pier 27 was completed March 19, 1914. 

Pier 25, An extension fourteen feet wide was constructed along 
the entire southerly side of this pier to carry a surface track; this is 
similar in design to that used on pier 27. It was completed on April 
30, 1914. 



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48 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

Miscellaneous, The outer 337 feet of Sixteenth Street wharf was 
brought out to full width by building a 77 foot extension on the north- 
erly side ; this was completed February 6, 1913. 

A creosoted pile bulkhead wharf 290 feet long with an average 
width of 110 feet was built in front of section 8 of the seawall and was 
completed January 2, 1913. This was designed for temporary'' use 
during the construction of the seawall south of Mission Street. 

A creosoted pile bulkhead wharf 411 feet long and 60 feet wide to 
accommodate government vessels and lumber schooners is in course 
of construction north of Fisherman's Lagoon and will be completed 
in one month. 

Projected work. Plans have been prepared or are in course of 
preparation as follows : 

New piers, numbered 16 and 18 to be located between Howard and 
Folsom streets; these plans are completed and contracts may be let 
as soon as possible. 

Piers 35 and 37, located respectively at the foot of Montgomery 
Street and the foot of Kearny Street ; these are 80 per cent completed. 

Piers 22 and 24, located near the foot of Harrison Street ; these have 
just been begun. 

Seawall extending from Jones Street to Larkin Street; instructions 
have been given to prepare these plans and in connection therewith 
to provide for the removal of Fisherman's Lagoon to the blocks north 
of Jefferson Street, between Hyde and Larkin streets. 

2. Maintenance and Repairs. 

The ordinary repairs to piers, bulkheads and ferry slips have been 
made by the state force, but some large jobs amounting to practical 
reconstruction of piers were let by contract. Li order to determine the 
relative cost of small work by contract and by day's labor, a compari- 
son was made for one month on the basis of actual work done, taking 
into account for the state force all pay roll and proper material 
charges and increase in wages since the contract system was aban- 
doned as against prices paid for contract work in 1910-1911. The com- 
parison showed a saving of 35 per cent and this would justify the 
adoption of the present system if no other reason existed; it may, 
however, be accepted as a fact that work done by forces under the 
direct control of those who pay for it is of better quality than that 
done by contractors and the conclusion is warranted that the day's 
labor system now in use for small repairs results in better work at a 
lower cost than the contract system. . 

Disintegration of concrete supports of five piers. In order to. ascer- 
tain whether repairs were necessary, piers 19, 21, 23, 25, all constructed 
in 1901 and pier 27 constructed in 1907, all of which are supported on 



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REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS, 49 

cylinders of plain concrete deposited in water and carried only a few 
feet below the mud line, were examined by divers and their condition 
found to be as follows: 

The 234 cylinders under pier 19 contain three piles each; of these 
cylinders, three had fallen, the disintegration of the concrete in 157 
had exposed the piles and 74 were in good condition. 

The 234 cylinders under pier 21 contain three piles each; of these 
cylinders, two had fallen down, the piles in four had been eaten oflf, 
leaving them hanging on the caps, the disintegration of the concrete 
in 166 had exposed the piles and 62 were in good condition. 

The 234 cylinders under pier 23 also contain three piles each; of 
these cylinders, 15 had fallen down, the piles in two had been eaten 
off, the piles in 140 were exposed and 77 were in good condition. 

The condition of the outer 60 feet of pier 25 having become danger- 
ous some four years ago, repairs were made by driving a creosoted pile 
on each side of the cylinders. There were 274 three-pile cylinders 
under this pier, of which 18 had fallen down, the piles in 12 had 
been eaten ofif and those in 135 were exposed, the concrete in 22 showed 
disintegration and 87 were in good condition. 

Of the 400 one-pile cylinders under pier 27, 58 had disappeared, the 
piles in 49 had been eaten off, those in 40 cylinders had been exposed 
by the destruction of the concrete, which had also begun to crumble in 
32 others without, however, exposing the piles, and 221 were in good 
condition. 

The results of the diver's examination showed the necessity of making 
repairs to these five piers and instructions were given to do so. The 
repairs to piers 25 and 27 were included in the contracts for the spur 
track extensions previously described and on the completion of these 
contracts, another was let for the repair of pier 19 ; this last was 12 per 
cent completed on June 30, 1914, and it is intended to begin work on 
the remaining two piers as soon as possible. 

The repairs are made with creosoted piles which are driven under 
the timber caps of piers 19, 21, 23 and 25 and in the case of pier 27 
carry sub-caps supporting the steel caps of the pier. The defective 
cylinders are to be loosened and laid on the bottom, care being taken 
to prevent damage to the piles during the lowering. These repairs 
will insure about fifteen years' further useful life of these structures, 
at the end of which time it will be cheaper to tear down and rebuild 
than to attempt to maintain them. 

3. Belt Railroad. 
A large amount of work has been done on the belt railroad, both 
in the way of additional spurs serving piers and industries and sidings 
and extensions. Mention has already been made of the fact that all 
4—14746 



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50 REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

new piers are provided with one or two trax^ks, those completed and 
under contract being as follows : Piers 46, 32, 30, 28, 26, 37, 39 and 41, 
two tracks each and piers 15 and 17 one track each ; of those projected, 
piers 16, 18, 29, 31, 33 and 35 are to have two tracks, while those to be 
numbered 24 and 22 are to be supplied with one. Spurs have also been 
constructed to piers 25 and 27 and it is intended to place one later 
on pier 13. 

A decided improvement in operating conditions was effected by the 
building of that portion of the Line crossing the foot of Market Street 
and connecting the northern and southern divisions; this link is 3,900 
feet long and extends from Folsom Street to Broadway. Some diffi- 
culty was experienced in the construction of the section in front of 
the Ferry Building and extending north to Clay Street ; The Embarca- 
dero at this point is a sand fill carried by a timber platform supported 
by piling cut off at low water level and it was necessary for a distance 
of 390 feet where the piles were too far apart to carry trains safely, to 
trench the street, drive the required additional piles and lay a new 
plank platform to retain the sand. The entire connection was com- 
pleted and ready for operation on January 27, 1913. 

The belt railroad is being further extended from the foot of Powell 
Street, its former northerly terminus, by the construction of the line 
to the government transport docks at Fort Mason. This line begins 
at the corner of Powell and Jefferson streets, and runs westerly along 
Jefferson Street to Van Ness Avenue, turning thence to the comer of 
Beach and Laguna streets and connecting with the government tracks 
to the transport docks and warehouses and also with the tracks of the 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Between Taylor and Jones 
streets, where it runs along the southerly edge of Fisherman's Lagoon, 
and between Larkin Street and Van Ness Avenue where it crosses the 
cove east of Black Point, it is on trestle and under the government 
reservation at. Fort Mason, in tunnel. The trestles are open deck, built 
in accordance with standard railroad practice, having creosoted pile 
bents and creosoted sway braces and girts; tower bents are spaced 
every 150 feet. The tunnel is 1,500 feet long, its easterly portal being 
situated 120 feet west of the westerly line of Van Ness Avenue and 
its westerly portal 245 feet east of the easterly line of Laguna Street. 
It is concrete lined throughout with a clear width of 17 feet and a 
clear height above top of rail of 22 feet. At the westerly end from the 
portal to Laguna Street, there are concrete retaining walls about 250 
feet long, having a height of 27 feet at the portal face and four feet 
at the easterly line of Laguna Street ; these walls were ordered built to 
save as much ground as possible for the use of the reservation. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 51 

The material encountered in the tunnel was a sandstone shale for 
the easterly 700 feet, clay in the middle 400 feet and sand in the 
westerly 400 feet. The easterly and middle portions were excavated 
by the ordinary heading and bench method, a center shaft being sunk 
to hasten the work, the westerly section in sand being taken out as an 
open cut and backfilled after the masonry was completed. The shaly 
rock from the easterly portion was used to make an embankment 
extending into the bay from Hyde Street to Larkin Street, and heavily 
riprapped along the northerly side and the westerly end to protect it 
from wash. 

This extension, which is 1.09 miles long, was 47 per cent completed 
on June 30, 1914, and is expected to be ready for trains by November 
1, 1914, in ample time to serve the exposition. 

A reinforced concrete engine house containing seven stalls was 
erected on Seawall Lot 8, bounded by Lombard and Sansome streets 
and The Embarcadero. This building is provided with a drop pit, 
machine shop, blacksmith shop and store room ; the engine house proper 
and the machine shop are floored with wooden blocks on a concrete 
base, the store room with concrete and the blacksmith shop with cinders. 

It is expected that this engine house will suffice for the needs of the 
belt railroad for several years and when additional stalls are required 
another engine house should be built on the southern division. 

This engine house was completed April 30, 1914. 

