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INDEX 
1924—FOURTEENTH SEASON—1925 


* Indicates First Performance at these Concerts. 
**_[Tndicates First Performance in San Francisco. 
+—Indicates First Performance anywhere. 


Page 
AUBER—: | e : 
Overture 10: ShracDia volo. eee See. eee 205, 213, 403 
BACH—- = 
Air from: Demiajor= Suite: ee ee Eee 153 
BACH-STEINBERG—-. 
zach Ct OVEN GLO) Uh ote Soe = det SC ae aE PRR Chet ar Aree” aetnd ree aR Te BAD Wows Ee PRY I NoSE SANS YE bas oy! ese 1 KG) 
BEETHOVEN— . : 
Sy pNony. Nes. Crminore tore te ge eae hee ee oh eau 233 
PetECL AT LAE OTT A OVC ences oo ence Sco tat cy ch agence SS Ee yea at ae se 455 
Sock p Wohive aN. 0. EAStOral cos 6 ska. oe oe oop eee een Pee 129, 140, 180 
Overtice, -weonore,”” (NO 6 Bree ae a a a a 111, 120, 200, 244, 265 
Concerto. for Violin, Damajor=(Cecilia, Hansen) <2. .2 2... 2. eee 145 
BIZET— 
Carmen-outte 2.5.2.2 en Soe ae ee ed ee 
BLOCH, ERNEST— 
ae Three Jewasn. POeniS.255.es se <b kd sececsnsd ese eee 269, 324 
BOCCHERINI— 
IDG TUG bn. ee heater pe a ee a gu ae cl a ies sy She aa nS ee 
BOELLMAN— 
Symphonic Variations for se lbioclie (Max Waeon a) 2300 3 ks es eee. 384 
BORODIN— 
AEE MUSICAERON  PeMCe LO OR coon ce a cn eat ee ene emcee 379 
BOTTESINI— | 
**kConcerto for Violin and Double Bass (Louis Persinger, Waldemar 
(Sele tier. Seater a ee 290, 301 
BRAHMS—. | 
SYMPLGH Mi One. BD GAOL eee en he ee ly ee 87 
SAA i Eo Nig oie wits pineal Slee ae Oia ae aaa le, ae. De Auailed Breet ntinc tang ro ceded 432, 445 
Concerto for Viole: mayors CG@eorees EMESCO):.-:-- eras eso 393 
Academic Festival Overture Ly ee ak ERs A SRR Rae CRE SPER BT 269, 324 
**Rhapsody for Contralto Solo and Male Chorus (Mme. Charles Cahier) 551 
Four Hungarian, (Dancestuinietect. thud J \ stor whore ee apie 254 
BRUCH— 
Concerto for Violin, Gennnor  “CLouts Persingzer) i io Ot esis. 170, 244 
Kol Nidrei for Violoncello (Walter. Ferner)..23.3OIS 2G 3 5..t 112, 265 
CHABRIER— | 
RAD SOCY MUG Die ot Ae rk coh: Aina shint es ee ee ee 27, 225 
CHAMINADE— | 
*Concertino for Flute and Orchestra (Anthony hinden) =< 34 333, 385 
CHOPIN— 
Goneerto tor Piano; EF minor (Muri Silda)... ea ee 121, 135 
CLOKEY, JOSEPH—. 
BEET iy oi (eee eae ORR SAO crate emer een ee aie 373, 437 
COTTENET— 
Chanson-Meditation, for Violin Solo (Louis Persinger) .u...-.:c.:cc00-c0c0----- 376 








19224—FOURTEENTH SEASON—1925 





Page 
CRIST— f 
*Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes (Eva Gauthier) 000.0... ee eceeteeeeeeeeeeeeneee 76 
DELIBES— 
Balléoutte,. COppelia: Se SR ee eee en EF Pe SP ene Re oe 65, 225 
DE GREEF— 
: owe Cid Tlentisn: Ol. SONS Sesctsrs. sot esata eae eee ee BAe ae 
| DOHNANYI— : 
Orcenmestra ouite, Opus Oo" an oe a ie a te ae ene ge ft oe ee 
DVORAK-STOCK—. 
PATROMES UHI ke Ane see re Se ae ee oe ue ee ae 374, 385, 437 
EICHHEIM— 
**Oriental Impressions (Conducted by the composer) .u0.....--..--cc--eeececeneeeeneees 89 
ENESCO— 7 
**Symphony, E flat major (Conducted by the composer) ..0...........--e--c0eeceee-- 396 
FRANCK— 
*Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra (E. Robert Schmitz) 
pat SNS ce ich Beier ee ona eee ER 181, 190 
SE TTL IPO TAY ed TN) EO f= eg es et ee ee ee ee SS 273, 365 
GLUCK— 
Riveriure.-1l PRIS ene 1k ANS. eae op ae a te ee erm 109, 264 
GLUCK-GEVAERT— 
LN a oe 5 es apap a eee ee OR Pe rare auntie te Met ee OS. eet Nf 253, 364 
GOLDMARK, RUBIN— 
De AN CAMPER TIA SO CINE: ican ae Poe Piaas Meee LN ie dao ee a ee a Od eee S17 
GOOSENS— 
| POET. C= Fee, O: Lah COL aoa teen eg ee ge et ae eee ee 449 
| GRIEG— 
Goneerto- for Piano; A minor: (Percy Graincer). te A AS 35 
POUL + DI SULG POTSAallal 2 cick tee eee, step oan noe eara none nk pts noe Ee eID 
WUlicge ee eet eV, > INO. Ba oN ah pe SA ee einer eg ee 155, 200 
HADLEY— ‘ 
PORTER ea E PSOMCUIEA  coivcegi scree Sete ih esas trea ae eg ST 
HANDEL— ‘ 
Largo, for Orchestra and Organ (Theodore J. Irwin)............................-.. 456 
HAYDN— . 
Royo airs ANA FOL <LOMUL pPTIS® oc aces ee ee ee ee 189, 204, 264 
PREG AREL CORT ON0T OMICS oc ces oc act gest eat et IN on Ee Sn ORO An 
**Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra (Lewis Richards)......324, 345, 356 
HUBAY— ; 
vfieire: atl. Violin. Solo. CY chidi..Menuhinja..0 3 oes ae ee 404 
IPPOLITOW-IVANOW— 
“In the Village,” from Caucasian Sketches.............. 156, 200, 204, 225, 290, 404 
JACOBI, FREDERICK— 
Ry OY op a a ch ed ten Se Gag eh Lee a ee Oe 44 
KREISLER—. 
PERLITE A WRCTITIOIS 5 ieee Ech SE ceo Ue a 100, 157, 201, 205, 225 
LALO— 
Concerto for Violin, F minor (Eugenia Argiewicz Bem)............-.......-...- 154 
Concerto for Violoncello, D minor (Walter Ferner).......................... 314 
LEKEU— 
Sea etOLOS iting Orehestrac. cies Oa en eee epee ate gee i) 
LISZT— 
OC SO SE hae tae a rn sk sine NE ea MBN eee at Ps Neen 63, 99, 204 


ReQLOUMANSE: Pik 1, AN AION Pa eases 2 Sot Zine BSR e ease TI ee ee eRe 340, 434 








1924—F OURTEENTH SEASON—1925 


Page 
MAHLER— : 
Symphony No. 2 (Resurrection) (Helen Stanley, Mme. Cahier).......... 553 
MASSENET— 
Alsatian SC@MmeS ......------..--:c--ecceecceeeceeecneseceeceeceseneccenecnnnrennnnaennesnnnannansnansesccnaecssseses 25, 99 
Oe Pek AE epee Ge 5X7 Aig One eect pina Secs IB a te ieee ia Bod Seip arene REET ee 63, 140, 144, 437 
MENDELSSOHN— | ‘ 
Concerto for. Vion. © minor Cerna RupiNnSstein)22- 234 
Spring Sone and > pin TInS ao ONe ea tee sores ccartnn: ot. ore ren taeeeeae aie pee 99, 113, 403 
MEYERBEER— oe 
Aria, “O Paradiso,” from “L’Africaine” (Rudolf Laubenthal)............... 527 
MONASTERIO—. : 7 
Serenata Andaluza ey olin Solo -GLouise PersHimen) =. ae eee ae: 376 
MOZART— 
STII D FRO ELV seer SEIT) Oe oe tr meade Se eee ccna Due 313, 408 
PERSINGER, LOUIS— | 
Baoatelle-“Vi16lin Solo sGouis ak ersit Ge) oe ae ee haere terrae tg 376 
PIERNE— 
RAVEL— 
tite; “Ma - Mere Owe (Mother! Goose) ao. ete acter eee eee 213 
AT wovHebtew-stelodses: (Ewa Gantnier) ac. = eee ae ee ee 76 
RESPIGHI— 
TEBaliade Oli thes Crone St. osteo eee ae ee 132 
se Antique Dances Toratne tatec as see gn eee ee Ae eee 344, 353 
RIMSKY-KORSAKOW— ! 
Symphonic: Suite -cScheheraza@e se 2 eek te eee, ee eee 34, 215 
Overtiires = tar an SSiat Sea SEOE oer eee nia er ee eee 526 
**Scherzo... phe: Bumple Beer “trom; Sar Satan oo... n5 ee 376, 385, 437 
ROSSINI— 
Overture.to. Wittiani Tel (ce ea eet eee 255, 285, 404 
Overture=to sha sGazzae labs entt ema ieee ee emer te ee eye. Meck 67 
: Aria, Una Voce Poco Fa, from “The Barber of Seville” (Eva Gauthier) 78 
SAIN T-SAENS— 
CAEN Val Oh THE TIALS acs ac eee ae ee eng ce ee a, eee et et nee eG 
Ballet Sites Onme tren rye Vil tk et eee ee en ee ee eee ee ee oe 23: 225 
PEUGEOT a NO Cie Cis ee ek ee ee 65, 99, 204, 225, 437 
SCHUBERT— 
Sym photiy.1n ss miner. WAlmiShed 1s ee ees 98, 110, 120, 144 
Military Mamel cit arth See, teak nd oer aeon hce aie ams eae ee 455 
SCHUBERT-STOCK— 
ie Be sy otael nf oy = elke ia a ar nar Aas ac Teta Mag ah ols oe Fb arte oie ay A Std te Memcaite Ke 300 
SCHUMANN— . 
Sani pbony INO: 3k PROTEGE. Soot asa He ee artre  e  t  eee 171 
(Transcribed for modern orchestra by Frederick Stock) 
“The Pilgrimage of the Rose” (Helen Stanley, Mme. Cahier, Rudolf 
Laupenthal. Alexander Wapnis) a2 eee os he a Wee SE oe 523 
SCRIABIN— 
BL ec DET MerO ©” Lal scta Sze peer eee RL tees | Te ae ee oe ee eee 531 
SIBELIUS— 
NeaSes Teri Stent. SSS a St ES eee Na re ep Nata deus MR Veter east oae SD 337 
SMETANA— : 
DVM pHOnicaorm,-.- tne Mioldal cf he oy an eee ne eee ane: Cece 66, 141 
Overture tor ene: bartered: Bride on ee ee ree 23 
SOWERBY— 


** The Irish Washerwoman 








19224—FOURTEENTH SEASON—1925 





Page 
STRAUSS, JOHANN— 
Onesitive tos BHeAG rps aaron the et he tia eo 2) 157 
Watt Onethe. Beautiful Bluey Danuber acs. -c5e-.-oca een 100, 113, 437 
| STRAUSS, RICHARD— 
| PONE Ce OCT WON 9 Wai i eB a ioe er 236, 244, 266 
| Rondo, “Til Entel eres DAC eons cccat non aner etn dscendtc eedaseseorerinntates ee ees Sink Seg 45, 120 
: ** Burleske, in D minor for Pina and Orchestra (E. Robert Schmitz). 180, 190 
| STRAVINSKY— 
Sliite: FPOt © mb Her IEG AvING. 2c tse AS ccna c eee een ee eT ES 345, 357 
SVENDSEN— 
BOC HOTA MAV UA Sus 58 ois ae scat ate ek, sche ecu Aue ec 297, 409, 449 
| TAYLOR, DEEMS— 
‘aries a nrouch the Iaoowing Glass 232s ak Se ee 9, 54, 77, 289 
| 
TSCHAIKOWSKY— 
H SIEUPUNOMI NE, RU. Dy HES SEPT O NG eee eae eee ee a eee hee ee ew 1, 4s CO 
SP Cy NOL, 6, Pa tCUIGUE. cots res cree nw ener Oe eee nee 421 
¥ Pontasia.~~ i SanCeSca da WeMnlitnt: scene sy ai Zensen 93, 141, 144 
! | EET Gye CCW By a) 4 Opti ak A et ee te eee eet PR rscpenn ck IK Al eee 204, 214, 284 
i EEE. GSES SSNS eee Se re Santa Se Rant de ero | od RENE NEN RIN et, teary Se OER CIO! 427 
Concerto: fon Violin.«D majora( Mischa -Elman).....cte oe ee ees 201 
PEL bys <n 11S UNUIECEAC ROL rove sureties REA IA, C8 404, 425 
VERDI— 
' Requiem (Helen Stanley, Mme. Cahier, Rudolf Laubenthal, Alexander 
i POMPE Re es it aoe abs < teaacae ae Se AER ee aE ie ae 465 
{ 
VIVALDI— 
e*Concerto for otrins Orchestra; A minors cialee tosis cpecales itt 43 
WAGNER— 
: PU AMLIA TES EF, §) CNUEE CCC nese OR oe UR EE Eo hye ene lnsec ease cece nits 412, 495 
ECVE CEO Orpel? (ONO EUS.) aoa Sa cccrieta av bveli seasons ncaa Ri Be 505 
PROG RAAT RO akacrcc aie cents abel incvstinntnis boebectinieab eed SALINAS 2 APS PT ee 280 
| wratl,.-ai-of song (Florence Hast6n)iL Assen 6 oe SP ee 281 
CWomenpriny UP relide? ci) APR a I BS 0 Soe Bie 253, 284 
! PREC OCUCTIONs LOAN CTE hi gor 15.s2ss oa eee nad, pe = 280, 385 
| Lohenegrin’s Narrative (Rudolf Laubenthal).....4. 23 ae 497 
| Elisa's Dreanr (Florence aston yc 3 54.20 dR ek eee ioe kd 280 
“Die Meistersinger,” Prelude RS eee paren ae (Es BPE oy, ee Se, 409, 451 
Introduction to Act III, Dance of the Apprentices and Procession 
a5 a oa OO a I a ed ee ee RN GRD SMH LARS Arete Gegen SE | 34, 54 
| ci A SOs Of 2 1° ee et CRON 9 3208S STs {mnie 552 2) 5 at OS ey cr 280, 379, 384 
“Die Walkure,” Act I (Helen Stanley, Rudolf Laubenthal)........00000000 505 
Wotan’s Farewell and Magic Fire Spell (Alexander Kipnis)............ 507 
) “Pristamaned.lsolde,.’ ‘Preludeand. Love Deathaecw chee Sh: 191, 245 
Same as above (Isolde, PLOTCNCE aaAS(OR }s 355, once nee Men ee ee 2 ee 281 
“Das Rheingold,” Entrance of the Gods into Walhalla.....0- 281 
: SEAT ST h PD’ PELUG Co cssscic: senatcccxspqsspahteszsscnctaeteetenslg ee oe 169, 181, 280, 364 
“Parsifal,” Good Friday Spells. fei sti, ATA OIN 3s) Tyee ee a) 8 > 254 
Ovevtire OM Relais... CAE SE EO Sth tht Iu BI eas 2 25, 98 
he F atts t. Ov rire sn cxccortecceccectea ise AELUG IAS ESE SGN te 393 
] Songs with Orchestra, “Traume” and “Schmerzen” (Mme. Charles 
aT Oo) eae een eel pane ee ie einen armors: b. B68, SS ysl Yas 499 
| WEBER— | 
. ONEPritREe tO OBERG IN 352 el Ben kh ee Pd pe ee DE 153, 204 
d WEBER-WEINGARTNER— 
Pa StatLOme LO tC: LIAN CC eon So ancnen cic ig Sto Be cgmsss SEAL GEER ak uss ge OE TODS 
| WIENIAWSKI— } 
Souvenir de Moscow, Violin Solo (William F. Laraia)........0..0000000. 285 





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FIRST PAIR 


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L924 1925 


Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR 


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The San Francisea Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 


FIRST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
484th and 485th Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, October 31, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, November 2, 2:45 o’clock 


| PROGRAMME 
1. Symphony No. 5, E Minov..........------------------ 1 schaikowsky 


Andante—Allegro con anima 

Andante cantabile con alcuna licenza 
Valse—Allegro moderato 

Finale: Andante maestoso—Allegro—Allegro vivace 


Intermission 
2. Adagio for. String, Orchestra: 222 nic. 21-0..- 255 -52-3252------ Lekeu 
(First time in San Francisco) 
3. Suite, “Through the Looking Glass’’.............. Deems Taylor 


(First time at these concerts) 
I. (a) Dedication 
I. (b) The Garden of Live Flowers 


Il. Jabberwocky 
If. Looking Glass Insects 
IV. The White Knight 





Illuminating talks by Victor Lichtenstein on the pro- 
grammes of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, illustrated 
by artists of the orchestra, Friday at noon on concert days, 
Sorosis Hall, Sutter near Powell. Management, Alice Seckels. 





Notice.—Patrons desiring programmes sent to them 
in advance of each concert may secure same upon pay- 
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Symphony No. 5, E Minor : ~ “ Tschaikowsky 


In the Fifth Symphony of Tschaikowsky we seem to see whole 
nations in revolt, mourning, rejoicing, conquering. The first move- 
ment suggests the surging of a great mass of people—perhaps the 
Russian nation at work and at play, vital and free-souled, but sub- 
merged and unhappy. The second movement, one of the most 
popular compositions Tschaikowsky ever wrote, is a passionate and 
sensuous andante, although shortly before the movement's end the 
theme of the symphony appears as a sort of rumble of cannon amid 
the pathos of a people's suffering. The third movement is a beau- 
tiful piece of delicate tracery, perhaps the aristocracy of the people, 
dancing in its ballroom, oblivious of the groaning of the workers out- 
side. Toward the close of the movement the threatening motive is 


again heard as though the guests heard the first mutterings of the mob 
n the streets below. With the opening of the fourth movement the 
armies of the people seem to be approaching for battle. This is one 
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Adagio for String Orchestra - o - - - Lekeu 


Guillaume Lekeu was born near Verviers, Belgium, January 20, 
1870. Although possessed of musical gifts, they did not receive 
development until he was fourteen years of age, his artistic spirit 
having been suddenly awakened by some pieces of Beethoven. After 
thoroughly acquainting himself with the masters, Lekeu removed to 
Paris in 1889 and studied under Gaston Villan. He completed the 
study of harmony in two months and Villan then introduced him to 
Cesar Franck, who was struck with his talent and consented to give 
him lessons in composition. After twenty lessons the death of the 
master left Lekeu without counsel in his work, but Vincent d’Indy took 
up the instruction of the composer. In January, 1894, Lekeu con- 
tracted typhoid fever, from which he died at the age of twenty-four. 


The title page of the score of the Adagio bears the following 
motto, ‘Ihe pale flowers of memory,’’ quoted from a poem by 
Georges Vanor. In this work the strings are divided into solo violin, 
first, second, third and fourth violin; first and second violas; solo 
’cello, first and second ‘cello. The basses alone remain undivided. 


Suite, ‘“Through the Looking Glass” - - - Deems Taylor 


Deems Taylor, born in New York December 22, 1885, was 
educated at the Friends’ School, New York public schools, Ethical 
Culture School, and at New York University, from which he received 


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the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1906. From 1912 to 1916 he was 
assistant editor of the ‘“Western Electric News’; in 1916, assistant 
Sunday editor of the New York “‘Tribune’’; correspondent in France 
for the same paper during 1916 and 1917; associate editor of 
“Collier's Weekly,” 1917 to 1919. In 1921, Mr. Taylor was ap- 
pointed music critic on the New York ‘‘World,’’ a position which he 
is still holding. His principal orchestral works are “The Siren Song,” 
a symphonic poem; a cantata, ‘“The Chambered Nautilus’; a cantata, 
“The Highwayman”; “Through the Looking Glass’; “Portrait of a 


Lady,” rhapsody for orchestra; also numerous choral pieces, piano 
compositions, songs, etc. 


‘Through the Looking Glass’’ was originally written for flute, 
oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, pianoforte and strings, and in that form 
was produced by the New York Chamber Music Society, February 18, 
1919. The following season the same organization performed the 
work in San Francisco, while on tour. In September, 1921, Mr. 
Taylor began a revision of his work for full orchestra and, the first 
version having been in three movements, he added the “Garden of 
Live Flowers,” which is now the second division of the opening move- 
ment of the suite. 


When the suite was first performed by the New York Symphony 
Orchestra, March 10, 1923, the following description was provided by 
Mr. Taylor: 


So 


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‘The Suite needs no extended analysis. It is based on Lewis 
Carroll’s immortal nonsense fairy-tale. “Through the Looking Glass 
and What Alice Found There,’ and the five pictures it presents, will, 
if all goes well, be readily recognizable to lovers of the book. There 
are four movements, the first being subdivided into two connected 
parts. 


I. (a) Dedication 


Carroll precedes the tale with a charming poetical foreword, the 
first stanza of which the music aims to express: 
Child of the pure, unclouded brow 
And dreaming eyes of wonder! 


Though time be fleet, and I and thou 
Are half a life asunder, 


Thy loving smile will surely hail 
The love-gift of a fairy-tale. 


A simple song theme, briefly developed, leads to 


I. (b) The Garden of Live Flowers 


‘“‘O Tiger-Lily,’’ said Alice, addressing herself to one that was 
waving gracefully about in the wind, “I wish you could talk.” 


“We can talk,’’ said the Tiger-Lily, ‘““when there’s anybody worth 
talking to.” . 


‘‘And can the flowers talk>”’ 


‘As well as you can,” said the Tiger-Lily, “and a great deal 
- louder.” 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 


REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no_ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 


obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 


flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


Mm. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 








Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


11 























ANNOUNCEMENT 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, November 14, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, November 16, 2:45 P. M. 





PROGRAMME 


1. Concerto for String Orchestra, A Minor............-..--- Vivaldi 
Arranged for concert use by S. Franko 
(First time in San Francisco) 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio 
Allegro | 
DSTA DONT” NOG Mieke sen ae repe pe te teu siet sewer Frederick Jacobi 
(First performance anywhere) 
Furioso—Ma non troppo—Presto 
Lento non troppo 
Allegro amabile 
3. Rondo, “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks’’............-..- 
SS epee A SST SAE 2 LRN gg pe ee OE ae Richard Strauss 











ANNOUNCEMENT 


FIRST POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, November 9, 2:45 P. M. 





PROGRAMME 
be Overtire <Phedre is fore ie ee oe eee Massenet 
2S Ballet Suites. 5 bbenry: Vili ee Soe eg Saint-Saens 
Introduction and Entrance of the Clans 
Scotch Idyl 
Dance of the Gypsy 
Gigue and Finale 


B “O\wertuvey Gsleng tee a soccer ioe ook acta ete ato: eee Wagner 
AeA \satianys DC OTES oot esse cae eee co oyee es ene eae eee Massenet 
Sunday Morning Sunday Evening 
At the Tavern Under the Linden Trees 


5. Rhapsody, ~ ‘Espana’ Seon aa e EON ee ce agen teen Chabrier 





Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., on Monday 
preceding concert, hours 9 to 5; and at Curran Theatre from 
10 A. M. on day of concert. 











Shortly after Alice had entered the looking-glass country, she 
came to a lovely garden in which the flowers were talking — in the 
words of the Tiger-Lily, ‘‘as well as you can, and a great deal louder.” 
The music, therefore, reflects the brisk chatter of the swaying, bright- 
colored denizens of the garden. 


II. Jabberwocky 


’Twas brillig, and the slithy toves ‘‘Beware the Jabberwock, my son! 
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe. The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! 
All mimsy were the borogoves Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun 
And the mome raths outgrabe. The frumious Bandersnatch!”’ 
He took his vorpal sword in hand: And as in uffish thought he stood, 
Long time the manxome foe he sought— The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, 
So rested he by the Tumtum tree, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And stood awhile in thought. And burbled as it came. 
One, two! One two! And through and “‘And hast thou slain the Jabberwock? 
through Come to my arms, my beamish boy! 
The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!” 
He left it dead, and with its head He chortled in his joy. 


He went galumphing back. 


This is the poem that so puzzled Alice, and which Humpty- 
Dumpty finally explained to her. The theme of that frightful beast, 
the Jabberwock, is first announced by the full orchestra. The clarinet 
then begins the tale, recounting how, on a ‘‘brillig’’ afternoon, the 
‘‘slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.’’ Muttered impreca- 
tions by the bassoon warn us to “beware the Jabberwock, my son.’ 
A miniature march signalizes the approach of our hero, taking “‘his 
vorpal sword in hand.’ Trouble starts among the trombones—the 
Jabberwock is upon us! The battle with the monster is recounted in 


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Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
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AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

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a short and rather repellant fugue, the double-basses bringing up the 
subject and the hero fighting back in the interludes. Finally his vorpal 
blade (really a xylophone) goes “snicker-snack’’ and the monster, 
impersonated by the solo bassoon, dies a lingering and convulsive 
death. The hero returns to the victorious strains of his own theme— 
“O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!’’ The whole orchestra rejoices 
—the church bells are rung—alarums and excursions. Conclusion. 
Once more the slithy toves perform their pleasing evolutions, undis- 
turbed by the uneasy ghost of the late Jabberwock. 


II. Looking-Glass Insects 


The score contains extracts from the dialogue of Alice and the 
gnat ‘about the size of a chicken’’ about various insects, among them 
the bread-and-butter-fly. 

‘‘And what does it live on?’”’ 

“Weak tea with cream in it.”’ 

‘Supposing it couldn't find any>?”’ 

‘“Then it would die, of course.’’ 

“But that must happen very often,” said Alice thoughtfully. 

“Tt always happens,”’ said the gnat. 

Here we find the vociferous diptera that made such an impression 
upon Alice—the Bee-elephant, the Gnat, the Rocking-horse-fly, the 
Snap-dragon-fly, and the Bread-and-butter-fly. There are several 
themes, but there is no use trying to decide which insect any one of 
them stands for. 

IV. The White Knight 

The score contains extracts from the conversation of the White 
Knight, and an account of his leave-taking. 

He was a toy Don Quixote, mild, chivalrous, ridiculous, and 
rather touching. He carried a mouse-trap on his saddle-bow, “be- 
cause, if they do come, I don’t choose to have them running about.’ 
He couldn’t ride very well, but he was a gentle soul, with good inten- 
tions. There are two themes; the first, a sort of instrumental prance, 
being the Knight’s own conception of himself as a slashing, dare-devil 
fellow. The second is bland, mellifluous, a little sentimental—much 
more like the Knight as he really was. The first theme starts off 
bravely, but falls out of the saddle before very long, and has to give 
way to the second. The two alternate, in various guises, until the 
end, when the Knight rides off, with Alice waving her handkerchief— 
he thought it would encourage him if she did. 











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Elwyn Artist Series 


At Scottish Rite Hall—Season 1924-1925 


10 SUPREME EVENTS 


Subscription Tickets for Entire Series 


$7.00, $10.00, $15.00 


(Plus 10% Tax) 


MORIZ ROSENTHAL Monday Eve., Nov. 17 


‘‘A Pianistic Giant Accomplishing the Superlative” 


CECILIA HANSEN Thursday Eve., Dec. 4 


‘‘The Sensation of the Concert Season’ — 
Chicago “‘Herald-Examiner”’ 


ISA KREMER Friday Eve., Dec. 12 


Russian Singer of Folk Songs 


*JASCHA HEIFETZ Sunday Mat., Jan. 18 


‘‘The Incomparable” 


MARIA IVOGUN Monday Eve., Jan. 26 


Europe’s Greatest Coloratura Soprano 














ALBERT SPALDING Friday Eve., Feb. 20 


America’s Supreme Violinist 


*ROLAND HAYES Sunday Mat., Feb. 22 


Phenomenal Negro Tenor—The Sensation of Recent Years 


MABEL GARRISON Weiaedee Eve., Mch. 18 


One of America’s Most Gifted and Gracious Singers 


LONDON STRING QUARTET 


Tuesday Evening, April 7 


‘Unsurpassed as a Perfect Ensemble”’ 


REINALD WERRENRATH 
Monday Evening, April 20 


‘*An American Institution” 


MERLE ALCOCK Early May 


Leading Contralto Metropolitan Opera Co. 


*Patrons may have their choice of one of these two great 
artists, or, by paying $1.00, $1.50, or $2.00 extra, may enjoy the 
additional concert on the season ticket. Single tickets for these 
artists are $1.00 to $3.00. The Heifetz and Hayes concerts are 
both at the Casino Theatre; all others will be held at Scottish 
Rite Hall. (Save 3314% on Season Tickets.) 


Season Tickets Now on Sale—Sherman, Clay & Co. 


















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Musical Association of San Francisco 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 


OFFICERS 
Joun D. McKzsz, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President E. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 
A. W. WipenHaAm, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
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John D. McKee, Chairman 


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EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


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Che San Francisco Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 
FIRST POPULAR CONCERT 
486th Concert ° 
CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, November 9, 2:45 o’clock 


PROGRAMME 
1. Overture to “The Bartered Bride’ ..............-.2.-...:. Smetana 
2S Ballet oulte. entry. Villas eee ee ee Saint-Saens 


Introduction and Entrance of the Clans 
Scotch Idyl 

Dance of the Gypsy 

Gigue and Finale 


3. jOverture,. Rienzi. <5... Rae ee eee Wagner 
Intermission 

4 Alsatian= Scenes... .22.6.602 cee ees ae be eee Massenet 
|] Sunday Morning 3 Under the Linden Trees 
2 At the Tavern ("Cello Solo, Walter Ferner) 
(Clarinet Solo, H. B. Randall) 

4 Sunday Evening ean eg 

5, wivhapsedywispanas <b yk ee. Ey ac, Bee Chabrier 


FIRST AUDITORIUM “POP” CONCERT 
Tomorrow Night — 8:20 P. M. 


Soloist: PERCY GRAINGER, Pianist 





Reserved Seats: 50c, 75c, $1, at Sherman, Clay & Co. 








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Overture to “‘The Bartered Bride”’ - - “ ~ Smetana 


The ‘“‘Bartered Bride’”’ was the second of Smetana s eight operas. 
Its great popularity in Prague is attested by the fact that it has had 
almost four hundred performances. The work was intended by its 
composer to be typical of Bohemian life and character — to be a 
national opera, and so it really is. ‘‘The charm of Smetana to the 
outside world lies in the fact that while the national character remains 
the foundation of his thoughts, he knew how to clothe the national 
Bohemian music in modern and high art forms, and at the same time 
remain truly original, always himself, always Smetana.” The story of 
the opera illustrates Bohemian village life and is full of mirth. ‘The 
work is a great favorite on continental stages and is included in the 
repertoire of the Metropolitan Opera in New York. 


The music of the overture is characteristic of the opera, though 
‘n form it is rather unconventional. The fugue which follows the 
short introduction has a coursing theme that never loses the charm of 
dance and jingle, and has a flavor of rustic festivity. 


Ballet Suite from “‘Henry VIII.” - ~ - - Saint-Saens 


‘Tenry VIII,” an opera in four acts and six scenes, written by 
Admand Silvestre and Leonce Detroyat, with music by Saint-Saens, 
was produced at the Opera, Paris, on March 5, 1883, and performed 
thirty-three times during the year following. This was six years after 
the production of the same composer's much more popular opera, 


“Samson and Delilah.”” The book of “Henry VIII." is founded on 








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Opening Event 


Elwyn Artist Series 


SCOTTISH RITE HALL 


Monday Evening 
November 17 


MORIZ 


ROSENTHAL 


PIANIST 









Management 


~ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 


Reserved Seat Sale 
: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
$2.00, $1.50, $1.00, 50c. (Plus Tax) 

































ELWYN ARTIST SERIES--10 Supreme Events 


At Scottish Rite Hall—Season 1924-1925 
Subscription Tickets for Entire Series $7, $10, $15 (Plus 10% Tax) 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL ALBERT SPALDING 

Monday Eve., Nov. 17 Friday Eve., Feb. 20 


““\ Pianistic Giant Accomplishing the America’s Supreme Violinist 


Superlative’’ *ROLAND HAYES 
CECILIA HANSEN Sunday Mat., Feb. 22 
Thursday Eve., Dec. 4 Phenomenal Negro Tenor— 

“The Sensation of the Concert Season’’— MABEL GARRISON 
Chicago ‘‘Herald-Examiner”’ a NS nese Eves Mch. 18 . 
I America’s Most Gifted ar 
ISA KREMER oO" Gracious Singers 
Friday Eve., Dec. 12 London String Quartet 
Russian Singer of Folk Songs ee Tuesday Eve., Apr. 7 ; 
% ASCHA HEIFETZ JInsurpassed as a Perfect Ensemble 
sat Wako Jane 18 REINALD WERRENRATH 


Monday Eve., Apr. 20 


*“An American Institution” 


MARIA IVOGUN MERLE ALCOCK 
Monday Eve., Jan. 26 Early May 


Europe’s Greatest Coloratura Soprano Leading Contralto Metropolitan Opera Co. 


“The Incomparable” 





*Patrons may have their choice of one of these two great artists, or, by paying 
$1.00, $1.50, or $2.00 extra, may enjoy the additional concert on the season ticket. 
Single tickets for these artists are $1.00 to $3.00. The Heifetz and Hayes concerts 
are both at the Casino Theatre; all others will be held at Scottish Rite Hall. (Save 
33'44% on Season Tickets.) 


Season Tickets Now on Sale—Sherman, Clay & Co. 


24 





7 


the political and domestic troubles of the muchly-married King of 
England. As was customary in French operas at that time, the ballet 
was an essential part of every performance, the suite provided by 
Saint-Saens consisting of four movements, the titles of which explain 
themselves. 


Overture to ‘‘Rienzi’’ - - =: w= - - Wagner 


Wagner, while conductor of a small orchestra at Riga, Russia, in 
the midst of terrible privations, began his opera “‘Rienzi,’’ based on 
Bulwer Lytton’s novel of the same name, with a libretto versified by 
himself. He took the unfinished work with him on his first and ill- 
fated visit to. Paris, where he sought to have it performed at the 
Grand Opera. But the opera was rejected and he took it back to 
Germany. It was not until three years later, in 1842, that it was 
produced at Dresden. Wagner frankly admitted his purpose of “‘out- 
Meyerbeering Meyerbeer,”’ then at the height of his fame as a con- 
cocter of ‘‘grand historic opera.’’ He succeeded in doing so. ‘Rienzi’ 
achieved a success that made the unknown composer famous; had he 
wished, he could have become wealthy and popular with a series of 
such works. But one attempt in the Meyerbeer genre amply sufficed 
him; after “Rienzi” he turned from it forever, to follow the path 
which was to lead through frightful toil, almost universal obloquy and 
bitter penury, at last to immortality. 


Suite, ‘‘Alsatian Scenes’”’ ~ - - - - Massenet 
This suite was written after the war of 1870-72, which deprived 


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France of her provinces of Alsace and Lorraine, a war in which 
Massenet took part. The following is a translation of the composer's 
preface to the score: 


66 


Especially now that Alsace is enclosed by a wall, do 
all of my former impressions of the country return tome, That which 
I recall with happiness is the Alsatian village, the Sunday morning at 
the hour of service; the church bells, the deserted streets, the empty 
houses with some old people sunning themselves before their doors, 
the filled church, and the religious songs heard at intervals by the 
passer-by. 

“And the Tavern, in the principal street, with its little leaded 
windows, garlanded with hops and roses. ‘Oho there, Schmidt, 
some wine!’ And the song of the foresters as they lay aside their guns. 
Oho! the joyous life and the gay companions. 


“Again, further on, "twas always the same village, but with the 
great calm of a Sunday afternoon, at the edge of the country, a long 
avenue of linden trees, in whose shadows a loving pair walks quietly, 
hand in hand, she leaning toward him and murmuring softly, “Wilt 
thou love me always?’ 


“Also Sunday evening, in the public square, what noise, what 
commotion! Everybody out of doors, groups of young beaux in the 


Tue San Francisco Savings ano Loan Society 


(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 


One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


JUNE 30th, 1924 


Assete sees parker EAs Eo SDE eo eee $93,198,226.96 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds.,..... 3,900,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund.......,...........- 446,024.41 
NEISSION BRANCH 2. gales dons VS eeee coe be ae Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH........... Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
TIATOH ES ER ESE. ae RAING Ee o codivieis v.ciowic ane cies Haight and Belvedere Streets 
WEST PORTAL BRANGH.. i. caeude sbrbades West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 


_ Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 


26 











street, and the dances which rhythmize the songs of the country. 
Eight o'clock. The noise of the drums, the sound of bugles, it was 
the retreat. The French retreat! Alsace! Alsace! And when in 
the distance the last roll of the drums was silenced, the women called 
the children from the street, the old folks relighted their pipes, and to 
the sound of the violins the joyous dance recommenced in more lively 
circlings by more crowded couples.’ 


Rhapsody, “Espana’”’ - Bil ca a : c : Chabrier 


Emmanuel Chabrier, the French composer, visited Spain with his 
wife in 1882, and wishing to know the true Spanish dances, he went 
at night to ball-rooms where the company was mixed. Chabrier took 


notes from Seville to Barcelona, passing through Malaga, Cadiz, 
Grenada, Valencia. The Rhapsody ‘Espana’ is only one of two or 
three versions of these souvenirs, which he first played on the piano 
to his friends. Lamoureux heard Chabrier play the piano sketch of 
“Espana” and urged him to orchestrate it. At the rehearsals no one 
thought success possible. The score with its wild originality, its 
novel effects, frightened the players. The first performance was at 
a Lamoureux concert in Paris, on November 4, 1883, and met with 
instantaneous success. 


Writing to a friend from Seville, Chabrier described a ball-room 
scene: ““The gypsies sing their malaguenas or dance the tango, and the 







ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist— I eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 






REDFERN Mason— 


He played admirably. 
There was no_ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


























Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





27 














ANNOUNCEMENT 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, November 14, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, November 16, 2:45 P. M. 





PROGRAMME 


1. Concerto for String Orchestra, A Minor.................. Vivaldi 
Arranged for concert use by S. Franko 
(First time in San Francisco) 
Allegro moderato 
dagio 
Allegro 
Pe SUED ROI Ue te, Bail Acar ee cane es Tn el A Frederick Jacobi 
(First performance anywhere) 
Furioso—Ma non troppo—Presto 
Lento non troppo 
Allegro amabile 


Ee Rondo, “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks’’.............. 











ANNOUNCEMENT 


SECOND POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, November 23, 2:45 P. M. 





PROGRAMME 
rt Overttire? “Phitdre 5. os see ee at gee a Massenet 
7. Daler. suite, *;GCOPpela «... os an aka ee Delibes 
o.. .Prelude-to.< thes Deluge tcc nd re oe Saint-Saens 
(Violin Solo, Louis Persinger) 
2. Symphonic Poem, “The Moldaw”......2.....2.2..0000.ccc0eceec-- Smetana 
BLO WOig  OEGAM ee ghee ea ae eso SE or ed OS Liszt 








—$$$_— 


Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., on Monday 
preceding concert, hours 9 to 5; and at Curran Theatre from 
10 A. M. on day of concert. 


28 





manzanilla is passed from hand to hand and every one is forced to 
drink it. These eyes, these flowers in the admirable heads of hair, 
these shawls knotted about the body, these feet that strike an infinitely 
varied rhythm, these arms that run shivering the length of a body 
always in motion, these undulations of the hand, these brilliant 
smiles, and all this to the cry of “Olle, Olle, anda la Maria! Anda la 
Chiquita! Eso es! Baile la Carmen! Anda! Anda!’ shouted by the 
other women and the spectators. However, the two guitarists, grave 
persons, cigarette in mouth, keep on scratching something or other in 
three time. es vee 








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JJersonnel 


The San Francisea Sumphony Orchestra 


FIRST VIOLINS 


Persinger, Louis 


Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Hofmann, W. F. 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Callinan, W. G. 
Manchester, W. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Purt, B. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


CEOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Geena, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 


Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 


Annarumi, A. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 


Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


Orchestral Manager 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 


Fragale, F. 


3\ 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R.E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 

















Steinway 
For qualities that endure 


7 nes is usually bought but once in 
a lifetime. It will remain in your 
home from now henceforth—a monument 
to your judgment, a witness to your taste. 


As the years go on, associations will 
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gtow tender above it. Songs, old and new, 
will come from it mellow and familiar. 
During these years, your piano should come 
to be the very heart of your Home. 


So choose this piano carefully. Choose 
it as you would choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose it for the 
qualities that will endure. 


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a7 ‘THE CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO PRESENTS 


SAN FRANCISCO ==+ 
SYM HONY ORCHESTRA 


Alfred Hertz ««Conductor 


IN A 


POPULAR CONCERT 


EXPOSITION. AUDITORIUM 


MONDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1924 
8:20 P.M. 


WITH 


Bais GRAINGER, Pianist 


GUEST ARTIST 
(By Arrangement with Selby C. Oppenheime r) 


— 














The Piano is the Stcinway 
Percy Grainger makes rolls for the Duo-Art 
Colunvbia Records 


—__——— 


AUSPICES 
Nawon JAMES RoOLPH, JR.. AND BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS 
DiIrRECTION—AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
J. EmMmMer HaypDEN, CHAIRMAN 
ANGELO J. Rossi EpwIn G. BATH 





bo 





PROGRAM 


NATIONAL ANTHEM 


Symphonie Suite, ‘‘Scheherazade’ wu... Rimsky-Korsakow 


I. The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship 
II. The Narrative of the Kalendar Prince 
III. The Young Prince and the Young Princess 


IV. Festival at Bagdad—The Sea—The Ship Goes 
to Pieces on a Rock Surmounted by the 
Bronze Statue of a Warrior—Conclusion. 


This opulent, richly melodic and flamingly colored oriental suite is a daring 
and brilliant attempt to translate into music some of the tales told the Sultan 
Shahriar by the Sultana Scheherazade, in the “‘Arabian Nights.’’ It will be 
remembered that these thousand-and-one tales, each taking one night to relate, 
were made so interesting by the Sultana that Shahriar spared her life, despite 
his oath to put to death each one of his wives after the first night. The 
stories chosen by the composer are the ones indicated above, a single theme, 
that of Scheherazade, which is mostly assigned to the solo violin and represents 
the Sultana in the narrative, links the four movements together. 


The first movement opens with a theme and accompanying figure suggest- 
ive of the sea. Then follows the Scheherazade theme, introducing the story- 
teller. The elaboration of these themes, and an additional one which might be 
termed, ‘“‘The Ship,’’ constitutes the contents of this movement. In the second 
movement, after the Scheherazade motive, the bassoon over a drone bass begins 
the Kalendar Prince’s narrative, the same subject closing the movement. The 
third movement begins with a charming romanza, while the second theme, 
brought forth by the clarinet, is one of the most ingratiating in the whole 
work. A new episode presents the most bizarre effects, and is given an oriental 
coloring by the fantastic use of the triangle, tambourine, cymbals and drum. 
The final movement opens with a suggestion of the original sea motive, fol- 
lowed by the Scheherazade motive, played by the solo violin, which then leads 
into the revels of the festival, beginning with a dance figure played by two 
flutes. This figure, together with themes from the earlier parts of the work, 
develops into a wild dance, which waxes more and more furious until at last 
the trombones thunder forth the sea motive in ominous tones. But that does 
not stop the merry-making and dancing which continues until the vessel, storm 
driven, crashes on the magnetic rocks. When all is serene once more, the 
motive of the Scheherazade again appears. The Sultana is ready to go on with 
another story, but the Sultan has relented his vow and all is peaceful. 


EN ERM LS Son 


Introduction to Act III, Dance of the “Apprentices 
and Procession of the Guilds from 
‘“The Mastersingers’’ 


The prelude begins and closes with the expressive theme (in the ’cellos) 
intended to be typical of the emotions of Hans Sachs, which, according’ to 
Wagner, expresses the bitter moan of the resigned man, who presents to the 
world a strong and serene countenance. Following this the wind brings for- 
ward a hymn-like motive which first had been introduced in the third scene of 
the second act. The music of the remaining selections belongs to the fifth 
scene of the act. This takes place in a meadow through which winds the river 
Pegnitz. The town of Nurnberg is visible in the distance, and there is much 
bustle on the field for a singing contest is to be held, with the hand of the 
fair Eva, daughter of Veit Pogner, the goldsmith, as the prize. Here follows 
the Dance of the Apprentices, at the conclusion of which the approach of the 
Mastersingers is signaled, and all the people range themselves on the river 
bank to let the stately procession pass between the ranks. 





Sp SS ai et ee a na Se Wagner 





PROGRAM 


(Continued) 
2 Concerto for Piawo, Wr A WMO ene enneeeeeceecencceenceenneeeeeteccetenstee Grieg 
Allegro 
Adagio— 


Allegro marcato 
PERCY GRAINGER 


If Norway had produced no other composer, Grieg’s music alone would have 
made her musically famous. Grieg’s music owes much of its success to the 
skill with which he has adapted the classical structure to themes so nearly 


allied to actual traditional tures as to be hardly distinguishable from genuine 
folk-music. 


Grieg married in June, 1867, but his finances did not permit of a real 
honeymoon trip. However, a remunerative winter in Christiania enabled him 
to enjoy this pleasure a year later in the modified form of a vacation at 
Sollerod, Denmark, and it was there that he composed his A minor piano con- 
certo, his only one. The work embraces the customary three movements, of 
which the first is a brilliant sonata form, the second an expressive Adagio, and 
the last, which follows the one preceding without pause, an elaborate Rondo. 


COMING! 
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 8:20 P.M. 


Exposition Auditorium 


CHARLES M. COURBOIN 
Famous Belgian-American Organist 


Formerly of Antwerp. Chevalier of the Order of the Crown of Belgium. 
Guest Soloist Famous Wanamaker Organ. 


Admission Free 


SINGERS WANTED! 
SECOND SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL CHORUS 
ALFRED HERTZ, Director General 


For details apply at Community Service, 317 Flood Building. 
Telephone Douglas 4293. 


Next Auditorium Symphony Concert 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 8:20 P.M. 
Soloist: EVA GAUTHIER, Soprano 


Reserved Seats $1, 75c, 50c. On Sale Thursday, November 14th, 
Sherman, Clay & Co. 


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Opening Event 


Elwyn Artist Series 


SCOTTISH RITE HALL 
Monday Evening, November 17 
PIANO es 


yy: 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
PROGRAM 





A. Eight Preludes 
B. Nocturne, Opus 9, Number 2 
C. Chant Polonaise 

IV. 
7 Ne LCE RC oe BRI so Pat case pe SS eee ee lal a M. De Falla 
Boa Miisatrelenmiecc-a toe. ero ce al nce ga ge eee re Debussy 
GP epillotes esi k cot nce cen eee aa a ae ge cata Rosenthal 
D. Rhapsody Hongroise—Number 7 hi a A pe le a Pst emai dy RES Liszt 


Knabe Piano 
Reserved Seat Sale, SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., $2.00, $1.50, $1.00, 50c (Plus Tax) 
























ELWYN ARTIST SERIES--10 Supreme Events 


At Scottish Rite Hall—Season 1924-1925 
Subscription Tickets for Entire Series $7, $10, $15 (Plus 10% Tax) 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL ALBERT SPALDING 

Monday Eve., Nov. 17 Friday Eve., Feb. 20 


‘A Pianistic Giant Accomplishing the America’s Supreme Violinist 


Superlative’ *ROLAND HAYES 


CECILIA H ANSEN Sunday Mat., Feb. 22 
Thuredae Bene aes a Phenomenal Negro Tenor— 
“The Sensation of the Concert Season’’— MABEL GARRISON 
Chicago ‘‘Herald-Examiner”’ 6 Wednesday Eve., Mch. 18 
ne of America’s Most Gifted and 
ISA KREMER Gracious Singers om 
Friday Eve., Dec. 12 London String Quartet 
Russian Singer of Folk Songs Tuesday Eve., Apr. 7 
*JASCHA HEIFETZ ‘Unsurpassed as a Perfect Ensemble” 


REINALD WERRENRATH 
Monday Eve., Apr. 20 


“An American Institution”’ 


MARIA IVOGUN MERLE ALCOCK 
Monday Eve., Jan. 26 Early May 


Europe’s Greatest Coloratura Soprano Leading Contralto Metropolitan Opera Co. 


Sunday Mat., Jan. 18 


“The Incomparable” 





*Patrons may have their choice of one of these two great artists, or, by paying 
$1.00, $1.50, or $2.00 extra, may enjoy the additional concert on the season ticket. 
Single tickets for these artists are $1.00 to $3.00. The Heifetz and Hayes concerts 
are both at the Casino Theatre; all others will be held at Scottish Rite Hall. (Save 
33!/s% on Season Tickets.) 


Season Tickets Now on Sale—Sherman, Clay & Co. 


39 





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| The San Francisca Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 
SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
488th and 489th Concerts 
CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, November 14, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, November 16, 2:45 o’clock 


PROGRAMME 


1. Concerto for String Orchestra, A Minor............------ Vivaldi 
(First time in San Francisco) 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Ze Svan PhO nw Sees oe eee ee ea ence tee Frederick Jacobi 
(First performance anywhere) 
Furioso—Ma non troppo Presto 
Lento non troppo 
Allegro amabile 


Intermission 
3. Rondo, ‘“‘Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks’’............-... 
Pelee, Dane ay uae rake cae 1 ARS EF a epee Richard Strauss 


Next Auditorium Concert, Wednesday Eve., November 26 


Soloist: EVA GAUTHIER, Soprano 
Tickets Now on Sale at Sherman Clay & Co. 





TO SYMPHONY SUBSCRIBERS 


It has been suggested that subscribers who for any 
reason find themselves unable to attend the Symphony 
Concerts send their tickets to the Community Music 
School, 544 Capp Street, and thus make it possible for 
worthy and appreciative students to hear the concerts, 
who would not otherwise be able to do so. _ Tickets 
should be mailed as early as possible each week to Com- 
munity Music School, 544 Capp Street, San Francisco. . 





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Concerto in A Minor, for String Orchestra - - ° Vivaldi 


During Vivaldi's time (1680-1734) the word ‘“‘Concerto” had a 
meaning different from that of today. It signified a series of move- 
ments for instruments much in the nature of a suite, of which, in part, 
it was a direct development. Philip H. Goepp has supplied informa- 


tion on this subject as follows: 


“We find in Vivaldi’s concertos the simplicity of theme, familiar 
to us in Bach’s Brandenburg concertos, as well as the abundant 
sequences and harmonies. The concerto in A minor 1s scored, in the 
modern edition by Sam Franko, for groups of solo and of tutti instru- 
ments. The first movement, Allegro moderato, A minor, 2-4 time, 
has two solo violins against a full body of strings; the second, Adagio, 
D minor, 2-4 time, has a solo violin, viola and ‘cello; in the third, 
Allegro, A minor, 4-4 time, reappear the two solo violins of the 


beginning. 


‘‘As against the Suite, where all the movements are in the same 
key, it is interesting to see the approach towards the symphony in the 
contrast of keys in the Adagio in D minor. But in the separate move- 
ments, with an abundance of counterpoint and even of tonal modula- 
tion, there is in the main a single group of themes, entering in various 









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related keys. In the Finale is a free digression in the manner of the 
fantasy or toccata. 


“Comparatively few of Vivaldi’s compositions have been pub- 
lished and those that are, are mainly for string instruments in various 
combinations. Original manuscripts are found in several private and 
public collections; in Dresden alone there are over eighty manuscript 
concertos. He wrote in all about eighty concertos, thirty-five operas, 
and many sonatas, cantatas and arias.”’ 


Symphony - - - - - - ~ Frederick Jacobi 
Frederick Jacobi was born in San Francisco, May 4, 1891. At 


a very early age he displayed musical tendencies, and at the age of 
eight his musical education was seriously commenced. He later studied 
in New York with Rubin Goldmark and Rafael Joseffy. In 1911 he 
went to Berlin and continued his studies under Paul Juon for two 
years. On returning to this country, Mr. Jacobi became, in 1913, 
assistant conductor at the Metropolitan Opera House under Alfred 
Hertz. 

Among his compositions for orchestra are the “Pied Piper,’ given 
its initial performance here March 24, 1916; ‘“‘A California Suite,”’ 
produced here December 6, 1917; and a Symphonic Prelude, ““The 
Eve of St. Agnes,’’ performed here January 26, 1923. 


The Symphony played today was sketched during the summer of 
1922 in Blue Hill, Maine, and finished the following year in Colorado 
Springs. 

The mood of the first movement was suggested by the Assyrian 
bas-relief, The Lion Hunt, which is described in Elie Faure’s ‘History 
of Art’: “My war chariots crush men and beasts and the bodies of my 
enemies. The monuments which I erect are made of human corpses 
from which I cut the heads and the limbs. I cut off the hands of all 
those whom I| capture alive. 


‘Assyrian art is of a terrible simplicity. Although an almost flat 















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44 








silhouette (one that is barely shadowed by undulation) alone marks 
out the forms, that form is bursting with life, movement, force, savage 
character. One might say that the sculptor ran a knife over the course 
of the nerves which carry the murderous energy to the back, the limbs, 
and the jaws. The bones and muscles stretch the skin to the breaking 
point. Hands clutch paws, close upon necks, and draw the bowstring; 
teeth tear, claws rend; the blood spouts thick and black. 

Here a lion vomits blood because his lungs are run through by a spear. 
There a lioness in fury, her teeth and claws out, drags towards the 
hunter her body paralyzed by the arrows that have pierced the marrow 
of her spine. . . . It is the poem of strength, of murder and of 
hunger. 

The second movement is a sort of nocturne—a Nocturne in 
Nineveh. Bathed in the cool moonlight, stretched across the fertile 
plain, lies the city asleep. A solitary priest, perhaps, stands upon the 
rampart, gazing at the stars. He stops; from the distance comes the 
sound of a flute. 

The last movement is warmer. It is less remote. Weary of the 
nightmare of ancient times, we turn gladly toward the picture of a 
happier day. 


‘‘Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks” is z Richard Strauss 
This work was composed in 1894-95 and first performed at 


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Cologne, November 5, 1895, under the baton of Franz Wullner. With 


the exception of the title, the score contains no clue as to the meaning 
of the music. However, the following interesting analysis has been 


made by William Klatte: 


“A strong sense of German folk feeling pervades the whole 
work. The source from which the tone poet drew his inspiration is 
clearly indicated in the introductory, which to some extent stands for 
the ‘once upon a time’ of the story books. That which follows is not 
to be treated in the pleasant and agreeable manner of narrative poetry, 
but in a more sturdy fashion, is at once apparent by the characteristic 
bassoon figure which breaks in upon the piano of the strings. Of equal 
importance for the development of the piece is the horn theme imme- 
diately following. 


‘He wanders through the land as a thoroughgoing adventurer. 
The rogue, putting on his best manners, slyly passes through the gate, 
and. enters a certain city. It is market day; the women sit at their 
stalls and prattle. Hop! Eulenspiegel springs on his horse, gives a 
smack of the whip, and rides into the midst of the crowd. A confused 
sound of broken pots and pans, and the market women are put to 
flight. In haste the rascal rides away and secures a safe retreat. 

‘This was his first merry prank; a second follows immediately. 


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Eulenspiegel has put on the vestments of a priest and assumes a very 
unctuous mien. Though posing as a preacher of morals, the rogue 
peeps out from the folds of his mantle (the Eulenspiegel motive on the 
clarinet points to the imposture). He fears for the success of his 
scheme. A figure played by the muted violins, horns and trumpets 
makes it plain that he does not feel comfortable in his borrowed 
plumes. But soon he makes up his mind. Away with all scruples. 
He tears them off. 


‘Again the Eulenspiegel motive is brought forward in the previ- 
ous lively tempo, but is now subtly metamorphosed and chivalrously 
colored. Eulenspiegel has become a Don Juan, and he waylays pretty 
women. And one has bewitched him; Eulenspiegel is in love. Hear 
him now, glowing with love the violins, clarinets and flutes sing. But 
in vain. His advances are received with derision, and he goes away 
ina rage. Howcan one treat him so slightingly? Is he not a splendid 
fellow? Vengeance on the whole human race. He gives vent to his 
rage, and strange personages suddenly draw near. A troop of honest, 
worthy Philistines. In an instant all his anger is forgotten. But it is 
still his chief joy to make fun of these lords and protectors of blameless 
decorum, to mock them. Now that Eulenspiegel has had his joke, he 
goes away and leaves the professors and doctors behind in thoughtful 





ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist— Teacher—Lecturer 


REDFERN Mason— 


He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 





Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 





Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 











ANNOUNCEMENT 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, November 28, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, November 30, 2:45 P. M. 








PROGRAMME 
Li WYIOPUGHVGNG,: cick) MAIO i ee Brahms 


Allegro non troppo 

Adagio non troppo 

Allegretto gracioso 

Allegro con spirito 

Ze rieiitale Sure ose ork eek Reo ete oe eS Stes hae Eichheim 
(Conducted by the composer) 

Korean Sketch 

Siamese Sketch 

Entenraku, Chinese Ceremonial Music 
Japanese Nocturne 

Chinese Sketch 


(First time in San Francisco) 
3. Fantasia, “Francesca da Rimini’’.................... Tschaikowsky 














ANNOUNCEMENT 


SECOND POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, November 23, 2:45 P. M. 











PROGRAMME 
¥. Overture: phedreseee ee ee, a a te Massenet 
Pe DANCE Suites: COP DOI ac.. cies esheets ao ae teres Delibes 
3, -Prelade tos i he Deluge: sei ce ee Saint-Saens 






(Violin Solo, Louis Persinger) 






2. Symphonic Poem, “The Moldau”.........................-........-. Smetana 






Fob OMe Sean io eed io es ee ee eae Liszt 








Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., on Monday 
preceding concert, hours 9 to 5; and at Curran Theatre from 
10 A. M. on day of concert. 







48 








meditation. (Fragments of the typical theme of the Philistines are 


here treated canonically. ) 


“Alas! There is a sudden jolt to his wanton humor. The drum 
rolls a hollow roll; the jailer drags the rascally prisoner into the crim-_ 
‘nal court. The Eulenspiegel theme replies calmly to the threatening 
chords. Eulenspiegel lies. Again the threatening tones resound; but 
he does not confess his guilt. On the contrary, he lies for the third 
time. His jig is up. Fear seizes him; the fatal moment draws near; 


he is strung up. The last struggle (flutes), and his soul takes flight. 


‘After sad, tremulous pizzicati of the strings, the Epilogue begins. 
At first it is almost identical with the introductory measures, which are 
repeated in full; then the most essential parts of the second and third 
chief theme passages appear, and finally merge into a soft chord. 


Eulenspiegel has become a legendary character. The people tell their 


, 


tales about him: ‘Once upon a time But that he was a merry 


rogue and a real devil of a fellow seems to be expressed by the final 


eight measures, full orchestra, fortissimo. ” 


Studio Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
) Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTIL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Orley See 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 

























49 





/ 
it 
it} 
| 

| 

: 
it; 
1 





FIRST VIOLINS 
Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and. 
Assistant Conductor 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 
Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 
Meriz, E. 
Mendelevitch, R. 
Laraia, W. F. 
Gluschkin, M. 
Gordohn, R. 
Hofmann, W. F. 
Bem, Eugenia 
Koenig, H. 
See, Orley 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Amsterdam, M. 
Pasmore, Mary 
Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Callinan, W. G. 
Manchester, W. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Purt, B. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


ersomel 


Che San Francisea Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


‘CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 





BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
wait, £ «WwW. 
Clark; O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


50 











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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


i) 


Fe) 
; 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


SEASON 1924-25 


FIRST BERKELEY CONCERT 


HARMON GYMNASIUM 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 19, 1924 
8:15 O'CLOCK 


PROGRAMME 


SIVIMPHONDCONG Re EM Oradea OE ssa Tae oe es Tschatkowsky 
Andante—Allegro con anima 
Andante cantabile con alcuna licenza 
Valse—Allegro moderato 
Finale: Andante maestoso—Allegro—Allegro vivace 
INTERMISSION 
Inrropuction ro Acr III, Dance of the Apprentices and Procession of 


the<Guilds from: —.) he Miasters(ers: 5-035 castes hele cio eh ectsess Wagner 
g 


, 


SUITES v= L-hroughatiie: booking (olass 2k ti dicta nc mci aise a Deems Taylor 


I. (a) Dedication 
(6) The Garden of Live Flowers 


Il. Jabberwocky 
III. Looking Glass Insects 
IV. The White Knight 











SYMPHONY No. 5, E Minot........ 00.00... PA ee Ree ay hae Syrah ener a Tschaikowsky 


In the Fifth Symphony of Tschaikowsky we seem to see whole nations in revolt, 
mourning, rejoicing, conquering. The first movement suggests the surging of a 
great mass of people—perhaps the Russian nation at work and at play, vital and 
free-souled, but submerged and unhappy. The second movement, one of the most 
popular compositions Tschaikowsky ever wrote, is a passionate and sensuous 
andante, although shortly before the movement’s end the theme of the symphony 
appears as a sort of rumble of cannon amid the pathos of a people’s suffering. The 
third movement is a beautiful piece of delicate tracery, perhaps the aristocracy of 
the people, dancing in its ballroom, oblivious of the groaning of the workers out- 
side. Toward the close of the movement the threatening motive is again heard 
as though the guests heard the first mutterings of the mob in the streets below. 
With the opening of the fourth movement the armies of the people seem to be 
approaching for battle. This is one of the most remarkable depictions in all music 
of that peculiar sensation known as mob-emotion. Here it inevitably means the 
triumph of a great popular cause. The armies of liberty have fought and won. 


Inrropuction To Act III, Dance of the Apprentices and Procession of the 


Guilds from“ he; Mastersingers: aia ease Pes ene wetmon ee Wagner 


The prelude begins and closes with the expressive theme (in the ’cellos) intended 
to be typical of the emotions of Hans Sachs, which, according to Wagner, expresses 
the bitter moan of the resigned man, who presents to the world a strong and serene 
countenance. Following this the wind brings forward a hymn-like motive which 
first had been introduced in the third scene of the second act. The music of the 
remaining: selections belongs to the fifth scene of the act. This takes place in a 
meadow through which winds the river Pegnitz. The town of Nurnberg is visible 
in the distance, and there is much bustle on the field for a singing contest is to be 
held, with the hand of the fair Eva, daughter of Veit Pogner, the goldsmith, as 
the prize. Here follows the Dance of the Apprentices, at the conclusion of which 
the approach of the Mastersingers is signaled, and all the people range themselves 
on the river bank to let the stately procession pass between the ranks. 


SUITE, Through the Looking Glass?) 23 sae et eee oe ee Deems Taylor 


Deems Taylor, born in New York, December 22, 1885, was educated at the 
Friends’ School, New York public schools, Ethical Culture School, and at New 
York University, from which he received the degree of Bachelor.of Arts in 1906. 
From 1912 to 1916 he was assistant editor of the “Western Electric News’; in 
1916, assistant Sunday editor of the New York “Tribune”; correspondent in 
France for the same paper during 1916 and 1917; associate editor of “Collier’s 
Weekly,” 1917 to 1919. In 1921, Mr. Taylor was appointed music critic on the 
New York “World,” a position which he is still holding. His principal orchestral 
works are “The Siren Song,” a symphonic poem; a cantata, “The Chambered 








Nautilus”; a cantata, “The Highwayman”; “Through the Looking Glass”: 
; > g y ; ; 
“Portrait of a Lady,” rhapsody for orchestra; also numerous choral pieces, piano 
compositions, songs, etc. 


“Through the Looking Glass” was originally written for flute, oboe, clarinet, 
bassoon, horn, pianoforte and strings, and in that form was produced by the New 
York Chamber Music Society, February 18, 1919. The following season the 
same organization performed the work in San Francisco, while on tour. In 
September, 1921, Mr. Taylor began a revision of his work for full orchestra and, 
the first version having been in three movements, he added the “Garden of Live 
Flowers,” which is now the second division of the opening movement of the suite. 

When the suite was first performed by the New York Symphony Orchestra, 
March 10, 1923, the following description was provided by Mr. Taylor: 

“The Suite needs no extended analysis. It is based on Lewis Carroll’s im- 
mortal nonsense fairy-tale. ‘Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found 
There,’ and the five pictures it presents, will, if all goes well, be readily recognizable 
to lovers of the book. There are four movements, the first being subdivided into 
two connected parts. 


I. (a) DepicaTion 


Carroll precedes the tale with a charming poetical foreword, the first stanza of 
which the music aims to express: 


Child of the pure, unclouded brow 
And dreaming eyes of wonder! 
Though time be fleet, and I and thou 

Are half a life asunder, 
Thy loving smile will surely hail 


The love-gift of a fairy-tale. 


A simple song theme, briefly developed, leads to 


I. (6) THe Garven or Live FLowers 


“O Tiger-Lily,” said Alice, addressing herself to one that was waving grace- 
fully about in the wind, “I wish you could talk.” 


“We can talk,” said the Tiger-Lily, “when there’s anybody worth talking to.” 
“And can the flowers talk?” 


~ As well as you can,” said the Tiger-Lily, “and a great deal louder.” 


Shortly after Alice had entered the looking-glass country, she came to a lovely 
garden in which the flowers were talking—in the words of the Tiger-Lily, “as well 
as you can, and a great deal louder.” The music, therefore, reflects the brisk 
chatter of the swaying, bright-colored denizens of the garden. 








II. JasBerwocky 


Twas brillig, and the slithy toves “Beware the Jabberwock, my son! 
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe. The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! 
All mimsy were the borogoves Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun. 
And the mome raths outgrabe. The frumious Bandersnatch!”’ 
He took his vorpal sword in hand: And as in uffish thought he stood, 
Long time the manxome foe he sought— The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, 
So rested he by the Tumtum tree, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, 
And stood awhile in thought. And burbled as it came. 


One, two! One two! And through and through “And hast thou slain the Jabberwock? 


The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! Come to my arms, my beamish boy! 
He left it dead, and with its head O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!” 
He went galumphing back. He chortled in his joy. 


This is the poem that so puzzled Alice, and which Humpty-Dumpty finally 
explained to her. The theme of that frightful beast, the Jabberwock, is first 
announced by the full orchestra. The clarinet then begins the tale, recounting 
how, on a “brillig” afternoon, the “slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.” 
Muttered imprecations by the bassoon warn us to “beware the Jabberwock, my 
son.” A miniature march signalizes the approach of our hero, taking “his vorpal 
sword in hand.” Trouble starts among the trombones—the Jabberwock is upon 
us! The battle with the monster is recounted in a short and rather repellant 
fugue, the double-basses bringing up the subject and the hero fighting back in the 
interludes. Finally his vorpal blade (really a xylophone) goes “snicker-snack” 
and the monster, impersonated by the solo bassoon, dies a lingering and convulsive 
death. The hero returns to the victorious strains of his own theme—“O frabjous 
day! Callooh! Callay!” The whole orchestra rejoices—the church bells are 
rung—alarums and excursions. Conclusion. Once more the slithy toves perform 
their pleasing evolutions, undisturbed by the uneasy ghost of the late Jabberwock. 


III. Looxinc-Giass Insects 


The score contains extracts from the dialogue of Alice and the gnat “about 
the size of a chicken” about various insects, among them the bread-and-butter-fly. 


“And what does it live on?”’ 

“Weak tea with cream in it.” 

“Supposing it couldn’t find any?”’ 

“Then it would die, of course.” | 

“But that must happen very often,” said Alice thoughtfully. 
“Tt always happens,” said the gnat. 


Here we find the vociferous diptera that made such an impression upon Alice— 
the Bee-elephant, the Gnat, the Rocking-horse-fly, the Snap-dragon-fly, and the 








Bread-and-butter-Ay. There are several themes, but there is no use trying to 
decide which insect any one of them stands for. 


lV. THe Wuire KNIGHT 


The score contains extracts from the conversation of the White Knight, and 
an account of his leave-taking. 

He was a toy Don Quixote, mild, chivalrous, ridicuous, and rather touching. 
He carried a mouse-trap on his saddle-bow, “because, if they do come, I don’t 
choose to have them running about.” He couldn't ride very well, but he was a 
gentle soul, with good intentions. There are two themes; the first, a sort of instru- 
mental prance, being the Knight’s own conception of himself as a slashing, dare- 
devil fellow. The second is bland, mellifluous, a little sentimental—much more 
like the Knight as he really was. The first theme starts off bravely, but falls out 
of the saddle before very long, and has to give way to the second. The two alter- 
nate, in various guises, until the.end, when the Knight rides off, with Alice waving 
her handkerchief—he thought it would encourage him if she did. 











UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


Committee on Music and Drama 


SECOND BERKELEY CONCERT 


THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 18, 1924 


PROGRAMME 
OVERTURE © IphivenidiincAulis,. 2 5.5.15 i cotee we Agia au eiets Rep ehakel hea haere Gluck 
SympHonic Poem, “Vitava” (The Moldau)........../00.00 hi thtshiens Smetana 
COVER TURE.“ UCOMOEEGS. INOw dy GOING) oot sce naeo ces tse his hose aes cages aed atk ON eee Beethoven 


BY MBHON YS EMA MON: (bis, cade bik ats Rute Risa (kts actrees Sees eae Cesar Franck 


Subscription rates for the remaining three concerts: 


Repulat ste {fo 8x i ope cece eo per oe 
Sfucents 3.34. Se Ee 2:25 


The second concert of the California Music League, Modeste Alloo, Conductor, 
will be given on December 2nd in Harmon Gymnasium. Subscription for three 
concerts; reserved seats, $5.25; unreserved, $3.75; student reserved, $1.90; student 
unreserved, $1.50. 





ANNOUNCEMENT 


The Adoration Cycle of the “Chester Mysteries”? will be presented by the 
Mask and Dagger Society under the auspices of the Little Theatre on December 
Sth and 6th, in Wheeler Hall. The only other times that this cycle has been 
modernly produced were the productions by the Greenwich Village Theatre, 
New York, and by Mr. Everett Glass at the Players Club, in San Francisco. 
The three plays to be given are “The Shepherd’s Watch,” “The Adoration of 
the Magi,’ and “Offerings of Shepherd’s.”’ 











SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY 


(ORCHESTRA Dy 
Wiihe Musteal 
Assoctation of | 
oan Francisco 








~1>4] fee 
SECOND POPULAR 


eq] ex 


1924 — 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR | 
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Musical Association of San Francisco 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 








OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKezs, President 


J. B. Levison, Vice-President E. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 









A. W.:-WiIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 






BOARD OF GOVERNORS 












J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
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EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 








MUSIC COMMITTEE 







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Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 






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Che San Francisco Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 
SECOND POPULAR CONCERT 
491st Concert 
CURRAN THEATRE 


Sunday Afternoon, November 23, 2:45 o’clock 


PROGRAMME 

L.: (Owertire:-: Phedre so. 25222 eee ete eee: Massenet 
22 AZO VES TOTCADN. 6 cocker ee Liszt 
$4 7Dalletoulte,  \Oppelial< meee te tie eee Delibes 

Slavonic Theme with Variations 

Festive Dance and Waltz 

Nocturne 

Dance of the Automatons and Waltz 

Czardas 
4 2Prelude toi the-Deluce: ote ae Saint-Saens 

(Violin obbligato, Louis Persinger) 
5 Symphonic: Poem: The Mahdai go ese aes Smetana _ 
» Overture'to “La Gazza Ladra --ieee eee Rossini 


Auditorium Symphony Concert, Next Wednesday 8:20 


Soloist: EVA GAUTHIER, Soprano 
Tickets Now on Sale at Sherman Clay & Co. 


TO SYMPHONY SUBSCRIBERS 


It has been suggested that subscribers who for any 
‘reason find themselves unable to attend the Symphony 
Concerts send their tickets to the Community Music 
School, 544 Capp Street, and thus make it possible for 
worthy and appreciative students to hear the concerts, 
who would not. otherwise be able to do so. Tickets 
should be mailed as early as possible each week to Com- 
munity Music School, 544 Capp Street, San Francisco. 





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Overture, ‘‘Phedre”’ - - - = - Massenet 


This overture, based upon a mythological legend, has been 
described as having for its subject ‘“‘the power of love, and its inexora- 


ble fate when disregarding the commands of duty.” 


Phedre, it will be recalled, was the daughter of Minos, King of 
Crete; after the death of Antiope she became the wife of Theseus. 
Subsequently she had the misfortune to become desperately enamored 
of Theseus’ son, Hippolytus, who failed to reciprocate her advances— 
whereupon she substituted hatred for love and revenged herself by 
making the father jealous of the son. Theseus committed Hippolytus 
to the vengeance of Neptune, who caused a monster to come up out 
of the sea as the youth was driving along the shore and to so terrify 
his horses that they demolished his chariot. Hippolytus was killed 
in the accident, but Aesculapius brought him back to life, and Diana 
frustrated Phedre’s malicious designs by removing him to Italy, where 
he enjoyed the protection of the nymph Egeria. 


‘“‘Love’s Dream” - = . . - = - = Liszt 


Liszt’s familiar and popular “‘Love’s Dream,”’ the third of a group 
of nocturnes, is a musical reflection of the following poem by 


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11 SUPREME EVENTS 


Subscription Tickets for Entire Series 


$7.00, $10.00, $15.00 


All Attractions Included 
EVA GAUTHIER Thursday Eve., Dec. 4 


Mezzo-Soprano “The High Priestess of Modern Song” 


ISA KREMER Friday Eve., Dec. 12 


Russian Singer of Folk Songs 


CECILIA HANSEN Monday Eve., Dec. 22 


“The Sensation of the Concert Season’’— 
Chicago ‘‘Herald-Examiner”’ 


JASCHA HEIFETZ Sunday Mat., Jan. 18 (Casino Theatre) 


‘“‘The Incomparable” 


MARIA IVOGUN Monday Eve., Jan. 26 


Europe’s Greatest Coloratura Soprano 


ALBERT SPALDING Friday Eve., Feb. 20 


America’s Supreme Violinist 


ROLAND HAYES Sunday Mat., Feb. 22 (Casino Theatre) 


Phenomenal Negro Tenor—The Sensation of Recent Years 


MABEL GARRISON Wednesday Eve., March 13 


One of America’s Most Gifted and Gracious Singers 


LONDON STRING QUARTET Tuesday Eve., April 7 


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REINALD WERRENRATH Monday Eve., April 20 


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F. Freiligrath, which is printed on the fly-leaf of the piano score: 

““O love, O love, so long as e’er thou canst, or dost on love believe; 

The time shall come, when thou by graves shalt stand and grieve; 

And see that still thy heart doth glow, doth bear and foster love divine, 
So long as e’er another heart shall beat in warm response to thine. 

And, whoso bares his heart to thee, O, show him love where in thy power, 
And make his every hour a joy, nor wound his heart at any hour, 

And keep a guard upon thy tongue—an unkind word is quickly said: 

Ah me—no ill was meant—and yet 

The other goes and weeps thereat.” 


Ballet Suite, ‘““Coppelia” - ~ - - ~ ~ Delibes 


‘““Coppelia,’’ which with ‘Sylvia’? brought Delibes into popularity 
as a modern composer, is one of the most beautiful ballets in the entire 
modern repertoire. 

The story of the ballet is concerned with a maker of dolls in a 
little French village, one of his dolls being very beautiful and life-size. 
He places this doll in an open window, where it is much admired by 
the youths of the village, who believe it to be real, and a great deal of 
jealousy on the part of the village maidens results. 

The fourth number in the suite played today, the ‘‘Dance of the 
Automatons,” in a very effective picture of the metronomic steps of 
the dancing dolls, ending with the well-known “Valse Lente.”’ 


Prelude to ‘“‘The Deluge” - -. - - - Saint-Saens 


Camille Saint-Saens was born October 9, 1835, and died Decem- 
ber 16, 1921. He began the study of the piano at the age of two 





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and a half years, entered the Conservatoire in 1848 and in 1858 was 





‘appointed organist of La Madeleine, the most fashionable parish in 
France. This position he filled with distinction until 1877, establish- 
ing a world-wide reputation as one of the greatest of organ virtuosi 
and masters of improvisation. Saint-Saens visited the United States 
for the first time in 1906 and his second visit in 1915 was made as 
representative of the French government at the Panama-Pacific Inter- 
national Exposition in San Francisco. For this occasion he wrote a new 
orchestral work, “Hail California,’ the first performance of which he 
conducted in Festival Hall at the Exposition on June 19. 

The prelude to “The Deluge,’’ with the solo violin part, is one of 
Saint-Saens’ most popular works. It is the prelude to his Biblical 
cantata, “The Deluge,’’ which was composed in 1876 and is based 
upon the Biblical narration of the Flood. It is a short, expressive 
movement in the free form for the string orchestra—a slow intro- 
ductory passage, leading to a quasi-fugal treatment of a sustained 
subject given out by the violas, following which the solo violin intro- 
duces a melodious obligato, which holds the foreground to the end. 


Symphonic Poem, ‘‘The Moldau”’ _ - " - - Smetana 

“The Moldau,’’ written more than a month after Smetana had 
become stone deaf, is the second of a cycle of six similar works. It 
was begun November 20, and completed December 8, 1874 (just fifty 


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Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,900 ,000.00 
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years ago). The score of the work is prefixed by the following 
explanatory program: 


“Two springs pour forth their streams in the shade of the 
Bohemian forest, the one warm and gushing, the other cold and 
tranquil. Their waves, joyfully flowing over their rocky beds, unite 
and sparkle in the morning sun. The forest brook, rushing on, be- 
comes the River Moldau, which with its waters speeding’ through 
Bohemia’s valleys, grows into a mighty stream. It flows through dense 
woods in which are heard the joyous sounds of the hunt, and the notes 
of the hunter’s horn are heard ever nearer and nearer. It flows through 
emerald meadows and lowlands, where there is being celebrated with 
song and dancing a wedding feast. At night in its shining waves the 


wood and water nymphs hold their revels, and in these waves are 
reflected many a fortress and castle—witnesses of bygone splendor of 
chivalry and the vanished martial fame of days that are no more. At 
the Rapids of St. John the stream speeds on, winding its way through 
cataracts and hewing the path for its foaming waters through the rocky 
chasm into the broad river-bed, in which it flows on in majestic calm 
toward Prague, welcomed by time-honored Vysehrad, to disappear in 
the far distance from the poet's gaze.’ 


Overture to “La Gazza Ladra”’ - - ~ - - Rossini 
“Ta Gazza Ladra’’ (The Thieving Magpie) is one of Rossini's 




















ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


Mm. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—TI eacher—Lecturer 


REDFERN MAson— 


He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 





Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 












Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


67 








ANNOUNCEMENT 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, November 28, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, November 30, 2:45 P. M. 





PROGRAMME 

2 he OVINONONYKING. 2, 1 Nlalbis ee a ee Brahms 
Allegro non troppo 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegretto gracioso 
Allegro con spirito 

ZieOriental Suite: «2%. 75 Sie ae Re eRe eee a) Eichheim 
(Conducted by the composer) 

Korean Sketch 
Siamese Sketch 
Entenraku, Chinese Ceremonial Music 
Japanese Nocturne 


Chinese Sketch 


(First time in San Francisco) 
3. Fantasia, “Francesca da Rimini’’......:............. Tschaikowsky 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


THIRD POPULAR CONCERT 


Curran Theatre 
Sunday, December 7, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: WALTER FERNER, ’Cellist 








| PROGRAMME 
|. Overture, “Iphigenie in Aulis? .27.10220220.00..) ee. Gluck 
Z.. Symphony im 6 mmmor, - Wnfiinishéas..---... 7, Schubert 
Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 
3, Overture: oLeenote;: Nowe st hfe ee Beethoven 
4. UOLANIGTeL. TOL: VIOIONCENO.. ...- ck ee Bruch 
Walter Ferner 
5. “The Irish’ Washerwontan)...¢o..-..0.0:0.0000i oc Sowerby 
(First time in San Francisco) 
6. (a) Spring Song | Mendelssohn 


(b) Spinning Song | 
7. Overture,-7 Phe’ Gypsy Baron se inok eee Johann Strauss 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., on Monday 


preceding concert, hours 9 to 5; and at Curran Theatre from 
10 A. M. on day of concert. 








68 








forty operas and was first produced at Milan, italy, in 1817. It had 
but fair success and was soon forgotten, but the overture became a 
popular concert number and has remained so to this day. The story 
revolves around Fernando, a fugitive soldier; his daughter Ninetta; 
Gianetto, her sweetheart; I] Podesta, the village magistrate, and last, 
but not least, a magpie whose thieving habits create the most compli- 


cated situations, one of which almost leads to Ninetta’s being executed. 
While the overture fails to compare with Rossini’s masterpiece in the 
same form, his overture to “William Tell,” it still is one of the best 
works of the period when his writings were in the purely Italian style. 








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Ryaio tours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
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48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 














69 





FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, R. 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. | 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 





Jersonnel 


Che San ¥ rancisen Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 
Lahann, J. 


Principal 
Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimandao, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 


Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 








BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F.N. 


’ TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


70 











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NZ THE CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO PRESENTS 


SAN FRANCISCO === 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


IN A 


POPULAR CONCERT 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 


WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1924 


8:20 P.M. 






WITH 


EVA GAUTHIER, Mezzo-Soprano 


GUEST ARTIST 












The Piano is the Steinway 
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AUSPICES 


Mayor JAMES ROLPH, JR., AND BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS 








DIRECTION—AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAaypEN, CHAIRMAN 
ANGELO J. Rossi Epwin G. Batu 












COMING! 
MONDAY, DECEMBER 1, 8:20 P.M. 


Exposition Auditorium 
CHARLES M. COURBOIN 


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Admission Free 







ees SINGERS WANTED ! ee ee 
SECOND SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL CHORUS 
ALFRED HERTZ, Director General 


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For details apply at Community Service, 317 Flood Building. 
Telephone Douglas 4293. 


Next Auditorium Symphony Concert 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 8:20 P.M. 


Soloist: CECELIA HANSEN, Violinist 
“Peer of the Auer Clan.” 


Reserved Seats $1, 75c, 50c. On Sale Monday, December Ist, 
Sherman, Clay & Co. 


EVA GAUTHIER IN RECITAL 
Scottish Rite Hall 
THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 4 
Tickets 50c to $2.20, at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


San RaFAEL REcITAL—TUESDAY Eve., DECEMBER 9th 






Next Friday SYMPHONY Next Sunday 
3 P.M. ORCHESTRA 2:45 P.M. 


CURRAN THEATRE 


SV PEDO TA IN Os esa cas occ res ceca ones veusdvsiescesenawe Brahms 
Oriental Impressions............2.-...2222..000-+- Henry Eichheim 
(Conducted by the composer) 

(First time in San Francisco) 

PraxCos CAG BR arcsec Tschaikowsky 
(First time in San Francisco) 


Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 








Program 


NATIONAL ANTHEM 
UpA WALDROP at the Organ 


2 SYMPHONY NO 0-H minors a Se Tschakowsky 
Andante—Allegro con anima 
Andante cantabile con aleuna licenza 
Valse—Allegro moderato 


Finale: Andante maestro—Allegro—Allegro vivace 


In the Fifth Symphony of Tschaikowsky we seem to see whole nations 
in revolt, mourning, rejoiciig, conquering. The first movement suggests 
the surging of a great mass of people—perhaps the Russian nation at work 
and at play, vital and free-souled, but submerged and unhappy. The second 
movement, one of the most poptlar compositions Tschaikowsky ever 
wrote, is a passionate and sensuous andante, although shortly before the 
movements end the theme of the symphony appears as a sort of rumble 
of cannon amid the pathos of a people’s suffering. The third movement 
is a beautiful piece of delicate tracery, perhaps the aristocracy of the 
people, dancing in its ballroom, oblivious of the groaning of the workers 
outside. Toward the close of the movement the threatening motive is 
again heard as though the guests heard the first mutterings of the mob in 
the streets below. With the opening of the fourth movement the armies 
of the people seem to be approaching for battle. This is one of the most 
remarkable depictions in all music of that peculiar sensation known as 
mob-emotion. Here it inevitably means the triumph of a great popular 
cause. The armies of liberty have fought and won. 


INTERMISSION 








2. (a)— Two “HEBriw: MELODINS.2 5 ee _...deavel 
Mme. GAUTHIER 


Kaddisch 
L’Enigme Eternelle 


These settings of Hebrew melodies were composed in May, 1914, and 
published in the following year, with Hebrew and French text. The first, 
Kaddisch, is a prayer of consolation and atonement—a prayer for the dead. 


(b) CutnesE MotHEerR GoosE— RHYMES................... Bainbridge Crist 
Mme. GAUTHIER 


The “Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes” were published in 1917. The 
text consists of translations from the Chinese by Isaac Taylor Headland 
of Peking University. The music is based upon Chinese themes. 





LADY BUG 


Fly to the mountain, and feed upon dew, 
Feed upon dew, and sleep on a rug, 


| Lady-bug, lady-bug, fly away, do, 
| And then run away, like a good little bug. 


| BABY IS SLEEPING 


My baby is sleeping, my babe’s asleep, 

My fiow’r is resting, I’ll give you a peep. 
How cunning he looks, as he rests upon my arm. 
My flow’r’s most charming of all that charm. 





WHAT THE OLD COW SAID 


i 

| A sad old cow to herself once said, 
| While the north wind whistled through her shed, 
| 
| 
| 


“To head a drum they will take my skin, 
And they’ll file my bones for a big hairpin. 
The scraps of bone they will make into dice, 
And sell them, off at a very low price. 

My sinews they’ll make into a whip, I wot, 
And my flesh they’ll put in a big soup pot.” 











OF WHAT USE IS A GIRL? 


We keep a dog to watch the house, 

And a pig is useful, too; 

We keep a cat to catch a mouse, 

But what can we do with a little girl like you? 


THE MOUSE 


He climbed up the candlestick, 
The little mouse brown 

To steal and eat tallow, 

And he couldn’t get down. 

He call’d for his grandma, 
But his grandma was in town, 
So he doubled up into a wheel 
And roll’d himself down. 


3. Sure, ‘‘ THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS 7.0.0. Deems Taylor 


1 (a) Dedication 
(b) The Garden of Live Flowers 


II. Jabberwocky 
IIT. Looking Glass Insects 


IV. The White Knight 


This suite, by Deems Taylor, the eminent New York critic, needs no 
extended analysis. It is based on Lewis Carroll’s immortal nonsense 
fairy-tale, “Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There,” 
and the five pictures it presents will be readily recognizable to lovers of 
the book. There are four movements, the first bing subdivided into two 
connected parts. The first is a dedication to the “child of the pure, un- 
clouded brow and dreaming eyes of wonder,” which goes without pause 
into “The Garden of Live Flowers,” a movement which reflects the brisk 
chatter of the swaying, bright-colored denizens of the garden. Then 
comes the story of the battle with the Jabberwock. The theme of the 











frightful beast is first announced by the full orchestra. The clarinet then 
begins the tale, recounting how, on a “brillig’” afternoon, the “slithy toves 
did gyre and gimble in the wabe.’” Muttered imprecations by the bas- 
soon warn us to “beware the Jabberwock, my son.” A miniature march 
signalizes the approach of our hero, taking “his vorpal sword in hand.” 
Trouble starts among the trombones—the Jabberwock is upon us! The 
battle with the monster is recounted in a short and rather repellant 
fugue, the double-basses bringing up the subject and the hero fighting 
back in the interludes. Finally his vorpal blade (really a xylophone) 
goes “snicker-snack” and the monster, impersonated by the solo bassoon, 
dies a lingering and convulsive death. The hero returns to the victorious 
strains of his own theme. The whole orchestra rejoices—the church 
bells are rung—alarums and excursions. Conclusion. Once more the. 
slithy toves perform their pleasing evolutions, undisturbed by the uneasy 
ghost of the late Jabberwock. In the third movement, “Looking Glass 
Insects,” we find the Bee-elephant, the Gnat, the Rocking-horse-fly, the 
Snap-dragon-fly, and the Bread-and-butter-fly. There are several themes, 
but there is no use trying to decide which insect any one of them stands 
for. In the “White Knight” we have a toy Don Quixote, mild, chival- 
rous, ridiculous, and rather touching, but who couldn’t ride very well. 
There are two themes; the first a sort of instrumental prance, being the 
Knight’s own conception of himself as a slashing, dare-devil fellow. The 
second is bland, mellifluous, a little sentimental—much more like the 
Knight as he really was. The first theme starts off bravely, but falls out 
of the saddle before very long, and has to give way to the second. The 
two alternate, in various guises, until the end, when the Knight rides off, 
with Alice waving her handkerchief—he thought it would encourage him 
if she did. 


4, Arta, ‘‘UNA VOCE POCO FA’’ 
fron The Barer 01 Seve. Se ee Rossina 


Mme. GAUTHIER 


“The Barber of Seville” was first presented at the Argentina Theatre 
in Rome, February 5, 1816, and was first produced in the United States 
at the Park Theatre, New York, November 29, 1825, the role of Rosina 
being sung by Maria Felicita Garcia, afterwards famous as Malibran. The 
aria, “Una voce poco fa” which is sung by Mme. Gauthier in the original 
key of E with cadenzas written for Mme. Marietta Alboni, comes in the 
second scene of the first act of the opera and is in the form generally 
adhered to by Italian composers of that period—a slow opening section 
succeeded by a quicker movement culminating in a brilliant coda. 





























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Waiting for you 


Here is Victrola No. 400, a mahogany 
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Your Victrola is waiting for you here. 
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SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY Ez 
ORCHESTRA 


a Marntamea by 
ONE 


‘i The Mustcal zs 
: Assoctation of 
i oan Francrsco 


THIRD PAIR 


ved] fied 


. 1924 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CON DU CTOR 


[eRe 




































Alfred Hertz 


‘RECOMMENDS 
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Symphony 


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Jlersontel 


Che San Hrancisen Sumphony Orchestra 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, R. 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

. Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


‘CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H, 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


83 











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Those to whom music is a gift or 
an artora great privilege hold one 
piano at the pinnacle—the Mason 
& Hamlin. For they know it to be 
wrought byskilled artisans—men 
who build with infinite pains that 
the final product will be. worthy 
the hands of an artist. So does it 
deserve a place in your home. 


WileyBAllenG. 


135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 





84 











Che San Francisco Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—-Season— 1925 
THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
493d and 494th Concerts 
CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, November 28, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, November 30, 2:45 o’clock 


PROGRAMME 


lI Symphony,.No-2, > Wiajors: a a eee Brahms 
Allegro non troppo 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegretto gracioso 
Allegro con spirito 
Intermission 
2, Oriental impressions .-2 4 -<2 sae srat ose (ia see Eichheim 
(Conducted by the composer) 
Korean Sketch 
Siamese Sketch 
Entenraku, Chinese Ceremonial Music 
Japanese Nocturne 
Chinese Sketch 
(First time in San Francisco) 
3. Fantasia, “Francesca da Rimini’’...................- Tschaikowsky 


(First time at these concerts) 
(The Piano is a Steinway) 





Next Auditorium Concert, Friday Eve., December 19 


Soloist: CECILIA HANSEN, Violinist 
Tickets Now on Sale at Sherman Clay & Co. 





TO SYMPHONY SUBSCRIBERS 


It has been suggested that subscribers who for any 
reason find themselves unable to attend the Symphony 
Concerts send their tickets to the Community Music 
School, 544 Capp Street, and thus make it possible for 
worthy and appreciative students to hear the concerts, 
who would not otherwise be able to do so. Tickets 
should be mailed as early as possible each week to Com- 
munity Music School, 544 Capp Street, San Francisco. 





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86 








Symphony No. 2in D Major_ - - - - - Brahms 


Brahms spent more than ten years upon the writing of his First 
Symphony, which was produced in 1876, and then brought forth his 
Second Symphony only about a year later. The work was completed 


at Lichtenthal during the summer of 1877 and had its first public 
performance in orchestral form at a Philharmonic concert in Vienna, 


December 30, 1877, under the direction of Hans Richter. 


