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VOL. 9 NO,13 
NOVEMBER 1979 


ISSUE NO, 195 


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LETTERS ' 


We have fought the DOT and Amtrak for years, indeed since the early days of 
1971, and | would not suggest that we now bury the ax and give up the battle 
for good rail passenger service, now that we have lost several of our better 
trains and routes. 

Hhat we should do is rethink our goals and come from a stightly different ap- 
proach. 1 do not believe there is anyone out there who really cares WHO provides 
the train service, just so long as we receive good service. Perhaps it is tine 
that we study: (1) Non-profit corporations to "Provide public transportation by 
means of a system of fixed rail either under contract for the state(s) or as an 
agency of Amtrak." In other words, form the management company to operate any 
given route such as "Dixie Flyer Corp.", etc. As a non-profit public transit 
group there would be federal funds available just as for toll roads. (2) Work 


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RAIL TRAVEL NEWS, Box 9007, Berkeley CA 94709. 


NEW STAFF MEMBER JOINS RTN 


RIN is pleased to announce that another new correspondent is added to its 
staff. Mr. Janes Feeney, working out of East Northport, New York, will help us 
cover the massive New York and Northeast rail scene. Mr. Feeney, like so many 
of our other staff and readers, is a member of the National Association of Rail- 
road Passengers and shares our balief that a rail renaissance is in the making 
and that the country will be better off when it has more and better passenger 
train service. We wish to welcome Jim aboard, 

We would also like to remind you, as we noted last issue, that our regular 
twice-monthly publication schedule has resumed, so.that the deadlinesfor any 
subaitted materials or advertising are closer together than they have been. 


Rail Travel News, Vol. 9, No. 13. November, 1979. Whole number 195. 

Copyright @ 1979 by Message Media. Published twice aonthly by Message Media 

P, b Box 9007, Berkeley CA 94709. Subscription $12.00 per year; single copy 50g. 
Overseas and institutional rates on request. STAFF: James Russel], Editor. 

Paul Rayton, Editor-at-Large. Regional Correspondents: Peter Putnam Bretz, South- 
ern California; James Feeney, New York; Jack Ferry, I]Jinois; Adron Hall, Missis- 
sippi; Kenneth Maylath, Maryland; Peter Roeha, Massachusetts. : 


LE TTERS (continued) 


to decentralize Amtrak proper, turn Aetrak's Washington OC offices tnto a national 
coordination office, and set up two or more regional carriers or "Aatraks" such — 
as Amvest. Each regional carrier could be supported from a central trust fund 
just like the highways, with the balance of the money coming fro the states and 
fare box. You might be surprised at the great raception this fdea has gained in 
Washington, (3) Work to add a handful of totally new "stub routes® such as 
Billings, Helena, Sandpoint or Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Springfield and St. Louis, 
Dallas-Houston; run the PALMETTO to Jacksonville, etc. 
This may not be the final answer to the mess, but it might get some wheels 

rolling and that's what counts. 

Robert W. Rann 

Newhall, California 


ON THE COVER 


It's about noon on Friday, Oct 26, and the inaugural press run of Awtrak's nev 
DESERT WIND is waiving at the big mission-style San Bernardino CA station. Leased 
observation car 100, wired with loudspeakers campaign-style, brings up the rear of 
the train. See our special coverage of this inaugural run in this issue, starting 
on page 11. Photo by Peter Putnam Bretz. 


AMTRAK BOARD CONSIDERS EQUIPMENT PLANS 


At its Oct 31 meeting, Amtrak's Board of Directors approved spending up to 
$31.6 million to buy 30 new diesel locomotives with head-end electric pover. Said 
Aatrak: “The board's approval will permit Amtrak management to reserve production- 
line positions for the new locomotives, insuring that Amtrak wil] have the locoao- 
tives as soon as they are needed to pover new or converted conventional cars going 
into service. Ali Amtrak cars are gradually being converted to all-electric oper- 
ation, replacing the obsolete use of steam for car heating and in some cases afr- 
conditioning." Describing the new units, Amtrak said: "The new locomotives will 
be 4-axle, 3000hp units. Acquisition of 30 such locomotives will bring Amtrak's 
total of diesel-electric units equipped to supply head-and power (HEP) to 193. 
Autrak currently projects a requirement of 235 HEP diesels needed for conversion 
of the entire system, including new trains that are expected to be added as state- 
supported services." 

Besides the locorotive approval, Amtrak's Board heard management plans to spend 
$27.1 uillion in the next two fiscal years to "begin the process of comp] iance 
with recent handicapped access requirements." Of the total, $15.6 million will be 
for making some passenger cars accessible to the handicapped by making them "bar- 
rier-free", And $11.5 million will be for renovations to passenger stations. 
Aatrak said that examples of alterations include construction of ramps and lower 
ticket counters at stations, and on trains the addition of special restrooms and 
making coaches and sleeping accommodations accessible. The Board took its first 
action on this plan at its Oct 31 meeting when it approved funding for changes to 
72 conventional cars, to cost $6.9 million. The cars include 36 coaches and 36 
sleepers, and they will get space to park and secure one wheelchair; a restroom 
which is accessible to the handicapped; and an orthopedic storage area in each car. 

The modified cars will run first on the BROADWAY LIMITED and the LAKE SHORE LIM- 
ITED. The alterations will be done concurrently with Astrak's electrification 
progran at the Beech Grove facility near Indianapolis. ee 


The action of Amtrak's Board is contingent upon Congressional approval of Am 
trak's capital funding for fiscal 1980 as contained in the DOT's appropriations 
bill for that year. 

Besides the above equipment plans, Amtrak's Board also approved spending $30.5 
willion to expand its program of rebuilding and electrifying conventional. cars. 

This new program, also subject to Congressional appropriations approval, involves 
458 cars that should be completed by spring of 1981, The 158 include 72 coaches, 

31 sleepers, 16 lounges, 10 diners, 5 slumbercoaches, and 24 baggage and baggage- 
dormitory cars. The 10 diners will get all-electric kitchens, and the lounges will 
be fitted vith food service bars. Sp:.ial handicpapped accommodations will be ar- 
ranged in 17 coaches and 17 sleepers. ; 

Amtrak told RTN that no dome cars are included in the. 158, since the cars to be 
rebuilt are for Eastern trains running out of New York--the Florida trains, the 
CRESCENT, the BROADWAY and LAKE SHORE. Amtrak said it is storing those domes that 
are in poorest condition, with no plans to sell them. The discontinuance of domed 
trains such as the NORTH COAST HIAWATHA will free more domes for use on other conven- 
tional trains such as the COAST STARLIGHT and SAN FRANCISCO ZEPHYR, Amtrak said. 
These latter trains should be running two domas in each consist now, Amtrak said. 

Said Amtrak of the electrified equipment, "Passenger reaction to the rebuilt cars 
has been good since they retain the spaciousness of the famous older cars but have 
the reliability and comfort of modern mechanical equipment." 


% SOUTHWEST LIMITED DERAILS AGAIN 


Just 20 days after its Oct 2 derailment in Lawrence KS, Amtrak's SOUTHWEST LIM 
{TED derailed again on Uct 22, just inside the city limits of Offerle, a town 
about 28 miles east of Dodge City KS. The 1:10am derailment was much less specta- 
cular than the earlier wreck of the combined eastbound SOUTAWEST LIMITED/LONE STAR. 
The westbound train 4 was traveling at an unknown speed on 90mph speed limit main 
line when the last 3 cars of the 11-car train left the tracks, with the rear wheels 
of the ninth car off the rails, and the two following cars completely off. 

The injuries in this wreck were minor. At Dodge City regional hospital 4 pass- 
engers were treated and released and one passenger adsitted; at Spearville hospital 
two passengers were admitted. The last 3 cars, al] sleepers, were cut off from the 
train and passengers shifted into coaches ahead for continuation of the journey, 
which eventually ended in Chicago at 9:46pm, 6 hours, 41 minutes late. (The west~ 
bound #3 was also delayed by the wreck, reported at Las Vegas NM running 9 hours, 
42 minutes behind schedule.) 

Santa Fe Railway spokesmen said the wreck might have been caused by a separation 
of rails due to a failure in an angie bar. 

The consist of the derailed train was engines 518, 517, 536 (SOP's); cars 1256 & 
1264 (baggage), dorm 9994, coaches 9904, 9962, 9912, lowelevel diner 8075, done 
lone 9350, and sleepers 2212 "Indian Falls", 2762 "Palm View", and 2756 "Palm 

ath*, 


NEW YORK STATE voters on Nov 6 approved the $400 million Energy Conservation 
Through Improved Transportation Bond Act. The Act was described fn detail in the 
last issue ef RIN, In New Jersey, approval was also given by voters for a bond 
issue totalling $475 million for improving and rehabilitating transportation facil- 
ities, Of the total, $150 million will go towards mass transit. 

LAKE SHORE LIMITED has bagun using the Post Road *short cut® on its Boston-Al- 
bany leg. Effective with the Oct 28 timetable, the Boston section leaves Boston 
at 4:40pm, 20 minutes later than before, with Chicago arrival the same, 3:10pa. 

The train arrives in Boston 25 minutes earlier than before, at 3:20pm. However, 
the eastbound New York section has its running time lengthened by 10 minutes. 
Amtrak rebuilt the 12.6 miles of track between Post Road and Rensselaer NY under a 
$4.1 million capital grant from the Federal Government. Penn Central had abandoned 
the segment in 1972 and the track was removed. 

page 4 


ABOARD AN AMTRAK GHOST TRAIN 
by Peter Putnam Bretz 


n October 1 | was in Duluth awaiting boarding of the MORTW STAR for Chi- 

cago when | became fully aware of Amtrak's intention te run. "ghest ’ 

trains"«-that is, no timetable mention nor appearance in the computer, 
but running nevertheless. 

The injunction by Wichita Judge Thies to keep three of Amtrak's "hit Tist® 
trains going was, by now, two-day-old news. hat was newly learned was that Astrak 
vas complaining that it didn't want to put the trains back. "We've shuffled cars 
around already and re-assigned thea"; "We've closed all the stations on the HIAWATHA 
route’; "The computer has been deprogrammed." So Aatrak elected to send out the 
first ghost train, the NORTH COAST HIAWATHA running as an extra, with a coaches- 
only consist. 

We passed the HIAWATHA just west of Minneapolis that evening. | looked from ay 
window in electrified sleeper "Pacific Hills" and saw one loconotive, two conven- 
tional coaches and a food-service car. However, the rear car was parler-done- 
letygecser vent on 9331 "Silver Veranda"; a unique consist--but all the way to Se- 
attle 

In Chicago next morning things vere even more up in the air. On Oct 1 the EM- 
PIRE BUILDER had left Seattle on its new schedule--eastbound Mon-Thur-Sat; and the 
NORTH COAST HIAWATHA departed on its old schadule--Mon-Wed-Fri. Hence two transe 
cons leaving within 20 minutes of each other! Did they meet up at Spokane? Did 
they conbine forces, only to split again at Sandpoint? 

The big news was this morning's wreck of the SOUTHWEST LIMITED/LONE STAR rune 
ning on the LONE STAR's old route via Topeka, with that strange story of the en- 
gineer being allowed to run over unfamiliar track, The LONE STAR was now being 
combined with #3 and #4 north of Newton, Kansas. {St carried coaches only, with 
foal ve tice 7 ie all bala too. 

y plans called for traveling Chicago-Houston as well, but | was booked on the 
INTER-AMERICAN to Ft. Worth in a sleeper, then coach to San Antonio, where | would 
catch a plane to Houston and eventually beard the SUNSET LIMITED. No clerk knew 
anything for certain, {| had heard that the FLORIDIAN was running with a full con- 
sist--sleepers and all, No sign of it in the computer. | walked out to greet the 
last northbound full-service FLORIDIAN which had left Miami two days before, En- 
gines 301 and 638 were on the head end; then dorm, sleepers, diner, lounge, coaches, 
and on the rear was private car "Hampton Roads" from the Gold Coast Chapter NRHS. 
Its large square drumhead read “ORANGE BLOSSOM SPECIAL-~FULLY AIR-CONDITIONED.® 

| talked with more clerks, both in person and by phone; Amtrak lounge personnel; 
and station services people. No one really knew what was happening and no one was 
willing to make any decisions. 