The total length of line between the north side of Second Street 
wharf, the present southerly terminus, and Beach and Laguna streets, 
the proposed northerly terminus, is 3.70 miles. A comprehensive plan 
has been worked out for the track system between these termini which 
contemplates 1.86 miles of single track, 0.64 mile of double track and 
1.20 miles of three track road, the number of tracks being determined 
by local conditions of railroad yards and tracks serving industries at 
different points. The single track sections extend from the north side 
of Second Street wharf to Berry Street, from King to Townsend 
Street, from Folsom Street to Broadway and from Powell to Laguna 
Street ; the double track sections from Berry to King Street, from Har- 
rison to Folsom Street, from Broadway to Green Street and from 
Battery to Francisco Street, and the three track sections from Towns- 
end to Harrison Street, from Green to Battery Street and from Fran- 
cisco to Powell Street. 

To render possible the storage of cars during the season of heavy 
traffic, yards have been projected on Seawall lots 20 and 18 at the 
south end and on lots 1, 2, A and B at the north end; these yards will 
assist materially in doing away with congestion of the main line and in 



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52 REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

assuring rapid delivery of ears to shippers and to the different railroad 
companies entering the city. Several of the tracks planned for these 
yards have already been laid. 

4. Ferry Slips and Buildings. 

Passenger Ferry Slips. Plans for new passenger slips at the north 
and south ends of the ferry system have been prepared, those at the 
north end being designated A and B and those at the south end being 
numbered 7, 8, 9 and 10 ; of these, slips B, 8, 9 and 10 are to be entirely 
new and slips A and 7 are to be partially rebuilt to fit the enlarged 
system. 

The dolphins are to be constructed of creosoted piles carrying a tim- 
ber deck covered with a double layer of planking at the outer end and 
with a single layer paved with asphalt on the inner portion. While 
the general type of construction is similar to that used in the older 
slips, several improvements have been made, such as strengthening the 
aprons to permit the passage of loaded trucks weighing twenty tons 
and reinforcing the noses of the dolphins and the clusters at the outer 
ends of the aprons with the object of reducing the liability to damage 
at these points, the most vulnerable parts of the fender line. The older 
aprons w;ere capable of carrying a twelve ton vehicle, but as loads have 
increased since the general adoption of the auto truck, shippers who 
desired to send heavy machinery, etc., across the bay were put to seri- 
ous inconvenience and expense on account of the limited capacity of 
the aprons and, to meet their wishes, the heavier aprons have been 
designed. The noses of the new dolphins are more heavily piled than 
other portions and are strongly braced transversely by continuous lines 
of timbers fastened to the piles and extending entirely across the 
dolphin, these timbers being placed both above and below the deck and 
bearing against the ribbons of the spring line. The clusters contain 
nineteen piles as against nine formerly. It is expected that these 
changes will result in decreasing repairs, as the nose and cluster are 
more subject to damage by ferry boats than any other part of the 
spring line and consequently of tener in need of repairs. 

The end dolphin on the southerly side of slip 10 is to be of larger 
size than any of the others, its average length, measured from the 
water front line, being 670 feet and its width at the outer end, 120 
feet; it is to carry a shed 110 feet wide by 430 feet long intended 
for express purposes. The berthing space of 650 feet on the southerly 
side of this dolphin makes this a particularly favorable location for 
small boats and launches and a space 60 feet Wide outside the shed 
has been left for use of the business of these vessels. The end dolphin 
on the northerly side of slip B has a berthing space of 465 feet vrith a 
width at its outer end of 66 feet. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 53 

Foundations for upper deck aprons have been provided at all slips 
and contracts for these, wherever necessary, can be let after the com- 
pletion of the slips. 

Slip 8 was completed June 25, 1914, and contracts for slips 7, 9 
and 10 will be let in the near future, in time to insure their being 
available for use before the opening of the Panama-Pacific International 
Exposition. 

Car Ferry Slips. The present car ferries at the foot of Lombard 
Street are to be torn out to make room for piers and two new ones are 
being built between the foot of Powell Street and the foot of Taylor 
Street. They are of creosoted piles carrying a timber deck planked 
with Oregon pine, which on the eastern dolphin is covered with a wear- 
ing surface of cedar to permit of teaming when this dolphin is used 
for berthing vessels. The construction follows the plan of the present 
car ferry slips in general, but with steel aprons and wider dolphins 
supplied with more tracks, there being two of these on the easterly 
dolphin, four on the middle one and two on the westerly dolphin. 

In connection with the contract for the car ferry slips, the adjacent 
bulkhead is being reconstructed to carry tracks, this work being carried 
out in timber on the same plan as the slips. 

The car ferry slips were 4 per cent completed June 30, 1914. 

Buildings, Plans for buildings in the vicinity of the ferry slips are 
being prepared as follows: 

Extension to the southerly end of the main Ferry Building to be 
used for baggage purposes. 

Post oflBce building to be located opposite the foot of Mission Street 
with a connecting shed on the dolphin between slips 8 and 9. 

Shed on the dolphin on the south side of slip 10 to be used for 
express purposes. 

The Ferry Building extension is to be a one story structure 140 feet 
wide by 126 feet deep, carrying out the arcade treatment of the first 
story front of the main building. It is to be of frame construction with 
plastered exterior, the latter being painted to match the stone of the 
Ferry Building. There is to be a light steel frame shelter at the 
southern end for teams handling baggage and a two story steel frame 
and concrete structure behind the extension for the gangways for pas- 
sengers to and from the upper and lower decks of ferry boats. The 
extension is to be supported by creosoted piles with a wooden floor, the 
rear gangways being carried on concrete piles with a concrete deck 
paved with asphalt. 

The Ferry Building as originally designed included a wing at each 
side, which for lack of funds was not built. Ultimately, but probably 
not for some years, they will doubtless be added and will be of the 



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54 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

same stone as the present structure. For this reason the one story- 
extension for baggage room purposes now in progress being only tem- 
porary in character, is of frame and plaster construction. 

The interior is to be arranged for use by the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany and the Western Pacific Railway. In connection with the erec- 
tion of this addition, a part of the present baggage room at the southern 
end of the Ferry Building is to be remodeled to provide waiting room 
space for the Western Pacific. 

The post office is to be 167 feet wide by 125 feet deep on the fi^rst 
floor with a second story extending the full width of the building and 
58 feet deep. The construction is to be steel frame with brick walls, 
carried by concrete piles and a concrete deck paved with asphalt. The 
first floor is to be divided into work rooms for handling mail with 
the necessary space for the public and the second floor is to contain 
offices for the use of the office force. In addition there will be four 
mezzanine floors provided with lockers, etc., for the working force. 

Connected with the main post office there will be a timber shed con- 
taining an area of approximately 16,000 square feet and divided into 
work rooms and storage spaces ; this shed is to be built on the dolphin 
between ferry slips 8 and 9. The two story steel and concrete gang- 
way in the rear of the Ferry Building extension is to be continued 
to the southerly end of the post office and from this point a one story 
structure is to be built over the passageway to the extreme southerly 
ferry slip. 

The shed intended for Wells Fargo & Company is to be 110 feet wide 
by 430 feet deep on the first floor with a second story 202 feet deep 
across the entire width of the building; the construction is to be wood 
frame with plastered exterior. The lower floor is to be used for 
general office and work room purposes, the second floor being intended 
for the clerical force and for sorting and distributing express matter. 

5. street Work and Maintenance. 

Besides the ordinary repair work done on The Embarcadero by 
Harbor Commission forces, considerable new work has been done by 
contract during the last two years in connection with improvements 
ordered by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors on streets bounding 
property belonging to the state. The different contracts of this char- 
acter which have been awarded are as follows : 

Paving the easterly half of Beale Street between Bryant Street and 
The Embarcadero, completed in April, 1913. 

Sewering Bryant Street between Beale and Main streets, completed 
in May, 1913. 

Paving the southerly half of Brannan Street from First Street to 
The Embarcadero, completed in Jmie, 1913. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 55 

Sewering Steuart Street between Folsom and Harrison streets, com- 
pleted in July, 1913. 

Sewering and paving the southerly half of Bryant Street between 
Main and Spear streets and the easterly half of Spear Street from The 
Embarcadero to near Harrison Street ; this has not yet been completed. 

In addition to those enumerated above, a contract has been let for 
sewering and paving The Embarcadero from pier 34 to pier 26, which 
was about 2 per cent completed on June 30, 1914, and it is intended 
to extend this pavement northerly as soon as feasible. Contracts will 
also be awarded for sewering and paving Fremont Street from The 
Embarcadero to Brannan Street, and Main Street from The Embarca- 
dero to Bryant Street; the property fronting on both sides of these 
streets is under control of the state and plans and specifications will 
be prepared in this office and the work done under our direction. 

