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fhe MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO presents 


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Fhe SAN FRANCISO 
YMPHOVY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX - CONDUCTOR 








TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


DECEMBER 6, 1940 - APRIL 19, 1941 


ot nl tine oes een 


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ONORA WOOD ARMSBY ¢ PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 





MARGARET SPEAKS 


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RACHMANINOFF 





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PIERRE MONTEUX-CONDUCTOR 


PREZ INA BIVLA LEB BE NT GIS LIGASE S) 





RATS 





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TO PUR Ma Doss 








TRS TAROT ELE 


ISAAC STERN 








DOROTHY MAYNOR 














MAOTEM cconces wooe sasse 


It is customary for the Musical Association of 
San Francisco to send out a yearly prospectus 
announcing the varied attractions to be presented under its management. The 
pages of this folder cover the 1940-1941 season and reveal the general spirit and 
character of our program. 


One noteworthy feature may be observed—the division of the scheduled 
twelve pair of concerts into six pair which will present guest artists, and six pair 
that will be purely orchestral. The Musical Association feels its patrons’ interests 
will be best served by hearing frequent orchestral performances under our dis- 
tinguished leader, Pierre Monteux. 


In keeping with the established standard for our programs will be the artists 
who have been chosen for their unexcelled qualities: 
RACHMANINOFF: World-renowned composer and pianist, who will appear in two pair 


of concerts, featuring a cycle of his outstanding works, many of which will be 
new to San Francisco. 


DorotHy MAyNor: Soprano, who has electrified the East with her gifted voice and 
artistry, and who will make her exclusive San Francisco appearances this season 
with the Symphony. 


Jose Irursi: A favorite among our established pianists--one who is always welcome 
and eagerly anticipated. 


ISAAC STERN: Youthful violinist, who has already attained top rank through his virile 
and authoritative virtuosity. 


Sir THOMAS BEECHAM: Recognized throughout the world as England’s outstanding 
conductor and interpreter. 


Interesting orchestral programs will be announced upon the return of Pierre Monteux 
to San Francisco. 


A special performance with Margaret Speaks, gifted soprano of the concert 
and radio world, on Sunday evening, March 2, under the auspices of the San 
Francisco Symphony Forum, will be a colorful event. On this occasion, the 
Forum, composed of college students from Berkeley, Stanford, Mills and Univer- 
sity of San Francisco, will function in the capacity of management. The students 
of the Forum are incorporated in the Musical Association and are a vital force. 
Their courage, faith and service are prophetic of the important part youth plays 
and will continue to play in our work. 


The Musical Association, which maintains the San Francisco Symphony 

Orchestra, receives its support from the voluntary generosity of its friends and 

U through the sale of season tickets. Your purchase of a season ticket helps 
towards solving our economic problems. 


Al We take this opportunity to thank you for your valued support and invite 
S 5 Ps e e ° . 
your co-operation in again assisting to make our 
symphony continuingly secure and successful. 


| 





FRIDAY AFTERNOON SERIES 


TWO-THIRTY O’CLOCK 


DECEMBER 6° 9.0 > 6° 48s ee  CORENING CONCERT 
DECEMBER 13... . . . .. .. ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
JANUARY3 . . . . SiR THOMAS BEECHAM, Guest Conductor 
JANUARY 17 <2 on Be oe ee LISAAC STERN: Vrolinis! 
TANUARY: 240 vs. s)he Dera fc ee tee PORGHESTRAT: PROGRAM 
REBRUARY (© +. 400) beeen ee | RACH MANINOBE,, Pianist 
FEBRUARY 14 . . . . . . +. +. RACHMANINOFF, Pianist 
REBRUARY 2) 40. SP ee oe VORCHESTRATAEROGRAM 
Marco 14... . . . . . DorotHy Maynor, Soprano 
MaRncHoS)s 2°. 0e 4 2a 2» ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
NPRIE tia Ok es <b Dee he oe een DORCHESERAT PROGRAM 
AIPRIT ELC ae bat ah 4) ee os ae oe ee.) OSESELURBIcnLaiese 


SEASON TICKETSeFRIDAY SERIES 
TWELVE CONCERTS 
ORCHESTRA, Center sections and first four center aisle 
seats in side sections, 6thto 28throws. . . . . . $33.00 
ORCHESTRA, 3rd, 4th and 5th rows, allsections . . . . 26.40 


ORCHESTRA, all side sections 6th to 28th rows not includ- 
me ftouriaisie Seats a0. 0 yt tees a oe ag oe 


ORCHESTRA, [stand 2nd tows 4 ). 1. %» 402.2 ° 2 2-19.80 
GRAND TIER, three center sections, firstthreerows. . . 33.00 
GRAND) LIBRA Dalanices.s> fe b> eo. 4 ees Be ee ee el ee al OO 
Dress CIRCLES first five tows... (2. # af i wots oe 1 LOS 
DRESS GIRGCERSNEXUSINTOWS co) © ose ae Ibe, wa bowl) 
ALCON So GIRGIR Gr bc, U8 The! ne i ee sere ALOE) 
BALCONN wee * 3 ty Hetce: Suh Ped  Wee es eat mine cesta SOOO 
Boxes‘obeip ht seater ai <2 / a i) do a eats, ued Le tOLO OO 
DOXxESs Sincleseats, ss se a ar wt oS poate She eae agOUOU 


All Tickets are Tax Exempt 





SATURDAY NIGHT SERIES 







EIGHT-THIRTY O’CLOCK 
















DECEMBER} ( 3 2 « . « & o's. » » OPENING CONCERT 


DECEMBER 14... . . . . . ORCHESTRAL PRocRAM 
JANUARY4 . . . . Sir THomas BEECHAM, Guest Conductor ‘ 
JANUARY]8. . . . . . . . . . Isaac Stern, Violinist 
JANUARY 25° 2 5 3°. 895-2] - ORGHEStRAD PROGRAM 
FEBRUARY 8 . . . . . . . . RACHMANINOFF, Pianist 
FEBRUARY 15 . . . . . . . +. RACHMANINOFF, Pianist 
PEBRUARY2Z2 4. @ 4 ~2 «s 4 ~ ..+ ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
MarcH 15... . . . . . DororHy Maynor, Soprano 
MARCH 29) ae iu. = @ ie. 4 ORCHESTRAL PROCRAM 
APRA O tne to 4 oe = (ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
APRIDIONS hot, oleae be ene 2 ac, JOSE TTRURBESeramist 





SEASON TICKETS*SATURDAY SERIES 







TWELVE CONCERTS 





ORCHESTRA . . . . $15.00 Granp Tier... . $15.00 
Dress CircLtE . . . 10.20 Batcony CirctE .. 10.20 
BaLcony. . . . . 6.60 BoxesofS8seats . . 144.00 








SPECIAL POPULAR CONCERT 
Sunday Evening, March 2 @ Eight-Thirty O’Clock 






Soloist: MARGARET SPEAKS, Soprano 








ORCHESTRA : a0, 1. .- $1.25 “-Granp Tier’ > 4. 4 $195 
Dress CIRCLE. « . . 100. BatconyCimcie. . . 85 
DATCONY 4 mean Seek 65" Rox Sears « os. =. Shoe ahSO 











Under auspices of San Francisco Symphony Forum of Uni- 
versity of California, Stanford University, Mills College and 
University of San Francisco 






All Tickets are Tax Exempt 
































i 


THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCIS¢ 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 


| 

| 

{ 

} 

| 

! 

| Mrs. Leonora Woop Armssy, President and Managing Director 

| E. RaymMonp ArMsBY. . . . Vice-President JoHN A.McGrecor. .. . . . Treasurer 
| 
{ 
| 


Pau A. BissINcER . . . . Vice-President Howarp K. SKINNER .. . . . Secretary 
CuHartEs R. BtytH .. . . Vice-President GerrALDG.Ross . . . . Assistant Secretary 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
| Dr. Hans BARKAN MorTIMER FLEISHHACKER Guwo J. Musto 

PaAut A. BISSINGER Miss LutiE D. GoLDsTEIN Mrs. ASHTON H. Potter 
Miss LoutseE A. Boyp Mrs. WALTER A. HAAS Miss ELsE SCHILLING 
Mrs. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY Mrs. E. S. HELLER Mrs. M. C. Stoss 

Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN Mrs. Marcus S. KoSHLAND Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 


KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. O. G. Miter, Chairman 














E. RayMonp ARMSBY GEORGE T. CAMERON J. B. Levison 
Mrs. Epwarp Otis BARTLETT MorTIMER FLEISHHACKER JoHN Francis NEYLAN 
Paut A. BISSINGER Miss Lutie D. GoLpsTEIN Mrs. AsHuTon H. Porter 
CHARLES R,. BLYTH Mrs. Marcus S. KosHLAND Joun H. THRELKELD 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 
| Mrs. LEonorA Woop ARMSBY Mrs. GEorcE T. CAMERON J. Emmet HAYDEN 
Dr. Hans BARKAN Dr. LEo ELOESSER CHARLES G. Norris 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 
Puiuie N. Boone VIRGINIA ADAMS Henry Evers 
Lewis BYINGTON CoRNELIA CLARK MARYLOUISE SANFORD 
| COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 
C.0.G. MILLER. ... . . . . Finance’ Mrs. Jonn P. Cocutan .Vice-Chair.Ticket Sales 
Mrs. Marcus S. KosHLAND . Women’s Finance Mrs. ASHTON H. Potter . . . . Box Sales 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss . Ticket Sales and Publicity Mrs. Lirti1an BrrmincHam . Symphony Guild: 
| Mrs. H. R. McKinnon .Young People’s Concerts Puitip N. Boone . . S.F. Symphony Forum 
BOARD OFGOVERNORS 
E. RayMonp ARMSBY Mrs. Paut I. Facan Mrs. Ancus D. McDonaLp 
. Mrs. LEonorA Woop ARMSBY MortTIMER FLEISHHACKER Joun A. McGreEcor 
G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD Mrs. J. C. FLowErs Mrs. Harotp R. McKINNoN 
Mrs. Georce W. BAKER, JR. Joun F. Forses R. C. NEWELL 
Dr. HANS BARKAN Mrs. J. E. FRENCH CHARLES G. Norris 
Mrs. Epwarp O. BARTLETT Miss LutiE D. GoLpsTEIN CHARLES PAGE, JR. 
ALBERT M. BENDER JoserpH D. GRANT Puuiuip H. PatcHiIn 
CHARLES R. BLYTH FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS Mrs. Asuton H. Potter 
Miss Loutse A. Boyp Mrs. LEon GUGGENHIME Mrs. STANLEY POWELL 
Mrs. F. W. BRADLEY Mrs. WALTER A. HAAs Mrs. GeorcE B. Rossins 
H. SEWALL BRADLEY Mrs. Harry S. HALEY OTTORINO RONCHI 
Paut A. BISSINGER J. Emmet HaybDEN Mrs. Henry P. RussELi 
| GrEoRGE T. CAMERON Mrs. E. S. HELLER Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
| Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN Watter S. HELLER Mrs. M. C. Stoss 
| Mrs. Joun P: CocHLAN Mrs. I. W. HELLMAN Mrs. Nico. SMITH 
Mrs. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 
| Mrs. W. W. CrRocKER Mrs. Marcus S. KosHLAND Mrs. Powers SYMINGTON 
Mrs. O. K. CusHING FREDERICK J. KOSTER Mrs. Davip ARMSTRONG-T AYLOR 
Mrs. GEORGES DE LATOUR GAETANO MEROLA JosEePH S. THOMPSON 
| Miss KATHARINE DONOHOE C. O. G. MILLER Joun H. THRELKELD 
JosEepH H. Dyer, Jr. Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER Mrs. Cyrit ToBIN 
Mrs. FRANK EDOFF Rosert W. MILier THomMas J. WATSON 
| SipnEY M. EHRMAN Epwarp F. MoFFaATT MICHEL WEILL 
ALBERT I. ELkus KENNETH MONTEAGLE Mrs. Eur H. WIeEt 
Dr. LEO ELOESSER Guiwo J. Musto LEONARD E. Woop 


ForREST ENGELHART Dwicut F. McCorMAck J. D. ZELLERBACH 





THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OP S70 No oR ANG ES oe 


PR ESE NES eee 


SAY PRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
C-O° NOD he ree 


20. 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD k. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 











COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


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SEE YOUR LAWYER ABOUT YOUR WILL TODAY 


Dp) Ee ALR enon) 


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Market at Montgomery . . . . Market at Grant Avenue 
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MEMBER F. D. I. GC. 


























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340 POST STREET - 


BNP, YAO, WNP YUH WEN 


ESOL ROL ENS ENSL ENOL 


Formal Occasions 
OS LD 


the value of a goad appearance 


found in the correciness 


of Oxford Formal Clathes. 


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FULL DRESS $95 
TUXEDO $85 


Bullock & Jones 


CUSTOM TAILORS - MEN’S WEAR - IMPORTERS 
UNION SQUARE NORTH 


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See ney 


Continental Buffet Luncheon in the Garden Court 


RUSS MORGAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA PLAY NIGHTLY 
(Except Monday) AND AT SATURDAY TEA DANSANTS 


THE PALACE HOTEL 





TODAY'S GREAT PIANO 


LHE. CHOICE (OF 


TODAY'S GREAT ARTISTS 


CHARLES NAEGELE 
WILLEM NOSKE 





RUDA FIRKUSNY 
ARNOLD GABOR 


FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 


SIMON BARER 
JOSEPH BATTISTA 
HAROLD BAUER 


WALTER GIESEKING 
BORIS GOLSCHMANN 
EUGENE GOOSSENS 


LOUIS PERSINGER 
LILY PONS 
ROSA RAISA 



















MOISSAYE BOGUSLAWSKI WILLIAM HARMS ANGEL REYES 

ANTON BILOTTI IRMA SCHENUIT HALL GIACOMO RIMINI 
JUSS! BJOERLING STEPHAN HERO MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
LUCREZIA BORI AMPARO ITURBI TITO SCHIPA 

JEANNE BEHREND JOSE ITURBI E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
BELA BARTOK EDWARD JOHNSON BERNARDO SEGALL 
MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU BREENDAN KEENAN JOHANN SINGER 
MARIO CHAMLEE ALEXANDER KELBERINE RUTH SLENCZYNSKI 
ALFREDO CASELLA ALEXANDER KIPNIS LEO SMIT 

KARIN DAYAS WIKTOR LABUNSKI JOSEPH SZIGETI 
CECILLE DE HORVATH WESLEY LA VIOLETTE LEONARD SHURE 

JOSE ECHANIZ RALPH LEOPOLD MAGDA TAGLIAFERO 
DAVID EARLE JOSEF LHEVINNE ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
FLORENCE EASTON ROSINA LHEVINNE HELEN TRAUBEL 
SEVERIN EISENBRGER ERICA MORINI PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANK FARREL EDITH MASON VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
DANIEL ERICOURT ALFRED MIROVITCH SAMUEL YAFFE 

JAKOB GIMPEL GRACE MOORE FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin in its Concerts. 
310 SUTTER ST. 


soarerst, — MALDtHt 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARTISTS DO 


1828 WEBSTER ST. 
OAKLAND 


Poa 


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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
E. RAYMOND ARMSBY VICE-PRESIDENT JOHN A. MCGREGOR... 
PAUL A. BISSINGER VICE-PRESIDENT HOWARD K. SKINNER. . . 
CHARLES R. BLYTH VICE-PRESIDENT GERALD G. ROSS ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


TREASURER 
SECRETARY 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Guipo J. Musto 

Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 
Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 


DR. HANS BARKAN 

PaUL A. BISSINGER 

Miss LOUISE A. BOYD 

MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 
Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTicE D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


Pee 


a FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Cc. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTiceE D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


J. B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
j PAUL A. BISSINGER 

" CHARLES R. BLYTH 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. NORRIS 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. HANS BARKAN Dr. LEO ELOESSER 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 
PHILIP N. BOONE VIRGINIA ADAMS HENRY EVERS 
LEWIS BYINGTON CORNELIA CLARK MARYLOUISE SANFORD 
RICHARD LYON 


Mrs. LEONORA WoOOoOD ARMSBY 


. CHAIRMAN WOMEN’S FINANCE COMMITTEE 
. TICKET SALES AND PUBLICITY 


MrRs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND . 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss. : 
Mrs. H. R. MCKINNON. 
Mrs. JOHN P. COGHLAN. 


- YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER. 


Mrs. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM. 


PHILIP S. BOONE. 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS . 
MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 


Mrs. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 


G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
Mrs. GEORGE W. BAKER, JR. 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

Mrs. EDWARD D. BARTLETT 
ALBERT M. BENDER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 

Miss Louise A. Boyo 
MRS. F. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
GEORGE T. CAMERON 

MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN 


MRS. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE 


Mrs. W. W. CROCKER 
Mrs. O. K. CUSHING 

Mrs. GEORGES DE LATOUR 
MISS KATHARINE DONOHOE 
JOSEPH H. DYER, UR. 
MRS. FRANK EDOFF 
SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 
ALBERT |. ELKUS 

DR. LEO ELOESSER 
FORREST ENGELHART 


. VICE-CHAIRMAN, TICKET SALES 


- Box SALES 
. SYMPHONY GUILD 


SAN’ FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
. HONORARY CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
. VICE-CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


MRS. PAUL |. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 
JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS 
Mrs. LEON GUGGENHIME 
Mrs. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S. HALEY 
J. EMMET HAYDEN 

MrRs E. S. HELLER 
WALTER S. HELLER 

Mrs. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
GAETANO MEROLA 

Cc. 0. G. MILLER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
ROBERT W. MILLER 
EDWARD F. MOFFATT 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Guipo J. Musto 

DWIGHT F. MCCORMACK 


E COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 
ci else MIME ER Ys 2c. Pick isl Chere ARCOM Miter e bens . . . CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 

JOHN A. MCGREGOR 

MRS. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 

R. C. NEWALL 

CHARLES G. NORRIS 

CHARLES PAGE, JR. 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 

Mrs. STANLEY POWELL 

Mrs. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 

OTTORINGO RONCHI 

MRS. HENRY P. RUSSELL 

MisS ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 

Mrs. Nicol SMITH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

MRS. POWERS SYMINGTON 

Mrs. DAVID ARMSTRONG- 
TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 

JOHN H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. CYRIL TOBIN 

THOMAS J. WATSON 

MICHEL WEILL 

LEONARD E. Woop 

J. D. ZELLERBACH 





beautiful flowers earved by hand with white sand on flawless Slasd 


Torch Ginger (illustrated), Bamboo, Night Blooming Cereus, Oppi and Butterfly Orchid. 


Dinner plates doz. 50.00 
Salad plates doz. 35.00 
Butter plates doz. 25.00 
Lombte glasses doz. 19.50 


momeseayme - °° SLOANE 
- GLASS SHOP + STREET FLOOR 


SUTTER wear GRANT ¢ SAN FRANCISCO 


SV; 
¢,8. 


Sh 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


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FIRST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1192nd and 1193rd Concerts 


FripAY, DecEMBER 6, 2:30 P. M. 
SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 8:30 P. M. 


; A\\ alsyens 


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.. Program... 


ie BILEE OVERTURE Weber 


SYMPHONY No. 5, 
ferret PVCU OIRO) WSO Zin at Nei ea Sibelius 


‘Tempo molto moderato — Allegro moderato 
Andante mosso, quasi Allegretto 
Allegro molto 


NPE R. Mais: SahiOgn 


SYMPHONY No. 2, 
DYN WAN KORG @ bl OP sai ca anlinre prereset ae a Brahms 


Allegro non troppo 

Adagio non troppo 

Allegretto grazioso, quasi Andantino 
Allegro con spirito 














SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 


its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. 


a Meher 


phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. ‘Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 


and courage. 


. . We feel that not only the Association, but all the 


members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 


Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 


Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 


Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 


Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 


deLatour, Mrs. George F. 


Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 


Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 


Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 
Evans, Mrs. Harry 
Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 


Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. 
Gray, Nancy 

Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harriss Mrs-sk. W. 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs Horace 

Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 
Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Knox, Mrs. John B. 

Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 


Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 

Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 
Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 


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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


JUBILEE OMETRGE CER rt rae ae tees Karl Maria Von Weber 
(1786-1826) 


Friedrich August, the first king of Saxony, celebrated the fiftieth 
anniversary of his coronation in September, 1818. Weber was at the time 
director of the state-supported German opera in Dresden, the Saxon 
capital, and composed several works in honor of his royal patron’s jubilee, 
of which this overture is the best known. It is in the style commonly 
adopted for such productions, climaxing and ending with the Saxon 
national anthem, which is far from unknown to the American audience, 
but with a different title and reference. 


SYMPLONY No:.5, 
Bera NE AS OR © DUIS O2 i ose aetna oe Jean Sibelius 
(1865-) 

This work is played today as San Francisco’s part in an international 
tribute to Sibelius on the occasion of his 75th birthday. It is therefore 
particularly interesting to note that the fifth symphony received its first 
performance at a concert in Helsinki on its composer’s fiftieth birthday, 
December 8, 1915.* This event was celebrated as a national holiday 
throughout Finland. 

The symphony, however, reflects no holiday mood. “In a deep dell 
again’, wrote Sibelius late in 1914, and the “deep dell’ was apparently 
one of the spirit. “But I already begin to see dimly the mountain I shall 
certainly ascend ... God opens His door for a moment, and His 
orchestra plays the fifth symphony’. For Karl Ekman, from whose bio- 
graphy of Sibelius this quotation is taken, the fifth symphony reflects the 
composer’s reactions to the outbreak of the first World War. Ekman 
calls it “an expression of its author’s strong optimism, gained through 
suffering; in an evil time an uplifting testimony to an indomitable faith 
in life’s ever renovating power’. 

It is no part of a program editor’s business to tell his readers whether 
a thing be good or bad, or to what degree it is to be appreciated. His 
attitude, in the late Sir Donald Francis Tovey’s phrase, should be that 
of “counsel for the defense’, and his defense should do no more than 
assemble pertinent facts, since no attorney ever does more than appeal to 
the jury’s cold, impersonal powers of reasoning. Nevertheless, a subjective 
reaction to a piece of music may at times be quoted in these notes, and no 


*The score was later revised and did not attain its final form until 1919. At this time 
Sibelius was working simultaneously on his fifth, sixth and seventh symphonies. 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
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HENRI TEMIANKA 


PRESS REVIEWS FOLLOWING MR. TEMIANKA’S RECITAL 
IN TOWN HALL, NEW YORK, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1940 


NEW YORK TIMES (Noel Strauss) 


... Violin playing that was exceptional in all respects... An 
aACHIEVEMent On the titsh Tank... Ante completely mature te gens 
remarkable on the interpretational side as it is for its highly perfected 
technique . . . Rare finesse and charm . . . Unfailing accuracy of 
finger. 


NEW YORK SUN (Ivan Kolodin) 


ee Wail iia playing in a noble and enduring tradition ee 
violinist of consequence and an interpreter of distinction. 


NEW YORK HERALD-TRIBUNE (Jerome D. Bohn) 


. . . A violinist of genuine importance . . . Few players can hold 
the listener’s undivided attention throughout the course of one of 
Bach’s long works for violin solo as did Mr. ‘Temianka with his con- 
ception of the B Minor Partita. 


NEW YORK TELEGRAM (Robert C. Bagar) 


. . . Rarely has one heard the fascinating Szymanowski piece per- 
formed with such poetry, sensitiveness and exactitude. 


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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


subjective reaction to this symphony is more interesting than that of 
Cecil Gray, as published in his book on Sibelius. 


“Physicists and astronomers tell us’’, says Gray, “that there is in the cos- 
mos a species of star which they call a White Dwarf, the substance of which 
is so compressed that a piece the size of a shilling may weigh as much as 
several tons, and Sibelius’ fourth symphony is a veritable White Dwarf 
in the musical firmament. .. If the fourth is a White Dwarf, the fifth 
is its Opposite, a Red Giant, a Betelgeuse of music, a huge work in which 
the substance 1s highly attenuated and rarefied . . . . In the fourth there 
is not a bar that could possibly have been written by any other com- 
poser, dead or alive . . . . In the fifth, on the contrary, there is not a bar, 
considered in isolation from its context, that could not have been written 
by anyone else, yet curiously enough the effect of the whole is just as 
completely and absolutely individual, as utterly unlike anything else in 
music as the fourth itself. For this reason it is perhaps an even more re- 
markable achievement than its predecessor, for it is less difficult, though 
assuredly difficult enough, to do something which no one else has ever 
previously done, than to reveal a fresh and unsuspected beauty in the 
familiar, the obvious, the commonplace, the hackneyed even, which is 
what Sibelius does in this work” 


It is common practice for symphonic program books to contain formal 
outlines of symphonies and other works in large forms, but in the case of 
the last four of Sibelius’ seven symphonies these are extremely difficult 
to present within reasonable limits of space, since these works dispense 
almost entirely with the classical patterns. 


Too much is said about the bones and sinews of the classical forms, too 
little about the spirit that animates them. With the earliest masters of 
these forms, like Haydn and Mozart, they are a device for securing 
dynamic symmetry. Their emphasis is upon balance; upon statement, 
contrast and restatement. In one of the most profoundly influential first 
movements in the symphonic literature, that of the ninth symphony, Bee- 
thoven hints at one revolutionary change in the formal meaning of the 
sonata pattern, and completely achieves another. The innovation com- 
pletely achieved is the organization of the movement around a central 
climax, creating the kind of pyramidal first-movement form much beloved 
of later symphonists, among them Brahms. ‘The innovation hinted at is 
the gradual evolution of the form from mysterious beginnings, in place 


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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


of the specific statement of a thesis with which the classical sonata move- 
ment commonly opens. 


The later symphonies of Sibelius build upon the mysterious opening 
of the ninth symphony and carry it to its logical conclusion, leading to a 
type of structure wherein the classical balances and restatements are 
almost completely absent, their place being taken by continuous growth 
from tentative beginnings to climactic conclusion. In a scheme of con- 
tinuous evolution no one part is more important than another, and the 
rerminology of principal and subordinate themes, bridge passages, etc. 
therefore cannot apply. Consequently the only verbal analysis possible is 
one in which practically every line of the music has a corresponding line 
of text, and such an analysis is out of the question in the present program 
book. 

These remarks are directed, so far as the fifth symphony is concerned, 
at the first and last movements. The second is a series of remarkably 
simple variations on the theme presented by the flutes at the ninth bar, 
the rhythm stated by the strings at the outset marching almost without 
interruption throughout. 


SYMPHONY No. 2, 


DEVIANT ORR OPUS 1300 fae thers ae eee Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 

Brahms carried self-criticism to almost pathological lengths, destroying 

innumerable complete compositions and endlessly revising others. Prof. 

Tovey remarks that the published work of Brahms is like an iceberg seen 

from a distance; only about one-ninth of the composer’s total output exists 

in print, and the manuscripts of the remainder were burnt by Brahms 
himself. 


One evidence of this diffidence to inflict his music upon the world is 
revealed in Brahms’ curious custom of issuing two works in the same form 
in the same or immediately successive opus numbers (the piano sonatas, 
Opp. 1 and 2; the four sets of piano variations, Opus 21, 23 and 24; the 
piano quartets, Opp. 25 and 26; the two string quartets, Opus 51; the 
clarinet sonatas, Opus 120, etc.) It is almost as if the satisfactory comple- 
tion of one work in a given pattern cost the composer so much effort and 
labor that sufficient head of creative steam was left over to cause a second 









SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WaAIlnut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 


The following distinguished members of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra are teaching at the Conservatory: 


STANISLAS BEM CHARLES RUDD 
In Charge of Cello Department Clarinet and Saxophone 
HENRY WOEMPNER BENJAMIN KLATZKIN 


Flute and Woodwind Ensemble Trumpet and Brass Instruments 





3 











THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 





Presents 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, Managing Director 
HOWARD K. SKINNER, Business Manager 


OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


TWELVE FRIDAY AFTERNOON AnD SATURDAY NIGHT CONCERTS 
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DATES AND GUEST ARTISTS 


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Sunday Evening, March 2 - Eight Thirty O’Clock 
Soloist: MARGARET SPEAKS, Soprano 


Tickets: 65¢ to $1.25 (Tax Exempt ) 








Box Office: War Memorial Opera House—UNderhill 4008 


14 

























































































PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


work in the same mold to emerge. Sometimes these Brahmsian pairs seem 
to comment on each other, or to reflect the given form in different lights. 
‘The most obvious example of this is the pair of concert overtures, Opp. 80 
and 81, the first of which is the comic Academic Festival, while the second 
is the Tragic. 


A good case might be made out for regarding the first and second sym- 
phonies as an intimately related pair of this sort. Brahms worked for fif- 
teen years on the first symphony, completing it in 1876. The second sym- 
phony was finished a year later, and had taken only a few months of effort. 
The two works have one highly significant thematic idea in common. The 
huge, stormy motif, C-B-C, upon which the finale of the first symphony is 
constructed, dominates the second symphony as D-C sharp-D. The key 
plan of the first symphony rises by thirds, that of the second symphony 
descends by thirds. (In the first symphony the first movement is in C 
minor, the second in A flat major, equivalent to G sharp, the third is in 
B and the last again in C. In the second symphony the progression of the 
four movements is D, B, G and D.) This nearly precise reversal of the 
sequence of keys in the first symphony may have been accidental, but with 
a Brahms very little happens by accident. 


The emotional character of the two works is likewise sharply con- 
trasted. ‘he first symphony is rugged, heroic, vehement, and caused Hans 
von Bulow to call it Beethoven’s tenth. The second symphony is far more 
intimate and relaxed and jovial. Philip Hale, paraphrasing Richard 
Specht, speaks of it as evoking “sunshine, fair days, warm winds, clarity 





ANN OUN GE ME Ne 


Second Pair of Symphony Concerts 
PIERRE MONTEDX, Conductor 


Friday, December 13, 2:30 ° Saturday, December 14, 8:30 


PROGRAM 


Minekicat mestivak \OVvertures, .5 0. fcee tok William Schuman 
(First performance in San Francisco) 


ESEHONUON ZS YI PHODY wc fate sas: vs oes ees Vaughan Williams 


SV MED OLLONIGGINGT (fA IINd | Olivas este soc csxe coe eay hoe auehe eae Beethoven 


Box Office: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland; 
Telephone SUtter 1331(San Francisco) or HIgate 1220 (Oakland) 





15 










THt ART COMMISSIM 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


Municipal Concerts 


SEASON 1941 


LEOPOLD STOKOWSKHI 


JANUARY 10, 1941 


BALLET RUSSE DE MONTE CARLO 


JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 1941 


ALEXANDER BRAILOWShHhY 


MARCH 4, 1941 


hIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 


MARCH 21, 1941 


YEHUDI MENUHIN 


APRIL 15, 1941 




















with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


® 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 





In accordance with the policy of the Art Commission, the single and season 
tickets for this series will be offered at popular prices. For information, phone 
or write Box Office, War Memorial Opera House, UNderhill 4008 


J. EMMETT HAYDEN 


Chairman, Music Committee 


16 






















PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


and tenderness.” It pleased Brahms’ humor, however, to refer to the work 
in quite different terms. Just as he was finishing the score, he wrote to 
Elisabet von Herzogenberg: “You have only to sit down to the piano, put 
your small feet on the two pedals in turn, and strike the chord of F minor 
several times in succession, first in the treble, then in the bass (ff and pp) 
and you will gradually gain a vivid impression of my latest.” A few days 
before the first performance he wrote Frau von Herzogenberg ‘“The orches- 
tra will play my new symphony with crepe bands on their sleeves. It is to 
be printed with a black edge, too’. 


I 
Allegro Non Troppo, D major, 3/4 time. The first theme is stated at 
once without introduction: 





As the brackets in the above quotation indicate, the theme is divided 
into three parts, of which the first, consisting solely of the first three notes, 
is much the most important. This figure, hereafter to be called the 
“motto,” dominates the entire fabric of the first and last movements. 

Drum rolls and chords of the lower brass introduce an important 
transition theme, derived from the motto: 


2 VIOLINS Ca ~ 
ee Pe ee eS 





This leads eventually to the second theme, beginning in F sharp minor, 
and sung by the violas and ’celli: 





The woodwinds and upper strings take up this theme, and introduce 
a long, complicated concluding subject beginning thus: 


INS 





4 VIOL 





Another important phase of the concluding theme derived from motive 






VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO . TU XEpDo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 








17 








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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


C in Example 1, is given to the violins in octaves over persistent synco- 
pation: 




















a apt if coins a oe! Ss oes me pa oe eed be (es ee eo 
Pi 


References to the second theme (Example 3) end the exposition. 

Space, time and patience do not permit an extended outline of the 
extremely intricate development. It is based almost entirely upon Ex- 
amples 1, 2 and 5, put through manifold changes of key, instrumental 
treatment, and rhythm, in the stormy, climactic Brahmsian fashion. ‘he 
motto is omnipresent, both in its original form and inverted. ‘Those who 
have observed the themes as unfolded in the exposition will have little 
difficulty in tracing their transformations in the development. 

The recapitulation restates the materials of the exposition in somewhat 
varied guise. The motto is omitted, and the second phrase of Example | 
appears in the oboes instead of the horns. Example 2 does not recur, but 
the second theme, (Example 3) is restated as before in the lower strings. 
Examples 4 and 5 come back, also, before the close of the recapitulation. 
The coda begins with a prominent horn solo based on an inversion of the 
motto. Further working over of the motto in the full orchestra and in 
solo wind instruments against plucked chords of the strings, bring the 
movement to an end. 


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Mrs. Jane C. Brophy 
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e, ; . , 
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University of California O 
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Philip S. Boone 

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20 








rs 










PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


Bl 
Adagio Non Troppo, B major, 4/4 time. The ‘celli have the principal 
subject at the outset: 





A horn call, extended by the woodwinds and later the strings, con- 
cludes the first section of the movement. 

The middle section begins with a change of time signature to 12/8 and 
the following woodwind subject: 





The key changes to B minor, and example 8 is developed in stormy 
and mysterious fashion. 

The third and final section of the movement restores the original key 
and time signature. his is a highly modified recapitulation of the first 
part of the movement. Example 6 and the horn call that follows it are 





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7, 14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 








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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


restated, with signal alterations of treatment, but with sufficient resem- 
blance to the first section to satisfy the demands of the ear for symmetrical 
balance in the structure of the movement as a whole. 


III 
Allegretto Grazioso, G major, 3/4 time. A scherzo with two trios. ‘The 
scherzo theme is given out by the oboe at the beginning: 





The first trio, in 2/4 time, Presto non assat, is obviously derived from 
the scherzo proper: 


LINS 
oe 





The scherzo is restated in abbreviated form, beginning, as before, in 
the oboe. 
The second trio is also a Presto, but in 3/8: 





This theme is obviously derived from the triplet figure of Example 9 
and its last bars. After the second trio the scherzo is heard for the third 
time, beginning in the violins in F sharp major, but returning to the 
oboe solo and G major before the end. 


IV 
Allegro Con Spirito, D major, 4/4 time. Practically all the materials 
of the finale, except the second theme, are derived from the motto in the 
first movement. It begins at once with its first subject: 
VIOLINS 


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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


(Compare the first three notes of Example 12 with the first three notes 
of Example 1.) 


The joyous full throated rush of the first subject and its bridge passage 
lead eventually to the broader second theme, which, like the first, is given 
to the violins, but with the motto constantly twisting below it in the ’celli: 





The most striking feature of the concluding passage in the exposition 
section is the extraordinary series of rapid, rushing scale passages in the 
woodwind instruments. 


The development begins with a restatement of the first theme (Ex- 
ample 12) and is based entirely upon it. The first part of the develop- 
ment is exuberant and exultant; the second part, marked tranquillo, 
works out the material more mysteriously. An idea taken from the fifth 
bar of Example 12, deep in the trombones under tremolando strings, ends 
this section. 


The recapitulation is orthodox, bringing back Examples 12 and 13 and 
their connecting links as before. Example 12 also provides the stuff of the 
brilliant, grandiose coda, although Example 13 provides the final bars. 


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An affiliate of the Musical Association of San Francisco 


CHAIRMEN 
Virginia Adams William Barkan Philip S. Boone 
OFFICERS 
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Cornelia Clark Richard Palmer 
Henry Evers Marylouise Sanford 


EXECUTIVE COUNCILS 


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DR. DAVID P. UNRUH, Director 
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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 


1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 


2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 


3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DeE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DICTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOWN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BurG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 


a Ss 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


"7C ELLOS: 

BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 

DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 


KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 


SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


GBEES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIVO, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 


ScCHivo, LESLIE J. 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RuDpD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
RUDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


CONDUCTOR 


BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAyYE, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 


BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 


TROMBONES: 


Gios!i, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 


LIBRARIAN AND 
PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 


SS SSS 


26 








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Copyright 1940, LIGGETT & MyERs TOBACCO Co 





THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
Pe ea NE Ron NG eGo 


PRESENTS THE 


SAN PRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
CoG chee ens Ses 


P| ie 
SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD kh. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 








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OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


Municipal Concerts 


SEASON 1941 


JOHN BARBIROLLI 


JANUARY 10, 1941 


THE ART COMMISSION =i 


} 


RUSSE BALLET DE MONTE CARLO 


JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 1, 1941 


ALEXANDER BRAILOWShHY 


MARCH 4, 1941 


hIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 


YEH UDT MENUH IN 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
| PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


e 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


In accordance with the policy of the Art Commission, the single 
and season tickets for this series will be offered at popular prices. 
SEASON TICKETS NOW ON SALE 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY—SUtter 1331 
PRICES: $4.00 to $9.50 
6 Events—4 Concerts (Auditorium) —2 Ballet (Opera House) 


JeEMMED TE HAYDEN 


\| Chairman, Music Committee 











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After the last note of the Symphony 
THE CONCERT IS YOURS 


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Columbia 260, Weingartner  con- 
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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


GEEIEERS 


Mrs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


FE, RAYMOND ARMSBY 
PauL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


DR. HANS BARKAN 

PauL A. BISSINGER 

Miss LOUISE A. BOYD 

MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 
Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


FE, RAYMOND ARMSBY 

Mrs. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
PauL A. BISSINGER 

CHARLES R. BLYTH 


Mrs. LEONORA WooD ARMSBY 


DR. HANS BARKAN 


VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTice D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Cc. oO. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
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Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. LEO ELOESSER 


JOHN A. MCGREGOR... =. 
HOWARD K. SKINNER 
GERALD G. RoSS 


TREASURER 
SECRETARY 
ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


Guipo J. Musto 

Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
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J. B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. NORRIS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


PHILIP N. BOONE 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


Gf Sa MilecerR. 

Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND . 
Mrs. M. C. SLoss. i fe 
Mrs. H. R. MCKINNON. 
MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN. 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER. 
MRS. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM. 
PHILIP S. BOONE. Fic 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS . 

MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

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G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 

Mrs. GEORGE W. BAKER, JR. 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

MRS. EDWARD O. BARTLETT 
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CHARLES R. BLYTH 

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H. SEWALL BRADLEY 

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JOSEPH H. DYER, UR. 

MRS. FRANK EDOFF 

SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 

ALBERT |. ELKUS 

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FORREST ENGELHART 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


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MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


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MrRs. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

Mrs E. S. HELLER 
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Mrs. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
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See Ge MIERER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
ROBERT W. MILLER 
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DWIGHT F. MCCORMACK 
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JOHN A. MCGREGOR 

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A 

+ 
Z 
—, 
— 
by 





| Sen Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


a 
A SLO  - 


Ww 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1194th and 1195th Concert 


| 
| 


R \ CRN err 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13, 2:30 P. M. 
| SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14, 8:30 P. M. 


==\\ 


| 
| 
: 


_—_ 


— 


AMERICAN FESTIVAL 
BAY Cd Or) Bal BN BS Dee ae ee ete eerie ae William Schuman 


(First performance in San Francisco) 


A LONDON SYMPHONY Vaughan Williams 
Lento — Allegro risoluto 
Lento 
Scherzo 
Andante — Allegro — 
Epilogue: Lento 


NS EE ROVE S25 OeN 


SYMPHONY No. 7, 
Beethoven 
Poco are — Vivace 
Allegretto 
Presto 
Allegro con brio 


a E 
_f 














SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women's Committee... . Their 
phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all Bere activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 
and courage. .. . We feel that not only the Association, but all the 
members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard Force, Mrs. R. C. Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Alward, Mrs. H: V. Girvin, Mrs. Richard Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Babcock, Mrs. William Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. Gray, Nancy Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Baldwin, Mrs. John Haley, Mrs. Harry S. Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans Hamilton, Mrs. Noble Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto Harris, Mrs. L. W. Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. Hepburn, Miss Louise Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. Howard, Mrs Horace Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline Jenkins, Miss Eleanor Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. Kahn, Mrs. Ira Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett ; Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen Kendrick, Mrs. Charles Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. Kirkham, Mrs. Francis Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner Knox, Mrs. John B. Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley Kropp, Miss Miriam T. Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. Lawler, Mrs. John Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. McDonald, Mrs. Angus Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd McDonald, Mrs. Julliard Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. Warner, Mrs. Davis 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 

Ebright, Mrs George Miller, Mrs. Harry East Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Evans, Mrs. Harry Miller, Mrs Robert Watt Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Faber, Mrs. Harold Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth Young, Mrs. Dwayne 


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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


AMERICAN FESTIVAL OVERTURE... .William Schuman 
ie (1910—) 

The composer provides the following notes on this overture, which 
was commissioned by the Boston Symphony Orchestra and had its first 
performance at a concert of that organization last year: 

“The first three notes of this piece will be recognized by some listeners 
as the ‘call to play’ of boyhood days. In New York City it is yelled on the 
syllables, “Wee-Awk-Eee’ to get the gang together for a game or a festive 
occasion of some sort. ‘This call very naturally suggested itself for a piece 
being written for a very special occasion—a festiv al of American music by 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra. From this it should not be inferred that 
the overture is program music. In fact, the idea for the music came to 
mind before the origin of the theme was recalled. The development of 
this bit of ‘folk material’ then, is along purely musical lines. 

“The first section of the work is concerned with the material discussed 
above and the ideas growing out of it. This music leads to a transition 
section and the subsequent announcement by the violas of a fugue subject. 
The entire middle section is given over to this fugue. ‘The orchestration 
is at first for strings alone, later for wood-winds alone and finally, as the 
fugue is brought to fruition, by the strings and wood-winds in combin- 
ation. 

“This climax leads to the final section of the work, which consists of 
opening materials paraphrased and the introduction of new subsidiary 
ideas. The tempo of the work is fast.” 

Mr. Schuman was born in New York City and is a graduate of Columbia 
University. He studied composition with Roy Harris and others. He has 
been a member of the faculty of Sarah Lawrence College since 1935, and 
is at present holder of a Guggenheim Fellowship. Among his works are 
three symphonies, three string quartets, a piano concerto, ‘and a consider- 
able number of choral works, “including a recently published cantata, with 
text by Genevieve ‘Taggard, entitled This Is Our Time. 


AION DON SY MPHONY 52. Ralph Vaughan Williams 
(1872—) 

Dr. Vaughan Williams has brought out at least three different versions 
of this work. The first was completed in 1912, and the last, considerably 
shorter than the others, in 1920. This is the published version and the 
one played today. 

Albert Coates conducted the first performance of the symphony in its 
final form, and issued an extensive, picturesque description of it first 


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The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the Univer- 
sity of California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, 
and is affiliated with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, 
faith and service of its members is prophetic of the important part youth plays 
and will continue to play in our work. 





CHAIRMEN 
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OFFICERS 
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The Neat Guest Artist 


Sir Thomas Beecham, who will conduct the concerts of January 3-4, has 
had an exceptionally varied career, beginning with an amateur orchestra 
which he founded and directed at the age of ten years. That this was no 
mere child’s amusement is attested by the fact that this organization was 
often conducted by the celebrated Hans Richter. Beecham made his first 
professional appearances as a symphonic conductor in 1905, at the age of 
26, directing the Queen’s Hall Orchestra in London. In 1908 he established 
his own orchestra in the British capital, abandoning it two years later to 
go into opera. The Beecham seasons of opera at Covent Garden and other 
London theatres lasted from 1910 to 1920, and were among the most im- 
portant in recent operatic history. In the same period Beecham directed 
some of Diaghilev’s London presentations of Russian ballet and Russian 
opera, and conducted the Halle Orchestra of Manchester. In 1932 he 
founded the London Philharmonic Orchestra and became director of 
Covent Garden. He has appeared frequently with American orchestras, 
but this will be his first concert in San Francisco. 


Eee 
—— ea acca 


40 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


published in the bulletin of the British Music Society. ‘This is almost in- 
variably reprinted in American program books when the symphony is 
performed, sometimes without indication of its source, and with the im- 
plication that it is to be regarded as an “official” interpretation. But it 
is not “official”. Vaughan Williams has never sanctioned it; A. E. F. 
Dickinson’s Introduction to the Music of R. Vaughan Williams, half of 
which 1s devoted to the London symphony, snubs it completely; and it 
is by no means insignificant that Arthur Bliss, who knows Vaughan 
Williams and his work extremely well, remarked in reply to some 
questions posed by the writer of these lines that he had never seen the 
Coates “program’’. That “program”, however, is given below for what it 
may be worth. 

Vaughan Williams himself has said “The title might run A Symphony 
by a Londoner—that is to say that various sights and sounds of London 
may have influenced the composer, but it would not be helpful to 
describe these. The work must succeed or fail as music, and in no other 
way. Therefore if the hearers recognize a few suggestions of such things 
as the Westminster chimes or the lavender cry, these must be treated as 
accidents and not as essentials of the music”. 

With these warnings, and with Mr. Bliss’ further warning that “this 
symphony has London’s personality, and is no mere colored photograph”, 
one may give Coates’ description once again, presenting it as the reaction 
of one student of the work and not as guide to its “meaning’’. Quotations 
from the score* have been added by the present editor. 


And now for Coates: 


I 
“The first movement opens at daybreak by the river. Old Father 


*One purpose of these citations is to make as clear as possible the strong family re- 
semblance which many of the themes, both quoted and unquoted, bear to each other. 
The design of the opening bar of Example | is repeated, in varied forms, in the opening 
bars of Example 3, 4, 5, 7 and 8, and will be heard elsewhere as well. It, scarcely needs 
to be pointed out that this fact agrees completely with the “programmatic” function 
Coates ascribes to Example 1. But it is also well to bear in mind what Sir Donald Francis 
Tovey says in his essay on Beethoven’s seventh symphony: “It is possible to hear too 
much about the way in which a whole work is ‘based on the one idea embodied in its 
first four notes:’ and some day an analyst will arise who will administer a drastic cure 
by persuading people to swallow the soul-stirring doctrine that every piece of music 
whatever is based on the one idea embodied in a figure of one single note.” 





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42 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


Thames flows calm and silent under the heavy gray dawn, deep and 
thoughtful, shrouded in mystery: 


4 Engl; sh Aorn 









5 Saeeeeanee e  ea ) 
2) SSE ee | ee Se ae ee 
py Ss ee 


(AYY BSS ry = 
‘ Gea ee ee Ey © eS A 






Pete. or eet 


London sleeps, and in the hushed stillness of early morning one hears 


Big Ben (the Westminster chimes) solemnly strike the half hour. 
“Suddenly the scene changes (Allegro risoluto) : 













1a a AO 2 2° ee 2) ee ee 
; = eer ae ae Co Se St SS eS Sr Se Scere 
i tt i OP rg Ih ng a 


So USS > 









One is in the Strand in the midst of the bustle and turmoil of morning 
traffic. ‘I’his is London street life of the early hours—a steady stream of 
foot passengers hurrying, newspaper boys shouting, messengers whistling, 
and that most typical sight of London streets, the costermonger (‘Coster 
‘Arry’) , resplendent in pearl buttons and shouting some coster song refrain 
at the top of his raucous voice, returning from Covent Garden Market, 
seated on his vegetable barrow drawn by the inevitable little donkey: 


~~ 











' aw 





SE A a Se ET EY ay — A a LSS EE 6) od A Ao 

pe ee Pea ee 
eA aw ES oie L 

Sf oes [eee [ae] a Sag = oa a A i 0 SP V0 ES 































faery ‘cae A a oe oe AG Ren 6 oe 

aren iy ee ae $f gt ay ol Pn +f ree | 4 \ Biwe 6 ty ty pH 
Oe Oe Oe ADAG GIN AB A SMBS Aad BB | ge T 

ye) ee ttt a_i Raa Ff HSSaww 













“Then for a few moments one turns off the Strand into one of the 
quiet little streets that lead down to the river, and suddenly the noise 
ceases, cut off as if by magic: 


J celly and basses _ chrrnels 











SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WaAlnut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 






The following distinguished members of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra are teaching at the Conservatory: 







STANISLAS BEM CHAREES RUDD 
In Charge of Cello Department Clarinet and Saxophone 
HENRY WOEMPNER BEN JAMIN KLATZKIN 






Flute and Woodwind Ensemble Trumpet and Brass Instruments 







43 








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44 


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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


We are in that part of London known as the Adelphi, formerly the 
haunt of fashionable bucks and dandies about town, now merely old- 
fashioned houses and shabby old streets, haunted principally by beggars 
and ragged street urchins. 


“We return to the Strand and are once again caught up in the bustle 
and life of London—gay, careless, noisy, with every now and then a touch 
of something fiercer, something inexorable, as though one felt for a 
moment the iron hand of the great city—yet, nevertheless, full of that 
mixture of good humor, animal spirits and sentimentality that is so 
characteristic of London.”’ 


ot 


“In the second movement the composer paints us a picture of that 
region of London which lies between Holborn and the Euston Road 
known as Bloomsbury. Dusk is falling. It is the damp and foggy twilight 
of a late November day.* ‘Those who know their London known this 
region of melancholy streets over which seems to brood an air of shabby 
ventility—a sad dignity of having seen better days. In the gathering 


*Mr. Bliss writes “Vaughan Williams always insisted that it should be called Symphony 
by a Londoner, implying, I feel sure, that it is no mere descriptive or picturesque work 
about a great city, but the music of a man whose artistic sense was dominated by his 
living and working there. I do not know, for instance, whether the slow movement was 
originally designed by Vaughan Williams to represent London at night, but I do know 
that it conjures up at once the river on the Chelsea Embankment where Vaughan 
Williams lived, because I lived and worked in the same house with him, and its slow 
beauty can be traced to no other source.” 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


Third Pair of Symphony Concerts 
SIR THOMAS BEECHAM, Guest Conductor 


Friday, January 3, 2:30 Saturday, January 4, 8:30 


PROGRAM 


Suite from The Faithful Shepherd Handel-Beecham 


(First performance in San Francisco) 


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46 




























PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


eloom there is something ghost-like. A silence hangs over the neighbor- 
hood, broken only by the policeman on his beat. 


Eng lish horn 





“There is tragedy, too, in Bloomsbury, for among the many streets 
between Holborn and Euston there are alleys of acute poverty and worse. 

“In front of a pub, whose lights flare through the murky twilight, 
stands an old musician playing the fiddle. His tune is played in the 
orchestra by the viola: 





S = ‘ , ° 6a G 
In the distance the ‘lavender cry’ is heard: ‘Sweet lavender, sweet 
lavender, who'll buy sweet lavender?’ 
c/grinel 
eee ee] | PA ee Sa 
a aa BS en (Sea ae) 
fr oF eer ey GP” GaP Geel Gey Dee Ee ey See 
Se Opt a sey ——— a 


Up and down the street the cry goes, now nearer, now farther away. 













. 


“The gloom deepens, and the movement ends with the old musician 
still playing his pathetic little tune.”’ 


III 


“In this movement one must imagine one’s self sitting late on a Saturday 
night on one of the benches of the ‘Temple Embankment (that part of 
the Thames Embankment lying between the Houses of Parliament and 
Waterloo bridge). On one side of the river all is quiet, and in the silence 
one hears from a distance, coming from the other side of the river, all 
the noises of Saturday night in the slums. (The ‘other side’, the south 
side of the River Thames, is a vast net-work of very poor quarters and 
slums.) On a Saturday night these slums resemble a fair; the streets are 
lined with barrows, lit up by flaming torches, selling cheap fruit, vege- 
tables, produce of all kinds; the streets and alleys are crowded with people. 
At street corners coster girls in large feather hats dance their beloved 
‘double-shuffle jig’ to the accompaniment of a mouth organ. We seem to 
hear distant laughter; also every now and then what sound like cries of 
suffering. Suddenly a concertina breaks out above the rest; then we hear 
a few bars on a hurdygurdy organ: 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET: SAN FRANCISCO : TU xeEDo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 











48 





THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Presents 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, Managing Director 
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AMERICANS EESTIVAL OVERTURE sn ..5. © em ets WILLIAM SCHUMAN 
CFIRST SAN FRANCISCO PERFORMANCE) 

ACEONDONESYMPEH GIN his wie oe coetss @ eto oes eee: VAUGHAN WILLIAMS ! 
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All this, softened by distance, melted into one vast hum, floats across 
the river to us as we sit meditating on the Temple Embankment. 

“The music changes suddenly, and one feels the ‘Thames flowing 
silent, mysterious, with a touch of tragedy. One of London’s sudden fogs 
comes down, making Slumland and its noises seem remote. Again, for a 
few bars, we feel the Thames flowing through the night, and the picture 
fades into fog and silence. 

IV 

“The last movement deals almost entirely with the crueler aspects of 
London, the London of the unemployed and unfortunate. After the 
opening bars we hear the ‘Hunger March’—a ghostly march of those 
whom the city grinds and crushes, the great army of those who are cold 
and hungry and unable to get work: 

Y 
(8 2 Ee RS Se Ease Pe ae aa 


Baar ae 

2 ee ee Ge eS 
Ty he ee) ee ed ee ee ee a Ee 
Sa SS ae ve SD SS CN GR RS ST OES ESSE ns SAS SD ON RD Ce SY 






















Sn ed EE ee) Ee, ES 
a a a ed a a eae 
. eet Cy ES eS Be 












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PROGRAN NOE S—_Continwed 


‘We hear again the noise and bustle of the streets (reminiscences of the 
first movement), but these now also take on the crueler aspect. ‘There 
are sharp discords in the music. This is London as seen by the man who 
is ‘out and under’; the man ‘out of a job’, who watches the other man go 
whistling to his work; the man who 1s starving, watching the other man 
eat— and the cheerful, bustling picture of gay street life becomes dis- 
torted, a nightmare seen by the eyes of suffering. 

“The music ends abruptly, and in the short silence that follows, one 
again hears ‘Big Ben’, chiming from Westminster tower. 

“There follows the epilogue, in which we seem to feel the great deep 
soul of London—London as a whole, vast and unfathomable—and the 
symphony ends as it began, with the river—old Father ‘Thames—flowing 
calm and silent, as he has flowed through the ages, the keeper of many 
secrets, shrouded in mystery.” 








SYMPHONY No. 7, 

ie V IE ORG Ob W592 eras stewca nae Ludwig Van Beethoven 
(1770-1827) 

Historians of music are fond of quoting examples of critical pathology 
in connection with the seventh symphony. One commentator, we are 
told, saw the slow movement as “the love-dream of an odalisque”, while 
another perceived it to be a procession through the catacombs. Stull an- 
other envisaged the entire symphony as an expression of Austria’s rejoicing 
at the defeats Napoleon was suffering at the time of its composition, while 
a fourth authority, anticipating Karl Goldmark by many years, declared 
this score to represent a rustic wedding. The thesis behind all these 
nosegays of conflicting views seems to be that because some opinions about 
music are demonstrably wrong, no opinions are ever right. Yet several 


University of California Extension Division 


announces 


*Droorams and Personalities of the Symphony Season” 
Ss ymp yi 


Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 


Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
7,14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 


Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 





JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 
PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
TEACHER of VOICE 
From Primary Beginning to Final Accomplishment 
Opera, Church and Concert Repertoire 


740 PINE STREET EXbrook 4366 

















PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


generations have concurred most heartily in Richard Wagner’s dictum 
that the seventh symphony is “the apotheosis of the dance’, and it is not 
accidental that this work has, in recent seasons, figured in the repertoire 
of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra only in connection with the 
performances of the Monte Carlo Ballet Russe.* 


The seventh symphony had its first performance on December 8, 1813, 
at a curious concert in the great hall of the University of Vienna. This 
event was organized by Johann Maelzel, the musical mechanician and 
inventor of the metronome, whom Beethoven immortalized in the second 
movement of his eighth symphony. Maelzel at that time operated a kind 
of dime museum in Vienna in which the principal attractions were his 





*Although the phrase just cited is universally familiar, it is usually quoted apart 
from its context, doubtless because the whole passage is in the high-flown style which 
Wagner frequently affected. It is to be found in Wagner’s Art W ork of the Future: 
“All tumult, all yearning and storming of the heart become here the blissful insolence 
of joy, which snatches us away with bacchanalian might and bears us through the roomy 
space of Nature, through all the streams and seas of Life, shouting in glad self-con- 
sciousness as we tread throughout the Universe the daring measures of this human 
sphere-dance. ‘This symphony is the Apotheosis of the Dance herself: it is Dance in her 
highest aspect, as it were the loftiest deed of bodily motion incorporated in an ideal 
mould of tone. Melody and Harmony unite around the sturdy bones of rhythm to firm 
and fleshy human shapes, which, now with giant limbs’ agility, and now with soft, 
elastic pliance, almost before our very eyes, Close up the supple, teeming ranks; the while 
now gently, now with daring, now serious, now wanton, now pensive, and again exult- 
ing, the deathless strain sounds forth and forth; until, in the last whirl of delight, a kiss 
of triumph seals the last embrace.” 





THE SAN FRANCISCO TRIO 


ALICE MORINI BORIS BLINDER 
Piano WILLIAM WOLSKI Violincello 


Violin 
S. F. Chronicle — A. Frankenstein — November 28 


‘There was no difficulty that was not completely surmounted, 
and no expressive possibility that was not thoroughly realized. 


S. F. Examiner — Alexander Fried — November 28 


Only a trio of the first rank could master such a program as 
the one that triumphantly opened a new season of the San 
Francisco Trio last night. 


NEXT CONCERT, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 8 
COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 


Reserved Seats: SHERMAN, CLAY — $1.00 — $1.50 — $2.00 





Di 


















PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


mechanical trumpeter and a mechanical orchestra called the Panharmoni- 
con. He prevailed upon Beethoven to compose for this contraption a 
kind of symphonic poem celebrating Wellington’s victory over the forces 
of Napoleon in the battle of Vitoria, in Spain, which had occurred in 
June, 1813. Maelzel and Beethoven together would then take the Pan- 
harmonicon to London, and the English would be treated to the spectacle 
of seeing the foremost composer of his time exhibited like a sideshow 
freak, along with a composition of his, mechanically interpreted, which 
was calculated to play up to their political passions. 

Maelzel perceived, however, that a performance of Wellington’s Victory 
with a full orchestra and under the most brilliant possible conditions 
would enhance the prestige of his Panharmonicon. He therefore arranged 
a concert for the benefit of the Austrian and Bavarian soldiers who had 
been wounded in the action against Napoleon at Hanau in September, 
and persuaded some of the foremost musicians of that time to donate 
their services to the cause. Thus among the players in the orchestra that 
assembled under Beethoven’s baton on December 8 were such as Meyer- 
beer, Spohr, Hummel and Salieri. The program consisted of Wellington’s 
Victory, two marches, by Duschek and Pleyel, performed by Maelzel’s 
mechanical trumpeter with full orchestral accompaniment, and “an en- 
tirely new symphony”, the one played on this occasion. ‘he concert was 
an enormous success and was twice repeated, but in the meantime Bee- 
thoven quarreled with Maelzel, the Panharmonicon version of Welling- 
ton’s Victory was never completed, and the trip to London was called off. 
According to a news report sent from Stuttgart in 1937, the Panharmoni- 
con had just come to light in that city; it was put in working order and 
presumably is still amusing visitors to the Stuttgart public museum, if 
that institution has not been closed because of the war. 

I 

Poco sostenuto, A major, 4/4 time. ‘The symphony opens with one of 
the longest introductions in the literature. It is composed of two separate 
themes, the first given out by the oboe with a sharp chord from the 
orchestra, “like a pennant unfolding from a flagstaff’, as someone has 
put it: 








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465 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 


Presents 


SIR THOMAS BEECHAM 


In a Lecture 


*A MINGLED CHIME” 





MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 6, 8:30 o’clock 
Tickets on Sale Women’s City Club - $1.00 plus tax 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


This is developed, especially in conjunction with a rising staccato scale 
figure of the strings. ‘he oboe also has the second theme: 









Pes Ze, 2 






oN SS ee en et 
0 iS Sees) ESS SSeS 
: EEE SY 










4 a P 








2 4 
GG 22 C2 eee) | 
’ 2) GDB Ee Tay. PS Sa es PS © SE a 0h 
JF 7 0 28", ES EY 
pe ee | Se (EES) 





Both themes are worked over, and the introduction ends with re- 
iterated intimations of the rhythm of the principal theme to come, the 
violins answering the flute and oboe antiphonally. 

The main movement now begins (Vivace, 6/8 time) with four bars 
devoted solely to the rhythm which will dominate to the end, after which 
the flute has the principal theme: 





s Ley, 
ter+t + OCA OSS Ss ,5 Se 








The theme is repeated by the full orchestra. The second theme is reached 
through a transition passage of some length: 





The concluding portion of the exposition immediately follows, be- 
ginning: 





The development is based largely on Example 3, with particular em- 





TWO INTERNATIONALLY-KNOWN ARTISTS 


MAXIM SCHA PIRO Fa esa 
EEN Rel TEMIANKA Violinist 


in the second of a series of 6 Sonata Recitals 
“The History of the Sonata” 

All Beethoven Program including Kreutzer Sonata by request. 
COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE—Wednesday Eve. Dec. 18, 8:30 
Seats on Sale Sherman, Clay & Co. and Community Playhouse 

Prices: 83¢ — $1.10 — $1.65 




















FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 
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JOSEPH BATTISTA 
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MARIO CHAMLEE 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
KARIN DAYAS 
CECILLE DE HORVATH 
JOSE ECHANIZ 

DAVID EARLE 
FLORENCE EASTON 
SEVERIN EISENBRGER 
FRANK FARREL 
DANIEL ERICOURT 
JAKOB GIMPEL 


Sere Cone uine ae o 


BEFORE THE SYMPHONY 





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RUSS MORGAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA PLAY NIGHTLY 
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JOSEPH SZIGETI 
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ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
HELEN TRAUBEL 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
SAMUEL YAFFE 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin in its Concerts. 


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_——— 





54 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


phasis upon its rhythmic rather than its melodic aspect. Example 5 also 
plays a prominent part in the development. | 
_ ‘The recapitulation brings the principal theme, Example 3, back in the 
full orchestra in the original key. It is repeated more quietly, in a varied 
form, with much use of conversational woodwind solos. ‘The second 
theme (Example 4) and the concluding section are reheard in customary 
fashion, and the coda, begun after a brief, sudden pause, gives further 
treatment to Example 3 and its all-pervading rhythm. 
II 

Allegretto, A minor, 2/4 time. The lower strings have the theme at the | 

third bar: 




















\ 
The melody is then transferred to the violins while the violas and 
‘celli play a countersubject against it: 


SSS Ge BSS Be Ee eee 
SW eS Se Se ~ 6S SS a 
ES Sia 












— [| 4} peg — es ; 
-—— —— coc —, 


— See 
This material expands through the orchestra, with constantly increasing 
sonority. 
The second section of the movement goes into A major, with the 
following theme in the clarinet over undulating triplets of the violins, 
the rhythm of Example 6 continuing in the ’celli and basses: 
















(This theme is certainly not unrelated to Example 1.) 
The key returns to A minor, and Example 7 is developed by the wood- 
winds, with a broken chordal figure in 16th notes and the rhythm of | 
Example 6 in accompaniment. This episode eventuates in a double fugue | 
based on the principal theme of the movement: | 
| 
| 











PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


The coda recalls the A major episode (Example 8) and ends with 
further restatements of Example 6. 
III 
Presto, F major, 3/4 time. The first part of the scherzo expresses the 
theme: 





Ve © 6 Ve 


The second part, much longer than the first, develops and restates this 
material. 

The trio (Assai meno presto, D major) is based upon a melody said 
to be an old Austrian hymn, sung by the woodwinds below a sustained 
high A of the violins: 





The second section of the trio brings forth a continuing idea, and the 
first part is restated. 

The entire scherzo is now repeated, after which the entire trio is heard 
once more, and then the scherzo for a third time. The coda recalls the trio 
before the end. 

IV 

Allegro con brio, A major, 2/4 time. Four bars of rhythm precede the 

principal theme, given to the violins: 





« ny ——— as 

This melody is often said to be that of Nora Creina, one of the many 
Irish folk songs Beethoven published in his own arrangements. But it 
is actually the accompaniment figure set to Nora Creina, and 1s Bee- 
thoven’s own. 


The violins also have the second theme: 





The development whirls Example 12 through many keys. Recapitula- 
tion in the original key follows, and the recapitulation of the second 
theme as well. The coda gives Example 12 a final twirl. 


56 


















































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PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


ALINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 


iST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 


Z2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WoLSKI, WILLIAM 


3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 

PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
De GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DICTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRDO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 

VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV: 
TOLPEGIN, VicTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 


ae es be 


oe epee ee gee eer ae ON EE Oe Se 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


,CELLOS: 
BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 
DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BeM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 


KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 


SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH AA E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 


ENGLISH HORN: 


SCHIvoO, LESLIE J. 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RUDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 


RuUDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 


FRAGALE, FRANK 


CONDUCTOR 


BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAYE, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 


BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 


TRUTNER, HERMAN C, 


TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 


TRUMPETS: 


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BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 


TROMBONES: 


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KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


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PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 


LIBRARIAN AND 


PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 





Ke ys REE aaa ai eaiaencs 


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PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO. 











THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANGISCO 


PARES ENE ST: 


| SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 









PIERRE MONTEUX 
GSN Dee AR ess ae 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD Kk. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 





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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
MRS. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
E. RAYMOND ARMSBY . . VICE-PRESIDENT JOHN A. MCGREGOR .. . . TREASURER 
PAUL A. BISSINGER . . VICE-PRESIDENT HOWARD K. SKINNER ...., SECRETARY 
CHARLES R. BLYTH .. VICE-PRESIDENT GERALD G. ROSS . ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


DR. HANS BARKAN MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
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MRS.. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

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KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


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C. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
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E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


PHILIP N. Boone 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
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VIRGINIA ADAMS 
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COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


pie. eS a MIRE ERS toenail Grete 2 9- 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND..... Si cn Fon 
MRS HEL GS wea grtic A eethe atc de Silat sete LA ie en 
MRS. gies MGRINNGONS ty gos, Ble 28st esc oy aos le) ees 
MRs. JOHN P. COGHLAN. 

MRS. ASHTON H. PoTtTEerR. 

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BHlEIP, SS DEINE seed ee, vane. bc eae - « . SAN 


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BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


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Mrs. GEORGE W. BAKER, UR. 

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FORREST ENGELHART DWIGHT F. McCoORMACK 
MRS. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 


HENRY EVERS 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


iy aera - CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 
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- TICKET SALES AND PUBLICITY 
- + » YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
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exes - Box SALES 
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JOHN A. McGREGOR 

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J. D. ZELLERBACH 


65 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Ww 
THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1196th and 1197th Concerts 





PRIDAY a) ANUARY 20,0 2700 sei 
SATURDAY, JANUARY 4, 8:30 P. M. 





ERE 9 Ett SE SWAP ETON a kT ee NO er Rtg UNA rat ES FOP ty 


SIR THOMAS BEECHAM, Guest Conductor 
Ww 


Ae Program e's 
SUITE FROM 


GET i by ied Cs by BG BY Be GL Bel SAN is be) PA gs WY RG Ue nS re Oe Handel 
(ARRANGED BY SIR THOMAS BEECHAM) 
Introduction and Fugue 
Adagio 
Gavotte 
Bourrée 
Minuet 
Pastorale 
Finale ) 
(First performance in San Francisco) f 

















SGV ISRON IEG ELTON i EEEn RIV Roos orins eece Delius 


SYMPHONY No. 31, 
EVIE AN ORE Aeon ee. eh an ean dre ea aera Mozart 


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Allegro assai 











Andantino 
Allegro 








DON] Peels Orn 


SYMPHONY No. 7, 
Ce IVIERS GIRS) Ray BO Sate 2 cat Ge sere Saree es Sibelius 


(In one movement) 








SUITE FROM 
IBle i Sty Rad Mei EG NBEO ted ed) ae ine we ee Eee eo Bizet 
Prelude 
Aubade 
Serenade 
March 
Gipsy Dance 








































GUEST ARTIST THIS WEEK 

Sir ‘Thomas Beecham, has had an exceptionally varied career, beginning 
with an amateur orchestra which he founded and directed at the age of 
ten years. That this was no mere child’s amusement is attested by the fact 
that this organization was often conducted by the celebrated Hans Richter. 
Beecham made his first professional appearances as a symphonic conduc- 
tor in 1905, at the age of 26, directing the Queen’s Hall Orchestra in 
London. In 1908 he established his own orchestra in the British capital 
abandoning it two years later to go into opera. The Beecham seasons of 
opera at Covent Garden and other London theatres lasted from 1910 to 
1920, and were among the most important in recent operatic history. In 
the same period Beecham directed some of Diaghilev’s London presenta- 
tions of Russian ballet and Russian opera, and conducted the Halle 
Orchestra of Manchester. In 1932 he founded the London Philharmonic 
Orchestra and became director of Covent Garden. He has appeared fre- 
quently with American orchestras, but this will be his first concert in 
San Francisco. 


THE NEXT GUEST ARTIST 

Isaac Stern was born in Russia in 1920, and was brought to San Francisco 
at the age of ten months. He comes of a musical family, his mother having 
graduated from the Imperial Conservatory in St. Petersburg, while his 
father, too, was active musically in Russia. He obtained most of his musical 
education in San Francisco, principally with Robert Pollak and Naoum 
Blinder. Although he had been playing in public as early as 1928, his 
official debut recital was given at the Veteran’s Auditorium in 1935. He 
made his first appearance with orchestra at a concert of the San Francisco 
Symphony at the Civic Auditorium in 1936, playing the Saint-Saens violin 
concerto in B minor, and in the following season he presented the Brahms 
concerto on the Friday-Saturday series at the Opera House. He has since 
been soloist with many other orchestras and has given recitals generally 
throughout the country. For his third appearance with this orchestra, 
on January 17 and 18, he has chosen the Sibelius concerto. 


ERRATUM 
Since many subscribers keep these programs for future reference, it is 
worth pointing out that Examples | and 4 in the notes on the Vaughan 
Williams London symphony, appearing on Page 47 in the program book 
for the second concert of the present season, were erroneously inter- 
changed. 





Ne Jae Roos 
EY IGS EAE 
oe 






= You Should Have These 
COLUMBIA RECORDINGS 
ERTS Recorded by the 
London Philharmonic Orchestra 
album Conducted by 













| \ Off Grant nr. Sutter SIR THOMAS BEECHAM 
| LORD YOUR CRE COR De PB RAR 
| 


SYMEPTIONYsNog3 1,  MATORYS: sy een nte ck aes: Seperate Mozart 
| Formerly $5.00 now $3.50 
| SUNEMERS NIGE Re @ Ne aceriss ROVE Retry ante eet oe Cee Uh: sec eye Delius 


Formerly $1.00 now 75¢ 
| DONE GIOVANNI OWVERIEUR E208 ics 0 tan nhs te na cen bec Beste ore tees Mozart 
now $1.00 

















PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SUTTE FROM 


LAE PACER UIS SHE PAE RD nt George Frederic Handel 
(1685-1759) 
(ARRANGED BY SIR THOMAS BEECHAM) 

The Faithful Shepherd (Il Pastor Fido) is the seventh of Handel's 45 
operas. It was not a great success on the occasion of its first production, in 
London in 1712, nor did it win much favor when revived and refurbished 
22 years later. It remains to this day one of Handel’s most obscure com- 
positions. 

The libretto, by one Gaetano Rossi, employs a typical early 18th century 
story of Arcadian nymphs and shepherds. Amaryllis is betrothed to 
Silvio, but loves and is loved by Mirtillo; Mirtillo is also loved by 
Eurilla, while Silvio is pursued throughout the three acts by Dorinda. 
Thanks to Eurilla’s machinations, Amaryllis is condemned to death for 
being unfaithful to Silvio, but at the end the goddess Diana decrees the 
marriage of Amaryllis to Mirtillo and that of Silvio to Dorinda. 

Sir ‘Thomas Beecham’s suite, made in 1939, draws freely upon the 
“symphonies,” dance movements, and other portions of both versions. 
The pastorale, however, is interpolated from Handel’s opera Parnasso 
in Festa of 1734. 


SUMMERS NIGH LOIN WEES RV bie ee Frederick Delius 
(1862-1934) 

A remarkable number of the works of Delius reflect moods of nature— 
or, to be more accurate, the moods of the composer in contemplating 
nature—in the form of tone poems, choral pieces and songs. His list of 
compositions is replete with titles like Over the Hills and Far Away, In 
a Summer Garden, North Country Sketches, Songs of Sunset, A Song Be- 
fore Sunrise, A Song of the Aligh Hills, Midsummer Song, To Be Sung 
of a Summer Night on the Water, On H earing the First Cuckoo in Spring, 
and so on. 

Summer Night on the River is an extremely short work calling for an 
unusually small orchestra. It was composed in 1911 and received its first 
performance three years later under the baton of Willem Mengelberg. 


SYMPHONY No. 31, 
DNA TOR (PH RIS) oan, pesca ea are he: W. A. Mozart 
(1756-1791) 
The long job-hunting odyssey of Mozart’s early manhood brought him 
and his mother to Paris in March, 1778. At first they were well received, 





War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 

* * * * 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 

OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 







69 


eee “~~ EE 








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SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . Their 
phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. ‘loo much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 
aid courage... =. We feel that not only the Association, but all the 
members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 

Evans, Mrs. Harry 

Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 





Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D 
Gray, Nancy 

Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs Horace 

Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 
Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Knox, Mrs. John B. 

Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 





Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, fe 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill G. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 
Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 
Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 


se ___ ee 





JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 
PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
TEACHER of VOICE 


From Primary Beginning to Final Accomplishment 


Opera, Church and Concert Repertoire 


740 PINE STREET 


INSTRUCTIONS 


1030 BUSH ST., SAN FRANCISCO, PHONE OR 6367 


LARGE STOCK OF FINE 
HARPS - RENTAL HARPS 


ACCESSORIES 


REPAIR SHOP 
9114 S. BUDLONG AVE. 
Los ANGELES, CALIF. 


EXbrook 4366 





oo 











PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


for Mozart had made a great impression in the French capital when he 
nad given concerts there fifteen years before. It soon developed, however, 
ihat the Parisian patrons of art still thought of him as a seven year old 
prodigy and could not take him seriously in his new role of composer, 
full-grown virtuoso and all-round maestro di musica. Consequently com- 
missions were slow in coming and the payment for them was even slower, 
pupils were few, and salaried positions were not to be had. Worst of all, 
frau Mozart died very suddenly in July, and the composer was only too 
glad to return to his father in Salzburg about three months later. 

Disastrous as the Parisian adventure was, it nevertheless called forth 
a number of Mozart’s most interesting early works, among them the flute 
and harp concerto, the ballet music to Les Petits Riens, and this symphony 
which was commissioned by Jean Le Gros, conductor of the Concert 
Spirituel. 

The Concert Spirituel was one of the earliest concert societies in 
Europe. It had been founded in 1725 for the purpose of providing con- 
certs on church holidays, when the Opéra and the theatres were closed 
At first 1ts programs laid strong emphasis on religious music, but by 1778 
the offerings had drifted over toward the secular side. Le Gros took office 
as director of the Concert Spirituel in 1777. He had been a tenor at the 
Opéra, and had retired, it was said, because he had grown too fat to cut 
an heroic figure on the stage. At all events, he would appear to have been 
an excellent musician with several quite definite ideas concerning what 
he wanted in the way of new music. Among other things, he disliked the 
repeated exposition commonly employed at the time in the first move- 
ments of symphonies, and therefore Mozart’s Paris symphony is probably 
the only important work of its kind before Beethoven in which no first- 
movement repeat is to be found. Of considerably greater importance, Le 
Gros took great pride in the precise attack of which his orchestra was 
capable, and demanded that this be exploited in new works written for 
him. ‘Thus arose a kind of gambit that was the sign and symbol of the 
Concert Spirituel throughout the whole musical world and which was 
known as the premier coup d’archet. (First stroke of the bow.) 

The rest of the story can best be told in excerpts from Mozart’s letters 
to his father. 

“I brought along the new symphony”, Mozart writes in describing a 
certain meeting with friends, “with which the Concert Spirituel will open 








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71 








se meseernre—nnecentceseesaeeew ommemnanssaeeserererwyerrnmmnenetstes ee tternremntnatwatae: 
tae et pean naan es sagan an 


WS a a ee 


A es cmt 


ae 


eee 


O_O 


—— 





eect aie eae 


BEFORE THE SYMPHONY ; 





Continental Buffet Luncheon in the Garden Court 


RUSS MORGAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA PLAY NIGHTLY 
(Except Monday) AND AT SATURDAY TEA DANSANTS 


TAR TARACT- HO TE 












TODAY'S GREAT PIANO 


THE CHOICE OF 


TODAY'S GREAT ARTISTS 


















FRANCES ANTOINE RUDA FIRKUSNY CHARLES NAEGELE 
WILHELM BACHAUS ARNOLD GABOR WILLEM NOSKE 
SIMON BARER WALTER GIESEKING LOUIS PERSINGER 
JOSEPH BATTISTA BORIS GOLSCHMANN LILY PONS 

HAROLD BAUER EUGENE GOOSSENS ROSA RAISA 
MOISSAYE BOGUSLAWSKI WILLIAM HARMS ANGEL REYES 

ANTON BILOTTI IRMA SCHENUIT HALL GIACOMO RIMINI 
JUSS! BUOERLING STEPHAN HERO MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
LUCREZIA BORI AMPARO ITURBI TITO SCHIPA 

JEANNE BEHREND JOSE ITURBI E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
BELA BARTOK EDWARD JOHNSON BERNARDO SEGALL 
MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU BREENDAN KEENAN JOHANN SINGER 
MARIO CHAMLEE ALEXANDER KELBERINE RUTH SLENCZYNSKI 
ALFREDO CASELLA ALEXANDER KIPNIS LEO SMIT 

KARIN DAYAS WIKTOR LABUNSKI JOSEPH SZIGETI 
CECILLE DE HORVATH WESLEY LA VIOLETTE LEONARD SHURE 
JOSE ECHANIZ RALPH LEOPOLD MAGDA TAGLIAFERO 
DAVID EARLE JOSEF LHEVINNE ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
SEVERIN EISENBRGER ERICA MORINI PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANK FARRELL EDITH MASON VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
DANIEL ERICOURT ALFRED MIROVITCH SAMUEL YAFFE 
JAKOB GIMPEL GRACE MOORE FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin in its Concerts. 


BS, y 
310 SUTTER Si. 4 al paniit 1828 WEBSTER ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 


FLORENCE EASTON ROSINA LHEVINNE HELEN TRAUBEL 
| 
CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARTISTS DO | 










































































PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


at Corpus Christi. They both liked it very much, and I too am quite 
pleased with it. But I cannot say whether it will be popular, and, to tell 
the truth, I care very little, for who will not like it? I can answer for its 
pleasing the few intelligent French people who may be there, and as for 
the stupid ones, I shall not consider it a great misfortune if they are not 
pleased. I still hope, however, that even asses will find something in it 
to admire, and moreover I have been careful not to neglect le premier 
coup @Warchet, and that is quite sufficient. What a fuss the oxen here 
make of the trick! The devil take me if I can see any difference! They 
all begin together, just as they do in other places”. 


Later on Mozart writes “I have had to compose a symphony for the 
opening of the Concert Spirituel. It was performed on Corpus Christi day 
with great applause . . . I was very nervous at the rehearsal, for never 
in my life have I heard a worse performance. You have no idea how they 
twice scraped and scrambled through it. I was really in a terrible way and 
would gladly have rehearsed it again, but as there was so much else to 
rehearse, there was no time left. So I had to go to bed with an aching heart 
and in a discontented and angry frame of mind. I decided next morning 
not to go to the concert at all, but in the evening, the weather being fine, 
[at last made up my mind to go, determined that if my symphony went 
as badly as it did at the rehearsal, I would certainly make my way into 
the orchestra, snatch the fiddle out of the hands of Lahoussaye, the first 
violin, and conduct myself! I prayed God that it might go well, for it is 
all to His greater honour and glory; and behold—the symphony began. 
Raalf was standing beside me, and just in the middle of the first Allegro 
there was a passage which I felt sure must please. The audience were quite 
carried away, and there was a tremendous burst of applause. But as I knew, 
when I wrote it, what effect it would surely produce, I had introduced the 
passage again at the close—when there were shouts of ‘Da capo’. ‘The 
Andante also found favour, but particularly the last Allegro, because, 
having observed that all last as well as first Allegros begin here with all 
the instruments playing together and generally unisono, I began mine 
with two violins only, piano for the first eight bars, followed instantly by 
a forte; the audience, as I expected, said ‘hush’ at the soft beginning, and 
when they heard the forte, began at once to clap their hands. I was so happy 
that as soon as the symphony was over, I went off to the Palais Royal, 
where I had a large ice, said the rosary as I had vowed to do, and went 





JAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WAInut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 






The following distinguished members of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra are teaching at the Conservatory: 







STANISLAS BEM CHARLES RUDD 
In Charge of Cello Department Clarinet and Saxophone 
HENRY WOEMPNER BENJAMIN KLATZKIN 
Flute and Woodwind Ensemble Trumpet and Brass Instruments 







SS SS SS LES 


1) 








P casa nen enna eee eg Nn ae 10 Arent At AAO T TTT, peer een g et soceeemmnnnnnnensst se reryETPe—ammnennnn nn pe seeerei 
| 
| 






THE ART COMMISSION 



















OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 10, 8:30 


JOHN BARBIROLLI 


Guest Conductor 


—PROGRAM— 











Tickets: 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.50 — No Tax 


March 4 March 21 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
April 15 


MONTEUX, Conducting 


OPERA HOUSE 
JANUARY 28 to FEBRUARY 1 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


In Association with S. HUROK 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 














SIX MAGNIFICENT PERFORMANCES 
Company of 65 Brilliant Dancers — Six Spectacular New Ballets 
—————— 


Tickets: 50c, $1.10, $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 


72: 











PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


home, for I always am and always will be happiest there, or else in the 
company of some good, true, honest German who, if he is a bachelor, 
lives alone like a good Christian, or, if married, loves his wife and brings 
up his children properly. Now I have a piece of news for you which you 
may have heard already, namely, that that godless arch-rascal Voltaire 
has pegged out like a dog, like a beast! ‘That is his reward! You are quite 
right, we owe Theresa wages for five quarters. ‘That I do not like being 
here, you must long ago have noticed. I have very many reasons, but, as 
I am here, it is useless to go into them”. 


This, however, is not the end of the tale. The letter just cited was 
written on the third of July; on the ninth Mozart had this to say: 

“Le Gros is so pleased with it that he says it is his very best symphony. 
But the Andante had not the good fortune to win his approval; he de- 
clares that it has too many modulations and that it is too long. He derives 
this opinion, however, from the fact that the audience forgot to clap their 
hands as loudly and to shout as much as they did at the end of the first 
and last movements. For indeed, the Andante is a great favorite with my- 
self and with all connoisseurs, lovers of music, and the majority of those 
who have heard it. It is just the reverse of what Le Gros says, for it is 
quite simple and short. But in order to satisfy him (and, as he maintains, 
some others) I have composed a fresh Andante. Each is good in its own 
way, for each has a different character. But the last pleases me even more”. 

Two Andantes for the Paris symphony therefore exist, one published 
as the second movement of the whole, one separately. No one knows 
which was the original, which the afterthought. 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Fourth Pair of Symphony Concerts 
Friday, January 17, 2:30 Saturday, January 18, 8:30 
Soloist: ISAAC STERN, Violinist 


PROGRAM 


‘Toccata and Fugue in D Minor 
(Orchestrated by Leonidas Leonardi) 
Concerto tor Violinvands Orchestra sence. wee es eee eo Sibelius 


Music for A Scene from Shelley Samuel Barber 
(First Performance in San _ Francisco) 


Three Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet Symphony Berlioz 


Box Office: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland; 
Telephone SUtter 1331(San Francisco) or HIgate 1220 (Oakland) 














Soe ieen wn 90 ot peememrninndins ssasessenee mmancaseseetierr TTT eannananssnt teeters = 
> 
| 


Seta IPSS 








Se Vows lek he 





FRIDAY BOX HOLDERS 


Mrs. Pierre Monteux 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 


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Q 


W 


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Marquise de Pins 


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Lady ‘Tennyson 


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Miss Florence Williams 


Mrs. Reed J. Bekins 

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Mrs. James A. McKee 

Mrs. Arthur S. Musgrave 


Mrs. Frank E. Buck 
Mrs. Ralph K. Davies 
Mrs. J. Lindsay Hanna 
Mrs. James Levensaler 
Mrs. Olga Meyer 

Mrs. Frank Summers 













PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


An outline of the symphony is not urgently called for. The premier 
coup @archet will be readily recognized in the unison and octave D’s of 
ihe strings in the opening bars. But I cannot refrain from reprinting the 
theme of the finale as given, with added historical sound effects, by Prof. 
Tovey in his Essays in Musical Analysis: 





== Loud and pro- 
— longed applause. 
= 


SYMPHONY No. 7, 
CMa] OR 7.O) Bey Scli(ac sae eetnnl cat ean iene eee at ie Jean Sibelius 


(1865—) 

This work, completed in 1924, is Sibelius’ last symphony and his most 
recent big work in any form except for the symphonic poem, Tapiola, of 
1925. Sibelius has produced nothing at all since 1929, or if he has, it has 
not been made public. Throughout the past decade frequent references 
have been made in the musical press to an eighth symphony, but this has 
so far failed to materialize. 

