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FTHE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY > PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
HOWARD K. SKINNER + BUSINESS MANAGER 


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“In the eyes 
of the law’ 


Your Will, to you, may be a very personal matter, 
close to your heart. 


But “in the eyes of the law” a Will is a formal, 
legal document, subject to strict legal interpretation. 


Knowing this, a prudent man goes with his 

plans and purposes to his attorney so his Will 

can be drawn in legal terms; and thereafter reviews 
it periodically with his attorney to keep 

its provisions up to date. 


By taking these simple precautions, he safeguards 
the interests of those he is most anxious 
to protect. 


An officer of our Trust Department will be glad to 


advise with you and your attorney. 


AeReisek.  O.E PAR Ne EIN o. 


Wells Fargo 
Bank & UNION TRUST CO. 


SAN FRANCISCO : 20 


Market at Montgomery + Market at Grant Ave. 
Established 1852 


Member F. D.1I.C. 








Xe MUSIC-LOVING 
FRIEND = 2 
Musical bift Onder 


FROM 


* SHERMAN, CLAY * 





Save Tune... 


Save Effort. . . 


and give something they’ll love— 
good at all 8 of our stores 


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San Francisco—Kearny and Sutter Streets, 2539 Mission Street, 
near 21st. In Oakland—(after Jan. 2, 1945) Broadway at 
Hobart. San Jose—80O South First Street. Sacramento—1 2th 
and K Streets. Fresno—1127 Fulton Street. Also Seattle and 
Portland. 


Sherman |; 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 3 


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Musical Assoctation of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E- Raymond -Armsby--...---.---------... Vice-President Charles Page... Bet Aare Treasurer 
Paul AvcBissingétc = =. x a Vice-President Howard: (Kk. Skinner =e ee Secretary 
Charles: -R-] Blyth. 3 es eee Vice-President Geraid-.G!-Ross..23.2 2S Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II-_-.....-.. _.........Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE x6 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Cc. O. G. Miller, Chairman 
E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 
PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 
Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mis. John P:-Coghlan:...........-....._.---_- Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill.................----- Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Deile 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Mrs. George W. Baker, Jr. Albert I. Elkus Mrs. Il. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Dr. Hans Barkan Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Humphrey Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Forrest Engelthart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Ottorino Ronchi 
James B. Black Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Gaetano Merola Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher C.0O.G. Miller Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mortimer Fleishhacker Robert W. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron ~ Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidg2 Miss Lutie D. Goldstein » Guido J. Musto Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, II Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell Leonard E. Wood 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. 
ADMINISTRATION 
Gerald Ross Curran Swint Virginia Webb Deborah Spalding 


Constance Alexander 
TICKET SALES 


Victor Mohl Joesph Scafidi Kathleen Lawlor Doris Lowell 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA > 





Miss Ruby Asquith, Ballerina... S. F. Ballet Company 


427 Post Street e . 
(In the St. Francis Hotel) é, 


YU kon 2061 


MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





PNG Ry Riesb de 


Cro 
is Musical Association of San Francisco warmly 


thanks the many friends whose encouragement and 
Support denotes a deep personal interest in the welfare 
of the orchestra. Our program today commemorates 


their never-failing cooperation and devotion. 


Back the bt War Loan 








IN APPRECIATION 

Cre 
The Musical Association of San Francisco desires to express its grati- 
tude to Radio Station KPO for the weekly “Know Your Symphony” program 
with Mrs. M. C. Sloss as commentator, and to Radio Station KOW for mak- 
ing available time immediately preceding the Sunday noon broadcasts of 
the New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra for the presentation of 
the San Francisco Symphony News, each of which outlines the activities of 

the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 7 




















Your WILL cannot 


bequeath “good judgment” 


By intelligent management you have built up 
your Estate. Your Will sets up the Plan you 
want your Executor to follow. 


If you appoint an indzwidual as Executor and 
Trustee, will his judgment in handling your 
estate match your judgment in creating it? And 
will he remain always in good enough health, 
and be free enough from his own personal affairs 
to. give your Plan his best attention! 


On the other hand, by appointing this Bank 
as Executor and Trustee you are definitely as- 
sured specialized experience, group Judgment 
and careful attention throughout the life of your 
estate. Our continuing staff of seasoned estate 
managers can and do faithfully follow both the 
letter and the spirit of your Plan. 


Get details from any officer of this Bank. 


Head Office: 400 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Mission Branch: 16TH & JuLtian AVENUE 


BUY U. S. WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 


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194-4 
Neat LON AL ASSOCIATION OUR 
Founded in 1864. EIGHTIETH 
ANNIVERSARY 
SAN FRANCISCO : PORTLAND + SEATTLE » TACOMA YEAR 





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MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 




















SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


-<@}- 


FIRST PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1|, AT 2:15 


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2, AT 8:30 


-<{@>- 
“Program 
VALE AR TE Sa 58 CRE CO ey Si GS Os NEI RY SE dan eng aes Tarek Weber 
NIG IVGARN AIR EACDLOINS2 OPUS. 36.5552 6 oe ee Elgar 
Theme— 

War wk Gon: Vareou vane 

Vai ee De SP: Var. 9: Nimrod 

Wain ls Var. 10: Intermezzo: Dorabella 

Var. 4: W.M.B. Wate len Galeenss 

AVE Veo htg tn) Raed Oty) Neca Varnle a: GN 

Var. 6: Ysobel Var, 13: Romanza: = ** 

Vata el Lovte Var, 4) Finale. U. 

Poa SrORALERAN Db ARAN IEE LU AG. uo ee Creston 
(FIRST PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
INTERMISSION 
SYMPHONY IN C IVIE AST OR er oe rd serene pre eee ae Schubert 


Andante — Allegro ma non troppo 
Andante con moto 
Scherzo: Allegro vivace 


Allegro vivace 











SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIFRRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


~<@}- 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS | 


Friday, December 15, at 2:15 
Saturday, December 16, at 8:30 





} 
ALL-RUSSIAN PROGRAM 
Francesca da Rimini, Symphonic Fantasy............. Tschaikowsky 
SEM TLOULY eo NOt iter eke tei oe pains le, ant atest deve e cee Kalinnikoff 
SeMtem DAM OlIC Gam. se. ces lenge moiad Se wes Spr NS. en nee eS Prokofieff 
(Orchestrated by Harold Byrnes. First Performance in San Francisco) 
SwGOHOWY INOe Or 2a) keane eu es een eee Shostakovitch 
*<@>-> 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Thursday, December 21, at 8:30 
Saturday, December 23, at 8:30 


JASCHA HEIFETZ, Guest Artist 


Symphony. No. 2, Im A MIMOr. v1. See See ee ea Saint-Saens 
Boenre. tor Violin ang -Orchestiay mam: sae ee slo Chausson 
@oncerto. foc Violin Jand tOrchest( arse te Geet Louis Gruenberg 


(First Performance in San Francisco) 


Don J GEG acetates Mae ee A Sm hg mR Lic Nyyiee tp) Uv Ra RCM ER Se Strauss 


ee $000 
10 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


ON RotOI RES OCR Odi CANE ee Karl Maria von Weber 
: (1786-1826) 

Euryanthe was composed in 1823 in an unsuccessful effort to repeat the tri- 
umph Weber had won in Vienna with his lreischutz of 1821. ‘The libretto, 
based on a medieval French romance, was by Wilhelmina von Chezy, and is 
outlined as follows by Felix Borowski: 

“The story, naively medieval, concerned the beauteous Euryanthe, who, be- 
trothed to Count Adolar, is beset with innumerable dangers because she is 
loved vainly by the villainous Lysiart, Count of Forest and Beaujolais, who, 
aided by Eglantine de Puiset, a perfidious friend, endeavors to effect her down- 
fall. ‘The plot contained ghosts, poisons, tombs and other paraphernalia of 
legendary opera, and excitement was given to one of the acts by the appearance 
in it of a serpent which would have slain Euryanthe’s lover if, happily, she had 
not intervened. 

“This species of drama,’ Borowski continues, “was not in itself likely to 
antagonize a public which listened with rapture to operas that were crowded 
with spectres, vampires, goblins, devils and other supernatural phenomena, 
and whose principal illumination was red fire. What was a serious impediment 
to eventual success was Frau von Chezy’s collaboration. That poetess had 
written the ‘book’ of Rosamunde for Schubert, and the prompt failure of this 
composition had largely been due to the futility of her text. Weber must have 
had misgivings as to the dramatic and literary quality of Frau von Chezy’s 
Euryanthe, for he was finally constrained to make many changes in it. Nor were 
his personal relations with the eccentric authoress altogether happy. That lady 
was accustomed to descend upon the composer and his wife at all hours, and 
particularly at inconvenient ones, her loud voice and extraordinary attire 
evoking scarcely suppressed titters from visitors who might happen to be present. 
‘Weber,’ wrote the composer’s son, ‘often felt inclined to turn the Chez, as he 
called this thing in petticoats, which was neither man nor woman, out of the 


rbd 


house’. 


‘The opera was a failure, but its overture has survived. The overture is com- 
posed ef melodies from the music-drama itself. During the course of the mysteri- 
ous Largo episode “Weber had the intention of disclosing a picture on the stage 
of Emma’s tomb, with Euryanthe kneeling in prayer at the coffin of the suicide, 
and with the appearance of the dead woman’s ghost to add a touch of eerie 
horror to the scene.” 


PAN Go VV OA ILA TONS to tine Aue eae. Sir Edward Elgar 
(1857-1934) 

Although this work has been known as the Enigma Variations for so long 
that to list it in any other way would be actually misleading, the title on the 
score is Variations on an Original Theme, and the word “Enigma” appears 
in the printed music only as a special designation for the theme, and the theme 
alone. In other words, a popular misconception to the contrary notwithstand- 
Ing, the enigma has nothing whatever to do with the variations, even though 
they were wrapped up in a picturesque mystery for 35 years; the enigma has to 
do solely and entirely with the melody upon which the variations are based. 

“The enigma,” said Sir Edward, “I will not explain — its ‘dark saying’ 
must be left unguessed, and I warn you that the apparent connection between 
the variations and the theme is often of the slightest texture; further, through 
and over the whole set another and larger theme ‘goes’ but is not played... 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 11 








; Es Lone Ai es 


vee 
... CONDUCTS WHENEVER YOU WISH! 


Choose Pierre Monteux’s next concert yourself. The distinguished 
conductor of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra has recorded 
a number of colorful performances on Victor Red Seal Records. 
Among them are works by D’Indy, Rimsky-Korsakov, Franck, 
Delibes and other masters. All are superb examples of the rare 
insight, the magnificent sweep of Monteux’s direction. See the 
Victor catalog for titlkes—many of your favorite selections are 


sure to be included. Listen to “The Music America Loves Best” 


every Sunday, 1:30 p.m., Station KPO. 
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THE WORLD‘S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE ON 


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—~— 

















So the principal theme never appears, even as in some late dramas, e.g., Maeter- 
linck’s L’Intruse and Les sept princesses — the chief character is never on the 
stage.” 

This is itself a “dark saying,” and one of an emphatically dusky hue. It has 
been interpreted by the soothsayers to mean that Sir Edward’s theme was created 
as a counterpoint to another melody, but Elgar never indicated what that other 
melody was. Many theories regarding its identity have been propounded, and 
the tune most frequently selected is Auld Lang Syne, but Elgar himself spe- 
cifically stated that “Auld Lang Syne won't do.” 

Nevertheless the famous Scottish tune is a good guess. The work is dedicated 
“To my friends pictured within,” and each variation except the thirteenth 
is distinguished in the score with the initials or the private Elgarian nickname 
of a member of the Elgar circle as it existed in Malvern, Worcestershire, where 
the variations were composed in 1899. Each variation is, according to the com- 
poser’s own statement, a “sketch of the idiosyncrasies” of the friend involved, 
but Elgar refused to identify the people behind the variations, and their names 
were not made public property until after his death. Elgar’s reticence on this 
head was not due to any desire to make an “enigma” out of the initials and nick- 
names; he simply felt that “this is a personal matter and need not have been 





Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 
a a Ee ee ee 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 
Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 13 





RESERVE 
Rlenctech Vihusht 








mentioned publicly. The variations should stand simply as a piece of music.” 


“His music is full, as his life was, of the treasuring up and chortling over 
little oddities and. appropriatenesses of word, action or event: this playful 
allusiveness was to him the salt of life.” So says A. H. Fox-Strangways, who 
knew Elgar well. To listen for these chortlings alone in the Enigma Variations 
is to miss their music, but not to listen for them at all is to overlook another 
value of the work. Consequently, we append some notes on “the friends pic- 
| tured within” derived from various books and articles on Elgar. ‘The authorities 
are in full agreement about the names of all the people involved except the 
heroine of Variation 13, but they are by no means in complete agreement about 
the “idiosyncrasies” sketched in the music. 


* * * * 


































| Theme: Andante, G minor, 4/4 time. The theme occupies the first 17 bars: 
h—p+—_t- fg =a 
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sempre Pp Px cs vin. 1, rit op dim 
ee eee ae eee ee ee a 
eae 2 =o +h Spi Oa 
ond. < ise IG BV anf ; / © 
a - rf Je — = ws * ee, ia,.—— 
wn Stan eae Bhlarg 
and leads without pause to 
; MARK HOPKINS x 
direct from New York’s 
eu Waldorf Astoria and the 
a Palmer House in Chicago 
o 
} : 
and his orchestra 


featuring lovely 
JUNE HOWARD 


in beautiful 


GEO. D. SMITH, 
General Manager 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 15 








Mosnteil’s great perfume 


and its subdued satellites... 














Var. 1: GALE. (L’istesso tempo, likewise listesso key and time.) Caroline 
Alice Elgar was the composer’s wife. 

Var. 2: H.D.S.-P. (Allegro, G minor 3/8.) H. D. Stuart-Powell was a pianist 
who used to play trios with Elgar and B.G.N. of Variation 12. The opening 
measures reflect the pianistic didoes with which Stuart-Powell was accustomed 
to warming up his fingers. 

Var. 3: R.B.T. (Allegretto, G major, 3/8.) Richard Baxter Townshend 
was an amateur actor who had a way of playing tricks with his voice, as witness 
the falsetto of the upper woodwinds and the deep rumble of the bassoons. 

Var, 4: W.M.B. (Allegro di molto, G minor, 3/4.) William M. Baker, a 
country squire, was extremely positive and fiery in argument. This is the 
shortest of the variations. 

Var. 9: R.P.A. (Moderato, GC minor, 12/8.) Richard P. Arnold,.son of 
Matthew Arnold, a man of various and changeable moods. This variation goes 
on without pause to 

Var. 6: YsoBEL. (Andantino, C major, 3/2.) Isabel Fitton played the viola 
in the Malvern quartet parties, and the variation therefore emphasizes that 
instrument. The leap of a tenth in the theme as heard at the beginning and 
end is said to refer to the fact that Miss Fitton was unusually tall. 

Var. 7: Troytr. (Presto, C major 4/4.) Arthur Troyte Griffith was the 
architect who built Elgar’s house at Malvern. According to some authorities 
“the solid, vigorous, structural character of the music” is a description of 
Griffith's profession. According to others the variation is to be interpreted in 
exactly the opposite way. Griffith was a tempestuous and excitable person given 
to saying unexpected things, and this, according to some, is what Elear here 
hits off. 

Var. 5: W.N. (Allegretto, G major, 6/8.) Miss Winifred Norbury was “a 
patrician lady of the older generation who lived in a charming 18th century 


OAKLAND’S 
Christmas 
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where there’s 
everything for 
the home 


Jackson 

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Company 


tlh and Clay 
Oakland, Calif. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 17 












THE MUSIC 
EPOVERKS 
SOCIETY 


Margaret Tilly - Founder 











TENTH SEASON 
MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 15 
MONDAY EVENING, MARCH 5 
MONDAY EVENING, APRIL 16 


CENTURY CLUB 


SUTTER AND FRANKLIN 


MARGAR- Edie lellele yrs ce ta renee Piano 
FRANCES WIENER .... . Violin 
BEIGIENeEMIMGRIEE IE 2 Viola 
HERMAN REINBERG ... . ‘Cello 


Guest Artists 
CLARAMAE TURNER . . Contralto 
RUDOLPH SCHMITT .. . Clarinet 
HUBERT SORENSON .... . Violin 
ROBERT E. SCHMIDT... .—.-Bass 
FRANK FRAGALE . . Bass Clarinet 


JANUARY 15 
Mozart — Toch — Beethoven 


. a rousing, expressive performance .. . extraordinarily successful 
season. —_-ALEXANDER FRIED, S. F. Examiner 
. magnificent performance . . . far too infrequent concerts. .. . 


—_-ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN, S. F. Chronicle 


chamber music is seldom played with such beauty, accuracy, and 
finesse . . . the Society ends its ninth season with colors flying. 
—MARJORY FISHER, S. F. News 


- fine chamber music concerts . . . excellent performances all. 


—MARIE HICKS DAVIDSON, S. F. Call-Bulletin 


_ that spirit of adventure, which has made the Society unique and 
valuable in the cornmunity. ... —ASHLEY PETTIS, The Argonaut 


SUBSGREPMION: LIGKEMS=-_ 3 “2 iss $6.00 and $3.00 — Tax Included 

From MRS. NATHAN FIRESTONE, Secretary .. . . 3494 - 21st Street 

SINGLE ADMISSIONS $1.25 and $2.00 — Opera Box Office, Normandy 
Lane, City of Paris 


18 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 























house in the country outside Worcester.” ‘This delicate variation leads without 
pause to 

Var. 9: Nrmrop. (Moderato, E flat major, 3/4.) Nimrod is the “mighty 
hunter” of the Book of Genesis: August Jaeger (Jaeger is the German word 
for hunter) was one of Elgar’s publishers and editor of The Musical Times. 
The variation is said to recall an evening when Jaeger waxed eloquent in 
praise of Beethoven’s slow movements. ‘The music is in a broad Beethovenian 
vein, and Elgar has been quoted as saying it was designed after the second 
movement of the Sonate Pathétique. 

Var. 10: Dorasetia. (Intermezzo: Allegretto, G major 3/4.) Dora Penny 
was an old friend of the Elgars. She stuttered. So does the music. 

Via L1G, Reo: (Allegro di molto, G minor, 2/2.) Here the authorities 
differ most absurdly. George Robertson Sinclair was organist of Hereford 
Cathedral. Certain writers claim the variation describes him furiously at work 
in his organ-loft with manuals and pedals flying, but others say the music has 
nothing to do with Dr. Sinclair at all; they insist it is a picture of his par- 
ticularly lively bulldog, and some have found in the variation a passage wherein 
the dog shakes water off his coat after a swim. 

Var. 12: B.G.N. (Andante, G minor, 4/4.) Basil G. Nevinson played the 
‘cello in the Elgar circle, and this episode brings the ‘cello to the fore. Without 
pause to 

Var. 13: *** (Romanza: Moderato, G major, 3/4.) According to some, the 
dark lady of Elgar’s asterisks was called Lady Mary Lygon, according to others 
Lady Mary Trefusis. No one knows s why Elgar left out her initials. At all events 
Lady Mary was, at the time of the composition of this work, on her way to 
Australia, and consequently part of the variation consists of a quotation from 
Mendelssohn’s Calm Sea and Prosperous Voyage over an accompaniment in 


MYRA GHITIS 


PIANIST 


in Recital 


Wednesday Evening, December 6th 


AT 8:30 


Italian Room, St. Francis Hotel 


“One of San Francisco’s most gifted young pianists . . . Has astonishingly brilliant clear 
technique. (Chronicle) 


“Has the invaluable talent of making her performances sharply interesting . . . Handles 
the keyboard with dashing force .. . (Examiner ) 


“Extraordinary clarity of finger work .. . Played with masculine strength ... tone of 
tremendous power and brilliance ... Young pianist well worth hearing. (News) 


“Impressed her listeners with ean fal ardor, excellent technique . ef 
“Brought rare beauty to lyrical passages . . . Maturity of musical understanding and mastery 
of her instrument.” (Argonaut ) 


Tickets $1.20, $1.80—Tax Included 
Opera Box Office, Normandy Lane, City of Paris—-EX brook 8585 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 19 

















‘or the finest music 0 | 
Cae: tuned to KP fi 


} on your dial 








Stradivari Orchestra > Richard Crooks 
Sun. at 9:30 a. m. Mon. at 5:30 p. m. 
John Charles Thomas os Contented Program 
Sun. at 11:30 a. m. Men. at 7:0C p. m. 
Music America Loves Best Telephone Hour 
Sun. at 1:30 p. m. Men. at 9:00 p. m. 
General Motors Symphony % Light and Mellow 
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20 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








which “the soft tremor of the drums suggests the distant throb of the engines 
Ol awIner a 

Von k OnW a rinale:s-Allieoro,. G amajor 94/4.) lhe initials refer: to 7a 
nickname by which Elgar himself was known at Malvern, but the nickname 
itself has not been revealed. This movement is bigger and more complex than 
any of the others, and Elgar originally intended not to number it among the 
variations but to set it apart with the designation Finale; that, however, would 
have left thirteen variations, and Sir Edward was not the first person or the 
last in human history to be prejudiced against that number. 

Concerning this section, Elgar wrote to his biographer, Basil Maine, as 
follows: : 

“Finale: bold and vigorous in general style. Written at a time when friends 
were dubious and generally discouraging as to the composer’s musical future; 
this variation is mainly to show what ‘E.D.U.’ (a paraphrase of a fond name) 
intended to do. References made to the first variation (C.A.E.) and the ninth 
(Nimrod) , two great influences on the life and art of the composer as entirely 
fitting to the intention of the piece. ‘The whole of the work is summed up in 
the triumphal, broad presentation of the theme in the major. 


PASEO RATE HaeAdNID eA ROAING): Hab Awe ou 8 Paul Creston 
(1906-) 
Mr. Creston provides the following information: | | 
“This work is similar in idea, aie not in form or content, to the composer's 
Prelude and Dance, in that it is a composition in two movements: the first of 
a preludic character and the second in a dance rhythm or form. 

“The Pastorale is based on a rhythmic figure presented by clarinets-and 
bassoons in the first measure, on which are superimposed, during the move- 
ment, various aspects of a single theme first announced by peace flutes in 
parallel triads. No new themes are introduced at any time, and the movement 
is really a continuous development of this single idea. 









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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


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“The Tarantella is in large ternary (ABA) form, with a short introduction. 
The ‘A’ section is built on a ten measure ground bass first played by.contra- 
basses alone, on which are piled themes and instrumental colors; developing to 
a presentation of it chordally in the brass choir, and finally, rhythmically in 
the timpani alone. A bridge passage leads to the ‘B’ section, light in character, 
in contrast to the dramatic quality of the first section. The repetition of the 
‘A’ section is slightly shortened, and the piece is brought to a vigorous con- 
clusion. 


“Among the theories of the origin of the Tarantella are: (1) that the dance 
movements were caused by the bite of the tarantula; and (2) that the move- 
ments were a means of eliminating the poison injected by this type of spider. 
In either case, it is certain that the dance must have been a violent one 
...and this is the conception the composer has adhered to in the four specimens 
of this dance he has written to date. ‘The present day social form of the tarantella 
is, in direct contrast to the original, a gay and light dance of marathonic length, 
usually becoming a test of endurance between dancers and musicians. 


“Pastorale and Tarantella was first performed by the NBC Symphony Or- 
chestra under Dean Dixon, January 27, 1942.” 

‘To the above the present editor would like to add, as a third theory for 
the origin of the word “‘tarantella,” that it may be derived from the name of the 
town of Taranto in southern Italy. More dances have been named after the 
places where they originated than after any other thing, as witness the classic 
siciliano, polonaise, allemande, bergamasca and fiorentina and such latter-day 
manifestations as the waltz Boston, Charleston, Chicago drag and Harlem hop. 

Mr. Creston was born in New York and studied piano and organ there. 
He is self-taught in composition. He has twice been awarded Guggenheim 
fellowships and has won many prizes, including a grant from the American 
Academy of Arts and Letters and the 1943 award of the New York Music 
Critics’ Circle, given for his first symphony. Mr. Creston has composed much 


¢ 


BEFORE THE Sysnfphony 


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Dancing afterwards in the Rose Room to 
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EDMOND A. RIEDER, General Manager 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 23 









Mech ING Gil Papel ee Cee Nine Rale5 


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oe .. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


LEXANDER 
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in many forms. He was first represented on the programs of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra last year, when André Kostelanetz presented his Frontters. 
Mr. Creston is organist of St. Malachy’s Church in New York and is on the 
staff of the Blue Network. 


SG LVICEELG)IN. Yoo LN cay Vac NU COIN ors a ieere sae ewan hos. Franz Schubert 
(1797-1828) 


The numbering and sequence of Schubert’s last symphonies has long been 
a matter of the wildest confusion. ‘The work played on this occasion bears the 
number 7 on the printed score; various authorities, however, call it Schubert’s 
eighth symphony, while on the labels of a recent recording it is called the 
ninth, and in the program books of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra and 
elsewhere it always numbered tenth. But the subject is not so dense and dark 
as some of the literature would make it appear, and although it is not par- 
ticularly important, it may be of interest to straighten it out. 

Schubert died in great poverty and obscurity leaving a vast number of 
manuscripts in the possession of his brother, Ferdinand. Among these manu- 
scripts were seven completed symphonies. The first six of these were works 
of Schubert’s youth and were composed between 1813 and 1818; the last is 
the great C major of the present program, written in 1828, the last year of the 
composer's life. 

Ferdinand Schubert dedicated himself to making his brother’s work known. 
What he lacked in means and influence he made up in intelligence and energy, 
and his efforts were successful. In 1838 he gave the manuscript of the C major 
symphony to Robert Schumann, who was instrumental in having it performed 
for the first time under Mendelssohn’s direction in Leipzig in 1839. It was 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 25 





published in 1850 as Schubert’s seventh symphony, since at that time only 
the seven completed symphonies of Ferdinand Schubert’s collection were known 
to exist. 

In 1865 the Unfinished symphony in B minor came to light, having lain 
unknown for 43 years in Anselm Hiittenbrenner’s garret in Graz. This work 
was promptly dubbed Number Eight, even though it had been composed in 
1822, six years before the C major. (Fortunately for everybody, Schubert always 
dated his manuscripts.) ‘Three years later, in 1868, another incomplete sym- 
phony by Schubert came to the attention of the world at large. This is a hazy 
sketch for a work in four movements in the key of E major; Schubert appar- 
ently dashed it off in a few hours in the summer of 1821 and never returned 
to it. This manuscript had belonged to Ferdinand Schubert, too, but he had 
regarded it only as a useless fragment, since, unlike the B minor Unfinished, 
it contained no completed movements. 

Ferdinand Schubert gave the incomplete symphony in E to Felix Mendels- 
sohn, who bequeathed it to his brother, Paul. In 1868 Paul Mendelssohn pre- 
sented the manuscript to Sir George Grove, who was much interested in it and 
was responsible for having it completed by John Francis Barnett. The Barnett 
version was played in London in 1883. Felix Weingartner made another 
reconstruction in 1928, and this was published in 1934, but the work has 
probably not been performed in this country in either edition. Since it dates 
from 1821, it may obviously be regarded as Schubert’s real seventh symphony. 

Grove believed that between the B minor Unfinished of 1822 (which 
was correctly numbered eighth, if for incorrect reasons) and the big C major 
of 1828, Schubert had written another symphony, presumably composed during 
an excursion to Gastein in the Tyrol in 1825. This would then be the ninth 
symphony and the big C major would be the tenth. But the manuscript of 
the symphony composed at Gastein has never been found, and some authori- 
ties doubt if it ever existed. On the other hand, one school of critics holds 
that Schubert's Grand Duo for piano four hands, Opus 140, may be an arrange- 
ment of the lost Gastein symphony; this has been orchestrated by Joseph 
Joachim, and the reasons for regarding the duo as a transcribed symphony 
are set forth in Sir Donald Francis ‘Tovey’s notes on the Joachim version in 
his Essays in Musical Analysis. 

A list of Schubert’s symphonies numbered according to Grove will clarify 
the foregoing: 


No: 1—D major, 1815: 

No. 2—B flat major, 1815. 

No. 3—D major, 1815. 

No. 4—C minor (Tragic), 1816. 

No. 5—B flat major, 1816. 

No. 6—C major, 1818. 

No. 7—E major, incomplete sketch, 1821. 

No. 8—B minor (Unfinished), 1822. 

No. 9—C major (Gastein), 1825. (Manuscript lost, if it ever existed.) 

No. 10—C major, 1828. 

Now it is obvious that a fragment like the E major sketch, which contains 
no movements playable without very extensive and highly conjectural restora- 
tions, need not be numbered among Schubert’s symphonies at all, and it is 
even more obvious that the Gastein, which no one has ever seen and which 
may have existed only in Sir George’s imagination, has even less reason to 
be included in the list. If, however, one agrees with Grove, Schubert’s last 
symphony is No. 10. If one agrees with Grove in part, accepts the E major 
and throws out the Gastein, the final symphony becomes No. 9. If one totally 
disagrees and rejects both dubious works, the last symphony then becomes 


26 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 














No. 8. ‘he only positively incorrect number is 7, the one by which the sym- 
phony is most widely known. 
I 


Andante, G major, 4/4 time. ‘The symphony opens with a very extensive 
introduction, beginning softly in the unaccompanied horns: 





(Through the editor’s error, Example 1 is given here as it appears in the 
score, instead of an octave lower, where it actually sounds.) ‘The strings have 
an answering phrase not quoted. The bulk of the introduction is based upon 
Example 1 worked out with marked contrasts of sonority. ‘Toward the end 
the bouncing fourths in the first measures of Example 2 are foreshadowed, 
but not at the interval of a fourth. The introduction ends with a crescendo 
leading to the main movement. 

Allegro ma non troppo, C major, alla breve. The principal theme is pre- 
sented by the strings in octaves interrupted by little triplet interludes of the 
woodwinds here given in small notes: 


4, 
0 gar. 3 3 3 


+ @ Lg Ws 

Se = ie er es pt 
rs sralassoomt | _ orne ee ; 
bassa- 



























Motif B and the woodwind triplets are worked over by way of transition to 
the second theme, which appears in the oboes and bassoons in E minor: 





and this is also subjected to considerable treatment. The closing section starts 
with a new version of Example | deep in the trombones, beginning in A flat 
minor, under continuing suggestions of Example 3: 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 27 











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28 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





This leads through a short crescendo to a new theme in the full orchestra 
wherein Schubert finally and triumphantly reaches the orthodox G major: 























ee 
‘ ae e 


(the brusque cut-off in the last bar is, of course, taken from Example 3.) 
The exposition ends immediately after Example 5 with brief suggestions of 
Motif A from Example 2, in G major. 


The development begins with a sudden Mozartian dive into A flat major. 
At its beginning it 1s concerned with Example 3 and with Motifs A and B 
from Example 2 treated in counterpoint against each other. Example 4 is 
added later in a big, full-throated form, but the development ends with a quiet 
passage wherein a figure derived from the second and third bars of Example 4 
is played by the lower strings and bassoons and is answered by a descending 
figure in the solo woodwinds, while the violins recall the woodwind triplets 
of Example 2. Bouncing octaves of the horn in the rhythm of Motif A herald 
the recapitulation. 


The first theme, Example 2, returns in the original key and form and leads 
through a modified restatement of the transitional material to the second 
theme, Example 3, now in the oboes and clarinets in C minor. Example 4 
comes back in the trombones starting in D flat minor, and leads to Example 
5 in C. There is a big coda based principally upon Motif B and the woodwind 
triplets, but at the very end the music returns to Example | in the full orchestra. 








WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


First Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 


years — has resigned in order to devote his time exclusively to 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 29 





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II 
Andante con moto, A minor, 2/4 time. The first theme is stated by the 


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y which begins in the strings: 





Bscanm_oanw 





ater the oboe adds a continuing phrase: 


[esa oes | call exe | 








a modified restatement of the opening measures of 


d by a subsidiar 













The second section of the movement has a new theme in F major, begun 


by the second violins after a formal introduction in the horns: 





= 
- 
— ) 
o ; 
‘@) i 
au: = ( a : 9 
{ & S » ~;, Vv apis HH be) mA 
al 6) \ Shae ee, 7, ae 5) 
Ne P : as » WRG 28S fs ee 
ws S ( Bes rae «ae m & & 
5s 2 tN eg Ge) ions sue 
4 D v ( roe Oss Sy slate 
sans 2 2 ? ae once gs S se s 
De fal) ~ FA wy ~ 
=i 2 \ eo“g yp fag Sas = 
ii ic ¥ ( ce ep ele Bo GD a 
ne > si ? asian 0 ¢ Bh. Shas 5 
a8 a eal = = »» SF GO Varono See! GS = 
WS : : ( ee daa 2 Ee a eS 
Ji as 10 ? Bee om Ses > 
tw Sere e ahead \ 006 
8 ~ _— VA ? Se Sh Za 
Con m— i. { — — U 
Slane eZ ene \ as . 2 
et beat a eR Gyan > N aL 
tS : by = ee == aah \ QO. 
CU = ~ = A = SN ee Ee ER aS OS RSS ZA 2 
hy Ex] (ae tx] = OE ee DL > 
L L ‘“ Y) 





se. 


as 


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‘This is also worked over at length. 

The key returns to A minor and the first portion of the movement (Ex- 
amples 6, 7 and 8) are restated, 6 and 7 having a new decorative counterpoint 
when first heard. Example 8 is subjected to an entirely new development 
which reaches a devastating climax followed by a pause, whereupon the ’celli 
sing a modified version of Example 6. 

Now, without benefit of formal introduction, the second section of the 
movement is reheard, but in A major and with Example 9 in the woodwinds, 
the strings having fresh ornamental material against it. Example 9 is again 
developed. ‘The coda goes back to A minor and Examples 6 and 7. 


III 
Allegro vivace, C major, 34 time. A scherzo in sonata term. The principal 
theme is stated at the outset: 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 33 








The second theme, in G major, appears in the first violins in the 30th bar: 











7 == a 7 ee ! 


ee: Oe a ae tn 

My date sa ‘ft SE 

This concludes the first section of the movement, which is then repeated. 
The second section is devoted to the development and recapitulation of these 
elements.’ Once again the development begins with a sudden shift into A flat, 
and Example 10 is treated. Very shortly, however, the woodwinds bring in a 
new tune starting in G flat: 





and shortly after that, Motif A from Example 11 is given prominent treatment. 
The recapitulation, rather modified, opens with Example 10 in the oboes in 
C, followed in due course by 11 in the same key, and there is a brief coda. 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 35 











lime soANeERANG SCOeBALEEn GUILD 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


36 





The trio goes into A major and is introduced by repeated E’s of the horns. 
The trio theme is given to the woodwinds. We quote the oboe parts: 


4) 
{; s cboes 














This is worked over in the customary two repeated sections. The reiterated E's 
return to provide the link to the restatement of the scherzo proper. ‘This entire 
section (Examples 10, 11 and 12, exposition, development and recapitulation) 
are heard once more at the end of the movement. 


IV 
Allegro vivace, G major, 2/4 time. ‘The finale begins with a fanfare-like 
introduction. The first four bars: 





set up a pair of rhythmic patterns which are heard incessantly throughout 
the entire movement; there is scarcely a single bar in the finale which does not 
employ the rhythm of the dotted eighth and sixteenth or that of the triplet. 

The fanfare leads to the first theme, given to the oboes and bassoons at 
the 37th bar, with the triplets twisting about it in the violins: 





THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC 
SYMPHONY 


conducted by 
ARTUR RODZINSKI 


SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3rd 


John Brownlee and 
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Eugene Istomin will be 
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Dr. Artur Rodzinski K a. W 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 37 











This is worked over, along with material from the opening fanfare. 

The music quiets down and eventually pauses completely for the grand 
entry of the second theme, given to the oboes in G major, but preceded by 
four repeated D’s of the horn: 






(Notice the insistent triplets of the violin accompaniment in both the original 
statement of Example 16 and its repetition.) Example 16 is worked over, with 
the triplets and dotted figure omnipresent, and a great, striding, seven-league- 
boots motif is added in the bass as the music reaches a climax. The exposition 
ends with the subsistence of this climax, and the music shades down into E 
Hat with a descending tremolo of the ’celli as the development begins. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 39 








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MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MRS. STANHOPE NIXON 
MR. AND MRS. NION R. TUCKER 


MRS. DUNN DUTTON 
MRS. WALTER HOBART 
MRS. FREDERICK HUSSEY 
MRS. KENYON JOYCE 
MRS. SAMUEL KNIGHT 
MRS. RICHARD McCREERY 


P 


MRS. WALTER D. HELLER 
MRS. MORRIS MEYERFELD 
MRS. RICHARD SHAINWALD 
MRS. GEORGE OPPEN 


RS. FRANK P. DEERING 
MRS. JAMES L. FLOOD 
MRS. BENJAMIN C. KEATOR 
MRS. HENRY S. KIERSTED 
MRS. HARRY B. LITTLE 
MRS. HAROLD R. McKINNON 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 


DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 


MRS. FRANCIS S. BAER 

MISS JENNIE BLAIR 

MRS. ELDRED BOLAND 

MRS. GEORGE M. BOWLES 
MRS. GEORGES S. DeLATOUR 
MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 

MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR 


MRS. OTTO BARKAN 
MRS. L. A. BENOIST 
M!SS MARILYN BENTLEY 
MRS. WALTER BENTLEY 
MRS. FOSTER NEWHALL 
MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
MRS. BRUCE SELFRIDGE 
MRS. MELVILLE L. SMITH 


MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 
*k*U.S. ARMY HOSPITALS 


MRS. HENRY BOYEN 

MRS. ARTHUR B. CAHILL 
COUNTESS LILLIAN DANDINI| 
MRS. JOHN L. FLYNN 

MRS. PETER B. KYNE 

MRS. JAMES F. McNULTY 
MRS. A. J. MOORE 

MRS. THEODORE WORES 


DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
MRS. ANGUS McDONALD 

DR. HANS VON GELDERN 

MRS. HENRY H. WEHRHANE 


MRS. C. W. CROSSE 
MRS. DUNCAN CURRY, JR. 
MikS. JOSEPH W. FOWLER 
MRS. RALPH HENKLE 

MRS. DANIEL C. HUNT 
MRS. F. W. WILLETT 

MRS. EDWARD C. WURSTER 


MRS. FRANK BUCK 

MRS. RALPH K. DAVIES 
MRS. J. LINDSAY HANNA 
MRS. JAMES LEVENSALER 
MRS. DOUGLAS McBRYDE 
MISS OLGA MEYER 

MRS. FRANK SOMERS 


*** Transportation Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 
with the cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








The development opens with a theme in the woodwind that is curiously 
reminiscent of Beethoven’s ninth symphony: 


} my AG fod tee bey) 
C0. Cal & = <2. 
























fl obce St P a le 
i . ne aes ks ad a 
Pe teh 




















rT aad Se 





—- : 
Clar - 0b TE 





(This theme is first suggested a little earlier, at the end of the exposition, 
but the above is the most striking instance of its use.) 

Several pages of the score are devoted to Example 17, followed by treatment 
of Example 16 and especially its four repeated notes. At the end of the develop- 
ment the opening fanfare of the movement is insistently suggested through a 
eradual crescendo. 

The fanfare finally bursts forth in the unexpected key of E flat major to 
start the recapitulation. Example 15 returns in the oboes as before, and again 
Example 16 is reached through a climax, subsistence and pause. ‘This time 
Example 16 is in C, and is ushered in by repeated E’s of the horn. It is worked 
over again, along with the striding subsidiary previously mentioned, and again 
reaches a climax. Example 16 also provides material of the coda, along with the 
omnipresent fanfare figures of Example 14. 


INE CALIFORNIA 2 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AL: 








42 





It Stands Alone 


KORBEL BRUT IS TOPS IN AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE 


Magazines which reach the most sophisticated audience in the United States 
unanimously give first place in American Champagnes to KORBEL BRUT 
WE didn’t say it first! THEY DID! 


“THE BEST AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE 
to date is KORBEL BRUT. Our guess is 
anyone would think it was imported.” 
—Harper’s Bazaar, February, 1941. 


“PROBABLY THE MOST CHAM- 
PAGNE-LIKE domestic wine is KOR- 
BEL BRUT.’’—Cue Magazine, Decem- 
ber 20, 1940. 


“THE OUTSTANDING AMERICAN 
CHAMPAGNE to date is KORBEL 
BRUT.’’— Town and Country, Febru- 
ary, 1941. 


“EXTREMELY ENJOYABLE, bone-dry 
and clean-tasting.’"—The New Yorker, 
March 15, 1941. 


“AMONG THE FEW FINE CALIFOR- 
NIA CHAMPAGNES IS KORBEL BRUT 
—a special cuvee which has been made 
as dry as the dryest Champagnes for 
the English market.’’— St. Regis, Pea- 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


; 
ay 
5 

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So that San Franciscans may become better acquainted 
with the organization and activities of their Musical Associa- 
tion, Station K PO has for several years presented in a special 
Saturday program, entitled “Know Your Symphony,” Mrs. 


M. C. Sloss, member of the Board of Governors and the Ex- 
Sloss’ informal and informative programs frequently feature 


with visiting artists and conductors and other music 


authorities. 


interviews with Director Monteux and orchestra members, 
Recommended for lovers of fine music are the twin pro- 
erams, “Standard Hour” and “Standard School Broadcast,” 
aired from K PO over the NBC Pacific Coast network Sunday 
evenings from 8:30 to 9:30 and ‘Thursday mornings from 
10:00 to 10:30. Coinciding with the Symphony Orchestra’s 
thirty-third season, “Standard Hour” is presenting Pierre 
Monteux and sixty-odd members of his orchestra in an eight- 
week series of concerts, devoted each week to the works of a 
different world-renowned composer. Scheduled for the De- 
cember 3rd concert are four works of Cesar Franck, for De- 
cember 10th, works of ‘Tschaikowsky. The ‘Standard 
School” orchestra, under the direction of Carl Kalash, broad- 


ecutive Committee. Broadcast weekly at 5:00 p. m., Mrs. 
casts a series of educational programs listened to by thou- 
; sands of grade, high school and college students throughout 


the west. 


Arturo ‘Toscanini and the NBC Symphony Orchestra 
are currently being featured in a nine-week Beethoven Festi- 
val on the General Motors Hour, heard over K PO Sundays 
from 2:00 to 3:00 p.m. Program December 3rd will include 


the Symphony No. 2 and the Septet in E Flat Major. 


Seg uo a ee ee 
ee a ey wie eee te: 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 43 


7 
% 
q 





DAYS 
PIANO 


the choice of 
Today's Great Artists 





GREAT 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO 
AS THE ARTISTS DO 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin 
in its Concerts. 


MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU HAROLD BAUER 


CECILLE DE HORVATH 
SEVERIN EISENBERGER 
ALEXANDER KELBERINE 
WESEEY PAV (OB 2ET TE 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
IRMA SCHENUIT HALL 
FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 
MAGDA TAGLIAFERO 
JOSEPH BATTISTA 
JEANNE BEHREND 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
WALTER GIESEKING 
EUGENE GOOSSENS 
BORIS GOLSCHMANN 
FLORENCE EASTON 
DANIEL ERICOURT 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
BREENDAN KEENAN 
ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
WIKTOR LABUNSKI 
ALFRED MIROVITCH 
CHARLES NAEGELE 
LOUIS PERSINGER 

E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
BERNARDO SEGALL 
ROSINA LHEVINNE 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
RUTH SLENCYNSKI 
ALEC TEMPLETON 


ANTON BILOTTI 
LUCREZIA BORI 
BELA BARTOK 
MARIO CHAMLEE 
KARIN DAYAS 
JOSE ECHANIZ 
DAVID EARLE 
FRANK FARREL 
JAKOB GIMPEL 
RUDA FIRKUSNY 
ARNOLD GABOR 
WILLIAM HARMS 
STEPHAN HERO 
AMPARO ITURBI 
JOSE ITURBI 
RALPH LEOPOLD 
JUSS! BUOERLING 
JOSEF LHEVINNE 
ERICA MORINI 
EDITH MASON 
GRACE MOORE 
WILLEM NOSKE 
LILY PONS 
ROSA RAISA 
ANGEL REYES 
GIACOMO RIMINI 
TITO SCHIPA 
JOHANN SINGER 
CEO SMT 
JOSEPH SZIGET! 
LEONARD SHURE 
HELEN TRAUBEL 
SAMUEL YAFFE 


MOISSAYE BOGUSLAWSKI! 


Haldiurin 


SE SEER Le Ronee 
SAN FRANCISCO 


44 


1828 WEBSTER ST. 
DOAKLAND 





BY APPOINTMENT 











Champagnes of the highest quality 


GH. Mumm &( 


Ca SOCIETE VINICOLE DE CHAMPAGNE.SUCCESSEUR 















NOW-—with the liberation 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


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Si e Musical Association 
of San Francisco, maintaining and operating 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, still 
requires $25,000.00 to complete the 1944- 
1945 season, and this is where you who are 
really deeply interested in the welfare of our 
city’s most beautiful music come forward 
with gifts of money to help in balancing the 


budget. 


The budget has been kept out of the red just 
because we have all of you who are vitally 
and courageously interested in the welfare of 


the sym Pp ho ny to assist US. 


Our campaign for needed funds for the or- 
chestra is now under way and we hope and 
rely on your making possible a successful 
: season by your contribution, large or small, 


LOs 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA a 








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46 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





ATA Ory 


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MILLS COLLEGE 


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MR. AND MRS. J. D. ZELLERBACH 


MR. AND MRS. VALLEJO GANTNER 
DR. AND MRS. NELSON HOWARD 
COLONEL A. E. HOWSE 

MRS. ROBERT SCARBOROUGH 


DR. AND MRS. HAROLD K. FABER 
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DR. AND MRS. B. H. PAGE 


COMMANDER AND MRS. WM. LISTER ROGERS 


Mr. AND MRS. JOHN ROSEKRANS 


ALPHA DELTA PHI 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 











There's a Fine art in bread 
making, too. Every OROWEAT 


loaf is a masterpiece. 


The GRIST-MILL BAKERS 


OROWEAT 


REPERTOIRE 
Presented by the Savoy Opera Company 


MIKADO ow Nk 


Make Your Reservations Now 


Evenings at 8:30 SATURDAY MATINEE 2:30 
Next Production—‘PIRATES OF PENZANCE” 


. Star Cast 4x Finest Singing Company 
ACCLAIMED BY CRITICS 


“A performance which most meticulous Savoyards could find little to blame— 
A group of principals with voices that please and diction that does justice to 
Gilbert’s lyrics and oral patter—plus a small chorus and orchestra made the 
performance sparkle—I don’t know where one can go in the city to spend a 
more enjoyable evening.’—Claude LaBelle, 8. F. News. 
“Good craftsmanly show. Rapport between audience and cast comprises enter- 
tainment of a pleasant and waim sort.”—Robert Liles, S. F. Chronicle. 
“Hilarious revival—lots of fun—magnificent, rich voices.” 

—Alexander Fried, S. F. Examiner. 

* 


RESERVATIONS TAKEN NOW «+ OPERA BOX OFFICE, CITY OF PARIS 
EXbrook 8585, or at Theatre — BUSH STREET MUSIC HALL 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 49 





PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
FORD, LouIsS W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
D!I BIANGA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENG 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PIERRE MONTEU®X, Conbuctor 


"'GELLOS: 


BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 


REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 

BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 


BASSES: 

KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 

SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
ScCHIPILLIT!, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSIN!, JOSEPH 


FEUTES: 
RENZ!I, PAUL UR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 
REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE Jd. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScHivo, LESLIE J. 
OBOE D’AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 
SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
RIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
RIBBINS, F. C. 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 
HAUG, JULIUS 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIPSLAY, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, JR. 


TRUMPETS: 
BuUBB, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND S&S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Giosi, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SINAI, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELWOOD 


PIANO AND CELESTA: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


STAGE MANAGER: 
J. T. HEAVEY 


ns 


20 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY - PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
HOWARD, KK. SKENNERS «) BUSINESS, MANAGER 





WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
cond Pair ° All Russian Program ; December 15-16, 1944 





“In the eyes 
of the law’ 


Your Will, to you, may be a very personal matter, 
close to your heart. 


But “in the eyes of the law” a Will is a formal, 
legal document, subject to strict legal interpretation. 


Knowing this, a prudent man goes with his 

plans and purposes to his attorney so his Will 

can be drawn zz legal terms; and thereafter reviews 
it periodically with his attorney to keep 

its provisions up to date. 

By taking these simple precautions, he safeguards 
the interests of those he is most anxious 

to protect. 


An officer of our Trust Department will be glad to 


advise with you and your attorney. 


DeRICS ie DLP Ack IVP meta: 


Wells Fargo 
Bank & UNION TRUST CO. 


SAN FRANCISCO : 20 


Market at Montgomery + Market at Grant Ave. 
Established 1852 


Member F. D.I.C. 








a 
NUSIC-LOVING 


FRIEND * * * 
Musical Cif Oder 


FROM 


* SHERMAN, CLAY * 








Save Tune... 


Save Effort... 


and give something they’Il love— 
good at all 8 of our stores 


LL ~~ 


San Francisco—Kearny and Sutter Streets, 2539 Mission Street, 
near 21st. In Oakland—(after Jan. 2, 1945) Broadway at 
Hobart. San Jose—80 South First Street. Sacramento—1 2th 
and K Streets. Fresno—1127 Fulton Street. Also Seattle and 
Portland 


Sherman) 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 71 











¥ 

















Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E. Raymond Armsby....................... Vice-President Charles, Page! ste ee Treasurer 
Paul A. Bissinger.....................: _......Vice-President Howard K. Skinner... cet ed See hee Secretary 
Charles'R.  Blythin. 3.32 Vice-President Geraid G. Ross............__.. eee Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II...................... Vice-President 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Miss Louise A. Boyd 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 


EXECUTIVE 


Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Joseph D. Grant 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas 


COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland 


Garret McEnerney, II 
Kenneth Monteagle 
Guido J. Musto 


Miss Else Schilling 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 


Mrs. John P. Coghlan 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. 0. G. Miller, Chairman 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Mrs. Tobin Clark 
Dr. Leo Eloesser 


Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


E. Raymond Armsb 
Y Mrs. William Lister Rogers 


Charles R. Blyth 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 


J. Emmet Hayden 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Charles G. Norris 


Mrs. George T. Cameron 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 


Mrs. John B. Knox 
Mrs. James Mills 
Mrs. Francis Redewill 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Michel Weill 


YOUNG PEOPLE’‘S CONCERT OFFICERS 


Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mis; UOnM LPs GOON ans eee ee Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill...................... Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman 


John Piel 


Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett 


Marcia Robinson 


E. Raymond Armsby 


Pamela Marsh 

Elwyn Thaver 

Betty Carl 
BOARD OF 
Mrs. George Ebright 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman 


Dr. Hans Barkan 

Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett 
James B. Black 

Charles R. Blyth 

Miss Louise A. Boyd 
Paul A. Bissinger 
George T. Cameron 

Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing 

Mrs. Georges de Latour 
Benjamin H. Dibblee 
Miss Katharine Donohoe 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. 


Gerald Ross 
Constance Alexander 


Victor Mohl 


Albert I. Elkus 

Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Forrest Engelhart 

Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Mrs. Paul |. Fagan 
Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Mrs. J. C. Flowers 

John F. Forbes 

Mrs. Frank R. Girard 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Joseph D. Grant 
Farnham P. Griffiths 
Madeleine Haas 


Mrs. Walter Haas 
Mrs. Harry S. Haley 
J. Emmet Hayden 


Ava Jean Barber 


Frank Winter 


Katherine Mulkey 


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THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


73 

















“There's an immortality in the expression of the 
finer human moods... These moods sincerely 
expressed in a portrait can mean so much to the 

a person towards whom that feeling Is directed.” 


Ylicleolc.. ot erdlen 


Yucteolea Jor 


_ MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER: oe 


8 427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEL) » YUKON 2061 












AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT 
Cro 


The Musical Association of San Francisco expresses its deep appreciation to 
those patriotic citizens who purchased $1,025,000 of War Bonds to attend 
the Sixth War Loan Concert played on December 7th for the San Francisco 
War Finance Committee, U. S. Treasury Department, by the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra under the leadership of Pierre Monteux, with John 


Charles Thomas and Larry Adler as guest soloists. 
—LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY. 


Back the 6th War Loan 


IN APPRECIATION 
Cre 


The Musical Association of San Francisco desires to express its grati- 
tude to Radio Station KPO for the weekly ‘’Know Your Symphony” program 
with Mrs. M. C. Sloss as commentator, and to Radio Station KOW for mak- 
ing available time immediately preceding the Sunday noon broadcasts of 
the New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra for the presentation of 
the San Francisco Symphony News, each of which outlines the activities of 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








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Thirty-third Season 
1944. 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


-i@p>- 


SECOND PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15, aT 2:15 


SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16, AT 8:30 


RUSSIAN PROGRAM 


~4@}- 


“Program 


SYMPHONIC FANTASIA 
PIRSA OS CIE SG: IDIAN TRIO BUNGE Je Tschaikowsky 


Se VEE TIO IN YEN @ileslNsG IVilIN @ Resear eeea, e Kalinnikoff 
Allegro moderato 
Andante commodamente 
Allegro non troppo 
Allegro moderato 


INTERMISSION 
SOT BO OU © Wiese eee ete 5 aN i Prokofieff 


(Nos. 1, 2 AND 4 ORCHESTRATED BY HAROLD ByRNs) 
Suggestion Diabolique 
Despair Alla Folia 
Scherzo Humoristique, for four bassoons 
March 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
SAME EOINGYAIN sage nomen Ss ae ee ke Uae Shostakovitch 
Largo 
Allegro 
Presto 


(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 


CL 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA a7 








SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-<@}- 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Thursday, December 21, at 8:30 
Saturday, December 23, at 8:30 


JASCHA HEIFETZ, Guest Artist 


Dy MP MOMy NOs ide MOM Ole ete cake ie ae af eet meee ee ne Saint-Saens 
Pocmne, 10k Violinsand-Onenestrar «brent se ee ee Chausson 
Goncerto for Violin and sOrchestral: aot ee). ee Louis Gruenberg 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 
Deathranc nash oun OD tre nate sila ees he ee ene oh Sirauss 
<@} 


FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, January 12, at 2:15 
Saturday, January 13, at 8:30 


EFREM KURTZ, Guest Conductor 
LEONARD PENNARIO, Soloist 


SULCEZ TOTO thine OUCHESTE A. & ade Aine sore OP tates te Reece ya Corelli 
Symphonic Metamorphoses on Themes by Weber....... Hindemith 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 

Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 2, in C Minor. ..Rachmaninoff 
SIM PAOMYsNOsmOw dine bel EnnOi (CROCHE LIC. aun ke ee ee Tscharkowsky 

*4@}>- 


“STANDARD HOUR” BROADCAST 
KPO, NBC Pacific Coast Network 
Sunday, December 17, at 8:30 
MAXIM SCHAPIRO, Soloist 
ALL BEETHOVEN PROGRAM 
Prometheus Suite 
Concerto No. 1, First Movement 
MR. SCHAPIRO 


Symphony No. 7 





pli ahi baat APE eel ee nw 2 ek SAE tee St Sap 
78 SAN FRANCISCO 











PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


FANTASIA, FRANCESCA 
DAGHRETIVISEIN Tie cesta ete ee wae oy Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky 
(1840-1893) 


T’schaikowsky’s attention was first directed to the historic love-tale of 
Paolo and Francesca late in 1875, when a libretto for an opera on this sub- 
ject was presented for his consideration by a Russian poet named Zvantsev. 
The composer seriously considered setting this text, but the project fell 
through for two reasons—first, because Zvantsevy was an ardent Wagnerite, 
and insisted that his book be treated in Wagnerian fashion, and second because 
T’schaikowsky fell under the spell of Bizet’s Carmen, and resolved to write his 
next Opera on a contemporary subject. But the Paolo and Francesca theme 
lingered on in Vschaikowsky’s imagination, and resulted in the creation of this 
orchestral piece in the summer of 1876. It is rather curious, in view of the 
Zvantsev episode, to find Tschaikowsky writing in 1878, ‘“Cui’s remark that I 
wrote it (rancesca da Rimini) under the influence of the Nibelungen is very 
true; I recognized this myself when I was writing. If I’m,not mistaken, this 
influence is seen especially in the introduction. Isn’t it strange that I let an 
artistic work I really didn’t care for influence me?” 


The story of the tragic love-affair of Francesca da Rimini and her husband’s 
brother, Paolo Malatesta, has been told by countless authors. ‘Tschaikowsky 
turned to Dante’s version, and the score bears a quotation from the /nferno, 
here subjoined in the translation by Henry Francis Cary: 


“Dante, coming into the second circle of Hell, witnesses the punishment of 
carnal sinners, who are tossed about ceaselessly in the dark air by furious winds. 
Among these he meets with Francesca of Rimini, who relates her Story: 


“No greater grief than to remember days 
Ot joy, when misery is at hand. That kens 
Thy learn’d instructor. Yet so eagerly 
If thou art bent to know the primal root 
From whence our love gat being, I will do 
As one who weeps and tells his tale. One day 
For our delight we read of Lancelot, 
How love him thrall’d. Alone we were and no 
Suspicion near us. Oft-times by that reading 
Our eyes were drawn together, and the hue 
Fled from our alter’d cheek. But at one point 
Alone we fell. When of that smile we read, 
The wished-for smile so rapturously kissed 
By one so deep in love, then he, who ne’er 
From me shall separate, at once my lips 
All trembling kiss’d. The book and writer both 
Were love's purveyors. In its leaves that day 
We read no more.’ Thus while one spirit spake, 
The other wailed so sorely that, heart-struck, 
I, through compassion fainting, seem’d not far 
From death, and like a corse fell to the ground.” 


T’schaikowsky’s fantasia opens with an extended passage describing the 
entry of Dante and Virgil into the second circle of hell.and the “furious winds” 
which buffet the souls of the damned. A second section, with clarinet solo over 
plucked strings, is apparently intended to suggest Francesca’s narrative. This is 
developed at length, but the work ends with the material with which it began. 


(Program Notes Continued on Page 83) 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 79 











Co levrve onteux 


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Choose Pierre Monteux’s next concert yourself. The distinguished 
conductor of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra has recorded 
a number of colorful performances on Victor Red Seal Records. 
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PIERRE MONTEUX 


This year Pierre Monteux opens his tenth season as conductor of the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra. During the summer and fall Mr. Monteux made 
triumphant appearances as guest conductor of the New York Philharmonic 
Symphony Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at Ravinia Park and as 
conductor of the Montreal Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra on its initial tour 
of Eastern Canada. 


CRITICAL COMMENT 


OLIN DOWNES, New York ‘Times ... Mr. Monteux’s interpretaticns of the works of Brahms 
and Beethoven were the most musicianly and stirring performances of those scores that the 
present writer has heard from any conductor in a considerable number of years in this city. 
This interpreter, whose authority was so obvious, knew not only the letter but the living tradi- 
tion of that music. And this from a Frenchman born, whose artistic predilections might reason- 
ably be supposed to lie in other directions than German symphonism. It is very much hoped 
that he will return in another season. He has again proved his exceptional powers as a musician 
and conductor, and this with the simplicity and absorption in his task which always character- 
ized him. 


VIRGIL ‘THOMSON, New York Herald-Tribune . . . Pierre Monteux’s two-week visit as 
guest conductor of the Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra . .. has led music lovers of all 
schools, the critical press included, to two conclusions: namely, that this conductor has drawn 
from our orchestra more beautiful sounds and more beautiful mixtures of sound than any 
other conductor has done in many years, and that his readings of Brahms are very refreshing. 
He has made the Philharmonic play with real beauty of tone, many kinds of it, and with per- 
fecting balance and blending ... to sound, in short, like an orchestra, a real, first-class 
orchestra requiring no apology. 

HENRY SIMON, P.M... . Mr. Monteux repeated the impression he had made in previous 
concerts last evening .. . to wit, the Fast would have been wise never to have permitted this 
conductor to leave us and make his permanent home so far away as San Francisco. 


HENRY MARX, New York correspondent, Chicago Music News... As a guest conductor, Mr. 
Monteux is much too good for any one’s comfort. A musician of his insight and dexterity right- 
fully belongs in New York. 


CLAUDIA CASSIDY, Chicago Sunday Tribune ... I agree with you absolutely, Mr. Marx. 
with one slight alteration. You have the right man but the wrong place. Rightfully, Monteux 
belongs in Chicago. San Francisco knows what it has and treats him accordingly. 


ALBERT GOLDBERG, Chicago Tribune . . . Comparisons may be odious and repetitions 
monotonous, but in spite of good intentions, one’s memory flew back to an unforgettable evening 
at Ravinia last summer, when the Chicago Symphony played Schumann’s First Symphony under 
the direction of a selfless, unassuming little Frenchman by the name of Pierre Monteux, and 
things happened to the symphony and to the audience which had never happened before 
within memory. The music then glowed with youth and passion, it realized, with the simplest 
means and the profoundest inspiration, all that Schumann seemed to want his symphony to 
mean, and the audience was thrilled as it never had been by this work. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 81 





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SVM TIONY GN Os IN AGaNVELN ORE ac etl Basil Kalinnikoff 
(1866-1901) 

The life of Basil Kalinnikoff belongs among the short and simple annals 
of the poor. He was the son of a police official in a small town. He pursued a 
brilliant and promising career as a student in Moscow between 1884 and 1893. 
but he developed tuberculosis in that same period and spent the last six years of 
his life in the health resorts of the Crimea, where he died at the age ol Jo. Hor 
obvious reasons his list of works is extremely small, and he is known today almost 
exclusively for this symphony, which was first performed in 1897. 

I 

Allegro moderato, G minor, alla breve. Vhe principal theme is stated at 

once: 





r 
The theme is repeated a fourth higher and is then worked over for several 
pages of the score, the risine scale figure in the last bars of Example 1 now 
becoming a rapid run in eighth notes. The second theme appears tn the violas, 
celli and horns in F sharp minor: 







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en eas es 
gfe 1 2 Gt GEE ES 





















J ee) Ee a eS 

A Feria [esr] 5 Re es ee a OB PaaS SS 6) ES) ESS ES 
1. ip? CP a f 1 aS SSS SI a See SS en oe 
mead (at © A rae wp fg — ae | fe ge tig tt fe TS BES eS 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


83 





Monteil’s great perfume 


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This is repeated in the upper octaves, and there is a closing section based on 
Example 


The development begins with treatment of the second theme (Example 2) 
in the clarinet, followed by a descending pizzicato figure that suggests the “cat- 
like tread” of the sailors in the se cond act of Pinafore. The opening bars of 
Example | are then reintroduced and are worked over at length, ev ventually 
in combination with material from Example 2. ‘This reaches a climax, which 
subsides and is followed by a fugue on a varied version of Example 1, begun 
by the second violins. This likewise attains a climax and subsistence, where- 
upon the recapitulation sets in. 


The principal theme returns in G minor in the oboe and bassoon, with 
the rising scale in half notes now assigned to the strings. Again this material 1s 
briefly worke d over, and Example 2 returns in G minor in the violins, violas 
and ’celli. The brief coda involves further discussion of Examples | and 2 and 
the “catlike tread” motif. 


II 


Andante commodamente, E flat ma jor, 3/4 time. There is an introduction 
of slowly undulating major thirds in the harp and violins spotted with color- 
chords elsewhere. T he theme is played by the English horn and violas starting in 
the thirteenth bar: 





[his is repeated by the clarinet and ’celli an octave lower. 


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A new section (Un poco pitt mosso, G sharp minor) now begins, with its 
theme in the oboe: 





col 82 75b In 


LONE [ae nr ey SHRuE ACID Ny eS oe AFR 





f U ‘ 
"sa 
a Ais 





The oboe has a continuing phrase not quoted. The passage works up to a 
climax with twisting 16th-note figures, and then goes down to a whisper of the 
strings. Now both the themes of the movement are played off against each other. 
Example 3 is heard in the horn and Motif B from Example 4 tn the clarinet. 
Then Motif A of Example 4 appears in the flute against Example 3 in the 
violins. Motif A passes to the violins and violas along with Example 3 in oboe 





Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 


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WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated by the City and County of San Francisce 
through the Board of Trustees of the W/ar Memorial. 
Hard-of hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 87 












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Sun. at 7:00 p. m. Fri. at 6:30 p. m. 
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and clarinet. At the end the key returns to E flat major, the undulating thirds 
are reinstated, and Example 3 is sung by the English horn once more. 
Ii 
Allegro non troppo, C major, 3/4 time. The scherzo proper, 1n one continu- 
ous section, is based largely on the theme heard at the outset: 





5 5 trings CLO, 
tee Sa 6-9 1365 o Dy om an 







2 ES ea yt 23023 931083 
Se aes soo aw eae eea les 
_ es 







There is, however, an important subsidiary beginning in the 56th bar in the 
full orchestra: 


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This is taken up by all concerned. At the end of the trio Example 7 returns in 
the oboe with a new counterpoint in the bassoon. ‘The second phrase of Example 
7 now goes to the violins and flute, and there are other alterations as well. 

The music then returns to Allegro non troppo, C major, 3/4, and after a 
few bars of transition, the scherzo proper (Examples 5 and 6) is repeated in 
varied form. 

IV 

Allegro moderato, G major, alla breve. ‘Vhe key signature is G major, but 
the finale begins in G minor with a restatement of Example | from the first 
movement. This serves as introduction. At the seventh bar the tempo changes 
to Allegro risoluto, and ascending scales lead into the main theme, in the 
violins and woodwind: 








ma 
y a ee a ee 1S a 6 ee SS Eee 
CA} —___* 23's: ee beeen’ | : =... eS aaa Se ae 
SS SS ee ae 7 eee eS aes 





‘This is briefly worked over, whereupon Example 9 returns, and both themes 
are developed at some little length. The clarinet and horn bring in Example 2, 





BEFORE THE Sym “hony 


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Dancing afterwards in the Rose Room to 
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Lhe Sr mbace 


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EDMOND A. RIEDER, General Manager 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 91 








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the second theme of the first movement, which is followed by rondo-like restate- 
ments of 9 and 10. During the final repetition of Example 9 in the violins, the 
brass recall Example 6 from the scherzo, but transformed in rhythm to alla 
breve. 

There is a grandiose climax (E flat major, 3/2) in which the brass thunder 
out Example 3 from the second movement, while the strings and woodwind 
continue to work away at the first bars of 9. 

The climax recedes, and the coda (Allegro con brio,) G major (alla breve) 
returns to the Polovetsi-like tune from the third movement. Again there 1s a 
climax and a thunderous recollection of Example 3 (Maestoso) before the end. 


SU DA O18 © Oils ee eee ee Serge Prokofieff 
(1891-) 

The Suggestion Diabolique and the Despair alla Folia come from Proko- 
fieff’s set of four piano pieces, Opus 4, the Scherzo Humoristique and the 
March from the ten piano pieces of Opus 12. All were written between 1908 
and 1913, and were orchestrated by Harold Byrns a few months ago. Mr. Byrns 
also provided the general title, Suite Diabolique. But, since Prokofieff has 
published the Scherzo Humoristique in an arrangement of his own for four 
bassoons, Mr. Monteux substitutes this version for Mr. Byrns’ orchestration of 
that movement. 

The only movement that requires any particular comment 1s the second. 
Despair alla Folia is based upon the famous old Portuguese tune, La Folia, on 
which so many composers have written variations. It is best known to the modern 
audience through the violin solo version of Corelli, but this is only one of some 
95 different settings listed in the Oxford Companion to Music. La Folia (“mad- 
ness’) was originally a dance tune. It derives its title from the fact that the 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 93 









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PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


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dance was a noisy affair accompanied by tambourines “and performed by men 
dressed as women who behaved so wildly that they appeared to be out of their 
senses. 

Mr. Byrns was born in Hanover in 1903. He studied in Berlin and began 
his career conducting opera and concerts in Germany and Italy. He has also 
conducted much in this country, and is at present living in Hollywood, where he 
is active as an arranger for films and radio. 


SY MUP OINGY IN ORG) tee epkeces Oe hoop bere tis Seen Dmitri Shostakovitch 
(1906-) 

In his recent biography of Shostakovitch, Victor Ilyitch Seroff devotes one 
paragraph to the sixth symphony: 

“In 1938 Dmitri started work on a new symphony. In a statement about it 
he said: ‘I have set myself a task fraught with great responsibility, to express 
through the medium of sound the immortal image of Lenin as a great son of the 
Russian people and a great leader and teacher of the masses. I have received 
numerous letters from all corners of the Soviet Union with regard to my future 
symphony.’ ‘This symphony, Dmitri’s sixth, was presented at the Moscow 
Festival of Soviet Music in 1939, but Lenin’s name was not connected with it. 
The sixth, like the fifth, had no political program attached to it; these two 
works stood purely on their musical merit.” 

The program notes of the New York Philharmonic Orchestra also state, on 
the authority of Nicolas Slonimsky, that the sixth symphony was to have 
included parts for solo voices and chorus on verses by peasant poets, but Mr. 
Seroff says this idea was included in the original plan for the seventh symphony 
rather than the sixth. At all events it is not difficult to see a picture of a great 
popular leader like Lenin in the sixth symphony, with its brooding first move- 
ment, its festive scherzo, and its finale in the style of a popular march. To be 


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sure, very much the same qualities appear in other works of Shostakovitch 
which are not supposed to be musical portraits of Lenin, but that does not make 
a great deal of difference. Shostakovitch has passed his entire intellectual life 
in an atmosphere heavily charged with the ideas and ideals of the founder of 
the soviet state, and all his works are products of that milieu. 


I 
Largo. The principal theme is begun at once in a unison of the lower 
strings and lower woodwind: 









De Eee er. SS 
Ty 9 #HF [TT al emo lg  _A gind 
yy Be el I Ue A ee 2 eee 
Jd |) SE eee 2 GSE 
— —_ 3 CT ’ 


— 










SIalv isp is subjected to four varied repetitions. * 


*The technique of varied repetition—which is neither development nor variation nor 
“transformation of themes’—is one which Shostakovitch uses often; the most sensational 
instance is in the treatment of the second theme of the first movement in the seventh sym- 
phony. It is an eminently Russian method: witness Moussoresky’s prelude to Khovanchina. 
Discussing this prelude in his biography of Moussorgsky, Oskar von Riesemann observes: 
“When a song is sung in a Russian village—especially by several singers in succession—no two 
stanzas are usually sung alike. Each singer tries to introduce individual variations in the 
melody to suit his or her own voice and mood, and in accordance with the meaning of the 
particular verse. Thus the song loses all rigidity and seems to be a living, breathing organism, 
capable of varying with every moment. This peculiarity of Russian folk song becomes in 
Moussoresky’s hands a most effective means of musical expression which he employs in many 
of his works, and nowhere more successfully than in this prelude.” The present writer would 
like to suggest that Shostakovitch’s varied repetitions, which are more complicated than Mous- 
sorgsky’s, may be regarded as an extension and elaboration of this principle. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 97 








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After the climax of the fourth repetition has receded, the English horn 
begins the second section of the movement with a new theme: 





Muted trumpets repeat the opening figure of Example 2, whereupon the solo 
flute and solo bassoon continue the theme with new material not quoted. For 
several pages of the score the music 1s practically one continuous, uninterrupted 
unfoldment of new thematic ideas, and quotation Is not practicable. ‘The section 
reaches a climax, which subsides with a return of Example 2 in varied form in 
the clarinets. There is an oboe solo based on Example 2 over sustained trills of 
the lower strings. This passes to the violins and then to the solo flute, the trills 
continuing throughout. The flute solo 1s extensive and florid. The violins take 
over fora few bars, but the section ends with the flute again to the fore. 


