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UNITED 

STATES 

ARMY 

MATERIEL 

COMMAND 

WASHINGTON 
D.C. 20315 


AFETY 

IGEST 


AMC Pamphlet 
AMC 385- 76 


MAR 1967 



• AMC PRESENTED DA AWARD DF HONOR FOR SAFETY 





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• General Harold K, Johnson, Chief of Staff, U.S, Army, 
is shown presenting the Department of the Army Award of 
Honor for Safety for Fiscal Year 1966 to General Frank S, 
Besson, Jr,, Commanding General, U.S, Army Materiel Command, 





"FIRST IN SAFETY ’ 



Left to right above are COL Braunstein, AMC Secretary 
of the General Staff, holding DA Award of Honor, General 
Johnson, General Besson, Mr* Wilkenson, Army Director of 
Safety, and Mr, Bishoff, AMC Safety Director, Presentation 
ceremonies were held at AMC Headquarters, Washington, D,C, 





HEADQUARTERS 

UNITED STATES ARMY MATERIEL COMMAND 

WASHINGTON. D.C. 20315 


AMC PAMPHLET 

Number 385 76 March 1967 

The Safety Digest is an AMC Pamphlet prepared by the Safety Division, 
Headquarters, U. S. Army Materiel Command. Its purpose is to disseminate 
information which can materially influence and improve safety programs at 
all Command establishments. 

Articles are included to supplement technical knowledge as well as practical 
knowledge gained through experience. They provide a basis for the further 
refinement of safety measures already incorpol'ated in operating procedures 
and process layout. To achieve maximum effectiveness, the Safety Digest 
should be given widespread circulation at each AMC establishment. 

Articles appearing in the Safety Digest are unclassified and are not copy- 
righted. They may be reproduced as desired in order to bring pertinent 
accident prevention information to the attention of all employees. The Amy 
Materiel Command Safety Digest should be given a credit line when articles 
are extracted. 

Unclassified material believed to be of interest or benefit to other establish- 
ments is welcome for publication in the Safety Digest. Please send articles 
for review to: U. S. Army Materiel Command Field Safety Agency, Charles- 
town, Indiana. If possible, include pictures, charts, drawings, and illustrations 
that clarify and heighten interest in your presentation. 

(AMCAD-S) 

FOR THE COMMANDER: 

SELWYN D. SMITH, JR 
Major General, USA 

OFFICIAL: Chief of Staff 



TTANLY J. 

Colonel, O'! 

Chief. Administrative Office 


Distribvtion: 

Speciol 


I 



FOREWORD .. 
IN THIS ISSUE 


THE ROAD TO MISSION SAFETY-70 1 

NATICK LABORATORIES SALUTES SAFE DRIVERS 3 

APPLYING TECHNICAL "KNOW-HOW” TO SAFETY 4 

FIRE FIGHTING AND PREVENTION SERVICES 6 

THE CASE OF THE MISPLACED GAS LINES 7 


CURRENT EVENTS 

UNBELTED DRIVER LOSB DRIVER’S SEAT 10 

BLOWING PAPER STARTS ACCIDENT SEQUENCE 11 

PROPELLANT CHARGE STACKS ARE NOT FOR CLIMBING 12 

IGNORED SOP COSTS ONE FINGER 12 

PERCH ABOVE TUB LEADS TO BURNS 14 

BICYCLE RIDERS COME OUT IN THE SPRING 15 

TEST WARNING SIGNS 17 

LTG W. R BUNKER PRESENTS AMC SAFETY AWARD TO ATLANTA 

ARMY DEPOT 19 

PICATINNY ARSENAL DRIVER EARNS SAFETY AWARDS 19 

TBCOM INSTALLATIONS PRESENTED FY 1966 SAFETY AWARDS 

BY MAJOR GENERAL LELAND G. CAGWIN 20 

NEW CUMBERLAND ARMY DEPOT PRESENTED AMC AWARD OF HONOR 

BY BG THOMAS H. SCOTT, JR 21 

SPRINGFIELD ARMORY RECEIVES AMC AWARD OF MERIT 21 

INSTALLED MOBILE CONVEYOR 22 

AWARD MADE FOR RESCUE OF ACCIDENT VICTIM 22 

EXPLOSIVES SAFETY 

PROPELLANT AND HAZARDOUS MATERIAL 23 

FIRE, RADIATION AND EXPLOSIVES HAZARDS COURSE AT AMC 

AMMUNITION SCHOOL, SAVANNA ARMY DEPOT 27 

WATCH WHERE YOU’RE BACKING 28 

SAFETY SLOGANS ON BACKS OF FIRE SYMBOLS 29 

DO YOU KNOW? 31 

REFERENCE PUBLICATIONS 33 

ECOM SAFETY DISPLAY 33 

ASAFETY ARTICLE REFERENCE INDEX 34 

WELL, DID YOU KNOW? 39 

SAFETY SHOE SAVES TOES 40 


FRONT COVER ... GENERAL HAROLD K. JOHNSON, CHIEF OF STAFF, U. S. ARMY 


I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2016 


https://archive.org/details/safetydigestl967wash_0 


THE ROAD TO MISSION SAFETY 


MISSION 

SAFETY 


1 


Marvin D, Farmer, Deputy Director for Ammunition 
Lexington-Blue Grass Army Depot 


Early in 1965 President Lyndon B, Johnson launched 
the nationwide safety program that we know as MISSIOiT 
SAFETY-70. It is designed to reduce the needless loss 
of life, limb, and human productivity in a nation where 
we give the highest value to human life. It is an 
organized effort by Federal departments and agencies. 

This is not just the President 's program. It is your 
programl 

Here are some very important milestones that must 
be considered if we are to travel the road to MISSION 
SAFETY-70 successfully and on schedule, 

FIRST is the need for technical safety skills. 

It takes a lot of sweat to organize, to train, to 
motivate, to plan, and to set into motion an effective 
safety program. Before you start be sure you have the 
"know-how” to develop it, to implement it, and to keep 
it going and growing, A poorly planned program is 
doomed a failure, 

SECOND is top management's interest. To create 
this interest, you must convince the manager that the 
struggle for accident-free operations is his responsi- 
bility, Within his philosophy of management, he must 
have and demonstrate a healthy respect for the safety 
program, and have a personal interest in the safety of 
every individual under his influence, 

THIRD is the supervisor's role. In building 
the safety program, give the supervisor a key part to 
play. Keep him in mind when you plan every step of the 
program. The supervisor is responsible for a given 
area, and with this responsibility goes an accountability 
for accidents that occur within his area of control. 

Be sure he is consulted, that his ideas are carefully 
weighed, and that his responsibilities are made quite 
clear. He can make or break any safety program, 

FOURTH is employee interest. You must have the 
employees' interest if your program is to be a success. 
Interest is not automatic, especially among the rank and 
file. It requires hard work to develop it, and it 
requires a lot of effort to keep. To get and keep 
this interest, I recommend these simple but effective 
rules ; 


1 



1, Keep your safety program always out of the 
rut of routine, 

2, Keep the employees participating in the 

program, 

3, Recognize their contributions, 

4, Commend their records, 

FIFTH is inspection. To be effective, any program 
must be properly administered. Safety is no exception. 
This calls for inspections , follow-ups , and a continuous 
seeking out and elimination of hazards. In addition to 
the organized inspection effort, every employee should 
be a self-appointed inspector with the inquisitive traits 
that help him recognize and identify the hazards that 
surround him. The individual members of a safety- 
minded work force will do just this, 

SIXTH is investigation. Never gloss over an 
investigation, even of a minor incident. Small events 
are often symptoms of real trouble ahead. This trouble 
may be avoided if we dig deep enough, weigh all the 
facts and then visualize what could have happened. Many 
accidents repeat themselves or lead to more serious 
trouble because symptoms rather than real problems are 
treated. 