In his biography of the Finnish master Karl Ekman quotes a letter 
Sibelius wrote in 1918 in which he discusses plans for work in progress. 
He was then revising the fifth symphony and creating the sixth and 
seventh. ‘The last is referred to as ““The seventh symphony: joy of life and 
vitality, with appassionato passages. In three movements, the last a 
‘Hellenic rondo.” Later in the same letter Sibelius says “With regard to 
Symphonies VI and VII the plans may possibly be altered according to 
the development of the musical ideas. As usual, I am a slave to my themes 
and submit to their demands.” 

The plans for the seventh symphony were indeed altered, and when the 
work had achieved its final form the three movements had been forged 
into one, while the “Hellenic rondo” had disappeared. ‘The composition 


ee ee eee eee ee 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET : SAN FRANCISCO , TUXEDO 2738 











Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 











| 





ei ee ee 


Pp erernae NES ee TOS ce RE SET 


a - a t es 





THE MUSIC 
EO VE KS 
SOCIETY 


MARGARET TILLY, FOUNDER 





SIXTH SEASON 1941 
TUESDAY EVE: JAN. > FEB. 16, cAr belies 


—— COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE == 


MERRILL JORDAN...Flute |] LUCIEN MITCHELL. . Viola 
FRANK HOUSER..... Violin |] HERMAN REINBERG. .’Cello 
MARGARET TILLY....Piano 














“New and unfamiliar music, beautifully played—they are performing a noble work. 
As usual their program was full of interest and their manner of performance highly 
distinguished. It is unfortunate that an ensemble so admirably musical and compe- 
tent will give only three concerts this year”. 


Alfred Frankenstein in the San Francisco Chronicle 





“The Music Lovers are not only excellent artists. They show brains and a sense of 
adventure—They are musicians of high competence and mature understanding”’. 


Alexander Fried in San Francisco Examiner 





“These evenings—presented with fine musicianship and a contageously adventuresome 
spirit are as civilized an activity as can be found in the city—Watch the Music Lovers 
and hear them”. 

Marjory M. Fisher in San Francisco News 





“impassioned singing of the strings against a profoundly moving piano part, were 
moments of indescribable beauty”. 
Marie Hicks Davidson in Call-Bulletin 








TICKETS FROM SHERMAN, CLAY & CO and from 
LULU, J: BLUMBERG, Manager 


78 








= 3131 JACKSON STREET 











PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


of a symphony in a single movement is not unique. Many other con- 
temporary composers have written symphonies in one movement—witness 
the works of Carlos Chavez and Willem Pijper played at these concerts 
last season and the third symphony of Roy Harris, which will be presented 
this year—but the one-movement plan of Sibelius’ seventh is different 
from that of others. Ihe one-movement symphony is commonly con- 
structed in a number of more or less independent sections contrasting 
in tempo and thematic material, and therefore corresponding to the separ- 
ate movements of the classical symphonic pattern. With Sibelius, how- 
ever, there are no contrasting sections; the entire work is a single unit, 
but a unit that is singularly rich in the variety of its constituent particles. 

In discussing the symphonies as a whole in his book on Sibelius Cecil 
Gray says “From first symphony to last one finds a steady, consistent 
diminution in the use of contrapuntal devices, culminating in the seventh, 
in which no trace of fugato and singularly little polyphony even of the 
ireest kind are to be found. Finally, the whole sequence shows a progres- 
sive disinclination to employ large-scale symmetrical melodies as _ his 
thematic material, and an ever-increasing tendency to build the move- 
ments out of short and fragmentary subject-matter.” 

The first part of this statement may be compared with Sibelius’ views 
on modern music as given by Ekman: “I find much that is interesting 
in present-day music, although I cannot be in sympathy with all the ten- 
dencies that have been expressed within the last few decades . . . The 
error of our day has been its faith in polyphony. It has seemed as if people 


PROUD TRADITIONS 





SS ao mtnhe Opera. .a. sand jewels by 
SEGRE VES SDR EAT (So “EF ACR EP Both 
brilliantly woven into the romantic, glamorous 


pattern that is San Francisco. 


SHREVE, TREAT & EACRET 


PEARL AND GEM SPECIALISTS = %* JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 
OUN ae LR Reeoul exes Gal AY REY Seco ales or eels 





SS 











LIES PEON AE eX 


FOS STs Sie 


=e es 
Sse Ss 


See 


ee 


/ 
| 
| 


A Mrs. Pierre Monteux 


B Gamma Phi Beta 
University of California 


G Chi Phi 
University of California 


D Pi Beta Phi 
University of California 


E Zeta Psi 
University of California 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 
Philip S$. Boone 
Lewis Byington 
Richard Lyon 


1 Kappa Alpha Theta 
University of California 


G Delta Upsilon 
University of California 


H Chi Omega 
University of California 


J} Delta Kappa Epsilon 
University of California 


K Dr. and Mrs. Donald Dallas 
Dr. and Mrs. Nelson Howard 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Laird 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Leslie 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Scarborough 


Ib Mrs. Wallace Alexander 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ambrose 
Dr. and Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank Gerbode 
Dr. and Mrs. B. H. Page 
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Titzell, Jr. 


The following University and College Organizations are Season Subscribers: 


Delta Delta Delta 
University of California 


Phi Delta Theta 
University of California 


Dominican College 
San Rafael 


San Jose State College 
80 


M 


Syn 


O 


W 


SATURDAY NIGHT BOX HOLDERS 
Mr. and Mrs. F. Worthen Bradley 


Mrs. Jane C. Brophy 


Dr. and Mrs. Garnett Cheney 


Dr. Miriam Miller 


Dr. and Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick E. Supple 


Delta Tau Delta 
Stanford University 


Theta Delta Chi 
Stanford University 


Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Zellerbach 


Chi Psi 
Stanford University 


Delta Gamma 
University of California 


Kappa Kappa Gamma 
University of California 


International House 
University of California 


Mills College 


Bowles Hall 
University of California 


Alpha Phi 
University of California 


Psi Upsilon 
University of California 


Sigma Chi 
University of California 


St. Mary’s College 


St. Luke’s Hospital Student Nurses 
Stanford Hospital Student Nurses 
Stanford University Medical School 


University of California Medical School 


University of San Francisco 














PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


imagined that the whole had become better by placing nonentities on top 
of each other. Polyphony, of course, is a force when there is good reason 
‘or it, but for a long time it has almost seemed an illness raging among 
composers’, 

As was pointed out in the program notes for Sibelius’ fifth symphony 
published here a few weeks ago, the only kind of outline possible for the 
‘ater symphonies of this composer is one in which practically every line 
of the music has a corresponding line in the analysis. Such an analysis of 
the seventh symphony is provided by Ernest Newman in the second volume 
of the Sibelius Society recordings. It is extremely useful in connection 
with records, but is likely to prove more exhausting than enlightening 
in the concert hall. The seventh symphony does not trace the continuous 
ascent from misty beginnings to climactic conclusion often observable 
in other symphonic movements by Sibelius: its most obvious factor of unity 
is a big theme first stated by a solo trombone and repeated twice later on. 
Around these three statements of the principal subject is, again to quote 
Gray, “a host of small, pregnant, fragmentary motives of which at least 
a dozen play a prominent part in the unfolding of the action. The re- 
sourceful way in which these are varied, developed, juxtaposed, permuted 
and combined into a continuous and homogeneous texture is one of the 


miracles of modern music; Sibelius himself has never done anything to 
equal it in this respect”. 


THE SAN FRANCISCO TRIO 


ALICE MORINI BORIS BLINDER 
Piano WILLIAM WOLSKI Violincello 


Violin 
S. F. Chronicle — A. Frankenstein — November 28 


There was no difficulty that was not completely surmounted, 
and no expressive possibility that was not thoroughly realized. 


S. F. Examiner — Alexander Fried — November 28 


Only a trio of the first rank could master such a program as 
the one that triumphantly opened a new season of the San 
Francisco Trio last night. 


NEXT CONCERT, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 8 
COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 


Reserved Seats: SHERMAN, CLAY — $1.00 — $1.50 — $2.00 








——— 
eee - St 


pia) soared 


SSS pe 


ae 


IES SEPSIS NATE aI 8 EI ST 





MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 17 


TOM C. GIRTON Presents 





SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


16 Performances 7 ‘Tickets: 


DATES 





Thitty -“Fitcst Opnual eee tin erie. JEve 


FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


WAR MEMORIAL OnP sees bis OxUino. ls 


MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 


$1.90 Si VERSO) $1.65 $1.25 
OPERAS Box ist 20 Rows Last 8 Rows Grand Dress 
Seats Orchestra Orchestra Tier | Circle 


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filled in order received. THe: enclosed CHECK Bp icce--cee.< encase nceene seen eecne ners HM bceancsbnt eee aaa is in full pe 
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PROGRAM “=NO© FES——Gontinucd 


SUITE FROM 


IBV MAR WULAUUDD IONE Sy RPG Shee ee Georges Bizet 
(1838-1875) 

The Fair Maid of Perth, opera in four acts after Sir Walter Scott’s like- 
named novel, was first produced in Paris in 1867, three years after The 
Pearl Fishers and eight years before Carmen. The story, as told by MM. 
Saint-Georges and Adenis, the librettists, is as follows: 

A young gipsy girl named Mab takes refuge from a crowd of too ardent 
admirers in the home of the armorer, Henry Smith. Smith is about to en- 
tertain his fiancée, Catherine Glover, and her father, and, in order not 
(o arouse Catherine’s jealousy, hides Mab in an adjoining room. As Henry 
and Catherine are discussing the plans for their wedding they are inter- 
rupted by the Duke of Rothsay, who comes to the armorer for a dent- 
straightening job on his sword. ‘The Duke makes love to Catherine, there- 
by enraging Henry, who is prevented from throwing his hammer at the 
Duke only by the sudden appearance of Mab, who deflects Henry’s arm. 
Che presence of a strange woman in Henry’s house causes Catherine’s 
temper to flare up, and in the ensuing uproar no one but the audience 
notices that Mab is carefully pocketing a jewel Henry had offered Cather- 
ine as a symbol of their engagement. 

The second act is largely a carnival scene during which the Duke en- 
gages Mab to induce Catherine to come to a masked bal] he is giving that 
night. heir conversation is overheard by Ralph, one of Father Glover’s 
apprentices, who informs Smith. In the third act a masked woman does 


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THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the Univer- 
sity of California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, 
and is affiliated with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, 
faith and service of its members is prophetic of the important part youth plays 
and will continue to play in our work. 





CHAIRMEN 
Virginia Adams William Barkan Philip S. Boone 
OFFICERS 
Lewis Byington Richard Lyon 
Cornelia Clark Richard Palmer 
Henry Evers Marylouise Sanford 
EXECUTIVE COUNCILS 
Ava Jean Barber Louise Lindley Frederick Rea 
J. Brandon Bassett Lois Mitchell James Schwabacher 
John Collins Edward Nielson Janet Scott 
John Donahue Douglass North Dr. Marceille Spetz 
William Gillis Wrede Petersmeyer Milton ‘Tucker 
Peggy Hawkins Edward Pinger Ann Wilder 
Fred W. Kimball Mary Powell Jane Williams 
David Leaf Patricia Pruyn 








University of California Extension Division 


announces 
“Programs and Personalities of the Symphony Season” 


Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 


Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
7,14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 


Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 


| 








WOMEN’S CITY CLUB 
465 POST STREET SAN FRANCISCO 


Presents 


SIR THOMAS BEECHAM 


In a Lecture 


“A MINGLED CHIME” 


MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 6, 8:30 o’clock 
Tickets on Sale Women’s City Club - $1.00 plus tax 

















PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


indeed appear in the Duke’s palace. The Duke believes her to be Cather- 
ine, but it is actually Mab herself. Smith appears, and then Father Glover 
and Catherine. Father Glover tells the Duke that Catherine has forgiven 
Smith, and asks Rothsay to come to the wedding. But Smith now has his 
turn; he denounces Catherine, and at the climax of his denunciations 
discovers the jewel pinned to the Duke’s cloak. 

In the last act Ralph pleads Catherine’s innocence. Henry refuses to 
hear him, and Ralph challenges him to a duel. As Smith is leaving to meet 
Ralph at the appointed place, Catherine emerges from her house weak 
and wan and tells him she is about to die. Smith goes off to his duel, 
resolved to lose it. In a moment Mab appears seeking Catherine, and 
discovers that she has lost her mind. Mab informs Catherine and Father 
Glover that the Duke has taken Ralph’s place at the duel and has been 
killed by Henry. Henry returns, likewise Catherine’s reason, and all ends 
happily. 

The prelude is that to the first act. The other four movements are all 
drawn from the carnival scene of the second act. The aubade, however, 
is not a part of the printed score. It was withdrawn by Bizet in favor of 
the serenade which immediately follows it in this suite, and was arranged 
lor concert purposes by Sir Thomas Beecham from the unpublished manu- 
script. The gipsy dance is sometimes used for part of the ballet in the 
fourth act of Carmen. 









THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Presents 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, Managing Director 
HOWARD K. SKINNER, Business Manager 


OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON AND SATURDAY NIGHT 
AT 2:30 * « e * AT 8:30 


FRI., JAN. 24 —_— SAT., JAN. 25 FRI., MAR. 14 —_ SAT., MAR. 15 
















ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM DOROTHY MAYNOR 
FRI, FEB. 7 — SAT. FEB. 8 ee saa he 
FRI., M . 23 —— SAT., MAR. 29 
SEGUE), SEN QE BLESSING): ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 






FRI., FEB. 14 cae SAT.» FEB. 15 FRI., APR. 4 yo SAT.» APR. 5 











SERGEI RACHMANINOFF ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM | 
FRI., FEB. 21 ae SATB PER SAS ES hae Tes aed Conon OA ARRAS 
ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM JOSE TLUREL 






SPECIAL POPULAR CONCERT 
Sunday Evening, March 2 - Eight Thirty O’Clock 
Soloist: MARGARET SPEAKS, Soprano 






TICKETS: FRIDAY 55¢ to $2.75 — — — SATURDAY 55¢ to $1.25 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE, SHERMAN, CLAY — SUtter 1331 









85 








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———— 


PEERS: © NUN EE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conouctor 


& 
FIRST VIOLINS: 7G ELLOS: BASSOONS: 
BLINDER, NAOUM BE aa KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
ASTER 
CONCERT M E Bae yt LA HAYE, E. B. 
HEYES, EUGENE * : BAKER, MELVILLE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR CLAUDIO, CESARE 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 
KIRS, RUDOLPH CONTRA BASSOON: 
eee at ee By he Bem, STANISLAS 
3RD ASST. CONCER A 
ARKATOV, JAMES BAKER, MELVILLE 


HOUSER, F. S. 


PASMDORE, 


PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


MARY 


CLAUDIO, FERDINAND HORNS: 


MORTENSEN, MODESTA 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 


ANDERSON, THEODORE BASSES: 
DE GRASSI, ANTONIO Ute aS Te red SNe 
’ KUCHYNKA, FRANK TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
LARAIA, W. F. PRINCIPAL 
ROTH, PAUL 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN BELL, WALTER 
GUARALD!I, MAFALDA GUTERSON, AARON 
TRUMPETS: 
DicTEROW, HAROLD ScCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
GORDOHN, ROBERT BUENGER, AUGUST KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
STORCH, A. E. BARTON, LELAND S. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH KRESS, VICTOR 
SECOND VIOLINS: 
HAUG, JULIUS FLUTES: 
TROMBONES: 


PRINCIPAL 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 


WOEMPNER, HENRY LE. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. Gios!, ORLANDO 


GOUGH, WALTER 
’ BENKMAN, HERBERT SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. PICCOLO: 
HELGET, HANS BENKMAN, HERBERT TUBA: 
BARET, BERTHE 
MURRAY, RALPH 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. OBOES: 


ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, Jd. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS HARPS: 
ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 


SPAULDING, MYRON ATTL, KAJETAN 
KOBLICK, NATHAN MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


VIOLAS: 


ENGLISH HORN: 


ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 
TYMPANI: 


CLARINETS: LAREW, WALTER 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 


PRINCIPAL 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 


VERNEY, ROMAIN RupDpD, CHARLES PERCUSSION: 
WEILER, ERICH FRAGALE, FRANK 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN VENDT, ALBERT 


HAHL, EMIL 


E FLAT CLARINET: SALINGER Met 


TRIENA, FRANK 


VAN DEN BURG, JAC 


RuDD, CHARLES 
LIBRARIAN AND 


OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VicTOR BASS CLARINET: PERSONNEL MANAGER 
KARASIK, MANFRED FRAGALE, FRANK HAUG, JULIUS 





A eS eee eee 


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* RELATIVELY SO COMPARED TO OTHER FOODS 





MARION HUTTON 
in Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade, broadcasts... 


-_ 


s, 


4 


FECERERDKOREECALR TAY 


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and for the best of reasons...Chesterfiell 


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yourself...so tune in now for your! 
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Copyright 1941, Liccett & Myers Tosacco Co. 


PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO. seis 700 MONTGOMERY, 5S. F. 





THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Pee SB NSS TBE 


NAY FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTHA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
GON De Wer oem 


ple 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD kh. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 






















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After the last note of the Symphony 
THE CONCERT IS YOURS 


on Columbia Records! 


PehOGGA LACAN DVEUGU ii were cee Bach 


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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


MRs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY, 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


DR. HANS BARKAN 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
MISS LOUISE A. Boyp 


MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 


MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 


MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 


PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


MRS. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 


DR. HANS BARKAN 


SAN FRAN 


PHILIP N. BooNE 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


Be jah (e. iMijyuse.- 


MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND, 


Mrs. M. C. Stoss. fe 
MRS. H. R. MCKINNON. 
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MRS. ASHTON H. Porter. 


MRS. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM. 


PHILIP S. BoOoONE. ete 
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E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 


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G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
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MRS. EDWARD O. BARTLETT 
ALBERT M. BENDER 
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Guipo J. Musto 

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MRS. PAUL I. FAGAN 
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JOHN F. ForRBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
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MRS. HARRY S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

MRS E. S. HELLER 
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MRs. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
MRS. MARCUS S&S. KOSHLAND 
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GAETANO MEROLA 

ene GeeMIbEeER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
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a surreal’ 
touch with a 


for Flowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 





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VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 
TORSO. weats beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT .. . with daisies in the crown 
| DUCK _ . carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


Exclusive with 


*" SLOANE 


Coe ChE: Riven edie Gans Avner 















San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


A PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Xs 


FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
2000th and 2001st Goncerts 


Fripay, JANUARY 17, 2:30 P. M. 
SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 8:30 P. M. 


Soloist: ISAAC STERN, Violinist 
Ww 


TOCCATA AND 


GEG CEN DY ANLIIN ©) Rosa te dete Deke a raed Bach 
(ORCHESTRATED BY LEONID LEONARDI) 






















CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND 
ORG@EES TRAC De MINOR: ZOPUS 472 fee Sibelius 4 
Allegro moderato 
Adagio di molto 
Allegro ma non tanto 
MR. STERN 





NE ERM s:S ON 


MUSIC FOR A SCENE FROM SHELLEY... . Barber AG 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 
To the Memory of SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER 





THREE EXCERPTS FROM 
ROMEO AND JULIET SYMPHONY... Berlioz 
Love Scene 
Queen Mab Scherzo 
Romeo Alone-Sadness-Distant Sounds of Music and 
Laughter-Festival in Capulet’s Palace 
————— 
Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ 


Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 
These affairs are opening to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 








GUEST ARTIST THIS WEEK 


Isaac STERN was born in Russia in 1920, and was brought to San Francisco 
at the age of ten months. He comes of a musical family, his mother having 
graduated from the Imperial Conservatory in St. Petersburg, while his 
father, too, was active musically in Russia. He obtained most of his musical 
education in San Francisco, principally with Robert Pollak and Naoum 
Blinder. Although he had been playing in public as early as 1928, his 
official debut recital was given at the Veteran’s Auditorium im L955 MELE 
made his first appearance with orchestra at a concert of the San Francisco 
Symphony at the Civic Auditorium in 1936, playing the Saint-Saens violin 
concerto in B minor, and in the following season he presented the Brahms 
concerto on the Friday-Saturday series at the Opera House. He has since 
been soloist with many other orchestras and has given recitals generally 
throughout the country. For his third appearance with this orchestra, 
on January 17 and 18, he has chosen the Sibelius concerto. 


THE NEXT GUEST ARTIST 


SERGE] RACHMANINOFF is one of the few contemporary musicians to win 
equal standing as a major composer and a virtuoso executant. He was born 
near Novgorod in 1873, and was trained at the Moscow Conservatory, 
studying piano under Nicholas Sverov and composition under Anton Aren- 
sky; personal friendship with Tschaikowsky during his student days also 
did much to form his point of view. 

Rachmaninoff was chief conductor at the Imperial Theatre in Moscow 
from 1904 to 1906. He then settled in Dresden for two years devoted solely 
to composition. In 1909 he made his first American tour, returning to Mos- 
cow in 1910, and remaining there until the Russian Revolution. Until 1915 
Rachmaninoff’s activities as pianist were largely devoted to the interpreta- 
tion of his own works. In that year Alexander Scriabin died, and Rach- 
maninoff resolved to make a European tour playing only Scriabin’s works. 
His reputation as a general virtuoso dates largely from this time. Rach- 
maninoff left Russia in 1917, and has lived in the United States ever since. 

Rachmaninoff’s larger works include three operas, Aleko (1892), The 
Miserly Knight (1905) , and Francesca da Rimini (1905) ; three symphonies 
(1895, 1907 and 1936) ; four piano concertos (18915 -E90d- 1909 and 1927) ; 
several choral pieces including The Bells (1913) ; a trio in memory of 
Tschaikowsky (1893) ; a ‘cello sonata (1901) ; the tone poem The Island of 
the Dead (1907) ; the Rhapsody for Piano and Orchestra on a Theme by 
Paganini (1934) ; many songs; two piano sonatas (1907 and 1913); and 
countless small piano pieces, of which one is in the key of C sharp minor. 

Rachmaninoff made his first appearance with the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra last season when he played his second concerto. ‘This 
year he will appear on two successive Friday-Saturday pairs. He will 
present his third concerto at the concerts of February 8-9 and the Rhap- 
sody on a Theme by Paganini at the concerts of February 14-15. 


ee l 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO . TU xeEpo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 











96 











PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


TOCCATA AND FUGUE IN D MINOR....-..:. J. Spach 
(1685-1750) 


(ORCHESTRATED BY LEONID LEONARDI) 

Virtuosi of the violin and piano, like Paganini and Liszt, have often 
cultivated a kind of long-haired diabolism: only the organists, among 
concert performers, can play God. Nowhere is the organ’s cataclysmic 
grandeur more thunderously and majestically exploited than in Bach’s 
toccata and fugue in D minor, and the work, like others by the same com- 
poser, has been a tempting challenge to those who conjure the genii out 
of a still louder and more variously colorful medium— the modern See 
phony orchestra. | 

Leonid Leonardi was born in Moscow in 1901, and received his training 
in Paris. Among his teachers were d’Indy, Busoni and Ravel. He has done 
much conducting for radio in this country, and in recent years has been 
active as a composer and arranger for the films. He lives in Hollywood. 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 


DEMEN ORO BUS ee See ean gral Jean Sibelius 
(1865-) 


Sibelius wrote his violin concerto in 1903, but revised it two years later. 
It was first performed in 1905 at a concert of the Berlin Singakademie 
with Carl Halir playing the solo and Richard Strauss conducting. Maud 
Powell introduced it to America in the following season. 


I 


Allegro moderato, D minor, 2/2 time. The solo has the principal theme 
at the fourth bar: 


{ LTTE Was FS tas Wage Gites 








<> 
PLE SS? pera Pato ot HH +t 
—- ptt re pp fF #69} — BS Bisse BAe ee Ee) > i eS ET. 
0 a i | = | ee Be Ee ae a <_d ee) ee ey a ESS} 4 
a | Es Be 2 ee | ee ee eee el 






This melody takes no less than 30 measures for its complete unfolding, 
after which it is worked over for another 22 measures. Then comes a brief 
solo cadenza, after which the orchestral strings bring in the second theme 
in B flat major: 






Ss 





War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
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97 








> a 





SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . Their 
phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 
and courage. ... We feel that not only the Association, but all the 








members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Hoc GeL as Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 


Evans, Mrs. Harry 
Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 





Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. 
Gray, Nancy 

Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs Horace 

Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 
Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Knox, Mrs. John B 

Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East: 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 





Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 

Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 
Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 





JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 
PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
TEACHER of VOICE 


From Primary Beginning to Final Accomplishment 


Opera, Church and Concert Repertoire 


740 PINE STREET 


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1030 BUSH ST., SAN FRANCISCO, PHONE OR 6367 


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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 










WS Fy > 0 ne ee 
OVA C25 ey 


This episode ends with Example 2 in the solo, treated with leaping oc- 
taves and trills in D flat major. A third theme immediately follows, the 
tempo changing to Allegro molto and the key to B flat minor as the or- 
chestral violins present: 


[2A ae ed Sa pe 
ol Bey. RS i A BR SY Lon 2] DS Bt we HE eee a 
fs? 5} BEG od 0 Ge 0 ee ee semester AS nee eA 
YE ee] a ee ’ 4 Rt hf ARDr 


wy “> Se 









This also has its second section given to the violins and flutes a few bars 
later: 


2) 4 b- /A- . agence ye 
{ =—_ io t fi_ f ea ( Sf Ime ft gf ’ La fo 
Ly See | i= f- 
eT FRSA see oe 21 TCL = i | z 
7 FIERA st at ie 
wm ea ae Ar: EE A I EO To< aay 


After a minor climax the exposition ends with a long-held pedal B flat 
of the ‘cellos and basses, over which the solo instrument begins a big 
cadenza. With a final outburst, the orchestra resigns the stage to the prin- 
cipal instrument. 


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CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 
D MINOR, OPUS 47 Sibelius 
Played by Jascha Heifetz and the London Philharmonic 
Sir Thomas Beecham, conducting 
THREE EXCERPTS FROM 
ROMEO AND JULIET SYMPHONY Berlioz 








om Neee eRe ere reer 


eS 
het h too SA. 


set A I I CCC LOA CC OCCA OE 


Se 











THE ART COMMISSION 


100 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
GAITE PARISIENNE CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesday Eve., January 29 coated ADE se 
SERENADE NEW YORKER 
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Thursday Eve., January 30 Sunday Mat., February 2 
LES SYLPHIDE SEES 
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THE NEW YORKER ee Pee pata 
Sunday Eve., February 2 
Friday Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


Tickets: 50c, $1.10, $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


March 4 March 21 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHOUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax ‘Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEUX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 














PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


The cadenza is written into the score and is based on Example 1. It 
serves not only as cadenza but as development section as well. At its end 
the bassoon cuts in under the solo and harks back to Example | in G minor 
to begin a free, wide-open recapitulation in which all the material quoted 
above returns in clearly recognizable if somewhat varied forms. Example 
I, treated in conflicting rhythms between the solo and orchestra, provides 
the coda. 

II 


Adagio di molto, B flat major, 4/4 time. The solo violin has the prin- 
cipal subject after five bars of introduction from the woodwinds: 


Bree ea 2 Re Eee 6 Weep ET 

8 USS Gere Gn SU a Se] GS SS lh Le (Se 0 ed Wear ee ll 
(e023 ORG SS Bars GE be GS 2 ee EE Sy A SS 
QP Aaa (ee Bl 4sey 


HA Best Ga) ES a Be fe SSeS a ey AI 





Like the principal theme of the first movement, this melody is exception- 
ally long and its statement constitutes the whole first part of the move- 
ment. 


A contrasting idea, derived from the woodwind introduction, is stated 
by the orchestral violins: 










fh oe EE a 
0.0 A a SE EB be EE ee 2) es ee 
ES SS SS SL SS Rs SS SS A A 6 AY A 

: e 
, 










fi: 4 fz 


The solo joins, and the pace grows more dramatic and agitated. Eventu- 
ally the violas go back to Example 6 to bring in the combined recapitu- 
lation and development with which this comparatively short movement 
concludes. 





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101 





as rence tna. 


Web rwet cemten hme - 


Se be EEE ELAN SF LS 


a a 








ee a or 
BEFORE THE SYMPHONY ; 





Continental Buffet Luncheon in the Garden Court 


LEO REISMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA PLAY NIGHTLY 
(Except Monday) AND AT SATURDAY TEA DANSANTS 


THE PALACE HOTEL 














iy 
TODAY'S GREAT PIANO 


Poh CH OC hao 


TODAY'S GREAT ARTISTS 


FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 
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JOSEPH BATTISTA 
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MOISSAYE BOGUSLAWSKI 
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JUSS! BUOERLING 
LUCREZIA BORI 
JEANNE BEHREND 
BELA BARTOK 

MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU 
MARIO CHAMLEE 
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KARIN DAYAS 
CECILLE DE HORVATH 
JOSE ECHANIZ 

DAVID EARLE 
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RUDA FIRKUSNY 
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EDITH MASON 
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CHARLES NAEGELE 
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LOUIS PERSINGER 
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E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
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ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
HELEN TRAUBEL 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
SAMUEL YAFFE 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 


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rete ee 


102 

















III 


Allegro ma non tanto, D major, 3/4 time. A kind of free rondo con- 
cerned with the statement, restatement and embellishment of two sub- 
jects. The first is given out by the solo at the fifth measure:* 









2 en 
mE — ee EE ee £8 2 2 ee _ ee beer ess Ee 
(CV (en a Ee ee ee eC eC Ce eee eae SoS 
AY See Sa ee aaa LP 8 ES SS : 






‘The second appears in the orchestral strings at the 48th bar of the move- 


ment: 





>>> 





*“Evidently a polonaise for polar bears,” says the learned ‘Tovey. 





ANNOUNCEMENT 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Fifth Pair of Symphony Concerts 


Friday, January 24, 2:30 Saturday, January 25, 8:30 
PROGRAM 
Symphony No. 85, B Flat Major (The Queen of France) . .Haydn 
VII P MOM VINOs Obert ese ase jous tel Pa lee apaates ee gaieiae ct ar Fae Roy Harris 
(First performance in San Francisco) 
SIGS SAK Gwe Za a UUs (tel ayn tehaeeee eee a pee ean oe Strauss 
Dance Or thes oCVel:V Gls. LO a5 C) O27TLG stay ete ie enna ener Strauss 





Box Office: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland; 
Telephone SUtter 1331(San Francisco) or HIgate 1220 (Oakland) 








—— cain antl Rare Ss a tT a mm 


Anorm 


cna RR Seo En hee ae RE US ee ES 


pth oF 








THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Presents 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON AND SATURDAY NIGHT 
Al 2:c0) 7 e * © AT 8:30 


FRI., JAN. 24 —  SAT., JAN. 25. FRI., MAR.14 — SAT., MAR. 15 | 
ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM DOROTHY MAYNOR 
FRI., FEB. 7 a SAT., FEB. 8 sa ate eLS. 


FRI., MAR. 28 SAT., MAR. 29 
SERGE] RACHMANINOFF ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 


FRI., FEB. 14 SAT., FEB. 15 FRI., APR. 4 —_— SAT., APR. 5 


SERGEI RACHMAN INOFF ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 


PIANIST 


FRI., APR. 18 SAT., APR. 19 
FRI., FEB. 21 —_— SAT., FEB. 22 


ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM JOSE ITURBI 


PIANIST 


SPECIAL POPULAR CONCERT 
Sunday Evening, March 2 - Eight Thirty O’Clock 
Soloist: MARGARET SPEAKS, Soprano 


TICKETS: FRIDAY 55¢ to $2.75 — — SATURDAY 55¢ to $1.25 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE, SHERMAN, CLAY — SUtter 1331 


FINE FOODS 


Served in the most beautiful 
restaurants inthe West... 
at no greater cost 
than elsewhere. 


ICE CREAM 
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always in favor 


104 











PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


MUSIC FOR A SCENE FROM SHELLEY... .Samuel Barber 
(1910-) 

Mr. Barber writes: “In the summer of 1933 I was reading Shelley’s 
‘Prometheus Unbound’. The lines in Act II Scene 5, where Shelley indi- 
cates music, suggested the composition. It is really incidental music for 
this particular scene, and has nothing at all to do with the figure of 
Prometheus. 


“The lines are as follows: 

‘Panthea to Asia: (within a cloud in the top of a 

snowy mountain) 

Nor is it I alone, 
Thy sister, thy companion, thine own chosen one, 
But the whole world which seeks thy symphony. 
Hearest thou not the sounds i’ the air which speak 

the love 

Of all articulate beings? Feelest thou not 
The inanimate winds enamoured of thee? List! (Music.) 


69? 


Samuel Barber, a nephew of Louis Homer, was born in West Chester, 
Pennsylvania. He studied at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadel- 
phia and is at present a member of the faculty of that school. He won the 
American Prix de Rome in 1935 and the Pulitzer prize in 1935 and1936. 
He has written a symphony, a violin concerto, and other orchestral works, 
a string quartet and a ’cello sonata, and many vocal works, including a 
choral piece entitled A Stopwatch and an Ordnance Map. Music for a 
Scene from Shelley was first performed by the New York Philharmonic 
Symphony Orchestra in 1935. 


THREE EXCERPTS FROM 


ROMEO AND: JULIET SYMPHONY ...... Hector Berlioz 
(1803-1869) 


Romeo and Juliet, Dramatic Symphony with Chorus, Vocal Solos, and 





JAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WAInut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 









The following distinguished members of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra are teaching at the Conservatory: 


STANISLAS BEM CHARLES RUDD 
In Charge of Cello Department Clarinet and Saxophone 
HENRY WOEMPNER BENJAMIN KLATZKIN 
Flute and Woodwind Ensemble Trumpet and Brass Instruments 






105 





ALEG TEMPLETON 


PLA NTS 1 
WORLD’S FOREMOST MUSICAL PERSONALITY 


WAR MEMORIAL 
OPERA HOUSE 
THURSDAY EVE., MARCH 27 


TICKETS ON SALE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 


ADMISSIONS: 83'—$1.10—$1.65—$2.20—Box Seats $2.48 
Tax Included 
Presented by TOM C. GIRTON 

Wm. E. CHAMBERLAIN Local Manager 


MvAIN-A.G-EM EN T:> MCA. ARTISTES ~LID.. 


MAXIM HENRI 


SCHAPIRO TEMIANKA 


Pianist Violinist 


Continuing their Series 


“THE HISTORY OF THE SONATA” 
* 


—ALEXANDER FRIED, S. F. Examiner, Dec. 19th, 1940 


NEXT CONCERT: SCHUBERT-SCHUMANN 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 22nd, 1941 
at 8:30 o'clock 


GCOMMUNILY PLAYHOUSE 
Tickets for the series: $3.30 - $5.50 - $8.80. Single Tickets: 83c - $1.10 - $1.65. 


(All seats reserved.) At Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland, 
| and at Community Playhouse 











THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the Univer- 
sity of California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, 
and is affiliated with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, 
faith and service of its members is prophetic of the important part youth plays 
and will continue to play in our work. 





CHAIRMEN 
Virginia Adams William Barkan Philip S. Boone 
OFFICERS 
Lewis Byington Richard Lyon 
Cornelia Clark Richard Palmer 
Henry Evers Marylouise Sanford 


EXECUTIVE COUNCILS 


Ava Jean Barber Louise Lindley Frederick Rea 

J. Brandon Bassett Lois Mitchell James Schwabacher 
John Collins Edward Nielson Janet Scott 

John Donahue Douglass North Dr. Marceille Spetz 
William Gillis Wrede Petersmeyer Milton ‘Tucker 
Peggy Hawkins Edward Pinger Ann Wilder 

Fred W. Kimball Mary Powell Jane Williams 
David Leaf Patricia Pruyn 


University of California Extension Division 
announces 
“Programs and Personalities of the Symphony Season” 


Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 


Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
7, 14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 


Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 








——___ 


SUBSCRIBE NOW TO... 


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MAGAZINE 


If you wish to receive your copies by mail during 1941, 
please send $1.00 to: 


OPERA AND CONCERT 
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San Francisco, California 




















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108 





FRIDAY BOX HOLDERS 


Mrs. Pierre Monteux 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 


Mrs. George Washington Baker, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Winston Cowgill 
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Mrs. Frank W. Fuller 

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Mrs. Morris Meyerfield 
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Q 


Sp) 


W 


V7; 


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Mrs. W. Parmer Fuller, Jr. 
Mrs W. Parmer Fuller III 
Miss Virginia Lowrey 
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Miss Lurline Roth 

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Marquise de Pins 


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Lady ‘Tennyson 


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Miss Florence Williams 


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Mrs. Arthur S. Musgrave 


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Mrs. Ralph K. Davies 
Mrs. J. Lindsay Hanna 
Mrs. James Levensaler 
Mrs. Olga Meyer 

Mrs. Frank Summers 











RROGRAM IN OLE S-_Gontinwead 


Prologue in Choral Recitative, After Shakespeare's Tragedy, to quote its 
full and official title, was the major work of Berlioz for the year 1839. 
It was written as the result of a gift of money made the composer by Pagan- 
ini, who admired his gifts and desired to give him a year free of financial 
concerns. Paganini, incidentally died a few months after the score was 
completed, and never heard the composition his generosity had made 
possible. 


The work is a kind of cantata in three parts—one is tempted to call 
them “acts’’—subdivided so that there are seven principal movements. 
‘Today’s excerpts are all from Part II. 


Berlioz himself regarded the Love Scene as his finest orchestral move- 
ment. It deals, of course, with the passions of the balcony episode, and 
no quotations are necessary to indicate its programmatic intention. 


The Queen Mab Scherzo was inspired by the following well known 
speech of Mercutio: 


Mer. O, then, I see Queen Mab hath been with you. 
She is the fairies’ midwife, and she comes 
In shape no bigger than an agate-stone 
On the fore-finger of an alderman 
Drawn with a team of little atomies 
Athwart men’s noses as they lie asleep; 
Her waggon-spokes made of long spinners’ legs, 
The cover of the wings of grasshoppers, 
The traces of the smallest spider’s web, 
The collars of the moonshine’s watery beams, 
Her whip of cricket's bone, the lash of film, 
Her waggoner a small grey-coated gnat, 
Not half so big as a round little worm 
Prick’d from the lazy finger of a maid; 
Her chariot is an empty hazel nut 








— 





“A first-rate talent, admirably trained. The case for Werner Philipp is splen- 
didly proven.” Alfred Frankenstein, San Francisco Chronicle 
“Masterful brushwork, grandeur and epic breadth.” 

New York Herald-Tribune 


WERNER PHILIPP 
PAINTER 
Classes for advanced students and beginners 
Special classes for Children . Private Lessons 
Studio at 


fH 34e SY LORS RAE Telephone ‘TUxedo 0536 





109 








SS EF Oe a a et eS 


MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
LIGKE LS GOrON SALE FEBRUARY “17 


TOM C. GIRTON Presents 
SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


Thitty -“Fitst IE yi ele ascontinenial aye 


FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


WAR 


MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 





MEE ME ORO A tas Or PRA EO) S28; 


17 Performances 7 Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax exempt) 


DATES 


Monday Eve., Mar. 10 


sé 


Tuesday Eve., 
Wed. Eve., pa ED 
huesday. Eve...“ /18 


Friday Eve., “14 


Saturday Mat., “ 


Sunday Mat., “ 16 
Sunday Eve. “ 
Monday Eve., “ 
Tuesday Eve., “ 
Wed. Eve., i 
Thursday Eve., ‘ 20) 
priday Eve. . ‘“ 21 
Saturday Mat., “ 2 
Saturday Eve., “ 


Sunday Mat., “ 23 


Sunday Eve., “ 





23 | 


OPERAS 


IMME BUTTERFLY 














1] (Ballet) 
AIDA 
Ly: (Ballet) 
LA TRAVIATA 

LSP he CBallet) 
| FAUST 

14) (Ballet) 








Triple Bill MarTHa 


15) from Romeo and Juliet 


Ballet Divertissment 
'RIGOLETTO 
(Ballet) 





(In English) Balcony Scene 





| IL ‘TROVATORE 
16| (Ballet) 





iby | | CAVALLERIA & PAGLIACCI 





18|LA BOHEME 





19| BARBER OF SEVILLE 





‘CARMEN 
| (Ballet) 





‘Lucta 

| (Ballet) 
(TALES OF HOFFMAN 
2 | (Ballet) in English 








22'|SAMSON ET DELILAH 





MME BUTTERFLY 
(In English) 
AIDA 








(Ballet ) 


$1.90 
Box 
Seats 


—— 


een ea 


| 


$1.75 $1.50 $1.65 
Ist 20 Rows Last 8Rows, Grand 
Orchestra | Orchestra Tier 


$1.25 $1.00 i 

Dress | Balcony | |! 
| Circle | Circle | Pal 
oi eee | 














po Se SS 
—— = a 


MAIL ORDERS NOW 
BEING RECEIVED. 


Location Desired 


THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 
SHERMAN, CLAY & Co., SUTTER AND KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO, © 
‘TELEPHONE: EXBROOK 6696 





he enclosed check hts. een. ae aero ee eee gee ae is in full payl 
FT ee ge ae ee BE Feito ch 1 ge wee tee Babe seats as indicated in above $f 
Nannie: 2 (DP 5t7th) Sarl es eee ae 0S) he ae eA och cle te oh eign ei alien, are 
Address 


Telephone No 


eee eee ee eae 


SEND SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE IF TICKETS ARE TO BE MAILED 








PROGRAM (NO TES—Continuwed 


Made by the joiner squirrel or old grub, 
Time out 0’ mind the fairies’ coachmakers. 
And in this state she gallops night by night 
Y Through lovers’ brains, and then they dream of love; 
O’er courtiers’ knees, that dream on court’sies straight, 
O’er lawyers’ fingers, who straight dream on fees, 
O’er ladies’ lips, who straight on kisses dream, 
Which oft the angry Mab with blisters plagues, 
Because their breaths with sweetmeats tainted are: 
Sometime she gallops o’er a courtier’s nose, 
And then dreams he of smelling out a suit; 
And sometimes comes she with a tithe-pig’s tail 
Tickling a parson’s nose as a’lies asleep, 
Bul Then dreams he of another benefice: 
: Sometime she driveth o’er a soldier’s neck, 
e And then dreams he of cutting foreign throats, 
Of breaches, ambuscadoes, Spanish blades, 
Of healths five-fathom deep; and then anon 
Drums in his ear, at which he starts and wakes, 
And, being thus frighted, swears a prayer or two, 








PROUD TRADITIONS 


| & ee aathet © perdaw.) anc |e cise Dy 


SURO be ule Ran AU Cra VACG Romer ately. O1bag 





brilliantly woven into the ‘romantic, glamorous 
y 8 


pattern that is San Francisco. 


SHREVE, TREAT & EACRET 


co, C PEARL AND GEM SPECIALISTS * JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 
OING Ee fle Here Rb mo bes G hea ROY ae Sale Re Ben edl 
{| pay! 


OVE Sf 











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2 ea EE EE 


A Mrs. Pierre Monteux 


B Gamma Phi Beta 
University of California 


(3 Chi Phi 
University of California 


D Pi Beta Phi 
University of California 


E Zeta Psi 
University of California 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 
Philip S. Boone 
Lewis Byington 
Richard Lyon 


E Kappa Alpha Theta 
University of California 


G Delta Upsilon 
University of California 


H Chi Omega 
University of California 


J Delta Kappa Epsilon 
University of California 


K Dr. and Mrs. Donald Dallas 
Dr. and Mrs. Nelson Howard 
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Laird 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Leslie 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Scarborough 


L Mrs. Wallace Alexander 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ambrose 
Dr. and Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Dr. and Mrs. Frank Gerbode 
Dr. and Mrs. B. H. Page 
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Titzell, Jr. 





SATURDAY NIGHT BOX HOLDERS 


M Mr. and Mrs. F. Worthen Bradley 
Mrs. Jane C. Brophy 
Dr. and Mrs. Garnett Cheney 
Dr. Miriam Miller 
Dr. and Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick E. Supple 


N Delta Tau Delta 
& Stanford University 


P Theta Delta Chi 
Stanford University 


O Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Zellerbach 


R Chi Psi 
Stanford University 


S Delta Gamma 
University of California 


aly Kappa Kappa Gamma 
University of California 


U International House 
University of California 


V Mills College 


W Bowles Hall 
University of California 


Xx Alpha Phi 
University of California 


Y Psi Upsilon 
University of California 


Z Sigma Chi 


University of California 


The following University and College Organizations are Season Subscribers: 


Delta Delta Delta 
University of California 


Phi Delta Theta 
University of California 


Dominican College 
San Rafael 


San Jose State College 


112 


St. Mary’s College 

St. Luke’s Hospital Student Nurses 
Stanford Hospital Student Nurses 
Stanford University Medical School 
University of California Medical School 


University of San Francisco 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


And sleeps again. This is that very Mab 
That plats the manes of horses in the night, 
And bakes the elf-locks in foul slottish hairs, 
Which once untangled much misfortune bodes; 
This is the hag, when maids lie on their backs, 
That presses them and learns them first to bear, 
Making them women of good carriage: 
‘This is she— 

Rom. Peace, peace, Mercutio, peace! 
Thou talk’st of nothing. 


Mer. ‘True, I talk of dreams, 
Which are the children of an idle brain, 
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy, 
Which is as thin of substance as the air 
And more inconstant than the wind, who woos 
Even now the frozen bosom of the north, 
And, being anger’d puffs away from thence, 
Turning his face to the dew-dropping south. 

The movement played last on this occasion, for reasons of purely musi- 
cal contrast, appears in the score just before the Love Scene. It consists 
mostly of the brilliant Festival in Capulet’s Palace introduced by brief 
episodes (Andante malinconico, Allegro and Larghetto espressivo) which 
are more or less in keeping with the literary ideas of the first part of the 
title: Romeo Alone—Sadness—Distant Sounds of Music and Dancing. 


Linest . . 
TYPE OF PRINTING 


Ww 


from Ft Calling Card . . . To A Billboard 


Ww 


Disaé PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO. 


L00O MONTGOMERY STREET. 7 7) S UrrEeR 4772 





Helis 








a 




















PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAQUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DeE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DICTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOMN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 





7GELLOS: 


BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 


DEHE, WILLEM 


REINBERG, HERMAN 


CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 


PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 


KUCHYNKA, FRANK 


PRINCIPAL 


SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 


BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 


SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScH!ivo, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 


SCHIVO, LESLIE J. 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RupDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 


RuDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


CONDUCTOR 


BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAyYE, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 


BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 


TROMBONES: 


Gios!, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 


LIBRARIAN AND 
PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 








Te ee SF RTE IEE AE DELLE AT OOTP EY LEE ET et POOLED EI LI RL CT IOI ATL TELE EE OE I Se OE REDE EI TEE OGL ITC AO NN AT CN PP TEE BET GENE IR PO I 


114 














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PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO 700 MONTGOMERY, 5S. F. 


Copyright 1941, Liccett & Myers Tosacco Co. 





THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANGISCO 


PCE SEN 38-21 one 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
oe 








PIERRE MONTEUX 
GC ON Dow 6 Eon 


70 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD kh. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 





OPE ay es ta FE es a 


eres 


aes 


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ee 


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————— 









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120 


After the last note of the Symphony 


THE CONCERT IS YOURS 


on Columbia Records! 


SVAN D EL OI S999 can aay arene: qu teats ees Harris 


Foremost among modern compositions is this 
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a surveals#’s 
touch wrth a 
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Ce 











San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Ww 


FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
2002nd and 2003rd Concerts 







FRIDAY, “JANUARY 24° 2:30 Po Mi. 
SATURDAY, JANUARY 25, 8:30 P. M. 






Xs 
.. Program... 


SYMPHONY NO. 85, B FLAT MAJOR 
(THE-OUEEN OF FRANGE\ = 220 ens Haydn 


Adagio—Vivace 






Romanza: Allegretto 
Minuetto: Allegretto 
Presto 


SS VIE EE GIN VaBINIO) oo oe ae area etn ee te eae one Harris 
(In one movement) 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 


TNS RaMcl Sos EOIN 


STARE 35 Be AEE oN Et WS Tae Ae oe eae Strauss 
Introduction—Of the Dwellers in the Back-World—Of 
the Great Yearning—Of Joys and Passions—The Grave 
Song—Of Science—The Convalescent—The Dance Song 
—The Night Wanderer’s Song. 


DANCE OF THE SEVEN VEILS, 
BRO MESA OML [as any Yea eo eee ihe gee Strauss 





Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ 
Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 
These affairs are open to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 





123 














124 


THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 


President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 














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Artistic Director Musical Director 
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LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
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CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


March 4 March 21 
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MONTEDX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEDUX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 























PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SYMPHONY NO. 85, B FLAT MAJOR 


(ULE O OTE IN © Pe Teie Any Gilt Vine orto. Franz Josef Haydn 
(1732-1809) 


Few things in the domain of strictly useless musical information are 
more amusing to contemplate than the utter confusion of the authorities 
as regards the Paris symphonies of Haydn. One authority will tell you Hay- 
dn wrote twelve symphonies for Paris, another that he wrote only six. Ac- 
cording to one school, these works were commissioned by the Concert 
Spirituel, according to another by the rival Concert de la Loge Olympi- 
que. The dates also vary, but 1786 is the year most often given. 


It is therefore not surprising that at least three different theories have 
been put forward to account for the title, The Queen, or The Queen of 
France, applied to the fourth of the Paris symphonies. ‘These theories, in 
the order of their appeal to the present writer, are as follows: 


1. That the title refers to a secret “program.” According to Giuseppe 
Carpani, who wrote one of the early biographies of Haydn,* the compo- 
ser was in the habit of stimulating his creative imagination by composing 
after all manner of stories. His symphonies are actually ilustrations of 
those stories, says Carpani, (just as Richard Strauss’ Till Eulenspiegel 
is a musical illustration of that famous tale) but Haydn never revealed 
the literary ideas that underlie his work. Many of the titles of the Haydn 
symphonies, however, are, according to Carpani, mysterious references to 
“programs” that were lost forever with the composer’s death. 


Dr. Frederick Niecks, in his curious and fascinating book, Program 
Music of the Last Four Centuries, quotes Carpani as declaring that one 
of the symphonies of Haydn, for instance, was written to illustrate the 
idea of a poor man going to America, making a good deal of money by 
trading with the Indians, returning home in stormy weather on the At- 
lantic, and settling down to raise a large family. “Although Haydn had 
pointed it out to him,” says Niecks, “‘and Pichl had cited it, Carpani did 
not remember which symphony this was.” (Italics mine.) 

2. That the symphony derives its title from the fact that Marie An- 
toinette heard it when performed by the Concert Spirituel or the Concert 
de la Loge Olympique, and expressed her approval of it in emphatic and 
delighted terms. This is quite possible, and tends to confirm another 
theory, namely 


*This biography was stolen by that celebrated literary adventurer, Henri Beyle, 
better known as Stendhal, and published in French as his own. 





War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 

* * * * 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN FHE LOBBY 











125 





H 


/ 





MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 17 


TOM C. GIRTON Presents 
SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


: Thitty -“Fitst Cun. Ver seoniiicnie: bie: 


FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


ReAC Re a Vik NOoR Ay OP EeRVAG SHO lUsS3E 
MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 


17 Performances 7 Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax eee a 










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Seats Orchestra | Orchestra Tier Circle | Circle | Baloo 
| ——————_ | —————— ee ee 


“d MME BUTTERFLY 
fionday Eve., Mar. 10 (In English) 
iY CARMEN 
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ie s AIDA | 
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iy LA TRAVIATA 
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FAUST 


iday Eve., “« 14 (Ballet) | | | 

| Triple Bill MARTHA | 

(In English) Balcony Scene | 
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sé 


15 ‘from Romeo and Juliet 
Ballet Divertissment 


turday Mat., 





qT RIGOLETTO 
‘nday Mat. “ 16 (Ballet) 


t s In TROVATORE | | | 
_nday Eve., 16 (Ballet) | | x Peres) (ao Sen 
fjpnday Eve., “ 17 CAVALLERIA & PAGLIACCI | 


| tesday Eve. “18 La BOHEME 


Ved. Eve., “ 19 BARBER OF SEVILLE 

| CARMEN 

; -ursday Eve,“ 20 (Ballet) 

a fs LUCIA 

0 iday Eve., vA | (Ballet) 

i 3 TALES OF HOFFMAN | 
} putcay Mat., Ze (Ballet) in English | 


“urday Eve., “ 22 SAMSON ET DELILAH | | | 


2 ‘MME BUTTERFLY 
ia, Mat., Phe, (In English) SSeS fs ce Se oH te oe | —— 
SS —_— ee | S™”™”S—C rece > 





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gcation Desired 


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PANG GRA MeN OmteEss 


3. That the symphony contains a hidden reference to Marie Antoin- 
ette’s past life. Marie Antoinette was an Austrian princess, daughter of 
Maria Theresa. Josef Haydn was one of the major purveyors to the Aus- 
trian aristocracy; Marie Antoinette had often heard him and his music 
before her marriage to Louis XVI in 1770, and Haydn had every reason to 
know her musical tastes. It is entirely in keeping with Haydn’s nature 
for him, in writing a symphony Marie Antoinette might hear in Paris, 
to quote a melody that she might have known and liked in the days of 
her girlhood at the court of Vienna. ‘This melody would have no reference 
value for anyone in the audience except the queen herself; for Marie 
Antoinette it would be a delicate personal compliment and a “remem- 
brance of things past.” 
This theory is brought forward by Michel Brenet in her biography of 
——— Haydn. The evidence, to be sure, is very slight. It is simply that the theme 
of the second movement in this symphony (which: Haydn used again 
in a somewhat different form in his better known Military Symphony) 
is that of a French song by an unknown composer—precisely the kind 
al of song that was popular among young ladies of the aristocracy in Haydn’s 
tume. The rest is conjecture, but a very intelligent conjecture based upon 
thorough knowledge of Haydn and his psychology. 


SME ELON WAN Ooi ewe, Cue ocr eRe naan ge ee oe Roy Harris 
a (1898-) 
Mr. Harris composed his third symphony in the fall of 1938, and it was 
first performed in the following year by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
The following outline of it amplifies material supplied by the composer. 
— The symphony is in one movement, subdivided into five closely linked 
and interwoven sections. The first, described by the composer as ‘“Tragic— 
low string sonorities,” opens in the ’celli, with a kind of echo at the 
ae unison and octave in the violas at the end of each phrase. The sonority 
increases. with subdivision of the parts, bass clarinet and bassoons are 
added, and, after a gesture of the trombones and horns, the violins make 
their first entry at the 60th bar with the following theme: 


a 


Continued 

















A ee) A ee) Pa De Be BS 
Pao et tt th eT th GRRE 
SRI SE SS 2 PSS ZA LR VE ON GT 








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ALIF. 
VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 
- For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
pe 872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO . TU xeEpo 2738 
pace 


Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 






127 





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THE NEXT GUEST ARTIST 


SERGE] RACHMANINOFF is one of the few contemporary musicians to win 
equal standing as a major composer and a virtuoso executant. He was born 
near Novgorod in 1873, and was trained at the Moscow Conservatory, 
studying piano under Nicholas Sverov and composition under Anton Aren- 
sky; personal friendship with ‘[schaikowsky during his student days also 
did much to form his point of view. 

Rachmaninoff was chief conductor at the Imperial Theatre in Moscow 
from 1904 to 1906. He then settled in Dresden for two years devoted solely 
to composition. In 1909 he made his first American tour, returning to Mos- 
cow in 1910, and remaining there until the Russian Revolution. Until 1915 
Rachmaninoff’s activities as pianist were largely devoted to the interpreta- 
tion of his own works. In that year Alexander Scriabin died, and Rach- 
maninoff resolved to make a European tour playing only Scriabin’s works. 
His reputation as a general virtuoso dates largely from this time. Rach- 
maninoff left Russia in 1917, and has lived in the United States ever since. 

Rachmaninoff’s larger works include three operas, Aleko (1892), The 
Miserly Knight (1905) , and Francesca da Rimini (1905) ; three symphonies 

(1895, 1907 and 1936) ; four piano concertos (1891, 1901, 1909 and 1927) 
several choral pieces including The Bells (1913); a trio in memory of 
Tschaikowsky (1893) ; a ’cello sonata (1901) ; the tone poem The Island of 
the Dead (1907) ; the Rhapsody for Piano and Orchestra on a Theme by 
Paganini (1934); many songs; two piano sonatas (1907 and 1913); and 
countless small piano pieces, of which one is in the key of C sharp minor. 

Rachmaninoff made his first appearance with the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra last season when he played his second concerto. ‘This 
year he will appear on two successive Friday-Saturday pairs. He will 
present his third concerto at the concerts of February 8-9 and the Rhap- 
sody ona Theme by Paganini at the concerts of February 14-15. 











SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WAInut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 









The following distinguished members of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra are teaching at the Conservatory: 


STANISLAS BEM CHARLES RUDD 
In Charge of Cello Department Clarinet and Saxophone 
HENRY WOEMPNER BENJAMIN KLATZKIN 
Flute and Woodwind Ensemble Trumpet and Brass Instruments 






128 





PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


This 1s worked over and leads to the second section of the symphony 
(“Lyric—strings, horns, woodwinds’) introduced by this brief but very 
prominent flute solo: 





followed nine bars later by the principal theme of the section: 


COTTE ES 
FASE es ' — / SE 
AHIR Jay 23 SO ES es a STD 


: — 

SS ee aay 

Gee AN SS eee ES ey 2 Sareea BS eee 

0 2 Se) ed ee ee ee Ray Pie oy Lee a 
Ce EY RE ee eT ITY Sy ae fe Sea ee) 


3 violins 























The second section merges shortly into the third (“Pastoral”). Over a 
shimmering polytonal background of the elaborately subdivided strings, 
the woodwinds bring forth several new figures, beginning in the English 
horn: 






— <a 
SSeS) Ce Ee a OR PT BS OS ES OS ee 
, BEIT JE TE GP Ee SP Ps ee a Te Cn BES Pe Lae ee a Be er] 
fl NARROW A 2 amo Ge ee Ey Aa 229 (PRE RS BS ee) Ay) 
ote Pos NERA 

] 5 ee 












followed by the oboe: 


5 P 


if —_Sp +f op ee Eo ot PS 
” eee 
Se EEE ed CA SA I ON ES (SSPE Bee SRE RSE Fa LE SES TS TS 
















and bassoons and bass clarinet: 


ey Aras for these 
fe NaN 


cs 
THE 


music 2 album RECORDS 


Off Grant nr. Sutter 


14 TILLMAN PLACE 





SY ME LION YANO seo etait else aioe eens tee o eictal Spa toasty, ween kel e oer ee oe Harris 
Koussevitzsky—Boston Symphony Orchestra. Formerly $4.50 now $2.50 
ep SIS RAE e ZA eAs EUS PIA Cie) gettin tieenceetapeusteyauest ise vice Cores wi tee ET LESS 
Koussevitzsky—Boston Symphony Orchestra. Formerly $9.00 now $5.00 
DANCE OF THE SEVEN VEILS FROM SALOME Strauss 
Leopold Stokowski—Philadelphia Orchestra. Formerly $2.00 now $1.00 





129 





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SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . Their 
phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 
and courage. ... We feel that not only the Association, but all the 
members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 


Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 


Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 


Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 


Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 


Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 


Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 
Evans, Mrs. Harry 
Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 





Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
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oy ee 





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130 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


The atmosphere grows more agitated, the brass take over the lead pre- 
viously assigned to the woodwinds, the percussion makes its presence 
known, and Section IV begins with the following fugue subject in the 
strings: 





The development of this fugue subject is entrusted almost entirely to 
the brass against dramatic comment of the woodwinds and strings. To- 
ward the end of the section the woodwinds and strings return to Example 
3, developing it in canon against further discussion of the fugue in the 
brass. Section IV ends in the following rhythmic figure: 





This leads at once into Section V (“Dramatic-Tragic’) in which the 
strings and woodwinds return in canon to Example I, the brass and per- 
cussion continuing to develop Example 8. The coda involves still further 
developments of Examples 1 and 3 over repeated D’s of the kettledrum. 


Roy Harris was born in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. He studied at the 
University of California and privately with Arthur Farwell and Nadia 
Boulanger, and has held the Guggenheim Fellowship and the Creative 
Fellowship of the Pasadena Music and Arts Association. He taught com- 
position at the Westminister Choir School in Princeton, New Jersey, from 
1954 to 1938, and has been a member of the faculty of the Juilliard School 
in New York, where he is at present living. 


In addition to his three numbered symphonies for orchestra, Mr. Harris 
has written a Symphony for Voices on Poems by Walt Whitman, a Folk 
Song Symphony, for voices and orchestra, a symphonic elegy entitled 
Farewell to Pioneers, an overture on the theme of When John ny Gomes 
Marching Home, and many other orchestral works. Among his contri- 
butions to the literature of chamber music are three string quartets, a 
trio, a Passacaglia, Cadenza and Fugue for piano quintet, and a trans- 
cription, made with Mrs. M. D. Herter Norton, of Bach’s Art of the Fugue, 





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132 


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PROGRAM NO FES € ontii7wed 


for string quartet. He has also written many choral compositions beside 
those mentioned above. 


WELWS SPAKE AA RAT EOS RGN oe oc, ots ees Richard Strauss 
(1864-) 

Thus Spake Zarathusta, Tone Poem (Freely After Friedrich Nietzsche) 

for Large Orchestra is the fifth of the seven tone poems by Richard 

Strauss. It was composed in 1896, just after Till Eulenspiegel and just 

before Don Quixote. 

The phrase “freely after Friedrich Nietzsche” poses a very difficult 
problem. Strauss has been quoted as saying that his work is not to be 
regarded as a musical illustration of Nietzsche's famous book, Thus Spake 
Zarathustra. “I meant,” said he, “to convey by means of music an idea of 
the development of the human race from its origin through the various 
phases of its development, religious and scientific, up to Nietzsche's idea 
of the Superman. The whole tone poem is intended as my homage to 
Nietzsche’s genius, which found its greatest exemplification in Thus 
Spake Zarathustra.” 

Nevertheless the score is scattered through with allusions to Nietzsche’s 
volume. Strauss reprints an extract from Nietzsche’s opening page on a 
flyleaf of the music, and seven of the eight movements that follow the 
introduction to the tone poem are distinguished with the titles of “dis- 
courses” in the philosopher’s Zarathustra. Consequently the commenta- 
tors on Strauss often give the text of these “discourses,” obviously with 
the idea that they throw some light on the drift of the composer’s thought. 



















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PROGRAM 


Symphony No. 2, E Minor, Opus 27..........-.. Rachmaninoff 


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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


Yet the connection is often very difficult to perceive and the present writer 
has come to the conclusion that Nietzsche’s text provides very little clue 
to the understanding of Strauss, except insofar as its dithyrambic, psal- 
modic style may have influenced the big, grand gesture of the music. 
Strauss’ work seems rather to set forth certain ideas the composer took 
over from Nietzsche and made very much his own, and it is very possible 
that Nietzsche would have writhed at Strauss’ treatment of them.* It 
should also be pointed out that, as elsewhere, Strauss does not hesitate 
throughout Zarathustra to depart from the text of his extra-musical ideas 
to follow his musical ideas to their ultimate development. ‘This is, in the 
last analysis, a tone poem, not a sermon or a tract. 

It is, of course, obvious that the Nietzschean concept of the Superman 
would appeal very strongly to a composer who was very shortly (1898) 
to say farewell to the tone poem with a work called A Hero’s Life in 
which the hero is the composer himself. Both the Zarathustra and the 


*Nietzsche was alive at the time of the first performance of the tone poem— his 
body died in 1900 — but his mind had long since collapsed. One reason for the 
statement made above that the philospher might have writhed at a tribute from Richard 
Strauss is that Strauss was an ardent disciple of Wagner, while Nietzsche, at first a 
friend of the composer of Tristan, had turned violently against him. In Thus Spake 
Zarathustra Nietzsche refers to Wagner as “one who tooted a mournful horn in mine 
ear,” and as a “murderous minstrel” whose ‘“‘awful, melancholy air” had ‘“‘slain the 
rapture” of Zarathustra’s dance. “Only in the dance do I know how to speak the parable 
of the highest things,” says Zarathustra, “and now hath my grandest parable remained 
unspoken in my limbs.” 








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136 











PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


Hero of Strauss may be described in the words with which Elizabeth 
Forster-Nietzsche sets forth her brother’s ideal: “the strong, mighty and 
magnificent man, overflowing with life and elevated to his zenith.” 

The passage from Zarathustra’s Prologue given on a title page of the 
score is as follows: | 


“When Zarathustra was thirty years old, he left his home and the 
lake of his home, and went into the mountains. There he enjoyed his 
spirit and his solitude, and for ten years did not weary of it. But at last 
his heart changed, and rising one morning with the rosy dawn, he. went 
before the sun and spake thus unto it: 


“Thou great star! What would be thy happiness if thou hadst not 
those for whom thou shinest! 


“For ten years has thou climbed hither into my cave: thou wouldst 
have wearied of thy light and of the journey had it not been for me, mine 
eagle and my serpent. 

‘But we awaited thee every morning, took from thee thine over- 
flow, and blessed thee for it. 

“Lo! I am weary of my wisdom, like the bee that hath gathered too 
much honey; I need hands outstretched to take it. 


eee 


I would fain bestow and distribute, until the wise have become 
once more joyous in their folly, and the poor happy in their riches. 


“Therefore must I descend into the deep, as thou doest in the eve- 
ning when thou goest behind the sea, and givest light also to the nether- 
world, thou exuberant star! 


“Like thee must I go down, as men say, to whom I shall descend. 


“Bless me, then,thou tranquil eye that canst behold even the great- 
est happiness without envy! 


“Bless the cup that is about to overflow, that the water may flow 
golden out of it, and carry everywhere the reflection of thy bliss! 

“Lo! ‘This cup is again going to empty itself, and Zarathustra is a- 
gain going to be a man.’ 

“Thus began Zarathustra’s down-going.”’* 


Over a long-held low C, fifty fathoms deep, the trumpets state the 
figure upon which the greater part of the tone poem 1s based: 


1 


fae eee 


This motif is unmistakably associated with the idea of the Superman. It 
develops into an enormous climax on a sustained C major chord. ‘There 
follows at once the movement entitled Of the Dwellers in the Back-World. 
(The Backworldsmen are, according to Nietzsche, those who subscribe 


*The teachings of Nietzsche’s Zarathustra do not resemble in the slightest degree 
the teachings of the great Persian prophet of that name. Nietzsche had his reasons for 
inventing a fictional Zarathustra in his own image, but that point lies outside the 
province of these notes. This is as good a place as any to observe that Nietzsche’s book 
had been published in sections between 1883 and 1885, and was a vivid, burning issue 
in the intellectual life of the period in which Strauss composed his tone poem. 


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PROGRAM. NOTES—Continued 


to the tenets of the great Western religions.) At the fifth bar of this move- 
ment the bassoons state the following motif: 





3 





Throughout the tone poem this* seems to symbolize all that is opposed 
to the Superman—the “slave morality” which “extols the qualities favor- 
able to the weak, the suffering and the oppressed.” ‘The citadel of this 
“slave morality” is identified by the following figure in the horns, which 
occurs a few bars after Example 2. ‘The words given in the quotation 
below are written into the score at this point, and they are more general 
in significance than might be implied by the language in which they 
appear: ** 





The greater part of the Dwellers in the Back-World, however, is based 
upon the theme which immediately succeeds Example 3: 


4 violas 


, LOLINS 





dilate tempo hastens slightly at the beginning of the next movement, 
Of the Great Yearning. At its seventh bar Example I returns in the 
English horn, and the greater part of the episode is based upon that 
figure, treated in conjunction with rapid chromatic passages. 

"The pace grows still faster, and a new theme appears in the violin at 
the outset of the movement called Of Joys and Passions: 


pe 
) oe 


EE ET a ee et] were Be See Ee 
a ee ee a a a 
(1 (a eee Ee Shy See PR "g gp yy 1 + 






WEES GEs Ey 25 ee a a A Bae ea ESP ie Aol EP ES) 


This is developed at some length. 

The tempo slackens at the beginning of The Grave Song, heralded by a 
return of Example 2, the anti-Superman motif. The Joys and Passions 
theme, however, continues through the Grave Song, appropriately altered 
in character, and with an extra-musical significance too obvious to be 
pointed out. Examples 1 and 2 are also prominent through this move- 
ment. ‘This leads to 


*It is worth pointing out that the motif of the Superman is a chord without a third; 
it can therefore be major or minor or neither major nor minor; it is ambiguous or rath- 
er ambivalent, in precisely the same fashion as the cosmic opening of Beethoven’s ninth 
symphony. It is perhaps not too fanciful to associate this ambivalence with the idea 
of the subtitle to Nietzsche’s Zarathustra: “A Book for All and None.” Example 2, the 
anti-Superman theme, on the other hand, is always major or minor. 


**It is obvious that the whole of Nietzsche’s attitude toward religion cannot be set 
forth in seven notes in a tone poem. He was no soap-box atheist, and there is probably 
no thinker in history who has suffered so much from snap vulgarizations of his thought. 


139 














SED AE EEE 8 OP en Go BE an ae 


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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


Of Science. Example 1 is transformed into 
g basses & cel{z 






NSE SAGES Foe eas 

and subjected to ponderous and very learned fugal development. But 
science offers no solution to Zarathustra’s quest. At the end of the fugue 
the anti-Superman figure sounds again, dolefully, and the searching 
philosopher’s attention is drawn to another possibility, as the music 
eventuates in a passage of a highly sensuous and dance-like character. 
This new road seems to appeal; at least Example | is very prominent 
at the end of the movement. 


There is a sudden burst of energy with the introduction of the title 
The Convalescent. The theme of this movement, however, is the fugue 
subject (Example 6) now treated freely and joyously. (The values of 
science, in other words, are now “transvalued” in terms of the Super- 
man’s overflowing health and energy.) ‘There is a climax and a pause. 
Then Example 2 sounds out again, at first in its characteristically lugu- 
brious form. Almost at once, however, it is worked over with passionate 
vigor, and during the course of this latter treatment the trumpet issues 
an important call: 

ee 
eee ae on 


PEER? SER REA SEAT el a a 
EDGER, 17 IY BY Si EET ee Ree Rereo as 
(4. ED Ey BE PE a Ce 
Wi 2 Pe Ee ee eee ae 
€ 


in which one can almost visualize the Superman in action against opposing 
forces, much like the Hero on his battlefield in that later tone poem. 


As these materials are worked over, the music grows more and more 
waltz-like, and finally goes over into The Dance Song, with the following 


melody in a solo violin, prepared by repeated statements of Example 1: 













ae j 
(Ey SiS ee I i I oy AOI 
ee SE —__ Art = +--+ £3 
= _ ES eS OTN REN hc: SEES 
Set EY Se eT IO SS A > A cs SLAM Se A EAL SRN a ET 
t t 





There follows a symphonic waltz, many pages in length, based mainly 
upon Examples 8 and 1, but also with subsidiary waltz themes not quoted. 
Suddenly a deep bell is heard signalizing the start of the last movement 

The Night Wanderer’s Song. The bell tolls twelve times, through the 
attainment and subsistence of a big climax. Then the violins bring in a 
broad lyrical melody: 






yap 70ue- res hres eee ee 

AAS dy GE © DS SC ST GS a dD i OP Oe ee ee ee FS 
EE (ETE saa) a Fe a PG a Oe De es es ee ee 

tt he ot Rie r OIE BAP re Ley 2 Se A ee ee eee eT) 


SOG ae ef mee Sees Bese ee ee ee 
and the tone poem ends very quietly, with its famous, inconclusive jux- 


taposition of the chords of B major and C major, suggesting riddles and 
mysteries and insoluble enigmas. 









14] 





a 





7 ee 





eee 

















PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DicTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
DOLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 








142 


’CELLOS: 

BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 

DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAubDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 
KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, ROY 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScHivo, LESLIE J. 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RubDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
CLOW, RAY 


-E FLAT CLARINET: 


RuUDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


CONDUCTOR 


BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAyYE, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 

’ TRUTNER, HERMAN CC. 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
ROTH, PAUL 

JAKOB, JOS. 
GEHRING, CONRAD 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND &. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
STORCH, WALTER 


TROMBONES: 


Gios!i, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


ORGAN: 


ALTMANN, LUDWIG 


LIBRARIAN AND 
PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 





ES 














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MARION HUTTON 
in Glenn Miller’s Moonlight 
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— hei UJ MOS 


popular number 





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soaaasaea ie 


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and for the best of reasons... Chesterfield} 
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yourself...so tune in now for your 194 
smoking pleasure. 


Copyright 1941, Liccetr & Myers Tobacco Co. 


=> 


PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO © => 700 MONTGOMERY, S. F. 





THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


PRESENTS THE 


NAY FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
GOON D U-CsT: o5n 


2g 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD kK. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 

















COUID- ANYONE YOU KNOW 
| ~ ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT? 


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nnn neEeneneenenenmenenenaatal secant LL LLL LLL ALL LLL NN ee . e - = ane -_ ania =- —n n 
- ST ay | 


148 





After the last note of the Symphony 
THE CONCERT IS YOURS 


m your Record Library! 


SYNLRELONY 2 ONO i o2 2s cee Rachmaninoff 
The famous Symphony in E minor pre- 
sented in Album M239... six 12-inch 
records .. . at the new low price, $6.50 


CONGERE ONO 6 a8 Rachmaninoff 
The D minor concerto, featuring Vladi- 
mir Horowitz at the piano with The 
London Symphony Orchestra. Album 
M117 .. . five 12-inch records, offered 
at the new low price, $5.50. 


REE ES OID) Yea. prresntie on Rachmaninoff 
The Rhapsody for piano and orchestra 
on a theme of Paganini .. . made up of 
94 variations from Paganini’s famous 
caprices. Album M250, three 12-inch 
records. Now only $3.50. 








For the most complete selec- 

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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
MRS. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
E. RAYMOND ARMSBY . . VICE-PRESIDENT JOHN A. MCGREGOR .. . . TREASURER 
PAUL A. BISSINGER . . VICE-PRESIDENT HOWARD K. SKINNER .. . . SECRETARY 
CHARLES R. BLYTH . . VICE-PRESIDENT GERALD G. Ross . ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


DR. HANS BARKAN MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 

PAUL A. BISSINGER Miss LuTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 

Miss LOUISE A. Boyb MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 

MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY Mrs. E. S&S. HELLER 

MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTice D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. LEO ELOESSER 


MRs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 
DR. HANS BARKAN 


Guipo J. Musto 

Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
MissS ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 
Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 


J. B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. NorRRIS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


PHILIP N. BOONE 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


Cees GaMILbeRia ws. vuctiteil sale) ae 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND . 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss. 
MRS. H. R. MCKINNON. 
MRS. dBHNe Ee GOGHEAN.sucssercmintte te 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER. 
MRS. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM... 
PHIEIPOS: BOONE} % ets 20%. cre ota tee 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS. 

MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MrRs. LEQNORA WooD ARMSBY 

G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 

Mrs. GEORGE W. BAKER, JR. 

DR. HANS BARKAN 

MRS. EDWARD CD. BARTLETT 

ALBERT M. BENDER 

CHARLES R. BLYTH 

MisS LouIseE A. Boyo 

Mrs. F. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

GEORGE T. CAMERON Mrs E. S. HELLER 

MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN WALTER S. HELLER 

MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN Mrs. |. W. HELLMAN 

MRS. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 

Mrs. W. W. CROCKER MRS. MARCUS S&S. KOSHLAND 

Mrs. O. K. CUSHING FREDERICK J. KOSTER 

Mrs. GEORGES DE LATOUR GAETANO MEROLA 

MISS KATHARINE DONOHOE Cc. O. G. MILLER 

JOSEPH H. DYER, UR. Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 

MRS. FRANK EDOFF ROBERT W. MILLER 

SIDNEY M. EHRMAN EDWARD F. MOFFATT 

ALBERT |. ELKUS KENNETH MONTEAGLE 

DR. LEO ELOESSER Guioo J. Musto 

FORREST ENGELHART DWIGHT F. MCCORMACK 
MRS. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 


MRS. PAUL I. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 
JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS 
MRS. LEON GUGGENHIME 
MrRs. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S&S. HALEY 
Jd. EMMET HAYDEN 


HENRY EVERS 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


Si (gite’ Ved date » « » CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 
- CHAIRMAN WOMEN’S FINANCE COMMITTEE 

- TICKET SALES AND PUBLICITY 
Seats, COO a s) ener sete! #l isl te eh cl ee er oe NOUNG! PEOPLES SCONEERTS 
; . - ». VICE-CHAIRMAN, TICKET SALES 


e ere 6 06 ce lee SALES 
. SYMPHONY GUILD 


Sa lathe te WS SAN" FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
. HONORARY CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
. VICE-CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


JOHN A. MCGREGOR 

MRS. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 

R. C. NEWALL 

CHARLES G. NORRIS 

CHARLES PAGE, UR. 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 

MRS. STANLEY POWELL 

MRS. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 

OTTORINO RONCHI 

MRS. HENRY P. RUSSELL 

Miss ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 

Mrs. Nicot SMITH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

MRS. POWERS SYMINGTON 

Mrs. DAVID ARMSTRONG- 
TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 

JOHN H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. CYRIL TOBIN 

THOMAS J. WATSON 

MICHEL WEILL 

Mrs. Ev! H. WIEL 

LEONARD E. Woop 

J. D. ZELLERBACH 


149 














a survealst’s 
touch with a 
sense of humor | 






New F Orms 
for Flowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 











laSter with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


HSAGE . . . wherein violets form the face 
ORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
UITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
ARDEN HAT . . with daisies in the crown 
UCK .. . carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


‘ shown 


Exclusive with 


*“! SLOANE 


SoU be ESR 2nie a‘tice. GURGAGNE TE 




















San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor : 


Ww 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
2002nd and 2003rd Concerts 














FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2:30 P.M. 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY'S8, 8:30 P.M. 


Soloist: SERGEI RACHMANINOFF, Pianist 


Ww 
Rachmaninoff Program 
SYMPHONY NO. 2, E MINOR, OPUS 27 
Largo—Allegro moderato 
Allegro molto 
Adagio 
Allegro vivace 


EN eksR Me Sts LON 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
NOAA SHARP MINORe OP USA 
Vivace 
Andante 


nn 











Allegro vivace 


RHAPSODY FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 
ON A THEME OF PAGANINI, OPUS 43 


Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series | 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ ! 
Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 

These affairs are open to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 

* * ¥* ¥* 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 





a 


a 


GUEST ARTIST THIS WEEK AND NEXT 


SERGEI RACHMANINOFF is one of the few contemporary musicians to win 
equal standing as a major composer and a virtuoso executant. He was born 
near Novgorod in 1873, and was trained at the Moscow Conservatory, 
studying piano under Nicholas Sverov and composition under Anton Aren- 
sky; personal friendship with Tschaikowsky during his student days also 
did much to form his point of view. 

Rachmaninoff was chief conductor at the Imperial Theatre in Moscow 
from 1904 to 1906. He then settled in Dresden for two years devoted solely 
to composition. In 1909 he made his first American tour, returning to Mos- 
cow in 1910, and remaining there until the Russian Revolution. Until 1915 
Rachmaninoff’s activities as pianist were largely devoted to the interpreta- 
tion of his own works. In that year Alexander Scriabin died, and Rach- 
maninoff resolved to make a European tour playing only Scriabin’s works. 
His reputation as a general virtuoso dates largely from this time. Rach- 
maninoff left Russia in 1917, and has lived in the United States ever since. 

Rachmaninoff’s larger works include three operas, Aleko (1892), The 
Miserly Knight (1905) , and Francesca da Rimini (1905) ; three symphonies 
(1895, 1907 and 1936) ; four piano concertos (1891, 1901, 1909 and 1927) ; 
several choral pieces including The Bells (1913); a trio in memory of 
Tschaikowsky (1893) ; a’cello sonata (1901) ; the tone poem The Island of 
the Dead (1907) ; the Rhapsody for Piano and Orchestra on a Theme by 
Paganini (1934); many songs; two piano sonatas (1907 and 1913) ; and 
countless small piano pieces, of which one is in the key of C sharp minor. 

Rachmaninoff made his first appearance with the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra last season when he played his second concerto. This 
year he will appear on two successive Friday-Saturday pairs. He will 
present his first concerto and Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini at the 
concerts of February 8-9, and his third concerto at the concerts of Feb- 
ruary 14-15. 














SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WAIlnut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 


The following distinguished members of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra are teaching at the Conservatory: 






STANISLAS BEM CHARLES RUDD 
In Charge of Cello Department Clarinet and Saxophone 
HENRY WOEMPNER BENJAMIN KLATZKIN 
Flute and Woodwind Ensemble Trumpet and Brass Instruments 





a ———————————————— 


152 











PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


A brief sketch of the essential facts in Rachmaninoff’s career appears 
on the opposite page, and some information pertinent to the works of 
this program is to be found elsewhere in this book. In between one would 
like to present some authoritative estimate of Rachmaninoft’s contribu- 
tion to the musical literature and some direct personal statement of his 
creative point of view. It happens, however, that the best critical esti- 
mates, like Leonid Sabaneyeff’s study in his Modern Russian Composers, 
are too long and too much given to individual opinion, while a rather 
extended search has failed to turn up any statement of Rachmaninofl’s 
own that completely fills the second bill. The nearest one can come to 
the latter desideratum is an interview Rachmaninoff gave to the Musical 
‘Times in London in 1930. It is therefore reprinted here. 

“Human beings,” said the Russian master, “go on learning as long as 
they live. They gather experiences and impressions, from which they 
should draw conclusions to be utilized when they are getting old and 
have time to reflect on their memories. This. however, applies to those 
who have leisure wherein to assimilate impressions, and not to artists who 
rush about all the time giving concerts at Amsterdam today and at Paris 
tomorrow, and who take the boat on the following day for New York or 
Buenos Aires, who spend their life in sleeping-cars and hotel bedrooms 
and on concert-platforms. It is a life that hardly allows them a minute for 
rest, and leaves them no time to observe the places they visit. In this 
terrible and continual rush they have little chance of talking to people 


ee eee 
RACHMANINOFF says of the STEINWAY 


“I am very happy to have the opportunity of 
using the Steinway for my concerts because I 
consider it perfect in every way.” 


CTE oN WW as oY 


the piano of Rachmaninoff and vir- 
tually every other great artist, ts 
exclusive with Sherman, Clay. 

















Choose the beautiful Steinway 
grand or a new adaptation of 
the same Steinway you've al- 
ways known and loved (in a 
console case and priced at 
$525, grands priced from ve | 
$985), and your home will ce : gs 
have the world’s finest piano. x 

No other piano will give you 
so much for so little. 


7 


Sherman |Y Clay 


= 


= YJ 





10 Pacific Coast Stores 











153 











Hon. ANGELO J. ROSSI, Mayor 


MUNICIPAL CONCERTS ° 


SAN FRAN CI Cc 0 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 





ALEXANDER 


| 
Ww 
TUESDAY NIGHT, MARCH 4 | 





Sensational Russian Pianist 4 
—PROGRAM— a 

SAN ER ANGISCO OVERIFURE e222 cess Wesley La Violette ; 
(CONDUCTED BY THE COMPOSER) q 

CONCERTO FOR PIANO, B Flat Minor........ Tschaikowsky : 
Mr. BRAILOWSKY ; 

SAVEIANG ff 22] 2 DD Cae Nh © ata oes owe prin Calan a oe coc wieckt a gee eecn era Beethoven eS 


MonrTeux, Conducting 


Tickets $1.00 - 75c - 50c - No Tax 


FRIDAY NIGHT, MARCH 21 


KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD : 


First Lady of the Opera A 

Epwin McArtuur, Conducting 4 
TUESDAY NIGHT, APRIL 15 4 
Brilliant Young Genius of the Violin fe! 
MontTeEux, Conducting G 

Tickets for Flagstad and Menuhin Concerts : 


| $1.50 - $1.00 - 75c - 50c - No Tax 
| SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE: Sherman, Clay—SUtter 1331 





154 





Pan ee 
PAS es os 
Cae ae ee mam 


As tae 





PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


they meet and whom they find interesting. They have no leisure to read 
a book they may have been wanting to read for years. They must be 
always on the move during the season. They are obsessed by catching 
trains and practicing. Almost every day brings another concert engage- 
ment which must be fulfilled. 

“Success dominates artistic life. It carries us away with it, and hardly 
leaves us time enough to gather new impressions. These are confined to 
a period of the artist’s life before he attains success. In that first period 
the artist meets people destined to influence his later career. In the most 
dificult and critical period of my life, when I thought all was lost and it 
was useless to worry any more, I met a man who took the trouble to talk 
to me for three days. He restored my self-respect, dissipated my doubts, 
gave me back strength and confidence, and revived my ambition. He 
stimulated me to new work, and, I might almost say, saved my life. ‘This 
man was Count ‘Tolstoy. I was twenty-four years old when I was intro- 
duced to him. 