This symphony has been described by Hanslick “‘as peaceful, 
tender, but not effeminate serenity, which on the one side is quickened 
to joyous humor and on the other is deepened to meditative serenity. 
The first movement begins immediately with a mellow and dusky 
horn theme. It has something of the character of a serenade, and this 
impression is strengthened still further in the Scherzo and the Finale. 
The first movement immerses us in a clear wave of melody, upon 
which we rest, swayed, refreshed, undisturbed by two slight Mendels- 
sohnian reminiscences which emerge before us. A broad singing 
Adagio follows. The Scherzo is thoroughly delightful in its graceful 
movement in minuet tempo. It is twice interrupted by a Presto, 
which flashes, spark-like, for a moment. The Finale, more vivacious, 
but always agreeable in its golden serenity, is widely removed from 
the stormy finales of the modern school. Mozartian blood flows in its 
veins. This symphony is a contrast rather than a companion to the 
first symphony of Brahms, and thus it appears to the public.” 


The main theme of the first movement is introduced at the very 


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ONE RECITAL ONLY 


SCOTTISH RITE HALL, Thur. Eve., Dec. 4 


Tickets 50c to $2.00, at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


Two Recitals by 


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SCOTTISH RITE HALL ALCAZAR THEATRE 
Friday Eve., Dec. 12 Sunday Aft., Dec. 14 


Season tickets for the ELWYN ARTIST SERIES, including, Eva 
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Albert Spalding, Roland Hayes, Mabel Garrison, The London String 
Quartet, Reinald Werrenrath, and Merle Alcock, may still be purchased 
at Sherman, Clay & Company. 

Season tickets for the eleven attractions, $15.00, $10.00 and $7.00 
(Plus 10% Tax). 











HAs IT EVER OCCURED To You 





WHEN YOU SIT HERE THE FEW CAN NOT AND 
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THAT THE BURDEN ALONE 


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THIS IS NOT SUBSCRIBE IN PROPORTION . 
A COMPLAINT TO YOUR ENJOYMENT 
IT IS AN APPEAL BUT SIGN CARD NOW . 
a ae gt oe ee a eS gee en ee eee j 
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The undersigned, for the purpose of supporting the objects of the MUSICAL 
ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO, and maintaining 


“The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra” 
agrees to pay for a period of THREE (3) consecutive years on each first day of September, | 


commencing September 1, 192... the sum of 


RFE, AGERE ak 2S AA ROR TOD Stee ENE aaNet MRE PBE Dee Shee id ing ARON Be, eae ae Re Hundred Dollars 


to said Association. | 
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In the event of my death this guarantee shall lapse and same shall not be a 
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(eignanires 3. ak oS Re eee / 
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Return to Musical Association of San Francisco, 457 Phelan Building, San Francisco, 


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California. 


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organized charities. 














-- 





en 


Se OR ne eo ee IN IT eo 


Soloist with 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY | 
| ORCHESTRA 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


riday, December 12, 3:00 P. M. 
unday, December 14, 2:45 P. M. 


CURRAN THEATRE 


“Muri Silba, the wonderful little pianist, who created such pleased surprise 
and admiration at her first New York appearance, renewed her right to be con- 
sidered as one of the really great artists of the piano.""—-New York **Telegraph.” 


“The young artist made an immediate impression. Miss Silba displayed 
qualities which entitle her to a place in the first rank among the younger genera- 
tion of pianists.’'—-Chicago “Journal.” 

















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outset by the horns; the second subject is a lyric theme for the ‘cellos. 
The second movement opens with the main theme announced by the 
‘cellos. The second subject is presented by the flutes and oboes, and 
is followed by a new theme in the strings. The third movement is in 
the form of an intermezzo with two episodes or trios. Its principal 
theme is stated by the oboe, clarinets and bassoons, with a pizzicato 
figure in the ‘cellos. The fourth movement is in sonata form. The 
principal subject appears in the strings, and after a long transitional 
passage the second subject is announced, also by the strings. The 
movement ends with a long and elaborate coda. 


Oriental Impressions - - - “ - Henry Eichheim 


Henry Eichheim was born in Chicago, January 3, 1870, and 
studied violin with Carl Becker, S. E. Jacobsohn and Leopold Lichten- 
bere. He was a member of Theodore Thomas’ Orchestra in New 
York for one year and was one of the first violins of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra from 1890 to 1912, when he left to devote 
himself to composition, concert work and teaching. 


In 1915 and 1919 he journeyed to the Far East, visiting Korea, 
Japan and China; and in 1922, India, Java and Burma. He studied 
with enthusiasm various types of Oriental music in these countries, 
returning with invaluable notes and a large collection of Oriental 
instruments. 

In 1921, upon invitation of Mrs. Frederick 5. Coolidge, Mr. 
Eichheim composed five Oriental Sketches, scored for a’small group 
of instruments, corresponding in size with that of a Chinese orchestra, 










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and the group was performed at Pittsfield, October 1, 1921, under 
the composer's direction. After rescoring the ‘‘Impressions” for full 
orchestra, Mr. Eichheim conducted the first performance of the work 
in its new form by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, March 24, 1922. 
It was later performed by the Chicago Symphony, Philadelphia Sym- 
phony, Cleveland Orchestra, and in London by the London Symphony. 
It has also been performed under the composer's baton by the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. 


Mr. Eichheim’s compositions include a symphonic poem after 
Lafcadio Hearn’s ““The Soul of the Great Bell’’; a Sextet and Quartet 
for strings; a Violin Sonata, ‘Cello Sonata, Violin pieces, Piano pieces 
and many songs. 

Upon the occasion of the first performance of the ‘Oriental 
Impressions’ by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the following 
analysis was supplied by Mr. Philip Hale: 

I. Korean Sketch. ‘This sketch is based on themes heard and 
noted by Mr. Eichheim at Seoul, the capital of Korea, which he visited 
in 1915. At first is the street laborers’ song, sung during working 
hours. There are usually five men. One, the leader, sings a refrain, 
to which the other four answer. They work when it occurs to them 
to do so. The song, as a rule, is of a humorous nature. This song is 
here given to the English horn. There is a contrasting motive played 


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by a street musician (flute). Other motives are from the theater. 
The closing theme is the love song (oboe) of a Geisha girl, sung to 
Mr. Eichheim in Seoul. He photographed her, and her portrait was 
published in “‘Asia’’ (February, 1922). The Korean Sketch is orches- 
trated for two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, four horns, a Chinese 
drum (double headed and without snares), antique cymbals, a large 
tam-tam, two harps, pianoforte, twenty violins, eight violas, eight 
violoncellos, eight double basses. ’’ 


Il. Siamese Sketch. ‘‘The Sketch begins with the irregular 
sounding of the four bells that, waved by the wind, hang on the 
Emerald Buddhist Temple, the place where the King of Siam worships 


in Bangkok. The next motive is a chant of a Buddhist temple priest 
(English horn). The racket in a theater follows. A street musician 
plays on a beautiful toned Siamese instrument called the ekeh, which 
is a reed instrument of bamboo. The cry of a female peddler, a street 
singer, is for viola and English horn. The four temple bells bring the 
close. The score calls for flute, oboe, English horn, harp, pianoforte, 
marimba, xylophone, a cymbal struck with a hard metal stick, antique 
cymbals, a large brass bell, four bells (C, F, G, B), a large tam-tam, 
twenty violins, and eight violas.”’ 


lll. Entenraku. ‘‘This is authentic ceremonial music of the 
eighth century, and is used only at the Japanese imperial court.” 


IV. Japanese Nocturne. ‘‘It is based on motives heard at night 









ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—T eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


REDFERN MAson— 


















He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 








Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


9] 











ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, December 12, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, December 14, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: MURI SILBA, Pianist 


PROGRAMME 
1. Symphony No. 6, “‘Pastoral’’ Beethoven 
Allegro ma non troppo (Awakening of Joyful 
Feelings on Arrival in the Country) 
Andante molto moto (By the Brook) 
Allegro (Village Festival) — 
Allegro (The Storm)— 
Allegretto (Shepherd’s Song. Thanksgiving 
after the Storm) 
2. Ballade of the Gnomides Respighi 
(First time in San Francisco) 
3. Concerto for Piano, No. 1, E Minor Chopin 
Allegro maestoso 
Romanze 


Rondo 
MURI SILBA 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


THIRD POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, December 7, 2:45 P. M. 
Soloist: WALTER FERNER, ’Cellist 


PROGRAMME 


. Overture, “Iphigenie in Aulis’’ 
. Symphony in B minor, “Unfinished’’ 

Allegro moderato 

Andante con moto 
. Overture, ““Leonore,’’ No. 3 
. Kol Nidrei, for Violoncello 

alter Ferner 

. ‘The Irish Washerwoman’’ Sowerby 


(First time in San Francisco) 


. (a) Spring Song 
(Sb Spuninon Sonprycuy sweat ean ee ata eh eee ee ied een 
. 7. Overture, ““The Gypsy Baron’’ Johann Strauss 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., on Monday 


preceding concert, hours 9 to 5; and at Curran Theatre from 
10 A. M. on day of concert. 





in Ikao, Matsushima, Yokohama, and Tokio, played by blind mas- 
seurs, with the shrill piping of food venders, the playing of a koto and 
the chanting of a prayer by an old man beating a small wooden bell. 
Piccolo, two oboes, English horn, bass clarinet, four horns, two harps, 
ancient cymbals, fish-head (a wooden drum to accompany prayers), 
twenty violins, six violas, six violoncellos, six double basses (two 
tuned down to E flat).”’ 


V. Chinese Sketch. ‘‘This sketch contains music heard in Buddhist 
temples, theaters, tea houses, at weddings and funeral processions, also 


street cries and other sounds of city and country life heard in Peking, 
Hang-Chow, Buddhistic temples in the western hills, Shanghai, Hong- 
kong, Canton, and various villages. Piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, 
English horn, two bassoons, four horns, two harps, pianoforte, fluctu- 
ating tam-tam, large tam-tam, a Chinese wooden block, xylophone, 
two small temple bells, small cymbals, antique cymbals, twenty violins, 
eight violas, eight violoncellos, eight double basses.” 


Fantasia, ‘‘Francesca da Rimini’ - - - Tschaikowsky 


The score of Tschaikowsky’s work contains the following quota- 
tion from the fifth canto of the “Inferno”: 


‘Dante, coming into the second circle of Hell, witnesses the 
punishment of carnal sinners, who are tossed about ceaselessly in the 
dark air by the most furious winds. Amongst these he meets with 


Studio stlours: a ee Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ._ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

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ADDRESS 

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93 








Francesca of Rimini, who relates her story: 


‘" “No greater grief than to remember days 
Of joy, when misery is at hand. That kens 
Thy learn’d instructor. Yet so eagerly 
If thou art bent to know the primal root, 
From whence our love gat being. I will do 
As one who weeps and tells his tale. One day 
For our delight we read of Lancelot, 
How him love thrall’d. Alone we were, and no 
Suspicion near us. Oft-times by that reading 
Our eyes were drawn together, and the hue 
Fled from our alter’'d cheek. But at one point 
Alone we fell. When of that smile we read 
The wished-for smile so rapturously kissed 
By one so deep in love, then he who ne’er 
From me shall separate at once my lips 
All trembling kiss’'d. The book and writer both 
Were love's purveyors. In its leaves that day 
We read no more. Thus while one spirit spake 
The other wailed so sorely, that heart-struck 
I, through compassion fainting, seem’d not far 
From death, and like a corse fell to the ground.’ ”’ 

(Translation by Henry Francis Cary. ) 


Felix Borowski has analyzed the piece as follows: 

“The piece begins with a tonal description of the awesome scene 
which meets the eyes of Dante and of Virgil as they entered the second 
circle, or the real entrance of Hell, at the portal of which sits Minos, 
the infernal judge, and crowding before him the souls of sinning spirits 
awaiting the word which shall dispose of their fate. The whole first 
part of the work is devoted to the delineation of the fierce winds by 
which the souls are driven about incessantly, the poignant wailing of 
the damned, the unutterable terror of the place. After the hubbub 
has died down, a new section is introduced in which the clarinet sings 
a plaintive subject over a pizzicato accompaniment in the strings. This 
may be taken to represent the narrative of Francesca. After this has 
been worked over at considerable length, the material of the first part 
is given further presentation.”’ 








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Symphony in B Minor, “Unfinished” - - - Schubert 
Allegro moderato 


Andante con moto 


Only the first two movements of Schubert's Eighth Symphony, 
universally known as the “Unfinished,” are complete. There are 
nine bars of a Scherzo, and with them the symphony stops; and 
yet among all the composer's works not one is more beautiful in 
ideas or perfect in form than this. No more of it has ever been 
found, and no one knows why Schubert should have left it incom- 
plete. As would be expected from Schubert's sentimental tem- 
perament, his music is essentially lyric and found its most natural 
expression in the songs for single voice, of which he wrote over 
eight hundred in all. His symphonies have been characterized as 
‘‘expanded song, delightful, as songs are delightful, for their 
directness of feeling, their beauty of detail, their warmth of color, 
and their sensuous charm.’ Although the Unfinished Symphony 
was written in 1822, it was not produced until 1865, thirty-seven 
years after the composer's death. Since then it has become one 


of the most popular symphonic works in all musical literature. 


Overture to “Rienzi” - - - - - ‘ Wagner 


The palmy days of the historical romance have long since 
gone, and with them the days of the monumental historical drama 
and opera. Their great era was nearly a century ago, in the time 
of Scott and Bulwer-Lytton, of Victor Hugo and Manzoni, of 
Meyerbeer’s ‘““The Huguenots’ and Wagner's ‘Rienzi.’ With 
Bulwer-Lytton’s novel as the basis for the libretto, ‘Rienzi’ was 
produced October 29, 1842, at Dresden, winning immediate 
popularity. The overture is about one-third Bulwer-Lytton, one- 
third Meyerbeer, and one-third Wagner; in its use of definite 
themes from the opera itself—the third act trumpet call, Rienzi's 
prayer, the chorus at the end of the first act, and the battle hymn 
——and in the variety and fullness of its orchestration, it fore- 


shadows the later Wagnerian music-dramas. 


Intermission 











Prelude to “The Deluge” a “ : - Saint-Saens 
(Violin obbligato, Louis Persinger) 


The prelude to “The Deluge,” with the solo violin part, is 
one of Saint-Saens’ most popular works. It is the prelude to his 
Biblical cantata, ““The Deluge,”’ which is based upon the narration 
of the Flood. It is a short, expressive movement in the free form 
for the string orchestra—a slow introductory passage, leading to 
a quasi-fugal treatment of a sustained subject given out by the 
violas, following which the solo violin introduces a melodious 
obbligato, which holds the foreground to the end. | 


Spinning Song - ~ - - - - Mendelssohn 


Of the many brief pieces written by Mendelssohn under the 
general designation “Songs Without Words,’ one of the most 
popular is the “Spinning Song.”’ It is a gem of descriptive writ- 
ing, the whirring accompaniment supporting the melody and 


giving the song its title. 


‘“T.ove’s Dream” - - - - - - - Liszt 


Liszt’s familiar and popular “Love's Dream,” the third of a 
group of nocturnes, is a musical reflection of the following poem 
by F. Freiligrath, which is printed on the fly-leaf, of the piano 
score: 


“© love, O love, so long as e’er thou canst, or dost on love believe; 
The time shall come, when thou by graves shalt stand and grieve; 
And see that still thy heart doth glow, doth bear and foster love divine, 
So long as e’er another heart shall beat in warm response to thine. 
And, whoso bares his heart to thee, O, show him love where in thy power, 
And keep a guard upon thy tongue—an unkind word is quickly said: 
Ah me—no ill was meant—and yet 
The other goes and weeps thereat.” 


“Under the Lindens,’”’ from “Alsatian Scenes” : Massenet 
(‘Cello obbligato, Walter Ferner) 
(Clarinet obbligato, H. B. Randall) 


The ‘Alsatian Scenes” were written after the war of 1870 and 
describe the composer's recollections of a peaceful Alsatian vil- 
lage. The movement played this evening pictures the great calm 


of a Sunday afternoon, at the edge of the country; a long avenue 











of linden trees, in whose shadows a loving pair walk quietly, hand 
in hand, she leaning toward him and murmuring softly, ‘‘Wilt 
thou love me always?” | 


Caprice Viennois - = - - - - Kreisler 


The Caprice Viennois (Cradle Song), by Fritz Kreisler, the 
eminent violinist, is one of his best known violin compositions, 
possessing the touch of sadness and graceful rhythm characteristic 
of his other Viennese pieces. Although originally a violin solo, 
the composer has also arranged it for piano solo, while the 


orchestration played this evening was arranged by Alfred Hertz. 


Waltz, ‘‘On the Beautiful Blue Danube”’ . Johann Strauss 


Johann Strauss, composer of this famous and popular waltz, is in 
a class by himself, with his nearest relatives as his only rivals. 
His works in dance form are very numerous, his waltzes alone 
reaching the number of one hundred and fifty-two, and of these 
the “Blue Danube”’ is the most celebrated. 





Coming Attractions 


To be presented by the Stockton Musical Club 





December 15—A concert of Christmas Carols to be given by 


the A Cappella Choir of the Department of 
Music of the College of the Pacific, assisted by 
Esther Hornaday, Harpist. 


February 9—MARIA IVOGUN, Coloratura Soprano. 
March 17—MYRA HESS, Pianist. 
April 27—MERLE ALCOCK, Contralto. 












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Musical Association of San Francisco 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 









OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKess, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President E. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 






A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 







BOARD OF GOVERNORS 











J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 








EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E.R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 








MUSIC COMMITTEE 






J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E.. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 








WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 









EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 







Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 





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106 








The San Francisen Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 
THIRD POPULAR CONCERT 
493d and 494th Concerts 
CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, December 7, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: WALTER FERNER, ’Cellist 


PROGRAMME 
1. Overture, ‘‘Iphigenie in Aulis’’.................--.------------- Gluck 
2. Symphony in B minor, “Unfinished’’................-....- Schubert 


Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 





3% Overture? Leandre;: | Nowa ek ee Beethoven 
| Intermission 
As kKel-Nidre for: Violoncello <.2c35 8 Se ee ek we Bruch 
Walter Ferner 
Ser heirs: WASherWOMan «25 case fer ones Sowerby 
(First time in San Francisco) 


6. (a) Spring Song 
(b) Spinning Song § pil ah Ts i aie ea ai Ss be ates cag ode be Mendelssohn 


7. Waltz, ‘‘On the Beautiful Blue Danube’’...... Johann Strauss 








Next Auditorium Concert, Friday Eve., December 19 


Soloist: CECILIA HANSEN, Violinist 
Tickets Now on Sale at Sherman Clay & Co. 





TO SYMPHONY SUBSCRIBERS 


It has been suggested that subscribers who for any 
reason find themselves unable to attend the Symphony 
Concerts send their tickets to the Community Music 
School, 544 Capp Street, and thus make it possible for 
worthy and appreciative students to hear the concerts, 
who would not otherwise be able to do so. Tickets 
should be mailed as early as possible each week to Com- 
munity Music School, 544 Capp Street, San Francisco. 











107 








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Overture, “‘Iphigenie in Aulis’’ - - . : - Gluck 
Modern opera practically dates from the efforts made by Gluck 


to correct the abuses which had crept into the works of the Italians 
of his time ‘‘through the mistaken vanity of singers and the unwise 
compliance of composers which had rendered it wearisome and ridicu- 
lous, instead of being, as it once was, the grandest and most imposing 
stage of modern times.’ Regarding his overtures he stated: “My idea 
was that the overture ought to indicate the subject and prepare the 


spectators for the character of the piece they are about to see.” 


Wagner, who was a great admirer of Gluck, revised the instru- 
mentation and text in 1846, and in that form produced the opera in 
Dresden in 1848. The overture originally led directly into the first 
scene of the opera. The concert version which is now generally used 
is that made by Wagner. According to Wagner, the thematic ele- 
ments of the overture are (1) ‘“‘a motive of appeal from painful, 
gnawing heart-sorrow’; (2) “‘a motive of violence, of commanding, 
overbearing demand’; (3) “a motive of grace, of maidenly tender- 


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named coming in the introduction and the others in the Allegro. 


Symphony in B Minor, “Unfinished’’ - - - Schubert 
Only the first two movements of Schubert’s Eighth Symphony, 


universally known as the “‘Unfinished,’’ are complete. There are nine 
bars of a Scherzo, and with them the symphony stops; and yet among 
all the composer's works not one is more beautiful in ideas or perfect 
in form than this. No more of it has ever been found, and no one 
knows why Schubert should have left it incomplete. As would be 
expected from Schubert’s sentimental temperament, his music is essen- 
tially lyric and found its most natural expression in the songs for single 
voice, of which he wrote over eight hundred in all. His symphonies 
have been characterized as “‘expanded song, delightful, as songs are - 
delightful, in their directness of feeling, their beauty of detail, their 


warmth of color, and their sensuous charm.’”’ 


The outward circumstances of the “‘Unfinished’’ Symphony are 
exceedingly simple. Schubert had applied for admission to’ the 
Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde of Vienna in 1821, as a viola player, 


and had been refused. A society in Graz elected him an honorary 








ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU PRESENTS 


ISA KREMER 


RUSSIAN SINGER OF INTERNATIONAL 





‘ FOLK SONGS 

'|SCOTTISH RITE HALL ALCAZAR THEATRE 

Friday Evening, Dec. 12 Sunday Aft., Dec. 14 

PROGRAM FOR DECEMBER 12 
Fantaisie in F Minor. pete Sancltsthle Sovusea. nEgerega REM Eal se vawedbe esac ccibeses Chopin 
| toe (3 L. RePee Set Se anne intl See Nee. Serpe ae Rk ete ETS pect thoe 0/8 Catt atu ete Russian 
Chi vuol la Zin garetla vCPaieiélionacs se i ree as nae bah aoutadapvereee Italian 
THe HB lUe BOllS Of SOOURAM Cio we ae saree at ada nc bacaeen ce eae ae Beh er scadt ea ngn as ceodedocee ck cetera English 
Le Petit Navire SEB ECPNIG en iscninantental Gap cin Se ptusvncdauduu ths ecubou swe: acdlucdte ee ce eegass French 
Dushechka Dievitza (Dargomjsky)............. Sigel ted ate! ak ee Sey ee ee Russian 
CU TERA TA GAINED Ce nod cn osc cae bciac Reeneltigs etn te ends doacotea Nee Con tbe ond Uatspeemaect RUERaeeS Italian 
SP POt HG ECOL IGM hse tae: fadidy Nadbangd acta sos abs sau henaha cane Sea eameastepwacadiphs = oka ede-entchasceint oaaeten English 
jig Feo Sil Sc Os tae eT ls Se oe ans I te A SEES EN PG aE oe I See rae ey Russian 

IV. 

Prelucte: icGr SAAT VINOE 2 el ale ttn ot dees ne Sach abew ais soak sdonatspaentuns eect Rachmaninoff 
Stel Pete tc Geo) see es epee NRO irsb IE ey Sas, Sea. oi eaint es AER UR ae ee We aE SS Sg SARS Pic gaat 0 Mee ot. Liszt 


V. 
Song of the Shepherd Lehl, from “Snegourotchka’’—(Rimsky-Korsakoff) ..Russian 


hittie Boy -plue—(Mach aGver)) occ cig ae toasg cae nenb ee teteatecs peadteen aU paps dtnodstmeneceeuae English 
LavPastorella dél Alpini ome eee Soe as SEE sore Pe oases Nasinade annecuncanesncenacveccuas French 
Phyllis und die game pee meee cts S euakdut Sade pach cee ust en eset coord dhas canbe German 
iaory (Gorriae lee 206 28 sits Ne atk =. Baad atkn abt cance de ndatas se phone pate acaneodpaccetne= sama lure teedebaedede French 
Lia lanza: -( Tarantella )—— CROSSE) Fa nk een Se gir eek ec decceas esacetacecectote Italian 
Ther isittle: Sparrow (Brock way ) ax spect os. crenenge a euynarshschnautobeer saseeugiien lsccarwaneuss eS 
LG} ELS <0 TER LY Co LE Ve P= epeeune Cpe ahiorertne Sp MURE DRE mieoyll Ardea 6 An fe Clee, phn Rule Aan ote a po REI op we ee Russian 


LEON ROSENBLOOM, Assisting Artist 
Tickets, 50c to $2.00, at Sherman, Clay & Co. 








110 











member. In acknowledgment Schubert sent these two movements. 
Duncan, in his excellent book on Schubert, boldly suggests that the 
symphony is really not unfinished—any more than were Beethoven's 
Sonatas in E minor and F sharp. At any rate, the work that came 
into being with so little ceremony was never heard by the composer 
and fell into neglect for forty years, has ever since the first hearing 
maintained itself as the highest concentration of beauty in musical 
form—in so far as this may be said of any work. It is in music what 
the Venus of Milo is in sculpture, the Sistine Madonna in painting, or 


the Iliad in epic poetry. 


Overture, ‘‘Leonore,’”’ No. 3 - - - - Beethoven 


‘Fidelio,’ Beethoven’s only opera, was first performed at 
Vienna, in 1805. For this opera he composed at one time and an- 


other no fewer than four overtures, three of them known as “Leonore’ 


Overtures Nos. 1, 2 and 3. ‘‘Leonore’’ was the original title of the 
opera, so named after the heroine, Beethoven subsequently changing 


the title of his work to ‘‘Fidelio."’ The third overture, played today, 
is by far the finest of the four. It is the drama in miniature, and far 
outclasses anything in the opera itself. It is a masterpiece of dramatic 


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unity, strength and passion, as well as of unique and imposing musical 
construction. 


“Kol Nidrev’ for Violoncello and Orchestra - . . Bruch 


The “Kol Nidrei’’ is a chant which is recited in synagogues at the 
beginning of the evening service on the Day of Atonement, the most 
solemn festival of the Jewish race, and takes its name from its two 
opening words. While it is probable that no two synagogues chant 
the melody, note for note, the same, the traditional formula is pre- 
served everywhere. The structure is simple, the melody being an 
intermingling of simple cantillation with rich figuration. The opening 
is what the masters of Catholic song term a ““Pneuma,”’ or soul breath. 
Instead of announcing the opening words in a monotone, there was a 
long sighing tone used in the melody, falling to a lower note and rising 
again. There is a similarity of the strain with the first five bars of 
Beethoven's C sharp minor quartet, and there are strong similarities in 
some of the Gregorian chants of the Catholic Church. 


‘The Irish Washerwoman’”’ - - ~ - Leo Sowerby 


‘The Irish Washerwoman”’ is the name of a jig originally com- 
posed by Walter (‘Piper’) Jackson. This performer was the most 





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(THE SAN FRANCISCO. BANK) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 


One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
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COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
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112 











celebrated Irish piper of the eighteenth century. Living in the middle 
of the century, Jackson was known for his skill, not only in playing on 
the Uillean or Union bagpipe, but for the jigs and reels which he com- 
posed for it. He lived at Ballingarry, County Limerick, and was a 
gentleman of wealth and landed estates. Many of Jackson's tunes 
found publication in collections printed in the eighteenth century. The 
score of Mr. Sowerby’s setting of ‘““The Irish Washerwoman’’ contains 
a note to the effect that the piano version of the tune was made April 
26, 1916, and that the piece—to use Mr. Sowerby’s expression—was 
‘‘dressed up orchestrally,’’ December 18, 191 7-January 6, 1918. The 


piece consists of the tune (sixteen measures long) constantly repeated, 
with continuously shifting changes of harmony and instrumental color. 


“Spring Song”’ and “Spinning Song” - - - Mendelssohn 


Of the many brief pieces written. by Mendelssohn under the gen- 
eral designation ‘Songs Without Words,’ the two most popular are 
the ‘‘Spring Song”’ and the ‘Spinning Song.” The first is a melody of 
appealing beauty, said to be derived from an old English folk-song, 
while the second is a gem of descriptive writing, the whirring accom- 
paniment supporting the melody and giving the song its title. 


Waltz, ‘“‘On the Beautiful Blue Danube’”’ - - Johann Strauss 


The composer of this famous waltz is in a class by himself with 










ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the _ score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacifice Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—T eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


REDFERN Mason— 
He played admirably. 


There was no_ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 




























Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


113 

















































ANNOUNCEMENT 
FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, December 12, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, December 14, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: MURI SILBA, Pianist 


PROGRAMME 
i “Sympnony No: vO; Pastorar oo. sss Beethoven 
Allegro ma non troppo (Awakening of Joyful 
Feelings on Arrival in the Country) 
Andante molto moto (By the Brook) 
Allegro (Village Festival) — 
Allegro (The Storm)— | 
Allegretto (Shepherd’s Song. Thanksgiving 
after the Storm) 


2. ell ace. Ofst oe: CanOMiG 68s sus <cck ides ca ade oencwayannshseopbeses Respighi 
(First time in San Francisco) 
3. Concerto for Piano,:No. 1, E. Minor......2................. Chopin 
Allegro maestoso 
Romanze— 
Rondo 
MURI SILBA 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


FOURTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, December 21, 2:45 P. M. | 


Soloist: EUGENIA ARGIEWICZ BEM, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 

hsOverture toc: Fra-.DipVolo- uss eeesuses: eicgeic oats. ccose= Auber 
2 Suites eer: GoyntiaGNor Lek h a hae ons ole and ss Subebi os Grieg 

Morning 

Ase’s Death 

Anitra’s Dance 

In the Hall of the Mountain King 
$+ Concerto tor. Violine WINOTG, <1. au-keisob chek ives abecee eae Lalo 

Eugenia Argiewicz Bem 

4. Shepherd’s Music from the “Christmas Oratorio’ ........ Bach 
5. “In the Village,’ from Caucasian Sketches.......2........ 

eae sak aE eC i oer oy eae eee a. Ippolitow-lvanow 
62 Caprice Viennois eit cic ncs ocean he aeetcc eee Soc eee a Kreisler 
7; Overture: The Gypsy Baron’ 2 ees Strauss 


Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., on Monday 
preceding concert, hours 9 to 5; and at Curran Theatre from 
10 A. M. on day of concert. 


114 











his nearest relatives as his only rivals. He is the genius of a famous 
musical family. His works in dance form are very numerous, his 
waltzes alone reaching the number of one hundred and fifty-two, but 
the one played today is undoubtedly the most celebrated. Curiously 
enough, it was not a success at first, written as a chorus. In instru- 
mental form, however, its success was instantaneous. Hans von Bulow 
Grst set the example of putting this fascinating waltz on symphony 


orchestra programmes. 


a 
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Our most inexpensive cards, along with the more exclusive ones, have been designed with 
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Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 
Afternoons—2-5 


Phone Douglas 1678 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Studio Hours: 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


“apd fig 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


(Tuesday) Douglas 1678 






Phone Piedmont 8140-J 


115 


eee 








Jdersomel 


The San HFrancisea Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


FIRST VIOLINS 


Persinger, Louis 


Concert Master and 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Assistant Conductor 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 
Lahann, J. 


Principal 
Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske,'F. E. 


. Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O- E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


lt tas gs EE A ak A ey Ve pee eerie 
116 














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Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
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Let your choice, if possible, 
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Sherman, iPlay & Co. 


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Remaining Dates 


Chamber Music 
Monday eve., Dec. 15 
Symphony (reg.) 
Thursday eve., Jan. 8 
Chamber Music 
Tuesday eve., Jan. 13 
Symphony (pop) 
Thursday eve., Jan. 22 
Symphony (reg.) 
Thursday eve., Feb. 12 
Symphony (pop) 
Thursday eve., Feb. 26 
Symphony (reg.) 
Thursday eve., Mar. 12 


Symphony (pop) 
Thursday eve., Mar. 26 





SAN FRANCISCO 


Symphony Orchestra 


AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 
OAKLAND, CAL. 


Thursday Evening, December 11, 1924 


Eight-thirty- o’clock 


Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 


Box Office at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland, Cal. 
Telephone Lakeside 6700 








PROR 4 
Thursday EvenirDece 


Owertures:Leanotes? NO: (os 5 2 eee ee Beethoven 


“Fidelio,” Beethoven’s only opera, was first performed at Vienna, 
in 1805. For this opera he composed at one time and another no 
fewer than four overtures, three of them known as “Leonore” Over- 
tures Nos. 1, 2 and 3. “Leonore” was the original title of the 
opera, so named after the heroine, Beethoven subsequently changing 
the title of his work to “Fidelio.” ' The third overture played this 
evening is, by far, the finest of the four. It is the drama in minia- 
ture, and far outclasses anything in the opera itself. It is a master- 
piece of dramatic unity, strength and passion, as well as of unique 
and imposing musical construction. 


Symphony in B minor, “Unfinished”’.................-.. Schubert 


Rendo, “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks” Richard Strauss 


Allegro moderato 


Andante con moto 

The history of the “Unfinished” Symphony is very interesting. 
Two brothers, Anselm and Joseph Huttenbrenner, were very fond of 
Schubert and were continually seeking to make him known. About 
1820, Anselm returned to his home in Graz, Styria, where he 
succeeded in having Schubert elected honorary member of the local 
musical society. In return for the compliment, Schubert began, in 
1822, the composition of the eighth symphony, sending the incom- 
plete work to Anselm. In 1827 Schubert visited Graz, but neither 
there nor elsewhere did he ever hear his unfinished work. In 1860, 
the brother, Joseph Huttenbrenner, tried to interest Johann Herbeck, 
4 renowned Viennese orchestral conductor in Schubert’s symphony, 
but it was five years later before Herbeck made a move. 

The symphony received its first performance, on December 16, 
1865. at Vienna, forty-three years after Schubert wrote it, and 
thirty-seven years after the composer's death. Since then it has be- 
come one of the most popular symphonic works in all musical liter- 
ature. Perfect in form and of masterful orchestration, a descriptive 
analysis of the symphony is superfluous. 


Till Eulenspiegel is the hero of an old Folk-book of the fifteenth 
century attributed to Dr. Thomas Murner (1475-1530). Till is sup- 
posed to be a wandering mechanic of Brunswick, who plays all sorts 
of tricks, practical jokes on everybody, and he always comes out 
ahead. In the book Till is condemned to die on the scaffold but 
escapes. Strauss kills him on the callows. Strauss himself when 
asked to prepare a program for his work refused with the words, 
“T eave it to each listener to crack for himself the nut, which the 


rogue has given him.” 


Intermission 








9 
vo. 


SECOND ATTRACTION—SYMPHONY SERIES 
REGULAR PROGRAM . 
Symphony No. 6 (pastoral) F Major op. OS /60 3s Beethoven 


Burlesque: :.....-:----.--------veecnsceceec cen eosenececceenercnec resets 
Soloist: E. RoBERT SCHMITZ 





Pretude>“Parsital’’: 2c) Se aoe Richard Wagner 
Symphonic Variations..........-.---,-------2-----1---+--0----- Cesar Franck : 


Soloist: E. RoBERT SCHMITZ 
Thursday Night, January 8, 1924 


Prices 75cts. to $2.00. no tax 








| 
R0R AM 
enitDecember II, 1924 


Goncerto for Pianos. Nos 1) mmr eae ae Chopin 


; 


Allegro maestoso 
Romanze 
Rondo 


Murti SILBA 


In the first movement (Allegro maestoso) there are three chief 
themes, and they are exposed—the first two in E minor, the third 
in E major—by the first violins in the orchestral introduction. After 
the third theme fragments of the first are heard, and they prepare 
the first entrance of the pianoforte. The themes are used again in 
similar fashion, and the tonalities are those of the introduction, but 
the themes are broadened and lead to a virtuoso use of the piano- 
forte. In the second orchestral tutti there is employment of the first 
motive, and there is a modulation to C major with the second theme 
given to the solo instrument. Brilliant pianoforte passages follow, 
while the orchestra makes use of the first motive. There is then a 
tutti with the first motive in E minor, followed by the pianoforte 
with the second motive in E minor and at last the third in G major. 
The close is in E minor with the initial motive in the orchestra. In 
the second movement (Romanze) the strings play a short introduc- 
tion. The first phrase is used later in various ways. The important 
motives are given out in succession by the pianoforte and varied. 
Later a theme in C sharp minor is introduced which has only pass- 
ing significance and gives way to the second motive, which is now in 
G sharp minor. The strings sing the first theme with ornamentation 
in the pianoforte. 


Rondo: After a few measures of orchestral introduction the first 
chief theme is given to the pianoforte. The most noticeable of the 
other themes are an energetic tutti motive and a delicate melody 


given to the pianoforte. 














The 
Chamber Music Society 


of SAN FRANCISCO 
Monday Evening, December 15 


PROGRAM 


1. Quartet, E minor, for strings.........-.... 
Te pe ee Satta Ae epee A Frank Bridge 
Adagio—Allegro appassionato 
Adagio molto 
Allegretto :grazioso 
Allegro agitato 





2. Quintet, D SA} OF prose seco haat nss Brandts- Buys 
3. (a) Scherzo  ...-.---s---ceseecersenesesesnenees Beethoven 

(b) Variations (‘‘Death and the 
PCG Fev T Pipes sete aeeee tanta A eo at Schubert 
° (0), VAVACE 2-.c-ntenccsccenereccncenensenonacesensence Haydn 

for string quartet 

Founded in 1916 by ELIAS HECHT | Single Admission Prices 

LOUIS PERSINGER, Violin NATHAN FIRESTONE, Viola $1.00, $1.50 and $2.00 2° 
‘ ioli cvik a) ee i 1] ‘ 

LOUIS FORD, Violin WALTER FERNER, Violoncello oickeees for ARR neuitarOni BA Pa 
Musical Direction, LOUIS PERSINGER Lox office, Sherman, Clay & Co., Oak- 
Management, ZANNETTE W. POTTER land, Cal. Telephone Lakeside 6700. 











MO BI CB A RE So gene ee 


t 
b 
) 


Her own Aldrich piano 


Because it is such a good, honestly 
made, durable piano, it will be her com- ( 
panion for years and years to come. 
Long before its strings lose melody, 
she will have grown up to a home of 


her own, and a Steinway! Hi : 
Meaawhilethe Aldrich is only $4.45. | 
It is a responsive, sympathetic piano, ‘| ¥ 


A 


and dependable, 


Sherman, lay & Co. 


Oakland — Fourteenth and Clay Streets 
Berkeley -- Telegraph and Channing 
San Francisco—Kearney and Sutter Streets 






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SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY = 
ORCHE 


B) Maintained by 
The Musical u 
Assoctation of 
ean Francisco 










(1 
W 


FOURTH PAIR 


1924 1925 I 
2 lee ER GUrtSeCnin. eadson oe 
ALFRED HERTZ Sasa TOR 


a 














Alfred Hertz 


RECOMMENDS 
CONN INSTRUMENTS 


The San Francisco 





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CONN 
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No Higher Endorsement 


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47 Kearny St. 531-16th St. 





Musical Association of San Hrancisen 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 


OFFICERS 


JoHN D. McKzs, President _ 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President EK. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 
A. W. WipENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 
E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 
Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 
C. H. Crocker W. E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 
Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 


WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 





125 








on ee 
Way VUE se 
All are : 2 ae 
; ae va CAN 





$Hlason & Hamlin Pianos 


Those to whom music is a gift or 
an art ora great privilege hold one 
piano at the pinnacle—the Mason 
& Hamlin. For they know it to be 
wrought byskilled artisans—men 
who build with infinite pains that 
the final product will be worthy 
the hands of an artist. So does it 
deserve a place in your home. 


Wiley B Allen ©. 


135 KEARNY STREET,SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 





126 








Che San Franciseo Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 


FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
498th and 499th Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, December 12, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, December 14, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: MURI SILBA, Pianist 


PROGRAMME 


lSyanphony IN6:'6;20 Pastoral see oe re ee Beethoven 
legro ma non troppo (Awakening of Joyful 
Feelings on Arrival in the Country) 
Andante molto moto (By the Brook) 
Allegro (Village Festival )— 
Allegro (The Storm)— 
Allegretto (Shepherd’s Song. Thanksgiving 
after the Storm) 
2+ Ballade of the Ghomides:. 4 8 ee ee Respighi 
(First time in San Francisco) 
Intermission 
3i..Concerto for Piano; Nox ihc. Minor. i es Chopin 
llegro maestoso 
Romanze— 


Rondo 
MURI SILBA 


The Piano is a Steinway 
NOTE:—All Season Tickets must be paid for During December 





Auditorium Concert, Next Friday, 8:20 P. M. 
Soloist: CECILIA HANSEN, Violinist 


Overiire;: seneare «sor ee ta Pod «. Massenet 
Symphony in B minor, “Unfinished’’._................ Schubert 
bb rancescal Gar twiminins? se ceto ee ee Tschaikowsky 
Concerto On tole OpieOs. ce oa eae es, Beethoven 


CECILIA HANSEN 
Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co., 50c, 75c, $1.00. 





127 








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Symphony No. 6, “Pastoral’’ - - - - Beethoven 


What is probably one of the best commentaries to be found on 
Beethoven's “‘Pastoral’’ Symphony is that written by the late Oscar 
Weil for a performance in the Greek Theatre at the University of 
California, September 27, 1906, and which is quoted herewith from 
“Oscar Weil, Letters and Papers,’ published by the Book Club of 
California:. 


6é 6 


All painting in instrumental music, if pushed too far, is a fail- 
ure. These are Beethoven’s own words, found in one of his sketch 
books, proving quite conclusively that he recognized the limitations of 
his art, and that in the composition of his Sixth Symphony he intended, 
as he states on the title page, ‘more an expression of feeling than a 
painting. Expressions of his own feelings,. remember; of the emo- 
tions awakened in his own breast by the situations that give title to 
the various movements; not in any sense an attempt to delineate either 
scenes or situations for others. Indeed, we find him again noting— 
apropos of this same Symphony— ‘The hearers should be allowed to 
discover the situations for themselves’; and again, ‘People will not 
require titles to recognize the general intention to be more a matter of 
feeling than painting in sounds.’ 


‘This, | think, we may safely accept as Beethoven’s attitude 


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towards all of his compositions that bear descriptive titles, excepting 
perhaps the ‘Battle Symphony’ (Op. 91), which as a mere pot-boiler, 





we need not consider at all. That the bird episode, towards the close 


of the second movement of the ‘Pastorale,’ imitates the voices of the 
nightingale, quail, and cuckoo need not trouble us. Beethoven him- 
self spoke of it as a joke, and I think it falls beautifully into its place 
as an aside uttered playfully, as one might a witticism happily 
remembered and flung lightly into the flow of an even quite serious 
sentence. 


“It would seem almost as though Beethoven, while thus clearly 
defining his own attitude towards the descriptive element in music, 
was looking both backward and forward; into the past, with its 
innumerable programme pieces that had been a fashion since the time 
of the earlier Frenchmen and Italians; and into that future of sym- 
phonic monstrosities on all sorts of impossible themes in which we of 
today are living. He himself did very little programme making. 
Of his thirty-three Pianoforte Sonatas, only two have authentic 
inscriptions,—the ‘Pathetique’ and ‘L’Absence’; the ‘Pastorale’ was 
christened by its publisher (very appropriately, too!) ; and the ‘Moon- 
light’ by a sentimental German poet. Beethoven laughed at the title 
and called it ‘silly. He certainly did call the Third Symphony the 
‘Eroica,’ but I fancy him, later on, not over-satisfied with the title. 
Aside from the Funeral March and something in the general trend of 
the first movement, the ‘Eroica’ is simply a symphony and nothing 
more; there is nothing of the heroic in either its Scherzo or the final 
set of variations. The Fifth is much the more heroic symphony of the 
two. The programme for his Sixth Symphony, as well as its division 
into five movements and much of their sub-titles, Beethoven found 
made to his hand in a ‘Grande Symphonie’ by J. S. Knecht, which had 
been published in 1784, twenty-four years before the birth of the 
‘Pastorale,’ and which had been advertised on the cover of one of his 
own early Sonatas. We have no means of knowing whether or not 








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he had ever heard the Knecht Symphony; it is, of course, possible, 
though I have not been able to trace any performance of it in 
Germany. Besides his programme, Beethoven found other material 
for his Symphony ready made: the opening theme of the first move- 


ment is a phrase from a Bohemian folk-song, caught from the lips of 
a peasant and lifted by his magical touch into the empyrean; the 
Scherzo is built largely on a dance tune frequently heard at the country 
inns in the neighborhood of Vienna; and the storm episode of the 
fourth movement is really an amplification of the storm music in 
‘Prometheus.’ At its first performance, December 22, 1808, this 
Symphony was given as No. 5 and was followed on the programme by 
the one in C minor, now known as the Fifth, but then designated the 
Sixth. Both were completed at about the same time. 

“There can be no attempt here to describe or analyze this 
masterwork of the Master-Genius of our Art; one must hear it! And 
this best, I should say, without reference to its programme,—forget- 
ting as far as one can that there is such a programme, and permitting 
the music to interpret itself. This is the only rational way to listen to 
any music; analysis should come after the hearing. 

“There is surely much to be gained towards the understanding 
and enjoyment of music through a recognition and analysis of its 
forms; but this analysis must be made for oneself, and it is not until 





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one has learned somewhat of the how to do it for oneself that there is 
the least profit to be had out of reading the analysis of another. | 
hope to have something to say, shortly, about the how-to-analyze-for- 
oneself, as well as about the construction (build) of the symphony, 


which embraces also the sonata, since their form is virtually identical. 
The subject is really not at all difficult to one who has a little patient 


capacity for work.” 


“Ballade of the Gnomides”’ - - - - - Respighi 


The score of “Ballade of the Gnomides’’ contains the following 
‘program, the original Italian being by Carlo Clausetti: 
“Dragging the raving gnome, the women go, abandoning their flimsy 
draperies to the wind. 
The diminutive man gambols between those, his two brides, whom a 
single nuptial bed awaits, 


‘Oh! gnomides, let the race be brief, lest he weary fall when falls the 
Bear! 


“No torch was lighted at the distorted nuptials, but without, hordes of 
gnomes were waiting, eager for the prey. 


And in the thick night a sharp cry resounded, so painful as to rout the 
darkness. 


Then silence. The new dawn was breaking; the mad wives drew their 


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vain booty from the alcove 


And fled with it, followed by the cunning throng of manlings thickly 
swarming about 


And muttering prayers worthy only of the anathemas to be heard, in 
blaspheming jargon, in the depths infernal. 


By a rough path, they reached a broad hill whose sharp ridge over- 
looked a sea of blue. 


In a twinkling the filthy husband was downward hurled and the rite 
thus ended. 


“Now on the summit of the hill, after their sleepless night, the two 
women dance in the morning breeze. 


And, while the day is breaking, the tiny people join in the dance of the 
cruel widows. 


One shrieks, another mocks, still another bites or laughs aloud; a wild 
frenzy possesses them all, as at a witches’ sabbath.” 


As to form, the work is freely constructed, the score containing 
nothing to indicate the programmatic significance of the various sec- 
tions. Of the rhythmical figure which opens the work in the first 
violins and the motive heard in the muted trumpets at the third meas- 
ure, considerable use is made, there being eighteen pages of the score 
devoted to development of this material. A sharp cry from an E flat 
clarinet opens the next section, which is followed by a quieter section 
the material of which is drawn from the opening trumpet motive. 
With a theme taken from the first measure of the work there follows 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round . 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


Mm. Anthony Linden 


Orchesiral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist— T eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


133 





ANNOUNCEMENT 
FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, December 26, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, December 28, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: LOUIS PERSINGER, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 
. Prelude to ‘‘Parsifal’’ 


2. Concerto for Violin, G minor 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio 
Finale: Allegro vivace 


LOUIS PERSINGER 


. Symphony No. 3, “‘Rhenish’’ Schumann 
(Transcribed for modern orchestra by Frederick Stock) 
Allegro con brio 
Scherzo 
Andante commodo 
Molto maestoso— 
Allegro giocoso 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


FOURTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, December 21, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: EUGENIA ARGIEWICZ BEM, Violinist 
PROGRAMME 


. Overture to “Fra Diavolo’”’ 
2. Suite, “Peer Gynt,’’ No. | 

Morning 

Ase’s Death 

Anitra’s Dance 

In the Hall of the Mountain King 
. Concerto for Violin, F minor... 

Eugenia Argiewicz Bem 
. Shepherd’s Music from the “‘Christmas Oratorio’ 
. ‘In the Village,’’ from Caucasian Sketches 
Ippolitow-Ivanow 

. Caprice Viennois Kreisler 
. Overture, “The Gypsy Baron”’ _..Strauss 


Tickets on sale .at Sherman, Clay & Co., on Monday 
preceding concert, hours 9 to 5; and at Curran Theatre from 
10 A. M. on day of concert. 





= 





a funeral march, beginning in the drums. 


Concerto for Piano, No. 1,in Eminor - - 7 = Chopin 


In the first movement there are three chief themes, and they are 
exposed—the first two in’ E. minor, the third in E major—by the first 
violins in the orchestral introduction. After the third theme fragments 
of the first are heard, and they prepare the first entrance of the piano- 
forte. The themes are used again in similar fashion, and the tonalities 
are those of the introduction, but the themes are broadened and lead 
to a virtuoso use of the pianoforte. In the second orchestral tutti 
there is employment of the first motive, and there is a modulation to 
C major with the second theme given to the solo instrument. Brilliant 
pianoforte passages follow, while the orchestra makes use of the first 
motive. There is then a tutti with the first motive in E minor, followed 
by the pianoforte with the second motive in E. minor and at last the 
third in G major. The close is in E minor with the initial motive in 
the orchestra. In the second movement the strings play a short intro- 
duction. The first phrase is used later in various ways. The important 
motives are given out in succession by the pianoforte and varied. 
Later a theme in C sharp minor is introduced, which has only passing 
significance and gives way to the second motive, which is now in 
G sharp minor. The strings sing the first theme with ornamentation 
in the pianoforte. In the Rondo, after a few measures of orchestral 
introduction, the first chief theme is given to the pianoforte. The most 
noticeable of the other themes are an energetic tutti motive and a 
delicate melody given to the pianoforte. 


Sudiootigurs: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Ce Sec 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 
















135 








JJersonel 





Che Sau Srancisean Sumphony Orchestra 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 


Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F.N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Waener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


136 





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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


SEASON 1924-25 


SECOND BERKELEY CONCERT 


HARMON GYMNASIUM 


THURSDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 18, 1924 
8:15 O'CLOCK 


PROGRAMME 


1. Symphony No.6 in-F major, “Pastoral 4.00... Beethoven 
Allegro ma non troppo (Awakening of Joyful Feelings on Arrival in the 
Country) 
Andante molto moto (By the Brook) 
Allegro (Village Festival)— 
Allegro (The Storm)— 
Allegretto (Shepherd’s Song. Thanksgiving after the Storm) 


INTERMISSION 
ef OVERLUT Es SPOOLS su kee ee ee ae Mi oe Massenet 
3. -oymphonic Poem, <The Wioldau ss. -4 ke ee Smetana 
4; Bantasias* Francesca da, Rimini sie Ae es. T’schatkowsky 








Ssymphony.No: 6:in Fimajor, “Pastoral si: 2:5..5031.0ccs. Beethoven 


The first movement of the symphony opens immediately with the exposition of 
the first theme, piano, in the strings. The more cantabile phrase in the antithesis 
of the theme assumes later an independent thematic importance. The second 
theme is in C major, an arpeggio figure, which passes from first violins to second 
violins, then to ’cellos, double-basses, and woodwind instruments. The develop- 
ment of these themes is a gradual crescendo. The free fantasia is very long. A 
figure taken from the first theme is repeated again and again over sustained 
harmonies, which are changed only every twelve or sixteen measures. The third 
part is practically a repetition of the first, and the coda is short. 

In the second movement, the first theme is given to the first violins over a 
smoothly flowing accompaniment. The antithesis of the theme, as that of the 
first theme of the first movement, is more cantabile. The second theme, more 
sensuous in character, is in B flat major, and is announced by the strings. The 
remainder of the movement is very long and elaborate, and consists of embroidered 
developments of the thematic material already exposed. In the short coda the 
nightingale (flute), quail (oboe), and cuckoo (clarinet) are heard. 

The third movement is practically the scherzo. The thesis of the theme 
begins in F major and ends in D minor; the antithesis is in D major throughout. 
This theme is developed brilliantly. The second theme, of a quaint- character, 
is played by the oboe over middle parts in waltz rhythm in the violins. The bass 
to this is one of Beethoven’s jokes. This second theme is supposed to suggest the 
playing of a small band of village musicians, in which the bassoon player can get 
only the notes F, C and octave F out of his ramshackle old instrument; so he keeps 
silent wherever this series of three notes will not fit into the harmony. After 
being played through by the oboe, the theme is next taken up by the clarinet, and 
finally by the horn, the village bassoonist growing seemingly impatient in the 
matter of counting rests, and now playing his F, C, F, without stopping. The 
trio of the movement is a strongly accentuated rustic dance tune, which is developed 
in fortissimo by the full orchestra. There is a return of the first theme of the 
scherzo, which is developed as before up to the point when the second theme should 
enter, and the tempo ts accelerated to presto. But the dance is interrupted by 
a thunder-storm, which is a piece of free tone painting. 

There is a clarinet call over a double organ-point. The call is answered by 
the horn over the same double organ-point, with the addition of a third organ- 
point. The horn repetition is followed by the first theme, given out by the strings 
against sustained harmonies in clarinets and bassoons. This theme, based on a 
figure from the opening clarinet and horn call, is given out three times. This 
exposition is elaborate. After the climax a subsidiary theme is developed by full 
orchestra. There is a short transition passage, which leads to an abbreviated 
repetition of the foregoing development of the first theme. The second theme 
enters, B flat major, in clarinets and bassoons. The rest of the movement is 
hardly anything more than a series of repetitions of what has gone before. 


Overture. + bhedte. ccc.) in te eet ote hw Sag es Massenet 
This overture, based upon a mythological legend, has been described as having 
for its subject “the power of love, and its inexorable fate when disregarding the 


commands of duty.” 








Phedre, it will be recalled, was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete; after 
the death of Antiope she became the wife of Theseus. Subsequently she had the 
misfortune to become desperately enamored of Theseus’ son, Hippolytus, who 
‘failed to reciprocate her advances—whereupon she substituted hatred for love and 
revenged herself by making the father jealous of the son. Theseus committed 
Hippolytus to the vengeance of Neptune,.who caused a monster to come up out 
of the sea as the youth was driving along the shore and to so terrify his horses that 
they demolished his chariot. Hippolytus was killed in the accident, but Aesculapius 
brought him back to life, and Diana frustrated Phedre’s malicious designs by 
removing him to Italy, where he enjoyed the protection of the nymph Egeria. 


Symphonic. Poem, “Che: Moldau 2: 3s oe hee Smetana 


“The Moldau,” written more than a month after Smetana had become stone 
deaf, is the second of a cycle of six similar works. It was begun November 20, 
and completed December 8, 1874. The score of the work is prefixed by the follow- 
ing explanatory program: 

“Two springs pour forth their streams in the shade of the Bohemian forest, 
the one warm and gushing, the other cold and tranquil. Their waves, joyfully 
flowing over their rocky beds, unite and sparkle in the morning sun. The forest 
brook, rushing on, becomes the River Moldau, which with its waters speeding 
through Bohemia’s valleys, grows into a mighty stream. It flows through dense 
woods in which are heard the joyous sounds of the hunt, and the notes of the 
hunter’s horn are heard ever nearer and nearer. It flows through emerald meadows 
and lowlands, where there is being celebrated with song and dancing a wedding 
feast. At night in its shining waves the wood and water nymphs hold their revels, 
and in these waves are reflected many a fortress and castle—witnesses of bygone 
splendor of chivalry and the vanished martial fame of days that are no more. At 
the Rapids of St. John the stream speeds on, winding its way through cataracts 
and hewing the path for its foaming waters through the rocky chasm into the 
broad river-bed, in which it flows on in majestic calm toward Prague, wel- 
comed by time-honored Vysehrad, to disappear in the far distance from the 
poet’s gaze.” 


Bantasia, > brancesca da-Riminws 5) Tschatkowsky 


This piece, which is a tonal description of the encounter of Dante and Virgil 
with Francesca da Rimini upon their entrance into the second circle of Hell, begins 
with a portrayal of the awesome scene which meets their eyes at the second circle, 
or real entrance of Hell, at the portal of which sits Minos, the infernal judge, and 
crowding before him the souls of sinning spirits awaiting the word which shall 
dispose of their fate. The whole first part of the work is devoted to the delineation 
of the fierce winds by which the souls are driven about incessantly, the poignant 
wailing of the damned, the unutterable terror of the place. After the hubbub 
has died down, a new section is introduced in which the clarinet sings a plaintive 
subject over a pizzicato accompaniment in the strings. This may be taken to 
represent the narrative of Francesca. After this has been worked over at con- 
siderable length, the material of the first part is given further presentation. 








UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


Committee on Music and Drama 


THIRD BERKELEY CONCERT 


THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 29, 1925 


PROGRAMME 
Overture, No. 3 ““Lenore?’........0: ci ee Beethoven 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra............::::: sss Bruch 


Louts PEersinGER, Soloist 
Overture“Don Juan’ eee, oe ee eee Mozart 


Prelude and Love’s Death from “Tristram and Isolde”..... Magner 


(SuBjEct TO CHANGE) 





ANNOUNCEMENT 


The third concert of the California Music League, Modeste Alloo, Conductor, 
will be given on February 17, 1925, at Harmon Gymnasium at 8:15 o’clock. 


























WA 


7 THE CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO PRESENTS 


SAN FRANCISCO === 


SYMPHONY ORCHE STRA| 


| cA lfed Hertz.~~Conductor 


IN A 
POPULAR CONCERT 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM. 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1924 


8:20 P.M. 





WITH 


CECILIA HANSEN, Violinist 


GUEST ARTIST 


Cecilia Hansen makes Victor Records exclusively 


ee ead 





AUSPICES 
Mayor JAMES ROLPH, JR., AND BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS 
DIRECTION—AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
J. EmmMer HaypEN, CHAIRMAN 
ANGELO J. Rossi EpwiIn G. Bato 





Program 


& 


NATIONAL ANTHEM 
(UpA Waxprop at the Organ) 


Sa> CUOVERTURE, “CE HERDER 2 2 Se pee Massenet 


Massenet’s dramatic overture follows in a general way Racine’s trag- 
edy of the same name, based on the mythological legend. After the 
portentous opening we hear the ill-fated queen overwhelmed at the thought 
of, and bewailing, her unlawful passion (clarinet). The duet in the 
oboes suggests the scene between Phedre and Oenone. The tragic motive 
breaks in again, and changes into an Allegro appassionato (Hypolite 
chafing under his restraint, and on the point of leaving for Mycenae). 
Phedre and Hypolite meet; the passionate declaration of love follows 
(given to the violins in unison), and then the storm breaks over us. 
Heptune redeems his vow to Theseus. Hypolite, encountering the mon- 
ster cast up by the rising sea, is dragged to his death by his frightened 
steeds. Again we hear the wailing melody of the beginning, and the 
declaration of undying love; the turbulent episode of the first part is 
repeated, and the overture closes with the tragic motive of the opening. 


2. SyMPHONY IN B Minor, ‘‘ UNFINISHED? nc cccccecsscceeemnene Schubert 
Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 


In 1822 Schubert, elected an honorary member of the musical society 
of Graz, began this symphony (No. 8) intended as an acknowledgment 
of the compliment. He finished the Allegro and Andante and wrote nine 
measures of the Scherzo during the same year, but never took it up 
again, and there is no record of his ever having heard it. Only in one 
sense may this work be said to be unfinished. If a symphony must be 
in three or four movements arranged according to a certain order, then 
it is unfinished. And Schubert actually began the composition of a 
Scherzo. On the other hand Beethoven’s piano sonata, opus 109 has 
two movements, but no one considers it “‘unfinished.’’ Perhaps the 
common tonality of the two movements completes the scheme; but if 
Schubert were alive today, and should write two movements, the first 
beginning in C major and the second ending in B flat minor, would it 
necessarily be considered unfinished? Possibly even Schubert felt he 
could not write two more movements which would worthily follow 
these two. At any rate, during the six remaining years of his life he 
did not return to the symphony, and instead of mourning because the 
other movements were not added, let: us rejoice in the possession of 
these two. 


3. FANTASIA, ‘SHRANCESCA DA RIMINI? Wo cccssnccceeeeen Tschatkowsky 


This piece, which is a tonal description of the encounter of Dante 
and Virgil with Francesca da Rimini upon their entrance into the 
second circle of Hell, begins with a portrayal of the awesome scene 
which meets their eyes at the second circle, or real entrance of Hell, 
at the portal of which sits Minos, the infernal judge, and crowding 
before him the souls of sinning spirits awaiting the word which shall 
dispose of their fate. The whole first part of the work is devoted to 
the delineation of the fierce winds by which the souls are driven 
about incessantly, the poignant wailing of the damned, the unutter- 
able terror of the place. After the hubbub has died down, a new 








section is introduced in which the clarinet sings a plaintive subject 
over a pizzicato accompaniment in the strings. This may be taken 
to represent the narrative of Francesca. After this has been worked 
over at considerable length, the material of the first part is given 
further presentation. 


INTERMISSION 


4, Concerto FoR VIOLIN IN D Magor 


Allegro ma non troppo 
Larghetto— 
Rondo: Allegro 


CECILIA HANSEN 


Sees Chee et aa Beethoven 


City of San Francisco Municipal 
Christmas Eve. Observance 


ADMISSION FREE — PUBLIC INVITED 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 
Wed. Eve., Dec. 24, 7 P.M. to 10 P.M. 


Auspices 
Mayor JAMES RoipyH, Jr. BoARD OF SUPERVISORS 
Direction: Avuprror1umM COMMITTEE i 
J. EMMET HayYvEN, Chairman; ANGELO J. Rossi, Epwin G. Bats 
Program arranged by San Francisco CoMMUNITY SERVICE 
CHESTER W. ROSEKRANS, Executive Secretary 





SYMPHONY “POP” NEXT SUNDAY 
CURRAN THEATRE 
Soloist: EOGENIA ARGIEWICZ BEM, Violinist 





NEXT AUDITORIUM CONCERT 


San. Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
THURSDAY, JANUARY 15th 


Sotoitist: 


MISCHA ELMAN 


VIOLINIST 


Tickets on sale, December 22, Sherman, Clay & Co. 











| 
| 
| 
| 


Scottish Rite Auditor- 
gum: Monday Eve- 
ning, December 22 


Management, Ekoyn 








new Victor artist, is here. 

This remarkable young 
Russian violinist has creat- 
ed a furore in her American 
appearances to date. 

Hear Cecilia Hansen in 
concert, then prepare to en- 
joy her Victor records—for 
surely they will soon be 
many. 

Let us play her“‘Berceuse”’ 
or “Rondino” on the Vic- 
trola for you zow! 


Kearny & Sutter Sts., S. F. 
Mission Street near 21st 
Oakland, Fourteenth and Clay 


, ‘ateanatneeatatdeienatinenatensdinentdieetidineesdineradieentaeedineete tte ete eee 
LICKETS AT SHERMAN. CLAY & CO. 





are she sweeps 


LYS ° 
A) \\. the strings! 
7. ty. Cecilia Hansen, promising 


Sherman, |@lay & Co. 




















(SAN I FiANCISCO 
pace 


Lene rienaraaan by {kK 
X98} The Musical « 
Association of |e 
o> an Francisco | 






FOURTH POPULAR 


1924 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


























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Alfred Hertz 


RECOMMENDS 
CONN INSTRUMENTS 


The San Francisco 
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148 








Musical Assoviation of San Francisco 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 


OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKes, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President _ E.R. Dirmonp, Treasurer 
A, W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 
E. D. Beylard John S. Drum - Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 
Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 
C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J.B. Levison M. C. Sloss 
Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin - William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE . 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond | J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 


WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 





149 











HE choice of the 

Mason & Hamlin Piano 
for the concert platform 
proclaims its sonority— 
its selection by famous art- 
ists declares the quality of 
its tone—its presence in 
homes of wealth and taste 
bears tribute to its unpar- 


alleled beauty! 


Wiley BAllen ©. 


135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 


150 














Che San HFrancisen Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 





1924——_Season—1925 
FOURTH POPULAR CONCERT 
502d Concert 
CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, December 21, 2:45 o’clock 
Soloist: EUGENIA ARGIEWICZ BEM, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 
s: Overturecte = Oberon oi ee kee Weber 
PRAAIF ATOR inial GEveuite. ..eeaue ere Semen oe Sia ae Bach 
.* Concerto for: Viohhnvinr minor. en ee Lalo 
Andante—Allegro 


Andantino 
Allegro con fuoco 


KUGENIA ARGIEWICZ BEM 


Intermission 
. Peer Gynt Suite, No. Je ae eee wee eta ee a ea Grieg 
Morning 
Ase’s Death 


Anitra’s Dance 
In the Hall of the Mountain King 
. In the Village, from ‘‘Caucasian Sketches’ 


NOTE:—All Season Tickets must be paid for During December 


NOTICE! There will be no concert Sunday, January 
4, the next Popular Concert in the regular series being 
given Sunday afternoon, January 18. The sixth pair of 
concerts will be given Friday and Sunday afternoons, 
January 9 and 11. For programmes see announcements 


on page 158 

















We take pleasure in announcing a series of Masterworks recorded 








by famous European Orchestras in albums. 










Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, in A Major, Opus 92, in nine parts, on 
five records. Set complete in album form...........-.- $8.75 

Beethoven: Symphony No. 8, in F, Opus 93, in seven parts, on four 
PSs EY DU ee Toe ARES, PeeE RE So, Teer yt BSE By F58 e Som Reye $7.00 


By Weingartner and London Symphony Orchestra. 


Dvorak: Symphony in E Minor, No. 5, Opus 95, from the New 
World, 10 parts, five records............-...---- $8.75 complete 


By Halle Orchestra, London. 


Mozart: Symphony No. 39, in E flat, Opus 543, in six parts, on 
CHLOE TOCOLAS  lahens cevin ke seeane cade Cyuioen len seewnast $5.25 complete 





By Weingartner and London Symphony Orchestra. 





Tschaikowsky: Symphony Pathetique, in eight parts, on four records, 
















complete’ ‘in albu yn 520.535 25s ase teem ssnpsaket avalene au stas—o- $7.00 
‘By Sir Henry Wood and New Queen’s Orchestra. 

Beethoven: Quartet in C Sharp Minor, in ten parts, on five records, 
GOmpletes Wn AUP cc os tance. opsvececoncengacest ce seasbeasteett oend $8.75 
By Lener String Quartet, of Budapest. 

Haydn: Quartette in D Major, in six parts, on three records, 
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By Lener String Quartet, of Budapest. 

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By Lener String Quartet, of Budapest. 


Send for our historical catalog of ‘‘Musical Masterworks,’ free. 





QUARG MUSIC CO. 


206 Powell Street Open Evenings 





Overture to ““Oberon”’ ~ ~ a - - - Weber 


The great success of Weber’s operas, particularly “Der Frei- 
schutz’’ and ‘“‘Euryanthe,”’ led to an offer from the directors of Covent 
Garden in London for an opera to be written for production in that 
theatre. Weber was in failing health at the time, but undertook the 
commission and selected a fairy tale by Wieland, “Oberon,” as the 
subject of the libretto. The overture was the last portion which he 
wrote, as it is also his last musical composition. The overture is a 
resume of the musical contents of the opera and has been placed 
among the finest of the romantic overtures the world possesses. After 
the introduction there is heard the prolonged horn tones representing 
the call of Oberon, the king of the fairies. All the elves of his kingdom 
obey the summons. The famous crashing chord, which comes as a 
striking surprise, concludes the introduction. The leading subject and 
the love song form the material for the main section, and the closing 
subject is the melody of the well-known “Ocean, thou mighty 
monster,” aria of the third act. 


Air from D major Suite - : - ~ - Bach 

This selection has its proper place as the second movement of 
Bach’s third orchestral suite (or “overture,” as such works were styled 
in his day), which is supposed to have been written during the period 


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153 














of his residence at Leipsic. It is the most familiar, as well as the most 
universally admired, of all the master’s orchestral compositions, being 
the original of the celebrated “Air for the G String’’—+the latter being 
a transcription for violin with piano accompaniment by August 
Wilhelmj, in which the movement is transposed to C major, and the 
noble melody given to the sonorous low string of the solo instrument. 


Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in F minor - - Lalo 


This concerto was performed for the first time by Sarasate at a 


concert National du Chatelet, Paris, January 18, 1874. Its success was 


immediate. 


There is a short and sturdy introduction with recitative passages 
for the solo violin. In the Allegro, after a few measures of introduc- 


tion, the chief theme, passionate in nature, is given to the solo violin. 
A theme of a gentle character (flutes) and a suave motive (solo 


violoncello) with the first motive furnish the chief material for devel- 


opment. The Andantino movement is, in effect, a Romance for the 


GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 


Pianist 
(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 
Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 


Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-] 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 





















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_ solo instrument. Besides the vigorous chief theme, in the Allegro con 
fuoco movement, there is a motive of charming gayety twice given 
out by the solo instrument, and occurring later in dance rhythm with 
embroidery by the solo violin. 

The orchestral part of this concerto is so important and so finely 
worked that, as the late Hugues Imbert well suggested, the composi- 
tion might be entitled “Symphony with solo violin.” 


Peer Gyni Suite, No. 1 - - - - “ - Grieg 


The character of Peer Gynt is taken from a Norwegian folk- 
legend. He is a sort of Norsk Faust, a man destined to be lured on 
to destruction by his over-wealth of imagination unless he be saved 
by a woman. In the play, Peer Gynt is a peasant boy whose parents 
had once seen better days; but the father is dead, and the mother and 
son are now living in extreme poverty. The boy’s head teems with 
ideas and he forms many grand plans for the future. He makes his 
mother his confidante and she, though not blind to the fantastic wild- 
ness of his ways and schemes, cannot help believing in him. His 


youthful arrogance is unbounded. He goes to a wedding and carries 


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155 























off the young bride to the mountains, where he afterwards deserts her. 
Roaming about through the night he meets a party of frolicsome dairy 
maids. At last he finds refuge in the halls of the king of Dovre 
Mountains; here he falls in love with the king's daughter, but is 
expelled from the palace upon his love being discovered. Returning 
home again, he finds his mother, Ase, on her death bed. After her 
death he sails for foreign lands, stays away for many years, and at 
length lands upon the coast of Morocco, a rich man. In an Arabian 
desert he meets Anitra, daughter of a Bedouin chieftain, and falls in 
love with her; but his love is only short-lived, and Anitra, discovering 
that her hold upon him grows weaker, soon leaves him. He dreams 
of Solveig, his first love, the bride whom he abandoned in the Norway 
mountains. He goes back to his northern home, finds Solveig faith- 


fully waiting for him, and dies in her arms. 


“In the Village,” from Caucasian Sketches - - Ippolitow-Ivanow 


Ippolitow-Ivanow, one of the younger school of Russian con- 
ductors, was for a number of years conductor of the opera in Tiflis, 


Caucasus, and while there made a thorough study of the music of the 


a —eec—0——0— om | 





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156 











country. As a result he wrote a monograph on the Georgian folk 
songs and the suite known as ‘Caucasian Sketches.’ 

The piece is preceded by an introduction consisting of declama- 
tory passages for an English horn and a solo viola alternately, and of 
a plaintive melody for the former instrument. The main body of the 
movement is built upon the theme given out, after four introductory 
measures by the oboe. The piece closes with material similar to that 
with which it began. 


Caprice Viennois’~ - 7 - - - - - Kreisler 


The Caprice Viennois is one of the best known compositions of 
Fritz Kreisler, the eminent violinist, possessing the touch of sadness 
and graceful rhythm which is characteristic of his other Viennese 


pieces. Although originally a violin solo, the composer has also 
arranged it for piano solo, while the orchestration played today was 


arranged by Alfred Hertz. 


Overture to “The Gypsy Baron”’ ~ - ~ Johann Strauss 


To Johann Strauss, the younger—and greater—is probably due 
credit for having provided the world with more genuine pleasure than 
any other musicians who ever put pen to paper. Berlioz, Wagner 
and Brahms were profuse in their expressions of admiration for his 
music, and Hans von Bulow even went so far as to advocate the 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


REDFERN Mason— 


He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner, 


M1. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—T eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


157 


I 





— 
cr = 


= = 
pees 









ANNOUNCEMENT 
FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, December 26, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, December 28, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: LOUIS PERSINGER, Violinist 










PROGRAMME 
[ee enelucdettor a arsibale sett pereae fie oe oom melons steel Wagner 
2. Concerto for Violin, G minor 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio 
Finale: Allegro vivace 
LOUIS PERSINGER 
a. OyIMpHOny No. 5, hhenish wets... ee Schumann 
(Transcribed for modern orchestra by Frederick Stock) 
Allegro con brio 
Scherzo 
Andante commodo 
Molto maestoso— 
Allegro giocoso 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, January 9, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, January 11, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: E. ROBERT SCHMITZ, Pianist 





















PROGRAMME 


I. Symphony in G major ( Wdhe-Surprise >)... 2-2. Haydn 
Adagio cantabile—Vivace assai 
Andante—Theme and Variations 
Menuetto: Allegro molto 
Finale: Allegro di molto 
(First time at these concerts) 


2. Burleske in D minor for Piano and Orchestra 













(First time in San Francisco) 


3. Prelude and Love Death from “Tristan and Isolde’’.... 






4. Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra.......... 


i tmoieSiive ula diet qi rate me see RSE eee lad ae ieee ag Cesar Franck 
(First time at these concerts) 







158 























occasional insertion of his waltzes into the programmes of symphony 
concerts. Wagner is quoted as saying on one occasion: “One of 
Strauss waltzes as far surpasses in charm, finish and real musical worth 


hundreds of the artificial compositions of his contemporaries as the 


tower of St. Stephens surpasses the advertising columns on the Paris 
boulevards.’’ Although he is best known for his waltzes, of which he 
wrote nearly four hundred, Strauss also composed a number of oper- 


ettas, among them being the ““Gypsy Baron,”’ the overture to which is 
played today. 





Studio Hours: Monday, Tuesday and 683 Sutter Street 
Friday Afternoon, 2 to 5 Studio No. 2 


STUDIO OF THE THEATRE 
REGINALD TRAVERS 


announces he will open a practical School of the Theatre January Fifth. 


Special attention given to singers getting up a INTERVIEW BY APPOINTMENT 


repertoire coached in stage business and technique. Phone: Franklin 7190 


SHiaiOn Hours. Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Orley See 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


a 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 

















159 

















FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


JJersonnel 


The San Francisea Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 
King, O. 


~ Villalpando, W. 


Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 


Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 





BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F.N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


160 











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Musical Association of San Francisen 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 









OFFICERS 
JoHN D. McKzs, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President EK. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 






A. W. WipEeNHAM, Secretary-Manager 







BOARD OF GOVERNORS 












J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 







EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker. E. S. Heller William Sproule 










MUSIC COMMITTEE 






J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E.. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 












WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 





165 


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135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 


166 











Che San Francisea Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 


FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
503d and 504th Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, December 26, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, December 28, 2:45 o’clock 
Soloist: LOUIS PERSINGER, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 


1Abreladé- tot? t arsitah oo eee ake ee a Wagner 
2«.Concerto for: Violin Gumiiorig: tet. es = ee Bruch 
Allegro moderato 


dagio 
Finale: Allegro vivace 


LOUIS PERSINGER 


Intermission 


9s SVINDLONW NOs 15s) EN ETISN Sie) meee ne ee Schumann 
(Transcribed for modern orchestra by Frederick Stock) 
Allegro con brio 
Scherzo 
Andante commodo 
Molto maestoso— 
Allegro giocoso 
(First time in San Francisco) 


NOTE:—All Season Tickets must be paid for During December 


NOTICE! There will be no concert Sunday, January 
4, the next Popular Concert in the regular series being 
given Sunday afternoon, January 18. The sixth pair of 
concerts will be given Friday and Sunday afternoons, 
January 9 and 11. For programmes see announcements 


on page 158 


167 


Se Be ee ee ee ee ae 














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168 











Prelude to “Parsifal’’ Spt rie - ~ - : Wagner 


The following are Wagner's own words about the prelude, con- 
tained in H. E. Krehbiel’s “Studies in the Wagnerian Drama’: “Strong 
and firm does Faith reveal itself, elevated and resolute even in suffer- 
ing. In answer to the renewed promise, the voice of Faith sounds 
softly from eminent heights—as though borne on the wings of the 
snow-white dove,—slowly descending, embracing with ever-increasing 
breadth and fulness the heart of man, filling the world and the whole 
of nature with mightiest force, then, as though stilled to rest, glancing 
upward again toward the light of heaven. Then once more from the 
awe of solitude arises the lament of loving compassion, the agony, the 
holy sweat of the Mount of Olives, the divine suffering of Golgotha; 
the body blanches, the blood streams forth and glows now with the 
heavenly glow of blessing in the chalice, pouring forth on all that lives 
and languishes the gracious gift of Redemption through Love. For 
him we are prepared, for Amfortas, the sinful guardian of the shrine, 
who, with fearful rue for sin gnawing at his heart, must prostrate 
himself before the chastisement of the vision of the Grail. Shall 
there be redemption from the devouring torments of the soul? Yet 
once again we hear the promise and—hope!”’ 


The prelude reflects the prevailing sacred sentiment of the entire 
opera. It begins with a theme which suggests the Last Supper and 
the mission of the Knights of the Holy Grail. Intoned at first without 
harmony by strings and woodwinds, in its vague tonality it rises almost 
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presently strengthened when trumpets and trombones proclaim the 
Grail theme. Next comes the theme of Faith, again given out by the 
brass choir, militant and assertive. 


Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in G minor ~ - Bruch 


Of Bruch’s four concertos for violin and orchestra, the one in 
G minor is the best known; it is, indeed, a rival of the Mendelssohn 
violin concerto for the honor of being the most popular work of this 
type ever written. The concerto was completed in 1866, and was 
first played in April of that year. In the same summer Bruch sent the 
manuscript to Joseph Joachim, the greatest violinist of his time, and 
the latter had a considerable hand in the extensive revision which 
shaped the concerto as it now stands; the dedication of the work to 
Joachim was no mere compliment. The concerto begins with a 
prelude having no thematic connection with the rest of the movement, 
the main body of which opens with a statement of the first theme by 
the violin against a tremolo accompaniment. The violin likewise 
announces the second theme. After an extended development, and 
a long passage for the full orchestra, there is a return of the prelude, 
and a transitional passage leads over to the slow movement. The 
Adagio is built up out of the three principal themes, one of them being 


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justly considered among the loveliest melodies of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. This melody prevails throughout the entire movement, the other 
. themes being employed essentially as contrasts. The final movement, 
after a brief orchestral prelude, introduces the marck-like first theme 
‘n the violin. The second theme, more lyric in character, appears first 
-n the orchestra, and after extended development of the material the 


movement ends with a brilliant coda. 


Symphony No. 3, ‘‘Rhenish”’ - ~ - - Schumann 


In arranging this symphony for modern orchestra, Frederick 
Stock, conductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, has given the 
following explanation of the circumstances which prompted him to 
undertake the work: 

‘It happened in the earlier part of December, 1903, that Theo- 
dore Thomas conducted at one of the concerts of that season—the 
thirteenth in the history of our orchestra—Robert Schumann's third, 
or ‘Rhenish’ symphony. After the presentation of the symphony the ° 
writer of these lines found Thomas in most dejected spirits in the green 
room behind the stage of the Auditorium, which in those days housed 
the orchestra for its regular season of symphony concerts. 

‘*‘Oh, if Schumann had only known how to handle the orches- 
tra,” Thomas said to me, rather angrily, ‘how effectively his music 
could be made to sound! Such fine, noble themes, good workman- 
ship, and yet such abominably poor orchestration! All of Schumann's 
four symphonies should be re-scored, but especially this one. Anton 








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Dvorak promised me that he would take them in hand; but of course 
he is so busy all the time composing his own music, that I doubt if he 
ever will get to it. I shall do it myself as soon as time permits.’ 

“The time never came for Thomas to do as he intended, for just 
about thirteen months later he left this world. His remarks concern- 


ing Schumann's symphonies have ever lingered in my memory, and 
today’s first performance of his ‘Rhenish’ symphony in an entirely 
new orchestral garment is an attempt to bring to new life a work for 
which I have always felt the most affectionate regard. The new score 
represents a great amount of arduous, conscientious labor on my part, 
and | have taken pains to preserve the spirit of romance with which 
all of Schumann’s works are imbued. 


‘‘Comparing the original score with the new orchestration, one 
will find that about a dozen new instruments have been added, not 
only for the sake of sonority, but especially to obtain a larger variety 
of color effects. The first and last movements have been intentionally 
scored with utmost brilliancy, while the scherzo has been treated with 
lightness of touch and a somewhat deft humor. The romanza, or 
third movement, retains much of Schumann’s tone color, which is quite 
soft and shadowy. The cathedral scene, which precedes the finale, is 
changed completely as regards orchestral design; I believe that Schu- 
mann intended to picture the great Cologne cathedral as its massive 
forms rise boldly against the dull sky of a gray autumn day, when 
heavy mists rise from the Rhine, as it majestically passes in close 
vicinity to the cathedral. Here again I have tried to preserve the 


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172 





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romantic mysticism so characteristic of the original.”’ 


The score of Mr. Stock’s new version of Schumann’s symphony 
contains the following inscription: ““To a devoted lover of all good 
music, and a great admirer of Robert Schumann’s genius—Mrs. Clyde 
M. Carr—this amplified version of one of his most beautiful works is 
respectfully dedicated by Frederick A. Stock,” while below his name 
the transcriber wrote: “May the Lord and Schumann bestow mercy 
upon him!”’ 

Mr. Felix Borowski, the splendid programme annotator for the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, supplied further comment upon the 
symphony, on the occasion of its first performance in the new form 
December 9-10, 1921: 

“Before proceeding to a comparative analysis of the symphony, 
+ should be stated that Mr. Stock has made more than a mere 
rearrangement of Schumann's orchestration. In certain places, in 
order to give greater clarity to the thought, the transcriber has found 
it necessary to add a measure here or there—as, for instance, an extra 


‘measure at the beginning of the fourth movement, so that the enuncia- 


tion of the theme of the movement, somewhat clouded in Schumann's 
version, may be made more apparent to the ear. In order, too, that 
the work be given a more effective ending, Mr. Stock has replaced the 
coda of Schumann’s invention by another, in which, however, he has 
employed the master’s material. It is worth mentioning, also, that the 
transcriber has not omitted to avail himself of such opportunities as 
arise from contrapuntal embellishment in the various orchestral voices, 
these, however, growing out of the material which Schumann orig- 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


REDFERN Mason— 
He played admirably. 


There was no_ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl._— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—1 eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


173 



































Now Open For Bookings 


SAN FRANCISCO WIND INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE 


C. Addimando, Oboe H. Benkman, Flute 
N. Zannini, Clarinet Charles Tryner, French Horn 
E. Kubitschek, Bassoon Isabelle Arndt, Piano 
Management LULU BLUMBERG 
3131 Jackson Street Telephone Fillmore 8035 








ANNOUNCEMENT 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, January 9, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, January 11, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: E. ROBERT SCHMITZ, Pianist 





PROGRAMME 
1. Symphony in G major (“The Surprise’’) ..............--Haydn 


Adagio cantabile—Vivace assal 
Andante—TIheme and Variations 
Menuetto: Allegro molto 

Finale: Allegro di molto 


(First time at these concerts) 


2. Burleske in D minor for Piano and Orchestra.......-.... 
EA GUMEY (ele b bee, einay 2 mere ian, Salty ine Woe pee Richard Strauss 


(First time in San Francisco ) 


2 Prelude and Love Death from “Tristan and Isolde’’.... 


4. Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra.......... | 


Rn Se ey rept oer ey ates ee isn PEE Ne Cesar Franck 
(First time at these concerts) 


174 








inated in the first place. 

“Tt will be of interest to compare the orchestral forces used by 
Schumann and those which are used to interpret the present version 
of the symphony. Schumann employed the following instruments: 
Two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two 
trumpets, three trombones, kettledrums and strings. In the first, sec- 
ond and third movements he did not employ trombones at all. Mr. 
Stock’s score calls for three flutes (the third flute interchangeable 
with a piccolo), three oboes (one interchangeable with an English 
horn), three clarinets, three bassoons, four horns, four trumpets, three 
trombones, bass tuba, kettledrums, triangle, cymbals, bass drum, side 
drum, tambourine, and strings.’ 










Studio Hours: Monday, Tuesday and 683 Sutter Street 
Friday Afternoon, 2 to 5 Studio No. 2 


STUDIO OF THE THEATRE 
CRREGINALD TRAVERS 


announces he will open a practical School of the Theatre January Fifth. 


Special attention given to singers getting up a INTERVIEW BY APPOINTMENT 
Phone: Franklin 995 


repertoire coached in stage business and technique. 








Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 


Phone D las 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 one Vougias 


Studio Hours: 














KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
_ SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 





Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 





175 


es erg 




















wil Wy 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 





Jdersmuel 


Che Sau Francisen Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Geena, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese. W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimandao, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. , 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 








BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 
Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F.N. . 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R.E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E, 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


176 








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Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
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Remaining Dates 


Chamber Music 
Tuesday eve., Jan. 13 


Symphony (pop) 
Thursday eve., Jan. 
Symphony (reg.) 
Thursday eve., Feb. 12 
Symphony (pop) 
‘Thursday eve., Feb. 26 
Symphony (reg.) 
Thursday eve., Mar. 12 
Symphony (pop) 
Thursday eve., Mar. 26 





SAN FRANCISCO 


Symphony Orchestra 


E. ROBERT SCHMITZ, Soloist 
AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 


Thursday Evening, January 8, 1925 


Eight-thirty- o’clock 


Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 


Box Office at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland, Cal. 
Telephone Lakeside 6700 








A. 


Program 
Symphony No, 6; ° Pastoral” e042 Beethoven 


Allegro ma non troppo (Awakening of Joyful Feelings on Arrival 
in the Country) 

Andante molto moto (By the Brook) 

Allegro (Village Festival)— 

Allegro (The Storm) — 

Allegretto (Shepherd’s Song: Thanksgiving after the Storm) 


Burleske in D minor for Piano and Orchestra........ 
Richard Strauss 


E. RoBERT SCHMITZ 
Intermission 


Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra... 
Cesar Franck 


E. RoBERT SCHMITZ 


Preludes to. . Parsital ccc alse eel eas ne W agner 





pammpnony, No.6, Pastoral oan a eres eee Beethoven 


Beethoven is so illustrious a master of absolute music that his 
few excursions into the realm of “program” music, or music that 
tells a story, are of intense important interest. Supporters of the 
belief that music may be made to relate a definite story or to 
depict incidents as well as broad feeling and emotions, will find in 
Beethoven only a partial ally. The master approached the task of 
writing a symphony that should tell a story with some hesitance 
and a realization of the limitations of his narrative medium. We 
find that his intentions, when this symphony was first conceived, 
concerned itself with the creation of a work without any definite 
program. In one of his sketch books he wrote the title, “Sinfonia 
Characteristica, or Recollections of Country Life.” Scrawled at 
side of the page were the annotations, “the hearer should be per- 
mitted to discover the situations for himself; he who has ever 
conceived an idea of country life ought to be able, without many 
indications, to think of the author’s meaning,” also this expression 
of truth and wisdom: “Carried too far, all delineation in instru- 
mental music loses.” At a later period Beethoven reconsidered 
his intention of allowing the hearers of his symphony to discover 
its pictures for themselves and gave each. movement its subt'tle. 
Still later he modified this concession to program music rather 
quaintly by writing under the name of the work the phrase: 
“More an expression of feeling than’ of painting.” 


Burleske in D minor for Piano and Orchestra.............- 


Richard Strauss 


The Burleske was composed during the winter of 1885-86 and 
was first performed on June 21, 1890, with Strauss conducting. 
The pianist was Eugen d’A‘bert, to whom the Burleske is dedi- 


cated. Strauss’ “Death and Transfiguration” was given its first 
performance on the same occasion. 





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Program 


The piece opens Allegro vivace in 3-4 time. The first group of 
themes includes the opening phrase for the kettledrums, followed 
by measures that show the influence of Brahms and a motive for 
the pianoforte. The “song theme,” of an expressive nature is 
derived from the second measure of the kettledrum figure. The 
pianoforte extends it. Solo instrument and kettledrums have little 
episodes of dialogue. After the development for pianoforte and 
orchestral tutti, the introduction of the repetition section is note- 
worthy. There is a long coda with a solo cadenza. 


Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra..Cesar Franck 


“The title, “Symphonic Variations,’ is fairly modern,” says 
Philip H. Goepp. “Probably the first great work in this form 
was Schumann’s Etudes Symphoniques’ for piano, which are like- 
wise variations. The word symphonic is used probably with refer- 
ence to the breadth of treatment rather than to the instrumental 
scoring. So here with Cesar Franck the first tune (it is not called 
theme) gives the essence, but not at all the strict outline of the 
subject. There is all the personal sty'e of the composer, and the 
theme has an unusual tonality. The first half ends in F sharp 
minor; the second, not in the relative major, but in A minor. 
There is much of the famous ‘lowered supertonic’ in the design 
of the tune. In the course of the variations it seems that the 


main striking traits, an eccentric pace of the question, with a 
smooth pleading flow of answer are mainly followed, with little 
heed of other elements such as the sequence of keys. An element 
of difficulty in this free kind of variations, for the unprepared 
listener, is the lack of separation. The train of variant verses, 
entering and ceasing quite without warning, come like a delicate 
chain of clouds, where the separate members are hard to distin- 
guish in the group.” 


Prebide #0 tearciial cig) me ee eho one W agner 


The following are Wagner’s.own words about the-prelude, con- 
tained in H. E. Krehbiel’s “Studies in the Wagnerian Drama”: 
“Strong and firm does Faith reveal itself, elevated and resolute 
even in suffering. In answer to the renewed promise, the voice of 
Faith sounds softly from eminent heights—as though borne on the 
wings of the snow-white dove,—slowly descending, embracing with 
ever-increasing breadth and fulness the heart of man, filling the 
world and the whole of nature with mightiest force, then, as 
though stilled to rest, glancing upward again toward the light of 
heaven. Then once more from the awe of solitude arises the 
lament of loving compassion, the agony, the holy sweat of the 
Mount of Olives, the divine suffering of Golgotha; the body 
blanches, the blood streams forth and glows now with the heavenly 
glow of blessing in the chalice, pouring forth on all that lives and 
languishes the gracious gift of Redemption through Love. For 
him we are prepared, for Amfortas, the sinful guardian of the 
shrine, who, with fearful rue for sin gnawing at his heart, must 
prostrate himself before the chastisement of the vision of the Grail. 
Shall there be redemption from the devouring torments of the 
soul? Yet once again we hear the promise and—hope!” 








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oa ORCHESTRA 


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1924 1925 
Fourteenth Season. cag 


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184 















Musical Assoviation of San Francisco 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 











OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKess, President 

J. B. Levison, Vice-President K. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 

A. W. WipENHAM, Secretary-Manager 











BOARD OF GOVERNORS 











J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd ’ Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J.B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 







EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 














MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 












WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
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EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 









Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. - Telephone Garfield 2819 


185 





— 





SET IO A Ae Os) 
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aA i 
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HE choice of the 

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186 











ae ae 
Che San Franciseo Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
506th and 507th Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, January 9, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, January 11, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: E. ROBERT SCHMITZ, Pianist 


PROGRAMME 


I. Symphony in G major, ‘“The Surprise’’.................... Haydn 
Adagio cantabile—Vivace assai 
Andante—Theme and Variations 
Menuetto: Allegro molto 
Finale: Allegro di molto 
(First time at these concerts) 


2.. Burleske in D minor for Piano and Orchestra.............. 


(First time in San Francisco) 
Intermission 
3. Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra.......... 


Eee Ar eee ae pa Taree al. on GN ee RE Cesar Franck 
(First time at these concerts) 


4. Prelude and Love Death from ‘‘Tristan and Isolde’’.... 








Baap heels Mea Bat Soh Erg Ei Ur Ae SOS, a OAS Aga age CRN Wagner 
(The Piano is a Mason & Hamlin) 
E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
Illustrated Lecture 
“The Fortnightlys” : : ; St. Francis Colonial Ballroom 


Monday Evening, January 19 


RECITAL 
Scottish Rite Auditorium —Thursday Evening, January 22 





MASTER CLASS 


Commencing Tuesday, January 13—~Technic and Interpretation 
Reservations for Master Class and private lessons may now be made. 