SEVENTH is a medical program. Regardless of its 
size you can have a good one. If your medical program 
is only first-aid kits, be sure you have the right items 
in the right places, and available for the people who 
know how and when to use them. At most federal 
activities we are provided with medical assistance. The 
importance of a strong relationship between medical, 
safety, and operating officials cannot be overemphasized. 
Pre-employment and periodic physical examinations, timely 
medical care, special exposure examinations, and preventive 
medicine can mean hours on the job that may otherwise be 
human potential wasted through sickness and lost-time 
injuries, 

EIGHTH is safety equipment. Do not slight your 
safety equipment. Get the glasses, goggles, masks, shields, 
helmets, gloves, clothing, shoes, boots, and aprons you 
need for the exposure you have. Get the best equipment 
available for the particular job, and keep it in top 
condition, and make certain it is used, 

NINTH is guards and shields. Putting the right 
guard or shield in the right place is important. We 
must minimize the room for human error. By mechanical 
means we can protect the employee from himself. 


2 


TENTH is training, we jump into our car, start 
the engine, release the brake, shift through 3 gears, 
and proceed down the road all on one kick-off thought, 

"I'm driving." How and why is this possible? The 
answer is training. The mind and body have been trained 
and disciplined to perform these automatic actions to 
meet our personal needs. Training for safety has a 
beginning that is as basic and as important as the 
training and personnel discipline for any daily task. 
Accident-free operations are the result of training. 

We must train in every aspect of safety from the 
simple safe practices training to the deep and technical 
aspects of prevention, analysis, equipment design, and 
program development. 

It is high time that plans which appear on paper only 
emerge into people, equipment, and know-how to meet the 
needs inherent in the federal and civil establishments 
of today. V7e can successfully travel the MISSION SAFETY- 
70 road. With the application of proper effort, we can 
even arrive at our objective ahead of schedule. 

* * * 


NATICK LABORATORIES SALUTES SAFE DRIVERS 



One hundred eighty-eight safe driving years established 
by 60 military and civilian drivers and mechanics at the 
U.S, Army Natick Laboratories were recognized recently 
in an award ceremony. Presenting a variety of badges 
and safety awards were BG W, M, Mantz, Commanding General, 
and COL C, T, Riordan, Deputy Commander, James Gannon 
(bottom row, left) is Natick Laboratories Safety 
Director, 


3 






APPLYING TECHNICAL " KNOW-HOW " TO SAFETY 


Safety Division, P&O Directorate 
U.S, Army Electronic Proving Ground 


The Maintenance Division at Fort Huachuca has been 
drawing upon the technical ingenuity of its personnel to 
provide safer working conditions. 

One successful project was the development of a 
portable work stage to provide a stable platform on which 
to perform external work on electronic trailer or truck- 
vans. (See Photo 1) . The work stage was designed by 
Mr. E. E. Anderson of the Maintenance Division. The 
design of wheels, suspension, and locking braces is such 
that a man needs only to lift about 10 pounds to move 
the stage. He can move it in one minute. (See Photo 2.) 

The stage is an aid to both safety and efficiency. 

With braces adaptable to uneven surfaces, a self-contained 
ladder, and a safe capacity of 4 v/orkmen, the stage has 
been credited with time savings of 2 1/2 to 4 hours in 
the painting of some types of vans. Storage is no problem 
and retrieval is easy with the portable design. The 
unit is easily disassembled for long-term storage or 
shipment. The cost was small because the stage was 
constructed almost entirely from salvaged scrap. 

Mr. Emil J. Ross, Maintenance Division supervisor, 
has contributed 2 designs for increased safety and con- 
venience. The first, shown in Photo 3, is a collapsible 
handrail added to a standard portable stairway. The 
safety advantages are obvious. The design is such that 
no additional storage space is required, additional weight 
is negligible, and the handrail is easily removed 
when necessary. This item has been reviewed by the 
160th Signal Group and rated excellent for field operations. 
Its usefulness has attracted favorable consideration to 
making the design a modification to the standard tactical 
stairway. 

The second development by Mr. Ross is the self- 
locking portable platform shown in Photo 4. With no 
weight on the step, the platform is freely movable for 
convenient relocation. When a man steps onto the platform, 
the legs make solid contact with the floor and provide 
a sturdy, stable platform for work. Here again cost 
is minimized by using materials and parts commonly found 
around a maintenance shop. 


4 


These 3 "gadgets” have the common factor of conven- 
ience in addition to safety. Accident case histories 
are filled with incidents involving workmen who omitted 
safe practices because they were inconvenient or time 
consuming. Any development that makes safety easier and 
quicker is a welcome addition. 



Photo 1 - Painter at the U,S, 
Army Electronic Proving Ground 
is working on a movable plat- 
form that makes his work safer 
and easier. The platform will 
accommodate additional workmen 
safely. 



Photo 3 - A WAC technician 
is shown using the safe and 
convenient handrail to this 
standard stairway. 



Photo 2 - Without a man's 
weight on it the platform 
rides on spring-suspension 
and becomes easily movable. 
The telescoping braces 
adapt easily to uneven 
surfaces. 



Photo 4 - Workmen and inspec- 
tors alike appreciate the 
handy portable steps shown 
here. When the man steps off, 
the spring-mounted wheels 
provide easy movement to a 
new work location. 


5 





FIRE FIGHTING AND PREVENTION SERVICES 


In the November 1966 edition of the Safety Digest, 
information was provided in article "Fire Fighting and 
Prevention Services" to update current practices related 
to fire prevention activities. 

Clarification has been provided regarding the 
detailed intent of the policies and procedures of the 
referenced DA and AMC publications discussed in the 
article. 

Paragraphs 3, 8, and 9 of the article are revised 
as follows: 

"3, In accordance with AR 420-90 and paragraph 
1221, AMCR 385-224, where Government installations are 
located within the limits of a municipality, procedures 
will be established to immediately request firefighting 
service from the municipality for all fires occurring 
on the Government installation. For other installations, 
the severity of the fire V7ill be the determining factor 
in requesting assistance from municipal and other fire- 
fighting organizations, '• 

"8. Sprinkler systems in administrative areas and 
other places of assembly, will be equipped to sound an alarm 
inside the building and transmit the alarm to Fire Department 
Headquarters, Sprinkler system alarms for other buildings 
will comply with the requirements of paragraph 11, 

AR 320-90." 

"9, For all reportable fires, supplemental information 
will be provided with DA Form 5-2, Fire Report, similar 
to the information required in Inclosure 1 to AMCR 385-4," 



6 




THE CASE OF THE MISPLACED GAS LINES 


On a Saturday morning in October 1965 the occupants 
of an apartment at an AMC installation left home. An hour 
and a half later an observant neighbor called the post fire 
department to report smoke coming from the apartment. Two 
units were dispatched promptly, and within 5 minutes after 
their arrival the fire was brought under control. Less 
than 100 gallons of water, in the form of spray, was used. 

