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ALEXANDER TANSMAN 





JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 











RICHARD CROOKS 


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E CELEBRATE this year the Silver Jubilee of the San Francisco Symphony 

Orchestra. This important Anniversary represents not only a quarter 

of a century of notable achievement by the Orchestra but it also com- 

memorates a long list of distinguished Sponsors and Patrons whose interest has 
carried the Symphony forward to this milestone. 

To look back over the road the Orchestra has traveled with the idea of 
pointing out even the highlights in its history 1s beyond the province of this 
message. 

It is the future which now engrosses us, bright as it is, with exceptional 
prospects. 

In our leader, Pierre Monteux, we have an artist noted for his singularly 
balanced and appreciative point of view of the music of all schools. Monteux 
has a technical knowledge of everything pertaining to the instruments of the 
Orchestra, and of conducting. Under his direction our Orchestra is becoming 
an unrivaled symphonic body. 

Spurred by these facts the Musical Association of San Francisco is working 
to increase its personnel to ninety players. An ensemble of this size would be 
adequate to any project entrusted to it. Such an objective seems particularly 
appropriate in view of the coming Golden Gate International Exposition when 
San Francisco can show the world what she is doing for music. 

Confident of the merit of our plans we earnestly appeal to our Contributors 
and Patrons to assist in achieving the goal. 

We are moving toward other eventful Anniversaries. The Orchestra we 
sponsor today is to bridge the gap between our time and coming generations. 
May we pass on to our successors a wonderful reminder of the 1936 Jubilee. 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, 
President and Mana ging Director 








FRIDAY AFTERNOON SERIES---2:30 P. M. 


Friday Afternoon, January 8 
Friday Afternoon, January 15 
Friday Afternoon, January 22 
Friday Afternoon, February 5 
Friday Afternoon, February 19 
Friday Afternoon, March 5 
Friday Afternoon, March 19 
Friday Afternoon, April 9 
Friday Afternoon, April 16 
Friday Afternoon, April 23 








Sigaer aa OPENING CONCERT 

_ GEORGE GERSHWIN, Pianist-Conductor 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN, Pzanist-Com poser 
TOSCHA SEIDEL, Vzolinist 

RICHARD Crooks, Tenor 

MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto 

_ IsaAc STERN, Vzolznist 

VLADIMIR HOROWITZ, Pzanist 

JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 

. Last FripAy CONCERT 


SEASON TICKETS—(Tax Exempt) 


Orchestra (first 5 rows) . $20.00 
Orchestra (text 255fOws)/ ee ee) ae OU 
Grand sbier (fiist 3. LOWS ieee ee 200 
Grand Tier (next 2 rows) . . se 20,00 
Pressi@iicleu(avSGo rows) =.= ate ce en 


Dress Circle (next 6 rows) . $10.00 
Balcony Gitelesircatast ae aetentnces a: 7.50 
Balcony iets eee ras Meee is ao ang eee 5.00 
Boxes (seating 8) 240.00 
Boxes (seating 6) 180.00 


SATURDAY NIGHT (REPEAT) SERIES---8:30 P. M. 


Saturday Evening, January 9 
Saturday Evening, January 16 
Saturday Evening, January 23 
Saturday Evening, February 6 
Saturday Evening, February 20 
Saturday Evening, March 6 
Saturday Evening, March 20 
Saturday Evening, April 10 
Saturday Evening, April 17 
Saturday Evening, April 24 


; First SATURDAY CONCERT 

. GEORGE GERSHWIN, Pianist-Conductor 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN, Pranist-Com poser 
TOSCHA SEIDEL, Vzolinist 

RICHARD CROOKS, Tenor 

MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto 

. ISAAC STERN, Violinist 

VLADIMIR HOROWITZ, Pzanist 

. JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 

. Last SATURDAY CONCERT 


SEASON TICKETS—(Tax Exempt) 


Orchestra ees $10.00 
Grndskietm. eae eee apes 10.00 
DresscGircle nee ta eee PO) 








Balcony Circle . $ 7.50 
Balcony 32 eenere ai ec cetera 5.00 
Boxes (seating 8) 120.00 





SEASON TICKETS NOW ON SALE 


OPERA HOUSE BOX OFFICE OR SHERMAN, CLAY & CO: 





MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Mrs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 
JOHN A. MCGREGOR . 


Mrs. E. 8S. HELLER 
PAUL BISSINGER 


EDWARD F. MOFFATT . 


PETER CONLEY . 


OFFICERS 


President and Managin g Director 


._ Vice-President and Treasurer 


Vice-President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 

Business Manager 





EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE | 


Mrs. WALTER A. HAAS Mrs. M. C. SLoss 

Mrs. MARcus S. KOSHLAND MRs. SIGMUND STERN 
Guo J. Musto Mrs. CyriL ToBIN | 
Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER EDGAR WALTER 
Mrs. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 


Dr. HANS BARKAN 

Miss LENA BLANDING 
Miss LouIsE A. Boyp 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Dr. LEO ELOESSER J. EMMET HAYDEN 


Mrs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 


FINANCE COMMITTEE | 


J. B. LEVISON 
B. B. MEEK 
JOHN A. MCGREGOR 
JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
J. H. THRELKELD 


C. O. G. MILLER, Chairman 
WALLACE M. ALEXANDER 
RAYMOND ARMSBY 

PAUL BISSINGER 

CHARLES R. BLYTH 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MILTON H. ESBERG 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
Mrs. Marcus S. KOSHLAND 


—- 


JOHN A. MCGREGOR 
Mrs. HAROLD RICHERT MCKINNON 
Mrs. ANGUS MCDONALD | 
R. C. NEWELL ; ) 
CHARLES PAGE, JR. | 
Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 

Mrs. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 

Miss ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. SLoss 

Ray W. SMITH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

Mrs. POWERS SYMINGTON 

Mrs. DAvip ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 


ALBERT I. ELKuS 
HERBERT ELOESSER 

Dr. LEO ELOESSER 
MILTON H. EsSBERG 

Mrs. PAUL I. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
JOHN F. FoRBEs 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 
FRANK J. FRosT 

Don E. GILMAN 

Miss LuTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
Mrs. Harry S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 


Mrs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 

RAYMOND ARMSBY 

G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 

Mrs. GEORGE WASHINGTON 
BAKER, JR. 

Dr. HANS BARKAN 

Mrs. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 

ALBERT M. BENDER 

Miss LENA BLANDING 

Miss LoulIsE A. Boyp 

Mrs. F. W. BRADLEY 

PAUL BISSINGER 

GEORGE T. CAMERON 

WILLIAM H. CROCKER Mrs. Marcus S. KOSHLAND JOHN H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. W. W. CROCKER FREDERICK J. KOSTER Mrs. CyRiL TOBIN | 

Mrs. O. K. CUSHING GAETANO MEROLA EDGAR WALTER : 

Mrs. GEORGE DE LATOUR ROBERT W. MILLER MICHEL WEILL 

A. B. C. DOHRMANN KENNETH MONTEAGLE Mrs. ELI H. WIEL 

Miss KATHERINE DONOHOE Gulpo J. Musto Mrs. SARAH STETSON WINSLOW 

JOSEPH H. DYER, JR. DwiGHTt F. MCCORMACK LEONARD Woop 


PAST PRESIDENTS | 


W. B. BOURN WILLIAM SPROULE JOHN D. McCKEE 
RICHARD M. TOBIN JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 





T. B. BERRY 
J. B. LEVISON 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES: FOURTH FLOOR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
PACKET -ORBICE: .SEUBRNEAIN, CUEAY xc; CO; SU LER AND KEARNY” SEREETS 


INDEPENDENT LITHO. CoO.,S. F. 














The Musical Association of San Francisco 


MAINTAINING THE 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


MEMBERSHIP FOR SEASON 1937 
(As of April 20, 1937) 






8 

OFFICERS reall 
Mrs. LEoNoRA Woop ArMsBy .. . . President and Managing Director | : 
JOHN A: McGrrcorR .. ... . ... Vice-President and ireaswer | i 
MESES HELLER eo. ve gti oe ko alegre eee ame . 
PAUL BISSINGER $500 ie Oe a SS a Sy ag : 
Bnwasp eh MOrRrattT 0 goo aa eas a eer 4 
PEPER CONEDY Nh eo ee ee OL | 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. M, C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 
Mrs. George B. Robbins 


pets ania antes 


MUSIC COMMITTEE tf 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Mrs. George T. Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 
Armsby Dr. Leo Eloesser 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. O. G. Miller, Chairman George T. Cameron J. B. Levison 

Wallace M. Alexander Milton H. Esberg’ B. B,. Meek 

Raymond Armsby Mortimer Fleishhacker John A. McGregor 

Paul Bissinger Miss Lutie D. Goldstein John Francis Neylan 

Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus 8S. Koshland J. H. Threlkeld 
Frank J. Frost 





ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 5 
Walter A. Weber’ Erich Weiler Eugene B. LaHaye Leslie J. Schivo 


SEASON TICKET SALES COMMITTEE 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss, Chairman Mrs. Edward Otis Bartlett, in charge box sales 








YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chr. Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chr. 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


Mrs. George Washington Mrs. Harold Faber 
Baker, Jr. Mrs. Donald Gregory 
Mrs. Otto Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas 
Mr. Charles M. Dennis Mrs. Gregory Jones 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Churchill Peters 
Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


Mrs. Harold 

Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. Thomas 

Page Mailliard — 
Mrs. Butler S. Sturtevant 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Herbert Eloesser 
Armsby Dr. Leo Eloesser 

Raymond Armsby Milton H. Esberg 

G. Stanleigh Arnold Mrs. Paul I. Fagan 

Mrs. George Washington Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Baker, Jr. Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers 

Dr. Hans Barkan John Fy Forbes 

Mrs. Edward Otis Mrs. J. E, French 
Bartlett Frank J. Frost 

Albert M. Bender Don E. Gilman 

Miss Lena Blanding Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 

Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Harry S. Haley 

Mrs. F. W. Bradley J. Emmet Hayden 

Paul Bissinger Mrs. Marcus 8. Koshland 

George T. Cameron Frederick J. Koster 

William H, Crocker Gaetano Merola 

Mrs. W. W. Crocker Robert W. Miller 

Mrs. O. K. Cushing Kenneth Monteagle 


Mrs. George De Latour Guido J. Musto 
Miss Katherine Donohoe Dwight F. McCormack 


Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. John A. McGregor 
Albert I. Elkus Mrs. Harold Richert 
McKinnon 


PAST PRESIDENTS 


T. B. Berry J. B. Levison W. B. Bourn 
William Sproule John D. McKee 
9 


Mrs. Angus McDonald 

R. C. Newell 

Charles Page, Jr. 

Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 

Mrs. George B. Robbins 

Miss Else Schilling 

Mrs. M. C. Sloss 

Ray W. Smith 

Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Mrs. Powers Symington 

Mrs. David Armstrong 
Taylor 

Joseph S. Thompson 

John H. Threlkeld 

Mrs. Cyril Tobin 

Edgar Walter 

Michel Weill 

Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 

Mrs. Sarah Stetson 
Winslow 

Leonard Wood 


Richard M, Tobin 
Joseph S. Thompson 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES: 4TH FLOOR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 








The Musical Association of San Francisco is fortunate in being able 
to list so large a membership which has generously contributed to the support 
of the Season of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-seven. 


CLASSES OF MEMBERSHIP 


Class A: Persons subscribing $1000 per year or 
Class B: Persons subscribing $ 700 per year or 
Class C: Persons subscribing $ 500 per year or 
Class D: Persons subscribing $ 400 per year or 
Class E: Persons subscribing $ 300 per year or 
Class F: Persons subscribing $ 250 per year or 
Class G: Persons subscribing $ 200 per year or 
Class H: Persons subscribing $ 150 per year or 
Class I: Persons subscribing $ 100 per year or 

Persons subscribing less than $100 per 


over—HONORARY MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
over—REGULAR MEMBERS 
year—ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


HONORARY MEMBERS 


Class A 

Alexander, Mr. and Mrs. Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M. Norris, Mr. Charles G. 

Wallace M. Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Milton H. Rosenbaum, Mrs. Emma 
Armsby, Mrs. Leonora Wood Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. Rosenberg, Mrs. Abraham 
Blanding, Mr. Gordon Mortimer Schilling, Miss Else 
Blyth, Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Heller, Mrs. E. S. Schwabacher, Mrs. Ludwig 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. Koshland, Mrs. Marcus S. Sherman, Clay and Co. 
Bradley, Mr. H. Sewall Miller, Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Crocker, Mr. William H. McGregor, Mr. John A. Taylor, Dr. and Mrs. 


DeLatour, Mr. and Mrs. George Neyland, Mr. and Mts. 
John Francis 
Haas, Mr. and Mrs. Walter A. [Young 


David Armstrong 
Volkmann, Mr. George F. 
People’s Symphony] 


REGULAR MEMBERS 


Class B 
Hellman, Mrs. I. W., Jr. Schelling, 


Mr. and Mrs. Ernest 


REGULAR MEMBERS 


Class C 
Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. Newton Grant, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Emporium, The Levison, Mr. J. B. 
Frost, Mr and Mrs. F. J. Pacific Gas and Electric Co. 


Sharon, Mrs. Louise T. 


1: In Memory of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Stern and Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles W. Haas 


REGULAR MEMBERS 


Class D 


Chamberlain, Mrs. Selah 








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———— 


SS eee Eee 


FS ES ES 




















Barkan, Dr. and Mrs. Hans 

Coleman, Miss Persis H. 

Guggenhime, Mr. and Mrs. 
Berthold 


Anonymous 

Cameron, Mr. and Mrs. George T. 

Eloesser, Dr. Leo 

Goldstein, Misses Celene and 
Lutie D. 


Beaver, Miss Anna W. 
Breuner, Misses Caroline 
and Katherine 
Brooke, Mrs. Julia Fox 
California Barrel Co., Ltd. 
Crocker, Mr. and Mrs. 
William W. 
Dibblee, Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Louis M. 


Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd S. 

City of Paris 

Felton, Mrs. Charles N. 


Adams, Mrs. J. W. 

Allen, Mr. Wyatt H. 
Anonymonus 

Babcock, Mrs. William 
Baldwin Piano Company 
Beaver, Mrs. F. H. 
Belcher, Mr. F. J., Jr. 
Bender, Mr. Albert M. 
Berenson, Mrs. Sanford 
Blanding, Miss Lena 
Bloch, Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Bluman, Miss Lorna 
Blumlein, Mr. Jacob 
Boggs, Mrs. A. G. 
Borden’s Dairy Delivery Co. 


REGULAR MEMBERS 
Class E 


Guggenhime, Mrs. Leon 
Griffith, Miss Alice 
Huntington, Miss Marion 


REGULAR MEMBERS 
Class F 


Giannini, Mr. A. P. 
Haas, Mrs. A. 

Heller, Mr. Walter S. 
Jacobi, Mr. J. J. 
Kohn, Mrs. Eva Heller 


REGULAR MEMBERS 
Class G 


Ehrman, Mrs. Albert L. 
Epstein, Mr. Gustave 
Goodrich, Mr. and Mrs. 
Chauncey S. 
Guggenhime, Mrs. D. J. 
Hale Bros. 
Hall, Mr. Frederic W. 
Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert B. 
Koshland, Mr. Daniel E. 


REGULAR MEMBERS 
Class H 


Flowers, Mrs. J. C. 
Lengfeld, Mrs. A. L. 

Lowe, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Munsell, Mrs. Juliet E. Orr 
Musto, Miss Laura 


REGULAR MEMBERS 
Class I 


Brandenste'n, Mrs. M. J. 
Brown, Miss Martha Leonard 
Buchanan, Mrs. A. N. 

Caswell, Mrs. Geo. W. 

Clark, Mrs. Warren D. 
Clayburgh, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. 
Clift Hotel 

Coghlan, Mrs. John P. 

Cohn, Mrs. Max M. 

Coleman, Mr. S. Waldo 

Cross, Mrs. Charles 

Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 

Daly, Mrs. John D. 

Davis, Mr. D. G. 

Deering, Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. 
Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd 





Hyman, Mrs. Joseph 
Musicians’ Union, Local No. 6 
Tubbs, Mrs. Alfred S. 


Leib, Mr. William 
Michaels, Mr. C. F. 
Shomo, Mrs. J. A. 

Wiel, Mr. and Mrs. Eli H. 
Witter, Mr. and Mrs. Dean 














Page, Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. 

Schwabacher, Mr. and Mrs. 
Albert E. 

Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. M. C. 

Volkmann, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 

Volkmann, Miss Johanna M. 

Welch, Mr. Andrew 

White House, The 

Wiel, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin J. 

Yellow Cab Co. 


O’Connor, Moffatt & Co. 
St. Francis Hotel 

Sloss, Mrs. Leon 

Walter, Mrs. John I. 


Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Samuel L. 
Donohoe, Mr. J. A. 
Donohoe, Miss Katherine 
Ehrman, Mrs. Fredericka 
Ehrman, Mrs. S. W. 

Elsey, Mr. Fred T. 

Faville, Mr. Wm. B. 

Forbes, Mr. John F, 

French, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. 
Fuller, Mr. and Mrs. W. P., Jr. 
Gall, Mrs. Rebecca F. 
Glaser, Mrs. Edward F. 
Graham, Dr. Gilbert F. 
Greenebaum, Mr. Emil 
Griffin, Mrs. Willard M. 





Dy 


Gunst, Mr. and Mrs. Morgan A. 

Gunst, Mrs. Moses A. 

Hass, Mr. Louis S. 

Hayne, Mrs. Grace P. 

Heller, Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. 

Hellmann, Mrs. Horatio G. 

Hewlett, Mrs. A. W. 

Hockenbeamer, Mrs. A. F, 

Hooker, Mr. Osgood 

Hutchinson, Miss Kate F. 

Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kendrick, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles H. 

Kleinjung, Mrs. J. R. 

Kohlberg, Mrs. M. S. 

Koster, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick J. 

Larsh, Mrs. H. G. 

Layman, Dr. Mary H. 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Dorothy L. 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip, Jr. 

Lipman, Mr. F. L. 

Lisser, Dr. and Mrs. Hans 

Lurie, Mr. Louis R. 

Mack, Mrs. A. 

Magnin, I. & Co. 

Mannon, Mr. J. M., Jr. 


Ackerman, Mrs. I. S. 
Allen, Mrs. H. W. 
Altman, Mr. John C. 
Ammen, Mrs. Vera T. 
Anderson, Corona W. 
Anderson, Mr. Melvin J. 
Andrew, Mrs. Prentis 
Andrews, Miss Margaret 
Andrews, Miss Mary 
Andrews, Mrs. R. E. 
Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Anonymous 

Anthony, Mr. C. C. 
Armsby, Mrs. J. K. 
Arnhold, Mrs. B. 
Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. F. D. 
Arnstein, Mr. Hugo 
Ash, Mr. Charles S. 
Astredo, Mrs. Blanche 
Bacigalupi, Miss Beatrice 
Bacigalupi, Dr. Rimo 
Baerwald, Mr. and Mrs. Ernst 
Bahalor, Mrs. A. B. 


REGULAR MEMBERS 
Class I (Continued) 


Meek, Mr. B. B. 
Meyer, Mrs. George H. C. 
Meyerfeld, Mrs. Morris 
Michels, Mrs. Leopold 
Moffitt, Mr. J. K. 
Monteagle, Mr. and Mrs. 
Kenneth 
Monteagle, Mr. Louis F. 
Morrison, Mrs. A. F. 
Morshead, Mrs. Etta C. 
Musto, Mr. Guido J. 
McAllister, James W. Inc. 
McCreary, Mrs. F. C. 
McDonald, Mr. and Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Mark L. 
McEnerney, Mr. Garret W. 
Neustadter, Mr. Newton 
Newbauer, Mrs. S. R. 
Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oppenheimer, Miss Emilie 
Pacific Musical Society 
Pauson, Frank and Sons 
Raiss, Mr. Carl 
Rees, Mr. A. S. 
Roth, Mrs. W. P. 
Salz, Mr. and Mrs. Milton H. 
Samson, Mrs. R. 
San Francisco Music Club 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Bailhache, Mrs. Arthur L. 

Baker, Mr. and Mrs. 
George W., Jr. 

Baker, Mrs. Wakefield 

Bakewell, Mrs. Harriet B. 

Bakewell, Mrs. John 

Ballard, Mrs. J. S. 

Barkan, Mr. Fritz 

Barkan, Dr. and Mrs. Otto 

Baruch, Mrs. Albert 

Baruch, Mr. Frederick 

Bates, Mrs. George E. 

Beetz, Mr. Hans B. 

Behrend, Mrs. J. F. 

Bell, Miss Jessie F. 

Bell, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 

Benner, Mr. and Mrs. F. C. 

Bentz, Mr. A. C. 

Bepler, Dr. Alice C. 

Bergerot, Mr. and Mrs. P. A. 

Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. 
McKinley 

Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 

Bissinger, Mrs. Samuel 





Schilling, Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph 
Schloss, Mrs. Florence F. 
Schuckl, Mr. and Mrs. Max 
Shainwald, Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard 
Simon, Mrs. Alfred 
Sinton, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 
Skewes-Cox, Mrs. Vernon 
Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis 
Somers, Mrs. George B. 
Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Newton W. 
Stone, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 
Sussman, Mrs. Emilie 
Sutro, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 
Threlkeld, Mrs. M. C. 
Walter, Mr. and Mrs. 
Clarence R. 
Waters, Mr. James F. 
Weatherwax, Mrs. C. M. 
Williams, Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Willson, Mr. Meredith 
Winslow, Mrs. S. Stetson 
Wood, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard E. 
Wright, Mr. and Mrs. Harold 
Younger, Mrs. W. J. 
Zellerbach, Mr. J. D. 


Blair, Miss Jennie M. 
Blenur, Mrs. John 
Bloom, Mr. Jonas 
Bloom, Mrs. Samuel 
Bloomfield, Dr. Arthur L. 
Boardman, Mrs. Walter W. 
Bocqueraz, Mr. and Mrs. Leon 
Bohemian Club 

Symphony Orchestra 
Bontecon, Miss Helen 
Booth, Mrs. F. E. ; 
Booth, Mrs. W, F. 
Bosley, Mr. Wm. B. 
Bostwick, Mr. H. F. 
Boudreaux, Miss Adalaine 
Bowes, Mrs. E. L. 
Bowman, Miss Elsie 
Boyle, Miss Nina 
Bracher, Miss Louise P. 
Brandenstein, Mrs. H. U. 
Bransten, Mrs. Edward 
Bransten, Mr. Edward, Jr. 
Bransten, Mrs. Manfred 
Bridge, Mrs. Adelaide M. 


seme mS at ST ET EE SL RS EN ET SE SEALE a SN A ES 
Heenan ee eee ee ee a 








Brooks, Mr. George W. 
Brown, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 
Brown, Miss Annie Florence 
Brown, Mr. H. A. 

Brown, Miss Janet 

Brown, Mrs. Laurence Clay 
Brown, Mrs. Louis C. 
Brownstone, Mrs. Louis H. 
Brunn, Dr. Harold 
Buchanan, Miss Linda 

Buck, Miss Martha 

Buck, Mr. Thomas 
Buckwalter, Mrs. Edna 
Bullis, Mrs. Edward A. 
Burckhardt, Miss Caroline 
Miss Burke’s School 
Burmister, Mrs. R. B. 

Bush, Mr. Philip 

Cahn, Mrs. Mayer I. 

Camp, Miss Claire 

Camp, Mr. and Mrs. Harry F. 
Campbell, Mrs. G. P. 
Carson, Mrs. A. C. 

Center, Mrs. J. W. 

Charles, Mr. Martin A. 
Charles, Mrs. Raymond W. 
Charpiot, Mrs. Henry Charles 
Choral of Miss Burke’s School 
Clark, Mrs. Herbert W. 
Clark, Miss Minnie C. 

Clay, Miss Maude C. 
Clayburgh, Mrs. K. 
Clayburgh, Mrs. Leo J. 
Clifford, Miss Beatrice 
Clyde, Mrs. Brooke 

Cody, Mrs. Bernard A. 
Coleman, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Coman, Mrs. E. T. 

Conrad, Mr. and Mrs. Barnaby 
Cook, Miss Houston 

Cook, Mrs. W. H. 

Cooper, Mrs. C. M. 

Cooper, Miss Ethel 

Coppée, Miss M. Pauline 
Cordes, Mrs. F. C. 

Cresalia, Mr. Matt T. 

Davis, Dr. and Mrs. Albert D. 
Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin 
Davis, Miss Blanche 

Davis, Mrs. C. H. 

Deering, Mrs. James H. 
Deering, Mrs. Robert L. 
Delany, Miss Marion 
Dernham, Mrs. Irene B. 
Destruel, Miss Laura 

Devlin, Mrs. Frank J, 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Dobie, Mr. Charles C. 
Dodge, Mrs. George M. 
Dolan, Mr. Arthur J., Jr. 
Don Lee, Inc. 
Drescher, Mrs. H. B. 
Drexler, Mrs. E. A. 
Drown, Miss V. Newell 
Dryfoos, Mrs. Beatrice G. 
Dunlop, Mr. R. D. 
Dunn, Mrs. Herbert 
Earhart, Miss Gertrude 
Eastwood, Miss Alice 
Einstein, Else B. 
Eisenbach, Mr. David R. 
Eisner, Mrs. Norman 
Elkus, Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles DeY. 
Elkus, Mrs. Eugene S. 
Eloesser, Mr. Herbert 
Emge, Dr. Ludwig A. 
Eppinger, Mrs. J., Jr. 
Epstein, Mrs. Milton H. 
Epstein, Mr. Rudolph B. 
Erskine, Mrs. Morse 
Esberg, Mr. Alfred I. 
Etienne, Mr. Victor, Jr. 
Evans, Mrs. Albert John 
Evans, Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. 
Everingham, Dr. Summer 
Faber, Dr. and Mrs. Harold K. 
Fairmont Hotel 
Faubel, Miss Grace 
Feigenbaum, Mrs. L. 
Firestone, Mr. and Mrs. Nathan 
Fischer, Mrs. E. G. 
Fisher, Mr. Haldane S. 
Fitzgerald, Miss Amada 
Fitzgerald, Mrs. R. M. 
Flammer, Mr. Charles 
Fleischman, Mrs. M. F., 
Fleishman, Mrs. Carrie H. 
Fleishmann, Mrs. S. G. 
Fletcher, Dr. C. D. 
Floyd, Mrs. B. Creelman 
Folndorf, Miss Gertrude 
Folger, Mrs. J. A. 
Foster, Mr. Walter F. 
Frank, Mrs. Jennie L. 
Frank, Mrs. Ludwig 
Frankenau, Mrs. M. 
Franklin, Mrs. P. 
Friedlander, Mrs. Eva 
Frontin, Miss E. A. 
Funkenstein, Miss Sara 
Gantner and Mattern 
Garland, Dr. and Mrs. L. H. 


Garrett, Miss Elsa 
Gehrels, Dr. and Mrs. Ernst 
George, Miss Julia 
Ghirardelli, Mrs. Alfred 
Ghirardelli, Mr. D. Lyle 
Glenn, Dr. and Mrs. Robert A 
Goodman, Mrs. I. 
Goodman, Mrs. Pauline 
Gowan, Miss Edith 
Graham, Mrs. Chalmers 
Graves, Mr. B. I. 
Greefkens, Miss Geraldine 
Green, Dr. A. S. 
Greenberg, Mr. and Mrs. 
Maurice 
Greenberg, Mrs. Agnes H. 
Greene, Mr. A. Crawford 
Greenwell, Mrs. James O. 
Gregory, Mrs. Warren 
Grimm, Mr. H. T. 
Guggenhime, Mr. Richard 
Gustafson, Miss Amaley 
Haas, Mr. Edward F. 
Hackett, Mr. C. Nelson 
Haefner, Emma 
Hallawell Seed Co. 
Halsey, Mrs. Theo. V. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Hamilton, Miss Vera A. 
Hancock Brothers 
Handlon, Mrs. Joseph H. 
Hanna, Mrs. R. J. 
Hardy, Mrs. Summer 
Harris, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawrence W. 
Hayden, Mr. J. R. 
The Anna Head School 
Heavenrich, Mrs. Sarah C. 
Hecht, Miss Edith 
Heller, Mrs. Claire S. 
Hellman, Mrs. F. J. 
Hellman, Mr. I. W. 
Hennessy, Miss Aileen M. 
Hertz, Laura B. 
Hess, Teresa 
Hill, Mrs. Harry 
Hiller, Miss Edna 
Hinze, Miss Clara 
Hoffman, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar 
Holden, Mrs. Alice F. 
Hooker, Miss Jennie M. 
Hooper, Mr. Arthur W. 
Hosford, Mrs. George N. 
Howell, Mr. Albert J. 
Humphrey, Mrs. C. F. 
Hurrle, Etna E. 





ee SS SSeS sesame as” aS SG 
{ 


A 


Hyman, Mrs. Morris 

Hyman, Mrs. Vera R. 

Isola, Mr. Attilio 

Ivanhoff, Sonia 

Jacobs, Mrs. Carrie E. 

Jeddis, Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. 

Jenkins, Mrs. James 

Johnson, Mrs. Grace Noble 

Jordan, Mrs. David Starr 

Kahn, Mrs. Felix 

Kahn, Mrs. Irvin H. 

Kahn, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 

Kaye, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. 

Kelly, Miss Irene 

Keyston, Mr. and Mrs. 

George N. 

King, Miss Genevieve 

Kirk, Mrs. Josiah H. 

Kirkwood, Mr. and Mrs. 
Robert C., Jr. 

Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. 

Klumpkey, Misses Anna 
and Julia 

Knox, Mrs. John B. 

Kohn, Mrs. Simon 

Korbel, Miss Caroline 

Korbel, Miss Lucia 

Koshland, Mr. and Mrs. 
Abraham 

Krauss, Miss Luise H. 

Krotoszyner, Mrs. Martin 

Kutner, Mr. Alfred 

Laborde, Mr. J. 

Lacey, Mr. Joseph C. 

Lachman, Mrs. Marie 

Lang, Mr. and Mrs. Albert G. 

Langhorne, Mrs. James P. 

LaPlace, Margaret E. 

Lasky, Mrs. Moses 

Laws, Mrs. C. L. 

LeConte, Miss Helen M. 

LeConte, Mr. Joseph N. 

Lehmann, Mrs. A. 

Lens, Mrs. Frances 

Levy, Clara M. 

Levy, Miss Elaine A. 

Levy, Mr. Hans 

Levy, Miss Martha 

Levy, Mr. S. D. 

Liebenthal, Mrs. A. 

Liebes, H. & Co. 

Liebman, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice 

Lilienthal, Mr. B. P. 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Arthur G. 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 

Lilienthal, Miss Victoria 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Lisberger, Mrs. Carolyn A. 
Livermore, Mr. Norman B. 
Livingston Bros. 
Livingston, Mr. Lawrence 
Lloyd, Mrs. Lewis Marshall 
Lombardi, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. 
Lowenthal, Mrs. W. B. 
Lucia, Dr. and Mrs. Salvatore P. 
MacCallum, Miss Jean A. 
Madison, Mr. Frank D. 
Magnin, Jos. & Co. 
Mailliard, Mr. and Mrs. 
TW oie 
Majors, Dr. Ergo A. 
Mangels, Miss Agnes 
Manheim, Mrs. Henry 
Marshall, Mrs. Stuart M. 
Marwedel, Mr. and Mr. C. W. 
Marx, Mrs. Melville 
Maxwell, Mrs. John K. 
Mayer, Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. 
Mears, Prof. and Mrs. Eliot G. 
Mendelson, Mrs. Julius 
Mendessolle, Maison 
Menzies, Mrs. R. H. 
Metcalf, Mrs. John Brockway 
Methner, Mr. Fred 
Meyer, Mrs. Alfred 
Meyer, Miss Henrietta 
Middlemas, Mrs. Stuart 
Miller, Mrs. Ensel B. 
Mills, Miss Gwladys 
Milton, Mr. and Mrs. 
Maxwell C. 
Moffat, Miss Henrietta 
Monteagle, Mr. Paige 
Moore, Miss Jessie S. 
Morris, Miss Avis M. 
Moulin, Mr. Gabriel 
Mouton, Miss Madeleine 
Muller, Mrs. Emmy 
Murray, Mrs. Hamilton 
Musicians’ Club of San Francisco 
McBain, Miss Janet 
McBean, Mr. Atholl 
McBean, Mrs. Atholl 
McBryde, Mrs. Irma G. 
McGinnis, Mr. and Mrs. 
Felix S. 
McGregor, Mr. Campbell 
McKinnon, Mr and Mrs. 
Harold R. 
McLaughlin, Mrs. Alfred 
McMillan, Mrs. Dan 
McNear, Mrs. George P. 
Nathan, Mr. and Mrs. A. N. 


Nathan, Mrs. Henry J. 
Nelson, Miss Theresia 
Neppert, Miss Julia M. 
Neppert, Miss Louise C. 
Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Nickelsburg, Mr. and Mrs. M. S. 
Nickelsburg, Mrs. S. 
Nichols, Mr. Henry D. 
Noble, Mr. Alexander 
Noble, Dr. and Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Nollen, Emeline B. 
Norman, Miss Dorothy 
Older, Mrs. B. J. 
Oliver, Mrs. E. L. 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Julius 
Palo Alto Fortnightly ° 

Music Club 
Paschel, Mr. Philip P. 
Petty, Mr. J. J. 
Pflueger, Mr. J. C. 
Pflueger, Mr. Paul A. 
Pierce, Miss Mabel L. 
Pischel, Mrs. Kaspar 
Philomath Club 
Phillips, Miss Esther B. 
Podesta & Baldocchi 
Politzer, Mr. and Jerome 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton 
Potter, Mrs. J. Sheldon 
Powell, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley 
Prager, Miss Alice C. 
Prechtel, Mrs. George P. 
Raas, Mrs. J. C. 
Rademaker, Miss Harriet 
Raisch, Miss Leila 
Ransohoff’s 
Rathbone, King & Seeley 
Rawlings, Miss Jane D. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Richard, Mr. Harry G. 
Rinder, Dr. Reuben R. 
Reed, Dr. Alfred C. 
Reed, Mr. Laurence E. 
Rehfisch, Mrs. H. M. 
Reincke, Mr. L. M. 
Renny, Miss Jessie ’ 
Reynolds, Mrs. L. R. 
Rhine, Miss Esther 
Robertson, Mrs. Ralph D. 
Robinson, Mrs. M. R. 
Rolph, Mr. Ronald T. 
Roos, Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. 
Roos Bros. 
Rood, Mrs. Vernon 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Albert M. 
Rosenstein, Mrs. Ludwig 








SS rnp penneeeperepenereeeee n 
' { 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 





Ross, Mr. Thomas F., 

Roth, Mr. A. 

Rothschild, Mr. August B. 
Rubke, Mr. F. W. 

St. Goar, Mrs. Fred. H. 
Salinger, Jehanne Biétry- 

Salz, Mr. A. K. 

Sampson, Dr. and Mrs. John J. 
Saroni, Mrs. A. B. 

Sbarboro, Mrs. A. E. 
Schaubye, Mr. and Mrs. Carl 
Schilling, Dr. and Mrs. Walter 
Schirmer, Mr. William 
Schneider, Mr. W. C. 
Schwabacher, Mrs. Loius A. 
Schussler, Mr. Henry 
Schwamm, Miss Louise 
Selene, Miss Rose L. 
Sellman, Mrs. Waters 

Sharp, Miss Fannie L. 

Sharp, Dr. and Mrs. J. G. 
Sharp, Miss Violet M. 
Shapeero, Mr. Ezra 

Sheldon, Mrs. E. S. 
Sherman, Mrs. Julius 

Shuey, Mr. Clarence A. 
Shook, Dr. Francis M. 
Sieroty, Mrs. Henry 

Simon, Mr. R. O. 

Simpson, Mrs. A. W. 
Sinsheimer, Mrs. Samuel C. 
Sinton, Mr. Stanley H. 
Slack, Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. 
Sloss, Mrs. Eleanor F. 

Sloss, Mr. Leon, Jr. 
Smithies, Dr. Harold R. 


Sommer and Kaufmann 
Smith, Mrs. Stuart F. 
Sperry, Mrs. Horace B. 
Stater, Glen C., Inc. 
Stebbins, Miss Lucy Ward 
Steinhart, Miss Hilda 
Stern, Mrs. Rose 

Stevens, Mr. Harley C. 
Stewart, Dr. and Mrs. H. R. 
Stich, Mrs. Camilla F. 
Stolz, Mr. Max 

Stow, Miss Nellie 

Stowe, Dr. W. P. 
Strassburger, Mrs. Lawrence 
Stull, Miss Florence 
Strobridge, Mrs. T. A. 
Sturtevant, Mrs. Butler S. 
Sullivan, Mr. Frank E. 
Sutter, Mr. Louis 

Sutton, Miss Maud 

Sutro, Miss Barbara 
Sweetland, Mr. E. J. 
Tantau, Mrs. H. H. 

Terry, Mr. M. C. 

Thieben, Mrs. Joseph 
Thompson, Miss Barbara Beach 
Thompson, Miss Harriet R. 
Thorner, Mrs. Theodore 
Tremoureux, Mrs. M. C. 
Trotter, Mr. W. 

Tucker, Mr. and Mrs. Nion R. 
van Den Bergh, Miss Flora 
Van Sicklin, Mrs. Horace 
Van Pelt, Mrs. H. M. 
Vittoria Colonna Club 
Wagner, Helen R. 
Waldeck, Mrs. Eda 


Waldrop, Mr. and Mrs. Uda 
Wangenheim, Mrs. Ethel A. 
Ward, Mrs. James W. 
Waybur, Mrs. Robert 
Weber, Mr. R. W. 
Weed, Mrs. B. 
Weill, Mr. and Mrs. Michel D. 
West, Mr. Frank A. 
White, Miss Irene H. 
Wildberg, Mrs. Irving I. 
Willard, Miss Elisa May 
Willard, Miss Mary 
Williams, Mr. Stephen 
Williams, Miss Millicent 
Williamson, Mrs. G. G. 
Wills, Mrs. Carol S. 
Wilson, Mrs. A. W. 
Wilson, Mr. Irving M. 
Wolf, Mrs. J. L. 
Wolf, Mrs. Max 
Wolf, Mrs. Paul 
Wolff, Mrs. George 
Wood, Mrs. H. Meyer 
Woodruff, Mrs. E. D. 
Woddward, Miss Gertrude B. 
Women Musicians Club 

of San Francisco 
Wormser, Mr. S. I. 
Wurster, Mr, William W. 
Y. M. H. A. Mothers’ Club 
Zaruba, Mrs. Eleonora K. 
Zellerbach, Miss Lillian 
Zentner, Mrs. Julius 
Zimmerman, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Zimmerman, Mr. George A. 
Zook, Mr. Edgar T. 


FORM OF BEQUEST 


In order to assist in the permanency of the San Francisco Symphony 


Orchestra, I hereby bequeath 


an endowment fund under the name of 


RED RN id to be placed in 


, controlled by the Musical Association of 


San Francisco, the proceeds from which shall be used toward maintaining the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra as one of the outstanding cultural and 
educational assets of our Community. 


CO ee ee em ae te ee ee 


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AUGNOTANGTOVANCACRDAVRNGARONONR AWAD EROROGOROOODOBOROGAD SEDO OVIROGLE 


ii! 





SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY 
OR CHESTER 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
CONDUCTOR 








Willem van den Burg 
Assistant Conductor 





MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


DAOC 


LO 








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aaa TWENTY-FIFTH SEASON 


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PRINTS 
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Mmarvirner 


| Pye florets 
conventional patterns 
... dark backgrounds 
Misses’ and women's 


sizes . 


2975 
to 4.973 


DRESS SALON e FOURTH FLOOR 











The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 

Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby . President and Managing Director 

John A. McGregor .. . . Vice-President and Treasurer 
Mrs. E.S. Heller . Vice-President Edward F. Moffatt Secretary 
Paul Bissinger Vice-President Peter Conley . Business Manager 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. George B. Robbins 

MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 


Dr. Hans Barkan 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Dr. Leo Eloesser 





Armsby Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. O. G. Miller Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. 
Chairman George T. Cameron Koshland 
Wallace M. Alexander Milton H. Esberg J. B. Levison 


Mortimer Fleishhacker B. B. Meek 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein John Francis Neylan 
J. H. Threlkeld 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
Albert I. Elkus Mrs. Harold Richert 


Raymond Arsmby 
Paul Bissinger 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 


Armsby Herbert Eloesser McKinnon 
Raymond Armsby Dr. Leo Eloesser Mrs. Angus McDonald 
G. Stanleigh Arnold Milton H. Esberg R. C. Newell 


Mrs. George Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Charles Page, Jr. 
Washington Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Baker, Jr. Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers Mrs. George B. Robbins 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bartlett 
Albert M. Bender 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 
Mrs. F. W. Bradley 
Paul Bissinger 
George T. Cameron 


John F. Forbes 

Mrs. J. E.French 

Frank J. Frost Ray W. Smith 

Don E. Gilman Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Miss Lutie D.Goldstein Mrs. Powers Symington 

Mrs. Harry S. Haley Mrs. David 

J. Emmet Hayden Armstrong Taylor 

Mrs. Marcus S. Joseph S. Thompson 
Koshland John H. Threlkeld 


Miss Else Schilling 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss 





William H. Crocker 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing 


Mrs. George De Latour 


Miss Katherine 
Donohoe 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. 


T. B. Berry 
W.B. Bourn 


Frederick J. Koster 
Gaetano Merola 
Robert W. Miller 
Kenneth Monteagle 
Guido J. Musto 


Dwight F. McCormack 


John A. McGregor 


PAST PRESIDENTS 


William Sproule 
John D. McKee 
J.B. Levison 


Mrs. Cyril Tobin 

Edgar Walter 

Michel Weill 

Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 

Mrs. Sarah 
Stetson Winslow 

Leonard Wood 


Richard M. Tobin 
Joseph 8. Thompson 


Executive Offices: 4th FLOOR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Ticket Office: Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 


a a a a ls a a a i a ae ee A ee ee a) 








! 
1 ‘ 
: CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARTISTS DO | 
| 
| 


FAMOUS PIANISTS endorse the : 


BALDWIN PIANO|| | 


The new Baldwin is a truly magnificent 
instrument, and in my judgment, it has 
no superior in the world today. 


ee ae 


It has the most beautiful tone I have ever 
found in a piano. 


fi CLD 


At last, we have a most perfect piano. 





The New Masterpiece Baldwin Grands 
are a revelation. Whether Miniature or 
Concert Grand, they are of superior 


qualities. pili 


BALDWIN PIANOS 


310 Sutter Street san Francisco, Calif. 














San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 
FIRST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1195th and 1196th Concerts 


Friday, January 8, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, January 9, 8:30 P. M., 1937 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
PROGRAMME 


De aE NG DD: EAT O Re. 52.se eee eee ee ee eae Bach 
Overture 
Air 
Gavotte I and II 
Bourrée 
Gigue 


2. “PROD Bat @ RAINS LE AD aes cece one ee ee W agner 
30s TONTAAPIC TWEE. “UB ERICA se oe eee Debussy 


Par les rues et par les chemins 
Les parfums de la nuit— 
Le matin d’un jour de féte 


INTERMISSION 


Aes 1 WEB ELOINW SN Os0% NAC NLEN OR sa 5-5 cee eee Beethoven 


Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro— 
Finale: Allegro 


“One. can live without music but not so well.’ 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
Announcement will be made shortly on details for a series of 
four Young People’s concerts to be given Saturday mornings, 
April 3, 10 17, 24 under the direction of Ernest Schelling. 
































KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much = 


to your family ra AY ~ 


Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning . . . now. 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 


bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


TRUS = DEP AK TM ENT 


Wells Fargo Bank 
Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery Market at Grant Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 





BY WAY OF APOLOGY 


The writer of these lines undertakes the editorship of this program book 
with no settled conviction concerning its contents other than the conviction 
that it must contain, in the briefest possible space, material of direct value 
and significance to the San Francisco audience of 1937. To that end, the 
audience itself is respectfully requested to express itself by letter as to what 
it wants or does not want in these notes. If a cross section of the audience 
interest can be obtained in this way, it will be given the utmost weight in 
determining the future policy of these discussions. 


I have before me a widely quoted program note on Beethoven’s fifth 
symphony. It begins by painstakingly dating the origins of the work from 
the earliest sketches. There follows the complete program of the concert 
at which it was first performed, and about 500 words on a pair of singers 
who did and did not participate in that event, needless to say in connection 
with another work than the fifth symphony. After several quotations of 
early reviews come several brilliant pages of analysis by Hector Berlioz, and 
the essay concludes with a long series of dates of first performances in 
various cities. 


Except for the excerpt from Berlioz, which is unfortunately far too long 
to be reprinted here, I submit that all of this material, while of interest to 
the student of Beethoven’s biography, is of no importance to the music lover 
listening to the fifth symphony. When this music rings out in San Francisco’s 
War Memorial Opera House in January, 1937, it is a datum of absurdly little 
value that Pauline Milder, who DID NOT sing in the concert when the 
fifth symphony was first presented, was born in 1785, did various and 
sundry things, and died in 1834. 


As I see it, a program note should do two things. It should first of all 
place a work against its background in the general scheme of things musical. 
Secondly it ought, when a piece of music that is essentially architectonic is 
performed, to point out the order, succession and logic of its thematic 
elements, its orchestral peculiarities, and so on. While A. E. F. Dickinson 








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PETER CONLEY ATTRACTIONS 


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WED. EVENING, JANUARY 13 


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Good Seats Available 


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JO HN S ON 


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ROBERT O’CONNOR 
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MONDAY EVE., FEBRUARY 15 


MARIAN ANDERSON 
FAMOUS NEGRO CONTRALTO 
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WED. EVE., 8:30, FEBRUARY 24 


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VETERANS’ 
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Mon., Tues., Wed., Thur. 
January 11, 12, 13, 14 


All Seats Reserved 


Nights, 75c, 40c — Mats. 40c 
(incl. tax) 





BOX OFFICE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., San Francisco & Oakland 





a tn li i i ne in ie aie ate te i ti i a 1a fai ii oa aie ah a ae a a a de 


prcbably overstates the case when, in his book on the symphonies of Mozart, 
he says that such things are permanently missed unless attention is 
specifically directed to them, it is nevertheless true that many felicities and 
basic significances in music can be brought out by intellectual analysis. 

This does not mean technical analysis or the composition of annotations 
directed solely to a professional audience. It does mean that no one’s 
emotional understanding of a highly organized and complex work of art has 
ever been lessened by grasping the essentials of its organization. The contrary 
is rather the case. 

As stated above, however, these program notes aim to be of service to 
the general audience of San Francisco. If the conception of their function 
here outlined is erroneous, they will be changed according to the expressed 
desires of those whom they aim to serve. 


ts 
PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SUITE No.3, DMAJOR ....... .. J.S. Bach 
(1685-1750) 


The orchestration of Bach, and of the pre-symphonic age in general, is 
based upon radically different concepts of ensemble from those of the 
symphonic period — roughly speaking, from the days of Haydn to the 
present. The symphonic composer thinks in terms of an orchestra made up 


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entirely of professional musicians, performing in public halls for heterogeneous 
audiences, and essentially the same in instrumentation throughout the 
civilized world. The composer of Bach’s time, on the other hand, wrote for 
a very small private ensemble, made up of a nucleus of professionals 
surrounded and considerably outnumbered by amateurs, and capriciously 
different and individual as regards instrumentation in each specific instance. 

Therefore, where the more modern composer need think only of the 
limitations and possibilities of the instruments in a universally standard 
orchestra, the composer of Bach’s age had first to know what instruments 
were available in this and that band, and which of these were in the hands 
of professionally competent performers, before writing a single note. Conse- 
quently each of Bach’s orchestral works calls for an instrumental balance 
peculiar to itself alone. 

The third suite is scored for three trumpets, two oboes, kettledrums, 
and strings. No one knows for what ensemble it was composed, but the 
context clearly reveals Bach’s respect for the trumpeters he had in mind, 
and his rather amusing contempt for the oboeists, who do nothing but double 
the strings throughout. 

The term “suite” as applied to Bach’s four orchestral works in this 
form, implies a good sized overture followed by a number of brief move- 
ments, most of them in dance rhythms. The overture is always of a special 
type — the so called “French overture” — in which a slow, pompous in- 
troduction is succeeded by a quick fugue, and this in turn by a restatement 
of the introductory material. The dances are all derived from the 16th 
century French tradition and bear French names. By the time of Bach most 
of these had long ceased to be practiced as dances, and remained as purely 
musical rhythmic patterns. The celebrated ‘Air’ which forms the slow 
movement of this suite is, of course, not a dance movement in any sense 
of the word. 


PRELUDE TO PARSIFAL . . . . Richard Wagner 
(1813-1883) 


The prelude to “Parsifal” is based upon four leading motives associated 
with the mystical and religious element in this “stage consecrating festival 
play.” 

Sehr langsam, A flat major, 4/4 time. Strings and woodwinds in unison 
present, bare of accompaniment, the motive of the Eucharist: 





which is then repeated an octave higher with a shimmering, arpeggiated 
accompaniment. After a long pause the motive is once more given out in bare 


11 

















PH EE NPY ke 


y. Fo SO 


Conducted by MONTEUX, KURTZ, DORATI 
ACCOMPANIES ALL PERFORMANCES 


canto BD APE Ea ee Ra Ss See 





Thursday Eve.,....January 28 


Aurora’s Wedding 
Symphonie Fantastique 
Boutique Fantasque 


Friday Eve......... January 29 


Cimarosiana | 
Choreartium | 
Spectre de la Rose | 
Le Beau Danube Dd | 


| 
) 


Saturday Aft.......January 30 SECURE 


Lake of Swans 





Petrouchka : 
Prince Igor Seki vA aT S ' 
Saturday Eve.....January 30 ae ae center 
Pavillon 
Symphonie Fantasque 
L’Apres midi d’un Faun 2 
Cimarosiana 
Sunday Aft... January 31 < 
Sylphides ) 
Le Tricorne 
L’Apres midi d’un Faun 
Le Beau Danube 
e 
$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 
(Programmes subject to change) Box Office 
Sherman, Clay & Co. 
PRESENTED BY THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO | 


EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR., Secretary 
Direction of Music Committee: J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 








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12 





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unison, but now in C minor, and this version, too, is repeated in an 
accompanied form. A second long pause leads to the motive of the Grail: 





The last quoted phrase is developed at some length. Eventually the key of 
A flat is reinstated, and the Eucharist sounds out once more, now, however, 
to be worked over with impassioned, agonized harmonies, during the course 
of which the motive of the Lance is thrown off: 

















With a final statement of the Eucharist, the prelude is brought to a close. 


IBBRUM 2 chun a OS Re eee Claude Debussy 
(1862-1918) 

Ever since “Carmen” burst upon the world in 1875, French composers 
have interested themselves in Spain and its music. The examples of this 
genre composed by Chabrier, Ravel and Debussy are world famous, but 
all the other Frenchmen of the last 50 years have contributed to it in one 
way or another, with the sole exception, so far as I know, of Cesar Franck. 
I'ather Franck in a toreador’s hat is one of the less readily imaginable 
pictures. 

Claude Debussy’s contact with Spanish territory was limited to an 
afternoon at San Sebastian. But his power in the handling of Spanish 
musical idioms is attested by no less an authority than Manuel de Falla, the 
greatest living Spanish musician. 

Debussy wrote Spanish music even when he did not want to, insists de 


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Falla in his article in the Revue Musicale. His interest in the liturgical 
modes, upon which the idioms of Spanish folk music are also based, led in- 
evitably to the unconscious creation of works with the Iberian flavor, among 
which de Falla cites the scherzo of the quartet. When Debussy consciously set 
out to picture Spain, says this writer, he gives us the very essence of Andalusia, 
“the truth without literal authenticity,” in a music which, while not docu- 
mented with actual Spanish material, evokes the soul of the land. 


Concerning “Iberia” de Falla says: ‘Echoes of the villages, in a kind 
of sevillana, seem to float in a crystalline atmosphere filled with scintillant 
sunshine; the intoxicating magic of Andalusian nights, the gaiety of people 
on a holiday marching and dancing to the joyous noise of a band of guitarras 
and bandurrias — all this whirls in the air, now close, now distant, and our 
imagination, constantly stimulated, is enchanted by the intense expressive- 
ness and rich shading of this powerful music.” 


De Falla concludes with the strongest tribute of all, namely that 
Debussy finished the propaganda for Spanish nationalism begun by Pedrell, 
and actually showed Spain itself how to use its own idioms. 


The titles of the three movements of “Iberia” are, in English, “In the 
Streets and by the Wayside,” “Perfumes of the Night,” and “The Morning 
of a Festival Day.” 


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H i ss. vO -a_ Yr ‘eer r.—— 


Concetts Monteux; Paris’ .22--..4.... 2 eee 1914 
Ballet: Russe: de Didenlewe:. 626 3G ioe ee 1911-1917 
Metropolitan: \Opetianc. 3. ce ee he 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra..................0.2.......2... 1919-1924 
Concertgebovw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holand 1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra.......................... Ba LES Sis 1929-1936 


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and Chloe, Ravel; and many other modern works famous today. 





BERKELEY CONCERT 


Men’s Gymnasium, University of California 
o 


Sunday, January 17, 3:15 P. M. 
Soloist: GEORGE GERSHWIN, Pianist-Composer 


PKCOVG RA VE oe 


ft: - SYMPHONY UNO? SINC MIN O Re. ee Beethoven 
2. CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 
ENG EIEN Retin: cae oe aac he ree ee Gershwin 
(The Composer at the Piano) 
3. SUDLLE FROM: --PORGY “AND BESS 3.422 Gershwin 
(Conducted by the Composer) 
40 REAPSODY. “SiR ANAY 2s ten foes 92 es eh ee Chabrier 


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ry 


SYMPHONY No. 5, C MINOR, 


OPUS 67 .. .. . . . Ludwig van Beethoven 
(1770-1827) 


The most popular of Beethoven’s symphonies is too well known to 
require much discussion. I should like, however, to examine one phase of its 
popularity that can stand some criticism. 


The opening phrase of the symphony: 








is popularly supposed to represent ‘‘Fate knocking at the door.’’ This legend 
originated with Anton Schindler, one of Beethoven’s constant companions 
during the last 14 years of his life. Schindler was a literal minded soul who 
wrote an important biography of the composer in the course of which, among 
other things, he laments that Beethoven did not publish all his works with 
literary or pictorial titles above each movement, as in the case of the sixth 
symphony or the sonata known as “Farewell, Absence and Return.” Schindler 
believed Beethoven had some such literary idea in mind when writing each 
and every one of his works, and constantly quizzed the composer to discover 
them. Some of the “interpretations” Beethoven gave him were clearly 
jocular, but the unsuspecting Schindler, unaware that he was being spoofed, 
records them solemnly as revelations from on high. 


The remark, “So Fate knocks at the door,’ was made by Beethoven 
when going over the score of the fifth symphony with Schindler prior to a 
performance of that work conducted by the latter in 1823. The context of 
Schindler’s report makes it clear that Beethoven was, for the moment, 
talking Schindler’s literal minded language in order to impress a musical 
idea upon him. There is no evidence whatever that in the years 1805 to 
1807, when the symphony was being composed, Beethoven had any such 
idea in his head. 


The evidence of those years points rather to the contrary, since the same 
figure, or one very closely related to it, turns up in many other works of this 
period, among them the “Sonata Appassionata,” the “Eroica,” the first 
Rasoumovsky quartet, the fourth piano concerto and the violin concerto. 


Fate or no fate, the phrase clearly has a pioneering constructive 
purpose. In the fifth symphony Beethoven, for the first time in the history 
of music, specifically and unmistakably sets out to unify the four move- 
ments of the symphonic form. He does this in several ways, primarily by 
the use of the “Fate” motive, or something derived from it, in every move- 
ment, but also by the mysterious flashback to the scherzo in the course of the 
finale, and the linking together of the last two movements. 


i 














18 


POETS O NGNSE aE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 

Blinder, Naoum 

Concert Master 
Fenster, Lajos 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W. F. 
Gordohn, Robert 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
de Grassi, Antonio 
Wegman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
See, Orley 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Haug, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Rosset, Emil 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold,Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Moulin, Harry 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Houser, F. S. 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 

Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 

Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Mitchell, L. 
Lichtenstein, Victor 


B 
Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Eup its cee Ernest 


Principal 
Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 


Basses: 
Bell, Walter 
Principal 


Schmidt, Robert E. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A. 


Flutes: 


Woempner,Henry. C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 
Shanis, Julius 
Sargeant, W. 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 

Rudd, Charles 

Fragale, Frank 
Bass Clarinet: 


Fragale, Frank 


a Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 
Tympani: 
Wagner, R. E. 


Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E. 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 
Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 











oe 








[* Bier ishoneeaneis saeonan o) 
SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday Afternoon, January 15, at 2:30 
Saturday Evening, January 16, at 8:30 


W: AG Si MEOr Ries. “O° P BURSA aC Omiae Ee 


GEORGE GERSHWIN, Guest Artist 
POR OCG he Aa 


OVERTURE TO DIE MEISTERSINGER.................... Wagner 
SYMPHONY No. 4, A MAJOR (ITALIAN )........ Mendelssohn 
PIANO CONCERTO, FF sia @) eee ee Gershwin 


(The composer at the piano) 
SYMPHONIC SUITE FROM PORGY AND BESS....Gershwin 
(The composer conducting) 


RHAPSODY BS BAIN GAG eee ee) et eee ee Cabrier 


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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby . President and Managing Director 
. . . Vice-President and Treasurer 


John A. McGregor ‘ 
Vice-President 
Vice-President 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. E. S. Heller . 
Paul Bissinger 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 
Guido J. Musto 


Edward F. Moffatt 
Peter Conley . 


Secretary 
Business Manager 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 


Mrs. Sigmund Stern 


Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 


Mrs. Walter A. Haas 


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Armsby 


C. O. G. Miller 
Chairman 


Wallace M. Alexander 


Raymond Arsmby 
Paul Bissinger 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby 
Raymond Armsby 
G. Stanleigh Arnold 
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Washington 
Baker, Jr. 
Dr. Hans Barkan 
Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bartlett 
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Mrs. F. W. Bradley 
Paul Bissinger 
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Mrs. O. K. Cushing 


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Miss Katherine 
Donohoe 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. 


T. B. Berry 
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Mrs. George B. Robbins 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 
Cameron 


Charles R. Blyth 
George T. Cameron 
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Dr. Leo Eloesser 
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FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 

J. B. Levison 

B. B. Meek 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein John Francis Neylan 


J. H. Threlkeld 


Albert I. Elkus 

Herbert Eloesser 

Dr. Leo Eloesser 

Milton H. Esberg 

Mrs. Paul I. Fagan 

Mortimer Fleishhacker 

Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers 

John F.. Forbes 

Mrs. J. E.French 

Frank J. Frost 

Don E. Gilman 

Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 

Mrs. Harry S. Haley 

J. Emmet Hayden 

Mrs. Marcus S. 
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Robert W. Miller 

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PAST PRESIDENTS 


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BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


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Armstrong Taylor 
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Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. Sarah 
Stetson Winslow 
Leonard Wood 


Richard M. Tobin 
Joseph S. Thompson 


Executive Offices: 4th FLOOR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Ticket Office: Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 








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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1197th and 1198th Concerts 


Friday, January 15, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, January 16, 8:30 P. M., 1937 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: GEORGE GERSHWIN, Pianist 
PROGRAMME 


1. Overture to ‘Die Meistersinger von Nurnbe ‘g’’............ Wagner 


2. Symphony No. 4, A major (“Italian”).............- Mendelssohn 


Allegro Vivace 

Andante Con Moto 

Con Moto Moderato 

Presto 
3. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, F major..........-... Gershwin 

Allegro 

Adagio 

Allegro Agitato 

(The Composer at the Piano) 


First Performance in San Francisco 


INTERMISSION 
A. (‘Suitesirom, “Orey and: BESS. a ee ree aoe Gershwin 


Catfish Row 
Porgy Sings 
Fugue 
Hurricane 
Good Mornin’, Sistuh 
First Performance in San Franctsco 


(Conducted by the Composer) 
Fete Polonaise from ‘Le Roi Malgré Lui’’................. Chabrier 


[The Piano is a Steinway ] 


wi 


“One can live without music but not so well.” 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
Announcement will be made shortly on details for a series of 
four Young People’s concerts to be given Saturday mornings, 
April 3, 10 17, 24 under the direction of Ernest Schelling. 








25 























KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much 





Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning .. . now. 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR ~ 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI— ORMANDY 





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26 











PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


Since space in this program book is somewhat limited, and since the 
overture to ‘‘Meistersinger” and the “Italian” symphony are very well known 
and Chabrier’s ‘Polish Festival” is sufficiently expalined by its title, this 
week’s annotations will be devoted entirely to the composer and the two 
works introduced to San Francisco for the first time in this pair of concerts. 


George Gershwin’s career is bisected by a date — February 12, 1924. 
It was then that Paul Whiteman gave his first concert in Aeolian Hall, 
New York, introducing, among other things, the ‘““Rhapsody in Blue.” The 
“Rhapsody in Blue” not only established Gerswin as a composer of music 
for the concert platform, but it likewise clinched the success of his career 
as a composer for the stage. 


True enough, Gershwin had a string of successful scalps to his belt 
before 1924. Whiteman did not commission the “Rhapsody” from an 
unknown. But Gershwin went into the concert of February 12 as one of the 
better Broadway jazzboys, and emerged a self sufficient musical personality. 


The composer started his career as a piano player (not a pianist) for 
the publishing house of Remick, having studied the piano and composition 
in his native Brooklyn, where he was born in 1898. His earlier songs, 
interpolated in various musical shows, attracted sufficient attention to justify 
the commission of his first complete score, “La La Lucille,” produced in 1919, 
when the composer was 20 years of age. Shortly afterward came his first 
nation-wide hit, the song called ‘““Swanee.’”’ Then the music to George White’s 
“Scandals,” for five consecutive annual editions, beginning in 1920, and many 
other comedies and individual songs. His first attempt at composition more 
or less in the European tradition was the one act opera, “Blue Monday 
Blues,” interpolated in the “Scandals” for 1922 without success, nor did 
the revised form of the work, renamed “135th Street,” fare much better. 


Gershwin was no stranger to Aeolian Hall when the “Rhapsody in Blue” 


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28 


PETER CONLEY ATTRACTIONS 





ROBERT O’CONNOR 
AMERICAN PIANIST 


“An interpreter of Poetic Sensi- 
bility.’”—Olin Downes, N. Y. Times 


RECITAL — MON. EVE., FEB. 1 
& 


VIENNA CHOIR BOYS 
“WIENER SAENGERKNABEN” 
All New Program 


TUESDAY EVE., FEBRUARY 2 


Admiral 
RICHARD E. BYRD 
IN PERSON with SECOND EDI- 
TION PICTURES of ANTARCTIC 


EXPEDITION II 
MATINEE and NIGHT, FEB. 3 


RACHMANINOFF 
Only 2 Recitals in Northern Calif. 


FRIDAY EVE., FEBRUARY 5 


SUN. MATINEE, FEBRUARY 7 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


DANCE RECITAL 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 


MONDAY EVE., FEBRUARY 15 


MARIAN ANDERSON 
FAMOUS NEGRO CONTRALTO 
Only Recital in San Francisco 


WED. EVE., 8:30, FEBRUARY 24 
a 


LAWRENCE TIBBETT 
MON EVE., 8:30 — APRIL 19 


NINO MARTINI 
THURS. EVE., 8:30 — APRIL 29 


TRUDI SCHOOP AND 
COMIC BALLET 


Complete New Program 
WED. EVE., 8:30 — MARCH 17 


SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 


TED SHAWN 
And His Company of 
Male Dancers 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 


Tuesday Evening, April 6 
Wednesday Afternoon and 


Evening, April 7 


BOX OFFICE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., San Francisco & Oakland 


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was first produced. In 1923 he had appeared there as accompanist to 
Mme. Eva Gauthier, when that artist had ventured, probably for the first 
time in history, to include a group of popular hits of the day in a serious 
recital program. 

The “Rhapsody in Blue” was a world success, and remains today the 
principal monument to Whiteman’s effort to “make a good girl out of jazz,” 
as H. O. Osgood phrases it. Whiteman toured the country for several 
seasons giving jazz concerts. He invited new works for his orchestra from 
many composers, but of all the compositions created for and introduced by 
Whiteman in this period, Gershwin’s alone has won public favor. And it 
was written in ten days, as a sort of afterthought, to add dramatic, soloistic 
punch to the original program. 

A number of the outstanding theatrical works of Gershwin since 1924 
are “Lady Be Good,” “Tip Toes,” “Song of the Flame,” ‘Funny Face,” 
“Strike Up the Band,” “Girl Crazy,” “Of Thee I Sing,” “Let Em Eat Cake,” 
and ‘“‘Porgy and Bess.” His principal efforts in the concert field have been 
the piano concerto, the orchestral suite entitled “An American in Paris,” and 
the “Second Rhapsody.” 

One member of the distinguished audience that gathered in Aeolian 
Hall on that phenomenal day in 1924 was Dr. Walter Damrosch, then 
conductor of the New York Symphony Orchestra. Damrosch conceived 
the idea of commissioning a piano concerto for the traditional instrumentation 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
FINE FOODS 


lce Cream « Sodas 
Pastries « Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
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from Gershwin. This came to performance on December 5, 1925, in a 
concert of the New York Symphony in Carnegie Hall. Introducing the 
concerto in F Damrosch said: 


“Various composers have been walking around jazz like a cat around 
a plate of hot soup, waiting for it to cool off, so that they could enjoy it 
without burning their tongues, hitherto accustomed only to the more tepid 
liquid distilled by cooks of the classical school. Lady Jazz, adorned with 
her intriguing rhythms, has danced her way around the world, even as far 
as the Eskimos of the North and the Polynesians of the South Sea Isles. 
But for all her travels and her sweeping popularity, she has encountered no 
knight who could lift her to a level that would enable her to be received 
as a respectable member in musical circles. 


“George Gershwin seems to have accomplished this miracle. He has 
done it boldly by dressing this extremely independent and up-to-date young 
lady in the classic garb of a concerto. Yet he has not detracted one whit 
from her fascinating personality. He is the prince who has taken Cinderella 
by the hand and openly proclaimed her a princess to the astonished world, 
no doubt to the fury of her envious sisters.” 


A brief outline of the concerto follows. The thematic excerpts are 
quoted by special permission of Harms, Inc., owners of the copyright. 

I. Allegro. After 27 bars of preluding and foreshadowing the first 
subject is stated by the flutes and oboes: 





This is repeated by the full orchestra and leads to the statement of the 
second principal subject, announced by the piano solo at its entrance as 
follows: 





This is repeated, worked up to a climax, and restated, forte. A brief cadenza 
for the solo instrument introduces a development based for some 14 pages 
of the score upon Example ‘1. A episodic theme is then introduced by the 
strings, moderato cantabile: 








Development continues on the basis of all three themes quoted. There is 
no orthodox recapitulation, its place being taken by a very full statement, 
grandioso, of Example 2. Further working over of Example 1 provides a coda. 

II. Adagio. At the forth measure a muted trumpet publishes a 
nostalgic blues: 





The tempo quickens with the entry of the solo, leading to an elaborate, 
rhapsodic, somewhat fox-trottish working out of the trumpet blues. After 
a piano cadenza comes a new tune: 








Elaboration of this material leads to a climax and a sudden, brief pause, 
whereupon the trumpet returns to its blues to conclude the movement. 

III. Allegro agitato. The finale is a kind of rondo, based upon the 
nervous, brilliant reiterative theme stated at the outset by the orchestra and 
repeated by the piano. This subject comes back several times. In the 
interstices between its repetitions material from the first two movements is 
quoted, so that the finale summarizes all the thematic elements of the 
entire work. Example 2 is given particularly important consideration toward 
the end, and the final bars are based upon Example 1. 

“Porgy and Bess,” folk opera by George Gershwin, libretto by Du Bose 
Heyward, lyrics by Du Bose Heyward and Ira Gershwin, was first produced 
by the Theater Guild in Boston in September, 1935, later going to New 
York for an extended run. It is based upon the well known novel and play, 
“Porgy,” (the “g” as in “go”) by Du Bose and Dorothy Heyward, a brief 
synopsis of which follows: 

The action takes place in Catfish Row, a Negro tenement in Charleston, 
S. C., inhabited chiefly by fishermen, dock laborers, and their numerous 
wives and children. The poles of good and evil in this little community 
are Porgy, the wistful crippled beggar, and Sporting Life, bootlegger and 
dope peddler, whose proudest boast is that he has been to New York. 
Among the more persistent customers of the latter are Crown, a huge power- 
ful stevedore, and his lady love, the abandoned Bess, who is despised by all 
of Catfish Row except Porgy. 

Crown kills Robbins, another young stevedore, in an argument over a 
crap game, and makes his getaway to parts unknown, leaving Bess with 
Porgy. A Negro lawyer sells Bess a ‘“‘divo’ce” from Crown, (price $1.00, 
raised to $1.50 when the lawyer discovers Bess and Crown had never been 
married) and this makes Porgy her husband according to the mores of 
Catfish Row. And the cripple’s influence over the woman is a soothing, 
calming and endearing one. 

A few weeks later all of Catfish Row except the crippled Porgy goes 


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PRESENTED BY THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR., Secretary 


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on a picnic to one of the islands off the coast. Here Crown, who has 
been hiding in the palmetto jungle, seizes Bess and forces her to remain 
with him several days. But she returns to Catfish Row and to Porgy, 
who forgives her. | 


The fishermen of the tenement are caught in a howling hurricane, and 
the women, along with Porgy and the children, come together to sing and 
shout for their deliverance. At the height of the storm Crown strides into 
the assemblage. When one of the fishing boats is blown against the shore, 
Crown swaggers out into the storm to assist in such rescue as may be effected. 


In the final act Crown steals into the room inhabited by Porgy and 
Pess, and is killed by Porgy. His body is discovered by the police, who 
do not suspect the murderer or the motive, and force Porgy, much against 
his will, to come to the morgue to identify the body. Sporting Life, who 
has had his eye on Bess throughout the play, sees to it that Porgy makes 
a feeble, unsuccessful effort to evade the police Summons, and when the 
beggar does not return for several days, the bootlegger convinces Bess that 
Porgy has been thrown in jail for a long sentence because of this attempted 
evasion. Porgy comes back at the end of a week to find Bess flown with 
Sporting Life, and the drama ends with Porgy in his goat cart setting out 
on the long, futile trail to New York and his beloved Bess. 


In an article Gershwin contributed to the New York Times shortly 
after the premiere he said, in very brief part: 


“Porgy and Bess’ is a folk tale. Its people would naturally sing folk 
music. When I first began work on the music I decided against the use of 
original folk material because I wanted the music to be all of one piece. 
Therefore I wrote my own spirituals and folk songs. But they are still 
folk music — and therefore, being in operatic form, ‘Porgy and Bess’ 
becomes a folk opera. 


“However, because ‘Porgy and Bess’ deals with Negro life in America, 
it brings to the operatic form elements that have never before appeared in 
opera, and I have adapted my method to utilize the drama, the humor, 
the superstition, the religious fervor, the dancing and the irrepressible high 
spirits of the race. If, in doing this, I have created a new form, which 
combines opera with theater, this new form has come quite naturally out 
of the material.” 


The symphonic suite from “Porgy and Bess” contains five movements. 
The first, “Catfish Row,” sets the tone and atmosphere of the locale, and 
includes, among other things, a foxtrot and a lullaby called “Summer Time.” 
The second, “Porgy Sings,” is composed of Porgy’s philosophical song, 
“I Got Plenty O’ Nothin’, and Nothin’s Plenty for Me,” and a portion of 
the duet, ‘“Bess, You Is My Woman Now.” The “Fugue” is the music that 
accompanies the killing of Robbins by Crown. The “Hurricane” is self- 
explanatory. The finale, “Good Mornin’, Sistuh,” “is music from the last 
scene which includes parts of the ‘Occupational Symphony’ and finishes with 
a spiritual, ‘Oh Lord, I’m On My Way,’ which is sung by Porgy and chorus.” 


35 





hips Cf) sm 


CONDUCTOR OF 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PARIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


His Career— 


Concerts Monteux, (Paris)... Se 1914 
Ballets Russes de Diaghilew................................ 1911-1917 
Metropolitan. Opera’ s.i.2.:2.2 ie ee 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra............................---- 1919-1924 
Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland 1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra........................----..------ 1929-1936 


Has conducted... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 
tras here in America. Is only French Conductor to conduct Berlin 
and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mengel- 
berg ten years. Conducted every major orchestra in Europe. Creator 
of Petrouchka, Sacre du Printemps,le Rossignol, Stravinsky; Daphnis 
and Chloe, Ravel; and many other modern works famous today. 









BERKELEY CONCERT 


Men’s Gymnasium, University of California 
@ 


Sunday, January 17, 3:15 P. M. 
Soloist: GEORGE GERSHWIN, Pianist-Composer 


POURS OFGMR SAY VME TE: 


1. SYMPHONY No. 5 -ENy CxMEINO Re eee Beethoven 
2. CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 
TINGE: IVEAC © Re Se ee ee Gershwin 
(The Composer at the Piano) 
3, SUELE, FROM ]PORGYSAND BESS Gershwin 
(Conducted by the Composer) 
AS COREEAPSO DY TEN SB Oi eee ee ee Gershwin 


(The Composer at the Piano) 
TICKETS AT STEPHENS UNION AND USUAL AGENCIES 





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[Seigieigie@)ukial Ge adee a 
THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


= 
Friday Afternoon, January 22, at 2:30 
Saturday Evening, January 23, at 8:30 


WAR MEMO RM AL 60 Pe RAS He Ores 


SO} tas 


ALEXANDER TANSMAN, Guest Artist 
PROGRAM 
SYMPHONIE PANTASTIOUBs = 222.0200 Berlioz 
CONCERTINO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA....Tansman 


First Performance in San Francisco 


(The Composer at the Piano) 
ARTAJAN DeALLA.POLACCAL 2) eed oe eee Tansman 


First Performance in America 


(The Composer Conducting) 
LA: VALS ie ert a oe tee eRe tie ee oe nn eee Ravel 


Among our customers we are honored to include 


WILLIFM WOLSKI 


First violinist with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra who 
selected from our Collection of Rare Instruments a violin, one 
of the finest specimens of the famous old master, Carlo Bergonzi, 


in existence today. 


THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER CO. 


364 SUTTER STREET *PHONE SUTTER 8611 SAN FRANCISCO 


Quality in instruments, with the guarantee which the 
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——— 


38 








PETS ON AN aA 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 

Blinder, Naoum 

Concert Master 
Heyes, Eugene 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W.F 
Gordohn, Robert 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
de Grassi, Antonio 
Wegman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
Houser, F.S 


Second Violins: 


Gough, Walter 
Principal 
Haug, Julius 
Rosset, Emil 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold,Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Laraia, Attilio F. 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Moulin, Harry 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Mitchell, L. 


Cellos: 


Van den Burg, Willem 
Principal 
Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 
Hranek, Carl 


Basses: 

Bell, Walter 
Principal 

Schmidt, Robert E, 
Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A. 


Flutes: 


Woempner,Henry. C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 
Shanis, Julius 
Sargeant, W. 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Bassoons: 


Kubitschek, Ernest 
La Haye, E. B 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F’. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 
Tympani: 
Wagner, R. E. 


Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E. 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 
Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 











Rachmaninofi 


Direction: CHARLES FOLEY 
PROGRAM: FRIDAY EVE., 8:30 P. M. — FEB. 5 









1. Organ Fantasia and Fugue in G-minor.............................. Bach-Liszt 
2... ponata, Opust LOGe ee. eee ee Beethoven 






Vivace ma non troppo 

Adagio espressivo 

Prestissimo 

Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 








3. (a) Polonaise, C-minor 







b) Nocturne .......22- ; 
os NEVA he 1, Weep 0 oe A ce ae PO gee alate i > em aa eee aa Chopin 
(d) Rondo, Opus 16........ } 
LNcE-E RYE S SON 
4. Four Etudes-Tableaux, ‘Opus: 33... Rachmaninoff 
C-sharp minor 
G-minor 
K-flat minor 
E-flat major 
do.” sonnetto- del. Petrarea, NO: 23). 2 eo oe eee Liszt 
6. Magice7hire.25 —-, 3425 iol) Ree ee 2 ee ee Wagner-Brassin 
tz.> tudes | PEMA Obes ee ee ee ee eee ene Paganini-Liszt 


Steinway Piano 


PROGRAM: SUNDAY AFT., 2:30 P. M. — FEB. 7 





1 Variations: (Aen aj O28 2b yi ed oe ee ee Mozart 

2.  Bhree Sonatas Ao aoe is eee ia es ee Scarlatti 

g.. ‘ponata, OPUS oss b=MINOr ieee er ee Chopin 
ON = Hehe Ve bas Se sO Ni 

4; ‘Prelide 242s, Soe: NSS ae Ee A Bach-Rachmaninoff 


AE ET RO Wi Sec) a Rachmaninoff 





5. (a) Daisies, song.... 

(b) Oriental Sketch 

6. (a) Nocturne, G-major........ ) : 
(b) Nocturne, (Noon Tide) [9 vonnawent 

7. (a) Etude, D-flat major 
(b) Valse Oubliee No. 3 

(c) Polonaise, E-major.. 
Steinway Piano 


GEORGE ENGLES, Managing Director — Management NBC ARTISTS SERVICE 
RCA Building, New York City 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1199th and 1200th Concerts 


Friday, January 22, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, January 23, 8:30 P. M., 1937 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN, Guest Artist 


PROGRAMME 
1. Fantastic Symphony, Episode in the Life of an Artist....Berlioz 


Reveries — Passions 

A Ball 

Scene in the Country 

March to the Scaffold 

Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath 


INTERMISSION 


2.. Concertino for Piand and Orchestra... 2 Tansman 
Toccata 
Intermezzo Chopiniano 
Finale 


(The Composer at the Piano) 


(First Performance in San Francisco) 


3. “Aria. and’ Willa Polacca-+ 22. 2 eee Tansman 
The Composer Conducting 


(First Performance in America) 


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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


FANTASTIC SYMPHONY, EPISODE IN THE 
LIFE OF AN ARTIST, OPUS 14 . . Hector Berlioz 
(1803-1869) 

In 1827 Hector Berlioz, a young unknown musician, 23 years of age, 
saw an English company present Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and “Romeo and 
Juliet” in Paris. He promptly fell violently and more or less permanently 
in love with the leading lady, the Irish actress, Henrietta Smithson. Her 
absence made his heart grow fonder, and three years later, Henrietta being 
in England, Berlioz conceived the idea of writing a great symphony to 
celebrate his feverish passion. 


That some of the material in the work that resulted was originally 
composed with quite other purposes in mind is a datum for the Ph. D’s. 
But it is important to note that while building up movements to tell 
Henrietta of his “reveries and passions,” of his anguish and jealousy and the 
disconsolate wanderings in the country in which he did quite literally indulge, 
whispers against the fair name of Miss Smithson reached the composer’s ears. 
He believed them, and his rage boiled up into the present finale of the 
“Fantastic Symphony,” the most violent, priceless and permanent slander 
ever set down in music. 

The work finally came to performance in December, 1830. Henrietta 
was back in Paris, but she did not hear it until its repetition two years later. 
“Witches’ Sabbath” and all, she took it as a great tribute to herself, and in 
1833 she and Berlioz were married, but not until an injury had destroyed 
the graceful carriage which had been part of her charm on the stage. Their 
marriage was not a great success: when Henrietta died in 1854 she had long 
been separated from her husband. 

This preliminary statement will throw a great deal of light on the real 
meaning of the composer’s own “program,” which is printed on a flyleaf 





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of the score. A translation of this material follows, our own Fuller Explanation 
Department putting in its parenthetical oar when necessary. The translation, 
with a few slight changes, is Philip Hale’s. 


“Program of the Symphony. 

“A young musician of morbid sensibility and ardent imagination poisons 
himself with opium in a fit of amorous despair. The narcotic dose, too weak 
to result in death, plunges him into a heavy sleep accompanied by the 
strangest visions, during which his sensations, sentiments and recollections 
are translated by his sick brain into musical thoughts and images. The 
beloved woman herself becomes for him a melody, like a fixed idea which he 
finds and hears everywhere.” 

(The main point here is that Henrietta is symbolized in all five move- 
ments by one and the same melody. Example 1 below. This tune has exactly 
the same function as the Wagnerian leading motive and some critics [not 
Germans! | have insisted that the source of the Wagnerian leading motive is 
to be found here. It is more likely that both Wagner and Berlioz were 
indebted to Beethoven and Weber for the device. The parallel with Beetho- 
ven’s fifth symphony is readily apparent.) 


‘Part I. Reveries, Passions. 


‘He first recalls that uneasiness of soul, that ‘vague des passions,’ those 
moments of causeless melancholy and joy which he experienced before seeing 


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her whom he loves; then the volcanic love with which she suddenly inspired 
him, his moments of delirious anguish, of jealous fury, his returns to loving 
tenderness, and his religious consolations.”’ 


(There is an extensive introduction, Largo. The main movement begins, 
Allegro agitato e appassionato assai, with the “fixed idea,” or Henrietta 
motive, in the violins: 
































This is made the principal subject of a fully rounded symphonic piece in a 
freely handled “first movement” form.) 


“Part IF. A Ball. 


“He sees his beloved at a ball, in the midst of the tumult of a 
brilliant fete.” 


(A waltz movement during the course of which Example 1, or Henrietta 
Smithson, appears in 3% time.) 


“Part III. Scene in the Country. 


“One summer evening in the country he hears two shepherds playing a 
‘ranz des vaches’ (a type of melody used for gathering cattle together) in 
alternate dialogue. This pastoral duet, the scene around him, the light 
rustling of the trees gently swayed by the breeze, some hopes he has recently 
conceived, all combine to restore an unwonted calm to his heart and to 
impart a more cheerful coloring to his thoughts. But ske appears once more, 
his heart stops beating, he is agitated with painful presentiments; if she were 


to betray him! ... One of the Shepherds resumes his artless melody, but 
the other no longer answers him. The sun sets... distant thunder... 
solitude . . . silence.” 


(The English horn, or Shepherd No. 1, begins the movement with his 
“artless melody,” answered by the oboe, Shepherd No. 2, an octave higher. 
At the conclusion of this duet the first theme of a sonata form structure 
steals in with the violins and flute: 











A second theme of less importance to the future course of the move- 
ment follows almost immediately. Development starts with Example 2 in 
the ’cellos and violas. A highly important feature of the development is the 
appearance of the Henrietta motive in the woodwind over a dramatic tremolo 


51. 











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52 


COL. W. DE BASIL’S 


BALLET RUSSE 


WITH THE 


ENTIRE S. F. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Conducted by MONTEUX, KURTZ, DORATI 





REPERTOIRE 


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(Programmes subject to change) 





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in the strings. When, at the close of the extensive working out, Example 2 
reappears more or less in its original form in recapitulation, the Henrietta 
motive is employed as a counterpoint against it. At the end of the entire 
scene the English horn-shepherd pipes up again, but the oboe-shepherd has 
gone home and the only answer is the thunder of the drums.) 


“Part IV. March to the Scaffold. 


‘He dreams he has killed his beloved, that he is condemned to death 
and led to execution. The procession advances to the tones of a march which 
is now sombre and wild, now brilliant and solemn, in which the dull sound of 
the tread of heavy feet follows without transition upon the most resounding 
outbursts. At the end the fixed idea reappears for an instant, like a last 
thought of love interrupted by the fatal axe. 


“Part V. Dream of a Witches’ Sabbath. 


“He sees himself at a witches’ sabbath, in the midst of a frightful group 
of ghosts, ghouls and monsters of all sorts who have come together for his 
burial. He hears strange noises, groans, ringing laughter, shrieks to which 
other shrieks reply. The beloved melody again reappears, but it has lost its 
noble and timid character; it is now more than an ignoble dance tune, trivial 


and grotesque. It is she who comes to the witches’ sabbath . . . Howlings of 
joy at her arrival . . . She takes part in the diabolical orgy . . . The funeral 
knell . . . burlesque of the Dies Irae . . . The witches’ dance . . . The witches’ 


dance and the Dies Irae together.” 


(Here the composer, with unparalleled boldness, suggests the ghoulish 
Black Mass by quite literally and specifically jazzing an ancient liturgical 
melody. He takes the medieval hymn tune known as the Dies Irae, which 
is a portion of the Roman Catholic mass for the dead, and subjects it to 
syncopation—probably the first instance of the jazzing of the classics o 
record. | 


But before we come to that we hear the gathering of the fiendish clan. 
Henrietta appears not far from the beginning in the following hideously 
libeled version, squealed by the piccolo and E flat clarinet: 





After the funeral knell the noble old Dies Irae, in its traditional form, 
is intoned by the brass: 











It is immediately repeated in notes of half the original time value 
(diminution), then in double diminution, octaves higher and syncopated: 


53 





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Eventually the ’cellos and basses state the theme of the witches’ dance: 


es aaa 


which is developed fugally at some length, with many strange, supernatural 
effects. As the “program” indicates, the Dies Irae mingles with the witches’ 
dance before the conclusion.) 


CONCERTINO FOR PIANO AND 


ORCHESTRA .. . .. . . Alexander Tansman 
(1897——_) 
The composer of this work was born, raised and educated in Poland. 
He first came to the attention of the musical public at large in 1919 when 
he won both first and second prizes in a competition for Original works 
sponsored by the Polish government. Tansman was at that time serving 
in the Polish army. 




















In 1920 the composer went to Paris, which has remained his headquarters 
ever since. But he has traveled extensively throughout the world, and is at 
present on his sixth American tour. He has to his credit innumerable works 
for the piano in large and small forms; two symphonies, a sinfonietta, 
“Triptych,” Polish dances, tone poems and works in various other forms 
for orchestra; four string quartets, violin sonatas, and other compositions 
for chamber ensemble, and an opera in five acts, “The Kurdish Night,” 
libretto by Jean Richard Bloch. His “Sonatine T ransatlantique” has been 
adapted by Kurt Jooss for the ballet, “The Big City,” and his sextet is the 
basis of Adolph Bolm’s ballet, “The Tragedy of a ’Cello.” 


Tansman’s esthetic credo is thus quoted by David Ewen in “Composers 
of Today:” 


“Music has never changed its substance, and will never change its goal. 
Its body will always be melody and its goal, emotion . . . Originality has 
never been an act of will, and to seek it is the least original thing in the 
world. It is only necessary to become a master of one’s technique in order 
to be able to serve one’s self freely of originality and to apply it sub- 
consciously to musical ideas.” 


The anonymous author of a pamphlet on the “Triptych” issued by the 
Columbia Phonograph Company thus shrewdly summarizes Tansman’s 
present style: 


“He is a Pole, and he is of today. That is to say there are conflicting 
tendencies which develop a characteristic idiom in his musical utterance. 
His is the heritage of Polish song, a song of hymnal basis, of broad and 


55 





















EE ae CL 


CONDUCTOR OF 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PARIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


His Career-— 


Concerts Monteux, Paris...........--.....---------------------- 1914 
Ballets Russes de Diaghilew...................-.----------- 1911-1917 
Metropolitan Opera Sad te ol see he eee WOES 
Boston Symphony Orchestra.........-.......-..------------ 1919-1924 
Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland 1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra.............-..------------------- 1929-1936 


Has conducted... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 
tras here in America. Is only French Conductor to conduct Berlin 
and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mengel- 
berg ten years. Conducted every major orchestra in Europe. Creator 
of Petrouchka, Sacre du Printemps, le Rossignol, Stravinsky; Daphnis 
and Chloe, Ravel; and many other modern works famous today. 



















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flowing melodies, reflected often in the fervor and quixoticism of Polish 
patriotism. That melodic tradition is, however, attuned to the rhythms of 
today, to rhythms vigorous and energetic and energizing, impersonal and 
sometimes mechanistic, so that in his music are contrasted a romantic, Polish 
sensitivity and a marked dynamic quality, and a flowing and sometimes 
ecstatic lyricism expresses itself, through him, in the hurried pulses of 
our modern life.” 


The concertino was composed in 1936. Its first movement, entitled 
“Toccata,” opens with a piano cadenza, followed by “a movement of very 
rhythmic and dynamic character constructed in the form of an allegro on 
two themes.” The lyrical slow movement, “Intermezzo Chopiniano,” is 
likewise based upon a contrast of two themes, both stated by the solo 
instrument. The Finale is in the rondo form customary in the last 
movements of concertos. 


ARIA AND ALLA POLACCA . . Alexander Tansman 


These two orchestral movements, composed in 1934 dedicated to 
Toscanini, will have their first American hearing at these concerts. They 
are thus described by their composer: : 


“The Aria carries a broad, simple, and uninterrupted melody which 
spreads throught the entire orchestra. The theme, which is first exposed 
by the oboe in a serious and quiet manner, develops into a great climax, 
and ends with the strings in the serene mood of the beginning. 


“The Alla Polacca is entirely original in substance, but its melody and 
structure are typically Polish in character. The principal movement is based 
upon a syncopated rhythm characteristic of Polish musical prosody. The 
trio is an episode in 34 time in the tempo of the mazurka. The themes 
are exposed by the wind instruments accompanied by the strings in arabesque 
style. The brasses recall the rhythm of the Opening section and are used 
as a bridge to bring it back and wind up the work in a broad Sweep.” 


THE WALTZ, 


A CHOREOGRAPHIC POEM .. . Maurice Ravel 
(1875——_) 

The score of this work contains the following ‘“program:” 

“Whirling clouds give glimpses, through rifts, of couples waltzing. The 
clouds scatter little by little. One sees an immense hall peopled by a twirling 
crowd. The scene is gradually illuminated. The light of the chandeliers 
bursts forth, fortissimo. An imperial court about 1855.” 

Alfredo Casella, who assisted Ravel in the first performance of this 
composition, (Vienna, 1920) adds that it “is a sort of triptych: a. The Birth 
of the Waltz; (the poem begins with dull rumors, as in ‘Rheingold,’ and 
from this chaos gradually takes form and development) }. The Waltz; c. 
The Apotheosis of the Waltz.” 