Yesterday's INTER-AMERICAN had gone out with a full-service conventional diner 
and sleeper to ba switched out at Temple and then to go on their own to Houston, 
But when it got to Ft. Worth there was no extra engine, so the cars were switched 
out there, No, | still could not make reservations for tonight's LONE STAR even if 
I'd wanted to. 

| left Chicago Oct 2 at 11:15am on the daily INTER-ANERICAN, train 21, despite 
noti ces posted that #21 and #22 would cease daily operation on Oct 1. We had en- 
gine 320, Amdinette 29200, Amcoaches 21847 & 21873, my sleeper "Pine Shore", and 
deadheading 21864. No one knew how far this sleoper was going to go. ~ The porter 
thought he was going to Houston. We wouldn't know until we got to Texas. Hy ori- 
ginal ticket read Chicago-Ft. Worth, but | had been able to secure reservations to 
Houston, tho not able to buy the extra ticket. 

After a snooth ride on the MoPac, | was awakened just as we left Dallas. We 
reached Ft. Worth about 20min early. Wo, we learned, the sleeper was not going 


page 5 


to Houston--it was being uncoupled here, to go north this evening on #22. The 
tinetable showed a connection, a train 23 between Temple and Houston, Was that 
running? "No, not today. Just #15 and 16, The LONE STAR is running northbound 
on #24's schedule, however." Leaving at 8:55am from Houston, that would bring #16 
into Temple at 1:25pm, just in time to meet #22 coming in from San Antonio. the 
southbound LONE STAR was operating--on its old schedule--but running an hour late. 

At tpm on a hot, hot Wednesday | dragged myself back to the Ft. Worth station to 
wait another hour for #15. \t finally arrived with engine 525 leading; no baggage; 
sleeper "Star Range"; lounge-dora 3381 "Concho"; and coaches 5699, 5606 and 5664. 
No hi-levels, no Jallas equipment. Just about that tine, the westbound connection 
from Dallas arrived with one hi-level coach. It was running on the old schedule, 
whereas its northbound connection was on the new schedule, over an hour later. | 
managed to get a space in the sleeper, and we pulled out after only 10mins at the 
station, but then sat at the T&P crossing 45ains for a freight. 

Down the line, at Rio Vista, just south of Cleburn, we took siding. Soon, here 
comes the lonesome LONE STAR, It streaks by with two hi-level coaches and a 3300- 
series lounge car. That was it. Moments later--the block signal was still yellow 
e=here comes #22 rolling north right on tine with its Aufleet cars. Quite a sight 
to see two Amtrak shorty-type trains out here in the middle of noplace, 

The lounge attendant in "Concho" was helpful, but there was no hot food. He 
was even out of coffee. | still had my SUNSET to catch in Houston. Normally #1 
runs 5 to 7 hours late dua to SP dealings in Louisiana, but teday, wouldn't you 
know, there was a wrack and so passengers were being bused to Houston. 

The law applies: a late train always gets later. Altho we had a leeway of two 
hours and 10 minutes plus 15 minutes of padding in the schedule, we had already 
Test an hour, and there was such slow running. And we went into the hole for 
freight trains (after all, we were an “extra®--no need to keep us on schedule). 
The conductor "cheered" us by saying that yesterday the SP stabbed us one hour at 
Rosenburg, Oh me, oh ay! it was wall past 10pm when we hit West Junction, and 
double track--eeaning #1 could not pass us anytime, and it was two days unti] the 
next train! 

We finally staggered into the station at 10:40pm, and the SUNSET was stil] sit- 
ting there! {t seeas one of the buses had gotten lost at Beaumont and couldn't 
find the station, As it was, just 5 ainutes after our arrival, my SUNSET was pull- 
ing out. The hurry was pointless, tho, for back at West Junction #1 stopped and 
waited over an hour for an SP freight! We finally arrived in Los Angeles over 
three hours late. 

Now the LONE STAR and other Amtrak ghost trains are gone. Will there be a 
resurrection? Tine will tell. 


OU RBAN-SUBURBAN TRANSIT 


Qh ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee 


sha 
ResedUp One-Way 12-Ride 40-Ride | 
‘ 7:10a 7:50a 


| Read Down = M.-F between 


5:05p §:35p Chicago 
§:50p 6:19p Gary (5th & Chase) 6:27 6:58a $2.05 $2450 $69.00 
5:59 6.23p Gary (Broadway) 6:228 6:53a 2.40 2850 70.00 
i 6.20p645p Valparaiso 6:00a 6:35a 3.45 41.00 90.00 


Fares and schedules subject to change, service available between any two 
stations along route. 


Union Station, 210 S. Canal St., Chicago/ Amtrak City Ticket Office. 80 E. 
es ae Chicago/Cadi 786-1333. Elsewhere in Illinois, call toll-free 
972-9147. 


AMTRAK TOOK OVER operation of the Chicago-Valparaiso IN commuter trains from 
Conrail effective Oct 29, and in Chicago newspapers it published the above schede 
ules and fares, under the heading "Amtrak's made it our job to get you to your job," 
ate said it was starting to make commuting more of a pleasure by "bringing back 
page ‘ 


the smoother, more reliable bi-levels." The trains are numbered 321-2<3-4 and are 
listed in the Oct 28 nationwide tisetable. (They were also shown in the Oct 1-27 
timetable as tentative.) 


A STREETCAR LINE is proposed for Chico, California, and has the approval of Cal- 
trans and the backing of over 1000 citizens who signs petitions, But the Public 
Utilities Commission opposes the idea as too expensive. Last month they visited the 
proposed Esplanade location and turned thumbs down. The newspaper Chico Enterprise- 
Record continues to editorialize in support of the plan. 

A POSSIBLE SOLUTION to NY City's transit financial woes is outlined in a new book, 
"The Financial Outlook for the New York City Transit Authority" by Edvard S. Seeley 
Jr. it's available at $3.25 each from City Almanac, 66 Fifth Ave, NYC NY 10011. 

BART'S LABOR DISPUTE continues, and so does its reduced service run by supervisory 
personnel. On Nov 8 BART said it would expand its reduced service on Nov 19 so that 
trains will operate to all stations except Daly City and the Balboa Park station in 
San Francisco. Service will continue to be only on weekdays from Gam to 6pa, 

CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE has released a report which says that the cost of mak- 
ing transit stations and vehicles accessible to the handicapped will run $6.8 billion 
over the next 30 years, an amount equal to $38 per trip for avery handicapped rider. 

WALL STREET JOURNAL, discussing the transportation bond proposals in New York and 
New Jersey, said Oct 19 that public transit systems were not ready for the pressure 
of the gasoline shortage last summer because of the shortage of good equipment. Many 
people were turned off of public transit when they tried to use it then. 

DIAL-A-RIDE bus service began in losco County, Michigan, on Oct 15. The service 
fs available five days a week, and is available from Gam to Gpm on a same-day basis 
in densely populated areas, and on a 24ehour reservation basis elsewhere. The serve 
ice is a one-year desonstration project funded by a $325,500 grant from the Michigan 
Transportation “ommission. 

TORONTO'S GO TRANSIT system began publication of times on the 24-hour clock system 
starting with the Oct 28 semi-annual revised tinetables. 


ek ee en ay 
LATEST AMTRAK RIDERSHIP DATA - AUGUST 


Metroliners 141,677] Washington-Montreal 45,185 Amtrak relea: 

NE Corr Conventional 505,232] New York-Florida 88,561} these ents tes 
New Haven-Springfld 31,334) Chicago-NY/Washington 31,184] ures on Oct’23. They 
NY-Philadelphia 201,871) Chicago-Cincinnati/OC 18,896) show that August was 
PhilaeHarrisburg 91,9471 Kansas City-NY/DC 28,610) the third consecutive 
NY-Harrisburg 16,074] Chicago-Seattle tN} 22,118] sonth of over two 
NY-Buffalo/Detroit 74,0654 Chicago-Seattle (S) 24,253] million ridership. 
Chicago-St. Louis 21,378 | Ghicago-San Francisco 34,323 


Every route shoved 


Chicago-Mil waukee 32,932 | Chicago-Los Angeles 38,683] an increase over last 
Chicago-Detroit 51,400} Chicago-Houston 32,135] year, with these ex- 
Chicago-Carbondale 16,279} Ghicago-New Orleans 29,528) ceptions: NY-Harrise 
Chicago-Quincy 8,617] Chicago-Florida 20,4621 burg, Seattle-Port- 
L.A.=San Diego 143,209 | Chicago-L aredo 26,5481 and, Seattle-Vancou- 
Seattie-Port] and 10,775 L.A.-New Orleans 11,939] ver, St, Paul-Duluth, 
Seattle-Vancouver 8,832 | L.A.-Seattle 63,005] and the EMPIRE BUILD- 


Washington-Cincinnati 8,062 Chi cago-NY /Boston 37,298} ER. Total ridership 
Wash.-Martinsburg 22,229] Boston-Newport News 68,689] yas 2,173,684--up 

Oakland-Bakersfiald 11,366) New York-Savannah = 53,797] from 1,796,852 in Aug 
New York-Hontreal  15,950| Seattle-Salt Lake 17,061] 1978 (up 212). Short 


Chicago-Port Huron 11, 745 | Boston-Tri-State 8,627} distance was up 29.3% 
Chicago-Dubuque 7,160 } NY-New Orleans 30,7964 & NE Corridor up 12.6, 
St. Paul-Ouluth 8 846 Special trains 1,206 page 7 


RAIL CANADA 


THE WITHDRAWN TIMETABLE: VIA Rail Canada issued a systemwide timetable for the 
period Oct 28-Feb 2, but no sooner was it out than it had to be withdrawn and conm- 
pletely reprinted because of major changes in service. For this timetable period, 
VIA was implementing the CTC's Final Plan for transcon services, with one train ori- 
ginating in Montreal and one in Toronto. The two would consolidate at Sudbury, rune 
ning together to Winnipeg, where they would become two trains--one for the north (CN) 
route and one for the south (CP) route to Vancouver, Passengers for the CN route 
would have to change trains in Winnipeg in either direction. A tri-weekly train be- 


tween Capreol and Winnipeg would serve the Northern Ontario line and connect with the ~ 


transcons in Winnipeg. But Transport 2000 complained to the CIC about these two ser- 
vice inadequacies, and VIA agreed to run thru sleeping cars so first class passengers 


need not change trains in Winnipeg. The CTC wouldn't alter the trieweakly Capreol run - 


but Transport 2000 and a woman in Sioux Lookout with an 800-signature petition pre- 
vailed upon Transport Minister Mazankowski to order the train to run six times weekly 
(daily except Tuesday), The order came on Oct 25, precipitating the rush to reprint 
schedules. The altered timetable has changes in tables 7, 8, 14, 24, 39, 44A and 45, 
The orange-and-black timetable is identified by "Revised" printed on the cover. A 
sheet of sample fares effective Nov 19 was inserted in the copy we received. 

ae 


GEA Eastern transcontinental services. 


Incercity and connecting services. 
0000000 Ferries 


Map indicates main line and connecting points. 
VIA intermediate stops not shown. 