“Young man,’ said he to me, ‘do you imagine that everything in my 
life goes smoothly? Do you suppose I have no troubles, never hesitate and 
lose confidence in myself? Do you really think faith is always equally 
strong? All of us have difficult moments; but this is life. Hold up your 
head, and keep on your appointed path.’ 

“Another great event in my career happened when I was introduced 
to I’schaikowsky some three years before he died. To him I owe the first 
and possibly the deciding success in my life. It was my teacher Sverev who 
took me to him. T’schaikowsky at that time was already world-famous and 


, 


ANNOUNCEMENT 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Seventh Pair of Symphony Concerts 


Friday, February 14, 2:30 Saturday, February 15, 8:30 


SERGEI RACHMANINOFF, Guest Artist 
PROGRAM 


OQVCELULE COM BOTT ONE Sitihy oof eem ny che Sena aah, Rae thee Beethoven 
Sy MpROMysING..3) E Hlat Major Gihentshy) 1... 2,0 cs Schumann 


Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 3, D Minor. Rachmaninoff 
Mr. RACHMANINOFF 


Manic HiresMusic tromeaDve Vauculeesel es 2 ashe. ee W agner 





Box Office: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland; 
Telephone SUtter 1331(San Francisco) or HIgate 1220 (Oakland) 


155 





SET I 


ares 


Serv: 


SSIS =< dae. "PET 


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Lae Per; 


(OSL LTRS? Se ee 


<b FF PSO) ye 


STE as ee 








SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . Their 
phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 
and courage. ... We feel that not only the Association, but all the 
members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloy 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 

Evans, Mrs. Harry 

Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 


Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 
Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. 
Gray, Nancy 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs Horace 
Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 
oS Miss Eleanor 

ahn, Mrs. Ira 
Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Knox, Mrs. John B. 
Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 


Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


honored by everybody, but he remained unspoiled. He was one of the 
most charming artists and men I ever met. He had an unequalled delicacy 
of mind. He was modest, as all really great people are, and simple, as 
very few are. (I have met only one other man who at all resembled him, and 
that was ‘T’chekov.) T’schaikowsky was about fifty-five at that time, that 
is to say, more than twice my age, but he talked to me, a young beginner, 
as if I were his equal. He listened to my first opera, Aleko, and arranged 
for it to be given at the Imperial Theater. The mere fact of having a work 
performed at the Imperial Theater would have been enough to start my 
career; but I’schaikowsky did even more. Timidly and modestly, as if he 
were afraid I might refuse, he asked me if I would consent to have my 
work produced with one of his operas. To be on the poster with Tschai- 
kowsky was about the greatest honor that could be paid to a composer, 
and I would not have dared to suggest such a thing. ‘T’schaikowsky knew 
this. He wanted to help me, but was anxious also not to offend or 
humiliate me. 

“‘T soon felt the result of T’schaikowsky’s kindness. I began to be known, 
and some years later I became leader of the Imperial Opera orchestra. 
Having once reached this important position the rest came easy. The 
difficult thing is to take the first step, to mount the first rung of the 
ladder. It looks so high that many artists of talent never reach it and are 
lost before getting there. A talented beginner, full of hope and confidence, 








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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


may find actual success replaced by inward satisfaction, but real results 
can be obtained if he has not to struggle too much for his bread, if his 
nerve be not impaired by continually having to ask for support, and if 
he is not obliged to dissipate his time in trying to obtain a hearing for 
his works. Artists need help at the beginning of their career—advisers who 
can warn them not to appear in public too soon, and who can guide 
their footsteps. 

“Very few artists are so fortunate as to be able to rely from the first on a 
real protector, as was the lot of Josef Hofmann, the world-famed American 
pianist, whose path was smoothed by a. philanthropic society, and the boy- 
violinist, Yehudi Menuhin, who also has influential protectors. Parents, 
of course, often spoil children they consider wonderful. It happens very 
rarely that parents can be persuaded not to try to make fortunes out of 
their children too early. I myself discovered a young man of sixteen de- 
serving assistance—T’srekensky. Realizing that he had great talent, I sent 
him to Hofmann. 

“Although I had to fight for recognition, as most young men have to, 
although I have experienced the troubles and sorrows which precede suc- 
cess, and although I know how important it is for an artist to be spared 
such troubles, I realize when I look back on my early life that it was 
enjoyable in spite of all its vexation and bitterness. 

“The older we get the more we lose that divine self-confidence which 
is the treasure of youth, and the fewer are those moments when we believe 
that what we have done is good. We get lucrative contracts—more, in 
fact, than we can accept—but we are still longing for that inner satisfac- 
tion which is independent of outside success, and which we felt at the 
beginning of our career at the time of our troubles when success seemed 
far away. 

“Nowadays it very rarely happens to me to feel sincerely satisfied with 
myself, to feel that what I do is really a success. Such occasions stick in my 
memory for a long time—for nearly the rest of my life. I recollect the city 
where I felt this thrill of satisfaction last, and I remember all the details. 
I remember the concert hall, where everything seemed to me to be perfect 
that night—the lighting, the pianoforte, the audience. Only on such a 
night do I feel happy and satisfied. ‘The last time I had this happy feeling 
was at Vienna. 

“There is, however, a burden which age perhaps is laying on my shoul- 








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160 














PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


ders. Heavier than any other, it was unknown to me in my youth. It is 
that I have no country. I had to leave the land where I was born, where I 
passed my youth, where I struggled and suffered all the sorrows of the 
young, and where I finally achieved success. 

“The whole world is open to me, and success awaits me everywhere. 
Only one place is closed to me, and that is my own country—Russia.” 


SYMPHONY NO. 2, E MINOR, OPUS 27 


Rachmaninoff composed his second symphony in Dresden in 1906-7, 
and it was first performed in Moscow two years later. It is dedicated to 
Serge ‘Taneieff. his composer, often called “the Russian Brahms,” was 
one of the most characteristic and important figures of the musical Mos- 
cow in which Rachmaninoff grew up and in which his musical ideals 
were formed. 

In the last half of the 19th century musical Russia was rather sharply 
divided into two camps. On the one hand was the St. Petersburg school 
of Rimsky-Korsakoff, Moussorgsky and Borodin, on the other fie Mos- 
cow school of Tschaikowsky, Rubinstein and Taneieff. The St. Petersburg 
group took as its base the Russian national ideal, with its glorification of 
native folk song and folk dance and all that goes with them. It was in- 
clined to take an experimental, if not revolutionary attitude toward 
matters of form and texture, and made use of Western musical tradi- 
tions only if they served its purposes. Its most extreme personality 1 


AXIM HENRI 


M 


SCHAPIRO TEMIANKA 


Pianist Violinist 










Continuing their Series 


“THE HISTORY OF THE SONATA” 
* 


. among the finest and most stirring musical events of the winter.” 
—ALEXANDER FRIED, S. F. Examiner, Dec. 19th, 1940 


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PROGRAM .NOTES—Continued 


Moussorgsky, who refused to recognize the validity of any of the Western 
conventions at all, and gallantly declined to submit himself to the disci- 
pline of acquiring what was in those days regarded as technique. 


The Moscow school held exactly the opposite point of view. It was 
rooted in Western traditions and conventions, and made use of native 
Russian materials only for special purposes and particular reasons. Most 
of the works of ‘Taneieff, and many of those by Ischaikowsky and Rach- 
maninoff, have no hint or suggestions of Russian coloring, although the 
great emphasis placed upon the Slavonically flavored compositions of the 
last two masters mentioned serves to obscure that fact. 


In 1922 Josef Stransky, conductor of the New York Philharmonic, made 
many cuts in Rachmaninoff’s E minor symphony which were approved by 
the composer. Rachmaninoff later told the librarian of the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra that when he conducts the work himself he makes no 
cuts, but that he did not object to abbreviations made by others. The 
Stransky version is the one used on this occasion. 


1 


Largo, E minor, 4/4 time. The symphony opens with an extended intro- 
duction, based upon the melody presented by the violins at the fourth bar: 





This is developed to a climax and subsides, and the introduction ends 
with a reminiscence of Example | in the English horn. 


The tempo changes to Allegro moderato and the time to alla breve, and, 
again at the fourth bar, the violins have the principal subject: 


= 





(This, it will be seen, is closely related to Example 1. There is, indeed, 
a great deal of inter-relationship and family resemblance between many 
of the principal ideas of the symphony.) Example 2 is repeated and ex- 
tended, and there is a transition passage in a slightly faster tempo, in 
which a triplet figure is prominent, leading over to the second theme. 


The second theme appears after a sudden diminuendo and a change 
of pace to Moderato: 


—<' 


















At g 
JO) en Ge Be) eee BS 
4 2 6 Gl 2 2S GS Ge a ee ee ee es 
Bese ae JZ BS a) 
hae Eee TS 




















THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 





The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the Univer- 
sity of California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, 
and is affiliated with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, 
faith and service of its members is prophetic of the important part youth plays 
and will continue to play in our work. 





CHAIRMEN . 
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re UE 


University of California Extension Division 


announces 





“Programs and Personalities of the Symphony Season” 


Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 


Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
7, 14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 


Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 
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164 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


This also is repeated and varied, and the exposition dies away in a long 
pranissimo. 


The development begins, after six bars of rhythmic preparation, with 
the theme of the introduction (Example 1) in a solo violin. The develop- 
ment as a whole is mostly based on this subject, worked out in many 
disguises and in connection with scale passages, strong rhythmic figures, 
and dramatic calls and outbursts of the brass. 


‘There isa big climax, followed by a brief, but broadly sonorous passage 
of retransition. The recapitulation is concerned, in this version, with the 
second theme only, given out in the key of E major. The coda (pitt vivo) 
is based upon a kind of quick-march version of Example 1. 


BE: 


Allegro molto, A minor, alla breve. A free, modern-type scherzo, 
opening: 


viol, Z HS : 
4. horns gee ea de ems = 
a Ss Ve oe oe [os ooo c (SSeS p—(—— Ee a 
ames 
ES a 7 ST 

















Some 84 bars later the violins have a markedly contrasted melody 
(Moderato) in. G major: 





The rhythm of Example 4 reasserts itself in a pianissimo passage, and 
eventually the first part of the movement is restated. 


A sudden sharp chord announces the trio: (Meno mosso), devoted mainly 
to the following figure, given out by the second violins: 


a pat ® nae . e A « a Ae a 
6) es be ; r goa , é ! } 


{\ C a! ¢ Abe 

Y (ey GES] (EE EG CSS) A ee 2 ree ee 
Cee GSM Ge a ES Ea Saeed 
0, CE) ES DS) 
a Eee 

























This scrambles through the whole orchestra. Later a kind of mysterious 
march is added. The scherzo proper finally returns, for a free restatement 
and discussion of Example 4. 
ise 
Adagio, A major, 4/4 time. The first violins have the principal theme 
eke airste bar: 





DE 2 ee Be 
a=— (a ies 


This is almost immediately followed by a long clarinet solo, and that by 


165 








| 
| 
| 


A 





PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


a third thematic idea in strings and woodwinds. The section ends with 
a return to Example 7. The middle section of the movement is devoted 
to development of the theme of the introduction to the first movement, 
Example I. Example 7 comes back at the crest of a climax, and the third 
section of the movement is devoted to it, combined with further discus- 
sion of Example I, with solo instruments prominent. 


Le 


Allegro vivace, E major, alla breve. The principal theme is a kind of 
fanfare for the violins and woodwinds: 


25) > 
Fee a er ae eS > Pe ga 









See : Fae. 
a eT ER SY 
A mysterious processional ensues in the wind instruments, and then Ex- 
ample 8 returns. ‘The broad second theme, in D major, is sung by the 


violins in octaves: 





Between the exposition and the development a flashback to the third 
movement is inserted for six bars of Adagio. 

The tempo immediately picks up at the beginning of the develop- 
ment, the first part of which is concerned with Example 8, eventually 
joined by suggestions of Example | in solo woodwinds. ‘The development 
concludes with much emphasis upon a descending scale derived from 
Example 9. 

A return to Example 8 in its original key brings in the recapitulation, 
which restates previous materials in orthodox fashion. The coda involves 
further treatment of Example 8. 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 
NO. 1, FSHARP MINOR, OPUS 1 


This work was originally written in 1890, when the composer was 17 
years old and was studying at the Moscow Conservatory. It was com- 
pletely rewritten in 1917, and it is said that this version, which is the 
one played today, ‘leaves little more of the old concerto than a few of 
its most beautiful themes.’’ The work was added to the present program 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO : TUxepo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 














166 











PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


quite late in the day, and no score was available at the time these notes 
had to be compiled. Consequently no outline can be provided. 


RHAPSODY ON A THEME OF PAGANINI, OPUS 43 


Rachmaninoff’s rhapsody, composed in 1934, is based upon Paganini’s 
most famous tune, that of the caprice in A minor for solo violin, which 
is also the basis of Brahms’ Variations on a Theme by Paganini for piano 
solo. Rachmaninoff’s work is also in variation form. 

The theme is not heard in its original form until after the introduc- 
tion and first variation. It is given to the violins: 























In the seventh variation the solo piano introduces the theme of the 
Dies Trae: 








ie Ge ETO 
2 En ee 0 ee ey or i, ea a PT 
Se (Se SS 0 a Oe ee ee Fe a PS 














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167 








| 
| 





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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


There has been much speculation regarding Rachmaninoff’s use of this 
melody. It is the tune of a hymn dealing with the terrors of the Day of 
Judgment which for centuries has been part of the Roman Catholic mass 
for the dead, and many modern composers have employed it to suggest 
the grotesque and macabre.* Rachmaninoff may quote it with reference 
to Paganini’s supposedly diabolical powers, but a somewhat more logical 
explanation was put forward by Herbert F. Peyser, as quoted in Musical 
America for December 10, 1939. Peyser had not, at that time, heard the 
Rhapsody but he was nevertheless moved to suggest that “if you eliminate 
the melodic notes of the first part of the Paganini theme and reduce it 
to its skeleton, you will notice, I think, that the Dies Irae is to all intents 
and purposes the inversion of the Paganini. Even rhythmically there is 
a Close family relation. Now, I don’t know what Rachmaninoff does with 
these materials, but a clever musician would, it seems to me, notice this 
kinship, and make something of it on purely musical grounds—let alone 
what he might do in an emotional and poetic sense.” 


Peyser’s argument is, for the present writer, a trifle difficult to follow, 
yet if one will play the notes marked with crosses in the second part of 
the theme (after the double bar) something vaguely resembling the Dies 
Trae will result. The notes marked with crosses in the first part of the 
theme are identical with the opening notes of the theme of the finale in 
Beethoven’s Eroica. Granting that this pattern is merely tonic and domi- 
nant, which can occur in any simple melody, it is still noteworthy that 
Rachmaninofl’s treatment of the theme in the first variation (before the 
theme itself appears) has a certain resemblance to the finale of the Eroica 
in several respects. 


The Dies Irae reappears in Rachmaninoff’s tenth variation and in the 
24th and last, and its spirit doubtless conditions many of the proceedings 
in between. 


In 1939 Rachmaninoff collaborated with Michel Fokine on the libretto 
to a ballet, Paganini, which is based on this rhapsody. In the first part of 
this stage work the great violinist appears on a concert platform sur- 
rounded by figures of envy, scandal, gossip and guile, with Satan himself 
guiding his bow. In the second scene Paganini plays the guitar among the 
people. In the final episode the violinist attempts to compose, his hand 
this time guided by a figure called Divine Genius, but his communion with 
the muse is interrupted by a virtuoso in his own image, who brings with 
him a host of Paganini imitators and the devil’s crew of Guile, Envy and 
Scandal. ‘The Divine Genius routs these intruders, and at the end leads 
the spirit of the dead Paganini upward and away. 


This story was doubtless imposed upon the music after the fact, and is 
not to be taken as a “program” for the Rhapsody. Nevertheless, it is worth 
noting that the point of the ballet has certain very marked similarities to 
the ideas expressed in the Musical Times interview with Rachmaninoff 
quoted above. 


*Berlioz: Fantastic Symphony. Liszt: Dance of Death. Rachmaninoff: Island of the 
Dead. Schelling: A Victory Ball. Miaskovsky: Sixth Symphony (where it refers to the 
Russian Revolution) , etc. 


169 

















PERS ON NEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CoNnoducToR 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WoOLSK!, WILLIAM 
3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
De GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALD!I, MAFALDA 


DIcTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOHMN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BurRG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 





’CELLOS: 


BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 


DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KiIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
Petty, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 


KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 


SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
ScCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, ROY 


PICCOLO: 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 


ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RuDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
CLow, RAY 


E FLAT CLARINET: 


Rupp, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 


FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAyYE, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 


BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 


TRUTNER, HERMAN CE. 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 


ROTH, PAUL 
JAKOB, JOS. 
GEHRING, CONRAD 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
STORCH, WALTER 


TROMBONES: 


Gios!, ORLANDO 


SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 


KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


ORGAN: 


ALTMANN, LUDWIG 


LIBRARIAN AND 


PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 





——————— OOOO 


170 























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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


PRESENTS THE 


NAY FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
G0 ON De oor On 


tA tee 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD h. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 



















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175 








F 
y 
: 
4 


After the last note of the Symphony 


THE CONCERT IS YOURS 
in your Record Library! 


SYMPHONY (NO 2.0... Rachmaninoff 
The famous Symphony in E minor pre- 
sented in Album M239 .. . six 12-inch 
records ... at the new low price, $6.50 


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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
E. RAYMOND ARMSBY ,. , VICE-PRESIDENT JOHN A. McGREGOR.... TREASURER 
PAUL A. BISSINGER VICE-PRESIDENT HOWARD K. SKINNER ...., SECRETARY 
CHARLES R. BLYTH , VICE-PRESIDENT GERALD G. Ross . ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
MiSS LUTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


DR. HANS BARKAN 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

MISS LOUISE A. Boypb 

MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 
MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


Guipo J. Musto 

MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
MISS ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. SLoss 
MRS. SIGMUND STERN 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 





—_—— 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. EDWARD OTs BARTLETT 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


MRs. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 
DR. HANS BARKAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTIE D. GoLpDSTEIN 


MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. LEQ ELOESSER 


J. B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
MRS..ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. Norris 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


PHILIP N. Boone 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


C. O. G. Mitcer.. A GF 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND. 


MRE. UM. wes SloOSS.e tts 
MRS. H. R. MCKINNON. .... 


MRS. JOHN P, COGHLAN. 


MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER... 
MRS. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM. .... 


PHILIP S. Boone. Sore 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS. 
MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. LEQNORA Woop ARMSBY 
G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
Mrs. GEORGE W. BAKER, JR. 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

MRS. EDWARD CO. BARTLETT 
ALBERT M. BENDER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 

MISS LOUISE A. BoypD 
MRS. F. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

GEORGE T. CAMERON 

MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
MRS. JOHN P, COGHLAN 
MRS. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE 
MRS. W. W. CROCKER 

MRs. O. K, CUSHING 

MRS. GEORGES DE LATOUR 
MISS KATHARINE DONOHOE 
JOSEPH H., DYER, JR. 

MRS. FRANK EDOFF 

SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 

ALBERT I. ELKuS 

DR. Leo ELOESSER 
FORREST ENGELHART 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


oralesehre l oiten sivas te: feogerre at eae - « « CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Ser - CHAIRMAN WOMEN’S FINANCE COMMITTEE 


HENRY EVERS 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


siher vente Mel ia tence Wisk tan Ses - - TICKET SALES AND PUBLICITY 


eietred*ergerlied te » « « YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
ei fat ag at somion de - » VICE-CHAIRMAN, TICKET SALES 


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BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


MRS. PAUL I. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 

JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTiE D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P, GRIFFITHS 
MRS. LEON GUGGENHIME 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

MRS E. S&S. HELLER 
WALTER S&S. HELLER 

Mrs. I. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
GAETANO MEROLA 

C. O. G. MILLER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
ROBERT W. MILLER 
EDWARD F. MOFFATT 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Guipo J. Musto 

DWIGHT F. McCoRMACcK 
MRS. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 


JOHN A. McGREGoOR 

MRS. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 

R. C. NEWALL 

CHARLES G. NorRRIS 

CHARLES PAGE, UR. 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

MRS. ASHTON H. PoTTER 

MRS. STANLEY POWELL 

MRS. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 

OTTORINO RONCHI 

MRS. HENRY P. RUSSELL 

Miss ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. Stoss 

MRS. NICOL SMITH 

MRS. SIGMUND STERN 

MRS. POWERS SYMINGTON 

MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG- 
TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 

JOHN H. THRELKELD 

MRs. CYRIL TOBIN 

THOMAS J. WATSON 

MICHEL WEILL 

MRS. ELI H. WIEL 

LEONARD E. Woop 

J. D. ZELLERBACH 


7a 





New Forms 


or Flowers 
by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 


Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE _ wherein violets form the face 
rORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT . . with daisies in the crown 
DUCK . . carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


20t shown 


Exclusive with 


*" SLOANE 


CoUicb ol cho Ree nie air, (Gane DoNiA, 


























San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Ww 
SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
2004th and 2005th Concerts 


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2:30 P.M. 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 8:30 P. M. 


Soloist: SERGEI RACHMANINOEFFE, Pianist 


Ww 
Program 
OWE RAL Ra LO GiVi@ Nulese ate ea ee ae Beethoven 
SYMPHONY NO. 5 ee ele AG MAJOR, 
OR USD Liisi TS TI dat, borate eae, ee Schumann 
Lebhaft 
Scherzo: Sehr massig 
Nicht schnell 
Feierlich 
Lebhaft 


PN oie Ra sS.S Orn 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, / 
INOS. DMEIN@ Ro SO PUSia0 eae Rachmaninoff 
Allegro ma non tanto 
Intermezzo: Adagio — 
Finale 


MAGIC FIRE SCENE FROM 
DDT SVVAAT TAGES Ere aera ee ae ee A RE Wagner 


er 


Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ 
Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 
These affairs are open to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 








NOTE: Announcement of Young Peoples’ Concerts on Page 197. 


179 

























SG FS Ee eee 


Se PLE EH Pes Re as ETE 


GUEST ARTIST THIS WEEK 
SERGEI RACHMANINOFF is one of the few contemporary musicians to win 
equal standing as a major composer and a virtuoso executant. He was born 
near Novgorod in 1873, and was trained at the Moscow Conservatory, 
studying piano under Nicholas Sveroy and composition under Anton Aren- 
sky; personal friendship with Tschaikowsky during his student days also 
did much to form his point of view. 


Rachmaninoff was chief conductor at the Imperial Theatre in Moscow 
from 1904 to 1906. He then settled in Dresden for two years devoted solely 
to composition. In 1909 he made his first American tour, returning to Mos- 
cow in 1910, and remaining there until the Russian Revolution. Until 1915 
Rachmaninoff’s activities as pianist were largely devoted to the interpreta- 
tion of his own works. In that year Alexander Scriabin died, and Rach- 
maninoff resolved to make a European tour playing only Scriabin’s works. 
His reputation as a general virtuoso dates largely from this time. Rach- 
maninoff left Russia in 1917, and has lived in the United States ever since. 


Rachmaninoff’s larger works include three operas, Aleko (1892), The 
Miserly Knight (1905) , and Francesca da Rimini (1905) ; three symphonies 
(1895, 1907 and 1936) ; four piano concertos (1891, 1901, 1909 and LOZ7 i 
several choral pieces including The Bells (1913); a trio in memory of 
Tschaikowsky (1893) ; a cello sonata (1901) ; the tone poem The Island of 
the Dead (1907) ; the Rhapsody for Piano and Orchestra on a Theme by 
Paganini (1934); many songs; two piano sonatas (1907 and 1915) ; and 
countless small piano pieces, of which one is in the key of C sharp minor. 


Rachmaninoff made his first appearance with the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra last season when he played his second concerto. This 
year he will appear on two successive Friday-Saturday pairs. He will 
present his first concerto and Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini at the 
concerts of February 7-8, and his third concerto at the concerts of Feb- 
ruary 14-15. 


a 
a 


THE NEXT GUEST ARTIST 

Dorotuy Maynor was born in Norfolk, Virginia, and received her first 
musical training in the choir of her father’s church. Later she studied 
at Hampton Institute, and was for several seasons a member of the famous 
Hampton Institute Negro Choir. As a student at the Westminster Choir 
School she had an audition with Serge Koussevitzky, who immediately 
arranged for her to sing at an official reception for members of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and officials of the Berkshire Festival. ‘hat was in 
the summer of 1939, and Miss Maynor’s career as a soloist dates from that 
occasion. She has since sung with many orchestras in the east, but will 
make her first appearance in San Francisco at the Symphony concerts of 
March 14-15. 


180 

















2 





PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


OVER TURE OCB GMON Tae oan. Ludwig van Beethoven 
(1770-1827) 

Lamoral, Count of Egmont, Prince of Gavre, led an unsuccessful up- 
rising of the Dutch against their Spanish rulers in the year 1567. Two and 
a quarter centuries later this exploit, for which Egmont was executed, 
became the subject of a drama by Goethe. Beethoven composed incidental 
music for a revival of Goethe’s tragedy staged in Vienna in 1810, of which 
only the overture remains in the modern repertoire. 

Various critics have attempted to show that Beethoven, in this over- 
ture, paints a specific tone picture of various aspects of the play, but these 
attempts are more naive than convincing. The assertion of the heroic will 
against oppression was, however, a favorite theme with Beethoven (wit- 
ness [’delio) and the piece is clearly conceived in terms of the general 
spirit and feeling of Goethe’s work. 


SYMPHONY NO. 3, E FLAT MAJOR, 


OU AGS oO Ra eM ASUS Ue ene his te? ae Robert Schumann 
(1810-1856) 

In 1849 Schumann was appointed director of the symphony orchestra 
in the Rhenish city of Diisseldorf. His years in this post were the most 
difficult and unhappy of his entire life, for Schumann was not a gifted 
conductor, managed the non-musical aspects of his position badly, and 
these stresses and strains greatly aggravated the nervous troubles from 
which he had long suffered. In 1854 he attempted to commit suicide, and 
he spent the last two years of his life in an insane asylum. 

The third symphony* was composed late in 1850, and was first presented 
early in the following year at a concert of the Diisseldorf orchestra, Schu- 
mann conducting. Schumann’s biographers state that the work was in- 


*It is actually Schumann’s fourth and last symphony in order of composition. The 
symphony in D minor, second in order of composition, is numbered fourth because it 
was published after the others. 






—~—. 





War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 
* * * * 
- Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 


ee eee 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO : TUxeEpDo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 
SSS 


18] 
















































———————S———— 





















SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE: Sherman, Clay—SUtter 1331 





ART COMMISS 
of SAN FRANCI 
Hon. ANGELO J. ROSSI, Mayor 


“MMUNICIPAL CONCERTS * 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, (Conductor 


Ww 
TUESDAY NIGHT, MARCH 4 


ALEXANDER 
BRATLOWSKY 


Sensational Russian Pianist 


—PROGRAM— 


ION 
SCO 


= 
















SAN FRANCISCO OVERTURE.........-.. Wesley La Violette 
CONDUCTED BY THE COMPOSER) 
CONCERTO FOR PIANO, B Flat Minor........ Tschatkowsky 
Mr. BRAILOWSKY 
SVENEP ELON VANOW Ohare sen. c Aihara eee h bicussvaaitene Beethoven 


Montreux, Conducting 


Tickets $1.00 - 75c - 50c - No Tax 


FRIDAY NIGHT, MARCH 21 


KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 


First Lady of the Opera 
Epwin McArtruour, Conducting 


TUESDAY NIGHT, APRIL 15 


YEHUDI MENUHIN 


Brilliant Young Genius of the Violin 
MontTEvux, Conducting 








Tickets for Flagstad and Menuhin Concerts 
— $1.50 - $1.00 - 75c - 50c - No Tax 




















| 
| 
| 
| 


PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


tended by its composer as a reflection of the folk-life of the Rhineland, 
and some of its thematic ideas have been traced back to Rhenish folk 
songs. Ihe fourth movement was inspired by the ceremonies which took 
place in the Cologne cathedral when a certain archbishop was raised to 
the rank of cardinal. On the original manuscript Schumann titled this 
movement “In the manner of the accompaniment to a solemn ceremony,” 
but he later withdrew this superscription. 


: I 
Lebhaft (Lively), E flat major, 3/4 time. The principal theme appears 
at once in the full orchestra: 


ioe Bata eae RT et aes : ae 
pastes | Salers brett ett 


This is worked over at some length. The quieter second subject begins 
in the woodwinds in G minor: 


























9 woodwinds 
= 


rar ae ee a MARCA sat ae oes 
El rr Peed Salers eee 


This is also worked over, by itself and in conjunction with ideas from 
Example 1, and the exposition ends with a brief concluding theme not 
quoted. 












































ANNOUNCEMENT 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Eighth Pair of Symphony Concerts 


Friday, February 21, 2:30 Saturday, February 22, 8:30 
PROGRAM 
Piece PEGEOUGIIC..4) diets ca eaee es eee al es Oe César Franck 
(Orchestrated by Charles O’Connell — first performance) 
SITU ONO AS ry aac, Piola a ee ee ee Darius Milhaud 


(Conducted by the composer — first performance in San Francisco) 
SA OUN OIGT CSA Beh Gi oy oh cements er bayer Paalsy waa ear os me Schubert 
This concert as a whole and the presentation of Piéce Héroique in particular 


are dedicated to Ignace Jan Paderewski as part of the nation-wide Paderewski 
Testimonial to be observed from February 15 to 22. 


a ee 


Box Office: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland; 
Telephone SUtter 1331(San Francisco) or HIgate 1220 (Oakland) 





183 








a 
~ ae: ess = = 


— 


SS 


SASS Stare 


SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 





: 
- 
4 
: 


its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . Their 
phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. ‘Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 


and courage. ... We feel that not only the Association, but all the F 


members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloy 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
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Edoff, Mrs. Frank 

Evans, Mrs. Harry 

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Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
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McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
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Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
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Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 


Noble, Mrs. Charles 

Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 

Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 

Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert . 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick } 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 

Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 

Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton q 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 











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184 





~ 


‘ ~4.| Aas 


PROGRAM NO'TES—Continued 


The development begins with a sudden G major chord (fff) in the full 
orchestra. The first portion of the development is concerned mainly with 
Example 2. Then Example 1 comes back to prominence and is taken 
through various keys in dramatic fashion, with the entire orchestra at 
work practically all of the time. Toward the end of the development 
Example | is treated in the manner of a horn call under tremolandi in 
the strings. 

The first theme goes back to the original key to begin a fairly orthodox 
recapitulation. The coda introduces a new thematic idea not quoted. 

II 

Scherzo: Sehr mdssig (Very moderately), C major, 3/4 time. The ’celli, 

violas and bassoons have the principal theme at the outset: 





which is taken up by the higher strings and woodwinds. A second section 
follows, with a rapid, staccato, skipping figure in 16th notes, with which 
Example 3 is eventually combined. 

A kind of trio ensues beginning in the woodwinds. (The clarinet part 
only is quoted) : 


4 3 
ea 2 


RACHMANINOFF says of the STEINWAY 


“I am very happy to have the opportunity of 
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consider it perfect in every way.” 


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Sa 
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be a 
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PROGRAM = NOTES—Gonitinued 


The skipping 16th note figure also appears throughout this trio. 

A fourth section of the movement is devoted to the development of 
these materials. At the end Example 3 is restated in much the same form 
as at the beginning and there is a coda of some size beginning very quietly 
with a fragment of Example 3, working up to a climax, and subsiding. 

II] 

Nicht schnell (Not fast), A flat major, 4/4 time. ‘The slow movement 
is freely constructed on three themes. The first is given to the clarinets 
at the beginning: 







































































The middle section of the movement works over Examples 6 and 7, and 
all three ideas return in the final portion. 
IV. 

Feierlich (Solemnly), E flat minor, 4/4 time. This movement, often 
referred to as the ‘“‘cathedral scene,” is called by Prof. ‘Tovey “one of the 
finest pieces of ecclesiastical counterpoint since Bach.”’ Its theme is as 
follows: 


8 


brass 


4 —f- ai 
Le EG I an ree pa Ae ee 
Vi 
Lebhaft E flat major, alla breve. Strings and woodwinds give out the 
principal theme: 


9 


ee eee ee ee SE 
ue eee ee eae 


The transition to the econd theme is an ingenious transformation of the 
187 


































































































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subject of the ‘cathedral scene,” entirely altered in character. Strings and 
woodwinds also have the short second theme: 











The concluding portion of the exposition is based upon material more 
remarkable for its rhythmic than its melodic interest. 

The brief development is concerned mainly with flying fragments of 
Example 10, but Example 9 is not altogether neglected. ‘The recapitula- 
tion is regular, and there is an extended coda with somewhat disguised 
references to the music of the “cathedral scene” and to the first theme of 
the first movement, Example I. 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
PANTENO R= OPT S23 ae net een Sergei Rachmaninoff 
(1873-) 
Rachmaninoff composed his third piano concerto in the summer of 
1909 for use during his first American tour, which took place in the 
following fall and winter. It was first performed at a concert of the New 
York Symphony Orchestra, Walter Damrosch conducting, in November 
of the year mentioned. It is dedicated to Josef Hofmann. 


I 


Allegro ma non tanto, D minor, 4/4 time. After two bars of the 
rhythmic selvage which the composer seems to like, the piano gives out 
the principal theme in simple octaves: 













a Peg TTS heey = 
OO Petes Swe ST ASaaf aves rous Suey Premeas 
Fetter te tee eee ee ee ee 
SS SS 6G Fe om ome nae el freee eee cae] 


This is repeated by the orchestra with embroideries in the solo. A transi- 
tion passage in which a portion of the second theme is hinted at leads to 
the second theme proper, which involves three quite separate ideas. The 
first of these is a broad theme (Moderato) begun in the lower strings. ‘hhe 
second restores the original tempo and begins with the following rhythmic 
figure of the orchestra: 








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189 








i 
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THE MUSIC 
BO: VER S 
SOC PET Y 


MARGARET TILLY, FOUNDER 


Renee ees 
SIXTH SEASON 1941 


TUESDAY EVE., JAN. 7, FEB. 18, APRIL 8 


———} COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 

MERRILL JORDAN...Flute {|} LUCIEN MITCHELL.. Viola 

FRANK HOUSER.....Violin || HERMAN REINBERG..’Cello 
MARGARET TILLY....Piano 























“New and unfamiliar music, beautifully played—they are performing a noble work. 
As usual their program was full of interest and their manner of performance highly 
distinguished. It is unfortunate that an ensemble so admirably musical and compe- 
tent will give only three concerts this year”. 


Alfred Frankenstein in the San Francisco Chronicle 
sss: 


“The Music Lovers are not only excelient artists 


101 They show brains and a sense of 
adventure—They are musicians of high competence 


and mature understanding”. 
Alexander Fried in San Francisco Examiner 





“These evenings—presented with fine musicianship and a contageously adventuresome 
spirit are as civilized an activity as can be found in the city—Watch the Music Lovers 
and hear them”’. 


Marjory M. Fisher in San Francisco News 
Se ee re ee ee 


“—impassioned singing of the strings against a profoundly moving piano part, were 
moments of indescribable beauty”. 


Marie Hicks Davidson in Call-Bulletin 
ea, Ce ee 


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190 


ei 








an 


PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 





which is answered by the solo. After this dialogue, the piano brings in 
a new version of Example 2: 





which is worked over. 

The development opens with a return to Example 1. This theme is 
most prominent throughout this section of the movement, although 
thematic interest here is very often dissolved in the torrents and cascades 
of figuration that stream from the solo instrument. ‘The development 
concludes with a long cadenza written into the score. ‘Toward its end solo 
wind instruments recall Example 1.* Example 1 itself, in its original 
form and scoring, comes back after the cadenza to begin the greatly trun- 
cated recapitulation. The movement ends with references to Example 2. 

II 

Intermezzo. Adagio, A major, 3/4 time. ‘The oboe states the principal 

theme: 


This employment of orchestral instruments during the course of a solo cadenza is 
probably without precedent in the literature of the concerto. 








THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Presents 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON AND SATURDAY NIGHT 


Ailieeeie tes el ® * & @ AT 8:30 
FRI., FEB. 21 — SAT., FEB. 22 FRI., MAR. 28 —_ SAT., MAR. 29 
ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM — ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
BR MARSA: | ee. er MARS ERI: APR. 4 — SAT., APR. 5 
CSE ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 

FRI., APR. 18 _ SAT., APR. 19 
JOSE ITURBI 
PIANIST 





UNIVERSITY “POP” CONCERT 
Sunday Evening, March 2 - Eight Thirty O’Clock 
Soloist: MARGARET SPEAKS, Soprano 


TICKETS: FRIDAY 55¢ to $2.75 — — SATURDAY 55¢ to $1.25 
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191 










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CHAPTERS 
1. How It Began 
2. An Island Is Built 
3. The Magic City 
4. Beauty and Color 
5. Let There Be Light 
6. ‘The Government on 
Parade 
7. California Presents 
8. Show Window of the 
States 
9. Friends From Abroad 
0. Market Place of the 
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11. Old Masters and Art 
in Action 
12. Science in the Service 
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13. ‘The Woman’s Role 
14, Pageant and Song 
15. The Street of the 
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16. Gala Days of ’39 
17. The Months Between 
18. ‘The Golden Forties 
19. And the World Came 
20. The Curtain Falls 
Appendix 
Index 





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Re 


ST ET Bi tee eA cE ee et ae 


PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 





which is continued and extended by the strings. ‘The solo instrument 
makes its entry, takes up Example 4 in D flat major and develops it, with 
its subsidiaries, at considerable length. ‘The middle section of the move- 
ment (poco pitt mosso) exploits rather waltz-like material in 3/8 time, 
with rapid figuration of the solo. A very brief return to Example 4 con- 
cludes the intermezzo proper. The solo then takes up a new idea in heavy 
octaves and drives without pause into 


II] 
Alla Breve (here used as a tempo indication as well as a time signa- 
ture to indicate a speed just twice as fast as that of the preceding link 
passage) , D minor. ‘The piano has the principal theme at the third bar: 





This is extensively worked over and is then re-presented in rhythmically 
altered form. A second variant follows, marked Scherzando, and making 


SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WAInut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 


The following distinguished members of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra are teaching at the Conservatory: 


STANISLAS BEM CHARLES RUDD 
In Charge of Cello Department Clarinet and Saxophone 


HENRY WOEMPNER BENJAMIN KLATZKIN 


Flute and Woodwind Ensemble Trumpet and Brass Instruments 





“THE SECOND HURRICANE”’ 


Sponsored by Composers’ Forum, Ashley Pettis, Director 
Exciting Play-Opera by AARON COPLAND, Feb. 28th, 
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musical direction of NICHOLAS GOLDSCHMIDT, 
stage direction ARTHUR GLEDITZSCH. Admission 
75¢. Tickets: SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC, 3435 Sacramento St., WA. 3496 or Theatre. 








193 








; 





THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM tg 


The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the Univer- 
sity of California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, 
and is affiliated with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, 
faith and service of its members is prophetic of the important part youth plays 
and will continue to play in our work. 





s 
CHAIRMEN 
Virginia Adams William Barkan Philip S. Boone 
OFFICERS 
Lewis Byington Richard Lyon 
Cornelia Clark Richard Palmer 
Henry Evers Marylouise Sanford 
EXECUTIVE COUNCILS 
Ava Jean Barber Louise Lindley Frederick Rea 
J. Brandon Bassett Lois Mitchell James Schwabacher 
John Collins Edward Nielson Janet Scott 
John Donahue Douglass North Dr. Marceille Spetz 
William Gillis Wrede Petersmeyer Milton ‘Tucker 
Peggy Hawkins Edward Pinger Ann Wilder 
Fred W. Kimball Mary Powell Jane Williams 
David Leaf Patricia Pruyn &, 








University of California Extension Division 


announces 
“Programs and Personalities of the Symphony Season” 


Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 


Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
7, 14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 


Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 





Alice Seckels presents... 


FANJA URRY 


Brilliant Pianist in Concert 
“A New Star in the Musical Sky” 


COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 19, 1941 
Reserved Seats: SHERMAN, CLAY & PLAYHOUSE OFFICE 


_— 








PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


much use of capricious, scherzo-like figuration in the solo. Toward the 
end of this section all the themes of the preceding movements are recalled. 
First is Example | in the lower strings; then comes Example 3 in the solo 
followed by Example 2 in the violins and woodwinds combined with vague 
hints of 4. 


The Scherzando section ends quietly in the solo, and is followed by a 
recapitulation of the first portion of the movement. There is an extended 
coda in the major during the course of which a broad new theme rises 
to great importance: 





MAGIC FIRE SCENE FROM 


OTE VV AL IG OTOL eC Re hin. el Oo eee aed, Richard Wagner 
(1813-1883) 

In the final scene of Die Walkiire, Wotan, chief of the Nordic gods, 
puts his daughter, the Valkyr Briinnhilde, to sleep under a tree at the top 
of a mountain. For breaking Wotan’s command she is condemned to sleep 
until awakened by a hero without fear who shall plunge through the ring 
of fire with which the mountain top is to be surrounded. At the start of 
the excerpt Wotan calls upon Loge, the god of fire, to ring the mountain 
with flame. The fire springs up, and music descriptive of it mingles with 
a motive significant of Briinnhilde’s sleep. At the end Wotan stretches 
forth his spear and proclaims that any who fear his power shall not attempt 
to penetrate the flames. He sings this, ironically enough, to the motive of 
Siegfried, who will indeed be unafraid of Wotan’s power, will smash his 
spear, go through the fire, and awaken Briinnhilde. 





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FOUR CONCERTS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE 


SATURDAY MORNINGS AT 10:30 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


RUDOLPH GANZ, Conducting 


War Memorial Opera House 


MEARR- GE} Aine? sha ater anastre ware eer 5 be “The Orchestra’ 
MEAIRIG EE See sos tea, Steen e eee eae “Nature in Music” 
IVE ARI GIES Ue fees ee he eee ig rei “The Waltz’ (with Ballet) 
704 8 i Ds ee ee ee “Human Emotions and Moods in Music” 


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BALGON Yan lasts OLEOWS) excess n she. «pes tae eee .60 
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All Tickets are Tax Exempt 


Auspices Young People’s Concerts Committee 
Mrs. HArotp R. McKINNOoN, Chairman 
Mrs. WALTER A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 
Mrs. HAro.tp K. FABER, Vice-Chairman 


“ ~ ' ‘ 
v2) 
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Musical Association of San Francisco 
Mrs. LEonorA Woop Armssy, President and Managing Director 
Howard K. SKINNER, Business Manager 





197 





So Se 


— 


7 
6 
: 


| 
| 


PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DeE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DICTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BurRG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 





198 


"CELLOS: 

BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 

DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 
KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, ROY 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE J. 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScCHIvo, LESLIE J. 


CLARINETS: 
SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RuDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
CLowW, RAY 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
RUDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


CONDUCTOR 





BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAYE, E. B. 
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LAMBERT, PIERRE 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 

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GEHRING, CONRAD 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN e 
BARTON, LELAND S. 

KRESS, VICTOR 

STORCH, WALTER 


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KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


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MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT % 
SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


ORGAN: 


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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


PRESENTS THE 


NAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
CO Nt Me Go hoe a 


2g" 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD kh. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 

















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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 


PAUL A. BISSINGER . . VICE-PRESIDENT 


VICE-PRESIDENT 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. LEONORA WooD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
JOHN A. MCGREGOR .. . . TREASURER 
HOWARD K. SKINNER .. . . SECRETARY 
GERALD G. Ross . ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


CHARLES R. 


DR. HANS BARKAN 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
Miss LOUISE A. Boypb 


MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 


Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 


MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 


PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


MRS. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 


DR. HANS BARKAN 


BLYTH . . VICE-PRESIDENT 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTtTiE D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTtie D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. MARCUS S&S. KOSHLAND 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. LEO ELOESSER 


Guipo J. Musto 

MRs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
MisS ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss 
Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 


J. B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. NORRIS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


PHILIP N. BoOoNE 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


Ce cee MiltkeER 

MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND . 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss. - 
MRS. H. R. MCKINNON. 
MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN. 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER. 


MRS. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM... 


PHILIP & BooONeE. : 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS. 
MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 


MRS. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 


G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
MRS. GEORGE W. BAKER, UR. 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

MRS. EDWARD O. BARTLETT 
ALBERT M. BENDER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 

Miss LouISE A. Boypb 
MRs. F. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN 


MRS. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE 


Mrs. W. W. GrRocKER 
Mrs. O. K. CUSHING 

MRS. GEORGES DE LATOUR 
MISS KATHARINE DONOHOE 
JOSEPH H. DYER, UR. 
MRS. FRANK EDOFF 
SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 
ALBERT |. ELKuS 

DR. LEO ELOESSER 
FORREST ENGELHART 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


HENRY EVERS 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


- - CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 
. CHAIRMAN WOMEN’S FINANCE COMMITTEE 
~ - TICKET SALES AND PUBLICITY 


» e« » YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


;. nigra ode) TICKET SALES 


se teute 5 - Box SALES 
ea . SYMPHONY GUILD 


5 OM 8G, oe cibeLie . SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


. HONORARY CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
. VICE-CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


MRS. PAUL I. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 

JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTiE D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS 
Mrs. LEON GUGGENHIME 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

Mrs E. S&S. HELLER 
WALTER S&S. HELLER 

Mrs. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
Mrs. MARCUS §. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
GAETANO MEROLA 

Cc. O. G. MILLER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
ROBERT W. MILLER 
EDWARD F. MOFFATT 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Guipo J. Musto 

DWIGHT F. McCORMACK 
MRS. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 


JOHN A. McGREGOR 

MRS. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 

R. C. NEWALL 

CHARLES G. NORRIS 

CHARLES PAGE, UR. 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 

MRS. STANLEY POWELL 

MRS. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 

OTTORING RONCHI 

MRS. HENRY P. RUSSELL 

Miss ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. SLtoss 

Mrs. Nicot SMITH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

MRS. POWERS SYMINGTON 

Mrs. DAVID ARMSTRONG- 
TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S&S. THOMPSON 

JOHN H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. CYRIL TOBIN 

THOMAS J. WATSON 

MICHEL WEILL 

Mrs. EL! H. WIEL 

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VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 

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Exclusive with 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Ww 


EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
2007th and 2008th Concerts 





FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2:30 P.M. 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 8:30 P.M. 


PADEREWSKI TESTIMONIAL CONCERT 


Ww 
Program 


IS AR(CIE 18s ONL OLEH Tae oa aon Sie eae ne | Franck 


ORCHESTRATED BY CHARLES O'CONNELL — FIRST PERFORMANCE 


SHAVE ELON ok teore atk tao eeweg? Oar = Bele Dies Milhaud 2 


Pastoral: Modérément animé 

Trés vif 

‘Tres modéré 

Animé 
THE COMPOSER CONDUCTING—FIRST PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO 


PN Ee RVs SOON 


SVE TION YolNsG MAT O Ree. a age 96, Sage eo Schubert 
Andante — Allegro ma non troppo 
Andante con moto 
Allegro vivace 
Allegro vivace 





Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ 
Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 
These affairs are open to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 
Eee 


NOTE: Announcement of Young Peoples’ Concerts on Page 222. 








Heer re SSS © 


207 











‘THE ANNOUNCEMENT of a National Paderewski Testimonial to honor 
Paderewski on the Golden Anniversary of his American debut prompted 
Mr. Paderewski to issue the following statement: 


“My dear American Friends: 


“When fifty years ago I came over to your great and hospitable country 
I never dreamed that half a century later anyone would pay the slightest 
attention to that date. The honor you are bestowing on me now, in addt- 
tion to your unfailing friendship I have been always proud to enjoy, comes 
at a moment when all our efforts should be united in order to help and 
assist those who fight in defending the most sacred principles of democ- 
racy and of our civilization, when all the tribute, the appreciation and all 
our gratitude should be concentrated. upon their heroism and upon their 
valiantness. 


“In spite of those considerations, my appreciation of your kind thought, 
my warm response to the suggestions of the Testimonial Committee, makes 
me accept its plan with deepest gratitude. 

“For the sake of millions of innocent victims of this terrible war, to 
whom the proceeds of the manifestations connected with my name are 
going to bring help, from the bottom of my heart I wish you every success 
and I thank you. 


I. J. PADEREWSKI” 
New York, January 16, 1941 


Contributions can be sent to Ignace Paderewski, 37 East 36th St., New 
York City. 








THE NEXT GUEST ARTIST 


DorotHy MAynor was born in Norfolk, Virginia, and received her first 
musical training in the choir of her father’s church. Later she studied 
at Hampton Institute, and was for several seasons a member of the famous 
Hampton Institute Negro Choir. As a student at the Westminster Choir 
School she had an audition with Serge Koussevitzky, who immediately 
arranged for her to sing at an official reception for members of the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra and officials of the Berkshire Festival. ‘That was in 
the summer of 1939, and Miss Maynor’s career as a soloist dates from that 
occasion. She has since sung with many orchestras in the east, but will 
make her first appearance in San Francisco at the Symphony concerts of 
March -14-15. 











i 





PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


PEC RELIC CO) OB ls 9h patos, eee che Reet. at eR César Franck 
(1822-1890) 
(ORCHESTRATED BY CHARLES O'CONNELL) 
‘This is the last of a series of three pieces written in 1878 for the dedi- 
cation of the organ in the ‘Trocadéro. ‘The transcriber is musical director 
for the RCA Victor Company. 


SEEING Sie ieee Rte Se tir dadere OOS A, Darius Milhaud 
(1892-) 

“IT always thought ’d wait until I was past fifty before writing a 
symphony,’ Milhaud remarked to the present writer, “but the opportunity 
came a little earlier, and I am very glad of it.” 

Opportunity knocked in the form of a commission from the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra to compose a symphony for that organization’s fif- 
tieth anniversary celebration, which is taking place throughout the present 
season. ‘he commission was given in the summer of 1939. In September of 
that year the second World War broke out, and in reaction to the doleful 
happenings of those days Milhaud found himself completely unable to 
work. “But I had promised a symphony for the Chicago festival,” he said, 
“and it had to be completed. I drove myself to it, finished the score in 
December, 1939, and it was an intellectual and spiritual life-saver for me.” 

Although this is Milhaud’s first symphony for full orchestra, he has 
produced a prodigious quantity of music in every other form and manner. 
For those who may be making his acquaintance for the first time today, it 
may be said that the composer was born in Aix-en-Provence and studied 
at the Paris Conservatory with André Gédalge and others. From 1917 to 
1919 he was attached to the French Legation in Rio de Janeiro, where his 
chief was the poet-diplomat, Paul Claudel. This experience had two im- 
portant results for Milhaud: it aroused his interest in Brazilian folk 
themes, which appear in many of his works of the post-war period, and 
it led to his collaboration with Claudel in a remarkable series of stage 
works, of which the most celebrated are a translation of the Oresteia of 
Aeschuylus and an opera, Christopher Columbus, produced in Berlin in 
1930. 

Milhaud returned to Paris in 1919, and became one of the most 
prominent members of the notorious Group of Six. This association—the 
other members were Arthur Honegger, Francis Poulenc, Georges Auric, 
Germaine ‘Tailleferre and Louis Durey—was never taken very seriously by 
its members, and soon dissolved. Milhaud lived in Paris for the next 
twenty years, producing a long list of ballets, operas, and other stage 
and film music, orchestral works, chamber music, concertos, songs, and so 
on. Works of his played in San Francisco in recent years include the ballet 
score The Creation of the World, the Suite Provengale for orchestra, a 





wee, 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 

* a ¥* * 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 

OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 


209 








ART 
of 8 





A 
Hon. ANGELO J. ROSSI, Mayor 


MUNICIPAL GONGERTS «| 


SAN FRANCI a 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


| PIERRE MONTEUX, (Conductor 
Ww 
| 








TUESDAY NIGHT, MARCH 4 


ALEXANDER 
BRATLOWSKY 


Sensational Russian Pianist 


—PROGRAM — 


SAIN SE RANGISGCO OVER UR oases eo Wesley La Violette 
(CONDUCTED BY THE COMPOSER) 
GONGERTOVFORSPIANO?B Flat Minor... 73.4. Tschaikowsky 
Mr. BRAILOWSKY 
SYNGE ELON DY SNIO eer eters is tae hie ie apes Ob ce Beethoven 


Montreux, Conducting 


Tickets $1.00 - 75c - 50c - No Tax 


FRIDAY NIGHT, MARCH 21 


KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 


First Lady of the Opera 
Epwin McArTuor, Conducting 


TUESDAY NIGHT, APRIL 15 


h YEHUDI MENUHIN 


i Brilliant Young Genius of the Violin 
iA MonrTeux, Conducting 









| | Tickets for Flagstad and Menuhin Concerts 
$1.50 - $1.00 - 75c - 50c - No Tax 


| SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE: Sherman, Clay—SUtter 1331 








quintet for woodwinds and piano, the violin solo version of his ‘cinema 
fantasy” entitled Le Boeuf sur le Toit, several of his ten string quartets, 
and the piano suites L’album de aadene Bovary, SAaraONCHe and Sau- 
dades do Brazil. Milhaud is now a member of the faculty of Mills College. 
The symphony was first performed at a concert of the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra in October, 1940, and the present is its second presenta- 
tion anywhere. Like other works of Milhaud, its forms are quite free, and 
bear little or no relationship to the traditional symphonic structures. It 
embodies the principle of constant melodic growth and evolution which 
Milhaud learned from Gédalge and which has been the guiding principle 
of his entire career. ‘he following outline was prepared. in col bouton 
with the composer. 
I 
Pastoral: Moderement animé, F, 4/4 time. This movement is described 
by Milhaud as “very melodic and quiet, with great feeling for nature.” 
Its first melodic element (Milhaud prefers this term to dhe conventional 
“theme” or “subject’’) appears at once in the flutes and first violins, 
pizzcato: 


1 

t <—— ~ 

ton gheat F 
-y ‘ + $ Lay + 





* 


Thirty measures are required for the full exposition of this melody. Then 








ANNOUNCEMENT 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
Ninth Pair of Symphony Concerts 


Friday, March 14, 2:30 Saturday, March 15, 8:30 
DOROTHY MAYNOR, Guest Artist 

PROGRAM 

Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel.......... Brahms 

(Orchestrated by Edmund Rubbra—First Performance in San Francisco) 

Aria, L’Amero Saro Costante, from J] Re Pastore....:... Mozart 

Aria, Leise, Leise, from Der Freischiitz................ Weber 
MISS MAYNOR 

San Juan Capistrano, Two Nocturnes.............. McDonald 

(First Performance in San Francisco) 

Aria, Depuiss lee Oui roOmlmIeOUISCl sacs, eee ny aes Charpentier 
MISS MAYNOR 

SUMING var eee ae Me nce oe ON Bale eeu eee ee eae Franck 


ee ae Ne eS VERE SEES, A ei EO ERY cy eg ee 
Box Office: Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland; 
Telephone SUtter 1331(San Francisco) or HIgate 1220 (Oakland) 




















SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. .. . Their 
phenominal work is a nucleous around which centers all other activities 


of the Symphony Orchestra. ‘Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 


and courage. 


We feel that not only the Association, but all the 


members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 


Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 


Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, MisOus 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, ‘Mts Benj. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 
Evans, Mrs. Harry 
Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 


Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. : 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J; D. 
Gray, Nancy 

Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs Horace 

Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs Thomas B 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 
Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Knox, Mrs. John B. 

Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 


Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Walker, ‘Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 
Wiel, Mts. Eli H. 
Whitaker, Misit. Ge. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 











JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 
PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
TEACHER of VOICE 


From Primary Beginning to Final Accomplishment 


Opera, Church and Concert Repertoire 


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| 

















its first portion is briefly developed in canon. The second major melodic 
element appears in the woodwind at the 49th bar: 








sy 
Ss es — ee ee a ee ee 
so er el memos oe Ae tie Ate tt con So oa Ra 
ieee csc cans ses ce ae cel pee oma om ee Case a ee a 
ée i ty Sn Lez rv “¢g 7 — 
ae oa —— 

SIRE enrages etie aa re ene 
seme oe Be LT iss i aay ee a ee, | 
v es = ca 

Se ee nee eee ee 
& f ? { == 4 fpr | T Yd t | Pine di soa # = 
‘ ———— See oma oom —= 


These materials are developed at some length. The second idea is then 
recalled in canon, with elements of the first, newly expressed. Example 1 
re-enters in a very calm and simple manifestation, with changes of or- 
chestration, to provide the coda. 


II 
Tres vif, A flat, 2/2 time. (“Rather dramatic and robust, with a fugue 
in the middle.”) The first two bars express a rhythmic pattern which 
recurs at intervals throughout the movement. At the third bar the wood- 
winds have the principle melodic element: 


GEIL Te ee Eiptpete ini tae oeFip in 
= aes eee 
INE SEA on a ONE ans eed 87 Se 
= ue Peep eee oe paren oats ape A | 


This is worked over with various secondary ideas not quoted, after which 
the violins have a more lyric element: 


























which is worked over in conjunction with ideas from the first part of 
the movement. A third element, more light and rapid in character, appears 
in the violins under fragmentary comments of the woodwind: 


























rene fe» for Fete $ fete tee oe NY 
Sah ast caer 1 —$ i i ——— poe BY A 8 a 7 ey me {— 
SS SS a ye 
v ——- = Seg ae eee 

52 Fy Eiigt Se ge az CERT: titre tes LIN ee 
(tee Sr ee ee 2oSee==! 
S = eae: : I at ——— 





Example 3 returns in the full orchestra. A big climax is attained, and 
following it the rhythmic pattern of the first two bars is restated. A fugue 
on Example 3 now follows. The concluding portion of the movement 
freely develops all the materials cited. 


215 











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III 


Tres modéré, G, 3/4 time. Woodwinds and horns open with a chorale, 
followed by a more tender element given to the violins: 








6 Chorale ; ¥ \ 
es SE) TESS PI a 9 Mee a a Nea i dl ESSE (TREN a FeO Sree TS BP 
an = 98 ig feed ta ge Gate pee | 4 No : 7 
La eges ee en Ce PS OP Re oe a Oem 
ae on Ss pf? ee “~—[———> ot el es 
f The dramatic element of the chorale and the more tender idea continue 


in dialogue. A new idea, expressed simultaneously in the extreme high and 
low registers of the orchestra, ensues: 











The tender theme is eventually fully expressed by the clarinet over an 
accompaniment of four solo ’celli, harp, kettledrums and gong: 


ecm a Bal ' Soe esas 
f Me Sa sy Sen or 
#O oe i O pataE +h = 
ee, 
This is worked over, with changes of instrumentation. Example 8 returns, 
and after it the chorale from the beginning of the movement, quite loud 
and full. The dialogue of dramatic and tender is compressed into alter- 
nating bars of fortissimo and pianissimo. Once more the chorale is heard, 
P now very softly, and the movement ends with a reminiscence of Example 


8 in the English horn. 





IV 


Animé, A, 2/2 time. (“Also a pastoral, but more vigorous and joyous 
6 the first.’ ") The first thirty bars are in the nature of an introduction: 


ipertise Sooo a ee ee eae 


The principle melodic element follows, in the rey strings, harp and 
woodwinds: 






























































ho 
ped 
Ot 








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This is also a lengthy idea requiring thirty bars for its full exposition. 
A new element now appears, also in strings and woodwinds: 














11 
7 GD 7 Dap Mea pe a POE WRT OP DP) AY aN SOD IS =e | 
(aorerere = YESS tea eH ae 





Example 11 is worked over with various counterpoints and suggestions 
of Example 9. After a crescendo Example 9 itself comes back in shortened 
form. Example 10 returns, its first fifteen bars superimposed on its last 
fifteen measures. After another climax a new melodic element, in the 
manner of a folk dance, appears in the woodwinds, horns and trumpets: 








Ie Titer ie~ pe eee. aS ne —~ 
ett 9 pe cette tt toot ti ff berewaa o 
ge EE Ere 0 tee tt teeter teeter ree 


This is combined with previous materials. At the end Examples 9 and 10 
are combined, and are eventually fused with Example 12 











ZINE ENE ON A TIN (Cet OA |G Ree BO Seether anne Franz Schubert 
; (1797-1828) 

The numbering and sequence of Schubert’s last symphonies has long 
been a matter of the wildest confusion. The work played on this occa- 
sion bears the number 7 on the printed score; various authorities however, 
call it Schubert’s eighth symphony, while on the labels of a recent record- 
ing it is called the ninth, and in the program books of the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra and elsewhere it 1s always numbered tenth. Yet the sub- 
ject is by no means so difficult to make sense of as some of the literature* 
would make it appear, and, although it is not particularly important, it 
may be of interest to straighten it out. 

Schubert died in great poverty and obscurity, leaving a vast number of 
his manuscripts in the possession of his brother, Ferdinand. Among these 
manuscripts were seven completed symphonies. ‘The first six of these are 
works of Schubert’s youth, composed between 1813 and 1818; the last is 
the great C major of the present program, written in 1828, the last year 
of the composer’s life. 

Ferdinand Schubert dedicated himself to making his brother’s work 
known. What he lacked in means and influence he made up in intelligence 
and energy, and his efforts were successful. In 1838 he gave the manuscript 
of the C major symphony to Robert Schumann, who was instrumental in 
having it performed under Mendelssohn’s direction in Leipzig in 1839, 
and it was published in 1850 as Schubert’s seventh symphony. 

In 1865 the Unfinished symphony in B minor came to light, and was 
promptly dubbed Number Eight, despite the fact that it had been written 
in 1822, six years before the C major. (Fortunately for everybody, Schu- 
bert always dated his manuscripts.) Three years later another unfinished 


*Including, alas, the notes by the present writer published in this program book 
when the symphony was last played by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, in 1938. 











VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO : TU xeEpo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 




















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Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 


Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
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Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 





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symphony by Schubert came to the attention of the world at large. ‘This 
is a sketch for a work in four movements in the key of E major, which 
Schubert apparently dashed off in a few hours in the summer of 1821 and 
never returned to. The manuscript of this had been given to Mendelssohn 
by Ferdinand Schubert; neither, apparently, had regarded it as anything 
but a useless fragment, since, unlike the unfinished symphony in B minor, 
it does not contain any completed movements. In 1868 this manuscript was 
presented to Sir George Grove by Paul Mendelssohn, the composer's 
brother. Grove was much interested in it, and was responsible for having 
it completed by John Francis Barnett, and this version was performed in 
London in 1883. Grove gave the manuscript to the Royal College of 
Music in London, where it is today. Another completed version of it 
was made by Felix Weingartner in 1928 and published in 1934; so far as 
| know this symphony has never been performed in any version in this 
country. Since it dates from 1821, it may obviously be regarded Schubert's 
real seventh symphony. 


Sir George Grove believed that between the B minor Unfinished 
(which was correctly numbered eight, if for incorrect reasons) and the 
big C major of 1828, Schubert had written another symphony, during an 
excursion to Gastein in the Tyrol in the summer of 1825. ‘This would 
then be the ninth symphony, and the big C major would be the tenth. 
But the manuscript of the symphony composed at Gastein has never been 
found, and some authorities doubt if it ever existed. One school of critics 
holds that Schubert’s Grand Duo for piano four hands, Opus 140, may be 
a transcription of the lost Gastein symphony; this has been orchestrated 
by Joseph Joachim, and the reasons for regarding the duo as a transcribed 
symphony are set forth in Sir Donald Francis ‘Tovey’s notes on the Joachim 
version in his Essays in Musical Analysis. 


In other words, one may make out a case for calling Schubert's last 
symphony Number Eight, Number Nine or Number Ten, depending 
upon one’s attitudes toward the E major sketch and the mysterious Gas- 
tein; the only positively incorrect number is seven, the number by which 
it is most widely known. 


I 
Andante, C major 4/4 time. Two horns give out the theme of the 
long and extremely important introduction: 





This is worked over through several repetitions. Toward the end of the 
introduction the bouncing rhythm of the principal subject to come (Ex- 
ample 2) is suggested. 


The tempo changes to Allegro ma non troppo and the time signature 
to alla breve as the first theme of the main movement is given out by the 
strings, interrupted by pulsating triplets of the woodwinds which are 
not quoted: 





A second portion of this theme follows very shortly in-the violins: 


219 








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This is briefly worked over, and leads to the second theme, one of those 
typically Schubertian melodies that waver between the modes. It is stated 
by the oboes, beginning in E minor and ending in the orthodox dominant 
key of G major: 





After some working over of this material, also, the trombones softly in- 
tone a closing theme derived from the introduction: 





A reminiscence of Example 2, but in G major, concludes the exposition. 
cony The development is comparatively short and very clear in content, 
taking Examples 2, 3 and 4 through various keys and relatively uncompli- 
cated combinations. Toward the end Example 5 is introduced, and the 
transition to the recapitulation, hushed and mysterious in feeling, is based 








oa on this figure. 

The recapitulation begins with Example 2 again in the strings, as at 
the beginning of the main movement. ‘The thematic material is reviewed 
a in regular and orthodox fashion, with Example 4 beginning in C minor. 

The trombones again have Example 5 as concluding theme. The coda, 















= one : : A ) : 
marked pit moto, is based mainly on the scale-wise progressions of 
Example 3, but the movement ends with a grandly sonorous return to 
the theme of the introduction. 
II 
—— Andante con moto, A minor, 2/4 time. Seven bars of introduction 
establish the rhythm. The theme then appears in the solo oboe: 
ee 
—— The clarinet joins the oboe for a few bars of repetition, whereupon the 
instrument first heard brings in the sequel to its melody in the key of 
A major: 
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2a 








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RUDOLPH GANZ, Conducting 


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7a 








This is worked over at length by the entire orchestra. A placid chord of 
the horns and bassoons introduces the second theme, in F major, begun 
by the second violins and continued by the first violins and clarinet: 





oe IN SA Be sede 
This, too, is subjected to development. Echoing calls of the horn and 
strings signalize the return of the first theme (Examples 6 and 7), which 
the oboe now resumes, with decorative countersubjects in the trumpet 
and strings. he working over at length achieves a climax, after which 
there is a sudden pause, and the ‘cellos return to Example 6 in a placid, 
consoling version. 

Now the key changes to A major, and the flute and clarinet go back 
to the second theme (Example 8) above much figuration in the strings. 
This passage, too, is climactic and dramatic, but gradually dies down. ‘The 
key finally goes back to A minor, and the oboe restates Example 6 for the 
last time. It is worth noting that Example 7, always heretofore in the 
major, remains in the minor as the movement comes to its end. 


III 
Allegro vivace, CG major, 3/4 time. A scherzo in sonata form, its 
principal subject beginning thus in the strings: 












This is immediately answered by the woodwinds. The strings return to 
Example 9 in a slightly altered version, leading eventually to the second 
theme of the movement, also given out by the violins, in the key of G: 





Example 9 returns to conclude the exposition, and the entire exposition 
section is then repeated. The second half of the scherzo is given over 
to the much condensed development and the recapitulation of these 
materials. 

The trio goes into A major. It is introduced by repeated notes of 
the horns, after which the woodwinds give out a long melody beginning: 





After the trio, based entirely on Example 11 and its sequel, the reiterated 

notes of the horn come back again, heralding the repetition of the scherzo. 
The movement goes back to its opening (Example 9) and the entire 

Scherzo portion, up to the beginning of the trio, is heard once more. 


IV 


Allegro vivace, C major, 2/4 time. The finale opens with a loud 


unison call from the full orchestra, answered by a triplet figure from 
the Strings, piano: 


223 








Os Ou! 


P 





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These two rhythms, the dotted eighth and sixteenth and the triplet, 
will be heard incessantly through the movement, which contains scarcely 
a single bar without the one or the other. 

A second portion of the principal theme is heard shortly after in the 
oboes, with the strings twisting about it in triplets: 





Repetitions of these materials, plus a rising and descending scale in the 
dotted rhythm, lead eventually to a big C major chord and a dramatic 
pause. Then, after four repeated notes in the horn, there rises the second 
theme, given to the woodwinds, with the strings harping persistently on 
the triplet by way of accompaniment: 





This is worked over, and the exposition concludes with a repetition of 


the busy scales in the dotted rhythm and huge rising chords in the 
trombones and horns climbing seven-league stairs in seven-league boots. 
But the exposition quiets down in its last bars with a string tremolo, which 
continues into the first bars of the development. 


The development, like the corresponding division of the first move- 
ment, is short. At its outset the oboes, over the tremolo and the dotted 
rhythm, illustrate how much the bracketed motif in Example 14 is in- 
debted to the finale of Beethoven’s ninth symphony. Elsewhere in the 
development the four repeated notes of Example 14 ring out like the 
trumpets of Judgment. The section ends with repeated reminiscences of 
the little call with which the movement had opened. (Example 12, first 
two bars.) ‘These become more insistent, and eventually bring in the 
recapitulation. 


The recapitulation begins with Example 12, but in the highly un- 
orthodox key of E flat major. Example 13 is reheard, and the transition 
to Example 14, much as in the exposition. Example 14 itself comes back 
in regular fashion, and the stair-climbing concluding theme. The coda 
combines Examples 12, 13 and 14 in a new development, bringing the 
movement to a triumphant close. 





PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DICTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 





"CELLOS: 

BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 

DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 
KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLIT!, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY GC. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, ROY 


PICCOLO: 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIVO, LESLIE J. 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScCHIvo, LESLIE J. 


CLARINETS: 
SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RuUDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
CLOW, RAY 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
RUDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


CONDUCTOR 


BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HArYE, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 

JAKOB, JOS. 
GEHRING, CONRAD 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND S&S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
STORCH, WALTER 


TROMBONES: 


Gios!, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


ORGAN: 


ALTMANN, LUDWIG 


LIBRARIAN AND 
PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 





226 














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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


PRESENTS THE 


| SAN PRANGISCO 
| SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
G200N 0D 06° On 


2g 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
HOWARD kh. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 




















COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
the above advertisement? . . . Now read it again, and think 
how fully a corporate executor meets each qualification. 

A trust company is never ill; it is never away. It can be counted 
upon to be present and ready to serve when the time comes. 
The officers of a trust company have a daily familiarity with 
probate procedure, the administration of property, and the 
affairs of your estate. 










SEE YOUR LAWYER ABOUT YOUR WILL TODAY 






of Sed (See Sa eee & Drees eA hed en Bihan: Nie: 


Wells Fargo Bank 
& Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery . . . . Market at Grant Avenue 
SeAG NE -ECRTAIN CSG © 


MEMBER F. D. I. C. 





















THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


GERICERS 


Mrs. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY . . 
PAUL A. BISSINGER . . 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


DR. HANS BARKAN 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

MiSS LOUISE A. BoYybD 

MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 
MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


MRS. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 


DR. HANS BARKAN 


VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTiE D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

Mrs. MARCUS S&S. KOSHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. LEO ELOESSER 


JOHN A. McGREGOR ... =. 
HOWARD K. SKINNER .. .« -« 
GERALD G. ROSS 


TREASURER 
SECRETARY 
ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


Guioo J. Musto 

MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. SLoss 
Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 


J. B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. NORRIS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


PHILIP N. BOONE 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


Gs [oh lee IM ieflistei- 


Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND . 
Mrs. M. GC. SLoss. Sa 
Mrs. H. R. MCKINNON. 

MRs. JOHN P. COGHLAN. 

MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER. 
Mrs. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM... 


PHILIP & BOONE. ; 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS. 
MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRs. LEONORA WooD ARMSBY 
G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
MRS. GEORGE W. BAKER, UR. 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

MRS. EDWARD O. BARTLETT 
ALBERT M. BENDER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 

Miss LouISeE A. BoyYob 
Mrs. F. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

GEORGE T. CAMERON 

MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN 
MRS. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE 
MRS. W. W. CROCKER 

Mrs. O. K. CUSHING 

MRS. GEORGES DE LATOUR 
MISS KATHARINE DONOHOE 
JOSEPH H. DYER, UR. 

MRS. FRANK EDOFF 

SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 

ALBERT |. ELKus 

DR. LEQ ELOESSER 
FORREST ENGELHART 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


oe Sh lalish on ne uewiet vain - - - GHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 
. CHAIRMAN WOMEN’S FINANCE COMMITTEE 


. VICE-CHAIRMAN, 


HENRY EVERS 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


- TICKET SALES AND PUBLICITY 
- YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
TICKET SALES 

- Box SALES 
. SYMPHONY GUILD 


eye tector © ae - SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


. HONORARY CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
. VICE-CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


MRS. PAUL I. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 

JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTie D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS 
Mrs. LEON GUGGENHIME 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S&S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

Mes E. S&S. HELLER 
WALTER S&S. HELLER 

Mrs. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
GAETANO MEROLA 

C. O. G. MILLER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
ROBERT W. MILLER 
EDWARD F. MOFFATT 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Guipo J. Musto 

DWIGHT F. MCCORMACK 
MRS. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 


JOHN A. MCGREGOR 

MRS. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 
R. C. NEWALL 

CHARLES G. NORRIS 
CHARLES PAGE, UR. 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
Mrs. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 
OTTORING RONCHI 


MRS. HENRY P. RUSSELL 
Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss 

Mrs. Nicol SMITH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 
MRS. POWERS SYMINGTON 
MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG- 


TAYLOR 
JOSEPH &S. THOMPSON 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 
Mrs. CYRIL TOBIN 
THOMAS J. WATSON 
MICHEL WEILL 
Mrs. Ev! H. WIEL 
LEONARD E. Woop 
J. D. ZELLERBACH 


251 








After the last note of the Symphony 


THE CONCERT IS YOURS 
im your Record Library! 


DOROTHY MAYNOR 

The outstanding discovery of the music 
world during the past year, was the phe- 
nomenal voice of this extraordinary so- 
prano. Her records to date include the 
following: 

PO IVICA. LAG Yh Aah eaten. Prades tye Schubert 
It is interesting to compare Miss May- 
nor’s interpretation of this classic with 
that of Marian Anderson. Victor record 


[5752>.> =. “other side. “Gretchen. Am 
Spinnrade.” 12-inch. $1.00. 
MAGI Ge DER ss... of wes a Mozart 


Pamina’s Aria, “Ach, Ich Fuhl’s”’ with 
“Oh Sleep! Why Dost Thou Leave Me” 
on the opposite side. Victor 15826. 12- 
inch. $1.00. 





For the most complete selec- 


~ tions of popular and classical 
Hear these musical gems soon . . they’re recordings, visit our Mezza- 
valuable additions to any record library! nine Record Salon. 





For better values 
see our wide range of 
RADIOS * PHONOGRAPHS 
COMBINATIONS 
RADIO—PHONOGRAPH— 
RECORDERS 


A Radio For Every Price Group! 





Radio-Record Salon, Mezzanine 





232 * 


af 





A 
B 
C 
D 


G 


H 


M 


O 





FRIDAY BOX HOLDERS 


Mrs. Pierre Monteux 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby 


Mrs. George Washington Baker, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Winston Cowgill 
Mrs. Frank P. Deering 

Mrs. Frank W. Fuller 

Mrs. Thomas Carr Howe, Jr. 
Mrs. L. D. Howard 

Mrs. John S. Logan 


Mrs. Arthur Brown, Jr. 

Mrs. Phillip E. Bowles 

Mrs. Dunn Dutton 

Mrs. Frederick Hussey 

Mrs. Samuel Knight 

Mrs. Roger Lapham 

Mrs. Richard McCreery 

Mrs. Ashton Potter 

Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 


Mrs. Spencer Grant 
Mrs. A. J. Lowrey 

Mrs. Frank G. Noyes 
Mrs. William P. Roth 
Miss Else Schilling 

Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Miss Johanna Volkmann 
Mrs. Dean Witter 

Mrs. J. B. Wright 


Mrs. Alfred Ghirardelli 
Mrs. J. D. Goodfellow 

Mrs. Gustav Knecht 

Mrs. Maxwell C. Milton 
Mrs. William Orrick 

Mrs. William C. Volkmann 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant 


Mrs. George Bowles 

Mrs. Edward H. Clark, Jr. 
Mrs. Donald Gregory 

Mrs. Osgood Hooker, Sr. 
Mr. Osgood Hooker, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Monteagle 


Mrs. Parker Toms 


Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss 


Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Fleishhacker 


Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Levison 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Blyth 


Mr. and Mrs. George T. Cameron 
Mr. and Mrs. Nion R. Tucker 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Norris 


Mrs. Walter D. Heller 
Mrs. Morris Meyerfield 
Mrs. George Oppen 

Mrs. Richard H. Shainwald 


O 


~ 


W 


Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz 
Mrs. George Fuller 

Mrs. W. Parmer Fuller,]Jr. 
Mrs W. Parmer Fuller III 
Miss Virginia Lowrey 
Miss Bernice Roth 

Miss Lurline Roth 

Miss Virginia Volkmann 


Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley 


Mrs. Edward Otis Bartlett 
Mrs. Charles N. Black 

Mrs. Eldrid Boland 

Mrs. Georges deLatour 

Mrs. Frederick W. McNear 
Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller 
Marquise de Pins 


Mrs. Otto Barkan 

Mrs. Richard Heimann 
Mrs. Gerald F. Herrmann 
Mr. William F. Leib 
Mrs. Robert Watt Miller 
Mrs. Harry H. Scott 

Lady Tennyson 


Mrs. R. Stanley Dollar 
Mrs. William Earl Graham 
Mrs. William Hume 

Mrs. James Irvine 

Mrs. Joseph R. Knowland 
Mrs. Walton N. Moore 
Mrs. Frank Hunt Proctor 
Mrs. Ernest J. Sweetland 


Mrs. Prentiss Cobb Hale 


Mrs. Henry Boyen 

Mrs. Arthur Bowles Cahill 
Mrs. Arthur J. Crocker 
Countess Alessandro Dandini 
Mrs. John L. Flynn 

Mrs= Peter ba Kyne 

Mrs. James F. McNulty 

Mrs. ‘Theodore Wores 


Mrs. George Porter Baldwin 
Mrs. Frank J. Edoff 

Mrs. Laurence Fletcher 

Mrs. George Force 

Mrs Harold Force 

Mrs. R. C. Force 

Mrs. L. M. Giannini 

Miss Florence Williams 


Mrs. Reed J. Bekins 

Mrs. George Edwin Bennett 
Mrs. Clarence Loran Johnston 
Mrs. James A. McKee 

Mrs. Arthur S$. Musgrave 


Mrs. Frank E. Buck 
Mrs. Ralph K. Davies 
Mrs. J. Lindsay Hanna 
Mrs. James Levensaler 
Mrs. Olga Meyer 

Mrs. Frank Summers 













a surveals#’s 
touch with a 











N Cw F Orms 
for F lowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 








Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 
TORSO. wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR .. . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT .. . with daisies in the crown 
DUCK . . Cafries a mixed bouquet on his back 


Exclusive with 


~’ SLOANE 


SUTTER near GRANT 











See 


ee aS 





PRD pe 
Bios 






«5 Mayet Wa 


aN 












mea 






wate en 
:. Cnt Grte a 


seas 


. * : Zz: : re F 6 
ticeuE sin ey: 







San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 









PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Ww 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Fripay, MArcu 14, 2:30 P. M. 


SATURDAY, Marcu 15, 8:30 P. M. 
Soloist, DOROTHY MAYNOR, Soprano 


Program 
VARIATIONS AND FUGUE ON A 
TENE BY ELLAND OILS 2406 Se ae Brahms 


ORCHESTRATED BY EDMUND RUBBRA, FIRST PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO 


RA ek AMERO. SAR@ COSA N TE 


RON EE SRA) CO) EGE e eee wae sear Mozart 
ARLAS LEISE LEIS: FROM 
OW EIR d BY Dy SG a Ef NS AI Aa i Maar ae A Re Rn nem tage ate cle Weber 


Miss MAYNOR 


PRY VO) SEN GC) @GIEUERIN GS 20 ars. &. detenein mentees ack ees McDonald 
The Mission 
Fiesta 
First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO 
ARTA DE PUSS EE JOURS: 
Habs IN oles GIES eS hcl eek foe Se nees o Charpentier 


Miss MAYNOR 
eNG@s the ke Vin oro lEOen 


CLAERCHEN’S DEATH, 
eye @) eee eV) ING eke ose ere ne et oe re Beethoven 


PLAYED IN MEMORY OF ALBERT M. BENDER 


SNe LEHI NOV ly IN LAN) ioe oe Set Ne ey og Ee cts cae Franck 
Lento — Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto 
Allegro non troppo 


Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ 
Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 
These affairs are open to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 























SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


HERE IS HOW THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN 
FRANCISCO STANDS FINANCIALLY FOR THE 
PRESENT SEASON: 


Receipts: 


236 





Present 


Deficit 


10% 
About 
$20,000 







San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
War Memorial Opera House 


San Francisco, California 
Please accept (or add to) my contribution in the amount of 


Saco ren SS Erol Nes od (Ua! Ge cea eh Sere Dollars (Sa eee ss s) 
which is enclosed herewith as my portion toward extinguishing this 
year’s deficit. 











There is a side to our Symphony Orchestra which may be prosaic, but 
which at the moment is all important with respect to maintaining the 
orchestra at its present peak. The Orchestra is under contract to the Musi- 
cal Association for eighteen weeks of each year. In that time 52 concerts are 
given, and to cover the cost of paying the orchestra, conductor, guest 
artists, promotion, rent of the Opera House, advertising, etc., $210,000.00 
is necessary. 


This sum is secured in several ways: First of course by the sale of season 
boxes and tickets; next by the concerts which are sold to other organiza- 
tions, such as the Art Commission of San Francisco, the Standard Oil 
Thursday evening programs, and an occasional concert at one of our 
colleges. 


Although the sum derived from these sources of revenue is considerable, 
it does not meet the amount required for our season's expenditures, and 
this is where you who are really deeply interested in the welfare of our 
city’s most beautiful music come forward with gifts of money to help in 
balancing the budget. The budget has been kept out of the red just be- 
cause we have all of you who are vitally and courageously interested in the 
welfare of the Symphony to assist us. 


Perhaps you ask yourselves, “Why do we all accept the task which is 
put upon us every year of making up the differences out of our pockets be- 
tween what the concerts can earn and what they cost to produce?” One 
answer is because we love and enjoy our symphony and are proud of it. 
This is true, of course, but there is a larger aspect to the picture than this. 
Our Symphony is a symbol of the strength and ability of our city to hold 
its own among the other great cities of America. Every metropolis knows 
the value of a beautiful orchestra in promoting its prestige to the world 
at large. London, New York, Boston, Philadelphia and San Francisco are 
all admired for their magnificent orchestras. 3 


So great and steady and acknowledged a force an orchestra is felt to be 
that the London Philharmonic Orchestra now plays to countless thousands 
throughout all England in the shelter of tents or any spot where crowds 
may collect to listen. 


In the face of what music means to the world in fair or turbulent 
times, it is well for us to accept gratefully our proportionate share of look- 
ing after the welfare of the Symphony. In return, your orchestra will tide 
you through the moods and anxieties which may be ahead of you, for music 
is in the heart, and there is rhythm in the pulse beat of us all, and we long 
in imagination to be part of music, even though we are only listeners. 


Our campaign for needed funds for the orchestra is now under way 
and we hope and rely on your making possible a successful season by your 
contribution, large or small, to the MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN 
FRANCISCO, WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE, SAN FRANCISCO. 


LEONORA Woop ARMSBY. 


ho 
655 
~I 








SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE ; 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 





its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . ‘Their 
phenomenal work as a nucleus around which centers all other activities £ 
of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise cannot be given this group g 


who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 


and courage. 


.. We feel that not only the Association, but all the / 


members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 


Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 


Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 


Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 


Bentley, Mrs. Charles H 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 

Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 


Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 


Bullard, Mrs. Robert P 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 


Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 


deLatour, Mrs. George 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H 


Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 


Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 
Evans, Mrs. Harry 
Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 


1030 BUSH SrtT., 


LARGE STocK QO 
HARPS - 





ARPS -Kajotan Ald 


Ve INS aes Cl ce Gonos GaN secs 


RENTAL HARPS 
ACCESSORIES 


Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 

Force, Mrs. R. C 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 

Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 

Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. 

Jr. Gray, Nancy 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Hartis, “Mrs: L, W: 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 

; Hepburn, Miss Louise 

; Howard, Mrs Horace 

Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 

Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. 

Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 

Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 

. Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 

Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 

Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 

Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 

Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 

Knox, Mrs. John B. 

Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 

F. Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 

Ife. McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 


Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyrii 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 
Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 
Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 





740 PINE STREET 





SAN FRANCISCO, PHONE OR 6367 


REPAIR SHOP 
9114 S. BUDLONG AVE. 
Los ANGELES, CALIF. 


F FINE 


JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 
PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
TEACHER of VOICE 
From Primary Beginning to Final Accomplishment 
Opera, Church and Concert Repertoire 


EXbrook 4366 



















PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


VARIATIONS AND FUGUE ON A THEME 
BY SECAIN DE © Raise Ate Bee es en ae Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 
(ORCHESTRATED BY EDMUND RUBBRA) 

This work, which is not to be confused with the same composer’s Varia- 
tions ona Theme by Joseph Haydn, Opus 56, is, in its original version, the 
biggest and most erandly sonorous of Brahms’ several sets of variations for 
piano solo. Many critics have read orchestral effects into its texture, and 
it is quite likely that other orchestrations of it exist. 

The theme (which Rubbra gives to trumpets and drums at the outset, 
in the manner of a Handelian Renee) comes from one of Handel's key- 
board suites. The 18th century composer provided five variations Lor 11; 
Brahms gives 1t 25 variations anda big fugue by way of finale. 

Romina Rubbra was born in E1 igland in 1901. He isa pupil of Holst 
and Vaughan Williams, and has composed much in many forms. His 
Brahms transcription, which dates from 1938, bears the opus number 47 
in his list of works. 