Though the fire was confined to the kitchen, smoke 
and heat caused damage to the contents of the other rooms. 
Estimated damage to the building and the Army-owned 
refrigerator and range exceeded $4,100, Damage to the 
household effects of the residents amounted to $1,700, 

From the facts reported above, the fire might appear 
to be merely one of many unfortunate but rather ordinary 
blazes that occur in this country every day. The Army 
Materiel Command does not accept any fire as an ordinary 
occurrence. This one was the start of a chain of events 
that influenced installations in mauiy parts of the country. 
It caused the taking of corrective action to reduce the 
possibility of fires from similar causes. 

The following comments were included on the accident 
report, DA Form 285, for the fire: 

"Controls on gas range v;ere in 'off position. 

After the fire, the gas was turned back on and a le^ was 
found in the union, between the cut off valve and the 
burner control pipe. It is believed that a gas leak at 
this point was ignited by tne pilot light which in turn 
ignited the building, A board has been appointed to make 
a complete investigation of this incident," 

Several interesting facts were revealed during the 
investigation. The installation had experienced previous 
difficulty with gas leaks in the housing area. Housing 
that had been constructed in 1957 and 1959 had gas pipes 
that ran under concrete floor slabs. In 1963 gas leaks 
began to be reported. Investigation at that time led to 
the conclusion that the copper water lines were connected 
indirectly to the ferrous gas pipe through the household 
appliances. This permitted creation of a galvanic current 


7 




circuit and accelerated corrosion. Leaks then began to 
occur. To break the galvanic action circuit and reduce 
the rate of corrosion, dielectric unions were installed in 
the ferrous pipes from the copper pipes. This was thought 
to be effective, until 1965 when the fire occurred. 

Questions were next asked about the location of the 
gas line. Why were concrete floor slabs for houses 
poured above the gas lines? VJas there any established 
policy that was applicable to this action? 

A report by the U,S, Army Materiel Command Installations 
and Services Agency contains the answers to these questions. 
Direct burial of gas lines under floor slabs is a violation 
of Corps of Engineers Technical Manual 5-848-1, of Guide 
Specifications CE-300,05 and of the National Fire Codes 
published by the National Fire Protection Association. 
Installation of a gas pipe in a conduit under a floor slab 
is permissible, if it cannot be avoided. 

The gas pipes at this installation had been placed 
in a tile conduit, but the tile was not watertight. Because 
the gas pipe could not be removed readily, this was also 
a violation. 

Further investigation revealed the following extent 
of the problem: 

1, Eleven installations reported gas pipes v/ere 
buried under concrete floor slabs. 

2, At 10 of these installations the pipe was in 
direct contact with the soil, 

3, The buried gas pipes ran under 978 buildings. 

This total included structures that contained 925 housing 
units. 


4, No compelling reason was established in any 
instance for the practice. Overhead pipe could just as 
readily have been installed when the houses were built, 

5, At another installation gas pipes ran under the 
slabs of carports at 348 housing units. 

6, The cost of rerouting the gas lines at the 978 
buildings was estimated to be about $264,000, Another 
$100,000 cost might be incurred to reroute the lines 
buried under the carports. 


8 


The October 1965 fire occurred in a building where 
dielectric unions had been installed in an effort to cor- 
rect the hazard of leaking gas pipes. The merit of asbestos 
versus neoprene and plastic for dielectric unions was 
investigated. Questions were addressed to private and 
public utility companies and the American Oas Association. 

These experienced sources replied that asbestos gaskets 
do not remain gas tight. They also said that the use of 
any type dielectric union was not favored. 

Though the cost v;as high AMC determined that it was 
necessary to correct the unsatisfactory gas line installations. 
The action taken may be summarized as follows; 

1. It was decided to issue no AMC-wide guidance 
on the use of dielectric fittings. The installation 
where these fittings were in use was advised that nylon 
gaskets should be used in lieu of either asbestos or 
rubber gaskets, 

2, The installations which had 925 housing units 
with gas pipes buried underneath started action to correct 
the improper condition and to eliminate the use of di- 
electric unions inside any of their houses. Though the 
types of houses varied, the corrective action involved re- 
routing of the gas lines at buildings where these ran under 
the floor slabs, 

3, Corrective action was also started at installations 
where the improperly installed gas lines existed in buildings 
that were not used for family housing. This also involved 
rerouting gas lines to eliminate delivery of gas through 
pipes that ran under the floor slabs, 

4. The installation with gas pipes under the car- 
ports did not undertake a wholesale replacem.ent program. 

It was considered that the potential hazard to life and 
for fire was little more than for pipe under driveways. 
Wholesale rerouting would mean abandonment of a large 
amount of pipe which was serviceable and could serve 
trouble-free for many more years. Its pipes were about 
10 years old, and except for some joints, had a fairly 
good coal tar paper wrapping. The pipe at many of the 
housing units was being protected cathodically . All its 
gas services had dielectric unions at the regulator outside 
the house. The mains had dielectric flanges which divide 
(electrically) the housing areas into several units. When- 
ever a leak did occur the repair would take the form of 
rerouting the pipe at the particular housing unit. 


9 



UNBELTED DRIVER LOSES DRIVER’S SEAT 


A security guard was making a patrol in a half-ton 
truck. As he drove dov/n the road he reached to take a 
package of cigarettes from his lunch container which 
was on the seat beside him. At this moment the container 
began to slide off the seat. The guard attempted to catch 
it and lost control of his vehicle. 

The truck crossed the right berm and ran into a 4- 
foot deep ditch that paralleled the roadv/ay. The vehicle 
did not overturn, but continued down the ditch toward a 
concrete culvert about 100 feet ahead. 

The truck was equipped with seat belts, but the 
guard had left his unfastened. The jolt and sharp tilt 
of the vehicle to the right jarred his left hand loose 
from the steering wheel. He slid down against the right 
door. He was unable to make an effort to brake and slow 
the vehicle It moved forward along the ditch until it 
slammed into the culvert. 

The driver's only injury was a contusion of his right 
elbov;, which struck the door of the truck. Damage to the 
Army vehicle was $114, 

The guard was suspended for the remainder of the 
shift. He received a written reprimand for inattention 
and for failure to keep his vehicle under control. All 
personnel were instructed to fasten their seat belts 
when they drove Army vehicles. 


10 





BLOWING PAPER STARTS ACCIDENT SEQUENCE 


An Army employee was driving a pickup truck down a 
busy highway. A loose sheet of paper blew off the seat 
beside him. Thinking the document might have blown out 
the open window, the driver activated his right turn 
signal and pulled off to stop on the right berm. 

Three vehicles were following the Army truck. Seeing 
it slow and pull off to the right shoulder, the drivers 
of cars 2 and 3 swerved to the left. As he went by the 
operator of vehicle No, 2 slowed and without signalling 
made a turn to the left down a narrow country road. To 
get safely past car No. 2, the driver of vehicle No, 3 
veered back to the right, 

V7hile the drivers of vehicles 1, 2, and 3 had been 
making their separate maneuvers^ the operator of vehicle 
No, 4 had moved straight ahead without slowing. Now he 
discovered that vehicle No, 3 was mioving back into his 
lane close ahead. Trying to avoid striking No, 3 , he 
veered to the right. This brought the side of his 
vehicle over the edge of the berm and into contact with 
the left side of the parked Army truck. 