Mont-Joli 


Charl 
Riviere-du-Loup rlotterown 


Edmundston 
Sydney 


Montréal 
Fredericton Jct. 


Q% 
0 
re 
a 
% 
© 


Yarmouth Digby Halifax 


VIA'S NEW PATTERN of service to the Maritime Provinces is shown in the above dia- 
gram published in newspapers with the Oct 28 service changes. As outlined in RTN 
previeasly. two fulleservice trains, the ATLANTIC and the OCEAN, serve the Montreal- 

alifax run via two routes. The ATLANTIC leaves at 6:30pm daily via Fredericton, 
Saint John and Moncton. The OCEAN leaves at 11:40pm and runs via Campbellton, Monc- 
ton. Passengers to Gaspe take the OCEAN to Matapedia and connect with train 118, 
Matapedia-Gaspe. There is a new day train, the domeliner LE SAINT-LAURENT, trains 
18 & 19, between Montreal and Mont-Joli, leaving Montreal at 2pm daily. VIA said 
that altho the SCOTIAN is gone, service betwaen Halifax/Moncton and Montreal is 
significantly improved, Westbound connections from the OCEAN are made with train 
63, a Rapido, to Toronto. VIA does not plan for passengers connecting with the 
CANADIAN to use the OCEAN, but rather the ATLANTIC, The ATLANTIC now operates 

fro Montreal Central Station, and is a full-service train. VIA noted that its new 
service pattern provides for the first time ever, thru train service between Saint 
John, N.B. and Halifax on convenient schedules. Thru service on the ATLANTIC is 
supplemented by other services that require a change in Moncton. Said VIA, "The 
most interesting service changes are those within the Atlantic Region itself, which 
will now enjoy an integrated network serving Halifax, Sydney, Saint John N.B./Fred- 
ericton Jct,, Moncton, Campbellton, Edaundston and Prince Edward Island. The pos- 
page 8 


sibilities for more convenient travel between all points served in this area will be 
greatly enhanced, VIA boasted. 


THE LAST RUNS of the Ste-Foy-Edmonston train took place Oct 27, with Transport 
2000 Quebec Secretary Guy Chartrand aboard, The railiner carried a banner on the 
front. {t was the last run for the train, for the engineer and the conductor as 
well, and there wasn't a dry eye on the train at the end of the run. The 65 people 
aboard were reported pratty angry at the CTC for the discontinwance appreval. Many 
now have no regular public transportation; for others, the bus ride will be longer 
than the train and not dependable in winter. This case is again being reviewed by 
the CTC, as VIA was supposed to make a bus connection with Voyageur Bus, using LE 
ST=LAURENT. But Voyageur would not cooperate, and so there is no bus connection, 

RUMOUR HAS IT that VIA Rail will run a day train on the route of the CANADIAN on 
CP Calgary-Vancouver. To accommodate Regina, times were changed westbound vith the 
VIA takeover, so one really sees little of the Rockies that one pays to see westbound. 
The new train would run at "viewing tiaes" from Calgary, and people could stop over 
there and pick up the train the following morning. The train would take pressure off 
the CANADIAN, now crowded with short-haul travelers, skiers, tourists, ate. 

A FARE INCREASE on VIA may be on the say--perhaps 5%. Voyageur Bus reported] y 
would like to see it higher. VIA is also expected to raise minimun fares from $4 to 
perhaps $5 or more. The Federal Court says the CTC has no jurisdiction over siniaua 
fares unless discrimination can be proven. 

RAIL CONSUMER GROUP Transport 2000 Canada held its annual meeting in Montreal on 
Oct 20. Featured speaker was VIA's Leo Moisan (see QUOTES, below). Harry Gow has 
agreed to stay on as 12000 executive for another year. Transport 2000's treasury is 
getting very low because of the cost of much recent work on passenger train cases, 
and it would welcome donations. Mark your check "donation" and send to Transport 
2000, Box 300, Terminal A, Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1N 8V3. 

CANADIAN TRANSPORT COMMISSION wil] hold hearings on passenger train service be- 
tween Saskatoon and The Pas as follows: The Pas, 81 Edwards Ave., Nov 28 at Sam; 
Saskatoon, 90 22nd St. East, Oec 11 at 10am. 

CONRAIL ABANDONED THE line from St. Thomas, Ont. to Windsor, but three days later 
CTC inspectors showed up and ordered the line reopened. 

CTC WILL HOLD hearings (no dates given) in Northern Ontario on the Capreol-Hin- 
nipeg service and whether it should run daily. 

A DECISION ON what to do with the (Toronto) Pickering Airport site should come 
from Transport Minister Mazankowski by mid-November. 


QUOTES OF THE WEEK™ 


"What so offends this nation's millions of citizens are insults to their common 
sense such as programs where policies become more important than quality. 

"Everyone riding the doomed (NORTH COAST) HIAWATHA could explain why Washington 
has become more the butt of bad jokes than a center of respect. The arguaents for 
expanded, rather than reduced, passenger-train service are strong nationally, but 
on this particular day on this particular train, riders and craw alike shared a 
sense of bemused yet bitter frustration that those who make decisions are so out of 
touch that they don't even know how out of touch they are.* 

<<Phil Primack in New York Times, Oct 22. 

"Our new reservations system RESERVIA... is being designed with intermodality 
in mind. ... The new systea comes on stream in March of next year and will eventue 
ally enable Canadians to wake coincidental train, plane, rent-a-car, hotel, motel, 
ferry and--hopefully at some tine in the future--bus reservations. We will be the 
first country in the world to have a nationwide intermodal reservation system," 

=-VIA Rail Canada V.P. J. L. Moisan in address to Transport 
2000 Canada annual general meeting, Montreal, Oct 20. , 
page 


SAYING GOODBYE TO THE HILLTCPPER 
by R. Lyle Key, Jr. 


in Catlettsburg, Kentucky when the 

HILLTOPPER arrived from the yard 
with engine 266, Amcafe 20007, and 
Amcoach 21807. This short train was 
quite ample for the three of us who 
boarded this mid-September morning, 
but business would improve as we got 
further east. 

We departed Tri-State nine minutes 
late at 5:42am, and before long, circu- 
lar color/position signals showed that 
we were on N&W iron. I wish that I 
could have made the trip behind N& W's 
famous J class 4-8-4's on the POWHA- 
TAN ARROW, bet was quite thankful 
to be getting to ride any passenger 
train over the Norfolk & Western. The 
scenery thru "Wild and Wonderful" 
West Virginia is indeed spectacular, 
and one has to admire the men who laid 
this line thru the mountains. The rail- 
road seems to be a never-ending suc- 
cession of reverse curves, and one can 
appreciate why the HILLTOPPER is 
not one of Amtrak's swiftest trains. 
Long tunnels are also fairly common, 
and a good many slide fences guard the 
right-of-way in the numerous deep cuts 
we encountered. 

Breakfast was a disappointment. 
Amfleet food service cars are normally 
stocked with good breakfast sandwiches 
similar to McDonald's "Egg McMuffin"' 
but the only thing available on the 
HILLTOPPER was Danish pastries. 

After awhile one gets the impression 
that N&W doesn't haul any freight other 
than coal, but at Keystone, West Vir- 
ginia we overtook and slowly passed a 
long eastbound merchandise train. We 
were 32 minutes late at Welch, but 
back on schedule by the time we reached 
Bluefield. In Virginia the train began 
to make better time, since the line thru 
the New River valley was much less 
curvey. 

At lunchtime I finally had an enjoy- 
able Ammeal. The Food Service At-: 
tendant recommended the ham and 
cheese, and it was excellent. While it 
was warming in the microwave oven, 
he mentioned that he had been on the 
HILLTOPPER for three years--since 
it had started running--and he was not 
looking forward to working in the North- 


page 10 ~~ 


[: was still awfully dark in the morning 


east Corridor. "You don't get many 
tips on this train, but the people are 
really nice, just good home folks. They 
even do things like bring me vegetables 
from their gardens. I'm sure going to 
miss this run." 

Just west of Roanoke we passed the 
Roanoke NRHS Chapter's equipment 
which includes a CITY OF NEW ORLE- 
ANS observation lounge that has been 
repainted in N&é W's Tuscan red and 
gold. Just east of the Roanoke station 
we passed some genuine N& W passen- 
ger zars which have presumably been 
retained by the railroad for company 
specials, 

We met the westbound HILLTOPPER 
at 3:25pm just west of Lynchburg. He 
was on time and was also a one-engine, 
two-car train. As we proceeded east 
the topography flattened out and the 
view changed to more routine farms 
and woodlands. For dinner, I stuck 
with a winner and enjoyed another ham 
and cheese sandwich. 

The other two Catlettsburg passen- 
gers had detrained at Welch WV and 
Roanoke, but others had boarded, and 
by the time we reached Petersburg 
ridership was up to 30. We pulled into 
Petersburg three minutes hot at 6:12pm, 
and an Amtrak-chartered bus was on 
hand to take passengers to Suffolk, 
Portsmouth, and Norfolk. Eight pass- 
engers made the transfer to the big 
"Silver Eagle"-tvpe bus. The bus con- 
nection is, of course, operated in lieu 
of the rail service that went directly 
to Norfolk prior to the HILLTOPPER's 


route inauguration. 
We departed Petersburg on time at 


6:15pm, eased around a long left-hand 
curve, and headed slowly north on a 
connecting track that led to the SCL 
main line. At 6:28 the HILLTOPPER 
pulled to a stop by SCL's double track 
main, and at 6:30 we proceeded onto 
the northbound track for our run to 
Richmond. After a day of fairly slow 
running, it was really exhilirating to 
sail along at 80 over SCL's high speed 
track.. The sun was setting on Virginia 
as we rolled over the James River, 
and in a few days it would set for the 
last time on Amtrak's HILLTOPPER. 

Number 66 pulled into Richmond at 
7:04pm, one minute early, and I step- 
ped off to complete my trip on:this 
doomed train_ 


AMTRAK INTRODUCES 
THE 


by Peter Putnam Bretz 


Antrak began its new Los AngeleseLas Vegas-Ogden service on Oct 28, and on Oct 
26-27 it ran an inaugural press run eastbound over the route, taking two days to 
reach Ogden, with an overnight in Las Vegas. 

Las Vegas casino owners had long wanted train service from L.A., and three at- 
tempts had been made since the May 1 discontinuance of the Union Pacific's priv- 
ately-operated service over the route. A LAS VEGAS FUN TRAIN, running with a pack- 
age deal similar to the RENO FUN TRAIN, had been tried for the winter season of 
1971, but it did not last for a second season. In Sep 1974 the LAS VEGAS CELEBRITY 
TRAIN had run twice-weekly, arranged by a Los Angeles promoter, but it too was dis- 
continued after a few months. The LAS VEGAS LIMITED, partially supported by the 
state of Nevada, started operation in Nay, 1976 and ceased the following August. 
Now in Oct 1979, following the legislative work of Nevada Senator Howard Cannon, 

a train to Las Vegas--this time running thru to Ogden as a permanent train in the 
Amtrak system--makes its debut. 
Below, RIN's Peter Putnam Bretz reports on the inaugural press rub. 