57 











PUR ScOSN Wy ete 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor : 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 

Concert Master 
Heyes, Eugene 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W.F. 
Gordohn, Robert 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
de Grassi, Antonio 
Wegman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
Houser, F.S. 


Second Violins: 


Gough, Wa.ter 
Principal 
Haug, Julius 
Rosset, Emil 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold,Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Laraia, Attilio F. 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Moulin, Harry 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Mitchell, L. 


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Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem oe ea Ernest 


Principal 
Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 
Hranek, Carl 


Basses: 

Bell, Walter 
Principal 

Schmidt, Robert E, 
Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A. 


Flutes: 


Woempner,Henry. C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 
Shanis, Julius 
Sargeant, W. 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


a Haye, E.B 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: > 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland 8S. 
Kress, Victor 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 
Tympani: 
Waener, R. E. 


Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E. 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits; J.P: 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 
Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 


Sa EY 


58 








Ann oOUuUnee im ¢ aia 


FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
w 
Friday Afternoon, February 5, at 2:30 
Saturday Evening, February 6, at 8:30 
WAR MeEM O-R TA Loo PP ER A+GeO.w Ss. 


Soloist: TOSCHA SEIDEL, Violinist 
PROC And 


i SS REE OLD DANCH St... ee aes Arranged by Respight 
262 SWB Ur DE TMB RIES tec aco ie ee ci ee Isadore Freed 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 

3. DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION.....== Richard: Strauss 


4. CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA......Beethoven 
TOSCHA SEIDEL 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1207th and 1208th Concerts 


Friday, February 5, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, February 6, 8:30 P. M., 1937 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: TOSCHA SEIDEL, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 
1. Old Dances and Airs for the Lute......... Arranged by Respighi 


Gagliarda by Vincenzo Galilei 
Villanella by an unknown composer 
Passamezzo and Mascherada by an unknown composer 


2s - SOUS. Ce TE CS: octet eee eee ea Isadore Freed 
Allegro 
Andante Tranquillo 
Allegro non Troppo 


(First Performance in America) 


3.7 Death and tanshieikation ee) ee Richard Strauss 


IN TERM ISS 1 ON 


4. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, 
EOD Wi a Ty Oty, OPUS Galle aoe i cae a ee aot be ree Beethoven 
Allegro ma non Troppo 


Larghetto — 
Rondo 





65 


























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66 





PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


OLD DANCES AND AIRS FOR THE 


LUTE . . Freely transcribed by Ottorino Respighi 
(1879-1936) 

The editing, preservation and transcription of old Italian instrumental 
music was one of the principal phases of the late Ottorino Respighi’s activity. 
His list of achievements in this field is long and varied. He published three 
orchestral suites under the title of “Old Dances and Airs for the Lute,” of 
which the one played on this occasion, completed in 1916, is the first. 


The score contains four movements, all adapted from works of Italian 
composers of the late 16th century. In the present performance the first 
movement, “Balletto Called ‘Count Orlando,’” by Simone Molinari of 
Genoa, is omitted. 


Today’s performance therefore begins with a gagliarda by Vincenzo 
Galilei. The gagliarda was a very popular dance form of the period, its 
name being derived from the French adjective “galliard,”’ meaning gay, 
lively, or brisk. Vincenzo Galilei (1533-1591) is best known to fame through 
the circumstance that a San Francisco high school bears the name of his son, 
the great astronomer, Galileo Galilei. Vincenzo was a Florentine, and a 
figure of great importance both in the early history of opera and the later 
history of lute music. 


The “Villanella” and the “Passamezzo e Mascherada” are by unknown 
composers. T’he term villanella was applied in the 16th century to light- 
textured part songs or madrigals on rustic subjects. The passamezzo was a 
dance not unlike the gagliarda; the derivation of the word is obscure. 
‘“Mascherada”’ (“Masquerade’’) is apparently the name of a song that took 
its title from the text. It is not a term defining a tradition or style as are 
the other titles in Respighi’s suite. 





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JEUX DE TIMBRES ..... . . Isadore Freed 
(1900——_) 

Mr. Freed was born in Russia, but was brought to Philadelphia at the 
age of 3, and has spent most of his life in that city. He was educated at 
the Philadelphia Conservatory of Music and the University of Pennsylvania, 
and studied composition privately with Ernest Bloch. He began his career 
as a member of the faculty of the Curtis Institute and radio lecturer for 
the Philadelphia Orchestra. From 1929 to 1933 he lived in Paris, devoting 
his time to composition and conducting. Since his return from France he 
has been occupied as conductor of the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra and 
teaches in both Philadelphia and New York. 


Mr. Freed has composed much in many forms. He has written four 
string quartets, several sonatas and smaller works for chamber ensemble, 
much piano music, a number of choral compositions, a symphony and 
briefer works for orchestra, and is at present engaged upon an opera, “The 
Star Son,” on a libretto by Ludwig Lewisohn. He is much interested in 
educational music for children, and is editor of “Master of Our Day,” a 
series of small piano pieces intended to introduce the modern idiom into 
the educational field. 


“Jeux de Timbres” (“Studies in Tone Color”) was composed in 1931, 
and was first performed in 1933 by Pierre Monteux (to whom the published 


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score is dedicated) at a concert of the Symphony Orchestra of Paris. This 
is said to have been the first performance of an American work by that 
organization. 


“Jeux de Timbres” is thus described by its composer: 


“The suite is in three movements and has no program. Its title is due 
to the fact that each movement makes use of a different tone color. The 
opening Allegro brings into play the percussion colors (strings pizzicato, 
harp, piano and a large battery which is manipulated for its tonal rather 
than purely rhythmic qualities.) The Andante Tranquillo makes use of 
string textures. The Allegro non Troppo sets off woodwind against brass 
rather than woodwind mixed with brass. In all the movements, however, 
the entire orchestra is used. It is only the orchestral treatment which differs. 
One might say the orchestra is a background from which each movement 
drawns its own special coloring.” 


In another communication Mr. Freed adds “One point that might bear 
explanation is the French title. The work was written, performed and 
published in France during my extended sojourn there. To have given it 
an English title in that country would have been considered a mark of 
affectation, something I detest. Now the shoe is on the other foot so far as 
this particular work is concerned, but I can’t do anything about it.” 


DEATH AND TRANSFIGURATION . Richard Strauss 
(1864) 


In the year 1885 a promising youngster named Richard Strauss was 
chosen by Hans von Biilow, director of the magnificent symphony orchestra 
in the little German city of Meiningen, to become his assistant. In those 
days the German-speaking musical world was divided into two mutually 
hostile camps, that of the Wagnerians, devoted to the picturesque, the 
dramatic and the freely expressive, and that of the Brahmins, who worshipped 
the classic forms and the traditions of absolute music. Strauss went to 
Meiningen one of the most conservative of the classicists. He emerged, less than 
a year later, the creative spearhead of the Wagnerian movement, becoming 


eventually Richard II. 


For in Meiningen Strauss met Alexander Ritter, violinist, poet, and 
composer, who had been an intimate personal friend of Wagner, and was 
at that moment a member of Biilow’s orchestra. Ritter, whom Wagner 
credits with having brought the story of “Tristan and Isolde” to his attention, 
affected Strauss “like a storm wind,” according to Strauss’ own statement. 
The result was the series of tone poems, continuing the line of Wagner, 
Liszt and Berlioz, upon which the fame of Strauss principally rest today. 

The third of the tone poems, “Death and Transfiguration,” is the 
composer’s major tribute to Alexander Ritter, for it was inspired by one of 
Ritter’s writtings. The musical poem describes or illustrates the literary 
poem in considerable detail, and while a musical analysis might be of interest, 


on 

















MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


GRACE MOORE 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — FRIDAY EVE., FEB. 26 










IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his 
“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” 
ALSO 
Rossini “STABAT MATER” Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 
MUNICIPAL Te Irno Ross 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 












SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


SY ts Fe Ee ee 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 













RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 








(Ws 


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Ritter’s text alone is all that is vitally necessary. It is thus translated into 
English prose by William Foster Apthorp: 


“In the necessitous little room, dimly lighted by only a candle end, 
lies the sick man on his bed. But just now he has wrestled despairingly 
with death. Now he has sunk exhausted into sleep, and one hears only the 
soft ticking of the clock on the wall in the room, whose awful silence gives 
a foreboding of the nearness of death. Over the sick man’s pale features 
plays a sad smile. Dreams he, on the boundary of life, of the golden time 
of childhood? 


“But death does not long grant sleep and dreams to his victim. Cruelly 
he shakes him awake, and the fight begins afresh. Will to live and power 
of death! What frightful wrestling! Neither bears off the victory, and 
all is silent once more! 


“Sunk back tired of battle, sleepless, as in fever-frenzy the sick man 
now sees his life pass before his inner eye, trait by trait and scene by scene. 
First the morning red of childhood, shining in pure innocence! Then the 
youth’s saucier play — exerting and trying his strength — ’til he ripens to 
the man’s fight, and now burns with hot lust after the higher prizes of life. 
The one high purpose that has led him through life was to shape all he saw 
transfigured into a still more transfigured form. Cold and sneering, the 
world sets barrier upon barrier in the way of his achievement. If he thinks 
himself near his goal, a ‘Halt!’ thunders in his ear. ‘Make the barrier thy 
stirrup! Ever higher and onward go!’ And so he pushes forward, so he 
climbs, desists not from his sacred purpose. What he has sought with his 
heart’s deepest yearning, he still seeks in his death sweat. Seeks — alas! and 
finds it never. Whether he comprehends it more clearly or it grows upon him 
gradually, he can yet never exhaust it, cannot complete it in his spirit. Then 
clangs the last stroke of death’s iron hammer, breaks the earthly body in 
twain, covers the eye with the night of death. 


“But from the heavenly spaces sounds mightily to greet him what he 
yearningly sought for here: deliverance from the world, transfiguration of 
the world.” 







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CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 


D MAJOR, OPUS 61 .. . Ludwig van Beethoven 


(1770-1827) 
Beethoven’s violin concerto was composed in 1806, which means that 


it is a product of much the same life experience and attitudes that produced 
the symphonies from the third through the sixth, the fourth and fifth piano 
concertos, the “Rasoumovsky” quartets, and the piano sonatas known as the 
“Waldstein” and the “Appassionata” — in short, the most robust and 
affirmative period of the composer’s career. The violin concerto also shares 
with many of the works cited a peculiar absorption with themes based 
upon reiterated notes, of which the so-called “Fate motive” of the fifth 
symphony is the most celebrated instance. 

The work follows the outline of the concerto pattern as invented by 
Mozart, but considerably expanded in size. The first movement, following 
Mozart, is much the longest and most dramatic, the second the shortest 
and most lyric, and the finale the most brilliant for the soloist. Each 
movement is adorned with a cadenza, originally conceived as a passage of 
display improvised on the spot by the soloist. Since the practice of public 
improvisation has long since passed into the discard, the carefully composed 
cadenzas of Joachim will be employed on this occasion. 

‘‘Beethoven’s violin concerto is gigantic,” writes Donald Francis Tovey, 
“one of the most spacious concertos ever written, but so quiet that when 
it was a novelty most people complained quite as much of its insignificance 
as of its length. All its most famous strokes of genius are not only mysterious- 
ly quiet, but mysterious in radiantly happy surroundings. The whole 
gigantic scheme is serene.” 

The concerto was first produced in the year of its composition, the 
s0.0 part played by one Franz Clement, who had not demeaned himself even 
to look at the manuscript until he stepped upon the stage to play the work 
in public. Further light is shed upon the artistic morals of this virtuoso 
by the fact that at the same concert he presented a fantasy of his own 
with the violin held upside down. Such was the integrity of artists in the 
good old days. eae 

I. Allegro ma non troppo. The first movement follows the Mozart 
practice of exposing its thematic material twice, the first exposition for the 
orchestra alone, the second for the solo and orchestra. The violin does not 
enter until the 92nd bar. 

In the first measure the kettledrum beats the four repeated D’s which 
play so essential a role throughout the entire movement. The principal 
Subject enters in the woodwind: 


























Lf; CiiT-€ WN OVL Le UX 


CONDUCTOR OF 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PARIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





His Career— 


Concerts: Monteux; Parisicciciiscscokcccetieecteeee ee 1914 
Ballets Russes de Diaghilew.........................---..-- 1911-1917 
Metropolitari Opera acces eer 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra....................-.---------- 1919-1924 
Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland 1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra............--.-.--..--02-2s200---00 1929-1936 


Has conducted... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 
tras here in America. Is only French Conductor to conduct Berlin 
and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mengel- 
berg ten years. Conducted every major orchestra in Europe. Creator 
of Petrouchka, Sacre du Printemps,le Rossignol, Stravinsky; Daphnis 
and Chloe, Ravel; and many other modern works famous today. 





SAN FRANCISCO 


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ENSEMBLE of SAN FRANCISCO“ J, Buse 


Season Tickets 
are $5 and $3. 





Manager 
Three concerts are planned for the spring season: 
February 9; March 16; April 27 at CENTURY CLUB 
Sutter and Franklin Streets. 


PROGRAM — TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 9 


RUBUNSDEENS (ORs. 655i Sse aecces ra stead PIANO QUINTET 
RO RUG Ey no saccees 0 sbccsc canlteeeseecetssecscotengeas ates pe oeaacrasseen lS eee oe eee aceon QUINTET 
GILTIN RG oii csc ssstrnane toeweucacats ai caatat tioenatnanet daatch ete TRIO PATHETIQUE 
CHIRK TUBING asc -Slt sists ccc cee scasen eeepc ARABESQUE SEXTETS 
TTAINSMANG 3 Ssc. ota. LA DANSE DE LA SORCIERE } | 





The orchestral violins return to the repeated notes, now dramatically 
altered to D sharp. A rising scale figure in the woodwinds and an abrupt, 
emphatic outburst for the full orchestra lead to the second theme, again 
given out by the woodwinds, with the four reiterated notes beneath: 


\ Ca GG} 


This is taken up and worked over by the strings through a long 


crescendo, at the height of which the last thematic element of the movement 
is stated: 





























Suddenly the orchestra dies away and the solo violin makes its long 
delayed entrance. The second exposition now follows. The thematic material 
outlined above is restated in varied form, the solo now singing the principal 
melodies, now weaving arabesques about them as sung by other instruments. 

The solo rests for several pages of the score at the opening of the 
development section. The emphatic, full orchestral outburst previously 
referred to now returns, followed by a rehearing at some length of Example 2. 
The solo enters to work over Example 1. Insistent recollections of the 
four repeated notes in the brass herald the recapitulation, which finally 
bursts in with the entire orchestra, the drum’s four D’s scrubbed out by all 
the strings. The principal violin rejoins the ensemble, as the rising scale 
figure and Examples 2 and 3 are once more passed in review. The customary 
long held chord is prelude to the cadenza. After the cadenza a reminiscence 
of Example 2 concludes the movement. 

II. Larghetto. The slow movement is kind of meditation based almost 
entirely upon the subject stated at the outset by the orchestral violins: 
































The solo embroiders and decorates, but does not directly take up this melody. 
A brief cadenza leads without pause to 

IIT, entitled “Rondo,” with no tempo indication in the score. The solo 
gives out the leading subject at once: 


2 %, 
Spl o a 


There are side themes and episodes of contrast and development, but 
the movement returns constantly to Example 5 as its central focus. 





























77 





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PERSON GINGA 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 

Blinder, Naoum 

Concert Master 
Heyes, Eugene 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W. F. 
Gordohn, Robert 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
de Grassi, Antonio - 
Wegman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
Houser, F. 8. 


Second Violins: 

Gough, Walter 
Principal 

Haug, Julius 
Rosset, Emil 
Moulin, Harry 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold,Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Laraia, Attilio F. 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Mitchell, L. 


Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem pce? Ernest 


Principal 
Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 
Claudio, C. 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 


Schmidt, Robert E, 


Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A. 


Flutes: 


Woempner,Henry. C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 


Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 
Shanis, Julius 
Sargeant, W. 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


aye, E.B 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 
Tympani: 
Waener, R. E. 


Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E. 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 








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Aen nO ti aeieain eran eae 
FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 19, at 2:30 
SATURDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 20, at 8:30 


We Ag. —VB MO Rob ALL 70: PEAR AS Os 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Conducting 
Soloist: RICHARD CROOKS, Tenor 
POR. © iG Re aa 
1. Symphony No. 1, Opus 10........ BAS An he BS Shostakovich 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 
2. Lohensrins Harewells from “Lohéenerin’ 2... Wagner 
RICHARD CROOKS 
3:4 Chorale. “lervetit. is: My ‘Dongvine @ en Bach 
(Arranged by Lucien Cailliet) 
Contes soweetl,. DGRthis 224. eo Re Te ges ae ee ee Bach 
(Arranged by Alexander Kelberine) 
As - ACLO=VLONUG cence ees cca seschitl hens get aA aah eae al Raa Se wes, eee Turina 
CArranged by Lucien Cailliet) 
Bs. Ones Wilh OnCuestrae <u.) es oe eee Richard Strauss 
‘‘Zueignung’’ 
‘“Morgen’’ 


‘‘Heimliche Aufforderung”’ 
RICHARD CROOKS 


Rhumba from the “Rhumba” Symphony.................. Harl McDonald 





THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER COLLECTION of Rare Instruments 
is pleased to announce the honor bestowed on them by 


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Assistant Concert Master of the San Francisco Symphony orchestra 
and violinist with the San Francisco String Quartette, through his 
selection of the world famous 


NICOLAS BERGONZI VIOLIN 
This violin was formerly owned by Erica Morini who used it in 
Concert for years, Mr. Heyes is also the proud owner of two very 


famous violin bows both of which were made by Domenic Peccatte 
and purchased from our Collection. 


THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER CO. 


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PIERRE MONTEUX 
CONDU 


Willem van a os 
Assistant Conductor 





MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


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Fifth Pair 
TWENTY-FIFTH SEASON 
1937 


JUTE Ay aye sepals ill | 





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Friday Atternoon 


Box Holders 


Mrs. Pierre Monteux 
Available for Single Concerts 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 


Mrs. Samuel Kahn 
Miss Barbara Kahn 


Mr.and Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 
Mrs. Donald Gregory 

Mrs. Osgood Hooker, Sr. 

Mr. Osgood Hooker, Jr. 

Mrs. Butler Sturtevant 

Mrs. G. Parker Toms 

Mrs. Walker Kamm 

Mrs. Corbett Moody 

Mrs. Walker Henderson 


Mrs. J. B. Wright 

Mrs. Frank Noyes 

Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Miss Johanna Volkmann 
Mrs. Spencer Grant 
Miss Else Schilling 

Mrs. Dean Witter 

Mrs. Damon Wack 

Mrs. Lingan A. Warren 
Mrs. Robert MacGowan 


Mrs. Edward Macauley 

Mrs. Felton Elkins 

Mrs. Parmer Fuller 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hooker, Jr. 
Mr. Stephen Parrot 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Frost 
Mr. and Mrs. Morris P. Frost 


Miss Lena Blanding 
Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. George M. Stoney 


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Miss Marie Coppée 
Miss Emily Carolyn 


Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland 
Judge and Mrs. M. C. Sloss 


Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Levison 
Mr. and Mrs. 
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Dr. andMrs. 
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Mr. and Mrs. 
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Mr. and Mrs. Nion R. Tucker 


Mr. Charles G. Norris 


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Mrs. Morris Meyerfeld 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering 
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. McNear 
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Mr. and Mrs. George de Latour 


Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers 
Mrs. George Baker Robbins 


Mrs. Otto Barkan 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Heimann 
Mr. William F. Leib 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Miller 
Mr. Richard Walker 


Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Knight 
Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale 
Available for Single Concerts 
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83 








hii Kearny at Sutter 

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Effective March Ist 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1211th and 1212th Concerts 


Friday, February 19, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, February 20, 8:30 P. M., 1937 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: RICHARD CROOKS, Tenor 
WILLEM van pen BURG, Conducting 


PROGRAMME 





Chorale Prelude, Herzlich Thut Mich Verlangen!...,. 2. Back 
Orchestrated by Lucien Cailliet 
Symphony No. 104, D major (“London”)... ........Haydn 
Adagio — Allegro 
Andante 
Menuetto 
Allegro spiritoso 
Lohengrin’s Farewell, from “Lohengrin”... Wagner 
MR. CROOKS 
FC AMMATHN SICA Vide c2¢sci Norte welt ae eae gee RN «eee ee ee Glinka 
INTERMISSION 
he sswan /Of “Wuonela:cgcetee en oe ee a iugdie-scteiee cP DCIS 
DEE COSS ONS olen en acetal eee rE Cece! Strauss 
Zueignung 
Morgen 
Heimliche Aufforderung 
MR. CROOKS 
iihes EMpeswoim One. 21 eeeeay o cked \o\c) et en Se Respighi 


The Pines of the Villa Borghese— 
The Pines Near a Catacomb 

The Pines of the Janiculum— 

The Pines of the Appian Way 
























KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much 





















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make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning .. . now. 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
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estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 





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86 





PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


CHORALE PRELUDE, HERZLICH 


THUT MICH VERLANGEN ....J.S. Bach 


(1685-1750) 
Orchestrated by Lucien Cailliet 


The chorale prelude may be defined as a kind of meditation or improvis- 
ation for the organ based on the melody of a traditional hymn. The melody 
employed here was a great favorite with Bach. If it is unfamiliar under the 
title “Herzlich Thut Mich Verlangen” (“Fervent is my Longing”) it may 
perhaps be more familiar as the “Passion Chorale,” so extensively used in the 
“Passion According to St. Matthew,” and still more familiar as the English 
hymn, “O Sacred Head Now Wounded.” Bach made at least ten different 
settings of it for the organ, and employed it in many cantatas. The melody 
is not original with him, but was composed by Hans Leo Hassler (1564-1612). 


Mr. Cailliet, who made the orchestral transcription, is bass clarinetist 
in the Philadelphia Orchestra and principal arranger for that organization. 


SYMPHONY No. 104, D MAJOR 


(LONDON?) 3. 5 Ai Saran pancet Haydn 
(1732-1809) 


This last of Haydn’s Symphonies derives its nickname from the fact 
that it was composed in the British capital, and thereby hang several tales. 


In 1790 the composer retired from the service of the fabulously wealthy 
Ksterhazy family after 30 years of activity as composer, conductor and general 
musical supervisor in the Esterhazys’ more than princely household. He was a 
salaried lackey for those 30 years, but a salaried lackey who had practically 
invented modern music all by himself. The founder of the symphony, the 
symphony orchestra and the string quartet was not one to be permitted com- 
fortable retirement in his old age, and no sooner had Haydn’s resignation 
taken effect than he was snapped up by Johann Peter Salomon, a London 
concert manager, who brought him to England for two magnificently success- 
ful seasons — 1791-2, and 1794-5. Haydn wrote six symphonies for each 
English tour, and these twelve, commonly called the “Salomon symphonies,” 
are the orchestral works of this composer most frequently performed today. 


The “London” symphony was one of the principal documents in an 
amusing musicological row about 30 years ago. A musician named Kuhac, 


420 Sutter Street 






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who had been collecting Hungarian and Croatian folk songs, persistently 
found Haydn themes turning up in his folk material. He therefore came to the 
entirely logical conclusion that Haydn, who was of Croatian peasant stock, 
made regular and consistent use of old folk melodies in his symphonies and 
other works. (Haydn’s most famous tune, the Austrian national anthem, or 
“Deutschland Uber Alles,” is one of these, and the theme ascribed to him in 
Brahm’s famous orchestral variations is probably another.) If so, then 
Haydn was the first modern musician to use folk tunes in any regular, 
systematic manner, anticipating the Russians and other nationalists by a 
century. 

To this claim of Kuhac some authorities replied with the ingenious 
theory that the folk might just as easily have gotten the tunes from Haydn 
instead of the reverse. That this theory defies every known fact about folk 
song did not seem to bother its proponents, but they have as yet failed to 
answer the argument of Sir W. Henry Hadow, the major supporter of Kuhac, 
who points out that the finale of the “London” symphony, composed in London 
for performance in London, and never played in Hungary and Croatia within 
earshot of the peasantry, nevertheless is based on the theme of a very popular 
Croatian dance. 

I. The symphony begins with the slow introduction so commonly 
employed in Haydn’s time. In this instance the introduction is in D minor, 
beginning with a sort of horn call for the full orchestra. A change of tempo 


to allegro and change of mode from minor to major bring the first theme, 
simply stated by the violins in the customary Haydn manner: 


Example 1 






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89 








90 








MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


GRACE MOORE 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — FRIDAY EVE., FEB. 26 





IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his 
“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” 
ALSO 
Rosstint “STABAT MATER” Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 
M UNL CE PAL, aC  OsRsUss 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


ey ead Wek Be WAP Save fee ie aD 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 





RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 














q 


in A major, this taking the place of a second theme. Further transition 
material leads to an important closing subject: 


Example 2 











The development is almost entirely concerned with the third and fourth 
bars of Example 1, although material derived from Example 2 plays a minor 
role. Recapitulation brings back the themes discussed, but in a somewhat 
irregular and unorthodox fashion, with much insistence upon Bars 3 and 4 
of Example 1. 

II. Andante, G minor. The slow movement is based upon the melody 
stated at the outset by the violins: 


Example 3 





Some 45 bars are devoted to the statement of this subject matter. Then comes 
a contrasting-episode in G minor, with fuller orchestration and a more agitated 
mood. The key of G major then reinstates itself as well as the original theme 
and emotional atmosphere, and the movement progresses with repetitions and 
development of Example 8, growing more mysterious, unearthly and 
Beethovenian to the end. 

III. The minuet follows the conventions. It is in two parts, each re- 
peated. The contrasting section, or trio, is slower in tempo, smaller in 
orchestral dimensions, more gracious in its flow. The minuet proper is 
restated at the conclusion. 

Allegro spiritoso. Over a drone bass like that of a peasant bagpipe, 
the violins give out the folk melody previously referred to: 


Example 4 





This is repeated, and in the course of the transition a subject of some import- 
ance in the development is tossed off: 


Example 





The long notes of the second theme make a marked contrast to the rapid 
rush of Example 4: 


Example 6 





The development begins by working over the first two bars of Example 
4, but Examples 5 and 6 come in for their brief share of treatment before the 
recapitulation, which is quite regular, rehearsing the material of the exposition 
in the established manner. The coda once more develops Example 4. 


LOHENGRIN’S FAREWELL, 


FROM “LOHENGRIN” .. . . Richard Wagner 
(1813-1883) 


Elsa of Brabant, accused of the murder of her brother, is saved from 
death by the intervention of a mysterious knight who appears in a boat drawn 
by a swan, meets Elsa’s accuser in single combat, and vanquishes him. The 


91 











oe 


San Francisco Preparatory Urchestra 


WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Conductor 


Ohen ORCHESTRA now rehearses every Monday and 
Friday night from eight to ten in the Sherman, Clay 
& Co. building, corner of Kearny and Sutter streets. The 
works studied are the standard symphonic literature. 
This affords an opportunity to music students to prepare 
themselves for symphony orchestra positions, and to 
those who are studying music for the love of the art to 
increase their knowledge, experience and consequent en- 
joyment of music. 


Professional musicians, as well as advanced students, are 
accepted as members. 


Visitors are welcome at rehearsals. 
Membership dues are $2.00 per month. 


2 

For auditions Mr. Van den Burg may be reached by 
phone at ORdway 7060 or at his residence — 2318 
Leavenworth Street. 


LS | 
——— SSS essa 











PoE Ee, 8 CON ao 


Presents 


MARIAN 
ANDERSON 


FAMOUS AMERICAN CONTRALTO 

Opera House (Only Recital) 

WED. EVE., FEB. 24, 8:30 
2 


PR O.G RAM 


I. 
Begruessung. - 4 ie. Haendel 
Chio mai vi possa............. Haendel 
Siciliana....................-.-.-.----- Haendel 
Ah Spietato 
(CArmadigi 22 Haendel 
II. 
Liebesbotschaft ................ Schubert 
Ave Maria: 2 2237s: Schubert 
Der Tod und das 
Maedchen...................:.... Schubert 
Die Forelle.......................- Schubert 
III. 
Air of “Don Carlos” 
(O- Dono atale)}= Verdi 
IV. 
Die Fusswaschung............ Kilpinen 
Schilfrohr, saeus’le 
(Saev, saev, susa).......... Sibelius 
Sung in Swedish 
Die Libelle:.. 22. ee Sibelius 
Wer es ein Traum.............. Sibelius 
Sung in German 
V. 


Negro Spirituals: 
City called Heaven....Hall Johnson 
Lord, I can’t stay 


RW eee et Roland Hayes 
Crucifixion: ~4.0..: John Payne 
My soul’s been anchored 

in the Lord............ Florence Price 

 ] 


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knight and Elsa are married, but the stranger insists that his wife must 
never know his name and origin, on pain of losing him. Elsa does eventually 





demand his name, and the knight sorrowfully reveals that he is Lohengrin, 
son of Parsifal, a servant of the Holy Grail. The swan boat reappears, and 


Lohengrin addresses it: 


Mein lieber Schwan! 

Ach, diese letzte traur’ge Fahrt, 

Wie gern hatt’ ich sie dir erspart! 

In einem Jahr, wenn deine Zeit 

Im Dienst zu Ende sollte geh’n, 
Dann, durch des Grales Macht befreit, 
Wollt’ ich dich anders wiederseh’n! 


O Elsa, nur ein Jahr an deiner Seite 

Hatt’ ich als Zeuge deines Gliicks 
ersehnt! 

Dann kehrte, selig in des Grals Geleite, 

Dein Bruder wieder, den du _ todt 
gewannt. 

Kommt er dann heim, wenn ich ihm 
fern im Leben, 

Dies Horn, dies Schwert, den Ring 
sollst du ihm geben. 

Dies Horn soll in Gefar ihm Hiilfe 
schenken, 

In wildem Kampf dies Schwert ihm 
Sieg verleith: 

Doch bei dem Ringe soll er mein 
gedenken, 

Der einstens dich aus Schmach und 
Noth befreit! 

Leb’ wohl! Leb’ wohl! Leb wohl! mein 
susses Weib! 

Leb’ wohl! Mir ziirnt der Gral wenn 

ich noch bleib! 


KAMARINSKAYA . ... 


Beloved swan! 

Ah, mournful'tidings hast thou brought, 
So soon to see thee ne’er I thought. 
After a year had slowly past— 

The period of thy slavery— 

Then by the Grail released at last, 

I hoped my swan to see. 


Oh, Elsa, till a single year had ended, 

Had I remained, thy joy I should have 
seen, 

Then thy lost brother, by the Grail 
defended, 

To thee yet living would restore have 
been. 

If he returns, alone thou wilt receive 
him. 

This sword, this horn, this ring, rare 
presents give him. 

His arm will conquer when the sword 


he raises; 

The horn will aid him in an hour of 
need. 

As for the ring, whene’er on it he 
gazes, 


He’ll think on one who thee from 
danger freed. 

Farewell, farewell, I must away! 

Farewell, the Grail forbids my stay. 


Michael Ivanovitch Glinka 
(1803-1857) 


This work is based upon two Russian folk melodies, a wedding song and 
a dance tune, which Glinka chanced to hear played simultaneously at a village 
wedding. It derives its name from the traditional dance measure employed, 
which, being very light and frothy, is called “Kamarinskaya,” or “mosquito 


dance.,”’ 


Montagu-Nathan quotes Rimsky-Korsakoff as saying: “With ‘Kama- 
rinskaya’ Glinka bequeathed to posterity the symphonic treatment of the 
Russian folk tune’. The same authority quotes Tschaikowsky as writing: 
“Without intending to compose anything beyond a simple humorous trifle he 
has left us a little masterpiece every bar of which is the outcome of enormous 


PHONE FILLMORE 6102 


creative power. Half a century has passed since then, and many Russian 


ELSIE COOK-LARAIA 


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Classes for teachers demonstrating the successful presentation of the Tobias Matthay 
teaching principle. 

Studios: Dominican College, San Rafael — St. Rose Academy, San Francisco 
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ep 5 oe ee 3 











96 


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symphonic works have been composed. The germ of them all lies in ‘Kama- 
rinskaya,’ as the oak-tree lies in the acorn. For long years to come Russian 


composers will drink at this source.” 


THE SWAN OF TUONELA 


Jean Sibelius 
(1865——) 


a e * . s 


This is one of a group of orchestral pieces by Sibelius illustrating the 
Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. A note in the score explain its signifi- 


cance as follows: 


“Tuonela, the land of the dead, the Hades of the Finnish mythology, 
is surrounded by a swift river of black water on which the stately Swan of 


Tuonela glides, singing as it swims.” 
THREE SONGS... 


ZUEIGNUNG 


Ja, du weisst es, theure Seele, 
Dass ich fern von dir mich quale, 
Liebe macht die Herzen krank, 
Habe Dank! 


Kinst hielt ich, der Freiheit Zecher, 
Hoch die Amethisten Becher, 

Und du segnetest den Trank, 

Habe Dank! 


Und beschworst darin die Bésen, 
Bis ich, was ich nie gewesen, 
Heilig, heilig, an’s Herz dir sank, 
Habe Dank! 


—Hermann von Gilm. 


MORGEN 
Und Morgen wird die Sonne wieder 
scheinen 
Und auf dem Wege, den ich gehen 
werde, 
Wird uns, die Gliicklichen, sie wieder 
einen 


Inmitten dieser Sonnenatmenden 
Erde .. 


Und zu dem Strand, dem weiten, 
wogenblauen, 

Werden wir still und langsam nieder- 
steigen, 

Stumm werden wir uns in die Augen 
schauen, 

Und auf uns sinkt des Gliikkes stum- 
mes Schweigen. 

—John Henry Mackay. 


HEIMLICHE AUFFORDERUNG 

Auf, hebe die funkelnde Schale empor 
zum Mund, 

Und trinke beim Freudenmahle dein 
Herz gesund. 

Und wenn du sie hebst, so winke mir 
heimlich zu, 

Dann lachle ich und dann trinke ich 
still wie du. 


Richard Strauss 


(1864) 
DEVOTION 
Ah! thou knowest, sweet, all mine 


anguish, 
In thine absence how I languish. 
Love brings sorrow to the heart; 
Thanks, sweetheart! 


Once, when merry songs were ringing, 
I to Liberty was drinking, 

Thou a blessing did impart, 

Thanks, sweetheart! 


Thou didst lay those wanton spirits; 
Comfort, peace, my soul inherits, 
Joy and bliss shall love impart; 
Thanks, sweetheart! 


TOMORROW 

Tomorrow’s sun will rise in glory 
beaming, 

And on the pathway that my foot 
shall wander 

We'll meet, forget the earth, and lost 
in dreaming, 

Let heaven unite a love that earth no 
more shall sunder. . 


And toward that shore, its billows 
softly flowing, 
Our hands entwined, 
slowly wending, 
Gaze into each other’s eyes in love’s 

soft splendor glowing, 
Mute with tears of joy and bliss ne’er 
ending. 


our footsteps 


THE SECRET PLEDGE 

Up, lift now the sparkling cup to the 
lip and drink, 

And leave not a drop in the goblet 
filled full to the brink. 

And as thou dost pledge me, let thine 
eyes rest on me; 

Then I will respond to thy smile and 
gaze all silent on thee. 


97 











Een 6 Mee mr ea eee 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


| FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 5, at 2:30 
SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 6, at 8:30 


WAR Mee MG Re Tan O-Pak Rees EE Oy Uarsae: 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Conducting 


Soloist: MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto 
PROG AM 



























1. Concerto Grosso in D major................... Gin Bidet anael 
DO ATOM ig otek ako ae yt Ok cece ns a ew eee cope See ete ae ML OZALE 
MARIAN ANDERSON 
2 Welmabal 11° cs ib: gee Ne neem ae ee op NDE weed ened Ne REO PTD cpp oe Medan tee Ronee ea om Nese Ie tenor Albeniz 


(Orchestrated by Enrique Fernandez Arbos) 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 


i A. Ca)“O:Don Fatale’ from “Don, Carlos ee iasse ccc Verdi 
i Cb) “Deen Rivet xi: 2st se ee en ae eee Negro Spiritual 
(c) Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child........ Negro Spiritual 


i MARIAN ANDERSON 
} 5 Symphony Nos 2 Wee B MO ee a capiceccacese ee eee yee Tschaikowsky 


THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER COMPANY IS AGAIN 
PLEASED TO ANNOUNCE THE HONOR 
BESTOWED ON THEM BY 


WALTER BELL 


First, Bass Viol, with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
and teacher through his purchase of an 
ALEXANDER GAGLIANO 
bass-viol, the finest of its kind. This Bass Viol was formerly in 
the Collection of Rodman Wanamaker, of New York 
and is valued by us at $1000.00. 


THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER CO. 


364 SUTTER STREET PHONE SUTTER 8611 SAN FRANCISCO 





Quality in instruments, with the guarantee which the 
largest music house in the world can give. 


“Ask for our Free Brochure on Old Instruments.” 





Und still gleich mir betrachte um uns 
das Heer 

Der trunknen SchwaAtzer, verachte sie 
nicht zu sehr. 

Nein, habe die blinkende Schale, 
gefullt mit Wein, 

Und lass beim larmenden Mahle sie 

gliicklich sein. 


Doch hast du das Mahl genossen, den 
Durst gestillt, 

Dann verlasse der lauten Genossen, 
festfreudiges Bild, 

Und wandle hinaus in den Garten zum 
Rosenstrauch, 

Dort will ich dich dann erwarten nach 
altem Brauch. 


Und will an die Brust dir sinken, eh’ 
du’s gehofft, 
Un die Kiisse trinken, wie ehmals 


oft, 

Und flechten in deine Haare der Rose 
Pracht— 

O komm, du wunderbare ersehnte 
Nacht! 


—John Henry Mackay. 


THE PINES OF ROME . 


Then let thy eyes bright wander 
around o’er the comrades, 

Gay and merry. O do not despise 
them, love; 

Nay! lift up the sparkling goblet and 
join the sway. 

Let them rejoice and be happy this 
festive day, 


But when thou hast drunk and eaten, 
no longer stay; 

Rise and turn thine eyes from the 
drinkers, and hasten away, 

And wending thy steps to the garden 
where blush the roses fair, 

Come to the sheltering arbor, I’ll meet 
thee there. 


And soft on thy bosom resting let me 
adore, 

Thy beauty, drinking thy kisses as 
oft before. 

I’ll twine around thy fair forehead the 
roses white— 

O come, thou wondrous, bliss-bestow- 
ing, longed for night! 


—English translations by John Bernhoff. 


- . . Ottorino Respighi 
(1879-1936) 


This is the second of Respighi’s three tone poems celebrating the sights 


and sounds of the city where the com 


poser spent the greater part of his life. 


The first is the celebrated “Fountains of Rome”; the third is entitled “Roman 


Festivals.” 


“The Pines of Rome” was composed in 1924. The following descriptive 
and analytical remarks concerning it are quoted from the program notes of 
the late Philip Hale, which are in turn largerly quoted from Respighi’s 


preface to the score. 


I.— The Pines of the Villa Borghese (Allegretto vivace). Children are 
at plan in the pine-grove of the Villa Borghese, dancing the Italian equivalent 
of “Ring Around The Rosy,” mimicking marching soldiers and battles, twitter- 
ing and shrieking like swallows at evening, and they disappear. Suddenly 


the scene changes to — 


II. — The Pines Near a Catacomb (Lento; beginning with muted and 
divided strings, and muted horns). We see the shadows of the pines which 
overhang the entrance to a catacomb. From the depths rises a chant which 
reéchoes solemnly, sonorously, like a hymn, and is then mysteriously silenced. 


III. — The Pines of the Janiculum (Lento: piano cadenza, clarinet solo). 
There is a thrill in the air. The full moon reveals the profile of the pines of 
Gianicolo’s Hill. A nightingale sings (represented by a phonograph record of 
a nightingale’s song, heard from the orchestra). 


IV.— The Pines of the Appian Way (Tempo di marcia). Misty dawn 
on the Appian Way. The tragic country is guarded by solitary pines. 
Indistinctly, incessantly, the rhythm of innumerable steps. To the poet’s 
phantasy appears a vision of past glories; trumpets blare, and the army of the 
consul advances brilliantly in the grandeur of a newly risen sun toward the 
sacred way, mounting in triumph the Capitoline Hill. 


99 





rer A 









PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 





Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 
Blinder, Naoum 


S 
Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Eee Ernest 


‘Oper 








Concert Master Principal Haye, E. B. 
Heyes, Eugene Dehe. Will Hranek, Carl 
Asst. Concert Master ~°2® YY Miem Baker, M. 
Argiewicz, Artur Reinberg, Herman a 
Meriz, Emilio ee ea thy Contra Bassoon: 

Seager: S ; ; 
ee ean Coletti, Bruno La Haye, E.B. day 3 
Laraia, W.F. Bem, Stanislas Horns: aturday 
Gordohn, Robert Saiane eee Lambert, Pierre ee 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 708°V°Y; \reorge Trutner, Herman on 
Mortensen, Modesta Claudio, ©. Tryner, Charles E. fnday 
Pasmore, Mary 2 Roth, Paul 
de Grassi, Antonio Basses: 4 ; Bday } 
Wegman, Willem Bell, Walter FUMIPCUS ; mday | 
Claudio, Ferdinand Principal Klatzkin, Benjamin ¢ 
Koharits, Joseph Schmidt, Robert E. Barton, Leland S. peeday 
Houser, F.S Guterson, Aaron Kress, Victor B inesd 

Schipilliti, John 3 . 
Second Violins: Forman, F. F peace : d hursday 
Gough, Walter Hibbard, E. B. Giosi, Orlando 
Principal Storch, A. E. Shoemaker, R. F. Hay F 
Eanes J ae Buenger, A. Klock, J. ‘ 
osset, i.m1 x evra y 
Moulin, Harry Flutes: Tuba: 
Paterson, J. A. Murray, Ralph finday J 
Gold Julius Woempner,Henry. C. 
Helget fang Oesterreicher, Walter Harp: linday 3 
Laraia, Attilio F. Benkman, Herbert Attl, Kajetan Onday | 
Spaulding, Myron Herold, R. J. Morgan, Virginia 
rs MCs ay 
Rolie, Wathen Oboes: Tympani: Binead 
Lind, Waldemar Shanis, Julius Wagner, R. E. iE 
Schneider, D. Sargeant, W. Percussion: . 
ay Schivo, Leslie J. Tienda inert hiday E 
iolas: ae 
Firestone, Nathan English Horn: Panne M. A. iturday 
SEED asin Schivo, Leslie J. Steffan, D. btorday 
Hahl, Emil larinets: : , | 
Weiler, Fae rere hes oe ts ene, au ee : inday J 
Baker, Fred A. Se ant a let ti Rag iday 


Tolpegin, Victor 


Rudd, Charles 


Librarian: 





earea Manfred Fragale, Frank Haug, Julius IL OR 
in, Al d eee re 
ache feiae Victor ae ee ee Personnel Manager: a 
Mitchell, L. Fragale, Frank Oesterreicher, Walter il 02 
ee ee ee atin ote ati aie ae Cation 


100 








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10:00 P. M. for two bours of 
popular and classical music .« -» 


KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS 
OAKLAND: H.C. CAPWELL'S . . . Fourth Floos 

































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SAN FRANCISCO 
SY MPR 
OR CHEST RA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
CONDUCTOR 


Willem van den Burg 
Assistant Conductor 





MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby . President and Managing Director 
. . . Vice-President and Treasurer 


John A. McGregor ‘ 
Mrs. E.S. Heller . Vice-President 
Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Paul Bissinger 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
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Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 
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Edward F. Moffatt 
Peter Conley . Business Manager 


Secretary 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
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Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 


Mrs. Walter A. Haag 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby 


C. O. G. Miller 
Chairman 


Wallace M. Alexander 


Raymond Arsmby 
Paul Bissinger 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby 
Raymond Armsby 
G. Stanleigh Arnold 
Mrs. George 
Washington 
Baker, Jr. 
Dr. Hans Barkan 
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Bartlett 
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Mrs. W. W. Crocker 
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Miss Katherine 
Donohoe 
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MUSIC COMMITTEE 


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Cameron 


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FINANCE COMMITTEE 


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Koshland 
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PAST PRESIDENTS 


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BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Mrs. Harold Richert 
McKinnon 
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Miss Else Schilling 
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Armstrong Taylor 
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Executive Offices: 4th FLOOR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Ticket Office: Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 





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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1215th and 1216th Concerts 


Friday, March 5, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, March 6, 8:30 P. M., 1937 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: MARIAN ANDERSON, Contralto 


PROGR A M 
CONCERTO: GROSSO No, 5; Do MiATOR. a5) ae Handel 


Maestoso 

Allegro 

Presto 

Largo 

Menuetto 

Allegro 

(Solo Violins: Naoum Blinder, Eugene Heyes; 
Solo ’Cello: Willem van den Burg) 


ATES TS UAE ae se oe cae ce eee ee eee ea Mozart 
MISS ANDERSON 
| oH a cdl Be area stan Beco sy saneahttinee th sient ap cienstoesonien oe alk fs heer etre Of oo Albeniz 


Evocacion 
El Corpus en Sevilla 
Triana 
Orchestrated by Enrique Fernandez Arbos 


ARLTAY OLDON PATALE. Jb ROM. DON CSRLOS 72. Verdi 


NEGRO SPIRITUALS: 
DEEP RIVER 
SOMETIMES I FEEL LIKE A MOTHERLESS CHILD 
MISS ANDERSON 


INTERMISSION 
SYMPHONY Nowa, 0h MINOR| OPUS 3622 Tschaikowsky 


Andante sostenuto — Moderato con anima 
Andantino in modo di una canzone 
Scherzo: Pizzicato ostinato 

Allegro con fuoco 





109 


























KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much 





Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more mori) for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning .. . now. 


As a wise preliminary to such Lisnaings we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 

BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 

STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 





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SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 


110 











PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


CONCERTO GROSSO No. 5, 


D MAJOR ..... .. . George Frideric Handel 
(1685-1759) 


“This day are published proposals for printing by subscription, with His 
Majesty’s royal license and protection, Twelve Grand Concertos in Seven Parts, 
for four violins, a tenor, a violoncello, with a thorough-bass for the harpsicord. 
Composed by Mr. Handel. Price to subscribers, two guineas. Ready to be de- 
livered by April next. Subscriptions are taken by the author at his house in 
Brook Street, Hanover Square, and by Walsh.” 

Thus the London Daily Post of October 29, 1739, neglecting to mention 
what to the modern eye is one of the most remarkable features of the perform- 
ance, namely that the entire set was composed in about three weeks’ time. 

Handel’s concertos do not exhibit the unity of architecture revealed by 
the works of Bach in the same form. The number, length, character and 
sequence of the movements in Handel varies with each concerto. Their one 
unifying principle is the fact that, like most of the orchestral music of their 
time, they are written for a group of soloists—two violins and a ’cello—set 
off against a large accompanying orchestra. 


ALLELUJAHY (S325. 2c ee a LOZarE 
(1756-1791) 


This aria, based upon the single word “Allelujah,” is the third and final 
movement of a little motet for soprano solo and orchestra entitled “Exsultate, 
Jubilate.” It was, according to the original manuscript, “composto in Milano 
nel Gennaio, 1773, del Sgr. Cavaliere Amadeo Wolfgango Mozart, Academico 
di Bologna e di Verona.” The “Sgr. Cavaliere” who so proudly boasted his 
academic honors was at that time only 16 years of age, yet, according to the 
pele chronological catalogue of the learned Dr. Ké6chel, this is his 

5th wor wit. 


IBERIAS 0 ee ee ce We ee oe ee lsane Albeniz 


Orchestrated by ENRIQUE FERNANDEZ ARBOS. (1860-1909) 


We quote from John B. Trend’ S article on Albeniz in Grove’s Dictionary: 
“Iberia”? consists of 12 ‘scenes’ from different corners of Spain, 
inspired by the rhythms, harmonies, and turns of phrase of Spanish 
popular music; particularly the songs and dances of Andalucia. As a 
Catalan by birth, Albeniz could look at Andaluz music with something of 
the detachment of a foreigner; and if he did not penetrate to the true 





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Evening, March 22nd. 


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So 2B 


ep) 


Friday Atternoon 


Box Holders 


Mrs. Pierre Monteux 
Available for Single Concerts 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 


Mrs. Samuel Kahn 
Miss Barbara Kahn 


- Mr.and Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 


Mrs. Donald Gregory 


v Mrs. Osgood Hooker, Sr. 
- Mr. Osgood Hooker, Jr. 


- 


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v Mrs. Walker Kamm 


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Lady Tennyson 


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Mr. and Mrs. Richard Heimann 
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Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Knight 
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Available for Single Concerts 
Available for Single Concerts 
Dr. and Mrs. Hans Barkan 


Available for Single Concerts 








113 


















SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


WITH 


IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his 
“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” 
ALSO 
Rossini “STABAT MATER”. Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 


MUN DCT Peas) “Con .O Ro Un 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


WITH 


Se ee 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 


RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 


MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 





- =~ = La 








essence of it (as Falla has done), he realised that its determining fea- 

tures were the combination of strong, conflicting rhythms; the harmonic 
effects naturally obtained from instruments tuned in fourths; and the 
wavering, profusely ornamented melodies of the native ‘Cante Hondo.’ 
At the back of his mind there is generally a guitar-player who ends with 
the ‘Phrygian cadence,’ a dancer whose castanets are always syncopating 
against each other, and sometimes (as in ‘Triana’) the shake and bang 
of a tambourine. Albeniz did not try to reproduce these things in his 
music; he endeavored to suggest them on the pianoforte. The whole of 
his later work is a brilliantly pianistic ‘Evocacion’ of Spanish popular 
music, constructed on the principle of the pianoforte piece of that name, 
an which the ‘Jota’ of Navarre is contrasted with a melody from Anda- 
ucia.”’ 

Of the 12 pieces by Albeniz, Senor Arbos, conductor of the Symphony 
Orchestra of Madrid, has orchestrated six, but neither composer nor arranger 
intended to create a unified suite, and in omitting three of Arbos’ movements 
no violence is done to an artistic conception, 

“Evocacion” needs neither translation nor comment. “El Corpus en 
Sevilla,” (also widely known under the French title, “Féte-Dieu a Seville,’’) 
refers to the great religious procession on Corpus Christi Day in the capital 
of Andalucia. “Triana” is the name of a suburb of Seville largely inhabited by 
gypsies. 


ARIA, “O DON FATALE,” 


FROM “DON CARLOS” . . . . Giuseppe Verdi 
(1813-1901) 

Don Carlos, son of King Philip IV of Spain, loves and is loved by the 

French princess, Elizabeth of Valois. But reasons of state force Elizabeth 

into marriage with Carlos’ royal father. The predictable secret trysts and 

lovers, meetings follow. The Princess Eboli, who herself loves Don Carlos, 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
FINE FOODS 


lce Cream *« Sodas 
Pastries x Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Pig’n Whistle 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 












Eid arOulh iy @ Gul Coral ee 


SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 19, at 2:30 
SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 20, at 8:30 


Wien Me Bovi-O (RelA bs Oe Pe be AY © OGU so. & 


Soloist ISAAC STERN, Violinist 


PROGRAM 


I Ballet Suite trom: “Cephale jet Procris’) Gretry-Mottl 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 

Dy. ME ONCEMLOMOL VION Malo” iayOlz see sce wee ae Brahms 

ISAAC STERN 

ore sOVermates ir ISkeL tel ArGG eect oro) cu eee ren eee esac Philip James 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 

Ae She; Bmchanted tealke ec o.s.cees-ceec kee ee ees ee Liadow 

See Ole: LhOtauy cane Len DIR) oe... seers ees eee ree Stravinsky 

® 


The Musical Association of San Francisco is deeply honored by the spon- 


sorship of the Junior Chamber of Commerce for this pair of concerts. 














IN RECOGNITION 


a’ 


CITY CAN HAVE NO GREATER ASSETS THAN THOSE WHICH 

make for the cultural life of the community. And ad- 

mittedly music, with its far-reaching message and en- 
riching influence, holds supreme place in the aesthetic life 
of its people. 


San Francisco can justly be proud of its musical assets 
and its record of not only maintaining them but always 
striving to extend their scope. For nearly a century music has 
held a most important place in the cultural life of the city. 


Principal among the contributing agencies has been the 
Musical Association of San Francisco and the Symphony 
Orchestra it maintains. For a quarter of a century the or- 
chestra, and more recently the municipal sponsoring of music, 
have brought an enviable renown and distinction to San 
Francisco, placing it in the front rank of American cities 
which foster and encourage music as means of community 
expression. 


Not only to the Symphony Orchestra as a body, but to 
individual artists who claim San Francisco as home, is the 
city indebted for its cultural distinction. And in recognition 
of their contribution the San Francisco Junior Chamber of 
Commerce is honored to sponsor the Seventh pair of concerts 
of the Symphony’s Silver Jubilee Season and the appearance 
of Isaac Stern, young San Francisco violinist, as guest artist. 


That this concert pair may be outstanding in a season 
already brilliantly successful, we urge the attendance not 
only of our own members but of every loyal music-loving 
San Franciscan. 


SAN FRANCISCO JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 


Puitip F, LANpIs, 


President. 




























THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER COLLECTION of Rare Instruments 
is again pleased to announce the honor bestowed on them by 


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Violinist of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, through his 
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HELEN GAHAGAN 


Glamorous Star of Stage, Screen and Opera 
One Concert Bay Region 
APRIL Veber ERAN? S:” 

AUDITORIUM 
8:30 P. M. 
Tickets Now on Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


118 





discovers this state of affairs. Her love turns to hate (to coin a phrase) and 
she denounces the guilty pair to the King. Many complications ensue before 
Carlos is finally delivered up to the tender mercies of the Inquisition. 

The aria “O Don Fatale” (“O Fatal Gift’) is sung by the Princess Eboli 
in the fourth act, when (again to coin a phrase) she feels the pangs of remorse 
for her deed. Its text is as follows: 


O don fatale, o don crudel Oh beauty! thou fatal gift, 

Che in suo furor mi fece il cielo! By fortune, in vindicative mood, con- 
ceded me. 

Tu che ci fai...si vana altera Oh beauty! thou who mak’st our sex 
so haughty and so vain— 

Ti maledico, o mia belta. Beauty, I curse thee! 

Versar, versar sol posso il pianto, Ye bitter tears flow on apace! 

Speme non ho, soffrir dovro! No hope is left, all joy hath flown! 

Il mio delitto é orribil tanto My crime’s so base, so horrible! 

Che cancellar mai nol potro! Naught can e’er my sin atone! 

O mia Regina, io t’immolai , Oh, Queen beloved, I sacrificed thee 

Al folle error di questo cor. To the revolt of this wild heart. 

Solo in un chiostro al mondo ormai In a lone cloister from earth secluded 

Dovro celar il mio dolor! I may hide my sorrow apart! 

Oh ciel! E Carlo? a morte domani... Oh Heaven! and Carlos? 

Gran Dio! a morte andar vedro! Tomorrow he’ll be dragged to execu- 
tion! 

Ah! un di mi resta, One day alone is left me. 

La speme m/arride, Ah, what bright thought flashes o’er 
me! 

Sia benedetto il ceil! Lo salverd! Pans be to Heaven! I yet may save 

im! 


SYMPHONY No. 4, F MINOR, 


OPUS 36... . . . Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky 
) (1840-1893) 
Tschaikowsky’s famous letter of March, 1878, to Nadejda von Meck, is 
the locus classicus for program material on the fourth symphony. The most 
pertinent portion of this document is here quoted as it appears in “Beloved 
Friend,” Barbara von Meck and Catharine Drinker Bowen’s book on the 
Tschaikowsky-von Meck correspondence. 

“Our symphony has a program definite enough to be expressed in 
words; to you alone I want to tell — and can tell — the meaning of the 
work as a whole and in part. You will understand I attempt to do so 
only along general lines. 

The Introduction is the germ of the entire symphony, the idea 
upon which all else depends: 





“This is ‘Fate,’ the inexorable force that prevents our hopes of 
happiness from being realized, that watches jealously lest our felicity 
should become full and unclouded — it is Damocles’ sword, hanging 
over the head in constant, unremitting spiritual torment. It is un- 
conquerable, inescapable. Nothing remains but to submit to what seems 
useless unhappiness: 











“Despair and discontent grow stronger, sharper. Would it not be 
wiser to turn from reality and sink into dreams? 








120 





“Incomparable” Japanese dancer... . 


“Since Nijinsky he is the first and only dancer in whom all is 
complete; — such a perfection of inner and outer values, forms and 
contents; — like a great work of art, a great poem, deep music, 
an excellent painting. But human, is that intense life, wild passion, 
that feeling, which penetrates from him to the public, — thus he 
closes in one electric current both himself and his audience. 


“From the point of view of technique he knows all the ballet culture 
of the Occident, but that is only an incident, a factor, in this perfect 
richness of movement, rhythm and expression with which he is 
without a double. Each dance, whether it takes its influence from 
the East or the West, is a perfect masterpiece.” 


—Pesti Hirlap, Budapest 


First “San. francisco, -Recital, “wath lal oN sake, 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 11 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00 (plus tax) at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


WEEE RTD” ie DAV ss McA NAG BeMeEaN ie LNG: 








Fae 
. . 


a re 


a 





San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


1937 SEASON 


& 
Tues. 8:15 P.M., Mar. 9, Memorial Chapel, Stanford University 
Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 
Fri. 2:30 P.M., Mar.19, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinst 
Sat. 8:30 P.M., Mar. 20, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinst 
Tues. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 23, Civic Auditorium, with Igor Stravinsky and 
San Francisco Municipal Chorus 
Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 25, Broadeast for Standard Oil Co. 
Thur. 8:15 P.M., Apr. 1, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 
Sat. 10:30 A.M., Apr. 8, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 
Fri, 2:30P.M., Apr. 9, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 
Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr.10, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 
Sat. 8:30P.M., Apr.10, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 
Sun. 3:15 P.M., Apr.11, University of California, Huberman, Violinist 
Thur. 8:15 P. M., Apr.15, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 


Fri. 2:30 P.M., Apr.16, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 


Baritone 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr.17, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr.17, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 


Tues. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 20, Civic Auditorium, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 
Fri, 2:30 P.M., Apr. 23, Opera House 


Sat, 10:30 A. M., Apr. 24, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting: 

Sat. 8:30P.M., Apr. 24, Opera House 

Sun. 3:00P.M., Apr. 25, San Rafael 











YOUNG PEOPLE'S CONCERTS 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


April 8— “Form and Construction.” Laura Dubman, piano soloist. 
April 10 — “Early Suites.” 

April 17 — “The Minuet and Scherzo.” 

April 24— “The Overture.” 


SEASON TICKETS (Four Concerts): 60¢ — $1.00 — $1.40 — $2.00 











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12 





122 





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TR UD! Sea wee 


AND HER COMIC BALLET 
OPERA HOUSE — WED. EVE., MAR. 17 — SUN. AFT., MAR. 28 


TED SHAWN 


AND HIS MEN DANCERS 


VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUES. AND WED. EVES., APRIL 6-7 — WED. MAT., APRIL 7 


MARTHA GRAHAM 


AND HER DANCE GROUP 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 8 — SUNDAY AFT., APRIL 11 


LAURA DUBMAN 


























PIANIST WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 14 
BARITONE MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 19 
TENOR THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 








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“Oh, joy, at last the sweet and tender dream appears! Some bright 
clear human image passes, beckoning me on: 





“How delicious and how remote, now, the distressing first theme 
of the Allegro. Little by little, dream possesses the soul. Forgotten 
is sadness and despair. Happiness is here! But no, this was only a 
dream, and ‘Fate’ awakes us. 

“So life itself is a persistent alternation of hard reality with 
evanescent dreams and clutchings of happiness. There is no haven. Sail 
on that sea until it encompass you and drown you in its depths. This, 
approximately, is the program of the first movement. 


“The second movement expresses another phase of suffering. It is 
the melancholy that comes in the evening when we sit alone, and weary 
of work, we try to read, but the book falls from our hand. Memories 
crowd upon us. How sweet these recollections of youth, yet how sad to 
realize they are gone forever! One regrets the past, yet one would not 
begin life anew, one is too weary. It is easier to be passive and to 
look back. One remembers many things — happy moments when the 
young blood ran hot and life fulfilled all our desire. There were hard 
times too, irreparable losses, but they are very far away. It is sad and 
somehow sweet to sink thus into the past. 


“The third movement expresses no definite feelings; rather it is 
a succession of capricious arabesques, those intangible images that 
pass through the mind when one has drunk wine and feels the first 
touch of intoxication. The soul is neither gay nor sad. The mind is 
empty, the imagination has free rein and has begun, one knows not 
why, to draw strange designs. Suddenly comes to mind the picture of a 
drunken peasant, a brief street song is heard. Far off, a military 
procession passes. The pictures are disconnected, like those which 
float through the mind when one is falling asleep. They are out of 
touch with reality; they are wild and strange. 


“The fourth movement: If you truly find no joy within yourself, 
look for it in others. Go to the people. See — they know how to make 
the best of their time, how to give themselves up to pleasure! A peasant 
festival is depicted. No sooner do you forget yourself in this spectacle 
of others’ joy, than merciless Fate reappears to remind you of yourself. 
But the others are indifferent to you; they do not so much as turn their 
heads toward your loneliness and sadness. Oh, how gay they are! 
And how fortunate to be ruled by such simple, immediate feelings! 
Here one sees the existence of simple, deep joys; enter into them and 
life will be bearable. 


“This, dear friend, is all I can tell you about the symphony. Of 
course what I have said is neither clear nor complete. This follows from 
the very nature of instrumental music, which does not submit to detailed 
analysis. ‘Where words cease, there music begins,’ as Heine said.’ 


ELSIE COOK-LARATA 


Medalist and authorized representative of Tobias Matthay Piano School London, England 
Classes for teachers demonstrating the successful presentation of the Tobias Matthay 
teaching principle. 


Studios: Dominican College, San Rafael — St. Rose Academy, San Francisco 
For further information write secretary 
Cook-Laraia Studios 
PHONE FILLMORE 6102 3327 OcTAVIA STREET 





123 








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The Fairmont 


Mark atin 
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FOUR MINUTES FROM THE SHOPS AND THEATERS 
MODERATE RATES @ GARAGE IN THE BUILDING 


GEO. D. SMITH, General Manager 






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where is assembled a peerless 
collection . . . jades of every 
green hue, of yellow, blue 
mauve .. . artfully fashioned 
into a thousand beautiful forms. 


GUMP’S Antique Collections 
share with its modern creations 
the admiration of San Francisco 
visitor’s. 


GUMP'S 


250 POST STREET » SAN FRANCISCO 






BL SO) INGING es 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEVUX, Conductor 





Se 


ene 


Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 
Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 
Heyes, Eugene 


Asst. Concert Master 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W. F. 
Gordohn, Robert 


Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 


Pasmore, Mary 

de Grassi, Antonio 
Wegman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
Houser, F.'S. 


Second Violins: 

Gough, Walter 
Principal 

Haug, Julius 
Rosset, Emil 
Moulin, Harry 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold,Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Laraia, Attilio F. 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Mitchell, L. 


L ] 
Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem poueieecners Ernest 


Principal 


Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 
Claudio, C. 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 


Schmidt, Robert E, 


Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A. 


Flutes: 
Woempner,Hen 


Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Lae C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter Harp: 


Benkman, Herbert 

Herold, R. J. 
Oboes: 

Shanis, Julius 

Sargeant, W. 

Schivo, Leslie J. 
English Horn: 

Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 


Tympani: 
Wagner, R. E. 


Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E. 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 











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PIERRE MONTEUX 
CONDUCTOR = 
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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
M ac n (ada 2 hve 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 

Mrs Leonora Wood Armsby . President and Managing Director 

John A. McGregor . . . . . Vice-President and Treasurer 
Mrs. E. S. Heller . Vice-President Edward F. Moffatt Secretary 
Paul Bissinger Vice-President Peter Conley . Business Manager 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mortimer Fl'eishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 
Mrs. Walter A.Haas Mrs. George B. Robbins 

MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 


Dr. Hans Barkan 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Dr. Leo Eloesser 


Armsby Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. O. G. Miller Charles R. Roth Mrs. Marcus S. 
Chairman George T. Cameron Koshland 
Wallace M. Alexander Milton H. Esberg J. B. Levison 
Raymond Armsby Mortimer Fleishhacker B. B. Meek 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein John Frances Neylan 
J. H. Threlkeld 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
Albert I. Elkus Mrs. Harold Richert 


Paul Bissinger 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 


Arsmby Herbert Eloesser McKinnon 

Raymond Armsby Dr. Leo Eloesser Mrs. Angus McDonald 

G. Stanleigh Arnold Milton H. Esberg’ R. C. Newell 

Mrs. George Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Charles Page, Jr. 
Washington Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Baker, Jr. Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers Mrs. George B. Robbins 


Miss Else Schilling 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Ray W. Smith 


John F.. Forbes 
Mrs. J. E. French 
Frank J. Frost 
Don E. Gilman 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bartlett 





Albert M. Bender 
Miss Lena Blanding: 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Harry S. Haley 


Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. David 


Armstrong Taylor 
Joseph S. Thompson 
John H. Threlkeld 
Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mrs. F.. W. Bradley 
Paul Bissinger 

George T. Cameron 
William H. Crocker 


J. Emmet Hayden 

Mrs. Marcus §S, 
Kosland 

Frederick J. Koster 


Mrs. W. W. Crocker Gaetano Merola Edgar Walter 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Robert W. Miller Michel Weill 
Mrs. George De Latour Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katherine Guido J. Musto Mrs. Sarah 

Donohoe Dwight F. McCormack Stetson Winslow 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr, John A. McGregor Leonard Wood 

PAST PRESIDENTS 

T. B. Berry William Sproule Richard M. Tobin 
W.B. Bourn John D. McKee Joseph S. Thompson 


J. B. Levison 


Executive Offices: 4th FLOOR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Ticket Office: Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 





131 





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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1219th and 1220th Concerts 


Friday, March 19, 2:30 P. “., 1937 


Saturday, March 20, 8:30 F. M., 1937 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: ISAAC STERN, Violinist 


Paks OG Re Ao gye 


lL. Ballet Suite from “Cephale et Procris’ =). Grétry 


ORCHESTRATED BY FELIX MOTTL 
Tambourin 
Menuet 
Gigue 


2. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, D major, Op. 77....Brahms 


Allegro non troppo 

Adagio 

Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace 
MR. STERN 


PND ERM Ses TON 


3. COverture,= (Bret iiantes satcc cee ee eee Philip James 


(First performance in San Francisco) 


4. -suitetrome* Bhewhire = Bird’ ees ee re ee Stravinsky 


Introduction—The Fire Bird and Her Dance 
Dance of the Princesses 

Infernal Dance of King Kastchei 
Berceuse— 

Finale 


133 




























KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS a 
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may mean much fh 
to your family Ay _ 












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Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning .. . zow. 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
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today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
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134 








PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


BALLET SUITE FROM 


“CEPHALE ET PROCRIS” . André Ernest Grétry 
Orchestrated by Fetrx Mortrr (1741-1831) 


Céphale et Procris is an essay in the classic operatic style by a composer 
mainly distinguished for his contributions to the literature of opéra-comique. 
It is based upon a Greek myth which tells how the goddess Aurora fell in 
love with Cephalus, who rejected her advances because he dearly loved 
his wife, Procris. In order to test the fidelity of Procris Aurora transformed 
Cephalus into a stranger, and in this disguise he discovered that his spouse 
was all too human. Procris had her revenge by precisely the same device, 
and the mutual jealousy thus aroused led to the death of Procris at the 
hands of her husband. 


True to the tradition of its time, this ballet music aims at evoking 
classic antiquity through spirit and feeling, employing rhythms and forms 


of its own era rather than any ancient material or device. The minuet is 
subtitled “The Nymphs of Diana.” 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 


D MAJOR, OPUS 77 . . . . +. Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 

Brahms’ violin concerto was first produced in 1879, the solo part 
performed by Joseph Joachim, who had materially assisted Brahms with 
technical advice during the period of composition, and wrote the cadenza 
used on this occasion. 

I. Allegro non troppo, D major, 3/4 time. The first movement adheres 
to the classic form in exposing practically all of its thematic material in the 
orchestra before the entrance of the solo. The first theme is quite long. 





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CON CERT 
Mr. E. Robert Schmitz 
appears at the 
Community Playhouse 
San Francisco, Monday 
Evening, March 22nd. 
310 SUTTER STREET. 








Of its three separate phrases the first, presented immediately by the strings 
and bassoons, is the most important: 





The second theme, likewise, is composed of three separate phrases, 
beginning thus in the oboe: 


( 





The little motive distinguished with a bracket in the above quotation is 
the basic for subsequent portions of the second theme and is prominent 
elsewhere in the movement. A closing theme announces an important 
energetic rhythm: 





The solo violin makes its entry at the 90th bar with leaping, cadenza- 
like material, punctuated in the orchestra with the rhythm of Example 3, 
the orchestra later turning to material derived from Example 2 in accompani- 
ment to the runs and arpeggios of the solo. 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
FINE FOODS , 


lce Cream «x Sodas 
Pastries x Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Pign Mhistle 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 

















138 





PETER CONLEY ATTRACTIONS 


TOR: UD be 8 ete ee 


AND HER COMIC BALLET 
OPERA HOUSE—SUN. AFT., MARCH 28—TUES. EVE., MARCH 30 


TED SHAWN 


AND HIS MEN DANCERS 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUES. AND WED. EVES., APRIL 6-7 — WED. AFT. APRIL 7 


MARTHA GRAHAM 


AND HER DANCE GROUP 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 8 — SUNDAY AFT., APRIL 11 


LAURA DUBMAN 





























PIANIST WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 14 
LAWRENCE TIBBETT 
BARITONE MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 19 
HENRI ODEER ENG 
PIANIST MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 26 
NINO MARTINI 
TENOR THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 








TICKETS NOW ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. —_ San Francisco and Oakland 








ea) BY oe] ae 


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Friday Atternoon 


Box Holders 


Mrs. Pierre Monteux 
Available for Single Concerts 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 


Mrs. Samuel Kahn 
Miss Barbara Kahn 


Mr.and Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 
Mrs. Donald Gregory 

Mrs. Osgood Hooker, Sr. 

Mr. Osgood Hooker, Jr. 

Mrs. Butler Sturtevant 

Mrs. G. Parker Toms 

Mrs. Walker Kamm 

Mrs. Corbett Moody 

Mrs. Walker Henderson 


Mrs. J. B. Wright 

Mrs. Frank Noyes 

Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Miss Johanna Volkmann 
Mrs. Spencer Grant 
Miss Else Schilling 

Mrs. Dean Witter 

Mrs. Damon Wack 

Mrs. Lingan A. Warren 
Mrs. Robert MacGowan 


Mrs. Edward Macauley 

Mrs. Felton Elkins 

Mrs. Parmer Fuller 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hooker, Jr. 
Mr. Stephen Parrot 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. Frost 
Mr. and Mrs. Morris P. Frost 


Miss Lena Blanding 
Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. George M. Stoney 


NH ph a < c 


Mrs. Richard Girvin 
Miss Marie Coppée 
Miss Emily Carolyn 


Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland 
Judge and Mrs. M. C. Sloss 


Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Levison 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 


Dr. andMrs. 
David Armstrong Taylor 


Mr. and Mrs. 
George T. Cameron 
Mr. and Mrs. Nion R. Tucker 


Mr. Charles G. Norris 


Mr. Walter Heller 
Mrs. Morris Meyerfeld 


Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering 
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller 
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. McNear 
Lady Tennyson 


Mr. and Mrs. George de Latour 


Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers 
Mrs. George Baker Robbins 


Mrs. Otto Barkan 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Heimann 
Mr. William F. Leib 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Miller 
Mr. Richard Walker 


Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Knight 
Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale 
Available for Single Concerts 
Available for Single Concerts 
Dr. and Mrs. Hans Barkan 


Available for Single Concerts 











Onn 6m ce mc mere 


EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 9, at 2:30 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 10, at 8:30 


WoACR? iE OvR- AS. 0. P ob Rex oH Oru SE 
SoLoist AND GUEST CoNpUCTOR: ERNEST SCHELLING 





e 
Pee OsGa ke Ase 
. Overture to “The Marriage of Figaro”.:..2..-2-...se- Mozart 
2. Symphony No. 3, F majov.........---.-----------------eeereeer Brahms 
3. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, A minot............------ Schumann 
Mr. SCHELLING, Soloist 
A A-Victory® Balla .-ccccc2ce sees Schelling 


Mr. SCHELLING, Conducting 


SEEING SAN FRANCISCO 


means a visit to 
Gump's Jade Room 


where is assembled a peerless 
collection ... . jades of every 
green hue, of yellow, blue 
mauve .. . artfully fashioned 
into a thousand beautiful forms. 


GUMP’S Antique Collections 
share with its modern creations 
the admiration of San Francisco 


visitor’s. 


GUMP'S 


250 POST STREET » SAN FRANCISCO 





140 











The second exposition begins with Example 1, high in the principal 
instrument. The themes exposed by the orchestra alone at the outset of 
the movement are now reheard under the embroidery of the solo, which also 
discovers a brand new melody of its own: 





As is customary, the solo rests at the beginning of the development. The 
orchestra opens this section fortissimo, with material derived from Example 1 
and 3, and likewise rehearses Example 4. The violin re-enters with an 
expressive transformation of the bracketed motive in Example 2, to which 
it eventually adds a highly decorative countersubject, the motive itself 
continuing in the accompaniment. The countersubject then is developed by 
the orchestra. Flaming leaps of ninths in the solo and the rhythm of Example 
3 lead to the recapitulation, which is ushered in by another fortissimo 
statement of Example 1 in the orchestra. The thematic material is again 
passed in review in a fashion not unlike that of the second exposition. The 
coda begins with the cadenza. Example 1 is further developed at the end. 


II. Adagio, F major, 2/4 time. At the second bar the solo oboe gives 
out a melody which Max Bruch stated was that of a Bohemian folk song: 





After the full exposition of this tune the solo violin takes it up in varied 
and decorated form. A second section, with expressive arabesque for the 
solo, is in F sharp minor. Eventually the key and theme of the first section 
are reinstated, with further variation of the folk song by the soloist. 


III. Allegro giocoso ma non troppo vivace, D major 3/4 time. The 
solo gives out the principal subject of this brilliant rondo: 





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As the term “rondo” implies, the movement keeps returning to Example 6 
in its original key and rhythm, with episodes of contrast between the re- 
petitions. The most important episodic theme is stated by the solo violin 
in octaves: 

















A brief cadenza initiates the coda (poco piu presto) based on Examples ‘6 and 7. 


OVERTURE, “BRET HARTE” . . . . Philip James 
(1890) 


Mr. James is chairman of the department of music at New York 
University and is high in the councils of the National Broadcasting Company. 
He has composed much in many forms. 


The work played on this occasion won honorable mention in a prize 
competition for brief orchestral works by Americans sponsored last year by 
the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York. When it was presented 
by the New York Philharmonic Orchestra under John Barbirolli at Carnegie 
Hall in December, 1936, the program book contained the following infor- 
mation communicated by the composer: 


“Bret Harte is the third of three overtures I have written with that title. 
I do not propose, however, to entitle this one Bret Harte No. 3, as the first 
and second have never been performed, and the first (written some fifteen 
years ago) will never be performed, since I have destroyed it. All three 
overtures are quite different, althought using largerly the same thematic 
material. The present overture, composed in 1934, is not programmatic, 
although its title might have that implication. It is absolute in form, using 
motives based on bits of songs belonging to the time and people written of 
by Bret Harte in his Luck of Roaring Camp, Outcasts of Poker Flat, etc. 
I have tried to engender, through the medium of music, the romance, the 
boisterousness, the animation, and the many other abstract qualities of the 
people of Bret Harte and the West—a people and a section of our country 
whose glamour has been bedimmed through the eyes of Hollywood as well 
as by the mawkishness of the radio ‘hill-billy’ singer.” 


SUITE FROM “THE FIRE BIRD”  ._ Igor Stravinsky 
Geo 


The Fire Bird is the first of the ballets Stravinsky composed for the 
Ballets Russes de Diaghilev. It was first performed in Paris in 1910. An 


143 































SSS 


— 


.——~ 


3 ST SSS Es Se 


















First Violins: 

Blinder, Naoum 

Concert Master 
Heyes, Eugene 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W. F. 
Gordohn, Robert 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
de Grassi, Antonio 
Weeman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
Houser, F. S. 


Second Violins: 

Gough, Walter 
Principal 

Haug, Julius 
Rosset, Emil 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold, Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Laraia, Attilio F. 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Moulin, Harry 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 

Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 

Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Mitchell, L. 


144 


& 
Cellos: 


EP EI SO NGINGE aL 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Kubitschek, Ernest 


Principal 
Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 
Claudio, C. 


Basses: 

Bell, Walter 
Principal 

Schmidt, Robert E. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A, 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Piccolo: 
Benkman, Herbet 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Sargeant, W. 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 
Tympani: 
Wagner, R. E. 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E. 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, Jak. 


Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 








outline of its story follows, with parenthetical insertions referring to the 
movements of the suite. 

Prince Ivan wanders in a dark, enchanted forest, where he beholds a 
marvelous bird, whose feathers are plumes of fire, eating golden fruit from 
a silver tree. (Introduction—The Fire Bird and Her Dance.) Prince Ivan 
tries to catch the Fire Bird, but succeeds only in plucking one flame from 
her coat. The hero then wanders further into the forest until he comes to 
the domain of the demon Kastchei the Deathless, so called because his life 
does not reside in his body but in an egg hidden in his castle. There Prince 
Ivan beholds the grave dance of a bevy of princesses held in a trance-like 
spell through the demon’s power. (Dance of the Princesses.) ‘The presence 
of the Prince is made known to Kastchei. Demons surround the young man 
with murderous intent, but the flame from the Fire Bird’s coat protects him, 
and the Fire Bird herself appears at the height of the battle to assist him. 
(Infernal Dance of King Kastchei.) The Fire Bird leads Prince Ivan to 
the egg hidden in the castle. He breaks the symbol of Kastchei’s life; the 
castle and the demons disappear, the princesses are released from their 
spell, the Fire Bird stands revealed as the most beautiful princess of all, 
and wedding bells are sounded. (The last movement of the suite begins with 
a Berceuse played as an orchestral interlude in the original version. This 
leads without pause to a finale based upon the music which accompanies the 
disappearance of Kastchei’s castle.) 





THE RUDOLPH WURLITZER COLLECTION of Rare Instruments 
is again pleased to announce the honor bestowed on them by 


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145 





eS SS eee 








San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


Conductor 


Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


1937 SEASON 


Tues. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 28, 


PAUP Oslo Poi Mean: 
Thur. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 
Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 
Eri 2:30 P: M., Apr. 
sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 
Sat. 8:30 P. M.; Apr: 
sun; 3:15 P. M., Apr. 
Thur, 8:15.P. Mo Apr: 
Fri. 2:30 P.M., Apr. 
Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 
sat. 8:30 P. M., Apr: 
Tues. 8:15.P. M., Apr. 
Bri, 22:30) 2. M.A pr: 
Sat, 10:30 A. M., Apr. 
Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 
Sun. 3:00 P.M., Apr. 


25, 


Civic Auditorium, with Igor Stravinsky and 
San Francisco Municipal Chorus 

Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

University of California, Huberman, Violinist 

Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

Civic Auditorium, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 

Opera House 

Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Opera House 

San Rafael 





April 


YOUNG PEOPLE'S CONCERTS 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


3 — “Form and Construction.” Laura Dubman, piano soloist. 


April 10— “Early Suites.” 
April 17 — “The Minuet and Scherzo.” 
April 24— “The Overture.” 


SEASON TICKETS (Four Concerts): 60¢ — $1.00 — $1.40 — $2.00 


SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


146 


TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS ON SALE 


— SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND 


ELSIE COOK-LARATA 


Medalist and authorized representative of Tobias Matthay Piano School London, England 
Classes for teachers demonstrating the successful presentation of the Tobias Matthay 


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Studios: Dominican College, San Rafael — St. Rose Academy, San Francisco 
For further information write secretary 


PHONE FILLMORE 6102 





Cook-Laraia Studios 


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PIERRE MONTEUX 
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JUL 


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MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaing the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 

Mrs Leonora Wood Armsby . President and Managing Director 

John A. McGregor . . . . Vice-President and Treasurer 
Mrs. E. S. Heller . Vice- President Edward F. Moffatt Secretary 
Paul Bissinger Vice-President Peter Conley . Business Manager 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd’ Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 
Mrs. Walter A.Haas Mrs. George B. Robbins 

MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 


Dr. Hans Barkan 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Dr. Leo Eloesser 


Armsby Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. O. G. Miller Charles R. Roth Mrs. Marcus 8. 
Chairman George T. Cameron Koshland 
Wallace M. Alexander Milton H. Esberg J. B. Levison 
Raymond Armsby Mortimer Fleishhacker B. B. Meek 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein John Frances Neylan 
J. H. Threlkeld 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
Albert I. Elkus Mrs. Harold Richert 


Paul Bissinger 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 


Arsmby Herbert Eloesser McKinnon 

Raymond Armsby Dr. Leo Eloesser Mrs. Angus McDonald 

G. Stanleigh Arnold Milton H. Esberg R. C. Newell 

Mrs. George Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Charles Page, Jr. 
Washington Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Baker, Jr. Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers Mrs. George B. Robbins 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bartlett 
Albert M. Bender 
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Paul Bissinger 
George T. Cameron 
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Mrs. W. W. Crocker 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing 


Mrs. George De Latour 


Miss Katherine 
Donohoe 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. 


T. B. Berry 
W.B. Bourn 


John F. Forbes 

Mrs. J. E. French 

Frank J. Frost Ray W. Smith 

Don E. Gilman Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Powers Symington 

Mrs. Harry S.Haley Mrs. David 

J. Emmet Hayden Armstrong Taylor 

Mrs. Marcus S. Joseph S. Thompson 
Kosland John H. Threlkeld 

Frederick J. Koster Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Miss Else Schilling 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss 


Gaetano Merola Edgar Walter 
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PAST PRESIDENTS 
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Executive Offices: 4th FLOOR, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 


Ticket Office: 





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152 








San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1226th and 1227th Concerts 
Friday, April 9, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, April 10, 8:30 P. M., 1937 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: ERNEST SCHELLING, Pianist 


POMC ara) 


1.. Overture, to: “The Marriace of Pigato 2222 Mozart 


2. Symphony No» 3; F major, Opus 90222 ee Brahms 


Allegro con brio 
Andante 
Poco allegretto 
Allegro 


INTERMISSION 


GW 


Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, 
ASHIMOP OPUS) BAe seccs aee eee tee cose cot ee Schumann 


Allegro affetuoso 
Intermezzo— 
Allegro vivace 
MR. SCHELLING, SOLOIST 


AS A Victory Gia lite cee eee Ge rere Schelling 
MR. SCHELLING, CONDUCTING 








153 





KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
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may mean much 


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bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


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SYMPHONY No. 3, F MAJOR, OP. 90 Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 


Brahms completed his third symphony in 1883, six years after his 
second. Like the second, it is subtly cyclic: i.e., material from the first two 
movements reappears in the finale to bind the whole structure into unity. 

As with practically every other work of Brahms, the music alone tells 
the story. Therefore these notes will be concerned solely with the music. 

I. Allegro con brio, F major, 3/4 time. The symphony begins with 
three risings chords which play a prominent part in the entire course of the 
first movement. Then the first theme is stated by the violins: 





A transition passage of some length leads to the second subject, beginning in 
the solo clarinet, in the unorthodox key of A major: 





The concluding section of the exposition is based largely upon the rising 
chords of the opening and Example 1. 

The development opens with a full throated, lyrical version of Example 2, 
which is then combined with Example 3, and leads eventually to an ingenious 
inverted canon based on Example 3 alone. Mysterious, placid, long breathed 
chords, in which the solo horn is prominent, precede an extremely dark 
version of Example 1. 

The mood immediately brightens and the music picks up energy with 
the reappearance of Example 1 in its original key at the beginning of the 
recapitulation. This section rehearses the material of the beginning more or 
less regularly, Example 2 reappearing in the clarinet in D. The coda works 
up a final storm on the basis of Example 1, but ends very quietly. 

I. Andante, C major 4/4 time. The solo clarinet publishes the long, 
subtle first theme: 





After the full statement of this spacious tune and its several sub-sections, a 
kind of trio begins with the clarinet and bassoon in octaves: 





This middle portion of the movement is shorter than the first, but it, too, 
has important subsidiary themes. Repeated notes answering each other in the 


135 









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ifn costae 


RCRA A SERENE EE enact ee 


as Ns Ta, 


ROSS McKEE—announces 
2nd ANNUAL LUNCHEON 


For YOUNG PEOPLE 
ERNEST SCHELLING, GUEST oF HONOR 


Saturday noon 
April 17, 1937 


Following the Concert for Young People 


Schools of Music and Drama 


GOLDEN GATE COLLEGE 
220 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco Y. M. C. A. 


Reservations 50¢ 
Mail or phone reservations in advance TUxedo 1416 


Special tables reserved for teachers and their 
students and other parties. 


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Attend Concerts for Young People With the San Francisco Symphony 
ERNEST SCHELLING, conducting 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE APRIL 10, 17, 24, 1937 











various choirs of the orchestra lead to the return of the opening section in a 
highly varied guise. The strings soar upward at the beginning of the coda, 
wherein reminiscences of the opening clarinet melody and of the antiphonal 
repeated tones are also heard. 

III. Poco allegretto, C minor, 3/8 time. The violoncellos gives out 





which is extended and repeated by the violins. The trio begins in the wood- 
winds in A flat major: 





The first subject returns in the original key, now sung by the horn instead 
of the violoncello. The extension and repetition is entrusted to the oboe, but 
the theme goes back to the strings before the conclusion. 

IV. Allegro, 2/2 time. The finale defies tradition in several respects, 
not the least interesting of which is the fact that it opens in F minor instead 
of F major, and remains persistently minor in tonality almost to the end. 

Strings and bassoons give out the principal subject: 























The transition to the second subject begins with a chorale-like transforma- 
tion of Example 5 from the second movement. Energetic material related 
to Example 8 supervenes before the second theme, shouted by the horns: 











Further energetic outbursts conclude the exposition. 

There is no development in the orthodox sense, its place being taken 
by a singularly varied recapitulation of the first subject. This is not restated 
in its original form and key, in the customary fashion, but is presented 
fragmentarily. Little woodwind phrases derived from Example 8 are an- 
swered by interjections and rumblings of the strings, and the theme is tossed 
about and put through its paces in typical Brahmsian fashion. The second 
theme, however, is recapitulated in the traditional manner, appearing first 
in the horns and violoncellos. The coda begins with a peaceful transformation 
of Example 8, followed by a reference back to the transition subject derived 
from Example 5. But the symphony ends with a shimmering ghost of 
Example 1, the first theme of the first movement. 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 


A MINOR, OP.54 .. . . . . Robert Schumann 
(1810-1856) 


Among the musicians who were attaining maturity at the time of 
Beethoven’s death, three divided equally his gigantic heritage. Berlioz carried 


157 














Hnnounes tow es 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 16, at 2:30 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 17, at 8:30 


Wok VE MO" Ra AS i Omre be in er a ae pes 
Soloist: JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 
PROGRAM 


Ls 7 Le “ombedui-de Colpern: seas. a0 at ere ae Ravel 
oe Ata. hig strom. lhe Wlaskedy ball: sae an ere eee Verdi 
Largo al Factotum from “The Barber of Seville’’.............. Rossini 
MR. THOMAS 
3. Prelude and Love Death from ‘Tristan and Isolde’’........ W agner 
Ay wPerolosues tO) sPagliacci: a: ay) awe eee ee ee Leoncavallo 
MR. THOMAS 
5. Fantastic Variations, “Don Quixote’’.................. Richard Strauss 


Solo ’Cello: Willem Van den Burg 
Solo Viola: Nathan Firestone 





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onward his Gargantuan power. Mendelssohn took over the outward mantle 
of his supple craft. Schumann inherited his heart. 

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the many experiments in musical 
architecture which Schumann undertook. The romantic demon which drove 
Beethoven to persistent novelty in musical shape transferred itself to 
Schumann. Witness, among the works most cultivated in the orchestral 
concert room, the fourth symphony and the piano concerto. Granting that 
he was no equal to Beethoven in the handling of musical textures, orchestrally 
or contrapuntally, the legend that Schumann was incapable of monumental 
building is one of the many critical traditions which can stand re-examination. 
His formal innovations and eccentricities, if such they may be, are no product 
of weakness. Scratch below their surface and Beethoven’s rugged hand 
will be revealed. 

The first movement of this concerto was completed in 1841. It was 
originally conceived not as part of a concerto but as a separate and complete 
work, and it departs in many ways from the accepted traditions of the 
concerto style. The most obvious of these departures are that there is no long 
orchestral statement of the thematic material before the entrance of the solo 
instrument, and that the cadenza is not left to the caprice of the solo per- 
former, but was composed by Schumann himself and incorporated as an 
integral portion of the score. There are other points of difference, also, the 
whole conspiring to create greater unity between the solo and the orchestra 
than is the case with the conventional concerto of Schumann’s time. 

The intermezzo and finale were completed in 1845, and the entire work 
was given its first performance in that year by Mme. Schumann. 

I. Allegro affetuoso, A minor, 4/4 time. The piano defies the tradition 
of the double exposition with an abrupt, emphatic flourish, followed by the 
principal subject in the oboe: 








This is repeated by the solo, and leads to an important transitional theme in 
the violins under the embroidery of the solo: 





The little motive marked out with a bracket in the above quotation is 
elaborated by the piano, then by the orchestra. 

The second theme is complex. Its principal element is a new and some- 
what varied version of Example 1 given out in C major by the piano. The 
exposition ends with further working over of the bracketed motive in the 
orchestra, quieting down before the development. 

The key changes to A flat major at the outset of the development. 
Example 1 is elaborated by the solo in a songful, romantic mood, with broadly 
Sweeping arpeggios. But the dramatic flourish with which the movement had 
opened suddenly interrupts, and although the development returns to Ex- 
ample 1 immediately thereafter, the stormy mood continues. 