The arm of the Army driver was lacerated and a tendon 
was severed near his wrist. Damage to the 2 vehicles 
was estimated at $700, 

The accident was investigated by state police. They 
found the injured operator of the Arm.y vehicle was not 
at fault, because he signalled and made a proper halt on 
the road berm before the accident. The driver of vehicle 
No, 2 did not stop and remained unidentified. The driver 
of No. 3 had kept his vehicle under control and had 
avoided collision with the stopping and turning vehicles. 
The driver of No. 4 received a citation for traveling too 
fast for conditions. 



11 





PROPELLANT CHARGE STACKS ARE NOT FOR CLIMBING 


An Army employee was making a physical count of 155mm 
propellant charges stored in an igloo. The cartridge 
storage cases that contained these charges were stacked 
in rows that extended from the floor to the arched roof. 

In the center of the room the containers were stacked 
23 rows high. The stacks were separated by 18-inch aisles. 
The cases were so stacked that the bell ends of alternate 
rows protruded about 3 inches. 

The worker was instructed to use a ladder whenever 
it was necessary to reach surfaces above eye level. He 
decided it was easier to use the convenient 3-inch steps 
on the face of the stack. 

While he was making his count of the front stack, 
he climbed until his feet were on a row 5 feet above the 
concrete floor. He held to a container in the 5th row 
from the top with one hand and used the other hand in 
his counting. 

At this moment the container he was holding started 
to slip out of the stack. He lost his grip on it. Seeing 
he was about to fall, he jumped. He landed unevenly on 
the concrete floor 5 feet below. His right heel was 
fractured and he was away from work for 14 days. 

Prompt action was taken for reorientation of all 
inventory personnel on safety practices. Special 
emphasis was given to the use of ladders, A check was 
made to assure that all inventory crews were provided 
with approved ladders. 

Action was also started to prepare a standing 
operating procedure and job breakdown sheets to provide 
guidance for inventory personnel. 


IGNORED SOP COSTS ONE FINGER 


An Army contractor employee was operating a 
machine that performed a sawing operation on propellant 
grains. The machine covers prevented exposure to the 
moving parts, A posted standing operating procedure 
provided detailed instructions on operations in the 
iDuilding and in the saw operating bay. The SOP included 
actions to be taken to start, operate, and clean the 
machine. The machine was to be shut down before a 
wafer collection bin was removed from, the saw. Any 


12 






excessive collection of pov;der was to be removed from the 
saw blade and the condition was to be reported to a fore- 
man, A copper wire tool was provided for use in removing 
lodged propellant chips and wafers. 

The saw operator discovered that propellant wafers 
and chips v/ere accumulating at the junction of the saw 
travel void and the push bar of the saw machine. He 
attempted to remove these without shutting down the 
machine. He rem.oved the wafer collection guard bar and 
a collector bin, VJithout attempting to use the copper 
wire cleaning tool, he then reached in with his left hand 
to remove the lodged propellant. 

At this moment the saw cycled. The pusher bar moved 
forward across the open area and caught the man's middle 
finger, "All of a sudden I noticed that part of my left 
middle finger was off," the worker said later. At first 
it was thought the finger had been amputated by the saw. 
Examination of his glove (see photo) suggested that the 
finger had been sheared off when caught between 2 
surfaces , 

The man was away from work for 2 days because of his 
injury. He was suspended for 5 days for violation of the 
standing operating procedure. The working group leader 
was also suspended. 

Actions taken to prevent similar accidents included 
the following; 

1, Engineering studies were initiated for the 
installation of interlocking devices to prevent access to 
moving parts, 

2, Meetings were held with v/orking group leaders. 
Emphasis was placed on their responsibility for compliance 
with standing operating procedures and for accidents and 
injuries that might be caused by their workers deviating 
from these procedures, 

3, Production personnel were assembled and were 
reminded of the importance of compliance with standing 
operating procedures. Their personal responsibility for 
their own safety and that of their fellow workers was 
emphasized. 



13 


PERCH ABOVE TUB LEADS TO BURNS 


The job on which a contractor employee was working 
required the removal of cooling coils from a sulfuric 
acid cooling tub. The coils were to be lifted out by 
a chain hoist and a cable that were suspended from an 
overhead beam. 

The workman climbed upon a pipe that ran bove the 
acid filled tub. He then moved out on it to a position 
where he could attach the lifting device to the cooling 
coils. While he was doing this, his left foot slipped 
off the pipe. The foot and leg went down into the acid 
and were submerged to about 4 inches below his knee. 

He received first and second degree burns that led 
to hospitalization and 10 days lost time. 

To prevent similar accidents the contractor put 
into effect a requirement for job analysis by supervisory 
personnel and mechanics to determine necessary safety 
precautions. In the future, acid tubs were to be drained 
and scaffolding was to be erected to provide a safe 
working surface when work was to be done above them. 



" hJo Not5 Gonna mak.& Me 

WEAS. A HARD HAT/" 


Jack Tamplin 
Safety Office 
Navajo Army Depot 


14 




BICYCLE RIDERS COME OUT IN THE SPRING 


The warm weather and long days of spring will bring 
out sharply increased numbers of bicycle riders. Most of 
them will be young and they will remain active until the 
cooler weather of autumn makes riding less pleasant. 

While getting fine exercise and much fun, they will 
expose themselves, pedestrians, and motor vehicle drivers 
to additional hazards. Many will become involved in 
accidents , 

Collisions of bicycles and motor vehicles cause 
many deaths each year. The National Safety Council's 
"Accident Facts," 1966 edition, reports 680 deaths due to 
this cause in 1965, The majority of the victims were 
children, A total of 480 (70,6 percent) were in the 
0-4 (20) and 5-14 (420) age groups. Another 120 
(17,6 percent) were in the 15 - 24 age bracket. 

Proper driving and alertness by motor vehicle 
operators can prevent many bicycle and car accidents. 

More needs to be done. An accident prevention effort 
aimed at the adult drivers is only one part of a success- 
ful bicycle safety program, Som>ething must be done about 
the other driver involved, the child or teenager on the 
2-wheeled vehicle. 

Every individual who has a bicycle rider in his 
household should make himself responsible for providing 
off-the-job training in safety. Here are a few 
instructions for bicyclists that can prevent accidents 
and injuries to members of your household, 

1, Stay off sidewalks and high speed highways. 
These are made for specific use, by pedestrians, or by 
fast vehicles, A bicycle introduces an unnecessary 
hazard on each of them, 

2, Obey the rules that apply to other wheeled 
traffic. Here are the most pertinent ones, 

a. Drive on the right side of the road, 

b. Obey all traffic signals and signs, 

c. Yield the right of way to pedestrians, 

d. Signal before turning, 

e. Do not pass on hills or curves. 



15 




f. Drive in a straight line with, not 
against, traffic, 

g. Stay behind moving cars. 

h. Keep your eyes on the road ahead and both 
hands on the handlebars, except when signals are being 
given, 

i. Ride in single file, 

j. Do not park on pedestrian 'walkways or in 
parking spaces reserved for automobiles, 

k. Remain at the scene of any accident until 
any necessary on-the-spot investigation has been made by 
the police, 

3, Here are a fev/ desirable practices that are based 
on common sense : 

a. If there is a choice of routes, ride the 
bicycle on the less heavily traveled road, 

b. Vvear light colored clothes to make yourself 
more easily seen at night, 

c. Make certain the bicycle ridden at night 
has a reflector and a headlight, 

d. Do not block vision with bulky bundles, 

e. Make certain the bicycle is in serviceable 
condition before venturing out of the road, 

f. If repairs should become necessary, move 
the vehicle off the road before starting them, 

g. Make certain that any necessary local 
license or registration receipt has been obtained, 

h. Do not ride in rain, snow, fog, or on ice. 