There is a brief transition with a horn solo under high trills of the violins. 
Then Example 1 comes back in varied form in the violins, but the movement 
dies away in B major with a final reminiscence of the opening bars of Example 
9 high in the uppermost strings. 








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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 99 








THE SAN FRANCISCO BALLET GUILD 


Presents the 


San Francisce Ballet 
Company 


WILLAM CHRISTENSEN, Artistic Director 


in the 


Nutcracker Battet 


FIRST COMPLETE PERFORMANCE IN AMERICA 





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COMPANY OF 75 — SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
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I] 
Allegro. A free scherzo with its theme stated at once by the E flat clarinet: 





There are several subsidiaries, of which the most important appears 1! the 
55th bar from the beginning: 


















with woodu, AS / 
> > Ord ; ¢ 
A Sols. file aN se enues cole en ye A 
¢ - Ses 


mp | a P 

These materials, plus other minor subsidiaries, are worked over to a climax 
and are then restated by solo instruments. Eventually the lowest woodwinds 
bring in a new theme: 


















¢ 
. 
4 
10) A So BSS SSR Oe SS ee SS ee 0 ee _ Se FE) 0. 2) a Pea 
0 = ( Pe 2 A a EE) (I ee) (EE YF 6 Fo Se Ye I Beene} 











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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 101 














Example 5 is developed at some length, leading to another climax which 1s 
followed by a brief solo for the timpani. Examples 3 and 4 then come back in 
varied form. In the coda the piccolo has a new idea: 














and Example 5 is also given prominent treatment. ‘The movement ends in D 
major. 
[1] 
Presto. Violins begin the movement in B minor with the following theme: 














Z i lS Bay eS aaa mE a7 1 ee ee se ee 
a nn 7 2 
I aE] EF LES OO OES (SELINA 8 TE AE) Al AS EE SL A SY 5 WS ER BO ET TY YC DO cS = ae 
L I 


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OMAR KHAYYAM‘’S 


O’FARRELL STREET AT POWELL 
“Where the Celebrities Gather” 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 103 








0 Oo BB > 





Box Holders for Friday Afternoons 


MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX P 
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*** Transportation Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 


104 


with the cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


SAN FRANCISCO 








Example 7 returns, and there is a new subsidiary which is rather reminiscent 
of another symphonic finale written by a young man many years ago: 





‘These materials are worked over at some length. 
The middle section of the movement goes into 3/4 time; its theme appears 
after several introductory bars, marcalissimo, in the basses and bassoons: 











This is developed to a climax exploiting the kind of repeated figures that 
make one think the needle has stuck in a worn groove. ‘The climax 1s followed 
by a passage, based more on Example 10 than anything else, exploiting succes- 
sive solos of the bassoon, flute and piccolo, then the bassoon once more, and 
finally a single violin. 

The violin solo effects the return to Example 7, and the first part of the 
movement (Examples 7, 8 and 9) is reheard. 


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In an album of recordings by the Red Army Chorus called Folk Songs of the 
U. §. S. R. there is a piece by that redoubtable son of the Russian proletariat, 
Tovarich Jacques Offenbach. In the coda of Shostakovitch’s sixth symphony 1s 
the following tune: 

Chroughoul 
col Sd 
Flt 


12 wood. col BL Rroughowutl 
Ce ~s a 4 a ” 











This and Example 11 bring the symphony to an end in a brilliant B major. 


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107 






SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


, 
be 
y 








TODAY'S 


GREAT 


PIANO 


the chaice of 
Today's Great Artists 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO 
AS THE ARTISTS DO 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin 
in its Concerts. 


MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU HAROLD BAUER 


CECILLE DE HORVATH 
SEVERIN EISENBERGER 
ALEXANDER KELBERINE 
VA Steel yp ley WA WE) 9 pa gl 
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WILHELM BACHAUS 
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FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 
MAGDA TAGLIAFERO 
JOSEPH BATTISTA 
JEANNE BEHREND 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
WALTER GIESEKING 
EUGENE GOOSSENS 
BORIS GOLSCHMANN 
FLORENCE EASTON 
DANIEL ERICOURT 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
BREENDAN KEENAN 
ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
WIKTOR LABUNSKI 
ALFRED MIROVITCH 
CHARLES NAEGELE 
LOUIS PERSINGER 

E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
BERNARDO SEGALL 
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MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
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ALEC TEMPLETON 


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BELA BARTOK 
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108 


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c e Musical Association 


of San Francisco, maintaining and operating 


the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, stall 
requires $22,000.00 to complete the 1944- 
1945 season, and this is where you who are 
really deeply interested in the welfare of our 
city’s most beautiful music come forward 
with gifts of money to help in balancing the 


budget. 


The budget has been kept out of the red just 
because we have all of you who are vitally 
and courageously interested in the welfare of 


the symphony to assist us. 


Our campaign for needed funds for the or- 
chestra is now under way and we hope and 
rely on your making possible a successful 
season by your contribution, large or small, 


VOs 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








109 





110 








KEO SYMPHONY NOTES 


Maxim Schapiro, renowned Russian pianist now residing in 
san Francisco, will join Pierre Monteux and sixty members of the 
san Francisco Symphony Orchestra in a presentation of Beethoven's 
First Piano Concerto, when the “Standard Hour” is broadcast from 
KPO over the NBC Pacific Coast network at 8:30 next Sunday (De- 
cember 17th) evening. Other offerings in the special Beethoven 
salute include the Overture and Ballet music from “Prometheus” 
and selections from the Seventh Symphony. 


. Concluding concert of Arturo Toscanini’s nine-week Beethoven 
Festival with the NBC Symphony Orchestra will be broadcast over 
KPO on Sunday (the 17th) at 2:00 p.m. and will present Act II of 
the composer's l’idelio opera. Soloists on ‘Voscanini’s first radio per- 
formance of an entire opera include Rose Bampton as Leonore, Jan 
Peerce as lorestan, Eleanor Steber as Marcellina, Herbert Janssen 
as Pizarro, Sidor Belarsky as Rocco, Nicola Moscona as Don Fernando 
and Joseph V. Laderoute as Jacquino. A chorus of 40 mixed voices 
directed by Peter Wilhousky also participates. Maestro Toscanini will 
conduct the Leonore Overture No. 3, just before the finale. 


... Miliza Korjus, soprano star of concert stage and Hollywood films, 
Leonard Warren of the Metropolitan Opera and noted Negro con- 
ductor, Duke Ellington, “hot rhythms” pianist and composer 

all share guest star billing on NBC’s “Music America Loves Best” 
when it is broadcast over KPO Sunday (17th) at 1:30 Pp aiiees ine 
three invitation performers will be heard with Jay Blackton’s RCA 
Victor orchestra, Robert Shaw’s Victor Chorale and emcee Louis 
Calhern. 


... Richard Crooks will sing “Comfort Ye” from Handel’s oratorio 
“The Messiah,” and Howard Barlow will conduct the Firestone 
Symphony Orchestra and chorus in the ‘“March of the Knights of the 
Holy Grail,” from Wagner’s religious opera Parsifal ... ina special 
pre-Christmas program to be broadcast on the Firestone Hour over 
KPO Monday, December 18th, at 5:30 p.m. Crooks, the chorus and 
orchestra will join for a rollicking medley of gay Christmas carols, 
will return again to the “Hallelujah Chorus” from “The Messiah.” 
Crooks will close the program with “White Christmas,” Irving Ber- 
lin’s popular American Christmas ballad. 


SAN FRANCISCO 














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MILLS COLLEGE 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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N 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 
STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


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PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
FORD, LouIS W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSKI, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
Di BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENG 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PIERRE MONTEUMX, Conouctor 


"*CELLOS: 


BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 


REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 

BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 


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KARP, PHILIP 
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ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 
RENZI, PAUL UR. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


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REMINGTON, MERRILL 


SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIVO, LESLIE J. 


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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY _  - PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
HOw AR D (K-=.SIGINNER Ss, BUSINESS MANAGER 


ee ae te ee 


e 
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VAR MEMORIAL  ORBRA® Hous E- 
‘hird Pair Gone te - Heifetz, Guest Artist = + _ December 21:23, 1944 " 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 119 














Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E-sRaymond) AtimsSbpy.-2 4 Vice-President Gharles..Page:.:.: .2::..282.-2- bed ab aU enc 3 Treasurer 
Paul A. Bissinger..............................Vice-President Howard: K: Skinner <5 ee eee. Secretary 
Charles R. Blyth_.............................Wice-President Geraid G. Ross_.........................Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II__.............. _....Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Cc. O. G. Miller, Chairman 


E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 


Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mis: John PP. -Coghlan:- Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill....................- Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM AN? 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Deile 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. I. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Humphrey Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engelthart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul |. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Robert W. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, II Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Wood 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellierbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris 
ADMINISTRATION 

Gerald Ross Curran Swint Virginia Webb Deborah Spalding 


Constance Alexander 
TICKET SALES 
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THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 121 





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Yiholee bo 


MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER : 


427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEL) » YUKON 2061 


In addition to its schedule of regular concerts last season, the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra participated actively in providing enter- 
tainment for service men and women in the Bay Area. Through the enthu- 
siastic willingness of Pierre Monteux and the members of the Orchestra, 
and the cooperation of Musicians’ Union, Local No. 6, special concerts were 
presented at military camps and hospitals in the vicinity of San Francisco. 
During the present season, the Symphony Orchestra plans again to bring 
music to the men and women in uniform who are unable to attend regular 
concerts. The third annual Treasure Island Christmas Party with the entire 
personnel of the orchestra, Mr. Monteux, Heifetz, the San Francisco Ballet, 
and other prominent guest artists, begins the current list of activities 
planned for this 33rd Symphony Season. Enlisted service men and women 
who are able to attend the regular concerts are admitted to War Memorial 
Opera House without charge, as guests of the Musical Association. That 
as many as possible may be taken care of it is requested that subscribers 
who are unable to use their tickets kindly phone the Symphony Office— 
UNderhill 4008—giving location of their seats that they may be assigned 
to uniformed men. This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 


Rack the bth War Loan 


IN APPRECIATION 
Cr 


The Musical Association of San Francisco desires to express its grati- 
tude to Radio Station KPO for the weekly ‘““Know Your Symphony” program 
with Mrs. M. C. Sloss as commentator, and to Radio Station KQW for mak- 
ing available time immediately preceding the Sunday noon broadcasts of 
the New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra for the presentation of 
the San Francisco Symphony News, each of which outlines the activities of 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


ELELEELIPIDELELLELIDPILLLLEL IID, 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 123 






























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By intelligent management you have built up 
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If you appoint an zmdividual as Executor and 
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Thirty-third Season 
1944-45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


*<~@>- 


THIRD PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Thursday, December 21, at 8:30 
Saturday, December 23, at 8:30 

JASCHA HEIFETZ, Guest Artist 


~4@>- 
‘Program 
SYMPEONY NOU 2) TNGAUMEN ORG 2 Seo Saint-Saens 


Allegro marcato—Allegro appassionato 
Adagio 
Scherzo: Presto 


Prestissimo 


POEME, FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA....Chausson 
Mr. HEIFETZ 


INTERMISSION 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN-AND ORGHES PRA 
Re are eh Vee Me il ORES Ad ce SIR Ne CAYO ATMO A Gruenberg 
Rhapsodic 
With simplicity and warmth 
Lively, with good humor 
Mr. HEIFETZ 


(First Performance in San Francisco) 


ea IME SOND DPI RG AUN oo KGa OI ROAUIE ONY Se a Sea a Strauss 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 125 











iasche g ors 


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i 
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CEM iee by air, 


PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SVM PHONY NO2Z INA MINOR 33.3227 Camille Saint-Saens 
(1835-1921) 


The career of Saint-Saens was as long as it was prolific, but, since a large 
part of it was passed in the 20th century, we are accustomed to thinking of him 
as a more or less modern figure. It therefore comes as something of a shock to 
realize that the symphony of today’s program was composed in 1859, the year 
of the production of Faust, and is therefore considerably older than the sym- 
phonies of Brahms, Franck and ‘Tschaikowsky, all of whom died before our own 
century began. It is actually the fourth work of Saint-Saens in this form. Between 
the E flat symphony of 1852 and the A minor of 1859, Saint-Saens wrote two 
other symphonies which he later withdrew and destroyed. 

There is no particular story to be told about the A minor symphony, or, 
if there is, the composer’s biographers have failed to tell it. The following 
analysis, by Felix Borowski, is taken from the program books of the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra, thanks to a massive attack of the filtrable virus which 
produces the common cold. 


I 


“The main movement is preceded by introductory material which, follow- 
ing two incisive chords for full orchestra, opens with an undulating figure in 
the strings. This leads into Allegro appasstonato, A minor, 2-2 time, whose 
principal theme is thus given out by the first violins: 





In the material which follows much use is made of the figure of the third 
measure of the quotation which just has been made. The second subject is 
announced by the violins in octaves: 


No. 2. 
Sotlo voce ma espresstvo. 












The rhythmical construction of the second theme, it will be observed, has 
resemblance to that of the first, the first measure of each being frequently in 
evidence. It is with the opening subject that the Development section begins. 
This section is not extensive, and the Recapitulation is not much more than 
suggested. 


I] 


“Adagio, E major, 3-8 time. The slow movement is short and is lightly 
scored for woodwind and strings. It opens with the following subject in the 
muted strings: 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 127 














TODAYS CUESTA ARI Si 


Jascua Heirerz was born at Vilna, Russia, in 1901. He studied first with his 
father, and then with Elias Malkin at the Vilna School of Music, which he 
entered at the age of four and from which he was graduated at eight. Heifetz 
then spent four years at the Imperial Conservatory under the tutelage of 
Leopold Auer, and his career as a virtuoso began at the age of 12. He toured 
throughout Europe until 1917, when he made his first appearances in this 
country. Since that time he has been more closely identified with American 
musical affairs than with events abroad. A considerable number of important 
modern works have been introduced by him, including concertos by Castel- 
nuovo- Tedesco and the second concerto of Prokofieff, which he played, along 
with the Bruch G minor, when he was last heard with the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra, on January 26 and 27, 1940. 

This will be Mr. Heifetz’s fifth appearance as guest artist with the San 
Francisco Symphony. In 1930 he played the Brahms concerto, in 1936 the 
Glazounoff and the Mozart D major, and in 1938 the Beethoven. 


CF OO, 


Paes INe ie GU Estee ont 


EFrREM Kurrz will be guest conductor at the next pair of concerts January 
12 and 13. He was born in St. Petersburg in 1900 and studied at the St. Peters- 
burg Conservatory with Glazounoff, Cherepnin, and others. After the Russian 
Revolution he lived in Berlin, and made his first appearance as a conductor 
substituting for Artur Nikisch at one of Isadora Duncan’s Berlin concerts in 
1920. He was director of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Stuttgart from 1924 
to 1931; during the same period he made many appearances as guest conductor 
throughout Europe and South America. He came to this country in 1932 with 
the Monte Carlo Ballet Russe, and has made many appearances in this city 
with that organization and the Ballet Theatre. He is now conductor of the 
Kansas City Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Although Mr. Kurtz has often conducted the San Francisco Symphony in 
connection with the performances of the Monte Carlo Ballet and the Ballet 
‘Theatre, this will be his first local performance in concert. 








Ss Ss a 








128 SAN FRANCISCO 

















This is followed by another idea, given out by the English horn and first violins 
in © sharp minor, and the first theme is repeated in the woodwinds. At the 
close there is an episode beginning in the woodwinds, which later is reheard 
in the finale. The movement closes softly and tranquilly. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 129 





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| 8 “Scherzo. Presto, A minor, 3-4 time. ‘The movement begins with the 


following theme in the strings, forte: 





This is alternated with a passage for the woodwind, the first division of the 
scherzo consisting for the most part of this material. ‘The trio opens—after six 
syncopated E’s in the second violins—with this theme in the oboe: 


No. 5. 


oN lll es 


| At the conclusion of the trio the scherzo is not repeated, as usually is the case, 
: but a coda is substituted for it, its material rather concerned with that of the 
trio than with the first division of the movement. 


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GEO. D. SMITH, 
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- 4 SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 131 









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IV 


“Prestissimo, A major, 6-8 time. The principal theme of this finale is given 
to the first violins in a tarantelle-like subject, whose accompaninent is provided 
pizzicato, by the remaining strings. Four measures are quoted 


3 














No. 6. 
Prestlissimo. 
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There is vigorous working over of this matter, and later the following theme 
is heard in the woodwind and strings: 








SO 





1 WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


First Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 


years — has resigned in order to devote his time exclusively to 
teaching. 
SELL OS== 
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Other instruments take it up, and there is development, particularly of the 
two last measures of the quotation. An episode is heard, fortissimo, and the 
principal theme recurs in the violins, as before. A modified repetition of the 
second subject (No. 7) is heard, and No. 8 also is worked over. More episodical 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 135 




















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material is introduced, and the principal theme recurs in the violas, later to be 
heard in the first violins. A climax is attained, in which the first episode is 
eiven out by the woodwind. After a general pause fragments of the opening 
subject are interjected by the first violins, and a new division (Andantino, 
3-8 time) 1s begun by solo violins and violas. ‘Uhis is followed by a passage in 
the woodwind which is derived from material in the closing portion of the slow 
movement. The coda, in the original time and tempo, follows, and the sym- 
phony closes brilliantly with material taken from the opening theme.” 


POEME, FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA..... Ernest Chausson 


(1855-1899) 


The juxtaposition of Saint-Saens and Chausson on the same program 
tempts one to point out a few contrasts and neglected indebtednesses. Chausson 
was, of course, one of the disciples of César Franck. ‘The Franckists are often 
described as a lonely, misunderstood band who, alone and without support or 
comprehension from their contemporaries, upheld the standard of the large in- 
strumental forms in a French musical world otherwise completely dominated by 
opera. This view is not altogether correct. As today’s program illustrates, Saint- 


Saens was writing symphonies (and chamber music) long before the Franck 


iY 


circle existed. Some of the instrumental compositions of Gabriel Fauré, like 


nn 


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his well known violin sonata in A major, predate any of the works by which 
the Franckists are remembered, while still other composers, like Edouard Lalo, 
were also busy with symphonies and concertos before the Franck circle was 
formed. The Franckists make much of the Société Nationale de Musique, of 
which Franck was president and Chausson secretary in the 1890’s, but they 
seldom add that this organization, which existed primarily for the presentation 
of instrumental works by French composers, had been founded by Saint-Saens 
in 1871. 

Throughout the Franckist literature there is an undercurrent of ill-dis- 
cuised hostility toward Saint-Saens, who might have done much for this group 
if he had wished, but who chose to ignore it entirely. There are several reasons 
for this. One is implicit in Philip Hale’s line, “Saint-Saens, composer of music, 
pianist, organist, acoustician, archeologist, playwright, comedian, caricaturist, 
feuilletonist, critic, traveller, amateur of art, mathematics, astronomy, man of 
the world.” Only the first three of these designations can be applied to César 
Franck. In other words, there was a marked temperamental incompatibility 
between the two men which is clear in their music as well as in the record of 
their lives. 

Another reason for the lack of sympathy between Franck and Saint-Saens 
is the fact that the latter musician grew more conservative, not to say reactionary 
in his views and appreciations as he grew older, and the Franckians, who were 
much beholden to Wagner and the “music of the future,” did not appear on the 
scene until rather late in the day. 

All of this hasn’t anything to do with the Poéme of Chausson; it is simply 
set down here to counteract the commonly held idea that Chausson and his 
friends were pioneers and innovators of instrument music in France in the 
latter part of the 19th century. The fact of the matter is that the instrumental 
tradition has never died out in that country from the days of Couperin to those 
of Milhaud, although it his been subjected to various attenuations and changes 
of emphasis. 








BEFORE THE Syrnofohrony 


Fashionable San Francisco gathers in the 
exquisite Garden Court for luncheon. 


Dancing afterwards in the Rose Room to 
the music of Henry Busse and his orchestra 


She Satace 


HOTEL 


EDMOND A. RIEDER, General Manager 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 139 








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One of the few friends the Franckists were able to win among the com- 
manding figures of their own day was the violinist, Eugene Ysaye. Franck com- 
posed his violin sonata and his quartet for Ysaye, and it was for him, also, that 
Chausson wrote the Poéme. The work, first performed in 1896, is free in form 
and calls for no special analysis. Its title is to be taken in a general sense; in 
other words the piece does not reflect any literary influence. 





CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA Louis Gruenberg 
(1884-) 

Mr. Gruenberg writes as follows: 

“The concerto is the result of a commission from Heifetz, who desired to 
add an American concerto to his already stupendous repertoire, and this, of 
course, was nothing less than a challenge. It raised the question of questions as 
to what was really American in music. To my mind, American music consists 
(or should) of all human emotions and characteristics. Nothing less. 

“There are three movements. I have used several bars of two Negro 
spirituals in the second movement, and have endeavored to give the impression 
of a hill-billy fiddler and a small-town religious meeting in the third to add 
spice to the work. 

“The composition was written in three weeks, then polished, orchestrated 
and completed eight months later, last May.” 

To this one may add that the concerto was performed for the first time at 
a concert of the Philadelphia Orchestra three weeks ago. 

Mr. Gruenberg was born in Russia but was brought to this country at the 
age of two years. He studied in New York, Berlin and Vienna, and began his 
career in the last-named city as a pianist. He returned to this country at the out- 
break of the first World War and gave up the concert career for composition. 








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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA | 141 









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He taught at the Chicago Musical College in the 30's, but in recent years has 
been living in Hollywood and writing for the films. 

Among Mr. Gruenberg’s many works are the operas The Emperor Jones, 
Jack and the Bean Stalk, and Green Mansions (the last a “non-visual” opera 
written for radio) ; symphonies, sonatas and quartets, and chamber works bear- 
ing such titles as Danvel Jazz, Indiscretions, Diversations, and Jazzettes. Among 
his film-scores are The Fight for Life, So Ends Our Night, and Commandos 
Strike at Dawn. , 





2 DE ACRE AND GRAIN STG ihe As QING eee Richard Strauss 
} (1864-) 

In the year 1885 a promising youngster named Richard Strauss was chosen 
: by Hans von Bulow, director of the magnificent symphony orchestra in the little 
German city of Meiningen, to become his assistant. In those days the German- 
speaking musical world was divided into two mutually hostile camps, that of the 
Waenerians, devoted to the picturesque, the dramatic and the freely expressive, 
and that of the Brahmins, who worshipped the classic forms and the traditions 
of absolute music. Strauss went to Meiningen one of the most conservative of the 
classicists. He emerged, less than a year later, the creative spearhead of the 
post-Wagnerian movement, becoming eventually Richard Il. 


EE 
“ ee ee 


For in Meiningen Strauss met Alexander Ritter, violinist, poet, and com- 
poser, who had been an intimate personal friend of Wagner, and was at that 
moment a member of Biilow’s orchestra. Ritter, who Wagner credits with 
having brought the story of Tristan and Isolde to his attention, affected Strauss 
“like a storm wind,” according to Strauss’ own statement. The result was the 
series of tone poems, continuing the line of Wagner, Liszt and Berlioz, upon 
which the fame of Strauss principally rests today. 


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The score of Death and Transfiguration is prefaced with a poem by Ritter 
himself. This was not, as is often assumed, the inspiration of the music. On the 
contrary, Ritter wrote his lines in explanation of the music of Strauss, and they 
remain its best and most complete commentary. They follow in the prose transla- 
tion of William Foster Apthorp: 


“In the necessitous little room, dimly lighted by only a candle end, lies the 
ick man on his bed. But just now he has wrestled despairingly with death. Now 
he has sunk exhausted into sleep, and one hears only the soft ticking of the 
clock on the wall in the room, whose awful silence vives a foreboding of the 
nearness of death. Over the sick man’s pale features plays a sad smile. Dreams 
he. on the boundary of life, of the golden time of childhood? 


“But death does not long grant sleep and dreams to his victim. Cruelly he 
chakes him awake, and the fight begins afresh. Will to live and power of death! 
What frightful wrestling! Neither bears off the victory, and all is silent once 
more! 

“cunk back tired of battle, sleepless, as in fever-frenzy the sick man now sees 
his life pass before his inner eye, tratl by trait and scene by scene. First the 
morning red of childhood, shining in pure innocence! ‘Then the youth’s saucier 
play—exerting and trying his strength—'til he ripens to the man’s fight, and 
now burns with hot lust after the higher prizes of life. ‘The one high purpose 
that has led him through life was to shape all he saw transfigured into a still 
more transfigured form. Cold and sneering, the world sets barrier upon barrier 
in the way of his achievement. If he thinks himself near his goal, a “Halt!” 
thunders in his ear. ‘Make the barrier thy stirrup! Ever higher and onward go! 
And so he pushes forward, so he climbs, desists not from his sacred purpose. 
What he has sought with his heart’s deepest yearning, he still seeks in his death 
sweat. Seeks—alas! and finds it never. Whether he comprehends it more clearly 


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Before or After the Concert Visit the 


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Van Ness and Geary Leopold Lerner, Manager 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 145 








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or it grows upon him gradually, he can yet never exhaust it, cannot complete 
it in his spirit. Then clangs the last stroke of death’s iron hammer, breaks the 
earthly body in twain, covers the eye with the night of death. 
; “But from the heavenly spaces sounds mightily to greet him what he 
; yearningly sought for here: deliverance from the world, transfiguration of the 


) world.’ 


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OPERA AND CONCERT 


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Gentlemen: Enclosed is $1. Sond OPERA AND CONCERT to the fol- 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 147 








THE SAN FRANCISCO BALLET GUILD 


Presents the 


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WILLAM CHRISTENSEN, Artistic Director 


an the 


Nutcracker Ballet 


FIRST COMPLETE PERFORMANCE IN AMERICA 


Second Pee 
Holiday Ballet Seasau 


COMPANY OF 75 — SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
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Children’s Christmas Matinee 
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 24th 


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Gala Holiday Ballet 
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27th 
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SACRAMENTO—FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29th 
STOCKTON—SATURDAY, DECEMBER 30th 


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§ aveYy Onera C Cm fLany 


announces the presentation of the 


“PIRATES OF PENZANCE” 


“The Pirates of Penzance” is the third of the delightful and colorful 
Gilbert and Sullivan operas presented by the Savoy Opera Company 


INTRODUCING A NEW FEATURE 


SPECIAL WEDNESDAY LADIES MATINEE STARTING DECEMBER 20th 


Luncheon Served During the Performance 
San Francisco’s unique form of entertainment— 


Luncheon and Opera at the Matinee 
luncheon served at tables in an unusual setting at 1 p.m. is followed by a 
performance of ‘The Pirates of Penzance” at 2:30 with our all-star cast. 
These performances have captivated music-loving San Franciscans and 
brought salvos from the critics. 


This is a charming way to solve your entertainment problems. Bring your friends. 


ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE FOR ANY SIZE PARTY 
Performances Every Night at 8:30 Except Monday—Matinees 2:30 Wednesday and Sunday 


Light buffet suppers at evening performances 
Luncheon at Wednesday and Sunday matinees 


Prices, including tax and refreshments— 


Mat. $1.50, $2.00, $2.50; Eve. $2.50, $3.00. Children half-price 
AN IDEAL CHRISTMAS GIFT 
GILBERT & SULLIVAN THEATRE TICKETS MAKE AN IDEAL PRESENT 


For Reservations: 
BUSH STREET MUSIC HALL 


960 Bush Street near Jones, San Francisco ORdway 1109 
Opera Box Office, City of Paris, San Francisco EXbrook 8585 
Sherman, Clay Box Office, H. C. Capwell Co., Oakland HIigate 8575 


Batesecn take cuts ise a eee for ‘‘PIRATES OF PENZANCE” O 
BSF Lan Veeco Sey eee eaten a earns Aas er evenness Uy here at 
GS ieee Ieee nese te ce fee eet 6 a Re ot Gt oe eran ee nce 
(Cll ol ne ae ee LONG sta Phomec2et = eae 


Please send me Special Christmas Tickets without dates to be redeemed 
any time from December 19th to January Ist. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 151 














Box Holders for Friday A fternoons 


MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX 
MRS. SIGMUND STERN 
Mes. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 


MRS. JOHN T. BARNETT 
MRS. E. E. BROWNELL 
MRS. MORTON GIBBONS 
MRS. THOMAS HAIGHT 
MRS. HARRY HILL 

MRS. JAMES HORSBURGH 
MRS. SILAS PALMER 

MRS. T. E. PALMER 

MRS. ATHERTON RUSSELL 


E **€U. S. NAVAL HOSPITALS 


MRS. EDW/ARD H. BELL 
MRS. SPENCER GRANT 
MRS. MAXWELL C. MILTON 
MRS. WILLIAM H. ORRICK 


MRS. STUART RAWLINGS 
MISS ELSE SCHILLING 


MRS. DANIEL VOLKMANN 
MISS JOHANNA VOLKMANN 
MRS. DEAN WITTER 

MRS. J. B. WRIGHT 


G MRS. REED J. BEKINS 
MRS. GEORGE EDWIN BENNETT 
MRS. FRANK INGERSOLL 
MRS. CLARENCE LORAN JOHNSTON 
MRS. GEORGE S. JOHNSTON 
MRS. RALPH MERILLION 
MSSe Jn eb OSE 
MRS. ERNEST J. SYYEETLAND 


H MRS. JOSEPH D. GRANT 


MRS. JOHN CASSERLY 

MRS. DONALD GREGORY 

MRS. W/ELLINGTON HENDERSON 

MRS. OSGOOD HOOKER 

MR. AND MRS. KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
MRS. EDITH NORTH 


K MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
MRS. M. C. SLOSS 


L MRS. CHARLES BRANSTEN 
MRS. RICHARD FRANK 
MR. AND MRS. MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
MRS. LEWIS LAPHAM 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM, JR. 
MRS. FREDERICK WHITMAN 


M MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. BLYTH 
MRS. RICHARD HEIMANN 
MRS. A. J. LOWREY 
MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER 
MRS. EDGAR WOODS 


N MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MRS. STANHOPE NIXON 
MR. AND MRS. NION R. TUCKER 


Oo MRS. DUNN DUTTON 
MRS. WALTER HOBART 
MRS. FREDERICK HUSSEY 
MRS. KENYON JOYCE 
MRS. SAMUEL KNIGHT 
MRS. RICHARD McCREERY 


0 OO wm > 


P 


MRS. WALTER D. HELLER 
MRS. MORRIS MEYERFELD 
MRS. RICHARD SHAINWALD 
MRS. GEORGE OPPEN 








MRS. FRANK P. DEERING 
MRS. JAMES L. FLOOD 

MRS. BENJAMIN C. KEATOR 
MRS. HENRY S. KIERSTED 
MRS. HARRY B. LITTLE 

MRS. HAROLD R. McKINNON 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 


DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 


MRS. FRANCIS S. BAER 

MISS JENNIE BLAIR 

MRS. ELDRED BOLAND 

MRS. GEORGE M. BOWLES 
M&S. GEORGES S. DeLATOUR 
MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 

MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR 


MRS. OTTO BARKAN 
MRS. L. A. BENOIST 
M!SS MARILYN BENTLEY 
MRS. WALTER BENTLEY 
MRS. FOSTER NEWHALL 
MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
MRS. BRUCE SELFRIDGE 
MRS. MELVILLE L. SMITH 


MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 
*EKU.S. ARMY HOSPITALS 


MRS. HENRY BOYEN 

MrRS. ARTHUR B. CAHILL 
COUNTESS LILLIAN DANDINI 
MRS. JOHN L. FLYNN 

MRS. PETER B. KYNE 

MRS. JAMES F. McNULTY 
MRS. A. J. MOORE 

MRS. THEODORE WORES 


DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
MRS. ANGUS McDONALD 

DR. HANS VON GELDERN 

MRS. HENRY H. WEHRHANE 


MRS. C. W/. CROSSE 

MRS. DUNCAN CURRY, JR. 
MrS. JOSEPH W. FOWLER 
MRS. RALPH HENKLE 

MRS. DANIEL C. HUNT 
MRS. A. F. JUNCKER 

MRS. —. W. WILLETT 

MRS. EDWARD C. WURSTER 


MRS. FRANK BUCK 

MRS. RALPH K. DAVIES 
MRS. J. LINDSAY HANNA 
MRS. JAMES LEVENSALER 
MRS. DOUGLAS McBRYDE 
MISS OLGA MEYER 

MRS. FRANK SOMERS 





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Mapp omcuan Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 


with t 


152 


e cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


SAN FRANCISCO 








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March 15, 1941. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


155 





TODAYS GREAT 





PIANO 


the choice 
Today's Great Artists 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO 
AS THE ARTISTS DO 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin 
in its Concerts. 


MARIE THERESE BRAZEALU HAROLD BAUER 


CECILLE DE HORVATH 
SEVERIN EISENBERGER 
ALEXANDER KELBERINE 
WESEEY EA VIOCETTE 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
IRMA SCHENUIT HALL 
FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 
MAGDA TAGLIAFERO 
JOSEPH BATTISTA 
JEANNE BEHREND 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
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156 


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Cc KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA DR. AND MRS. B. H. PAGE 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
Oo COMMANDER AND MRS. WM. LISTER ROGERS 


D SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM MR. AND MRS. JOHN ROSEKRANS 


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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
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MRS. ROBERT SCARBOROUGH x U. S. ARMED FORCES 

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MR. AND MRS. JAMES H. HOWARD UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
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DISTRIBUTED 8Y FLORA HEITMILLER AGENCY 


209 POST ST., SAN FRANCISCO 8, CALIFORNIA* GARFIELD 1969 


discoveries i in eae Gem ie ee ele H G White 


4) collection of exclusive siftware G NEGUS: 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 157 








Before Ye Concert... 
Ajier the Concent 


Entertain your friends 








at Hotel Whitcomb, so conveniently 





near. Home of the Whitcomb Inn 


and The Parade Cocktail Lounge. 





HOmEL 
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KARL WEBER MANAGEMENT MARKET AT 8TH ¢ SAN FRANCISCO 


Tel.: UNderhill 9600 


A TOUCH OF THE OLD WORLD 









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SERVING THE EYE PHYSICIANS and their PATIENTS 





POSTAL ZONE GUIDE... 25c. 
FOR SPEED... USE ZONE NUMBERS! 


Send for PosTaL ZONE GulbeE of San Francisco, Oakland and Berkeley 
in booklet form. Alphabetical list of streets and avenues showing 
delivery unit number. 
Send 25c in stamps to 
PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING COMPANY 


700 Montgomery Street, San Francisco 11, Calif. 


SEV CE Utne ten Sed tee 5 ey eae nt ora eae: oe aes aa Ney eA nt Re cs 5 BAS. tS ee ok seminal een ee 
GET ee Ria ee ee ce ce AO ae a ee ay 2s LONE: (INO ee STALE eee eet a een 


158 SAN FRANCISCO 





& 


fe e Musical Association 


of San Francisco, maintaining and operating 


the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, still 
requires $20,000.00 to complete the 1944 
1945 season, and this 1s where you who are 
really deeply interested in the welfare of our 
city’s most beautiful music come forward 
with gifts of money to help in balancing the 


budget. 


The budget has been kept out of the red just 
because we have all of you who are vitally 
and courageously interested in the welfare of 


the symphony to assist us. 


Our campaign for needed funds for the or- 
chestra is now under way and we hope and 


rely on your making possible a successful 


season by your contribution, large or small, 


KOn 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








159 











KPO SYMPHONY NOTES 


2 


- Christmas theme runs throughout the outstanding musical 
programs on the airwaves this coming weekend. John Charles 
Thomas and John Nesbitt lead off the holiday features Sunday 
morning at 11:30 with their traditional rendering of “The Juggler 
of Notre Dame,” complete with symphony orchestra and chorus. 
Their Westinghouse program is aired locally over KPO. 


Yehudi Menuhin. recently returned from a tour of European 
war zones where he entertained Allied troops, will close the new 
‘Music America Loves Best” RCA Sunday program (1:30 p.m. KPO) 
with Schubert’s “Ave Maria,” in which he will be joined by the 
Victor chorale and orchestra. Among Menuhin’s other offerings 
will be the third movement of Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto in E 
Minor and ‘ ‘Spanish Dance” from De Falla’s “‘La Vida Breve.” The 
chorale will sing a group of six favorite Christmas carols. 


Eugene Ormandy will conduct the first of four General Mo- 
tors Symphony of the Air programs on Sunday (24) at 2:00 p.m. 
on KPO. He’ll present two special Christmas selections, Corelli’s 
Concerto Grosso No. 8 (Christmas Concerto) and an excerpt from 
Berlioz’ sacred trilogy, ““The Childhood of Christ,” the latter fea- 
turing Joseph V. Panne: tenor. Other selections will be Stravin- 


Sky’ s suite from ‘The Firebird” and the Bach-Ormandy Sinfonia 
for Double Orchestra. 


The all-time favorite Christmas carols will make up the 
Christmas Eve programs of the “American Album of Familiar 
Music” (6:30 p.m.) and the “Hour of Charm” (7:00 p.m.) , both 
to be heard on KPO. On the former tenor Frank Munn and the 
Buckingham Choir will sing “Panis Angelicus”; soprano Margaret 
Daum will join them for “Adeste Fidelis,” “Cantique de Noel” and 
Gounod’s “Ave Maria”; and soprano Jean Dickenson will sing 
Mozart's “Allelujah.”” The Hour of Charm’ will present again this 
year young Sara Fussell in her six-year-old traditional recitation of 
Clement Moore’s beloved poem ‘The Night Before Christmas,” with 
orchestral and choral background. 











SAN FRANCISCO 








MAIL ORDER BLANK 


Mail Orders Now 
TICKETS GO ON SALE DECEMBER 11 


TOM C. GIRTON presents 


SAN CARLO OPERA COMPANY 
Thitty-Yourth Hua Sey. 
FORTUNE GALLO, General. Director 
WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
JANUARY 8th to 21st inclusive 
16 Performances * Tickets: $1.20, $1.80, $2.40; Box Seats $2.40 (Tax Included) 



































$2.40 | $2.40 | $2.40 | $1.80 Lae 
DATES OPERAS Box Main Grand |DressCir.,| ,°!-2° 
Seats Floor Tier Bal. Cir. | Balcony 
Monday Eve., Jan. 8 |CARMEN 
[Tuesday Eve. ~ Q |LA TRAVIATA 
Wed. Eve. Pe LOontAIpDA 
Thurs. L-Ve: op RIGOLELro 4 ae eee 
Friday Eve. = Gls RAST 
Saturday Mat. “ 13 |BARBER OF SEVILLE 
Sunday Mat. “ 14 {LA BOHEME 
Sunday Eve. “ 14 |In TROVATORE 
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Monday Eve. “ 15 Jann Pacuracct ‘4 
Duesday Jive: ~~ “16 |La Poses 
Wed. Eve. fe AE ANB BeOS 
Thurs. Eve. “18 |Atba (Repeat) ota: 
; Friday Eve. “ 19 |RIGOLETTO (Repeat) i= 
Saturday Mat. “ 20 |FAusr (Repeat) 
Sunday Mat. “ 21 CARMEN (Repeat) 
Sunday Eve. “ 21 |LA TRAvIATA (Repeat) | 
Sat. Eve., an.13 CARMEN 
TWO PERFORMANCES IN OAKLAND | . Ja oo 
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SEND SELF-ADDRESSED STAMPED ENVELOPE IF TICKETS ARE TO BE MAILED 


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PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
FORD, LOUIS W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRD, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
Di BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENG 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PIERRE MONTEU®X, Conouctor 


"CELLOS: 


BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 


BASSES: 


KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


RENZI, PAUL JR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScCHIvo, LESLIE Jd. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScHivo, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BiIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BIBBINS, F. C. 


JULIUS HAUG 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, UR. 


TRUMPETS: 
BusBsB, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Giosi, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SINAI, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELWOOD 


PIANO AND CELESTA: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


PROPERTY MASTER: 
J. T. HEAVEY 








SAN FRANCISCO 


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Los Angeles 


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Your Chesterfield Santa Claus reminding you 
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the best of everything for real enjoyment... the 
cigarette that Satisfies belongs on top. 








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PISANI PRINTING & PUBLISHING CO,, 700 MONTGOMERY, S. F. ¢ 








V 


WHE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


EONORA WOOD ARMSBY - PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
HOWARD VK: “SKINNER S« BUSINESS MANAGER 


i — 


=} 


PAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Fourth Pair . Efrem Kurtz, Conducting ’ January 12-13, 1945 
Jan Smeterlin, Guest Artist 










Income for 
your dependents — 
while you live 






A man while he still lives may set apart 
all or some part of his property to 
provide income now or later for any 
of his beneficiaries by establishing a 
“family trust.” Each arrangement will 
be made to fit the needs of a particular 
family. It can always be altered. Ask “ 
about this service. 








TRUST DEPARTMENT i 


Wells Fargo | 


Bank « union trust co. 


SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 
Member F.D.I.C. 


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SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. in its 
NEW HOME in OAKLAND 





Convenience is the word for our new music store . 
located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
town Oakland. 

Step right off the street to our main floor... for REC- 
ORDSee SEER MUSIC wREGORD? GABINETRS see 
GONGERM MIGKElSe —Upstairs, soni the smezzoanine 
you'll find our other departments... Pianos, Band and 
Orchestra Instruments, Radios and Radio-Phonographs. 





Parking lot next door or just across the street. 





(| "reste 80 DUEL AB ETT 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 167 





“eet 7 





bHeE 








Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
—. Raymond Armsby...................----- Vice-President CRarlées- Pag@vc-ssec4.2:--4 eo dob esos reasurer 
PaulA:: Bissing@lies 5. sts se ae Vice-President Howard K. Skinner....................................Secretary 
Charles: Re (Blyth. 22 Vice-President Geraid G. Ross.._...... Seek DA, Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II_.-................... Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto ’ Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. 0. G. Miller, Chairman 


E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 


Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mrs; John: P; Coghlan... -2:-. ee Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill.._.............._.... Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM . 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox _ 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Biehl 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. |. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Humphrey Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engelthart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher CC. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Robert W. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, II Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe’ Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Weod 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris 
ADMINISTRATION 

Gerald Ross Curran Swint Virginia Webb Deborah Spalding 


Constance Alexander 
TICKET SALES 


Victor Mohl Joesph Scafidi Kathleen Lawlor Doris Lowell 
THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 169 





“There's an Immortality in the expression of the 
finer human moods... These moods sincerely 
expressed in a portralt can mean so uch to the 
person towards whom that feeling ts directed.” 


Ytucliolea Sotintlen 


iicliolea Ser 


MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER a ae 


427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEL) * YUKON 2061 











) > () > () ED (D(a ( ) (D(A ( ) <> ( ) << ¢ ) (<<) <a ) << ) << ) <)> 


ING Geo Te eae 


we) 


HE Musical Association of San Francisco warmly 
thanks the many friends whose encouragement and 
support denotes a deep personal interest in the welfare 
of the orchestra. Our programs commemorate their 
never-failing cooperation and devotion. 


—LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY. 


IN APPRECIATION 


Cw © 


The Musical Association of San Francisco desires to express its grati- 
tude to Radio Station KPO for the weekly “Know Your Symphony” program 
with Mrs. M. C. Sloss as commentator, and to Radio Station KQW for mak- 
ing available time immediately preceding the Sunday noon broadcasts of 
the New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra for the presentation of 
the San Francisco Symphony News, each of which outlines the activities of 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


rr a a 
SD (<DD> (> D> (> << (> <> (> <> (> (> <> (> << (> (> <<) <a) <a ( ) <a () < ( ) -() 
eens a ennai ene 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 171 





172 





...Of course you are...and we'll bet home 
planning tops the list of your after V-day 
dreams. For more than a century in war 
and peace W. & J. Sloane has been helping 
make just these kind of dreams come true 


for generations of Americans. 


WEJ 


SLOANE 


216 SUTTER near GRANT 
SAN FRANCISCO 8, CALIF. 


SAN FRANCISCO 
































TODAY SIGUESIVA ois 


ErREM Kurtz was born in St. Petersburg in 1900 and studied at the St. 
Petersburg Conservatory with Glazounoff, Cherepnin, and others. After the 
Russian Revolution he lived in Berlin, and made his first appearance as a con- 
ductor substituting for Artur Nikisch at one of Isadora Duncan’s concerts in 
1920. He was director of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Stuttgart from 1924 to 
1931; during the same period he made many appearances as guest conductor 
throughout Europe and South America. He came to this country in 1932 with 
the Monte Carlo Ballet Russe, and has made many appearances in this city with 
that organization and the Ballet Theatre. He is now conductor of the Kansas 
City Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Although Mr. Kurtz has often conducted the San Francisco Symphony in 
connection with the performances of the Monte Carlo Ballet and the Ballet 
Theatre, this will be his first local performance in concert. 


JAN SMETERLIN was born in Bielsko, Poland: in 1892. Although he had 
played a Beethoven concerto in public at the age of 8, his parents objected to 
his becoming a professional musician and sent him to Vienna to study law. 
Here he secretly joined Leopold Godowsky’s classes in piano-playing, and his 
career began when he won an Austrian state prize and was sent to London and 
Berlin for concerts. After service in the Polish forces in the first World War, 
Mr. Smeterlin resumed his musical activities in Vienna and generally through- 
out the continent of Europe. During this time he introduced many new works 
of Ravel, Szymanowski, Arthur Bliss and others. Mr. Smeterlin has been playing 
in this country off and on since 1930, but this will be his first appearance with 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


iQ FG Choy Se, 


Tne NEG GBESie Akt ow 


CARLOS CHAVEZ is equally well known as composer and conductor. He was 
born near Mexico City in 1899 and studied in the Mexican capital with Manuel 
M. Ponce and Pedro Luis Ogazon. The earlier part of his career was devoted 
entirely to composition. He founded the Symphony Orchestra of Mexico in 
1928 and remains its permanent conductor. He was director of the National 
Conservatory in Mexico City from 1928 to 1934, and for a time was Chief of 
the Department of Fine Arts in the Mexican Secretariat of Education. ‘This will 
be his third appearance with the San Francisco Symphony. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 173 








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Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-<e}- 
FOURTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, AT 2:15 
SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, AT 8:30 








EFREM KURTZ, Guest Conductor 


JAN SMETERLIN, Soloist 
-4e}- 
‘Program 
SUAIE HO Re S de RGIN Goi ere re rr cane Dore ee ets Corelli 
Sarabande 
Giga 


Badinerie 





(ARRANGED BY ETTORE PINELLI) 


SYMPHONIG METAMORPHOSIS OF THEMES 
BY ‘GV MONEE BES Repeeecto tore et cure ta Hindemith 
Allegro 
Turandot, Scherzo 
Andantino 


March 





(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
INO: 2 CVEUNO Ret oes nese ne are ate Rachmaninoff 
Moderato 
Adagio sostenuto 
Allegro scherzando 
Mr. SMETERLIN 
*<@}>- 
ENT BROOM Sis: LON 


SYMPHONY No. 6, BMINOR (PaTHETIC) .. . Tschaikowsky 
Adagio—Allegro non troppo 
Allegro con grazia 
Allegro molto vivace 
Adagio lamentoso 





Steinway Piano Used 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 175 





Bi 














| 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
| PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-{@}- 
FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Friday, January 19, at 2:15 
Saturday, January 20, at 8:30 
CARLOS CHAVEZ, Guest Conductor 
Brandenburg Concerto INO; 0 Guat One siren. Wie or en tee Bach 
Saka DAG CalOl 45 (UNOS aA) dagen oe OME te nee eusbeed iat. Ue 0a ee Chavez 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
Goncertot om HoumueblonnsiamakO@ Loest raven tmeeon e an ieee © eee Chavez 
| (FIRST PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
| Symphony No. 4, in B flat Hilal] Ole iencarctsae, se Mga eed ee ee: Beethoven 
| CVV CT LUTRCS EO meh 1. CNEO Mth eati tia. NS D te Re ag UN aati 1 oa toa LOR otek Cherubini 
-{@F- 
SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
Thursday, February 15, at 8:30 
Saturday, February 17, at 8:30 
WITOLD MALCUZYNSKI, Guest Artist 
ONET, DIG CgtO MLO MMIIOT CM Suesegie en: tents Taree aa A ee Ae Berlioz 
SN EMO MVE NO emt N OL: sOUMh EC yee tt vetren Satie as Jag ser St Berlioz 
(FERENC MOLNAR, SOLO VIOLA) 
Suite from The Plow That Broke the Plains.......... Virgil Thomson 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 2, in F minor.......... Chopin 
-4O>- 
STANDARD SYMPHONY BROADCAST 
KPO, NBC Pacific Coast Network 
Sunday, January 21, at 8:30 
JOSEPH SZIGETI, Guest Artist : 
SLM EMOT a INOS Willis Wan Oe wnt! ere Spee Nene eet) ean ae Haydn 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in D MA OF f-  euepe eare Tartini 
OVEGUUGERO BNO CITC tT AIL S.c.08) ee oat ante, eR Ree ene ed Gluck 
Baller Mitestholln Gey iidle- cutie) O Chis y en taen e n ene ee Grétry 
Overture tonne Blopement tiomne SCTAItOs 0 uence ean Mozart 





176 SAN FRANCISCO 








PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


CUT Ee ORG Sah ROUN Ge eet tere lena ae eee te areca Arcangelo Corelli 
(1653-1713) 
(ARRANGED BY ETrorE PINELLI) 

Ettore Pinelli, who was born in Rome in 1843 and died there in 1915, 
was one of the comparatively small band of 19th century Italian musicians who 
dared to buck the predominating operatic tides of their time and to cultivate 
the instrumental forms in the land of Verdi and Puccini. It is one of the 
stranger ironies of musical history that his compositions, and those of Bazzini, 
Seambati and other like-minded Italians of that era, are almost entirely forgotten 
today, while the only late 19th century Italian instrumental work in large form 
that remains in the repertoire is Verdi’s quartet, which was composed as a 
deliberate, isolated exercise in a medium and style Verdi regarded with the 
utmost suspicion and reserve. 

At all events, Pinelli was co-founder, with Sgambati, of the most important 
music school in Rome, the Liceo Musicale; he helped to establish a chamber 
music society in his native city, and, single-handed, established the Societa 
Orchestrale Romana. In his orchestral transcription of sonata movements by 
Corelli it is easy to perceive a gesture on the part of a modern Roman toward 
the greatest similarly-minded Roman of the baroque period, for Corelli lived in 
the Italian capital during the last 28 years of his life, and almost all of his count- 
less sonatas and concertos were composed there. 

The suite calls for no particular comment. ‘The sarabande and giga are, of 
course, traditional dances very commonly used in the 17th and 18th century 
sonata and suite. The sarabande is a slow dance in triple time: while the giga 
(gigue, or jig) is fast, and usually exploits triplet rhythms. ‘The badinerie, how- 
ever, is not a dance. The word is simply a different form of the term badinage, 
and has exactly the same meaning. It is not very common as a musical term. 
The only other instance the writer can think of is in Bach’s orchestral suite in 
B minor. 


SYMPHONIC METAMORPHOSIS OF THEMES 
BVCG eV enV ONG INS aeons arc ieepee een Paul Hindemith 
(1895-) 

Mr. Hindemith writes as follows: 

“As for the Metamorphosis, there is not much I can tell you. The first, third 
and fourth of the pieces are taken from Weber's four-hand piano compositions, 
and the second is a very free interpretation of ideas from Weber's overture to 
Schiller’s play, Turandot. 

“Originally the music was planned as part of a ballet for Massine, but this 
‘dea was discarded and I wrote the work without thinking about anything else 
but pleasant music, set down in a dignified and considerate way with the highest 
technical perfection at my disposal.” 

The Metamorphosis, incidentally, was composed in 1943 and was first per- 
formed at a concert of the New York Philharmonic-‘Symphony Orchestra about 
a year ago. At that time the writer was preparing program notes for a perform- 
ance of Stravinsky’s Capriccio for piano and orchestra at these concerts, and, in 
the light of this work by Hindemith, was very much struck by the following 
passage in Stravinsky’s autobiography: 

“There is little wonder that, while working at my Capriccio, I should find 
my thoughts dominated by that prince of music, Carl Maria von Weber, whose 
genius admirably lent itself to this manner, Alas! no one thought of calling 


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him a prince in his lifetime! I cannot refrain from quoting (authentically) the 
startling opinion that the celebrated Viennese dramatic poet, Franz Grillparzer, 
had of Euryanthe and its composer; I found it in a striking anthology of classical 
criticisms published by Schott. It runs as follows: ‘What I had feared on the 
appearance of Freischiitz seems now to be confirmed. Weber certainly has a 
poetical mind, but he is no musician. Not a trace of melody, not merely of 
pleasing melody but of any sort of melody. . .. Vatters of ideas held together 
solely by the text, without any inherent musical sequence. ‘There is no inven- 
tion; even the way in which the libretto is handled is devoid of originality. A 
total lack of arrangement and color... . This music is horrible. ‘This inversion 
of euphony, this violation of beauty, would in ancient Greece have been pun- 
ished by the state with penal sanctions. Such music is contrary to police regula- 
tions. It would give birth to monstrosities if it managed to get about. 

“Tt is quite certain that no one would dream nowadays of sharing Grillpar- 
zer’s indignation. Far from that; those who consider themselves advanced, if 
they know Weber, and still more if they do not know him, make a merit of 
treating him with contempt as a musician who is too easy, out of date, and at 
the best can appeal only to old fogies. Such an attitude might perhaps be under- 
standable on the part of those who are musically illiterate, but whose self-assur- 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 179 














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ance is too often equaled only by their incompetence. But what can be said for 
professional musicians when they are capable of expressing such opinions as, 
for example, those I have heard from Scriabin? It is true that he was not speak- 
ing of Weber, but of Schubert, but that does not alter the case. One day when 
Scriabin with his usual emphasis was pouring out ideological verbosities con- 
cerning the sublimity of art and its pontiffs, I, on my side, began to praise the 
orace and elegance of Schubert’s waltzes, which 1 was replaying at the time with 
real pleasure. With an ironical smile of commiseration he said: “Schubert? But 
look here, that is only fit to be strummed on the piano by little girls!’ ’ 

Needless to say, Hindemith’s opinion of Weber is not necessarily the same 
as Stravinsky’s: but the invocation of this romantic composer by two such im- 
portant contemporary musicians is rather interesting. 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
IN Gn 2ee COVEN © 'RERO PAO SS oe pen toa Sergei Rachmaninoff 
(1873-1943) 

Few important pieces of music have been created under stranger circum- 
stances than the second piano concerto of Rachmaninoff. In 1898, as the result 
of various difficulties in his professional life (chiefly the disastrous failure of his 
first symphony) the composer began to doubt his creative abilities and the 
worth-whileness of music making in general. He slumped into gloom and leth- 
argy, and found himself unable to start work upon a piano concerto for which 
he had been commissioned by the London Philharmonic Orchestra. 

Rachmaninoff’s relatives therefore took him toa certain Dr. Dahl, a psychi- 
atrist practicing the then new technique of autosuggestion. “My relations had 
told Dr. Dahl,” Rachmaninoff reveals in his memoirs, “that he must at all costs 
cure me of my apathetic condition and achieve such results that I would again 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 181 














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begin to compose. Dahl had asked what manner of composition they desired, 
and had received the answer, ‘a concerto for pianoforte,’ for this I had promised 
the people in London and had given it up in despair. Consequently I heard the 
same hypnotic formula repeated day after day while I lay half asleep in an 
armchair in Dahl’s study. ‘You will begin to write your concerto... you will 
work with great facility. . . . The concerto will be of excellent quality.’ It was 
always the same, without interruption. Although it may sound incredible, the 
cure really helped me. Already at the beginning of the summer I began again 
to compose. The material grew in bulk, and new musical ideas began to stir 
within me, far more than I needed for my concerto. By the autumn I had fin- 
‘ished two movements—the adagio and the finale—and a sketch for the suite for 
two pianofortes whose opus number 17—1is explained by the fact that I fin- 
ished the concerto later by adding the first movement.” 





I 


Moderato, C minor alla breve. Each movement of the concerto opens with 
the same gambit—an introduction which starts in a key distant from the main 
tonality, gradually approaches it, and finally achieves it with the initial state- 
ment of the principal theme. In the second and third movements these intro- 
ductions also serve as harmonic bridges from the movements just concluded. 


The first movement begins with eight blocky chords in the piano proceed- 
ing from F minor to C minor and from pp to ff. When the haven of C minor is 
reached, the chords spread out in wide arpeggios, con passione. Two bars later 
the violins, violas and clarinets state the principal theme, the arpeggios con- 
tinuing in the solo: 

















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The theme is very a and its second portion is not quoted. ‘The transi- 

‘ion to the second theme begins with capricious runs in the solo. ‘There is a 

sudden climax in the entire ensemble followed by a little phrase of the violas, 

whereupon the solo brings in the second theme, in E flat major. Its melody is as 
follows: 

, 6) piano 


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This is briefly worked over, and is followed by a closing theme begun by 
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The exposition ends shortly after with rapid passage-work in the solo. 
The solo rests at the outset of the development, which begins with a return 
io Example | in the orchestra. Almost the entire development section is based 
upon this theme, and it has the effect of a continuous crescendo in solo and 
orchestra together leading to a great climax. At the height of this climax Ex- 
ample 1 rides back again in its original form and key in the strings ff. “The fol- 
lowing transition passage 1s somewhat more extended than in the exposition. 
| rhe second theme (Example 2) recurs in the horns in A flat major in notes of 
| swice the original value. ‘The closing theme (Example 3) is given to the solo in 

C minor in a varied form, and also in notes of twice the original value. ‘The 
|. movement concludes with a quick-step coda. 


I] 
Adagio sostenuto, E major, 4/4 time. Four introductory bars in the orches- 
ira go from C minor (the key in which the first movement had closed) to E 


major, in which key the solo introduces an arpeggiated triplet figure. ‘This con- 
‘inues as the woodwind state the one and only theme of the movement: 


ae” 























‘There is 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA , 187 








188 





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the theme, and the violins the little interludes given to the solo in Example 4. 
The theme ultimately passes to the strings. 


Now the solo begins an elaborate, variation-like working out of the theme. 
This ends in a little cadenza written into the score. Then the piano returns to 
its triplet figure and Example 4 comes back in the violins. A short coda ends 
the movement. 

Ii 

Allegro scherzando, C minor, alla breve. The introduction, 1n the orches- 
tra alone, begins in E major, the key of the Adagio. It reaches a climax and is 
followed by a cadenza of the solo. Then eight bars of rhythmic preparation lead 
to the theme, given out by the piano. Its bare melodic bones are as follows: 









































A return to Example 5 ends the first theme-group. ‘The second theme, in B flat 
major, Moderato, appears in the oboe and violas after a few bars’ transition in 
the solo: 








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Example 7 is thundered out by all concerned (Maestoso, CG major) but the 
closing bars (piu vivo) go back to Example 5. 


SYMPHONY No. 6, B MINOR, 
(PHATE IGE TETUG AVR NC ci aes Re oe Peter Ilyitch Tschaikowsky 
| " (1840-1893) 

The first mention of Tschaikowsky’s last symphony occurs in a letter he 
wrote to his nephew, Vladimir Davidoff, on February ZOO a: 

“T must tell you how happy Iam about my work. As you know, I destroyed 
a symphony which I had partially composed and orchestrated in the autumn. 
[ did wisely, for it contained little that was really fine —an empty pattern of 
sounds without any inspiration. Just as I was starting on my journey the idea 
“came to me for a new symphony, this time with a program, but a program which 
will remain an enigma to all—let them guess it who can. The work will be 
entitled A Programmatic Symphony (No. 6). This program is penetrated by 
subjective sentiment. During my journey, while composing the work in my 
mind, I frequently shed tears. Now that I am home again I have settled down 
to sketch it out, and it goes with such ardor that in less than four days I have 
completed the first movement, while the rest of the symphony is clearly outlined 
in my head. There will be much that is novel as regards form in this work. For 
‘nstance, the finale will not be a great allegro, but an adagio of considerable 
dimensions. You cannot imagine what joy I feel at the conviction that my day 1s 
not yet over, and that I may still accomplish much. Perhaps I may be mistaken, 
but it does not seem likely.” 

The journey referred to in this letter was a conducting tour that took 
Tschaikowsky to Paris. Late in May of that year the composer went to England 
to receive an honorary degree at Cambridge, and wrote Davidoff “I suffer, not 
only from torments that cannot be put into words (there is one place in the sixth 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 193 














symphony where they seem to me to be adequately expressed) , but of a hatred of 
strangers and an indefinable terror — though of what, the devil only knows.” 

These alterations between gloomy fears of being played out, and exhila- 
ration at discovering that he still had much to Say, were typical of Tschai- 
kowsky throughout his life. In August he wrote his brother that ~ Twenty years 
ago I let myself write at ease and it was all right. Now I have become cowardly 
and uncertain. I have sat the whole day over two pages; that which I wished 
came constantly to naught. In spite of this, I make progress.” A little later 
Davidoff was reading “I am well satisfied with the contents, but not with the 
orchestration. I do not succeed in my intentions. It will not surprise me if the 
symphony is cursed or judged unfavorably; it will not be the first time. ] myself 
consider it the best, especially the most open-hearted of all my works.” 

The Pathetic was indeed “judged unfavorably” when ‘Tschaikowsky con- 
ducted it for the first time at a concert in St. Petersburg in October, 1893, but 
this does not seem to have disturbed him. On the following day his brother, 
Modeste, discovered the composer in his room about to send the score LOsthe 
publisher. He was worried about the title. “What does Programmatic Symphony 
mean when I will give it no program?” he complained. Modeste suggested the 
title Tragic, but Peter did not like this. Modeste turned to go, and then, on a 
sudden inspiration, turned back to utter the one word Pathetic. “Splendid, 
Modi, bravo, Pathetic!’ And the title was then and there inscribed on the score. 
Yet within a few hours Tschaikowsky was writing to the publisher to disregard 
this, and to print the work with no title at all. 

All this happened on October 29, 1893. Fight days later Peter Tschai- 
kowsky was dead. The official account of his death, supplemented by detailed 
reports of physicians, is that he was carried off by a sudden attack of cholera, 





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which was then epidemic in St. Petersburg. But the persistent unofficial account 
is that ‘schaikowsky committed suicide, and in the Tschaikowsky memorial 
issue Of Music and Letters Gerald Abraham stated that “recent research has 
shown beyond reasonable doubt that death was the secret programmatic idea at 


the back of the finale to the Pathetic.” 


*% *K %* %K * * * * 


Tschaikowsky’s fourth and_ fifth symphonies are dominated by “‘fate 
motifs” which recur in all the movements like the “fixed idea” of Berlioz’s 
Fantastic. Lhe Pathetic is similarly haunted, but in a much more subtle and 

4 plastic and all-pervading fashion, by a descending scale-line from which many 

independent themes are derived. (See the woodwind phrase of Example 2; Ex- 

ample 3, particularly Motif A: the last four bars of Example 4; and the opening 
bars of Examples 6, 10 and 11. ‘The descending scale also occurs in many other 
parts of the symphony.) 


This same drooping by tones and semitones 1s characteristic of one of the 
most famous examples of the pathetic in the classical literature, Mozart’s great 
string quintet in G minor. Tschaikowsky may have been influenced here by 
the Mozart quintet, but it is more likely that there is no direct connection be- 
tween the two works. It is perfectly obvious that two composers — even two as 
temperamentally unlike as Mozart and I’schaikowsky — might easily employ 





similar melodic devices to express similar emotional meanings, but it would 
be a very rash man who would generalize from this into any universal law of 
melodic expressiveness. Along this line it is worth pointing out that Hugo Rie- 
mann made much of the resemblance between the first four notes of Example | 












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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 195 


va 





below and the first five notes of Beethoven’s Sonate Pathétique; the descending 
scale line does not figure in either of these motifs. 
I 

Adagio, B minor, 4/4 time. The symphony opens with an introduction 
which starts, like the Rachmaninoff concerto of today’s program, in what Sir 
Donald Francis Tovey calls “the dark outlying region” of the subdominant, in 
this case E minor. This section is devoted to a foreshadowing, in the bassoons, 
of the principal theme (Example 1) to come, and ends with the descending scale 
in the violas. 

The key changes to B minor and the tempo to Allegro non troppo as the 
violas present the principal theme: 























This is counterstated by the woodwind and briefly worked over. A long chain 
of subsidiaries follows. beginning with a little horn call like a rhythmic variant 
of the opening notes of Beethoven’s fifth symphony, followed by: 


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In the subsequent material the twirling 16ths of Example 1 are much in evi- 




















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dence in various new combinations. A minor climax 1s attained, recedes, and is 
succeeded by the second theme. 

This section (Andante, D major) is practically a miniature movement in 
itself. It opens with the following theme in the violins, (teneramente, molto 
cantabile, con espansione) : 









































Four bars later the flute, followed in close imitation by the bassoon and then 
clarinet, has a contrasting phrase: 


















































This is also worked over, whereupon Example 3 returns in the violins and 
violas accompanied by repeated triplets elsewhere in the orchestra. “The section 
dies away in the clarinets, pppppp. 











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The development begins with a sudden explosive chord in the full orches- 
tra, ff and Allegro vivo. ‘Vhe greater part of this section Is given over to a fren- 
ied discussion of Example 1, with the direction feroce much in evidence. Some 
of the pronouncements of the brass, however, are based upon Motif A in Ex- 
ample 3. 

Ultimately the development quiets down to repetitions of the first four 
notes of Example | in the strings over syncopated triplets in the horns, and this 
leads through the outermost bastions of the tonality — B flat minor —and a 
crescendo to an extremely violent varied recapitulation of the principal theme 
in the full orchestra and in the home key of B minor, with much emphasis upon 
antiphonies of strings and wind. The subsidiaries are now dispensed with, and 
the recapitulation of the first theme ends in the major climax of the movement. 
Here the strings and flutes have the descending scale in its most gigantic form, 
falling slowly by whole and half steps from a high F sharp to the E natural two 
octaves and a tone below, while the trombones and tuba vocitferate a tragic new 
fieure of their own. 

The consoling second theme follows (Andante come prima, B major) with 
Example 3 in the violins and flutes. Example 4 is omitted, and the entire return 
of the second theme is concerned with a varied repeat of No. 3. Again the 
section dies away in the clarinets, this time with accompaniment. There is a 
short coda (Andante mosso, B major) in which Example | is given a chorale- 
like turn in the brass and woodwind accompanied by the descending scale 
plucked out by the strings. 


II 


Allegro con grazia, D major, 5/4 time. ‘This movement, which has aptly 
been called “a three-legged waltz,” opens with its principal theme in the ’celli: 


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The entire first part of the movement is based upon this idea. 
The trio opens with the following in the flutes, violins and ’celli, con dol- 
cezza e flebile: 






































There is also a continuing phrase not quoted. Throughout the entire trio the 
bass instruments repeat or sustain a low D to provide one of the longest pedal- 
points in the symphonic literature. Toward the end of this section Examples 5 
and 6 are combined. 

The first part of the movement is repeated in varied form at the conclu- 
sion of the trio, Example 5 being taken up by the violins and ‘celli in octaves. 
The wistful coda opens in the woodwind with the descending scale which is the 
pathetic leitmotiv of the entire symphony. 


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II 
Allegro molto vivace, G major, 4/4 time. The third movement is in the 
sonata form without development. The principal theme is composed of several 
fragmentary ideas, of which the most important are the bustling string figure 
heard at the beginning and throughout the first part of the movement, a new 
version of the omnipresent descending scale, and the motif given to the oboe 
at thé ninth bar: 

















The second theme, in E major, is given to the clarinet on its initial state- 
ment and is an extension of Example 7: 



















































































This is counterstated by the violins, which also bring in a secondary portion of 
the theme: 





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FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 
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WALTER GIESEKING 
EUGENE GOOSSENS 
BORIS GOLSCHMANN 
FLORENCE EASTON 
DANIEL ERICOURT 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
BREENDAN KEENAN 
ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
WIKTOR LABUNSKI 
ALFRED MIROVITCH 
CHARLES NAEGELE 
LOUIS PERSINGER 

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BERNARDO SEGALL 
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ANGEL REYES 
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Se=sae4 ; eemeiece — pone —] a ts 4 
ae ee (Eh ay TT) OY ART) 

d Te EE TT A — ~~ 





These materials are briefly worked over. The original key eventually returns 
and with it the numerous fragmentary ideas of the principal theme. Examples 
8 and 9 are also heard in G and there is a brilliant coda. 


IV 
Adagio lamentoso, B minor, 3/4 time. The movement opens with its prin- 
cipal theme in the strings, curiously divided between the parts but producing 
the following melody: 




















Three bars later there is a continuing phrase of the flutes and bassoons not 
quoted. The strings repeat their theme, but now the continuing phrase is in 
the bassoons alone and it takes those instruments into the most doleful nether 
regions of their compass. 

The horns begin a syncopated triplet figure over which the violins and 
violas sing the second theme (Andante, D major, con lenezza e devozione) : 


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Before the Concent... 
. _ After the Concert 
, Entertain your friends 
at Hotel Whitcomb, so conveniently 
near. Home of the Whitcomb Inn 


and The Parade Cocl.tail Lounge. 








HOTEL 
—— WHITCOME 
KARL WEBER MANAGEMENT MARKET AT 8TH « SAN FRANCISCO 


Tel.: UNderhill 9600 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 205 











KPO SYMPHONY NOTES 


a 


... Noted San Francisco contralto Fernanda Doria, who has sung 
in opera and concert all over the continent of Europe, will be Mrs. 
M. C. Sloss’ guest Saturday, January 13, on the KPO “Know Your 
Symphony” program which is broadcast at 5:00 p.m. Miss Doria and 
Mrs. Sloss, member of the Musical Association’s Executive and Public 
Relations Committees and of the Board of Governors, will discuss 
“The Singer and the Symphony.” 

...QOn the “Stradivari Orchestra,” which is broadcast over KPO 
each Sunday at 9:30 a. m., Jacques Gasselin, concert master, will play 
“Voi lo sapete” from Mascagni’s “Cavalleria Rusticana” on the Jan- 
uary 14th program. Paul LaValle will direct the orchestra in “Gypsy 
Dance” from Bizet’s “Carmen,” Chaminade’s “Scarf Dance,” Chopin’s 
Piano Waltz, Opus 64, and a medley from Kalman’s ‘Countess 
Maritza 


... Eugene Ormandy will conduct the last of his four concerts on 
NBC's “General Motors Symphony of the Air’ next Sunday when he 
presents an all-Brahms program between 2:00 and 3:00 p.m. High- 
lights will be the “Academic Festival Overture” and the “Symphony 
No. 2 1n D Major.” 


... Efrem Kurtz will again be presented as conductor on “The 
Standard Hour” Sunday, when it is broadcast from KPO over the 
NBC Pacific Coast network at 8:30 p. m. He will direct the entire 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra in Weber’s “Oberon’’ Overture, 
Corelli's “String Suite,” Richard Strauss’ “Rosenkavalier” Waltzes, 
Offenbach’s “Gaite Parisienne” and John Philip Sousa’s “E] Capitan” 
March. Special feature will be Stanley Bate’s “Hameen,” orchestral 
piece based on Saudi-Arabian melodies. 


... Rise Stevens, Metropolitan Opera mezzo-soprano, will be a 
guest on KPO’s “The Voice of Firestone” next Monday, January 15, 
(5:30 p.m.) when she sings Pestalozza’s “Ciribiribin,” Saint-Saens’ 
“Printemps qui commence” from “Samson and Delilah” and other 
selections. Howard Barlow will conduct the orchestra in the prelude 
to Act III from Wagner’s “Lohengrin,” Schubert’s “March Militaire’’ 
and Herbert’s ‘““‘Dagger Dance” from “Natoma.” 