ARTA} GAMERO-SAR OG: COS TAN TE, 
|B RCO iY Oy GY ey hy eed lead LON ard alors Deere et ure aan W.A. Mozart 
(1756-1791) 
Il Re Pastore (The Shepherd King) is the tenth of Mozart's 22 operas, 
composed in 1775 for the entertainment of the Archduke Maximilian of 


























} 
EIGHTH ANNUAL 
AUGUST, 1941 
6 
NINE CONCERTS 
Series A Series B Series C 
Dtlyoeon August 7 August 14 
August 2 August 9 August 16 
ees 3 August 10 August 17 
at Tanglewood, between Stockbridge and Lenox, Mass. 


SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor 


Subscription Prices 
for One Series of Three Concerts 
Front Section—$7.50 Rear Section—$4.50 
Front Section-—$6.00 Rear Section——$3.00 
(Double or triple the price for two or three series) 
(Subscriptions are limited to 1800 per series) 


Single Concert Prices: $3.00, $2.50, $2.00, $1.50 
e 


For Reservations and Information: 


BERKSHIRE SYMPHONIC FESTIVAL, INC. 
Stockbridge, Mass., or 113 West 57th Street, New York City 


eee 


a a ee 





239 











‘THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


announces z 


ANNUAL “EASTER” CONCERT 


of the a 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


featuring 


BASIL RATHBONE 


Narrator in ‘‘Peter and the Wolf’’ 


—PROGRAM— 


Overtaresto, he Blvino-Dutchimatie.:.e.. Wagner 
Syinphonysins bomainor, . Untnished =s2 2. Schubert 
BR eter anche. WVOLE ses a eek anne le ane eet Prokofieff 


*BASIL RATHBONE, Narrator 


Suite from “Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme”’ Richard Strauss 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 


Thus Diodes abalinUsthane eo acne aang! Richard Strauss 
*Mr. Rathbone has just made a recording of “Peter and the Wolf” 
with Leopold Stokowski. 


Ticket Prices 
ORCHESTRA, $2.50 and $2.00 > GRAND TIER $2.50 and $2.00 
DRESS GIR GLE-SI-b5 2 BALCONY CIRCLE, $1.25 
BALCONY, 75¢ : BOX SEATS, $2.75 
TAX EXEMPT 
Mail Orders Now Accepted 
Tickets on General Sale, Monday, March 24 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICES: Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco 
and Oakland. Telephone SUtter 1331 (San Francisco) or 
HIgate 1220 (Oakland). 


OPERA HOUSE Sc eS. 











240) 








Austria when he visited Salzburg. The libretto is by the protean Pietro 
Metastasio, whose texts were set by hundreds of 18th century composers. 
(There are settings of // Re Pastore by at least five other musicians beside 
Mozart.) The story, in simplest outline, is that Alexander the Great de- 
cides to make a shepherd named Aminta king of Sidon, but Aminta refuses 
to accept the throne when he learns that it means giving up his shepherdess- 
love, Elisa. Eventually the faithfulness of Aminta and Elisa touches Alex- 
ander’s heart, and he permits Aminta to make Elisa his queen. 

Although this famous aria is now sung exclusively by women, it was 
written for one of the male sopranos who, in the mid-eighteenth century, 
interpreted the leading masculine roles in opera. ‘This is Aminta speaking, 
and the drift of his expression is not much different from that of a certain 
broadcast made by an ex-king of England on December 11, 1936. 


L’amero, saro costante: Her I'll love, and love forever: 

Fido sposo e fido amante, Spouse e’er loyal and faithful lover, 
Sol per lei sospirero! For her only I breathe and live! 

In si caro e dolce oggetto, In that dear one my bliss I’m finding, 
La mia gioja, il mio diletto, Pure delight, joy, together binding, 
La mia pace io troverero. With the quiet sweet peace can give. 


(English version by Isidora Martinez.) 


ARPA»? LEISED LBisk.. EROM 
Oe Pew ON EY FEN Ce BU OVS Pe Te cits Karl Maria Von Weber 
(1786-1826) 
Kuno, chief of the forest rangers in the service of Prince Ottokar, has 
promised his daughter, Agatha, in marriage to the winner of a contest in 
marksmanship. Agatha is in love with Max, one of Kuno’s rangers, but Max 


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BEFORE THE SYMPHONY 





Continental Buffet Luncheon in the Garden Court 


GLEN GRAY AND HIS ORCHESTRA PLAY NIGHTLY 
(Except Monday) AND AT SATURDAY TEA DANSANTS 


THE PALACE HOTEL 








DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
By a 
GREAT AMERICAN INSTITUTION 


‘Che 


BOSTON 
are re 
Ome 





Now uses the Baldwin in Its Concerts 


fre, ~ 
S16 SUtsheER Si, 4 alpinint 1828 WEBSTER ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO DAKLAND 





2AZ 








fails to win the contest. He resolves to go with Caspar, another forest 
ranger, to the lair of an evil spirit named Samiel, there to obtain magic 
bullets with which he may hit any target. 

In the second act of the opera Agatha is alone, awaiting a visit from 


: Max. She sings: 
: RECITATIVE 
Wie nahte mir der Schlummer How tranquilly I slumber’d 
Bevor ich ihn geseh’n? — sefore on him TI gazed! 
Ja, Liebe pflegt mit Kummer But evermore with sorrow 
Stets Hand in Hand zu geh’n! Love hand in hand must go. 
Ob Mond auf seinem Pfad wohl lacht! The moon reveals her silv’ry light! 


(She draws the curtain from before the bal- 
cony; a bright starlit night is seen over the 
landscape.) 

Welch’ schéne Nacht! Oh lovely night! 
(She steps upon the balcony and folds her 
hands in prayer.) 


ARIA 
Leise, leise Softly sighing, 
Fromme Weise! Day is dying, 
Schwing’ dich auf zum Sternenkreise. Soar my prayer heav’nward flying! 
Lied, erschalle! Starry splendor 
Feiernd walle Yonder shining 





Pour on us thy radiance tender! 
(Looking out.) 


Mein Gebet zur Himmelschalle! 


O wie hell die goldnen Sterne. How the golden stars are burning 
Mit wie reinem Glanz’ sie gliih’n! Thro’ yon vault of ether blue 
Nur dort in der Berge Ferne, But lo, gath’ring o’er the mountains 
Scheint ein Wetter aufzuzieh’n. Is a cloud, foreboding storm, 

Dort am Wald’ auch schwebt ein Heer And along yon pinewood’s side, 

Dust’rer Wolken dumpf und schwer. — Veils of darkness slowly glide. 

7u dir wende Lord, watch over me, 

Ich die Hinde, I implore thee, 

Herr ohn’ Anfang und ohn’ Ende! Humbly bending I adore thee, 

Vor Gefahren Thou hast tried us, 

Uns zu wahren, Ne’er denied us, 

Sende deine Engelschaaren! — Let the holy angels guide us! 
Alles pflegt schon lingst der Ruh; Earth has lulled her care to rest; 

Trauter Freund! was weilest du? Why delays my loit’ring love? 

Ob mein Ohr auch angstlich lauscht, Fondly beats my anxious breast: 
Nur der Tannen Wipfel rauscht, Where, my love, dost thou rove? 
Nur das Birkenlaub im Hain Scarce the breeze among the boughs 
Fliistert durch die bange Stille; Wakes a murmur thro’ the silence, 

Nur die Nachtigall und Grille Save the nightingale lamenting, 
Scheint der Nachluft sich zu freu’n. — Not a sound disturbs the night. 
Doch wie? Triigt mich mein Ohr? But hark! doth my ear deceive? 
Dort Klingt’s wie Schritte — I heard a footstep, 
Dort aus der Tannen Mitte There in the pinewood’s shadow, 
Kommt was hervor — I see a form! 
Er ist’s! Er ist’s! ’Tis he, ’tis he! 
Die Flagge der Liebe mag wehen! O love, I will give thee a sign, 


(She waves a white handkerchief to him.) 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 


‘Trustees of the War Memorial. 
Bid * * * 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 


OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 








THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Presents 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


LAST THREE PROGRAMS 
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 28, 2:30 O’CLOCK 
SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 29, 8:30 O’CLOCK 


ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 


SINFONIA CONCERTANTE for Wind Instruments & Orchestra Mozart 





SINFONIA CONCERTANTE for Piano and Orchestra... .: Szymanowski 
MAXIM SCHAPIRO, Assisting Artist 
SVIMPHONTA. «LD ONESLICA cs chiens Se aa eee Richard Strauss 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 4, 2:30 O’CLOCK 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 5, 8:30 O’CLOCK 


ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
BRANDENBURG GONGERTOSIN@oiline ae ae tere ieee eee Bach 


GOLORSS VALTER HON Vee ts oe se aie Se ee Ca eee Arthur Bliss 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 
Conducted by the Composer 


STE BREED LD Sols at Segre ee ge ea heen tee tee We ee ies nes Wagner 
Suites No. 1 AND No. 2 from Daphnis WLM OWLOC no eee Ravel 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 18, 2:30 O’?CLOCK 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 19, 8:30 O’?CLOCK 


Soloist: JOSE ITURBI, Pianist 


PROGRAM 
SWINEP FON NO sa eerste hen ee eee Fea er, og Beethoven 
CONCERTO for Piano and Orchestra in A minor.......: Schumann 
Mr. IrursBI 
INO GRURN EIN Ot isso 2 ote a ee res eS eet es Edwin Stringham 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 

SET BESS An eee cee ee, ate OLR Te net yh Mike! Hols. kee pS Debussy 
TICKETS: FRIDAY 55¢ to $2.75 — — — SATURDAY 55¢ to $1.25 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE, SHERMAN, CLAY — SUtter 1331 





244 











Dein Madchen wacht 

Noch in der Nacht — 
Er scheint mich noch nicht zu sehen — 
Gott! tauscht das Licht 
Des Mondes nicht, 


So Schmiickt ein Blumenstrauss den Hut— 


Gewiss, er hat den besten Schuss gethan! 
Das kiindet Gliick ftir morgen an! 


O siisse Hoffnung! Neu belebter Muth! — 


Alle meine Pulse schlagen, 

Und das Herz wallt ungestum, 
Siiss entziickt entgegen ihm! 
Konnt’ ich das zu hoffen wagen? 
Ja, es wandte sich das Gltick 

Zu dem theuern Freund zuriick, 
Will sich morgen treu bewahren! 
Ist’s nicht Téuschung, ist’s nicht Wahn?e 





Thy maiden waits 

Through storm and shine. 

He seems not to see me yet, 
Heav’n, can it be I see aright? 


With flow’ry wreath his hat is bound! 
Success at last our hopes have crown’d. 
What bliss tomorrow’s dawn will bring! 
Oh! joyful token, hope renews my soul! 
How every pulse is flying, 

And my heart beats loud and fast, 

We shall meet in joy at last! 

Could I dare to hope such rapture? 
Frowning Fate at last relents, 

And to crown our love consents, 

Oh what joy for us tomorrow, 

Am I dreaming? Is this true? 


Himmel, nimm des Dankes Zahren Bounteous heav’n, my heart shall praise 


thee 


Fiir dies Pfand der Hoffnung an! For this hope of rosy hue. 


SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, 
SEAW Os ING Gal BRENIG Ser cated wat oan tena, te tee Harl McDonald 
(1899-) 

Mr. McDonald has written as follows concerning the work to be heard 
at these concerts: 

“San Juan Capistrano was composed in the latter part of 1938. ‘The 
music is meant to reflect two scenes in the little mission community of 
Capistrano which lies near the Mexican border in California. For nearly 
three hundred years the mission has dominated the town and its inhabi- 
tants. Except for an occasional automobile, at which children stare as it 
passes through, life in Capistrano goes on in much the same fashion as it 
did a century or two ago. 

“The first movement, The Mission, opens in a quiet vein suggesting the 
tranquillity of early evening. Occasionally the soft music of the strings 1s 
punctuated by the sound of mission bells. Faintly, from a distant proces- 
sion, comes a strain reminiscent of a seventeenth century ecclesiastical 
melody, and gradually the chanting and the clangor of the bells engulf 
the scene. As the procession disappears in the mission the subdued and 
languorous music of the opening passages is heard again. 

“The second nocturne, Fiesta, pictures the community baile or danza 
which is held in the mission-square. The movement opens with the fast 
Spanish-Colonial Jota in 6-8, 3-4 rhythm; there is an abrupt climax and 
the music then pictures the ever-popular danza-dueto in Habanero tempo. 
A return of the Jota music brings the piece to a close, fortissimo.” 

Harl McDonald was born on a ranch near Boulder, Colorado, but grew 
up in Southern California. He studied music with his mother and also at 
the University of Redlands and the University of California, at the Leip- 
zig Conservatory, and with various private teachers in this country and 
abroad. He was a member of the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania 
from 1927 to 1939, and was head of the music department of that institu- 
tion from 1933. He is now manager of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

He has composed four symphonies, two piano concertos, many choral 
works and a good deal of chamber music. The rhumba from his Rhumba 
Symphony and his Three Poems on Traditional Aramaic Themes have 


Pas) 











been presented in San Francisco by the Philadelphia Orchestra, and the 
San Francisco String Quartet has played his Quartet on Negro Themes. 


ARTA DEPUIS.LE TOURS 
JL COUN BV EX ONC) Ny De aes ton Sane ae Me Beek e Gustave Charpentier 
(1860-) 
Louise, the Parisian seamstress who has left her workaday home to live 
with the poet, Julien, stands in the garden of their cottage on the Butte 
Montmarte overlooking Paris. She turns to Julien: 


Depuis le jour ott je me suis donnée Since the day when I gave me unto you, 

Toute fleurie semble ma destinée. Radiant with flowers seems my fate. 

Je crois rever sous un ciel de féerie, I seem to dream under a fairyland heaven, 

L’ame encore grisée de ton premier baiser. My soul still drunk from your first kiss. 

Quelle belle vie! Mon réve n’était pas How beautiful is life! My dream has not 
un réve! been a dream. 

Ah! Je suis heureuse! Ah! I am so happy! 

L’amour etend sur moi ses ailes! Love spreads its wings over me! 

Au jardin de mon coeur A new joy sings 

Chante une joie nouvelle! In the garden of my heart 


ees 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
a 
The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the Univer- 
sity of California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, 
and is affiliated with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, 
faith and service of its members is prophetic of the important part youth plays 
and will continue to play in our work. 


EEE 
University of California Extension Division 


announces 











“Programs and Personalities of the Symphony Season” 


Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 


Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
7, 14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 


Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 














SHEET MUSIC 


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Best editions of Piano and Vocal Music 
Large Stock of Choral Music, Secular and Sacred 


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246 





~ Avia 





> Seta 





Tout vibre, tout se réjouit Everything trembles, everything rejoices in 


De mon triomphe! Autour de moi My triumph! About me 

Tout est sourire, lumiére et joie! Everything smiles, light and joy. 

Et je tremble delicieusement And I tremble with delight 

Au souvenir charmant When I recall the charm 

Du premier jour d’amour. Of the first day of love. 

SVAN ED ECO) Ni Yeh) oe VCLING Oe resent ear age César Franck 


(1822-1890) 

The legends of the Franck symphony have been told so often that 
people are beginning to tell them all over again with reverse english. ‘Thus, 
in order to typify the lack of understanding with which this work was re- 
ceived when it was first presented (in Paris in 1889) Vincent d’Indy cites 
the case of an unnamed professor at the Paris Conservatory who declared 
that, regardless of what virtues Franck’s composition might possess, it 
could never be called a symphony because it employs the English horn, 
an instrument never found in the symphonies of Haydn and Beethoven. 
Mr. Cecil Gray, in his book on Sibelius published in 1930, comes to the 
defense of the anonymous professor, and argues that the type of musical 
mind which demands effects of color so marked and individual as those 
provided by the English horn is incapable of true symphonic thinking: 
and it need scarcely be said that this estimable instrument is not to be 
found in the symphonies by the author of The Swan of Tuonela. 

Be that as it may, it is nevertheless true that many thousands of music 
lovers have been content to accept César Franck’s one contribution to the 
literature of the symphony as a deeply satisfying example of the species, 
and it is also true that, biographers and disciples to the contrary notwith- 
standing, the Franck symphony did not have much difficulty in making its 
way. It was first heard in America a few months after its introduction in 
Paris, and within ten years had been performed in practically every im- 
portant music center in the world. 

Franck’s symphony represents the culmination of a philosophy of mu- 
sical structure with which this composer is especially identified. This 
principle has been labeled cyclic form, a term which imphes the attain- 
ment of an inner organic unity between the several movements of a piece 
of music on a large scale through the quotation in later movements of 
material that had previously appeared in earlier, or through — and this is 














These selections are 


made available for you ™ ox 5738 
on Victor Records Music album 


14 TILLMAN PLACE LK Off Grant nr. Sutter 






SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, TWO NOCTURNES...............McDonald 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. Conducted by Koussevitzky. $1.00 
“DEPUIS LE JOUR,” FROM LOUISE............Sung by Dorothy Maynor 
SMT O IN oa) SAVIN © Rae es ate erent Spey ale py scesre oueueaoue gaye is Ce Meee ote ge Franck 


Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. Conducted by Leopold Stokowski. 
Formerly $12.00 Now $6.50 








ath 














a much subtler and esthetically quite different process —the derivation 
of some or all of the thematic ideas of a given work from one or two ger- 
minal motifs. This principle was not original with César Franck. It is to 
be found in many significant works of Beethoven, Schumann, Tschai- 
kowsky and Brahms, and it is certainly not unrelated to the Lisztian con- 
cept of “transformation of themes.” But where these other composers 
employ the cyclic principle occasionally, as one of many types of formal 
organization, Franck makes use of it constantly and bases his entire contri- 
bution to symphonic and chamber music upon it. 

Both types of cyclic procedure are to be found in Franck’s symphony — 
both the obvious direct quotation of material from one movement in 
another, and the subtle, hidden derivation of apparently different thematic 
ideas from one and the same germ-cell. 


The symphony, however, actually has two germinal motifs, the first 


A 


stated in the opening bar sPreaare ee se | ~ and the second ap- 














pearing as the first measure of the closing theme in the first movement. 


gre 5 All the important themes of the work are derived 


from one or another or both of these two figures. And each of these figures 
is worth a paragraph or two in itself. 

The questioning melodic curve of Example A appears often in music. 
It, or something closely resembling it, can be found in the subject of the C 
sharp minor fugue in the first book of Bach’s Well Tempered Clavier, in 
the fifth and sixth bars of the first movement in Schubert’s Unfinished 
symphony, in the finale of Beethoven’s last quartet, in Liszt’s tone poem, 
Les Préludes, and as the motif of Fate in Wagner’s Ring. The last three 
instances cited are worth looking into a little more closely. 

Beethoven, in the quartet mentioned, writes over the questioning motif 

















IMUsS eS SOULE. 
> tT 












the words ‘Muss es sein?’ (“Must it be?’’) 





and over the answering phrase, which looks ever so slightly like Franck’s 
second germinal figure (Example B above) he writes the words “Es 


ES F4uss Séli/ 


muss sein” (“It must be.”) re fF ee It is, of course, true 
c =e : or 














that Beethoven intended this in mock seriousness, but that fact has only 
recently been emphasized; at all events, whether it be intended with mock 
seriousness or serious seriousness, the total effect is decidedly serious, and 
it requires no great stretch of the imagination to see in this the source of 
the figure as used with fateful implications by both Liszt and Wagner. 
Franck was no less a student of Beethoven than his Hungarian and Ger- 


248 


vet — 


a 
‘ 

; 

: 








tne 1 


<a 





man colleagues, and it is entirely possible that his employment of the 
motif stems from the same place. 


The second germinal motif of the Franck Symphony (Example B) is 
called by M. d’Indy a forculus, referring to the neumic sign of medieval 
notation which appears in the Solesmes edition of the Roman Catholic 


missal as a This “torculus” appears elsewhere in the music of 





César Franck. It is, for example, the germinal motif of his violin sonata 
and his piano quintet. 


In the outline of the symphony which follows, the derivation of the 
themes from the germinal motifs is indicated with brackets over the quo- 
tations. When passing tones have been inserted between essential notes, 
the essential notes are indicated with crosses. 


Ife 


Lento, D minor,* 4/4 time. The symphony opens with a slow introduc- 
tion, beginning in the ’celli and basses with the first germ motif in its full, 
thematic form: 


*This work is said to be in D minor because the first movement opens and closes in 
that key. Actually, D minor plays a comparatively small part in the proceedings, at least 
by contrast with the emphasis upon the principal tonality in the classic symphonic 
form. The unorthodox freedom of Franck’s key-plan here and elsewhere is part and 
parcel of that famous Franckian chromaticism which led Claude Debussy to leave 
Franck’s class at the Paris Conservatory with the remark that he did not desire to study 
with a teacher whose only precept was “Modulate, modulate, modulate.” This aspect 
of Franck’s style has been traced by some authorities to the influence of Liszt and Wag-~ 
ner, but it is probably due to an equal degree to the composer’s life-long experience as 
a church organist. The organist, called upon to provide a diffused, atmospheric back- 
ground of sound to a church service, is likely to take refuge in a kind of persistent side- 
slipping or dissolving of tonalities. It is worth remarking also that Franck’s orchestra- 
tion in the symphony is clearly beholden to the organ in its handling of the classical 
instruments and in its use of such classical outlaws as the English horn, bass clarinet, 
tuba and cornet. (Just why M. d'Indy’s professor friend did not cast Franck into outer 
darkness for employing the last three of the instruments mentioned as well as the first 
remains to be explained.) This orchestration — one is tempted to call it “registration” — 
is particularly related to the resonances and sonorities of the Parisian organs of Franck’s 
time, which were somewhat reedier in tone than the organs we are used to hearing in 
America. It should be noted, however, that Franck does not by any means write for the 
orchestra in the organ-like fashion of the symphony in his tone poems and choral works. 















OAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


3435 Sacramento Street WAIlnut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 


VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 
San Francisco: ARTUR ARGEWICZ, J. MENSFORTH RAY 
Berkeley: DORIS BALLARD 
Burlingame: J. MENSFORTH RAY Carmel & Vicinity: MICHAEL MANN 


Los Altos: DANIEL WAHL 



































J ae 
apap Ee 


continued by the violins one bar later: 


























iS Sa Se 


Example | is then repeated and worked over. 
‘The tempo changes to Allegro non troppo and the time to alla breve 
as the main movement opens with the following theme in the violins: 


pes iipia 


(The first four bars of this, it will be readily seen, are a new version of 
Example 13) An important subsidiary phrase appears in the woodwind 


c 


eight bars after Example 3 as quoted: 


There is a rallentando and fermata, the tempo goes back to Lento and the 
time signature to 4/4, and the entire introduction (Examples eZ set seq-) 
is repeated, but in F minor. After this the tempo returns to Allegro non 
troppo and the time to alla breve, and the first theme proper (Examples 
3 and 4) is restated, also in F minor. ‘The second theme follows, in the vio- 
lins in F major: 


DRE ay ete ney ga ay I ee NS, ee, 
cul § V4 4 


PESTLE Cie pipte laad 












































Gb dere eager Sear 



























































leading to the closing subject, which is the second germ motif in its full 
thematic aspect, given out by violins, trumpets and woodwinds: 


gale te ts PER re Bie pees eieleie Bee 


‘The exposition ends with the first bars of Example 6 given out successively 
by solo horn, oboe and flute, each solo ending with a long-held chord. 





























The development also starts with the first measures of Example 6, but 


250 

















in the violins, and at a more dramatic pace. Detailed description of this 
section of the movement would take far too much space. Suffice it here 
to say that it concerns itself with both the germinal motifs in their simplest 
forms as in Examples A and B and in their fuller manifestations as Ex- 
amples | and 6, as well as with Examples 2 and 4, with various scale figures, 
and with at least one episodic theme not quoted. 

The development reaches a great climax at the height of which the 
tempo returns to Lento and the time to 4/4, and the recapitulation begins 
with a restatement of the material of the introduction in canon in the brass 
and lower strings under a marching progression of the upper strings, wood- 
winds and horns, which, like Example 14 below, is a kind of lowest com- 
mon denominator of Examples A and B. Once again there is a change to 
Allegro (not non troppo this time) and 4/4 time, and the first theme 
(Example 3) is restated in E flat minor by the strings, with a new answer- 
ing figure in the woodwind. It is worked over, with Example 4, through 
D minor to D major, in which key the second theme (Example 5) is re- 
capitulated, as well as the closing theme, Example 6. The recapitulation 
ends, as had the exposition, with woodwind solos on Example 6. ‘There is 
a long coda in D minor beginning with a modulating bass figure not 
quoted, over which Example 4 is given new treatment. In the last bars 
Example | comes back (Lento) and the movement ends on a triumphant 
D major chord like an organ piece of Bach concluding with the tierce de 
Picardie. 


if 


Allegretto, B flat minor, 3/4 time. Here a three-part, ABA type of 
slow movement and a scherzo are telescoped together. The principal theme 
of the slow movement is foreshadowed for 16 bars by the harp and plucked 
strings. Then it appears in the English horn: 











L xBe x | 


and is repeated with fuller orchestration. 
The second part of the slow movement, in B flat major, follows, its 
theme given to the violins: 




















Ties ieee 


Seas ane 


SHH 











VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist | 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO : TU xeEbo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 





Ik 














After some development of this, Example 7 returns in the English horn 
and plucked strings, to conclude the slow movement proper. 
The scherzo, in G minor, immediately follows: 



































The development of this theme (or rather of that portion of it given to 
the violins in the above quotation) also involves persistent ghostly refer- 
ences to Example 8. The trio of the scherzo, in E flat major, begins with 
this clarinet theme: 












































which is worked over in constant conjunction with the whispering six- 
teenth notes of the strings. 

‘The key returns to G minor and the scherzo (Example 10, violin fig- 
ure) is repeated, but in highly varied form, with Example 7 played off 
against it. Example 7 grows more insistent as the original tonality of B flat 
minor is reinstated, but through this section also the 16th-note scherzo 
idea is persistently heard. The coda, poco piu lento, consists of alternating 


THE SAN FRANCISCO TRIO 


ALICE MORINI WILLIAM WOLSKI 
Piano BORIS BLINDER Violin 


Violincello 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 2 
8:30 o’clock 


COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 


San Francisco 


PROGRAM 


*Trio A Major (Posthumous) TF Pet ORES R Meee’ Aen Ae odie to Brahms 
Xdariocands Vanlatlons Opel 2dnie ae ig sees eee Beethoven 
“Dumky” Tovey. Op. OO pan, 6 lth Sette te ie as etree oe Dvorak 


*Probably the first performance in America of this recently discovered work 
by Brahms. 


Tickets 83c, $1.10, $1.65 at Sherman, Clay Co., and 
Community Playhouse 














eet 





statements of the two trio themes (Examples 9 and 11) beginning in B 
major, but the movement ends in B flat major. 


III 


Allegro non troppo, D major, alla breve. ‘The ‘celli and bassoons have 
the principal theme at the seventh bar: 


12 









































zis saga ataezz etree 


Variation and restatement of this lead to the second theme, begun by the 
brass and continued in the strings, in B major: 


13 Crumpet 


i 
~*~ B x 






































The development begins in B minor with a ponderous ascending and 
descending bass figure not altogether unlike Example 4. Shortly, however, 
the time changes to 3/4, and Example 7, the principal theme of the 
slow movement, is reheard, again as an English horn solo accompanied by 
running triplets of the first violins. With a return to alla breve there is a 
comparatively brief development of Example 12 begun high in the violins, 
in B major. There is a long crescendo at the climax of which Example 15 
is shouted out by the full orchestra. This climax subsides, and the last 
part of the development begins, after a long-held pause, with a return to 
the ponderous bass figure referred to above, alternating with suggestions 
of Example 7 in the woodwind. Another climax is attained, this time serv- 
ing to bring in the recapitulation. 


Example 12, the principal theme of the movement, is restated by the 
full orchestra in the original key at the outset of the recapitulation, but the 
second theme (Example 13) is omitted, its place being taken by Example 
7 from the slow movement, now given fortissimo to practically everything 
in the orchestra except the first violins, which have an ornamental counter- 
point against it, but within a few bars they, too, take it up. 


Now begins a long coda. Thirteen measures after Example 7 has run 
its course as substitute second theme in the recapitulation, Example 6, the 
second germ theme, is heard in the violins in B flat major. Shortly after- 
ward the basses and ’celli take up this persistent bass figure: 

















which, as noted above, is a kind of lowest common denominator of both 
germ motifs, and over it, with the gleam of harps and all the other har- 
monic and instrumental attributes of glory and apotheosis, Examples | 
and 6 are heard in majestic alternations proceeding through various keys. 
But neither is given the final word, and the symphony ends with Example 
12, one of the several joint and equal products of both germinal figures. 


290 








PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conouctor 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DIcTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOHWN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
HAHL, EMIL 

TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 





Sg eS ES ee ee eee 
er 


LOA 


*7CEEEOS: 


BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 


DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 


KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 


SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, ROY 


PICCOLO: 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHivoO, LESLIE J. 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 


ScCH!ivo, LESLIE Jd. 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RuDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
Clow, RAY 


E FLAT CLARINET: 


RUDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 


FRAGALE, FRANK 





BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAyYe, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C., 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 

JAKOB, JOS. 
GEHRING, CONRAD 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND &. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
STORCH, WALTER 


TROMBONES: 


Gios!, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


ORGAN: 


ALTMANN, LUDWIG 


LIBRARIAN AND 
PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 











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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO. 


PRESENTS THE 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHBSTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
COGN De 68s oe 


2g" 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD k. SKINNEB, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


























COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
the above advertisement? . . . Now read it again, and think 
how fully a corporate executor meets each qualification. 

A trust company is never ill; it is never away. It can be counted 
upon to be present and ready to serve when the time comes. 
The officers of a trust company have a daily familiarity with 
probate procedure, the administration of property, and the 
affairs of your estate. 


SEE YOUR LAWYER ABOUT YOUR WILL TODAY 


ot Nig ss <i OR area DR es AS Re i Me Ee Nae 


Wells Fargo Bank 
& Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery . . . . Market at Grant Avenue 
S' AUN) FIRSA NG T-SiC.O 


MEMBER Ff. D. I. C. 























THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. LEQNORA WOOD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY . . VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 


PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH . 


DR. HANS BARKAN 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

Miss LOUISE A. Boypb 

MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 
MRS. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


MRS. LEONORA Woop ARMSBY 


DR. HANS BARKAN 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTicE D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

MRS. MARCUS S&S. KOSHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss Lutre D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. LEO ELOESSER 


JOHN A. McGREGOR.. . 
HOWARD K. SKINNER... . SECRETARY 
GERALD G. Ross . 


TREASURER 


ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


Guipo J. Musto 

Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 
MRS. SIGMUND STERN 


J. B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. NORRIS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


PHILIP 5S. BOONE 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


EGG. Milteer. 

MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND . 
Mrs. M. C. SLoss. : 
MRS. H. R. MCKINNON. 
MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN. 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER. 


MRS. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM... 


PHILIP S. BOONE. 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS . 
MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

Mrs. LEONORA WooD ARMSBY 
G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
Mrs. GEORGE W. BAKER, JR. 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

MRS. EDWARD O. BARTLETT 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 

Miss LOUISE A. Boypb 
PHILIP S. BOONE 

MRS. F. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

GEORGE T. CAMERON 

Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN 
MRS. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE 
MRs. W. W. CROCKER 

Mrs. O. K. CUSHING 

MRS. GEORGES DE LATOUR 
MISS KATHARINE DONOHOE 
JOSEPH H., DYER, JR. 

MRS. FRANK EDOFF 

SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 

ALBERT |. ELKusS 

DR. LEO ELOESSER 
FORREST ENGELHART 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


On On Oro ee oe one . - » GHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 


HENRY EVERS 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


. CHAIRMAN WOMEN’S FINANCE COMMITTEE 


. TICKET SALES AND PUBLICITY 


»~ « «© e e YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


ee) el kel e's es) of el ehiciee cee VIGEOEHAIRMAN. Tiere oACES 


a Ga Oc - Box SALES 
peere che . SYMPHONY GUILD 


Hop On eee "SAN" FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


. HONORARY CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
. VICE-CHAIRMAN YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


MRS. PAUL |. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 

JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LUTIE D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS 
MrRsS. LEON GUGGENHIME 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

Mrs E. S. HELLER 
WALTER S. HELLER 

Mrs. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
GAETANO MEROLA 

C. O. G. MILLER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
ROBERT W. MILLER 
EDWARD F. MOFFATT 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Guipo J. Musto 

DWIGHT F. MCCORMACK 
Mrs. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 


JOHN A. MCGREGOR 

MRS. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 

R. C. NEWALL 

CHARLES G. NORRIS 

CHARLES PAGE, UR. 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 

MRS. STANLEY POWELL 

MrRs. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 

OTTORINO RONCHI 

MRS. HENRY P. RUSSELL 

Miss ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. StLoss 

Mrs. Nicol SMITH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

MRS. POWERS SYMINGTON 

Mrs. DAVID ARMSTRONG- 
TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 

JOHN H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. CYRIL TOBIN 

THOMAS J. WATSON 

MICHEL WEILL 

Mrs. EL! H. WIEL 

LEONARD E. Woop 

Jd. D. ZELLERBACH 




























After the last note of the Symphony 


THE MUSIC IS YOURS 
im your Record Library! 


SINFONIA CONCERTANTE...Mozart 
K364. Album M 188, featuring Sammons, 
Tertis and Harty with the London Phil- 
harmenic Orchestra. Four 12-inch rec- 
ords. Now only $4.50. 

PER OUROGERA was oats Szymanowski 
Chant de Roxane, 14625. A 12-inch rec- 
ord featuring Jascha Heifetz. Now $1.00. 


NOU EURINO! }ace24 eaters Szymanowski 
Record 14383, with “Tarantella” on the 
opposite side. Yehudi Menuhin is the 
recording artist. 12-inch record, $1.00. 
SYMPHONIA DOMESTICA.....: Strauss 
Album M 520. Five 12-inch records, fea- 
turing Ormandy and the Philadelphia 
orchestra. Now only $5.50. 





For the most complete selec- 


e 
See the books, hear the records . . . then tions of popular and classical 
go to the Opera equipped to appreciate recordings, visit our Mezza- 
it more than ever! nine Record Salon. 


OT, better values 


see our wide range of 


RADIOS * PHONOGRAPHS 
COMBINATIONS 
RADIO—PHONOGRAPH— 
RECORDERS 
A Radio For Every Price Group! 


Radio-Record Salon, Mezzanine 





260 











THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI ANGELO J. ROSSI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 


President Mayor Secretary 
Presents 
Municipal Coucerts 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEU » Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


Civic Auditorium 


SATURDAY NIGHT, APRIL 12 


MUNICIPAL CHORUS 


HANS LESCHKE, Conducting 


In Beethoven’s 


es EOS Sa 
PEGGY TURNLEY RUSSELL ROBERTS 
REBA GREENLEY DOUGLAS BEATTIE 
In celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary of the Municipal Chorus no 
admission to the Concert will be charged. All seats reserved. Free tickets may 


be had at Symphony box office, Sherman, Clay. No one will be admitted 
without a ticket. 




















TUESDAY NIGHT, APRIL 15 


YEHUDI MENUHIN 


Brilliant Young Genius of the Violin 
—PROGRAM~— 


Overture, ““The Russian BASter 22c6 3 tates ee rage eet cn: Rimsky-Korsakov 
Concerto for Violin, D NWA O igre orto bs ican ae Ae eh ae Brahms 
Mr. MENUHIN 
Finale to a MEMO eioraa nna Ae ati ew natal. nity tee de Charles Jones 

Conducted by the Composer 
peat ca Sara eye rs inna sY_ 3 cre sisters Waltigks exe andes Ne air aed see eS heer eke, ook Ravel 
Mr. MENUHIN 
Boulpaa ide CInCOInstin cen: Sisto teen mew we a, he Elgar 


MonrTEvx, Conducting 


Tzigane 


Tickets: $1.50 - $1.00 - 75c - 50c - Tax Exempt 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 
IE 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 








261 












New F Orms 
for Flowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 










Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE .... wherein violets form the face 
TORSO. wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT .. . with daisies in the crown 
DUCK .. . carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


not shown 


Exclusive with 


* SLOANE 


Gib LL Eek une avr Gah AcING: 





a surveala’s 
touch with a 
sense of humor 













San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
: PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
or 
TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
2029th and 2030th Concerts 




























FRIDAY, MARCH 28, 2:30 P. M. 
SATURDAY, Marcu 29, 8:30 P. M. 


Program 
SINFONIA CONCERTANTE FOR 
OBOE, CLARINET, HORN 
BASSOON AND ORCHESTRA... Mozart 


Allegro 

Andantino con Variazioni 
Oboe: MERRILL REMINGTON 
Clarinet: RUDOLPH SCHMITT 
Horn: PIERRE LAMBERT 
Bassoon: ERNEST KUBITSCHEK 


SINFONIA CONCERTANTE FOR 
IN ODAIN DEO RIGEDE SUmRON so 2 ee Szymanowskhi 
Moderato 
Andante molto sostenuto — 
Allegro non troppo 
MAxim SCHAPIRO, Guest Pianist 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 


Ian (EE RoVviA S Sal Orn 


Sia ONTASDOMESEICAL ta, 0:5. Strauss 
a ee 


Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ 
Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 
These affairs are open to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 


EE —————————— ess SS ee 
_ War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 


and County of San Francisco through the Board of 


‘Trustees of the War Memorial. 
* * * * 


/ J 
Y 










Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 


OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 
a 





Receipts: 


SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


HERE IS HOW THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN 
FRANCISCO STANDS FINANCIALLY FOR THE 
PRESENT SEASON: 






Present 
Deficit 






San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
War Memorial Opera House 


San Francisco, California 


Please accept (or add to) my contribution in the amount of 


which is enclosed herewith as my portion toward extinguishing this 


year’s deficit. 














CURRAN THEATRE 
SUNDAY NIGHT, MARCH 30th, at 8:30 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
WERNER JANSSEN, Conducting 


in the NEw SYMPHOSHELL 


—PROGRAM— 
BEE EON BENS VEINS ScVEP ELONY. 
*MOZARTS  EKANTASY ON A BARREL ORGAN” 

*“ MUSIC GEORGE WASHINGTON KNEW” 
‘CHARLES TONES «Uli ORS Ss Maxey OGLE SERA 
*JOHANN STRAUSS’ “COTILLION LEADERS” 
SIBELIUS- SWAN OER LUONEEA 
SINIGAGLIA’S OVERTURE, “LE BARUFFE CHIOZZOTTE” 


Playing Saint-Saens’ “Havanaise” 


*First time in San Francisco 


40 FAMOUS MUSICIANS 


FROM HOLLYWOOD’S LEADING FILM STUDIOS 


ie) 


SEATS NOW ON SALE AT SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 
55c - $1.10 - $1.65 - $2.20 - $2.75 
Phone EXbrook 8585 





no 
(@) 
Cr 








SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . Their 
phenomenal work as a nucleus around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. ‘Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 


and courage. 


. . We feel that not only the Association, but all the 


members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. role 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloy 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 

Evans, Mrs. Harry 

Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 


Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. 
Gray, Nancy 

Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs Horace 

Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 
Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Knox, Mrs. John B. 

Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 


Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, ie 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 

Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 
Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 








JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 
PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
TEACHER of VOICE 


From Prima Beginning to Final Accomplishment 
J o 


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| PROGRAM NOTES 


7 By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 
" SINFONIA CONCERTANTE FOR 
' OBOE, CLARINET, BASSOON, 
ELORIN CAN D726 RG EE Se Rea a at es W. A. Mozart 
(1756-1791) 
The story behind this work is extremely mysterious, and while it is of 


no particular importance, it is rather interesting. 

When Mozcart was in Paris in April, 1778, he wrote to his father that he 
had been commissioned by Jean Le Gros, conductor of the famous Parisian 
musical society known as the Concert Spirituel, to write a sinfonia concer- 
tante for flute, oboe, horn, bassoon and orchestra. Some celebrated virtuosi 
upon these instruments were at that moment visiting Paris, and Le Gros 
wished to take advantage of the possibility of presenting them all at once 
in a single work. Among these virtuosi was Johann Baptist Wendling, one 
of the most famous flutists of the 18th century. 

Mozart completed his sinfonia concertante for the instruments men- 
tioned within three weeks of the receipt of the commission, but Le Gros 
grew cool toward the idea, never put the piece into rehearsal, and either 
lost or sequestered the manuscript, which to this day has never been found. 
Mozart believed Le Gros had been influenced in this by a composer named 
Cambini, who had taken offense when, at a social gathering, Mozart had 
improvised, in a somewhat truculent spirit, on the themes of one of his, 
Cambini’s, string quartets. All of these facts are known only through 
Mozart’s letters. 








COLLEGE OF THE HOLY NAMES 
LAKE MERRITT, OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 


SCEIM EZ IW ASE. GIEANSSES 
JUNE 19 to JULY 25, 1941 


E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 


World Gamous Pianist and Teacher 
Author of the book, ‘“"CAPTURE OF INSPIRATION” 


A great artist who combines the finest classical traditions and the best 
contemporary achievements. 


MASTER CLASSES in Piano Technique and Interpretation. 
Private lessons for adequately prepared students, teachers, and artists. 
Address the Chairman of the Music Department, 
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267 











THE NEXT GUEST ARTIST 


Jose IrurBI was born in Valencia, Spain, in 1895. He began to take lessons 
on the piano at the age of five, and at the age of seven ine began his pro- 
fessional career playing in motion picture theaters and cafes in Valencia. 
Eventually he was sent to the Paris Conservatory, from which he was 
graduated at the age of 17. He was head of the piano department at the 
Geneva Conservatory from 1919 to 1923, and began his career as a concert 
artist in the latter year. His American debut was made in 1928, and he 
has been closely identified with American musical affairs ever since. Iturbi 
made his first appearance as a conductor in Mexico City in 1933, and 
three years later was appointed to his present position as ‘director of the 
Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Iturbi has made three previous appearances with the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra on the regular subscription series. He played the 
Mozart D minor concerto in 1931 and again in 1933, and the Beethoven 
C minor concerto in 1936. He will present the Schumann concerto at the 
final concerts of the present season, April 18-19. 








THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Presents 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


LAST TWO PROGRAMS 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 4, 2:30 O’?CLOCK 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 5, 8:30 O’CLOCK 


ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
BRANDENBURG GONGERTOOINO:, esos Mae. © frase en hon ae eae he ee Bach 


(SOTO) Gre he 92 SLO INO 4 ens = 2 ee ae ae ee ey Arthur Bliss 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 
Conducted by the Composer 


STEGER ESD eID VLE, tiers meen oe, tee ee est OM A eS Bgl eg eo Wagner 
Su1ITrEs No. 1 anp No. 2 from Daphnis GiHONOLO Ga Ravel 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 18, 2:30 O?CLOCK 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 19, 8:30 O’?CLOCK 


Soloist: JOSE ITURBI, Pianist 


PROGRAM 
SVAN CEL OINGYS LN OL vo iracee ne sacs de a Ge RAs erat Tics eater, ae Beethoven 
GONGERTO tor Liano-and Orchestra im A minor. 1.4...) Schumann 
Mr. ITURBI 
INTOG DURINE GIN Geile, sa) Shae eh en ree hoe, Cae, Edwin Stringham 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 
eat GR = Ses Se DPN 2. os ye rae ee ET Bl en ee ges De Bussy 
TICKETS: FRIDAY 55¢ to $2.75 — — — SATURDAY 55¢ to $1.25 


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268 


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In 1869 Otto Jahn, the greatest 19th century authority on Mozart, 
died, and his enormous collection of Mozart documents was presented to 
the Prussian State Library. Among these papers was the manuscript, not 
in Mozart’s handwriting, of the sinfonia concertante of the present pro- 
gram, Which differs from the work described in Mozart’s letters in calling 
for the clarinet instead of the flute. Jahn had never mentioned the exis- 
tence of this manuscript to anyone. In his colossal Mozart biography he 
reconstructs the story of the Le Gros commission and the conductor’s sub- 
sequent refusal to present the work, and adds in a footnote simply that 
“this sinfonia concertante is lost beyond recovery.” 

At the time of Jahn’s death the firm of Breitkopf and Hartel was wind- 
ing up its complete edition of Mozart’s works, and the manuscript found 
in the Jahn collection was issued in the 24th and last series of that publi- 
cation, where it is identified without qualification as the sinfonia con- 
certante written for Le Gros in 1778. Apparently the editors did not at that 
time notice the difference in instrumentation between the piece described 
by Mozart and the piece taken from the Jahn collection. The sinfonia 
concertante published by Breitkopf and Hartel was listed in the second 
edition of Kochel’s catalogue of Mozart’s works as Appendix 9. This book 
came out in 1905. Some time after 1905 Breitkopf and Hartel published 
the separate score and parts of the sinfonia concertante, but by then the 
editors had apparently begun to have their doubts, for in this edition the 
work is described as “presumably identical with Kéchel Appendix 9,” 
which means “presumably identical with the work written for Le Gros in 
On 

On the basis of these facts one may construct four different theories 
regarding the sinfonia concertante as we have it today. 

|. It may be an arrangement, by an unknown hand, of Mozart’s sin- 
fonia concertante of 1778. The most likely reasoning here is that Le Gros, 
in order to avoid having trouble with Cambini, hid the original until 
both Mozart and Cambini had left Paris, and then, finding that a good 
flutist was not available, had the piece rearranged for the available instru- 
mentalists. A few weeks after the episode of the sinfonia concertante 
Le Gros commissioned and performed a symphony of the conventional 
sort by Mozart. (This is the Paris symphony played earlier this season by 
sir Thomas Beecham.) This work was a great hit, and its success may have 
caused Le Gros to go back to the sinfonia concertante. But the very exis- 
tence of the Paris symphony may also be used as the basis of precisely the 
opposite argument: if Cambini’s opposition was not sufficiently strong to 


en 
University of California Extension Division 


announces 






“Programs and Personalities of the Symphony Season” 






Ten lectures on the concerts of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and 
the symphonic literature in general, by Alfred Frankenstein. 







Friday mornings at 11, before the concerts, January 3, 17 and 24; February 
7, 14 and 21; March 14 and 28; April 4 and 18. 






Lecture Hall, 540 Powell Street. $5.00 for the course, single admission 75c 





269 
























THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


announces 


ANNUAL SUSTAINING FUND 
EASTER CONCERT 


of the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
featuring 


BASIL. RATHBONE 


Distinguished Star of Stage, Screen and Radio 
Narrator in ‘Peter and the Wolf” 


—PROGRAM— 


Overture to ““The Flying Dutchman se ee Wagner 
Symphony rin 18) jeaubaore. Llhakababieveel son sau a4 ec: Schubert 
Pete eanlid © (Ole VV Oli. terra (ate aire ieesm erat, oie Prokofieff 


*BASIL RATHBONE, Narrator 


Suite from ‘“‘Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme” Richard Strauss 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 


Thus Spake Zarathustra............-. Richard Strauss 
*Mr. Rathbone has just made a recording of “Peter and the Wolf” 
with Leopold Stokowski. 





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prevent Le Gros from giving Mozart a second commission, it is hard to 
imagine it strong enough to prevent Le Gros from playing the sinfonia 
concertante, especially when he particularly wanted to exploit Wendling 
at his concerts. The whole Cambini side of the story may have been com- 
pletely a figment of Mozart’s imagination, anyway. 


9. The work as it is now may have been an arrangement by Mozart 
himself of the sinfonia concertante of 1778. When Mozart was on his way 
back to Salzburg from Paris in October, 1778, he wrote his father that, 
although Le Gros might think he alone possessed the works written for 
him, the composer had them all fresh in mind and intended to write them 
down again as soon as he got home. But it is difficult to conceive of Mozart's 
substituting the clarinet for the flute in a version made for Salzburg, where 
he lived for three years after the Paris adventure. ‘The clarinet was a new 
instument in those days, and there were no clarinet virtuosi in Salzburg. 
Mozart’s great clarinet pieces were not written until a decade later, when 
he was living in Vienna. This arrangement might have been made, then, 
years after 1778, but a composer so prolific as Mozart had no need to carry 
things in his head so long, since it was not much more difficult for him to 
write a new work than to rewrite an old one. ‘Vheretore 

3. The present sinfonia concertante could be a later piece by Mozart 
having nothing whatever to do with the sinfonia concertante Of 1/75) pul 
there is no external evidence to show that he ever planned or executed a 
second work in this form. 

4. “The present sinfonia concertante could be a fake; i.e., a piece by an 
unknown composer ascribed to Mozart either through accident, ignorance, 
or deliberate misrepresentation. The strongest evidence for this belief 1s 
Jahn’s complete silence regarding the manuscript. It is conceivable, but 
not readily credible, that the manuscript came into Jahn’s possession too 
late in his life for that authority ever to have done anything about it; it 1s 
also conceivable, but still less credible, that the manuscript was never 1n 
Jahn’s possession at all, but was added to his collection by an unknown 
person after his death. Sir Donald Francis ‘Tovey believed this piece to be 
spurious on the basis of the internal evidence. In his Essays im Musical 
Analysis Tovey says bluntly ‘the man who wrote it could not compose.” 
This opinion, however, is not shared by one of the most eminent of con- 
temporary Mozartians, Dr. Alfred Einstein, who includes the work in his 


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third edition of Kéchel (1937) under the heading “works once lost, now 
partially recovered.” 

The term sinfonia concertante was employed in Mozart's time to 
describe a kind of freely constructed concerto in which more than one solo 
instrument was employed. In more recent times the phrase has somewhat 
altered in its application; it 1s used by Szymanowski, for instance, to cover 
a work for one solo instrument and orchestra in which the solo part does 
not stand out in such bold relief as it would in a concerto. 

The present composition reflects the old classic suite in that all three 
of its movements are in the same key, E flat major, and goes back to the 
classical concerto grosso in its employment of a solo group of four instru- 
ments. Lhe first movement, however, is clearly derived from the Mozart 
concerto pattern, for it begins with an extensive orchestral introduction 
in which all the material is set forth before it is taken up by the soloists. 
There is also the typical Mozartian cadenza for the soloists before the end. 
The finale is a theme and variations in which each solo instrument has 
its chance. The slow movement is omitted from today’s performance. 


SINFONIA CONCERTANTE FOR 
PTCAUNI Oe AINGID ONG Elias ile ee Ned ae Karol Szymanowski 
(1883-1937) 

Karol Szymanowski was the foremost Polish composer of the 20th cen- 
tury. He was born in the Ukraine of a wealthy and highly musical Polish 
family, studied in Warsaw with Zygmunt Noskowski, and, his studies 
completed, went to Berlin in 1903. He returned to his family estate in the 
Ukraine in 1908 and this remained his home, except for short trips abroad, 











THE SAN FRANCISCO TRIO 


ALICE MORINI WILLIAM WOLSKI 
Piano BORIS BLINDER Violin 


Violincello 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 2 
8:30 o’clock 


COMMUNITY PLAYHOUSE 


San Francisco 


PROGRAM 


* Trio A Major (Posthumous) Wee Tey See ee Tee bh ae ey Brahms 
Adagio and Variations, Op. + [22) E peeedittars UE aed a Rai, ae Dry, «9 Arent Beethoven 
“Dumky”’ ecto; Op: Ol) ye ea ae eh en ee ite eats Dvorak 


*Probably the first performance in America of this recently discovered work 
by Brahms. 


Tickets $3c, $1.10, $1.65 at Sherman, Clay Co., and 
Community Playhouse 


a 


Zs 











BEFORE THE SYMPHONY 





Continental Buffet Luncheon in the Garden Court 


GLEN GRAY AND HIS ORCHESTRA PLAY NIGHTLY 
(Except Monday) AND AT SATURDAY TEA DANSANTS 


THE PALACE HOTEL 














DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
By a 
GREAT AMERICAN INSTITUTION 


“Che 


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Now uses the Baldwin in Its Concerts 


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310 SUTTER ST. 4 alpimin 1828 WEBSTER ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 


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until the Russian Revolution of 1917. In 1920 Szymanowski established 
himself in Warsaw, and six years later was appointed director of the War- 
saw conservatory. In 1929 he resigned this position because of ill health, 
and he spent the last years of his life in a tuberculosis sanitarium in 
Switzerland. 

Four influences exerted themselves successively over Szymanowsk1’s 
music as his career progressed. First was the influence of Chopin. During 
his years in Berlin he fell under the spell of Richard Strauss and other late 
German romantics. Later he discovered Debussy and impressionism, and 
in the final phase he was deeply interested in Polish folk music. 

Szymanowski is best known in this country for his small violin pieces, 
like The Fountain of Arethusa, and his two violin concertos, all of which 
were composed for his friend, Paul Kochanski. His symphonies, operas and 
ballets, his choral works and his chamber music still remain to be dis- 
covered by the American public at large. 

The sinfonia concertante is Szymanowski’s fourth symphony. It was 
written in 1931, and is therefore one of his last works. It is very simply 
constructed on a modified classical plan, reflecting the composer's interest 
in Polish folk music in its finale. It was composed for Szymanowski’s own 
use, but his health prevented his exploiting it very fully, and it has there- 
fore been introduced in many music centers by Arthur Rubinstein, to 
whom it is dedicated. 

I 

Moderato, F major, 3/4 time. The timpani and plucked lower strings 
open with a rhythmic figure which persists for many bars. ‘The piano has 
the first theme at the fifth measure: 





This is taken up by solo wind instruments and is developed by the entire 
ensemble. The pace grows faster, and the first motif of Example 1 is worked 
over by way of transition to the second theme. ‘This appears in the piano, 
its essential melodic idea being: 







a eS Hw Sea Sao 
————_ ©, —___ 9 A 


Development of this leads to a big climax ending with a tremolo of the 
timpani and plano. 
Now a third theme makes its appearance in the solo flute: 





ett thety., “ewee ele be yb 

fp ee ee a 
he’ ae “bet, p> £# * Tine Ss 

= SSeS eee a ee 











H 

| 

| 
which is restated by the piano and worked over in a scherzando episode of 
some length. Example 3 then reappears in the whole orchestra. 





The recapitulation begins with Example 1 in two solo violins. After 
the reappearance of the second theme (Example 2) there is a cadenza for 
the piano, and a coda based on Example 3, 


IT 


Andante molto sostenuto, 4/4 time. ‘The theme appears in the flute 
over a murmuring accompaniment of the strings and piano, with a coun- | 
tertheme, not quoted, in the viola from the fourth bar: 





The piano has a little cadenza, and the theme goes to the solo violin with 
a new counter-idea in the trumpet, later the English horn and viola. 

The second theme is announced by the piano. (Only the topmost voice 
Is quoted) : 





SCHAPIRO TEMIANKA 


Pianist Violinist 


Concluding their Series 


“THE HISTORY OF THE SONATA” 
* 


. among the finest and most stirring musical events of the winter.” 
—ALEXANDER FRIED, S. F. Examiner, Dec. 19th, 1940 


DARIUS MILHAUD WALTER PISTON 
NICHOLAS MEDTNER 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 9th, 1941 
at 8:30 o’clock 
GLOUVEMAGENGE Tey (PiaiwAryY FO. SE 


Tickets for the series: $3.30 - $5.50 - $8.80. Single Tickets: 83c - $1.10 - $1.65. 
(All seats reserved.) At Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco and Oakland, 
and at Community Playhouse 





276 2 











Development of this leads through a climax to the reappearance of the 
frst theme, fortissimo, in the strings and horns. There is a little remi- 
niscence of Example 5, whereupon Example | from the first movement 
recurs and is treated in a kind of canon between the flute and piano. A 
piano cadenza leads without pause to 


il 
Allegro non troppo, A minor, 3/8 time. Rhythmic and dynamic ideas 
dominate in the first part of the finale, which is devoted to a kind of 
oradual unfolding of the mazurka which is to be its principal theme. ‘Ehe 
timpani begin: 























and the horns: 





The sonority grows constantly, ending ina huge climax and a pause. Then, 
after five bars of rhythm, the piano states the melody of the mazurka: 








S, 


The orchestra appropriates this and combines it with the figures previously 
quoted. 

A second mazurka theme, much quieter than the first, is stated by a 
solo violin against a counterpoint in the clarinet: 


SS 


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‘ 5 = 

|) Ze ee OO ee ey ee 
ar” 2 a Be SS ON a a ee 
CU ee 0 ee 2 ee 2 2 2 
0 © _2S (eae) (Ee) 





‘This theme is transferred to the piano. The tempo hastens, and Example 
J comes back, fortissimo, beginning in the piano, to which the strings and 
woodwinds are soon added. There is a fast and furious coda in A major 
on Example 9 and the rhythmic ideas of the opening. | 


evil IO NTA DOMES EILGA.. by. Richard Strauss 
(1862-) 

The Symphonia (sic) Domestica, completed on December 31, 1903, is 
the semi-final orchestral work of Richard Strauss. Except for the Alpine 
Symphony of 1915 his creative effort since 1904 has been concerned al- 
most exclusively with opera and other types of stage music. 

Strauss has always exhibited a certain inconsistency of attitude toward 
the descriptive or “programmatic” side of his work. On the one hand 
he has frequently stated that he wished his tone poems and symphonies to 
be heard simply as music, and on the other hand he has often scattered 
descriptive remarks through his scores and permitted his closest associates 
to publish extensive descriptive commentaries upon them. Ernest New- 
man once flew into a fine rage over this. “He writes a work like IRN 
Eulenspiegel,” said Newman, “that is based from start to finish on the 
most definite of episodes, and then goes through the heavy farce of mysti- 
fying his hearers by telling them he prefers not to give them the clue to 
the episodes, but to leave them to ‘crack the nut’ as best they can. All the 
while he is giving clue after clue to his personal friends, till at length 
sufficient information is gathered to reconstruct the story that Strauss had 
worked upon; this gradually gets into all the program books, and then we 
are able to listen to the work in the only way it can be listened to with 
any comprehension — with a full knowledge of the ‘program.’ With each 
new work of Strauss there is the same tomfoolery. One can use no milder 
word to describe proceedings that no doubt have a rude kind of German 
humor, but that strike other people as more than a trifle silly.” 

Still and all, there is something to be said for Strauss, and the hearer, 
confronted with one of his big orchestral pieces for the first time, is likely 
not to disagree too violently with the composer's point of view as it was 
set forth by Richard Aldrich when the Domestica was first performed in 
New York. “Dr. Strauss believes,” said Aldrich, ‘that the anxious search on 
the part of the public for the exactly corresponding passages in the music 
and the ‘program,’ the guessing as to the significance of this or that, the 
distraction of following a train of thought exterior to the music, are de- 
structive to the musical enjoyment. Hence he has forbidden the publica- 
tion of what he has sought to express until after the concert.” 

This agrees entirely with the writer’s experience with the music of 
Strauss. The first thing to be grasped is the general line of the musical 
expression. The descriptive, literary and picturesque allusions do not take 
their natural place in the whole scheme until the music becomes familiar 
—and then they often seem quite unimportant. Thirty years ago they 
seemed enormously important, and some of the commentaries published 
by such as Wilhelm Klatte when these works were new seem today a good 
deal funnier than the parody of them in H. L. Mencken’s Book of Bur- 
lesques. The prize monstrosity of that sort, however, is told of Strauss 


278 





himself, perhaps without foundation. “The composer is supposed to have 
asked the conductor, Anton Seidl, if he had noticed that the Donna Anna 
of his Don Juan had red hair. When Seidl replied in the negative Strauss 
‘s said to have answered, in all seriousness, ‘“Then I have failed.” 

The fact remains, however, that the Symphonia Domestica has a pro- 
eram; that program can be set forth simply, and it does unquestionably 
enhance one’s enjoyment of the work. The piece, which 1s “dedicated to 
my dear wife and our youngster,” is a picture of the domestic happiness 
of Richard Strauss and his family. It is in one continuous movement, sub- 
divided into four sections with episodes between. Ihe first movement sets 
forth the three basic themes, one describing the composer, one his wife, 


f C 


and one the child. ‘The second movement is a scherzo entitled, in the Ger- 
man commentaries, The Parents’ Happiness — The Child at Play. ‘Vhe 
third movement is an adagio called Doing and Thinking — Love Scene — 
Dreams and Cares. Vhe finale is a double fugue headed Merry Argument 
— Happy Conclusion. That is the general outline. A few details will be 
added below. 

[t should be noted, however, before turning to a more extended out- 
line, that the symphony 1s exceptionally complex, and the quotations 
below of the father and mother themes are the merest outline sketch of 
what goes on while they are being played. ‘The complexity of the structure 
is reflected in the exceptional size of the orchestra, which calls for such 
unusual things as an extra quartet of horns, a quartet of saxophones, the 
almost obsolete oboe d'amore, and a curious disposition of the clarinets 
whereby instruments of that variety in D, A. and B flat are all required. 


The symphony opens (Bewegt, F major, 2/4 time) with the Father 
theme, a long melody in four separate parts, OVCT each of which appears 
an adjective describing a different aspect of the Father's personality: he is 
“easy-going, “dreamy, “peevish” AG eh Yien 



























SAN FRANCISCO CON 


3435 Sacramento Street 


SERVATORY OF MUSIC, Inc. 


WAlnut 3496 
ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 





VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 


San Francisco: ARTUR ARGEWICZ, J. MENSFORTH RAY 
Berkeley: DORIS BALLARD 
Burlingame: J. MENSFORTH RAY Carmel & Vicinity: MICHAEL MANN 
Los Altos: DANIEL WAHL 


219 














280 




















The Mother theme follows. She is VED IVehy.a. | | 
“angry” by turns: 


affectionate’ and 





























































































































These materials are worked over, and the quiet Child theme is suggested 
by the oboe d’amore, its course interrupted by watchful hints of the 


Mother theme in the flute. Then, after a few bars. the Child theme is fully 
stated by the instrument which had first hinted at it: 











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This is followed by a very brief interlude, beginning with trills in the 
woodwinds, which is said by some to represent the Child taking a bath. 
It is obviously a bath before admiring relatives, for at the end of this 
passage occurs one of Strauss’ most engaging programmatic curiosities. 
A three note figure of the trumpets and clarinets is labeled in the score 
“The Aunts: ‘Just like his papal’ ” 


EPPIPS IE es “Cans den ige pel” 


and the answering phrase of the trombone, horns and oboes is labeled 
“The Uncles: ‘Just like his mama!’ ”: 











"Gan ate Mla-ma!” 


Now the scherzo (The Parents’ Happiness — the Child at Play) begins. 
It is naturally, like all the rest of the symphony, based upon the three 
principal themes, but it is not entirely in the gay 3/8 with which it opens. 
This scherzo admits a good deal of dramatic and lyric expression, and it 
ends with a passage a little like the woof-woofing of Cerebus in Gluck’s 
Orpheus, perhaps suggesting that the child, like the Niblungs of Richard 
[, is naturally given to works of destruction. 

There is now an interlude of some length (G minor, 6/8) labeled 
Cradle Song, and based upon a folk-like melody of the clarinets. A bell 
strikes seven, but it is not the child that is put to bed but the “dreamy” 
section of the Father theme, which appears first in the oboe (later flute 
and violins) and is rocked to sleep by the triplets of the clarinet in A. 

The adagio follows: Doing and Thinking — Love Scene Dreams 
and Cares. This is the longest section of the symphony, but it demands no 
special description. Alfred Kalisch and Percy Pitt called it “a symphonic 
slow movement of great polyphonic elaboration and superlative orchestral 
color,” and that will suffice. 

The bell strikes seven again, (A. M. this time) and the Father theme 
springs easy-goingly out of bed. The theme is taken up in fugal fashion 
as the finale proper (Merry Argument — Happy Conclusion) begins. ‘The 
Mother theme is introduced and eventually the Child. The finale, how- 
ever, soon loses its fugal character, and becomes a big symphonic allegro. 
(It is said that the argument is between the parents over the child’s fu- 
ture.) The Child theme gradually attracts to itself various episodic ideas 
all more or less in the nature of folk-tunes. There is a very brilliant con- 
clusion in which Papa has the last word. 





VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist | 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET : SAN FRANCISCO ° TUxepo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 





281 














=a naeanITEnTRTISIenmama 





PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 


1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 


2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 


3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMDORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 


DICTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOMWN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRD, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 
PATERSON, J. A. 
GOLD, JULIUS 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 


VIOLAS: 


FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN Buroa, Jac 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VicToR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conoucrtor 


"CELLOS: 

BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 

DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMDORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 
KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLIT!, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSIN!, JOSEPH 


jo] EY Ba pl 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, Roy 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 
REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
Sed iIVGs ee Stele: 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 
SCHive, CEesnie uk 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RUDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
BIBBENS, F. C. 
CLow, RAY 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
RUDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
LA HAYE, E. B. 
BAKER, MELVILLE in 


S25 i De 


Pt 


CONTRA BASSOON: : 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: ; 
LAMBERT, PIERRE 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C, 

TRYNER, CHARLES E., 
ROTH, PAUL 

JAKOB, JOS. 
GEHRING, CONRAD 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND S&S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
STORCH, WALTER 


TROMBONES: 


Giosi, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA - 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


ORGAN: 


ALTMANN, LUDWIG 


LIBRARIAN AND 
PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 











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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 


PRESENTS THE 


SAV FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX 
i ON D.wW CCE OC} 


2g” 


SEASON 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR — 


HOWARD Kk. SKINNER, Business Manager 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 








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COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
the above advertisement? . . . Now read it again, and think 
how fully a corporate executor meets each qualification. 

A trust company is never ill; it is never away. It can be counted 
upon to be present and ready to serve when the time comes. 
The officers of a trust company have a daily familiarity with 
probate procedure, the administration of property, and the 
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SEE YOUR LAWYER ABOUT YOUR WILL TODAY 


Sag el Oe at Digby SP vA Rk YMe oN: 


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& Union Trust Co. — 


Market at Montgomery . . . . Market at Grant Avenue 
SAN FRANCISCO 


MEMBER F. D. I. C. 




















THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. LEONORA WooD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
FE, RAYMOND ARMSBY . . VICE-PRESIDENT JOHN A. McGREGOR . . TREASURER 


HOWARD K. SKINNER ....- - SECRETARY 
GERALD G. ROSS ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


VICE-PRESIDENT 
VICE-PRESIDENT 


PauL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER Guipo J. Musto 

Miss LuTtie D. GOLDSTEIN Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
Mrs. WALTER A. HAAS Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER Mrs. M. CGC. SLOSS 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


DR. HANS BARKAN 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

Miss LouISE A. BOYD 

MRS. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 
Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


c. O. G. MILLER, CHAIRMAN 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

Mrs. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 


GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTie D. GOLDSTEIN 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


J. 8B. LEVISON 

JOHN FRANCIS NEYLAN 
Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. LEONORA WogoD ARMSBY Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
DR. HANS BARKAN DR. LEO ELOESSER 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


J. EMMET HAYDEN 
CHARLES G. NORRIS 


PHILIP S. BOONE 
LEWIS BYINGTON 
RICHARD LYON 


EG. GB: G. MILLler. - 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND . 
Mrs. M. C. SLoOss. Seren va 
Mrs. H. R. MCKINNON. 
Mrs. JOHN P. COGHLAN. 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER. 


Mrs. LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM... 


PHILIP S. BOONE. nas 
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MRS. HAROLD FABER. 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 


MRS. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 


G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
Mrs. GEORGE W. BAKER, JR. 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

MRS. EDWARD QO. BARTLETT 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 

Miss LOUISE A. Boypb 
PHILIP S. BOONE 

MrRs. F. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
GEORGE T. CAMERON 
Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
Mrs. JOHN P. COGHLAN 


MRS. ELIZABETH S. COOLIDGE 


Mrs. W. W. CROCKER 
Mrs. O. K. CUSHING 

Mrs. GEORGES DE LATOUR 
MISS KATHARINE DONOHOE 
JOSEPH H. DYER, UR. 
MRS. FRANK EDOFF 
SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 
ALBERT |. ELKUS 

DR. LEO ELOESSER 
FORREST ENGELHART 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


. CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE 


HENRY EVERS 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 


| CHAIRMAN WOMEN’S FINANCE COMMITTEE 


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BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


Mrs. PAUL I. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 

JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTtiE D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS 
Mrs. LEON GUGGENHIME 
Mrs. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. HARRY S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

Mrs E. S. HELLER 
WALTER S. HELLER 

Mrs. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
GAETANO MEROLA 

Gees Ges MIEEER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
ROBERT W. MILLER 
EDWARD F. MOFFATT 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Guipoo J. Musto 

DWIGHT F. MCCORMACK 
Mrs. ANGUS D. MCDONALD 


JOHN A. MCGREGOR 

MRS. HAROLD R. MCKINNON 

R. C. NEWALL 

CHARLES G. NORRIS 

CHARLES PAGE, JR. 

PHILIP H. PATCHIN 

Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER 

Mrs. STANLEY POWELL 

Mrs. GEORGE B. ROBBINS 

OTTORINO RONCHI 

Mrs. HENRY P. RUSSELL 

Miss ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 

Mrs. Nicol SMITH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

Mrs. POWERS SYMINGTON 

Mrs. DAVID ARMSTRONG- 
TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S. THOMPSON 

JOHN H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. CYRIL TOBIN 

THOMAS J. WATSON 

MICHEL WEILL 

Mrs. ELI H. WIEL 

LEONARD E. WooD 

J. D. ZELLERBACH 


287 








After the last note of the Symphony 
THE MUSIC IS YOURS 


m your Record Library! 


BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS 

‘The concertos complete are published in 
two volumes by Columbia. Volume I con- 
sists of Concertos 1-4 in 15 parts, Set 
M249, priced at only 8.25. Volume IT cov- 
ers. Concertos. 5 and 6: in 1? parts, Set 
M250, priced at 6.50. Both volumes are 
produced with the Busch Chambers Play- 
ers. Or you may procure the single record 
of Concerto No. 1 in F Major, played on 
tonight’s program, on Victor 11781, a 12- 
inch disc for only 1.00. This features the 
Ecole Normale Chambers Orchestra. 


DAPHNIS AND CHLOE 

Suite No. 1, 11882, with Coppola and the 
Paris Conservatory Orchestra. Now, $1.00. 
Suite No. 2, Album M667, Ormandy and 
the Philadelphia Orchestra, two 12-inch 
records for 2.50. 





For the most complete selec- 
tions of popular and classical 
e recordings, visit our Mezza- 


See the books, hear the records . . . then nine Record Salon. 
go to the Opera equipped to appreciate 
it more than ever! 


For Setter values 
see our wide range of 
RADIOS * PHONOGRAPHS 
COMBINATIONS 
RADIO—PHONOGRAPH— 
RECORDERS 


A Radio For Every Price Group! 





Radio-Record Salon, Mezzanine 


; 


CHER FREY 








San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Ww 
3 ELEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


29039nd and 2033rd Concerts 








FrIpAY. APRIL 4,'2:30 P. M. 
SATURDAY. APRIL 5, 8:30 P. M. 


Program 


| BRANDENBURG CONCERTO NO. 1, 
BONE ATO mene ee fee ans meee ee Bach 
Allegro 
Minuet — Trio I — Polacca — Trio II 
| Adagio 
Allegro 
NEE (OCT OV: SSA Rabel GIN Yon 5 ue oe ee ee Bliss 
F Purple: ‘The Color of Amethysts, Pageantry, Royalty and 
Death 
Red: The Color of Rubies, Wine, Revelry, Furnaces, Cour- 
age and Magic 
Blue: The Color of Sapphires, Deep Water, Skies, Loyalty 
and Melancholy 
Green: The Color of Emeralds, Hope, Youth, Joy, Spring 
and Victory 
First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO — 
‘THE COMPOSER CONDUCTING 
EN rE RMS ss FOwN 
RES TOE RELLY Les Lh SR Noe oe ween degen = BS. Wagner 
DAPHNIS AND CHLOE, 
SCH SN @ Saal: SAGNED ewe ie ao ieee ee te Ravel 
Nocturne 
Warlike Dance 
¥ 


Daybreak 
Pantomime — 
General Dance 
—ee  f 


Under the auspices of the San Francisco Museum of Art, a series 
of “Symphony Teas” is being given at the Museum in the Veterans’ 
Building on Friday afternoons following the Symphony Concerts. 
These affairs are open to the public with a fee of 35 cents. 













a survealt#’s 
touch with a 








for F lowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 









Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE . . . wherein violets form the face 
FORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT . . with daisies in the crown 


DUCK ... carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


10t shown 


Exclusive with 


~~ SLOANE 


Sr alee oR ine acre GRANT 









N™S 


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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


BRANDENBURG CONCERTO NO. ls 
PIA ORG easy noe ieee ame ends Oa = Johann Sebastian Bach 
(1685-1750) 

In the year 1721 Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg, com- 
missioned Bach to write a set of six concertos for his private household 
orchestra. Bach set out on this task in the daring exploratory spirit char- 
acteristic of him, and produced six concertos each for a different ensemble 
__in effect, discovering six different orchestras within the single frame- 
work of the instrumental forces available at the Brandenburg court. ‘This 
idea apparently seemed simply another instance of crazy modernism to 
the Margrave and his musicians; at all events the concertos were never 
played at Brandenburg, and the manuscript did not turn up for more 
than a century after it was created. 

The first concerto of the series is the longest and the most full-bodied 
“1 instrumentation. It calls for two horns, three oboes, violino piccolo, 
bassoon, and the customary string quintet. ‘The choice of these instru- 
ments, and their disposition in the whole fabric, brings the first Branden- 


burg far closer to the modern conception of orchestral balance than any 
other work of Bach’s time. Moreover, the soloistic spotlighting of particu- 
lar instruments, characteristic of the other concertos of the Brandenburg 
series, is here indulged in comparatively seldom. (The obsolete violino 
piccolo, by the way, 1s replaced with an ordinary violin in this per- 
formance.) 

The concerto is likewise very unusual in one aspect of its form. It 
provides the Allegro, Adagio and Allegro common to all the concertos of 
Bach, but tacked on to these is a kind of appendix consisting of a series 
of dance movements which, both in their musical character and their 
‘nstrumentation, reflect the true spirit of 18th century German Hausmusik. 

In order to secure a more effective contrast, Mr. Monteux inserts the 
dance movements between the first Allegro and the Adagio instead of play- 
ing them at the end. The first dance is a minuet for the full ensemble 
followed by a trio for two oboes and bassoon. The second dance is a 
Polacca, and its trio is for the horns and oboes. The Polacca, incidentally, 
is interesting historically. Movements bearing this title, or its French 
equivalent, Polonaise, were very popular among patriotic Saxon compo- 
sers. like Bach, at this time. The reason is that Friedrich August, the then- 
reigning Elector of Saxony, had become King of Poland in 1697, and had 
thereby established a Dresden-Warsaw axis in religion and polite customs 
as well as in government. In order to please his Polish subjects Friedrich 
August had become a Catholic. which fact has much to do with Bach's com- 
position of the B minor mass. But that, as Kipling was fond of remarking, 
is another story. 






War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 

* * ¥* * 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 


Snap 














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- 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


HERE IS HOW THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN 
FRANCISCO STANDS FINANCIALLY FOR THE 
PRESENT SEASON: 


4 


Financial Chart: 





‘There remains an imperative need for additional pledges to the main- 

tenance fund for this present season. We urge the many devoted friends 

of the Symphony Orchestra to contribute as much as they are able in order 
that this concert season may be closed without a deficit. 


= oer SR a a) ND ee ee ee ee ee ee ee ee 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
War Memorial Opera House 
San Francisco, California 


Please accept (or add to) my contribution in the amount of 


SEAS ae eee a eae Mia ie Se ES A Dollars (ise ae oe) 


which is enclosed herewith as my portion toward extinguishing this 
year’s deficit. 














THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


announces 


ANHUAL SUSTAINING FUND 
EASTER CONCERT 


of the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


featuring 


BASIL RATHBONE 


Distinguished Star of Stage, Screen and Radio 
Narrator in “‘Peter and the Wolf” 


—PROGRAM— 


Overturesto Phe st lyvane urchmman ) as oe Wagner 
ithe Pleasure Wome ot w wplack alinees a. ae eee Griffes 
=e REteh yaliGl CENGM VV Ole suk, te Rs A ee nl, ake Prokofieff 

*BASIL RATHBONE, Narrator 
EhunearianshatsodiNOs22- ac, umes Seatac So Liszt 
Symphonie No-67)(Pathetiqte)ies 22... Tschaikowsky 


*Mr. Rathbone has just made a recording of “Peter and the Wolf” 
with Leopold Stokowski. 


Ticket Prices 
ORCHESTRA, $2.50 and $2.00 > GRAND TIER $2.50 and $2.00 
DRESS CIRCLE, $1.65 . BALCONY CIRCLE, $1.25 
BALCONY, 75¢ ° BOX SEATS, $2.75 
TAX EXEMPT 
P SEATS NOW ON SALE 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICES: Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco 
and Oakland. Telephone SUtter 1331 (San Francisco) or 
HIgate 1220 (Oakland). 


OeEen HOUSE aon to eee 











293 








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SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. . . . ‘Wher 
phenomenal work as a nucleus around which centers all other activities 
of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 
anh <COUmAGEs aa. VC feel that not only the Association, but all the 


members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Ir. 
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AECORO RES NER EEO IND sae eee Nee ee eee area Arthur Bliss 
(1891-) 

Mr. Bliss was born in London and obtained his education at Cam- 
bridge and at the Royal College of Music, where he also taught for a brief 
period. He lived in Santa Barbara from 1923 to 1926, and then returned 
to England, remaining there until two years ago. He is now a member of 
the faculty of the University of California. Works of his recently played 
in San Francisco include the suite from the ballet Checkmate, a quintet 
for clarinet and strings, and a song cycle entitled Swmmer, 1940. His list 
of works includes much other einer music, many songs and choral 
pieces, a plano concerto, music for the film Things to Cone. etc. 

“The Color Symphony,” says Mr. Bliss, “owes its existence to the en- 
couragement of Sir Edward Elgar, at whose suggestion it was written for 
one or the Three Choir estas and it was produced in Gloucester 
Cathedral in 1922, the composer conducting. . . . The work was completely 
revised in 1932 and was subsequently published n this form. The four 
movements are labelled with color titles. These colors, with the images 
they suggest, give guidance to the four different moods suggested.” 

Sous Berane! the symphony Was given its first performance at Glou- 
cester a pamphlet about it was published by Percy Scholes. ““The name of 
the Bliss symphony will at once attract attention,” says the author in his 
introductory remarks, “and must necessarily arouse curiosity. A little 
explanation, then, is needed, and this will be best supplied by a frank 
personal] note 1f I may venture upon it. 

‘When, a day or two before this was written, the composer met me 
for a chat and in order that | might with him study the score of the new 
work and hear it from his hands at the piano, I urged upon him the 








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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


LAST PROGRAM 


FRIDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 18, 2:30 O’CLOCK 
SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 19, 8:30 O’CLOCK 
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abandonment of the vague title so far announced, and the suostitution 
of something more definite. I argued, and I think I shall be supported by 
the opinion of many, that the popularity of much of the greater music 
has for two centuries been impeded by ae repulsive, meaningless and 
alyebraic-looking titles-that-are-no- titles, as ‘In A flat, One oon antl that 
Sie works as Beethoven: s Heroic Sironony or Tschaikovsky’s Pathetic 
Symphony have gained, perhaps in ultimate appreciation, and decidedly 
in initial reception, by their more alluring titles. “Symphony in A flat, 
Op. 59” means absolutely nothing to the man in the street, for it 1S NOL a 
name but a mere means of mica reference, like the numbering of a car 
or a convict; Heroic Symphony at once catches his eye and engages his 
attention. I argued, and Bliss admitted, that Vaughan Williams nad done 
well in siving real names to his two existing ‘symphonies, A London 
Symphony le 4 Pastoral Symphony, and | begged Bliss (on behalf, as 
[ felt, of a large number of concert-goers) if he had had in his aoe 
when composing his work any extra- musical idea to allow it to appez 

in the title, as Vaughan W illiams had done. 


“At once he admitted the existence of such an idea. It seems (and it 
is interesting to hear this) that when composing he always experiences 
i play of nolo sensation, that such a play had been vivid in his mind 
dren working at this symphony and that the title, 4 Color Symphony, 
which at once suggested itself to him, would actually express a conception 
that had dominated him when at work. The title is, therefore, legitimate, 
and I think it is also attractive; whilst the sub-titles given to the various 
movements are, I feel sure, likely to be of service to many, by re vealing 
(in a very general way, of course) the underlying feeling of each.’ 

Mr. Scholes then indulges in a little general speculation on the subject 
of musical and visual associations. This portion of the pamphlet was later 
expanded into the detailed article, “Color and Music,” in Scholes’ recently 
published and readily obtainable Oxford Companion to Music. 

The following outline of the symphony, edited by Mr. Bliss in the 
light of the 1932 revision, is taken from the Scholes pamphlet. Quotation 
eke have been dispensed with. 











THE NEXT GUEST ARTIST 


Jose Irursr was born in Valencia, Spain, in 1895. He began to take lessons 
on the piano at the age of five, and at the age of seven Tixe began his pro- 
fessional career playing in motion picture Thesis and cafes in Valencia. 
Eventually he was sent to the Paris Conservatory, from which he was 
graduated at the age of 17. He was head of the piano department at the 
Geneva Conservatory from 1919 to 1923, and began his career as a concert 
artist in the latter year. His American debut was made in 1928, and he 
has been closely identified with American musical affairs ever since. Iturbi 
made his first appearance as a conductor in Mexico City in 1933, and 
three years later was appointed to his present position as director of the 
Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Iturbi has made three previous appearances with the San Francisco 
symphony Orchestra on the regular subscription series. He played the 
Mozart D minor concerto in 193] and again in 1933, and the Beethoven 
C minor concerto in 1936. He will present the Schumann concerto at the 
final concerts of the present season, April 18-19. 


297 








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298 








Ib 


Purple: The Color of Amethysts, Pageantry, Royalty and Death. The 
Movement opens with two bars of roll on the Kettledrum, leading to a 
slow tune which persists for some time, giving the feeling of a steady 
inexorable march, of Pageantry and the sense a Death: 


1 Andante maestoso = CRN ay ee 


; 

f) bs 
[= =: , ga a ee 
ae eae eee os ees 






































Another Tune shortly succeeds. It will be recognized from the following 
which is its later and definitive form. For the moment, however, it appears 
with a rhythmic figure which connects it, in the mind of the hearer, with 


Tune I: 
































‘There follows immediately a Tune less dramatic than the two pr eceding 
Wunes— léss of Pageantry and more of reflection on its symbolism” iS 
the composer's suggestion: 














"ap * 1) a yy 2 ee 2 os ¥, ~ z 
a = See 2 
3S aes = 


Then comes a short ‘Trumpet Fanfare, leading to a big outburst of 
emotion, with the use of the Full Orchestra: 





his may, perhaps, be described as the Royalty section. 
Tune 3 then returns, scored for different instruments, and in a dif- 













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ferent key, the march-like tap of the Drum still persisting as a rhythm 

transferred at various moments to various instruments. This Tune (3) 1s 

then to some extent “developed” and we return to Tune 2 anc. ob onewl: 
The general plan of the Movement has thus been: 


Gay = Abia yelie Amo 
(11) Outburst; 
(iin) eal OES, 257: 


(the later appearance of the Tunes giving them, of course, in a somewhat 
elaborated form) . 

It should, however, be recognized that the work is not what is usually 
spoken of as “Programme Music”; there are these hints, here and there, 
and there is a vague symbolism and a color association underlying every- 
thing, but there is not the detailed procedure according to pictorial, or 
narrative, or poetical plan that is to be found in such works, for instance, 
as those of Liszt and Strauss. 


Hie 

Red: The Color of Rubies, Wine, Revelry, Iurnaces, Courage and 

Magic. This is the Scherzo of the Symphony. Its central feeling is an- 

nounced at once by the Trumpet. At Bar 3 enters a rhythmic triplet figure, 
and soon, over it, comes this ‘Dune: 

Ppa os eae coe es et 
pee clarinel ar Le ag 2) | ail appa 
SS 0 to ETT eS eee. Ler 2 ER EE 4d 
Saee a Ee ery Ba aoe See Seer 1 sees ae 
violins tL EL) EE Le rere pir ee 


The downward leap in the ’Cellos, at the end, symbolises the revelry which 
characterizes the whole Movement. 

Another Tune (less important, very simple, and easily recognized) 
follows, and then the music works us to a convulsive climax, suggestive 
of high Courage. 

This dies away in a plucked-string passage for Violins, in a moment 
taken over by the Oboes, low down. In this way we are ushered into the 
Magic section: 





























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303 





EO ARTEL EE tA pn ene We ge MO VR OF mR ET Re REF eee Oe ee 
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English horn: 
From this we pass straight into “the reddest of all the tunes — red as 
a furnace”; 







































































Development of this brings in (in combination with Tune Oye sleumer 2 
from the First Movement (“Purple is not so far from Red’) . 

A reference to Tune 7 follows and dies down into sultry mutterings 
(‘an effect like glowing embers’’) . 

Then comes an Oboe Cadenza, which brings Recapitulation of the 
Tunes 5 and 8. 

Very quick Drum taps bring in a Coda, in which are heard references 
to all the ‘Tunes of the Movement, welded together in a prolonged and 
gigantic crescendo. 

The Movement ends in ‘“‘a blaze of Scarlet Flame.” 

This whole Movement is full of vitality, and, whatever else it may 
be, is not “highbrow music.” Its general scheme is logical — 

(i) Tunes 5, 6, 7, 8 — corresponding to an “Exposition.” 