The Winning Way to Travel. 


t's 8:15am at Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal on Friday, Oct 26. The 
consist of the press run DESERT WIND is waiting: engines 214 and 202; baggage 
car 1244, Amcoach 21269, Amdinette 20232, Amcoaches 21253 and 21854, Andinette 
20231, Amcoach 21825, and open-platform observation car 100 leased from Great 
Western Tours for the occasion. Two loudspeakers are hooked up on the car's obser- 
vation railing and a podium is set nearby on the station platforn. 
The pre-inaugural program is about to begin. At Sam, Amtrak's Art Lloyd takes 
the microphone and thanks everyone for showing up. "...! can assure you that we 


MOMENT OF IMPACT: Caltrans Director Adriana Gianturco christens the new ain 
at the Los Angeles ceremony. Photo by Peter Bretz. . page 11 


SAYING GOODBYE TO THE HILLTCPPER 
by R. Lyle Key, Jr. 


in Catlettsburg, Kentucky when the 

HILLTOPPER arrived from the yard 
with engine 266, Amcafe 20007, and 
Amcoach 21807. This short train was 
quite ample for the three of us who 
boarded this mid-September morning, 
but business would improve as we got 
further east. 

We departed Tri-State nine minutes 
late at 5:42am, and before long, circu- 
lar color/position signals showed that 
we were on N&W iron. I wish that I 
could have made the trip behind N& W's 
famous J class 4-8-4's on the POWHA- 
TAN ARROW, but was quite thankful 
to be getting to ride any passenger 
train over the Norfolk & Western. The 
scenery thru "Wild and Wonderful" 
West Virginia is indeed spectacular, 
and one has to admire the men who laid 
this line thru the mountains. The rail- 
road seems to be a never-ending suc- 
cession of reverse curves, and one can 
appreciate why the HILLTOPPER is 
not one of Amtrak's swiftest trains. 
Long tunnels are also fairly common, 
and a good many slide fences guard the 
right-of-way in the numerous deep cuts 
we encountered. 

Breakfast was a disappointment. 
Amfleet food service cars are normally 
stocked with good breakfast sandwiches 
similar to McDonald's "Egg McMuffin" 
but the only thing available on the 
HILLTOPPER was Danish pastries. 

After awhile one gets the impression 
that N&W doesn't haul any freight other 
than coal, but at Keystone, West Vir- 
ginia we overtook and slowly passed a 
long eastbound merchandise train. We 
were 32 minutes late at Welch, but 
back on schedule by the time we reached 
Bluefield. In Virginia the train began 
to make better time, since the line thru 
the New River valley was much less 
curvey. 

At lunchtime I finally had an enjoy- 
able Ammeal. The Food Service At-: 
tendant recommended the ham and 
cheese, and it was excellent. While it 
was warming in the microwave oven, 
he mentioned that he had been on the 
HILLTOPPER for three years--since 
it had started running--and he was not 
looking forward to working in the North- 


page 10 


[: was still awfully dark in the morning 


east Corridor. "You don't get many 
tips on this train, but the people are 
really nice, just good home folks. They 
even do things like bring me vegetables 
from their gardens. I'm sure going to 
miss this run." 

Just west of Roanoke we passed the 
Roanoke NRHS Chapter's equipment 
which includes a CITY OF NEW ORLE- 
ANS observation lounge that has been 
repainted in N& W's Tuscan red and 
gold. Just east of the Roanoke station 
we passed some genuine N&é W passen- 
ger ars which have presumahly been 
retained by the railroad for company 
specials, 

We met the westbound HILLTOPPER 
at 3:25pm just west of Lynchburg. He 
was on time and was also a one-engine, 
two-car train. As we proceeded east 
the topography flattened out and the 
view changed to more routine farms 
and woodlands. For dinner, I stuck 
with a winner and enjoyed another ham 
and cheese sandwich. 

The other two Catlettsburg passen- 
gers had detrained at Welch WV and 
Roanoke, but others had boarded, and 
by the time we reached Petersburg 
ridership was up to 30. We pulled into 
Petersburg three minutes hot at 6:12pm, 
and an Amtrak-chartered bus was on 
hand to take passengers to Suffolk, 
Portsmouth, and Norfolk. Eight pass- 
engers made the transfer to the big 
"Silver Eagle''-type bus. The bus con- 
nection is, of course, operated in lieu 
of the rail service that went directly 
to Norfolk prior to the HILLTOPPER's 


route inauguration. 
We departed Petersburg on time at 


6:15pm, eased around a long left-hand 
curve, and headed slowly north on a 
connecting track that led to the SCL 
main line. At 6:28 the HILLTOPPER 
pulled to a stop by SCL's double track 
main, and at 6:30 we proceeded onto 
the northbound track for our run to 
Richmond. After a day of fairly slow 
running, it was really exhilirating to 
sail along at 80 over SCL's high speed 
track.. The sun was setting on Virginia 
as we rolled over the James River, 
and in a few days it would set for the 
last time on Amtrak's HILLTOPPER. 

Number 66 pulled into Richmond at 
7:04pm, one minute early, and I step- 
ped off to complete my trip on:this 
doomed train- 


AMTRAK INTRODUCES 
THE 


by Peter Putnam Bretz 


Amtrak began its new Los AngeleseLas Vegas-Qgden service on Oct 28, and on Oct 
26-27 it ran an inaugural press run eastbound over the route, taking two days to 
reach Ogden, with an overnight in Las Vegas. 

Las Vegas casino owners had long wanted train service from L.A., and three at- 
tempts had been made since the May 1 discontinuance of the Union Pacific's priv- 
ately-operated service over the route. A LAS VEGAS FUN TRAIN, running with a pack- 
age deal similar to the RENO FUN TRAIN, had been tried for the winter season of 
1971, but it did not last for a second season. In Sep 1974 the LAS VEGAS CELEBRITY 
TRAIN had run twice-weekly, arranged by alos Angeles promoter, but it too was dis- 
continued after a few months. The LAS VEGAS LIMITED, partially supported by the 
state of Nevada, started operation in Nay, 1976 and ceased the following August. 
Now in Oct 1979, following the legislative work of Nevada Senator Howard Cannon, 

a train to Las Vegas--this time running thru to Ogden as a permanent train in the 
Amtrak system--makes its debut. 
Below, RIN's Peter Putnam Bretz reports on the inaugural press run. 


The Winning Way to Travel. 


t's 8:15am at Los Angeles Union Passenger Terminal on Friday, Oct 26. The 

consist of the press run DESERT WIND is waiting: engines 214 and 202; baggage 

car 1244, Amcoach 21269, Amdinette 20232, Amcoaches 21253 and 21854, Andinette 

20231, Amcoach 21825, and open-platform observation car 100 leased from Great 
Western Tours for the occasion. Two loudspeakers are hooked up on the car's obser- 
vation railing and a podium is set nearby on the station platforn. 

The pre-inaugural program is about to begin. At Sam, Amtrak's Art Lloyd takes 

the microphone and thanks everyone for showing up. "...1 can assure you that we 


i 


¢ eR mmr 


iis : 


MOMENT OF IMPACT: Caltrans Director Adriana Gianturco christens the new train 
at the Los Angeles ceremony. Photo by Peter Bretz. . page 11 


ES, a SS A a Ee 
 EeEE=E=aEeEEeEeEeEeeeeee——OO 


are going to continue running trains and more trains as the need for them has been 
demonstrated. Today, we will launch a new train, a new route... We are going back 
into a service that is needed..." 

Originally scheduled to appear here was Amtrak's Clark Tyler, but instead Alan 
Boyd himself is on hand. Art Lloyd introduces Mr. Boyd, who says his role here is 
small and ceremonial. "Amtrak is 84 years old now and has had eight years of annual 
crises. ‘nis year, Amtrak is stabilized." Mr. Boyd stands tall in a blue pin- 
striped suit. His voice is deep and booming. "...we will continue to grow and of- 
fer more and better service to the traveling public... Many people think that all 
we're doing is providing greater opportunity for those who have a dire need to get 
to Las Vegas... yet, we are also providing another route from Chicago to Los Ang- 
eles... | think it is going to be a major branch of the Amtrak tree." 

There are words also from Caltrans director Adriana Gianturco, from San Francis- 
co NARP director Bob Glover, from BART chairman and NARP director John Kirkwood, 
and George Falcon comes forward to present a Golden Spike award to Senator Cannon, 
who couldn't be present. Alan Boyd accepts the award on the Senator's behalf. 

Also introduced are famed railfan E. M. Frimbo, new Amtrak public affairs director 
Carole Foryst, food chef Dave Laughlin, new division manager Dave Michaels, sales 


WV reporter interviews Amtrak Prastdent Alan Boyd as Caltrans Direc or Adriana 
Gianturco looks on. Photo by Paul Rayton. 


director Jack Gordon, the UP's Larry Kirkaby, a Las Vegas city councilman, and 
others. Almost 100 people flew in from Las Vegas for the ceremony. 

Now it's tine to christen the new train, and Adriana Gianturco breaks the bot- 
tle of champagne against the coupler of car 100. Ten minutes later, we're all 
aboard and on our way. 

At Pasadena, the three A's (Art, Alan, and Adriana) are on the rear platforr 
making the same little speeches. We leave Pasadena at 10:20am, the first of five 
stops on today's schedule. The Las Vegas Association is giving out plaques to 
each city along the way. But Pasadena's went to one of the city motorcycle patrol- 
men, as no city official was on hand. 

We rol] thru the Pasadena subway. The train goes slowly and stops. An announce- 
ment on the P.A. says that we are "dogging it" so as not to arrive early in Pomona, 
our stop scheduled for 10:50. A request is made that the last two Amtrak cars be 
kept clean, as they are for display purposes at each stop. Indeed, the Amdinette 
has plastic-encased food samples to inspect, as well as tables filled with Amtrak 
paae 12 


hats and "We've been working on the railroad" buttons. 

At Pomona the ayriad people who came to greet the train don't wait for the spee- 
ches--they all want to go thru and check out the equipment. Alan Boyd gets off and 
says hello to some locals. 

An hour later at San Bernardino Art Lloyd tells the crowd that the Aafleet cars 
on the DESERT WIND are only temporary--that new Superliners are slated for next year. 
Santa Fe and UP officials are acknewledged. Alan Boyd says he is very confident 
of the future of rail passenger service. It's a bright, sunny day, and a couple of 
hundred people file thru the train. Art is anxious to leave so as not to hold up 
the westbound SOUTHWEST LIMITED, which is waiting outside town. We leave at 12:10, 
right on our schedule. We stand outside on the open platform and watch No. 3 pass, 
running over six hours late. There is an open-platform car on its rear also. 

We ascend Cajon Pass on the steep westbound track. Dignitaries crowd the rear 
platform. Henry Luna of Great Western Tours tells us about this car #100. It was 
built by Pullman-Standard for the C&NW, and was named "Imperial Leaf." Autoliner 
Corp. converted it from a 4-4-2 into a business-type car. 

Champagne, hors d'oeuvres and Aplets and Cotlets are served. The camera crew 
from Channel 13, Las Vegas crowds past and goes outside as we clear the summit at 


2 


The DESERT WIND on its press run goes Gleds: leavineeekiad: running in the 
median strip of the Foothill Freeway, to avoid gaining time. Paul Rayton photo. 


12:40pm. We drift into conversation with Adriana Gianturco. She says that she 
knew nothing about railroading when she took office, but now calls herself a "rail 
enthusiast." 

Someone passes thru, giving out yellow DESERT WIND T-shirts. Art Lloyd points 
out the new Santa Fe freight yard near Barstow. We arrive at the station at 1:54 
pm. There is much milling about and picture-taking. Mayor Bernard Keller of Bar- 
stow says "We're all proud to have this train here thru Barstow..." 

On the Union Pacific Railroad now, we head for Nevada, Why didn't Amtrak route 
the DESERT WIND on the UP out of L.A.? The answer is that the stations at East 
Los Angeles and Riverside would have to be refurbished, and a new one built at Pom- 
ona (the UP tore down their 1962 structure in 197%). Double utilization of agents 
on the Santa Fe line was deemed cheaper and better. 