Management: Ida G. Scott, Kohler & Chase Bldg., Kearny 6417 


——————————————— 
187 








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Symphony in G major, “The Surprise”’ - ~ 3 Haydn 


This symphony, known as “The Surprise,’’ and in Germany as 
the symphony “with the drum-stroke,’’ is the third of the twelve 
Salomon symphonies as arranged in the order of their appearance in 
the catalogue of the Philharmonic Society of London. It is known as 
No. 6 in the Breitkopf and Hartel edition. 


Composed in 1791, this symphony was performed for the first 
time on March 23, 1792, at the sixth Salomon concert in London. It 
pleased immediately and greatly. The Oracle characterized the sec- 
ond movement as one of Haydn's happiest inventions, and likened 
‘‘the surprise ’—which is occasioned by the sudden orchestral crashes 
in the Andante—to a shepherdess, lulled by the sound of. a distant 
waterfall, awakened suddenly from sleep and frightened by the 
unexpected discharge of a musket. 


Griesinger, in his Life of Haydn, contradicts the story that Haydn 
introduced these crashes to arouse the English women from sleep. 
Haydn also contradicted it, and said it was his intention only to sur- 
prise the audience by something new. ‘The first allegro of my sym- 
phony was received with countless ‘Bravos,’ but enthusiasm rose to its 
highest pitch after the Andante with the drum stroke. ‘Ancora, 
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me on my idea.’ On the other hand, Gyrowetz, in his Autobiography, 
said that he visited Haydn just after he had composed the Andante, 
and Haydn was so pleased with it that he played it to him on the 
piano, and, sure of his success, said with a roguish laugh: ““The women 
will cry out here!”’ 


The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two bassoons, 
two horns, two trumpets, kettledrums, and strings. 


Burleske in D minor for Piano and Orchestra - Richard Strauss 


The Burleske was composed during the winter of 1885-86 and 
was first performed on June 21, 1890, with Strauss conducting. The 
pianist was Eugene d’ Albert, to whom the piece is dedicated. At this 
same concert Strauss’ ‘‘Death and Transfiguration’’ was given its first 
performance. The work is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, 
two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, a set of four 
kettledrums, and strings. 


The piece opens Allegro vivace in 3-4 time. The first group of 
themes includes the opening phrase for the kettledrums, followed by 
measures that show the influence of Brahms and a motive for the 
pianoforte. The “song theme,” of an expressive nature, is derived 
from the second measure of the kettledrum figure. The pianoforte 
extends it. Solo instrument and kettledrums have little episodes of 
dialogue. After the development for pianoforte and orchestral tutti, 
the introduction of the repetition section is noteworthy. There is a 
long coda with a solo cadenza. 


Symphonic Variations for Piano and Orchestra ~ Cesar Franck 


‘The title ‘Symphonic Variations’ is fairly modern,”’ says Philip 
H. Goepp. ‘Probably the first great work in this form was Schumann's 


GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianist 
(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 
Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 
Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-J 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 


190 














‘Etudes Symphoniques’ for piano, which are likewise variations. The 
word symphonic is used probably with reference to the breadth of 
treatment rather than to the instrumental scoring. So here with Cesar 
Franck the first tune (it is not called theme) gives the essence, but not 
at all the strict outline of the subject. There is all the personal style 
of the composer, and the theme has an unusual tonality. The first 
half ends in F sharp minor; the second, not in the relative major, but 
in A minor. There is much of the famous ‘lowered supertonic’ in the 
‘design of the tune. In the course of the variations it seems that the 
main striking traits, an eccentric pace of the question, with a smooth 
pleading flow of answer are mainly followed, with little heed of other 
elements such as the sequence of keys. An element of difficulty in 
this free kind of variations, for the unprepared listener, is the lack of 
separation. The train of variant verses, entering and ceasing quite 
without warning, come like a delicate chain of clouds, where the sepa- 
rate members are hard to distinguish in the group.” 


Prelude and Love Death from “Tristan and Isolde’ - Wagner 


The Prelude has been described as a “‘sumptuously picturesque 


composition having much the same general form as the Prelude to 
‘Lohengrin’—working up through a long crescendo to a fortissimo 
climax, and then subsiding quickly to a pianissimo.”’ The Love Death 


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19] 








closes the opera, when Isolde, in a transport of love and grief, sings 
her death song over the dead body of her lover, Tristan. In the 
present concert version the Love Death is attached, by a simple har- 
monic device, to the Prelude. Wagner himself has given an account 
of the content of the composition in one of his writings: 


‘Now there is no end to the yearnings, the longing, the delight 
and the misery of love. World, might, fame, splendor, honor, knight- 
hood, truth and friendship all vanish like a baseless dream. Only one 
thing survives: desire, desire unquenchable, and ever freshly mani- 
fested longing—thirst and yearning. The only redemption: death, the 
sinking into oblivion, the sleep from which there is no awakening. The 
musician who chose this theme for the prelude to his love-drama, as he 
felt that he was here in the boundless realm of the very element of 
music, could only one care: how he should get bounds to his fancy; 
for the exhaustion of the theme was impossible. Thus he took once 
for all this unsatiable desire; in long-drawn accents it surges up, from 
its first timid confession, its softest attraction, through throbbing sighs, 
hope and pain, laments and wishes, delight and torment, up to the 
mightiest onslaught, the most powerful endeavor to find the breach 
which shall open to the heart the path to the ocean of the endless joy 
of love. In vain; its powers spent, the heart sinks back to thirst with 
desire, with desire unfulfilled, till at last, in the depth of its exhaustion, 
the starting eye sees the glimmering of the highest bliss of attainment. 
It is the ecstasy of dying, of the surrender of being, of the final redemp- 
tion into that wondrous realm from which we wander farthest when we 
strive to take it by force.”’ 


: . J Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday ' Phone Douglas 1678 
Studio Hours: Aftecicone css z 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 








Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


ot - 


48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 
Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 























ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU ANNOUNCES 


MARIA 


IVOGUN 


Europe’s Greatest Coloratura Soprano 





Scottish Rite Hall—Monday Eve., Jan. 26, 8:30 P. M. 
Tickets Now: Sherman, Clay & Co. $2.00, 1.50, 1.00, .50 


‘‘Averse though I am to superlatives, the candid beauty of Mme. Ivogun’s voice, the 
fineness of her technical skill, the wise restraints she puts upon its volume, and the vital 
sympathy in its vibrations tempt me to overstep caution and pronounce her to be the great- 
est coloratura soprano | have heard. 


“I _know that she has everything that | like in a soprano voice and nothing that I dis- 
like. Her legato is flawless. The ease and clarity of her coloratura passages make them 
worthy of being heard by every student—and by some widely advertised singers who think 
they are beyond the need of study. Througout her wide range, every tone is perfectly 
placed.”—Ray C. Brown, S. F. Chronicle March 1, 1924 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis: 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner, 


M1. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 











ANNOUNCEMENT 
SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Curran Theatre 


Friday, January 23, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, January 25, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: ERNA RUBINSTEIN, Violinist 





PROGRAMME 


Le SYEADNGHYONO. OS nC inmiOr te eee Beethoven 
Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro 
Finale: Allegro . 


Ze LORE Osi, On uan sacks eh es Richard Strauss 
3. Concerto for Violin, E minor.......................... Mendelssohn 
Allegro moto appasionato 
Andante 


Allegretto non troppo—Allegro molto vivace 


ERNA RUBINSTEIN 





ANNOUNCEMENT 
FIFTH POPULAR CONCERT 


Curran Theatre 


Sunday, January 18, 2:45 P. M. 





PROGRAMME | 
1. Overture, “Fra Diavolo’’ Se eee I oe Se ARS BE Auber 
Ze UG weWIOtner CrO08G, oso est ee Ravel 


Pavene of the Sleeping dace 

Hop ’'O My Thumb 

Laideronnette, Empress of the Pagodes 
Beauty and the Beast 

The Fairy Garden 


3. Overture: to “*Fannhauser i228 Rote Wagner 


4. Symphonic Suite, ‘““Scheherazade’’.....__._. Rimsky-Korsakow 


194 

















AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 


Next Thursday, 8:20 P. M. 


Soloist 


MISCHA ELMAN 


Violinist 


Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 





THE 


MARGARET MARY MORGAN (CO. 


TTT 


Engraving: Printers - Publishing 
Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 





















THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 


One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or-consolidations with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 3lst, 1924 





Asseta Sod ts Ce es & Ceca no epeeiera we $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund...........-++++e0: 461,746.52 
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Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
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COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 


195 

















Jdersonnel 






Che San Francisen Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 





FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T: 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 

















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WZ || 25 
WZ THE CITY OF SAN FRAN CISCO PRESENTS 


SAN FRANCISCO += 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA - 


ant wed cAlfted He riZ««axConductor 


IN A 
POPULAR CONCERT 





, 
I 
—————— eee 
aaa — — 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM. 


THURSDAY, JANUARY 15, 1925 | 


8:20 P.M. 


WITH 


MISCHA ELMAN, Violinist 


GUEST ARTIST 


err 


Mischa Elman makes Victor Records exclusively 
The piano is the Steinway 


_— 


| _ AUSPICES 
Mayor JAMES RoupH, JR., AND BOARD or 
SUPERVISORS 
DirEcTION—AUDITORIUM COMMITTER 
J. Emmet Haypen, CHarrMAN 
ANGELO J. Rossr Epwin G. Baru 

















PROGRAM 
v 


NATIONAL ANTHEM 


* Ovrertoune, “* Grongke,’’ NO. 3.35. 2.2 32 Beethoven 


“Fidelio,” Beethoven’s only opera, was first performed at Vienna, in 
1805. For this opera he composed four overtures, three of which went 
under the title of “Leonore” and of which the third is by-far the finest. 
The overture is the drama in miniature, and far outclasses anything in 
the opera itself. It is a masterpiece of dramatic unity, strength and pas- 
sion, as well as of unique and imposing musical construction. 


Mat cE Be APY 6 SUPERS INOS acces A cama cand Grieg 


Morning 

Ase’s Death 

Anitra’s Dance 

In the Hall of the Mountain King 


This widely known and popular work of the Norwegian master is the 
first of two suites of incidental music to Ibsen’s dramatic poem of the 
same name. In the first movement no great stretch of imagination is 
necessary to follow the daylight as it grows from the first timid, twink- 
ling rays of the dawn up to the bursting into full view of the golden orb 
in all its splendor. The second movement is played as a prelude to the 
third act of the drama and is a picture of the lonely, forsaken old mother 
dying in solitude, with many a moan of distress and many a lament for 
her harum-scarum boy. The third movement is in Africa, and Peer Gynt, 
lying on cushions, smoking a long pipe and drinking coffee, watches Anitra 
and her maidens as they dance. The last movement pictures the scene 
in the hall of the mountain king and the grotesque incantations and 
dances of the imps. 


3. ‘‘IN THE VILLAGE”’’ from Caucasian Sketches..[ ppolitow-Ivanow 


Ippolitow-Ivanow, one of the younger school of Russian conductors, 
was for a number of years conductor of the opera in Tiflis, Caucasus, and 
while there made a thorough study of the music of the country. The piece 
played this evening from his‘group of “Caucasian Sketches” is introduced 
by declamatory passages for an English horn and a solo viola alternately. 
The main body of the movement is built upon the theme given out, after 
four introductory measures by the oboe. Of particular interest in this 
piece is a pair of small Caucasian “tympani oriental” which can be noted 
in the middle section. These instruments were presented by Vassily 
Safonow to Mr. Max Nickel, percussionist in the orchestra, during Saf- 
onow’s term as conductor of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, and 
are the only ones in America, 


4. *'P re TRISH WASHER WOMANCZN oo cccccceccscccccssscsseceeseesssseseeeee Leo Sowerby 


“The Irish Washerwoman” is the name of a jig originally composed 
by Walter (“Piper”) Jackson, who was the most celebrated Irish piper of 
the eighteenth century. Living in the middle of the century Jackson was 
known for his skill, not only in playing on the Uillean or Union bagpipe, 
but for the jigs and reels which he composed for it. 








5. ‘‘CAPRICE VIENNOIS’’ weescrreestensertarenaesedbnsnronnsieeereoey—esein oes FOASLOR 

The Caprice Viennois (Cradle Song) is one of the best known com- 
positions of Fritz Kreisler, the eminent violinist, possessing the touch of 
sadness and graceful rhythm which is characteristic of his other Viennese 
pieces. Although originally a violin solo, the composer has also arranged 
it for piano solo, while the orchestration played this evening was arranged 
by Alfred Hertz. 


INTERMISSION 


6. CONCERTO For VIOLIN AND OrcHESTRA, D major... Tschaikowsky 


Allegro moderato 
Canzonetta—Andante— 
Finale: Allegro vivacissimo 


MiscHA EUMAN 


Oddly enough four great composers number among their works only 
one important concerto for violin and orchestra. These are Beethoven, 
Brahms, Mendelssohn and Tschaikowsky. The concerto played this eve- 
ning was composed in March, 1878, at Clarens, in a villa overlooking Lake 
Geneva. It was dedicated first to Leopold Auer—later to Adolph Brodsky, 
who gave it its first performance in Vienna, December 4, 1881. Tschai- 
kowsky experienced great trouble in bringing out this concerto. Because 
of its tremendous technical difficulties as well as the doubtfulness, at that 
time, of its effectiveness with the public, he was repeatedly disappointed 
by violinists, among them Auer, Kotek and Sauret, whom he had expected 
to play the - work. 


NEXT AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 
TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 10 
Soloist: FLORENCE EASTON 


Prima Donna Soprano, Metropolitan Opera Company 


ALL WAGNER PROGRAMME 


TICKETS NOW: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., $1.00, 75c, 50e. 
SECURE YOUR SEATS EARLY 


LS eS less SSSR 


SYMPHONY POPULAR CONCERT 
NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P.M. CURRAN THEATRE 
Eater acne eae SS oat ne ae Pa SL SS ss EON 
ERNA RUBINSTEIN 


Sensational Young Violinist 


Soloist with the Symphony 
FRI. and SUN. AFTERNOONS NEXT WEEK, CURRAN THEATRE 

















| ataeaetinantinesestiaeaataaatiagenatieeatiaaimendaede ade eae ea | 
THE PIANO I8 TFHERE STEINWAY 


You can enjoy Mischa 
Elman as often as you 
like, if you own a 
= Victrola. We have 
Victrolas of every 






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“ Mission Street near 21st 

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SAN JOSE 


e(USICAL cASSOCIATION 


PRESENTS 


©rchestra 


cAtrreD SHeERTz, (onductor 





eorris € “DatLtEy @7¥CEMORIAL cAUDITORIUM 


SAN JOSE, CALIFORNIA 


riday, fanuary 16th, 1925 


AVG sto Fai 


San Grancisco Symphony 





0 COO 

















‘Programme 
ees) 


f Overture te! “Oberéw lcs Se be le Las ae Weber 


The overture to ‘Oberon’ is a resume of the musical contents of the 
opera and has been placed among the finest of the romantic overtures 
the world possesses. After the introduction there is heard the pro- 
longed horn tunes representing the call of Oberon, the king of the 
fairies. All the elves of his kingdom obey the summons. The famous 
crashing chord, which comes as a striking surprise, concludes the in- 
troduction. The leading subject and the love song form the material 
for the main section, and the closing subject is the melody of the well- 
known ‘Ocean, thou mighty monster,” aria of the third act. 


2. Symphony in G Major, “The Surprise”... Hayden 
Adagio cantabile —Vivace assai 
Andante—Theme and Variations 
Menuetto: Allegro molto 
Finale: Allegro di molto 


This symphony, known as “The Surprise,” and in Germany as the sym- 
phony, ‘‘with the drum-stroke,”” was composed in 1791 and was frst 
performed on March 23, 1792, at the sixth Salomon concert in London. 
It pleased immediately and greatly. The Oracle characterized the sec- 
ond movement as one of Hayden’s happiest inventions, and likened ‘‘the 
surprisé”—which is occasioned by the sudden. orchestral crashes in 
the Andante—to a shepherdess, lulled by the sound of a distant water- 
fall, awakened suddenly from sleep and frightened by the unexpected 
discharge of a musket. 


Some italy Nog rece Ne 2 See ee ere aes ae Tschaikowsky 


This work by the Russian master was inspired by a prolonged visit to 
Rome, some of the themes being taken from collections of folksongs, 
others based upon songs Tschaikowsky heard in the streets. The title 
is well chosen, as one melody follows another in a capricious manner 
although there is no violence done to the basic principles of musical 
form. The inevitable Tarantella, a characteristic Italian folk dance, 
is a feature of the last part of the work though at the end the move- 
ment becomes too rapid even for a Tarantella. 


Intermission 


Leeeemde tO. <4l he deluge’ 22.) eee wi Saint-Saens 
Violin Oligato, Louis Persinger 

This piece is the prelude to Saint-Saens’ biblical cantata “‘The Deluge,”’ 

which is based on the biblical narration of the flood. It is a short, 

expressive movement in the free form for the string orchestra—a slow 

introductory passage, leading to a quasi-fugal treatment of a sustained 


subject given out by the violas, following which the solo violin jn- 
troduces a melodious obligato, which holds the foreground to the end. 


a | 


SepOe’s, | TP eatin se wee Sse Pt OR Meier Gv. 5y Liszt 


The ‘Loves Dream’’ (“‘Liebestraum’’) is one of three short nocturnes 
for piano solo, the one ‘played this evening (the third, in A flat) being 
the most popular.- Liszt originally used the melody as a song, which 
was set to the poem, “‘O Love,” by Ferninand Freiligrath. : 


6. “In the Village” from Caucasian Sketches 


Ippolitow-Ivanow 


Ippolitow-Ivanow, one of the younger school of Russian conductors, 
was for a number of years conductor of the opera in Tiflis, Caucasus, 
and while there made a thorough study of themusic of the country. The 
piece played this evening from his group of ‘“‘Caucasian Sketches” is 
introduced by declamatory passages for an English horn and a solo 
viola alternately. The main body of the movement is built upon the 
theme given out, after four introductory measures by the oboe. 








“Programme 
SLY 


/.: Caprice TV iennois 22) eee ee ee eae Kreisler 


The Caprice Viennois (Cradle Song) is one of the best known compo- 
sitions of Fritz Kreisler, the eminent violinist, possessing the touch of 
sadness and graceful rhythm which is characteristic of his other Viennese 
pieces. Although originally a violin solo, the composer has also ar- 
ranged it for piano solo, while the orchestration ‘played this evening 
was arranged by Alfred Hertz. 


5S. Overture to “irae iavolo a. ee ae eee ee Auber 


The overture to “Fra Diavolo” which carries out the merry spirit of 
the opera, opens with a drum solo, very softly, followed by a march 
tune for violins, violas and ‘cellos. The march, gradually extending to 
the other instruments, productes the effect of an advancing troop of 
soldiers. It grows louder and louder until the soldiers have passed, then 
dies away in the distance. Other themes are presented and developed 
to a splendid climax. 


REMAINING CONCERTS 


Albert: ,Spalding,. Violinist... 2.04. = ae eee ee February 19 
Mabel. Garmson. Sopranotia so eee ae March, 19 
dite Sthipa, ya Tenors se eae oe oe April 21 


“An Organization Worthy the Support of 


Every Citizen” 


~? 
be rs 
2 


MARIAN E. IVES, Business Manager 


se 


BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Mrs. Wm. J. Leet Mr. Earl Towner 
Dr. Chas. M. Richards Miss Marian FE. Ives 
Mr. Chester Herold Mr. David M. Burnett 
Mr. Robert R. Syer Mr. George S. Eardley 








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CHE Sm} PROAES OV GK 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY) 
= ORCHESTR4 


Marntamenr Dy {kk 
The Musical 4 | 
Association of i 
oan Francisco 


Se 
5 Te 
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| FIFTH POPULAR 








A 
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1924 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUC Lt 


a 


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Alfred Hertz 


RECOMMENDS 
CONN INSTRUMENTS 


The San Francisco 
Symphony 


CONN 
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“IT take great pleasure in 
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Conn San Francisco Co. Conn Oakland Co. ° 
47 Kearny St. 531-16th St. 


208 















Musical Association of San Francisen 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 










OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKzs, President 


J. B. Lrvison, Vice-President EK. R. Drmwonp, Treasurer 







A. W. WipENHAM, Secretary-Manager 









BOARD OF GOVERNORS 










J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J.B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 









EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 











MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 












WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 








EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 













Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 








209 





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HE choice of the 

Mason & Hamlin Piano 
for the concert platform 
proclaims its sonority— 
its selection by famous art- 
ists declares the quality of 
its tone—its presence in 
homes of wealth and taste 
bears tribute: to its unpar- 


alleled beauty! 


Wiley BAllen ©. 


135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 


210 











The San Francisco Soumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—_Season—1925 


FIFTH POPULAR CONCERT 
510th Concert 


CURRAN THEATRE 








Sunday Afternoon, January 18, 2:45 o’clock 







PROGRAMME 
fy Overture toh fa Diavolo (oe Auber 
2. Suite, “Mother Goose’”’ 
Pavane of the Sleeping Beauty 
Hop O’ My Thumb 
Laideronnette, Empress of the Pagodes 


Beauty and the Beast 
The Fairy Garden 


eee aN cae tw te ae at ee Om Tschaikowsky 











3. Italian Caprice 






Intermission 





4. Symphonic Suite, “‘Scheherazade’’.......... Rimsky-Korsakow 
The Sea and Sinbad’s Ship 
The Narrative of the Kalendar Prince 
The Young Prince and the Young Princess 
Festival at Bagdad—The Sea—The Ship Goes to 


Pieces on a Rock Surmounted by the Bronze 
Statue of a Warrior—Conclusion 











SAN FRANCISCO WIND INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE 






Announcement of Change in Concert Dates 





In order to avoid conflict with late bookings of the Symphony 
Orchestra, concerts of the San Francisco Wind Instrument 
Ensemble will be given in the Ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel, 
Friday evening, February 13, and Tuesday evening, April 28, 
instead of February 3 and April 14, as originally announced. 
Management, Lulu Blumberg, 3131 Jackson Street; Telephone 
Fillmore 8035. 









2ii 








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by famous European Orchestras in albums. 


Beethoven: Symphony No. 7, in A Major, Opus 92, in nine parts, on 
five records. Set complete in album form.............. $8.75 


Beethoven: Symphony No. 8, in F, Opus 93, in seven parts, on four 
PECOLOS (52. rakes Emer eects Sack 6 lide hide aahansScapaanecavs we cores $7.00 
By Weingartner and London Symphony Orchestra. 


Dvorak: Symphony in E Minor, No. 5, Opus 95, from the New 
World, 10 parts, five records...... pee Rie $8.75 complete 


By Halle Orchestra, London. 





Mozart: Symphony No. 39, in E flat, Opus 543, in six parts, on 
PRO TOCOTOG. ees cr oan bela ican geetsawineneee $5.25 complete 
By Weingartner and London Symphony Orchestra. 


Tschaikowsky: Symphony Pathetique, in eight parts, on four records, 
COMPIGEA : EA ATE a eee vce eee aac ead ea $7.00 


By Sir Henry Wood'and New Queen's Orchestra. 
Beethoven: Quartet in C Sharp Minor, in ten parts, on five records, 

Ploy ey 0) (ido va toed Lo ba 7 Epa eeu RE tel yell Re PISS CoP RS $8.75 
By Lener String Quartet, of Budapest. 
Quartette in D Major, in six parts, on three records, 
Oe LOE Ge F1Tl ys BA CRT a. oak cooks Cadded,stecsbc ec dec ceatetectccee $5.25 
By Lener String Quartet, of Budapest. 
Mozart: Quartet in C Major, eight parts, on four records, com- 

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By Lener String Quartet, of Budapest. 


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Overture to “Fra Diavolo’’ - - - - = Auber 


The comic opera, “Fra Diavolo,’’ was a tremendous success on 
the occasion of its first performance in Paris, January 28, 1830, and 
has remained a popular favorite to this day. The scene of the play is 
laid in Italy, the plot dealing with Fra Diavolo, the celebrated leader of 
a band of brigands, parading under the name of the Marquis of San 
Marco. The overture, which carries out the merry spirit of the opera, 
opens with a drum solo, very softly, followed by a march tune for 
violins, violas and ‘cellos. The march, gradually extending to the 
other instruments, produces the effect of an advancing troop of sol- 
diers. It grows louder and louder until the soldiers have passed, then 
dies away in the distance. Other themes are presented and developed 
to a splendid climax. 


Suite, “Mother Goose” (Ma mere I’Oye) ~ - - Ravel 


The five little pieces which Ravel named ‘“‘Mother Goose’’ were 
originally composed for piano (four hands) and for the edification of 
two children—Mini and Jean Godebski—to whom the work was dedi- 
cated. The first performance of the work in its original form took 
place in Paris, April 10, 1910. The orchestral version was first pro- 
duced by the New York Symphony Orchestra in 1912 and was per- 
formed by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra during the same 


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season. The following is a condensed description of the five numbers, 
by Carlo Fischer: | 

‘The Pavene was a graceful and stately dance popular at the 
court of Henry XIV., in this case the form being utilized to give an 
impressionistic sketch of the Sleeping Beauty. We all remember Hop 
o My Thumb, who scattered crumbs to find his way, but the birds ate 
them up. In the third movement we have the picture of the little 
pagodes bobbing their heads as they play and sing for their empress as 
she takes her bath. In the next number, Beauty (clarinet), after argu- 
ing with the Beast (contrabassoon), finally consents to marry him, 
whereupon he turns into a beautiful prince (solo violin and ‘cello). 
The final number presents merely a general picture of the fairy 
garden. ” 


Italian Caprice - - - - - - Tschaikowsky 


The Italian Caprice was written in the period in which Tschai- 
kowsky sojourned in Italy in 1880 and was first performed the same 
year in a concert at Moscow, Nicholas Rubinstein conducting. The 
themes are taken from collections of folk songs, or based on songs © 
Tschaikowsky heard in the streets. The Caprice opens with a trumpet 
fanfare—a bugle call of the Italian cavalry, which the composer heard 
every evening while living in the Hotel Constanzi, next to the barracks 
of the Royal Cuirassiers. The title, “Italian Caprice,’’ is well chosen, 
as one melody follows another in a capricious manner, although there 
is no violence done to the basic principles of musical form. The inevi- 
table Tarantella, a characteristic Italian folk dance, is a feature of the 
last part of the work, though at the end the movement becomes too 
rapid even for a tarantella, and it ends in a quick 2-4 time. 

It would seem that the first title for the work was ‘'Italian Fan- 
tasia.” “lam working at the sketch of an Italian Fantasia’ based upon 


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Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
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Phone Franklin 6257 


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Phone Sutter 3634 


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214 











folk songs,’ he wrote to Nadeshda von Meck, ‘‘and thanks to the 
charming themes, some of which | have taken from collections and 
some of which I have heard in the streets, the work will be effective.”’ 
The orchestration of the Caprice was not finished when Tschaikowsky 
returned to Russia, and he completed it at Kamenka in the summer. 


Symphonic Suite, ‘“Scheherazade’’ - - Rimsky-Korsakow 


This opulent, richly melodic and flamingly colored Oriental suite, 
by Rimsky-Korsakow, is a daring and brilliant attempt to translate into 
music some of the tales told by the Sultan Shahriar by the Sultana 
Scheherazade, in the “‘Arabian Nights.’’ These thousand-and-one tales, 
each taking one night to relate, it will be remembered, she made so 
interesting that the Sultan spared her life, despite his oath to put to 
death each one of his wives after the first night. The stories chosen by 
the composer are the ones indicated in the sub-titles; a single theme, 
that of Scheherazade, which is mostly assigned to the solo violin and 
represents the Sultana in the narrative, links the four movements 
together. 


_ The first movement opens with a theme and accompanying figure 
suggestive of the sea. Then follows the Scheherazade theme, intro- 
ducing the story-teller. The elaboration of these themes, and an 











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215 











additional one which might be termed ‘“‘The Ship,”’ constitute the 
contents of this movement. 

In the second movement, after the Scheherazade motive, the 
bassoon over a drone bass begins the Kalendar Prince’s narrative, the 
same subject closing the movement. 

The third movement begins with a charming romanza, the melody 
having somewhat the nature of a folk song. A second theme brought 
forth by the clarinet is one of the most ingratiating in the whole work. 
A new episode presents the most bizarre effects, and is given an 
Oriental coloring by the fantastic use of the triangle, tambourine, 
cymbals and drum. It is a veritable picture of an Arabian night. 

The final movement opens with a suggestion of the original sea 
motive, followed by the Scheherazade motive, played by the solo 
violin, which then leads into the revels of the Festival, beginning with 


a dance figure played by two flutes. This figure, together with themes 
from the earlier parts of the work, develops into a wild dance, which 
waxes more and more furious until at last the trombones thunder forth 
the sea motive in ominous tones. But that does not stop the merry- 
making and dancing, which continues until the vessel, storm driven, 
crashes on the magnetic rocks. When all is serene once more, the 
motive of the Scheherazade again appears. The Sultana is ready to 
go on with another story, but the Sultan has relented his vow and all is 
peaceful. 








Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 
Afternoons—2-5 


oo KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 





Studio Hours: Phone Douglas 1678 

















Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 









KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
Sere SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
zs RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 






Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


abd] pee 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 


& 





ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU ANNOUNCES 


MARIA 


IVOGUN 


Europe’s Greatest Coloratura Soprano 













Scottish Rite Hall—Monday Eve., Jan. 26, 8:30 P. M. 
Tickets Now: Sherman, Clay & Co. $2.00, 1.50, 1.00, .50 





‘‘Averse though I am to superlatives, the candid beauty of Mme. Ivogun’s voice, the 
fineness of her technical skill, the wise restraints she puts upon its volume, and the vital 


sympathy in its vibrations tempt me to overstep caution and pronounce her to be the great- 
est coloratura soprano | have heard. 


“I know that she has everything that I like in a soprano voice and nothing that I dis- 
like. Her legato is flawless. The ease and clarity of her coloratura passages make them 
worthy of being heard by every student — and by some widely advertised singers who think 
they are beyond the need of study. Througout her wide range, every tone is perfectly 
placed.”—Ray C. Brown, S. F. Chronicle March 1, 1924 


ALFRED Metzcer— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 


making a fine appearance, 5 ; : , 
, . scious virtuosity; it was 
revealing magnetism and 
io : the pure bel canto of the 
distinct personality and |i 
eee } ee ef flute, every note round 
obtaining uniform and in- : 
: and perfect as a pearl.— 
stant response from his | 3 : 
ae : | San Francisco Examiner, 
musicians.—Pacific Coast |§ 3 : 


Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


REDFERN Mason— 


He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





217 

























ANNOUNCEMENT 
SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Curran Theatre 


Friday, January 23, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, January 25, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: ERNA RUBINSTEIN, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 


FE Symphony INo; Sssim Gimmmote 24s cis he wointsn Beethoven 
Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro 
Finale: Allegro 


Be Tone*Poens “Don aan 222 eee Richard Strauss 
3. Concerto for Violin, E minor...-...........-..--------- Mendelssohn 
llegro moto appasionato 
Andante 


Allegretto non troppo—Allegro molto vivace 


ERNA RUBINSTEIN 


ANNOUNCEMENT 
SIXTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, February 1, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloists | ELLEN EDWARDS | ,.. 
oloists ) ALLAN BIER ( lanists 


PROGRAMME 
le7Preludesto:{Lohéngring acters Aw ke A Wagner 
Dee Baliet suite & bined 2 ser 28 ie Bo a A ee Gluck-Gevaert 
3. Fourthiunearian Ioances. 20/0 ee Os Brahms 
AvCarmival or the FAninials., ....--.02-.. 1 conta seceansensoecek Saint-Saens 
hee@yerture tos - William ‘ell 2 --c eee ke ee Aes Rossini 
6. ““SaterjentenssSondae: iin ee cis be Sein Svendsen 
7. Invitation tothe Wances ore Pe 





218 











ES 
Te ee 


LAST AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 
Tuesday, February 10, 8:20 P. M. 


Soloist: FLORENCE EASTON, Soprano 


ALL-WAGNER PROGRAMME 


Tickets now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
$1.00, 75c, 50c 





THE 


MARGARET MARY MORGAN (CO. 


Engraving ° Printers . Publishing 





Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 


























THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or-consolidations with other Banks. 





Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 3ist, 1924 


ee a 


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Assetae cee eet ea eee cleat $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,009,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund. .....-.-++++sereees 461,746.52 
MISSION BRANCH............cee recs ceerereeetees Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH.......-+eeeeeceeeeres Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH........++seeeeees Haight and Belvedere Streets 


WEST PORTAL BRANCH........-2---2:: =: West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 
CERERTS CIS Se 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 


219 








dersomel 


Che San Francisen Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal] 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 


Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


220 















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Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
dure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a Steinway. Thete is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring —of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


Sherman, [lay & Co. 


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Oakland - Clay at rath 














SAN FRANCISCO 


Symphony Orchestra 





ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 
OAKLAND, CAL. 








REMAINING SYMPHONY 
DATES 


od 


Thursday Evening, Feb. 12 
Thursday Evening, Feb. 26 
Thursday Evening, Mar. 19 
Thursday Evening, Mar. 26 


YW? 


Program 


Thursday Evening, 


January 22, 1925 


Ejight-thirty- o’clock 








A yAYW YN 

















SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Another “Pop” 


Program February 12, 1925 
Soloist: WILLIAM F. LARATA, Violinist 


Prelude to “Lohengrin” : ; . Wagner 

Sigurd Jorsalfar ; oh. SGTEES 

Italian Caprice . ; : ; ; Tschaikowsky 

Overture to “William Tell” 3 : : .. Rossini 

Fantasia on Russian Airs, for Violin . : . Wrieniawski 
WILLIAM F. LARAIA 

Invitation to the Dance : : : : . Weber 





Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 
Box Office at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland, Cal. 
Telephone Lakeside 6700 














SCHUMANN-HEINK 


COMES TO OAKLAND 


AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 


Monday Night, 


January 26, 1925 
8:30 o’clock 


Prices: $2.50, 2.00, $1.50, $1.00 


PLUS TAX 


Mail orders and reservations now being received 


at the Sherman-Clay Box Office, Oakland 


Management annette W. Potter 








Vladimir De Pachmann, Thursday Night, February 5, 1925 





Next Symphony Thursday Night 


, Concert by San Francisco Symphony Orchestra February 12 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 





Fourth Attraction 
ARTISTS CONCERTS SERIES 


ALFRED CORTOT 


French Master Pianist 


Auditorium Opera House 
Oakland 


Monday Night, Feb. 23 ’25 
Prices: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00 20° 


Tickets now selling at Sherman, Clay & Co’s Box Office, Oakland 
Management Zannette W. Potter 








| 
| 








1.—Ballet Suite, “Henry VIII” 





i.—Rhapsody, 


Program 


Introduction and Entrance of the Clans 
Scotch Idyl — Dance of the Gypsy — Gigue and Finale 
“Henry VIIT’, an opera in four acts and six scenes, written by 


Admand Silvestre and Leonce Detroyat, with music by Saint-Saens, 
was produced at the Opera, Parish, on March 5, 18838. The book is 
founded on the political and domestic troubles of the muchly-married 
King of England. As was customary in French operas at that time, 
the ballet was an essential part of every performance, the _ suite 
provided by Saint-Saens consisting of four movements, the titles of 
which explain themselves. 


2°—Ballets-Sutte;.- Coppelian ates Spee Tabata ssn as es Se ees Delibes 
Slavonic Theme with Variations — Festive Dance and Waltz 
Nocturne — Dance of the Automatons and Waltz — Czardas 


“Coppelia,” which with “Sylvia” brought Delibes into popularity 


as a modern composer, is one of the most beautiful ballets in the 
entire modern repertoire. The story of the ballet is concerned with a 
maker of dolls in a little French village, one of his dolls being very 
beautiful and life-size. He places this doll in an open window, where 
it is much admired by the youths of the village, who believe it to be 
real, and a great deal of jealousy on the part of the village maidens 
results. 


db relude: to. ane’ Deluge eager. ao 8c on 22) Oe eee Saint-Saens 


(Violin obligato, LOUIS PERSINGER 


This number is the prelude to Saint-Saens’ cantata, “The Deluge” 
which was composed in 1876 and is based upon the biblical narration 
of the Flood. It is a short expressive movement in the free form for 
the string orchestra a slow introductory passage, leading to a 
quasi-fugal treatment of a sustained subject given out by the violas, 
following which the solo violin introduces a melodious obligato, 
which holds the foreground to the end. 





4.—“In the Village” from Caucasian Sketches............0......... I ppolitow-Ivanow 


Ippolitow-Ivanow, one of the younger. school of Russian con- 
ductors, was for a number of years conductor of the opera in Tiflis, 
Caucasus, and while there made a thorough study of the music of the 
country. The piece played this evening from his group of Caucasian 
Sketches is introduced by declamatory passages for an English horn 
and a solo viola alternately. The main body of the movement is built 
upon the theme given out, after four introductory measures by the 


oboe. 


PR Renita OEY ADE FAR ON es SAR, Saint-Saens 


“The: “lrish« Washermvomtan ce soe as OS ae Leo Sowerby 


“The Irish Washerwoman” is the name of a jig originally com- 
posed by Walter (‘Piper’) Jackson, who was _the most celebrated 
Irish piper of the eighteenth century. Living in the middle of the 
century Jackson was known for his skill, not only in playing on the 
Uillean or Union bagpipe, but for the jigs and reels which he com- 
posed for it. 


Gaprice *Vaemeols: epee ee i ee ease ee Kreisler 


The Caprice Viennois (Cradle Song) is one of the best known 
compositions of Fritz Kreisler, the eminent violinist, possessing the 
touch of sadness and graceful rhythm which is characteristic of his 
other Viennese pieces. Although originally a violin solo, the composer 
has also arranged it for piano solo, while the orchestration played 


this evening was arranged by Alfred Hertz. 


Emmanuel Chabrier, the French composer, visited Spain with his 
wife in 1882, and wishing to know the true Spanish dances, he went 
at night to ballrooms where the company was mixed. He took notes 
from Seville to Barcelona, passing through Malaga, Cadiz, Granada, 
Valencia. The rhapsody, “Espana” is only one of two or three 
versions of these souvenirs, which he first played on the piano to his 
friends. Lamoureux heard Chabrier play the piano sketch of “Espana 
and urged him to orchestrate it. At the rehearsals no one Py tac 
success possible. The score with its wild originality, its eee OILe COs; 
frightened the players. The first performance was at a amoureux 
concert in Paris, on November 4, 1883, and met with instantaneous 


Success. 


“Espana, pic cee Ee he ee eee Chabrier 








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ORCHESTRA 


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1924 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR 


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228 











Musical Association of San Francisen 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 










OFFICERS 
| JOHN D. McKzs, President 

J. B. Levison, Vice-President K. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 

A. W. WipenNHAM, Secretary-Manager 










BOARD OF GOVERNORS 










J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain ES. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J.B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 






E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 








EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 








MUSIC COMMITTEE 










J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 








WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 








EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 









Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 


229 








HE choice of the 

Mason & Hamlin iano 
for the concert platform 
proclaims its sonority— 
its selection by famous art- 
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230 














Che San HFrancisea Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 
1924—Season—1925 
SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
512th and 513th Concerts 
CURRAN THEATRE 





Friday Afternoon, January 23, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, January 25, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: ERNA RUBINSTEIN, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 


i> Syniphony: Nosy in Ginmor =. eaten Beethoven 
Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro— 
Finale: Allegro 


Intermission 
Zz. Lone Poems Woneaan oe oe ee Richard Strauss 
3. Concerto for Violin, E minor.......................... Mendelssohn 
Allegro moto appasionato 


Andante 
Allegretto non troppo—Allegro molto vivace 


ERNA RUBINSTEIN 


(Miss Rubinstein uses the Steinway piano)<— 





NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 





SAN FRANCISCO WIND INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE 
Announcement of Change in Concert Dates 


In order to avoid conflict with late bookings of the Symphony 
Orchestra, concerts of the San Francisco Wind Instrument 
Ensemble will be given in the Ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel, 
Friday evening, February 13, and Tuesday evening, April 28, 
instead of February 3 and April 14, as originally announced. 
Management, Lulu Blumberg, 3131 Jackson Street; Telephone 
Fillmore 8035. 


231 








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Symphony Pathetique, in eight parts, on four records, 
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By Sir Henry Wood and New Queen’s Orchestra. 


Quartet in C Sharp Minor, in ten parts, on five records, 
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Symphony No. 5, in C minor - - - - Beethoven 

Of all the nine symphonies by Beethoven, the Fifth, completed in 
1807, is probably the best known, the most generally comprehended, 
and the most widely popular. Each of its movements is a gem of the 
first brilliance, and collectively they constitute a work of the profound- 
est grandeur of symphonic form. F aultless in conception and construc- 
tion, it reveals an exquisiteness of poise and an unfaltering certainty of 
progressive thought which entitles it to the first place among the purely 
classical symphonies. There have been many conjectures as to the 
thoughts which Beethoven tried to translate into music in this sym- 
phony; conjectures put forward by those who feel that every musical 
utterance must have a definite meaning. However, as a prominent 
critic aptly expressed it: ‘‘For me this symphony has no ‘program’ or 
‘plot’; it is an expression of absolute music, disassociated entirely from 


earthly events and telling no story save that of manly strength and 
beauty.”’ 


The first movement is a wonderful example of thematic invention. 
Beethoven spoke of the opening subject as ‘Fate knocking at the 


door.” It consists of three powerful repeated notes followed by a 


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drop of a third. After a long pause this is given out again a tone 
lower. It is tossed about from instrument to instrument like an in- 
spired game of battledoor and shuttlecock. The working out is 
intensely dramatic. As for the slow movement, nothing lovelier was 
ever created. It is a set of variations of incomparable grace and deli- 
cacy. Rugged humor blends with pathos, working up to an emotional 
climax inexpressibly noble and beautiful. The Scherzo is gigantic with 
much development of the two themes. The second part of the trio 
has a famous passage for the double basses and presents the amusing 
incident of two ineffectual attempts to start the theme—the third time 
being successful. Instead of being detached as usual, the Scherzo 
leads without pause into the fourth movement, which is reached 
through a heavy crescendo. The scoring is now enriched through the 
addition of three trombones, contrabassoon and piccolo, and thus 
reinforced the entire orchestra bursts forth into an exultant, triumphant 
song of joy and victory. 


Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in E minor - Mendelssohn 


Mendelssohn in his youth composed a violin concerto with accom- 
paniment of stringed instruments, also a concerto for violin and piano 
with the same sort of accompaniment, but these works were left in 
manuscript. Probably they were played at the musical parties at the 
Mendelssohn house in Berlin on alternate Sunday mornings. As early 
as 1838, Mendelssohn conceived the plan of composing a violin con- 
certo in the manner of the one in E minor, for in writing to Ferdinand 
David he said: “‘I should like to write a violin concerto for you next 
winter. One in E minor is running in my head, and the beginning does 
not leave me in peace.’ The concerto was composed in 1844 and had 
its first performance from manuscript in Leipsic, March 13, 1845. 


The first movement begins immediately after an introductory 


pe na A A a es vk a td 
GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 


Pianist 
(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 


Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 











Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-J : 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 






234 








measure with the first theme given out by the solo violin. This theme 
is developed at length by the solo instrument, which then goes on with 
cadenza-like passage work, after which the theme js repeated and 
developed as a tutti by the full orchestra. The second theme is first 
given out pianissimo in harmony by clarinets and flutes Over a sustained 
organ-point in the solo instrument. The chief theme is used in the 
development which begins in the solo violin. The brilliant solo cadenza 
ends with a series of arpeggios, which continue on through the whole 
announcement of the first theme by orchestral strings and wind. The 
conclusion section is in regular form. The first section of the Andante 
is a development of the first theme sung by the solo violin. The middle 
part is taken up with the development of the second theme, a some- 
what agitated melody. The third part is a repetition of the first, with 
the melody in the solo violin, but with a different accompaniment. 
Mendelssohn originally intended the accompaniment (strings) to the 
first theme to be played pizzicato. He wrote to David: “‘I intended 
to write it this way, but something or other—I don’t know what— 
prevented me.” The Finale opens with a short introduction. The 
main body of the movement begins with calls on horns, trumpets, 
bassoons, drums, answered by arpeggios of the solo violin and trem- 
olos in the strings. The chief theme of the rondo is announced by the 
solo instrument. The orchestra has a second theme. In the recapitu- 





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235 








lation section the fortissimo second theme appears again, and there js a 
brilliant coda. 


Tone Poem, “Don Juan’ - - - - Richard Strauss 


This remarkable piece of program music was written in 1888, the 
composer then being twenty-four years old—an age at which his fee]- 
ings and sympathies may well have been at one with those of the 
young hero of Nicholas Lenau’s poem, graphically depicted in the 
wonderfully eloquent music of this composition. The Don Juan of 
Lenau’s strange poem is a young man of superb health and vigor, a 
fact made evident in Strauss’ energetic and torrentially emotional 
music. He sets out upon a quest for the perfect example of woman- 
hood, entering what the poem calls a “‘magic realm, illimited, eternal, 
of gloried woman—loveliness supernal.’’ He flies from conquest to 
conquest, always in pursuit of his ideal, and meeting always with dis- 
appointment and disillusionment. Through the vivid and sardonic 
adventures of his pursuit, Strauss’ wonderful music follows him step by 
step to his final disappointment and the duel scene which ends with his 
death. Every character of the drama is represented by a definite 
musical theme, every emotion reflected in tone psychology, and every 
incident drawn in masterly sound pictures. 









Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 


Studio Hours: Atternaotieaa.8 










KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 







Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Orley See 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


i 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 
























236 











ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU ANNOUNCES 


MARIA 


IVOGUN 


Europe’s Greatest Coloratura Soprano 





Scottish Rite Hall—Monday Eve., Jan. 26, 8:30 P. M. 


Tickets Now: Sherman, Clay & Co. $2.00, 1.50, I.00, .50 


“Averse though | am to superlatives, the candid beauty of Mme. Ivogun’s voice, the 
fineness of her technical skill, the wise restraints she puts upon its volume, and the vital 
sympathy in its vibrations tempt me to overstep caution and pronounce her to be the great- 
est coloratura soprano | have heard. 


“I _know that she has everything that I like in a soprano voice and nothing that I dis- 
like. Her legato is flawless. The ease and clarity of her coloratura passages make them 
worthy of being heard by every student—and by some widely advertised singers who think 


they are beyond the need of study. Througout her wide range, every tone is perfectly 
placed.”—Ray C. Brown, S. F. Chronicle March 1, 1924 


ALFRED METZGER— 
In his conducting Mr. 
- Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl— 
San Francisco Examiner, 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





237 











ANNOUNCEMENT 
EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 







Curran Theatre 


Friday, February 6, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, February 8, 2:45 P. M. 








PROGRAMME 
I. Academic. Festival Overture... Brahms 
a; bates Jewish Poems: vs Veen, Sorte nie? Ernest Bloch 






ance 
Rite 
Funeral Procession 
(First time in San Francisco) 
3. Symphony No. 1, ‘‘Rustic Wedding. a. cases ne Goldmark 
Wedding March 
Bridal Song 
Serenade 
In the Garden 


Rustic Dance 
ee 
ANNOUNCEMENT 
SIXTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, February 1, 2:45 P. M. 


ee ELLEN EDWARDS ,.. 
oioists ALLAN BIER i lanists 














PROGRAMME 








[abrelude-ta WLohengring se 4) Ges etre lao Wagner 
Dee Suite «2 NIG ers Ni be Pass fee Gluck-Gevaert 
3. Four: Honiearian Dances... 88 (“Ye ent ti fee 

4. Carnival of the Animals... 

S-eOverturesto; William: fells. cere ee, Rossini 
6. “Saterjentens Sondag” Ta pa Gaee Svendsen 
7. Invitation to the Dance 








St .— 








LAST AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 
Tuesday, February 10, 8:20 P. M. 


Soloist: FLORENCE EASTON, Soprano 
ALL-WAGNER PROGRAMME 


Tickets now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
$1.00, 75c, 50c 





THE 


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Commercial Printing 


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(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 
SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

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the Assets of which have never been increased 
by meréers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 
















Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


* DECEMBER 3list, 1924 


WSSOLS ey sok eee et ON sa dae eo $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund.................00: 461,746.52 
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COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 





239 








Jdersonnel 





Che San Francisen Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W, 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A, 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F, 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


‘CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


240 





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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


SEASON 1924-25 


THIRD BERKELEY CONCERT 


HARMON GYMNASIUM 


THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 29, 1925 
8:15 O'CLOCK 


Soloist: LOUIS PERSINGER, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 
i. Overture, lseona ie oN Gis pc teh teen Becthoven 
2. Coneerto for Violin and Orchestra, G minor .................. Bruch 


Allegro moderato 
Adagio 
Finale: Allegro vivace 


Louis PERSINGER 


INTERMISSION 


5. -lone Poem.** 0b. sale. oe eo ee eee Richard Strauss 


4. Prelude and Love-Death from ‘‘Tristan and Isolde’’..Wagner 











Overture... LieOnore,”. NOsi9 oo NO he ee Beethoven 

‘«Fidelio,’’? Beethoven’s only opera, was first performed at Vienna, in 
1805. For this opera he composed at one time and another no fewer than 
four overtures, three of them known as ‘‘ Leonore’’ Overtures Nos. 1, 2 and 
3. ‘*Leonore’’ was the original title of the opera, so named after the 
heroine, Beethoven subsequently changing the title of his work to ‘‘ Fidelio.’’ 
The third overture, played this evening, is by far the finest of the four. It 
is the drama in miniature, and far outclasses anything in the opera itself. 
It is a masterpiece of dramatic unity, strength and passion, as well as of 
unique and imposing musical construction. 


Coneerto for Violin and Orchestra in G minor .................... Bruch 


Of Bruch’s four concertos for violin and orchestra, the one in G minor 
is the best known; it is, indeed, a rival of the Mendelssohn violin concerto 
for the honor of being the most popular work of this type ever written. The 
concerto was completed in 1866, and was first played in April of that year. 
In the same summer Bruch sent the manuscript to Joseph Joachim, the 
greatest violinist of his time, and the latter had a considerable hand in the 
extensive revision which shaped the concerto as it now stands; the dedication 
of the work to Joachim was no mere compliment. The concerto begins with 
a prelude having no thematic connection with the rest of the movement, 
the main body of which opens with a statement of the first theme by the 
violin against a tremolo accompaniment. The violin likewise announces the 
second theme. After an extended development, and a long passage for the 
full orchestra, there is a return of the prelude, and a transitional passage 
leads over to the slow movement. The Adagio is built-up out of the three 
principal themes, one of them being justly considered among the loveliest 
melodies of the nineteenth century. This melody prevails throughout the 
entire movement, the other themes being employed essentially as contrasts, 
The final movement, after a brief orchestral prelude, introduces the march- 
like first theme in the violin. The second theme, more lyric in character, 
appears first in the orchestra, and after extended development of the 
material the movement ends with a brilliant coda. 


Rone Poent="-Donesuan. sos ea te ae Richard Strauss 

This remarkable piece of program music was written in 1888, the com- 
poser then being twenty-four years old, an age at which his feelings and 
sympathies may well have been at one with those of the young hero of 
Nicholas Lenau’s poem, graphically depicted in the wonderfully eloquent 
music of this composition. The Don Juan of Lenau’s strange poem is a 
young man of superb health and vigor, a fact made evident in Strauss’ 
vital, energetic and torrentially emotional music. He sets out upon a quest 
for the perfect example of womanhood, entering what the poem calls a 








‘‘magie realm, illimited, eternal, of gloried woman—loveliness supernal!’’ 
He flies from conquest to conquest, always in pursuit of his ideal, and meet- 
ing always with disappointment and disillusionment. Through the vivid 
and sardonie adventures of his pursuit Strauss’ wonderful music follows 
him step by step to his final disappointment and the duel scene which ends 
with his death. Every character of the drama is represented by a definite 
musical theme, every emotion reflected in tone psychology and every incident 
drawn in masterly sound-pictures. 


Prelude and Love-Death from ‘‘Tristan and Isolde’’......Wagner 


The Prelude has been described as a ‘‘sumptuously picturesque compo- 
sition having much the same general form as the Prelude to ‘ Lohengrin’— 
working up through a long crescendo to a fortissimo climax, and then sub- 
siding quickly to a pianissimo.’’? The ‘Love-Death’ closes the opera, when 
Isolde, in a transport of love and grief, sings her death song over the dead 
body of her lover, Tristan. In the present concert version the ‘Love-Death’ 
is attached, by a simple harmonic device, to the Prelude. Wagner himself 
has given an account of the content of the composition in one of his writ- 
ings: 

‘<Now there is no end to the yearnings, the longing, the delight and the 
misery of love. World, might, fame, splendor, honor, knighthood, truth 
and friendship all vanish like a baseless dream. Only one thing survives: 
desire, desire unquenchable, and ever freshly manifested longing—thirst and 
yearning. The only redemption: death, the sinking into oblivion, the sleep 
from which there is no awakening.’’ The musician who chose this theme 
for the prelude to his love-drama, as he felt that he was here in the bound- 
less realm of the very element of music, could have only one care; how he 
should set bounds to his fancy; for the exhaustion of the theme was im- 
possible. Thus he took once for all this unsatiable desire; in long-drawn 
accents it surges up, from its first timid confession, its softest attraction, 
through throbbing sighs, hope and pain, laments and wishes, delight and 
torment, up to the mightiest onslaught, the most powerful endeavor to find 
the breach which shall open to the heart the path to the ocean of the endless 
joy of love. In vain; its powers spent, the heart sinks back to thirst with 
desire, with desire unfulfilled, till at last, in the depth of its exhaustion, the 
starting eye sees the glimmering of the highest bliss of attainment. It is 
the eestacy of dying, of the surrender of being, of the final redemption into 
that wondrous realm from which we wander farthest when we strive to take 


it by force. ’’ 








UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


Committee on Music and Drama 





LAST BERKELEY CONCERT 


THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 5, 1925 


Soloist: Lewis Ricuarps, Harpsichordist 


PROGRAMME 
1iAntique: Dances: for themhuteiee dF at LA ten Sag? Respighr 
rod SUE Ay 98 0 Saeco Seach dat lee ai ahr REN Ran nici cn nie SER AA EAS Bach 
Ss. woncerto for ctarpsichord jc 54s) a ae ee ae Haydn 
Lewis RicHARDS 
Pre SUL, REG: ERG OLE eer on cee re ee gee Stravinsky 


(SupyEcr ro CHANGE) 





ANNOUNCEMENTS 


The third coneert of the California Music League, Modeste Alloo, Con- 
ductor, will be given on February 17, 1925, at Harmon Gymnasium at 8:15 
o’clock. 





The little Theatre of the University of California announces the follow- 
ing programme for the Spring Season: 

(1) ‘‘Outward Bound,’’ by Sutton Vane, Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 6, 7; (2) 
‘‘Her Husband’s Wife,’’ by A. E. Thomas, Feb. 27, 28; (3) Prize One-act 
Plays, or ‘‘The Pigeon,’’ by John Galsworthy, March 20, 21; (4) ‘‘She 
Stoops to Conquer,’’ by Oliver Goldsmith, April 10, 11. 

Coupon books at the Sather Gate Book Shop and at Miss Ball’s Office, 
$1.50 for the four performances. 












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The San Hrancisen Sunmphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 
1924—Season—1925 
SIXTH POPULAR CONCERT 
515th Concert 
CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, February 1, 2:45 o’clock | 


Soloists J Pina pa Pianists 











PROGRAMME 


L..; Preludesto-* ‘Lohenerin ies ores 8 freee tee ee Wagner 
oY Ballet: Sure tS eee eee ate t ee Gluck-Gevaert 
Air 
Dance of the Slaves 
Tambourin 
Gavotte 
Chaconne 
3): Four Hungarian (Dancess icsctos sateen ee ctuaceeencer gs Brahms 
4. Good Friday Spell from “Parsifal’’............-...-...---.-- Wagner 
Intermission 





5. Overture to “William Tell’’-...........--...-....22.-2-.2-2------ Rossini 


6, “Carnival of:the “Animale 2 3 Sect ee steee-oe = Saint-Saens 
A Grand Zoological Fantasia 


Introduction and Royal March of the Lions 
Hens and Roosters 
Wild Asses 
Tortoises 
The Elephant 
Kangaroos 
Aquarium 
Persons with Long Ears 
The Cuckoo in the Heart of the Wood 
Aviary 
Pianists 
Fossils 
The Swan (’Cello Solo, Walter Ferner) 
Finale 
(Ellen Edwards and Allen Bier at the Pianos) 
(The Pianos are Steinways) 
EL 


251 











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BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 


Recorded in Europe by the 


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Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


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Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 


Ist 
1st 


Ist 
2nd 


2nd 
3rd 


3rd 
3rd 


4th 
4th 


4th 


4th 


4th 
4th 


Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 2. 


Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


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Prelude to ‘‘Lohengrin” - - - : - - Wagner 


It was with this work that Wagner first used the overture to pre- 


pare the audience for the action of the scene, which was to follow, so 


he deliberately here departed from the use of the orthodox form of 
overture, and in this prelude tells us of the descent from Heaven of 
the Holy Grail, as it was brought by the angels and delivered into the 
hands of the holy Titurel. The number begins with soft A major 
chords in the highest register of the violin. The. motive of the Grail is 
then announced. Coming nearer and nearer, the light of the Grail is 
seen in the sky, while the air is filled with the blessings dispensed by 
the holy cup. As the sounds grow louder, the senses are overwhelmed, 
until at the tremendous climax thundered out by the full orchestra the 
mystic light of the Grail is seen in all its glory. The mysterious Grail 
motive then fades away, being played at the end by muted strings; 
and the number ends with the same A major chords pianissimo. | 


Ballet Suite - . - - - - - Gluck-Gevaert 


This suite is the second of three suites, and consists of five dances, 
the first, second, third and fifth numbers being from Iphigenie in 
Aulis and the fourth from Armide. The first one is named Air and is 
orchestrated for strings, one bassoon, and one oboe. ‘The second is 
Dance of the Slaves and is orchestrated for flutes, oboes, clarinets, 
bassoons, horns and strings. The third number. is called Tambourin 
and is written for piccolo, bassoons, horns, tambourine and strings. 
The fourth is a Gavotte and calls for only part of the strings and two 


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bassoons. The last number, Chaconne, is the only number in which 


_the trumpets and tympani are added. 


Four Hungarian Dances’ - - - - - - Brahms 


To many of the uninitiated, the name of Brahms stands as some- 
thing to be avoided in searching for music of the lighter and entertain- 
ing sort. He has, however, written some of the most tuneful and 
easily comprehended music in his Hungarian dances. When Brahms 
was a boy, he attended concerts given by the great Hungarian violin- 
ist, Remenyi, who included in his performances examples of Hungarian 
music, such as Friskas and Czardas. The odd rhythms and harmonies 
fascinated Brahms, and when, a few years later, he went on tour with 
Remenyi, as the latter’s pianist, he made a serious study of Hungarian 
music. It was not until some years later, however, that these studies 
bore fruit in the shape of Hungarian Dances, which continued to appear 
from time to time as piano duets. 


Good Friday Spell from ‘‘Parsifal’’ . - - ~ Wagner 


“The Good Friday Spell is an excerpt drawn from the third and 
last act of the opera. The scene presents a pleasant landscape with a 
hermitage in the foreground. Gurnemanz, now an old man, emerges 
from his hut. He has heard groans, and proceeding to a thicket of 
brambles, discovers the unconscious form of Kundry. He restores her 
to consciousness and learns that she has come to resume her services 
to the knights of the Grail. Soon a knight in black armor appears. 
It is Parsifal, who has searched long and vainly for the home of the 
Grail. Gurnemanz, not having recognized the stranger, reproaches 
him for having entered armed the sacred precincts of the Grail. Lay- 
ing aside his armor, Parsifal is made known, and Gurnemanz narrates 
how the knights of the Grail have fallen upon an evil plight; for 
Amfortas no longer takes the hallowed cup trom out its shrine, or 
administers the sacred food. Parsifal is overcome with grief and 
anguish. He is led by Gurnemanz and Kundry to a spring, and there 
the woman bathes his feet and dries them with her hair, while Gurne- 
manz anoints him king. Parsifal bends down to the spring and taking 
a little water in his hands baptizes. Kundry. He turns around and 


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perceives the smiling beauty of the woods and fields, and Gurnemanz 
explains that the loveliness of nature on this Good Friday is an expres- 
sion of the world’s gratitude to the Redeemer. They now proceed to 
the Hall of the Grail. Titurel has died of the privation caused by the 
withholding of the Grail, and his body is brought in for burial. 
Amfortas is also borne in on a litter; for he is about to uncover the 
holy chalice. Meanwhile Parsifal and his companions have entered 
unperceived. As Amfortas in agony exposes his wound, Parsifal . 
comes forward, touches it with the sacred spear, bidding him to be 
healed. Parsifal then takes the Grail and kneels in prayer before it. 
The cup glows with light; from above a white dove descends, and 
hovers over Parsifal, who waves the chalice gently to and fro. Kundry 
sinks slowly down before him, and dies at his feet. Gurnemanz and 
Amfortas kneel in homage before Parsifal, and from above there 
floats down the sound of voices singing, “Wondrous work of mercy! 
Salvation to the Savior.”’ 


Overture to ‘‘William Tell’’ - - - . - Rossini 


This overture, which is probably played as often as any other 
single work at concerts the world over, was called by Berlioz “‘a 
symphony in four parts.’ 

The opening Andante depicts the serene solitude of Nature at 
dawn, and the music is enchantingly reposeful. From a slowly climb- 
ing figure on the ‘cello the wayward, elusive air resolves after a time 
into a more definite rhythmic tune, soon lapsing into dreamy medita- 
tion, which continues to the close of the movement. The tranquil 


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mood of the Andante is rudely interrupted by the beginning of the 
second movement—a string passage suggesting the distant mutterings 
of a storm. This comes nearer and nearer, until the full fury of the 
storm bursts upon the ear. The fortissimo passage continues until the 
storm seems to have spent its force, and the strain dies down into 
refreshing calmness once more. The storm is followed by a beautiful 
pastoral with a delicious melody for the English horn. As the last 
notes of the melody die away, the trumpets enter with a brilliant 
fanfare on the splendid finale, a fitting climax to a great work. 


“Carnival of the Animals” - . . “ . Saint-Saens 


The “Carnival of the Animals’’ was not published in its entirety 
until 1922, and contains on the score the following note of the pub- 
lisher: ““Fhe ‘Animals’ Carnival’ was composed in February, 1886. 
The composer wished to present it as a surprise at the annual Mardi- 
Gras concert of the violoncellist Lebouc. Saint-Saens had formerly 
intended to write the ‘Carnival’ for his pupils at the Niedermyer 
School, but time was wanting. . . The composer, having per- 
mitted for some years the hearing of the work under special conditions, 
finally forbade any performance. A special article in his last will and 
testament removed the ban and allowed the publication of this charm- 
ing Fantasia, in which exquisite music is blended with jocosity of an 
excellent quality.”’ 


The following brief description of each number is also contained 
in the score: 


I. Introduction and Royal March of the Lion. Andante maes- 


Studio Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 


Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
" ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


bd Pee 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 





256 


























toso, 4-4. Piu Allegro. Two pianofortes and strings. IJ. Hens and 
Roosters. Allegro moderato, 4-4. Clarinet; two pianofortes, violins 
and viola. III. Wild Asses (Hemiones): Horses of Tartary. Presto 
furioso. Two pianofortes. IV. Tortoises. Andante maestoso, 4-4. 
First pianoforte and strings. Here Saint-Saens utilized two themes 
from Offenbach’s ‘“‘Orphee aux Enfers,”’ “which he adorned harmon- 
ically.”’ These extracts are from the final ballet and measures of the 
finale of the first act. V. The Elephant. Allegro pomposo, 3-8. 
Second pianoforte and double bass. Saint-Saens borrowed some 
measures from Berlioz’ “Ballet of Sylphs,”’ with a slight remembrance 
of Mendelssohn's ‘‘Midsummer Night's Dream’’ music. VI. Kanga- 
roos. Moderato, 4-4. Two pianofortes. VII. Aquarium. Andan- 
tino, 4-4. Two pianofortes, flute, celesta, and strings (without double 
bass). VIII. Persons with Long Ears. Tempo ad lib., 3-4. Violins. 
IX. The Cuckoo in the Heart of the Wood. Andante, 3-4. Clarinet 
(off stage), two pianofortes. X. The Aviary. Moderato grazioso, 
4-4, Flute, two pianofortes, strings. XI. Pianists. Allegro moderato. 
‘The pianists should imitate the awkward playing of debutants.’’ Two 
pianofortes and strings. XII. Fossils. Allegro ridicolo, 2-2. Clarinet, 
xylophone, two pianofortes, strings. ‘In this section occur the themes 
of ‘J’ai du bon tabac,’ ‘Ah, vous dirai-je maman, Saint-Saens “Danse 
Macabre,’ “Partant pour la Syrie,’ and Rosina’s air in “The Barber of 
Seville.’ ’’ XIII. The Swan. Violoncello and two pianofortes. “The 
Swan’”’ was published for violoncello and one pianoforte in 1887. 

XIV. Finale. Molto allegro, 4-4. Piccolo, clarinet, celesta, SI 
two pianofortes and strings. 





ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—TI eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


RepDFERN Mason— 

He. played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 








Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





By | 















ANNOUNCEMENT 
EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, February 6, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, February 8, 2:45 P. M. 









PROGRAMME 






L.-Academic Festival Overture... ....0.00 2.3 Brahms 
ZF Three Jewish: Poems. eee ee Ernest Bloch 
Dance 
Rite 






Funeral Procession 






(First time in San Francisco) 






Sie RPA ROY: tcl AMINE. to On ek oe 2 Cesar Franck 
Lento—Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto 
Allegro non troppo 









ANNOUNCEMENT 
SEVENTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, February 15, 2:45 P. M. 


Gtncre LOUIS PERSINGER, Violinist 
WALDEMAR GIESE, Double Bass 









PROGRAMME 
1. Symphony in G Major (‘‘Surprise’’ ) -.......2.222....22..... Haydn 
(By special request) 
2. Legend for Orchestra, “‘Zorahayda’’.................... Svendsen 






3. Scherzo (““The Bumble Bee’’) from “Tsar Saltan’’.... 


7 AP NE PeRRER OMT NSF eS Ce BM gE Ae Rimsky-Korsakow 





4 suites: “oigurd sotealfar ‘ip sieotS ee ye re Grieg 


5. Concerto Duet for Violin and Double Bass........... Bottesini 
(First time in San Francisco) 


LOUIS PERSINGER, WALDEMAR GIESE 
6. Invitation’ to: the: Danceél ee; Weber-Weingartner 












258 

















LAST AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 
Tuesday, February 10, 8:20 P. M. 


Soloist: FLORENCE EASTON, Soprano 
ALL-WAGNER PROGRAMME 


Tickets now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
$1.00, 75c, 50c 





MARGARET MARY MORGAN (O. 


Engraving: Printers - Publishing 


| Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 


























eed 
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THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 


INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 
One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 3lst, 1924 
Aecstar 506k ek Seo ge TS Rn trees $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 





Employees’ Pension Bands... eee aos 88 461,746.52 
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Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 





259 








Jdersomnel 


Che San Francisca Symphony Orchestra 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


‘CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


260 




















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2tX8) The Musical 2 
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Stanford University 
February 3, 1925 


“of 


cAuspictes 
STANFORD SYMPHONY COMMITTEE 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR 








1. 





PROGRAMME 





Overture to “Iphigenie in Aulis” _- - - - Gluck 


Modern opera practically dates from the efforts made by 
Gluck to correct the abuses which had crept into the works of the 
Italians of his time ‘‘through the mistaken vanity of singers and the 
unwise compliance of composers which had rendered it wearisome 
and ridiculous instead of being, as it once was, the grandest and 
most imposing stage of modern times.”’ Regarding his overtures 
he stated: “My idea was that the overture ought to indicate the 
subject and prepare the spectators for the character of the piece 


they are about to see.”’ 


Wagner, who was a great admirer of Gluck, revised the instru- 
mentation and text in 1846, and in that form produced the opera 
in Dresden in 1848. The overture originally led directly into the 
first scene of the opera. The concert version which is now gen- 
erally used is that made by Wagner. According to Wagner, the 
thematic elements of the overture are (1) “a motive of appeal 
from painful, gnawing heart-sorrow’’: (2) ‘‘a motive of violence, 
of commanding, overbearing demand”: (3) “a motive of grace, 
of maidenly tenderness,”” and (4) ‘‘a motive of painful, torment- 
ing pity’ —the first named coming in the introduction and the 


others in the Allegro. 


Symphony in G major, “The Surprise” - - - Haydn 


Adagio cantabile—Vivace assai 
Andante—Theme and Variations 
Menuetto: Allegro molto 

Finale: Allegro di molto 


This symphony, known as “The Surprise’’ and in Germany as 
the symphony “‘with the drum-stroke,” is the third of the twelve 
Salomon symphonies as arranged in the order of their appearance 
in the catalogue of the Philharmonic Society of London. Com- 
posed in 1791, it was performed for the first time on March 23, 


1792, at the sixth Salomon concert in London. It pleased imme- 


diately and greatly. The Oracle characterized the second move- 


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ment as one of Haydn's happiest inventions, and likened “the 
surprise’ —-which is occasioned by the sudden orchestral crashes 
in the Andante—to a shepherdess, lulled by the sound of a distant 
waterfall, awakened suddenly from sleep and frightened by the 
unexpected discharge of a musket. Griesinger, in his Life of 
Haydn, contradicts the story that Haydn introduced these crashes 
to arouse the English women from sleep. Haydn also contradicted 
it, and said it was his intention only to surprise the audience by 
something new. ‘The first allegro of my symphony was received 
with countless ‘Bravos, but enthusiasm rose to its highest pitch 
after the Andante with the drum-stroke. ‘Ancora, ancora!’ was 
cried out on all sides, and Pleyel himself complimented me on my 
idea.’ On the other hand, Gyrowetz, in his Autobiography, said 
that he visited Haydn just after he had composed the Andante, 
and Haydn was so pleased with it that he played it to him on the 
piano, and, sure of his success, said with a roguish laugh: “The: 


women will cry out here!” 


Overture, “‘Leonore,” No.3 - - “ - Beethoven 


“Fidelio,” Beethoven's only opera, was first performed at 
Vienna in 1805. For this opera he composed at one time and 
another no fewer than four overtures, three of them known as 
‘I eonore’ Overtures Nos. I, 2 and 3. .“Leonore’ was the orig- 
inal title of the opera, so named after the heroine, Beethoven 
subsequently changing the title of his work to ‘‘Fidelio.’’ The 
third overture, played this evening, is by far the finest of the four. 
It is the drama in miniature, and far outclasses anything in the 
opera itself. It is a masterpiece of dramatic unity, strength and 


passion, as well as of unique and imposing musical construction. 


Intermission 


“Kol Nidrei” for Violoncello and Orchestra ~ » Bruch 
WALTER FERNER 


The ‘‘Kol Nidrei’’ is a chant which is recited in synagogues at 
the beginning of the evening service on the Day of Atonement, 


the most solemn festival of the Jewish race, and takes its name 








from its two opening words. While it is probable that no two 
synagogues chant the melody, note for note, the same, the tradi- 

- tional formula is preserved everywhere. The structure is simple, : 
the melody being an intermingling of simple cantillation with rich 
figuration. The opening is what the masters of Catholic song term 


a “Pneuma,”’ or soul breath. Instead of announcing the opening 





words in a monotone, there was a long sighing tone used in the | 
melody, falling to a lower note and rising again. There is a sim- | 
ilarity of the strain with the first five bars of Beethoven’s C sharp | 
minor quartet, and there are strong similarities in some of the 
Gregorian chants of the Catholic Church. 





5. Tone Poem, “Don Juan’’ - ~ - Richard Strauss 


This remarkable piece of program music was written in 1888, 
the composer then being twenty-four years old—an age at which 
his feelings and sympathies may well have been at one with those 
of the young hero of Nicholas Lenau’s poem, graphically depicted 
in the wonderfully eloquent music of this composition. The Don 
Juan of Lenau’s strange poem is a young man of superb health 
and vigor, a fact made evident in Strauss’ energetic and torren- 
tially emotional music. He sets out upon a quest for the perfect 
example of womanhood, entering what the poem calls a “magic 
realm, illimited, eternal, of gloried woman—loveliness supernal.”’ 
He flies from conquest to conquest, always in pursuit of his ideal, 
and meeting always with disappointment and disillusionment. 
Through the vivid and sardonic adventures of his pursuit, Strauss’ 
wonderful music follows him step by step to his final disappoint- 
ment and the duel scene which ends with his death. Every char- 
acter of the drama is represented by a definite musical theme, 
every emotion reflected in tone psychology,, and every incident 
drawn in masterly sound pictures. 


ee i Ae Se ae ee 
Next Stanford Symphony Concert 





TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 31, 8:15 o’clock 


ASSEMBLY HALL 





— a 





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SYMPHO ONY 
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Fourteenth Season 


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FIRST VIOLINS 
Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 


Assistant Conductor 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


Jdersomel 


Che San Hrancisen Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


‘CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 


Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 





BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


265 








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Mason & Hamlin Piann 
for the concert platform 
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Wiley BAllen ©. 


135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 


266 





=~ SRE, 
Che San Francisca Symphony Orchestra 
"AEFRED HERTZ Conductor 
1924—Season—1925 
EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
516th and 517th Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, February 6, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, February 8, 2:45 o’clock 


PROGRAMME 


1. Academic Festival Overture 


2. Three Jewish Poems 
Dance 
Rite 
Funeral Procession 
(First time in San Francisco) 


Intermission 


3. Symphony in D minor Cesar Franck 
Lento—Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto 
Allegro non troppo 


NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 


SAN FRANCISCO WIND INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE 
Announcement of Change in Concert Dates 


In order to avoid conflict with late bookings of the Symphony 
Orchestra, concerts of the San Francisco Wind Instrument 
Ensemble will be given in the Ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel, 
Friday evening, February 13, and Tuesday evening, April 28, 
instead of February 3 and April 14, as originally announced. 
Management, Lulu Blumberg, 3131 Jackson Street; Telephone 


Fillmore 8035. 











109 Stockton Street 


BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 
Recorded in Europe by the 





Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 





1st Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


Ist Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Ist Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


3rd Movement—Part 2. 


3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th ,Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof, Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


Send for our catalogue of ‘‘Musical Masterworks’’—free, 


QUARG MUSIC CO. 


206 Powell Street Open Evenings 








Ny: 


Overture, ‘‘Academic Festival,’’ Opus 80 = wight a Brahms 


Brahms wrote his “Academic Festival’’ Overture in 1880 as an 
acknowledgment of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy which had 
been bestowed upon him by the University of Breslau. This work, as 
well as another new composition, the ““Tragic’’ Overture, was produced 
at Breslau, January 4, 1881, in the presence of the august functionaries 
of the university, Brahms himself conducting. 


The overture is in reality a fantasia on student songs. Brahms 
was fond of these pieces, and on occasions when they were sung at 
social festivities he would join in lustily and with much enthusiasm. 


Three Jewish Poems “ - . . - Ernest Bloch 


Upon the occasion of the first performance of the Three Jewish 
Poems by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, February 1, 1918, the 
following notes were furnished by the composer: 


‘It is not my purpose, not my desire, to attempt a reconstitu- 
tion’ of Jewish music, or to base my work on melodies more or less 
authentic. I am not an archaeologist. I hold it of first importance to 
write good, genuine music, my music. It is the Jewish soul that inter- 
ests me, the complex, glowing, agitated soul, that I feel vibrating 


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Piano—Composition 






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"Cello and 
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A. KOSTELANETZ 


Accompanist 








throughout the Bible: the freshness and naivete of the Patriarchs; 
the violence that is evident in the prophetic books: the Jew’'s savage 
love of justice; the despair of the Preacher in Jerusalem; the sorrow 
and the immensity of the Book of Job; the sensuality of the Song of 
Songs. 


“All this is in us; all this is in me, and it is the better part of me. 
It is all this that I endeavor to hear in myself and to transcribe in my 
music: The venerable emotion of the race that slumbers “way down in 
our soul. 


‘The ‘Jewish Poems’ are the first work of a cycle. I do not wish 
that one should judge my whole personality by this fragment, this first 
attempt, which does not contain it. The ‘Psalms,’ ‘Schelomo,” ‘Israel’ 
are more representative, because they come from the passion and the 
violence that I believe to be the characteristics of my nature. In the 
‘Jewish Poems’ I' have wished in some way to try a new speech, the 
color of which should serve my future expression. There is in them a 
certain restraint; | hold myself back; my orchestration is also guarded. 
The ‘Poems’ are the first work of a new period; they consequently have 
not the maturity of the ‘Psalms’ or of ‘Israel.’ 


“It is not easy for me to make a program for the ‘Poems.’ Music 
is not translated by words. The titles, it seems to me, should sufficiently 
inform the hearer. 





“I. Danse. This music is all in the coloring; coloring rather 
sombre, mystical, languorous. 


“II. Rite. This movement is more emotional; but there is some-. 
thing solemn and distant, as the ceremonies of a cult. 


“IU. Funeral Procession. This is more human. My father died—. 
these ‘Poems’ are dedicated to his memory. There is something im-. 





GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianis 
(Returned from World re with Jean Gerardy) 


Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
3 and Accompanying 








Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-] 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 


















nah te ae 








placably severe in the rhythms that obstinatel'y repeat themselves. At 
the end, sorrow bursts forth, and at the idea of an eternal separation 
the soul breaks down. But a very simple and serene melody arises 
from the orchestral depths as a consolation, a balm, a gentle faith. 
The memory of our dear departed ones is not effaced; they live for- 
ever in our hearts. 


‘"The form is free, but it is really there, for I believe that our 


constitution demands order in a work of art.’ 


Symphony in D minor - - - - . Cesar Franck 


In Vincent d’Indy’s “Life of Franck,’ attention is called, in 
commenting on the violin and piano sonata, that the first of its organic 
germs is used as the theme of the four movements of the work, further 
stating, “From this moment cyclical form, the basis of modern sym- 
phonic art, was created and consecrated.’ d Indy then adds: 


‘The majestic, plastic, and perfectly beautiful symphony in D 


- minor is constructed on the same method. I purposely use the word 


method for this reason: After having long described Franck as an 
empivicist and an improvisor—which is radically wrong—his enemies 
(of whom, in spite of his incomparable goodness, he made many) and 


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his ignorant detractors suddenly changed their views and called him 
a musical mathematician, who subordinated inspiration and impulse to 
a conscientious manipulation of form. This, we may observe in pass- 
ing, is a common reproach brought by the ignorant Philistine against 
the dreamer and the genius. Yet where can we point to a composer 
in the second half of the nineteenth century who could—and did— 
think as loftily as Franck, or who could have found in his fervent and 
enthusiastic heart such vast ideas as those which lie at the musical basis 
of the Symphony, the Quartet and ‘The Beatitudes’ ? 


“It frequently happens in the history of art that a breath Ppass- 
ing through the creative spirits of the day incites them, without any 
previous mutual understanding, to create works which are identical 
in form, if not in significance. It is easy to find examples of this kind 
of artistic telepathy between painters and writers, but the most striking 
instances are furnished by the musical art. 


“Without going back upon the period we are now considering, 
the years between 1884 and 1889 are remarkable for a curious return 
to pure symphonic form. Apart from the younger composers, and 
one or two unimportant representatives of the old school, three com- 
posers who had already made their mark — Lalo, Saint-Saens, and 






Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 





Studio Hours: 








KAJETAN. ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 







Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 













Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


abd fei 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday ) Douglas 1678 




















a a —— ——————e 


=* 


Franck—produced true symphonies at this time, but widely different 
as regards external aspect and ideas. 


‘‘Lalo’s Symphony in G minor, which is on very classical lines, is 
remarkable for the fascination of its theme, and still more for charm 
and elegance of rhythm and harmony, distinctive qualities of the 
imaginative composer of ‘Le Roi d’Ys.’ 


‘‘The C minor Symphony of Saint-Saens, displaying undoubted 
talent, seems like a challenge to the traditional laws of tonal structure; 
and although the composer sustains the combat with cleverness and 
eloquence, and in spite of the indisputable interest of the work— 
founded, like many others by this composer, upon a prose theme, the 
Dies Irae—yet the final impression is that of doubt and sadness. 


‘Franck’s Symphony, on the contrary, is a continual ascent 
towards pure gladness and life-giving light, because its workmanship 
is solid and its themes are manifestations of ideal beauty. What is 
there more joyous, more sanely vital, than the principal subject of the 
Finale, around which all the other themes in the work cluster and 
crystallize? While in the higher registers all is dominated by that 
motive which M. Ropartz has justly called ‘the theme of faith.’ This 
symphony was really bound to come as the crown of the artistic work 
latent during the six years to which | have been alluding. ’’ 


















ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchesiral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist— 1 eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 





Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





275 








LAST AUDITORIUM SYMPHONY CONCERT 
Tuesday, F ebruary 10, 8:20 P. M. 


Soloist: FLORENCE EASTON, Soprano 
ALL-WAGNER PROGRAMME 


Tickets now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
$1.00, 75c, 50c 














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One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
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Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
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DECEMBER 31st, 1924 


ASERb Se ean hy, PO ke Pee ee $96,917,170.69: 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund.................... 461,746.52 
WASSER ESICPUING OE cto sg he cog So ahecen aie emntie Dae ok Mission and 21st Streets 
PARKeOPRESIDIO= BRANCH? uccbos by watu meas Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGH STREET BRANCH. o30 on tek kc Haight and Belvedere Streets 


WESToPORTAL (BRANGH. si cic anes 22 earn West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 


; FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
i COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 


Ten ot 
- =~ 





= * 


276 








ANNOUNCEMENT 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, February 20, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, February 22, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: WALTER FERNER, ’Cellist 





PROGRAMME 


PeSymphonyiins Gs iminOr tee ee ae te oe Mozart 
Allegro molto 
Andante 
Menuetto 
Finale 
2. Concerto, D minor, for Violoncello...................2..222...- Lalo 
Prelude. Lento—Allegro maestoso 
Intermezzo. Andante con moto 
Rondo. Andante—Allegro vivace 
WALTER FERNER 


Se ASNectort sha psOO yim eee keno Rubin Goldmark 


(First time in San Francisco) 


ANNOUNCEMENT 
SEVENTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, February 15, 2:45 P. M. 


Solojsts | LOUIS PERSINGER, Violinist 
onois® | WALDEMAR GIESE, Double Bass 





PROGRAMME 
Es Symphonyiin;G: Major -G surprise::) ..-:0-2 2. a Haydn 
(By special request) . 
2. Legend for Orchestra; ~Zorahayda ™ -..2.2....25....c... Svendsen 


3. Scherzo (““The Bumble Bee’’) from “Tsar Saltan’’.... 
Rimsky-Korsakow 


Bt SUE SOT Crh OLS ALLA ecw toe eee ee eng oe eee Grieg 


5. Concerto for Violin and Double Bass.................... Bottesini 
(First time in San Francisco) 


LOUIS PERSINGER, WALDEMAR GIESE 
6; Invitation: tosthesvance +) 1 Seco Weber-Weingartner 











Choose your piano carefully, 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
dure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
bea STEINWAY. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring —of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


Sherman, [lay & Co. 


Kearny & Sutter Sts. 
Oakland - Clay at 14th 









THE CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO PRESENTS 


Sf 
SAN FRANCISCO +2 
SIME HONY ORCHESTRA 


anc | Alf ed Hertzs aaConductor 
ul Ik - 

\Gr j POPULAR CONCERT 

NA 

: EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM | 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY -10, 1925 


8:20 P.M. 


WITH 


FLORENCE EASTON, Soprano 


GUEST ARTIST 


BRUNSWICK RECORDS 


—————_——, 


AUSPICES 


MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR., AND BOARD OF 
SUPERVISORS 


DIRECTION—AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
J. Emmet HaypEN, CHAIRMAN 
ANGELO J. ROSSI Epwin G. Bato 














ALL WAGNER PROGRAMME 


2 


1. PRELUDE To ‘‘Parstraz’’ 


“Parsifal” was written for the Bayreuth Theatre, where it was pro- 
duced July 28, 1882. For twenty-one years it was played only at Bayreuth, 
but on December 24, 1903, it was produced in New York at the Metropol- 
itan Opera House under the direction of Alfred Hertz. The prelude, which 
like all of Wagner’s, is designed to lift the hearer into the particular 
atmosphere of the play, is built on the four themes which constitute the 
religious element of the drama. 


2. BACCHANALE FROM “‘TANNHAUSER”’ (Paris Version) 


When “Tannhauser” was first performed in 1854, there was, after 
the close of the overture and preceding the scene between Venus and 
Tannhauser, a bacchanale. But when the opera was produced in Paris 
the whole scene was remodeled. The new version is far superior to the 
old, and in the words of W. H. Humiston, “No one ever used the ‘chord 
of the ninth’ with a more haunting beauty than in the closing pages of 
this Bacchanale—for after a passionate climax the music (and action) 
diminishes in intensity and fervor til] Tannhauser and Venus are left 
alone.” 


3. ARIA, Eisa’s DREAM, FROM ‘‘LOHENGRIN”? 
FLORENCE EASTON 


Elsa describes a knight, who had appeared to her in a dream, and upon 
whom she calls to defend her cause in the ordeal of battle which the 
king ordains shall be the test of her guilt or innocence. 


4. INTRODUCTION To Act III, ‘‘Lowenerin’’ 


In the closing scene of Act II Lohengrin and Elsa have been united 
in marriage, and the introduction to Act III is indicative of the joyous 
spirit of the wedding festivities. The principal theme, a brilliant and 
stirring march, dominates the whole, being interrupted by a short middle 
period. There is then a return to the first subject fortissimo, in full 
orchestra. 


INTERMISSION 


oO. ‘‘Prize SonG’’ FRoM ‘“THE MASTERSINGERS’’ 


The “Prize Song” is the well-known tenor solo from Waegner’s only 
comic opera, “The Mastersingers of Nurnberg.” It is Sung by Walther 
in the last act, and wins him the first prize (the hand of Eva, the beauti- 
ful daughter of Pogner, the goldsmith) in the song contest on the banks 
of the river Pegnitz. 








6. Furnace to ‘‘THE RHINEGOLD’’ (Entrance of the Gods into 
Walhalla) , 


In the fourth and last scene in “The Rhinegold,” following a deafen- 
ing thunderbolt with which Donner ends the battle between the giants 
Fafner and Fasolt, a blindingly radiant rainbow is seen to stretch from 
earth to Wotan’s castle, Walhalla, gleaming in the light of the setting 
sun. Wotan hails the citadel, and led by Wotan and Fricka, the gods 
slowly pass to Walhalla over the rainbow. From below is heard the 
mournful cry of the Rhine-maidens, bereft of their precious treasure, the 
Rhinegold. 


7. ArtA, ‘‘Ham, Haut oF SonNG’’ FROM ‘‘TANNHAUSER’”’ 
FLORENCE EASTON 


Tannhauser, having thrown off the spell cast over him by Venus, re- 
turns to the Wartburg and his friends, and agrees to take part in the 
singing tournament, the prize for which is to be the hand of Elizabeth. 
The second act of the opera takes place in the great hall of the Wartburg, 
the Hall of Song. Previous to the assembly, Elizabeth enters alone and in 
the noble song expresses her joy over the return of Tannhauser and his 
participation in the contest. 


8. PRELUDE AND Love DEATH FROM ‘‘ TRISTAN AND ISOLDE’’ 
IsoLtpE, FLORENCE EASTON 


This number forms the opening and close of Wagner’s powerful music- 
drama. The prelude is based upon a single motive, which is worked up 
with consummate skill into various melodic forms, and frequently appears 
throughout the work. It might well be termed the motive of restless, 
irresistible passion. 'The Finale, or “Love Death,” closes the opera, when 
Isolde, in a transport of love and grief, sings her death song over the 
dead body of her lover, Tristan. 


On account of the character and length ef this 
programme there will be positively no encores. 


Popular Symphony Concert 
NEXT SUNDAY, 2:45 P.M. CURRAN THEATRE 


Second San Francisco 


SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL 


CHORUS OF 600 
FOUR WORLD-FAMOUS SOLOISTS 
AUGMENTED SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ALFRED HERTZ, Director 


Under joint auspices of the City of San Francisco 
and Musical Association of San Francisco. ; 
Complete announcement will be made at an early date as to exact dates, soloists, 
works to be presented, and ticket sale. 





SEASON TICKETS FOR NEXT YEAR’S AUDITORIUM SERIES! 


Holders of season tickets for the series closing with tonight’s concert who wish 
to renew their locations for next year should write their name and address on the 
back of stub provided for this purpose and hand to door-man or leave at Symphony 
Box Office, Sherman, Clay & Company, before March 1. This applies only to those 
desiring the same seats. If different locations are desired they may be ordered upon 
the opening of the season ticket sale next summer. 





— ee 











Radio! 


Visit our big new Radio depart- 
ment. It is now stocked with 
wonderful instruments. 


Demonstrations in the evening 
in your own home, when the great 
stations are on the air. 


Remember, convenient terms, 
as on all musical wares we carry. 


Sherman May & Co. 


Kearny and Sutter Streets, s. F. 
2515 Mission Street, near Twenty-first St. 








== Mifred Heriz, Conductor = | -* 


REMAINING SYMPHONY 
DATES 


xe | 
Thursday Evening, Feb. 26 


Thursday Evening, Mar. 19 
Thursday Evening, Mar. 26 


LD 





Soloist 


WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


Violinist 





| 
SAN FRANCISCO 


Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 
OAKLAND, CAL. 


Thursday Evening, February 12, 1925 


Eight-thirty o’clock 





Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 
Box Office at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland, Cal. 
Telephone Lakeside 6700 








<< 


tf 





PAUL WHITEMAN 








ANNA PAVLOWA 


Two Performances—March 9 and 10 





| 
PROGR 
Thursday Evetiy Febr 


Prelude ‘tox Lohensriny 33 Sees a alae al on ee Wagner 


It was with this work that Wagner first used the overture to prepare the 
audience for the action of the scene which was to follow. and in this prelude 
tells us of the descent of the Holy Grail. as it was brought by the angels and 
delivered into the hands of the holy Titurel. who built for its shrine the Castle 
of Montsalvat. One writer has said that this prelude is “a mighty web of sound 
woven on the single theme of the Holy Grail.” We hear the motive at first softly 
in the highest register of the divided violins; it is taken up by the deeper 
strings, and, gradually increasing in volume, it is finally loudly intoned by the 
trombones; then as silently the theme dies away with a long diminuendo to the 
high tones of the strings again. 


Sune irom. .”’Sigurd -Jorsalfar’: 3.00.0 o ke ew Grieg 


Prelude (In the King’s Hall) 
Intermezzo (Borghild’s Dream) 
March of Homage 


These three pieces are part of the incidental music Grieg wrote to 
Bjornstjerne Bjornson’s play, “Sigurd Jorsalfar,” the play being based on an old 
Norwegian Saga. Sigurd is the younger brother of two kings that ruled jointly 
in Norway. He is the trim type of war and wild desire; his brother, Eystein, of 
peace and constructive art. The period of their reign was likewise the period 
of the invasion of Jerusalem by the Crusaders, among them Sigurd. He set out 
for the Holy Land with a great force, fought many battles, and finally returned 
to Norway in triumph. 


fratany Caprice 'orpcc.is. lla oS cae cece T schaikowsky 


This work was inspired by a prolonged visit Tschaikowsky made in Rome, 
some of the themes being taken from collections of folksongs, others based upon 
songs Tschaikowsky heard in the streets. The title is well chosen, as one melody 
follows another in a capricious manner although there is no violence done to the 


Coming 








Two Performances—March 2 and 3 


Prices — $2.50 to $1.00, plus tax 


THE INCOMPARABLE 


Prices — $3.50 to $1.00, plus tax 


Tickets on sale at the Z. W. Potter box office. Telephone Lakeside 6700. 