(i) ‘Tunes 8+ 1, 6, 7 —treated as a sort of “Development.” 
(1) Tunes 5, 8 —as a shortened “Recapitulation.” 
(iv) And then the long Coda just described. 

II]. 

Blue: The Color of Sapphires, Deep Water, Skies, Loyalty and Mel- 
ancholy. Vhis is another Slow Movement. A rhythm which binds together 
much of the Movement is the following, which is constantly recurring: 


It Fret Lents. 


f) 
@ aye 

















wo 








7 


Above this appear arabesques, such as this: 


9b eh CrP tp tr 

















Perhaps Ya suggests Water, and 9b the play of Sunlight upon it. A section 
lor Wind Instruments only is opened by: 


Le eee oo Sere ee 






































Here there comes the interplay of Oboe and Bass Clarinet over the rock- 
ing motion of Flutes, and perhaps a hint of “all the blueness of nature — 
Skies and Seas.” ‘This is cut into abruptly by a loud and emphatic restate- 
ment of the opening rhythm, 9a. 

Above this then comes 9c (the reason for the adoption of this ‘a-b-c’ 
numeration 1s evident: 9a, b, and ¢ are in close connection). This is a 
Trumpet theme, “rather suggestive of Loyalty”: 


oleae ET ee | 
re EA ae epi DE 


Yt cantabile ¢ molto legate 
































The Middle Section of the Movement opens here with a long trill on 
the Flute, leading to a Tune characteristic of Melancholy: 





Then is built up a big climax, in which the same tune is heard 
forlissimo, given out by all the Trombones. A good deal of play is then 
made with this tune, suggestive of different aspects of Melancholy. 

The Final Section gives us again 9a, 9b, and 9c, and then 10. A Coda 
is formed by a long-drawn crescendo and diminuendo, in which the rhythm 
of Ya is heard, first in the Wood-Wind, then (at the top of the crescendo) 
on the ‘Trombones, and finally, very softly, on the Kettledrum. (This is 
the only entry of the Kettledrum in the whole Movement and the note 
heard is its lowest possible.) A touch of every mood and every theme in 
the Movement enters into this somewhat extended Coda. 


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305 











The general scheme of the Movement, it will be seen, is that of a 

free sort of Rondo — 
(i) 9a and b; 10; 9a and c. E 
(oye de 4 
(Gi RE lo euarclaes: 10 . 
(iv) CODA, consisting chiefly of 9a and c, and 11. 


IV 
Green: The Color of Emeralds, Hope, Joy, Youth, Spring and Victory. 
This Final Movement is based on the Fugue form. The general plan of x 


the Fugue may be described as roughly that of Bach’s (so-called) S¢. 
Anne’s Fugue, i.e., it falls into three sections, of which the first grows out 
of a slow, dignified Subject, and the second out of a lighter and more 
rapid Subject. The treatment of the third Section differs with Bach and 
Bliss but their general formal and emotional schemes have some resem- 
blance, as organists will at once notice. 

The Subject of the First Section of the Fugue (at the opening 
chiefly handled by strings) differs perhaps from anything ever written 
or heard by Bach: 





As the Section grows in intensity, several of the tunes from previous 
movements appear as “Episodes,” notably “Tunes 6 and 1. When all this 
has been worked up to the first big climax, in which the Subject 1s con- 





stantly more and more compressed in its treatment, stretto-wise, the a 
Trumpets give out a quick, rhythmic figure leading to the 
SECOND SECTION, a fugal treatment (chiefly for Wind) of this 
Subject: 
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In this Section ‘Tune 6 is again drawn upon, and Tunes 13 and 6 
can be said to represent two qualities of Youth, its Hope and its Joy. 

A prolonged crescendo based on 13 brings in a reference, on plucked- 
violins, to Tune 3, almost immediately followed by the return very loudly 
of 12 combined with 13, and this leads to the 

LAST SECTION — The entrance of six Kettledrums. playing rhyth- 
mic figures from 13, announces the culminating point of the whole Sym- 
phony, which closes soon afterwards in a burst of fanfares borrowed from 
Example 4 (first movement) . 

There is a poetical idea in this “Green” Fugal Movement. “It is.’ 
says the composer, “as Spring-like as anything I can write — growing all 
ie times 


Seo E CERO a DNAs nee eter ee, ee, oe Richard Wagner 
(1813-1883) 

Wagner wrote the Siegfried Idyll as a birthday gift to Cosima Liszt, 
mother of Wagner’s son, Siegfried, and the composer's future wife. Cosima 
was born on Christmas Day, and she awakened on December 29, 18 70;sto 
the strains of this serenade played by a small orchestra assembled on the 
stairs of the Wagner villa at Lucerne. The work is based upon the love 
music from the final scene of Wagner's music drama. Siegfried, particularly 
upon the leading motives known as Peace and Siegfried Treasure of the 
World. Interwoven with this material are bird calls and a German nursery 
folk song, Schlaf’, mein Kind, schlaf’ ein, this last with obvious reference 
to the infant Siegfried Wagner, who was then seven months old. 


DAPHNIS AND CHLOE, 
SEEES NOS IAN Dee te ee Gl lap eee Maurice Ravel 
(1875-1937) 

Daphnis and Chloe was Ravel’s contribution to the repertoire of the 
Diaghilev Ballet Russe. It was first produced in Paris in 1910 with chore- 
ography by Michel Fokine, with Nijinsky and Karsavina in the name 
parts, Adolph Bolm and Enrico Cecchetti in other roles, and Pierre Mon- 
teux conducting. 

The elaborate plot was adapted by Fokine from the famous Greek 
pastoral novel of the same name written in the third century, A.D., by a 
highly mysterious author named Longus. Daphnis and Chloe are shepherd 
lovers. ‘Their adventures are far too many and involved to detail here. 
Suffice it to say that at one stage in the action of the ballet Chloe is car- 
ried off by pirates. The first suite contains the music of Daphnis’ prayer 


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308 








io Pan for her safekeeping and the dance in the pirates’ camp. The second 
suite consists of the music that accompanies Chloe’s return, the panto- 
mime of Daphnis and Chloe in honor of Pan, and the general dance of 
rejoicing. 

The setting for the Nocturne is the entrance to the temple of Pan 
from which, but a moment before, Chloe has been kidnapped. Daphnis 
has come too late to save her, and has thrown himself upon the ground. 
Then comes the Nocturne, the action of which is described as follows 
in the score: 

“A little flame shines suddenly above the head of one of the statues 
in the grotto. Lhe nymph moves and descends from her pedestal. A second 
and a third nymph join her, and they begin a slow, mysterious dance. ‘They 
perceive Daphnis, bend over him, and wipe away his tears. They arouse 
him and conduct him to the altar stone. Little by little the form of the god 
becomes visible. Daphnis prostrates himself in supplication.” 

The setting for the Warlike Dance is thus described: 

“A dim light. We are in the camp of the pirates. A rugged coast, the 
sea in the background, with rocks to right and left. A trireme is near the 
shore, and cypresses grow about. We see the pirates running here and 
there, laden with booty. ‘Torches are brought in which at the end throw 
a lurid light on the scene.” 

The score contains the following notes on the second suite: 

“Daybreak: No sound but the murmur of rivulets fed by the dew 
that trickles from the rocks. Daphnis lies stretched before the erotto of 
the nymphs. Little by little the day dawns. The songs of birds are heard. 
Afar off a shepherd leads his flock. Another shepherd crosses the back of 
the stage. Herdsmen enter, seeking Daphnis and Chloe. They find Daphnis 
and awaken him. In anguish he looks about for Chloe. She at last appears 
encircled by shepherdesses. The two rush into each other’s arms. Daphnis 
observes Chloe’s crown. His dream was a prophetic vision; the intervention 
of Pan is manifest. The old shepherd, Lammon, explains that Pan saved 
Chloe in remembrance of the nymph, Syrinx, whom the god loved. 

“Pantomime: Daphnis and Chloe mime the story of Pan and Syrinx. 
Chloe impersonates the young nymph wandering over the meadow. Daph- 
nis as Pan appears and declares his love for her. The nymph repulses him; 
the god becomes more insistent. She disappears among the reeds. In 
desperation he plucks some stalks, fashions a flute, and on it plays a mel- 
ancholy tune. Chloe comes out and by her dance imitates the accents of 
the flute.” (This movement leads without pause to the following.) 


“General Dance: The dance grows more and more animated. In mad 
whirlings, Chloe falls into the arms of Daphnis. Before the altar of the 
nymphs he swears on two sheep his fidelity. Young girls enter; they are 
dressed as bacchantes and shake their tambourines. Daphnis and Chloe 
embrace tenderly. A group of young men comes on the Stage. 

“Joyous tumult. A general dance. Daphnis and Chloe.” 








VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist | 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO . TUxEpo 2738 
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 — 


309 








FE hoo © NGINGEsE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, 


FIRST VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
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3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 
ANDERSON, THEODORE 
DE GRASSI, ANTONIO 
LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALD!I, MAFALDA 


DICTEROW, HAROLD 
GORDOWN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
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PATERSON, J. A. 
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HERBERT, WALTER 
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KOBLICK, NATHAN 


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PRINCIPAL 


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WEILER, ERICH 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
TRIENA, FRANK 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR 
KARASIK, MANFRED 





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PRINCIPAL 
DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


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BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLIT!I, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
DRSINI, JOSEPH 


Behe S. 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, ROY 


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BENKMAN, HERBERT 


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REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 


ScHive, CESclie J. 


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SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RUDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
BIBBENS, F. C. 
Clow, RAY 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
RUDD, CHARLES 


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FRAGALE, FRANK 





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KLOCK, JOHN 


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MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


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SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


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EES ENE So PEE 


NAY FRANCISCO 
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MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFIGERS 


Mrs. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 
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CHARLES R. BLYTH 


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333 














a14 





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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


oy 


TWELETH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
29040th and 2041st Concerts 


Fripay, APRIL 18, 2:30 P. M. 
SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 8:30 P. M. 


Soloist: JOSE TTURBI, Pianist 


Program 


SYMPHONY NO. 8, F MAJOR, OPUS 93......Beethoven 
Allegro vivace e con brio 
Allegretto scherzando 
Tempo di Minuetto 
Allegro vivace 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND 
ORGCHESTRACNO Ee GAG MATOR. LatsZt 


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SYMPHONIC VARTA LIONS FOR 
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Dialogue of the Wind and the Sea 








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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SYMPHONY NO. 8, F MAJOR, 

CE Score ser ee vee eae, ae Cohen Gees Ludwig Van Beethoven 

(1770-1827) 

The eighth is the shortest and gayest of Beethoven’s symphonies, and 
the only one that contains no slow movement. It therefore reminded Pro- 
fessor Donald Francis ‘Tovey of the story about the person who, seeking 
General Tom Thumb, knocked by mistake on the door of Luigi Lablache, 
the famous operatic basso, who was nearly seven feet tall and had one of 
the most tremendous voices of all time. “I am sorry, I was looking for ‘om 
Thumb,” said the unexpected visitor. “I am Iom Thumb,” roared Lab- 
lache; ‘““when I am at home I relax.”’ 

The symphony was composed in the summer of 1812, the greater part 
of it at Linz, where Beethoven had gone to break up a love affair between 
his brother, Johann, and his housekeeper. This curious episode, which 
reveals none of its parties in a particularly favorable light, is not reflected 
in the music, but an incredible amount of midnight oil has been burnt 
over the fact that the second movement of the eighth symphony does reflect 
another experience of Beethoven's at about the same period. Some time 
before going to Linz Beethoven had been the guest of honor at a dinner at 
which another guest was Johann Maelzel, the famous mechanician. Mael- 
zel had already brought out his musical chronometer, which he was later, 
in an improved form, to name the “metronome.” His “panharmonicon, ” 
a mechanical orchestra for which Beethoven composed his Battle Sym- 
phony, was just beginning its long and curious career, but his “automatic” 
chess player, which was to be exposed by Edgar Allan Poe and cause Mael- 
zel’s downfall, was not yet in existence. At his dinner Beethoven impro- 
vised a canon with punning words directed at Maelzel, and the theme of 
this appears in the second movement of the eighth symphony (Example 4) 
accompanied by the persistent, ticking notes of the woodwind as if to 
suggest the beat of Maelzel’s chronometer. 

I 

Allegro vivace e con brio, F major, 3/4 time. The first movement 
bursts at once into its principal subject: 

1 VIOLINS, CLARINET 



















This is extended in a dramatic, leaping phrase of the violins, and leads 
into the second theme, also given to the upper strings: 








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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
HERE IS HOW THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN 
FRANCISCO STANDS FINANCIALLY FOR THE 
PRESENT SEASON: 
Financial Chart: 
$10,000 
y 


There remains an imperative need for additional pledges to the sustaining 
fund for this present season. We urge the many devoted friends of the 
Symphony Orchestra to subscribe as much as they are able in order that the 
season may be closed without a deficit. Any contribution no matter how 


small will be gratefully received. i 


318 








% % Ns aay 








An extensive concluding section now follows. During its course several 
thematic ideas are heard, of which the most important is the leaping 
octave figure 














several times repeated at the very end of the exposition. The entire expo- 
sition is then repeated, from the beginning of the movement. 

The development section is concerned entirely with Example 3 and 
the first five notes of Example 1. It develops a big climax, at the crest of 
which the first theme comes back in the brass instruments to begin the 
recapitulation. ‘This section of the movement is orthodox, passing all the 
materials of the exposition in review down to the reiterated octaves of - 
Example 3, now on the tonic, F, instead of the dominant, C. The coda 
presents further development of Examples | and 3. 

II 

Allegretto scherzando, B flat major, 2/4 time. The second movement 
is in the sonata form without development. Over the “metronome” chords 
of the woodwinds the tune of the Maelzel canon is brought forth by the 
upper and lower strings in dialogue, beginning 





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| ll ZT|y|!!_l_!|!|!y!yttyt_t_t_f£ffff tt oom __ __ ________~______,__ ________,. «§ Winn g§ sp yO 


of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise cannot be given this group 
who have undertaken their task for the Symphony with dauntless energy 
We feel that not only the Association, but all the 


and courage. 


SYMPHONY WOMEN’S COMMITTEE 


It is appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express 
its gratitude to the members of the Women’s Committee. 
phenomenal work as a nucleus around which centers all other activities 


members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
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Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs Robert R. 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 
Dibblee, Mrs Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 

Evans, Mrs. Harry 

Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 





Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 

Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. 
Gray, Nancy 

Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harris. Mrs... WW 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs Horace 

Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr, Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs Thomas B. 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 
Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Knox, Mrs. John B. 

Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Mrs Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 





Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Page, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 
Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 

Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 
Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 








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A brief transition section leads to a recapitulation of the first part of 
the movement, and a short coda. 
II] 
Tempo di Minuetto, F major, 3/4 time. The minuet proper is based 
primarily upon the following idea, stated at the third bar: 























The trio consists mainly of a broad melody first stated by the horns, 
and a high-pitched, arabesque figure in the solo clarinet, both above a 
persistent, rather heavy triplet accompaniment in the ’celli. Vincent d’Indy 
thought this section of the movement might be a takeoff on the efforts of 
a village band, like the trio of the scherzo in the sixth symphony. At the 
conclusion of the trio the minuet is heard again. 

IV 

Allegro vivace, F major, 2/2 time. The violins have the principal sub- 

ject at the outset: 








‘This is repeated by the full orchestra. leading over to the second theme, 
also in the violins: 














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322 




















<i See Daas Bicseaceeas 


The woodwinds take up this subject, and later the strings, and the 
movement proceeds to rush through a brief development section based on 
Example.7. Leaping octave F’s of a solo bassoon precede the recapitulation, 
which restates the materials of the exposition in regular order. ‘There now 
follows a coda as long as exposition and development together. This sec- 
tion is proportionately the longest coda in any of Beethoven’s symphonies, 
and might better be called, in d’Indy’s phrase, a “terminal development.” 
[t is concerned mainly with further possibilities inherent in Example 7, 
but Example 8 is also reheard before the end. 


CONCERTO-.FOR PIANO AND 


ON GEN Sa Roce IN Ox sr ee A te WEAT @) Res sacs Franz Liszt 
(1811-1886) 

Liszt began work on his first concerto as early as 1830, but he made 
many different versions of it and did not relinquish it as finished until 
26 years later. It was first performed at Weimar in 1855, with Liszt as 
soloist and Berlioz conducting. 

Like most of the large-scale works of this composer, the concerto is 
very free in form, and exploits, but not to the same extent as do Liszt’s 
symphonic poems, the principle of “transformation of themes.” It is in 
one continuous movement subdivided into four sections which correspond 
roughly to the four movements of the classical symphonic pattern. 

The work opens (Allegro maestoso, E flat major, 4/4 time) with its 
principal theme in the full orchestra. According to Philip Hale, Liszt 
was given to singing this theme, in defiance of his adverse critics, to the 
words ‘Das versteht ihr alle nicht!”” (“This you all don’t understand!’’) 


EE En) Eee ES Ds | SS. 
Dae oe ey 
je a 





This is immediately answered by thundering octaves of the piano. Ex- 
ample | is stated again by the orchestra, and this time is answered by the 
kind of poetic, improvisatory material that makes pianists shake their 
heads as they deliver it. Example | returns a third time, with new octave 
passages in the piano by way of reply. The middle section of the move- 
ment is introduced by rocking triplets of the piano under a gracefully 
rising broken chord of the clarinet. ‘Ihe main theme of the second section 
follows three bars later: 





ANNUAL SPRING CONCERT 


University of California Concert Band 
CHARLES C. CUSHING, Conductor 


Sunday afternoon, April 20, at 3:15 
Men’‘s Gymnasium, U. C. campus - Admission free 


Works of Josquine des Pres, Palestrina, Rimsky-Korsakov, 
Tchaikowsky, Prokofieff, Bizet, Debussy and Gustav Holst 











323 








This is briefly developed. ‘The first movement ends with a varied return 4 
of Example | and the pianistic thunderations and poetizings of the open- ‘7 
ing pages, leading without pause to ie 
Quasi Adagio, B major, 12/8 time. The strings foreshadow the prin- 
cipal theme for nine bars. ‘Then the piano states it: me 














Contrast is provided by a dramatic recitative of the piano over a tremolo 
of the strings. ‘Toward the end of the movement a new idea is introduced 
by the flute above a long trill of the solo: 

















This is taken up by other solo instruments, but the movement ends with 
a reminiscence of Example 3 in the clarinet. 

Allegretto vivace, E flat major, 3/4 time. The entrance of the triangle, 
which caused much discussion when the work was new, announces the 
scherzo, which is based mostly upon the theme heard in the piano at the 
tenth bar: 

















=) 
Ey 2 SPS Ses: STE 
SY DT OY ol 24 91119 Pe —— 





‘The scherzo is the shortest movement of the four. It concludes with one 
of the many brief piano cadenzas with which the concerto is ornamented, 
a cadenza this time based upon Example |. ‘This theme is worked over with 
Example 4 in a kind of introduction to the finale: 

Allegro marziale animato, E flat major, 4/4 time. Here most of the 
principal themes are “transformed” in grandiose style, much as they are 
in the finale to Les Préludes. Example 3 begins the procession, followed 
by Examples 4, 5 and 6. The coda involves a new idea in the violins: 





but the work ends with references to Example IL 
324 








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arf 


tn ofl te 


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SYMPHONIC VARIATIONS FOR 


PIANOSAND OR GHESE RA. Hi ee Set Cbsaye Pane 
(1822-1890 

Cesar Franck was not always the mystical, other-worldly organist of 
the traditional picture. He began his career asa plano virtuoso, and among 
his earlier works are the fantasies on operatic airs and the Souvenirs of 
this place and that which were the plano virtuoso’s stock-in-trade in the 
1840's. The Symphonic Variations, however, are of the same period (1885) 
as the violin sonata, the Prelude, Chorale and Fugue, and other major 
works of Franck, and they reflect his virtuoso interests only in their 
mastery of the pianistic idiom. 

The theme (Poco Allegro, F sharp minor, 4/4 time) is stated at once 
in dialogue between the strings and piano: 











— i a eh 
SLIUNGS 




















There follows a rather free series of variations— so free, in fact, that most 
program annotators side-step the issue of saying how many there are, but 
if the double bars in the score are any criterion, the composer thought 
there were eleven. 


THE SEA, THREE 
SVE ELOIN TG SKEET CEE Ses te ee Claude Debussy 
(1862-1918) 
The Sea, completed in 1905, is Debussy’s largest orchestral work. The 
following comments upon it are taken from Oscar Thompson’s biography 
of the composer. 


From Dawn Till Noon on the Ocean. “There is a mysterious, eerie 
quality in the undulations with which this sketch begins. In the music 
are at once an incantation and an awakening. The chief subject is de- 
claimed by muted trumpet and English horn. Thereafter, as the light 
seems to grow clearer and Nature more boisterous, the waves of this chi- 
merical sea ride higher, throwing their spume into the sunshine, with all 
manner of glint and refraction, exultant, tumultuous, but not menacing 
or cruel. ‘Toward the end wind instruments intone a solemn theme that 
has been described as ‘the chorale of the depths.’ Above it continues the 
pitching of the waves: there comes a momentary lull, then a last shake of 
the mane of these horses of the sea.” 


Play of the Waves. “Here Debussy limns his now throughly awakened 
seéa at play. There are waves of every color and mood in a capricious sport 
of wind and spray. In a contrastive sense this is the scherzo of Debussy’s 
heretical] symphony. ‘The elements dance, they romp and race through im- 
memorial games the secrets of which never wilt be known to man. The 


325 








REARS ANT EEE ALE IAT SEL 


MUSIC and ARTS INSTITUTE of SAN FRANCISCO 


SCHOOLS OF MUSIC + DRAMA ; OPERA 


30 resident and guest teachers and artists - classes and private instruction in San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland - For free information regarding courses and activities, address: 


ROSS McKEE, secretary and founder. 
795 SUTTER at JONES PRospect 0911 - TUxedo 0854 













Artists of the Institute will be heard in a free song recital at San Francisco Museum of 


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INDIVIDUAL COACHING AND SMALL CLASSES 












OPERA CLASS Armando Agnini 






1. Operatic and dramatic roles—make up—stage 





technic—Professional productions 






II. Stage craft—sets—lghts—props—costumes. 





VOICE Lawrence Sherrill 


Principles of singing, sight singing, part singing, 
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MUSIC THEORY WILLIAM FUHRMANN 

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PIANO Ross Mckee 


Elementary and advance Keyboard technic, reper- 
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waves become coryphées, or they gambol like dolphins. About all is an 
aura of the remote and unreal. This is a world of sheer fantasy, of strange 
visions and eerie voices, a mirage of sight and equally a mirage of sound. 
On the sea’s vast stage is presented a trancelike phantasmagoria so evan- 
escent and fugitive that it leaves behind only the vagueness of a dream, 


“Dialogue of the Wind and the Sea presents a gustier and wider sea, 
with a stronger dramatic emphasis and something more closely akin to 
human quality in the impersonation, however, incorporeal it may be, of 
wind and ocean. The use of the whole-tone scale is more conspicuous 1n 
this movement than elsewhere in The Sea. ‘There are two clear recollections 
of the first movement, the first subject being whisked back in one of count- 
less necromantic transformations of fragments of song, and the chorale 
returning again for a climax of growing sonorities. This climax has few 
parallels in Debussy’s usually reticent scoring. Ihe brass peals forth in 
shining splendor. At the close is again the undulation of harmonies sug- 
gestive of the sea that rolls and will not cease to roll, whatever the puny 
destinies of man. The dialogue of wind and waves is of cosmic things, of 
which Debussy’s arabesques are cabalistic symbols. he music only hints 
at the immensities it does not attempt to describe. ‘Yet beneath these elu- 
sive and mysterious overtones, writes Lawrence Gilman, ‘the reality of the 
living sea persists; the immemorial fascination lures and enthralls and 
terrifies, so that we are almost tempted to fancy that the two are, after all, 
‘dentical—the ocean that seems an actuality of wet winds and tossing 
spray and inexorable depths and reaches, and that uncharted and haunted 
and incredible sea which opens before the magic casement of the dream- 


ing mind’.”’ 








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ADA CLEMENT, LILLIAN HODGHEAD, Co-Directors 


VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 


San Francisco: ARTUR ARGEWICZ, J. MENSFORTH RAY 
Berkeley: DORIS BALLARD 
Burlingame: J. MENSFORTH RAY — Carmel & Vicinity: MICHAEL MANN 
Los Altos: DANIEL WAHL 








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The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


29TH SEASON 1940-194] 


ff he season consisted of 52 performances in a period of 18 weeks between 

December 6, 1940, and April 19, 1941. The Musical Association of San 
Francisco sponsored 12 Friday-Saturday pairs, one Easter concert, and 
four Young People’s concerts. By arrangement with the Musical Associa- 
tion the Art Commission presented six Ballet Russe performances and 
five concerts, and Standard Oil Company of California presented ten 
broadcasts, and Stanford University and the San Francisco 
Forum sponsored one concert each. 

The repertoire for the season follows. Unless otherwise indicated, the 
compositions named below were played on the Musical Association series 
under the direction of Pierre Monteux. Initials in parentheses before titles 
indicate programs other than the regular offerings of the Musical Associa- 
tion. AC refers to Art Commission concerts, BR to Ballet Russe perfor- 
mances, SS to Standard Symphony broadcasts, YP to young People’s con- 
certs, “Stanford,” ‘Easter’? and “Forum” to those special events. Names 
of soloists and guest conductors are placed after the titles of the works 
they performed, except that the initials YP alone indicate the guest con- 
ductorship of Rudolph Ganz in the Young People’s series and the initials 
BR alone indicate the guest conductorship of Efrem Kurtz or Franz Allers 
with the Ballet Russe. An asterisk indicates first local performance, a 
double asterisk first performance anywhere. 


Symphony 


AUBER: ) BIZET: 3 
(SS) Overture to Fra Diavolo Suite from The Fair Maid of Perth 
BACH: (Sir Thomas Beecham) 
Brandenburg Concerto No. | (Forum) Ouvre ton Coeur (Margaret 
(YP) Chorale for Brass (arr. Abert) Speaks) 
* arr. Leonardi) Toccata and Fugue BLISS: 
in D minor ee Stanford) = (*) A Color Symphony (Arthur Bliss) 
BOLZONI 
BARBER: y ; el Pe ONS 7 . 
(*) Music for a Scene from Shelley (xP) Minuet for Strings (and SS) 
; BORODIN: 
BEETHOVEN: (SS) Dances from Prince Igor 
(YP) Rondo from C minor concerto o 
Robert Brereton) BRIN S ae pee 
( . % : pera (AC) Concerto for Violin and Orches- 
aaa peeuem eee SS) ; tra (Yehudi Menuhin) 
4Aarchen’s Death, from Egmon AC\ &y ng Te tie 
(AC) Missa Solemnis (Hans Leschke, ah Symphony No. I: (John: Barbir- 
Municipal Chorus, Peggy ete Symphony No. 2 (and Stanford and 
Reba Greenley, Russell Roberts, SS) 


Douglas Beattie.) 


: (* arr. Rubbra) Variations and Fucue 
(AC) Marcia Funebre from Symphony e 


on a Theme by Handel 
on 8 RNS ocaanee _ CHARPENTIER: 
(AC) Symp 1ony No. 5 (and SS) Aria, Depuis le Jour, from Louise 
Symphony No. 7 (and SS) 


(Dorothy Maynor) (Also by Margaret 


Symphony No. 8 Speaks for Forum) 


BERLIOZ: 


aaa ; CHOPIN: 
(Forum) Suite from The Damnation of (BR) Les Sylphides 
Faust (and SS) DEBUSSY: se 


(AC) Overture, The Roman Carnival 
(John Barbirolli) (and SS) 
Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet Sym- 


(Forum) Prelude to The Afternoon of 
a Faun 
(YP) Clair de Lune 


phony The Sea 
BINGHAM: DELIBES: 
(Forum) All Hail the Blue and Gold (SS) Ballet music from Lakme 


328 





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DELIUS: 
Summer 


Thomas Beecham) 


Night on the: River- (Sir 


DILLON: bite 
(SS) Chinese Suite 
DVORAK: _ fo see gee 
(YP) Finale from Violin Concerto 
(Mischa Myers) 
(SS) New World Symphony 
ELGAR: Me ten, 
(AC) Enigma Variations (John Bar- 
biroll1) 
(AC) March, Pomp and Circumstance 


FOSTER: 

(AC) (arr. Busch) Old Folks at Home 
FRANCK: 

(**arr. O’Connell) Piéce Héroique 

(and Stanford) 
Symphony 
Symphonic Variations for Piano and 
Orchestra (Jose Iturbi) 

GANZ: 

(YP) * The Cuckoo 

(YP) **Percussional Melée 
GERSHWIN: 

(BR) (*arr. Bennett) The New Yorker 
GLAZOUNOFF: 

(SS) Scenes de Ballet 
GLINKA: 

(SS) Kamarinskaya 
GLUCK: 

(YP) Ballet music from Orpheus 
GRIEG: 

(YP) Heart Wounds 

(SS) Norwegian Dances 


GRIFFES: 
(Easter) ‘The Pleasure Dome of Kublai 
Khan 
GUION: 
(YP) ‘Turkey in the Straw 
HANDEL: 


(*arr. Beecham) Suite from The Faith- 
ful Shepherd (Sir Thomas Beecham) 
HARRIS: 
(Stanford) **Ode to Truth 
*Symphony No. 3 
HAUG: 
(SS) **Barcarolle for Flute and Orches- 


HAYDN: 
Queen of France Symphony (and SS) 
HERBERT: 
(Forum) Prelude to Act III of Natoma 
JONES: 
(AC) *Finale to a Symphony (Charles 
Jones) 
LA VIOLETTE: 
(YP) *Masquerade for woodwinds 
(AC) **San Francisco Overture (Wes- 
ley La Violette) 
LIADOV: 
(SS) The Enchanted Lake 
LISZT: 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 
| (Jose Iturbi) 
(YP) Liebestraum 
(SS) Mephisto Waltz 
(Easter) Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 
(and SS) 
(SS) Les Preludes 


MAC DOWELL: 

(YP) ‘Toa Wild Rose (and SS) 

(SS) To a Water Lily 
MASSENET: 

(SS) Ballet music from Le Cid 

(SS) Suite from Les Erinnyes 
MC DONALD: 

*San Juan Capistrano 
MENDELSSOHN: 

(YP) Overture, Fingal’s Cave 

(YP) Suite from Midsummernight’s 
Dream 

MILHAUD: 
*Symphony (Darius Milhaud) 
MOZART: 

(YP) First movement from Concerto for 
two pianos (Helen and Andrienne 
Levitt) 

Aria, L’Amero, Saro Costante, from 
Il Re Pastore (Dorothy Maynor) 

Sinfonia Concertante for Woodwinds 
and Orchestra (Merill Remington, 
Rudolph Schmitt, Ernest Kubitschek 
and Pierre Lambert) 

Paris Symphony (Sir Thomas Beec- 
ham) 

NICOLAT: 

(SS) Overture to The Merry Wives of 

Windsor 

OFFENBACH: 
(BR) (arr. Rosenthal) Parisian Gaieties 

PONCHIELLI: 

(SS) Dance of the Hours, from La 
Gioconda 

PROKOFIEFF: 

(Easter) *Peter and the Wolf (Basil 

Rathbone) 
RACHMANINOFF: 

Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 
| (Sergei Rachmaninoff) 

Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 
3 (Sergei Rachmaninoff) 

Rhapsody on a Theme by Paganini 
(Sergei Rachmaninoff) 

Symphony No. 2 (and SS) 

RAVEL: 

(Forum) Bolero 

Daphnis and Chloe, Suites Nos. 1 and 2 
(and SS) 

(AC) Tzigane (Yehudi Menuhin) 

RIMSKY-KORSAKOFF: 

(SS) March from Le Coq d’Or 

(YP) Flight of the Bumblebee 

(BR) Spanish Caprice (and YP) 

(AC) Overture, The Russian Easter 

SAAR: 
(SS) Lake Emerald 
SAINT- SAENS: 
(YP) Marche Héroique 
SCHUBERT: 
Symphony in C major (scherzo on YP) 
(SS) Unfinished symphony 
SCHUMAN, WILLIAM: 
*American Festival Overture 
SCHUMANN, ROBERT: 
Symphony No. 3 
(YP) ‘Traumerei 
SCHNEIDER: 
(Forum) Fires of Wisdom 


329 









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REESE ELSE EIST CEES SEE TEE TSAR EIEL ITT EET EENES 
—— = maaan pets 


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SP SS ee ee 


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—————— ooo ooo SO OOO Ooo oe es ees ees se 
ae Poe SSS oa Ja 5 


— - - = -- 











SEARCH: 
(SS) La Golondrina 
SIBELIUS: 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 
(Isaac Stern) 
(SS) Finlandia 
(SS) Valse ‘Triste 
Symphony No. 5 
Symphony No. 7 (Sir Thomas Beec- 
ham) 
SHOSTAKOVITCH: 
R) Symphony No. 1 (Rouge et Noir) 
SMETANA: 
(YP) The Moldau 
SMITH: 
(Forum) Hail, Stanford, Hail 
SPEAKS: 
(Forum) Sylvia and Morning (Marga- 
ret Speaks) 
STRAUSS, JOHANN: 
(YP) Emperor Waltzes 
(Forum) ‘Tales from the Vienna Woods 
(and SS) 
STRAUSS, RICHARD: 
Dance of the Seven Veils from Salome 
Symphonia Domestica 
Thus Spake Zarathustra 
STRAVINSKY: 
(BR) *The Fairy’s Kiss 
(BR) The Poker Game 
(BR) Petrouchka 
SZYMANOWSKI: 
*Sinfonia Concertante for Piano and 
Orchestra (Maxim Schapiro) 
STRECH: 
(SS) Old Hawaii 
TSCHAIKOWSKY: 
(AC) Concerto for Piano and Orches- 
tra, No. | (Alexander Brailowsky) 
(BR) The Nutcracker 
(BR) Serenade for String Orchestra 
(BR) The Swan Lake 
(Forum) Romeo and Juliet (and SS) 











Zu 


CS a SA, TERE 
| a Pee) 
a 
Vidi ES 

THE 


Weingartner - Old 


EX 5738 


MUSIC \ > 2; Album 





(Easter) Symphony No. 6 (excerpts on 
YP and SS 
VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: 
London Symphony 
WAGNER: 

ART COMMISSION WAGNER PROGRAM; 
KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD, SOLOIST; EDWIN 
McARTHUR, CONDUCTING: 

Overture to Meistersinger (and SS) 

Elsa’s Dream from Lohengrin 

Dich, Theure Halle from Tann- 
hduser 

Bacchanale from Tannhduser (and 
BR) 

Prelude and Finale from Tristan 
und Isolde 

Prelude and Good Friday Spell 
from Parsifal (Good Friday Spell 
also on SS and Stanford) 

Ride of the Valkyries from Die 
Walkiire 
Brunnhilde’s Immolation from 
Gotterddmmerung 

Wotan’s Farewell and Magic Fire Scene 
from Die Walkiire (and SS) 

Siegfried Idyll 

(Easter) Overture to The Flying Dutch- 
man (and SS) 

(SS) Introduction to Act III of Lohen- 
grin 

(SS) Prize Song from Meistersinger 

(SS) ‘Traume 

WEBER: 

(SS) Overture to Euryanthe 

(SS) Invitation to the Dance 

Aria, Leise, Leise, from Der Freischiitz 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Jubilee Overture (and SS) 

(YP) Overture to Oberon 

(BR) Vienna, 1814 


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CONCERTO for PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, No.1, E FLAT MAJOR. . Liszt 
Emil Sauer and Orchestre des Concerts du Conservatoire Paris Felix 

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SYMPHONIC VARIATIONS FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA..... Franck 

Walter Gieseking with London Philharmonic Orchestra and Sir Henry Wood 
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“VIRGINIA MORGAN 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 





Concert Harpist | 


SAN FRANCISCO TU xeEpo 2738 


Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 











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APPRECIATION 


he following members of the Musical Association of San Francisco 
- through their contributions to the Sustaining Fund . . have rend- 


ered a valuable public service. 


The Musical Association gratefully 


acknowledges this assistance which has made it possible for the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra to perform magnificent music during 


its twenty-ninth season. 


HONORARY MEMBERS 


ANONYMOUS 
ARMSBY, MRS. LEONORA WOOD 
BOYD, LOUISE A. 
BRADLEY, MRS. F. W. AND H. SEWALL 
CROCKER, THE W. H. FAMILY 
COUNTESS pe LIMUR 
MRS. HENRY POTTER RUSSELL 
WILLIAM W. CROCKER 
CHARLES CROCKER 
EHRMAN, MR. AND MRS. SIDNEY M. 
FLEISHHACKER, MR. AND MRS. MORTIMER 


HAAS, MADELEINE AND WILLIAM 
HAAS, MR. AND MRS. WALTER 
FHELEER, MRS.-E. S&S. 

HILLS BROS. COFFEE, INC. 
KOSHLAND, MRS. MARCUS 5. 
McGREGOR, JOHN A. 

MILLER, MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. 
NORRIS, CHARLES G. 
SCHILLING, ELSA 

STERN, MRS. SIGMUND 
VOLKMANN, GEORGE F. 


REGULAR MEMBERS 


ANONYMOUS 

ACKERMAN, MRS. LLOYD S. 
ALLYNE, LUCY H. 

BAILEY, MR. AND MRS. FRAZER 
BARKAN, DR. AND MRS. HANS 
BENNETT, MRS. GEORGE E. 
BERTON, MRS. G. A. 

BISSINGER, MR. AND MRS. NEWTON 
BISSINGER, MR. AND MRS. PAUL 
BLOCH, LOUIS 

BLUMLEIN, JACOB 

BLYTH, MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. 
BORDEN’S DAIRY DELIVERY CO. 
BREUNER, CAROLINE 

BREUNER, KATHERINE 

BROOKE, MRS. PHILIP N. 

BROWN, MARTHA LEONARD 
CALIFORNIA BARREL COMPANY, LTD. 
CAMERON, MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. 
CITY OF PARIS DRYGOODS Co. 
CLARK, MRS. TOBIN 

CLARK, MRS. WARREN D. 
CLAYBURGH, HERBERT E. 
COGHLAN, MR. AND MRS. JOHN P. 
COHN, MRS. MAX M. 

COLEMAN, PERSIS H. 

COLEMAN, S. WALDO 

CUSHING, MRS. OD. K. 

DALY, MRS. JOHN D. 

DAVIS, D. G. 

DELATOUR, MRS. GEORGES 
DINKELSPIEL, MRS. LLOYD wW. 
DINKELSPIEL, MRS. LOUIS M. 
DINKELSPIEL, MRS. SAMUEL L. 
DODGE, MRS. GEORGE M. 

DURHAM, MR. AND MRS. WILLARD H. 
EHMANN, MR. AND MRS. E. W. 
EHRMAN, MR. AND MRS. ALBERT L. 
EHRMAN, MRS. ALFRED 

EHRMAN, MRS. S. W. 

ELOESSER, DR. LEO 

THE EMPORIUM 

ENGELHART, MR. AND MRS. FORREST 
EPSTEIN, MR. AND MRS. GUSTAV 
ESBERG, MRS. MILTON H. 

FAVILLE, W. B. 

FELTON, MRS. CHARLES N. 
FLOWERS, MRS. JOSEPH C. 
FORBES, JOWN F. 

FORCE, R. C. 

FULLER, MRS. W. PARMER, JR. 
GALL, MRS. REBECLA F. 

GAMBLE, ELIZABETH 

GLASER, MRS. EDWARD F. 
GOLDSTEIN, CELENE AND LUTIE D. 
GRAHAM, DR. GILBERT F. 

GRANT, MR. AND MRS. J. D. 


GRANT, MR. AND MRS. SPENCER 
GREENEBALUM, EMIL 
GRIFFIN, MRS. WILLARD M. 
GRIFFITH, ALICE S&S. 
GRIFFITHS, FARNHAM P. 
GUGGENHIME, MRS. D. J. 
GUGGENHIME, MRS. LEON 
HAAS, MRS. A. 
HAAS, LOUIS 5S. 
HALL, FREDERIC W. 
HASTINGS, MRS. RUSSELL P. 
HAYNE, MRS. GRACE P. 
HELLER, WALTER 5. 
HELLMAN, MRS. I. W. 
HELLMANN, MRS. HORATIO G. 
HOCKENBEAMER, MRS. A. F. 
HOOKER, OSGOOD 
HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 
HUNTINGTON, MARIAN 
HYMAN, MRS. JOSEPH 

IN MEMORIAM 
IRVINE, MRS. JAMES 
JACOBI, J. d. 
KAHN, MRS. IRA 
KEAST, MR. AND MRS. GEORGE 
KENDRICK, MR. AND MRS. CHARLES 
KING, ARTHUR DALE 
KING, MRS. FRANK B. 
KLEINJUNG, MRS. JOSEPHINE 
KOSHLAND, MR. AND MRS. DANIEL 
KOSHLAND, MRS. JESSE 
KOSTER, FREDERICK J. 
LANG, MR. AND MRS. ALBERT G. 
LARSH, MRS. H. G. 
LAYMAN, DR. MARY H. 
LENGFELD, MRS. A. L. 
LEVISON, MR. AND MRS. J. B. 
LIEBES | Heed Gel 
LILIENTHAL, MR. AND MRS. PHILIP 
LIPMAN, F. L. 
LISSER, DR. AND MRS. H. 
LOCHEAD, MR. AND MRS. JAMES K. 
LOWE, MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL 
Mc BEAN, MRS. ATHOLL 
McDONALD, MR. AND MRS. ANGUS 
McDONALD, MRS. MARK L. 
Mc ENERNEY, MR. AND MRS. GARRET 
MACCALLUM, JEAN A. 
I. MAGNIN & CO. 
MANNON, d. M. JR. 
MARTIN, A. B. 
MEYERFELD, MRS. M. 
MIGHAELS, C. F. 
MILLS, MRS. EDWARD M. 
MOFFITT, DR. A. EC. 
MONTEAGLE, MR. AND MRS. KENNETH 
MLUNSELL, MRS. dU. E. @. 


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MURPHY, WALTER P. 

MUSICIANS’ UNION, LOCAL NO. 6 
MUSTO, GUIDO 

MUSTO, LAURA 

NEUSTADTER, NEWTON H. 
NEWBALIER, MRS. SANFORD R. 
NOYES, MRS. FRANK G. 

SLIVERSs MRS-E. i: 
OPPENHEIMER, MRS. JULIUS 
PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY 
PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY 

PAGE, CHARLES R. 

PAUSON, FRANK & SONS 

PISANI, G. 

POWELL, MR AND MRS. STANLEY 
RAISS, MRS. CARL 

ROLKIN, MRS. EDWARD M. 
ROSENBAUM, MRS. EMMA 
ROSENBERG, MRS. ABRAHAM 
JOHN ROSENFELD & SONS 

ROTH, MRS. W. P. 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSICAL CLUB 
SCHILLING, MRS. RUDOLPH 
SCHILLING, DR. AND MRS. WALTER 
SCHWABACHER, MR. AND MRS. ALBERT 
SCHWABACHER, MRS. LOUIS A. 
SCHWABACHER, MRS. LUDWIG 
SHAINWALD, MRS. RICHARD H. 
SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. 

SHERMAN, MRS. FRED R. 

SHOMO, MRS. J. A. 


ASSOCIATE 


ANONYMOUS 

AARON, MRS. LEOPOLD 
ACHENBACH, MRS. M. S&S. 
ACKERMAN, MRS. I. GS. 
ADAMS, MRS. WILLIAM WOOD 
ALEXANDER, ELIZABETH 
ALLEN, MRS. H. W. 

ALLEN, MARTHA L. 

ALLEN, MRS. WYATT H. 
ALTMAN, JOHN C. 

ALWARD, MRS. H. V. 
ANDERSON, MRS. BERRIEN P. 
ANDERSON, MRS. MELVIN J. 
ANDERSON, MRS. NANCY W. 
ANDREWS, MARGARET 
ANDREWS, MARY 

ANDREWS, MR. AND MRS. ROBERT E. 
ANSPACHER, SELAM 
ARNHOLD, MRS. B. 
ARNSTEIN, MRS. WALTER 
ASH, CHARLES &. 

ASTREDO, MRS. J. C. 
BABCOCK, MRS. WILLIAM 
BAKER, MRS. GEORGE W., JR. 
BAKER, MRS. WAKEFIELD 
BAKEWELL, HARRIET 
BALDWIN, A. R. 

BALDWIN, FRANCES 
BALDWIN, MRS. JOHN G. 
BARKAN, FRITZ 

BARKAN, DR. OTTO 
BARTLETT, MRS. EDWARD OTIS 
BARUCH, MRS. FREDERICK 
BARUH, MARCUS M. 
BATCHELDER, LINCOLN 
BAUER, MRS. SAMUEL 
BAUM, HELEN 

BEATTY, MYRFLE 

BEAVER, MRS. FREDERICK 
Se PeneeaMirs. ohePReEN 
BEETZ, HANS B. 

BENIOFF, MR. AND MRS. DAVID 
BENNER, MR. AND MRS. FREDERICK C. 
BENTLEY, MRS. GHARCES: H: 
BENTLEY, FLORENGE 

BEND Z4.MRS.-A.. EG. 

BEBEER,- DRe ALICE GE. 
BERENSON, MRS. A. 
BERKELEY PIANO CLUB 
BELURMAN, MRS. ANNIE P. 
BIRMINGHAM, MRS. J. E. 
BISHOP, MRS. ROY 
BISSINGER, MRS. S&S. 


D02 


SIMON, MRS. ALFRED 

SINTON, MRS. EDGAR 
SKEWES-COX, MRS. VERNON 
SLACK, CHARLES W. 

SLOSS, MRS. JOSEPH 

SeBSS,. MRS] EEEIN 

SLOSS, MR. AND MRS. LEON, JR. 
SLOSS, MR. AND MRS. LOUIS, JR. 
SLOSS, JUDGE AND.MRS:.M. C. A 
STERN, MR. AND MRS. NEWTON W. 
STRAUSS, MRS. JACK 

SUTRO, MR. AND MRS. ALFRED 
TAYLOR, MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG 
THOMPSON, MORLEY P. 
THREEKELD, “MRS. M.+E: 

TUBBS, MRS. ALFRED 

VOLKMANN, MR. AND MRS. DANIEL 
VOLKMANN, JOHANNA M. 
VOLKMANN, MR. AND MRS. WM. G. 
WALKER, MR. AND MRS. RANDOLPH C. 
WALTER, MRS. C. R. 

WALTER, MRS. JOHN I. 

WHITAKER, MR. AND MRS. L. EC. 

THE WeAbEE Ae CSE 

WIEE, MR. AND IMRS: BE rH: 
WILLIAMS, MRS. W. WILBERFORCE 
WITTER, MR. AND MRS. DEAN 
WRIGHT, MR. AND MRS. HAROLD L. 
YELLOW CAB COMPANY 

YOUNGER, MRS. W. Jd. 

ZELLERBACH, MR. AND MRS. J. D. 





4 


MEMBERS 


BUORNSTAD, MRS. A. W. 

BLACKWELDER, MRS. ELLIOT 

BLAIR, JENNIE M. 

BLOOM, MRS. S&S. 

BLOOMFIELD, DR. AND MRS. ARTHUR L. 

BOARDMAN, MRS. WALTER W. 

BOGGS, MRS. ANGUS G. 

BOHEMIAN CLUB SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 

BOLAND, MRS. F. ELDRED 

BRETEN.] MRS. ROBERT GE. 

BONTICON, HELEN 

BEE TESMRS Ar. ee 

BOWLES, MRS. GEORGE 

BOYLE, NINA 

BRANDENSTEIN, MRS. M. J. 

BRANSTEN, MR. AND MRS. EDWARD 

BRANSTEN, MRS. MANFRED 

BRAWNER, MRS. W. P. F. 

BRICCA, MRS. C. R. 

BRICE, MRS. ELIZABETH 

BROOKS, GEORGE W. 

BROWN, MRS. ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

BROWN, MRS. HILYER 

BROWN, MRS. I. I. 

SROWN, MRS. LAURENCE CLAY 

BREWIN EE IVR stare ese es. 

BRUCE, MRS. STARR 

BRUNN, DR. HAROLD 

BUCHANAN, LYNDA 

BUCK, THOMAS 

BUCKWALTER, EDNA W. 

BUBB EE MRS. CEE 

BULLARD, MR. AND MRS. ROBERT P. 

BULLIS, MRS. EDWARD A. 

BULLOCK & JONES CO. 

BURCKHARDT, CAROLINE 

BUSH Peele 

BED ey Mrs. PERE 

SB Elisksy ae Ree oS, al ee 

CAHN, MRS. M. I. 

CAHN, MR. AND MRS. RALPH 

CAMERON, ESTELLE M. 

CAMP, MR. AND MRS. HARRY 

CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS H. 

CAMPBELL, MRS. G. P. 

CARRUTHERS, MRS. CE. P. 

CARSON, MRS. A. C. 

CELLA, ALMA 

CHAPMAN, MRS. C. EC. 

CHARLES, MARTIN A. 

CHARLES, MRS. RAYMOND 

CHASE, MRS. GEORGE QQ. 








CHIPMAN, MRS. W. F. 
CLARK, MRS. DEARBORN 
CLAY, MAUDE C. 

CLAYTON, A. FLORENCE 
COBLENTZ, MRS. LAMBERT 
COGGINS, MRS. SHIRLEY M. 
COGHILL, NEWTON B. 
COLE, MRS. CHARLES R. 
COLE, MRS. ERNEST R. 
COLLINSON, E. 

COLMAN, MR. AND MRS. JESSE 
COMAN, MRS. E. T. 
CONRAD, MRS. BARNABY 
COOK, HOUSTON 

COOK, MRS. W. H. 

COOPER, ETHEL 

COPE, MRS. WALTER B. 
CORDES, DR. FREDERICK C. 
COWERD, MARY COOK 
CREED, MRS. W. E. 

CROWLEY, MRS. P. J. 
CUSHING, MRS. wu. E. 
DAILEY, MRS. GARDNER 
DAVIS, MRS. ALBERT D. 
DAVIS, ALVIN 

DAVIS, B. 

DAVIS, MRS. FRANCES L. 
DEERING, MRS. JAMES H. 

bE GUIGNE, CHRISTIAN III 
DELANY, MARION 

DELEE, MRS. EDITH S&. 
DEMPSTER, MRS. L. R. 
DERNHAM, MRS. IRENE B. 
DILL, MR. AND MRS. MARSHALL 
DON LEE, INC. 

DONOHOE, KATHERINE 
DREXLER, E. A. 

DURBROW, MRS. C. w. 
DUTOT, ELIZABETH 
DUTTON, MRS. DUNN 
DUTTON, MRS. GRAYSON 
EARHART, GERTRUDE 
EASLEY, JULIA M. 

EBRIGHT, MRS. GEORGE 
EDOFF, MRS. FRANK u. 
EDWARDS, MRS. ELIZABETH D. 
EHRLICH, PHILIP S. 
EISENBACH, DAVID R. 
EISNER, MRS. NORMAN 
ELKUS, MRS. CHARLES pe Y. 
ELOESSER, HERBERT 

EMGE, DR. LUDWIG A. 
EPPINGER, MRS. JOSUA, UR. 
EPSTEIN, MRS. MILTON H. 
ERSKINE, MRS. MORSE 
ERSKINE, DOUGLAS 

ESBERG, A. |. 

EVANS, MR. AND MRS. HARRY 
FABER, DR. AND MRS. HAROLD K. 
FAIRMONT HOTEL 

FALK, EDNA SALLY 

FAUBEL, GRACE 

FAURE, VICTOR C. 
FEIGENBAUM, MRS. B. J. 
FIELD, MRS. ALEXANDER 
FUNSTEN, MRS. uJ. d. 
GARDNER, MRS. KENNETH D. 
GAY, ELIZABETH 
GREENHOOD, FRANCES 
GREENLEE, MRS. FREDERICK L. 
GREGORY, MRS. DONALD 
GREGORY, MRS. WARREN 
GRIFFIN, MIRIAM 

GRIMM, H. T. 

GUGGENHIME, MRS. RICHARD E. 
GUMP, A. L. & CO. 

GUNST, MR. AND MRS. MORGAN A. 
GUNST, MRS. M. A. 
HACKETT, C. NELSON 
HAEFNER, EMMA 
HALLOWELL SEED Co. 
HAMILTON, MRS. EDWARD M. 
HAMILTON, MRS. NOBLE 
HAMSHAW, MRS. WALTER 
HANCOCK BROS 

HANDLON, MRS. JOSEPH H. 
HANNA, MRS. RIGHARD u. 


HANNAH, MRS. CHARLES C. 
HARDY, MRS. SUMNER 

HARRIS, MRS. L. W. 

HARRISON, MRS. ROBERT W. 
HAYDEN, CURTIS 

HAYDEN, uJ. R. 

HEGHT, EDA 

HEIMANN, MR. AND MRS. RICHARD 
HELLER, MR. AND MRS. EDWARD H. 
HELLER, MRS. WALTER D. 
HELLMAN, MRS. F. Jd. 

HENRY, CHARLES A. 

HEWLETT, MRS. A. W. 

HEYMAN, MRS. ALVIN 

HILL, MRS. HARRY 

HILLER, EDNA 

H!IRSCHKIND, W. 

HODGES, MRS. EE. S. 

HEeBKRER, MRS. -REIBERW Gay oriix: 
HORSBURGH, MRS. JAMES 
HOSFORD, MRS. GEORGE N. 
HOUGAARD, MRS. WILLIAM F. 
HOUGHTELLING, WILLIAM 
HOWELL, JOHN THOMAS 
BETTER, MRSS ERNESi 

HYMAN, MRS. VERA R. 

HYMAN, MRS. WILLIAM 

JACKSON, MRS. B. Jd. 

JACOBS, MRS. CARRIE E. 

JACOBS, IRVING P. 

JACOBS, REBECCA 

JANNEY, MRS. F. F. 

JEDDIS, MRS. FRANK L. 

JENKINS, ELEANOR CUSHING 
JOHNSON, GRACE N. 

JOHNSON, LEDA 

JORDAN, MRS. DAVID STARR 
JOSEPH, SIGMUND 

KAHN, MRS. FELIX 

KAHN, SAMUEL 

KAUFFMAN, MRS. SOL 

KAYE, MR. AND MRS. JAMES MAYEFIELD 
KEATOR, MRS. BENJAMIN C. 

KEI EsyY@ oe eee 

KENNA, MRS. A. 

KENT, ARTHUR H. 

KEYES, EDNA L. 

KING, PERGY_E: 

KIRK, MRS. JOSIAH H. 

KIRKHAM, MRS. FRANCIS 
KIRKWOOD, MRS. ROBERT C. 
KIRKWOOD, MRS. R. C., JR. 
KLUMPKEY, ANNA E. AND JULIA 
KNIGHT, MRS. SAMUEL 

KNOX, MRS. JOHN 

KNOX, MR. AND MRS. MAURICE H. 
KOHN, MRS. S. 

KORBEL, CAROLINE 

KOSHLAND, MR. AND MRS. ABRAHAM 
KOSHLAND, MR. AND MRS. ROBERT J. 
KUHN, MRS. CHARLES J. 

KUTNER, ALFRED 

LAGEY, JOSEPH) &: 

LAMONT, DONALD Y. 

LANDELS, MRS. E. D. 
LANSBURGH, S&S. LAZ 

LATHROP, MR. AND MRS. LELAND S&S. 
LEAVENS, MR. AND MRS. ROBERT F. 
CEES MRS: RUSSELELYV. 

LENS, FRANCES 

LESTER, ALBERT.M. 

LETGCAER, SB. W. 

LEVY, MARTHA 

EN. Yieurois es 

LEWIS, AZRO N. 

CEWisS, MRS. Is. -N: 
PIiBRRENSTEIN, MRS. Jey 
LIEBENTHAL, MRS. A. 

LIEBES, ARNOLD 

LIEBMANN, MR. AND MRS. MAURICE 
CIStENTEAAL, 8. PR: 

LILIENTHAL, MRS. JESSE W., JR. 
LILIENTHAL, MR. AND MRS. SAMUEL 
LILIENTHAL, VICTORIA 
LIVERMORE, MRS. NORMAN 
LIVINGSTON BROS. 

LIVINGSTON, LAWRENCE 


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LONG, MR. AND MRS. J. A. 
LOWE, WILLIAM H. 
LOWENBERG, A. Ju. 
LOWREY, MRS. A. J. 
LYMAN, MRS. OLIVER B. 
Mc BAINE, MRS. J. P. 
Mc CREARY, MRS. F. EC. 
Mc DONALD, MRS. JULLIARD 
Mc GAW, MRS. JOHN 
Mc GINNIS, MR. AND MRS. FELIX Ss. 
Mc GREGOR, CAMPBELL 
Mc KINNON, MR. AND MRS. HAROLD R. 
Mc NEAR, MRS. GEORGE P. 
MACAULEY, MRS. EDWARD 
MACK, MRS. A. 
MAILLIARD, MR. AND MRS. Jd. W., JR. 
MAJORS, DR. ERGO A. 
MARK HOPKINS HOTEL 
MARSHALL, MRS. STEWART M. 
MARWEDEL, MRS. C. W. 
MARX, MRS. MELVILLE 
MASON, GERTRUDE A. 
MAYER, MRS. HENRY L. 
MEARS, PROF. AND MRS. ELIOT G. 
MENDELL, MRS. GEORGE H. 
MENDELSON, MRS. JULIUS 
MENDESSOLLE, EVELYN 
METCALF, MRS. JOHN B. 
MEYER, MRS. ALFRED 
MEYERHOFF, MRS. PAUL 
MIDDLEMAS, MRS. STUART 
MILBANK, MRS. ROBBINS 
MILLER, MRS. HARRY EAST 
MILLS, GWLADYS 
MILTON, ANN 
MILTON, MRS. MAXWELL 
MITTAU, FRANKLIN 

IN MEMORY OF FREDERICK MITTAU 
MOFFAT, HENRIETTA 
MOFFITT, JAMES K. 
MOORE, JAMES R. 
MOORE, MRS. JOSEPH, JR. 
MOORE, MRS. WALTON N. 
MORGAN, MRS. H. W. 
MORRISON, MRS. LEWIS F. 
MUEH, ELIZABETH 
MLIRDOCK, MRS. WILLIAM C., JR. 
MUSICIANS CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO 
MYERS, HELEN E. 
NATHAN, MR. AND MRS. A. 
NATIONAL LEAGUE OF AMERICAN 

PEN WOMEN SAN FRANCISCO 
BRANCH 

NATZEL, JOHN D. 
NELSON, MR. AND MRS. ROLPH R. 
NELSON, THERESIA 
NEPPERT, FLORENCE E. AND JULIA M. 
NEWHALL, MRS. E. W., JR. 
NICHOLS, HENRY D. 
NICKELSBURG, MR. AND MRS. M. 5S. 
NIELSEN, MRS. ERICH 
NOBLE, MRS. CHARLES, JR. 
NOCK, H. M. 
NORRIS, MRS. FRANK 
NORRIS, MRS. L. A. 
NORTON, RICHARD 
D’CONNOR, MOFFATT & CO. 
OLCESE, MARGARET T. 
OLDER, MRS. B. J. 
OLIVER, MRS. A. LESLIE 
OLNEY, MRS. WARREN, JR. 
OPPEN, MRS. GEORGE 
ORRICK, W. H. 
OTTO, MRS. GEORGE 
PETTIT, DR. A. V. 
PFLUGER, J. C. 
PHILOMATH CLUB 
PISCHEL, MRS. KASPAR 
PODESTA & BALDOCCHI 
POSEY, MRS. MARY M. 
POTTER, MRS. ASHTON 
POTTER, MRS. J. SHELDON 
QUINLAN, MRS. THOMAS 
RAAS, MRS. J. C. 
RANSOHOFFS INC. 
RATHBONE, KING AND SEELEY 
RAWLINGS, JANE D. 


Doe: 


REDEWILL, DR. AND MRS. FRANCIS H. 
REGENSBURGER, HELEN 
REHFISCH, MRS. H. M. 

REINCKE, L. M. 

RENNY, JESSIE 

RETTENMAYER, MRS. Jd. P. 
RHINE, ESTHER 

RICH, HELEN D. 

RICHARDSON, MRS. WILLIAM J. 
RINDER, REV. REUBEN R. 
ROBINSON, MRS. M. R. 

ROGERS, MRS. WILLIAM Ele TER 
ROOS BROS. 

ROOS, MRS. ROBERT A. 
ROSENBAUM, MRS. CHARLES W. 
ROSENER, LELAND 5. 

ROWE, MRS. ALBERT H. 

RUBKE, F. W. 

RUEGER, MR. AND MRS. GODFREY, JR. 
SAHLEIN, MRS. HENRY 

ST. FRANCIS WOOD MUSICAL CLUB 
SALOMON, MRS. LEON 

SALZ, MILTON H. 

SAMPSON, DR. AND MRS. J. J. 
SARONI, MRS. ALFRED B. 
SAYLES, FRANCES C. 

SBARBORD, MRS. A. E. 

SCATENA, GEMMA 

SCHMIDT, MRS. BERNHARD H. 
SCHMIEDELL, MRS. E. G. 
SCHWAMM, LOUISE 

ScoTT, MRS. B. C. 

SCOTT, MRS. HARRY H. 

SELENE, ROSE 5S. 

SELLMAN, MRS. W. H. 
SHAINWALD, MRS. R. S. 

SHARP, FANNIE AND VIBE T 
SHARP, DR. AND MRS. JAMES GRAHAM 
SHELDON, MRS. EDWIN R. 
SHERMAN, MRS. JULIUS 

SHOOK, DR. FRANCIS M. 
SIMPSON, MRS. A. W:; JR. 
SINSHEIMER, MRS. SAMUEL 
SINTON, STANLEY H. 

SINTON, MRS. STANLEY, JR. 
SLOSS, MR. AND MRS. RICHARD L. 


SMITH, MRS. STUART F. 
SMITHIES, DR. HAROLD R. 
SOMMER & KALI FMANN 
SONNENBERG, MRS. A. 
SPAULDING, MRS. W. H. 
SPERRY, MRS. HORACE B. 
SPRAGUE, FRANCES A. 
STARR, MRS. G. W. 
STEBBINS, L. W. 
STEINHART, HILDA 
STEINHART, ROSE 
STEPHENS, MRS. GEORGE 
STERLING, MRS. RALPH T. 
STEVENS, HARLEY C. 
STEWART, MRS. CHARLES A. 
STOLZ, EMANUEL M. 

STOLZ, MAX 

STONE, MRS. ABRAHAM LINCOLN 
STRASSBURGER, MRS. LAWRENCE 
STRAUS, MRS. LOUIS 
STULL, FLORENGE 
SULLIVAN, FRANK E. 
SUSSMAN, MRS. EMILIE 
SUTRO, MRS. JOHN A. 
SWAYNE, MRS. LLOYD 
TERWILLIGER, MRS. H. L. 
TETLOW, MARY A. 

THOMAS, ARTHUR F. 
THOMPSON, BARBARA BEACH 
THOMPSON, MRS. JAMES A. 
THOMPSON, L. GERTRUDE 
THOMPSON, MRS. BETTIE W. 
THORNER, MRS. THEODORE 
TOBIN, MRS. CYRIL 

TOBIN, MRS. Jd. 5S. 

TOOHIG, MRS. JOSEPH D. 
TOYE, MRS. FLORENCE M. 
TROUILLET, MRS. ELISE 
TUBBS, TALLANT 

UPTON, MRS. JOHN 


























VAN WYCK, MRS. SYDNEY 

VINCENT, MRS. W. GERMAIN 

VON ADELUNG, MRS. EDWARD 

VOUTE, C. A. 

WAGNER, HELEN R. 

WALDECK, EDA 

WALDROP, MRS. UDA 

WALKER, MRS. DAVID H. 

WALKER, MRS. P. ud. 

WALLACE, MRS. R. W. 

WALTER, MRS. EDGAR 

WARE, MRS. EVELYN &. 

WARREN, MRS. LINGAN A. 

WEATHERWAX, MRS. C. M. 

WEILL, MR. AND MRS. MICHEL D. 

WEINSTOCK, MRS. H. BARBARA 

WHITLEY, MRS. H. A. 

WILBER, MRS. EARLE MORSE 

WILDBERG, MRS. IRVING I. 

WILLARD, E. M. 

WILARD, MARY 

WILLIAMS, STEPHEN 

WILSON, MRS. A. W. 

WOLF, MRS. PAUL T. 

WOMEN’S MUSICIANS’ CLUB OF 
SAN FRANCISCO 


WOOD, MRS. CALEN 

WOOD, HAZEL AND MYRTLE 
WOOD, MRS. L. E. 

WOOD, MRS. PAUL 
WORMSER, MRS. PAUL 
WRIGHT, MRS. H. E. 
WURSTER, WILLIAM WILSON 
YABROFF, MRS. SAMUEL 
ZANE, MARGARET 
ZARUBA, MRS. V 
ZENTNER, MRS. JULIUS 
ZIEL, JOHN G. 
ZIMMERMAN, MRS&. P. 
ZIMMERMAN, RUDOLPH 
ZOOK, EDGAR T. 


ADDENDA 


PODD, MRS. JAMES 
REYNOLDS, MRS. LLOYD 
LEHMANN, MRS. A. 
NORTH, MRS. HENRY E. 
MAYES, MRS. CAROLYN B. 
MACEY, MRS. JAMES ud. 
CRESSY, MR. FRANK A. 


FIRMS AND ORGANIZATIONS CONTRIBUTING 


We are fortunate in being able to list a number of firms and organiza- 
tions among our ConuDtione for this is a definite recognition io the 
Symphony’s worth to the community as a Civic asset, as W vell as being a 
source of cultural uplift to thousands of individuals. 


BALDWIN PIANO CO. 

BEETZ BROS., INC. 

BENIOFF BROS. DAVID, FURRIERS 

BERKELEY PIANO CLUB 

BOHEMIAN CLUB SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 

BORDEN’S DAIRY DELIVERY CO. 

BULLOCK & JONES COMPANY 


CALIFORNIA BARREL COMPANY, LTD. 


CITY OF PARIS DRYGOODS CO. 
DON LEE, INC. 

THE EMPORIUM 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 
FORTHNIGHTLY MUSIC CLUB 
GUMP, A. L. & CO. 

HALOWELL SEED COMPANY 
HANCOCK BROS. 

FILES BROS. COFFEE, (ING. 
HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

LIEBES, ARNOLD 

H. LIEBES COMPANY 
LIVINGSTON BROS 

l. MAGNIN & CO. 

MAISSON MENDESSOLLE 


MARK HOPKINS HOTEL 

MUSICIANS’ CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO 

MUSICIANS’ UNION, LOCAL NO. 6 

NATIONAL LEAGUE OF AMERICAN PEN 
WOMEN SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH 

D’CONNOR MOFFAT & COD. 

PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC COMPANY 

PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY 

PAUSON, FRANK & SONS 

PHILOMATH CLUB 

PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO. 

PODESTA & BALDOCCHI 

RANSOHOFFS, INC. 

RATHBONE, KING, & SEELEY 

ROOS BROS. 

ROSENFELD, JOHN & SONS 

ST. FRANCIS WOOD MUSICAL CLUB 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSICAL CLUB 

SHERMAN, CLAY & COMPANY 

SOMMER & KAUFMANN 

THE WHITE HOUSE 

WOMEN’S MUSICIANS’ CLUB OF 
SAN FRANCISCO 

YELLOW CAB CO. 


MAXIM SCHAPIRO 


Internationally Renowned Concert Pianist and Teacher 


SAN FRANCISCO STUDIO 


2632 LARKIN STREET 


PHONE GRAYSTONE 6273 














NN PIII INE NL NIA IN ANS 


FIRST VIGLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERT MASTER 


HEYES, EUGENE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
BRD ASST. CONCERT MASTER 


HOUSER, F. S. 
PASMORE, MARY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA 


SS FF 





| ANDERSON, THEODORE 

| De GRass!, ANTONIO 

| LARAIA, W. F. 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION 


| JENSEN, THORSTEIN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
| 


DicTEROW, HAROLD 
ai} | GORDOHWN, ROBERT 


SECOND VIOLINS: 


HAUG, JULIUS 
PRINCIPAL 


WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
MOULIN, HARRY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
SHAPRO, DAVID R. 
ROSSET, EMIL 

| 

| 





PATERSON, J. A. 
GOLD, JULIUS 
HERBERT, WALTER 
SPAULDING, MYRON 
| KOBLICK, NATHAN 


it VIOLAS: 

|| FIRESTONE, NATHAN 
i PRINCIPAL 

|| VERNEY, ROMAIN 

a | WEILER, ERICH 

t| MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
TRIENA, FRANK 

| VAN DEN Burs, JAc 
Al | DOLSHAUSEN, DETLEV 
W TOLPEGIN, VicToR 

Bl | KARASIK, MANFRED 
i 


it 336 





————$_—_—$———— 


PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, 


’CELLOS: 

BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 

DEHE, WILLEM 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
CLAUDIO, CESARE 
KIRS, RUDOLPH 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
PETTY, WINSTON 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 


BASSES: 
KUCHYNKA, FRANK 
PRINCIPAL 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLIT!I, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, A. E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


ple e lyr aye 


WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 
HEROLD, Roy 


PICCOLO: 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 
REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIvO, LESLIE dl. 
D’ESTE, CHARLES 


ENGLISH HORN: 


ScCHIvo, LESLIE J. 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RUDD, CHARLES 
FRAGALE, FRANK 
BiIBBENS, F. C. 
Clow, RAY 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
RupDD, CHARLES 


BASS CLARINET: 
FRAGALE, FRANK 





CONDUCTOR 








BASSOONS: 


KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
EA RAYE Es Se 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


CONTRA BASSOON: 


BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 


LAMBERT, PIERRE 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
ROTH, PAUL 

JAKOB, JOS. 
GEHRING, CONRAD 


TRUMPETS: 


KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN 
BARTON, LELAND &. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
STORCH, WALTER 


TROMBONES: 


Gios!, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARPS: 


ATTL, KAJETAN 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 


TYMPANI: 


LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 


VENDT, ALBERT 
SALINGER, M. A. 
PECKHAM, FRANK 


ORGAN: 


ALTMANN, LUDWIG 


LIBRARIAN AND 
PERSONNEL MANAGER 


HAUG, JULIUS 









ACME BREWERIES, San Francisco— 


% RELATIVELY SO COMPARED TO OTHER FOODS 











MARION HUTTON 
in Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade, broadcasts... 


a / bilitifs MOI 


poplar nluynler 


There’s a greater demand than ever | 
for Chesterfields. Smokers who have tried © 
them are asking for them again and again, i 
and for the best of reasons...Chesterfields 
are cooler, better-tasting and definitely milder. 
Chesterfields are made for smokers like 
yourself...so tune in now for your 1941 








smoking pleasure. 
me, F a 
Ley Salisfy | 


“iss ° 700 MONTGOMERY, S&S. F. 


{ 


Copyright 1941, Liccetr & Myers Tosacco Co. 


PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING CQO. 





Swe Sov Aen ia at SE Sr Lees ela Ls Lasers a 









The MUSICAL ASSOCIATION 
OF SAN FRANCISCO presents 


She 
ae SAN FRANGISCO 








Tt \ 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX » CONDUCTOR 
Hour Concerts for 
YOUNG PEOPLE 


KR udelih Ga & onducting 





n ever | 
e tried 


again, | 
rfields 
milder. 


A Ss 
if WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


MARCH 1- 8-15 *® APRIL 5, 1941 


F, 
i LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY -: PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 








One 


Rudohih 





| es the auspices of the Young People’s Concerts Committee, the 
Musical Association of San Francisco presents its seventh season of 


concerts for young people, with Rudolph Ganz conducting. 


The first program will be devoted to “The Orchestra” and will include a 


demonstration of the various instruments. 


“Nature in Music’ is the title of the second program. It will illustrate the 


effectiveness of music in a descriptive way. 


The title of the third program is “The Waltz,” featuring waltz movements 
pros 5 


as well as a complete ballet with special choreography and costumes. 


The final program is entitled “Human Emotions and Moods in Music,” 
and will bring out the unlimited possibilities of the orchestra in depicting 


varying moods. 


Students attending all concerts may participate in a new notebook 
competition for which complete details will be announced later. Ques- 
tions on the first three programs, with notebook covers, will be sup- 
plied to all season ticket holders participating. An interval of three 
weeks between the third and fourth concerts will permit sufficient 
time for careful judgment of the notebooks submitted so final contest 


winners may be announced and prizes awarded at the last concert. 


Mrs. Harotp RicHeErRT McKInnon, Chairman 


Mrs. WALTER A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 


Mrs. Haro.p K. FABER, Vice-Chairman 





SATURDAY @ 





Ces ee ee 








THE CONCERTS 


MARCH]... . . « « «= «|. “Pur OrcHEsSTRA”’ 


Demonstration of Instruments 


MARCHS . ......-— sits iat “Na TURE IN Music” 
MARCH. 15.-.0... ° ws Sb eo es ew.) “Ee Warez 


With Ballet 


APRIL 5. : . “Human EMoTIons AND Moops In Music” 


Award of Prizes for Notebook Competition 


ORDERS FOR SEASON TICKETS SHOULD BE PLACED IMMEDIATELY 


SEASON TICKET PRICES 


(Four Concerts) 


ORGHEST RAM SEATS edie ste ee whe ol cae cle ROI 
CHANDMLIER ObATIChas «(2 aunt yr en Bo “ees 2.00 
DRESS CIRELE SRUTS). “oe. ced «el a ee 1.40 
BARCONYAGIRGIE SPATS 04 5 we. ee pe 1.00 
BACGONY (UTE rows). 620-4 le 62 | Sela 1.00 
BALCONY, (lasi0 BOWS) <2 sawdiny kewl ale. a. .60 
BOxese(seannorayy tly ae sp 4d ie? Aw 1 BOO 


All Tickets are Tax Exempt 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE - UNperuty 4008 
Howarp K. Skinner, Business Manager 





NE eeeeeEeEeEeEeE——————————— 


THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


maintaining the 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Prerre Montevux, Conductor 





OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E. Raymond Armsby . . Vice-President John A. McGregor . . . . . Treasurer 
Paul A. Bissinger . . . . Vice-President Howard K. Skinner . . . . . Secretary 
Charles R. Blyth . . . . Vice-President Gerald G. Ross . . . Assistant Secretary 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Guido J. Musto 

Paul A. Bissinger Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Walter A. Haas Miss Else Schilling 
Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley Mrs. E.S. Heller Mrs. M. C. Sloss 

Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 


Kenneth Monteagle 





YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 











EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE @, 
Mrs. George W. Baker, Jr. Mrs. Harold Faber Mrs. Robert W. Miller bs 
Mrs. Otto Barkan Mrs. Donald Gregory Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon 4 
Mrs. Robert P. Bullard Mrs. Walter A. Haas Mrs. Churchill Peters | ? 
Mr. Charles M. Dennis Mrs. Thomas Page Mailliard Mrs. Ashton H. Potter : ; y 
Mrs. Harry Evans Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. AN 





ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Hans Barkan Mrs. George A. Gunn Marquise Henri G. de Pins 
| Mrs. Charles H. Bentley Mrs. Maurice Harrison Mrs. Stanley Powell | 
| Mrs. Alan Benner Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden Mrs. Laurence Redington 
| Mrs. Louis A. Benoist Mrs. A. Bourn Hayne Mrs. Hall Roe 
| Mrs. Russell G. Blackman Mrs. E. H. Heller Mrs. Walter F. Rountree 

Mrs. Arthur Bliss Mrs. Thomas Carr Howe, Jr. Mrs. John S. Selfridge 

Miss Barbara Burke Mrs. Bruce Kelham Mrs. F. R. Sherman 
| Miss Estelle Carpenter Mrs. J. C. Kittle Mrs. Nicol Smith 
| Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Roger Kent Mrs. G. Willard Somers 
| Mrs. Barnaby Conrad Mrs. Lee Laird Mrs. Edward B. Stanwood 
| Miss Eleanor Cramer Mrs. Baldwin McGaw Mrs. Laurence H. Tharp 
| Mrs. W. W. Crocker Mrs. Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
| Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee Mrs. Arturo Orena Mrs. Richard Walker 
| Mrs. Lloyd Dinkelspiel Mrs. Charles Page Mrs. Wendell Witter 

Mrs. Alfred Esberg, Jr. Mrs. Robert Patterson Mrs. Richard A. Woods 

Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Miss Betsy Pilsbury Mrs. Clarence M. Young 


Mrs. Leon Guggenhime Mrs. John G. Ziel 











NOTES 


AND PROGRAMS 
of the 


CONCERTS 
FOR 


YOUNG PEOPLE 


1941 SEASON 


Audeltd Ganz, as onducting 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY - PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 











All contestants must be season ticket holders in order to participate. 


INSTRUCTIONS 
Read Carefully 


1. Notebook entries covering the first three concerts must be sent 


in not later than Saturday, March 22. 


2. Your completed notebooks should be sent to the examining 
group of your school. Contestants whose schools do not have an 
examining group should send their entries to the Judging Com- 
mittee of the Young People’s Concerts, War Memorial Opera 


House, San Francisco. 


3. Name, age and address must be clearly printed on the space 


provided above. 


Names of the prize-winners will be announced at the last concert on 


April 5. 











eRe Sho She Sho ho Sh She Sw Sw Sho Hh Ho Ho No Hd Hd Hid Hm dt hm An Pa dM 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
San Yranctsce Symphony Orchestra 
RUDOLPH GANZ - CONDUCTING 
Llinst Concert, 194 Seaton 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 1, 10:30 


CP ED PPP EBP EERE PEEBISISM 
“The Orchestra” 


PROGRAM 


Assisting Artist Miscua Myers, Violinist 


Ee Sie She Sie She She She She She She She Sh 
SEE ee ee ep EO eB EP EP Ep SS, 


EL OVERTURE £0 OBBRONA (os a ee eae Weber 


2. A History or VioLIn MAKING 


Illustrated with slides from the Ernest Schelling Collection of The Philharmonic- 
Symphony Society of New York 


3. DEMONSTRATION OF ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS 


MINUET OR SHRINCS: 4 cunts. se 2) Se es Bolzoni 
MASQUERADE RORMWINDS 3. a. 4 4 i ee. en V iolette 
CHORALE FORD RAScESis 3.42, | a Ce 08 2 peer bert 
PERCUSSIONNINIPT EH 4 eo Se ee) Ganz 


4, “AMERICA, THE BEAUTIFUL” (Everybody Sing) 


2. THmRD MovEMENT FROM VIOLIN CONCERTOINA MINOR. . Dvorak 
MISCHA MYERS 
OU MARCHEAOUAVEs Weer ore ee ae schaikowsky 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman - Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and M anaging Director 
Howard K. Skinner, Business Manager 








OVERTURE TO “OBERON” . . Carl Maria von Weber (1786-1826) 


Carl Maria von Weber, a German, has been called the first romantic opera 
composer. Born of a musical family, he was taught to finger the piano almost as 
soon as he could speak. Instructed by his father, Baron Franz von Weber, the 
child, it was hoped, would equal his cousin, Mozart, and was therefore made to 
write incessantly in order to earn money. 

Before he was fourteen, he had written various compositions, including two 
operas. His fame rests chiefly on three opera masterpieces, “Der Freischutz,” 
“Euryanthe” and “Oberon.” He was appointed conductor of the opera at Breslau 
before he was eighteen years old. 

The opera “Oberon,” the overture of which is being played today, was first 
produced at Covent Garden, London, England. He finished the overture in 
March, 1826, under heroic effort and in April the work was produced with 
triumphant success. He wrote in all 250 compositions. He died when he was 


only forty years old. 


SVMPRICA THE DEAUEINUL: © 4 2 Sl ee ee ewe en ana 
Led by St. Monica’s Boys’ Choir, FATHER Encar Boy Le, Director 

O beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain, 

For purple mountain majesties above the fruited plain. 


America! America! God shed His grace on thee, 


And crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to shining sea. 


O beautiful for pilgrim feet whose stern impassioned stress 
A thoroughfare for freedom beat across the wilderness. 


America! America! God mend thine ev’ry flaw, 


Confirm thy soul in self-control, thy liberty in law. 














)® 


/@ 





Tutirp MOVEMENT FROM VIOLIN CONCERTO 
INA MINOR . . . . . . . . Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904) 


A simple, kindly man, modest and retiring, with a great love for his art, 
Antonin Dvorak rose from being a Bohemian village inn-keeper’s son to a man 
esteemed and honored in two worlds—honored in the Old World by university 
and other titles, and esteemed in the New World because of his helping to point 
the way to the freer use of our native idioms of musical language, particularly 
in his “New World” Symphony, which is probably his best-known work. His 
talent for composition was of the highest order. 

The last movement of his violin concerto played today was written for the 
great violinist, Joseph Joachim. It is a spirited Rondo and has much the same 


character as some of Dvorak’s famous Slavonic dances. 


MarcHEStav. . . . Peter Iljitsch Tschaikowsky (1840-1893) 


It is said of Tschaikowsky, that while he is not the most Russian, he is the 
greatest of all Russian composers. In his early years he studied piano and also 
sang, but graduated from the university as a lawyer. Fortunately, he later de- 
cided on musical composition for a career, and gave to the world a tremendous 
number of orchestral works, operas, piano music and songs. 

The Marche Slav was written and first performed in 1876 for a concert given 
at Moscow for the benefit of the soldiers wounded in the war between Turkey 
and Servia, and was first called the Russo-Servian March. It was intended to 
appeal to the patriotic feelings of the Balkan States and its principal themes 


are based on South Russian or Servian folk-music. 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial . . . Hard-of-hearing aids are available in 


the lobby. Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 











Announcement 


SECOND YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT 
Saturday Morning, March 8, 10:30 


“NATURE IN MUSIC” 


I, OVERTURE, “PENGAES*CAVE 2 = 5-2 5s “2 Seco 4s “40. Mendelssohn 


Zt LOCA WEEDANOSE! -o 2. a5 0 a om ee we ee ee we aeDowell 


6) THE BUMBLE BEE... wo. . 2. ts eS Rimsky-Korsakow 


) 
CDPHE CUCKOO SE: oy. Osa a Ee Le ea eeacan 
(c) 
(ce CEAIRESDESGUNE <6 Breiner gs ee i Debussy 


Co 


. First MOVEMENT FOR CoNcERTO IN E FLAT, (for two pianos) . . Mozart 
ADRIENNE AND HELEN LEVITT 


APES AIVERSVOLDAU of) 460 4a ta te dee we UR eee, a 2 eS refana 


DEOVEREURE TO. WILLIAM DELI) oo 2° So) eo - Giokee ok ee we RO SSEnT 


FIRST CONCERT—MARCH 1 


Se Se Se OO AEE OS 0 Se, SI, S| pet ue en mR i oO ews) 00/0, GOV aD) Oh WT, AaB, fb, Aa Sash OW’ et10N Nh 0h GH. 4 po ‘oy On; Osx asus sy Onl Gt bag wl FO Wn amos wa >t ws Ww tor aso Ss 0s Taek oso ees oe Uno ALO oo ene cn we we 














2. The brass section of an orchestra includes these four instruments ranging in 


pitch from high to low: 











o. 1 enjoyed the numbers of this program in the following order and for the 


reasons given: 














Fc: {va ck sparen a ater gira eae Asn A esr ee see ete Re eso tol Nan sae Se ee because: 
TITLE 


Odea ie ee eee hte ak ned Soe a ae Bao! ENE See yi, ch ee ee because: 
At bd BD 












YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
San Yrancisco Symphony Onchestra 


RUDOLPH GANZ - CONDUCTING 


Second Concert, 1941 Season 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 8, 10:30 





Nature in Music” 


PROGRAM 


Assisting Artists, ADRIENNE AND HELEN Levitt, Duo Pianists 
(Members Junior Auxiliary of The Pacific Musical Society ) 


1- OVERTURE, “FINGAL S CAVE <~ 2 1 -2<, 2 © « . . © Mendelssohn 
2(a) TOA WipiRose <4 5 =. . £6 &- 2 apo) 
(D-Link sGUCKOOnLa ene. Le os a ot Gd 1s) ee eee 
(6) (PRESB UMBreg Beni pM, Cue fs vn oe bal Dat cae Wh Rimsky-Korsakow 
(CVGr Amn DesunNey 2) See: tee a ee eee Debussy 
3. First MOVEMENT FoR ConceERTO IN E F3at, (for two pianos) . . Mozart 
ADRIENNE AND HELEN LEVITT ‘ 
4. THE River Morpau . 2 2 . . < 2 2 . 2 «se 4 . . Smetana 
o. AMERICA” (Everybody Sing) . ..... 2.2.2.2... Carey 
6. OVERTURE TO “WILLIAM TELL” . . Foe a ude eh Ee ROSSITER 


(Baldwin Pianos Used) 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman - Mrs. Walter A. Haas, H onorary Chairman 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and M anaging Director 
Howard K. Skinner, Business Manager 








OVERTURE, 
““FINGAL’S CAVE” . . Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847) 


Felix Mendelssohn was born at Hamburg, Germany, February 3, 1809, and 
when only three years of age took his first piano lessons from his mother and 
older sister. At the age of nine he gave his first public recital. Unlike most com- 
posers, Mendelssohn had no worries about money and his life was a very happy 
one, which can be noted in most of his compositions. 