ZO PInza. DassOlOL thie Metropolitan, will be a guest on the 
“Telephone Hour” when it, too, is broadcast over KPO Monday 
night at 9:00 o’clock. Supported by Donald Voorhees and the orches- 
tra, Pinza will sing the aria “Ella giammai m’amd” from Verdi’s 
“Don Carlos,” and the aria of the ‘Tambour-Major from Thomas’ 
“Le Caid” as his operatic numbers. The orchestra will play the 
Overture to “William Tell” by Rossini. 





206 


SAN FRANCISCO 








11 Se + 
poppe aah 


ChESG: ——— 























This is worked over with constantly increasing volume and faster pace until it 
ends on a sudden pause after two bars of Vivace. 

Eight bars of transition serve as a bridge to the recapitulation of the prin- 
cipal theme, Example 10, which 1s now subjected to some development.* At the 
close of this episode a gong very quietly seals the doom of Peter Tschaikowsky 
and the human race. A few transitory bars in the horns lead to the recapitula- 
tion of the second theme, Example 11, in B minor in the strings, and with this 
the symphony dies away. 


*Like the finale of the first symphony of Brahms, this movement must be analyzed as sonata 
form without development with development in the recapitulation. The terminology of music 
‘s unfortunately all too full of this kind of double-talk, but it is not my fault. 


WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


First Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 







WGQTS a has resigned in order to devote his time exclusively to 
teaching. 

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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 207 


bi he ae 











Box Holders for Saturday Night 





















MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX N MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E. AMBROSE 
MR. THEODORE BEKINS 
MILLS COLLEGE DR. ALVIN COX 


DR MIRIAM MILLER 


KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA DR. AND MRS. B. H. PAGE 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
0 COMMANDER AND MRS. WM. LISTER ROGERS 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM MR. AND MRS. JOHN ROSEKRANS 
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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

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208 


SAN FRANCISCO 





aie 





eS ES 


T,, e Musical Association 
of San Francisco, maintaining and operating 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, still 
requires $15,000.00 to complete the 1944- 
1945 season, and this 1s where you who are 
really deeply interested in the welfare of our 
city’s most beautiful music come. forward 
with gifts of money to help in balancing the 


budget. 


The budget has been kept out of the red just 
because we have all of you who are vitally 
and courageously interested in the welfare of 


the symphony to assist us. 


Our campaign for needed funds for the or- 
chestra is now under way and we hope and 
rely on your making possible a successful 
season by your contribution, large or small, 


to: 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SAN FRANCISCO 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


209 





PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
Forb, Louis W. 
HOLM. THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
SHWE!ID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSKI, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
Di BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENG 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


210 


PIERRE MONTEU®X, Conoucror 


‘CELLOS: 


BLINDER, BorRIS 
PRINCIPAL 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 


BASSES: 


KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


RENZI, PAUL JR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIivo, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
SCHIvoO, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BiISBiNS, F. C. 


JULIUS HAUG 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, UR. 


TRUMPETS: 
Buss, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Giosi, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SINAI, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELwoop 


PIANO AND CELESTA: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


PROPERTY MASTER: 
J. T. HEAVEY 


SAN FRANCISCO 











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San Franc 


ME BREWERIES 


AC 








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ONE — for Real Mildness 
TWO — for Cooler Smoking 
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THE MUSIGALT ASSOCTALION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY - PRESIDENT AND MANAGING _ DIRECTOR 
HOWARD K. SKINNER © BUSINESS MANAGER 








Sr . 
ye ae Fe 
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family. It can always be altered. Ask 






about this service. 









TRUST DEPARTMENT 


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Bank « union rrust co. 


SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 
Member F. D.I. C. 













Fusill 


SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. in its 
NEW HOME in OAKLAND 








New Telephone Number 
Higate 8440 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Convenience is the word for our new music store... 
located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
town Oakland. 


Step right off the street to our main floor... for REC- 
ORDS ... SHEET MUSIC...RECORD CABINETS... 
CONCERT TICKETS. Upstairs, on the mezzanine, 
you'll find our other departments... Pianos, Band and 
Orchestra Instruments, Radios and Radio-Phonographs. 


Parking lot next door or just across the street. 


Sherman |y Clay 


7a) |e: 











ARN EY — Om 








ees | 


M EIN Gale E CONCERTS 
Ol 


art &Y 


“ay be 
THe per" SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


ROS STAN Be 
BALLET THEA TRS 


GOLLNER KAYE LAING CHASE 
HIGHTOWER PETROFF J. REED TUDOR ALONSO KRIZA 
ROMANOFF LANG ORLOFF R. REED 


and by Special Arrangement 


TAMARA TOUMANOVA 
© 


ANTAL DORATI, Musical Directcr MOIS ZLATIN, Associate Director 


70 Performances 
Evenings at 8:30 REPERTOIRE Matinees at 2:30 
THURSDAY, FEB. 1 SIND ANA EY carne baest SATURDAY, FEB. 10 
SWAN LAKE 
AO etal al Saas POMCORAND JULIET 
GRAND PAS DE DEUX JUDGMENT OF PARIS IGHT SONATA 

from ‘DON QUIXOTE” FANCY FREE MOONLIG 
GALA PERFORMANCE GRADUATION BALL 
FRIDAY, FEB. 2 
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PETROUCHKA ROMEO AND JULIET 
PETROUCHKA 
PRINCESS AURORA PILLAR OF FIRE EAC GKRDEN 
SATURDAY, FEB: 3 GALA PERFORMANCE GRAND PAS DERE 
ROMEO AND JULIET SER EE 
pec OnE cH SONATA FRIDAY, FEB. 9 
N BALL 

WALTZ ACADEMY SUN. EVE., FEB. 11 
SUNDAY MAT., FEB. 4 
WALTZ ACADEMY *DARK ELEGIES PRINCESS AURORA 
PETER AND THE WOLF PAS DE DEUX FANCY FREE 
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Kw KK 


AR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Tickets $1 Xe $1.80, $2.40, $3.00, Tax Included 


SYMPHONY BOX OFFICE, SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. —SUtter 1331 





“There's an Immortality in the expression of the 


finer human moods... These moods sincerely 
expressed ina portratt can mean so much to the 
person towards whom that feeling ts directed.” 


Ytucleolee. Sohintlor 


14, ten 


MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER 


427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTFI) e YIIKON 9NA1 








Musical Association oj San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
—E. Raymond Armsby Vice-President Charles Page 
Paul A. Bissinger Vice-President Howard K. Skinner 
Charles R. Blyth Vice-President Geraid G. Ross 
Garret McEnerney, Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 

Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 

Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 

Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 
C. O. G. Miller, Chairman 


E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 


Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 


Mrs. John B. Knox 
. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 


. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 


Mrs. John P. Coghlan Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill Vice-Chairman 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 

Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Biehl 


BOARD OF GOVERNORS 


E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. |. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Humphrey Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engeihart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul |. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Robert W. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein’ Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
. O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, I! Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe Mrs. Waiter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Wood 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris 


ADMINISTRATION 


Gerald Ross Curran Swint Virginia Webb Deborah Spalding 
Constance Alexander 
TICKET SALES 


Victor Mohl Joesph Scafidi Kathleen Lawlor Doris Lowell 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








is is one way to make clothes last 


| a long time. 





more practical method is to buy 
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| *BEMBERG is the registered trade-mark of AMERICAN BEMBERG CORPORATION 


218 SAN FRANCISCO 











eg re oe ee Ne 


TODAYS GUEST Anis 


Cartos CHaAvez is equally well known as composer and conductor. He was 
born near Mexico City in 1899 and studied in the Mexican capital with Manuel 
M. Ponce and Pedro Luis Ogazon. The earlier part of his career was devoted 
entirely to composition. He founded the Symphony Orchestra of Mexico in 
1928 and remains its permanent conductor. He was director of the National 
Conservatory in Mexico City from 1928 to 1934, and for a time was Chief of 
the Department of Fine Arts in the Mexican Secretariat of Education. This will 


be his third appearance with the San Francisco Symphony. 


C7 OoOo™~ 


NEXT GUEST, ARTIST: 


Wrrotp MALCuzyYNSKI was Paderewski’s last pupil. He was born in Warsaw, 
and began his professional training in the field of law. He studied the piano as 
an avocation, but was advised by Paderewski to make it his life's work. He 
then studied with that master for several years, and at this time won the Inter- 
national Chopin Competition in Warsaw. On the completion of his studies, 
eave recitals and was soloist with orchestras in many parts of 


t 


Europe. He was in the Balkans when Poland fell to the Germans in 1939, and 


Malcuzynski 


went to Paris with his wife, who is also a pianist and a member of the celebrated 
Parisian musical family of Gaveau. The Malcuzynskis escaped from Paris just 
ahead of the Germans in 1940, and, through the intervention of a musical friend, 
were able to go to South America. Malcuzynski gave many recitals in Buenos 
Aires, Rio de Janeiro, Lima and elsewhere. Yehudi Menuhin heard him play 
in Montevideo and was responsible for his coming to the United States. Mal- 
cuzynski has given concerts in many parts of this country, but this will be his 
first appearance in San Francisco. He will play on the concerts of Thursday and 


Saturday night, February 15-17. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 219 








Head Office: 400 CaLirorNIA STREET 
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Thirty-third Season 
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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


-<@}- 
FIFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
: FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, aT 2:15 


SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, AT 8:30 


CARLOS CHAVEZ, Guest Conductor 


-4e}- 
‘Program 


BRANDENBURG CONCERTO No. 3 


b 


TIN GEA ORG ei carne Pieces ey rae mrad seer Soh eae ence na Bach 
Allegro 
Allegro 
SARABANDE OUR sale EIN Groner eet rr. Chavez 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
CONCERTO FOR FOUR HORNS 
AUNT EUR. Gece Sa RANG fet rsa tere tk eee ie ceenee eee ce Chavez 


Allegro 
Adagio cantabile 
Rondo: Vivo 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
Soloists: FUERMAN TRUTNER, Dino LUCCHESI, CHARLES I'RYNER 
AND PAUL ROTH 


Nee Velotoen®) IN 


SYMPHONY No. 4, IN B FLAT MAJOR pee eee Beethoven 
Adagio - Allegro vivace 
Adagio 


Scherzo: Allegro vivace 
Allegro ma non troppo 


OVER TURE FOCANAG RE ONS Sie tn Nas iho Cherubini 


A REQUEST 
It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use their tickets 
kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
of their seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 
This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 


mt A 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 221 








222 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


~{@}- 


SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Thursday, February 15, at 8:30 
Saturday, February 17, at 8:30 


WITOLD MALCUZYNSKI, Guest Artist 


Overtume tome iro 1G Cus GaT Nace amen ead. tie eee nee 2 Berlioz 
Symphony No. 3, Harold in LEG Raed hoe eee at eats aes ee ee ee Berlioz 
(FERENC Mounar, SOLO VIOLA) 

Suite from The Plow That Broke the Plains... .. “eae Virgil Thomson 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 

Concerto for Piano and:Orchestra, No. 2,in F minor.......... Chopin 
-40}- 


SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, February 23, at 2:15. 
Saturday, February 24, at 8:30 


LORIN MAAZEL, Guest Conductor 
NAOUM BLINDER, Soloist 


OVventuirestouk Osan des sce Aaa e ee te enn eee ea Schubert 

Neel Penny eb yaaay lal oven i, hea aeer ec oWenel Siercar ht ApEn aN Retr a eae en at Pe Mendelssohn 

Conecertovton Violmbeand Orchestras .12.4. 202... Set oe ey Bloch 
~4e}- 


STANDARD SYMPHONY BROADCAST 


KPO, NBC Pacific Coast Network 
Sunday, January 21, at 8:30 


: | JOSEPH SZIGETI, Guest Artist 


SVL NOUN VARIN lap eka x A A] Oars tata a Ree tree cee Ree sin ee Haydn 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, in D TA OU torea ti ese Bales acon Tartini 
Overture to Iphigenia in Aulis....... Aids eas ea ne ACN e BET Gluck 
Balletouiter thom Gen Wa lcrcl senOCKLs sane on wena wee ey ent, Grétry 


Overture to Miewslopement froupine Scvacuor. 294. ane ae Mozart 


SAN FRANCISCO 








PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


BRANDENBURG CONCERTO No. 3, 
TN GsM Aq GO Reigen tiene Sh apace er are Johann Sebastian Bach 


(1685-1750) 


In the spring of 1718 Prince Leopold of Anhalt-Cothen went to Carlsbad 
to take the waters, bringing with him five members of his household orchestra 
and his personal staff composer and harpsichordist, Johann Sebastian Bach. 
The Prince apparently gave musical parties at Carlsbad, and .these were pre- 
sumably attended by another blue-blooded musical enthusiast, Christian Lud- 
wig, Margrave of Brandenburg. ‘he Margrave commissioned Bach to compose 
some concertos for his own orchestra, and these were dispatched in 1721 with 
the following letter, written in the purest Saxon French: 

“4 son altesse royale, Monseigneur Crétien Louis, Margraf de Brandebourg, 
€tc., Etc. 

“Monsergneur, 

“Two years ago, when I had the honor of playing before your Royal High- 
ness, I experienced your condescending interest in the insignificant musical 
talents with which heaven has gifted me, and understood your Royal Highness’s 
eracious willingness to accept some pieces of my composition. In accordance 
with that condescending command, I take the liberty to present my most humble 
duty to your Royal Highness in these concerti for various instruments, begging 
your Highness not to judge them by the standards of your own refined and deli- 
cate taste, but to seek in them rather the expression of my profound respect and 
obedience. In conclusion, Monseigneur, I most respectfully beg your Royal 
Highness to continue your gracious favor toward me, and to be assured that 
there is nothing I so much desire as to employ myself more worthily in your 
service. 

“With the utmost fervor, Monseigneur, I subscribe myself, 

“Your Royal Highness’s most humble and most obedient servant, 

Jean Sébastien Bach.” 

The letter was, of course, purely conventional. ‘—The concertos were not, 
wherefore the Margrave’s “refined and delicate taste” led him to put the manu- 
script aside and forget all about it. It was not even entered in the extensive 
catalogue of his music library, and the noble lord died in 1734 little realizing 
he had won a tiny niche in history through the commissioning of a piece of 
music that was shortly to be sold in a job-lot of junk which the Margrave’s heirs 
disposed of for eight cents. 

Yet it is easy to understand why Christian Ludwig thought little of his 
concertos by Bach, for these works are among the most startingly original 
orchestral compositions of all time. Nothing like them had previously existed 
and nothing like them has been created since. 

It was the custom then, and for a long time afterward, for instrumental 
compositions in the same form to be produced in litters of six. (The last im- 
portant instance of this practice is Beethoven's set of six quartets, Opus 18, 
written in 1800.) Bach obviously perceived in the Brandenburg commission an 
opportunity to experiment with six totally different types of orchestral balance, 
color and sonority. The standard, universal orchestra of the present time was 
unknown, and instrumental ensembles varied greatly from place to place as 
well as from time to time within a single place. Bach’s six experiments in the 
Brandenburg concertos are therefore almost a complete treatise on 18th century 
ensemble practice and potentiality as seen by the most daringly inventive 
musical mind of that age. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 223 


















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The third Brandenburg is written for strings in nine parts—three violins, 
three violas and three ’celli—plus the harpsichord bass which. 1s frequently 
omitted in modern presentations. Bach obviously intended this work to be 
played with only one performer to a part, for the Brandenburg concertos are 
really chamber music on a grand scale. 


The third Brandenburg also provides a bit of a mystery as regards form. 
It is customary for the concerto to be cast in three movements, a tradition which 
Bach follows in all the Brandenburg set except the first and third. ‘The third 
concerto contains two Allegro movements separated by two strange, problem- 
atical bars of Adagio. One school of thought believes these bars were intended 
as the final cadence of a slow movement to be improvised, probably by the 
harpsichordist. “Today they are sometimes used as the excuse for a cadenza by 
the concertmaster, and sometimes as the excuse for a slow movement interpo- 
lated from some other work of Bach. Mr. Chavez belongs to the school which 
holds that these two bars are exactly all the slow movement Bach ever intended 
—a mere point of harmonic contrast in 5 minor between two movements in 
G major. 


OO Ee SS — ee 


Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 


8 ES SS 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated by the Citv and Countv of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 225 





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Sos Pasig] BY DY Ee) sh ©)1 Rear a Del III Core eh aah meerat oe bene Carlos Chavez 


(1899-) 


According to Percy Scholes, the sarabande is the “measure full of state 
and ancientry” to which Shakespeare refers in Much Ado A bout Nothing. Yet 
at the very time Shakespeare was writing this line (1598) the dance was sup- 
pressed by law in Spain because of its presumed lewdness. Jehan Tabouret, the 
foremost dancing authority of that period, wrote in 1596 that the sarabande had 
lost its lascivious character in being transplanted from Spain to France, and he 
praises it for its seriousness and grandeur. It is possible that ‘Tabouret’s ex- 
planation 1s correct, and this would resolve the apparent inconsistency between 
Shakespeare’s attitude and Philip II's law, but it is also possible that the sara- 
bande was merely suffering from the moral condemnation that seems to be the 
fate of every dance when it is new. In 1805 Dr. Charles Burney, writing of the 
latest dance-craze of his time, said “The word waltzen, whence this word 1s 
derived, implies to roll, wallow, welter, tumble down, or roll in the dirt of 
mire.” Burney knew perfectly well that waltzen means simply “to turn,’ and was 
applied to the dance for innocent and obvious reasons, but his moral indigna- 
tion ran away with him. 

At all events, the sarabande probably originated in the Orient. It came into 
Europe through Spain and achieved great and lasting popularity. It is often 
used by modern dancers to suggest “state and ancientry,’ and such was appar- 
ently its intention in this case. For the sarabande by Mr. Chavez is part of an 
extended ballet score which he wrote last year for Martha Graham on a commis- 
sion from the Elisabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation. It has not as yet been 
presented with Miss Graham's choreography, nor has the score as a whole been 
performed in concert. ‘The subject of the ballet is derived from Greek tragedy. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 227 













































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CONCERTO FOR FOUR HORNS 
SAINI Ls OOF EL PSUR Aon ate ta etn hee oad ach Sticlen par Carlos Chavez 


The following notes, by Francisco Agea, are taken from the program book 
of the Symphony Orchestra of Mexico for Siejorcenmlorere ay, ES): 

“This work was originally conceived and created in 1930 as a sonata for 
four horns. In this form it was played in May, 1930, ,at the Teatro Arbeu, in 
one of the concerts arranged by the National Conservatory of Music. 

“Tater the composer, realizing the extreme difficulty of the work, in which 
the four cornists were playing constantly and alone for more than twenty 
minutes, planned to rewrite the piece in the form of a concerto for horns and 
orchestra. But it was not until the spring of 1937 that he was able to get at the 
revision. The first two movements were played in the new version on April 11 
of that year at the chamber music festival held in Washington under the pat- 
ronage of Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, and the first movement was performed in 
Mexico at the chamber music festival held in July, 1937. The finale was re- 
written only this year (1939). 

“Tn the new scoring, the four horns still have all the most important the- 
matic parts of the original, but they are not treated as virtuoso instruments in 
the ordinary sense of that word. Besides the horns and the usual strings, the 
orchestration calls for a quartet of clarinets and also of double reeds (English 
horn, two bassoons and contra-bassoon) which reinforce rather than compete* 
with the horns. The work is therefore neither a concerto nor a concerto grosso, 
but a sinfonia concertante in which the horns predominate as soloists. As for 
the structure, much use is made of the cyclic form. ‘The two principal themes 





* Mr. Agea here refers to the fact that concertare, the Italian word from which concerto 
is derived, means ‘“‘to compete,” and a concerto is therefore literally a competition rather than 
an exercise in ensemble. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 229 





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of the first movement reappear as important thematic elements in the other two 
movements, the first theme in the finale and the second in the Adagio.” 


SYMPHONY No. 4, B FLAT MAJOR 


CP'S 60s ioe phate Gates Ske om Sate Saar ce Ludwig van Beethoven 
; (1770-1827) 


Because there is no authentic story to be told about the fourth symphony, 
romantic biography has been forced to invent one. ‘The fourth symphony was 
never dedicated to Napoleon and later re-dedicated to an abstract ideal of hero- 
‘sm. Fate does not knock at its door. It paints no nature-pictures, and proclaims 
no philosophy of human brotherhood in choral terms. There is not even a shred 
of an anecdote about a dinner party and a metronome-ticking scherzo to be told 
as background to the fourth symphony, wherefore we are informed that this 
work is so genial, sunny and light-hearted in mood because Beethoven was in 
love with the Countess Theresa von Brunswick when he wrote it in 1806. We are 
informed by the same authorities that the eighth symphony is even more light- 
hearted than the fourth because Beethoven was perfectly miserable in 1812. 


ik 


Adagio, B flat major, 4/4 time. The symphony begins with one of Beet- 
hoven’s most important innovations, a slow introduction which serves to create 
a mood of mystery and expectancy out of which the main movement will event- 
ually take form. The introduction ends with rising scales punctuated by pauses. 
Shortly the scales swing into the theme of the Allegro vivace: 


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This is repeated by the full orchestra, whereupon the violins bring in the second 
part of the theme: 





The second theme, in F major, is introduced by the woodwind after a long 
crescendo and a passage in a markedly syncopated rhythm: 





The theme is extended by the violins, and after a passage of sequences the con- 
cluding theme appears in a canon of the clarinet and bassoon. Only the clarinet 
part is quoted: 





p dolce 
Example 4 is repeated by the full orchestra, and the concluding section returns 
for a moment to the syncopated rhythms previously heard. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 233 











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The syncopations bridge the gap to the comparatively short development 
section, which is based almost entirely upon the principal theme. (Example 1.) 
Not far from the beginning of the development, however, a new episodic idea 
is introduced: 


pe = artes “eae tise? 


But this is accompanied throughout by intervals from the first bars of Exam- 
ple 1. Toward the end of the development the woodwind motif in the last four 
bars of Example 1 comes to prominence. The section ends with mysteriously 
hushed repetitions of the rising triplet figure at the very beginning of Example | 
heard in the strings over a long roll of the kettledrums, leading through a erad- 
ual crescendo to the recapitulation. 






























woodwi 


This section is not a literal repetition of the exposition. here are some 
alterations in Example I as it is restated, and Example 2 is entirely omitted. 
Examples 3 and 4, however, come back much as before, but in B flat major. 
Example | 1s further treated in the coda. 


II. 
Adagio, E flat major, 3/4 time. A sonata-like rondo. The second violins 
begin by stating the rhythm to be heard almost incessantly in accompaniment 
throughout the movement, followed by the principal theme in the first violins: 


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SYMPHONY. ORCHESTRA 235 




















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The theme is counter-stated by the woodwind, and there 1s a longish transition 
with new material not quoted. The second theme, or first episode, 1s stated by 
H the clarinet in B flat major over a 16th-note figure in the violins: 


7 clarinet 















Ime ‘4. 
ner TP 


A brief concluding figure is given to the bassoon over 32nd-note figuration in 
the strings. 

The principal theme (Example 6) now returns in the violins in a floridly 
ornamented form and is briefly developed. The recapitulation starts with this 
same ornamented version of the theme in the flute. ‘The transitional material 
follows, and the second theme (Example 7) is reheard, again in the clarinet, but 
in E flat. The concluding motif is played by the horns instead of the bassoons, 
and there is a very brief coda based on the principal theme. 








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eae: 


SHA: 
Allegro vivace, B flat major, 3/4 time. The conventional scherzo and trio. 


The first section of the scherzo, 20 bars long, presents the following subject: 


& full orchestra clar.g.bs51. 


Presi tee siete tears 


iid 5 




































The section is repeated, and is followed by a much longer section, also repeated, 


in which Example 8 is worked over. 
The trio begins as follows: 


9g wiolinS— per violir 


ealar adie a ciee 


! | . 
wood 1091 71L 































—_—_ 
oe ™~ — 


pment eee sess 


f— 








This is also worked over at some length. 

The scherzo proper (Example 8 and following) 1s then heard once more. By 
an exception to the usual procedure, the trio is also reheard. At the end of the 
movement the scherzo comes back once more. 


IV. 
Allegro ma non troppo, B flat major, 2/4 time. The finale begins with its 
theme in the strings: 

















PATRICE MUNSEL 


brilliant young star of the 
Metropolitan Opera may be 
heard every Sunday on the 


FAMILY HOUR 


2:00 to 2:45 p.m. 


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740 on 
the dial 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 239 














ght 1945 Cresta Blanca Wine Company, Inc., 


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UInS. 





oltre na : 
10 jst violins ah 2 mt ylns. tas e 


— ee a = 






























The 16th notes spin out for seven more bars, whereupon the strings begin the 
second part of the theme: 


violins 


ieee ear ae ia 


© wooduind 











































A short transition takes the music into F major for the second theme: 


obi eae = eae 














This is extended by the strings. ‘There is a concluding idea in the violins: 
































But the exposition ends with references back to the bustling sixteenths of the 
principal theme. (Example 10.) The entire exposition is then repeated, from 
the beginning of the movement. 

Examples 10 and 11 also provide the materials of the short development. 





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Dinner, a la carte, after- 
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lounge. 4 P. M. to midnight. 


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O’FARRELL STREET AT POWELL 
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241 | 








242 





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The recapitulation begins with Example 10 in the bassoon. (A perfect in- 
stance of what Professor Tovey calls the Great Bassoon Joke.) Example 11 1s 
omitted from the recapitulation, but the rest of it is regular enough, bringin 
back the themes and nexuses of the exposition in regular order, with the secon 
theme (Example 12) in B flat. There is an extended coda again based on the 
spinning sixteenths of the principal theme, and with references to Example I1. 


OVER WURE ROSANA CE OIN 3 ire cree merece Luigi Cherubini 
(1760-1842) 

Maria Luigi Carlo Zenobio Salvatore Cherubini enjoys anonymous immor- 
tality as the putative originator of one of the world’s worst jokes—“What'’s 
worse than a flute?”’ ‘“Iwo flutes’”—a feeble, deathless wheeze on which several 
billion variations have been rung. But in his own time Cherubini was regarded 
as a great musician, and the critic of the early 1800's who declared that Beet- 
hoven’s Fidelio would some day be ranked as high as Cherubini’s Faniska was 
considered a mad enthusiast. 


If Cherubini’s reputation has not lived forever, the man himself threatened 
to. When he was born, Mozart was a child of four and Bach had been gone only 
a decade. When he died, the careers of Wagner and César Franck were already 
under way, and Tschaikowsky, as Lawrence Gilman has observed, was cutting 
his first teeth. 

Cherubini began his own career as a church composer in Italy. His first 
operas were also produced in that country, but in 1788 he settled in Paris and 
remained there for the rest of his life. He was connected with the Paris Con- 
servatory in one capacity or another from 1795 to 1841. For the last two decades 
of that period he was director of the Conservatory and as such came into sharp 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 243 

















iISLRINA Gat PIA Ce Ge Orn CE Rel S 


C st wts 
TH pe CAN FRANCISCO 
pare SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


Veta Oab a 


Micho Wai 


GULES ie * SOE OVS & 


® 
PROGRAM 
Overture, Cornolantisn a. tess foe ase Sony emia pats Beethoven 
Concerto) ton Violin-andiOrehestra ve majors: eee ee Bach 
MR. MENUHIN 
Rondo + cn lMEutensplegelns.:.2-2-.e. soe se ene es Strauss 
Symphonie Espagnole for Violin and Orchestra.....................- Lalo 


MR. MENUHIN 





MUSIC 
MAINTAINS 
MORALE 


MUSIC 
MUST 


GO 
ON! 








CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 25, 8:30 


Tickets: 30c, 60c, 90c, $1.20, $1.80, Tax Included—Sherman, Clay ... SUtter 1331 








conflict with a young revolutionist named Hector Berlioz, who provides some 
marvelously malicious vignettes of Cherubini in his autobiography. 

Cherubini composed some 300 works, including 29 operas, six string quar- 
‘ets and an immense amount of church music. He was the dictator of musical 
theory in France in his time, and his Course of Counterpoint and Fugue was 
still of sufficient interest to call for reprinting as late as 1911. 

Perhaps a score or libretto of Anacreon, or Fugitive Love 1s still to be found 
somewhere, but not in the haunts of this writer. It was a one-act ballet-opera 
produced in 1803. According to Gilman it was a failure because of its story, 
which seems to have been based on one of the odes of Anacreon, the classic Greek 
poet who is particularly well known for his versified praise of wine and cheer 
and good fellowship. Anacreon was the patron saint of a popular chowder and 
marching society in London at the end of the 18th century, and the “constitu- 
tional song” of this organization, To Anacreon in Heaven, originally intended 
as a broad “ode to joy” ina highly materialistic sense, was played at the opening 
of today’s program under the title The Star Spangled Banner. 

Gilman quotes H. E. Krehbiel as saying that Cherubini’s overture “ex- 
presses the antique joyousness of life, though there are shadows which serve to 
lift the general mood into higher relief.” 


a 


WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


First Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 





years — has resigned in order to devote his time exclusively to 
teaching. 

STUDIOS— 

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438 Hicucrest Rp., SAN CARLOS SCG: LAS 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 245 

















TODAY'S GREAT 


PIANO 





the cheice of 
Today's Great Artists 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO 
AS THE ARTISTS DO 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin 
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MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU HAROLD BAUER 


CECILLE DE HORVATH 
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ERICA MORINI 
EDITH MASON 
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KARL WEBER MANAGEMENT MARKET AT 8TH ¢ SAN FRANCISCO 


Tel.: UNderhill 9600 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 247 











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FOR YOUR RECORD COLLECTION : 


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248 








A 
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Box Holders for Friday Afternoons 


PJERRE MONTEUX 
SIGMUND STERN 
LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 


JOHN T. BARNETT 
WHITNEY BENTLEY 
E. E. BROWNELL 
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MORTON GIBBONS 
HARRY HILL 

JAMES HORSBURGH 
SILAS PALMER 

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ATHERTON RUSSELL 


5. NAVAL HOSPITALS 


EDWARD H. BELL 
SPENCER GRANT 
MAXWELL C. MILTON 
. WILLIAM H. ORRICK 
STUART RAWLINGS 


MISS ELSE SCHILLING 


MRS 


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MISS JOHANNA VOLKMANN 


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DEAN WITTER 
J. B. WRIGHT 


REED J. BEKINS 

GEORGE EDWIN BENNETT 
FRANK INGERSOLL 
CLARENCE LORAN JOHNSTON 
GEORGE S. JOHNSTON 

RALPH MERILLION 

Je ROSEN 

ERNEST J. SWEETLAND 


JOSEPH D. GRANT 


JOHN CASSERLY 

DONALD GREGORY 

YW/ELLINGTON HENDERSON 
SGOOD HOOKER 

AND MRS. KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
EDITH NORTH 


MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
M. C. SLOSS 


CHARLES BRANSTEN 

RICHARD FRANK 
AND MRS. MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
LEWIS LAPHAM 

ROGER LAPHAM, JR. 

FREDERICK WHITMAN 

AND MRS. CHARLES R. BLYTH 


RICHARD HEIMANN 
A. J. LOWREY 


MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER 


MRS. 


N MR, 


EDGAR WOODS 
AND MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON 


MRS. STANHOPE NIXON 


MR. 


O MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
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AND MRS. NION R. TUCKER 


DUNN DUTTON 
WALTER HOBART 
FREDERICK HUSSEY 
KENYON JOYCE 
SAMUEL KNIGHT 
RICHARD McCREERY 


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MRS. WALTER D. HELLER 
MRS. MORRIS MEYERFELD 
MRS. RICHARD SHAINWALD 
MrS. GEORGE OPPEN 


MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 
MRS. 


FRANK P. DEERING 
JAMES L. FLOOD 
BENJAMIN C. KEATOR 
HENRY S. KIERSTED 
MRS. HARRY B. LITTLE 

MRS. HAROLD R. McKINNON 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 


DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 


MRS. FRANCIS S. BAER 

MISS JENNIE BLAIR 

MRS. ELDRED BOLAND 

MRS. GEORGE M. BOWLES 
MRS. GEORGES S. DeLATOUR 
MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 

MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR 


MRS. OTTO BARKAN 
MRS. L. A. BENOIST 

M!SS MARILYN BENTLEY 
MRS. WALTER BENTLEY 
MRS. FOSTER NEWHALL 
MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
MRS. BRUCE SELFRIDGE 
MRS. MELVILLE L. SMITH 


MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 
**#U. S. ARMY HOSPITALS 


MRS. HENRY BOYEN 

MRS. ARTHUR B. CAHILL 
COUNTESS LILLIAN DANDINI 
MRS. JOHN L. FLYNN 

MRS. PETER B. KYNE 

MRS. JAMES F. McNULTY 
MRS. A. J. MOORE 

MRS. THEODORE WORES 


DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
MRS. ANGUS McDONALD 

DR. HANS VON GELDERN 

MRS. HENRY H. WEHRHANE 


MRS. C. W. CROSSE 

MRS. DUNCAN CURRY, JR. 
MrS. JOSEPH W/. FOWLER 
MRS. RALPH HENKLE 

MRS. DANIEL C. HUNT 
MRS. A. F. JUNCKER 

MRS. E. W. WILLETT 

MRS. EDWARD C. WURSTER 


MRS. FRANK BUCK 
MRS. RALPH K. DAVIES 
MRS. J. LINDSAY HANNA 
MRS. JAMES LEVENSALER 
MRS. DOUGLAS McBRYDE 
MISS OLGA MEYER 

MRS. FRANK SOMERS 


TOO AA aie Service through courtesy of the R #¢d Cross Motor Corps 


with t 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


e cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


249 




















250 


KPO SYMPHONY NOTES 


a2 


... One of the most unusual fine-music programs on the air now 
is “The Stradivari Orchestra,” which features musicians recruited 
from New York’s major symphony orchestras, playing on rare Stradi- 
varius violins, violas and cellos, most of which belonged to the fa- 
mous Wurlitzer collection. Under the direction of Paul Lavalle, the 
orchestra plays a half hour’s worth of the world’s best-loved melodies 
every Sunday morning from 9:30 to 10:00 over KPO. 


On Sunday, January 21, Jacques Gasselin will play the violin solo 
“Je dis que rien ne m’epouvante,”’ famous aria from Bizet’s “Carmen.” 
Among the orchestral selections will be the “Bohemian Polka” by 
Weinberger, “Gavotte” from Massenet’s “Manon,” “Rosenkavalier” 
Waltzes by Richard Strauss and Chopin’s “Grand Valse Brillante.” 


... Claudio Arrau, brilliant Chilean concert pianist, will be guest 
of honor, along with current singing star Perry Como, on “Music 
America Loves Best,’ when it is broadcast over KPO Sunday at 1:30 
p. m. Arrau will be supported by Jay Blackton and the orchestra in 
two Chopin compositions, the first movement from the Concerto 
No. | in E Minor and the Etude in F Major. 


... Arturo Toscanini will return to conduct the NBC Symphony 
Orchestra Sunday (KPO, 2:00 p.m.) in an all-Russian program, in- 
cluding T’schaikowsky’s ‘““Manfred” Symphony and the overture to 
“Colas Breugnon,” opera based on the novel by Romain Rolland, 
composed by the brilliant modern Russian composer Kabalevsky. 


... Joseph Szigeti will play Tartini’s “Violin Concerto in D Major,” 
accompanied by Pierre Monteux and the entire San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra, on the “Standard Hour,” which will be broadcast 
from KPO Sunday at 8:30 p. m. Monteux will conduct the orchestra 
in Haydn’s Symphony No. 13 in G Major, the Overture to Gluck’s 
“Iphigenie en Aulide,” the ballet suite from Andre Gretry’s ““Cephale 
and Procris” and the overture to Mozart’s “Abduction from the 
Seraglio.”’ 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss will be heard Saturday, January 20, in her regular 
weekly “Know Your Symphony” program at 5:00 p. m. on KPO, in 
which she will give more symphony sidelights about visiting artists, 
orchestra members and future concerts. 


SAN FRANCISCO 








oe Musical Association 


of San Francisco, maintaining and operating 


the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, still 
requires $12,000.00 to complete the 1944- 
1945 season, and this 1s where you who are 
really deeply interested in the welfare of our 
city’s most beautiful music come forward 
with gitts of money to help in balancing the 
budget. 





The budget has been kept out of the red just 
because we have all of you who are vitally 
and courageously interested in the welfare of 
the symphony to assist us. 


Our campaign for needed funds for the or- 
chestra is now under way and we hope and 
rely on your making possible a successful 
season by your contribution, large or small, 


LO: 


MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
SAN FRANCISCO 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 251 














PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAQUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOoOLSKI, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
FORD, Louis W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALD!, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
DI BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENC 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


252 


PIERRE MONTEU®X, Conouctor 


’CELLOS: 
BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 


REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 

BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMDRE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 


BASSES: 


KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


RENZI, PAUL JR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL. 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
SCHIvo, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIsBiNns, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BIBBINS, F. C. 


JULIUS HAUG 


BASS CLARINET : 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
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‘ sip eee oe Witold Malcuzynski, Guest Artist °— February 15-17, 1945 






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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 273 








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Compounded at:4 Copyrighted by Coty, Inc. in U.S.A. 























SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


-—4 


The San Francisco Symphony Forum, the student affiliate of the 
Musical Association of San Francisco, is the organization through which 
hundreds of young music lovers in Bay Area colleges and universities 
are able to buy seats to the regular subscription symphony concerts. 
The Forum had its informal beginning in 1939, when eight University 
of California fraternity men pooled their funds to purchase a box for 
the Saturday evening concert series. The idea spread rapidly and soon 
the increasing number of student ticket-holders from the University of 
California organized regular meetings to discuss the music on future 
programs. Other Bay Area colleges, including Stanford University and 
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day night concerts. Although the war has cut down severely on various 
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and Maxim Schapiro, well-known Russian-American pianist, familiar 
to many as a soloist with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. The 
first of these informal meetings took place last month at the University 
of California Delta Delta Delta sorority, and the University of Cali- 
fornia Medical School followed with a forum meeting last week at 
Toland Hospital at the University of California Hospital. A number 
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world. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








276 





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OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
—E. Raymond Armsby........-. eon ee Vice-President Charies..Page 2 eee eee Treasurer 
Paull (A: \BISSING Gl sors 2 ote ease Vice-President Howard. (Ki Skinnerscc2 ee ee Secretary 
Charles 2 Rowe BLVEie coe ee eee erwe eee _...Vice-President GeraidiG: Ross: 3... Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II..............---..--- Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Cc. O. G. Miller, Chairman 
E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mrs; John: P= Coghilan:..:---- > Chairman Mies. Francis Redewill.............--.-.--- Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter ‘Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson [Marilyn Biehl 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. 1. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mes. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Bumphrey Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engethart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else {chilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher Cc. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. C. O. G. Miller Mis. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes _ Kenneth Monteagie Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocicer Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
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STAFF 

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THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 277 





“There's an Immortality in the expression of the 
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Ytucleoleea Setentlere 


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427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEL) * YUKON 2061 





Se a NORE TOF ET NAOT FON OE ee RE 


N@GDAY S*GWEST ey AInieioit> 


Wirotp MALCuUzYNSKI was Paderewski’s last pupil. He was born in Warsaw, 
and began his professional training in the field of law. He studied the piano as 
an avocation, but was advised by Paderewski to make it his life’s work. He 
then studied with that master for several years, and at this time won the Inter- 
national Chopin Competition in Warsaw. On the completion of his studies, 
Malcuzynski gave recitals and was soloist with orchestras in many parts of 
Europe. He was in the Balkans when Poland fell to the Germans in 1939, and 
went to Paris with his wife, who is also a pianist and a member of the celebrated 
Parisian musical family of Gaveau. ‘The Malcuzynskis escaped from Paris just 
ahead of the Germans in 1940, and, through the intervention of a musical friend, 
were able to go to South America. Malcuzynski gave many recitals in Buenos 
Aires, Rio de Janeiro, Lima and elsewhere. Yehudi Menuhin heard him play 
in Montevideo and was responsible for his coming to the United States. Mal- 
cuzynski has given concerts in many parts of this country, but this will be his 
first appearance in San Francisco. 


COO ~ 


GUEST ARRISHS INE ie VyBEI 


Lorin VARENCOVE MAAZEL was born in Neuiully, France, of American par- 
ents, on March 6, 1930. His grandfather, Isaac Maazel, was concertmaster of the 
Imperial Opera Orchestra in Moscow at the age of 14, and played in the orches- 


tra of the Metropolitan Opera for 25 years. His father is a singer and teacher 
and his mother a pianist. Lorin studied violin with his aunt, Frances Berkova, 
and piano with Fanchon Armitage, both of Los Angeles. He began directing his 
own family orchestra at the age of seven, and made such progress that he was 
placed under the tutelage of Vladimir Bakaleinikoff to study conducting. In 
1938 he directed the orchestra of the National Music Camp at Interlochen, 
Michigan, where he was heard by Olin Downes, who brought him to New York 
in the following year to conduct at the World’s Fair. Since then he has con- 
ducted the NBC Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Chicago Sym- 
phony, the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, the Pittsburgh and Cleveland Orches- 
tras, and the New York Philharmonic. He is still studying with Bakaleinikoff, 
who is now the assistant conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony. 

Naoum BINDER was born in Eupatoria, Crimea, in 1891. He graduated 
from the Odessa Conservatory at the age of 14, but continued his studies at the 
Royal Academy of Music in Manchester, England, under Adolph Brodsky. He 
was professor of violin at the Odessa Conservatory from 1911 to 1920 and at the 
Moscow Conservatory from 1921 to 1928. During this period he made concert 
tours throughout Russia, and in ‘Turkey, Palestine and Japan as well. He came 
to the United States in 1928 and taught for a number of years at the Institute of 
Musical Art in New York. He was appointed concertmaster of the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra in 1932 and founded the San Francisco String Quartet in 
1934. He has repeatedly appeared as soloist with the San Francisco Symphony 
and other American orchestras. 


a IS BN I. I I IE, FE 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 











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1944 
NATIONAL ASSO GPALION OUR 
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Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-4e}- 
SIXTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


"THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15, AT 8:30 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17, AT 8:30 


WITOLD MALCUZYNSKI, Guest Artist 


-4e}- 
‘Program 
PRELUDE LOWE TROIINS 
ATE CARRE FLAC oe igs cree ceed oer SN aera Berlioz 
HAROLD IN LEABY. SY VEEELON™ 
WARE ViiOLACSOM Oma en ee ee ee meee Berlioz 


Harold in the Mountains, Scenes of Sadness, Happiness and Joy. 
March of the Pilgrims Singing Their Evening Prayer. 
Serenade of a Mountaineer of the Abruzzi to his Mistress. 
Orgy of the Brigands. Memories of Past Scenes. 
FERENC MOLNAR, VIOLA SOLOIST 


INTERMISSION 


SULEE BROOM MELE. PCO AL 
BROKE? TELE AE BAUIN Sie foe eee eae Mies hae ae ee Thomson 
Prelude 
Pastorale (Grass) 
Cattle 
Blues (Speculation) 
Drought 
Devastation 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
ING:229 CNG ESNEEIN.© R& eco sete oreo ae ee ee eae eee a. Chopin 
Maestoso 
Larghetto 
Allegro vivace 
Mr. MALCUZYNSKI 
STEINWAY PIANO USED 
Te OU USS OE IIS I PRIN 
It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use their tickets 
kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
of their seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 
This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


a 








281 











SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


~{@}- 


SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, February 23, at 2:15 
Saturday, February 24, at 8:30 


LORIN MAAZEL, Guest Conductor 
NAOUM BLINDER, Soloist 


OVEREUTERCOMNOSAINIUIN CC 1. ne RM Ae tea eee ok Schubert 

Kealiarie ONim Dl OMY ee nectar Bete Une eee tae, Mendelssohn 

Goncertoior Violinaand. Orenestrae tease eee ee eee Bloch 
Daphnis ance GHGS UITCel IN Or eae males vues ees Pe). ete aa Ravel 
| *4@}- 


EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, March 9, at 2:15 
Saturday, March 10, at 8:30 


ANIA DORFMAN, Soloist 


PASSACA Caen e ek Re ae ee ea AR nn teens cS een Handel-Akon 
(First Performance) 
Concertostion Rianomand:- Orchestras NOmLa. eee Beethoven 


MBIVE PINT LOGON: 9 PILING tao. Sew as erin 9 ert tae ce Oe Oe a Ay a Stravinsky 


STANDARD SYMPHONY BROADCAST 
KPO, NBC Pacific Coast Network 


Sunday, February 18, at 8:30 
WITOLD MALCUZYNSKI, Guest Artist 


Selections from the Fantastic Symphony ee A as PRE MO rem nd Berlioz 
Concerto tor biano-and Orchestras NO. ee ee ee TetSzt 
TC SaP Tele Se asset te eek Oe AS Eee OE eee Gt Stns oe Rete ee Liszt 


282 SAN FRANCISCO 


Wt etude a nt ep Ba es a 











PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


PREEUDES TO EE GOAN 
Pd CRAIC TELA Eh on oe are acids Oe aap eae ae Hector Berlioz 
(1803-1869) 

The Trojans, an opera in five acts based upon Virgil’s Aeneid, was one of 
the last works of Berlioz. It was written between 1856 and 1858, and proved on 
completion to be too long for presentation in one sitting. Berlioz therefore 
recast it in two parts—The Taking of Troy and The Trojans at Carthage—and 
in this form it was finally given in 1863. It ran for 21 performances. During the 
run one of the composer’s friends told him people were coming to it in increas- 
ing numbers, whereupon he replied, “They are coming, but f am going.” He 
had already completed his swan-song, the comic opera, Beatrice and Benedict, 
and although he lived for six more years, he composed nothing in that time. 

The prelude to The Trojans at Carthage is not a highly developed concert 
piece like the Beethoven overtures or Berlioz’s own overture to Benvenuto 
Cellini. It is a short introduction intended only to set the emotional tone of 
the opening scene, not to summarize the character of the entire drama. Berlioz 
gives it the subtitle Lamento, for in the opera it leads to a passage wherein Dido, 
Queen of Carthage, bewails her forthcoming forced marriage to Jarbas, King 
of Numidia. Dido is saved from this fate by Aeneas, who lands in Carthage on 
his way to Italy after the fall of Troy; what happens after that is of no particular 
importance so far as a program note on the prelude is concerned. 


HAROLD IN ITALY, SYMPHONY 
WARE VIO LA SOR O tener eo eee ee Hector Berlioz 


After a performance of the Fantastic Symphony which Berlioz conducted in 
Paris in December, 1833, he was stopped on his way out of the theatre by “a man 
with long hair, piercing eyes, and a strange, haggard face—a genius, a Titan 
among giants, whom I had never seen before, and at first sight of whom I was 
deeply moved; this man pressed my hand and overwhelmed me with burning 
eulogies that set both my heart and my brain on fire. Jt was Paganini!”’ 

‘The composer’s autobiography continues as follows after a few lines which 
we omit: 

“Some weeks after the triumphant concert which I have just described, 
Paganini came to see me. 

““T have a wonderful viola,’ said he, ‘an admirable Stradivari, and should 
greatly like to play it in public. But I have no music for it. Would you write 
me a solo? I have no confidence in anyone but you for such a work.’ 

* ‘Certainly, I answered; ‘I am more flattered than I can say; but in order to 
fulfill your expectation, and make a composition sufficiently brilliant to suit 
such a virtuoso as yourself, I ought to be able to play the viola, and this I can- 
not do. It seems to me that you alone can solve the problem.’ 

“ ‘No,’ replied Paganini; ‘you will succeed. JI insist. As for me, I am too unwell 
at present to compose. I could not think of such a thing.’ 

“In order to please the illustrious virtuoso, then, I endeavor ed to write a 
solo for the viola, but so combined with the orchestra as not to diminish the 
importance of the latter, feeling sure that Paganini’s incomparable execution 
would enable him to give the solo instrument all its due prominence. The 
proposition was a new one. A happy idea soon occurred to me, and I became 
intensely eager to carry it out. 

“No sooner was the first movement written than Paganini wished to see it. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 283 








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At sight of the rests, however, in the viola part in the allegro, “That is not at all 
what I want, cried he. ‘Iam silent a great deal too long. I must be playing the 
whole time.’ 

“«That is exactly what I said,’ | answered. “What you really want is a concerto 
for the viola, and you are the only man who can write it.’ 

“To this he made no reply, but seemed disappointed, and left me without 
further remarks. A few days afterwards, being already a sufferer from that 
throat affection which was ultimately to prove fatal to him, he went to Nice, and 
did not return till three years later. 

“Finding that the plan of my composition did not suit him, I apphed 
myself to carrying it out in another way, and without troubling myself any 
further as to how the solo part should be brought into brilliant relief. I con- 
ceived the idea of writing a series of scenes for the orchestra, in which the viola 
should find itself mixed up, like a person more or less in action, always pre- 
serving his own individuality. “The background, I formed from my recollec- 
tions of my wanderings in the Abruzzi, introducing the viola as a sort of melan- 
choly dreamer, in the style of Byron’s Childe Harold. Hence the title of the 
symphony, Harold in Italy. As in the Fantastic Symphony, one principal theme 


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through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 285 





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(the first strain of the viola) 1s reproduced throughout the work, but with this 
difference, that in the Fantastic Symphony the theme—the idée fixe—obtrudes 
itself obstinately, like a passionately episodic figure, into scenes wholly foreign 
to it, whilst Harold’s strain is superadded to the other orchestral strains, with 
which it contrasts both in movement and character, without hindering their 
development. Notwithstanding its complicated harmonic tissue, I took as little 
time to compose this symphony as I usually did to write my other works, though 
| employed considerable labor in retouching it. In the Pilgrims’ March, which 
I improvised in a couple of hours one evening over my fire, I have for more 
than six years past been modifying the details, and think that I have much 1m- 
proved it. Even in its first form it was always completely successful from the 
moment of its first performance at my concert in the Conservatoire, on Novem- 
ber 23rd, 1834.” 

As is often the case with Berlioz, there is more here than meets the casual 
eye. A careful reading of the passage just quoted will reveal that, immediately 
upon receiving Paganini’s commission, the composer had a “happy idea,” but 
he does not say this “happy idea” had anything to do with Byron or his Childe 
Hayold; on the contrary, he expressly states that the idea of Harold came to him 
only after Paganini had seen the completed first movement and had rejected it. 
Berlioz’s recent biographers have discovered that the original “happy idea” was 
for a choral work with orchestra and viola obbligato to be titled Mary Stuart's 
Last Moments. Berlioz omitted all reference to this in his memoirs apparently 
because he was constantly being accused—and he has often been accused since 





his death—of a kind of insincerity or even dishonesty in changing the titles 






Th) 
STRARTER 


and his music 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 287 











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and literary implications of his music without making any changes in the music 
itself. 

This accusation, however, is based upon a naive misunderstanding of the 
way in which a man like Berlioz composed. He was a musician first and an 
illustrator only secondarily, and he knew extremely well how readily music 
adapts itself to almost any external idea that may be imposed upon it. 


Furthermore, the literary implications of the first movement, which was 
the only one submitted to Paganini, are really extremely vague. A title such as 
Scenes of Sadness, Happiness and Joy, like the Reveries and Passions of the 
Fantastic Symphony, actually specifies nothing; it could be applied without the 
slightest incongruity to practically any first movement in Brahms or Beethoven. 
The second and third movements of Harold are more particular in their descrip- 
tive suggestions, but they were apparently written after the Mary Stuart scheme 
had been abandoned. But even if they had been sketched or completed with 
Mary Stuart’s Last Moments in mind, it is not difficult to see how they could 
have been changed over to Harold in Italy without any forcing or artificiality. 

One of the major factors that contributed to Mary Stuart’s downfall was 
religious dissension, and it is easy to perceive how a romantic writer might 
create a fictional scene wherein the doomed Queen of Scots in her prison tower 
hears or imagines she hears a march of pilgrims singing their evening prayer. 
And since they use bagpipes in Italy as well as in the country north of the River 
Tweed, a Scotch idyll can easily become a serenade of a mountaineer of the 
Abruzzi to his mistress. Robert Schumann, who was nobody’s fool, heard Men- 
delssohn’s Scotch symphony under the impression that he was listening to the 
same composer's /talian symphony, and wrote with great fervor of the beautiful 
Italian scenes the music had evoked. 








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The scene now changes to the fourth volume of Sir Donald Francis ‘Tovey’s 
Essays in Musical Analysis: 

“There are excellent reasons for reading Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. But 
among them I cannot find any that concern Berlioz and this symphony, except 
for the jejune value of the discovery that no definite elements of Byron’s poem 
have penetrated the impregnable fortress of Berlioz’s encyclopedic inattention. 
Many picturesque things are described in famous stanzas in Childe Harold; but 
nothing remotely resembling Berlioz’s Pilgrims’ March, nor his serenade in the 
Abruzzi. As to the brigands, Byron has described the varieties of costume in a 
crowd of mixed nationality consisting undoubtedly of potential brigands; but 
the passage is not in the Italian cantos, and Berlioz tells us that his work con- 
cerns Harold in Italy. On the other hand there is no trace in Berlioz’s music of 
any of the famous passages in Childe Harold. No doubt ‘there was a sound of 
revelry by night’ in the Orgy of Brigands, but the Duchess of Richmond’s ball 
was not an orgy of brigands, nor was it interrupted by a march of pilgrims 
singing their evening prayer. Nor is there anything to correspond to an invoca- 
tion of the ocean, except a multitude of grammatical solecisms equivalent to 
Byron’s ‘there let him lay.’ 

“There, then, let Berlioz lie; the whitest liar since Cyrano de Bergerac. 
(This sentence is a completely Berliozian enharmonic modulation.) ‘There is 
4 river in Monmouth and a river in Macedon; there is a B in Byron and a B in 
Berlioz; and as Byron stood upon the Bridge of Sighs and stood in the Coliseum, 
and in this and that historic or picturesque spot, to meditate on history, politics, 
| and family affairs, so the viola solo delivers its idée fixe unchanged and un- 
| adorned, while Berlioz does whatever occurs to him to do with his orchestra. 
i" There is nothing Byronic about that 7dée fixe. It did not occur to him in con- 


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nection with Byron. It comes in fully ripe glory of instrumentation, exactly as 
in the Harold Symphony, except that it is for a cor anglais an octave higher 
than its position in the viola, in a work described by Berlioz as an early indis- 
cretion which he burnt, an overture to Rob Roy. In Berlioz’s vocabulary ‘burnt’ 
means carefully preserved, so that an admiring posterity can discover evidence 
of the truth of Oscar Wilde’s assertion that a true artist lives in a series of 
masterpieces in which no progress whatever can be discerned. ‘The Overture 
to Rob Roy turned up early in this century, and proved to be quite a presentable 
and engaging work. Mendelssohn declared that what he found so Philistine 
about Berlioz was that ‘with all his efforts to go stark mad he never once suc- 
ceeds.’ From its own standpoint the criticism was neither unfriendly nor untrue; 
a large part of Berlioz’s charm consists in his earnest aspirations to achieve the 
elamour of a desperate wickedness against the background of his inveterate and 
easily shockable respectability. Poor Byron had Lady Byron for his background. 
Berlioz had to content himself with his master Cherubini. Master and pupil 
deserved each other; you have only to read Cherubini’s treatise on counterpoint 
to see the psychological origin of all revolutions; and you have only to read 
Berlioz’s own account of his diplomatic triumphs over Cherubini to see how low 
human nature can sink, when an ill-bred younger artist gets his chance of scoring 
off a disappointed old one. 

“On the whole, Berlioz’s imaginary wickednesses are more amiable than 
the virtues, real or imaginary, for which he professes admiration. - He is as 
adventurous as Jules Verne, who never went farther from his native Amiens 
than Paris, and spoke no language but French, though he sent Mr. Phileas Fogg 
of the London Reform Club round the world in eighty days, and a small com- 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 293 

















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pany of Franco-Algerians, Russians, and other nationalities round the solar 
system on a fragment of a comet in eighteen months. And Berlioz is quite as 
innocent as Jules Verne, though he also succeeds when he is as macabre as Poe. 
Perhaps only the profounder Verne-scholars are aware that Jules Verne also 
made an essay in the macabre, in his story of Maitre Zacharius the clockmaker, 
whose soul went into his clocks and watches, until it came to a bad end in his 
masterpiece which, designed to display pious texts every hour, suddenly took 
to displaying horrid blasphemies, till at midnight it burst with a thunderclap, 
while the soul of its author went Elsewhere. There are some quite good Ber- 
liozian touches in the Verneal innocence, and I am strongly inclined to trace 
the resemblances between Harold in Italy and Hector Servadac on the comet 
Gallia. 

“But—and this is a very big but—Berlioz, whose genius for instrumenta- 
tion has always been acknowledged, also had a genius for composition. ‘Iwo 
causes have prevented the recognition of this: first, that he notoriously failed 
to learn anything his masters tried to teach him; and secondly, that almost 
everything they tried to teach him was wrong. ‘The musical authorities of Paris 
in the first quarter of the nineteenth century had been the Latin contemporaries 
of the supreme Viennese classics of instrumental music. ‘These classics were as 
foreign to them as Berlioz’s adored Shakespeare (with or without le denowement 
de Garrick*) ; yet the Parisian ideas of musical form were supposed to have 
advanced with the times; and Berlioz undoubtedly thought that the expositions 
of the first allegros in his Fantastic and Harold Symphonies were symphonic 
expositions in the style established by Mozart and Haydn and developed by 








*This is a reference to Berlioz’s notes on the third part of his Romeo and Juliet symphony, 
which, he says, can be understood only by an audience extremely familiar with the fifth act of 
Shakespeare’s play as edited by Garrick.—A. F. 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 295 











Beethoven. ‘To us such an idea seems ridiculous; it is like constructing the first 
act of a drama round the incident of the loss of an umbrella which turns out to 
have no connection with the plot; and we naturally blame Berlioz for so obvi- 
ously deficient a sense of form. But, in the first place, did his teachers know 
better? Cherubini had a very good sense of form; he was profoundly moved by 
Haydn and Mozart, nor did Beethoven fail to influence him more than he liked 
to admit to himself, But his tr satment of the Viennese forms results only by 
a precarious series of flukes in anything that can be judged by the same criteria; 
and in some of his best movements, sida as the overture to Anacreon, the form 
has no resemblance to that of any other classic, ancient or contemporary. We 
had better ascertain what Cherubini thought about form before we decide 
whether Berlioz thought likewise, otherwise, rightly or wrongly. In the second 
place, we shall be aris en to recognize that his genius for composition is inde- 
pendent of any external shapes. Hig sonata expositions are quite flat and do not 
establish their “complementary key.’ ‘Then why call them sonata expositions? 
‘They are very clear, entertaining, and all the better for the repeats which Ber- 
lioz prescribes. He cannot ‘dey velop” a theme; he can only submit it to a process 
aptly described by Dannreuther as ‘rabbeting.’ But this process leads to excel- 
lent climaxes, whatever it may be called. ra what about Berlioz’s codas? Ah, 
there his natural element coincides with the classical form: he is a born per- 
orator, and everything leads up to his perorations. But notice that everything 
does genuinely lead up to them; he does not perorate upon a vacuum. He can- 
not argue; he cannot meditate: he has at least this in common with Byron that 
‘sobald er reflektirt ist er ein Kind.’ But he can sum up and pile on the agony 
or the exultation; he can also begin at a real beginning. Iam not quite certain 
about his middle. Just as his harmony is, like even his divinest instrumentation, 


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all top and bottom, so there is a certain hollowness about his forms, apart from 
the fact that they are in any case totally different from (and infinitely better 
than) anything they profess to be. From the two typical defects of bad high- 
brow music Berlioz is absolutely free: he never writes a piece consisting, like 
the Intermezzo (and most of the rest) of Cavalleria, entirely of impassioned 
ends. His hollowness may be said, in Hibernian metaphor to lie on the surface; 
inwardly all is as true as if Mr. Gulliver had spoken it. 

“Perhaps the most gloriously nonsensical fact about the Harold Symphony 
is that its viola solo is the result of the work having been commissioned by 
Paganini, who is said to have played it at the first performance in 1834.* Any- 
thing less like a concerto has never been conceived: the part has its difficulties of 
endurance, tone-production, and conception, but is about as suited for the dis- 
play of a virtuoso’s powers as a bath-chair for a world’s speed record.” 

Tovey was a very perceptive and a very witty man, but at times he was him- 
self guilty of “encyclopedic inattention,” as when he wrote the first paragraph 
of the quotation above. Tovey claims to know how to read the hidden meanings 
of Berlioz (“In Berlioz’s vocabulary ‘burnt’ means carefully preserved”’) , but, 
like many others, he sometimes reads him wrong when he makes the plainest 
of plain statements. If Tovey and the multitude of other critics who have made 
much of the discovery that Harold in Italy has next to nothing to do with Childe 
Harold had read the composer’s memoirs carefully, they would have seen that 
,erlioz never intended the symphony to be a series of musical lantern slides 
illustrating Byron. On the contrary, Berlioz says the symphony “‘is a series of 
scenes for the orchestra in which the viola finds itself mixed up, like a person 





*Footnote by Tovey: “Both Berlioz and Paganini drew the line somewhere. Paganini 
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more or less in action, always preserving his own individuality. ‘The back- 
eround I formed from my recollections of my wanderings in the Abruzzi, intro- 
ducing the viola as a sort of melancholy dreamer, in the style of Byron’s Childe 
Harold. Hence the title of the symphony, Harold in Italy.” 

One wonders also what to make of an author who tells us in his text that 
Paganini “‘is said to have played” this symphony on the occasion of its first per- 
formance and then adds a footnote to tell us he didn’t. But there 7s something 
marvelously picturesque, if not “gloriously nonsensical,” about the fact that 
the solo in Harold was first performed by Crétien Urhan, whom one of the 
critics of that day called “the Paganini of the viola, the Byron of the orchestra, 
the Salvator Rosa of the symphony.” Urhan made a determined effort to live 
up to his given name. He dressed like a clergyman, ate nothing, gave away 
every sou he earned, and sat for 30 years as concertinaster of the orchestra at 
the Paris Opéra without once letting his modest gaze wander up to the stage. 
What he thought of the bandit-orgy in Harold is not recorded. 


I. 
HAROLD IN THE MOUNTAINS, SCENES OF SADNESS, HAPPINESS AND JOY. 


Adagio, G major, 3/4 time. The symphony opens with wandering chro- 
matic material beginning in the lowest depths of the basses and ‘celli. From the 
thirteenth bar the woodwinds, in octaves, foreshadow the Harold theme (Ex- 
ample | below) but in the minor. The twisting chromatic figure of the opening 
returns and introduces the Harold theme proper, given to the solo viola in the 
major, and with harp accompaniment: 


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‘The theme is repeated with clarinets and violins added to the accompaniment; 
then the viola extends it with new phrases and it is worked over at length by all 
concerned. 


The tempo changes to Allegro and the time signature to 6/8. The prin- 
cipal theme (Example 2) is foreshadowed by the orchestra for a page or two 
of the score, before it is stated in its definitive form by the viola: 


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The second theme follows very shortly. It begins in the orchestra in F 
but passes to the orthodox “complementary’ 
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There follow a short development based mostly upon Example 2, a somewhat 
abbreviated and disguised recapitulation, and an immensely long coda or ter- 
minal development wherein the Harold theme 1s worked over in combination 
with Examples 2 and 3. 
iis 
MARCH OF THE PILGRIMS SINGING HEIR EVENING PRAYER. 

Allegretto, E major, 2/4 time. ‘The pilgrims appear in the strings after 15 

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There are four varied repetitions of this theme, whereupon the viola brings in 
the Harold theme to contemplate the procession as it passes by, the orchestra 
mnging eight more changes on Example 4. 

A kind of trio, marked Canto religioso, now follows. It is in C mayor, and it 
is Composed of solemn, organ-like chords of the woodwind alternating with 
equally solemn and organ-like chords of the strings; meanwhile, from beginning 
to end, the solo viola reels off arpeggios sul ponticello and the basses continue 
their untiring march. 

At length Example 4 returns in the woodwind in CG, and the movement dies 
away in E major with reminiscences of that theme, plus the marching basses, 
bell-like sounds in the woodwind, and the viola’s broken chords. 


JAE. 
SERENADE OF A MOUNTAINEER OF THE ABRUZZI TO HIS MISTRESS. 


Allegro assai, C major, 6/8 time. Piccolo and oboe pipe a gay tune over 
a drone bass: 





The tempo is cut in half and the English horn begins the serenade: 





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Shortly the viola sings the Harold theme while the woodwind continues with 
Example 6. The development of this continues at length. The final section of 
the movement returns to the lively piping of Example 5. The rhythm of this 
eoes on while the viola sings Example 6 and, high above, the flute and harp 
have the Harold theme. 


AWE 
Orcy OF THE BRIGANDS. MEMORIES OF PAST SCENES. 


Berlioz described this movement as follows in writing to Heine about a 
performance of Harold he had conducted in Germany: 
“In the finale, that furious orgy where wine, blood, joy, rage, all combined, 











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yarade their intoxication—where the rhythm sometimes seems to stumble 
along, sometimes to rush on in fury, and the brass seems to vomit forth curses 
and to answer prayer with blasphemies; where they laugh, drink, fight, destroy, 
slay, rape, and utterly run riot; in this brigand scene the orchestra became a 
regular pandemonium; there was something positively supernatural] and terri- 
fying in its frantic life and spirit, and violins, basses, trombones, drums, and 
cymbals all sang and bounded and roared with diabolical order and concord, 
whilst from the solo viola, the dreamy Harold, some trembling notes of his 
evening hymn were still heard in the distance as he fled in terror.” 

Tom Wotton, the foremost Berlioz scholar of the present day, would have 
us believe the above was written in jest, but this seems rather unlikely. Tovey, on 
the other hand, decides to go Berlioz one better. He recalls that in his mono- 
drama called Lélio Berlioz deals with some brigands who invite their female 
captives to drink from cups made from the skulls of their lovers, and ‘Tovey 
insists that Example 9 below “may possibly show how the raw material of these 
utensils is obtained; at all events it is eminently suggestive of bright deaths 
quivering at victims’ throats, of streams of gore, and of round objects rolling 
on the ground.” ‘Tovey, also, will have none of Harold’s merely fleeing in 
terror. For him Harold’s heart is broken by the reminiscence of the pilgrim’s 
hymn at the end of the movement; “he can endure life no longer; he drinks 
oison and leaves the brigands to finish their orgy without him.” 

Allegro frenetico, G minor, alla breve. The movement begins with the 
“memories of past scenes.” Its first part is clearly modeled after the introduction 
to the finale of Beethoven’s ninth symphony. A brusque, imperious motif of 
the strings, foreshadowing Example 7 to come, opens the movement, and is 
followed by a flashback to the first bars of the first movement. Again the strings 
interrupt with their brusque figure, whereupon the solo recalls the pilgrims’ 
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serenade (Example 6). ‘The strings wave their arms around once again, and 
the viola recalls Example 2. After a final “off with his head” from the orchestra, 
the viola sings the Harold theme, and this leads through an animato to the main 
movement, or orgy. 


The principal theme appears in the full orchestra, tempo primo: 





This is worked over and leads through a transition with a new figure not quoted 
to the second theme, in B flat major: 





A great climax is attained with a motif thundered by the trombones under a 
slow trill of the strings: 











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There is a brief transition in place of a development, and then the entire 
orgy (Examples 7, 8, 9 and 10) is recapitulated. 

The long coda opens with a working-out of Example 8., At the org1astic 
height of this there is a sudden hush and three solo strings sing the pilgrims’ 
hvmn. The solo viola flees in terror or drinks poison or both, but the brigands 
continue to have fun to the end. 


SULLE PROM ii Ri OVV ir Aas 
BURA OAKES TELE eA NS teens eit a nee Virgil Thomson 
(1896-) 

The Plow That Broke the Plains is a short documentary film produced by 
Paré Lorentz for the Farm Security Administration of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. It came out in 1935, during the unlamented ‘“‘dust bowl” 
era in the plains states, and was intended solely to serve as part of the govern- 
ment’s program of education and rehabilitation among the “dust bowl” farmers, 
but the esthetic interest of the picture has given it an extraordinarily long lease 
of life. The same thing is true of the soil-erosion film, The River, also produced 
by Mr. Lorentz and Mr. ‘Thomson under the same auspices. 

The score of Mr. Thomson’s concert suite contains six of the nine move- 
ments composed for the picture. It also contains excerpts from Mr. Lorentz’s 
script, as follows: 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 307 














It Stands Alone 


KORBEL BRUT IS TOPS IN AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE 


Magazines which reach the most sophisticated audience in the United States 
unanimously give first place in American Champagnes to KORBEL BRUT 
WE didn’t say it first! THEY DID! 


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to date is KORBEL BRUT. Our guess is 
anyone would think it was imported.” 
—Harper’s Bazaar, February, 194]. 


“PROBABLY THE MOST CHAM - 
PAGNE-LIKE domestic wine is KOR- 
BEL BRUT.’’—Cue Magazine, Decem- 
ber 20, 1940. 


“THE OUTSTANDING AMERICAN 
CHAMPAGNE to date is KORBEL 
BRUT ."’— Town and Country, Febru- 
ary, 1941. 


KORBEL 2 


“EXTREMELY ENJOYABLE, bone-dry 
and clean-tasting.’’—The New Yorker, 
March 15, 1941. 


“AMONG THE FEW FINE CALIFOR- 
NIA CHAMPAGNES IS KORBEL BRUT 
—a special cuvee which has been made 
as dry as the dryest Champagnes for 
the English market.’’— St. Regis, Pea- 
cock Alley, The Ambassador, Plaza En 
Passant, The Savoyard, The Ritz Carl- 
ton, The Hampshire, The Sherry-Neth- 
erlands, Pierrot, January, 1941. 


ROUGE 
PINK 


Distributed by 
TRADERS DISTRIBUTING CO. 
314 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 


21 BRANDS, INC. 
17 E. 52nd ST., NEW YORK CITY 


SAN FRANCISCO 

















PROLOGUE 


This is a record of land... of soil rather than 
yeople—a story of the Great Plains: the 400,- 
000,000 acres of wind-swept grass lands that 
spread up from the Texas Panhandle to Can- 


ada... A high, treeless continent, without 
rivers, without streams... A country of high 
WINGS an Gestinets AMC Ol CELE stalin. 


(SRASS 


The grass lands .. . a treeless, wind-swept con- 
tinent of grass stretching from the broad 
lexas Panhandle up to the mountain reaches 
of Montana and to the Canadian border. A 


country of high winds and sun... high winds 
and sun... Without rivers, without streams, 
with little rain. 


GME ye 


First came the cattle .. . an unfenced range a 
thousand miles long... an uncharted ocean 
of grass, the southern range for winter orazing 
and the mountain plateaus for summer. It 
was a cattleman’s Paradise. Up from the Rio 
Grande ... in from the rolling prairies . 

down clear from the eastern highways the 


cattle rolled into the old buffalo range. For 
a decade the world discovered the grass lands 
and poured cattle into the plains. The rail- 
roads brought markets to the edge of the 
plains land syndicates sprang up over- 
night and the cattle rolled into the West. 


At this point the score, in order to throw more light on the dramatic sig- 
nificance of the last two movements, provides the text to three movements which 
are omitted in concert performance. These are as follows: 


HOMESTEADER 


But the railroads brought the world into the 
plains new populations, new needs 
crowded the last frontier. Once again the 
plowman followed the herds and the pioneer 


came to the plains. Make way for the plow- 
man! High winds and sun... high winds and 


SUN. 6a ALCOUMDTY without rivers and with 


little rain. Settler, plow at your peril! 


ee 


waar a wonperFuL CALQUERI ts mabe THIS WAY: 


e 2 0z. Havana Club Rum light 


ca | 





@ | teaspoon sugar 

e Juice of ¥2 lime 

Shake well with cracked ice and 
strain into cocktail glass. 