As the train threads its way thru beautiful Afton Canyon, we're ushered into 
drawing roos B for an interview with Alan Boyd. Carole Foryst, Art and Adriana 
look on. We ask Mr. Boyd is he is a little tired right now of having everyone 


page 13 


SS eT ES A Ee a ee a 
a ____ 


are going to continue running trains and more trains as the need for them has been 
demonstrated. Today, we will launch a new train, a new route... We are going back 
into a service that is needed..." 

Originally scheduled to appear here was Amtrak's Clark Tyler, but instead Alan 
Boyd himself is on hand. Art Lloyd introduces Mr. Boyd, who says his role here is 
small and ceremonial. "Amtrak is 84 years old now and has had eight years of annual 
crises. ‘nis year, Amtrak is stabilized." Mr. Boyd stands tall in a blue pin- 
striped suit. His voice is deep and booming. "...we will continue to grow and of- 
fer more and better service to the traveling public... Many people think that all 
we're doing is providing greater opportunity for those who have a dire need to get 
to Las Vegas... yet, we are also providing another -route from Chicago to Los Ang- 
eles... | think it is going to be a major branch of the Amtrak tree." 

There are words also from Caltrans director Adriana Gianturco, from San Francis- 
co NARP director Bob Glover, from BART chairman and NARP director John Kirkwood, 
and George Falcon comes forward to present a Golden Spike award to Senator Cannon, 
who couldn't be present. Alan Boyd accepts the award on the Senator's behalf. 
Also introduced are famed railfan E. M. Frimbo, new Amtrak public affairs director 
Carole Foryst, food chef Dave Laughlin, new division manager Dave Michaels, sales 


gts 


TV reporter interviews Amtrak President Alan Boyd as Caltrans Director Adri a 
Gianturco looks on. Photo by Paul Rayton. 


director Jack Gordon, the UP's Larry Kirkaby, a Las Vegas city councilman, and 
others. Almost 100 people flew in from Las Vegas for the ceremony. 

Now it's time to christen the new train, and Adriana Gianturco breaks the bot- 
tle of champagne against the coupler of car 100, Ten minutes later, wo're all 
aboard and on our way. 

At Pasadena, the three A's (Art, Alan, and Adriana) are on the rear platfora 
making the same little speeches. We leave Pasadena at 10:20am, the first of five 
stops on today's schedule. The Las Vegas Association is giving out plaques to 
each city along the way. But Pasadena's went to one of the city motorcycle patrol- 
men, as no city official was on hand. 

We rol] thru the Pasadena subway. The train goes slowly and stops. An announce- 
ment on the P.A. says that we are "dogging it" so as not to arrive early in Pomona, 
our stop scheduled for 10:50. A request is made that the last two Amtrak cars be 
kept clean, as they are for display purposes at each stop. Indeed, the Amdinette 
has plastic-encased food samples to inspect, as well as tables filled with Amtrak 
paae 12 


hats and "We've been working on the railroad" buttons. 

At Pomona the myriad people who came to greet the train don't wait for the spee- 
ches--they all want to go thru and check out the equipment. Alan Boyd gets off and 
says hello to some locals. 

An hour later at San Bernardino Art Lloyd tells the crowd that the Aafleet cars 
on the DESERT WIND are only temporary--that new Superliners are slated for next year. 
Santa Fe and UP officials are acknewledged. Alan Boyd says he is very confident 
of the future of rail passenger service. It's a bright, sunny day, and a couple of 
hundred people file thru the train. Art is anxious to leave so as not to hold up 
the westbound SOUTHWEST LIMITED, which is waiting outside town. We leave at 12:10, 
right on our schedule. We stand outside on the open platform and watch No. 3 pass, 
running over six hours late. There is an open-platform car on its rear also. 

We ascend Cajon Pass on the steep westbound track. Dignitaries crowd the rear 
platform. Henry Luna of Great Western Tours tells us about this car #100. It was 
built by Pullman-Standard for the C&NW, and was named "Imperial Leaf." Autoliner 
Corp. converted it from a 4-4-2 into a business-type car. ; 

Chaapagne, hors d'oeuvres and Aplets and Cotlets are served. The camera crew 
from Channel 13, Las Vegas crowds past and goes outside as we clear the suamit at 


The DESERT WIND on its press run goes slowly leaving Pasadena, running in the 
median strip of the Foothill Freeway, to avoid gaining time. Paul Rayton photo. 


12:40pm. We drift into conversation with Adriana Gianturco. She says that she 
knew nothing about railroading when she took office, but now calls herself a "rail 
enthusiast." 

Someone passes thru, giving out yellow DESERT WIND T-shirts. Art Lloyd points 
out the new Santa Fe freight yard near Barstow. We arrive at the station at 1:54 
pr. There is much milling about and picture-taking. Mayor Bernard Keller of Bar- 
stow says "We're all proud to have this train here thru Barstow..." 

On the Union Pacific Railroad now, we head for Nevada. Why didn't Amtrak route 
the DESERT WIND on the UP out of L.A.? The answer is that the stations at East 
Los Angeles and Riverside would have to be refurbished, and a new one built at Pom- 
ona (the UP tore down their 1962 structure in 1974), Double utilization of agents 
on the Santa Fe line was deemed cheaper and better. 

As the train threads its way thru beautiful Afton Canyon, we're ushered into 
drawing room 8 for an interview with Alan Boyd. Carole Foryst, Art and Adriana 
look on, We ask Nr. Boyd is he is a little tired right now of having everyone 


page 13 


pias ee Aa ee ere ee 
aE A 
tell him how to run Amtrak. "Why, no, Pete--I'm always looking for good ideas." 
Asked if he is taking a high profile lately, he says the burdens of office are not 
so pressing now, and besides he much prefers being out on the trains than behind a 
desk. Answering a question, he says he is far from satisfied with the say certain 
railroads are handling their contract obligations; but rather than publicizing the 
railroad problems, he will use "Amtrak remedies." What about better cooperation 
between the Operating and Marketing departments? Alan Boyd disavowes any knowledge 
of such past happenings, but says the whole purpose of the great reorganization 
(see RIN #193) is to promote the "team concept." We come away with a feeling that 
here is a man who can command respect. 

The train rips and zips along, and we arrive in Las Vegas at 5:35pm, 15 minutes 
early, Santa Claus is here to meet us, in 84-degree weather. A Dixieland jazz 
ensemble from the Union Plaza Hotel plays "Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home.® 
Train riders deposit their bags in the lobby of the new Amtrak station in the Union 
Plaza Hotel. The Downtown Las Vegas Casino Association has gone all out--over 50 
rooms in various hotels have been provided gratis to Amtrak people and guests. There 
is a cocktail party for us at the Top 0' the Mint restaurant--a fabulous buffet with 
succulent canapes, teriyaki beef, scampi, etc, The centerpiece is an Amtrak-logoed 
freight train carved in ice and bathed in blue light. Drinks are on the house. 


The first revenue run of the DESERT WIND, on Oct 28, runs thru the Highland 
Park section of L.A., heading for Pasadena. Photo by Paul Rayton. 


aturday gorning. The new station in the hotel annex fs very nice and somehow 

differsnt--perhaps it is the chairs: rows of brown plush-like aaterial with 

metal frames, somewhat like lounge car chairs. And there are a few super- 

comfortable easy chairs scattered about. Outside, Las Vegas show girls in 
purple miniskirts and the band from Las Vegas High School, in crimson and black 
uniforms, are ready for today's opening ceremony, A badly-placed P.A. system makes 
the speeches a little hard to hear, but a spirit of enthusiasm prevails. 

Once more Alan Boyd accepts the Golden Spike Award for Senator Cannon, and reads 
the Senator's prepared remarks: "Today marks a new chapter in the history of Las 
Vegas as one of the world's most popular destinations... | am hopeful that...before 
long we get more than onceea-day service..." People crowd the display cars. A lit- 
tle girl steps forward and interviews Alan Boyd for her school paper. 
page. 14 


Pete Bretz photo 


We're off on time at Sam, and proceed up the UP's middle-of-nowhere route to 
Salt Lake City, However, Meadow Valley Wash provides interesting scenery, what with 
double-wide tunnels and twists and turns of track. 

There is a commotion on the back platform as we near Caliente (we are not sched- 
uled to stop). Everyone is pointing and taking pictures. Some local residents are 
at trackside carrying signs that read "WE ARE TAXPAYERS, TOO. CALIENTE NEEDS AM- 
TRACK (sic)®. We are later told that Delta would make a better stop. 

We pour a cup of coffee and chat with E. M. Frimbo. He has recently completed 
his 2,569,000" mile of rail travel. Would he do it all over again, if given the 
chance? "Yes, of course | would," he ejects without a second's hesitation, "every 
bit." Just then Art Lloyd comes on the P.A. to ask that the two rear display An- 
fleet cars be vacated during the stop at Mil ford. 

We arrive at 3:07pm to find the whole town is out. Milford High School's band 
is playing the opening theme from "Also Sprach Zarathustra’. Mayor Roy Young makes 
appropriate comments from the rear platform, Then, everyone files thru the display 
section and gets Amtrak hats and puts on the big blue buttons. We pull out at 3:38. 

The DESERT WIND, traveling the legendary rails of the CITY OF LOS ANGELES, the 
CHALLENGER, the CITY OF ST. LOUIS, the UTAHAN, the PONY EXPRESS, rolls thru Delta 
at about 4:40pm, but nobody notices our passing. There are green fields and snow- 
covered mountains in the distance. 

Amtrak tries to provide a nice example of an Amsupper for all of us, but trouble 
with the microwaves in both Amdinettes delays serving. But most of us get fed be- 
fore our 6:50pm arrival in Salt Lake City. 

Again, plenty of people in Salt Lake have turned out to see the train, It's puz- 
zling that folks want to seo Amfleet cars, as the PIONEER, whose equipment is sit- 
ting nearby, has carried Amfleet since its inception. We say goodbye to E. M. Frin- 
bo here, and are said to see him go. Speeches commence at the back platform. Utah 
Governor Scott Mathison, an ex-UP man, is introduced. He says we are all looking 
forward to making trips on the train. Congressman Gunn McKay speaks. Senator 
Thorp Waddingham puts in a plug for a stop and Delta. Festivities over, we leave 
Salt Lake at 7:15pm and arrive in Ogden at 8:06pm. 

The program takes place inside the Ogden station, The T. H. Bell Junior High 
School band blasts forth in the echoing structure. Gunn McKay, who rode up the 
36 miles from Salt Lake, is enthusiastically greeted. The Mayor of Ogden talks 
about the importance of railroad jobs. Murray Moler, editor of the Ogden Stand- 
ard-Examiner (the driving force behind the 1969 Promontory Celebration) says he's 
glad that Ogden is now Junction City, USA again, with the missing link in place. 
Speeches over, the band strikes up again, plays two more tunes, then packs up and 
leaves. It becomes quiet. Soon, only those of us waiting for train 5 are left. 

‘At 1:00am the SAN FRANCISCO ZEPHYR pulls in, running late. Al] three trains 
are now sideeby-side in the station: #5, #26, and the new #36. The observation 
car is switched to #5 to deadhead to Oakland. We board our sleeper and go, but 
we will be back. By all indications, the opinion is that the DESERT WIND will be 
very popular indeed. page 15 


fo ee ee ee ee 
SE PY a 
tell him how to run Amtrak. "Why, no, Pete--I'm always looking for good ideas." 
Asked if he is taking a high profile lately, he says the burdens of office are not 
so pressing now, and besides he much prefers being out on the trains than behind a 
desk. Answering a question, he says he is far from satisfied with the say certain 
railroads are handling their contract obligations; but rather than publicizing the 
railroad problems, he will use "Amtrak remedfes." What about better cooperation 
between the Operating and Marketing departments? Alan Boyd disavowes any knowledge 
of such past happenings, but says the whole purpose of the great reorganization 
(see RIN #193) is to promote the "team concept." We come away with a feeling that 
here is a man who can command respect. 