In 1829 Mendelssohn made his first trip to England, and after the close of 
his concert season there, took a pleasure trip through Scotland and Ireland, 
which gave him the inspiration for his “Scotch” Symphony and the “Fingal’s 
Cave” Overture. Fingal’s Cave is a deep cavern in the island of Staffa, and 
Mendelssohn was so impressed that he later described his impressions in music. 
The composition is often called the “Hebrides’”’ Overture. 


CBee Wii NOSE: 3 5-5 & « 3 = a 4. «MacDowell 
Ro EME NGHCROOg st 27a Shenrce Shins. se far abe ge po eae 
(c) THEBumBrE BEE. . . . . . . . +. MRimsky-Korsakow 
MBC DAIRESDE: LUNE: is: 7 Goeth eG ee tan Debussy 


First MovEMENT FROM CONCERTO IN E FLAT, 
(for two pianos) 


Oe ei ay Mozart (1756-1791) 
ADRIENNE AND HELEN LEVITT 

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, born at Salzburg, January 27, 1756, was one of 
the brightest lights in musical history. His compositions, including fifty-one 
symphonies alone, exceeded five hundred, and covered practically all fields of 
musical literature. Mozart commenced piano lessons with his father when he 
was four years of age, and at the age of six made his first public appearance. His 
success was such that concerts had to be arranged throughout Europe. 

Mozart wrote concertos for practically every instrument in the orchestra, 
several of which were for piano, but only one for two pianos, probably because 


he wanted a two-piano concerto to play with his sister. 


Tue River Motpau. . . . . Friedrich Smetana (1824-1884) 


Friedrich Smetana is generally regarded as the father of Bohemian music, 
with Dvorak as his nearest approach. Probably his best known work is the opera 
“The Bartered Bride”; however, his compositions included many forms. The 
symphonic poem played today is the second of a cycle of six similar works 


intended to glorify his native country. 

Although continuous, the work contains seven subdivisions, or scenes, of 
The River Moldau: I. Two springs forming the source; united they become the 
mighty river Moldau. II. It flows through dense woods in which are heard the 
sounds of the hunt. III. A rural wedding procession approaches along the river 


> 














bank. IV. Moonlight on the river, and dance of the nymphs. V. The Rapids of St. 
John. VI. The broad, majestic stream as it passes Prague. VII. The historic 
fortress Vysehrad, from the walls of which is obtained the last view of the river 


as it flows on and is lost to view in the distance. 


“AMERIGA? “re 00 cp ff pemeee, SRE Soave We on ai enaeaney 


My country, ’tis of thee, 
Sweet land of liberty, 

Of thee I sing. 

Land where my fathers died, 
Land of the Pilgrim’s pride, 
From ev'ry mountain side 


Let freedom ring. 


Our fathers’ God, to Thee, 
Author of liberty, 

To Thee we sing. 

Long may our land be bright 
With freedom’s holy light; 
Protect us by Thy might, 
Great God, our King. 


OVERTURE To “WituiaM TELL” . Gioachino Rossini (1792-1868 ) 


Although Rossini wrote many operas, he closed his career as a writer for 
opera at the early age of 37, with the opera “William Tell.” His best-known and | 
most frequently performed opera is “The Barber of Seville.” | 

The overture to “William Tell” has been described as a “symphony in four 
parts” or it might be called “A Tone Picture” with the following sub-titles: 

1. The Sunrise 

2. The Storm 

3. The Calm After the Storm 
4. Finale (The Trumpet Call) : 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial . . . Hard-of-hearing aids are available in 
the lobby. Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 








Announcement 


THIRD YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT 
Saturday Morning, March 15, 10:30 


“THE WALTZ” 


1. THIRD MovEMENT FROM SYMPHONY INC MAJOR. . . . . . Schubert 
Dea (a) ECE A RIGEh: Wyo ak ele Me LE eS Sibelius 


(b) WaLtz in A FLAT . Brahms 


(c) VALSE, ALLEGRO CON GRAZIA, FROM “SYMPHONIE 
PATHE TIOUR cee gutergs (NSO Sheltie s.! a T'schaikowsky 


38. THEEMPERORWALTZES. ........ . . . Johann Strauss 


4.“‘A MipsUMMER Nicut’s DREAM” . . . . . - . . «. Mendelssohn 


Overture 
Nocturne 
Scherzo 
Wiru San Francisco Opera BALLET 


a ee 
SECOND CONCERT—MARCH 8 


1. In the overture “Finca’s Cave,” Mendelssohn has described in tone the follow- 
ing features of the cavern: 


2. What picture of Nature is expressed in the four following numbers? 


To A Witp RosrE 


THE CucKoo 











"EHEY BUR Tei te en eco aa eee es Ps ged sca 


CLATRE DEC LUNE se58 os 0c) 6 to ee een IE! flea ey, 


3. The dates below are those of the birth of three composers represented 
(| i program. Place the name of each of the three before his birth year. 

sa oS opie ou An AERA FOS Cre ee Novem ta PR SEs Ee as he lt 82 Bs tae 1824 

Bee Soe rs RM ee ONC eter Mite OT TE AE ayn S 1756 





on this 








2. I enjoyed the numbers of this program (No. 2) in the following order and for 


the reasons given: 


IRM SO heh ag nn ek ea) eS hes Sey tok 1 Re, eC On ae because: 
ot Bat A A 











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ae) 
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TITLE 


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YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 
RUDOLPH GANZ - CONDUCTING 
Third Concert, 194) Season 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 15, 10:30 




















“She Walt," 
PROGRAM 


Assisted by the SAN FrANcIsco OPERA BALLET 
WILLAM CHRISTENSEN, Artistic Director 


1. Tairp MovEMENT FROM SYMPHONY 


INC MAJOR. ... .. . . .. . Franz Schubert (1797-1828) 

Jee): VAESE) URISTED sas wish. ce eee ele ee Bean Sibeliie (1865—) 

(b) WADTZ INCA RLAR 5. <4. %. Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) 
(c) VALSE, ALLEGRO CON GRAZIA, FROM “SYMPHONIE 

PATHETIQUE” . . . . . Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky (1840-1893) 

3. THE “EMPEROR” WatTzes . . . . . . Johann Strauss (1825-1899) 


4. “COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN” (Everybody Sing) 


5. “A MipsuMMER Nicut’s DREAM” . FelixM endelssohn-Bartholdy (1809-1847) 
Overture 
Nocturne 
Scherzo 
Wiru San Francisco OPERA BALLET 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman - Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and M anaging Director 
Howard K. Skinner, Business Manager 





“COLUMBIA, THE GEM OF THE OCEAN” 


O Columbia, the gem of the ocean, 
The home of the brave and the free, 


The shrine of each patriot’s devotion, 





A world offers homage to thee. 

Thy mandates make heroes assemble 
When Liberty’s form stands in view; 
Thy banners make tyranny tremble, 
When borne by the red, white, and blue! 
When borne by the red, white, and blue! 
When borne by the red, white, and blue! 
Thy banners make tyranny tremble, 
When borne by the red, white, and blue! 


The star-spangled banner bring hither, 
O’er Columbia’s true sons let it wave; 
May the wreaths they have won never wither, 
Nor its stars cease to shine on the brave. 
May thy service, united, ne’er sever, 

But hold to their colors so true; 

The army and navy forever, 

Three cheers for the red, white, and blue! 
Three cheers for the red, white, and blue! 
Three cheers for the red, white, and blue! 
The army and navy forever, 

Three cheers for the red, white, and blue! 





Ballet from 
“A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM” 


“A Midsummer Night’s Dream” has a three-fold counterplot; to-wit: 1. Un- 
der an ancient law in Athens a father could choose his daughter’s husband and 
if she refused to marry him, the father could demand that she be put to death. 
The father of Hermia had chosen Demetrius as her husband but she was in love 
with Lysander. When her father demanded the death penalty, she and Lysander 
agreed to meet in the woods and run away to his Aunt’s house where they could 
be married. Hermia confided in her friend Helena, who jealously betrayed them 
to Demetrius, with whom she is in love. When Demetrius pursues the fleeing 
couple, Helena pursues Demetrius. The four lovers arrive in the woods and 

















Lysander with Hermia stop to rest because Hermia is weary. Demetrius scorns 
Helena and leaves her unprotected in the woods while he goes on searching for 
Hermia. At last weary, he lies down to sleep. 


2. Six tradesmen have decided to present the tragedy of Pyramis and Thisbee 
as a play in celebration of the forthcoming marriage of Duke Theseus to Hip- 
polyta, queen of the Amazons. They go to the woods to rehearse the play. 


3. In these same woods dwell the fairies, ruled by Queen Titania and King 
Oberon, who have quarreled about a changeling boy that Titania has taken to 
raise. Oberon desires the boy for a page but Titania will not give him up, so 
Oberon sends mischievous Puck around the world after a flower with a magic 
love charm. Juice from this little flower sprinkled on the eyes of a sleeping 
person will cause that person to fall in love with the first person or being the 
sleeper sees after awakening. Oberon intends to shame the Queen into giving 
him the boy by causing her to fall in love with some ridiculous creature, and 
then to taunt her until she has to give in to him. 


Oberon hears Demetrius scorn Helena and taking pity on her tells Puck to 
find Demetrius whom he describes as a youth dressed in Athenian garb, and to 
sprinkle some of the flower juice on his eyes, thinking that Helena will be the 
first one he sees when he awakes. Puck mistakenly charms Lysander who is dis- 
covered and awakened by Helena. Lysander falls in love with Helena and 
abandons Hermia who awakes alone in the forest. Oberon learns of Puck’s mis- 
take and sends him again to Demetrius with the love charm which is sprinkled 
on him. Seeing Helena he also falls in love with her and seeks after her. Hermia 
finds the others and Helena quarrels with her because she thinks that Hermia 
has set her lovers to making fun of her. While the ladies quarrel, the men draw 
knives to fight for Helena, but Puck causes them to be blinded by fog and leads 
them astray in the forest. Demetrius is led to Helena while Lysander wanders 
until he becomes weary. When he lies down to sleep, Puck removes the charm 
and once again he loves Hermia, whom he marries. 


The players enter the woods to rehearse. In the meantime, Bottom has fallen 
asleep in the woods where he is found by Puck who puts the head of a donkey 
on his shoulders. Awakened by the change, Bottom goes to the meeting not real- 
izing that he has a donkey’s head and frightens the others who run away from 
him. When Titania lies down to sleep, Puck leads Bottom to her. She awakens 
to see this donkey head and falls in love with him. Puck and Oberon are greatly 
amused to see her make love to the creature; Oberon chides her about it until she 
gives him the boy. While she is asleep again the charm is removed and she is 
embarrassed about falling in love with a donkey. Now poor Bottom is left alone 
in the forest forsaken by all. He discovers his predicament and mourns his fate. 
Puck tires of this joke and removes the head. (CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE) 








The play is given for the Duke and Hippolyta, who with the other couples 
laugh at the foolishness of the players. The fairies laugh at the foolishness of the 
mortals and go on living happily in the woods with their King and Queen. 





Choreography by WiLLAM CHRISTENSEN 
Music by FeLtrx MENDELSSOHN 
After the story by William Shakespeare 
Costumes by J. C. TAyLor and CHarLotTe Rwer 





OBERON . . . . . Willam Christensen HELENA . . . . . Jacqueline Martin 
MUUANTAR. =, 09 8! < 2° 2 Janet Reed DEMETRIUS . . . . . Deane Crockett 
BUCK sas « « . . « Ruby Asquith PEASEBLOSSOM . . . . Ruth Riekman 
iimesnuSs 2 = . ~ . . « Ron Marvin MusTARDSEED. . . . . Zoya Leporsky 
DEPPOLYIAssi 2. . 4 « Jean Dalziel MotH ..... . . Mattlyn Gevurtz 
LysANDER .. . . . . Harold Lang CoBWEB .... . . Zoe Del Lantis 
HerMIA .. . . . . Barbara Wood 
PLAYERS 
Bottom .. . .. . Norman Thomson DNOUIG 4 4 a «| ia Prancisebailey 
OGINGE =) — «. = . « « Sarl Riggins FLUTE . . . . . . . Frank Marasco 
STARVELING. . . .. . Alice Kotchik SNUG sce «brs Go a dois wbernard 
FAIRIES 


Anna White, Bette Gerlach, Helen Louise Evans, Eileen Whitson, Doris Whistler, 
Lorraine Pace, Barbara McIntyre, Natalie Carr 


SCARE FOR THE BALLET 
Fritz BERENS, Conductor-Pianist 


DEANE CROCKETT, Personnel 
ARMANDO AGNINI, Technical Director 





The San Francisco Opera Ballet is sponsored and maintained by 


THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA ASSOCIATION 


GaETANO MEROLA, General Director 
Rosert Watt Miter, President 
War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisco 


through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial . . . Hard-of-hearing aids are available in 
the lobby. Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 





Announcement 


FOURTH YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT 
Saturday Morning, April 5, 10:30 


“HUMAN EMOTIONS AND MOODS IN MUSIC” 





[PVA CHE pEABROLOUR? os. 0h 5 oth wee at Tus oS ees ok, iow SHIT SHENG 
Za\ a2) CRAUMEREL (DREAMING) = 4.4 .9. 1 5. | Schumann 
(b) BALLET oF THE Happy Spirits (Happiness). . . . . . . Gluck 
(ce MUEART WOUNDS \(SADNESS).° SPS «, 6. 4 ancl eS Grieg \ 
(PORE VIN THE STRAW (HUN eee tee ee ol ee me Garon 
3. RonDo FRoM C minor Concerto for Piano . . . . . . . Beethoven ; 
ROBERT BRERETON e 
4.LovE DREAM. . Sie Ae oa ee em eee LEST x 


9. DISTRIBUTION OF Prizes for Notebook Competition 
6. “THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER” (Everybody Sing) . . . . . . Smith 





us 





THIRD CONCERT — MARCH 15 


|. [wo composers represented on this program who wrote masterpieces before 
they reached the age of 20 years are: 


2. There are two terms in music often confused. Define each so the difference is clear. 


id shi shed Rees eee eee ee ee Re NM ORE Re ec 


3. State the differences in mood and tempo between the waltzes on this program: 


Thestimperor \Waltzeste. csr fenced Ain, Sele Wee 








4. In listening to symphonic music our attitude is different from that while seeing 
a ballet accompanied by a symphony orchestra. State this difference: 


OO OR ER EERE EER ROE EES EEO OE eee eee 


q 3 } 
ia thems aS A hems SRR Eee Sawn awn wn w nde enna nwniemnws Swince Un wanna cmon oun asen a annenenddencssnccescaeossaaus See ee ee ee } TW 





d. 1 enjoyed the numbers of this program in the following order and for the 


reasons given: 


Sr PPOs IPE nd SEA ntl ty bir Wie ee Weta nok e PO Ro Be Bint ae because: 
TITLE 





SE EEE ESE EERE EEE ESSE ERE EHO E EEE ERE EE eee EON Oe ee eee 





— 


a PA ae a A I ce RAR nce vote SOR reg RAE Se cee eae sey er Re ENE because: 


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ed ct dP dn ct ct te dfn ct at 








YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS 


RUDOLPH GANZ - CONDUCTING 


Aonrth Concent, 194) Season 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 5, 10:30 


“Auman Emotions and Mecds in Music” 


PROGRAM 


Assisted by RopertT BRERETON, Pianist 


|. Marcur HEROIQUE— “4-10. 3) 4?) se) 1 Sane Sees 
2. (a) TRAUMEREI (DREAMING) . . . .. . Schumann 
(b) BaLLer oF THE Happy Spirits (Happiness) . . Gluck 
(c) HEARTWouNDs (SADNESS) . . . . .. Grieg 
(b) TuRKEY INTHE Straw (Fun) .- . 2 . ~~ ) =@ueaa 
3. Ronpo from C minor Concerto forPiano. . . Beethoven 


ROBERT BRERETON 


Hs LOVERUREAM 90 Move fk) i oy OE 1, es 
o. DisrRIBUTION oF Prizes for Notebook Competition 


6. “THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER” (EverybodySing). . Smith 


(The Piano is a Steinway) 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman - Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and M anaging Director 
Howard K. Skinner, Business Manager 


Ee ee ee Dp Eee EP EP ED 








MarcueE Heroique . . Charles Camille Saint-Saéns (1835-1921) 

Charles Camille Saint-Saéns, the distinguished French composer, 
was one of the most remarkable figures in modern music. He first ap- 
peared in public at the age of eleven and at sixteen composed his first 
symphony. Although chiefly known as a composer, he was outstanding 
as an organist, and his improvisations were marvelled at. The “Marche 


Heroique” was written in memory of a friend who was killed in the 


defence of Paris in 1871. 


“TRAUMEREI” . . . . . . . Robert Schumann (1810-1856) 

Although Schumann wrote a great number of works in the large 
forms, for orchestra, chorus, solo instruments, etc., one of his most 
widely known compositions is “Traumerei’ which is in the early reper- 
toire of all violinists. It is from a volume of pieces for piano solo to 
which Schumann gave the title “Childhood Scenes” and described it 


as “‘reminiscences written for older ones.”’ 


DANCE OF THE Happy SPIRITS FROM 
“ORPHEUS” . . . Christoph Wilibald Gluck (1714-1787) 


Modern grand opera goes back in an unbroken line to Gluck and 
its history begins with his “Orpheus and Eurydice,” the oldest of all 
grand operas which still hold the stage, which was produced in Vienna 
in 1762. Many of the delightful melodies of the opera have been 
gathered together by Felix Mottl, the famous conductor, to form a 


suite for orchestra. 


HEARTWouNDS. . . . . . . . Edvard Grieg (1843-1907) 


Edvard Grieg, the Norwegian composer, suffered greatly with poor 


health and on this account did little composing during his later years 


but would spend his time arranging his piano pieces and songs for 





ate 




















orchestra. The piece played today is arranged for string orchestra from 


his song “The Wounded Heart,” expressive of sorrow and suffering. 


TURKEYINTHESTRAW. . . . . . .. David Guion (1895—) 


David Guion, an American composer born in Texas, and an accom- 
plished pianist and teacher, is best known for his arrangements of 
Negro songs for piano and orchestra, also his musical settings for 
Mother Goose rhymes. His most famous arrangement is “Turkey in the 


Straw’’ which is also known as “‘Old Fiddler’s Breakdown.” 


Ronpo from Concerto No. 1 In C MAJoR 
for Piano and Orchestra . Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827) 
Beethoven is often called the greatest composer of all time, and was 
an outstanding pianist during his early years. He was forced to give 
up his career as a pianist when he was about thirty as he lost his sense 
of hearing, however most of his great composing was done after he be- 
came deaf. It appears that altogether Beethoven wrote seven piano con- 


certos although only five were published. 


“LOVESDREAWE 2°. gulecs-as 0 « ranzelisziaqioudeloooD 


Franz Liszt, the Hungarian composer, achieved early fame as a pian- 
ist and gave concerts in all the principal cities of Europe. After hear- 
ing Paganini, the great violinist, Liszt was so impressed that he prac- 
ticed and practiced to attain the same skill on the piano that Paganini 
had on the violin. He finally won the title “Prince of Pianists,” and some 
think he was the greatest pianist of all time. After twenty years of sen- 
sational success he retired from the concert stage and devoted himself 
to composing and teaching. Among his piano compositions was a group 
of three Nocturnes, the third of which carries the title ““Liebestraum” 


or “Love Dream.”’ 











THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER 


Oh say! can you see, by the dawn’s early light, 

What so proudly we hailed at the twilight’s last gleaming? 
Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thro’ the perilous fight 
O’er the ramparts we watch’d, were so gallantly streaming? 
And the rockets’ red glare, the bombs bursting in air, 

Gave proof thro’ the night that our flag was still there. 

Oh, say, does that Star-Spangled Banner yet wave 

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave? 


Oh, thus be it ever when free men shall stand 

Between their lov’d homes and the war’s desolation! 

Blest with vict’ry and peace, may the heav’n rescued land 
Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation! 
Then conquer we must, when our cause it is just, 

And this be our motto: “In God is our trust.” 

And the Star-Spangled Banner in triumph shall wave 

O’er the land of the free and the home of the brave! 




















THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


maintaining the 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Pierre Montevux, Conductor 


OFFICERS 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 


Ek. Raymond Armsby 
Paul A. Bissinger . 
Charles R. Blyth . 


Vice-President 
Vice-President 
Vice-President 





John A. McGregor . 
Howard K. Skinner . 
Gerald G. Ross . 


Treasurer 
Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon, Chairman 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Honorary Chairman 
Mrs. Harold Faber, Vice-Chairman 


Mrs. George W. Baker, Jr. 
Mrs. Otto Barkan 

Mrs. Arthur Bliss 

Mrs. Robert P. Bullard 
Father Edgar Boyle 


Mrs. Hans Barkan 

Mrs. Charles H. Bentley 
Miss Florence Bentley 
Mrs. Alan Benner 

Mrs. Louis A. Benoist 
Mrs. Russell G. Blackman 
Mrs. George Brady 
Miss Barbara Burke 
Miss Estelle Carpenter 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan 
Mrs. Barnaby Conrad 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker 
Mrs. Benjamin Dibblee 
Mrs. Lloyd Dinkelspiel 
Mrs. Robert Dohrmann 
Mrs. J. Donner 

Mrs. Richard Doyle, Jr. 
Mrs. Alfred Esberg, Jr. 


Mrs, Leonora Wood Armsby 
Mrs. George W. Baker, Jr. 
Arthur Bliss 

Mrs. Arthur Bliss 

Father Edgar Boyle 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mr. Charles M. Dennis 

Mrs. Harry Evans 

Mrs. Harold Faber 

Mrs. Donald Gregory 

Mrs. Walter A. Haas 

Mrs. Thomas Page Mailliard 


ADVISORY COMMITTEE 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Leon Guggenhime 
Mrs. George A. Gunn 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas, Jr. 
Mrs. Maurice Harrison 
Mrs. J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. A. Bourn Hayne 
Mrs. E. H. Heller 

Mrs. Thomas Carr Howe, Jr. 
Mrs. Bruce Kelham 
Mrs. J. C. Kittle 

Mrs. Roger Kent 

Mrs. Lee Laird 

Mrs. Albert Geiger Lary 
Mrs. Baldwin McGaw 
Mrs. Edward F. Moffatt 
Mrs. Arturo Orena 

Mrs. Charles Page 


JUDGING COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Robert W. Miller 

Mrs. Harold Richert McKinnon 
Mrs. Churchill Peters 

Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 

Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. 


Mrs. Robert Patterson 
Marquise Henri G. de Pins 
Mrs. Stanley Powell 

Mrs. Laurence Redington 
Mrs. Hall Roe 

Mrs. Walter F. Rountree 
Mrs. John S. Selfridge 
Mrs. F. R. Sherman 

Mrs. Nicol Smith 

Mrs. G. Willard Somers 
Mrs. Edward B. Stanwood 
Mrs. Laurence H. Tharp 
Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Richard Walker 
Mrs. Wendell Witter 

Mrs. Richard A. Woods 
Mrs. Clarence M. Young 
Mrs. John G. Ziel 


Mrs. Harold K. Faber, Chairman 


Mrs. Robert P. Bullard 
Charles M. Dennis 
Rudolph Ganz 

Mrs. Walter A. Haas 


Pierre Monteux 


Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon 
Mrs. Hall Roe 

Mrs. John S. Selfridge 
Howard K. Skinner 

Mrs. Edward B. Stanwood 















The First 
UNIVERSITY “POP” CONCERT 


UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
STANFORD UNIVERSITY 


Ww 





WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
MARCH 2, 1941 


Pierre Mouteurx, Conductor 





LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY, PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR - HOWARD K. SKINNER, BUSINESS MANAGER 











HIS CONCERT tonight is to our knowledge the first of its 

type to be given in the United States. It is an all-request 

program directed and managed by the University of Cali- 
fornia and Stanford University branches of the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Forum. This organization was founded two years ago to pfo- 
mote a keener interest in the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra at 
the major universities in the Bay area. The Forum, though very young 
in years, reaches a milestone tonight in its first student-directed per- 
formance of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 

We, the members of the San Francisco Symphony Forum, feel a 
deep obligation to the very keen understanding and co-operation of 
the officers of the Musical Association who have made it possible 
for us to present this concert and who encourage us in our plans 


for the future. 
VIRGINIA ADAMS 


PHILIP BOONE 


RICHARD LYON 


Chairmen, San Francisco Symphony Forum 


mG 


PATRONS AND PATRONESSES 


Dr. and Mrs. Warren D. Allen Dr. Aurelia Reinhardt 

Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby President and Mrs. Robert Gordon Sproul 
Dean and Mrs. John Bunn Dean and Mrs. Herferd E. Stone 

Provost and Mrs. Monroe E. Deutsch Dr. and Mrs. Robert E. Swain 

Dr. and Mrs. Albert I. Elkus Mr. and Mrs. Frank Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther B. Marchant President and Mrs. Ray Lyman Wilbur 


Mr. and Mrs. Pierre Monteux Dean Marty Yost 


ee ee ae 


~—_ 











THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO PRESENTS 


The Ginst 
UNIVERSITY “POP” CONCERT 


UNDER THE AUSPICES OF SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AND STANFORD UNIVERSITY 


te 
San Bnavucisce. S. ymphony Onchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CONDUCTOR 
Sunday Evening, March 2, 8:30 


yk 
SOLOIST: MARGARET SPEAKS, SOPRANO 
Ww 
Praguam 
Hail stantordyidatle ah ite eee hl Mary Ropers saa 
Fires of Wisdom (Mills College) . . . . . . Edwin Schneider 
AO haStaubigancoren MSUATE Ere (jae nk meng ae MWR ye dey), 
2.Prelude to Act III, from “Natoma” . . . . . . Véctor Herbert 
3. (a) Aria, “Depuis le jour” from “Louise? . . . . . Charpentier 
(b) Ouvre ton coeur . nae eee Bizet 
MISS SPEAKS 
4. Overture-Fantasie, “Romeo and Juliet” . . . . . Tschaikowsky 
INTERMISSION 
All Hail, Blue and Gold . ee ale Harold Bingham 
(Orchestrated for this occasion by Albert I. Elkus ) 
2 : ooo! pes from “The Damnation of Faust” . . Berlioz 
6.Preludeto““The AfternoonofaFaun”. . ..... . Debussy 
MQ DES VIIa yea tyke hy Se Se a Gy a Wg! aes. OleweS peaks 
ME MOrinoren es Se Nate ey, Oley Speaks 
(c) Tales fromthe Vienna Woods. . . . . . . Johann Strauss 
MISS SPEAKS 
Sh BION, ull ad AR nah of UR ea al eM MF a” Aap) °07° 57:9) 


ee EE a te es Oe OS SECOND SM PP oh ea 
War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial... Hard-of-hearing aids are available 


in the lobby. Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 








| 
) 
| 
| 
| 
‘| 
| 








THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
maintaining the 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 

Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E. Raymond Armsby . Vice-President John A. McGregor . . . Treasurer 
Paul A. Bissinger . . Vice-President Howard K. Skinner . . . Secretary 
CharlesR. Blyth. . . Vice-President Gerald G. Ross. . Assistant Secretary 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Guido J. Musto 
Paul A. Bissinger Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Walter A. Haas Miss Else Schilling 
Mrs. Frederick W. Bradley Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. M. C. Sloss 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Kenneth Monteagle 


Ww 
THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the University of 
California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, and is affiliated 
with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, faith and service of its 
members is prophetic of the important part youth plays and will continue to play in 
our work. 


CHAIRMEN 
Virginia Adams Richard Lyon Philip S. Boone 
OFFICERS 
William Barkan Cornelia Clark Richard Palmer 
Lewis Byington Henry Evers Marylouise Sanford 


EXECUTIVE COUNCILS 


Ava Jean Barber David Leaf Patricia Pruyn 

J. Brandon Bassett Louise Lindley Frederick Rea 

John Collins Lois Mitchell James Schwabacher 

John Donahue Edward Nielson Janet Scott 

William Gillis Douglass North Dr. Marceille Spetz 

Peggy Hawkins Wrede Petersmeyer Milton Tucker 

Dan Hays John Piel Ann Wilder 

Fred W. Kimball Edward Pinger Jade Williams 
Mary Powell 


Grateful acknowledgment is made to Sherman, Clay & Company for their generous gift of a 
phonograph and records for the Forum’s library, to The Music Album for records, and to 
Podesta & Baldocchi for their floral contribution. 

















Aunual 
SUSTAINING FUND 


SasierCancent 


FEATURING 


BASIL RATHBONE 


NARRATOR 
Ww 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
AP ROS Wee Re EE INGE fl 
1941 


Pierre Mouteunr, Conductor 


meclhora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director - Howard K. Skinner, Business Manager 





RS I PT SET SOL SE ERIS PN | TR INES BS LID EE 


SSUES - 
—— < 














T IS appropriate at this time that the Musical Association express its gratitude to the 
members of the Women’s Committee, the Young People’s Concerts Committee 
and the San Francisco Symphony Forum. .. . Their phenomenal work is a nucleys 

around which centers all other activities of the Symphony Orchestra. Too much praise 

cannot be given these groups who have undertaken their tasks for the Symphony with 
dauntless energy and courage... . We feel that not only the Association, but all the 





members of our audiences, take pleasure in offering them this tribute. 


Adams, Mrs. Josiah H. 
Allan, Mrs. Frank Howard 
Alward, Mrs. H.V. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bailey, Mrs. Frazer 
Baker, Mrs. George W. Jr. 
Baldwin, Mrs. John 
Barkan, Mrs. Hans 
Barkan, Mrs. Otto 
Bartlett, Mrs. Edw. Otis 
Benner, Mrs. Alan 
Benoist, Mrs. Louis A. 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Bentley, Miss Florence 
Birmingham, Mrs. J. E. 
Blackman, Mrs. Russell G. 
Bliss, Mrs. Arthur 
Bocqueraz, Mrs. Roger 
Boyd, Miss Louise A. 
Boyle, Father Edgar 
Brady, Mrs. George 
Brooke, Mrs. Philip N. 
Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 
Bullard, Mrs. Robert P. 
Burke, Miss Barbara 
Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 
Carpenter, Miss Estelle 
Cheney, Mrs. Garnett 
Chickering, Mrs. Allen 
Cole, Mrs. Robert R. 
Conrad, Mrs. Barnaby 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 
Dailey, Mrs. Gardner 
Dennis, Charles M. 
Dollar, Mrs. R. Stanley 
deLatour, Mrs. George F. 


Dibblee, Mrs. Benj. H. 
Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Lloyd 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk Jr. 
Dohrmann, Mrs. Robert 
Donner, Mrs. J. 

Doyle, Mrs. Richard Jr. 
Dunne, Mrs. Arthur 
Ebright, Mrs. George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank 
Esberg, Mrs. Alfred Jr. 
Evans, Mrs. Harry 

Eyre, Mrs. Edw. Engle 
Faber, Mrs. Harold 
Fisher, Mrs. Marshal H. 
Force, Mrs. R. C. 
Girvin, Mrs. Richard 
Goldstein, Miss Lutie D. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. D. 
Gray, Nancy 

Gregory, Mrs. Donald 
Guggenhime, Mrs. Leon 
Gunn, Mrs. George A. 
Haas, Mrs. Walter A. 
Haas, Mrs. Walter A. Jr. 
Haley, Mrs. Harry S. 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Harrison, Mrs. Maurice 
Hayden, Mrs. J. Emmet 
Hayne, Mrs. A. Bourn 
Heller, Mrs. E. H. 
Hendrickson, Mrs. Alfred 
Hepburn, Miss Louise 
Howard, Mrs. Horace 
Howe, Mrs. Thomas Carr Jr. 
Hunter, Mrs. Thomas B. 
Johnston, Mrs. Clarence Loran 


Jenkins, Miss Eleanor 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 

Kamm, Mrs. Walker W. 
Keator, Mrs. Benj. C. 
Kelham, Mrs. Bruce 
Kendrick, Mrs. Charles 
Kent, Mrs. Roger 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. Robert C. Jr. 
Kittle, Mrs. J. C. 

Knox, Mrs. John B. 
Kropp, Miss Miriam T. 
Laird, Mrs. Lee 

Lary, Mrs. Albert Geiger 
Lawler, Mrs. John 
McDonald, Mrs. Angus 
McDonald, Mrs. Julliard 
McGaw, Mrs. Baldwin 
McKinnon, Mrs. Harold R. 
Mailliard, Mrs. Thos. Paige 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East Jr. 
Miller, Mrs. Robert Watt 
Moffatt, Mrs. Edward F. 
Monteagle, Mrs. Kenneth 
Noble, Mrs. Charles 
Oliver, Mrs. Edwin Letts 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Selby 
Orena, Mrs. Arturo 

Page, Mrs. Charles Jr. 
Patterson, Mrs. Robert 

de Pins, Marquise Henri G. 
Peters, Mrs. Churchill C. 
Peterson, Mrs. Baltzer 
Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 
Poundstone, Mrs. H. C. 
Powell, Mrs. Stanley 


Proctor, Mrs. Frank Hunt 
Ray, Mrs. Milton S. 
Redewill, Mrs. Francis H. 
Redington, Mrs. Laurence 
Rich, Mrs. H. Dunning 
Robertson, Mrs. Cameron 
Roe, Mrs. Hall 

Rogers, Mrs. Wm. Lister 
Roos, Mrs. Leslie Leon 
Rountree, Mrs. Walter F. 
Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 
Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 
Selfridge, Mrs. John S. 
Sherman, Mrs. F. R. 
Sinsheimer, Miss May 
Sloss, Mrs. Frank H. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis Jr. 
Smith, Mrs. Nicol 
Somers, Mrs. G. Willard 
Stanwood, Mrs. Edward B. 
Tharp, Mrs. Laurence H. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Towne, Mrs. Herbert 
Vaughan, Mrs. Kendrick 
Volkmann, Mrs. Daniel 
Walker, Mrs. Randolph 
Warner, Mrs. Davis 
Whitaker, Mrs. L. C. 
Wiel, Mrs. Eli H. 
Witter, Mrs. Wendell 
Wood, Mrs. Benton 
Woods, Mrs. Richard 
Woods, Mrs. Wm. Wallace 
Young, Mrs. Clarence M. 
Young, Mrs. Dwayne 
Ziel, Mrs. John G. 











THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


The San Francisco Symphony Forum is composed of students from the University of 
California, Stanford, Mills, St. Mary’s and University of San Francisco, and is affiliated 
with the Musical Association of San Francisco. The courage, faith and service of its 
members is prophetic of the important part youth plays and will continue to play i | 


our work. 


Adams, Virginia 
Barber, Ava Jean 
Barkan, William 


Bassett, J. Brandon Donahue, John 
Evers, Henry 
Gillis, William 


Boone, Philip S. 


Byington, Lewis 
Clark, Cornelia 
Collins, John 


EXECUTIVE COUNCILS 


Hawkins, Peggy 
Hays, Dan 
Kimball, Fred W. 
Leaf, David 
Lindley, Louise 
Lyon, Richard 


Mitchell, Lois 
Nielson, Edward 
North, Douglass 
Petersmeyer, Wrede 
Palmer, Richard 
Piel, John 


Pinger, Edward 
Powell, Mary 
Pruyn, Patricia 

Rea, Frederick 
Sanford, Marylouise 
Schwabacher, James 


Scott, Janet 

Spetz, Dr. Marceille 
Tucker, Milton | 
Wilder, Ann 
Williams, Jade 








0 the 
littee 


des SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


oe PIERRE MONTEUX «© CONDUCTOR 
L the 
: ANNUAL SUSTAINING FUND 


‘is H, 

rence 

ing 

eron ( / 


< SUNDAY; APRIL TttR Teen ir 
G, 
s, ACT aa Goa Ray PS Mi 
y 
lard * 
ard B, 
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Program 
Ovciutetos Lhe Plyinc Dutchman 2° tio ce ee een 
be, iheieleasure Dome of Kublai Khan, 2). 4 2 8 = 2s) SepGraies 
M. 
pRetemand ste. Wolf a% =. s-common on OOO 
BASIL RATHBONE ® NARRATOR 
Hungarian Rhapsody. No, 2° 2.8. <<. « . « 2 © » wet Be eegee 
INTERMISSION 
7 of Symphony No. 6 (“Pathetique’) . . . . . . . . Tschaikowsky 
sted Adagio—Allegro—Andante—Allegro vivo 


Allegro con grazia 
Allegro molto vivace 
Adagio lamentoso 





rceille i War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisco 
; through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. . .Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the 
lobby. Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 


OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 








ITHE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCIS¢ 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





OFFICERS 


Mrs. LEonorA Woop Armssy, President and Managing Director 
E. RayMonp ARMspyY . Vice-President Joun A. McGrecor . 
Pau. A. BIssINGER Vice-President Howarp K. SKINNER 
CHARLES R. BLyTH Vice-President GrratpG. Ross . 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


MortTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss Lutie D. GotpsTEIN 
Mrs. WALTER A. Haas 
Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

Mrs. Marcus S. KosHLAND 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. O. G. MILLER, Chairman 
GEorRGE T. CAMERON 
MorTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss Lutie D. GoLpsTEIN 
Mrs. Marcus S. KosHLANpD 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. GEorcE T. CAMERON 
Dr. Leo ELOESSER 


Treasurer 
. Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 


Dr. Hans BARKAN 

Paut A. BISsINGER 

Miss Loutse A. Boyp 

Mrs. FREDERICK W. BRADLEY 
Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 


Guivo J. Musto 

Mrs. AsHTon H. Porter 
Miss Extse ScHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. Sioss 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 


J. B. Levison 

JOHN Francis NEYLAN 
Mrs. AsHuton H. Porter 
Joun H. THRELKELD 


E. RayMonp ARMSBY 

Mrs. Epwarp Otis BARTLETT 
Paut A. BISSINGER 

CHARLES R. BLytTH 


J. Emmet Haypen 
CHARLES G. Norris 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM OFFICERS 


Mrs. LEonorA Woop ARMSBY 
Dr. Hans BARKAN 


aS ————— = 


a 


ee 


a ad 


i 


Purr S. BOONE 
Lewis ByINGTON 
RicHarp Lyon 


VIRGINIA ADAMS 
CORNELIA CLARK 
Wo. BARKAN 


Henry Evers 
MARYLOUISE SANFORD 
RICHARD PALMER 


COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 


C.-O. G. MILuer . 


Mrs. Marcus S. KosHLanp . Women’s Finance 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss . Ticket Sales and Publicity 
Mrs. H. R. McKinnon .Young People’s Concerts 
Mrs. JoHN P. CocuHian .Vice-Chair.Ticket Sales 


Finance 


Mrs. AsuHton H. Porrer . 
Mrs. Littian BirmincHAM . Symphony Guild 
Puitie S. Boone . 

Mrs. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. HAROLD FABER . 


Box Sales 


S. F. Symphony Forum 
Hon. Chair.; Y..P.C. 
Vice-Chair., Y. P. C. 


BOARD OFGOVERNORS 


E. RaymMonp ARMSBY 

Mrs. Leonora Woop ARMSBY 
G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 
Mrs. Grorce W. BAKER, Jr. 
Dr. Hans BARKAN 

Mrs. Epwarp O. BARTLETT 
CHARLES R. BLytTH 

Miss Louise A. Boyp 
Puiwip S. BOONE 

Mrs. F.. W. BRADLEY 

H. SEWALL BRADLEY 

Pau. A. BISSINGER 

GEorRGE T. CAMERON 

Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
Mrs. Joun P. CoGHLAN 
Mrs. ELIzABETH S. CooLIDcE 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker 

Mrs. O. K. CusHine 

Mrs. GEorGES DE LATOUR 
Miss KATHARINE DONOHOE 
JosepH H. Dyer, Jr. 

Mrs. FRANK EpoFF 

SIDNEY M. EHRMAN 

Apert I. Etxus 

Dr. LEo ELOESSER 

ForREST ENGELHART 


Mrs. Paut I. Facan 
MortTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLowers 

Joun F. Forses 

Mrs. J. E. FRENcH 

Miss Lutie D. GoLpsTEIN 
Josepy D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P, GRIFFITHS 
Mrs. Leon GUGGENHIME 
Mrs. WALTER A. HAAs 
Mrs. Harry S. HAtey 

J. Emmet HaypEN 

Mrs. E. S. HELLER 
WALTER S. HELLER 

Mrs. I. W. HELLMAN 
WituiAM F. HumpHrey 
Mrs. Marcus S. KosHLAND 
FREDERICK J. Koster 
GAETANO MEROLA 

C. O. G. MILLER 

Mrs. C. O. G. MILLER 
Rosert W. MILuer 
Epwarp F. Morratt 
KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Guipo J. Musto 

Dwicut F. McCormack 


Mrs. Ancus D. McDonatp 
Joun A. McGrecor 

Mrs. Harotp R. McKinnon 
R. C. NEWELL 

CHARLES G. Norris 
CHARLES PacE, JR. 

Puiuie H. Patcuin 

Mrs. ASHTON H. Potter 
Mrs. STANLEY PowELL 
Mrs. GreorceE B. RossBins 
OTTORINO RoncHI 

Mrs. Henry P. RusseLu 
Miss Ese SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. Stoss 

Mrs. Nicou SmitH 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

Mrs. Powers SYMINGTON 
Mrs. Davin ARMSTRONG-TAYLOR 
JosEPpH S. THOMPSON 
Joun H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. Cyrit TosBIn 
THomaAs J. WATSON 
MIcHEL WEILL 

Mrs. Ext H. Wier 
LEonaRD E. Woop 

J. D. ZELLERBACH 











THE COMMITTEE ON COMMEMORATION OF 
THE FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 
STANFORD UNIVERSITY 


Presents the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MontTEUX, Conductor 


FOUNDERS DAY 


March 9, 1941 
8:00 P.M. 





MEMORIAL CHURCH 
STANFORD UNIVERSITY 








PROGRAM 


The audience is requested to refrain from applause 


Toccata and Fugue-in Di Minor 2 22. % < «J. s.Bach 


(Orchestrated by Leonid Leonardi) 


Nowhere is the organ's cataclysmic grandeur more thun- 
derously and majestically exploited than in Bach's toccata 
and fugue in D minor. Like other organ works by the same 
composer, it has been a tempting challenge to those who 
conjure the genii out of the modern symphony orchestra 
with all its flexibility and color. 


Piéce Herdique . . . César Franck 


(Orchesirated by Charles O'Connell) 


This is the last of a series of three pieces written in 1878 
for the dedication of the organ in the Trocadero. The work 
begins in B minor, but the last half is in the triumphant key 
of B major favored by the composer when he wished to 
express highest religious aspiration. 


Good Friday Spell from “Parsifal” . . . Richard Wagner 


The “Good Friday Spell” is perhaps the most beautiful of 
the few separate lyrics in ‘’Parsifal.’’ Parsifal, having re- 
covered the sacred spear from Klingsor, has strayed under 
Kundry's parting curse through endless maze and misery in 
returning search of the Grail. On the verge of despair he 
comes upon Gurnemanz, and the repentant Kundry. Here 
follows the scene of the feet-washing, of the anointing of 
Parsifal by Gurnemanz, and of Kundry’s baptism. Parsifal 
remarks on the beauty of the meadows and flowers. Gurne- 
manz explains that this beauty is caused by the Spell of 
Good Friday, and that the flowers and trees, watered by the 
tears of repentant sinners, express by their luxuriousness 
the redemption of man. 


Ode to Truth (First Performance) . . . . . Roy Harris 


Dedicated to Stanford University in honor of fifty years of distinguished 
contribution to American scholarship. 

The composer, who is present on the occasion of this 
first performance, writes as follows: "It is my belief that 
Truth is the goal of education. Consequently, when Stanford 





{ 











University commissioned an orchestral work, it was my hope 
to create music which would honor the ardent scholar. I 
have named it ‘Ode to Truth’ and have dedicated it to ‘schol- 
ars in search of Truth.’ 

“The ‘Ode to Truth’ is structurally like the Gothic arch— 
with the greatest climax at the center of the work. Excepting 
at the climax and the coda, the work is canonic throughout. 
Materials from Stanford songs have been freely adapted and 
woven into the contrapuntal texture of the work. The coda 
is a chorale in which the harmony is a study in atonal major 
consonance. 


INTERMISSION 


Symphony No. 2,inD Major . . . . . Johannes Brahms 





Allegro non troppo 

Adagio non troppo 

Allegretto grazioso, quasi andantino 
Finale 


The symphonies of Brahms have certainly each a most 
distinctive character. Names are easily given; they are as 
quick to disappear. They undergo the same sort of test and 
wear as songs and proverbs. Neither of the names ‘Pathetic’ 
or ’Appassionata”’’ that Hanslick offered for the third Brahms 
symphony, have taken hold. Hans Richter made an equally 
vain attempt when he called it the “Eroica.” The name 
Pastoral’ that Hanslick suggested for the second symphony 
of Brahms, does seem to have met with more lasting re- 
sponse, as it has a better ground. And the truth of the name 
lies rather in a contrast with the other symphonies of Brahms 
than in its own instrinsic character. The word “Pastoral” 
suits the work in no tangible sense, and there is no evidence 
of any corresponding intention of the composer. Indeed, 
heroic feeling abounds in the first and last movements, and 
the Adagio has the full depth of symphonic tradition. There 
is a clear sense, at the outset, of simplicity together with a 
certain primeval feeling. The main melody has a spontaneous 
flow, a lack of effort, a natural freshness that gives to the 
whole work a special serenity of mood. And yet an air of 
the heroic is somehow present from the beginning. It is in 
the conjunction, some might say in the balance, of these 
two elements that lies the temper of the symphony. 
































Je ART COMMISSION ‘OF SAN FRANCISCO 
QTTORING RONGHI, PRESIDENT . - JOSEPH HOVER Ue. SECRETARY 








SAN FRANCISE 
SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


with 


JOHN 
ABRBIROLLI 


GUEST CONDUCTOR 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Livic Auditorium :: Friday, 


Ka 


Evening, January 10, 1941 











COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
the above advertisement? . . . Now read it again, and think 
how fully a corporate executor meets each qualification. 

A trust company is never ill; it is never away. It can be counted 
upon to be present and ready to serve when the time comes. 
The officers of a trust company have a daily familiarity with 
probate procedure, the administration of property, and the 
affairs of your estate. 


SEE YOUR LAWYER ABOUT YOUR WILL TODAY 


Ti D 


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& Union Trust Co. 


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S ACN: aE (REACN: CalcSeCO 


NIEMBERSE. Dil. G: 

















© | THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


« Municipal Concerts 
| with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUxX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 


—REPERTOIRE— 


Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
p GAITE PARISIENNE CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesday Eve., January 29 SERE iat / 
SERENADE NEW YORKER 
BAISER DE LA FEE BACCHANALE 
VIENNA—1814 CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Thursday Eve., January 30 Sunday Mat., February 2 
LES SYLPHIDE SERENADE 
ROUGE ET NOIR Se Le te Ne 
THE NEW YORKER VIENNA—I814 
; Sunday Eve., February 2 
Friday Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


March 4 March 21 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
’ 7 Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax ‘Tickets: 50¢, /5¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEUX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No ‘Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 


= eee ee ee ee 




















hs sl hg 























New F Orms 
for F lowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 











PlaSter with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 
TORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT .. . with daisies in the crown 
DUCK . . Carries a mixed bouquet on his back 
not shown 


Exclusive with 


~~ SLOANE 


S Wr EoL ER in ea. r-eG-R-A.NEE 








San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


with 


JOHN BARBIROLEI 


Guest Conductor 


3 
Program 


| OVERTURE, THE ROMAN CARNIVAL... .Berlioz 





VARIATIONS ON AN 
ORIGINAL THEME} (ENIGMA) 420. oe oa: Elgar 
Theme: Andante— 
Varwels L-istesso, tempo =(G; 4A. E.) 
Wena pay Mi Keren ood LD eso a) 
Vaile son Nleoretro (Roe se les) 
Var. 4: Allegro di molto (W. M. B.) 
Vale OY MLOCeT AON (cde 2N0) ae 
Var. 6: Andantino (Ysobel) 
Var. 7: Presto (Troyte) 
Wako oe ALleoretto™ (WW. IN: —— 
Var. 9: Moderato (Nimrod) 
Var. 10: Intermezzo: Allegretto (Dorabella) 
Var: 11: Allegro di molto (G. R. S.) 
Varet2: Andante-(B. Gy N.)—— 
Var. 13: Romanza: Moderato (***) 
Valoltsebinales Alleoro, (EoD els) 


INTERMISSION 


SYMPHONY NO. 1, 

Oy HIN ORGS OPUS GB). gat wantrces alta ec Brahms 
Un poco Sostenuto—Allegro 

Andante sostenuto 

Un poco Allegretto e grazioso 

Adagio—Allegro non troppo, ma con brio 





NEL Ee nm ON EME AR AAAS OO PRA ARRAS NER oki HERE PHRAP ACAD REEMA RDA Rteemaneommmmmneee® 











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Served in the most beautiful 
restaurants inthe West... 
at no greater cost 
than elsewhere. 


ICE CREAM 
SODAS 


PASTRIES 
CANDIES 

















. Tthe Theatre 
always in favor 











' 


after 





£ 
ef 
33 Powell—The Art Gallery Dining Room “A 
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Also Stores in — Los Angeles — Pasadena — Hollywood - 
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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


OVERTURE, THE ROMAN CARNIVAL... .Hector Berlioz 
(1803-1869) 


This is the prelude to the second act of Berlioz’s opera, Benvenuto Cel- 
lini. It was an afterthought, added to the score in 1843, five years after the 
first production. 

For Berlioz to have composed an opera about Benvenuto Cellini was 
complete poetic justice, for the swashbuckling memoirs of Cellini constitute 
the greatest artistic autobiography of the Renaissance, and the memoirs of 
Berlioz are equally preéminent among the artistic autobiographies of the 
Romantic period. But the opera, like all the works of the composer in this 
form, has failed to keep the stage except for sporadic revivals, and it is 
known in this country almost solely through the overture to the first act 
and the orchestral movement now to be played. 

The plot of the work, like so many operatic stories, becomes gibberish 
when reduced to a synopsis. Suffice it to say that it concerns both the 
amours and the professional rivalries and adventures of Cellini, and 
reaches its climax with the famous story of the casting of the bronze 
Perseus. The Roman Carnival overture is based essentially upon two 
themes. The first, stated toward the beginning by the English horn, is one 
of Cellini’s love songs from the first act. The second an extremely rapid, 
whirling affair, is the tune of a saltarello (literally a “jump-dance”’) which 


occurs during a Roman carnival scene in the second act. 


VARIATIONS ON AN 


ORIGIN A Tee TELE ME: CENT GVA aoe Sir Edward Elgar 


(1857-1934) 

There are really two enigmas, one connected with the theme, one with 

the variations. Both, as will be seen, may be closely connected. Sir Edward 
himself, however, recognized only the enigma of the theme. 





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PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
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OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 
Friday, January 17, 2:30 Saturday, January 18, 8:30 


Soloist: ISAAC STERN, Violinist 
PROGRAM 


Toccata and Fugue in D Minor Bach 
(Orchestrated by Leonidas Leonardi) 


GOncerlontoOneavtOlin ana: Onchesttas cre. penne Sibelius 


Music for A Scene from Shelley Samuel Barber 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 


Three Excerpts from Romeo and Juliet Symphony Berlioz 


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Continued 


PROGRAM? NOODLES 


“The enigma” he said, “I will not explain—its ‘dark saying’ must be 
left unguessed and I warn you that the apparent connection between the 
variations and the theme is often of the slightest texture; further, through 
and over the whole set another and larger theme ‘goes’ but is not played. . . 
So the principal theme never appears, even as in some late dramas—e. g. 
Maeterlinck’s L’Jntruse and Les Sept Princesses—the chief character is 
never on the stage.” 

This is in itself a “dark saying” of an emphatically dusky hue. It has 
been interpreted by the wise men to mean that the theme was created as 
a counterpoint to another melody, but Elgar never indicated what that 
other melody was. R. C. Powell contributed an article to Music and 
Letters for July, 1934, in which he argues that the other melody was 
Auld Lang Syne, but this view has been disputed, notably by A. H. Fox- 
Strangways, who replied to Powell in Music and Letters for January, 
1935. Those interested in this extremely curious and ingeniously argued 
controversy are referred to the files of the magazine itself. 

Auld Lang Syne is a good guess for several reasons, among them the 
nature of the second enigma, that of the variations. Each variation, with 
the exception of the thirteenth, is distinguished in the score with the 
initials or the private Elgarian nickname of one of the composer’s friends. 
Each variation, according to Elgar’s own statement, is a sketch of the 
idiosyncrasies of one of those friends, and the whole is therefore a series 
of portraits of the Elgar circle as it existed in Malvern, Worcestershire, 
where the Elgars lived from 1891 to 1904. (The variations were written 
in 1899.) 


Elgar never revealed the enigma of the theme, but he did clear up the 
mystery of the variations, and his explanation was made public prop- 
erty shortly after his death. That explanation is appended, but it is well 
to bear in mind that the composer declared the connection between the 
variations and the friends to be “‘a personal matter that need not have 
been mentioned.” This is not program music a /a Richard Strauss re- 


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Continued 


PROGRAM - NOTES 


quiring a detailed story for its full appreciation. “His music is full, as 
his life was,” says Fox-Strangways, ‘“‘of the treasuring up and chortling 
over little oddities and appropriatenesses of word, action or event: this 
playful allusiveness was to him the salt of life.” “To listen too intently 
for these chortlings in the variations is to miss their music, and to empha- 
size them too strongly in a program note would justly call down upon 
one’s head the devastating remark of Philip Hale with reference to Max 
Kalbeck’s effort to read a detailed picture of the temptation of St. An- 
thony into Brahms’ variations on a theme by Haydn: “Was not Kalbeck 
like the man ‘of meager aspect with sooty hands and face’ seen by Captain 
Lemuel Gulliver at the Academy of Lagado engaged for eight years 
upon a project for extracting sunbeams from cucumbers?” 


Theme: Andante, G minor, 4/4 time. ‘The theme occupies the first 
17 measures and leads without pause to 


Var. 1: L’istesso tempo, likewise l’istesso key and time: C. A. E. Caro- 
line Alice Elgar was the composer’s wife. 


Var: 2: Alleoro, G minor, 3/8: H. DeS-P. This-reters to El Dotter 
Powell, a pianist who used to play trios with Elgar and B. G. N. of 
Variation 12. ‘The opening measures reflect the pianistic didoes with 
which Stuart-Powell was accustomed to warming up his fingers. 

Var 3: Allegretto, G major, 3/8: R. B. T. Richard Baxter ‘Towns- 
hend was an amateur actor who had a way of playing tricks with his 
voice, as witness the falsetto of the woodwinds and the deep rumble of 
the bassoons. 


Var 4: Allegro di molto, G minor, 3/4: W. M. B. William M. Baker 
Was a country squire who was extremely positive and fiery in argument. 
This is the shortest of the variations. 

Var. 5: Moderato, C minor, 12/8: R. P. A. Richard P. Arnold, son 


of Matthew Arnold, a man of various and changeable moods. This 20eS 
without pause to 


Var. 6: Andantino, C major, 3/2: Ysobel. Isabel Fitton played the 








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Continued 





PROGRAVE NOES 


viola in the Malvern quartet parties, and the variation therefore empha- 
sizes that instrument. The leap of a tenth in the theme as heard at the 
and did not reveal their true symphonic personalities until later periods. 
Thus, the first completely characteristic symphony of Beethoven is the 
beginning and end is said to refer to the fact that Miss Fitton was un- 


usually tall. 


Varad: Presto. G major, 4/4: Troyte. Arthur ‘Troyte Griffith was an 


architect, and obviously an excitable and tempestuous person. 


Var. 8: Allegretto, G major, 6/8: W. N. Winifred Norbury was “a 
patrician lady of the older generation who lived in a charming 18th 
century house in the country outside Worcester.” “This delicate variation 


goes on without pause to 


Var. 9: Moderato, E flat major, 3/4: Nimrod. Nimrod is the mighty 
hunter of the Book of Genesis; August Jaeger (Jaeger is the German 
word for hunter) was one of Elgar’s publishers and editor of The Musical 
Times. ‘The variation is said to recall an evening when Jaeger waxed 
eloquent in praise of Beethoven's slow movements. ‘The music is in a 
broad Beethovenian vein, and Elgar has been quoted as saying it was de- 
signed after the slow movement of the Sonate Pathétique. 


Var. 10: Intermezzo: Allegretto, G major, 3/4: Dorabella. Dora 
Penny was an old friend of the Elgars. She stuttered. So does the music. 


Var. 11: Allegro di molto, G minor, 2/2: G. R. S. George Robertson 
Sinclair, organist of Hereford Cathedral, had a particularly lively bull- 
dog named Dan. ‘This variation deals with the dog rather than with Dr. 
Sinclair. 

Var. 12: Andante, G minor, 4/4: B. G. N. Basil G. Nevinson played 
the ‘cello in the Elgar circle, and this episode brings the ‘cello to the 
fore. Without pause to 


Var. 13: Romanza: Moderato, G major. 3/4. 7° The persone dis 
tinguished solely by three asterisks was Lady Mary Lygon, who was, at 
the time of the composition of this work, on her way to Australia. Part 
of the variation, therefore, consists of a quotation from Mendelssohn's 
overture, Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage, over an accompaniment in 





VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO TUxepo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 














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PROGR AIM N-OOGE S=— Cov fenire fd. 


“the soft tremor of the drums suggests the distant throb of the en- 


which 
vines of a liner.” 

Var. 14: Finale: Alleoro;,.G major, 4/4: E. DD, U. The ainitials- refer 
to a nickname with which Elgar himself was known at Malvern, but the 
nickname has not been revealed. ‘This movement is bigger and more 
varied than any variation has a right to be. Elgar originally intended 
not to number it and call it simply “finale,” but that would have lett 


thirteen variations, and he did not like that number. 





Se ae |e ae 


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GAETANO MEROLA, GENERAL DIRECTOR 





PAUL POSZ, BUSINESS MANAGER 


CONCERT ATTRACTIONS 


INGE Xcoles - AS IRA GSE LON 
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SYMPHONY NO. 1, 
CoN EN. ORS * OTe sO Otccw cts oer ener ape oe Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 


The first symphony of Brahms is probably the most mature and _ per- 
sonal first symphony in the literature of music. All the other great masters 
of the form made their initial essays in the symphony early in their careers, 
third, the first completely characteristic symphony by Schubert is the 
eighth, and so on. Brahms, however, was extremely reluctant to try his 
hand at the symphony until his career was very well on its way. “I shall 
never compose a symphony,” he once told a friend, “You have no con- 
cepuon of how the likes of us feel when we ve the tramp of a giant like 
Beethoven behind us.” 


Consequently it was not until 1876, after having established himself as 
a world figure by means of his chamber music, his German Requiem, and 
2 other works, that Brahms produced his first symphony. No one knows how 
long the composition of the music had taken, but sketches for it are known 
| to have existed as far back as 1862. Phe work employs the classic Beethoven 
3 orchestra and follows, in a broad, free manner, the classic Beethoven 
g formula. Its most striking original feature, perhaps, is the extensive intro- 
duction to the last movement, with its Alpine horn call emerging from 
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PIEARE MONTEUX, Conductor 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


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EpwIN McArTHUR, Conducting 


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PROGRAM 
ALL WAGNER PROGRAM 


Prelude to “Die Meistersinger”’ Orchestra 
(a) Elsa’s ““Traum”’ from “Lohengrin” Madame Flagstad 
(b) “Dich theure Halle” from “Tannhauser”’. . Madame Flagstad 
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; “Gotterdammerung”’ Madame Flagstad 
j TUESDAY NIGHT, APRIL 15 
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MonrTeEux, Conducting 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


ALEXANDER 
BRAILOWShY 


Pianist 


K 


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IN 


Program 


SAIN HRA NGISCO-OVEREP ERG eos a La Violette 


(FIRST PERFORMANCE — [THE COMPOSER CONDUCTING) 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
NO. 1, B FLAT MINOR Tschaikowsky 
Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso — 
Allegro con spirito 
Andantino semplice 
Allegro con fuoco 
Mr. BRAILOWSKY 


Ne ER VES SCOEN 


SYMPHONY NO. 5, C MINOR, OPUS 67... Beethoven 
Allegro con brio 
Andante con moto 
Allesro — 
Allegro 
THE PIANO'IS A STEINWAY 
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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


CAN PRANG TS COsOVEIR ICC i age cs Wesley La Violette 


(1894-) 


This work, composed in the summer of 1939, was written at the in- 
vitation of Pierre Monteux for the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 
[ts title is not to be taken in a descriptive sense. It signifies merely that 
the music was created while the composer was living in this city and for 
the San Francisco orchestra and its conductor, to whom it is dedicated. 


Mr. La Violette provides the following outline: 


“The material for the overture is announced in the opening five notes 
given to the strings, ‘fast and brilliantly.’ It is freely developed at some 
length, leading to a Pitt Largo where the thematic material is given to 
the town solo. iP he introductory material returns, anda L arghetto Moder- 
ato section gives the thematic material, inverted and augmented rhythmi- 
cally, to ihe solo trumpet. It is further developed in fhe strings. At the 
climax the theme appears in the brass, maestoso, augmentation, while 
the strings figure the theme in diminution rhythmically. The principal 
ficure returns, and leads to an extensive dev elopment in a solo string and 
10 woodwind quartet, which is later answered by full sections, leading 
to the final statement in an Andante Maestoso, with an accelerando to a 
brilliant close, with the entire orchestra.’ 

Wesley La Violette was born in St. James, Minnesota, and was raised 
In Spokane, Washington. He was graduated from the school of music at 
Northwestern University in 1917, nd after a period of war service re- 
ceived the degrees of Master of Music and Doctor of Music at the Chicago 
Musical College. He was a member of the faculty of that institution for ten 
years, and then for five years taught at DePaul U niversity in the same 
city. He is director of the DePaul U niversity Press, recently established for 
the publication of American music, although for the past two years he has 
been living in San Francisco. He has composed four string quartets, two 
symphonies, an opera entitled Shylock, two violin concertos and two sona- 
tas for the same instrument, an octet for wind and piano, and many songs, 
symphonic poems etc. He is also author of Music and Its Makers. 


















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2. An Island Is Built 

3. The Magic City 

4. Beauty and Color 

5. Let There Be Light 

6. The Government on 
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8. Show Window of the 
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10. Market Place of the 
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Pageant and Song 

The Street of the 

Barkers 

16. Gala Days of ’39 

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RONG ROA Vi NTO fo Cr Oil te. 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 


NOs be Balse nel VUEN O Ness an Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky 
(1840-1893) 


The first piano concerto of Tschaikowsky provides an illuminating 
study in musical criticism as practiced by those against whom musical 
criticism is usually directed — the virtuost. The German pianist and con- 
ductor, Hans von Biilow, is reported to have said, “If I don’t practice for 
one day, I notice it. If I don’t practice for two days, the public notices it. 
If | don’t practice for a week the critics notice it.” Von Biilow as critic 
plays an important part in this story, but first other things are to be 
discussed. 

Tschaikowsky composed this concerto in 1874, at which time he was 
a member of the faculty of the Moscow Conservatory, the founder and 
director of which was the celebrated pianist, Nicholas Rubinstein, who is 
| not to be confused with his better known brother, Anton. On Christmas 
ey Eve, 1874, Tschaikowsky played over his B flat minor concerto for his 
chief. At the end, as ‘schaikowsky himself described it: 

“Then burst forth from Rubinstein’s mouth a mighty torrent of words. 
He spoke quietly at first; then he waxed hot, and at last resembled Zeus 
hurling thunderbolts. It appeared that my concerto was utterly worthless, 
absolutely unplayable; passages were so commonplace and awkward that 
they could not be improved; the piece as a whole was bad, trivial, vulgar. 
I had stolen this from that one, and that from this one; only two or three 
pages were good for anything while the others should be wiped out or 
radically re-written. ‘For instance, that! What is it, anyhow?” (And then 
he caricatured the passage on the pianoforte.) ‘And this? Is it possible?’ 
and so on, and so on. I cannot reproduce for you the main thing, the tone 
in which he said all this. An impartial bystander would necessarily have 
believed that I was a stupid, ignorant, conceited note-scratcher who was 
so impudent as to show his scribble to a celebrated man.” 

As a result of this reception Tschaikowsy destroyed the dedication to 
Nicholas Rubinstein, and re-dedicated the work to Hans von Bulow. ‘That 
artist wrote to the composer ““The ideas are so original, so noble, so power- 
i ful; the details are so interesting, and though there are many of them they 
do not impair the clearness and unity of the work. The form is so mature, 
ripe, distinguished in style, for intention and labor are everywhere con- 
cealed. I should weary you if I were to enumerate all the characteristics 


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woencreret 


PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


of vour work — characteristics which compel me to congratulate equally 
the composer as well as all those who shall enjoy actively or passively the 
composition. ” And since von Biilow was about to embark on an American 
tour he took the concerto with him and gave it its first hearings in Boston 
and New York. 

The semi-final commentary on this exercise in comparative criticism as 
practiced by performers is that Biilow afterward eliminated the concerto 
from his repertoire, while Rubinstein took it up and played it frequently 
from 1878 on. But the ultimate commentary is that, after Bulow had 
accepted the original version and then rejected it, and Rubinstein had 
rejected the original and later accepted it, Tschaikowsky himself com- 
pletely revised the score according to suggestions made to him by the 
pianist Edward Dannreuther. 

The concerto opens with one of Tschaikowsky’s most stirring pages — 
a long introduction in which a broad, sweeping melody is given to the 
strings. This is repeated in modified form by the solo instrument. ‘There 
is a solo cadenza, and the theme is restated by the strings under ascending 
chords of the piano. The introduction, really a movement in itself, leads 
at last into the main movement, in the customary sonata form, contrasting 
a Russian folk tune first introduced by the piano with a somewhat broader 
theme sung later by the woodwinds and horns. There is the usual develop- 
ment and recapitulation, and the usual cadenza before the end. ‘This ca- 
denza is not left to the caprice of the interpreter, as is usual with classical 
concertos, but was written by Tschaikowsky and is an integral part of the 
score. 

The slow movement opens with a folk-like melody in the solo flute, 
taken up by the piano and developed in various ways. There is a sudden 
change to Prestissimo at the opening of the second section of the move- 
ment. The main material of this section is a waltz-like tune based on the 
melody of an old French song. Another solo cadenza, and then the move- 
ment returns to Andante semplice and the flute theme of the opening. The 
finale is a rondo based on the eminently Russian melody given to the 
solo at the beginning, and developed with the utmost brilliance, sonority 
and soloistic display. 


SYMPHONY NO. 5, C MINOR, 
) N/a , 
GD) ACSC Se a Stk ie ee eam Ludwig van Beethoven 
(1770-1827) 
One of the favorite games of the musical debunkers is to tell us that 
Beethoven did not intend the first four notes of the fifth symphony to rep- 
resent “fate knocking at the door.” 











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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


This remark was, to be sure, made by Beethoven himself, but it was 
made many years after the symphony was written and under special and 
peculiar circumstances. It is first recorded by Anton Schindler, who lived 
with Beethoven during the last 14 years of his life, and wrote an invalu- 
able, if in spots unauthentic, biography of the composer. Schindler was a 
naive and literal-minded soul who honestly believed Beethoven had com- 
posed every one of his works in response to an inner “program,” and was 
much distressed that Beethoven had not clearly indicated the nature of 
that “program” in each instance. Schindler would have had a descriptive 
title placed over every movement Beethoven produced, like the titles the 
composer himself provided for the sonata known as Farewell, Absence and 
Return, and was rather baffled to discover Beethoven unsympathetic to- 
ward this idea. 


In 1823 Schindler conducted a series of performances of Beethoven's 
symphonies, and the composer let fall the famous “fate knocking at the 
door” while going through the score of the fifth symphony with him in 
preparation for these concerts. It is clear that Beethoven was for the 
moment talking Schindler’s language in order to impress a musical idea 
upon him, but there is no evidence whatever for the statement that Beet- 
hoven thought of the figure in those terms while creating the fifth sym- 
phony in the year 1805-7. 

But there is this much to be said for Schindler — that Beethoven's 
mature symphonies do convey so marked a sense of extra-musical refer- 
ence, so strong a sense of the ethical and rhetorical, that their interpreta- 
tion in terms of extra-musical imagery was inevitable. These “interpreta- 
tions” may be characterized, as Sir Donald Francis Tovey has characterized 
them, as “roaring cataracts of nonsense,” but there would not be so many 
of them, nor would they have appeared so frequently and in so many 
places if there were not something in the music to call them forth. 

The opening figure of the fifth symphony carries a purely musical sig- 
nificance that quite transcends the obvious idea of “fate knocking at the 
door.” The fifth symphony is the first great work wherein a composer 
tackles the problem of binding the four movements of the conventional 
symphonic structure into unity. The four-note motif* has that binding 
value; it recurs, if subtly, in the second movement, and quite unmistakably 
in the third and fourth. Other devices for the attainment of unity are the 
link between the third and fourth movements so that the scherzo goes into 
the finale without pause, and the literal repetition of a portion of the 





*It is also worth noting that motifs of repeated notes appear frequently in Beetho- 
ven’s works of the same period as the fifth symphony, as witness the finale of the Eroica, 
the first movement of the Sonata Appassionata, the first movement of the fourth piano 


concerto, the first movement of the violin concerto, and the scherzo of the quartet, Opus 
59, No. LI. 





VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 
For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO : TU xepo 2738 


Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 








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PROGRAM 2NO FES—Gontinwed 


<cherzo in the last movement. ‘The fifth symphony may therefore be re- 
carded as the first in the 19th century sequence of “cyclic” symphonies, its 
principles being developed more fully by Schumann in his fourth sym- 
phony, and reaching the ultimate in complexity in the symphony by 
César Franck. 

An innovation of equal, if not greater importance, 1s the enormous 
emphasis here given to the finale. These notes have several times referred 
to the quite profound remark that in the first movement of the 18th cen- 
tury forms “the composer shows what he can do, in the second what he can 
feel. and in the last how glad he is that it is all over.’ The finale of the 
fitth symphony is almost the first important instance of a last movement 
wherein the composer does not “show how glad he is that it 1s aM OWGies = 
here, rather, is the triumphant summation in grand rhetorical gestures ol 
3 all that had gone before, in a spiritual if not in a thematic sense. The 
q entire concept of symphonic balance is here reproportioned, and the older 
| concept was never to be re-established. 


RGIS 7G 


a renee 


ee 


THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


"| SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


= OPERA HOUSE - - TWENTY-NINTH SEASON 


a FRIDAY AFTERNOON ano SATURDAY NIGHT 
i AT 2:30 « * e 2 AT 8:30 
4 FRI, MAR.14 —  SAT., MAR. 15 FRI., APR. 4 — SAT., APR. 5 
4 DOROTHY MAYNOR ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 
zg SOPRANO 
FRI., APR. 18 — SAT., APR. 19 
FRI,MAR.28 —  SAT., MAR. 29 


JOSE ITURBI 


PIANIST 


ORCHESTRAL PROGRAM 





i - pages 


UNIVERSITY ““POP’’ CONCERT 
Sunday Evening, March 2 - Eight Thirty O’Clock 


Soloist: MARGARET SPEAKS, Soprano 





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- Yhe ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
TORING RONCHI, a : : : . a Lee JR., SECRETARY . 


ANGELO J. ROSSI, Mayor 


SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY 
OHGHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


with 


KIRSTEN 
FLAGSTAD 


-DWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 


Jd. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Avie Auditorium 
































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THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI ANGELO J. ROSSI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Mayor Secretary 
Presents 
Municipal Coucerts 

with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


Ciuic Auditorium 
SATURDAY NIGHT, APRIL 12 


MUNICIPAL CHORUS 


HANS LESCHKE, Conducting 


In Beethoven’s 
—SOLOISTS— 
PEGGY TURNLEY RUSSELL ROBERTS 
REBA GREENLEY DOUGLAS BEATTIE 
In celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary of the Municipal Chorus no 
admission to the Concert will be charged. All seats reserved. Free tickets may 


be had at Symphony box office, Sherman, Clay. No one will be admitted 
without a ticket. 


TUESDAY NIGHT, APRIL 15 


YEHUDI MENUHIN 


Brilliant Young Genius of the Violin 


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[ii aleatoeaaS wii iOun yar Ne 4h ces tk hea cutee 7 gene x. 5 ciety ene Charles Jones 
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Mr. MENUHIN 
OU mani Clen C(rcUMstayCes wt at fifa kee baw Gib a kit. nutes Elgar 


MOoNTEUxX, Conducting 


Tickets: $1.50 - $1.00 - 75c - 50c - Tax Exempt 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 
ee Ee Be 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 





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EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 


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PRELUDE TO DIE MEISTERSINGER VON 
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| (a) ELSA’S DREAM, FROM LOHENGRIN 
(b) DICH, THEURE HALLE, FROM 
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ELSA’S DREAM, FROM LOHENGRIN 


Einsam in triiben ‘Tagen 
Hab’ ich zu Gott gefleht, 
De Herzens tiefstes Klagen 
Ergoss’ ich im Gebet: 


Da drang aus meinem Stohnen 


Ein Laut so klagevoll, 
Der zu gewalt’gem T6nen 
Weit in die Ltifte schwoll: 


Ich hért’ ihn fern hin hallen, 


Bis kaum mein Ohr er traf; 
Mein Aug ist zu gefallen, 
Ich sank in stissen Schlaf. 


In lichter Waffen Scheine 
Ein Ritter nahte da, 

So tugendlicher Reine 

Ich keinen noch ersah: 

Ein golden Horn zur Hiften, 
Gelehnet auf sein Schwert, 
So trat er aus den Liiften 

Zu mir, der Recke werth; 
Mit ziichtigem Gebahren 
Gab Troéstung er mir ein: 
Des Ritters will ich wahren, 
Er soll mein Streiter sein! 


Oft when the hours were lonely, 
I unto heav’n have pray’d, 
One boon I ask’d for only, 

To send the orphans aid; 

I pray’d in tears and sorrow, 
With heavy heart and sore, 
Hoping a brighter morrow 

Yet was for us in store. 

Afar my words were wafted, 

I dreamt not help was nigh, 
But One on high vouchsaf'd it, 
While I in sleep did lie. 


I saw in splendor shining, 

A Knight of glorious mien, 

On me his eyes inclining 

With tranquil gaze serene; 

A horn of gold beside him, 

He leant upon his sword, 

Thus when I erst espied him 

‘Mid clouds of light he soar’d; 

His words so low and tender 

Brought life renew’d to me. 

My guardian, my defender, 

Thou shalt my champion be! 
—NATALIA MACFARREN. 


THE LECTURE EVENT FOR WHICH 
WE HAVE WAITED FIVE YEARS 


The One and Only 


DOROTHY THOMPSON 


First Lady of Journalism 


Subject: 


SLOW SECURE IS OUR FU PURE: 
REVEALING FACTS SHE WOULD NEVER 
DARE UTTER OVER THE RADIO 


OPERA HOUSE 


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 26 AT 8:30 P. M. 


One Lecture Only 


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announces 


ANNUAL “EASTER” CONCERT 


of the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


featuring 


BASIL RATHBONE 


Distinguished Star of Stage, Screen and Radio 
Narrator in ‘Peter and the Wolf”’ 


—PROGRAM— 


Overture to. Lhe Flyine Dutchman... 7-7... =. Wagner 
Symphony in B minor, “Unfinished”......... Schubert 
Ae) ey eles CMa avout h alee CO) CMe nee es Mee ee ene oro Prokofiteff 


*BASIL RATHBONE, Narrator 


Suite from ‘Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme” Richard Strauss 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 
Thus Spake Zarathust tare Richard Strauss 


*Mr. Rathbone has just made a recording of “Peter and the Wolf” 
with Leopold Stokowski. 


Ticket Prices 
ORCHESTRA, $2.50 and $2.00 > GRAND TIER $2.50 and $2.00 
DRESS CIRCLE, $1.65 2 BALGONY CIRGLE, $1-25 
BALCONY, 75¢ “ BOX SEATS, $2.75 
RACKS Ew yee 


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Tickets on General Sale, Monday, March 24 
SYMPHONY BOX OFFICES: Sherman, Clay & Co., San Francisco 


and Oakland. Telephone SUtter 1331 (San Francisco) or 
HIgate 1220 gee ee 


OPERA HOUSE Ait eee 





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apes) 2 











DICH, THEURE HALLE, FROM TANNHAUSER 


Dich, theure Halle, griiss’ ich wieder, Oh hall of song, I give thee greeting! 
In dir erwachen seine Lieder, All hail to thee, thou hallow’d place! 
Froh eriiss’ ich dich, geliebter Raum! ‘Twas here that dream, so sweet and 
Und wecken mich aus diistrem Traum. fleeting, 

Da er aus dir geschieden, Upon my heart his song did trace. 
Wie 6d’ erschienst du mir! But since by him forsaken, 

Aus mir entfloh der Frieden, A desert thou dost seem! 

Die Freude zog aus dir! Thy echoes only waken 


Remembrance of a dream. 


Wie jetzt mein Busen hoch sich hebet, But now the flame of hope ts lighted 
So scheinst du jetzt mir stolz und hehr; Thy vault shall ring with glorious war, 
Der mich und dich so neu belebet, For he, whose strains my soul delighted, 
Nicht weilt’ er ferne mehr! No longer roams afar! 

Sei mir gegrtisst. Sei mir gegrusst! All hail to thee, all hail to thee! 

Du, theure Halle, sei mir gegrtisst! Thou hall of glory, dear to my heart! 


—NATALIA MACFARREN. 














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SAN FRANCISCO 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 


Concert Harpist 


TU xepo 2738 








ISOLDE’S LOVE-DEATH, FROM TRISTAN UND ISOLDE 


; ISOLDE: ISOLDE: (Unconscious of all around her, 
4 Mild und leise turning her eyes with rising inspiration 
, wie er laichelt, on Tristan’s body.) 
wie das Auge How gently and softly 
hold er Offnet: He smiles 
secht ihr, Freunde, And opens his eyes: 
seh’t ihr’s nicht? Look, my friends, 
Immer lichter Do you not see it? 
wie er leuchtet Ever brighter, 
wie er minnig Ever lovelier, 
immer micht’ger, Ever stronger, 
Stern-umstrahlet Enshrouded in stars 
hoch sich hebt: He is borne on high: 
seht ihr Freunde, Look, my friends, 
seh’t ihr’s nicht Do you not see 
Wie das Herz ihm How his heart 
muthig schwillt, Swells in courage, 
voll und hehr Full and sublime, 
im Busen quillt: In his breast, 
wie den Lippen How from his lips 
wonnig mild In gentle ecstacy 
stisser Athem His sweet spirit 
sanft entweht: Goes softly forth? 
' Freunde, seht — Look, my friends, 
fiihlt und seht ihr’s nicht? Do you not feel and see this? 
Hore ich nur Do I alone hear 
diese Weise, This melody, 
die so wunder — So wonderful 
voll und leise, And heavenly? 
Wonne klagend, This rapturous lament 
Alles sagend, That tells all 
mild vers6hnend In gentle expiation? 
aus ihm tonend This song 
auf sich schwingt, That soars from him 
in mich drinet, And forces from me 
hold erhallend Answering echoes: 
um mich klingt? That ring around me 
Heller schallend, Ever louder 
mich umwallend, And surround me? 
sind es Wellen Are they softly blowing 
Sanfter Liifte? On the atr? 
Sind es Wogen Are they exhaling 
wonniger Diifte? This blissful fragrance? 
Wie sie schwellen, How they swell 
mich umrauschen, And rush around me! 
soll ich athmen, Shall I breathe them? 
y soll ich lauschen? Shall I listen? 
soll ich schliirfen, Shall I drink them in? 
untertauchen, Immersing myself 
suss in. Diiften Sweetly in their fragrance, 


- s mich verhauchen? Myself expiring 








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In dem wogendem Schwall On the waves, 


‘7 dem tonenden Schall On the melody, 

in des Welt-Athems On the sighs 

wehendem All — Of the sorrowing universe, — 
ertrinken — Drowning — 

versinken — Sinking — 

unbewusst — Unknowing — 

héchste Lust! Ultimate desire! 


BRUNNHILDE’S IMMOLATION, FROM 
GOETTERDAEMMERUNG 


The text of this episode is too extensive for quotation here. It forms 
the finale to the entire Ring cycle. The body of Siegfried has been brought 
back to the hall of the Gibichungs on the banks of the Rhine. At the be- 
ginning of the /mmolation Scene Brunnhilde orders a funeral pyre erected 
to receive him, and while the young men heap up the branches, she re- 
views the fated tangle of deceit and misunderstanding that has led to 
Siegfried’s death. She calls upon the gods to witness the result of their 
dalliance with the forces of evil, and commands the Rhine maidens to re- 
trieve the ring of the Niblungs from her ashes. The funeral pyre is NOW 
alight, and Brunnhilde springs upon her Valkyr horse and rides into it. 
The flames engulf the entire scene. Then the Rhine rises, and upon its 
flood the Rhine maidens appear to take the ring as Brunnhilde had de- 
sired. The flood subsides, and at the end the castle of the gods is seen 
aflame in the heavens. 





— 


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15. The Street of the 
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16. Gala Days of ’39 

17. The Months Between 

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19. And the World Came 

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Appendix 
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Dramatized by CLARE TREE MAJOR 


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SUNDAY AFTERNOON,. MARCH 23, 1941 


—CHARACTERS — 


EG 1 ee ee eee Kay Mallory Miss Rottenmeier...............----- Elaine Sheldon 
Detach esd tse A aii nother Helen Yaple Cla taineeyets Pipe ec ee Se Betty O’Connor 
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Sebastian, the Servant.......... Anthony Peyton 
—SCENES— 


ANG I. Scene 1 On the Mountain Side. 
Scene 2. Outside the Alm Uncle’s Cottage. 
Scene 3. ‘The same, the next morning. 
Scene 4. A Pasture on the Mountain Side, late afternoon. 
ACT II. Scene 1 Mr. Sesemann’s Library, in Frankfort, two years later. 
Scene 2 The same, two months later. 
ACT III. Scene 1 Outside the Alm Uncle’s Cottage, the end of the following summer. 
Directed by CLARE TREE MAJOR 
Assisted by WALTER ROBERTS 
Costumes by MARIAN DePEW 
Settings by IRVING MORROW 


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THE MAGIC CITY 


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1939-1940 
by JAMES and WELLER 





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PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


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Program 


ON TRO URE, 
Sethe RoW SS LAINGE AS TERS Fee Rimsky-Korsakoff 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN 
NN DIORCHES DRA, D MAJOR, OPUS. /7. Brahms 
Allegro non troppo 
Adagio 
Allegro giocoso ma non troppo vivace 
Mr. MENUHIN 


[NEE ReMi Ss sk ON 


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‘THE COMPOSER CONDUCTING — FIRST PERFORMANCE 
LEZ GHIA IST Ss lr a Sa Se Ravel 


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VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 


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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


OVERTURE, 
TREE RUSS TP AING EAS TE Re ar ae N. A. Rimsky-Korsakoff 
(1844-1908) 

“During the summer of 1888,” wrote Rimsky-Korsakoff in his auto- 
biography, “I finished Scheherezade and The Bright Holiday, an Easter 
overture on themes from the obikhod.” (The obikhod is the most import- 
ant collection of canticles of the Greek Orthodox church, and all the titles 
referred to below are those of hymns in this volume.) 


“The rather lengthy, slow introduction of the Easter Sunday Overture,” 
the composer continues,” (blithely disregarding the change he has effected 
in the title of the work, and the further change that was to eventuate in 
the title The Russian Easter, which appears in the score) “on the theme 
of Let God Arise, alternating with the ecclesiastic theme, 4n Angel Wailed, 
appeared to me, in its beginning, as it were, the ancient Isaiah’s prophecy 
concerning the resurrection of Christ. The gloomy colors of the Andante 
lugubre seemed to depict the holy sepulchre that had shone with ineffable 
light at the moment of the resurrection—the transition to the Allegro of 
the overture. 


“The beginning of the Allegro, Let Them Also That Hate Him Flee 
Before Him, led to the holiday mood of the Greek Orthodox church 
service on Christ’s matins; the solemn trumpet voice of the Archangel was 
replaced by a tonal reproduction of the joyous, almost dance-like bell- 
tolling, alternating now with the sexton’s rapid reading and now with the 





conventional chant of the priest reading the glad tidings of the Evangel. 
The obikhod theme, Christ Is Risen, which forms a sort of subsidiary part 
of the overture, appeared amid the trumpet-blasts and the bell-tolling, 
constituting also a triumphant coda. 








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“In this overture were thus combined reminiscences of the ancient 
prophecy, of the gospel narrative, and also a general picture of the Easter 
service and its pagan merrymaking. The capering and leaping of the 
Biblical King David before the ark, do they not give expression to a mood 
of the same order as the mood of the idol-worshipper’s dance? Surely the 
Russian obikhod is instrumental dance music of the church, is it not? And 
do not the waving beards of the priests and sextons clad in white vestments 
and surplices, and intonating Beautiful Easter in the tempo of Allegro 
vivo, etc., transport the imagination to pagan times? And all those Easter 
loaves and twists, and the glowing tapers—how far a cry from the philo- 
sophic and socialistic teachings of Christ! This legendary and heathen 
side of the holiday, this transition from the gloomy and mysterious even- 
ing of Passion Saturday to the unbridled pagan-religious merry-making on 
the morn of Easter Sunday is what I was eager to reproduce in my overture. 