*Write for FREE Recipe Book—‘‘Delicious Rum Drinks” 





Distilled and Bottled by JCSE ARECHABALA, S. A. ° 
Sole Agents for U.S.A. 


*WILLIAMS [MPORTERS A Division of R. C. Williams & Co., Inc., 610 5th Ave., N. Y. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 309 


86 PROOF e Cardenas, Cuba 





TODAY'S 





GREAT 


PLANO 


the choice of 
Today's Great Artists 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO 
AS THE ARTISTS DO 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin 


in its Concerts. 


MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU HAROLD BAUER 


GEEIEEER DE ABRVATH 
SEVERIN EISENBERGER 
ALEXANDER KELBERINE 
WESEEY CA VIbDER DRE 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
IRMA SCHENUIT HALL 
FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 
MAGDA TAGLIAFERO 
JOSEPH BATTISTA 
JEANNE BEHREND 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
WALTER GIESEKING 
EUGENE GOOSSENS 
BORIS GOLSCHMANN 
FLORENCE EASTON 
DANIEL ERICOURT 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
BREENDAN KEENAN 
ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
WIKTOR LABUNSKI 
ALFRED MIROVITCH 
CHARLES NAEGELE 
LOUIS PERSINGER 

E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
BERNARDO SEGALL 
ROSINA LHEVINNE 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
RUTH SLENCYNSKI 
ALEC TEMPLETON 


ANTON BILOTTI 
LUCREZIA BORI 
BELA BARTOK 
MARIO CHAMLEE 
KARIN DAYAS 
JOSE ECHANIZ 
DAVID EARLE 
FRANK FARRELL 
JAKOB GIMPEL 
RUDA FIRKUSNY 
ARNOLD GABOR 
WILLIAM HARMS 
STEPHAN HERO 
AMPARD ITURBI 
JOSE ITURBI 
RAEP RREEEPoED 
JUSS! BUOERLING 
JOSEF LHEVINNE 
ERICA MORIN! 
EDITH MASON 
GRACE MOORE 
WILLEM NOSKE 
EIS weeins 
ROSA RAISA 
ANGEL REYES 
GIACOMO RIMINI 
TITO SCHIRA 
JOHANN SINGER 
EPERESMilm 
qHHSEPR I SZiGEtvl 
LEONARD SHURE 
HELEN TRAUBEL 
SAMUEL YAFFE 


MOISSAYE BOGUSLAWSK!I 


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SAN FRANCISCO 





310 


1828 WEBSTER ST. 
DOAKLAND 





BY APPOINTMENT 

















Champagnes of ihe highest quality 


6. H. Mumm &( 


socitre VINICOLE DE CHAMPAGNE.SUCCESSEUR 


NOW-—with the liberation 
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forward to early resump- 
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1037 GEARY ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
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WARNING 


Many were disappointed. The rains failed... 
and the sun baked the light soil. Many left... 


they fought the loneliness and the hard years 
... but the rains failed them. 


WAR AND TRACTOR 


Many were disappointed, but the great day 
was coming ... the day of new causes—new 
profits—new hopes. 

‘Wheat will win the war!” 

“Plant wheat . . 

“Plant the cattle ranges...” 

“Plant your vacant lots...” 

“Plant wheat!” 


“Wheat for the boys over there!” 
“Wheat for the Allies!’ 

“Wheat for the British!” 
“Wheat for the Belgians!” 
“Wheat for the French!” 
“Wheat at any price...” 
“Wheat will win the war!” 


The movements of the concert suite then continue: 


BLUES (SPECULATION) 


hen we reaped the golden harvest . then 
we really plowed the plains .. . we turned 
under millions of new acres for war. We had 
the man-power ... we invented new machin- 


ery, the world was our market. By 1933 the 
old grass lands had become the new wheat 
lands ~ a hundred million acres >. - two 
hundred million acres . . . More wheat! 


DROUGHT 


A country without rivers ... without streams 
_. with little rain... Once again the rains 
held off and the sun baked the earth. This 


time no grass held moisture against the winds 
and sun this time millions of acres of 
plowed land lay open to the sun. 


DEVASTATION 


Baked out—blown out—and broke! Year in, 
year out, uncomplaining they fought the worst 
drought in history ... their stock choked to 
death on the barren land their homes 
were nightmares of swirling dust night and 
day. Many went ahead of it— but many 
stayed until stock, machinery, homes, credit, 
food, and even hope were gone. On to the 
West! Once again they headed into the set- 
ting sun . Once again they headed West 
out of the Great Plains and hit the highways 
for the Pacific Coast, the last border. Blown 
out—baked out—and_ broke Nothing to 








———__. 





stay for .. . nothing to hope for . . . home- 
less, penniless and bewildered they joined the 
ereat army of the highways. No place to go 

. and no place to stop. Nothing to eat... 
nothing to do... their homes on four wheels 

. their work a desperate gamble for a day’s 
labor in the fields along the highways, price of 
a sack of beans or a tank of gas .. . All they 
ask is a chance to start over and a chance for 
their children to eat, to have medical care, to 
have homes again. 50,000 a month! ‘The sun 
and winds wrote the most tragic chapter in 
American agriculture. 





| | 
| WILLIAM F. LARAIA | 
| First Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 
| years — has resigned in order to devote his time exclusively to 


teaching. 

ST UDIOS— 

3325 OCTAVIA ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
438 Hucucresr Rp., SAN CARLOS 


FERRARI 


——_— 











Fr. 6102 
SV Geb sls 


NICOLAUS 








AND FORMER FIRM OF @ TRAINER & PARSONS 


Dispensing Optiecaus. 
444 POST 
SERVING THE EYE PHYSICIANS and their PATIENTS 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


311 











MING AGED SANE gt Gen NG aR ies 


SAN FRANCISES 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


MARIAN 


AANDERSON 


GUEST SOLOIST 


e 
PROGRAM 
SVIMPNOMY, INOws OMe eee c teste tt 3 Wome pers. 1 tee Beethoven 
Alto Rhapsody for Solo Contralto and Chorus................... Brahms 


MISS ANDERSON 


MUNICIPAL CHorus, HANs LESCHKE, Director 


G]aiifOr nas SUITOR ee eri NGA cr eau ees Sg Harold Brubeck 
Conducted by the Composer 


OuMioiFernandortrom laieavorita 4.4 a ee Donizetti 








MUSIC 
MAINTAINS {| 
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MUSIC £ 
MUST # 
Go 
ON] 








CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 2, AT 8:30 


Tickets: 30c, 60c, 90c, $1.20, $1.80, Tax Included — Sherman, Clay .. . SUtter 1331 








Virgil Thomson was born in Kansas City and graduated from Harvard 
University. He also received part of his training under Nadia Boulanger in | 
Paris. He has been an instructor at the Cambridge University and conductor | 
of the Harvard Glee Club, organist and choirmaster of King’s Chapel in Boston 
and a member of the staff of the Boston Transcript; he was appointed to his 
present post as music critic of the New York Herald-Tribune some five years ago. 

Mr. Lhomson’s list of works is extremely long and extraordinarily varied. 
Perhaps his most celebrated composition is the opera Four Saints in Three Acts. : 
He has also written two symphonies, three string quartets, four piano sonatas, : 
and sonatas for violin and for flute; a ballet called Filling Station; incidental 
music to plays of Shakespeare, Sophocles, and others; two masses and other | 
choral works; much organ music, and numerous short works for piano, voice, 
orchestra and chamber ensemble. He has also composed over a hundred “musi- 
cal portraits” for various instrumental media of which the best known are 
probably Canons for Dorothy Thompson and The Mayor La Guardia Waltzes. 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 

INO: acl OMENING@ Roi ote ane seo meee taiet Frederick Chopin 
(1810-1849) 

Chopin completed both his piano concertos in the spring of 1830 and pre- 
sented them for the first time during a series of “farewell concerts” which he 
eave in Warsaw at that time. ‘Uhey are his only works involving the orchestra, 
, medium in which he had little interest or skill, and it is very likely that they 
would never have been written at all if conditions of the musical life in the 
1830’s had not made the composition of concertos practically obligatory for a 
musician with Chopin’s ambitions. The solo recital was practically unknown— 
it is said to have been invented by Liszt about 1840—and public concerts always 











A TOUCH OF THE OLD WORLD 









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at Hotel Whitcomb, so conveniently 
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involved the services of an orchestra. Consequently a composer-virtuoso like 
Chopin had no choice but to bring himself before the general public with con- 
certos. 

Chopin’s F minor concerto was completed before the one in E minor, but 
it was published later and is therefore known as No. 2. Its slow movement was 
inspired by Chopin’s love for Constantia Gladkowska, who, the movies to the 
contrary notwithstanding, was not an ardent Polish revolutionist but a rather 
fragile little opera singer. Constantia’s charms were partly responsible for the 
fact that Chopin bade public farewell to Warsaw on three separate occasions, 
He was anxious to make his way professionally in big capitals like Vienna and 


4 


Paris; at the same time he was 19 years old, and Constantia lived in Warsaw. 

The programs of the three “farewell concerts” have been preserved and 
make interesting reading today. Chopin first performed the F minor concerto 
on March 17, 1830; the concert opened with an overture by Paul Muni, better 
known in those days as Joseph Elsner; it also contained an overture by one 
Kurpinski, a set of coloratura variations by Paér sung by Mme. Meier, and it 
closed with Chopin improvising on Polish national airs. In between the first 
and second movements of the concerto a celebrated horn player named Goérner 
performed a divertissement of his own. In those days the unity of a composition 
in large form was not regarded as sacrosanct, and it was very common to inter- 
sperse all manner of things between the various divisions of symphonies and 
concertos. Mozart, Beethoven and Chopin saw no harm in this, which is an 
interesting commentary on the attitude of many contemporary performers who 
will not allow as much as a single handclap between the movements of a work 
in sonata form. 

Other notes have taken so much space in today’s program book that an 
outline of the concerto will have to be passed up. 







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A 
B 
Cc 
D 





Box Holders for Friday Afternoons 


with the cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX P MRS. WALTER D. HELLER 
MRS. SIGMUND STERN MRS. MORRIS MEYERFELD 
MRS. RICHARD SHAINWALD 
MRS. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY MRS. GEORGE OPPEN 
MRS. JOHN T. BARNETT 
MRS. WHITNEY BENTLEY Q MrsS. FRANK Pp: DEERING 
MRS. E. E. BROWNELL MRS. JAMES L. FLOOD 
MRS. DAVID COWLES MRS. BENJAMIN C. KEATOR 
MRS. MORTON GIBBONS MRS. HENRY S. KIERSTED 
MRS. HARRY HILL MRS. HARRY B. LITTLE 
MRS. JAMES HORSBURGH MRS. HAROLD R. McKINNON 
MRS. SILAS PALMER MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
MRS. T.. E. PALMER 
MRS. ATHERTON RUSSELL R DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 
**U. S. NAVAL HOSPITALS S MRS. FRANCIS S. BAER 
MRS. EDWARD H, BELL MISS JENNIE BLAIR 
MRS. SPENCER GRANT MRS. ELDRED BOLAND 
MRS. MAXWELL C. MILTON MRS. GEORGE M. BOWLES 
MRS. WILLIAM H. ORRICK MRS. GEORGES S. DeLATOUR 
MRS. STUART RAWLINGS MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MiSS ELSE SCHILLING MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 
MRS. DANIEL VOLKMANN MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR 
MISS JOHANNA VOLKMANN 
MRS. DEAN WITTER T MRS. OTTO BARKAN 
RSs Dee wR ora: MRS. L. A. BENOIST 
MRS. REED J. BEKINS M!SS MARILYN BENTLEY 
MRS. GEORGE EDWIN BENNETT MRS. WALTER BENTLEY 
MRS. FRANK INGERSOLL MRS. FOSTER NEWHALL 
MRS. CLARENCE LORAN JOHNSTON MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
MRS. GEORGE S. JOHNSTON MRS. BRUCE SELFRIDGE 
MRS. RALPH MERILLION MRS. MELVILLE L. SMITH 
MRS. J. T. POSEY 
MRS. ERNEST J. S\/EETLAND U MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 
MRS. JOSEPH D. GRANT Vv ***kU. S. ARMY HOSPITALS 
MRS. JOHN CASSERLY w MRS. HENRY BOYEN 
MRS. DONALD GREGORY 
MRS. ARTHUR B. CAHILL 
MRS. WELLINGTON HENDERSON 
2, COUNTESS LILLIAN DANDIN| 
MRS. OSGOOD HOOKER MRS. JOHN L. FLYNN 
MR. AND MRS. KENNETH MONTEAGLE ; 
MRS. EDITH NORTH MRS. PETER B. KYNE 
. MRS. JAMES F. McNULTY 
M&S. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND MRS. A. J. MOORE 
MRS. M. C. SLOSS MRS. THEODORE WORES 
MRS. CHARLES BRANSTEN 
MRS. RICHARD FRANK Xx DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
MR. AND MRS. MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER MRS. ANGUS McDONALD 
MRS. LEWIS LAPHAM DR. HANS VON GELDERN 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM, JR. MRS. HENRY H. WEHRHANE 
MRS. FREDERICK WHITMAN Y MRS. C. W/. CROSSE 
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. BLYTH MRS. DUNCAN CURRY, JR. 
MRS. RICHARD HEIMANN MrS. JOSEPH W/. FOWLER 
MRS. A. J. LOWREY MRS. RALPH HENKLE 
MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER MRS. DANIEL C. HUNT 
MRS. EDGAR WOODS MRS. A. F. JUNCKER 
MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON MRS. EF. W. WILLETT 
MRS. STANHOPE NIXON MRS. EDWARD C. WURSTER 
MR. AND MRS. NION R. TUCKER Zz MRS. FRANK BUCK 
MRS. DUNN DUTTON MRS. RALPH K. DAVIES 
MRS. WALTER HOBART MRS. J. LINDSAY HANNA 
MRS. FREDERICK HUSSEY MRS. JAMES LEVENSALER 
MRS. KENYON JOYCE MRS. DOUGLAS McBRYDE 
MRS. SAMUEL KNIGHT MISS OLGA MEYER 
MRS. RICHARD McCREERY MRS. FRANK SOMERS 
*** Transportation Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 


us 
ae 
Vl 





VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSK!I, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
ForRD, Louis W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALD!I, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSKI, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
Di BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENG 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conoucror 


‘'SECCOS: 


BLINDER, BoRIS 
PRINCIPAL 


REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 

BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 


BASSES: 
KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 


= 


SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 


STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 
RENZI, PAUL UR. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL. 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIVO, LESLIE Jd. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
SCHivoO, LESLIE Jd. 


OBOQE D’AMOUR ANO 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BIBBINS, F. C. 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
LUCCHESI, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
ROTH, PAUL 


TRUTNER, HERMAN, UR. 


TRUMPETS: 
Buss, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND S&S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Giosi, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SINAI, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELLWOOD 


PIANO AND CELESTA: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


PROPERTY MASTER: 
J. T. HEAVEY 


JULIUS HAUG 


IN SERVICE WITH THE UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES 


DICTEROW, HAROLD—VIOLIN 
HOUSER, F. S.—VIOLIN 
KHUNER, FELIX—VIOLIN 
MICHAELIAN, ERNEST A.—VIOLIN 


316 


MOULIN, HARRY—VIOLIN 
RosSS, NATHAN—VIOLIN 
LEPLIN, EMANUEL—VIOLA 


DLSHAUSEN, DETLEV—VIOLA 
CLAUDIO, CESARE—’CELLO 
DE PALMA, ATTILIO—HORN 
ALTMANN, LUDW!G—ORGAN 


SAN FRANCISCO 


h 
4 
| 
Py 
t 
y 
3 











isco ¢ Los Angeles 


San Franc 


ME BREWERIES 


UO 
< 


2, 


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Here you sit 


and in I walk and say 


And that’s a mighty happy picture. 
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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY «+ PRESIDENT AND MANAGING _ DIRECTOR 
HOWARD K. SKINNER «© BUSINESS MANAGER 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


“Seventh Pair ° Sr.-Jr. Conductors” — Monteux - Maazel + February 23-24, 1945 


a Fa | 






Income for 
your dependents - 


while you live 


A man while he still lives may set apart 
all or some part of his property to 
provide income now or later for any 
of his beneficiaries by establishing a 
“family trust.’’ Each arrangement will 
be made to fit the needs of a particular 
family. It can always be altered. Ask 
about this service. 


TRUST DEPARTMENT 


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Convenience is the word for our new music store... 
located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
town Oakland. 


Step right off the street to our main floor... for REC- 
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you'll find our other departments .. . Pianos, Band and 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA S21 











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GOLDEN 


MOMENTS 








Compounded at:+ Copyrighted by Coty, Inc. in U.S.A. 


LDPE OT 














KPO 
Symphony Notes 


. Not of musical note but of great interest to every radio listener 
is the new series, “Our Foreign Policy,” to be launched on KPO Sat- 
urday at 4:00 p.m. Secretary of State Edward R. Stettinius, Jr., speaking 
from Mexico City, will be principal speaker on the first of seven broad- 
casts which will be officially sponsored by his department. For the first 
time in radio, the three major governmental bodies charged with formu- 
lation and execution of America’s international policy are joining in 
the discussion of the plans for building the peace. Series will continue 
throughout the year, with the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and 
the House F oreign Affairs Committee sponsoring later broadcasts. 


When the United Nations Conference opens in San Francisco on 
Apr il: 25, “Our Foreign Policy” will originate from NBC’s local studios 
in Radio City and w ill present top- ranking delegates and commentators. 
Also on the start-off program Saturday w il be Assistant Secretaries of 
State Archibald MacLeish and Dean Acheson, who will speak from 
Washington following Mr. Stettinius’ address. 


The man who has toured England’s blitzed areas with a full 
sy mphony orchestra and has ovine huteHeOLt concerts within sound of bombs, 
Dr. Malcolm Sar gent, will conduct the second of four concerts being 
presented by the NBC Symphony Orchestra on the “General Motor 
Symphony of the Air” Sunday at 2:00 p.m. (K .PO) . Guest soloist that 
day will be Yehudi Menuhin who will be heard in Elgar’s Violin Con- 
certo in B Minor. Dr. Sargent, who is the prominent conductor of the 
London DHuinmmon dhe Halle Orchestra and other noted musical 
ensembles of Great Britain, will conduct the orchestra in Handel’s 
“Water Music.” 


The 250-year-old violins of “The Stradivari Orchestra” will 

Ps heard in the overture to ‘““The Marriage of Figaro” by Mozart and 

1 Toselli’s “Serenade,” Gabriel Marie’s “La Cinquantaine”’ and other 

Stecuous on Sunday, when the program is broadcast over KPO at 9:30 

a.m. Paul Lavalle directs the orchestra and Jacques Gasselin, concert- 

master, has chosen Mosart’s “Il mio tesoro” from “Don Giovanni” as 
his Stradivari solo. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





323 





324 





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dreams. For more than a century in war 
and peace W, & J. Sloane has been helping 
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ae 3 





Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
—. Raymond Armsby...............--.--.--- Vice-President Charles) Pac emcee rccct rece nee sewers Treasurer 
Paul A. Bissinger...........-...- eee, Vice-President Howard (Wen SI ini e is. nooo ess eee ooac ec wasn sce eeeee Secretary 
Charles. -R. Blyth... Eee ee Vice-President Geralid-G (ROSS ee see Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II_..-..--.----.------- Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Ms. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Cc. O. G. Miller, Chairman 


E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 


Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mis:. Jonn: PP: *Coghlan:-s-.--2. ees Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill..................---- Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox _ 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett _ Etwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Eliza eth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Biehl 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. I. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Humphre Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engethart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Carles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else {chilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul |. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher Cc. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylo! 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, II Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Wood 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mis. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris 
STAFF 

Constance Alexander Victor Mohl Deborah Spalding 
Kathleen Lawlor Gerald Ross Curran Swint 
Doris Lowell Joseph Scafidi Virginia Webb 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 325 





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MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER | 


427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEI\ «4 YVIIKON 9N2e .. . 





TODAYS “GUEST AkSISiis 


Coo ~J 


LORIN VARENCOVE MAAZEL was born in Neuilly, France, of American parents, 
on March 6, 1930. His grandfather, Isaac Maazel, was concertmaster of the 
Imperial Opera Orchestra in Moscow at the age of 14, and played in the orches- 
tra of the Metropolitan Opera for 25 years. His father is a singer and teacher 
and his mother a pianist. Lorin studied violin with his aunt, Frances Berkova, 
and piano with Fanchon Armitage, both of Los Angeles. He began directing 
his own family orchestra at the age of seven, and made such progress that he was 
placed under the tutelage of Vladimir Bakaleinikoff to study conducting. In 
1938 he directed the orchestra of the National Music Camp at Interlochen, 
Michigan, where he was heard by Olin Downes, who brought him to New York 
in the following year to conduct at the World’s Fair. Since then he has con- 
ducted the NBC Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Chicago Sym- 
phony, the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra, the Pittsburgh and Cleveland Orches- 
tras, and the New York Philharmonic. He is still studying with Bakaleinikoff, 


who is now the assistant conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony. 


Naoum BuinpER was born in Eupatoria, Crimea, in 1891. He graduated 
from the Odessa Conservatory at the age of 14, but continued his studies at the 
Royal Academy of Music in Manchester, England, under Adolph Brodsky. He 
was professor of violin at the Odessa Conservatory from 1911 to 1920 and at the 
Moscow Conservatory from 1921 to 1928. During this period he made concert 
tours throughout Russia, and in Turkey, Palestine and Japan as well. He came 
to the United States in 1928 and taught for a number of years at the Institute of 
Musical Art in New York. He was appointed concertmaster of the San Fran- 


cisco Symphony Orchestra in 1932 and founded the San Francisco String Quartet 


in 1934. He has repeatedly appeared as soloist with the San Francisco Sym- 


phony and other American orchestras. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 














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your Estate. Your Will sets up the Plan you 
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1944 
NADTEONAE <ASSOCLATION OUR 
Founded in 1864 EIGHTIETH 
ANNIVERSARY 
SAN FRANCISCO - PORTLAND : SEATTLE - TACOMA YEAR 
| i] : 
ererieit ! : ce 

7 a — a 

Ss presoeuerwemsamanensess1904908"F BE 

——— = 


MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 


328 SAN FRANCISCO 








a Rn eer | 


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Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-{@}- 
SEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 23, AT 2:15 


SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, AT 8:30 
LORIN MAAZEL, Guest Conductor 
NAOUM BLINDER, Soloist 


-4o}- 


‘Program 


OS TERE USE: SLi@) ei: © Sie VIAGGIO) rrr ewes ens ge Schubert 


Mr. MAAZEL CONDUCTING 


SYMPHONY NO. 4, IN A MAJOR GaP ALILT AWN) 
Ss STORE TES Eke atta ee ER dere Phan! tae Soe PE A Mendelssohn 
Allegro vivace 
Andante con moto 
Con moto moderato 
Saltarello: Presto 
Mr. MAAZEL CONDUCTING 


INTERMISSION 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHES PRA______.. Bloch 


Allegro deciso 


Andante 
Deciso 
Mr. BLINDER 
Mr. MONTEUX CONDUCTING 
DANS ANd GE le OR esS Cela SIN I@) so ee ee Ravel 
Daybreak 
Pantomime— 


General Dance 
Mr. MONTEUX CONDUCTING 


a a a a 





It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use thetr tickets 
kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
of their seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 
This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 329 











Nee eee eee eee eee ee nee mead 


a 





330 








SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


~{e>- 


EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, March 9, at 2:15 
Saturday, March 10, at 8:30 


ANIA DORFMAN, Soloist 


PASSACADII A: Pace renee Ae a Mak neds aren. Weak naan, wien ate Ae: Handel-Akon 
(First Performance) 
Concerto 10m Pianovancd Orchestra Noel oe eee Beethoven 
The Rite of Spring nied ih Mra RNa Nae PA dt ere th ed ale nen he IP any, Stravinsky 
*40>- 


FIRST BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Tuesday, March 13, at 8:30 
ERICA MORINI, Soloist 
Symphony No. I, in C minor 
Tragic Overture 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 


* * * 


SECOND BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Thursday, March 15, at 8:30 
DUSOLINA GIANNINI, Soloist 
Symphony No. 3, in F major 
A Song of Fate, for Chorus and Orchestra 
(The Municipal Chorus, HANS LESCHKE, Conductor) 
A Group of Songs 
Symphony No. 2, in D major 


* * * 


THIRD BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Saturday, March 17, at 8:30 
ARTUR SCHNABEL, Soloist 


Academic Festival Overture 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 2, in B flat major 
Symphony No. 4, in E minor 


SAN FRANCISCO 











PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


AVA RH RAS LIOR IEC Oe Vad Oya Dy CUNO DY da a) ose Franz Schubert 
(1797-1828) 

Schubert’s most famous overture has been masquerading for a century and 
a quarter under a title which is difficult, if not impossible, to account for. It 
was not composed for Wilhelmine von Chezy’s play, Rosamunde, Queen of 
Cyprus, for which Schubert did write a good deal of incidental music, nor was 
it ever performed in connection with that drama. Yet it was published in 
Schubert’s lifetime as the overture to Rosamunde, and no one knows why. 

The few ascertainable facts in the case do not clear up the mystery, but they 
will at least serve to show why it exists. 

With a few exceptions, notably Gluck and Beethoven, composers of the 18th 
and early 19th centuries did not regard the overture as an organic, integral part 
of a stage work; it was therefore a common practice for an overture originally 
written for one opera to be incorporated into the score of another. A celebrated 
instance of this is the overture to The Barber of Seville, which Rossini had used 
twice before, for operas called Aurelian in Palmyra and Elizabeth, Queen of 
England. Schubert did the same thing several times. 

The overture of today’s program was composed in 1819 for a “melodrama” 
(i. e. a spoken play with musical accompaniment) entitled The Magic Harp. 
This work was a failure when it was performed, but the overture was well 
received; consequently Schubert salvaged it for his opera of 1823 known vari- 
ously as The Conspirators and The Domestic War. In the same year, 1823 
Schubert produced his incidental music for Rosamunde, using as overture a 
piece he had originally composed for the opera of 1821 called Alfonso and 
Estrella. Wherefore now arises this paradox: the Alfonso and Estrella over- 
ture, actually performed as part of the Rosamunde music, is published as the 
overture to Alfonso and Estrella, while the Magic Harp overture, which never 
had anything whatever to do with Rosamunde, was printed before Schubert’s 
death as the overture to that play. 

Some musicologists have guessed that the shift in the titles was the result of 
a clerical error or typographical mixup in the publisher’s office. After all, 
Schubert himself played so fast and loose with his overtures that others might 
easily become a bit confused about them. But it seems highly unlikely that so 
gross a mistake could have occurred with the composer on hand to correct it, 
especially since so little of Schubert’s music was printed during his lifetime. 

On the day when Rosamunde was played for the first time, Schubert’s friend, 
Moritz von Schwind, wrote a letter about the performance in which he spoke 
of Schubert’s using the Alfonso and Estrella overture, and adding that Schubert 
had his doubts about this work. Schubert, said Schwind, felt the overture was 
too noisy and “cut up” to serve as an effective prelude to Alfonso and Estrella, 
and Schwind stated that Schubert intended to write another overture for that 
opera. ‘To be sure, Schubert expressed no doubts about the suitability of the 
overture as prelude to Rosamunde, but he was a very emotional man and often 
grew discouraged about many of his compositions. It is just barely possible 
that, on further reflection, he decided that the Alfonso and Estrella overture 
would not do for Rosamunde either, wherefore he resurrected the good old 
Magic Harp overture, which had served him well on two previous occasions, 
and published it under its present title. 

This is only a wild theory groping in the dark. It presupposes a hope on 
Schubert's part that Rosamunde might be remembered as a whole. (It was the 
the usual thing in those days for the overtures to stage-music to be published 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 331 














SS 


SS" 


) a Lo vve WM. nteux 


... CONDUCTS WHENEVER YOU WISH! 


Choose Pierre Monteux’s next concert yourself. The distinguished 
conductor of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra has recorded 
a number of colorful performances on Victor Red Seal Records. 
Among them are works by D’Indy, Rimsky-Korsakov, Franck, 
Delibes and other masters. All are superb examples of the rare 
insight, the magnificent sweep of Monteux’s direction. See the 
Victor catalog for titkes—many of your favorite selections are 


sure to be included. Listen to “The Music America Loves Best” 
every Sunday, 1:30 p.m., Station KPO. 
* BUY MORE WAR BONDS * 
THE WORLD’S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE ON 


4, VICTOR RAS2c6 Records- 8 


RCA VICTOR DIVISION, RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA, CAMDEN, N. J. 








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before the rest. Beethoven's overture to Goethe’s Egmont, lor example, 
appeared In print a year ahead of the other pieces Beethoven had written for 
that play.) But if Schubert ever held such a hope, it was not destined to be 
fulfilled. Rosamunde had been presented only twice, and was never to be 
revived. After the second performance the orchestral parts of the incidental 
music were tied up and lost sight of for 43 years, when they were discovered by 
Sir George Grove and Sir Arthur Sullivan in the house of a certain Dr. Schneider 
in Vienna. | 

SYMPHONY NO. 4, A MAJOR, OPUS 90 Cie Ae IAIN) 

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy 

(1809-1847) 

It is characteristic of Mendelssohn's turn of mind that, of the four purely 
orchestral symphonies he published, three bear ttles suggestive of places or 
yeriod atmospheres. ‘Vhe third is the Scotch, the fourth 1s the Italian, and the 
fifth is called the Reformation Symphony.* Mendelssohn was not, like the wild 





#Mendelssohn’s second symphony, the Song of Praise, is really a cantata rather than an orchestral piece. 
It may be worth adding by way of footnote that, while Mendelssohn published only five symphonies, he actually 
composed 17. The first twelve symphonies, eleven of them for strings alone and one for full orchestra, were 
written during the composer's childhood and youth. He considered them student efforts, and to this day they 
have not been printed. 


i  ———————————————_—__ LK 


Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 


LK 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated by the Citv and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 333 








Mee saaannnnnnponntes eee 





RESERVE 
levied Yihisht yy 


nley Distillers Corp., N.Y. C. 














Frenchman, Berlioz, whom he met in Rome, a composer of elaborately de- 
scriptive “program symphonies,” but he was very sensitive to geographical 
impressions, and his list of works, orchestral and otherwise, is filled with re- 
flections of his travels. 

The /talian symphony was begun in Italy in 1831 and had its first perform- 
ance in London two years later. It was completely revised between 1835 and 
1837, and in this form was not heard until two years after Mendelssohn had 
died. It was not published until 1851. With the possible exception of the second 
movement, sometimes called the Pilgrims’ March, it does not depict any specific 
scenes, but simply embodies the sum total of his Italian impressions so far as 
they could be set down in tones. 

13 
Allegro vivace, A major 6/8 time. The principal theme is stated at once by the 
violins, over rapidly reiterated chords of the woodwind and horns: 










4 
pi as WO A ee 


GU Te OCT Ae SS SF OS Le BS, 
(Vt Ra oe eee Se ESS Se ez 
3 fe Se) eee) Se eee 3 

~ 5 ae ei 
This is worked over at some length, and leads to a short transition passage 
which begins with lightly skipping triplets in the first violins. “The second 


theme is stated by the clarinets and bassoons in E: 






















Haw Prag ie acral Count 


TED 
NTRARTER 


and his music 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 335 








BEAUTY BALM 


for the new. fragile. feminine look 


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This theme is taken up by the flutes and then by the strings. Material drawn 
from Example 1 concludes the exposition, which is then repeated from the be- 
cinning of the movement. 

The development opens with a few bars’ reference to the transition subject. 
Then the second violins introduce a new idea: 














which is treated in a busy fugato of the strings. Eventually Example | 1s com- 
bined with and played off against Example 3. Long-held notes of the solo oboe 
(pianissimo) , heard above fragmentary references to the first bar of Example 
1, precede the recapitulation. 

The recapitulation itself begins with Example | in the strings, over the 
reiterated chords of the woodwind, as at the beginning. The restatement of 
the first theme is considerably shorter than its initial statement in the expo- 
sition. Example 2 returns in A major in the violas and ’celli. There 1s a long 
coda, beginning with Example 3 in the woodwinds, after which all the other 
thematic ideas of the movement are given a final workout. 










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IL. 

Andante con moto, D minor, 4/4 time, The title, Pzlgrims’ March, some- 
times applied to this movement, does not come from Mendelssohn himself, and 
some authorities are inclined to scoff at it. “But,” says Sir Donald Francis 
Tovey, “there is no difficulty in tracing the main idea of this movement to a 
religious procession which we know Mendelssohn did see in the streets of 
Naples . . . The wailing introduction figure is Just such an intoned litany as 
Berlioz uses on a larger scale in the ‘Domine Jesu’ of his Requiem; and the rest 
is eminently processional and picturesque. ” 

The ‘‘wailing introductory figure,” in the unison strings and woodwinds, 
reminded Sir George Grove of “the cry of a muezzin from his minaret,” although 
it is a rare day indeed when one hears the cry of a muezzin from the campanile 
of Santa Maria del Fiore: 





This is instantly followed by the main theme of the movement, given to oboes, 
bassoons and violas over persistently marching eighth-notes of the lowest strings: 


) : 





























<2? 
Pe SEES === 
Hf fee PSS Sees 
, G4, 


The theme is repeated by the violins an octave higher, with a decorative counter- 
subject of the flutes. Then the original combination gives out the second part 
of the melody: 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 339 

















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which is also repeated by the violins with flute embroidery. 
A short transition passage in the strings, based upon the ‘“‘muezzin’s cry,” 
leads to the contrasting episode, in A major: 
































The “muezzin’s cry” suddenly returns, fortissimo, in the original key, where- 
upon Example 5 1s briefly developed. The contrasting theme Example 7) 1s 
reheard, then the transition passage of the strings, and the movement dies 
away with fragmentary references to Example 5. 


ITI. 


Con moto Moderato, A major, 3/4 time. This movement is in the triple 
rhythm of the minuet or scherzo commonly employed as the third movement 
of the classical symphony, and it is in the minuet-scherzo form, but the 
essential character of the music is neither minuetish nor scherzoish; it is will- 
fully unclassifiable, and in this it predicts the highly individual third movements 
of Brahms. 

The first section of the movement has the following theme in the violins: 











SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 341 











A 
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a 
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In the second section this theme is worked over. 
The trio, in E major, opens as follows: 































































i eS ee 7 B aceag : : nena 


This also has a second section, in which Example 9 is subjected to develop- 
ment. After the trio, the first part of the movement is reheard. The trio is 
recalled in the coda. 

IV. 

Saltarello: Presto, A minor, 4/4 time. Five introductory bars serve to set the 
saltarello rhythm. (The name, derived from the Italian saltare, to jump, 
is that of a rapidly hopping folk dance popular in and around Rome). ‘The 
theme appears in the flutes: 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 343 





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bare saltarello rhythm in the violins. Shortly, however, the violins turn 
new melody: * 























which plays an extremely important part in the proceedings from this point. 
Examples 10 to 12 eventually are combined, then are heard in alternation, 
and are combined again. ‘There is no orthodox recapitulation, but the move- 
ment ends with material derived from its first theme. 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA......Ernest Bloch 
(1880-) 

The following notes are taken from the pamphlet issued by the Columbia 
Recording Company in connection with Joseph Szigeti’s disks of this work: 

“The violin concerto was, so far as its composer can trace its derivation, the 
work of several years (1930-7). Bloch cannot recall precisely how the many 
sketches for the work or iginated and ‘still less how they happened to be gath- 
ered together to form a whole.’ “They arose,’ he says, ‘mostly on the inspiration of 
the moment and with no preconceived idea of a violin concerto, though most of 
them were orchestrally or “‘violinistically” conceived.’ He continues, ‘however, 
music being for me a kind of language, it is easy to discover, in the chosen mate- 





*Says Tovey: ‘‘W. S. Rockstro, a copious contributor to Grove’s Dictionary who knew and used the cor- 
rect technical term for everything in music, no matter how familiar the thing or how sesquipedalian the term, 
has told us that, while the two principal themes of this movement are indeed saltarellos, the eel-like legato 
running theme which is a prominent feature in the development is a tarantella. The victims of tarantula-bite 
cannot even stop to jump in their dance.’ 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 347 
















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rial that went to make this concerto, parentage or affinities, either in the expres- 
sive or the purely musical-thematic frame of the motifs. They combine with 
each other in a rather intricate way throughout the score, appearing and dis- 
appearing like the characters in a drama. But it would be impossible for me to 
delineate any plan or “program” in this work—TI can only say there 1s in it no 
“Jewish” inspiration or intention, as was the case in my /srael symphony, 
s-helomo, or the Three Jewish Poems, for instance. The idea of the concerto 
itself may date from 1930, when part of the introduction was written in Paris. 
Its progress was several times interrupted, for the completion of two works 
which I had already partly written and for the composition of the orchestral 
suite, Evocations. ” 

The pamphlet also states that the first theme of the first movement (Example 
1 below) ) is “of American Indian character.” In a personal letter to the writer 
Mr. Bloch elucidates: “The opening motif of the concerto is of my own imagina- 
tion, but when it ‘came’ to me, if I correctly remember, in San Francisco, about 
1930, I felt that it had quite an ‘American Indian’ character. And that is all.” 

The following outline of the concerto, by Geoffrey Sharp, was originally 
published in the English Music Review and has been reprinted in pamphlet 
form by the Ernest Bloch Society of London. It is therefore a kind of official 
analysis. It concludes with a paragraph which might better be given at the be- 
ginning. Bloch has pointed out that the themes of the work “combine with each 
other in a rather intricate way throughout the score, appearing and disappearing 
like the characters in a drama.” Mr. Sharp makes this more specific: “Ex. 2 1s 
common to all three movements; Exs. 3 and 5 are to be found in the first and 
second movements, and Exs. | and 4 (b) are to be found in the first movement 





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and the finale. This may be accepted as providing some musical j ustification for 
regarding the whole work as a continuous narrative, nonetheless definite in 
spite of its three phases of defiance, resignation and withdrawal. ‘The problem 
of this withdrawal, which 1s liable to loom so large at a first hearing, is partially 
solved by the presence of already familiar musical fragments; and our enigma 1s 
thus circumscribed by a safeguard comparable to the Malvern Hills.” 
Mr. Sharp’s outline is as follows: 
I. 
: “The opening of the work is clear and straightforward, with a possible | 
: reservation at the mezzo-forle: | 











“The subsequent excursion into the depths of the orchestra provides a suit- 
able atmosphere for the rhapsodical entry of the solo violin mistertoso with 
material of which the essential character is summarized in Ex. 2: | 





The soloist now indulges in an exacting but relevant miniature cadenza alter 
which an ostinato figure, Moderato assat, is presented by the lower strings, harp 
and timpani; this is an important feature of the whole work: 








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and should be clearly noted beneath the two following episodes which are 
projected over 1t mn rapid succession: 














the first (a) on flutes and trumpets, the second (b) on the violins followed by 
wood-wind 1n imitation. Ex. 4 (a) continues, but the ostinato is modified on 


the re-entry of the solo instrument with references to Ex. 1. Between these 1s 


heard: 


























whereupon the tempo quickens to allegro, and then broadens for a tutti on Ex. 


] leading to: 














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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 353+ 











affinity with the first half-bar of Ex. 5. Once more the music quietens, meno 
mosso, fora polyphonic episode of which the principal strands are: 











respectively on the solo violin and on a solo viola and bassoon, while a third 

strand is given to another solo viola and a clarinet. This leads to a very free D 
recapitulation. The solo violin re-enters with Ex. 2 in extended form, and a { 
tutti follows with the ostinato, Ex. 3, in the new key, and 4 (b) on the wood- 
wind. At the next entry of the solo violin Ex. 4 (a) is heard again on the trum- 
pets. Soon Ex. | reasserts itself, followed by Ex. 6. Bravura passages on the solo 
violin herald the approach of the climax—an astonishing and utterly convincing 
testimony to the persistent bitterness and unflagging intensity of modern life. 
Examples 4 (a) and (b) in reversed order are combined with Fx. 3 and the 
first phrase of Ex. | to form a tutti which eventually leads to the cadenza proper. 
The introductory material is similar to that used to prepare the ground for the 
earlier example and should be carefully noted. It is also important to realize 
that this cadenza is as much an intrinsic part of the design as any of the rest of 
the work and by no means the excrescence that some critics automatically dub 
all members of the breed! In the epilogue a new, but derivative, melodic trend 
appears on the solo violin and oboe before the tempo quickens once more for a 
coda based upon extracts from the foregoing material. There is an abrupt final] 
chord quite in keeping with the general character of the movement. 


IAG 


‘The slow movement opens semplice ed incoloro with: 
§ 





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a 





on the oboe, the counter-melody being played by the leader of the orchestra. 


Presently the soloist enters “off the key”’ with: 








to provide one of the most magical moments of the whole work. Ex. 9 follows 
in the course of three pages of music which makes our promising young com- 
posers of the contemporary scene look like a gaggle of pretentious antitheses of 


Lord Goring. A fourth motive: 





intervenes before the resumption of Ex. 9, now with a suggestion of Ex. 10 in 
the bass. Ex. 5 makes a reappearance from the first movement, and after further 
references to Exs. 11 and 10, Ex. 8 is resumed on the solo violin. ‘Towards the 
end the ostinato, Ex. 3, returns, and the movement concludes with a fragment 
of Ex. 8 on the flute, followed by the solo violin with a faint suggestion of the 


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II. 


“The finale opens deciso with: 





in the orchestra, whereupon the solo violin rhapsodizes with material derived 
from Ex. Land 4 (b) . This figure: 








also acquires prominence. ‘Then the tempo quickens to allegro moderato and 
the soloist makes a vigorous entry with: 




















The next subject, also on the solo instrument, Is: 





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SAN FRANCISCO 





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with a slackening of the tempo it reappears as a horn solo leading to a resump- 
tion of Exs. 1 and 2 on the violin. Other characters in the drama make further 
appearances, and before long the initial phrase ot EX. 12 begins to assert itsell 
in conjunction with other material. Ex. 14 insinuates itself into the reckoning 
on the solo instrument da lontano, and Ex. 15 appears on strings and horns. 
Now, Exs. | and 12 combine to form a tutti leading to the coda, and here Exs. 
14 and 12 are followed by a final reference to Ex. 1 on the solo violin, and this 
movement too ends with an abrupt chord.” 
SYMPHONIC FRAGMENTS FROM DAPANIS 

AND SG bids Ole OC OND so. RaRaU Os sate ete een Maurice Ravel 

(1875-1937) 

Daphnis and Chloe was Ravel's contribution to the repertoire of the Diag- 
hilev Ballet Russe. It was first produced in Paris in 1910, with choreography by 
Michel Fokine, with Nijinsky and Karsavina in the name parts, Adolph Bolm 
and Enrico Cecchetti in other roles, and Pierre Monteux conducting. The 
preparation of the work was the Cause of violent disputes and dissension between 
Fokine and Diaghilev and Diaghilev and Ravel, and led eventually to Fokine’s 
severing his connection with the celebrated producer. 

The story of the ballet is based upon a famous Greek pastoral novel, prob- 
ably written in the second or third century A. D. by a highly mysterious author 
named Longus, about whom nothing else is known save that some early manu- 
scripts of Daphnis and Chloe ascribe the tale to him. 

On a flyleaf of the score Ravel gives the sketchy outline of the plot which is 
subjoined. In explanation of the first paragraph it should be added that an 
episode of the story concerns the kidnaping of Chloe by pirates and her restora- 
tion to her young lover, Daphnis, after he had prayed to the god Pan. The titles 
of the three movements have been interpolated at the appropriate points. 

DAYBREAK 

“No sound but the murmer of rivulets fed by the dew that trickles from the 
rocks. Daphnis lies stretched before the grotto of the nymphs. Little by little the 
day dawns. ‘he songs of birds are heard. Afar off a shepherd leads his flock. 
Another shepherd crosses the back of the stage. Herdsmen enter, seeking Daph- 
nis and Chloe. ‘They find Daphnis and awaken him. In anguish he looks about 
for Chloe. She at last appears encircled by shepherdesses. The two rush into each 
other’s arms. Daphnis observes Chloe’s crown. His dream was a prophetic vision: 
the intervention of Pan is manifest. ‘The old shepherd, Lammon, explains that 
Pan saved Chloe in remembrance of the nymph, Syrinx, whom the god loved.” 

PANTOMIME 

“Daphnis and Chloe mime the story of Pan and Syrinx. Chloe impersonates 
the young nymph wandering over the meadow. Daphnis as Pan appears and 
declares his love for her. The nymph repulses him; the god becomes more insist- 
ent. She disappears among the reeds. In desperation he plucks some stalks, 
lashions a flute, and on it plays a melancholy tune. Chloe comes out and by her 
dance imitates the accents of the flute.” (This movement goes without pause 
into the following.) GENERAL DANCE 

“The dance grows more and more animated. In mad whirlings, Chloe falls 
into the arms of Daphnis. Before the altar of the nymphs he swears on two sheep 
his fidelity. Young girls enter; they are dressed as bacchantes and shake their 
tambourines. Daphnis and Chloe embrace tenderly. A group of young men 
comes on the stage. 

“Joyous tumult. A general dance. Daphnis and Chloe.” 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 359 














MFG INE Gale pe ns bens GT ies 


nissior 









gr com 


ce ae 
THO ese SAN FRANCISCO | 
ET sae SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA _ 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


MARIAN 


PINDER TS 


GUESIRSOROI Si 


&® 
PROGRAM 
SVMPHONWaiN Ore O2resce eae Otte yk es Se ae recap cet ee at Beethoven 
Alto Rhapsody for Solo Contralto and Chorus...................- Brahms 
MISS ANDERSON A 
MUNrciPpAL CHORUS, HANS LESCHKE, Director 
CaLTOrM aso uit ehaes ois ee oat le aces Harold Brubeck 


Conducted by the Composer 


ONG Eernanaortromielia avon Cat, eae eee Donizetti 
MISS ANDERSON 







MUSIC 
MAINTAINS 
MORALE 





2 eee s 


CIVIC AUDITORIUM 
FRIDAY EVENING, MARCH 2, AT 8:30 


Tickets: 30c, 60c, 90c, $1.20, $1.80, Tax Included—Sherman, Clay .. . SUtter 1331 





~ on ote. 


a2 2 ETO etna net ee RVs 


ee 


« 


oe eed 


SAN FRANCISCO RUSSIAN OPERA AND BALLET ASSN. 


“Presents 


“THE SLEEPING BERUTY”’ 


American Premier of P. I. Tschaikowsky’s Ballet 
(Complete Version — Prologue and Four Acts) 


With 
The Outstanding Classical Ballerina 
NINA YOUSHKEVITCH 


Assisted by 
SIDNEY STAMBAUGH 


“Among the outstanding performances of the season, and they would be outstanding 
in any season anywhere, I would place Nina Youshkevitch in “Sleeping Beauty” and ‘Swan 
Lake.”? She is a true classical ballerina. She is intensely musical, and her work is clear and 
devoid of all superfluous trimming . . .’—Arnold Haskell, Times, London. 


_..and we can name Nina Youshkevitch the star of the company who by her dynamic 
interpretation shows herself worthy of the artistic mission that was entrusted to her.—Edouard 


Beaudu, Intransigent, Paris. 
The young Nina Youshkevitch who alone among the dancers seems endorsed with a 
technique and charming gift.—Darius Milhaud, Le Jour, Paris. 


“F willingly pay tribute to Nina Youshkevitch who is charming, gracious and whose 
dance is above perfection.—Reynaldo Hahn, Le Figaro, Paris. 


Company of 100 Artists 


Symphony Orchestra Spectacular Scenery Beautiful Costumes 


Choreography by Sergei Temoff 


Music Director: DR. IAN ALEXANDER 
Stage and Technical Director: VLADIMIR DUBENSKY 
Scenery Designed by: ALEXANDER EDWARD ANDERSON 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


Wednesday, Apr. 4, and Friday, Apr. 6 - 8:30. Sun., Apr. 8 - 2:30 


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SHERMAN & CLAY BOX OFFICE, GA. 4061 
Make checks payable to California Concerts, Inc. 
Cro 
A San Francisco Russian Opera and Ballet Association Attraction. 
S. M. Saroyan, President — V. Velikoselsky, Secy.-Treas. 
300 Montgomery Street, Suite 800. GArfield 0171. 
San Francisco 4, California 


SS I 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 361 

















Box Holders for Friday Afternoons 


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0 Oo B > 


P 


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DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 


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MISS JENNIE BLAIR 

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MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 

MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR 


| 
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ag nl Pe, a 


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**k#U. S. ARMY HOSPITALS 


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*** Transportation Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 


with the cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


362 


SAN FRANCISCO 


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ee ee ae 


Re AE 








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A MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX N MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E. AMBROSE 
MR. THEODORE BEKINS 

B MILLS COLLEGE DR. ALVIN COX 
DR MiRIAM MILLER 

Cc KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA DR. AND MRS. B. H. PAGE 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
O COMMANDER AND MRS. WM. LISTER ROGERS 


D SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM MR. AND MRS. JOHN ROSEKRANS 
E DELTA DELTA DELTA P ALPHA DELTA PHI 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


R SIGMA PHI 


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H P| BETA PHI S ALPHA PHI 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
J SIGMA KAPPA T STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA U STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


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M DR. AND MRS. HAROLD K. FABER 
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Sextet in B flat major, Opus 18........- nS eetcr at nae Se eee PEE een dO Sa lseh tee te Brahms 
Octem ir eatlaterniayl Ore O DUiswe: Ok. tee Mle Steet oe eee ae et Cet Peis hae ge eee ee Mendelssohn 
By San Francisco’s Leading Artists 


GUESTS OF HONOR 
JOSE FERRER UTA HAGEN 


Sunday, March 11th, 3:00 p.m., Colonial Ballroom, St. Francis Hotel 
Admission—Reserved Section $2.00; Unreserved Section $1.00 (plus tax) 


Tickets on Sale at City of Paris—EXbrook 8585 Sherman & Clay, GArfield 4061 
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Se 











SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 363 














PERSONNEL 





SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 


ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 


ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 


ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
FORD, LoOuIS W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
D! BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENC 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN — 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKGN, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PIERRE MONTEU®X, Conouctor 


‘CELESS: 


BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
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CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
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HRANEK, CARL 


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KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


RENZ!I, PAUL UR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 
REMINGTON, MERRILL. 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIvo, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
SCHIVO, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’AMOUR anp 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BIBBINS, F. C. 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, JR. 


TRUMPETS: 
Buss, CHARLES, UR. 
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KRESS, VICTOR 
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DICTEROW, HAROLD—VIOLIN 
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364 


MOULIN, HARRY—VIDLIN 
ROSS, NATHAN—VIOLIN 
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DE PALMA, ATTILIO—HORN 
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SAN FRANCISCO 








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and in I walk and say 


Your sep 


And that’s a mighty happy picture. 
Chesterfields never fail to fit in with your 
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Chesterfield’s exceptional Mildness, Better Taste 
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THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


[LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY - PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 
HOWARD K. SKINNER +© BUSINESS MANAGER 








= —_ = eT EE RETR POLIO MEE ERP Pe Say PRE © ET ES TP a er FR FPSO SS 4 PRIUS TE PN PME SOF PITT Mee ED EEE YP TERE ORT te 
— rene, +6 ’ f 
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Ain Blais Ati nth et. nee — a = 
OR ee ELUATE ALIN gr 


[WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 





rs aR 


Sor co 


x | Eighth Pair . Ania Dorfmann, Guest Artist . March 9-10, 1945 


- 


F 8 






Income for 
your dependents — 


while you live 


A man while he still lives may set apart 
all or some part of his property to 
provide income now or later for any 
of his beneficiaries by establishing a 
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family. It can always be altered. Ask 
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TRUST DEPARTMENT 


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NEW HOME in OAKLAND 


4 








Convenience is the word for our new music store... 
located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
town Oakland. 


Step right off the street to our main floor... for REC- 
ORBDSE. sone MUSIG. sR ECORDe CABINETS rans 
CONCERT TICKETS. Upstairs, on the mezzanine, 
you ll find our other departments... Pianos, Band and 
Orchestra Instruments, Radios and Radio-Phonographs. 





Parking fot next door or just across the street. 


Sherman 


o 
a. 
@,!'' 


New Telephone Number 
Hi gate 8440 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 389 





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Brilliant young soprano, Hazel Hayes, will be guest soloist with 
the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, under the ahaseeorn of Alfred 
VWallensten when the “Standard Hour” is broadcast Sunday from the 
Marine Corps Base at San Diego, for airing over KPO and the NBC 
Pacific Coast network at 8:30 p.m. Miss Hayes’ selections include 
“Ah. Love But A Day” by Beach, “Kiss in the Dark” by Victor Herbert, 
“The Rosary” by Ethelbert Nevin and “L’Amour, Toujours L’Amour” 
by Friml. 1 he orchestra will be heard in the Overture to Rossint’s tragic 
opera “Semiramide,’’ Strauss’ “‘f Emperor Waltz,” selections from * ‘Ona 
homa” and “Beautiful Galatea” from Franz von Suppe’s operetta 
“Galatea. 


Sunday morning the “Stradivari Orchestra, ” conducted by Paul 
Lavalle, will include in its NBC program (KPO, 9:30 a.m.) Intermezzo 
(Jewels of the Madonna) by Wolfe-Ferrari, “Cavatina” by Raff (violin 
solo by Jacques Gasselin) , ‘T’schaikowsky’s “Sleeping Beauty” Waltz 
and selections from ““The Merry Widow” by Franz Lehar. 


. Dr. Malcolm Sargent, distinguished British musical director serving 
as s cuest conductor of the NBC Symphony Orchestra, will conclude fe 
‘lone -week “General Motors Symphony of the Air’ engagement Sunday 
(KPO 2:00 p.m.) with an all-E nglish program. Fe atured work will be 
William Walton’s Concerto for Viola and Orchestra, with William 
Primrose as soloist. Shortly after the March 11 broadcast, Dr. Sargent 
returns to England for symphony engagements in many cities and out- 
lying sections con the benefit of war Srarkere: 


Marjorie Lawrence, Metropolitan Opera soprano, highlights “The 

at clep! 10ne Hour” Monday (KPO, 9:00 p.m.) w ith the familiar ‘ ‘Danny 

Boy” and the aria “Il va venir’ from Halevy’s “La Juive.” Don Voor- 

hees and the Bell Telephone Orchestra will open with the conductor’s 

arrangement of “Lion and the Lamb,’ and Miss Lawrence with the 
male chorus and orchestra will close with “The Lost Chord.’ 


_ Dorothy Kirsten, soprano, and Allan Jones, screen and recording 
tenor, will be guest soloists Sunday when Jay Blackton’s RCA Victor 
Orchestra and Robert Shaw’s Victor Chorale are heard on “Music 
America Loves Best’? over KPO at 1:30 p.m., Louis Calhern emceeing. 


——s 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 391 





392 





...Of course you are...and we'll bet home 
planning tops the list of your after V-day 
dreams. For more than a century in war 
and peace W, & J. Sloane has been helping 
make just these kind of dreams come true 


for generations of Americans. 


WeJ 


SLOANE 


216 SUTTER near GRANT 
SAN FRANCISCO 8, CALIF. 


SAN FRANCISCO 














Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
—. Raymond Armsby:...--2.-------.---2—- Vice-President Gharles® Page ssscs ce neta eaten ones ae Treasurer 
Paulo A. BiSSING CMa seco cece ee eee eee Vice-President Howard =e .Sikimtne rien ease eee Secretary 
CharlesuR= Bly th:s.2 2 Vice-President GeraidG. (Ross=..---- =. ee Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II-.-.---....----------- Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Cc. O. G. Miller, Chairman 
E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 
Mys. Selah Chamberlain 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

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Anta DORFMANN was born in Odessa, and gave her first concert in her native 
city at the age of 11. At the age of 13 she was taken to Paris to study with Isidor 
Philippe, but after a year with that teacher she was forced to return to Russia 
by the outbreak of the revolution, and since that time she has been entirely 
self-taught. Miss Dorfman left Russia in 1920, and began her concert career in 
Liege, Belgium. She played with many important orchestras and conductors in 
Europe, and has appeared widely in this country since her arrival here in 1936. 


This will be her first performance with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


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eee 
Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-4e}- 
EIGHTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Fripay, Marcu 9, At 2:15 
SATURDAY, MARCH 10, AT 8:30 


ANIA DORFMANN, Guest Artist 


-4e}- 





‘Program 


PASSAGAG EIAGING Ge VGN © ees Handel 


(FREELY TRANSCRIBED BY ALFRED AKON, First PERFORMANCE) 





PRELUDE JO EORENGRIN: 22 Wagner 
CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
NOMIEN, GOVEN | ORGS Beethoven 

Allegro con brio 

Largo 

Allegro 

Miss DORFMANN 
INTERMISSION 
ye) ea] 0 Fe) ie OY) EB) UN Gore Se ea Stravinsky 
PART I 
THe ADORATION OF THE EARTH 
Introduction - Dance of the Adolescents - Abduction - Spring Rounds - 
Games of Rival Towns - Procession of the Sage - 


Adoration of the Earth - Dance of the Earth 
Part II 
"THE SACRIFICE 
Introduction - Mysterious Circles of the Adolescents - Glorification of 


the Chosen One - Evocation of the Ancestors - Ritual of the Ancestors - 
Sacrificial Dance of the Chosen One 

It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use their tickets 

kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 

of their seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 

This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 

ee 
397 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 











a 


{se tieaghalies damaamtne cenit 


398 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


~<@}- 


FIRST BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Tuesday, March 13, at 8:30 
ERICA MORIN, Soloist 


Symphony No. 1, in GC minor 
Tragic Overture 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 


SECOND BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Thursday, March 15, at 8:30 
DUSOLINA GIANNINI, Soloist 


Symphony No. 3, in F major 
A Song of Fate, for Chorus and Orchestra 
(The Municipal Chorus, Hans Leschke. Conductor) 


Five Songs, Orchestrated by Alfred Hertz 
Symphony No. 2, in D major 


THIRD BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 
Saturday, March 17, at 8:30 
ARTUR SCHNABEL, Soloist 


Academic Festival Overture 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 2, in B flat major 
Symphony No. 4, in E minor 


-4@}- 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Thursday, March 22, at 8:30 
Saturday, March 24, at 8:30 


ARTUR SCHNABEL, Guest Artist 


Old Dances and Airs for the Lute, First Series......... arr. Respighi 

Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 4, in G IVa] Olay ae Beethoven 

HOURE ICD Cams tO e INOCaysaes oy ta ee a, a ae ec ee Roy Harris 
(First Performance in San I'rancisco) 

Symphony No. 3, in E Flat Mla OIE [ORICA Dis oe oe Schumann 





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—$—$__— 


SAN FRANCISCO 

















—< 


PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


PASSACAGLIA IN G MINOR....George Frederick Handel 
(1685-1759) 
(FREELY TRANSCRIBED BY ALFRED AKON) 


In its original form this movement is the finale of one of Handel’s suites 
for the harpsichord. Mr. Akon has arranged it for string orchestra, adding some 
variations of his own in Handelian style. ‘The transcription was made last June. 

Mr. Akon joined the viola section of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
at the beginning of the present season. He was born in Hartford, Connecticut, 
“7 1905. He studied violin and viola with William Kroll, Jacques Gordon and 
others, and composition with Vittorio Giannini and Frederick Jacobi. He served 
for some years on the faculty of the Julius Hartt School of Music in Hartford, 
and was introduced to San Francisco audiences last season with a transcription 
of a concerto grosso by Benedetto Marcello. 


PRELUDE WOU bie iC TuliN Richard Wagner 
(1813-1883) 

Wagner's own explanation of the significance of this prelude, as translated 
and somewhat abbreviated by Ernest Newman, is as follows: 

“Out of the clear blue ether of the sky there seems to condense a wonderful, 
yet at first hardly perceptible vision; and out of this there gradually emerges, 
ever more and more clearly, an angel host bearing in its midst the sacred 
Grail. As it approaches earth it pours out exquisite odors, like streams of gold, 
ravishing the senses of the beholder. The glory of the vision grows and grows, 
until it seems as if the rapture must be shattered and dispersed by the very 
vehemence of its own expansion. The vision draws nearer, and the climax 1s 
reached when at last the Grail is revealed in all its glorious reality, radiating 
fiery beams and shaking the soul with emotion. The beholder sinks on his 
knees in adoring self-annihilation. ‘The Grail pours out its light on him like a 
benediction, and consecrates him to its service: then the flames gradually die 
away, and the angel host soars up again to the ethereal heights in tender joy, 
having made pure once more the hearts of men by the sacred blessings of the 
Grail.” 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
NO. 1, IN CGC MAJOR, @ PRs Ludwig Van Beethoven 


(1770-1827) 

Beethoven was not always the remote, eccentric, lonely genius of the 
accepted picture. He made his bow upon the world stage (Vienna, 1795) as a 
concert pianist, and in this role quickly won great celebrity and material 
reward. Consequently his early compositions lay great stress Upon the piano; 
the great majority of his 35 odd piano sonatas, the greater bulk of his chamber 
works with piano, and the first three of his five piano concertos all fall within 
this first period of his career. 

Carl Czerny records that Beethoven’s playing was noteworthy for its 
“tremendous power, character, unheard-of bravura and facility. In rapidity 
of scale passages, trills, leaps, etc., no one equalled him, not even Hummel. 
His attitude at the piano was perfectly quiet and dignified . . . his fingers were 
very powerful, not long, and broadened at the tips by much playing; for he 
told me often that in his youth he had practiced stupendously, mostly until 
past midnight.” 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 399 

















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Wenzel Tomaschek, a virtuoso of considerable prominence in his own day, 
heard Beethoven perform his first piano concerto for the first time in 1798, and 
wrote that “his magnificent playing, and particularly the daring flights in his 
improvisation, stirred me to the depths of my soul; indeed, I found myself so 
profoundly shaken that for several days I could not bring myself to touch the 
piano. 

Beethoven might well have continued for many years as the popular lion 
of the concert hall and private salon had it not been for circumstances beyond 
his control. Fifteen years after ‘Tomaschek, Ludwig Spohr heard Beethoven at 
the piano. “He had already discontinued playing both in public and at private 
parties, wrote Spohr, “and I had but one opportunity to hear him, when I 
casually came to a rehearsal of a new trio at Beethoven’s house. It was by no 
means an enjoyment, for, in the first place, the pianoforte was woefully out 
of tune, which, however, troubled Beethoven little, since he could hear nothing 
of it, and secondly, of the former so much admired excellence of the virtuoso 
scarcely anything was left, in consequence of his total deafness. In the fortes 
the poor man hammered in such a way upon the keys that entire groups of notes 
were inaudible, so that one lost all intelligence of the subject unless the eye 
followed the score at the same time. I felt movedwith the deepest sorrow at so hard 


Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 





WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated bv the Citv and Countv of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 401 











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a destiny. It is a sad misfortune for anyone to be deal, how then could a musician 
endure it without despair? Beethoven's almost continual melancholy was no 
longer a riddle to me.” 

It may be worth adding that the C major concerto is called Number | 
because it was the first work of Beethoven in this form to be published. ‘The 
concerto in B flat, published as No. 2, Opus 19, actually preceded it in order of 
composition. ‘TVhis kind of thing happened often to Beethoven's works, and the 
fact that a given composition bears a relatively late opus number does not 
necessarily mean that it is a late work. 


I 


Allegro con brio, C major 4/4 time. ‘Vhe concerto has the customary double 
exposition, one for the orchestra and one for the solo instrument with orchestra. 
The first theme is stated at once by the violins: 





























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This is repeated and worked over with fuller orchestration. The second theme 
then appears, also in the violins, in the unorthodox key of E flat major alter 


NTRARTER 


and his music 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 403 
















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three bars that pun on the fact that the chords of E flat major and G minor have 








wa 
two notes in common: 
Y The second theme is repeated in F and G, and is followed by a transitional 
| section going over to the closing theme. The latter starts in the horns and oboes: 
Cor : 











And with it the first exposition comes to a full, flourishing close in C major. 
The piano enters to start the second exposition with a new first theme: 
















































































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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 405 





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After a new transition passage, the second theme (Example 2) appears in the 
flutes and violins in G. The piano takes it up. The closing theme (Example 5) 
returns in the woodwind and piano, and the second exposition cnds with de- 
velopment of it, and ornamental material, in solo and orchestra. “Vhe second 
exposition comes to a very solid close in G major. 
| The development starts with a sudden pianissimo in the strings and a sus- 
| tained high G of the oboe. After a few more bars forte, the piano begins the 
working-out with a variant of Example 2 in E flat. The first part of the short 
. development 1s devoted to this theme, but later a portion ol Example | is heard 
pianissimo in the violins under passage work of the solo. ‘The development ends 
with a sudden descending scale of the solo. 

Example | comes back in C major, fortiss¢mo, in the whole orchestra, to pen 
the recapitulation. The piano continues the theme. Example 2 recurs in C major 
in the orchestra, and is also continued by the piano. The return of Example 5 
is followed by an extended coda, during the course of which the solo has the 





usual cadenza. (The cadenza used on this occasion is by Carl Reinecke.) 
| After the cadenza the movement concludes with a few bars based on Example 3. 
Be 


| Largo, A flat major 2/2 time. The piano starts the principal theme: 













































































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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 407 











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which is extended by the violins: 


vin. IZ 
Ges a SS 





Example 5 comes back in the clarinet, and both themes are disc ussed at length 
by solo and orchestra. After these variations and “quasi-variations” there is a 


long coda beginning: 
































But the movement ends with a reminiscence of its opening theme. 
Lie 


_ Ronpo: Allegro scherzando, C major, 2/4 time. The piano states the prin- 
cipal subject without introduction: 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 409 











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This is repeated by the orchestra, and there ts a tr ansition passage leading to 
the second theme, given to the violins and oboe in G: 


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Your check will aid in providing Symphony tickets for music students in public high 


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Make Checks payable to Musical Association of San Francisco and mail to 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE, Opera House, San Francisco 2, Calif. 

















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s worked over by solo and orchestra. 


Example 91 





nding in C 


in F minor and e 
orchestra. Now a new episodic 


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minor in 


1 
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back again, this time in C 


ated. Example 8 swings 


fly tre 


and is brie 


the solo. 


c 
c 


ansition and by Example 9 


t of the movement, Example 8 
is a coda devoted to further repetitions of Example 8. 


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(1882-) 


in dates, but the happenings described 


s autobiography is sparse 


b 


Stravinsky 


in 


hat book must have taken place 


xcerpts from t 


ing e 


first of the follow 


in the 


solemn pagan 


girl dance herself to death. 


ate the god of spring. Such was the theme 


I must confess th 


described it to m 


a complete surprise, my mind 


ges of The Fire Bird in St. Peters- 
in imagination a 


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= pa ie 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








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yainter who specialized in pagan subjects. He w TEA ts 
} pee aoe ] a agian subjects. He welcomed my inspiration with 
enthusiasm, and became m)} collaborator in this creation. In Paris I told Diag 
’ ‘ © " re 4s *e . . , : : ‘ 
hile fF about it, and he Was at Once carried away by the idea, though its ncolltrae 
tion was delayed by the following events.” 2 ei ac 
| 2 zs as events” were, to pul it succinctly, Pelrouchka, which Stra 
. Irs Ot Vc « > “, ae ae , Se 4 - : “ie . / : a 
vins y peeaD as a ittle piano piece by way of diversion before tackling the Rite 
but which ultimately developed into a big ballet = 
Bp aie Taye pe aT cae ey : c 
= phe having been composed and produced, Stravinsky returned to 
ce oe and completed it in the early spring of 1913 Diaghileff appointed 
ibow “por > > . va ine 3 : ‘ . ae ‘ 2) } 
ee \ to create the choreography, much to Stravinsky’s distress. Nijinsky 
says the composer, knew nothing whatever about music, and, although he as 
a great dancer, was inexperienced and incompetent as a chor i * The 
ae CG aoe tas ” a as a Choreographer. ; 
result was endless trouble and difficulty for all concerned ee 2 
a therefore natural that Stravinsky approached the first performance 
: i ite in a dubious frame of mind. That event took place at the Théatre 
»C © + H TO pac d- = oo c ~ -¢€ 5 
des Champs Elysces in Paris on May 28, 1913, and caused one of the greates 
scandals in the history of modern music. aes ae 
ro i : ( : as y > ; or nye 2 ‘ | . ay. 
he « ymplexity of my score,” says Stravinsky, “had demanded a erez 
number of rehearsals, which M ux hz er eas 
ee eae : Ss Monteux had conducted with his usual skill and 
oo a Ss or the actual performance, | am not in a position to judge, for | 
. 1€ au itorium al the first bars of the prelude, which had evoked derisive 
aughter. I was disgusted. [hese demonstrations, at first isolated, soon became 
eo tn provoking counter-demonstrations and very quickly developing into 
a terri ue During the whole performance I was at Nijinsky’s side in the 
wines. He was sté ae en eee eRe ike a: 
at 8s ee was standing on a chair screaming ‘sixteen, seventeen, eighteen’ 
ey had their own me ¢ Erect NI nine ode ne 
\ nethod of counting to keep time. Naturally, the poor dancers 





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could hear nothing by reason of the row in the auditorium and the sound of 
their own dance steps. I had to hold Nijinsky by his clothes, for he was furious, 
and ready to dash on the stage at any moment and create a scandal. Diaghileft 
kept ordering the electricians to turn the lights on or off, hoping in that way to 
put a stop to the noise. That is all I can remember about that first performance. 
Oddly enough, at the dress rehearsal, to which we had, as usual, invited a 
number of actors, painters, musicians, writers and the most cultured represen- 
| tatives of society, everything had gone off peacefully, and I was very far from 
' expecting such an outburst. 
“Now, after the lapse of more than 20 years, it is naturally difficult for me 
| to recall in any detail the choreography of The Rite without being influenced 
YS by the admiration with which it met in the set known as the avant-garde— 
ready, as always, to welcome as a new discovery anything that differs, be it ever 
so little, from the déja vu. But what struck me then, and still strikes me most, 
| about the choreography, was and is Nijinsky’s lack of consciousness of what he 
’ was doing when he created it. He showed therein his complete inability to 
accept and assimilate those revolutionary ideas which Diaghileff had made his 
creed, and obstinately and industriously strove to inculcate. What the chore- 
ography expressed was a very labored and barren effort rather than a plastic 
realization flowing simply and naturally from what the music demanded. How 
far it was from what I had desired! 

“In composing The Rite I had imagined the visual part of the performance 
as a series of rhythmical mass movements of the greatest simplicity which would 
have an instantaneous effect on the audience, with no superfluous details or 
complications such as would suggest effort. The only solo was to be the sacrifi- 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 417 








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cial dance at the end of the piece. The music of that dance, clear and well 
defined, demanded a corresponding choreography simple and easy to under- 


stand. But there again, although he had grasped the dramatic significance of 


the dance, Nijinsky was incapable of giving intelligible form to its essence, and 
complicated it either by clumsiness or lack of understanding. For it is un- 
deniably clumsy to slow down the tempo of the music in arden tO Compose 
complicated steps which cannot be danced in the tempo prescribed. Many 
choreographers have that fault, but I have never known any who erred in that 
respect to the same degree as Nijinsky.” 