The train rips and zips along, and we arrive in Las Vegas at 5:35pm, 15 minutes 
early. Santa Claus is here to meet us, in 84-degree weather. A Dixieland jazz 
enseable from the Union Plaza Hote) plays "Bill Bailey, Won't You Please Come Home." 
Train riders deposit their bags in the lobby of the new Amtrak station in the Union 
Plaza Hotel. The Downtown Las Vegas Casino Association has gone all out--over 50 
rooms in various hotels have been provided gratis to Amtrak people and guests. There 
is a cocktail party for us at the Top 0' the Mint restaurant--a fabulous buffet with 
succulent canapes, teriyaki beef, scampi, etc. The centerpiece is an Autrak-logoed 
freight train carved in ice and bathed in blue light. Drinks are on the house. 


The first revenue run of the DESERT WIND, on Oct 28, runs thru the Highland 
Park section of L.A., heading for Pasadena. Photo by Paul Rayton. 


aturday morning. The new station in the hotel annex is very nice and somehow 

differsnt--perhaps it is the chairs: rows of brown plush-like material with 

metal frames, somewhat like lounge car chairs. And there are a few super- 

comfortable easy chairs scattered about. Outside, Las Vegas show girls in 
purple sinieskirts and the band from Las Vegas High School, in crimson and black 
uniforms, are ready for today's opening ceremony. A badly-placed P.A. system makes 
the speeches a little hard to hear, but a spirit of enthusiasm prevails. 

Once more Alan Boyd accepts the Golden Spike Award for Senator Cannon, and reads 
the Senator's prepared remarks: "Today marks a new chapter in the history of Las 
Vegas as one of the world's most popular destinations... | am hopeful that... before 
long we get more than onceea-day service..." People crowd the display cars. A lit- 
tle girl steps forward and interviews Alan Boyd for her school paper. 
page. 14 ; 


Pete Bretz photo 


Ay s 


We're off on time at 9am, and proceed up the UP's middle-of-nowhere route to 
Salt Lake City, However, Meadow Valley Wash provides interesting scenery, what with 
double-wide tunnels and twists and turns of track. 

There is a commotion on the back platform as we near Caliente (we are not sched- 
uled to stop). Everyone is pointing and taking pictures. Some local residents are 
at trackside carrying signs that read "WE ARE TAXPAYERS, TOO. CALIENTE NEEDS AM- 
TRACK (sic)®. We are later told that Delta would make a better stop. 

We pour a cup of coffee and chat with E. M. Frimbo. He has recently completed 
his 2,569,000" mile of rail travel. Would he do it all over again, if given the 
chance? "Yes, of course | would," he ejects without a second's hesitation, "every 
bit." Just then Art Lloyd comes on the P.A. to ask that the two rear display As- 
fleet cars be vacated during the stop at Mil ford. 

We arrive at 3:07pm to find the whole town is out. Milford High School's band 
is playing the opening theme from "Also Sprach Zarathustra’. Mayor Roy Young makes 
appropriate comments from the rear platform, Then, everyone files thru the display 
section and gets Amtrak hats and puts on the big blue buttons. We pull out at 3:38. 

The DESERT WIND, traveling the legendary rails of the CITY OF LOS ANGELES, the 
CHALLENGER, the CITY OF ST. LOUIS, the UTAHAN, the PONY EXPRESS, rolls thru Delta 
at about 4:40pm, but nobody notices our passing. There are green fields and snov- 
covered mountains in the distance. 

Antrak tries to provide a nice example of an Amsupper for all of us, but trouble 
with the microwaves in both Amdinettes delays serving. But most of us get fed be- 
fore our 6:50pm arrival in Salt Lake City. 

Again, plenty of people in Salt Lake have turned out to see the train, It's puz- 
zling that folks want to see Amfleet cars, as the PIONEER, whose equipment is sit- 
ting nearby, has carried Amfleet since its inception. We say goodbye to E. M. Frin- 
bo here, and are seid to see him go. Speeches commence at the back platform. Utah 
Governor Scott Mathison, an ex-UP man, is introduced. He says we are all looking 
forward to making trips on the train. Congressman Gunn McKay speaks. Senator 
Thorp Waddingham puts in a plug for a stop and Delta. Festivities over, we leave 
Salt Lake at 7:15pm and arrive in Ogden at 8:06pm. 

The program takes place inside the Ogden station, The T. H. Bell Junior High 
School band blasts forth in the echoing structure. Gunn McKay, who rode up the 
36 wiles from Salt Lake, is enthusiastically greeted. The Mayor of Ogden talks 
about the importance of railroad jobs. Murray Moler, editor of the Ogden Stand- 
ard-Examiner (the driving force behind the 1969 Promontory Celebration) says he's 
glad that Ogden is now Junction City, USA again, with the missing link in place. 
Speeches over, the band strikes up again, plays two more tunes, then packs up and 
leaves. It becomes quiet. Soon, only those of us waiting for train 5 are left. 

At 1:00am the SAN FRANCISCO ZEPHYR pulls in, running late. Al? three trains 
are now sideeby-side in the station: #5, #26, and the new #36. The observation 
car is switched to #5 to deadhead to Oakland. We board our sleeper and go, but 
we will be back. By all indications, the opinion is that the DESERT WIND will be 
very popular indeed. page 15 


NEW RAIL SERVICE IN RHODE ISLAND 


by Stephen Dunham 


A new tourist line on the shores of 
Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island is 
making a game attempt to revive rail 
travel on the scenic ex-New Haven New- 
port Branch. The Old Colony & New- 
port Railway, operated by the nonprofit 
Newport County Railroad Foundation, 
began operations on the 8.4-mile branch 
in the summer of 1979. 

Equipment consists of a Brill 1925- 
vintage coach-baggage (RPO doodlebug), 
originally owned by the New York Cent- 
ral, and late of the Wolfeborough Rail- 
road in New Hampshire; and a Brill 1928 
trailer for overflow crowds. 

When the cars were to be moved south 
to Nc-wport after they were purchased 
from the Wolfeborough, Conrail condem- 
ned the Sakonnet River Bridge, the only 
access to the otherwise isolated branch, 
on the day before the scheduled move, 
apparently on general principles. The 
doodlebug and trailer crossed the bridge 
clandestinely. 

As its first operating season draws to 
a close, the future looks bright for the 
line. As of October 1979 the OC&N was 
running two trips a day on weekends 
from its downtown Newport terminus to 
Portsmouth RI and return. 

What makes the railroad unusual 
among tourist lines is its bid for regu- 
lar passengers in addition to joy-riders. 
The terminus in Portsmouth for most 
trains is Cory's Lane, adjacent to 


"Green Animals", a garden of sculptured 
hedges, where a 40-minute stopover is 
provided. But the trains also make sta- 
tion stops at the marina in Melville and 
in the Newport Navy Base, where the 
cars are stored to protect them from 
vandalism. 

The roundtrip I took on an October 
Saturday saw several passengers board- 
ing and detraining at the marina, and 
presumably some trips are patronized 
by military personnel traveling between 
the Navy Base and downtown Newport. 
Even the "deadhead" trips between the 
Base and Newport are included in the 
published schedules, and intermediate 
one-way fares of $1 are also listed, as 
opposed to the standard $3 Newport- 
Portsmouth roundtrip. Group rates and 
two-hour charters are also available, 
and they too are mentioned in the sched- 
ule. 

The ambitions of the Foundation in- 
clude a 12-mile extension of service 
beyond Portsmouth to Battleship Cove 
in Fall River MA, a popular tourist 
attraction where three retired Navy 
ships are open to the public, one of 
them the battleship Massachesetts; 
and a steam locomotive to pull its three 
P-70 ex-PRR coaches, now stored on 
the Navy Base. 

New service and steam locomotion, 
if the plans come to fruition, will surely 
make the OC&N a permanent fixture in 
Newport. 


a aaa iar a aren ree cee aes ee, 
ABOARD THE FIRST ELECTRIC LAKE SHORE 


by Peter Putnam Bretz 


Due to being in the right place at the right time, | was fortunate enough to be 
aboard Amtrak's first all-electric LAKE SHORE LIMITED on Oct 15 (the first west- 


bound all-electric was on Oct 16). 


| rode from Chicago to Boston in sleeper 2992 "Pine Peak". Ahead of this car 
vere five newly-converted coaches from Union Pacific's 1960-65 order. The brown 
interior hues were most restful. The diner was 8500 (ex-CZ "Silver Diner"). The 
New York sleeper was 2900 "Pacific Forest", and slumbercoach 2051. 

The diner was the highlight of the traine-a splendid refurbishing job. Beech 
Grove should be proud. Having seen the kitchen mockups last July, | was prepared 
only slightly for the gleaming work areas, complete lack of smoke, and cleanliness. 
The design allows passengers to see into the kitchen. The booth seating is very 
pleasing and comfortable, as are the soft brown and beige colors, Even the table 
cloths and linen service reflect this, as well as new china and stainless steel 


cutlery. 


i believe this is the aost impressive refurbishing job Astrak has yet 


done. Even tho the car ts 31 years old, it seemed new, and would satisfy discria- 


page 16 


inating tastes. 

The dining car steward, Henry Hartsfield, was excellent, and his crew did a 
superb job, Due to the new electrification it was possible to announce thru the 
train the "first call to dinner.® 

A significant problem was the lack of a lounge car, and four tables in the diner 
were given over to lounge space. An Amdinette stated for use had repertedly dev- 
eloped some problems. ! did see one heading west next day on the Boston section. 


Meced Train of Thoughts 
AMTRAK'S APPROPRIATIONS BILL, as we go to press, has been passed by both the 
House and Senate, and conferees from the two are to meet to iron out a final bill. 

This bill actually gives Amtrak the mney that was approved in the auth zation 

bil] completed on Sep 27. That was the legislation that dooned the "hit list 
trains but gave Amtrak wore money and stability than it's ever had. The final 
court action on the suits to stop the cutbacks of the FLORIDIAN, LONE STAR, and 
NORTH COAST HIAWATHA came on Nov 5 when the Supreme Court refused to reconsider 
the decision of one Supreme Court judge in letting the discontinuances proceed. 
Suits had been brought by Kansas, Minnesota, and the city of Nashville...e. 

EDWARD L. ULMAN, former Amtrak Board member who died in office, will be commen- 
orated by the naming of a Superliner sleeping car for hia and placesent of a plaque 
in the Seattle station. Amtrak's next Board meeting will be in Seattle on Noy 28-- 
an unusual out-of-Washington DC occasion--and the ceremony will take place then. 

A name preci will be placed on the exterior of the new car. Generally, tho, Super- 
liner sleepers will not be named, Amtrak said. 'ollowing the meeting, sone board 
members will ride the eastbound EMPIRE BUILDER, on Nov 29..... 


xr & 

AN IMPROVED LEXAN-type saterial for train windows aay be used by Amtrak. The 
Oct 1 issue of Chemical Engineering News reports that General Electric's "Mergard* 
has been specified by Amtrak for new passenger car side windows, Amtrak was not 
immediately able to confirm the report. Margard is said to be four to five tines 
more resistant to scratching than Lexan because of a silicone coating which is bond- 
ed to the material in a new way to resist removal. [ts cost is three tines that 
of tempered glass. This could result in clearer windows for train riders..ece 

THE PEORIA TRAIN and the HOOSIER STATE, the new Chicago-Indianapolis train, have 
not yet begun operation, and no dates have been set for startup. Amtrak said it 
would not sign the Peoria train contract until labor costs had been reduced. The 
Indianapolis train requires "lots of track work" said an Amtrak spokesman, and it 
is "still up in the air"..... 