“Accordingly I requested Count Golenicheff-Kutusoff to write a pro- 
eram in verse, which he did for me. But I was not satisfied with his poem, 
and wrote in prose my own program, which is appended to the published 
score. Of course in that program I did not explain my views and my con- 
ception of the bright holiday, leaving it to tones to speak for me. Evidently 
these tones do speak of my feelings and thoughts, but within certain limits, 
for my overture raises doubts in the minds of some hearers, despite the 
considerable clarity of the music. In any event in order to appreciate my 
overture even ever so slightly it is necessary that the hearer should have 
attended Easter morning service at least once, and, at that, not ina,domestic 
chapel but in a cathedral thronged with people from every walk of life, 
with several priests conducting the cathedral service—something which 
many intellectual Russian hearers, let alone hearers of other confessions, 
quite lack nowadays. As for myself, I had gained my impressions in my 
childhood passed near the Tikhvin Monastery.” 


Rimsky-Korsakoff’s “program,” printed in the score, consists of two 
Biblical quotations and two paragraphs of the composer's own, as follows: 


“Tet God arise, let his enemies be scattered: let them also that hate 
Him flee before Him. As smoke is driven away, so drive them away: as 
wax melteth before the fire, so let the wicked perish at the presence of 
God.” (Psalm 67). 


“And when the sabbath was past, Mary Magdalene, and Mary the 
mother of James, and Salome, had bought sweet spices that they might 


“VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO . TU xeEpo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College | 


























come and anoint him. And very early in the morning, the first day of the 
week, they came unto the sepulchre at the rising of the sun. And they said 
among themselves, who shall roll us away the stone from the door of the 
sepulchre? And when they looked, they saw that the stone was rolled 
away: for it was very great. And entering into the sepulchre they saw a 
young man sitting on the right side, clothed in a long white garment; and 
they were affrighted. And he said unto them, be not affrighted: Ye seek 
Jesus of Nazareth, which was crucified: he is risen; he is not here: behold 
the place where they laid him.” (Gospel of St. Mark.) 


“And the joyous tidings spread throughout the universe, and those 
who hated Him fled before Him, driven away like smoke. 


“‘Resurrexit!’ sing the choirs of angels in heaven, to the sound of the 
trumpets of the archangels and the rustling of the wings of the seraphim. 
‘Resurrexit!’ sing the priests in the temples, surrounded by clouds of in- 


cense, in the light of innumerable tapers, to the pealing of triumphant 
bells.” 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 
TEAS ORS ORG eel tere arta eee Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 
Brahms’ violin concerto was first produced in 1879, the solo part 
performed by Joseph Joachim, who had materially assisted Brahms with 
technical advice during the period of composition. 


I. 
Allegro non troppo, D major, 3/4 time. The first movement adheres 


SSS 


MENUHIN’S INCOMPARABLE ART 
PERPETUATED ON GRAMOPHONE RECORDS 


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Kreutzer Sonata,’ Beethoven’s Seventh and Tenth sonatas, Schumann’s D 
minor, Mozart’s A Major and F Major, Lekeu’s sonata in G, Pizzetti’s sonata, 
Brahms’ D Minor, Enesco’s A Minor, Cesar Franck’s A Major, Bach’s E Major, 
Schubert Rondo Brilliant, Szymanowski’s Mythes, etc. Also Mendelssohn's 
famous concerto in E Minor recently recorded in Paris with Enesco conducting 
the great Orchestra Colonne; the “lost” Schumann Concerto with the New 
York Philharmonic Orchestra, Barbirolli conducting; Mozart’s concertos No. | 
in D Major, No. 3 in G Major, No. 7 in D Major; Paganini’s Concerto No. 1] in 
D Major; Elgar’s B Minor; Lalo’s Symphonie Espagnole; Bruch’s G Minor; 
Dvorak’s A Minor; Chausson’s Poeme; and many smaller works such as the 
“Legende” of Wieniawski (with orchestra); Rossini-Paganini’s “Moses Fan- 
tasy”; Locatelli’s Labyrinth; Wieniawski’s Souvenir de Moscou; Szymanowski’s 
Notturno and Tarantella; Pugnani-Kreisler’s Praeludium and Allegro; 
Kreisler’s Caprice Viennois, Schon Rosmarin, etc. 

















to the classic form in exposing practically all of its thematic material in 
the orchestra before the entrance of the solo. ‘The first theme is quite long. 
Ot its three separate phrases the first, presented immediately by the strings 
and bassoons, is the most important: 





The second theme, likewise, is composed of three separate phrases, 
beginning thus in the oboe: 




















The little motive distinguished with a bracket in the above quotation is 
the basic for subsequent portions of the second theme and is prominent 
elsewhere in the movement. A closing theme announces an important 
energetic rhythm: 





The solo violin makes its entry at the 90th bar with leaping cadenza- 








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like material, punctuated in the orchestra with the rhythm of Example 3, 
the orchestra later turning to material derived from Example 2 in accom- 
paniment to the runs and arpeggios of the solo. 


The second exposition begins with Example 1, high in the principal 
instrument. The themes exposed by the orchestra alone at the outset of 
the movement are now reheard under the embroidery of the solo, which 
also discovers a brand new melody of its own: 





As is customary, the solo rests at the beginning of the development. 
The orchestra opens this section fortissimo, with material derived from 
Examples! and 3, and likewise rehearses Example 4. The violin re-enters 
with an expressive transformation of the bracketed motive in Example 2, 
to which it eventually adds a highly decorative countersubject, the motive 
itself continuing in the accompaniment. The countersubject then is devel- 
oped by the orchestra. Flaming leaps of ninths in the solo and the rhythm 
of Example 3 lead to the recapitulation, which is ushered in by another 
fortissimo statement of Example | in the orchestra. The thematic material 
is again passed in review in a fashion not unlike that of the second ex- 
position. The coda begins with the cadenza. Example | is further devel- 
oped at the end. 


1 Wt 
Adagio, F major, 2/4 time. At the second bar the solo oboe gives out 


a melody which Max Bruch stated was that of a Bohemian folk song: 
eee ee ———_ a 





After the full exposition of this tune the solo violin takes it up in varied 
and decorated form. A second section, with expressive arabesques for the 
solo, is in F sharp minor. Eventually the key and theme of the first section 
are reinstated, with further variation of the folk song by the soloist. 


NOE 
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solo gives out the principal subject of this brilliant rondo: 


Gag Fred bith 


As the term “‘rondo” implies, the movement keeps returning to Example 6 























in its original key and rhythm, with episodes of contrast between the 
repetitions. “The most important episodic theme is stated by the solo 
violin in octaves: 






































A brief cadenza initiates the coda (poco piu presto) based on Examples 
6 and 7. 


Eile Nee te @ eNO AVE PEO) ING. Geri eta eae Charles Jones 
(1912-) 
The composer provides the following information: 

“In the summer of 1938 I completed a rather short symphony which was 
made up of two distinct parts or movements. While these movements 
were not thematically connected in any way, they were intended to com- 
plement each other and form part of a two unit formal scheme. The part 
played to-night is the second or finale of the symphony, and in hearing 
this by itself it is necessary to bear in mind that it is the contrasting 
portion to a lyrical and broadly planned first movement. Its chief pur- 
pose 1s to create a kind of musical tension not found in the first part, 
and thus bring the piece to a satisfactory conclusion. The tempo in- 
dication is Allegro Moderato, and the form is that of a rondo, treated 
in such a way that the chief elements of sonata form (two contrasting 
themes) are also present. 


“About myself I can add that I was born in Canada of American 
parents and received my musical education in New York City, eraduating 
from the Juilliard Graduate School in 1939. Since then I have been a 
member of the faculty of Mills College. My teachers have been Bernard 
Wagenaar, Aaron Copland and Darius Milhaud. Among my works are a 
suite for strings, a Capriccio tor viola and piano, a sonatina for violin, a 
string quartet, songs, piano pieces and a symphony.’ 


AL ee AGING tow ata ee ce. og. sek kk a ak 2 oa ee areata Maurice Ravel 
(1875-1937) 


Ravel composed the Tzigane in 1924. Its use of Hungarian gypsy) 
material may have been prompted by the fact that it was written for the 
well known Hungarian violinist, Jelly d’Aranyi. ‘The first part is a long 
introduction or recitative for violin alone,” says Madeleine Goss in her 
biography of Ravel, “a series of variations such as gypsies love to develop 
from their native themes, and giving the effect of improvisation. The 








work begins in slow tempo and gradually increases to a dazzling whirl- 
wind of violin acrobatics.”’ 


POMP AND CIRCUMSTANCE, 
UT Te TA Te es Ii Ge INO) lee es eet Sir Edward Elgar 
(1857-1934) 

Elgar composed five marches under the general title Pomp and Cir- 
cumstance. ‘These appeared at various intervals between 1901 and 1930, 
but only the first has achieved any wide-spread popularity. As the author 
of the article on Elgar in Grove’s Dictionary shrewdly remarks, these 
marches “illustrate that love of the proud pageantry of war which be- 
longs essentially to times of peace.” 

There exists a wide-spread idea that the first Pomp and Circumstance 
march was written for the coronation of King Edward VII, but this is 
an error. The work was first performed nearly a year before Edward’s 
coronation, but the broad melody of its trio was employed in a Corona- 
ation Ode which Elgar composed for performance at Covent Garden 
as part of the festivities associated with Edward’s assumption of the 
throne. Edward fell ill shortly before the date set for this production and 
the Coronation Ode was never given an “official” performance, but the 
Pomp and Circumstance tune, set to the words Land of Hope and Glory 
from the ode, has become a kind of secondary British national anthem. 


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CONCERT ATTRACTIONS — SPRING SERIES 


TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 22 


JOSEF HOFMANN 


THE “COMPLETE PIANIST” 


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HELEN TRAUBEL JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 


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OTTORINO RONCHI, PRESIDENT JOSEPH H. DYER, JR., SECRETARY 


PRES EN TS 






WITH? THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CONDUCTOR 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 


OPERA HOUSE El G H-T.. -P_E RF -O:R «MUA Ni7Geees 


JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 194! 






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THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 


President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 


Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
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Tickets: $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


March 4 March 21 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEUX, Conducting 

Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 














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TUESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 28, at 8:30 


Ballet Russe de Monte Carla 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


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POKER GAME 


Ballet in Three Deals, by Igor STRAVINSKY 
(Libretto in collaboration with M. Malaieff) 
Choreography by George BALANCHINE 
Scenery and Costumes by Irene SHARAFF 


Several players at the green cloth of the ‘The Joker eliminates one adversary by fill- 
card room find their game complicated by ing out a spade flush, but his knavery is 
the endless vagaries of the Joker. ended by a triumphant “royal flush” in 

The first deal results in two equal hearts. 

“straights” pitted against each other with Fer strussle asainst: wronedoers 
the Joker unable to upset the balance of CR ROD aris Ort gn Pe 
power. In the second deal the Joker con- 
spires with three aces to sweep to victory 
over four queens. The last deal becomes a 
tense struggle between three “flushes.” 


Peace is very well in its way. 

But what purposes does it serve 

With enemies who do not keep faith 
—La Fontaine 


Frederic FRANKLIN 


Alicia MARKOVA 
Marc PLATOFF 


Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine and Ten __........... 
THOMAS, GELEZNOVA, GRANTZEVA, KORJINSKA 









Alexandra DANILOVA 
Roy MILTON 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 

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Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
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iS Ss 22 the Opera - ec. candajewels by 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH Ht. DYER; JR. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 


In Beethoven’s 


Missa Setlemunis 


with the 


= The Art Co nnceios 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


In Celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary 
of the Municipal Chorus no Admission to 
the Concert will be Charged. 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM, APRIL 12 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 








$e 





ache pea Sanat cote cm pe etnaence Perce ttlg ie eee ne aE Ian GIBSON 
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Seven, Eight, Nine and Ten.............-... Miles. MARRA, HILL, BROWN, WILLIAMS 
Diamonds 
OO Wet ea Re a eer ee ee ia ag ae Milada MLADOVA 
aT ae po ena ERNE eS a eer sae ea ae ae Robert STEELE 
Mack neccep tt ceries nee eee acer Coenen nas ees genre i ey cay ieee Thomas ARMOUR 
Bee cease Mes ie Sacer en sca ae ogceeea James STARBUCK 
Clubs 
Quiet 2s a noes tee Saar eee ete woe aor ae Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 
Pa gee IR NE anes Pan ste BOP ee ee nae a i pana Chris VOLKOFF 
Ea gue eso eee teres re orca Pen oe Pera erage Vladimir KOSTENKO 
Pao cle sa sree eens Oss cede Boatman A Be ecm See Alexander GOUDOVITCH 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 





THE NUTCRACKER 


(Casse Noisette) 
Fairy-tale ballet in two acts and three scenes 

Music by TCHAIKOWSKY Choreography by PETIPA 

Revived by Mme. A. FEDEROVA 

Scenery and costumes after Alexandre BENOIS 
Costumes executed by Karinska, Inc. 
Scenery executed by Eugene B. Dunkel Studios, Inc. 

Waltz, Second Scene: Original choreography by Mme. A. Fedorova 


ACT I] 

Scene 1. Counselor von Stahlbaum gives 
a Christmas party for his children, Clara 
and Fritz, and invites many friends. Each 
guest brings a present, that of Dr. Drossel- 
mayer being a Bavarian doll in the shape 
of a nutcracker. When the party is over 
and all go to bed, Clara has a dream in 
which the Nutcracker comes to life and 


beckons her to follow him into the land 
of fantasy. 

Scene 2. In the Snowcountry, the Snow- 
flakes dance for Clara, after which the 
Nutcracker takes her to visit the Kingdom 
of Candy. 

ACT II 

In the Kingdom of Candy a celebration 
in Clara’s honor is given on the terrace of 
the Palace of Sweets. 





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DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
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ACT I 

Scene 1 
Gourisel of stot eet eee ee te ANG Sette io LA Vladimir KOSTENKO 
SOC Gt Cie nee in See eee EP Rs St, eee oe et ke. Sat. Jeanette LAURET 4 
Their Children... ................. Dorothy ETHERIDGE and Ian GIBSON | 
Dre Drosselinayer= <.ntee ion Fee er es a ee, Pe ee Simon SEMENOFF 
Guests 2 eter es nee oan Cetncont= Sea 2 Miles. Tania SEMENOVA, Katia GELEZNOVA 


Nathalie KELEPOVSKA, Vida BROWN, Tatiana CHAMIE 
MM. Alexandre GOUDOVITCH, James STARBUCK, Chris VOLKOFF 
Roy MILTON, Robert STEELE 


See y aes UN Swe NE wees oo Se etewe wera p ewe Howe UNCLE TNS 


inneir’ Ghildrenis- 455"). + Miles. CRABTREE, LACCA, THOMAS, WILLIAMS, 

HILL, WOICIKOWSKA 

PROV Ss 75s hos ce eae nar chee ee _...Anna SCARPOVA and Nicholas BERESOFF 
Scene 2 


Snow Flakes 
Alicia MARKOVA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 
Miles ROUDENKO, MARRA, KORJINSKA, LACCA, ROSTOVA, GELEZNOVA, 
MLADOVA, WILLIAMS, HIGHTOWER, GRANTZEVA, CRABTREE, 
BROWN, HILL, KELEPOVSKA, THOMAS, SEMENOVA 


% 
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BETWEEN ACTS VISIT THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA GUILD LIBRARY-MUSEUM 
IN LOBBY OPPOSITE COURT ENTRANCE 








Intermission 
ACT II 
SLC Tela £1 EET Viel SW es OE A peat iy Beh PM OE con hee ie SES Alicia MARKOVA 
Mirlitons 
Miles. FLOTAT, LACCA, ETHERIDGE, THOMAS, KORJINSKA, SCARPOVA 
Chinese 


Leila CRABTREE and ROLAND GUERARD 
Miles. CHAMIE, WOICIKOWSKA MM. IRWIN, MILTON 


Walse 
Lubov ROSTOVA, Milada MLADOVA, Tania GRANTZEVA 
Chris VOLKOFF, James STARBUCK, Ian GIBSON 
Mile. BROWN, ROUDENKO, GELEZNOVA, HIGHTOWER, HILL, LACCA, 
WILLIAMS, FLOTAT, KELEPOVSKA, THOMAS, MARRA, SCARPOVA | 


Trepak 
Frederic FRANKLIN 
MM. ARMOUR, KATCHAROFF, GOUDOVITCH, TOMIN 


Pas de Deux 
Alicia MARKOVA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 


Pinaleiz.e Entire Cast 
Conductor: Franz ALLERS 


its ees SR TES eS See ew 


Intermission 


—_______. 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist | 
For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 

872 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO . TU xEpDo 2738 

Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 








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Sunday Vet < 2 16 


Monday Eve, “17 


Tuesday Eve. “ 18 


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Pe CNClOSEd: CHECIS Hoc cescccct ecco cees soewasseeee, scotesuatasteeeennvgeeemetecnsasneraen ss 


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UN; a bec ea eet a ets ae arisen eer: Ana meee pay ot coerce cor Circ ah pas 


Telephone 1A Ce ee eae a eee TR Dias eorerepeoner eee Gor 
SEND SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE IF TICKETS AR 


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Be 


GAITE PARISIENNE 


Ballet in One Act 
































f Music by Jacques OFFENBACH 
Orchestrated by Manuel ROSENTHAL in collaboration with 
Jacques BRINDEJONC-OFFENBACH 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Decor and Theme by Count Etienne de BEAUMONT 
Scenery executed by Oreste Allegri Costumes executed by Mme. Karinska 
This is the saucy and sparkling French the glove-seller at once, and he falls head 
sister of “Le Beau Danube,” and it had over heels in love with her, with the result 
its first performance at the Theatre de that the flower-girl becomes jealous. 
w( Ge o O* ‘The ae : 
Monte Carlo in the spring of 1938. ‘I’h Brightly uniformed soldiers enter, and 
) ballet is concerned with the immense os lates 
sly RE the “cocodettes” prove that a uniform is 
ae susto of living in and for the moment, é Es, 
always an attraction, for they leave every- 
15¢ Anding its supreme expression in the Of- Leena aes ) ij leb 
Balcon thing and follow. The outstanding celeb- 
fenbach can-can. ceed : 
bch ve : ;, rity of the hour, La Lionne, makes her 
Out on the terrace there is a ball every 
Bes | PE es appearance in the company of a Duke and 
evening. As the curtain rises, the waiters 
On a x ; the Lady in Green. She ignores the 
and the girl attendants are arranging the , 
o. Ses wealthy Peruvian, as he walks up and 
tables and preparing the cloakroom; an 
down, but flirts first with one and then 
attractive young flower-girl and a fascinat- " 
with the other of the assembled men. 
ing glove-seller are laying out their wares. 
Dancing attendance on this fair femininity Meanwhile the Austrian baron, grown 
is a wealthy Peruvian; but a group of _ bold, approaches the glove-seller; and at 
“cocodettes”—ladies of light and easy vir- the same time the officer playfully makes 
tue—enter and succeed in tearing him a game of trying to kiss the kirl, who 
away from the two charming rivals. ‘There spiritedly defends herself. The baron, in 
now appears a young Austrian baron enraged jealousy, flies at the interloper, 
whose friends have sung the praises of but they are separated. The scandal 
both the gaiety of Paris and this fascinat- a however, and all are drawn into 
ing vendor of gloves. The baron recognizes The celebrity tries to calm the officer, 
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San Yrancisce ena Association 


GAETANO MEROLA, GENERAL DIRECTOR 
PAUL POSZ, BUSINESS MANAGER 


CONCERT ATTRACTIONS 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5 
GLADYS SWARTHOUT 


CAPTIVATING AMERICAN SOPRANO 
TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 11 


MARIAN ANDERSON 


THE GREATEST LIVING CONCERT SINGER 


THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 13 
VLADIMIR HOROWITZ 


SENSATIONAL RUSSIAN PIANIST 
DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED LATER 


LINA PAGLIUGHI 


PHENOMENAL COLORATURA SOPRANO 


SPRING SERIES 


TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 25 
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN 


DYNAMIC TITAN OF THE PIANO 
SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 30 


MISCHA ELMAN 


TONE MASTER OF THE VIOLIN 
TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 1 


NINO MARTINI 


TENOR STAR OF OPERA, CONCERT, FILMS 


TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 22 
JOSEF HOFMANN 


THE “COMPLETE PIANIST” 
TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 


HELEN TRAUBEL 


THE "AMERICAN FLAGSTAD” 
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 2 


JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 


AMERICA’S MOST POPULAR BARITONE 


Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10 — Tax Exempt 
BOX OFFICE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — EXBROOK 8585 


WAR MEMORIAL 


OPERA HOUSE 














while the glove-seller, impressed by the 
haron’s bravery, drags him off. 

And now the divertissement begins: 

First the dancers appear in the famous 
quadrille, then in a variety of numbers. 
The crowd takes part; flowers and sou- 
venirs are distributed; the characters alter 
beneath the black velvet masks and ‘“‘Baou- 
tas” (the feather-boas of the period) 
which have been given out. One might 


Glavessellety sx cor eS cave te sy ee nose 
Flower Gitl....---4--------- Se ee he Ve ee Sees Ws 
[eae ONN ets. Ficlets 
Mheslady sin “Green... ..-.0- =e. Pe 2 ee 
Thepeerd Viatt --s2ca-na--cu22-e- we Set ae ee 
Titra “1 SE Wace) 0 ae Se hot 7 AS me te SE SS 
TOMO EIC OLE ile face tate oa es a Pores Serhan 
Tem Kot instance eek Ane) ete tee oe 


Tortoni........ Ns FE brite ORT SEO 


AE TS oe ies ee _...Tatiana GRANTZEVA 


easily imagine the scene to be in Venice. 
The farandole becomes still gayer, until 
the crowd disappears through the garden 
and the stage is empty. 
Empty, that is, save for the glove-seller 
and her baron, whom she allows to em- 
brace her tenderly ... And they, too, move 
away ... the light fades. 

At which moment, the Peruvian, still 
alone, dashes across the stage—in mad 
pursuit of pleasure. 





Mia SLAVENSKA 
Jeanette LAURET 
Leonide MASSINE 
George ZORITCH 
Marc PLATOFF 


Robert IRWIN 


Girl Attendants 
Miles. SCARPOVA, ETHERIDGE, CRABTREE, CHAMIE 


Cafe Waiters 
MM. KATCHAROFF, BERESOFF, SEMENOFF, TOMIN 


**Cocodettes”’ 


Miles. KORJINSKA, FLOTAT, MLADOVA, ROUDENKO, HIGHTOWER, 
LACCA 


Billiard Players 
Thomas ARMOUR, Ian GIBSON, James STARBUCK 


Soldiers 
MM. VOLKOFF, MILTON, KOSTENKO, STEELE, STARBUCK, GOUDOVITCH 


The Dance Master 
Robert IRWIN 













IAN SSscoR=eGo hh OANnes 


| 
LARGE STocK OF FINE 

HARPS = RENTAL HARPS 

ACCESSORIES 





e nh ih i} Wee! fs 
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1030 BusH St., SAN FRANCISCO, PHONE OR 6367 i) " 


REPAIR SHOP 
9114 S. BUDLONG AVE. 
Los ANGELES, CALIF. 


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Dandies 3 
MM. BERESOFF, KATCHAROFF, SEMENOFF, TOMIN 


Can-Can Dancers 


Katia GELEZNOVA 
Miles. ETHERIDGE, HIGHTOWER, KELEPOVSKA, KORJINSKA, BROWN, 
WILLIAMS, THOMAS, HILL, SCARPOVA, ROUDENKO 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


Cast Subject to Change 





Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


Julius FLEISCHMANN, President Leonide MASSINE, Artistic Director 

Sergei DENHAM, Vice-President 

David LIBIDINS, Administrative Efrem KURTZ, Musical Director 
Director YAZVINSKY, Regi G 

Rene BLUM, Founder and Director, Jean Pitan ose 
Ballets de Monte Carlo Franz ALLERS, Associate Conductor 


Staff for S. HUROK 


IT a UBIC EPR WAN CC LS tie Gece ta nth ee ae Oe ea ee ome Pe Company Manager 


Gerald (Goodeie = ee SE eee eS eee Meee ROE General Press Representative 
Bath Vir nist tcc eines eee cna h Coen tag Se RC Advance Press Representative 
MaéuRroliinattet de 5265 copie ah eee ie ern ane Ce pee ne ey ea Executive Secretary 
CSV SO Ch ek cn eke cao ee ese ee ia Be ae eect or Oy Carpenter 
CarliGir ett teeter as aed ren 2 Bat idea ee itor geet ae eas ee Property Master 
SidheyAhlubbard5 7 2 <a eae ee as ge ed Se ae eh Electrician 
MabélaGarpentery 25 gc aie eo eee en ee ese nt See eee Wardrobe Mistress 


Pletiry aBiasetttes tee fetes ec er ee eee De ele ee Wardrobe Master 


Exclusive Management: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City 


The management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion pictures 
inside the theatre without written permission. 


SOUVENIR PROGRAMS FOR SALE IN THE LOBBY 


VANESSI’S 


A a aa BRO. A sD Wee 























Son Francisco — 


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MARION HUTTON 
in Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade, broadcasts... 


is 
38) 


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SE EEEEREEROREEERK SES 


There’s a greater demand than ever 
for Chesterfields. Smokers who have tried 
them are asking for them again and again, 
and for the best of reasons...Chesterfields 
are cooler, better-tasting and definitely milder. 
Chesterfields are made for smokers like 
yourself...so tune in now for your 1941 





















smoking pleasure. 


Tle Sith 









Copyright 1941, Liccett & Myers Tobacco Co. 










' 3 oe 2 » - ¥. 
4 ‘ ; 


dhe ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
: , a | : . oo H. DYER, JR., SECRETARY 





os 


=< 






)> 
SKESRESTSASULEAERE 


wep enee-ecwweesdereerenereerwrerewessrere rene innianinmannisntsidianennt tnantnssststieesecents3tieens bbe rete seit te ean ASnansinntbsnipiisiinsisaeeineiscasssetee 





ie Is 







WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CONDUCTOR 


again, 
fields 
nilder. 
s like 
r 1941 














J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 








——___ 


EIGHT PERFORMANCES 
OPERA HOUSE JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 194! 














COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
the above advertisement? . . . Now read it again, and think 
how fully a corporate executor meets each qualification. 

A trust company is never ill; it is never away. It can be counted 
upon to be present and ready to serve when the time comes. 
The officers of a trust company have a daily familiarity with 
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SHAN? EoReAGN: GL Sze 


MEMBER F. D. I. C. 








THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 








LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
GAITE PARISIENNE CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesday Eve., January 29 ner ADE / 
SERENADE NEW YORKER 
BAISER DE LA FEE BACCHANALE 
VIENNA—1814 CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Thursday Eve., January 30 Sunday Mat., February 2 
SERENADE 
eee ees SCHEHERAZADE 
EE EE IES VIENNA—I1814 


THE NEW YORKER 
Sunday Eve., February 2 


Friday Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


Tickets: $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
March 4 March 21 


ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEDX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.000—No Tax Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEDX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 





J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 





2S eet eee ae > 





ae ee 
ee 


a 


SEs 


wae es SE 


Se ee Sa cee PO 










eRe Santi, 
4 hr, “54 


¥. 
seo 















%“s 
rT 






New F Orms 
for Flowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 


| Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


(| VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 

TORSO. wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
| GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
| GARDEN HAT . . with daisies in the crown 
| DUCK .. . carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


, not shown 


Exclusive with 


*~ SLOANE 


SUS TE RY ne. at? 7GsR ACNE 


» 
ay 
% 


ate 









J WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 29, at 8:30 


The 
Rattet Russe de Monte Carle 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


Goer Sarr wr ey 





seonanasenreereentsonrenparmranssenninsensehnmnerngntnetn stew ec—amert tae mR CARE OROR A GORA AAe OBE 
es wre Pees} = gies BA PEP ear ere 






Sa 


1 


SERENADE 


Choreography by George BALANCHINE 
Music by TCHAIKOWSKY 
Costumes by Jean LURCAT 

Settings by Gaston LONGCHAMP 












Just as symphonic themes integrate ‘points’ and in the free plastic medium. 
and flow one against another, so this ballet The sonatina, a sombre adagio, calls forth 
uses three types of movement in counter- _ two girls and a boy in a tragic pantomime 
point. The sonatina and waltz are designed against the background of the corps-de- 
in ceaseless linear patterns danced on the _ ballet. 






1. Sonatina 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 
Miles. ROUDENKO, HIGHTOWER, MLADOVA, GELEZNOVA, GRANTZEVA, 
CRABTREE, ETHERIDGE, KORJINSKA, FLOTAT, THOMAS, LACCA, 
HILL, BROWN, WILLIAMS, MARRA, SCARPOVA, KELEPOVSKA 










2. Waltz 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Marc PLATOFF 
Miles. ROUDENKO, HIGHTOWER, MLADOVA, ETHERIDGE, CRABTREE, 
HILL, THOMAS, FLOTAT, KORJINSKA, LACCA, WILLIAMS, 
SCARPOVA, MARRA, GRANTZEVA 










3. Adagio 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 
Miles. Milada MLADOVA, Rosella HFGHTOWER, Lubov ROUDENKO, 
Miles. BROWN, THOMAS, CRABTREE, HILL, GELEZNOVA, 
GRANTZEVA, WILLIAMS 









—_——— 





War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 


Trustees of the War Memorial. 
* * * * 







Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 








PP OD al ReAeDe isk OiNeS 





LS Pe eee tine @)Ocran. syne Al ajeWClsay 
Go Rai Vi Bese al Ry Ah Cre ACG RoE Oneal 


brilliantly woven into the romantic, glamorous 


pattern that is San Francisco. 


SHREVE, TREAT & EACRET 


PEARL AND GEM SPECIALISTS * JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 
OUNER So HGR Ewes) bo © GHEE A RS Y 2S) 2 ORE Ea 





— TT 
j 


. — - 
| The Art Commission 
OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, JR. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 
In Beethoven’s 
| Missa Selemnis 
with the 


| San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
i PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 

| In Celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary 

of the Municipal Chorus no Admission to 

| the Concert will be Charged. 


| GENIC] A UD EEORITUM« vA.P Robie 2 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 


4 rr pe CC eS 











MM. ARMOUR, STARBUCK, TOMIN, GOUDOVITCH 
Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


BETWEEN ACTS VISIT THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA GUILD LIBRARY-MUSEUM 
IN LOBBY OPPOSITE COURT ENTRANCE 


Intermission 


BAISER DE LA FEE 


Ballet-Allegory in Four Scenes by Igor STRAVINSKY 
Inspired by the Music of Tchaikowsky 
Based on the tale, ““The Virgin of the Lake,’ by Hans Christian Andersen 
Choreography by George BALANCHINE 
Costumes by Alice HALICKA 


“Le Baiser de la Fee’ (“fhe Fairy's 
Kiss’), inspired by the music by Tchai- 
kowsky and written by Stravinsky in 
“heartfelt homage to Tchaikowsky’s won- 
derful talent,” was composed for Ida Rub- 
instein and presented for the first time at 
the Opera in Paris, November 27, 1928. 
Stravinsky writes in his Autobiography: 

“As I was free to choose both the subject 
and scenario of the ballet, I began to 
search for them, in view of the character- 
istic trend of Tchaikowsky’s music, in the 
literature of the nineteenth century. With 
that aim, I turned to a great poet with a 
gentle, sensitive soul whose imaginative 
mind was wonderfully akin to that of the 
musician. I refer to Hans Christian Ander- 
sen, with whom in this respect Tchaikow- 
sky had so much in common. 

“In turning over the pages of Andersen 


Her Friend 


hem ridestootmints. 6. aware. season te 









for these 


VICTOR 
RECORDS 


SERENADE IN -C MAJOR anes ments = 
Adrian Boult and B. B. C. Symphony 
Was $5.00 Now $3.50 


iE SNURGRACKER SULEES 4...ace. 
Boston Symphony 
Formerly $6.50 Now $3.50 





THE 


14 TILLMAN PLACE 


BA EE Mersey oh rT ebed 2 ee Tschaikowsky 


Seta Re I Tschaikowsky-Koussevitzky 





I came across a story I had completely for- 
gotten but which struck me as being the 
very thing for the idea I wanted to ex- 
press. It was the very beautiful stor 
known as “The Ice Maiden.” I chose that 
as my theme and worked out the story on 
the following lines. A fairy imprints her 
magic kiss on a child at birth and parts it 
from its mother. Twenty years later, when 
the youth has attained the very zenith of 
his good fortune, she repeats the fatal kiss 
and carries him off to live in supreme 
happiness with her ever afterwards. As my 
object was to commemorate the work of 
Tchaikowsky, this subject seemed to me 
to be particularly appropriate as an alleg- 
ory, the muse having similarly branded 
Tchaikowsky with her fatal kiss, and the 
magic imprint has made itself felt in all 
the musical creations of this great artist.” 


EX 5738 


MUSIC 


Off Gront or. Sutter 


Gated eae 
cane: 


cars 


peers 


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DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
By a 
GREAT AMERICAN INSTITUTION 


(Che 


BOSTON 
@) iphone 
OF ee 





Now uses the Baldwin in Its Concerts 


aa, x 
Sib SlUuLTER. Sk 4 alpinin 1828 WEBSTER 5ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 














FINE FOODS 


Served in the most beautiful 
restaurants in the West .. . 
at no greater cost 
than elsewhere. 


ICE CREAM after 











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SODAS 2 Vthe Theatre 
ace always in favor 


33 Powell—The Art Gallery Dining Room 


130 Post—In the Shopping District 
1032 Market—In the Theatre District 621 Market—New and Modern 


Also Stores in — Los Angeles — Pasadena — Hollywood 





—_— 
































Piis Mother cic it cee an Oe et We ee Rc ce ac ea, ee aa Ea Jeanette LAURET 


Mitre. Wrote te ws ee te ae sect eR tg < Me ce ate aden eas ee ee aoe Jeanette LAURET 
Two: Wilt Settee ce teeecre see ed Sao RE ae tee MM. STARBUCK, MILTON 
Snowflakes............ Miles. ROUDENKO, MARRA, GRANTZEVA, GELEZNOVA, 


HIGHTOWER, SCARPOVA, KORJINSKA, MLADOVA, LACCA, 
KELEPOVSKA, BROWN, WILLIAMS, HILL, WOICIKOWSKA, 
POURMEL, FLOTAT, THOMAS, ETHERIDGE 


1 Saad SEV Vs anteram pt 5 Oa tee ale Ae ae en Sra ted aly ORO Ra BS ee Ratha hd SARs ON Mia SLAVENSKA 
Prem ohad owe. ull cphaee For ee, Ser. 5 toes, Set, Bed he ase yee Milada MLADOVA 
Mountaineers................ MM. KATCHAROFF, ARMOUR, GODKIN, KOSTENKO, i 
VOLKOFF, GOUDOVITCH, KOKITCH, BERESOFF yl 
Second Tableau—The Village Festival L 
ive Brideet oom e- 5! o.-8- ee FE Bite eka a eas eee ak ae Pee Andre EGLEVSKY eH 
ier DEG e ne ee) ert k esos Se eee er pe 2 oem ene: sea eon, eee Alexandra DANILOVA i 
The Bridesmaids...........--.----------- Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Milles. GELEZNOVA, | 
GRANTZEVA, ROUDENKO, MLADOVA, HIGHTOWER iF 
The Fairy (disguised as a Gypsy) ..........-.-.-2----c-c2c0csc0-eeeceeeeeeeeeeeeeees Mia SLAVENSKA i 
Peasant: Gitls and "DO ys sence tee et le cee re Fee eee Sad ae eee ee The Ensemble i 
iE 


Third Tableau—Inside the Mill 
Dance of the Peasant Girls........ Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Miles. GELEZNOVA, 
MLADOVA, ROUDENKO, BROWN, GRANTZEVA, HIGHTOWER, 
WILLIAMS, HILL, FLOTAT, LACCA, ETHERIDGE, 
SCARPOVA, POURMEL, KORJINSKA 





cletep eae = 


Pas de Deux: 
Alexandra DANILOVA and Andre EGLEVSKY 


OY ye 


2S 


Variation: 


Alexandra DANILOVA 


Coda: 
Alexandra DANILOVA, Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Andre EGLEVSKY 


and Ensemble 


SE TE, ae I pe Re EE ae ee en 


pee <a 


Scene: The Fairy and The Bridegroom 
Mia SLAVENSKA and Andre EGLEVSKY 


HARPS- Kajelan At 


NES ROUeC TT lO Nes 












fig 
| sal) ih 


Sree Re ee ee ee eee 
sea mer 


1030 BusH ST., SAN FRANCISCO, PHONE OR 6367 
| 
LARGE STOCK OF FINE REPAIR SHOP 
HARPS - RENTAL HARPS 9114 S. BUDLONG AVE. 
ACCESSORIES Los ANGELES, CALIF. 


MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY, 


TOM C. GIRTON Presents 
SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


Thitty - Fist Grnual a Asconsinental Wowk: 


FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


WAM RonaViS Be McG ieelt Ae lem Op bP HaRovns ald Ore asek 
MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 





17 Performances » Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax exempt) 


$1.90 S175 $1.50 $1.65 | $1.25 $1.00 ; 
DATES OPERAS Box 1st 20 Rows Last8 Rows Grand | Dress | Balcony | Balen 


Seats Orchestra | Orchestra Tier. | Circle Circle 
MME BUTTERFLY 
Monday Eve., Mar. 10 (In English) | 


| Gui ee CD Se, ee eae lee Pe a ee ee 
| Tuesday Eve, “ 11 (Ballet) | 
H AIDA 
| Wed. Eve., oy Ly (Ballet) 
| LA TRAVIATA 
| Thursday Eve., “ 13 (Ballet) 
ae FAUST 
# Friday Eve, “ 14 


ES | SS | 


ee ———— 








(Ballet) 


Triple Bill MARTHA 
ss (In English) Balcony Scene 
Saturday Mat., 15 “from Romeo and Juliet | 
i Ballet Divertissment _ 


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| f RIGOLETTO 
_ Sunday Mat., 16 (Ballet) Sepa NE i 


Ir. TROVATORE | 


i Sunday Eve., S16 (Ballet) 


Monday Eve., ‘© 17 CAVALLERIA & PAGLIACCI | 
Tuesday Eve., “ 18 LA BOHEME 











Wed. Eve., “19 BARBER OF SEVILLE 
CARMEN 

Ti Thursday Eve... 20 (Ballet) tee i ae eS ee, te ee 
im LUCIA | 

_ Friday Eve, “21 (Ballet) | yostenc% 


ii rs TALES OF HOFFMAN 
Saturday Mat., 22 (Ballet) in English fe ete) Seiad (ose eeiee. |S Se 

















Saturday Eve., 22 SAMSON ET DELILAH 


i bi MME BUTTERFLY 
_ Sunday Mat., 23 (In English) 


1 , AIDA | | 
_ Sunday Eve., 23 _ (Ballet) | a 


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reerta ree tia rae 


Fourth Tableau—Epilogue 
(Berceuse de demeures eternelles) 


: 

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ST Fie: ALE Vien ccs we Ars a on aaa oe tage PL is a de oa ae, Pea Mia SLAVENSKA i 

Te EAC Rt OO rece See ae ee Andre EGLEVSKY lH 
Conductor: Efrem KURTZ i 
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Intermission [ 


VIENNA - 1814 


Music by Carl Maria von WEBER, orchestrated by Russell BENNETT 
Libretto and Choreography by Leonide Massine 
754 Costumes and Scenery designed by Stewart CHANEY 


Sal cony - 
Costumes executed by Karinska Inc. 


Scenery executed by Eugene B. Dunkel Studios Inc. 


The scene represents the gala peace ball island of Elba causes a panic among the 
tendered by Prince Metternich to the di- celebrants, though Metternich calms them 
lomats of all countries to celebrate the and prevails upon the men to exhibit 
defeat of Napoleon. With the arriving courage, and upon the women to follow 
Ambassadors comes Princess Lieven, with — their example. 


whom Metternich falls in love. An unfortunate incident causing con- 
A brilliant Polonaise opens the ball, fol- sternation brings the fete to an end, and 
lowed by a grand divertissement. The sud- Metternich takes tender leave of Princess 


den news of Napoleon’s escape from the Lieven. 


Dritice aIVICCCORERIC Ec ee. at oe ee ee Be re bon eae ne re Se ee de Marc PLATOFF 
DrittCessal Vila fatOns son chs este de ee PR On fe ee Tatiana ORLOVA 





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TEACHER of VOICE | 

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GAETANO MEROLA, GENERAL DIRECTOR 
PAUL POSZ, BUSINESS MANAGER 


CONCERT ATTRACTIONS 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5 THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 13 
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Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10 — Tax Exempt 
BOX OFFICE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — EXBROOK 8585 | 


OPERA HOUSE 















WAR MEMORIAL 













Pred erice wy Olle Gentz 25 Seto ree OMe teen ee ee Pees i en a ah Casimir KOKITCH 


Peinicess: Wel Veni ns, eee ee ns, en, Seo ee tate ee OE Mia SLAVENSKA 
Prince. dewhigner =. 755 2.2. Ee oe pn ad i ae ee ak ee By at Simon SEMENOFF 
Barotr clad eet. ssi meres ee ae ee 8 ie ee ee ee Robert STEELE 
Baronesst laa per.= oh. eee an ee ee oe eee Mees Nesta WILLIAMS 
Secretaries.............. Igor YOUSKEVITCH, Andre EGLEVSKY, Roland GUERARD, 
George ZORITCH, Frederic FRANKLIN 

Webtitanites: 25-0... ce ee ete Alexandra DANILOVA, Rosella HIGHTOWER, 
Tatiana GRANTZEVA, Milada MLADOVA, Andree THOMAS 

Bord: Castel reac iit k aso oan hate ce cc heh at eee oe aS James STARBUCK 
lady: Gastelreagh 27 ge ny 22 eS tet ee eee ee eee Katia GELEZNOVA 
Tally rata dig nxt Me. ets, Cie tan A eR en Da pe, nas ANE a ae one ig Nicholas BERESOFF 
MadamevdesPerigord:: trea 56 Ae eatin nes erate oe ae ee eens eee Jeanette LAURET 
Madame denSagan::2<y.Ao) cs toe ee ee a hn re Tatiana SEMENOVA 
Murat’s Ambassadors......................-. Thomas ARMOUR and Michel KATCHAROFF 
SUR CIES WW LY CS osoc neste? om ete acne ce ee ne ee Anna SCARPOVA and Yolanda LACCA 
Dirtchwlieg atvon 3 sien, ee ee ee ae Tatiana CHAMIE and Georges TOMIN 
ihvcolan. Legation...) = 5. Lubov ROUDENKO and Alexander GOUDOVITCH 
Counts Rasuimovsky.s20ss 6 eee Baran oe eh ae Vladimir KOSTENKO 
WSs Ng Y (OR Cae sie a ee Rede RES Bit Oe CE BOR elem ee PRES Mia es De OO Robert IRWIN 

DIVERTISSEMENTS: 


Dance Saxon 


Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 


Sicilienne 


Chris VOLKOFF 


Theme Russe 


Mia SLAVENSKA and Marc PLATOFF 


Variation 


Simon SEMENOFF 


Entree Chinoise: 


Princess Turandot and Unknown Prince........ Alicia MARKOVA, Leonide MASSINE 
ielicmeh htee. Chinese c...c¢cs- ee eee MM. GIBSON, GOUDOVITCH, MILTON 
Pas de Deux 


Alexandra DANILOVA and Andre EGLEVSKY 


Mazurka 
Katia GELEZNOVA and Frederic FRANKLIN 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 
For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 

872 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO ; TU xepo 2738 

Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 














Miles. MARRA, FLOTAT, LACCA, CRABTREE, KELEPOVSKA 
ETHERIDGE, WILLIAMS, BROWN 

MM. KOSTENKO, GOUDOVITCH, VOLKOFF, KATCHAROFF 
TOMIN, STEELE, MILTON, GIBSON 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


Cast Subject to Change 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


Julius FLEISCHMANN, President Leonide MASSINE, Artistic Director 

Sergei DENHAM, Vice-President : ; 

David LIBIDINS, Administrative Efrem KURTZ, Musical Director 
Director YAZVINSKY, Regi G I 

Rene BLUM, Founder and Director, fon poe eee 
Ballets de Monte Carlo Franz ALLERS, Associate Conductor 


Staff for S. HUROK 


INDE ICE FW ATACOLS Se setae as ee eee oak Sete ont es eee ee Company Manager 


Gerald Goode 


Ly IE ARIES ae et es Me Re BAO ee ME Eee eS General Press Representative 


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Cath iGreene: eco ac ia i ee Se eh INE ae hk CAE ON rere BS os ene ee ee Property Master 
Sidtie yi EAD D array aie ce Reece ca en recede ee Bei. Const anc ae Electrician 
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BlencymBiasetties che iat ceet  e e e Seae eee ga eh ee Wardrobe Master 


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30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City 


The management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion pictures 
inside the theatre without written permission. 


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in Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade, broadcasts... 


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te ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
_ LS PRES ENT 5 oF 


IN| ASSOCIATION WITH 


S. HUROK 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CONDUCTOR 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 


a 


EIGHT PERFORMANCES 
PERA HOUSE JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 1941 


——_——_—— 






















COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
the above advertisement? . . . Now read it again, and think 
how fully a corporate executor meets each qualification. 

A trust company is never ill; it is never away. It can be counted 
upon to be present and ready to serve when the time comes. 
The officers of a trust company have a daily familiarity with 
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THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 


a Wevechaemecrvanaransecstiseer 


President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
GAITE PARISTENNE CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesday Eve., January 29 Soe ee é 4 
SERENADE NEW YORKER 
BAISER DE LA FEE BACCHANALE 
VIENNA—I814 CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Thursday Eve., January 30 Suse Sy mak February 2 
LES SYLPHIDE eee 
ROUGE ET NOIR Se ers 
THE NEW YORKER WENN tele 
Sunday Eve., February 2 
Friday Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


Tickets: $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 
CIVIC AUDITORIUM 








March 4 March 21 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 


YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEUX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1. 50—No Wax. 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 



















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for Flowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 


PlaSter with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 
TORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT . . with daisies in the crown 
BUCK . . Carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


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THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 30, at 8:30 


The 


balled Russe de Monte Carle 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 





LES SYLPHIDES 


Music by CHOPIN 


Orchestrated by GLAZOUNOV, STRAVINSKY and TANEIEFEF 
Story and Choreography by Michel FOKINE 
Scenery executed by Emile BERTIN 
Costumes by Mme. KARINSKA 


This romantic reverie is a ballet with- 
out story. Into a romantic glade bathed in 
the silver moonbeams come the dancers— 
pure white sylphs with skirts rather long 
as Taglioni might have worn them—to 
transport us to another world, to the 
music of Chopin .. . And at the end, the 
airy phantoms, the romantic glade, the 
silver moonbeams—all fade away and 
naught remains but an unforgettable 
memory. 

Originally staged for a charity fete in 
St. Petersburg, its first performance in 


Western Europe was given at the Theatre 
du Chatelet, Paris, on June 2, 1909. The 
work is remarkable for a number of rea- 
sons, but for none more than its absolute 
unity of atmosphere despite the fact that 
it is composed of various disconnected 
dances. The Chopin works included in the 
ballet are as follows: “Nocturne,” Opus 
325 INO. 23. Valse; sOpus,./0," No.1? Mae 
vurka,” Opus 33, No. 3; “Mazurka,’’ Opus 
67, No. 3; “Prelude,” Opus 28, No. 7, also 
used as the overture; “Valse,” Opus 64, 
No. 2; and “Valse,’’ Opus 18, No. 1. 


Nocturne: 
Mia SLAVENSKA 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Yolanda LACCA 
Miles. KORJINSKA, GRANTZEVA, FLOTAT, MLADOVA, KELEPOVSKA 
GELEZNOVA, SCARPOVA, HIGHTOWER, BROWN, MARRA, HILL, 
THOMAS, WILLIAMS, ETHERIDGE, POURMEL 


and 


Andre EGLEVSKY 


Valse: 
Nathalie KRASSOUSKA 


al 
War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 


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Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 


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PEPER CON AD Ra WNT TEL VM onnnnennhyyNS¥oeeeNeyeseeS¥ TOE Dury ae 


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ONE P-EL RUE Eee SIG GA RN So Ea 














a ST 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 
In Beethoven’s 


Missa Selemnis 


with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
In Celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary 
of the Municipal Chorus no Admission to 
the Concert will be Charged. | 


GEV-1LC.2 AUD EE OR. LUM SACP REL eh 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 




















Mazurka: 
Andre EGLEVSKY 


Prelude: 
Yolanda LACCA 


Pas de Deux: 
Mia SLAVENSKA, Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Yolanda LACCA 
Andre EGLEVSKY 


and ensemble 


Conductor: Franz ALLERS 


BETWEEN ACTS VISIT THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA GUILD LIBRARY-MUSEUM 
IN LOBBY OPPOSITE COURT ENTRANCE 


Intermission 


2 


ROUGE ET NOIR 


(Red and Black) 
Ballet in four movements and one scene 


Music by Dmitri SHOSTAKOVITCH (First Symphony) 


Choreography by Leonide MASSINE Scenery and costumes by Henri MATISSE 


Scenery executed by Oreste ALLEGRI 


FIRST MOVEMENT 
(Aggression) 
Man, symbolizing the poetic spirit, is pursued and overtaken by brutal forces. 


White 
Alicia MARKOVA and Fgor YOUSKEVITCH 
Mile. MLADOVA, LAURET, KELEPOVSKA, GELEZNOVA, WILLIAMS, 
SEMENOVA 


Yellow 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Yvonne HILL, Luboy ROUDENKO, 
Tatiana GRANTZEVA 
George ZORITCH, Thomas ARMOUR, Marc PLATOFF 


(| Cm 
VICTOR Bisa =s @ 
THE \ EX 5738 
RECORDS 


for these (aceestse 


14 TILLMAN PLACE Off Grant or. Sutter 


Chopin 
London Philaarmonic — Conductor Malcom Sargent 
Was $5.00 Now $3.50 ' 
PUTS SHIA G VEER ELOIN Vodern t= a ceeAicirs ane eeece Tae: oe a aad eee Shostakovitch 
Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra — Conductor Stokowski 
Was $9.00 Now $5.00 


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DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
By a 
GREAT AMERICAN INSTITUTION 


(Che 


BOSTON 
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Now uses the Baldwin in Its Concerts 


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310 SUTTER ST. 4 alpiitt 1828 WEBSTER ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO , DAKLAND 











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Served in the most beautiful 
restaurants inthe West... 
at no greater cost 
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PASTRIES always in favor 


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Blue 
Eleanora MARRA 


Red 
Rosella HIGHTOWER 


Black 
Jeanette LAURET 
Miles. SCARPOVA, KORJINSKA, CHAMIE, THOMAS, FLOTAT, ETHERIDGE 
MM. KATCHAROFF, SEMENOFF, GIBSON, KOSTENKO, TOMIN 


SECOND MOVEMENT 
(Field and City) 


The men of the city encounter the men of the field and bear them off. 
Red 
Frederic FRANKLIN 
Miles. LACCA, HIGHTOWER, POURMEL, BROWN, WOICIKOWSKA 
MM. BERESOFF, MILTON, STEELE, VOLKOFF, GOUDOVITCH 


Blue 
MM. IRWIN, KOKITCH, STARBUCK, GIBSON 


Yellow 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and George ZORITCH 


White 
Miles. GELEZNOVA, KELEPOVSKA, MLADOVA, SEMENOVA 


THIRD MOVEMENT 
(Solitude) 


Woman parted from Man is tormented in her solitude by an evil spirit. 


White 
Alicia MARKOVA 
Black 


Marc PLATOFF, Casimir KOKITCH and Chris VOLKOFF 


Blue 
Miles. FLOTAT, SCARPOVA, KORJINSKA, ETHERIDGE, THOMAS 


MM. SEMENOFF, KATCHAROFF, ARMOUR, KOSTENKO, TOMIN 


FOURTH MOVEMENT 
(Destiny ) 
Man eludes the brutal forces and finds Woman again. But joy is shortlived, for in 
freeing himself from his worldly enemies he is conquered by destiny. 


White 
Alicia MARKOVA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 


Miles. LAURET, WILLIAMS, GELEZNOVA, KELEPOVSKA, 
MLADOVA, SEMENOVA 


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MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 17 


TOM C. GIRTON presents 
SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


Thitty - First ‘nnual Wer econinenial: FEW 


FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


WAR NEVE @eR esol = Orr beRaAS He Oe Usoee 
MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 





17 Performances 7 Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax exempt) 


$1.90 att | coe Bee $1.25 ane 154 
DATE OPERAS Box Ist 20 Rows, Last 8 Rows ran Dress alcony | the 
Soe Seats Orchestra | Orchestra Tier Circle | Circle Balcony 











MME BUTTERFLY 
Monday Eve., Mar. 10 (In English) 


CARMEN 
Tuesday Eve., “ 11 (Ballet) 


AIDA 
Wed. Eve., rate b4 (Ballet) 


1 LA TRAVIATA 
it hursday Eve., “ 13 (Ballet) 


FAUST 





(Ballet) 


Triple Bill MARTHA 


{8 > (In English) Balcony Scene 
‘Saturday Mat., 15 ‘from Romeo and Juliet 
| Ballet Divertissment 





bY e 
| Friday Eve., 





if 5 RIGOLETTO 
Sunday Mat., 16 (Ballet) 


iq * IL ‘TROVATORE 
sunday Eve., 16 (Ballet) 
{ Pe ie hk a 
‘Monday Eve., “17 CAvALLERIA& PAGLIACCI 
it a eearreeeeeoioe” ES————|—___——'— 
Tuesday Eve, “ 18 La BonEemME 

Ned. Eve., “19 BARBER OF SEVILLE 

i} CARMEN 


Chursda Eve., “ 20 (Ballet) ea a ae 


y LUCIA 


| *riday Eve., ae A | (Ballet) | 
| lO | 
Hy, 2 TALES OF HOFFMAN | 
poturday Mat., “ 22 (Ballet) in English | 


| aturday Eve., ‘ 22 SAMSON ET DELILAH | 


1 “ MME BUTTERFLY 
junday Mat., 23 (In English) Sis ee WNT MN Wie een Soe 2AM See 


| AIDA | | 
| AAIL ORDERS NOW THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 


SEING RECEIVED. SHERMAN, CLAy & Co., SUTTER AND KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
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Black 
Marc PLATOFF 


MM. KOKITCH, IRWIN, VOLKOFF, GOUDOVITCH, GIBSON 
BERESOFF, STEELE, STARBUCK 
Red 
Frederic FRANKLIN 
Mile. ROUDENKO, GRANTZEVA, MARRA, WOICIKOWSKA, WILLIAMS, 
HIGHTOWER, POURMEL, BROWN 
Blue 


Miles. FLOTAT, SCARPOVA, KORJINSKA, CHAMIE, ETHERIDGE 
MM. KATCHAROFF, SEMENOFF, ARMOUR, KOSTENKO, TOMIN 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


Intermission 


THE NEW YORKER 


Libretto by Rea IRVIN in collaboration with Leonide MASSINE 
Music by George GERSHWIN, orchestrated by David RAKSIN 
Scenery and costumes designed by Carl KENT after Rea IRVIN and 
Nathalie CROTHERS 
Costumes executed by Mme. BERTHE 
Scenery executed by Eugene B. Dunkel Studios Inc. 


A dioramic view of New York’s cafe so- tween the covers of The New Yorker mag- 
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adventure of the animated drawings made To Central Park’s Plaza come Arno’s 
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{| GAETANO MERDLA, GENERAL DIRECTOR 

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| CONCERT ATTRACTIONS 

1 WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5 THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 13 

1 GLADYS SWARTHOUT VLADIMIR HOROWITZ 

‘ CAPTIVATING AMERICAN SOPRANO SENSATIONAL RUSSIAN PIANIST 

1 TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 11 DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED LATER 

i MARIAN ANDERSON LINA PAGLIUGHI 

ih THE GREATEST LIVING CONCERT SINGER PHENOMENAL COLORATURA SOPRANO 

5 SPRING SERIES 

i TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 25 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 22 

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it DYNAMIC TITAN OF THE PIANO THE “COMPLETE PIANIST” 

4 SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 30 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 

Hi MISCHA ELMAN HELEN TRAUBEL 

! TONE MASTER OF THE VIOLIN THE “AMERICAN FLAGSTAD” 

TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 1 FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 2 

i NINO MARTINI / JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 

‘*, TENOR STAR OF OPERA, CONCERT, FILMS AMERICA’S MOST POPULAR BARITONE 
Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10 — Tax Exempt | 

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BOX OFFICE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — EXBROOK 8585 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


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baby-faced debutantes, keyhole column- The thread of the story is incidental to 
ists, Steig’s “Small-Fry,” gullible gangsters, | the portrayal of characters whose lives be- 
’ ’ ating - ; . on] r 2 > 1 r 

Soglow’s King, all these with gentle mad- 8" ci eee cily neces to; bed 






























5 RN RRR FEF 


PET ven ennte tone S605 ee VNO PA FV WV FIT EGE IEEE Meee ewn enews Fant va eda PNT 


ae The titles of ‘““The New Yorker” and the 
ness people the parade of New York after characters appearing therein are by special 
dark. permission of ‘The New Yorker Magazine. 
i 
: 
Scene 1 : 
Hokinsony Dad yas) he oo or et kn eee Pe eer Cee eee ge Tatiana CHAMIE 1 
AI Col bs aparece a rae eS ee ee, Re MCL OM ee PRY oe Neale Leonide MASSINE | 
Colonel spss ecole teh hy reat ek ok Moen Otel ee we og VT Vladimir KOSTENKO 
Whey Dow a get: te at! Rasta are Ane ee Aetts eeeee  D e Jean YAZVINSKY i 
Bustace Rilleyas SY 20 ci= tk sua h ste, Sete ee ita mo oan Wk Soe George ZORITCH . 
Cha uthe nF rien fhe: lake t 20S oh ers ante ers ae ere wk af ay Nicholas BERESOFF H 
Ole ans 2A cbt eet oes en een. Me ere SMU, Ory een Od Bey Rey Marc PLATOFF 
DO OkMAN pai. Seen ee oe ee Boe Sais Pree ie at sn, Mea tm Ue Ape e ee Robert STEELE 
By Me pints aden MeN ae mie her Aine ae Alexandre GOUDOVITCH ti 
Ded dienes. 3. Se: eee, hee ss, hk oe eee, eee ri, Michel KATCHAROFF | 
Girls eee. ate 8 Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Miles. MLADOVA, GRANTZEVA, i 
BROWN, GELEZNOVA 
Boys..Frederic FRANKLIN and MM. VOLKOFF, STARBUCK, ARMOUR, TOMIN 
Scene 2 
Matttond’Flotel: ire reat, em Le RS perce Sa wee eh Casimir KOKITCH 
WWELILOLS. «22 se tr ses wees serena er is Mr pee ten re PE, MM. IRWIN and ARMOUR 
DPUTICAEC Ey tas py Pete Sant Soe en Othe Beep SEE Se Pee. ome CON Ae Georges TOMIN 
LOT AY CV: CR og? CA Mee GR ae AL RU eT aR OmenEL Aru tae LN oe Leonide MASSINE 
(SUCCESS ee Bt ae We ek TS ee Jeanette LAURET and Simon SEMENOFE 


Anna SCARPOVA and Robert STEELE 

Rosella HIGHTOWER and Alexandre GOUDOVITCH 
Tatiana FLOTAT and Nicholas BERESOFF 

Jean YAZVINSKY and Vladimir KOSTENKO 
Tatiana CHAMIE and George ZORITCH 


Deb Cat te: sat ccc ete Ot acne a wes EE a ee Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 
Her Three Boy-Friends.....................:........ Igor YOUSKEVITCH, Andre EGLEVSKY 

and Roland GUERARD 
Shialivhty e.2tewe see soci. tt Ae ee Lubov ROUDENKO and Ian GIBSON 
SOR GE Lec ie ey gt os ogee Fons AR oabiie eee mee MPR RNS Alexandra DANILOVA 
Se meittles KAN Se 5 en, cent tee Oe a Pesce See ei eae ny Michel KATCHAROFF 
BOUY Sata 1! cians 36 Re ee ee nN eet tee AO tee Oy Roy MILTON 


Se TN PEN Sree Ae Pie eee) SIN ae Hers oie Me. Sy RL Fyb Frederic FRANKLIN 










pore tient Sc TOM e eight aie tact RR me IS eR. hc RN ene | MRR TOON rR Georges TOMIN 
a a ore ele Sitios 2 a SO reed eM I neo a a Frederic FRANKLIN 










VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO : TU xEpo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 






——L 


Saar  preennen on a ES 
os : —s— 








Gitests?. (ne a eee a ne Jeanette LAURET and Simon SEMENOFF 
Anna SCARPOVA and Robert STEELE 

Rosella HIGHTOWER and Alexandre GOUDOVITCH 
Tatiana FLOTAT and Nicholas BERESOFF 

Jean YAZVINSKY and Vladimir KOSTENKO 
Tatiana CHAMIE and George ZORITCH 


Girls:.2- ea Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Miles. MLADOVA, GRANTZEVA, 

BROWN, GELEZNOVA 
BOV 8: cet tee ee ee MM. GIBSON, VOLKOFF, ARMOUR, STARBUCK 
INC WS DOM a cect see ts Ae ee BS ce eee SOEs cre Rehm a perro eee Georges TOMIN 


Piano solo: Miss Rachel CHAPMAN 
Conductor: Franz ALLERS 


Cast Subject to Change 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


Julius See eietae. eka Leonide MASSINE, Artistic Director 
Deel LIBIDINS, Administrative Efrem KURTZ, Musical Director 

Director ; Jean YAZVINSKY, Regisseur General 
Rene BLUM, Founder and Director, 

Ballets de Monte Carlo Franz ALLERS, Associate Conductor 

Staff for S. HUROK 

IWatEciCe: “WW UEMCOTS ce cede see eae op oe ce ee a eee eee Company Manager 
Geral du Goodet cfc ae ee ere ene ies Sea eave lone pace erase es General Press Representative 
PAEIVIGEE 1g het ne So anc eee OR eee ot ene See Advance Press Representative 
[a4 ker Sg Cb efs) ohn: bo RAL Ree ue oie Ceara At nes Sees ene NR) nep ents weet PETC re” Executive Secretary 
CIE SPITE «De aE ee ena OO at ee Eber See eR SME Renn ne ONE Boer Ay Ee nr Re Carpenter 
SETS RL CTI ee ee a RE edge Bp tN? Cree ar Ee ORR eS eT Property Master 
Sidney Flubbard osc oes eee ee a Si a ak ch sas cane mae sa bee ater eect maori ann aee ee Electrician 
Mabel Carpenter: 2. ce. ecco tect. oh eect otnrren fe ach clatter use the tee tease oer Wardrobe Mistress 
beni r ye BLAS CREM hee ee ee 8 i ohn ae eae ute cea eae a Wardrobe Master 


Exclusive Management: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City 


The management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion pictures 
inside the theatre without written permission. 


SOUVENIR PROGRAMS FOR SALE IN THE LOBBY 


VANESSI’ $ 























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MARION HUTTON 
in Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade, broadcasts... 


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Jue ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
: : - : - . - i HH. , JR., SECRETARY 


+ 





IN; ASSOCIATION WITH 


S. HUROK 





KEREAREVES 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CONDUCTOR 











rs ikem J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 


ur 194 
EIGHT PERFORMANCES 
0PERA HOUSE JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 194! 













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A 





THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
GAITE PARISIENNE CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesday Eve., January 29 aaa ‘ y 
SERENADE NEW YORKER 
BAISER DE LA FEE BACCHANALE 
VIENNA—I814 CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Sunday Mat., February 2 


Thursday Eve., January 30 
LES SYLPHIDE 
ROUGE ET NOIR 
THE NEW YORKER 


SERENADE 
SCHEHERAZADE 
VIENNA—1814 

Sunday Eve., February 2 


Friday Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


Tickets: $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
March 4 March 21 


ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 


MONTEDUX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 

















J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 


- — —— — —— — 7 . wee Ea 
Aes saad cemvrcyeaiennsnne teneswesee siv¥Fteh pbs vedeh iw viel bhai anbabusnveayeeyt¥elee seve dieb¥eveul hii. a 
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touch with a 
sense of humo 











New Forms 
for F lowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 


Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 
TORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT .. . with daisies in the crown 
DUCK .. . carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


not shown 


_ Exclusive with 


'~ SLOANE 


S20 EEE Renters te GeRw A Nea: 








So 
SS 









FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 31, at 8:30 


The 


Balled Russe de Monte Carle 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


SWAN LAKE 


Choreographic Poem in One Act 


Music by TCHAIKOWSKY 


Choreography after PETIPA 


Scenery executed by Prince SCHERVACHIDZE after CUYP 
Costumes by Mme. KARINSKA 


This work, originally a two-act, three- 
scene ballet, is seen today in one act. It 
was I'chaikowsky’s first ballet composition, 
written, as he said, “partly because I want 
the money, but also because I have long 
had a wish to try my hand at this kind 
of music.” Its choreography is the work of 
Marius Petipa, and his chief assistant, Lev 
Ivanov. It was first produced in St. Peters- 
burg in 1876 but did not meet with real 
success until it was revived some twenty 
years later. ) 


In a clearing near the wood’s edge, a 
single crowned swan crosses a moonlit 
lake. A young Prince and his friends come 
to hunt swans. He sends his friends in 


CAMMY: Sok, saa aN oe Det Alicia MARKOVA 
Si kOe a ee AE Igor YOUSKEVITCH 
LS 55 ie ee Se, 8S. Roland GUERARD 
Ye Gee ANE OS WT, role es Viadimir KOSTENKO 


The Swans 


search of the birds, remaining behind him- 
self lost in thought. 

The Swan Queen appears, the one who, 
as a swan, crossed the stage as the curtain 
rose. Once a human Queen, she is under a 
sorcerer’s spell and only at this hour may 
regain her human form. The little swans 
are surprised by the huntsmen who 
threaten them with bow and arrow, but 
the Prince intervenes. 

The Prince and the Swan Queen fall in 
love. Upon learning that they are about to 
leave this unhappy place, the Sorcerer ap- 
pears and spirits the girl away. The 
Prince, unable to prevail against the Sor- 
cerer’s spell, his heart breaking with un- 
fulfilled love, falls to the ground, dead. 


Rosella HIGHTOWER, Tatiana GRANTZEVA 
Miles. CRABTREE, FLOTAT, ETHERIDGE, LACCA, SCARPOVA, MLADOVA, 
GELEZNOVA, KELEPOVSKA, KORJINSKA, MARRA, WILLIAMS, 


* * 


HILL, CHAMIE, BROWN, THOMAS, SEMENOVA 





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Sree 







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AA nt ee Renee ee ees pee Cmmnninnennmene nee ba. 































es 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 


* * 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 












PROUD TRADITIONS 


iS = the © pera..e 2 ac [ewelsspy 
CHRE Vie ob RE AT oo FA GR oth 
brilliantly woven into the romantic, glamorous 


pattern that is San Francisco. 


SHREVE, TREAT & EACRET 


PEARL AND GEM SPECIALISTS * JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 
OUN Bee - BER EE “SILEX G ReAURE Y= soc RE Ee 








—— 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 


In Beethoven’s 


Missa Selemunis 


with the 


ie: tte Art Commission 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


In Celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary 
of the Municipal Chorus no Admission to 
the Concert will be Charged. 


CIVIC AU DEF ORTUM, 2A PRE Iz 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 








1. Entrance 


Alicia MARKOVA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 


2. Valse 
Rosella HTIGHTOWER, Tatiana GRANTZEVA 


and ensemble 


3. Adagio 
Alicia MARKOVA, Igor YOUSKEVITCH and Roland GUERARD 


4. Pas de quatre 
Miles. CRABTREE, FLOTAT, ETHERIDGE, LACCA 


5. Variation 


Igor YOUSKEVITCH 


6. Variation 


Alicia MARKOVA 


7. Variation 


Roland GUERARD 


8. Coda 
Alicia MARKOVA, Igor YOUSKEVITCH 


and ensemble 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


BETWEEN ACTS VISIT THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA GUILD LIBRARY-MUSEUM 
IN LOBBY OPPOSITE COURT ENTRANCE 


Intermission 


PETROUCHKA 


A Burlesque in One Act 
By Igor STRAVINSKY and Alexandre BENOIS 


Choreography by Michel FOKINE Decor by Alexandre BENOFS 
Scenery Executed by Emile Bertin Costumes executed by Mme. Karinska 
The scene is the Admiralty Square, St. throng his three dancing puppets, Petru- 
Petersburg, about 1830. It is carnival time. chka, the Dancer, and the Moor. 
The crowds are merry. An old Charlatan, The Charlatan, with his magic, has en- 


Oriental in appearance, exhibits to the dowed these dolls with human attributes 






for these 


COLUMBIA _s. 
RECORDS Music 


14 TILLMAN PLACE 





EX 5738 


Album 


Off Grant nr. Sutter 









DIV VAAUN RACKED. cs te Win chee London Philharmonic Conducted by Antol Dorati 
Was $6.00 Now $4.50 
PESO) () CIRRKGA ye sen aiaoe aclee seine hs ae he IS Se cles Stravinsky 
New York Philharmonic — Conducted by Igor Stravinsky 
PAUSE ca ARISING NIN 26.5 3. obo oe Nom ed a eh eee Offenbach 


London Philharmonic Orchestra — Conducted by Kurtz 








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DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
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and sentiments. Petrouchka has the most scuffle starts within the puppets’ booth. 
humanity of the three and therefore suf- “The Moor chases Petrouchka in dead ear- 
fers most from the cruelty of the Charla- nest, and strikes him down with his scimi- 
tan who holds him prisoner, aloof from tar. The crowd, amazed, gathers round. A 
life. He feels deeply his enchantment, his policeman goes for the Charlatan, while 
ugliness, his grotesqueness. Petrouchka the crowd watches Petrouchka’s death 
seeks consolation in his love for the Danc- agony. 

er, and believes his suit successful, not The Charlatan reassures the crowd. He 
realizing that his paroxysms of love only holds up the strawstuffed figure of Pe- 
cause her to fear him. The dancer prefers _trouchka. “It’s only a puppet, a doll,” he 
the strong, exotic Moor, a healthy bar- says. Laughing the crowd disperses. Saw- 
barian who first attacks and then worships dust Petrouchka has gone to rest. The 
his cell-plaything, a cocoanut shell. The  Charlatan tramping away to his bed 


Dancer succeeds in fascinating him. Pe- glances over his shoulder. To his conster- 
trouchka, alone in his cell, shakes an im- nation he sees Petrouchka on the roof of 
potent fist at a framed picture of the Char- the booth. “All your cruelty cannot kill 


latan, rushes to the Moor’s quarters and me,” the puppet seems to say. “I live de- 
bursts in on a love scene. The jealous — spite you.” Frightened, the Charlatan runs 
Moor kicks him out. away. . .. Then four pulse-beats in the 
Back in the Square, it is night and the orchestra and the ghost of Petrouchka, as 
snow has begun to fall. The fun of the well as Petrouchka himself, is still. 
Fair is at its height; gaiety reigns. A mer- a Oe F 
chant, gay with vodka, accompanied by The music for this ballet is a develop- 
two gypsy girls, dispenses largesse to the ment of what Stravinsky originally intend- 
crowd; coachmen and nursemaids and ed to be a one-movement work for piano 
grooms dance to rhythmic Russian melo- and orchestra. This masterpiece of mod- 
dies; a trained bear performs for the ern ballet had its first performance at the 
crowd, and the scene is capped by a mad’ ‘Theatre du Chatelet, Paris, on June 13, 
dance of masked revelers. Suddenly a_ 1911. 


hem ances ec. She oe ee sate OE Peni bnety tes eo that Alexandra DANILOVA 
BETLOUCIIRA! ene iia) a EPO abl. tad ONS ae SE ot chi Sd Ween iad Leonide MASSINE 
MbemBlackamookcce sss i Aen) meee eeu he Ft ara See Andre EGLEVSKY 
hem Charlatans: oti nk noe we Ste he be. Mien hee Peek neg Simon SEMENOFF 
hesChief Nutseinaid =... 0. Si eet Crates ES Ce he Tatiana ORLOVA 
dines@hier Coachman. to. ets eee ne eet at Ee Vladimir KOSTENKO 


The Nursemaids: 
Miles. GRANTZEVA, KORJINSKA, MLADOVA, GELEZNOVA, KELEPOVSKA, 
SCARPOVA, WILLIAMS, BROWN 


The Coachmen: 
MM. MILTON, STEELE, STARBUCK, VOLKOFF 


The Grooms: 
MM. ARMOUR, KATCHAROFF 


The Gay Merchant: 
Casimir ‘KOKITCH 


HARPS -Xajetan Add 


NST Rawle C TONES 


1030 BusH StT., SAN FRANCISCO, PHONE OR 6367 


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HARPS - RENTAL HARPS 9114 S. BUDLONG AVE. 
ACCESSORIES Los ANGELES, CALIF. 





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MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 17 


TOM C. GIRTON Presents 
SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


Thirty -Fiest nual Se acen neni Wee 


FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


Wont Ree NOE ME @ Ret Agi Osh Ree Oro 
MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 





17 Performances 7 Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax exempt) 


$1.90 $1.75 | $1.50 $1.65 Sik25 $1.00. | 
DATES OPERAS Box Ist 20 Rows Last8 Rows Grand Dress | Balcony | , 14 
Seats Orchestra | Orchestra Tier Circle | (Circle 4 Balcony 


a 








MME BUTTERFLY | | 
_ Monday Eve., Mar. 10 (In English) | 


CARMEN | 
i duesday Eve, “ 11 (Ballet) 


_ Wed. Eve., saan) 0/4 (Ballet) ETE eS an be ee ts | 


ex TRAVIATA | 
Thursday Eve., “ 13 (Ballet) 


FAUST 





: Friday Eve., y (Ballet) 


Triple Bill MARTHA 


ep (In English) Balcony Scene 
Saturday Mat., 15 from Romeo and Juliet 
Ballet Divertissment 








| - RIGOLETTO 
} Sunday Mat., 16 (Ballet) 


In TROVATORE 


Sunday Bye... :: 16 (Ballet) 
“Monday Eve., “ 17 CAVALLERIA & PAGLIACCI 
(2 EA Se Ee SESS SSS ee 


f | 
) Tuesday Eve., “ 18 La BOHEME | | 

















Wed. Eve., “ 19 BARBER OF SEVILLE 
CARMEN 


Thursday Eve., ‘“ 20 (Ballet) 


} LucIA 


‘Friday Eve., eA (Ballet) Se Ot RP gre ee el ates Soe fee Re 








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1 te TALES OF HOFFMAN 
‘Saturday Mat., 22 (Ballet) in English _ 


‘Saturday Eve., “‘ 22 SAMSON ET DELILAH (Nceetin Sod oe a Se ee pee 
‘ s MME BUTTERFLY | 

‘Sunday Mat., 25 (In English) | se 
i yi AIDA | 

‘Sunday Eve., 23 | (Ballet) 


/MAIL ORDERS NOW THE TOM C. GIRTON BOX OFFICE 













/BEING RECEIVED. SHERMAN, CLAY & Co., SUTTER AND KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO, CALlf 
Location Desired TELEPHONE: EXBROOK 6696 
; SPE eMmClOSCG CHECKS cscassn teste cece ec eer ener rae oma is in full paymen 


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SEND SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE IF TICKETS ARE TO BE MAILED 





The Gypsies: 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Eleanora MARRA 


The Street Dancers: 
Miles. FLOTAT, CHAMIE 


, The Barker: 
Alexander GOUDOVITCH 


The Masqueraders: 
Mile. HIGHTOWER, LACCA, ETHERIDGE 


MM. IRWIN, TOMIN 


Merchants, Officers, Soldiers, Ladies, Gentlemen, Children, Cossacks, 
Animal Trainers, etc. 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


Intermission 


75¢ 
Balcony 


GAITE PARISIENNE 


Ballet in One Act 
Music by Jacques OFFENBACH 
Orchestrated by Manuel ROSENTHAL in collaboration with 
Jacques BRINDEJONC-OFFENBACH 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Decor and Theme by Count Etienne de BEAUMONT 


Scenery executed by Oreste Allegri Costumes executed by Mme. Karinska 


This is the saucy and sparkling French — concerned with the immense gusto of liy- 
sister of “Le Beau Danube,” and it had its ing in and for the moment, finding its 
first performance at the Theatre de Monte | supreme expression in the Offenbach can- 


Carlo in the spring of 1938. The ballet is can. 


JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 
PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
TEACHER of VOICE 
From Primary Beginning to Final Accomplishment 
Opera, Church and Concert Repertoire 








Rert Ravere’4 “LURE OF THE TROPICS” 








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ayn THE SPECTACULAR TROPICAL PLACE OF AMERICA ... 
e spac DE LUXE CUISINE — MUSIC 3 FLOOR SHOWS NIGHTLY 








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See Tee arp rereaeeaeaa F Pas 
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Symphony 
Flowers 


Whether it be a simple corsage or the 
most elaborate arrangement, Podesta 
and Baldocchi floral creations are 
famous for beauty and artistry... . 


We TELEGRAPH 
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THE OPERFECT: CHOICE FOR 
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BEFORE VDHE GCONCERT 


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ABBR ERE RRR RR ER RRR RRR RRR RRR RRR ERR Kee 





GAETANO MEROLA, GENERAL DIRECTOR 
PAUL POSZ, BUSINESS MANAGER 


CONCERT ATTRACTIONS 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5 THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 13 
GLADYS SWARTHOUT VLADIMIR HOROWITZ 
CAPTIVATING AMERICAN SOPRANO SENSATIONAL RUSSIAN PIANIST 
TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 11 DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED LATER 
MARIAN ANDERSON LINA PAGLIUGHI 
THE GREATEST LIVING CONCERT SINGER PHENOMENAL COLORATURA SOPRANO 
SPRING SERIES 
TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 25 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 22 
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEF HOFMANN 

DYNAMIC TITAN OF THE PIANO THE “COMPLETE PIANIST” 
SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 30 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 
MISCHA ELMAN HELEN TRAUBEL 
TONE MASTER OF THE VIOLIN THE “AMERICAN FLAGSTAD” 
TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 1 FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 2 
NINO MARTINI JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
TENOR STAR OF OPERA, CONCERT, FILMS AMERICA’S MOST POPULAR BARITONE 


Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10 — Tax Exempt 
BOX OFFICE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — EXBROOK 8585 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 





San Yrancisce a Asseciation 
| 
| WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE) 














Out on the terrace there is a ball every Meanwhile the Austrian baron, grown 
evening. As the curtain rises, the waiters bold, approaches the glove-seller; and at 
and the girl attendants are arranging the the same time the officer playfully makes 
tables and preparing the cloakroom; an 4 game of trying to kiss the girl, who spir- 

rises oe sent ED ie shale itedly defends herself. The baron, in en- 
attractive young flower-girl and a fascinat- 
; lene eae aa raged jealousy, flies at the interloper, but 

- . re-S ay ei oe) . y r ) arty Ve ~ ‘j 
DOS OTe Se tae PAYEE CULE Wabes ee are separated. The scandal spreads, 
Dancing attendance on this fair femininity however, and all are drawn into it. The 


is a wealthy Peruvian; but a group of celebrity tries to calm the officer, while 


“cocodettes”—ladies of light and easy vir- the glove-seller, impressed by the baron’s 
tue—enter and succeed in tearing him bravery, drags him off. 
away from the two charming rivals. There And now the divertissement begins: 
now appears a young Austrian baron First appear the dancers of the famous 
whose friends have sung the praise of quadrille, followed by a variety of num- 
both the gaiety of Paris and this fas- bers. The crowd takes part; flowers and 
cinating vendor of gloves. The baron rec- souvenirs are distributed; the characters 
ognizes the glove-seller at once, and he alter beneath the black velvet masks and 
falls head over heels in love with her, with  ‘‘baoutas” (the feather-boas of the period) 
the result that the flower-girl becomes which have been given out. One might 
jealous. easily imagine the scene to be in Venice. 
Brightly uniformed soldiers enter, and ‘The farandole becomes still gayer, until 
the “cocodettes” prove that a uniform is — the crowd disappears through the garden 
always an attraction, for they leave every- | —and the stage is empty. 
thing and follow. Then the outstanding Kmpty, that is, save for the glove-seller 
celebrity of the hour, La Lionne, makes and her baron, whom she allows to em- 
her appearance in the company of a Duke — brace her tenderly . And as they, too, 
and the Lady in Green. She ignores the move away... the light fades. 
wealthy Peruvian, as he walks up and At which moment, the Peruvian, still 
down, but flirts first with one and then alone, still unattached, dashes across the 
with the other of the assembled men. stage—in mad pursuit of pleasure. 
Glovessel le ter sont cos Ae Se cathe hae 5 eee MCN gh ee Lave Me et peat a Mia SLAVENSKA 
Blowete Girls <2 she). tA Pee a i ah eg ee Ae Ae ren neg Stee ie led YN Cn Pos Eleanor MARRA 
Ley) 6) Cayo hs (eee ener Renee ede FOR eA ANTE Oe SO MNIC mee tat nT ae ee Jeanette LAURET 
fittesMady in: Greenicttg mots) hice seo a le oe Tatiana OLCHOVA 
lites Reriiviariet Cx go ORE exe ee br ok be oP ye Meine Sa eta oh See Leonide MASSINE 
Mine Baroni sete: tea! eS ak et ER hee PNA Pe DIET MUTA PRC GE EIEN Frederic FRANKLIN 
CRO LE Cer ox. a See a SS REG be Sagem Wes poe teaaaee OS Marc PLATOFF 
‘Un.7 DYCT a eh Re Me eaten a COME rt A Rete ue etnies pote tee, MERE fk Casimir KOKITCH 
MRO EL OR. < S:8 oro ae Nee ellen oe 7a 2 arora a ees Cee gt tn Meer eae Robert IRWIN 


Girl Attendants 
Miles. SCARPOVA, ETHERIDGE, CRABTREE, CHAMIE 


Cafe Waiters 
MM. KATCHAROFF, BERESOFF, SEMENOFF, TOMIN 


*“Cocodettes”’ 
Miles. KORJINSKA, FLOTAT, MLADOVA, ROUDENKO, 
HIGHTOWER, LACCA 


Billiard Players 
George ZORITCH, Thomas ARMOUR, Ian GIBSON 


Soldiers 
MM. VOLKOFF, MILTON, KOSTENKO, STEELE, STARBUCK, GOUDOVITCH 


The Dance Master 
Robert IRWIN 


Dandies 
MM. BERESOFF, KATCHAROFF, SEMENOFF, TOMIN 


VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET . SAN FRANCISCO . TU xeEpDo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 





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hse tre pr eee rec erem neni an RAH REYES FETA ES ESF OEE SNTURNRARANOTT AE OS EENOTE HEY SEVERN ETF EN FO 












EA PATER He AMT IT TS Ths, La 








Can-Can Dancers 
Lubov ROUDENKO 
Miles. GRANTZEVA, ETHERIDGE, HIGHTOWER, KELEPOVSKA, 
KORJINSKA, BROWN, WILLIAMS, THOMAS, 
ROSTOVA, HILL, POURNEL 


Conductor: Franz ALLERS 
Cast Subject to Change 
Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


Julius FLEISCHMANN, lee pea Leonide MASSINE, Artistic Director 
Sergei DENHAM, Vice-President ; ‘ 
David LIBIDINS, Administrative Efrem KURTZ, Musical Director 
Director ean YAZVINSKY, Regi 
Rene BLUM, Founder and Director, J g ORT Regusent Crees 
Ballets de Monte Carlo Franz ALLERS, Associate Conductor 
Staff for S. HUROK 
ISU Ce VIL C LS se cen eerie Sy ee eee eee ach Ad Company Manager 
Gerald: Gooden xt en a sa General Press Representative 
Patle WRO tris: ro hace se eae ec ees ace Advance Press Representative 
IV ate nek t co bn iny ed tos ao se Ses wc cee etn eee ee Executive Secretary 
CBr VSO TICES rarest cco ees edd Bee Be is ee I ae eee ee coe Carpenter 
CETL Tae 0 Bele ieee re a Sie ele eye EE ect S-SUR  MNER EN true Dasa Pometecady Sa ae Ecce ton ean i Property Master 
Sidneys Pit DD ars al one ates ets pene Pen St eens sae a etn en ae eee Electrician 
Mabel: Gar penitent c ince ec are: fete ee ee eee eee ey ce Wardrobe Mistress 
PV en tye Biase t tics sete ask ee ie tee el i ee pe nee eZ Wardrobe Master 


Exclusive Management: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City 


The management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion pictures 
inside the theatre without written permission. 


SOUVENIR PROGRAMS FOR SALE IN THE LOBBY 











“A first-rate talent, admirably trained. The case for Werner Philipp is splen- 
didly proven.” Alfred Frankenstein, San Francisco Chronicle 
“Masterful brushwork, grandeur and epic breadth.” 

New York Herald-Tribune 


WERNER PHILIPP 


PAINTER 


Classes for advanced students and beginners 
Special classes for Children . Private Lessons 
Studio at 


1554 TAYLOR STREEL Telephone ‘TUxedo 0536 












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VANESSI’S 


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* RELATIVELY SO COMPARED TO OTHER FOODS 





MARION HUTTON 
in Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade, broadcasts... 