On account of the increasing traffic along the water front, especially 
at the southerly end, it is highly desirable in order to avoid congestion, 
that all streets leading into The Embarcadero be improved and the 
work enumerated above has been of material benefit in this respect. 

6. Electrical Department. 

The work of the electrical department during the past two years 
has been varied and extensive, numerous improvements in the lighting 
of piers and ferry slips having been effected and considerable progress 
made in placing wires underground. 

The electric lighting system along The Embarcadero has been 
extended from pier 34 northerly to Harrison Street and from pier 11 
northerly to pier 27 by the installation of 39 additional electroliers 
equipped with 250 watt and 400 watt tungsten lamps. Conduits, wires 
and post-holes are being placed in sections 9 A and 9B of the- seawall and 
bulkhead wharf now under construction and when these are completed 
there will be a continuous system of high efficiency electroliers, 110 
in all, from Channel Street northerly to Lombard Street. 

The problem of proper pier illumination has been the subject of study 
with the purpose of obtaining maximum efficiency with, minimum cost. 
As a result of data obtained from trial installations, the large wattage 
Mazda lamp was adopted and this is replacing the arc lights formerly 
used; all but five of the piers have been equipped with the modem 
lamps and the changes on these piers will be made in a short time. The 
improvement in lighting due to these changes, with its accompanying 
economy, has met with the hearty approval of shipping men. 

An underground conduit system for Harbor Commission wires has 
been planned from Channel Street to Lombard Street; of this, the sec- 
tion from the channel to Harrison Street has been completed, conduits 
are being placed in sections 9A and 9B of the new seawall and the 



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56 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

section from the Ferry Building to Lombard Street is about 85 per 
cent finished. A manhole is to be built opposite each pier entrance^ 
from which conduits and service wires are to be led into the sheds. 

Notice has been served on electric public service corporations to 
place their wires underground and this is gradually being done, a sepa- 
rate system of conduits being laid for these wires. All poles and over- 
head wires, with the exception of those owned by the United Bailroads 
have already been removed from the Ferry Building north to Chest- 
nut Street. AU private service wires to piers or other state property 
are to be run into Harbor Commission manholes ; the conduits and wires 
extending from the latter are owned by the Harbor Commission, thus 
minimizing inconvenience and delay when the contract for furnishing 
electricity passes from one company to another. 

Five new fire boxes numbered from 934 to 938 inclusive have been 
installed on The Embarcadero between Channel and Harrison streets 
and have been connected with the fire alarm system of the city. 

Precautions have been taken to protect the outer ends of exposed 
structures by installing fog bells and beacons, bells having been placed 
on piers 46, 32, 26 and 17, aU connected with testing apparatus in the 
Ferry Building to enable the operator to be certain that they are ringing 
properly and beacons having been established on piers 46 and 39. In 
addition, new beacons of high power have been installed, one on the 
main ferry dolphin and another at the top of the tower and all pier 
head lights along the water front have been replaced by others of greater 
candle power. A Douglas fog signal of 25,000 candle power has been 
placed on the main ferry dolphin and a second is to be furnished for 
pier 39. Safety lights of large candle power have also been installed at 
every ferry apron and have proved of great benefit during rush hours. 

A remote control system has been introduced whereby the street lights 
from the Ferry Building north to Chestnut Street are operated from 
the main switchboard in the Ferry Building and this will eventually 
be enlarged to include all Harbor Commission lights from Channel 
Street to Fisherman's Wharf. 

The time service in the building had become the cause of much com- 
plaint on account of the unreliability of the tower clock and the various 
electric clocks in the offices and waiting rooms. The department in- 
vestigated the subject carefully, collecting data from terminals in other 
cities and adopted a modem half -minute jump electric clock system, con- 
trolled by a master clock; this system is now being installed. At the 
same time, the Howard pendulum movement in the tower is being re- 
placed by an electric movement designed by this department and con- 
trolled by the master clock operating the secondary clocks in the build- 
ing; this movement was successfully tested for several months under 
actual working conditions before being installed. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 57 

7. Tugs and Dredgers. 

The dredging equipment has been kept busy not only in maintaining 
the necessary depth at the older piers but also in excavating at the new 
structures wherever necessary before and after completion. 

The smaller dredger, in addition to its ordinary work, spent consider- 
able time in the troublesome task of taking out the rock blasted on the 
north side of pier 54 and the large machine was engaged at different 
times in pulling pile snags and dredging for sections 9A and 9B of the 
seawall. 

The floating equipment has been kept in good condition in accordance 
with the requirements of the Federal Board of Inspectors ; the expense 
of maintaining and repairing it has been quite heavy on account of its 
age and may be expected to increase as it grows older. Oil burners have 
been installed in both tugs and a considerable saving in operating cost 
has been effected by the use of liquid fuel in place of coal. 

8. Testing Department. 

This department has tested, both chemically and physically, all cement 
used on the work and has also passed on all rock, gravel and sand 
furnished by contractor for use in concrete; numerous tests have also 
been made on roofing felts, asphalt, paints, etc., furnished by manu- 
facturers and intended for our work. 

A series of long time tests has been begun to determine, if possible, 
the action of seawater on local cements and it is hoped to add something 
of value to our knowledge on this subject. 

Authority has been granted for the purchase of an Olsen Universal 
Testing Machine of 150,000 pounds capacity and of an Olsen cold 
bending machine and these will be installed in the near future. This 
will enable us, instead of employing others to do our work, to make the 
necessary tests on all reinforcing and structural steel, concrete, brick, 
metals, wood, etc., in our laboratory; added to this advantage there 
will be a saving in the cost of this service, as the machine will pay for 
itself in doing the work already planned. 

Respectfully, 

JEROME NEWMAN, 

Assistant State Engineer. 



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Belt Railroad Locomotive. 




Belt Railroad Engine House. 



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PART III. 

REPORT ON TYPES OF PIER 
CONSTRUCTION. 

By Consulting Engineers of San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 



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Rear View of Belt Railroad Engine House. 




Side View of Belt Railroad Engine House. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 61 



REPORT ON TYPES OF PIER CONSTRUCTION. 



San Francisco, March 13, 1912. 

Maritime Committee, Chamber of Commerce, 
San Francisco, California. 

Gentlemen : In accordance with your instructions we have made an 
inspection of the improved portions of the water front, and have in- 
vestigated the conditions under which the piers or wharves must be 
constructed, and find that the type of pier or wharf constructed to be 
adopted, will, in general, be controlled by the character of the found- 
ation. 

We find that from piers 54 to 26 the foundation is hard pan overlaid 
with a comparatively thin layer of mud, and northerly from pier No. 26 
to a point at the southerly end of the grain sheds the foundation is of 
mud of unknown depth, but increasing in density with depth. 

In the past the type of wharf supports has been untreated piles, 
creosoted piles, and untreated piles encased in concrete and built under 
the Holmes patent, the Kaetitz patent and the Black patent, and re- 
inforced concrete piers such as are constructed at piers 36, 38, 40 and 54. 

In the waters of San Francisco Bay the imtreated fir piling, as is 
well known, has but a short average life and is, therefore, not to be con- 
sidered in the construction of new piers or wharves. Creosoted piling 
has a much longer life and will be referred to further along in this re- 
port. The untreated piling encased in concrete, of the types above 
mentioned, are subject to very rapid destruction by marine borers, if 
through any accident there should be a defect of any kind in the con- 
crete protection, or if in the course of time, or by reason of unforeseen 
conditions the mud line should be so lowered as to expose the wooden 
piles. Many of the piers or wharves that have been constructed in this 
manner in the last few years are now in a very bad condition, due in a 
large measure to this cause. 

For the construction of piers or wharves where hard pan foundation 
is found, we believe that if pile foundations are driven^ owing to the 
shallow depth of the mud, such piles would have little or no support 
and would be very unstable unless a suitable filling of small rock or 
other material was dumped around them to provide sufScient lateral 
stiffness. The forming of such fills would in a great measure obstruct 
the tidal prism, and for that reason it is doubtful if permission could 
be obtained from the Federal authorities for such style of construction. 
This leaves no other suitable type of pier or wharf construction except 
the reinforced concrete pier style, such as has been previously mentioned. 



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62 REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

which is a very excellent type of long life and low maintenance cost, but 
at the same time has the disadvantage of a very heavy initial expense, 
and is a very diflScult construction in which to make alterations if the 
changing conditions of the port would make new arrangements necessary. 
This is mentioned in connection with the constant changes occurring in 
the manner of handling freight at both railway and seaport terminals 
and considering that in a very few years still more radical changes may 
be made which would mean very heavy expenditures to make the changes 
to meet the new conditions. Notwithstanding this, however, it would 
be our recommendation that on hard pan foundation this style of con- 
struction be adopted. 