THE EMPIRE BUILDER got its Superliner cars in revenue service with the runs be- 
ginning in Chicago Oct 28 and in Seattle Oct 29, Both trains carried Superliner 
diner and sleeper. No Superliner lounge cars are available yet. The third con- 
sist of the train will be Superliners also, but with an electrified conventional 
sleeper+-the train wil] not be all-conventional, as reported herelast issue. An- 
trak officials are pleased with the way Superliner cars withstood the crash in 
the Oct 12 SHAWNEE accident. RIN has learned that the train was traveling at 58 
mph when it collided with the ICG freight train (see last issue). Sema sample 
fares on the EMPIRE BUILOER are: Chicago-Seattle one-way coach $147; roundtrip 
4Qeday excursion $206. Sleeping car fares in addition to coach charges are: 

52 single economy roos; $59 double economy room; $103 family room; $118 single 
deluxe roos; §206 deluxe double bedroom, Railfans have learned that the handi- 
capped room on Superliner cars can be reserved not more than 24 hours before train 
departure if it has not been taken by then by a handicapped traveler. The large 


page 17 


room (to be nicknamed the "railfan room"), full-car width on the lower level, can 
be had at single economy room rates..... 

SAN LUIS OBISPO was the scene of a meeting of Citizens for Rail California, the 
California NARP-affiliate, on Oct 12-14, Attendance was ‘way up, at 100. Major 
speakers included George Gray, chief of Caltrans's Division of Mass Transportation, 
Amtrak's Arthur Lloyd; J. Michael Morrison, president of I11iNARP; J. P. Jones of 
the United Transportation Union, and other union leaders. The key resolution com- 
ing out of the meeting was that Caltrans be urged to purchase at minimal cost the 
older steam-heated conventional equipment from Amtrak and electrify it for Calif- 
ornia use, The next CRC conference is slated for the weekend of Mar 28, 1980, in 
Sacramento...0. PS ae: 


SOUTHWEST COAST CORRIDOR: House bill HR 5403 is now on the floor for considera- 
tion. The bill, introduced Sep 25 by Congressmen Van Deerlin, Patterson and Cor- 
man, is directed at reducing Los Angeles-San Diego travel time to one hour, 55 min- 
utes and to extend the corridor north to Oxnard CA. !he bill is largely a result 
of Citizens for Rail California lobbying at local and federal levels, with CRC's 
Carl Schiermeyer taking most of the credit. The bill would put in place the insti- 
tutional arrangements to accomplish the corridor upgrading and extension. The 
UTU's Sacramento representative, J. P. Jones, is deemed amenable to thruecrew ar- 
rangements, citing the SAN JOAQUIN as a precedent. Santa Fe and Southern Pacific 
would be forced to accept physical arrangements to right of way for passenger 
trains. The bill will require Amtrak to treat the corridor seriously by preparing 
detailed reports on upgrading of the line. The bill, thru Congressional "horse 
trading", also holds out hope for other corridors around the country. The bill 
was announced in Southern California by the three Congressmen riding private car 
1509 from San Diego to L.A, on Oct 4..... 

WINDFALL OIL PROFITS tax legislation will soon be considered by Senate-House 
conferees, and on Nov 1 Caltrans director Adriana Gianturco sent the California 
Congressional delegation a telegram urging them to work toward dedicating a sub- 
stantial part of any such tax revenues to increase federal aid for public transit. 
"Since transportation consumes approximately 50 of all petroleum in this country, 
a transit alternative for those people who cannot (or don't want to) afford higher 
automobile gasoline prices is a logical use of such revenues", said Caltrans..... 

x ww & 


AMTRAK PRESIDENT BOYD is currently traveling in Japan, examing Japanese track 
construction..... SUPERLINER TRAINING TRAIN that ran from Chicago to Seattle 
starting Oct 2 (see RIN 193) was followed in places by a helicopter from which 
films were taken for later commercials using Superliner equipment. Glacier Park 
was one of the locations where the train was filmed..... 

THE PIONEER ARRIVED at Ogden on Oct 15 17 hours late and was turned there to 
become train 25..... THE PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL northbound on Oct 29 and the 
southbound of Oct 30 were cancelled and passengers bused because of maintenance 
work on the Fraser River Bridge at New Westminster, B.C. Astrak sources say the 
combined southbound PACIFIC INTERNAT IONAL/MOUNT RAINIER run between Vancouver and 
Portland will be short-lived. Complaints are arising from travel agents in B.C, 
If the schedule is changed, the PI will return to its former schedule, connecting 
with the STARLIGHT, or will be flip-flopped, leaving Seattle at 8am for Vancouver 
and returning in the evening..... 

AMTRAK DENIES SELLING any dome cars in good condition, but it is reported that 
ex-GN dome coach 9461, which received only tight body damage in the May EMPIRE 
BUILDER derailment near Kennewick WA is for sale "as is" at the Pasco BN-yard rip 
track. Many Amtrak workers privately decry the waste of Astrak's car disposal 


program, calling it one of Amtrak's poorest and weakest policy areas at this tine... 


BEHIND-THE-SCENES moves are continuing, it is reported, to revive the NORTH 
oe ee within a short period of time. If this move is successful, it is 
page : 


believed that Oklahoma's Congressional delegation will sake a big push to restore 
the LONE STAR. There has been little heard on political moves to back revival of 
the FLORIDIAN and the NATIONAL LIMITED,.... 

THE JANUARY STARTUP of the second SAN JOAQUIN and the seventh SAN DIEGAN could 
be speeded up to Dec 15 if some Amtrak people have their way--they want to get the 
new trains running as the heavy holiday season comes up rather than at the winter 
traffic dropoff when it's over..... 

STEPDOWN HI-LEVEL COACH 39916 was one of several such cars hurried thru the elec- 
trification conversion program in order to ready it for use on the first EMPIRE 
BUILDER Superliner run, There was no work on car upholstery or appointments..... 


THE SAD STATE of the 
San Antonio Amtrak sta- 
tion is shown in this 
photo taken by Alfred 
E. Ehm. Train 21, the 
INTER-AMERICAN, running 
about 2 hours late, is 
awaiting the dispatch- 
er's permission to head 
south. The picture in- 
dicates a complete lack 
of shelter, lights, 
toilet, even paving, 
for passenger use, A 
pile of Am-garbage is 
strewn near the train. 


After complaining to Amtrak Board meabers, and sending some pictures like this, 
Mr. Ehm noted that some Amtrak officials came into town to look about (ostensibly 
to put up a shelter at the Medina Street site, the promised trackwork to bring 
the INTER-AMERICAN into the SP station having been discarded again), and recently 
Aatrak president Alan Boyd was in town. Sleeping car passengers have to board or 
detrain at a spot where the pavement has been hazardly dug out..... 

MORE AMTRAK ADVERTISING has appeared since the last Amtrak bil] was passed, it 
appears, than at any other single time. We've seen TV commercials here we've never 
seen before. Amtrak has run a major full-page ad in newspapers all over the U.S. 
It's headed: "America's Getting into Training" and shows conventional passenger 
coaches across the top, with passengers of every possible description on the plate 
form. The ad has a lot of text, explaining where Amtrak's at now, and what it's 
doing to improve service. The text begins: "This year a lot of you got your travel 
plans into shape the easy way. You sat back in a plush Amtrak seat. And got into 
training. After a solid year of proposals and counterproposals, hearings and de- 
bates--and a summer's worth of energy crises--Congress established guidelines under 
which trains would be kept, And for the first time gave Amtrak the long-term sup- 
port we've needed to see those plans through to reality"..... 

~*~ *« * 


THE AMTRAK CRESCENT'S consist as Oct 28 is bag-dorm, 4 coaches, lounge, diner, 
2 sleepers NYsNew Orleans, and one sleeper DC-New Orleans. The sleeper-lounges 
are gone. The diner and lounge cars will operate into New York, combined with an 
Anfleet train between NY and Washington each way. On Oct 29 no. 20 arrived in 
Washington 25mins late, at 8:55am, Passengers were told they could detrain and 
board #180, the train it combines with, but the CRESCENT would be held until 10:10 
am to be combined with train 172--the reason: 15 minutes was not considered enough 
time to do the switching, so train 180 would be delayed. To complete this story, 
the combined CRESCENT/train 172 departed 20 minutes late, at 10:30am..... 49 

age 


THE SUNSET LIMITED'S timekeeping has rail observers up in arms. Between New 
Orleans and Houston, no. 2 has been late an average of Shrs, 40mins since May 1, 
reports one recordekeeper. On Oct 12 train 2 reached New Orleans at 4:15aa; it 
was due at 8:45pm the previous evening, On Nov 1, train 1 left San Antonio over 
6 hours late. On Oct 28 train 2 was there at 8: 30am, 3 hours late. An employee 
said that on Oct 30 train 1 came into East Yard, San Antonio at 8am and was held 
up there until after 11am, New Orleans sources say the train is being sidetracked 
by freights between Houston and New Orleans, Accounts from passengers include the 
following: into siding for an hour => 3 SP freights pass, then return to the main 
for about 15 miles and into a siding again; train is backed into a siding for pas- 
sage of freight; train heads into siding, but it is found that freight cars are 
parked there, so train backs out and continues to next siding; into siding to allow 
a small freight train of one engine and 10 cars to pass. Amtrak seems to be ignor- 
ing the situation. Several months ago Amtrak fssued an advisory that delays of 4 
to 6 hours east of Houston would be routine, owing to freight train congestion. 
Amtrak records show a zero on-time record for July and August..... 

A WASHINGTON RALLY on Oct 14 to support Gay Rights Awareness Weok saw some’ par 
ae arriving by train. A croup of 110 traveled east on the SAN FRANCISCO 
ZEPHYR, At Ogden a minister lay across the track in front of the train to protest 
the group's actions. A description of the trip, dubbed the "Gay Freedom Train", 
is contained in the Nov issue of Out magazine. Author Jim Austin makes the issue 
available at $1 plus 54¢ postage; address, 5907 Penn Mall, Room 210, Pittsburgh PA 
15206..... RIO GRANDE ZEPHYR'S dome lounge observation car was to be removed 
from the train about Oct 31 for overhauling. it is expected to be out a few months 
and the substitute is dome lounge dorm "Silver Shop"..... 

ey FOR THE RECORD: President Carter signed the Amtrak authorization bill] on 
Sep 29, it is known as Public Law 96-73..... 

TENTATIVE SUPERLINER TIMETABLE has been given by Amtrak: next Feb 1 the SF ZE. 
PHYR should get the new cars; then the DESERT WIND on Har 1; the PIONEER on Jun 1; 
the COAST STARLIGHT on Sep 1; the SOUTHWEST LTD on Oct 1, 1980, the SUNSET Nov Tens 

OKLAHOMA PASSENGER RAIL ASSOCIATION has been organized by serious rai} support- 
ers, Address: 1120S, 21st St, Chickasha OK 73018. Newsletter is available..... 

Nevs in this issue is updated thru November 8, 1979, 


SE AS TE DE EN a 
FREE BUMPERSTRIPS: Please note that the announcerent of free bump- 
erstrips, on page 2, is for NEW subscriptions only--it's a giamick to get more sub- 
scribers. We're sorry that we couldn't possibly send free bumperstrips to all re- 


newin bscribe: 
CORRE CTION: On page 13 it says that car 100 used on the DESERT WIND vas 


originally the "Imperial Leaf". However, it was actually "Imperial Drive", 


CARS & CONSISTS 


*Rock Island inspection train of facilities around Kansas City, due to Tv K.C, 
Union Station 7:30am Nov 3 for K.C. tour & due in Topeka by Spm via UP: engine 
Kansas City Terminal 71 switcher; car ATSF 89 track inspection car. 