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af 
COVIT TTT TTY CLOTTED 


ih, 
SER, 
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There’s a greater demand than evé 
for Chesterfields. Smokers who have trie 
them are asking for them again and agai 
and for the best of reasons... Chesterfield 
are cooler, better-tasting and definitely milde 
Chesterfields are made for smokers lik 
yourself...so tune in now for your 194 
smoking pleasure. ) 


Copyright 1941, Liccstr & Myers Tosacco Co. ; ify k 


SS EE OE I OE LS PPE 


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Juco ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


OTTORING RONCHI, presipent = jj JOSEPH H. DYER, UpR., SECRETARY 


PRES EN 7 5 


IN| ASSOCIATION WITH 


S. HUROK 


Ballet Russe 
: Carte 







WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CONDUCTOR 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 


EIGHT PERFORMANCES 
0PERA HOUSE JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 194! 






os = ee ee 


EOD 2. 


ee de br ateenteee 


8 














COULD ANYONE YOU KNOW 
ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT 2 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
the above advertisement? . . . Now read it again, and think 
how fully a corporate executor meets each qualification. 

A trust company is never ill; it is never away. It can be counted 
upon to be present and ready to serve when the time comes. 
The officers of a trust company have a daily familiarity with 
probate procedure, the administration of property, and the 
affairs of your estate. 


SEE YOUR LAWYER ABOUT YOUR WILL TODAY 


Dake UP Sse Dr tia PAvAD Ro eM EN 


ells Fargo Bank 
& Union Trust Co. 


Market at Montgomery . . . . Market at Grant Avenue 
SicAC NT -F RAGIN, GoD S4G.O 


MEMBER F. D. I. C. 























THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
GAITE PARISIENNE CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesday Eve., January 29 yee ADE j as 
SERENADE NEW YORKER 
BAISER DE LA FEE BACCHANALE 
VIENNA—I814 CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Thursday Eve., January 30 Sunday Mat., February 2 
SERENADE 
ey AS he SCHEHERAZADE 
ROUGE ET NOIR See Sere y ame 
THE NEW YORKER VIENNA—1814 
Sunday Eve., February 2 
Friday Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


Tickets: $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


March 4 March 21 


ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax ‘Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEDUX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 














J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 

















ee og survealt?’s 


fe touch with a 











New F Ornms 
for F lowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 


Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 
TORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
-GARDEN HAT .. . with daisies in the crown 
DUCK .. . carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


not shown 


Exclusive with 


~~ SLOANE 


SHU] Ik sno wneecait oe 'GakeA Ne 

















4) SATURDAY MATINEE, FEBRUARY 1, at 2:30 


The 
Balled Russe de Mente Carte 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


TV WEP RSPerEP <aaereveeS CUBA P OTR ONET 


POKER GAME 


Ballet in Three Deals, by Igor STRAVINSKY 
(Libretto in collaboration with M. Malaieff) 

Choreography by George BALANCHINE 
Scenery and Costumes by Irene SHARAFF 





















Several players at the green cloth of the The Joker eliminates one adversary by fill- 

card room find their game complicated by ing out a spade flush, but his knavery is 

the endless vagaries of the Joker. ended by a triumphant “royal flush” in 
The first deal results in two equal hearts. 

“straights” pitted against each other with 


Ever str i wrongdoers. 
the Joker unable to upset the balance of EO EME SS eu: © 


power. In the second deal the Joker con- Peace is very well in its way. 

spires with three aces to sweep to victory But what purposes does it serve = 
over four queens. The last deal becomes a With enemies who do not keep faith? 
tense struggle between three ‘“flushes.”’ —La Fontaine 

















ee Perini Fe ROA ED. SAWP toes 5 Shere we oo eke a! ne SO ey _...Frederic FRANKLIN 


“SE o sae Silt Be ee Gein eae ERP SEP a, Soe eee Oe LCaoe ee em ARG! Alicia MARKOVA 


ND en Snes pe, clay eee et” en Rt uh Mee et ena. ee eae Marc PLATOFF 
IS tt ee ee eee ies ea AE, We ot I Igor YOUSKEVITCH 
BNSC cc Sen, ee a I LN ni nals ee LPL SO As ae Georges TOMIN 
Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine and Ten... Miles. ROUDENKO, HIGHTOWER, 


THOMAS, GELEZNOVA, GRANTZEVA, KORJINSKA 


a nel OE RE Be ah oa TE ME ee ee etn ele Alexandra DANILOVA 
cn ELGG nL ae ee a IRR, PN ieee, ee ed a Roy MILTON 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
‘Trustees of the War Memorial. 

* % # it ii 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby i 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. iat 
OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 


ee 


= 









PR OLD. FRADE EONS 


KS Oy hee ntneOpera>..o.. = and jewels sby 
GS hURL EE Vengo ReneS cle Clo ARC ROE iy s =o ot i 
brilliantly woven into the romantic, glamorous 


pattern that is San Francisco. 


SHREVE, TREAT & EACRET 


PEARL AND GEM SPECIALISTS * JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 
OiN Eon eh ERREsEe ook x GEA ROY. ont Robe 





Cn 


The Art Commis 


sion 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, JR. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 
In Beethoven’s 
Missa Solemnis 
with the 
| San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


In Celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary 
of the Municipal Chorus no Admission to 
the Concert will be Charged. 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM, APRIL 12 





ter a! Axe eee ee 


—___— 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 








Ian GIBSON 
PACE 5. ee Reon ger Se at ee ae een Os Rene ee lh Mes Ene A Sim pie Ee Robert IRWIN 
Seven, Eight, Nine and Ten... ............. Miles. MARRA, HILL, BROWN, WILLIAMS 

Diamonds 
(OT CTS bameiesees aivariaect poe peech srepn Pen arree, Dealer ye pane ee PME a Pd Milada MLADOVA 
IRIN oe Sane seca acess acme aap oe ae a ep ae eet nO ree SD RE Robert STEELE 
Jack ee EO Se TER PES Ee RE ROASTS to Peat ee Ene eines ee ne | Se ae yee Thomas ARMOUR 
1X EO EAE EDEN ae RS Oe er RE PO hoe Oh Set ee Sa eee James STARBUCK 
Clubs 

(CITT) | RENIN ee koe NR Ress eee re valine Mee oo ne | Sant Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 
It Se as sok an seey notre peat oe eet ath oe MOOR te IE OG Cr ce te We Chris VOLKOFF 
ack’ ecco ot fhe nett oh Me es eRe A Se ote Sealer et Es Vladimir KOSTENKO 
PR CO secre cc haere ae te Ae eee red ro ee, I Ie, on eg Alexander GOUDOVITCH 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


BETWEEN ACTS VISIT THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA GUILD LIBRARY-MUSEUM 
IN LOBBY OPPOSITE COURT ENTRANCE 





Intermission 


THE NUTCRACKER 


(Casse Noisette) 
Fairy-tale ballet in two acts and three scenes 

Music by TCHAIKOWSKY Choreography by PETIPA 

Revived by Mme. A. FEDEROVA 

Scenery and costumes after Alexandre BENOIS 
Costumes executed by Karinska, Inc. 
Scenery executed by Eugene B. Dunkel Studios, Inc. 

Waltz, Second Scene: Original choreography by Mme. A. Fedorova 


Cred and Fritz, and invites many friends. Each 
Scene 1. Counselor von Stahlbaum gives guest brings a present, that of Dr. Drossel- 
a Christmas party for his children, Clara mayer being a Bavarian doll in the shape 






for these 


COLUMBIA _ .. 
RECORDS music 


14 TILLMAN PLACE 









EX 5738 


2 album 


Off Grant nr. Sutter 






NUE NWT GRACE: SU Lalsbye ser thos s.r ook ete oe Be tee Tschaikowsky 
Chicago Symphony — Conducted by Stock 
Was $5.00 Now $3.50 


CE RIGGLOE ES PAGIN Ollie acer semctne ct eee Sacer Rimsky-Korsakoff 
Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra of New York 
Conducted by Barbirolli $2.50 











—. 
Sr Rms ere eters ey seetaa pees cen yuRWe eo le 




















DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
By a 
GREAT AMERICAN INSTITUTION 


“Che 


BOSTON 
Vihear 
Oe. 





Now uses the Baldwin in Its Concerts 


ee, Ba 
Wo Stitt eres. 4 alpinint 1828 WEBSTER 5ST. 
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 

















FINE FOODS 


Served in the most beautiful 
restaurants inthe West .. . 
at no greater cost 
than elsewhere. 


ICE CREAM after 
SODAS . Vthe Theatre 


PASTRIES 
CaRiEe always in favor 











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a ee 


33 Powell—The Art Gallery Dining Room 
130 Post—In the Shopping District 
1032 Market—In the Theatre District 621 Market—New and Modern 


Also Stores in — Los Angeles — Pasadena — Hollywood 

















of a nutcracker. When the party is over 
and all go to bed, Clara has a dream in 
which the Nutcracker comes to life and 
beckons her to follow him into the land 
of fantasy. 

Scene 2. In the Snowcountry, the Snow- 
flakes dance for Clara, after which the 


Nutcracker takes her to visit the Kingdom 
of Candy. 
ACT II 
In the Kingdom of Candy a celebration 
in Clara’s honor is given on the terrace of 
the Palace of Sweets. 


ACT I 


Scene 1 


Dis Drosselmayer.:.... 8. ee ee 


PRCT, See cee aete _.......Wladimir KOSTENKO 
A a ye ere ee AER e tS Jeanette LAURET 
Dorothy ETHERIDGE and Ian GIBSON 
Ne Rae Pe ek eon Simon SEMENOFF 


Glestshia een ss eck. ee ee ee Miles. Tania SEMENOVA, Katia GELEZNOVA 
Nathalie KELEPOVSKA, Vida BROWN, Tatiana CHAMIE 
MM. Alexandre GOUDOVITCH, James STARBUCK, Chris VOLKOFF 


Roy MILTON, Robert STEELE 


mher Children... sae Miles. CRABTREE, LACCA, THOMAS, WILLIAMS, 

HILL, WOICIKOWSKA 

LEG Cite BA en ie ee eal oP RR en eT Anna SCARPOVA and Nicholas BERESOFF 
Scene 2 


Snow Flakes 


Mia SLAVENSKA and Andre EGLEVSKY 
Miles. ROUDENKO, MARRA, KORJINSKA, LACCA, ROSTOVA, GELEZNOVA, 
MLADOVA, WILLIAMS, HIGHTOWER, GRANTZEVA, CRABTREE, 
BROWN, HILL, KELEPOVSKA, THOMAS, SEMENOVA 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


Intermission 


ARPS -Kajetan Add 


INSTRUCTIONS 


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MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 17 


TOM C. GIRTON Presents 
SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


Thirty - First JE ell Wie. ve 


| FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


WReAGR Mets MeO Ror AsIS OrP ht ReA\t gOrGr sak: 
ul MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 





17 Performances 7 Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax exempt) 
$1.90 $1.75 $1.50 $1.65 $1525. che S100 


i DATES OPERAS Box 1st 20 Rows|Last8 Rows) Grand Dress | Balcony | , /°¢ 
i Seats Orchestra | Orchestra Tier Circle | Circle | Balcony 
i} MME BUTTERFLY | 

i Monday Eve., Mar. 10 (In English) 


Wimesday Eve, “ 11) (Ballet), he ee, | ee ee 


| CARMEN 








\. AIDA | | 
| Wed. Eve., | (Ballet) ‘P< | kee 
La TRAVIATA | | 
Bebaursday Eve, “ 13) (Ballet) Ss LT Fa [eee ie Pn ay A Pc Ba Eee 
f: ; FAUST 
|| Friday Eve., “ 14 (Ballet) [ee 

| 


Triple Bill MARTHA 


i ne (In English) Balcony Scene 
| Saturday Mat., 15 from Romeo and Juliet | 
Ballet Divertissment 


y , RIGOLETTO 
| Sunday Mat., I (Ballet) 
It TROVATORE 
Sunday Eve., 


eee es 
| 
| Sunday + LO (Ballet) een REE ERG See sia 





‘ Monday Eve., ‘* 17) CAVALLERIA & PAGLIACCI 


i Tuesday Eve., “ 18 LA BOHEME 


_ Wed. Eve., “ 19) BARBER OF SEVILLE BS | 
NN | | em ee or | Ae Se ae ee ny a eer md | SS eee 
CARMEN | 


Thursday Eve., “ 20 (Ballet) TF enh a (a wl 


LUCIA 
ae 


Friday Eve., 21 (Ballet) | 
| 
| 


é TALES OF HOFFMAN 
Saturday Mat., “ 22 (Ballet) in English oe cain atl ae oe ee es ee 


| Saturday Eve., “ 22 SAMSON ET DELILAH | 


p MME BUTTERFLY | 
{ Sunday Mat., 23 (In English) Cpe Sy eek ab, OG ice —_ 





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= 





Se 





oe 





——— 


AIDA 
| Sunday Eve., “ 23) (Ballet) | 


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Sugaty Clone Paty saeco ce, el tt ee a ee ee Mia SLAVENSKA 
Mirlitons 

Miles. FLOTAT, LACCA, ETHERIDGE, THOMAS, KORJINSKA, SCARPOVA 
Chinese 


Leila CRABTREE and ROLAND GUERARD 
Miles. CHAMIE, WOICIKOWSKA MM. IRWIN, MILTON 


Walse 
Natalie KRASSOVSKA, Milada MLADOVA, Tania GRANTZEVA 
Chris VOLKOFF, James STARBUCK, Ian GIBSON 
Miles. BROWN, ROUDENKO, GELEZNOVA, HIGHTOWER, HILL, LACCA, 
WILLIAMS, FLOTAT, KELEPOVSKA, THOMAS, MARRA, SCARPOVA 


75¢ Trepak 
alcony Frederic FRANKLIN 
MM. ARMOUR, KATCHAROFF, GOUDOVITCH, TOMIN 


Pas de Deux 
Mia SLAVENSKA and Andre EGLEVSKY 


Finale- =. * =) Entire Cast 


Conductor: Franz ALLERS 


Intermission 








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SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 30 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 
MISCHA ELMAN HELEN TRAUBEL 


TONE MASTER OF THE VIOLIN THE “AMERICAN FLAGSTAD” 












TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 1 FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 2 
NINO MARTINI JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 


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Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10 — Tax Exempt 
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THE GREATEST LIVING CONCERT SINGER PHENOMENAL COLORATURA SOPRANO 
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TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 25 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 22 
ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEF HOFMANN 
DYNAMIC TITAN OF THE PIANO THE “COMPLETE PIANIST” 

































CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 


Ballet in one scene by Leonide MASSINE 
Music by RIMSKY-KORSAKOFEF 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
in collaboration with ARGENTINITA 
Scenery and Costumes by Mariano ANDREU 


Costumes executed by Mme. Karinska 


Not even the glaring summer sun over a. Alborada—typical dances of Spanish 
the little town in the desolate region of Galicia composed of steps called “‘munei- | 
old Castile has discouraged the peasants, — ras” | 
hidalgos and dons who have turned out 


in high spirits for the fair. The crowd RR an ee ere ace enecaeets aye a : 
watches the fortune-telling gypsies dance a eae a Othe uslaee CUS ORY. goa ae | 
a fiery “buleria’” which ignites the peas- aoe 
ants and “‘majas” until the dance becomes c. Alborado—a comic dance in the style i | 
general and the couples swing into a fren- — of Northern Spain . | 
“ied “jota.” d. Gypsy scene and songs—combining 

The choreography of Leonide Massine eae re “bul ARE ae opis ferns 5 
and Argentinita follows the score’s nota- ‘'© Y0'CTO , Dulerla and “panadero 


tions closely: e. Asturian fandango 
1. Alborada 


Miles. MARRA, FLOTAT, CHAMIE, SCARPOVA, CRABTREE, KORJINSKA, 
BROWN, HIGHTOWER, HILL, ETHERIDGE 
MM. SEMENOFF, BERESOFF, KATCHAROFF, ARMOUR, GIBSON, 
KOSTENKO, STEELE, STARBUCK, IRWIN, 
GOUDOVITCH, TOMIN 


2. Variation 


Miles. GELEZNOVA, ROUDENKO, GRANTZEVA, MLADOVA, 
WILLIAMS, KELEPOVSKA 
MM. KOKITCH, YOUROFF, VOLKOFF, ROLANOFF, MARKOFF, MILTON 


Miles. LAURET and ORLOVA 
MM. BERESOFF, SEMENOFF, KATCHAROFF, ARMOUR 


4. Gypsy Scene and Song 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Leonide MASSINE 


5. Asturian Fandango 


Alexandra DANILOVA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and Leonide MASSINE 


and the entire company 







| 
| 






Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 
Cast Subject to Change 













VIRGINIA MORGAN Concert Harpist | 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
872 CHESTNUT STREET SAN FRANCISCO . TU xeEbo 2738 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 


















Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


Julius FLEISCHMANN, peace. Leonide MASSINE, Artistic Director 
Sergei DENHAM, Vice-President : i 
David LIBIDINS, Administrative Efrem KURTZ, Musical Director 
Director : Jean YAZVINSKY, Regisseur General 
Rene BLUM, Founder and Director, 
Ballets de Monte Carlo Franz ALLERS, Associate Conductor 
Staff for S. HUROK 
WUE ICODN WTEC CES cc ec ae ew gaa cage away sea cee one eee Company Manager 
GBorald Gooden rs ee et Pe ae cee General Press Representative 
DEED LY Gey are ee eee ott ah ee er Owens Parte AD eae ROU ea note Advance Press Representative 
Mae: Frobriaticn. cece soi tb eee ck ened Sate ieee etwas recoceeaee Executive Secretary 
COV Sarnia rae rc an Bee senior eee eae sare Seeanee Carpenter 
EES cee ci, So ED, Rami le RIE PM, inn atm ae ey rere meet Property Master 
Sidney Hubbard. .........-.....2222..--22s-c--ecceesnsceeeccetenenceneccceesnneesnnsecennsnecennresceanccsenes Electrician 
Mabel sCarpentet: 25.52 s en Boe or wren coe need seepem wee ae Wardrobe Mistress 
Pleneys Biasettis. 2.5 ee Stee NA RRR oath, SEE ee ENG Eee Wardrobe Master 


Exclusive Management: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City 


The management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion pictures 
inside the theatre without written permission. 


SOUVENIR PROGRAMS FOR SALE IN THE LOBBY 


Llipest 








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They Saif Te 
































dic ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


OTTORINO RONCHI, PRESIDENT | JOSEPH H. DYER, JR., SECRETARY 
PRES ENT 5S | | 


IN; ASSOCIATION WITH 


Ss. HUROK 


WITH THE 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, CONDUCTOR 









J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 






EIGHT PERFORMANCES 
JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 194! 


es ss Se 


See out ee pare ea 


Fe ee oe 


— — 


Jemates 





[MSP RC eM eS FE 


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ANSWER THIS ADVERTISEMENT? 


Could any human being you know fill all the requirements of 
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MEMBER F. D. I. C. 


























THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 


LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
GAITE PARISIENNE CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesday Eve., January 29 Sain, ADE y 
SERENADE a NEW YORKER 
BAISER DE LA FEE BACCHANALE 
VIENNA—1814 CAPRICCIO ESPAGNOL 
Thursday Eve., January 30 Sunday Mat., February 2 
SERENADE 
LES SYLPHIDE 
SCHEHERAZADE 
ROUGE ET NOIR : : 
THE NEW YORKER VIENNA—I814 
Sunday Eve., February 2 
ae Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


Tickets: $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


March 4 March 21 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEDX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 

















J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 















a surveals?; 
touch with a 
sense of Aum 










New F Orms 
for F lowers 


by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 











Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


_ VISAGE . ... wherein violets form the face 
' TORSO. wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
' GUITAR ... for either long or short blooms 
| GARDEN HAT . . with daisies in the crown 
: BUCK . . Carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


Exclusive with 


~~ SLOANE 


SoU el Er Ro snvelairea *GanwAaNaD 








SUNDAY MATINEE, FEBRUARY 2, at 2:30 


The 
Ballet Russe de Monte Corte 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


























SERENADE 


Choreography by George BALANCHINE 
Music by TCHAIKOWSKY 
Costumes by Jean LURCAT 

Settings by Gaston LONGCHAMP 


Just as symphonic themes integrate ‘“points’’ and in the free plastic medium. 
and flow one against another, so this ballet The sonatina, a sombre adagio, calls forth 
uses three types of movement in counter- two girls and a boy in a tragic pantomime 


point. The sonatina and waltz are designed against the background of the corps-de- 
in ceaseless linear patterns danced on the ballet. 


1. Sonatina 
Mia SLAVENSKA 
Miles ROUDENKO, HIGHTOWER, MLADOVA, GELEZNOVA, GRANTZEVA, 
CRABTREE, ETHERIDGE, KORJINSKA, FLOTAT, THOMAS, LACCA, 
HILL, BROWN, WILLIAMS, MARRA, SCARPOVA, KELEPOVSKA 


2. Waltz 
Mia SLAVENSKA and Marc PLATOFF 
Miles ROUDENKO, HIGHTOWER, MLADOVA, ETHERIDGE, CRABTREE, 
HILL, THOMAS, FLOTAT, KORJINSKA, LACCA, WILLIAMS, 
SCARPOVA, MARRA, GRANTZEVA 
3. Adagio 
Mia SLAVENSKA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH . 

Miles. Milada MLADOVA, Rosella HIGHTOWER, Lubov ROUDENKO, 
Miles. BROWN, THOMAS, CRABTREE, HILL, GELEZNOVA, 
GRANTZEVA, WILLIAMS 
MM. ARMOUR, STARBUCK, TOMIN, GOUDOVITCH 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


BETWEEN ACTS VISIT THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA GUILD LIBRARY-MUSEUM 
IN LOBBY OPPOSITE COURT ENTRANCE 


Intermission 







_—_—_— 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 
Trustees of the War Memorial. 

* * * * 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Lobby 
Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 

OPERA GLASSES FOR RENT IN THE LOBBY 











PROUD TRADITIONS 


AS jens Ee" C) Dera. tena PANG Jewels by 





Soe RE Viki LR EAE 2Oe She ANG Raku. both 
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The Art Commission 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 


. In Beethoven’s 


Missa Sotemunis 


with the 







San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


{ 
) 
In Celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary 






of the Municipal Chorus no Admission to 
the Concert will be Charged. | 





CIViLG AU DITO RTUMe: APRPREL [2 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 

















SCHEHERAZADE 


A choreographic drama in one act by Leon BAKST 
Music by RIMSKY-KORSAKOFF 
Choreography by Michel FOKINE 

Scenery and Costumes by Leon BAKST 


Costumes executed by Mme. Karinska 


In his opulent palace, Shariar, King of 
India and China, listens to the suspicions 
of his brother, Shah Zeman, concerning 
the infidelity of the King’s wives, especially 
his favorite, Zobeide. To test the love of 
his ladies, the King leaves the palace os- 
tensibly for a hunt. As soon as he departs, 
the wives bribe the Chief Eunuch to open 
the doors to the slave quarters. Zobeide 
commands the Eunuch to unlock still an- 
other door, and out steps a handsome 


Zobeide 
The Favorite Slave 


Shale Shatiat soca es eee 
Shah Zeman, his brother.......................------ 
Tne. Chief Bunch =>. cscs ne tee 


negro, which is the signal for the orgy to 
begin. Youths come bearing food and 
wine; the revelry mounts in abandonment. 
At its height, the King suddenly returns. 
He commands his men to put the slaves 
and sultanas to death. Undecided about 
Zobeide, whom he truly loves, he would 
let her live did he not prize honor more. 
But Zobeide snatches a dagger and stabs 
herself, falling dead at the feet of her 
erieving master. 


Beer es eo Se ee ee Jeanette LAURET 
gan he es Ae Frederic FRANKLIN 
WER Tey Sia ee ee Jean YAZVINSKY 
ie pee ee ee Casimit KOKLECE 


Odalisques.............. Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Eleanora MARRA, Milada MLADOVA 
The Sultan’s Wives..............---. Miles. KORJINSKA, GELEZNOVA, KELEPOVSKA, 
POURMEL, HILL, CHAMIE, WILLIAMS, BROWN 

Olmet. 22 2<c. Miles. FLOTAT, LACCA, CRABTREE, ETHERIDGE, GRANTZEVA, 
ROUDENKO, SCARPOVA, HIGHTOWER 

PRGOLESCONITS 2 aid tek ncee ee MM. SEMENOFF, KATCHAROFF, GIBSON, TOMIN, 


IRWIN, ARMOUR 


INCRE OS tess. xedicnehs Peta ey nes os MM. VOLKOFF, KOSTENKO, STEELE, MILTON, 
STARBUCK, GOUDOVITCH, YOUROFF 


Eunuchs, the Sultan’s Suite, etc. 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


Intermission 


for these 


VICTOR 
RECORDS 


SERENADE IN GC MAJOR 


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7 BAEC R SRD Sree 
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B. B. C. Symphony Orchestra 


Conducted by Boult — Was $6.00 Now $3.50 


DCHEBEERAZADE SUET Es «ci. 5: 5 sees 


ae ieee eee: Rimsky-Korsakoff 


Philadelpha Symphony Orchestra — Conducted by Stokowski 
Was $12.00 Now $6.50 

















DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
By a 
GREAT AMERICAN INSTITUTION 


‘Che 


BOSTON 
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3. 


VIENNA - 1814 


Music by Carl Maria von WEBER, orchestrated by Russell BENNETT 
Libretto and Choreography by Leonide Massine 
Costumes and Scenery designed by Stewart CHANEY 
Costumes executed by Karinska Inc. 
Scenery executed by Eugene B. Dunkel Studios Inc. 


The scene represents the gala peace ball island of Elba causes a panic among the 
tendered by Prince Metternich to the di- _celebrants, though Metternich calms them 
lomats of all countries to celebrate the and prevails upon the men to exhibit 
defeat of Napoleon. With the arriving courage, and upon the women to follow 
Ambassadors comes Princess Lieven, with their example. 


whom Metternich falls in love. An unfortunate incident causing con- 
A brilliant Polonaise opens the ball, fol-  sternation brings the fete to an end, and 
lowed by a grand divertissement. The sud- Metternich takes tender leave of Princess 


den news of Napoleon’s escape from the Lieven. 


Erica WICLter nic ie ois nee etc eee ed ee Marc PLATOFF 
Ptinicess tIVi el atile ie cies pias he ete 0) ken 0 is Ga. tery. oe fe Sem Tatiana ORLOVA 
BredericisV Ofle Gentg os cote etn ot he ep ee eeae ok anne ts Aen oye ee Ae Casimir KOKITCH 
RRinicessr ACV et ite. sce hee he: i Oe ree, Oe el ee ee ee a at Mia SLAVENSKA 
Princetde: Ligtios: 2 so). sy oe eee Be ee oe ty neg tie arn teal Simon SEMENOFF 
Batotiekl aa vere yn.) oe ke eee occ eae Ne eee hy. 5 SE eel cha ea Met oa ta Nae I eS Robert STEELE 
a tOMesSi: bl AA SOE Se aoe ae eee? de ik a oe Senne ante eee Nesta WILLIAMS 
Sectetaties!s.2.2..cc.: Igor YOUSKEVITCH, Andre EGLEVSKY, Roland GUERARD, 
George ZORITCH, Frederic FRANKLIN 

Debutantes.....__. OE sa ede ct we ante) RE Alexandra DANILOVA, Rosella HIGHTOWER, 
Tatiana GRANTZEVA, Milada MLADOVA, Andree THOMAS 

Horan Gastelreaghy tts Accs bg ee ee ase hae a ENP ae James STARBUCK 
Lady Castelreagh........ Pere Wy ads Nesp ek ve se 9 tee eee te Katia GELEZNOVA 
lia tari eee mets ne ee een ee Oy ee Ee ete see Nicholas BERESOFF 
Madames desiDerigord 2a. ee ties tay eer Ae et Noe ay eee Jeanette LAURET 
Madamiemde toa Cat ours! tet bo Ade ot eae tote ies se ae ees Tatiana SEMENOVA 
Murat’s Ambassadors.....................--- Thomas ARMOUR and Michel KATCHAROFF 
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itcheberationee. 7.4 woe ee eek Tatiana CHAMIE and Georges TOMIN 
Tyrolian Legation._.................. Lubov ROUDENKO and Alexander GOUDOVITCH 
IOGEAR a SUE OVSICY 2) ose 1 es oe ce Dy Rhone Ee She Vladimir KOSTENKO 
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17 Performances 7 Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax exempt) 





_ Tuesday Eve., 
Wed. Eve., ¥ 
| Thursday Eve., “ 20 


} Briday Eve,  “ 21 
| Saturday Mat., “ 


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p1.20 lke : ey see op | St | 154 
D OPERAS ox lst 20 Rows} Last 8 Rows ran ress | Balcony 
nll oe Seats Orchestra | Orchestra Tier Circle Circle | Balcony 
Ri oS) OOS a a — — — — — — — — — —— eee KO ODSW_OBean=nan"==@=@ ed 
MME BUTTERFLY | 
_ Monday Eve., Mar. 10 (In English) 
CARMEN | | 
Tuesday Eve., “ 11) (Ballet) 
[ J AIDA 
| Wed. Eve., 12 (Ballet) 
3 La TRAVIATA 
_ Thursday Eve., iN (Ballet) 
Friday E Kt FAUST 
riday Eve., (Ballet) 
SE ET ee oa ee Ge ee | a | CER SO PR Seo a r——_—_———— TFG ee = 
Triple Bill MARTHA 
4 (In English) Balcony Scene 
Saturday Mat., 15 ‘from Romeo and Juliet 
Ballet Divertissment SN a are EIRP eS ec eee 
RIGOLETTO 
Sunday Mat., 16 (Ballet) SS SES | ee ee 
IL TROVATORE 
Sunday Eve; ot > 16 (Ballet) col (ee 
Monday Eve., “* 17 CavALLERIA & PAGLIACCI | | 
Monday Eve,“ 17/Cavatrerta&Pacttaccr! |_| 


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ee 


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MME BUTTERFLY 


| Sunday Mat., “ 23 (In English) Er ee a ee ee eel Oe 
3 AIDA | 
Sunday Eve., 23 | (Ballet) 


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DIVERTISSEMENTS: 


Dance Saxon 


Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 


Sicilienne 


Chris VOLKOFF 


Theme Russe 
Mia SLAVENSKA and Marc PLATOFF 


Variation 
Simon SEMENOFF 


Entree Chinoise: 


Princess Turandot and Unknown Prince........ Alicia MARKOVA, Leonide MASSINE 
he. bhree: Chittese cscs tre eee MM. GIBSON, GOUDOVITCH, MILTON 


Pas de Deux 
Alexandra DANILOVA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 


Mazurka 


Katia GELEZNOVA and Frederic FRANKLIN 
Miles. MARRA, FLOTAT, CRABTREE, KELEPOVSKA, HILL, 
WOICIKOWSKA, WILLIAMS, BROWN 
MM. KOSTENKO, GOUDOVITCH, VOLKOFF, STARBUCK, KATCHAROFF, 
TOMIN, STEELE, MILTON 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 








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MARION HUTTON 
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‘he ART COMMISSION OF SAN FRANCISCO 
OTTORING RONCHI, PRESIDENT — : JOSEPH H. DYER, dR., SECRETARY 


PRESENTS 





IN; ASSOCIATION WITH 


. HUROK 


WCE) FALL os LB se 



















‘elds SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
dor PIERRE MONTEUX, cONDUCTOR 

like J. EMMET HAYDEN, CHAIRMAN MUSIC COMMITTEE 
1941 


EIGHT PERFORMANCES 
OPERA HOUSE JANUARY 28 TO FEBRUARY 2, 194! 

















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THE ART COMMISSION 


OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 
Presents 
with the 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
And Guest Attractions 


OPERA HOUSE 
In Association with S. HUROK 


BALLET RUSSE de MONTE CARLO 














LEONIDE MASSINE EFREM KURTZ 
Artistic Director Musical Director 
—REPERTOIRE— 
Tuesday Eve., January 28 Saturday Mat., February 1 
POKER GAME POKER GAME 
THE NUTCRACKER THE NUTCRACKER 
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Saturday Eve., February 1 
Wednesda ayer Eve., January 29 SOREN ADE y 
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Thursday Eve., January 30 Sunday Mat., February 2 
SERENADE 
LES SYLPHIDE 
SCHEHERAZADE 
ROUGE ET NOIR IENNA—1814 
THE NEW YORKER y Te 
Sunday Eve., February 2 
Friday Eve., January 31 LES SYLPHIDES 
LAKE OF SWANS ROUGE ET NOIR 
PETROUCHKA SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 
GAITE PARISIENNE GAITE PARISIENNE 


Tickets: $1.65, $2.00, $2.50 — No Tax 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 


March 4 March 21 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY KIRSTEN FLAGSTAD 
MONTEUX, Conducting EDWIN McARTHUR, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00—No Tax Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 
April 15 
YEHUDI MENUHIN 
MONTEUX, Conducting 
Tickets: 50¢, 75¢, $1.00, $1.50—No Tax 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE—SHERMAN, CLAY SUtter 1331 


ee s_—_—_—_—ooo"—_ 


J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 





















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by WILLIAM JUSTEMA 









Plaster with colorings to suit your individual decor. 


VISAGE .. . wherein violets form the face 
TORSO . wears beads, and ferns in her shoulders 
GUITAR . . for either long or short blooms 
GARDEN HAT .. . with daisies in the crown 
DUCK . . Carries a mixed bouquet on his back 


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SUNDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 2, at 8:30 






The 
Ballet Russe de Mente Carle 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 









LES SYLPHIDES 


Music by CHOPIN 
Orchestrated by GLAZOUNOV, STRAVINSKY and TANEIEFF 
Story and Choreography by Michel FOKINE 
Scenery executed by Emile BERTIN 
Costumes by Mme. KARINSKA 


This romantic reverie is a ballet with- 
out story. Into a romantic glade bathed in 
the silver moonbeams come the dancers— 
pure white sylphs with skirts rather long 
as Taglioni might have worn them—to 
transport us to another world, to the 
music of Chopin .. . And at the end, the 
airy phantoms, the romantic glade, the 
silver moonbeams—all fade away and 
naught remains but an unforgettable 
memory. 

Originally staged for a charity fete in 
St. Petersburg, its first performance in 


Western Europe was given at the Theatre 
du Chatelet, Paris, on June 2, 1909. The 
work is remarkable for a number of rea- 
sons, but for none more than its absolute 
unity of atmosphere despite the fact that 
it is composed of various disconnected 
dances. The Chopin works included in the 
ballet are as follows: “Nocturne,” Opus 
39 No. 2: “Valse,” Opus 70, No. 1; “Ma- 
zurka,” Opus 33, No. 3; “Mazurka,” Opus 
67. No. 3; “Prelude,” Opus 28, No. 7, also 
used as the overture; “Valse,” Opus 64, 
No. 2: and “Valse,” Opus 18, No. 1. 


Nocturne: 


Mia SLAVENSKA 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Rosella HIGHTOWER 
Miles. KORJINSKA, GRANTZEVA, FLOTAT, MLADOVA, KELEPOVSKA 
GELEZNOVA, SCARPOVA, HIGHTOWER, BROWN, MARRA, HILL, 
THOMAS, WILLIAMS, ETHERIDGE, POURMEL 


and 
George ZORITCH 
Valse: 


Rosella HIGHTOWER 


Mazurka: 
George ZORITCH 


War Memorial Opera House. Owned and operated by the City 
and County of San Francisco through the Board of 


Trustees of the War Memorial. 
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Attendant will connect same to your seat location on request. 


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PROUD TRADITIONS 


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pattern that is San Francisco. 


SHREVE, TREAT & EACRET 


PEARL AND GEM SPECIALISTS = %* JEWELERS AND SILVERSMITHS 
OPNU Es, eh Roba S IX Gas ACR Ys Sa Re oe 


~~ 


The Art Commission 
OTTORINO RONCHI JOSEPH H. DYER, Jr. 
President Secretary 


Presents 


THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 
HANS LESCHKE, Conductor 


In Beethoven’s 


with the 


( 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


In Celebration of the Fifteenth Anniversary 
of the Municipal Chorus no Admission to 
the Concert will be Charged. 


CIVIC - AUDITORIUM; APRIL 12 
J. EMMET HAYDEN, Chairman Music Committee 








Prelude: 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 


Pas de Deux: 
Mia SLAVENSKA and George ZORITCH 


Valse: 
Mia SLAVENSKA, Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Rosella HIGHTOWER 
George ZORITCH 


and ensemble 


Conductor: Franz ALLERS 


BETWEEN ACTS VISIT THE SAN FRANCISCO OPERA GUILD LIBRARY-MUSEUM 
IN LOBBY OPPOSITE COURT ENTRANCE 


Intermission 


ROUGE ET NOIR 


(Red and Black) 
Ballet in four movements and one scene 
Music by Dmitri SHOSTAKOVITCH (First Symphony) 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE Scenery and costumes by Henri MATISSE 
Scenery executed by Oreste ALLEGRI 


FIRST MOVEMENT 


(Aggression) 
Man, symbolizing the poetic spirit, is pursued and overtaken by brutal forces. 


White 
Alicia MARKOVA and [gor YOUSKEVITCH 
Miles. MLADOVA, LAURET, KELEPOVSKA, GELEZNOVA, WILLIAMS, 
SEMENOVA 


Yellow 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA, Yvonne HILL, Lubov ROUDENKO, 
Tatiana GRANTZEVA 
George ZORITCH, Thomas ARMOUR, Marc PLATOFF 


Blue 
Eleanora MARRA 


Red 
Rosella HIGHTOWER 


for these 


VICTOR ef oesis 
RECORDS MUSIC 3 album 


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BURRS aT SVEN TY oeree ee ate so tegpetie lo nar viince sey 6: oele\= 1 sler sm a.n Freres y ons Szostakowicz 


Played by the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra Conducted by Stokowski 


INVITATION TO THE WALTZE von Weber 
Played by the B. B. C. Symphony Orchestra Conducted by Toscanini 














| DISTINGUISHED RECOGNITION 
By a 
GREAT AMERICAN INSTITUTION 


Ae 


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Black 
Jeanette LAURET 
Miles. SCARPOVA, KORJINSKA, CHAMIE, THOMAS, FLOTAT, ETHERIDGE 
MM. KATCHAROFF, SEMENOFF, GIBSON, KOSTENKO, TOMIN 


SECOND MOVEMENT 
(Field and City) 


The men of the city encounter the men of the field and bear them off. 


Red 
Frederic FRANKLIN 
Miles. LACCA, HIGHTOWER, POURMEL, BROWN, WOICIKOWSKA 
MM. BERESOFF, MILTON, STEELE, VOLKOFF, GOUDOVITCH 


Blue 
MM. IRWIN, KOKITCH, STARBUCK, GIBSON 


Yellow 
Nathalie KRASSOVSKA and George ZORITCH 


White 
Miles. GELEZNOVA, KELEPOVSKA, MLADOVA, SEMENOVA 


THIRD MOVEMENT 
(Solitude) 


Woman parted from Man is tormented in her solitude by an evil spirit. 
White 


Alicia MARKOVA 
Jeanette LAURET, Katia GELEZNOVA 


Black 
Marc PLATOFF, Casimir KOKITCH and Chris VOLKOFF 


Blue 
Miles. FLOTAT, SCARPOVA, KORJINSKA, ETHERIDGE, THOMAS 
MM. SEMENOFF, KATCHAROFF, ARMOUR, KOSTENKO, TOMIN 


FOURTH MOVEMENT 


(Destiny ) 
Man eludes the brutal forces and finds Woman again. But joy Is shortlived, for in 
freeing himself from his worldly enemies he is conquered by destiny. 
White 


Alicia MARKOVA and Igor YOUSKEVITCH 
Miles. LAURET, WILLIAMS, GELEZNOVA, KELEPOVSKA, 
MLADOVA, SEMENOVA 


Black 
Marc PLATOFF 
MM. KOKITCH, IRWIN, VOLKOFF, GOUDOVITCH, GIBSON 
BERESOFF, STEELE, STARBUCK 





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HARPS - RENTAL HARPS 9114 S. BUDLONG AVE. 
ACCESSORIES Los ANGELES, CALIF. 











MAIL ORDER BLANK 


All Mail Orders Filled Before Tickets Go On Sale 
TICKETS GO ON SALE FEBRUARY 17 


TOM C. GIRTON presents 
SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 


Thitty - First Ia ya Ween Loner! hv 


FORTUNE GALLO, General Director 


WAR MEM @O-Roi A -OLPSE R Ave EO eS 
MARCH 10 TO MARCH 23 INCLUSIVE 


17 Performances 7 ‘Tickets: 75¢ to $1.75, Box Seats $1.90 (tax exempt) 








| $1.90 
OPERAS | Box 


Seats 
MME BUTTERFLY 
| (In English) 
‘CARMEN 


Tuesday Eve., “ 11 


DATES 


| Monday Eve., Mar. 10. 


(Ballet) 
AIDA 
12| (Ballet) 
'LA TRAVIATA 
(Ballet) 


Wed. Eve., 
Thursday Eve., “ 13 


| Friday Eve, “ 


Triple Bill MARTHA 
(In English) Balcony Scene 
from Romeo and Juliet 
Ballet Divertissment 

RIGOLETTO 
(Ballet) 


‘In ‘TROVATORE 
(Ballet) 


Saturday Mat., “ 15 


“Sunday Mat., “ 16 
Sunday Eve., “ 16 


Monday Eve., “17 CavaLiEertA& PAGLIACcI | | 


Tuesday Eve. “ 18 La BoHEME 
si 19| BARBER OF SEVILLE 
CARMEN 


Wed. Eve., 


Thursday Eve., “ 20 


\Friday Eve, “ 21| 
‘Saturday Mat., “ 22 


(Ballet) 


(Ballet) 


TALES OF HOFFMAN 
(Ballet) in English 


‘Saturday Eve., “ 22 SAMSON ET DELILAH 


‘MME BUTTERFLY 


‘Sunday Mat, “ 23 (In English) 


AIDA 
Sunday Eve., “ 23 (Ballet) 


| 


ee ee ED 


$1.65 
Grand 
Tier 


$1.50 
Last 8 Rows 
Orchestra | 


$1.75 
lst 20 Rows 
Orchestra 


| 





—_— SS, _—_-_lCoOoor OOOO 
———--— --- i 


_—  ———— — 








$1.00 
Balcony 
Circle 


$1.25 
Dress 


| _ 754 
Circle | Balcony 
































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(print) coisas IO se ae Lace. 9 as A ar Re, ee eA, pelo! a 2 comeamercdaenanas-Unsaceas aes ' 


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SHERMAN, CLAY & Co., SUTTER AND KEARNY STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 


TELEPHONE: EXBROOK 6696 


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ee ee eee EE SESE ESET EE EERE REET SEED 


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Red 
Frederic FRANKLIN 


Mile. ROUDENKO, GRANTZEVA, MARRA, WOICIKOWSKA, WILLIAMS, 
HIGHTOWER, POURMEL, BROWN 


Blue 
Miles. FLOTAT, SCARPOVA, KORJINSKA, CHAMIE, ETHERIDGE 
MM. KATCHAROFF, SEMENOFF, ARMOUR, KOSTENKO, TOMIN 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 





Intermission 





SPECTRE DE LA ROSE 


Choreographic Poem by Theophile GAUTIER 


Music by WEBER Scenes and Dances by Michel FOKINE 
Scenery and Costumes designed by Leon BAKST 
The theme of this romantic ballet was Teatre de Monte Carlo, 1911. 
suggested by J. L. Voudoyer, after the * * * 


poem by Theophile Gautier: A young girl returning from her first 

—- “Souleve ta paupiere close ball, fatigued by the excitement of it all, 

Qu’effleure une songe virginal. falls asleep in her chair. In her dream the 

— Je suis le spectre de la rose rose she holds in her hand comes to visit 

Que tu portais hier au bal.” her, dances with her, kisses her, and at 

break of day leaps from the casement 

It is set to Weber’s “Invitation to the window, as she awakens disillusioned and 
er Dance.” It was first produced at the saddened. 


The Young Girl...........-.------------.---cs--ecreecencceneenneennceensnseseecen canes 


9h Sia) Pot ea, Ue ele atta ee bel ie A, eee ase eee eee oe cae ade 
Conductor: Franz ALLERS 


Nathalie KRASSOVSKA 
Andre EGLEVSKY 





Intermission 









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San Yrancisce Onera Association 


GAETANO MEROLA, GENERAL DIRECTOR 


PAUL POSZ, BUSINESS MANAGER 


| CONCERT ATTRACTIONS 


WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5 THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 13 
GLADYS SWARTHOUT VLADIMIR HOROWITZ 
CAPTIVATING AMERICAN SOPRANO SENSATIONAL RUSSIAN PIANIST 
TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 11 DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED LATER 
| MARIAN ANDERSON LINA PAGLIUGHI 
| THE GREATEST LIVING CONCERT SINGER PHENOMENAL COLORATURA SOPRANO 
| SPRING SERIES 
TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 25 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 22 
| ARTUR RUBINSTEIN JOSEF HOFMANN 
DYNAMIC TITAN OF THE PIANO THE “COMPLETE PIANIST” 
SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 30 TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 29 
MISCHA ELMAN HELEN TRAUBEL 
| TONE MASTER OF THE VIOLIN THE “AMERICAN FLAGSTAD” 
| TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 1 FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 2 
| NINO MARTINI JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 
TENOR STAR OF OPERA, CONCERT, FILMS AMERICA’S MOST POPULAR BARITONE 


Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10 — Tax Exempt 
BOX OFFICE: SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. — EXBROOK 8585 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE | 












GAITE PARISIENNE 


Ballet in One Act 
Music by Jacques OFFENBACH 
Orchestrated by Manuel ROSENTHAL in collaboration with 
Jacques BRINDEJONC-OFFENBACH 
Choreography by Leonide MASSINE 
Decor and Theme by Count Etienne de BEAUMONT 


Scenery executed by Oreste Allegri 

This is the saucy and sparkling French 
sister of “Le Beau Danube,” and it had 
its first performance at the Theatre de 
Monte Carlo in the spring of 1938. The 
ballet. is concerned with the immense 
custo of living in and for the moment, 
finding its supreme expression in the Of- 
fenbach can-can. 

Out on the terrace there is a ball every 
evening. As the curtain rises, the waiters 
and the girl attendants are arranging the 
tables and preparing the cloakroom; an 
attractive young flower-girl and a fascinat- 
ing glove-seller are laying out their wares. 
Dancing attendance on this fair femininity 
is a wealthy Peruvian; but a group of 
“cocodettes”—ladies of light and easy vir- 
tue—enter and succeed in tearing him 
away from the two charming rivals. There 
now appears a young Austrian baron 
whose friends have sung the praises of 
both the gaiety of Paris and this fascinat- 
ing vendor of gloves. The baron recognizes 
the glove-seller at once, and he falls head 
over heels in love with her, with the result 
that the flower-girl becomes jealous. 


Brightly uniformed soldiers enter, and 
the “cocodettes” prove that a uniform is 
always an attraction, for they leave every- 
thing and follow. The outstanding celeb- 
rity of the hour, La Lionne, makes her 
appearance in the company of a Duke and 
the Lady in Green. She ignores the 


Glove-Seller 
Flower Girl 


The Baron 
The Duke 


| eZvha) GAT SSS aes oe ae eee net or edged alee ON een ee 
The Lady in Greenn.:.:...-.:-.-.-.-------0----+<2+0-----" 


OU OC LT ee ee wk ee a a ra eee aoa oe 


Fine. (GYtian eee moan eee eee 


Costumes executed by Mme. Karinska 


wealthy Peruvian, as he walks up and 
down, but flirts first with one and then 
with the other of the assembled men. 

Meanwhile the Austrian baron, grown 
bold, approaches the glove-seller; and at 
the same time the officer playfully makes 
a game of trying to kiss the kirl, who 
spiritedly defends herself. The baron, in 
enraged jealousy, flies at the interloper, 
but they are separated. The scandal 
spreads, however, and all are drawn into 
it. The celebrity tries to calm the officer, 
while the glove-seller, impressed by the 
baren’s bravery, drags him off. 

And now the divertissement begins: 

First the dancers appear in the famous 
quadrille, then in a variety of numbers. 
The crowd takes part; flowers and sou- 
venirs are distributed; the characters alter 
beneath the black velvet masks and “Baou- 
tas’ (the feather-boas of the period) 
which have been given out. One might 
easily imagine the scene to be in Venice. 
Uhe farandole becomes still gayer, until 
the crowd disappears through the garden 
—and the stage is empty. 

Empty, that is, save for the glove-seller 
and her baron, whom she allows to em- 
brace her tenderly ... And they, too, move 





away _ the light fades. 
At which moment, the Peruvian, still 
alone. dashes across the stage—in mad 


pursult of pleasure. 


Alexandra DANILOVA 
Tatiana GRANTZEVA 
__. Jeanette LAURET 
Tatiana OLCHOVA 


Girl Attendants : 
Miles. SCARPOVA, ETHERIDGE, CRABTREE, CHAMIE 
Cafe Waiters 
MM. KATCHAROFF, BERESOFF, SEMENOFF, TOMIN 





872 CHESTNUT STREET 











——— 


Bowe Pe. eA aA ee 


VIRGINIA MORGAN 


For all Information regarding Engagements and Lessons Address 
SAN FRANCISCO . 
Member: San Francisco Symphony, Music Faculty Mills College 





Concert Harpist 
TU xepo 2738 


ee eee 























*Cocodettes”’ 
Miles. KORJINSKA, FLOTAT, MLADOVA, ROUDENKO, HIGHTOWER, 
LACCA 
Billiard Players 
George ZORITCH, Thomas ARMOUR, Ian GIBSON 
Soldiers 
MM. VOLKOFF, MILTON, KOSTENKO, STEELE, STARBUCK, GOUDOVITCH 
The Dance Master 
Robert IRWIN 
Dandies 
MM. BERESOFF, KATCHAROFF, SEMENOFF, TOMIN 
Can-Can Dancers 
Katia GELEZNOVA 
Miles. ETHERIDGE, HIGHTOWER, KELEPOVSKA, KORJINSKA, BROWN, 
WILLIAMS, THOMAS, HILL, SCARPOVA, ROUDENKO 


Conductor: Efrem KURTZ 


Cast Subject to Change 


Sponsored by UNIVERSAL ART, INC. 


Julius FLEISCHMANN, int Leonide MASSINE, Artistic Director 
Sergei DENHAM, Vice-President 2 ; 
David LIBIDINS, Administrative Efrem KURTZ, Musical Director 
Director é Jean YAZVINSKY, Regisseur General 
Rene BLUM, Founder and Director, 
Ballets de Monte Carlo Franz ALLERS, Associate Conductor 
Staff for S. HUROK 
NaBriceo WW titers se Ptah eae ese ee Oe AIG Metre ae kates Company Manager 
Seraldt Goode.t: se. ee Ret ee Be ee General Press Representative 
MAUI IVIOLRIS He coe art eet te ee Ps GN: PA Be le Advance Press Representative 
Wigemt FOlMa ten s..¢f 5.8 ok eet Oe se ek at oer ye AS We ae Ca Executive Secretary 
EN = Smithy ss ke ee Fee art Ca a oer Sea Va i I Pak. ee Me Pte Woe 8, Carpenter 
SS ATI GREC Hc ek ed AS an ee eee tee Sieg ae se RR ow 1 ts ge Property Master 
SIGE Ve EAUDD ALG. et Nice em ee age Ree OU Le Ph) ne Nee ax pu Electrician 
NiabelmGarpentet i: 5.8 a ne te ee aay te a en ee Wardrobe Mistress 
enya Diasettie: 8 oO -comt dam Steet ee ome eG wee Wardrobe Master 


Exclusive Management: HUROK ATTRACTIONS, INC. 
30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York City 


The management strictly forbids the taking of any photographs or motion pictures 
inside the theatre without written permission. 


SOUVENIR PROGRAMS FOR SALE IN THE LOBBY 









VAN ESSI'S 


Beh O.-! BEDS IW. -Ageey 


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MARION HUTTON 
in Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade, broadcasts... 


Copyright 1941, Liccett & Myers Tosacco Co. 


ea 





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and for the best of reasons...Chesterfields 
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Chesterfields are made for smokers like 
yourself ...so tune in now for your 1941 
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DECEMBER ATTRACTIONS 


OF THE 


San Francisco Opera Association 
Presented by GAETANO MEROLA, General Director 
s * > ob s 


FIRST TIME IN AMERICA 


BALI inva DANCERS 


eA Whole New World of Dance and Music 
with (MISS) DEVI DJA 


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Recent Sensation of Europe! 








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LIMITED ENGAGEMENT 


GEARY THEATRE. srcestier ti ors: 
DECEMBER 1], at 8:30 
Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10, 55¢—Tax Exempt 


Brilliant Young Russian Pianist 


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Returning after four years’ absence more sensational than ever before! 













PROGRAM 

Two Sonatas, Two Etudes 
C minor, G major.......... conseneneed Scarlatti Pour les Agrements | Debussy 
Phantasie, C major, Op. 17....Schumann Pour les huit doigts 
Toccata, bs Woeaztopistoawansaoudtpstts 

aa One : eis LL Sonetto 104 del Petrarca 
SOO NO SFB CEOS UI red Au bord d’une source Liszt 
Etude, E flat minor, Op. 10 Chobin SAT Eien ae ae 
Etude, F major, Op. 10 [ P Variations on a Theme 
Etude, G flat major,Op.10 | fYOU ye Cal MON oer |. sc cnoscsecs08se Horowitz 





CG p F RA ie @ U S 3 @ JLUESDAY EVENING, 
DECEMBER 12, at 8:30 
Tickets: $2.75, $2.20, $1.65, $1.10—Tax Exempt 


ALL TICKETS AT SHERMAN, CLAY BOX OFFICE 
SUTTER AND KEARNY STREETS TEL. EX Brook 8585 


























THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Mrs. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
. VICE-PRESIDENT 
. VICE-PRESIDENT 
. BUSINESS MANAGER 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY . 
PaUL A. BISSINGER. 
HOWARD K. SKINNER 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 
PauL A. BISSINGER 
DR. HANS BARKAN 

W. H. BERG 

Miss LouISE A. BOYD 


C. O. G. MILLER 

E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

MRS. EDWARD OTIS BARTLETT 
PAUL A. BISSINGER 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 


Mrs. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
Dr. LED ELOESSER 


Mr. C. O. G. MILLER . 
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MR. KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
Mr. R. E. FISHER 

Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 

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Mrs. ASHTON H. POTTER. 
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E. RAYMOND ARMSBY 

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G. STANLEIGH ARNOLD 

MRS. GEORGE WASHINGTON 
BAKER, UR. 

DR. HANS BARKAN 

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ALBERT M. BENDER 

W. H. BERG 

MiSS LOUISE A. BoYyo 

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H. SEWALL BRADLEY 

PAUL A. BISSINGER 

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CHARLES R. BLYTH 

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MRS. JOHN P. COGHLAN 

Mrs. W. W. CROCKER 

Mrs DOD. K. CUSHING 

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JOSEPH H. DYER, UR. 

MRS. FRANK EDOFF 

SIDNEY M. EHXHRMAN 


OFFICERS 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Mrs. SELAH CHAMBERLAIN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Miss LuTice D. GOLDSTEIN 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
Mrs. E. S HELLER 

Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 


PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
CHARLES R. BLYTH 
JOHN A. MCGREGOR 
GERALD G. ROSS. 


. VICE-PRESIDENT 
. TREASURER 
. ASSISTANT SECRETARY 


MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
Guipo J. MusTO 

Miss ELSE SCHILLING 
Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


CHARLES R. BLYTH 

GEORGE T. CAMERON 

Miss LuTIE GOLDSTEIN 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
J. 8. LEVISON 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


CHARLES G. NORRIS 
DR. HANS BARKAN 


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MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
JOHN H. THRELKELD 


Mrs. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
J. EMMETT HAYDEN 


. CHAIRMAN, FINANCE COMMITTEE 


. CHAIRMAN, FINANCE CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE 
CHAIRMAN, MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 


. VICE-CHAIRMAN, 


MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE 


; . CHAIRMAN, SEASON TICKET COMMITTEE 
. VicE- CHAIRMAN, SEASON TICKET COMMITTEE 


. CHAIRMAN, Box COMMITTEE 


CHAIRMAN, YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERTS COMMITTEE 


ALBERT |. ELKUS 

DR. LEO ELOESSER 

MRS. PAUL |. FAGAN 
MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
Mrs. J. C. FLOWERS 
JOHN F. FORBES 

Mrs. J. E. FRENCH 

Miss LuTiceE D. GOLDSTEIN 
JOSEPH D. GRANT 
FARNHAM P. GRIFFITHS 
MRS. WALTER A. HAAS 
MRS. HARRY S. HALEY 

J. EMMET HAYDEN 

Mrs. E. S. HELLER 

Mes. |. W. HELLMAN 
WILLIAM F. HUMPHREY 
Mrs. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
FREDERICK J. KOSTER 
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GAETANO MEROLA 

C. O. G. MILLER 

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Guioo J. Musto 


. CHAIRMAN, SYMPHONY GUILD 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


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MCKINNON 

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MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 

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OTTORINO RONCHI 

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Miss ELSE SCHILLING 

Mrs. M. C. SLOSS 

Mrs. SIGMUND STERN 

MRS. POWERS SYMINGTON 

Mrs. DAVID ARMSTRONG - 
TAYLOR 

JOSEPH S&S. THOMPSON 

JOHN H. THRELKELD 

Mrs. CYRIL TOBIN 

MICHEL WEILL 

LEONARD E. WooD 

LLOYD YODER 





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sd 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


FIRST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


1341st and 1342d Concerts 
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8. 2:30 P. M. 


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9: 8:30 P. M. 


OVER TURE, LEONORE NO: 3, OPUS 72) wBeethoven 


VARIATIONS ON A THEME BY JOSEPH 
EGY VYDINR@) POS: 5 6A chee oe 4 Brahms 


Sa NTS Fl RUNES ODI So crstcerae tiie A eat cic, Ravel 
Prelude to the Night 
Malaguena 
Habanera 


Feria 
INT ERMISSTON 


SY MER AONYaN@O#2: MENT ORO P5243 Sibelius 
Allegretto 
Tempo andante ma rubato 


Vivacissimno — Allegro moderato 











M 





FRIDAY BOX HOLDERS 


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N 


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Mrs. Errol MacBoyle 
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nee 

















eee 





; 





PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


OVERTURE, LEONORE NO. 3....Ludwig Van Beethoven 
(1770-1827) 


The foundation for this famous work was laid 3 years before its com- 
poser was born, when, in his celebrated preface to Alceste, the Chevalier 
Gluck said, among a great many other things, “My idea was that the over- 
ture ought to indicate the subject and prepare the spectators for the 
character of the piece they are about to see.” 

The operatic overture before Gluck is likely to be a symphonic compo- 
sition of some length in several distinct movements, somewhat like the 
concert suite of Bach, but this earlier type of overture has no connection, 
either in mood or material, with the music-drama to come, so that a com- 
poser might frequently use for one opera an overture originally composed 
for another. Gluck ties the overture to the mood of the opera as a W hole, 
and Mozart, going a step further in the overture to Don Giovanni, makes 
an organic connection between overture and opera by quoting material 
from the final scene in the instrumental prelude. 

In all but one of the four overtures to his single opera Beethoven fol- 
lows both Gluck and Mozart. In the overture entitled /idelio the prelude, 
Gluck-fashion, only suggests the atmosphere of the drama, but in the three 
overtures entitled Leonore themes from the Opera proper are employed. 
These quoted themes, however, are not the principal subjects; they are 
merely incidental episodes in the course of sonata-form movements whose 
main themes are not heard again after the curtain rises. It remained for 
Wagner to turn the operatic overture into a symphonic composition based 
entirely on materials from the opera itself. 

When /idelio was first produced at Vienna in 1805 it was preceded by 
the overture now known as Leonore No. 2. The other two Leonores and 
the Fidelio were written for subsequent revivals and revisions. The Leo- 
nores were numbered in the order of their publication, and hence the 
curious perversity that Leonore No. J was actually the last composed. 
Beethoven disliked the title /idelio, which had been invented by his libret- 
tist, Joseph Sonnleitner; he preferred the name Leonore, which was the 
title of the French opera from which Sonnleitner had taken the story, and 
so designated the overtures whenever he could. 





The War Memorial Opera House 1s owned and 


operated by the City and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 
Head sets for the deaf are available in the foyer. At- 


tendant will connect with seat location upon request. 











9 











Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
Mrs 
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10 


aan 

















PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


A study of the relations of the three Leonore overtures would be ex- 
tremely instructive, especially of the relations between No. 2 and No. 3, 
which have the same thematic materials. The way in which No. 2, which 
to anyone else would have been enough, was reshaped into the perfectly 
formed musico-dramatic master piece sate is No. 3 affords an iIncomparably 
illuminating exhibition of the workings of genius. Genius, said Emerson, 
is one-fourth inspiration and three-fourths perspiration. 

Anne McMaster neatly sums up the common attitude toward Leonore 
No. 3? when she says ““T he overture is, to all intents and purposes, a distil- 
lation of the opera, so that the opera tends to be merely a dilution of its 
overture.” Those who heard Fidelio during the recent San Francisco Opera 
season may beg leave to disagree, but let us console ourselves with con- 
currence 1n Miss McMaster’s opinion when no revival of ride fio is in sight. 

The opera concerns itself with the “escaped prisoner’ story which was 
so common in the early 1800's because political imprisonment was so wide- 
spread an evil during those N vapoleonic days. Florestan, a Spanish gentle- 
man, has been unjustly incarcerated by one Don Pizzaro. Florestan’s wife, 
Leonore, disguises herself as a man, and under the name of Fidelio obtains 
employment at the prison in which her husband is held. Hearing that the 
minister of justice is about to inspect the prison, Don Pizzaro resolves to 
kill Florestan forthwith, but his plan is frustrated by Leonore, and all 
ends happily. 

The overture is a large-scale symphonic piece in “first movement” 
form. During the slow introduction one hears a snatch of Florestan’s aria 








ANNOUNCEMENT 


Second Pair of Symphony Concerts 
Friday, December 15, 2:30 Saturday, December 16, 8:30 


IGOR STRAVINSKY 
Guest Conductor 


PROGRAM 


SVM PUOMVeNOwmes iG ma AOr ts Mees atieee oe abe Le Tschaitkowsky 
(First performance in San Francisco) 

The Card Game, Ballet in Three Deals..............; Stravinsky 
(First performance in San Francisco) 

PALO LOULC AN ae Gee ne en ee ee ae ee Stravinsky 


Box Office, Sherman Clay & Co., San Francisco (Exbrook 8585) and 
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PIERRE MONTEUX 


Conductor 





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Civic Auditorium 


Friday night, January 12 


LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI 
Conducting San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra 
C 
Friday night, March | 
VERDIS “REQUIEM” 
Soloists: Verna Osborne, Myrtle Leon- 
ard, George Stinson and Perry Askam, 
with Municipal Chorus, Hans Leschke, 
director, and San Francisco Symphony, 
Monteux, Conductor 


‘Tuesday night, March 12 
LOTTE LEHMAN 
Distinguished Viennese Soprano with 
San Francisco Symphony and Monteux 
@ 

Tuesday night, April 2 
JOHN CHARLES THOMAS 


Baritone, Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany, with San Francisco Symphony 
and Monteux ; 


Tuesday night, April 9 
JOSEF HOFMANN 
World Famous Pianist with San Fran- 
cisco Symphony and Monteux 





Opera House 





BALLET RUSSE DE MONTE CARLO 


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Streets. Phone EX brook 8585. 








4 


PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


at the opening of the second act, and during the course of the development 
one hears the distant call of the trumpeter placed in a tower of the prison 
by Don Pizarro to sound a warning signal when the carriage of the min- 
ister of justice shall be sighted. 


VARIATIONS ON A THEME BY 
JOSERTE RW N Ors chs ee ene ae Johannes Brahms 
(1833-1897) 

“I shall never compose a symphony,” Brahms once wrote to a friend. 
“You cannot imagine how the likes of us feel when we hear the tramp 
of the giant behind us.” 

The giant, of course, was Beethoven, and his seven-league stride did 
prevent Brahms from producing his first symphony until 1876, by which 
time he was 43 years of age and had established himself as a world figure 
by virtue of his chamber music, choral works, songs and piano pieces. 
But in the meantime Brahms made several ventures into the field of 
orchestral composition with works of smaller scope than the symphony, of 
which these variations, composed in 1873, are the most important. They 
are published in two versions. Opus 56B 1s for two pianos, but the orches- 
tral version represents the composer’s original conception. 

Brahms took the theme from an unpublished divertimento for wind 
instruments by Haydn. Haydn gives the tune the highly mysterious title 
Chorale St. Anthony, as if to imply that it is not his own but a traditional 
hymn, either directly quoted or freely adapted. Haydn frequently made 
use of folk melodies of various sorts, but industrious research has so far 
failed to turn up any hymn or folk tune that might have served as the 
original for this chorale. 

Brahms begins with the Chorale St. Anthony orchestrated for wind 
instruments as in Haydn, but with the bass doubled by the lower strings: 





























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PIERRE MONTEUX, A?tistic Director 


Fourth Season Three Concerts 


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PROGRAM NOTES —Comiinwed 


Fight vari iations and a finale follow. The variations are all in B flat 
major, the key of the theme, or in B flat minor. Each variation, like the 
theme, consists of four periods, the first two of ten bars each, and the 
second two each of 19 bars. Sometimes the second and fourth periods are 
literal repetitions of the first and third, as in the theme, and sometimes 
they carry forward ideas stated in the first and third sections. 

“The listener need not try to recognize Haydn’s melody throughout 
Brahms’ variations:” Prof. Tovey sagely remarks, “he will have no Suni 
culty in doing so whenever 3rahms wishes. i... Line~e us nOmmore neédior 
the variations to keep on edie us of the original melodic surface of 
the theme than there is for birds of paradise to remind us of crows because 
the anatomist knows that that 1s what they are.” 

Var. 1. Poco pitt animato, major, 2/4. “Like a bell the solemn last five 
notes’ (the repeated B flats at the end of the theme) “toll from beginning 
to end throughout the first variation,” says Tovey. “This does not mean 
that the real order of events in the theme is altered; it simply shows that 
the surface melody is now completely free to discuss in any order whatever 
topics are suggested by Haydn’s theme or added to it by the variations.” 
Flowing counter-figures weave ornamental patterns about the repeated 
notes. 

Var. 2. Pitt vivace, minor, 2/4. A rather brusque and vigorous working 
out of the implications of the first bar of the theme. 

Var. 3. Con moto, major, 2/4. A fluent, peaceful transformation of the 
theme, with much romantic sighing of the horn in the second part. 

Var. 4. Andante con moto, minor, 3/8. One of the classic examples of 
invertible counterpoint. The first period consists of a further romanticiz- 
ing of the Haydn tune in the soprano, with a running sixteenth-note 
figure below it. In the second period these two elements change places; 
the tune is now in the lower voices and the running figure in the soprano. 
The materials of the third and fourth periods also switch about in the 
same fashion. 

Var. 5. Vivace, major, 6/8. An impetuous, scherzo-like variation, based 
mainly on the inversion of the first bar of the theme. 

Var. 6. Vivace, major, 2/4. Further development of the theme in in- 
verted form, now in a somewhat march-like character. 








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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


Var. 7. Grazioso, major, 6/8. If two weeks from now, you find yourself 
haunted by the dreamy rhythm and melody of a langorous bacarolle, 
this will be it. 

Var. 8. Presto non troppo, minor, 3,4. The theme is transformed into 
a whispering, scurrying ghost. 

Finale. Adante, major, 2/2. Now the music 1s released from the bond- 
age of the 10-and-19-bar formula. The theme is reduced to the following 
subject 





which is repeated many times, without change of key or rhythm, after the 
fashion of a chaconne, with varying harmonies above it. Eventually the 
finale leads to Haydn’s chorale as heard at the beginning, and the work 
ends triumphantly. “Then came a clear brightness,” said old William 
Caxton, “and all the beasts fled away, and St. Anthony understood that in 
that great light our Lord came.” 


SPAUNGIS Teles tadlelenS O) 1) Vice sisi ees eee eee ees eee Maurice Ravel 
(1875-1937) 

To judge from most concert and operatic programs, the music of Spain 
was invented by Georges Bizet in the year 1875, and has remained ever 
since almost the exclusive property of French and Russian composers. ‘The 
Russians like Spanish folk rhythms and modes because, like the folk 
music of some parts of Russia, they are strongly beholden to Arab and 
African sources. The French like Spanish rhythms and devices because 
they are thoroughly exotic. Between them the Rimskys, Debussys, Cha- 
briers and Ravels have succeeded in forming our conception of what 
Spanish music is and should be, and this mutual interest in the art of a 
third country is one of several extremely strong links between the music 
of France and the music of Russia. 

Although he was a classicist at heart, the vein of the exotic was an 
extremely important aspect of Ravel’s nature, so that the list of his works 
is strewn with Greek, Hebrew and Madagascar songs, and a striking quan- 
tity of compositions in Spanish style. His only opera is The Spanish Hour; 
among his piano pieces are the Habanera later orchestrated to form the 
third movement of the work now to be played, and the Alborada del 





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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conobuctor 


Is 


ww 
of q of 
FIRST VIOLINS: "CELLOS: BASSOONS: 
BLINDER, NAOQUM DEHE, WILLEM, SOLO KUBITSCHEK, ERNEST 
CONCERT MASTER REINBERG, HERMAN, SOLO LA HAYE, E. B. 
HEYES, EUGENE BLINDER, Bor!s, SOLO BAKER, MELVILLE 
1ST ASST. CONCERT MASTER KIRS, RUDOLPH Se ANBE AEE 
ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR BEM, STANISLAS ; 
2ND ASST. CONCERT MASTER Bea AU AMES 
WOLSKI, WILLIAM : CONTRA BASSOON: 
3RD ASST. CONCERT MASTER PETTY, WINSTON 
HOUSER. F. S. PASMORE, MARY BAKER, MELVILLE 
PASMORE. MARY ANDERS, DETLEY 
CLAUDIO, FERDINAND HORNS: 
BASSES: 
MORTENSEN, MODESTA LAMBERT, PIERRE 
ANDERSON, THEODORE KUCHYNKA, FRANK TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
bE GRASSI, ANTONIO BAIS aA aN NER tAC cole 
LARAIA. W. F SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
2 Leki 3 ROTH, PAUL 
MENDELEVITCH, RODION ELL, WALTER 
JENSEN, THORSTEIN GUTERSON, AARON . 
Buna MAPACOR SCHIPILLITI, JOHN TRUMPETS: 
DicTeEROW, HAROLD BUENGER, AUGUST KLATZKIN, BENJAMIN «3 
GORDOHN, ROBERT STORCH, A. E. BARTON, LELAND S. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH KRESS, VICTOR 
SECOND VIOLINS: FLUTES: 
TROMBONES: 
HAUG, JULIUS, PRINCIPAL WOEMPNER, HENRY C. 
WEGMAN, WILLEM SHANIS, RALPH F. Gios!, ORLANDO 
GOUGH, WALTER BENKMAN, HERBERT SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
MOULIN, HARRY KLOCK, JOHN 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID PICCOLO: 
LARAIA, ATTILLI 5 
LLIO F BENKMAN, HERBERT TUBA: 
HELGET, HANS 
MURRAY, RALPH 
BARET, BERTHE OBOES: , 
SHAPRDO, DAVID R. 
REMINGTON, MERRILL 
ioe eigel aaa ts SHANIS aA Aide HARPS: 
SPAULDING, MYRON r 
KOBLICK, NATHAN SCHIvoO, LESLIE J. ATTL, KAJETAN 
PATERSON, J. A. SARGEANT, WILLIAM MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
WYKOFF, DAVID 
ENGLISH HORN: 
VIOLAS: SCHivo, LESLIE J. BEAN 
LAREW, WALTER 
FIRESTONE, NATHAN CLARINETS: 
PRINCIPAL ‘se 
VERNEY, ROMAIN SCHMITT, RUDOLPH PERCUSSION: 
RubDD, CHARLES 
A yeaa Bie PoAGALe FRANK VENDT, ARBER 
WEILER, ERICH : SALINGER, M. A. 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN CARR, ALBERT 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC Rupp, CHARLES 
TRIENA, FRANK LIBRARIAN AND 
TOLPEGIN, VICTOR BASS CLARINET: PERSONNEL MANAGER 
KARASIK, MANFRED FRAGALE, FRANK HAUG, JULIUS 
a PS a tt 8 DE SS ee Ee Ee eee 
SS a ann Oe 
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) 

: 

é 
” 


a 


PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


Gracioso, also orchestrated by the composer; no radio program is complete 
without the Vocalise in the Form of a Habanera, no symphonic * ‘pop 
concert complete without the notorious Bolero; Ang it is worth noting 
that Ravel ended his creative career with a song cycle entitled Don 
Quixote to Dulcinea. There are those who would hate us believe that 
Ravel’s Hispanic leanings were due to the circumstance that his mother 
was a Basque and that he was born in the Basque country, and it may 
be so. 

The Spanish Rhapsody, composed in 1907, is one of Ravel’s most per- 
suasive tributes to the land below the Pyrenees. It is a study in musical 
materials of Spanish character harmonized and orchestrated with the 


gleaming, irridescent impressionism of which the composer was a past 


master. The work calls for no particular analysis, and it need scarcely be 
said that Malaguena is the name of a type of dance-song popular about 
Malaga, while Habanera is the name of a similar type of traditional music 
originally imported from Cuba. 


SY MEE ON YEN OZ DIVE OURO) ES) Aon ae Jean Sibelius 
(1865- +) 


Like all the symphonies of Sibelius, there Is no special story to be told 

about hiss work. G basene “program, ’ although conflicting unofficial 
“programs” have been read into it. It 1s sometimes called die Pastoral 

symphony of Sibelius, and it has been used as a major exhibit in the writ- 
ings of that critical school which, when it turns to Sibelius, produces pur- 
ple prose indistinguishable from the pamphlets written by travel agencies 
to boost the Nor th Cape cruise. But the second symphony is neither more 
nor less “pastoral” than the other symphonies or the violin concerto of its 
composer. There is simply a strong vein of folk-like melody in everything 
Sibelius does. 

The second symphony was composed in 1901-2, and was produced in 
the latter year at Helsinki. 

if 

Allegretto, D Major, 6/4 time. The strings begin the movement with 
a strumming, guitar-like figure. The woodwinds bring in the principal 
subject at the ninth measure: 





The principal subject consists of three woodwind phrases, the first two 
answered with an echo in the horns; the last time the echo is elven to 
the clarinets. Then the flutes begin an extended transition passage, dur- 








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PROGRAM NOTES—Continued 


ing the course of which the violins give out the following extremely 
important idea: 








The transition concludes with rising scale passages, crescendo, in the 
plucked strings, leading to the second theme, in the woodwinds: 





An extremely active, twisting figure in eighth notes in the strings leads 
to a climactic restatement of Example 3 and then to a resumption of the 
strumming heard at the beginning of the movement, now combined with 





from the woodwinds. The strumming figure concludes the exposition. 

The development opens with Example 3 in the oboe over a bustling, 
busy accompaniment of the violas. The first part of the development is 
given over, however, to a working out of Example 4, combined with the 
accompaniment idea first stated by the violas. A minor climax 1s attained 
on an idea derived from Example 2. Before pursuing further the com- 
poser’s apparent intention of basing most of the development on the 
secondary figures (Examples 2 and 4), the clarinet makes an attempt to 
recall the second theme (Example 3) over reiterated G sharps of the 
kettledrum, and the ‘celli recall the first theme (Example 1). But these 
efforts are fruitless, and the second part of the development relentlessly 
pursues the fortunes of Example 2 through a gradually attained climax 
wherein Example 3 is glorified, and is continued by new, broad phrases 
derived from Example 2. 

The recapitulation begins with Example | in the woodwinds, as at 
the beginning, but shortly afterward it is combined with a portion of the 
transition section. The crescendo of the plucked strings returns just 
before the restatement of the second theme (Example 3), which is fol- 
lowed, as before, by the twisting, eighth note idea of the strings, and by a 
final statement of Example 3. Example 4 comes back, and the movement 
ends with the guitar-figure with which it had begun. 

I] 

Tempo Andante, ma rubato, D minor, 4/4 time. ‘The first 4() odd bars 
of the movement are devoted to a shadowy idea plucked out by the 
basses and ’celli. This continues when the bassoons bring in the principal 
subject, in octaves: 











This theme gradually spreads through the orchestra, there are continuing 
phrases, the tempo grows faster and the emotional temperature markedly 
warmer. Toward the end of this section the violins and woodwinds have 
an important new figure: 


20) 


cF 


a 








4 


cP 


a 


PROGRAM NOT ES—Continued 














The first section of the movement then ends with long-held chords sud- 
denly diminishing from fff to ppp. 

The second section of the movement is in F sharp major, and is marked 
Andante sostenuto. It is begun by the violins 




















and during the course of the working out appears the figure 





with which the second section ends. 

The first section is now recapitulated, but in markedly varied guise. In 
place of the plucked ‘celli and basses one hears a triplet accompaniment 
of the violins and violas, stated for only a bar and half before Example 5 
is resumed, by a solo trumpet. Again the atmosphere grows warmer, and 
Example 6, when it comes back, is subjected to development. Once again 
the section ends with long chords, suddenly diminishing in volume. 

The Andante sostenuto section is reheard, also in altered form and key, 
Example 7 being given to the clarinet, and Example 8 to the violins. 
Both are developed at length, with broad, full orchestration. Example 9 
begins the coda, played by the bass instruments under a furious, rapid 
heure of the violins and violas. But the movement ends with a remi- 
niscence of Example 5, with which it had begun. 


IT] 


Vivacissimo, B flat major, 6/8 time. A freely handled scherzo, begun 
busily by the strings. The headlong flight of the scherzo proper ends in a 
series of pauses broken by repeated B flats of the kettledrum. The trio 
that follows is marked Lento e suave. It is in 12/4 time, and is based on the 
lollowing oboe melody: 





After the trio the scherzo is repeated in somewhat varied form. ‘The trio 
Is also repeated, and leads, through a passage of gathering weight and 
sonority, without pause to 


IV 


Allegro moderato, D major, 3/2 time. The triumphant principal sub- 
ject 1s first stated somewhat fragmentarily, although with the fullest 


PA 


— 











| 
i 
| 
| 





PROGRAM NOT ES—Continued 


OF 


possible sonority. It is not until its restatement at the 25th bar that the 


subject 1S entirely revealed: 








The transition grows quieter, and the folk-like second theme appears in 
the woodwinds, after several false starts: 


























The sonority gradually increases, and the trumpets and bassoons have an 
important idea: 











The brief development is based largely on Example 13 and the first three 
notes of Example 11, although there are occasional hints of Example 12. 
The development works up to a big climax, whereupon there ensues an 
extremely triumphant recapitulation. Examples 11 and 12 are reheard 
with the utmost brilliance and power, the rehearing of Example 12 being 
particularly extended and sonorous. Example 13 ante the rec ‘apitulation, 
in orthodox fashion, and in the coda Example 11 receives its final 
apotheosis. 


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Mae. STRAVINSKY was born in 1882 near Si i 
. . . ye 

Petersburg, where his father was a leading ; 

Nae basso in the Imperial] Opera. He obtained his ; 
formal training in music under Rimsky-Kor- j 

sakov, and made his debut as a composer with ; 

e > a a 

a symphony presented in the Russian capital : 

; 


in 1908. I0wo years later Stravinsky was com- 
missioned by Serge de Diaghilev to write a 
ballet for the latter’s famous Russian ballet 
company, and the success of this first effort, 
The Fire Bird, \ed to a close collaboration be- 
tween the two which ended only with Diaghi- 
lev’s death in 1929. For Diaghilev Stravinsky 


whit, same — 
OTOH tis Rad eS Splits silage, 


See ie aoe wrote, beside The Fire Bird, the ballets Pe- 
IGOR STRAVINSKY | ees | 
trouchka (1911), The Rite of Spring (1912), ; 
Pulcinella, on themes by Pergolesi, (1920), and The Village Wedding é 
(1922). Diaghilev also produced Stravinsky's operas, The Nightingale - 


(1914, Renard (1917) , and Mavra (1922), and a choreographic version of 
The Nightingale (1920). Beside the “Diaghilev” works just mentioned, 
also to his credit the following ballets: The Story of 4 
(1928), The Fairy's Kiss, on 
and The Card Game 


Stravinsky has 
Soldier (1918), Apollo, Ruler of the Muses 
themes by Tschaikowsky (1928); Persephone (1934) 
(1936). 
Although the 
ereatest amount of atte 
concertos for piano and for violin, piano piece 
has made two previous appearances in San F 


ballet is the form to which Stravinsky has devoted the 


ntion, he has also written much chamber and or- 
chestral music, s, choral 
music and songs. He 
On February 13, 1935, he gave a recital at the Opera House with the vio 
linist, Samuel Dushkin, presenting his Duo Concertant for violin and 
ulcinella and The Fairy’s Kiss, and short extracts 
‘ightingale. On March 23, 1937, 
yrus and the San 


-aNncisco. 


piano, suites based on P 
from The Fire Bird, Petrouchka and The N 
at the Civic Auditorium, he conducted the Municipal Ch« 
ymphony of the Psalms, which, next 


Francisco Symphon y Orchestra in his S) 
is his most important contribution 


to the “opera-oratorio, © Oedipus Rex, 
to the choral literature. 

Mr. Stravinsky was r 
of Poetics at Harvard. 


28 


ecently appointed Charles Eliot Norton Professor 





THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


MRS. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 
. VICE-PRESIDENT 


E. RAYMOND ARMSBY . 


OFFICERS 


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y: HOWARD K. SKINNER . . BUSINESS MANAGER GERALD G. ROSS. . . ASSISTANT SECRETARY 
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ere — Sabie iri, 3 ane erg : i 


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“i 


San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
1343rd and 1344th Concerts 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15, 2:30 P. M. 


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16, 8:30 P. M. 
a 


IGOR STRAVINSKY 


Guest Conductor 


SYMPHONY NO. 2, 
CENERNO Res@ Paiste taro he ess ee Tschaikowsky 
Andante sostenuto—Allegro vivo 
Andantino marziale 
Scherzo: Allegro molto vivace 
Moderato assai—Allegro vivo 
First performance in San Francisco 


Ne AR Mees US OLN 


THE CARD GAME, 


BALE EE UN SE EUR E Reb BAlgog. 2 etc Stravinsky 


First Deal: 
Introduction—Pas d’action—Dance of the Joker 
—Little Waltz. 


Second Deal: 
Introduction—March—Variations of the Four 
Queens—Variation of the Jack of Hearts and 
Coda—March—Ensemble Dance. 

Third Deal: 
Introduction — Waltz-Minuet — Presto (Battle 
of the Spades and Hearts) —Final Dance (Tri- 
umph of the Hearts). 

(Played without pause) . 





First performance in San Francisco 


SU LEE ROVEPEAPROU GHA. 2... es Stravinsky 


The Exhibition of Hocus-Pocus—Russian Dance— 
Petrouchka’s Cell— 
The Fair Toward Evening 


(Played without pause) . 


At the piano: DOUGLAS THOMPSON 





3] 








ee Canes, > 


G 


M 


a2 


FRIDAY BOX HOLDERS 


Mrs. Pierre Monteux 
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Mrs. George W. Baker, Jr. 
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N 


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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SYMPHONY NO. 


CMINOGREORUSH 2) 2 shelerainticheTschavnowsian 
(1840-1893) 

Tschaikowsky wrote his second symphony in the summer of 1872, and 
it was first perfor med in Moscow early in the following year. Seven years 
later he completely revised the work. At that time he wrote to his “Beloved 
Friend,’”’ Mme. von Meck, “How I thank the fates that caused Bessel to fail 
in his contract and never print this score! How much seven years can mean 
when a man is striving for progress in his work! Is it possible that seven 
years hence I shall look upon what I write today as I look now at my 
music written in 1872? I know it is possible, because perfection, the ideal, 
is boundless, and in seven years I shall not yet be old.” 

The revised version was played for the first time in Moscow in 1881. 
Tschaikowsky’s biographers are fond of pointing out that none of the 
critics of the Moscow newspapers observed that the work had been changed 
in the eight years since they had previously heard it. The biographers are 
also ‘eid of quoting extensive passages from the writings of these same 
critics when they happen to be favorable toward Teschiaikcouy sky. 

Before turning to an outline of the symphony it is worth pointing out 
that Stravinsky Wace: in his autobiography among his earliest musical 
recollections the experience of hearing Tschaikowsky conduct the first 
performance of his Pathetic symphony in 1893, when the future composer 
of Petrouchka was 11 years old. “I think that the beginning of my con- 
scious life as artist and musician dates from this time,’”” Stravinsky con- 
cludes. In more recent years Stravinsky has been one of ‘Tschaikowsky’s 
strongest champions. In 1928 he produced a ballet, The Fairy’s Kiss, 
“inspired by the muse of ‘Tschaikowsky,”’ and quoting a number of themes 
from works of Peter Ilyitch. Although the autobiography does not spe- 
cifically say so, one can perceive Stravinsky s admiration for the older 
composer stemming from his increasing emphasis upon classical design, 
as opposed to the ideal of free forms and the use of folk motifs emphasized 
by the school of Rimsky-Korsakov and Moussorgsky under the influence 
of which Stravinsky began his career. In other words, Stravinsky sees 
Tschaikowsky as the great 19th century Russian classicist, and the fore- 
runner of his own most recent tendencies. 








The War Memorial Opera House is owned and 
operated by the City and County of San Francisco 


through the Board of ‘Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Head sets for the deaf are available in the foyer. At- 


tendant will connect with seat location upon request. 








33 











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Q 
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