For those portions of the water front where the foundation is of mud 
of great depth, we believe it will be found most economical, in the long 
run, to build the piers, or wharves, using creosoted piles for supports, 
such piles to be of large butt size and of the best quality obtainable ; the 
creosoting to be done by the most approved method known. The deck 
of such pier or wharf to be framed of creosoted caps with large floor 
joists, using 12x12 timbers, or similar size, instead of the usual 3x12 
or 4x12 joists ; to be planked over with 4-inch plank and surfaced with 
wood blocks laid on tar paper, or other approved form of paving, par- 
ticular care being given to water-proofing that portion of the pier or 
wharf outside of the sheds. We believe that if piles of proper quality 
are procured, structures of this kind would have a useful life of at least 
twenty years. There are creosoted piles now in use supporting wharves 
on either side of San Francisco Bay, that have been in use for more than 
twenty years, and we have definite knowledge of other pile structures 
in similar localities in Central California where the expectation of life 
is as long. 

Reinforced concrete piles were considered for piers or wharves where 
mud foundations occur, but, owing to their high cost, and the lack of 
experience with this type of construction, in this locality we would not 
recommend their adoption, but would advise that from time to time as 
opportunity offered, experiments be made with this type of construction. 

It was our desire to submit exact figures showing the relative economy 
of creosoted pile piers, or wharves, and reinforced concrete piers or 
wharves, but owing to the fact that no records have been kept by the 
Harbor Commissioners, showing the cost of maintenance, we are unable 
to do so, but can only submit figures showing the first cost and the esti- 
mated cost of maintenance. In preparing this statement we have 
assumed that the cost of the creosoted pile wharf, as above described, is 
$1.00 per square foot, and the cost of the reinforced concrete pier type 
wharf is $3.24 per square foot, and have estimated the useful life of the 
creosoted pile wharf as being 20 years, and that of the reinforced con- 
crete pier type of construction as permanent within the limitations, as 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 63 

previously set forth. The following table shows the total annual charges 
for each type of wharf or pier construction : 



Interest on first cost at 4 per cent 

Annual maintenance 

Replacement fund, 20 years 

Redemption fund, 75 years 

Insurance _ 

Total annual charges per square foot. 






Creosoted 
pile 

$0.0400 , 
.0500 

.0336 
.0022 ' 
.0060 


Uelnforced 
concrete 

$0.1300 




.0125 









.0072 












$0.1318 


$0.1497 







This would indicate that the creosoted pile, pier or wharf, was at least 
as economical a structure as the reinforced concrete type. 

The style or kind of sheds that have been constructed on the different 
piers along the water front have ranged from the cheapest board and 
tatten structures, with wooden frames, to the reinforced concrete 
type of building, and there seems to be a diversified opinion among 
shipping men as to the proper style of shed to construct. Taking into 
consideration the many changes that are going on constantly in the 
manner and methods of handling cargoes from ship to wharf, and from 
wharf to ship, we believe a type of moderate cost should be adopted, 
and would recommend that buildings supported by either steel or wooden 
trusses, preferably the latter, be erected, so designed as to make the 
members as large as possible ; the roof to be constructed either of tar and 
gravel, corrugated iron or other similar roofing material ; that the sides 
from the eaves to the heads of the doors and the ends to be constructed 
of corrugated iron ; that rolling metal doors be provided along the entire 
length of either side. It is also recommended that in case wooden 
trusses are used that they be planked on either side with redwood timber 
to act as fire breaks. Of course, it is expected that buildings of this 
kind would be given the proper attention, be painted sufficiently and 
minor running repairs kept up. Such buildings would not in any sense 
be fire proof, but each pier should be protected with proper fire fighting 
apparatus, such as hose, fire extinguishers, etc. 

With very small repairs sheds of this character would last a long 
time, and should it be found desirable at any time to make alterations 
due to changed conditions, they could be easily made. 

In closing we take pleasure in acknowledging the very courteous treat- 
ment we have received from the Harbor Commissioners and their Engi- 
neer, and to acknowledge our debt to them for their hearty cooperation 
in giving us all the information at their command. 
Yours very truly, 

R. M. Drake. 
Leland S. Rosener. 
Henry A. Campbi^^. t 

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PART IV. 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 67 



REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY. 



August 27, 1914. 
To the ho7iorahle, the Board of State Harbor Commissioners. 

Gentlemen : Herewith please find my report from the first day of 
July, 1912, to the first day of July, 1914. 

During that time I have submitted to the Board thirty -five written 
opinions and have rendered many verbal ones. I have drawn forty-five 
contracts, involving a total sum of $2,175,337.23, exclusive of the 
amounts contracted to be paid for oil, piles, lumber, street cleaning, and 
electric light and power, and exclusive of any sum above the price of a 
minimum number of barrels of oil contracted for. 

The following actions are pending in the Superior Court: 

1. Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company vs. State of California 
and the present members of the Board of State Harbor Commissioners, 
to enjoin the Board from entering into twelve feet, claimed by the 
plaintiff as the easterly line of its property at Market Street and The 
Embarcadero, and claimed by the Board to be a portion of the westerly 
line of The Embarcadero. The Board has answered and filed a cross- 
complaint in ejectment. The Cowell Lime and Cement Company by 
itself and its predecessors claim to have been in possession for fifty 
years. 

2. Johan Alfred Matsson vs. State of California, the present Board 
of State Harbor Commissioners and the former board as boards, and the 
members of the present and former boards as individuals, to recover 
$35,533 on account of the death of plaintiff's son, caused by his being 
struck by a train of cars on the belt railway. Demurrers to the com- 
plaint have been sustained as to the members of the present Board of 
State Harbor Commissioners and also as to the State of California, 
leaving the action pending against W. V. Stafford, W. E. Dennison and 
P. S. Teller as individuals. 

3. People of the State of California, ex rel Board of State Harbor 
Commissioners vs. Southern Pacific Company, a corporation — three 
cases — Nos. 13,555, 13,097 and 13,099 ; suits in ejectment to recover pos- 
session of five parcels of land on the northerly line of Channel Street, 
between Fifth and Sixth streets. 

4. People of the State of California, ex rel Board of State Harbor 
Commissioners vs. Gray Bros. Crushed Rock Company, a corporation, 
and The Aetn<i Indemnity Company of Hartford, Cmm, On October 
28, 1913, judgment was rendered in the superior court in favor of the 



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68 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

Board and against the said defendants. The Aetna Indemnity Com- 
pany is insolvent. On November 17, 1913, a claim on the judgment was 
presented to the receiver in insolvency at Hartford, Conn., supplemental 
to the claim that was presented prior to the judgment. No dividend 
has yet been declared by the receiver. 

5. People of the State of California, ex rel Board of State Harbor 
Commissioners vs. 145 defendants, being owners of individual parcels 
of land constituting property north of India Basin and extending to 
Islais Creek. 

There is pending in the Supreme Court of the State of California 
the action brought by W, A, Brown against the Board of State Harbor 
Commissioners. This was a mandamus proceeding brought by Brown, 
a wharfinger who was removed by the Board, to compel the Board to 
restore him to office. Judgment was rendered by Judge Seawell in 
favor of the Board, from which judgment Brown has appealed. 
Respectfully submitted. 

DANIEL A. RYAN. 



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PART V. 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF 
BELT RAILROAD. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 71 



Report of Superintendent of Belt Railroad. 

San Francisco, California, October 8, 1914. 
To the Honorable, the Board of State Harbor Commissioners, 
Union Depot and Ferry House, San Francisco, 

Gentlemen : I herewith submit the biennial report of the operation 
of the belt railroad for the fiscal years beginning July 1, 1912 and end- 
ing June 30, 1914. 

Operation. For the past year we have continuously operated with 
six train crews, but during the fall months, it has been necessary to 
increase the number of crews to ten. 

Two new standard switch engines have been purchased in the last 
two years. The business has increased both in volume and weight, so 
that engines 2 and 3 can not handle the trains in an efficient manner. 
I recommend that locomotives 2 and 3 be sold and two new, heavier, 
locomotives be purchased. There are 7 locomotives, and all are in daily 
service at present; belt railroad employees maintaining and repairing 
all equipment. Equipment is in good serviceable condition. The belt 
railroad is operated night and day, and every day in the year, crews 
working eight-hour shifts. Business is increasing and extending west- 
ward so rapidly that when the new car ferry slips at Powell Street are 
in operation it will be necessary to have more yard room to operate the 
new slips, and handle trains to and from the transport docks and fair 
grounds. 

I recommend that the blocks of land west of Taylor street and north 
of Jefferson Street be reserved for belt railroad tracks, as they are the 
only available lots west of Powell Street suitable for yard room. 

Construction. The belt railroad has been extended south to a connec- 
tion with the southern division, and as far north as Hyde Street. There 
has been 33,082 feet of new track constructed; 31 nine-inch girder 
rail turnouts; 9 sixty-pound tee rail turnouts, and 3 nine-inch girder 
rail crossings, but this does not relieve the congestion of cars very much 
during the busy season. Tracks have been laid on piers 17, 25, 26, 27, 
28, 30, 32, 39, 41 and 46. Main line extended south from Broadway 
Street to pier 46, and west from Powell to Hyde Street. 