GRA MI 


Wet, February, 12, 1925 


} 
| 
WI 


> Rapa Ta Ss RE eS 


| basic principles of musical form. The inevitable Tarantella, a characteristic 
| Italian folk dance, is a feature of the last part of the work though at the end 
the movement becomes too rapid even for a tarantella. 


Fo RE Oe a Se ec at Ee 





ants 
| AX SCVETLUTE LO? AV LLITA THN LGU or acre ie ee ice ee ee Rossini 


Thematically, this overture is unrelated to the opera, being merely a brilliant 
introduction, but as such it has few equals. Berlioz, the great French composer, 
called it a “symphony in four parts,” while the title, “Tone Picture,” would be 
equally appropriate with the following descriptive sub-titles: I. “Sunrise Among 
the Mountains” (five solo cellos); Il. “An Alpine Storm”; III. Pastoral, 
“Shepherd’s Thanksgiving,” the air used being a well-known Swiss folk song, 
“Ranz des Vaches” (solo for English horn with flute obligato); IV. “Trumpet 
Call Summoning the Swiss Soldiers, and Their March.” 


5. Souvenir de Moscow, stor Violin. ct a eee W ieniawski 
WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


This well known work, combines Russian folk tunes with interesting display 
of violin technic. Particularly beautiful is the principal theme, “The Red 
Sarafan.” Wieniawski was a prize pupil in 1846 at the Paris Conservatoire and 
became a teacher at the Petrograd Conversatory, later going also to Brussels. He 
had an extended tour of the United States in 1872 with Rubinstein. 


6“Tnivitation to. the Danee- e e W eber-W eingartner 


The original composition, written in 1819 and dedicated to the composer’s wife, 
was a simple composition for the piano. Carl Taussig made an elaborate concert 
version for piano, and Berlioz transcribed it literally for orchestra for the Paris 
performance of Weber’s “Der Freischutz” to be used as ballet music. Felix 
Weingartner made another version in 1896, in which he has developed it from a 
comparatively simple piano piece to a symphonic poem for orchestra. The work 
may be roughly divided into three parts—the introduction (the invitation to 
dance), the waltz, and then the coda—where the lady is gracefully excorted back 
to her seat at the close of the dance. 








Fourth Attraction 
ARTISTS CONCERTS SERIES 


ALFRED CORTOT 


French Master Pianist 


Auditorium Opera House 
Oakland 


Monday Night, Feb. 23 ’25 


Prices: $1.00, $1.50, 92,0028 





Management Zannette W. Potter Telephone Lakeside 6700 


Sherman, 





The pianos sold under this 
dealer name have this about 
them: They are good pianos. 
They are made by reliable 
manufacturers, to whose 
wartanty is added the pledge . 
of a retail firm for fifty years 
loyal to its obligations. 


It is a simple fact that, what- 
ever piano you find for sale 
elsewhere, its equal in price 
—if it is a piano worth hav- 
ing—can be found here or 
certainly will be promptly 
obtained for you. 


Home of Steinway, Duo-Art, Weber, Sohmer, Steinert, 


Sherman, Clay & Co., Steck, Aldrich, 
and other good pianos. 





h Jay & Co. 
by 





Oakland — Fourteenth and Clay Streets 
Berkeley -- Telegraph and Channing Way 
San Francisco—Kearney and Sutter Streets 








Young People’s Concerts 


UNDER THE DIRECTIONS OF 


WILLIAM EDWIN CHAMBERLAIN 


First Concert—Fourteenth Season 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


HARMON GYMNASIUM 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 13, 1925 


AT 3:00 O’CLOCK 


This concert has been made possible through the generosity 
of the San Francisco Musical Association and the University of 


California. 











as 
Or 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


BERKELEY, FEBRUARY 13, 1925 
3:00 P.M. 


SOLOISTS : 


LOUIS PERSINGER, Violin 
WALDEMAR GIESE, Double Base 


PROGRAMME 


. Andante from Symphony in G major (‘‘Surprise’’) ....Haydn 


. Two Movements from the Suite ‘‘Through the Looking 


EE Ss Soe CAEN Hy ea a rea aP edi SEA oy. eae Ae tee Deems Taylor 


Jabberwocky 
Looking Glass Insects 


PUP Aa Yi epinichin VCE eer ree, tN es sees atone dal eee rae Brahms 
. ‘In the Village,’’ from Caucasian Sketches..[ppolitow-Ivanow 


- Coneerto for Violin and Double Bass ........................-- Bottesine 


Louis PERSINGER and WALDEMAR GIESE 


eVitarryes Wear Ghee oe oo irk eres eos dee cake Schubert 











1. Andante from Symphony in G major (‘‘Surprise’’)....Haydn 


It is from this movement (the second) that Haydn’s G major symphony 
gains its nickname. It is in the form of a theme with variations, and after 
each period in which the melody is softly sung, the full orchestra comes in 
with a ‘‘surprise’’ in the form of a loud, clashing chord. It has been said 
that Haydn introduced these clashing chords for the purpose of waking up 
the fashionable English ladies who slept during his concerts in London, 
However, Haydn himself said that this was not so, but that he merely wanted 
to be unique and unusual in his symphony. 


2. Two movements from the Suite ‘‘Through the Looking 
GR Brac idiepeste tek cr iby ear at! (Neem sh eet ren aie ner fx Deems Taylor 


Jabberwocky 
Looking Glass Insects 


These numbers from Deems Taylor’s suite, ‘‘Through the Looking 
Glass,’’ are based on Lewis Carroll’s immortal fairy-tale of the same name, 
and the pictures presented will be readily recognized by all who have read 
the book. First comes the story of the battle with the Jabberwock. The 
theme of the frightful beast is first announced by the full orchestra. The 
clarinet then begins the tale, recounting how, on a ‘‘brillig’’ afternoon, the 
‘<slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe.’’? Muttered imprecations 
by the bassoon warn us to ‘‘ beware the Jabberwock, my son. ?? A miniature 
march signalizes the approach of our hero, taking ‘‘his vorpal sword in 
hand.’’ Trouble starts among the trombones—-the Jabberwock is upon us! 
The battle with the monster is recounted in a short and rather repellent 
fugue, the double-basses bringing up the subject and the hero fighting back 
in the interludes. Finally his vorpal blade (really a xylophone) goes 
‘<snicker-snack’’ and the monster, impersonated by the solo bassoon, dies 
a lingering and convulsive death. The hero returns to the victorious strains 
of his own theme. The whole orchestra rejoices—the church bells are rung 
—alarums and excursions. Once more the slithy toves perform their pleasing 
evolutions, undisturbed by the uneasy ghost of the late Jabberwock. 





In the movement, ‘‘ Looking Glass Insects,’’ we find the Bee-Elephant, 
the Gnat, the Rocking-horse-fly, the Snap-dragon-fly, and the Bread-and- 
butter-fly. There are several themes, but there is no use trying to decide 
which insect any one of them stands for. 


On Roh al sarah altel digg Bin ¢1 0. camer ee Ine ctr rma te et ery PR Brahms 


When Brahms was a boy he attended concerts given by the great Hun- 
garian violinst, Remenyi, who. included in his performances examples of 
Hungarian music, such as Friskas and Czardas. The odd rhythms and 
harmonies fascinated Brahms, and when, a few years later, he went on tour 








with Remenyi, as the latter’s pianist, he made a serious study of Hungarian 
music. It was not until some years later, however, that these studies bore 
fruit in the shape of Hungarian Dances, which continued to appear from 
time to time as piano duets. 


4. ‘‘In the Village,’’ from Caucasian Sketches..[ppolitow-Ivanow 


Ippolitow-Ivanow, one of the younger school of Russian conductors, was 
for a number of years conductor of the opera in Tiflis, Caucasus, and while 
there made a thorough study of the music of the country. The number 
played this afternoon from his suite of ‘‘Caucasian Sketches’’ has as its 
main material a dance of the natives, with an introduction which is a 
musieal picture of a Caucasian village of cliff-dwellers. Solos for the 
muted viola and the English horn are heard as the answering calls echoing 
from one rock-dwelling to another, and the resemblance between the tones 
of these two instruments is made strikingly apparent. 


5. Concerto for Violin and Double Bass ........-............-.... Bottesivna 


Bottesini was one of the most remarkable performers on the double-bass 
which the history of that instrument has ever known. Exhibiting talent 
for music at an early age, he was sent to Milan to the Conservatory as an 
applicant for musical instruction. As there was only one vacant place— 
that for a contrabassist—Bottesini took up this instrument rather from 
necessity than from a special desire to make himself master of its difficul- 
ties. He wrote much music for the double-bass, of which, in addition to 
the Concerto played today, he was accustomed to perform at his concerts 
with electrifying effect variations on The Carnival of Venice. 


asm] WEEN 22 hop Taaed 1 I hig) ¢ Manet settee ete Ria ae en aha a Rape Re RR hea Schubert 


In none of Schubert’s lesser compositions is his genius for rhythm, 
melody and spirit shown more plainly than in this March. So popular did 
it become that many orchestrations of it have been made, it originally 
having been written for piano (four hands). A piece so well-known as this 
March is, makes any special analysis unnecessary, as its decisive rhythm 
and spirited melody are of instant appeal. 















SYMPHONY" 
ORCHESTRA 

yo, Marntained by | 
TONS) The Musical 2 


Ds Association of fa; 
be 





oan Francisco 


SEVENTH POPULAR 


1924 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR 


[__ CBe oa. I} 
: 











Alfred Hertz 


RECOMMENDS 
CONN INSTRUMENTS 


The San Francisco 
Symphony 


CONN 
INSTRUMENTS 





No Higher Endorsement 


can be given to a musical 


“I take great pleasure in 
instrument, hence if the recommending Conn instru- 


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means anything to you, your 


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OININ 


WORLD'S 

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS 
OF HIGH GRADE BAND AND 
ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS 


ALFRED HERTZ. 








Conn San Francisco Co. Conn Oakland Co. 
47 Kearny St. 531-16th St. 


292 








Musical Association of San Francisco 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 
OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKzg, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President EK. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 


A. W. WipENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J.B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 


WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 


293 





-P 


mal 
Wo 





HE choice of the 

Mason & Hamlin Piano 
for the concert platform 
proclaims its sonority— 
its selection by famous art- 
ists declares the quality of 
its tone—its presence in 
homes of wealth and taste 
bears tribute to its unpar- 


alleled beauty! 


Wiley BAllen ©. 


135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 


294 














Che San HFrancisea Symphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 
1924—Season—1925 
SEVENTH POPULAR CONCERT 
521st Concert 
CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, February 15, 2:45 o’clock 


Shiotats {LOUIS PERSINGER, Violin 
) WALDEMAR GIESE, Double Bass 


PROGRAMME 


1. Two Movements from the ‘‘Surprise’’ Symphony...... Haydn 
Andante—Theme and Variations 
Finale: Allegro di molto 


(By Special Request) 


2. Legend for Orchestra, “Zorahayda’’.................... Svendsen 
(First time at these concerts) 
3, Ca) ‘Serenade! ii eet ee ene ne | ons eee Pierne 
(b)ia Che ubee te Ses os ie tere sate e aan aes Schubert 
Intermission 
4«-Snite. Sigurd jorsaltarc 5 soe) eee ee ae Grieg 


In the King’s Hall 
Borghild’s Dream 
March of Homage 
(First time at these concerts) 


ae Concerto for Violin and Double Bass.................... Bottesini 
(First time in San Francisco) 


LOUIS PERSINGER and WALDEMAR GIESE 


6, Invitation tothe Dance... Weber-Weingartner 


hy | 

NOTE! Victer Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 

Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 

which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 











109 Stockton Street 


BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 
Recorded in Europe by the 





Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 


lst Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


Ist Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


ist Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


3rd Movement—Part 2. 


3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


) 4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


Send for our catalogue of ‘Musical Masterworks’’—free. 


QUARG MUSIC CO. 


206 Powell Street Open Evenings 


296 





Symphony in G major (‘‘The Surprise’’) - : Pe Haydn 


This symphony, known as “The Surprise’’ and in Germany as 
the symphony “with the drum stroke,’ is the third of the twelve 
Salomon symphonies as arranged in the order of their appearance in 
the catalogue of the Philharmonic Society of London. The name 
“Surprise’’ comes from the second movement, which is in the form 
of a theme with variations. After each period in which the melody 
is softly sung, the full orchestra comes in with a ‘surprise’ in the form 
of a loud crashing chord. It has been said that Haydn introduced 
these chords for the purpose of waking up the fashionable English 
ladies who slept during his concerts in London. However, Haydn 
himself said that this was not so, but that he merely wanted to present 


something unique and unusual in his symphony. 


Legend for Orchestra, “Zorahayda,’”? Opus 11 - = Svendsen 


This composition by the Norwegian composer is based upon ““The 
Legend of the Rose of the Alhambra,’’ one of Washington Irving's 


fascinating tales. Jacinta sits melancholy and alone by a fountain in 


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the Alhambra. Zorahayda appears, predicts for Jacinta the end of 
her love sorrow and tells of her own troubles, which baptism as a 
Christian alone will end. Jacinta baptizes Zorahayda in the sacred 
water of the fountain, and she disappears with transfigured counte- 
nance. Jacinta, remembering the prediction of the mysterious appa- 


rition, is illumined with hope and joy. 


The score of ““Zorahayda’’ contains the following enumeration 


and explanation of the various situations of the story: 


‘Solitude and melancholy of Jacinta—Appearance of Zorahayda 
—She predicts for Jacinta the end of her troubles, and tells her of her 
own unhappiness. Baptism alone will bring her repose — Jacinta 
sprinkles the sacred water over her head—Disappearance of Zora- 


hayda—Joy of Jacinta over the remembrance of the prediction.”’ 


Serenade - - . - : = : zs : Pierne 


Gabriel Pierne is best known in this country for his delicious 
little “Serenade.’’ He has written several operas. He succeeded 


Franck as organist at Ste. Clothilde, Paris, and Colonne as director of 















Studio Hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 


Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Orley See 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


~aebd]_ Spd 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 























Master School of Musical Arts 
of California 


LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF, Director 
ALICE SECKELS, Manager 


Endowed by Alice Campbell Macfarlane 








Cesar Thomson Lazar S. Samoiloft Josef Lhevinne 
Violin V o1ce Piano 


Sigismund Stojowski W. J. Henderson Andres De Segurola 


Bigue Comorian Tecturer Operatic Department 
Annie Louise David 
Julia Claussen Felix Salmond Harp 
V oice ’Cello and 
7 Chamber Music A. Kostelanetz 
: Accompanist 
Emil J. Polak Samuel Gardner Sight Reading 
Coach Violin Ear Training 





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thus affording the opportunity for a closer and more permanent association between the most 
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The official Piano is the Baldwin. 


Write for catalog giving dates, terms and full information. 


Address ALICE SECKELS, 68 Post Street, Phone Douglas 7267 
SAN FRANCISCO 


299 





the Concerts Colonne. The ‘‘Serenade’’ is much the same type of 





music as the one written by Moskowski; very dainty in construction 


and full of melody and rhythm. It is written for muted strings. 


“The Bee” - - - - - - - ~ Schubert 


This little piece—originally written as a violin solo with piano 
accompaniment—was arranged for orchestra by Frederick Stock, con- 
ductor of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Franz Schubert (no 
relation to the great Franz Schubert of Vienna) was a violinist whose 
artistic energies were confined to the musical life of Dresden, the city 
in which he was born. In addition to ‘“The Bee,’’ which is the only 
work of Schubert that is widely known, he composed a number of 
etudes for the violin, a fantasie for violin and orchestra; a duet for 
piano and violin, and two duets for violin and violoncello in conjunc- 
tion with Frederick Kummer, who was first ‘cellist in the Dresden 


orchestra. 


Suite, “Sigurd Jorsalfar’ — - - - - - - Grieg 


“Sigurd Jorsalfar’’ is the title of a play by Bjornstjerne Bjornson, 
which was brought out for the first time at the Christiania Theater in 
1872. The story has to do with Sigurd, the younger brother of two 
kings that ruled jointly in Norway. He is the grim type of war and 
wild desire; his brother, Eystein, of peace and constructive art. The 
period of their reign was likewise the period of the invasion of 


Jerusalem by the Crusaders, among them Sigurd. He set out for the 


GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianis 
(Returned from World ek with Jean Gerardy) 


Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 





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300 











Holy Land with a great force, fought many battles, and finally re- 


turned to Norway in triumph. 


From the music to the play Grieg drew two pieces— “The Norse 
People’ and “‘King’s Song’’—for baritone solo, male chorus and or- 
chestra numbered Opus 22, and the Suite of three pieces for orchestra, 


numbered as Opus 56. 


Concerto for Violin and Double Bass - - Bottesini 


Giovanni Bottesini (1821-1889) was one of the most remarkable 
performers on the double-bass which the history of that instrument 
has ever known. Exhibiting talent for music at an early age, he was 
sent to the Milan Conservatory as an applicant for musical instruction. 
As there was only one vacant place—that for a contrabassist— 
Bottesini took up this instrument rather from necessity than from a 
special desire to make himself master of its difficulties. He did, how- 
ever, soon make extraordinary progress, and so great was his virtu- 
osity that, on leaving the Conservatory, he set out upon a concert tour 
as a solo performer. He finally settled in Havana as principal 


double-bass in the Havana opera. In 1850, Don Francesco Marty y 


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301 





ANNOUNCEMENT 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, February 20, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, February 22, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: WALTER FERNER, ’Cellist 


PROGRAMME 
1. Symphony in G minor 
Allegro molto 
Andante 
Menuetto 
Finale 
2. Concerto, D minor, for Violoncello 
Prelude. Lento—Allegro maestoso 
Intermezzo. Andante con moto 
Rondo. Andante—Allegro vivace 
WALTER FERNER 
3. ““A Negro Rhapsody’”’ 


(First time in San Francisco) 


ANNOUNCEMENT 
EIGHTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 


Sunday, March 1, 2:45 P. M. 
Soloist: ARTUR ARGIEWICZ, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 


. Suite, Opus 19 Dohnanyi 
Andante con variazioni 
Scherzo 
Romanza 


Rondo 


. Concerto for Violin, D minor Vieuxtemps 


ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 
. Four Old Flemish Folk Songs de Greef 
. Valse Triste Sibelius 


Boccherini 





Torrens, the Havanese impressario, brought his company to New 
York; at its head, Bottesini, who was assisted by Arditi. Bottesini 
made good use of his experience as a director. He conducted the 
Italian Opera in Paris from 1855 to 1857. In 1861 he was director 
at the Bellini Theater at Palermo; two years later, conductor at 


Barcelona; in 1871, conductor at the Lyceum Theater, London. 


As a composer, Bottesini’s most ambitious productions were a 
number of operas, the earliest of which, ‘“‘Cristoforo Colombo,’’ was 
produced at Havana in 1847. His latest dramatic works were ‘‘Ero 
e Leandro’ (composed to a text by Boito), produced at Turin in 
1879, and “La Regina del Nepal,’’ brought out at the same place in 
the following year. Bottesini wrote much music for the double-bass, 
including variations on the “Carnival of Venice,’ with which he 


electrified his audiences. 


Invitation to the Dance’ - - ~ - Weber-Weingartner 


The original composition, written in 1819 and dedicated to the 


composers wife, was a simple composition for the piano. Carl 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


REeDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





303 








Taussig made an elaborate concert version for piano, and Berlioz 
transcribed it literally for orchestra for the Paris performance of 
Weber’s “Der Freischutz’’ to be used as ballet music. Felix Wein- 
gartner made another version in 1896, in which he has developed it 
from a comparatively simple piano piece to a symphonic poem for 
orchestra. The work may be roughly divided into three parts—the 
introduction (the invitation to dance), the waltz, and then the coda— 


where the lady is gracefully escorted back to her seat at the close of 








the dance. 
THE 
MARGARET MARY MORGAN ((O. 
Engraving: Printers - Publishing 
Commercial Printing 
619 California Street Douglas 4633 














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the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 





Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 31st, 1924 





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AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 





304 








Jdersonnel 


Che San Francisco Somphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


‘CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 


Hranek, C. 


BASSES 
Lahann, J. 


Principal 
Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 


Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 


Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


a eee 
cg TT ET 


305 











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308 





Musical Association of San Srancisen 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 
OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKzez, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President EK. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 


A. W. WiDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker _W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J.B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 


WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 


309 





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HE choice of the 

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for the concert platform 
proclaims its sonority— 
its selection by famous art- 
ists declares the quality of 
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homes of wealth and taste 
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Wiley BAllen ©. 


135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 


310 











Che San HFrancisea Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 
1924—-Season—1925 





NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
522d and 523d Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, February 20, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, February 22, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: WALTER FERNER, ’Cellist 


PROGRAMME 
1. Symphony in G minor 7? K SFO) ios a ed Mozart 
Allegro molto 
Andante 
Menuetto 


Finale—Allegro assai 
Intermission 


2. Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra in D minotv......Lalo 
Prelude. Lento—Allegro maestoso 
Intermezzo. Andante con moto 
Rondo. Andante—Allegro vivace 
WALTER FERNER 


3. AeNegro Rhapso dye... nner eee et Rubin Goldmark 


(First time in San Francisco) 


NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 





311 








BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 
Recorded in Europe by the 


Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-W. inkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 


ist Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


lst Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 


Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


lst Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd 


2nd 
3rd 


3rd 
3rd 


4th 
4th 


4th 


4th 


4th 
4th 


Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 2. 


Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


Send for our catalogue of ‘“‘Musical Masterworks’’—free. 


QUARG MUSIC CO. 


206 Powell Street Open Evenings 


312 








Symphony in G minor - “ - - - i. Mozart 


Mozart wrote forty-nine symphonies—the first in London in 
1764, when he was only eight years of age. The earlier ones are very 
thinly scored, many of them calling only for strings, a pair of flutes or 
oboes, and as many horns. It was not until he came to his thirty- 
ninth symphony—the “‘Parisian,’’ written in | 778—that he began to 
apply any great’ breadth of instrumentation, and it was reserved for 
the year | 788 to witness his crowning achievements in this form—the 
three great symphonies in E flat, G minor and C major (the so-called 
‘“Jupiter’). All three of these works were written between June 26th 
and August | Oth, the one played today having been completed within 
ten days. 


The G minor Symphony has been the object of boundless admi- 
ration on the part of all subsequent composers and critics, some of 
whom have voiced the opinion that it is Mozart’s orchestral master- 
piece. Beethoven is said to have been so deeply impressed with its 
beauties that he rescored it from a pianoforte copy; and Schubert, 
speaking of the Andante, said: “| seem to hear the angels singing.’’ 
Otto Jahn in his biography of Mozart reviews the work in the follow- 
ing words: “In the G minor Symphony sorrow and complaining take 
the place of joy and gladness. The pianoforte quartet and the quintet 


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313 








NIN) 


in G minor are allied in tone, but their sorrow passes in the end to 
gladness or calm; whereas here it rises in a continuous climax to a wild 
merriment, as if seeking to stifle care. The agitated first movement 
begins with a low plaintiveness, which is scarcely interrupted by a 
calmer mood of the second subject, which in working out intensifies a 
gentle murmur into a piercing cry of anguish; but, strive and struggle 
as it may, the strength of the resistance sinks again into the murmur 
with which the movement closes. The Andante, on the contrary, is 
consolatory in tone, not reposing on the consciousness of an inner 
peace, but striving after it with an earnest composure which even 
attempts to be cheerful. The Minuet introduces another turn of 


expression. A resolute resistance is opposed to the foe, but in vain; 
and again the effort sinks to a moan. Even the tender comfort of the 
trio, softer and sweeter than the Andante, fails to bring lasting peace. 
Again the combat is renewed, and again it dies away, complaining. 
The last movement brings no peace—only a wild merriment that seeks 
to drown sorrow; and goes on its course in restless excitement. This 
is the most passionate of all Mozart’s symphonies, but even in this he 
has not forgotten that ‘music, when expressing horrors, must still be 
music. 


Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra, in D minor - . Lalo 


This concerto was first played at a Pasdeloup concert in Paris, 


CHL it aurs: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


KAJETAN ATTL 
Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


Py eee 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 





314 

















THE 


Maldwin 


is the 


Official Piano 


of the 





wD 


Master School of Musical Arts 


of California 
LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF, Director 
ALICE SECKELS, Manager 


68 Post STREET—Room 309 


: Endowed by Alice Campbell Macfarlane 


San Francisco Los Angeles 


A Faculty of Celebrated Artist Teachers 


Joser LHEVINNE LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF WILLIAM J. HENDERSON 
SIGISMUND STOJOWSKI JuLIA CLAUSSEN CrEsAR THOMSON 

FELIxX SALMOND ANDRES DE SEGUROLA SAMUEL GARDNER 

EMIL J. PoLak A. KoSTELANETZ ANNIE LoutsE Davip 





Fairmont Hotel, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
October 10, 1924. 





BALDWIN Prano COMPANY, 
310 Sutter Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
DEAR SIRS: 


Let me express my appreciation of your kindness in co-operating with 
the Master School of Musical Arts in California. 


I have been familiar with the Baldwin Piano for many years. I have 
found it unrivalled in tone and action—in fact, the ideal piano for both con- 
cert and studio. The school has done well to have made its arrangements 
with you. 


Very truly yours, 
(Signed) LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 





GheBaldwin Diane Company 


310 Sutter Street 





315 








December 8, 1877, Adolphe Fischer, to whom the work is dedicated, 
playing the solo part. Philip H. Goepp has described the work as 


follows: 


‘‘The first movement is in a way II Penseroso to L’ Allegro of the 
rest of the concerto; it is minor in key, tragic or heroic in mood, and 
almost half the length of the work. Here the preluding orchestra 
strikes the ominous theme in awesome unison. Soon the solo voice 
has a line of pleading, a meditation, that is broken into by ponderous 
chords. The main text begins in the combined motives of the group 
of cellos and the solo voice. A passionate line of the latter ends ever 
in a crash of harmonies. Again there is a clear duality in the tender 
song of the solo voice against a softest answer in the high wood. It 
is sharply broken by a rude descending motive of all the voices. Then 
follows the most rhythmic passage, a song of the solo ’cello to a steady 
descending pizzicato tread of strings, anon with exclamatory chords 
or dulcet sounds of lightest wood. The prelude returns, though in a 
new key, and a new rhythmic song. The ending is in the ominous 


motive of the stentorian chorus. 


‘‘In the Intermezzo, as against the former rhapsody, we are lulled 
in the thrall of pure rhythm, almost of a slow singing dance. It seems 
as if in the swaying song of the solo ‘cello we caught former strains of 
sad longing. And almost as great is the magic change in turn to the 
enchanting rapid lilt. 

‘‘In the slow rhythmic mood of the Finale we strike a vein that 


seems akin to Spain and to the Orient—an effect of poised tone 
relieved in a quicker run to a slow swaying rhythm. In every way 








GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianist 
(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 
Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 
Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-J 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 










een en naaniaeaeeeeaenn aeeiananenamnammasdaasamaaeustentanadanninenasandeeninemasunmnenteenbisoaemammnss 


316 

















here is the glad transformation of the beginning mood. After buoyant 
chords, that seem to promise a lilt of tarantelle, the ascending tune in 
the major recalls a former minor song. There are delicious touches of 
resonant color, as the long, rhythmic organ-point of soft brass against 
rising chords of strings; best of all, when the second big melody is 
sung with magical effect in a duet of the solo ‘cello and clarinet. 


Indeed, it is all buoyancy, melody and color, in splendid fulfilment of 


the longing mood of the beginning.’ 


A Negro Rhapsody~ - 2 - 7 - Rubin Goldmark 


Rubin Goldmark, born in New York, August 15, 1872, is a 
nephew of the late Carl Goldmark. He gained his musical training at 
the Vienna Conservatory and at the National Conservatory, New York. 
His tone poem, “Samson,” was performed at these concerts February 
17, 1922. The first performance of the Negro Rhapsody was at a 
concert of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, January 18, 1923, 
for which Mr. Lawrence Gilman made the following analysis: 


‘There is a slow introduction begun by the ‘celli and violas in 
unison singing ‘Nobody Knows de Trouble I've Seen,’ repeated in 
imitation by the woodwind. Flutes, clarinets, and bassoons, in G 
minor, have another phrase from the same song. Most of the orches- 


Cable Address, ‘‘Mandib’”’ Telephone Sutter 2945 


Established 1869 


Manheim, Bibbern & Co. 


315 MONTGOMERY STREET 


SAN FRANCISCO 


Susurance Brokers Stork and Bond Brokers 
Members, Insurance Brokers 
Exchange 
Fire (in all its branches), Marine, 
Burglary, Casualty, Automobile, ; 
Life, Liability, Earthquake, Strike Quotations and information on all 
and Riot, Etc. stocks and bonds always on hand. 


Members, The San Francisco Stock 
and Bond Exchange 


317 





ANNOUNCEMENT 


TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, March 6, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, March 8, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: LEWIS RICHARDS, Harpsichordist 


PROGRAMME 
. Antique Dances for the Lute Respighi 
Arranged for Modern Orchestra 

(First time in San Francisco) 
. Chaconne Bach-Steinberg 
(First time in San Francisco) 
. Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra, in D major 


Larghetto 
Rondo all’Ongharese 
LEWIS RICHARDS 
“The Fire Bird’’ 
Introduction—Variations of the Fire Bird 
Rondo of the Princesses 
Dance Infernal of the King Kastchei 
Berceuse and Finale 


ANNOUNCEMENT 
EIGHTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, March 1, 2:45 P. M. 
Soloist: ANTHONY LINDEN, Flutist 


PROGRAMME 
. Suite, Opus 19 

Andante con variazioni 
Scherzo 

Romanza 

Rondo 

. Concertino for Flute and Orchestra 


ANTHONY LINDEN 


. Four Old Flemish Folk Songs 
. Valse Triste 
. Menuet 











i 








tra now takes this tune, while the horns in imitation sing against it 
‘Nobody Knows.’ There is a decrescendo, with long-held chords of 
the woodwind, while under them the basses murmur ‘O Peter, Go 
Ring dem Bells.” The main body of the piece begins with a variant 
of ‘Nobody Knows,’ with inversions in the woodwind, the basses 
repeat O Peter, Go Ring dem Bells,’ while the violins introduce the 
fourth of the seven basic themes. (It should be said here that a 
number of the counter-subjects and subsidiary themes used in the 
Rhapsody are of Mr. Goldmark’s own invention.) This fourth tune 
consists of the first bars of ‘O, Religion is a Fortune.’ With it, in the 
horns, is combined the behest to Peter. This material is developed, 
with a climax on ‘Nobody Knows. A passage of antiphonal chords 
for contrasted instrumental groups leads to an Andante non troppo 
with an English horn solo on ‘Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless 
Child,’ above a counter melody for the French horn. A solo violin 
sings this melody, and then a solo ‘cello announces the chief lyric sub- 
ject of the work and the sixth of its seven basic themes; it consists of 
two measures of ‘Oh, When I Come to Die.’ The strings, horns, and 
wood repeat it in a rich forte, and turn it over to the horn quartet, 
while they themselves (divisi), with harp and celesta, weave about it 
pianissimo arabesques. Trombones recall the first theme (‘Nobody 
Knows ), crescendo, and the full band attains its highest point of emo- 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


‘REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


Mm. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


319 








tional intensity on ‘Oh, When I Come to Die,’ followed by a diminu- 
endo and a fermata on a soft A major chord of the strings. 


‘There is a return to the Tempo giusto, and the seventh and 
last of the themes is exhibited. This was found years ago by Mr. 
Goldmark in a magazine article, quoted there as a melody sung by 
the Tennessee negroes while working on the river. This irresistible 
tune is played by the woodwind in unison, with pizzicato accompani- 
ment. The themes are now polyphonically exploited, there is a bril- 
liant stretto, and a lusty climax on the “Tennessee River’ tune. At the 
close Peter is for the last time loudly exhorted by the brass.”’ 





THE 


MARGARET MARY MORGAN (CO. 


Engraving: Printers « Publishing 
Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 




















THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 


One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by merégers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 3lst, 1924 





Athebs? cic i$ Oa ote Pa et on See ge Ob Re a ce $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds,...... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund. .........++eeeeeees 461,746.52 
MISSION BRANCH... 0... cecccccnccsvcsvenneses Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH)? .... ci cceveccs vives Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH.......cccccccccs:, Haight and Belvedere Streets 


WEST PORTAL BRANGH own. cc cc cn a ince ss West Porta] Ave. and Ulloa St. 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 





320 














The San HFrancisea Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hah], E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


ersurmel 


‘CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 


Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


321 





BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 
















Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
dure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a STEINWAY. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring —of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


Kearny & Sutter Sts. 
Oakland - Clay at 14th 





Sherman, [Play & Co. 











REMAINING SYMPHONY 
DATES 


ox 


Thursday Evening, Mar. 19 
Thursday Evening, Mar. 26 


ONS 


Soloist 
LEWIS RICHARDS 
Harpsichord 





SAN FRANCISCO 


Symphony Orchestra 


AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 
OAKLAND, CAL. 


Thursday Evening, February 26, 1925 


Ejight-thirty o’clock 


Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 
Box Office at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland, Cal. 
Telephone Lakeside 6700 

















PRA 
Thursday Evepruary 


1. Academic Festival Overture... Brahms 


Brahms wrote his “Academic Festival” Overture in 1880 as an 
acknowledgment of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy which had 
been bestowed upon him by the University of Breslau. This work, 
as well as another new composition, the “Tragic” Overture, was 
produced at Breslau, January 4, 1881, in the presence of the august 
functionaries of the university, Brahms himself conducting. The 
overture is in reality a fantasia on student songs. Brahms was fond 
of these pieces, and on occasions when they were sung at social 
festivities he would join. in lustily and with much enthusiasm. 


2. Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra, D major..Haydn 
Vivace — Larghetto — Rondo all’ Ongharese 
Lewis RicHarps 


The development of the pianoforte of today has been the result 
of many centuries of experimentation, and it was not until the close 
of the eighteenth century that the piano as we now know it—that 
is, an instrument in which the vibration of the strings is caused 
by the action of hammers—displaced the older varieties. Of these 
by far the most important were the clavichord, in which the strings 
were set in motion by tangents, and the harpsichord, or, in French, 
clavecin, in which the strings were not struck, but were plucked or 
twanged by sharp points of crow-quill embedded in the “jacks,” the 
“jacks” in turn, being set in motion by the action of the keys. 

The Haydn concerto selected for this evening’s concert, one of 
his earlier works, has been out of print for many years, but 
Mr. Richards found original manuscripts of it in the Royal 
Conservatory library at Brussels, and thus is able to present the 
work in the form in which Haydn originally wrote it. 





3. Solo Numbers for Harpsichord 
Lewis RIcHARDS 


Arig scopy Watigtions <8 ee Se Sana Shea ere Handel 


EhGst Brookes eee Sais 20 egret RIS Ls haoetie Pe mR John Ayrlton 
Turkish March from A major Sonata... Mozart 
Intermission | 
de Mhree Jewish Pidens. 0 042s das so Ernest Bloch 
Dance — _ Rite —  Fumeral Procession 


Upon the occasion of the first performance of the Three Jewish 
Poems by the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, February 1, 1918, the 
following information was furnished by the composer: 

“The ‘Jewish Poems’ are the first work of a cycle. I do not wish 
that one should judge my whole personality by this fragment, this 


See ee teense — 
2 Performances -ANNA PAVLOWA--2 Performances G 
and her BALLET RUSSE 
Monday and Tuesday Nights, March 9 and 10 


Prices $3.50 to $1.00, plus tax 
Tickets on sale now at Sherman-Clay Box Office. a 


Management Zannette W. Potter 

















ANI 
epruary 20, 1925 


first attempt, which does not contain it. The ‘Psalms,’ ‘Schelomo,’ 
‘Israel’ are more representative, because they come from the passion 
and the violence that I believe to be the characteristics of my nature. 
In the ‘Jewish Poems’ I have wished in some way to try a new 
speech, the color of which should serve my future expression. Ther 
is in them a certain restraint; I hold myself back; my. orchestration 
is also guarded. The ‘Poems’ are the first work of a new period; 
they consequently have not the maturity of the ‘Pslams’ or of ‘Israel.’ 
It is not easy for me to make a program of the ‘Poems.’ Music is 
not translated by words. The titles, it seems to me should suffi- 
ciently inform the hearer. 


“Tl. Danse. This music is all in the coloring; coloring rather 
sombre, mystical, languorous. 


“IT. Rite. This movement is more emotional; but there is some- 
thing solemn and distant; as the ceremonies of a cult. 


“III. Funeral Procession. This is more human. My father died 
—these ‘Poems’ are dedicated to his memory. There ‘s something 
implacably severe in the rhythms that obstinately repeat themselves. 
At the end, sorrow bursts forth, and at the idea of an eternal separa- . 
tion the soul breaks down. But a very simple and serene melody 
arises from the orchestral depths as a consolation, a balm, a gentle 
faith. The memory of our dear departed ones is not effaced; they 
live forever in our hearts. 


“The form is free, but it is really there, for I believe that our 
constitution demands order in a work of art.” 

LEWIS RICHARDS is a native of Michigan, but has spent the 
ereater part of his life in Europe, whither he went in 1902 to become 
a pupil of Arthur de Gref, at the Royal Conservatory of Music at 
Brussels, Belgium. He obtains a brilliant “First Prize with distinc- 
tion” from that institution in 1905, being the first American pianist 
to. attain that honor. After three years of teachng in this country, 
he returned to Europe and engaged in concert work appearing in 
the capitals and important cities of Belgium, France, England, Hol- 
land, Germany, Austria and Hungary, winning the approval of 
audiences, musicians and critics alike. His interest in the music of 
the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth century led him to take up 

: the study of the ancient clavecin and harpsichord, his success as a 

| performer on the clavecin winning him a membership in the famous 
“Societe des Instruments Anciens”, of Paris, of which Saint-Saens 
was president, and it is as a Harpsichordist that he is meeting with 
tremendous success in the United States, the present season being 
his second tour. 

Mr. Richards was living in Brussels when the war began in 1914. 
Through his friends, Brand Whitlock, United States minster to Bel- 
gium, and Hugh Gibson, secretary of the American legation, Herbert 
Hoover’s attention was attracted to this young artist. He was invited 
to join the great relief machine Hoover built up in London, his 
executive ability eventually elevating him to the position of assistant 
director which he held until recently. 


PAUL WHITEMAN=—=in Person 


AND HIS ORCHESTRA 
Monday and Tuesday Nights, March 2 and 3 
Prices $3.00 to $1.00, plus tax 


Tickets for these extraordinary events on sale now at Sherman-Clay Box Office. 
Management Zannette W. Potter 


























Coming 








—— 





PR 19 ed FR Ss Fe Ss Fe 


xy recat 
AVIAED DAB LE. EVEN MENGE A EOS FELN Wid ¥ 
























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To possess a Duo-Art is to enjoy 
the privilege of listening at will to 
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Duo-Art pianos are from $750 up; 
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Oakland — oildachel and Clay Streets 
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Fourteenth Season = 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR © 
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328 














Musical Association of San Francisco 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 
OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKezs, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President EK. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 


A. W. WipenHam, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg bor Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE | 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 


WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 


329 





i s) ee ef iN 


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filason & Hamlin Btanog 


Those to whom music is a gift or 
an art ora great privilege hold one 
piano at the pinnacle—the Mason 
& Hamlin. For they know it to be 
wrought byskilled artisans—men 
who build with infinite pains that 
the final product will be worthy 
the hands of an artist. So does it 
deserve a place in your home. 


Wiley B.Allen ©. 


135 KEARNY STREET,SAN FRANCISCO 
1323 WASHINGTON STREET, OAKLAND 

















Che San Francisca Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 
1924—Season—1925 


EIGHTH POPULAR CONCERT 
525th Concert 


CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, March 1, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: ANTHONY LINDEN, Flutist 


PROGRAMME 
ls Suite, ‘Opis 19) 2 Pc ee ane eer ee ae eee Dohnanyi 
Andante con variazioni 
Scherzo 
Romanza 
Rondo 
2.. Concertino for: Flute-and: Orchestra: 25 Chaminade 


(First time at these Concerts) 


ANTHONY LINDEN 


Intermission 
3:+F our: Old Flemish Folk. Sonea.c aii eee de Greef 
A. Valsesliriste 2.ci Ate vee ere ie caer ee Sees Sibelius 
DHA WEGRUEE se cokes cod at es yn ake Stee eee eget eee Boccherini 
6: ‘Polonaise in: Ex majors: eat nett a ia es Liszt 


NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 





SSS SSayese 


331 








| 
: 
i 








109 Stockton Street 


BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 
Recorded in Europe by the 


Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 


Ist Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


1st Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


1st Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


3rd Movement—Part 2. 


3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


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Orchestra Suite, Opus 19 ° - aioe - Dohnanyi 


The Opus 19 Suite, one of Dohnanyi’s most recent compositions, 


is in four movements, the first being an Andante con Variazione in F 
sharp minor, but ending in major. The second is a Scherzo, in A 
minor, the opening with wood-winds, and then strings, reminding one 
of the familiar “Midsummer Night’s Dream’”’ Scherzo. But it is worked 
out in a modern fashion, a noteworthy passage being an organ-point 
on A in the violas, and ‘cellos playing rapidly repeated sixteenth 
notes, alternating an open string A with the A on the neighboring 
strings. Then there are piquant effects on the harp with harmonics 
from the strings. The third movement is a Romanza, in F major; 
first an oboe solo, then a ‘cello solo; then the key changes to F sharp 
minor, and the romantic qualities of the English hoz are brought into 
requisition. The last movement, a Rondo, is built on a vigorously 
rough theme on the strings, in A major; the theme of the Andante is 
quoted towards the close. As a whole, this work though built on old 
models, has been given a modern spirit and there is no vain searching 
after odd and bizarre effects. 


Concertino for Flute and Orchestra, in D major - Chaminade 


As the title implies, this composition is a condensed form of the 


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concerto (a work for solo instrument with orchestral accompaniment) 
differing from the larger form in that it is in one continuous move- 
ment instead of the usual three of the concerto. The work is typically 
French in the character of its graceful themes and charming orches- 
tration, the harp, especially having an attractive part. The cadenzas 


and many of the flute passages have been revised and rewritten by 


Mr. Linden. 


Cecile Chaminade was born in Paris in 1861, and is the first 
musician of her sex to attain wide renown as a composer. She is best 


k-own for her songs and compositions for piano solo. 


Four Old Flemish Folk-Songs - Arthur de Greef 


Arthur de Greef, who is best known as a pianist, was born at 
Louvain, October 10, 1862, and was for a number of years instructor 
in piano playing at the Conservatory of Brussels. The group of pieces 
played today were arranged by de Greef from old folk-tunes, but 


were not composed by him. These transcriptions were published in 


SA ORL OTE: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
Afternoons—2-5 


i KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 

AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 





334 














Felix Salmond Julia Claussen 


Cello and Chamber Music Voice 





Cesar Thomson 
Violin 


Master School of Musical Arts 


of California 
LAZAR S. SAMOILOFEF 


(Director 





ALICE SECKELS 
Manager 


W. J. Henderson 


Lecturer 





Lazar S. Samoiloff 
Voice 





Annie Louise David 
aaee "1, {These Artist Teachers will give 
Instructions in 


SAN FRANCISCO 


AND 
LOS ANGELES 
ayy MAY — SEPTEMBER, 1925 
epee FAIRMONT HOTEL 


Coach San Francisco 











Nicholai Mednikoff 


Piano 





A. Kostelanetz 
Accompanist 


335 








Josef Lhevinne 
Piano 





Andres de Segurola 
Operatic Department 





Sigismund Stojowski 
Piano — Composition 





Samuel Gardner 
Violin 





) 
: 
: 
: 
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London in 1915, and were given their first performance in the United 


States by the New York Symphony Orchestra in 1918. 


The fly-leaf of the score contains the following titles and texts for 


the four songs: 


GEORGE STE 


I. 
**The Solitary Rose’’ 


I know a rose, in meadow green, 
To solitude resigned, 

Her beauty ruined by a storm 
Before her blossom-time was done. 
This will be the maiden’s fate 

Who has never learnt to love. 


II. 
‘‘Hoepsasa’”’ 


Well, Mary Ann, whither away? 


Beyond the town walls, the soldiers to seek. 


Hoepsasa, falhala, our Mary Ann. 


Well, Mary Ann, what will you do there? 
I'll spin and love the soldier laddies. 
Hoepsasa, falhala, our Mary Ann. 


Il. 
“‘Wounded Is My Heart”’ 


Wounded am I inwardly, 

So deeply pierced my heart, 

By my great love of you, 

So long since wounded to the core, 
That where’er I go or turn, 

Nor day nor night I rest; 

That where’er I| go or turn, 

You fill my thoughts alone. 


IV. 
‘‘The Duke of Alva’s Statue’’ 


He who would exalt himself 


Pianist 


(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 


Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 


and Accompanying 


Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 


Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 


Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 


Phone Berkeley 436-J 


336 


WART McMANUS 














Is but a sorry wight. 
Duke, your statue, raised against our will, 
Would be better overthrown. 


The evil deed 

Which you have wrought 
Is intolerable to us all. 

It is contrary 

To our country’s custom. 


Valse Triste’ - - - ~ - - - - Sibelius 


The “Valse Triste’’ is one of the most popular of the Finnish 
masters lesser compositions. It is one number from the incidental 
music to a drama written by the composer's gifted brother-in-law, 
Arvid Jarnefeld, entitled “‘Kuolema’’ (Death), which accounts for the 
yearning and shuddering sadness of the theme. 


It is night. A son who has been watching by the bedside of his 
sick mother, has fallen asleep from sheer weariness. Gradually, a 
ruddy light is reflected through the room; there is a sound of distant 
music; the glow and the music steal nearer, until the strains of a waltz 
melody float distinctly to our ears. The sleeping mother awakens, 
rises from her bed, and in her long white garment, which takes the 
semblance of a ball dress, begins to move slowly and silently to and 


fro. She waves her hands, and beckons in time to the music, as though 










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Established 1869 


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337 

















ANNOUNCEMENT 


TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, March 6, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, March 8, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: LEWIS RICHARDS, Harpsichordist 


PROGRAMME 
. Antique Dances for the Lute Respighi 
Arranged for Modern Orchestra 

(First time in San Francisco) 
. Chaconne Bach-Steinberg 
(First time in San Francisco) 
. Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra, in D major 


Larghetto 
Rondo all’ Ongharese 
LEWIS RICHARDS 
“The Fire Bird’’ Stravinsky 
Introduction—vVariations of the Fire Bird 
Rondo of the Princesses 
Dance Infernal of the King Kastchei 
Berceuse and Finale 


ANNOUNCEMENT 
NINTH POPULAR CONCERT 


Curran Theatre 
Sunday, March 15, 2:45 P. M. 


PROGRAMME 


. Overture, “In Bohemia” Henry Hadley 
. Ballet Suite Joseph Clokey 
(First performance anywhere) 
. (a) Humoresque Dvorak-Stock 
(b) Scherzo, ““The Bumble Bee,”’ 

“Tsar Saltan’’ Rimsky-Korsakow 

(First performance in San Francisco) 
. Solo Numbers for Violin 
LOUIS PERSINGER 

(a) Chanson—Meditation Cottenet 
(b) Serenata Andaluza Monasterio 
(c) Bagatelle | Louis Persinger 
. Suite from ‘;Carmen”’ 
. Prize Song from ““The Mastersingers’’ 
. Ballet Music from “Prince [gor’’ 











she were summoning a crowd of invisible guests. And ‘now they ap- 
pear, these strange, visionary couples, turning and gliding to an un- 
earthly waltz rhythm. The dying woman mingles with the dancers, 
she strives to make them look into her eyes, but the shadowy guests, 
one and all, avoid her gaze. Then she sinks exhausted on her couch, 
and the music breaks off. Presently, she gathers all her strength and 
invokes the dance once again with more energetic gestures than before. 
Back come the shadowy dancers, gyrating in a wild, mad rhythm. The 
weird gayety reaches a climax; there is a knock at the door, which 
flies open; the mother utters a despairing cry; the spectral guests van- 
ish: the music dies away; Death stands on the threshold. 


Menuet . - . - . ~ . . Boccherini 


Boccherini is a unique figure among the many Italian composers 
of his time, in that he devoted himself almost wholly to instrumental 
music instead of to the opera, which latter always has been the par- 
ticular ideal of his nation. A single opera (or melodrama) is all that 
he wrote for the stage; but in the field of instrumental composition his 
productivity was immense, as is evidenced by his 54 trios, 91 quartets, 
and 125 quintets for strings with flute or oboe; 16 sextets, 2 octets, 
violin sonatas and duos, 20 symphonies, an orchestral suite, and a con- 
certo for violoncello. He also left a number of sacred compositions, 
among which are to be mentioned a mass, a ‘Stabat Mater,” a Christ- 
mas cantata, and some motets. 


The “Menuet” is a piece of music in dance rhythm and of French 





ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist——T eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


- REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 








Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


ac nn ETSI 
en 


339 








I 

i 
il 
} 
i 
if 
ii 
i 





origin. The name is derived from the French “menu” (small), and 
refers to the short steps of the dance. | 


Polonaise in E Major - - - - “ - - Liszt 


Franz Liszt, born in Raiding, Hungary, on October 22, 181 1G 
became the greatest figure in the musical world of his day, and while 
still a young man acquired the title of the world’s greatest pianist. To 
Liszt we owe the creation of the symphonic poem form of orchestral 
writing. 

The musical form polonaise is in 3-4 time, and though originally 
a Polish dance, is in reality a stately march which, in Europe, is often 
used to open formal balls and other festive gatherings. 


on RE Mae ee AUR Svea Pies ey IP CORE NS eR NO Verena 
THE 
MARGARET MARY MORGAN (CO. 


Gngraving- Printers - Publishing 


Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 





THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 


One of the Oidest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mer¢gers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San F rancisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 31st, 1924 


ABCOUG eee LS Ce ae, ee ROE eee at $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund.................... 461,746.52 
MISSTON=-BRANCH coe e gcc ser ae ee Le oe erate Si Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRESIDIOCBRANCEH.. 2,2. es dake Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGH E-STREET) BRANGH) =>. 270.7 Soe oe Haight and Belvedere Streets 


WEST PORTAL BRANCH ooo) he che tite West Porta] Ave. and Ulloa St. 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 


FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 





340 




























Wdersunnel 


Che San Francisen Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Purt, B. 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A, 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 

Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


341 














Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
dure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a STEINWAY. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring—of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


SGcriaiteie & Co. 
wy 


Kearny & Sutter Sts, 
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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


QW bh 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


SEASON 1924-25 


FOURTH BERKELEY CONCERT 
HARMON GYMNASIUM 


THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 5, 1925 


AT 8:15 O’CLOCK 


SOLOIST : 
LEWIS RICHARDS, Harpsichordist 


PROGRAMME 


Antique Dances toruthedbwte:.< jis. Steet Ha ae Respighi 
Arranged for Modern Orchestra. 
Balletto detto il Conte. 
Gagliarda. 
Villanella. 
Passamezzo. 


Chaconne. an: jee Vase eeu eke, acinar ee Bach-Steinberg 


Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra, D majot.......... Haydn 
Vivace— 
Larghetto— 
Rondo all’Ongharese. 


INTERMISSION 
Suite, “L’Oiseau de Feu” (The Fire-Bird).........0000..... Stravinsky 


Introduction—Variations of the Fire-Bird. 
Rondo of the Princesses. 

Dance Infernal of the King Kastchei. 
Berceuse and Finale. 








Anugque: Dances for the, Late sons eee eee Respighi 


Arranged for Modern Orchestra. 


These pieces, originally associated with the lute, were formed into an orchestral 
suite by Respighi. His set comprised four movements by sixteenth-century 


masters: 


I. “Balleto detto Il Conte Orlando,” by Simone Molinaro. Molinaro was 
one of the most celebrated lutenists of his day. In 1600 he was director of the 
music in Genoa cathedral. The dance is in D major, 44 time, Allegret to moderato. 


II. Gagliarda, by Vincenzo Galilei. Galilei, the father of the great astron- 
omer, Galileo, was born in 1533 at Florence. He was not only a notable performer 
on the lute, but a composer of considerable gifts, who was one of the principal 
representatives of that Florentine school which, endeavoring to revive Greek 
tragedy, brought into being the opera. The galliard was a lively dance, frequently 
associated with the pavan, usually written in triple time—generally 3-2—but 
occasionally in 4-4. This example is in D major, 3-4 time, Allegro marcato. 


III. Villanella, by Ignoto. The composer of this dance lived at the end of the 
sixteenth century. The villanella was a fifteenth century dance-chorus of light 
character, resembling the canzone and balletti of its day. This example is in 
B minor, Andante cantabile, 2-4 time. 


IV. Passamezzo and Mascherado, by Ignoto. The passamezzo was related 
to the pavan. Tabourot, in his Orchesographie (1588), said that when the pavan 
was played less solemnly and more quickly it was called a passamezzo. The 
movement is in D major, 2-4 time, Allegro vivo 


Chacon et een 5) ee ee a dtr aoe, Bach-Steinberg 


. This Bach Chaconne, as arranged for orchestra by Steinberg, was given its 
first performance in America December 19, 1924, by the Cincinnati Symphony 
Orchestra. According to Grove, the Chaconne was a dance usually in 3-4 time, 
of a moderately slow movement, which belonged to the class of variations—in 
fact, in the large majority of cases it was actually a series of variations on a “ground 
bass,” mostly eight bars in length. It is supposed to have been of Spanish 
origin. 

The programme of the Cincinnati performance contains the interesting infor- 
mation by Mr. Fritz Reiner, conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony, that Stein- 
berg is the son-in-law of Rimsky-Korsakow, the famous composer, and that 
Stravinsky wrote “Fireworks” as a wedding gift to Sonia, the daughter of Rimsky- 
Korsakow. Mr. Steinberg is the editor of “Principles of Orchestration,” by his 
illustrious father-in-law. 


Steinberg’s scoring consists of two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, 
two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, kettledrums and 


strings. 





Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra, D majot................ Haydn 


The development of the pianoforte of today has been the result of many 
centuries of experimentation, and it was not until the close of the eighteenth 
century that the piano as we now know it—that is, an instrument in which the 
vibration of the strings is caused by the action of hammers—displaced the older 
varieties. Of these by far the most important were the clavichord, in which the 
strings were set in motion by tangents, and the harpsichord, or, in French, 
clavecin, in which the strings were not struck, but were plucked or twanged by; 
sharp points of crow-quill embedded in the “jacks,” the “jacks,” 
set in motion by the action of the keys. From about 1600, when Hans Ruckers, 
the great clavecin maker of Antwerp, vastly developed the possibilities of the 
instrument, until nearly the end of the eighteenth century, the clavecin was the 
foremost instrument of its type, above all for service with the orchestra. The 


in turn, being 


music composed for it cannot adequately be rendered on the piano, for the 
reason that composers necessarily took closely into account both the brilliant 
incisiveness of its tone, akin to that of the harp, and its limitations in the matter 
of emphasis and expressiveness. The Haydn concerto played this evening, one 
of his earlier works, has been out,of print for many years, but Mr. Richards found 
original manuscripts of it in the Royal Conservatory Library at Brussels, and thus 
is able to present the work in the form in which Haydn originally wrote it. 


Suite, “L’Oiseau de Feu” (The Fire-Bird)..............0+ Stravinsky 


Igor Stravinsky, one of the younger Russian composers, who has aroused great 
admiration by his modern treatment of the orchestra, secured the attention of 
the musical world with the performance of his Scherzo Fantastique, which was 
written in 1906. It was inspired by Maeterlinck’s Life of a Bee. The first 
performance, in 1908, was heard by Serge de Diaghileff, the director of the famous 
Russian ballet, who was so taken with it that he commissioned the young com- 
poser to write a ballet for his organization. Stravinsky set to work on it at once, 


the result being “L’Oiseau de Feu.” It was finished in the early Spring of 1910 


and produced in Paris three weeks later. It created an immediate furor and 
placed Stravinsky in the forefront of the new composers. Since then he has 
written a number of ballets, including “Petrouchka,” “Sacre de Printemps” and 
“The Nightingale.” The music of “L’Oiseau de Feu,” apart from the stage 
performance, aroused so much favorable comment that the composer arranged it 
in the form of an orchestral suite. The following is the story of the ballet, as 
related by Felix Borowski: 


“Tyan Tsarevich, wandering in the night, observes in the gloom the Fire-Bird, 
plucking golden apples froma silver tree. He attempts to seize the Fire-Bird and, 
after a chase, succeeds in capturing her. The bird entreats Ivan to release her, 
and, after receiving from her a glowing feather, he permits the Fire-Bird to escape. 
As the dawn comes, Ivan perceives that his wanderings have taken him into the 
park of an ancient castle. From that building there emerge thirteen maidens, 











who pluck the apples from the silver tree and throw them to each other. Ivan, 
who had concealed himself in order that he might watch the playing of the maidens, 
now reveals himself and is given one of the golden apples. The maidens withdraw 
into the castle, which is the home of the monstrous Kastchei, who turns into stone 
all the adventurous travelers who may enter his domain. Ivan determines to 
penetrate into Kastchei’s abode. Upon opening the gate he is confronted by a 
horde of monsters and eventually by the fearsome Kastchei himself. He attempts 
to petrify Ivan, but the latter is given protection by the glowing feather which 
has been given him by the Fire-Bird. Soon the Fire-Bird comes to Ivan’s 
assistance and wards off the magic that, wielded by the enchanter, would have 
brought Ivan to the fate of the previous trespassers upon the monster’s domain. 
The Bird causes the frightful company of Kastchei’s retinue to break into a 
frenzied dance. ‘The casket in which the fate of the wizard is contained is revealed. 
In it is an egg which Ivan dashes to the ground. The death which it contains 
unites itself with its owner, and Kastchei expires. His castle vanishes; its 
beautous prisoners are freed and Ivan receives in marriage one of them, the 
beautiful Tsarevna.”’ 


The Committee on Music and Drama 


announces: 


The fourth concert of the Berkeley Musical Association, with 
Mr. Georces ENEsco, violinist, and Mr. GrorGE STEWART 
McMawnus, pianist, in Harmon Gymnasium, Tuesday evening, 
March 17. 

The English Club production of Aristophanes’. “The Frogs”, 
in the Greek Theatre, Saturday evening, April 4. 

The fourth concert of the California Music League, MopEsTE 
ALLOoo, conductor, in Harmon Gymnasium, Tuesday evening, 


April 14. 


Two recitals by THomas WILFRED with his invention, 
the Ciavitux (Color Organ), in the Greek Theatre, on 
the evenings of Wednesday, April 15, and Saturday, 
April 18, 1925. 





—— 















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Founded December 20, 1909 


OFFICERS 


JOHN D. McKezz, President 
EK. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 


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Incorporated February 3, 1910 


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Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller 

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350 











Che San Francisen Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor | 
1924—Season—1925 
TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
527th and 528th Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, March 6, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, March 8, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: LEWIS RICHARDS, Harpsichordist 


Member of the Societe des Instruments Anciens de Paris 


(Pleyel Harpsichord ) 


PROGRAMME 


I. Antique Dances for the Lute..........................-....... Respighi 
| Arranged for Modern Orchestra 
(First time in San Francisco) 
Balletto detto il Conte 
Gagliarda 
Villanella 


Passamezzo 


Z,¢ Chaconne .io se ee ee ee Bach-Steinberg 
(First time in San Francisco) 


3. Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra, in D major 


aoe RUe Se Se Fe el 2 ah tags eee: 1 Mae eee eben Haydn 
Vivace 
Larghetto 
Rondo all’Ongharese 
LEWIS RICHARDS 
Intermission 
4. Suite, ““L’Oiseau de Feu’ (The Fire Bird) .......... Stravinsky 


Introduction—Variations of the Fire Bird 
Rondo of the Princesses 

Dance Infernal of the King Kastchei 
Berceuse and Finale 





NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 


351 








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Recorded in Europe by the 


Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


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Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 


1st Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


Ist Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Ist Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


3rd Movement—Part 2. 


3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe).. 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


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352 








——— 














Antique Dances for the Lute’ - ~ -— : Respighi 
(Arranged for Modern Orchestra) 


These pieces, originally associated with the lute, were formed 
into an orchestral suite by Respighi. His set comprises four move- 
ments by sixteenth century masters: | 


I. ““Balleto detto Il Conte Orlando,” ‘by Simone Molinaro. 
Molinaro was one of the most celebrated lutenists of his day. In 1600 
he was director of the music in Genoa cathedral. The dance is in 
D major, 4-4 time, Allegretto moderato. 


Ii. Gagliarda, by Vincenzo Galilei. Galilei, the father of the 
great astronomer Galileo, was born in 1533 at Florence. He was not 
only a notable performer on the lute, but a composer of considerable 
gifts, who was one of the principal representatives of that Florentine 
school which, endeavoring to revive Greek tragedy, brought into 
being the opera. The galliard was a lively dance, frequently associ- 
ated with the pavan, usually written in triple time—generally 3-2— 
but occasionally in 4-4. This example is in D major, 3-4 time, 
Allegro marcato. 


Ill. Villanella, by Ignoto. The composer of this dance lived 
at the end of the sixteenth century. The villanella was a fifteenth 


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353 











century dance-chorus of light character, resembling the canzone and 
balletti of its day. This example is in B minor, Andante cantabile, 2-4 
time. 






IV. Passamezzo and Mascherado, by Ignoto. The passamezzo 
was related to the pavan. Tabourot, in his Orchesographie (1588), 
said that when the pavan was played less solemnly and more quickly 
it was called a passamezzo. The movement is in D major, 2-4 time, 
Allegro vivo. 


Chaconne - - - - - - - Bach-Steinberg 


This Bach Chaconne, as arranged for orchestra by Steinberg, was | 
given its first performance in America, December 19, 1924, by the | 
Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra. According to Grove, the Chaconne : 
was a dance usually in 3-4 time, of a moderately slow movement, 
which belonged to the class of variations, being, in fact, in the large 
majority of cases, actually a series of variations on a “ground bass,”’ 
mostly eight bars in length. It is supposed to have been of Spanish 


origin. : 


The programme of the Cincinnati performance contains the inter- 
esting information by Mr. Fritz Reiner, conductor of the Cincinnati 


Siacionours Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 


Afternoons—2-5 
3 KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 

ADDRESS | 
KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB / 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 | 
| 


Orley See 


Violinist and Teacher | 
Concert and Recital | 


} aed fpaie- 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 
| 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 





354 





7. ——EE——— 














THE 


Haldwin 


is the 


Official Piano 





UUM AE 









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Fairmont Hotel, 
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ARTS 


October 10, 1924. OF CALIFORNIA 
Lazar Ss. SAMOILOFF, oirector 
Baldwin Piano Company, Enpowep sy ALICE CAMPBELL MACFARLANE 








ALICE SECKELS, Manager 


310 Sutter Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 








Dear Sirs: CA Faculty of Celebrated 


Let me express my appreciation 









of your kindness in co-operating Artist Teachers 
with the Master School of Musical 
Arts in California. Josef Lhevinne........................ Piano 
Cesar Thomson ...................... Violin 
I have been familiar with the Paliv kGnlniond a a eile tes ‘Cello 


Baldwin Piano for many years. | 
have found it unrivalled in tone 
and action—in fact, the ideal Weeiakicnioceon 
Piano for both concert and stu- 
dio. The school has done well to 








Sigismund Stojowski -................. 
peer nas alsuten = Fe Piano—Composition 








have made its arrangements with Andreas de Segurola.................... 
YOu tay et eh See, BR Te pe gage nn |e ree Operatic Department 
Annie Louise David................ Harp 






Very truly yours, Samuel Gardner...................... Violin 
Fomilisl. 2Polales eset os Coach 
(Signed) LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF. A. Kostelanetz............ Accompanist 





Che Baldwin Pianos Company 


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355 








Symphony, that Steinberg is the son-in-law of Rimsky-Korsakow, the 
famous composer, and that Stravinsky wrote ‘‘Fireworks’ as a wed- 


ding gift to Sonia, the daughter of Rimsky-Korsakow. Mr. Steinberg 


| 
) 
| 
| 
| 
| 


is the editor of ‘Principles of Orchestration’’ by his illustrious father- 


in-law. 


Steinberg’s scoring consists of two flutes, two oboes, English 
horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three 


trombones, tuba, kettledrums and strings. 


Concerto for Harpsichord and Orchestra, D major - - Haydn 


The ‘development of the pianoforte of today has been the result 
of many centuries of experimentation, and it was not until the close of 


the eighteenth century that the piano as we now know it—that is, an 


instrument in which the vibration of the strings is caused by the action 
of hammers—displaced the older varieties. Of these by far the most 
important were the clavichord, in which the strings were set in motion 
by tangents, and the harpsichord, or, in French, clavecin, in which the 
strings were not struck, but were plucked or twanged by sharp points 
of crow-quill embedded in the “‘jacks,”’ the ‘‘jacks,”’ in turn, being set 


in motion by the action of the keys. From about 1600, when Hans 





Ruckers, the great clavecin maker of Antwerp, vastly developed the 


possibilities of the instrument, until nearly the end of the eighteenth 
century, the clavecin was the foremost instrument of its type, above all | 


for service with the orchestra. The music composed for it cannot 


adequately be rendered on the piano, for the reason that composers 








GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianist 
(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 
Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 


Residence Studio: 
2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street . 
Phone Sutter 3634 | 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
i! Phone Berkeley 436-J 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 











necessarily took closely into account both the brilliant incisiveness of 
its tone, akin to that of the harp, and its limitations in the matter of 
emphasis and expressiveness. The Haydn concerto played today, 
one of his earlier works, has been out of print for many years, but 
Mr. Richards found original manuscripts of it in the Royal Conserva- 
tory library at Brussels, and thus is able to present the work in the 
form in which Haydn originally wrote it. 


Suite, “L’Oiseau de Feu”? (The Fire Bird) — - - Stravinsky 


Igor Stravinsky, one of the younger Russian composers, who has 
aroused great admiration by his modern treatment of the orchestra, 
secured the attention of the musical world with the performance of 
his Scherzo Fantastique, which was written in 1906. It was inspired 
by Maeterlinck’s “Life of a Bee.’’ The first performance, in 1908, was 
heard by Serge de Diaghileff, the director of the famous Russian 
ballet, who was so taken with it that he commissioned the young com- 
poser to write a ballet for his organization. Stravinsky set to work on 
it at once, the result being ““L’Oiseau de Feu.’’ It was finished in the 
early spring of 1910 and produced in Paris three weeks later. It 
created an immediate furor and placed Stravinsky in the forefront of 
the new composers. Since then he has written a number of ballets, 


Cable Address, ‘‘Mandib’”’ ; Telephone Sutter 2945 


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357 











ANNOUNCEMENT 
ELEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, March 20, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, March 22, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: GEORGES ENESCO, Violinist | 





PROGRAMME 
tne Nehaust) Overture:d.fo oe Site 6 oe a Wagner 


2. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in D major...... Brahms 
Allegro non troppo | 
Adagio 
Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace 


GEORGES ENESCO 


3.. symphony in E flat major, Opus. [3.............00. 2. Enesco 
Assez vif et rythme 
Lent 
Vif et vigoureux 
(Conducted by the composer) 











ANNOUNCEMENT 


NINTH POPULAR CONCERT 
Curran Theatre 
Sunday, March 15, 2:45 P. M. 


PROGRAMME 
oeOverture. ily Bohemia’. + vse 2 Henry Hadley 
21 Ballet Suitess 22 Soe PS eee te: EEG ROS eS Joseph Clokey 


(First performance anywhere) 
3. (a)” Flomoresqie aie a ie Aas sig Dvorak-Stock 
(b) Scherzo, ““The Bumble Bee,’’ from , 
tasarspaltan “seein a AAe. Rimsky-Korsakow 
(First performance in San Francisco) 
4. Solo Numbers for Violin | 
LOUIS PERSINGER 7 





—— 


(a) Chanson—Meditation _00.202...2222.ccec cece Cottenet 
ib) oerenata Andalova 212. ve we an Monasterio 
Koy) Piri of 127; 2) Hl oneal ia: peat eae tere Meant & Louis Persinger 
a, ouite: trom.” Carmen oes)... eplialdits Muha ns len Roum l Mi wrth Bizet 
6. Prize Song from ‘““The Mastersingers’’...................... Wagner 
7. ‘Ballet: Music from “Prince Igor he Borodin 


358 | 








including “‘Petrouchka,” “‘Sacre de Printemps” and ‘‘The Nightin- 
gale.’ The music of “L’Oiseau de Feu,” apart from the stage per- 
formance, aroused so much favorable comment that the composer 


arranged it in the form of an orchestral suite. The following is the 
story of the ballet, as related by Felix Borowski: 


“Ivan Tsarevich, wandering in the night, observes in the gloom 
the Fire Bird, plucking golden apples from a silver tree. He attempts 
to seize the Fire Bird and, after a chase, succeeds in capturing her. 
The bird entreats Ivan to release her, and, after receiving from her a 
glowing feather, he permits the Fire Bird to escape. As the dawn 
comes, Ivan perceives that his wanderings have taken him into the 
park of an ancient castle. From that building there emerge thirteen 
maidens, who pluck the apples from the silver tree and throw them 
to each other. Ivan, who had concealed himself in order that he 
might watch the playing of the maidens, now reveals himself and is 
given one of the golden apples. The maidens withdraw into the 
castle, which is the home of the monstrous Kastchei, who turns into 
stone all the adventurous travelers who may enter his domain. Ivan 
determines to penetrate into Kastchei’s abode. Upon opening the 
gate he is confronted by a horde of monsters and eventually by the 
fearsome Kastchei himself. He attempts to petrify Ivan, but the latter 


ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


-Reprern Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





359 











is given protection by the glowing feather which has been given him 
by the Fire Bird. Soon the Fire Bird comes to Ivan’s assistance and 
wards off the magic that, wielded by the enchanter, would have 
brought Ivan to the fate of previous trespassers upon the monster's 
domain. The Bird causes the frightful company of Kastchei’s retinue 
to break into a frenzied dance. The casket in which: the fate of the 


wizard is contained is revealed. In it is an egg, which Ivan dashes to 
the ground. The death which it contains unites itself with its owner, 
and Kastchei expires. His castle vanishes, its beauteous prisoners are 
freed and Ivan receives in marriage one of them, the beautiful 
Tsarevna.”’ 








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San Francisco Los Angeles Portland 
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San Francisco Class—June 3rd to July 1st 
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Phone Kearny 6417 








361 











Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
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Let your choice, if possible, 
be a STEINWAY. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring—of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


Sherman, [lay & Co. 


Kearny & Sutter Sts. 
Oakland - Clay at 14th 











The San Francisco Symphony 


r chestra ALFRED HERTZ, (Conductor 


4 


FAW 
ZA Lyis 4 


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wt. 
Pee dow 

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| eee . 


Ay 
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fantord Memorial Church 


Founders’ ‘Day, March 9, 1925 


STANFORD UNIVERSITY 





a == — er 











PROGRAM 


Prelude to ‘‘Parsifal’’ - - - - - Wagner 


The following are Wagner's own words about the prelude, 
contained in H. E. Krehbiel’s ‘‘Studies in the Wagnerian Drama’’; 
“Strong and firm does Faith reveal itself, elevated and resolute 
even in suffering. In answer to the renewed promise, the voice 
of Faith sounds softly from eminent heights—as though borne on 
the wings of the snow-white dove,—slowly descending, embrac- 
ing with ever-increasing breadth and fulness the heart of man, 
filling the world and the whole of nature with mightiest force, 
then, as though stilled to rest, glancing upward again toward the 
light of heaven. Then once more from the awe of solitude arises 
the lament of loving compassion, the agony, the holy sweat of the 
Mount of Olives, the divine suffering of Golgotha; the body 
blanches, the blood streams forth and glows now with the heaven- 
ly glow of blessing in the chalice, pouring forth on all that lives 
and languishes the gracious gift of Redemption through Love. 
For him we are prepared, for Amfortas, the sinful guardian of 
the shrine, who, with fearful rue for sin gnawing at his heart, must 
prostrate himself, before the chastisement of the vision of the 
Grail. Shall there be redemption from the devouring torments 
of the soul? Yet once again we hear the promise and—hope!”’ 


The prelude reflects the prevailing sacred sentiment of the 
entire opera. It begins with a theme which suggests the Last 
Supper and the mission of the Knights of the Holy Grail. In- 
toned at first without harmony by strings and woodwinds, in its 
vague tonality, it rises almost like incense from the mystic orches- 
tra. The churchly atmosphere is presently strengthened when 
trumpets and trombones proclaim the Grail theme. Next comes 
the theme of Faith, again given out by the brass choir, militant 
and assertive. 


Suite - - - - - . - Gluck-Gevaert 


Air | 

Dance of the Slaves 
Tambourin 
Gavotte 

Chaconne 








This suite is the second of three suites, and consists of five 
dances, the first, second, third and fifth numbers being from 
Iphigenie in Aulis and the fourth from Armide. The first one is 
named Air and is orchestrated for strings, one bassoon, and one 
oboe. The second is Dance of the Slaves and is orchestrated for 
flutes, oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns and strings. The third 
number is called Tambourin and is written for piccolo, bassoons, 
horns, tambourine and strings. The fourth is a Gavotte and 
calls for only part of the strings and two bassoons. The last 
number, Chaconne, is the only number in which the trumpets 
and tympani are added. 


Intermission 


Symphony in D minor - - - - Cesar Franck 


Lento—Allegro non troppo 
' Allegretto 
Allegro non troppo 


In Vincent d’Indy’s ‘‘Life of Franck,"’ attention is called, in 
commenting on the violin and piano sonata, that the first of its 
organic germs is used as the theme of the four movements of 
the work, further stating, “From this moment cyclical form, the 
basis of modern symphonic art, was created and consecrated.” 


d‘Indy then adds: | 


"The majestic, plastic, and perfectly beautiful symphony in 
D minor is constructed on the same method. I purposely use the 


- word method for this reason: After having long described Franck 


as an empivicist and an improvisor—which is radically wrong— 
his enemies (of whom, in spite of his incomparable goodness, he 
made many) and his ignorant detractors suddenly changed their 
views and called him a musical mathematician, who subordinated 
inspiration and impulse to a conscientious manipulation of form. 
This, we may observe in passing, is a common reproach brought 
by the ignorant Philistine against the dreamer and the genius. 
Yet where can we point to a composer in the second half of the 
nineteenth century who could —and did — think as loftily as 
Franck, or who could have found in his fervent and enthusiastic 











heart such vast ideas as those which lie at the musical basis of 
the Symphony, the Quartet and “The Beatitudes’ > 

“It frequently happens in the history of art that a breath 
passing through the creative spirits of the day incites them, with- 
out any previous mutual understanding, to create works which 
are identical in form, if not in significance. It is easy to find 
examples of this kind of artistic telepathy between painters and 
writers, but the most striking instances are furnished by the 
musical art. 


“Without going back upon the period we are now consider- 
ing, the years between 1884 and 1889 are remarkable for a 
curious return to pure symphonic form. Apart from the younger 
composers, and one or two unimportant representatives of the old 


school, three composers who had already made their mark— 
Lalo, Saint-Saens, and Franck — produced true symphonies at 
this time, but widely different as regards external aspect and 
ideas. 


‘“Lalo’s Symphony in G minor, which is on very classical lines, 
is remarkable for the fascination of its theme, and still more for 
charm and elegance of rhythm and harmony, distinctive qualities 
of the imaginative composer of ‘Le Roi d’Ys.’ 


“The C minor Symphony of Saint-Saens, displaying un- 
doubted talent, seems like a challenge to the traditional laws of 
tonal structure; and, although the composer sustains the combat 
with cleverness and eloquence, and in spite of the indisputable 
interest of the work—founded, like many others by this com- 
poser, upon a prose theme, the Dies Irae—yet the final impres- 
sion is that of doubt and sadness. 


‘’Franck’s Symphony, on the contrary, is a continual ascent 
toward pure gladness and life-giving light, because its work- 
manship is solid and its themes are manifestations of ideal beauty. 
What is there more joyous, more sanely vital, than the principal 
subject of the Finale, around which all the other themes in the 
work cluster and crystallize? While in the higher registers all is 
dominated by that motive which M. Ropartz has justly called ‘the 
theme of faith.’ This symphony was really bound to come as 
the crown of the artistic work latent during the six years to 
which I have been alluding.” - 





The audience is requested to refrain from applause. 


























: Mek CN TAe ee ae 0 


F Le FRANCISCO 
‘3 SYMPH ONY: 
> ORCHESTRA 


4; Marntamea by |@ 
1 The Musical 4 |& 
Association of kk 

an Francisco 











NINTH POPULAR 


1924 1925 : 
Fourteenth Season ee 
ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR 


Ee oC] 














Alfred Hertz 





“RECOMMENDS 


CONN INSTRUMENTS 


The San Francisco 
Symphony 


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Musical Association of San Francisen 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 
OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKzg, President 
J. B. Lzvison, Vice-President EK. R. Diwonp, Treasurer 


A. W. WipENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
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George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE | 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


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EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


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Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 


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HE choice of the 

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for the concert platform 
proclaims its sonority— 
its selection by famous art- 
ists declares the quality of 
its tone—its presence in 


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Wiley BAllen ©: 


135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
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, — 


Che San Franciseo Symphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor | 
1924—Season—1925 


NINTH POPULAR CONCERT 
530th Concert 


CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, March 15, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: LOUIS PERSINGER, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 


~ Overture, “ini Bohemia. eat) ae Oe Se Henry Hadley 
2: .Ballet Site ci ta gs le eens ak SPs Joseph Clokey 


(First performance anywhere) 
Pan 


The Dripping Spring 
Twilight Moth 
The Moon Flower 
The Bat 
Sela) <Pinmionesqite: (52 u keds eee scp k Dvorak-Stock 
(b) Scherzo, ‘““The Bumble Bee,’’ from 
CO SAT Saltani qe. as eee Rimsky-Korsakow 
(First performance in San Francisco) 


4. Solo Numbers for Violin 
LOUIS PERSINGER 
Gyula Ormay at the Piano 


—, 


(a); Ghanson-Meditation = .2)scehe coe aso a Cottenet 

(b): Serenata Andaluza’... 20 oe ee Monasterio 

CG) -Bagatelléser sta es o on ite a ee ae Louis Persinger 
Intermission 

J eepuite frome ait Orig ue hee wees eae ek ages Bizet 

6. Prize Song from “The Mastersingers’’..................... Wagner 

/; Ballet: Music from “Prince lgor. 2 Borodin 


(The Piano is a Steinway) 





NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 


371 














109 Stockton Street 


BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY | 
Recorded in Europe by the 


Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 


1st Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


1st Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


1st Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


3rd Movement—Part 2. 


3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof, Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


Send for our catalogue of ‘‘Musical Masterworks'’—free. 


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206 Powell Street Open Evenings 





ee 


Overture, “In Bohemia” - ~ “ a pee ta Henry Hadley 


The overture, “In Bohemia,’’ by Henry Hadley, former conductor 
of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, was written at the request 
of the Bohemian Club in 1900 and was to have been produced that — 
summer in the Bohemian Grove under the composer's baton at the 
annual High Jinks of the Club. Mr. Hadley, having been called to 
Furope at that time, the performance was postponed. In the meantime 
the work was heard in nearly every large city throughout Germany. 
Mr. Victor Herbert was the first to play it in America, in Pittsburgh. 


The title, “‘In Bohemia,”’ in this instance has no national meaning, 
but refers only to that Elysium where true artists dwell. The score is 


dedicated to both Victor Herbert and the Bohemian Club. 


Ballet Suite - ~ - - 5 - Joseph W. Clokey 
Joseph W. Clokey was born in New Albany, Indiana, in 1890, 


and commenced the study of the piano at the age of six. He attended 
Miami University at Oxford, Ohio, and in 1912 received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, majoring in mathematics. Deciding to forsake 
mathematics for music, a year later he entered the Cincinnati Conserv- 
atory, studying composition with Edgar Stillman Kelley and organ 


ESTABLISHED 1852 


PU ALS 


CONSISTENT 
PRICES 


Shreve and Company 


Jewelers and Silversmiths 


Post and Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 





373 




















with K. O. Staps. Since 1915 he has been head of the Department of 
Musical Theory at Miami University. At present, Mr. Clokey is on a 
leave of absence in California in order to devote his entire time to 
composition and is now residing at La Mesa. 


The largest portion of Mr. Clokey’s compositions are for voice or 
organ, and include six cantatas, four operas, two suites, a sonata and 
numerous pieces in smaller forms. The Ballet Suite played today is 
his only work thus far for orchestra alone, although it was originally 
conceived as part of a larger work for orchestra, chorus, ballet, soli 
and a reader, somewhat in the nature of a masque. As Mr. Clokey 
has explained, ‘‘It is not a suite in the strictest sense of the word, but 
merely five pieces, having little in common except perhaps that they 
are all intended for dancing and might be appropriate on a summer 
night.”’ 


Humoresque - - - - - - - Dvorak-Stock 


This popular composition was originally written for the piano by 
Anton Dvorak, the Bohemian composer, and has been arranged for 
orchestra by Frederick Stock, conductor of the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra. Otto Meyer, the Minneapolis violinist, tells this story: 

“When I was in Prague I' said to Dvorak, ‘Why did you call your 





Studio’ Haars: Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 


Be ara 5 
— KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 







Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Orley See 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


~atbd] Spe 
48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 















374 





; 
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= 2 eS SS = = 


LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Voice Piano 


Opens his S. F. Classes Opens his S. F. Classes 
April 27th May Lith 


SEVEN WEEKS FIVE WEEKS 


Enroll Now! 


: moter SCHOOL 
iL ARTS 


OF CALIFORNIA 
Lazar s. SAMOILOFF, oirecror 


as . . 4 ee nae Expowep py ALICE CAMPBELL MACFARLANE — ee ee He 

| Cesar Thomson Re ane Bee W. J. Henderson 

Violin Repertoire and Interpretive Lecturer 
Classes 


i ae: (Active and Auditor) 
| ee ye Private Lessons-Free Scholarship 





For Information Apply 
ALICE SECKELS, Manager 


he ay Room 139 Fairmont Hotel = 
; ] ulia Claussen Douglas 8800 Samuel Gardner 
V ove All classes will be held at Fairmont Hotel Violin 





Andres De Segurola Felix Salmond Sigismund Stojowski Emil I. Polak 
Operatic Department Cello— Piano—Composition Coach 
Chamber Music 





375 











famous little work a Humoresque? No one who plays it humorously, 
as its title demands, plays it as he feels it." The old composer replied, 


with a twinkle in his eye, ‘My boy, that is where the joke comes in.’ ”’ 


Scherzo, ““The Bumble Bee,”’ from “Tsar Saltan’’ - Rimsky-Korsakow 


This little number is taken from ““The Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan, 
His Son the Renowned and Mighty Paladin, the Prince Guildon Saltan- 
ovich, and the Beautiful Tsarevna Lebed (Swan),’’ an opera in four 
acts, seven scenes, and prologue, composed in 1899-1900 for a libretto 
based on a fairy tale by Pushkin. The lengthy-titled opera was first 
produced by the Private Opera Company in Moscow in December, 
1900, although an orchestral suite was performed at Leningrad a short 
time before the production of the opera, which is conspicuous for the 


large number of Russian folk songs utilized. 


The Scherzo played today, which is not in the suite, is in the first 
scene of the second act of the opera. In the operatic Scherzo there are 
voice parts. The stage direction is: “‘Out of the sea comes a bumble- 


bee and flies about the swan.”’ 


Chanson-Meditation - - - - - - Cottenet 
Serenata Andaluza - - - - “ = Monasterio 
Bagatelle ~ ” ; - - - -— Louis Persinger 


Cottenet’s Chanson-Meditation was first introduced to American 
audiences by Fritz Kreisler (to whom it is dedicated) some years ago, 


and at that time Cottenet was living in New York, one of the board 


GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianist 
(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 
Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 


Residence Studio: 
2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-J 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 


376 






























of directors of the Metropolitan Opera House. Aside from the piece 
played today, very little has become known of Cottenet’s work as a 


composer. 


Monasterio, born in 1836, died in 1903, was a very distinguished 
Spanish violinist and at one time a pupil of De Beriot. He was known 
in Europe as a soloist and especially as a quartet leader, his quartet 
concerts in Madrid having been particularly popular. At the time of 
his death he was director of the Royal Conservatory in Madrid. A 
number of his pieces for violin are still included in the repertoire of 
well-known artists. 


Louis Persinger’s “Bagatelle’’ is one of several short pieces of 
lighter character which he has written in San Francisco. A number 
of his transcriptions and arrangements have been published in New 
York, his settings of Reichardt’s “In the Time of Roses’ and Dvorak’s 
‘Songs My Mother Taught Me’”’ being especially popular with violin- 
ists in general. 


Suite from “‘Carmen’”’ - : : : = : - Bizet 


Georges Bizet, whose “‘Carmen’”’ is a landmark in the history of 
opera, was perhaps the most distinctly original of modern French 
writers. This gifted composer was unfortunately stricken down prac- 





Cable Address, ‘‘Mandib’’ Telephone Sutter 2945 


Established 1869 


Manheim, Dibbern & Co. 


315 MONTGOMERY STREET 


SAN FRANCISCO 







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ANNOUNCEMENT 


ELEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Curran Theatre 


Friday, March 20, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, March 22, 2:45 P. M. 


Soloist: GEORGES ENESCO, Violinist 





PROGRAMME 
PasAGF aust.Overfaurese +0 A tactie ye ECL ide Oe Wagner 
2. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in D major...... Brahms 
Allegro non troppo i 


Adagio 
Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace 


GEORGES ENESCO 


3. Symphony in E flat major, Opus 13........................ Enesco 
Assez vif et rythme 
Lent 
Vif et vigoureux 
(Conducted Bee the composer) 








ANNOUNCEMENT 
LAST POPULAR CONCERT 


Curran Theatre 
Sunday, March 29, 2:45 P. M. 


TSCHAIKOWSKY PROGRAM 


1. Symphony No. 6, ““Pathetique’’ 
Adagio—Allegro—Andante—Allegro vivo 
Allegro con grazia 
Allegro molto vivace 
Adagio lamentoso 


2. The ‘‘Nutcracker’’ Suite 
Overture 
(March 
7 (Dance of the “‘Fee Dragee’’ 
II. (Russian Dance 
(Arabian Dance 
(Chinese Dance 
(Dance of the ‘“‘Mirlitons’’ 
Il. Dance of the Flowers 


3. March Slav 


aT STS ESR REE DSSTETSHTMNTN aospupEmITEsommecnmmneme nnn eran 
378 











| 
. 
| 
| 





ee ee 


tically on the eve of what would, without doubt, have been an excep- 
tionally brilliant career. Bizet’s chief characteristic was what is known 
as ‘‘local color,’’ of which the ““Carmen’”’ Suite, as well as the opera, 
has its full share. The music of “Carmen’’ is suffused in the warm 
tones of the south, and these tones are not confined to special numbers. 
The opera was first produced at the Opera Comique, in Paris, March 
3, 1875, just about fifty years ago. 


Prize Song from ‘‘The Mastersingers”’ “ = pie = Wagner 


The “Prize Song’’ is the well-known tenor solo from Wagner's 
only comic opera. It is sung by Walther in the last act, and wins him 
the first prize (the hand of Eva, the beautiful daughter of Pogner, the 
goldsmith) in the song contest on the banks of the river Pegnitz. 


Ballet Music from ‘Prince Igor’’ . - - - Borodin 


Borodin. was born in 1834 and began to compose his opera, 
‘Prince Igor,’’ in 1870, but his progress was so slow that when he died 
in 1887, only the prologue and the first two acts had been finished, 
and his friends Rimsky-Korsakow and Glazounow completed the 
work. The plot of “Prince Igor’ is based upon a national poem, “The 
Epic of the Army. of Prince Igor,’ a production of remote origin, 


ALFRED METZGER— 3 

In his conducting Mr. Js oe | - Reprern Mason— 
Linden impresses by dis- |f " are ; 
pensing with the score, |e : He, played Vadojauly. 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


There was no self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchesiral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—T eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





379 








which narrates the expedition made in the twelfth century by Russian 


princes against the nomadic Polovtsi, who had invaded the Russian 
principalities. 


it The ballet music played today is part of the opera completed by 

At Borodin himself, and is divided into two parts. These superbly bar- 
baric dances and songs are intended to distract and delight the Slavic 
Prince Igor, who, although a prisoner of the Khan Kontshak of the 
Polovtsi, is treated with all respect in the hope that he will consent not 
only to a lasting peace with the Polovtsi, but also to the union of Igor’s 
son Vladimir with the Khan’s beautiful daughter. 









THE 
MARGARET MARY MORGAN (CO. 


Gngraving- Printers - Publishing 


Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 


THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 


One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
ahi, | by mergers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


| DECEMBER 3ist, 1924 

| BESOCE ee ee ite 2a. 3 ten, has $96,917,170.69 
BH! Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 4,000,000.00 
| | Employees’ Pension Fund 461,746.52 
| BS tye Mission and 21st Streets 

Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

} 


Haight and Belvedere Streets 
West Porta] Ave. and Ulloa St. 


| | Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of : 
q FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 
: 





380 








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Yeatman Griffith 


Recognized Authority on Voice Production and the 
Art of Singing 


California Vocal Master Classes 


For Artists; Teachers; Students 
San Francisco Los Angeles Portland 
June July August 











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International Fame’ 


Teacher of World-Famed Artists and Teachers in 
America and Europe 


San Francisco Class—June 3rd to July Ist 
ENROLLMENTS NOW 


Full information on application 


IDA G. SCOTT 


Kohler and Chase Building 
Phone Kearny 6417 











381 




















Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
dure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a Sreinway. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring —of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


Sherman, [lay & Co. 


Kearny & Sutter Sts. 
Oakland - Clay at 14th 








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FINAL SYMPHONY 
CONCERT 


Thursday Evening, 
March 26 


LY 


Soloists: 
MAX GEGNA 
Cellist 
ANTHONY LINDEN 
Flutist 





SAN FRANCISCO 


Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 
OAKLAND, CAL. 


Thursday Evening, March 19, 1925 


Eight-thirty o’clock 





Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 
Box Office at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland, Cal. 
Telephone Lakeside 6700 

















1. 





PRO .o 
Thursday Even Mar 


Overture; ein. Bohemia ie ead ot Cee eek ee ea a Henry Hadley 

Regarding his overture, “In Bohemia”, Mr. Hadley, former conductor of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, has supplied the following information: 

“In Bohemia” was written at the request of the Bohemian Club in 1900 and was 
to have been produced that summer in the Bohemian Grove. Mr. Hadley, having 
been called to Europe at that time, the performance was postponed. In the mean- 
time the work was heard in nearly every large city throughout Germany. Mr. 
Victor Herbert was the first to play the work in America, in Pittsburgh. The 
title, “In Bohemia”, in this instance has no national meaning but refers only to 
that Elysium where true artists dwell. The score is dedicated to both Victor 
Herbert and the Bohemian Club of San Francisco.” 


Symphonic Variations for Violoncello and Orchestra.................... Boellman 


MAX GEGNA 


The Symphonic Variations were played for the first time at a Lamoureux. con- 
cert, Paris, November 27, 1892. Joseph Salmon, to whom the composition is 
dedicated, was the solo performer. The work begins with an Introduction 
(Moderato maestoso), the ’cello giving out a vigorous subject. The theme proper 
is announced by the solo instrument, and an orchestral passage eight measures in 
length leads to the variations, which are closely knit together, rather than separate 
divisions. 


Biitesstrom © Carmen no Ps cis Bi ee er eC ce iene eerie Se Bizet 
Georges Bizet, whose “Carmen” is a landmark in the history of opera, was per- 
haps the most distinctly original of modern French writers. This gifted composer 
was unfortunately stricken down practically on the eve of what would, without 
doubt, have been an exceptionally brilliant career. Bizet’s chief characteristic 
was what is known as “local color”, of which the “Carmen” Suite, as well as the 
opera, has its full share. The music of “Carmen” is suffused in the warm tones 
of the south, and these tones are not confined to special numbers. The opera was 
first produced at the Opera Comique, in Paris, March 3, 1875, just a little over 
fifty years ago. 