“EMPIRE BUILDER, train 8, last eastbd conventional consist, Pasco WA Oct 27: 
engines 234, 250, heater car 672; cars 1181, 4552, 9454 "Silver Rifle” (running 
backwards) , "4891, 4540, 3254 "City of Chicago", 8068, 2670 "Silver Terrain", 2671 
"Silver Plateau*, 2662 "aSilver Prairie’ , OT tack cars T-4, T-2. Sane, first Sue 
perliner eastbd consist Oct 29: engines 241, 243; cars 4259 baggage, 39916 (ex- 
Santa Fe stepdown coach} , Superliner coaches "34087, 34035, Superliner diner 
38004, Superliner sleeper 32002. 

*UP Steam Special, Denver Oct 13: enti Os 44h (4-8-4); cars ai, out 5480 
5475, 5472, 5473, Tounge 6203, 5484, 5483, 5482, 5486, dome 7006 (ail UP equip. j. 
adoast ST ARLIGHT , train 11, San Jose Oct is “engines $P8927, Atk 535 ‘ 642; 

page 20 


cars 1239, 2261 "Placid Harbor®, 4530, 4508, 4856, dome 9480, 4532, 4534, dome 
$471, done 9352, 8024, 2607 "Pacific Cove", 2651 *Silver Shore", 

#LAKE SHORE CIMITED, train 449, first alleelectric LSL from Boston, Oct 16: 
engine 288; cars 1154, "Andinette 20224, 4615, 4608, 2932 "Pacific Shore". Same 
Springfield MA Oct 18: engines 296, 291; cars 1218, 20224, 4613, 4618, 2981 
"Pine Crest*, 20006 deadhead. 

* ADIRONDACK SPECIAL, inaugurating return of psor service on exeM¥C branch 
UticasLake Placid, Utica NY Oct 9: engines Adirondack 29, D&H 4075 (RS-3's); cars 
2 Adirondack coaches, Adir. lounge, Adir. 1st class coach, Atk 6805 coach, Mir. 
parlor-cafe, D&H business car 100. 

*Amtrak special VOTE YES EXPRESS, Syracuse-Niagara Falls NY to publicize NY 
transportation bond issue, Syracuse Oct 30: engine 297; cars 21090, 21243, Andin- 
ette 20223, Lehigh Valley business car 353. 

*INTER-AMERICAN, train 22/24, Little Rock Oct 24: engines 318, 286; cars 1353, 
2991 "Beatrice V, MacDonald", deadhead 21049 on at St. Louis, (to Houston: 20213 
22 notte, 21881), (to Laredo: 21888, 20029 Aadinette) , deadheads on at St. Louis: 

: 9 

~ "ANN RUTLEDGE, train 301, Alton IL Oct * engines 231, 327; cars 20219 Aadin- 
ette, 21238, 21260, deadhead to St. Louis: 2 

*SOUTHWEST LIMITED, train 4, Kansas City Oct 28: engines “ATSF 5102 (off at KC), 
Atk 512. (on at KC from #3), Atk 511 & 531; cars dome 9480 deadhead, 8102 deadhi, 
1036, 1091, 9990, 9918, 9934, 9970, 9984, 9936, 2236 "Elberton", 2265 "Placid 
Scene", 2661 "Silver Plain", 9 hrs late due bo engine failure. 

*LE "SAINT-LAURENT, VIA train 18, first run, St. Lambert, Que., Oct 28: engine 
VIA 6537 (FP9A); steam car VIA 15423: cars VIA 9616 bag, coach ViA S618, Skyline 
dome coach VIA 515, coach VIA 5583, 

*ATLANTIC, VIA train 12, first easthd run via CNeCPON, St. Lambert Oct 28: 
engines VIA 6784 (FPA4), 6635 (FB9); cars 9645 bag, coaches 5595, 5489, coach- 
Jounge 3033, Dayniter 5700, diner B7, sleepers "Cape Tournentine®, *Groenbush®, 
"Greenway", "\Kakabeka Falis*. 


RAIL FANTRIPS 


Dec 1-2: Sierra RR & Gotd Country Excursion, incl dinner trip on Supper Chief, 
overnite on Pullman at Jamestown, & visit to West Side & Cherry Valley Railway. 
$85. BAERA c/o Neil Lang, 555 Jean #532, Oakland CA 94610, (415) 653-9691. 

Dec 8: Special group lvs NY, GCT, for visit to Branford Trolley Huseua, Valley RR 


& dinner at Anderson's Angus Corral. 13 hrs for $33.50 all-inclusive. RR Enthus- 
jasts NY Division, Box A-1353, G.C. Sta., NY NY 10017 for flyer or tickets. 


One Rail Fantrips listing is free. Send full info to: RAIL TRAVEL NEWS, 
Fantrips Dept., PO Box 9007, Berkeley CA 94709, 


EXPRESS ADS 


HARP has offered to help form America's first deaf Rail Travel Club. 
So if you are deaf, or know someone who is deaf, someone who likes passenger 
trains and travel, please write: lowa-Hebraska Association of Railroad Passengers 
Post Office Box 3182, Omaha, Nebraska 68103. 


ALLeORIGINAL LP STEREO COLLECTOR'S ALBUM, People Trains and Things by Lucas & Har- 
won Bros Band. 12 songs in bluegrass, gospel , country & folk traditions incl. As- 
trak,. Southern Crescent, Auto-Train, Legend of Dr Kron, Trail of Tears, The Living 
Word, Asheville Special, People Trains. Color cover. 8-track $7 pp; LPs $6 pp 

Passenger Train Kusic Publ, 3025 Blalock Dr, West Columbia SC 29169, Order t today! 


RTW ADVERTISING RATES: Express Ads $1 per line of 80 spaces. Display ads 
$1.25 per square inch. RAIL TRAVEL NEWS, Box 9007, Berkeley CA 94709. 


" page 21 


EXPRESS ADS 


RAINS!!! We know thea!!! we ride them!!! We sell train tickets!!! 
Cal] us for tickets and reservations for your next trip!!! 

GREAT WESTERN TOURS, 639 Market St., Suite 900, San Francisco 94105, 
(415) 398-2994. P.5. We sell air tickets, too. 

CHESAPEAKE & QHIO CALENDAR ~ 1980. Thirteen outstanding photos of steam and 
diesel by Reid, Collins, Collias, Cook, Huddleston and cthers on 11x17 fold-out 
appointment calendar, Historical C&0/PM/HV dates each month. Excellent 
reproduction. Order today; limited run. $3.25 postpaid, C&O Historical 
Society, Dept. RIN, P. 0. Box 112, Springfield, VI 05756. 

JOIN THE NATIGNAL ASSOCIATION OF TIMETABLE COLLECTORS, $12 annual meabership 
brings two regular publications and many benefits for the collector. Sample pub- 
lication free. Tom Coval, Membership Director, 21£. Robin Rd, Holland PA 18966. 
For sale: THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF RAILROAD TIMETABLES. A delightful book, 100 
pages, 70 illustrations, only $7.95 postpaid. Tom Coval, 21 £, Robin Road, 
Holland PA 18966. 

Railroadiana hardware, books,. jewelry and more now available from one source. 
Send 28¢ in stamps for large, 14-page catalog. Replica Mail Specialties, P.0. 
Box A-1353, Srand Central Sta., New York NY 10017. Please note new PO box number 
50 Different Railroad Postcards $4.50, 100 different $7.95 postpaid. 

Joseph Lajoie, 22 Stevens Street, Methuen, Mass. 07844. 

AMTRAK SLIDES: RTN reader wishes to trade color slides of Western Amtrak trains 
for Eastern Amtrak trains. Can trade slides of SAN DIEGANS, COAST STARLIGHT 
and SOUTHWEST LIMITED in various locations. interested in non-Anfleet Eastern 
trains. Mark Johnston, 420 N. Sunnyslope Ave, Pasadena CA 91107. 
TROLLEY TRAILS THROUGH THE WEST, Vol. 7 - Northern California $4.00. Back 
issues $3 each. Moneyback guarantee. Wilson Brothers Publications, 

Box 772rtn, Yakina WA 98907. 

Dissected, analyzed, unclothed, the NAKED AMTRAK LAW is set forth by none other 
than the low-cost rail transit catalyst. There in his unofficial 1979 UPDATED 
AMTRAK LAW, stand MONTREALER, NATIGNAL LIMITED, SHENANDOAH, CARDINAL, FLORIDIAN, 
LONE STAR, PIONEER, NORTH CUAST HIAWATHA, DESERT WIND, to stun Amtrak, to shock 
the Congress at this mirror-view by catalyst Robert J. Swan of what they have 
legislated...as of] production staggers. $10, Box 1866, Long Beach CA 90801. 
50 RR LIST--China-glass-paper-et¢,LSASE: Collector-Box 65 Miami FL 33164. 
NORTHWEST RAIL IMAGES is not the official train photographer of the 1980 Olyapic 
Games. Nevertheless, we do have a new fall pricelist of reissued and new titles 
for our duplicate color slide sets, that include Amtrak and pre-Amtrak subjects. 
35¢ brings a list and sample slide. NRI, 4891 Donald Street, Eugene, OR 97405. 
FOR SALE: Official RR Guides: Dec 149, Mar '51, Sep '61. Good condition, Also 
HO BN passenger train set. Send SSAE, Don Wiles, Box 113, Sanders AZ 86512. 
AMTRAK WINDOW/BUMPER STICKERS, 34x15". Red and blue Amtrak Togo on white back- 
ground, plus "I'd Rather Be Ridin’ Amtrak" in bold, black letters. Sent postpaid 
firs. class. $1.95 each, $3.70 for two, $5.45 for three. Huge discounts on large 
quant:.jes. Write: P.B.M., 4412 Idledell, Fort Worth TX 76716. 

COLLEUi cn'S ITEM: Fall 1979 VIA timetable, withdrawn as soon as published due to 
errors, changes. For envelope with this & other fliers, write 72000 Meabership 
Services, Box 300, Ottawa, Ont. K1N 8V3, encl. $1 for postage and handling. 


nace 22 


Carl loucks 


READY FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT!!! 
ss ...Selling Railroad Timetables 


Employee Timetables, Public Timetables, 
Brochures, Guides, Postcards, Tickets, a 


The 1978-79 AMTRAK ANNUAL Addressed Envelope for latest list and 


specials. 

* 160 pages, over 300 photographs. 199 Wayland St., Hamden, Ct. 06518 

* large 8%x11 format, softbound. 

* full-color covers. 

* complete rosters including engines, cars, 
and work equipment. 

* official Amtrak consists. 

* maps, charts and diagrams 

* 16-page 1979 supplement sent FREE 
when published. 


BACK ISSUES 


The full year 1978 is available-- 
Volume 8, 16 issues of Rail Travel News, 
for just $5.50 postpaid (no tax), sent 
parcel post, 

Early 1979 issues are available at 
45¢ each (nos. 183 thru 188) and 50¢ 
each (no. 189 to present) pestpaid, 
RAIL TRAVEL NEWS, PO Box 9007, 

Berkeley CA 94709. 


$12.95 + $1 postage and handling. 


Rail Transportation Archives 
P.O.Box 1970 
San Francisco, CA 94101 


Midwest 


Florida 
Sunliners 


A photographic coverage of all passenger trains 

between Midwest & Florida during 1930s, 1940s, 

and 1950s. Over 260 photos, 160 pages, soft- 

bound, Full color cover. Immediate mailing. 
$12.50 pp. 


(Illinois residents please add 5% sales tax). 


RPC Publications 
P.O. Box 296 
Godfrey, itlinels 62035