Several pages later Stravinsky writes as follows: 

“I think it was in the month of April, 1914, that both The Rite and 
Petrouchka were played tor the first time at a concert in Paris, Monteux being 
the conductor. It was a brilliant renascence of The Rite after the TVhéatre des 
Champs-Elysées scandal. ‘he hall was crowded. ‘The audience, with no scenery 
to distract them, listened with concentrated attention and applauded with an 
enthusiasm I had been far from expecting, and which greatly moved me. 
Certain critics who had censured The Rite the year before now openly admitted 
their mistake. ‘This conquest of the public naturally gave me intense and 
lasting satisfaction.” 

The above paragraph is particularly significant, for The Rite has since 
made its way ae entirely as a concert piece, and, although other choreogra- 
phers have taken it in hand, it has never made a ereat success on the stage. 

It is perhaps worth ae that The Rite of Spring is not a rootiess phe- 
nomenon. Stravinsky’s teacher, Rimsky-Korsakoff, was a very thorough student 
of Russian folkways in all their aspects, and certain themes of The Rite are said 
to have been taken from his collection of Russian folk tunes. In Rimsky’s 
Russian Easter Overture, with its picture of pagan merry-making that survives 


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in the Christian ritual, one can perceive a germ of Stravinsky’s Rite, to say 
nothing of the pagan religious dances in Rimsky’s Snow Maiden. Prokofieff, 
who was likewise a pupil of Rimsky, composed his Scythian Suite, also a tone 
picture of pagan Russia, at the same time as Stravinsky wrote the Rite. Stra- 
vinsky and Prokofieff, are, of course, infinitely harsher and more savage about 
it than Rimsky-Korsakoff. Stravinsky's rhythmical complexities, particularly, 
are almost beyond belief; there are countless pages in The Rite in which the 
time signatures change in every bar. 


It is also interesting to note that at the time when these Russian composers 
were making their excursions into the primitive, Picasso and other artists in 
Paris were rescuing African Negro sculpture from the ethnographic museums 
and studying it intensively for its plastic and expressive virtues. 


Since The Rite is better known as a concert piece than as a ballet and is 
likely to remain so, a sketch of its action taken from this or that choreography 
would be supererogatory. The work is in two parts, or acts, the first presumably 
taking place in a valley or some such open place in the daytime, the second at 
night inside a semicircle of rough-hewn monoliths, each surmounted by the 
skull of a different animal and all lighted with flickering fires. The action of 
the first part has to do with the assemblage of the tribes, their sports and games, 
and their final gathering under the leadership of a sage to dance their adoration 
of the earth. ‘he second part works up to the culminating sacrifice through 
various ritual dances. 

The short subsidiary movements in each part succeed each other without 
pause, and it is difficult, if not impossible, to provide indications in a program 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 421 





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THE SAN FRANCISCO BALLET GUILD 


Mrs. JUILLIARD McDONALD, President i 


Announces 


Spring Season 
of 





THE SAN FRANCISCO BALLET ' 


WILLAM CHRISTENSEN 
Artistic Director 
HAROLD CHRISTENSEN REYNOLD WIGGINS i 
Ballet School Director Business Manager 


Three Outstanding Performances 
MAY 11, 12 and I3 
After Triumphal Eastern Tour 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
FRIDAY, May 11, 8:30 P.M. BLUE PLAZA 


(American Premiere) 
Music by AARON COPLAND 
Story, Settings and Costumes by ANTONIO SOTOMAYOR 
Choreography by WILLAM CHRISTENSEN 


Also: SWAN LAKE - Romeo and Juliet - Old Vienna 
SATURDAY, May 12, 8:30 P.M... WINTER CARNIVAL 
Music by J. STRAUSS—Choreography by WILLAM CHRISTENSEN 
Also: Sonate Pathétique - Grand Pas de Deux - BLUE PLAZA 


SUNDAY, May 13, 8:30 P.M.....PYRAMUS & THISBE 


Story Based on the Greek Myth 
Music by FRITZ BERENS—Choreography by WILLAM CHRISTENSEN 


Also: Grand Pas de Deux - BLUE PLAZA - Now the Brides 4 


eo ee ’ 


Program Subject to Change 
Tickets from $1.20 to $3.00 (tax included) at Opera Box Office 
City of Paris—EXbrook 8585 


ORDER BLANK 


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Opera Box Office, City of Paris, 


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Ricasesresetves. see ee Sseatsi@ ioe feo, each—Total $........... 
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note for the end of one and the start of another. It is also unnecessary. But 
perhaps it should be pointed out that the semi-final movement of the first part, 
which, like the act as a whole, is called Adoration of the Earth, is actually noth- 
ing more than a bar or two of silence between the two climaxes of the Procession 
of the Sage and the Dance of the Earth. During this silence, to judge from an 
indication in the score, the sage, who has been brought to the fore during the 
procession, prostrates himself for a moment on the eround. 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 423 





424 








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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 425 





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eee ae oe ere ee — eS ee ee eee _ POO ~ ~ 





SAN FRANCISCO RUSSIAN OPERA AND BALLET ASSN. 


(After last fall’s outstanding success in its production of PRINCE IGOR.) 


Now ‘Presents 
First Annual Season of Russian Opera 


With 
Today's Most Outstanding Russian Singers 


‘Ke pertoire 
BORIS GODUNOFF. . . By M. Moussorgsky 
THE DEMON ...... . By A. Rubinstein 
PRINGE IGOR 2) 2. as) 1 DY A. borodin 


General Director: EUGENE PLOTNIKOFE 
Choreography by: Sergei Temoff 
Choral Director: Dr. Ian Alexander 


Company of 150 - Symphony Orchestra - Beautiful Costumes 
Spectacular Russian Ballet - Magnificent Scenery - Chorus of 60 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


The authorities are right. “Prince Igor” is quite definitely a great opera, one of the 
greatest of its time and place. . . . Eugene Plotnikoff directed with the vividness and clarity 
of a thorough master of his trade. . . . Both performances were sold out to the doors, which 
is a far from insignificant fact.—Alfred Frankenstein, S. F. Chronicle. 

Elaborate as the opera is, the production was very creditable, more so in its musical 
elements than in its dramatic. Its principal artists have won repute in Paris and New York. 
... They were applauded by a capacity crowd.—Alexander Fried, S. F. Examiner. 

The Russians have done it again. .. . After their recent season of tip-top ballet they 
turned to another art form, grand opera, and last night at the San Francisco Opera House 
presented in a highly creditable manner their national opera, Borodin’s ‘tPrince Igor.—Marie 
Hicks Davidson, S. F. Call-Bulletin. 

Russian opera scored an effective inning at the War Memorial Opera House last night 
when an SRO audience experiencd a highly admirable production of Borodin’s ‘Prince 
Igor.”... The Russian Opera Association is to be congratulated upon the general excellence 
of its initial venture and it is to be hoped that “Prince Igor,” which will be repeated tonight, 
is the forerunner of future annual seasons of Russian opera by Russian artists in our Opera 
House.—Marjory M. Fisher, The News. 

First honors go to Eugene Plotnikoff, who conducted the performance.—Ashley Pettis, 


The Argonaut. 
May 16 to 27, Inclusive 


Wednesday May 116;,8:30 pote. . aia ciee. avn BA ee et encas: Boris Godunoft 
Friday, May 18, 8:30 p.m...... yn ys <e BOW At ea ee Ney The Demon 
Saturday, May 19, 8:30 p.m....... RE AE an ey ee eRe / yey Bw Prince Igor 
Sunday, May 20, 8:30 p. m.... , e Boris Godunoft 
Piuesday. Viayi 225.525 0. pe ehiete ch ee Vuk oe Rea he ike Perak aa ae oe ee Prince Igor 


EBridayyMay-25- 5:30 patna ee ean Ae | _.. The Demon 
Tickets: 3.00, 2.40, 1.80, 1.20 (tax included) 


Sherman & Clay Box Office—GA. 4061. 


Make checks payable to California Concerts, Inc. 
Reservations for three performances given first preference. 


**A San Francisco Russian Opera and Ballet Association Attraction.” 


S. M. Saroyan, President—V. Velikoselsky, Secy.-Treas. 


300 Montgomery Street, Suite 800. GArfield 0171. 
San Francisco 4, California 


428 SAN FRANCISCO 





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SAN FRANCISCO RUSSIAN OPERA AND BALLET ASSN. 


“Presents 


“THE SLEEPING BEAUTY”’ 


American Premier of P. I. Tschaikowsky’s Ballet 
(Complete Version — Prologue and Four Acts) , 


With 
The Outstanding Classical Ballerina 
NINA YOUSHKEVITCH 


Assisted by 
SIDNEY STAMBAUGH 


“Among the outstanding performances of the season, and they would be outstanding 
in any season anywhere, I would place Nina Youshkevitch in “Sleeping Beauty” and “Swan 
Lake.” She is a true classical ballerina. She is intensely musical, and her work is clear and 
devoid of all superfluous trimming. . ”—Arnold Haskell, Times, London. 


_.- and we can name Nina Youshkevitch the star of the company who by her dynamic 
interpretation shows herself worthy of the artistic mission that was entrusted to her.—Edouard 
Beaudu, Intransigent, Paris. 

The young Nina Youshkevitch who alone among the dancers seems endorsed with a 
technique and charming gift.—Darius Milhaud, Le Jour, Paris. 


“F willingly pay tribute to Nina Youshkevitch who is charming, gracious and whose 
dance is above perfection.—Reynaldo Hahn, Le Figaro, Paris. 


Company of 100 Artists 


Symphony Orchestra Spectacular Scenery Beautiful Costumes 


Choreography by Sergei Temoff 


Music Director: DR. IAN ALEXANDER 
Stage and Technical Director: VLADIMIR DUBINSKY 
Scenery Designed by: ALEXANDER EDWARD ANDERSON 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Wednesday, Apr. 4, and Friday, Apr. 6 - 8:30. Sun., Apr. 8 - 2:30 


Tickets: 3.00, 2.40, 1.80, 1.20 (tax included) 
SHERMAN & CLAY BOX OFFICE, GA. 4061 
Make checks payable to California Concerts, Inc. 


CZ 


A San Francisco Russian Opera and Ballet Association Attraction. 
S. M. Saroyan, President — V. Velikoselsky, Secy.-Treas. 
300 Montgomery Street, Suite 800. GArfield 0171. 
San Francisco 4, California 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . 429 


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Box Holders for Friday Afternoons 


MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX 
MRS. SIGMUND STERN 
MRS. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 


MRS. JOHN T. BARNETT 
MRS. WHITNEY BENTLEY 
MRS. E. E. BROWNELL 
MRS. DAVID COWLES 
MRS. MORTON GIBBONS 
MRS. HARRY HILL 

MRS. JAMES HORSBURGH 
MRS. SILAS PALMER 

MRS. T. E. PALMER 

MRS. ATHERTON RUSSELL 


E **U. S. NAVAL HOSPITALS 


F MRS. EDWARD H. BELL 
MRS. SPENCER GRANT 
MRS. MAXWELL C. MILTON 
MRS. WILLIAM H. ORRICK 


MRS. STUART RAWLINGS 
MISS ELSE SCHILLING 


MRS. DANIEL VOLKMANN 
MISS JOHANNA VOLKMANN 
MRS. DEAN WITTER 

MRS. J. B. WRIGHT 


G MRS. REED J. BEKINS 
MRS. GEORGE EDWIN BENNETT 
MRS. FRANK INGERSOLL 
MRS. CLARENCE LORAN JOHNSTON 
MRS. GEORGE S. JOHNSTON 
MRS. RALPH MERILLION 
MRS; Jt ROSEY 
MRS. ERNEST J. SWEETLAND 


H MRS. JOSEPH D. GRANT 


J MRS. JOHN CASSERLY 
MRS. DONALD GREGORY 
MRS. WELLINGTON HENDERSON 
MRS. OSGOOD HOOKER 
MR. AND MRS. KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
MRS. EDITH NORTH 


K MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
MRS. M. C. SLOSS 


L MRS. CHARLES BRANSTEN 
MRS. RICHARD FRANK 
MR. AND MRS. MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
MRS. LEWIS LAPHAM 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM, JR. 
MRS. FREDERICK WHITMAN 


M MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. BLYTH 
MRS. RICHARD HEIMANN 
MRS. A. J. LOWREY 
MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER 
MRS. EDGAR WOODS 


N MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MRS. STANHOPE NIXON 
MR. AND MRS. NION R. TUCKER 


Oo MRS. DUNN DUTTON 
MRS. WALTER HOBART 
MRS. FREDERICK HUSSEY 
MRS. KENYON JOYCE 
MRS. SAMUEL KNIGHT 
MRS. RICHARD McCREERY 


0 OO w > 


*** Transportation Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 
with the cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


430 


P 


MRS. WALTER D. HELLER 
MRS. MORRIS MEYERFELD 
MRS. RICHARD SHAINWALD 
MrS. GEORGE OPPEN 


MRS. FRANK P. DEERING 
MRS. JAMES L. FLOOD 

MRS. BENJAMIN C. KEATOR } 
MRS. HENRY S. KIERSTED 

MRS. HARRY B. LITTLE 
MRS. HAROLD R. McKINNON 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 


DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 


MRS. FRANCIS S. BAER 

MISS JENNIE BLAIR 

MRS. ELDRED BOLAND 

MRS. GEORGE M. BOWLES 
MRS. GEORGES S. DeLATOUR 
MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 

MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR 


MRS. OTTO BARKAN 
MRS. L. A. BENOIST 
M!SS MARILYN BENTLEY 
MRS. WALTER BENTLEY 
MRS. FOSTER NEWHALL 
MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
MRS. BRUCE SELFRIDGE 
MRS. MELVILLE L. SMITH 


MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 
***U. S. ARMY HOSPITALS 


MRS. HENRY BOYEN 

MRS. ARTHUR B. CAHILL 
COUNTESS LILLIAN DANDINI 
MRS. JOHN L. FLYNN 

MRS. PETER B. KYNE 

MRS. JAMES F. McNULTY 
MRS. A. J. MOORE 

MRS. THEODORE WORES 


DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
MRS. ANGUS McDONALD 
DR. HANS VON GELDERN 
MRS. HENRY H. WEHRHANE ; 


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MRS. C. W. CROSSE 

MRS. DUNCAN CURRY, JR. 
MrkS. JOSEPH W. FOWLER 
MRS. RALPH HENKLE : 
MRS. DANIEL C. HUNT ; 
MRS. A. F. JUNCKER ‘ 
MRS. RALPH K. DAVIES 
MRS. E. W. WILLETT 

MRS. EDWARD C. WURSTER 


To ed | 


MRS. FRANK BUCK 

MRS. J. LINDSAY HANNA 
MRS. JAMES LEVENSALER 
MRS. DOUGLAS McBRYDE 
MISS OLGA MEYER 

MRS. FRANK SOMERS 


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Te ey. - 


SAN FRANCISCO 








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Box Holders for Saturday Night 








A MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX N MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E. AMBROSE 
MR. THEODORE BEKINS * 
Be MES COLLEGE DR. ALVIN COX 
DR MiRIAM MILLER 
C KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA DR. AND MRS. B. H. PAGE 


\ UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
; Oo COMMANDER AND MRS. WM, LISTER ROGERS 


p> SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM Mi. AND MRS. JOHN ROSEKRANS 
i —E DELTA DELTA DELTA P ALPHA DELTA PHI 
| Gre RTT ORICATAEORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
F DELTA GAMMA Q GAMMA PHI BETA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
R SIGMA PHI 


MILLS COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


P| BETA PHI Ss ALPHA PHI 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


SIGMA KAPPA T STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


MR. AND MRS. J. D. ZELLERBACH INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
MR. AND MRS. VALLEJO GANTNER 

DR. AND MRS. NELSON HOWARD Ww CHI OMEGA 

COLONEL A. E. HOWSE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
MRS. ROBERT SCARBOR 

ONS x U. S. ARMED FORCES 

DR. AND MRS. HAROLD K. FABER Y KAPPA ALPHA THETA 

MR. AND MRS. JAMES H. HOWARD UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
MR. AND MRS. LEE LAIRD 

MR. AND MRS. JEROME VLADIMIR POWELL Z INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 

DR. AND MRS. HUGH ROSE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


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CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT 


LOIS FAIR 


Young California Pianist 
Artist-Pupil of Lev Shorr 
Fripay, Marcu 16, 1945, 8:30 p.M. CENTURY CLuB AUDITORIUM 


Tickets 90 cents and $1.20 (tax included). On sale at Opera House Box Office, 
4 Normandy Lane, City of Paris, or by mail, Lulu J. Blumberg, 3131 Jackson Street 


Sextet in’ B flat majlOm OPUS: | Oe 5. ccc 5 eke cc cece nee nese erence ee eae = een eeme reese aa Brahms 
Octetuin Eo tlat major, Opus, 20 ass. Fee to Mendelssohn 
By San Francisco’s Leading Artists 
GUESTS OF HONOR 
JOSE FERRER UTA HAGEN 
Sunday, March 11th, 3:00 p.m., Colonial Ballroom, St. Francis Hotel 

Admission——Reserved Section $2.00; Unreserved Section $1.00 (plus tax) i 
Tickets on Sale at City of Paris—EXbrook 8585 Sherman & Clay, GArfield 4061 
Joint Anti-Fascist Refugee Committee 68 Post Street GArfield 3615 
De eee nee eee = A Be ee eee 
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WGA.” I. BLUMBERG presents 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 431 





VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
ForRbD, Louis W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALD!I, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSKI, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
Di BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENGC 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 

* WHITE, ALBERT 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUMX, Conouctor 


‘SELEOS: 


BLINDER, BoRIS 
PRINCIPAL 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 


BASSES: 


KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


RENZI, PAUL UR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 
REMINGTON, MERRILL. 


SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIvoO, LESLIE Jd. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScCH!ivo, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BIBBINS, F. C. 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C., 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, JR, 


TRUMPETS: 
Buss, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND 5S, 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Gios!i, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SINA!I, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELwoop 


PIANO AND CELESTAS: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


PROPERTY MASTER: 
J. T. HEAVEY 


JULIUS HAUG 


IN SERVICE WITH THE UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES 


DICTEROW, HAROLD—VIOLIN 
HOUSER, F. S.—VIOLIN 
KHUNER, FELIX—VIOLIN 
MICHAELIAN, ERNEST A.—VIOLIN 


432 


MOULIN, HARRYMVIOGLIN 
Ross, NATHAN—VIOLIN 
LEPLIN, EMANUEL—VIOLA 


OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV—VIOLA 
CLAUDIO, CESARE—’CELLO 
DE PALMA, ATTILIO—HORN 
ALTMANN, LUDW!IG—ORGAN 


SAN FRANCISCO 





—— 


“ 








} EVENING CONCERT 


Nearly two hours 0 | 
fine music every . / | 
night of the week | 









: 8:10 to 10 P.M. 
| sTATION KK ¥ A 


San Francisco 
* 
1210 on your piAt 


ACME BREWERIES 


San Francisco Los Angeles 


OE SM 





one on Chesterfield 


2 


: WETE changing 1) Ve it’s a lasting friendship .. . well-earned 


? by Chesterfield’s three top qualities... 
a NEW OU b... MILDNESS * BETTER TASTE 


COOLER SMOKING 


t 


And when your G.I. Joe steps out of khaki into a 
blue pin-stripe and he’s home for keeps, you'll again 
enjoy Chesterfields together and agree that nothing 
measures up to their... 


RIGHT COMBINATION x WORLD’S BEST TOBACCOS 


HESTERFIELD Za 


Copyright 1945, Liccett & Myers Tosacco Co. 


PISANI FRINTING & PUBLISHING CO,, 700 MONTGOMERY, S&S. F. 





JcHE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY -> PRESIDENT AND MANAGING DIRECTOR 


HOWARD K. SKINNER «- BUSINESS MANAGER 








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A man while he still lives may set apart 
all or some part of his property to 


provide income now or later for any 
of his beneficiaries by establishing a 


“family trust.” Each arrangement will 


be made to fit the needs of a particular 
family. It can always be altered. Ask 


about th 


7S S€vUICEe. 


TRUST DEPARTMENT 


Wells Fargo 


Bank « union Trust co. 


SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 
Member F.D.I.C. 





Fpuunithf 


SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. in its 
NEW HOME in OAKLAND 

















Convenience is the word for our new music store... 
located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
town Oakland. 


Step right off the street to our main floor... for REC- 
ORDS =... SHEER MUSIG...... .REGORD: GABIINETSi. 
CONCERT TICKETS. Upstairs, on the mezzanine, 
you'll find our other departments . . . Pianos, Band and 
Orchestra Instruments, Radios and Radio-Phonographs. 





Parking lot next door or just across the street. 


New Telephone Number 
Hi gate 8440 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


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KNOW YOUR SYMPHONY 


P< 





Another of the contributions of the Musical Association to the 


| 
cultural education of the younger generation, is the series of Young 
People’s Concerts presented each season by the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra under the direction of Dr. Rudolph Ganz. 

The concerts are given in War Memorial Opera House on four 
Saturday mornings; and from balcony to orchestra, the House is filled 
for each performance with enthusiastic youngsters, ranging in age from 
6 to 16. The popularity of the series can be well judged by the fact that 
seats for the current series were unobtainable a month before the first 


concert began. 


Under the current Musical Association plan, young people not only 
attend the concerts, but partiicpate in them as well. A series of audi- 
tions are held at the end of each season for the purpose of choosing 
several Bay Area musicians under the age of 17 to appear as guest 
soloists with the Symphony Orchestra the following year. ‘This Season's 
young guests were Vernon Jones, 13-year-old clarinetist; and Virginia 
Schwartz, 16-year-old pianist. From the ranks of the Orchestra itself 
came the Season’s only adult guest, Miss Virginia Morgan, principal 


harpist with the Symphony. 


i 


Through the cooperation of Charles M. Dennis, Superintendent of 
Music in the local public schools, each concert program includes the 
appearance of a glee club made up of boys and girls from one of the 
San Francisco grammar or high schools. Active audience participation 
in the series is encouraged through a notebook competition for which 
each young season-ticket holder is eligible. Prizes for the best notebooks 
are distributed at the final concert by Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard, 


chairman of the Young People’s Concert series. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 299 





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$6 LOOKER ANNE OP 


Lad CA RAK RRR ADAD NINE SGSOOU DAR NERO COOO RRR AAR RECORD 4 


“AARHAANASSSOSSSOOU TUE GMASSSESGOUUCR AAU JGR COOOAA RRA SSSOUDOG NI 


360 


...of course you are...and we'll bet home 
planning tops the list of your after V-day 
dreams. For more than a century in war 
and peace W. & J. Sloane has been helping 
make just these kind of dreams come true 


for generations of Americans. 


W & J 


SLOANE 


216 SUTTER near GRANT 
SAN FRANCISCO 8, CALIF. 


SAN FRANCISCO 





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Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
—E. Raymond Armsby.............-.--------- Vice-President Charles Rage? 22 20r is eee tier Treasurer 
Paul Av BiSSING CMe: 5-62-22 -co.tencceseeene ..Vice-President Howard’ Ke Skinnercr2.c- 5 seen cen ee Secretary 
Charles’ RK; (Blyth: :.2.. sce Vice-President Geraid G. Ross. 222525222230. Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II--..........---------- Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. O. G. Miller, Chairman 
E. Raymond msby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayder 
Urs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Roger 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’‘S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mrs... John.'P;-Coghlans-...2. 22. Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill..................-... Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Biehl 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. 1. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. umpires Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engelhart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R, Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher C. 0. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mss. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulftord Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs, O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, I] Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe’ Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Wood 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris 
STAFF 

Constance Alexander Victor Mohl Deborah Spalding 
Kathleen Lawlor Gerald Ross Curran Swint 
Doris Lowell Joseph Scafidi Virginia Webb 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 561 













“There's an Immortality in the expression of the 
finer human moods... These moods sincerely 
expressed tna portrait can mean so much to the 
person towards whom that feeling ts directed.” 


“icholie, Sofevuston 


Liholia Antler 


= MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER 


427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEL) « YUKON 2061 





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GUEST ARTIST THIS WEEK 


ARTUR SCHNABEL was born in Lipnik, Austria, in 1882. He studied with 
Leschetisky in Vienna and began his career in a series of sonata recitals 
with the violinist, Carl Flesch. His reputation grew quickly, and he appeared 
throughout Europe as a solo pianist and chamber music player. Although he 
had given recitals in New York in 1922, his first real American success came 
when he participated in a Brahms festival of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
eleven years later. Since then he has made repeated tours throughout this 
country, specializing particularly in the German classics. He was the first pianist 
to give all of Beethoven’s sonatas in a series of recitals in New York. He has 
edited the Beethoven sonatas and written extensively on technical and esthetic 
matters. 


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GUEST ARTISTS NEXT WEEK 


Dusotina GIANNINI is the product of a musical family. Her father was an 
opera singer, her mother a violinist. She received her first training from her 
father in her native city of Philadelphia and later studied wtih Marcella Sem- 
brich in New York. She made her debut at a concert of the Schola Cantorum in 
New York in 1923 and for a number of years was active as a concert singer. She 
went to Europe in 1927 and remained there until 1956, devoting herself largely 
to opera. During this period she sang at Covent Garden, in the leading opera 
houses of Berlin, Vienna, Prague and other cities, and at the Salzburg Festival 
under the direction of Bruno Walter and Toscanini. She came back to this 
country in 1936 to join the Metropolitan Opera. She has repeatedly appeared 
wtih the San Francisco Opera Company, and made her first appearance with 
the San Francisco Symphony on the Art Commission series last year. 


FREDERICK JAGEL was born in Brooklyn in 1897. After service in the Army 
‘nthe first World War and a number of years in business in New York, he went 
to Europe to study singing. He made his debut as an operatic tenor in Leghorn 
in 1924, and for three years sang in many Italian opera houses. He joined the 
Metropolitan in 1927 and has been one of its leading artists ever since. He has 
repeatedly sung with the San Francisco Opera Company, but this will be his 
first appearance with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


Douc.as BEATTIE was born in San Jose in 1907. He graduated from the 
University of California as a biologist, but during his student days in Berkeley 
he also studied voice in San Francisco with Frank Carroll Giffen. He made his 
first professional appearances in Genoa in 1934. In the following year he 
returned to California, singing twice with the San Francisco Symphony Orches- 
tra and later joining the San Francisco Opera Company. He was a member 
of the Metropolitan from 1939 to 1942. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 











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Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-4e}- 
NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
"THURSDAY, MARCH 22, AT 8:30 


SATURDAY, MARCH 24, AT 8:30 


ARTUR SCHNABEL, Guest Artist 


~{e}- 
‘Program 
OLD SONGS ANDSAURs HOR eo EeeuUirk: 
Ee PRUS ToS Ee Ree Stier tee. ene ta inate Arr. Respighi 


Galliard, by Vincenzo Galilei 
Villanella, by an unknown composer 
Passamezzo and Mascherada, by an unknown composer 


CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
NORINCO RTO ee Ore eee Beethoven 
Allegro moderato 
Andante con moto 
Vivace 
Mr. SCHNABEL 


INTERMISSION 


HOLKER EH YsEEUNES OE OD AY 2a. corre Harris 


(First Performance in San Francisco) 


SYMPHONY NO. 3, IN E FLAT MAJOR, 
OWA OS OWE GRISHOINU ial) PNg Bee Spates bie ong a bi Schumann 
Lebhatt 
Scherzo: Sehr massig 
Nicht schnell 
Feierlich 
Lebhaft 


ARAP AAP PPP PPP PPP PD PPD PPP PPP PDP PPP PPP PPP PPP PPP PII PP IPI AID IAIN INI AAPA AAP 


It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use their tickets 
kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
of their seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 
This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 


UE EEN 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


565 








SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
~{@}- 


TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Thursday, March 29, at 8:30 
Saturday, March 31, at 8:30 


Guest Artists: 


DUSOLINA GIANNINI, Soprano 
FREDERICK JAGEL, Tenor 
DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Bass 
THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS, Hans Leschke, Director 


SCLECTON SELON GI SURGE A aac eee ae a ee ty Wagner 


STANDARD SYMPHONY BROADCAST 
KPO and NBC Coast Network 


Sunday, A pril 1, at 8:30 
THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS, Guest Artists 


SELECEIOMS ain OM LAAN Pi Cilice teoe teen ttt ete okey eet Spee Wagner 


ELEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, A pril 6, at 2:15 
Saturday, A pril 7, at 8:30 


LOTTE LEHMANN, Guest Artist 


PUA CUCM WMENTO LUO MN Via eect d, We cata tc hoe vitals onal Sica hte tae Yon nate Haren. Mozart 
Gamers ovinp Nony INO ue cere ahi ee ek einer epee Schoenberg 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 

INE CrOUD Ol SOMOS cis. debirt wale oes pec agt sake A ROE ORs eeragtecah Schubert 
Die Junge Nonne 

Standchen 


Der Jungling an der Quelle 
Der Erlkonig 


A Group of Modern Songs: 


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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


OLD DANCES AND AIRS FOR THE LUTE, 
LR SSUES ARES aiies ss omens tee nce tas Arr. Otlorino Respighi 
(1879-1936) 

The editing and transcription of old music was an important phase ol 
Respighi’s activity. Among many other achievements 1n this field, he produced 
three series of Old Dances and Airs for the Lute the first of which was published 
MLZ 

The score of the present set contains four movements, all adapted from 
works of Italian composers of the late 16th century. ‘Vhe first movement, Ballet 
Called ‘Count Orlando, by Simone Molinaro of Genoa, will be omitted today. 

We begin, therefore, with a galliard by Vincenzo Galilei of Florence, who 
was born in 1533 and died in 1591. Galilei was a figure of great importance in 
the early history of opera. He was also a celebrated lutenist and composer for 
the lute, but perhaps his greatest claim to fame is that he was the father of 
the astronomer, Galileo Galilei. 

“The galliard is so called because one must be blithe and lively to dance 
it.’ So says Vhoinot Arbeau in his treatise on dancing entitled Orchesography 
published in France in 1588. The name of the dance is derived from the 
French adjective gaillard, which means lively or brisk. Arbeau gives very ex- 
tensive directions for the galliard, but his illustrations are more vivid than his 
text, and we give a few of them at the top and bottom of this page. 

The Villanella and the Passamezzo and Mascherada are by unknown com- 
posers. The term villanella was applied in the 16th century to light-textured 
part-songs or madrigals on rustic subjects. 

Arbeau describes the passamezzo as a pavane “played less gravely and in 
quicker measure.” Of that other dance itself Arbeau says: “A nobleman can 
dance the pavane with cape and sword, and you others dressed in your long 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 












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gowns, walking decorously with a studied gravity, and the damsel with chaste 
demeanor and eyes cast down, sometimes glancing at the onlookers with a vir- 
ginal modesty. And as for the pavane, it 1s used by kings, princes and great 
lords, to display themselves on some day of solemn festival with their fine 
mantles and robes of ceremony; and then the queens and the princesses and 
the great ladies accompany them with the long train of their dresses let down 
and trailing behind them, or sometimes carried by damsels. And these pavanes, 
played by hautboys and sackbuts, are called the Grand Bal, and last until those 
who dance have circled two or three times round the room, if they do not 
prefer to dance by advances and retreats. ‘hese pavanes are also used in a 
masquerade when there is a procession of triumphal chariots of gods and god- 
desses, emperors or kings resplendent with majesty.” 


Whether or not the Mascherada of Respighi’s suite refers to the type of 
masquerade described by Arbeau is anybody's guess. At all events the word 
does not describe a traditional form, as do such terms as ballet, galliard and 
passameZzo. 


a 


Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 








WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated bv the Citv and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 








SS 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 569 








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CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
NO SIN GWEN ORMORW SG. tis ee Ludwig van Beethoven 


(1770-1827) 


The fourth piano concerto dates from 1809. It is therefore contemporary 
with such works as the fifth symphony, the Sonata A ppassionata, the first Ras- 
oumovsky quartet and the violin concerto, and shares with these compositions 
that curious pre-occupation with themes exploiting patterns of three or four 
reiterated notes of which the most famous instance 1s the so-called “Fate motive” 
or “V signal” of the fifth symphony. Note the reiterated B’s and A’s of Example 
1 below. They are heard almost incessantly throughout the first movement, like 
the famous drum notes of the violin concerto. 


i 
Allegro moderato, G major, 4/4 time. The tradition of the concerto as 
handed down to Beethoven from Mozart and Haydn requires a complete ex- 
position of the thematic material of the first movement in the orchestra alone 
before the entrance of the solo instrument. Beethoven had faithfully followed 
that tradition in his earlier concertos, but now he permits the piano to state the 
first theme very quietly at the outset: 











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Then the piano, as if abashed at its temerity, relapses into silence for 74 bars. 
The idea stated by the piano is answered immediately by the strings in B major: 



































2 = ae 
peezigenrte i leydelteaie Tere lace fe rere 
PP pee 


and this material is briefly worked over. 
The violins have the second theme, in A minor: 




























































































A few bars on the reiterated notes of Example 1 and 2 conclude the first 
exposition. 


The second exposition begins with the entrance of the solo instrument, 
giving out Example | in a highly varied and ornamented form. This leads over 
to an entirely new second theme, in D, stated by the first violins: 







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and immediately ce hee by the piano in embroidered fashion. ‘The strings 
then bring in their original second theme (Example 3) in D minor. This is again 
worked over with the reiterated notes, and leads to the closing theme (Exam- 
ple 4) in A major. 

This theme (Example 4) is also treated at the outset of the short develop- 
ment section. The bulk of the development, however, is concerned with Example 

| and its reiterated notes and with new, predominantly ornamental material. 

The recapitulation begins with a return to Example | in a somewhat varied 
form, in the piano alone, fortissimo. This section amounts to an abbreviated 
restatement of the second exposition with appropriate changes of key. Exam- 
ple 5 comes back in G major, Example 3 in G minor, and Example 4 in D major. 
This leads to the cadenza. (The cadenzas used on this occasion are by Beethoven 
himself.) The coda is based on the closing theme (Example 4) and the reitera- 
ted notes of Example I. 


I] 

Andante con moto, E minor, 2/4 time. This movement reminded Liszt of 
the scene of Orpheus and the Furies in Gluck’s opera. ‘The strings of the orches- 
tra (strings alone are used throughout the movement) point an accusing finger 
at the piano in a brusque unison-and-octave idea: 





























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To this the piano replies pleadingly: 


7 

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3 












































4 The movement then proceeds in alternate dialogue of the solo and orchestra. 
The accusations of the strings grow gradually less severe, and the pleadings of 
the piano more eloquent. The movement dies away in a mutter of the strings 
and a quiet broken chord of the piano, whereupon there is a direction to pro- 
ceed at once to the finale. * 

* Such directions are rare in Beethoven, and occur only in cases like this and the Waldstein 
sonata, when the slow movement is extremely short and may be regarded as a kind of introduc- 
tion to the finale. The modern insistence upon stony silence between the separate movements 
of a work in large form has no justification in classical practice. It was, rather, the accepted 
thing in Beethoven’s day for the several movements of a symphony or concerto to be broken 
up and scattered through a concert program, with works of other composers between. 





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Vivace, G major, 2/4 time. The strings state the principal theme at the outset: 


feneayy 


This is answered by the piano in ornamented form. ‘The strings then continue 
the theme: 









































y Ba Fea 


and again the piano answers. ‘This material is then worked over in dialogue. 
The piano has the second theme, in D. 



































The movement is a rondo, and proceeds with alternations and extremely briul- 
liant developments of its two themes. ‘Toward the end there is a cadenza. Over 
the hole in the score where this is to be inserted Beethoven writes the lordly 
direction La cadenza sia corta: “The cadenza shall be brief.”’ 





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ue (1898- ) 

Mr. Harris writes as follows: 

“Folk Rhythms of Today was, in its original form, the last of five movements 
in a ballet composed for Hanya Holm and produced by her and her dancers 
at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center in 1942. It was originally scored for 
string orchestra, piano and chorus. The orchestral version was written for 
Dimitri Mitropoulos and first performed by the Minneapolis Symphony Or- 
chestra. As its title implies, the work is a symphonic characterization of contem- 
porary dance rhythms, which, I consider, have, through usage, become folk 
rhythms which everybody understands. The form is ABA (fast, slow, fast) the 
last section employing rhythmic groups of 3 plus 3 alternating with 2 plus 2 
plus 2. The middle section is in a blues rhythm and exploits that mood.” 
SYMPHONY NO. 3, IN E FLAT 

NUIEN | KOWRSE MON eA OLS Me MU WIN UISIGD) oy AM eo a oe Robert Schumann 

(1810-1856) 

In 1849 Schumann was appointed director of the symphony orchestra in 
the Rhenish city of Dusseldorf. His five years in this post were the most difficult 
and unhappy of his entire life. Schumann was not a gifted conductor. Further- 
more he managed the non-musical sides of his position badly, and the stresses 
and strains produced by this combination of circumstances greatly aggravated 
the nervous troubles from which he had long suffered. In 1854 he attempted 
to commit suicide, and he spent the last two years of his life in an insane asylum. 

The third symphony* was composed in 1850, and was first presented early 





*TIt is actually Schumann's fourth and last symphony in order of composition. The 
symphony in D minor, second in order of composition, is numbered fourth because it 
was published after the others. 





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in the following year at a concert of the Diisseldorf orchestra, Schumann co 
ducting. Schumann’s biographers state that the work was aacoaiied by its ae 
poser as a reflection of the folk-life of the Rhineland, and some of Hehe 
ideas have been traced back to Rhenish folk songs. The fourth movement w : 
inspired by the ceremonies which took place in ihe Cologne cathedral ene 
certain archbishop was raised to the rank of cardinal. On the orieinal ma ? 
script Schumann titled this movement “In the manner of the accom ee 
to a solemn ceremony,” but he later withdrew this superscription. ike 





I 
Lebhaft (I wely) E flat maior. { . a ; J 
at major, 3/4 time. ‘The principal theme < ; 
. : y ’ é ¢ 1eNn A ars 
once in the full orchestra: I me appears at 


psn Ae Eerie te etter res 


This is worke er. at some length. T 
: ked ovet at some length. ‘Phe quieter second subject begins in the 
woodwinds in G minor: on 
































gears 


eeeaeeee eal eereeiees 


his ; oe worked over, by itself and in conjunction with ideas from Example 
, and the exposition ends with a brief concluding theme not quoted. 


a ree peal a es begins with a sudden G major chord (fff) in the full 
chestra. Ihe first portion of the development is concerned mainly with Ex- 


a Shitiamnl with f the Lome 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 58 
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ample 2. ‘Phen Example I comes back to prominence and is taken through 
various keys in dramatic fashion, with the entire orchestra at work practically 
all of the time. Toward the end of the development Example | is treated in the 
manner of a horn call under tremolandi in the strings. 





The first theme goes back to the original key to begin a fairly orthodox 


recapitulation. The coda introduces a new thematic idea not quoted. 


Scherzo: Sehr massig (Very moderately) , 


C major, 3/4 time. The ‘celli, 
violas and bassoons have the principal theme at the outset: 





which is taken up by the higher strings and woodwinds. A second section follows, 
with a rapid, staccato, skipping figure in 16th notes, with which Example 3 is 


eventually combined. 
A kind of trio ensues beginning in the woodwinds. (The clarinet part only 
is quoted) : 











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The skipping 16th note figure also appears throughout this trio. 

A fourth section of the movement is devoted to the development of these 
materials. At the end Example 3 is restated in much the same form as at the 
beginning, and there is a coda of some size beginning very quietly with a frag- 
ment of Example 3, working up to a climax, and subsiding. 


IT] 


Nicht schnell.(Not fast), A flat major, 4/4 time. The slow movement is 
freely constructed on three themes. The first is given to the clarinets at the 
beginning: 














Pag aa 
} f g 
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Pianist 


Saturday, March 24, 3 P.M. 
at the home of Mrs. M.S. Koshland 


Admission $3.00. Make reservations with Lulu J. Blumberg, 3131 Jackson Street 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 587 











Los Angeles, California 


lanca Wine Company, Inc., 


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Phe second appears in the violins immediately afterward: 

















And the third is given to the violas and bassoons over a broken chord figure of 
a solo ‘cello: : 


7 


é 


pe 





























=e 





2 





The middle section of the movement works over Examples 6 and 7, and all 
three ideas return in the final portion. 
LV 
Feierlich (Solemnly), E flat minor, 4/4 time. ‘This movement, often re- 
ferred to as the “cathedral scene,” is called by Prof. ‘Tovey “one of the finest 
pieces of ecclesiastical counterpoint since Bach.” Its theme is as follows: 

















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Dinner, a la carte, after- 
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OMAR KHAYYAM‘S 


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*tW here the Celebrities Gather” 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 589 











SAN FRANCISCO RUSSIAN OPERA AND BALLET ASSN. 


“Presents 


“THE SLEEPING BEAUTY’? 


American Premier of P. I. Tschaikowsky’s Ballet 
(Complete Version — Prologue and Four Acts) 


With 
The Outstanding Classical Ballerina 


NINA YOUSHKEVITCH 


Assisted by 
SIDNEY STAMBAUGH 


“Among the outstanding performances of the season, and they would be outstanding 
in any season anywhere, I would place Nina Youshkevitch in “Sleeping Beauty” and ‘Swan 
Lake.” She is a true classical ballerina. She is intensely musical, and her work is clear and 
devoid of all superfluous trimming . . .”,—Arnold Haskell, Times, London. 


...and we can name Nina Youshkevitch the star of the company who by her dynamic 
interpretation shows herself worthy of the artistic mission that was entrusted to her.—Edouard 
Beaudu, Intransigent, Paris. 


The young Nina Youshkevitch who alone among the dancers seems endorsed with a 
technique and charming gift.—Darius Milhaud, Le Jour, Paris. 


“F willingly pay tribute to Nina Youshkevitch who is charming, gracious and whose 
dance is above perfection.—Reynaldo Hahn, Le Figaro, Paris. 


Company of 100 Artists 
Symphony Orchestra Spectacular Scenery Beautiful Costumes 


Choreography by Sergei Temoff 


Music Director: DR. IAN ALEXANDER 
Stage and Technical Director: VLADIMIR DUBINSKY 
Scenery Designed by: ALEXANDER EDWARD ANDERSON 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 
Wednesday, Apr. 4, and Friday, Apr. 6 - 8:30. Sun., Apr. 8 - 2:30 


Tickets: 3.00, 2.40, 1.80, 1.20 (tax included) 
SHERMAN & CLAY BOX OFFICE, GA. 4061 
Make checks payable to California Concerts, Inc. 


Cro 


A San Francisco Russian Opera and Ballet Association Attraction. 
S. M. Saroyan, President — V. Velikoselsky, Secy.-Treas. 
300 Montgomery Street, Suite 800. GArfield 0171. 
San Francisco 4, California 








390 SAN FRANCISCO 








V 


Lebhaft E flat major, alla breve. Strings and woodwinds give out the prin- 
cipal theme: 


























The transition to the second theme is an ingenious transformation of the sub- 
ject of the “cathedral scene,” entirely altered in character. Strings and wood- 
winds also have the short second theme: 





The concluding portion of the exposition is based upon material more remark- 
able for its rhythmic than its melodic interest. 

The brief development is concerned mainly with flying fragments of Ex- 
ample 10, but Example 9 is not altogether neglected. The recapitulation is 
regular, and there is an extended coda with somewhat disguised references to 
the music of the “‘cathedral scene” and to the first theme of the first movement, 
Example I. 








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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 391 














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)pera, Concert and Symphony 


OPERA & CONCERT 
700 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco 11, California 


Gentlemen: Enclosed is $1. Send OPERA AND CONCERT to the fol- 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 393 








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TODAY'S 


GREAT 


PIANO 
the choice of 
Today's Great Artists 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO 
AS THE ARTISTS DO 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin 
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MARILE THERESE BRAZEAU HAROLD BAUER 


CECILLE DE HORVATH 
SEVERIN EISENBERGER 
ALEXANDER KELBERINE 
WESEEY EA VIBEETTE 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
IRMA SCHENUIT HALL 
FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 
MAGDA TAGLIAFERDO 
JOSEPH BATTISTA 
JEANNE BEHREND 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
WALTER GIESEKING 
EUGENE GOOSSENS 
BORIS GOLSCHMANN 
FLORENCE EASTON 
DANIEL ERICOURT 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
BREENDAN KEENAN 
ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
WIKTOR LABUNSKI 
ALFRED MIROVITCH 
CHARLES NAEGELE 
LOUIS PERSINGER 

E. ROBERT SCHMITZ 
BERNARDO SEGALL 
ROSINA LHEVINNE 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
RUTH SLENCYNSKI 
ALEC TEMPLETON 


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LUCREZIA BORI 
BELA BARTOK 
MARIO CHAMLEE 
KARIN DAYAS 
JOSE ECHANIZ 
DAVID EARLE 
FRANK FARREL 
JAKOB GIMPEL 
RUDA FIRKUSNY 
ARNOLD GABOR 
WILLIAM HARMS 
STEPHAN HERO 
AMPARO ITURBI 
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RALPH LEOPOLD 
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ERICA MORINI 
EDITH MASON 
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How to spend 


aN IDEAL EVENING 


i lerER twenty-three consecutive weeks of Gilbert & Sullivan Operas at 


the Bush Street Music Hall, which have gained widespread recognition by 
critics and the public altke, 


THE SAVOY OPERAHCOMPAINY 


again leads with another novel production. 


“MUSICAL COCKTAILS” 


Beginning March 21, the Savoy Opera Company will present a Gilbert & Sullivan DREAM 
—a potpourri of the most beautiful episodes from their operas—arranged by Gilbert & 
Sullivan themselves. In climaxing contrast, a 1945 terpsichorean festival. 

There is something new under the San Francisco Sun: Rare entertainment in a refined 
and intimate manner. The greatest operettas of all time revitalized by the San Francisco 
SAVOYARDS. Glorious voices, beautiful scenery and costumes, and—a glass of cham- 
pagne serv ed during the entr’acte with a light buffet supper—all for the price of admis- | 
sion. A most unusual way to entertain your friends. Make your next party at the | 


Bush Street Music Hall. 


ALL STAR CAST INCLUDING, SAVOY OPERA COMPANY BAY ORTRES 
BALLET AND GUEST ‘COMEDIAN 


ORDER BLANK 


BUSH STREET MUSIC HALL, ORpway 1109 
960 Bush Street, San Francisco. 
Prices $3.00, $2.50—Includes Buffet Supper and Glass of Champagne 


Enclosed please find my check for $ Peres in payment for 
seats at §$ iene MUSiGAly COC ATES =a 
Name .__. : be ee. Phone 
AaCTESSe poor’ sad a Citye= 
PERFORMANCES NIGHTLY . . 8:30 
MATENE ES UINIDAY> 350.8 = ne 25) 


(Make Check Payable to Savoy Opera Company) 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 395 








Se eee ee 
Sain —— Ss 





SAN FRANCISCO RUSSIAN OPERA AND BALLET ASSN. 


(After last fall’s outstanding success in its production of PRINCE IGOR.) 
Now “Presents 
First Annual Season of Russian Opera 
With 
Today's Most Outstand ing Russian Singers 


‘Repertoire 
BORIS GODUNOFF . . . By M. Moussorgsky 
THE DEMON ....... By A. Rubinstein 
PRINCE IGOR ........ .By A. Borodin 


General Director: EXGENE PLOTNIKOFE 
Choreography by: Sergei Temoff 
Choral Director: Dr. Ian Alexander 


Company of 150 - Symphony Orchestra - Beautiful Costumes 
Spectacular Russian Ballet - Magnificent Scenery - Chorus of 60 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 


The authorities are right. “Prince Igor” is quite definitely a great opera, one of the 
greatest of its time and place. .. . Eugene Plotnikoff directed with the vividness and clarity 
of a thorough master of his trade. . . . Both performances were sold out to the doors, which 
is a far from insignificant fact.—Alfred Frankenstein, §. F. Chronicle. 

Elaborate as the opera is, the production was very creditable, more so in its musical 
elements than in its dramatic. Its principal artists have won repute in Paris and New York. 
... They were applauded by a capacity crowd.—Alexander Fried, S. F. Examiner. 

The Russians have done it again. . .. After their recent season of tip-top ballet they 
turned to another art form, grand opera, and last night at the San Francisco Opera House 
presented in a highly creditable manner their national opera, Borodin’s ‘Prince Igor.—Marie 
Hicks Davidson, S. F. Call-Bulletin. 

Russian opera scored an effective inning at the War Memorial Opera House last night 
when an SRO audience experiencd a highly admirable production of Borodin’s “Prince 
Igor.”... The Russian Opera Association is to be congratulated upon the general excellence 
of its initial venture and it is to be hoped that “Prince Igor,” which will be repeated tonight, 
is the forerunner of future annual seasons of Russian opera by Russian artists in our Opera 
House.—Marjory M. Fisher, The News. 

First honors go to Eugene Plotnikoff, who conducted the performance.—Ashley Pettis, 


The Argonaut. 
May 16 to 27, Inclusive 


Wiedtiesdays(May. 162.8330 <p ties 00%: ee oa wes ew ere Boris Godunoft 
Bridaya MaAvalOtS:s0sp.cin-ss\ Sets eS ok. en eee ae eee ee The Demon 
SattitdayanWViay O78: 30) princes Gok oily Ah eee ee lb oe ee ee Prince Igor 
Sanday, Viay-205 S:30ipemic) Wie oe ee ee a Mae Bie wt 4 Boris Godunoff 
Muesday.sMays22~ S230/ps-mose 65 oil. cect ee ee eae) eae ee Oe Prince Igor 
Rerdays Mayr 25>, S:30:p. tives.) toe ke Oe | Rhea The Demon 


Sherman & Clay Box Office—GA. 4061. 


Make checks payable to California Concerts, Inc. 
Reservations for three performances given first preference. 


“A San Francisco Russian Opera and Ballet Association Attraction.” 


S. M. Saroyan, President—V. Velikoselsky, Secy.-Treas. 


300 Montgomery Street, Suite 800. GArfield 0171. 
San Francisco 4, California 


596 SAN FRANCISCO 









Co 


S ymphony /V ales 


Helen ‘Traubel, who is generally regarded as the world’s leading 
Waenerian soprano, will be special guest artist on the “Telephone 
Hour” Monday, when it presents a program of Easter music over KPO 
at 9:00 p. m. Miss ‘Traubel’s songs include “Dich teure Halle” from 
Waener’s “Tannhauser,” and a children’s song, “Vespers,” with music 
by Fraser-Simson and lyrics by A. A. Milne. The orchestra, directed by 
Donald Voorhees, and the male chorus will present the “Grail Scene” 
from “Parsifal” and will be joined by Miss ‘Traubel in the Easter hymn, 
“Christ the Lord Is Risen ‘Voday.” | 


Erica Morini, celebrated violinist, will be guest soloist Sunday on 
the “Standard Hour,” which will feature Alfred Wallenstein and the 
Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra and will be aired over KPO at 
8:30 p. m. Program will open with Mozart's Overture to the “Marriage 
of Figaro” and will also offer Samuel Barber’s Adagio for Strings and 
Ravel’s “Ia Valse.”” Miss Morini will be presented in the Bruch Violin 
Concerto in G Minor. 


. The Chicago Symphony Orchestra, under the direction of Desire 
Defauw, will be featured in the first of a five-week series of concerts on 
NBC’s “Orchestras of the Nation” regular Saturday program. Broadcast 
locally over KPO, the March 24 concert will include the Overture to 
Berlioz’ “Benvenuto Cellini” and Gretry’s Ballet Suite from “Cephale 
et Procris,” arranged by Felix Mottl. 


_ Such famous and fine Stradivari violins as the “Earl,” the “Des 
Rosiers,” the “Van der Leyen” and the “Paganini” will be heard when 
the “Stradivari Orchestra” is broadcast Sunday over KPO at 9:30 a. m. 
Jacques Gasselin will play the solo in the Berceuse from Godard’s 
“Tocelyn” and will join the orchestra in the other numbers which 
include Chopin’s “Minute Waltz,” Drigo’s “Serenade,” “Lion du Bal” 
by Gillett and the Concerto in E Minor by Mendelssohn. 


_. . Just returned from overseas, Robert D. Murphy, U. S. State De- 
partment political adviser on German affairs to Supreme Headquarters, 
American Expeditionary Forces, will talk on “What About the Enemy 
Countries” on “Our Foreign Policy,’”’ which will be broadcast by KPO 
Saturday at 4:00 p. m. Other participants will include assistant secre- 
taries of state James C. Dunn and Archibald MacLeish. This will be 
the fifth program on NBC University of the Air’s post-war peace 
series, “Our Foreign Policy,” which will move to San Francisco on 
April 28 to cover the United Nations Conference. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 











Box Holders for Friday A fternoons 


MRS. WALTER D. HELLER 





A MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX P 
B MRS. SIGMUND STERN MRS. MORRIS MEYERFELD 
MRS. RICHARD SHAINWALD 
C MRS. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY MRS. GEORGE OPPEN 
D MRS. JOHN T. BARNETT 
MRS. WHITNEY BENTLEY Q MRS. FRANK P. DEERING 
MRS. E. E. BROWNELL MRS. JAMES L. FLOOD 
MRS. DAVID COWLES MRS. BENJAMIN C. KEATOR 
MRS. MORTON GIBBONS MRS. HENRY S. KIERSTED 
MRS. HARRY HILL MRS. HARRY B. LITTLE 
MRS. JAMES HORSBURGH MRS. HAROLD R. McKINNON 
MRS. SILAS PALMER MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 
MRS. T. E. PALMER . 
MRS. ATHERTON RUSSELL R DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 
#*. S. NAVAL HOSPITALS 5 MRS. FRANCIS S. BAER 
MRS. EDWARD H. BELL MISS JENNIE BLAIR 
MRS. SPENCER GRANT MRS. ELDRED BOLAND 
MRS. MAXWELL C. MILTON MRS. GEORGE M. BOWLES 
MRS. WILLIAM H. ORRICK MRS. GEORGES S. DeLATOUR 
MRS. STUART RAWLINGS MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MISS ELSE SCHILLING MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 
MRS. DANIEL VOLKMANN MRS. FREDERICK W. McNEAR 
MISS JOHANNA VOLKMANN 
MRS. DEAN WITTER T MRS. OTTO BARKAN 
MRS. J. B. WRIGHT MRS. L. A. BENOIST 
MRS. GEORGE EDWIN BENNETT DANS at EI Ee SAA 
MRS. FRANK INGERSOLL MRS. FOSTER NEWHALL 
MRS. CLARENCE LORAN JOHNSTON MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
MRS. GEORGE S. JOHNSTON MRS. BRUCE SELFRIDGE 
MRS. RALPH MERILLION MRS. MELVILLE L. SMITH 
MRS. J. T. POSEY 
MRS. ERNEST J. SXWYEETLAND U MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 
MRS. JOSEPH D. GRANT Vs ®*#U. S. ARMY HOSPITALS 
MRS. JOHN CASSERLY RU NRE EHENIRVARGVEN 
MRS. DONALD GREGORY 
MRS. ARTHUR B. CAHILL 
MRS. \\/ELLINGTON HENDERSON 
COUNTESS LILLIAN DANDINI 
MRS. OSGOOD HOOKER ARS TOUN LEEIYNIN 
MR. AND MRS. KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
MeSc EDIE NORTE MRS. PETER B. KYNE 
MRS. JAMES F. McNULTY 
MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND MRS. A. J. MOORE 
MRS. M. C. SLOSS MRS. THEODORE WORES 
MRS. CHARLES BRANSTEN 
MRS. RICHARD FRANK xX DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
; MR. AND MRS. MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER MRS. ANGUS McDONALD 
/ MRS. LEWIS LAPHAM DR. HANS VON GELDERN 
‘ MRS. ROGER LAPHAM, JR. MRS. HENRY H. WEHRHANE 
MRS. FREDERICK WHITMAN oA ema ERAGE 
f M MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. BLYTH MRS. DUNCAN CURRY, JR. 
: ote CHAR ECREDMONIN MS. JOSEPH W/. FOWLER 
i MRS. A. J. LOWREY MRS. RALPH HENKLE 
: MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER MRS. DANIEL C. HUNT 
MRS. EDGAR WOODS MRS. A. F. JUNCKER 
| N MR. AND. MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON MRS. RALPH K. DAVIES 
i MRS. STANHOPE NIXON MRS. E. W. WILLETT 
' MR. AND MRS. NION R. TUCKER MRS. EDWARD C. WURSTER 
: O MRS. DUNN DUTTON Z MRS. FRANK BUCK 
MRS. WALTER HOBART MRS. J. LINDSAY HANNA 
| MRS. FREDERICK HUSSEY MRS. JAMES LEVENSALER 
| MRS. KENYON JOYCE MRS. DOUGLAS McBRYDE 


MRS. SAMUEL KNIGHT 
MRS. RICHARD McCREERY 


MISS OLGA MEYER 
MRS. FRANK SOMERS 


*** Transportation Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 
with the cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


Siar ere < Ad earn Re iS 


598 SAN FRANCISCO 


i 
i 
i 
| 





Box Holders for Saturday Night 


MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX 


MILLS COLLEGE 


KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


DELTA DELTA DELTA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


DELTA GAMMA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


MILLS COLLEGE 


P| BETA PHI 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


SIGMA KAPPA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


MR. AND MRS. J. D. ZELLERBACH 


MR. AND MRS. VALLEJO GANTNER 
DR. AND MRS. NELSON HOWARD 
COLONEL A. E. HOWSE 

MRS. ROBERT SCARBOROUGH 


DR. AND MRS. HAROLD K. FABER 
MR. AND MRS. JAMES H. HOWARD 
MR. AND MRS. LEE LAIRD 


MR. AND MRS. JEROME VLADIMIR POWELL 


DR. AND MRS. HUGH ROSE 


N 


Z 


MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E. AMBROSE 
MR. THEODORE BEKINS 

DR. ALVIN COX 

DR MiRIAM MILLER 

DR. AND MRS. B. H. PAGE 





COMMANDER AND MRS. WM..LISTER ROGERS 


MR. AND MRS. JOHN ROSEKRANS 


ALPHA DELTA PHI 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


GAMMA PHI BETA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


SIGMA PHI 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


ALPHA PHI 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 
STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


CHI OMEGA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


U. S. ARMED FORCES 


KAPPA ALPHA THETA 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
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——— 


SOTTO OP GSES ie Ra 


POS a in a 


PERSONNEL 











SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSKI, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
ForD, Louis W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALD!I, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
EARATA AT RUT: Bs 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BAUER, BEN 

BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
D! BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENCG 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PIERRE MONTEU®X, Conouctor 


'GECLOS: 


BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 
SAPHIR, RUTH 


BASSES: 


KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLIT!I, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI, JOSEPH 


BELEIGTES: 
RENZI, PAUL JR. 


SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 
REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIVO, LESLIE J. 


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BASSOONS: 
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TRUTNER, HERMAN C., 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
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KLOCK, JOHN 


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SINAI, JOSEPH 
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DICTEROW, HAROLD—VIOLIN 
HOUSER, F. S.—VIOLIN 
KHUNER, FELIX—VIOLIN 


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Ross, NATHAN—VIOLIN 
LEPLIN, EMANUEL—VIOLA 
LUCIEN, MITGHELL—VIDLA 


OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV—VIOLA 
CLAUDIO, CESARE—’CELLO 
DE PALMA, ATTILIO—HORN 
ALTMANN, LUDW!IG—ORGAN 








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PTHE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


Mae LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY > PRESIDENT AND MANAGING _ DIRECTOR 
: HOWARD K. SKINNER +© BUSINESS MANAGER 








PRESENTS THE THIRTY-THIRD SEASON: OF THE 





WAR MEMORIAL OPERA H OUS5B 
24 Tenth Pair ‘ “Parsifal” ° March 29-31, 1945 





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SAN FRANCISCO 
Established 1852 


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Convenience is the word for our new music store... 
located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
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Parking lot next door or just across the street. 


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VAHETT 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 605 


re) 











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THE MAGNIT” 


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Compounded an 








KNOW YOUR SYMPHONY 


ew 


A white light flashes at Conductor Pierre Monteux’s 
stand: a voice calls through a loudspeaker, “Ready, Maitre’; 
the musicians are tensely quiet; the light turns red; Monteux 
raises his baton, and another recording session of the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra is under way. 


In addition to their regular concert activities for the cur- 
rent season, Monteux and the Orchestra have been busy mak- 
ing records for Victor Red Seal. The necessary equipment was 
installed in War Memorial Opera House early in January and 
the first records by the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra in 


ary 27. At these sessions, the Symphonie Espagnole of Lalo and 
Violin Concerto No. 1, by Bruch were recorded, both with 
Guest Artist Yehudi Menuhin. 


two years were cut on Friday, January 26 and Saturday, Janu- 
Recording sessions are sandwiched in between rehearsal 

and concert schedules. Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring,” the first 
performance of which was conducted by Monteux 1 Paris in 

1913, was put on wax by the San Francisco Symphony in a 

session beginning at midnight following the concert of March 
10. But the majority of recording dates are scheduled for late 


afternoon or early evening. 


Among the records already made during this season by 
\fonteux and the orchestra are: Brahms’ Symphony No. 2, his 
Alto Rhapsody with Marian Anderson; Berlioz Overture 
“Benvenuto Cellini,” the overture to Part 2 of “Les ‘Troyens,” 
and the Symphonie Fantastique; Istar and Prelidestom Bier: 
vaal” by D’Indy; Sadko and the Prelude to “Coq d'Or” by 
Rimsky-Korsakov. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 607 





608 





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SAN FRANCISCO 








Lai RIG ANEROSET SEF a 


SRR 


Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E-Raymond AfrtiSDYssc:--.vca.--c----- 2. Vice-President Charles Page................ LSE Ae eA Treasurer 
Paul A. Bissindefss. =) | ee Vice-President Mowatd-Ke-Skinnenysc. 7-4 Aes et Secretary 
Charles: .R>- (Bly fhesa ss Ser ie Vice-President GeraidtGs Rossi. se. 2 ee Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, J1.........:.........-. Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


C. 0. G. Miller, Chairman 


E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayder 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Roger 
Mrs, John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard - Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan... aS be Roy es ae Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill__................... Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Biehl 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond Armsby - Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert |. Elkus Mrs. 1. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Bampbrey Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engethart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, I! Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe’ Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Wood 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris 
STAFF 

Constance Alexander Victor Mohl Deborah Spalding 
Kathleen Lawlor Gerald Ross Curran Swint 
Doris Lowell Joseph Scafidi Virginia Webb 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 609 





SAE NORRE OO AE LER OEEEENEER LALA DANS SN SOCCCENEE EN EAD DEM RONORE ASO IEEE LEDER ARDS SANSONE DARA RAR ARARNAAAA ACCRA RARER ALR BAA re 


“There's an immortality in the expression of the 
finer human moods... These moods sincerely 


| expressed in a portrait can mean so much to the 
person towards whom that feeling is directed." 


Liherlis. Seb nblore 


tikhrlis. Sotentler 


MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER 


427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEL) » YUKON 2061 





GUEST AR STS. i |SevV eek 


DusoLINA GIANNINI Is the product of a musical family. Her father was an 
opera singer, her mother a violinist. She received her first training from her 
father in her native city of Philadelphia and later studied wtih Marcella Sem- 
brich in New York. She made her debut at a concert of the Schola Cantorum in 
New York in 1923 and for a number of years was active as a concert singer. She 
went to Europe in 1927 and remained there until 1936, devoting herself largely 
to opera, but she returned to America for a concert tour each season during 
this period..She sang at Covent Garden, in the leading opera houses of Berlin, 
Vienna, Prague, and other cities, and at the Salzburg Festival under the direc- 
tion of Bruno Walter and ‘Toscanini. In 1936 she joined the Metropolitan 
Opera Company and remains one of the principal sopranos of that organiza- 
tion. She has repeatedly appeared with the San Francisco Opera Company, 
and made her first appearance with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra on 
the Art Commission series last year. 


FREDERICK JAGEL was born in Brooklyn in 1897. After service in the Army 
in the first World War and a number of years in business in New York, he went 
to Europe to study singing. He made his debut as an operatic tenor in Leghorn 
in 1924, and for three years sang in many Italian opera houses. He joined the 
Metropolitan in 1927 and has been one of its leading artists ever since. He has 
repeatedly sung with the San Francisco Opera Company, but this will be his 
first appearance with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


DoucLas Brarrre was born in San Jose in 1907. He graduated from the 
University of California as a biologist, but during his student days in Berkeley 
he also studied voice in San Francisco with Frank Carroll Giffen. He made his 
first professional appearances in Genoa in 1934. In the following year he 
returned to California, singing twice with the San Francisco Symphony Orches- 
tra and later joining the San Francisco Opera Company. He was a member 
of the Metropolitan from 1939 to 1942. 


-— 
GUEST ARTIST NEXT WEEK 


Lorre LEHMANN was born in Germany and received her training in Berlin. 
The list of European opera houses in which she has sung leading roles is prac- 
tically encyclopedic, and one cannot begin even to list a fraction of them. She 
was first heard in the United States with the Chicago Civic Opera in 1930, and 
she joined the Metropolitan three years later. She has also sung many times 
with the San Francisco Opera Company. As an operatic interpreter, she has 
paid particular attention to Wagner and Richard Strauss. In addition to her 
work as an opera and concert singer, Mme. Lehmann has published poetry, 
novels and an autobiography. ‘This will be her third appearance with the 
san Francisco Symphony Orchestra. She was soloist on the Art Commission 
series in 1938 and 1940. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 






























Your WILL cannot 
bequeath “good judgment” 


By intelligent management you have built up 
your Estate. Your Will sets up the Plan you | 
want your Executor to follow. 


If you appoint an zdividual as Executor and 
Trustee, will his judgment in handling your 
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and be free enough from his own personal affairs 
to. give your Plan his best attention? 


On the other hand, by appointing this Bank 
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AND STAMPS 





THE BANK OF 
CALIFORNIA 


NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 
Founded in 1864 






1944 
OUR 
EIGHTIETH 
ANNIVERSARY 

YEAR 









letter and the spirit of your Plan. 






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MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 


612 SAN FRANCISCO * 











Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-4e}- 
TENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


‘THURSDAY, MARCH 29, at 8:30 
SATURDAY, MARCH 31, AT 8:30 


t 


Guest Artists 

DUSOLINA GIANNINI, Kundry 
FREDERICK JAGEL, Parsifal 

DOUGLAS BEATTIE, Gurnemanz 

THE MUNICIPAL CHORUS 

Hans Lescuke, Director 
EpwWIN RICKMAN, President 
By courtesy of the Art Commission 
Augmented by a group of students from the Senior High Schools 

CHARLES DENNIS, Director of Music 


{e+ 
‘Program 
SELECTIONS PRO Meee Ashes Liles t.ho cee ee se Wagner 
Act I 
‘Prelude -Kundry and Parsitfal 
.Narrative of Gurnemanz ‘Transformation Scene 
-Gurnemanz and Parsifal Ritual of the Holy Grail 


INTERMISSION 
Acr I] 
-Introduction, Klingsor’s Magic Castle 
Parsifal and the Flower Maidens 
(FLOWER MAIDENS: FRANZISKA WEISS, DELPHIA PHILLIPS; CONSTANCE 
D’ Acres, GENEVIEVE OLIVER, ADA LEONHARDT; REBA GREENLEY) 
-Kundry and Parsifal 
INTERMISSION 
Act III 
- Introduction 
.Good Friday Spell 
“Procession of the Knights of the Grail 
-Glorification 





weer" 





a It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use their tickets 
if kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
ibe of their seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 
} This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 613 








tr ren ne ee 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 











-4e}- 


ELEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Friday, A pril 6, at 2:15 
Saturday, A pril 7, at 8:30 


LOTTE LEHMANN, Guest Artist 


Prague hPa 0) 816) 0h teaceee ene Cr ee ee ane oe oe WL ee sk eee eee ee, Mozart 
C hamiber SMT ROMY INGin2 aa wen a awe, athe eth ign. Ot Schoenberg 
(First Performance in San I’ ranNcisco ) 

A Group ORAS OUMOSEs melee we he tage toa kk ie wake Stiaa’ tien Schubert 


Die Junge Nonne 
Standchen 
Der Juingling an der Quelle 
Der Erlkonig 
A Group of Modern Songs: 


Invitation au MOVE Ci onic: chee mc ae eee te eet ane: tinge .Duparc 
Si mes vers avient nee ELE SrAh-wi-ty cee eet Neen Peeks AN ee age Fei Hahn 
| 
ENMARGGOMSE Grab nh ata oeltctiat Wa ices they Wee te Wolf 
ESTO RIS US gargs Stee Ret ee cate ee en ANE SG Say tee oie Wolf 
AUIS oe ys tee 2. St Oe a ee Peer te iD Ae PN ys Maal rial fl Debussy 


TWELFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
(LAST CONCERTS OF THE SEASON) 
FRIDAY, APRIL 13, AT 2:15 
SATURDAY, APRIL 14, at 8:30 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Guest Artist 





WUOHE Clarinet, Pet homteds Sik teehonr) Ati ah MRR UR EE ath nee S1VAUSS 


SULUCHIN Oh: Operates pated Set a ied Ae: abe Art a thee Mute Bach-Wood 
Pr elidleston MiresAnlewnoonmeol aatatiin: < aaes cabs oe Debussy 
Concerto for Pianowand: Orchestra No. 310.0.,) da2) ee). Beethoven 
SHON RCIMIN CON ie 21,10) A Aa nas CO ee oO ete ee Sicleng Ride sare 1 Milhaud 

(lirst Performance in San Francisco) 
> YAP DO ys SE) VIO; aoe hee er eine ade eee 5 en teem eae l’ranck | 


STANDARD SYMPHONY BROADCAST 
KPO and NBC Coast Network 
Sunday, April 1, at 8:30 | 
MICHAEL STRANGE, Guest Narrator 


PaaS SA GAG | TALshION Gr MUO. F eo, 2, eh ene rene on ie Handel-Akon 
PREMUIG CR Om EO NLCTIONU Tres, «hea Caan oe aaah pee) oe ees Meee Ai Wagner 
Symphonic Piece from LCCC CNUD LTO ree wetes 4 Ath ete a ee Franck 
Ao) WB a Keke Oe 10) SY 7 eRe bs Se ing Me ne eS eae eed 02 Bh Wagner 
NCACEIMIC Mest als OVeOLUlCHW aie” voc teal ys tasin tee Lae ee! syahms 








——————————— ——————————————————————————emououoSoo 


614 SAN FRANCISCO 











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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


7 7 , “Ur , T ‘ 7 y Y , = 
Chien GW LOINS BRO PAT UST ANS : > tau i eee, Richard Wagner 
C 
. (1813-1883) 

In his days as conductor of the Dresden Court ‘Theater, between 1842 and 
1849, Wagener laid the foundations, at least from a literary point of view, for 
«+ | > ree re ifpa’c , = L; ~ eee hee : 
all the rest of his life’s work. It was then that he read the Nzbelungenlied and 
the Volsung Saga, trom which the Ring cycle was eventually to be derived, the 
Tristan und Isolde of Gottfried von Strassburg, and the legends of the Holy 
Grail as told by the Bavarian poet, Wolfram von Eschenbach. But many years 
were 10 elapse between the reading of Wolfram’s poems and the completion of 
Parsifal. [hat 1s a very long and involved story, and it 1s scarcely worth telling 
in this place. Suffice it to say that Wagner finished Parsifal in 1882 and produced 
° , dy aes « : scat 4 eS : . , - . . . e . 
it at Bayreuth in that year. It was his final artistic achievement. He died some 
seven months after this ‘“stage-consecrating festival play” had been performed 
for the first time. 

AGT | 
? he Sie er of the longest and most highly developed in Wagner, 1s 
yased upon four of t 1e most Important leading motifs in the score. ‘There are 
more than twenty leading motifs in Parszfal, but these four, associated with 
the mystical and religious elements of the work, are all we shall be able to quote. 