Prize Song: trom ines Mastersingers 7250302. ymca ih are eae Wagner 
The “Prize Song” is the well-known tenor solo from Wagner’s only comic 

opera. It is sung by Walther in the last act, and wins him the first prize (the 

hand of Eva, the beautiful daughter of Pogner, the goldsmith) in the song contest 

on the banks of the river Pegnitz. 














Hear CHALIAPIN _ Risin 


Baritone 
in Oakland Auditorium Arena 


Friday Night, March 27, 8:30 p. m. 


When Chaliapin appeared in San Francisco 
last he remained on the stage singing song 
after song for a full two hours, each inter- 
pretation bringing new thrills and added start- 
ling amazement to his hearers, for there is no 
interpretative artist that ever lived with the 
vivid power of portrayal, the intensive per- 
sonality nor the consummate art of the Rus- 
sian. He will be assisted by Abraham Sopkin, 
violinist and Max Rabinowitsch, pianist, two 
of the most capable of the younger Russian 
school of instrumentalists. 


Tickets: .. $3:00, $2:00, $1.00, plus tax. 
Now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland 
Management Zannrette W. Potter 














LOR AME 
EveniMarch 19, 1925 








9. Concertino for Flute and Orchestra, in D majov.........................- Chaminade 


ANTHONY LINDEN 


As the title implies, this composition is a condensed form of the concerto (a 
work for solo instrument with orchestral accompaniment) differing from the 
larger form in that it is in one continuous movement instead of the usual three 
of the concerto. The work is typically French in the character of its graceful 
themes and charming orchestration, the harp, especially having an attractive part. 
The cadenzas and many of the flute passages have been revised and rewritten by 


Mr. Linden. 
Ole Gia) Sa MORESO UG <2 che ha Bec ag a ge ee fe et Dvorak-Stock 
(b) Scherzo, “The Bumble Bee” from “Tsar Saltan’’....Rimsky-Korsakow 


This popular composition was originally written for the piano by Anton Dvorak, 
the Bohemian composer. Otto Meyer, the Minneapolis violinist, tells this: story: 
“When I was in Prague J said to Dvorak, ‘Why did you call your famous little 
work a Humoresque? No one who plays it humorously, as its title demands, plays 
it as he feels it... The old composer replied, with a twinkle in his eye, ‘My boy, 
that is where the joke comes in.’ ” 

“The Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan”, based on a fairy tale by Pushkin, was prod- 
uced by the Private Opera Company in Moscow in December, 1900. An 
orchestral suite was performed at Leningrad a short time before the production 
of the opera, which is conspicuous for the large number of Russian folk songs 
utilized. The Scherzo, which is not in the Suite, is in the first scene of the 
second act. In the operatic Scherzo there are voice parts. The stage direction is: 
“Out of the sea comes a bumble-bee and flies about the syan.” 


(7 Liroaieion ere sa Gil ll. “iOMEN OTN... 065 8 ae sa ae ee aha Wagner 


In the closing scene of Act II Lohengrin and Elsa have been united in 
marriage, and the introduction to Act III is indicative of the joyous spirit of the 
wedding festivities. The principal theme, a brilliant and stirring march, domi- 
nates the whole, being interrupted by a short middle period. There is then a 
return to the first subject fortissimo, in full orchestra. 


Se 











PROGRAM FOR 
FINAL SYMPHONY CONCERT OF OAKLAND’S SERIES 


March 26 
Le Syimphonynin (os MENON Sse: yo eee cok Ee ee Rea hy ae ie fae. ee Mozart 
Allegro molto 
Andante 
Menuetto 
Finale: Allegro assai 
2. bevend for rchestta, . Aorahia vida. .nncs 3 c.c col eae eae aes Svendsen 
pire NIEOL ACKER <> SUN been rn oan oui here aes anh eon eee ata T'schaikowsky 
I. Overture 
(March 
(Dance of the Fee Dragee 
IJ. (Russian Dance 
(Arabian Dance 
(Chinese Dance 
(Dance of the Mirlitons 
Wil. Dance of the Flowers 
Wa wl INepro Rha psogy.c.2 0: cn hose ee ilies 5 socal a Caatines oe nc cee Rubin Goldmark 

















Mus C is A No BS OE S384), Tar 


Her own Aldrich piano 


Because it is such a good, honestly 
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Long before its strings lose melody, 
she will have grown up to a home of 
her own, and a Steinway! 

Meanwhilethe Aldrichis only $445. 
It is a responsive, sympathetic piano, 
and dependable. 





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| ORCHESTRA Dy 

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1924 | 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


 ALFR = Hi oe CONDUCTOR 


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Alfred Hertz 


“RECOMMENDS 


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Musical Association of San Franciseo 


Founded Decembe: 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 
OFFICERS 
JOHN D. McKausg, President 
J. B. Levison, Vice-President EK. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 


A. W. WipennHaM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard John S. Drum Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Herbert Fleishhacker Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C. H. Crocker W.E. Creed Wm. T. Sesnon 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
E. R. Dimond _ John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 


E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond J. B. Levison 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller William Sproule 


® MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard Robert C. Newell 


WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 
' Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
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Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. Telephone Garfield 2819 





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From Artisan to Artist 





fHlason & Hamlin Pianos 


Those to whom music is a gift or 
an art ora great privilege hold one 
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a 135 KEARNY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 
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Che San Francisea Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 
1924—-Season—1925 
ELEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
532d and 533d Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, March 20, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, March 22, 2:45 o’clock 


Soloist: GEORGES ENESCO, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 
daisAc aust: Overtures: 22s. ines lek cya tal el as Wagner 


2. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in D major......Brahms 
Allegro non troppo 
Adagio 
Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace 


GEORGES ENESCO. 


Intermission 


3. Symphony in E flat major, Opus 13........................ Enesco 
Assez vif et rythme 
Lent 
Vif et vigoureux 
(Conducted by the composer) 


(Mr. Enesco uses the Steinway Piano and makes Duo-Art recordings) 


S_=’~”_=_—="”"_=rae_o33V“VOV"——————"—X—s———___"""-——— 
NOTICE OF MEMBERS’ CONCERT 


Announcement is hereby made of the complimentary concert to be given for 
the members of the Musical Association in the Palm Court of the Palace Hotel, 
Thursday evening, April 2, 1925. Admission cards will be mailed to members in 
due course. 


In the past numerous members of the Association have taken advantage of 
the opportunity to arrange dinner parties at the hotel on the evening of the 
concert. Therefore, this advance notice is given in order that all members may 
have ample opportunity for such arrangements. 





NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 





391 





109 Stockton Street 


BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 
Recorded in Europe by the 


Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 





1st Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


i 1st Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
lad Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


lst Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


a 3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


H 3rd Movement—Part 2. 


4 3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
eit hi Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


Ai |) 4th Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


i 4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 


Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 


| 

' 4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
| 

Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


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“‘A Faust Overture”’ ~ - " - ve - Wagner 


Wagner originally intended to write a ‘‘Faust’’ Symphony of 
which this was to be the first movement. In a letter to Liszt, written 
in 1854, he makes the following explanation: “Perhaps you would at 
once understand my tone-poem if I called it Faust in Solitude. At that 
time | intended to write an entire Faust Symphony. The first move- 
ment, that which is ready, was this Solitary Faust, longing, despairing, 
cursing. The ‘feminine’ floats around him as an object of his longing, 
but not in its divine reality; and it is just this insufficient image of his 
longing which he destroys in his despair. The second movement was 
to introduce Gretchen, the woman. I had a theme for her, but it was 
only a theme. The whole remains unfinished. I wrote my Flying 
Dutchman instead.”’ 


The overture begins with a slow introduction with a despairing 
theme in the basses and tuba. The principal theme, at the conclusion 
of the introduction, is a vigorous one and is stated by the violins. 
After considerable development, the second theme is stated by the 
flute. The longing and despair of Faust are suggested in this part, 
which leads to a recapitulation and a hopeful close. 


Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, D major - : Brahms 


iad 


Brahms worked on the composition of this concerto during the 
summer and autumn of 1878. Joachim, with whom Brahms consulted, 
furnished the bowing and fingering markings and also wrote a cadenza, 


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and it was he who first performed the concerto at Leipzig, January 


1, 1879. The cadenza played today is by Enesco. 


It has often been noted that the concertos of Brahms are in reality 
symphonies with a principal solo voice, rather than mediums for display 
of virtuosity. On this thought Philip H. Goepp has made the follow- 
ing comment: 


“The violin concerto of Brahms corresponds to Schumann’s piano 
concerto in so far as each work is singular and eminent for a prevailing 
poetic character. To enjoy the Brahms concerto, we must once for all 
lose thought of mere display. And in this connection it is tempting to 
touch on a certain attitude of the public towards concertos in general. 
Between those listeners who hail the difficult feat in itself, and the true 
coquoscente, there is a group who resent the obtrusion of technique. 
One hears this criticism of many concertos, even the noblest. An 
answer is obvious. The lay-listener forgets that the soloist does not 
always hold the most important role. There is a natural alternation, a 
kind of antiphony between soloist and orchestra, an exchange of the 
melody; each in turn has the main say or merely adorns. When the 
burden of the subject sings in the orchestra, it is vain to listen merely 
to the soloist. If we conceive a concerto as an equal duet of soloist 
and orchestra, the beauty and meaning become suddenly clear. We 













S7idion Haies> perneeey, Wednesday, Saturday Phone Douglas 1678 
: Afternoons—2-5 








KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 







Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 
PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
ADDRESS 

KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 












Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 





394 





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t] fi “ai 
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LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 


Voice 


Opens his S. F. Classes 
April 27th 


SEVEN WEEKS 


JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Piano 


Opens his S. F. Classes 
May 11th 


FIVE WEEKS 





| 139 Fairmont Hotel 





| 





of the 


| MASTER SCHOOL | 


USICAL 
OF CALIFORNIA 
Lazar Ss. SAMOILOFF, pirecror 


LICE SECKELS, Manager 





cA Faculty of Celebrated 
Artist Teachers 


Josef Lhevinne.............-.......... Piano 
Cesar? Thomson: -:.3.0 Violin 
Felix Salmond:...:.22.05...<--.2.:.<.. ’Cello 
Julia; Clausserlissecos ie Voice 
Lazar S. Samoiloff.................. Voice 
W. J. Henderson................ Lecturer 


Sigismund Stojowski .................- 
Pe AEE op ae iano—Composition 

Andreas de Segurola.................-.. 
SE heb elscarts Operatic Department 


Annie Louise David...:............ Harp 
Samuel Gardner...................... Violin 
PIE ct Pela ce eo et Coach 
A. Kostelanetz............ Accompanist 
Nicholai Mednikoff ................ Piano 





ENROLL NOW 


MAKE APPLICATION FOR ALL INFORMATION TO 
ALICE SECKELS, Manager 


Phone Douglas 7267 


GheBaldwin Piano Company 


310 Sutter Street 











must not put the soloist on too high a pedestal at all; he moves on an 
equal plane with the orchestra, who sing with him as a sympathetic 
chorus. The greatest interpreter will least desire such a one-sided 
attitude of the audience. In the Brahms concerto, where there is least 
possible exploiting of virtuosity, we must catch the melodic lines as in 
a symphony, else the whole poetry is lost to us. At the first flush we 
have not the feeling of a formal concerto,—rather the poetic climate 
of the writer's sonatas for violin, or of the glorious trio with the horn, 
fragrant with the sense of the woods.”’ 


Symphony in E flat major, Opus 13 - " Georges Enesco 


Georges Enesco, born in 1881 at Cordaremi, Roumania, was but 
seven years of age when his father was persuaded to take him.to the 
Vienna Conservatory, directed at that time by Joseph Hellmesberger. 
At first his application was declined because of his age, but upon 
hearing the boy play, Hellmesberger was so impressed that he was 
admitted to the institution. A few years later he won first prizes for 
harmony and violin playing. Later he went to the Paris Conserva- 
toire, where he studied composition with Gabriel Faure and violin 
with Martin Marsick, again capturing a first prize for his violin playing. 

His principal orchestral works are ‘‘Poeme Roumain,”’ Pastorale 
Fantaisie, three symphonies, a suite, three Roumanian rhapsodies, a 
Symphonie Concertante for ’cello and orchestra, a symphony for two 
flutes, oboe, English horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns. 
He has also composed two sonatas for piano and violin, a quintet, 
and an opera, “Oedipus.”’ 


In commenting on the music of Roumania, Enesco has written: 
‘Contrary to the general idea, Roumania is not a Slavic, but a Latin 
country. Settled two thousand years ago, it has maintained its com- 








GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianist 
(Returned from World Tour with Jean Gerardy) 
Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 


Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
: Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-J 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 





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pletely Latin character, in spite of its insignificant size, and though 
surrounded on every side by alien communities, Slavic and Teutonic. 
So entirely, indeed, has the preservation of its identity seemed ‘to 
absorb its energies, that it has hitherto found little leisure for the 
cultivation of the arts. Most of the creative work by Roumanians has 
been done within the past fifteen years. Our music, curiously 
enough, is influenced not by the neighboring Slav, but by the Indian 
and Egyptian folk-songs introduced by the members of these remote 
races, now classed as Gypsies, brought to Roumania as servants of 
the Roman conquerors. The deeply. Oriental character of our own 
folk-music derives from these sources, and possesses a flavor as singu- 
lar as it is beautiful.’’ 

The following splendid analysis of the E major Symphony has 
been made by Lawrence Gilman: 

“The chief theme of the first movement is heard at once, without 
introduction, an exceedingly energetic and forcible subject for four 
horns, two trumpets, and two cornets in unison. After the orchestra 
has confirmed this vigorous assertion, a soft-footed downhill run of 
triplets in the string family, halted at the bottom by stopped horns, 
makes clear the way for the entrance of the second theme in the oboe. 
This is taken over by the violins, and soon yields to a waltz-like 
motive, whence is derived a voluptuous episode which Maurice Ravel 


Cable Address, ‘‘Mandib’”’ ‘Telephone Sutter 2945 


Established 1869 


Manheim, Dihbern & Co. 


315 MONTGOMERY STREET 


SAN FRANCISCO 


Susurance Brokers Stork and Bond Brokers 


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useing Corea PAY eo eee Members, The San Francisco Stock 


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Burglary, Casualty, Automobile, , ; 
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and Riot, Ete. stocks and bonds always on hand. 





397 












































LAST 


PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday, April 3, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, April 5, 2:45 P. M. 





PROGRAMME 


I. Symphony No. 3, in F major 
Allegro con brio 
Andante 
Poco Allegretto 
Allegro 


wesw we w eee eee eee wee mew et eeeeseannce 


LAST 
POPULAR CONCERT 


Curran Theatre 
Sunday, March 29, 2:45 P. M. 





TSCHAIKOWSKY PROGRAM 


1. Symphony No..6, “‘Pathetique’’ 
Adagio—Allegro—Andante—Allegro Vivo 
Allegro con grazia ) 
Allegro molto vivace 
Adagio lamentoso 


2. The ‘‘Nutcracker’’ Suite 
Overture 
(March 
(Dance of the “‘Fee Dragee’’ 
IJ. (Russian Dance 
(Arabian Dance 
(Chinese Dance 
(Dance of the ‘‘Mirlitons”’ 
Ill. Dance of the Flowers 


3. March Slav 




















seems to have had vaguely in the back of his mind when he com- 
posed La Valse. A dotted figure put forward by the second violins 
and violas is much used. There is elaborate development, with an 
extended crescendo and a heaven-storming climax, fff, on the chief 
theme; then a lull, with the ‘cellos remembering, pianissimo, the 
voluptuous episode of the waltz. Another long crescendo and a 
brilliant peroration, with the characteristic BRIE of the chief subject 
in the basses, ends the movement. 


“In the slow movement, ideas full of melancholy brooding are 
elaborated with a profusion of ornament, arabesques of fantastic and 
poetical beauty. The horn begins the tale with a motive of three 
descending notes (D sharp, C sharp, B), twice repeated; two clarinets © 
add their voices, and a trio of stopped horns color the phrase darkly 
in the second measure, while the kettledrums mutter a curious figure 
in two-part harmony. The characteristic rhythm of ‘the clarinet figure 
pervades the orchestra, and then the violins sing a new and expressive 
song (6-8 time), continued by the woodwind above a pizzicato 
accompaniment in which lurks the rhythmic ghost of the three-note 
horn theme, which recurs fragmentarily in the wind. The texture of 
the music grows more complex, and the orchestra becomes a dusky 
garden of sombrely decorative counterpoint. The strange reverie 
comes to a close most delicately scored—for two solo violas and four 
solo ‘cellos, accompanied by the rest of the violas and ’celli, with a 
few notes for the lower woodwind and double basses, ppp. All the 
strings except the basses are muted throughout this movement. 


‘The Finale is a movement of singular fervor, brilliancy, and 


ALFRED METZcER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; if was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—Teacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





399 














elan. It begins with buoyant and rapidly flowing octave passages for 
the strings, pianissimo. But fanfares for the brass stir the music to a 
swiftly achieved fortissimo. A harp glissando introduces the first of 
two cantabile subjects, for strings, horns, and clarinets: the second 
follows almost immediately: an ardent melody for the first and second 
violins in unison. This material furnishes the subject-matter of the 
finale, together with reminiscences from the two preceding movements 
—especially the descending three-note horn motive from the slow 
movement, which at the end is transformed into a jubilant assertion 


‘ of triumphant strength.” 












THE 
MARGARET MARY MORGAN ((O. 


Gngraving ° Printers . Publishing 


Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 

















THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 
One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 31st, 1924 


Aaseta fo ih ae od ay Pe ok ee ers $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund.................... 461,746.52 
) MISSION*BRANCEeins 5.5. treed. Bh awlboro nes: Mission and 21st Streets 
PARS-PRESIDIO BRANGH sii hii} cai on Sa ele aoa Clement St. and 7th Ave, 
HAIGHT STREETS BRANCH Os fee die. Pore Haight and Belvedere Streets 


WEST. PORPFALABRANGH 3 oases rele oe West Portal Ave.-and Ulloa St. 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 








o ———EeE———E———— 





| 





wee 


FIRST VIOLINS 

Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 

Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W. F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 
Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Purt, B. 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 


VIOLAS 

Fenster, Lajos 

Principal 
Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 


Jdersonnel 


Che San HFrancisea Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


"CELLOS 

Ferner, Walter 
Principal 

Dehe, W. 
King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 
Kirs, R. 
Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 
Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 





' BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 
Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 


TROMBONES 


Tait, F. W. 


Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 
Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R.E. 


PERCUSSION 
Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


~Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


401 














Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
dure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a STEINWAY. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring—of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


Stigrinan, Way & Co. 


| Kearny & Sutter Sts. 
Oakland - Clay at 14th 











School Children’s Symphony 


Series 
By the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


Auspices Board of Education of the City and County of San Francisco 
TUESDAY, MARCH 24, 1925 | 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 
1:45 P. M. 








Soloist 


YEHUDI MENUHIN 
Phenomenal Ejight-Year-Old Violinist 





PROGRAMME 


‘1. Overture to “Fra Diavolo”’ . - - - - Auber 


This overture, which carries out the merry spirit of the opera, 
opens with a soft drum solo, followed by a march theme for the 
violins, violas and ‘cellos. The march, gradually extending to the 
other instruments, produces the effect of an advancing troop of 
soldiers, the march past being given by the whole orchestra, and 
at last gradually dying away in the distance. The final themes 
are taken from the first act, and the material is worked up to an 
effective climax. 





2. (a) Spring Song _ 


(b) Spinning Song{ | 3 % 5 s - Mendelssohn 


Of the many brief pieces written by Mendelssohn under the Vi 
general designation “Songs Without Words,” the two most popular 
are the ‘‘Spring Song’’ and the “Spinning Song.’ The first is a 
melody of appealing beauty, said to be derived from an old English 
folk-song, while the second is a gem of descriptive writing, the 








6. 


whirring accompaniment supporting the melody and giving the song 


its title. 


“In the Village,” from Caucasian Sketches - Ippolitow-lvanow 


This number is a musical picture of a village of Caucasian cliff- 
dwellers. Solos for the muted viola and the English horn are heard 
as the answering calls echo from one rock-dwelling to another, 
while the main part of the movement depicts a dance of the natives. 


In this dance the rhythm is made particularly fascinating by the 
use of a pair of ‘‘tympani oriental’’; two small drums about the 
size of a saucer. 


Menuet - - . . . . - 2 Boccherini 


The ‘“Menuet’’ is a graceful and stately form of dance which 
prevailed about two hundred years ago, and the name always re- 
calls a scene in a royal ballroom, powdered wigs, and lace-fringed 
sleeves. The name is derived from the French ‘“‘menu” (small), 
and refers to’the short, dainty steps of the dancers. 


Three Dances from the ‘‘Nutcracker’’ Suite - Tschaikowsky 
(a) Dance of the Sugar-Plum Fairy 
(b) Chinese Dance 
(c) Dance of the Flutes 


The ‘‘Nutcracker’’ Suite is taken from a ballet which Tschai- 
kowsky wrote during 1891, the year in which he made his first and 
only visit to the United States. The “Dance of the Sugar-Plum 
Fairy’ is the most distinguished instance of the use of the Celeste— 
an instrument in which plates of steel, suspended over resonating 
boxes of wood, are struck by hammers from a keyboard. The 
Chinese Dance is founded on an unchanging and sort of grunting 
accompaniment for the bassoons and double-basses pizzicato, 
against phrases in the highest register of the flutes. The dainty, 
leisurely Dance of the Flutes describes itself through its title. There 
is a short middle section for the brass choir more spirited in. rhythm. 


Violin Solo, ‘‘Hejre Kati’ - - wih Dre - Hubay 


YEHUDI MENUHIN 
(Louis Persinger at the Piano) 


Jeno Hubay, violinist and composer, was born in Budapest, 
September 14, 1858. As soloist and teacher, he has a great name 
in Europe. He is the composer of several operas, but is best 
known for his violin pieces, of which the one played today is, per- 
haps, the most famous. This work, like most of his violin composi- 
tions, is founded on Hungarian national airs. 


(The Piano is a Steinway) 


Overture to “William Tell’ - - ~ - “ Rossini 


This famous overture, which has been called by Berlioz “a 
symphony in four parts,’ opens with a serene picture of Nature at 
dawn. This is followed by a storm, which gradually approaches 
and, after spending its full fury, dies down into a refreshing calm 
and refreshing pastoral. As the last notes of the melody fade away, 
the trumpets enter with a brilliant fanfare on a spirited finale. 


Take this program home with you and save it. 











Second San Francisco 


Spring Music Festival 
ALFRED HERTZ, Director , 


April 18, 21, 23, 25, 1925 


CHORUS OF 500 VOICES 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA > 


Augmented to 125 musicians 


SOLOISTS 
MME. HELEN STANLEY | MME. CHARLES CAHIER 


Soprano, Metropolitan Opera Co. || Contralto, Vienna Imperial Opera 


RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL ALEXANDER KIPNIS 


Tenor, Metropolitan Opera Co. Baritone, Chicago Opera Co. 


Principal Works to be Presented 
Saturday Evening, April 18 


Verdi’s “‘Requiem”’ 
With Full Chorus, Four Soloists and Orchestra 


Tuesday Evening, April 21 
A Miscellaneous Programme of Solos, Duets and Concerted 
Numbers with Full Chorus and All Soloists participating 


Thursday Evening, April 23 


Schumann’s “‘Pilgrimage of the Rose’ 
For Full Chorus and Four Soloists 


Saturday Evening, April 25 
The ‘‘Resurrection’’ Symphony of Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto with Full Chorus 
also 


The ““Rhapsodie”’ of Brahms 


For Contralto Solo and Men’s Chorus 


SEASON TICKETS, $4, $8, $12. NOW ON SALE. 
Sherman, Clay & Co. 


SINGLE TICKETS, $1, $2, $3. ON SALE MARCH 30. 


Festival under joint auspices of Musical Association of 
San Francisco and the City of San Francisco | 




















MUSIC HEADQUARTERS! 


Sherman; Elay & Co. 


Do you want to play the 


SAXOPHONE? - 


Do you want to know more about the 


VIOLIN? 


Do you know that every boy wants to play the 


CELLOS? 





Do you know that every girl should play the 


GUITAR or MANDOLIN? 


That it is a wonderful thing to know how to play the 


PIANO 





Come to music’s headquarters and 


learn more about all these wonderful instruments 





Sherman [lay & Co. 


Kearny and Sutter Streets, s. F. 


Mission St., near Twenty-second 
Oakland, Fourteenth & Clay Sts. 




















Final Concert 
Season 1924-25 


LY 





SAN FRANCISCO | 


Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 
OAKLAND, CAL. 


Thursday Evening, March 26, 1925 


Eight-thirty o’clock 





Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 
Box Office at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland, Cal. 
Telephone Lakeside 6700 








ii 








Thursday Evy, Ma: 


CENT PEW at 01 06 72 (een mi ni Dies OC aeRO ie cir SETS Cee] Cr ees eae Bach-Steinberg 


This Bach Chaconne, as arranged for orchestra by Steinberg, was given its 
first performance in America, December 19, 1924, by the Cincinnati Symphony 
Orchestra. According to Grove, the Chaconne was a dance usually in 3-4 time, 
of a moderately slow movement, which belonged to the class of variations, 
being, in fact, in the large majority of cases, actually a series of variations on a 
“sround bass,” mostly eight bars in length. It is supposed to have been of 
spanish. . 

Steinberg’s scoring consists of two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two 
clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, tuba, kettle- 
drums and strings. 


The G minor Symphony of Mozart has been the object of boundless admira- 
tion on the part of all subsequent composers and critics, some of whom have 
voiced the opinion that it is Mozart’s orchestral masterpiece. Beethoven is said 
to have been so deeply impressed with its beauties that he rescored it from a 
pianoforte copy; and Schubert, speaking of the Andante, said: “I seem to hear 
the angels singing.” Otto Jahn in his biography of Mozart reviews the work in 
the following words: “In the G minor Symphony sorrow and complaining take 
the place of joy and gladness. The pianoforte quartet and the quintet in G minor 
are allied in tone, but their sorrow passes in the end to gladness or calm; whereas 
here it rises in a continuous climax to a wild merriment, as if seeking to stifle 
care. The agitated first movement begins with a low plaintiveness, which is 
scarcely interrupted by a calmer mood of the second subject, which in working 
out intensifies a gentle murmur into a piercing cry of anguish; ‘but, strive and 
struggle as it may, the strength of the resistance sinks again into the murmur 
with which the movement closes. The Andante, on the contrary, is consolatory 
in tone, not reposing on the consciousness of an inner peace, but striving after 
it with an earnest composure which even attempts to be cheerful. The Minuet 
introduces another turn of expression. A resolute resistance is opposed to the 
foe, but in vain; and again the effort sinks to a moan. Even the tender comfort 
of the trio, softer and sweeter than the Andante, fails to bring lasting peace. 
Again the combat is renewed, and again it dies away, complaining. The last 
movement brings no peace—only a wild merriment that seeks to drown sorrow; 
and gets on its course in restless excitement. Th's is the most passionate of all 
Mozart’s symphonies, but even in this he has not forgotten that “music when 
expressing horrors, must still be music.’ ” . 


INTERMISSION 


Hear CHALIAPIN _ Ben 

















in Oakland Auditorium Arena 


school of instrumentalists. 
Tickets: .. $3:00, $2:00, $1.00, plus tax. 


Management Zanrette W. Potter 





Baritone 


Friday Night, March 27, 8:30 p. m. 


When Chaliapin appeared in San Francisco 
last he remained on the stage singing song 
after song for a full two hours, each inter- 
pretation bringing new thrills and added start- 
ling amazement to his hearers, for there is no 
interpretative artist that ever lived with the 
vivid power of portrayal, the intensive per- 
sonality nor the consummate art of the Rus- 
sian. He will be assisted ty Abraham Sopkin, 
violinist and Max Rabinowitsch, pianist, two 
of the most capable of the younger Russian 


Now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland 











GRAM 
Evy, March 26, 1925 


: 3. Legend for Orchestra, “Zorahayda,” Opus Lares Svendsen 


This composition by the Norwegian composer is based upon “The Legend 

of the Rose of the Alhambra,” one of Washington Irving’s fascinating tales. 

Jacinta sits melancholy and alone by a fountain in the Alhambra. Zorahayda 

appears, predicts for Jacinta the end of. her love sorrow and tells of her own 

troubles, which baptism as a Christian alone will end. Jacinta baptizes Zorahayda 

t in the sacred water of the fountain, and she disappears with transfigured 

) countenance. Jacinta, remembering the prediction of the mysterious apparition, 
is illumined with hope and joy. 


j The score of “Zorahayda” contains the following enumeration and explanation 
of the various situations of the story: 





“Solitude and melancholy of Jacinta—Appearance of Zorahayda—She predicts 
for Jacinta the end of her troubles, and tells her of her own unhappiness. 
Baptism alone will bring her repose—Jacinta sprinkles the sacred water over her 
head—Disappearance of Zorahayda—Joy of Jacinta over the remembrance of the 
prediction.” | 


Aw & Prelude? to: **Vhe -Mastersingersr:.cfrr ee ae W agner 


The prelude to “The Mastersingers,” which ranks today as one of the most 
popular and impressive concert numbers, is built on five times, the first one 
being the grandiose theme of the mastersingers themselves, after which comes 
the motive of “Waking Love.” This is followed by the pompous “Banner” motive, 
a march-like theme which accompanies the marching of the guild as its banner 
with St. David and the harp is carried before them. The “Love Confessed” motive, 
derived from the famous Prize Song comes next, followed by the “Impatient 
Ardor” theme. After these melodies have been stated and developed, the magni- 
ficent climax approaches, the famous instance in which the three themes—numbers 
one, three and four—are employed simultaneously. This overwhelming example 
was Wagner’s defying reply to his critics, who claimed that he could not write 
counterpoint. 


ee ieee ne 
| ROSA PONSELLE | 
; SENSATIONAL DRAMATIC 

SOPRANO 

- AUDITORIUM OPERA HOUSE 

OAKLAND 

Monday Night, March 30 

Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00—plus tax—on sale at 
, Sherman, Clay & Co., 14th and Clay Sts. Oakland \t 





Management ZANNETTE W. POTTER 











—_———— 














ee US EC SOR AON EACLE AS OSD Tee 





Her own Aldrich piano 


Brcause it is such a good, honestly 
made, durable piano, it will be her com- 
panion for years and years to come. 
Long before its strings lose melody, 
she will have grown up to a home of 
her own, and a Steinway! M” 
Meanwhilethe Aldrichis only $445. 
ic is a responsive, sympathetic piano, 


and dependable. 












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Ny aes vit ere wire aM eb i) i = hh 
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Sherman, !( Gy 








ay & Go. 


Oakland — Fourteenth and Clay Streets 
Berkeley -- Telegraph and Channing Way 
Fruitvale — 3420 East Fourteenth Street 


San Francisco—Kearney and Sutter Streets 








School Children’s Symphony 


Series 


By the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 

ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor | 

Auspices Board of Education of the City and County of San Francisco 
FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 1925 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 
1:45 P. M. 








Soloist: KAJETAN ATTL, Harpist 


PROGRAMME 


1. Andante from the “Surprise”? Symphony = Haydn * 5 


It is from this movement (the second) that Haydn's G major 
Symphony gains its nickname. It is in the form of a theme with 
variations, and after each period in which the melody is softly sung, 
the full orchestra comes in with a “‘surprise’’ in the form of a loud, 
crashing chord. It has been said that Haydn introduced these 
clashing chords for the purpose of waking up the fashionable 
English ladies who slept during his concerts in London. However, 
Haydn himself said that this was not so, but that he merely wanted 
to present something unique and unusual in his symphony. 


2. Two Numbers from “Peer Gynt” Suite No. 1 - - Grieg 


Anitra’s Dance 
In the Hall of the Mountain King 
The best known composition written by the greatest of the 
Norwegian composers, Edward Hagerup Grieg, is the “Peer Gynt’ 
- Suite, No. 1. The term suite is given toa collection of short pieces 
for the orchestra, and is generally applied to a group that have one 
collective title and tell a story. Thus this suite tells of incidents in 
the life of Peer Gynt, a young man who is so filled with wild dreams 
of his own greatness and tells such amazing stories of his adventures 
that he finally comes to believe them himself. | 
Anjtra’s Dance is a perfect type of Oriental dance. It is in 
regular dance form—that is, dance, trio, or alternating dance, and 
repetition of original dance. “In the Hall of the Mountain King” is 











descriptive of Peer Gynt’s experiences in the Dovre Mountains, 
where he tries to make love to the King’s daughter, but is chased 
away by the imps and elves. ‘This is an interesting example of the 
constant repetition of a theme being used to tell a musical story. 


. Three Solos for Harp 
KAJETAN ATTL 


Aubade - - - Hasselmans 
Andante - ~ - - ~ - Tedeschi 
Teasing - - - - : - - Poenitz 


These three little numbers explain themselves by their titles, an 
‘‘Aubade”’ being a morning serenade as opposed to the ‘“‘Serenade’’ 
or music played in the evening. As to the harp itself, it is interest- 
ing to note that it is made up of forty-six strings and seven pedals. 
It has a compass of six and a half octaves and plays in different 
keys by the use of the pedals. Although the harp is one of the 
oldest of musical instruments, it has only been regularly used in 
symphony orchestras during the last fifty or sixty years. 


. Prize Song from ‘‘The Mastersingers”’ - - - Wagner 
The ‘‘Prize Song’”’ is the well-known tenor solo from Wagner's 
only comic opera, “The Mastersingers of Nurnberg.’ In early days 


in Europe the singers organized themselves into “Guilds” and the 
‘““Guilds’” from the various towns would hold singing contests. In 
Wagner's opera, the song contest was being held with the beautiful 
Eva, daughter of the village goldsmith, as the first prize, and it was 
with this song that Walther, Eva's lover, wins her. 


(a) Humoresque - - - - ; ” Dvorak 

This well-known composition was originally written for the 
piano by Anton Dvorak, the Bohemian composer, and has been 
arranged for ‘orchestra by Frederick Stock, conductor of the 
Chicago Symphony Orchestra. Dvorak was asked once by a 
friend why he had called the piece “Humoresque’’ when there was 
nothing humorous about it. Dvorak replied, “My boy, that is 
where the joke comes in.”’ 


(b) ‘*The Bumble Bee’”’ ” - - Rimsky-Korsakow 

This little number, the character of which is indicated by its title, 
is taken from the opera “Tsar Saltan’’ by Rimsky-Korsakow, the — 
famous Russian composer. In the opera this piece has voice parts, 
it coming in the first scene of the second act, where the stage direc- 
tion reads: ‘Out of the sea comes a bumble-bee and flies about the 
swan. 


. Overture to “Tannhauser” - - - - - Wagner 

This composition is a splendid example of Wagner's method of 
introducing the principal themes of the opera in the overture. The 
work opens with the “Pilgrim’s Chorus,’ beginning softly and 
swelling into a mighty anthem in the brasses, against a weird 
counter-figure in the violins, which Wagner said was meant to 
symbolize “the pulse of life.” This is followed by the music of 
Venusberg, the subterranean abode of Venus, the goddess of love. 
Then comes a sudden return of the solemn “Pilgrim’s Chorus,”’ 
which again swells into a mighty paean of triumph and praise, 
bringing the overture to a thrilling close. 


TAKE THIS PROGRAM HOME WITH YOU AND SAVE IT. 











Second San Francisco 


Spring Music Festival 
ALFRED HERTZ, Director 


April 18, 21, 23, 25, 1925 


CHORUS OF 500 VOICES 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Augmented to 125 musicians 


SOLOISTS 
MME. HELEN STANLEY || MME. CHARLES CAHIER 


Soprano, Metropolitan Opera Co. || Contralto, Vienna Imperial Opera 


RUDOLF 'LAUBENTHAL ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
Tenor, Metropolitan Opera Co. Baritone, Chicago Opera Co. 


Principal Works to be Presented 
Saturday Evening, April 18 


Verdi’s “‘“Requiem”’ 
With Full Chorus, Four Soloists and Orchestra 


Tuesday Evening, April 21 
A Miscellaneous Programme of Solos, Duets and Concerted 
Numbers with Full Chorus and All Soloists participating 


Thursday Evening, April 23 


Schumann’s “‘Pilgrimage of the Rose’ 
For Full Chorus and Four Soloists 


Saturday Evening, April 25 
The ‘‘Resurrection’’ Symphony of Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto with Full Chorus 
also 


The “Rhapsodie” of Brahms 


For Contralto Solo and Men’s Chorus 


SEASON TICKETS, $4, $8, $12. NOW ON SALE. 


herman, Clay & Co. 


SINGLE TICKETS, $1, $2, $3. ON SALE MARCH 30. 


Festival under joint auspices of Musical Association of 
San Francisco and the City of San Francisco 











MUSIC HEADQUARTERS! 


Sherman; Glay & Co. 


Do you want to play the 


SAXOPHONE? 


Do you want to know more about the 


VIOLIN? 


Do you know that every boy wants to play the 


*CELLO? 





Do you know that every girl should play the 


GUITAR or MANDOLIN? 


That it is a wonderful thing to know how to play the 


PIANO 


Come to music’s headquarters and 


learn more about all these wonderful instruments 


Sherman ay & Co. 


Kearny and Sutter Streets, s. F. 
Mission St., near Twenty-second 


Oaklands Fourteenth & Clay Sts. 

















“FRANCISCO 
| SYMPHONY = 


ORCHESTRE Dy 
3 The Musical 4 ly 
Association of 
aan Prancisco 














1924 1925 
Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR 
‘(Cee Oes | 
: 











Alfred Hertz 


‘RECOMMENDS 
CONN INSTRUMENTS 


The San Francisco 


Symphony 


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416 














Musical Association of San Francisen 


Founded Decembe: 20, 1909 


OFFICERS 


JOHN D. McKzg, President 


J. B. Levison, Vice-President 


Incorporated February 3, 1910 


EK. R. Drwonp, Treasurer 


A. W. WiwwenHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann 
E. D. Beylard John S. Drum 

Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg 
Miss Louise A. Boyd - Herbert Fleishhacker 
George T. Cameron J. D. Grant 

Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller 

C. H. Crocker W. E. Creed 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison 


Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin 


E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 
E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond 
Wm. H. Crocker E. S. Heller 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard 


WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 


Mrs. M. S. Koshland, Chairman 
Miss Lena Blanding, Vice-Chairman 
Mrs. M. C. Porter, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. 


417 


John D. McKee 
Seward B. McNear 
L. F. Monteagle 
Robert C. Newell 
J. C. Raas 

F. R. Sherman 
Wm. T. Sesnon 
M. C. Sloss 
William Sproule 
Sigmund Stern 


J. B. Levison 
William Sproule 


Robert C. Newell 


Telephone Garfield 2819 








THE WIND INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE 


of San Francisco 


(Next concert, April 28th) 









uses exclusively the 


Mason & Hamlin Piano 


Of all the beautiful pianos of the world, none so 
perfectly meets the ideals or the exacting require- 
ments of the truly cultured musician and the 
concert artist as does the Mason & Hamlin. 







Among those who know and appreciate master 
craftsmanship and the true artistry of the piano, 
its position is absolutely unassailable. 


Wiley BAllen ©. 


135 Kearny St., San Francisco 
1323 Washington St., Oakland 









Now obtainable with the Ampico re-enacting mechanism 


418 














Che San Francisen Sumphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 
1924—_Season—1925 


LAST POPULAR CONCERT 
537th Concert 


CURRAN THEATRE 
Sunday Afternoon, March 29, 2:45 o’clock 


TSCHAIKOWSKY PROGRAMME 


1. Symphony No. 6, “Pathetique’’ 
Adagio—Allegro—Andante—Allegro vivo 
Allegro con grazia 
Allegro molto vivace 
Adagio lamentoso 


2. The ‘Nutcracker’ Suite 


I. Overture 

(March 

(Dance of the “Fee Dragee’’ 
II. (Russian Dance 


(Arabian Dance 
(Chinese Dance 
(Dance of the ‘‘Mirlitons’”’ 


Ill. Dance of the Flowers 


3. March Slav 











NOTICE OF MEMBERS’ CONCERT 


Announcement is hereby made of the complimentary concert to be given for 
the members of the Musical Association in the Palm Court of the Palace Hotel, 
Thursday evening, April 2, 1925. Admission cards will be mailed to members in 
due course. 


In the past numerous members of the Association have taken advantage - of 
the opportunity to arrange dinner parties at the hotel on the evening of the 
concert. Therefore, this advance notice is given in order that all members may 
have ample opportunity for such arrangements. 





NOTE! Victor Lichtenstein’s “Symphonylogues” are continuing at the . 
Sorosis Hall at noon on the day of each Friday Symphony Concert, at 
which an illuminating discourse and thematic analysis is given on the cur- 
rent programme, illustrated by members of the orchestra. 


419 











BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 
Recorded in Europe by the 


Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-Winkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin. National Opera 









lst Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


1st Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non_ troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 







ist Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


3rd Movement—Part 2. 


3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 









4th Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 













4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


Send for our catalogue of ‘Musical Masterworks’’—free. 


QUARG MUSIC CO. 


206 Powell Street Open Evenings 





420 

















Symphony No. 6, ‘‘Pathetique’’ 


Although some of his compatriots deny that he is typically 
Russian, to us of the western world Tschaikowsky is emphatically 
‘Russia incarnate,’ his wonderful music expressing all the woe and 
despair, the substratum of barbarism and the upper layer of refinement 
and culture, and other characteristics of Russia at that time. And 
surely in no other work of his have we such a complete picture of the 
composers mind and message as in this intensely beautiful symphony. 
It is a human and national document of exceptional fidelity and vivid- 
ness; a profoundly moving picture of the mental agonies of a singularly 


unhappy life. 


It is, perhaps, not too fanciful to say that this symphony expresses 
the dark despair and heart-rending social sufferings of a people pic- 


tured here in music more effectively than they are pictured in the words 


of Tolstoi or Gorky; the same tinge of gloom that we see in the works 
of Russian novelists and poets gives to Tschaikowsky’s musical utter- 
ances such a poignant, personal, heart-rending note, for which surely 
his Russian heredity and environment are responsible. For that 
reason, the “Pathetique’’ Symphony has aroused and maintained a 









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popular interest almost unparalleled in the annals of musical history, 
and it remains the most profoundly stirring of his works. 


The symphony starts with a short Adagio introduction, the 
melody being in the lowest notes of the bassoon, with a dark accom- 


paniment in the violas and basses. The Allegro begins with a theme 


formed from the introduction and played at first by violas and ‘cellos. 
The flutes and clarinets answer this with a similar phrase and a counter- 
subject is introduced which leads up to a powerful climax. After 
some sinister harmonies in the trombones the beautiful consolatory 
second subject is heard, andante, in violins and ‘cellos. Like the 
principal theme, this second subject has two counter-subjects, of which 
the first is a kind of dialogue between flute and bassoon and the 
second a poignant descending scale, which in one instance, when 
played by the trumpet, fortissimo, becomes menacing. After many 
fluctuating emotions and violent dramatic struggle the consolatory 
theme is again heard, the stress of the movement dies down and a 
beautiful coda, in which the theme is accompanied by descending 
pizzicato scales, ends the movement in an ominous calm. 


In the greatest possible contrast to the first movement, which is 
pervaded by an almost unrelieved gloom, stands the second move- 
ment, a peculiar blending of grace and melancholy. It is written in 



















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Afternoons—2-5 


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Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


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ADDRESS 

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BRING YOUR VOICE AND PIANO 





LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 


Voice 


Opens his S. F. Classes 
April 27th 


SEVEN WEEKS 


It is welcome news to artist 
teachers and students of singing 
that Lazar S. Samoiloff will come to 
the Pacific Coast for this, his second 


season. Seldom has the career of, 


a vocal master met with such un- 
qualified endorsement from profes- 
sional Artists, many of whom have 
qa National reputation. A few of 
those who have written letters of 
appreciation: 


Claire Dux, Julia Claussen, Curt 
Taucher, Isa Kremer, Gabrielle Bes- 
anzoni, Rosa Raisa, Giacomo Ri- 
mini, Angelo Menghetti, Bianca 
Saroya, Marie Escobar, Sonya Yer- 
gin, Consuelo Escobar. 





cA Faculty of Celebrated 
Artist Teachers 


Josef Lhevinne..............-...-.---- Piano 
Cesar Thomson ...........-.---------- Violin 
Felix Salmond..............------------ ’Cello 
Julia Claussen......-.........-.-.--.... Voice 
Lazar S. Samoiloff..............---- Voice 
W. J. Henderson.............--- Lecturer 


Sigismund Stojowski -.....-.---------- 
Beak pee ee Piano—Composition 

Andreas de Segurola..........-.-------- 
nae Dre eee Operatic Department 


Annie Louise David.........--..-.- Harp 
Samuel Gardnet.....-......---------- Violin 
Emil J. Polak............-.---.-<..4- Coach 
A. Kostelanetz..........-- Accompanist 
Nicholai Mednikoff .............-.- Piano 


PROBLEMS TO THESE MEN 


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JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Piano 


Opens his S. F. Classes 
May 11th 


FIVE WEEKS 


Josef Lhevinne is one of the few 
representatives of that great virtu- 
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came into vogue in the latter days 
of Liszt and Rubinstein, and as such 
has established himself in the realm 
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He is a teacher of rare insight as 
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Enpowep sx ALICE CAMPBELL MACFARLANE 
Avice SECKELS, Manager 


Room 139 Fairmont Hotel 
Douglas 7267 


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The Baldwin is the Official Piano 

















the unusual time signature of 5-4, and begins with a graceful dance 
subject in the ‘cellos. Ultimately an interlude, or trio, follows, in 
which an extraordinary effect is gained by the incessant reiterations of 
the low D by the basses and tympani. Over this organ-point, flute, 
violin and ‘cello sing a sweetly complaining tune. The first part is 
repeated, and the movement, despite its evident determination at the 
outset to be cheerful, ends in a rather melancholy spirit. 


The third movement strikes a note of vigorous joy of life. ‘‘It 
is a piece of grand barbaric animalism,’’ writes Neuman, ‘“‘reminding 
us of a Tartar horde, galloping madly along the steppes, the sun 
glinting on its arms and full of the primitive joy of life.” Although 
placed as the third movement in the work, it is really more in the style 
of the sweeping finale of a conventional symphony—a symphonic 
march in which Tschaikowsky gives full sway to his extraordinary skill 
in thematic development and instrumentation. 


The last movement, which might be considered the usual slow 
movement of a symphony misplaced, evokes again the tragedy-laden 
atmosphere of the opening. By the masterly manner of their pres- 
entation and the insistence with which they force themselves upon our 
notice, the composer has made this movement one of the most hugely 
impressive in musical literature. These sadly descending scales, so 
characteristic of Tschaikowsky, assume an air of profound exhaustion 
against which vainly pulsate the passionate syncopated triplets of the 
accompaniment. An ominous clang of the gong leads to a despairing 
passage in the brass that seems like a descent into the grave itself. 
Now the theme, which at times breathed a spirit of consolation, is 
heard in a minor key, entirely bereft of its former element, and speak- 
ing only of gloom and defeat. It descends lower and lower, and the 


GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianis 
(Returned from World oie with Jean Gerardy) 


Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 







Residence Studio: 


2444 Larkin Street, San Francisco 
Phone Franklin 6257 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-J 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 








424 











end is like a world ‘from which the last flickering breath of life has 


vanished.’ 


Suite from the “‘Nutcracker’’ Ballet 


This suite is taken from a ballet which Tschaikowsky wrote in 
1891 for the St. Petersburg Opera House, together with his opera 
“Tolanthe.”’ It was shortly after commencing work on the “‘Nut- 
cracker’ that Tschaikowsky made his only visit to the United States, 
to assist in the opening of Carnegie Hall, New York. 


The following analysis of the various movements of the suite is 
by Lawrence Gilman: 

“Miniature Overture. This prelude to the fairy ballet is scored 
without the lower bass instruments—the ‘celli and double-basses are 


not used at all. The chief theme begins at once, pianissimo, in the 
violins. 


‘March. In the ballet, the opening scene of the first act is the 
decorating and lighting of the Christmas tree; then President Silber- 
haus, who is giving the party, orders the March to be played. Clari- 
nets, horns, and trumpets have the captivating march tune. There isa 
contrasting trio-like section. 


‘Dance of the Fee Dragee. This dance is taken from a Pas de 















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deux in Act II called, in the score, ‘Variation II (pour la danseuse).’ 
After four introductory measures, the celesta, which so captivated 
T’schaikowsky, plays the chief theme, and later disports itself in a 
cadenza. 


‘Russian Dance. In the second act of the ballet, No. 12 of the 
score, is a divertissement comprising these dances: Chocolat, Cafe, 
The, Trepak, and Danse des Mirlitons. In the concert suite they are 
differently named: Cafe is changed to Danse Arabe, and The to Danse 
Chinoise. The Trepak is a national Russian folk dance, of rapid and 
energetic character, strongly accented. Violins announce the chief 
dance theme. 


“Arabian Dance. Here the Fairy Dragee’s dancers remember 
that Russia and the Orient are neighbors. Above a drone-like double 
pedal-point for the low strings, a clarinet dreams of Araby. Then the 
violins enter, molto expressivo. 


‘Chinese Dance. This concise and captivatingly fantastic move- 
ment — only thirty-two bars long —is founded on an unchanging 
accompaniment figure for the bassoons and double-basses pizzicato, 
above which the flute disports itself capriciously. 


“Dance of the Mirlitons. A ‘mirliton,’ according to the best 








LAST 
PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday, April 3, 3:00 P. M. 
Sunday, April 5, 2:45 P. M. 


PROGRAMME 


Laspymipnony No. 3..in fi majors. ce ee ke Brahms 
Allegro con brio 
Andante 
Poco Allegretto 
Allegro 


2. Seherzo; «bam o ~ohenter 260 ee Goosens 
(First time in San Francisco) 


3. Legend, “‘Zorahayda’’ 
4. Prelude to “The Mastersingers’’............................ Wagner 





426 








{) 


authorities, makes a noise like a kazoo; and a kazoo, one learns, is 
merely one of those domestic music producers constructed out of a 
piece of thin paper and acomb. The mizrliton is described as a wooden 
or cardboard tube with the ends covered by a membrane; a triangular 
hole is cut in the tube a short distance from each end. ‘By singing into 
one of the holes, a sound is produced not unlike that obtained by sing- 
ing against a comb wrapped in thin paper.’ In other words, it is a 


kind of toy pipe, and in Tschaikowsky’s ballet, the mirlitons were 
among those present in the divertissement of the second act. The 
charming first theme of this dance is sung by the flutes, above a pizzi- 
cato accompaniment of the strings. 


‘Waltz of the Flowers. This is No. 13 in the score of the ballet— 
Act II. An introduction, with a concluding harp cadenza, leads to the 
chief waltz theme (for the horns) — one of Tschaikowsky's most 
famous and ingratiating tunes. ” 


March Slav 


As to its principal thematic material, the “March Slav’’ is based 
on South Russian or Servian folk-music. The principal theme of the 
march is founded on the Servian folk-song, “Come, My Dearest, Why 










ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—1I eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


REeDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; wt was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 



























Address: all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 


427 











So Sad This Morning?’’ The principal theme is given out, after four 
introductory measures, by the violas and bassoons, later to be taken 
up by the violins and woodwind. A middle section appears in the 
clarinets and bassoons (pizzicato in the basses). There are heard later 
fragments of the Russian national hymn, and a long organ point on 
F leads, through a crescendo, to a resumption of the main theme in 
the full orchestra. A closing section sets forth a new idea in the clari- 
nets (accompaniment given to violoncellos and basses pizzicato, and 


kettledrums), which is afterward combined with the Russian hymn 
vociferated by the trombones. 










THE 
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Gngraving - Printers ° Publishing 


Commercial Printing 


619 California Street Douglas 4633 


THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


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428 











Second San Francisco 


Spring Music Festival 


ALFRED HERTZ, Director 
EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 


Apri 18¢2714:29;.25,.1925 


CHORE SROEs 00F VOICES | 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Augmented to 125 musicians 


SOLOISTS 
MME. HELEN STANLEY || MME. CHARLES CAHIER 


Soprano, Metropolitan Opera Co. || Contralto, Vienna Imperial Opera 
RUDOLF 'LAUBENTHAL ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
Tenor, Metropolitan Opera Co. Baritone, Chicago Opera Co. 

Principal Works to be Presented 


Saturday Evening, April 18 


Verdi’s ‘““Requiem”’ 
With Full Chorus, Four Soloists and Orchestra 


Tuesday Evening, April 21 
A Miscellaneous Programme of Solos, Duets and Concerted 
Numbers with Full Chorus and All Soloists participating 


Thursday Evening, April 23 


Schumann's “Pilgrimage of the Rose’ 
For Full Chorus and Four Soloists 


| Saturday Evening, April 25 
The ‘‘Resurrection’’ Symphony of Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto with Full Chorus 
also 


The “‘Rhapsodie’’ of Brahms 


For Contralto Solo and Men’s Chorus 
SEASON TICKETS, $4, $8, $12. NOW ON SALE. 


Sherman, Clay & Co. 
SINGLE TICKETS, $1, $2, $3. ON SALE MARCH 30. 


Festival under joint auspices of Musical Association of 
San Francisco and the City of San Francisco 


429 





ee = = 








Choose yout piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
of your family circle. Choose 
it for qualities that will en- 
dure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a STEINWAY. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring —of distinction so 
immediately recognized. 


Sherman, (Play & Co. 


Kearny & Sutter Sts. 
Oakland - Clay at 14th 





















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el 
s = URCIIE a. 
eG The Musical 4 |@reé 
1 ASSOcIation OF |e a 
San Francisco [Rwy 





of }o- 
Stanford University 
March 31, 1925 
| ~ed_pa- 


cAuspices 
STANFORD SYMPHONY COMeaEIEE 





PROGRAMME 


. Symphony No. 3, in F major - " - - Brahms 


Allegro con brio 
Andante 


Poco allegretto 


Allegro 


Brahms worked on his Third Symphony in 1882 and in the 
summer of 1883 completed it, the first performance being given at 
a Philharmonic Concert in Vienna, December 2, 1883, Hans Richter 
conducting. Richter in a toast christened this symphony the 
‘““Eroica,”» and WHanslick remarked concerning this: ““Truly, if 
Brahms’ first symphony is characterized as the ‘Pathetic’ or the 
‘Appassionata’ and the second as the ‘Pastoral,’ the new symphony 
in F major may be appropriately called his ‘Eroica.’ ”’ 


Philip H. Goepp has made the following analysis of the work: 

“We can never neglect the very beginning of Brahms. In many 
greatest works it is often purest introduction, preface, not integral; 
in Haydn it is often irrelevant,—at best, like grace at table. In 
Brahms, push it aside as we will, it reappears ever with haunting 
meaning, seems ever like overshadowing motto. Here it is two 
chords, loud and long, one in the clear, bright light of day, the 
second dark and somber; we are between clouds and sunshine. In 
this April light we proceed. In a way, Brahms seems to have the 
symphonic point of view more than anyone; that is, the element of 
big design. The perfect placidity of his poise helps here; he is the 
sanest, perhaps, of all secular masters (where Bach is absent) ; at 
least, he has least frenzy of poet. Beethoven would begin with that 
wonderful reversible way of his: melody of bass and treble which 
can be inverted with equal effect. Somewhat similarly we catch in 
Brahms a special depth of design which does not lie on the surface, 
so that you can never study him in a hurry. Here in the symphony 
one can easily overlook the fact that the motto of the first three 
bars is instantly the bass of the next in fagots and strings, the omi- 
nous motive at the foundation of it all. The main theme, which 


. here begins, sweeps down the simple lines of tonic chord, too free 


for conventional melody. But through the melodious woof, on 
goes the actual fugue of the motive of the first three bars like a 
subtly pervasive legend. Equally with the jolting rhythm is the 
rude jar of sudden harmonic change; beginning in clearest white 


’ light of major tone, it plunges the next step into dark, cloudy 











y 


minor, and so it climbs the Parnassian height through quick, vary- 
ing tonal hue. There is a sense of ploughing through heavy waves 
of resistance with jolting motion, listing now here, now there, up in 
the bright sun, down in dark depths; but it does come to a gentle 
haven, though ever with a certain heaviness of gait, never a smooth 
grace, until the next tune, which hums for the nonce like lullaby. 
There is no return to boisterous theme—a line or so of sighing 
strings with soothing wood, and then, still in a remote tonal scene, 
here is the real second theme, a song sweetly quaint and appealing, 
almost plaintive, with a swing (of 9-4) that is not dainty nor awk- 
ward, but seems in one moment the one, in the next the other; is 
certainly naive,—novel yet natural; on the whole, gives the spon- 
taneous song a tinge of slow dance. The rare charm of the song 
1s blended of limping basses of strings and of a high note of flute 
piping in at oddest moments. 


‘‘The Andante is in the simple classic vein hallowed by rare 
masters; settled, assured, in placid repose. Child-like, ingenious 
beauty is foremost; spontaneity rather than intensity of message. 
The cadence is ever echoed in deep brown of low strings. Every- 
where is the frugal economy of soundest art, the air of plain living 


and high thinking. 


‘In the Allegretto, with all lagging motion, the step of slow 
dance is somewhat strongly marked with a beat of the foot that has 
something of the German Landler, again something of Slavonic in 
the late deferred accent. But the gloom is thick overhead, and 
leaves but a shadow of the dance; even in the second melody, 
where for a moment we hope for a sunnier light, we have at most 
the odd shifting mood of first Allegro. But in the third is a change 
of mood. Still in the old uncertain humor there is much more of 
joy and trust, though of a timid kind, in the melody with its delicate 


hesitancy, with just a faint reminder of dance in the pace. 


“In the last movement the theme in unison sounds like bar- 
barous war-tune, ruthless in rough minor. As the march is kept in 
striding basses, and violins sound lightly a constant tremulous call, 
‘cellos strike a cheery tune in curiously new swing, strongly and 
broadly crossing the strict stride of marching basses. In the close 
the main melody enters, losing its old speed, with soft tenderness, 
ending with firm, serene confidence. As the theme mutters again 
in low bass,—now a little faster,—echoed in high wood, a strain 
of ancient melody gives sweetly comforting answer. It is the motto 
of the big beginning of the symphony, cleared of turbid gloom, in 
simple, soothing conclusion. 


Intermission 





2. Four Old Flemish Folk Songs - - - - de Greef 


The Solitary Rose 
Hoepsasa 


Wounded Is My Heart 
The Duke of Alva’'s Statue 


Arthur de Greef, who is the transcriber and not the composer 
of these songs, is best known as a pianist. He obtained his train- 
ing on the piano from Louis Brassin, who from 1869 until 1879 
was principal instructor in piano playing at the Conservatory of 
Brussels. For a number of years he has been well known to Euro- 
pean concert goers, and he has given recitals in America. The 
transcriptions of the Four Old Flemish Folk Songs, which are 


dedicated to Henri Vergrugghen, were published in London in 
1915. 


. Polonaise in E major - - - - - - Liszt 


Liszt wrote two polonaise for piano solo, the one played this 
evening being the most familiar. The arrangement for orchestra is 


by Karl Miller-Berghaus, who also orchestrated the popular second | 


Rhapsody. The musical form of the polonaise is in 3-4 time, and 
though originally a Polish dance, is in reality a stately march, which, 
in Europe, is often used to open formal balls and other festive 
gatherings. 


SECOND SAN FRANCISCO 


SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL 





Exposition Auditorium 
April 18, 21, 23, 25 


SINGLE AND SEASON TICKETS NOW ON SALE 


Sherman Clay & Co. San Francisco 





| 
| 
| 











AN EVENING OF LIGHT MUSIC BY 
THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA’... ° PALM COURT OF 
THE PALACE HOTEL, THURSDAY, 
THE SECOND OF APRIL, NINETEEN 
HUNDRED AND TWENTY-FIVE 

NINE O’CLOCK 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 





MEMBERS’ CONCERT 








—s 
— 

















Foe TP AEM COURT 3S. -USED 15s 
EVENING THROUGH THE COURTESY 
OF THE PALACE HOTEL MANAGEMENT 
IN COMPLIMENT TO THE MEMBERS OF 
THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION AND THE 
WOMEN’S AUXILIARY 














a ee 


i 
' 
} 
‘ 
: 








. Overture, ‘‘Phedre’” - - - - - Massenet 
Ballet Suite - - - - - - Joseph Clokey 
Pan 


The Dripping Spring 
Twilight Moth 

The Moon Flower 
The Bat 


. Third Movement from 


‘Symphonie Pathetique’” - Tschaikowsky 
Allegro molto vivace 
Intermission 
. Prelude to “The Deluge” - - - Saint-Saens 


(Violin obligato, LOUIS PERSINGER) 


(a} Menuet *- - «= > - - = = “Boccherini 

(b) Humoresque - - - - - - Dvorak 

(c) Scherzo, ““The Bumble Bee” - - - 
Sat Bo eel G  } e S Rumsky-Korsakow 


. Waltz, ‘On the Beautiful Blue Danube” - 


Stee ic = ao Pe OMAN erates 


ea ees Re Oe 








ECOND SAN FRANCISCO 
SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 


EVENINGS -- APRIL 18, 21, 23, 25, 1925 


TICKETS N OW SHERMAN CLA CLAY CO. 


SMEMBERS ARE URGED TO SECURE THEIR TICKETS 
BEFORE BEST LOCATIONS ARE SOLD. 














SAN F “FRANCL 
RV MPHONYESE 
2 a) ORCHESTRA 


4, Marntamead oy @ 
The PMusrecal 4 








Assoctation of 
San Francisco 





1924 1925 - 
Fourteenth Season oe 














Alfred Hertz 


RECOMMENDS 
CONN INSTRUMENTS 


The San Francisco 
Symphony 


CONN 
INSTRUMENTS 


No Higher Endorsement 


can be given to a musical 
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instrument, hence if the sscontnending Conninestres 


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ALFRED HERTz. 


WORLD'S ; 
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Conn San Francisco Co. Conn Oakland Co. 
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440 











Musical Assoviation of San Hranciseo 


Founded Decembe: 20, 1909 


OFFICERS 


JOHN D. McKesg, President 


J. B. Levison, Vice-President 


Incorporated February 3, 1910 


E. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 


A. W. WImDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann 
E. D. Beylard John S. Drum 

Miss Lena Blanding Milton H. Esberg 
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Selah Chamberlain E. S. Heller 

C. H. Crocker W. E. Creed 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker J. B. Levison 


Wm. H. Crocker Walter S. Martin 


E. R. Dimond John A. McGregor 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
John D. McKee, Chairman 
E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond 
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MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. B. Levison, Chairman 


E. S. Heller E. D. Beylard 


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EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


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' A, W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


Hours 10 to 12 A. M., 2 to 4 P. M. 


441 


John D. McKee 
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L. F. Monteagle 
Robert C. Newell 
J. C. Raas 

F. R. Sherman 
Wm. T. Sesnon 
M. C. Sloss 
William Sproule 
Sigmund Stern 


J. B. Levison 
William Sproule 


Robert C. Newell 


Telephone Garfield 2819 








THE WIND INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE. 


of San Francisco 


(Next concert, April 28th) 


uses exclusively the 


Mason & Hamlin Piano 


Of all the beautiful pianos of the world, none so 
perfectly meets the ideals or the exacting require- 
ments of the truly cultured musician and the 
concert artist as does the Mason & Hamlin. 


Among those who know and appreciate master 
craftsmanship and the true artistry of the piano, 
its position is absolutely unassailable. 


Wiley BAllen ©. 


135 Kearny St., San Francisco 
1323 Washington St., Oakland 


Now obtainable with the Ampico re-enacting mechanism 








442 











The San Francisco Sumphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


1924—Season—1925 


| LAST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
| 540th and 54ist Concerts 


CURRAN THEATRE 


Friday Afternoon, April 3, 3:00 o’clock 
Sunday Afternoon, April 5, 2:45 o’clock 


PROGRAMME 


i Symphony No, dyn: by nvayors ee ca ee eee Brahms 
Allegro con brio 


Andante 
Poco Allegretto 
Allegro 
Intermission 
FS cherzo.- slam: OF DHANter yal nee ot ieee os ee eee Goosens 
(First time in San Francisco) 


3 dl egends WZ OFAMAV Ga chee cetera are eee enema ere Svendsen 


4. Prelude to ““The Mastersingers  .............--.-------------- Wagner 





THE WIND INSTRUMENT ENSEMBLE 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Next Concert, Tuesday evening, April 28, Ball Room, 
Fairmont Hotel. 


Secure tickets now at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


443 





109 Stockton Street 


- BEETHOVEN’S NINTH SYMPHONY 
Recorded in Europe by the 





Symphony Orchestra of Berlin 
Under the direction of Bruno Seidler-W. inkler 


and 


Includes the Chorus of the Berlin National Opera 


Ist Movement—Part 1, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


1st Movement—Part 2, Allegro, ma non troppo, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


lst Movement—Part 3, Allegro, ma non troppo. 


2nd Movement—Part 1, Molto vivace, New Symphony Orchestra, Berlin—Con- 
ducted by Bruno Seidler- Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


2nd Movement—Part 2, Molto vivace. 


3rd Movement—Part 1, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


3rd Movement—Part 2Z. 


3rd Movement—Part 3, Adagio molto e cantabile, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 1, Presto. 


4th Movement—Part 2, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 3, Presto allegro assai, New Symphony Orchestra—bBerlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Schlosshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—and chorus Berlin National Opera. 


4th Movement—Part 4, Presto allegro assai—New Symphony Orchestra—Berlin, 
Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler. Eugen Transky, Tenor, and chorus 
Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


4th Movement—Part 5, continuation—Presto allegro assai movement. 


4th Movement—Part 6, Presto allegro non tanto, New Symphony Orchestra— 
Berlin, Conducted by Bruno Seidler-Winkler, Vocal by Ethel Hansa, Soprano— 
Eleanor Scholsshauer, Alto—Eugen Transky, Tenor—Prof. Albert Fischer, 
Bass—chorus Berlin National Opera (Recorded in Europe). 


Price Complete, in Handsomely Bound Album, $10.00 


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Symphony No. 3, in F major - ~ ~ 2 Brahms 
Brahms worked on his Third Symphony in 1882 and in the 


summer of 1883 completed it, the first performance being given at 
a Philharmonic Concert in Vienna, December 2, 1883, Hans Richter 
conducting. Richter in a toast christened this symphony the 
“Froica,” and Hanslick remarked concerning this: “Truly, if 
Brahms’ first symphony is characterized as the ‘Pathetic’ or the 
. ‘Appassionata’ and the second as the ‘Pastoral,’ the new symphony 
in F major may be appropriately called his “Eroica.’ ”’ 
Philip H. Goepp has made the following analysis of the work: 
‘We can never neglect the very beginning of Brahms. In many 
greatest works it is often purest introduction, preface, not integral; 
in Haydn it is often irrelevant,—at best, like grace at table. In 
Brahms, push it aside as we will, it reappears ever with haunting 
meaning, seems ever like overshadowing motto. Here it is two 
chords, loud and long, one in the clear, bright light of day, the 
second dark and somber; we are between clouds and sunshine. In 
this April light we proceed. In a way, Brahms seems to have the 
symphonic point of view more than anyone; that is, the element of 
big design. The perfect placidity of his poise helps here; he is the 
sanest, perhaps, of all secular masters (where Bach is absent); at 
least, he has least frenzy of poet. Beethoven would begin with that 









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wonderful reversible way of his: melody of bass and treble which 
can be inverted with equal effect. Somewhat similarly we catch in 
Brahms a special depth of design which does not lie on the surface, 
so that you can never study him ina hurry. Here in the symphony 
one can easily overlook the fact that the motto of the first three 
bars is instantly the bass of the next in fagots and strings, the omi- 
nous motive at the foundation of it all. The main theme, which 
here begins, sweeps down the simple lines of tonic chord, too free 
for conventional melody. But through the melodious woof, on 
goes the actual fugue of the motive of the first three bars like a 
subtly pervasive legend. Equally with the jolting rhythm is the 
rude jar of sudden harmonic change; beginning in clearest white 
light of major tone, it plunges the next step into dark, cloudy 
minor, and so it climbs the Parnassian height through quick, vary- 
ing tonal hue. There is a sense of ploughing through heavy waves 
of resistance with jolting motion, listing now here, now there, up in 
the bright sun, down in dark depths; but it does come to a gentle 
haven, though ever with a certain heaviness of gait, never a smooth 
grace, until the next tune, which hums for the nonce like lullaby. 
There is no return to boisterous theme—a line or so of sighing 
strings with soothing wood, and then, still in a remote tonal scene, 
here is the real second theme, a song sweetly quaint and appealing, 
almost plaintive, with a swing (of 9-4) that is not dainty nor awk- 
ward, but seems in one moment the one, in the next the other; is 
certainly naive,—novel yet natural; on the whole, gives the spon- 
taneous song a tinge of slow dance. The rare charm of the song 





Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday 
Afternoons—2-5 


ce KAJETAN ATTL 


Solo Harpist 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Studio Hours: Phone Douglas 1678 






Using Lyon & Healy Harps, The World’s Standard 
FOR ENGAGEMENTS 
AS SOLO ARTIST, ACCOMPANIST, OR 

BER Ee bank re PLAYER IN ENSEMBLE MUSIC, 
“aaeeee Ss ADDRESS 

ei eae KAJETAN ATTL, BOHEMIAN CLUB 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
RES. PHONE FRANKLIN 7847 


Orley See 


Violinist and Teacher 
Concert and Recital 


48 Wildwood Avenue, Piedmont 


Phone Piedmont 8140-J (Tuesday) Douglas 1678 











































BRING YOUR VOICE AND PIANO 





LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 


Voice 


Opens his S. F. Classes 
April 27th 


SEVEN WEEKS 


It is welcome news to _ artist 
teachers and students of singing 
that Lazar S. Samoiloff will come to 
the Pacific Coast for this, his second 
season. Seldom has the career of 
a vocal master met with such un- 
qualified endorsement from profes- 
sional Artists, many of whom have 
a National reputation. A few of 
those who have written letters of 
appreciation: 


Claire Dux, Julia Claussen, Curt 
Taucher, Isa Kremer, Gabrielle Bes- 
anzoni, Rosa Raisa, Giacomo Ri- 
mini, Angelo Menghetti, Bianca 
Saroya, Marie Escobar, Sonya Yer- 
gin, Consuelo Escobar. 





cA Faculty of Celebrated 
Artist Teachers 


TOSCO LAO VINIG. cc sicti eet sreec ect anees Piano 
Cesar Thomson ........--.----------- Violin 
Felix Salmond............-.------------ ’Cello 
Julia Claussen...............----------- Voice 
Lazar S. Samoiloff..............---- Voice 
W. J. Henderson.............-.. Lecturer 


Sigismund Stojowski ..-........------- 
LE eae ee Piano—Composition 








Annie Louise David............---- Harp 
Samuel Gardnevr.....--....-..-------- Violin 
Renilicds Ola occ ic. oo ncen secre sasece Coach 
A. Kostelanetz..........-- Accompanist 
Nicholai Mednikoff .-.-.......-.-.-- Piano 





PROBLEMS TO THESE MEN 


a 





- JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Piano 


Opens his S. F. Classes 
May 1th 


FIVE WEEKS 


Josef Lhevinne is one of the few 
representatives of that great virtu- 
oso school of piano playing which 
came into vogue in the latter days 
of Liszt and Rubinstein, and as such 
has established himself in the realm 
of pianistic art as one of the su- 
preme masters of the instrument. 
He is a teacher of rare insight as 
well as a virtuoso, and brings un- 
usual authority to all questions re- 
lating to piano playing. 


Enroll Now! 


Private Lessons—-Teachers’ Course 
—Repertoire and Interpretation 
Classes—-Active and Auditor—Mas- 
ter Recitals—Free Scholarships 


ARTS 


OF CALIFORNIA 
Lazar s. SAMOILOFE, oirector 


EnpowEep By ALICE CAMPBELL MACFARLANE 
ALicE SECKELS, Manager 








Room 139 Fairmont Hotel 
Douglas 7267 


San Francisco 


The Baldwin is the Official Piano 











is blended of limping basses of strings and of a high note of flute 
piping in at oddest moments. 


‘The Andante is in the simple classic vein hallowed by rare 
masters; settled, assured, in placid repose. Child-like, ingenious 
beauty is foremost; spontaneity rather than intensity of message. 
The cadence is ever echoed in deep brown of low strings. Every- 
where is the frugal economy of soundest art, the air of plain living 


and high thinking. 


‘In the Allegretto, with all lagging motion, the step of slow 
dance is somewhat strongly marked with a beat of the foot that has 
something of the German Landler, again something of Slavonic in 
the late deferred accent. But the gloom is thick overhead, and 
leaves but a shadow of the dance; even in the second melody, 
where for a moment we hope for a sunnier light, we have at most 
the odd shifting mood of first Allegro. But in the third is a change 
of mood. Siill in the old uncertain humor there is much more of 
joy and trust, though of a timid kind, in the melody with its delicate 
hesitancy, with just a faint reminder of dance in the pace. 


‘In the last movement the theme in unison sounds like bar- 
barous war-tune, ruthless in rough minor. As the march is kept in 
striding basses, and violins sound lightly a constant tremulous call, 
‘cellos strike a cheery tune in curiously new swing, strongly and 
broadly crossing the strict stride of marching basses. In the close 
the main melody enters, losing its old speed, with soft tenderness, 
ending with firm, serene confidence. As the theme mutters again 
in low bass,—now a little faster,—echoed in high wood, a strain 
of ancient melody gives sweetly comforting answer. It is the motto 
of the big beginning of the symphony, cleared of turbid gloom, in 
simple, soothing conclusion.’ 


GEORGE STEWART McMANUS 
Pianis 
(Returned from World ae with Jean Gerardy) 


Instruction in the Art of Piano Playing 
and Accompanying 


Residence Studio: 
1459 Fourth Ave., San Francisco 
Phone Sunset 2487 


Mondays: Ray Coyle Building, 526 Powell Street 
Phone Sutter 3634 


Thursdays: 2510 College Avenue, Berkeley 
Phone Berkeley 436-J 


Available for engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 











Scherzo, ‘“Tam o’ Shanter” - - _ - Eugene Goosens 


This composition was given its first production by the Halle 
Orchestra at Manchester, England, in 1917, and was first performed 
in America by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, March 23, 1923. 


As the title suggests, it is based upon the famous Burns poem of 
the same name, and is descriptive mostly of Tam’s wild ride after 
leaving the village inn: 


Nae man can tether time or tide; 

The hour approaches Tam maun ride; 

That hour, o’ night’s black arch the key-stane, 
That dreary hour he mounts his beast in; 

And sic a night he taks the road in, 

As ne'er poor sinner was abroad in. 


The wind blew as ’twad blawn its last; 

The rattling show’rs rose on the blast; 

The speedy gleams the darkness swallow’d; 
Loud, deep, and long, the thunder bellow’d; 
That night, a child might understand, 

The Deil had business on his hand. 


Then Kirk-Alloway—warlocks and witches in a dance—Old Nick 


screwing the pipes—the horrid things seen by Tam—till he shouted to 
one dancing “‘souple jade’: “Weel done, Cutty-sark’’—then the wild 


ride to gain the key-stone of the bridge. 


Legend for Orchestra, “‘Zorahayda,”’ Opus 11 ~ - Svendsen 


This composition by the Norwegian composer is based upon ‘“The 
Legend of the Rose of the Alhambra,’”’ one of Washington Irving's 





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315 MONTGOMERY STREET 





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as Maher meee mrosene Members, The San Francisco Stock 
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449 











Second San Francisco 


Spring Music Festival 


ALFRED HERTZ, Director 
EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 


April 18, 21, 23, 25, 1925 


CHORUS OF. 500). VOICES 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Augmented to 125 musicians 


SOLOISTS 
MME. HELEN STANLEY | MME. CHARLES CAHIER 


Soprano, Metropolitan Opera Co. || Contralto, Vienna Imperial Opera 


RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL ALEXANDER KIPNIS 


Tenor, Metropolitan Opera Co. Baritone, Chicago Opera Co. 
Principal Works to be Presented 





Saturday Evening, April 18 


Verdi’s ‘“Requiem”’ 
With Full Chorus, Four Soloists and Orchestra | 
Tuesday Evening, April 21 


A Miscellaneous Programme of Solos, Duets and Concerted 
Numbers with Full Chorus and All Soloists participating 


Thursday Evening, April 23 


Schumann's ‘Pilgrimage of the Rose”’ 
For Full Chorus and Four Soloists 





Saturday Evening, April 25 
The “Resurrection” Symphony of Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto with Full Chorus 
also 


The “Rhapsodie’ of Brahms 


For Contralto Solo and Men’s Chorus 
TICKETS NOW ON SALE SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
$1, $2, $3, (No Tax) 


Festival under joint auspices of Musical Association of 
San Francisco and the City of San Francisco 


450 











fascinating tales. Jacinta sits melancholy and alone by a fountain in 
the Alhambra. Zorahayda appears, predicts for Jacinta the end of her 
love sorrow and tells of her own troubles, which baptism as a Christian 
alone will end. Jacinta baptizes Zorahayda in the sacred water of the 
fountain, and she disappears with transfigured countenance. Jacinta 
remembering the prediction of the mysterious apparition, is illumined 
with hope and joy. 

The score of ‘‘Zorahayda’”’ contains the following enumeration 
and explanation of the various situations of the story: 

“Solitude and melancholy of Jacinta—Appearance of Zorahayda 
— She predicts for Jacinta the end of her troubles, and tells her of her 
own unhappiness. Baptism alone will bring her repose—Jacinta 
sprinkles the sacred water over her head—Disappearance of Zora- 


hayda—Joy of Jacinta over the remembrance of the prediction.’ 


Prelude to ‘“The Mastersingers”’ - - - Wagner 
The prelude to ““The Mastersingers,’’ which ranks today as one 


of the most popular and impressive concert numbers, is built on five 


themes, the first one being the grandiose theme of the mastersingers 





ALFRED METZGER— 

In his conducting Mr. 
Linden impresses by dis- 
pensing with the score, 
making a fine appearance, 
revealing magnetism and 
distinct personality and 
obtaining uniform and in- 
stant response from his 
musicians.—Pacific Coast 
Musical Review. 


M. Anthony Linden 


Orchestral Conductor and Flute Virtuoso 
Soloist—TI eacher—Lecturer 
Solo Flutist, San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
Formerly Solo Flutist, Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra 
Director Linden School of Flute Playing 


REDFERN Mason— 

He played admirably. 
There was no _ self-con- 
scious virtuosity; it was 
the pure bel canto of the 
flute, every. note round 
and perfect as a pearl.— 
San Francisco Examiner. 








Address all communications to 


457 Phelan Building, San Francisco 





45] 











ay 





themselves, after which comes the motive of “Waking Love.” This is 
followed by the pompous ‘‘Banner’’ motive, a march-like theme which 
accompanies the marching of the guild as its banner with St. David 
and the harp is carried before them. The “Love Confessed’' motive, 
derived from the famous Prize Song, comes next, followed by the 
‘Impatient Ardor”’ theme. After these melodies have been stated and 
developed, the magnificent climax approaches, the famous instance in 
which the three themes—numbers one, three and four—are employed 
simultaneously. This overwhelming example was Wagner's defying 
reply to his critics, who claimed that he could not write counterpoint. 








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Yeatman Griffith 


“Recognized Authority on Voice Production and the 
Art of Singing” 





For Artists; Teachers; Students 


Summer Vocal Master Classes 


THIRD SEASON PACIFIC COAST 
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Los Angeles, Cal. July 6th to Aug. 3rd 
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Choose your piano carefully. 
Choose it as you would 
choose an intimate member 
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it for qualities that will en- 
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Let your choice, if possible, 
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Shermans lay & Co. 


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Oakland - Clay at 14th 














School Children’s Symphony 


Series 


By the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 


Auspices Board of Education of the City and County of San Francisco 


TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 1925 
EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 
1:45 P. M. 


. PROGRAMME 


1. Military March - - - - - - Franz Schubert 
1797-1828 


In none of Schubert’s lesser compositions is his genius for 
rhythm, melody and spirit shown more plainly.than in this March. 
So popular did it become that many orchestrations of it have been 
made, it originally having been written for piano (four hands). 
A piece so well known as this March makes any special analysis 
unnecessary, as its decisive rhythm and spirited melody are of 
instant appeal. 

2. Andante from Symphony No.5 - - Ludwig van Beethoven 
1770-1827 

The greatest writer of symphonies was Ludwig van Beethoven, 
who was one of the most wonderful musicians the world has ever 
known. This Andante, considered by critics the best slow move- 
ment from any symphonic work, is the second movement from 
Beethoven’s greatest symphony, the fifth. This symphony is some- 
times called: the ““Fate’’ symphony because it opens with a motive 
in the first movement which is described as “Fate rapping at the 
door.’’ Beethoven composed this work at a time of great mental 
and physical suffering. He had just come to realize that the deaf- 
ness, which had been troubling him, was growing worse, and that 
it was hopeless for him to expect ever to be cured. The Andante 
played today is a “double theme and variation,’ and the first 
melody played by the violoncellos at the beginning is the principal 
subject. . 

3. Three Entr’acts from “Carmen” - - - Georges Bizet 
1838-1875 

“Carmen,” Bizet’s greatest opera, was given its first produc- 
tion in Paris, March 3, 1875. It was coldly received and Bizet, 
who had given his best efforts for its composition, was broken- 
hearted. He died three months later, never knowing that the 
French public had changed its opinion of the work and that the 
entire musical world had accepted it as one-of the masterpieces of 
operatic literature. The ‘‘Entr’acts’ were little intermezzi to be 
played between the acts of the opera. Bizet was especially suc- 





cessful in writing what is known as ‘‘local color’’ into his music, the 
music of “Carmen” being rich in the warm tones of the south; the 
action of the opera was in Spain. 


. Prelude to “The Deluge”’ : . - Camille Saint-Saens 


1835-1921 
(Violin obligato, Louis Persinger ) 

The prelude to ‘““The Deluge,’ with the solo violin part, is one 
of Saint-Saens’ most popular works. It is the prelude to his Biblical 
cantata, “The Deluge,’’ which is based upon the narration of the 
flood. It is a short, expressive movement in the free form for the 
string orchestra—a slow introductory passage, leading to a quasi- 
fugal treatment of a sustained subject given out by the violas, fol- 
lowing which the solo violin introduces a melodious obligato, which 
holds the foreground to the end. 


Dance of the Automatons and Waltz from “Coppelia”’ - 
- - - - - - Clement P. L. Delibes 
1836-1891 


One of the expressions of musical art in which the French revel 
is the ballet. Many of their prominent composers have written in 
this form and supplied the French stage with a number of its great- 
est ballet successes. “‘Coppelia’’ is concerned with a maker of dolls 
in a little French village, one of his dolls being very beautiful and 
life-size. He places this doll in an open window, where it is much 
admired by the youths of the village, who believe it to be real, and 
a great deal of jealousy on the part of the village maidens results. 
The number played this afternoon is a very effective picture of the 
quick and precise steps of the dancing dolls, ending with the 
beautiful ““Valse Lente.” 


Caprice Viennois - - - . - Fritz Kreisler 
1875— 


The Caprice Viennois (Cradle Song) is one of the best known 
compositions of Fritz Kreisler, the well-known violinist, possessing 
the touch of sadness and graceful rhythm which is characteristic of 
his other Viennese pieces. Although originally a violin solo, the 
composer has also arranged it for piano solo, while the orchestration 
played today was arranged by Alfred Hertz. 


Hungarian Dance - . - " - Johannes Brahms 
1833-1897 


Johannes Brahms was the greatest composer of instrumental 
music of the latter part of the nineteenth century. All his life he 
loved the Hungarian music, with its unusual rhythmic accent and 
its melancholy strains. Hungarian dances were originally the 
dances of the gypsies, and are composed of two distinct parts, the 
‘‘Lassen,’’ or slow movement, which is generally in the minor and 
of a melancholy strain; and the “Friska,’’ which is a rapid, wild and 
impassioned dance. The lassen is usually danced first, then, as the 
dancers become more animated, the friska is heard, and later the 
dancers drop back to the lassen for a rest. 


Largo, for Orchestra and Organ - George Frederic Handel 
1685-1759 | 


Handel composed forty operas, of which only a few airs 
survive. The so-called “‘Largo’’ is the air Ombra maifu from the 
opera “‘Xerxes.’’ His fame rests chiefly upon his oratorios, the 
greatest of which is “The Messiah.” 


TAKE THIS PROGRAM HOME WITH YOU AND SAVE IT. 














Second San Francisco 


Spring Music Festival 


ALFRED HERTZ, Director 
EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 


April 18, 21, 23, 25, 1923 


~CHORUS OF 500 VOICES 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Augmented to 125 musicians 


SOLOISTS 


MME. HELEN STANLEY || MME. CHARLES CAHIER | 


Soprano, Metropolitan Opera Co. || Contralto, Vienna Imperial Opera 


RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL ALEXANDER KIPNIS 


Tenor, Metropolitan Opera Co. Baritone, Chicago Opera Co. 
Principal Works to be Presented 
Saturday Evening, April 18 
Verdi’s ‘‘Requiem”’ 
With Full Chorus, Four Soloists and Orchestra 
Tuesday Evening, April 21 
A Miscellaneous Programme of Solos, Duets and Concerted 
Numbers with Full Chorus and All Soloists participating 
Thursday Evening, April 23 
Schumann’s ‘Pilgrimage of the Rose’ 
For Full Chorus and Four Soloists 
Saturday Evening, April 25 


The ‘‘Resurrection’” Symphony of Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto with Full Chorus 
also 


The ‘‘Rhapsodie’”’ of Brahms 
For Contralto Solo and Men’s Chorus 
TICKETS NOW ON SALE SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
$1, $2, $3, (No Tax) 


Festival under joint auspices of Musical Association of 
San Francisco and the City of San Francisco 


DOIPZO it 


— 

















| MUSIC HEADQUARTERS! 


Sherman, Elay & Over 


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Do you want to know more about the 


VIOLIN? 


Do you know that every boy wants to play the 


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Do you know that every girl should play the 


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That it is a wonderful thing to know how to play the 


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Come to music’s headquarters and 


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Choose’ your piano carefully. 

Choose it as you would choose 
an intimate member of your 
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qualities that will endure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a Steinway. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring —of distinction so — 


immediately recognized. 


Sherman, lay & Co. 


Kearny and Sutter Streets, s.F. 
Oakland, Fourteenth and Clay Streets 



























SECOND SAN FRANCISCO 


Spring Music Festival 


CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR., AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 


AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman 


Angelo Rossi Edwin G. Bath 
AND 
Musical Agsoriation of San Hrancisco 
Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 


WHICH MAINTAINS 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 





OFFICERS 
Joun D. McKEE, President 

J. B. LEvison, Vice-President E. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 

A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 









BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



















J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding John S. Drum L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Milton H. Esberg Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron Herbert Fleishhacker J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain J. D. Grant Wm. T. Sesnon 
W.E. Creed E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C H. Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
Wm. H. Crocker John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Manager 
Assisted by 
SAN FRANCISCO COMMUNITY SERVICE 
Henry L. Mayer, President 
Marshal Hale, Vice-President 


C. L. Rosekrans, Executive Secretary 


457 PHELAN BUILDING 
GARFIELD 2819 




















THE ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 


WESTERN OFFICE OF 
WOLFSOHN MUSICAL BUREAU, INc. 


ANNOUNCES 


TEN SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS 


BY 


INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS ARTISTS 
On Thursday Evenings During Season 1925-26 


AT 


SPECIAL SEASON TICKET PRICES: 
$3.50, $5.00, $8.00 


A Deposit of $1.00 Per Ticket Holds Your Reservation. Balance to Be Paid on or 
Before September 1, 1925 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 





Josef Hofmann 
“The Best of the best.” 


Edward Johnson 


(Leading Tenor, Met. Opera Co.) 


Operatic excerpts, lights and costumes 
“America’s foremost tenor.” 


Margaret Matzenauer 
(Leading Contralto, Met. Opera Co.) 


“Sings magnificently.” 


Cecilia Hansen 


“Sensation of the season.” 





Joint Recital 


Hulda Lashanska 


“Most beautiful lyric soprano of 
today.” 


Felix Salmond 


“The Fritz Kreisler of the 
violoncello.” 








Thamar Karsavina and her 
Ballet, with Pierre 


Vladimiroff 
“Everything she does is instinct with 
grace.” 


Maria Kurenko 
“A new Patti from Siberia.” 
Vincente Ballester 


(Leading Baritone, Met. Opera Co.) 
“A continuous delight.’ 


Tescha Seidel 


“A mighty master of his instrument.” 


Joint Recital 


Olga Samaroff 


“Greatest of America’s women 
pianists.” 


London String Quartet 


“The finest chamber music 
organization in the world.” 


RESERVE YOUR SEASON TICKETS NOW—SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AFTER APRIL 25—638 PHELAN BUILDING 








ALFRED HERTZ, Conpuctor 


ee 


SOPRANOS 
Mur, HELEN STANLEY Mrs. LornA LACHMUND 


Mrs. Grack HENKEL Mrs. TERESA TUM SUDEN 


CONTRALTOS 
Mme, CHARLES CAHIER Mrs. Eva GRUNINGER ATKINSON 


Miss RADIANA PAZMOR Mrs. LInniAN BIRMINGHAM 


. TENOR 


RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL 


BASSES 


1 
~ 


ALEXANDER KIPNIS Y, HAROLD DANA 


CHORUS DIRECTOR 


Dr. HANS LESCHKE 


ASSISTANT CHORUS DIRECTORS 


GLENN H. Woops EUGENE BLANCHARD 


ORGANIST 


UpaA WALDROP 


ACCOMPANISTS 
Mrs. VIOLET FENSTER BLAGG 
Miss MinpRED RANDOLPH 


J. L. ELMQUIST 


CHORUS SECRETARY 


LOUISE BENNETT 

























| The Maximum of Advancement with Minimum of Effort | 


MR. LOUIS 


GRAVEURE 


Distinguished Recital Baritone 





and 





\e Famous ‘‘Master”’ Vocal Teacher 


THE PIONEER DIRECTOR OF “VOCAL 
MASTER-CLASSES” IN THE WEST 


will be in 


LOS ANGELES, CAL. | SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


(Second Summer ) ( Third Summer) 


June 1 to July 6 July 27 to August 29 
1925 1925 
FIVE WEEKS ONLY IN EACH CITY 


“MASTER” and “AUDITOR” CLASSES 
and PRIVATE TUITION 








For Particulars, Rates, Reservations, 


Details, Etc., address 
SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER, Manager 


Foxcroft Building, 68 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 


ENROLL NOW ENROLL NOW 


Learn to sing in the way that is actually sustaining Graveure 
in the position of one of the world’s greatest artists 








FIRST CONCERT 
Saturday, April 18, 1925, 8:20 P. M. 