A car storage yard has been constructed on seawall lot No. 20. A 
new terminal yard for the Western Pacific Railroad on lots No. 22 and 



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72 REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 

No. 7. The Santa Fe yard on lots No. 5 and No. 6 has been recon- 
structed. New switching tracks have been laid on lots No. 1 and No. 2. 
A new 5-stall reinforced concrete engine house containing repair pits, 
machine shop, blacksmith and boiler shop, storeroom, drop pit and 
office, and a 20,000-gallon water tank have been constructed for the belt 
railroad. Four cars have been reconstructed, and are as good as new. 
Becommendations. Owing to the steady increase of business, and 
demands of local industries along the San Francisco Bay shore for 
economical and expeditious transportation, I recommend that the belt 
railroad be extended north to the United States Government Presidio 
Reservation, and for the present, as far south as Islais Creek. There 
are no facilities on the entire length of the belt railroad for handling 
heavy packages such as machinery, marble, steel building material, and 
crushed rock. I believe a suitable revolving locomotive crane owned 
and controlled by the belt railroad would be profitable to the belt rail- 
road, and very serviceable to its patrons. 

Respectfully submitted. 

F. A. STEVENS. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



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PART VI. 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 77 



REPORT OF THE SECRETARY. 



San Francisco, July 2, 1914. 
To the honorable, the Board of State Harbor Commissioners. 

Gentlemen: There is respectfully submitted to you herewith the 
report of my office for the biennium commencing July 1, 1912, and 
ending June 30, 1914. 

The following summary of receipts compares the two biennial periods, 
1912-1914 and 1910-1912: 

Receipts, 1912-1914, including $5,796.77 drafts returned and cancelled, $2,974,837 62 
Receipts, 1910-1912, including $10,019.30 drafts returned and cancelled, 2,639,740 71 

an increase in favor of the last biennial period of $335,090 91 

Your attention is respectfully directed to the increased revenue de- 
rived from dockage, tolls, w^harfage and rents. 

The increase in the item of rents was due principally to the comple- 
tion and putting into operation of the various new wharves and piers 
constructed by your honorable body. 

The earnings of the belt railroad have, in previous reports, been 
included in the miscellaneous receipts. In the present instance they 
have been set forth separately showing the earnings of the two divi- 
sions. A comparative statement of the receipts of the belt railroad 
for the two biennial terms, follows : 

Receipts, 1912-1914 $381,539 50 

Receipts, 1910-1912 165,620 00 

A gain of $215,909 50 

or 130.03 per cent. 

These gains indicate the healthy growth of the business of the port. 

The total number of tons of freight handled over the state wharves 
during the biennial period 1910-1912, amounted to 13,427,848 tons, and 
for the biennial period 1912-1914, 14,782,861 tons, an increase of 
1,355,013 tons, or 10.09 per cent. For the preceding biennial period 
the gain over its predecessor was 1.7 per cent. 

I express below, in tabular form, the number of vessels docking at the 
state wharves during the last two biennial periods, together with the 
tons of freight discharged and loaded over the state wharves during 
the twenty years, from 1894 to 1914. 

KespectfuUy submitted. 

LEO V. MERLE, Jr., 

Secretary. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



Ocean Steamers Docking at the State Wharves of San Francisco During the Two 
Fiscal Years July 1, 1912, to June 30, 1914. 



Over 8.000 tons 

From 7,000 to 8,000 tons. 
From 6.000 to 7,000 tons. 
From 5,000 to 6,000 tons. 
From 4,000 to 5,000 tons. 
From 3,000 to 4,000 tons. 
From 2,000 to 3,000 tons. 
From 1,000 to 2,000 tons. 
From 500 to 1,000 tons... 
Under 500 tons... 

Total 



3 
3 
1 

12 
34 
77 
49 
43 
52 
126 



400 



Note. — The largest steamer docked at the state wharves was the German steamer 
Cleveland of 10,300 net tons. The largest sailing vessel was the British ship Croydon 
of 3,073 tons net. 



Tons of Freight Discharged and Loaded Over the State Wharves During the Twenty 

Years From 1894 to 1914. 



Year 


Tons 


1894-95 . .- - - 


3.729.367 


1895-96 — — - — 


3,848,461 


1896-97 - — 


3,657.219 


1897-98 - 


3*894,362 


1898-99 - - 


4,154,453 


1899^1900 - - 


4,646,157 


1900-01 . - - .- 


5048,831 


1901-02 — -. 


4.890.679 


1902-03 — 


5,203,485 


1903-04 - 


5,528>048 


1904-05 — — 


5,292,113 


1905-06 - .— 


5,748,992 


1906-07 — 


6,802,793 


1907-08 - .- - 


6.468.527 


1908-09 .- - 


6,325,078 


1909-10 — - 


6,866,148 


1910-11 - - - 


6,629,122 


1911-12 _ - 


6,798,726 


1912-13 


7,528,965 


1913-14 _ 


7,253,896 






Total - 


110,315,422 







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PART VII 



FINANCIAL STATISTICS 



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REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



FINANCIAL STATISTICS. 



Summary of Receipts for the Two Fiscal Years July 1, 1912, to June 30, 1914. 



Dockage .| ^25,413 20 



Tolls 

Wharfage 

Rents 

Belt railroad, north 
Belt railroad, south 
Miscellaneous 



376.448 25 

10,040 59 

626,173 89 

158,516 50 

29,030 00 

25,455 32 



$229,188 00 

362,694 80 

12,336 36 

670,595 74 

159,114 00 

34,879 00 

50,155 20 



Totals -. $1,450,077 75 I $1,518,963 10 

Balance in treasury June 30, 1912 _ 

Drafts returned and canceled _ 

Proceeds of sale of Second San Francisco Seawall bonds __. 

Transfers from Harbor Improvement Fund to Second San Fran- 
cisco Seawall Fund _ - 



Grand total 



$454,601 20 

739.143 05 

22,376 95 

1,295,769 63 

317,630 50 

63,909 00 

75.610 52 



$2,969,040 85 

129,071 97 

5,796 77 

8,374,008 00 

95.767 66 



$11,573,685 25 



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BKPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 





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86 



REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



Summary of Receipts and Disbursements by Months for the Two Fiscal Years 
July 1, 1912, to June 30, 1914. 



Month 



1912— July 

August — 
September 
October _, 
November , 
December . 

1913— January __ 
February _, 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Receipts 

$121,139 73 
122.222 48 
118,967 43 
121.333 14 
131,406 03 
121.712 72 
116.503 47 
114,772 06 
108,417 79 
107,646 92 
131,853 43 
134,102 55 



Total for 1912-13-._ ' $1,450,077 75 



July 

August 

September 
October _.. 
November . 
December . 
1914 — January _. 
February . 
March 



April 

May . 
June . 



Total for 1913^14._. 
Totals for two years 



$117,542 77 
137.093 60 
118,048 71 
131,436 72 
138,777 91 
129,593 49 
133,86:2 27 
126,788 41 
122,995 80 
300 92 
123,305 07 
124,314 71 
114,902 72 



Balance in treasury June 30, 
1912 _ __..| 

Drafts returned and can- 
celed - - _ 

Proceeds of sale of Second 
San Francisco Seawall 
bonds 

Transfers from Harbor Im- 
provement Fund to Sec- 
ond San Francisco Sea- 
wall Fund - 



$1,518,963 10 
$2,969,040 85 

$129,071 97 
5.796 77 

8,374.008 CO 
95,767 66 



$11,573,685 25 



Disbarsementtf 



Transfers to San Fran- 
cisco Seawall Sink- 
ing Fund 

Transfers to Second 
San Francisco Sea- 
wall Sinking Fund- 
Balance in Second San 
Francisco Seawall 
Fund, June 30, 1914.. 
Balance in San Fran- 
cisco Harbor Im- 
provement Fund, 

June 30, 1914 

Disbursements Second 
San Francisco Sea- 
wall Fund prior to 
July 1, 1912 -. 



$65,875 20 


196,926 96 


185,912 96 


149,121 61 


220,564 82 


266.319 91 


284.063 50 


230,403 63 


261,957 30 


271,740 01 


321,461 14 


279,407 00 


$2,735,754 04 


$245,681 56 


376.945 72 


280,310 93 


288.824 38 


309,659 94 


266,895 50 


493.075 81 


291,993 14 


170,563 88 


1 191,836 95 


221,277 65 


491,025 97 


$3,628,091 43 


$6,363,845 47 


$123,899 44 


232,482 84 


4.239.852 22 



279.408 84 



34,196 44 
$11,573,685 25 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



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94 



REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



Monthly Income From Union Depot and Ferry Building. 