Every community has its own local traffic hazards. 

Add instruction on these when teaching the young bicyclist 
how to ride safely. 

The effort you make to provide instruction and 
enforcement of safe bicycle rules can prevent, a bicycle 
accident in your family. 


16 


TEST WARNING SIGNS 


SFC John E, Goldsborough , Safety NCO 
Maintenance Evaluation Branch 
U.S. Army Armor and Engineer Board 


Much of the equipment testing by the U.S, Army Armor 
and Engineer Board involves the operation of high speed 
or oversize equipment on access roads that are open to 
general military and civilian traffic not associated with 
board test operations. During a recent monthly Safety 
Council meeting it was suggested that warning signs be 
posted on roads where safety hazards exist as a result 
of test operations. 

The members of the council believed that permanent 
signs might eventually lose their effectiveness because 
many drivers appear to disregard special warning signs 
they see frequently. The following conclusions were 
therefore reached: 

1, The signs should be portable and constructed 
of lightweight material that would survive the elements, 

2, The signs should be eye catchers during both 
daylight and darkness. 

3, Signs should be posted during actual testing 
operations only, 

4, When not in use, signs should be stored where 
they would be available to all test divisions. 

Using available resources, round metal posts were 
fabricated, with 2 crossbars at the bottom to prevent 
twisting in the ground. These posts were permanently 
placed at the entrances of roads where the greatest 
hazards existed, A guide pin was inserted on the upper 
portion of the post to align the removable sign when it 
was mounted and to prevent the sign from moving with the 
wind . 


Signs were constructed with a metal pipe welded to 
the upper portion of the reverse side. The pipe was 
notched at the bottom to enable the sign to mate with the 
guide pin on the post. (See Photo 1.) Use of a short 
section of pipe reduced the distance the sign must be 
lifted in order to mount it. 


17 




A receptacle was mounted on the face of the sign to 
accommodate a sliding plate with the words "HIGH SPEED" 
on one side and "OVERSIZE" on the other. This made it 
easy to warn traffic of the type of equipment to expect, 
(See Photo 2,) 

A cage v/as mounted on top of the sign to accommodate 
a blinking lantern for night use, (See Photos 2 and 3,) 

Instructions concerning the signs were disseminated 
to the test divisions for immediate implementation. 



Photo 3 


Photo 4 


18 



LTG W.B. BUNKER PRESENTS AMC SAFETY AWARD 
TO ATLANTA ARMY DEPOT 



LTG Bunker, Deputy Commanding General, AMC, is shown 
above presenting the AMC Commendation for Safety for 
Atlanta Army Depot to John G, Thompson, Depot Safety Officer 
Left is COL A, J, McDermott, Jr,, Depot Commander. 


PICATINNY ARSENAL DRIVER EARNS SAFETY AWARDS 



Nicholas Sullivan, a truck driver, has earned recog- 
nition at Picatinny Arsenal for over 500,000 miles of safe 
driving. Mr. Sullivan is shown at the left holding a 
watch and a National Safety Council certificate he has 
accepted from COL John S, Chambers, Jr,, Commanding Officer. 
Frank Reilly, second from left. Safety Officer, and Bill 
Casterline, Transportation Supervisor, watched the 
presentation. Mr, Sullivan has been a member of the 
Picatinny Arsenal transportation division for 35 years. 

He was cited for his safe driving during the last 26 of 
these years, because the records for the first 9 years 
were no longer available. Recognition was given Mr. 

Sullivan as part of the safe driving incentive program 
for individual drivers and teams at Picatinny Arsenal, 





TECOM INSTALLATIONS PRESENTED FY 1966 SAFETY AWARDS 
BY MAJOR GENERAL LELAND G. CAGWIN 


Photo 1 shows Colonel Carl E, Bledsoe, Comirianding 
Officer, U,S. Army General Equipment Test Activity, 
accepting an AMC Award of Merit and a TECOM Award of 
Honor for the FY 1966 safety record of his activity. 

Photo 2 shows Colonel John R, Bailey, Jr,, Commanding 
Officer, Jefferson Proving Ground, receiving an AMC Award 
of Merit and a TECOM Award of Honor, Photo 3 shows 
Colonel James A. Wiley, Comjnanding Officer, U.S. Army 
Artie Test Center receiving a TECOM Award of Merit. 

Photo 4 shows Colonel Joseph J, Fraser, Jr,, Commanding 
Officer, Dugway Proving Ground, accepting a TECOM Award 
of Merit, The awards were presented by Major General 
Leland G, Cagwin, TECOM Commanding General, 



Photo 3 


Photo 4 









NEW CUMBERLAND ARMY DEPOT PRESENTED AMC AWARD OF HONOR 

BY BG THOMAS H. SCOH, JR. 



BG Thomas II, Scott, Jr,, AMC's Director of Supply, 
representing AMC Commanding General, Frank S, Besson, Jr,, 
is shown presenting the top AMC safety award - the Award 
of Honor, COL Victor L, Cary, NCAD, Commanding Officer, 
is at the left, Mr, Norman Smith, installation safety 
director is at the right. 


SPRINGFIELD ARMORY RECEIVES AMC AWARD OF MERIT 



The Springfield Armory was recently awarded its 
third consecutive AMC Award of Merit for Safety, BG William 
J, Durrenberger , Commanding General of the U,S, Army 
Weapons Command, right, made the presentation to COL 
Arthur H, Sweeney, Jr,, center. Commanding Officer of 
the installation, John P, Devine, left, Safety Officer 
of the Sprinfield Armory, participated in the ceremony. 


21 









Photo 1 


Photo 2 


INSTALLED MOBILE CONVEYOR 


The work of the Surveillance Workshop at Sierra Army 
Depot has been facilitated and made safer' by installing 
a mobile conveyor at each end of each bay. When a conveyor 
is not in use one end can be rolled away, as shown in 
Photo 1, When ammunition and components are to be moved 
into or out of the building, the conveyor is turned to 
the position shown in Photo 2, The system is bonded and 
grounded while in use. Following its installation the 
use of hand trucks was almost eliminated in these bays, 
where ammunition is unloaded, inspected, and outloaded. 

The idea for the installed mobile conveyors was suggested 
by Mr, James Ramsey, a government employee who recently 
retired at Sierra Army Depot, 


AWARD MADE FOR RESCUE OF ACCIDENT VICTIM 



His heroic action in rescuing an accident victim won 
the Meritorious Civilian Service Award for Clayton H, Dugger, 
a warehouseman-forklift operator at Sacramento Array Depot, 

Mr, Dugger is shown receiving the award from Colonel John 
E, Maier, Commanding Officer, The award was made for his 
rescue of Mr, Willis White, right, who was trapped beneath 
a 750-pound door that fell from a railroad car, A $100 
cash honorarium accompanied the medal and award certificate. 