The woodwind return to Example 1 to begin the recapitulation. This 
section runs a regular course, re-establishing the material as in the exposition. 
The second theme is now in A major. The cadenza begins with altogether 


161 








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new material, but ends with Example 1 under and over dramatic thrills. A 
kind of quickstep version of Example 1 provides the coda. 

II. Intermezzo. Andantino grazioso, F major, 2/4 time. The brief 
slow movement is almost entirely conversational in effect. Its first section is 
based upon a whimsical dialogue between the piano and the strings, the solo 
opening with four ascending notes, answered a sixth lower by four ascending 
notes in the orchestra. The violoncellos introduce a broader melody in C 
major for the contrasting section, with the solo continuing its conversational 
role: 





The material of the first part of the movement is restated at the end, but the 
intermezzo does not come to a full stop. The clarinet brings in a reminiscence 
of Example 1, the first theme of the first movement, whereupon the piano 
plunges into 

III. Allegro vivace, A major, 3/4 time. Eight preliminary bars precede 
the main theme, thundered by the piano: 





Running passage work by the soloist effects the transition to the second 
theme, a kind of mysterious march in E major, given out by the violins: 





This is repeated by the piano and worked over at length by the orchestra 
under the brilliant decoration of the solo. 

Example 4 returns in the orchestra at the outset of the development. 
This subject is extensively elaborated. A new episodic melody is stated 
by the oboe: 





and this is woven into the development of Example 4. 

The piano once again thunder outs Example 4, in D major, at the begin- 
ning of the recapitulation. Example 5 returns in the strings in A. Once again 
this march tune is taken up by the solo and worked over. The brilliant coda 
is based largely on Examples 4 and 6. 


A VICTORY BALL .. .. . . . Ernest Schelling 
(1876——) 


This orchestral fantasy, composed in 1922, is dedicated “to the memory 
of an American soldier.” It was suggested by a poem of Alfred Noyes, and 
seven of Noyes’ nine stanzas are quoted in the score as follows: 


163 








164 





San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


© 
FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 16 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 17 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 
FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 23 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 24 
BEETHOVEN NINTH SYMPHONY 
SYMPHONY OF PSALMS... STRAVINSKY 


LAST BERKELEY CONCERT — SUNDAY AFT., 3:00, APRIL 11 
BRONISLAW HUBERMAN, Violinist 








YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 10:30-11:30 A. M. 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


April 17 — “The Minuet and Scherzo.” 
April 24— “The Overture,” with San Francisco Opera School Ballet 


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PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


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The cymbals crash, Under the dancing “What did you think 


And the dancers walk, Feet are the graves. We shoud find,” said a 
With long silk stockings Dazzle and motley, shade, 
and arms of chalk, In long bright waves, ‘When the last shot 
Butterfly skirts, Brushed by the palm- echoed 
And white breasts bare, fronds And peace was made?” 
And shadows of dead men “Christ,” laughed the 
W atching "em there. Grapple and whirl fleshless 
Ox-eyed matron, jaws of his friend. 
And slim white girl, “I thought they’d be 
Shadows of dead men See, there is one child praying 
Stand by the wall, Fresh from school, For worlds to mend.” 
Watching the fun Learning the ropes (Dich » cat , 
Of the Victory Ball. As the old hands rule. pees aula et ieesman 
Standing near. 
They do not reproach, God, how the dead mens «7, 
I’m glad they can busy 
Because they know, Chuckle again, ; 
: Their thoughts else- 
If they’re forgotten, As she begs for a dose ren 
It’s better so. Of the best cocaine. 


We mustn’t reproach ’em. 
They’re yong, you see.” 
“Ah,” said the dead men, 


“So were we!” 
Victory! Victory! 


On with the dance! 
Back to the jungle 

The new beasts prance! 
God, how the dead men 

Grin by the wall, 
Watching the fun 

Of the Victory Ball. 


(Reprinted by permission, from Collected Poems, Volume 3, by Alfred Noyes. 
Copyrighted, 1920 by F. (. Stokes Co. and Alfred Noyes.) 


The score also contains further descriptive material: 


“A BACCHANALE TRAVERSED BY A VISION 


‘‘A vision of troops marching on, irresistibly, inexorably. Nothing stops 
them—not those who fell by the way—not those whose fate is written in 
fiery, stormy skies. On they march to Victory or disaster—in either case 
desolation—suffering—death.”’ 

The first section of the work is devoted to dance music obviously deal- 
ing with the scene described by Noyes. Bugle calls interrupt, and the march 
of the ghostly troops begins. A huge climax is reached, and at its crest one 
hears the melody of the Dies Irae, 





the medieval liturgical chant associated through its text with the retributive 
terrors of the Judgment Day. The vision passes. The ball resumes, but at 
the end the vision countermarches across the scene with the skirling of Scottish 
pipes. Finally, a touch of irony better left without comment. 








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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaing the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 
Mrs Leonora Wood Armsby . President and Managing Director 
John A. McGregor . . . . . Vice-President and Treasurer 
Mrs. E. S. Heller . Vice-President Edward F. Moffatt . Secretary 
Paul Bissinger . Vice-President Peter Conley . Business Manager 
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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEVUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1231st and 1232nd Concerts 


Friday, April 16, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, April 17, 8:30 P. M., 1937 


WAR MEMOR LAL OR ERA. Ov SE 


Soloist: JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 
Pop Con nk MT 


Le “Pombeau Ge: Comper inte sa ce ee Ravel 
Prélude 
Rigaudon 
Menuet 
Forlane 
Aria, “Eri tu,” from “A Masked Ball”..................-.----.-------.--. Verdt 
Aria, “Largo al Factotum,” from “The Barber of Seville”..Rossint 
MR. THOMAS 
Prelude and ‘‘Isolde’s Love-Death,” 
froin. ° PesStatie cei SOLU ace eer eee Wagner 


[TN YE RM Ss Fon 


Prologue; tol Pagliacer’-..2—......64e-1- 2 Se Leoncavallo 
MR. THOMAS 
Don Quixote, Fantastic Variations 
on a Theme of, Knichtly Character-=2 "22-2 Strauss 


Solo ’Cello: WILLEM VAN DEN BURG 
Solo Viola: Nathan Firestone 

Solo Violin: Naoum Blinder 

Solo Bass Clarinet: Frank Fragale 
Solo Tenor Tuba: George C. Melvin 


173 











174 


KNOWLEDGE 
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PROGRAM NOTES 
By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 
LE TOMBEAU DE COUPERIN .. . Maurice Ravel 
(1875——) 


There is no exact English equivalent for Ravel’s title. The work is not a 
headstone for Couperin, much less a grave. It is a series of movements com- 
posed in loving memory of Francois Couperin le Grand (1688-1733), the greatest 
master of the classic era in France. In its original form, composed in 1914, the 
suite consists of six piano pieces, but in scoring the work for orchestra five 
years later Ravel omitted a fugue and a toccata. 

The orchestral “Tombeau de Couperin” therefore consists of a prelude and 
three courtly classical dances in the style of Couperin’s period. The term 
“menuet” need no discussion. The rigaudon (English “rigadoon’’) is a very old 
and very lively French dance, said to derive its name from one Rigaud. The 
forlane is Italian in origin, and was at one time very popular in Venice. Its 
name may, perhaps, come from that of the city of Forli. 


ARIA, “ERI TU,” 
FROM “A MASKED BALL” . . . Giuseppe Verdi 
(1813-1901) 


Renato, Creole secretary to Richard, Count of Warwick and provincial 
governor of Boston, has reason to believe that his wife, Amelia, is carrying on 
a love affair with his chief. He sends for Amelia and announces his attention 
of killing her. Amelia protests her innocence, and pleads in the name of their 
child. Renato relents, and transfers his hatred to Richard, who is referred to 
without being named throughout the aria. Amelia is presumed to leave her 


husband alone at the end of the third line of the recitative. 


RECITATIVO 
Alzati! la tuo figlio a te concedo 
riveder. 
Nell’ombra e nel silenzio, 1a, 
Il tuo rossore e l’onta mia nascondi. 
Non é su lei, nel suo 
Fragile petto che colpir degg’io. 
Altro, ben altro sangue a terger dessi 
L’offesa — il sangue tuo! 
E lo trarra il pugnale 
Dallo sleale tuo core: 
Delle lacrime mie vendicator! 


ARIA 
Eri tu che macchiavi quell’anima, 


La delizia dell’anima mia — 

Che m/’affidi e d’un tratto esecrabile 
L’universo avveleni per me! 
Traditor! che compensi in tal guisa 
Dell’amico tuo primo la fé! 

O dolcezze perdute! O memorie 
D’un amplesso che l’essere india! 
Quando Amelia, si bella, si candida 
Sul mio seno brillava d’amor! 

E finita — non siede che l’odio, 

E la morte nel vedovo cor! 


RECITATIVE 
Rise again! There your child is—you 
may behold 
His face once more. In silence and 


seclusion 

There, thy blush and my disgrace 
conceal forever. 

’Tis not on her, in her weakness and 
frailty 

Should descend my anger. Other, far 
other 

Life-blood must wipe out her offenses. 

And thine shall it be! 

She shall withdrawn the dagger 

Out from thy heart disloyal, and thus 

Be the avenger of all my wrongs! 


AIR 
It was thou who did’st sully that spirit 


pure, 

Once the joy and delight of my being; 

Whom I trusted, yet with falsehood 
detestable, 

Thou hast poisoned the whole world 
for me! 

Traitor foul! thus so basely repaying 

Thy best friend who confided in thee! 

O delights lost forever! remembrance 

Of embraces that made life celestial! 

When Amelia, so lovely and innocent 

On my bosom with rapture reclined! 

Now ’tis ended, and only aversion 
remaining 

A place in my lone heart can find. 


ES 





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ARIA, “LARGO AL FACTOTUM,” FROM “THE 
BARBER OF SEVILLE” Gioacchino Antonio Rossini 


Largo al factotum della citta, presto 
a butega che 

L’alba é gia. Ah che bel vivere! 

Che bel piacere per un barbiere di 
qualita! 

Ah bravo Figaro, bravo bravissimo 
fortunatissimo 

Per verita pronto a far tutto la notto 
il giorno 

Sempre d’intorno in giro sta. Miglior 
cucagna 

Per un barbiere vita pit’ nobile no 
non si da. 

Rasori e pettine, lancette e forbici, 
al mio comando 

Tutto qui sta. V’é la risorsa poi del 
mestiere colla 

Di metta col cavaliere tutti mi chie- 
dono tutti mi 

Vogliono; donne, 
fanciulli! 

Qua la parucca, presto la barba! 

Qua la sanguigne, presto il viglietto! 

Figaro! Figaro! Figaro! 

Ohime che folla Figaro! 

Ohimeé che furia! 

Una alla volta per carita! 

Figaro qua, Figaro 1a, 

Figaro su, Figaro git, pronto pron- 
tissimo, 

Son come un fulmine, sono il factotum 
della citta! 

Ah, che bella vita! faticar poco diver- 
tirsi assai. 

E in tasca sempre aver qualche doblone 

Gran frutto della mia riputazione. 

Orst presto a bottega. 


ragazze, vecchie, 


(1792-1868) 


Make room for the factotum of the 
town! It is already dawn—I must 
away to my shop. Oh, what a happy 
life—what pleasure awaits a barber 
of quality! Oh, bravo Figaro, bravo 
bravissimo; thou are surely the 
happiest of men, ready at all hours 
of the night, and by day perpetually 
in bustle and motion. What happier 
region of delight; what nobler life 
for a barber than mine! Razors, 
combs, lancets, scissors, behold them 
all at my command! Besides, the 
snug perquisites of the business, with 
gay damsels and cavaliers. All call 
me, all want me, dames and maidens, 
old and young. My peruke! cries 
one; my beard! shouts another. Bleed 
me! cries this; this billet-doux! 
whispers that. Figaro! Figaro! 
Figaro! Heavens, what a tumult! 
One at a time, for mercy’s sake! 
Figaro here, Figaro there, Figaro 
above, Figaro below. I am the 
factotum of the town! Oh, what a 
happy life! But little fatigue, 
abundant amusement, with a pocket 
that can always boast a doubloon, 
the noble fruit of my reputation. 

But I must hasten to the shop. 





LAST CONCERT FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


With Dance Group from San Francisco Opera Ballet School 


Saturday, April 24, 10:30 A. M. 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


FOREST MEADOWS, SAN RAFAEL 
Sunday, April 25, 3:00 P. M. 
Soloist: HENRI DEERING, Pianist 











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PROLOGUE TO “I PAGLIACCI” 


Si puo? Signore! 
scusatemi se solo mi presento. 

Io sono il Prologo. Poiché in iscena 
ancor le antiche maschere mette 
l’autore, in parte ei vuol riprendere 
le vecchie usanze, e a voi di nuovo 
inviami. Ma non per dirvi come pria: 
“Le lagrime che noi versiam son 
false: Degli spasimi e dei nostri 
martir non allarmatevi!” No: 
L’autore ha cercato invece pingervi 
uno squarcio di vita. Egli ha per 
massima sol che l’artista € un uom 
e che per gli uomini scrivere ei deve. 
— Ed al vero ispiravasi. 

Un nido di memorie in fondo a 
anima cantava un giorno, ed ei 
con vere lacrime scrisse, e i singhiozzi 
il tempo gli battevano! Dunque, 
vedrete amar si come s’amano gli 
esseri umani; vedrete dell’odio i tristi 
frutti. Del dolor gli spasimi, urli di 
rabbia, udrete, e risa ciniche! 

E voi, piuttosto che le nostre povere 
gabbane d’istrioni, le nostr’anime 
considerate, poiché noi siam uomini 
di carne e d’ossa, e che di quest’orfano 
mondo al pari di voi spiriamo l’aere! 
Il concetto vi dissi. — Or ascoltate 
com’egli e svolto. Andiamo. 
Incominciate! 


Signori! ~~. . 3 





Ruggiero Leoncavallo 
(1858-1919) 


A word, allow me! sweet ladies and 
gentlemen, 

I pray you hear, why I alone appear. 

I am the Prologue. 

Our author loves the custom of a 
prologue to his story, 

And as he would revive for you the 
ancient glory, 

He sends me to speak before you. 

But not to prate, as once of old, 

That the tears of the actor are false, 
unreal, 

That his sighs and cries and the pain 
that is told 

He has no heart to feel! 

No! No! Our author tonight a chapter 
will borrow 

From life with its laughter and sorrow. 

Is not the actor a man with a heart, 
like you? 

So ’tis for men that our author has 
written, 

And the story he tells you is true. 

A song of tender memories deep in 
his listening heart 

One day was ringing; with trembling 
hand he wrote it, 

And marked the time with sighs and 
tears. Come then, 

Here on the stage you shall behold 
us in human fashion, 

And see the sad fruits of love and 
passion, 

Hearts that weep and languish, cries 
of rage and anguish, 

And bitter laughter. 

Ah, think, sweet people, 

When you look on us, clad in our 
motley and tinsel, 

Ours are but human hearts, beating 
with passion, 

We all are men, like you; for glad- 
ness or sorrow 

’Tis the same broad heaven above us, 

The same wide, lonely world before us! 

Will ye hear then the story, how it un- 
folds itself, surely and certain? 

Come then, ring up the curtain! 


DON QUIXOTE, FANTASTIC VARIATIONS 
ON A THEME OF KNIGHTLY 


CHARACTER... 


Richard Strauss 
(1864) 


Like other tone poems by Strauss, “Don Quixote” has been the subject of 





many and exceedingly various interpretations by the authorities. The present 
writer hesitates to add one more analysis to an already burdened literature, 
but space is limited, and the essence of the commentaries by Arthur Hahn and 
Philip Hale—the two best so far as “Don Quixote” is concerned—is their 


179 








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180 








extensiveness. These notes therefore employ a little used source, the authorized 
two piano version by Otto Singer, which contains references to Cervantes not 
found in the orchestral score, supplented with the writer’s own imagination. 


Despite the title, there. are actually three themes rather than one. Two 
of these three are dramatized through persistent association with solo instru- 
ments, Don Quixote being impersonated by the violoncello while the role of 
Sancho Panza is generally taken by the viola. The Dulcinea theme is given 
varied instrumental treatment. 


The work falls into thirteen sections, an introduction, a passage stating the 
themes of the Don and Sancho, ten variations, and a finale. 


The introduction, according to Singer, tells how “Don Quixote, busy with 
reading romances of chivalry, loses his reason and decides to go out into the 
world as a knight errant.” This passage is devoted largely to a gradual 
evolution of the Don Quixote melody. Not far from the beginning, however, 
we are introduced to Dulcinea del Toboso, as sung by the oboe 


Ale ge 





followed by mysterious trumpet calls, as, according to Hale, the Don envisions 
her in distress. The introduction then returns to its main business, the pro- 
gressive revealment of the Don Quixote theme. The atmosphere grows wilder 
and cloudier as the prelude nears its goal. Then, suddenly, after a pause, the 
solo ’cello states the subject of the hero which the introduction has been pre- 
paring through all its pages: 


‘céllo 


This is the knight of the rueful countenance, complete with all delusions. A 
graceful flourish of the clarinet concludes this theme. 


Immediately the gawky, hooty combination of bass clarinet and tenor 
tuba announces Sancha Panza: 





The solo viola enters and concludes the Sancho Panza theme with the follow- 
ing naive material: 
































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His “grasp of the obvious is painfully precise,” as the last two bars reveal. 

The themes of the Don (solo ’cello) and of Sancho (bass clarinet, later 
viola) begin their tonal adventures. The first variation is labeled by Singer 
“Out into the world under the sign of the beautiful Dulcinea del Toboso.”’ 
Dulcinea herself appears in the polyphonic web. Hale insists that the latter 
part of this variation represents the fight with the windmills. 

Variation 2. “Victorious battle with the hosts of the great emperor 
Alifanfaron.” They may be the hosts of Alifanfaron to Don Quixote, but they 
are only sheep to Richard Strauss. The ’cello rouses himself to battle. The 
sheep reply with a brassy symphonic version of the Bronx cheer, accompanied 
in the woodwinds with a kind of pastoral horn call which plays an important 
part in a later adventure. The ’cello charges, and the hosts of Alifanfaron 
seek fresh fields and pastures new. 

Variation 3. ‘“Sancho’s speeches, questions, arguments and proverbs. 
Don Quixote’s vows, dissertations and promises.” Further development of the 
thematical material, beginning dialogue fashion, with the viola holding up 
Sancho’s end. Don Quixote requires the full orchestra to snort his scorn of 
the squire’s reasoning, and grows especially full throated and eloquent when 
describing his womanly ideal, Dulcinea. 

Variation 4. “Battle with the penitents.” Don Quixote jogs along the road 
for a while, his theme in the strings. Brass and woodwind then sing a pilgrim’s 
hymn, as the band of penitents comes into view. The Don sees them as robbers, 
and attacks them, to his discomfiture. 

Variation 5. “Don Quixote’s vigil. Sighs, prayers and vows to Dulcinea.” 
An accompanied monologue for the ’cello, its character indicated by the title 
quoted from Singer. 

Variation 6. “The meeting with Dulcinea.” A coarse and unrefined wench 
passes by, her presence indicated by the following trollopy variation of the 
Dulecinea theme in the woodwind: 





Sancho declares this to be the fair Dulcinea in the flesh. The ’cello is pained 
and astonished. The viola (later tenor tuba) is triumphant. 

Variation 7. “The ride through the air.” The Don Quixote and Sancho, 
blindfolded on their wooden horse, imagine themselves riding Pegasus. The 
wind of the orchestra, assisted by a theatrical wind machine, whistles through 
their themes. The unchanging tremolo D of the basses is said to signify that 
they do not leave the ground. 

Variation 8. “Notewrothy adventure with the enchanted boat.” The Don 
finds a boat on the bank of a stream which he believes was put there by magic 
to further his knightly career. He and Sancho embark. The variation is a 
brief, stormy barcarolle, terminating with both in the water. At the end a 
little prayer gives thanks for their deliverance. 

Variation 9. “Battle with two magicians.” A bit of learned, ecclesiastical 
counterpoint for the bassoons, whom Don Quixote attacks as magicians, and 
by whom he is laid low. 

Variation 10. Singer gives four successive titles during the course of this 
variation. The opening, in which a portion of the Don Quixote theme is 
shouted out against angry answering trumpet calls, is labeled “Don Quixote 
is vanquished by the Knight of the White Moon.” (The Knight of the White 
Moon, it will be remembered, was a young man named Samson Carrasco sent 
by the friends of the Don to conquer him in combat and send him home.) 
The second part of the variation, beninning with impassioned material in the 
full orchestra but gradually softening in character, is called “The homeward 
journey.” The pastoral horn call from the second variation returns, coupled 
with suggestions of Sancho Panza: “Don Quixote decides to become a 
shepherd.” Over the quiet conclusion Singer writes, “Don Quixote’s under- 
standing again becomes bright and clear and free of the shadows of unreason.” 

Finale. “Don Quixote’s death.” The ’cello sings nobly, peacefully, with 
pathetic accent. Hale aptly quotes the Shelton translation of Cervantes, for 
this music clearly deals with the good Don Quixote who “was ever of a mild 


183 

















fc A A an al 
ANNOUNCEMENT... 


LAST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS — 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 23, at 2:30 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 24, at 8:30 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
PROGRAM 


SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
Soloists: 
LENA KROPH, Soprano MYRTLE LEONARD, Contralto 
ROY RUSSELL, Tenor DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Bass 


“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” STRAVINSKY 

SYMPHONY No. 9 (Choral) BEETHOVEN 
A a i a i a a i a a a i a 
and affable disposition and of a kind and pleasing conversation, beloved of all 
who knew him.” And the words he speaks here are, without doubt, “significant, 
Christian-like and well couched.” 

“The notary was present at his death,” says Shelton, “and reporteth 
how he had never read or found in any book of chivalry that any errant knight 
died in his bed so mildly, so quietly, and so Christianly as did Don Quixote. 
Amidst the wailful plaints and blubbering tears of the bystanders, he yielded 
up the ghost, that is to say, he died.” 


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PERSON IN BL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 

Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 

Heyes, Eugene 


Asst. Concert Master 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W. F. 
Gordohn, Robert 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 

de Grassi, Antonio 
Wegman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
Houser, F. S. 


Second Violins: 
Gough, Walter 
Principal 
Haug, Julius 
Rosset, Emil 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold, Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Laraia, Attilio F. 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Moulin, Harry 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Mitchell, L. 


Cellos: 


Van den Burg, Wille 
Principal 
Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 
Claudio, C. 


Basses: 

Bell, Walter 
Principal 

Schmidt, Robert E. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A, 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 


Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Piccolo: 
Benkman, Herbert 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Sargeant, W. 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Bassoons: 


m Kubitschek, Ernest 
La 


Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 
Roberts, R. 
Jacobs, J. A. 


Trumpets: 
Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Klatzkin, Leon 


Trombones: 
Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 


Tympani: 
Wagener, R. E. 


Percussion: 
Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. b> 


Organ: 
Harvey, Leslies J. 


Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 


Oesterreicher, Walter 

















a 





PEcT- Re COGN, 


W tk. {Pak SNe 


HENRI 
DEERING 


PIANO RECITAL 


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VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
MONDAY EVE., APRIL 26 








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SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY 
ORICHE 1 Rar 


PERE VIN EEX 
CONDUCTOR 


Willem van den Burg 
Assistant Conductor 





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MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaing the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 


Mrs Leonora Wood Armsby . President and Managing Director 


John A. McGregor . . 
Mrs. E. S. Heller . Vice-President 
Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Paul Bissinger 


Dr. Hans Barkan 


Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 
Guido J. Musto 


. . . Viee-President and Treasurer 
Edward F. Moffatt 
Peter Conley . Business Manager 


Secretary 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 


Mrs. Walter A. Haas 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby 


C. O. G. Miller 
Chairman 


Wallace M. Alexander 


Raymond Armsby 
Paul Bissinger 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Arsmby 
Raymond Armsby 
G. Stanleigh Arnold 
Mrs. George 
Washington 
Baker, Jr. 
Dr. Hans Barkan 
Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bartlett 
Albert M. Bender 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 
Mrs. F. W. Bradley 
Paul Bissinger 
George T. Cameron 
William H. Crocker 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing 


Mrs. George De Latour 


Miss Katherine 
Donohoe 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. 


T. B. Berry 
W.B. Bourn 


Mrs. George B. Robbins 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 
Cameron 


Dr. Leo Eloesser 
J. Emmet Hayden 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Charles R. Roth 
George T. Cameron 
Milton H. Esberg 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
J. H. Threlkeld 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 

J. B. Levison 

B. B. Meek 

John Frances Neylan 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Albert I. Elkus 

Herbert Eloesser 

Dr. Leo Eloesser 

Milton H. Esberg 

Mrs. Paul I. Fagan 

Mortimer Fleishhacker 

Mrs. Joseph C. Flowers 

John F. Forbes 

Mrs. J. E. French 

Frank J. Frost 

Don E. Gilman 

Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 

Mrs. Harry S. Haley 

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a te a i a a i ie ae an le le ie ae ae ie lll 


191 
























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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 
TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1235th and 1236th Concerts 
Friday, April 23, 2:30 P. M., 1937 
Saturday, April 24, 8:20 P. M., 1937 


W AR MM EM. OLR 1 Abe, 0) PE oR Aes OU Se! 


THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS, Guest Artists 


Dr. Hans LEsScHKE, D’rector 


Ve ete: Gielen VE 


1. SYMPHONY "OF TTEE- PsAlMs = STRAVINSKY 


Prelude 
Double Fugue 
Allegro Symphonique 


INTERMISSION 


2. SYMPHONY No. 9, D MINOR, OPUS 125... BEETHOVEN 
Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso 
Molto vivace 
Adagio molto e cantabile 
Finale: Ode to Joy 


Soloists: 
LINA KropH, Soprano 
MYRTLE LEONARD, Contralto 
Roy RUSSELL, Tenor 


Douctas BEATTIE, Bass 


193 





KNOWLEDGE 
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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SYMPHONY OF THE PSALMS. . . Igor Stravinsky 


(1882——) 


The score bears the following dedication: 


“This symphony, composed to the glory of God, is dedicated to the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of 
its existence.” 


The work was commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the 
Boston Symphony, for the half-centenary celebration referred to, which was 
observed in 1930. It is typical of that absorption with classic themes and 
forms which has been the major feature of Stravinsky’s output in recent 
years, here treated in a somewhat more starkly expressive fashion than else- 
where, in keeping with the devotional nature of the poems employed. 


Special attention should be directed to the highly unusual orchestra 
employed. There are no violins, violas or clarinets, their place being taken 
by considerably amplified sections of flutes, oboes and trumpets. Thus there 
are five flutes, four oboes and English horn, and five trumpets, in addition 
to three bassoons and contra bassoons, four horns, three trombones, tuba, 
kettledrums, two pianos, harp, violoncelli and basses. 


—— ——~ = = = - 2 
———— = 


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ANNOUNCING 
RIEDEL STUDIO OF OPERA 


@ STAGE e 
ARMANDO AGNINI 


Stage and Technical Director of Metro- 
politan and San Francisco Opera Company. 


@ OPERA e 
DR. KARL RIEDEL 


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and San Francisco Opera Company, Inter- 
national Wagnerian Authority. 
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MEMBERS OF SAN FRANCISCO OPERA COMPANY 


























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The text is taken from the Vulgate. It is appended both in its original 
form and as it appears in the King James version. 


PRELUDE 


PSALMUS XXXVIII, VERSES 13 AND 14 


Exaudi orationem meam, Domine, 
et depreciationem meam: auribus per- 
cipe lacrymas meas. 

Ne sileas, quoniam advena ego sum 
apud te, et peregrinus, sicut omnes 
patres mei. Remitte mihi, ut refrigerer 
priusquam abeam, et amplius non ero. 


PSALM 39 (KING JAMES VERSION ) 


Hear my prayer, O Lord, and give 
ear unto my cry, 
Hold not Thy peace at my tears: 
For I am a stranger with Thee, 
And a sojourner, as all fathers were. 
O spare me, that I may recover strength 
Before I go hence, and be no more. 


DOUBLE FUGUE 


The orchestra alone exposes and develops a fugue of its own. The chorus 
enters at the 29th bar with a second fugue subject. 


PSALMUS XXXIX, VERSES 1, 2,3,AND 4 


Expectans expectavi 
intendit mihi. 

Et exaudivit preces meas; et eduxit 
me de lacu miseriae, et de luto 
faecis. 

Et statuit supra petram pedes meos; 
et direxit gressus meos. 

Et immisit in os meum canticum no- 
vum, carmen Deo Nostro. 

Videbunt multi et timebunt: et spera- 
bunt in Domino. 


Dominum, et 


PSALM 40 (KING JAMES VERSION) 


I waited patiently for the Lord, 
And He inclined unto me, and heard 
my cry. 

He brought me up also out of a horri- 
ble pit, out of the miry clay, 
And set my feet upon a rock, and 

established my goings. 
And He hath put a new song in my 
mouth, even praise unto our God: 
Many shall see it, and fear, 
And shall trust in the Lord. 


ALLEGRO SYMPHONIQUE 


PSALMUS CL 


(Alleluia) 

Laudate Dominum in sanctis ejus: 
laudate eum in firmamento vir- 
tutis ejus. 

Laudate eum in virtutibus ejus: lau- 
date eum secundum multitudinem 
magnitudinis ejus. 

Laudate eum in sono tube: laudate 
eum in psalterio et cithara. 

Laudate eum in tympano et choro: 
laudate eum in chordis et organo. 

Laudate eum in cymbalis bene sonan- 
tibus: laudate eum in cymbalis 
jubilationis: omnis spiritus laudet 
Dominum. 


PSALM 150 (KING JAMES VERSION) 


(Alleluia) 
Praise ye the Lord. 
Praise God in His Sanctuary; 
Praise Him in the firmament of His 
power. 
Praise Him for His mighty acts; 
Praise Him according to His excel- 
lent greatness. 
Praise Him with the sound of the 


Trumpet; 

Praise Him with the Psaltery and 
Harp. 

Praise Him with the timbrel and 
dance; 


Praise Him with stringed instru- 
ments, and Organs. 

Praise Him upon the loud cymbals; 

Praise Him upon the high sounding 
cymbals, 

Let everything that hath breath, 
praise the Lord. 

Praise ye the Lord. 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
FOREST MEADOWS, SAN RAFAEL 


Sunday, April 25, 3:00 P. M. 
Soloist: HENRI DEERING, Pianist 





197 




















- 4 













PE Toe R= CeO UN cle. Egy, 


Wi iE oP Rees EN 


HENRI 
DEERING 


PIANO RECITAL 


@ 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
MONDAY EVE., APRIL 26 








HENRI DEERING — ISAAC STERN 
SONATA RECITAL — TUES. EVE., MAY 11 








TICKETS AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO.) S: F. and Oakland 


198 








SYMPHONY No. 9, D MINOR 


OPUS 125... .. . . . Ludwig van Beethoven 
(1770-1827) 


The ninth symphony is the only orchestral work of importance written 
during the third and final phase of Beethoven’s career. This much discussed 
“third period” of Beethoven is characterized by many things, first of all by 
the fact that the composer, being totally deaf, was largely cut off from 
his surrounding world. He therefore created his own mysterious, unearthly, 
meditative other-world in which he dreamed and thought long thoughts. 
There is much dynamic activity in this other-world, also, but it is no longer 
the dramatic, affirmative kind of activity of the earlier works like the fifth 
symphony. The whole musical scheme is directed to the exploration of new, 
rarefied and super-terrestrial regions. 

Since it enters new realms, it speaks a new language. Formal con- 
struction is related to the traditional architecture of music but no longer 
stays within the traditional frames. The problem of analysis therefore 
becomes extraordinarily difficult, and the present annotations make no 
pretense to being anything but the most rudimentary outline. If the reader 
desires to discover what the conscientious musical anatomist is up against 
in the case of the ninth symphony, he is referred to the absorbing studies by 
Donald Francis Tovey in the first two volumes of his “Symphony Analyses.” 

The symphony was composed between 1817 and 1823. The choral finale 
—the most grossly obvious of the formal innovations—was an afterthought. 
Beethoven originally intended to end the work with an orchestral version of 
the movement which now concludes the A minor quartet, Opus 132. But he 
had throughout his active career nursed the intention of setting Schiller’s 
“Ode to Joy.” 

I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso, D minor, 2/4 time. Over 
an empty fifth, A and E, of the second violins, ’cellos and horns, intimations 
of the theme to come flicker and leap across infinite space. The modality is 
vague; it is neither major nor minor. Woodwinds join the long held chord 
of the horns, and the modality problem is solved in favor of the minor as 
the first theme bursts forth in the full orchestra: 





Once again the empty fifths and the flickering leaps are sounded, this 
time on the basis of D and A, and once again the vagueness resolves itself 
into a full throated statement of the theme, now in B flat. A transition 
passage leads to what is, despite its comparative brevity, the most complex 
second subject in the literature of symphonic music, beginning thus in the 
woodwinds 





The second subject also stresses a crescendo descending scale in the strings, 
an emphatic rhythm derived from Example 1, and several other melodic 
elements. The exposition ends with a passage like a mighty trumpet call 
sounded by the full orchestra. 

The mysterious fifths and gigantic leaps of the introduction return 
to begin the development. After momentary consideration of the trumpet 


199 





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call and of Example 1 in its entirety, the development settles down to an 
elaborately polyphonic and curiously persistent working out of the little 
motive distinguished with a bracket in Example 1. Eventually Example 3 
joins the polyphony. A tempestous climax is reached, at the crest of which 
Example 1 rides in to begin the recapitulation. 

Both principal subjects, in all their varied complexity, are repeated in 
somewhat altered guise. After the trumpet call seals off the second subject, 
as in the exposition, a long and elaborate coda is introduced. This section, 
better called a “terminal development” in Vincent d’Indy’s illuminating phrase, 
works over Example 1, the descending scale from the second theme, the 
trumpet call, and the bracketed motive. A final triumphant statement of 
Example 1 concludes the movement. 


II. Molto vivace, D minor, 3/4 time. The second movement combines 
the characteristics of the fugue, scherzo and sonata form. It opens with eight 
bars devoted to the statement of its essential rhythm. The second violins 
then begin a five part fugue. Both subject and countersubject are quoted: 





At the fifth bar of the above the violas enter imitatively in fugal fashion, 
followed at four bar intervals by each of the remaining string voices. An 
important incident in the headlong rush that follows is the introduction of 
the second theme by the woodwinds: 





The first section of the movement comes to its end with sudden rests and 
pauses, and is then repeated. The second portion of the movement is devoted 
to a ceaselessly dynamic, highly polyphonic development and recapitulation 
of the foregoing materials. 

The key changes to D major and the rhythm from 3 to 2 as the wood- 
wind open the trio: 





This is extended by the strings. Example 6 returns in the horn with a busy, 
staccato counterpoint in the violins, later transferred to the oboe as the 
bassoons takes up Example 6. The theme and its counterpoint are worked 
over by the entire orchestra, but the trio ends quietly. The entire scherzo 
portion—the introductory rhythm, the fugue on Example 4, and all the rest 
of the movement down to within a page or two of the trio—is then repeated. 
A very brief coda introduces a reminiscence of the trio at the end. 


' III. Adagio molto e cantabile, B flat major, 4/4 time. After two 
introductory woodwind bars, the first violins give out the main melody 





which is repeatedly interrupted in its course by the woodwinds. After the 
full exposition of this subject the tempo speeds up to Andante moderato, the 
rhythm changes from 4 to 3 and the key from B flat to D, with the introduction 
of a contrasting melody in the second violins and violas: 





























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202 





Again the chorus repeats the last four lines. The quartet continues: 


Freude trinken alle Wesen Draughts of joy from cup o’erflowing 
An den Britisten der Natur; Bounteous Nature freely gives; 

Alle Guten, alle Bosen, Grace to just and unjust showing, 
Folgen ihrer Rosenspur. Blessing everything that lives. 

Kiisse gab sie uns und Reben, Wine she gave to us, and kisses, 
Einen Freund gepriift im Tod; Loyal friend on life’s steep road; 
Wollust ward dem Wurm gegeben E’en the worm can feel life’s blisses, 
Und der Cherub steht vor Gott! And the Seraph dwells with God! 


Once more the chorus repeats the last four lines and builds up a 
climax on the word “steht vor Gott!” 

The orchestra alone now develops the theme in the manner of a military 
march. Then the tenor solo, answered by the chorus: 


Froh wie seine Sonnen fliegen Glad as His suns his will sent plying 
Durch des Himmels pracht’gen Plan, Through the vast abyss of space, 
Laufet, Briider, eure Bahn, Brothers, run your joyous race, 
Freudig wie ein Held zum Siegen. Hero-like to conquest flying. 


The orchestral development continues at length until the sudden irruption of the 
chorus repeating the first stanza. (“Freude, schoner Gotterfunken,” etc.) 

Andante maestoso, G major, 3/2 time. Basses and tenors of the chorus 
introduce a new theme 





Seid wm = schlung - en, Mil - -li- o = nen} Die- sen Kuss der ganz-en Weltd 


to which the subsequent stanza is set. 


Seid umschlungen, Millionen! O ye millions, I embrace ye! 

Diesen Kuss der ganzen Welt! Here’s a joyful kiss for all! 

Briider, tiberm Sternenzelt Brothers, o’er yon starry sphere 
Muss ein lieber Vater wohnen. Sure there dwells a loving father. 
Ihr stiirzt nieder, Millionen? O ye millions, kneel before Him. 
Ahnest du den Schopfer, Welt? World, dost feel thy Maker near? 
Such ihn tiberm Sternenzelt. Seek Him o’er yon starry sphere, 
Uber Sternen muss er wohnen. O’er the stars enthron’d, adore Him. 


Allegro energico, D major, 6/4 time. Examples 9 and 10 are combined 
by the chorus, combining also the texts, “Freude, schoner Goétterfunken” and 
“Seid umschlungen, Millionen.” After the famous passage in which the 
choral sopranos hold a high A for 13 successive bars, the basses return to 
“Thr stiirzt nieder,” and the variation ends very softly on the words “Muss 
ein lieber Vater wohnen.”’ 

Allegro ma non tanto, D major, 2/2 time. Solo voices and chorus further 
vary and embroider “Freude, schéner Gétterfunken” and its immediately sub- 
sequent lines. This section ends in a kind of quadruple cadenza for the vocal 
soloists (poco adagio) on the words “Wo dein sanfter Fligel weilt.” 

The coda, Prestissimo, involves an extremely rapid and brilliant develop- 
ment of Examples 9 and 10 with the stanzas “Freude, schoner Gotterfunken” 
and “Seid umschlungen, Millionen.” 

The English translation of the “Ode to Joy” employed here is the 
standard one by Natalia Macfarren. 






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203 

























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The key, tempo and rhythm of the beginning return, and Example 7 is 
. subjected to a fluent, highly decorative variation. Once again the rhythm 
changes from 4 to 3, once again the tempo goes to Andante moderato, and 
Example 8 is repeated without essential change save that it is now in the wood- 1 | 
winds and in G major. | 

For the third and final time the Adagio tempo and the rhythm of four 
are stated, with Example 7 sung by the clarinets in E flat. The extensive 
portion of the movement which follows is given over to the exceedingly 
complicated and elaborate variation of Example 7 using the full resources 
of the orchestra. 

IV. The finale is a cantata based upon Schiller’s “Ode to Joy,” cast 
in the instrumental form of introduction, theme and variations. 

A chaotic outburst for the full orchestra precedes a brusque, dramatic 
recitative for the ’cellos and basses. A momentary flashback to the opening 
of the first movement is brushed aside by the recitative. The woodwind | 
makes an effort to recall the scherzo, but this pleases the ’cellos and basses | 
no better. Two bars of the slow movement, also, fail to win favor of the | 
lower strings. At last the woodwinds hint at Example 9 to come, and this 
is received by acclamation in the recitative. The lower strings are, in fact, 
so pleased with the tune that they promptly appropriate it to themselves | 
and give it its first full exposition: 









The theme gradually spreads throughout the orchestra in a grand triumphal 
progress. The chaotic outburst heard at the beginning of the finale then 
returns, whereupon the baritone opens the vocal portion of the movement 
with a line of prose by Beethoven himself: 


O Freunde, nicht diese Tone! O friends, not these tones! 
sondern lasst uns angenehmere an-- Let us rather attune our voices more 
stimmen, und freudenvollere! pleasantly and more joyfully! 






The baritone solo and chorus then answer each other on the word 
“FRreude” (Joy) whereupon the baritone intones the first stanza of Schiller’s 
poem to the melody of Example 9, which will also be basis of all subsequent 
stanzas save one: 



















Praise to Joy, the God-descended 
Daughter of Elysium, 


Freude, schoner Gotterfunken, 
Tochter aus Elysium, 


Wir betreten, feuertrunken, Ray of mirth and rapture blended, 
Himmlische, dein Heiligtum! Goddess, to thy shrine we come! 
Deine Zauber binden wieder By thy magic is united 

Was die Mode streng geteilt; What stern custom parted wide; 
Alle Menschen werden Briider All mankind are brothers plighted 


Wo dein sanfter Fliigel weilt! Where thy gentle wings abide! 








The chorus repeats the last four lines. The solo quartet goes on: 


Wem der grosse Wurf gelungen, Ye to whom the boon is measured, 
Eines Freundes Freund zu sein, Friend to be of faithful friend, 
Wer ein holdes Weib errungen, Who a wife has won and treasured, 
Mische seinen Jubel ein! To our strain your voices lend! 

Ja, wer auch nur eine Seele Yea, if any hold in keeping 

Sein nennt auf dem Erdenrund! Only one heart all his own, 

Und wer’s nie gekonnt der stehle Let him join us or else, weeping, 
Weinend sich aus diesem Bund! Steal from out our midst, unknown! 


205 


mee sfte se sla cle stn site ste ste ste sie stie.stte...tee..sten..tee...elie...aiie...sie...alte....he...a...alien...2ie.-aln Lan 








Te Props) gino toate 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 

Concert Master 
Heyes, Eugene 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Meriz, Emilio 
Wolski, William 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Laraia, W. F. 
Gordohn, Robert 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
de Grassi, Antonio 
Wegman, Willem 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Koharits, Joseph 
Houser, F.S 


Second Violins: 

Gough, Walter 
Principal 

Haug, Julius 
Rosset, Emil 
Paterson, J. A. 
Gold, Julius 
Helget, Hans 
Laraia, Attilio F. 
Spaulding, Myron 
Baret, Berthe 
Moulin, Harry 
Koblick, Nathan 
Lind, Waldemar 
Schneider, D. 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Verney, Romain 
Hahl, Emil 
Weiler, Erich 
Baker, Fred A. 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Karasik, Manfred 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Mitchell, L. 


206 


So 
Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Kubitschek, Ernest 


Principal 
Dehe, Willem 
Reinberg, Herman 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Coletti, Bruno 
Bem, Stanislas 
Haight, Rebecca 
Rogovoy, George 
Claudio, C. 


Basses: 

Bell, Walter 
Principal 

Schmidt, Robert E. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Schipilliti, John 
Forman, F. F. 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Storch, A. E. 
Buenger, A, 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Piccolo: 
Benkman, Herbert 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Sargeant, W. 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 
Roberts, R. 
Jacobs, J. A. 


Trumpets: 
Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Klatzkin, Leon 


Trombones: 
Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 


Tuba: 
Murray, Ralph 


Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Morgan, Virginia 


Tympani: 
Wagner, R. E. 


Percussion: 
Vendt, Albert 
Salinger, M. A. 
Greer, E. 
Steffan, D. 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 
Organ: 
Harvey, Leslies J. 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius | 
Personnel Manager: | 
Oesterreicher, Walter |} 














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Presented by THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ANGELO ROSSI, Mayor 
5{ EDGAR WALTER, President JOSEPH H. DYER, Secretary 
Direction of Music Committee: J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 
THE BALLET RUSSE IS UNDER MANAGEMENT OF S. HUROK 


















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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
AND 


Col. W. de BASIL’s BALLET RUSSE 


(EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT S. HUROK) 
Thursday Evening, January 28th, 1937 


1 


LE MARIAGE D’AURORE 
(AURORA’S WEDDING) 


Ballet in One Act 
Music by P. TCHAIKOVSKY 
Choreography after Marius PETIPA 
Scenery by Leon BAKST 
Costumes by Alexandre BENOIS 


1. Prelude 


2. Polonaise 


Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHAMIE, KRASSNOVA, LEONTIEVA, LIPKOVSKA, 
MARRA, OBIDENNA, OSATO, RADOVA, STRAKHOVA 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALONSO, BOROVANSKY, LAZLOVSKY, 
KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, LADRE, LIPATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY, 
ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY, SEMENOFF 


8. Dance of the Seven Ladies of Honour and Their Partners 


Irina BARONOVA, Olga MOROSOVA, Anna ADRIANOVA, Tamara 
GRIGORIEVA, Anna VOLKOVA, Edna TRESAHAR, Lubov ROSTOVA 
David LICHINE, Roman JASINSKY, Paul PETROFF, Serge BOUSLOFF, 
Serge ISMAILOFF, George ZORITCH, Boris BELSKY 


First Variation: Second Variation: 
Anna ADRIANOVA Edna TRESAHAR 
Third Variation: Fourth Variation: 
Anna VOLKOVA Olga MOROSOVA 
Fifth Variation: Sixth Variation: 
Tamara GRIGORIEVA Irina BARONOVA 


4. Scene and Dance of the Duchesses 
Miles. Tatianna LIPKOVSKA, MARRA, ABRICOSSOVA, OBIDENNA, LVOVA 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY, ROSTOFF, 
ZEGLOVSKY 


5. Farandole 


Artistes of the Ballet 
FAIRY TALES: 


6. Florestan and His Sisters 
Lubov ROSTOVA, Vera NELIDOVA, and George ZORITCH 


7. Little Red Riding Hood: 
Anna LEONTIEVA and Edouard BOROVANSKY 


8. The Blue-Bird 
Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA and David LICHINE 


(Continued on page 6) 


3 








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OPERA HOUSE - WEDNESDAY F E B 3 
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9. The Porcelain Princesses: 
Eugenie DELAROVA, Galina RAZOUMOVA and Serge LIPATOFF 
10. The Three Ivans 
H. ALGERANOFYF, Marian LADRE and Narcisse MATOUCHEVSKY 
11. Pas de Deux of Princess Aurora and Prince Charming: 
Irina BARONOVA and Roman JASINSKY 


12. Mazurka 
All the Artistes of the Ballet 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 








INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 








2. 

SYMPHONIE FANTASTIQUE 
(AN EPISODE IN THE LIFE OF AN ARTIST) 
Choreographic Symphony 
Music and Book by BERLIOZ 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 


Scenery and Costumes by Christian BERARD 
Scenery executed by Prince A. SCHERVACHIZDE 


A young musician of unhealthily sensitive nature and endowed with vivid 
imagination has poisoned himself with opium in a paroxysm of love-sick despair. 


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The narcotic dose he had taken was too weak to cause death, but it has thrown 
him into a long sleep accompanied by the most extraordinary visions. In this 
condition his sensations, his feelings and memories find utterance in his sick 
brain in the form of musical imagery. Even the beloved one takes the form of 
melody in his mind, like a fixed idea, which is ever returning, and which he 
hears everywhere. 


1st Movement. — VISION AND PASSIONS. 

At first he thinks of the uneasy and nervous condition of his mind, of 
sombre longings, of depressions and joyous elation without any recognizable 
cause, which he experienced before the beloved one had appeared to him. Then 
he remembers the ardent love with which she suddenly inspired him; he thinks 
of his almost insane anxiety of mind, of his raging jealousy, of his reawakening 
love, of his religious consolation. 


2nd Movement. — A BALL 
In a ball-room, amidst the confusion of a brilliant festival, he finds the 
loved one again. 


3rd Movement. — IN THE COUNTRY 

It is a summer evening. He is in the country musing when he hears two 
shepherd lads who play the ranz des vaches (the tune used by the Swiss to call 
their flocks together) in alternation. This shepherd duet, the locality, the soft 
whisperings of the trees stirred by the zephyr wind, some prospects of hope 
recently made known to him, all these sensations unite to impart a long un- 
known repose to his heart, and to lend a smiling colour to his imagination. 
And then she appears once more. His heart stops beating, painful forebodings 
fill his soul. “Should she prove false to him?” One of the agra resumes 
the melody, but the other answers him no more ,.. sunset... distant rolling 
of thunder ... loneliness . . . silence. 


4th Movement. — THE PROCESSION TO THE STAKE 
He dreams that he has murdered his beloved, that he has been condemned 


to death and is being led to the stake. A march that is alternately sombre and 
(Continued on page 10) 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
FINE FOODS 


Ice Cream « Sodas 
Pastries « Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
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world a different kind of car—Lincoln-Zephyr. The Lincoln-Zephyr 
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AMERICAN PIANIST 


Rent keane VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
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wild, brilliant and solemn, accompanies the procession . . . The tumultuous 
outbursts are followed without modulation by measured steps. At last the 
fixed idea returns, for a moment a last thought of love is revived — which is 
cut short by the death blow. 


5th Movement. — THE WITCHES’ SABBATH. 


He dreams that he is present at the witches’ dance, surrounded by horrible 
spirits, amidst sorcerers and monsters in many fearful forms, who have come 
to assist at his funeral. Strange sounds, groans, shrill laughter, distant yells, 
which other cries seem to answer. The beloved melody is heard again, but it 
has its noble and shy character no longer; it has become a vulgar, trivial and 
grotesque kind of dance. She it is who comes to attend the witches’ meeting. 
Friendly howls and shouts greet her arrival ... She joins the infernal orgy... 
bells toll for the dead ...a burlesque parody of the Dies irae .. . the witches’ 
round dance... the dance and the Dies irae are heard at the same time. 


FIRST MOVEMENT 
JAY umm” WIS TCL ary c, eo a aa cece tanec -Leonide MASSINE 
A By Vea BYE] Cay Xz (0 be nee ee Ue UO AEN has Pa ok NOnmetaeme eS rer ete ear er Tamara TOUMANOVA 


Gaiety: 
Alexandra DANILOVA and Paul PETROFF 
Milles. NELIDOVA, SEROVA, VOLKOVA 


Melancholy: 
MM. JASINSKY, ZORITCH, PLATOFF 


Reverie: 
Anna ADRIANOVA 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, GRIGORIEVA, MARRA, OBIDENNA, 
RAZOUMOVA, ROSTOVA, STRAKHOVA 


Passion: 
MM. ALGERANOFF, BOROVANSKY, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, 
KATCHAROFF, LADRE, MATOUCHEVSKY, PETROFF, ROSTOFF 





SECOND MOVEMENT 
A Ball 


The Guests: 
Olga MOROSOVA and Dimitri ROSTOFF 
Miles. DELAROVA, OSATO, TRESAHAR, ADRIANOVA, CHABELSKA, 
CHAMIE, LEONTIEVA, LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, MARRA, RADOVA, 
RAZOUMOVA, STRAKHOVA 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, ALONSO, BOROVANSKY 
ISMAILOFF, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, LADRE, LIPATOFF, 
MATOUCHEVSKY, ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 


The Beloved. ......-...---------:-::-ccscseeeccneeeeeeeecoseeecenennecceetseteenenaeses Tamara TOUMANOVA 
ENON Y GUNG AM USICIAN 528 eos ceo oxe seston sce oe are earn eee ates Leonide MASSINE 





CATT GH LAGHT OFR-f BE: CU RRNA, Sigasow 
The World Famous N. Y. AMERICAN 


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STRING QUARTET o¥ 


James Levy : Arn Adaskin : Milton Blackstone : Boris Hambourg 


MONDAY F F BR 8 COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 
EVENING = Sutter at Mason 


Reserved Seats at: Sherman, Clay & Co., 55¢, 85¢, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20 
Vallely Current Review — FEBRUARY 11 — Fairmont 
MANAGEMENT: ALICE SECKELS-ELSIE CROSS | 


10 











THIRD MOVEMENT 


EheyOlar Shepherd: 2 i. sge.coe kc tere eee Mare PLATOFF 

The Younes Shephertiscct cs es ees acs, ee ee ee George ZORITCH 

Phe Young (Musician. x2: ee pees, ee Leonide MASSINE 

‘The: Belovedss seta racactee. ces Sh nae Tamara TOUMANOVA 

Ene, Deer. 2 2. ee etn ee ee Alexis KOSLOFF 
The Picnic: 


Miles. Nina VERCHININA, GRIGORIEVA, OBIDENNA, ROSTOVA 
The Children: 
Miles. Lisa SEROVA, ABRICOSSOVA, LEONTIEVA, VOLKOVA 
The Winds: 
MM. PETROFF, JASINSKY, BOUSLOFF 





FOURTH MOVEMENT 
Lhe. Young Musician.£.........,4.4 280. 2 ee ee Leonide MASSINE 
‘De Sauer ee oe ah ee ge ee Boris BELSKY 
The Executioners: 
MM. BOROVANSKY, ISMAILOFF, ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 


The Judges: 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, BOUSLOFF, KATCHAROFF, 
LADRE, LAZOVSKY, LIPATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY 
The Crowd: 
Miles. MARRA, CHAMIE, DELAROVA, CHABELSKA, ADRIANOVA, 
LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, 
MM. ALONSO, KOSLOFF 
FIFTH MOVEMENT 
The Monsters: 
MM. JASINSKY, PETROFF, ZORITCH 


The Witches: 
Miles. Tamara TOUMANOVA, Nina VERCHININA, Olga MOROSOVA 


The Ghouls: 
Miles. DELAROVA, LEONTIEVA, LVOVA, SEROVA, STRAKHOVA 
VOLKOVA 
The Vampires: 
Miles, CHAMIE, LIPKOVSKA, NELIDOVA, RADOVA, RAZOUMOVA, 
TRESAHAR 
The Spectres: 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, GRIGORIEVA, MARRA, 
OBIDENNA, OSATO, ROSTOVA 
The Devils: 
MM. ALONSO, BOROVANSKY, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, LADRE, 
LAZOVSKY, LIPATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY 
The Monks: 


MM. PLATOFF, ALEXANDROFF, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF 
ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 


Conductor: Pierre MONTEUX 








INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 


(Continued on page 18) 


11 








KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much 
a3 


to your family oa : f. 


Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning . . . now. 
As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 
A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


LRUS F. DEP AR T MEN T 


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Union Trust Co. 


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SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 





Pon iy Ro OO NE iY 


Pere S Cant as 


MARIAN 
ANDERSON 


Opera House (Only Recital) 
WED. EVE., FEB. 24, 8:30 


PARSOCGARS AL MM 


LE: 
Bevruessung 2 Haendel 
Chio mar Vi possas=... Haendel 
SICUIANG +n ee ee ee Haendel 
Ah Spietato 
(“Armadier’ )\ eee Haendel 
II. 
Liebesbotschatt.........5- Schubert 
Ave. Marian. ee Schubert 
Der Tod und das 
Maedchen!..... Schubert 
Die’ Morelles soe Schubert 
rT; 
Air of “Don Carlos” 
(O- Don. Hatalé)..se Verdi 
IV. 
Die Fusswaschung............ Kilpinen 
Schilfrohr, saeus’le 
(Saev, saev, susa).......... Sibelius 
Sung in Swedish 
Die Libelile:.g S22 2c..2 ase Sibelius 
Wer es ein Traum.............. Sibelius 
Sung in German 
V. 


Negro Spirituals: 
City called Heaven....Hall Johnson 
Lord, I can’t stay 


BW AY ccteenss eee eae: Roland Hayes 
Crucifixion]... ae John Payne 
My soul’s been anchored 

in the Word.-..:. Florence Price 

@ 
TICKETS: $2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 


SHERMAN, CLAY, & “Co. 








S. Hurok 


S. Hurok, manager of most of the outstanding dance attractions in this 
country today, is unique among the great impresarios of music, dance and the 
drama, having confined his efforts chiefly to the importation of celebrated 
European organizations. He has done more to bring to the masses the highest 
type of entertainment than anyone connected with the amusement world. 


With uncanny judgment, he has imported year after year, the best of 
foreign attractions, has fostered many careers in this country, and has been 
associated for a quarter of a century with the most significant artists of all lands. 


A Russian with ideals and a positive conviction that the American public 
can lend its appreciation to the finest artists and organizations, he has left 
small things to others, and has devoted his boundless energy to the production 
of large scale and often spectacular attractions. He fervently hopes that his 
efforts will bring about a renaissance of interest in the stage arts, surpassing 
that of European audiences. He is convinced that people in America need only 
be made aware of great art and they will flock to it. Some years ago The New 
York Times declared editorially that “S. Hurok has done more for the cause of 


music than the invention of the phonograph.” 


Mr. Hurok managed the last American seasons of Anna Pavlowa and her 
Ballet Russe, Isadora Duncan, Fokine and Fokina, and Loie Fuller. He brought 
to this country the famous composers Richard Strauss and Alexander Glazounov. 
He has presented many celebrated violinists, including Mischa Elman, Efrem 
Zimbalist, Eugen Ysaye, Kubelik, and scores of great singers including Tetraz- 
zini, Gluck, Schumann-Heink and the immortal Chaliapin. He introduced Mary 
Wigman to New York, kindling a furore in the dance world that still continues, 
although interest has now turned to the brighter art of the Ballet Russe. He 
also delivered for American delectation the fiery Flamenco dancer, Vicente 
Escudero, Uday Shan-Kar and his Hindu Company, Trudi Schoop and her 
Comic Ballet. 


Through depressions and prosperity, Mr. Hurok has, single-handed, con- 
tinued to present large touring organizations of distinction. He managed the 
tours of the German Grand Opera, the Russian Grand Opera, the .Habima 
Theatre, the Italian Piccoli Theatre, the Moscow Cathedral Choir and the 
Vienna Choir Boys. 


During the current season he will offer Marian Anderson, the sensational 
Negro contralto; Rudolf Serkin, the latest genius of the piano; the Kolisch 
Quartet, adjudged to be the finest string ensemble in the world; the Dana 
Singing Ensemble, a Polish quintet; Ginette Neveu, a phenomenal young 
French violinist; Joseph Schmidt, Europe’s current radio idol; Arthur Rubin- 
stein; a continental ensemble including Raphael, Victor Chenkin and Emma 
Runitch; and Mme. Pagliughi, a brilliant Italian coloratura soprano. 


Last and highly important, he will bring the Salzburg Opera Guild for its 
first American tour, beginning in the Fall of 1937. This is the famous troupe 
which took part in the recent Salzburg Music Festival where it received 
accolades of praise from press and public. 











Rachmaninoti 


OPERA HOUSE 
PROGRAM: FRIDAY EVE., 8:30 P. M. — FEB. 5 


1. Organ Fantasia and Fugue in G-minor............................-. Bach-Liszt 


2: ponata, Opts: 209.58 5 Ai eee ee ee eee eee Beethoven 
Vivace ma non troppo 
Adagio espressivo 
Prestissimo 
Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 





3. (a) Polonaise, C-minor 


(b) Nocturne .................. ° 
Cc) Mazurka. 2:25 ( Fee eae ce Pe as eae ae fe ae Chopin 
(d) Rondo, Opus 16........ 
4. Four Etudes-Tableaux, Opus 33.......................-..2-2------- Rachmaninoff 
C-sharp minor 
G-minor 
E-flat minor 
E-flat major 
Sonnetto .del ;\Petrarca «Nos 2253). 4 ee ee Liszt 
Maite. Fire ici etic scdncese sheds heceece ver eee ee Wagner-Brassin 
Btude,” H-Mmaiore... eee ci ee ee Paganini-Liszt 


PROGRAM: SUNDAY AFT., 2:30 P. M. — FEB. 7 


1, ¥ Variations, Asmajorie es. 225.0 54 ee is ae eee Mozart 
Ze: LAPGG SOnatasicd.:.c. skit. ts pees eels eae ee ee Scarlatti 
3-. Sonata, Opus 58, B-minore oo er eee Chopin 
BS (AP BOLUGG ral creck 2 fete RE ke a ee ae Bach-Rachmaninoff 
5. 


(a) Daisies, song.... 
(b) Oriental Sketch 


6. (a) Nocturne, G-major........ John Field 


(b) Nocturne, (Noon Tide) } 
7. (a) Etude, D-flat major 


(b) Valse Oubliee No. 3 
(c) Polonaise, E-major.. 


$2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.10, Including Tax — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
NEAONTAG EM Bonar = PUR Bee CLOWN alate. 





15 











oe HuROK HresSenic 
The WORLD’S GREATEST 








SALZBURG OPERA GUILD 


Sensation of last summer’s Salzburg Music Festival. 
One of the world’s greatest operatic organizations. 
Complete European Company in repertoire of unfa- 
miliar operatic masterpieces. Symphony Orchestra. First 
time in America. Season 1937-1938. 


TRUDI SCHOOP 


AND HER COMPANY OF COMIC DANCERS 


Second sensational coast to coast tour. 

“This Trudi Schoop Ballet is the most amusing and 
the most amazingly fresh entertainment in New York,” 
writes Edna Ferber. ‘‘A dazzling evening in the theatre 
and a triumph of sheer talent.” 


FEODOR CHALIAPIN 


Great Russian Basso. 


MARIAN ANDERSON 


World’s Outstanding Contralto. 
One of the greatest living singers—New York Times. 


DANA ENSEMBLE 


Famous Polish Singing Quintet. 














ARTISTS and ORGANIZATIONS 

















UDAY SHAN-KAR 


AND HIS HINDU BALLET 


In a complete new repertoire of Hindu Dances. New 
Costumes and New Productions. 

“Beauty and Excitement”—New York Times. ‘“Gape 
in awe at the superlative beauty of Shan-Kar’”—New 
York World Telegram. 


CONTINENTAL ENSEMBLE 


Emma Runitch - Victor Chenkin - Raphael 
Unique — Novel — Delightful | 


RUDOLF SERKIN ‘OLISCH QUARTET 
New Genius of the Piano String Ensemble 


MADAME PAGLIUGHI GINETTE NEVEU 


Brilliant Italian Coloratura Veins CHER eee: 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEPH SCHMIDT 


Triumphant Return Engagement Europe’s Radio Idol 


VIENNA CHOIR BOYS 


Fifth American Tour 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION regarding these 
and other attractions which Mr. Hurok has engaged 
abroad, address Peter Conley, San Francisco Opera House, 
or Hurok Attractions, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 


My 








3 


LA BOUTIQUE FANTASTIQUE 
(THE FANTASTIC TOY SHOP) 


Ballet in One Act 


Music by G. ROSSINI, Orchestrated by O. RESPIGHI 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Curtain, Scenery and Costumes by Andre DERAIN 


The action takes place in 1865. Customers of varied tourist types are seen 
in a toy shop, where the proprietor shows them his novelties, some Tarantella 
dancers, street vendors, kings and queens from playing cards, dogs, Cossacks, 
and especially two dancers from the Cabaret. Some of the visitors purchase 
dolls. Amongst the customers there is an English lady, an American family, 
and also a large Russian family of the rich manufacturing class. All of them 
are delighted with the two cabaret dancers, but, unfortunately, each of the 
pair is bought by different customers. After paying, the customers go away 
and the shop is closed for the night. 

Coming to life after nightfall, the dolls, left alone, are filled with pity for 
the fate of the two dancers, lovers who are about to be separated because they 
have each been bought by different people who do not know each other. 

The lovers then plan to escape. They take a tender farewell of their 
companions and disappear into the night, the other toys aiding their flight. 

In the morning the shopkeeper and his assistants come in to open the 
shop. The customers of the day before arrive to take away their purchases, 
and are astonished at not having had them delivered as had been promised. 
The shopkeeper calms them down and shows them the parcels ready for them 
to take away, but as he hands them over he finds only paper. In spite of his 
amazement the customers think he is cheating them, and repay him by wreck- 
ing the shop; but the dolls come to life and chase them, terrified, into the street. 


Phe *SHOP KC Pee. £2 eo sce cosees care tesscends oe cdese evant ecuecenas oases Edouard BOROVANSKY 
ELIS ASST CEN Gece ectescteed as hua okaue eat gue as ieee acct ee te Alexis KOSLOFF 
Re VIG AG Loos alk pas ke arco ce acceac ut Peta Asa onset ee ae oe eR N, MATOUCHEVSKY 
AICTE NS ISTO VU aT ae a cee cae ore a ee ee G. CHABELSKA 
Piers Wierd eee Ae ee eS gS hs ce Gee a E. MARRA 
ITE TAG TI CAT: Secce Peete acer BES 2 cog act Adah I ate tee nara rein, sy M. PLATOFF 
| yep Ai. a Oe 5 ak Reve Ps Be APY e oh FOP eRe mOMMEE OR COROT ET Ec, Oh UMD LEY apne Broa Ae L. OBIDENNA 
PGT 5 O Dh oe eet car toate Rie tees heed ee ae 2 2 at Re oy eee ae ets A, ALONSO 
hem Daughter oro chneAe areca eee en eu ee Ne eae oe V. NELIDOVA 
AY ORUISSIaty WECTCO Sit. fee ae 2a eee ae eee eee as serge GRIGORIEFF 
1s Bf al") fh i ee a Seen a See le Coe AO RUMEN ERE ole nA OMe Sane) ie T. CHAMIE 
TBO LY? SOMES ways ess cv vane csesicy saute aan ws aac nA eta One oe lea hs ee ae A. RIKOFF 


Their Four Daughters: 
Miles. IVANOVA, PETROVA, SEMENOVA, SMIRNOVA 


THE DOLLS: 
Tarantella Dancers: 
Olga MOROSOVA and Roman JASINSKY 


he -@ueen: of Club Sec. ee eae eas eter Tamara GRIGORIEVA 
PGI O UGE AOL VA CARUR: 27 os eee oe oe a eae tee ies Lubov ROSTOVA 
ENGR KS? (OL AS DAG CS tact cto hol Pee at ca ces se Came te Paul PETROFF 
He Kine Of DigimiOndss :.7.c0 tage ee Re ee Ble Ao Re eee Dimitri ROSTOFF 
BS oKz DNS) 010) of ome ree Pc eto eRe Ae ene: papier SOROS noes <2 ReneS Raper Michel KATCHAROFF 
ee Wel One Ea Cie te caer ec sce hl od eae cat ie See ae nee H. ALGERANOFF 
AS Cossack, Chieti. cx occecesees. os seam amisecrew eet ee NN elude She ee ss wc Ate ee Marian LADRE 


ESC OSSACK GIR eee ua cttw os ate tet tee tes aed get. eee ete ae Tatiana LIPKOVSKA 


Five Cossacks: 


MM. ALEXANDROFF, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, KOSLOFF, 
MATOUCHEVSKY 


18 











Dancing Poodles: 
Lisa SEROVA and Serge LIPATOFF 


Can-Can Dancers: 
Alexandra DANILOVA and Leonide MASSINE 


Twelve of their Friends: 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, ADRIANOVA, LEONTIEVA, KRASSNOVA, LVOVA, 
MARRA, OSATO, RADOVA, RAZOUMOVA, STRAKHOVA, 
TRESAHAR, VOLKOVA 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


CAST SUBJECT TO CHANGES 


Founder and Director General: COL. W. DE BASIL 
Maitre-de-Ballet and Artistic Collaborator: Leonide MASSINE 
Conductors: Efrem KURTZ and Antal DORATI 
Regisseur General: Serge GRIGORIEFF 


STAFF FOR 8S. HUROK 


David -Labidins >” (iis, ae se oho ee eee ee Company Managers 
Maurice Winters | 


Gerald: Go0de@ic..5 2) er el, bed i General Press Representative 
[sek 01 GN Ko) 2 of ee nn Sen Te a er ee eC Advance Press Representative 
Wise: SHR Te neck cs ae te al en eae ep Executive Secretary 
Boris: SCHWanzts genes ee ek eu tees aces ogee oe Concert Meister 
Nathan Rosenit..2% cat ee Be, ee Ue ek ee mee Orchestra Manager 
Cly G@S rant iisssate- Sous iss icevs best shecm: ea ee ne Chief Carpenter 
Carl Gré@iie cu occ. eee eee ae ae ee ee Chief Property Man 
GONG RETO RN Oe Fi dois eee ee ee eens ce inet ne Chief Electrician 
AUQUStS. GSAT ces ace Rees al gee, ee Wardrobe Mistress 


The Management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion 
pictures inside the Theatre without written permission. 


EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, N. Y, C. 





COLLECTOR @® DEALER @® APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows. High--Medium--Low Priced. 











19 








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Monte Carlo Ballet Russe, Use and Recommend... 


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Visitors Cordially Welcome to San Francisco’s Most Fascinating Shoppe. 
Catalog and price lists sent anywhere on request. —- World Wide Mail Order Service. 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


Thur. 8:30P 
Fri. 8:30P 
Sate tou L 
Sat. 8:30P 
Sun. 2:30P 
Fri, 2:30P 
Sat. 8:30 P. 
Thur G2loe: 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Pry -22250/6. 
Sat. 8:30P. 
Thur. 8:15 P 
Mrs eS scOlee 
Fri, «2:30 P. 
Sat. 8:30P. 
Tues. 8:15 P. 
Thur. 8:15 PB: 
Fri, 2:30 P: 
Sat. 8:30 P. 
Tues. 8:30 P. 
Thur. S10: 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Sat. 10:30 A. 
Er §—2:30-P. 
Sat. 10:30 A 
Satu  otodue, 
SUNS. oslo ©. 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
rr 7 22:30'2: 
Sat. 10:30 A. 
Sat. 8:30 P. 
Tues. 8:15 P. 
Erie 200 be 
Sat. 10:30 A. 
Sat. 8:30P. 
Sun. 3:00P. 





Conductor 


Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


1937 SEASON 


. M., Feb. 
M., Feb. 


. M., Feb. 
M., Feb. 
M., Mar. 
M., Mar. 
M., Mar. 
M., Mar. 
M., Mar. 
M., Mar. 
M., Mar. 


M., Mar. 
M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 


M., Apr. 
.M., Apr. 


M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 


M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 
.M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 


M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 


.M., Jan.28, — 


WITH COL. W. DE BASIL’S 


.M., Jan. 29, 
MJan.30, + BALLET RUSSE 
“Mo Jai 8h ok © PuHor (OoPre rR AO es 6 


5, Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

6, Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

M., Feb. 11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

M., Feb. 18, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

M., Feb. 19, Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

M., Feb. 20, Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

26, Civic Auditorium, with Grace Moore, Soprano 
5, Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 
6, Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 

















9, Memorial Chapel, Stanford University 
11, Broadeast for Standard Oil Co. 

19, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 
20, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 


23, Civic Auditorium, with Igor Stravinsky and 


San Francisco Municipal Chorus 
25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 
1, Broadeast for Standard Oil Co. 
3, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 
9, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 
10, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 
10, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 
11, University of California 
15, Broadcast. for Standard Oil Co. 
16, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 
17, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 
17, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 
20, Civic Auditorium, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 
23, Opera House 
24, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 
24, Opera House 
25,San Rafael 


TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND 













KAJETAN ATTL'S 
HARP ENSEMBLE 


Beginners or Advance Students Phone for appointment. | 

When Buying or Renting a Harp only an Experienced 
Harpist can advise Correctly. 

Large Stock of Harps for Sale or Rent: 


1030 BUSH STREET Phone ORdway 6367 Studio No.6 






First Harpist with San 

Francisco Symphony for 

Twenty-four Consecutive 
Years. 









































a : ee 
os i 
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MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


GRACE MOORE 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — FRIDAY EVE., FEB. 26 


IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his 
"SYMPHONY OF PSAEMS 
ALSO 
RossIni “STABAT MATER” Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 


MUN LC. Ati CE OsRols 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


Sb Vt Be ee Ne oe 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 








RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 




















24 





Studio 


Classic and 
modern ballet, 
character, 
Oriental 
dancing, 
Eurhythmics. 
Classes for 
beginners or 
advanced 
students, 
all ages. 


420 SUTTER STREET 


——E aaa 





If your product requires 
force and vigor, we stand 
ready at all times to 
render you the kind of 
service that makes the 
printed word SPEAK. 
Your message will carry 
its emphasis in a truly 
dignified manner. 





15 Columbus Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
SUtter 42772 


















PETER CONLEY Presents 
NANCIE 


MONTE U X 


DANCE RECITAL 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUESDAY EVE. FEB., 15, 8:30 P. M. 


PROGR AM 


Sarabande and Variations........ Corelli 
J. NIELSEN 
Gavotte vec. oa eee Lulli 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Divertissements: ..3: = Couperin 
J. NIELSEN 
Tempore! palo... ee Scarlatti 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


Suite: Rondo, Minuet, Badinerie....Bach 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


BP Teneh>  OULCe Leen settee eae Bach 
J. NIELSEN 
Pantomime, 2 2eee eaecserzuees Mozart 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Country Dances --.-- Beethoven 
J. NIELSEN 
French Revolutionary 
Dance)... ee (Popular Songs) 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Extract from Ballet Music 
from “Rosamunde’’.............- Schubert 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Waltzes: 24 OS ee Brahms 
J. NIELSEN 
Valse: Romantique:.......---. Chabrier 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
WrialtZictd ben eee er Chabrier 
J. NIELSEN 


Danse Sacrée 
Danse Profane 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


Funeral March in 
Jazz SoM es ra SEO KO UCR 
NI 


LSEN 
Danse ericuse.c2 2 J. Nielsen 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
AIMeLICAN © lASSIC. ee Handy 
J. NIELSEN 
March, from ‘‘Love for 
Three Oranges”’ ..............-. Prokofieff 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


The Pasmore Quartet (Mary Pasmore, 
first violin, William Laraia, second 
violin, Erich Weiler, viola, and Dorothy 
Pasmore, cello) will play musique de 
scene during the intervals. 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 — 83¢ 
SHERMAN, CLAY & Co. 

















TRUDI SCHOOP 
COMIC BALLET 


ALL NEW PROGRAM 


* 


OuP-E ROA “h-OeUes7e 
WED. EVE. 8:30 
MA RCH 17 


* 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 Including Tax 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


MANAGEMENT: PETER CONLEY 









THE ART COMMISSION 


JosepH H. Dyer, JR., Secretary 






EpGAR WALTER, President 












PLR ES EN TS 


GRACE MOORE 





TINS ee edna Oey: 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


CAV ECAC DET One UM 
Friday Evening, February 26th 


Popular Prices: 25¢ — 50¢ — 75¢ — $1.00 
Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


Direction: MUSIC COMMITTEE - J. Emmet Haypven, Chairman 


ae 


“ 


se 


ELS 


————S 


St ees 


SR tee es oe 


Sr SS 


Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


FOUR SATURDAY MORNINGS (10:30 to 11:30) OPERA HOUSE 
APRIL 3 — APRIL 10 — APRIL 17 — APRIL 24 


= 
RESERVE SEASON TICKETS NOW 
Sherman, Clay & Co. Box Office - Sutter & Kearny Sts., San Francisco 


Please reserve the following Season Tickets for the 
Four Concerts for Young People: 





ORCHESTRA SEATS Gee ee ani drs 
—____GRAND TIER SEATS @ Oe ee Git wee 
= JUDRESS CIRCLE SEATS: (@ Sila0 as. oe gids Ee 

SS BATEONY. CIRCLE: SEATS @) $) 100m =e eat $ 
+" _BATCONY (FIRSTS ROWS) @ Geo es are 
Lt BATCONY (TAST*G ROWS) @ 60.5. ee” aes 94 
_____BOXES (SEATING 8) S30 Ont ee $ 

POAT, .cukueee wtseutenecs $ 


PAYMENT HEREWITH $————— 


BAAN CE: “DiUihe eee $+ 
VAG 1a Me ete Oe ER ERE SUR De ae OTS Ae Be eee eins el AE oe ON 
SECC Ee isan GM Gun Lond O ahee eet et eek, aed ee te a eee 
CHE Niagiee BAl) eel tee ne Oe PON Gee ecg enone ee 
Vd 1110) Roe ee ee RE RM Re ME Reet Pelee, 


Zi 








 ————— 


The Man with the 


Baton 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 
maitre de musique 


He started to compose, a time ago, 
but stopped because everything sound- 
ed like Schumann or Debussy. In 
Paris he has a school for conductors 
and this year allowed all 10 students 
to take turns conducting on a single 
program. During the war he saw 
action at Verdun, Rheims, Soissons 
and the Argonne. For years he was 
known as the greatest viola player in 
Europe, now plays viola in a private 
quartet with Yehudi Menuhin, in fact 
is Yehudi’s professor of quartet. He 
conducts from memory because he 
studies each score so thoroughly he 
doesn’t need it in performance. He 
thinks that better music is being 
produced today than 20 years ago, 
and that today’s product is equal in 
quality to that of any past period. 

For the sake of the record we here 
append Mrs. Monteux’ neatly-written, 
complete account of her famous hus- 
band’s career: 


“Paris National Conservatory — Ist 
prize violin, viola, harmony and 
counterpoint. 


“Colonne Orchestra — ist viola (18 
years old); 2nd conductor. 


‘“‘Conductor: 
Concerts Berlioz (Paris) 
Orchestre Dieppe—concerts, opera 
Concerts d’avant-garde (Paris) 
Concerts Monteux (Paris) 
Ballets Russes de Diaghileff 
—5 years 

Metropolitan Opera—1916-1919 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
—1919-1924 

Concertgebouw (Amsterdam) 
—1924-1934 

Societé Wagner (Amsterdam) 
—1926 

Paris Symphony Orchestra 
—1930-1937 

San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra—1935- 


“Has conducted every major orches- 
tra in Europe. Only French conductor 
to direct Berlin Philharmonic and 


28 











Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras, also 


Salzburg Festival. Has conducted 
many times in the Hollywood Bowl, 
as well as the Los Angeles Orchestra 
and the Philadephia Orchestra. 

“Creator of many modern works in- 
cluding ‘Petrouchka,’ ‘Sacre du Prin- 
temps,’ ‘Chant du Rossignol’ of Stra- 
vinsky; ‘Daphnis et Chloe,’ Ravel; 
‘Jeux’ of Debussy, and this year start- 
led musical Europe with a magnificent 
rendering of Darius Milhaud’s ‘Chris- 
tophe Colombe’ in which he employed 
the great French Chorus of Nantes, 
16 soloists and the Paris Symphony 
Orchestra.” 

And to complete the account, here 
is a list of Pierre Monteux’ Victor 
recordings compiled by the obliging 
H. W. Wilson of the Record Library: 

M-111—BERLIOZ, “Symphonie 

Fantastique,” Paris Symphony 
Orchestra 

M-230—PAGANINI, Violin concerto 

in D major, with Yehudi Menuhin 
M-231—MOZART,Violin concerto in 
D major, No. 7, with Yehudi 
Menuhin 

M-246—MOZART, Violin concerto 
in D major (“The Adelaide’’) 
with Yehudi Menuhin 

11140-1—_BERLIOZ, “Benvenuto 
Cellini” Overture, Op. 23, and 
“Troyens a Carthage” Overture. 




















MAIL ORDER BLANK 


FOURTH ANNUAL DOLEAR OF BRAVS EAS OWN. 
Tom C. Girton 


Presents 


FORTUNE GALLO 


and his 


SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


WAR MEMORTAL OPE RAH IOUS 
FEBRUARY 26 TO MARCH 14 INCLUSIVE 


eras — 22 Performances — 6 Repeats — Tickets: 55¢, 83¢, $1.10, $1.65, $1.93 (tax included) 





$1.93 $1.65 $1.10 $1.65 $1.10 83¢ BB¢ 
Dates Box 1st 12rows| Balance Grand Dress Balcony Bal 
Seats Orchestra | Orchestra Tier Circle Circle cony 
by Eve.;..ebi' 26) Atda 6) eesc coco scscsc Weacses cousencoveeese  ceepecus omen tevae res neat pase yeuesccteee | een cent eae oe | ae os 
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tidy Eve, 27) T-Trovatore: Vechten ee 
lay Mat.,  @B Rigoletto: © Wet Ae ete ia vcescenssn akcosee cease ste aes cho eae eae oe eee freee |e 
hy Eve., PY ZB) Cavimem 0 cas sceccce des voce ciescna nce becceau ae seseneena ct cee e  Nett  eeme C 
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myEve, ” (2) Da Travinta, © [ocecce ec bees cecsccccccktiecs be peccccutesrocstuseei [som ot cxcnesecere lee eeeni ee eee eee eee | eS 
nesday Eve., ” #38/| Jewels of the 
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day Eve., ” 4] Cavalleria and 
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May Eve., me 7 Cavmen (© © Mieke BA hesettecc ceca ssccaa Teeuwen cs has rc op Ae 2 cr aN 
day Eve., a Bi Le Boheme  —  sbcceccceeccschee atabes thrdec basco Papeete ec ee SE 
wday Eve., dd Ol Mavster «68 9 aim ee Pease Pa Se bn, Soot Ae Roe eee es scebonicuecdeueecta’ Pee ee 
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day Eve, ” 18] La Tosca 
My Mat. 9) “al Aida = fk Bee BL a a al reer dt Re 
pay Eve... 14 | Madanie Butterfly =... 00s ees | caine eto fence |e ee 
ORDERS NOW BEING RECEIVED THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 
‘servations will be filled in order received. Ground Floor Kohler & Chase Bldg., 26 O’Farrell St., San Francisco 
Telephone: EXbrook 6696 
Mi Order Coup on The €nelOsed: CHECK GS sas aiescs sosnsceooccscseztuanaxessiotes pecieee is in full payment 
tion de rived PON tk ce as can Rede cn sc eee ome Nate seats as indicated in above space, 
Name: (print) issssseccicc:jcdscccdeasesasngzcsctesensgoeeesesecisacc st pesceeke 
POT OSS: seictvasscscvscvteeibdakencscestinacenin Sacee eae Ra ee 





MUSICAL DIRECTORY 


V-O°C ALL 


Rena Lazelle 


VOCAL TEACHER AND COACH 


Well Known Pupils: Elbert Bellows, Fred- 
eric Bittke, Albert Browne, Worden Dixon, 
Esther Green, Reba Greenley, Lysbeth 
Hughes, Herbert Maas, Margie Nemes, 
Eleanor Nielson, Andrew Robertson, Jean- 
ette Sholl, Franziska Weiss 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3307 
Mondays: Hotel Oakland, Oakland 


Joseph Greven 


VOICE SPECIALIST 


Teacher of Many Local Favorite and 
Prominent European and American Artists 


927 Lake St. BAyview 5278 


Mme. Beatrice Bowman 
Teacher of Emily Hardy, Alice Avakian, 
Ralina Zarova 


2217 California St. Tel. WEst 4406 


Nino Comel 
VOCAL TEACHING — COACHING 


Teacher of Josephine Tumminia and 
Mari Monte 


376 Sutter St. DOuglas 6379. AShberry 7438 


Beatrice Lewis 
STUDIO OF THE MODERN DANCE 


533 Post Street ORdway 0829 


Henley Voice Studio 


Enid Henley, Soprono-Teacher; Homer 
Henley, Nationally Known Vocal 
Authority 


Studio: 2847 Union St. Tel. WE 9036 


PIANO 


Malen Burnett School of Music 


Thorough training from kindergarten to 
concert stage. Courses for those training 
to be teachers. 


2580 Broadway. Tel. Fillmore 1898 


B LINCOLN 
ATCHELDE 
CONCERT PIANIST - TEACHER 


555 SUTTER ST. @ SUtter 4970 


508 SUTTER nr POWELL 


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CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


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WAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


DAY AND EVENING COURSES 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 
NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 








SOBERT WALLACE 


HE HOUSE OF FURS one Forty six GEARY 


DUHUTIFUL MORE 
TRAGUL SWAGGERS 


As a noteworthy feature of the 
Annual Robert Wallace January 
Clearance Sale we now present a 
glorious selection of fine black 
Caracul swagger coats. Carefully 
selected pelts... exquisite texture 
...expert craftsmanship assure oe 
you of many outstanding values. 
The lovely coat illustrated is one 
of many smart styles, especially 


priced for this sale event at only 


I] 





Sherman 


KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS 
OAKLAND: H.C. CAPWELL'S ... Fourth Floor 








































The magic beauty of world 
famous symphoniesis yoursto 
enjoy whenever you wish with 


Victor Higher Fidelity 
RECORDS 


In fact, Victor records offer the one 
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at any time that you desire! They 
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orchestras. Victor’s new higher fidelity These are but a few of the symphonies 
recordings capture every delicate available on Victor Higher Fidelity 
whisper of every instrument with the Recordings ! 
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; : S h No. 7 in A M 
thrill music lovers at the San Fran- eTeawie ae peethoven. Onis i 
cisco Symphony concerts. Played by Arturo Toscanini 

and Philharmonic Orchestra 
of New York. 5 records with $4( 
album 
Symphony No. 4 in G Major 

(Antonin Dvorak) 

Played by the Philharmonic 
Orchestra by Vaclav Talich. $750 
5 records with album 


Schubert’s Symphony No. 8 
in B Minor (unfinished) 
Played by Koussevitzky and 
the Boston Symphony Orches- $650 
tra. 3 records with album 


Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 

4 in A Major 
Played by Serge Koussevitzky 
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Tune in on KJBS every evening at Orchestra. 3 records with $ 50 
10:00 P. M. for two hours of album 6 
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UII 





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SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY — "= 
ORCHESTRA ee 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 





COL. W. de BASIL’S 


BALLET 
RUSSE 


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WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO 


Presented by THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ANGELO ROSSI, Mayor 
EDGAR WALTER, President JOSEPH H. DYER, Secretary 
Direction of Music Committee: J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 
THE BALLET RUSSE IS UNDER MANAGEMENT OF S. HUROK 





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Misses’ and women's 


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"DRESS SALON © FOURTH FLOOR 


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THE ART COMMYS SiON PRESEN es 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
AND 


Col. W. de BASIL’s BALLET RUSSE 


(EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT S. HUROK) 


Friday Evening, January 29th, 1937 


i 
CIMAROSIANA 


Ballet Divertissement 


Music bv Domenico CIMAROSA 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 


The age of classic Italian music, unlike the later, heavier German 
classicism, was permeated with the same elements of fantasy and comedy as 
the classic age of Italian drama which gave the world the decorative 
“maschere,” or masks, of the Commedia dell’Arte. It consorted well with the 
stage actions of Goldoni and Moliere, shared their charm and humor. Amongst 
names comprising Pergolese, Logroschino, and some others, Cimarosa (1749- 
1801), stands out by reason of the individual manner in which his music blends 
these traits, forming a delightfully decorative basis for the dance-sequence, 
with its spirit of comedy and gallantry so truly baroque, which the present 
ballet presents. Following in outline the manner of both the early Italian 
classical, musical and ballerina traditions, this is danced as a pas de trois, a 
pas de six, a tarantelle, contre-danse, a pas de deux, and a grand finale. 


1. Pas de Trois 
Tamara GRIGORIEVA, Lubov ROSTOVA and George ZORITCH 


2. Pas de Six 


Miles. CHAMIE, RAZOTJMOVA, VOLKOVA 
MM. KATCHAROFF, LADRE, MATOUCHEVSKY 


3. Tarantella 
Eugenie DELAROVA and Marian LADRE 


4. Pas de Quatre 


Edna TRESAHAR, Kira STRAKHOVA 
Serge BOUSLOFF, Serge ISMAILOFF 


(Continued on page 6) 


3 








Sherman 















Neen ee se eens 
aT, 


Kearny at Sutter 


H. C. Capwell’s 
Fourth Floor, Oakland 


8 California Stores 


Play records through 


your radio 






for only 


$ 16 50 i | . 


If you already have a radio and have been longing for 
recorded music so that you may enjoy command perform- 
ances of your favorite concerts, symphonies, operas or 
popular music, you'll be interested in this RCA Victor 
record player. It plays through any modern AC radio and 
its tone equals that of the radio to which it is attached. 


Plays all size records. 


Enjoy the music you wish, when you wish! 











PETER CONLEY PRESENTS 








* * * * * 


ADMIRAL 


BYRD 


IN PERSON - TELLING HIS THRILLING STORY 


“CONQUERING THE ANTARCTIC” 
ILLUSTRATED WITH MOTION PICTURES 








OPERA HOUSE - WEDNESDAY F F B 3 
MATINEE 3:15 — NIGHT 8:20 F 





ALL SEATS RESERVED: $1.10 — 83¢ — 55¢ Including Tax 


On Sale Now: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland 








5. Pas de Trois 
Alexandra DANILOVA, Roman JASINSKY and Paul PETROFF 


6. Contre-Dance 


Miles ABRICOSSOVA, ADRIANOVA, CHABELSKA, LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, 
NELIDOVA, OBIDENNA, OSATO, RADOVA, SEROVA 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, ALONSO, BELSKY, BOROVANSKY, 
KOSLOFF, LIPATOFF, PLATOFF, ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 
Scenery and Costumes by Jose-Maria SERT 


7. Pas de Deux 
Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA and David LICHINE 


8. Finale 
The Artists of the Ballet 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 


INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 





GREATER 
AS THE 
YEARS 


GO BY aa 


The Baldwin of today is an infinitely greater instrument. Responsive to 
the ever increasing requirements of today’s great artists, today’s Baldwin 
more than fulfills their every desire. @ Play the Baldwin yourself. Let 
the tone prove to you that the Baldwin of today is the finest expression 
of all that a piano means. Learn ot our new payment plan. 


Baldwin 


310 SUTTER STREET 
AN O § 








2. 


CHOREARTIUM 


Choreographic Symphony Music, BRAHMS’ Fourth Symphony 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Scenery and Costumes by Constantin TERECHKOVITCH and Eugene LOURIE 
Curtain by Georges ANNENKOFF 
Scenery executed by Elisabeth POLUNIN 


I.—Allegro non troppo: 
Tamara TOUMANOVA and David LICHINE 
Tamara GRIGORIEVA 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, BOROVANSKY, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, 
KATCHAROFF, LADRE, LIPATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY, 
PLATOFF, ZORITCH, 
Paul PETROFF 
Miles. Anna ADRIANOVA, LIPKOVSKA, OSATO, TRESAHAR 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, LEONTIEVA, NELIDOVA, OBIDENNA, 
RAZOUMOVA, SEROVA, STRAKHOVA, VOLKOVA 


(Continued on page 10) 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
©, FINE FOODS 


Ice Cream « Sodas 
Pastries «x Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Dig'n Mhistle 


33 POWELL STREET, Near Market 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
_and the Opera House 














ON TG? alk ie ING. se ete a eae V-1 2 


BIiILt BY. LENG OEN.4 02 eh ee 
LINCOLN STANDABD 
OF MECHANICAL EXGCELLENGE 


Drama combined with music gave the world a different kind of art 
—opera. Lincoln engineering, united with Ford resources, gave the 
world a different kind of car—Lincoln-Zephyr. The Lincoln-Zephyr 
enters 1957 proved by a year’s superb performance. It is not a new 


still far ahead 





“model.” It is the original car, improved, refined 


in its standards of power, comfort, safety, economy. It brings to the 


medium-price field the Lincoln standard of mechanical excellence. 