Sehr langsam, A flat major, 4/4 time. Strings and woodwinds in a bare, 
unaccompanied unison, open the prelude with the motif of ‘The Eucharist: 





which is then repeated an octave higher to a shimmering, arpeggiated accom- 
paniment. After a long pause, the motif is once more given out in bare unison, 
but now in C minor, and this version, too, is repeated in accompanied form. 


A second long pause leads to the motif of the Grail: 





Phis motif is not original with Wagner. It is the so-called Dresden Amen, com- 
posed in the 18th century for the use of the Saxon Royal Chapel by Johann 
Gottlieb Naumann. It is also to be found in Mendelssohn's Reformation 


symphony and in other 19th century works. 
Phe motif of the Grail is immediately followed by that of Faith: 





a moti of Faith ts developed at some length. Eventually the key of A flat 
is reinstated and the Eucharist sounds out once more, now, however, to be 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 615 





CLE YOM CUlV24 homes 
C 


Several of the most memorable moments in Parsifal 
have been recorded by Victor for you to enjoy in your 
own home. These recordings bring you two of the 
greatest Wagnerian interpreters the world has known 
—Kirsten Flagstad and Lauritz Melchior. Choose 
your favorite scenes from Victor’s catalog, ““The Music 
America Loves Best,”’ shown above. Then hear these 
electrifying performances at your Victor dealer’s. 


Listen to “The Music America Loves Best,’’ Sundays, 1:30 p.m., over Station KPO. 


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THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS. ARE ON 


| ICTOR R/ Stel Renrds- @ 


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worked over with impassioned, agonized harmonies during the course of which 
from the fourth and fifth bars of Example | detach themselves to form 


Pr a figure 
the independent motif of the Sacred Lance: 





With a final statement of the Eucharist, the prelude is brought to a close. 

In the material which follows we give the full and complete text of all the 
passages employed in the present performance. ‘The translation used is that of 
H. 1.. and Frederick Corder. Passages omitted are summarized in parenthesis 
and italics. 

(The curtain rises to disclose a forest on the grounds of the castle of Mont- 
salvat, in Spain, which is the citadel of the Knights of the Holy Grail. Gurne- 
manz, an aged member of the order, awakens two esquires who are asleep under 
a tree. During their conversation it develops that Amfortas, leader of the 


ee ee 


Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 


nn nnn LEE 





WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated bv the Citv and County of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 





| SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 617 





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knights, is suffering from a wound which will not heal. Kundry, a strange, half- 
WwW ild woman who had laughed at Christ on the cross, had heen conde eed (0 
eternal laughter, and fries to ex prate by serving the Knights of the Grail, brings 
balsam for Amfortas’ wound. Amfortas ts anne inona lilter. Kundry’s balsam 
soothes his wound but does not heal it, and Amfortas knows, because of a 
miraculous voice which had spoken to him from the Grail in the shrine of 
Montsalvat, that his healing can be brought about only through a “guileless 
fool.” When Amfortas is taken back to the castle, Gurnemanz tells the esquires 
how his wound had occurred: Amfortas and his knights guarded the Grail and 
the Sacred Lance which had pierced Christ's side on hie C ross, but the magician 
Klingsor, using the wiles of an unnamed woman, had stolen the Lance from 
Amfortas and with it dealt him the unclosing wound. Gurnemanz continues 


with the story of Klingsor.) 


Gurnemanz. TViturel, der fromme Held, Gurnemanz. Titurel, the pious lord, 
der kannt’ ihn wohl. He knew him well; 
Denn ihm, da wilder Feinde List und Macht — For, when the savage foe with craft and 
des reinen Glauben’s Reich bedrohten, might 
ihm neigten sich in heilig ernster Nacht The true believers’ kingdom rended, 
dereinst des Heiland’s sel’ge Boten: Anon to him, in midst of holy night 
daraus er trank beim letzten Liebesmahle, The Saviour’s messengers descended. 
das Weihgefiiss, die heilig edle Schale, The sacred Cup, the vessel pure, unstainéd, 
darein am Kreuz sein g6ttlich Blut auch Which at the Last Passover Feast 
floss, He drainéd — 
zugleich den Lanzenspeer, der diess vergoss,— Which at the Cross received His holy 
der Zeugengtiter héchstes W undergut,— blood, 






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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 619 










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das gaben sie in uns’res Konigs Hut. 
Dem Heilthum baute er das Heiligthuim. 
Die seinem Dienst ihr zugesindet 
auf Pfaden, die kein Stinder findet, 
ihr wisst, dass nur dem Reinen 
vergonnt ist sich zu einen 
den Briidern, die zu hoéchsten 
Rettungswerken 
des Grales heil’ge Wunderkrafte starken: 
drum blieb es dem, nach dem thr fragt, 
verwehrt, 
Klingsor’n, so hart thm Muth’ auch drob be- 


schwert. 
Jenseits im ‘Chale war er eingesiedelt; 
dariiber hin liegt iipp’ges Heidenland: 
unkund blieb mir, was dorten er gestindigt; 
doch btissen wollt’ er nun, ja heilig werden. 
Ohnmachtig, in sich selbst die Sitinde zu 
ertodten, 
an sich leet er die Frevlerhand, 
die nun, dem Grale zugewandt, 
verachtungsvoll dess’ Hititer von sich stiess; 
darob die Wuth nun Klingsor’n unterweis, 
wie seines schmahlichen Opfers ‘That 
ihm gabe zu bésem Zauber Rath; 
den fand er jetzt:— 
die Witiste schuf er sich zum Wonnegarten 
d’rinn wachsen teuflisch holde Frauen; 
dort will des Grales Ritter er erwarten 
zu boser Lust und Hollengrauen: 
wen er verlockt, hat er erworben; 
schon Viele hater uns verdorben. 
Da Titurel, in hohen Alter’s Mtihen, 
dem Sohne nun die Herrschatt hier verliehen, 





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With eke the Spear that shed the sacred 
flood, — 
These signs and tokens of a worth untold 
The angels gave into our monarch’s hold. 
A house he builded for the holy things. 
Ye, who their service have attained to 
By paths no sinners ever gained to, 
Ye know *tis but permitted 
The pure to be admitted 
‘Mid those the Grail’s divinely magic power 
With strength for high salvation’s work doth 
dower. 
He whom you named had therefore been 
denied :— . 
Klingsor — however long and hard he tried. 
Far in yon valley then he found asylum; 
For over there ’tis rankest Pagan land. 
I ne'er found out what sin he had committed; 
Absolved he now would be, yea, holy even. 
Unable in himself to stifle thoughts of evil, 
He set to work with guilty hand, 
Resolved to gain the Grail’s command; 
Bul with contempt was by its guardian 
spurned, 
Wherefore in rage hath Klingsor surely 
learn’d | 
How by the damnable act he wrought 
An infamous magic might be taught; 
Which now he’s found:— 
The waste he hath transformed to wondrous 
gardens 
Where women bide, of charms infernal; 
Thither he seeks to draw the Grail’s true 
wardens 












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Carl Kalash and Orchestra 
Thurs. at 4:30 p. m. 


Stradivari Orchestra >a Richard Crooks 
Sun. at 9:30 a. m. Mon. at 5:30 p. m. 
John Charles Thomas > Contented Program 
Sun. at 11:30 a. m. Mon. at 7:00 p. m. 
Music America Loves Best Telephone Hour 
Sun. at 1:30 p. m. Mon. at 9:00 p. m. 
General MotorsSymphony % Light and Mellow 
Sun. at 2:00 p. m. Tues. at 10:00 a. m. 
Album of Familiar Music >. Standard School Broadcast 
Sun. at 6:30 p. m. Thurs. at 10:00 a. m. 
Hour of Charm >. Waltz Time 
Sun. at 7:00 p. m. Fri. at 6:30 p. m. 
The Standard Hour % Know Your Symphony 
Sun. at 8:30 p. m. Sat. at 5:00 p. m. 
| 


Part of a continuous Parade of Stars 
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Se ee 


622 SAN FRANCISCO 





ay 


— 


FESR 


Amfortas’ liess es da nicht ruh’n 
der Zauberplag’ Einhalt zu thun; 
das wisst ihr, wie es da sich fand: 
der Speer ist nun in Klingsor’s Hand; 
kann er selbst Heilige mit dem verwunden. 
den Gral auch wihnt er fest schon uns 
entwunden. 


Vor dem verwaisten Heiligthum 
in briinst’gem Beten lag Amfortas, 
ein Rettungszeichen heiss erflehend: 
ein sel’ger Schimmer da entfloss dem Grale; 
ein heilig’ Traumeesicht 
non deutlich zu ihm spricht 
durch hell erschauter Wortezeichen Male:— 
“durch Mitleid wissend 
der reine ‘Thor, 
harre sein’, 
den ich erkor.” 


To wicked joys and pain elernal. 
Those who are lured find him their 
master: 
To many happens such disaster. 
When Titurel decayed in manhood’s power 
And with the regal might his son did dower 
Amfortas gave himself no rest, 
Bul sought to quell this magic pest; 
The sequel ye have all been told; 
The spear is now in Klingsor’s hold. 
Kuen the holy it can cleave asunder: 
The Grail already he counts as his plunder. 
Before the plundered sanctuary 
In pray’r impassioned knelt Amfortas, 
Imploring for a sign of safety: 
A heav'nly radiance from the Grail then 
floated; 
A sacred phantom face 
From lips divine did chase 
These words, whose purport clearly could be 
noted :— 
“By pity ‘lightened 
A guileless Fool;— 
Wail for him 


My chosen tool.” 


(The four esquires repeat the final words. ) 


(Shouts are heard from a nearby lake on the castle grounds, and a wounded 
white swan flies into view. It has been shot with an arrow by an unknown youth 
whom the esquires bring to Gurnemanz. The old man upbraids the boy, who 
eventually breaks his bow and throws it away.) 








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DANCING ON THE PENINSULA 
in the beautiful 


GARDEN ROOM 
EVERY SATURDAY EVENING 


featuring the romantic voice of 


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with the 
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN HOTEL 
ORCHESTRA 
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Gurnemanz. Wo bist du her? 

Parsifal. Das weiss ich nicht. 

Gurnemanz. Wer ist dein Vater? 

Parsifal. Ich weiss nicht. 

Gurnemanz. Wer sandte dich dieses Weg’s? ° 


Parsifal. Ich weiss nicht. 
Gurnemanz. Dein Name dann? 
Parsifal. Ich hatte viele doch weiss ich ihrer 
keinen mehr. 
Ich hab’ eine Mutter; Herzeleide sie heisst: 


im Wald und auf wilder Aue waren wir heim. 


Gurnemanz. Wer gab dir den Bogen? 
Parsifal. Den schuf ich mir selbst, 
vom Forst die rauhen Adler zu scheuchen. 
Gurnemanz. Doch adelig scheinest du selbst 
und hochgeboren: 
warum nicht liess deine Mutter 
hessere Waffen dich lehren? 


Kundry 
Den Vaterlosen gebar die Mutter, 
als im Kampf erschlagen Gamuret; 


Gurnemanz. Whence comest thou? 
Parsifal. J do not know. 
Gurnemanz. Who is thy father? 
Parsifal. J do not know. 
Gurnemanz. Who bade thee wander this 
way? 
Parsifal. JZ know not. 
Gurnemanz. Thy name then? 
Parsifal. J once had many, 
But now I know not one of them. 
I have a mother; Heart’s Affliction 
she’s hight: 
The woods and the waste of moorlands were 
our abode. 
Gurnemanz. Who gave thee that weapon? 
Parsifal. J made it myself, 
To drive the savage eagles from the forest. 
Gurnemanz. But eagle-like seem’st thyself, 
and well descended: 
Why did thy mother not teach thee 
Manlier weapons to handle? . 
Kundry 
Bereft of father his mother boré him, 
For in battle perished Gamuret: 





SCREEN JOURNALISM AT ITS BEST 


Complete News Coverage — Distinguished Commentators 


TELENEWS THEATRE - 


... Market Near Fifth 


ENCORE “Sweet Swing £J98 


JAN SAVITT 


AND HIS ORCHESTRA 
IN THE ROSE ROOM 


DANCING NIGHTLY {EXCEPT MONDAY} 
SATURDAY COCKTAIL DANSANT 


The Vadace Hotel 


EDMOND A. RIEDER, General Manager 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





625 








vor gleichem frihen Heldentod 
den Sohn zu wahren, waffenfremd 
in Oeden erzog sie ihn zum ‘Thoren 
die Thorin! 
Parsifal 
Ja! Und einst am Waldessaume vorbei, 
auf sch6nen ‘Thieren sitzend, 
kamen glanzende Minner: 
Ihnen wollt’ ich gleichen;: 
sie lachten und jagten davon. 
Nun lief ich nach, doch konnte sie nicht 
erreichen; 
durch Wildnisse kam ich, bergauf, thalab; 
oft ward es Nacht; dann wieder Tag: 
mein Bogen musste mir frommen 
gegen Wild und grosse Manner. 


Kundry 
Ja, Schacher und Riesen traf seine Kraft 
den freislichen Knaben ftirchten sie Alle. 


Parsifal. Wer fiirchet mich? Sag”! 
Kundry. Die Bosen. 
Parsifal. Die mich bedrohten, waren sie 
bos’? 
Wer ist gut? 
Gurnemanz. Deine Mutter, der du entlau- 
fen, und die um dich sich nun hiirmt und 
gramt. 


Kundry. Zu End’ ihr Gram: seine Mutter 
ist todt. 
Parsifal. ‘Todt? — Meine Mutter? — Wer 


sagt’ es? 


ne er a es 











From like untimely hero’s death 
To save her offspring, strange to arms 
She reared him a witless fool in deserts. 
What folly! 
Parsital . 
Aye, and once along the hem of the wood, 
Most noble beasts bestriding, 
Passed by men all a-glilter; 
Fain had I been like them: 
With laughter they galloped away. 
Now T pursue; but cannot as yel o’erlake 
lhem: 
Through deserts P've wandered, o'er hill 
and dale; 
Oft fell the night, then followed day: 
My bow was forced to defend me 
‘Gainst the wolves and mighty peoples. 
Kundry. Yes, caitiffs and giants fell to his 
mioht; 


The fierce-striking boy brines fear on their 


spirits. 

Parsifal. Who feareth me, say? 

Kundry. The wicked. 

Parsifal. Those who attacked me, were they 
then bad? 

Who is good? 

Gurnemanz. Thy dear mother, whom thou 
forsookest, 

And who for thee must now mourn and 
grieve. 

Kundry. She grieves no more; for his mother 
is dead. 

Parsifal. Dead?—what, my mother?—who 
SAYS SOL 


DEANE DICKASON 








626 


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9:30 


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Kundry. Ich ritt vorbei, und sah sie sterben: Kundry. / rode along and saw her dying; 
dich ‘Thoren hiess sie mich grussen. Poor fool, she sent thee her blessing. 
(Parsifal springs upon Kundry, raging, and seizes her by the throat. ) 
Gurnemanz. Verriickter Knabe! Wieder Gurnemanz. Jnsensate stripling! Outrage 
Gewalt? again? — 
Was that dir das Weib? Es sagte wahr. What harm has she done? She speaks the 
Denn nie liigt Kundry, doch sah sie viel. truth. 


For Kundry lies not, and much has seen. 
(After Gurnemanz has released Kundry, Parsifal stands awhile as if turned to stone ; 
then he is seized with a violent trembling. ) 
Parsifal. Ich — verschmachte! — Parsital. J — am fainting! 
(Kundry has hastily sprung to a brook, brings water now in a horn, sprinkles Parsifal with some, 
and then gives him to drink.) 


Gurnemanz. So recht! So nach des Grales Gurnemanz. ’Tis well! Thus has the Grail 


Gnade: directed: 
das Bése bannt, wer’s mit Gutem vergilt. He ousteth ill who doth give for it good. 
Kundry. Nie thu’ ich Gutes; — nur Ruhe~ Kundry. I do no good thing;—but rest I 

will ich. long for 


(Whilst Gurnemanz is attending to Parsifal with fatherly care, Kundry, unperceived by them, 


crawls towards a thicket. ) 


Nur Ruhe! Ruhe, ach, der Mtiden! — But rest, but rest! Alas, I’m weary!— 
Schlafen! — Oh, dass mich keiner wecke! Slumber!—Oh, would that none might wake 
Nein! Nicht schlafen! — Grausen fasst me! 

mich! No! I'll sleep not! — Terror grips me. 


(She gives a suppressed cry and falls into a violent trembling: then she lets her arms drop powerless, 
and her head sinks low, and staggers a little farther. ) 
Machtlose Wehr! Die Zeit ist da. Vain to resist! The time has come. 
Schlafen — schlafen —: ich muss. Slumber — slumber — : I must. 
(She sinks down behind the thicket and is seen no more. A stir is perceived down by the lake, and the 
train of Knights and Esquires with the litter passes back homewards at back. ) 


Gurnemanz. Vom Bade kehrt der Kénig Gurnemanz. From bathing comes the king 
heim; hoch steht die Sonne: again; 





is the smartest night spot in 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 627 








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soe 








—_ 
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i 





ies te 








nun lass’ mich zum frommen Mahl. dich 
geleiten; denn, — bist du rein, 


wird nun der Gral dich tranken und speisen, 


Parsifal. Wer ist der Gral? 
Gurnemanz. Das sagt sich nicht; 
doch bist du selbst zu ihm erkoren, 
bleibt dir die Kunde unverloren. 

Und sieh’! - 
Mich diinkt, dass ich dich recht erkannt: 
kein Wee fthrt zu ihm durch das Land, 
und Niemand kénnte ihn beschreiten, 
den er nicht selber mécht’ geleiten. 


Parsifal. Ich schreite kaum, 
doch wahn’ ich mich schon weit. 
Gurnemanz. Du siehst, mein Sohn, 
zum Raum wird hier die Zeit. 


High stands the sun now: 
Let me to the holy Feast then conduct thee: 
For — an thou’rt pure, 
Surely the Grail will feed and refresh thee. 
Parsifal. What is the Grail? 
Gurnemanz. Janay not say: 
But if to serve it thou be bidden, 
Knowledge of it will not be hidden. 
And lo! - 
Methinks I know thee now indeed: 
No earthly road to it doth lead, 
By no one can it be detected 
Who by itself is not elected. 
Parsifal. J scarcely move, 
Yel swiftly seem lo run. 
Gurnemanz. My son, thou seest 
Here Space and Time are one. 


Gradually, while Parsifal and Gurnemanz appear to walk, the scene changes imperceptibly from L. to R. 


Ihe forest disappears; a door opens in rocky cliffs and conceals the two: they are then seen again in sloping 


passages which they appear to ascend.—Long sustained trombone notes softly swell, approaching peals of bells 


are heard.—At last they arrive at a mighty hall, which loses itself overhead in a high vaulted dome down 


from which alone the light streams in.—From the heights above the dome the increasing sound of chimes. 


Gurnemanz. Jetzt achte wohl; und lass’ 
mich seh’n, 
bist du ein Thor und rein, 
welch Wissen dir auch mag beschieden sein.— 


Gurnemanz. Now give good heed, and let 
me see, 
If thow'rt a Fool and pure, 
What wisdom thou presently canst secure.— 


At each side in the background a large door opens. From the R. enter slowly the Knights of the Grail 


in solemn procession, and range themselves, during the following chorus, by degrees at two long covered 


tables which are placed endways towards the audience, one on each side, leaving the middle of the stage free. 


Only cups—no dishes—stand on them. 

Die Gralsritter. Zum letzten Liebesmahle 
gerustet Tag ftir ‘Tag, 
eleich ob zum letzten Male 


he Knights of the Grail. The Holy Supper 
duly 
Prepare we day by day, 





ee 








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630 SAN FRANCISCO 











es heut’ ihn letzen mag, 
wer guter That sich freu't, 
ihm ser das Mahl erneu't: 
der Labung dart er nahn, 
die herrste Gab’ emptal’n. 


Jiingere Mdannerstimmen 
Den siindigen Welten 
mit tausend Schmerzen 
wie einst sein Blut geflossen, 
dem Erlé6sungs-Helden 
mit freudigem Herzen 
sei nun mein Blut vergossen. 
Den Leib, den er zur Stihn’ uns bot, 
er leb’ in uns durch seinen ‘Tod. 
Knabenstimmen 
Der Glaube lebt: 
Die Taube schwebt, 
des Heiland’s holder Bote. 
der ftir euch fliesst, 
des Wein’s geniesst, 
und nehmt vom Lebensbrode! 


Through the opposite door Amfortas is brought in on his litter by Esquires 


As on that last time truly 
The soul it still may stay. 
Who lives to do good deeds 
This Meal for ever feeds: 
The Cup his hand may lift 
And claim the purest gift. 
Voices of Younger Men 
As anguished and lowly 
His life stream’s spilling 
For sinners He did offer, 
For the Saviour holy 
With heart free and willing 
My blood I now will proffer. 
His body, given our sins to shrive, 
Through death becomes in us alive. 
Boys’ Voices 
His love endures, 
The dove upsoars, 
The Saviour’s sacred token. 
Take the wine red, 
For you *twas shed; 
Let Bread of Life be broken. 


him march boys who bear a shrine draped in purple-red cloth. This procession wends to the center 


background, where, overhung by a canopy stands a raised longish marble table. on which the boys place the 


shrine, still covered. 


When the song is ended and the Knights have ; 
(The voice of the aged Titurel is heard, commanding Amfortas to reveal 

the Grail and perform its sacred ceremonies. Amfortas refuses, for he feels 
himself unworthy to carry out his office. 


ritual of the Grail begins.) 


Knaben 
“Nehmet hin mein Blut 


taken their seats there is a long pause and silence. 


Boys 
“Take and drink my blood; 








There's a Fine art in bread 
making, too. Every OROWEAT 


loat is a masterpiece. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 





and serving brethren: before 


gut at length he gives in, and the 





Inc., Los Angeles, California 


» Copyright 1945 Cresta Blanca Wine Company, 








9 um uns rer Liebe Willen! Thus be our love remembered! 
: Nehmet hin meinen Leib Take my body and eat: 
auf dass ihr mein’ gedenk.”’ Do this and think of me!” 

A blinding ray of light shoots down from above upon the cup, which glows with increasing purple lustre. 
Amfortas, with brightened mien, raises the Grail aloft and waves it gently about on all sides. Since the coming 
of the dusk all have sunk upon their knees, and now cast their eyes reverently towards the Grail. 

Amfortas sets down the Grail again, which now, while the deep gloom wanes, grows paler; the boys 
cover it as before and return it to the shrine. — As the original light returns to the hall the cups on the table 
are seen to be filled with wine, and by each is a piece of bread. All sit down to the repast, including Gurne- 
manz, who keeps a place by him for Parsifal, whom he invites with a sign to come and partake. Parsifal, how- 
ever, remains silent and motionless at the side, as if dumbfounded. 


Knabenstimmen Boys’ Voices 
b Wein und Brod des letzten Mahles Wine and Bread the Grail’s Lord changéd 
wandelt’ einst der Herr des Grales, Which at that Last Meal were rangéd, 
© durch des Mitleid’s Liebesmacht, Through His pity’s loving tide 
in das Blut, das er vergoss, When He shed for you His gore 
inden’ Leib; den dar er bracht*. And His Body crucified. 
Jiinglingsstimmen Youths’ Voices 
i Blut und Leib der Opfergabe Blood and Body which he offered 
wandelt heut’ zu eurer Labe Changed to food for you are proffered 
der Erloser, den ihr preis’t, By the Saviour ye revere 
in den Wein, der nun euch floss, In the Wine which now ye pour 
in das Brod, das heut’ euch speis't. And the Bread ye eat of here. 
Die Ritter The Knights 
Nehmet vom Brod, Take of this Bread, 
wandelt es kiihn Change it again, 
zu Leibes Kraft und Stiirke; Your pow’rs of body firing; 
treu bis zum ‘Tod, Living and dead 
fest in Mitih’n, Strive amain 
zu wirken des Heiland’s Werke. To work out the Lord’s desiring. 
f Nehmet vom Wein, Take of this Wine, 
wandelt ihn neu Change it anew 
zu Lebens feurigem Blute, To life’s impetuous torrent; 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA | 633 








zu kimpfen mit seligem Muthe. To fight as duly shall warrant. 


Alle Ritter. Selig im Glauben! All the Knights. Blesséd Believing! 
Selig in Liebe! Blesséd in Loving! 
Jtinglinge Youths. Blessed in Loving! 


Selig in Liebe! 
Knaben 


Boys. Blessed in Believing! 
Selig im Glauben! 

During the repast Amfortas, who has not partaken, has gradually relapsed from his state of exaltation: 
he bows his head and presses his hand to the wound. The pages approach him; his wound has burst out 
afresh ; they tend him and assist him to his litter; then, while all prepare to break up, they bear off Amfortas 
and the shrine in the order in which they came. The Knights and Esquires fall in and slowly leave the hall 
in solemn procession, whilst the daylight gradually wanes. The bells are heard pealing again, — 

Parsifal, on hearing Amfortas’ cry of agony, has clutched his heart and remained in that position for some 
time; he now stands as if petrified, motionless. When the last knight has left the hall and the doors are again 
closed, Gurnemanz in ill humour comes up to Parsifal and shakes him by the arm, 


(At the end of the act Gurnemanz asks Parsifal if he understands the 
ceremony he has witnessed. Parsifal merely shakes his head. This angers Gurne- 
manz, who pushes the boy out a narrow side door with a warning nol lo return.) 


awe All| 
(The second act takes place in the domain of Klingsor. We hear the intro- 
duction, but omit the entire first scene, wherein Klingsor orders Kundry to 
seduce and destroy Parsifal, who, he knows, ts the “gurleless fool’ predicted by 
the voice from the Grail. Kundry refuses, but she is unable to resist Klingsor’s 
power. The scene changes to Klingsor’s magic garden.) 

He sinks slowly with the whole tower; at the same time the garden rises and fills the entire stage. Tropi- 
cal vegetation; most luxuriant wealth of lowers; at the back it is bounded by the battlements of the castle 
wall on to which give sideways abutments of the castle itself (florid Arabian style) with terraces. . 

On the wall stands Parsifal, looking down on the garden in astonishment. from all sides, from the 


garden and from the palace rush in mazy courses lovely damsels, first singly, then in numbers; their dress 
is hastily thrown about them, as if they had been suddenly startled from sleep. 


Maddchen Damsels 
Heir war das Tosen, Here was the tumult: — 
Watfen, wilde Rife! Weapons, wild exclaimings! 





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Wehe! Rache! Auf! 
Wo ist der Frevler? 
Kinzelne. Mein Geliebter verwundet. 
Andere. Wo ist der Meine? 
Andere. Ich erwachte allein,— 
wohin entfloh er? 
ITmmer Andere. Drinnen im Saale?- 
Sie bluten! Wehe! 
Wer ist der Feind? — 
Da steh’t er! Seht! — 
Meines Ferris Schwert? — 
Ich sah’s, er sttirmte die Burg. — 
Ich horte des Meisters Horn. 
Mein Held lief herzu, 
sie Alle wamen, doch Jeden 
empfing er mit blutiger Wehr. 
Der Ktiihne! Der Feindliche! 
Alle sie flohen ihm. - 
Du dort! Du dort! 
Was schul’st due uns solche Noth? 
Verwtinscht sollst du sein! 


Horror! Vengeance! Up! 
Where is the culprit? 

Several. My beloved is wounded! 

Others. Where is my lover? 

Others. J awakened alone! — 
Where hath he fled to? 

Still Others. There in the palace? — 
They're bleeding! Horror! 
Where is the foe? — 

There stands he! See! — 
’'Tis my Ferris’ sword — 
I saw’t, he took us by storm. — 
I heard too the master’s horn. 
My hero rushed on: 

They all assailed him, but each one 

Encountered a bloody repulse. 
What boldness! what virulence! 
All of them fled from him. — 
Thou there! Thou there! 

Why shape for us such distress? 
Accurst, accurst mayst thou be! 


(Parsifal leaps somewhat lower toward the garden.) 


Die Mddchen. Ha! Ktuhner! Wage'’st du zu 

trotzen? 
Was schlueg’st du uns’re Geliebten? 

Parsifal 

Ihr sch6nen Kinder, musst’ ich sie nicht 
schlagen? 

Zu euch Holden ja wehrten sie mir den Weg. 

Middchen. Zu uns wolltest due 
Sah’st du uns schon? 

Parsifal. Noch nie sah ich solch’ zieres Ge- 
schlecht: 

nenn’ ich euch schon, dtinkt euch das recht? 

Die Mddchen 


Damsels. Ha! bold one! Dar’st thou ap- 
proach us? 
Why hast thou slaughtered our lovers? 
Parsifal 
Ve lovely maidens, had I not to slay them, 
When they endeavored to check approach Lo 
your charms? 
Damsels. Vo us camest thou? 
Sawest thou us? 
Parsifal. I’ve seen nowhere yet beings so 
bright: 
Ifl said fair, would it seem right? 
Damsels 


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635 








So willst du uns wohl nicht schlagen? Then wilt thou not treat us badly? 








Parsifal. Das m6cht’ ich nicht. Parsifal. J could not so. 
Mddchen. Doch Schaden Damsels. But sadly. 
schuf’st du uns grossen und vielen: What thou hast done has annoyed us: ‘ 
du schlugest uns’re Gespielen: Our playmates thou hast destroyed us. 
wer spielt nun mit uns? Who'll sport with us now? ' 
Parsifal. Das thw ich gern. Parsital. That well will I. 
Die Madchen Damsels 
Bist du uns hold, so bleib’ nicht fern: If thow art friendly come more nioh, 
und willst du uns nicht schelten, Let kindness be accorded, 
wir werden dir’s entgelten: And thou shalt be rewarded: a 
wir spielen nicht um Gold, For gold we do not play, | 
wir spielen um Minne’s Sold: But only for love’s sweet pay, 
willst du auf Trost uns sinnen, Wouldst thou console us rightly 7 
sollst den du uns abgewinnen. Then win it from us, and lightly. 
(Some have gone into the groves and now returp in Hower-dtesses, appearing like flowers themselves. ) 
Die geschmiickten Mddchen Phe adorned Damsels 4 
Lasset den Knaben! — Er vehéret mir. — Touch not the stripling! — He’s for none 
Nein! — Nein! — Mir! — Mir! but me. — 
Die andern Mddchen. Ah, die Schlimmen! - No!— No!— Me! Me! 
Sie schmticken sich heimlich. he other Damsels. Ah, the minxes! 
They’ve slily adorned them. 
(They also withdraw and return similarly dressed. ) 
Die Mddchen The Damsels 
Komm’! Komny! Come! Come! 
Holder Knabe, Handsome stripling, 
lass mich dir bliithen! I'll be thy flower! 
Dir zu wonniger Labe Sweetly dancing and rippling 
gilt mein minniges Miihe. Bliss unshadowed Ill shower. A 
Parsifal Parsifal 
Wie duftet ihr hold! How sweet is your scent! 
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Die Mddchen ‘The Damsels 


Des Gartens Zier The garden’s pride 
und duftende Geister And ‘ovilor: we've given. 
im Lenz pfltiickt uns der Meister; In spring time we were riven: 
wir wachsen hier We here abide, 
in Sommer und Sonne, Through sunlight and summer, 
fur dich bluhend in Wonne. To bloom still on each comer. 
Nun sei uns freund und hold, Oh, be but kind and true, 
nicht karge den Blumen den Sold: And grudge not the flowers their due: 
kannst du uns nicht lieben und minnen. If thou wilt not fondle and cherish, 
wir welken und sterben dahinnen. We swiftly must wither and perish. 
Lrstes Madchen. An deinen Busen nimm First Damsel. Unto thy bosom take me! 
mich! . 
Zweiles. Die Stirn lass’ mich dir kiihlen! Second. Thy hot brow, let me soothe it! 
Drittes. Lass mich die Wange dir fiihlen! Third. Turn thy fair cheek that I smooth it! 
Viertes. Den Mund lass’ mich dir ktissen! Fourth. Thy mouth give to my kisses! 
liinftes. Nein, mich! Die Sch6nste bin ich. Fifth. No, here! ’Tis Il am the best. 
Sechstes. Nein, ich! Duft’ich doch siisser. Sixth. No, 7! I am the sweeter. 
Parsifal Parsifal 
Ihr wild holdes Blumengedringe, Ye wild crowd of beautiful flowers, 
soll ich mit euch spielen, entlasst mich der If Lam to play, ye must widen your bowers. 
Enge! 
Madchen. Was zank’st du? Dansels. Why quarrel? 
Parsifal. Weil thr streitet. Parsifal. °Tis your riot. 
Middchen. Wir streiten um dich. Damsels. We quarrel for thee. 
Parsifal. Das meidet! Parsifal. Then quiet. 
Lrstes Mddchen First Damsel 
Weiche du! Sieh’, er will mich. Back with you! See, he wants me. 
Zweites Mddchen. Nein, mich! Second Damsel. No, me! 
Drittes. Mich, lieber! Third. Me, rather! 
Viertes. Nein, mich! Fourth. No, me! 
Erstes Mddchen First Damsel. Thou shiunnest me? 


Du wehrest mir? 


Zweites. Scheuchest mich? Second. Flyest mez 


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Eerstes. Bist du feige vor Frauen? 
Zweiles. Magst nicht dich getrauen? 


First. Art with women so wary? 
Second. Of thy favor chary? 


Mehre Madchen. Wie schlimm bist du, Zager Several Damsels. The cold trembler! see 


und Kalter! 
lndere Mddchen. Die Blumen liisst du 

umbuhlen den Falter? 
Livste Halfte. Weichet dem ‘Vhoren! 
Lin Madchen. Ich geb’ ihn verloren. 
Andere. Uns sei er erkoren! 
Andere. Nein, uns!—Nein, mir!— 

Auch mir!—Hier, hier!— 

Parsifal 

Lass't ab! Thr fanet mich nicht! 
Kundry’s Stimme 

Parsifal! — Weile! 


how he cowers! 
Others. Wouldst see the butterfly wooed by 

the flowers? 
First Half. Fool! we efuse him! 
One Damsel. I’m ie 10 lose him. 
Others. We others will choose him. 
Others. No, we! draw near!— 

No, I—here, here!— 

Parsifal No more! Yow ll catch me not! 


Kundry’s Voice. Parsifal—tarry! 


From a flowery arbor at side is heard.) 


PASC eAGSIUAL eae 


Parsifal. Parsifal ...? 


(The damsels are startled and pause—Parsifal stands arrested. ) 


So nannte traumend mich einst die Mutter- 


Kundry’s Stimane 
Hier weile, Parsifal!— 
Dich griisset Wonne und Heil zumal. 
Ihr kindischen Buhlen, weichet von ihm: 
friih welkende Blumen, 
nicht euch ward er zum Spiel bestellt! 
Geht heim, pflegt der Wunden: 
cinsam erharrt euch mancher Held. 
Die Madchen 
Dich zu lassen, dich zu meiden— 
O weh‘! O weh’ der Pein! 
Von Allen moéchten gern wir scheiden, 


FERRARI 


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So once, when dreaming, my mother called 
me .— 
Kundry’s voice. 
Here bide thee, Parsifal!— 
Where joy and gladness on thee shall fall — 
Ye frivolous wantons, leave him in peace: 
Flow’rs soon to be faded, 
He came not here for your delight! 
Go home, tend the wounde ods 
Lonely awaits you many a knieht. 
The Damsels 
Thus to leave thee, thus to sever— 
Alas! Alas, what pain! 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


639 





mit dir allein zu sein.— 
Leb’ wohl! Leb’ wohl! 
Du Holder! Du Stolzer! 
Du — Thor! 


With thee but to remain.— 
Farewell! farewell! 
Thou fair one, thou proud one! 
Thou — Fool! 


(With the last words they disappear into the castle, gently laughing. ) 


Parsifal. Dies Alles—hab’ ich nun getriiumt? 


Parsifal. Was all this — nothing but a 
dream? 


He looks timidly to the side from whence Kundry’s voice came. There is now visible the branches being 
withdrawn a youthful female of exquisite beauty—Kundry in entirely altered form—on a flowery couch and in 


light drapery of fantastic, somewhat Arabian style. 

Parsifal. Rietest du mich Namenlosen? 

Kundry. Dich nannt’ ich, thér’ger Reiner, 
al parsi, “— 

Dich, reinen Thoren: ,,Parsifal.“ 

So rief, da in arab’schem Land er verschied. 

dein Vater Gamuret dem Sohne zu, 

den er, im Mutterschooss verschlossen, 

mit diesem Namen sterbend griisste. 

Dir ihn zu ktinden, harrt’ich deiner hier: 

was zog dich her, wenn nicht der Kunde 
Wunsch? 

Parsifal. Nie sah’ ich, nie tritumte mir, was 
jetzt 

ich schau’, und was mit Bangen mich 
erftillt.— 

Entblihtest du auch diesem Blumenhaine? 

Kundry. Nein, Parsifal, du thér’ger Reiner! 

Fern—fern—ist meine Heimath:— 
dass du mich fiandest, weilte ich nur hier. 
Von weit her kam ich, wo ich viel ersah’. 


Ich sah’ das Kind an seiner Mutter Brust, 


sein erstes Lallen lacht mir noch im Ohr; 

das Leid im Herzen, 

wie lachte da auch Herzeleide, 
als ihren Schmerzen 

zujauchzte ihrer Augen Weide! 

Gebettet sanft auf weichen Moosen, 

den hold geschlafert sie mit Kosen, 
dem, bang’in Sorgen, 


Parsital. Calledst thou me, who am nameless? 
Kundry. / named thee, foolish pure one, 
“Fal parst,’ — 
Thou, guileless Fool, art“ Parsifal.” 


So cried, when in Arabia’s land he expired, 


Thy father Gamuret unto his son, 

Who then the daylight had not greeted: 
‘Twas by this name he, dying, called thee. 
Here have I tarried this but to disclose: 
What drew thee here, if not desire to know? 


Parsifal. J saw ne'er, I pictured ne'er whal 
here 
I see, and which impresses me with awe.- 


And bloomest thou too in this flower-garden? 

Kundry. Nay, Parsifal, thou foolish pure one! 
Far—far from hence my home is:— 

For thee to find me, I but tarried here. 

I come from far lands, where P’'ve noted pruch. 

I saw the child upon its mother’s breast; 

Its infant lisping laughs yel in my ear: 
Though filled with sadness, a 
How laughed even then Heart's Affliction, 

When, shouting gladness, 
It gave her sorrows contradiction! 
In beds of moss ’twas softly nested, 
She kissed it till in sleep it rested: 
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den Schlal bewacht der Mutter Sehnen, 
ihn weckt’ am Morgen 
der heisse Thau der Mutter-Uhrinen. 
Nur Weinen war sie, Schmerz-Gebahren 
um deines Vaters Lieb’-und Tod: 
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um. stillen ‘Tod sie warb: 
ihr brach das Leid das Herz, 
und—Herzeleide—starb.- 
Parsifal 


The timid mother watched it sleeping; 
It waked the morrow 
Beneath the dew of mother’s weeping. 
All tears was she, encased in anguish, 
Caused by thy father’s death and love: 
That through like hap thou shouldst not 
languish, 
Became her care all else above. 
[far from arms, from mortal strife and riot, 
Sought she to hide away with thee in quiet. 
All care was she, alas! and fearing: 
Never should aught of knowledge reach thy 
hearing: 
Hearst thou nol still her lamenting voice, 
When far and late thou didst roam? 
Ah! how she did laughingly rejoice 
To welcome thee hastening home! 
When her wild arm around thee was laid, 
Wert thou of kisses so much afraid?— 
But thou didst not behold her pain, 
Her features anguish ridden, 
When thou returnedst not again, 
And ev’ry trace was hidden. 
For days and nights she waited, 
And then her cries abated; 
Her pain was dulled of its smart, 
And gently ebbed life’s tide; 
The anguish broke her heart, 
And—Heart’ s Affliction—died. 


Parsital 


(always earnestly, finally terribly affected, sinks down at Kundry’s feet, painfully overpowered ) . 


Wehe! Wehe! Was that ich? Wo war ich? 


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Dein Sohn, dein Sohn musste dich morden? Thy son, thy son must be thy murderer? 








O Thor! Bloder, taumelnder Thor! Oh Fool! Thoughtless, shallow-brained Fool! 
Wo irrtest du hin, ihrer vergessend? Where couldst thou have roved, thus to forgel 
her? 
Deiner, deiner vergessend, Thus, oh, thus to forget thee, 
traute, theuerste Mutter? Faithful, fondest of mothers! 
Kundry Kundry 


(still reclining, bends over Parsifal’s head, gently touches his forehead, and wreathes her arms 
confidingly about his neck). 


War dir fremd noch der Schmerz, Hadst thou never been distrest, 
des ‘Trostes Stisse Then consolation : 
labte nie auch dein Herz: Could not have cheered thy breast. 
das Wehe, das dich reu'’t, Let now thy bitter woe 
die Noth nun busse, Find mitigation 
im Trost, den Liebe dir beut! In joys that Love can show! 
Parsifal Parsifal 
Die Mutter, die Mutter konnt’ ich vergessen! My mother, my mother! Could I forget her? 
Ha! Was Alles vergass ich wohl noch? Ah! must all be forgotten by me? 
Wess’ war ich je noch eingedenk? What have I eer remembered yet? 
Nur dumpfe Vhorheit lebt in mir! But senseless Folly dwells in me! 
Kundry. Bekenntniss Kundry. Pranseression 
wird Schuld und Reue enden. When owned is quickly ended! 
Erkenntniss Confession 
in Sinn die Thorheit wenden: Hath Folly often mended. 
die Liebe lerne kennen, Of Love, oh, learn the fashion 
die Gamuret umschloss, Which Gamuret once knew, 
als Herzeleid’s Entbrennen When Heart’s Affliction’s passion 
ihn sengend uberfloss: Had fired his bosom through. 
die Leib und Leben The life thy mother 
einst dir gegeben, Gave thee can smother 
der Tod und Thorheit weichen muss, ven death, and dullness too remove. 
sie beut’ To thee 
dir heut’— Now she 
als Muttersegens letzten Gruss Sends benediction from above 
der Liebe—ersten Kuss. In this first—kiss of Love. 
CShe has bowed her head quite over his, and now presses her lips on his in a long kiss.) 
Parsifal Parsifal 
Cstarts up suddenly with a gesture of intense terror ; his looks alter fearfully, he presses his hands tightly 
against his heart, as if to repress an agonizing pain; finally he bursts out). i 
Amfortas!— Amfortas! 
Die Wunde!—Die Wunde!— The spearwound!—The spearwoundl 
Sie brennt in meinem Herzen. InomeT feel it burning. : 
Oh, Klage! Klage! Oh, horror! horror! 
Furchtbare Klage! Direfullest horror! 
Aus tiefstem Inner’n schreit sie mir aut. It shrieks from out the depth of my soul, 
Oh!—Oh!— Oh!—Oh!— 
Elender!— Misery!— 
Jammervollster!— Lamentation! 
Die Wunde sah’ ich bluten:— I saw thy wound a-bleeding:— 
nun blutet sie mir selbst— It bleeds now in mysel| 
hier—hier! here—here! — 
Nein, nein! Nicht ist es die Wunde: No, no! This is not the spearwound: 
fliesse ihr Blut in Str6men dahin! Let it gush blood in streams tf it list. 
Hier! Hier im Herzen der Brand! Here!—here! My heart is ablaze! 
Das Sehnen, das furchtbare Sehnen, The passion, the terrible passion, 
das alle Sinne mir fasst und zwinet! That all my senses doth seize and sway! 
Oh!—Qual der Liebe!— Oh!—Love’s delirium!— 









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a ES A AMAT ON ge a oa ORM mane. Mingunine, Sitesi np mph am 


OS 0 A i A A CCT AER 6. OLS ee AT Ang wt Mem ye le 


oe PR ee 


Wie Alles schauert, debt und zuckt 
in sundigem Verlagen! ... 
Ks starrt der Blick dumpf aul das Heilsgefiiss: 
das heilige Blut ergl6h’t; 
Krlosungswonne, gottlich mild’, 
durchzittert weithin alle Seelen: 
nur hier, im Herzen, will die Qual nicht 
weichen 
Des Heiland’s Klage da vernehm’ ich, 
die Klage, ach! die Klage 
um das verrath’ne Heiligthum:— 
“erldse, rette mich 
aus schuldbefleckten Hiinden!”’ 
So—riel die Gottesklage 
furchtbar laut mir in die Seele. 
Und ich? Der Thor, der Feige? 
7u wilden Knabenthaten flor’ ich hin! 
Erloser! Heiland! Herr der Huld! 
Wie biiss’ ich Stinder solche Schuld? 
Kundry 
Gelobter Held! Entflieh’ dem Wahn! 
Blick’ auf! Ser hold der Huldin Nah’‘n! 
Parsifal 
Ja! Diese Stimme! So rief sie ihm;— 


und diesen Blick, deutlich erkenn’ ich ihn. 
auch diesen, der ihm so friedlos lachte. 


Die Lippe,—ja—so zuckte sie ihm;— 


so neigte sich der Nacken.— 
so hob sich ktihn das Haupt;— 
so flatterten lachend die Locken- 


so schliing um den Hals sich der Arm- 
so schmeichelte weich die Wange—! 
Mit aller Schmerzen Qual im Bund, 
das Heil der Seele 
entktsste ihm ihr Mund!- 
Ha!—dieser Kuss! 
Verderberin! Weiche von mir! 
Ewig—ewle—von mir! 
Kundry 
Grausamer!—Ha!— 
Fuhtst du im Herzen, 
nur Anderer Schmerzen, 
so fuhle jetzt auch die meinen! 
sist du Erléser, 
was bannt dich, Boser, 
nicht mir auch zum Heil dich zu einen? 
Seit Ewigkeiten—harre ich deiner, 
des Heiland’s, ach! so spat, 
den einst ich ktihhn verschmiaht.— 
Oh!— 
Kenntest du den Fluch, 
der mich durch Schlaf und Wachen 


How all things tremble, heave and quake 
With longings that are sinful! ... 
My frozen glance stares on the sacred Cup:— 
The Holy One’s blood doth glow;— 
Redemption’s rapture, sweet and mild, 
Is trembling far through ev'ry spirit; 
But in this heart will the pangs not lessen. 


The Saviour’s wailing I distinguished, 
Phe wailing—ah! the wailing 

lor His polluted sanctuary:— 
“Recover, save me from 
The hands that guilt has sullied!” 
Thus—rang the lamentation 

Through my soul with fearful loudness: 
And I—oh, Fool!—oh, coward!— 

To wild and childish exploits hither fled. 
Redeemer! Saviour! Gracious Lord! 
What can retrieve my crime abhorred? 

Kundry } 

My noble knight! fling off this spell! 
Look up! nor Love’s delights repel! 
Parsifal 
Aye! Thus it called him! This voice it 
Was ;— 
And this the glance; surely T know it well — 
The eyeglance which smiled away his 
quiet — . 
These lips too,—aye—they tempted him 
thus ;— 
So bowed this neck above him — 
So high was raised this head;— 
So fluttered these locks as though 
laughing ,— 
So circled this arm round his neckh— 
So softened each feature in fondness,—! 
In league with Sorrow’s dismal weight, 
This mouth took from him 
His soul’s salvation straight!— 
Ha!—with this kiss!— 
Pernicious one! Get thee from me! 
Leave me—leave me—for aye! 
Kundry : 
Cruel one!—Ha!— 
Felt eer thy nature 
For one fellow creature. 
Then feel now my desolation! 
Werl thou the Saver, 
Thou wouldst not waver, 
Bul with me unite for salvation? 
Through endless ages for thee 've waited, 
The Saviour—ah, so late! 
At whom TI scoffed in hate — 
Oh!— 
Couldst thou know the curse, 
Which through me, waking, sleeping, 





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durch ‘Pod und Leben, 


Pein und Lachen, 
zu neuem Leiden neu gestihlt, 
endlos durch das Dasein qualt! 
Ich sah—Ihn—lIhn 
und—lachte 
da traf mich sein Blick- 
Nun such’ich ihn von Welt zu Welt, 
ihm wieder zu begegnen: 
in h6chster Noth— 
wahn’ ich sein Auge schon nah’, 
den Blick schon auf mir ruh’n:— 
da kehrt mir das verfluchte Lachen wieder, 
ein Stinder sinkt mir in die Arme! 
Da lach’ ich—lache— 
kann nicht weinen: 
nur schreien, wiithen, 
toben, rasen 
in stets erneu’ten Wahnsinn’s Nacht, 
aus der ich bitissend kaum erwacht.- 
Den ich ersehnt in ‘Vodesschmachten, 
den ich erkannt, den blod’ Verlachten, 
lass’ mich an seinem Busen weinen, 
nur eine Stunde dir vereinen, 
und, ob mich Gott und Welt verstéss’t! 
in dir entsiindig’t sein und erlés’t! 
Parsifal 
In Ewigkeit 
warst du verdammt mit mir 
fiir eine Stunde 
Vergessen’s meiner Sendung, 
in deines Arm’s Umfangen!— 
Auch dir bin ich zum Heil gesandt, 
bleib’st du dem Sehnen abgewandt. 
Die Labung, die dein Leiden endet, 
beut nicht der Quell, aus dem es fliesst: 
das Heil wird nimmer dir gespendet, 
wenn jener Quell sich dir nicht schliesst. 
Fin andrer ist’s,—ein andrer, ach! 
nach dem ich jammernd schmachten sah, 
die Briider dort in grausen N6then 
den Leib sich qualen und ertédten. 
Doch wer erkennt ihn klar und hell, 
des einz’gen Heiles wahren Quell? 
Oh, Elend! Aller Rettung Flucht! 
Oh, Weltenwahns Umnachten: 
in héchsten Heiles heisser Sucht 


nach der Verdammniss Quell zu schmachten! 


Kundry. 
So war es mein Kuss, 

der Welt-hellsichtig dich machte? 
Mein volles Liebes-Umfangen 
lasst dich dann Gottheit erlangen! 

Die Welt erlése, ist diess dein Amt:- 
schuf dich zum Gott die Stunde, 

fiir sie lasse mich ewig verdammt, 
nie heile mir die Wunde. 

Parsifal. Erl6ésung, Frevlerin, biet’ ich auch 

dir. 


Kundry. Lass’ mich dich Gottlichen lieben, 


Erlésung gabst du dann mir. 

Parsifal. Lieb’ und Erlo6sung soll dir 
lohnen,— 
zeigest ZU 

zu Amfortas mir den Wee. 
Kundry 

Nie—sollst du ihn finden! 

Den Verfall nen, lass’ ihn verderben, 





644 


Salvation can’st thou never borrow, 


Through death and lifetime, 
Joy or weeping, 
While ever steeled to bear fresh woes, 
Endless through my being flows! 
I saw Him- —Him- 
And—mocked Him! 
I caught then His glance,— 
! seek Him now from world to world, 
Once more to stand before Him: 
In deepest woe- 
Sometimes His eye doth seem near, 
His glance resting on me, 
Returns then th’ accursed laughter on me, 
A-sinner sinks in my embraces! 
Then laughter—laughte) 
Weep I cannot; 
But only shriek 
And rage and wallow 
In night and madness never slaked, 
Krom which, repentant, scarce I'd waked- 
Thou for whom, shamed to death, ve bided, 
Thou whom TI knew and, fool, derided, 
Let me upon thy breast lie sobbing, 
But for one hour together throbbing; 
Lhough forced from God and man to flee, 
Be yet redeemed and pardoned by thee! 
Parsifal. Eternally 



































Should I be damned with thee, 
If for one hour 
I forgot my holy mission, 
Within thy arms embracing! 
To thy help also am I sent, 
If of thy cravings thou repent. 
The solace, which shall end thy sorrow, 
Yields not that spring from which it flows: 








Till that same spring in thee shall close. 
Kar other ‘tis—far other, aye! 

For which I saw, with pitying eyes, 

That brotherhood distrest and pining, 
Their lives tormented and declining, 
But who with certain clearness knows 








The source whence true salvation flows? 
Oh, mis’ry! What a course is this! 

Oh, wild hallucination! 
In such a search for sacred bliss 
Thus to desire the soul’s damnation! 
Kundry. dnd was il my kiss 

















This great knowledge conveyed thee? 
If in my arms I might take thee, 
'T would then a god surely make thee! 
Redeem the world then, if *tis thy aim: 
Stand as a god revealed; 
kor this hour let me perish in flame, 
Leave aye the wound unhealéd. 
Parsifal. Redemption, sinner, I offer e’en 
thee— 
Kundry. Lel me, divine one, but love thee; 
Redemption then should I see. 
Parsifal. Love and Redemption thou shalt 
lack not— 
If the way 
To Amfortas thou wilt show. 
Kundry 
Thou—never shalt find it! 
Let the doomed one perish forever.— 











SAN FRANCISCO 








mame 


den Un-seligen, The shame seeker, 





Schmach-llsternen, Joy destitute, 
den ich verlachte—lachte—lachte! Whom TI have laughed at—laughted al— 
Haha! Ihn traf ja der eig’ne Speer? laughed at! 
Parsifal. Wer durft’ ihn verwunden mit Ha, ha! He fell by his own good spear? 
heil’ger Wehr? Parsifal. Who dared raise against him the 
Kundry. Er—Er—, holy gear? 
der einst mein Lachen bestratt: Kundry. Hea eo 
sein Fluch—ha!—mir giebt er Kraft; Who puts my laughter to flight: 
gegen dich selbst ru? ch die Wehr, His curse—ha!—doth te nd me might: 
vieb'st du dem Stinder des Mitleid’s Ehr’!- For thyself the Spear doth awail 
Ha! Wahnsinn!— If thou dost pity the Seung ’s falel!- 
Mitleid! Mitleid mit mir! Ha! madness! 
Pity! pity me, pray! 
Nur eine Stunde mein, One single hour with me— 
nur eine Stunde dein: One single hour with eee 
und des Weges — Then, the wished-for 
sollst du geceitet sein! Path thou shalt straightway see! 
Parsifal. Vergeh’, unseliges Weib! Parsifal. Begone, dele stable wretch! 
Kundry 
Kundry Hither! Hither! Oh, help! 
Hilfe! Hilfe! Herbei! Seize on the caitiff; Oh, help! 
Haltet den Frechen! Herbet! Ward all the ways there! 
Wehr’t ihm die Weve! Ward ev’ry passage! — 
Wehr’t ihm die Pfade!— For, fled’st thou from hence, and foundest 
Und floh’st du von hier, und fiindest All the ways of the world, 
alle Wege der Welt, The one that thou seek’st 
den Weg, den du such’st, That pathway ne'er shalt thow pass 
dess’ Pfade sollst du nicht finden! through! 
Denn Pfad und Wege, All paths and courses, 
die mir dich entfthren, Which from me would part thee, 
so—verwunsch’ ich sie dir: Here—I curse them to thee: 
Irre! Irre,— Wander—wander — 
mir so vertraut— Thou whom I trust— 
dich weih’ ich ihm zum Geleit’! Thee will I give as his guide! 


(Alingsor appears upon the castle wall. He flings the Sacred Lance al 
Parsifal, but it remains floating over his head. Parsifal grasps the Lance and 
brandishes it with a gesture of exalted rapture, making the sign of the cross 


with it.) 
Parsifal. Mit diesem Zeichen bann’ ich Parsifal. This sign I make, and ban thy 
deinen Zauber: cursed magic: ; 

wie die Wunde er schliesse, As the wound shall be closed, 

die mit ihm du schlugest,— Which thou with this once clovest,— 

in ‘Trauer und ‘Trimmer To wrack and to ruin 

stiirze die triigende Pracht! Falls thy unreal display! 

As with an earthquake the castle falls to ruins; the garden withers up to a desert: the damsels lie like 
shriveled flowers strewn around on the ground — Kundry has sunk down with a cry. To her turns once more 
from the summit of the ruined wall the departing 
Parsifal. Du Weisst— Parsifal. Thou know’st— 

wo einzig du mich wiedersieh’st! Where only we shall meet again! 


(He disappears. The curtain closes quickly. ) 


Act III. 

(The third act takes place in the domain of the Grail before a hermitage on 
the edge of a wood. It is a beautiful spring day. We hear the introduction 
but cut the first scene. In this passage Gurnemanz discovers Kundry asleep as vf 
ee ad in the thicket. He revives her and she goes off to bring water. Now a knight 

1 black armor appears. It is Parsifal. Parsital removes iG helmet and shield 
as kneels in prayer before the Sacred Lance, w hich he has brought with him 
from Klingsor’s garden. Parsifal tells Gurnemanz of his wanderings. Gurnemanz 
tells Parsifal that Titurel has died and that on this day, for the firs! time in many 
long months, Amfortas will reveal the Grail as a ceremony of sanctification for 
ihe “ke parted knight; and Amfortas hopes that in that ceremony he may also 
expire. Gurnemanz recognizes that Parsifal will be the salvation of the Knights 
of the Grail.) 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 645 








: 
i 
Is 
i 


rae e Med = Pt Sg 


Gurnemanz 


(taking water from the spring in the hollow of his hand, and sprinkling Parsifal’s head). 


Gesegenet sei, du Reiner, durch das Reine! 
So weiche jeder Schuld 
Bekiimmerniss von dir! 


(Meanwhile Kundry has taken a golden flask 


Gurnemanz 





Now blessed be, thou pure one, through pure 
water! 
So may all care and sin 
Be driven far from thee. 


from her bosom and poured some of the contents upon 


Barsif al’s feet, which she now dries on her hair, quickly unbound for the purpose. ) 


Gurnemanz 


Gurnemanz 


(empties the flask completely over Parsifal’s head, rubs it gently, and folds his hands over it). 


So ward es uns verhiessen, 
so segne ich dein Haupt, 
als Konig dich zu griissen. 
Du—Reiner.— 
mitleidvoll Duldender, 
heilthatvoll Wissender! 
Wie des Erlés'ten Leiden du gelitten, 


die letzte Last entnimm nun seinem Haupt. 
Parsifal 
Mein erstes Amt verricht’ ich so:— 
die ‘Taufe nimm, 
und glaub’ an den Erl6éser! 


(scoops up some water from the spring, unperceived, bends down to the kneeling Kundry and sprinkles her head). 


Aye, thus it was foretold me, 

My blessings on thy head:— 

Our king deed behold we. 

JE, hou——pure one— 

Allpitying sufferer, 

Allknowing rescuer! 
Thou who the sinner’s sorrows thus hast 

suffered, 
Assist his soul to cast one burden more. 
Parsifal 





I first fulfill my duty thus:— 
Be thou baptize d, 
And trust in the Redeemer! 


CKundry bows her head to the earth and appears to weep bitterly. ) 


Parsifal 


Parsifal 


(turns round and gazes with gentle rapture on the woods and meadows). 


Wie dtinkt mich doch die Aue heut’ so 
schon!— 
Wohl traf ich Wunderblumen an, 


die bis zum Haupte stichtig mich umrankten; 


doch sah’ ich nie so mild und zart 


How fair the fields and meadows seem 
today!— 
Many a magic flow’r I’ve seen, 
Which sought to clasp me in its baneful 
tw ININGS; 
But none I’ve seen so sweet as here, 





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die Halmen, Bliithen und Blumen, 
noch duftete All’ so kindisch hold 
und sprach so lieblich traut zu mir? 
Gurnemanz 
Das ist Char-Freitags-Zauber, Herr! 
Parsifal. O wel’, des héchsten Schmerzentag’s 
Da sollte, wiihn ich, was da bluh't, 
was athmet, lebt und wieder lebt, 
nur trauern, ach! und weinen? 
Gurnemanz. Du sieh’st, das ist nicht so. 
Des Siinders Reuethranen sind es, 
die heut’ mit heil’gem ‘Thau 
hetriufet Flur und Au: 
der liess sie so gedeihen. 
Nun freu’t sich alle Kreatur 
auf des Erl6sers holder Spur 
will ihr Gebet ihm weihen. 
thn selbst am Kreuze kann sie nicht 
erschauen: 
da blickt sie zum erl6s’ten Menschen aul; 
der fiihlt sich frei von Stinden-Angst und 
Grauen, 
durch Gottes Liebesopfer rein und hel: 
das merkt nun Halm und Blume auf den 
Auen, 
das heut’ des Menschen Fuss sie nicht zertritt, 
doch wohl, wie Gott mit himmlischer Geduld 
sich sein’ erbarmt und ftir ihn litt, 
der Mensch auch heut’ in frommer Huld 
sie schont mit sanftem Schritt. 
Das dankt dann alle Kreatur, 
was all’ da bliiht und bald erstirbt, 
da die entstndigte Natur 
heut’ ihren Unschulds- Vag erwirbt. 


These tendrils bursting with blossom, 
Whose scent recalls my childhood’s days 
And speaks of loving trust to me. 
Gurnemanz. That is Good-Friday’s spell, my 
lord! 
Parsifal. las, that day of agony! 
Now surely everything that thrives, 
That breathes and lives and lives again, 
Should only mourn and sorrow? 
Gurnemanz. That see’st, that is not so. 
The sad repentant tears of sinners 
Have here with holy rain 
Besprinkled field and plain, 
And made them glow with beauty. 
All earthly creatures in delight 
At the Redeemer’s trace so bright 
Uplift their pray’rs of duty. 
To see Him on the Cross they have no power: 
And so they smile upon redeemed man, 
Who, feeling freed, with dread no more doth 
COW), 
Through God’s love-sacrifice made clean and. 
pure: 
And now perceives each blade and meadow- 
flower 
That mortal foot today it need not dread; 
For, as the Lord in pity man did spare, 
And in His mercy for him bled, 
All men will keep, with pious care, 
Today a tender tread. 
Then thanks the whole creation makes, 
With all that flow’rs and fast goes hence, 
That trespass- pardoned Nature wakes 
Now to her day of Innocence. 


(Kundry has slowly raised her head again, and gazes with moist eyes, earnestly and calmly beseeching, 
up at Parsifal.) 


Parsifal. Ich sah’ sie welken, die mir lachten: 


ob heut’ sie nach Erl6sung schmachten? 
Auch deine Thriine wird zum Segensthaue: 
du weinest—sieh! es lacht die Aue. 


Parsifal. I saw my scornful mockers wither: 
Now look they for forgiveness hither?— 
Like blessed sweet dew a tear from thee too 
floweth: 
Thou weepest—see! the landscape groweth. 


ws (He kisses her softly on the brow. ) 
(Distant bells are heard pealing, very gradually swelling. ) 


Gurnemanz. Mittag.— 
Die Stund’ ist da:— 


Gurnemanz. Mid-day.— 
The hour has come:— 


Gurnemanz has brought out a coat-of-mail and mantle of the knights: of the Grail, which he and Kundry 


put on Parsifal. The landscape changes very gradually, 


as in the first act, but from R. to L. Parsifal solemnly 


grasps the Spear and, with Kundry, follows the conducting Gurnemanz. — When the wood has disappeared, 
and rocky entrances have presented themselves in which the three become invisible, processions of knights 
in mourning garb are perceived in the arched passages ; the pealing of bells ever increasing. ~~ At last the 


whole immense Hall becomes visible just as in the first act, only without the tables. Faint light. The doors open 
again. From one side the knights bear in Titurel’s corpse in a coffin. From the other Amfortas 1s carried on 1n 
his litter, preceded by the covered shrine of the Grail. The bier is erected in the middle; behind it the 


throne with canopy where Amfortas is set down. 
(Gesang der Ritter waihrend des Einzuges.) 
Krster Zug 


(Song of the knights during the procession.) 
First ‘Prain 


(with the Grail and Amfortas) . 


Geleiten wir im bergenden Schrein 
den Gral zum heiligen Amte, 
wen berget ihr im diist'ren Schrein 
und fiihrt ihn trauernd daher? 
Zweiter Zug 


To sacred place in sheltering shrine 
The Holy Grail do we carry; 
What hide ye there in gloomy shrine, 
Which hither mourning ye bear? 
Second ‘Train | 


(with Titurel’s coffin). 


Es biret den Helden der ‘Prauerschrein, 
er birgt die heilige Kralt; 
der Gott selbst einst zur Pflege sich gab: 
Titurel fiihren wir her. 


Erster Zug. Wer hat ihn gefallt, der in Gottes 


Hut 
Gott selbst einst beschirmte? 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


A hero lies in this dismal shrine 
With all this heavenly strength, 
To whom all things once God did entrust: 
Titurel hither we bear. 
First Train. By whom was he slain, who by 
God himself . 
Once was ever sheltered? 


647 








SP ma me) ee 


Zweiter Zug. Thn fallte des Alters t6dtende 
Last, 
da den Gral er nicht mehr erschaute. 
Lrster Zug. Wer wehrt’ ihm des Grales Huld 
zu erschauen? 
Zweiter Zug. Den dort ihr geleitet, der 
sundige Hiiter. 
Lrster Zug. Wir geleiten ihn heut’, denn 
heut’ noch einmal 
—zum letzten Male!— 
will des Amtes er walten. 
Zweiter Zug. Wehe! Wehe! Du Hiiter des 
Heil’s! 
Zum letzten Male 
sei deines Amts gemahnt! 


Second Train. He sank beneath the mortal 
burden of years, 
When the Grail no more he might look on. 
First Train. Who veiled then the Grail’s 
delights from his vision? 
Second Train. He whom ye are bearing: its 
criminal guardian. 
First Train. We conduct him today, for here 
once again, 7 
—And once more only— 
He fulfilleth his office. 
second ‘Train. Sorrow! Sorrow! Thou guard 
of the Grail! 
Be once more only 
Warned of thy duly lo all, 


(The coffin is set down on the bier, Amfortas placed on the couch. ) 


(Tilurel’s coffin is opened, and Amfortas calls upon his spirit to gtve him 
release from his sufferings. The assembled knights demand that Amfortas per- 
form the office of the Grail. Again he refuses. He tears open his dress and reveals 


that his wound is bleeding afresh. Now Parsifal, who has entered un perceived 


with Kundry and Gurnemanz during the foregoing, steps forward and touches 
Amfortas wound with the tip of the Sacred Lance. Parsifal absolves Amfortas 
and announces that henceforth he, Parsifal, will rule in Montsalvat.) 


Parsifal 
Den heil’gen Speer — 

ich bring’ ihn euch zurtick. — 
Oh! Welchen Wunders héchstes Gltick! 
Die deine Wunde durfte schliessen, 
ihm seh’ ich heil’ges Blut entfliessen 
in Sehnsucht dem verwandten Quelle, 
der fort fliesst in des Grales Welle! 
Nicht soll der mehr verchlossen sein: 
enthullt den Gral! Oeffnet den Schrein! 
Alle 


Parsifal 
The holy Spear — 

Once more behold in this. - 
Oh, mighty miracle of bliss! - 
This that through me thy wound restoreth. 
With holy blood behold it poureth. 
Which yearns to join the fountain glowing, 
Whose pure tide in the Grail is flowing! 
Hid be no more that shape divine: 
Uncover the Grail! Open the shrine! 
All 


The boys open the shrine; Parsifal takes from it the Grail and kneels absorbed in its contemplation, 
silently praying. The Grail glows with light; a halo of glory pours down over all, — Titurel, for the moment 


reanimated, raises himself in henediction in his coffin. 


From the dome descends a white dove and hovers 


over Parsifal’s head. He waves the Grail gently to and fro before the upgazing knights. Kundry, looking up 
at Parsifal, sinks slowly to the ground, dead. Amfortas and Gurnemanz do homage on their knees to Parsifal. 


Hochsten Heiles Wunder: 
Erlodsung dem Erloser! 


Wondrous work of mercy: 
Salvation to the Saviour! 





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Yearly Dues $5.00 from January to January 


Your check will aid in providing Symphony tickets for music students in public high 
schools and Junior Colleges and in building up the orchestra’s library and repertoire. 


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(EN Cathe En Py Oey Sieuoungsiamasinaglines. masiiey a 








WILLIAM F. LARAIA 








TE TIS RS, AT ES SY 


a 





lirst Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 
years —— has resigned in order to devote his time exclustvely to 
teaching. 

STUDIOS— 

3325 OCTAVIA St., SAN FRANCISCO 
438 HiLLcrEest Rp., SAN CARLOS 





648 


Fr. 6102 
Se Gal b7fllte 





SAN FRANCISCO 








Re ae 


iS ymphony Nates 


. An Easter program of particular beauty is planned for NBC’s 
“Standard Hour” Sunday (KPO, 8:30 p.m.), when Pierre Monteux 
will conduct the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra and Michael 
Strange, poet, author and actress, will give the narration of the Last 
Supper according to the ele of St. John, with orchestral background 
music from the Prelude to “Parsifal.” ‘“Passacaglia” in G Minor by 
Handel, arranged for strings by orchestra ‘member Alfred Akon: 
Prelude to “Lohengrin,” “Symphonic Piece” from “The Redemption” 
by Cesar Franck, and the “Academic Festival Overture” by Brahms, 
complete the program. 


The second act of Gluck’s “Orpheus & Eurydice” and the final 
chorus of Bach’s “Passion According to St. Matthew” will be presented 
by Arturo ‘Toscanini and the NBC “Symphony Orchestra on the Easter 
Sunday broadcast of the “General Motors Symphony of the Air,” 
which will be broadcast over KPO at 2:00 p.m. ‘This program, featuring 
Nan Merriman, mezzo-soprano, and a special chorus under Peter Wil- 
housky, concludes the 1944-5 winter series. 


Lily Pons will make her first appearance in this country fol- 

lowing a four months’ tour of service camps overseas, when she sings on 

“The Telephone Hour’s” great artists series Monday, at 9:00 p.m. over 

KPO. With her husband, Andre Kostelanetz, the coloratura soprano 

traveled in China, Burma, Assam, India, Belgium and France in her 

second overseas trip to entertain service men. She cancelled all engage- 
ments for the winter to make this trip possible. 


An Easter program featuring Blanche ‘Thebom, Metropolitan 
Opera mezzo-soprano, and ‘Thomas L. ‘Thomas, baritone, as guest stars 
will be presented on “Music America Loves Best”? over KPO Sunday 
at 1:30 p.m. Thomas and the Victor Chorale open with “The Palms,” 
Miss ‘Thebom follows with “Allelujah” and joins the chorale in the 
Easter hymn from “‘Cavalleria Rusticana.” ‘The chorale will be heard 
in three Easter hymns, “Christ the Lord [s Risen ‘Voday,” “Oh Sacred 
Heart Now Wounded” and “Love Is Come Again.” 


. Opening with the lovely “Naila Waltz” by Delibes, Paul Lavalle 
and the ‘ ‘Stradivari Orchestra” will present a program dedicated to 
Easter and the spring season Sunday at 9:30 a.m. over KPO. William 
Lincer will play an especially arranged solo, “Kamennoi-Ostrow’’ by 
Rubinstein and the orchestra will play the “Ave Maria”’ from “Caval- 
leria Rusticana,” ““Levitsky’s “Waltz,” a Brahms waltz, Friml’s “Gian- 
nina Mia” from “The Firefly” and “Country Gardens” by Grainger. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 











649 - 














It Stands Alone 


KORBEL BRUT IS TOPS IN AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE 


Magazines which reach the most sophisticated audience in the United States 
unanimously give first place in American Champagnes to KORBEL BRUT 
WE didn’t say it first! THEY DID! 


“THE BEST AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE 
to date is KORBEL BRUT. Our guess is 
anyone would think it was imported.”’ 
—Harper’s Bazaar, February, 1941. 


‘PROBABLY THE MOST CHAM- 
PAGNE-LIKE domestic wine is KOR- 
BEL BRUT.’’—Cue Magazine, Decem- 
ber 20, 1940. 


“THE OUTSTANDING AMERICAN 
CHAMPAGNE to date is KORBEL 
BRUT.’’— Town and Country, Febru- 
ary, 1941. 