SOLOISTS: Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 
Rudolph Laubenthal, Tenor 


Alexander Kipnis, Baritone 





VERDI'S “REQUIEM” 


Composed in Memory of Alessandro Manzoni 


For Four Solo Voices, Chorus and Orchestra 


a 


1. Requiem and Kyrie (Requiem e Kyrie) 
Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano, Tenor, Bass and Chorus 


2. Day of Anger (Dies irae) 
From the Accursed (Confutatis), Solo Bass 
Sadly Groaning, Guilty Feeling (Ingemisco), Solo Tenor 
Ah! Remember (Recordare), Soprano and Mezzo-Soprano 
King of Glories (Rex tremendae), Quartet and Chorus 
Tenor 
What Affliction (Quid sum miser), Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano and 
Now the Record (Liber scriptus), Mezzo-Soprano and Chorus 
Hark the Trumpet (Tuba mirum), Chorus 
Day of Anger (Dies irae), Chorus 
Ah! What Weeping (Lacrymosa), Quartet and Chorus 


3.. Oh, Lord God (Domine Jesu) 


Offertory for Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano, Tenor and Bass 


4. Holy (Sanctus) 
Fugue for Two Choirs 


5. Lamb of God (Agnus Dei) 


Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano and Chorus 


6. Light Eternal (Lux aeterna) 
Mezzo-Soprano, Tenor and Bass 


7. Lord, Deliver My Soul (Libera me) 
Solo for Soprano, Chorus and final Fugue 








| JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Master of the Pianoforte 


| 
| PLAYs AND ENDorSES EXCLUSIVELY THE 
ii 

| 

} 


| GW, 
therm 


i ESTABLISHED 1823 ea 





‘Bll @ 

i 

[| This great artist and teacher expresses his authoritative 
| opinion in the following terms: 

4 “The Chickering pianos have a splendid evenness 
| of scale and action, whith is the most important 
factor in artistic performance. In addition, I find 
i in the Chickering piano a wonderful variety of tone 
bl color and an exquisite singing quality, from the 
ih most delicate to the most powerful effects, with a 
| beautiful elasticity of touch, combining brilliancy 
i and solidity in a completely satisfying manner. 

it (Signed) JosrEr LHEVINNE.” 
ih 











| CHICKERING WAREROOMS 
| LEE S. ROBERTS, INC. 

| 230 Post Street, S. F., Cat. 

i This new home of the Chickering will open on or about May 1, 1925. 

| ie invitation of inspection is extended all music lovers. | 

, 


Eh 
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bh 
Ye 
te! 








NOTES 


Following the death of Rossini, November 13, 1868, a group of 
Italian composers conceived the idea of collaborating in the composition 
of a grand Mass to be performed in the cathedral at Bologna once every 
hundred years on the centenary of Rossini’s death. Each of the composers 
was assigned one of the thirteen numbers which were to comprise the work, 
Verdi writing the final ‘“‘Libera me.” The task was finished, but when the 
Mass was taken as a whole, the various parts formed a musical Joseph's 
coat, a lack of symmetry and coherence in treatment being so evident that 
the project went no further. 

However, Verdi's “Libera me” so attracted the attention of Signor 
Mazzucato that he persuaded Verdi to compose a complete Requiem Mass 
in memory of Alessandro Manzoni, the poet-patriot, who had just died, 
using the original “Libera me’ as a nucleus. Verdi assented, and imme- 
diately commenced the work, the first performance being given in the 
Church of San Marco at Milan, May 22, 1874, the anniversary of Manzoni s 
death. Three performances were later given at La Scala, Milan, the first 
of which was conducted by the composer, and within a short time it was 
heard throughout Europe. 

George P. Upton has briefly analyzed the work as follows: 

‘The ‘Requiem’ opens, after a few measures of prelude, with the 
chorus chanting the appeal for rest, sotto voce, the effect being carried as 
pianissimo as possible until the basses, by an abrupt change of key, give out 
the theme of a fugue (‘Te decet hymnus’), written in pure religious style. 
The introductory ‘Requiem’ is repeated, and leads to the ‘Kyrie,’ the theme 
of which is stated by the tenor, and in turn taken up by the other soloists, 





ESTABLISHED 1852 


AT 
CONSISTENT 
PRICES 


Shreve and Company 
Jewelers and Silversmiths 


Post and Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 














Third Annual Season 


The San Francisco Opera 
Company 


Gaetano Merola, Director 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM, SEPTEMBER 19 to OCTOBER 4, 1925 


8 SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 
(6 Evenings and 2 Saturday Matinees ) 


2 NON-SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 


Artists 


Sopranos: Tenors: 
Claudia Muzio Tito Schipa 


Fernand Ansseau 
Elvira de Hidalgo Antonio Cortis 
Rosina Torri 


Lodovico Oliviero 


Baritones and Basses: 





Contraltos: 
Marguerite d’ Alvarez 


Irene Marlo 


Conductors: 
Gaetano Merola 
Pietro Cimini 


Giacomo Spadoni 


Riccardo Stracciari 
Cesare Formichi 
Marcel Journet 
Vittorio Trevisan 


Antonio Nicholich 


Technical Director: 
Giovanni Grassi 


Ballet Master: 


Natale Carossio 





Operas 


The operas presented will be chosen from the following: 
“‘Aida,’’ “Samson et Dalila,’’ ““Traviata,’’ “‘Rigoletto,’’ “Manon’”’ 
(Massenet), “Il Barbiere di Siviglia,’’ ‘“Martha,’’ ‘“Amore dei Tre 
Re,” “‘Faust,’” ““Anima Allegra’ (first time in America outside the 
Metropolitan), ““Tosca,’’ ‘“‘Madame bButterfly’” and ‘‘Fedora.”’ 


Subscriptions 


Subscriptions will be accepted commencing Monday, May 


11th, at the offices of SAN FRANCISCO OPERA COMPANY. 
KEARNY 6346 68 POST? STREEE 





the chorus shortly joining, a double sextet interwoven with it, and the whole 
closing pianissimo, as the ‘Requiem’ opened. 

“The second part, the ‘Dies irae,’ is in strong contrast with the first, 
and is more broadly and dramatically worked up, and with freer accom- 
paniment. The opening chorus is one of startling power. The tenors and 
basses open the number, immediately followed by the four parts announc- 
ing the ‘day of wrath’ in high, sustained notes, while the second sopranos, 
altos, and tenors accompany them with immense sweeps of sound that rise 
and fall like the waves. There are nine numbers in this part which have 
been already specified, the most effective of them being the Adagio trio 
(‘Quid sum miser ) for soprano, alto, and tenor, upon which Verdi has 
lavished his melodious inspiration. The trio is continually interwoven with 
the chorus shouting fortissimo the ‘Rex tremendae Majestatis,’ until it takes 
another form in the prayer (‘Recordare’), a duet for soprano and alto in 
Verdi's best operatic vein. An effective tenor solo (‘Ingemisco’), followed 
by a solemn and majestic bass solo (‘Confutatis’), leads to the stirring 
measures of the ‘day of wrath’ again, and closes this part in a powerful en- 
semble, both vocal and dramatic. 

“The offertory (‘Domine Jesu’) is a quartette with three motives,— 
the first Andante, the second Allegro, and the third Adagio in Gregorian 
form, the three themes being admirably worked up and accompanied. The 
‘Sanctus,’ the fourth part of the Mass, is an impressive Allegro double 
chorus, followed by the ‘Agnus Dei, a duet for soprano and alto which is 
full of melodious inspiration, illustrated with charming instrumental color. 
The sixth part is the ‘Lux aeterna, a trio for alto, tenor, and bass, which 
leads to the ‘Libera me,’ the final division and the climax of the work. In 
its general effect it is a soprano obligato with chorus. After a monotone 





Leading Musical cAttractions — Management 


SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER 








IO) 


MME. FRIEDA 





' TITO 


SCHIPA 


FAMOUS TENOR 
TWO RECITALS 


COLUMBIA 
THEATER 


SUNDAY AFTERNOONS oxck AUDITORIUM 


ONLY 
April 19-26 





Thursday Night, April 30 


AOS 








TICKETS ON SALE AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 








' 
lat 











aoe eet = 


— => — - SSeS ~ 


ise SSeS oe 
—- ae —— 








ad ge BE ey Leen TR A re mo a eo Pr in ~ A eer se a I aS ore 


fern RT: 


eee) 





a 
iz 








SECOND CONCERT 


Spring Music Festival 


TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 21 
WAGNER PROGRAMME 


1. Overture to ““Tannhauser’’ 
2. Lohengrin’s Narrative from “Lohengrin” 
Rudolf Laubenthal 
3. Solo Numbers with Orchestra 
(a) Traume 
(b) Schmerzen 
Mme. Charles Cahier 
4. March from ““Tannhauser’’ 
For Orchestra and Chorus 
“Die Walkure,’’ Act I 
Sieglinde and Siegmund Love Scene 
Mme. Helen Stanley, Rudolf Laubenthal 
6. “Die Walkure,’’ Act Iil 
Wotan’s Farewell and Magic Fire Spell 
Wotan, Alexander Kipnis 


Lea 


THIRD CONCERT 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 23 


Soloists: 
Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 
Rudolf Laubenthal, Tenor - 


Alexander Kipnis, Baritone 


(2S Phe: Pilerimaceror the Rese: 0.5 5 = Pees Schumann 
For Soli, Chorus and Orchestra 
2. Overture, ““The Great Russian Easter’’.......... Rimsky-Korsakow 
3. Aria, “O Paradiso!’” from “L’Africaine’’........ --....... Meyerbeer 
RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL 
Ate OSI Ges | ToetASO es eae. aaa tga ee ee Scriabine 


For Orchestra and Organ 


LAST CONCERT 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 25 


Soloists: 
Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 


PERIOD SOC: Soccer Ea Brahms 
For Contralto Solo, Male Chorus and Orchestra 
Symphony No. 2 (‘‘Resurrection’’ Symphony)...................- Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto Soli, Mixed Chorus, 
Orchestra and Organ 





recitative and solo, the ‘Dies irae’ is repeated, likewise the Requiem aeter- 
nam,’ which forms the introduction of the Mass, and the ‘Requiem’ closes 
with a fugue of majestic proportions, ending with the same pianissimo effect 
which characterizes the opening of the work.” 


No. 1. Requiem and Kyrie (Requiem e Kyrie) 
Soprano, Mezzo-soprano, Tenor, Bass. and Chorus 


Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine: Rest eternal, grant them Lord; 
f Et lux perpetua luceat eis. And let light perpetual shine upon them. 
Te decet hymnus, Deus, in Sion There shall be singing to Thee in Sion, 
Et tibi reddetur votum in Jerusalem. And pray’r shall go up to Thee in Jerusa- 
Exaudi orationem meam. lem. 
Ad te omnis caro veniet. Give ear to my supplication. 
Requiem aeternam dona eis, Domine; Unto Thee shall all flesh come. 
Et lux perpetua luceat eis. Rest eternal, grant them, Lord, 
Kyrie eleison, And let light perpetual shine upon them. 
Christe eleison. Kyrie eleison, 


Christe eleison. 


No. 2. Day of Anger (Dies irae) 


Dies erae, dies illa, Day of anger, day of trouble, 
Solvet saeclum in favilla: Time shall perish like a bubble. 
Teste, David, cum Sibylla. So spake David and the Sibyl. 
Quantus tremor est futurus, How each heart shall beat with terror, 
Quando Judex est venturus, When the Judge comes, truth to mirror, 
Cuncta stricte discussurus! Strictly weighing mortal error! 
Hark, the Trumpet (Tuba mirum) 

Chorus 
Tuba mirum spargens sonum, Hark! the trumpet sound appalling, 
Per sepulchra regionum, Earth’s sepultur’'d dead upcalling, 













Representing 


| Lyon & Healy 


KAJETAN 
HARPS 


ATTL 


Concert 


Harpist 


— aa ee; Zz g 


Solo Harpist S. F. Symphony For Engagements Address Bohemian Club 














nae 
5 ae 


il 


Lazar S. Samoiloff 
V oice 


Director and Vocal 
Pedagogue 


The most striking feature 
of his teaching is its prac- 
tical application to the 
constant problems of the 
professional artist and 
teacher. Letters of appre- 
ciation from many world- 
famous artists attest to 
his enviable place in the 
teaching world among 
them being Claire Dux, 
Julia Claussen, Bianca 
Saroya, Kurt Tauncher, 
Rosa Raisa, Isa Kremer, 
Helen Stanley. 





Julia Claussen 
Voice 





Josef Lhevinne 
Piano 


A great artist, he has 
proved himself a remark- 
able teacher of his instru- 
ment. He is ina position, 
by his own experience, 
to bring every true tal- 
ent to fruition in a far 
shorter time than would 
ordinarily be considered 
possible. 


He is a teacher of rare 
insight as well as a vir- 
tuoso, and brings unusual 
authority to all questions 
relating to piano playing. 


One of the world’s truly 
great voices. Not only is 
she at the height of her 
own powers, but she has 
had experience as a 
teacher, and possesses the 
rare gift of imparting 
knowledge. She will give 
general instruction in 
stage technique, coach 
operatic roles and demon- 
strate her own _ vocal 
method. 





LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 


ENDORSES THE 














Baldwin 


Fairmont. Hotel, 
San Francisco, Cal, 
October 10, 1924. 


Baldwin Piano Company, 
310 Sutter Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Dear Sirs: 
Let me express my appreciation of your kind- 


ness in co-operating with the Master School of 
Musical Arts in California. 


I have been familiar with the Baldwin Piano 
for many years. I have found it unrivalled in 
tone and action—in fact, the ideal piano for 
both concert and studio. The school has done 
well to have made its arrangements with you. 


Very truly yours, 
(Signed) LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF. 


OF CALIFOF 


LAzaRr.s. SAMO;LO! 


Enpowep By ALICE CAMPBELI 


ALice Secxers, Man 


ENROLL | 


OPENING OF FIR 


LAZAR 5S. SAN 


San Francisco Clas: O} 


SEVEN WEE 


JOSEF LHE! 


San Francisco Class O 





Andres De Segurola 
Operatic Department 


A master in character 
portrayal, for many seéa- 
sons leading bass _bari- 
tone of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. He will 
conduct opera classes, 
teaching acting, and 
makeup, and coaching in 
operatic repertoire. The 
staging of acts from 
operas will give practical 
experience and prove an 
important step for the 
operatic aspirant. 





pe 


Emil J. Polak 
Coach 
One of the most success- 
ful coaches in New York 


today. Recently heard 
here with Jeritza. 


FIVE WEE 





W. J. Hender: 


Lect rer 


Distinguishec crit 
New York Su 
author of _ nany 
will give si? lec 
Monday ani T 
evenings at ‘he - 
Hotel, begining 
Open to the pub 





ig % ee 
A. Kos :lan 
Accom ani 


A course in sigh 
and ear trailing 
fessionals aad 
by one emin:ntl 
ful in th’s 
branch of music 





aeeeeememmend 


ALIFORNIA 
MO:;LOFF, oirecror 


2 CAMPBELL MACFARLANE 
Seckets, Manager 


OLL NOW 
)F FIRST CLASSES 


$I S 


S$, SAMOILOFF | 

Clas; Opens April 27th 
VEN WEEKS 

F LHEVINNE 


Class Opens May 11th 
IVE WEEKS 





Samuel Gardner 
Violin 
One of the leaders among 
America’s younger violin- 
ists. Well-known as con- 
ductor and _ composer, 
through long association 
with his teacher, Franz 
Kneisel, he has rapidly 
taken a place among the 
successful teachers of vio- 
lin, chamber music and 

conducting. 


V. J. Henderson 
Lect ‘rer 


aguishec critic of the 

York Sun, and 
yr of nany books, 
give si? lectures on 
day ani Thursday 
ngs at he Fairmont 
|, beginting May 25. 
to the, public. 





A. Koss :lanetz 
Accom anist 


Annie Louise David 
Be ee Harp 

urse in sight reading 
ear trailing for pro- 
onals aid amateurs 
ne emin:ntly success- 
in ths important 
ch of music. 


One of the best-known 
teachers and performers 
of the harp in America. 


RE Soete sot eee ee 





Cesar Thomson 
Violin 
One of the most distin- 
guished among the violin 
teachers and performers 
of modern times, sharing 
with Auer the distinction 
of having remarkable suc- 
cessful artist students. 
Formerly it has been nec- 
essary to go to Brussels 
to work with him. This 
is the first opportunity to 
study in the West with 
this justly famed master. 


Felix Salmond 
Cello— 
Chamber Music 


The extraordinary artis- 
try of this noted cellist 
has made him a favorite 
everywhere. His classes 
in London have been the 
goal of students from all 
parts of the world. Coach- 
ing in chamber music will 
be given by Mr. Salmond 
and pianists, violinists 
and cellists may enroll 
for actual experience or 
as auditors. 














Sigismund Stojowski 
Piano—Composition 








eee See eee Sa: Wee t Lee eee Sek ee 


He holds a high place in 
three phases of musical 
creation: pianist, com- 
poser and teacher. The 
most authoritative expo- 
nent of Paderewski’s 
methods and ideals. He 
stands today among the 
eminent artist teachers. 
Numbered among his 
pupils are Levitzki, 
Novaes and Loesser. 





This Faculty of Celebrated Artist 
Teachers Will Give Instruction in 


SAN FRANCISCO 
AND 


LOS ANGELES 


Between May and September, 
1925 


Dates for each Master sent on request 
Free Scholarships are offered with each 





Teacher 
Write for Application Blank and Catalog. 
Address 


Master School of Musical Arts 
ALICE SECKELS, Manager 
Office: 

Room 139, FarrMoNT HOTEL 
PHONE Douctas 7267 SAN FRANCISCO 





SE SSS ™ 
-- ——<——— ——— = — eee SSS — — - 
a = > oS —— = =a = — = : z — = ———————————————SSSS==— = ~~ Se - Se a a - =A a S y 





~ Re ent 


a 


a a 





———— 


a 

















Under 
Linnard M anagement 


¥ 


LWwOePAM ODS OLELS 


have in a large measure become the center 
of San Francisco’s social life. Perfected 
unobtrusive service to every guest is the 


secret of their sustained popularity. 


FAIRMONT $ Ess 
Hotel Company WHITCOM B 


D. M. Linnard LeRoy Linnard D. M. Linnard Ernest Drury 
President Manager & Lessee Manager 








—_ 


THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 
One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mer¢gers or-consolidations with other Banks. 





Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 3lst, 1924 





EN TE San ae are, neg er eae Carpets ane $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund.........-.-.seeee+- 461,746.52 
WEES SELON ESERINGEAG aig Fos ws wide clase Seles Sine o bees Mission and 21st Streets 
PARSSPRESTDIOs BRANGH cinco oles aie oc whet 6 one ee Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. «2 ..c ccc ccdeces. Haight and Belvedere Streets 
WEST PORTAL BRANCH... 22... 62+.5.08- West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 





Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4 lf) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 





a =e 





Coget omnes ante thronum. Round the Lord’s throne prostrate falling, 


Mors stupebit et natura, Death with wonder is enchained, 
Cum resurget creatura, When man from his grasp regained, 
Judicanti responsura. Stands before the Judge arraigned. 


Now the Record (Liber scriptus) 


Messo-Soprano and Chorus 


Liber scriptus proferetur, Now the record shall be cited, 
In quo totum continetur, Wherein all things stand indited, 
Unde mundus judicetur, Whence the world shall be requited, 
Dies irae! Day of anger! 
Judex ergo cum sedebit, When to judgment all are bidden, 
Quidquid latet, apparebit; Nothing longer shall be hidden; 
Nil inultum remanebit. Not a trespass go unsmitten. 


What Affliction (Quid sum miser) 


Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano and Tenor 


Quid sum, miser! tunc dicturus, What affliction mine exceeding? 
Quem patronum rogaturus. Who shall stand forth for me pleading, 
Cum vix justus sit securus? When the just man aid is needing? 


King of Glories (Rex cendae) 
Quartet and Chorus 


Rex tremendae majestatis! King of glories, bright and glowing! 
Qui salvandos salvas gratis, Grace on whom thou wilt bestowing, 
Salva me, fons pietatis! Save me, Lord, with mercy flowing! 
Salva me, Salva me. Save me, Lord, Save me. 





Quarg Music Company 


109 Stockton Street 





206 Powell Street ———TWO STORES 


Open Evenings 
ao 
|, a ‘2 Victor mE 


Records 






TRADE ae 


>LONG DISTANCES 


TRADE MARK REG. 





They cost more, but 
they do more 





They tune thru everything 





$240 and up. Easy Terms 





oo ee 
——_ 





\NICH-&-BACH 


UVALITY PIANOS 
and PLAYER PIANOS 


JULIA CLAUSSEN 


“Prima “Donna Mezzo-Soprano 
Metropolitan Opera Co., New York 


WRITES: 
KRANICH & BACH, 


New York. 
Gentlemen: 


Your piano is unexcelled in the beautiful | 
quality of its tone and workmanship. ; 








Very sincerely yours 


| Exclusive “Representative 
: , é Oakland 
~ MUSIC ce.” ET tere 
140 O’F ARRELL STREET : 1016 J Street, Sacramento 








The Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society 


HIBERNIA BANK 
Incorporated 1864 





HEAD OFFICE 
COR. MARKET, McALLISTER and JONES STS. 


MISSION OFFICE 
COR. VALENCIA AND 22ND STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


PSE nme omen ae tis oe eee EY sad 6 ee ee $81,603,701.25 
RESERVE FUND = 5 ,922.693.15 





OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A. M. TO 3 P. M. 





OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY FROM 10 A. M. TO 8 P. M. 


SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AT MISSION OFFICE 














Ah! Remember (Recordare) 


Soprano and Mezzo-Soprano 


Recordare, Jesu pie, 

Quod sum causa tuae viae. 
Ne me perdas illa die. 
Quaerens me, sedisti lassus; 
Redemisti, crucem passus; 
Tantus labor non sit cassus, 
Juste Judex ultionis, 
Donum fac remissionis 
Ante diem rationis. 


Sadly Groaning, Guilty Feeling 
Solo Tenor 

Ingemisco tamquam reus, 

Culpa rubet vultus meus: 

Supplicanti parce Deus. 

Qui Mariam absolvisti, 

Et latronem exaudisti, 

Mihi quoque spem dedisti. 

Preces meae non sunt dignae, 

Sed tu bonus fac benigne, 

Ne perenni cremer igne. 

Inter oves locum praesta, 

Et ab haedis me sequestra; 

Statuens in parte dextra: 


From the Accursed (Confutatis) 
Bass Solo 


Confutatis maledictis, 
Flammis acribus addictis, 
Voca me cum benedictis, 
Oro supplex et acclinis, 
Cor contritum quasi cinis 
Gere curam mei finis. 





Ah! remember, Jesus blessed, 

For me Thy path was oppressed. 

Save me then, by fear distressed. 

For my sake, thou sat’st down weary, 
Thy cross bearing, meek and cheery; 
Fruitless be not toil so dreary. 
Justice, vengeance, ye appall me, 
From my sins, Lord, disenthrall me, 
Ere to answer thou dost call me. 


(Ingemisco ) 


Sadly groaning, guilty feeling, 

O’er my visage blushes stealing: 

Lord, Oh, spare me, lowly kneeling. 
Thou who Mary’s sin forgavest, 

Who to hear the thief vouchsafedst, 
Unto me bright hope thou gavest. 
Though my sad pray’rs breath be wasting, 
Kindly glances on me casting, 

Save me from flames everlasting, 

With thy sheep, Lord, deign to rate me, 
From the wicked separate me, 

At Thy right do Thou instate me: 


From the accursed and rejected, 
Doom’d to fiery flames convicted, 
Call me forth with thine elected. 
Lo! I pray, a suppliant sighing, 
Dark remorse my heart updrying, 
Heed me at the hour of dying. 


YEATMAN GRIFFITH 


“Recognized Authority on Voice Production and the Art of Singing” 





Summer Vocal Master Classes 


FOR ARTISTS - TEACHERS - STUDENTS 
ENROLLMENTS NOW 


Address Communications 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. June 3rd to July Ist 
To IDA G. SCOTT, Kohler & Chase Building 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 
To L. E. BEHYMER, 705 Auditorium Building 
PORTLAND, ORE. 


July 6th to Aug. 3rd 


Aug. 10th to Sept. 7th 


To OTTO WEDEMEYER, 611 Bush & Lane Building 
EE 








San Francisco’s Home for 4 Musical Education 
ra Ae hal eet tr 1 Ba gta Ze aE. OE SRS 


Complete Summer Courses 
1925 Season Opens June 22nd 


Instructions in all Branches of 


MUSIC DURING THE SUMMER 


Morning (lasses Free Recitals Private Lessons 


ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE 


2315 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 
TELEPHONE WEST 4737 














ee ee 








garden-fresh Che Dominican College 


erat neg SD AT: ere 
< 
= = 2 a 
ye 
¥ 


oi trestaanespenaeeaiatantesgntinnitadiitit 


F le OW E R S of San Rafael 


A College for Women 


See == 


ee 


Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Dominic 
Resident and Day Students 


OU are always 


assured Nature’ s 


i Bl 

Hi} Fs 

Hi} mostexqusite bloo 

i] ee es Degrees conferred in College of Letters 

i when we serve you— and Sciences and in School of Music. 

Mt j Approved by the Graduate Division of 

' Blossoms that will the University of California. 

iH express your thought Accredited by the California State Board 
in fragrant unforget- of Education. California State Teachers’ 

’ Credentials granted. 





SS 


able beauty. School of Music Building, Auditorium 
: and Equipment unsurpassed. Artist Fac- 
ulty. Normal Music Training Department 
offers exceptional opportunities both to 
resident and day pupils. California State 
Elementary and Secondary Credentials in 
Music granted. 


For information, address 
VIL, ‘ The Dean of the College 
San Rafael 


The Voice of a Thousand Gardens” ; 
- Artist Concert Course under 
226-226 GRANT AVE. TEL. KEARNY 4975 management of Alice Metcalf 


SAN FRANCISCO 





Orders telegraphed anywhere 


a 
enna i ~--$— —— 


<= 








San Francisco Conservatory of Music 
Ada Clement and Lillian Hodghead, Co-Directors 





aaa SS 


NEW PIPE ORGAN SOON READY 


Summer Organ Courses With 


WARREN D. ALLEN 


3435 Sacramento Street Phone: Fillmore 898 





————————————————o — 


ee 


Madame Emmy Tromboni 


Teaches Absolute Purity of Tone Along Scientific, Modern Lines 





| 
| 
y'| 
| 
| 
i} 
1 


| 


Prepares Students and Teachers for All Branches of 
Vocal Art 


601-602 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Phone Garfield 6046 








Ah! What Weeping (Lacrymosa) 
Quartet and Chorus 


Lacrymosa dies illa! 
Qua resurget ex favilla 
Judicandus homo reus 
Huic ergo parce Deus. 
Pie Jesu Domine, 

Dona eis requiem. 


No. 3. 


Ah! what weeping on that morrow 
When man’s ashes form shall borrow, 
Judgment guilty shall declare him! 
In Thy mercy, Lord, then spare him. 
Gentle Jesus, Gracious Lord, 

Grant them Thy eternal rest. 


Oh, Lord God (Domine Jesu) 


Offertorio for Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano, Tenor and Bass 


Domine Jesu Christe, 

Rex gloriae, libera animas 

Omnium fidelium defunctorum 

De poenis inferni et de profundo lacu. 
Libera eas de ore leonis, 

Ne absorbeat eas tartarus, 

Ne cadante in obscurum. 

Signifer sanctus Michael repraesentet eas 
In lucem sanctam. 

Quam olim Abrahae promisisti et semini 
ejus. 
Hostias et preces 

offerimus. 
Tu suscipe pro animabus illis, 
Quarum hodie memoriam facimus, 
Fac eas, Domine, de morte transire ad 
vitam. 


tibi, Domine, laudis 


No. 4. Holy (Sanctus) 


Fugue for Two Choirs 


Sanctus, Sanctus, Sanctus, 


Stella Raymond-Vought 


Coloratura Soprano Voice Culture 


Available for Concerts, Oratorios and 
Recitals 


“Madame Vought has a bril- 
liant soprano voice, which she 
with the skill of an 
artist.. Her coloratura was 
; perfect, every note being given 
with the polish of a gem.” 
—San Francisco “Call.” 


726 Sutter Street. Prospect 4820 


uses 








O, Lord Christ Jesue, 

King of Glory, deliver Thou 

The souls of all them that died 

In the faith of Jesue from pains everlast- 
ing, 

And the abyss unfathom’d. 

Deliver them from the mouth of the lion, 

Lest the jaws of the pit shall swallow 
them. 

Lest they lie in the utter darkness. 

But let Holy Michael, leader of hosts, 

Bring them into Thy holy splendor. 

As unto Abraham Thou didst promise 

And to his seed forever. 

Sacrifice and pray’r unto Thee. 

Lord, offer we with praises. 

Accept Thou these now for the souls 

Of them, Lord, for whose sake 

We do in memory hold this day. 

Make them to pass, O Lord, from death 


Unto life everlasting. 
Holy, Holy, Holy, 


MADAME VOUGHT PRESENTS 
ELEANORE STADTEGGER | 


Coloratura Soprano 
in Joint Recital With 
MAX GEGNA 


"Cellist San Francisco Symphony 


IRENE MILLIER 
Pianist and Accompanist 
FAIRMONT HOTEL 
Friday Evening, May Ist, 8:30 
Admission, $1. Tickets, 
Clay, & Co. 


Sherman 





Warriner Vocal Studios 


METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE 
NEW YORK CITY 


SAN FRANCISCO SUMMER COURSE 
June 25th to August 25th, 1925 


For information and reservations address studio 43. 

















See eee _ 
SSS = = 


SSS 


Hi} 
H) 
Ih 
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Dominus Deus Sabaoth, 

Pleni sunt coeli et terra gloria tua. 
Hosanna in excelsis, 

Benedictus qui venit in nomine Domini. 


No. 5. Lamb of God (Agnus Dei) 


= 


Lord God of Sabaoth, 

Heaven and earth are full of Thy glory, 
Hosanna in the highest, 

Blessed is he who comes in the name of 


the Lord. 


Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano and Chorus 


Agnus Dei, 
Qui tollis peccata mundi, 
Dona eis requiem sempiternam 


No. 6. 


Light Eternal (Lux aeterna) 


Lamb of God, 
That takest away the sins of the world, 
Grant them eternal rest. 


Mezzo-Soprano, Tenor and Bass 


Lux aeterna luceat eis, 
Domine, 

Cum Sanctis tuis in aeternum 
Quia pius es. 

Requiem aeternam dona eis. 


No.7. 


Let light eternal shine upon them, 
O Lord God, 

As on Thy Saints, now and ever, 
For Thou art good, 

Grant them rest eternal. 


Lord, Deliver My Soul (Libera me) 


Solo for Soprano, Chorus and final Fugue 


Libera me, Domine, de morte aeterna 

In die illa tremenda, 

Quando coeli movendi sunt et terra 

Dum veneris judicare saeculum per 
ignem. 

Tremens factus sum ego et timeo, 

Dum discussio venerit atque ventura Ira; 

Dies irae, dies illa, 

Calamitatis et miseriae, 

Dies magna et amara valde, 

Libera me! 





GEORGE 


Address: 479 Forest Street, 
Phone: Piedmont 3554 


Lord, deliver my soul from the doom 

Of eternal death, 

In the dread day of judgment; 

When the heaven and earth 

Shall both be moved; 

When Thou shalt come in the midst of 
fire 

To judge the whole world. 

Full of terror am I, and of dreadful fear 

At the judgment that shall come, 

And at the coming of Thy wrath, 

Day of anger, day of trouble, 

Of utter confusion and despondency, 

And most bitter sorrow. 

O, Lord, deliver my soul! 


IRVING KRICK 


Solo Pianist 


Available for Club Engagements in Bay Region 
Season 1925-1926 


Oakland 








STEWART McM AN U S Pianist and Teacher 


1459 4th Ave. Sunset 2487 


Available for Engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 


Mondays: 526 Powell Street 


Thursdays: 2510 College Ave., Berkeley 


Has toured as assisting artist with Pablo Casals; Jean Gerardy and George Enesco 


Master Class of Pianoforte Playing 
MARGUERITE MELVILLE LISZNIEWSKA 
Master Faculty—Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 
Five weeks commencing June 22, 1925 
Sorosis Club, 536 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif. 
and School of Music, Dominican College, San Rafael, Calif. 


For full information address: 
ALICE METCALF, Manager 


STUDIO: 1233 California St., San Francisco, Calif. 


Phone Prospect 8158 


eS 


2222] + 


FIRST VIOLINS 


Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 


Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W.F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 

Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Purt, B. 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 
Willard, J. M. 
Curcio, R. 
Baker, Genevra 


VIOLAS 


Fenster, Lajos 
Principal 


Hahl, E. 
Baker, F.A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 
Wellendorff, H. 
Firestone, N. 


dersomel 


The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


*CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 
Demetrio, G. 


Gough, Flori 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 


Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 
Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 


Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 


Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 
Randall, W. F. 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 





BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 


Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 


Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 
Findeisen, C. 
Cleveland, G. 
Salvatore, M. 
Trutner, H. 
Dabelow, W. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 
Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 
Edwards, G. M. 
Savant, S. 
Linden, Arthur 
Dering, B. A. 
Klatzkin, B. 


BASS TRUMPET 
Klotz, L. 


TROMBONES 


‘Tait; Fea. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 
Ingram, T 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 


Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 


Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Wood, W.A. 
Overbeck, H. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 









CoRR ERAGE 
a iv 





] 











SOPRANOS 


Albright, Ethel A. 
Alpern, L 
Anderson, Anna 
Anderson, Hildur E. 
Anderson, Margaret 
Asmussen, Dorothea 
Atha, Mrs. Miles M. 
Auger, Miss Lina 
Augustson, Mrs. Selina 
Backus, Violet M. 
Ballard, Zebulon V. 
Bannerman, Miss Julia 
Barr, Elsie J. 
Bartlett, Catherine Q:° 
Bashford, Edith 
Beckert, Elsie M. 
Beckett, Helen I. 
Beppler, Miss Myrtha 
Blagg, Violet Fenster 
Bowen, Beatrice 
Bradford, Dorothy 
Bradford, Helen M. 
Brennan, Katherine 
Brown, Genevieve McK 
Brown, Mrs. R. C. 
Buck, Mrs. K. A. 
Burns, Miss E. 
Canet, Kathleen 
Caradonna, Miss Mary 
Centini, Mary G. 
Chapman, Lula Mae 
Clifford, Miss Beatrice 
leal, Anyta Clayr 
Cole, Grace A. 
Crowley, Miss Katharine 
Davidson, Miss Leda 
Davis, Mrs. L. 
DeVoney, Bessie D. 
Debrecht, Eulalia 
DeCamp, Miss Carolyn 
Delaney, Lorna Claire 
Deward, Mrs. J. M. 
Doane, Mrs. O. K. 
Doheny, Mrs. Nellie 
Duerbeck, Anna M. 
Durkin, Miss A. Hazel 
Eames, Mrs. E. A. 
Easton, Mrs. Verna M. 
Elliott, Miss Adelaide’ 
Ellwanger, Clara Jane 
Emerson, Miss Mattie E. 
Erwin, Miss McHenry 
Fries, Mrs. C. G. 
Gassenberg, Ellen 
Gates, Phyllis Scharff 
Goldberg, Mrs. Addie 
Grossman, Jeannette 
Grubb, Edna M 
Hamm, Dorothy 
Hart, Frances 
Heal, Gertrude M. 
Heeck, Eliese 
Henkel, Grace 
Heyde, Margaret E. 
Hiestand, Elizabeth 
Hobrecht, Mrs. Charles 
Holmes, Isabelle A. 
Hook, Mrs. H. O. 
Hooper, Mrs. John 
Howard, Carrie L. 
Hueter, Mrs. Ernest L. 
Hull, Marion Turney 
Hussey, Mrs. Zelie A. 
Jacobsen, Adelaide 
Jann, Sara C. 
Janson, Edna E. 
Johnson, Frances 
Johnson, Jean 
Johnson, Miss M. 
Jung, Margaret 


CHORUS 


San Francisco Division 


MRS. VIOLET FENSTER BLAGG, ACCOMPANIST 
Kaunitz, Miss Mildred H. Vallina, Louise 


Kec, Marguerite 
Keefe, Mrs. F. C. 
Keenan, Miss S. A. 
Kelly, Addie 

Kern, Lydia H. 
Kinread, Mrs. Kate 
Kinross, Onida 

Kline, Mrs. Harold 
Knudsen, Marie S. 
Koblick, Mrs. Esther 
Kurtz, Mrs. Rubye 
Lachmund, Lorna 
Lawson, Mrs. A. W. 
Lazelle, Miss Rena 
Leonard, Kathryn 
Lewis, Miss Melita 
Lineer, Lillian 

Loge, Miss Clara 

Lull, Sarah L. 

Lynch, Mrs. Charles 
Lynn, Ethel 
MacIntosh, Mabel D. 
Mailer, Miss Barbara A. 
Marshall, Mrs. S. H. 
McGovern, Mrs. C. J. 
McKercher, Hyacinth 
Melkonian, Bertha 
Melville, Clara Soper 
Merriman, Miss Faith 
Mesherry, Mrs. Lewis 
Meussdorffer, Irene 
Mitchell, Miss Vlada 
Mont, Mrs. N. 
Morgan, Florence M. 
Morris, Caroline W. 
Morris, Edythe Vivian 
Munson, Florence E. 
Newhouse, Mrs. W. G. 
O’Day, Miss Marie 
Overbeck, Mrs. H. 
Penhorwood, Miss Li 
Perrin, Miss E. J 
Price, Jane Ellen 
Pritchard, Miss Ann A, 
Podhurst, Mrs. N. 
Potvin, Miss Vivienne 
Reinecke, Lillian 
Rich, Mrs. Marie 
Riedaelli, M. 
Ringressy, Paula C. 
Roche, Mrs. William 
Roesti, Miss Olga 
Rosberg, Esther A. 
Scholz, Mrs. Elsie F. 
Schwartzberg, Simona 
Scobey, Mrs. Nellie G 
Sherman, Ruby M. 
Simpson, Miss Loretto 
Sisson, Madeleine A. 
Slate, Mrs. Ruth 
Slater, Ruth M. 
Smith, Madeleine L. 
Sousa, Frona Simon 
Southworth, Estelle 
Spencer, Annita A. 
Spaney, Alice 

St. John, Marie 
Sterling, Miss Emma 
Street, Mrs. Francis 
Stuart, Ruby E. 

Sund, Miss Hilda 
Swint, Catherine B. 
Tauber, Miss D. 
Thomson, Carolyn R. 
Thompson, Mrs. E. H. 
Tooker, Dorothy 
Tresidder, Miss Oliene 
Trowbridge, Fawn Post 
Tum Suden, Teresa 
Ulman, Adele 


Vedder, Margaret 
Vejar, Anna Ray 
Vrang, Marian J. 
West, Miss Edythe 
Wheeler, Isabella 
Wheeler, Mrs. W. T. 
Willmering, Parl B. 


ALTOS 


Allen, Jane 

Atkinson, Eva Gruninger 
Barbat, Mrs. J. Henry 
Bartlett, Miss Olive S. 
Barbieri, Florence M. 
Baum, Helen H. 
Berman, Mrs. D. 
Berton, Nadine 
Blotkey, Mrs. Anna K. 
Blythe, Helene S. 
Booth, Maude 

Brock, Mrs. Netta 
Brown, Zulina B. 
Burke, Doris J. 
Butler, Miss Amy 
Calderwood, Rush 
Chamberlin, Sue 
Christensen, Alma 
Claussen, Estelle L. 
Clement, Ada 
Clement, Marion 
Cole, Susan 

Craig, Elizabeth 
Donnan, Carol 
Donnan, Grace W. 
Doty, Nellie F. 
Dozier, Elizabeth 
Ennis, Mrs. O. 

Evans, Madeline 
Fern, Mrs. Wallace T 
Finlay, Alice 

Freese, Kathryn 
Friedrichs, Mrs. C. 
Germain, Mrs. A. M. 
Glick, Mildred 
Guthrie, Paula 
Gwinn, Mrs. Joseph M, 
Haase, Mrs. S. 
Hammer, Mrs. Adele 
Hansen, Miss M. 
Harper, Mrs. Annabel 
Hellar, Edwinna M. 
Hennessy, Marion A. 
Heyde, Gertrude E. 
Hirsch, Eleanora E. 
Holcombe, Miss E. A. 
Holcenberg, Anita 
Holt, lvy 

Keesing, Florence 
Kienast, Celestine 
King, Helen 

Krist, Martha L. 
Langley, Mrs. Virginia 
Leonard, Ramona A. 
Lindstrom, Mrs. Louis 
Marston, M. Garthwaite 
Martschinke, Mrs. Ida 
Maul, Juliet 

Mayers, Gertrude 
McCoy, Elizabeth 
McElroy, Aileen J. 
Merrill, Miss Virginia 
Messerschmidt, Elsa 
Meyer, Mrs. Kuno 
Millington, Louise 
Miner, Ethelwyn E. 
Morse, Mrs. Helen 
Mott, Katherine A. 
Nelson, Mrs. Ada F 
Neustadt, Mrs. B. 
Page, Mrs. Margaret V. 








Peltzer, Enid 

Peterson, Mrs. Gertie 
Plise, Mme. Marie Light 
Porter, Mrs. Francis H. 
Pratt, Mrs. W. W. 
Prentiss, Mrs. C. W. 
Preston, Ines F. 
Rampe, Mrs. Will E. 
Randall, Helena F. 
Reinhold, Anna 

Runge, Doris 

Schulz; Erna 

Shatz, Josephine 
Shepman, Mrs. Mildred 
Smith, Irene 

Stinson, Mrs. R. H. 
Stone, Grace E. 

Storm, Ethel L. 
Strandberg, Mary F. 
Strauch, Auge 

Tauber, Mrs. Jessica M. 
Trauner, Irene R. 
Trauner, Mrs. J. 

Tyler, Mrs. H. Upton 
Weinberg, Mrs. Emilie S: 
Weisbaum, Mrs. Elsie L. 
Wild, Helen 

Wise, Miss Dorothy 
Wise, Miss Frank 
Wilson, Miss L. May 
Worst, Eva 

Wrenshall, Mrs. E. K. 
Zaretzky, Emilie 


TENORS 


Adam, Richard 
Alexander, Thomas 
Anger, Maurice 
Ash, Major J. E. 
Barnes, George 
Barrientos, Bernard R. 
Battison, Robert 
Blatt, Walter E. 
Boyd, F. T. 
Brown, Guy L. 
Brown, Roy C. 
Carcione, J. 
Cardinal, Emile J. 
Dahl, F. M. 
De Li, R. E. Artur 
Edson, Henry F. 
Eggers, A.R. 
Erwin, Dixon A. 
Elmquist, J. L. 
Ferry, Joseph P. 
Folsom, Elbert 
Friedlander, G. 
Gagos, Kurken 
Giannini, Edilio. 
Giannini, Italo 
Gross, Albert E. 
Hackenberg, Charles 
tel Philip C. 
amann, Henry C. 
Hoffman, C. P. 
Holton, Erwin 
Johnson, Willard L. 
Jones, Gwynfi 
Kennedy, Charles H. 
Liederman, B. 
Lindner, Arthur 
Lundquist, Caleb 
Mahr, Jacob J. 
Marr, James 
Mavor, J. 
McNeil, Earle F. 
McNeil, J. L. 
Micklich, Max 
Morris, Carl 
Nelson, James F. 


Olds, Leon B. W. 








San Francisco Division (Continued) 


Padel, Orrin Leon Cowles, Jean Lundgren, Richard Seger, Stewart 


Paxson, W. L. Crofts, F. E Lundine, Prof. Carolus Sherriffs, Alick G. 
Rogers, W. H. Delmar, C. L. Maginnes, A Simmen, John 
Sitenice rub Easton, Charles H. Maples, Thomas Skinner, John 

? pig erase Fauer, Theo. K. Marston, Otis 


Smith, George 
Sommer, Dr. Herman 
Stradem, Charles 


Smiths. cL. 

Smith, John Preston 
Smith, Wm. L. 
Steward, Parker 
Stone, George O. 


Flammer, Victor May, W. 

Grahn, Edward McCoy, L. Harlan 
Gruber, Dr. William Melbourne, Louis A. Summerville, J. T. 
Guenter, George Moore, H. S. Taylor, W. Allen 
Hagan, Elmer Oswald, Charles E. Tibbe, Cuthbert P. 


Taylor, R. H. Hauschild, J. H. Parker, W. J. Tyler, Dr. H. Upton 
Thomas, Jack Hein, George Pasmore, H. B. Van Hulst, Carel 
Willi : H Hencke, John Platz, Joseph Vogel, H. Victor 
MAINS 3 _S-he Herz, Leo Plagemann, Louis Ward, P. H. 
BASSES Hofmann, W. C. Rich, Ross C. Watts, Francis P. 
Homberger, H. Rickman, Edwin West, John E. 
Albert, F. W. Hooke, Geo. H. Rickleffs, Henry F. Wright, R. K. 
Augustson, Hugo M. Hunt, Emery L. Schepte, Henry Wyatt, O. W. 
Ballard, John R. Isaacs, Frank Schoedsack, G. A. Young, A. C. 
Carleton, Chas. W. Lamont, G. E. Schulz, G. W. Ziegler, J. E. 


East Bay Division 
MISS MILDRED RANDOLPH, ACCOMPANIST 


anor sem Sree pres: Vistar airs. dn B. 

. ash, Mrs. Geo. H. ordon, Mrs. J. enz, R. L. 

glee ton tuna M: Nielsen, Mrs. C. B. Harrington, Mrs. L. R. Sirola, Onni 
Campbell Gladys Mary Nordvik, Mrs. J. M. Hirsch, Edith 

Cavanaugh, Nadi Anita Reynolds, Grace D. Josten, Mrs. John BASSES 

Cote Nirs, the} Rinehart, Miss Amy Knott, Mrs. B. F. Arterburn, A. B. 
Crockett, Mrs.GraceL, Schmitt, Mrs. Theresa E. Medina, Mrs. Evelyn Ball, Alexander W. G. 
De Vaux, Mrs. Norman Sweeney, Dorothy Moody, Mrs. May VanD Brinkley, B. G. 


SOPRANOS 


Ellis, Miss Jennie 
Engler, Muriel 

Gray, Mary 
Hammond, Margaret 
Hanly, Mrs. Leo B. 
Hawes, Mrs. L. V. 
Hayden, Ada F. 
Helmstein, Miss F. 


Shideler, Florence V. 
Weaver, Margaret G. 
Will, Mrs. Andrew J. 


Woods, Mrs. Glenn H. 
ALTOS 


Ashley, Blanche 
Brinkley, Mrs. B. G. 


Parker, Miss B. F. 
Rowlands, Mary J. 
Schulze, Mrs. Bertha 


Schwarzmann, Mrs. E. G. 


Shewmaker, Ethel M. 
Trevorrow, Mrs. W. J. 
von Ahnden, Emma 
Wagener, Winifred L. 


Castleman, S. J. 
Compton, Leonard D. 
Coy, Fred A. 

Freese, Henry M. 
Gordon, W. D. 
Harrington, L. R. 
Howe, William T. 


Jecks, F. Marshall 
Mullen, G. C. 

Plant; Tak. 

Pollard, Clarence M. 
Reber, Otto F. 
Uridge, Harry E. 
Whitehead, Rex 


MADAME KRISTOFFY PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
JOHANNA Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Training 


Phone Douglas 6624 


Hoszowski, Emma 
Lewis, Mrs. J. W. 
Lewis, Mrs. M. H. 
McCord, Miss Alice E 
Miller, Alice B. 
Miller, Mrs. H. K. 


Castleman, Mrs. Stanley 

Cushing, Mrs. A. S. TENORS 

Dillon, Miss Bertha Blosser, Roy H. 
Essex, Mrs. L. B. Clarke, Frank Sidney 
Flammer, Mrs. Charles Egbert, R. 

Freese, Thada S. Ellis, E. R. 





740 Pine Street 










MARGARET Special Summer Course for a limited 
number of advanced students and those 
I ° , wishing to be coached for the Concert 
riLLy Pianist See 
ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU Seudie: 


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Phelan Bldg. Fillmore 9082 


THE 
AV) Gace 0. 


Engraving. PPYINMLELS. . Publishing 


619 CALIFORNIA STREET 
DOUGLAS 4633 


Commercial Printing 





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by the 
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under the direction of 


the famous Wagnerian conductor 


Alfred Hertz 
issued on April 18 


On that date any dealer in Victor products will gladly play them 

for you. Hear the Victor Records by Alfred Hertz and the San 

Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and you will appreciate how 

truly the Victrola brings to you their art—and the pleasure to 

be derived from hearing them as often as you wish in your own 
home on the Victrola. 


There is but one Victrola and that is made by the Victor Company 
Look for these Victor trade marks 


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as MASTERS, VOICE” Victor Talking Machine Co. of Canada, Led., Montreal 
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SECOND SAN FRANCISCO 





iit a ATE COLE RIO IO A LA A A ELL ILLS LLL LL AS 








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The instrument of the immortals 


and the piano of the home 


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SECOND SAN FRANCISCO 


Sprring Music Hestival 


CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR., AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 


AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 


J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman 
Angelo Rossi Edwin G. Bath 
AND 


Musical Association of San Hranciseo 


Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 
WHICH MAINTAINS 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 





OFFICERS 
Joun D. McKEE, President 
J. B. LEvison, Vice-President E. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

. E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding John S. Drum L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Milton H. Esberg Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron Herbert Fleishhacker J. C. Raas 
Selah Chamberlain J. D. Grant Wm. T. Sesnon 
W.E. Créed E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 
C H. Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Templeton Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 


Wm. H. Crocker John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Manager 
Assisted by 
SAN FRANCISCO COMMUNITY SERVICE 
Henry L. Mayer, President 
Marshal Hale, Vice-President 


C. L. Rosekrans, Executive Secretary 


457 PHELAN BUILDING 
GARFIELD 2819 





























THE ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 


WESTERN OFFICE OF 


WOLFSOHN MUSICAL BUREAU, INc. 
ANNOUNCES 


TEN SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS 


INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS ARTISTS 
On Thursday Evenings During Season 1925-26 


SPECIAL SEASON TICKET PRICES: 
$3.50, $5.00, $8.00 


A Deposit of $1.00 Per Ticket Holds Your Reservation. 
Before September 1, 1925 


Balance to Be Paid on or 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 


Josef Hofmann 
“The Best of the best.” 


Edward Johnson 
(Leading Tenor, Met. Opera Co.) 


Operatic excerpts, lights and costumes 
“America’s foremost tenor.” 


Margaret Matzenauer 
(Leading Contralto, Met. Opera Co.) 
“Sings magnificently.” 


Cecilia Hansen 


“Sensation of the season.” 


Joint Recital 


Hulda Lashanska 


“Most beautiful lyric soprano of 
today.” 


Felix Salmond 


“The Fritz Kreisler of the 
violoncello.” 








Thamar Karsavina and her 
Ballet, with Pierre 
Vladimiroff 


“Everything she does is instinct with 
grace.” 
Maria Kurenko 
“A new Patti from Siberia.” 


Vincente Ballester 
(Leading Baritone, Met. Opera Co.) 
“A continuous delight.” 


Tescha Seidel 


“4 mighty master of his instrument.” 


Joint Recital 


Olga Samaroff 


“Greatest of America’s women 
pianists.” 





London String Quartet 


“The finest chamber music 
organization in the world.” 





RESERVE YOUR SEASON TICKETS NOW—SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


AFTER APRIL 25—638 PHELAN BUILDING 





ALFRED HERTZ, Conpucror 


SOPRANOS 
Mme. HELEN STANLEY Mrs. Lorna LACHMUND 
Mrs. Grace HENKEL Mrs. TERESA TUM SUDEN 
CONTRALTOS 
Mme. CHARLES CAHIER Mrs. Eva GRUNINGER ATKINSON 
Miss RADIANA PAZMOR Mrs. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 
THNOR 


RuDOLF LAUBENTHAL 


BASSES 


ALEXANDER KIPNIS K. Harotp DANA 


CHORUS DIRECTOR 


Dr. Hans LESCHKE 


ASSISTANT CHORUS DIRECTORS 


GLenn H. Woops KUGENE BLANCHARD 


ORGANIST 


| Upa WALDROP 


ACCOMPANISTS 
Mrs. VioLET FENSTER BLAGG 
Miss MinpDRED RANDOLPH 


J. L. EuMQUIST 


CHORUS SECRETARY 


LOUISE BENNETT 





















Learn to sing in the way that is actually sustaining Graveure 
in the position of one of the world’s greatest artists 





MR. LOUIS 


GRAVEURE 


ee LS Distinguished Recital Baritone 
Ger e and 


Ne Famous ‘‘Master’’ Vocal Teacher 


_ 
THE PIONEER DIRECTOR OF “VOCAL 
MASTER-CLASSES” IN THE WEST 


will be in 


LOS ANGELES, CAL. | SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


(Second Summer ) (Third Summer) 
June 1 to July 6 July 27 to August 29 
1925 1925 


FIVE WEEKS ONLY IN EACH CITY 


“MASTER” and “AUDITOR” CLASSES 
and PRIVATE TUITION 








For Particulars, Rates, Reservations, 


Details, Etc., address 


SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER, Manager 
Foxcroft Building, 68 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 


ENROLL NOW ENROLL NOW 





SECOND CONCERT 
Tuesday, April 21, 1925, 8:20 P. M. 


SOLOISTS 
Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 
Rudolf Laubenthal, Tenor 


Alexander Kipnis, Baritone 





WAGNER PROGRAMME 





1. Overture to ‘““Tannhauser ’ 
2. Lohengrin’s Narrative from “Lohengrin” 


RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL 


3. Ca) -Traume 
(b) Schmerzen 
MME. CHARLES CAHIER 


4. March, ‘Hail, Bright Abode,’ from ‘‘Tannhauser 
CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA 


Intermission 


5. “Die Walkure,”” Act I 
Sieglinde and Siegmund Love Scene 
MME. HELEN: STANLEY, RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL 


6. ‘‘Die Walkure,”’ Act Ill 
Wotan’s Farewell and Magic Fire Spell 
Wotan, ALEXANDER KIPNIS 








On account of the character and length of this program there will be 
positively no encotes. 








JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Master of the Pianoforte 


PLAYS AND ENDORSES EXCLUSIVELY THE 


Chickering) 


This great artist and teacher expresses his authoritative 


opinion in the following terms: 


“The Chickering pianos have a splendid evenness 
of scale and action, which is the most important 
factor in artistic performance. In addition, I find 
in the Chickering piano a wonderful variety of tone 
color and an exquisite singing quality, from the 
most delicate to the most powerful effects, with a 
beautiful elasticity of touch, combining brilliancy 
and solidity in a completely satisfying manner. 

(Signed) JosEF LHEVINNE.” 


CHICKERING WAREROOMS 
LEE S. ROBERTS, INC. 
230 Post STREET, S. F., CAL. 


Gs new home of the Chickering will open on or about May 1, 1925. | 


An invitation of inspection is extended -all music lovers. 








Overture to ‘““Tannhauser”’ 

Of the ‘‘Tannhauser’’ Overture, Wagner himself has left the following 
programme: 

“To begin with, the orchestra leads before us the Pilgrims’ Chant 
alone; it draws near, then swells into a mighty outpour, and passes finally 
away. Evenfall; last echo of the chant. As night breaks, magic sights and 
sounds appear, a rosy mist floats up, exultant shouts assail our ears; the 
whirlings of a fearsomely voluptuous dance are seen. These are the ‘Venus- 
berg’s’ seductive spells, that show themselves at dead of night to those 
whose breast is fired by daring of the senses. Attracted by the tempting 
show, a shapely human form draws nigh; ‘tis Tannhauser, Love's minstrel. 
He sounds his jubilant Song of Love in joyous challenge, as though to force 
the wanton witchery to do his bidding. Wild cries of riot answer him; the 
rosy cloud grows denser round him, entrancing perfumes hem him in and 
steal away his senses. In the most seductive of half-lights, his wonder-seeing 
eyes behold a female form indicible; he hears a voice that sweetly murmurs 
out the siren-call, which promises contentment of the darer’s wildest wishes. 
Venus herself it is, this woman who appears to him. Then heart and senses 
burn within him; a fierce devouring passion fires the blood in all his veins; 
with irresistible constraint it thrusts him nearer before the goddess’ self he 
steps with that canticle of love triumphant and now he sings it in ecstatic 
praise of her. As though at wizard spell of his, the wonders of the Venus- 
berg unroll their brightest fill before him; tumultuous shouts and savage 
cries of joy mount up on every hand in drunken glee, Bacchantes drive their 
raging dance and drag Tannhauser to the warm caresses of Love's Goddess, 
who throws her glowing arms around the mortal drowned with bliss, and 
bears him where no step dare tread, to the realm of Being-no more. A 
scurry, like the sound of the Wild Hunt, and speedily the storm is laid. 
Sees ee nae ee CBee Gene es emote err See ih Re ee ee 


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OUALTE® 


CONSISTENT 
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San Francisco 




















Third Annual Season 


The San Francisco Opera 
Company 


Gaetano Merola, Director 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM, SEPTEMBER 19 to OCTOBER 4, 1925 


8 SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 
(6 Evenings and 2 Saturday Matinees ) 
2 NON-SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 


Artists 





Sopranos: 
Claudia Muzio 
Elvira de Hidalgo 


Rosina Torri 


Contraltos: 
Marguerite d’ Alvarez 


Irene Marlo 


Conductors: 
Gaetano Merola 
Pietro Cimini 


Giacomo Spadoni 


Tenors: 
Tito Schipa 
Fernand Ansseau 
Antonio Cortis 
Lodovico Oliviero 


Baritones and Basses: 
Riccardo Stracciari 
Cesare Formichi 
Marcel Journet 
Vittorio Trevisan 


Antonio Nicholich 


Technical Director: 
Giovanni Grassi 


Ballet Master: 


Natale Carossio 


The operas presented will be chosen from the following: 


‘‘Aida,’’ “Samson et Dalila,’’ 


‘Traviata,’ ‘Rigoletto,’ “Manon” 


(Massenet), “Il Barbiere di Siviglia,”’ ‘Martha,’ ““Amore dei Tre 
Re,” ‘Faust,’ “‘“Anima Allegra’ (first time in America outside the 
Metropolitan), ‘“‘Tosca,’”” ‘Madame Butterfly’ and ‘Fedora.’ 


Subscriptions 


Subscriptions will be accepted commencing Monday, May 


11th, at the offices of SAN FRANCISCO OPERA COMPANY. 


KEARNY 6346 


68 POST STREET 








Merely a wanton whir still pulses in the breeze, a wave of weird voluptuous- 
ness, like the sensuous breath of unblest love, still soughs above the spot 
where impious charms had shed their raptures, and over which the night 
now broods once more. But dawn begins to break already; from afar is 
heard again the Pilgrims’ Chant. As this chant draws closer yet and closer, 
as the day drives farther back the night, that whir and soughing of the air— 
which had erewhile sounded like the eerie cries of souls condemned—now 
rises, too, to ever gladder waves; so that when the sun ascends at last in 
splendor, and the Pilgrim’s Chant proclaims in ecstacy to all the world, to 
all that lives and moves thereon, Salvation won, this wave itself swells out 
the tidings of sublimest joy. ‘Tis the carol of the Venusberg itself, re- 
deemed from curse of impiousness, this cry we hear amid the hymn of God. 
So wells and leaps each pulse of life in chorus of redemption; and both 
dissevered elements, both soul and senses, God and Nature, unite in the 
atoning kiss of hallowed Love.’ 


In Distant Lands, from “Lohengrin” (Lohengrin’s Narrative ) 
This selection is sung by Lohengrin in the third and closing scene of 

Ace Ill. Elsa has violated her promise not to inquire into the identity and 
origin of her champion and newly-made husband—a secret which he, as 
one of the Knights of the Holy Grail, is obliged to keep concealed from all 
mankind, and which once revealed, puts an abrupt ending to his sojourn 
amongst them. Lohengrin has perforce to depart forthwith, and in deep 
sorrow, tells the story which makes his going imperative: 

In distant land where ye can never enter, 

A castle stands, the Monsalvat its name: 

A radiant temple rises from its centre— 

More glorious far than aught of earthly fame. 





° . . Management 
Leading Musical Attractions — ger5y c. OPPENHEIMER 








12 


TITO MME. FRIEDA 


SCHIPA 


FAMOUS TENOR 
TWO RECITALS 


COLUMBIA 
THEATER 


POSITIVE FAREWELL 
Entire. Change of Program 


NEXT SUNDAY AFTERNOON oaix AUDITORIUM 


Thursday Night, April 30 
April 26 per eke es 





KOH 








TICKETS ON SALE AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


























And there a vessel of most wondrous splendor, 
A shrine most holy, guarded well, doth rest; 
To which but mortals purest service render— 
’Twas brought to earth by hosts of angels blest! 


Once every year a dove from heaven descendeth, 
To strengthen then its wondrous powers anew: 
Tis called the Grail—and purest faith it lendeth 
To those good knights who are its chosen few. 


To serve the Grail, whoe’er is once elected, 
Receives from it a supernatural might; 

From baneful harm and fraud is he protected, 
Away from him flee death and gloom of night: 


Yea, who by it to distant lands is bidden. 

As champion to some virtuous cause maintain, 
Well knows its powers are from him never hidden 
If, as its knight, he unreveal’d remain. 


Such wondrous nature is the Grail’s great blessing, 
Reveal’d, must then the knight from mortals flee; 





THIRD CONCERT 


Spring Music Festival 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 23 


Soloists: 
Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 
Rudolf Laubenthal, Tenor 


Alexander Kipnis, Baritone 


1. ‘‘The Pilgrimage of the Rose’’......-....---..---------------- Schumann 
For Soli, Chorus and Orchestra 
2. Overture, “The Great Russian Easter ’-........- Rimsky-Korsakow 
3. Aria, “‘O Paradiso!” from “L’Africaine’ ....-:.. .-..2.--. Meyerbeer 
RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL 
2 Paeme. Ge Lt xtase = o-oo Serena es eee Scriabine 


For Orchestra and Organ 


LAST CONCERT 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 25 


Soloists: 
Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 


‘“Rhapsodie”  .....---2---+-----c--0eeeeeecoeoconeneneececcnneneneneeacansnnenonsce= Brahms 
For Contralto Solo, Male Chorus and Orchestra 
Symphony No. 2 (‘‘Resurrection”’ Svmphony) 2. ee Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto Soli, Mixed Chorus, 
Orchestra and Organ 


J ——$—$—$—— ee 








Let in your hearts ne’er rest a doubt oppressing— 
If known to you he sails across the sea. 


Now list what he to you in troth declareth: 
The Grail obeying—here to you I came, 
My father Parsifal!—a crown he weareth— 
His knight am I—and Lohengrin my name. 


Traume 
Schmerzen 

These two songs are Nos. 5 and 4, respectively, of a_set entitled, 
“Funf Gedichte fur eine Frauenstimme in Musik gesetz von Richard Wag- 
ner.” There are five songs in the set, written to texts by Mathilde Wesen- 
donck, a great admirer and close friend of Wagner s. 


Traume (Dreams) 


Say, oh, say, what wondrous dreamings 
Keep my inmost soul revolving, 

That they not like empty gleanings 

Into nothing are dissolving? 


Dreamings that with every hour, 
Every day, in brightness grow, 
And with their celestial power 
Sweetly through the bosom flow? 


Dreamings that like rays of splendor 
Fill the bosom, never waning, 
Lasting image there to render: 

All forgetting, one retaining! 









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Lyon & Healy " 1 al L = = KAJETAN 
HARPS Waly py, —— ATTL | 


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Yo ff) 


4 Wit J f 
§ Se 5S) aL, ike 
bed Wh j 
ee 


Hi! f., 
Wt Pie te 
| i | 


Solo Harpist S. F. Symphony For Engagements Address Bohemian Club 
























































Lazar S. Samoiloff 
V oice 


Director and Vocal 
Pedagogue 


The most striking feature 
of his teaching is its prac- 
tical application to the 
constant problems of the 
professional artist and 
teacher. Letters of appre- 
ciation from many world- 
famous artists attest to 
his enviable place in the 
teaching world among 
them being Claire Dux, 
Julia Claussen, Bianca 
Saroya, Kurt Tauncher, 
Rosa Raisa, Isa Kremer, 
Helen Stanley. 





Josef Lhevinne 
Piano 


A great artist, he has 
proved himself a remark- 
able teacher of his instru- 
ment. He isin a position, 
by his own experience, 
to bring every true tal- 
ent to fruition in a far 
shorter time than would 
ordinarily be considered 
possible. 

He is a teacher of rare 
insight as well as a vir- 
tuoso, and brings unusual 
authority to all questions 
relating to piano playing. 











Julia Claussen 
Voice 


One of the world’s truly 
great voices. Not only is 
she at the height of her 
own powers, but she has 
had experience asa 
teacher, and possesses the 
rare gift of imparting 
knowledge. She will give 
general instruction in 
stage technique, coach 
operatic roles and demon- 
strate’ her own vocal 
method. 





LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 


ENDORSES THE 


Baldiin 


Baldwin Piano Company, 
310 Sutter Street, 


Fairmont Hotel, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
October 10, 1924. 


San Francisco, Cal. 


Dear Sirs: 





Let me express my appreciation of your kind- 
ness in co-operating with the Master School of 
Musical Arts in California. 


I have been familiar with the Baldwin Piano 
for many years. I have found it unrivalled in 
tone and action—in fact, the ideal piano for 
both concert and studio. The school has done 
well to have made its arrangements with you. 


Very truly yours, 
(Signed) LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF. 








OF CALIFOI 
LAzARr.s. SAMOILO 


ENDOWED BY ALICE CAMPBEL: 
ALICE SEckets, Mai 


ENROLL | 
OPENING OF FIR 


LAZAR S. SAN 


San Francisco Class Oy 
SEVEN VEE 


JOSEF LHE\ 


San Francisco Clas; O; 
FIVE WEE! 





Andres De Segurola W. J. Heidersc 
Operatic Department Lecturer 

Distinguished criti 
New York Sun 
author of flany 

will give six lectu 
Monday anc Thi 
evenings at tie Fe 
Hotel, beginting h 
Open to therpublic 


A master in character 
portrayal, for many sea- 
sons leading bass _bari- 
tone of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. He will 
conduct opera classes, 
teaching acting, and 
makeup, and coaching in 
operatic repertoire. The 
staging of acts from 
operas will give practical 
experience and prove an 
important step for the 
operatic aspirant. 





A. Koste!anetz 
Accomt nist 





Emil J. Polak 
Coach and ear traiting f 


A course in sight 1 


fessionals atd an 
by one emineitly s 
ful in this im 
branch of mt Sic, 

‘ 


One of the most success- 
ful coaches in New York 
today. Recently heard 
here with Jeritza. 





: = = 


reich a 


MOILOFF, oirector 


E CAMPBELL MACFARLANE 


Seckris, Manager 


OLL NOW 


JF FIRST CLASSES 


S, SAMOILOFF 
Class Opens April 27th 


VEN 'VEEKS 


- LHEVINNE 


Clas; Opens May 11th 


IVE WEEKS 





’. J. He derson 
Lecturer 
guished critic of the 


York Sun, and 


- of riany books, 
ive six lectures on 
ay anc Thursday 
igs at the Fairmont 
beginting May 25. 
to thesnublic, 





, Koste!anetz 
Accom} inist 


‘se in sight reading 
rr traiting for pro- 
als atd amateurs 
-emineitly success- 
n this important 
of mt Sic, 

‘ 








Sasiiel Gardner 


Violin 

One of the leaders among 
America’s younger violin- 
ists. Well-known as con- 
ductor and composer, 
through long association 
with his teacher, Franz 
Kneisel, he has rapidly 
taken a place among the 
successful teachers of vio- 
lin, chamber music and 
conducting. 





‘Anata {sate David 
Harp 


One of the best-known 
teachers and _ performers 
of the harp in America. 


Cesar Thomson 
Violin 
One of the most distin- 
guished among the violin 
teachers and performers 
of modern times, sharing 
with Auer the distinction 
of having remarkable suc- 
cessful artist students. 
Formerly it has been nec- 
essary to go to Brussels 
to work with him. This 
is the first opportunity to 
study in the West with 
this justly famed master. 





Felix Salmond 
Cello— 
Chamber Music 


The extraordinary artis- 
try of this noted cellist 
has made him a favorite 
everywhere. His classes 
in London have been the 
goal of students from all 
parts of the world. Coach- 
ing in chamber music will 
be given by Mr. Salmond 
and pianists, violinists 
and cellists may enroll 
for actual experience or 
as auditors. 





He holds a high place in 
three phases of musical 
creation: pianist, com- 
poser and teacher. The 
most authoritative expo- 
nent of Paderewski’s 
methods and ideals. He 
stands today among the 
eminent artist teachers. 
Numbered among his 
pupils are _ Levitzki, 
Novaes and Loesser. 








Sigismund Stojowski 
Piano—Composition 





This Faculty of Celebrated Artist 


Teachers Will Give Instruction in 


SAN FRANCISCO 


AND 


LOS ANGELES 


Between May and September, 
1925 


Dates for each Master sent on request 
Free Scholarships are offered with each 
Teacher 
Write for Application Blank and Catalog. 
Address 


Master School of Musical Arts 
ALICE SECKELS, Manager 
Office: 

Room 139, FairRMONT HOTEL 
PHONE DouGLas 7267 SAN FRANCISCO 






































































































THE 


Under 


Linnard “Management 


— 


: 


TWO FAMOUS HOTELS 


have in a large measure become the center 

of San Francisco’s social life. Perfected 

unobtrusive service to every guest is the 
secret of their sustained popularity. 


FAIRMONT et 


Hotel Company WHITCOM B 


D. M. Linnard LeRoy Linnard D. M. Linnard Ernest Drury 


President Manager R Lessee Manager 








SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 
One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 3lst, 1924 





ete bing ne tt A ae pig ane ate a A aa Plo mow $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds7,.:...... 4,000 ,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund........---++++++++:: 461,746.52 
MISSION BRANCH............0 cece eeeereeteeneees Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRESIDIO BRANCH.......---eeeeeeeeeses Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGHT STREET BRANCH...... Poe ee Vinee Haight and Belvedere Streets 
WEST PORTAL BRANCH........+--++-+++ +> West Porta] Ave. and Ulloa St. 





Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 











a a 


Dreamings like the sun that kisses 
From the snow the buds new born, 
That to strange and unknown blisses 
They are greeted by the morn. 


ee 


That expand they may and blossom 
Dreaming spend their odors suave, 
Gently die upon thy bosom, 

And then vanish in the grave. 


= ———————————— 
=e eS ms 


Schmerzen (Sorrows) 


Sun, thou weepest every even 
Thy resplendent glances red, 
When into the sea from heaven 
All too soon thou sinkest dead; 
But new splendors thee adorn, 
Glory of the darkened earth, 
When thou wakest in the morn, 
Hero-like of proudest worth. 
Why should I in vain regretting 
Load with heaviness my heart, 

If the sun must find a setting, 

If the sun e’en must depart? 

And engenders death but living, 
If but grief can lead to bliss: 

Oh! I thank thee then for giving, 
Nature, me such pain as this. 








Quarg Music Company 


109 Stockton Street 








—TWO STORES 


ae Ir Victor YT 


Records 


SS 2 
>LONG PERE * ADI O j Phonographs j 


TRADE MARK REG. 


206 Powell Street 
Open Evenings 







They cost more, but 
they do more 


They tune thru everything 


$240 and up. Easy Terms 








QUALITY PIANOS 
and PLAYER PIANOS 


JULIA CLAUSSEN 


Prima “(Donna “Mezzo-Soprano 
Metropolitan Opera Co., New York 





WRITES: 
KRANICH & BACH, 
New York. 


Gentlemen: 
Your piano is unexcelled in the beautiful 
quality of its tone and workmanship. 


Very sincerely yours 





Exclusive ‘Representative 





} # Oakland 
— MUSIC co. oho 
140 O’FARRELL STREET 1016 J Street, Sacramento 


The Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society 


HIBERNIA BANK 
Incorporated 1864 
HEAD OFFICE 
COR. MARKET, McALLISTER and JONES STS. 


MISSION OFFICE 


i COR. VALENCIA AND 22ND STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


Pree Oy ETT MES ea Ieee RE TN aoe GB a ce AEST $81,603,701.25 
FORGIVE MREN Da wee at Lak os Seka eee 5,922.693.15 





OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A. M. TO 3 P. M. 





OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY FROM 10 A. M. TO 8 P. M. 


SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AT. MISSION OFFICE 





























March from ‘“‘Tannhauser”’ 


The plot of ‘“Tannhauser’ was taken from an old German tradition 
which centers about the castle of Wartburg, in the Thuringian Valley, where 
the landgraves of the thirteenth century instituted peaceful singing contests 
between the Minnesingers and the knightly poets. The brilliant March is 
from the scene wherein the people and the minstrels assemble within the 
hall of the castle—the former to witness and the latter to participate in the 
tournament of song, the prize being the hand of the fair Elizabeth. As the 
cuests enter and are welcomed by Elizabeth and the Landgrave, they join 
in a chorus of homage: 


Hail! bright abode, where song the heart rejoices; 
May lays of peace within thee never fail; 

Long may we cry with loyal voices, 

Hail! to our land—our fatherland, all hail! 


“Die Walkure,’’ Act I 


‘Die Walkure’ is the second in the great group of four music dramas 
known as the Niebelung Ring, the others being “Das Rheingold,’ ““Sieg- 
fried,”’ and ‘“‘Gotterdammerung. In Act I, Siegmund, exhausted, rushes 
‘nto the hut of Hunding, a warrior, seeking protection from a storm which 
is raging in the forest. Sieglinde, Hunding’s wife, gives him refreshments, 
having conceived a passionate love for the stranger, but with the return of 
Hunding, Siegmund realizes that he is in the house of an enemy, although 
he is allowed to remain for the night. After having poured a sleeping 
potion into Hunding’s drink, Sieglinde confides to Siegmund her story; of 
how she was abducted and forcibly wedded to her husband. She also tells 
how on her wedding day an old man entered the hut and plunged into the 


YEATMAN GRIFFITH | 


‘Recognized Authority on Voice Production and the Art of Singing” 
Summer Vocal Master Classes 


FOR ARTISTS - TEACHERS - STUDENTS 
ENROLLMENTS NOW 


Address Communications 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. June 3rd to July Ist 
To IDA G. SCOTT, Kohler & Chase Building 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. July 6th to Aug. 3rd 
To L. E. BEHYMER, 705 Auditorium Building 
PORTLAND, ORE. Aug. 10th to Sept. 7th 
To OTTO WEDEMEYER, 611 Bush & Lane Building 





San Francisco’s Home for a Musical Education 


Complete Summer Courses 
1925 Season Opens June 22nd 


Instructions in all Branches of 


MUSIC DURING THE SUMMER 





Morning (lasses Free Recitals Private Lessons 
ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE 
2315 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 





TELEPHONE WEST 4737 


























garden-fresh Che Aominican College 


FLOWERS of Sun Rafael 


A College for Women 


Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Dominic 
Resident and Day Students 


OU are always 
assured Nature’s 





most exqusite Blooms 

Degrees conferred in College of Letters 
when we serve you— and Sciences and in School of Music. 
Blossoms that will Approved by the Graduate Division of 

; the University of California. 

express your thought Accredited by the California satis Bees 
: : of Education. California State Teachers’ 
IT} fragrant, unforget- Credentials granted. 


able beauty. School of Music Building, Auditorium 
and Equipment unsurpassed. Artist Fac- 
ulty. Normal Music Training Department 
offers exceptional opportunities both to 
resident and day pupils. California State 
Elementary and Secondary Credentials in 
Music granted. 


For information, address 
tulebit!) The Dean of the College 
San Rafael 


The Voice of a Thousand Gardens” ; 
ae ‘% T x : Artist Concert Course under 
= RANTELAVE, EL. KEARNY 4975 management of Alice Metcalf 


SAN FRANCISCO 


Orders telegraphed anywhere 








San Francisco Conservatory of Music 
Ada Clement and Lillian Hodghead, Co-Directors 


NEW PIPE ORGAN SOON READY 


Summer Organ Courses With 


WARREN D. ALLEN 


3435 Sacramento Street Phone: Fillmore 898 





Madame Emmy Tromboni 


Teaches Absolute Purity of Tone Along Scientific, Modern Lines 


Prepares Students and Teachers for All Branches of 
Vocal Art 


601-602 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Phone Garfield 6046 








trunk of the tree a magic sword, which should belong only to him who 
could take it out, and which no one has so far succeeded in doing. The 
door at the back has blown open, through which can be seen the full beauty 
of a moonlit night after the storm. In an ecstacy of new-born love, they 
seat themselves on the rude bench, and with her hand in his, Siegmund 
sings his beautiful Love Song. As they gaze upon each other in rapture, 
they recognize that they are brother and sister, both children of Walse who 
has plunged the sword into the tree for their deliverance. Imbued with 
new strength, Siegmund seizes the shining hilt and pulls it from its mighty 
sheath. The re-united brother and sister agree to fly from the power of 
Hunding, and arm in arm, they pass out into the moonlight forest as the 
curtain falls. 


Wotan’s Farewell and Magic Fire Spell from “Die Walkure’”’ 


Wotan’s farewell to Brunnhilde and the Magic Fire Spell form the 
conclusion of ‘‘Die Walkure.’’ For her disobedience to his command, that 
Siegmund the Volsung shall not be protected in the combat with his enemy 
Hunding, Wotan condemns Brunnhilde, the Valkyrie—and his daughter— 
to lie asleep on a rock to become the booty of the first man who finds and 
awakes her. Brunnhilde piteously begs that her punishment may be re- 
mitted; or, if Wotan will not be moved to mercy, that she may lie sur- 
rounded by a circle of ever burning flames, so that only the bravest hero can 
penetrate it and arouse her. 


The god, moved by her supplications, consents to the granting of this 
wish. He lays Brunnhilde on the mossy covering of the rock, and, his fare- 
well spoken, strikes the ground with his spear, whereupon the flames spring 


up on every side. 


Ba aa a a ra le sc eS 
St lI R d V ht MADAME VOUGHT PRESENTS 
ella Kaymond-voug ELEANORE STADTEGGER 
Coloratura Soprano Voice Culture Coloratura Soprano 
Available for Concerts, Oratorios and in Joint Recital With 


eae MAX GEGNA 





“Madame Vought has a bril- "Cellist San Francisco Symphony 
liant soprano voice, which she 
uses with the skill of an IRENE MILLIER 
artist. Her coloratura was Pianist and Accompanist 
perfect, every note being given FAIRMONT H Ocha 
with the polish of a gem.” z 
Ra Pe RS Ee ene Friday Evening, May Ist, 8:30. 
= Admission, $1. Tickets, Sherman 
726 Sutter Street. Prospect 4820 Clay, & Co. 





Warriner Vocal Studios 


METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE 
NEW YORK CITY 


SAN FRANCISCO SUMMER COURSE 
June 25th to August 25th, 1925 


For information and reservations address studio 43. 

















SS 


eg ee I 





Ne 


ee ee 


As the fire encircles the sleeping Valkyrie, Wotan slowly leaves the scene. 
Farewell, my noble, valorous child. 

Thou of my heart the pride and delight. 

Farewell! Farewell! Farewell! 


Must I forsake thee and may my love no more greet thee in welcome; 
May’st thou no more ride near me in battle, nor bear my cup by banquet; 
Must I resign thee, O my belov'd one, 

Thou laughing delight of my vision; 


A fire for thy bridal couch shall be lighted as ne'er yet has burned for a 
bride! 

Flickering flames encircle the fell; 

Let terror consuming frighten the craven, 

Let cowards fly from Brunnhilde’s rock! 

For one alone winneth the bride; one freer than I, the god. 

These loving, luminous eyes, which oft with smiles I have kissed, 

When valor my caress rewarded, or when with praises of heroes brave thy 
childish lips were inspired; 


These resplendent, luminous eyes, which oft have shone thro’ the storm 

When hopeless longing my heart had tortured, when earthly pleasures my 
senses tempted from wild sadness to wander; 

Their parting glance gleams on me now, as my fond lips give thee love's 
farewell! 

On mortal more blessed still may they shine, on me, ill-starr’'d immortal, 

They must close now forever! 

For so turns the god now from thee; so kisses thy godhood away! 


IRVING KRICK 


Solo Pianist 


Available for Club Engagements in Bay Region 


Season 1925-1926 


Address: 479 Forest Street, Oakland 
Phone: Piedmont 3554 


an M cM AN U S Pianist and Teacher 


1459 4th Ave. Sunset 2487 


Available for Engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 


Mondays: 526 Powell Street Thursdays: 2510 College Ave., Berkeley 


Has toured as assisting artist with Pablo Casals; Jean Gerardy and George Enesco 








Master Class of Pianoforte Playing 
MARGUERITE MELVILLE LISZNIEWSKA 


Master Faculty—Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 
Five weeks commencing June 22, 1925 
Sorosis Club, 536 Sutter St., San Francisco, Calif. 


For full information address: STUDIO: 1233 California St., San Francisco, Calif. 
ALICE METCALF, Manager Phone Prospect 8158 


| and School of Music, Dominican College, San Rafael, Calif. 








—_ 





FIRST VIOLINS 


Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 


Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W.F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 

Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Purt, B. 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 
Willard, J. M. 
Curcio, R. 
Baker, Genevra 


VIOLAS 


Fenster, Lajos 
Principal 


Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 
Wellendorff, H. 
Firestone, N. 


Wersonnel 


The Sau Francisen Symphony Orchestra 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 
Demetrio, G. 


Gough,.Flori 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 


Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 


Addimando, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 


Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 
Randall, W. F. 





BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 
Findeisen, C. 
Cleveland, G. 
Salvatore, M. 
Trutner, H. 
Dabelow, W. 


TRUMPETS 


Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 
Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 
Edwards, G. M. 
Savant, S. 
Linden, Arthur 
Dering, B. A. 
Klatzkin, B. 


BASS TRUMPET 
Klotz, L. 


TROMBONES 
Tait, F. W. 
Clark; OSE: 
Bassett, F. N. 
Ingram, T. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 


Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagener, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 


Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Wood, W. A. 
Overbeck, H. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 
Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 














Seen ass 


ee 


Mano 4 Se dda Tom 








—— CHORUS 


San Francisco Division 


SOPRANOS 


Albright, Ethel A. 
Alpern, L. 

Anderson, Anna 
Anderson, Hildur E. 
Anderson, Margaret 
Asmussen, Dorothea 
Atha, Mrs. Miles M. 
Auger, Miss Lina 
Augustson, Mrs. Selina 
Backus, Violet M. 
Ballard, Zebulon V. 
Bannerman, Miss Julia 
Barr, Elsie J. 

Bartlett, Catherine Qi ' 
Bashford, Edith 
Beckert, Elsie M. 
Beckett, Helen I. 
Beppler, Miss Myrtha 
Blagg, Violet Fenster 
Bowen, Beatrice 
Bradford, Dorothy 
Bradford, Helen M. 
Brennan, Katherine 
Brown, Genevieve McK 
Brown, Mrs. R. C. 
Buck, Mrs. K. A. 
Burns, Miss E. 

Canet, Kathleen 
Caradonna, Miss Mary 
Centini, Mary G. 
Chapman, Lula Mae 
Clifford, Miss Beatrice 
Cleal, Anyta Clayr 
Cole, Grace A. 
Crowley, Miss Katharine 
Davidson, Miss Leda 
Davis, Mrs. L. 
DeVoney, Bessie D. 
Debrecht, Eulalia 
DeCamp, Miss Carolyn 
Delaney, Lorna Claire 
Deward, Mrs. J. M. 
Doane, Mrs. O. K. 
Doheny, Mrs. Nellie 
Duerbeck, Anna M. 
Durkin, Miss A. Hazel 
Eames, Mrs. E. A. 
Easton, Mrs. Verna M. 
Elliott, Miss Adelaide 
Ellwanger, Clara Jane 
Emerson, Miss Mattie E. 
Erwin, Miss McHenry 
Fries, Mrs. C. G. 
Gassenberg, Ellen 
Gates,Phyllis Scharff 
Goldberg, Mrs. Addie 
Grossman, Jeannette 
Grubb, Edna M. 
Hamm, Dorothy 

Hart, Frances 

Heal, Gertrude M. 
Heeck, Eliese 

Henkel, Grace 

Heyde, Margaret E. 
Hiestand, Elizabeth 
Hobrecht, Mrs. Charles 
Holmes, Isabelle A. 
Hook, Mrs. H. O. 
Hooper, Mrs. John 
Howard, Carrie L. 
Hueter, Mrs. Ernest L. 
Hull, Marion Turney 
Hussey, Mrs. Zelie A. 
Jacobsen, Adelaide 
Jann, Sara C. 

Janson, Edna E. 
Johnson, Frances 
Johnson, Jean 
Johnson, Miss M. 
Jung, Margaret 


MRS. VIOLET FENSTER BLAGG, ACCOMPANIST 
Kaunitz, Miss Mildred H. Vallina, Louise 


Kec, Marguerite 
Keefe, Mrs. F. C. 
Keenan, Miss S. A. 
Kelly, Addie 

Kern, Lydia H. 
Kinread, Mrs. Kate 
Kinross, Onida 

Kline, Mrs. Harold 
Knudsen, Marie S. 
Koblick, Mrs. Esther 
Kurtz, Mrs. Rubye 
Lachmund, Lorna 
Lawson, Mrs. A. W. 
Lazelle, Miss Rena 
Leonard, Kathryn 
Lewis, Miss Melita 
Lineer, Lillian 

Loge, Miss Clara 

Lull, Sarah L. 

Lynch, Mrs. Charles 
Lynn, Ethel 
MacIntosh, Mabel D. 
Mailer, Miss Barbara A. 
Marshall, Mrs. S. H. 
McGovern, Mrs. C. J. 
McKercher, Hyacinth 
Melkonian, Bertha 
Melville, Clara Soper 
Merriman, Miss Faith 
Mesherry, Mrs. Lewis 
Meussdorffer, Irene 
Mitchell, Miss Vlada 
Mont, Mrs. N. 
Morgan, Florence M. 
Morris, Caroline W. 
Morris, Edythe Vivian 
Munson, Florence E. 
Newhouse, Mrs. W. 
O'Day, Miss Marie 
Overbeck, Mrs. H. 
Penhorwood, Miss Li 
Perrin, Miss E. J. 
Price, Jane Ellen 
Pritchard, Miss Ann A. 
Podhurst, Mrs. N. 
Potvin, Miss Vivienne 
Reinecke, Lillian 
Rich, Mrs. Marie 
Riedaelli, M. 
Ringressy, Paula C. 
Roche, Mrs. William 
Roesti, Miss Olga 
Rosberg, Esther A. 
Scholz, Mrs. Elsie F. 
Schwartzberg, Simona 
Scobey, Mrs. Nellie G 
Sherman, Ruby M. 
Simpson, Miss Loretto 
Sisson, Madeleine A. 
Slate, Mrs. Ruth 
Slater, Ruth M. 
Smith, Madeleine L. 
Sousa, Frona Simon 
Southworth, Estelle 
Spencer, Annita A. 
Spaney, Alice « 

St. John, Marie 
Sterling, Miss Emma 
Street, Mrs. Francis 
Stuart, Ruby E. 

Sund, Miss Hilda 
Swint, Catherine B. 
Tauber, Miss D. 
Thomson, Carolyn R. 
Thompson, Mrs. E. H. 
Tooker, Dorothy 
Tresidder, Miss Oliene 
Trowbridge, Fawn Post 
Tum Suden, Teresa 
Ulman, Adele 


Vedder, Margaret 
Vejar, Anna Ray 
Vrang, Marian J. 
West, Miss Edythe 
Wheeler, Isabella 
Wheeler, Mrs. W. T. 
Willmering, Parl B. 


ALTOS 


Allen, Jane 

Atkinson, Eva Gruninger 
Barbat, Mrs. J. Henry 
Bartlett, Miss Olive S. 
Barbieri, Florence M. 
Baum, Helen H. 
Berman, Mrs. D. 
Berton, Nadine 
Blotkey, Mrs. Anna K. 
Blythe, Helene S. 
Booth, Maude 

Brock, Mrs. Netta 
Brown, Zulina B. 
Burke, Doris J. 
Butler, Miss Amy 
Calderwood, Rush 
Chamberlin, Sue 
Christensen, Alma 
Claussen, Estelle L. 
Clement, Ada 
Clement, Marion 

Cole, Susan 

Craig, Elizabeth 
Donnan, Carol 
Donnan, Grace W. 
Doty, Nellie F. 
Dozier, Elizabeth 
Ennis, Mrs. O. 

Evans, Madeline 
Fern, Mrs. Wallace T 
Finlay, Alice 

Freese, Kathryn 
Friedrichs, Mrs. C. 
Germain, Mrs. A. M. 
Glick, Mildred 
Guthrie, Paula 
Gwinn, Mrs. Joseph M. 
Haase, Mrs. S. 
Hammer, Mrs. Adele 
Hansen, Miss M. 
Harper, Mrs. Annabel 
Hellar, Edwinna M. 
Hennessy, Marion A. 
Heyde, Gertrude E. 
Hirsch, Eleanora E. 
Holcombe, Miss E. A. 
Holcenberg, Anita 
Holt, lvy 

Keesing, Florence 
Kienast, Celestine 
King, Helen 

Krist, Martha L. 
Langley, Mrs. Virginia 
Leonard, Ramona A. 
Lindstrom, Mrs. Louis 
Marston, M. Garthwaite 
Martschinke, Mrs. Ida 
Maul, Juliet 

Mayers, Gertrude 
McCoy, Elizabeth 
McElroy, Aileen J. 
Merrill, Miss Virginia 
Messerschmidt, Elsa 
Meyer, Mrs. Kuno 
Millington, Louise 
Miner, Ethelwyn E. 
Morse, Mrs. Helen 
Mott, Katherine A. 
Nelson, Mrs. Ada F. 
Neustadt, Mrs. B. 
Page, Mrs. Margaret V. 





a — 


Peltzer, Enid 

Peterson, Mrs. Gertie 
Plise, Mme. Marie Light 
Porter, Mrs. Francis H. 
Pratt, Mrs. W. W. 
Prentiss, Mrs. C. W. 
Preston, Ines F. 
Rampe, Mrs. Will E. 
Randall, Helena F. 
Reinhold, Anna 

Runge, Doris 

Schulz, Erna 

Shatz, Josephine 
Shepman, Mrs. Mildred 
Smith, Irene 

Stinson, Mrs. R. H. 
Stone, Grace E. 

Storm, Ethel L. 
Strandberg, Mary F. 
Strauch, Auge 

Tauber, Mrs. Jessica M. 
Trauner, Irene R. 
Trauner, Mrs. J. 

Tyler, Mrs. H. Upton 
Weinberg, Mrs. Emilie S: 
Weisbaum, Mrs. Elsie L. 
Wild, Helen 

Wise, Miss Dorothy 
Wise, Miss Frank 
Wilson, Miss L. May 
Worst, Eva 

Wrenshall, Mrs. E. K. 
Zaretzky, Emilie 


TENORS 


Adam, Richard 
Alexander, Thomas 
Anger, Maurice 
Ash, Major J. E. 
Barnes, George 
Barrientos, Bernard R. 
Battison, Robert 
Blatt, Walter E. 
Boyd, F. T. 

Brown, Guy L. 
Brown, Roy C. 
Carcione, J. 
Cardinal, Emile J. 
Dahl, F. M. 

De Li, R. E. Artur 
Edson, Henry F. 
Eggers, A. R. 
Erwin, Dixon A. 
Elmquist, J. L. 
Ferry, Joseph P. 
Folsom, Elbert 
Friedlander, G. 
Gagos, Kurken 
Giannini, Edilio 
Giannini, Italo 
Gross, Albert E. 
Hackenberg, Charles 
Hall, Philip C. 
Hamann, Henry C. 
Hoffman, C. P. 
Holton, Erwin 
Johnson, Willard L. 
Jones, Gwynfi 
Kennedy, Charles H. . 
Liederman, B. 
Lindner, Arthur 
Lundquist, Caleb 
Mahr, Jacob J. 
Marr, James 
Mavor, J. 

McNeil, Earle F. 
McNeil, J. L. 
Micklich, Max 
Morris, Carl 
Nelson, James F. 


Olds, Leon B. W. 





I Padel, Orrin Leon 


A A a Nf Rr op ee TLRS A 


Cowles, Jean 


a | Paxson, W.L. protke, fee 
| Rogers, W. H. eimar, \&. 1 
| Shanes: Dr: FH: EesconyCharleeH. 
| Smith, H. L. iene Vi 
pe Flammer, Victor 
a Smith, John Preston Grahn, Edward 
; Smith, Wm. L. Gruber, Dr. William 


Steward, Parker 
Stone, George O. 
Taylor, R. H. 
Thomas, Jack 
Williams, H. 


BASSES 


| Albert, F. W. 