ARTHUR R. LINDBURG CO. CHESTER N. WEAVER CO. 
1101 Van Ness Ave. 2910 Broadway 
San Francisco Oakland 


ee OhU = Ne Ae Ecco eh) DE eAeileale sn) 








Pela ONIMENG 


me Ee Sie Nien S 


ROBERT O'CONNOR 


AMERICAN PIANIST 


RESERVED SEATS VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
$2.20, $1.65, $1.10, 88c MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 19387 


SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. EIGHT THIRTY O'CLOCK 








I1.—Andante sostenuto 


Nina VERCHININA 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, ADRIANOVA, CHABELSKA, CHAMIE, DELAROVA, 
LEONTIEVA, LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, MARRA, MOROSOVA, NELIDOVA, 
OBIDENNA, OSATO, RADOVA, RAZOUMOVA, ROSTOVA, SEROVA, 
STRAKHOVA, TRESAHAR, VOLKOVA 


IlI.—Allegro gioccoso: 


Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA and Serge BOUSLOFF 
Alexandra DANILOVA and Roman JASINSKY 
Miles, LEONTIEVA, OSATO, RAZOUMOVA, SEROVA, 
STRAKHOVA, VOLKOVA 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALONSO, BELSKY, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, 
LIPATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY, ROSTOFF 


IV.—Allegro energico e passionato: 


Tamara TOUMANOVA 
David LICHINE and Paul PETROFF 
MM. BOROVANSKY, ISMAILOFF, LADRE, ROSTOFF 
Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA 
Miles. Tamara GRIGORIEVA, MOROSOVA, NELIDOVA, 
RAZOUMOVA, TRESAHAR 


Serge BOUSLOFF 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALONSO, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, LIPATOFF, 


PLATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY, ROSTOFF 
Alexandra DANILOVA and Anna ADRIANOVA 
Roman JASINSKY 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, CHAMIE, DELAROVA, LEONTIEVA, 
LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, NELIDOVA, OBIDENNA, OSATO, 
RADOVA, SEROVA, STRAKHOVA, VOLKOVA 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 
INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 


GA FTG GH TOF Tole. CURE N IE SA S:OuN 2 
The World Famous N. Y. AMERICAN 


HART HOUSE “ONE 
STRING QUARTET. ™ 


James Levy : Arn Adaskin : Milton Blackstone : Boris Hambourg 


MONDAY COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 
EVENING F E B a 8 Sutter at Mason 


Reserved Seats at: Sherman, Clay & Co., 55¢, 85¢, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20 
Vallely Current Review — FEBRUARY 11 — Fairmont 
MANAGEMENT: ALICE SECKELS-ELSIE CROSS 





LE SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
(THE SPIRIT OF THE ROSE) 


Romantic Poem in One Act by J. L. VAUDOYER, 
after the poem by Theophile GAUTIER 
Music by C. M. WEBER 
Choreography after Michel FOKINE 
Scenery and Costumes by Leon BAKST 


A young girl who has just returned from her first ball sits dreaming. The 
Spirit of the Rose she is wearing visits her, and they dance together. He leaps 
out of the casement, and then she awakens, sad and disillusioned. 


The: -¥ ote 2 Garb. 45 ae eae asa Irina BARONOVA 
The Specthe of the Roses: 2:2 sss eee ee eee Paul PETROFF 


Conductor Pierre MONTEUX 








SHORT INTERMISSION 





4, 


LE BEAU DANUBE 
(THE BEAUTIFUL DANUBE) 


Character Ballet 
Music by Johann STRAUSS 
Arranged and Orchestrated by Roger DESORMIERE 
Book and Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Scenery by Vladimir POLUNIN, after Constantin GUYS 
Costumes by Count Etienne de BEAUMONT 


The scene is laid in a public garden at Vienna on a holiday in 1860. The 
people are dressed in their best. Little milliners and their companions are 
filled with the holiday spirit. They are joined by a group of foppish young 
men-about-town, who amuse everyone by their antics. Whilst itinerant per- 

(Continued on page 18) 


11 













KNOWLEDGE j% 
OF THIS . 
SUBJECT 


may mean much \s =f 
























> yas wy 
to your family *\WXHy 
Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 


future needs by sound planning .. . now. 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 

BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 

STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 






TRU Stl DYER ACR ay MENGE 


Wells Fargo Bank 


and 
Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery Market at Grant Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 


12 








Peel eR (GO eNale ony: 


Presse n ts 


MARIAN 
ANDERSON 


Opera House (Only Recital) 
WED. EVE., FEB. 24, 8:30 


PRS @) Gen an vi 





I. 
BeSTUCSSUN Pe ee Haendel 
Chio: mai Vil possa7.0.. Haendel 
PLO ULE H ob: Wapemnae aD oA ERR Haendel 
Ah Spietato 
CArmadigiv ie. Haendel 
II. 
Liebesbotschaft ................ Schubert 
Ave (Marifw. athe yom Schubert 
Der Tod und das 
Maedchen...6... se Schubert 
Die: Korean ote Schubert 
III. 
Air of “Don Carlos” 
(O: Don: Patale).222. Verdi 
IV. 
Die Fusswaschung............ Kilpinen 
Schilfrohr, saeus’le 
(Saev, saev, susa).......... Sibelius 
Sung in Swedish 
Die: TsiDeller. oe 2:2) scat ae Sibelius 
Wer es ein Traum.............. Sibelius 
Sung in German 
V.. 


Negro Spirituals: 
City called Heaven....Hall Johnson 
Lord, I can’t stay 


B Wavelet ee ede Roland Hayes 
Cruchiaxionwe sae tee John Payne 
¥ My soul’s been anchored 
IMmtne Words. Florence Price 
sr] 


TICKETS: $2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 








S. Hurok 


S. Hurok, manager of most of the outstanding dance attractions in this 
country today, is unique among the great impresarios of music, dance and the 
drama, having confined his efforts chiefly to the importation of celebrated 
European organizations. He has done more to bring to the masses the highest 
type of entertainment than anyone connected with the amusement world. 


With uncanny judgment, he has imported year after year, the best of 
foreign attractions, has fostered many careers in this country, and has been 
associated for a quarter of a century with the most significant artists of all lands. 


A Russian with ideals and a positive conviction that the American public 
can lend its appreciation to the finest artists and organizations, he has left 
small things to others, and has devoted his boundless energy to the production 
of large scale and often spectacular attractions. He fervently hopes that his 
efforts will bring about a renaissance of interest in the stage arts, surpassing 
that of European audiences. He is convinced that people in America need only 
be made aware of great art and they will flock to it. Some years ago The New 
York Times declared editorially that “S, Hurok has done more for the cause of 
music than the invention of the phonograph.” 


Mr. Hurok managed the last American seasons of Anna Pavlowa and her 
Ballet Russe, Isadora Duncan, Fokine and Fokina, and Loie Fuller. He brought 
to this country the famous composers Richard Strauss and Alexander Glazounov. 
He has presented many celebrated violinists, including Mischa Elman, Efrem 
Zimbalist, Eugen Ysaye, Kubelik, and scores of great singers including Tetraz- 
zini, Gluck, Schumann-Heink and the immortal Chaliapin. He introduced Mary 
Wigman to New York, kindling a furore in the dance world that still continues, 
although interest has now turned to the brighter art of the Ballet Russe. He 
also delivered for American delectation the fiery Flamenco dancer, Vicente 
Escudero, Uday Shan-Kar and his Hindu Company, Trudi Schoop and her 
Comic Ballet. 


Through depressions and prosperity, Mr. Hurok has, single-handed, con- 
tinued to present large touring organizations of distinction. He managed the 
tours of the German Grand Opera, the Russian Grand Opera, the Habima 
Theatre, the Italian Piccoli Theatre, the Moscow Cathedral Choir and the 
Vienna Choir Boys. 


During the current season he will offer Marian Anderson, the sensational 
Negro contralto; Rudolf Serkin, the latest genius of the piano; the Kolisch 
Quartet, adjudged to be the finest string ensemble in the world; the Dana 
Singing Ensemble, a Polish quintet; Ginette Neveu, a phenomenal young 
French violinist; Joseph Schmidt, Europe’s current radio idol; Arthur Rubin- 
stein; a continental ensemble including Raphael, Victor Chenkin and Emma 
Runitch; and Mme. Pagliughi, a brilliant Italian coloratura soprano. 


Last and highly important, he will bring the Salzburg Opera Guild for its 
first American tour, beginning in the Fall of 1937. This is the famous troupe 
which took part in the recent Salzburg Music Festival where it received 
accolades of praise from press and public. 








Rachmaninoif 


OPERA HOUSE 
PROGRAM: FRIDAY EVE., 8:30 P. M. — FEB. 5 


1. Organ Fantasia and Fugue in G-minor.............................. Bach-Liszt 


2; -iponata,;. Opus, 09:20. ee ee Beethoven 
Vivace ma non troppo 
Adagio espressivo 
Prestissimo 
Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 


3. (a) Polonaise, C-minor 
(b) Nocturne .................. 


(ce) Mazutkar2 i ( SNE OAT pre r taave se 67 Serer e oF et Chopin 
(d) Rondo, Opus 16........ \ 
4. Four Etudes-Tableaux, Opus 33............0..000020000.000......-- Rachmaninoff 
C-sharp minor 
G-minor 
EK-flat minor 
E-flat major 
Sonnetto:del .Petrarca Nojs25*. 44028 eee eos Liszt 
Magic Wine c.2). ie See ee Wagner-Brassin 
Etude, -Ei-majorss62. 02 cs. case eee es Paganini-Liszt 


PROGRAM: SUNDAY AFT., 2:30 P. M. — FEB. 7 


LL. Variations, -A-majorincs oo ee ee ee Mozart 
2s. “Lhree: SOnataa ssc sees i ee eh wee ee ae Be Scarlatti 
3., -oonata, Opus)-58; B=mmors se ee Chopin 
A. -Prelud ect cians tee eset sth ee a pe nee Bach-Rachmaninoff 
5. 


(a) Daisies, song.... 
(b) Oriental Sketch 


6. (a) Nocturne, G-major........ ! ; 
(b) Nocturne, (Noon Tide) {70°00 John Field 


7. (a) Etude, D-flat major 





(b) Valse Oubliee No. 3 
(c) Polonaise, E-major.. 


$2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.10, Including Tax — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
MANAGEMENT: PETER. “GONL EY 





a 
15 











=. HuROK presents 
The WORLD S GREATLEom 








SALZBURG OPERA GUILD 


Sensation of last summer’s Salzburg Music Festival. 
One of the world’s greatest operatic organizations. 
Complete European Company in repertoire of unfa- 
miliar operatic masterpieces. Symphony Orchestra. First 
time in America. Season 1937-1938. 


TRUDI SCHOOP 


AND HER COMPANY OF COMIC DANCERS 


Second sensational coast to coast tour. 

“This Trudi Schoop Ballet is the most amusing and 
the most amazingly fresh entertainment in New Y orks 
writes Edna Ferber. “A dazzling evening in the theatre 
and a triumph of sheer talent.” 


FEODOR CHALIAPIN 


Great Russian Basso. 


MARIAN ANDERSON 


World’s Outstanding Contralto. 
One of the greatest living singers—New York Times. 


DANA ENSEMBLE 


Famous Polish Singing Quintet. 


——_—_—<—<———————————a SO 








ARTISTS and ORGANIZATIONS 
















UDAY SHAN-KAR 


AND HIS HINDU BALLET 


In a complete new repertoire of Hindu Dances. New 
Costumes and New Productions. 

“Beauty and Excitement”—-New York Times. “Gape 
in awe at the superlative beauty of Shan-Kar”—New 
York World Telegram. 


CONTINENTAL ENSEMBLE 


Emma Runitch - Victor Chenkin - Raphael 
Unique — Novel — Delightful 


RUDOLF SERKIN ‘OLISCH QUARTET 
New Genius of the Piano String Ensemble 


MADAME PAGLIUGHI GINETTE NEVEU 


Brilliant Italian Coloratura Gua rnp nd 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEPH SCHMIDT 


Triumphant Return Engagement Kurope’s Radio Idol 


VIENNA CHOIR BOYS 


Fifth American Tour 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION regarding these 
and other attractions which Mr. Hurok has engaged 
abroad, address Peter Conley, San Francisco Opera House, 
or Hurok Attractions, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 











j 
| 
! 
f 





formers are displaying their art, a young hussar enters and meets a charming 
girl. One of the strolling players, a dancer, recognizes in the hussar her former 
lover, and engages in a violent quarrel with his companion, who faints and is 
taken away by her parents. She contrives, however, to escape from them, and 
returns in time to interrupt a love scene between the hussar and the dancer, 
who retires vanquished, leaving the young couple together. The parents, having 
missed their daughter, now arrive on the scene and bestow their blessing. 


In the evening there is a public ball with a quadrille in which all join — old 
and young. The King of the Dandies, surrounded by young girls, adds to the 
general enjoyment. Returning to the scene the hussar and his sweetheart meet 
the dancer who, accepting the inevitable, becomes reconciled to them, and the 
happy ending of the idyll is merged in the gaiety of the throng. 


PA GtaStLC OG PUAN COT re. reer cekeketetoeenc eeavecoecneacpaep ein: ween eee Alexandra DANILOVA 
PH esc AUS COT tc oes. sees ee ee cece ee Tatiana _ RIABOUCHINSKA 
EY Ge ECTS Ges EV ATA oe ees «Stenbeck paths Sp cac ce caose desea? eu ebenecencesce se eeemneens Olga MOROSOVA 
PP WGt ERUSS aie sre oe co eet ose come eee Leonide MASSINE 
The. Kine otrthe Dandies s:22 cece eer ao ccck pees eee tee gees -David LICHINE 
PW ermA Chet eas 22 cuss ses dewencacs sbactvatevcuaeocereseussevsseencensee ene teense eee anew reee Marian LADRE 
TEOMA CMe 159-5 acs oa, to sg ieee acasessa gone cs anew navcdeaccenceaseeyaiee H. ALGERANOFF 
PPTs MOU Cit ocd eats asset oe epee oe pe ee eee A. ADRIANOVA 
Mes hater sonst ca S58 cag te ce ne epee acter ane Spnents aguas ieee tenet ceones: Gveapevanavessesee = B. BELSKY 
n@) Aa tis tog os hoe eotoencce eek Soe Re ak et aoe es pec erase eee ea A. KOSLOFF 
eG at GEM er 3c sco ose ea hac ele entecactie sae eetedcaus du snel an tetea aioe H. ALGERANOFF 


The Modistes: 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, GRIGORIEVA, MARRA, OBIDENNA 


The Needlewomen: 
Miles. OSATO, TRESAHAR 


The Ladies of the Town: 
Milles. NELIDOVA, SEROVA, RADOVA, STRAKHOVA 


The Salesmen: 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, PLATOFF 


The Dandies: 
MM. ALONSO, KATCHAROFF, MATOUCHEVSKY 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 


CAST SUBJECT TO CHANGES 





18 








Founder and Director General: COL. W. DE BASIL 
Maitre-de-Ballet and Artistic Collaborator: Leonide MASSINE 
Conductors: Efrem KURTZ and Antal DORATI 
Regisseur General: Serge GRIGORIEFF 








STAFF FOR S. HUROK 
David Libidins ) 


Matrice Winters) wt) °° (“tee ee eee wonipany Maver 
Gerald: \Goodesvr.t4 14. ee ere ee General Press Representative 
Pau) SVL ORT 9 att Oe es ala OO th eke Advance Press Representative 
Maes BrOnmrenie.6 0 pe caren 6 cutee on Executive Secretary 
Boris) Schwatznci..2. o2. uses a cee ee ee Concert Meister 
Nathan: Rosenis2 i. fee ts ey ee Orchestra Manager 
Glyde Smithy. 4.3, ce oo csaee eee ee ee Chief Carpenter 
Garl GieenSiccs:...c dudes Sho cea cape te ein Chief Property Man 
Gener Tierney S0icbo. 2 ian beet. ee Chief Electrician 
PRUVEUIS Cals ROSE aCe pee cia oet crue ent a ee Wardrobe Mistress 





ee 


The Management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion 
pictures inside the Theatre without written permission. 








EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
| 30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, N. Y. C. 











GArfield 4544 


WOR 


COLLECTOR ® DEALER @ APPRAISER 





Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows. High--Medium--Low Priced. 











The World’s Foremost Exponents of Dance Arts, Headed by The 
Monte Carlo Ballet Russe, Use and Recommend... 


SELVA TOE SLIPPERS 


Featured in the West Exclusively by 


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Golden Gate Theatre Bldg. — 25 Taylor St. — Phone PRospect 1643 


Dancing Shoes For Ballet-Toe, Tap, 

Accessories Spanish, Acrobatic, 

Dance Belts-Tights g Modern, 

Opera Lengths-Leotards Interpretative 
Import 


Retailers ZS [7 LE and 
Wholesalers . Export 


The BALLET JOOSS also chose DANCE ART BALLETS during recent San Francisco 
Engagement. In addition to the ‘‘Only Specialized Theatrical Shoe Service in Northern 
California’? DANCE ART also features complete Stocks of DAZIAN'’S, ASSOCIATED 
and MAHARAM Costume Fabrics, and ACCESSORIES FOR STAGE AND SCREEN. 
WIGS, MAKE-UP, and Musical Dance Accessories, are amon the thousands of theatrical 
necessities stocked for the convenience of the Dance and Theatrical Profession. 


Costume Pattern, Designing and Wardrobe Making Service 
Visitors Cordially Welcome to San Francisco’s Most Fascinating Shoppe. 
Catalog and price lists sent anywhere on request. — World Wide Mail Order Service. 


Headquarters for Parilia Costumes and Supplies. 


MUSICIANS MARVEL 


AT THE PERFECTED TONE BALANCE 
OF THE NEW 


BALDWIN - BUILT 





All who see this marvelous instru- 
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the eye, charms the ear, lures the 
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BALDWIN PIANOS 340 Sutter Steert 
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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


Conductor 


Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


1937 SEASON 


e 

Thur. 8:30 P. M., Jan. 28, WITH COL. W. DE BASIL’S 

Fri. 8:30 P. M., Jan. 29, 

Sat. 2:30P.M.Jan.30, + BALLET RUSSE 

t. : . M., Jan. 30, 

Bul 2:30P.M.,Jan.31, | AT THE OPERA HOUSE 

Fri, 2:30P.M., Feb. 5,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

Sat. 8:30P.M., Feb. 6,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 18, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Feb. 19, Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Feb. 20,Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 8:20 P. M., Feb. 26, Civic Auditorium, with Grace Moore, Soprano 

Fri. 2:30P.M., Mar. 5,Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 

Sat, 8:30P.M., Mar. 6,Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 

Tues. 8:15 P.M., Mar. 9, Memorial Chapel, Stanford University 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 11, Broadeast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri, 2:30 P. M., Mar. 19, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

Sat. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 20, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

Tues. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 23, Civic Auditorium, with Igor Stravinsky and 
San Francisco Municipal Chorus 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Thur. 8:15 P.M., Apr. 1, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 3, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Fri. 2:30P.M., Apr. 9,Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 10, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 10, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

Sun. 3:15 P.M., Apr. 11, University of California 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 15, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 


Fri, 2:30 P. M., Apr: 
Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 
Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 
Tues. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 
Fri. 2:30 P.M., Apr. 
Sat, 10:30 A. M., Apr. 
Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 
Sun. 3:00P. M., Apr. 


16, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

17, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

17, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

20, Civic Auditorium, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 

23, Opera House 

24, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

24, Opera House 

25,San Rafael 


TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS ON SALE 


SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


—————————————————XVSOOOEOCOXO———x<&=€lVRVT™T”{@2=2@{_——™™_—_—_ LL 


SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND 

























SS ee =e 
— eS 


stebeheceeteges vaca e— 






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Se a Oe Se 

























ee 





KAJETAN ATTL'S 
HARP ENSEMBLE 


Beginners or Advance Students Phone for appointment. 

When Buying or Renting a Harp only an Experienced 
Harpist can advise Correctly. 

Large Stock of Harps for Sale or Rent: 

1030 BUSH STREET Phone ORdway 6367 Studio No.6 


IO. OE 


First Harpist with San 

Francisco Symphony for 

Twenty-four Consecutive 
Years. 


a 
j 
| 
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é 



































MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


GRACE (MeO ORE 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — FRIDAY EVE., FEB. 26 





IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his 
“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” 
ALSO 
Rossini “STABAT MATER” Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 
MeU-Nd CTPA i -G-b- One S 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


5 YeL yr A abe 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 





RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 
























GEORGE PRING 






Studio 


Classic and 
modern ballet, 
character, 
Oriental 
dancing, 
Eurhythmics. 

Classes for 
beginners or 
advanced 
students, 
all ages. 


420 SUTTER STREET 


EE 






a 


If your product requires 
force and vigor, we stand 
ready at all times to 
render you the kind of 
service that makes the 
printed word SPEAK. 
Your message will carry 
its emphasis in a truly 
dignified manner. 





15 Columbus Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
SUtter 4772 





24 














PETER CONLEY Presents 
Ni ASN Cries 


MONTEUX 


DANCE RECITAL 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUESDAY EVE. FEB., 15, 8:30 P. M. 


PROGRAM 


Sarabande and Variations........ Corelli 
J. NIELSEN 
Gavotte ce eee ee eee Lulli 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Divertissements: -..02-----. Couperin 
J. NIELSEN 
Tempo di Ballov6 eee Scarlatti 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


Suite: Rondo, Minuet, Badinerie....Bach 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


Krench- Stitess.....6s eae Bach 


Pantomime oe ee eee Mozart 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


Country Dances... Beethoven 
J. NIELSEN 
French Revolutionary 
Dance .ossiereee (Popular Songs) 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Extract from Ballet Music 


from “Rosamunde’”’.........--.-- Schubert 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


Waltzes ee hace eee eee Brahms 
J. NIELSEN 

Valse -Romantiques. 2. -- Chabrier 

NANCIE MONTEUX 

NW el Giz tence oe cue eee Sees Chabrier 
J. NIELSEN 

Danse Sacrée 

Danse Profane 

Ea ret AR aoa Nae Debussy 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


Funeral March in 
Jazz Tempo ...... Castelnuovo-Tedesco 
(| LSE 


Danse Sericuse...c-..5- ee J. Nielsen 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
American Glacsic. 226 Handy 
J. NIELSEN 
March, from ‘“‘Love for 
Three Oranges nee Prokofieff 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


The Pasmore Quartet (Mary Pasmore, 
first violin, William Laraia, second 
violin, Erich Weiler, viola, and Dorothy 
Pasmore, cello) will play musique de 
scene during the intervals. 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 — 83¢ 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


SS 
rr 





TRUDI SCHOOP 
COMIC BALLET 


ALL NEW PROGRAM 


* 


O2P-E RUA Her UeseE 
W-EsDe 2 E NSE 8ee50 
Mi: SA RG ine alee 7, 


* 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 Including Tax 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


MAIN AcG BMCEON Peo Ph Bile G OuNe EBay 








THE ART COMMISSION 


EpGAR WALTER, President JosepH H. Dyer, JrR., Secretary 


P Rta Ne 


GRACE MOORE 


Nee dP: IRS Se (OPaiy 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Clive AU Di O han 
Friday Evening, February 26th 


Popular Prices: 25¢ — 50¢ — 75¢ — $1.00 
Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


Direction: MUSIC COMMITTEE - J. Emmet HAypen, Chairman 





























Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


FOUR SATURDAY MORNINGS (10:30 to 11:30) OPERA HOUSE 
APRIL 3 — APRIL 10 — APRIL 17 — APRIL 24 


e 
RESERVE SEASON TICKETS NOW 
Sherman, Clay & Co. Box Office - Sutter & Kearny Sts., San Francisco 


Please reserve the following Season Tickets for the 
Four Concerts for Young People: 


ORCHESTRA SEATS (*S 72:00! Peres eet G. Suee 
GRAND TIER SEATS @ 30002. eee oo eee 
DRESS CLRELEC SEATS. = (@es ol 10sa es oan eee 
BALCONY “CIRCLE: SEATS @eS 100 ane, , ener 
BALCONY (FIRSTS ROWS) @ 1.002... eae 
BALCONY (LAST 6 ROWS) @ 60... Gee 
BOXES (SEATING 8) @-$3000un eee 
TOTAL fea Se eee $ 


PAYMENT HEREWITH $————— 


BALANCE DUE 2] 3e0-22 S$ 
EMT 1 ee eT OC Ee 2 eee ON See CR RAD Le as th eee 
SEV OC be chit We he PPS SG Se 8 DO ha es eh pene eee 
(Os oN Eee RO A chro HORE x85 es, ae ee ee 
SCHOOL: cis meee ee ee Sk crcree hac one See ee ee 


PAE | 











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a Ee ee 
a 


The Man with the 


Baton 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 
maitre de musique 


He started to compose, a time ago, 
but stopped because everything sound- 
ed like Schumann or Debussy. In 
Paris he has a school for conductors 
and this year allowed all 10 students 
to take turns conducting on a single 
program. During the war he saw 
action at Verdun, Rheims, Soissons 
and the Argonne. For years he was 
known as the greatest viola player in 
Europe, now plays viola in a private 
quartet with Yehudi Menuhin, in fact 
is Yehudi’s professor of quartet. He 
conducts from memory because he 
studies each score so thoroughly he 
doesn’t need it in performance. He 
thinks that better music is being 
produced today than 20 years ago, 
and that today’s product is equal in 
quality to that of any past period. 

For the sake of the record we here 
append Mrs. Monteux’ neatly-written, 
complete account of her famous hus- 
band’s career: 


“Paris National Conservatory — 1st 
prize violin, viola, harmony and 
counterpoint, 

“Colonne Orchestra — lst viola (18 
years old); 2nd conductor. 


“Conductor: 
Concerts Berlioz (Paris) 
Orchestre Dieppe—concerts, opera 
Concerts d’avant-garde (Paris) 
Concerts Monteux (Paris) 
Ballets Russes de Diaghileff 
—5 years 

Metropolitan Opera—1916-1919 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
—1919-1924 

Concertgebouw (Amsterdam) 
—1924-1934 

Société Wagner (Amsterdam) 

Paris Symphony Orchestra 
—1930-1937 

San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra—1935 


“Has conducted every major orches- 
tra in Europe. Only French conductor 
to direct Berlin Philharmonic and 


28 











Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras, also 
Salzburg Festival. Has conducted 
many times in the Hollywood Bowl, 
as well as the Los Angeles Orchestra 
and the Philadephia Orchestra. 

“Creator of many modern works in- 
cluding ‘Petrouchka,’ ‘Sacre du Prin- 
temps,’ ‘Chant du Rossignol’ of Stra- 
vinsky; ‘Daphnis et Chloe,’ Ravel; 
‘Jeux’ of Debussy, and this year start- 
led musical Europe with a magnificent 
rendering of Darius Milhaud’s ‘Chris- 
tophe Colombe’ in which he employed 
the great French Chorus of Nantes, 
16 soloists and the Paris Symphony 
Orchestra.” 

And to complete the account, here 
is a list of Pierre Monteux’ Victor 
recordings compiled by the obliging 
H. W. Wilson of the Record Library: 

M-111—BERLIOZ, “Symphonie 

Fantastique,” Paris Symphony 
Orchestra 

M-230—PAGANINI, Violin concerto 

in D major, with Yehudi Menuhin 
M-231—MOZART, Violin concerto in 
D major, No. 7, with Yehudi 
Menuhin 

M-246—MOZART, Violin concerto 
in D major (“The Adelaide’’) 
with Yehudi Menuhin 

11140-1—_BERLIOZ, “Benvenuto 
Cellini” Overture, Op. 23, and 
“Troyens a Carthage” Overture. 





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Mursda 

day | 


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Nation 





MAIL ORDER BLANK 


FOURTaA ANN UAL DCL. LA KK OP ERAS EA SOwW. 
Tom C. Girton 


Presents 


FORTUNE GALLO 


and his 


SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
FEBRUARY 26 TO MARCH 14 INCLUSIVE 


Operas — 22 Performances — 6 Repeats — Tickets: 55¢, 83¢, $1.10, $1.65, $1.93 (tax included) 





$1.93 $1.65 $1.10 $1.65 $1.10 83¢ BB¢ i 

Dates Operas Box 1st 12rows| Balance Grand Dress Balcony Bal i 
Seats | Orchestra | Orchestra Tier Circle Circle acu H 

Rata it 

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iday Eve., Feb. 26; Aida 

turday Mat., ” ##27| Martha and Ballet 
turdiy Eve., ” 27/11 Trovatore 

Inday Mat., ” 28) Rigoletto 


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————- 


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Inday Eve., ” 28| Carmen 

onday Eve., March 1) Mamade Butterfly 
Uesday Eve, ” #2! La Traviata 
ednesday Eve.,” 8] Jewels of the 


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tursday Eve., ” 4] Cavalleria and 

Pagliacci ee Le. Vesacdedumstban cue testy Sasa sk beat SoESEEe Hl ncuape teers NCEE: Sea ea asathascfetccteesealteticoe eee 
day Eve., ~~ Ol Dolengrin: 660 8 tS ee ee ee | ia neers Ded i cd ee eae 
aturday Mat., ” 61! Lucia di 

Lammermoor) ei | as eee est Sree te ad a Ear rere fer rrr eer. ee 4 
Inday Mat, ”  7|Madame Butterfly |... bcsessessseecceeon ssibSRcciotisccgats |eampegeeeecaees 
inday Eve., mE SUN Camere eM scehouc  S aaree e a a a  e e ecs we|C ee 
mnday Kven* “Ae Sino haw at, halite pine ee erence creat fe ae bre Ns © 
meday Eve; °° (Ol Wanst.  o6 fo. FG Be et ee a ee | | ee 


Wednesday Eve.” 10] La Gioconda 


Mursday Eve, ” 11] I Trovatore 


SPOS SS oe csacesoseras PCOOSSOSIISOSOSPORPOS beowcaunsceresSOSeSOSSe Peteccsessvessessesess | secacceseseresssesee eesceseeces==--anerse Povcasesecocssesseses 


itiday Eve., ” 12! Rigoletto 


saturday Mat. ” 418] L’Oracoloand Ballet 
and Pagliacci _|.................... ssgbbnedualss leslebhGa Leste sencepeauest2eee Pace! pau cuntectseccca\[acee-y hte eaasies 3 pete on ae ee ee 


saturday Eve, ” 138| La Tosca 


PSO OSS SSS O HOS OS OOT OES POSS COS OSSD SOOO DOO SS? LOSSES OS SHSOSSSOSSSO OD WS SSSOSSSS SSO SOOSS EOS boy eeeSss SS SS SSS SESESS [SSOTVSSOSSO TOSSES SSS POSSESS OSSS SSE SOSSOSES 


PindayMat, ” 414| Aida 





minday Eve, ” 14| Madame Butterfly | 


ee eee ee er ee ee ert ttre rere eet ett errr rt ree ere rT) 





L ORDERS NOW BEING RECEIVED THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 
rTeservations will be filled in order received. Ground Floor Kohler & Chase Bldg., 26 O’Farrell St., San Francisco 
Telephone: EXbrook 6696 
ail Order Coupon ‘The, enclosed :Check: |S. s.csccsesnaxctreoan atari ee is in full payment 
Nation desired SOP Sh ins oc eA ae eee seats as indicated in above space. 
Name: (print) isse sd cosets cdere ated saseas ph actu be ebeeescoesesesncegcaeababeeea acevo ease canton aan eae een 
PGP CRE oe Sess ee NER eon ae cde ee ee 








MUSICAL DIRECTORY 


VOCAL 





Rena Lazelle 


VOCAL TEACHER AND COACH 


Well Known Pupils: Elbert Bellows, Fred- 
eric Bittke, Albert Browne, Worden Dixon, 
Esther Green, Reba Greenley, Lysbeth 
Hughes, Herbert Maas, Margie Nemes, 
Eleanor Nielson, Andrew Robertson, Jean- 
ette Sholl, Franziska Weiss 


3435 Sacramento Street WaAlnut 3307 
Mondays: Hotel Oakland, Oakland 





Joseph Greven 
VOICE SPECIALIST 


Teacher of Many Local Favorite and 
Prominent European and American Artists 


927 Lake St. BAyview 5278 





Mme. Beatrice Bowman 


Teacher of Emily Hardy, Alice Avakian, 
Ralina Zarova 


2217 California St. Tel. WEst 4406 





Nino Comel 
VOCAL TEACHING — COACHING 
Teacher of Josephine Tumminia and 
Mari Monte 
376 Sutter St. DOuglas 6379. AShberry 7438 





Beatrice Lewis 
STUDIO OF THE MODERN DANCE 


533 Post Street 


ORdway 0829 







SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


DAY AND EVENING COURSES 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 
NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 








30 





Henley Voice Studio 


Enid Henley, Soprono-Teacher; Homer 
Henley, Nationally Known Vocal 
Authority 


Studio: 2847 Union St. Tel. WE 9036 


Pas AN*O 


Malen Bumett School of Music 


Thorough training from kindergarten to 
concert stage. Courses for those training 
to be teachers. 


2580 Broadway. 


B LINCOLN 
ATCHELDE 
CONCERT PIANIST - TEACHER 


555 SUTTER ST. © SUtter 4970 


Tel. Fillmore 1898 


508 SUTTER nr POWELL 





WaAlnut 3496 












(BERT WALLACE 


HEHOUSE OF FURS one Forty six GEARY 


DCHUTIFUL MORE 
RAGUL SWAGGERS 


As a noteworthy feature of the 
Annual Robert Wallace January 
Clearance Sale we now present a 
elorious selection of fine black 
Caracul swagger coats. Carefully 


selected pelts... exquisite texture 


expert craftsmanship assure ™ 


you of many outstanding values. 
The lovely coat illustrated is one 
of many smart styles, especially 


priced for this sale event at only 


I] 





























The magic beauty of world 
famous symphonies is yoursto 
enjoy whenever you wish with 


Victor Higher Fidelity 
RECORDS 


In fact, Victor records offer the one 
way to hear your favorite symphonies 
at any time that you desire! They 
give you all the greatest symphonies 
of the world’s greatest composers... 
played by the world’s finest symphony 
orchestras. Victor’s new higher fidelity 
recordings capture every delicate 
whisper of every instrument with the 
same clearness and brilliance that 
thrill music lovers at the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony concerts. 





Tune in on K]BS every evening at 
10:00 P. M. for two hours of 
popular and classical music . . 


KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS 


OAKLAND: H.C. CAPWELL'S ... Fourth Floor 


These are but a few of the symphonies 
available on Victor Higher Fidelit 
Recordings | 


Symphony No. 7 in A Major 
(Ludwig van Beethoven, Opus 92) 

Played by Arturo Toscanini 

and Philharmonic Orchestra 

of New York. 5 records with $4() 

album 

Symphony No. 4 in G Major 
(Antonin Dvorak) 

Played by the Philharmonic 

Orchestra by Vaclav Talich. $750 

5 records with album 


Schubert’s Symphony No. 8 
in B Minor (unfinished) 
Played by Koussevitzky and 
the Boston Symphony Orches- $6°° 
tra. 3 records with album 


Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 

4 in A Major 
Played by Serge Koussevitzky 
and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. 8 records with 56°! 
album 








SAN TRANG fe ees 
SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 








COL. W. de BASIL'S 


BALLET 
RUSSE 


p 
DAS 


\ 


Tie 
pame | 
750 x \Z\ 
AL HF 
r g 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO 


Presented by THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ANGELO ROSSI, Mayor 
6 EDGAR WALTER, President JOSEPH H. DYER, Secretary 
Direction of Music Committee: J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 
THE BALLET RUSSE IS UNDER MANAGEMENT OF S. HUROK 
















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OP ics florals, 
__ conventional patterns 
,.. dark backgrounds 


Misses’ and women's 






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DRESS SALON © FOURTH FLOOR 


CARN RN AY RET PROSE ERSTE AE 








THE ART COMMISSION TP RES Nis 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


AND 


Col. W.de BASIL’s BALLET RUSSE 


(EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT S. HUROK) 


Saturday Matinee, January 30th, 1937 


i 


LE LAC DES CYGNES 
(THE SWAN LAKE) 


Choreographic Poem in One Act 
Music by P. TCHAIKOVSKY 
Choreography after M. PETIPA 
Scenery by Prince A, SCHERVACHIDZE 
Costumes Executed by Mme. O. LAROSE 


This is an abridged version of a four-act ballet composed by Tchaikovsky 
between August, 1875, and March, 1876, and produced at Moscow, February 
20th, 1877. 


The story concerns a Princess and her companions who have been changed 
into swans by the spells of a wicked sorcerer, but are permitted to resume 
human shape from midnight to dawn. A young Prince and his friends have 
planned a nocturnal hunt near a lake where, the night before, they had seen 
a flock of swans. But the Queen of the Swans reveals herself to the Prince, 
who orders the hunt to be abandoned. He falls in love with the Queen of the 
Swans, but at break of day she and her companions becomes swans once more 
and fly away. The Prince attempts to follow them, but the Sorcerer bars the 
way. Powerless against his spells, the Prince dies. 


whe Queen of ithe Swans 32)... ee Alexandra DANILOVA 
HOt Pin G65 2h cas eee ee Pee en De ee Paul PETROFF 
ihe WN rienduor GaeyErinice: cere. eee ee ee Serge BOUSLOFF 


OME VIL. Geniusss.< seve sce, ese ree ne Mare PLATOFF 


(Continued on page 6) 


3 












Kearny at Sutter 


Sherman |) cary at Sati 


Fourth Floor, Oakland 


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OPERA HOUSE - WEDNESDAY F F B 3 
MATINEE 3:15 — NIGHT 8:20 : 





ALL SEATS RESERVED: $1.10 — 83¢ — 55¢ Including Tax 


On Sale Now: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland 

















The Swans: 
Tamara GRIGORIEVA and Lubov ROSTOVA 
Milles. ABRICOSSOVA, ADRIANOVA, CHABELSKA, CHAMIE, LVOVA, 
MARRA, NELIDOVA, OBIDENNA, OSATO, RADOVA, RAZOUMOVA, 
SEROVA, STRAKHOVA, TRESAHAR, VOLKOVA 


Dance of the Little Swans: 
Milles. NELIDOVA, RAZOUMOVA, TRESAHAR, VOLKOVA 


The Huntsmen: 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALONSO, ISMAILOFF, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, 
MATOUCHEVSKY, ZEGLOVSKY, ZORITCH 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 








INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 











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PETROUCHKA 


A Burlesque in Four Acts 


Book by Alexandre BENOIS and Igor STRAVINSKY 
Music by Igor STRAVINSKY 
Choreography after Michel FOKINE 
Curtain, Scenery and Costumes by Alexandre BENOIS: 
The action of this Ballet takes place in St. Petersburg in 1830. 


SCENE I. 


During the festivities of a fete week, an old oriental Charlatan intrigues a 
crowd of revellers with his “Animated Puppets.” These three dolls, which he 
calls Petrouchka, the Dancing Girl and the Blackamoor, perform a wild dance 
of passionate abandon. 


SCENE II. 


The cunning of the Charlatan’s magic has inspired into these creatures all 
the passions of humanity, and Petrouchka, being endowed with a greater 


(Continued on page 10) 


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Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
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1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 

















RUILE BY LINCOLN TO. THE 
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RESERVED SEATS VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
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SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. EIGHT THIRTY O’CLOCE 








amount than either of the others, consequently feels and suffers more than the 
Blackamoor or the Dancing Girl. With acute bitterness he endures the 
Charlatan’s cruelties, his own slavery and his exclusion from the daily life 
around him, and his extreme ugliness. He longs to find consolation in the 
Dancing Girl’s love, and believes he is about to gain it. The pretty girl, how- 
ever, flies from him, as his wild airs and queer ways arouse in her not love, 
but fear. 


SCENE III. 


The Blackamoor’s existence is a very different matter. Though he is stupid 
and bad, his splendid appearance and sumptuous attire completely ensnare the 
Dancing Girl, who uses all her wiles to attract him, which she succeeds in 
doing. A love scene between the two is interrupted by Petrouchka, raging with 
jealous passion; but the Blackamoor swiftly throws him out. 


SCENE IV. 


The fete is at its height, when a gay pedlar, accompanied by some singing 
gipsies, scatters handfuls of notes among the crowd. Nursemaids dance with 
coachmen, and a trainer arrives with his performing bear. Finally parties of 
masqueraders drive the revellers into a frenzy of gaiety. 


Suddenly, from the Charlatan’s little theatre, a shrill cry is heard. The 
desperate rivalry between Petrouchka and the Blackamoor has ended in 
tragedy. The puppets dash from the theatre in confusion, the Blackamoor 
attacks Petrouchka with a sword and, surrounded by the horrified crowd, 
he dies in the snow. 


A police officer fetches the Charlatan, who hastens to calm the crowd by 
explaining to them that Petrouchka is only a puppet, and that it is his art that 
made the puppet live. He tells those around him to make certain for themselves 
that the figure has only a wooden head and a sawdust body. 


As the crowds disperse the Charlatan is left alone. He is horrified to see 
above his little theatre the ghost of Petrouchka, which threatens him, and 
mockingly makes grimaces at the people whom the Charlatan has fooled. 





CA+sHTGHLIGHT]: OF PAE CUICREN T SEASON 
The World Famous N. Y. AMERICAN 


HART HOUSE _ ONE 
STRING QUARTET. 


James Levy : Arn Adaskin : Milton Blackstone : Boris Hambourg 


MONDAY F f B 8 COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 
EVENING js Sutter at Mason 


Reserved Seats at: Sherman, Clay & Co., 55¢, 85¢, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20 
Vallely Current Review — FEBRUARY 11 — Fairmont 
MANAGEMENT: ALICE SECKELS-ELSIE CROSS 





10 




















The Dance i casccenc ten pan eee eters te eg ed eee Tamara TOUMANOVA 


Petrotichilea ccc: oo: ae acteaa escent ee Leonide MASSINE 
The Blackamioors:...cha% 017i a David LICHINE 
The: Old. Charlatan 125.425. 055.20. .202 i ee i Marian LADRE 
the ChiefaNursemaidsn.06 9, oe gts 6. aA e ee Lara OBIDENNA 


Bveisisughen ase toudeusdaestathacel GMs si a ee eee a ee Serge ISMAILOFF 
Pe ee Mt 2M AT Samer Teh Sy the S Mare PLATOFF 


The Nursemaids: 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, GRIGORIEVA, MARRA, MOROSOVA, 
NELIDOVA, RAZOUMOVA, ROSTOVA 


The Coachmen. 
MM. ALGERANOFF, BOUSLOFF, ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 


The Grooms: 


Michel KATCHAROFF, Narcisse MATOUCHEVSKY 


The Gipsies: 
Miles. DELAROVA, LIPKOVSKA 


The Street Dancers: 
Miles. CHAMIE, VOLKOVA 


The Showman of the Fair: 
M. ALEXANDROFF 


The Masqueraders: 
Miles. OSATO, STRAKHOVA 
MM, ZORITCH, LIPATOFF 
Pedlars, Officers, Soldiers, Aristocrats, Ladies, Children, Maids, 


Cossacks, Policemen, Animal Trainers, ete. 


Conductor: Pierre MONTEUX 











INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 











(Continued on page 18) 


11 





KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much ss, 


>I + (% 
\' 


AWAY 

oN 
<\/ BP 
Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 


make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning . . . vow. 


to your family *% 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


TRUST DEPARTMENT 


Wells Fargo Bank 


and 
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Market at Montgomery Market at Grant Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 








Poe ie CON Ee 


P Pi CaS CLAS 


MARIAN 
ANDERSON 


Opera House (Only Recital) 
WED. EVE., FEB. 24, 8:30 


PORVOVG Rav Mi 


I. 
Begrucesunge: 2) ee Haendel 
Chio mai vi pOssa.:-.....2:. Haendel 
ICIIANIA ri ee rece Haendel 
Ah Spietato 
(ArmMadizei.) eae Haendel 
II. 
Liebesbotschaft ................ Schubert 
AVe MAT As aes eee Schubert 
Der Tod und das 
Maedchen..................---..- Schubert 
Die; Forelle 2:35 Schubert 
ITI. 
Air of “Don Carlos” 
(©; Don atale). 22 cis Verdi 
LV: 
Die Fusswaschung............. Kilpinen 
Schilfrohr, saeus’le 
(Saev, saev, susa).......... Sibelius 
Sung in Swedish 
Die Wibelleteca.e teers cose: Sibelius 
Wer es ein Traum.............. Sibelius 
Sung in German 
¥; 


Negro Spirituals: 
City called Heaven....Hall Johnson 
Lord, I can’t stay 


WAY career 5 ee, Roland Hayes 
CLuCciINI Ona. eee John Payne 
My soul’s been anchored 

In. theveord. 5... Florence Price 

@ 


TICKETS: $2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 














S. Hurok 


S. Hurok, manager of most of the outstanding dance attractions in this 
country today, is unique among the great impresarios of music, dance and the 
drama, having confined his efforts chiefly to the importation of celebrated 
European organizations. He has done more to bring to the masses the highest 
type of entertainment than anyone connected with the amusement world. 


With uncanny judgment, he has imported year after year, the best of 
foreign attractions, has fostered many careers in this country, and has been 
associated for a quarter of a century with the most significant artists of all lands. 


A Russian with ideals and a positive conviction that the American public 
can lend its appreciation to the finest artists and organizations, he has left 
small things to others, and has devoted his boundless energy to the production 
of large scale and often spectacular attractions. He fervently hopes that his 
efforts will bring about a renaissance of interest in the stage arts, surpassing 
that of European audiences. He is convinced that people in America need only 
be made aware of great art and they will flock to it. Some years ago The New 
York Times declared editorially that “S, Hurok has done more for the cause of 
music than the invention of the phonograph.” 


Mr. Hurok managed the last American seasons of Anna Pavlowa and her 
Ballet Russe, Isadora Duncan, Fokine and Fokina, and Loie Fuller. He brought 
to this country the famous composers Richard Strauss and Alexander Glazounov. 
He has presented many celebrated violinists, including Mischa Elman, Efrem 
Zimbalist, Eugen Ysaye, Kubelik, and scores of great singers including Tetraz- 
zini, Gluck, Schumann-Heink and the immortal Chaliapin. He introduced Mary 
Wigman to New York, kindling a furore in the dance world that still continues, 
although interest has now turned to the brighter art of the Ballet Russe. He 
also delivered for American delectation the fiery Flamenco dancer, Vicente 
Escudero, Uday Shan-Kar and his Hindu Company, Trudi Schoop and her 
Comic Ballet. 


Through depressions and prosperity, Mr. Hurok has, single-handed, con- 
tinued to present large touring organizations of distinction. He managed the 
tours of the German Grand Opera, the Russian Grand Opera, the Habima 
Theatre, the Italian Piccoli Theatre, the Moscow Cathedral Choir and the 


Vienna Choir Boys. 


During the current season he will offer Marian Anderson, the sensational 
Negro contralto; Rudolf Serkin, the latest genius of the piano; the Kolisch 
Quartet, adjudged to be the finest string ensemble in the world; the Dana 
Singing Ensemble, a Polish quintet; Ginette Neveu, a phenomenal young 
French violinist; Joseph Schmidt, Europe’s current radio idol; Arthur Rubin- 
stein; a continental ensemble including Raphael, Victor Chenkin and Emma 


Runitch; and Mme. Pagliughi, a brilliant Italian coloratura soprano. 


Last and highly important, he will bring the Salzburg Opera Guild for its 
first American tour, beginning in the Fall of 1937. This is the famous troupe 
which took part in the recent Salzburg Music Festival where it received 
accolades of praise from press and public. 




















Rachmaninoff 








OPERA HOUSE 


PROGRAM: FRIDAY EVE., 8:30 P. M. — FEB. 5 


1. 
2. 


Organ Fantasia and Fugue in G-minor.............................. Bach-Liszt 


Sonatas vO purse 209s er 2 eine ee ee nn ae Beethoven 
Vivace ma non troppo 
Adagio espressivo 
Prestissimo 
Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 


(a) Polonaise, C-minor ] 


(b) Nocturne .....:.2-....... | : 
Cc) Mazurka te. 2). ( ETS aap eo Ge eae mage eae Chopin 
(d) Rondo, Opus 16........ } 
Four Etudes-Tableaux, Opus 33......00.....0...-.-000c0000000--- Rachmaninoff 

C-sharp minor 

G-minor 

K-flat minor 

E-flat major 
Sonnetto: del) PetrarcaiNo:23....25 eo. 2 ee Liszt 
Magic. Wires 225. ccc ee ot i ee Wagner-Brassin 
Eitude; Bi -Maj Ob ei5 oso cence eee eT ON Paganini-Liszt 


PROGRAM: SUNDAY AFT., 2:30 P. M. — FEB. 7 


AE i aad) Mle 


Variations, A-majorcsuccee oe ee ee Mozart 
Three: Sonatas 2 cc: ae eee ee ee eee Scarlatti 
Sonata, Opus 58, B-minor:...0 2.2 ee Chopin 
PPG LUG Oy eke. See sacs pee a eee See Bach-Rachmaninoff 


(a) Daisies, song.... 
(b) Oriental Sketch 


(a) Nocturne, G-majocr........ 1 ; 
(b) Nocturne, (Noon Tide) {00 00 John Field 


(a) Etude, D-flat major 
(b) Valse Oubliee No. 3 
(c) Polonaise, E-major.. | 


$2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.10, Including Tax — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


MANAGEMENT: PETER "CON UE V 


A a TES SSeS ere ree 


15 














S. HuUROK presents 
The WORLD’S GREATEST 








SALZBURG OPERA GUILD 


Sensation of last summer’s Salzburg Music Festival. 
One of the world’s greatest operatic organizations. 
Complete European Company in repertoire of unfa- 
miliar operatic masterpieces. Symphony Orchestra. First 
time in America. Season 1937-1938. 


TRUDI SCHOOP 


AND HER COMPANY OF COMIC DANCERS 


Second sensational coast to coast tour. 

“This Trudi Schoop Ballet is the most amusing and 
the most amazingly fresh entertainment in New Yorke 
writes Edna Ferber. “A dazzling evening in the theatre 
and a triumph of sheer talent.” 


FEODOR CHALIAPIN 


Great Russian Basso. 


MARIAN ANDERSON 


World’s Outstanding Contralto. 
One of the greatest living singers—New York Times. 


DANA ENSEMBLE 


Famous Polish Singing Quintet. 


i = 





ARTISTS and ORGANIZATIONS 
















UDAY SHAN-KAR 


AND His HINDU BALLET 


In a complete new repertoire of Hindu Dances. New 
Costumes and New Productions. 

“Beauty and Excitement”—New York Times. ‘“Gape 
in awe at the superlative beauty of Shan-Kar’”—New 
York World Telegram. 


CONTINENTAL ENSEMBLE 


Emma Runitch - Victor Chenkin - Raphael 
Unique — Novel — Delightful 


RUDOLF SERKIN ‘OLISCH QUARTET 
New Genius of the Piano String Bae nIe 


MADAME PAGLIUGHI GINETTE NEVEU 


Brilliant Italian Coloratura Veda eee ie 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEPH SCHMIDT 


Triumphant Return Engagement Europe’s Radio Idol 


VIENNA CHOIR BOYS 


Fifth American Tour 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION regarding these 
and other attractions which Mr. Hurok has engaged 
abroad, address Peter Conley, San Francisco Opera House, 
or Hurok Attractions, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 





17 








3. 


PRINCE IGOR 


Polovtsien Dances from the Opera “Prince Igor” 


Music by BORODINE 
Choreography after Michel FOKINE 
Scenery and Costumes by Nicholas ROERICH 


“The Tale of the Armament of Igor’ is the greatest of Russian historical 
epics. Its hero lived from 1151 to 1202, and was eighth in descent from Rurik, 
the founder of the oldest Russian State. In the distribution of Provinces, which 
was the family custom, he became Prince of Novgorod-Seversk, a petty state, 
of which Poultivle was the capital. In 1185 he led a great expedition against 
the Polovtsi, a Tartar tribe occupying the plains of the Don. He was taken 
prisoner with his son, Vladimir, but the mighty Khan Kontchak, ruler of the 
Polovtsi, was magnanimous and hospitable. Instead of treating the two Princes 
as captives, he gave a banquet in their honour, followed by dances, in which 
the warriors and their womenfolk took part. These dances are a prominent 
feature in the opera which Borodine composed on the basis of the old saga. 
The march, which takes the place of an overture, is borrowed from the third 
act, where it is associated with the victorious return to camp of the Polovtsi, 
laden with booty from Poultivle. 


AS POlOV ESTO. VWOTNISAT exces a tee eeceeeeces Tamara GRIGORIEVA 
IAS Palowts eri Give ae ee ane neo cone Vera NELIDOVA 
A POLOVESICTE “WAVEHO Rare cee rose coc se cata eee ee eteae eee David LICHINE 


The Polovtsien Women: 
Mlles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, DELAROVA, LVOVA, MARRA, 
MOROSOVA, OBIDENNA, OSATO, RADOVA, RAZOUMOVA, VOLKOVA 


The Polovtsien Girls: 
Miles. ADRIANOVA, LEONTIEVA, LIPKOVSKA, PETROVA, ROSTOVA, 
SEROVA, STRAKHOVA, TRESAHAR 


The Polovtsien Warriors: 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, BELSKY, BOROVANSKY, 
BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, JASINSKY, PETROFF, PLATOFF, 
ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY, ZORITCH 


The Polovtsien Boys: 
MM. ALONSO, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, LADRE, LIPATOFF, 
MATOUCHEVSKY 


18 


Conductor: Pierre MONTEUX 





2 a a oe Sa a ee ee 
CAST SUBJECT TO CHANGES 











Founder and Director General: COL. W. DE BASIL 
Maitre-de-Ballet and Artistic Collaborator: Leonide MASSINE 
Conductors: Efrem KURTZ and Antal DORATI 
Regisseur General: Serge GRIGORIEFF 


a ee 
STAFF FOR S. HUROK 


David. Erbidiis: oh ak ne eee she MirenemeS a! Company Managers 
Maurice Winters } 

Gerald| Good @o..i-2) bn .25,, Wes eek a en cy General Press Representative 
Faun, Morris. 2037 eee ee ene Advance Press Representative 
Mae: Frohman}: sicher 2. es ahr Executive Secretary 
Boris Schwarzs.c3 sk eee ore ie ene ee ee a Concert Meister 
Nathan, Rosen...25.3. 22840) toys cece ee Orchestra Manager 
Clyde 5 rin sac case oa os ea oe ee alle here ee Chief Carpenter 
Car): Greemin® 22 Sec is. eal aie ee cee a ee Chief Property Man 
Gene: Pier Gy: 5:9 tes: halen Oh cee. a od Chief Electrician 
Augusta Wesan ded fo. 20 sok st eee hee ee Wardrobe Mistress 


oo 


The Management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion 
pictures inside the Theatre without written permission. 





EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, N. Y, C. 








GArfield 4544 


COLLECTOR @® DEALER @ APPRAISER 


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es advertised 






therein 














San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


1937 SEASON 











2 

Thur. 8:30 P. M., Jan. 28, © _W. DE BASIL’S 

Fri. 8:30 P.M., Jan. 29, WH Ole Wayne 

Sat. 2:30P.M,Jan.30, |} BALLET RUSSE 

Sat. 8:30P.M., Jan. 30, 

Sun. 2:30P.M.,Jan.31, | AT THE OPERA HOUSE 

Fri, 2:30P.M., Feb. 5,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Feb. 6,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Thur, 8:15 P. M., Feb. 18, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Feb. 19, Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Feb. 20,Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 8:20 P.M., Feb. 26, Civic Auditorium, with Grace Moore, Soprano 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Mar. 5,Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 

Sat, 8:30P.M., Mar. 6,Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 

Tues. 8:15 P.M., Mar. 9,Memorial Chapel, Stanford University 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Mar. 19, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

Sat. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 20, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

Tues. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 23, Civic Auditorium, with Igor Stravinsky and 
San Francisco Municipal Chorus 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Thur. 8:15 P.M., Apr. 1, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 38, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Fri. 2:30P.M., Apr. 9,Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 10, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 10, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

Sun. 3:15 P.M., Apr. 11, University of California 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 15, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri, 2:30 P.M., Apr. 16, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 17, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 17, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

Tues. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 20, Civic Auditorium, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Apr. 23, Opera House 

Sat, 10:30 A. M., Apr. 24, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 24, Opera House 

Sun. 3:00 P. M., Apr. 25,San Rafael 


TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 





SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND 





KAJETAN ATTL'S 
HARP ENSEMBLE 


Beginners or Advance Students Phone for appointment. 


First Harpist with San 
Francisco Symphony for 
Twenty-four Consecutive 

Vears. Large Stock of Harps for Sale or Rent: 


1030 BUSH STREET Phone ORdway 6367 Studio No.6 


When Buying or Renting a Harp only an Experienced 
Harpist can advise Correctly. 











MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH ? 


GRACE MOORE 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — FRIDAY EVE., FEB. 26 











IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his 
“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” 
ALSO 
Rossini “STABAT MATER” Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 


MU Nid G1 PvA LCi O Reuss 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


ST VO A ee 


| CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 











RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 





EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 








23 











GEORGE PRING 






Studio 


Classic and 
modern ballet, 
character, 
Oriental 
dancing, 
Eurhythmics. 
Classes for 
beginners or 
advanced 
students, 
all ages. 


420 SUTTER STREET 


ee 






—— 


If your product requires 
force and vigor, we stand 
ready at all times to 
render you the kind of 
service that makes the 
printed word SPEAK. 
Your message will carry 
its emphasis in a truly 
dignified manner. 





15 Columbus Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
SUtver 47°72 

















PETER CONLEY Presents 
NAN €C iE 


ON TEU X 


DANCE RECITAL 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUESDAY EVE. FEB., 15, 8:30 P. M. 


PeRnOeG Wy Aww 


Sarabande and Variations........ Corelli 
J. NIELSEN 
Gavotte Soko See eee Lulli 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Divertissemeénts 2.....-.---...-. Couperin 
NIELSEN 


Tempo di Ballo 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


Suite: Rondo, Minuet, Badinerie....Bach 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
E'TGNCD UllOi a saccteecagsst ey ane Bach 
J. NIELSEN 
Pantomime $425. Mozart 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Country Dances=.........- a... Beethoven 
J. NIELSEN 
French Revolutionary 
Dane i ara CP ae Songs) 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Extract from Ballet Music 
from “Rosamunde’’.............. Schubert 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Waltzes 2 sere Fe eek Brahms 
J. NIELSEN 
Valse Romantique..........-:.. Chabrier 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Welt ante te eee cee Chabrier 
J. NIELSEN 
Danse Sacrée 
Danse Profane 
oe Se ers Debussy 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


Funeral March in 
Jazz Tempo ...... Oasis meee neacec° 


J. NIELSE 
Danse: SCEICUSC. 3. acre eee J. Nielsen 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
American ‘Classic: 2 =23....3.8 22 Handy 
J. NIELSEN 


March, from “‘Love for 


Three Oranwes - ee Prokofieff 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


The Pasmore Quartet (Mary Pasmore, 
first violin, William lLaraia, secon 
violin, Erich Weiler, viola, and Dorothy 
Pasmore, cello) will play musique de 
scene during the intervals. 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 — 83¢ 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CQO. 











TRUDI SCHOOP 
COMIC BALLET 


ALL NEW PROGRAM 


* 


OPERA fh OW St 
WE Da EVES 2675) 
Me AR eC eel 


* 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 Including Tax 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


MANAGEMENT: PETER CONLEY 








THE ART COMMISSION 


EDGAR WALTER, President JosepH H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 


PRES ENT s 


GRACE MOORE 


eccieenan inane lens atewieNiclanaan ine tani dn inti 


TV WNe SP RA SO ey, 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


ChyvealO "2 U Dion ues 
Friday Evening, February 26th 
Popular Prices: 25¢ — 50¢ — 75¢ — $1.00 
Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
Direction: MUSIC COMMITTEE - J. Emmet Haypen, Chairman 
































Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


FOUR SATURDAY MORNINGS (10:30 to 11:30) OPERA HOUSE 
APRIL 3 — APRIL 10 — APRIL 17 — APRIL 24 


& 
RESERVE SEASON TICKETS NOW 
Sherman, Clay & Co. Box Office - Sutter & Kearny Sts., San Francisco 


Please reserve the following Season Tickets for the 
Four Concerts for Young People: 


ORCHESTRA SEATS QS: 2OUR Ss ener $—-—— -—— 
GRAND TIER SEATS (AS77001 ..c et ent oe $—-———-- 
DRESS CIRCLE, SEATS @) S$: MAG eee $-- 
BALCONY CIRCLE, SEATS =@5-1.00:. 2 ee S——--—-- 
BALCONY CEIRSE S-ROW'S) 5@GeleO0t ee eee $——— 
BALCONY (LAST 6 ROWS) @ (OO Gos eee $—- —- 
BOXES (SEATING 8) (Q) S30°00 ie ee eee 3 
A OUCAUD Fis conor 2 ene ee $ 
PAYMENT HEREWITH $————— 
BAVANCE DUE. =e $——--- 
IN, ONGC change «dens etiel TEC cle lane es tN OI Cee oe 
SEV COE oe shee a RR ea AN Gis, SOR ees e eR een eee 
OL Fae ee et eae PU ORC Soh iso eee Oe 
PSY C1 1011) ee eee PR TRI oe ee ee Pe 


27 














The Man with the 
Baton 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 
maitre de musique 


He started to compose, a time ago, 
but stopped because everything sound- 
ed like Schumann or Debussy. In 
Paris he has a school for conductors 
and this year allowed all 10 students 
to take turns conducting on a single 
program. During the war he saw 
action at Verdun, Rheims, Soissons 
and the Argonne. For years he was 
known as the greatest viola player in 
Europe, now plays viola in a private 
quartet with Yehudi Menuhin, in fact 
is Yehudi’s professor of quartet. He 
conducts from memory because he 
studies each score so thoroughly he 
doesn’t need it in performance. He 
thinks that better music is being 
produced today than 20 years ago, 
and that today’s product is equal in 
quality to that of any past period. 

For the sake of the record we here 
append Mrs. Monteux’ neatly-written, 
complete account of her famous hus- 
band’s career: 


“Paris National Conservatory — Ist 
prize violin, viola, harmony and 
counterpoint. 

“Colonne Orchestra — 1st viola (18 
years old); 2nd conductor. 

‘“‘Conductor: 


Concerts Berlioz (Paris) 

Orchestre Dieppe—concerts, opera 

Concerts d’avant-garde (Paris) 

Concerts Monteux (Paris) 

Ballets Russes de Diaghileff 
—5 years 

Metropolitan Opera—1916-1919 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
—1919-1924 

Concertgebouw (Amsterdam) 
—1924-1934 

Société Wagner (Amsterdam) 
—1926- 

Paris Symphony Orchestra 
—1930-1937 

San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra—1935- 


“Has conducted every major orches- 
tra in Europe. Only French conductor 
to direct Berlin Philharmonic and 


28 











Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. also 
Salzburg Festival. Has conducted 
many times in the Hollywood Bowl, 
as well as the Los Angeles Orchestra 
and the Philadephia Orchestra. 

“Creator of many modern works in- 
cluding ‘Petrouchka,’ ‘Sacre du Prin- 
temps,’ ‘Chant du Rossignol’ of Stra- 
vinsky; ‘Daphnis et Chloe,’ Ravel; 
‘Jeux’ of Debussy, and this year start- 
led musical Europe with a magnificent 
rendering of Darius Milhaud’s ‘Chris- 
tophe Colombe’ in which he employed 
the great French Chorus of Nantes, 
16 soloists and the Paris Symphony 
Orchestra.” 

And to complete the account, here 
is a list of Pierre Monteux’ Victor 
recordings compiled by the obliging 
H. W. Wilson of the Record Library: 

M-111—BERLIOZ, “Symphonie 

Fantastique,” Paris Symphony 
Orchestra 

M-230—PAGANINI, Violin concerto 

in D major, with Yehudi Menuhin 
M-231—MOZART, Violin concerto in 
D major, No. 7, with Yehudi 
Menuhin 

M-246—MOZART, Violin concerto 
in D major (“The Adelaide’’) 
with Yehudi Menuhin 

11140-1—_BERLIOZ, “Benvenuto 
Cellini” Overture, Op. 23, and 
“Troyens a Carthage” Overture. 


(per 












iday 
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nday 
nday | 
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bturda: 





bturda: 
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Sunday | 


AIL OF 
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MAIL ORDER BLANK 


FOURTH ANN UAE DOLLA R«O POEL RAYS BAS OWN. 


Tom C. Girton 


Presents 


FORTUNE GALLO 


and his 


SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA YHOU SD 
FEBRUARY 26 TO MARCH 14 INCLUSIVE 


N 
\ 
i] 


Operas — 22 Performances — 6 Repeats — Tickets: 55¢, 83¢, $1.10, $1.65, $1.93 (tax included) 


Dates 
iday Eve. Feb. 26 
hturday Mat., ” 27 
turddy Eve., ” 27 
tnday Mat., "es 28 
inday Eve., ” 28 


onday Eve., March 1 
lsday Eve, ” 2 
ednesday Eve., ” 8 











tursday Eve, ” 4 


iday Eve., 2 
hturday Mat., ” 


inday Mat., ea 
tnday Eve., We aT 
onday Eve., «48 
usdayEve, ”% 9Q 
tinesday Eve., ” 10 


lursday Eve, ” 11 
iday Eve., » 412 
iturday Mat., ” 18 
Murday Eve, ” 18 
Inday Mat. = 44 
inday Eve, ” 44 





5| Lohengrin 





$1.93 
Operas Box 
Seats 
Aida 
Martha and Ballet 
Il Trovatore 


Rigoletto 

Carmen 

Mamade Butterfly 
La Traviata 


Jewels of the 
Madonna 


Cavalleria and 
Pagliacci 


6| Lucia di 


Lammermoor 
Madame Butterfly 


Carmen 

La Boheme 
Faust 

La Gioconda 
Il Trovatore 
Rigoletto 


L’Oracoloand Ballet 
and Pagliacci 


La Tosca 


Aida 


aL ORDERS NOW BEING RECEIVED 
'Teservations will be filled in order received. 


tll Order Coupon 


Nation desired 


wee weer wesw we eweeses 


ee ry 


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$1.65 $1.10 
lst 12rows| Balance 
Orchestra | Orchestra 


$1.65 
Grand 
Tier 


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$1.10 3 83¢ | a 
ress aicony 
Circle Circle | Balcony 


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llth ttle hel tte eet tee PtP ee ee ee ee eee eee ee eee ee Ter eee 2 ee nae 


Re eee ee ee TITTLE ee ere eT TT eee 


Re ee eee etre ee eee 


Jo eee ewe cect cece ccewes PTOCCSSOCESSSSSOESESS boccescesceseeseseees: 


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batt teetet attain wii Lhe TT ie tt tet ee ee rrr eee ere 


Madame Butterfly ssc. c.</52c5o icine -csacsnscectncces [eccees aeliscaadec nel legesategantaneotsSel be penascpaantoesseoee | sesteeees ateee eee Unc ee en ee 


THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 
Ground Floor Kohler & Chase Bldg., 26 O’Farrell St., San Francisco 


Telephone: EXbrook 6696 





Thesenclosed: check, Sls iectincc kasi ccs ee rae is in full payment 
POY Sk Ales Bet ce ee eed seats as indicated in above space. 
Nannie. (print) .cc.soscaknsumsinaetcatn acer ddeui's Boas Reueetk he Meade eee 
AGP CSB 25sec RRs ate ee 
Telephone NO sii hosts ctasscrck ets Act eR act ee ee 


| 


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| 
| 
| 
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| 





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INE t 





MUSICAL DIRECTORY 











VOCAL Henley Voice Studio 
Enid Henley, Soprono-Teacher; Homer 
Rena Lazelle Henley, Nationally Known Vocal 
Authority 


VOCAL TEACHER AND COACH 


Well Known Pupils: Elbert Bellows, Fred- 

one ea pugs EOWA Womren Biker 
sther reen, Reba reenley, Lysbeth 

Hughes, Herbert Maas, Margie Nemes, PIA N.O 
Eleanor Nielson, Andrew Robertson, Jean- 
ette Sholl, Franziska Weiss 


Studio: 2847 Union St. Tel. WE 9036 


Malen Burnett School of Music 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3307 — : 
Thorough training from kindergarten to 
Mondays: Hotel Oakland, Oakland concert stage. Courses for those training 
to be teachers. 
2580 Broadway. Tel. FlIllmore 1898 


Joseph Greven 
VOICE SPECIALIST 


Teacher of Many Local Favorite and 
Prominent European and American Artists L I N (@: O L N 
927 Lake St. BAyview 5278 B ATCHELDE 


CONCERT PIANIST - TEACHER 


555 SUTTER ST. ® SUtter 4970 





Mme. Beatrice Bowman 


Teacher of Emily Hardy, Alice Avakian, 
Ralina Zarova 


2217 California St. Tel. WEst 4406 





Nino Comel 
VOCAL TEACHING — COACHING 


Teacher of Josephine Tumminia and 
Mari Monte 


376 Sutter St. DOuglas 6379. AShberry 7438 


Beatrice Lewis 
STUDIO OF THE MODERN DANCE SO8 SUTTER nr POWELL 
533 Post Street ORdway 0829 











SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


DAY AND EVENING COURSES 


PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 
NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 








30 





OBERT WALLACE 


HEHOUSE OF FURS one Forty six GEARY 





AUT marr 
PARACIL SIAGCERS 


As a noteworthy feature of the 
Annual Robert Wallace January 
Clearance Sale we now present a 
glorious selection of fine black 
Caracul swagger coats. Carefully 
selected pelts...exquisite texture 
expert craftsmanship assure 
you of many outstanding values. 
The lovely coat illustrated is one 
of many smart styles, especially 


Priced for this sale event at only 


I] 

















RET 


KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS 
OAKLAND: H.C. CAPWELL'S . . . Fourth Floor 


The magic beauty of world 
famous symphonies is yoursto 
enjoy whenever you wish with 


Victor Higher Fidelity 
RECORDS 


In fact, Victor records offer the one 
way to hear your favorite symphonies 
at any time that you desire! They 
give you all the greatest symphonies 
of the world’s greatest composers... 
played by the world’s finest symphony 
orchestras. Victor’s new higher fidelity 
recordings capture every delicate 
whisper of every instrument with the 
same clearness and brilliance that 
thrill music lovers at the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony concerts. 





Tune in on KJBS every evening at 
10:00 P. M. for two hours of 
popular and classical music .. . 











————————— 


SSS SEE 









These are but a few of the symphonies 
available on Victor Higher Fidelity 
Recordings ! 


Symphony No. 7 in A Major 
(Ludwig van Beethoven, Opus 92) 

Played by Arturo Toscanini 

and Philharmonic Orchestra 

of New York. 5 records with $4( 

album 

Symphony No. 4 in G Major 
(Antonin Dvorak) 

Played by the Philharmonic 

Orchestra by Vaclav Talich. $75 

5 records with album 


Schubert’s Symphony No. 8 

in B Minor (unfinished) 
Played by Koussevitzky and 
the Boston Symphony Orches- 6% 
tra. 3 records with album | 


Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. | 
4 in A Major 

Played by Serge Koussevitzky 

and the Boston Symphony | 

Orchestra. 3 records with $67 

album . 








JAN FRANCISCO 
»S YMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA = 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor a 





COL. W. de BASIL’S 


BALLET 
RUSSE 


ee: 
. ss 





108 


ty 

10 

7 

6 
| WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO 
| Presented by THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 

5 ANGELO ROSSI, Mayor 

6 EDGAR WALTER, President JOSEP EADY ERUGecreun 


Direction of Music Committee: J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 
THE BALLET RUSSE IS UNDER MANAGEMENT OF S. HUROK 





ew 


PRINTS 


in the 


. 


win dsl OV 


¢ 


_ manner 


Daley. florals, 
conventional patterns 
... dark backgrounds 
Misses’ and women's 


sizes . 


pa ROLL SERS ON TN IOS 


é 


2975 


so 


Pane on) 


to 


ge oF OE LES 
r Raa I BRC 
BENS BEE z 


ee 


~ DRESS SALON ¢ FOURTH FLOOR 





THE ART COMMISSION PRESEN is 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
AND 


Col. W. de BASIL’s BALLET RUSSE 


(EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT S. HUROK) 


Saturday Evening, January 30th, 1937 


1 


LE PAVILLON 


Ballet by Boris KOCHNO on 
Music by BORODINE 
Arranged and orchestrated by Antal DORATI 
Choreography by David LICHINE 
Scenery and Costumes by Cecil BEATON 
Scenery executed by Prince A. SCHERVACHIDZE 
Costumes executed by Madame B. KARINSKY, Paris 


At midnight the spirits of the garden surround the Pavilon where a poet 
awaits a young lady. The spirits bewitch the poet, who, forgetting his tryst, 
comes out of the Pavilion and is enticed away. 

The young lady appears, and, finding the poet has not kept his word, 
is deeply grieved, 

The poet returns and suddenly seeing the young lady consoles her, protest- 
ing his devotion. The spirits try to separate the lovers, but day approaches and 
they lose their power over the young couple, leaving them to their love. 


The. Young: bady 603.2 face. eee ee ne ee Irina BARONOVA 
The: Chief @pirit see. seo tees A ee Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA 
The: Poet...gk21 305) ee ee ka (ee David LICHINE 


The Spirits of the Garden: 


Miles. Tamara GRIGORIEVA, Lubov ROSTOVA, 
ABRICOSSOVA, ADRIANOVA, LEONTIEVA, MARRA, NELIDOVA, OSATO, 
RADOVA, RAZOUMOVA, SEROVA, STRAKHOVA, TRESAHAR, VOLKOVA 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 








INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 








2 


SYMPHONIE FANTASTIQUE 
(AN EPISODE IN THE LIFE OF AN ARTIST) 
Choreographic Symphony 
Music and Book by BERLIOZ 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 


Scenery and Costumes by Christian BERARD 
Scenery executed by Prince A. SCHERVACHIZDE 


A young musician of unhealthily sensitive nature and endowed with vivid 
imagination has poisoned himself with opium in a paroxysm of love-sick despair. 


(Continued on page 6) 


3 














Kearny at Sutter 


THEFT IM cary at Sati 


Fourth Floor, Oakland 


8 California Stores 





Play records through 


your radio 


for only 


$1650 


eas 
eee 


If you already have a radio and have been longing for 
recorded music so that you may enjoy command perform- 
ances of your favorite concerts, symphonies, operas or 
popular music, you'll be interested in this RCA Victor 
record player. It plays through any modern AC radio and 
its tone equals that of the radio to which it is attached. 


Plays all size records. 


Enjoy the music you wish, when you wish! 









ir 








PETER CONLEY PRESENTS 








* * * 
ADMIRAL 


BYRD 


IN PERSON - TELLING HIS THRILLING STORY 


“CONQUERING THE ANTARCTIC” 
ILLUSTRATED WITH MOTION PICTURES 


* * 





OPERA HOUSE - WEDNESDAY F F B 3 
MATINEE 3:15 — NIGHT 8:20 : 





ALL SEATS RESERVED: $1.10 — 83¢ — 55¢ Including Tax 


On Sale Now: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland 














The narcotic dose he had taken was too weak to cause death, but it has thrown 
him into a long sleep accompanied by the most extraordinary visions. In this 
condition his sensations, his feelings and memories find utterance in his sick 
brain in the form of musical imagery. Even the beloved one takes the form of 
melody in his mind, like a fixed idea, which is ever returning, and which he 
hears everywhere. 


1st Movement. — VISION AND PASSIONS. 
At first he thinks of the uneasy and nervous condition of his mind, of 


sombre longings, of depressions and joyous elation without any recognizable 
cause, which he experienced before the beloved one had appeared to him. Then 
he remembers the ardent love with which she suddenly inspired him; he thinks 


of his almost insane anxiety of mind, of his raging jealousy, of his reawakening 
love, of his religious consolation. 


2nd Movement. — A BALL 
In a ball-room, amidst the confusion of a brilliant festival, he finds the 
loved one again. 
38rd Movement. — IN THE COUNTRY 


It is a summer evening. He is in the country musing when he hears two 
shepherd lads who play the ranz des vaches (the tune used by the Swiss to call 
their flocks together) in alternation. This shepherd duet, the locality, the soft 
whisperings of the trees stirred by the zephyr wind, some prospects of hope 
recently made known to him, all these sensations unite to-impart a long un- 
known repose to his heart, and to lend a smiling colour to his imagination. 
And then she appears once more. His heart stops beating, painful forebodings 
fill his soul. “Should she prove false to him?” One of the shepherds resumes 
the melody, but the other answers him no more... sunset ... distant rolling 
of thunder ... loneliness . . . silence. 


GREATER 
AS THE 
YEARS 
GO BYa ea 


The Baldwin of today is an infinitely greater instrument. Responsive to 
the ever increasing requirements of today’s great artists, today’s Baldwin 
more than fulfills their every desire. @ Play the Baldwin yourself. Let 
the tone prove to you that the Baldwin of today is the finest expression 
of all that a piano means. Learn ot our new payment plan. 


Baldwin 


A N O § 





310 SUTTER STREET 


St PEGE LE NSS NER EET AR BETO ER RE LR 








4th Movement. — THE PROCESSION TO THE STAKE 

He dreams that he has murdered his beloved, that he has been condemned 
to death and is being led to the stake. A march that is alternately sombre and 
wild, brilliant and solemn, accompanies the procession . . . The tumultuous 
outbursts are followed without modulation by measured steps. At last the 
fixed idea returns, for a moment a last thought of love is revived — which is 
cut short by the death blow. 

5th Movement. — THE WITCHES’ SABBATH. 

He dreams that he is present at the witches’ dance, surrounded by horrible 
spirits, amidst sorcerers and monsters in many fearful forms, who have come 
to assist at his funeral. Strange sounds, groans, shrill laughter, distant yells, 
which other cries seem to answer. The beloved melody is heard again, but it 
has its noble and shy character no longer; it has become a vulgar, trivial and 
grotesque kind of dance. She it is who comes to attend the witches’ meeting. 
Friendly howls and shouts greet her arrival ... She joins the infernal orgy... 
bells toll for the dead ...a burlesque parody of the Dies irae ... the witches’ 
round dance ... the dance and the Dies irae are heard at the same time. 


FIRST MOVEMENT 
A. Young’. Musicians... 2. (255i Se ee eee Leonide MASSINE 
The. Beloved: -.:2s.s5 seen ct eee Pup dpcuptdon titan Spacer eta memes Tamara TOUMANOVA 
Gaiety: 
Alexandra DANILOVA and Paul PETROFF 
Miles. NELIDOVA, SEROVA, VOLKOVA 


Melancholy: 
MM. JASINSKY, ZORITCH, PLATOFF 


Reverie: 
Anna ADRIANOVA 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, GRIGORIEVA, MARRA, OBIDENNA, 
RAZOUMOVA, ROSTOVA, STRAKHOVA 


(Continued on page 10) 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
FINE FOODS 


Ice Cream «x Sodas 
Pastries « Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Dign Whistle 


33 POWELL STREET, Near Market 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 














Pareles kat PRN ae a A coon J WE hI V-1 2 


Butter BY LINC UDN 24.07 
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OF MECHANICAL EXCELLENCE 


Drama combined with music gave the world a different kind of art 
—opera. Lincoln engineering, united with Ford resources, gave the 
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enters 1957 proved by a year’s superb performance. It is not a new 
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medium-price field the Lincoln standard of mechanical excellence. 





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O-Be = YOM NEA Essa POD a Beas 





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AMERICAN PIANIST 


RESERVED SEATS VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
$2.20, $1.65, $1.10, 83c MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1937 


SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. EIGHT THIRTY O’CLOCK 











Passion: 


MM. ALGERANOFF, BOROVANSKY, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, 
KATCHAROFF, LADRE, MATOUCHEVSKY, PETROFF, ROSTOFF 





SECOND MOVEMENT 
A Ball 


The Guests: 


Olga MOROSOVA and Dimitri ROSTOFF 
Miles. DELAROVA, OSATO, TRESAHAR, ADRIANOVA, CHABELSKA, 
CHAMIE, LEONTIEVA, LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, MARRA, RADOVA, 
RAZOUMOVA, STRAKHOVA 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, ALONSO, BOROVANSKY 
ISMAILOFF, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, LADRE, LIPATOFF, 
MATOUCHEVSKY, ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 


OG BCL OVO sec ooec cones bass cee cee tikeeh nae Spe cece nan aednane te seau ede caneececwesnn t= Tamara TOUMANOVA 
The Young Musician..........--..----.---cc--ccsseecee-ceseeeeeseceeenesennenceneneceaee Leonide MASSINE 


The Old Shepherd............-.-------:-::--css-ccseecesecseecenecneenencesocesemeseseeeneesonene Mare PLATOFF 

The Young Shepherd.............--.-----------2-:---ceeccecceeccescesneeeneeeneeneecens Roman JASINSKY 

The Young Musician.............-.....-.-.-ccsccsscsecssecoseenerceeeesenttencsransees Leonide MASSINE 

Fb) PP sim SY 1216 bye eee ee aoe eee Pree eee Sern ENE anne terernee army yy PPeorer = Tamara TOUMANOVA 

FIST Gr CD ceacec ae eee od a Ra caeas staan sce awen esas pec der= mer narreaeas Alexis KOSLOFF 
The Picnic: 


Miles. Nina VERCHININA, GRIGORIEVA, LVOVA, ROSTOVA 


The Children: 
Miles. Lisa SEROVA, ABRICOSSOVA, LEONTIEVA, VOLKOVA 


The Winds: 
MM. PETROFF, BOUSLOFF, ZORITCH 





FOURTH MOVEMENT 
Mhe Yoting MUsiGian..ccq.222. 1-5-5 cece caensnnate nese ce teeteadsans essen -ponteenenseanee= Leonide MASSINE 
Ay a -)eel fn Co) nan sO ane fae bat) APE meee rere mere ere Tree Seer Serge ISMAILOFF 
The Executioners: 
MM. BELSKY, BOROVANSKY, ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 


The Judges: 


MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, BOUSLOFF, KATCHAROFF, 
LADRE, LAZOVSKY, LIPATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY 





CA WIiGHLLGEHLT OF THE CURRENT SHApon- 
The World Famous N. Y. AMERICAN 


HART HOUSE OSG 
STRUNG? O UALR eal ae 


James Levy : Arn Adaskin : Milton Blackstone : Boris Hambourg 


MONDAY F E B 8 COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 
EVENING ° Sutter at Mason 


Reserved Seats at: Sherman, Clay & Co., 55¢, 85¢, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20 
Vallely Current Review — FEBRUARY 11 — Fairmont 
MANAGEMENT: ALICE SECKELS-ELSIE CROSS 


10 





The Crowd: 
Miles. MARRA, CHAMIE, DELAROVA, CHABELSKA, ADRIANOVA, 
LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, 
MM. ALONSO, KOSLOFF 
FIFTH MOVEMENT 


The Monsters: 
MM. JASINSKY, PETROFF, ZORITCH 


The Witches: 
Milles. Tamara TOUMANOVA, Nina VERCHININA, Olga MOROSOVA 


The Ghouls: 
Miles. DELAROVA, LEONTIEVA, LVOVA, SEROVA, STRAKHOVA 
VOLKOVA 


The Vampires: 
Miles, CHAMIE, LIPKOVSKA, NELIDOVA, RADOVA, RAZOUMOVA, 
TRESAHAR 


The Spectres: 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, GRIGORIEVA, MARRA, 
OBIDENNA, OSATO, ROSTOVA 


The Devils: 
MM. ALONSO, BOROVANSKY, KATCHAROFF, KOSLOFF, LADRE, 
LAZOVSKY, LIPATOFF, MATOUCHEVSKY 


The Monks: 
MM. PLATOFF, ALEXANDROFF, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF 
ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 


Conductor: Pierre MONTEUX 








INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 





3, 
L’APRES-MIDI D’UN FAUNE 


Choreographic Poem 
Music by Claude DEBUSSY 
Choreography after Waslaw NIJINSKY 
Scenery by Prince A. SCHERVACHIDZE 
Costumes by Leon BAKST 


Debussy’s prelude to the elusive eclogue of Stephane Mallarme—“L’A pres- 
Midi d’un Faune”—written in 1892—marked with its appearance a fresh phase 
in musical development. It united the atmospheric and colorful qualities of 
Manet’s painting and the subtleties of verse of the French Symbolists with 
music—created in a stroke what is known today as “musical impressionism.” 
This notable work is the musical basis of Nijinsky’s dance-poem. The sub- 
stance of Mallarme’s poem has hitherto evaded translation. It consists of half- 
lights of speech, so to say, subtle nuances half-expressing, half-veiling, tran- 
Slent, elusive moods. 


(Continued on page 18) 
rl 








KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much 


to your family oa: ne : 


Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning .. . now. 
As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 
A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


Ton UnS<t: os) EP An Rok Ma Ba wn. 


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SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 








Ee oe 


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Eo VLESS. C1 TOS 


MARIAN 
ANDERSON 


Opera House (Only Recital) 
WED. EVE., FEB. 24, 8:30 


Pik OG x 


I. 
Becrucssunge = Haendel 
Chio: mal Vil possa==..5...0 Haendel 
SIGIIAN A seers ote Haendel 
Ah Spietato 
(SArMnadign”) <s-Axes co Haendel 
II. 
Liebesbotschaft ................ Schubert 
AVe MiSWiei sn ee Schubert 
Der Tod und das 
Maedchen 2. eee Schubert 
Die: Morello: 204 Schubert 
EET. 
Air of “Don Carlos” 
(O-Don Mataleye2 i: Verdi 
IV. 
Die Fusswaschung............ Kilpinen 
Schilfrohr, saeus’le 
(Saev, saev, susa).......... Sibelius 
Sung in Swedish 
Diese tbellescin ches Sibelius 
Wer es ein Traum.............. Sibelius 
Sung in German 
V. 


, Negro Spirituals: 
City called Heaven....Hall Johnson 
Lord, I can’t stay 


DW BY ese th cassettes Roland Hayes 
CEUCTI RON ees ne John Payne 
My soul’s been anchored 

in the Lord...........: Florence Price 

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TICKETS: $2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 


SHERMAN, 


CLAY & CO. 








S. Hurok 


S. Hurok, manager of most of the outstanding dance attractions in this 
country today, is unique among the great impresarios of music, dance and the 
drama, having confined his efforts chiefly to the importation of celebrated 
European organizations. He has done more to bring to the masses the highest 
type of entertainment than anyone connected with the amusement world. 


With uncanny judgment, he has imported year after year, the best of 
foreign attractions, has fostered many careers in this country, and has been 
associated for a quarter of a century with the most significant artists of all lands. 


A Russian with ideals and a positive conviction that the American public 
can lend its appreciation to the finest artists and organizations, he has left 
small things to others, and has devoted his boundless energy to the production 
of large scale and often spectacular attractions. He fervently hopes that his 
efforts will bring about a renaissance of interest in the stage arts, surpassing 
that of European audiences. He is convinced that people in America need only 
be made aware of great art and they will flock to it. Some years ago The New 
York Times declared editorially that “S, Hurok has done more for the cause of 


music than the invention of the phonograph.” 


Mr. Hurok managed the last American seasons of Anna Pavlowa and her 
Ballet Russe, Isadora Duncan, Fokine and Fokina, and Loie Fuller. He brought 
to this country the famous composers Richard Strauss and Alexander Glazounov. 
He has presented many celebrated violinists, including Mischa Elman, Efrem 
Zimbalist, Eugen Ysaye, Kubelik, and scores of great singers including Tetraz- 
zini, Gluck, Schumann-Heink and the immortal Chaliapin. He introduced Mary 
Wigman to New York, kindling a furore in the dance world that still continues, 
although interest has now turned to the brighter art of the Ballet Russe. He 
also delivered for American delectation the fiery Flamenco dancer, Vicente 
Escudero, Uday Shan-Kar and his Hindu Company, Trudi Schoop and her 
Comic Ballet. 


Through depressions and prosperity, Mr. Hurok has, single-handed, con- 
tinued to present large touring organizations of distinction. He managed the 
tours of the German Grand Opera, the Russian Grand Opera, the Habima 
Theatre, the Italian Piccoli Theatre, the Moscow Cathedral Choir and the 
Vienna Choir Boys. 


During the current season he will offer Marian Anderson, the sensational 
Negro contralto; Rudolf Serkin, the latest genius of the piano; the Kolisch 
Quartet, adjudged to be the finest string ensemble in the world; the Dana 
Singing Ensemble, a Polish quintet; Ginette Neveu, a phenomenal young 
French violinist; Joseph Schmidt, Europe’s current radio idol; Arthur Rubin- 
stein; a continental ensemble including Raphael, Victor Chenkin and Emma 
Runitch; and Mme. Pagliughi, a brilliant Italian coloratura soprano. 


Last and highly important, he will bring the Salzburg Opera Guild for its 
first American tour, beginning in the Fall of 1937. This is the famous troupe 
which took part in the recent Salzburg Music Festival where it received 
accolades of praise from press and public. 

















Rachmeaninotf{ 








OPERA HOUSE 


PROGRAM: FRIDAY EVE., 8:30 P. M. — FEB. 5 


is 
2. 