“EXTREMELY ENJOYABLE, bone-dry 
and clean-tasting.’’-—-The New Yorker, 
March 15, 1941. 


“AMONG THE FEW FINE CALIFOR- 
NIA CHAMPAGNES IS KORBEL BRUT 
—a special cuvee which has been made 
as dry as the dryest Champagnes for 
the English market.’’— St. Regis, Pea- 
cock Alley, The Ambassador, Plaza En 
Passant, The Savoyard, The Ritz Carl- 
ton, The Hampshire, The Sherry-Neth- 
erlands, Pierrot, January, 1941. 


KORBEL sev oan’ 
SEC PINK 
Distributed by 


TRADERS DISTRIBUTING CO. 
314 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 


21 BRANDS, INC. 
17 E. 52nd ST., NEW YORK CITY 


SAN FRANCISCO 















































Box Holders for 


PJERRE MONTEUX 
MRS. SIGMUND STERN 
Mrs. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 


MRS. JOHN T. BARNETT 
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MRS. HARRY HILL 

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—E **U.S. NAVAL HOSPITALS 


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H MRS. JOSEPH D. GRANT 


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M MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. BLYTH 
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MRS. 


0 oO BS > 


Friday Afternoons 


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ASHTON H. POTTER 


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MRS. 
MRS. 


*** Transportation Service Duar courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 


with the cooperation of Mrs. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


eorge Cameron. 


651 

















PERSONNEL 


SAN: FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUM®X, Conbuctor 


VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSK!I, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
FORD, Louis W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHMN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BAUER, BEN 

BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
D!I BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENC 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


'CELLOS: 


BLINDER, BorRI!ISs 
PRINCIPAL 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 
SAPHIR, RUTH 


BASSES: 


KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLIT!, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI. JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 
RENZI, PAUL JR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 


BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScCHIvoO, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScCHIvoO, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BIBBINS, F. C. 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 


BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C., 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E, 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, JR 


TRUMPETS: 
BusBB, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Gios!, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 


MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SiNAI, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELWOOD 


PIANO AND CELESTA: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


PROPERTY MASTER: 
go. fj. REAVEY 


JULIUS HAUG 


IN SERVICE WITH THE UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES 


DICTEROW, HAROLD—VIOLIN 
HOUSER, F. S.—VIOLIN 
KHUNER, FELIX—VIOLIN 
MICHAELIAN, ERNEST A.—VIOLIN 


MOULIN, HARRY=VIOLIN 
Ross, NATHAN—VIOLIN 
LEPLIN, EMANUEL—VIOLA 
LUCIEN, MITCHELL—VIOLA 


OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV=——VIOLA 
CLAUDIO, CESARE—’CELLO 
DE PALMA, ATTILIO—HORN 
ALTMANN, LUDW!G-——ORGAN 





SSS tS SS 


652 


SAN FRANCISCO 








EVENING CONCERT 


Nearly two hours of 
fi 12€ MUSIC every 
night of the week 


a 
> 






8:10 to 10 P.M. 
STATION KK WA 


San Francisco 
* 


1210 ON YOUR DIAL 





ACME BREWERIES 


San Francisco* Los Angeles 






























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moog e . | 
WESC changing lo Yes, it’s a lasting friendship ... well-earned | 


by Chesterfield’s three top qualities... 


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4 COOLER SMOKING q 





And when your G.I. Joe steps out of khaki into a 1 
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enjoy Chesterfields together and agree that nothing 





measures up to their... 


RIGHT COMBINATION *x WORLD’S BEST TOBACCOS 


PISAN! FRINTING & PUBLISHING CO,, 700 MONTGOMERY, S&S. F. * 


Copyright 1945, Liccetr & Myers Tosacco Co. 








eH Bee She ao sO) CCA EO NO SAN FRANCISCO 


ie LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY - PRESIDENT AND MANAGENG_ DIRECTOR 
H HOWARD K. SKINNER «© BUSINESS MANAGER 





H:O;UeS £: 
aa E : 


leventh Pair ° - Lotte Lehmann, Guest Artist — | ead A pril 6-7, 1945, 


y 


% 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA 





- 
oy 
a 

2 


eRe A 
— 


Income for 
your dependents - 


while you live 


A man while he still lives may set apart 
all or some part of his property to 
provide income now or later for any 
of his beneficiaries by establishing a 
“family trust.” Each arrangement will 
be made to fit the needs of a particular 
family. It can always be altered. Ask 
about this service. 


TRUST DEPARTMENT 


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Bank « union taust co. 


SAN FRANCISCO 


Established 1852 
Member F.D.I.C. 








SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. in its 
NEW HOME in OAKLAND 





x \ | ; Convenience is the word for our new music store... 
~~ / Le located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
town Oakland. 


Step right off the street to our main floor . . .-for REC- 
ORDS ... SHEET MUSIC ...RECORD CABINETS... 
CONCERT TICKETS. Upstairs, on the mezzanine, 
you'll find our other departments . . . Pianos, Band and 
Orchestra Instruments, Radios and Radio-Phonographs. 





Parking lot next door or just across the street. 


New Telephone Number 


Hi gate 8440 awe Yj 


he aoll 


mA I Sd 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 657 











THE MAGNET” 


és“ 





S.A. 


Compounded and Copyrighted 
by Coty, Inc. in U 








BMUNICIPAL CONCERTS 
Ov 


3 
ari © On 
THe 


ve" CAN FRANCISCO 
| SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


CEOSENG CON GE kal 
TUESDAY EVENING, APRIL 10, AT 8:30 


we 
GRAGE 


MOORE 


IN CONCERT VERSION OF 


epee Dyes ay 


with 


Rae UL dN 


and 


MUNICIPAL CHORUS 





hans AUDITORIUM 
Tickets: 30c, 60c, 90c, $1.20, $1.80, Tax Included—Sherma . . . SUtter 1331 





660 





...Of course you are...and we'll bet home 
planning tops the list of your after V-day 
dreams. For more than a century in war 
and peace W, & J. Sloane has been helping 
make just these kind of dreams come true 


for generations of Americans. 


W&J 


SLOANE 


216 SUTTER near GRANT 
SAN FRANCISCO 8, CALIF. 


SAN FRANCISCO 








Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E. Raymond. Armsby..-.---.:----:23. Vice-President Charles: Pagex.5.22 32-064 eine Treasurer 
Paul VA:. BisSingemiscc--4 sc2escsc 2st wees. Vice-President Howard’ \K;. Skinmer?=:0-- 3. -2s st Secretary 
Charles: Ri>. Blyth:-2 3... ae Vice-President Geraid) G; (Ross2.2 2.23: Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II-........-..---. _.....Wice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd : Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, Il Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Cc. O. G. Miller, Chairman 
E. Raymond Armsby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayder 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Roger. 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 
Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 


Mrs; John P;. Coghlani..22is- se Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill...................-.- Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecily Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Biehl 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

E. Raymond Armsby Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. |. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Humphrey Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engelhart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul |. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher Cc. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Mulford Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour, Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, Il Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe’ Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Weod 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris : 

op wz Ss ate we + Le , No ies ers OO i eres Mee cg Th 

STAFF 

Constance Alexander Victor Mohl Deborah Spalding 
Kathleen Lawlor Gerald Ross Curran Swint 
Doris Lowell Joseph Scafidi Virginia Webb 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 661 














“There's an immortality in the expression of the 
finer human moods... These moods sincerely | | 
expressed in a portrait can mean so much to the 
person towards whom that feeling ts directed.” 


UE TE 


MASTER PHOTOGRAPHER | 


: 427 POST STREET (IN THE ST. FRANCIS HOTEL) * YUKON 2061 





* 











(LAST CONCERTS OF THE SEASON) 
FRIDAY, APRIL 13, AT 2:15 
SATURDAY, APRIL 14, aT 8:30 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Guest Artist 


Suite No. 6 Bach-Wood 

Prelude to The Afternoon of a Faun Debussy 

Concertonor Liaho,anc Orchestras iNorore ose eee Beethoven 

Suite from Protée Milhaud 
(First Performance in San Francisco) 

Symphony, D Minor Franck 


_ TWELFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
: 
| 





\ 
\ 
\ 
{ 
) 
‘ 
\ 
, 
) 
) 
) 
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{ 


GUEST ARM Siliesliitor VViEEI< 


Lorre LEHMANN was born in Germany and received her training in Berlin. 
‘The list of European opera houses in which she has sung leading roles is prac- 
tically encyclopedic, and one cannot begin even to list a fraction of them. She 
was first heard in the United States with the Chicago Civic Opera in 1930, and 
she joined the Metropolitan three years later. She has also sung many times 
with the San Francisco Opera Company. As an operatic interpreter, she has 
paid particular attention to Wagner and Richard Strauss. In addition to her 
work as an opera and concert singer, Mme. Lehmann has published poetry, 
novels and an autobiography. ‘This will be her third appearance with the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. She was soloist on the Art Commission 


series In 1938 and 1940. 


Coo ~ 


GUEST ART Silt sINEZGR Wy EEX 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN was born in Lodz, Poland, in 1886. He made his first 
public appearance as a concert artist at the age of four. The major part of his 
instruction was gained in Berlin, where Rubinstein became a protégé of Joseph 
Joachim, and where he studied the piano with Heinrich Barth. His formal 
debut was made in Berlin at the age of 11, when he played a Mozart concerto 
under Joachim’s baton. Later Rubinstein studied for a time with Paderewski. 
He has been before the American public since 1906, and has appeared in concert 
throughout the entire world. 

This will be Mr. Rubinstein’s sixth appearance with the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra. He was last heard playing the Khatchaturian concerto on 


the Art Commission series last year. 














SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








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SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-4e}- 








i ELEVENTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 
iq FRIDAY, APRIL 6, AT 2:15 

‘ SATURDAY, APRIL 7, AT 8:30 

| LOTTE LEHMANN, Guest Artist 

f ‘Program 


SYMPHONY NO. 38, IN D MAJOR (PRAGUE) . Mozart 
Adagio — Allegro 
Andante 
Presto 


CHOAMBER: SYMPHONY ONO Zee acces oe Schoenberg 


i 


Molto Adagio 
Con Fuoco 
(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 


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1h eo (We rer RA MS oR Dar Men ce neu Use See Se EMA aRCnG ter Wolf 
U7 SU aS) Sas GR a petra are rep Teeny Re ence Wnt pees Ske ae Debussy 


From Dawn "Til Noon on the Ocean 
Play of the Waves 
Dialogue of the Wind and the Sea 


PARARARARARRAAR PP PPP PP PPP PPP PELE ILL ED PDD PPD PIP DD PD PP PPP PPD PD DDI NII NI NIE NINE NANI NA NANA NES 


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kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
of their seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 
This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 











SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 665 





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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SYMPHONY NO= 307 Ds Via ORS Gis Gea W. A. Mozart 
(1756-1791) 

Mozart's associations with the city of Prague provide a bright spot in 
his generally tragic career. In the summer of 1786 his opera, The Marriage 
of Figaro, was produced in the Czech capital with enormous success. The 
comedy was given daily for months on end, its melodies were transformed 
into waltzes and quadrilles for the local dance halls, and the biggest hit of 
all was made by Figaro’s burlesque military aria at the end of the first act, 
Non Pitt Andyrat. 

Composers had no property rights in their works in those days, and there- 
fore Mozart got nothing but glory from his success—glory, and the chance of 
realizing something out of his popularity by means of personal appearances. 
Consequently, at the invitation of a nobleman, he went to Prague in January, 
1787, and there gave two of the most uproariously successful concerts of his 
life, at the first of which this symphony received its first performance. 

It would be interesting to compare those symphony concerts of 1787 with 
similar events today, but details are unfortunately lacking in the available 
literature. he orchestra was the typical provincial band of its time, boasting 
no more than three first and three second violins, two violas and two basses. 
The programs, following 18th century tradition, comprised concertos, sym- 
phonies, and solos both vocal and instrumental; both the solo recital and the 
purely orchestral symphony concert were alike unknown. Unlike the audience 
of today, the audience of the 18th century expected and demanded new works 
and would have been aggrieved if such had not been provided, a situation 
which explains why Mozart wrote over 40 symphonies and an even greater 
number of concertos during his brief career. 

The concerts, again following a custom now gone, also involved a great 
deal of improvisation. There are records of Mozart’s having improvised piano- 
forte sonatas on themes handed him across the footlights, and of his immediately 
repeating these sonatas note for note, but in a different key. At the end of the 
concert at which the Prague Symphony was produced his improvisation natu- 
rally turned to Non Pitt Andrai. The audience thereupon tore up their seats; 
Mozart had reached the pinnacle, so far as popular reception is concerned. 

It is also worth noting that, in the autumn of 1787, Mozart’s Don Giovanni 
had its first production in Prague. In the last act of that work Don Giovanni's 
private band entertains its master at dinner with popular hits of the moment. 
When the band strikes up Non Pit Andra the Don raises his hand and says 
“We've had enough of that!” or words to that effect. Even popularity has its 
limitations. 

This work is sometimes called the Symphony Without Minuet, but that 
‘s a distinction without a difference. Many, if not most of Mocart’s symphonies 
have no minuets; in this they reflect the old form of the Italian overture or 


sinfonia, best known to modern audiences through examples by Johann Chris- 


tian and C. P. E. Bach. But the Prague is the only late symphony of Mozart 
in which no minuet is to be found. 
pie ep ee SS ee 


Buffet Service in Basement Promenade and Dress Circle during all performances 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE. Owned and operated bv the Citv and Countv of San Francisco 
through the Board of Trustees of the War Memorial. 


Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 667 














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CHAMBER SYMPHONY NO. 2, OPUS 38..... Jp eey ia Schoenberg 
1874- ) 
By LEONARD STEIN* ( } 


Schoenberg sketched the second chamber symphony while composing his 
first work in this form, Opus 9. ‘That was in 1906, and for several years there- 
after, while occupied with other compositions, Schoenberg continued work on 
the present score. However, after a time it was abandoned, not to be resumed 
until 1939, when it was completed for a performance by the New Friends of 
Music under the direction of Fritz Stiedry which took place the following year. 

Originally composed, like its predecessor, for a group of solo instruments, 
the second chamber symphony was later rescored for a small orchestra con- 
sisting of strings, two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns 
and two trumpets. But it is also its length and content that give this work the 
character of a chamber symphony. It consists of two movements: the first, slow 
(Adagio); the second, fast (Con Fuoco), concluded by an epilogue which 
recapitulates the tempo and mood of the first movement. In form and substance 
these two movements resemble the middle adagio and allegro-finale move- 
ments of a regular symphony, omitting the first sonata-allegro movement 
characteristic of most symphonies. Nevertheless symphonic unity is here achieved 
by the inclusion of themes and motifs of the first movement in the second, and 
by the epilogue which rounds out the composition. 

Although completed within the most recent period of Schoenberg’s musical] 
development, the second chamber symphony is not written in the twelve-tone 
technique used almost exclusively by the composer today. Instead it resembles 

*Mr. Stein is a Los Angeles composer who studied with Schoenberg and has been serving 
as his assistant since 1939. We are deeply indebted to him for these notes, which were 
especially prepared for these concerts. 


_ 














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the harmonic treatment of his earlier compositions, opus | through 10, which 
include the first two string quartets, the first chamber symphony and the sextet, 
Verklaerte Nacht. An outgrowth and expansion of the harmonic means devel- 
oped by Wagner, Richard Strauss, Gustav Mahler and other late 19th and 
early 20th century composers, this type of composition can be described as 
“extended tonality”; as the composer explains, “rich and even remote harmonic 
relations are used.”’ 

Because of this application of far-reaching harmonic means in works such 
as the second chamber symphony, Schoenberg is often and erroneously com- 
pared with Richard Strauss. Although Strauss first used. many of these newer 
harmonic devices in his large symphonic compositions, his applications of 
them are different in many important respects from those of Schoenberg. It is 
sufficient to explain one difference. The themes of Strauss, for the most part, 
are based on a sustained or slowly changing harmony in which the dissonant 
tones are usually embellishing additions. In contrast, a theme of Schoenberg 
could never be played over a sustaining harmony, as it is based on fast-moving 
harmonic progressions which take advantage of remote harmonic relationships. 
Because of this fundamental difference in harmonic construction, the two com- 
posers employ widely divergent types of themes and melodies. However, to 
the discerning listener the contrast between the works of Strauss and Schoen- 
berg is rapidly apparent. 


The two movements of the second chamber symphony are dissimilar in 
structure and in treatment of the themes as well as in character. The first 
movement. in E flat minor, is slow, and contains many expressive themes. 






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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 671 

















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[is form is quite stmple—ABA or three-part form, with several themes within 
each section. ‘This movement may be summarized as follows: 

The first principal theme expands from a one-measure phrase and revolves 
around two remotely related harmonies—E flat minor and A minor. This 
harmonic progression ultimately prevails in the epilogue. ‘The flute plays the 
melody of this theme at the very beginning, accompanied by the strings: 






































‘The second principal theme, also in E flat minor, enlarges motifs of the first 
theme. It appears in the 11th bar with its melody in the first violins: 

















and gradually works up to a climax with the help of the woodwinds. 
The contrasting middle section begins six bars after the end of Example 
°. It is based upon a short theme: 















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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 673 





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which is treated in imitation by various combinations of instruments—first the 
‘celli and double basses, then the first violins, and finally horns and woodwind 
—building to a climax on which the two principal themes (Examples | and 2) 
appear in the full orchestra. 

After a few short cadences, played very softly, there now appears the 
second (B) group of themes. 

The first subordinate theme is in a slightly faster tempo and in a con- 
trasting key. Like the principal themes, it is very expressive, unwinding itself 
eradually in the violas: 
































a a Ree a 


‘The second subordinate theme appears immediately after Example 4, carried 
by the violins over the full orchestra: 







gve----L-~— — 


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and immediately repeated by the horns. ‘This theme, which reiterates a single 
tone before expanding, is the most forceful subject in the movement. 
Examples 4 and 5 are repeated in different settings, leading to a powerful 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 675 











climax in the upper winds and strings, while Example 1, the first principal 
theme, reappears in the bass. 

The recapitulation of the principal themes, like most repetitions in Schoen- 
berg’s works, is greatly varied, not only by different orchestral settings, but 
also by the use of different counterpoints and counter-melodies. 

The coda which concludes the movement consists of many rich cadences 
built on fragments of the foregoing themes. It shows the composer's ability to 
unify many diverse ideas in the most delicately treated instrumental com- 
binations. At the end the ‘cellos repeat a fragment of Example I, and the 
movement resolves quietly. 

II. 

In many respects the second movement is the antithesis of the first. Marked 
Gon Fuoco— with fire’—it moves constantly forward with great urgency, 
At times playful, it is entirely possessed by a deep and serious nature. 

In contrast to the lyrical themes of the first movement, those of the second 
are succinct and concise, never being allowed to linger and expand. There 
exists a multiplicity of themes and fragments of themes, and this provides 
continual renewal for the development of each section. This movement is 
written in G major, but, due to its speed and contrapuntal complexities, its 
tonal relationships are often strained to the limit. 

The form of the second movement is also more complex than the first. 
It approaches the sonata-allegro, but, unlike the conventional form, it has no 
definite recapitulation. ‘his is partly the result of a continuous development of 
the themes and their transformation through numerous contrapuntal com- 
binations. In addition the composer dislikes the feeling of a recapitulation: 
“It seems that after so much has happened it would be like a man returning to 
his childhood.” 











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A summary of the form of the second movement follows: 

|. First division, or expression, of a sonata-allegro form. The principal 
oroup of themes consists of 
ra) 


|. An accompaniment figure of three short motifs affirming the key. 
: ; - ‘ c / 
[his opens the movement in the ’celli, violas and bassoon: 





This 1s a wildly running figure of many rhythmic and melodic changes. Ap- 
pearing throughout in one form or another, it is used as a kind of musical 
“cement” and as a generator of other themes. 


. . . » e . Sy! 
principal theme appears in the oboe over a solt string accompaniment: 


8 After ten bars devoted to varied repetitions of the foregoing, a second 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 677 








This theme is more sustained and regular 
but 1s soon overwhelmed by the re 
A transition se 


In construction than Example qh 
appearance of Example 7 itself, 
ction follows shortly, introducing two new themes: 





— 





Beginning softly, the transition very quickly builds to a heavy climax which 
introduces the subordinate group of themes, in a faster tempo. 

l. ‘The first subordinate theme has a very forceful character; its presenta- 
tion by the horns gives it almost a march-like feeling: 











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By contrast, the second subordinate theme, which follows at once in the 
Is more quiet and flowing: 


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But once again Example 7 rudely intrudes upon the scene, and, in combina- 
‘ion with other themes and motifs, soon brings the first division of the move- 
ment to a close in a strong cadence to D major. 


The elaboration section which follows 1s, as the composer explains, “‘an- 
other way of remaining with one’s ideas, of revealing the destiny of those ideas 
and of providing a contrast of structure.” All the previous themes are used, at 
times broken down into little bits and at other times fused in different combina- 
tions with other themes and their fragments. Phe moods also change frequently 
and unexpectedly, from one extreme—light and airy punctuation of phrases— 
to the other extreme—a marked conflict of ideas where everything seems to 
happen at once. Climaxes are sudden and the dynamics change continually. 


It is difficult to analyze this section as clearly as the first, as there are very 
few cadences and the divisions overlap one another. But it is sufficient to notice 
that all the themes of the first division now appear, with the first principal 
theme (Example 7) always somewhere in the picture. 


Approximately half-way through the elaboration, fragments of themes 
from the first movement begin to intrude. This is a foreshadowing of the 
appearance of important ideas from both movements in the epilogue. 

At first Example 3 from the first movement appears against Example 8 
from the second movement; later the strong subordinate theme olf the first 
movement (Example 5) enters, tending to pull against the rhythmic flow of the 


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other themes. A climax of great contrapuntal intensity is ultimately reached, 


1n which four different principal motifs appear In as many measures: 














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After a section which recalls the ending of the first division of the second 
movement, there comes a repetition of the subordinate group of themes (Ex- 
amples 10 and 11), this time greatly intensified and in a faster tempo. This 
ycappearance of the subordinate themes is like a belated recapitulation in the 
sonata form. 

From this point a powerful climax is built, dominated by the ever-present 
first principal theme (Example 7) , taken in turn by trumpets, violins and high 


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woodwinds. As the apex is reached, the movement broadens and the two 
harmonies which dominate the epilogue are introduced simultaneously: 


Ex.l3 g--, EPILOGUE: Harmonic Progression- @band a 
geese ~ Melee fo Adagio : Be dems ions) govh 








Se 


The structure of the entire symphony is thus rounded out by a reference to 
the opening harmonic idea (Example 1) at the very end of the work. 

The epilogue, or coda of the entire symphony consists of themes from 
both movements presented in short, halting phrases. It reverts to the key (E£ 
flat minor), and the tempo (Molto Adagio) of the first movement, and the 
somber nature of this section also reminds one of the first movement. There is 
one last climax, and the composition ends with a strong cadence consisting of 
the two principal harmonies with which it began. 


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FOUR SONGS 


Dik JUNGE NONNE 
Wie braust durch die Wipfel der heulende 
Sturm! 
Fs klirren die Balken, es zittert das Haus! 
Fs rollet der Donner, es leuchtet der Blitz, 
Und finster die Nacht wie des Grab! 


Immerhin so tobte es jlungst in mir! 
Es brauste das Leben wie jetzo der Sturm, 
Es bebten die Glieder wie jetzo das Haus, 
Es flammte die Liebe wie jetzo der Blitz, 
Und finster die Brust wie das Grab. 


Nun tobe, du wilder, gewaltUger Sturm, 

Im Herzen ist Friede, im Herzen ist Ruh’; 

Des Briutigams harret die liebende Braut, 

Gereinigt in) prifender Gluth der ewigen 
Liebe getraut. 


[ch harre mein Heiland mit sehnendem Blick! 

Komm, himimlischer Brautigam, hole die 
Braut! 

Erl6se die Seele von. irdischer 

Horch! friedlich ertonet 
Thurm! 


Haft! 


das Glocklein vom 


Fs lockt inich das stisse Geton 
Allmachtig zu ewigen Hohn! 
Alleluja! 
—J.N. Craigher 


fetes Mette eek Sith. Franz Schubert 


(1797-1828) 


THE YouNG NuN 
How the howling storm roars through the 
branches! The rafters groan, and the whole 
house lrembles. The thunder rolls and the 
lightning flashes, and the night is dark as 
the grave. 


Such was the storm of my own life. My limbs 
trembled like this house, love burned in me 
like the lightning, and my heart was dark as 
the grave. 


Now rage, wild, powerful storm! In my heart 
are peace and quiet. The bridegroom awaits 
his loving bride purified in the proving fire 
of elernal love. 


I await my Saviour with longing elance! 
Come, heavenly bridegroom, take thy bride! 
Release my soul from its earthly grip! Hark, 
the bell sounds joyfully from the tower! 


The sweet sound calls me to eternal heights! 
Hallelujah! 





wnat A wonDERFUL DAIQUIRI is mape THis way: 


e 2 oz. Havana Club Rum light 
e |] teaspoon sugar 

e Juice of 12 lime 

Shake well with cracked ice and 
strain into cocktail glass. 


*Write for FREE Recipe Book—“’Delicious Rum Drinks” 


Reps ume 





86 PROOF © 


Smoother dr 
from 


HAVANA CLUB RUM 


Distilled and Bottled by JOSE ARECHABALA, S.A. 


inks come 


Cardenas, Cuba 


Sole Agents for U.S.A. 


“WILLIAMS IMPORTERS A Division of R. C. Williams & Co., Inc., 610 5th Ave., N.Y. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


683 








Serve PAR-I-PAk Gecerages 
aud You Sewe the Gest! 


are a symphony in good 


taste. You'll like them, 





for they have everything 
you want in a fine carbonated beverage... 
rich, full flavor, sparkle that lasts to the 
final sip, quality that’s never surpassed. 
Make a note now, and next time you en- 


tertain, serve Par-T-Pak Beverages. 






PAR-I-PAK 


Par-T-Pak Cola 
Par-T-Pak Root Beer 
Par-T-Pak Orange 
Par-T-Pak Ginger Ale 
Par-T-Pak Upper Ten 


Par-T-Pak Sparkling 
W ater 





684 SAN FRANCISCO 








STAENDCHEN 
cise flehen meine Lieder 
Durch die Nacht zu dir; 

In den stillen Hain hernieder, 
Liebchen, komm’ zu mir! 


liisternd schlanke Wipfel rauschen 
in des Mondes Licht; 

Des Verrithers feindlich lauschen 
riirchte, Holde, nicht. 


Horst die Nachtigallen schlagen? 
\ch, sie flehen dich. 

\fit der T6ne sussen Klagen 
Flehen sie ftir mich. 


Sie versteh'n des Busens Sehnen, 
kKennen Liebesschmeyz, 

Fiihren mit den Silbertonen 
Jedes weiche Herz. 


Lass auch dir die Brust bewegen, 
L.iebchen, h6re mich, 
Bebend harr’ ich dir entgegen! 
Komm, begliicke mich! 
—Ludwig Rellstab 


DER JUENGLING AN DER QUELLE 
Leise, riesender Quell! 
Ihr wallenden, flispernden Pappeln! 
Euer Schlummer gerausch 
Wecket die Liebe nun auf. 


FERRARI 


SERENADE 
My songs yearn softly through the night to 
thee. In the quiet grove below, come, my love, 
fo me. 


Whispering slender treetops rustle in_ the 
moonlight; do not fear, my love, a betrayer’s 
hostile overhearing. 


Do you hear the nightingales strike up? 
They long for you. Their sweet lament im- 
plores for me. 


They know the heart’s longing, they know 
love’s pain, and they lead, with their silvery 
sound, every uncertain heart. 


Let your heart also be moved. Beloved, hear 
me. Trembling, I wait for you. Come, and 
bring me joy! 


"THE YOUTH AT THE SPRING 
Softly rippling spring! Bubbling, whispering 
chatter! Your slumberous bustling awakens 
my love. 


NICOLAUS 


AND FORMER FIRM OF @ TRAINER & PARSONS 


Dish 6, Oot ° 
444 POST 
SERVING THE EYE PHYSICIANS and their PATIENTS 








After the Concert 


Entertain your friends 


at Hotel Whitcomb, so conveniently 
near. Home of the Whitcomb Inn 
and The Parade Cocl.tail Lounge. 


HOREE 


WHITCOME 


- * MARKET AT 8TH «© SAN FRANCISCO 
KARL WEBER MANAGEMENT Tel.: UNderhill 9600 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 685 








—» Copyright 1945 Cresta Blanca Wine Company, 











ty fe 
ae 








Linderung sucht’ ich bei euch, 
(Ind sie zu vergessen die Spréde, 
\ch, und Blatter und Bach 
Seufzen, Luisa, dir nach. 
Esto! 


DER ERLKOENIG 


Wer reitet so spat durch Nacht und Wind? 
Ks ist der Vater mit seinem Kind; 

kr hat den Knaben wohl in dem Arm, 

Wr fasst ihn sicher, er halt ihn warm. 


“Mein Sohn, was birgst du so bang dein 
Gesichte”’ 

“Siehst,Vater, du den Erlkonig nicht? 

Den Erlenkonig mit Kron und Schweif?” 

“Mein Sohn, es ist ein Nebelstreif.” 


“Du liebes Kind, komm’, geh’ mit mir! 

Gar schéne Spiele spiel’ ich mit dir; 

Manch’ bunte blumen sind an dem Strand, 
Meine Mutter hat manch’ gtIden Gewand. 


“Mein Vater, mein Vater, und h6rest du 
nicht, 

Was Erlenk6nig mir leise verspricht?” 

“Sei ruhig, bleib’ ruhig, mein Kind; 

In diirren Blattern sauselt der Wind.” 


“Willst, feiner Knabe, du mit mir geh’n? 
Meine Voéchter sollen dich warten schon: 


Meine Téchter tihren den nichtlichen Reihn, 


Und wiegen und tanzen und singen dich 
Cline 


I sought solace with you, and to forget her 
coldness. Ah, and both the leaves andthe 
brook sigh, Loutsa, for you. 


‘THE ERL-KING 


Who rides so late through the night and the 
wind? It is a father with his child. He holds 
the boy tight in his arm. He keeps him safe 
and keeps him warm. 


“My son, why are you so afraid?” “Father, 
do you not see the Erl-King? The Erl-King 
with his crown and tail?” “My son, that is 
only a strip of mist.” 


“Lovely child, come, go with me! I will 
play nice games with you; there are many 
beautiful flowers along the shore, and my 
mother has golden garment for you.” 


“My father, my father, dot you hear what 
the Erl-King has promised me?” “Be quiet, 
my child; it is only the wind sighing in the 
dry leaves.” . 


“Lovely boy, will you come with me? My 
daughters shall wait on you; my daughters 
lead the nightly fairy-ring, and will dance 
and sing for you and rock you to sleep.” 


REMEMBER THE NAME 


when. you buy your post-war radio-phonograph with FM 


BUY MORE WAR BONDS! 





CONSE ARGIGL IS) YANN) ZANE 


Especially with 


George Mardikian conducting! 


Dinner, a la carte, after- 
theater supper, cocktail 
lounge. 4 P. M. to midnight. 


OMAR KHAYYAM‘S 


O’FARRELL STREET AT POWELL 


*‘Where the Celebrities Gather’ 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


687 





TODAY'S 
PIANO 


the choice of 
Today's Great Artists 


GREAT 


CHOOSE YOUR PIANO 
AS THE ARTISTS DO 


The Boston Symphony now uses the Baldwin 
in its Concerts. 


MARIE THERESE BRAZEAU HAROLD BAUER 


GEBIEEE DE HERVATE 
SEVERIN EISENBERGER 
ALEXANDER KELBERINE 
WESLEY EA VIBDEERTE 
ALEXANDER TANSMAN 
IRMA SCHENUIT HALL 
FRANCES ANTOINE 
WILHELM BACHAUS 
PAUL WITTGENSTEIN 
VICTOR WITTGENSTEIN 
FRANCISZEK ZACHARA 
MAGDA TAGLIAFERD 
JOSEPH BATTISTA 
JEANNE BEHREND 
ALFREDO CASELLA 
WALTER GIESEKING 
EUGENE GOOSSENS 
BORIS GOLSCHMANN 
FLORENCE EASTON 
DANIEL ERICOURT 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
BREENDAN KEENAN 
ALEXANDER KIPNIS 
WIKTOR LABUNSKI 
ALFRED MIROVITCH 
CHARLES NAEGELE 
LOUIS PERSINGER 

Es ROBERT SEAMITZ 
BERNARDO SEGALL 
ROSINA LHEVINNE 
MORIZ ROSENTHAL 
RUTH SLENCYNSKI 
ALEC TEMPLETON 


ANTON BILOTTI 
LUCREZIA BORI 
BELA BARTOK 
MARIO CHAMLEE 
KARIN DAYAS 
JOSE ECHANIZ 
DAVID EARLE 
FRANK FARRELL 
JAKOB GIMPEL 
RUDA FIRKUSNY 
ARNOLD GABOR 
WILLIAM HARMS 
STEPHAN HERO 
AMPARD ITURBI 
JOSE ITURBI 
RALPH LEOPOLD 
JUSS! BUOERLING 
JOSEF LHEVINNE 
ERICA MORINI 
EDITH MASON 
GRACE MOORE 
WILLEM NOSKE 
LILY PONS 
ROSA RAISA 
ANGEL REYES 
GIACOMO RIMINI 
nite Sewalra 
JOHANN SINGER 
CER SMid 
HOSEPH SZIGET! 
LEONARD SHURE 
HELEN TRAUBEL 
SAMUEL YAFFE 


MODISSAYE BOGUSLAWSK! 


HBaliuin 


See here esis 
SAN FRANCISCO 


688 


1828 WEBSTER ST. 
DOAKLAND 








BY APPOINTMENT 






Champagnes of hie Rushes quality 


U H. Mumm &( 


sociere VINICOLE DE CHAMPAGNE-_SUCCESSEUR 












NOW-—with the liberation 
of France—we are looking 
forward to early resump- 
tion of shipments of the 
“Aristocrat of Cham- 
. which, dur- 


ing the last four years 


pagnes.. 


and more, we have 
been able to sup- 
ply in limited 


quantities. 


vm inc. 
Vauauee v.c. s,) & Assoc 
3 . 
— ie aes ite sit California 
& Co san Francise? 
igen ' 
w.d- Nv 
S ave— 


War Bonds 
You Buy 


SAN FRANCISCO 











“fein Vater, mein Vater, und siehst du nicht 
dort 

Erlk6énigs Tochter am dtistern Ort?” 

‘Mein Sohn, mein Sohn ich seh’ es genau, 

ks scheinen die alten Weiden so grau.” 

‘Ich liebe dich, micht reizt deine schoéne 
Gestalt, 

Und bist du nicht willig, so brach’ ich 
Gewalt!”’ 

“Mein Vater, mein Vater, jetzt fasst er mich 
an! 

EKrlk6nig hat mir ein Leid’s getan!” 


Dem Vater grauset’s, er reitet geschwind, 
Er halt in Armen das achzende Kind, 
Erreicht den Hof mit Mtih’ und Noth; 

In seinen Armen das Kind war todt. 





Vion enfant, ma soeur, 

Songe a la douceur. 

D’aller la-bas vivre ensemble, © 
Aimer a loisir, 

Aimer et mourir 

Au pays qui te ressemble! 


Les soleils mouillés 

De ces ciels brouillés 

Pour mon esprit ont les charmes 
Si mystérieux 

De tes traitres yeux, 

Brillant a travers leur larmes. 


Send for our new brochure 
“What My Ears Await which 
tells of the listening pleasure 


Philharmonic Radio Corporation, 





Goethe 


INVITATION: AU VOYAGE .. 


“Father, father, don’t you see there—the Erl- 
King’s daughters in that dark spot?” “My 
son, I see it perfectly. It is only the old gray 
willows.” 


“I love you, your form charms me, and if you 
are not willing, I shall use force!” “Father, 
he has taken hold of me! The Erl-King has 
hurt me!” 


The father shudders, and he rides like the 
wind. He holds the groaning child in his 
arms and reaches his home by weary effort; 
and in his arms the child was dead. 


Ae ue Mea ah, A wie Pes Henri Duparc 


(1848-1933) 


My child, my love, dream of the loveliness 
of going away to live together, to love at let- 
sure, to love and to die in that land so much 
like you! 


The liquid suns of those mottled skies charm 
my spirit with the same mystery as your 
confessing eyes shining amid their tears. 


("Ho Sratamet eile fle Some 
Philharmonic 3 


RADIO - PHONOGRAPH 


*n store for you when the 
new PHILHARMONIC Radio- 
Phonograph is available. 


Department 9, 528 East 72nd Street, New York City 








Before or After the Concert Visit the 


Cardinal Richeliex Cocktail Lounge 


the RICHELIEU HOTEL 


Van Ness and Geary 


Leopold Lerner, Manager 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


689 














It Stands Alone 


KORBEL BRUT IS TOPS IN AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE 


Magazines which reach the most sophisticated audience in the United States 
unanimously give first place in American Champagnes to KORBEL BRUT 
WE didn’t say it first! THEY DID! 


“THE BEST AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE 
to date is KORBEL BRUT. Our guess is 
anyone would think it was imported.” 
—Harper’s Bazaar, February, 1941. 


Sr OBAB Youle aii@s lmiGi EVAN 
PAGNE-LIKE domestic wine is KOR- 
BEL BRUT.’’—Cue Magazine, Decem- 
ber 20, 1940. 


“THE OUTSTANDING AMERICAN 
CHAMPAGNE to date is KORBEL 
BRUT.’’— Town and Country, Febru- 
ary, 1941. 


KORBEL « 


“EXTREMELY ENJOYABLE, bone-dry 
and clean-tasting.’’—The New Yorker, 
March 15, 1941. 


“AMONG THE FEW FINE CALIFOR- 
NIA CHAMPAGNES IS KORBEL BRUT 
—a special cuvee which has been made 
as dry as the dryest Champagnes for 
the English market.’’—— St. Regis, Pea- 
cock Alley, The Ambassador, Plaza En 
Passant, The Savoyard, The Ritz Carl- 
ton, The Hampshire, The Sherry-Neth- 
erlands, Pierrot, January, 1941. 


BRUT ROUGE 


PINK 


Distributed by 
TRADERS DISTRIBUTING CO. 
314 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 


21 BRANDS, INC. 
17 E. 52nd ST., NEW YORK CITY 


SAN FRANCISCO 








, Calin 


LneSS 


/ 


SO 


peace and beauty, 


all is 
l repose. 


2 


There 


, 


La, tout n’est qu’ordre et beauté, 


Luxe, calme, et volupteé! 


e 


and swe 


their 


al 
To meet your least whim they come 


ie) 
o 


ships sleepin 


c 


vavabond 


these 
wharves. 


See 


Vois, sur ces canaux 
Dormir ces valsseaux 


of the world. 


end 


the 


from 


Dont Vhumeur est vagabonde; 


C’est pour assOuVIr 


4811 


dé 
nt du bout du monde. 


lon moindre 
Ou'ils vienne 


~ 


lown in hyacinth and gold. 


The settling sun clothes the fields, the wharves 
whole 


and the 
The world goes to sleep bathed in warm light. 


ants 


a ville enticre, 


F 


es soleils couch 
devetent les champs, 
Yhyacinthe et dor; 
e monde s’endort 
Jans une chaude 


es CahaulxX, 


— eed et 


lumicere! 


calm, 


softness, 


all is peace and beauty, 


~ 
~~ 
~ 
~ 
~ 
~~ 
~ 
~ 
~ 
~ 
~ 
~ 
a 
~ 
x ~ 
Ne a 
en «WD 
A 
~~ 
~ ~~ 
Se Ss. 
r <— 
= 
> ~ 
<A 
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vs 
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= — 
= —_ 
Se oad 
— — 
~ Zs 
~~ — 
— = 
—_— 
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— “6 
ST 4 
A ~~ 
—~— =— 
* ~ 
_— 
— 
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— wv 
~ 
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—w 4 
~~ 
— 


—Baudelaire 


S 


. 
4 


Nal DiCse A iGk 


~ 
4 


AVAIE 


Se, 


EI 


\\ 


SI MES 


Reynaldo Hahn 


Your 


10 


€ 


ragile, 
if my verse had wings like 


My verse would fly, soft and f{ 


beautif 
a bird. 


doux et fréles, 


Vers votre jardin si beau, 


\les vers fuiratent, 


ul garden, 


Si mes vers avaient des ailes 


Comme l’oiseau! 


meTTY 


to your 


sparks 
if my verse had wines like the soul. 


would fly like 


hearth, 


Il 


étincelles, 


Ils voleraient, 
Vers votre foyer qui rit, 


Si mes vers avaient des ailes 


Comme l’esprit. 





tq 
eT 


crystalware, of exquisite 
loveliness make cherished 


Flower containers, figurines, 


gifts for every occasion 


You'll find a 


CHARGE ACCOUNT 


most convenient 


America’s Most Famous Florists 


” . A e A. A ‘ A 2 
pg eT NO NO NO ON 





224 Grant Ave., San Francisco 


A A 
> 





Telephone SUTTER 6200 


Cresta Blanca Wine Company, inc., los Angeles, Calif. 


California Grape Brandy 84 proof. 





691 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








Box Holders for Friday A fternoons 


MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX 
MRS. SIGMUND STERN 
MRS. LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY 


MRS. JOHN T. BARNETT 
MRS. WHITNEY BENTLEY 
MRS. FE. E. BROWNELL 
MRS. DAVID COWLES 
MRS. MORTON GIBBONS 
MRS. HARRY HILL 

MRS. JAMES HORSBURGH 
MRS. SILAS PALMER 

MRS. T. E. PALMER 

MRS. ATHERTON RUSSELL 


E **U. S. NAVAL HOSPITALS 


F MRS. EDWARD H. BELL 
MRS. SPENCER GRANT 
MRS. MAXWELL C. MILTON 
MRS. WILLIAM H. ORRICK 


MRS. STUART RAWLINGS 
MISS ELSE SCHILLING 


MRS. DANIEL WOLKMANN 
MISS JOHANNA VOLKMANN 
MRS. DEAN WITTER 

MRS. J. B. WRIGHT 


G MRS. REED J. BEKINS 
MRS. GEORGE EDWIN BENNETT 
MRS. FRANK INGERSOLL 
MRS. CLARENCE LORAN JOHNSTON 
MRS. GEORGE S. JOHNSTON 
MRS. RALPH MERILLION 
MIRS <7) sa POSEY 
MRS. ERNEST J. SWEETLAND 


H MRS. JOSEPH D. GRANT 


J MRS. JOHN CASSERLY 
MRS. DONALD GREGORY 
MRS. WELLINGTON HENDERSON 
MRS. OSGOOD HOOKER 
MR. AND MRS. KENNETH MONTEAGLE 
MRS. EDITH NORTH 


K MRS. MARCUS S. KOSHLAND 
MRS. M. C. SLOSS 


L MRS. CHARLES BRANSTEN 
MRS. RICHARD FRANK 
MR. AND MRS. MORTIMER FLEISHHACKER 
MRS. LEWIS LAPHAM 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM, JR. 
MRS. FREDERICK WHITMAN 


M MR. AND MRS. CHARLES R. BLYTH 
MRS. RICHARD HEIMANN 
MRS. A. J. LOWREY 
MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER 
MRS. EDGAR WOODS 


N MR. AND MRS. GEORGE T. CAMERON 
MRS. STANHOPE NIXON 
MR. AND MRS. NION R. TUCKER 


0 MRS. DUNN DUTTON 
MRS. WALTER HOBART 
MRS. FREDERICK HUSSEY 
MRS. KENYON JOYCE 
MRS. SAMUEL KNIGHT 
MRS. RICHARD McCREERY 


0 OO BD > 


P 


MRS. WALTER D. HELLER 
MRS. MORRIS MEYERFELD 
MRS. RICHARD SHAINWALD 
MRS. GEORGE OPPEN 


MRS. FRANK P. DEERING 
MEFS. JAMES L. FLOOD 

MRS. BENJAMIN C. KEATOR 
MRS. HENRY S. KIERSTED 
MRS. HARRY B. LITTLE 

MRS. HAROLD R. McKINNON 
MRS. ASHTON H. POTTER 


DR. AND MRS. FRANK R. GIRARD 


MRS. FRANCIS S. BAER 

MISS JENNIE BLAIR 

MRS. ELDRED BOLAND 

MRS. GEORGE M. BOWLES 
MRS. GEORGES S. DeLATOUR 
MARQUISE HENRI de PINS 
MRS. ROGER LAPHAM 

MRS. FREDERICK W/. McNEAR 


MRS. OTTO BARKAN 
MRS. L. A. BENOIST 
M!SS MARILYN BENTLEY 
MRS. WALTER BENTLEY 
MRS. FOSTER NEWHALL 
MRS. STANLEY POWELL 
MRS. BRUCE SELFRIDGE 
MRS. MELVILLE L. SMITH 


MRS. DAVID ARMSTRONG TAYLOR 
**KU. S. ARMY HOSPITALS 


MRS. HENRY BOYEN 

MRS. ARTHUR B. CAHILL 
COUNTESS LILLIAN DANDINI 
MRS. JOHN L. FLYNN 

MRS. PETER B. KYNE 

MRS. JAMES F. McNULTY 
MRS. A. J. MOORE 

MRS. THEODORE WORES 


DR. AND MRS. JOSEPH C. FLOWERS 
MRS. ANGUS McDONALD 

DR. HANS VON GELDERN 

MRS. HENRY H. WEHRHANE 


MRS. C. W. CROSSE 

MRS. DUNCAN CURRY, JR. 
MRS. JOSEPH W. FOWLER 
MRS. RALPH HENKLE 

MRS. DANIEL C. HUNT 
MRS. A. F. JUNCKER 

MRS. RALPH K. DAVIES 
MRS 2E. WoW |LEETT 

MRS. EDWARD C. WURSTER 


MRS. FRANK BUCK 

MRS. J. LINDSAY HANNA 
MRS. JAMES LEVENSALER 
MRS. DOUGLAS McBRYDE 
MISS OLGA MEYER 

MRS. FRANK SOMERS 


*** Transportation Service through courtesy of the Red Cross Motor Corps 


with the cooperation of Mrs. George Cameron. 


692 


SAN FRANCISCO 








Prés de vous, purs et fidéles, 
I] accourraient, nuit et jour, 
Si mes vers avaient des ailes 
Comme l'amour! 
—Victor Hugo 


MORGEN 


Und morgen wird die Sonne wieder scheinen, 
Und auf dem Wege, den ich gehen werde, 
Wird uns, die Gliicklichen, sie wieder einen, 
Inmitten dieser sonnenatmenden Erde. 


Und zu dem Strand, dem 
blauen, 

Werden wir still und langsam niedersteigen. 

Stumm werden wir uns in die Augen schauen, 

(nd auf uns sinkt des Glitickes stummes 
Schweigen. 


weiten, wogen 


—John Henry Mackay 


ANAKREONS GRAB 


Wo die Rose hier bltiht, 

Wo Reben um Lorbeer sich schlingen, 
Wo das Turtelchen lockt, 

Wo sich das Grillchen erg6tzt, 

Welch ein Grab ist hier 

Das alle G6ter mit Leben sch6n 
Bepflanzt und geziert? 

Ks ist Anakreons Ruh! 


Fruhling, Sommer und Herbst 
Genoss der gliickliche Dichter; 
Vor dem Winter hat ihn 
Endlich der Hiigel gesschiitzt. 
—Goethe 


Ithleed tsa lise 


Fruhling lasst sein blaues Band 
Wieder flattern durch die Liifte; 
Susse, wohlbekannte Diifte 
Streifen Ahnungsvoll das Land. 


Veilchen traiumen schon, 
Wollen balde kommen, 
Horch, von fern ein leiser Harfenton! 
Friihling, ja du bist’s, 
Dich hab’ ich vernommen! 
—Eduaid Morike 


O16) Se“ (9) ey 56) sept a ee ef) 6S welt elie aes 6: © oP Ge. hau ae 


It would run to you, pure and faithful, each 
night and each day, if my verse had wings 
like love. 


Or in ae oe Richard Strauss 


(1864- ) 


And tomorrow the sun will shine again, and 
will reunite us happy ones along the path 
that I shall go, in the midst of this sun- 
breathing earth. 


And, quiet and slow, we shall descend to the 
broad, wave-blue shore. We shall look with- 
out speaking into each other’s eyes, and ove) 
us will come the wordless peace of joy. 


es ta Dhaene, Motes OER D Hugo Wolf 


(1860-1903) 


Here where roses bloom, where wines and 
laurels intertwine, where doves coo and 
crickets make their merry sounds, what grave 
is this which all the gods have planted and 
adorned with living things? It is Anacreon’s 
last resting-place. 


Spring, summer and autumn companion the 
happy poet; the hill has shielded him at last 
from the winter. 


Oe Foe ree Se Hugo Wolf 


Spring flings its blue banner through the air 
once more. Sweet, familiar scents fill the world 
with boding. 


The violets dream now, but they will soon 
blossom, and hark! there is a distant sound 
of harps. Spring, it is thou! I have perceived 
thee! 





WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


First Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 
years —— has resigned in order to devote his time exclusively to 
teaching. 

STUDIOS— 

3325 OcTAVIA StT., SAN FRANCISCO 
438 HiLucrest Rp., SAN CARLOS 


Fr. 6102 
SS Galas 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


693 











Box Holders for Saturday Night 


A MRS. PIERRE MONTEUX N MR. AND MRS. THOMAS E. AMBROSE 
MR. THEODORE BEKINS 

B MILLS COLLEGE DR. ALVIN COX 
DR MiRIAM MILLER 

C KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA DR. AND MRS. B. H. PAGE 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
Oo COMMANDER AND MRS. WM. LISTER ROGERS 


D SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM Mr. AND MRS. JOHN ROSEKRANS 


P ALPHA DELTA PHI 


& 
E DELTA DELTA DELTA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


Q GAMMA PHI BETA 


ELTA GAM 
Fe OA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
R SIGMA PHI 


G MILLS COLLEGE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
H PI BETA PHI S ALPHA PHI 

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
J. SIGMA KAPPA T | STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA U STANFORD MEDICAL SCHOOL 


K MR. AND MRS: J. D. ZELLERBACH VY INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
L MR. AND MRS. VALLEJO GANTNER 
DR. AND MRS. NELSON HOWARD Ww CHI OMEGA 
COLONEL A. E. HOWSE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 


MRS. ROBERT SCARBOROUGH Xx U. S. ARMED FORCES 
M DR. AND MRS. HAROLD K. FABER Y KAPPA ALPHA THETA 
MR. AND MRS. JAMES H. HOWARD UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 
MR. AND MRS. LEE LAIRD 
MR. AND MRS. JEROME VLADIMIR POWELL Z INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
DR. AND MRS. HUGH ROSE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 














BUY WAR BONDS 
AND STAMPS 






































94 SAN FRANCISCO 


oO’ 











THE SEA, THREE SYMPHONIC SKETCHES. . . Claude Debussy 
(1862-1918) 


The Sea, completed in 1905, is Debussy’s largest orchestral work. The 
following comments upon it are taken from Oscar Thompson's biography of the 
composer, 

Krom Dawn ’Til Noon on the Ocean. “Vhere is a mysterious, eerie quality 
in the undulations with which this sketch begins. In the music are at once an 
incantation and an awakening. The chief subject is declaimed by muted trumpet 
and English horn. ‘Thereafter, as the light seems to grow clearer and Nature 
more boisterous, the waves of this chimerical sea ride higher, throwing their 
spume into the sunshine, with all manner of glint and refraction, exultant, 
tumultous, but not menacing or cruel. ‘Toward the end wind instruments intone 
a solemn theme that has been described as ‘the chorale of the depths.’ Above it 
continues the pitching of the waves; there comes a momentary lull, then a last 
shake of the mane of these horses of the sea.” 

Play of the Waves. “Here Debussy limns his now thoroughly awakened 
sca at play. There are waves of every color and mood in a capricious sport of 
wind and spray. In a contrastive sense this is the scherzo of Debussy’s heretical 
symphony. ‘The elements dance, they romp and race through immemorial 
eames the secrets of which never will be known to man. The waves become 
coryphees, or they gambol like dolphins. About all is an aura of the remote and 
unreal. ‘This is a world of sheer fantasy, of strange visions and eerie voices, a 
mirage of sight and equally a mirage of sound. On the sea’s vast stage is pre- 
sented a trancelike phantasmagoria so evanescent and fugitive that it leaves 
behind only the vagueness of a dream. 

“Dialogue of the Wind and the Sea presents a gustier and wilder sea, 
with a stronger dramatic emphasis and something more closely akin to human 
quality in the impersonation, however, incorporeal it may be, of wind and 
ocean. The use of the whole-tone scale is more conspicuous in this movement 
than elsewhere in The Sea. ‘There are two clear recollections of the first move- 
ment, the first subject being whisked back in one of countless necromantic 
transformations of fragments of song, and the chorale returning again for a 
climax of growing sonorities. This climax has few parallels in Debussy’s usually 
reticent scoring. The brass peals forth in shining splendor. At the close is again 
the undulation of harmonies suggestive of the sea that rolls and will not cease 
to roll, whatever the puny destinies of man. The dialogue of wind and wave 












te 


enchantingly lovely man) 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 695 











is of cosmic things, of which Debussy’s arabesque are cabalistic symbols. The 
music only hints at immensities it does not attempt to describe. ‘Yet beneath 
these elusive and mysterious overtones,’ writes Lawrence Gilman, ‘the reality 
of the living sea persists; the immemorial fascination lures and enthralls and 
terrifies, so that we are almost tempted to fancy that the two are, after all, 
identical—the ocean that seems an actuality of wet winds and tossing spray and 
inexorable depths and reaches, and that uncharted and haunted and incredible 
sea which opens before the magic casement of the dreaming mind’.’ 


FOOTNOTE TO THE BRAHMS FESTIVAL 

“Dear Mr. Frankenstein: 
“Would you kindly allow me a few comments on your program notes 
Brahms’ Academic Festival Overture? The ‘short story’ to which you refer 
cannot be correct. Brahms was far from replying to his honorary academic de- 
gree with a joke. ‘This composition is really a festival one. The four German 
student songs used it in are not, as you write, freshman beer-drinking songs 
known in all the saloons and taverns of the German university towns. They 
are old and time-honored songs which—maybe with the exception of the third 
one—were sung only at formal and festival occasions in German student life. 
“The first melody, brilliantly intoned by the trumpets, was written in 
1819 and bears the title Nach Unterdriickung der Burschenschaft, (After the 
Suppression of the Burschenschaft). Vhe Burschenschaft, an organization of 








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(at that time) liberal patriotic fraternities, was dissolved and outlawed by the 
reactionary forces which came into power in Germany after the liquidation of 
ihe Napoleonic rule. ‘This song is a solemn hymn of liberty-loving men against 
reactionary despotism. It is not nationalistic and could be sung everywhere 
where freedom is suppressed by tyranny. It is quite possible that the bearded 
and robed professors looked embarrassed when they heard this melody. At that 
time the administration of German universities was quite reactionary, and this 
presentation could have seemed rather daring. 

“The next song is the Hochfeierliche Landesvater (Most Solemn Song to 
the Father of the Country), written before 1770. It was used in a rare and 
exclusive ceremony of patriotic consecration. A sword was passed around and 
each student pierced it through his colored fraternity cap, singing: [ch durch- 
bhohr den Hut und schwore, halten will ich stets auf Ehre, stets ein braver 
Bursche sein. (I pierce the hat and swear I will always insist upon honor and 
always be a brave fellow) . ; 

“Tt is the melody that accompanies these words which appears in the over- 
ture interwoven with the Burschenschaft song. After this ceremony the student’s 
sweetheart was honored with the job of closing the hole in the hat by embroid- 
ering a silver oak leaf over it as a token of participation in a Landesvater. 
‘There were never many of those oak leaves on a hat. 

“Liberty, honor and patriotism are the themes of the first part of the over- 
ture. Then comes the pleasantry, the so-called Fuchsenritt, the Ride of the 
Freshmen, composed in the 18th century. This is part of an initiation ceremony. 
The freshmen entered the room riding on heavy wooden chairs or benches. 
The rumbling rhythm of this ride is well marked in Brahms’ instrumentation. 

“Closing, then, with the official anthem of the German student, the Gaudea- 
mus, was a logical necessity. 

“Having been familiar with German student life of 40 years ago, I thought 
‘hese few notes might interest you. 

Very sincerely yours, 
Dr. BERNHARD BERLINER.” 

(The editor thanks Dr. Berliner on his own behalf and that of his readers 
for the privilege of printing the only genuinely informative note on the 
Academic Festival that he has ever seen.) 


iE 





COLONIAL BALLROOM, HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 
SAN FRANCISCO STRING QUARTET 
Naoum Blinder ° William Wolski ° Ferenc Molnar . Boris Blinder 


Assisting Artist - Stanislaus Bem, Violoncellist 


WEDNESDAY NIGHT,. APRIL 11 


at 8:30 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 697 














An important factor in the maintenance of the San Fran- 





CSCO Symphony Orchestra, for which we are ever grateful, is 
the foresight of patrons who, desiring to assist in the Orches- 
| tra’s permanent existence, made bequests for the benefit of 


generations to follow. | 


HELLER, EMANUEL S. 
IRWIN, Mrs. FANNIE M. 
BLANDING, LENA 


DIMOND, Mrs. E. R. 





KURING, = MIRS) EFRDEON B: 
GOLDSTEIN, CELENE 
MONTEAGLE, Mrs. Lypra PAIGE 


McENERNEY, Mr. AND Mrs. GARRET W. 





HarT, BENNO 

| LuisseR, Mrs. Louis 

ANTHONY, C. C. 

FABER, Dr. AND Mrs. Haro.p K. 


MEYER, HENRIETTA 











JOIN THE SYMPHONY LEAGUE TODAY 


Yearly Dues $5.00 from January to January 


Your check will aid in providing Symphony tickets for music students in public high 
schools and Junior Colleges and in building up the orchestra’s library and repertoire. 


Make Checks payable to Musical Association of San Francisco and mail to 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE, Opera House, San Francisco 2, Calif. 





) A 
\ 698 SAN FRANCISCO 








ae Musical Association of 
San Francisco takes this opportunity to thank the follow- 
ing member contributors toward its 1944-1945 season. 
This annual support gives a permanent character to the 
affairs of the Orchestra, which is essential toward main- 
taining its ideals. 


We feel certain all music lovers will unite their senti- 
ments of gratitude with our own in this tribute we pay to 
their valued and unforgetable friendship. 


*<@>- 


HONORARY MEMBERS $1000.00 AND OVER 


Miller, Mr. G Mrs. C. O. G. 
Sherman, Clay & Company 
Stern, Mrs. Sigmund 
Warren, Whitney 
Zellerbach, Mr. & Mrs. J. D. 


Dibblee, Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin H. 
Ehrman, Mr. & Mrs. Sidney M. 
Fleishhacker, Mr. & Mrs. Mortimer 
Haas, Mr. G Mrs. Walter A. 
Heller, Mrs. E. S. 

Koshland, Mrs. Marcus S. 


Anonymous 
Armsby, Mrs. Leonora Wood 
Bacon, Mrs. Edward R. 
Crocker, William H. Family 
Crocker, Dr. Charles 
Crocker, W. W. 
Russell, Mrs. Henry Potter 


REGULAR MEMBERS OVER $100.00 


Goldstein, Lutie D. 
Gomperts, Mr. & Mrs. Jack 


Musto, Laura 
Neppert, Julia G Florence 


Anonymous 
Barkan, Dr. G Mrs. Hans 


Bissinger, Mr. &G Mrs. Newton 
Blyth, Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. 
Boyd, Louise A. 

Bransten, Mrs. Louise R. 
Brooke, Mrs. Julia Fox 

Brown, Martha Leonard 
California Barrel Company 
Cameron, Mr. & Mrs. George T. 
Clark, Mrs. Wilson 

Cohn, Mrs. Max M. 

Coleman, Persis H. 

Conrad, Mrs. Barnaby 
Cushing, Mrs. O. K. 


Dinkelspiel, Mr. &G Mrs. Lloyd W. 


Durham, Mr. & Mrs. Willard H. 
Ehrman, Mr. & Mrs. Albert L. 
Eloesser, Dr. Leo 

Engelhart, Mr. & Mrs. Forrest 
Epstein, Gustav 

Fagan, Mrs. Paul I. 

Fisher, Mr. & Mrs. Marshal H. 
Gainsborough, L. P. 

Girard, Dr. & Mrs. Frank R. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Grant, Mrs. J. D. 
Greenebaum, Emil 

Griffith, Alice S. 

Gump, S. G. G Company 
Haas, Mrs. A. 

Hastings, Mrs. Russell P. 
Hayne, Mrs. G. P. 

Heller, Walter S. 

Hellman, Mrs. |. W. 

Hooker, Lt. Osgood C. 
Hopkins, Mr. & Mrs. L. Arundel 
Jacobi, J. J: 

Kaye, James Mayfield 
Koshland, Mr. & Mrs. Daniel 
Lengfeld, Mrs. A. L. 
Livingston, Lawrence 

Lowe, Samuel 

McBean, Atholl 

McDonald, Mrs. Mark L. 
Magnin, |. & Company 
Meyerfeld, Mrs. Morris 
Monteagle, Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth 
Musicians’ Union, Local No. 6 


Norris, Mr. & Mrs. Charles G. 


Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 


Pisani Printing & Publishing Co. 
Powell, Mr. & Mrs. Stanley 


Rosenbaum, Mrs. Emma 
Salz, Ansley K. 

Schilling, Else 
Schwabacher, Mr. & Mrs. 


Albert E. 


Schwabacher, Mrs. Ludwig 
Shomo, Mrs. J. A. 

Simon, Mrs. Alfred 

Sloss, Mrs. Leon 

Sloss, Judge & Mrs. M. C. 
Strauss, Mrs. Jack S. 

Taylor, Mrs. David Armstrong 
Tubbs, Mrs. Alfred S. 
Volkmann, Mr. & Mrs. Daniel 


Volkmann, George F. 


Volkmann, Johanna M. 
Walter, Mrs. John |. 
White House, The 


Wiel, Mr. & Mrs. Eli H. 
699 








Anonymous 

Allen, Mrs. Wyatt H. 

Bailey, Mrs. Frazer A. 
Baldwin Piano Company 
Bennett, Mrs. George Edwin 
Berliner, Dr. G Mrs. Bernhard 
Bissinger, Lt. G Mrs. Paul A. 
Blumlein, Jacob 

Borden’s Dairy Delivery Company 
Bradley, H. Sewall 

Breuner, Caroline 

Breuner, Katherine 
Clayburgh, Herbert E. 
Coghlan, Mr. & Mrs. John P. 
Coleman, S. Waldo 

Collier, Mr. G Mrs. H. D. 
Daly, Mrs. John D. 

Davis, D. G. 

Dinkelspiel, Mrs. Samuel L. 
Dodge, Mrs. George M. 
Donnell, Mrs. O. D. Jr. 
Eames, Mr. and Mrs. E. W. 
Ehmann, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin W. 
Ehrman, Mrs. Alfred 
Ehrman, Mrs. S. W. 
Emporium, The 

Faville, William B. 

Flood, Mrs. James L. 
Flowers, Mrs. Joseph C. 
Forbes, John F. 

Fuller, Mr. G Mrs. W. P., Jr. 
Glaser, Mrs. Edward F. 


REGULAR MEMBERS $100.00 


Grace, Mrs. Joseph T. 
Griffiths, Farnham P. 
Guggenhime, Mrs. D. J. 

Hart, Mrs. Henry H. 

Hayne, Mrs. Willliam Alston 
Heller, Lt. Col. G Mrs. Edward H. 
Hellmann, Mrs. Horatio G. 
Hiller, Mrs. Stanley 

Hotel St. Francis 

Humphrey, William F. 
Huntington, Marian 

Jackson, Mrs. Charlotte |. 
Kahn, Mrs. Felix 

Kendrick, Major & Mrs. Charles H. 
Kimber, John E. 

King, Mrs. Frank B. 

Koshland, Mrs. Jesse 

Koster, Mr. & Mrs. Frederick J. 
Lang, Mrs. Albert George 
Larsh, Mrs. H. G. 

Layman, Dr. Mary H. 

Levison, Mr. & Mrs. J. B. 
Liebes, H. G Company 
Lilienthal, Mr. & Mrs. Philip 
Lipman, File 

Lisser, Dr. G Mrs. Hans 
Lochead, Mr. & Mrs. James K. 
McEnerney, Mr. & Mrs. Garret |! 
McGregor, Campbell 
MacCallum, Jean A. 

Moffitt, Dr. Herbert C. 
Morshead, Etta C. 

Munsell, Mrs. J. E. O. 





Musto, Guido J. 
Newbauer, Mrs. S. R. 
Noyes, Mrs. Frank 
Oliver, Mrs. E. L. 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. Julius 
Parrott, Barbara 
Pauson, Frank & Sons 
Raiss, Mrs. Carl 
Rolkin, Mrs. Edward M. 
Rosekrans, John N. 
Rosenfeld’s Sons, John 
Roth, Mrs. W. P. 
Rothschild, John 
Schilling, Dr. G Mrs. Walter 
Schwabacher, Mrs. Louis A. 
Shainwald, Mr. G Mrs. Richard B 
Shearer, Mrs. Ailene H. 
Sherman, Mrs. Fred R. 
Shook, Mrs. Francis M. 

In memory of 

Dr. Francis M. Shook 
Skewes-Cox, Mrs. Vernon 
Slack, Judge Charles W. 
Sloss, Mr. & Mrs. Leon, Jr. 
Sloss, Mrs. Louis 
Stern, Mr. &G Mrs. Newton W. 
Walter, Mrs. C. R. 
Wickett, Mrs. Frederick A. 
Williams, Mrs. W. Wilburforce 
Witter, Mrs. Dean 
Wright, Mr. & Mrs. Harold L. 
Zellerbach, Harold L. 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS LESS THAN $100.00 


Aaron, Mrs. Leopold 
Abrahams, Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. 
Ackenbach, Mrs. Moore S. 
Ackerman, Mrs. a P. 
Ackerman, Mrs. |. S. 
Ackerman, Mr. & ‘Mrs. Lloyd S. 
Adler, Mrs. Aaron A. 
Akard, Mrs. W. C. 

Akin, Carlotta Grace 
Albert, Mrs. Alexander 
Alexander, Mrs. Edgar W. 
Alexander, Elizabeth 
Alexander, Mrs. M. E. 
Allen, Edward O. 

Allen, Mrs. H. W. 

Allen, Martha L. 

Allen, Dr. R. H. 

Allyne, Lucy 

Altman, Mrs. Jack 
Altman, Mr. & Mrs. John C. 
Altman, Mr. & Mrs. Mark 
Alward, Mrs. H. V. 
Amberg-Hirth 

Anderson, Mrs. Berrien 
Anderson, Melvin J. 
Anderson, Mrs. T. H. 
Andrews, Margaret 
Andrews, Mary 

Andrews, Mr. & Mrs. Robert E. 
Anspacher, Mrs. Selma 
Arnhold, Mrs. Bertha 
Arnot, Dr. Philip H. 
Arnstein, Mrs. Hugo 
Arnstein, Mrs. Walter 
Ash, Carles S. 

Astredo, Mrs. J. E. 
Atkinson, Dr. Dorothy W. 
Babcock, Mrs. William 
Bachman, Jerome N. 
Bacigalupi, Beatrice 
Baerwald, Mr. & Mrs. Ernst 
Bailache, Mrs. Arthur L. 
Baker, Mrs. Wakefield 
Baldwin, A. R. 

Baldwin, Frances 

Ballard, Mrs. J. S. 

Barkan, Fritz 

Barkan, Dr. & Mrs. Otto 
Barthold, R. M. 

Bartlett, Mrs. Edward Otis 


700 


Bartlett, Olive S. 
Bartolowitch, Stephen 
Baruch, Mrs. Albert 
Baruch, Mrs. Frederick 
Baum, Helen 

Batchelder, Lincoln 

Bauer, Mrs. Samuel 
Bechtel, Kenneth K. 
Bechtel, Mrs. Stephen 
Beetz, Mr. & Mrs. Hans B. 
Behrend, Mrs. J. F. 

Bell, Mr. G Mrs. Walter 
Bender, Mrs. W. L. 

Benioff, Mr. G Mrs. David 
Benner, Dr. G Mrs. Alan 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Bentley, Marilyn 

Bentley, Mrs. W. H. 

Bepler, Dr. Alice C. 
Berkeley Piano Club 
Berton, Mrs. G. A. 
Beusman, Mrs. Annie P. 
Biber, Mr. & Mrs. George V. 
Bishop, Agnes 

Bjornstad, Mrs. A. W. 
Black, Mrs. Alfred P. 
Blackwelder, Mrs. Eliot 
Blair, Jennie M. 

Bloch, Mrs. F. V. 

Bloom, Charles W. 

Bloom, Mrs. Sam 
Bloomfield, Dr. G Mrs. Arthur L. 
Blum’s 

Boardman, Mrs. Elizabeth Cole 
Bocqueraz, Mr. & Mrs. Leon 
Bogert, Mrs. T. L. 

Boggs, Mrs. A. G. 
Bohemian Symphony Orchestra 
Boland, Mrs. F. Eldred 
Bolton, Mrs. Robert C. 
Booth, Mrs. F. E. 

Bourquin, M. Mitchell 
Bower, Fred L. 

Bowes, Mrs. E. L. 

Bowles, Mrs. George M. 
Boyd, Hal 

Boyle, Nina 

Bracher, Louise P. 

Braden, Mrs. H. Robert 
Bradley, Mrs. James Parks 


Brandenstein, Mrs. M. J. 
(Deceased) 

Bransten, Mr. & Mrs. Edward 

Bransten, Mrs. Joseph 

Bransten, Mrs. Manfred 

Breach, Mrs Genoa E. 

Bretz, Marie 

Brewster, Hughes 

Bricca, Mrs. Constantine R. 

Brooke, Mrs. Henry L. 

Brooks, Mrs. B. M. 

Brooks, George W. 

Brown, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 

Brown, Mrs. Cabot 

Brown, Mrs. 

Brown, Mrs. | 

Brown, Mrs. 

Brownell, Mrs. E. E. 

Brownstone, Mrs. Louis H. 

Bruce, Mr. & Mrs. Starr 

Brunn, Dr. Harold 

Brunnier, H. J. 

Bruns, Margaret 

Buchanan, Lynda 

Buckwalter, Mrs. Edna W. 

Bugbee, Mrs. Lee 

Bull, Mrs. Alpheus 

Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 

Bullard, Robert P. 

Bullion, Mrs. Alice 

Bullis, Mrs. Edward A. 

Bullock and Jones Co. 

Burckhardt, Caroline 

Bush, Mr. & Mrs. Philip 

Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 

Butte, Felix, Jr. 

Cahn, Mrs. Mayer |. 

Cahn, Mr. & Mrs. Ralph G. 

California Club of California 

Camp, Mr. & Mrs. Harry 

Campbell, Douglas 

Campbell, Mrs. Grace P. 

Campbell, Mrs. John D. 

Campiche, Dr. Paul 

Carlson, Mrs. Arthur W. 

Carrigan, Mrs. Andrew 

Catlin, Miss B. M. 

Cella, Alma 

Chamberlain, Mary Alicia 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Weston P. 


SAN FRANCISCO 








Chapman, Mrs. C. C. 
Charles, Martin A. 
Charles, Mrs. Raymond 
Charpiot, Mrs. Henry Charles 
Chipman, Mrs. W. F. 
Clara, Madame 

Clark, Mrs. B. V. 