Augustson, Hugo M. 
Ballard, John R. Isaacs, Frank 
Carleton, Chas. W. Lamont, G. E. 


j East Bay 


Guenter, George 
Hagan, Elmer 
Hauschild, J. H. 
Hein, George 
Hencke, John 
Herz, Leo 
Hofmann, W.C., 
Homberger, H. 
Hooke, Geo. H. 
Hunt, Emery L. 





San Francisco Division (Continued) 


Lundgren, Richard 
Lundine, Prof. Carolus 
Maginnes, A. 
Maples, Thomas 
Marston, Otis 

May, W. 

McCoy, L. Harlan 
Melbourne, Louis A. 
Moore, H. S. 
Oswald, Charles E. 
Parker, W. J. 
Pasmore, H. B. 
Platz, Joseph 
Plagemann, Louis 
Rich, Ross C. 
Rickman, Edwin 
Rickleffs, Henry F. 
Schepte, Henry 
Schoedsack, G. A. 
Schulz, G. W. 


Division 


) MISS MILDRED RANDOLPH, ACCOMPANIST 


SOPRANOS 
Alderton, Nina M. 


Beukers, Grace 
Campbell, Gladys Mary 
Cavanaugh, Miss Anita 
Cote, Mrs. Ethel 
Crockett, Mrs. Grace L. 
De Vaux, Mrs. Norman 
Ellis, Miss Jennie 
Engler, Muriel 

Gray, Mary 

Hammond, Margaret 
Hanly, Mrs. Leo B. 
Hawes, Mrs. L. V. 
Hayden, Ada F. 
Helmstein, Miss F. 
Hoszowski, Emma 


Lewis, Mrs. J. W. 


Morgan, Connie 
Nash, Mrs. Geo. H. 
Nielsen, Mrs. C. B. 
Nordvik, Mrs. J. M. 
Reynolds, Grace D. 
Rinehart, Miss Amy 
Schmitt, Mrs. Theresa E. 
Sweeney, Dorothy 
Shideler, Florence V. 
Weaver, Margaret G. 
Will, Mrs. Andrew J. 
Woods, Mrs. Glenn H. 


ALTOS 


Ashley, Blanche 
Brinkley, Mrs. B. G. 
Castleman, Mrs. Stanley 
Cushing, Mrs. A. S. 
Dillon, Miss Bertha 
Essex, Mrs. L. B. 
Flammer, Mrs. Charles 
Freese, Thada S. 


McCord, Miss Alice E 
Miller, Alice B. 
Miller, Mrs. H. K. 


Freitag, Miss Gertrude 
Gordon, Mrs. J. 
Harrington, Mrs. L. R. 
Hirsch, Edith 

Josten, Mrs. John 
Knott, Mrs. B. F. 
Medina, Mrs. Evelyn 


Moody, Mrs. May Van D 


Parker, Miss B. F. 
Rowlands, Mary J. 
Schulze, Mrs. Bertha 


Schwarzmann, Mrs. E. G. 


Shewmaker, Ethel M. 
Trevorrow, Mrs. W. J. 
von Ahnden, Emma 


Wagener, Winifred L. 


TENORS 


Blosser, Roy H. 
Clarke, Frank Sidney 
Egbert, R. 

Ellis, E. R. 


Seger, Stewart 
Sherriffs, Alick G. 
Simmen, John 
Skinner, John 
Smith, George 
Sommer, Dr. Herman 
Stradem, Charles 
Summerville, J. T. 
Taylor, W. Allen 
Tibbe, Cuthbert P. 
Tyler, Dr. H. Upton 
Van Hulst, Carel 
Vogel, H. Victor 
Ward, P. H. 

Watts, Francis P. 
West, John E. 
Wright, R. K. 
Wyatt, O. W. 
Young, A. C. 
Ziegler, J. E. 


Hanly, Leo B. 
Lenz, R: L. 
Sirola, Onni 


BASSES 


Arterburn, A. B. 
Ball, Alexander W. G. 
Brinkley, B. G. 
Castleman, S. J. 
Compton, Leonard D. 
Coy, Fred A. 

Freese, Henry M. 
Gordon, W. D. 
Harrington, L. R. 
Howe, William T. 
Jecks, F. Marshall 
Mullen, G. C 

Plant, T. R. 

Pollard, Clarence M. 
Reber, Otto F. 
Uridge, Harry E. 
Whitehead, Rex 





| Lewis, Mrs. M. H. 
; 


PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 


JOHANNA KRIS] OF FY 
JOHANNA Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Training 


Phone Douglas 6624 


MARGARET 


TIL LY Pianist 


ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 
Phelan Bldg. 


= 


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Commercial 


740 Pine Street 





sR ee hs enti Ee EIS Oe a ad ee a eee 
Special Summer Course for a limited 


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wishing to be coached for the Concert 
platform 


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ARGARET MARY MORGAN (°°: 


Engraving , P I. 1H [7S . Publishing 


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Studio: 
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Fillmore 9082 





Printing 





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The first 
Victor Records 
by the 
San Francisco 


Symphony Orchestra 


under the direction of 


the famous Wagnerian conductor 


Alfred Hertz 
issued on April 18 


On that date any dealer in Victor products will gladly play them 
for you. Hear the Victor Records by Alfred Hertz and the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and you will appreciate how 
truly the Victrola brings to you their art—and the pleasure to 
be derived from hearing them as often as you wish in your own 
home on the Victrola. 


There is but one Victrola and that is made by the Victor Company 
Look for these Victor trade marks 


t Tt 


we <2 Victor Talking Machine CO Camden,N. J. 
“HIS MASTERS, VOICE” Victor Talking Machine Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal 
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SECOND SAN FRANCISCO 
| 





F 
ROGRAMME 








STEINWAY 


The instrument of the immortals 
_and the piano of the home 


Choose your piano carefully. 

Choose it as you would choose 
an intimate member of your 
family circle. Choose it for 


qualities that will! endure. 


Let your choice, if possible, 
be a Steinway. There is no 
other piano of qualities more 
enduring —of distinction so 


immediately recognized. 


Sherman, |@lay & Co. 


Kearny and Sutter Streets, s.F. 
Oakland, Fourteenth and Clay Streets 











SECOND SAN FRANCISCO 


Surin Music F pstinal 


JOINT AUSPICES 


CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR., AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS | 


AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman 


Angelo Rossi Edwin G. Bath 
AND 
Musical Assoriation of San Hranciseo | 
Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3: 1910 | 


WHICH MAINTAINS 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 





OFFICERS 
JoHN D. McKEE, President 
J. B. LEvison, Vice-President E.. R. DiMonp, Treasurer 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS ) 3 
J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 


E. D. Beylard E. R, Dimond Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding John S. Drum L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Milton H. Esberg Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron Herbert Fleishhacker J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain J. D. Grant Wm. T. Sesnon 

W. E. Creed E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C H. Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
Wm. H. Crocker John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Manager 
Assisted by 
SAN FRANCISCO COMMUNITY SERVICE 
Henry L. Mayer, President 
Marshal Hale, Vice-President 


C. L. Rosekrans, Executive Secretary 


457 PHELAN BUILDING 
GARFIELD 2819 








ae ee oa es 


THE ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 


WESTERN OFFICE OF 
WOLFSOHN MUSICAL BUREAU, INc. 


ANNOUNCES 


TEN SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS 


INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS. ARTISTS 
On Thursday Evenings During Season 1925-26 


SPECIAL SEASON TICKET PRICES: 
$3.50, $5.00, $8.00 


A Deposit of $1.00 Per Ticket Holds Your Reservation. Balance to Be Paid on or 
Before September 1, 1925 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM . 


Josef Hofmann 
“The Best of the best.” 


Edward Johnson 


(Leading Tenor, Met. Opera Co.) 


Operatic excerpts, lights and costumes 
“America’s foremost tenor.” 


Margaret Matzenauer 
(Leading Contralto, Met. Opera Co.) 


“Sings magnificently.” 


Cecilia Hansen 


“Sensation of the season.” 


Joint Recital 


Hulda Lashanska 


“Most beautiful lyric soprano of 
today.” 


Felix Salmond 


“The Fritz Kreisler of the 
violoncello.” 








Thamar Karsavina and her 
Ballet, with Pierre 
Vladimiroff 


“Everything she does is instinct with 
grace.” 
Maria Kurenko 


“A new Patti from Siberia.” 


Vincente Ballester 
(Leading Baritone, Met. Opera Co.) 


“4 continuous delight.” 


Tescha Seidel 


“4 mighty master of his instrument.” 





Joint Recital 


Olga Samaroff 


“Greatest of America’s women 
pianists.” 





London String Quartet | 


“The finest chamber music 
organization in the world.” 





RESERVE YOUR SEASON TICKETS NOW—SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AFTER APRIL 25—638 PHELAN BUILDING 








ALFRED HERTZ, Conpuctor 


SOPRANOS 
Mme: HELEN STANLEY Mrs. LorNA LACHMUND 
Mrs. Grack HENKEL Mrs. TERESA TUM SUDEN 
CONTRALTOS 
Mpg, CHARLES CAHIER Mrs. Eva GRUNINGER ATKINSON 
Miss RADIANA PAZMOR Mrs. LInLIAN BIRMINGHAM 
TENOR 


RubDOLF LAUBENTHAL 


BASSES 


ALEXANDER KIPNIS EK. Haroutp DANA 


CHORUS DIRECTOR 


Dr. Hans LESCHKE 


ASSISTANT CHORUS DIRECTORS 


GuENN H. Woops | EUGENE BLANCHARD 


ORGANIST 


UpaA WALDROP 


ACCOMPANISTS 
Mrs. VIOLET FENSTER BLAGG 
Miss MitpRED RANDOLPH 


J. L. ELMQUIST 


CHORUS SECRETARY 


LOUISE BENNETT 








| The Maximum of Advancement with Minimum of Effort | 
I se ee ee ee 


MR. LOUIS 


GRAVEURE 


Distinguished Recital Baritone 


and 


ie Famous ‘‘Master’’ Vocal Teacher 





THE PIONEER DIRECTOR OF “VOCAL 
MASTER-CLASSES” IN THE WEST 


will be in 


LOS ANGELES, CAL. | SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


(Second Summer ) (Third Summer) 


June 1 to July 6 July 27 to August 29 
1925 1925 
FIVE WEEKS ONLY IN EACH CITY 


“MASTER” and “AUDITOR” CLASSES 
and PRIVATE TUITION 








For Particulars, Rates, Reservations, 
Details, Etc., address 


SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER, Manager 
Foxcroft Building, 68 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 


ENROLL NOW ENROLL NOW 





Learn to sing in the way that is actually sustaining Graveure 
in the position of one of the world’s greatest artists 











THIRD CONCERT 
Thursday, April 23, 1925, 8:20 P. M. 





SOLOISTS: 
Sopranos: Contraltos: 
MME. HELEN STANLEY MME. CHARLES CAHIER 
Lorna Lachmund Eva Gruninger Atkinson 
Teresa tum Suden Lillian Birmingham 
Grace Henkel Radiana Pazmor 
Tenor: Basso: 
RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL ALEXANDER KIPNIS 


E. Harold Dana 


PROGRAMME 


‘*The Pilgrimage of the Rose’ ’...........---------.---------0++- Schumann 
Soli, Chorus and Orchestra 


Intermission 
Overture, ‘“The Russian Easter’’..........-.-.------ Rimsky-Korsakow 
Aria, “‘O Paradiso,” from “‘L’ Africaine’’...........--..--- Meyerbeer 


RUDOLF LAUBENTHAL 


Lee PoeMme CEs) EE XtASOr eee fae oe ee nee a ies eee Scriabine 
For Orchestra and Organ 


(First time in San Francisco) 


Uda Waldrop at the Organ 





| 





JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Master of the Pianoforte 


PLAYS AND ENDORSES EXCLUSIVELY THE 


Ghicke kering ye 


This great artist and teacher expresses his authoritative 
opinion in the following terms: 


“The Chickering pianos have a splendid evenness 
of scale and action, which is the most important 
factor in artistic performance. In addition, I find 
in the Chickering piano a wonderful variety of tone 
color and an exquisite singing quality, from the 
most delicate to the most powerful effects, with a 
beautiful elasticity of touch, combining brilliancy 
and solidity in a completely satisfying manner. 
(Signed) JOsEF LHEVINNE.” 


CHICKERING WAREROOMS 
LEE S. ROBERTS, INC. 
230 Post STREET, S. F., CAL. 


This new home of the Chickering will open on or about May 1, 1925. | 
An invitation of inspection is extended all music lovers. 











‘‘The Pilgrimage of the Rose” - - - ~ Robert Schumann 


All nature is rejoicing in the return of Spring. Youths and maidens 
sing its praises; trees put forth their leaves; flowers, their brightest bloom; 
and even fairies give vent to their joy in dancing and song. But one voice 
of sadness is heard amidst this general exultation— it is that of a sweet little 
Rose. From her flowery nook, she has heard the maidens singing of Love; 
and blooming and fragrance have ceased to fulfil her idea of bliss. She 
sighs to be a maiden and to love as maidens do. The Queen of the Fairies 
endeavors to persuade her that Love does not always bring happiness, but 
the Rose is urgent, and her wish is at length granted. The Queen changes 
her into a lovely maiden; she gives her a magic rose and charges her to bear 
it with her on her earthly pilgrimage. As long as she retains this flower in 
her possession, she is to be shielded from harm and to enjoy the purest of 
earth’s joys; but should she part with it, she is at once to forfeit her human 


existence and resume that of a rose. 


Our Rose-Maiden, bearing her guardian or emblem flower in her hand, 


now sets forth on her journeyings. She is first repulsed by an old crone to 
whom she applies for shelter, on the score of her having no “character. 
Her next encounter is with a Grave-digger, who is preparing a grave for the 
young and beauteous daughter of a neighboring Miller. He tells the tale 





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CU ALIS 


CONSISTENT 
PRICES 


Shreve and Company 
Jewelers and Silversmiths 


Post and Grant Avenue 
San Francisco 


[nT 





Ss ee eS See = 





Third Annual Season 





The San Francisco Opera 
Company 


Gaetano Merola, Director 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM, SEPTEMBER 19 to OCTOBER 4, 1925 


8 SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 
(6 Evenings and 2 Saturday Matinees ) 


2 NON-SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 


Sopranos: 
Claudia Muzio 
Elvira de Hidalgo 


Rosina Torri 


Contraltos: 
Marguerite d’ Alvarez 


Irene Marlo 


Conductors: 
Gaetano Merola 
Pietro Cimini 


Giacomo Spadoni 


Tenors: 
Tito Schipa 
Fernand Ansseau 
Antonio Cortis 
Lodovico Oliviero 


Baritones and Basses: 
Riccardo Stracciari 
Cesare Formichi 
Marcel Journet 
Vittorio Trevisan 
Antonio Nicolich 


Technical Director: 
Giovanni Grandi 


Ballet Master: 


Natale Carossio 


The operas presented will be chosen from the following: 


‘‘Aida,’” “Samson et Dalila,”’ 
(Massenet), “Il Barbiere di Siviglia,’’ “‘Martha,”’ 


‘Traviata,’ “‘Rigoletto,”’ “Manon” 


‘‘Amore dei Tre 


Re,” “‘Faust,’’ ““Anima Allegra’’ (first time in America outside the 
Metropolitan), ‘“Tosca,’"” “‘Madame Butterfly’ and “Fedora.” 
Subscriptions 


Subscriptions will be accepted commencing Monday, May 


llth, at the offices of SAN FRANCISCO OPERA COMPANY. 


KEARNY 6346 


68 POST STREET 











of love forsaken, of a broken heart, an early grave. Our poor Rose sighs: 
‘Alas! does true love bring such sorrow?’ Her conversation with the 
Grave-digger is interrupted by the approach of the funeral procession. A 
mournful dirge is sung around the grave of the Miller's fair daughter, and 
the Rose mingles her voice with those of the friends and relatives who are 
bemoaning their loss. 

This sad duty fulfilled, the Grave-digger has leisure to perceive that the 
Stranger-Maiden is young and lovely; he offers her a shelter for the night, 
which she gladly accepts, ending her first day's pilgrimage with thanks- 
giving, but hearing in her dreams the voices of her early companions, who 
beg her to return to Rose-land and to avoid the griefs that an earthly 
pilgrimage must necessarily entail on her. 

During the night, the Grave-digger has bethought himself of a charm- 
ing arrangement. He has been struck with the resemblance between “Rosa’’ 
and the only daughter whom the Miller and his wife are mourning, and he 
determines to introduce her to the old couple, hoping they may feel inclined 
to adopt her in the place of their loved one. His plan meets with success; 
Rosa is adopted by the Miller, is wooed in due time and wedded by the son 


of his neighbor the Forester. At the end of a year, a sweet babe comes into 





7 8 « ° Management 
Leading Musical cAttractions — 51 py c. OpPENHFIMER 








1) 


TITO MME. FRIEDA 





FAMOUS TENOR 
TWO RECITALS 


COLUMBIA 
THEATER 


POSITIVE FAREWELL 
Entire Change of Program 


NEXT SUNDAY AFTERNOON oxtx AUDITORIUM 


Thursday Night, April 30 
April 26 icc leit aed f 





COR 








TICKETS ON SALE AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 




















the world to bless the union:—and now it would seem that Rosa has indeed 
reaped all that was promised to her from her careful holding of the magic 
rose. The purest of earthly joys were promised to her. She has been 
daughter, wife, mother—what can she lack? Only to insure perfect safety 
and happiness to one whom she loves. She therefore places the rose in the 
hand of her own babe and fades away; not, however, into Rose-land—but 


thither where the Angels bear her. 


Overture, “La Grande Paque Russe” (The Russian Easter ) - - 
- = - - ~ - ~ - - Rimsky-Korsakow 
This work, an overture on themes of the Russian Church, contains on 
the score the following Biblical quotation: 
‘Tet God arise, let His enemies be scattered: 
Let them also that hate Him, flee before Him. 
As smoke is driven away, so drive them away: 
As wax melteth before the fire, 


So let the wicked perish at the presence of God.” 
(Psalm LXVII.) 


The overture begins with an Introduction in which a melody of the 





‘LAST CONCERT 


Spring Music Festival 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 25 


Soloists: 


Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 


“Rhapsodie.” ...s-c-.--cecccecencn oer canta nen acteneecennennmennemennneeccteeete: Brahms 
For Contralto Solo, Male Chorus and Orchestra 
Symphony No. 2 (‘‘Resurrection’”” Symphony)......-.......------ Mahler 


For Soprano and Contralto Soli, Mixed Chorus, 
Orchestra and Organ 











Russian Church is given to the wood-wind. The strings take it up. A 
cadenza for the solo violin leads to a section in which the solo violoncello 
repeats a phrase. The opening chant is now given to the trombones. 
Strings answer antiphonally. The solo violin has another cadenza. A 
portion of the chant is developed. The main body of the overture begins 
with the exposition and development of the first theme, which is taken 
from the ecclesiastical melody of the Introduction, first in the strings and 
clarinet, then in a steadily fuller orchestra. The second theme is allotted 


to the violins (two of them in altissimo play harmonics) against repeated 
chords in the woodwind and a triplet figure for the harp. A call is sounded 
by horns and trumpets. A new section follows with much work for per- 
cussion instruments. ‘‘Note the imitation of a deep-toned bell in the gong.’ 
There is a church-like return of the second theme in the woodwind, and then 
a recitative for the trombone, accompanied by sustained harmonies for the 
violoncellos and double basses. The first theme reappears. There is the 
customary recapitulation section, more extended, with very different instru- 
mentation. The coda is long. At the end the second theme is sounded 
vigorously by trombones and lower strings. 


Aria, “‘O Paradiso!”’ from “L’Africaine” - 2 - Meyerbeer 


Meyerbeer wrote eighteen operas, of which “T’Africaine’’ is the last. 








Representing 


Lyon & Healy 
HARPS 


The ST ill NaS 
World’s Standard — gar {juan Mil imdae ey, 


Concert 


- 


i 


Solo Harpist S. F. Symphony _ For Engagements Address Bohemian Club 








LAZAR S. 
SAMOILOFF 


Director and Vocal 
Pedagogue 

The most striking feature 
of his teaching is its prac- 
tical application to the 
constant problems of the 
professional artist and 
teacher. Letters of appre- 
ciation from many world- 
famous artists attest to 
his enviable place in the 
teaching world among 
them being Claire Dux, 
Julia Claussen, Bianca 
Saroya, Kurt Tauncher, 
Rosa Raisa, Isa Kremer, 
Helen Stanley. 


JOSEF 
LHEVINNE 


Piano 


A great artist, he has 
proved himself a remark- 
able teacher of his instru- 
ment. He is ina position, 
by his own experience, 
to bring every true tal- 
ent to fruition in a far 
shorter time than would 
ordinarily be considered 
possible. 


He is a teacher of rare 
insight as well as a vir- 
tuoso, and brings unusual 
authority to all questions 
relating to piano playing. 


eee 








JULIA 
CLAUSSEN 


Voice 
One of the world’s truly 
great voices. Not only is 


she at the height of her 
own powers, but she has 
had experience as a 
teacher, and possesses the 
rare gift of imparting 
knowledge. She will give 
general instruction in 
stage technique, coach 
operatic roles and demon- 
strate her own vocal 
method. 





LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 


ENDORSES THE 


Baldwin 


Fairmont Hotel, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
October 10, 1924. 


Baldwin Piano Company, 
310 Sutter Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 


Dear Sirs: 

Let me express my appreciation of your kind- 
ness in co-operating with the Master School of 
Musical Arts in California. 


I have been familiar with the Baldwin Piano 
for many years. I have found it unrivalled in 
tone and action—in fact, the ideal piano for 
both concert and studio. The school has done 
well to have made its arrangements with you. 


Very truly yours, 
(Signed) LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF. 











OF CALIFO 


LAZAR.S. SAMOILC 


ENpowep By ALICE CAM?BEL 


br 
Atice Seckens, Ma 


ENROLL 


OPENING OF riIR 
= 
LAZAR S. SAN 


San Francisco Clas: O 


SEVEN ‘VEI 


JOSEF LHE' 


San Francisco Clas; C 





ANDRES de 
SEGUROLA 


A master’ in. character 
portrayal, for many sea- 
sons leading bass bari- 
tone of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. He will 
conduct opera classes, 
teaching acting, and 
makeup, and coaching in 
operatic repertoire. The 
staging of acts from 
operas will give practical 
experience and prove an 
important step for the 
operatic aspirant. 





One of the most success- 
ful coaches in New York 
today. Recently heard 
here with Jeritza. 





FIVE V/EE 





WILLIAM 
HENDIRS¢ 


Distinguished crit 
New York Su 
author of any 
will give six lect 
Monday anc. TI 
evenings at the I 
Hotel, beginring 
Open to the publ 





A. KOSTIILA 


A course in sight 
and ear traliling 
fessionals and < 
by one emin¢ntly 
ful in this in 
branch of misic. 


— 





iL 


LIFORNIA 


{(OILOFF, oirector 


CAMPBELL. MACFARLANE 


1CKEL’, Manager 


\LL NOW 


FE PIRST CLASSES 


i 
5. SAMOILOFF 


lass Opens April 27th 


EN 'VEEKS 


“LHEVINNE 


“las; Opens May 11th 


VE VIEEKS 





VILLIAM J. 
ENDERSON 


wished critic of the 
York Sun, and 

of any books, 
ve six lectures on 
ry anc. Thursday 
gs at the Fairmont 
beginring May 25. 
0 the ,public. 





ro 


-OSTILLANETZ 


rse in sight reading 
ar traliling for pro- 
yals and amateurs 
> emin¢éntly success- 
n this important 
1 of misic. 


ee 








GARDNER 
Violin 

One of the leaders among 
America’s younger violin- 
ists. Well-known as con- 
ductor and composer, 
through long association 
with his teacher, Franz 
Kneisel, he has rapidly 
taken a place among the 
successful teachers of vio- 
lin, chamber music and 
conducting. 





& Bis: 
ANNIE LOUISE 
DAVID 
Harp 
One of the best-known 


teachers and _ performers 
of the harp in America. 





CESAR 
THOMSON 


Violin 


One ot the most distin- 
guished among the violin 
teachers and performers 
of modern times, sharing 
with Auer the distinction 
of having remarkable suc- 
cessful artist students. 
Formerly it has been nec- 
essary to go to Brussels 
to work with him. This 
is the first opportunity to 
study in the West with 
this justly famed master. 





FELIX 
SALMOND 


Chamber Music and 
Cello 


The extraordinary artis- 
try of this noted cellist 
has made him a favorite 
everywhere. His classes 
in London have been the 
goal of students from all 
parts of the world. Coach- 
ing in chamber music will 
be given by Mr. Salmond 
and pianists, violinists 
and cellists may enroll 
for actual experience or 
as auditors. 


SE ————————————— 


SIGISMUND 
STOJOWSKI 


Piano and Composition 


He holds a high place in 
three phases of musical 
creation: pianist, com- 
poser and teacher. The 
most authoritative expo- 
nent of  Paderewski’s 
methods and ideals. He 
stands today among the 
eminent artist teachers. 
Numbered among his 
pupils are Levitzki, 
Novaes and Loesser. 








This Faculty of Celebrated Artist 


Teachers Will Give Instruction in 


SAN FRANCISCO 
AND 
LOS ANGELES 


Between May and September, 


1925 





Dates for each Master sent on request 
Free Scholarships are offered with each 
Teacher 


Write for Application Blank and Catalog. 
Address 


Master School of Musical Arts 


ALIcE SECKELS, Manager 


Office: 


Room 139, Fairmont HOTEL 
PHONE DoucLas 7267 SAN FRANCISCO 





QUALITY PIANOS 
and PLAYER PIANOS 


JULIA CLAUSSEN 


Prima “Donna “Mezzo-Soprano 
Metropolitan Opera Co., New York 









WRITES: 
KRANICH & BACH, 
New York. 


Gentlemen: 
Your piano is unexcelled in the beautiful 


quality of its tone and workmanship. 
Very sincerely yours 


Exclusive ‘Representative 





o Oakland 
MUSIC co. — 


140 O’FARRELL STREET 1016 J Street, Sacramento 





The Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society 


HIBERNIA BANK 
Incorporated 1864 

















HEAD OFFICE 
COR. MARKET, McALLISTER and JONES STS. 


MISSION OFFICE 


COR. VALENCIA AND 22ND STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


Nani ubese testcase hake on eer eA Ate kote $81,603,701.25 
RUSE Ve Nee es ee a la 5,922.693.15 


OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A. M. TO 3 P. M. 
OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY FROM 10 A. M. TO 8 P. M. 


SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AT MISSION OFFICE 





I 
| 
) 
i 


Symphony Society of New York, December 10, 1908, under the direction 
of Modest Altschuler. Upon this occasion, Mr. Altschuler supplied the 
following information: 

“While I was in Switzerland during the summer of 1907 at Scriabine s 
villa, he was all taken up with the work, and I watched its progress with 
keen interest. The composer of the Poeme de l’Extase’ has sought to 
express therein something of the emotional (and therefore musically com- 
municable) side of his philosophy of life. Scriabine is neither a pantheist 
nor a theosophist, yet his creed includes ideas somewhat related to each of 
these schools of thought. There are three divisions in his poem: |. His 
soul in the orgy of love; 2. The realization of a fantastical dream; 3. The 
glory of his own art.” 

The work is scored for piccolo, three flutes, three oboes, English horn, 
three clarinets, bass clarinet, three bassoons, double bassoon, eight horns, 
five trumpets, three trombones, bass tuba, kettledrums, bass drum, cymbals, 
triangle, gong, bells, celesta, two harps, violin solo, organ and strings. 

The following analytical description was written by Dr. A. Eaglefield 
Hull in his ‘‘Scriabine’’: 

‘The basic idea of the fourth ‘chief orchestral work of Scriabine is the 


ecstasy of untrammeled action, the joy in creative activity. The prologue, 


YEATMAN GRIFFITH 


“Recognized Authority on Voice Production and the Art of Singing” 
Summer Vocal Master Classes 


FOR ARTISTS - TEACHERS - STUDENTS 
ENROLLMENTS NOW 


Address Communications 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. June 3rd to July Ist 
To IDA G. SCOTT, Kohler & Chase Building 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. July 6th to Aug. 3rd 
To L. E. BEHYMER, 705 Auditorium Building 
PORTLAND, ORE. Aug. 10th to Sept. 7th 
To OTTO WEDEMEYER, 611 Bush & Lane Building 











San Francisco’s Home for 4 Musical Education 
ta ot ie cht ea Ne it MOPS CS RAND Me ODES ALICE Me SS 


Complete Summer Courses 
1925 Season Opens June 22nd 


Instructions in all Branches of 


MUSIC DURING THE SUMMER 


Morning (lasses Free Recitals Private Lessons 
ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE 
2315 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 


TELEPHONE WEST 4737 

















garden-fresh 
FLOWERS 


OU are always 
assured Nature’s 
mostexqusite Blooms 


Che Dominican College 
of San Rafael 
A College for Women 














Conducted by the Sisters of Saint Dominic 
Resident and Day Students 
















Degrees conferred in College of Letters 


when we serve you— and Sciences and in School of Music. 






Approved by the Graduate Division of 
the University of California. 


Accredited by the California State Board 
of Education. California State Teachers’ 
Credentials granted. 


Blossoms that will 


















express your thought 





in fragrant, unforget- 





School of Music Building, Auditorium 
and Equipment unsurpassed. Artist Fac- 
ulty. Normal Music Training Department 
offers exceptional opportunities both to 
resident and day pupils. California State 
Elementary and Secondary Credentials in 
Music granted. 


able beauty. 
















Orders telegraphed anywhere 


Ris Gbelbedh 


The Voice of a Thousand Gardens” 
226-226 GRANT AVE. TEL. KEARNY 4975 
SAN FRANCISCO 


For information, address 


The Dean of the College 
San Rafael | 








Artist Concert Course under 
management of Alice Metcalf 








San Francisco Conservatory of Music 
Ada Clement and Lillian Hodghead, Co-Directors 


NEW PIPE ORGAN SOON READY 


Summer Organ Courses With 


WARREN D. ALLEN 





3435 Sacramento Street Phone: Fillmore 898 





Madame Emmy Tromboni 


Teaches Absolute Purity of Tone Along Scientific, Modern Lines 


Prepares Students and Teachers for All Branches of 
Vocal Art 


601-602 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Phone Garfield 6046 








Andante, Lento, contains two motives, which may be said to symbolize: 
(a) human striving after the ideal (flute) ; (b) the ego theme gradually 
realizing itself (clarinet). The sonata form proper, Allegro volando, starts 
with a subject symbolic of the soaring flight of the spirit. The leading 
motives of the prologue are almost immediately brought into conjunction 
with it. The second subject, Lento, is of a dual character, the higher theme 
on a violin solo being marked carezzando, and apparently typifying human 
love, whilst the lower theme is marked serioso. The third subject then 
enters, an imperious trumpet theme, summoning the will to rise up. The 
creative force appears in rising sequences of fourths, having a close affinity 
to the corresponding theme in ‘Prometheus’ (Scriabine’s fifth and last 
completed orchestral work). The themes grow in force and pass through 
moods of almost kaleidoscopic duration—at times spending dreamy mo- 
ments of delicious charm and perfume, occasionally rising to climaxes of 
almost delirious pleasure; at other moments experiencing violent, stormy 
emotions and tragic cataclysms. In the Development we pass through 
moments of great stress, and only achieve brief snatches of the happier 


mood. Defiant phrases cut right down across the calmer motives, the 
second of which appears in full as a prologue to the Recapitulation section. 
The three subjects are repeated in full, followed by moods of the utmost 











Coe ee 
| Stella Raymond-Vought ereaxore. srareccer 





Coloratura Soprano Voice Culture Coloratura Soprano 
Available for Concerts, Oratorios and in Joint Recital With 
ws erecta MAX GEGNA 
\ “Madame Vought has a bril- ’Cellist San Francisco Symphony 
liant soprano voice, which she 
uses with the skill of an IRENE MILLIER 
artist. Her coloratura was Pianist and Accompanist 
perfect, every note being given FAIRMONT HOTEL 


with the polish of a gem.” 


3 —San Francisco “Call.” Friday Evening, May Ist, 8:30 
ission, $1. Tickets, Sh 
796 “Sutter Street. Beoasecteda20 Admission Re aicnee erman 





Warriner Vocal Studios 


METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE 
NEW YORK CITY 


SAN FRANCISCO SUMMER COURSE 
June 25th to August 25th, 1925 


For information and reservations address studio 43. 








/ 
A 
4 


a es eS 





charm, and pleasurable feelings becoming more and more ecstatic, even 
scherzando, at length reaching an Allegro molto coda of the swiftest and 
lightest flight imaginable. The trumpet subject becomes broader, and 
assumes great majesty, until it finally unrolls itself in a rugged and diatonic 
epilogue of immense power and triumphant grandeur. The harmonic 
system of this work may be said to be on the border line between the first 
period of the composer's harmonic technic and his final one. The new 
harmony is not continuous, but is here used in conjunction or rather in 
alternation with the old. The coda is almost (not quite) old fashioned in 
its broad diatonic style, being completely devoid of chromaticism. The 
composition serves as an excellent illustration of the manner in which 
Scriabine’s more advanced harmony sprang logically and evolved gradually 
from the older method. We have attempted a psychological explanation 
of the music—an almost unavoidable course, seeing that it is outlined in 
the composer's French indications, and that he pursues the same methods, 
the very same moods, occasionally even the same melodic subject (the 
trumpet theme with that in ‘Prometheus’ ) as he does in his other symphonic 
works. But Scriabine, notwithstanding all his explainers and annotators 


(blessed word!), is the champion of absolute music — music pure and 


simple—read what you like into it.”’ 


IRVING KRICK 


Solo Pianist 


Available for Club Engagements in Bay Region 


Season 1925-1926 


Address: 479 Forest Street, Oakland 
Phone: Piedmont 3554 


ediak M cM AN U . Pianist and Teacher 


1459 4th Ave. Sunset 2487 


Available for Engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist 
Mondays: 526 Powell Street Thursdays: 2510 College Ave., Berkeley 


Has toured as assisting artist with Pablo Casals; Jean Gerardy and George Enesco 


LISZNIEWSKA Master Class of Pianoforte Playing 


Master Faculty—Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 
Five weeks commencing June 22, 1925 
Sorosis Club, 536 Sutter St., San Francisco, and School of Music, Dominican College, San Rafael 
For full information address: 
ALICE METCALF, Manager, STUDIO: 1233 California St., San Francisco Phone Prospect 8158 
See EE EES Sc OPE EE a ART EROS an A IVI SEDI ERTS ES a BOT Te MOT AR Lhe I 









MARGUERITE 
MELVILLE 











= 





ersunnel 


The San Franciseo Symphony Orchestra 


FIRST VIOLINS 


Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 


Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 

' Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W.F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. - 

Pasmore, Mary 

Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 

Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 


_ Purt, B. 


Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 
Willard, J. M. 
Curcio, R. 
Baker, Genevra 


VIOLAS 


Fenster, Lajos 
Principal 


Hah], E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 
Wellendorff, H. 
Firestone, N. 





"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 
Demetrio, G. 
Gough, Flori 


BASSES 


Lahann, J. 
Principal 


Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 


Annarumi, A. 
Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 
Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 


Addimandao, C. 
Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 
Randall, H. B. 


Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 
Randall, W. F. 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 


Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 


Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 
Findeisen, C. 
Cleveland, G. 
Salvatore, M. 
Trutner, H. 
Dabelow, W. 


TRUMPETS 
Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 
Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 
Edwards,G. M. 
Savant, S. 
Linden, Arthur 
Dering, B.A. 
Klatzkin, B. 


BASS TRUMPET 
Klotz, L. 


TROMBONES 


Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 
Ingram, T. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 


Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 


Nickel, M. 
Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Wood, W.A. 
Overbeck, H. 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 





Piono D 


P 


es 








ae 


—w 


, 





SOPRANOS 


Albright, Ethel A. 
Alpern, L 

Anderson, Anna 
Anderson, Hildur E. 
Anderson, Margaret 
Asmussen, Dorothea 
Atha, Mrs. Miles M. 
Auger, Miss Lina 
Augustson, Mrs. Selina 
Backus, Violet M. 
Ballard, Zebulon V. 
Bannerman, Miss Julia 
Barr, Elsie J. 

Bartlett, Catherine Qu: ° 
Bashford, Edith 
Beckert, Elsie M. 
Beckett, Helen I. 
Beppler, Miss Myrtha 
Blagg, Violet Fenster 
Bowen, Beatrice 
Bradford, Dorothy 
Bradford, Helen M. 
Brennan, Katherine 
Brown, Genevieve McK 
Brown, Mrs. R. C. 
Buck, Mrs. K. A. 
Burns, Miss E. 

Canet, Kathleen 
Caradonna, Miss Mary 
Centini, Mary G. 
Chapman, Lula Mae 
Clifford, Miss Beatrice 
Cleal, Anyta Clayr 
Cole, Grace A. 
Crowley, Miss Katharine 
Davidson, Miss Leda 
Davis, Mrs. L. 
DeVoney, Bessie D. 
Debrecht, Eulalia 
DeCamp, Miss Carolyn 
Delaney, Lorna Claire 
Deward, Mrs. J. M. 
Doane, Mrs. O. K. 
Doheny, Mrs. Nellie 
Duerbeck, Anna M. 
Durkin, Miss A. Hazel 
Eames, Mrs. E. A. 
Easton, Mrs. Verna M. 
Elliott, Miss Adelaide 
Ellwanger, Clara Jane 
Emerson, Miss Mattie E. 
Erwin, Miss McHenry 
Fries, Mrs. C. G. 
Gassenberg, Ellen 
Gates, Phyllis Scharff 
Goldberg, Mrs. Addie 
Grossman, Jeannette 
Grubb, Edna M. 
Hamm, Dorothy 

Hart, Frances 

Heal, Gertrude M. 
Heeck, Eliese 

Henkel, Grace 

Heyde, Margaret E. 
Hiestand, Elizabeth 
Hobrecht, Mrs. Charles 
Holmes, Isabelle A. 
Hook, Mrs. H.O. - 
Hooper, Mrs. John 
Howard, Carrie L. 
Hueter, Mrs. Ernest L. 
Hull, Marion Turney 
Hussey, Mrs. Zelie A. 
Jacobsen, Adelaide 
Jann, Sara C. 

Janson, Edna E. 
Johnson, Frances 
Johnson, Jean 
Johnson, Miss M. 
Jung, Margaret 


—CHORUS 


San Francisco Division 





MRS. VIOLET FENSTER BLAGG, ACCOMPANIST 
Kaunitz, Miss Mildred H. Vallina, Louise 


Kec, Marguerite 
Keefe, Mrs. F. C. 
Keenan, Miss S. A. 
Kelly, Addie 

Kern, Lydia H.. 
Kinread, Mrs. Kate 
Kinross, Onida 

Kline, Mrs. Harold 
Knudsen, Marie S. 
Koblick, Mrs. Esther 
Kurtz, Mrs. Rubye 
Lachmund, Lorna 
Lawson, Mrs. A. W. 
Lazelle, Miss Rena 
Leonard, Kathryn 
Lewis, Miss Melita 
Lineer, Lillian 

Loge, Miss Clara 

Lull, Sarah L. 

Lynch, Mrs. Charles 
Lynn, Ethel 
MacIntosh, Mabel D. 
Mailer, Miss Barbara A. 
Marshall, Mrs. S. H. 
McGovern, Mrs. C. J. 
McKercher, Hyacinth 
Melkonian, Bertha 
Melville, Clara Soper 
Merriman, Miss Faith 
Mesherry, Mrs. Lewis 
Meussdorffer, Irene 
Mitchell, Miss Vlada 
Mont, Mrs. N. 
Morgan, Florence M. 
Morris, Caroline W. 
Morris, Edythe Vivian 
Munson, Florence E. 
Newhouse, Mrs. W. G. 
O'Day, Miss Marie 
Overbeck, Mrs. H. 
Penhorwood, Miss Li 
Perrin, Miss E. J. 
Price, Jane Ellen 
Pritchard, Miss Ann A. 
Podhurst, Mrs. N. 
Potvin, Miss Vivienne 
Reinecke, Lillian 
Rich, Mrs. Marie 
Riedaelli, M. 
Ringressy, Paula C. 
Roche, Mrs. William 
Roesti, Miss Olga 
Rosberg, Esther A. 
Scholz, Mrs. Elsie F. 
Schwartzberg, Simona 
Scobey, Mrs. Nellie G 
Sherman, Ruby M. 
Simpson, Miss Loretto 
Sisson, Madeleine A. 
Slate, Mrs. Ruth 
Slater, Ruth M. 
Smith, Madeleine L. 
Sousa, Frona Simon 
Southworth, Estelle 
Spencer, Annita A. 
Spaney, Alice 

St. John, Marie 
Sterling, Miss Emma 
Street, Mrs. Francis 
Stuart, Ruby E. 

Sund, Miss Hilda 
Swint, Catherine B. 
Tauber; Miss D. 
Thomson, Carolyn R. 
Thompson, Mrs. E. H. 
Tooker, Dorothy 
Tresidder, Miss Oliene 
Trowbridge, Fawn Post 
Tum Suden, Teresa 


Ulman, Adele 


Vedder, Margaret 
Vejar, Anna Ray 
Vrang, Marian J. 
West, Miss Edythe 
Wheeler, Isabella 
Wheeler, Mrs. W. T. 
Willmering, Parl B. 


ALTOS 


Allen, Jane 

Atkinson, Eva Gruninger 
Barbat, Mrs. J. Henry 
Bartlett, Miss Olive S. 
Barbieri, Florence M. 
Baum, Helen H. 
Berman, Mrs. D. 
Berton, Nadine 
Blotkey, Mrs. Anna K. 
Blythe, Helene S. 
Booth, Maude 

Brock, Mrs. Netta 
Brown, Zulina B. 
Burke, Doris J. 
Butler, Miss Amy 
Calderwood, Rush 
Chamberlin, Sue 
Christensen, Alma 
Claussen, Estelle L. 
Clement, Ada 
Clement, Marion 
Cole, Susan 

Craig, Elizabeth 
Donnan, Carol 
Donnan, Grace W. 
Doty, Nellie F. 
Dozier, Elizabeth 
Ennis, Mrs. O. 

Evans, Madeline 
Fern, Mrs. Wallace T 
Finlay, Alice 

Freese, Kathryn 
Friedrichs, Mrs. C. 
Germain, Mrs. A. M. 
Glick, Mildred 
Guthrie, Paula 
Gwinn, Mrs. Joseph M, 
Haase, Mrs. S. 
Hammer, Mrs. Adele 
Hansen, Miss M. 
Harper, Mrs. Annabel 
Hellar, Edwinna M. 
Hennessy, Marion A. 
Heyde, Gertrude E. 
Hirsch, Eleanora E. 
Holcombe, Miss E. A. 
Holcenberg, Anita 
Holt, Ivy 

Keesing, Florence 
Kienast, Celestine 
King, Helen 

Krist, Martha L. 
Langley, Mrs. Virginia 
Leonard, Ramona A. 
Lindstrom, Mrs. Louis 
Marston, M. Garthwaite 
Martschinke, Mrs. Ida 
Maul, Juliet 

Mayers, Gertrude 
McCoy, Elizabeth 
McElroy, Aileen J. 
Merrill, Miss Virginia 
Messerschmidt, Elsa 
Meyer, Mrs. Kuno 
Millington, Louise 
Miner, Ethelwyn E. 
Morse, Mrs. Helen 
Mott, Katherine A. 
Nelson, Mrs. Ada F. 
Neustadt, Mrs. B. 
Page, Mrs. Margaret V. 





Peltzer, Enid 

Peterson, Mrs. Gertie 
Plise, Mme. Marie Light 
Porter, Mrs. Francis H. 
Pratt, Mrs. W. W. 
Prentiss, Mrs. C. W. 
Preston, Ines F. 

Rampe, Mrs. Will E. 
Randall, Helena F. 
Reinhold, Anna 

Runge, Doris 

Schulz, Erna 

Shatz, Josephine 
Shepman, Mrs. Mildred 
Smith, lrene 

Stinson, Mrs. R. H. 
Stone, Grace E. 

Storm, Ethel L. 
Strandberg, Mary F. 
Strauch, Auge 

Tauber, Mrs. Jessica M. 
Trauner, Irene R. 
Trauner, Mrs. J. 

Tyler, Mrs. H. Upton 
Weinberg, Mrs. Emilie 5S: 
Weisbaum, Mrs. Elsie L. 
Wild, Helen 

Wise, Miss Dorothy 
Wise, Miss Frank 
Wilson, Miss L. May 
Worst, Eva 

Wrenshall, Mrs. E. K. 
Zaretzky, Emilie 


TENORS 


Adam, Richard 
Alexander, Thomas 
Anger, Maurice 
Ash, Major J. E. 
Barnes, George 
Barrientos, Bernard R. 
Battison, Robert 
Blatt, Walter E. 
Boyd, F. T. 

Brown, Guy L. 
Brown, Roy C. 
Carcione, J. 
Cardinal, Emile J. 
Dahl, F. M. 

De Li, R. E. Artur 
Edson, Henry F. 
Eggers, A. R. 
Erwin, Dixon A. 
Elmquist, J. L. 
Ferry, Joseph P. 
Folsom, Elbert 
Friedlander, G. 
Gagos, Kurken 
Giannini, Edilio 
Giannini, Italo 
Gross, Albert E. 
Hackenberg, Charles 
Hall, Philip C. 
Hamann, Henry C. 
Hoffman, C. P 
Holton, Erwin 
Johnson, Willard L. 
Jones, Gwynfi 
Kennedy, Charles H. 
Liederman, B. 
Lindner, Arthur 
Lundquist, Caleb 
Mahr, Jacob J. 
Marr, James 
Mavor, J. 

McNeil, Earle F. 
McNeil, J. L. 
Micklich, Max 
Morris, Carl 
Nelson, James F. 
Olds, Leon B. W. 





ee 


ST 


San Francisco Division (Continued) 


Padel, Orrin Leon Cowles, Jean Lundgren, Richard Seger, Stewart 


Paxson, W. L. Crofts, F..E Lundine, Prof. Carolus Sherriffs, Alick G. 
Rogers, W. H. Delmar, C. L. Maginnes, A. Simmen, John 
Shanks: Dr FE: Easton, Charles H. Maples, Thomas Skinner, John 


Fauer, Theo. K. Marston, Otis 
Flammer, Victor May, W. 

Grahn, Edward McCoy, L. Harlan 
Gruber, Dr. William Melbourne, Louis A. 


Smith, George 
Sommer, Dr. Herman 
Stradem, Charles . 
Summerville, J. T. 


Smith, H. L. 
Smith, John Preston 
Smith, Wm. L. 


Steward, Parker Guenter, George Moore, H. S. Taylor, W. Allen 
Stone, George O. Hagan, Elmer Oswald, Charles E. Tibbe, Cuthbert P. 
Taylor, R. H. Hauschild, J. H. Parker, W. J. Tyler, Dr. H. Upton 
Thomas, Jack Hein, George Pasmore, H. B. Van Hulst, Carel 
Willi : H Hencke, John Platz, Joseph Vogel, H. Victor 
doe ai ag RS Herz, Leo Plagemann, Louis Ward, P. H. 
BASSES Hofmann, W. C. Rich, Ross C ’ Watts, Francis P. 
Homberger, H. Rickman, Edwin West, John E. 
Albert, F. W. Hooke, Geo. H. Rickleffs, Henry F. Wright, R. K. 
Augustson, Hugo M. Hunt, Emery L. Schepte, Henry Wyatt, O. W. 
Ballard, John R. Isaacs, Frank Schoedsack, G. A. Young, A. C. 
Carleton, Chas. W. Lamont, G. E. Schulz, G. W. Ziegler, J.E 
East He Division 
MISS MILDRED RANDOLPH, ACCOMPANIST 
SOPRANOS ore connie. Bresiees See se dently, bed B. 
. ash, Mrs. Geo. H. ordon, Mrs. J. enz, R. L. 
Se ee oe Nielsen, Mrs. C. B. Harrington, Mrs. L. R. Sirola, Onni 
Campbell Gladys Mary Nordvik, Mrs. J. M. Hirsch, Edith 
Cavanaugh, Miss Arita Reynolds, Grace D. Josten, Mrs. John BASSES 


Rinehart, Miss Amy Knott, Mrs. B. F 
Schmitt, Mrs. Theresa E. Medina, Mrs. Evelyn 
Sweeney, Dorothy 


Cote, Mrs. Ethel 
Crockett, Mrs. Grace L. 
De Vaux, Mrs. Norman 


Arterburn, A. B. 
Ball, Alexander W. G. 


Ellis, Miss Jennie 
Engler, Muriel 

Gray, Mary 
Hammond, Margaret 
Hanly, Mrs. Leo B. 
Hawes, Mrs. L. V. 
Hayden, Ada F. 
Helmstein, Miss F. 
Hoszowski, Emma 
Lewis, Mrs. J. W. 
Lewis, Mrs. M. H. 
McCord, Miss Alice E 
Miller, Alice B. 
Miller, Mrs. H. K. 





youanna KRIS] OFFY 


Shideler, Florence V. 
Weaver, Margaret G. 
Will, Mrs. Andrew J. 


Woods, Mrs. Glenn H. 
ALTOS 


Ashley, Blanche 
Brinkley, Mrs. B. G. 


Castleman, Mrs. Stanley 


Cushing, Mrs. A. S. 
Dillon, Miss Bertha 
Essex, Mrs. L. B. 


Flammer, Mrs. Charles 


Freese, Thada S 


Phone Douglas 6624 





Moody, Mrs. May VanD Brinkley, B. G. 


Parker, Miss B. F 
Rowlands, Mary J. 
Schulze, Mrs. Bertha 


Schwarzmann, Mrs. E. G. 


Shewmaker, Ethel M. 
Trevorrow, Mrs. W. J. 
von Ahnden, Emma 
Wagener, Winifred L. 


TENORS 


Blosser, Roy H. 
Clarke, Frank Sidney 
Egbert, R 

Ellis, E. R. 


Castleman, S. J. 
Compton, Leonard D. 
Coy, Fred A. 
Freese, Henry M. 
Gordon, W. D. 
Harrington, L.R. 
Howe, William T. 
Jecks, F. Marshall 
Mullen, G. C 

Plant, T. R. 

Pollard, Clarence M. 
Reber, Otto F. 
Uridge, Harry E. 
Whitehead, Rex 


PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 












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number of advanced students and those 
wishing to be coached for the Concert 
platform 


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under the direction of 


the famous Wagnerian conductor 


Alfred Hertz 
issued on April 18 


On that date any dealer in Victor products will gladly play them 
for you. Hear the Victor Records by Alfred Hertz and the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and you will appreciate how 
truly the Victrola brings to you their art—and the pleasure to 
be derived from hearing them as often as you wish in your own 
home on the Victrola. 


There is but one Victrola and that is made by the Victor Company 
Look for these Victor trade marks 


Victrola 


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SECOND SAN FRANCISCO 


Spring Music Festival 


CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR., AND BOARD OF SUPERVISORS 


AUDITORIUM COMMITTEE 
J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman 


Angelo Rossi Edwin G. Bath 
AND 
Musical Assoriation of San Hrauctaco 
Founded December 20, 1909 Incorporated February 3, 1910 


WHICH MAINTAINS 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ALFRED HERTZ, Conductor 





OFFICERS 
Joun D. McKEE, President 
J. B. LeEvison, Vice-President E. R. Dimonp, Treasurer 
A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


J. K. Armsby A. B. C. Dohrmann John D. McKee 

E. D. Beylard E. R. Dimond Seward B. McNear 
Miss Lena Blanding John S. Drum L. F. Monteagle 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Milton H. Esberg Robert C. Newell 
George T. Cameron Herbert Fleishhacker J. C. Raas 

Selah Chamberlain J. D. Grant Wm. T. Sesnon 

W. E. Creed E. S. Heller F. R. Sherman 

C H. Crocker J. B. Levison M. C. Sloss 

Mrs. Templeton Crocker Walter S. Martin William Sproule 
Wm. H. Crocker John A. McGregor Sigmund Stern 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Manager 
Assisted by 
SAN FRANCISCO COMMUNITY SERVICE 
Henry L. Mayer, President 
Marshal Hale, Vice-President 


C. L. Rosekrans, Executive Secretary 


457 PHELAN BUILDING 
GARFIELD 2819 

















THE ELWYN CONCERT BUREAU 


WESTERN OFFICE OF 
WOLFSOHN MUSICAL BUREAU, INc. 
ANNOUNCES 


TEN SUBSCRIPTION CONCERTS 


INTERNATIONALLY FAMOUS ARTISTS 
On Thursday Evenings During Season 1925-26 


AT 


SPECIAL SEASON TICKET PRICES: 
$3.50, $5.00, $8.00 


A Deposit of $1.00 Per Ticket Holds Your Reservation. Balance to Be Paid on or 
Before September 1, 1925 


EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 


Josef Hofmann Thamar Karsavina and her 
“The Best of the best.” Ballet, with Pierre 
Vladimiroff 
Edward Johnson “Everything she does is instinct with 
(Leading Tenor, Met. Opera Co.) grace.” 


Operatic excerpts, lights and costumes 


“America’s foremost tenor.” Maria Kurenko 


“A new Patti from Siberia.” 


Margaret Matzenauer Vincente Ballester 
(Leading Contralto, Met. Opera Co.) (Leading Baritone, Met. Opera Co.) 


oe a My 3) 
Sings magnificently. “A continuous delight.” 


Cecilia Hansen Tescha Seidel 


“Sensation of the season.” “4 mighty master of his instrument.” 


Joint Recital 


Olga Samaroff 


Joint Recital 


Hulda Lashanska 


“Most beautiful lyric soprano of 
today.” 


“Greatest of America’s women 
pianists.” 





Felix Salmond London String Quartet 


“The Fritz Kreisler of the “The finest chamber MUSIC 
violoncello.” organization in the world.” 








RESERVE YOUR SEASON TICKETS NOW—SHERMAN, CLAY £00: 
AFTER APRIL 25—638 PHELAN BUILDING 








ALFRED HERTZ, ConpucTor 


SOPRANOS 


Mme. HELEN STANLEY Mrs. LorNnA LACHMUND 


Mrs. GRACE HENKEL Mrs. TERESA TUM SUDEN 


CONTRALTOS 


Mme. CHARLES CAHTER Mrs. Eva GRUNINGER ATKINSON 


Miss RapDIANA PAZMOR Mrs. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 


THNOR 


RupboLF LAUBENTHAL 


BASSES 


ALEXANDER KIPNIS KEK. Haroutp DANA 


CHORUS DIRECTOR 


Dr. Hans LESCHKE 


ASSISTANT CHORUS DIRECTORS 


GuEeNN H. Woops KUGENE BLANCHARD 


ORGANIST 


UpA WALDROP 


ACCOMPANISTS 
Mrs. VIOLET FENSTER BLAGG 
Miss MinprRED RANDOLPH 


J. L. ELMQUIST 


: CHORUS SECRETARY 


LOUISE BENNETT 





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Distinguished Recital Baritone 


and 


a Famous ‘‘Master’’ Vocal Teacher 


THE PIONEER DIRECTOR OF “VOCAL 
MASTER-CLASSES” IN THE WEST 


will be in 


LOS ANGELES, CAL. | SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


(Second Summer ) | (Third Summer) 


June 1 to July 6 July 27 to August 29 


1925 1925 
FIVE WEEKS ONLY IN EACH CITY 





“MASTER” and “AUDITOR” CLASSES 
and PRIVATE TUITION 








For Particulars, Rates, Reservations, 


Details, Etc., address 


SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER, Manager 
Foxcroft Building, 68 Post Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 


ENROLL NOW ENROLL NOW 


Learn to sing in the way that is actually sustaining Graveure 
in the position of one of the world’s greatest artists 














LAST CONCERT 
Saturday, April 25, 1925, 8:20 P. M. 


_ (Mme. Helen Stanley, Soprano 
SOLOISTS: ) Mme. Charles Cahier, Contralto 


Uda Waldrop, Organist 





PROGRAMME 


Rhapsody for Contralto, Male Chorus and Orchestra.....--- Brahms 
MME. CHARLES CAHIER 


Intermission 


Symphony No. 2 (‘‘Resurrection”’ Symphony) 22-22 2-- =: Mahler 


I. Allegro maestoso. With serious and solemn expression 


throughout. 
II. Andante. moderato. In a very easy-going manner. 
[ll]. With a quietly flowing movement. 


IV. Primal Light (Contralto solo). Very solemn, but in a simple 


manner; like a choral. 


V. Finale. The Supreme Call. (Chorus, Contralto and Soprano 


solos. ) 


(Last three movements played without pause. ) 


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JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Master of the Pianoforte 


PLAYS AND ENDORSES EXCLUSIVELY THE 


-ED 
ICREY1 


ESTABLISHED 1823 NS 


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This great artist and teacher expresses his authoritative 
opinion in the following terms: 


“The Chickering pianos have a splendid evenness 
of scale and action, which is the most important 
factor in artistic performance. In addition, I find 
in the Chickering piano a wonderful variety of tone 
color and an exquisite singing quality, from the 
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beautiful elasticity of touch, combining brilliancy 
and solidity in a completely satisfying manner. 
(Signed) JOsEF LHEVINNE.” 


CHICKERING WAREROOMS 
LEE S. ROBERTS, INC. 
230 Post STREET, S. F., CAL. 


Bee new home of the Chickering will open on or about May 1, 1925. 
An irfivitation of inspection is extended all music lovers. 





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Rhapsody for Contralto, Male Chorus and Orchestra...................-.-.- Brahms 


The five or six years following 1867 formed the great period of 
Brahms’ choral writing. To these years belong the ‘““German Requiem,” 
the ‘‘Schicksalslied,’’ and the ‘“Triumphlied”’; the Rhapsody preceded the 
‘‘Schicksalslied’’ by only a very short space. In all of the choral works it is 
Brahms the philosopher who speaks. The Rhapsody is based on a few 
stanzas of Goethe's ‘“‘Harzreise im Winter,” the following translation being 


by R. H. Benson: 


Aber abseits wer ist’s? But who goes there apart? 

Ins Gebusch verliert sich sein Pfad, In the brake his pathway is lost; 
Hinter ihm schlagen Close behind him clash 

Die Strauche zusammen, The branches together; 

Das Gras steht wieder auf, The grass rises again, 

Die Oede verschlingt ihn. The desert engulfs him. 

Ach, wer heilet die Schmerzen Who can comfort his anguish— 
Dess, dem Balsam zu Gift ward? Who, if balm be deathly? 

Der sich Menschenhass If the hate of men : 

Aus der Fulle der Liebe trank! . From the fullness of Love be drained? 
Ist auf deinem Psalter, But if from Thy Psalter, 

Vater der Liebe, ein Ton All-loving Father, one strain 
Seinem Ohre vernehmlich, Can but come to his hearing, 

So erquicke sein Herz! Oh, enlighten his heart! 

Oeffne den umwolkten Blick Lift up his o’erclouded eyes, 
Ueber die tausend Quellen Where are the thousand fountains, 
Neben dem Durstenden Hard by the thirsty one 

In der Wuste! In the desert. 


—7 





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CONSISTENT 
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Third Annual Season 


The San Francisco Opera 
Company 


Gaetano Merola, Director 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM, SEPTEMBER 19 to OCTOBER 4, 1925 
8 SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 
(6 Evenings and 2 Saturday Matinees ) 
2 NON-SUBSCRIPTION PERFORMANCES 


Artists 


Sopranos: Tenors: 


Claudia Muzio Tito Schipa 


Fernand Ansseau 
Elvira de Hidalgo Antonio Cortis 


Rosina Torri Lodovico Oliviero 


Contraltos: 
Marguerite d’ Alvarez 


Irene Marlo 


Conductors: 
Gaetano Merola 
Pietro Cimini 


Giacomo Spadoni 


Baritones and Basses: 
Riccardo Stracciari 
Cesare Formichi 
Marcel Journet 
Vittorio Trevisan 
Antonio Nicolich 


Technical Director: 
Giovanni Grandi 


Ballet Master: 


Natale Carossio 





Operas 


The operas presented will be chosen from the following: 
‘‘Aida,’’ “Samson et Dalila,’ ‘“Traviata,’’ “‘Rigoletto,’’ “Manon’”’ 
(Massenet), “‘I] Barbiere di Siviglia,’ “‘Martha,’’ ‘““Amore dei Tre 
Re,” ‘‘Faust,’’ “‘Anima Allegra’ (first time in America outside the 
Metropolitan), ‘““Tosca,’” “‘Madame Butterfly’’ and ‘Fedora.’ 


Subscriptions 


Subscriptions will be accepted commencing Monday, May 


11th, at the offices of SAN FRANCISCO OPERA COMPANY. 
KEARNY 6346 68 POST STREET 


awa? 





Symphony No. 2 (The “Resurrection” Symphony)....--...----------------- Mahler 

The nine symphonies of Gustav Mahler are now generally acknowl- 
edged as one of the greatest modern contributions to the art of music, but 
owing to the magnitude of their conception and treatment, these symphonies 
are events rather than the rule on American concert programmes. 


The score of the Second Symphony calls for eighteen first violins, six- 
teen second violins, twelve violas, twelve ‘celli, ten double basses (some 
with the contra C string), two harps, four flutes interchangeable with four 
piccolos, four oboes (two interchangeable with two English horns), five 
clarinets (one interchangeable with bass clarinet), four bassoons (one in- 
terchangeable with double bassoon), six horns (and four horns in the dis- 
tance), six trumpets (four trumpets wn the distance), four trombones, one 
tuba, organ, two sets of three kettledrums for three drummers (also kettle- 
drums in the distance), bass drum, snare drum, and a multitude of other 


percussion instruments. 


An analysis of the musical content of this great work has been made by 
Philip H. Goepp as follows: 


‘Allegro maestoso begins the first movement ‘throughout with grave 
-and solemn expression, in the funereal mood that Mahler strikes early in 
his Fifth Symphony. A story seems almost to hover over the music, in the 
dramatic manner of the phrases. In a significant prologue they herald and 
later surround the main legend, in long notes of the upper reeds, with an 





° © . Management 
Leading Musical cAttractions — serpy c. oPPENHEIMER 





1)» 


TITO MME. FRIEDA 


SCHIPA 


FAMOUS TENOR 





TWO RECITALS 
COLUMBIA 
THEATER 


POSITIVE FAREWELL 
Entire Change of Program 


NEXT SUNDAY AFTERNOON oxty AUDITORIUM 


Thursday Night, April 30 
April 26 ioe Ma eae) a 





OH 





TT 


TICKETS ON SALE AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 





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answering refrain in the strings. A resonant call of the trumpets with other 

vibrant wind leads presently to a transformed tone and mood, with a gentle 
ascending melody in violins, supported by soft horns in echoing figure. The 

melody rises into a supplicating song with a sudden glow of ecstasy and 

merges in the music of the beginning. Action,—resolution seems the ani- 

mating mood, as the rising call sounds in trumpets against a masterful j 
descending stride of horns, with a surging climax of the melody doubled in 

thirds. More and more softly blows the heroic call till it melts, in slowing : 
pace, into the mood of the second theme. A rare song is here of the ten- 

derly pleading motive (from the first theme) answering the discourses of 

English horn and mystic violins. The second melody mingles with the mo- 
tive in a delicate play of dissonance. In the story of this first chapter we 

seem to see stirring action blended with sentiment, regret mingled with 

hope, rising to triumphant resolution;—and then back to a melting song, 

with the changing hues of lament and buoyant cheer. The rebound to sud- 

den action (heralded with soft rolling drums) comes with a shock; as sud- 

denly it is hushed to an inaudible phrase of lowest strings. Clear symbols 

of action are the motives that rise into a mighty tumult till at the height they 

reach a masterful stride. At last they return to the first ordered song of 
resolution, followed by the moving mystic play of gentle melody. Just be- 

fore the end the two moods are blended in the song of the trebles against 

the motive of the brass. 


‘“The second movement begins with a placid song of the strings, as in 


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the quartet, save for the air of simplicity. The folk-tone is most clearly 
marked in the quaint Andante melody. But this is not all. A soft patter 
of the strings (over a repeated note of the horns) moves in a kind of fugal 
figure ‘very leisurely,’ to melodic phrases in the woodwind. In the return 
of the first melody in the woodwind the ‘cellos take the lead with a new 
expressive melody, that reaches a height of stress ‘in energetic motion, with 
stentorian brass against the tumultuous strings,—ever in answering phrases. 
A quiet recession is followed by a new energy with aggressive accents be- 
fore the return of the second melody. ‘The former tune of the ‘cellos here 
sings bravely in the violins. | 
‘‘In the third movement is a strange frugality, not to say barrenness 
of harmony, together with a plainness of tune. Strikingly impersonal and 
unemotional seems the quality or the humor, if we may so call it. . The word 
Scherzo is not used. ‘In quiet flowing motion,’ beginning and sustained 
with strokes of kettledrums, is a lively course of violins, continued in thirds 
of clarinets. In general the tone is minor, though the harmony is seldom 
clearly or fully stressed. Soon a counter-tune plays high in reeds and pic- 
colo, and now another in a blast of the woodwind. Anon there is a dainty 
-tinkle in clear major and a roguish phrase in the high clarinet, with a 
rippling run through the whole gamut. The running figure begins afresh in 
a new major key with a counter-tune in the reeds: or there is one above and 
one below. A pair of trumpets blow their phrase in thirds. In the sheer 
descending octaves of the tune and the bass is a strange crudeness, followed 














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LAZAR §. 
SAMOILOFF 


Director and Vocal 
Pedagogue 


The most striking feature 
of his teaching is its prac- 
tical application to the 
constant problems of the 
professional artist and 
teacher. Letters of appre- 
ciation from many world- 
famous artists attest to 
his enviable place in the 
teaching world among 
them being Claire Dux, 
Julia Claussen, Bianca 
Saroya, Kurt Tauncher, 
Rosa Raisa, Isa Kremer, 
Helen Stanley. 


JOSEF 
LHEVINNE 


Piano 


A great artist, he has 
proved himself a remark- 
able teacher of his instru- 
ment. He is ina position, 
by his own experience, 
to bring every true tal- 
ent to fruition in a far 
shorter time than would 
ordinarily be considered 
possible. 


He is a teacher of rare 
insight as well as a vir- 
tuoso, and brings unusual 
authority to all questions 
relating to piano playing. 











JULIA 
CLAUSSEN 


Voice 
One of the world’s truly 
great voices. Not only is 


she at the height of her 
own powers, but she has 
had experience asa 
teacher, and possesses the 
rare gift of imparting 
knowledge. She will give 
general instruction in 
stage technique, coach 
operatic roles and demon- 
strate her own _ vocal 
method. 





LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF 


ENDORSES THE 


Baldmin 


Baldwin Piano Company, 
310 Sutter Street, 


Fairmont Hotel, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
October 10, 1924. 


San Francisco, Cal. 


Dear Sirs: 


Let me express my appreciation of your kind- 
ness in co-operating with the Master School of 


Musical Arts in California. 


I have been familiar with the Baldwin Piano 
for many years. I have found it unrivalled in 
tone. and action—in fact, the ideal piano for 


both concert and studio. 


The school has done 


well to have made its arrangements with you. 


Very truly yours, 
(Signed) LAZAR S. SAMOILOFF. 














OF CALIFORN 


<= == a 





Lazar.s. SAMOGiLOFF, 


ENDOWED BY ALICE CAMPBELL MA 


ALICE SECKELS, Manager 


ENROLL NO 


OPENING OF FIRST 
LAZAR S. AMOI 


San Francisco Class Open 


SEVEN WEEKS 


JOSEF LHEVIN 


San Francisco Class Open 





ANDRES de 
SEGUROLA 


A master in character 
portrayal, for many sea- 
sons leading bass _bari- 
tone of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. He will 
conduct opera _ classes, 
teaching acting, and 
makeup, and coaching in 
operatic repertoire. The 
staging of acts from 
operas will give practical 
experience and prove an 
important step for the 
operatic aspirant. 






EMIL J. 
POLAK 


Coach 


One of the most success- 
ful coaches in New York 
today. Recently heard 
here with Jeritza. 


FIVE WEEKS 






WILLIAM J. 
HENDIE.RSON 


Distinguished critic of t 
New York Sun, as 
author of anany bool 
will give six lectures | 
Monday an«d Thursd 
evenings at the Fairmo 
Hotel, beginging May : 
Open to the public. 


Fi 


A. KOSTI:-LANET: 


A course in jight readi 

and ear traiting for p: 

fessionals aiid amatet 

by one eminently succe 
}. ful in thi; importa 
k branch of music. 


ee 






S:LOFF, virector 


\MPBELL MACFARLANE 


KEL’, Manager 


LL NOW 


FIRST CLASSES 


“SAMOILOFF 


435 Opens April 27th 


NM WEEKS 


LHEVINNE 


lass Opens May 11th 


2 WEEKS 





LLIAM Ay 
NDERSON 


ished critic of the 
‘ork Sun, and 
of inany books, 
2 six lectures on 
» ancl Thursday 
- at the Fairmont 
eginging May Zo. 
the public. 





OSTU-LANETZ 


se in ight reading 
- training for pro- 
ils aid amateurs 
eminently success- 
_ thi; important 










SAMUEL 


GARDNER 
Violin 

One of the leaders among 
America’s younger violin- 
ists. Well-known as con- 
ductor and composer, 
through long association 
with his teacher, Franz 
Kneisel, he has rapidly 
taken a place among the 
successful teachers of vio- 
lin, chamber music and 
conducting. 


ANNIE LOUISE 


DAVID 
Harp 
One of the best-known 


teachers and performers 
of the harp in America. 


‘CESAR 
THOMSON 


Violin 


One ot the most distin- 
guished among the violin 
teachers and performers 
of modern times, sharing 
with Auer the distinction 
of having remarkable suc- 
cessful artist students. 
Formerly it has been nec- 
essary to go to Brussels 
to work with him. This 
is. the first opportunity to 
study in the West with 
this justly famed master. 


FELIX 
SALMOND 


Chamber Music and 
Cello 


The extraordinary artis- 
try of this noted cellist 
has made him a favorite 
everywhere. His classes 
in London have been the 
goal of students from all 
parts of the world. Coach- 
ing in chamber music will 
be given by Mr. Salmond 
and pianists, violinists 
and cellists may enroll 
for actual experience or 
as auditors. 


Nee ees 


SIGISMUND 
STOJOWSKI 


Piano and Composition 


He holds a high place in 
three phases of musical 
creation: pianist, com- 
poser and teacher. The 
most authoritative expo- 
nent of Paderewski’s 
methods and ideals. He 
stands today among the 
eminent artist teachers. 
Numbered among his 
pupils are Levitzki, 
Novaes and Loesser. 








This Faculty of Celebrated Artist 


Teachers Will Give Instruction in 


SAN FRANCISCO 
AND 
LOS ANGELES 


Between May and September, 


1925 





Dates for each Master sent on request 
Free Scholarships are offered with each 


Teacher 


Write for Application Blank and Catalog. 


Address 


Master School of Musical Arts 


ALICE SECKELS, Manager 


Office: 


Room 139, Farrmont Hote. 
PHONE DoucLas 7267 SAN FRANCISCO 


Dr ae ee 


of music, ‘ 


- 
—_ s 
y 


a RE ig gt a OE REE nine 

































an = BZ 


by flashes of impish humor. Against a shrill high note, long-sustained in 
piccolo and flute, the bass rumbles far below in the running theme. Sud- 
denly, ‘forwards,’ with a shock of new key the brass (and the added wood- 
wind) ring out a clear tune in clarion tones against the motion of strings 
.and bassoons,—stressed with a vehement fanfare of trumpets on high. 
The tune is carried gayly on by woodwind and violins with the repeated 
chord of trumpets. The whole seems a series of madrigals of elfin-tones 
and blasts of stentorian forest-horns. In the heart of the movement is a 
delicately sonorous song of trumpets against soft purling second violins 
crowned by a melody of the first violins on high. And it is echoed with 
new beauty in horns and the high wood (while very softly an old tune 
dances in the bass), and still once more in a fairy song of the trumpets 
against the elfin strings. The tune of the beginning has returned, but the 
trumpets hold their delicate song, and not until a burst of coursing strings 
and wood are we back in the clear air, the plain light of day. The earlier 
phrases are enriched in harmony and augmented in the other wind to 
rhythmic strings. All the tumult ends in a ringing effect, as in the martial 
blast of trumpets, followed by the unison of dissonance that is dissolved in 
a subtle descent till the first theme bursts boisterously into the other silence. 
And again the high violins descend in delicate hues of diminishing volume. 
The end is as of a vanishing host of will-o’-the-wisps. 


‘The fourth movement of this mysterious work has a vocal text for the 











THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK 


(LATELY THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY) 


SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 
INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 


One of the Oldest Banksin California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by merégers or-consolidation s with other Banks. 


Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 


DECEMBER 3lst, 1924 


RGSOES 5000 te oe Te ee ae oe $96,917,170.69 
Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds....... 4,000,000.00 
Employees’ Pension Fund.................06. 461,746.52 
WOOL DRANG 828 oe, Th tae aan wk eben eee ks Mission and 21st Streets 
PARK-PRES?*DIO- BRANCH... scant geek et oe. Clement St. and 7th Ave. 
HAIGH Po acre PaCANGE, 2555 Sek oe peace Haight and Belvedere Streets 


WEST “PORTA: BRANCH 2 -2..2oixt dew coe. West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 


Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 


FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4 YY) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 
AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 





———— 





alto solo, a verse taken from the famous ‘Knaben Wunderhorn,’ a collection 
of old German poetry,—translated by Margaret Munsterberg: 


Thou red, red rose! 

Ah, man lies in bitter throes. 

Yea, man lies in greatest woe— 

Far rather I would to heaven go. 

| entered upon a broad highway. 

Then came an angel bright and wanted to stay me. 
Ah no, I would not let him stay me! 

Ah no, I would not let him stay me! 

I am from God, I will go back to God! 

The merciful God, the merciful God, a candle will be sending, 
To light my way unto a blessed life unending. 


“In the soft brass plays the hymn changing the rhythms in the ancient 
manner from three to four. With the new line: ‘I entered upon a broad 
highway,’ a bell sounds high against the open horns and reeds. With the 
angel comes a transfiguring harmony with a play:of harps. The chords turn 
minor with the warning word. The whole is brief, without a repetition of 
words. 

“The Finale is spent for more than half its length in an emotional 


_ strife that prepares for the choral song of assured resurrection. In the pace 


of the preceding Scherzo begins a wild burst of vibrant and tremulous per- 
cussion. In a transformed clear harmony we catch the vision of an ascend- 
ing symbolic strain. There is much dramatic play of figures of the wood 
and brass, with graphic changing chords. A chorale sounds slowly in the 









Quarg Music Company 


109 Stockton Street 





206 Powell Street —-—TWO STORES 


Open Evenings 
EEA la Victor e) 


ga lao 


LONG DISTANCES 


TRADE MARK 








They cost more, but 
they do more 


They tune thru everything 


$240 and up. Easy Terms 















guess 





PR rN - 
—— . . 
* 


= eee 

















: ee 





a SS EP oS OE eS 





\NICH-&-BACH 


QUALITY PIANOS 
and PLAYER PIANOS 


JULIA CLAUSSEN 


Prima “Donna Mezzo-Soprano 
Metropolitan Opera Co., New York 


WRITES: 
KRANICH & BACH, 
New York. 


Gentlemen: 
Your piano is unexcelled in the beautiful 


quality of its tone and workmanship. 
Very sincerely yours 








Exclusive “Representative 


Oakland 


1016 J Street, Sacramento 





140 O’FARRELL STREET 





The Hibernia Savings 
and Loan Society 


HIBERNIA BANK 
Incorporated 1864 
HEAD OFFICE 
COR. MARKET, McALLISTER and JONES STS. 


MISSION OFFICE 


COR. VALENCIA AND 22ND STS. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


$81,603,701.25 
5;922,693.15 


OPEN DAILY FROM 10 A. M. TO 3 P. M. 
OPEN ALL DAY SATURDAY FROM 10 A. M. TO 8 P. M. 


SAFE DEPOSIT VAULTS AT MISSION OFFICE 


= 


= 


wood with a murmuring counterpoint of strings, followed by a new ve- 
hement plot of motives in the wind. Then there is a clear foreshadowing 
of the latter song: ‘Believe me, my heart. The chorale now sounds in full 
solemnity of the brass with thrilling changes of chord, and again follows the 
play of graphic motives rising into a fanfare of arpeggic and tremulant 
voices. 

‘‘Allegro energico bursts a storm of contrary figures that precedes a 
vigorous almost martial stride of martellato strings in the melody of the 
chorale, echoed by the whole band. It drives to a triumphant song of the 
trumpets that lead the way throughout, in highest range. The strain is 
loud in the renewed tempest with steadily urgent motion of the wind. It 
subsides in the returning pleading phrase (of the trombone) of tremulant 
strings. A new picturesque element appears in a group of trumpets with 
light percussion that sounds in the farthest distance in midst the pleading 
dialogue, as of some playful music scarce audibly wafted by the wind into 
a tragic scene. Softly, but more and more urgent is the pleading discourse. 
Suddenly the distant music is much clearer, and the other stronger, till both 
unite in a climactic tempest. As the tremulous sounds die away, the symbol 
of resurrection sings very softly in the ’cellos,—in violins, at last in resonant 
soft horns to flashing changes of harmony. Again the far distant brass (now 
there are horns with the trumpets) sound gentle echoes. A bird warbles 
on high. The trumpets are stirred to a boisterous madrigal of quicker calls. 
As they are stilled, the bird sings again, joined by a more tuneful mate. 


YEATMAN GRIFFITH 


“Recognized Authority on Voice Production and the Art of Singing” 
Summer Vocal Master Classes 


FOR ARTISTS - TEACHERS - STUDENTS 
ENROLLMENTS NOW 
Address Communications 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. June 3rd to July ist 
To IDA G. SCOTT, Kohler & Chase Building 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. July 6th to Aug. 3rd 
To L. E. BEHYMER, 705 Auditorium Building 
PORTLAND, ORE. Aug. 10th to Sept. 7th 
To OTTO WEDEMEYER, 611 Bush & Lane Building 











San Francisco’s Home for 4 Musical Education 
a 


Complete Summer Courses 
1925 Season Opens June 22nd 


Instructions in all Branches of 


MUSIC DURING THE SUMMER 


Morning (lasses Free Recitals Private Lessons 
ARRILLAGA MUSICAL COLLEGE 
2315 JACKSON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 


TELEPHONE WEST 4737 














Soprano Solo 





Believe me, thou hast not been born in vain 


Nor lived in vain thy sorrow bearing. 


Chorus 


All that lived on earth must surely perish 
All that perish shall be resurrected. 


Chorus and Contralto Solo 


Oh, cease thy sorrow, prepare thee for the morrow! 


Soprano and Contralto 





Oh, pain that all men smitest 

Behold I have fled thee, 

Oh, death that all things blightest, 

] never shall dread thee! ‘ 
My wings that I have won unfolding 

My fervent love outpouring 

I shall be soaring 

The light no eye hath seen beholding. 


Chorus 





On pinions wrung from mortal anguish 

Will I far be soaring 

Death, O take me, life restoring 

Rise thou shalt, yea, rise again 

Wilt thou my heart in moments blessed 

Sins thou hast conquered, to God will bear thy spirit. 


IRVING KRICK 


Solo Pianist 


Available for Club Engagements in Bay Region 
Season 1925-1926 


| Address: 479 Forest Street, Oakland 
| Phone: Piedmont 3554 





GEORGE M cMAN US Pianist and Teacher 


STEWART 


1459 4th Ave. Sunset 2487 


Available for Engagements as Solo Pianist or Accompanist | 


Mondays: 526 Powell Street Thursdays: 2510 College Ave., Berkeley 


Has toured as assisting artist with Pablo Casals; Jean Gerardy and George Enesco 








| _____Has toured as assisting artist with Pablo Casals; Jean Gerardy and George Enesco | 
MARGUERITE LISZNIEWSKA Master Class of Pianoforte Playing 


MELVILLE 





Master Faculty—Cincinnati Conservatory of Music 
Five weeks commencing June 22, 1925 


Sorosis Club, 536 Sutter St., San Francisco, and School of Music, Dominican College, San Rafael 


ALICE METCALF, Manager, STUDIO: 1233 California St., San Francisco 


For full information address: 
Phone Prospect 8158 











Wdersomel 


The San Francisca Symphony Orchestra 


FIRST VIOLINS 


Persinger, Louis 
Concert Master and 
Assistant Conductor 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Assistant Concert 
Master 


Ford, Louis 
Assistant Concert 
Master 

Meriz, E. 

Mendelevitch, R. 

Laraia, W.F. 

Gluschkin, M. 

Gordohn, R. 

Seiger, Rudy 

Bem, Eugenia 

Koenig, H. 

See, Orley 

Mortensen, Modesta 

Amsterdam, M. 

Pasmore, Mary 


Ruiz, R. 


SECOND VIOLINS 

Jensen, T. 

Principal 
Haug, J. A. 
Callinan, W. G. 
Hidden, R. L. 
Gold, J. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Blaha, A. 
Manchester, W. 
Atkinson, Helen 
Purt, B. 
Dunn, H. A. 
Gough, W. 
Hoffman, H. H. 
Dabelow, W. 
Willard, J. M. 
Curcio, R. 
Baker, Genevra 


VIOLAS 


Fenster, Lajos 
Principal 


Hahl, E. 
Baker, F. A. 
Wismer, H. 
Weiler, E. 
Lichtenstein, V. 
Patchook, S. 
Dierich, F. 
Kolb, R. 
Lewis, A. 
Wellendorff, H. 
Firestone, N. 


"CELLOS 


Ferner, Walter 
Principal 


Dehe, W. 

King, O. 
Villalpando, W. 
Weiss, A. 

Kirs, R. 

Gegna, M. 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Hranek, C. 
Demetrio, G. 


Gough, Flari 


BASSES 
Lahann, J. 


Principal 
Greene, S. 
Bell, W. 
Storch, A. E. 
Cassetta, L. R. 
Guterson, A. 


Annarumi, A. 


Giese, W. 


FLUTES 
Linden, Anthony 
Newbauer, Louis 


Oesterreicher, Walter 
Orchestral Manager 


Benkman, H. 


PICCOLO 
Oesterreicher, Walter 


OBOES 
Addimando, C. 


Shanis, Julius 
Schipilliti, V. 
Utschig, H. 


ENGLISH HORN 
Schipilliti, V. 


CLARINETS 


Randall, H. B. 
Zannini, N. 
Fragale, F. 
Greenbaum, A. A. 
Randall, W. F. 


A. W. WIDENHAM, Secretary-Manager 


ALFRED HERTZ, CONDUCTOR 


BASS CLARINET 
Fragale, F. 


BASSOONS 
Kubitschek, E. 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, C. 


CONTRA BASSOON 
Kolb, R. 


HORNS 
Hornig, W. 
Tryner, C. E. 
Roth, P. 
Huske, F. E. 
Rocco, R. 
Findetsen, C. 
Cleveland, G. 
Salvatore, M. 
Trutner, H. 
Dabelow, W. 


TRUMPETS 


Ditzel, E. 
Arriola, A. 
Kegel, Otto 
Kress, V. 
Edwards, G. M. 
Savant, S. 
Linden, Arthur 
Dering, B. A, 
Klatzkin, B. 


BASS TRUMPET 
Klotz, L. 


TROMBONES 


Tait, F. W. 
Clark, O. E. 
Bassett, F. N. 
Ingram, T. 


TUBA 
Murray, R. 


HARP 


Attl, Kajetan 
Schipilliti, Annette 


TYMPANI 
Wagner, R. E. 


PERCUSSION 


' Nickel, M. 


Vendt, A., Jr. 
Kundy, E. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Wood, W.A. 
Overbeck, H. 


s 


PIANO AND CELESTA 


Ormay, Gyula 


LIBRARIAN 
Kegel, Otto 






ey vtosnoneinnesiyee ten 





ag 





—— CHORUS —— 


San Francisco Division 


SOPRANOS 


Albright, Ethel A. 
Alpern, L 

Anderson, Anna 
Anderson, Hildur E. 
Anderson, Margaret 
Asmussen, Dorothea 
Atha, Mrs. Miles M. 
Auger, Miss Lina 
Augustson, Mrs. Selina 
Backus, Violet M. 
Ballard, Zebulon V. 
Bannerman, Miss Julia 
Barr, Elsie J. 
Bartlett,.Catherine Qu: ° 
Bashford, Edith 
Beckert, Elsie M. 
Beckett, Helen I. 
Beppler, Miss Myrtha 
Blagg, Violet Fenster 
Bowen, Beatrice 
Bradford, Dorothy 
Bradford, Helen M. 
Brennan, Katherine 
Brown, Genevieve McK 
Brown, Mrs. R 


- Buck, Mrs. K. A. ; 


Burns, Miss-E. 

Canet, Kathleen 
Caradonna, Miss Mary 
Centini, Mary G 
Chapman, Lula Mae 
Clifford, Miss Beatrice 
Cleal, Anyta Clayr 
Cole, Grace A. 
Crowley, Miss Katharine 
Davidson, Miss Leda 
Davis, Mrs. L. 
DeVoney, Bessie D. 
Debrecht, Eulalia 
DeCamp, Miss Carolyn 
Delaney, Lorna Claire 
Deward, Mrs. J. M. 
Doane, Mrs. 

Doheny, Mrs. Nellie 
Duerbeck, Anna M. 
Durkin, Miss A. Hazel 
Eames, Mrs. E. A. 
Easton, Mrs. Verna M. 
Elliott, Miss Adelaide 
Ellwanger, Clara Jane 
Emerson, Miss Mattie E. 
Erwin, Miss McHenry 
Fries, Mrs. C. G. 
Gassenberg, Ellen 
Gates, Phyllis Scharff 
Goldberg, Mrs. Addie 
Grossman, Jeannette 
Grubb, Edna M. 
Hamm, Dorothy 

Hart, Frances 

Heal, Gertrude M. 
Heeck, Eliese 

Henkel, Grace 

Heyde, Margaret E. 
Hiestand, Elizabeth 
Hobrecht, Mrs. Charles 
Holmes, Isabelle A. 
Hook, Mrs. H. O. 
Hooper, Mrs. John 
Howard, Carrie L. 
Hueter, Mrs. Ernest L. 
Hull, Marion Turney 
Hussey, Mrs. Zelie A. 
Jacobsen, Adelaide 
Jann, Sara C 

Janson, Edna E. 
Johnson, Frances 
Johnson, Jean 
Johnson, Miss M. 
Jung, Margaret 


MRS. VIOLET FENSTER BLAGG, ACCOMPANIST 


Kaunitz, Miss Mildred H. 


Kec, Marguerite 
Keefe, Mrs. F. C. 
Keenan, Miss S. A. 
Kelly, Addie 

Kern, Lydia H. 
Kinread, Mrs. Kate 
Kinross, Onida 

Kline, Mrs. Harold 
Knudsen, Marie S. 
Koblick, Mrs. Esther 
Kurtz, Mrs. Rubye 
Lachmund, Lorna 
Lawson, Mrs. A. W. 
Lazelle, Miss Rena 
Leonard, Kathryn 
Lewis, Miss Melita 
Lineer, Lillian 

Loge, Miss Clara 

Lull, Sarah L. 

Lynch, Mrs. Charles 
Lynn, Ethel 
MacIntosh, Mabel D. 
Mailer, Miss Barbara A. 
Marshall, Mrs. S. H. 
McGovern, Mrs. C. J. 
McKercher, Hyacinth 
Melkonian, Bertha 
Melville, Clara Soper 
Merriman, Miss Faith 
Mesherry, Mrs. Lewis 
Meussdorffer, Irene 
Mitchell, Miss Vlada 
Mont, Mrs 

Morgan, Florence M. 
Morris, Caroline W. 
Morris, Edythe Vivian 
Munson, Florence E. 
Newhouse, Mrs. W. G. 
O'Day, Miss Marie 
Overbeck, Mrs. H. 
Penhorwood, Miss Li 
Perrin, Miss E. J 
Price, Jane Ellen 
Pritchard, Miss Ann A. 
Podhurst, Mrs. N. 
Potvin, Miss Vivienne _ 
Reinecke, Lillian 
Rich, Mrs. Marie 
Riedaelli, M. 
Ringressy, Paula C. 
Roche, Mrs. William 
Roesti, Miss Olga 
Rosberg, Esther A. 
Scholz, Mrs. Elsie F. 
Schwartzberg, Simona 
Scobey, Mrs. Nellie G 
Sherman, Ruby M. 
Simpson, Miss Loretto 
Sisson, Madeleine A. 
Slate, Mrs. Ruth 
Slater, Ruth M. 
Smith, Madeleine L. 
Sousa, Frona Simon 
Southworth, Estelle 
Spencer, Annita A. 
Spaney, Alice 

St. John, Marie 
Sterling, Miss Emma 
Street, Mrs. Francis 
Stuart, Ruby E. 

Sund, Miss Hilda 
Swint, Catherine B. 
Tauber, Miss D. 
Thomson, Carolyn R. 
Thompson, Mrs. E. H. 
Tooker, Dorothy 
Tresidder, Miss Oliene 
Trowbridge, Fawn Post 
Tum Suden, Teresa 


Ulman, Adele 


Vallina, Louise. 
Vedder, Margaret 
Vejar, Anna Ray 
Vrang, Marian J. 
West, Miss Edythe 
Wheeler, Isabella 
Wheeler, Mrs. W. T. 
Willmering, Parl B. 


ALTOS 


Allen, Jane 

Atkinson, Eva Gruninger 
Barbat, Mrs. J. Henry 
Bartlett, Miss Olive S. 
Barbieri, Florence M. 
Baum, Helen H. 
Berman, Mrs. D. 
Berton, Nadine 
Blotkey, Mrs. Anna K. 
Blythe, Helene S. 
Booth, Maude 

Brock, Mrs. Netta 
Brown, Zulina B. 
Burke, Doris J. 
Butler, Miss Amy 
Calderwood, Rush 
Chamberlin, Sue 
Christensen, Alma 
Claussen, Estelle L. 
Clement, Ada 
Clement, Marion 

Cole, Susan 

Craig, Elizabeth 
Donnan, Carol 
Donnan, Grace W. 
Doty, Nellie F. 
Dozier, Elizabeth 
Ennis, Mrs. O 

Evans, Madeline 
Fern, Mrs. Wallace T 
Finlay, Alice 

Freese, Kathryn 
Friedrichs, Mrs. C. 
Germain, Mrs. A. M. 
Glick, Mildred 
Guthrie, Paula 
Gwinn, Mrs. Joseph M, 
Haase, Mrs. S. 
Hammer, Mrs. Adele 
Hansen, Miss M. 
Harper, Mrs. Annabel 
Hellar, Edwinna M. 
Hennessy, Marion A. 
Heyde, Gertrude E. 
Hirsch, Eleanora E. 
Holcombe, Miss E. A. 
Holcenberg, Anita 
Holt, Ivy 

Keesing, Florence 
Kienast, Celestine 
King, Helen 

Krist, Martha L. 
Langley, Mrs. Virginia 
Leonard, Ramona A. 
Lindstrom, Mrs. Louis 
Marston, M. Garthwaite 
Martschinke, Mrs. Ida 
Maul, Juliet 

Mayers, Gertrude 
McCoy, Elizabeth 
McElroy, Aileen J. 
Merrill, Miss Virginia 
Messerschmidt, Elsa 
Meyer, Mrs. Kuno 
Millington, Louise 
Miner, Ethelwyn E. 
Morse, Mrs. Helen 
Mott, Katherine A. 
Nelson, Mrs. Ada F 
Neustadt, Mrs. B. 
Page, Mrs. Margaret V. 


Peltzer, Enid 

Peterson, Mrs. Gertie 
Plise, Mme. Marie Light 
Porter, Mrs. Francis H. 
Pratt, Mrs. W. W. 
Prentiss, Mrs. C, W. 
Preston, Ines F. 

Rampe, Mrs. Will E. 
Randall, Helena F. 
Reinhold, Anna 

Runge, Doris 

Schulz, Erna 

Shatz, Josephine 
Shepman, Mrs. Mildred 
Smith, Irene 

Stinson, Mrs. R. H. 
Stone, Grace E. 