Organ Fantasia and Fugue in G-minor.............................. Bach-Liszt 


sonata, Opus 109.3) Ghee ee el ee Beethoven 
Vivace ma non troppo 
Adagio espressivo 
Prestissimo 
Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 


(a) Polonaise, C-minor 


(b) Nocturne .................. : 
(Cc) “Mazurka ( I and aa aS Fk Chopin 
(d) Rondo, Opus 16........ } 
Four Etudes-Tableaux, Opus 33................000000.0.........--- Rachmaninoff 

C-sharp minor 

G-minor 

E-flat minor 

E-flat major 
Sonnetto del Petratca N0.22)...2.4 ee eee ee Liszt 
Maleie Wires 6.52380 8 cca ee eae es Wagner-Brassin 
Bete, Pom jON so. oj. eect ee ee Paganini-Liszt 


PROGRAM: SUNDAY AFT., 2:30 P. M. — FEB. 7 


She CE he 


Variations; (A <M ajOr nie ec tsere eee ee Mozart 
(hree.Sonatas:22 2... eee ee Scarlatti 
Sonata, Opusi58; B-minor:.-222..2) ee ee ee Chopin 
Prelid@ eee oe ge oS Ae IR ane ees Bach-Rachmaninoff 
(a) Daisies, song.... / ; 

(b) Oriental Sketch f ~~) 6 et toe tel be Loam Rachmaninoff 
(a) Nocturne, G-major........ : 
Cb): Nocturne, CNoon: Tide); jc | '* ar Gum. ae 1b) ae John Field 


(b) Valse Oubliee No. 3 


(a) Etude, D-flat major 
(c) Polonaise, E-major.. | 


$2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.10, Including Tax — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 





MANAGEMENT: PETER CONE EY 


15 


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16 





Ss, HuROK presaiis 
The WORLD‘S GREATEST 


SALZBURG OPERA GUILD 


Sensation of last summer’s Salzburg Music Festival. 
One of the world’s greatest operatic organizations. 
Complete European Company in repertoire of unfa- 
miliar operatic masterpieces. Symphony Orchestra. First 
time in America. Season 1937-1938. 


TRUDI SCHOOP 


AND HER COMPANY OF COMIC DANCERS 


Second sensational coast to coast tour. 

“This Trudi Schoop Ballet is the most amusing and 
the most amazingly fresh entertainment in New York,” 
writes Edna Ferber. ‘‘A dazzling evening in the theatre 
and a triumph of sheer talent.” 


FEODOR CHALIAPIN 


Great Russian Basso. 


MARIAN ANDERSON 


World’s Outstanding Contralto. 
One of the greatest living singers—New York Times. 


DANA ENSEMBLE 


Famous Polish Singing Quintet. 











it 


ARTISTS and ORGANIZATIONS 


UDAY SHAN-KAR 


AND HIS HINDU BALLET 


In a complete new repertoire of Hindu Dances. New 
Costumes and New Productions. 

“Beauty and Excitement”—New York Times. “Gape 
in awe at the superlative beauty of Shan-Kar”—New 
York World Telegram. 


CONTINENTAL ENSEMBLE 


Emma Runitch - Victor Chenkin - Raphael 
Unique — Novel — Delightful 


RUDOLF SERKIN ‘KOLISCH QUARTET 


World’s Greatest 


New Genius of the Piano String Ensemble 
MADAME PAGLIUGHI GINETTE NEVEU 
nate f Phenomenal 
Brilliant Italian Coloratura Young French Violinist 
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEPH SCHMIDT 
Triumphant Return Engagement Europe’s Radio Idol 


VIENNA CHOIR BOYS 


Fifth American Tour 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION regarding these 
and other attractions which Mr. Hurok has engaged 
abroad, address Peter Conley, San Francisco Opera House, 
or Hurok Attractions, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 


17 








grow more vague; fact or fancy, he will never certainly know. If he could but 
put substance into his dreams as he blows out empty grape-skins. It is 
impossible. He forsakes the vain attempt. The rich sunlight enmeshes him in 
languor. The grass is lush and soft. He turns lazily to sleep again and dreams, 
since waking blurs the actuality of his visions. 


Such is the theme of this pagan poem, pagan, yet etheralised through its 
symbolic vision, so that, as has been said, “‘All that is leering and savage in the 
face of the satyr disappears. Desire still speaks, but there is a veil of tender- 
ness.” The whole poem, as the dance, is symbolic of the transience of 
physical delights and the solace of dreams. 


PEG ING FD seve celgcteast ones eos oe aes ge ee een daa ge ome meaee pecans Tamara GRIGORIEVA 
BE cc WRed Yb 0 Done ee in NOR RE er Per ec es es arene Sue STROM oer Ure oh sity pee David LICHINE 


Nymphs: 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHAMIE, MARRA, NELIDOVA, OBIDENNA, OSATO 


Conductor: Pierre MONTEUX 





SHORT INTERMISSION 


4, 
CIMAROSIANA 


Ballet Divertissement 


Music by Domenico CIMAROSA 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 


The age of classic Italian music, unlike the later, heavier German 
classicism, was permeated with the same elements of fantasy and comedy as 
the classic age of Italian drama which gave the world the decorative 
“maschere,” or masks, of the Commedia dell’Arte. It consorted well with the 
stage actions of Goldoni and Moliere, shared their charm and humor. Amongst 
names comprising Pergolese, Logroschino, and some others, Cimarosa (1749- 
1801), stands out by reason of the individual manner in which his music blends 
these traits, forming a delightfully decorative basis for the dance-sequence, 
with its spirit of comedy and gallantry so truly baroque, which the present 
ballet presents. Following in outline the manner of both the early Italian 
classical, musical and ballerina traditions, this is danced as a pas de trois, a 
pas de six, a tarantelle, contre-danse, a pas de deux, and a grand finale. 


1. Pas de Trois 
Tamara GRIGORIEVA, Lubov ROSTOVA and George ZORITCH 


2. Pas de Six 


Miles. CHAMIE, LEONTIEVA, VOLKOVA 
MM. KATCHAROFF, LADRE, MATOUCHEVSKY 


38. Tarantella 
Eleonora MARRA and Marian LADRE 


4. Pas de Quatre 


Anna ADRIANOVA, Vera NELIDOVA 
. Serge BOUSLOFF, Serge ISMAILOFF 


5. Pas de Trois 
Alexandra DANILOVA, Roman JASINSKY and Paul PETROFF 


18 








6. Contre-Dance 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHABELSKA, LIPKOVSKA, LVOVA, OBIDENNA, 
OSATO, RADOVA, SEROVA, STRAKHOVA, TRESAHAR 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, ALGERANOFF, ALONSO, BELSKY, BOROVANSKY, 
KOSLOFF, LIPATOFF, PLATOFF, ROSTOFF, ZEGLOVSKY 
Scenery and Costumes by Jose- Maria SERT 
7. Pas de Deux 
Tamara TOUMANOVA and David LICHINE 


8. Finale 
The Artists of the Ballet 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 





CAST SUBJECT TO CHANGES 





Founder and Director General: COL. W. DE BASIL 
Maitre-de-Ballet and Artistic Collaborator: Leonide MASSINE 
Conductors: Efrem KURTZ and Antal DORATI 
Regisseur General: Serge GRIGORIEFF 








STAFF FOR 8S. HUROK 


David.LADIGUNS gi) nSeo\ sac 2 ieee gece a tare Company Managers 


Maurice Winters | 


Gerald “Goodes carn) ti a coe eae eee General Press Representative 
[eH 8 MSs Uh) od F- Bisecine Are R  t POU RS i oP ts Advance Press Representative 
Mae Prohimaniit.ccm.c ices 3 ho eee eee eee Executive Secretary 
Boris’ Web War Zit eivste coe faces ee ee Concert Meister 
Nathan. Roseim. 2.722. 275s Se eee ee Orchestra Manager 
Gy de SU asco wc ep eas cond ctanpaneeerane ce meee Chief Carpenter 
Carl "Greence2 8 ice ooo ee es Chief Property Man 
Gener Tierney sas pesca ee eee ae ene ne ee eee Chief Electrician 
Augustar: Besa ricci oe case coe meses one Wardrobe Mistress 





The Management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion 
pictures inside the Theatre without written permission. 


EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, N. Y. C. 







COLLECTOR @® DEALER @ APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows. High--Medium--Low Priced. 


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The BALLET JOOSS also chose DANCE ART BALLETS during recent San Francisco 
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Costume Pattern, Designing and Wardrobe Making Service 
Visitors Cordially Welcome to San Francisco’s Most Fascinating Shoppe. 
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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PLE R RE MONT Ex; 


Conductor 


Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


1937 SEASON 


* 
TRUE ey ES a chee ae WITH COL. W. DE BASIL’S 
ri. : . M., Jan. 29, 
Sat. 2:30P.M.,Jan.30, > BALLET RUSSE 
‘ : . M., Jan. 30, 

Sun 2:30P.M.,Jan.31, | AT THE OPERA HOUSE 

Fri, 2:30 P.M., Feb. 5,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

Sat. 8:30P.M., Feb. 6,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 18, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Feb. 19, Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Feb. 20,Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Feb. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 8:20 P. M., Feb. 26, Civic Auditorium, with Grace Moore, Soprano 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Mar. 5,Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 

Sat, 8:30 P.M., Mar. 6,Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 

Tues. 8:15 P.M., Mar. 9, Memorial Chapel, Stanford University 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Mar. 19, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

Sat. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 20, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

Tues. 8:30 P. M., Mar. 23, Civic Auditorium, with Igor Stravinsky and 
San Francisco Municipal Chorus 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Mar. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Thur. 8:15 P.M., Apr. 1, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Sat. 10:30 A.M., Apr. 8, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Fri. 2:30P.M., Apr. 9, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 10, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30P.M., Apr. 10, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 

Sun. 3:15 P.M., Apr. 11, University of California 

Thur. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 15, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Apr. 16, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

Sat. 10:30 A. M., Apr. 17, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 17, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 
Baritone 

Tues. 8:15 P. M., Apr. 20, Civic Auditorium, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 

Fri. 2:30 P.M., Apr. 28, Opera House 

Sat, 10:30 A. M., Apr. 24, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 

Sat. 8:30 P.M., Apr. 24, Opera House 

Sun. 3:00P.M., Apr. 25, San Rafael 


TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND 














KAJETAN ATTL'S 
HARP ENSEMBLE 


Beginners or Advance Students Phone for appointment. 


First Harpist with San 
Francisco Symphony for 
Twenty-four Consecutive 

Vears. Large Stock of Harps for Sale or Rent: 


1030 BUSH STREET Phone ORdway 6367 Studio No.6 


When Buying or Renting a Harp only an Experienced 
Harpist can advise Correctly. 





$ 
3 
3 
$ 


a 


< 

























MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


GRACE MOORE | 





CIVIC AUDITORIUM — FRIDAY EVE., FEB. 26 








IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his | 
“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” , 
ALSO 
Rossini “STABAT MATER” Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 
MUNICIPAL CHORUS 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor | 
WITH 


5k VE A BN 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 














RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 














GEORGE PRING 






Studio 


Classic and 
modern ballet, 
character, 
Oriental 
dancing, 
Eurhythmics. 
Classes for 
beginners or 
advanced 
students, 
all ages. 


420 SUTTER STREET 


LL 


If your product requires 
force and vigor, we stand 
ready at all times to 
render you the kind of 
service that makes the 
printed word SPEAK. 
Your message will carry 
its emphasis in a truly 
dignified manner. 





15 Columbus Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
SUtter 4772 

















PETER CONLEY Presents 
NANCIE 


MONTEU X 


DANCE RECITAL 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUESDAY EVE. FEB., 15, 8:30 P. M. 


PROGRAM 


Sarabande and Variations........ Corelli 
J. NIELSEN 
Gavotte: 2 eho Lulli 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Divertissements ..........------------ Couperin 
J. NIELSEN 
Mempord! Ballozece eee Scarlatti 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


Suite: Rondo, Minuet, Badinerie....Bach 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


Wrench: (Suites. tccee seen escenn Bach 
J. NIELSEN 
Pantormline 20a ees Mozart 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Country Dances22....-e Beethoven 
J. NIELSEN 
French Revolutionary 
Dance ene ero eopuat Songs) 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


Extract from Ballet Music 


from “Rosamunde’”’.............- Schubert 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


Woaltzess 0 cee ee Brahms 
J. NIELSEN 

Valse Romantique................-.-- Chabrier 

NANCIE MONTEUX 

WIRD cet er Oy ea eee: Chabrier 
J. NIELSEN 

Danse Sacrée 

Danse Profane 

RM et Leen ee PN ee ers Debussy 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


Funeral March in 
Jazz Tempo ...... Castelnuovo-Tedesco 
J. NIELSEN 


Danse Sérieuse......:..:.4------------ J. Nielsen 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


American Olassi@s 2 cose -c2es-o Handy 
J. NIELSEN 
March, from ‘‘Love for 


Three Oranges” ............---- Prokofieff 
NANCIE MONTEUX 


The Pasmore Quartet (Mary Pasmore, 
first violin, William Laraia, second 
violin, Erich Weiler, viola, and Dorothy 
Pasmore, cello) will play musique de 
scene during the intervals. 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 — 83¢ 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


Leanne eee ee 
SS | 
SS nnn 








TRUDI SCHOOP 
COMIC BALLET 


ALL NEW PROGRAM 








* 


OPERA HOUSE 
WED: “EV Ec 8:30 
MA OR Coa ee 7 













* 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 Including Tax 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 








MANAGEMENT: PETER CONLEY 



















THE ART COMMISSION 


EDGAR WALTER, President JosepH H. Dyer, JrR., Secretary 


PRESENTS 


GRACE MOORE 








EIN] LP aE RS Om. 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


CIVIC AU DIT Oe 
Friday Evening, February 26th 


Popular Prices: 25¢ — 50¢ — 75¢ — $1.00 
Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


Direction: MUSIC COMMITTEE - J. Emmet HaAypeEn, Chairman 


26 





Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


FOUR SATURDAY MORNINGS (10:30 to 11:30) OPERA HOUSE 
APRIL 3 — APRIL 10 — APRIL 17 — APRIL 24 


RESERVE SEASON TICKETS NOW 
Sherman, Clay & Co. Box Office - Sutter & Kearny Sts., San Francisco 


Please reserve the following Season Tickets for the 
Four Concerts for Young People: 


ORCHESTRA SEATS @ $ 2.00 
=] GRAND TIER SEATS @ $ 2.00 

DRESS CIRCLE SEATS  @ $ 1.40 
BALCONY CIRCLE SEATS @ $ 1.00 
BALCONY (FIRST 5 ROWS) @ $ 1.00 
BALCONY (LAST 6 ROWS) @ 

BOXES (SEATING 8) @ $30.00 


PAYMENT HEREWITH $————— 
BALANCE DUE 


IN OPIE: = e. ea E A eed ee a be ee ee ee 


Street 


Ye) 7)1) 2p as ee ene err etre OT, PT ede ey 








The Man with the 


Baton 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 
maitre de musique 


He started to compose, a time ago, 
but stopped because everything sound- 
ed like Schumann or Debussy. In 
Paris he has a school for conductors 
and this year allowed all 10 students 
to take turns conducting on a single 
program. During the war he saw 
action at Verdun, Rheims, Soissons 
and the Argonne. For years he was 
known as the greatest viola player in 
Europe, now plays viola in a private 
quartet with Yehudi Menuhin, in fact 
is Yehudi’s professor of quartet. He 
conducts from memory because he 
studies each score so thoroughly he 
doesn’t need it in performance. He 
thinks that better music is being 
produced today than 20 years ago, 
and that today’s product is equal in 
quality to that of any past period. 

For the sake of the record we here 
append Mrs. Monteux’ neatly-written, 
complete account of her famous hus- 
band’s career: 


“Paris National Conservatory — Ist 
prize violin, viola, harmony and 
counterpoint, 


“Colonne Orchestra — 1st viola (18 
years old); 2nd conductor. 


“Conductor: 
Concerts Berlioz (Paris) 
Orchestre Dieppe—concerts, opera 
Concerts d’avant-garde (Paris) 
Concerts Monteux (Paris) 
Ballets Russes de Diaghileff 

—5 years 

Metropolitan Opera—1916-1919 


Boston Symphony Orchestra 
—1919-1924 


Concertgebouw (Amsterdam) 
—1924-1934 


Société Wagner (Amsterdam) 





Paris Symphony Orchestra 
—1930-1937 

San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra—1935- 





28 








“Has conducted every major orches- 
tra in Europe. Only French conductor 
to direct Berlin Philharmonic and 
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras, also 
Salzburg Festival. Has conducted 
many times in the Hollywood Bowl, 
as well as the Los Angeles Orchestra 
and the Philadephia Orchestra. 


“Creator of many modern works in- 
cluding ‘Petrouchka,’ ‘Sacre du Prin- 
temps,’ ‘Chant du Rossignol’ of Stra- 
vinsky; ‘Daphnis et Chloe,’ Ravel; 
‘Jeux’ of Debussy, and this year start- 
led musical Europe with a magnificent 
rendering of Darius Milhaud’s ‘Chris- 
tophe Colombe’ in which he employed 
the great French Chorus of Nantes, 
16 soloists and the Paris Symphony 
Orchestra.” 


And to complete the account, here 
is a list of Pierre Monteux’ Victor 
recordings compiled by the obliging 
H. W. Wilson of the Record Library: 


M-111—BERLIOZ, “Symphonie 
Fantastique,” Paris Symphony 
Orchestra 


M-230—PAGANINI, Violin concerto 
in D major, with Yehudi Menuhin 


M-231—MOZART, Violin concerto in 
D major, No. 7, with Yehudi 
Menuhin 


M-246—MOZART, Violin concerto 
in D major (“The Adelaide’’) 
with Yehudi Menuhin 


11140-1—BERLIOZ, “Benvenuto 
Cellini” Overture, Op. 23, and 
“Troyens a Carthage” Overture. 





Oper 








Mday E 
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turday 
Inday M 
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lursday 





day Ev 
turday | 


inday M: 
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ednesday 
lursday ] 
Mday Eve 
Mturday WV 


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Inday Ma 


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ul ORDE 





Teservatij 


til Ord. 


ation des 








MAIL ORDER BLANK 


ROU RTA CN NU AL DOLLAR OPRERA SEAS OW 
Tom C. Girton 


Presents 


FORTUNE GALLO 


and his 


SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
FEBRUARY 26 TO MARCH 14 INCLUSIVE 


Operas — 22 Performances — 6 Repeats — Tickets: 55¢, 83¢, $1.10, $1.65, $1.93 (tax included) 
fr 





s $1.93 $1.65 $1.10 $1.65 $1.10 83¢ | 55¢ 
a Operas | Box [ist 1zzows| Balance | Grand | Drews | Raley | Baleony 
Bday Eve., Feb. 26) Aida © [hescescocssnsccnssons prsesvveensenosensnse beanternsesnsesacenors peapernvesnesensonnce fesenaeanssassénacene bocenertnrenareroeres fesvosaneeqaarsoessas 
turday Mat., ” 27| Martha and Ballet (ooo... psscssccesessssoes besssoeesnnesnsennee beseasesnee assesses Pessssenscssessnnsses Fonneranennscsnsssees besanasassensstanses 
turday Eve.,  27/ Tl Trovatore (| oi.cccseccsssscsee peceeereeeesssssesses bocsnssensensesescesesbecusenssenarananeess besensensssnecserane [essseascezsesrsestes paamananenassanensses 
inday Mat., % 2B) Rigoletto 9 [oneeceeceseccscsssee bessesececeseeecereee posesesessenstnensene [enseensonseasecitacs bessesnsesenacececoes cap casa pacccebae’ Lea cuat taeteane eee 
Inday Eve., 7% 98] Carmen (I occccceccccccccccece:feseoseccereccaccccer pososesessesescnvsces bessncessosesceeseren beasscsesesecseasoses becsceseesvasccrseres bencsesreseeenenscars 
mday Eve., March 1|Mamade Butterfly [oop --eeeeeeeee OA Ree ere MR RE Es pel ern erst 
lesday Eve., 2) La Traviata (9 (on... .cescesssssenporsesensceseemecets beseseesesenssneencen beceseeseessesncenean becnssrerescnsrantanesparnacnssectacanenass Pacanansennancenece cS 
ednesday Eve., ” 8] Jewels of the 

Madonna ——_C‘“*édA ne ececen ccc ccc cncncs poco enceneceencncccen freee succecsoaco anaes peescesceecesecncenes bavesesssssecsensens peosnevescescscansten beoveecssseessonsaceer 
hursday Eve., ” 4!/ Cavalleria and 

Pagliacci eececccssceccennaes broveesceesersessners berecsesensesssstnee oamenssneesnenennes cL eee Tn ek on Baka tpeameat taceareser ess taeemee 
Mday Eve., ” B] Lohemgrim (9 Jececeeesssccececeea | eceeesceecececececes besescececesecetsnsees pestessensssnnscnseae besseseesascsnsnsenns Pensasarenanasesesene:Lacsesensanenssensees 
turday Mat., ” 6] Lucia di 

Lammermoor iis.....-eeeeeeeeee [everett walbandsausem cela Meataaatened StteN | coer a meee sccuduud eSvteewiveast)steursksececeacemuee 
inday Mat., » 1] Madame Butterfly  |.................0-- besssseestecorsessees pessesscecceessnesteesbesaseresssseseseenee beosseesenseronseenss schiasdasssEcteedou Lee scetontesceeaeee 
inday Eve., FUT Carmien. Peete sesotescucolucs evbesecuboccoceatane [ touceccogeapsteensts| Snesteveemaneronsons= Laiheatereseepeeasaet Senden nceexoival epee eee 
inday Eve., mS Sita Boheme. Ss lence Pe emer ete a en Rey nc 2 bl cor jad cane WSaSaee lt dbadea pee: bebestierosmsseeene 
Bsday Eve 9) Waumt 99 9 \  ~ [ccchcccccbccslncce Pesseteectentcsamcens [aera TeTe) Nr onreerered (Mgmnt cramer! [Ne Maen er eta rs 


tdnesday Eve.,” 10] La Gioconda 


hursday Eve., ” LT rovatore. ©  /iekas- eee ssovaseasenttetegpye! bacenve conse ouseorees perare seccaeserae reel seo eetere= ein Wits eco tot | 
Mday Eve., ” 12) Rigoletto 


turday Mat., ” 18| L’Oracoloand Ballet 
and Pagliacci —_{....-.----neescnecnee beseeeceeccsenceerers benesesesesensenenees HS so hc Soe wa, Leg Soe ecco cane) [powcweces eaten eeeebs hacen seiencrreennEn F 


Mturday Eve. ” 13] La Tosca 


ce pacnccuconsences Pecnscccecoccesenecuet bonpccevcnccncscesces peccuccersoscossccces Leccucuyessccosccusos joscoovaccessunconeces WOscoseceESSSSSS“ sus, 


Bode o pccoescacecicss! beteveutrcdcvessouah=nilasceccscavceseehsober benbessussoncsenvesse) hestonsnesenssnneuans| Plc luccos +e LoS T SSo oi Sok SEE Ga: aa ae 





inday Mat. » 14| Aida 


tnday Eve., » 14| Madame Butterfly |.........--:---2--feccossccsescececens feceeeenssscersssnass fesscesscensenensnees feovencnescossscnnes [peceseeeneereseestess | Suppers 

l ORDERS NOW BEING RECEIVED THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 

feservations will be filled in order received. Ground Floor Kohler & Chase Bldg., 26 O’Farrell St., San Francisco 
Telephone: EXbrook 6696 

il Order Coupon The enclosed check G..............-ccecccssscccscscssencsescersnesancesesnnsssee is in full payment 

ttion desired Lo) Rane tan Ae Rey ee ROR EEE Aree te erst seats as indicated in above space. 
Name (print)............ 8 eR ee ee em PoR OE i IO 
COT CRG ooo ceca cca eee cev raves As Tope Seca as ten suecevenonsegeute= saguekwiugiaseedan¥ereces SOE EER eneRomEeeeee 


Telephone NO so.c.:i2cc.scsc.cccnsseeaen-paccenssenscausananscutieetavenceseceievansnoanesansteneoseeeeaenneert Hosea 








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VOCAL 





Rena Lazelle 


VOCAL TEACHER AND COACH 


Well Known Pupils: Elbert Bellows, Fred- 
eric Bittke, Albert Browne, Worden Dixon, 
Esther Green, Reba Greenley, Lysbeth 
Hughes, Herbert Maas, Margie Nemes, 
Eleanor Nielson, Andrew Robertson, Jean- 
ette Sholl, Franziska Weiss 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3307 
Mondays: Hotel Oakland, Oakland 





Joseph Greven 


VOICE SPECIALIST 


Teacher of Many Local Favorite and 
Prominent European and American Artists 


927 Lake St. BAyview 5278 
Vee 5 er a Bed SA ie eee 
Mme. Beatrice Bowman 


Teacher of Emily Hardy, Alice Avakian, 
Ralina Zarove 


2217 California St. Tel. WEst 4406 





Nino Comel 
VOCAL TEACHING — COACHING 
Teacher of Josephine Tumminia and 
Mari Monte 
376 Sutter St. DOuglas 6379. AShberry 7438 





Beatrice Lewis 
STUDIO OF THE MODERN DANCE 


533 Post Street 





MUSICAL DIRECTORY 








Henley Voice Studio 


Enid Henley, Soprono-Teacher; Homer 
Henley, Nationally Known Vocal 
Authority 


Studio: 2847 Union St. Tel. WE 9036 








PIANO 





ORdway 0829 


Malen Burnett School of Music 


Thorough training from kindergarten to 
concert stage. Courses for those training 
to be teachers. 


2580 Broadway. Tel. Fillmore 1898 


LINCOLN 
ATCHELDE 


CONCERT PIANIST - TEACHER 


555 SUTTER ST. ®@ SUtter 4970 


508 SUTTER nr POWELL 





SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street 


WAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 
DAY AND EVENING COURSES 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 


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OBERT WALLACE 


IHE HOUSE OF FURS one rorty six GEARY 





DUTIFUL MORE 
UARACUL SWAGGERS 


As a noteworthy feature of the 
Annual Robert Wallace January 
Clearance Sale we now present a 
glorious selection of fine black 
Caracul swagger coats. Carefully 
selected pelts... exquisite texture 
...expert craftsmanship assure ™ 


you of many outstanding values. 





The lovely coat illustrated is one 7 


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Priced for this sale event at only L / 


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Gherman 




































The magic beauty of world 
famous symphoniesis yoursto 
enjoy whenever you wish with 


Victor Higher Fidelity 
RECORDS 


In fact, Victor records offer the one 
way to hear your favorite symphonies 
at any time that you desire! They 
give you all the greatest symphonies 
of the world’s greatest composers... 
played by the world’s finest symphony 
orchestras. Victor’s new higher fidelity 
recordings capture every delicate 
whisper of every instrument with the 
same clearness and brilliance that 
thrill music lovers at the San Fran- 
cisco Symphony concerts. 


popular and classical music . 


KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS 
OAKLAND: H.C. CAPWELL'S .. . Fourth Floor 


Tune in on K]BS every evening at 
10:00 P. M. for two hours of 





These are but a few of the symphonies 
available on Victor Higher Fidelity 
Recordings | 


Symphony No. 7 in A Major 
(Ludwig van Beethoven, Opus 92) 

Played by Arturo Toscanini 

and Philharmonic Orchestra 

of New York. 5 records with $4( 

album 

Symphony No. 4 in G Major 
(Antonin Dvorak) 

Played by the Philharmonic 

Orchestra by Vaclav Talich. $751 

5 records with album 


Schubert’s Symphony No. 8 

in B Minor (unfinished) 
Played by Koussevitzky and 
the Boston Symphony Orches- $6! 
tra. 3 records with album 


Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 

4 in A Major 
Played by Serge Koussevitzky 
and the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. 3 records with $63 
album 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY. ee 
ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor wo ; 


COL. W. de BASIL’S 


BALLET 
RUSSE 





1e8 


10 
j A i 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO 


Presented by THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
ANGELO ROSSI, Mayor 
5s! EDGAR WALTER, President JOSEPH H. DYER, Secretary 
Direction of Music Committee: J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 
THE BALLET RUSSE IS UNDER MANAGEMENT OFS) AHUR@K 














| Va iene 
New 
PRINTS 





in. the 
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DRESS SALON ¢ FOURTH FLOOR 


THE ART COMMISSION PRESENTS 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
AND 


Col. W. de BASIL’s BALLET RUSSE 


(EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT S. HUROK) 


Sunday Matinee, January 31st, 1937 


1 


LES SYLPHIDES 


A Romantic Reverie in One Act 


Music by CHOPIN—Orchestrated by Vittorio RIETI 
Choreography after Michel FOKINE 
Scenery by Prince A. SCHERVACHIDZE, after COROT 
Costumes executed by Mme. 0. LAROSE 


Nocturne: 


Irina BARONOVA, Tamara TOUMANOVA, Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA, 
Kdna TRESAHAR, Galina RAZOUMOVA 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, ADRIANOVA, CHAMIE, LIPKOVSKA, LEONTIEVA, 
LVOVA, MARRA, NELIDOVA, OBIDENNA, OSATO, RADOVA, 
ROSTOVA, SEROVA, STRAKHOVA 
Roman JASINSKY 


Valse: 


Tamara TOUMANOVA 


Mazurka: 


Irina BARONOVA 


Mazurka: 


Roman JASINSKY 


Prelude: 
Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA 


Valse: 
Irina BARONOVA and Roman JASINSKY 


(Continued on page 6) 


3 








i 
\ 


Sherman 








Kearny at Sutter 


H. C. Capwell’s 
Fourth Floor, Oakland 


8 California Stores 


Play records through 


your radio 


for only 


$1650 





“sn. 





If you already have a radio and have been longing for 
recorded music so that you may enjoy command perform- 
ances of your favorite concerts, symphonies, operas or 
popular music, you’ll be interested in this RCA Victor 
record player. It plays through any modern AC radio and 
its tone equals that of the radio to which it is attached. 


Plays all size records. 


Enjoy the music you wish, when you wish! 














PETER CONLEY PRESENTS 








* « x  * te 
ADMIRAL 


BYRD 


IN PERSON - TELLING HIS THRILLING STORY 


“CONQUERING THE ANTARCTIC” 
ILLUSTRATED WITH MOTION PICTURES 


OPERA HOUSE - WEDNESDAY F F B 3 
MATINEE 3:15 — NIGHT 8:20 ; 





ALL SEATS RESERVED: $1.10 — 83¢ — 55¢ Including Tax 


On Sale Now: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland 














Valse: 


Irina BARONOVA, Tamara TOUMANOVA, Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA, 


Edna TRESAHAR, Galina RAZOUMOVA 
Roman JASINSKY 
and Artistes of the Ballet 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 


INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES. 


LE TRICORNE 
(THE THREE-CORNERED HAT) 


Ballet by Martinez SIERRA, drawn from a Fable by ALARCON 
Music by Manuel de FALLA 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Scenery and Costumes by Pablo PICASSO 


2. 


The scenario is adapted by Martinez Sierra from a story by Alarcon 


GREATER 
AS THE 
YEARS 

GO BYaa 


The Baldwin of today is an infinitely greater instrument. Responsive to 
the ever increasing requirements of today’s great artists, today’s Baldwin 
more than fulfills their every desire. @ Play the Baldwin yourself. Let 
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of all that a piano means. Learn ot our new payment plan. 


Baldwin 


A N O § 





310 SUTTER STREET 





(1833-1891), which has also supplied the basis of Hugo Wolf’s opera “Der 
Corregidor.” The scene is laid in eighteenth-century Spain. 


In rustic quiet a miller and his wife amuse themselves by teaching their 
bird to pipe the hours of the day. Enamoured, both are jealous and inclined to 
flirt with passers-by, to test each other. The Corregidor, Governor of the 
province, passes with his wife and suite through the village. Attracted by the 
miller’s wife, the amorous Corregidor seeks to pay her attention. She amuses 
herself by flattering and leading on the ridiculous old man. 


The miller appearing, his wife mockingly tells him of the Corregidor’s 
advances. The Governor, incensed at her mockery, departs threatening revenge. 
The miller and his wife celebrate their jest by dancing, drawing their neigh- 
bors into merriment. The revels are interrupted by the Corregidor’s Officers, 
who arrest the miller and take him away. Alone, the miller’s wife laments. 
The Corregidor, bent on achieving his aim, attempts to follow her into the 
mill. She eludes him and lures him on to the bridge, where she contrives to 
trip him. He falls into the mill stream, and, frightened by her act, the miller’s 
wife runs for assistance to extricate him. The Governor, however, gains the 
bank in her absence, and entering the mill, divests himself of his garments, 
hangs them out to dry and seeks refuge in the miller’s bed. 


Meanwhile, the miller returns, perceives the Governor, and determines to 
make a public fool of him in revenge. He exchanges his clothes for those of the 
Governor, leaving his own behind with a taunting message scribbled on the 
wall. The enraged Governor, to pursue him, is reduced to donning the miller’s 
clothes; but the villagers, informed of the jest, intercept him and make public 
sport of him. While he makes his escape, the throng celebrate his discomfort 


by a merry riot, dancing a “jota” as they toss his effigy in the air. 
Ms 


(Continued on page 10) 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
®, FINE FOODS 


Ice Cream «x Sodas 
Pastries « Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Pign Mhistle 


33 POWELL STREET, Near Market 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 





Sa 


SLC INTELL ARO RE LES ELEN LET TONELLI OLDE OLEE TEPER nee ery 


—Ss Se 


ENTITLE EET EN 


— 
eda 


PEELE OE AT RSS 88 TEETER ETE IT TET TREE eee 
eS 


sereverry 
~ ae 








a ee i a Eo ee Be 


Ss 











BUELL BY -LUNGOLN tO) le 
LINCOLN STANDARD 
OF “MECHANIC ATL “EX 6 Ewer Nite 





Drama combined with music gave the world a different kind of art 
—opera. Lincoln engineering, united with Ford resources, gave the 
world a different kind of car—Lincoln-Zephyr. The Lincoln-Zephyr 
enters 1957 proved by a year’s superb performance. It is not a new 
“model.” It is the original ear, improved, refined —sull far ahead 
in its standards of power, comfort, safety, economy. It brings to the 


medium-price field the Lincoln standard of mechanical excellence. 





ARTHUR RB. LINDBURG CO. CHESTER N. WEAVER CO. 
1101 Van Ness Ave. 2910 Broadway 
San Francisco Oakland 


RY OUR NEAR ESP 0 DS pe aaa 





eel GOIN EIEN 
Pete 2S. E oN 1.95 


ROBERT O'CONNOR 


AMERICAN PIANIST 


RESERVED SEATS VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
$2.20, $1.65, $1.10, 88c MONDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1937 


SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. EIGHT THIRTY O’‘CLOCE 








PI MTN Poco cen ieee ca eee x cote ne aca ubeaudes sh eeca saan wucGeree eames eee Leonide MASSINE 


Mei MVETILOI S| WUE Cr eicon. coceteeccavecee ee seme ec ae wey eee toe atest! Tamara TOUMANOVA 
Them GOVerniOL -.cescote see eee eee Dee Reae semen UN ety I ne A David LICHINE 
1 ios BF 10s aeons ee earner eas eran, erie Michel KATCHAROFF 


The Alguazils: 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, BOROVANSKY, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, 
PLATOFF, ZORITCH 


Neighbors: 
Miles. CHAMIE, MARRA, NELIDOVA, OSATO, RAZOUMOVA, SEROVA, 
TRESAHAR, VOLKOVA 
MM. BELSKY, JASINSKY, KOSLOFF, LADRE, LAZOVSKY, LIPATOFF, 
MATOUCHEVSKY, PETROFF 


Jota: 
Miles. TOUMANOVA, DELAROVA, LIPKOVSKA, GRIGORIEVA, 
OBIDENNA, ABRICOSSOVA 
MM. MASSINE, KATCHAROFF, LADRE and the preceding 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 





INTERMISSION OF FIFTEEN MINUTES 





3. 


L’>APRES-MIDI D’UN FAUNE 


Choreographic Poem 


Music by Claude DEBUSSY 
Choreography after Waslaw NIJINSKY 
Scenery by Prince A. SCHERVACHIDZE 
Costumes by Leon BAKST 


Debussy’s prelude to the elusive eclogue of Stephane Mallarme—“L’Apres- 
Midi d’un Faune’—written in 1892—marked with its appearance a fresh phase 
in musical development. It united the atmospheric and colorful qualities of 
Manet’s painting and the subtleties of verse of the French Symbolists with 





CAO Gon InGaAs ie eer: SRA Ou 
The World Famous N. Y. AMERICAN 


HART HOUSE aca 
STRING OQUAK TE os 


James Levy : Arn Adaskin : Milton Blackstone : Boris Hambourg 


MONDAY F 3 B 8 COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 
EVENING 7 Sutter at Mason 


Reserved Seats at: Sherman, Clay & Co., 55¢, 85¢, $1.10, $1.65, $2.20 
Vallely Current Review — FEBRUARY 11 — Fairmont 
MANAGEMENT: ALICE SECKELS-ELSIE CROSS 


10 











music—created in a stroke what is known today as “musical impressionism.” 
This notable work is the musical basis of Nijinsky’s dance-poem. The sub- 
stance of Mallarme’s poem has hitherto evaded translation. It consists of half- 


lights of speech, so to say, subtle nuances half-expressing, half-veiling, tran- 
sient, elusive moods. 


The Faun, a simple, passionate creature of sylvan life, wakens in the 
forest. Fleeting memories of the preceding afternoon tease his brain. Here 
and there the images of alluring nymphs, each with her contrasting fascina- 
tions, drift through his brain, but he cannot assure himself whether there are 
actual memories of beings or mere visions of imagination. Surely there was 
one lovely nymph—and yet more—tender, shy, bold, provoking, yielding—only 
to recapture events! But he cannot. One after another, images take life before 
him, only to elude him. He strives to discern whether it be a swan in shining 
flight down by the lake, or naiads playing in the water. The delicious sensations 
grow more vague; fact or fancy, he will never certainly know. If he could but 
put substance into his dreams as he blows out empty grape-skins. It is 
impossible. He forsakes the vain attempt. The rich sunlight enmeshes him in 
languor. The grass is lush and soft. He turns lazily to sleep again and dreams, 
since waking blurs the actuality of his visions. 


Such is the theme of this pagan poem, pagan, yet etheralised through its 
symbolic vision, so that, as has been said, “All that is leering and savage in the 
face of the satyr disappears. Desire still speaks, but there is a veil of tender- 
ness.” The whole poem, as the dance, is symbolic of the transience of 
physical delights and the solace of dreams. 


Shes Nyiip Weta he eos 2 ope SOs Aes et aoe ee ee Tamara GRIGORIEVA 
fcc) 0) « ee Sane eles ere MCT POOMR Me Rn we fee David LICHINE 


Nymphs: 
Miles. ABRICOSSOVA, CHAMIE, MARRA, NELIDOVA, OBIDENNA, OSATO 


Conductor: Pierre MONTEUX 





SHORT INTERMISSION 





4, 


LE BEAU DANUBE 
(THE BEAUTIFUL DANUBE) 


Character Ballet 
Music by Johann STRAUSS 
Arranged and Orchestrated by Roger DESORMIERE 
Book and Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Scenery by Vladimir POLUNIN, after Constantin GUYS 


Costumes by Count Etienne de BEAUMONT 
(Continued on page 18) 


11 





KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much 


to your family SAG 


Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning . . . now. 
As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 
A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


PRS Si = DUE Ps ATR MM ENE 


Wells Fargo Bank 
Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery Market at Grant Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 








Pee Taga 


CONLEY 


Presents 


MARIAN 
ANDERSON 


Opera House (Only Recital) 
WED. EVE., FEB. 24, 8:30 


PR sO Gives 


I. 
Beg ruesSUN G2. .cececsto.cceecee es Haendel 
Chio: mal Vi" PoOssa:2:-<:---..-. Haendel 
Sicilian iac2. eee ee Haendel 
Ah Spietato 
(SArmnadipl’’) ioe. Haendel 
II. 
Liebesbotschaft ................ Schubert 
Ave Maria. =..0.2..0 3 Schubert 
Der Tod und das 
Macdchnen.. ie Schubert 
Die. Porelle:c 2 a2 es Schubert 
III. 
Air of “Don Carlos” 
(O Don Fatale) = i2s..k.. Verdi 
IV. 
Die Fusswaschung............ Kilpinen 
Schilfrohr, saeus’le 
(Saev, saev, susa).......... Sibelius 
Sung in Swedish 
Dre iibelles seas ee Sibelius 
Wer es«cin, Traum... Sibelius 
Sung in German 
V. 


Negro Spirituals: 
City called Heaven....Hall Johnson 
Lord, I can’t stay 


away 


SANE se a Roland Hayes 
See John Payne 


My soul’s been anchored 


in the Lord..... 


TICKETS: $2.20 
SHERMAN, 


ie Florence Price 


$1.65 $1.10 
CLAY. @).6 0: 










































































































S. Hurok 


S. Hurok, manager of most of the outstanding dance attractions in this 
country today, is unique among the great impresarios of music, dance and the 
drama, having confined his efforts chiefly to the importation of celebrated 
European organizations. He has done more to bring to the masses the highest 
type of entertainment than anyone connected with the amusement world. 


With uncanny judgment, he has imported year after year, the best of 
foreign attractions, has fostered many careers in this country, and has been 
associated for a quarter of a century with the most significant artists of all lands. 


A Russian with ideals and a positive conviction that the American public 
can lend its appreciation to the finest artists and organizations, he has left 
small things to others, and has devoted his boundless energy to the production 
of large scale and often spectacular attractions. He fervently hopes that his 
efforts will bring about a renaissance of interest in the stage arts, surpassing 
that of European audiences. He is convinced that people in America need only 
be made aware of great art and they will flock to it. Some years ago The New 
York Times declared editorially that “S, Hurok has done more for the cause of 
music than the invention of the phonograph.” 


Mr. Hurok managed the last American seasons of Anna Pavlowa and her 
Ballet Russe, Isadora Duncan, Fokine and Fokina, and Loie Fuller. He brought 
to this country the famous composers Richard Strauss and Alexander Glazounov. 
He has presented many celebrated violinists, including Mischa Elman, Efrem 
Zimbalist, Eugen Ysaye, Kubelik, and scores of great singers including Tetraz- 
zini, Gluck, Schumann-Heink and the immortal Chaliapin. He introduced Mary 
Wigman to New York, kindling a furore in the dance world that still continues, 
although interest has now turned to the brighter art of the Ballet Russe. He 
also delivered for American delectation the fiery Flamenco dancer, Vicente 
Escudero, Uday Shan-Kar and his Hindu Company, Trudi Schoop and her 
Comic Ballet. 


Through depressions and prosperity, Mr. Hurok has, single-handed, con- 
tinued to present large touring organizations of distinction. He managed the 
tours of the German Grand Opera, the Russian Grand Opera, the Habima 
Theatre, the Italian Piccoli Theatre, the Moscow Cathedral Choir and the 
Vienna Choir Boys. 


During the current season he will offer Marian Anderson, the sensational 
Negro contralto; Rudolf Serkin, the latest genius of the piano; the Kolisch 
Quartet, adjudged to be the finest string ensemble in the world; the Dana 
Singing Ensemble, a Polish quintet; Ginette Neveu, a phenomenal young 
French violinist; Joseph Schmidt, Europe’s current radio idol; Arthur Rubin- 
stein; a continental ensemble including Raphael, Victor Chenkin and Emma 
Runitch; and Mme. Pagliughi, a brilliant Italian coloratura soprano. 


Last and highly important, he will bring the Salzburg Opera Guild for its 
first American tour, beginning in the Fall of 1937. This is the famous troupe 
which took part in the recent Salzburg Music Festival where it received 
accolades of praise from press and public. 





























Rachmaninoff 





OPERA HOUSE 


PROGRAM: FRIDAY EVE., 8:30 P. M. — FEB. 5 


1. 
2. 


Organ Fantasia and Fugue in G-minor........................--.--- Bach-Liszt 


Sonata, Opus V098...2..22.222. 2s ee Beethoven 
Vivace ma non troppo 
Adagio espressivo 
Prestissimo 
Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo 


(a) Polonaise, C-minor 
(b) Nocturne .................. 


(ce) Mazurka 2. 8. ( SRT RE Oe ALD” RRO NOL a ae Chopin 
(d) Rondo, Opus 16........ | 
Four Etudes-Tableaux, Opus 33....................2-20...-.....-.- Rachmaninoff 
C-sharp minor 
G-minor 
E-flat minor 
E-flat major 
Sonnetto:.del Petrarcay NO. 225 ee eee Liszt 
Magic: Fireiscc3 visas o ee eee ee Wagner-Brassin 
Etudes i-maj orci ee eee Paganini-Liszt 


PROGRAM: SUNDAY AFT., 2:30 P. M. — FEB. 7 


0 ee ee 


Variations; A-major.sccncicle ee ee eee Mozart 
Three: Sonatas sso. cscnvicss.cceet ech ee ee ee ee Scarlatti 
Sonata, Opus-58;, B-minor::. <3. tee eee Chopin 
Prelude: 252k Bi eee hi Oe ae mee Bach-Rachmaninoff 


(a) Daisies, song.... 
(b) Oriental Sketch 


(a) Nocturne, G-major........ ! 
(b) Nocturne, (Noon Tide) {9 UT John Field 


(a) Etude, D-flat major 
(b) Valse Oubliee No. 3 
(c) Polonaise, E-major.. 


$2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.10, Including Tax — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


MANAGEMENT ® PETER CONE VY 





15 











S. HuROK oresents 
The WORLD’S GREATEST 








SALZBURG OPERA GUILD 


Sensation of last summer’s Salzburg Music Festival. 
One of the world’s greatest operatic organizations. 
Complete European Company in repertoire of unfa- 
miliar operatic masterpieces. Symphony Orchestra. First 
time in America. Season 1937-1938. 


TRUDI SCHOOP 


AND HER COMPANY OF COMIC DANCERS 


Second sensational coast to coast tour. 

“This Trudi Schoop Ballet is the most amusing and 
the most amazingly fresh entertainment in New York,” 
writes Edna Ferber. “A dazzling evening in the theatre 
and a triumph of sheer talent.” 


FEODOR CHALIAPIN 


Great Russian Basso. 


MARIAN ANDERSON 


World’s Outstanding Contralto. 
One of the greatest living singers—New York Times. 


DANA ENSEMBLE 


Famous Polish Singing Quintet. 











i 


ARTISTS and ORGANIZATIONS 


UDAY SHAN-KAR 


AND HIS HINDU BALLET 


In a complete new repertoire of Hindu Dances. New 
Costumes and New Productions. 

“Beauty and Excitement”—New York Times. “Gape 
in awe at the superlative beauty of Shan-Kar’—New 
York World Telegram. 


CONTINENTAL ENSEMBLE 


Emma Runitch - Victor Chenkin - Raphael 
Unique — Novel — Delightful 


RUDOLF SERKIN ‘OLISCH QUARTET 
New Genius of the Piano String Ensemble 


MADAME PAGLIUGHI GINETTE NEVEU 


Brilliant Italian Coloratura Voune Eocene 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEPH SCHMIDT 


Triumphant Return Engagement Europe’s Radio Idol 


VIENNA CHOIR BOYS 


Fifth American Tour 


FOR FURTHER INFORMATION regarding these 
and other attractions which Mr. Hurok has engaged 
abroad, address Peter Conley, San Francisco Opera House, 
or Hurok Attractions, 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 


17 














The scene is laid in a public garden at Vienna on a holiday in 1860. The 
people are dressed in their best. Little milliners and their companions are 
filled with the holiday spirit. They are joined by a group of foppish young 
men-about-town, who amuse everyone by their antics. Whilst itinerant per- 
formers are displaying their art, a young hussar enters and meets a charming 
girl. One of the strolling players, a dancer, recognizes in the hussar her former 
lover, and engages in a violent quarrel with his companion, who faints and is 
taken away by her parents. She contrives, however, to escape from them, and 
returns in time to interrupt a love scene between the hussar and the dancer, 
who retires vanquished, leaving the young couple together. The parents, having 
missed their daughter, now arrive on the scene and bestow their blessing. 


In the evening there is a public ball with a quadrille in which all join — old 
and young. The King of the Dandies, surrounded by young girls, adds to the 
general enjoyment. Returning to the scene the hussar and his sweetheart meet 
the dancer who, accepting the inevitable, becomes reconciled to them, and the 
happy ending of the idyll is merged in the gaiety of the throng. 


Thexotrect= Dancer. <tr eee ee ee Alexandra DANILOVA 
The sD aue itera s. 21 rer Wir eee ee ee Tatiana RIABOUCHINSKA 
He A ITSG et ANd... 258 28 a se ee Bs, eee ee ee Olga MOROSOVA 
4h) eVc¥al w WG Ih: W etait nn sete tee Pinas eS Ae etry ABD eer ARON ORT PS care 1h Leonide MASSINE 
ihepsing ot the Dandies. ce See eee eee David LICHINE 
Phe 38 Chl bess c. secsseccuteercass a, corse aetna bees eee ee Edouard BOROVANSKY 
De Mave SOT nea ete ee ee ea een, edie, oe H. ALGERANOFF 
Bes Mounier. xis secs eae ee eee ec eee ee ee A. ADRIANOVA 
AN RCA SG 6 =) gee neRrp en er et iene RMN AS SOM oe bc oh ie SMe re Ls. Whroanec on Ge SM B, BELSKY 
ATOR T CIS Geet eeu ae ee ee ee ni eee ek: nee tee ee NR ae A. KOSLOFF 
he -Gardener..: 7 4 Rete Conte Bee tee eee eee ee ee H. ALGERANOFF 


The Modistes: 
Miles. ABRICOSOVA, MARRA, OBIDENNA, ROSTOVA 


The Needlewomen: 
Miles. LIPKOVSKA, RAZOUMOVA 


The Ladies of the Town: 
Miles. NELIDOVA, SEROVA, RADOVA, STRAKHOVA 


The Salesmen: 
MM. ALEXANDROFF, BOUSLOFF, ISMAILOFF, PLATOFF 


The Dandies: 
MM. ALONSO, KATCHAROFF, MATOUCHEVSKY 


Conductor: Antal DORATI 

















CAST SUBJECT TO CHANGES 





Founder and Director General: COL. W. DE BASIL 
Maitre-de-Ballet and Artistic Collaborator: Leonide MASSINE 
Conductors: Efrem KURTZ and Antal DORATI 
Regisseur General: Serge GRIGORIEFF 








STAFF FOR S. HUROK 
David Libidins  } 


ae ne eee eRe ER REE Pe ein OR ey ms RNS Company Managers 
Maurice Winters | 
Gerald: Goode 2cuiwie te oe ok ee ee General Press Representative 
Baul .Morrish se ae oe ee Advance Press Representative 
Mae: Mrohmians. 20:53 es-0 ton eee ee Executive Secretary 
BOris (SW WaT gece acc loetecnncocd ec Siec eee ae eee cae Concert Meister 
Nathan” ROS @iis.ccsczceacoe st sccasa cn patsenasscreyscea ee ceses tesa ee eee Orchestra Manager 
Clyde sS ravi taco ote oo 5 ae ae eee emer Chief Carpenter 
Carl Greenside a ee Be ee eee Chief Property Man 
Gene PIGrne yoo 1 Pere rae eee eee eee Chief Electrician 
Avigusta Bese mac. 2225 cc, Sees ccc cones eee ee Wardrobe Mistress 





The Management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion 
pictures inside the Theatre without written permission. 





EXCLUSIVE MANAGEMENT: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 ROCKEFELLER PLAZA, N. Y, C. 















COLLECTOR @® DEALER @ APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows. High--Medium--Low Priced. 





19 











20 





The World’s Foremost Exponents of Dance Arts, Headed by The 
Monte Carlo Ballet Russe, Use and Recommend .. . 


SELVA TOE SLIPPERS 


Featured in the West Exclusively by 


The DANCE ART CO. 


Golden Gate Theatre Bldg. — 25 Taylor St. — Phone PRospect 1643 


Dancing Shoes For Ballet-Toe, Tap, 
Accessories Spanish, Acrobatic, 
Dance Belts-Tights ; Modern, 

Opera Lengths-Leotards Interpretative 


, is Import 
Retailers iy ‘ (Ww and 


Wholesalers * \ Export 


The BALLET JOOSS also chose DANCE ART BALLETS during recent San Francisco 
Engagement. In addition to the ‘‘Only Specialized Theatrical Shoe Service in Northern 
California’” DANCE ART also features complete Stocks of DAZIAN’S, ASSOCIATED 
and MAHARAM Costume Fabrics, and ACCESSORIES FOR STAGE AND SCREEN. 
WIGS, MAKE-UP, and Musical Dance Accessories, are among the thousands of theatrical 
necessities stocked for the convenience of the Dance and Theatrical Profession. 
Costume Pattern, Designing and Wardrobe Making Service 
Visitors Cordially Welcome to San Francisco’s Most Fascinating Shoppe. 
Catalog and price lists sent anywhere on request. — World Wide Mail Order Service. 


Headquarters for Parilia Costumes and Supplies. 


MUSICIANS MARVEL 


AT THE PERFECTED TONE BALANCE 
OF THE NEW 


BALDWIN - BUILT 


All who see this marvelous instru- 
ment exclaim with delight. It thrills 
the eye, charms the ear, lures the 
fingers. The perfected tone balance 
of the exclusive Acrosonic Scale is entirely new. 
Standard 88 note scale, yet a compact design of 
fascinating beauty. An amazing value ... con- 
venient terms. Come in and try it. 


BALDWIN PIANOS 310 Sutter Steert 








MAGATING 


as odverined 






therein 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


Thur. 8:30 P. 
Fri. 8:30P. 
Sat. 2:50 'P. 
Sat. 8:380P. 
Sun.) 200 Lr. 
Fri, 2:30 P. 
Sat. 8:30 P. 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Thur, 8:15 P. 
Fri. 2:30 P. 
Sat. 8:380P. 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Fri. :8320:P. 
Fri. 2:80 P. 
Sat. 8:30 P. 
Tues. 8:15 P. 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Fri. 2:30 P. 
Sat. 8:30 P. 
Tues. 8:30 P. 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Sat. 10:30 A. 
Fri. 2:380P. 
Sat. 10:30 A. 
Sat. _ 8:30 P: 
Sun. 3:15 P. 
Thur. 8:15 P. 
Py. -ZsS05P? 
Sat. 10:30 A. 
Sat. 8:380P. 
Tues, 8:15 P. 
Pri, 922302 
Sat, 10:30 A. 
Sat. 8:30 P. 
Sun. 3:00 P. 


Conductor 


Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


M., Apr. 


.M., Apr. 


M., Apr. 


M., Apr. 
M., Apr. 


1937 SEASON 


a 
220 WITH COL. W. DE BASIL’S 
36 BALLET RUSSE 
31, | AT THE OPERA HOUSE 


. 5,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 

. 6,Opera House, with Toscha Seidel, Violinist 
.11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

.18, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

.19, Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

. 20, Opera House, with Richard Crooks, Tenor 

. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

. 26, Civic Auditorium, with Grace Moore, Soprano 
. 5, Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 
. 6,Opera House, with Marian Anderson, Contralto 
. 9,Memorial Chapel, Stanford University 

.11, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

.19, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

. 20, Opera House, with Isaac Stern, Violinist 

. 28, Civic Auditorium, with Igor Stravinsky and 


San Francisco Municipal Chorus 


. 25, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 
. 1, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 
. 8, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 


Conducting 


. 9,Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 
.10, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 


Conducting 


.10, Opera House, Ernest Schelling, Pianist 
.11, University of California 

. 15, Broadcast for Standard Oil Co. 

*,16, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 


Baritone 


.17, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 


Conducting 


.17, Opera House, with John Charles Thomas, 


Baritone 
20, Civic Auditorium, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 
23, Opera House 
24, Young People’s Concert, Ernest Schelling 
Conducting 
24, Opera House 
25,San Rafael 


TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND 








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1030 BUSH STREET Phone ORdway 6367 Stud 


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io No.6 



































MUN IGI PAL. © ON © ER Tes 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


GRA CE. Mao @ ke 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — FRIDAY EVE., FEB. 26 





IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Conducting SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY and playing his 
“SYMPHONY OF PSALMS” 
ALSO 
Rossini “STABAT MATER” Conducted by HANS LESCHKE 


MUNICIPAL) “GBvO;Reu:s 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUESDAY, MARCH 23 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


keV A en 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE., APRIL 20 





RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75¢, 50¢, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


EDGAR WALTER, President JOS. H. DYER, JR, Secretary 


DIRECTION OF MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 











23 











GEORGE PRING 







Studio 


Classic and 
modern ballet, 
character, 
Oriental 
dancing, 
Eurhythmics. 
Classes for 
beginners or 
advanced 
students, 
all ages. 


420 SUTTER STREET 


eee 


If your product requires 
force and vigor, we stand 
ready at all times to 
render you the kind of 
service that makes the 
printed word SPEAK. 
Your message will carry 
its emphasis in a truly 
dignified manner. 





15 Columbus Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
SUtter 4772 














PETER CONLEY Presents 
NAN CLE 


MONTE U X 


DANCE RECITAL 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUESDAY EVE. FEB., 15, 8:30 P. M. 


PROGRAM 


Sarabande and Variations........ Corelli 
J. NIELSEN 
Gavotte..2...4.8 eee Lulli 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Divertissements” .....-.2:-<---.+--. Couperin 
J. NIELSEN 
Tempo dr Ballovs = ae. ae. Scarlatti 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Suite: Rondo, Minuet, Badinerie....Bach 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Brench. Site che tee seen Bach 
J. NIELSEN 
Pantomime. eee Mozart 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Country Dances! -2......-......- Beethoven 
J. NIELSEN 
French Revolutionary 
DANCG lave (Popular Songs) 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Extract from Ballet Music 
from “Rosamunde’’.............- Schubert 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Waltzes wie ct eee ee Brahms 
J. NIELSEN 
Valse Romantvique.........:.- Chabrier 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Waltz aa ee et ees Chabrier 
J. NIELSEN 


Danse Sacrée 
Danse Profane 
Sgn Mareen ta age cg geaee Debussy 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
Funeral March in 
Jazz Tempo ...... Castelnuovo-Tedesco 


J. NIELSEN 
Danse: Sericuses.2... =e -e J. Nielsen 
NANCIE MONTEUX 
American ClassiGs. sos Handy 
J. NIELSEN 
March, from ‘“‘Love for 
Three Oranges” =. Prokofieff 


NANCIE MONTEUX 


The Pasmore Quartet (Mary Pasmore, 
first violin, William Laraia, second 
violin, Erich Weiler, viola, and Dorothy 
Pasmore, cello) will play musique de 
scene during the intervals. 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 — 83¢ 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
———SSSEFEFEFEFL~7~AI HDH_= 











TRUDI SCHOOP 
COMIC BALLET 


ALL NEW PROGRAM 


* 


O-PIECRGA ssh OxUes.& 
WED 2 VE 6753-0 
MA R Cereal. 


* 


$2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 Including Tax 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


MANAGEMENT: PETER CONLEY 








THE ART COMMISSION 


EDGAR WALTER, President JosEPH H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 


POR ESE Nets 


GRACE MOORE 





GOP RIR Rs, -" 








TANG GP oh pe ON, 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Cel Vel CAC ie Oye ray 
Friday Evening, February 26th 


Popular Prices: 25¢ — S50¢ — 75¢ — $1.00 
Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 


Direction: MUSIC COMMITTEE - J. Emmet HaAypen, Chairman 


26 





Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


FOUR SATURDAY MORNINGS (10:30 to 11:30) OPERA HOUSE 
APRIL 3 — APRIL 10 — APRIL 17 — APRIL 24 


RESERVE SEASON TICKETS NOW 
Sherman, Clay & Co. Box Office - Sutter & Kearny Sts., San Francisco 


Please reserve the following Season Tickets for the 
Four Concerts for Young People: 


ORCHESTRA SEATS @ $ 2.00 
GRAND TIER SEATS @ $ 2.00 
DRESS CIRCLE SEATS  @ $ 1.40 
—— BALCONY CIRCLE SEATS @ $ 1.00 
BALCONY (FIRST 5 ROWS) @ $ 1.00 
BALCONY (LAST 6 ROWS) @ 
BOXES (SEATING 8) @ $30.00 


PAYMENT HEREWITH $————— 
BALANCE DUE 


SGT TAL) | RR ORe ee Le at Mien ee Mey ee oT NA RS boty Fs 








The Man with the 


Baton 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 
maitre de musique 


He started to compose, a time ago, 
but stopped because everything sound- 
ed like Schumann or Debussy. In 
Paris he has a school for conductors 
and this year allowed all 10 students 
to take turns conducting on a single 
program. During the war he saw 
action at Verdun, Rheims, Soissons 
and the Argonne. For years he was 
known as the greatest viola player in 
Europe, now plays viola in a private 
quartet with Yehudi Menuhin, in fact 
is Yehudi’s professor of quartet. He 
conducts from memory because he 
studies each score so thoroughly he 
doesn’t need it in performance. He 
thinks that better music is being 
produced today than 20 years ago, 
and that today’s product is equal in 
quality to that of any past period. 


For the sake of the record we here 
append Mrs. Monteux’ neatly-written, 
complete account of her famous hus- 
band’s career: 


“Paris National Conservatory — Ist 
prize violin, viola, harmony and 
counterpoint. 


“Colonne Orchestra — Ist viola (18 
years old); 2nd conductor. 


“Conductor: 
Concerts Berlioz (Paris) 
Orchestre Dieppe—concerts, opera 
Concerts d’avant-garde (Paris) 
Concerts Monteux (Paris) 
Ballets Russes de Diaghileff 

—5 years 

Metropolitan Opera—1916-1919 


Boston Symphony Orchestra 
—1919-1924 

Concertgebouw (Amsterdam) 
—1924-1934 

Société Wagner (Amsterdam) 

Paris Symphony Orchestra 
—1930-1937 

San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra—1935- 








28 





“Has conducted every major orches- 
tra in Europe. Only French conductor 
to direct Berlin Philharmonic and 
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras, also 
Salzburg Festival. Has conducted 
many times in the Hollywood Bowl, 
as well as the Los Angeles Orchestra 
and the Philadephia Orchestra. 


“Creator of many modern works in- 
cluding ‘Petrouchka,’ ‘Sacre du Prin- 
temps,’ ‘Chant du Rossignol’ of Stra- 
vinsky; ‘Daphnis et Chloe,’ Ravel; 
‘Jeux’ of Debussy, and this year start- 
led musical Europe with a magnificent 
rendering of Darius Milhaud’s ‘Chris- 
tophe Colombe’ in which he employed 
the great French Chorus of Nantes, 
16 soloists and the Paris Symphony 
Orchestra.” 


And to complete the account, here 
is a list of Pierre Monteux’ Victor 
recordings compiled by the obliging 
H. W. Wilson of the Record Library: 


M-111—BERLIOZ, “Symphonie 
Fantastique,” Paris Symphony 
Orchestra 


M-230—PAGANINI, Violin concerto 
in D major, with Yehudi Menuhin 


M-231—MOZART, Violin concerto in 
D major, No. 7, with Yehudi 
Menuhin 


M-246—MOZART, Violin concerto 
in D major (“The Adelaide”) 
with Yehudi Menuhin 


11140-1—_BERLIOZ, “Benvenuto 
Cellini” Overture, Op. 23, and 
“Troyens a Carthage” Overture. 





Oper 


day E 
turday 
lurday 
nday M 
nday E 
nday E 
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tinesde 


ursday 


lay Ey 
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day M 
bay E 
day E 
day F 
dnesda 
ursday 
day Ey 
hirday | 
hrday 
hday M 
hday Ey 


IL ORI 
teserva 


ll Or 


tion 











MAIL ORDER BLANK 


FOU RTH ANNUAL DOLL AR OF? Eek AS 2A SLOLN 
Tom C. Girton 


Presents 


FORTUNE GALLO 


and his 


SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


WAR MEMORIAL OPE RA EO U SE 
FEBRUARY 26 TO MARCH 14 INCLUSIVE 


peras — 22 Performances — 6 Repeats — Tickets: 55¢, 83¢, $1.10, $1.65, $1.93 (tax included) 





S $1.93 $1.65 $1.10 $1.65 $1.10 83¢ | 55d 
oe Orenss | ene, (tata | cesta | Gelert ctr | eee oes 
May Hive; . "Reb;\26);Aida’s fo. 52) 9 Wine cee See en ree eee Leen ee Sees cecee ee eee eseensaa speeeeeek | ease NRO 
wday Mat., "”. 27 | Martha and Ballet. 9) 5oc.. 5.02. ie hesccoccecssachocccna |ueovevesvecseapscecel buaceedtossetaetcese! Vactescamee eee neat naa anna ec uenas De 
firday Eve., ” 27/¥1 Trovatore (ou. nasearenscdsastadees' Peacsbactececacsuecest | Geacoote toaccuettse= Losec aschiceaner ees | Seetcastinsesncstsen| ata eaetee uate 
nday Mat., ” 28) Rigoletto SR eee or ee ee to open ee oa ore le ores eye ners ron. 
hday Eve., * CfeCarmen:. 2, )f) “Ultcd ee eee Lowascuahiaconsevuess! besadineutas cuceesheuel batcedbececcupesuee| [so ccest neeesecosote| Ieamene cee bees econ taco eee ances 
nday Eve., March 1] Mamade Butterfly Riad pl ee A Ie aes [Sesonccseeantacteneee | peemaeetesnsara ster) Ret eansecesce eae sevdacceseycore cee sal| Stee rarsen seat 
day vez. 1 2 ba Traviatae. eke ae ee dasincdnounscopetiel [eaneasanseceseised en] Shasettevscds deceuch | sommpssbvoseaseteceal arreerce eae 8 
binesday Eve., ” 8] Jewels of the 
Pi mcorarig Sia Bhie anc ccewcacnapaa pe carta ven evieracua: Pusberseetecteenctes 1a ae eee sedveatesedovenapstes bladed sedeesteettcte 
isday Eve., ” 4! Cavalleria and 
Pagliacci <cecesandcatccocel atts onsbdsogexccues Lwcesesebabuus ialsaal kekeerece Regeeetecece |e ieee ott =o! aciseee 020 Rance ntc ee ene ane 
ilay Eve., zs 5) Loliengrin. yd) ee ee a ace ee Le ae sessadeaduas teeta Eee 
irday Mat. ” 6) Lucia di 
Tom mer rman soe ok a acsearle eee | Le cae eeerecet ee ts) | eee Sesscainsbeknei ceeds eacacctee ee 
bday Mat., eT Madame Butterfly: iy: 5cicico cx coc Vises vcs Peres | ate ace st wasthessliva, orci | Geebeasreeatces 
bday Eve., a> Ty NOG PMe@ne tiem Any eta ees eee ee FIRE Rene eT eared LOU Tua ty cade ccxascaattotys tetera tener eaee 
MdayEve, ” 8!La Boheme  becccccccccocccsccee: PS Na A ee eee Ae WEAN kane eae (Sie Penge ne (Ih Oe RSS Sacha eeaeasesdesmneee 
may Eves, 9-9) Raust) .-) voy ee be a ee es Silos eeacecsutacil sctecueeneeeeneas 
inesday Eve. ” 10) La Gioconda |... ee. niiscebidasndbetenve [ys ccuncb once tessetonl Punsuguosenssterssvon | mc ccetendu cece eoaees | oe ree eee ee ee 
aday:Eive,. 2-1 |ivrovatore> © * 0 iiccs ee see ele ee ee, ee “hss Seles suc hedlf coeceaa ances cee ee eee 
tay Eve., yeh | Rigoletta: © °° 2 Stkecungncssscruse | eeceecencceauteocoes ae Ae yet poe ee Spregeeeee I shocg sowcseanuisd® [eoeseicuxécasstedeoes: loeteter tneceneere 
hirday Mat., ” 18] L’Oracoloand Ballet 
and'Paglincei.’ © \eseqces hiatal ele eee  cccbcbesostoacecoeen VeccevsSugesdanasoten, Poccsomeeececkooteeret ices ee aeaeEaeee 
enday Niven. 9? 8|\Le Wostas 6 6° — Wench ee es hie: Sian 5 Be eS ee Smee Bar eee eee | Me oe ol te ecdies Lh eeeeeee clears 
bay: Mata. #. S14\ Aida = [ca ewe ee RR ener | Mes MRE NGC. od eh oS ote 
nday Eve., et 4). Madame Butterfly ojo .c00 55 too fosgk sce ecco is ee elo ae coco pce Nese cea eee reseoseeonecsnnsenes 
. ORDERS NOW BEING RECEIVED THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 
‘servations will be filled in order received. Ground Floor Kohler & Chase Bldg., 26 O’Farrell St., San Francisco 
Telephone: EXbrook 6696 
1 Onder Coupon Theenclosed check). $.32.2s¢-5.04. 3 visstscsaiesssesatsestcercaueesnsetenare is in full payment 
ition desired TOR rete Co Se od Ae cev acto bee OO seats as indicated in above space. 
Namie (print) o3sciiess::s0: sstghocseadocsnecte es cccewds teres oe es oe cae ee 
POY OSS Sac cd55s 52s Saccchs pans Woceenh ceed SS arcade ede ee tate eae ee ; ee, 
Telephone’ Nos. 25.553 cocse eee es ee Rl 











IHE 


i 


( 


j 





VOCAL Henley Voice Studio 
Enid Henley, Soprono-Teacher; Homer 
Rena Lazelle Henley, Nationally Known Vocal 
Authority 


VOCAL TEACHER AND COACH 


Well Known Pupils: Elbert Bellows, Fred- iS 2 hE eh ee 2 on. ale 
eric Bittke, Albert Browne, Worden Dixon, ' 


Studio: 2847 Union St. Tel. WE 9036 


Esther Green, Reba Greenley, Lysbeth 
Hughes, Herbert Maas, Margie Nemes, PIANO 
Eleanor Nielson, Andrew Robertson, Jean- 


tte Sholl, Franziska Wei ~ Malen Burnett School of Music _ 
ette Sholl, Franziska Weiss Malen Burnett School of Music | 


3435 Sacramento Street WaAlnut 3307 ie! , | 
Thorough training from kindergarten to | 

Mondays: Hotel Oakland, Oakland concert stage. Courses for those training | 
to be teachers. | 
2580 Broadway. Tel. Fillmore 1898 


Joseph Greven 
VOICE SPECIALIST 


Teacher of Many Local Favorite and 
Prominent European and American Artists LINCOLN 
927 Lake St. BAyview 5278 B ATCHELDE 


CONCERT PIANIST - TEACHER 


555 SUTTER ST. ® SUtter 4970 


Mme. Beatrice Bowman 
Teacher of Emily Hardy, Alice Avakian, 
Ralina Zarova 


2217 California St. Tel. WEst 4406 


Nino Comel 
VOCAL TEACHING — COACHING 


Teacher of Josephine Tumminia and 
Mari Monte 


376 Sutter St. DOuglas 6379. AShberry 7438 


Beatrice Lewi 
SiGe Man MODERN DANCE S08 SUTTER nr POWELL 


533 Post Street ORdway 0829 





SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


DAY AND EVENING COURSES 
PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 
NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 





30 





hOBERT WALLACE 


IHE HOUSE OF FURS one forty six GEARY 


DUHUTIFUL MONE 
UARACUL SWAGGERS 


As a noteworthy feature of the 
Annual Robert Wallace January 
Clearance Sale we now present a 
glorious selection of fine black 
Caracul swagger coats. Carefully 
selected pelts... exquisite texture 
..e€xpert craftsmanship assure ™ 
you of many outstanding values. 
The lovely coat illustrated is one 
of many smart styles, especially 


priced for this sale event at only 


I]9 





Sherman |/ Clay 


KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS 
OAKLAND: H.C. CAPWELL'’S .. . Fourth Floor 





The magic beauty of world 
famous symphoniesis yours to 
enjoy whenever you wish with 


Victor Higher Fidelity 
RECORDS 


In fact, Victor records offer the one 
way to hear your favorite symphonies 
at any time that you desire! They 
give you all the greatest symphonies 
of the world’s greatest composers .. . 
played by the world’s finest symphony 
orchestras. Victor’s new higher fidelity These are but a few of the symphonies 
recordings capture every delicate available on Victor Higher Fidelity 
whisper of every instrument with the Recordings | 

same clearness and brilliance that ; 

thrill music lovers at the San Fran- Symptons Noa Pik es 


cisco Symphony concerts. Played by Arturo Toscanini 
and Philharmonic Orchestra 


of New York. 5 records with $40 
album 








Symphony No. 4 in G Major 
(Antonin Dvorak) 

Played by the Philharmonic 

Orchestra by Vaclav Talich. $750 

5 records with album 


Schubert’s Symphony No. 8 
in B Minor (unfinished) 
Played by Koussevitzky and 
the Boston Symphony Orches- $659 
tra. 3 records with album 


Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 
4 in A Major 

Played by Serge Koussevitzky 

and the Boston Symphony 


Tune in on KJBS every evening at Orchestra. 3 records with $¢ £50 
10:00 P. M. for two hours of album 6 


popular and classical music . « . 











Mu 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
FEBRUARY 26, 8:30 P. M 


SOLOISTS: 


CHARLOTTE BOERNER 
EMILY HARDY 


Sopranos 


* 
ERY OtGe Ree 


1. Overture to ‘Fidelio’ Beethoven 


2. Aria, Mi chiamano Mimi from “La Boheme” 
EMILY HARDY 


SOs SUE EE 88s Puccini 


3. Symphony No. 3 in C minor for Organ and Orchestra... Saint-Saens 


Adagio—Allegro moderato—Poco adagiio 
Allegro moderato—Presto—Maestoso—A llegro 


(Leshe Harvey, Organist) 
INTERMISSION 
4, “The «jewel “Sone” rom (ch aust) eee oa san eee eee Gounod 


CHARLOTTE BOERNER 


3 Une Bel die trom Madame Buttentiv: =. ees. alles eee Puccini 
CHARLOTTE BOERNER 


6. ov Night on athe Baldy aicuntaime seem teen gee ee Moussorgsky 


7. Aria, “Una voce poco fa” from ‘The Barber of Seville”... Rossini 
EMILY HARDY 


8. Rakoczy March from “The Damnation of Faust”’............................. Berlioz 


Auspices ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
EDGAR WALTER, President JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr., Secretary 
Direction: Music Committee, J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 











SCAG CAFS CAG CAG CAGE CAGE RAGE CAGES OAR 


THE ART COMMISSION 
EpGAR WALTER, President JosEpH H. DvER, JrR., Secretary 
or 
The San Francisco 


Symphony Orchesira 


GUESTs CONDUCTORS 


IGOR STRAVINSKY 
HANS LESCHKE 


WITH THE 


SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Director 


or 
) 


~D 


Gh 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


TUESDAY EVENING MARCH 28, 1937 


UNDER DIRECTION OF THE MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J. Emmet HAypEN, Chairman 


© 





GRANT AVENUE VAT. “GEARY cod) Rb.o 


UITS f Spring 


and LIvINGSTON’s 
19 Sn tts 


x All the season's 
most outstanding styles in 
a great Spring collection! 


(o Ale ved Bits 


29:75 to 89-75 


. Cla Shits 


(Crs tume Suits 


49-50 to 225.00 


SUIT SALON e FIFTH FLOOR 





PETER CONLEY ATTRACTIONS 
TR UD Se oP 


AND HER COMIC BALLET 
OPERA HOUSE—SUN. AFT., MARCH 28—TUES. EVE., MARCH 30 
a ae ao ee Ae Ter et 


TED SHAWN 


AND HIS MEN DANCERS 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
TUES. AND WED. EVES., APRIL 6-7 — WED. AFT. APRIL 7 
a es eee a eg ee 


MARTHA GRAHAM 


AND HER DANCE GROUP 
THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 8 — SUNDAY AFT., APRIL 11 


LAURA DUBMAN 


PIANIST WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 14 
we eS ee ne 


LAWRENCE TIBBETT 


BARITONE MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 19 


MEN RAE DEERING 


PIANIST MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 26 


NINO MARTINI 


TENOR THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 
a ee re oe 


PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM MAY 2, 3, 4 


ISAAC STERN and HENRI DEERING 


SONATA RECITAL THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 6 























TICKETS NOW ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — San Francisco and Oakland 





RCA Victor 


Padio-Phoneardah 






Combination at a feature price 


PLETE 


5-tube RCA Vic- 
tor Radio, RCA 
Victor Record 
Player, 7 Clas- 
sical Records. 





Now you can hear the music you like 
best, broadcast or recorded, when- 
ever you please on this radio and 
record player combination. 

The radio is equipped with 
dynamic speaker; illuminated read- 
easy dial; high frequency tone con- 
trol, wide tuning range for fine 
reception on domestic and short 
wave broadcasts. 

The record player may be attached 
to any radio—plays records through 
the radio loud speaker. 

This combination with 7 classical 
records, at a feature price. . . $59.95. 





; 
oo 














San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


SILVER JUBILEE SEASON 







PR O-GRRE Apes 
STABAT MATER . . . . . . . . ROSSINI 


Stabat Mater, quartet and chorus 

Cujus Animam, tenor solo 

Quis est Homo, soprano and alto duet 

Pro Peccatis, bass solo 

Eia Mater, bass and chorus 

Sancta Mater, quartet 

Fac ut Portem, alto solo 

Inflammatus, soprano and chorus 

Quando Corpus, quartet 

In Sempiterna Saecula, chorus and quartet 


HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 
MARIE MONTANA, Soprano 
MARGARET O’DEA, Contralto 
CECIL LAUSTIN, Tenor 
DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Bass 























IN EE RMIUIS S31 ON 









SYMPHONY OF THE PSALMS . STRAVINSKY 
Prelude 
Double Fugue 
Allegro Symphonique 







IGOR STRAVINSKY, Conductor 


(First performance in San Francisco) 









" ROBERT WALLACE ~ 


~ , THE HOUSE OF FURS one forty six Geary 


MOLt | 7 
COMMANDS Tht 
SPRING SPOTLIGHT 


The most important fur news for 
Spring 1937is the revival of Mole. 
Robert Wallace has created...and 
presents...a notable collection of 
exquisitely lovely Mole coats... 
fashioned from superbly matched 
and individually selected pelts of 
unusual quality. The lustrous 
beauty of Mole lends distinction 


to every age and to all occasions. 





The coatillustrated is one of many 


stunning Spring models at only 


Ibo 








x 


PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


2 
STABAT MATER ... - Gioachino Antonio Rossini 
(1792-1868) 


The Stabat Mater is a twelfth century poem of uncertain authorship— 
which has been set to music hundreds of times. The settings most favored 
today are those of Palestrina, Pergolesi, Haydn, Rossini and Dvorak. 


In 1829 Rossini staged his thirty-fifth and last opera, William Tell. 
He was then only 37, but he nevertheless called it a day so far as the lyric 
theater was concerned, and the only important work he produce in the 39 
years of life that remained to him is that which is sung on this occasion. 
And this was written as a sort of accident. 


Rossini went to Spain in 1831 with a wealthy Spanish friend named 
Agualdo. Here he was requested by a priest, Don Manuel Varela, to create 
a Stabat Mater. Rossini was extremely reluctant to do so. With the modesty 
of the greatly gifted he regarded himself as a mere theatrical tune-smith. 
Religious composition was for the learned, not for one who had left the 
academies as soon as his professors assured him he knew enough to harmonize 
a melody. But his Spanish hosts were insistent, and at length Rossini gave in. 


The first six movements of the work were written by the summer of 
1832; then Rossini fell ill and was unable to complete it. He consequently 
engaged one Tadolini to compose the last four movements, and in this form 
the manuscript was delivered to Don Manuel with the stipulation that it 
must never be published, and must be regarded as a personal and private 
gift from the composer. 


In 1837 Don Manuel died, and his executors sold the manuscript to a 
French publisher who proceeded to issue it over Rossini’s protest. At length, 
in order to stifle this unauthorized venture, Rossini was forced to finish the 
score himself, the new version appearing in 1841, 


The text of the poem is appended, divided according to the Rossini 
setting. The translation is one that was made for the late Paul Steindorff. 


No. -—INTRODUCTION 


Chorus and Quartette 


Stabat mater dolorosa Stood the afflicted mother weeping, 
Juxta crucem lacrymosa, Near the cross her station keeping, 
Dum pendebat Filius ; Whereon hung her Son and Lord; 











MUNICIPAL CONCERT 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 


PIERRE MONTEUX, ConpDucTor 


So ev tT AO Se 


VLOUPINIST — GU ES ARES 2 





| AUDITORIUM — TUES. EVE. APRIL 20 | 





Reserved Seats: $1.00, 75c, 50c, 25c Sherman, Clay & Co. 


DIRECTION: MUSIC COMMITTEE — J. EMMeEeT HAYDEN, Chairman 


COLLECTOR @® DEALER @ APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows, High--Medium--Low Priced. 





SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


“SUMMER COURSES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL” 


PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
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el 


THE ART COMMISSION 


EpGAR WALTER, President JosrepH H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 


In commemoration of the Silver Jubilee 


of the San Francisco Symphony, will 


present a Gala Concert in the Civic 
Auditorium, Sunday, April 4, 2:15 


o clock with the 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 


PIERRE MONTEUX, ConpuctTor 
CHARLOTTE BOENER, Soprano 


DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Baritone 


DIRECTION: MUSIC COMMITTEE — J. EMMeEeT HAypEN, Chairman 


ADMISSION FREE — npc coast TO COAST BROADCAST 3 TO 4 P.M. 











No. 2—AIR (Tenor) 


Cujus animam gementem Through whose spirit sympathizing, 
Contristantem et dolentem Sorrowing and agonizing, 
Pertransivit gladius. Also passed the cruel sword. 
O quam tristis et afflicta Oh! how mournful and distressed 
Fuit illa benedicta Was that favored and most blesséd 
Mater Unigeniti; Mother of the only Son! 
Quae moerebat et dolebat Trembling, grieving, bosom heaving, 
Et tremebat, cum videbat While perceiving, scare believing, 
Nati poenas inclyti. Pains of that Illustrious One. 
No. 3—DUET (Soprano and Contralto) 
Quis est homo qui non fleret, Who, the man, who, called a brother, 
Christi matrem si videret W ould not weep, saw he Christ’s mother 
In tanto supplicio? In such deep distress and wild? 
Quis non posset contristari Who could not sad tribute render 
Piam matrem contemplari Witnessing that mother tender, 
Dolentem cum Filio? Agonizing with her child? 
No. 4—AIR (Bass) 
Pro peccatis suae gentis For His people’s sins atoning, 
Vidit Jesum in tormentis, Him she saw in torments groaning, 
Et flagellis subditum. Given to the scourger’s rod; 
Vidit suum dulcem natum Saw her darling offspring dying, 
Morientem desolatum Desolate, forsaken, crying, 
Dum emisit spiritum. Yield His spirit up to God. 
No. 5—RECITATIVE (Bass) AND CHORUS 
Kia, mater, fons amoris, Make me feel thy sorrow’s power, 
Me sentire vim doloris That with thee I tears may shower, 
Fac, ut tecum lugeam. Tender mother, fount of love! 
Fac, ut ardeat cor meum Make my heart with love unceasing 
In amado Christum Deum, Burn toward Christ the Lord, that 
pleasing 
Ut sibi complaceam. I may be to Him above. 
No. 6—QUARTETTE 
Sancta mater, istud agas, Holy mother, this be granted, 
Crucifixi fige plagas That the slain one’s wounds be planted 
Corde meo valide. Firmly in my heart to bide. 
Tui nati vulnerati, Of Him wounded, all astounded— 
Tam dignati pro me pati, Depths unbounded for me sounded, 
Poenas mecum divide. All the pangs with me divide. 
Fac me vere tecum fiere, Make me weep with thee in union; 
Crucifixo condolere, With the Crucified, communion 
Donec ego vixero. In his grief and suffering give; 
Juxta crucem tecum stare, Near the cross with tears unfailing 
Te libenter sociare I would join thee in thy wailing 
In planctu desidero. Here as long as I shall live. 
Virgo, virginum praeclara, Maid of maidens, all excelling! 
Mihi jam non sis amara, Be not bitter, me repelling 
Fac me tecum plangere. Make thou me a mourner too; 


No. 7—CAVATINA (Contralto) 


Fac ut portem Christi mortem, Make me bear about Christ’s dying, 
Passionis ejus sortem, Share His passion, shame defying, 
Et plagas recolere. All His wounds in me renew. 
Fac me plagis vulnerari, Wound for wound be there created; 
Cruce hac inebriari, With the cross intoxicated 
Ob amorem Filii. For thy Son’s dear sake, I pray— 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem van den Burg, Asst. Conductor 


1937 SEASON 


& 
DAS Ts OP AREA PAs ar 
FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 9 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 10 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Pianist 
& 

FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 16 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 17 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 
& 

FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 23 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 24 
BEETHOVEN NINTH SYMPHONY 
@ 

LAST BERKELEY CONCERT — SUNDAY AFT., 3:00, APRIL 11 


BRONISLAW HUBERMAN, Violinist 


YOUNG PEOPLE'S CONCERTS 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 
April 3—“Form and Construction.” Laura Dubman, piano soloist. 
April 10— “Early Suites.” 
April 17 — “The Minuet and Scherzo.” 
April 24— “The Overture,” with San Francisco Opera School Ballet 


SEASON TICKETS (Four Concerts): 60¢ — $1.00 — $1.40 — $2.00 


TICKETS FOR ALL CONCERTS ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — SAN FRANCISCO AND OAKLAND 


TOMORROW NIGHT, MARCH 24 


There will be a Gala Concert presented in this auditorium by the 
California Western School Music Conference, now in convention here. 


A band of one hundred and forty, conducted by Frank Mancini of 


Modesto, a chorus of three hundred forty, led by Glen Woods of 
Okland, and an orchestra of one hundred and thirty five, conducted by 


DR. ALFRED HERTZ 


will perform, at 8:30 o’clock, 
The concert is free to the public. 

















No. 8—AIR (Soprano) AND CHORUS 


Inflammatus et accensus May I, fired with pure affection, 
Per te, Virgo, sim defensus Virgin, have through thee protection 
In die judicii. In the solemn Judgment Day. 

Fac me cruce custodiri, Let me by the Cross be warded, 

Morte Christi praemuniri, By the death of Christ be guarded, 

Confoveri gratia. Nourished by divine supplies. 
No. 9—QUARTETTE 


When the body death hath riven, 
Grant that to the soul be given 
Glories bright of Paradise. 


No. 10—FINALE 
Through all eternity. Amen. 


SYMPHONY OF THE PSALMS .. . Igor Stravinsky 
The score bears the following dedication: (1882——) 
“This symphony, composed to the glory of God, is dedicated to the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of 

its existence.” 


Quando corpus morietur, 
Fac ut animae donetur 
Paradisi gloria. 


In sempiterna saecula. Amen. 


The work was commissioned by Serge Koussevitzky, conductor of the 
Boston Symphony, for the half-centenary celebration referred to, which was 
observed in 1930. It is typical of that absorption with classic themes and 
forms which has been the major feature of Stravinsky’s output in recent 
years, here treated in a somewhat more starkly expressive fashion than else- 





where, in keeping with the devotional nature of the poems employed. 
The text is taken from the Vulgate. It is appended both in its original 
form and as it appears in the King James version. 


PRELUDE 


PSALMUS XXXVIII, VERSE 13 AND 14 


Exaudi orationem meam, Domine, 
et depreciationem meam: auribus per- 
cipe lacrymas meas. 

Ne sileas, quoniam advena ego sum 
apud te, et peregrinus, sicut omnes 
patres mei. Remitte mihi, ut refrigerer 
priusquam abeam, et amplius non ero. 


PSALM 39 (KING JAMES VERSION ) 


Hear my prayer, O Lord, and give 
ear unto my cry, 
Hold not Thy peace at my tears: 
For I am a stranger with Thee, 
And a sojourner, as all fathers were. 
O spare me, that I may recover strength 
Before I go hence, and be no more. 


DOUBLE FUGUE 
The orchestra alone exposes and develops a fugue of its own. The chorus 
enters at the 29th bar with a second fugue subject. 


PSALMUS XXXIX, VERSES 1, 2,3, AND 4 


Expectans expectavi Dominum, et 
intendit mihi. 

Et exaudivit preces meas; et eduxit 
me de lacu miseriae, et de luto 
faecis. 

Et statuit supra petram pedes meos; 
et direxit gressus meos. 

Et immisit in os meum canticum no- 
vum, carmen Deo nostro. 

Videbunt multi et timebunt: et spera- 
bunt in Domino. 


PSALM 40 (KING JAMES VERSION ) 


I waited patiently for the Lord, 

And He inclined unto me, and heard 
my cry. 

He brought me up also out of a horri- 
ble pit, out of the miry clay, 

And set my feet upon a rock, and 
established my goings. 

And He hath put a new song in my 
mouth, even praise unto our God: 

Many shall see it, and fear, 

And shall trust in the Lord. 

















* » w< . . . ~ —s Oe ee Se i‘ 7 et ‘ é . 


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HARP ENSEMBLE 


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PSALMUS CL 


(Alleluia) 

Laudate Dominum in sanctis ejus: 
laudate eum in firmamento vir- 
tutis ejus. 

Laudate eum in virtutibus ejus: lau- 
date eum secundum multitudinem 
magnitudinis ejus. 

Laudate eum in sono tube: laudate 
eum in psalterio et cithara. 

Laudate eum in tympano et choro: 
laudate eum in chordis et organo. 

Laudate eum in cymbalis bene sonan- 
tibus: laudate eum in cymbalis 
jubilationis: omnis spiritus laudet 
Dominum. 


Read Opera House News for the Latest Notes of the 
Musical World 


Opera House News - 11 Columbus Ave, San Francisco 


ALLEGRO SYMPHONIQUE 


PSALM 150 (KING JAMES VERSION ) 


(Alleluia) 
Praise ye the Lord. 
Praise God in His Sanctuary; 
Praise Him in the firmament of His 
power. 
Praise Him for His mighty acts; 
Praise Him according to His excel- 
lent greatness. 
Praise Him with the sound of the 


Trumpet; 

Praise Him with the Psaltery and 
Harp. 

Praise Him with the timbrel and 
dance; 


Praise Him with stringed instru- 
ments, and Organs. 

Praise Him upon the loud cymbals; 

Praise Him upon the high sounding 
cymbals. 

Let everything that hath breath, 
praise the Lord. 

Praise ye the Lord. 