State Mining Bureau.. _ 

California Development Board 

Pullman Company ._ __. 

State Prison Board 

State Commissioner of Horticulture 

Wells Fargo & Company _ 

McPartland & Reich _ 

Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Co. 

F. W. Butler 

Cohen & Figone _ 

Western Union Telegraph Company- 
Postal Telegraph Company 

Morton's Special Delivery ___ 

Union Transfer Company 

Pacific Transfer Company 

Southern Pacific Company 

Northwestern Pacific and Santa Fe. 

Key Route _._ 

Bootblack privileges _ 

Weighing machine privileges 

Piano privileges __ 

Foster & O'Rear — _ 

Globe Express Company 

Home Telephone Company. _ 

Brown News Company 

U. S. Postal Department 

U. S. Customs Service, room No. 3.-. 

San Francisco bar pilots 

Board of Education 

U. S. Parcel Post Terminal Railway. 

Y. M. C. A 

Fish and Game Commission 

Ferry Advergraph Company. _ 

Oakland, Antioch and Eastern Rail- 
way 

The Service Bureau. 

Taxicab Company of California 

Travelers Aid Society of California. 
Lock cabinet privileges 



Totals 



Net decrease 



Monthly 

rentals. 

Jul7. 1912 



Monthly 

rentals, 

June. 1914 



$135 00 

115 00 

100 00 

50 00 

30 00 

3.940 64 

450 00 

270 00 

217 85 

250 00 

85 00 

50 00 

50 00 

63 50 

15 00 

7.300 92 

5.469 59 

2,118 89 

120 00 

52 55 

350 00 

1.750 00 

277 56 

40 00 i 

15 00 I 

200 00 

50 00 

30 00 I 

10 00 



$23,606 50 



$150 00 

115 00 

100 00 

50 00 

30 00 

2,504 60 

450 00 

525 25 

217 85 

250 00 

86 00 

50 00 

50 00 

92 26 



_L 



7.254 15 

5.469 59 

2.153 21 

120 00 

^1 75 

350 00 

1.750 00 

277 56 



I 



15 00 : 

200 00 ! 
50 00 
60 00 



185 00 
25 00 
10 00 

200 00 

63 36 
30 00 
50 00 
25 00 
15 40 



$23,024 98 



$15 00 



255 25 



28 76 



34 32 



Decrease 



$1,436 04 



15 00 
46 77 



80 



40 00 



30 GO : 



185 00 
25 00 
10 00 

200 00 

63 36 
30 00 
50 00 
25 00 
15 40 



10 00 



$967 09 



$1,548 61 
967 09 



$581 52 



Note. — The decrease is caused by Wells, Fargo & Co. giving up the Dolphin on 
which the Board's electrical shop and carpenter and paint store room are now located. 



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REPORT OF BOArD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



95 



Comparative Statement of Receipts and Disbursements, 1863-1914. 



Receipts 



From 

comm encement 

of the 

comxDisslon 



Proceeds 

of sale of 

Seawall bonds, 

interest, etc. 



Revenue 
from all 
sources 



Deferred 

payment 

drafts 



Drafts 

refused and 

canceled 



1863-^4 _. 




$117,848 28 
177,393 66 
183,716 80 
336,409 36 
294,304 28 
287,890 53 
252.649 56 
148,917 03 
195,031 14 
190.330 47 
265.709 06 
373,541 72 
372.078 74 
448.087 25 
446.516 82 
466,420 55 
427,687 56 
419.437 49 
455.005 64 
436.030 54 
501.243 25 
500.702 10 
483.851 04 
527.890 96 
580,152 51 
619.537 54 
599.105 58 
600.821 20 


1 


$117,848 28 


1864-65 






177,393 66 


1865-66 - 




1 - 


183.716 80 


1866-67 




1 


336.409 36 


1867-68 




_ ._._ 1 


294.304 28 
287.890 53 
252,649 56 
148,917 03 


1868-69 - — . 


__ 


i 


1869-70 


___ 




1870-71 







1871-72 


- 


..-..:::....:::::..::..:::.::] 


195.031 14 


1872-73 




1 


190.330 47 


1873-74 




1 -■ 


265.709 06 


1874-75 






373,541 72 


1875-76 _ 




1 


372,078 74 


1876-77 


'" "" 


"I 


448,087 25 


1877-78 




1 


446,516 si 


1878-79 




:::::::::::::::|:::::::::::::;: 


466,420 55 


1879-80 






427,687 56 


1880-81 




1 


419,437 49 


1881-82 1 


1 


455,005 64 
436,030 54 


1882-83 ! 


1 . 


1883-84 I 


1 

__ _ 1 _ 


501,243 25 


1884-85 




— 1 


500,702 10 


1885-86 




■" r 


483,851 04 


1886-87 




1. _.. 


527,890 96 


1887-88 






580,152 51 


1888-89 




1 


619,537 54 
599,105 58 
600.821 20 
651.112 11 
629.957 55 
583,674 58 


1889-90 




) 


1890-91 




1 


1891-92 




651.112 11 
629.957 55 
583,674 58 




1892-93 






1893-94 




1 


1894-95 




586.618 61 
599.207 89 
562.123 05 
581.661 05 




586,618 61 


1895-96 




1 


599.207 89 


1896-97 






562,123 05 


1897-98 




' 


581,661 05 


1898-99 




630.455 62 
731,033 41 
772,989 03 


1 $123 45 


630,579 07 


1899^1900 




34 80 


""1 ^58 21 


1900-01 -. - 




11,623 43 


: 12 46 


1901-02 




825,191 43 
829,096 35 
1,008,193 09 
1,283,804 80 
1,065,990 36 
1,241,294 96 
1 374ft87 19. 




-. i91 43 


1902-03 




-.. j- 


-■■iHi96 35 


1903-04 




$504,218 01 1 88 60 
261,188 98 ' 279 04 
99,789 67 


1 ;M > m 70 


1904-05 _ - 




l,rA:y,272 82 


1905-06 




L 165. 780 03 


1906-07 _ 






1 ^^f 1,294 96 


1907-08 


$261,850 OO 


j 183 90 


t i;:^i;. ^1-21 02 


1908-09 


1,006,375 73 I i;367;i88 58 
751,024 90 1 1.637.949 19 


51 40 


■■ :■;::: mL5 71 


1909-10 


' 


■'■i->:>7i 09 


1910-11 




1,301,536 43 
1.328.184 m 


1 21 10 


! 'ii'l •"-57 53 


1911-12 _ 


1,005,008 00 


1 9,998 20 


2,.i4;:,l91 18 


1912-13 


858,000 00 1 1.450,077 75 
6.511,000 OO 1 1,518,963 10 


1 1.234 90 


2.309,312 65 


1913-14 


' 4,561 87 


8.n^l.524 97 








Totals — _ 
Transfer fro 
San Franci 
p. 110, Sec. 


$10,393,258 63 I $33,269,501 70 1 $865,196 66 $28,200 69 
m San Francisco Depot Sinking Fund to 
SCO Harbor Improvement Fund, Act 1891, 
5 $116,265 02 


$44,556,157 68 


Transfer fro 
San Franci 


m Harbor In 
cjnn Sftawall F 


iprovement Fund to Second 

und - - ■ 95.767 GR 










212,032 68 












$44,768,190 36 



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96 



REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



Comparative Statement of Receipts and Disbursements, 1863-1914 — Continued. 

Dlabursements 



Material, 
supplies, pay 

rolls and 
miscellaneous 



Transfer to 

San Francisco 

Depot Sinking 

Fund 



Transfer to 

San Francisco 

Seawall 

Sinking 

Fund 



Transfer to 

second San 

Francisco 

Seawall 

Sinking 

inind 



Deferred 

payment 

drafts 



Prior to i 
June 30, 1912 

1912-13. 

1913-14 , 



Totals 



.$30,239,086 65 
2,735,754 04 


$1,055,868 00 


$762,971 26 
211,949 72 
211,949 72 


$23,111 10 

60,167 88 

172,314 96 


$865,196 66 


3,628,091 43 










$36,602,932 12 


$1,055,868 00 


$1,186,870 70 


$255.593 94 


$865,196 66 





Part payment . 
of principal ' d„i„„«« i„ 
and interest | a.^*l?"*^J" 
on loan from ' San Francisco 

chapter 202 


Balance In 
San Francisco 
Seawall Fund. 
June 30, 1912 


Balance in 

second 

San Francisco 

Seawall Fund. 

June 30. 1914 


Total 


Prior to 
June 30, 1912 


$280,000 00 


$2,467 88 






1912-13 - 








1913-14 


.. „/ . " " 















Totals ..__ 


$280,000 00 1 $279,408 84 


$2,467 88 


$4,239,852 22 


$44,768,190 36 



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REPOET OP BOARD OP STATE HABBOB COMMISSIONERS. 