22 








EXPLOSIVE 

SAFETY 




Safety Division 

Thiokol Chemical Corporation, Longhorn Division 
Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant 

Composite propellant is basically a physical mixture 
of an organic fuel, an oxidizer, and an organic binding 
agent. The handling of the majority of the ingredients 
used in the production of solid propellants presents 
health, fire, and explosion hazards. In order to cope 
with the hazards involved, safety criteria have been 
developed and published as directives outlining the 
minimum requirements necessary for the protection of 
personnel and property. 

The safety criteria developed were based upon the 
principle of limiting the exposure of a minimum number 
of personnel, for a minimum time, to a minimum amount of 
a hazardous material. The implementation of this 
principle requires that all hazardous operations be 
scrutinized to devise methods for reducing the 
number of people exposed, the length of time of exposure, 
and the quantity of material. Determination of personnel 
limits requires the following: 


1, Jobs not necessary to a particular hazardous 
operation shall not be accomplished there. 


2, Unnecessary personnel shall not be permitted 
to visit the location. 


23 




3. Too many consecutive operations shall not be 
permitted in the same room or building without adequate 
dividing walls, fire walls, or operational shields, 
depending upon the nature of the hazard. 

Hazardous material limits should reflect the minimum 
requirements for a safe and efficient operation. 

Following are some of the general safety requirements 
applicable to the manufacturing and loading of solid 
propellants that have been derived from the principle 
of limiting exposure of a minimum number of personnel for 
a minimum time, to a minimum amount of a hazardous 
material : 

1, All rooms, cubicles, and buildings containing 
hazardous materials shall have posted in a conspicuous 
place a placard that states the maximum amount of material 
and the maximum number of personnel permitted in the 
location at any one time. Prompt action should be taken 
to remove excess material and personnel, when these are 
found to be present, 

2, Hazardous materials, including explosives, 
shall not be stored within an operating building except 
for the minimum quantities necessary to maintain 
individual operations, 

3, All buildings and magazines shall be kept 
clean at all times. In explosives areas, waste materials 
such as oily rags, combustible and explosives scrap, and 
paper shall be kept separate from each other and placed 
in approved marked containers. Spillage of explosives 

or other hazardous m^aterials must be removed promptly, 

A regular program of cleaning shall be carried on as 
frequently as local conditions require for maintaining 
safe conditions, 

4, Hand tools used for repair ;vork in buildings 
that may contain explosives or hazardous concentrations 
of flammable gases or vapors must be properly maintained. 
If the use of ferrous hand tools is required because of 
strength characteristics, the immediate area should be 
free from exposed explosives and other combustible 
materials , 

5, Before being placed into routine operations, 
all new or newly repaired process equipment for use in 
hazardous operations must be examined and tested to 
assure that it is in safe working order. 


24 


6, Before repairs are made on any equipment that 
has been exposed to explosives, a Decontamination Tag 
signed by operating supervision shall be placed on the 
equipment. This tag must certify that all explosives 
have been removed. If it has been impossible to clean 
some part of the equipment this fact shall be noted on 
the tag, together with adequate instructions to mainten- 
ance personnel concerning safe methods of handling, 

7, Prior to starting any operation involving 
explosives, an adequate standing operating procedure 
must be developed and approved. The standing operating 
procedure shall include, as a minimum, such items as 
safety requirements, personnel and explosives limits, 
equipment designation and location, and sequence of 
operations. Applicable portions of the approved 
standing operating procedure shall be conspicuously 
posted convenient to all stations involved in the 
operation for the guidance of all personnel, 

8, Operational shields shall be utilized for the 
protection of personnel, material, and equipment. Design 
of these shields shall be based on the potential hazards 
involved, 

9, Composite propellant manufacturing and motor 
loading operations shall be performed in a special 
area that is separated from all other areas and the 
boundary of the establishment by inhabited building 
distances , 

10, Individual explosives buildings within a 
composite propellant line shall be separated from each 
other and from other buildings not containing explosives 
by appropriate intraline distances, 

11, Batch mixing operations shall be performed in 
buildings that are used exclusively for that purpose. 
Small mixers may be located in buildings containing other 
operations, provided the mixer is in a separate bay with 
operational shields protecting all other operations 

from the mixing operation, 

12, Propellant mixing operations shall be remotely 
controlled with operators provided adequate protection 
from a potential explosion of the total quantity of 
materials being mixed. 


25 


13, Effective means shall be provided for preventing 
extraneous material from entering mixers, 

14, Because of the dangers of contamination of 
oxidizers, all personnel, as a minimum., shall be 
shielded from screening, blending, grinding, and m.echanical 
drying operations by a 12-inch reinforced concrete wall 

or equivalent, 

15, Oxidizer should be processed in closed 
systems to prevent dusting and contamination from out- 
side sources, 

16, If the material used in fuel oompositions is 
toxic or flammable, adequate exhaust ventilation and 
personal protective equipment shall be utilized, 

17, Compatibility of materials shall be established 
and controls shall be incorporated to preclude the mixing 
of materials at a time or in a manner that would result 

in sensitive compositions or hazardous conditions prior 
to process requirements, 

18, When operations are performed on cured propel- 
lant contained in pressure vessels or rocket motors and 
there is a possibility of ignition, the vessel or rocket 
motor should be secured in fixtures capable of withstanding 
the rated thrust, 

19, Explosives shall not be handled roughly, thrown 
about, tumbled, dropped, or walked over other explosives, 

* * * 


26 



The Army Materiel Command Ammunition School at the 
Savanna Army Depot has added the "Fire, Radiation and 
Explosives Hazards" course to its present 29 courses of 
insturction in all phases of ammunition. 

This course was started 29 August 1966, and is 
available to members of all firefighting units, police 
department personnel, and civil defense people, 
irrespective of their association with the Federal 
Government, 

Designed to enlighten federal, city, and town 
officials on procedures taken against radioactive 
material, the 4 day, 32 hour schooling was originally 
planned to last but 8 weeks. However, the demand 
for attendance from both DOD personnel and non-federal 
employees has caused the school officials to include 
the Fire Radiation Course in its regular curriculum 
permanently. 

Accompanying classroom discussions in the understanding 
of peaceful benefits of the atomic industry, problems 
of radiation, contamination and practical exercises in 
different types of fires involving explosives and/or 
radiation hazard materials, the course will send its 
students away v/ith a feeling of great competency in 
being prepared to handle the situation stated above. 

Since its origin some 165 students have attended, 

AMC Fire Prevention Specialists, Safety Officers, and other 
interested personnel may attend. As of late December, 
spaces for classes 11 thru 20, April thru June are 
available. Those interested in attending are asked to, 
contact the Director, AMC Ammunition School at the 
Savanna Army Depot, Savanna, Illinois 61074, 


Students attacking fire in cargo of radioactive material 
during the Fire, Radiation, and Explosives Hazards Course, 



27 




WATCH WHERE YOU’RE BACKING 


Safety Division, P&O Directorate 
U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground 



Truck drivers in the post telephone section at 
Fort Huachuca have taken steps to reduce the frequency 
of backing accidents in their section. 

The first step is the use of fluorescent-orange 
parking cones as visual reminders of the hazardous areas 
of reduced visibility behind the vehicle. Attached to 
the vehicle by a sash chain and snap, the cones are 
placed in the danger zones around a parked vehicle by 
the driver. The cones serve as visual reference points 
and alerting devices for other drivers as well as for 
the driver of the parked vehicle. 