AFTER THE CONCERT 





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THE ART COMMISSION 


ES av. aS 








THE 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MON TEUX, Conductor 






CHARLOTTE BOERNER, Soprano 
DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Baritone 








CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


SUNDAY, APRIL 4 Ee OS.7 
AT 2:15 P. M. 






THE ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


EDGAR WALTER, President JosEPH H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 
























To the Citizens of San Francisco: — 


Congratulations to the Musical Association of San Francisco 
for having maintained the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for 
twenty-five years, and built it up to a point where it is now recognized 
as one of the really great orchestras of the world. 


It is, I am sure, with pardonable pride that I call attention to 
the Municipal Election two years ago when by an overwhelming 
majority, the voters of San Francisco decided to make the Symphony 
Orchestra a civic enterprise and assist in its maintenance through 
a very slight addition to the tax fund. 


We are gratified to have this wonderful orchestra, with its 
distinguished conductor, Pierre Monteux, and I am sure we all agree 
that an equally sincere vote of thanks is due Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby, president of the Musical Association of San Francisco, and 
the Board of Governors of the Association for preserving this 
valuable organization. 


As an indication of the appreciation of the public I can point 
to the attendance at the Municipal Concerts given this season. 
Through the efforts of the Art Commission’s Music Committee, of 
which Mr. J. Emmet Hayden is chairman, these concerts have been 
successful to the point where a surplus was created in the Art 
Commission’s fund, and it was therefore deemed the proper medium 
of reciprocity would be a free concert for the citizens of San Francisco 
in appreciation. To this the Musical Association and the members 
of the Orchestra heartily agreed, and we are here today not only to 
enjoy a rich musical feast, but also by our attendance to express 
our appreciation and realization of what a symphony orchestra 
means to our community. 


Respectfully, 


ANGELO J. ROSSI, Mayor 




















SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
APRIL 4, 2:15 P. M. 


CHARLOTTE BOERNER, Soprano 
DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Bass-Baritone 


Soloists: 


PROG, RAY 


1. Overture, “Le Carneval Romain” 





2. Aria, “Deh vieni non tardar” from “The Marriage of Figaro” 


CHARLOTTE BOERNER 


3. “Festivals” 


4. Aria, “Once in Kazan” from “Boris Goudounow” 
DOUGLAS BEATTIE 


5. The Sorcerer’s Apprentice 
INTERMISSION 


6. (a) “La Calunnia” from “The Barber of Seville” 


See eB ee eee eee ewe 


(b) Song to the Evening Star from “Tannhauser’.............. 


DOUGLAS BEATTIE 


7. Bacchanale from “Tannhauser” (Paris Version) <:...i0:..2 eee 


(Assisted by members of the Municipal Chorus) 


8. (a) Agathe’s Aria from “Der Freischutz”......................... 


(b) Aria, “Ah, Forse é Lui” from “La Traviata”... 


CHARLOTTE BOERNER 


9. Rondo, “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks”... Richard Strauss 








San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conduetor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 
@ 


FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 9 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 10 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Pianist 


FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 16 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 17 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 


FRIDAY AFT,, 2:30, APRIL 23 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 24 
BEETHOVEN NINTH SYMPHONY 


SYMPHONY OF PSALMS. . STRAVINSKY 


LAST BERKELEY CONCERT — SUNDAY AFT., 3:00, APRIL 11 
BRONISLAW HUBERMAN, Violinist 


———————SS6CWSE== 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 10:30-11:30 A. M. 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


April 10— “Early Suites.” 
April 17 — “The Minuet and Scherzo.” 3 
April 24— “The Overture,” with San Francisco Opera School Ballet 


RESERVED SEATS: 50c — 35c¢ 25e — l5dc 











Civic Auditorium Tuesday Eve., April 20 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY |: 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


SYLVIA LENT vrozrwisr 


AND 


MEREDITH WILLSON 


CONDUCTING HIS “SYMPHONY OF SAN FRANCISCO” 
Reserved Seats: $1.00 — 75c — 50c — 25c 
Now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 
































THE ART COMMISSION 


EDGAR WALTER, JOSEPH H. DYER, JR., Sec 


Presents 
THE SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


soloist 


SYLVIA LENT 


Violinist 


MEREDITH 
WILLSOWN 


Guest Conductor 


IKE 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
fIPRILAZ0) 137 


UNDER THE DIRECTION MUSIC COMMITTEE: J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 








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_ Ln Appreciation 


At the conclusion of the 1937 season of Municipal 
Concerts the Art Commission desires to express its 
grateful appreciation to the citizens of San Francisco 
who have made possible one of the most brilliant and 


successful seasons in the existence of Municipal Concerts. 


Without your generous patronage and enthusiastic co- 
operation these Municipal Series would have been 
impossible. The Commission extends its hearty thanks 
to Pierre Monteux, under whose direction and guidance 
our orchestra has attained distinguished heights, to the 
Musical Association of San Francisco, and to its energetic 
president and managing director, Mrs. Leonora Wood 


Armsby. 


The Art Commission of the City and County of San 
Francisco trusts that it will continue to deserve your 
Support by constantly keeping these concerts upon a 


high artistic level and maintaining their meritorious 


standard. 

EpGAR WALTER 
JOSEPH Je DYER, JR. President, Art Commission of the 
Secretary City and County of San Francisco 





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Epcar WALTER, President Josrpu H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 


PARE GS aNeek is 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


CIYIC A VD FRO RIUM 
K.P Reel. Boe0 = 8 720 - ae 


PUR OG ReAsGay, 
1. OVERTURE TO. THE RINGROD "Y Sizer ace LALO 


D> et NERTELOINGY~ STEN Bee IVETE RS srs ane WILLSON 
(A Symphony of San Francisco) 
Andante—Allegro ma molto moderato—Allegro molto 
Andante 
Presto 
Allegro 
MR. WILLSON, Conducting 


Tt Noe SS OWN 


3. CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 
Ge MINORS sOPUS 22 Oe 2 xen cee ete cir te eee BRUCH 
Prelude— 
Adagio 
Allegro energico 
MISS LENT, Soloist 


4. INTRODUCTION AND WEDDING MARCH , 
FROVESTHE GOLDEN COCK 2233 -= RIMSKY-KORSAKOFF 


UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE MUSIC COMMITTEE 
J-EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 











PoE SEE“ R>.C*OenNrr een 





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HENRI 
DEERING 


PIANO RECITAL 


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MONDAY EVE., APRIL 26 











HENRI DEERING —  JISAAC STERN 
SONATA RECITAL — TUES. EVE., MAY 11 





| aia —— a Se = ~— —_——— - _—~=—— — : — — —— --~ — = 


TICKETS AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., S. F. and Oakland 





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2 ae mn 














a SI LE sem — 


PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


OVERTURE TO “THE KING OF YS” . Edouard Lalo 
(1823-1892) 

Margared and Rozenn, daughters of the king of the ancient Breton city 
of Ys, both love a warrior named Mylio. Mylio returns Rozenn’s love and is 
married to her, whereupon Margared makes common cause with the enemies 
of Ys. She opens the sea-gates of the town during the wedding of Mylio and 
Rozenn and throws herself into the flood. A vision of the city’s patron saint 
appears as the water recedes and Ys is saved. 

The overture is drawn from material in the opera and depicts its highly 
dramatic conflict. 


SYMPHONY IN F MINOR .. .. . Meredith Willson 
(A Symphony of San Francisco) (1902 ) 

Mr. Willson was born in Mason City, Iowa. At the age of 14 he went to 
New York to study flute with Georges Barrére. At the age of 17 he was 
flute soloist in Sousa’s band, and at 20 was first flutist of the New York 
Philharmonic Orchestra. After five years with the Philharmonic he came West 
to go into the radio field, and has been musical director for the western 
division of the National Broadcasting Company since 1933. 

Mr. Willson’s symphony in F minor was given its first performance at a 
special concert of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra exactly one year 





ANNOUNCEMENT... 


LAST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday Afternoon, April 23, at 2:30 
Saturday Evening, April 24, at 8:30 


W ACKY- MEM 26 Ra Aales OFP iis RA GH O2ULS Er 
PAI O; GaKecAM 


SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL CHORUS 


Soloists: 


LENA KROPH, Soprano MYRTLE LEONARD, Contralto 


ROY RUSSELL, Tenor DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Bass 
ESN PHONY Of {PSALMS 22.3. sae ee STRAVINSKY 
SYMPHONY No. 9 (@HOraENEf 52478 4. See eel ieee BEETHOVEN 











and one day ago. At that time the program book contained the following 
material, contributed by the composer: 

“The Symphony in F minor, which is specifically dedicated to Frederick 
Winfield Pabst and Lewis Scott Frost, was inspired by the incomparable 
traditions of San Francisco. It is not an attempt at specific or program 
writing but rather a delineation of the spiritual personality that is San 
Francisco. 

“The first movement begins with a brief Andante introducing the 
fundamental accompaniment motive. This motive is developed slightly in 
an Allegro ma molto moderato which leads into a further short development, 
Allegro molto, which in turn leads directly to the first theme which is 
definitely of masculine character. The second theme in contrast, is a simple 
melody that sounds almost like an old hymn tune. Generally speaking, the 
first movement is intended to convey pioneer courage, loyalty, strength of 
purpose and freedom. 

The second movement is an Andante in passacaglia form, and here I 
have tried to express in music the rebirth of a great city from smouldering 
ruins and ashes. The theme of this movement begins in a scarcely audible 
thread of sound from muted violi, celli and harp, and with each subsequent 
variation on the theme hope rises higher and higher. 

“The third movement, marked Presto, is a happy little piece picturing 
the almost childish delight of a people who have a continental love for artistic 
pursuits; a music loving sincerity that thronged the streets on Christmas eve 
to hear Tetrazzini’s Caro Nome at Lotta’s Fountain. The two themes in the 
scherzo are introductory to the fourth movement, which follows without pause, 
It is an Allegro molto of steel and present-day metropolitanism. It strives 
to depict an impressive skyline approached on either side by the most awe 
inspiring works of the modern engineer. The first theme is in the rhythm 
of the machine age, the second is one suggesting martial triumph. The 
trumpet motive, which is heard through this final movement and which occurs 
at its very conclusion, is a call of defiance to the very elements themselves 


AFTER THE CONCERT 
FINE FOODS 


lce Cream « Sodas 
Pastries * Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Pign Whistle 


33 POWELL STREET, Near Market 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 








that had the temerity to dispute the spiritual strength and courage of the 
golden city of the West.” 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 


G MINOR, OPUS 26. . .... +. . Max Bruch 
(1838-1920) 


Fate has played one of its oddest tricks with the posthumous reputation 
of Max Bruch. Celebrated in his time as one of the first choral composers 
of the age, he is remembered today almost solely for his contributions to the 
literature of the violin and violoncello. But he was not in any sense a 
specialist in writing for the strings, and the present concerto owes much of 
its position to the fact that it was thoroughly revised by Joseph Joachim, 
who gave the first performance of the final version in 1868. 


I. Prelude. Allegro moderato, G minor, 4/4 time. Dramatic phrases 
for the woodwind and two brief cadenzas for the solo lead to the first subject, 
stated by the principal violin over an emphatically moving bass: 





A repetition of this theme an octave higher and a return of the moving bass 
figure leads to the second subject, also stated by the solo: 











A concluding theme of less importance ends the exposition. The development 
opens with a fiery, dramatic working out of Example 1 in the solo, after which 
the orchestra considers the possibilies inherent in the first measure of Example 
2 while the violin continues with decorative passage work. The solo rests as 
the orchestra continues its working out of the principal themes. There is no 
recapitulation, but the woodwind phrases and solo cadenzas of the opening 
return at the end of the movement. A brief, progressively quieter passage for 
the orchestra leads without pause to 


II. Adagio, E flat major, 3/8 time. The solo gives out the main theme 
beginning thus: 


























The theme is long, with an important second section, the concluding portion 
of which is subjoined: 














The contrasting middle section of the movement is introduced by the orchestral 
strings, the solo violin continuing above with decorative material: 














7 
a Se 
Ta acer eee eke ee 


The solo now reintroduces Example 4, and the movement proceeds to work 
over and discuss all the themes quoted, now in the solo instrument, now in the 
accompaniment. Example 3 is given a full restatement before the conclusion. 


9 








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III. Allegro energico, G major, 2/2 time. Orchestral foreshadowings 
predict the main theme, heard in its full form at the entry of the principal 
instrument: 





This is repeated in varied aspects. Triplet passage work for the solo effects 
the transition to the second theme, heard first in the orchestra alone, but 
quoted here as suny by the solo immediately afterward: 





A brief passage based on Example 6 leads to an orthodox recapitulation 
wherein Examples 6 and 7 and their various nexuses are given a second 
extensive hearing. A coda based on Example 6 concludes the concerto. 


INTRODUCTION AND WEDDING MARCH FROM 


‘THE GOLDEN COCK” . N. A. Rimsky-Korsakoff 
(1844-1908) 


King Dodo, ruler of a mythical kingdom, is beguiled by a scheming’ 
astrologer into believing that a golden cock, placed on the tower of the royal 
palace, will protect his country from harm. The king offers the astrologer 
any reward he may desire, and proceeds to sleep, secure in his faith in the 
magic bird. The cock crows to warn of danger. The armies of Dodo go out 
to fight, but they cannot find the enemy. Dodo himself, searching for hostile 
troops, finds instead the beautiful Queen of Shemakhan, whom he brings back 
to his palace and is about to marry. But the astrologer appears and demands 
the queen as his reward. Dodo is shocked and refuses, whereupon the golden 
cock flies down from its perch and kills him with a vigorous peck. At the 
end the astrologer explains that it was all a myth and a dream. 

The prelude is based largely upon three leading motives associated 
with characters in the drama. It opens with the trumpet crowing the theme of 
the golden cock. Odd chromatic runs in the woodwinds (familiar from their 
appearance in the popular Hymn to the Sun) represent the queen. The 
astrologer appears in a bright, mysterious melody played by the bells. The 
wedding march, played at the triumphant return of Dodo and his bride-to-be, 
needs no description. 









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GUN TeV" ER Seay OSes Cee eee ahem ee 


COM MITLLPT TEE -O.N IM.U:S.LC- AWN DD DIRVA MEA 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


SPRING SERIES, 1937 
FIRST BERKELEY CONCERT, SUNDAY, JANUARY 17, 3:15 P.M. 
GYMNASIUM FOR MEN 


Soloist: GEORGE GERSHWIN, Pianist 
(4 


PROGRAM 


1.Symphony No.5,inC minor . . .. . . . Beethoven 
Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro— 
Finale: Allegro 


2. Suitefrom “Porgy and Bess” . . . . . . . . Gershwin 
Catfish Row 
Porgy Sings 
Fugue 
Hurricane 
Good Mornin’, Sistah 
(Conducted by the Composer) 


INTERMISSION 


3. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, F major . . Gershwin 
Allegro 
Allegro agitato ) 
(The Composer at the Piano) 


A Rhapsody in Blue 2 3 Sey 0 ee ee Gera 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Concert by University of California Symphony Orchestra, conducted by 
ProFEssor ALBERT ELKus, February 28. Open to the public without admis- 
sion charge. 

Second concert by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, April 11. Soloist, 
Vrapimir Horowrrz, pianist. Tickets $1.50, $1.00, 75 cents. Students 50 



































WN oP VaEeRoSe> PY O -B © 2A al eby OP Rae Nai 


COMMITTEE ON MUSIC AND DRAMA 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


SPRING SERIES 


1937 


LAST BERKELEY CONCERT, SUNDAY, APRIL II, 3:15 P.M. 
GYMNASIUM FOR MEN 


Soloist: BRONISLAW HUBERMAN, Violinist 
¢ 





PROGRAM 
1. Overture.” Le Carnival Romain’ 25. ©... 2 eee berio2 
2. Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, D major . . . Brahms 
Allegro non troppo 


Adagio 
Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace 


Mr. HuBERMAN 





INTERMISSION 


| 3. Symphonic Interlude from “The Redemption” Cesar Franck 


4. Suite from The Fire-Bird* "3-9 oye es OLRarI ay 


Introduction—Variations from the Fire-Bird 





Rondo of the Princesses 
Dance Infernal of the King Kastchei 
Berceuse and Finale 











ANNOUNCEMENT 


University of California Concert Band, Charles C. Cushing, Director, in 
a program of symphonic music. Gymnasium for Men, University of Cali- 
fornia, April 18, at 3:15 p.m. Admission free. 














STANFORD UNIVERSITY PAVILION 
ASSOCIATED STUDENTS OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY 


Present 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 26, 1937 


PROGRAM 
I. Prelude to:” Die Meistersinger 2s) 2 i ee WV ao Her 
2. oy tonony Nolo, in“ Crminoriee sy te iro ee eet aes aren) 
Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro 
Finale: Allegro 
Intermission 
3.) Petite Guitars fy ic nee ea has Sat os Pee) Eee a on oT Bree 
On the Water 
Procession 
Menuet 
Ballet 
4. (a) Waltz from Serenade. Opus 48. . . . . . =Tschaikowsky 
(b) Pizzicato from Symphony No.4 . . . . . =Tschaikowsky 
5: Fete Polonaise trom ‘Le Roi:Malore-Lui- 3/20 22 se 3) Chabrier 


By arrangement with CAROLYN E. WARE 
ELIZABETH STEARNS, Concert Manager 


The A.S.8.U. Concert Series will present Rachmaninoff, February 10; Wilbur Evans, 
March 1]; Lawrence Tibbett, April 16. 


The official piano oi the Associated Students is the Baldwin 

















The P 1ano 1 Cd MASTERPIECE 


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because the new Masterpiece 
Baldwin is the only piano in the 
world in which an absolutely even 
scale is made certain by use of the 
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Ease of purchase, too, is a Baldwin feature. Liberal 


trade-in policy. Monthly budget plan. 
Catalog on Request. 


Baldwin Pianos on display at 


HAGE’S 


STANFORD MUSIC SHOP 
266 University Avenue Palo Alto 





Commemoration of 


FOUNDERS’ DAY 


MARCH 9, 1937 


8:30 P.M. 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PreRRE Montevux, Director 


STANFORD MEMORIAL CHURCH 
STANFORD UNIVERSITY 











[his concert is given on the birthday of Senator Stanford as a suitable recog- 
nition of the debt owed by all Stanford men and women to the Founders of the 
University. 





PROGRAM 


Prelude to. Parsifal’ )-." 9 5G la ing ge 2y) ae | Wagner 


The following are Wagner's own words about the Prelude’ 
to Parsifal, as contained in H. E. Krehbiel’s Studies in the 
Wagnerian Drama: “Strong and firm does Faith reveal itself, 
elevated and resolute even in suffering. In answer to the 


| The audience is requested to refrain from applause 


| renewed promise, the voice of Faith sounds softly from emi- 
nent heights—as though borne on the wings of the snow- 
white dove—slowly descending, embracing with ever-in- 
| creasing breadth and fullness the heart of man, filling the 
| world and the whole of nature with mightiest force, then, as 
| though stilled to rest, glancing upward again toward the light 
of heaven. Then once more from the awe of solitude arises 
the lament of loving compassion, the agony, the holy sweat 
of the Mount of Olives, the divine suffering of Golgotha; the 
| body blanches, the blood streams forth and glows now with 
| the heavenly glow of blessing in the chalice, pouring forth 
on all that lives and languishes the gracious gift of Redemp- 
tion through Love. For him we are prepared, for Amfortas, 





| 

l the sinful guardian of the shrine, who, with fearful rue for 
Sin gnawing at his heart, must prostrate himself before the 
chastisement of the vision of the Grail. Shall there be re- 
demption from the devouring torments of the soul? Yet once 
again we hear the promise and—hope!”’ 





Variations on a Theme of Tschaikowsky . . . . Arensky 


These variations, which first appeared as a quartet for 
strings, are built on a theme from Tschaikowsky’s Opus 54, 
No. 5, the Opus being a group of sixteen songs for children. 
The fifth one is entitled ‘The Infant Jesus Has a Garden.” 
There are seven variations with a coda added. 











Symphonic Interlude from "The Redemption” . César Franck 


“The Redemption,” a choral and orchestral work in three 
parts, with text by Edouard Blau, porirays the material and 
Spiritual redemption of the world. The coming of Christ 
brought about the material redemption of mankind; the spirit- 
ual redemption is to be won in future ages by the means of 
prayer. 

In giving musical expression to this idea, Franck divided 
the work into three parts, the first and last choral and the 
second part orchestral. In the first part mankind is shown in 
its evolution from the crass pleasures of paganism to the 
regeneration through the coming of the Savior. In the sym- 
phonic interlude which then follows—the excerpt to be 
played this evening—the composer gave the following argu- 
ment: “Centuries pass. The joy of the world transformed 
and flourishing by the word of Christ. The era of persecution 





is started in vain, Faith triumphs over all obstacles. But now 
the modern period has come. Belief has perished, and man- 
kind, once more possessed by a cruel lust of enjoyment, and 
vain agitations, returns to the passions of the earlier ages.” 


Symphony No. 3, in C Minor (with Organ) . . Saint-Saéns 


Adagio—Allegro moderato—Poco adagio 


Allegro moderato—Presto—Maestoso—Allegro 
(LESLIE HARVEY, Organist) 


Although the C minor symphony of Saint-Saéns is num- 
bered the third of his series of symphonies, it is in reality the 
fifth. The original second and third symphonies were not 
satisfactory to the composer upon their first performances 
and were not published until some time later, while the fifth 
symphony, in C minor, was published as No. 3. 

The work was composed as the result of a request made 
to Saint-Saéns by the Philharmonic Society of London, and 
was first presented by the Society on May 19, 1886, with the 
composer conducting. Upon the occasion of Saint-Saéns’ last 





visit to America in 1915 it was first heard in San Francisco at 
the Panama-Pacific International Exposition. 

















First, the Nature .... and Purposes 
of the Institution Hereby Founded, 
to Be: 


Its nature, that of a university with 
such seminaries of learning as shall 
make it of the highest grade.... 


And its purpose, to promote the 
public welfare by exercising an in- 
fluence in behalf of humanity and 
civilization. ... 


—From the Founding Grant, 
November 11, 1885 


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MARIN MUSICAL CHEST 


PRESENTS 





San Francisco 


Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Soloist: HENRI DEERING, Pianist 





FOREST MEADOWS 
DOMINICAN COLLEGE 


SAN RAFAEL 


Sunday Afternoon, April 25, 1937 


3 O’CLOCK 









Shs Rafa el «GG Indepe Sp nt 








Compliments of 


First National Bank 


in San Rafael 


AFFILIATED WITH 


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Members Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 





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PROGRAM 


I. Overture ‘‘Le Carnival Romain’’ - Berlioz 
“The Roman Carnival’ was written to be eee as an overture to 
the second act of Berlioz’ opera “Benvenuto Celline”’, in 1838. It is 
brilliant throughout, and full of the gay, bustling scenes of a carnival. 


II. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, 


A Minor, Optis 54 - : x : - Schumann 


Allegro affetuoso 
Intermezzo 
Allegro vivace 


HENRI DEERING, SOLOIST 


“The first movement of this concerto”, writes Mr. Alfred Frankenstein, 
noted San Francisco music critic, “was completed in 1841’. It was origin- 
ally conceived not as a part of a concerto but as a separate and complete 
work, and it departs in many ways from the accepted traditions of the 
concerto style. The most obvious of these departures are that there is 
no long orchestral statement of thematic material before the entrance of 
the solo instrument, and that the cadenza is not left to the caprice of 
the solo instrument, but was composed by Schumann himself and in- 
corporated as an integral portion of the score. There are other points of 
difference, also, the whole conspiring to create greater unity between the 
solo and the orchestra than is the case with the conventional concerto of 
Schumann’s time. 7 


INTERMISSION 


III. Prelude to ‘‘Die Meistersinger’’ : . - Wagner 


“Die Meistersinger”’, Wagner’s only comic opera occupied the attention 
of the composer over a period of twenty years. It was finished in 1867 
and produced in Munich in 1868. The Prelude is composed of some of the 
principal themes, two of them symbolizing the corporation of the Master- 
singers, the others, various phases of the love of “Eva” and “Walther”. 
It Opens with the Meistersinger’s motive, a noble march movement im- 
mediately followed by a gentle motive “Waking Love”. Other themes 
included, are the “Banner” and a very melodious theme, ‘Love Confessed”’, 
followed by an agitated motive “Impatient Ardor’, and ending in an 
imposing climax with the motives ingeniously woven together by various 
groups of instruments. 


IV. ‘‘Festivals’’ - - - - - - - Debussy 


Claude Achille Debussy is a leader among the more progressive French 
composers. “Festivals,” is one of three nocturnes in a suite which includes 
“Clouds” and “Sirens” and is the last word in delicate impressionism, de- 
picting a festival at night with fireworks. The nocturnal procession is 
announced by three muted trumpets, accompanied by harps, which is one 
of the most beautiful compositions in orchestral literature. 


V. “‘Capriecio Espagnol’’ - - - Rimsky-Korsakow 

The “Capriccio Espagnol” was first performed in St. Petersbery in 1887 
and is constructed in five movements: “Alborada’, or “Miorning Seren- 
ade’; “Variations”, consisting of five variations upon a theme given out 
by horns with string accompaniment; “Alborada”’, which repeats the 
opening movement with change of modulation and color; “Scene and 
Gypsy Song”, the Gypsy Song being highly characteristic of wild gypsy 
life. Reaching a vigorous climax, it leads, without pause to the last move- 
ment “Fandango of the Asturias’, which is an old Austrian dance. A 
repetition of the “Alborada” is heard which forms the Coda. 


Steinway Piano used. 


VARVEI NING LI NINO NONI SI NIL III AIR 


AAU ANISUIAND: 











COMING ATTRACTIONS 


JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone, Song Recital, May 30, Forest 
Meadows, San Rafael. 


ROTH STRING QUARTET, gift of Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. 
Gymnasium, San Rafael High School. June 27. 


Autumn Festival will be from August 15 to September 15. 





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SATURDAY MORNING at 10:30 
APRIL 3, 1937 


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Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 


POR OrG AM 


FORM AND CONSTRUCTION 


Overture to ‘““Monsieur de Pourceaugnac”’ Jean-Baptiste Lully 
(1683-1687) 


Branle de Poitou “.° 
Chanson et Danse Basse CIAL SA SEALE 


(Arranged by John Blackwood MacEwen) 
“The Carman’s Whistle” William Byrd 
(Arranged by Granville Bantock) (1588-1623) 


Air from “Distressed Innocence”’ Henry Purcell 


Hornpipe from “The Married Beau” § (1658-1695) 


First Movement from A Major 
Piano Concerto Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
LAURA DUBMAN (1756-1791) 


EVERYBODY SING, “The Ash Grove” Welsh Folk Song 


The ash-grove, how graceful, how plainly ’tis speaking. 
The wind through it playing has language for me; 
When over.its branches the sunlight is breaking, 

A host of kind faces is gazing on me. 

The friends of my childhood again are before me, 
Fond memories waken as freely I roam. 

With soft whispers laden, the leaves rustle o’er me; 
The ash-grove, the ash-grove that sheltered my home. 


My laughter is over, my step loses lightness, 

Old country-side measures steal soft on my ear; 

I only remember the past and its brightness, 

The dear ones I mourn for again gather here. 

From out of the shadows their loving looks greet me, 
And wistfully searching the leafy green dome, 

I find other faces fond bending to greet me; 

The ash-grove, the ash-grove alone is my home. 


—John Oxenford. 


7. Carillon and Tourbillon Francois Couperin 
(Arranged by Richard Strauss) (1668-1733) 








LAURA DUBMAN ... press commenis 


NEW YORK TIMES—October 10, 1936 


“There was nothing tentative or uncertain about the manner in 
which these works were performed. Here was playing rather 
uncannily mature in its sensitive molding of phrase, sure control 
of tone, and charm of phrasing ..,.. the technique was clean 
and secure, and accentuation and rhythm were of a kind to 
lend decided interest to many a passage.” 


NEW YORK POST—October 10, 1936 


“Mistress Dubman has been excellently taught, but last night 
there were no pedagogic ghosts at her side directing her 
fingers. What she had to say sprang largely from within 
herself; and she said it with the manner born of the undistracted, 
unspoiled vision of the child mind... Her fingers have speed 
and neatness; her tone... is capable of surprising pungency 
and is graced with a nice sensitivity to color.” 


NEW YORK WORLD-TELEGRAM—October 10, 1936 


“Miss Dubman’s playing disclosed abundant technic, a singing 
legato, effectively employed in the first Bach selection and a 
natural aptitude for tonal coloring.” 


BROOKLYN TIMES UNION—December 2, 1936 


“There was a poise that was not affective, there was an 
assurance which did not result from egotism and there was 
musicianship and understanding revealed that older and more 
active players might well attempt to achieve.” 


MUSICAL AMERICA—December 10, 1936 


“Miss Dubman’s playing . .. was the feature of the evening. 
Sensitive musicality and the ability to mold a plastic line and 
shape a phrase and to secure a nicety of gradation in tone are 
assets which should carry her far... She was roundly applauded, 
and shared approbation with Miss Brico.” 


NEW YORK EVENING JOURNAL—December 2, 1936 


“Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto, played by the astonishing 
twelve-year-old Laura Dubman. She had poise and the assurance 
of extreme youth and the requisite glib fingerwork. The 
audience took her to its heart.” 


NEW YORK DAILY MIRROR—December 2, 1936 


“Little Miss Dubman, 12, who made a promising début in the 
Town Hall recently, made her initial appearance with an 
orchestra last night, and her success was astonishing ... . 
Certainly the child showed a maturity of conception, a tonal 
suavity and technical ease which many an adult musician 
might envy.” 


NEW YORK SUN—December 2, 1936 


“The twelve-year-old pianist supplied, indeed, the feature of 
the evening playing Beethoven’s B-flat major concerto in a 
manner as professional as it was straightforward and assured... 
the performance was shapely and musical. ,. the passage work 
was clean, melodies were clearly stated, and a neat balance was 
maintained as between the hands in a highly creditable achieve- 
ment of structural considerations ... Little Miss Dubman was 
recalled a half dozen times and accepted both applause and 
flowers like a veteran.” 













a be ee 


PIAN TST 


VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 


Wednesday Evening, April 14 


Ts 
SONATA D MINOR] CARLATT 
SON AT AOAMEN@RGD 2) i a Res Panes meee ae ; : 
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INTERMISSION 


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COLLECTOR ® DEALER @® APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows, High--Medium--Low Priced. 








SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3496 


| 

| A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 

| 
{ 


“SUMMER COURSES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL” 


PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 


NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 

















CAMP TAPAWINGO 


For girls 9-15 


Ideal vacation through integrated activities 


Mrs. Jacob Brodsky 
Miss Marjorie Dover 
651 - 7th Ave., San Francisco 







OPERA HOUSE NEWS 


A monthly publication devoted to the special in- 
terests of the concert-going public of the bay region. 


Telephone: SUTTER 4772 for advertising rates 
OPERA HOUSE NEWS — 11 Columbus Avenue — San Francisco 

















The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 


San FranciscoSymphony Orchestra 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President 
John A. McGregor, Vice-President 


and Treasurer 


Dr. Hans Barkan 

Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. E. S. Heller, Vice-President 
Paul Bissinger, Vice-President 


Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Mrs. Walter A. Haas 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Mrs. 


M. C. Sloss 


Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 


Guido J. Musto 
Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Mrs. George B. Robbins 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Chairman 
Mrs. George T. Cameron 


Mrs. 


Cyril Tobin 


Edgar Walter 


Dr. Leo Eloesser 
J. Emmet Hayden 


Young People’s Concerts Committee 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chr. 


Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


Mrs. George Washington 
Baker, Jr. 

Mrs. Otto Barkan 

Mr. Charles M. Dennis 

Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 


Mrs. William Babcock 
Mrs. Hans Barkan 

Mrs. Charles H. Bentley 
Mrs. Alan Benner 

Mrs. Russell G. Blackman 
Mrs. Albert Boardman 
Miss Barbara Burke 

Miss Estelle Carpenter 
Mrs. Edward H. Clark, Jr. 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker 

Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee 
Mrs. Lloyd Dinkelspiel 
Mrs. Frank W. Griffin 


Mrs. Harold Faber 
Mrs. Donald Gregory 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas 
Mrs. Gregory Jones 
Mrs. Churchill Peters 
Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 





EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. 


Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chr. 


Harold 


Richert McKinnon 


Mrs. 


Thomas 


Page Mailliard 


Mrs. 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leon Guggenhime 
Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. E. H. Heller 
Mrs. A. Bourn Hayne 
Mrs. Thomas 

Carr Howe, Jr. 
Mrs. J.C. Kittle 
Mrs. Lloyd Kincaid 
Mrs. Walker Henderson 
Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Howard Park 
Mrs. Allan LeFevre 
Mrs. Edward F. Moffatt 


Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 
Mrs. 


Butler S. Sturtevant 


Kenneth Monteagle 
Stanley A. Page 
Ottorino Orena 
Robert Patterson 
Laurence Redington 
F. R. Sherman 
Edward B. Stanwood 
Robert W. Miller 
Louis Sloss, Jr. 
Andrew Talbot 
Daniel Volkmann 
Lowell Wilson 


EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 4th FLOOR WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 


Peter Conley, Business Manager 








ES SR aS Ee 


Sek ae 


i 
a 
i 
£ 
i 








COLLECTOR @®@ DEALER @® APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows, High--Medium--Low Priced. 





SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WaAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


“SUMMER COURSES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL” 


PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
‘SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 


NORMAL COURSE as diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 





CAMP TAPAWINGO 


For girls 9-15 


Ideal vacation through integrated activities 


Mrs. Jacob Brodsky 
Miss Marjorie Dover 
651 - 7th Ave., San Francisco 





OPERA HOUSE NEWS 


A monthly publication devoted to the special in- 
terests of the concert-going public of the bay region. 


Telephone: SUTTER 4772 for advertising rates 
OPERA HOUSE NEWS — 11 Columbus Avenue — San Francisco 














The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 
San FranciscoSymphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President Mrs. E.S. Heller, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Vice-President Paul Bissinger, Vice-President 
and Treasurer Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 
Mrs. George B. Robbins 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Chairman Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Mrs. George T. Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


Young People’s Concerts Committee 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chr. Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chr. 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George Washington Mrs. Harold Faber Mrs. Harold 
Baker, Jr. Mrs. Donald Gregory Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. Otto Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. Thomas 
Mr. Charles M. Dennis Mrs. Gregory Jones Page Mailliard 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Churchill Peters Mrs. Butler S. Sturtevant 


Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Mrs. William Babcock Mrs. Leon Guggenhime Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 


Mrs. Hans Barkan Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden Mrs. Stanley A. Page 
Mrs. Charles H. Bentley Mrs. E. H. Heller Mrs. Ottorino Orena 
Mrs. Alan Benner Mrs. A. Bourn Hayne Mrs. Robert Patterson 
Mrs. Russell G. Blackman Mrs. Thomas Mrs. Laurence Redington 
Mrs. Albert Boardman Carr Howe, Jr. Mrs. F. R. Sherman 

Miss Barbara Burke Mrs. J.C. Kittle Mrs. Edward B. Stanwood 
Miss Estelle Carpenter Mrs. Lloyd Kincaid Mrs. Robert W. Miller 
Mrs. Edward H. Clark, Jr. Mrs. Walker Henderson Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Mrs. Stanley Powell Mrs. Andrew Talbot 
Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee Mrs. Howard Park Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Lloyd Dinkelspiel Mrs. Allan LeFevre Mrs. Lowell Wilson 


Mrs. Frank W. Griffin Mrs. Edward F. Moffatt 


EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 4th FLOOR WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
Peter Conley, Business Manager 




















KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much ec 
to your family AT » 


Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning .. . now. 
As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 
A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


Rew Sr DEP AUR EM EN tT 


Wells Fargo Bank 
Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery Market at Grant Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 





San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 9 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 10 
ERNEST SCHEELE LIN Gy Pans t 


) 
FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 16 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 17 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 
a 


FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 23 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 24 
BEETHOVEN NINTH SYMPHONY 


SYMPHONY OF PSALMS. . STRAVINSKY 


LAST BERKELEY CONCERT — SUNDAY AFT., 3:00, APRIL 11 
BRONISLAW HUBERMAN, Violinist 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 10:30-11:30 A. M. 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


April 10— “Early Suites.” 
April 17— “The Minuet and Scherzo.” 
April 24— “The Overture,” with San Francisco Opera School Ballet 


RESERVED SEATS: 50c — 35c 25¢e — 15c 


Civic Auditorium Tuesday Eve., April 20 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WITH 


SYLVIA LENT vrozcryisr 


AND 


MEREDITH WILLSON 


CONDUCTING HIS “SYMPHONY OF SAN FRANCISCO” 
Reserved Seats: $1.00 — 75c — 50c — 25c 
Now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 


























RCA Victor = = 
Radio-Phonograph. 2 


Combination at a feature price 


Now you can hear the music you like 
PLETE 


best, broadcast or recorded, when- 
ever you please on this radio and 
record player combination. 
5-tube RCA Vic- 
tor Radio, RCA 
Victor Record 


The radio is equipped with 
dynamic speaker; illuminated read- 

Player, 7 Clas- 

sical Records. 









easy dial; high frequency tone con- 
trol; wide tuning range for fine 
reception on domestic and short 
wave broadcasts. 

The record player may be attached 
to any radio—plays records through 
the radio loud speaker. 

This combination with 7 classical 
records, at a feature price .. . $59.95. 











era plomeas 





Sremeeerssusay 


SAN FRANCISCO 


> 1 IV PHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


ERNEST SCHELLING 


Conducting 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soybean 


»second Concert 


SATURDAY MORNING at 10:30 
APRIL 10, 1937 


TMi APO D vA NR UNE EL - EASE NEADA SR Shi rahe AL KAA a on RATTLE TG Lae Lal Nua s 





GRANT AVENUE AT GEARY STREET 


UITS es Spring 


and LIvINGsTON’s 
oe Sn tts 


x All the season's 
most outstanding styles in 
a great Spring collection! 


CG Hr | its 


29:75 to 89-75 


Cael I yits 


29:75 to 98-50 


(Ce. ian 
49-30 to 225-00 


SUIT SALON ¢ FIFTH FLOOR 








T has a heart—your heart. For a Baldwin becomes a 
part of you, as you play it, as you listen. Through its ivory 
fingers—and your own—flows an intimate understanding, 
a warm and mutual responsiveness. Yes, it’s your heart in 
the Baldwin. Yours and the hearts of the craftsmen, with 
generations of music behind them, who spend two patient 
years fashioning each Baldwin by hand. Your heart—and 
the hearts of such masters as Bauer, Iturbi, Lhevinne and 
Rosenthal, who inspire and find inspiration in this almost 
human instrument. Just to possess a Baldwin, to have a 
Baldwin as a distinguished and beloved member of your 
family, makes you hold your head a little higher. Yet a 
Baldwin is easy to own. As we will be glad to explain. 


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PRICED FROM 58 O55 F.0.B. CINCINNATI 


Dealer’s Name and Address 


Products of Baldwin: ACROSONIC, HAMILTON, HOWARD, MONARGH PIANOS 





YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 
































CASTILLEJA SCHOOL 


PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 


Prepares Girls for College Entrance 
(Or for accomplishment in Academic, Artistic, or Practical fields ) 
Kindergarten through High School Boarding or Day 


Beautiful 
Surroundings 


Roomy Buildings 

Experienced 
Teachers 

Small Classes 


Individual 
Attention 


& 
For further information 
address 


Mary I. Lockey A.B. 


Principal 
1312 Bryant St. 


PALO ALTO, CALIF. 
TEL. PALO ALTO 22131 


FINE FOODS 


lce Cream « Sodas 
Pastries x Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 





Pign Whistle 


33 POWELL STREET, Near Market 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 





4 YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 








Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 





PR O GK Aw 
THE SUITE, OLD AND NEW 


SFUMpGt Prelims yc sceeseyes seach t ee oheastac ah ee ee ee Henry Purcell 
(1658-1695) 
Le Tambourin du Triomphe..................... André-Cardinal Destouches 
(1672-1749) 
UES EG he oe Pe ae ca te deo Johann Sebastian Bach 
(Selected and arranged by Gustav Mahler (1685-1750) 
Overture 
Rondeau 
Badinerie 
Sarabande 
Gavotte 
DURES: “WILE OSCO ese ace pete cena ees ender Eugene Goossens 
(1893——_) 


Good Morning 

Promenade 

Hurdy Gurdy 

March of the Wooden Soldiers 
Lament for a Departed Doll 
The Old Musical Box 

Punch and Judy Show 

Good Night 


EVERY BODY SING. The Bourrée=1.w aca Lorenzo Gregory 


There are dances grave and stately, 
Minuet and saraband, 

And we dance them most sedately, 
Pointed toe and uplifted hand, 

And the polonaise we may justly praise, 
Habanera, bolero, mazurka gay, 

But for us the best over all the rest, 

Is the dance they call bourrée. 

Some admire the old fandango, 

Which they dance in sunny Spain; 
There are some who like the tango; 
And the polka do not disdain. 

There’s the lively tune of the rigadoon 
And the waltz and the gallop that once held sway, 
But for us the best over all the rest, 

Is the dance that they call bourrée. 


Tambo cnin) ancl (Gio Coot ree ee ee ce André Gretry 
(1741-1813) 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 














_— = ——— 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


8 
FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 16 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 17 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS, Baritone 
ae 
FRIDAY AFT., 2:30, APRIL 23 and SATURDAY EVE., 8:30, APRIL 24 
BEETHOVEN NINTH SYMPHONY 
SYMPHONY OF PSALMS. . STRAVINSKY 


LAST BERKELEY CONCERT — SUNDAY AFT., 3:00, APRIL 11 
BRONISLAW HUBERMAN, Violinist 











YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 10:30-11:30 A. M. 
ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


April 17 — “The Minuet and Scherzo.” 
April 24— “The Overture,” with San Francisco Opera School Ballet 


RESERVED SEATS: 50c — 35c 25¢ — 1lbdc 











Civic Auditorium Tuesday Eve., April 20 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


WITH 


SY LV PAREN GD. vie me eee 


AND 


MEREDITH WILLSON 


CONDUCTING HIS “SYMPHONY OF SAN FRANCISCO” 


' Reserved Seats: $1.00 — 75c — 50c — 25c 
Now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter and Kearny Streets 











YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 


COMING | 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conductor 


SSSMNM0M0M9M9M9M0M”@M@M@M090—sS@Ma9n@@m@m0MMm0$00Mmm993SSBSBS 

















APRIL 17 
Minuet from “Military” Symphony in G DIAN OL. eed take ae Haydn 
Mine irony Hflet Symphonyacu..e. ce eee ae Mozart 
Scherzo from Symphony No. 6 (Pastoral)..................... Beethoven 
Allegretiayirom-Symphony No. 221.60 so te Brahms 
MANGE o.c tts 21 Sorc dh ni he Oe es ee ee ee Mozart 
EVERYBODY SING 
Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks.....................:........ Richard Strauss 
| APRIL 24 
Overture to “The Marriage of Figaro”... ..0...... Mozart 
‘Tbe: (hildren eaDverttiteis.sd20 teeta kyl Men ak cate Ouilter 
*Waltz of the Flowers from the “Nutcracker” Suite... T'schaikowsky 
> cliree Crermanms Dances 2.0. 2. een ae eee ee eee Mozart 
Overtive,.“Potismovihneroint 2. et Bee ee Walton 
‘sallors’ Dapce irom “lhe: Red “Poppy oho ek Gliere 


‘“‘America, the Beautiful” 
EVERYBODY SING 
Freludeté "Die. Metategsinoer’ ic.2- te. o:  eiel Wagner 
*With a dance group from San Francisco Opera Ballet School 








RESERVED SEATS: 50c — 35¢ — 25e — 15e 
Box Office: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — San Francisco and Oakland 


PETER CONLEY ATTRACTIONS 


LAURA DUBMAN PIANIST WED. EVE., APRIL 14 
LAWRENCE TIBBETT BARITONE MON. EVE, APR. 19 
HENRI DEERING PIANIST ——_—OMON. EVE, APRIL 26 
NINO MARTINI TENor THUR. EVE., APRIL 29 


ISAAC STERN and HENRY DEERING 
SONATA RECITAL TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 11 

















TICKETS NOW ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — San Francisco and Oakland 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 7 











420 Sutter Street 


COLLECTOR @® DEALER @ APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments, 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows, High--Medium--Low Priced. 





SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3496 
A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


“STIMMER COURSES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL” 

PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 
NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 


SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 


CAMP TAPAWINGO 


For girls 9-15 


Ideal vacation through integrated activities 


Mrs. Jacob Brodsky 
Miss Marjorie Dover 
651 - 7th Ave., San Francisco 










OPERA HOUSE NEWS 


A monthly publication devoted to the special in- 
terests of the concert-going public of the bay region. 


Telephone: SUTTER 4772 for advertising rates 
OPERA HOUSE NEWS — 11 Columbus Avenue — San Francisco 





8 YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 











The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 


San FranciscoSymphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President Mrs. E. S. Heller, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Vice-President Paul Bissinger, Vice-President 


and Treasurer 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 


Mrs. George B. Robbins 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Chairman Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Mrs. George T. Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


Young People’s Concerts Committee 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chr. 


Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George Washington Mrs. Harold Faber Mrs. Harold 

Baker, Jr. Mrs. Donald Gregory Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. Otto Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. Thomas 
Mr. Charles M. Dennis Mrs. Gregory Jones Page Mailliard 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Churchill Peters Mrs. Butler S. Sturtevant 


Mrs. William Babcock 
Mrs. Hans Barkan 


Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leon Guggenhime Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 
Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden Mrs. Stanley A. Page 


Mrs. Charles H. Bentley Mrs. FE. H. Heller Mrs. Ottorino Orena 

Mrs. Alan Benner Mrs. A. Bourn Hayne Mrs. Robert Patterson 
Mrs. Russell G. Blackman Mrs. Thomas Mrs. Laurence Redington 
Mrs. Albert Boardman Carr Howe, Jr. Mrs. F. R. Sherman 

Miss Barbara Burke Mrs. J.C. Kittle Mrs. Edward B. Stanwood 
Miss Estelle Carpenter Mrs. Lloyd Kincaid Mrs. Robert W. Miller 


Mrs. Edward H. Clark, Jr. Mrs. Walker Henderson Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. 


Mrs. W. W. Crocker 


Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee 
Mrs. Lloyd Dinkelspiel 


Mrs. Frank W. Griffin 


EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 4th FLOOR WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Mrs. Stanley Powell Mrs. Andrew Talbot 
Mrs. Howard Park Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Allan LeFevre Mrs. Lowell Wilson 


Mrs. Edward F. Moffatt 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Président and Managing Director 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 


Peter Conley, Business Manager 















Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chr. 















































KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 


SUBJECT 


\ 
may mean much fh 
to your family ANS a 


Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning .. . vow. 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 

A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 

Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


Ne I a DEPARTMENT 


Wells Fargo Bank 


and 
Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery Market at Grant Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 


YOUNG PEQPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 








ROSS McKEE—announces 


2nd Annual Luncheon 


FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 


Ernest Schelling 


GUEST OF HONOR 


SATURDAY NOON 
7 cai ok Dee Na eli aS 


Following the Concert for Young People 








SCHOOLS of MUSIC and DRAMA 
GOLDEN GATE COLLEGE 


220 Golden Gate Ave., San Francisco Y. M. C. A. 


RESERVATIONS 50¢ 


Mail or phone reservations in advance TUxedo 1416 


Special tables reserved for teachers and their students and 


other parties 


Attend Concerts for Young People with the San Francisco 


Sym phony—ERNEST SCHELLING, conducting 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE APRIL 17, 24, 1937 














RCA Victor < 
Radio-Phonograph_ 










Combination a a feature price 





00: 


5-tube RCA Vic- 
tor Radio, RCA 
Victor Record 
Player, 7 Clas- 
sical Records. 













Now you can hear the music you like 
best, broadcast or recorded, when- 
ever you please on this radio and 
record player combination. 

The radio is equipped with 
dynamic speaker; illuminated read- 
easy dial; high frequency tone con- 
trol; wide tuning range for fine 
reception on domestic and short 
wave broadcasts. 

The record player may be attached 
to any radio—plays records through 
the radio loud speaker. 

This combination with 7 classical 
records, at a feature price. . . $59.95. 











[ 


ARs erento mee 


Co a eR 


SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


ERNEST SCHELLING 


Conducting 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Laire Concent 


SATURDAY MORNING at 
APRIL 17, 1937 


PRD up SUNS EHR 


stapes 


se ee =~ y : Uae Sa teantnns ae : , 7 
WO a es es Sl.” PE SEES ar ee, a 
ar 2 ee 2 a a ee 2 eee Ee 


‘ 











CASTILCLETA cS CHOUE 


PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 


Prepares Girls for College Entrance 
(Or for accomplishment in Academic, Artistic, or Practical fields) 
Kindergarten through High School Boarding or Day 


Beautiful 
Surroundings 


Roomy Buildings 


Experienced 
Teachers 


Small Classes 


Individual 
Attention 


@ 
For further information 
address 


Mary I. Lockey A.B. 


Principal 
1312 Bryant St. 


PALO ALTO, CALIF. 
TEL. PALO ALTO 22131 


FINE FOODS 


lce Cream *« Sodas 
Pastries * Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Pion Mhistle 


33 POWELL STREET, Near Market 


1032 MARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 








YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 











Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 


PK OG KAY 


THE MINUET. AND SCHERZO 


Minuet from “Military” Symphony in G major Joseph Haydn 
(1732-1809) 


Minuet from Symphony in E flat Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 
(1756-1791) 


Scherzo from Symphony No. 6 (Pastoral)....Ludwig van Beethoven 
(1770-1827) 


Allegretto from Symphony No. 2 Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 


EVERYBODY SING: Minuet... Mozart 


When dames wore hoops and powdered hair, 
And very strict was etiquette, 

When men were brave and ladies fair, 
They danced the minuet. 


Slippers high heeled with pointed toe, 
Trod stately measures to and fro. 
Quite demure, sedate, and bowing low 
They danced the minuet. 


Over his lady’s oustretched hand, 
Each gallant bends right gracefully; 
Gracious of mien, with manner grand, 
She sweeps a courtesy. 


Our whirling steps of modern days, 
Those lords and ladies would amaze. 
Yet the minuet we still must praise 
For grace and dignity. 


6. Rondo, “Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks” Richard Strauss 
(1864——) 





YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 5 








LAS T -SPUN LCE P A bes OO NR T 


Civic Auditorium Tuesday Evening, April 20 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


WITH 


SY VARA CEB Nes oo eres 


AND 


MER ED? T A Waite SON 


Conducting his “SYMPHONY OF SAN FRANCISCO” 


PKOG KAM 


GIVE re TUS Beg oe eis OT Sa ik eat ee ee Lalo 
A SYMPHONY OF SAN FRANCISCO: Meredith Willson 
(Conducted by the Composer) 
CONCERTOcFOR VIOBINGEN G MINOR. 235 2. Bruch 
SYLVIA LENT 

INTRODUCTION AND MARCH 
PROM “hE COOP D ae oe ee Rimsky-Korsakow 


& 
RESERVED SEATS: $1.00, 75c, 50c, 25¢ — SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


AUSPICES: SAN FRANCISCO ART COMMISSION 


EpGAR WALTER, President JosEPH H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 


DrirEcTION: Music CoMMITTEE, J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 








LAST 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conductor 


APRIL 24 
Overture to“The Marriage: of Figaro’ 23.2 eS Mozart 
‘Ehe: Children’s. 'Overtive <5 2S is ee Ouilter 
*Waltz of the Flowers from the “Nutcracker” Suite......Tschaikowsky 
*Thrée: German: Dances. scene ee ee Mozart 
Overture, SPostsmowthe2omit?. cee cee es ee ee Walton 
*Sarlors: Dance “irom. 1 he Red: POppy? ecco eee Gliere 


‘““America, the Beautiful” 
EVERYBODY SING 


Prelude to “Die Meistersinver 224-5 2% - ts Ae ee Wagner 
*With a dance group from San Francisco Opera Ballet School 


RESERVED SEATS: 50c — 35c — 25e — 15e 
Box Office: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — San Francisco and Oakland 


PETER CONLEY ATTRACTIONS 


LAWRENCE TIBBETT BARITONE MON. EVE., APR. 19 
HENRI DEERING PIANIST MON. EVE., APRIL 26 


NINO MARTINI TENOR THUR. EVE., APRIL 29 


ISAAC STERN and HENRI DEERING 
SONATA RECITAL TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 11 


TICKETS NOW ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. —- San Francisco and Oakland 





YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 7 





420 Sutter Street | 
Ser 


COLLECTOR ® DEALER @ APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows. High--Medium--Low Priced. 









SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WaAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


“SUMMER COURSES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL” 


PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ORGAN, WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 


NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 


CAMP TAPAWINGO 


For girls 9-15 


Ideal vacation through integrated activities 


Mrs. Jacob Brodsky 
Miss Marjorie Dover 
651 - 7th Ave., San Francisco 





OPERA HOUSE NEWS 


A monthly publication devoted to the special in- 
terests of the concert-going public of the bay region. 


Telephone: SUTTER 4772 for advertising rates 
OPERA HOUSE NEWS — 11 Columbus Avenue — San Francisco 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 











The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 


San FranciscoSymphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President Mrs. E. S. Heller, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Vice-President Paul Bissinger, Vice-President 
and Treasurer Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 
Mrs. George B. Robbins 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Chairman Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Mrs. George T. Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


Young People’s Concerts Committee 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chr. Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chr. 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George Washington Mrs. Harold Faber Mrs. Harold 

Baker, Jr. Mrs. Donald Gregory Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. Otto Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. Thomas 
Mr. Charles M. Dennis Mrs. Gregory Jones Page Mailliard 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Churchill Peters Mrs. Butler S. Sturtevant 
Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Mrs. William Babcock Mrs. Leon Guggenhime Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 


Mrs. Hans Barkan Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden Mrs. Stanley A. Page 
Mrs. Charles H. Bentley Mrs. E. H. Heller Mrs. Ottorino Orena 
Mrs. Alan Benner Mrs. A. Bourn Hayne Mrs. Robert Patterson 
Mrs. Russell G. Blackman Mrs. Thomas Mrs. Laurence Redington 
Mrs. Albert Boardman Carr Howe, Jr. Mrs. F. R. Sherman 

Miss Barbara Burke Mrs. J.C. Kittle Mrs. Edward B. Stanwood 
Miss Estelle Carpenter Mrs. Lloyd Kincaid Mrs. Robert W. Miller 
Mrs. Edward H. Clark, Jr. Mrs. Walker Henderson Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. 

Mrs. W. W. Crocker Mrs. Stanley Powell Mrs. Andrew Talbot 

Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee Mrs. Howard Park Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Lloyd Dinkelspiel Mrs. Allan LeFevre Mrs. Lowell Wilson 


Mrs. Frank W. Griffin Mrs. Edward F. Moffatt 


EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 4th FLOOR WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
Peter Conley, Business Manager 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 9 











10 





KNOWLEDGE 
OF THIS 
SUBJECT 


may mean much 
to your family ° 


Whether your estate will be large or small, you can 
make it provide more effectively for your family’s 
future needs by sound planning . . . now. 


As a wise preliminary to such planning, we sug- 
gest that you read the above booklet. It discusses 
estate problems from the practical standpoint of 
today’s conditions. And it explains the investment 
policies and procedure which form the basis of this 
bank’s trusteeship. 


A copy of this new booklet will be sent at your request. 
Write, call at our Trust Department, 
or telephone SUtter 1500. 


FRIDAY EVENINGS—KSFO, 7 O’CLOCK 
BUSINESS FORUM OF THE AIR 
PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA 
STOKOWSKI—ORMANDY 


TRUST DE POR TM BNE 


Wells Fargo Bank 


and 
Union Trust Go. 


Market at Montgomery Market at Grant Ave. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 





YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 





ROBERT WALLACE 


THE HOUSE OF FURS one rorry six Geary 





‘MOLE 


The most important fur news for 
Spring 1937is the revival of Mole. 
Robert Wallace has created...and 
presents...a notable collection of 
exquisitely lovely Mole coats... 
fashioned from superbly matched 
and individually selected pelts of 
unusual quality. The lustrous 


beauty of Mole lends distinction 





to every age and to all occasions. 


The coat illustrated is one of many 
\ 


stunning Spring models at only 


Ibo 


et el 








Y Cabfornia 
Sit. O.°r be 8 


| Re =e Oe cas oY 
at. Sutter: 





Fortunate is that home where music is known and loved. There, some 
strange, compelling power binds children and parents together. There, 
the young mother sings the child to sleep ... the boy begins, at the 
piano, his venture into realms of gold ... and friends, light-hearted, 
gay, repeat the songs of youth. Music brings to every home a rich 
measure of joy. It is the inspiration of the new generation ... the 
tranquil refuge of the old. It twines a silver cord of comradeship 
around father, mother, children ... unites their home, and all who 
enter it, with things which are deepest, finest, true. 





sal Ee | Ney . , the instrument of the im- 


mortals . . . the one perfect piano for your children 


Steinway has interpreted the genius of virtually every great 
musician from Liszt to Rachmaninoff. 

It is eminently fitting, therefore, that the Steinway should be the 
piano for your children. From the beginning, the youthful ear must 
be attuned to the correct tone and pitch , ... youthful hands 
trained to proper fundamentals of touch. 

Fortunately the Steinway, priced from $885, is within the reach 
of the modest income. It may be purchased on the most generous 
terms .... as little as 10% down and the balance distributed 


over a convenient period. 








Pe, Ae 


HER 


a 


Se 


SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


ERNEST SCHELLING 


Conducting 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


SrA Le RAMONE Both rer 


Bourn oneert 


SATURDAY MORNING at 10:30 
APRIL 24, 1937 


+ 


‘ Set = ee 
ANA Sn A Oss se eee ae a ee STS 
DSS A oo a ee ee BW 1 Caw Woe Fe EE, 
ts” AEROS Kae A Ph 8 OL ES hee Be A 2 Wd 0 "Se De 











GRANT AVENUE OAT Gea ¥ = SRE EL 


UITS 6. Spring 


and Livineston’s 
ne OS, its 


x All the season's 














most Outstanding styles in 






a great Spring collection! 








Gs iiccad Sits 
29:75 to $9.75 


(Case! oN, its 


29:75 to 98-50 


(Gees ane 
49-50 to 225-00 


FIFTH FLOOR 










SUIT SALON ¢ 








T has a heart—your heart. For a Baldwin becomes a 
part of you, as you play it, as you listen. Through its ivory 
fingers—and your own—flows an intimate understanding, 
a warm and mutual responsiveness. Yes, it’s your heart in 
the Baldwin. Yours and the hearts of the craftsmen, with 
generations of music behind them, who spend two patient 
years fashioning each Baldwin by hand. Your heart—and 
the hearts of such masters as Bauer, Iturbi, Lhevinne and 
Rosenthal, who inspire and find inspiration in this almost 
human instrument. Just to possess a Baldwin, to have a 
Baldwin as a distinguished and beloved member of your 
family, makes you hold your head a little higher. Yet a 
Baldwin is easy to own. As we will be glad to explain. 


e 
PRICED FROM 5805 F. 0. B. CINCINNATI 


310 SUTTER STREET 


Products of Baldwin: ACROSONIC, HAMILTON, HOWARD, MONARCH PIANOS 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 3 























CASTILLELA- Seno o. 


PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA 


Prepares Girls for College Entrance 
(Or for accomplishment in Academic, Artistic, or Practical fields ) 


Kindergarten through High School Boarding or Day 


Beautiful 
Surroundings 


Roomy Buildings 

Experienced 
Teachers 

Small Classes 


Individual 
Attention 
. 
For further information 
address 


Mary I. Lockey A.B. 
Principal 
1312 Bryant St. 
PALO ALTO, CALIF. 
TEL. PALO ALTO 22131 





FINE FOODS 


Ice Cream x Sodas 
Pastries * Candies 


Served in the most beautiful restaurants 
in the West—at no greater cost 
than elsewhere 


Pig'n Whistle 


33 POWELL STREET, Near Market 


1032 IMARKET STREET, Near Paramont Theatre 
and the Opera House 





4 YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 








_ 








Direction: MILDRED HIRSCH 
L. Overture to: *fheullamiage- of Pigaro’ 2... 2 oe eee. Mozart 


2. Three German Dances... es ee On es Mozart 


BOYS GIRLS 
Claudine Grady Mary de Laveaga Paula Wright Mildred Ferguson 
Dora Rogers Gabrilla Wright Jean Smith Rena Ross 
Anna Van Loghem Carmen Caiati Jean Solomon Avon Harper 
Helen Searls Charlotte Geary Clarice Curtice Genevieve Doolin 


SMALL GROUP 
BOY GIRLS 
Herbert Salinger Lucy Pope Gertrude Richter Colleen Clark 
Patricia Marcé Gala Glinsky Patricia Rosenwald 
Marianne Gianella 


on “Phe-@hildren’s: Overture 20s 26 hee et eer Be re” see Quilter 


4. Waltz of the Flowers from the “Nutcracker” Suite........ Tschaikowsky 


FIRST GROUP, Blue THIRD GROUP, Pink 
Milo Kimmerle Eugenie Zonn Tasia Pogre Celina Cummings 
Janet Carlton Florence Gale Emita de Sosa Peggy Koshland 


SECOND GROUP, Blaze FOURTH GROUP, Pink 
Patricia Marce Gala Glinsky Ruth Bennett Tosca Lippi 
Lucy Pope Marianne Gianella Gloria Henderson Carolyn La Veau 


Do. Overture, “Portsmouth Point........... PEE Ee ck tn eee ere he Walton 


6. Everybody Sing, “America the Beautiful” 


Words for song on page six. 


~ 


Yablochko from “The Red Poppy”....... Red bo Aber ser sip etsehe Bade uate eae Gliere 
Soloists: Laura Post, James Starbuck, from Professional Group 
Eugenie Zonn Emita de Sosa Barbara Wood 
Tasia Pogre Peggy Koshland Zoya Leporsky 
Tosca Lippi Janet Carlton Katherine Davies 
Ruth Bennett Florence Gale Gabrilla Wright 
Celena Cummings Gloria Henderson Claudine Grady 
Milo Kimmerle 


f Copyright, 1931, Ernest Schelling 
PROGRAM with SAN FRANCISCO OPERA JUNIOR BALLET 
‘ 


50° Ge relude. to. Die Meistersinoor”.. 2. et eo ee Wagner 
Choreography for all dances by MILprEp Hirscu, Ballet Mistress, San Francisco Opera Ballet School 
& 


Costumes for German Dances and‘‘Yablochko’’ furnished by GOLDSTEIN & Co. 
Costumes for Waltz of the Flowers, designed by Guy Alden and executed by Ysabel Bruce. 


ie 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 


5 








O beautiful for spacious skies, 

For amber waves of grain, 

For purple mountain majesties 

Above the fruited plain 

America! America! God shed His 
grace on thee, 

And crown thy good with brotherhood 

From sea to shining sea. 


O beautiful for pilgrim feet 

Whose stern impassioned stress 

A thoroughfare for freedom beat 

Across the wilderness. 

America! America! God mend thine 
ev ry flaw, 

Confirm thy soul in self-control, 

Thy liberty in law. 





SEEING SAN FRANCISCO 


means a Visit to 


Gump's Jade Room saa ke 


where is assembled a peerless 
collection . jades of every 
green hue, of yellow, blue 
mauve .. . artfully fashioned 


into a thousand beautiful forms. 


GUMP’S Antique Collections 
share with its modern creations 
the admiration of San Francisco 


visitor’s. 


GUMP'S 


250 POST STREET » 





SAN FRANCISCO 





AMERICA, THE BEAUTIFUL 


O beautiful for heroes proved 

In liberating strife, 

Who more than self their country 
loved, 

And mercy more than life. 

America! America! May God thy 
gold refine 

Till all success be nobleness 

And ev’ry gain divine. 


O beautiful for patriot dream 

That sees beyond the years 

Thine alabaster cities gleam 

Undimmed by human tears. 

America! America! God shed His 
grace on thee, 

And crown thy good with brotherhood 

From sea to shining sea. 


flown 


every mioc 
sory... alse 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 





= 





_—_——- &— = 


i 





5 = Wee a Sy) SN oa Oe, Be 
WILL PRESENT 


HENRI 
DEERING 


PIANO RECITAL 


VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
MONDAY EVE., APRIL 26 








HENRI DEERING — ISAAC STERN 
SONATA RECITAL — TUES. EVE., MAY 11 


TICKETS AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO., S. F. and Oakland 








SAN FRANCISCO 


CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 


3435 Sacramento Street WAlnut 3496 


A complete musical education from Beginners’ Work to 
Professional Coaching in all subjects 


“SUMMER COURSES IN ALL DEPARTMENTS 
VOCAL AND INSTRUMENTAL” 


PIANO, VIOLIN, CELLO, VOCAL, ASG WIND AND BRASS INSTRUMENTS, 
SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, MUSICIANSHIP, HARMONY, 
COUNTERPOINT, FORM, ENSEMBLE 


NORMAL COURSE with diploma in piano, voice, etc. 
SPECIAL CHILDREN’S COURSES 





LAWRENCE TIBBETT PROGRAM 7 













COLLECTOR ® DEALER @ APPRAISER 


Fine Repairing — Specialist in “Voicing” Master Instruments. 
Rare Old Violins--Violas--Cellos--Bows. High--Medium--Low Priced. 


CAMP TAPAWINGO 


For girls 9-15 
SEVENTH SEASON BEGINNING JUNE 2lst. 


Crafts, dramatics, photography, music and the dance integrated to 
give expression to the creative impulses of every young girl. 
Excellent cuisine and scientific health supervision. 


Mrs. Jacob Brodsky 651-7th Ave., SKyline 2671 Miss Marjorie Dover 





MISS HABhER’S SCHUUL 
for Girls 










PALO -A LT Oy -C A Leal 2 Oln NaS 


2) Iade es Bok hy EP aos Ee) en 
ACN DE OW EAR, ioeCue Cae 


and Lower School will be reopened on 
September 20, 1937 


ak 


T Eels EnP HoOcNcbe eR Bab OT lt Ol bas si) 


8 YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 





| 
| 
| 
The Boarding Department for both High School 
| 
| 





The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 


San FranciscoSymphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President Mrs. E.S. Heller, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Vice-President Paul Bissinger, Vice-President 
and Treasurer Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 


Mortimer F'leishhacker Mrs. Ashton H. Potter Edgar Walter 
Mrs. George B. Robbins 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Chairman Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Mrs. George T. Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


Young People’s Concerts Committee 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chr. Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chr. 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George Washington Mrs. Harold Faber Mrs. Harold 
Baker, Jr. Mrs. Donald Gregory Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. Otto Barkan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. Thomas 
Mr. Charles M. Dennis Mrs. Gregory Jones Page Mailliard 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Churchill Peters Mrs. Butler S. Sturtevant 


Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
Mrs. William Babcock Mrs. Leon Guggenhime Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 


Mrs. Hans Barkan Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden Mrs. Stanley A. Page 
Mrs. Charles H. Bentley Mrs. E. H. Heller Mrs. Ottorino Orena 
Mrs. Alan Benner Mrs. A. Bourn Hayne Mrs. Robert Patterson 
Mrs. Russell G. Blackman Mrs. Thomas Mrs. Laurence Redington 
Mrs. Albert Boardman Carr Howe, Jr. Mrs. F. R. Sherman 

Miss Barbara Burke Mrs. J.C. Kittle Mrs. Edward B. Stanwood 
Miss Estelle Carpenter Mrs. Lloyd Kincaid Mrs. Robert W. Miller 
Mrs. Edward H. Clark, Jr. Mrs. Walker Henderson Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Mrs. Stanley Powell Mrs. Andrew Talbot 

Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee Mrs. Howard Park Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Lloyd Dinkelspiel Mrs. Allan LeFevre Mrs. Lowell Wilson 


Mrs. Frank W. Griffin Mrs. Edward F. Moffatt 


EXECUTIVE OFFICE: 4th FLOOR WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
Peter Conley, Business Manager 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS PROGRAM 9 


ee 














KAJETAN ATTIL'S 
HARP ENSEMBLE 


Beginners or Advance Students Phone for appotniment. 


When Buying or Renting a Harp only an Experienced 
Harpist can advise Correctly. 


First Harpist with San 

Francisco Symphony for 

Twenty-four Consecutive 
Years. 


Large Stock of Harps for Sale or Rent: 
1030 BUSH STREET Phone ORdway 6367 Studio No.6 








{ 
2 
4 
{ 
| 
\ 


Gece ii eit 















ROBERT WALLACE 


THE HOUSE OF FURS one Forty six GEARY 


MOLE 
- COMMANDS THE 
SPRING SPOTLIGHT 


The most important fur news for 
Spring 1937is the revival of Mole. 
Robert Wallace has created...and 
presents...a notable collection of 
exquisitely lovely Mole coats... 
fashioned from superbly matched 
and individually selected pelts of 
unusual quality. The lustrous 
beauty of Mole lends distinction 
to every age and to all occasions. 
The coat illustrated is one of many 


; 
j ° 
; 
} 


stunning Spring models at only 


lov 














Califor 
b 
e 


OF 
ar 
t 








Fortunate is that home where music is known and loved. There, some 
strange, compelling power binds children and parents together. There, 
the young mother sings the child to sleep ... the boy begins, at the 
piano, his veniure into realms of gold ... and friends, light-hearted, 
gay, repeat the songs of youth. Music brings to every home a rich 
measure of joy. It is the inspiration of the new generation ... the 
tranquil refuge of the old. It twines a silver cord of comradeship 
around father, mother, children ... unites their home, and all who 
enter it, with things which are deepest, finest, true. 





Sal & | NWAY. . . the instrument of the im- 


mortals .. . the one perfect piano for your children 


Steinway has interpreted the genius of virtually every great 
musician from Liszt to Rachmaninoff. 

It is eminently fitting, therefore, that the Steinway should be the 
piano for your children. From the beginning, the youthful ear must 
be attuned to the correct tone and pitch , .. . youthful hands 
trained to proper fundamentals of touch. 

Fortunately the Steinway, priced from $885, is within the reach 
of the modest income. It may be purchased on the most generous 
terms .... as little as 10% down and the balance distributed 
over a convenient period. Steinway is exclusive with Sherman, Clay. 


{ 
| 
| 
| 


= 


S LIP ITE OLE NIE TITS OTe ———— 


1935 -193G 


Se Se 





en ee te ne + 








The Musical Association of San Francisco 


MAINTAINING THE 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


— MEMBERSHIP FOR SEASON 1936 
me (As of April 9, 1936) 





OFFICERS 
Joseph S. Thompson, President Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, John A. McGregor, Treasurer 
Vice-President Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Robert W. Miller Edgar Walter 


Guido J. Musto 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Mrs. George T. Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Armsby, Chairman Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 
MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
Armsby, E. Raymond _ Eloesser, Dr. Leo Musto, Guido J. 
| Armsby, Esberg, Milton H, McGregor, John A. 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. McKinnon, 
Arnold, G. Stanleigh Filmer, Mrs. W. Coy Mrs. Harold Richert 
Baker, Mrs. George Fleishhacker, Mortimer Newell, R. C. 
Washington, Jr. Flowers, Mrs. J. C. Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans Forbes, John F. Robbins, Mrs. George B. 
Bartlett, ; Gilman, Don E. Schilling, Miss Else 
Mrs. Edward Otis Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. Schlesinger, B. F. 
Bender, Albert M. Haley, Mrs. Harry 8. Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. Hart, Julien Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Blanding, Miss Lena Hayden, J. Emmet Taylor, Mrs. David 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. Koshland, Armstrong 
Cameron, George T. Mrs. Marcus 8S. Thompson, Joseph S. 
Crocker, William H. Koster, F. J. Threlkeld, John H. 
Crocker, Mrs. W.W. Lachman, Gus Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. Martin, Walter S. Walter, Edgar 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. Merola, Gaetano Weill, Michel 
Donohoe, Mendell, Wiel, Eli H. 
Miss Katherine Mrs. George H. Williams, 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. Miller, Robert W. Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Elkus, Albert I. Monteagle, Kenneth Winslow, Mrs. 8.8. 
ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 
Walter A. Weber Eugene Heyes M. A. Salinger 
Erich Weiler 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Peter Conley, 
Managing Director , Business Manager 
EXECUTIVE OFFICES: FOURTH FLOOR ® WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


ole OTC EeanaEe=weT OOOO 














The Musical Association of San Francisco is fortunate in being able 
to list so large a membership which has generously contributed to the support 
of the Season of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-six. 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry William Sproule J. B. Levison 
W.B. Bourn John D. McKee Richard M.Tobin 


HONORARY MEMBERS: 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF $1,000.00 OR OVER) 


Alexander, Mr. and Mrs. Esberg, Mr. and Mrs. Milton H. Rosenberg, Mrs. Abraham 
Wallace M. Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. Schilling, Miss Else 
Armsby, Mrs. Leonora Wood Mortimer Sherman, Clay & Co. 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. Heller, Mrs. E. S. Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Crocker, Mr. William H. Koshland, Mrs. Marcus S. Taylor, Mrs. D. Armstrong 


Ehrman, Mr. and Mrs. Sidney M. McGregor, Mr. John A. 


REGULAR MEMBERS: 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF $100.00 OR OVER) 


Ackerman, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd S. Clark, Mrs. Warren D. Fairmont Hotel 
Adams, Mrs. Jewett W. Clayburgh, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Faville, Mr. Wm. B. 
Allen, Mr. Harry B. Coghlan, Mrs. John P. Felton, Mrs. C. N. 
Allen, Mr. Wyatt H. Coleman, Miss Janet Fitzhugh, Mrs. W. M. 
Babcock, Mrs. William Coleman, Miss Persis H. Fleishhacker, Herbert 
Baldwin, Mrs. A. S. Coleman, Mr. S. Waldo Flowers, Mrs. J. C. 
Barkan, Dr. A. Crocker, Mr. Templeton Forbes, Mr. John F. 
Barkan, Dr. and Mrs. Hans Cross, Mrs. Charles Fox, Mrs. Herbert W. 
Beaver, Mrs. F. H. Cushing, Mrs. O. K. Freeman, Mrs. Allen G. 
Belcher, Mr. Frank J., Jr. Daly, Mrs. John D. French, Mrs. J. E. 
Bender, Mr. Albert M. Davis, Mr. D. G. Gall, Mrs. Rebecca F. 
Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. Newton Dibblee, Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Gamble, Miss Elizabeth F. 
Blanding, Miss Lena Dinkelspiel, Mrs. L. M. Gerstle, Major Mark L. 
Blumann, Lorna Dinkelspiel, Mr. and Mrs. Ghirardelli, D. & Co. 
Blumlein, Mr. Jacob Lloyd W. Glaser, Mrs. Edward F. 
Blyth, Mr. Charles R. Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Samuel L. Goldstein, Misses Celene 
Boardman, Mrs. Walter W. Donohoe, Mr. J. A. and Lutie D. 
Boggs, Mrs. A. G. Donohoe, Miss Katharine Goodrich, Mr. and Mts. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. Edwards, Mrs. James W. Chauncey S. 
Bradley, Mr. H. Sewall Ehrman, Mrs. Albert L. Graham, Dr. Gilbert F. 
Brandenstein, Mrs. M. J. Ehrman, Mrs. Alfred Greenebaum, Mr. Emil 
Breuner, Misses Carolyn Ehrman, Mrs. M. Griffin, Mrs. W. M. 

and Katherine Ehrman, Mrs. S. W. Griffith, Miss Alice 
Brown, Miss Martha Leonard Eloesser, Dr. Leo Guggenhime, Mr. and Mts. 
Buchanan, Mrs. A. N. Elsey, Mr. Fred T. Berthold 
California Barrel Co., Ltd. The Emporium Guggenhime, Mrs. D. J. 
Cameron, Mr. George T. Epstein, Mr. Gustav Guggenhime, Mrs. Leon 
City of Paris Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. Gunst, Mr, and Mrs. Morgan A. 


Gunst, Mrs. Moses A. 




















REGULAR MEMBERS (Continued): 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF $100.00 OR OVER) 


Haas, Mrs. A. 

Haas, Mr. Louis S. 

Haas, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Hale Bros. 

Hale, Mr. P. C. 

Hall, Mr. Frederic W. 

Hart, Mr. Julien 

Hayne, Mrs. G. P. 

Heller, Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. 
Heller, Mrs. Moses 

Heller, Mr. Walter S. 
Hellman, Mrs. I. W., Jr. 
Hellmann, Mrs. H. G. 
Henderson, Mrs. Charles B. 
Henderson, Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. 
Hewlett, Mrs. A. W. 
Hockenbeamer, Mr.and Mrs. A. F. 
Huntington, Miss Marion 
Hutchinson, Miss Kate F. 
Hyman, Mrs. Joseph 

Jacobi, Mr. J.. J. 

Kahn, Mrs. Felix 

Kahn, Mrs. George H. 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kendrick, Mr. Charles H. 
Kleinjung, Mrs. J. R. 

Kohn, Mrs. George A. 
Koshland, Mr, D. E. 
Koshland, Mrs. Jesse 

Koster, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Ji 
Lang, Mrs. Albert George 
Larsh, Mrs. H. G. 

Layman, Dr. Mary H. 

Leib, Mr. William 

Lengfeld, Mrs. A. L. 

Levison, Mr. J. B. 

Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Philip, Jr. 
Lipman, Mr. F. L. 

Lisser, Dr. and Mrs. Hans 
Lowe, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Mack, Mrs. A. 


Magnin, I. & Co. 

Mark Hopkins Hotel 
Meyer, Mrs. Geo. H. C. 
Meyerfeld, Mrs, Morris 
Michaels, Mr. C. F. 
Miller, Mr. C. O. G. 
Miller, Mr. Robert W. 
Mills, Mrs. Edward M. 
Moffitt, Mr. J. K. 
Monteagle, Mr. Loius F. 
Monteagle, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth 
Morrison, Mrs. A. F. 
Morshead, Mrs. Etta C. 
Musicians Union Local No. 6 
Musto, Mr. Guido J. 
Musto, Miss Laura 
McCreary, Mrs. F. C. 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Mark L. 
McEnerney, Mr. Garret W. 
Neustadter, Mr. Newton 
Newbauer, Mrs. S. R. 
Neylan, Mr. John Francis 
Norris, Mr. Charles G. 
O’Connor Moffatt & Co. 
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 
Pacific Musical Society 
Page, Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. 
Paschel, Mr. Philip 
Pauson, Frank & Sons 
Raiss, Mr. Carl 

Rees, Mr. A. S, 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Emma 
Rothschild, Mr. John 

St. Francis Hotel 

Samson, Mrs. R. 

Schilling, Mrs. Rudolph 
Schloss, Mrs. Florence F. 
Schuckl, Mr. Max 
Schwabacher, Mrs. Albert E. 
Schwabacher, Mrs. Ludwig 


Serrano, Mrs. Reuben L. 
Shainwald, Mr. and Mrs. R. S. 
Sharon, Mrs. Louise T. 
Shomo, Mrs. J. A. S. 
Simon, Mrs. Alfred 
Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph 
Sloss, Mrs. Leon 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis, Jr. 
Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. M. C. 
Somers, Mrs. Geo. B:; 
Standard Oil Co. 
In memory of Mr. and Mrs. 
Jacob Stern 
and Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
W. Haas 
Stern, Mr. and Mrs. Newton 
Stone, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 
Strickler, Dr. John Philip 
Sussman, Mrs. S. 
Sutro, Mrs. Alfred 
Thompson, Miss Barbara Beach 
Thompson, Mr. andMrs. Joseph S. 
Threlkeld, Mrs. M. C. 
Tubbs, Mrs. Alfred S. 
Volkmann, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel 
Volkmann, Miss Johanna M. 
Walter, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. 
Walter, Mrs. John I. 
Welch, Mr. Andrew 
White House 
Wiel, Mr. Eli H. 
Wiel, Mr. Irvin J. 
Willams, Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Winslow, Mrs. Sarah Stetson 
Wood, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. 
Wormser, Mr. S. I. 
Wright, Mr. Harold L. 
Wright, Mrs. J. B. 
Yellow Cab Co. 
Zellerbach, Mr. J. D. 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS: 


(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF LESS THAN $100.00) 


Ackerman, Mrs. I. S. 
Adams, Mrs. G. P. 
Alderson, Mrs. Harry 
Allen, Mrs. Elizabeth B. 
Allen, Mr. H. S, 

Allen, Mrs. H. W. 


Allen, Miss Martha L. 
Allyne, Miss Lucy H. 
Ammen, Mrs. A. L. 
Anderson, Mr. Melvin J. 
Andrew, Miss C. 

Altman, Mr. John C. 


American Jugo Slav 
Women’s Club 
Andrews, Miss Margaret 
Andrews, Miss Mary 
Anthony, Mr. C. C. 
Armsby, Mrs. J. K. 














ASSOCIATE MEMBERS (Continued): 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF LESS THAN $100.00) 


Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. F. D. 
Arnold, Mr. G. Stanleigh 
Arnstein, Mrs. Hugo. 
Arnstein, Mrs. Lawrence 
Ash, Mr. Charles S. 
Astredo, Mrs. J. C. 
Avery, Mrs. Wm. H. 
Bacigalupi, Miss Beatrice 
Bacigalupi, Dr. Rimo 
Bacigalupi, Mrs. Tadint 
Badger, Mr. H. F. 
Baerwald, Mr. and Mrs. Ernst 
Bailly, Mrs. T. Edward 
Baker, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W,, Jr. 
Baker, Mrs. Wakefield 
Bakewell, Miss Harriet B. 
Bakewell, Mis. John, Jr. 
Baldwin, Mr. A. R. 
Baldwin, Frances 
Ballard, Mrs. J. S. 
Barden, Miss Olivia 
Barkan, Mr. Fritz 
Barkan, Dr. and Mrs. Otto 
Barthold, Mr. R. M. 
Baruch, Mr. Frederick 
Baruch, Mrs. Albert 
Bates, Mrs. George E. 
Beaver, Miss Anna W. 
Beetz Bros. & Co. 
Behrend, Mrs. J. F. 
Bell, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Benner, Mr. and Mrs. Frederic C. 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles 
Bepler, Dr. Alice C. 
Berenson, Mr. and Mrs. Sanford 
Bergerot, Mr. P. A. 
Birmingham, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. 
Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. McKinley 
Bissinger, Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Bissinger, Mrs. Samuel 
Bjornstad, Mr. P. L. 
Blackman, Mr. and Mrs. Russell 
Blair, Miss Jennie M. 
Blenur, Mrs. John 
Bloom, Mr. Jonas 
Bloom, Mrs. Sam 
Bloomfield, Dr. Arthur L. 
Blumann, Ethel 
Bockmeier, Mr. John 
Bocqueraz, Mr. Leon 
Bohemian Club 

Symphony Orchestra 
Bolton, Miss Gertrude 


Bontecon, Miss Helen 
Booth, Mrs. F. E. 

Booth, Mrs. Wm. F. 
Bosley, Mr. Wm. B. 
Bossana, Mr. and Mrs. L. A. 
Bost, Dr. Frederick C. 
Bostlemann, Mr. Otto 
Bostwick, Mr. Harry F. 
Bowman, Miss Elsie 
Boyle, Miss Nina 
Bracher, Miss Louise P. 
Brandenstein, Mrs. H. U. 
Katharine Branson School 
Branson, Miss Katharine F. 
Bransten, Mrs. Edward 
Bransten, Mr. Edward, Jr. 
Bransten, Mrs. Manfred 
Brewster, Mr. Hughes 
Brice, Mis; Jcchs 

Bridge, Mrs. Adelaide M. 
Brooks, Mr. George W. 
Brown, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 
Brown, Mrs. Helgar 
Brown, Mrs. L. C. 
Brownell, Mrs. E. E. 
Brunn, Dr. Harold 

Buck, Mr. Thomas 
Buckwalter, Mrs. Edna 
Buckwalter, Mr. Richard 
Bullard, Mr. R. P. 

Bullis, Mrs. E. A. 
Burckhardt, Miss Caroline 
Burke, Miss Barbara 
Bumister, Mr. and Mrs. R. B. 
Burns, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. 
Cahill, Mrs. Edward F. 
Cahn, Mrs. M. I. 

Cahn, Mr. Ralph G. 
Caldwell, Mrs. Colbert 
Cambron, Mrs. Carroll 
Camp, Claire 

Camp, Mr. Harry 
Campbell, Mrs. G. P. 
Canac-Marquis, Mrs. F. 
Candy, Loreto 

Carolan, Miss Emily 
Carrigan, Marie Louise 
Caswell, Mrs. George 
Catch, Edith 

Cazenave, Mrs. Noel 
Center, Mrs. Jennie W. 
Century Club 
Chamberlain, Mary A. 


Champ, Mr. F. 

Charles, Mr. Martin A. 
Charles, Mrs. Raymond W. 
Charpiot, Mrs. Henry 
Civelli, Mr. Joseph 
Glark. Mr: GB. 

Clark, Mrs. Herbert W. 
Clark, Minnie C., 
Clayburgh, Mrs. Katie 
Clayburgh, Mrs. Leo J. 
Clayton, Mr. A. F. 
Cleary, Mr. Frank C. 
Clifford, Miss Beatrice 
Coblentz, Mrs. Lambert 
Cody, Mrs. Bernard A. 
Cohn, Mrs. Max M. 
Coleman, Mrs. R. L., Je. 
Collier, Miss Dorothy B. 
Colman, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Coman, Eva 

Conrad, Mrs. Barnaby 
Cook, Miss Houston 
Cook, Mrs. W. H. 
Cooper, Miss Ethel 
Cooper, Mrs. C. M. 
Cordes, Mrs. Frederick 
Costigan, Mrs. Geo. P. 
Cowen, Mrs. Miriam 
Cresalia, Mr. Matt T. 
Dairy Delivery Co. 
Davis, Mrs. Albert D. 
Davis, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin 
Davis, Miss B. 

Deering, Mrs. James 
Deering, Mrs. Robert L. 
Delany, Miss’ Marion 
DeLatour, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. 
De Lee, Mrs. S. T. 
Delmas, Mr. Lawrence P. 
Denicke, Mrs. E. A. 
Denman, Mr. William 
Dernham, Mrs. Irene B. 
Destruel, Miss Laura 
Devlin, Mrs. Frank J. 
Devlin, Mrs. Vincent 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Clara 
Dobie, Mr. Charles Caldwell 
Docker, Mrs. Charles T. 
Dodge, Mrs. Geo. M. 
Dolan, Arthur, Jr. 

Don Lee, Inc. 

Drescher, Mrs. H. B. 
Drexler, Mrs. E. A. 


——— E—E—EEE—EEE—EEE—EE——E—E—EE—EEEEE——EEOE—EEEEEEeeEOO oe el OOOOeE—~E=E=E_EO EOE ED OOO” 
EE EE AE EES 
tO LOL LOLOL LL LLL 


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— 


— 


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AMG CE Mr SC aac we Gre oe eee 
: > ~ 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS (Continued): 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF LESS THAN $100.00) 


Dryfoos, Mrs. Beatrice G. 
Dunlop, Mr. R. D. 
Dunn, Mrs. B. M. 
Dupas, Mr. J. M. 
Dwight, Mrs. Ward 
Earhart, Miss Gertrude 
Eastwood, Miss Alice 
Edwards, Mrs. James R. 
Einstein, Elsa B. 
Eisner, Mrs. Norman A. 
Eisenbach, Mr. David R. 
Eisenberg, Miss Margot 
Elkus, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. DeY. 
Elkus, Mrs. Eugene S. 
Eloesser, Mr. Herbert 
Emge, Dr. Ludwig A. 
Eppinger, Mrs. J., Jr. 
Epstein, Mr. Arthur P, 
Epstein, Mrs. Milton H. 
Erskine, Mrs. Morse 
Esberg, Mr. A. I. 
Etienne, Mr. Victor, rs 
Faber, Mrs. Harold K. 
Faubel, Miss Grace 
Faure, Mr. Victor C. 
Feigenbaum, Mrs. L. 
Feigenbaum, Mr. L. B. 
Fenton, Mrs. Bertha S. 
Firestone, Mrs. and Mrs. Nathan 
Fischer, Mrs. E. G. 
Fisher, Mr. Haldane S. 
Fitzgerald, Miss Amanda 
Fitzgerald, Mrs. R. M. 
Flammer, Mr. Charles 
Fleischman, Mrs. M. R, 
Fleishhacker, Mr. and Mrs. M., Jr. 
Flieschman, Mrs. Isidor 
Flieshman, Mrs. S. G. 
Fletcher, Dr. C. D. 
Floyd, Mrs. B. C. 
Folger, Mrs. | 
Follansbee, Mrs. A. Ws, Jk 
Frank, Mrs. Jennie S., 
Frank, Mrs. Ludwig 
Frankenau, Mrs. Max 
Franklin, Mrs. P. 
Fredericks, Miss Jessica 
& Associates 
Fried, Mr. Alexander 
Friedlander, Mrs. Eva 
Fries, Mrs. Frank 
Fries, Mr. Wm. 
Frontin, Miss E. a 


Fuller, Mr. W. P., Jr. 
Gale, Mr. Maurice A. 
Galkovitch, Mr. M. G. 
Galtie, Mr. and Mrs. L. 
Gantner & Mattern Co. 
Garland, Miss Edith 
Gassner, Louis, Inc. 
Gayley, Mrs. C. M. 

Geary, Mrs. J. J. 

Gehrels, Dr. and Mrs. E. 
Ghirardelli, Mrs. Louis 
Glenn, Dr. and Mrs. Robert 
Gock, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. 
Goldman, Mrs. Louis I. 
Goodman, Mrs. D. 
Goodman, Mrs. I. 

Goshing, Miss Aline 
Gowan, Miss Edith 
Graham, Mrs. Chalmers 
Grant, Mrs. Spencer 
Graves, Mr. B. I. 

Gray, Mrs. W. J. 
Greathead, Mrs. Norman i 
Green, Mrs. Allan Lee 
Green, Dr. A. S. 

Green, Dr. Louis D. 
Greene, Mr. A. Crawford 
Greenberg, Mrs. Agnes 
Greenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Maurice 
Greenberg, Mrs. Stuart 
Greenwell, Mrs. James O. 
Gregory, Mrs. Warren 
Griffith, Mrs. E. L. 
Grimm, Mr. H. T. 