Storm, Ethel L. 
Strandberg, Mary F. 
Strauch, Auge 

Tauber, Mrs. Jessica M. 
Trauner, Irene R 
Trauner, Mrs. J. 

Tyler, Mrs. H. Upton 
Weinberg, Mrs. Emilie Si 
Weisbaum, Mrs. Elsie L. 
Wild, Helen 

Wise, Miss Dorothy 
Wise, Miss Frank 
Wilson, Miss L. May 
Worst, Eva 

Wrenshall, Mrs. E. K. 
Zaretzky, Emilie 


TENORS 


Adam, Richard 
Alexander, Thomas 
Anger, Maurice 
Ash, Major J. E. 
Barnes, George 
Barrientos, Bernard R. 
Battison, Robert 
Blatt, Walter E. 
Boyd, F. T. 

Brown, Guy L. 
Brown, Roy C. 
Carcione, J. 
Cardinal, Emile J. 
Dahl, F. M. 

De Li, R. E. Artur 
Edson, Henry F. 
Eggers, A.R. 
Erwin, Dixon A. 
Elmquist, J. L. 
Ferry, Joseph P. 
Folsom, Elbert 
Friedlander, G. 
Gagos, Kurken 
Giannini, Edilio 
Giannini, Italo 
Gross, Albert E. 
Hackenberg, Charles 
Hall, Philip C. 
Hamann, Henry C. 
Hoffman, C. P. 
Holton, Erwin 
Johnson, Willard L. 
Jones, Gwynfi 
Kennedy, Charles H. 
Liederman, B 
Lindner, Arthur 
Lundquist, Caleb 
Mahr, Jacob J. 
Marr, James 
Mavor, J. 

McNeil, Earle F. 
McNeil, J. L 
Micklich, Max 
Morris, Carl 
Nelson, James F. 


Olds, Leon B. W. 

















——— ee —— 


Padel, Orrin Leon 
Paxson, W. L. 
Rogers, W. H. 
Shanks, Dr. F. H. 
Smith, H. L. 
Smith, John Preston 
Smith, Wm. L. 
Steward, Parker 
Stone, George O. 
Taylor, R. H. 
Thomas, Jack 
Williams, H. 


BASSES 


Albert, F. W. 
Augustson, Hugo M. 
Ballard, John R. 
Carleton, Chas. W. 


SOPRANOS 


Alderton, Nina M. 
Beukers, Grace 
Campbell, Gladys Mary 
Cavanaugh, Miss Anita 
Cote, Mrs. Ethel 


Crockett, Mrs. Grace L. 


De Vaux, Mrs. Norman 
Ellis, Miss Jennie 
Engler, Muriel 


Gray, Mary 
Hammond, Margaret 
Hanly, Mrs. Leo B. 


Hawes, Mrs. L. V. 
Hayden, Ada F. 
Helmstein, Miss F. 
Hoszowski, Emma 
Lewis, Mrs. J. W. 
Lewis, Mrs. M. H. 
McCord, Miss Alice E 
Miller, Alice B. 
Miller, Mrs. H. K. 


San Francisco Division (Continued) 


Cowles, Jean 
Crofts, F. E. 
Delmar, C. L. 
Easton, Charles H. 
Fauer, Theo. 
Flammer, Victor 
Grahn, Edward 
Gruber, Dr. William 
Guenter, George 
Hagan, Elmer 
Hauschild, J. H. 
Hein, George 
Hencke, John 
Herz, Leo 
Hofmann, W. C. 
Homberger, H. 
Hooke, Geo. H. 
Hunt, Emery L. 
Isaacs, Frank 


Lamont, G. E. 


Lundgren, Richard 
Lundine, Prof. Carolus 
Maginnes, A. 
Maples, Thomas 
Marston, Otis 

May, W 

McCoy, L. Harlan 
Melbourne, Louis A. 
Moore, H. 

Oswald, Charles E. 
Parker, W. J. 
Pasmore, H. B. 
Platz, Joseph 
Plagemann, Louis 
Rich, Ross C 
Rickman, Edwin 
Rickleffs, Henry F. 
Schepte, Henry 
Schoedsack, G. A. 
Schulz, G. W. 


East Bay Division 


MISS MILDRED RANDOLPH, ACCOMPANIST 


Morgan, Connie 
Nash, Mrs. Geo. H. 
Nielsen, Mrs. C. B. 
Nordvik, Mrs. J. M. 
Reynolds, Grace D. 
Rinehart, Miss Amy 


Schmitt, Mrs. Theresa E. 


Sweeney, Dorothy 
Shideler, Florence V. 
Weaver, Margaret G. 
Will, Mrs. Andrew J. 
Woods, Mrs. Glenn H. 


ALTOS 


Ashley, Blanche 
Brinkley, Mrs. B. G. 
Castleman, Mrs. Stanley 
Cushing, Mrs. A. S. 
Dillon, Miss Bertha 
Essex, Mrs. L. B. 
Flammer, Mrs. Charles 
Freese, Thada S 


Freitag, Miss Gertrude 
Gordon, Mrs. J. 
Harrington, Mrs. L. R. 
Hirsch, Edith 

Josten, Mrs. John 
Knott, Mrs. B. F. 
Medina, Mrs. Evelyn 
Moody, Mrs. May Van D 
Parker, Miss B. F 
Rowlands, Mary J. 
Schulze, Mrs. Bertha 


Schwarzmann, Mrs. E. G. 


Shewmaker, Ethel M. 
Trevorrow, Mrs. W. J. 
von Ahnden, Emma 


Wagener, Winifred L. 


TENORS 


Blosser, Roy H. 
Clarke, Frank Sidney 
Egbert, R. 

Ellis, E. R. 





Seger, Stewart 
Sherriffs, Alick G. 
Simmen, John 
Skinner, John 
Smith, George 
Sommer, Dr. Herman 
Stradem, Charles 
Summerville, J. T. 
Taylor, W. Allen 
Tibbe, Cuthbert P. 
Tyler, Dr. H. Upton 
Van Hulst, Carel 
Vogel, H. Victor 
Ward, P. H. 

Watts, Francis P. 
West, John E. 
Wright, R. K. 
Wyatt, O. W. 
Young, A. C. 
Ziegler, J.E 


Hanly, Leo B. 
Lenz, R. L. 
Sirola, Onni 


BASSES 


Arterburn, A. B. 
Ball, Alexander W. G. 
Brinkley, B. G. 
Castleman, S. J. 
Compton, Leonard D. 
Coy, Fred A 

Freese, Henry M. 
Gordon, W. D. 
Harrington, L. R. 
Howe, William T. 
Jecks, F. Marshall 
Mullen, G. C. 

Plant, TR 

Pollard, Clarence M. 
Reber, Otto F. 
Uridge, Harry E. 
Whitehead, Rex 





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JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 


Phone Douglas 6624 


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The first 
Victor Records 
by the 
San Francisco 


Symphony Orchestra 


under the direction of 


the famous Wagnerian conductor 


Alfred Hertz 
issued on April 18 


On that date any dealer in Victor products will gladly play them 
for you. Hear the Victor Records by Alfred Hertz and the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and you will appreciate how 
truly the Victrola brings to you their art—and the pleasure to 
be derived from hearing them as often as you wish in your own 
home on the Victrola. 





There is but one Victrola and that is made by the Victor Company 
Look for these Victor trade marks 


ae Yr 


eS Victor Talking Machine [Oo Camden.N. J. 


HIS MASTER'S VOICE” Victor Talking Machine Co. of Canada, Ltd, Montreal 
Canadian price-list on request 





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REPERTOIRE 


) of} 
, 1924 1925 
| Fourteenth Season 


ALFRED HERTZ CONDUCTOR 

















The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
1911—1925 


Note—The Roman Numerals indicate seasons in which work was performed. 


AUBER— 
Ry ey RY eo eB) Po so) Co ee aes os Parades! age Peer =p Se + oneie or opie VEONIIAEX, Xt XH XV 
Overture, “Masaniello” © 222.2222... ...2.----2----seececnno cen ennnnceescennennceeceeneeneee senna csnnanecnnmnasennenncesrennecs ones Vil 
Overture, “The Black Domino’”..........2....22.222--2.-c-s0---ccetdecenecnenecceenn erence neon cnc nnnensneeeereaenennncons Vill 
ARENSKY— 


Variations on Theme of Tschaikowsky....2.2.2..-2----------2.s--2-.ce0--2sncee seen aeeenenoenecneeeseeeeecees XE Xt 


ARRIOLA, ALFRED— 
Nursery Idols .....2........--------22-----2eeeeennncecce en ensneceneceee nnnanelecnesnanennnestonnanscanaenaocunnanaassnecasensnnennccces XIII 


ARTCIBOUCHEFF, N— 


See Variations 


d’ALBERT— 
Concerto for Violoncello, C Major..........2-..---2-----------e-c-eeeeeoete cece ene cc cence nese ee cne ence neater snenesceenscees XI 
BACH— 
Air on G String from Suite No. 3, D Major-............-.- kik VIL VIL, Xx; Xd, XU XI ALY. 
Passacaglia and Fugue in C Minor, (Organ Solo) .........-.--------------------------000neneeeeeeeeoe XIII 
Concerto No. 3, G Major for String Orchestra..............--.----------------2--2--2sseceec scene nnne ance neees Ill 
Shepherds’ Music, from Christmas Oratorio........----.---------------------2eesceneneeern neers IX 
Concerto for Two Violins and Orchestra, D Minor...-...-......---.-------------------------++--- xX, oe 
Prelude (Violin Solo) ..........-<.----------2-----2---nnnecceenec sence ce enn ccc ennccceneccnneatenneaeeanccneascanemencnanecneneaccnees XI 
Gavotte (Violin Solo) -........-22...-222---c---eeneccceeecceneneeceee cee eee scenes cee ensseaensannneenaeerseeseeaneneesteanecesanes XI 
BACH-ALBERT— 
Prelude, Choral and Fugue.........-22....-.-.cecceccecceceeeeeneeeeeeeeneneseenece see enneceeeesnteer tenes stnenanenecsnenacs VII 
BACH-GOUNOD— 
‘““Ave Maria” for Orchestra, Organ, Violin and Harp........-. VIE OVITE. XS XX, A AT 
BACH-MAHLER— 
COP EET aaa ae eae ea Nad Naess tute os phen snanae iawn aaveadswe pian aman cnenae XI, XIII 
BACH-STEINBERG— 
FE ES oie ee doe, SL ERT Qua ee URES eL Sar me- Uhuee x Sh eel ee aie pes eres Cran re eer X1V 
BANTOCK— 
Overture, ‘‘The Pierrot of the Minute’’..............-----------------------ecnnenne cn nenee ence sentence tenets lV 
BEETHOVEN— 
Symphony No. 1, C Major, Op. 21 .....----.--.----:.:-----2-scceccnnnneeececneeene cent eene es eanasaestnnnenancnnces VII, XI 
Symphony No. 2, D Major, Op. 36 .........-------------1:-4:secceoseentenecensnneentennnennnnessesenerennananecaes V, XIiil 
Larghetto, from above..........----..--:-------:-:+--eeeeeeeecceececensceceeeeneencnacnae arene stannnsranaecceaeccacaeesnesessenens IX 
Symphony No. 3, ‘‘Eroica,”” E Flat Major, Op. 55-...---------------------------------- Poa VI Xa ed 
Symphony No. 4,B Flat Major, Op. 60........-.------------------------sececrenc cs ee cece nen nce nreenscnenentns Vial 
Sy PROmy NOT 5 Op OF coca wren chee osha cegeensn -ctmeatae=-pe=nngeeesa==s- ie IVES Vil Exe SIA 
Andante, from abo0veraz.c...:.:--<-::----e----ecneceeceenne cn ecnneecesecnnnnceneeeennenandonnansnnecesnenarcaneaceennansne nes Xe 
Symphony No. 6, (Pastoral), F Major, Op. GOES SS os eI Re ee ree ar eee Vil, XiV 
Symphony No. 7, A Major, Op. 92....-----------------c-se-cceeooneesn ence cence seen renenneenaese: II, VI, Vill, X 
Allegretto from 7th Symphony...............-----------------2-eecceecoeennne cence ne ennenteecec cc ennneneasees seer rnnnances Vill 
Symphony No. 8, F Major, Op. 93........-----------------:eeeeceneec cece een eneenecnneeeeneeececeesteeneanmaes He Vi, IX 
Allegretto, from above...........------:---:----20se:econneeneeeeececenececeneenecetennnsnennceetanaaenennesennsansennennaccecen ees IX 
Symphony No. 9 (Choral) ..........----------:-ss:-sseeeseneeceeeceee cece renee csennesreneacenencccceeanaanaetsneeneences XIII 
Symphony No. 9, First Three Movements.........-....----------------<--------nnoeneetenccetereecee cn tenesesenenes XII 
Symphony, “Jemma” ~.....--...-------ccceeeceecececeneneccecnne cece cesneneanensnenensmancannanerceneassennensescecccasersncnesenmacaesss ] 
Overttbes . COriOlaxts.: cose. coos sce seca cance Paes cand en mci So sae ee name eee ees eaeemeaoe ine BEA GS BI 
CVT EUER em ee PTVO TN ames sets ts as aaa oe Sgn Se ae Be Sonne Cap deb ouenpagpee neat me nengentteene He VEX, Cee 
CONTA ge bate ses Bo (oo ba Beem basen te eB ee atin ele Oe yes eee ET ER feats MAA ewer Pere rece eet ee Bec Ill, XII 
Overtire saHieOnOorens. NOs ScD Ss Md oo snccacabe senda eee enanea epee tareadoneWine oe TeV WLM LE Xe hi 
Concerto for Pianoforte No. 5, Op. 73, E Flat Major, ““Emperor’’................--....-. Ill, IV, X 





f 
} 
} 














REPERTOIRE 


BEETHOVEN—Continued. 


Concertouor Violin, 1): Va jon st ee eee ee a ag LHGeTV Nok LV 
IVERIEU erie NN Cres Akan 05 aero han a Mal 5 eee eR ek At ya ten Ee IX, X,; XI, XIE, XIII 
DENA S 15 oat (20 ef Ga a eae PULTE Ne ete os ree aun cite Meme mua Bae adi ENS Se Me I rec so ak VI 
Trio in “‘C,’”’ Op. 87, for 2 Oboes and Engiish loysie sob seat ae een VI, VII, VIII 
Rondinor foro, Wand imatriatvents..-5..5 0s ee at eh eck ed eee Vill 
“Egmont” 

Reeudvollvaridalicidy. oll... vest aes eh ee as Rae We eg Sab oe VI 

Dies) rommiel Geraint. oo sto eit oye gn es Se a a, ee VI 

BERLIOZ— 

ONE Ue Stor DEDVenUtor Gelling | aoe ee a a et ae os VIII, XIII 
Overture, ‘‘Le Carnaval Romain,”’ Se Ses en ee EE er Pee Se Lent Pee, Deen TEV Va VEX ex] 
BON LASIAC OV TUONOUY. Crim ay Coch en oe ee es) Se eS IX 
The Damnation of Faust 

Minupe ales ARONEES tore ce eet Peat Pe. PB eet ee yet Ot Vie Vinx? Xi 

DenctodesiSrinnes-s sr ssn tren ia kk i a es tA et ee Mi Oe Oh 

RAKGCAY ain RCh Sto ees Go kt eee RN Both VEE Ma VL Xa XE 
Trio of the Young Ishmaelites from ‘‘The Infancy of Christ’’ 

(Bor eworritres an Harp). seca ae 2 Ole Get eas lee ae aod te Ree ee ae VIII 

BIZET— 

IVE PUGESS. APTI). oo. 320 ate Peed ates eat Pel occ, BU ee EAA ees, Bt oy i ee VIll 
Ouite eeu flesienne.. “Nos ain.) toe ie ip rea on ee MIS VS VAX XT 
Sulee,: inmosionne,’ a Non 2u hc los ne SW Pat ER AUR, Serene XIII 
SCATIIGT se SATB UN Cake eee ne pe ON a ae hn Pe Mi, VAL Is, 1 IE RX 
BMG LINE Z21G. ETO We SATIRIC I ese ts ce eee re ele PU ei en Shee eae IX 
PRIA DONeTA Ce oror eC aEMMGN) <2 1 cel fe tin ees a ta hes oe honleeneael ee eect IX, XI 
Duet tell: Mevor My Mother,” frome: Carmen. ots or, at se Sve ee XIII 


BLOCH, ERNEST— 
Bed NOT Soc anh ee OO hot Pn re raed oe ITI C8 ge Ce A Viti Xe xa 


BiH eMac aneas core Mees pa adaw iw Sse cute ns Sen ensure nah Oe See Ny Looe a XIV 

BLOCKX, JAN— 

pvr GUN SHOAnC Ober ashen Con ce ete OL ee wh RNS dea ee Oe VIII 
BOCCHERINI— 

SUVARI ADORNS ein sence ena nt ea el le onan bye VATE I, SN OTE OXEV 
BOELLMANN— 

“Symphonic Variations,”’ for ‘Cello and Orchestra... LTE Wk XAV. 

Fantaisie Dialoguee,” for Organ and Orchestra.....0..02:2c-ce-cececoeocoeeeeecccseeeee XII 
BOIELDIEU— 

Swerture, dia Dame “Blanche to... SG uno eee ee ee Rl ae ne geal os X 
BORODIN— 

yO YANO dae oP NAGO To en. git cnet Ie eek, tees NEN lies ge hee aa VI 

“proketeh: of the Steppessof, Middle: Apniat a. vena) mee a rs oe Io Xara, tl 

Ballet Music from ‘‘Prince LOO rs I I ee ia Fo ed SR XI, XII, XIII, XIV 
BOTTESINI— 

Concerto for Violinsand. Double Bags .o:) Jona. e Ae Se ae a XIV 
BRAHMS— 

Sympuony No. 1. © Minor, Op. Greco oe ee ee Lie NVISAVAL, cx, Xe TI 

Symphony No. 2, D Major, AE Ts ee a an ERE ee aS aie TEV Vk DxXGek, OLY 

pille BrEUCOs SELON LAD ONGC: cn aah ane  wRS ee EE a ee ee ee IX 

Symphony No. 3, F Major, Ops 390 2 cos is a a aera oe LIV VCVaALS Xe ev 

AMOR TOLL, STORM EDO Cer 2 ie keh ot Ne OS Mai MERRIE © eee tae ees XI 

SY WHO: Now 4s. EMINO, jOD. 90.12. iar te Nieman en an Maree teat VI, IX, XIII 

Perenage IMCD esMalOR tt Suche eine hl ae ares Cie be RO etre ORE eae trae oem XII 

SSE GN 8 rere SiGe cotciat sok no Soda See GRR GORENG pins Sone CURIE Gee eee, pais LETS ag eee XIV 

Overture, “‘Academic Bestivals Op nSUle So ee ee LN eet OE ea VII, XIV 

OV eI RUS esc e* EEG BAe tmp coe OSE aces 3 un, ORI Aine iy ae ee a hor a eee ee IX 

Soncemo foi VichineD, Major: Om ilies ck ae ee eee ee ee ee IV, VI, XIV 

ElUNeaTrinn.DAnGes oc 09s so i ee AA ene VI VIR VIE Xe X, XIE IV, 

Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Ore DO ae sas nt See Pe ae ee et IV, VII 

















REPERTOIRE 


BRUCH— 

Concerto for Violin, No. 1, G Minor, Op. 26......---..------------:ceceeseeneneennennn ter Il, VI, X, XIV 

“Kol Nidrei,” for Violoncello with Orchestra, Op. QE Seen Mineeneh VI, VU, IX, X, XIV 

Scotch Fantasy for Violin and Orchestra ........-.----------------:eeseereereneneccensnrenne erence anne IX 
BURGMEIN, J.— 
ENT Sra bot eta va CA PTO VEL oe caso ar cca caer ao seco aaa wenn obo teemwesuanuee ep edenceay nn srannanseacbevnesenaeas te ners taeet cee VII: 
BUSONI— 

Symphonic Suite, Op. 25....-...-.-c-c--csseccsccesseeeecenensesnecensoenesrnaseenencnenanarancscecenessnsnaccscsesesenee se seee ees IX 
BUSCH— 

Od Folks. at Pome sc 2--cick econ cannse -cdaene con ccuowans tosh cmastenaccnsnaneqecnnnassssonengengpensescersnnanenescsescsanne/ Sent IX 
CASELLA— 

red Pens 6 Papas (0 6 an Sen Ra een eS eS ie rete eae ea xX 
CHABRIER— 

Rhapsody for Orchestra, “Espana’’.......---..-------:---+s-ees0-e020rree VI, VU, VIII, IX, X, XI, XIV 
CHADWICK— 

“Jubilee,” from Symphonic Sketches............-------------c:esecressecrsseesnerensecenn nantes enn ee Ill 
CHAMINADE— 

MT Tn Sart Danie. ii scnsdcnennsaczctnn<nccpcoe cous banedeabowreennennsccenatpnewemsumeanersvene>Ansekaar=eeesananarne na seeresaeves VII 

Concertino for Flute and Orchestra................-.-.----e-0---sssnnnennesnnsnnnnceecconennencnnanscsccneonstansecceces XIV 
CHARPENTIER— 

Suite, “Impressions d'Italie’’.........-.....-------0---ce--seceeeeeeecennnreeneeecnnnennnnenananncnnrenaensnanecscncretsces XIII 

“Depuis le Jour,” from “Louise’’..........--..--------csessececeeeseeneerccnnennanennenmnnennens cnet een n ne Il, XIII 
CHAUSSON— 

Symphony, B. Flat-:..-.22--2:----c-cqonce-tocesoaseesnnnanernnnbe-enverccecnnnonnsroennssteneeneroncoesersenrerssnsnreennsans X, XI 

Symphonic Poem, “Viviane,” . Op. ; Reset ae Sys late ele en See 2 RLS oe eee VI 
CHERUBINI— e 

Overture, “The Abencera ges” .........--<..-----:-sse--eeesesecnensescenenecncencenncseenenarsenerenensssnnnnanamennceoness Vill 

Overture to “Amacreon’’............c2eeeeecceeneenenesenreeeeneererennanncnceenmenneaeenarnecansesennaanscnnccesencacoamers V, Vil 
CHOPIN— 

Andante Spianato and Polonaise, for Piano ANG -Orchestrar.cAcccdcceccacoscsctechcueee cs acevearemsgerss Vil 

Concerto for Pianoforte, E Mimor..........----..----seeceenecccecennnennntentensnneccecesenenennqencononereessnannes I, XIV 

Beach ae ccd Sew topcase ganna ba vate oumsoen@par acne Wine nb os ggcoensennnyasirgstonen tang terg “ane nos" sac ab seeroaea te IX 
CLOKEY, JOSEPH— 

Basa VV ere Sign be aco oo week as saan cocada ane cc net eonvavanuenssuadensasennenmnnaPSansanrgredapsunqesneren=aagnc oe treeoe Seah InR” XIV 
CRIST— 

Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes.......--.......------seereeecnnecennnnnceenentapsncnennccnensnennscncoceenraccceccesonasencs XIV 
COTTENET— 

Chanson Meditation (Violin Solo) -....2..---..------::-coeseececeeneeenenennencceennesnconenansnccannnnemereenaccssneness XIV 
DAVID— 

Air, ““Mysoli,” from “Pearl of WS ek FEN en Ss acts oan ck bop ease mane ern siennstesebarnrenapes I, XI 
DE BERIOT— 

Scene de Ballet, Violin Solo. .................0.:.--scccceneeeceeenenseensceneccccncccacneeaceenerennnssnenncerncnsccorsenanas XIII 
DEBUSSY— 

“‘Iberia,’’ No. 2, Tone Picture for Oe he ser aisc. sox ccccec tcc cokwe ke an ce ote eee a te aekee -honnametineens VI 

March, “Ecossaise”” ccc: :-cc--ceecwceoene-scecececnccenernncccenerannacnnansnnsnsanraseaessannacsmannacseractseapscsnnsenss II, VI 

Petite Suit Ccccccccc.siecicccicccrecaceconcecscteccsnecuoscocerscenestencspscstbnsnanseuacemececensconnurcannrtedsencceseanssnesaser eee, Si 

Prelude to “The Afternoon of a Faun”’...........-..------ 1, IV, V, VII, VII, IX, X, XI, XII, XIII 

The Children’s Corner.....--c------sc-cc-sencccesccreencccensencceeneccerccccconcnenensncnneseannnecnanncnnmmcncsarcunnancnss VHA X 

Golliwog’s Cakewalk, from above.............-.------:::-:-cesrereceeceeenecceteenanerennennannecanennnnrsnnanensanneces XII 

Three Orchestral Sketches, ‘““‘The Sea’ (La Mer). ...........---------------c02eeeereeneecrenmenecneenens Ill, Vil 

Oe Beecher a vase denn sneha new sbpsnanecoandetecaghaiinceanectsnseuonansamuernsabonr sireraone=Vees eBags ereap races IX 
DE GREEF, ARTHUR— 

Four Old Flemish Folk Songs.......-.....2...se----cceeeccneceenneceeeeceecceeens teen ersneeersnnncensnnenenenssess XIII, XIV 
DELIBES— 

Suite, ‘Coppelia’’............-------------eeecececeneeseneee secon eecnnnneesnnnnensennaesecnesaanannanewenees | eam, Gu. O ae GF Pe @ A 

Suite; “Sylvia”. 2.nic.c. oie. sc ceccceenccecnenceceennenncactneenscececccscuncoennecnensesnncrseneeurnsnenepnmarnenances I, XI, XII, XIII 

OST SN STIL ea rare ac eens wants nae Roos Sp pcb Soewnannbahndlp Seance wumwensoseswenchsadenenbeaseaamtee VI, X 

Po) Say raya: Pats 6 3) Roe ale cea Ben a tes eT a ety: ee de Pane Lee eee on tee eee TREE VI 

Intermezzo from ‘“‘Naila’’...----.----cccecccececeecceeenenscccencenccceseeneccnesnennncnscccseneeneoenecccemecanccanmacswonseass Vil 
DOHNANYI— 


Suite for Orchestra, Op. 19.-2-2......ccceeceeeeeeenneceeeeeeceenee cece cneneneectesseceesreseeenceeesens X, XI, XIII, XIV 











REPERTOIRE 


DOPPER, CORNELIS— 


ATS COTO IN + PM PRONG. fool oso te go eh NS ear ig wes Rae nee eee X 
DUBOIS— 
PREV ICTS, ETICES ROUB ERE UVR se a Ba ss ee Se Peo cena ee ee Vill 
SWItG <5 1sB — PF RTAR GOI coc ek oe a ee RR Rs ee RR Goer oe BE Se a eee VIII 
DUKAS— 
Scherzo (after a ballad by Goethe), “‘L’Apprenti Sorcier’’...... IW VeVi Villa xT Atl 
phd Med BY y er level Bote volo Be cot 7s WARP nen Ok gh SPR meta ne cas ap otis a aetonat ee Sua nei Scien des eaters hc VeVi xi! 
DUPARC— 
Sects hiker ok eked &7 oy) ce orig bro): hoy 2 eens he, Weenie Sie se Rreeiien.- BRABIVireR ties. ier Weemens eas WKS. cob eg Sal ter w rs Part aes IX 
ee REESE PEE OITA ee Sc ea sea gad ate ec oe eg ee SSS A aR ie Te oe ae XI 
DVORAK— 
Syinphony.-wi romathe: New !W orld. o.ccsc. scr ne ane een ncaee eee eee eee I, VU, IX, XI, XIII 
HN Eee e oes) pas yet tae. lo Let g Bie Oae A mer Slee ease RUGS Ae aes ler SRSA Ste PRY eae arene emit Ae ee aU a & IX, XI 
OMCTEM TE CORTON Ey tos CIS AE secs ease enact cas ceze nema neat ash ee nee eee II, XII, XIli 
OPEL Te 1 POCO IN ECR T nooo, Sade an as hncce ccc ane eae eee et ee ea ee ees Ill 
Concerto: for. violoncello... Minor. 2 3 he ee a eee XIl 
Bem LF ape Loy Gent he tC RPT aha RRO SR IRN eras DNL VERE GBD? ERE LEONE BETA Ge IRONS Sine ot Vib Vitex; 36 AY 
CLERC NA Ts SERRE Se oe a Ne ga he re Eg ee a EE ae Vill 
EICHHEIM— 
Orientalciimpressiogs: =--n-2-2 8... es SE i Se Ng gh aie ena SOE Bee hits an ye XIV 
ELGAR— 
March: ompvang CrcumsestanGeds co) oe re sence Il, VII, XI, XII, XIII 
ELKUS, ALBERT— 
WHpPTessians FTO. Bs WsTOek 1 TACO ys a ace ise ee IX 
J eXepelatepe aye co Wily Coy gg ceed Me Lk gael IS o 6 6 te tpmeel Spat ip Seth Barra NEE Sc tT SN a re 1 Rete ange <M le ue soe XII, XIII 
ENESCO— 
Roumanian Moapsody, No.3 A “Major, Opi tlc ees ae eee VI, VII 
SOSrIN eas Gets iit ee AT IVI ANON. Se Se ee es ee eS ea ee XIV 
FAURE— 
Bereeuse sOKr.. Ou GsRHOs OTC MesSe recs. Gee hn ee ee et OR ee ee Vill 
Romance without Words-for “Cello and’ Orchestra ..2222 ois ne een eee VIII, X 
FOOTE— 
ror eg Gish Cy hel ey ean oe hoe et Sean Bic Pet” Yo Came AN We Me 2 larg Rink pert “RAP oe Oa? dint Mr Ae OR ae Pray wee oe, ES Vi 
FRANCK— 
SHUT ONG 5 > BVO ces eae oo oe a ones eee ee eee BU OER OK Pa os eo TE OY 
Symphonic, oem; = le Chasseur. iam aoe ccc cca co tice ctw acco nw needa denea tes cosar ne adeee oo Vill 
i Symphonic Poem, = ses - Poles res oe cece arcnce ccs Sis nck en enna danced cecbeeseoreee, coapbee auc Seetean sas VI 
Syasiphonic: Variations for Piano and Orchestraic ci a XIV 
GERMAN— 
Suite; baree: Dances: £rOni > EIeCRry- UN Ute es tock ae sascha eee, See Il 
GILLET— 
Set Mo} ba cogs | wb) kale ee eerie APRA Ons MS hr acaba). Sha SE: Naan L. akiae eerie hs ta Ramee DEAE ak VIII, IX, X 
GLAZOUNOW— 
“‘Ballet Scenes’’ from Suite, Op. 52 
SG ber she Y Res BU: cot 2) Same ee et ct OE ise eo es, aL Fabs ae PTET re SR aie Os Se me Wa act ene Pee ads GPE ae Ser Lt oP V 
bs PSE Tosa toy oo 2 Oy. eis SSA gen MS ae PP Am iS |g Sac NEY I OSE oe ane er a teey, SORE Sy Ne NO VEE 
Grand: Pas>des: baancess from -Ruases! GAO ar. 6st re en cs debe eee XI, XII 
Nocturbedc throm SCOhOpiniatia:) aes oe ee re ce re dad oe eee ed ns SO Re VIIl 
Polonaise. (eoroimn | CHOPIN IRE hess. aoe et cote oe ernst aires <a ek aah nke sacs eae ge ag eee eee VIII 
perenande t.Spa snore oo cs cee sr ea ei see Ee ens pus senate essa eelgdgs ce tonats ceae Sa moe ee tes X 
NWiIEO) GO CONCEET SOD Tee ee ete tn oe ee Ee tn Dp ee a ed epee Sore ee Vil, IX, XIII 
See Variations 
GLINKA— 
eg ARTE SUAS Bah ime ee Sosa eS Seo te ack da wa, ean ae aa earache daa SURO Land Bodo cact nace aan Reeee Se beaCEeS VI 
FRG 5 ep T) oP AUER NEN c Sen Sco Sa caty as sce od See SR ead aR a a Ne ee tee a oe en Se SU 8 
GLUCK— 
“Dance of the Blessed: Spirits, --. froin’; OTrp nets: toc sscccse necks weeresneees esos VI CVIE ect 
Overture-splphiwnies dn AS es nok oo adress neaeas hinge eee ets ten ee eee ce VIE EX lV. 
GLUCK-GEVAERT— 


baie Wb POS etC LF gh ac PY ARS es ge Sk eSB 5 elicdie ts Sea IS RR SRA ie eet ve) EA Marys Oat ee TA As en IX, XIV 








re ee 2 





REPERTOIRE 
GODARD— 

Suite. Ops. tO; for Pirate: andvOrchestya sic. 52.2 ino soo eee ae = venation neten ecard eae c tpn snopes Vil 

LAAs Tiss Font Cama ity Cl 0 to) sees element ee 6 AP in ER ib a i oe oe meen es Seen ey Pema ee EP pee nner Sat o> ee XI : 
| GOLDMARK— : 

SvHiphonyoND. pte Ops ZO, IRUaLIC! W CUOINS fom. oon cs erence ennte eee ne Lee Sat ge ea eee IV, VIII: R 
| OEE Tee cc SECU TICE est OD ae wont ttn beckon seen ee pe apse ep seosoek anes eaake data es 1; 1V;0 Vile XT 
Overturess li Springtime, S31 Oped Civic seccace soe sec alee ace akon nee pemtonaee whee Se uaban op esaee eaten rang Il 
| GOLDMARK, RUBIN— 

ASST EEE sea taetine sty 21.05) 2 tap pene ain ay Bobet LOE paws SOeREy 1 Ait MP na ae Nie Ae erne te, aE OA A 3 AERR NEE, | BES tn XI 
| ANG OPO ISEB OCS ian oa eee coe eee dace OF ew a ones En ac oe RS RSS oe ces Sede eC Oe ED XIV 
| GOOSENS— 
| SYST AY Ss ZS pahae GEN as fiers bared c¥. Ca) a) sage PO eee Sr 3 ieee ei an CP doi rt tape ANB PRO ye Ere 8 Met yer Sy: XIV 

GOUNOD — 

a Oe Bids Ceghe (7 ot: PRR See Seer ne manne eee Fe nner oe ao NEAR ALG Seeger See” ES et uaa wep LW Meise pc eh “Roe Il 

PSery HOTS ORS Pode ote Gall ot: Lb E-) cet es te a Re eS SSeR CERES a OMORS Ole he ERS I a bear. Sy 

Parmer Daa TOR Ole DOGTIOTIO hE ioe too pide st ea cate eek en gee Vite. Soe ae AIH 
Valeo EO. & FROMMeO: arid. PUR ec een ok Cee 9 oer «ee ns Seen Se een co ap ae onten ae ats ] 
GRAINGER— 
| British spol Mut. Settings == .< fos eo ee eee i ee V, VI, VI 
| ivishu- Lune from County Derry; from: above. .o25.. <2 nce aes VIII, X, XIII 
Molly. om the: Shore; ifrorn “above Sisco ect oe oa neta sere aoe pened VIE. TX, > A 
Sasi EE Oe NUTT BENGE ee sk Sasa canis Spe wah eee wte ae ee aprega cet nie edewn aeece bets eek Ektcs Sa suee = ta mee acne apenas VI 
1 My Pavtad TRY Yor ah gh 1 tale CHES RE a alee WO Re RAE ee OS el PPR pee ee ae Ai ea Fed ee te wales oie LT XI 
| GRIEG— 
Concerto for Pianoforte in A Minor, Op. 16............-......-....------ IV Vin dx Ale 
a Ca ee aie ee Se cag OP ed are CO eee eine pe RERUN SaaS Ue ROSE tit  «  ain SS ae Ee VIIl 
) PICA WW GUNGSTO RG ISAS Us OTN ooo oo cx bac ode ate Scena ahs cn ca dteabaecunl a seeae teen ceapeete emcees II], Vil, XI, XIII 

EOE OU ILE: PELORT SOI ea nin ce ae anc oenas eae cwas an yaa cae han evit apawe Neat nae te aed aoe V5Vig VE 

UES a cj rm o) gh ep oye nt: koa Loe pee tan pen me a OBS foal RE Sn a ME Rem eB eee AOD | pe rie fk Sa SUL instr FRE DSN es Sey ey BE 24 II 

Sofveie a Song, trom: ~ reer Gynt > Suite No, Ze Op. 55 eae ede cangenceeeneaat pears VII, VIII 

Suites “Peer Gynt, Nod -1, Op. 4622-5. oo aaa eae EoVioVaY, VIG XX], XT Rex, ov, 

SESE Ol tag och gl Os alc uc blo Nie Aad eth nl ie Reel oa CRB SAO ent entra rere per ip ty SAS phe EN dite oe EAS on 
. ENOL OL WE WINDY TGTGOS, § CDF OD sega eee ota ee cak coc kl ican Ac te sane ebeataen ce gepe nae Reece ype eal ae GEG 
j Wie Chel er OES SIT IO od Fy INO Foe oioeasicn bance onan cee pote Beem iouan aetna eee eter eeeeeecet VIII, X, XIII 
SUtee fF Dimer | POTSA LEAD a5, occcaceaney vi suasc eset en oe ate acaba eee = PEN eS Laat Nata ae base XIV 
| HADLEY— 
SraTiphOny INO We, bee OUP.) SCASONS ois owns fannie arnt cacnas an osasseanos goepedbeccee uals a ates Ro tuseeede eeee I 
t SV MONONY. NOs 4 ye VERIO occas che noha ease ero basaeepne Scenes aera Pas oop aeceebaed- cosas Ska, Wen se sbeer a euseavee II 
Cig ee 605 00) 0) Cote Oe esto 1-7 | eae ines Bea Rie ae an Ee Dieies caat a apy anua ee Neen etn oa Me eke Pee decency ny rectum eke ie eee Vill 
WOVETEUT Est POT O Ce oe dae ee e ep, Ae re eee aie eed ie Ree See pene eee nen I] 
h Deas har go Reb hy 42 GS) 0) oho) 100 bs Lat ee RG Pes Sk Safe eee ee Lee en WO POSS Penh vat ae glee PROS een ae Soe? tt, AIV 
Gantata ein WiNSie Sb reAree a ei oe a Eee sak ot a ea aan ce eee alas ea a a I] 
Wonzertatrect for: C ellouand  Orcnest Te. a0 eso aee aac re eae ee en Cen ee eee i] 
PRIS S OC Vig see Se ALPE TE EY oo cutis 5 perce bce se a aac a ees Ss senate np sane semi II] 

SEE Eeda EE OTROETIO NIE OR A RUN eae eae Fe cen se eens Soh ep peak tae oh ae ee: DORE Urea ARR op eee asec oie ree ea II 

El ONG OCIS ALONG re | OP dD ssa oe eee eae ee wt OY SE Ti acc Gens ae en Reg lV 
| HALVORSEN— 
| Sr Se Bite LETS 58 ae 1) 0 Cs Meee a gE RE IE ty ee NS SY NS le SO ONS ts) SA al A Ae elie te EL oe x 
| HANDEL— 

Eurgo. tror Orchestra and Organ a. oe ese ee ea ee ee VIE XXXIV 
| Convertor Grassos Op seed aINOss ea rn at aden 4 eee cen am dares eae as Sy aed eae eee X 
HANSON, HAROLD H.— 
Spare hoy AKOGy Loyal satay 54 Wimeyy Sb 2 Thoth lo) 9 ee eee en tae he ER CRIS Ne AS Mr oe Se oR Shee ch oe Ie XI 
SVT DOOM PSO yi ke a es es ee Re oe a aa ie eee XI 
HAYDN— 
| OR Ug NAL ITOL IY, OBL 8 tant B ate eP ONDE EET, BORE PEROT SRE St Oe aie Tae ee A OF Agee Nn ene be Pos Toes See ER ye I] 
Symphony, G-Major (B.  & He Ed.Ne. -13)::\(The: Surprise) so eee ee V, VI, XIV 
| Margocrand = Finale «from sa DOV.c isc ee ee re ae te a Sem ee ee VI 
| ig cub apse e hides Cee G ES Coy deemed 1/515 G2: 9 oa ee ae ROE a aN nee as ER-Pe RHEE ith Oe WR TSEC g ITE AKG. IX 
) PRMGOREUGO LONE HD OVEs 2 soe soe tee ote ne eens ee Tenet a nai I, ee ra eae Ree eS IX 

Concerto ror Violoncello, sb wlWajor gmake Saat ca ale ae ar ee I, Panes Ropenees XIl 

SOncerto-1or. Liarpsichord ahnd-Orchestra, DMajorscnecccennnseee oe es XIV 

MHNeMo one Variations Lrom, Emperor OUaATtets co. seszss se eee ca ee eee cease ] / 





“ 
oe 2 EE 


REPERTOIRE 


HELLMESBERGER— 
CORDELL WOONNE ce Pe ie enns ee Mute eS Seg ence Foe eT Any ae te ee kOe MRT VIII 
HERBERT— 
PRTC CATIEN ADEA SIG ioc Sasti cs canto cobra Ne cos cease No cen nk ee ee on Be, Sega a nt a ee VII 
BPA S ORAS OY sete eo ores tence ta ae pee ieee Pe ene ae Se se eC ee SU, OR ett Vil 
Rrrelucdecta tye Alt Na tome chose eoc ce eer cee coe eee ees SOR See A dhe Inc iy II 
HEROLD— 
OVO TBO ae Z se TPO ssc he rdsnga sw ae ec de ara a Se Nae hoc IS eS AS NS iL a Vill 
HOLST, GUSTAVE— 
po iS eRe Diol ay AN, FCS ts Naas + ed gee ORE ele GPE RIAE Meet ee HiT A WHEN Toni fe er eerie Wh Ts x Ma bt XIT 
HUMPERDINCK— 
Die Koenigskinder 
\OLCES ch Fp Yok Sar eaaen ei Aero ong bar Soe MS ERAS NCEE RIOT Ten te etaily se iseeeeie COR Me Marg ire 1 ke Ill 
Pree cworse nOGACt. A Mellafest) i: one eS et a es a ee Ae a cede ce VI 
Preludesio 32d Act>-(Verdorben-Gestorben) sc. 323) oe eee eee VI 
Hansel and Gretel 
Dmeameicantoniitnes ts hope. ee ER Ve ae Men ae cep BE Nee Vie LX ek SH 
Raye hes genera eo ote teks: See aaah OR eb eh Re eae iain ae Vil 
D’ INDY— 
Et by (ayn tai oy een VA Loy Los 2 cy 1 | (o jeieetee nes taintaee SMES, AS tele al. Mer Stl ele non BC PRUE PvE A ras ein PS Ae aschenih  — waiess BE ! V 
IPPOLITOW-IVANOW— 
Caticasia nie kelGnes ei ek ne et Ores oa tap a ey eae te. TVs DURA ye eC pie ae XI, X1V 
TWwO.-Nmbpers: Sono. CAUCASIAN OKETCHES oo ek oe Rs Ee ee ee Pe VII 
JACOBY, FREDERICK—— 
Syimpicnic ioe, -o Une “Pied Pipe kt moose nte a coe ce See CSc, Pe ee ee V 
7a Niel VEY Coie ects ato Lt 0 | R= Renee eee sa Ale aN ai MRO TM EERE NR RON SONG FS RSS UT ee Oe higge Vil 
Sy mpnoniceP rejude, Thesis Vesor ot. Agnes v.04 5. ce ee ee Coke ed eas ae Ss XII 
SUV ERL EUSIY Vihar oa res upcecicnnn en scenes Bee S oe eet eae gt VR ee ee. Ree ees ne Le XIV 
JARNEFELT— 
PAPI Ci area ARO cto SR Rie Sie AR ar es | ee Re IX, NG od OT 
Ask 20 UY ig ae ea eA an oh ite centre ABU ey ent he OS Re CRG Ss MOORS, CRM Oe Oats Mo ekC kh Me C IX 
JENSEN-STOCK— 
EV Ex raat oat OAS ben eect sk eae Sees es ean eee ee en Mean 2) nee Ae yee aR IX 
JUON, PAUL— 
NS WAC EOLA eo ccen na Season dice Oe eae ana gt Re meee atts Par GENS eae ace RR Sd X 
KALINNIKOW— 
‘ PY MPHORY.S NOs whe Ge MENON eect agers A i Ben il cee eee i tae ee oe es Iv; IX 
KELLEY, EDGAR STILLMAN— 
symphony: No.2, 7 New, Englatid:) in‘B Flat: Minor, Op. 3320... 8o. ee ee ee ee VI 
KORNGOLD— 
OM ETENE 5 iN GAA ae ak cS ate can ut oe uae Rp ee RS eae geen. Tea OL SNe ae a xX 
KREISLER, FRITZ— 
Ese DeStretitl asl ON OIS VOY eek nee eas Ses Se ae ee ge Ce a ae tees 1X, XG ee Oy 
so) oF a Fo BP ANAS yo i eR ere rae gO ORE A itr SERS ore ARR Rs SORA SO SEIS IS eo, ce XII, XIII 
GEN oY 9 Col BAVA TSS ch ch fF SRE Dona aps Be aerh f pee ee et SN ce Ne eS Rome i Pee Fea Re XII, XIV 
LALO— 
Sy ii pHionie We spAwnGle TOT MVAOTHN.. Coot eet ee Aeon niet treet 8 yt areata ee ere ee | 
Concerto ane) iMinor: for eCellon-2 iota 5 ci a ees = an Ae ea ee oe ea Ill, 1X, XIV 
Concerta-for Violin 4ner ONGNGrs ao. ae ee ee pe. ae ae ae oy eae TRAIT XTV. 
Intermezzosfor:Cello-and Orchestras on cs ed ee ee es ae ee VI 
INOTWESIA He aN NR DS OGLE 228 cowry Pets to tes eos Bac ane ok Se eRe as SE tee arg Wk I ade Ean WV 
Overture, elie Soi Gas ioe ots dek acer as eee ue tay ai alee te oer oke En Vode ke RA SE lies a tbe a II 
LANGE,. GUSTAV— 
wo>Movements from “‘Pastorale’> (OboesQuarteb)u.- ye ee ee XI 
LASSEN— 
Hestiva ltcOventu ren st geet ayes Ac See eo pe as Teter aay Me, Ceca reeeen ie eticae! xX 
LEKEU— 
AGABIG; IGE SERIRG SKS Sere i i. sis ed a ERE Sere 68k SARS Oe SES ey ees a XIV 
LEONCAVALLO— 
POO SUE ECO eck APACE cone Ge eat lee De a ore ine may Peet Ly Se eee ne XIII 














REPERTOIRE 


LIADOW— 
sag BY oF oN Sone: Ree St Wey Toa gal cy 2 tH Sean ra aie oo Be pacts ne PON et ed PO ES Saver a ETRE EOISAS REE <O5 even Vill 
Symphonic Picture, “Fragments of the Apocalypse’”’...............2...22222222--22+2--0+--+2eee-eeeeeeeee XII 
BS Ey CEC REDO SENIT GEE TIE rE RATIOS et odio eS ceed oy atta nome Seo Saende Gave ane ee snaps nama mea eae XI 
POMEL TICR TIE GCE 1G RE Oo OB occa ta cat ee awa tepine npllensbes st icarasen ie tnsitancarb shane staden EX, oN; Xi 
BF Ret ARO rete CUES Oana nS ae oe es etre dara gute gh ay hanks saaanen stpy Bane tg Tobe canta ease aaa tenn obs IX, X 
MIGSiG OX CV AISE ECR DE) sas aaa eae crane haere eee Somue eects >, Gam, 4 ta, @ 0 mm, © 0b | 
See Variations 
LISZT— 
Foe PG seep aaRO Ng 1st od be) Re a PES a DO eo LE a men Seni ea etn Pe. Fee RES TRS ane XIII 
Serr PADIS POST VRE ZOD PE ee ns ap Ross cana ba eon cp ab Bawen tcp pn bat seed oemipe teed anaes Vil 
Symphonic Poem, No. 3, “The Preludes’’.......... LeIiVveVeENE Vile VES, Xe NE AB A 
SSIGRNX ETD COTA ECTS OMSEE A or PERRO FCF aasaccs Sere stot a ee da a eee Supls oseenee tun ae ines Ble ee sane PRG ese Bi 
COC EREO FOL EDO TED, Pade AG Cec NOS hice csc tcc cia ce Son Se wae oe Tere caches cane eee ene eR okeanses II, IV, XIl 
Concerto for Pianoan. A. Majors NOs -2o ne ic acs eet pn ee tae eegees VII, Xi 
UTES PAB IY FU DSO Ye INOW oo so Sasvee ao conc cofeed dons Feceseacthees cesescs sens agin selectieank VINEE VL os! 
SP Ret rier ee Pte Pe ES RIGOR Vir INO Gd occ cecdo as a oe tac gee spss oon Ba ween aetna anda Vit oIxXe Xe XE AH 
Hungarian Fantasie, for Piano and Orchestra.........-.---2.-22-2------------eseecnnceoneeneeneeeeeene IX, XIll 
oo SCTE TIS BLS 9 5 1 Sa eae aN MERE aE SR PLD is TOS «es Lal, AV, VEER RIS XT EE ALEV, 
Teed cate RENE we fina see a eR REN AORN Sai: ee RS ae eee Pe ee Lea ipa see On oer cet ery ee XII 
PCS OTA Ges RR POD cana eck pana re eana ok hoop callin bap apse Sachem ascbunbaeoncmedecusesoieanewe I, HW, XII, XIII, XIV 
Nae eee SN i pea alles One Aa RN EA. SER SIC 5 RD cl cw Oa, Ta ies eee RN or aC el Bh este Berar ae A 2 IV 
RPI PULSER OTTER oot oo Sac ae oe Rzs Uma Th Socigs = ot Sense aaa eeate= aaa wee te somnast ee Cees ane POR: Sera eea baad rata 1V 
LUIGINI— 
JS Ey oe REE aS SD ee nt tan ON Se eS ei ie Soe Ane oe a oy RRS SMO ake tens NS Ce > eG ied <5 A 
MacDOWELL— 
ER NE PESOS La a) 8S) aa Re So lanes Laelia nA et An eo we fae, 6 len Pa se IE ac, We ee tek Se, ] 
En De Oo Pam NY Dee to al Oo Shae) Alliear ee Sten ee Bees eee aes To Re SENG RY eee ee ba a eee ERE ne SER an writ a Liam Poe ok II 
SX CUTE ais Caged aA ss ae A eS See ee ee Pie 5 lpn Peip Mnte Sather. Sistine yen) pee ae Soa eRe wh Es Il 
Merle Testa Are Ege eal WS pete yo Peet eae Mog Weta er Se MR, Neat Rn CaN Aa des SRE 3 SORE Dh igs Eicon WIRY am poems k Se Mar yy Ill 
Divce stream. irittiahi sOuite ) oer oe oc 2 gs cccnka rat eguadndecats Tansee wee en ce oko aR actions pteadsoeeness Vill 
SCY Tel Shh ee tre Wel Beg tbe iis 4 Ue ogy Ae Sania a Sans ee eee C= teen en SO. fbr y NR Sn cet IX 
POOR POE O OU 5 Lae INO Oe os ke Rie aan ee eas Oona Sears aC agees enact EE haere IX 
MAHLER, GUSTAV— 
Sp TAAESEROEN GS EN Oc ign TOT os ess aon cep Basel Saban os stds Nene econ ast aapiae Semele PERE Boece tara X, XI 
SMI GHOMVONG.o2,-C) Minor, “"Restrrection *<202. 2s Sc eee tae eg tate te XIII, XIV 
agnyar ste teb OO fo ptamt, peo Coon 7 GL) eetinnnt lah eaeatde Seta e in i Ahae UN Ura ae Peels ierceat sm char RENEE As mee XII 
MAILLART— 
Overture, yes Dragons: “Ge Ville ree se soe ew Oats epbiae pao ced beak ge, eee oes x 
MARCELLI, U— 
Water colors——liour. Symphonic SKetches niga is iia poetic Sees dnc ab ose ane rocen ondtesnsotdneaueeas VIll 
MARTIN, PAUL— 
6S ye CGE CMC TIO WEE MOTO oa ccir5. Ses ce taen 5 ahead abet Soles san hasan dv ap beng nd Scaencenacona ve ualeeleceeotan heel XIII 
MASCAGNI— 
Intermezzo from ‘Cavalleria Rusticana’” for Orchestra and Organ..........................-.---- VII 
MASSENET— 
(GR LSA RPE Goede RADY ie Cy Sa GN i ae een eer eee EE Re EE Sent Aphis Soy pay REE hes) >, Cae, Copy. So lied. © 7 
Se RPE RER TA OFC TRO ooo a ae ak eres ee area ra a hi en a tee VII, VII, XIV 
SE NCer abe +E INCSH SL LOSS. -SLLOMEE ERO Vlas a eee oan en awa coe Ree on eee ankaatoensteae VIII, XII 
Fe SAS G00 2 OEM (od GLO A Ee Le ieee iy er ee aR, ct a RO en ean far EM PRE OF Yi e A hE So, ROR Stile ] 
Ballet sivitesic. frerirs hse: ii ren ao aac enigma oa nee daa benn eee act iennde VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII 
Batlee Douce meron © TA CTOCTRC Giese scat ences Seco uu cea oa awharee een ceae Demet ersogs saat ones XIII 
CET ES Ee Oreo a> ade a ae eae pee are Ot a a Sp i a ip EVO mo pO PEE MAE I ween. Sees ese a II 
SRBC eT, ite ein male ee et oe i Ce ate ase na tinea damaseninetics oo dbase oe dura aege a eae eels Vill, X 
RASC NE EIO TEER ORIN ee IS ocr eres eae pceed seen lubed wit eaeies Memes necasseste Ruaacassee VI, VII, IX 
SHATCG Ts EI COTICS 1 NGA OUI CALE > 2 vx ken awe cece sco e des Serna ae aa cata seonap tab eaabee eu sushes dpate neces Seveuies ends Vill 
SUitess (OS COMESI LU CORES MES 2 i eae sack wane das sours Fam te Roentgen Sacto aa a mgae anne aan oe ne Seoeeseans ioe is Vii 
MENDELSSOHN— 
Sympnony. No.4. italian; s Asaviajor,: Op. 290i. ceds anche caaeee se nates See awes teas em ebadeeag VI, VII 
SUMpHOM VINO s, A IMIR OF? “CO COE CRED costo de cdc cercensceMewaes onsen octets mas nteer oe nenn san ak eed agmenee Sea rene ones XI 
RUGS CTIETN GS ET ONDE ELLIO W Cee cin edn ik cao mate Saeed ange Det ae ead cen ee res ta ee ee eee II 
Concerto.tor Pianotorte,_No-; 2G Minor; Op. 25-25. sessed heh ee ene eee Ill 


CONCELtO FOR V TOI Os OF aoe eon aa scte duck wbnnnalagudeaaspua oe IV VE Eke XIV: 








- 
4 le = = 


REPERTOIRE 


MENDELSSOHN—Continued. 


Ovethure: tingatiscCa yer 3 22) 05505 tes le nets ane OL eC gcd Ona ay Ill, X, XII 
Overture, Memeina Op vo 205 oo vaste ra ae nt ens See eee en ie Vix 
Ove reuney. Ty: ieee 8 ae societies ANE Et Ne AEE A EN re ae re II, VII, XII 
Se SP ILY ah Sng gir naa dee a aS tn BOTS EA roe oe Oca Naga iran ene ase To me X, XI, XIII, XIV 
SOUS OM Bene ciate sade ee en A tn gee San ee) ioe ete aes X, XI, XIII, XIV 
Music to “Midsummer Night’s Dream” 
iia ols Fi Roe Siete aia el PN Orcs RARE OR RABIN) mee WOR Pe eS eo IES Vix XS X11 
Gi tek See Cae Seen Seen Se i earn rol ie Oe pe PME ea aS eS ease Nr” VI 
RL CTs Se Rea Bits Sa ene Oe Re MiSs SEED Chet, neTAN SE Gil tere MORO, Sue MSS Vinx 
Wedding nVignch otek. cacti pera ae ae, Pe adh ss ene VISX XE 
MEYERBEER— 
Avia +O. aradisg,” «irom-“LoAtrioaine:s eso. Set. ore Sere eres XIV 
MONASTERIO— 
Serensta: Andaluza (Vidlin ‘Selo)' 255 4. Oe ee etnias XIV 
MOSZKOWSKI— 
pete it Major une. t; Op. 3052 oe he, ete aug hen Semel Caer I 
sPOSECT YF PTV NBO ances aplasia eS a og II 
Themeveud- Variations from Suite: Noss.) ees oes ne I 
Maiaguena from, Bosbalt? 22 ce ee eo Se Oe ae ee II 
DOR CMEC. = Nata hye ance eee ae ae eC a Mee Oats wu omy VIL MVEA OX XI 
MOUSSORGSK Y— 
eure ioncthe bald: Mountain ease 3 2 ne wig ae ee ees Vi Ix 
Dance from; ta foire dex Sovotchintst ssc... oS aS en oe oe a XIII 
MOZART— 
S¥ymbhony,. duper IG Wajors = niet een i eee, eV et 
SyMiphony dike: Bint ee eee aa ys see ae ee ete a ee en ae ee iI, VII, XI 
Symphony. G AVEROL LK OGRel- 950) sar hn a ee ee Vi VES VE IX, OXSTV. 
Symphony in. Manor (Two-Movements) 22.23.0228 A ee II 
SDV ERCUSE CD MPS BAR 4.27 Sensis Sogcniens oo saedes ow accaed in IE Po VIE AX, XE 
Onetture.< Dneg Maeics i lube: jfk pon et oe Re ie eee ee et ere I, IX 
Overture | NMabiome On Eigaro 3... egies II, VI, XI, XIII 
Concerto.in te Majorfor Plute nnd: Harp. 2. kasi. cu.c8h2 Sos cn ee ee II 
Concetio int) Minor for Pianoforte, (Kv 466) ccc 2 oes cassceectocseensctrseavinnt pa Me V 
Concerto, -E.\sieteMajor= for Mianolorte. eos. eee es a ae XIII 
Concerto forsViolin in J EE lat Major, No. 16250232 o- eect ee VIII 
Concerto-for hinte, erp and: OLciest taro Sot ee nd Sey a ae IX, XII 
Recitative and Aria from “La Clemenza di Tito? oo cceciecceteseeeeeeeeee eee II 
Aria, “Deh vieni non tardar,” from “The Marriage of Figaro”... sw XIII 
PNP IBY 5) MALE ODO rateZe | AGOte a eines toe ick Mee en eo hee, Noe cine XIII 
NICOLAI— 
Overture, “The Merry Wives of Windsor? 27. 32. Seat =, 2 | VI, VIL, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII 
OFFENBACH— 
Intermezzo and Barcarolle from ‘‘Tales of Hoffmann”’........000000-00000---ee-------e X, XI 
DOVELERTECLO Pago Le UG acs 205 NOT sd aoe ee, tea artes OB SR Thee Oe eR en XI 


PERSINGER, LOUIS— 


BASALES CV IOIME SONG) coe etc ot ak asec Heats aoe ee Boo RE es Tee XIV 
PIERNE— 

SS 11 Se (VR Ee RIN OPED Mei eat PENS ie ee net TAM rene Seah, SeeA a VIE, VIN AEXS XT KIESXIV 
POPPER— 

Flungarianehhapsody (VioloncelloSolo)ss 27.20 <= ese ee i XII 
PONCHIELLI— 

Dancesorstne ours, “Wa “Giocanda: 5 ie ey aes gc es es ee a XII 

Aas wclewseuviar.- trom ba Gioconda cnn oan ee ee ee XIII 
PUCCINI— 

PIV TSB is CAPA LONN 1k ORCA. ees cc isc ree Sa IAS tee ee aS Ce ee eee eee ae Wo 

Ji bel-aly mirom-~ Madame bubtterhy, =~ s-0pr ok eee = ee or kg pe eee ete IV 

“Che: Gelidas Marita, trom “la oBohemecs .set soa nae eee eR XIII 
RABAUD, HENRI— 

eh TOCESSION A NOCERTING gr sO ne Os eae ee ee a ag Or La See ae tr eee ee a VIII 

BEGCIO SHG S Si OTERO ee ose ore wats so ks neat ae aaa pe een eos ae ee XIII 
RACHMANINOW— 

SVINPROHY INO. 2, ae VaNOEs COs Oh et ect kao ea ee i Ie is oh as re He, AV, Vile xe 

Symphonic: Poerm;=~ Dies Toteninsel- 2s eo a ee Ill 

Prelude “iio Sharp, NERO a 25 is, aoe sd ee an Sl eus Saca Soe sect ne he a ee ee Il, XIII 














REPERTOIRE 


RAF F— 


Third Movement from “Lenore” Symphony..........-------------:-0--erceeccneerteen center nanan XII 
RAVEL— 
Introduction and Allegro, for Harp and CROC RU Pelee oe Saga ew ecg ape wee Ramee ances IX 
Suite, “Ma Mere L’Oye’’.....--.....-.-----2----ssc---nasececcenansecnsennssncncennnennanccnnenaccrnces® iH, Vill, XM, -XIV- = 
“ta Valse,” Poeme Choreographique.......2:-...-----------seeenseeeeccsnennreeceeecnne ne senennnn ncn neste XI XI 
Rhapsodie Eispagnole ~.....-.....:-c-c---csscensncsecesrecenetotiesctncncntanterenesnsie lan laser anece sens s0aeeensce seen oe XII 
Mey ETODEGW. Melodie ses .-n i. cise ccnnckecnoseernep an secentsne centannnpshnarandeaneadabomeregetensonaseoeare sar race sar nant XIV 
REGER— 
Serie TAR OIL RTL EL UGS 5 ea oN con ce soca ppn ema nyu ented per nripnt ata gate tge or ene ara Rg aoaeor ee aca III 
RENIE— 
Vegende: (Harp: Solo )xicsci.acs< tess shee cu at cateestnmsgc eng on see tentiemedage argc Rok tansoica ag ae a XI 
RESPIGHI— 
Ballnda ofr the GmOTiGe csc 7. -cese2-5< oa eles pean Chew en nee eenegene tt geen oop are panera = MET XIV 
Antique Dances for the Lute...-.....--.-------.-----r--s-se-esercnneenesnnne nent tte etn XIV 
RIMSKY-KORSAKOW— 
Overture, “The Russian Easter’’:..-......--------:----c--s-sececcce-nnsennnnncccncenemnnnstrnnnnnn nna cnecee = Xba al 
“Sadko,”" Symphonic Poem..........--------2::-s+s-ssn--sereeee gennanensconeonorestncns renseonranessnnesnestassnnssossnsenses VII 
“Spanish Caprice’’......-.-2---------c---toncnscennseneseenreneneteseneeesaccenececenss ie VECVIE. VIG TX, helt 
Suite Symphonique, “Scheherazade,” Op: 35:...1], IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, XIV 
Gatto from. °° Mladen 2... -occosiatnennetorennecser nnn nnn neencsnenennmetenssnnarsartenesacannannnsansnncuhrae eavbsastrnonssresenge X 
Suite from “Tsar SY a; bo ieee Bee Renee eee ereer ere reer tren iors roe eT ear XIII 
Scherzo, “‘The Bumble Bee,” from “Tsar Saltam”......----------2:------beeecneneccseseen rete cetennnnee XIV 
Hymn to the Sun from “Le Cog dO nr! onion ennnnnen nnnennnnceceennnnnnectecenceesarsnnsanecensneneenenannsensecubers XI 
See Variations 
ROSSINI— 
Overture, ‘William Tell’’.........-.----------------------------- f ViS Vib VIC EX, Xx, XE A I Ve 
Overture to “La Gazza Ladra”’...........-2..---:---.0ceccsseccensennersarere center onnnncannannennanseatnnmarccanacenns XIV 
Aria, ‘Una voce poco fa,” from ‘The Barber iat Seyi ean. osc cece tank are a een enone XIV 
RUBINSTEIN— 
Concerto for Pianoforte, No. 4, D Minor, Op. CA ar Nr, tat caplet fSy gery rn os le BY St Ill 
“Toreadore and Andalouse,”’ from “Ball Costume’’............-----.---------------eeeeeeeeeneeesseeeeteteees Vill 
NheIOO ya 1th B= occas ocnnn sacccnas dee nn nneoaipann wenn pea~nr-ntmawen vaenseg- Seni bes ane stpcncsarennnicr ¢oomnncocnsenca- past snore cn nhnceaeae sto XI 
SABIN, WALLACE— 
SEI OTIR, (LUO cons -wenewsensesue owns ON ta Cui Oe ae nine d ceed oe ee rae ace peae ape ciund bap PapeeSurcEshpnaattewe se soak asc Vill, XI 
SAINT-SAENS— 
Symphony No. 2...2....---c--c-necdeeenenecnnesenn paneer canentnndinnsecenonnarsenmocananenanccennendcSaaudeaecsnsansenatessens canes == XIII 
Concerto for Violin in B Minor........-..--.---------------++-+-2--0 sec eee nec ee cc ene reer ne nen ennennnnncncnnnas PEA EX 
Concerto for Pianoforte, No. 2, G Mimnor..........--------------------ee-eeseeeeeceeeeee ee ee een i AV. Vill, x1 
Concerto for Violoncello, A Minor, Op. 33..-..21.-----------------------seeceecnnnceeee see Vie Vibe ix cit 
Concerto for Harp, G Major, Op. 154....2-2.-2--..:..:::eecccseeeennnecneneeceeeee teeter tee reneteneneneneneeeneee anaes x 
Fantasia, “Africa,” for Pianoforte........-.--------------------2------eneeeeoeeccecennenenttte ca cenaeenentnnnnnnnccsesaes XIII 
Carnival of the Animals............----------------------eneee sence rnc t een enc ence ne ceneenneennnnnennanerernnctanconeces XIII, XIV 
Danse Macabre. .....-..n----2---2cccecneenecnnoo enone nnn eene nee nnenenccenenncancnnceananeennnes Le Viale WS Va a Ao 
Fantasy for Harp.....--..-..--------0--ceescenseeseeceesnnnenenneennccnncceenenaatennenecceceacsennnecnencorenensennsecsnnnenennasseans x 
Music from “Samson and Dalila’”’ 
Aria, ‘Mon coeur s’ouvre ta VOIX" ........222-2..:..00--eeeeeeeeeene ence enn enennennenneeeneenneteneeengeneaenaes Xl 
Amour Viens @idet.....-22..22-------0c---on-on--nnn ees cennn nec en ce cnene eccenwe ance ccenennnesnengcnnanenensncnnacen i AV.-Vi1 
Bes coe ea ac oe een cep cca Mose asec once mtc cabweapneranctamcaganinnCatmaes scot bnarlaant ieee nes hens neat nea Sar VEIX 
Dance of the Priestesses of Dagon......2..-...--.2---------20--0eec ence een nenn eee e teen ec nnenetmenensncneeees VWiECX 
Prelude to “The Deluge’’....2...-222:22.----02-0.-22-0nee-ne---eeeonennnentn nnn nnnee Ie-VEoOMIL- VIER XX XIV 
Rondo Capriccioso, Violin Solo...............------+--2----t--------0-neneeeeneeecneceeeetee cc nnenecnees I, VII, X, XIII 
BELENAGES nncecccoceulensccucdcnaccaccccedeecnnuneccneceecenntnanwonsncuonsecncenaeenacnncecescnecentneccanunetnindencsmannnsdnectanwovaseaus Vill 
Suite, ‘‘Algerienne,’’ Op. 60..........22---------eeececeeecee cnc en ence een eee en eee eee ne eens cence nennenentneaneeesennanenees ix 
Symphonic Poem, “‘Le Rouet d’Omphale’’............-..-----------------------0-eeereeneetneee eee XS xX; XI 
Symphonic Poem, “Phaeton,” Op. 39..-......------2--------00----encceeenenereerecencctnen een nnnnnneeee ss cnnnnennnnees VI 
COT SP ace REE Ng ees eee RRS ERIC RAE U5 fal Scare, SericLNe rate nr oa Spee es Mo EEE Ns WA Via EX sy 
Tarantelle, for Flute, Clarinet and Orchestra............0.....--22-ecece sec cee note net enen conn enen ce senenennnesenns Vil 
“Henry VIII,’ Ballet Suite _...................--ceccee cece eeeeeeeeeeeeeeneneneeneneceeeeenenaneccnnnnncenncannesencees IX, XIV 
Two Movements, from above..............----- Re EA ie ede nti OPIS UN pitas SA SRR RETR eM en Se XIII 
SARASATE— 
“Ziguenerweisen,” for © Violin ...........-.--------0c-----ceeeecceeesce cence tence cen neon enn sneee cen eernneensnmanenecannmecnanese I] 
SCARLATTI-TOMMASINI— 
Bs ieper ICS EN Sa ak ee sek ee rg a NOS, ob Sa cate ater San decks gie ema eC an eee c be Recs une decakewsseaneanes XIII 





6 





é 


REPERTOIRE 


SCHEINPLUG— 


SCHNEIDER, EDWARD F.— 
syupnony, -Nowil;/A-.Minor, - lin Autumn: Dime. 00 a tre Se ge a II 


, 


SYRIDNG ier PGeii ny MAERAGSO! fcuk eee ee a gs eS es ed XI, XII 


SCHMITT, FLORENT— 


Wilennaisemithansp diet nese eet tie oe ttt a St a2 Ot Cae yee Se ee VII 
SCHOENEFELD— 

Marcia Pantastica from “Characteristic: Suite <1.) 0 ee ee XI 
SCHUBERT— 

SPRUE. Once 1G D8 IN ae eatin ese eae RUMEN, Ue eth ke See ote ETS GT lote Urge roe oS VI 

Symphony No. 8, B Minor (Unfinished) _I, WAV, VEE VA VANE eX, XI, XII, XIII, XIV 

pymbphonysCoMajor Bae be) Ed. Now J) incu che ee oe eee LN V4-IX, XH 

EMIGENIES 7 SEGUE DOV Greer a cee kitten ered ee ae eae TR tae SR AA” GI ee Soe, S i 

pret, blames. Pao Tamia, cc. kc. dost seee Ae NS Poe te tae ener oa ee IV 

eNOS NAIA MOREE SS, ia Veco cn cen ce eed g oa a WOE Rent pale 8S RE pO ae VI 

MOLAR Chen wis. cee tie ok ee FO ee RPE cree Fete RE OE Me PL Ee aT oA YS ee TRC VI 

AVERITT APO Chee ta occ oul Sk Ee OF arid tacts «Wh dtc BO ome he Vi Oe ST, wo XLT SORN/ 

ehtomentcMupicaie sn oe: seo Ate we fest ve uel a oe a ey Vas Tee Ree IX 
SCHUBERT-REGER— 

Entra ‘dcte and Ballet Music, "Rosamund! st. 2) Shed eo ae. se ea a VI 
SCHUBERT-STOCK— 

ga hr 22> Cran a er oe te laa sa IAs DNS eM PEN Ghd et ie eet OG eet ihe | Oe, Ca G19 
SCHUMANN, ROBERT— 

SyIphiuye Nospsbulila ty Op yO 2,00 nt eet wn Ones. he ee ad ee Re ae DIAAV Xe 

Symp HOsyENG.WnGMajOlm Op G de ret ee as ET Soe tn ie hae See Vill 

Syanplonsy. Ne. oS, hehiab Op, 1o7.vCRhenish) 45. usi ae ec ea hte eee IV 

Transcribed for modern orchestra by Frederick Stock.:.......... Peon Ce Ub as hie ee XIV 

SympbonyANoy ang): Minors spe 120. soa sik ose eae oe cae Ie Mae ae Vil, XIII 

WL DCT Berna ee Or THe MROSe wt onm ine ea or Cn ae St nr Sie tee eae) ae X1V 

Overture. Genowe via 00. secre ae ne ene ee Oe en Re SA ees See oT IX 

Overture, Na nived (5c. < cena: ceps finer tlh Bee IE et | IR on Snr greme Ore XI 
; Concerte fom ianolorte, vA Mino tck tut nes Oem Bedale BSN hea Ah Roe 4 WED, Gas 

pM CHO, STON AONE 2 2s Siin sth cn le Rea re Se ae eT Se eS ew a Sm II 

VAR AC LOD ee hee eet 8 any A a ee RT Nae Skee Gee Vil XS 
SCHUMANN, GEORG— 

Variations and Double-Fugue on A Menryc Poemes Ops 23 Oise cr ec hg ahaes esl a VI 
SCRIABIN— 

"dap Poemie Ge: UE tase. hit anatase eRe et a ee coeds, aoe ety ihe, nian Ore es XIV 
SERVAIS— 

Fantasia; ."O; CarauWemoria; (CON cSolo: use a wife a ede RN eee aes XIII 
SIBELIUS— 

ITED MOM, CNOmpM pst WINES arc 1 SEIN naa oe are Teng Sg ANE On ott Ment GENE aS Vill 

Symphonie soem, oS wan iof-Pwonela sxc ies hope heey a) Nak Se ITT, °X 

Done cera i Hn Oag aie. t6e Ais Re cs cen SOME eR Ne eee Coy NUP ry one" Kangra teem VII 

Tone Poem eran lam diag i3 a4 tact Ser eee te een oe Pan ee LS Wall Sex bie Xd 

Malset iri Stes. erie tity race is etaan eae ee Ra bee Per at Vile VAX, Sa Xe TV 
SINIGAGLIA— 

Overttre, “lax Barutte~Chiozzotter :, co. fein Wiag Pt oe nn es eg ae es VIII 

panledmontese ;Dances, si WO lial. sre an tea ae Sd rece! ag ee a Cee IX 
SKILTON— 

wor indiage Dantes sist ee ie Ne. 0 Or sea ait Ales heel ae Ol See OND SCPE eis VII 














REPERTOIRE 


SMETANA— 
Overture, “The Bartered Bridle a ooin ok eha nce cocedetas-n- asanacgasan-ancmese-s=serenesers= 1, 11], V1, VIII, X, XIV 
Symphonic Poem, “Vitava”’ (The Moldau) .....--..----------------------- ll, V, VI, VI, IX, XIII, XIV 


SOKOLOW, N.— 


See Variations 


SOWERBY— * 
TOD SB ohio FOE ek necasedasccccceen= ssn nnceenenntnt eaaeenannwnn erate reat nen sBb ae ewnaepsnsee ear wana nay raceme nena XI 
“The Irish Washerwoman” ........--.---.--s--sse-scsensennsaeeescensngesanstnnesnnnasnarancecnsessnnrnsecesssenese nese es XIV 
STOCK— 
eT) ores Coa LC Au ee OE eeepc ee amt RCE I 
STRAUSS, J.— 
Waltz, ‘Tales from the Vienna 5 nl | oe ae Sele i Reese MP ORs int see SNP aap er enh ee I 
Waltz, “On the Beautiful Blue Hanus 1: eae oes VI, VII, IX, XI, XII, XIV 
Waltz; from “The Bat’ ..-...--2-.--2---.-cs-s-02--s-nnesso-ncseereesderetennentensensacasncnnsn nna cnene nace amano amo o ATT xX 
ee PS as 76 cea ge nt a ek are oa “eel ae VIIl 
Overture to “The Gypsy. Baron’’...:........---22------0s-sonese-cacosstennnesncancnaceansnancascentensnsenonees XIII, XIV 
Perpetuum Mobile .co.c2..-...---.-2-s--.---eensssenennennssenenntnenn aanennnencasnasarcsennnanansvencnacnas snasaeneneesocee aoe IX, X 
en aa co) | ei ae a a er aN re er Oe eee cr ei oe Si eee ah RES XI 
BR cr deh lee RO CO oc ta Sema cc mang ams pen mewn = saw werent n 2 Nanna ores ana eepe a Il 
STRAUSS, R.— 
Symphonic Poem, Don (Faas Ope. ba tetaeso ewan EA IV, V,.VH, Xx, XX ATH, XIV 
Tone Poem, “Death and PT TATISM SULA TION soon cae comserw sw w nee ouewnseomaenwceaen= iVE Xe XE AG 
Rondo, “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks,” Op. 26.2505. 0. 5222cis secs senisesawae ee Ill, V, XI, XIV 
Serenade, Opus 7, for Wind Instruments............-----------------+-----1e-seeeescennrnnnn nnn XI 
Burleske in D Minor for Piano and Orchestra............-----.------------2es----eesessee nese cne cnn XIV 
Love Scene from “Feuersnot”’..........2....---t2s-2ssecceceenonneneeneeceneennennnnnceceneennaracesensennnsnancaa sense nnccnnns Vi 
Morgen, ecsiecicccntiecsccececdccnsecsanannnenencnnconcacaeasanancnadeseonedirysnpssasiecarntnassvensnaseasnenceserescasinsanescennrvenmetnas Vi 
Aria, “Oh, Powerful Princess,” froin CATIGGne. Bul. NaxO8 soos cncsccse a Bene ates tuccatcaneoe-seo tev XII 
STRUBE— 
Overture, “Pee ices oc oon ce dncnne noon aeons ca cenannecnenenasenesoonsndeccaannnvangnenannecaqnanendusanaenrecssansnescssen<5eas<° II 
STRAVINSKY— 
Suite, “L’oiseau de Feu’’..............-.------------ce-eennennene cence nec c cent nt eeennnnnnet acenaaanananens Xi MT, UXTV.. 
Song of the Volga Boatmen.........-------------------------s2-enennnnnen entree terrence tna nanannannn aaa XI, XIII 
SUPPE— 
Overture, “Poet and Peasant’ .........222----.---------eeeeececeeen sence nen nneenenntnnn ene taaanesensecennnnnnss Wiex. 2X! 
SVENDSEN— 
Overture, ‘Carnaval in Paris’’.......---..-.--..----------------eceseenenncoenneneesenene cnt ne nnn nneeeennenaccnnsnscaces Ii, XII 
Legend, “Zorahayda”’ ............---..-----0e-s-scsee-bocenesecennnnnceesecenescenennanscnensescnnranensanadadeccceaess decease XIV 
de SWERT— 
Serenade (Violoncello Solo) ........-....----...-------------- De fry ed ae el Oe ae eee Sate XII 
FARTINIA—=~- 
Sonata for Violin, ‘“‘Devil’s Trill’’......-.--..-..-2.2--.2---0---2eeceecenccenee een necens ene seen nena nnn taneeneasenseneeneces lil 
TAYLOR, DEEMS— 
“Through the Looking Glass’’..........-..-...---..---.---e:e-sesssceceseeeesnesenetee receeen ace cnenememenanensccnasnecnaes XIV 
TAYLOR, S. COLERIDGE— 
The Bamboula, Rhapsodie Dance..............-.--------------------1eeeecnceeecnenenenn nee n cnc nnene nn ne cee nnnannssens I, Vill 
THOMAS— 
OWE FEUTE, OMMIIDTIOT. oo soe e srencen eames cnnst soap eee anu hopes a natfeniraneneneat anges Il, VII, VIll, LX, XI, XIII 
Overture, “Raymond” .0...2.22..2..--2--neenennecneceencnnc cc nnne cen nnnnneeceetenceceenecnsennnnencnnesssccnannneaneseeaesnens XIII 
Song of the Drum Major, “Le Caid”’-.......22..222---------------2eeeeeese en nnnnee noon c ne neers nen ee cette neene cena: XII 
THORLEY, WALTER HANDEL— 
Impressions from Shakespeare, “‘Macbeth”’.........--------.------------------------n00eo occ eteenenee sree Vi 





) 
rf 





REPERTOIRE 


TSCHAIKOWSKY— 
S¥MPRON YANG. Fer OD. 550 ase ahseed rae Sc glee eles ance ene Spence na ll, VI, IX, XI, XU, XIII 
SoHE YZ. LOT. OVO ec en ea cc cw dat pene be eee enbiae area se aae nese IX 
i Symphony No. 5s be Minor 3. (te ee Se ee ee i Vill xk IE RAV. 
Andante. Canta bile: from aye ecco sca a ae as wens pa gh Sane wsemcenataenergeneneruanmsseanseune IX 
Symphony No. 6, ‘“‘Pathetique’”’...................-.... Il, I, IV, VI, VII, VIII, EX, X, XI, XIII, XIV 
, Symphony, “Manfred. Ops Bos can a ce aunt nego et Oaetes peepee IV 
( Andante for Strings; Ops Ae eae VII, VIII, IX, XI, XIII 
Overtare, 1612." On: 40. oe Se eee Il, IV, VI, VU, VII, IX, XI, XII, XIII 
Overture, “Romeo ands Juliet >. oc er ree cane I], IV, VIII, IX, XI, XII 
Concerto. for Violin, (D> Major in... ws... 2cadesnnstranecne- onc onwe ncn sew dom ptmnne sesdacnnpspwee=se+onsusneenencassnsescs I, XIV 
Concerto for Pianoforte, No. 1, B Flat Minov...............-.---.--------------- Il, IV, VI, X, XI, XII 
cto es at fe peas 9 Crean) [fea ho 1) cena aes peers Sn ae rg wei Sa ee eRe eee pr XII 
Fantasia, “Francesca: cha, PUirm iran nooo cc caw vnc cent ok La sace www nn ceebtnngscbpeencenemumeues pacpeveeasstensows XIV 
“Ite NanCass rice, token en a et ee Sees Le Visi XE Re 
March Slag ce ee I, I, IV, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, XII, XI, XIV 
INET ER CEE TELCO) ee re er 2 eS eR a ee ee I, VI, VH, VII, IX, XH, XIV 
Characteristic ‘Dances, “from aboveisticcnco cen cne Sects ckcian Beg seas ncn cur acs epensvecceceannseesecnesnes XI, Xiil 
Recitative and Aria, ‘“‘Adieu Forets’’ from “Jeanne d’Arc’”’.........---.---------------------eeee 22 nooo IV 
Serenade, “Melancholiaue, fOr. Vaiclina 2 aon cakes anes tnd apr ene Sear ewa ea eoneeaaes II 
STE oes A fo Be Se Deeg es RO Pa ak Meee So bhai, SHISRED et Qetier) a. TON URW nan Me ah A eRe SS a oceans Vil, X 
aT foram Pay dyes 18 ta Re Se eS Wl Ra aad ae Ne SRSMRS ofl oe Se REAR ee ete Rawr Se pero ee ame hmm X 
Variations on a Rococo Theme, ’Cello and Orchestra. .......---.---------------e-sseeenseseeseosoenesotenes XII 
PV OV VOCS eC inl Oe a Se i ABS en at ge Oak ah coaster Ix 
TEDESCHI— 
| Marrionétte Dante ter ee oe ee eet aka ect soeen oes Vil 
é TURINA— 
a IP HOCESBION |. Ol ROCIO is ooo a EN ENS 8 eg gate aaa See ace XII 
| VERDI— 
| Reco rrbe aya She Re es Sage ee eS A ine ee en SS a ere See See EE XIV 
| Avia: SA forete dui: frome Loe PEA Vite cen oe ee ec ace ee ene IV 
‘ Arig. 0 tDon. patale, os STOm DOD Carlos. 5... cc eee een owas ewes ee oe IX 
) Miser Eercriic ea ae ee a a a a ee OR ard SS I ie uae See cede ease eaticy I 
SS a DIONNE SHIMODTS,. |e LTOMI re TUR OLOCLOs 25h ican cpcoeucnc atesck dupa cabvus ade conccescc. nanos ne oie ae earee es XI 
Chaartety. Eth: Sea e lek Ce cee sacs og oe cee eee a ees ie Sg een oe XIII 
VIVALDI— 
) Concerto: for String 2-Orchnese ra. oa a aa as rec boa Sak as nO eee eae Be XIV 
VARIATIONS on a Russian Theme— 
: 1 Fe at SERA a ela ar Sieh 28-22 TR ees eee N. Artciboucheff 
ey UiiaiageeEB le hare ra aga op eh eRe art g ork = S0n Sin J. Wihtol 
ss Conti 01 Wie area ieee ae th rena ret Bee ae ems Joe AS CRARD OW... ccgr it net sc ae they ee ee X 
Nes ieee ee N. Rimsky-Korsakow/ 
Ne ipa ee Sate ee ree eae N. Sokolow 
yee, 77! erate rhe an ie eae eet en A. Glazounow 
VOLKMANN— 
Cover Cire es = RICHEY reas cca ea esse ae aa ates Se eae a Sn rg Ta eB oy eR ace Seep ees IX 
Serenade Now 37D Minor, sor string Orchestra, Opn 69.22 a ee eee IV 
VON REZNICEK— 
Ove rE Fe ODO rITils SUD NEON crane a ec ee a he OE Sete no daes a aaeaeeeb eee II 
WAGNER— 
FERC RTERTEG COVE TEUET Sorbo See NE ig ee SS er VEOV TS OVS oe LY. 
“Rienzi” 
Cove ri ea iets seca k nes, ee ene eenas se es Hi, Vi, VH, 1X, X, Xl, XH XU, XIV 
DRIES ELE CU COR GO bara a eS le Ue ad Re ge ae Oe ae a ll 
“Tbe Flying Dutchman” 
| Ovaries eee Seg es ies see ee ae I, WW 1V,-Vs VitixX, X3-Xh XH 
*“Tannhauser” 
Overtirelte so Se ee ees 1 VeVi NA AX XE XI TY: 
Aria, “Dich yb DOURe Peale noc. sas sacsc eaten ad a pacicos shcacucccaten ecsaacancctaneeeeenetataaee V, XII, XIV 
ESV vet aFst ot setae a Pia ne a RA Noe ede en ee ALP Se RSE I RRR A a oes ew ne IV, VI, X, XII, XIV 
INETOANCEIONR SEG AACE ore ee sek ae whan Sede Sad eer ee ae Ee ras deg cao XI 
Sone? Oct De me Venins 79 bere. ose. ecw ee ee ee ane ah ee eer ee apnea cerca ae XII 
‘ 1 Feared @ epee Rea ar Tt ap an ASR AUIS. SO RRNELT EEERES SUENT Sneed De Ee BE NR) PS XIII, XIV 





REPERTOIRE 


W AGNER-—Continued. 
**Lohengrin’”’ 
Pie lie irr ae sas oes domes eo daes seasep ese -sananap reef peo TUR IN eV Vike ah XII, XIII, XIV 
Introduction to Act [Uk-.....222--.-c20.---2-----2---2nonnenetsenensonnenssenccnenres VIX, XE XI AEC AI 
Lohengrin’s Narrative ...-.-.--- esta cena Ieee nt RPE Otel Ree seer ty tea eee oe hee XIV 
Pe acennion ito: them Cathed tale tse q:s. Bicsc.cnsaca ccc omce sa saemsennen tne men renege tee a ae Xi 
oy ER ae a a co a an ere sa EO ee Neat Cana cere GN XIV 
Silectiona brome (Lo WER Vin. coc scents nda tenet cnewetceere etre rr te ee I 
“Tristan and Isolde” 
Prelude cand a isolde’s, Lave-Deathn n..c.0in-5 oe emcee ene eens 
We ete ne eB oe ewes I, II, 111, IV, V, VI, VU, IX, xe XG ALI ALY, 
Tristan’s Vision (Arrangement by A. Seidl) -......----.------------s--cereneeerrr nnn V 
Been ET OTIS COPA CE 1 EM bese ccese ooh re tigen geatem arene enema det eesanne naga eseuerecaoae anes soe fra a XI 
“Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg” 
SRY oo, pige Se as a aber peer Een AV, Vi VE SV IL Ts, XE SE XE ATV. 
Brey Aen ELSE EOC EEN oo oes coon gates ease ag rece acer dnomeemn seamen ones for se eae aaa HE Vy VI 
oR SALTS) OSU Sie Sop ae ia IR nar ROO ane ne race ck ae ee ET XI, XIV 
Prize Sore (Wallac ling) cific oes ae a nanos ameter anna aoa ViF-Vil 
Procession of the Guilds and Introduction to Actatl lee cae ee Il, XII, XIII, X1V 
ZO ri cen ROIS Wea en aR APG ee SPECIES Se ie clr samara cate CaP aa XII 
sd ok Lenten Of) Sar) Suaeales Ae iy, etapa iran ae OES APES Oo Dacca ane ott as os Oca a Me eX 
‘‘Das Rheingold” 
Entrance of the Gods into Walhalla........-.-------------------------0-00r ro" VIE XT. XE: Xv: 
Ire TRY ea PrN ee ak chew esersaaencn oaemtcese er en cbeaatene caranbdarnger ce cargeesbacnsra aor ae gga ec II 
“Die Walkure”’ 
Sieglinde and Siegmund Love Scene, Act Weic.t..c.c5--0nc- 2 -2se-ceenone-nnnnannannesnsncnnennsneneore X1V 
Ride of the Valkyries....---2<--------ss-c-n----cnnpecccennsnsscccnnssnencnscanee EE EX, a ele 
Wotan’s Farewell and Magic-Fire Scene..........------------------+srrrernr nro Tdi, Ul, XIE ALY. 
‘“‘Siegfried”’ 
WHEAT OE, LITO NEOT OBE ie coos aes Coane atlanta nan nose lewee Pane sngegmone sore aearens ec eten ra eee Ti PV, Vik 
‘‘Die Gotterdammerung”’ 
Giecfried’s Rhine, Journey —--a:----2<a2--<--ssensnsnntsnes nn cnenc senso ee mar li IVes Vil 
Siegfried’s Death and Funeral P72) i lec Sn aL ON Seco ser eae [AL et 
‘Parsifal”’ 
pa A PG penis as ai Bertone nee eer AAS at ets a ate peed wi aon a Ve XT: MV 
Good Friday Spellic........-----1--s2e0<---0-ce--qenceneennaneecteconsatnnannendantntocnees Ill, VI, XII, XIII, XIV 
Klingsor’s Magic Garden and the Flower-Maidens......-----------------:00-ceneceeneeeceneecnneeenes Vil 
Fring PA PEIAAELORL GO COUIE once os aos ceed igag eee ennna ce sceeicerbragennesuphent ancaeaenesen seers <ccetanage ati aens Pert Age Il 
Ge eA SRA ne PS aL OR ite oP) ROPES Re iae alg ar Selden Rea AER ST aT Ill 
Te) Pe eRT NA een ace hott dene one ngtempen nnn gebednenemnenmese noms aonae VEO VIREO, SL AIEEE XIV 
(CS Bs ee ae CD Se Oa Se aS i eur ee emee eRTe  ec ot naaed bei ita e age ge XIV 
Sy ect eg ya Ga OE aneame ea Oamer en beret tt atari wears epee Tig oe ge i ela Bh Vee. © | 
WEBER— 
ES er a gba NMG lea cae BREA SESS Pa ee eae Sag eye ea DP XI 
Overture, “Euryanthie”’...2.<..-2:-22----22-2-22-2pns onc n ene c onan nent eee senneatanenceroannenreser crs: Hav VE XE 
Overture, “Der Freischutz’’...........-.------------------ccececneenenneeeescnnnnnnnnnns ene nennacn® LE VI, VI XE A 
Agathe’s Aria, from “Der Freischutz’’........---------0----te-sennenccereennnenenonennennccenmensncnencontecess Be XI 
Overture, ‘Oberon’ ......---------------s-sc-ce--senennnrnenaccnne nas snneeaensetnencnccees Eo Wi Vil AX, aK oe, XIV 
Concert Piece, F Minor, Pianoforte and Orchestra, Op. 79.......--.---------2----sennennccesncennennnenee V 
PPS OP oY CoC) Con 1 Re ee aN I Re agri x 
Scene and Aria from ‘‘Oberon’’—‘‘Ocean! Thou Mighty Monster’”’..........----------------++---+---- V 
WEBER- WEINGARTNER— 
Invitation to the Damce...s......-.-:-.2..0-----s-2eecnennnne ener sco nnereeenncnenecconnass V1, VII, VII, EX, XI, XIV 
WETZLER, H. H.— 
GY OEE TELS sR RY OrUlis Maa ieee Nb ol oc e cos aac da Pats ne bsag Senna she ut sempanpeeeso—ges gern OOo 7 ae ta ae XI 
WIENIAWSKI— 
Overtuxe “Russe.” for Wiclin: ss. S2ncsc cn eee taco ae ara Rear ne anne a Il 
Goncerto for, Violin. in D) Mimoreii. ce. sonees ann ces es cnerea ao nnte st nene acne nssgnern hardness sso Il, XII] 
Romance and Finale from D Minor Concerto.....-----..---