97 



Statement of the San Francisco Harbor Improvement Fund (State Treasurer Cus- 
todian) for the Two Fiscal Years Ending Junis 30, 1914. 



3912— July 

August 

September 
October — 
November 
December _ 

1913— January __ 
February _ 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Itemittances to 
State Treasurer 



$121,139 73 
122.222 48 
118,967 43 
121,333 14 
131,406 03 
121,712 72 
116.503 47 
114,772 06 
108,417 79 
107,646 92 
131.853 43 
134,102 55 



Totals for 1912-13 I $1,450,077 75 



July 

August — 
September 
October .. 
November 
December . 
1914— January _. 
February . 
March 



April 

May - 
June 



Totals 1913^14 .... 

Totals for two 
years 

Drafts returned and 

canceled 

1912— June 30- 

Balance in treas- 
ury 



$117,542 77 
137,093 60 
118.048 71 
131,436 72 
138.777 91 
129,593 49 
133,862 27 
126,788 41 
122,995 80 
300 92 
123,305 07 
124,314 71 
114,902 72 



$1,518,963 10 

$2,969,040 85 

$5,796 77 

129,071 97 



$3,103,909 59 



Drafts drawn 
by board 



Transfer to San Fran- 
cisco Seawall Sinking 
Fund — 

Transfer to Second San 
Francisco Seawall 
Sinking Fund 

Balance in treasury 
June 30, 1914 



$62,112 45 

124.167 68 

114,151 47 

84.203 07 

98,787 54 

87.017 09 

95.682 27 
95.666 63 
90.875 86 
84.126 11 
80.884 54 
76,907 52 

$1,094,582 23 

$71,016 31 
87,239 84 
62,129 20 
67,851 60 
66,309 58 

73.683 52 
93,406 38 
82.050 78 
90,428 99 

100,634 71 

84,013 56 
194.772 78 



$1,073,536 24 
$2,168,118 47 

$423,899 44 

232,482 84 
279,408 84 



$3,103,909 59 



7—14746 



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98 



REPOBT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR GOMMISSIONEBS. 



Statement of the San Francisco Harbor Improvement Fund, November 4, 1863, 

June 30, 1914. 



±o 



Fiscal ywr 


RamttUoeM to the 

endltorSuiFrmii. 

daoo Harbor Im« 

(SUte Traasiuer. 
custodian) 


Drafts OD San 
Frandseo Harbor 
ImproTement 
Fond (State 
Treasurer, cus- 
todian) 


186a-64 


$71.897 39 
123,365 23 
132,023 96 
268,573 45 
217,528 06 
212.532 07 
180,623 37 

96,097 20 
105.877 82 

91,042 59 
166.150 23 

245.369 00 
249.450 44 
310.909 33 
285.521 50 

274.370 87 
240.414 91 
204.782 41 
249.919 90 

194.860 84 
254.497 78 
259,702 01 
249.431 18 
245.509 83 

294.861 66 
321,606 12 
306,148 20 
319.721 19 
360.206 68 
334,575 70 
281.417 59 
215.278 73 
285.523 58 
256.612 21 
224,702 65 
334.943 72 
669,814 33 
725,702 72 
760.506 95 
761,337 47 
898,950 73 

1,220,947 50 
916.614 85 

100.000 00 
1,171,142 68 
1,074,112 64 

250,000 00 
1,384.895 67 
1,638,762 60 
1,301,293 63 
1,328,064 78 
10.019 30 

116,265 02 


$47,680 02 


1864-65 


62.334 82 


1865-66 


47,56S 50 


1866-67 — 


64.345 94 


1867-68 


354.121 12 


1868-69 


310,213 27 


1869-70 

1870-71 


272.670 93 
73.914 13 


1871-72 _- 


53.944 40 


1872-73 - — — 


80,640 23 


187a-74 

1874-75 


168.769 62 
189.549 17 


1875-76 - - - 


146.716 69 


1876-77 


266.661 37 


1877-78 - _ 


162.712 80 


1878-79 _ 


241,764 39 


1879-80 


419.429 27 


1880-81 


527.487 44 


1881-«2 - - 


131.140 42 


1882-83 


165,586 90 


1883-84 


186.588 60 


1884-86 - — 


376,700 41 


1885-86 _ 


289,838 61 


188^87 __ 


136,926 50 


1887-88 


244,452 11 


188a-89 


247,137 61 


1889-90 - - - 


311,633 96 


1890-91 - - 


232,991 25 


1891-92 


366,205 44 


1892-93 - - _ 


343.632 89 


1893-94 - 


315.899 66 


1894-95 


381,585 26 


1895-96 — 


346,501 16 


1896-97 — -, 


281.991 29 


1897-98 — 


245,385 94 


1898-99 _ __ _ 


314,371 42 


1899-1900 - 

1900-01 — 


639,353 45 
745,015 51 


1901-02 


758,510 69 


1902-03 _. — 


687.986 78 


1908-04 - — 


926.958 58 


1904-05 - — 


962,666 47 


1905-06 - 


1,095,098 73 


From State of California (act of special session, 
1906, <»bflptftr XTXVT) 




1906-07 . 


1,286,934 73 


1907-08 


1,440,840 88 


From State of California (act of special session, 
1907, chapter 202, act of March 13, 1907)— 




1908-09 _ — _ - 


1,186,758 98 


190^10 - - 


1,669,4(M 40 


1910-11 — _ 


1,118.318 21 


1911-12 


1,083,662 25 


Drafts returned and canceled 




Transfer from San Francisco Depot Sinking Fund 
(act 1891. p. 110, sec. 5) 




Deferred payment drafts paid 


13,774 56 


Transfers to San Francisco Seawall Sinking Fund 




423.899 44 


Transfers to Second San Francisco Seawall Sink- 
ing Fund 




23,111 10 


Transfers to San Francisco Depot Sinking Fund 


- -i 


87.989 OO 


Part payment of loan from General Fund 


1 


106,000 00 


1912-13 

1913-14 


1,450.077 75 
1,518,963 10 


1,094,582 23 
1,078,536 24 



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BEPOBT OF BOABD OF STATE HABBOB COMMISSIONEBS. 



99 



Statement of the San Francisco Harbor Improvement Fund, November 4, 1863, to 

June 30, 1914 — Continued. 



I^scftl year 
From the organization of the commission 


Remittances to the 

credit of San Fran< 

Cisco Harbor Im- 

proTement Fund 

(State Treasurer, 

custodian) 


Drafts on San 
Frandsoo Harbor 

Fund (State 
Treasurer, cus- 
todian) 


Drafts returned and canceled 


5,796 77 




Transfers to San Francisco Seawall Sinking Fund 


423,899 44 


Transfers to Second San Francisco Seawall Sink- 
ing Fund - - - - - - 




232,482 84 


Balance in treasury June 30, 1914 $279,408 84 

Balance in treasury June 30, 1912 129,071 97 




150,336 87 








$25,769,316 89 


$25,769,316 89 



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100 



REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



Proceeds of the Sales of Bonds for the Second San Francisco Seawall Fund, Estab- 
lished Under the San Francisco Harbor Improvement Act of 1909. 



Bonds 



1912— January 1 .. 
October 11 _. 
October 19 _. 
October 22 __ 
November 27 
December 10 _ 
December 13 _ 

1913— January 21 . 
February 13 _ 

March 8 _ 

March 11 

March 17 

August 28 _— 
October 4 _,_ 
December 13 _ 

1914— January 6 _, 
February 11 _ 
February 11 . 
February 13 _ 
February 13 . 
February 23 . 
February 25 _ 
February 27 _ 

March 2 _ 

March 4 

March 16 



Totals - - - 

June 30, transfer— creosoted piles used in work 
not charged to Second San Francisco Seawall 
Fund and reimbursed by transfer from San 
Francisco Harbor Improvement Fund 



$1,000,000 

610,000 

15,000 

50,000 

4.000 

15,000 

5,000 

1,000 

100,000 

5^000 

3,000 

50,000 

505,000 

500,000 

460,000 

300,000 

57,000 

5^000 

3,000 

26^000 

501,000 

3,342.000 

40,000 

638.000 

3,000 

60,000 



I- 



00 
00 
00 
00 
00 

00 ! 

00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 .... 

00 L.._ 

00 j— . 

00 L... 

00 I 

00 ; 

00 ' 
00 I 
00 ' 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 



$5,008 00 



$8,298,000 00 
95,767 66 



$8,393,767 66 



Bonds - - $8,298,000 00 



865 83 

75 95 

45 57 

394 94 

7.610 19 

50,764 98 

607 60 

9,691 22 

32 32 

911 40 



$76,008 00 



Premium 



Total bonds authorized.. 