Grobe, Mr. Henry 
Guggenhime, Mr. Richard E. 
Haas, Mr. Edward F. 
Hackett, Mr. C. Nelson 
Haefner, Emma 

Hagens, Mr. J. F. C. 
Hallawell Seed Co., Inc. 
Halsey, Mrs. T. V. 
Hamilton, Miss Vera A. 
Hamsher, Mr. W. R. 
Hancock Bros. 

Hanghey, Miss Myrtle A. 
Hardy, Mrs. Summer 
Harris, Mr. and Mrs. L. W. 
Hart, Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. 
Hassler, Miss Eleanor 
Hastings, Mrs. Russell P. 
Hayden, Mr. J. R. 

The Anna Head School 


Hecht, Miss Edith 
Hellman, Mrs. F. J. 
Hellwig, Mr. C. A. 
Hengstler, Mrs. L. T. 
Henley, Mr. Homer 
Hennessy, Miss Aileen M. 
Henry, Mr. Charles A. 
Heyman, Mrs. Stanley 
Hill, Mrs. Harry 

Hiller, Miss Edna 

Hinze, Miss Clara 
Hirschkind, Mr. W. 
Hobart, Mr. John 

Hockley, Elizabeth 
Hoffman, Miss Edna Maud 
Fioffman, Mrs. Oscar 
Hofmann, Mr. W. A. 
Holden, Mrs. Alice F. 
Holmes, Mrs. H. E. 
Honigbaum, Mr. A. 
Hooker, Miss Jennie M. 
Hooker, Mr. Osgood 
Hooper, Mr. Arthur W. 
Hosford, Mrs. George N. 
Humphrey, Mrs. C. FE. 
Hurrle, Etna E. 

Hyman, Mrs. Morris 
Hyman, Mrs. Vera R. 

IL Cenacolo Club 

Ingram, Mr. Thomas 
Ireland, Mrs. Wm. B. 
Isenberg, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. 
Isola, Mr. Attilio 

Ivanoff, Sonia 

Jacobson, Gladys T. 
Jackson, Margaret 

Jacobs, Carrie E. 

Jacobs, Miss Rebecca 
Jacoby, Mr. P. I. 

Jeddis, Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. 
Johnson, Mrs. Grace Noble 
Johnson, Mrs. S. O. 
Johnston, Mr. Wm. B. 
Jones, Miss Winifred 
Jordan, Mrs. David Starr 
Kahn, Mrs. Frederick 
Kahn, Mrs. Irving H. 
Kahn, Mr. Samuel 
Kalenborn, Mr. and Mrs. A. Ai 
Kauffman, Mrs. Leon 
Kaye, Mr. and Mrs. James M. 
Keast, Mr. George R. 
Kelly, Mrs. McClure 

















| 
| 
| 
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ASSOCIATE MEMBERS (Continued): 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF LESS THAN $100.00) 


Kerriush, Miss Bernice 
and Lucille Anble 
Keyes, Miss.Edna L. 


Keyston, Mr.and Mrs. George N. 


Kierulff, Mrs. Thomas C. 
Kincaid, Ester 

King, Miss Genevieve 
Kirchner, Rev. G. E. 
Kirk, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robt. C. 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robt. C., Jr. 
Klein, Mrs. Paul A. 
Klumpke, Misses Ann and Julia 
Knox, Mrs. John B. 
Kohn, Mrs. S. 

Kohlberg, Mrs. M. S. 
Korbel, Miss Caroline 
Korbel, Miss Lucia 
Koshland, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham 
Krauss, Miss Ethel 
Krauss, Miss Luise H. 
Kreutzmann, Dr. H. 
Krotoszyner, Mrs. M. 
Kutner, Mr. Alfred 
Laborde, Jean 

Lacey, Mr. Joseph C. 
Lachman, Mrs. Marie 
Lafayette Club 

Langendorf United Bakeries 
Langstroth, D. Lovell 

La Place, Mrs. L. 

Lathan Co., Inc. 
Laumeister, Mrs. Gustave 
Lavenson, Miss Sarah 
Laws, Mrs. C. L. 

Lawshe, Mrs. J. E. 

Lazar, Mr. Siegbert 
Lazelle, Miss Rena 


Leavens, Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. 


Le Conte, Miss Helen 

Le Conte, Mr. Joseph H. 
Lee, Dr. and Mrs. Russell 
Lehmann, Mrs. A. 
Lenenberger, Mrs. Emil 
Lens, Frances 

Leonardini, Josephine 
Levy, Clara M. 

Levy, Miss Elaine A. 
Levy, Mr. Hans 

Levy, Mr. S. D. 

Lewis, Mrs. G. N. 
Liebenthal, Mrs. A. 
Liebes, H. & Co. 


Liebmann, Mrs. Maurice 
Lilienthal, Mr. B. P. 
Lilienthal, Dorothy F. 
Lilienthal, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel 
Lilianthal, Miss Victoria 
Lisberger, Mrs. Carolyn 
Livermore, Mr. Norman B. 
Livingston Bros. 

Livingston, Mr. Laurence 
Lloyd, Mrs. Lewis Marshall 
Lockhead, Mr. and Mrs. James K. 
Lombardi, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. 
Louisson, Mrs. Theresa 
Lowe, Mrs. Wm. H. 

Mrs. W. B. Lowenthal 
Eucia,. Det. sand Mrs, 1s, 2: 
Lynch, Miss Arline 
MacCallum, Miss Jean A. 
MacIntosh, Miss Mabel D. 
Mackey, Mr. Donald 
Madison, Mr. F. D. 
Magnin, Joseph Co., Inc. 
Mailliard, Mr. J. W., Jr. 
Majors, Dr. Ergo A. 
Manheim, Mrs. Henry S. 
Mannon, Mr. J. M., Jr. 
Marshall, Mrs. Stewart M. 
Marwedel, Mrs. C. W. 
Marx, Mrs. Melvihe 
Mathews & Livingston 
Maxwell, Mrs. John K. 
Mayer, Mr. Henry L. 

Mears, Mr. and Mrs. Eliot G. 
Meisinger, Mary 

Mendelson, Mrs. Julius 
Menzies, Constance 

Menzies, Mrs. Robert 
Meyer, Mrs. Alfred F. 
Meyer, Miss Henrietta 
Meyerfeld, Mrs. Jesse 
Michels, Mrs. Leopold 
Michetti, Mr. Othello 

Miles, Dorothy 

Middlemas, Mrs. Stuart 
Miller, Mr. Ensel B. 
Miller, Harriet L. 

Miller, Dr. and Mrs. John J. 
Mills, Gwladys 

Milton, Mr. and Mrs. Maxwell 
Mitchell, Mr. Herbert H. 
Moffat, Miss Henrietta 
Monteagle, Mr. Paige 
Mooney, Mr. Thomas F. 


Morgan, Mrs. H. W. 
Morris, Miss A. M. 
Mouton, Miss Madeleine \ 
Mundstock, Mr. James ” 
Munsell, Mrs. Juliet E. Orr 
Murphy, Mr. Richard J. 
Murray, Mrs. Hamilton 
Musicians Club of S. F. 
Myers, Cora C. 
McAlister, Mr. James W. 
McBaine, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. 
McBean, Mr. and Mrs. Atholl 
McBean, Mrs. Peter 
McClave, Miss Elizabeth 
McCullough, Miss Mary 
McGinnes, Miss Olive 
McGrath, Mr. Philip R. 
McGregor, Mr. Campbell 
McKee, Dr. and Mrs. Albert 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
McLaughlin, Mrs. Alfred 
McLean, Mr. G. 
McNear, Mrs. George P. 
Nathan, Mrs. Henry J. 
Nelson, Mr. Ralph R. 
Nelson, Miss Theresia 
Neppert, Miss Julia M. 
Neppert, Miss Louise C. 
Newbauer, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse 
Newman, Mrs. Leo 
Nichols, Mr. Henry D. 
Nickelsburg, Mr. and Mrs. M. S. 
Nickelsburg, Mrs. S. 
Niklosowitz, Miss Elsie 
Nobel, Mr. Alexander 
Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Noble, Mrs. Chas. A., Jr. 
Noble, Brigadier Gen. 

and Mrs. Robert H. 
Norton, Miss Elizabeth 
Norton, Mr. R. N. 
Nowell, Mr. H. E. 
Noyes, Mrs. Frank 
Oeschger, Mrs. Joseph 
O’Kelly, Rev. Daniel J. 
Olcese, Miss Margaret 
Older, Mrs. Benjamin 
Oliver, Mrs. E. L. 
Olney, Mr. and Mrs. Warren, Jr. 
Ophuls, Louise 
Oppenheimer, Miss Emilie 
Oppenheimer, Mr. and Mrs. Julius . 
Orrick, Mr. and Mrs. Oliver S. j 








ASSOCIATE MEMBERS (Continued): 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF LESS THAN $100.00) 


Otis, Mrs. James Ross, Mr. Thos. F. Sommer & Kaufmann, Inc. 
Otto, Irene M. Roth, Mr. A. Sommer, Mr. Max 
Page, Mrs. Catherine Roth, Mrs. W. P. Sperry, Mrs. Horace B. 
Paget, Miss Frances R. Rothschild, Messrs. August Sprague, Miss Frances A.. 
Parsons, Marion R. and Robert Stadtmuller, Miss Henrietta 
Pasmore, H. B. Rubke, Mr. F. W. Stanwood, Mrs. Edw. B. 
Peabody, Gladys Sahlein, Mrs. Henry Stapff, Mrs. W. F. 
Peirce, Elizabeth Salz, Mr. Ansley K. Stebbins, Miss Lucy Ward 
Peters, Mrs. C. C. Salz, Mr. and Mrs. Milton H. Steinhart, Miss Hilda 
Pflueger, Mr. J. C. Samson, Mr. Walter J. Sterling, Mrs. Ralph 
Pflueger, Mr. P. A. Sampson, Dr. and Mrs. John J. Stern, Mr. and Mrs. John D. 
Phillips, Miss Esther B. San Francisco Musical Club Stern, Mrs. Rose 
Philomath Club Saroni, Mrs. A. B. Stevens, Mr. Harlye C. 
Pierce, Miss Mabel Sbarboro, Mrs. A. E. Stewart, Mrs. Charles A. 
Podesta & Baldocchi Schaubye, Mr. Carl Stewart, Mr. H. R. 
Popert, Mr. William H. Schilling, Dr. and Mrs. Walter Stich, Mrs. Camilla F. 
Porter, Mr. A. L. Schirmer, Capt. Wm. Stiles, Mr. George R. 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Bert C. Stilpher, Mr. Ben L. 
Potter, Mrs. J. Sheldon Schussler, Mr. Henry Stolz, Mr. Max 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley Schussler, Dr. Herman Stow, Miss Nellie 

. Prager, Alice J. Schwabacher, Mrs. Loius A. Strassburger, Mrs. Lawrence 
Prechtal, Mrs. Geo. P. Schwamm, Miss Loiuse Strassburger, Betti Ann and Fay 
Kaas, Mrs. J. ‘G. Selene, Miss Rose L. Strobridge, Mrs. T. W. 
Rabjohn, Mrs. G. Sellander, Mrs. W. H. Stull, Florence 
Raisch, Miss Leila Sellman, Mrs. Waters Sullivan, Mr. Frank E, 
Ransohoff’s Senger, Mr. George H. Sully, Mrs. J. O. 
Ransohoff, James (Mr. ) Sezer, Mrs. R. D. Surges, Mr. John B. 
Rathbone, King & Seeley, Inc. Shapeero, Mr. E. Sutro, Barbara 
Rawlings, Miss Jane D. Sharp, Miss Fannie L. Sutter, Mr. Louis 
Rawlinson, Laura Jones Sharp, Dr. and Mrs. J. G. Sutton, Miss Maud 
Redewill, Mr. H. M. Sharp, Miss Violet Sweetland, Mr. E. J. 
Reed, Dr. Alfred C. Sheldon, Mrs. Edwin R. Tantau, Mr. H. H. 
Reed, Mr. L. E. Sheldon, Mrs. E. S. Terry, Mr. M. C. 
Rehfisch, Mrs. H. M. Sherman, Mrs. Julius Tetlow, Miss Mary A. 
Reichelt, Mr. H. Sherwood, Mary Theller, Vesta B. 
Reid, Bessie L. Shreve & Co. Thode, Mr. H. 
Reinicke, Mr. L. M. Shuey, Mr. Clarence A. Thorner, Mrs. Theodore 
Renny, Miss Jessie Sieroty, Mrs. Henry Tobin, Mrs. Edw. J. 
Renshaw, Miss Gabrielle Simkins, Cordelia L. Towne, Mrs. Edw. B. 
Rettenmayer, Mr. J. P. Simmons, Mr. Wm. M. Trotter, Mr. William 
Reynolds, Mrs. H. B. Simpson, Helen & Grace Trouillet, Mme. J. 
Rhine, Miss Esther Simpson, Mrs. A. W., Jr. Trouillet, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. 
Richard, Mr. Harry G. Sinsheimer, Mrs. Samuel C. Turner, Mrs. A. H. 
Ritter, Mr. Kurt Sinton, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Turner,. Mr. J. O. 
Roberts, Mrs. Martha K. Sinton, Mr. Stanley H. Usigli, Mr. Gastone 
Robertson, Mrs. Ralph D. Sinton, Mrs. Stanley, Jr. Van Pelt, Mrs. H. M. 
Robinson, Mrs. M. R. Skewes-Cox, Mrs. Vernon von Der Bergh, Miss Flora 
Rood, Mrs. Vernon Skinner, Millicent W. Van Wyck, Mrs. S. M. 
Roos Bros. Slack, Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Vittoria Colonna Club 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Jennie Smith, Mr. Stuart F. von Adelung, Mrs. Edward 
Rosenbaum, Mrs. Nettie Smith, Mrs. Stuart F. Wade, Mrs. M. M. 
Rosenstein, Mrs. Ludwig Smithtes, Dr. Harold R. Wagner, Helen R. 
Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Smoyer, Jeanette Waldeck, Mrs. H. L. 

















oe rere awe ee eee nee eee 


2 














ASSOCIATE MEMBERS (Continued): 
(SUBSCRIPTIONS OF LESS THAN $100.00) 


Walker, Mrs. David H. Whitaker, Mrs. W. S. Wolf, Mrs. Max 

Walter, Mr. Edgar White, Irene H. Wolf, Mrs. Paul 
Wangenheim, Ethel A. Whitney, Dr. Elizabeth G. Wolff, Mrs. Moise L. 
Ward, Mrs. J. W. Wildberg, Mrs. Irving Women Musicians’ Club 
Ware, Mrs. Evelyn S. Willard, Mary Wood, Mrs. H. Meyer 
Washington, Mrs. A. S. Willard, Elisa May Wood, Mrs. Paul 
Washington, Mr: Lawrence Willard, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Woodruff, Mrs. Edwin D. 
Watson, Elizabeth Williams, Miss Millicent Woodward, Gertrude B. 
Watt, Mrs. Rolla V. Williams, Mr. Stephen Wright, Mrs. Harold L. 
Waybur, Mr. Bruce Williamson, Mrs. G. G. Wurster, Mr. W. W. 
Weatherwax, Mrs. C. M. Willis, Dr. Bailey Y. M. H. A. Mothers Club 
Weber, Mr. R. W. Wills, Mis: C..5. Younger, Mrs. Wm. J. 
Weed, Mrs. B. Wilson, Mrs. A. W. Zane, Mrs. F. A. 

Weill, Miss Irma Wilson, Mr. Irving M. Zaruba, Mrs. Eleanor K. 
Weill, Mr. Michel D. Wing, Mr. and Mrs. Chas B. Zentner, Mr. ‘and Mrs. Jules 
Weinstock, Mrs. Harris Wishart, Mr. J. E. Zimmerman, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Wessells, Mrs. Walter B. Witter, Mr. Dean Zimmerman, Mr. G. A. 
West, Mr. Frank Wolf, Mrs. J. L. Zook, Mr. Egard T. 


eile say Next 
(J ubscribe \/ low jor <I ext (“Veason 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


—— 


The undersigned, for the purpose of supporting the object of the 
Musical Association of San Francisco, hereby subscribes towards the 
Symphony Supporting Fund for the 1937 Concert Season as follows: 


Subscriptions of $100.00 or over shall aet as applications for 
membership in the Musical Association. 

Subscriptions may be deducted from personal income tax 
returns up to 15% of income. 


=a Oe  Se&"””"€—@—TP"PD"D@""=—"BDMDMD@M"a@M@D"@C@"@MN@DND[W@[FESOoa—'== 














MTT HAUTE EATATAATAPANAN ANAT ATACANAOP ACA DADOTAT 


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— Ibs = 
SARIN ER Ae Se = 
= PIERRE MONTEUX = 
are CONDUCTOR pe ee) 
== Willem van den Burg — 
Assistant Conductor psene 
= 
= 
= MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL m=. 
— ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO ae 





——| =—=|@ | TWENTY- FOURTH SEASON Oe 
1935-1936 o= 


aallllin i allt 



































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| 
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SUC | l {I alterin fe) _ _ 


OUR millinery salons are gay with an enticing array 
of the authentic creations of leading designers. Tiny 
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locks..toques alluring with flowers, veils, and roguish bows 


$10: $1 2°° $180 and more 














The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Joseph S. Thompson, President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Vice-President 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


OFFICERS 


Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
Mrs. E. S. Heller, Vice-President 


John A. McGregor, Treasurer 


Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby, Chairman 


MEMBERS 


Armsby, E. Raymond 
Armsby, 

Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Arnold, G. Stanleigh 
Baker, Mrs. George 

Washington, Jr. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans 
Bartlett, 

Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bender, Albert M. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. 
Blanding, Miss Lena 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Bourn, W. B. 
Cameron, George T. 
Crocker, William H. 
Crocker, Mrs. W. W. 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. 
Donohoe, 

Miss Katherine 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 

Robert W. Miller 

Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 
Cameron 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Edgar Walter 


Dr. Leo Eloesser 
J. Emmet Hayden 


OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Elkus, Albert I. 
Eloesser, Dr. Leo 
Esberg, Milton H. 
Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. 
Filmer, Mrs. W.. Coy 
Fleishhacker,: Mortimer 
Flowers, Mrs. J. C. 
Forbes, John F. 
Gilman, Don E. 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hart, Julien 

Hayden, J. Emmet 
Koshland, 

Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koster, F. J. 
Lachman, Gus 
Levison, J. B. 
Martin, Walter S. 
Merola, Gaetano 
Mendell, 

Mrs. George H. 


Miller, Robert W. 
Monteagle, Kenneth 
Musto, Guido J. 
McGregor, John A. 
McKee, John D. 
McKinnon, 

Mrs. Harold Richert 
Newell, R. C. 
Neylan, John Francis 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Schilling, Miss Else 
Schlesinger, B. F. 
Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 
Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Thompson, Joseph S. 
Threlkeld, John H. 
Tobin, Richard M. 
Walter, Edgar 
Wiel, Eli H. 
Williams, 

Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Winslow, Mrs. S.S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Albert A. Greenbaum 


Eugene Heyes 
Erich Weiler 


M.A. Salinger 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry 
W'. B. Bourn 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Managing Director 


a nh ENS 





William Sproule 
John D. McKee 


J. B, Levison 
Richard M. Tobin 


Peter Conley, 


Business Manager 











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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 
FIRST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1153rd and 1154th Concerts 


Friday, January 10, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, January 11, 8:30 P. M. 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


programme 
Li PASSACAGETA-EN© GIVING Ree tak rec eee ee Bach-Respighi 
(First time in San Francisco) 
2. SS YMPHONY? Nose, IN Ay MEA Oia eae eee Beethoven 
Poco sostenuto — Vivace 


Allegretto 
Presto: Presto meno assai 
Allegro con brio 


INTERMISSION 


3 ce EER EBs, INO GT UFR NESS: oc ad Leanne ene Debussy 
“Clouds” 
“Festivals”’ 
‘*Sirens”’ 
(Chorus of Sirens by members of San Francisco 
Municipal Chorus, Dr. Hans Leschke, director) 
4° RONDO; “TILL, EULENSPIEGEL’S 
VEER RY. PRANKS Re calle cos gure eee eens Richard Strauss 


STAGE SET DESIGNED BY JUNIUS CRAVENS 
PAINTED BY GUS SCHNEIDER 


As a convenience for concert patrons, coupon books have been 
issued, priced at $10.00, each containing twenty 50¢ coupons. 
These coupons may be exchanged as desired for any of the 
regular Opera House series or Berkeley series concerts. 





Col. W. de Basil’s 





MONTE CARLO 


BALLET RUSSE 


COMPANY OF 125 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


WAR MEMORIAL 


OPERA 


MON. EVE., JAN. 13 


SCHEHERAZADE ..........----- Rimsky-Korsakov 

LES: SVP Ei DES erat cece, eee Chopin 

AURORA'S WEDDING .........--- Tschaikovsky 
TUES. EVE., JAN. 14 

GARNAVAL 05.2. ice Sah eae eoceate Schumann 


CHOREARTIUM ..........-...Brahm's 4th Sym. 
THE MIDNIGHT SUN......Rimsky-Korsakov 


WED. MAT., JAN. 15 


THE SWAN “LAKE: 2... Tschaikovsky 
PE PRO UGELKA. cots secceeccateseocettee->- Stravinsky 
BRAUN GE [GO Rieter etcae beac Borodine 


WED. EVE., JAN. [5 


GOOD HUMOURED LADIES..D. Scarlatti 


EES “PRESAGES: 2+.--84-. 3... _Tschaikovsky 


THE BEAUTIFUL DANUBE............J. Strauss 
THUR. EVE., JAN. 16 
FANTASTIC: 1OY-SHOP G2 he§: Rossini 


CHOREARTIUM .........-.....Brahm's 4th Sym. 
THE MIDNIGHT SUN......Rimsky-Korsakov 


FRI. EVE., JAN. 17 


THE SWAN LAKE.)...........----.-.--Tschaikovsky 
DESOPRESAGES: venteesemrcancee Tschaikovsky 
LINTON: RA CIBIG were asc ticcens Nabokoff 


HOUSE 


SAT. MAT., JAN. 18 
A HUNDRED KISSES........... : 
SCHEHERAZADE .........-- Rimsky-Korsakov 
AURORA'S WEDDING ...........-. 


....D' Erlanger 


Tschaikovsky 


SAT. EVE., JAN. 18 


EESHSY EREINDEos esse Chopin 

PETROUCHKA .. Stravinsky 

PRINCE IGOR ... _...Borodine 
SUN. MAT., JAN. 

LINTON-APA CIFIC cee eects Nabokoff 

THREE CORNERED HAT............----- De Falla 

FANTASTIC TOY-SHOP ......... Rossini 


MON. EVE., JAN. 20 
GOOD HUMOURED LADIES...D. Scarlatti 
CHOREARTIUM ............... Brahm's 4th Sym. 
AURORA'S WEDDING 


TUES. EVE., JAN. 21 


_Tschaikovsky 


COTO Neatiaactt cetera Chabrier 
SCHEHERAZADE ...-......-- Rimsky-Korsakov 
SPEGTRE-DEIKAD ROSE irtas cee Weber 
THE BEAUTIFUL DANUBE............J. Strauss 


Tickets Now on Sale: Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco & Oakland 


Nights: $3.30, 


$2.75, 


$2.20, $1.65, $1.10 


Matinees: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10, 83¢ 


Me arn *au-@ee. cm; © Trae 


| iii OSH be) Orage ke 


CEORIN: loans 


J cn 

















Ay VYOUVMCEWNE! it Pees is 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, January 24, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, January 25, 8:30 P. M. 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Soloist: JOSEF LHEVINNE, Pianist 


PRS OCGSRAsM “MCE 


Overture; The, Camivaly Romain espe ee toe eee eae, Berlioz 
Symphonie Poems es MEOlnle sit eee ee ac ee eee Franck 
Goncerto:for- Piano, “Be flat minors test hee See Tschatkowsky 


JOSEF LHEVINNE 


Symphony No. ans © amin ors caste tee tae ere ete eee Brahms 














eS see ©. / ili eoee (Ges 


Tuesday, January 14, 8:30 P. M. 
CEVIG? At DE E.On wl 
Soloist: JOSEF SZIGETI, Violinist 
PROGRAMME 


Overture ’to, “sEUryVanthe scx et ee Re eee ee Weber 
Violin (CoitCerto “imino rete acetate oe, et eae Brahms 
JOSEF SZIGETI 
one: 2eOGnn, os On Waa ase Ree ore ale ce ae Ci teen ee Strauss 
Prelude yto.s Wohnen enn: eee Soe hes ee ieee ce POS gaan oe Wagner 
sal DG. SOLCELEL S. TA DOPCDUICE 2. eur essa Sees eae eee Dukas 


Auspices of the Music Committee of the San Francisco Art Commission 
J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman ® Ottorino Ronchi @ Albert A. Greenbaum 
© 


Tickets on Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sutter Streets 














PASSACAGLIA IN C MINOR .. . . Bach-Respighi 


This composition comes from the latter part of Bach’s residence in 
Weimar. The work was originally composed for a two manual clavicembalo 
with pedals, and afterward arranged for organ. A ‘“‘Passacaglia” was original- 
ly an old Spanish or Italian dance in triple time repeated. The short theme 
of two, four, or eight bars was incessantly repeated. The form is allied to 
that of the “Chaconne” although in the Chaconne the theme reappears in the 
upper and inner parts, whereas in the Passacaglia it is confined to the bass. 
Bach, however, does not restrict his subject to the bass so the work is really 
a combination of the two forms. 

The work was very likely influenced by the compositions of Buxtehude 
who wrote many passacaglias and chaconnes, although Bach wrote only the 
one in C minor. Leopold Stokowski commented: ‘“‘Bach’s Passacaglia is in 
music what a great Gothic Cathedral is in architecture — the same vast 
conception — the same soaring mysticism given eternal form.” 


SYMPHONY No. 7,IN A MAJOR .. . . Beethoven 


Beethoven wrote his A major symphony mostly in 1811-12, although 
sketches for it go back as far as 1808. From the very outset the symphony 
was recognized as a masterpiece and it stands today as one of the half dozen 
supreme achievements in the field of music. As in the case of other 
symphonies by Beethoven, there have been various programmes or inter- 
pretations read into the Seventh. Richard Wagner declared it to be the 
Apotheosis of the Dance. A writer in the “Gazette Musicale” (Paris) assert- 
ed that the symphony was intended to represent a rustic wedding with the 
following programme: First movement — Arrival of the Villagers; Second 
— Wedding March; Third — Dance of the Villagers; Fourth — Feast and 
Revels. However, it is safe to say that Beethoven never intended any 
specific programme for the symphony, but in explanation of its buoyant 
energy and its superb vitality, one may well look for a moment at the 
conditions amid which it was written. 

After the year 1809, the whole aspect of Europe, humbled for ten 
years by Napoleon’s victories, began to change. The people, formerly 
apathetic, were now the centers of resistance to Napoleon; they were driving 
their rulers to learn military efficiency. Beethoven was keenly conscious of 





The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


First Violin Second Violin Viola Violoncello 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
Wednesday Evening, January 15, at 8:45 
The program will include 


Ouartetercoecathi and. ene. Werden) ex eae feet tee Sere ean eee _...schubert 
Ouiserce ta: Cop mua sn NO guerre Hao Wie ee ed rr ee oe RAEN Bante avec Nae ee Brahms 


Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.: 50¢ — $1.00 — $1.50 (no tax) 





— 








all this; in 1810-12 he composed a good deal of definitely military music, 
and wherever he went the talk must have been largely of the rising tide 
of German-Austrian nationalism and the day when Napoleon should be 
overthrown. Against this background, the A major Symphony is easily 
explained. 


THREE NOCTURNES ...... .... . Debussy 


Although Debussy’s “Nocturnes” are three in number, only the first 
two, “Clouds” and “Festivals” have previously been given in San Francisco. 

The composer himself left a brief programme of the composition, 
as follows: 

“The title ‘Nocturnes’ is intended to have here a more general and, 
above all, a more decorative meaning. We, then, are not concerned with 
the form of the nocturne, but with everything that this word includes in the 
way of diversified impression and special lights. 

“Clouds: The unchangeable appearance of the sky, with the slow 
and solemn march of clouds dissolving in a gray agony tinted with white. 

“Festivals: Movement, rhythm dancing in the atmosphere, with 
bursts of brusque light. There is also the episode of a procession (a dazzling 
and wholly idealistic vision) passing through the festival and blended with 
it; but the main idea and substance obstinately remain — always the festival 
and its blended music — luminous dust participating in the universal 
rhythm of all things. 

“Sirens: The sea and its innumerable rhythm; then amid the billows 
silvered by the moon the mysterious song of the Sirens is heard: it laughs 
and passes.”’ 


RONDO, “TILL EULENSPIEGEL’S 
MERRY PRANKS” . . . . . Richard Strauss 
Till Eulenspiegel is the hero of an old folk-story of the fifteenth 


century, attributed to a Dr. Thomas Murner. Till is a wandering mechanic 
of Brunswick who plays all sorts of practical jokes on the simple-minded 








OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 


Pianist and Teacher 


Graduate of the University of Music, Vienna has returned 
from abroad after a year of study at the College of Music 
at the University in Koenigsberg, Germany, with a letter 
of highest praise and personal recommendation by the 
Dean, Professor Dr. Joseph Mueller-Blattau. 


6 
Mrs. Barrett will accept pupils for 
Piano and musical culture. Please address 


2755 WEBSTER ST. — SAN FRANCISCO — WAInut 7972 
| 











peasant folk. Although the composer has refused to give a detailed 
programme many commentators have done so, the substance of the story 
being: The opening bars of the work may be accepted as the “once upon 
a time” of the story books. Till is wandering, looking for adventure and 
comes to a certain city on market day, the market women sitting at their 
stalls gossiping. Suddenly Till mounts his horse and dashes among the 
crowd. Midst the uproar of broken pots and pans and shouting women, he 
beats a safe retreat. His next prank consists of putting on the vestments of 
a priest, but he does not feel comfortable in this role and soon throws off 
his robes. Next he appears as a Don Juan. However he really falls in love, 
only to be laughed at by the object of his devotion. Rage possesses him but 
is soon forgotten when he meets a company of ‘“‘worthy Philistines.” Assuming 
an air of great seriousness he mocks them, leaving the good doctors and 
professors quite puzzled. Gaily Till goes his way and even the ominous 
tones of the trombones forecasting his fate sound no warning in his conscience 
until he lands in prison and is dragged before the criminal court. (Note the 
roll of the drums and the threatening chords indicative of the questioning of 
the court, Till gaily answering each question with a lie.) Not until he is 
condemned to death does fear seize him but then it is too late. The fatal 
moment has come: he is strung up. The flutes portray his last struggle as 
his soul takes flight. The end of Till’s adventures is followed by an epilogue 
which ends as the tale began, with “Once upon a time.” 





The Clerer He 
She (Oise (Sy GOSteSS) =. 


who realizes the importance 
of a charming background 
entrusts her floral decor- 
ations to Podesta and Bal- 


| docchi — an assurance of 
WILLEM WEGMAN | yare beauty and true artis- 
Member of the San Francisco |__s try in arrangement. 
Symphony Orchestra 


TEACHER OF VIOLIN | QZ, Lo 
Studios at: | we altochi 
Castenada (Forest Hill) Ctleslia 
2363 Jackson Street “The Voice of a Thousand Gardens” 


878 - 36th Avenue 994 Grant Avenue . Telephone SUtter 6200 
PHONE BAyview 5223 





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KAJETAN ATTL’S HARP ENSEMBLE x* x * *- 


FIRST HARPIST WITH SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FOR TWENTY-TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS. 


BEGINNERS OR ADVANCE STUDENTS PHONE FOR APPOINTMENT. 
WHEN BUYING OR RENTING A HARP ONLY AN EXPERIENCED HARPIST CAN ADVISE CORRECTLY. 
LARGE STOCK OF HARPS FOR SALE OR RENT: 


1030 BUSH ( Phe dist 0307 STUDIO NO. 6 








FOUR SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 
War Memorial Opera House 
SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 1152-10280 
SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL -18, 10:30 
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 22, 4:00 
SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 10:30 
Season Tickets (4 concerts) $2.00 — $1.40 — $1.00 — $ .60 





Three Concerts at the University of California 


Under Direction of Committee on Music and Drama. 
William Popper, Chairman 


Sunday Aft., 3:15, January 26 — Grete Stueckgold, Guest Artist 

Sunday Aft., 3:15, March 15 — Alexander Brailowsky, Guest Artist 

Sunday Aft., 3:15, April 5 — Myra Hess, Guest Artist 

Season Tickets for the three concerts at The University of California 

are priced at $4.00, $3.00, $2.00, $1.50. Tickets are now on sale at 
Stephens Union Building on the Campus. 














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House Attractions 


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ES POS OGY TaN 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharich, Joseph 
Laraia,W. F. 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wright, Harold 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. S. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wegman, Willem 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Baker, Fred A. 
Hahl, Emil 
Karasik, Manfred 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Verney, Romain 
Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 


Van den Burg, Willem 
Principal 

Bem, Stanislas 

Coletti, Bruno 

Dehe, Willem 

Ferner, Walter V. 

Haight, Rebecca 

Kirs, Rudolph 

Pasmore, Dorothy 

Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 
Bell, Walter 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 
Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Bassoons: 
Weiss, Adolph 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Bubb, C. H. 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 


Klock, J. 
Tuba: 

Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 


Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 

Percussion: 
Vendt, Albert 
Wood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 

Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J.P: 


Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 


———Ssssssaos“<6_—waanaoaj>xse0w»”>»0va‘*nuaammM0»M nanny x_—_— eee 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Fri., Jan. 
Sat., Jan. 
Tue., Jan. 
Tue., Jan. 
Thur. Jan. 
EPri.wan: 
Sat: Jian. 
Sun., Jan. 


Tue., Jan. 
Fri.,'Jan. 
Sat., Feb. 
Tue., Feb. 
Thur., Feb. 
Fri., Feb. 
Sat., Feb. 
Tue., Feb. 
Tue., Feb. 


Fri., Feb. 
Sat., Feb. 
Thur., Mar. 
Fri., Mar. 
Sat., Mar. 
Sun., Mar. 


Mon., Mar. 


Thur., Mar. 
Tue., Mar. 
Fri., Mar. 
Sat., Mar. 
Tue., Mar. 
Thur., Apr. 
Fri., Apr. 
Sat., Apr. 
Sun., Apr. 
Sat., Apr. 


Sun., Apr. 
Tue., Apr. 
Thur., Apr. 
Fri., Apr. 
Sat., Apr. 
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Wed., Apr. 
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M., Civic Auditorium, Grete Stueckgold, Soprano 


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M., Opera House, Josef Lhevinne, Pianist 

M., Opera House, Josef Lhevinne, Pianist 

M., University of California, Grete Stueckgold, 
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M., Opera House, Jose Iturbi, Pianist 

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M., Civic Auditorium 

M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

M., Opera House, Otto Klemperer, conducting » 

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M., Civic Auditorium 

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Alfred Hertz, Conducting 

M., Opera House, Jascha Heifetz, Violinist 

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M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 


M., University of California, Alexander 
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M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

M., Opera House, Myra Hess, Pianist 

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M., University of California, Myra Hess, Pianist 

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Ernest Schelling, Conducting 

M., San Rafael, Albert Spalding, Violinist 

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Ernest Schelling, Conducting 

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Ernest Schelling, Conducting 





















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|| ORCHESTRA 






PIERRE MONTEUX 


CONDUCTOR CEE | 
a an 






Willem van den Burg 
Assistant Conductor 






MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 










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The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Joseph S. Thompson, President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Vice-President 


OFFICERS 


Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Treasurer 


Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby, Chairman 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 

Robert W. Miller 

Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 
Cameron 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Edgar Walter 


Dr. Leo Eloesser 
J. Emmet Hayden 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Armsby, E. Raymond 
Armsby, 

Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Arnold, G. Stanleigh 
Baker, Mrs. George 

Washington, Jr. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans 
Bartlett, 

Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bender, Albert M. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. 
Blanding, Miss Lena 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Cameron, George T. 
Crocker, William H. 
Crocker, Mrs. W. W. 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. 
Donohoe, 

Miss Katherine 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. 
Elkus, Albert I. 
Eloesser, Dr. Leo 


Esberg, Milton H. 
Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. 
Filmer, Mrs. W.. Coy 


McGregor, John A. 
McKinnon, 
Mrs. Harold Richert 


Fleishhacker,: Mortimer Newell, R. C. 


Flowers, Mrs. J. C. 
Forbes, John F. 
Gilman, Don E. 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hart, Julien 
Hayden, J. Emmet 
Koshland, 

Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koster, F. J. 
Lachman, Gus 
Martin, Walter S. 
Merola, Gaetano 
Mendell, 

Mrs. George H. 
Miller, Robert W. 
Monteagile, Kenneth 
Musto, Guido J. 


Neylan, John Francis 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Robbins, Mrs. George B. 
Schilling, Miss Else 
Schlesinger, B. F. 
Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 
Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Taylor, Mrs. David 
Armstrong’ 
Thompson, Joseph S. 
Threlkeld, John H. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Walter, Edgar 
Weill, Michel 
Wiel, Eli H. 
Williams, 
Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Winslow, Mrs. S. S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Walter A. Weber 


EKugene Heyes 


Erich Weiler 


M. A. Salinger 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry 
W.. B. Bourn 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Managing Director 


William Sproule 
John D. McKee 


J.B. Levison 
Richard M. Tobin 


Peter Conley, 


Business Manager 








Josef Shevinne 


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_———————————— 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
115Sth and 1159th Concerts 


Friday, January 24, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, January 25, 8:30 P. M. 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Soloist: JOSEF LHEVINNE, Pianist 


programme 


OVERTURE, “LE. CARNAVAL -ROIMEMIIN 2 eee ee Berlioz 


_— 


SYMPHONIC POEM, “BES | EOELD Ds]. .e ete Franck 


Bo 


PIANO CONCERTO, No. 1,IN B FLAT MINOR Tschatkowsky 


io) 


Andante non troppo e maestoso — Allegro con spirito 
Andantino semplice — Allegro vivace assai 
Allegro con fuoco 
’ JOSEF LHEVINNE 
EN. TE RMS sak ON 


Bell rings in buffet 3 minutes before curtain rises. 


SYMPHONY! Nol” EN: GaVEIN ORC oe oe ee tye eet Brahms 


tS 


Un poco sostenuto — Allegro 

Andante sostenuto 

Un poco allegretto e grazioso 

Adagio — Pit andante — Allegro non troppo ma con brio 


(The Piano is a Baldwin) 


“Vou can live without music but not so well.” 


i 


As a convenience for concert patrons, coupon books have been 
issued, priced at $10.00, each containing twenty 50¢ coupons. 
These coupons may be exchanged as desired for any of the 
regular Opera House series or Berkeley series concerts. 


od 
a 





53 








Perspecti 





83 Years in True 





In 1852, when this bank was established, California gold 
was stimulating a nationwide wave of business activity. Three years 
later, speculation outran even this golden reality. The wave of prosper- 
ity broke. Business receded until the forces of readjustment had done 
their work . . . when a new wave of commercial and industrial activity 
brought on another upward sweep. 


Throughout more than eight decades, this cycle has been endlessly re- 
peated. Railroad building, the opening of new lands, the rise of new 
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expansion has gone too far, deflationary forces have pulled business 
back to more solid ground for future growth. 


Against the extremes of such cycles, sound banking seeks to exert a 
stabilizing influence—in boom times, a conservative restraint . . . but 
in panic years, the balanced judgment warranted by a long view of the 
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men and resources. 1 
MERGER os 
F e % DEPRESSION 
- * DE 
= SES Ss 
‘ANIC - 


; Ea E : Bee : *In this chart, of the Business Index of Col. L. P. Ayres. 
iy e : oi ; Cleveland economist,“100” equals activity in 1899. Trend 

line equals increasing per capita rate of production. En- 

larged copy of advertisement will be sent on request. 


= = Pee pee: & SES ee ee ede eee Be 
1852 1855 1885 1890 1895 1905 1910 1915 1920 1925 1930 1935 


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Wells Fargo Bank & Union ‘Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery * SAN FRANCISCO * Market at Grant Avenue 














Announcement 
& 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, January 31, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, February 1, 8:30 P.M. 


WAR MEE ©; Ret Ag OGRAER Raunt HOSES 


Soloist: JOSE ITURBI, Pianist 


PR OFG RAS Medi 










SV IMPHON Ys TIN7 DIVAS OR aa bat oe a gen cane Mozart 
PFANO/CONCER TO: No; 3; [NGC OVEN © Reis eee eee Beethoven 
JOSE ITURBI 
OVERTURE So NUAN ER ESD eee eee eee Schumann 
PRELUDE, “THE AFTERNOON OF A’ FAUN?_ 2”: Debussy 





“DAPHNE AND’ CHLOE” (SECOND SUITE) 22 






3rd Municipal Concert 


Tuesday, January 28, 8:30 P. M. 
CLV ICU A UBDET ORLU™M 


First San Francisco Performance 


BRUCKNER MASS IN F MINOR 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conducting 


Soloists 
ESTHER GREEN, Soprano RADIANA PASMOREH, Contralto 
RAYMOND MARLOWE, Tenor JOHN HOWELL, Baritone 
UDA WALDROP, Organist 


Auspices of the Music Committee of the San Francisco Art Commission 
J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman ® Ottorino Ronchi @ Albert A. Greenbaum 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr, Secretary 
e 
Tickets on Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sutter Streets 


55 











OVERTURE, “LE CARNAVAL ROMAIN” . Berlioz 


) 


Berlioz composed an opera, ‘“‘Benvenuto Cellini.” In its original form 
it was in two acts. An overture bearing the same name as the opera was 
written as a prelude to the first act. The overture to the second act was 
called “Le Carnaval Romain.” 


The chief thematic material of the overture is taken from the opera. 
It begins with the theme of the Saltarello danced in the middle of the second 
act of the opera. An Andante follows, the English horn singing the melody 
of Benvenuto at the beginning of the trio in the first act. Then comes the 
Allegro Vivace, which is the main part of the overture. The theme is a song 
of Cellini’s followers in the second act. The Saltarello is also liberally 
employed in a brilliant and spectacular delineation of a carnival in Rome. 


SYMPHONIC POEM, “LES EOLIDES” . . . Franck 


The symphonic poem, “Les Eolides,’’ Franck’s first attempt in the 
field of descriptive orchestral composition, was inspired by a poem of the 
Same name by Charles Marie Rene Leconte de Lisle, commencing: 


“O floating breezes of the skies, sweet breaths of the fair spring, that 
caress the hills and plains with freakish kisses. 


“Virgins, daughters of Aeolus, lovers of peace, eternal nature awakens 
to your songs; and the Dryad seated amid the thick foliage sheds the tears 
of the scarlet dawn upon the mosses.” 


Georges Servieres, in his sketch on Cesar Franck, states: “This 
symphonic poem, played for the first time at an orchestral concert of the 
Societe Nationale on May 13, 1877, was again performed, through the efforts 
of M. Lamoureux, February 26, 1882. It was hissed. This setback so strongly 
affected the conductor that he waited until February 18, 1894, before again 
providing a hearing for “Les Eolides.” This time the public, converted to 
admiration for Cesar Franck, was glad to acknowledge the talent with which 


teense a ane name ame tam teeta ee OCC CCCCCCCCCC CCC. 
The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


First Violin Second Violin Viola Violoncello 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4th, 8:30 P. M. 


Mozart Beethoven Dohnanyi 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.: 50¢ — $1.00 — $1.50 (no tax) 














the master had known how to convey in smoothly graduated colors, by the 
delicacy of his harmonies and modulations, the musical impression of soft 
rustling, of the caresses of Spring breezes, as suggested by the lines of the poet.” 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO, No. 1, 
IN B FLAT MINOR .. .. . Tschaikowsky 


This brilliant concerto, completed in 1874, was first dedicated to 
Nicholas Rubinstein, who, when he first heard it, was so violent and abusive 
in his criticism that Tschaikowsky, in his anger and humiliation, changed 
the dedication to Hans von Bulow. Strange to say, the first public per- 
formance took place in Boston in 1875, when it was played by von Bulow, 
who was on a visit to this country. 


The work is in the customary three movements, the theme of the 
introduction being one of the most majestic ever written. The first theme of 
the Allegro which follows, is a Russian folk song which the composer heard 
sung by a blind beggar. A second theme, described by Tschaikowsky’s 
brother as a “gay little waltz tune which sounds like the strains from a 
distant ball room,’ is a popular French song. The second movement is 
developed from a soft, tender melody with the character of a lullaby. After 
a time the French song of the movement is heard again (allegro vivace assai), 
thus combining an Andante and Scherzo in one movement. The Finale is a 
rondo on three themes, the principal one being a wild, impetuous Slavic dance. 


SYMPHONY No.1, INC MINOR .. . .. . Brahms 


Brahms was forty-three years old before he produced his first symphony 
and the work therefore represents his mind in its most vigorous maturity 
and shows to fullest advantage his noble gravity of style and fine musical 
technique. However, in 1855 Brahms wrote in a letter to Joachim: “I have 
been trying my hand at a symphony during the past summer, have even 
orchestrated the first movement, and have composed the second and third.” 
The symphony was never completed, but the work was turned into a sonata 








OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 


Pianist and Teacher 


Graduate of the University of Music, Vienna has returned 
from abroad after a year of study at the College of Music 
at the University in Koenigsberg, Germany, with a letter 
of highest praise and personal recommendation by the 
Dean, Professor Dr. Joseph Mueller-Blattau. 

@ 

Mrs. Barrett will accept pupils for 
Piano and musical culture. Please address 


2755 WEBSTER ST. — SAN FRANCISCO — WAInut 7972 








57 








for two pianos. Later the first two movements were used for the first and 
second movements of the D minor piano concerto and the third movement 
was turned into the “Behold all flesh’? movement of the “German Requiem.” 
In biographies we find reference to the C minor symphony covering a period 
of almost fifteen years before its production, which took place November 
4, 1876. 

The New York “Tribune” published early in 1905 a note communicated 
by Mr. Walter Damrosch, concerning the first performance of the symphony 
in New York: 

“When word reached America in 1877 that Brahms had completed 
and published his first symphony, the musical world here awaited its first 
production with keenest interest. Both Theodore Thomas and Dr. Leopold 
Damrosch were anxious to be the first to produce this monumental work, but 
Dr. Damrosch found to his dismay that Thomas had induced the local music 
dealer to promise the orchestral parts to him exclusively. Dr. Damrosch 
found he could obtain neither score nor parts, when a very musical lady, a 
pupil of Dr. Damrosch, hearing of his predicament, surprised him with a full 
copy of the orchestral score. She had calmly gone to the music dealer without 
mentioning her purpose and had bought a copy in the usual way. The score 
was immediately torn into four parts and divided among as many copyists, 
who, working day and night on the orchestra parts, enabled Dr. Damrosch 
to perform the symphony a week ahead of his rival.” 


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—————— eee 





Pai SON IN EE 


SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTR 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor | 


Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia,W. F’. 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wright, Harold 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F.S. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Weeman, Willem 


Violas: 

Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 

Baker, Fred A. 

Hahl, Emil 

Karasik, Manfred 

Lichtenstein, Victor 

Tolpegin, Victor 

Vdovin, Alexander 

Verney, Romain 

Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 

Van den Burg, Willem 
Principal 

Bem, Stanislas 
Coletti, Bruno 
Dehe, Willem 
Ferner, Walter V. 
Haight, Rebecca 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 
Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 
Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 
English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Bassoons: 
Weiss, Adolph 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Bubb, C. H. 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 


Klock, J. 
Tuba: 

Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 


Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Wood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 
AR ohovinet Ghd ee 


Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 








61 























‘ 
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\ 
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i} 
Hy 
i { 
| 
| 
7 | 
/ 
| 
am| 
" 
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I 


San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra 


NeeaGeS Onli One) 
* 


Anticipated Expense 
ORCHESTRA: 


Musicians, Conductor, Soloists, Music, 
Rovyaltiessise, yy hs sen, ere tab te @ 000-00 
CONCERTS: 
Rental of Opera House, Stage Hands, 
Tickets and Selling Expense, Door- 
men and Ushers, Publicity and 
Advertising, Programs, and Special 
Concertyhxpensesct aan ees 15,150.00 
Admunistrative-Expense /...°%. 0. 4; 20,050.00 





$165,200.00 
Anticipated Income 








© Concerts and: Broadcasts: . 2s. a 260,650.00 
Interest from Endowment Funds . . 4,000.00 
Royalty on Victor Records . .. . 450.00 
a $ 88,300.00 
$ 76,900.00 
Subscriptions secured to date . . . $ 40,000.00 
Balance of subscriptions required . . 36,900.00 
$ 76,900.00 


* This figure includes fee of $30,000.00 from 
Art Commission for Civic Auditorium Concerts. 


Reference to the above statement will indicate the generous response 
already secured to the Symphony’s publication of its requirements, 
but the balance still required is drawn to the attention of all sym- 
phony lovers in the hope and expectation that they will consider 
very thoughtfully the sending of a subscription to the Musical 
Association, and the urging upon their friends of the same procedure, 
without waiting for the visit or communication of a representative, 
as no commissions are paid on subscriptions and those who have 
voluntarily interested themselves in securing funds are very fully 
occupied. 














FINE FOODS-- 


Relax and be served comfortably in the 
most beautiful restaurants in the West 
— at no greater cost than elsewhere. 










' 


VU after 
the Theatre 
always in favor 









D {a 
0 


0 
Nom 


33 POWELL STREET, near Market 
1032 MARKET STREET, near Opera House 


San Francisco — Pasadena — Oakland — Los Angeles — Hollywood 






POR? O32) CES NIM Uaioe 


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- 

























al WTO IO 
sie = 
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JUHU 








CORU HE ee 
— 
PIERRE MONTEUX sam 
ema CONDUCTOR > 
rere | 
——| Willem van den Burg 
5 [ee] 
Assistant Conductor — 
=a = ee 
aan 
— a 
ae) | Sar 
= 
ae -— 
-— aes. 
a 
=a MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL Eee 
= ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
pene 
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Vice-President 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby, Chairman 


Armsby, E. Raymond 
Armsby, 

Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Arnold, G. Stanleigh 
Baker, Mrs. George 

Washington, Jr. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans 
Bartlett, 

Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bender, Albert M. 
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Miss Katherine 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. 
Elkus, Albert I. 
Eloesser, Dr. Leo 


Walter A. Weber 


T. B. Berry 
W.B. Bourn 


Managing Director 


Joseph S. Thompson, President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 





OFFICERS 


—— 





The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maritain 1s “the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Treasurer 


Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 

Robert W. Miller 

Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 
Cameron 


Esberg, Milton H. 
Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. 
Filmer, Mrs. W. Coy 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Edgar Walter 


Dr. Leo Eloesser 
J. Emmet Hayden 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


McGregor, John A. 
McKinnon, 
Mrs. Harold Richert 


Fleishhacker, Mortimer Newell, R. C. 


Flowers, Mrs. J. C. 
Forbes, John F. 
Gilman, Don E. 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hart, Julien 

Hayden, J. Emmet 
Koshland, 

Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koster, F. J. 
Lachman, Gus 
Martin, Walter S. 
Merola, Gaetano 
Mendell, 

Mrs. George H. 
Miller, Robert W. 
Monteagle, Kenneth 
Musto, Guido J. 


Eugene Heyes 
Erich Weiler 


William Sproule 
John D. McKee 


Neylan, John Francis 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
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Schilling, Miss Else 
Schlesinger, B. F. 
Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 
Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Taylor, Mrs. David 
Armstrong 
Thompson, Joseph S. 
Threlkeld, John H. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Walter, Edgar 
Weill, Michel 
Wiel, Eli H. 
Williams, 
Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Winslow, Mrs. S. S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


M.A. Salinger 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


J. B. Levison 
Richard M. Tobin 


Peter Conley, 


Business Manager 


a a ee ie ee ee 





83 





SS 


It is a real sincere pleasure for me to be able to tell you how 
much I love my Baldwin. I have not the impression of putting 


my hands on the keys but to be in direct contact with the soul 
of my instrument, as there is one, 


and with such a degree of no 
bility and marvelousness . . . 


At last, a piano incomparably 
superior to all others in America. 


Baldwin .& Piano 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARUVISUS DO 




















San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1162nd and 1163rd Concerts 


Friday, January 31, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, February 1, 8:30 P. M. 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Soloist: JOSE ITURBI, Pianist 


programme 
1. SYMPHONY IN D MAJOR (Kochel 385).....................Mozart 


Allegro con spirito = 
Andante 
Minuetto 
Finale 
2. CONCERTO FOR PIANO, No.3, IN C MINOR....__.. Beethoven 
Allegro con brio 
Largo 
Rondo: Allegro 
JOSE ITURBI 


LONER Mar Ss) OLN 
Bell rings in buffet 3 minutes before curtain rises. 


3 5.@) VeBAS ST CER ie SUV TAU NEES Re Ee) fate ess ioe ete teem Schumann 
4. PRELUDE, “THE, APTERNOON OFFA’ FAUN” 2. 2. Debussy 
Si DAPHNE AND: GHEOE. =s(SEEOND ES UIE) eee Ravel 


(The Piano is a Baldwin) 


“Vou can live without music but not so well.’ 





As a convenience for concert patrons, coupon books have been 
issued, priced at $10.00, each containing twenty 50¢ coupons. 
These coupons may be exchanged as desired for any of the 
regular Opera House series or Berkeley series concerts. 

















SS aeeeaesencenentdeneienstengensecenneten coetenpnyer ese arer et ee SESS SS eee 
~ 












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Throughout more than eight decades, this cycle has been endlessly re- 
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1852. 1855 1860 1865 1870 1875 1880 1885 1890 











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pO EOP Per ee pre aero btctetr gd Ai Bs 
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SYMPHONY IN D MAJOR (Kochel 385) . . Mozart 


This symphony, composed at the end of July, 1782, was written for 
some festivities at the house of Sigmund Haffner, a merchant in Salzburg, 
who was greatly interested in Mozart, and the work is sometimes called the 
‘Haffner’ Symphony. It was composed in great haste, for Mozart was 
busy rearranging orchestra parts for an opera which had just been produced; 
he was working on his Serenade in C minor; and he was passionately in love 
with Constanze Weber, whom he married on August 4. Nevertheless the 
symphony was finished in a little less than two weeks. At first the work was 
in the form of a serenade, with a march as the first movement and with two 
minuets, but the march and one of the minuets were later cut out. 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO, No.3, IN C MINOR Beethoven 


The C minor piano concerto was composed, as the date on the 
manuscript shows, in 1800; it thus belongs to the period of the First Sym- 
phony, but while in many respects it has the characteristics of Beethoven’s 
earlier work, there are features of it, above all the finale, which point for- 
ward more definitely than anything in the C major symphony, its exact 
contemporary. Its first performance seems to have been on April 5, 1803, 
at the stupendous concert given by Beethoven at the Theatre an der Wien. 
The program was so long that some of the numbers had to be omitted; 
even so the performance included the First and Second Symphonies, the 
C minor Concerto, and the oratorio “Christus am Oelgerge.’” Beethoven 
doubled and tripled the price of seats, and made eighteen hundred gulden 
out of the concert. Beethoven himself was at the piano; Seyfried, whom he 
had invited to turn the pages for him, had a bad time of it, for many of the 
leaves were bare of notes, with here and there strange hieroglyphics as helps 
to the memory. When Beethoven had finished such an “invisible passage” he 
would wink at Seyfried to turn the page. 


OVERTURE, “MANFRED .... . . - Schumann 


The poem, “Manfred” was written by Lord Byron during his travels 
in Switzerland in 1816, and tells of the hapless love of Manfred for his sister, 
Astarte, and how he sought through earth and among the demons of Hell 
itself for absolution and salvation from his sin. Byron has described the 
work thus: “It is in three acts, of a very wild, metaphysical and inexplicable 
kind. Almost all the persons — but two or three — are spirits of the earth 
and air, or the waters; the scene is in the Alps; the hero, a kind of magician, 
who is tormented by a species of remorse, the cause of which is left half 
unexplained. He wanders about invoking these spirits which appear to him, 
and are of no use; he at last goes to the very abode of the Evil Principle, 
in propia persona, to evocate a ghost which appears to him and gives to him 
an ambiguous and disagreable answer; and in the third act he is found by his 
attendant dying in a tower where he has studied his art.” 


87 











a 











Dice teta parr Serr he tat ose ee rope ee a pace a een eer SENSEI S00 Anse Fer eeos i 4s0 ve ors ester weenes cecasate Isto mrseapsvenpeersngess soup: 
“Sf is ara * Sees U . - eee 












88 


— ONE FORTY six GEARY STREET 


oa 


OF FINER 
QUALITY 


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Annual Clearance 
Sale we present a 
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exquisite caracul 
coats at half price. 


The lovely black 
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one of many smart 
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PRELUDE, “THE AFTERNOON OF A FAUN” Debussy 


This composition, designated by Debussy as a “prelude symphonique”’ 
is based on an eclogue of Stephen Mallarme, and in keeping with the very 
nature of the composition, Louis Laloy has given the following fanciful 
analysis: “One is immediately transported into a better world: all that is 
leering and savage in the snub-nosed face of the faun disappears; desire still 
speaks, but there is a veil of tenderness and melancholy. The cord of the 
woodwind, the distant call of the horns, the limpid flood of harp tones, 
accentuate this impression. The call is louder, more urgent, but it almost 
immediately dies away, to let the flute sing again its song. And now the 
theme is developed; the oboe enters in, the clarinet has its Say, a lively 
dialogue follows, and a clarinet phrase leads to a new theme which speaks 
of desire satisfied; or it expresses the rapture of mutual emotion rather than 
the ferocity of victory. The first theme returns, more languorous, and the 
croaking of muted horns darkens the horizon. The theme comes and goes, 
fresh chords unfold themselves; at last a solo cello joins itself to the flute: 
and then everything vanishes, as a mist that rises in the air and scatters 
itself in flakes.” 


ORCHESTRAL FRAGMENTS 
FROM “DAPHNE AND CHLOE” ... . Ravel 


Ravel’s ballet, “Daphnis and Chloe,” was written for performances 
by the Diaghileff Russian Ballet, but owing to delays in the production, 
the composer arranged his music into an orchestral suite and in this form 
it was first given April 2, 1911, more than a year prior to the first production 
of the ballet itself. The orchestral suite is in two sections of three numbers 
each, the second group being played at these concerts. 

The story, printed on the flyleaf of the score, has been translated 
as follows by the late Philip Hale, annotator for the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra programmes: 





The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


First Violin Second Violin Viola Violoncello 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4th, 8:30 P. M. 


Mozart Beethoven Dohnanyi 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.: 50¢ — $1.00 — $1.50 (no tax) 





89 


anes DREAM AD AERE LAZASSS ORME EEE LEE 


ntti rene nner nee 


















































AN UNSOLICITED TRIBUTE FROM 
A WORLD-FAMOUS NOVELIST AND PLAYWRIGHT ! 


THE COMPANY WILL APPRECIATE SUGGESTIONS FROM ITS PATRONS CONCERNING ITS SERVICE 


~=—"| WESTERN 


Telegram or Cable- 


SIGNS 


DL = Day Lette 
NM = Night Message 
NL = Night Lecter 
LC = Deferred Cable 


NLT = Ca ble Night Lecter 














ram unless its de- 
forced character is in- ( a4 ) 
dicated by a suitable 
sign above or preced- 











ing the address. R.B WHITE NEWCOMB CARLTON J.C. WILLEVER Shi fe Redioataes 
The filing time as shown in the date Ss rate telegrams and day anaes the time - receipt at deatinatio on as shown op on aa sbown on all me messages, is sages, is STANDARD TIME. 
Receives at 935 DEC 31 PM 12 34 
NA95 13% DL= NEWYORK NY 30 1215P 


FULL-RAT 


S HUROK,MAJESTIC THEATRE= 
44 ST WEST OF BROADWAY= 


1N THAT SUNDAY NIGHT MOOD OF BOREDOM OF CURIOSITY I WENT TO 
SEE TRUDI SCHOOP AND HER DANCERS LAST NIGHT STOP | HAD 
NEVER BEFORE HEARD OF HER STOP ALL TODAY JIVE BEEN 
TELEPHONING MY FRIENDS AS THOUGH | HAD MADE AN EXCITING 
AND BRILLIANT DISCOVERY STOP TH!S TRUDI SCHOOP BALLET IS 1} 
THINK THE MOST AMUSING AND THE MOST AMAZINGLY FRESH 
ENTERTAINMENT IN NEWYORK STOP CERTAINLY EVERY ACTOR IN 
NEWYORK SHOULD BE COMPELLED TO SEE THIS PERFORMANCE IF ONLY 
TO LEARN SOMETHING ABOUT THE ART OF PANTOMIME STOP WITH NO 
SCENERY NO PROPS AND A LITTLE COLLECTION OF COSTUMES THIS 
TURNS OUT TO BE FOR ME AT LEAST A DAZZLING EVENING IN THE 
THEATRE AND A TRIUMPH OF SHEER TALENT AND SPIRIT STOP HAVE 
A SPECIAL MATINEE FOR ACTORS WONT YOU PLEASE= 
EDNA FERBER. 


Trudi Schoop.../.. Comic Ballet 


EUROPEAN COMPANY OF 22 ACTOR-DANCERS 











H Oo U 5 ED SUNDAY AFT., FEBRUARY 2 


Reserved Seats Now: $2.20 — $1.65 — $1.10 — 83¢ (tax included) 
Box Office Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland 


M‘asnsa 2 6 inven te4.5R ela & eC ON ery 


“OPERA FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 31 
| 
| 






































90 











_ 


ATTI)h ?>C° LIiAaKRR rralieraisRi 


Z A IC TA AT 


BAJETAN ATIL’S HARP ENSEMBLE * *. *% 8 


FIRST HARPIST WITH SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FOR TWENTY-TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS. 
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1030 BUSH 1 ee BIG RSA 0307 STUDIO NO. 6 














2S Ses 8 

a — 
os 
~~ 


SSS ae 


No sound but the murmur of rivulets fed by the dew that trickles 
from the rocks, Daphnis lies stretched before the grotto of the Nymphs. 
Little by little the day dawns. The songs of birds are heard. Afar off a 
shepherd leads his flock. Another shepherd crosses the back of the stage. 
Herdsmen enter, seeking Daphnis and Chloe. They find Daphnis and 
awaken him. In anguish he looks about for Chloe. She at last appears 
encircled by shepherdesses. The two rush into each other’s arms. Daphnis 
observes Chloe’s crown. His dream was a prophetic vision; the intervention 
of Pan in manifest. The old shepherd Lammon explains that Pan saved 
Chloe, in remembrance of the nymph Syrinx, whom the god loved. Daphnis 
and Chloe mime the story of Pan and Syrinx. Chloe impersonates the young 
nymph wandering over the meadow. Daphnis as Pan appears and declares 
his love for her. The nymph repulses him; the god becomes more insistent. 
She disappears among the reeds. In desperation he plucks some stalks, 
fashions a flute and on it plays a melancholy tune. Chloe comes out and 
imitates by her dance the accents of the flute. The dance grows more and 
more animated. In mad whirlings, Chloe falls into the arms of Daphnis. 
Before the altar of the nymphs he swears on two sheep his fidelity. Young 
girls enter: they are dressed as Bacchantes and shake their tambourines. 
Daphnis and Chloe embrace tenderly. A group of young men comes on the 
stage. Joyous tumult. A general dance. Daphnis and Chloe. Dorcon. 


= = ——_=— 











Announcement 
& 





FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Friday, February 14, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, February 15, 8:30 P. M. 

Wr ARs), Mu BuMvO. Rt Ait Opi: TROP AC a SEL) alia sb) 


Guest Conductor 


Ostia © sy Kove Revie Ohman 


Conductor Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra 


Bo BoE EeO WV HN 4 Pe ROG AGIVis NEES 


1 VOVERTURE, “EGMONT” 
2. SYMPHONY No. 3, “EROICA” 
335 SYMPHONY No; 5. EN .CaMINOR 





92 











PERS ORV INE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia,W. F. 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wright, Harold 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. 8. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wegman, Willem 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Baker, Fred A. 
Hahl, Emil 
Karasik, Manfred 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Verney, Romain 
Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 

Van den Burg, Willem 
Principal 

Bem, Stanislas 
Coletti, Bruno 
Dehe, Willem 
Ferner, Walter V. 
Haight, Rebecca 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 
Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Bassoons: 
Weiss, Adolph 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Bubb, C. H. 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 


Klock, J. 
Tuba: 

Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 


Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Wood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 











93 





























4th Municipal Concert 


Tuesday, February 4, 8:30 P. M. 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


Soloist: JOSEPHINE TUMMINIA, Soprano 
PR OLG’ RAM 

















i¥OVERTURE, “BENVENULO oCHLEINE is. lie. Berlioz 
2. SYMPHONY No. Oe ING EAE O Reece ao. Stee ane Beethoven 
3. ARIA, “CARO NOME” from “RIGOLETTO”.......__. Verdi 


JOSEPHINE TUMMINIA 
4. ARIA, “UNA VOCE POCO FA” 


from SbHhy BARBERSORSEVILT Eon te ey aie Rossini 
JOSEPHINE TUMMINIA 
DANC ERO RM 2 TAM Bi Rip mili utkue th tir ke Sh eae Dukas 
SYMPHONIC PORM, “LES PRE LUD Eoin tei one Liszt 
@ 


Auspices of the Music Committee of the San Francisco Art Commission 
J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman @ Ottorino Ronchi @ Albert A. Greenbaum 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr, Secretary 


Tickets on Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Kearny and Sutter’ Streets 


Lp Lerre a I? onteux 


CONDUCTOR OF 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PARIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Hin s "Ga fF eer. 
















SP es ARN 1 Ee Maa 1911-1917 








Metropolitan Operas 1s ae ee te ee eae 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra... 1919-1924 
Concertgebovw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland....1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra... 1929-1936 

Has conducted ... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 







tras here in America. Is only French Conductor to conduct Berlin 
and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mangel- 
berg ten years. Conducted every major orchestra in Europe. Creator 
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94 


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Joseph S. Thompson, President Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
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Walter A. Weber Eugene Heyes M. A. Salinger 
Erich Weiler 


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T. B. Berry William Sproule J. B. Levison 
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Managing Director Business Manager 





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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 
1936 Season 
FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
H 1166th and 1167th Concerts 
Friday, February 14, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, February 15, 8:30 P. M. 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


| 


OTTO KLEMPERER, Guest Conductor 


BEETHOVEN PROGRAMME 


1. OVERTURE, “EGMONT” 
2. SYMPHONYeNo: 3, EROICA] 


{ Allegro con brio 

; Marcia Funebre: Adagio assal 
4 Scherzo: Allegro vivace 
Finale: Allegro molto 





INTERMISSION 





SYMPHONY No. 5, IN C MINOR 


Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro 
Finale: Allegro 


eS) 


: “One can live without music but not so well.” 





As a convenience for concert patrons, coupon books have been 
issued, priced at $10.00, each containing twenty 50¢ coupons. 
These coupons may be exchanged as desired for any of the 
regular Opera House series or Berkeley series concerts. 














SIT 


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OVERTURE, “EGMONT” ... .. . . Beethoven 


The music to “Egmont” was composed during the winter of 1810-11, 
and performed during the following May. It was a time when Beethoven was 
strongly under the influence of Goethe. In the spirit of Goethe’s drama, 
the overture is charged with an air of sombre fate and heroic resolution, 
softened with touches of romance. The “Egmont” Overture is another 
instance, like the Eroica Symphony or the Sonata Opus 26, in which the 
utter tragedy of the subject is overborne by a climax of triumphant joy. 

The solemn Sostenuto of the beginning leads into the Allegro by a 
figure of the strings not unlike the famous phrase in the Leonore No. 3. 
A melody sings first in the ’cellos, rising to a great height. A strain of 
romance constantly interweaves with the heroic. The fateful legend of the 
beginning returns, but the sombre melancholy is slowly overborne. A climax 
of the heroic theme leads to a paean of triumph. 


SYMPHONY No: 3; CEROICGA 3] | oes eeethoven 


At the dawn of the nineteenth century the entire thinking world was 
thrown into a state of agitation by the rumor that Napoleon was about to 
give France and the world a new and ideal constitution, according to the 
precepts of Plato. Like many other artists of the day, Beethoven sought 
to honor the brilliant military genius by writing this symphony, whose 
original title was simply ‘‘Bonaparte.’”’ When, however, Napoleon proclaimed 
himself emperor in 1804, Beethoven, in a fit of anger, excited by the news of 
his idol’s self-exaltation, tore off and destroyed the original title page, and 
after Napoleon’s personal glory, in Beethoven’s estimation, had disappeared, 
he supplied another title: “Symphonie Eroica; composed to celebrate the 
memory of a great man.” This change of plan and title after Napoleon’s 
apostasy has given critics cause for much speculation as to the precise 
meaning of the various movements of the symphony. Fortunately, a close 
knowledge of the dramatic scheme underlying the symphony is not as 
essential as it might be for some modern program music — in fact, the 
music can be best appreciated in and by itself. However, Wagner has 
analyzed the symphony as follows: 





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I. “The first movement embraces, as in a glowing furnace, all the 
emotions of a richly gifted nature in the heyday of unresting youth, Weal 
and woe, lief and lack, sweetness and sadness, living and longing, riot and 
revel, daring, defiance and an ungovernable self-confidence, make place for 
one another so directly and interlace so closely that we can single none of 
them from out the rest, but our whole interest is given to this human 
being who shows himself so brimful of every feeling. Yet all these feelings 
spring from one main faculty — and that is force. This force, immeasurably 
enhanched by each emotional impression, and driven to vent its overfill, 
is the mainspring of the piece; it clinches, toward the middle of the move- 
ment, to the violence of the destroyer, and in its braggart strength we think 
we see a wrecker of the world before us, a Titan wrestling with the gods. 


II. “This shattering force, that filled us half with ecstasy and half 
with horror, was rushing toward a tragic crisis, whose serious import is set 
before our feeling in the second movement. The tone poet clothes it in the 
musical apparel of a funeral march. Emotion tamed by deep grief, moving 
in solemn sorrow, tells us in solemn tones, an earnest manly sadness goes 
from lamentations to thrills of softness, to memories, to tears of love, to 
searchings of the heart, to cries of transport. Out of grief springs new force, 
that fills us with warmth sublime. We battle no more against mourning, 
but bear it now outselves on the mighty billows of a man’s courageous heart. 





Announcement 
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FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, February 28, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, February 29, 8:30 P. M. 
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III. ‘‘Force, robbed of its destructive arrogance — by the chastening 
of its own deep sorrow — the third movement shows in all its bouyant 
gaiety. Its wild unruliness has shaped itself to fresh, to blithe activity; we 
have before us now the lovable, glad man, who paces hale and hearty through 
the fields of nature — winds his merry hunting horn from woodland heights 
— those horns which musically express the radiant, frolicsome, yet tender- 
hearted exultation of the man. In this third movement the tone poet shows 
us the gladly, blithely-doing man. 


IV. “These two sides the master now combines in the last move- 
ment to show us finally the man entire, harmoniously at one with self. This 
closing section is the harvest, the lucid counterpart and commentary of the 
first. Just as there we saw all human feelings in infinitely varied utterance 
— so here this manifold variety invites to one harmonious close, embracing 
all the feelings in itself and taking on a grateful plasticness of shape. The 
womanly at last reveals itself in ever more intense sympathy as the 
overwhelming power of love.” 


SYMPHONY No.5, IN C MINOR .. . . Beethoven 


The C minor Symphony is probably the best-known and most 
admired of the immortal nine, perhaps because it is the most human in its 
qualities. In the Fifth, as in the Third Symphony, we find that concentration 
of thought and labor which makes these two musical poems so all-powerful 
and overwhelming in their effect. It is not marked by a spontaneous flow of 
musical phrases lightly strung together, or by mere toying with musical 
forms; but each motive represents a concentrated essence of thought which, 
once heard, makes an indelible impression, and apparently admits of no 
change. 


The first movement is a wonderful example of thematic invention. 
Beethoven spoke of the opening subject as “Fate knocking at the door.” It 
consists of three powerful repeated notes followed by a drop of a third. The 
working out is intensely dramatic. As for the slow movement, nothing lovelier 
was ever created. It is a set of variations of incomparable grace and delicacy. 
The Scherzo is gigantic with much development of the two themes. The 
second part of the trio has a famous passage for the double basses and 
presents the amusing incident of two inefectual attempts to start the theme 
— the third time being successful. Instead of being detached us usual, the 
Scherzo leads without pause into the fourth movement, which is reached 
through a heavy crescendo. The scoring is now enriched through the 
addition of three trombones, contra-bassoon and piccolo, and thus re- 
enforced the entire orchestra bursts forth into an exultant, triumphant 
song of joy and victory. 


129 




















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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PARIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
His Career — 

Concerts Monteux, Paris 

Ballets Russe de Diaghlew 1911-1917 
Metropolitan Opera 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 1919-1924 
Concertgebovw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland....1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra 1929-1936 





Has conducted ... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 
tras here in America. Is only French Conductor to conduct Berlin 
and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mengel- 
berg ten years. Conducted every major orchestra in Europe. Creator 
of Petrouchka, Sacre du Printemps, du Rossignol, Stravinsky; Daphnis 
and Chloe, Ravel; and many other modern works famous today. 








OLGA 
BLOCK 
BARRETT 


Pianist and Teacher 


Graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Music, Vienna 
has returned from 
abroad after a year of 
study at the College of 
Music at the University 
in Koenigsberg, Ger- 
many, with a letter of 


highest praise and per- 
1 a Dr. Joseph Mueller- 
! Blattau. 
Se WILLEM WEGMAN od 
| Member of the San Francisco 
| Symphony Orchestra Mrs. Barrett will accept pupils 











by the Dean, Professor 








sonal recommendation 
TEACHER OF VIOLIN for Piano and musical culture. 


Studios at: Please address: 
Castenada (Forest Hill) ; 5 : 
9363 Jackson Street 2755 Webster St., San Francisco 
878 - 36th Avenue WAlnut 7972 


PHONE BAyview 5228 
126 











PERS OEN Ge ieel 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 
Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia, W. F. 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wegman, Willem 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. 8. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wright, Harold 


Violas: 

Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 

Baker, Fred A. 

Hahl, Emil 

Karasik, Manfred 

Lichtenstein, Victor 

Tolpegin, Victor 

Vdovin, Alexander 

Verney, Romain 

Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 

Van den Burg, Willem 
Principal 

Bem, Stanislas 
Coletti, Bruno 
Dehe, Willem 
Ferner, Walter V. 
Haight, Rebecca 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 
Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Bassoons: 
Weiss, Adolph 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 


Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Rosebrook, D. C. 


Trombones: 


Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 


Klock, J. 
Tuba: 

Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 


Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
W'ood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 
Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 








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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor — 








1930 Sr, 


M., Opera House, Otto Klemperer, conducting 

M., Opera House, Otto Klemperer, conducting 

M., Civic Auditorium, Isaac Stern, Violinist 

M., Civic Auditorium, Lotte Lehmann, Soprano, 
Alfred Hertz, Conducting 

M., Opera House, Jascha Heifetz, Violinist 

M., Opera House, Jascha Heifetz, Violinist 

M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

M., Opera House, Naoum Blinder, 

' Willem van den Burg 

M., Opera House, Naoum Blinder, 
Willem van den Burg 

M., University of California, Alexander 
Brailowsky, Pianist 

M., Civic Auditorium, Alexander Brailowsky, 


M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 


.M., Civic Auditorium, Viennese Program 

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.M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 


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M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 
Ernest Schelling, Conducting 

M., San Rafael, Albert Spalding, Violinist 


.M., Civic Auditorium, Albert Spalding, Violinist 
.M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 
.M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 


M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 
M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 
Ernest Schelling, Conducting 


.M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 


Ernest Schelling, Conducting 


M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 
Ernest Schelling, Conducting 








F070 Rie-G_O N-Cek Rat, fe OUR 


YOUNG PEOPLE 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


(See Dates Above) 


Fri., Feb. 14, 2:30P. 
Sat., Feb. 15, 8:30 P. 
Tue., Feb. 18, 8:20P. 
Tue., Feb. 25, 8:20P. 
Fri., Feb. 28, 2:30 P. 
Sat., Feb. 29, 8:30 P. 
Thur; Mar.95, S210'E- 
Fri., Mar. 13, 2:30 P. 
Sat., Mar. 14, 8:30P. 
Sun., Mar. 15, 3:15P. 
Mon., Mar. 16, 8:20 P. 
Pianist 
Thur.,Mar.19, 8:15 P. 
Tue., Mar. 24, 8:20P 
Fri., Mar. 27, 2:30 P 
Sat., Mar. 28, 8:30P 
Tue., Mar. 31, 8:20P 
Thur, Apr. oc. oslo 
Hal. Apis oj ss00sks 
Sat., Apr. 4, 8:30P 
SUN ADio: vO sos LOE. 
Sat., Apr. 11, 10:00 A. 
SUN. Apr. 22 3:00 LF. 
Tue., Apr. 14, 8:20 P 
Thur., Apr. 16, 8:15P 
Eri; Apr... L7,.:2:002. 
Sat., Apr. 18, 8:30 P. 
Sat., Apr. 18, 10:30 A. 
Wed., Apr. 22, 4:00 P 
Fri., Apr. 24, 2:30 P. M., Opera House 
Sat., Apr. 25, 8:30 P. M., Opera House 
Sat., Apr. 25, 10:30 A. 
SEASON 


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PIERRE MONTEUX 
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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 
Joseph S. Thompson, President Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, John A. McGregor, Treasurer 
Vice-President Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Robert W. Miller Edgar Walter 


Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Mrs. George T. Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Armsby, Chairman Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Armsby, E. Raymond __ Eloesser, Dr. Leo Musto, Guido J. 
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Miss Katherine Mrs. George H. Williams, 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. Miller, Robert W. Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Elkus, Albert I. Monteagle, Kenneth Winslow, Mrs. S. S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Walter A. Weber Eugene Heyes M. A. Salinger 
Erich Weiler 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry William Sproule J. B. Levison 
W'. B. Bourn John D. McKee Richard M. Tobin 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Peter Conley, 

Managing Director Business Manager 





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310 SUTTER STREET 


168 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 


FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1170th and 1171st Concerts 


Friday, February 28, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, February 29, 8:30 P. M. 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: HEIFETZ 


Violinist 
PR OFG SKA ier 


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MR. HEIFETZ 


5. Overture tox The Hive Dutchman, =. 2 ee Wagner 


“One can live without music but not so well.’ 


As a convenience for concert patrons, coupon books have been 
issued, priced at $10.00, each containing twenty 50¢ coupons. 
These coupons may be exchanged as desired for any of the 
regular Opera House series or Berkeley series concerts. 


169 








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VARIATIONS ON A THEME OF HAYDN Brahms 


Brahms wrote these variations in 1873 and they were given at 
a Philharmonic concert in Vienna, November 2 of the same year, 
although Brahms played his arrangement for two pianos with Clara 
Schumann at Bonn in August. 

The theme is taken from a collection of divertimenti for wind 
instruments by Haydn, and on the original score is entitled ‘‘Chorale 
St. Antoni.” The theme is given out by wind instruments, the cellos 
and basses doubling the contra bassoon part, pizzicato. In the first 
variation the violins enter accompanied by a figure in triplets in the 
violas and cellos. The wind instruments suggest the melody of the 
theme. II. Clarinets and bassoons have a variation of the theme. 
III. The theme is given to the oboes and bassoons in octaves. IV. The 
theme is set forth by an oboe and a horn in octaves. V. In this 
variation the melody is played lightly by the woodwind and later 
taken up by the strings. VI. The strings suggest the theme, pizzicato, 
while a new rhythmical figure appears in the bassoons and brass. 
VII. The flute and violas set forth the melody, the first violins and 
clarinet playing a descending scale against it. VIII. The strings are 
muted and the mood is pianissimo throughout. The piccolo enters 
with an inversion of the phrase. 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN, 
No. 41ND MAJOR “2. > ae 2 Mozart 


Although the fame which Mozart enjoyed in his own day 
was principally the fame of a player upon the clavier, he also 
performed upon the violin with more than ordinary skill. Mozart’s 
father, Leopold, was a violinist, who in his method for the instrument, 
gave to the violin playing world the principal, if not the only work 
of its kind which it possessed for many years. There are stories, 
for which Andreas Schachtner, a friend of the Mozart family, 
vouched, that when scarcely out of babyhood, Wolfgang read at 
sight the violin part of a trio without having had previous instruc- 
tion upon the instrument. 

The D major concerto was composed in October, 1775, at 
Salzburg. 


RHAPSODIE ESPAGNOLE.. . .. . Ravel 
Although the Rhapsodie Espagnole was completed in 1907, it 


was not published until a year later. The work is really a suite in 
four movements, played without pause. The first movement is based 
on a figure given at the beginning by the muted violins and violas. 
The second subject is announced by the clarinets in octaves, and 
brought in later by two bassoons above a sustained chord of the 
cellos and double basses. The movement leads into the succeeding 
one with a chord in harmonics for divided cellos and double basses. 


171 











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The Malaguena opens with a persistent figure in the double 
basses, followed by the second theme in a muted trumpet with 
tambourine and plucked string accompaniment. There is a recitative 
for the English horn followed by a reminiscence of the opening 
figure of the first movement. 

The Habanera is Cuban, supposed to have been introduced 
into Cuba by negroes from Africa, the dance passing on to Spain from 
there. In this movement (originally written by Ravel for piano) 
there are eight measures of introduction in which a syncopated figure 
for the clarinet plays an important part. The theme is continued by 
a solo viola, and its opening portion repeated by the strings. A new 
idea is then brought forward by the woodwind and harp, its rhythm 
punctuated by the strokes of a tambourine, the Syncopated figure 
being constantly in evidence in the strings. This theme is worked 
over almost to the end of the movement, which comes with softly 
played harmonics in the harp with the Syncopated rhythm at first 
in the violins and lastly in the celesta. 

The Fair. This movement is divided into three parts, the 
third and final one being a redevelopment of the material on which 
the first is based. The first part is based on two ideas, the first being 
given out by the flute, and somewhat later the second is introduced 
by three muted trumpets, the rhythm being reinforced by a 
tambourine. The figure is repeated by the oboes and English horn, 
the xylophone now accentuating the rhythm. This thematic material 
is eventually brought forward by the full orchestra. 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN, 
IN A MINOR ..... .. Q@lazounow 


This concerto, completed early in 1905, was given its first 
performance in Queen’s Hall, London, October 17, 1905, with Mischa 
Elman as soloist. A review of this concert in the London Musical 
Times stated the concerto “is dedicated to Leopold Auer, who at the 
composer’s request had undertaken to play it for the first time, but 
M. Glazounow, visiting the professor while he was giving Elman a 
lesson, was so impressed by his extraordinary ability that the com- 
poser asked M. Auer if he would allow Elman to give the first 
performance of the work, a request to which the distinguished 
violinist willingly assented.” 


OVERTURE TO “THE FLYING 
DUTCHMAN]. 4 eres es Wagner 


In 1839, Wagner made a trip from Pillau to London in a small 
merchant vessel, and met with a very stormy passage, and were 
compelled to put into one of the Norwegian fjords. “The passage 
through the Norwegian fjords,”’ wrote Wagner, “made a wondrous 


173 








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174 


| 
| 








impression on my fancy; the legend of the Flying Dutchman, as I 
heard it confirmed by the sailors, acquired a definite, peculiar color, 
which only my adventure at sea could have given it.”’ 

The overture opens with the representation of a storm. 
Through the bare fifths of the strings there is shouted forth by the 
horns and bassoons the motive of the curse laid on the Dutchman. 
The storm dies down with final mutterings of the course. There is a 
pause, following which there appears a change of time in which a 
portion of Senta’s ballad from the second act appears. The original 
tempo returns with material drawn from Senta’s ballad and the 
theme of the Flying Dutchman. 





The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


First Violin Second Violin Viola Violoncello 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 4th, 8:30 P. M. 


Mozart Beethoven Dohnanyi 
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175 





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The 


Triumphal Return of 
one of the Musical 
Giants of the Age. 


JAN 
KU BE Es 


OPERA HOUSE 
March 11 - 8:20 P. M. 





UNANIMOUS ACCLAIM FROM THE CRITICS 


‘“‘Chicago received Jan Kubelik like a long lost son yesterday afternoon. There was an 
audience that took not only all the available seats in Orchestra Hall, but crowded several 
hundred strong up on the stage. It was like the good old days when it meant something to 
be a world-famous violinist, and Mr. Kubelik received the ovation with evident pleasure and 
a full afternoon of beautiful playing.’’ —- Epwarp Moore in the Chicago Tribune. 


‘This apostole of the violin, this wizard of the bow, wrought magic with his celebrated 
Emperor Stradivarius. Throughout the afternoon he played like a king. Kubelik demon- 
started that he is at the zenith of his brilliant career. Dignity, simplicity, refinement are a 
few of his virtues and his flawless interpretations may be taken as models by violin students. 
His marvelous left hand is the most precise and impeccable technical agent that any violinist 
of the present century has demonstrated.’’ HERMAN DeEvrigs in the Chicago American. 


“Kubelik proved that he is still at the top as a violinist . . . His playing is completely 
lifted above the difficulties of mere technique. To be sure, the technique is an integral part 
of the musician’s art, but the truly perfect and ideal art is the interpretation of the original 
spirit of the composer, combined with complete masterey of the medium — through which 
the original spirit is recreated. And that, briefly, is Kubelik.’” — The Cleveland News. 


‘To hear Jan Kubelik at Orchestra Hall yesterday afternoon after a lapse of fifteen years 
or more was for most of those present to hear a new artist. Or at the very most it was to 
hear in new color and new emphasis an artist whose early greatness was recognized in a 
totally different generation of violinists. 

‘He has the methods of a virtuoso and the nature of a poet . . . It was the performance 
of a violinist for the sake of the violin. And the faultless phrases that soared with such 
essential musical ease and purity and sweetness had always a lofty and thouching strain of 
the dedicatory.’’ —- EUGENE STINSON in the Chicago Daily News. 

















Kubelik will be accompanied by his son Rafael, the distinguished 
composer-conductor. 


Prices: $1.10, $1.65, $2.20, $2.75, Tax Incl. - Tickets Sherman, Clay & Co. 
Wilfrid L. Davis, Management, Inc. 


176 





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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


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His Career — 
Concerts Monteux, Paris 
Ballets Russe de Diaghlew 1911-1917 
Metropolitan Opera 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 1919-1924 
Concertgebovw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland....1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra 1929-1936 


Has conducted ... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 
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and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mengel- 
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of Petrouchka, Sacre du Printemps, du Rossignol, Stravinsky; Daphnis 
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SAN FRANCISCO 


Pah eS. 6 vane 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia,W. F. 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wegman, Willem 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. S. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wright, Harold 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Baker, Fred A. 
Hahl, Emil 
Karasik, Manfred 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Verney, Romain 
Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Weiss, Adolph 


Principal 
Bem, Stanislas 
Coletti, Bruno 
Dehe, Willem 
Ferner, Walter V. 
Haight, Rebecca 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 


Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 


Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 


English Horn: 


Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 


Fragale, Frank 


La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 


Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 


Trumpets: 
Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Rosebrook, D. C. 

Trombones: 
Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 

Tuba: 
Storch, A. E. 

Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Wood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 


Tibbits? Je. 


Librarian: 


Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 



























































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Pianist and Teacher 
Graduate of the University of Music, Vienna has returned 
from abroad after a year of study at the College of Music 
at the University in Koenigsberg, Germany, with a letter 
of highest praise and personal recommendation by the 
Dean, Professor Dr. Joseph Mueller-Blattau. 


@ 
Mrs. Barrett will accept pupils for 
Piano and musical culture. Please address 


2755 WEBSTER ST. — SAN FRANCISCO — WAlInut 7972 





180 














San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
LAO SO! €N eat Solent 


Fri., Feb. 28, 2:30 P. M., Opera House, Jascha Heifetz, Violinist 
Sat., Feb. 29, 8:30 P. M., Opera House, Jascha Heifetz, Violinist 
Thur.,Mar 5, 8:15 P.M.,Standard Oil broadcast, Virginia Morgan, 
Soloist 
Fri.,Mar. 13, 2:30 P. M., Opera House, Naoum Blinder, 
Willem van den Burg 
Sat., Mar. 14, 8:30 P. M., Opera House, Naoum Blinder, 
Willem van den Burg 
Sun., Mar. 15, 3:15 P. M., University of California, Alexander 
Brailowsky, Pianist 
Mon., Mar. 16, 8:20 P. M., Civic Auditorium, Brailowsky, Pianist 
Thur., Mar. 19, 8:15 P.M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 


Tue., Mar. 24, 8:20 P. M., Civic Auditorium, Feuermann, Cellist 

Fri., Mar. 27, 2:30 P. M., Opera House, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 

Sat., Mar. 28, 8:30 P. M., Opera House, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 

Tue., Mar. 31, 8:20 P. M., Civic Auditorium, “The Damnation of Faust” 

Thur., Apr. 2 8:15 P. M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

Fri., Apr. 3, 2:30 P.M., Opera House, Myra Hess, Pianist 

Sat.,Apr. 4, 8:30 P. M., Opera House, Myra Hess, Pianist 

Sun., Apr. 5, 3:15 P.M., University of California, Myra Hess, Pianist 

Sat., Apr. 11, 10:00 A. M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 
Ernest Schelling, Conducting 

Sun., Apr. 12, 3:00 P. M., San Rafael, Albert Spalding, Violinist 

Tue., Apr. 14, 8:20 P. M., Civic Auditorium, Albert Spalding, Violinist 

Tue., Apr. 14, 8:20 P. M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

Thur., Apr. 16, 8:15 P. M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 

Fri., Apr. 17, 2:30 P. M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 

Sat., Apr. 18, 10:30 A. M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

Sat., Apr. 18, 8:30 P. M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

Wed., Apr. 22, 4:00 P. M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

Fri., Apr. 24, 2:30 P. M., Opera House,Last Pair 

Sat., Apr. 25, 10:30 A. M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

Sat., Apr. 25, 8:30 P. M., Opera House,Last Pair 


HOU RC O-N Cob RotS + Fa; 


YOUN G2PEO PEE 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 
(See Dates Above) 
SEASON TICKETS: $2.00 — $1.40 — $1.00 — 60¢ 





UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CONCERT 
Sunday, March 15, 3:15 P. M. 
Soloist: ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY, Pianist 
Playing the Chopin E minor concerto, and Liszt’s “Totentanz.” 