As an added incentive to follow the procedure, the 
drivers have adopted their own informal method of 
enforcement. An operator who leaves his vehicle with- 
out placing the cones in proper positions must buy 
coffee for the other drivers in the section. Very 
few drivers need more than one "memory lesson” of this 
type. 


Results have been encouraging. During the first 
4 1/2 months of FY 1967, the 28 drivers who used the 
cones did not experience a single accident or near 
miss. 


28 



SAFETY SLOGANS ON BACKS OF FIRE SYMBOLS 


George C, Thurston 

Chief, Safety and Surveillance Division 
Jefferson Proving Ground 

For intrainstallation movements of ammunition it is 
necessary to display fire symbols on the sides of ammunition 
trucks, Jefferson Proving Ground uses signs that show 
symbol 4 on one side and a safety message on the other. 

When the truck is hauling ammunition, symbol 4 is shown 
as in Photo 1, When no ammunition is being transported, 
the sign is changed to show a safety slogan, as in Photo 2, 

The fire symbol consists of an 18” X 18" piece of 
sheet metal with 2 hinges in the center. The top half 
is fastened securely to the steel frame, one steel keeper 
is mounted in the center of the top half of the symbol 
and another one is centered on the bottom bracket, A 
slot is centered on the bottom half of the fire symbol. 

The slot is positioned to allow the keepers to slide 
through, both in the closed and open position, A spring 
loaded tongue snap is hooked through the hole in the 
keeper to prevent the symbol from being dislodged by air 
current when the truck is in motion. 

To display the fire symbol, the ammunition hauler 
removes the snap from the top keeper, lowers the bottom 
half of the fire symbol from its upward position and 
places the snap in the lower keeper. To cancel the 
fire symbol, he reverses the operation. 

This type fire symbol provides an opportunity to 
advertise safety. There are 28 trucks that are equipped 
with fire symbols described above in use at Jefferson 
Proving Ground, Since each truck has a fire symbol on 
each side, there are 56 different safety slogans in 
movement at Jefferson Proving Ground every day. 

Before it adopted this method of displaying and 
cancelling fire symbols on ammunition trucks, Jefferson 
Proving Ground has used a one purpose sign. The fire 
symbol consisted of an 18" X 18" piece of sheet metal 
with a handle on the top. The fire symbol was painted 
on one side, and there was nothing on the reverse, A 
metal bracket held the sheet metal at the bottom and 
retaining tracks on either side made it possible to slide 
the symbol up and down. To display the fire symbol, 
the ammunition hauler would slide the square piece of 
sheet metal all the way out of the retaining tracks, turn 
the painted fire symbol side outward, place the sheet 

29 




metal symbol back in the tracks and lower the entire 
assembly. The tracks would sometimes be in such condition 
that the sheet metal would not slide freely. This would 
make necessary the application of force by the ammunition 
hauler, and it resulted in several first aid cases for 
lacerated fingers and bruised hands. 

Of the 2 methods, the one in use at the present time 
is far superior. All the materials except the handles 
on top of the fire symbols used in the old method were 
utilized on converting to the new system. The only new 
materials that were used were 2 steel keepers, 2 hinges, 
one spring loaded tongue snap and the screws to fasten 
the top half of the fire symbol to the frame bracket. 



30 






Here are 10 questions that will test your knowledge 
of safety requirements that you will need under different 
circumstances. The answers to all of them may be found 
in AMCR 385-224, How many can you answer without referring 
to the regulation? The correct answers and references 
appear on pages 39 and 40, 

1, Is humidification an effective way for preventing 
static electricity accumulations and subsequent 
discharges? 

Answer and Reference: 

2, What thickness of reinforced concrete wall is 
required for a disassembly operation involving 15 
pounds of explosives at least 3 feet from the wall? 

Answer and Reference: 

3, By what distance must a portable engine driven 
generator used to supply power for an ammunition 
operation be separated from a magazine? 

Answer and Reference; 

4, How far must a railroad classification yard be 
separated from an administrative area? 

Answer and Reference: 

5, May initiating explosives be handled if in a frozen 
condition? 

Answer and Reference: 

31 



6 


, What is maximum name plate voltage rating for single phase 
portable appliances? 

Answer and Reference: 

7. What factors determine the grouping of explosives and 
ammunition for compatibility? 

Answer and Reference: 


8, May hazardous materials be carried on a locomotive? 
T^swer and Reference : 

9, What is the maximum allowable resistance (in ohms) from 
aircraft to ground when ammunition and explosives are 
to be loaded or unloaded? 


Answer and Reference 


10, What minimum separation is required between containers 
of explosives or ammunition being spotted and opened 
at a destruction site? 


Answer and Reference: 


Seat belts 
Avert 

Fatal injuries 

Especially 

To 







You 


Set 

Example 
At all 
Times 


JOSEPH O'DEA 

Mason & Hanger - Silas Mason Co. 
Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant 


Buckle up 

Enjoy 

Life 

Think 

Safety 


32 


REFERENCE PUBLICATIONS 


AR 95-5, June 1966 

Aviation - Aircraft Accident Prevention, Investigation, 
and Reporting, 

AR 700-1300-8, Change 2, 9 December 1966 

Logistics - Malfunctions Involving Ammunition and 
Explosives , 

AR 750-13, 5 December 1966 

Maintenance of Supplies and Equipment - Spectrometic 
Oil Analysis, 

AMCR 385-2, Change 1, 4 January 1967 

Safety - Accident Reporting - Routing of Required Reports, 

AMC xMemiOrandum 120-3, 30 November 1966 

Mobilization - Emergency Instructions for Personnel, 

T3 Med 223, October 1966 

Respiratory Protective Devices, 


ECOM SAFETY DISPLAY 



Photo above shows one of 2 traffic displays prepared for 
Vetrans Day at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, Bernard M, S, 
Savaiko, ECOM Safety Director (left in photo) is shown 
discussing display at East gate with COL G, A, Kurkjian, 
Commander (center), and COL C, E, Daniels, Jr,, (right) 
executive officer. Army Electronics Support Command, 


33 




A SAFETY ARTICLE REFERENCE INDEX 


This index is a continuation of the list of more 
interesting safety articles included in the January 
1967 Safety Digest, 

0 Radiation Safety 

Your Radiation Program, Good, Bad or Indifferent, 

May 1963 

Industrial X-Ray Safety at Watervliet Arsenal, 

November 1964 

Reducing Dynamitron Radiation Exposure, November 
1965 

Accidental X-Ray Exposure, July 1966 
0 Biological Safety 

Safety is Key Word in Disease Study, March 1964 

Testing Hypodermic Syringes for Leakage, March 1964 

Safety in Biological Operations, May 1964 

Safety Precautions for Sewage Disposal Facilities, 

May 1964 

Non-Ventilated -Isolation Cages for -Animals, May 1964 

Industrial Hazards of a Microbiological Laboratory, 
March 1966 

0 Metals and Chemical Safety 

Clinical Observations on Cutaneous Effects Associated 
with Curing Epoxy Resins, January 1963 

Safe Handling and Use of Organic Peroxides, March 1963 

Hazards Associated with Methylene Chloride, M$y 1963 

A Method of Hazard Control in a Research and 
Development Laboratory, July 1963 

“Teflon'* - Health Hazard, July 1963 


34 



^ Metals and Chemical Safety (Cont) 