Total bonds issued. — $9,000,000 00 

Total bonds sold and delivered 8,296,000 00 



76.008 00 



$8,374,008 00 



Total bonds sold but not yet delivered. 



Bonds, par value, sold. 

Premiums 

Transfers 



Expenditures — 

Balance in fund June 30, 1914. 



$9,000,000 00 



♦702,000 OO 



$8,298,000 OO 
76,008 00 
95,767 66 



$8,469,775 66 
4,229,923 44 



$4,239,852 22 



♦The said amount of $702,000.00 is the aggregate of certain bonds sold by the State 
Treasurer to the Board of Control, but not delivered or paid for up to June 30, 1914. 



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REPORT OP BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 101 



Disbursements by Months of the Second San Francisco Seawali Fund for the Two 
Fiscal Years from July 1, 1912, to June 30, 1914, on Account of the Particular 
Improvements Constructed by Such Disbursements Following Thereafter. 

1912— July ._ _.._ $3,762 75 

August - - 74.759 28 

September .. — •_ _. 71,761 49 

October _._ 64,918 54 

November 121,777 28 

December „ 179,302 82 

1913— January _ 188,381 23 

February _ 134,737 00 

March .— 171.081 44 

April ._.. 187,613 90 

May 240,576 60 

June - — 202,499 48 

Total, 1912-13 - __.. $1,641,171 81 

July $174,665 25 

August _ - - 289,705 88 

September 218,181 73 

October „ _ 220,972 78 

November 243,350 36 

December 193,211 98 

1914-January _ 399,670 43 

February 209,942 36 

March 80,134 89 

April 91,202 24 

May 137.264 10 

June .♦. _ 296,253 19 

Total, 19ia-14 - 2,564,555 19 

Total two fiscal years _ $4,195,727 00 

Total prior to June 30, 1912 34,196 44 

Total to June 30, 1914 $4,229,923 44 



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102 



REPORT OF BOARD OP STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



Disbursements Second San Francisco Seawall Fund, July 1, 1912, to June 30, 1914. 

Pier 17, on account- $268,204 54 

Pier 26k blasting 6.740 75 

Piers 30 and 32, complete 1,247,493 60 

Pier 28, complete. 448,211 96 

Pier 26, complete — 633,114 84 

Belt railroad across Market street, complete 15,162 77 

Seawall, section 9a, on account ^ 180,053 43 

Pier 39, complete - 510,467 22 

Belt railroad tunnel and extension, on account - 64,720 34 

Pier 54, addition, on account 11,434 48 

Ferry slip. No. 8, on account 59,870 16 

Oar ferry slips, on account — _ 26,824 72 

Pier 41, on account— — - 32,341 27 

Pier 27, addition, for creosoted piles 23,834 70 

Pier 25, addition, for creosoted piles 26,405 67 

Pier 19, for creosoted piles 21,963 95 

Pier 46, for creosoted piles. $70,798 25 

Pier 46, for draftsmen.. 1,990 30 

TO 788 55 

Pier 15, for creosoted piles — $13*707 73 

Pier 15, for draftsmen — 402 15 

Pier 15, miscellaneous 120 90 

— 14,230 78 

Sixteenth street wharf, addition, on account - 7,504 96 

Bulkhead whart Fisherman's Cove, complete. 11,009 67 

Bulkhead wharf, west of Fisherman's Oove, on account - 6,130 48 

Belt railroad improvements and equipment, on account 249,416 29 

Pier 35, on account ai76 70 

Pier 37, on account 5,795 80 

Pier 39, shed, on account— ^ - 5,262 15 

Ferry slips 7 to 10, on account 3,776 50 

Seawall, section 9b, on account — 450 05 

Ferry building extension, on account — 292 05 

Plans for proposed piers, on account 10,064 65 

Miscellaneous construction 1,507 21 

General engineering and drafting 6^846 92 

Inspecting and testing materials — - 19,015 35 

Blue printing 704 69 

Advertising — 67 50 

Creosoted piles, cost of which was reimbursed from San Francisco 

Harbor Improvement Fund - 95,767 66 

Value of balance of creosoted piles on hand 105,054 64 

Total disbursements - $4,195,727 00 



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BEPOBT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOB COMMISSIONERS. 



103 



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104 



KEPOBT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOB OOMMISSIONEBS. 



Rates of Towage for the Port of San Francisco. 

(The Board of State Harbor Commissioners has no Jurisdiction OTer towa^re charges, 
which are fixed by the towboat owners.) 

TONNAOK OF TE88SLS. 





390 


450 


550 


650 


T50 


850 


950 




to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 




450 


550 


<50 


T50 


850 


950 


1.05O 



Stream to city front $12 50 

Stream to Oakland wharf 

or refinery 15 00 

Stream to Oakland creek.. 22 50 

Stream to sea with hawser 30 00 

Stream to Point Richmond 25 00 

Stream to Point San Pablo 30 00 

Stream to Port Costa 45 00 

Extra to lightship 20 00 



112 50 $15 00 115 00 $17 50 $20 00 $20 OO 



15 00 
25 00 
35 00 
30 00 
35 00 
50 00 
25 00 



20 00 
30 00 
40 00 
35 00 
37 50 
52 50 
25 00 



20 00 
30 00 
45 00 
37 50 
40 00 
55 00 
25 00 



22 50 
35 OO 
50 00 
40 00 
42 50 
57 50 
25 00 



25 00 
40 00 
55 00 
42 50 
45 00 
62 50 
25 00 



25 OO 
40 OO 
55 OO 
45 OO 
47 50 
65 00 
25 00 



TONNA6B OF YBSSKLS. 



1,050 

to 
1.150 



1,150 ; 1,250 

to to 
1.250 I 1.350 



1.350 

to 
1.450 



1.450 

to 
1,550 



1.550 

to 
1,650 



I 1.650 
to 



Stream to city front $22 50 

Stream to Oakland wharf 
or refinery 27 50 



$2250$2500$2500$2500$25 00 $25 00 



Stream to Oakland creek. 
Stream to sea with hawser 
Stream to Point Richmond 
Stream to Point San Pablo 

Stream to Port Costa 

Extra to lightship 



45 00 
55 00 
47 50 
50 00 
67 50 
25 00 



27 50 
45 00 
60 00 
47 50 
50 00 
70 00 
25 00 



30 00 

45 00 
60 00 
50 00 
55 00 
72 50 
25 00 



30 00 
50 00 
65 00 
50 00 
55 00 
72 50 

25 00 ; 



35 00 

50 00 
65 00 
55 00 
60 00 
75 00 
25 OC 



35 OO 
55 00 
65 00 
55 00 
60 00 
80 00 
25 00 



35 00 
55 00 
70 00 
60 00 
65 00 
85 00 
25 00 



Oakland cre^ to sea direct pays Oakland creek towage and sea towage, less $5. 
Port Costa to sea direct pays Port Costa towage and sea towage, less $10. 



Pilot Charges at San Francisco. 

(The State Board of Harbor Commissioners has no jurisdiction over pilot charges, 
which are fixed by act of legislature. Political Code, article VI, par. 2466.) 

All vessels under 500 net tons $3 per foot draft. 

All vessels over 600 net tons $3 per foot draft and 3 cents for every ton. 

These rates are compulsory and must be paid by every vessel spoken, inward or 
outward bound, except vessels under enrollment and licensed and engaged in the 
coasting trade between San Francisco and other United States ports, and vessels 
engaged in the whaling and fishing trades, which shall be exempt from all pilotage 
unless a pilot is actually employed. In all cases where inward-bound vessels are 
not spoken until inside the bar, the rates are reduced one half. 



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REPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



105 






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BEPORT OF BOARD OF STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS. 



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1 


72.781 


200,000 00 


2 


8,677 


25,000 00 


3 


38,849 


120.000 00 


4 


31.178 


110,000 00 


6 


54,606 


150.000 00 


6 


13,130 


50,000 00 


7 - — _ - — — - — 


87.067 


325,000 00 


8 


30,264 


145,000 00 


9 >._. 


4,727 


25.000 00 


10 


4.326 


28,500 00 


11 


45.372 


262,500 00 


12 ^ — 


75,524 


440.000 00 


IS 


3.103 


20,000 00 


U 


42,680 


800,000 00 


15 


75,447 


506.000 00 


16 


2,746 


25,000 00 


17 


23.647 


Not yet filled. 


Ig 


26,793 


93,775 00 


19 


14,623 


51.180 50 


20 


98.668 


327,838 00 


21 __ 


14,625 


85,000 00 


22 


97,791 


600,000 00 


23 _ 


88,577 


400,000 00 




78,285 


400.000 00 


26 


10,860 


67.500 00 


- 




Total area 


*1.069,S97 




Total valuation - - - — — 




$4,828,793 60 









*1, 009,399 square feet = 22.022 acres. 



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