TICKETS at Stephens Union — University of California Campus 


181 




















Announcement 
2 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, March 13, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, March 14, 8:30 P. M. 


Wi AR-- MoE OLR TAG Os Bikey 1s OO fea Ul pare ye 5: 





Soloists: 


NAOUM BLINDER, Violinist 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Cellist 


PROGRAMME 


1. Sinfonie Johann Christian Bach 


2 “Concerto or Violin and Cello, cA melon Brahms 


NAOUM BLINDER 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG 


3. .Overture> “News-of the Day ’...2.---sts27-2--- 52s Hindemith 


Ae Dr eles ae et Ae ee eg ree 


Dances trom “Lhe Three*Cormeredsblat--= 22. De Falla 














HANS CLEMENS 
TENOR 


OF THE 


MET ROP OLLTIAN- OPER AW C0: 
AND 


GAN FRANCISCO OPERA CO. 


/| Master Cl 

J *tnnounces a VV Laster Class 
Ge (Es ie 4 
Gain ning Gri y im \ ) } | ay 


For further information communicate with 
ELEANOR RUTH YOUNG 
421 C. 18th Avenue 
Telephones: BAyview 5210 — SKyline 4965 





182 








= 9S ace ee 
CY hl drind Conan ee 
SD be Coy Olen oo ymphony \‘—/eason 


The officers of the Musical Association need hardly draw attention 
to the success of the 1936 Symphony Season and the growing interest in 
the programs, attested by the increasing attendance, but this striking evi- 
dence of San Francisco’s determination to support a symphony orchestra 
of national note involves the necessity of securing a few more thousand 
dollars for the Sustaining Fund. 


It is easy to contend that the amount that a person gives is only 
an evidence of generosity to the degree that it is in proportion to the donor’s 
fortune, but in view of the innumerable demands and the complete absence 
of compulsion to contribute to the Symphony, it seems only proper to look 
upon the list of seventeen contributors who have each given One Thousand 
Dollars as a special Roll of Honor, and upon those who have contributed 
$100 or more as entitled to the distinction of being listed as members of 
the Musical Association, even though they did not formally apply at the 
time of contribution. 


A list of the membership will be published in one of the later sym- 
phony programs, those contributing $10.00 or more being listed as Associate 
Members. 


Envelopes, which require no postage, and which are so printed that 
it is only necessary to enter your subscription, name and address in the 
proper blanks, are distributed with the programs at this pair of concerts, 
and you are most cordially invited to list yourself among either the Members 
or Associated Members of the Association, either by leaving the envelope, 
suitably filled out, with the young ladies in the foyer or by mailing it in 
from your home should you desire to enclose a check therewith. 


With the generosity that has been shown, continued a little further, 
we will end this season of reconstruction with unqualified success and will 
be prepared for a triumphant 1936-37 season, and the management therefore 
urges you to do any part that you possibly can to bring us to our goal — A 
Solvent Symphony Season. 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


183 





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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


OFFICERS 


Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Treasurer 
Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Joseph S. Thompson, President 

Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 
Vice-President 

Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 

Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Robert W. Miller Edgar Walter 
Guido J. Musto 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 
Cameron 


Dr. Leo Eloesser 
J. Emmet Hayden 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby, Chairman 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Eloesser, Dr. Leo Musto, Guido J. 


Armsby, E. Raymond 
Esberg, Milton H, McGregor, John A. 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 


Armsby, 

Arnold, G. Stanleigh 
Baker, Mrs. George 
Washington, Jr. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans 

Bartlett, 

Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bender, Albert M. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. 
Blanding, Miss Lena 


Boyd, Miss Louise A. 


Cameron, George T. 
Crocker, William H. 
Crocker, Mrs. W. W. 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. 
Donohoe, 

Miss Katherine 
Dyer, Joseph H.., Jr. 
Elkus, Albert I. 


Walter A. Weber 


Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. McKinnon, 

Filmer, Mrs. W.. Coy Mrs. Harold Richert 
Fleishhacker,:Mortimer Newell, R. C. 

Flowers, Mrs. J. C. Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Forbes, John F. Robbins, Mrs. George B. 
Gilman, Don E. Schilling, Miss Else 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. Schlesinger, B. F. 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 

Hart, Julien Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Hayden, J. Emmet Taylor, Mrs. David 


Koshland, Armstrong 
Mrs. Marcus S. Thompson, Joseph §S. 
Koster, F. J. Threlkeld, John H. 


Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Walter, Edgar 
Weill, Michel 
Wiel, Eli H. 
Williams, 

Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Winslow, Mrs. 8S. S. 


Lachman, Gus 
Martin, Walter S. 
Merola, Gaetano 
Mendell, 

Mrs. George H. 
Miller, Robert W. 
Monteagle, Kenneth 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Eugene Heyes M.A. Salinger 


Erich Weiler 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry 
W'. B. Bourn 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 
Managing Director 


J. B. Levison 


William Sproule 
Richard M. Tobin 


John D. McKee 


Peter Conley, 
Business Manager 








187 








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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1173rd and 1174th Concerts 


Friday, March 13, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, March 14, 8:30 P. M. 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


eoriat { NAOUM BLINDER, Violinist 
oloists: WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Cellist 





PFReO- Ghose ey eee 
LIS SinfOniew share Core eee ee es oes Johann Christian Bach 
2, * Concerto: for: Violin-and> Cellto.-A minor ae Brahms 
Allegro 
Andante 
Vivace non troppo 
NAOUM BLINDER 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG 
LNT ERP 8-8 1c0eN 
33 symphonic Poem) sale; Chasseuba Maudie seetee teres tee Franck 
4:—-Overture'to * News-ol the: Days ss faces ee Hindemith 
Se Introduction $100 eM Ervadly. sees ea pee ere d’Indy 
6. Ballet Suite from ‘““The Three Cornered Hat’’.................. de Falla 
. The Neighbours 
The Miller’s Dance 
Final Dance 
“One can live without music but not so well.” 
ALEXANDER TCHEREPNINE 
Pianist — Composer 
FAIRMONT HOTEL — MARCH 25, 8:30 P. M. 
. Admission: $1.50 — Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
Auspices: Pro Musica Society 





189 











BANK SERVICES 
For the Traveler 


4 


A Letter of Credit ... 


issued against deposited 
cash or collateral security 
. may be drawn upon 
as required. On any long 
journey, carry a Letter of 
Credit... whether you ex- 
pect to use it or not. For 
in case of need, it will 
provide you with funds 
and a banking introduc- 
tion almost anywhere in 
the world. 
Foreign Department 


Travelers’ Checks. . . the 
convenient means of carry- 
ing pocket money on your 
journey. Safer than cur- 
rency, and you can cash 
them almost anywhere and 
at any time of day. De- 
nominations: $10,$20,$50, 
$100, Cost: 75¢ per $100. 

Exchange Department 


Safe Deposit Boxes for 
jewelry, documents, and 
other small valuables that 
you leave behind. Remem- 
ber your home is more apt 
to be visited by burglars or 
fire when you are away on 





a journey—although there 


are many possessions such 
as insurance policies, deeds, 
contracts, etc. that should 
have this protection even 
when you are at home. The 
cost is as low as, for a box 
23x 5x 114 inches . 
$4.00 a year. 


Vault storage for furs, 
silver, paintings, and other 
bulky valuables. Pack them 
in a suitcase or trunk and 
bring them to the bank be- 
fore you leave, You will 
travel with a freer mind. 
The cost for an ordinary- 
size suitcase is only 50¢ a 
month, or .. $5.00 a year. 

Safe Deposit Department 


During Your Absence, to 
supervise the collection 
of investment income from 
stocks, bonds, notes, mort- 
gages, and real estate. The 
redemption of called bonds 
and the prompt reemploy- 
ment of the proceeds. The 
sale or exercise of security 
“rights.” The payment of 
insurance premiums, The 
carrying out of needed 
maintenance work on real 
property. All such matters 
—so difficult to attend to 
from a distance, so costly 
when neglected—can be 
expertly cared for by your 
bank under a Living Trust 
or Agency Account. The 
cost? A small percentage 
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an office boy’s salary. 
Trust Department 


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for further 


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SINFONIE ..... .. .. . Johann Christian Bach 


Johann Christian Bach, known as the “Milanese” Bach because of his 
period of residence in that city, was born at Leipsic in 1735, the eleventh son 
of the great Johann Sebastian. Next to his brother, Carl Phillip Emanuel, he is 
probably the best known of Sebastian’s sons, and the only oneof this illustrious 
family to break the family traditions by traveling outside of Germany, adopt- 
ing “modern” characteristics in his compositions, and becoming a Catholic. At 
the age of fourteen, upon the death of his father, he went to Berlin, where he 
studied pianoforte and composition under his brother, Phillip Emanuel, but in 
1745 we find him in Italy, where he composed several of his best works. In 
1762 he left Milan and went to London to produce his first opera, which met 
with enormous success. Here he resided, with the exception of a brief stay 
in Paris, until his death in 1782, a great favorite among the pianists and 
musicians of the time as is shown by the fact that he was appointed by the 


queen to be conductor of her orchestra in London. 


The composition played at these concerts, originally used as an over- 
ture to one of Bach’s operas, was arranged by Dr. Fritz Stein. There are three 


distinct ““movements,” which, however, are played through without pause. 


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192 





CONCERTO IN A MINOR FOR VIOLIN, 
"CELLO AND ORCHESTRA .. .. . Brahms 


Brahms composed this concerto in Switzerland during the summer of 
1887. Its first performance was at Cologne, October 17, 1887, although it 
was given a private performance just after its completion. Its first American 
production was by the Theodore Thomas Orchestra in New York, January 5, 
1889, the soloists being Max Bendix and Victor Herbert. 


SYMPHONIC POEM, “LE CHASSEUR 
VEU Dees ie cee. geste wereaet LLP anGlk 


“Le Chasseur Maudit” (‘“The Wild Huntsman’’) is based on a ballad 
by Gottfried August Burger which, in its turn was founded upon an ancient 
legend. The programme of the symphonic poem is set forth on the flyleaf of 
the score as follows: 

“It is Sunday morning. In the distance is heard the joyous pealing of 
bells and the sacred chantings of the worshippers. What desecration! The 
wild Count of the Rhine winds his hunting horn... . 

‘The chase goes on over grain fields, moors and prairies. ‘Hold on, Count, 
I pray thee; listen to the pious chants.’ ‘No.’ And the rider rushes on like a 
whirlwind. Suddenly the Count is alone. His horse cannot move, nor his 
horn any longer give forth a sound. A grim, pitiless voice curses him: 
‘Desecrator’ it says, ‘be thou forever pursued by the Evil One.’ The flames 
blaze up on all sides. The Count, mad with terror and pursued by a pack of 
demons, flees ever faster and faster — across abysses by day and through 
the sky by night.” 


OVERTURE, “NEUES VOM TAGE” 
(“NEWS OF THE DAY”) .. . . . Hindemith 


Hindemith’s opera ‘““Neues vom Tage” was first produced in Berlin in 
1929 under the direction of Otto Klemperer, and an indication of its musical 
character can be obtained from an outline of the story which is quoted from 
a review in “Modern Music” by Hans Gutman: 


OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 


Pianist and Teacher 


Graduate of the University of Music, Vienna has returned 
from abroad after a year of study at the College of Music 
at the University in Koenigsberg, Germany, with a letter 
of highest praise and personal recommendation by the 
Dean, Professor Dr: Joseph Mueller-Blattau. 


Mrs. Barrett will accept pupils for 
Piano and musical culture. Please address 


2755 WEBSTER ST. — SAN FRANCISCO — WAInut 7972 





193. 























194 


PR a ete Sead GY O:2N. besa 


CONCERTS 


BRONISLAW HUBERMAN 


“No violinist at present before the public equals him” 
—LONDON DAILY TELEGRAPH 


Only S. F. Recital — VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
Fri. Eve., March 20. Seats now $2.20, $1.65, $1.10, 83¢ 


ARTUR SCHNABEL 


“Indisputably the musical man of the hour” 
—LAWRENCE GILMAN, N. Y. HERALD-TRIBUNE 


OPERA HOUSE (One Concert) Wed. Eve., Mar. 26 


NINO MARTINI 


New tenor star of the Metropolitan Opera and the radio idol of 
millions 


OPERA HOUSE (One Concert) Wed. Eve., April 29 


RESERVED SEATS AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. STORES 


Sutter and Kearny Sts., San Francisco and H. C. Capwell Co., Oakland 








“The plot concerns Laura and Edward, an ordinary married couple, 
who fail to agree. The curtain has barely risen for the first scene, when they 
are found in a bitter quarrel. Cups are smashed, we hear abuse, even revolver 
shots. Suddenly the relieving thought occurs to them: ‘We will get a divorce.’ 
No sooner said than done. The next scene finds them at the registrar’s. But the 
matter is not so simply solved. Their friends, another married couple, quickly 
succeed, by means of a feigned case of adultery, in getting a divorce, yet 
Laura and Edward have no end of difficulty. In order to provide a cause for 
divorce they hire the handsome Mr. Hermann; but Edward interrupts the 
first rendezvous at a museum, and, in a sudden fit of jealousy, flings a valu- 
able statue of Venus at the professional adulterer’s head and is taken to prison. 
Handsome Mr. Hermann — now actually, not professionally, in love with 
Laura — makes a surprise call on her in the bathroom of her hotel. The 
hotel staff also appears on the scene. Indignation, excitement, scandal! Since 
both Laura and Edward have aroused public interest, a manager presents him- 
self to engage them for his theatre. As the headliners in a variety show they 
abuse each other, smash cups and statues every evening, and end in discover- 
ing that, after all, they are well fitted for each other. They decide to remain 
together, but the chorus of newspaper readers object. “You are no longer 
private persons; you appear in the papers; you are the News of the Day! You 
must be divorced! The reader is entitled to his right! ” 





The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


First Violin Second Violin Viola Violoncello 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22nd, 8:30 P. M. 


Haydn Verdi Debussy 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.: 50¢ — $1.00 — $1.50 (no tax) 








San Francisco Conservatory of Music 


3435 Sacramento Street 


ERNEST BLOCH, Honorary Director 
ADA CLEMENT and LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 


Announce the engagement of 


EUGENIA BEM 


as Head of the Violin Department 





195 








“grimly conscious of exploring a 


“foremost exponent of the modern 


“TIME” (March 9) salutes 








196 


“courageons and confident” 


“indifferent to criticism” 


new field” 


U. S. dance” 





MARTHA GRAHAM 


‘Martha Graham grew up in Pittsburgh, Pa., daughter of a nerve specialist. One 
humiliating Sunday he saw his daughter, aged 2, spontaneously lift her skirts, flounce down 
a Presbyterian church aisle while her mother’s head was bowed solemnly in prayer. As her 
legs grew longer, Martha Graham was mote and more determined to dance, had to be re: 


minded time and again that her mother was a Standish, ninth direct descendant of Pilgrim 
Miles. 


‘‘Martha Graham became a leading Denishawn dancer. Still she felt frustrated, taught 
at Rochester’s Eastman School of Music, left Rochester determined to free-lance her way no 
matter what the odds. The way at first was vague. She had had no contact with Laban or 
Wigman. Yet she felt the same urge to escape from pretty dancing - + + In 1926 with 
11 dollars to her name she gambled on her first Manhattan recital . . - Recognition came 
when she was chosen to dance with the Cleveland Orchestra in 1928, again two years later 
when she impersonated the primitive virgin in Le Sacre du Printemps in the performances 
conducted by Leopold Stokowski . . 


“Though Martha Graham is intent on typifying the U. S. spirit, she is more consist- 
ently abstract . . . Adoring intellectuals hail her as a Pitestessnse seer ma 








Only One San Francisco Performance 


OPERA HOUSE — MARCH 30 


Tickets: $1.10; $1.65; $2.20; $2.75 
(Tax Included) — at Sherman, Clay & Co. 








OAKLAND . . March 27 & SAN DOSE a0 on cAprilal 
CARMEL .. . March 28 STANFORD... 3 April2 











INTRODUCTION TO “FERVAAL” ... . . d’Indy 


“Fervaal,” an opera in three acts, was first produced in Brussels in 
1897. Not only the music, but the text as well, is by d’Indy, the story being, 
briefly, as follows: “Fervaal is a young Celtic chief, the last of his race, the 
elect defender of his country against the Saracen invaders. By yielding to his 
love for Guilhen, the Saracen princess, he forfeits the favor of his gods. Arf- 
gard, the High Priest, precipitates the catastrophe by recalling Fervaal to his 
duties: Guilhen, forsaken, launches her devasting hordes against Cravann, 
Fervaal’s country. The Celts are defeated. Amid the horrors of the night 
following the battle Guilhen and Fervaal meet again. Their love is stronger 
than death; and when Guilhen dies of exhaustion, Fervaal lifts her in his 
arms, and with his precious burden climbs the slopes toward the peaks to 
which a choir of mystical voices, heralding the advent of the new and 
better religion foretold in ancient prophecy, calls him.” 


BALLET SUITE FROM “THE THREE 
CORNEREDHAT” sve) Oe aes oe enalla 


The ballet ““The Three-Cornered Hat” (“El Sombrero de Tres Picos’’) 
was first conceived as a mimetic farce and produced, with small orchestra, in 
1917 under the title “El Corregidor y la Molinera.” When Diaghilew visited 
Spain in that year he commissioned de Falla to compose a ballet for the 
Russian company, and the Spanish master turned his mimetic farce into a 
work for mimes and dancers with full orchestra. The first production was 
made at the Alhambra Theatre, London, July 23, 1919. 


The story has to do with a miller and his good-looking wife. She has 
been annoyed by the attentions of the Corregidor, a judge, who in keeping 
with old Spanish custom, wore a three-cornered hat. The action unfolds the 
pursuit of the woman by the judge and his final discomfiture. 





310 Sutter Street GArfield 4544 





COLLECTOR — DEALER — APPRAISER 


FINE SHOP RARE VIOLINS 
FINEST REPAIRS VIOLAS - CELLOS - BOWS 
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197 





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——— eS 


ee Chie 


CONDUCTOR OF 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PARIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
His Career — 


Concerts Monteux, Paris 

Ballets Russe de Diaghlew 1911-1917 
Metropolitan Opera 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 1919-1924 
Concertgebovw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland....1924-1934 
Paris Symphony Orchestra 1929-1936 


Has conducted ... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 
tras here in America. Is only French Conductor to conduct Berlin 
and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mengel- 
berg ten years. Conducted every major orchestra in Europe. Creator 
of Petrouchka, Sacre du Printemps, du Rossignol, Stravinsky; Daphnis 
and Chloe, Ravel; and many other modern works famous today. 









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INFORMAL 


EVENING CLOPHES 


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Post Street at Union Square 








198 

















POE RAS OVENS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 
Asst. Concert Master 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia,W. F. 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wegman, Willem 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. 8S. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wright, Harold 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Baker, Fred A. 
Hahl, Emil 
Karasik, Manfred 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Verney, Romain 
Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 


Van den Burg, Willem 
Principal 

Bem, Stanislas 

Coletti, Bruno 

Dehe, Willem 

Ferner, Walter V. 

Haight, Rebecca 

Kirs, Rudolph 

Pasmore, Dorothy 

Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 
Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


Bassoons: 
Weiss, Adolph 
La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 
Trumpets: 
Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Rosebrook, D. C. 
Trombones: 
Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 
Tuba: 
Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
W'ood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits, J. P. 


Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 








199 








Announcement 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Friday, March 27, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, March 28, 8:30 P. M. 


Soloist: SYLVIA LENT, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 


OVERTURE TO: RL DELO ince ee Beethoven 
CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN, IN A MAJOR................--- Mozart 
SYLVIA LENT 
FONE -PLCiU Rie SUBIR DAG teeter eee Debussy 
PN: TT Bek S257 L-O UN 
SYMPHONY No. 4, IN E MINOR... Brahms 


Pe te EE EIS 


FERRIER’S THEATER OF ART 
1470 Washington Street 
Phone: ORdway 3143 


ANDRE FERRIER 


PRESENTS AGAIN 
His Masterful Production: 


Pelleas 


ET 


Melisande 


5 Acts and 16 Scenes 
by MZETERLINCK 
Musical Interludes by DEBUSSY 


WEDNESDAYS MARCH 18-25 
FRIDAYS MARCH 
SATURDAYS (2 Matinees) 21-28 


Tickets Sherman, Clay & at Theatre 


200 


VISIT... 


The newest and 
most beautiful 
cocktail lounge in 
San Francisco. 


CARDINAL 
RICHELIEU 


hOl@) 
Van Ness at Geary 


Just a Short Walk 


a) Tw Our Special 
ourse 
Luncheon... 40< 








KAJETAN ATTL’S HARP ENSEMBLE * * * * 


FIRST HARPIST WITH SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FOR TWENTY-TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS. 
BEGINNERS OR ADVANCE STUDENTS PHONE FOR APPOINTMENT. 

WHEN BUYING OR RENTING A HARP ONLY AN EXPERIENCED HARPIST CAN ADVISE CORRECTLY. 
LARGE STOCK OF HARPS FOR SALE OR RENT: 


1030 BUSH pie O aie mOaGn STUDIO NO. 6 









































MUNICIPAL CONCERTS 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


Monday Evening, 8:30 P. M. — March 16 
Alexander Brailowsky, Soloist 


PER O-G@ ROA MME 


1. Symphony No. 4, in D minot............------------------------+-- Schumann 
(Played without pause) 
9. ACONCETLOMLOL EADS, Wil TNT Oe ge ee eee ee Chopin 
MR. BRAILOWSKY 
Symphonic Variations, ‘“‘Istar’’...........------------------------0 d’Indy 
Ae <"Lotentanz stor ilanos anes @LCMeSti dese ers aor ears arn Liszt 


MR. BRAILOWSKY 


(The Piano is a Steinway) 


Tuesday Evening, 8:30 P. M. — March 24 
Emanuel Feuermann, Cellist, Soloist 


AN EVENING OF VIENNESE MUSIC 


=O VELITe tO. IR OSeATILUIT IC C01 se eter ne ee Schubert 
2 “Concerto for Vicloncellos in’ Wstinay} One <= eee Haydn 
MR. FEUERMANN 
3° “Ewe; Eluneariane Danese. Secs: Sen Sete ee ee Brahms 
AO “Overture tOss ENG Bats een eee oe eee eee Johann Strauss 
5 Waltz from. Derek osenkavaller’. 26-2 Richard Strauss 
6: Perpetual Motion. 2.2 2 eee ee Johann Strauss 
7. Dance of the Seven Veils from ‘‘Salome’’.............. Richard Strauss 
8. Waltz, “Tales from the Vienna Woods”..........-..... Johann Strauss 
@ 


Reserved Seats: $1.00 — 75¢c — 50c — 25c (No Tax) 
Sherman, Clay & Co. Box Office 


AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


202 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Fri., Mar. 
Sat., Mar. 
Sun., Mar. 


Mon., Mar. 
Thur., Mar. 


Tue., Mar. 
Thur., Apr. 
Fri., Apr. 
Sat., Apr. 
Sun., Apr. 


*Sat:, ADI: 


Sun., Apr. 
Tue., Apr. 
Thur., Apr. 
Fri., Apr. 
Sate-Apr, 


*Sat., Apr. 
*Wed., Apr. 
*Sat., Apr. 


Fri., Apr. 
Sat., Apr. 


L933. 0-8 S620 Sa 


14 


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8:20 P. 
P.M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 
. M., Civic Auditorium, Feuermann, Cellist 


2:30 P. M., Opera House, Naoum Blinder, 


Willem van den Burg 


8:30 P. M., Opera House, Naoum Blinder, 


Willem van den Burg 

M., University of California, Alexander 
Brailowsky, Pianist 

M., Civic Auditorium, Brailowsky, Pianist 


M., Opera House, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 
M., Opera House, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 
M., Civic Auditorium, “The Damnation of Faust” 


. M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 


M., Opera House, Myra Hess, Pianist 

M., Opera House, Myra Hess, Pianist 

M., University of California, Myra Hess, Pianist 
M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 

M., San Rafael, Albert Spalding, Violinist 

M., Civie Auditorium, Albert Spalding, Violinist 
M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 

M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 

M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

M., Opera House,Last Pair 

M., Opera House,Last Pair 


FOR 


“YOUNG PEOPLE 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 
(See Dates Above) 
SEASON TICKETS: $2.00 


$1.40 $1.00 60¢ 





UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CONCERT 


Sunday, March 15, 3:15 P. M. 


Soloist: ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY, Pianist 


Playing the Chopin E minor concerto, and Liszt’s “Totentanz.” 


TICKETS at Stephens Union — University of California Campus 











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SAN FRANCISCO 
> YMPHON ¥ 
ORCHESTRA 


PEER REcViI@ uN LE eX 
CONDUCTOR 


Willem van den Burg 


Assistant Conductor 


ULEIELAUUATUOAEOAGANG EOE 


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MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
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The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 





San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Joseph S. Thompson, President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Vice-President 


OFFICERS 


John A. McGregor, Treasurer 
Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 


Armsby, Chairman 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 

Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Robert W. Miller Edgar Walter 
Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Armsby, E. Raymond 
Mrs. Leonora Wood 


Armsby, 

Arnold, G. Stanleigh 
Baker, Mrs. George 
Washington, Jr. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans 

Bartlett, 

Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bender, Albert M. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. 
Blanding, Miss Lena 


Boyd, Miss Louise A. 


Cameron, George T. 
Crocker, William H. 
Crocker, Mrs. W. W. 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. 
Donohoe, 

Miss Katherine 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. 
Elkus, Albert I. 


Walter A. Weber 


Eloesser, Dr. Leo Musto, Guido J. 
Esberg, Milton H. McGregor, John A. 
Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. McKinnon, 

Filmer, Mrs. W. Coy Mrs. Harold Richert 
Fleishhacker,: Mortimer Newell, R. C. 

Flowers, Mrs. J. C. Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Forbes, John F. Robbins, Mrs. George B. 
Gilman, Don E. Schilling, Miss Else 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. Schlesinger, B. F. 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 


Hart, Julien Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Hayden, J. Emmet Taylor, Mrs. David 
Koshland, Armstrong 

Mrs. Marcus S. Thompson, Joseph S. 


Koster, F. J. 
Lachman, Gus 


Threlkeld, John H. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Martin, Walter S. Walter, Edgar 
Merola, Gaetano Weill, Michel 
Mendell, Wiel, Eli H. 

Mrs. George H. Williams, 
Miller, Robert W. Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Monteagle, Kenneth Winslow, Mrs. S. S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Eugene Heyes M. A. Salinger 


Erich Weiler 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry 
W.. B. Bourn 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 
Managing Director 


William Sproule 
John D. McKee 





J.B. Levison 
Richard M. Tobin 


Peter Conley, 
Business Manager 


Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 

















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Among world-famous artists 
who use and endorse the 
Baldwin are— 


WILHELM BACHAUS 
HAROLD BAUER 
MOISSAYE BOGUSLAWSKI 
LUCREZIA BORI 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
FEODOR CHALIAPIN 
SEVERIN EISENBERGER 
WALTER GIESEKING 
WILLIAM HARMS 
JOSE ITURBI 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
WIKTOR LABUNSKI 
JOSEF LHEVINNE 
CHARLES NAEGELE 
LILY PONS 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
RUTH SLENCZYNSKI 
EMERSON WHITHORNE 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 





Lh itn. | 





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BALDWIN .. . of the glorious tone; 
of traditional quality. Choice of artists. 
Leader today as at the turn of the 
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is everywhere recognized as representing 
the highest piano quality. Note the 
pride in the voice of the owner when 
she says, “‘This is my Baldwin!” Observe 
the confident assurance of the artist at 
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when the pupil has access to a Baldwin. 


@ Come in and learn with suprise how 
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Baldwin Grands are priced $995 up. 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 


SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1179th and 1180th Concerts 


Friday, March 27, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, March 28, 8:30 P. M. 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: BRONISLAW HUBERMAN, Violinist 


RUSSIAN PROGRAMME 


I. ‘Overture. "he Russian asters = tee Rimsky-Korsakow 


2. CONGCELLO Ore V 10 lin, Tne)" tit Ore eee ee Tschatkowsky 


Allegro moderato 
Canzonetta: Andante — 
Finale: Allegro vivacissimo 


MR. HUBERMAN 
LAN TER MeL SS. O2N 


3. pymphonie:.Classiqués Opuse2 5.22 nee Been ARs Prokofieff 
Allegro 
Larghetto 
Gavotte 
Finale 


4. Orchestral Suite from the Ballet, ‘““Petrouchka’’............ Stravinsky 
GUNNAR JOHANSEN at the Piano 
(The Piano is a Steinway) 


“One can live without music but not so well.’ 





EXTRA CONCERT 


Sunday, April 19, 2 P. M. — War Memorial Opera House 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Conducted by Meredith Willson 


Program (to be announced later) includes premier performance 
of Mr. Willson’s new Symphony. 


Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter at Kearny Sts. 











245 


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BANK SERVICES 
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A Letter of Credit... 


issued against deposited 
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in case of need, it will 
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and a banking introduc- 
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Foreign Department 


Travelers’ Checks... the 
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ing pocket money on your 
journey. Safer than cur- 
rency, and you can cash 
them almost anywhere and 
at any time of day. De- 
nominations: $10,$20,$50, 
$100, Cost: 75¢ per $100. 

Exchange Department 


Safe Deposit Boxes for 
jewelry, documents, and 
other small valuables that 
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ber your home is more apt 
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Safe Deposit Department 


During Your Absence, to 
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bank under a Living Trust 
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cost? A small percentage 
of the income — rarely 
more than a fraction of 
an office boy’s salary. 
Trust Department 


—————— 


Write or call 
for further 


information 





Wells Fargo Bank 
Union Trust Co. 


Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 


Established 1852 
Market at Montgomery ‘ 
S.A Ne FE RA.N:‘C.1LS.GO 


Market at Grant Avenue 























OVERTURE, “THE RUSSIAN EASTER” 
Rimsky-Korsakow 


This work, an overture on themes of the Russian Church, begins with 
an introduction in which the melody of the Russian Church is given to the 
woodwind. The strings take it up. A cadenza for the solo violin leads to a 
section in which the solo ’cello repeats a phrase. The opening chant is now 
given to the trombones. The main body of the overture begins with the 
exposition and development of the first theme, which is taken from the 
ecclesiastical melody of the Introduction, first in the strings and clarinet, 
then in a steadily fuller orchestra. A call is sounded by horns and trumpets 
and a new section follows with much work for percussion instruments. There 
is the customary recapitulation and a long coda. 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND 
ORCHESTRA, IND MAJOR ... Tschaikowsky 


This concerto was composed in March, 1878, at Clarense, Switzerland, 
and at the time the violinist, Kotek, was visiting the composer and assisted 
him with suggestions from the violinist’s point of view, also playing it with 
him before the orchestral scoring was made. Almost four years elapsed before 
its first public performance, the concerto in the meantime having been 
dedicated to Leopold Auer, however Auer could not make up his mind to 
undertake the formidable difficulties of the work. Consequently the concerto 
was first produced by Adolf Brodsky in 1881 at a concert of the Vienna 
Philharmonic Society, with Hans Richter conducting. 











FINE FOODS-- 


Relax and be served comfortably in the 
most beautiful restaurants in the West 
— at no greater cost than elsewhere. 






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Rol after 
Ythe Theatre 
always in favor 


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WN RUTS 


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33 POWELL STREET, near Market 


semana! 
1032 MARKET STREET, near Opera House 


San Francisco — Pasadena — Oakland — Los Angeles — Hollywood 
















— 





247 








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SYMPHONIE CLASSIQUE .... . . Prokofieff 


Prokofieff was not yet six years old when he began to compose. His 
“First Symphony” was submitted to Taneiev in Moscow when he was eleven 
years old. The Symphonie Classique was begun in 1916 and completed in 
1917, its first performance being in Lenigrad by the orchestra now known as 
the State Orchestra. It was introduced to the United States by the Russian 
Orchestra in December, 1918. 

I. Allegro. — The violins announce the chief theme, after with a 
transitional passage in which the flutes are heard. Development follows and 
the second violins now sing a second theme. The first subject is developed, 
then the transitional measures, and again the second theme. The Recapitula- 
tion opens in the strings and there follows a transitional passage for flute. 
The strings again sing the second theme, and there is a short Coda. 

II. In the Larghetto the first violins announce the chief theme which 
is episodically treated. III. Gavotta. Strings and woodwind at once give out 
the first subject. In the Trio, flutes and clarinets are heard above an organ- 
point for ’cellos and double basses. The subject is then repeated by the strings. 
IV. Finale. The first theme of the movement is given to the strings; the 
second is for woodwind. 


SUITE FROM THE BALLET, 
SPETROU CHICA® © ret ca se ta oe DBL AVIS 


The ballet ‘“Petrouchka”’ with scenario by Alexandre Benois and 
music by Stravinsky, was first produced at the Chatelet, Paris, on June 13, 
1911, under the direction of Pierre Monteux, with Fokine as ballet-master 
and Nijinski as Petrouchka. The action of the ballet takes place in Admiralty 
Square, Leningrad. The time is “Butter Week” the Shrove-tide, of some year 
in the eighteen thirties. Stravinsky sets the stage with music in color as 
riotous as the ballet’s accompanying movement. For Butter Week is Carnival 
time — the Mardi gras. Booths erected for the fair line the square, through 
which, in gawking wonder, eddies a crow intent upon mad hilarity. The 
music was given as a whole when first performed in concerto at the Casino 
de Paris, March 1, 1914, with Monteux conducting, but Stravinsky later 
made editorial excisions, in three tableaux. 

Tableu I. — (a) Carnival. (b) Appearance of the Magician, who 
summons the crowd at the Fair to his show (flute solo). The curtain of this 
little theatre rises and discloses to the gaping crowd of revellers three puppets: 
Petrouchka (the clown), the Moor, and the Ballerina. The Magician blows 
his flute at them and gives them life (three solo piccolo notes.) 





The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22nd, 8:30 P. M. 


Haydn Verdi Debussy 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.: 50¢ — $1.00 — $1.50 (no tax) 





249 





Si: AGN” ERAN CBS :G-0 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO OPERA HOUSE 


SATURDAY, APRIL 11 10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 


GERMAN PROGRAM 

Chofale-and Fuge “in, GM imo rece ise ccrceee aden ar ee ates coat opera sa pectac ta ones ee ates Bach 
Allegro Moderato from ‘‘Unfinished’’ Symphony Schubert 
Overture, ‘‘Leonore’’ No. 

Perpetuum Mobile Johann Strauss 
Invitation to the Waltz Weber 
Everybody sing ‘‘Ode to Joy’’ 

Siegfried’s Rhine Journey . W agner 
Ride «df the: (Valk vties. cece eh oe Fe haa eh ode eee eae ae erent ass alee Wagner 


be pete APRIL 18 10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 


FRENCH PROGRAM 
Rakoczy 
Suite 
Symphony. No}. 3. East “MOverment: ccs .0- os accccc tr eeb ce eee tesas oe. eae et ed GPE - ENS 
‘AL wot INOcturnes.. - GlOUdS 2 ANG A FeStIVAIS sce oc asucetdeecuasucouteetet esas ee acess Debussy 
The Sorcerer's Apprentice Dukas 
Everybody sing ‘‘The Marseillaise’’ 
Rhapsody; .  SESpama > cesastacte a pacetcecese Nira See eae eres sar aan seen nce ant uae it Chabrie 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 4:00 to 5:00 P. M. 
RUSSIAN PROGRAM 

Overture to ‘‘Russlan and Ludmilla’’ Glinka 
Prelude to ‘“‘Khovantschina”’ : Moussorgsky 
Gopak from ‘‘The Fair of Sorotchinsi’’ Moussorgsky 
The Young Prince and the Young Princess to 
The Festival of Bagdad 
Everybody sing, ‘‘The Pedlar”’ 
Scherzovfrom> “SPathetique™= Sy mpiOny cate ssececeteas cee. -noeececeaaceetevoveee meee Tschaikowsky 
Cauicasiatiey SKetcheS 25-2. n ce ee ce ee yee tes even: Ctlae mony te eets I ppolitow-lvanow 


SATURDAY, APRIL 25 10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 


AMERICAN PROGRAM 
In War Time MacDowell 


Gal Sor the. Plates cea ee cles cb oe a ee eee Ce eee unl pees Goldmark 
Memionies*:0f my ChikdhGod cick seecd i tancetttace. -cessinctaeecnet vdeuae ees ceaceeub-seWan ae Loeffler 
A inal PCE CS caswacate ce sete cd Sa ~ 0 aac otaen ce nae keons pat tae ences Idee Ganz 
Siamese Sketch... accede Gis octets tetnanigup chee Percemauibas ances ce tCM OLIN 
Berceuse and T apantella C For Siac) Schelling 
Everybody sing ‘‘When Johnny Comes Marching Home"’ 

American Fantasy ....--Herbert 


ALL SEATS RESERVED 


Single Concerts: 50c, 35c, 25c, 15¢ — Box Office: Sherman, Clay & Co 
Season Tickets (4 Concerts) $2.00, $1.40,$1.10, 60c Sutter & Kearny Sts. 


AUSPICES: Young People’s Concerts Committee of The Musical 
Ass’n of San Francisco. Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 


‘Scheherazade’’..Rimsky-Korsakow 











(c) To the great astonishment of the crowd the three puppets — no 
longer dolls, but living beings now, start dancing a Russian dance (orchestra 
and piano.) 3 


Tableau Il. — Petrouchka is kicked into his chamber. The orchestra 
pictures this with a wild cry, then mournful chords of the piano. The suffer- 
ing of the clown is expressed by dull sobs of the bassoon. A glassy piano 
cadenza leads to a passage which represents the anger, the futile wrath of 
Petrouchka. Trumpets shrill his defiance, but soon sink to a mournful plaint 
in the piano, joined by woodwinds. Soon thereafter the Ballerina enters. The 
clown proclaims his love, but is repulsed, and in anger she leaves him. A 
clarinet cadenza gives voice to his wild despair. The piano follows with a 
cadenza which leads to another shrilling of Petrouchka’s anger and anguish. 


Tableau IV. — It is now towards evening of the Russian Mardi Gras. 
a) Gathering of the populace. 


(b)Dance of the Nurses (oboe and horn soli to the accompaniment 
of the bassoons. ) 


(c) A peasant enters leading a bear which marches on its hind legs. 
The peasant blows his flageolet (two strident clarinets) to the growls of 
the bear (tuba.) 


(d) Now appears a debauched old dotard with two gypsy dancers. 
He amuses himself by throwing coins to the crowd. (Sweeping figure in the 
strings over the tumult of the crowd.) 


(e) After which the gypsies dance (violin solo with oboe obligato), 
the old dotard playing the accordion at intervals. 


(f) There enter now coachmen and grooms from their dance (hilarious 
figures in the trumpets and trombones and the nurses join them in a 
grotesque dance. 


(g) Maskers enter in Mardi Gras disguise (strident chromatic 
discordant runs in strings and clarinets.) Among them is a Satan (introduced 
by a bizarre figure in the brass) who urges the crowd to gaiety and provokes 
it to mad frenzy (thunderous calls in the brasses.) Peasants, coachmen, 
grooms and nurses finally mingle in the mad whirl of dance until a mad 
piercing cry from the little theatre booth of the Charlatan (muted trumpets) 
interrupts the orgy. The Moor in a fit of jealous rage has killed Petrouchka. 





OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 


Pianist and Teacher 


Graduate of the University of Music, Vienna has returned 
from abroad after a year of study at the College of Music 
at the University in Koenigsberg, Germany, with a letter 
of highest praise and personal recommendation by the 
Dean, Professor Dr. Joseph Mueller-Blattau. 





Mrs. Barrett will accept pupils for 
Piano and musical culture. Please address 


2755 WEBSTER ST. — SAN FRANCISCO — WAlInut 7972 








een ee 


Scien bases See See aemeneirn hp >=-amens teen ee ee ee eee ae 


te me es 


RY en OT II 


Sa ae 5 pa I 


- Em os em oe ~~ 3 








"MARTHA GRAHAM S 
Art Challenges Society Folk” 


“ENTHRALLED BY DANCER” 


“As modern as a skyscraper, as truly rhythmic as 
the ocean surf, as different as next year’s hat” 


—VIRGINIA BorEN, Seattle Daily Times 
March 21, 1936 





Only One San Francisco Performance 


OPERA HOUSE— MARCH 30 


Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50 (Plus Tax) at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
Wilfrid L. Davis Megt., Inc. 








MARTHA GRAHAM will dance in: 


OAKLAND. . March 27 & SAN JOSE .. =. Aprill 
CARMEL see. VLAECKEZO SCAND ORDii ts 00 ccDril 2 





mA ICIAN ALTL’S HARP. ENSEMBLE. *:% ok oem 


FIRST HARPIST WITH SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FOR TWENTY-TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS. 
BEGINNERS OR ADVANCE STUDENTS PHONE FOR APPOINTMENT. 

WHEN BUYING OR RENTING A HARP ONLY AN EXPERIENCED HARPIST CAN ADVISE CORRECTLY. 
LARGE STOCK OF HARPS FOR SALE OR RENT: 


1030 BUSH Plone (Cll 0307 STUDIO NO. 6 


: 
| 





oS 


ar eee er ee 


= Ce ee at ee 
” 





Lf 1 CPEE oF | l Ol [ CU 


CONDUCTOR OF 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PARIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


His Career — 


























Concerts (Monteux sb tis) Sceeec sce: ee 1914 
Ballets Russe::de-Diachlew.. 20 oe a 1911-1917 
Metropolitan Operas: 25. te eo ee eo gt 1917-1919 
Boston Symphony Orchestra....................... Fats as oye 1919-1924 
Concertgebovw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Holland....1924-1934 
Paris: symphony. Orchestra -cvs6-teope apes tre sae 1929-1936 


Has conducted ... Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles Orches- 
tras here in America. Is only French Conductor to conduct Berlin 
and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras. Colleague of Willem Mengel- 
berg ten years. Conducted every major orchestra in Europe. Creator 
of Petrouchka, Sacre du Printemps, du Rossignol, Stravinsky; Daphnis 
and Chloe, Ravel; and many other modern works famous today. 





Sane ‘S OD brie ed oe 


A complete garden within a store provides the 
season’s appropriate setting for one of its most 
important events. Gump’s Spring Show of Wedg- 
wood chinaware and Suntec garden furniture an- 
nounces our appointment as Bay Area Represent- 
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Marel 2 4 Ole ae Gisril 4 


GUMP'S 


250 Post Street 








Poa ROS GIN Ee 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 

Asst. Concert Master 
Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia, W. F. 
Mendelevitch, Rodion 
Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wegman, Willem 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. S. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wright, Harold 


Violas: 


Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 
Baker, Fred A. 
Hahl, Emil 
Karasik, Manfred 
Lichtenstein, Victor 
Tolpegin, Victor 
Vdovin, Alexander 
Verney, Romain 
Weiler, Erich 





(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Weiss, Adolph 


Principal 
Bem, Stanislas 
Coletti, Bruno 
Dehe, Willem 
Ferner, Walter V. 
Haight, Rebecca 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 


Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 
Oesterreicher, Walter 
Benkman, Herbert 


Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 
Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 
English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 
Trumpets: 
Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Rosebrook, D. C. 
Trombones: 
Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 
Tuba: 
Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Wood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 


Tibbits, J. P. 


Librarian: 


Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 
Oesterreicher, Walter 





es 


Oe a ee ew eet ee ee ene 











Announcement 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Friday, April 3, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, April 4, 8:30 P. M. 


Soloist: SYLVIA LENT, Violinist 


PURHOsG Re A ee 


LOVER SURE COPE LD EEO 2.2 oe PEE a Beethoven 
2. -ONCERPO2FOR VIOLIN IN -A -MAIJOR = 47.8 2see0" Mozart 
SYLVIA LENT 
Ost ce eOINGE BEC TCR i Ls BRIG Santee see © ent a eee een ay Debussy 
LAN TER wat S838 Or N 
4° SY MPHON YoNo>4e INE VEINO Rae, 56a acess Brahms 








WILLEM WEGMAN 
Member of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra 
TEACHER OF VIOLIN 

Studios at: 
Castenada (Forest Hill) 
2363 Jackson Street 
878 - 36th Avenue 


PHONE BAyview 5223 
256 





VISIT... 


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most beautiful 
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San Francisco. 


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3 4a Our Special 
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Luncheon... 40. 














SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Pierre Monteux, Conductor 


OPERA HOUSE 


Fri. Aft., 2:30, Mar. 27 and Sat. Eve., Mar. 28 


BRONISLAW HUBERMAN 


VIOLINIST — GUEST ARTIST 


Fri. Aft., 2:30, Apr. 3 and Sat. Eve., Apr. 4 


SCL VE ee 


VIOLINIST — GUEST ARTIST 


Fri. Aft., 2:30, Apr. 17 and Sat. Eve., Apr. 18 


MISCHA ELMAN 


VIOLINIST — GUEST ARTIST 


Sun. Aft., 2 P. M., April 19 


MEREDITH WILLSON 


GUEST CONDUCTOR 


TICKETS NOW ON SALE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — SAN FRANCISCO and OAKLAND 


257 








Ninth Municipal Concert 


THE ART COMMISSION Presents 


Berlioz’ 


‘DAMNATION 
FAUST» 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
PERRY ASKAM, ssrrrone 
JOY McARDEN, soprano 
FELIX KNIGHT, renor 
DOUGLAS BEATTIE, sass 


MUNICIPAL CHORUS 


OPERA HOUSE April 1 


WEDNESDAY EVE., 8:30 P. 














BEST RESERVED SEATS $1.00 ON SALE AT 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — SAN FRANCISCO and OAKLAND 








Fri., Mar. 
Sat., Mar. 
Wed., Apr. 
Thur., Apr. 
Fri., Apr. 

| Sat., Apr. 

| Sun., Apr. 


*Sat., Apr. 
Sun., Apr. 
Tue., Apr. 
Thur., Apr. 
Fri., Apr. 
sat., Apr. 

*Sat., Apr. 
Sun., Apr. 

*Wed., Apr. 

*Sat., Apr. 
Fri., Apr. 
Sat., Apr. 





San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


TOS GN CFE SROL TT 


Zig oOLe, 
2857 -0200-E. 

1232202: 

Pa Soh WS Sel 

DF roto0tb: 

4, 8:30P 

5, os Lore. 
11, 20:30°AY 
12, 3:00 P: 
14, 8:20 P. 
1G, sSttee: 
Nie o0 bs 
18, 8:30 P. 
18, 10:30 A. 
10. 2c 00nE: 
22, 4:00:P. 
25, 10:30 A. 
24, 22 303E. 
25, 8:30 P. 


. M., Opera House, Bronislaw Huberman, Violinist 


M., Opera House, Bronislaw Huberman, Violinist. 
M., Opera House, ‘‘The Damnation of Faust” 

M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

M., Opera House, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 


. M., Opera House, Sylvia Lent, Violinist 


M., University of California, Gunnar Johansen, 
Pianist 

M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 

M., San Rafael, Albert Spalding, Violinist 

M., Civic Auditorium, Albert Spalding, Violinist 

M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 

M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 

M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 

M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

M., Opera House, Meredith Willson, Conducting 

M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 

M., Opera House,Last Pair 

M., Opera House,Last Pair 


ge ©. 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CONCERT 
Sunday, April 5, 3:15 P. M. 


Soloist: 


GUNNAR JOHANSEN, Pianist 


Playing Saint-Saens G minor Concerto 


TICKETS at Stephens Union — University of California Campus 





310 Sutter 





Street 





GArfield 4544 





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259 











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DEERE aA TANATTATATATATATATATTATE 


=a.) 


THE 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SY IW PLOY 
ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
CONDUCTOR 


Willem van den Burg 
Assistant Conductor 








MAINTAINED BY THE MUSICAL 
ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 





Eighth Pair 
TWENTY- FOURTH SEASON 
1935-1936 








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—_ —— 





The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


| OFFICERS 
Joseph S. Thompson, President Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, John A. McGregor, Treasurer 
Vice-President Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Robert W. Miller Edgar Walter 


Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Mrs. George T. Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Armsby, Chairman Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Armsby, E. Raymond FE loesser, Dr. Leo Musto, Guido J. 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Esberg, Milton H. McGregor, John A. 
Armsby, Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. McKinnon, 
Arnold, G. Stanleigh Filmer, Mrs. W. Coy Mrs. Harold Richert 
Baker, Mrs. George Fleishhacker, Mortimer Newell, R. C. 
Washington, Jr. Flowers, Mrs. J. C. Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans Forbes, John F. Robbins, Mrs. George B. 
Bartlett, Gilman, Don E. Schilling, Miss Else 
Mrs. Edward Otis Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. Schlesinger, B. F. 
Bender, Albert M. Haley, Mrs. Harry S. Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. Hart, Julien Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Blanding, Miss Lena Hayden, J. Emmet Taylor, Mrs. David 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. Koshland, Armstrong 
Cameron, George T. Mrs. Marcus S. Thompson, Joseph S. 
Crocker, William H. Koster, F. J. Threlkeld, John H. 
Crocker, Mrs.W.W. Lachman, Gus Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. Martin, Walter S. Walter, Edgar 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. Merola, Gaetano Weill, Michel 
Donohoe, Mendell, Wiel, Eli H. 
Miss Katherine Mrs. George H. Williams, 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. Miller, Robert W. Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Elkus, Albert I. Monteagle, Kenneth Winslow, Mrs. S. S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Walter A. Weber Eugene Heyes M.A. Salinger 
Erich Weiler 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry William Sproule J. B. Levison 
W’. B. Bourn John D. McKee Richard M. Tobin 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Peter Conley, 

Managing Director Business Manager 


Se nner eee SS ae ee ee ee ee ee 








279 











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CHARLES NAEGELE when the pupil has access to a Baldwin. 
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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 


EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1183rd and 1184th Concerts 


Friday, April 3, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, April 4, 8:30 P. M. 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Soloist: SYLVIA LENT, Violinist 


PROGRAMME 


1... -Sulte-in’ B minor CRor Strings-and? Flutes) 2:2. eee Bach 
Overture 
Rondo 
Sarabande 
Bourree I — Bourree II 
Polonaise 
Minuet 
Badinerie 
(Flute obligato, HENRY C. WOEMPNER) 
2. Concertontor Violins In=A majors (Ka 209) oa ee ee Mozart 
Allegro aperto 
Adagio 


Tempo di menuetto 
SYLVIA LENT 


LONE ERM Ss ON 


33) SV opbOMmy: INOs 4 ats nih Ores eee ee ore eens ae ee Brahms 


Allegro non troppo 

Andante moderato 

Allegro giocoso 

Allegro energico e passionato 


“One can live without music but not so well.’ 


SPECIAL EXHIBITION NOW ON DISPLAY 
Prize-winning notebooks from 
Ernest Schelling’s Eastern Young People’s 
Concerts. 


San Francisco Museum of Art 
Veterans’ Building, McAllister Street at Van Ness Ave. 


Admission Free — Open 12:00 to 10:00 P. M. Week Days 
1:00 to 5:00 P. M. Sundays 





281 








BANK 


SERVICES 


For the Traveler 


® 


A Letter of Credit... 


issued against deposited 
cash or collateral security 
. may be drawn upon 
as required. On any long 
journey, carry a Letter of 
Credit... whether you ex- 
pect to use it or not. For 
in case of need, it will 
provide you with funds 
and a banking introduc- 
tion almost anywhere in 
the world. 
Foreign Department 


Travelers’ Checks... the 
convenient means of carry- 
ing pocket money on your 
journey. Safer than cur- 
rency, and you can cash 
them almost anywhere and 
at any time of day. De- 
nominations: $10,$20,$50, 
$100, Cost: 75¢ per $100. 

Exchange Department 


Safe Deposit Boxes for 
jewelry, documents, and 
other small valuables that 
you leave behind. Remem- 
ber your home is more apt 





a journey—although there 
are many possessions such 
as insurance policies, deeds, 
contracts, etc. that should 
have this protection even 
when you are at home. The 
cost is as low as, for a box 
23x 5x 114 inches . 
$4.00 a year. 


Vault storage for furs, 
silver, paintings, and other 
bulky valuables. Pack them 
in a suitcase or trunk and 
bring them to the bank be- 
fore you leave. You will 
travel with a freer mind. 
The cost for an ordinary- 
size suitcase is only 50¢ a 


During Your Absence, to 
supervise the collection 
of investment income from 
stocks, bonds, notes, mort- 
gages, and real estate. The 
redemption of called bonds 
and the prompt reemploy- 
ment of the proceeds. The 
sale or exercise of security 
“rights.” The payment of 
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bank under a Living Trust 
or Agency Account. The 
cost? A small percentage 
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Trust Department 


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to be visited by burglars or month, or .. $5.00 a year. peTAZER 
fire when you are away on Safe Deposit Department information 
hers cet ae 
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Market at Montgomery 8 Market at Grant Avenue 


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SAN ERAN GES:G:O 


J 











SUTTESUIN-BoMINOR eo see tas oe ee aC 


Although this work is now known as a Suite, it was originally listed as 
an Overture, of which Bach wrote four, one in C major, one in B minor and 
two in D major. They are often known as the “French” suites, for when 
Bach was appointed chapel-master by Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cothen in 
1717, he found the court organized largely on the French model, and it was 
during the period between 1717 and 1723 that the Suites were composed. 


CONCERT FOR VIOLIN, IN A MINOR . . . Mozart 


During 1775 Mozart composed five concertos for violin, between 
April and December. Mozart always made an entry on his scores of the 
date upon which the work was finished, and upon the manuscript score of 
the A major Concerto is inscribed the date December 20, 1775. 

Mozart’s father was an accomplished violinist and his precocious son, 
although known principally for his ability upon clavier, was also a violinist 
of more than ordinary merit, and in the opinion of Mozart’s biographer, 
Otto Jahn, the five violin concertos were composed for his own use. 


SYMPHONY No. 4,IN E MINOR .. .. . Brahms 


This, the last of Brahms’ symphonies, received its first public per- 
formance at Meiningen on October 25, 1885, under the direction of the 
composer. ‘he work made an immediate and profound impression, being 
pronounced by the most advanced musicians and critics the greatest of all 
the master’s compositions in this form — his orchestral masterpiece in fact. 

The work has been commented on by George P. Upton as follows: 

“The Fourth Symphony is universally recognized as the most 
individual of all Brahms’s works of this class. In the simplicity and originality 
of its themes, and in the subjective character of its ideas as well as in its 
development, it bears the unmistakable impress of its composer. The same 
organic unity which characterizes the other three symphonies in such marked 
degree is also found in this, though the various movements illustrate 
different ideas. 





The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


First Violin Second Violin Viola Violoncello 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22nd, 8:30 P. M. 


Haydn Verdi Debussy 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.: 50¢ — $1.00 — $1.50 (no tax) 





283 






































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ROBERT WAL 


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‘The first movement opens with a melodious theme of unusual length, 
which is treated in a masterly but intricate style. It is a wayward fancy, 
now cheerful, and again serious, but coming to a sombre close as the second 
theme enters in the same general manner. As the movement draws to an end 
its melodious character grows more joyous, strong, and dramatic, and the 
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SSS Se ee eee 


“The second movement, Andante moderato, is almost akin to the Lied 
in the gracefulness and sweetness of its melody, its warmth of tone, and its 
refined and spirituelle character; and the third: Allegro giocoso, in rondo 
form, is full of animation and good humor, and yet is dignified in style and 
strong in expression, as befits the serious purpose of the composer, who 
always has a lofty object in view. 


“The Finale, a development of the Passacaglia form, is a model of 
earnest, serious, artistic workmanship, every measure of it revealing the 
conscientious and scientific scholar. It opens with a succession of massive 
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SYMPHONY 


SATURDAY, APRIL 11 


SATURDAY, APRIL 18 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 


Ass’n of San Francisco. 





SAN FRANCISCO 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO OPERA HOUSE 


GERMAN PROGRAM 


Chorale and Fugue in G Mimo0...............:s-csecccceeceeeececsececeseeceenesnenseneenennecesensnnes Bach 
Allegro Moderato from ‘‘Unfinished’’ Symphony.........----.-.---------------------- Schubert 
Overture, ‘“‘Leonore’’? No. 3..2..----cescsccescseceecsseceensccneecseseesesessnssnensneneseeensens Beethoven 
Perpetuum Mobile...............----ssc-1---seececeeeeseeeecsssenseeceseseeneneneceeaesseneecss Johann Strauss 
Bea EE 4a (079 VER «ODER 0 COUMON OF 0 | oy lcm SE i aete eln ap NO oe a oe ae OP ee ne Weber 
Everybody sing ‘“‘Ode to Joy”’ 

Siegfiied’s Rhine Jourmey......-..--------s----ceseceeeseeescceeeeeeecececeseerecenesesenanaseenanenennes Wagner 
Ride of the Valkyries ccc .sc.s-5 02 w case ase gene csesae se a escape morn ccr ns navencansnctnn erie Wagner 


FRENCH PROGRAM 


Rakoczy Marr ch.......---c-scecececeescsnecenseneneessoeeescsneeessssteceosnesensansnsesssesennnsnasncecenenes Berlioz 
TL ee es Sane ar et Sh a een et ae sn ee NY Se ee Rameau 
Symphony No. 3, Last Movement.........------------------------csesecoeeecoesteneeeneces Saint-Saens 
Two Nocturnes, “‘Clouds’’ and ‘‘Festivals’’.........-.----.---:--s-------ss-eseeeeeeeeees Debussy 
The Sorcerer's AppremtiCe........-..-.---.--c--s-cceeeeeceeeeeeeeeceeeeesece sees eeneceennesnensecneanennanes Dukas 
Everybody sing ‘‘The Marseillaise’’ 

Rhapsody, ‘‘Espana’’.........--.-c-ssscsscsscscsececsenseenensnescnsnesnsesesesaesasnesnsnenensacesssaecnss Chabrier 


RUSSIAN PROGRAM 


Overture to ‘‘Russlan and Ludmilla’? .........2.2.2.22-----.-------eeeeeeeneeeeeceeetteteneeees Glinka 
Prelude to ‘‘Khovantschina” --..ccc..2-2cc.-cc-c2- oan cic s nce ceceeecen nner nceesessensunen Moussorgsky 
Gopak from ‘‘The Fair of Sorotchinst’’.........-.-.-----------------eeee eee Moussorgsky 
ae in ere nih Suan, ‘*Scheherazade’’..Rimsky-Korsakow 
Everybody sing, ‘‘The Pedlar’’ 

Scherzo from ‘‘Pathetique’’ Symphony\............----.-------------eeeeeeeeeseeeeee Tschaikowsky 
Caucasian Sketches.............. pee ee vevesseeeee-------l ppolitow-Ivanow 


SATURDAY, APRIL 25 10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 


AMERICAN PROGRAM 


Wee NR) care a a aa ese ee ea acne nat = gas ao claw Ene ing a weiss aaa MacDowell 
(QA hime a} eek oY oten oe Fh hac Se pk pM ORNeS en c ORan OTP E Ie th eee es ieee te Goldmark 
Memories of my Childhood..........2....-------:ce-scceeecceecceeceeeceeeeeeeeennnnceeeecennenenenenees Loeffler 
ATTA ACUTE OSes sees ae oe wc age Sn eee i bah saad ei veliae cafes naan cadawtane ab sperm ammae neon tock Ganz 
Biieses = Sleetch a an eee eh ec Se a EE LR nip Rae ee ELC ELD 
Berceuse’ and barantella “GRoE s Strimgs)) ack aaas ns coos cance de cemented ease Schelling 
Everybody sing ‘‘When Johnny Comes Marching Home’”’ 

American Fantasy............. Resttnn Beced sea LEP O EST 


ALL SEATS RESERVED 


Single Concerts: 50c, 35c, 25c, 15¢ — Box Office: Sherman, Clay & Co 
Season Tickets (4 Concerts) $2.00, $1.40,$1.10, 60c Sutter & Kearny Sts. 


AUSPICES: Young People’s Concerts Committee of The Musical 
Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman 


Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 





ORCHESTRA 


10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 


10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 


4:00 to 5:00 P. M. 


RAJETAN ATTIL’S HARP ENSEMBLE... *&. %--% oe 


FIRST HARPIST WITH SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FOR TWENTY-TWO CONSECUTIVE YEARS. 
BEGINNERS OR ADVANCE STUDENTS PHONE FOR APPOINTMENT. 


WHEN BUYING OR RENTING A HARP ONLY AN EXPERIENCED HARPIST CAN ADVISE CORRECTLY. 
LARGE STOCK OF HARPS, FOR SALE OR RENT: 


1030 BUSH: = 64. Cas STUDIO NO. 6 





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PAE Ress Nel abe 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 


Asst. Concert Master 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia,W. F. 


Mendelevitch, Rodion 


Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wegman, Willem 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. S. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wright, Harold 


Violas: 

Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 

Baker, Fred A. 

Hahl, Emil 

Karasik, Manfred 

Lichtenstein, Victor 

Tolpegin, Victor 

Vdovin, Alexander 

Verney, Romain 

Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Weiss, Adolph 


Principal 
Bem, Stanislas 
Coletti, Bruno 
Dehe, Willem 
Ferner, Walter V. 
Haight, Rebecca 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 
Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 
Woempner, Henry C. 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 


English Horn: 
Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R 


Bass Clarinet: 
Fragale, Frank 


La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 
Trumpets: 
Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Rosebrook, D. C. 
Trombones: 
Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 
Tuba: 
Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Wood, W. A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits; dis L- 


Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 


Oesterreicher, Walter 














Announcement 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Friday, April 17, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, April 18, 8:30 P. M. 


Soloist: MISCHA ELMAN, Violinist 


PeR-O°-G EK AVE MM aE 


Is, SEERAgIC Over but Clock ae cee, coe ater cc eee eee er ee Brahms 
2, ss CONCELLO™ LOL, = VlGLiihe lta) SIN a Ole ee aie eee eet Beethoven 
MISCHA ELMAN 
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Last Municipal Concert 


AAO. 8 DCL C2 e-sico- kU Ho batk le) 2 C-OnMeM IGS 8 OeN 


CAN-EC AUD Lr Oe Um 
TUES. EVE., 8:20 P. M. — APRIL 14 


San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra 


Pierre Monteux, Conductor 


Soloist: ALBERT SPALDING, Violinist 


Saba 


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MR. SPALDING 


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Steinway Piano 


Reserved Seats: $1.00 — 75c — 50c — 25c (No Tax) 
Sherman, Clay & Co. Box Office 


AUSPICES: ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Sun.,Apr. 5, 3:15 P.M., University of California, Gunnar Johansen, 
Pianist 
*Sat., Apr. 11, 10:30 A. M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert, 
Sun., Apr. . M., San Rafael, Albert Spalding, Violinist 
Tue., Apr. : . M., Civic Auditorium, Albert Spalding, Violinist 
Thur., Apr. : . M., Standard Oil Company broadcast 
Fri., Apr. : . M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 
Sat., Apr. : . M., Opera House, Mischa Elman, Violinist 
*Sat., Apr. : . M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 
Sun., Apr. : . M., Opera House, Meredith Willson, Conducting 
*Wed., Apr. : . M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 
‘Sat. pe. . M., Opera House, Young People’s Concert 
Fri., Apr. : . M., Opera House,Last Pair 
Sat., Apr. 25, 8:30 P.M., Opera House,Last Pair 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA CONCERT 


Sunday, April 5, 3:15 P. M. 


Soloist: GUNNAR JOHANSEN, Pianist 
Playing Saint-Saens G minor Concerto 


TICKETS at Stephens Union — University of California Campus 





310 Sutter Street GArfield 4544 





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Graduate of the University of Music, Vienna has returned 
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291 














SHERMAN |YCLAY & CC 





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Willem van den Burg 
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The Musical Association of San Francisco 
Maintaining the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 





OFFICERS 
Joseph S. Thompson, President Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, John A. McGregor, Treasurer 
Vice-President Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Marcus S. Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Miss Lena Blanding Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Robert W. Miller Edgar Walter 


Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Mrs. George T. Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Armsby, Chairman Cameron J. Emmet Hayden 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Armsby, E. Raymond _Eloesser, Dr. Leo Musto, Guido J. 

Mrs. Leonora Wood Esberg, Milton H. McGregor, John A. 
Armsby, Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. McKinnon, 
Arnold, G. Stanleigh Filmer, Mrs. W. Coy Mrs. Harold Richert 
Baker, Mrs. George Fleishhacker, Mortimer Newell, R. C. 

Washington, Jr. Flowers, Mrs. J. C. Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans Forbes, John F. Robbins, Mrs. George B. 
Bartlett, Gilman, Don E. Schilling, Miss Else 

Mrs. Edward Otis Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. Schlesinger, B. F. 
Bender, Albert M. Haley, Mrs. Harry S. Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. Hart, Julien Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Blanding, Miss Lena Hayden, J. Emmet Taylor, Mrs. David 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. Koshland, Armstrong 
Cameron, George T. Mrs. Marcus S. Thompson, Joseph S. 
Crocker, William H. Koster, F. J. Threlkeld, John H. 
Crocker, Mrs. W. W. Lachman, Gus Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. Martin, Walter S. Walter, Edgar 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. Merola, Gaetano Weill, Michel 
Donohoe, Mendell, Wiel, Eli H. 

Miss Katherine Mrs. George H. Williams, ; 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. Miller, Robert W. Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Elkus, Albert I. Monteagle, Kenneth Winslow, Mrs. S.S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Walter A. Weber Eugene Heyes M. A. Salinger 
Erich Weiler 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry William Sproule J. B. Levison 
W. B. Bourn John D. McKee Richard M. Tobin 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, Peter Conley, 

Managing Director Business Manager 


EE I DERE I) OE FeO 8 2 ed 
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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 


1936 Season 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1188th and 1189th Concerts 


Friday, April 17, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, April 18, 8:30 P. M. 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Soloist: MISCHA ELMAN, Violinist 


Pook O GK A Wr Ve 


LS Eraeic (Overture: 2 eee een eee ee Brahms 
2. Concerto. ior Violin ine Pt Onset eee eee Beethoven 
Allegro ma non troppo 
Largetto — 
Rondo 
MISCHA ELMAN 
LN cok ReMi SS. 70.IN 
os heme: and, Wartationsesacc aro: een aoe eee Adolph Weiss 
(First Performance) 
4, <Pietures-at-an LE xhipitionsce,0e: wee Neen ee. Moussorgsky-Ravel 


EXTRA CONCERT 


Sunday, April 19, 2 P. M. — War Memorial Opera House 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Conducted by Meredith Willson 


Program (See Page No. 318) includes premier performance 
of Mr. Willson’s new Symphony. 


Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., Sutter at Kearny Sts. 





“One can live without music but not so well.” 


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BANK SERVICES 
For the Traveler 


A Letter of Credit... 


issued against deposited 
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Foreign Department 


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Exchange Department 


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Safe Deposit Department 


During Your Absence, to 
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“TRAGIC” OVERTURE, OPUS 81 . . . . . Brahms 


Brahms composed his Tragic Overture in the summer of 1880 at 
Ischl, a country watering-place in Upper Austria. Brahms fondness for this 
place was somewhat puzzling to those of his friends who were aware of his 
impatient antipathy to the bother and fuss of fashionable life. (Ischl) was a 
very fashionable resort. The Tragic Overture, together with its sister work, 
the Academic Overture, were composed in the rooms which Brahms occupied, 
where also was written his Trio, Opus 87, for Piano, violin and violoncello. 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN, IN D MAJOR . Beethoven 


Beethoven composed this concerto in 1806 for Franz Clement, who 
played it for the first time on December 23 of that year. It is said that 
Beethoven did not have the concerto ready in time for a rehearsal and that 
Clement played it on sight at the concert. As the concerto is now generally 
regarded as one of the greatest and most beautiful in the entire field of 
violin music, it might be interesting to note what one of the leading critics 
had to say about the work, following its first performance: 


‘The eminent violinist Clement played, besides other excellent pieces, 
a concerto by Beethoven, which on account of its originality and various 
beautiful passages was received with more than ordinary applause. Clement’s 
sterling art, his elegance, his power and sureness with the violin, which is 
his slave — these qualities provoked tumultuous applause. But the judg- 
ment of amateurs is unanimous concerning the concerto: the many beauties 
are admitted, but it is said that the continuity is often completely broken, 
and that the endless repetitions of certain vulgar passages might easily 
weary the hearer. It holds that Beethoven might employ his indubitable 
talents to better advantage and give us works like his first symphonies in 
C and D, his elegant septer in E flat, his ingenious quintet in D major, 
and more of the earlier compositions, which will always place him in the 
front rank of composers. There is fear lest it will fare ill with Beethoven 
and the public if he pursue this path.... ” 





The San Francisco String Quartet 


Naoum Blinder Eugene Heyes Lajos Fenster Willem Dehe 


First Violin Second Violin Viola Violoncello 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM 
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22nd, 8:30 P. M. 


Haydn Verdi Debussy 
Tickets on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.: 50¢ — $1.00 — $1.50 (no tax) 





315 



















SE 


Gat ean ing \//eronika alaky 
& 


Born in Budapest, Hungary, Veronika Pataky began her studies at 


the Loheland Seminary for gymnastic and dance, in Germany, and received 


her first diploma there at the age of sixteen. 


After two years of teaching at her mother’s dance school in Rumania 
there followed a year of study in the different dance schools of Germany. 
While in Munich in 1930 to watch the International Dance Festival she 
studied for a few weeks with Palucca, famous Wigman graduate, then was 
offered a special course with Mary Wigman herself in Dresden. 


Pataky completed in eight months a course usually requiring three or 
four years, received her diploma from the Wigman school and became leader 
of the concert group when it toured Germany and the United States from 


December, 1932, to March, 1933. 


During the summer of 1933 she made her own solo tour of Central 
Surope through Poland, Hungary and Rumania, continuing her career as 
the only internationally-known concert dancer from Hungary. The music 
for the dances on this tour was especially composed by a pupil of Bela 
Bart6ék; percussion accompaniments were her own creation. 


Pataky came to San Francisco in June of 1934 and was presented in 
solo recital at the Veterans’ Auditorium on January 11, 1935. She opened 
her School of Modern Dance at 555 Sutter Street, San Francisco, two 
months later and soon extended it to include a Peninsula branch at the 
Redwood City Woman’s Club. Her own dance group is now beginning to 


appear in demonstration programs and concerts. 


Two intensive summer courses will make her one of the busiest dance 
teachers in the bay region: a three-week session, from June 15 to July 4, 
at Pataky’s own San Francisco school; and a four-week course, from July 
6 to 31, at the Peninsula School Summer Workshop in Menlo Park. She 
is planning a New York recital next fall. 


Solo Recital nexT THURSDAY EVE., APRIL 23 
VETERANS’ AUDITORIUM — Tickets: $1.65, $1.10, 83¢, Sherman, Clay & Co. 


——————————————————————— 


THEME AND VARIATIONS .. . . Adolph Weiss 


Adolph Weisss, first bassoon of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, was born in Baltimore, Maryland. He studied with Weidig, 
Rybner, Lilienthal, and in Europe at the Berlin State Academy of Fine 
Arts in the master-class under Arnold Schoenberg. Prior to coming to San 
Francisco Mr. Weiss was with the New York Philharmonic-Symphony 
Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony, Rochester Philharmonic, N B C and 
W A B C Radio Stations in New York. 

His compositions include, for large orchestra, “American Life” 
(performed in New York, Berlin, Paris, Budapest, etc.); “I Segreti,”’ “The 
Libation Bearers,” cantata for chorus, solo, vocal quartet; Kammer Sym- 
phony for ten instruments; three string quartets; other chamber music and 
vocal and piano works, about 25 in all. 

The composition played at these concerts is based upon Walt 
Whitman’s “President Lincoln’s Burial Hymn,” with the following quotations: 
Var. I: “O harsh surrounding cloud that will not free my soul.” 

Var. II: “The gaiety and brightness of a Spring day.” 
Var. III: “In the swamp, in secluded recesses, 
A shy and hidden bird is warbling a song.”’ 
Var. IV: “Night and day journeys a coffin.” 
Var. V: “With dirges through the night, 
With a thousand voices rising strong and solemn.” 


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THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


Meredith Willson, Conducting 


Opera House — Sunday, April 19, 2:00 o’clock 


PRO GR A YM EB 


1. Overturesto. “Risslan cand Viel riya coerce Glinka 


<2 Symphony wie Ey NOt sce. cect eee Meredith Willson 
(A Symphony of San Francisco) 
Andante—Allegro molto moderato—Allegro molto 
Andante 
Presto 


Allegro 
INTERMISS LON 


3 Eime Kleme Nachtmusi¢.2.2.0.,.2..--- a ee eee ec ee Mozart 
Serenade 
Romanze 
Minuetto 
Rondo 


A Capriccio” Mspagnoléw.i. +... 2.tcc..2 Patera: Oo cere Rimsky-Korsakow 
Alborada 
Variations 
Alborada ~ 
Scene and Gypsy Songs 


Fandango of the Asturias 


* World Premiere 


Reserved Seats: $1.00 — 75¢ — 50¢ (No Tax) — Sherman, Clay & Co. 








Var. 


Var. 


Var. 


ole 


CU: 


Valse Lente, as in tavern entertainment; the sudden news of the 
calamity, the death of Lincoln, interrupts the dance. 
‘O western orb, sailing the heaven! 

Now I know what you must have meant, as a month since 
we walked up and down in the dark blue mystic.” 
“Come, lovely and soothing death: Approach strong, Deliveress 

I float this carol with joy, with joy to thee, O Death!” 
“And how shall I deck my song for the large sweet soul that had 
gone? Sea-winds, blown from East to West.” 


) 


“Pictures of growing spring; and farms and homes, 
With floods of the yellow gold of the gorgeous, indolent, 
sinking sun, burning, expanding the air.” 

“Then with the knowledge of death as walking one side of me, and 
the thought of death close-walking the other side of me!” 

“T saw askant the armies; and I saw hundreds of battle-flag 
borne through the smoke of battles.” 


Theme: Firmament at night. “And the great star early droop’d in the 


western sky.” 


These concerts mark the first performance anywhere. The title page 
bears the inscription: “To M. Pierre Monteux, respectfully dedicated in 
gratitude and devotion. San Francisco, 1936, A. W.” 











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PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION . Moussorgsky-Ravel 


In 1874, a posthumous exhibition of drawings and water colors by the 
artist and architect, Victor Hartmann, was arranged and held in Leningrad. 
Moussorgsky attended the exhibition and conceived the idea of paying 
tribute to his departed friend, Hartmann, by drawing the picture “in music,” 
and accordingly composed the suite for piano. There have been many 
orchestral arrangements of the composition, however the most clever is the 
Ravel orchestration which is played at these concerts. 

Following are the interpretations by the late Philip Hale of the 
various movements of the Suite: 

“I. Gnomes. A drawing of a little gnome dragging himself along on 
his short bandy legs; now crawling, now jumping. 

“IT. I] Vecchio Castello. A troubadour sings a melancholy song 
before an old tower in the Middle Ages. (M. Gillette, Saxophone). 

“IIT. Tuileries. Children disputing after their play. An alley in the 
Tuileries garden with a swarm of nurses and children. 

“IV. Bydlo. A Polish wagon with enormous wheels, drawn by oxen. 
Moussorgsky introduced a folk song. 

“V. Ballet of the chickens in their shells. A drawing made by Hart- 
mann for the staging of a scene in the ballet ‘Trilby.’ 

“VI. Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle. Two Polish Jews, the one 
rich, the other poor. One of them is grave, imposing, decisively marked; 
the other is lively, skipping, supplicating. 

“VIT. Limoges, The Market-place. Market women dispute furiously. 

“VIII. Catacombs. In this drawing, Hartmann portrayed himself, 
examining the interior of the catacombs in Paris by the light of a lantern. 

“IX. The Hut on Fowl’s Legs. The drawing showed a clock in the 
form of Baby-Yaga’s, the fantastical witch’s hut on the legs of fowls. 

“X. The Gate of the Bohatyrs at Kiew. Hartmann’s drawing re- 
presented in his plan for constructing a gate at Kiev, in the old Russian 
massive style, with a cupoloa shaped like a Slavonic helmet.” 





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SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


ERNEST SCHELLING, Conducting 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


SAN FRANCISCO OPERA HOUSE 


SATURDAY, APRIL 18 10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 
FRENCH PROGRAM 


OT TE chee bates cece ates east cesses seeccppo mu ncpe ben cer peerw ne canner et sdascbactesnaquncawemicersnsy irene 
Symphony No. 3, Last Movement........----------sessssesssssssoceessetecotenennnternene Saint-Saens 
Two Nocturnes, ‘‘Clouds’’ and ‘‘Festivals’’.........-----s-----cssesessesseseeneenenses Debussy 
The Sorcerer’s Appremtice.........--------ssssscsecesseescccscenesceaeseseesssensennsesancosenaatanaeeenenes Dukas 
Everybody sing ‘‘The Marseillaise’’ 

Rhapsody, ‘‘Espama’”’.....-.cosstersscescseescservensenseseenensnerneassseererersnscaseasacenenceseesearees Chabrier 


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22 4:00 to 5:00 P. M. 


RUSSIAN PROGRAM 





Overture to ‘‘Russlan and Ludmilla’’...........---c-:-c-cc-ccsesecnscesensteenesncrsnenscesnesens Glinka 
Prelude to ‘‘Khovantschima’ ’ ........-..-..--ccc--sseccecseeseecnsnnenennsessseacensessneanenees Moussorgsky 
Gopak from ‘‘The Fair of SG LOCC ENS” wacocencseceonteccs cacertbencucexnrnomastees Moussorgsky 
HES Seah cee ge a ceetine Ss crebemmaadel aR 7 arated 
Everybody sing, ‘‘The Pedlar’’ 

Scherzo from ‘‘Pathetique’’ Symphony........-.-.-----:---++--rseeeseseteereerees Tschaikowsky 
Caucasian  Sketches..............-cc--cccscssesesseceeseceeesecssecesnenensneeanenssnaroossens Ippolitow-Ivanow 


SATURDAY, APRIL 25 10:30 to 11:30 A. M. 


AMERICAN PROGRAM 


Dr War DG eenccciceucs cus cx -ccseaenonesonscnacevouengurcnnse-e-npovnesanseunnnsscnsorocctnar=ntp=resnacs MacDowell 
Call of the Plains. ..........-------o-scecccssseseerseccseceensesnnersnssncennseonasscerecnsnsanestonenes Goldmark 
Memories of my Childhood.............----- Ed ice wea scapdoncens snot essahaceunneumanonrnsetahs Loeffler 
Animal Pictures....----0---s--sssecs-osesecencee conccesnneseconenennnctenncesanessonsescnsacrannanssanscnaseeneres Ganz 
Siamese  Sketchi....---s-cc-ccee-<-osseceeceeonenceneseetrenseesecssenennnrcsencensnnarennsnaseousansscnsnsenecons Eichheim 
Berceuse and Tarantella CFor Strings) .....--..-.---+----eccsesresecetsesnenstsennscenees Schelling 
Everybody sing ‘“‘When Johnny Comes Marching Home’’ 

American  Famtasy......-.--cccecceessessensncsecesscencennnssnasanccentssnssronersnsnnssrnsnansacsonesenseses Herbert 


ALL SEATS RESERVED 
Single Concerts: 50c, 35c, 25c, 15c — Box Office: Sherman, Clay & Co 


AUSPICES: Young People’s Concerts Committee of The Musical 
Ass’n of San Francisco. Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 


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FIRST HARPIST WITH SAN FRANCISCO 
BEGINNERS OR ADVANCE STUDENTS 


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SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Willem Van den Burg, Assistant Conductor 


First Violins: 


Blinder, Naoum 
Concert Master 


Fenster, Lajos 


Asst. Concert Master 


Argiewicz, Artur 
Claudio, Ferdinand 
Gordohn, Robert 
Jensen, Thorstein 
Koharits, Joseph 
Laraia,W. F. 


Mendelevitch, Rodion 


Meriz, Emilio 
Mortensen, Modesta 
Pasmore, Mary 
Wolski, William 
Wegman, Willem 


Second Violins: 

Heyes, Eugene 
Principal 

Baret, Berthe 
Gold, Julius 
Gough, Walter 
Haug, Julius 
Houser, F. S. 
Helget, Hans 
Koblick, N. I. 
Paterson, J. A. 
Rosset, Emil 
Spaulding, Myron 
Wright, Harold 


Violas: 

Firestone, Nathan 
Principal 

Baker, Fred A. 

Hahl, Emil 

Karasik, Manfred 

Lichtenstein, Victor 

Tolpegin, Victor 

Vdovin, Alexander 

Verney, Romain 

Weiler, Erich 


(Listed Alphabetically) 


Cellos: 


Bassoons: 


Van den Burg, Willem Weiss, Adolph 


Principal 
Bem, Stanislas 
Coletti, Bruno 
Dehe, Willem 
Ferner, Walter V. 
Haight, Rebecca 
Kirs, Rudolph 
Pasmore, Dorothy 
Reinberg, Herman 


Basses: 


Bell, Walter 
Principal 
Buenger, A. 
Forman, F. F. 
Guterson, Aaron 
Hibbard, E. B. 
Ramos, Juan 
Schipilliti, John 
Schmidt, Robert E. 


Flutes: 


Woempner, Henry C. 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


Benkman, Herbert 
Herold, R. J. 


Oboes: 


Shanis, Julius 
Schivo, Leslie J. 
Dupuis, Andre 
Plemenik, A. 


English Horn: 


Schivo, Leslie J. 


Clarinets: 


Schmitt, Rudolph 
Rudd, Charles 
Fragale, Frank 
Clow, R. 


Bass Clarinet: 


Fragale, Frank 


La Haye, E. B. 
Hranek, Carl 
Baker, M. 


Contra Bassoon: 
La Haye, E. B. 


Horns: 
Lambert, Pierre 
Trutner, Herman 
Tryner, Charles E. 
Roth, Paul 
Trumpets: 
Klatzkin, Benjamin 
Barton, Leland S. 
Kress, Victor 
Rosebrook, D. C. 
Trombones: 
Giosi, Orlando 
Shoemaker, R. F. 
Klock, J. 
Tuba: 
Storch, A. E. 
Harp: 
Attl, Kajetan 
Thompson, Kathryn 


Tympani and 
Percussion: 


Vendt, Albert 
Wood, W.A. 
Salinger, M. A. 
Nickell, Max 


Piano and Celesta: 
Tibbits: veo. 


Librarian: 
Haug, Julius 


Personnel Manager: 


Oesterreicher, Walter 


eee 


Announcement 
& 
LAST PAIR 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Friday, April 24, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, April 25, 8:30 P. M. 


PP IO, Gok Aa a ee 


I’, “Overture, *Coriolants’” 222.1. eee ee Beethoven 
Zo Olegiryed | [dy Nc 526 5 3 Baie. eee ee Wagner 
3. Tnree Orchestral ‘Sketches a Vien as eee ee Debussy 
4. “symphony No.w2, in) Damayor...< ee eee Brahms 








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>Y MP HG 
COC Fre tes 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
CONDUCTOR 


Willem van den Burg 
Assistant Conductor 





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The Musical Association of San Francisco 


Maintaining the 





San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


Joseph S. Thompson, President 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Vice-President 


OFFICERS 


Dr. Hans Barkan, Vice-President 
John A. McGregor, Treasurer 


Edward F. Moffatt, Secretary 


Robert W. Miller, Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Lena Blanding 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 


Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Armsby, Chairman 


Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland 

Robert W. Miller 

Guido J. Musto 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. George T. 
Cameron 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Edgar Walter 


Dr. Leo Eloesser 
J. Emmet Hayden 


MEMBERS OF THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Armsby, E. Raymond 
Armsby, 

Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Arnold, G. Stanleigh 
Baker, Mrs. George 

Washington, Jr. 
Barkan, Dr. Hans 
Bartlett, 

Mrs. Edward Otis 
Bender, Albert M. 
Bradley, Mrs. F. W. 
Blanding, Miss Lena 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Cameron, George T. 
Crocker, William H. 
Crocker, Mrs. W. W. 
Cushing, Mrs. O.K. 
Dohrmann, A. B. C. 
Donohoe, 

Miss Katherine 
Dyer, Joseph H., Jr. 
Elkus, Albert I. 


Eloesser, Dr. Leo 
Esberg, Milton H. 
Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. 
Filmer, Mrs. W. Coy 


Musto, Guido J. 
McGregor, John A. 
McKinnon, 

Mrs. Harold Richert 


Fleishhacker, Mortimer Newell, R. C. 


Flowers, Mrs. J. C. 
Forbes, John F., 
Gilman, Don E. 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hart, Julien 

Hayden, J. Emmet 
Koshland, 

Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koster, F. J. 
Lachman, Gus 
Martin, Walter S. 
Merola, Gaetano 
Mendell, 

Mrs. George H. 
Miller, Robert W. 
Monteagile, Kenneth 


Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Robbins, Mrs. George B. 
Schilling, Miss Else 
Schlesinger, B. F. 
Sloss, Mrs. M. C. 
Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
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Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Walter, Edgar 
Weill, Michel 
Wiel, Eli H. 
Williams, 
Mrs. W. Wilberforce 
Winslow, Mrs. S. S. 


ORCHESTRA COMMITTEE 


Walter A. Weber 


Eugene Heyes 
Erich Weiler 


M.A. Salinger 


PAST PRESIDENTS OF THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 


T. B. Berry 
W.B. Bourn 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, 


Managing Director 


William Sproule 
John D. McKee 


J.B. Levison 
Richard M. Tobin 


Peter Conley, 


Business Manager 


ST 





Sok 














The Season of Nineteen Thirty-Six 


With this pair of concerts the Musical Association closes the delight- 
fully successful Season of Nineteen Thirty-six, successful because of the 
combining of many most fortunate factors. 


Foremost, essential and most thankless, or seemingly thankless was the 
remarkable achievement of President Richard M. Tobin in lifting the Musical 
Association out of the indebtedness which mounted through the recent years 
of depression. 

This would have been almost encouragement enough, but the addition 
of the Civic Support, first through the vote of San Francisco, and then by 
the prompt appropriation by the Art Commission, added what was virtually 
a mandate to boldly proceed. 


The consent of Vice-President Leonora Wood Armsby to assume the 
managing directorship at once gave assurance of artistic authority, an 
asstrance which the season has richly profited by in the selection of guest 
artists and in numberless details. 


Perhaps the greatest feature of Mrs. Armsby’s management was the 
securing of our conductor, Pierre Monteux. But even she could hardly have 
known how perfectly this great artist blends those qualities, not necessarily 
artistic, that supplied a vital need of our Orchestra. An utter absence of 
favoritism, a warm personal human sympathy with the orchestra personnel, 
quickly created a spirit of affection and comradeship that has welded the 
orchestra into a group of musicians who eagerly approach rehearsals and 
concerts. A program builder of great balance and taste, and an accompanist 
who inspires the guest artists, a very large part of our good fortune is in 
the engagement of Mr. Monteux. 


It is evidence of Mr. Monteux’ freedom from favoritism that he 
arranged for the importation of only five musicians, which is also evidence 
of the musical excellence of the greater portion of the members of the 
orchestra who only awaited the inspiration of adequate leadership. And in 
all matters relating to the business of gathering the orchestra we have 
enjoyed the most considerate and constructive cooperation of the Musicians’ 
Union. 

But after all, there would have been no business to carry on if it were 
not for the Membership and its generous subscriptions to the Sustaining 
Fund. That such support would be forthcoming even though the new season 
was so uncertain was the basic faith of this Administration. But even with a 
basic faith one can be surprised and your support has been inspirational, 
both by the contributions themselves and by the work of those who form an 
honorary list, from which I cannot refrain from giving the names of Miss 
Lutie Goldstein of the Women’s Committee and Mr. E. Raymond Armsby of the 
Men’s Committee, whose work in enlarging and conserving the membership 
was invaluable. 

In the liberal space given by their critics, in the frequent editorials of 
encouragement, and in the news and social publicity which they have so 
freely published, the newspapers and other periodicals have done their 
fullest part most generously. 

With this happy congeries of factors perhaps it is no wonder we have 
had a splendid season and can look forward to a larger orchestra, frequent 
orchestral novelties and a longer season for Nineteen Thirty-six and Thirty- 
Seven. 

Your President will be glad to accept your praise for his optimism, 
enthusiasm and loquacity. 






President. 


SO%2 








San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


WILLEM VAN DEN BURG, Assistant Conductor 
1936 Season 


TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1122nd and 1124th Concerts 


Friday, April 24, 2:30 P. M. 
Saturday, April 25, 8:30 P. M. 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


PROGRAMM E 


Le. ‘Overture... “Coniolagus acne se ee eee CLL OUEN 
Dir Apne Ered al Gly a rr te ee Wagner 
3. “Phree- Orchestral Sketches a Mer’ 22232. = ee ee Debussy 


From Dawn Till Noon on the Ocean 
Frolics of Waves 


Dialogue of Wind and Sea 


IN Phe Mes sl -O-N 


IT WOULD BE WONDERFULLY ENCOURAGING IF YOU 
WOULD EXPRESS YOUR APPRECIATION OF THIS SEASON 
BY MAKING YOUR PLEDGE FOR THE COMING SEASON 
ON THE ENVELOPE SUPPLIED WITH THIS PROGRAMME. 

MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 





4s, SVN DMONY INO. 22 sc Mae Oke caret eR reree ee e es es Brahms 


Allegro non troppo 
Adagio non troppo 
Allegretto gracioso 


Allegro con spirito 





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OVERTURE, “CORIOLAN” .. . . . . Beethoven 


Wagner was greatly impressed with this overture, and wrote quite a 
lengthy treatise on it to make clear the way for those who are about to 
share “the same sublime enjoyment as I myself have reaped.” Here is 
Wagner’s reproduction of the hero whom he begs us all to visualize for 
ourselves in order to better appreciate Beethoven’s creation: 


“Coriolanus, the man of force untamable, unfitted for hypocrite’s 
humility, banished therefore from his father’s city and, with its foes for 
allies, combating that city to extermination; Coriolanus, moved by mother, 
wife, and child, at last abandoning vengeance, and condemmed to death by 
his confederates for t