Removing Flammable Vapors and Liquids from Containers, 
September 1963 

Report of Literature Search of the Toxicological 
Properties of Para-Quinone-Dioxime , November 1963 

Safe Handling of Beryllium, July 1964 

Handling Lithium Metal, September 1964 

Aluminum Paint Hazard, November 1964 

Understanding Solvent Hazards, May 1965 

Toxicity of Tetra (KIS) Diraethylamino Ethylene, 
November 1965 

Silver Solder Containing Cadmium is a Health 
Hazard, July 1966 

0 Air and Gases 

Prevention of Air Blast Damage, November 1962 

Using Compressed Air for Breathing, May 1964 

Respirator Maintenance, July 1964 

Safe Air Compressor Operation, September 1964 

Oxygen Safety in the Hospital, January 1964 

Safety Built Into Gas Dynamics Laboratory Facility, 
January 1965 

Flammability of Vapor and Gases, January 1965 

Near Tragedy When Chemox Respirator is Misused, 
January 1965 

Movable Shields Protect Gas Cylinders, March 1965 
Understanding Solvent Hazards, May 1965 
Flammability of Vapor and Gases, July 1965 


35 


# Making Work Safer 


New Method of Covering Cable Splice Saves Hands, 
September 1963 

A Safety Control for Small Arms Weapons, November 1964 
Safe Lifting Device, November 1964 

Safe Operation of Mobile Aerial Towers, September 1964 

Materials Handling Safety Training, July 1964 

Breathing Equipment Fits Job Needs, November 1964 

Planning to Save Human Hands, November 1964 

Safe Maintenance of Tanks, January 1965 

A Safe Fire Hose Testing Method, March 1965 

Planning Produces Shop Safety, March 1965 

Box Eliminates Scaling Hazard, March 1965 

Movable Shields Protect Gas Cylinders, March 1965 

Protective Face Masks for Pyrotechnic Operations, 

March 1965 

Protective Device for Power Mowers, March 1965 

Rock Island Arsenal Uses Portable Aerial Towers, 
November 1965 

An Office Safety Check List, November 1965 
Curtain Makes Incinerator Safer, November 1965 
Planned Warehousing is Safer Warehousing, January 1966 
Mobile Scaffold Has Safety Net Extensions, March 1966 
Lineman Anchored to Snorkel, September 1966 
Prepare Now for Safer Winter Driving, September 1966 
Dermatitis: Cause and Prevention, September 1966 


36 


# Accident Causes 


"Falls” is Leading AMC Injury Cause, July 1965 
Prevent Hernia Type Injuries, January 1966 
"Struck by Object" Accidents, March 1966 
Safe Lifting Rules, March 1966 

Winter is Peak Season for Falls, September 1966 

0 Testing and Proving Ground Safety 

Testing Army Materiel for Safety, May 1963 

Evaluation of Safety in Testing Artillery, Mortar, 
Recoilless Rifle Ammunition, May 1963 

Conditioning Pits for Desert Environment, May 1963 

Range Safety at Radford Army Ammunition Plant, 
January 1966 

0 Fire and Firefighting Equipment 

Fluorescent Ballast Fires and Violent Failures, 
September 1963 

Flammability of Vapor auid Gases, January 1965 
A Safe Fire Hose Testing Method, March 1965 
Fast-Acting Deluge Systems, May 1965 
Flammability of Vapor and Gases, July 1965 
Curtain Makes Incinerator Safer, November 1965 
Fire Department Ingenuity Pays Off, January 1966 
Fire Safety Program Elements, May 1966 

0 Qff-The-Job Safety 

Aerosol Cans - Handle With Care, September 1964 
Off-Post Safety, January 1966 


9 


and 


37 


0 Off-The-Job Safety (Cont) 

Home Shop Safety, January 1966 

Watchfulness Can Reduce Mowing Hazards, May 1966 
Hazards of Organic Phosphorous Pesticides, May 1966 
Off-The-Job Safety, January 1963 
Off-The-Job Accident Prevention, September 1966 

0 Miscellaneous 

Reference Sources in Occupational Medicine, January 1963 

Air Supported Tentage, September 1963 

Oxygen Safety in the Hospital, January 1964 

Safety in Electronic Ultrasonic Cleaning, July 1965 

Mouth-to-Mouth Resuscitation Training, July 1965 

ARADMAC Solves Individual Heat Stress Problems, 

September 1965 

Deer VS Motor Vehicles, September 1965 

Safe Use of Plasma-Jet Torches, November 1965 

Sealing Compound MIL-S-8516C Considered Hazardous, 
November 1965 

A Disposal System for Flammable Solvents, March 1966 

Test of Polycarbonate Sheets for Use in Face Masks, 

March 1966 

Aviation Safety, May 1966 

Special Tools for Field Support of Combat Vehicles, 

May 1966 

Prevent Emergency Situations in Flight, July 1966 


38 



Here are the answers to the questions on pages 31 
and 32* All questions were based on information contained 
in AWCR 385-224, A reference to the pertinent paragraph 
follows each answer, 

1, Humidification for preventing static electrical 

accumulation and subsequent discharges is usually 
effective if the relative humidity is above 60 percent. 
However, certain materials such as metallic powders 
and some of the pyrotechnic mixtures cannot be 
exposed to air with 60 percent relative humidity 
because of the possibility of spontaneous ignition. 
Reference: Paragraph 708, 

2, A 12-inch reinforced concrete wall would be required. 

Reference: Paragraph 2504a, 

3, The generating unit shall be placed at least 50 feet 

from the magazine. Reference: Paragraph 623c(l), 

4, 1,800 feet. Reference: Paragraph 1713, 

5, If it is frozen, an initiating explosive shall not be 

handled. Reference: Paragraph 1401. 

6, No single phase portable applicuice having a rating 
of more than 230 volts shall be permitted. 

References Paragraph 621e, 

7, Explosives and aironunition are grouped for compatibility 
with respect to the following factors: 

a. Effects of explosion of the item. 

b. Rate of deterioration, 

c. Sensitivity to initiation. 


39 


d. Type of packing 


e. Effects of fire involving the item, 

f. Quantity of explosive per unit, 

X 

Reference; Paragraph 1902, 

8, The carrying 'of hazardous materials on a locomotive 
or other self-propelled rail vehicle is prohibited. 
Reference; Paragraph 2107c, 

9, 10,000 ohms. Reference; Paragraph 2305a, 

10, The containers of explosive or ammunition items to 
be destroyed must be spotted and opened at least 10 
feet from each other and from explosives material 
previously laid for destruction. Reference; 
Paragraph 2714c, 


SAFETY SHOE SAVES TOES 



James Quigley, Granite City Army Depot, has uninjured 
toes on his left foot because he wore his safety shoes, 

Mr, Quigley's work involved the handling of stacks of zinc 
ingots on pallets. When a pallet broke, the corner of a 
pile toppled and fell on his foot. The total weight of 
metal in the pile was 2,800 pounds. The shoe, which Mr, 

Quigley is wearing in the photo above, was scratched, 
but his toes were not injured. 


40 


*U. S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1967 O - 255-009 <7161A) 




FEDERAL SAFETY COUNCIL 



WORK SAFELY- "REDUCE FEDERAL 

EMPLOYEE WORK INJURIES 30 % BY 1970 ” 


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 


3 1262 09304 9368 


FLARE 



UNITED STATES ARMY MATERIEL COMMAND 
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20315