Clark, Mrs. Dearborn 
Clark, Mrs. Herbert W. 
Clark, Mrs. Tobin 

Clark, Mrs. Warren D. 
Clay, Maude C. 

Clayton, A. Florence 
Clift, Mrs. H. N. 

Cline, Dr. John W. 
Coblentz, Mrs. Lambert 
Cody, Mrs. Bernard A. 
Coggins, Mr. & Mrs. Shirley M. 
Coldwell, Mrs. Colbert 
Cole, Andrew M. 

Cole, Ernest R. 

Colman, Mr. & Mrs. Jesse C. 
Cook, Mrs. W. H. 
Cooper, Mrs. C. M. 
Cooper, Ethel 

Cope, Mrs. Walter B. 
Cordes, Dr. & Mrs. Frederick C. 
Covell, Dr. Charles Vernon 
GralQpatsa vant: 
Crawford, Fannie M. 
Creed, Mrs. W. E. 

Crim, Grace M. 

Cuddy, John 

Davis, Dr. G Mrs. Albert D. 
Davis, Mrs. Frances L. 
Davis, Mrs. John F. 
Davis, Louise 

Davis, Sarah Russell 
Dearing, Dr. Bradford F. 
de Bruyn, C. B. 

Deering, Mrs. Robert L. 
de la Harpe, J. 

Delaney, Marion 

de Latour, Mrs. Georges 
de Lee, Mrs. Edith 
Dempster, Mrs. L. R. 
Dennis, Charles M. 

de Pins, Marquise 
Dernham, Mrs. Irene M. 
Dewey, Constance M. 

de Wit, Mrs. Harry 
‘Dieterich-Post Company 
Dill, Mr. & Mrs. Marshall 
Dilsheimer, Mrs. Sara 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk, Jr. 
Don Lee 

Donohoe, Katharine 
Dray, Mrs. Frank R. 
Drexler, Mrs. Elise 
Dryfoos, Mrs. Beatrice G. 
Duncan, Mrs. Arthur L. 
Durden, Robert 

Dutton, Mrs. Dunn 

Dyer, Joseph H. 

Earhart, Gertrude 

Earle, Mrs. Marie E. 
Eastwood, Alice 

Ebright, Mrs. George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank J. 
Edwards, Mrs. Elizabeth D. 
Edwards, Mrs. J. P. 
Egan, Mrs. |. J. 

Ehrlich, Philip S. 
Einstein, Elsa B. 
Eisenbach, David R. 
Eisner, Mrs. Norman A. 
Eldridge, Anita 

Elkus, Mrs. Charles de Y. 
Ellis, Willard L. 

Eloesser, Herbert 

Emge, Ludwig M. D. 
Eppinger, Mrs. J., Jr. 
Epstein, Mrs. Milton H. 
Epstein, Dr. Norman N. 
Epstein, Mrs. Sarah 
Erskine, Mrs. Morse 
Esberg, Alfred |. 

Esberg, Mrs. Milton H. 
Etienne, Victor, Jr. 
Evans, Mr. & Mrs. Harry L. 
Evers, Mrs. Albert John 


SYMPHONY: ORCHESTRA 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Fairmont Hotel 

Falk, Edna Sally 

Farquhar and Heimbucher 
Faure, Victor C. 

Faust, Ida 

Fee, Marcia G. 
Feigenbaum, L. B. 
Feigenbaum, Mrs. Louis 
Fennimore, Mrs. W. D. 
Ferguson, Mrs. R. Craig 
Field, Mrs. Alexander 
Fisher, Haldane S. 
Fitzgerald, Amanda 
Fitzgerald, Mrs. R. M. 
Fitzhugh, Mrs. William M. 
Flammer, Charles 
Fleischman, Mrs. M. R. 
Fleishman, Mrs. S. G. 
Fletcher, Mr. G Mrs. Lawrence S. 
Floyd, Mrs. B. Creelman 
Folendorf, Gertrude 
Folger, Mrs. Roy S. 
Follansbee, Mrs. A. W., Jr. 
FOX, Gs 

Frank, Mrs. Jennie L. 
Frank, Lt. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Frankenau, Mrs. Max 
Frederick, Mr. G Mrs. Max 
French, Dr. Lindol R. 
Friedlander, Mrs. Eva 
Friedlander, Fanny 
Friedman, Mrs. Henry A. 
Fries, Mr. & Mrs. Frank H. 
Fries, William M. 

Fuller, Mrs. George 
Fulmer, Dr. Charles C. 
Funsten, Mrs. J. J. 

Gale, Mrs. Maurice 
Galland, Mrs. E. R. 
Galgiani, Dr. and Mrs. John V. 
Gamble, Elizabeth F. 
Gantner, Mrs. John O. 
Gardiner, Mrs. Frank H. 
Gardner, Mrs. Klznneth 
Gardner, Mrs. N. L. 
Garfinkel, Max 

Garland, Dr. & Mrs. L. H. 
Geisenhofer, Mrs. O. W. 
Gerbode, Dr. & Mrs. Frank 
Getz, Mrs. M. J. 
Ghirardelli, Mrs. Alfred 
Ghirardelli, D. Lyle 
Gibson, Dr. & Mrs. Arthur Collis 
Gilbert, A. M. & Company 
Gill, Mrs. Roy R. 

Glenn, Dr. & Mrs. Robert A. 
Gloor, Ernest 

Glover, Dr. Mary E. 
Godchaux, Helen & Josephine 
Goldman, Mrs. Robert L. 
Goodale, Mrs. George W. 
Goode, Mrs. Percy G. 
Goodfellow, Mrs. J. Downey 
Goodheart, C. |. 
Goodman, Mrs. Isaac 
Goodrich, Chauncey S. 
Gordon, Mrs. William 
Gould, Mrs. Jason 
Gradwohl, Mrs. David 
Grant, Mrs. Spencer 

Gray, Frances H. 

(In memory of Alice M. Gray) 
Gray, Mrs. Horace 
Greathead, Mrs. Norman J. 
Greefkens, Geraldine 
Greenberg, Mrs. Maurice S. 
Greenberg, Mrs. Stuart N. 
Greene, Mrs. A. Crawford 
Greene, Louis C. 

Greenwell, Mrs. J. O. 
Greenhood, Frances 
Greenlee, Mrs. Frederick L. 
Gregory, Mrs. Donald M. 
Gresham, Dean J. Wilmer 
Griffin, Miriam 

Grobe Music Company 
Grosjean, C. E. Rice Milling Co. 
Guggenhime, Mrs. Richard E. 
Gunst, Mrs. M. A. 

Gunst, Mr. & Mrs. Morgan A. 
Gustafson, Amaley 


(Continued) 


Haas, Mrs. Walter, Jr. 
Haase, Mrs. Elizabeth 
Haber, Mrs. Samuel B. 
Hackett, C. Nelson 
Haefner, Mrs. Emma 
Haines, J. Wilbur 
Hale, Mrs. Harriett G. 
Hall, Mrs. Sherwood 
Hallawell Seed Company 
Hamilton, Betty 
Hamitlon, Mrs. Edward Morse 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Hammond, Sarah S. 
Hamshaw, Mrs. Walter 
Hancock Bros. 
Handlon, Mrs. Joseph H. 
Hanford, Mrs. Lloyd D. 
Hanna, Mrs. Richard J. 
Hannah, Mrs. C. C. 
Harding, Helen 
Hardy, Mrs. Sumner 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Harrison, Mrs. Maurice 
Hart, Mrs. Walter Morris 
Haseltine, Mrs. Charles 
Hawley Forge and Mfg. Co. 
Hayden, Curtis 
Hayden, J. R. 
Hayman, Mrs. Alvin 
Haywood, Mrs. Marshall, Jr. 
Heimann, Mrs. Richard 
Heller, Mrs. Walter D. 
Hellman, Mrs. F. J. 
Hellwig, C. A. 
Henderson, Mrs. F. B., Sr. 
Hengstler, Mrs. Louis 
Hennessy, Aileen M. 
Herron, Eugenia L., M.D. 
Herz, Hildegard 
Hess, Teresa 
Hewlett, Mrs. A. W. 
Hexol, Inc. 
Hill, Mrs. Harry 
Hilp, Harry H. 
Hinze, Clara 
Hirschkind, W. 
Hobart, Mrs. Lewis P. 
Hockenbeamer, Mrs. A. F. 
Hodges, Mrs. E. S. 
Fonte. 
Hoisholt, Mrs. Andrew W. 
Hopkins, Mrs. Samuel 
Horsburg, Mrs. James 
Hotel Canterbury 
Hotel Mark Hopkins 
Hotel Stewart 
Hotel Whitcomb 
Hougaard, Mrs. W. F. 
Houghtelling, Mrs. William 
Howell, Albert J. 
Howell, John Thomas 
Howlett, Mrs. Frank 
Hughes, Mrs. Thomas R. 
Hunter, Mrs. Thomas B. 
Hurrle, Etna E. 
Hutchens, Mrs. F. C. 
Hyman, Mrs. Vera R. 
Hyman, Mrs. William L. 
Isenberg, Mrs. R. A. 
Jacobs, Mrs. Monroe B. 
Jacobs, Rebecca 
Jacques, Mrs. Joseph R. 
Janney, Mrs. Frederick F. 
Jeddis, Mrs. Alphonse 
Johnson, Mrs .Grace Noble 
Johnson, Mrs. Walter -S. 
Johnston, Mr. & Mrs. 
Clarence Loran 
Jones, Mrs. Marie C. 
Jordan, Mrs. David Starr 
Jordan, Mahlon K. 
Joseph, Sigmund 
Kahn, Mrs. Beatrice M. 
Kahn, Mrs. Francesca L. 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 
Kahn, Samuel 
K,alenborn, Mrs. A. S. 
Katharine Branson School 
Kauffman, Mr. & Mrs. Sol 
Kaufmann, Mrs. A. 
Keator, Mrs. B. C. 


701 








Keenan, Mrs. Hubbard 
Kelley, Mrs. Bettie 
Kelley, Walter S. 

Kelly, Mrs. Louise 

Kelly, Mrs. T. Henshaw 
Kent, Arthur H. 

Kerr, Dr. G Mrs. William J. 
Keyes, Edna L. 

Kiersted, Mrs. Henry S. 
King Extract Company 
King, Percy L. 

Kirk, Mrs. Joisah H. 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. R. C. 
Kirkwood, Mrs. R. C., Jr. 
Klumpkey, Julia 

Knox, Mrs. John B. 
KohImoos, John H. 
Kohn, Mrs. Simon 
{Corbel, Caroline 
Koshland, Mrs. Abraham 


Koshland, Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. 


Kroll, Dr. G Mrs. Frederick W. 
Lacey, Joseph C. 

Lacy, Mrs. George S. 
Lamont, Donald Y. 
Landels, Mrs. E. D. 
Lansburgh, S. Laz 
Lansdale, Mrs. Philip M. 
Lapham, Mrs. Lewis H. 

la Rue, Mrs. C. L. 

Lasky, Mrs. M. 

Lavenson, Sara 

Laws, Mrs. C. L. 

Leavens, Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. 
Lee, Mrs. Russell V. 
Lehmann, Mrs. Adolph 
Leib, William F. 

Lengfeld, K. H. 

Lens, Mrs. Frances 
Leonard, Ramona A. 
Leonardini, Josephine 
Letcher, B. W. 

Levy, Clara M. 

Levy, Elaine A. 

Levy, Emma G. 

Levy, Mrs. Fernand 

Levy, Harry J. 

Levy, Martha 

Levy, S. D. 

Lewis, Mrs. Gilbert N. 
Lichtenstein, Mrs. Joy 
Liebenthal, Mrs. A. 
Liebman, Mrs. Maurice 
Lilienthal, Mrs. A. G. 
Lilienthal, B. P. 

Lilienthal, Jean 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Jesse W., Jr. 
Lilienthal, Mr. G Mrs. Samuel 
Lisberger, Mrs. S. J. 

Liston, Mrs. Lester 
Livermore, Mrs. Norman B. 
Livingston Bros., Inc. 
Livingston, L., Jr. 
Livingston, Mrs. Samuel W. 
Logan, Mrs. John 
Lombardi, Ethel P. 

Long, Mr. & Mrs. J. A. 
Loustan, Mme. L. 

Lowe, William H. 
Lowenberg, Albert J. 
Lowenthal, Mrs. W. B. 
Lowrey, Mrs. Alan J. 

Lowy, Mrs. Benno 

Lyman, Mrs. Oliver 
McAlister, Mrs. J. W. 
McBaine, Mrs. J. P. 
McBride, Rexford W., M. D. 
McCreary, Mrs. F. C. 
McCreery, Mrs. Richard 
McDonald, Mrs. Juilliard M. 
McGaw, Mrs. John 

McKee, Mrs. Albert B. 
McLaughlin, Mrs. Alfred 
McLean, Goldberg Bowen Co. 
McNear, Mrs. F. W. 
McNear, Mrs. George P. 
Macey, Mrs. James G. 
Mack, Mrs. A. 


Mailliard, Ve & Mrs. J. W., Ne 


Majors, Dr. Ergo A. 


702 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Mangin, Mrs. J. N., Jr. 
Marcus-Lesoine, Inc. 
Marshall, Mrs. Stewart M. 


Martenet, Mr. & Mrs. Randolph W. 


Martin & Brown 

Marwedel, Mrs. C. W. 

Mason, Gertrude 

Mayer, Mrs. Henry L. 

Mayes, Mrs. Carolyn S. 
Meade, Mr. & Mrs. William A. 


Mears, Professor & Mrs. Eliot G. 


Mendelson, Mrs. Julius 
Mendessolle, Evelyn 
Menizes, Constance 
Merillion, Mrs. Ralph 
Metcalf, Mrs. John B. 
Metlar, George W/Goz, Ine: 
Meyer, Adolph C. 

Meyer, Mrs. Alfred F. 
Meyer, Julian J. 

Meyer, Luther 

Meyer, Mrs. Martin A. 
Meyer, Mrs. Minnie 
Meyerhoff, Mrs. Faul 
Middlemas, Mrs. Stuart 
Milbank, Mrs. Robbins 
Miles, Dorothy 

Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Dr. Miriam 

Mills, Gwladys 

Milton, Mrs. Maxwell C. 
Mintzer, Mauricia T. 
Mitchell, Sydney B. 
Moffat, Henrietta 

Moffitt, James K. 
Monteagle, Mr. and Mrs. Paige 
Moore, James R. 

Moore, Mrs. Joseph A., Jr. 
Morgan, Mrs. Horace W. 
Morgan, Norton J. 

Morgan, Mr. & Mrs. William O. 
Morrisey, Mrs. John 
Morrison, Mrs. Lewis F. 
Morrissey, Mrs. E. J. 
Morse, Clarence G. 
Mosgrave, Alicia 

Mosher, Mrs. Isabel 
Moulin, Gabriel Studios 
Mower, Reni 

Mueh, Mrs. W. G. 

Mulford, Mrs. Walter 
Murdock, Mrs. William C., 
Murphy, Eugene Fe 
Musante, Mrs. A. S. 

Myers, Mrs. L. A. 

Nathan, Mr. & Mrs. John J. 
Nature’s Herb Company 
Nelson, Mr. & Mrs. Ralph R. 
Neuhaus, Eugen 

Newhall, Mrs. E. W., Jr. 
Newhall, Mrs. Marion Foster 
Newman, Mrs. Alfred 
Newman, Mrs. William 
Nichols, Henry D. 
Nickelsburg, Mr. & Mrs. M. S. 
Nickelsburg, Mrs. S. 
Nields, James F. 

Nielsen, Mrs. Erich 

Nigh, Mrs. W. H., Jr. 
Noble, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Noble, Mrs. Ethel E. 

Nock, H. M. 


Northern California Harp Society 


Norton, Elizabeth 

Ochse, Mrs. L. R. 
O’Connell, Mrs. Phil 
O’Connor Moffatt and Co. 
Olcese, Margaret T. 
Older, Mrs. B. J. 

Oliver, Mrs. A. Leslie 
Olney, Mrs. Warren, Jr. 
Ophuls, Louise 

Oppen, Mrs. George 
Orella, Mrs. F. R. 

Orrick W. H. 

Otis, Mrs. James 

Otto, Mrs. George 
Pacific Musical Society 
Page, Dr. & Mrs. B. H. 
Page, Mr. & Mrs. Charles 





(Continued) 


Palmer, Mrs. Thomas E. 

Parker, Mr. & Mrs. C. F. 

Paschel, Philip P. 

Patek, Dr. Sadie Dernham 

Pennell, Elizabeth 

Peterson, Neil H. & Co. 

Pettit, Dr. A. V. 

Phillips, Esther B. 

Phillips, Herbert F. 

Philomath Club 

Pieper, Tecla 

Pierce-Rudolph Storage Co., Ltd. 

Pigott, John T. 

Pischel, Mrs. Kaspar 

Podesta & Baldocchi 

Poetz, B. N. 

Pollia, J. S. 

Polytechnic High School 
Music Club 

Posey, Mrs. Mary M. 

Potter, Alice, M.D. 

Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 

Potter, Mrs. J. Sheldon 

Prager, Alice S. 

Preddey, Walter G. 

Price, Christine 

Raab, Alexander 

Rademaker, Harriet E. 

Ransohoff’s, Inc. 

Rathbone, King & Seeley, inc 

Redewill, Dr. F. L. 

Reed, Dr. Alfred C. 

Reed, Laurence E. 

Rehfisch, Mrs. H. W. 

Reinheimer, Isidor 

Renny, Jessie 

Rettenmayer, Mrs. J. P. 

Reynolds, Lloyd R. 

Reynolds, Dr. & Mrs. Ralph A. 

Rhine, Esther 

Richard, Mr. & Mrs. Harry 

Rinder, Rev. Reuben R. 

Rives, Harold W. 

Robinson, Mrs. Mabel R. 

Rodgers, Mrs. Eben, Jr. 

Rodolph, George W. 

Roe, Mrs. Hall 

Rogers, Mrs. William Lister 

Roos Bros. 

Roos, Col. & Mrs. Robert A. 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Charles W. 

Rosenberg, Mrs. T. L. 

Rosener, Leland S. 

Rosenfeld, Max L. 

Rosenshine, Mrs. Monroe 

Roth, Adolph 

Roth, Mrs. Angela Wing 

Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 

Rubke, FL. W. 

Rudd, Mrs. Gertrude H. 

Ryan, Mrs. H. J. 

Sahlein, Mrs. Henry 

St. Francis Wood MOREA Club 

Salomon, Mrs. Leon 

Salz, Mrs. Howard H. 

Salz, Milton H. 

Sampson, Dr. & Mrs. John J. 

San Francisco Musical Club 

Saroni, Mrs. Alfred B. 

Sbarboro, Mrs. Alfred 

Schmidt, Mrs. B. H. 

Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G 

Schubert, Richard 

Schurman, Mrs. Robert 

Schwamm, Louise 

Schwartz, Mrs. Archie 

Schwartz, Sidney L. 

Scott, Mrs. B. C. 

Seckels, Alice 

Selene, Rose L. 

Sellman, Mrs. W/. H. 

Shainwald, Mrs. R. S. 

Sharp, Fannie & Violet 

Sharp, Dr. and Mrs. J. G. 

Shaw, Dr. E. B. 

Sherman, Mrs. Julius 

Shuey, Clarence A. 

Simkins, Mrs. Cordelia L. 

Simmons, Mrs. G. C. 

Simon Bros. 

Simon, R. O. 


SAN FRANCISCO 








Simonds Machinery Co. 
Simpson, Mrs. A. W 
Simpson, Grace Y. 

Simpson, Walter S. 

Sims, Mrs. R. M. 
Sinsheimer, May 
Sinsheimer, Mrs. Samuel C. 
Sinton, Mrs. Edgar 

Sinton, Stanley H. 

Sinton, Mrs. Stanley, Jr. 
Sir Francis Drake Hotel 
Sisters of the Holy Family 
Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Smallwood, Stanley C. 
Smith, Dorothea K. 

Smith, Mrs. Irving H. 
Smith, M. L. 

Smith, Mrs. Stuart F. 
Sommer & Kaufmann 
Sorenson, Nellie 
Southworth, Estelle 

Sperry, Mrs. Horace B. 
Sprague, Frances A. 
Stafford, Mrs. Douglas D. 
Starr, Mrs. George W. 
Stebbins, Mrs. Evelyn W. 
Stebbins, Lucy Ward 
Steinhart, Hilda 

Steinhart, Rose 

Stephens, Mrs. George C. 
Stewart, Mr. & Mrs. Charles A. 
Stich, Mrs. Camilla Frank 
Stockton, Eleanor 

Stolz, Max 

Stone, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 
Stout, Mabel 

Strassburger, Mrs. Lawrence 
Strong, Beulah 

Stull, Florence 

Sugarman, E. 

Sullivan, Frank E. 

Sussman, Mrs. Emilie 
Sutro, Mrs. Alfred 

Sutro, Barbara 

Sutro, Mrs. John A. 

Sutro, Mrs. Oscar 


Amberg-Hirth 

Baldwin Piano Company 
Berkeley Piano Club 

Blum’s 

Bohemian Symphony Orchestra 
Borden’s Dairy Delivery Co. 
Bullock & Jones Co. 
California Barrell Co. 
California Club of California 
Dieterich-Post Co 

Don Lee 

Emporium, The 

Fairmont Hotel 

Farquhar G Heimbucher 
Gilbert, A. M. & Co. 

Grobe Music Co. 

Grosjean, C. E. Rice Milling Co. 
Gump, S.G. & Co 

Hallawell Seed Co. 

Hancock Bros. 

Hawley Forge & Mfg. Co. 
Hexol, Inc. 

Hotel Canterbury 











SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Swett, Wilbur F., M.D. 
Syme, Myra 
Terwilliger, Mrs. H. L. 
Tetlow, Mary A 
Thelen, Max 

Thomas, Arthur F. 


Thomas, Mrs. Frederick F., 


Thompson, Barbara Beach 
Thompson, Mrs. James A. 
Thomson, Mrs. Herbert S. 
Threlkeld, Mrs. M. C. 
Timlow, Mrs. William F. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 
Tolenon, Mrs. Edward C. 
Torney, Mrs. E. J. 
Towne, Mrs. James W. 
Toye, Mrs. Florence M. 
Tresidder, Mrs. Don 
Tripp, Mrs. Kenneth C. 
Trouillet, Mme. J. 
Trouillet, Mrs. J. P. 
Unna, Warren W. 

Upton, Mrs. John 

Urist, Irving M. 
Vagedes, Mrs. Emma 

van Deinse, Mrs. F. C. 
van Diggelen, A. H. 

van Pelt, Mrs. H. M. 


van Wyck, Mrs. Sydney M. 


Vincent, Mrs. W. Germain 
Vittoria Colonna Club 
von Adelung, Mrs. Edward 
Voorhees, W.R. 

Wagner, Mrs. George 
Wagner, Helen R. 

Waine, Dr. & Mrs. Hans 
Waldeck, Mrs. Eda 
Waldrop, Mrs. Uda 
Walker, Mrs. P. J. 
Wallace, Mrs. Morton 
Wallace, Mrs. R. W. 
Walshe, P. 

Ware, Mrs. Edward R. 


Warren, Mr. & Mrs. Lingan A. 


Waterman, Mrs. Jesse H. 


FIRMS AND ORGANIZATIONS 


Hotel Mark Hopkins 
Hotel St. Francis 

Hotel Stewart 

Hotel Whitcomb 
Katherine Branson School 
King Extract Co. 

Liebes, H. & Co. 
Livingston Bros., Inc. 


McLean, Goldberg Bowen Co. 


Magnin, |. & Co. 
Marcus-Lesoine, Inc. 
Martin & Brown 


Metlar, George W. Co., Inc. 


Moulin, Gabriel Studios 


Musicians’ Union Local No. 6 


Nature’s Herb Co. 


Northern California Harp Society 


O’Connor Moffatt & Co. 
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 
Pacific Musical Society 
Pauson, Frank & Sons 
Peterson, Nei! H. & Co. 


(Continued) 


Weed, Mrs. Benjamin C. 
Weill, Mr. & Mrs. Michel D. 
Weingarten, Mrs. Milton 
Weller, Dr. G Mrs. Theodore W. 
Wiener, Grace B 
Wiener, Zelda 
Wiggin, Mrs. Mary A. 
Wihr, Mrs. George M. 
Wilbur, Dorothea E. 
Wildburg, Mrs. Irving I. 
Williams, Charles F 
Williams, Stephen 
Williamson, Mrs. G. G 
Willis, Mrs. E. N. 
Willits, Anna T. 
Wison, Mrs. A. W. 
Wilson, Mary E. 
Wise, Mrs. E. W. 
Wisecarver, R. P. 
Wiseman, Georgea 
Whitney, William W. 
Wolf, Mrs. J. L. 
Wolf, Mrs. Paul T. 
Wolff, Mrs. M. L. 
Wolfsohn, Dr. & Mrs. Fred 
Women Musicians’ Club of 
San Francisco 
Wood, Hazel & Myrtle 
Wood, Leonard E. 
Wood, Lois 
Woodruff, A. W. 
Woodward, Gertrude B. 
Wormser, Mrs. Paul 
Wright, Mrs. H. E. 
Wurkheim, S. & Brother 
Wuthman, Mrs. E. F 
Yabroff, Mrs. Samuel 
Yeazell, Louise A., M.D. 
Young, Mrs. H. S 
Zaruba, Mrs. V. 
Zentner, Mrs. Julius 
Ziel, Mrs. John G. 
Zimmerman, Mrs. Philip 
Zimmerman, Rudolph 
Zook, Edgar T 


Philomath Club 

Pierce-Rudolph Storage Co., Ltd. 

Pisani Printing & Publishing Co. 

Podesta & Baldocchi 

Polytechnic High School 
Music Club 

Ransohoff’s, Inc. 

Rathbone, King & Seeley, Inc. 

Roos Bros. 

Rosenfeld’s Sons, John 

St. Francis W/ood Musical Club 

San Francisco Musical Club 

Sherman, Clay & Co. 

Simon Bros. 

Simonds Machinery Co. 

Sir Francis Drake Hotel 

Sommer & Kaufmann 

Vittoria Colonna Club 

White House, The 

Women Musicians’ Club of 
San Francisco 

Wurkheim, S. & Brother 


703 





VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NAOQUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSK!I, WILLIAM 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ANDERSON, THEODORE 
ForpD, Louis W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALD!I, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARGIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMDORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRO, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BAUER, BEN 

BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
D! BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


VIOLAS: 


MOLNAR, FERENC 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUMX, Conouctor 


"CELLOS: 


BLINDER, BORIS 
PRINCIPAL 
REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 
BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMDORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 
SAPHIR, RUTH 


BASSES: 


KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLITI, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI. JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


RENZI, PAUL UR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 


REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
ScHivo, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
ScHivo, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


E FLAT CLARINET: 
BIBBINS, F. C. 


JULIUS HAUG 





BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


BASSOONS: 
KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E. 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, UR. 


TRUMPETS: 
BusB, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Gios!, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SiINAI, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELWOOD 


PIANO AND CELESTA: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


PROPERTY MASTER: 
ee ne AV EY: 


IN SERVICE WITH THE UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES 


DICTEROW, HAROLD—VIOLIN 
HOUSER, F. S.—VIOLIN 

KHUNER, FELIX——VIOLIN 
MICHAELIAN, ERNEST A.-—VIOLIN 


MOULIN, HARRY-VIOLIN 
Ross, NATHAN-—VIOLIN 
LEPLIN, EMANUEL=——VIOLA 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN—VIOLA 


OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV—VIDLA 
CLAUDIO, CESARE—’CELLO 
DE PALMA, ATTILIO=—-HORN 
ALTMANN, LUDW!IG-——ORGAN 








704 


SAN FRANCISCO 











ING CONCERT 


Nearly two hours Of 
fine MUSIC eve? y 


night of the week 







8:10 to 10 P.M. 
sTATION K YA 


San Francisco 


1260 ene cuR DIAL 


ACME BREWERIES 


San Francisco* Los Angeles 





¥ 


Ood laste FROM EVERY AN 
LUS REAL MILDNESS AND A COOLER § 


ENJOY ALL THE BENEFITS OF 
CHESTERFIELD’S RIGHT COMBINATION 
WORLD'S BEST TOBACCOS 





MIGGETT & myers To@AccO co. 





Copyright 1945, Liccett & Myers Tosacco Co. / 
PISANI FRINTING & PUBLISHING CO,, 700 MONTGOMERY, S. F. eae ie 












THE MUSICAL ASSOCIATION OF SAN FRANCISCO 


LEONORA WOOD ARMSBY + PRESIDENT AND MANAGING _ DIRECTOR 
HOWARD K. SKINNER + BUSINESS MANAGER 


= EF EET. OTP i aa ek a ae ah a a a i a a i ar i he a De ek nde anne, a Ee ns ae PEELE EOE LE GEE 
—s cf > a? © » @j'4 7 oe) = ae 
& “a5 
“al ach 














> — . See Ss , an —— ——— —_—S_ -— a ee 
OT eye oe Nh Se eT Ee ee TE EE ed OOP TE ELE POR a a ET a SS Oe ST rh EY 


WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUS B 


Twelfth Pair . Artur Rubinstein, Guest Artist — a April 13-14, 1945 









Income for 
your dependents - 


while you live 


A man while he still lives may set apart 
all or some part of his property to 
provide income now or later for any 
of his beneficiaries by establishing a 
“family trust.” Each arrangement will 
be made to fit the needs of a particular 
family. It can always be altered. Ask 
about this service. 


TRUST DEPARTMENT 


Wells Fargo 


Bank « union trust co. 


SAN FRANCISCO 


Established 1852 
Member F.D.I. C. 








SHERMAN, CLAY & CO. in its 
NEW HOME in OAKLAND 





Convenience is the word for our new music store... 
located in a building of its own in the heart of down- 
town Oakland. 


Step right off the street to our main floor... for REC- 
ORDS] omc MUSIC RECORD EGABIINEMomes 
CONCERT TICKETS. Upstairs, on the mezzanine, 
you'll find our other departments... Pianos, Band and 
Orchestra Instruments, Radios and Radio-Phonographs. 





Parking lot next door or just across the street. 


New Telephone Number 


| Hi gate 8440 Cherman y 





i SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 725 





SI DOSES SSS ASSAD OO nn 











AMELIE 





“THE MAGNET” 


Compounded and Copyrighted 
by Coty, Inc. in U.S.A, 











| 


KNOW YOUR SYMPHONY 


-—4 

With this 12th pair of symphony concerts, Pierre Monteux con- 
cludes his 10th season as conductor of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. On March 23, the University of California conferred the 
degree of Doctor of Laws upon Monteux with the words: 

Pierre Monteux: Native of France and veteran of the French Army 
in World War I; devoted citizen of the United States; artist and director 
of artists; conductor of notable orchestras in Europe and the United 
States, for all of which he has set high standards of excellence; renowned 
interpreter of the ballet and of the works of French and American com- 
posers; a scholarly and sensitive musician. 

LBE~<L 

On April 5, in appreciation of his decade of outstanding work with 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, the Board of Governors of the 
Musical Association of San Francisco honored Mr. Monteux at a testi- 
monial dinner. On this occasion, letters and telegrams of congratula- 
tions from some of the greatest names in music were received by the 

Conductor. Among Ridtten these included: 


ARTUR RODZINSKI, New York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra 
San Francisco is indeed fortunate in having as the leader Or tts 


symphony orchestra, Pierre Monteux, a ereat musician and a masterful 
conductor. 


SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY,. Boston Symphony Orchestra ... My warm- 
est congratulations go to you on your 10th anniversary as conductor of 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. May the following decades of 
your activities be as productive and successful for the benefit of the 
musical and cultural life of America. 

EUGENE ORMANDY, Philadelphia Orchestra . . . It gives the mem- 
bers of the Philadelphia Orchestra and myself great pleasure to extend 
our warmest congratulations on the 10th anniversary of your brilliant 
work as director of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Please accept 


our best wishes for continued success to you and your wonderful org nal 
zation. 


WALTER DAMROSCH ... My pleasure is mingled with great regret 
that San Francisco is 3000 miles aw ay and that I cannot be present to 
join in tribute to you as man and musician. My only hope is that San 
Francisco will be generous to us in the far East and let New York enjoy 
your artistry often. 


VLADIMIR GOLSCHMANN, St. Louis Symphony Orchestra . . . As 
one who has known and admired you since the days of the Concerts 
Monteux in Paris, may I add my congratulations to those of your many, 
many friends and may | thank you for all the musical joys I owe you. 


IGOR STRAVINSKY ... It is with an intense joy that I am sending 
a few words of appreciation to dear Pierre Monteux, the master ene 


of orchestras. My admiration for his consistent and understanding 


efforts to present avantguar d of musical works, an arduous task eon 
to enlighten an always resisting public taste, and an exacting mission of 
which Monten has eloriously ae himself. 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








SSS ISAS SSNS lee dde dene INS N SID OO SSCS SSSA SFERSAS IAA preeenonnnoccenanc MOAT 





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Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E, Raymond Armsby..--........-:.-...-:.-; Vice-President Gharles |Page.s5 ees cae eee Treasurer 
Paul.A.. Bissingen<:..-2<2-2220-2<c,-2se-s er =a Vice-President Howard -KecSkinners.--.2<:2....-5--3 tes Secretary 
Charles R. Bly thic.. 2-2 Vice-President Geraid :G* 'Rossi-s.-- Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, II_....-.....-.--.---.-- Vice-President 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 


Miss Louise A. Boyd 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Joseph D. Grant 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas 


Garret McEnerney, II 
Kenneth Monteagle 
Guido J. Musto 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 


Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE . 


C. O. G. Miller, Chairman 


Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland 


MUSIC COMMITTEE 


Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Mrs. Tobin Clark 
Dr. Leo Eloesser 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 


Mrs. John B. Knox 
Mrs. James Mills 
Mrs. Francis Redewill 


Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Mrs. William Lister Rogers 


E. Raymond Armsby 
Charles R. Blyth 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 


J. Emmet Hayder 
Charles G. Norris 


Dr. Hans Barkan 
Mrs. George T. Cameron 


Mrs. William Lister Roger 
Michel Weill 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan 


YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 


Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Charles M. Dennis 


Mrs. Grace Benoist 
Mrs. Walter A. Haas 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mrs: John JP: Coghlan... se Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill..............-.------ Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 


Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 


Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman 


John Piel 


Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett 


Marcia Robinson 


E. Raymond Armsby 


Pamela Marsh 
Elwyn Thayer 
Betty Carl 


BOARD OF 
Mrs. George Ebright 


Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman 


Dr. Hans Barkan 

Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett 
James B. Black 

Charles R. Blyth 

Miss Louise A. Boyd 
Paul A. Bissinger 
George T. Cameron 

Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker 
Mrs. O. K. Cushing 

Mrs. Georges de Latour 
Benjamin H. Dibblee 
Miss Katharine Donohoe 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. 


Constance Alexander 
Kathleen Lawlor 
Doris Lowell 


Albert I. Elkus 

Dr. Leo Eloesser 
Forrest Engelhart 

Mrs. Harold K. Faber 
Mrs. Paul I. Fagan 
Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
Mrs. J. C. Flowers 
John F. Forbes 

Mrs. Frank R. Girard 
Miss Lutie D. Goldstein 
Mrs. Joseph D. Grant 
Farnham P. Griffiths 
Madeleine Haas 

Mrs. Walter Haas 


Mrs. Harry S. Haley 
J. Emmet Hayden 


Katherine Mulkey 


Ann Wegman 
Paul Robinson 


GOVERNORS 


Mrs. E. S. Heller 

Walter S. Heller 

Mrs. I. W. Hellman 
William F. Humphrey 
Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland 
Frederick J. Koster 
Gaetano Merola 

Cc. 0. G. Miller 

Mrs. C. O. G. Miller 
Edward F. Moffatt 
Kenneth Monteagle 
Mrs. Donald Mulford 
Guido J. Musto 

Dwight F. McCormack 
Mrs. Angus McDonald 
Garrett McEnerney, II 
Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon 
R. C. Newell 

Charles G. Norris 


STAFF 


Victor Mohl 
Gerald Ross 
Joseph Scafidi 


Cecily Rideout 
Elizabeth Shaw 
Marilyn Biehl 


Charles Page 
Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. Henry P. Russell 
Miss Else Schilling 
Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Nicol Smith 
Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
. Powers Symington 
. David Armstrong Taylor 
. Cyril Tobin 
. Alfred S. Tubbs 
rs. Daniel Volkmann 
Michel Weill 
Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Leonard E. Wood 
J. D. Zellerbach 


Deborah Spalding 
Curran Swint 
Virginia Webb 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


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TODAYSs: GUESIECARSISi: 
COO ~*~ J 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN was born 1n Lodz, Poland, in 1886. He made his first 
public appearance as a concert artist at the age of four. ‘he major part of his 
instruction was gained in Berlin, where Rubinstein became a protégé of Joseph 
Joachim, and where he studied the piano with Heinrich Barth. His formal 
debut was made in Berlin at the age of 11, when he played a Mozart concerto 
under Joachim’s baton. Later Rubinstein studied for a time with Paderewski. 
He has been before the American public since 1906, and has appeared in concert 
(hroughout the entire world. 

This will be Mr. Rubinstein’s sixth appearance with the San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra. He was last heard playing the Khatchaturian concerto on 


the Art Commission series last year. 


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Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY os poaiaarbings 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
-{@}- 
TWELFTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, AT 2:15 
SATURDAY, APRIL 14, AT 8:30 


ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Guest Artist 


“Program 
SRE CALOINS SER CME WEIN OO ee ene) 2 se. Bach 


(ORCHESTRATED BY SIR HENRY Woop) 
Prelude 
Andante mistico 
Finale 


PRELUDE WOT HE AFTERNOON OF A FAUN: Debussy 


pee oe ees FOR? PIANO AND ORGEHEST RAG 
N@QE 3S UN GCG oNENG@IRe ©) POS 237 ee oe Beethoven 


ae con brio 
Largo 
Allegro 
Mr. RUBINSTEIN 


INTERMISSION 


SY MEREONIT GC SUE NO@2 PROMS PI Ogee fa snviauranid 


(First PERFORMANCE IN SAN FRANCISCO) 
Overture 
Prelude and Fugue 
Pastorale 
Finale 


SACVER-ELOINN BD VITIN OURS toca. eee cee len cs cole: Franck 
Lento—Allegro non troppo 
Allegretto 
Allegro non troppo 


ere as" 





It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use their tickets 
kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
of their seats that they may be assigned to untformed men and women. 
This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 








SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








| rtu LR l js i LS te in 


..- HEAR HIM ON VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 


You may enjoy a command performance by Artur Rubinstein 
any time you wish. The celebrated artist, who has been called the 
greatest Polish pianist since Paderewski, has recorded many 
superb performances for Victor. The Victor catalog lists inspired 
Rubinstein recordings of Chopin, Grieg, Tchaikovsky, Brahms 
and many others. Kach brings you the verve and power of Mr. 
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ness 1m perfect reproduction. Listen to ““Vhe Music America Loves Best” 
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PROGRAM NOTES 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


SELECTIONS BROMES UTE NO@Gaee. = Johann Sebastian Bach 
(1685-1750) 
ORCHESTRATED BY SIR HENRY Woop 

Bach, of course, wrote only four orchestral suites. hese selections are taken 
from the sixth suite of Bach transcriptions made by the late Sir Henry Wood. 

The first movement played on this occasion is the C sharp major prelude 
from the first book of The Well Tempered Clavier; Sir Henry transposes it up a 
semitone for the convenience of the orchestra. The second movement, arranged 
lor woodwind alone, is in B minor and comes from some unidentified prelude 
apparently for harpsichord or organ. The finale is the first movement of the E 
major partita for violin alone, arranged by Sir Henry for all the strings. 


PRELUDE TO THE AFTERNOON OF A FAUN.. Claude Debussy 
(1862-1918) 

As all the world knows, Debussy’s prelude, first performed in 1894, derives 
its title from a celebrated poem by Stéphane Mallarmé. A much abbreviated 
prose paraphrase of this poem, by Edmund Gosse, is traditionally printed in 
American program books when Debussy’ s Faun is played, and this tradition 
will be followed here. But strong reservations must be made regarding Gosse’s 
version. It is too definite, too specific. As Hayse Cooperman remarks, poetry was, 
for Mallarmé, “a network of suggestions wherein one allusion referred to one 
or two other allusions, the latter “being nothing more than a vapor having its 
source in a volatilized distillation of ultra- personal and super-sensitive images, 
or, one might say, mirages.”’ And on top of this, Debussy’s work is not program 
music illustrating Mallarmé, but a prelude to his poem. 


A few lines from Aldous Huxley’s translation of The Afternoon of a Faun 
Mav act as a corrective to Gosse’s literalism: 
I! would immortalize these nymphs: so bright 
ee sunlit coloring, so airy light, 
It floats like a drowsing down. Loved I a dream? 
My doubts, born of oblivious darkness, seem 
A subtle trace ry of branches grown 
The tree’s true self—proving that I have known 
No triumph but the shadow of a rose. 
But think. These nymphs, thei ur loveliness ... suppose 
They bodied forth your senses’ fabulous thirst? 
Illusion! Which the blue eyes of the first, 
As cold and chaste as is the weeping spring, 
Beget: the other, sighing, passioning, 
Is Say the wind, warm in your fleece at noon? 
No, through this quiet, when a weary swoon 
Crushes and chokes the latest faint essay 
Of morning, cool against the encroaching day, 
There is no murmuring water, save the gush 
Of my clear fluted notes; and in the hush 
Blows never a wind, save that which through my reed 
Puffs out before the rain of notes can speed 
Upon the arr, with that calm breath of art 
That mounts the unwrinkled zenith visibly 
Where inspiration seeks its native sky. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Vie se) 


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Gosse’s prose paraphrase 1s as follows: 
“A faun—a simple, sensuous, passionate being—wakens in the forest at 
daybreak and tries to recall his experience of the previous afternoon. Was he 
| the fortunate recipient of an actual visit from nymphs, white and golden god- 
desses, divinely tender and indulgent? Or is the memory he seems to retain 
nothing but the shadow of a vision, no more substantial than the ‘arid rain’ 
of notes from his own flute? He cannot tell. Yet surely there was, surely there 
is, an animal whiteness among the brown reeds of the lake that shines out 
vonder? Were they, are they, swans? No! But Natads plunging? Perhaps. 
“Vaeuer and vaguer grows the impression of this delicious experience. 
He would resign his woodland godship to retain it. A garden of lilies, golden- 
headed, white-stalked, behind the trellis of red roses? Ah! the effort 1s too great 
for his poor brain. Perhaps if he selects one lily from the garth of lilies, one 
benign and beneficient yielder of her cup to thirsty lips, the memory, the ever- 
receding memory, may be forced back. So, when he has glutted upon a bunch of 
erapes, he is wont to toss the empty skins into the air and blow them out ina 
visionary greediness. But no, the delicious hour grows vaguer; experience or 
dream, he will now never know which it was. The sun is warm, the grasses 
yielding: and he curls himself up again, after worshipping the efficacious star of 
wine, that he may pursue the dubious ecstasy into the more hopeful boskages of 





sleep: 
Bas a ee eee ee ee ee ee 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA wf 









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CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA, 
INO: SLUNG GeVEEN@ Rite tere ear elem s nee Ludwig van Beethoven 


(1770-1827) 


Beethoven first won the admiration and respect of the general public as a 
pianist. Consequently the majority of his early works are for the piano, either 
alone or in combination with other instruments, and most of these, including 
the first three concertos, were intended for Beethoven’s own use as a concert 
performer. 

Carl Czerny, who studied with Beethoven from 1800, the year of the com- 
position of the C minor concerto, to 1803, said his playing at that period was 
notable for its “tremendous power, character, unheard-of bravura and facility. 
In rapidity of scale passages, trills, leaps and so on no one equalled him, not even 
Hummel. His attitude at the piano was perfectly quiet and dignified, with no 
approach to grimace, except to bend down a little toward the keys as his deatf- 
ness increased. His fingers were very powerful, not long, and broadened at the 
tips by much playing; for he told me often that in his youth he had practiced 
stupendously, mostly until past midnight each day.” 

Ludwig Spohr met Beethoven 13 years later, and records that “he had dis- 
continued playing both in public and at private parties.” Spohr nevertheless 
heard him read through a new trio of his own. “It was by no means a pleasure,” 
he says, ‘for, in the first place, the piano was woefully out of tune, which, how- 
ever, troubled Beethoven little, since he could hear nothing of it, and secondly, 
of the formerly admired excellence of the virtuoso scarcely anything was left, 






DH Hapig te acral ue 


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STRARTER 


and his music 





SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 739 








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in consequence of his total deafness. In the fortes the poor man hammered in 
such a way upon the keys that entire groups of notes were inaudible, so that one 
lost all sense of the theme unless one’s eye followed the score at the same time. 
i felt moved with the deepest sorrow at so hard a destiny. It is a misfortune for 
anyone to be deaf; how then could a musician endure it without despair? 
Beethoven’s almost continual melancholy was no longer a riddle to me.” 

Beethoven waited three years before giving the C minor concerto its first 
performance. ‘The circumstances of that presentation cast some interesting 
sidelights on the musical conditions with which Beethoven was surrounded 
throughout his life. 

On March 26 and 30, 1803, the Wiener Zeitung carried the following notice: 

“On the fifth of April Herr Ludwig van Beethoven will produce a new ora- 
torio set to music by him, Christ on the Mount of Olives, in the Royal and 
Imperial Uheater-an-der-Wien. ‘The other pieces also to be performed will be 
announced on the large bill-board in front of the theater.” 

“The “other pieces” turned out to be Beethoven’s first and second sym- 
phonies and his third piano concerto, Still more things were planned, but were 
abandoned as the concert progressed because of the time consumed. As it was, 
the program could not have been less than four hours long. 

This occasion was to mark Beethoven’s debut as a composer of large con- 
certed vocal works. The concert was given for his benefit, and, according to 
lenaz von Seyfried, staff conductor of the Theater-an-der-Wien, who directed 
the program in question, Beethoven “doubled the prices of the first chairs, 
tripled those of the reserved, and demanded twelve ducats, instead of four 
florins.* for each box. ... The result, however, answered his expectations, for the 
concert yielded 1800 florins.” 


*The old Austrian ducat was worth about $2.25, the florin about fifty cents. 












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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 741 

















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The final rehearsal took place on the day of the concert, starting at 8 in 
the morning. Beethoven’s pupil, Ferdinand Ries, described it as erribic: ” they 
worked on the oratorio from 8 until 2:30, had lunch, and then went all over it 
again. The rehearsal could not have been adjourned much before the start of 
thie concert, Which was scheduled to begin at 6. 


In those days it was not a common practice for soloists to memorize their 
CONCertOS. Seyfried turned pages for Beethoven at the piano, which indicates 
that, since Seyfried was the conductor, Beethoven must have directed the con- 
certo and played the solo at the same time, as was the general custom among 
Sony plenie pianists. 


“T saw almost nothing but empty leaves,” says Seyfried. “At the most on one 
page or the other a few Egyptian hieroglyphs wholly unintelligible to me scrib- 
bled down to serve as clues for him, for he played almost all of the solo part 
from memory, since, as was so often the case, he had not had time to put it all 
down on paper. He gave me a secret glance whenever he was at the end of one 
of the invisible pages, and my scarcely concealable anxiety not to miss the de- 
cisive moment amused him greatly, and he laughed heartily at the jovial supper 
which we ate afterward.” 

Since modern audiences invariably think of Beethoven as the sick, eccentric 
middle-aged man of his last years, it might be well to point out that Beethoven 
was 29 w hen the third concerto was written and 32 when it was first performed, 
and was then far from being the recluse he eventually became. He lived well and 
he dressed well, and was distinctly a man of the world. 


] 
Allegro con brio, G minor, alla breve. Vhe first movement follows the class- 
ical prescription in containing two expositions of its thematic ideas, the first 





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for the orchestra alone, the second for the solo instrument and orchestra, al- 
though there are some slight departures from classical practice as this pair of 
expositions unfolds. 

The first phrase of the principal theme is heard at once in the Strings in 
octaves, and 1s answerecl by the woodwind in harmony: 


[TSA ees eee 
A a Woody, ng horns 
J SUFLNGS ~ pe: mi ie 4: ae | ae Jp 
(TTR SST Ea ; T E = i : } i a 
re a a ta os ag ee 
* Pine BOD age pica, . ae : we pis : A09E 9 OS : 
Ath Ee eS re me ew a eee ny . “0 . pe ey EC 
ee 2 2) : op 22 rf -*. 
pares ares Pte fp pn 0 pm PE 
Uae Sas eeeeelaze dere ees | eae, 
bs 7 PP violins sf J SF SF 


A brief cadential figure follows, after which the theme is boldly worked over 
and extended, beginning in E flat major, but darkening into the minor in order 
that the lyrical second theme may seem all the more radiant when it eventually 
appears in the clarinets and first violins in E flat mayor: 


2 

a ce a mee ee ce eee ee ee 

A oki Das cae ST | te DY FAB iy al ; 

bi ASerees aa aTe, Hed ot Dia ipl? pets bas | pete, 
pP eee r cena I — I fia] i Se 

After this second theme has been stated and counter-stated, a phrase derived 
from Motif A in Example | is heard, followed by two concluding motifs. The 
first of these motifs is: 


oboe viol, i oboe P 
4 dat Ne Be rae ee e 
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and the second: 
eh ere es ,+ > > id 
bo EE Strelit rer erieat 

PP 


A canonical restatement of the first part of Example 1 concludes the first ex- 
position. 











The piano enters with scales in octaves to begin the second exposition. ‘The 
piano gives out Example | ina somewhat varied form. The brief cadential figure 
and the bold extension’ol the theme are now divided between the solo instru- 
ment and the orchestra, after which the piano has a new transitional idea: 


oe, as 
pet fit thel, a pa pup, pfitt piet 
pp EL Ober eeepc ee eR 


ae —— 
h os x ‘ 
Me 2423) tr — be Ih 
01 fooaloat a Foss aim paws ea he 
pe fp 2 c= L xo 
S ¥ = | hed jaa et perc. 


The second theme (Example 2) now appears, again in E flat major, and begun 
by the solo. After this has run its course the first ‘concluding moti (Example 3) 
is briefly treated. There is slightly more extensive treatment of the vigorous, 
jumping Motif B from E xample | before the second exposition ends with a final 
reminiscence of Motif A. 





The solo instrument drops out, as usual, at the beginning of the compara- 
tively short development section, which opens with a v igorous Rraneerral passage 


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based on the second concluding figure (Example 4). “Then the piano re-enters, 
again introducing itself with rising scales, as well as Motifs B and A, but passing 
almost at once to a new version of Motif C from Example | 



































In the working over which follows, Motifs A and B remain in the orchestra and 
are heard in succession, as in Example | itself, as well as separately and in coun- 
tcrpoint against each other. Over this background the piano devotes itself largely 
Lo Example 6 and to ornamentation. 

The recapitulation begins with Motifs A and B of Example | in the or- 
chestra. Motif C is reduced to a brief descending phrase in the solo. ‘The piano’s 
transition theme (Example 5) comes back and then the second theme (Example 
2), in C major, begun by the solo. The first concluding theme (Example 3) 
is reheard, along with the treatment of Motif B which had followed it at the 
end of the second exposition. Motif A ends the recapitulation. Example 4 is 
completely suppressed. 

The coda begins with Example | in the orchestra in the original key, C 
minor. There is.an elaborate cadenza for the solo instrument. (Ihe cadenza 
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particularly Motif B, are heard after the cadenza. ‘The piano ends the movement 
with the rising scales it had employed at its first entry. 
I] 
Largo, E major, 3/8 me. he piano has the principal theme at the outset: 















ra ae a 
je) Te steal 
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pies ar a 4 2 a eee 
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¢ ie I. Seis FTE oe 
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This is repeated in highly varied form by the orchestra, and there is a con- 
tinuing phrase in the lower strings and bassoons. The orchestral passage ends 
with a descending broken chord of E major in octaves and unisons, forte, where- 
upon the piano states the second theme, in the same key: 




















8 nw 
—~ x ge —W ee 6 % vate 4 of “8 aes 
Pts , - . . ~ ” ¥5 =) : 34° 4. +6" Baer al oe a rf wf f 
7 hi ae era ST aRte Biipes serie er hy reper A reerier ere 
‘<i 2 ——oe Oo ss fF SSS Sa SS ee 
& a oe a, ~ 2 a —— _——-— Wy = — ——— pn = 


















































This is continued by the strings in the dominant key, B major, and the plano 
concludes the second subject with further ornamental sextolets and rapid scales. 

The middle section of the movement is a development-like episode wherein 
the piano has arpeggiated arabesques over a dialogue of the flute and bassoon, 
largely in slowly descending thirds. 

The recapitulation begins with the principal theme (Example 7) in the 
home key of E major, begun by the piano, but now the orchestra takes the lead 
away from the solo in the third bar, and while the lead is shortly restored to the 








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star performer, the orchestra continues to have its say throughout the recapitu- 
lation of the theme. The varied orchestral counterstatement of the subject 1s 
also reheard, and this provides the material for the coda; Example 8 is not 
brought back. ‘There isa brief cadenza and a final reference to Example 7 before 
the end. 
II] 
Allegro, C minor, 2/4 time. The finale is, as usual, in rondo form. ‘he 


principal subject is stated at once by the plano: 


Speed bem ite Na - pwaeraee || ae! ae 
Phy, xr : ee a dora ae en hea fe? ate ef to = 
GY DA F | ne? if = ae H = =e == as f : Si ms apace o7=a> 
v nef | Sf Sf 
‘This is worked over at some length by all concerned. 
Flourishes of trumpets and the solo instrument introduce the first episodic 
theme, again given to the solo: 


10 pases Aide aia ce tS Spt Ch gs Hoo 2 
bee ae ey 


The orchestra takes up Example 10, and the piano replies with enthusiastic 
triplet figures. A second part of the episode begins with the following in the 






































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The principal subject (Example 9) is now reheard in its entirety, inter- 
rupted by a short cadenza for the solo. 


‘The second episode is based upon a theme stated by the solo clarinet: 



































When this has run its course in orchestra and solo, there is a brief fugue on 
Example 9 in F minor, begun by the ‘celli. ‘This ends with repeated A flats in 
the entire orchestra, which the piano takes up. The piano discovers that A flat 
and G sharp are the same note, and so manages to bring back the principal 
subject (Example 9) in E major, but during the course of the rehearing the 
section goes back to the expected C minor. 

Again flourishes of the trumpets and the solo precede the first episodic 
theme (Example 10), which is combined with Example 9 and worked over to 
a dramatic pause, whereupon the piano gives out a transformation of example 


QO as follows: 



































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SYMPHONIC SUITE NO. 2 FROM PROTEE. .. Darius Milhaud 
(1892- ) 

Following the general practice of classic Greek dramatists, Aeschuylus 
wrote a comedy entitled Proteus to be performed after his cycle of three tragedies 
known collectively as the Oresteia. The Oresteia is preserved, but Proteus is 
lost, and only its title is known. Having translated the Oresteia into French. 
Paul Claudel proceeded to write his own comedy about Proteus, the prophet 
who lived in the sea, came to the land every day at noon, and had to be physically 
seized by humans before he would exercise his wisdom on their behalf. But 
Proteus did not prophesy willingly, and when captured would change himself 
into every conceivable shape in order to avoid being questioned. 

Mr. Milhaud composed much music for Claudel’s Ovresteia and for his 
Protee. The Protée music was completed in its present form in 1919. The suite 
consists largely of preludes and interludes and does not reflect any incidents of 
the drama. In fact, when the present set of pieces was published, it was simply 
called Symphonic Suite No. 2 and bore no reference at all to Claudel’s play. 

Mr. Milhaud points out that the overture is in a tango-habanera rhythm. 
This is followed by “a Prelude (very fast) and a Fugue (for brasses, with the 
rest of the orchestra sustaining them) ; a Pastorale using the rhythm 3-3-2; a 
Nocturne in 5/8 time which has also been used for a piano-and-violin piece 
called Le Printemps; and a Finale of a strong and bright character.” The 
Nocturne 1s omitted from the present performance. 

The suite is dedicated to the memory of Albéric Magnard, the French com- 
poser who was killed by the Germans defending his house at Baron (Oise) in 


September, 1914. 


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SYMPHONY, D MINOR 


A Rey At, Reed Pad PAGE al Gees César Franck 
(1822-1890) 

The legends of the Franck symphony have been told so often that people 
are beginning to tell them all over again with reverse english. ‘Thus, in order to 
typify the lack of understanding with which this work was received when it was 
first presented, (in Paris in 1889) Vincent d’Indy cites the case of an unnamed 
professor at the Paris Conservatory who declared that, regardless of what virtues 
Franck’s composition might possess, it could never be called a symphony because 
it employs the English horn, an instrument never found in the symphonies of 
Haydn and Beethoven. Mr. Cecil Gray, in his book on Sibelius published in 
1930, comes to the defense of the anonymous professor, and argues that the type 
of musical mind which demands ‘effects of color so marked and individual as 
those provided by the English horn is incapable of true symphonic thinking: 
and it need scarcely be said that this estimable instrument is not to be found in 
the symphonies by the author of The Swan of Tuwonela. 

Be that as it may, many thousands of music lovers have been content to 
accept César Franck’s one contribution to the literature of the symphony as a 
deeply satisfying example of the species, and, biographers and disciples to the 
contrary notwithstanding, the Franck symphony did not have much difficulty in 
making its way. It was first heard in America a few months after its introduction 
in Paris, and within ten years had been performed in practically every important 
music center in the world. 

Franck’s symphony represents the culmination of a philosophy of musical 
structure with which this composer is especially identified. ‘This principle has 
been labeled cyclic form, a term which implies the attainment of an inner 
organic unity between the several movements of a piece of music on a large scale 
through the quotation in later movements of material that had previously ap- 


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peared in earlier, or through—and this is a much subtler and esthetically quite 
different process—the derivation of some or all of the thematic ideas of a given 
work from one or two germinal motifs. ‘This principle was not original with 
César Franck. It is to be found in many significant works of Beethoven, Schu- 
mann, I’schaikowsky and Brahms, and it is certainly not unrelated to the Liszt- 
ian concept of “transformation of themes.” But where these other composers 
employ the cyclic principle occasionally, as one of many types of formal organ- 
ization, Franck makes use of it constantly and bases his entire contribution to 
symphonic and chamber music upon it. 

Both types of cyclic procedure are to be found in Franck’s symphony — 
both the obvious direct quotation of material from one movement in another, 
and the subtle, hidden derivation of apparently different thematic ideas from 
one and the same germ-cell. 

‘The symphony, however, actually has two germinal motifs, the first stated in 

A 
in the opening bar a a — F i= = f= and the second appearing as the 


first measure of the closing theme in the first movement: — = b> == ig 


All the important themes of the work are deriv ed from one or another or both of 
these two figures. And each of these figures is worth a paragraph or two in itself. 

The questioning melodic curve of Example A appears often in music. It, or 
something closely resembling it, can be found in the subject of the C sharp 
minor fugue in the first book of Bach’s Well Tempered Clavier, in the fifth and 
sixth bars of the first movement in Schubert’s Unfinished symphony, in the 


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i 
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—- 








e instances cited are worth looking 


le 


‘The last thi 


ate in Wagner's Ring. 


- 
4 


finale of Beethoven’s last quartet, in Liszt’s tone poem, Les Préludes, and as the 
motit of I 


/ 


re closely. 


into a little mo 


and over the 


= 


looks ever so slightly like Franck’s second germinal 


) he writes the words Es muss sein (“It must be”). 


Seuel 
P 








Nuss es 
= 
7 a 

















n, in the quartet mentioned, writes over the questioning motif the 


s sein? (“Must it bee”) 


thove 
Muss e 


€ 


Be 


words 





phrase, which 


ring } 
ample 


answe 
figure 


—_~= 


above 


B 


(Ex 


bE 


It is, of course, true that Beethoven intended this 


mock 


seriousness, but that fact has only recently been emphasized; at all 


nts. whether it be intended with mock seriousness or serious seriousness, the 


} 


11 


CvG¢ 


+, _ > 


> 


imagina- 


as used with fateful implications by 


' Franck was no less a student of Beethoven than his 


rman colleagues 


ss no ereat stretch of the 


C 


‘rious, and it require 


e in this the source of the figure 


~— 

Jp a 
— 

= A) 

ay ~/ 

—_ —_ 

— — 

~ 
= ~ 
~~ 
/ co 
—_ = 

— _ 
Y as 

ae —— 
eS) ~ 

~ 
& — 
St — 

_— ~ 
— _— 
On ZL 

F oS 

— ~ 4 
oOoO- 

—_ 

_ ~ 
— a- 
~ _ 

—_— -~ ~ 
~ ~ —_ 
— to ~ 
— —_— 


c 


ind it is entirely possible that his employ- 


ADE 
ment of the motif stems from the same place. 


C 


C 


Hungarian and Ge 





( 


é 


anck Sym 
Roman Catholic missal as 


p= 
—~ 
OO 
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— 
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A — 
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— 
SC = 
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= 3 
CS > 
Av 
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= 
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C 


referring to t 


t 


bv M. d’Indya torculus, 


The second germinal motif of the Fr 


ippears in the Solesmes edition of the 


é 


© 
c 





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; This “torculus” appears elsewhere in the music of César Franck. It is, for exam- 

ple, the germinal motif of his violin sonata and his piano quintet. 

| In the outline of the symphony which follows, the derivation of the themes 
from the germinal motifs is indicated with brackets over the quotations. When 
passing tones have been inserted between essential notes, the essential notes are 
indicated with crosses. 


I 
Lento, D minor,* 4/4 time. The symphony opens with a slow introduction, 
; beginning in the ‘celli and basses with the first germ motif in its full, thematic 


© iorm: 


*'This work is said to be in D minor because the first movement opens and closes in that 
key. Actually, D minor plays a comparatively small part in the proceedings, at least by contrast 
with the emphasis upon the principal tonality in the classic symphonic form. The unorthodox 
freedom of Franck’s key-plan here and elsewhere is part and parcel of that famous Franckian 
chromaticism which led Claude Debussy to leave Franck’s class at the Paris Conservatory with 
the remark that he did not desire to study with a teacher whose only precept was ‘Modulate, 
modulate, modulate.” ‘This aspect of Franck’s style has been traced by some authorities to the 
influence of Liszt and Wagner, but it is probably due to an equal degree to the composer’s life- 
f long experience as a church organist. The organist, called upon to provide a diffused, atmos- 

pheric background of sound to a church service, is likely to take refuge in a kind of persistent 
side-slipping or dissolving of tonalities. It is worth remarking also that Franck’s orchestration 
in the symphony is clearly beholden to the organ in its handling of the classical instruments 
and in its use of such classical outlaws as the English horn, bass clarinet, tuba and cornet. 
(Just why M. d’Indy’s professor friend did not cast Franck into outer darkness for employing 
the last three of the instruments mentioned as well as the first remains to be explained.) ‘This 
orchestration—one is tempted to call it “registration’—is particularly related to the resonances 
and sonorities of the Parisian organs of Franck’s time, which were somewhat reedier in tone 
than the organs we are used to hearing in America. It should be noted, however, that Franck 
does not by any means write for the orchestra in the organ-like fashion of the symphony in his 
tone poems and choral works. 


i See 





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J — eee rare | EVO SS = z ee 
Dp ey 
continued by the violins one bar later: 
Laat pale 
br fe 2 WN ere 
eS Sen as <a ee / 


Example | is then repeated and worked over. 
The tempo changes to Allegro non troppo and the time to alla breve as the 
main movement opens with the following theme in the violins: 




















Gre Meld A TTS pie pipate Idee 


(Lhe first four bars of this, it will be readily seen, are a new version of Exam- 
ple 1). An important subsidiary phrase appears in the woodwind eight bars 
alter Example 3 as quoted: 























—_ 





WILLIAM F. LARAIA 


first Violinist San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for twenty-five 


years — has resigned in order to devote his time exclusively to 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 763 











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There is a rallentando and fermata, the tempo goes back us) Lento and the time 
signature to 4/4, and the entire introduction (Examples [2 etseq.) is tepeated, 
but in F minor. After this the tempo returns to Allegro non troppo and the time 
to alla breve, and the first theme proper (Examples 3 and 4) is restated, also in 


















F minor. The second theme follows, in the violins in F major: 
7 OS ee 
a — Ae 














grape ele d. eae ae 


leading to the closing subject, which is the second germ motif in its full thematic 
j aspect, given out by violins, trumpets and woodwinds: 


| #26eetee eee eee eee 


The exposition ends with the first bars of Example 6 given out successively by 
solo horn, oboe and flute, each solo ending with a long-held chord. 

















The development also starts with the first measures of Example 6, but in 
the violins, and at a more dramatic pace. Detailed description of this section of 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 765 














the movement would take far too much space. Suffice it here to say that it con- 
cerns itself with both the germinal motifs in their simplest forms as in Examples 
A and B and in their fuller manifestations as Examples | and 6, as well as with 
Examples 2 and 4, with various scale figures, and with at least one episodic 
theme not quoted. 

The development reaches a great climax at the height of which the tempo 
returns to Lento and the time to 4/4, and the recapitulation begins with a 
restatement of the material of the introduction in canon in the brass and lower 
strings under a marching progression of the upper strings, woodwinds and horns, 
which, like Example 14 below, is a kind of lowest common denominator of Ex- 
amples A and B, Once again there is a change to Allegro (not non troppo this 
time) and 4/4 time, and the first theme (Example 3) is restated in E flat minor 
by the strings, with a new answering figure in the woodwind. It is worked over, 
with Example/4, through D minor to D major, in which key the second theme 
(Example 5) is recapitulated, as well as the closing theme, Example 6. ‘The re- 
capitulation ends, as had the exposition, with woodwind solos,en Example 6. 
There is a long coda in D minor beginning with a modulating bass figure not 
quoted, over which Example 4 is given new treatment. In the last bars Example 
| comes back (Lento) and the movement ends on a triumphant D major chord 
like an organ piece of Bach concluding with the teerce de Picardie. 

I] 

Allegretto, B flat minor, 3/4 time. Here a three-part ABA type of slow move- 
ment and a scherzo are telescoped together. ‘The principal theme of the slow 
movement is foreshadowed for 16 bars by the harp and plucked strings. Then it 
appears in the English horn: 








era sire esi baala ebiis 


o/ 


and 1s repeated with fuller orchestration. 








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i Ee ON) OL Gea) lite eu G 


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Featuring Songs from her “’Sunlight and Shade’’ 


Assisting Artists 
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The second part of the slow movement, in B flat major, follows, its theme 
eiven to the violins: 





After some development of this, Example 7 returns in the English horn and 
plucked strings, to conclude the slow movement proper. 


The scherzo..in G minor. immediately follows: 














The development of this theme (or rather of that portion of it given to the 
violins in the above quotation) also involves persistent ghostly references. to 
Example 8. The trio of the scherzo, in E flat major, begins with this clarinet 
theme: 





which is worked over in constant conjunction with the whispering sixteenth 
notes of the strings. 

‘The key returns to G minor and the scherzo (Example 10, violin figure) is 
repeated, but in highly varied form, with Example 7 played off against it. 
Example 7 grows more insistent as the original tonality of B flat minor is rein- 
stated, but through this section too the 16th-note sc herzo idea is persistently 
heard. ‘The coda, poco pit lento, consists of alternating statements of the two 
trio themes (Examples 9 and 11) beginning in B major, but the movement ends 
in B flat major. 

IT] 

Allegro non troppo, D major, alla breve. ‘Vhe ’celli and bassoons have the 

pr incipal theme at the seventh bar: 


ie 1 








Variation and restatement of this lead to the second theme, begun by the brass 
and continued in the strings, in B major: 


13 Crucmpel Bo, > FR violins 


biter finale gadis pa a 


The development begins in B minor with a ponderous ascending and de- 
scending bass figure not altogether unlike Example 4. Shortly, however, the time 
changes to 3/4, and Example 7, the principal theme of the slow movement, is 
reheard, again as an English horn solo, accompanied by running triplets of the 




















SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 767 














first violins. With a return to alla breve there is a comparatively briel develop- 
ment of Example 12 begun high in the violins, in B major. ‘There is a long 
crescendo at the climax of which Example 13 is shouted out by the full orchestra. 
‘This climax subsides, and the last part of the development begins, after a lone- 
held pause, with a return to the ponderous bass figure referred to above, alter- 
nating with suggestions of Example 7 in the woodwind: Another climax is at- 
tained, this time serving to bring in the recapitulation. 

Exaniple12, the principal theme of the movement, is restated by the full 
orchestra in the original key at the outset of the recapitulation, but the second 
theme (Example 13) is omitted, its place being taken by Example 7 from the 
slow movement, now given fortissimo to practically everything in the orchestra 
except the: frst violins, which have an ornamental counterpart against it, but 
within a few bars they, too, take it up. 

Now begins a long coda. Thirteen measures after Example 7 has run its 
course as substitute second theme in the recapitulation, Example 6, the second 
germ theme, is heard in the violins in B flat major. Shortly afterward the basses 
and ‘celli take up this persistent bass figure: 











which, as noted above, is a kind of lowest common denominator of both germ 
motifs, and over it, with the gleam of harps and all the other harmonic and 
instrumental attributes of glory and apotheosis, Examples | and 6 are heard in 
mayestic alternations proceeding through various keys. But neither is given the 
final word, and the symphony ends with Example 12, one of the several joint 
and equal products of both germinal figures. 





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‘laa Musical Association of 
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Baum, Helen 

Batchelder, Lincoln 

Bauer, Mrs. Samuel 
Bechtel, Kenneth K. 
Bechtel, Mrs. Stephen 
Beetz, Mr. G&G Mrs. Hans B. 
Behrend, Mrs. J. F. 

Bell, Mr. G Mrs. Walter 
Bender, Mrs. W. L. 

Benioff, Mr. &G Mrs. David 
Benner, Dr. G Mrs. Alan 
Bentley, Mrs. Charles H. 
Bentley, Marilyn 

Bentley, Mrs. W. H. 

Bepler, Dr. Alice C. 
Berkeley Piano Club 
Berton, Mrs. G. A. 
Beusman, Mrs. Annie P. 
Biber, Mr. & Mrs. George V. 
Bishop, Agnes 

Bjornstad, Mrs. A. W. 
Black, Mrs. Alfred P. 
Blackwelder, Mrs. Eliot 
Blair, Jennie M. 

Bloch, Mrs. F. V. 

Bloom, Charles W. 

Bloom, Mrs. Sam 
Bloomfield, Dr. & Mrs. Arthur L. 
Blum’s 

Boardman, Mrs. Elizabeth Cole 
Bocqueraz, Mr. & Mrs. Leon 
Bogert, Mrs. T. L. 

Boggs, Mrs. A. G. 
Bohemian Symphony Orchestra 
Boland, Mrs. F. Eldred 
Bolton, Mrs. Robert C. 
Booth, Mrs. F. E. 

Bourquin, M. Mitchell 
Bower, Fred L. 

Bowes, Mrs. E. L. 

Bowles, Mrs. George M. 
Boyd, Hal 

Boyle, Nina 

Bracher, Louise P. 

Braden, Mrs. H. Robert 
Bradley, Mrs. James Parks 


Brandenstein, Mrs. M. J. 
(Deceased) 

Bransten, Mr. & Mrs. Edward 

Bransten, Mrs. Joseph 

Bransten, Mrs. Manfred 

Breach, Mrs Genoa E. 

Bretz, Marie 

Brewster, Hughes 

Bricca, Mrs. Constantine R. 

Brooke, Mrs. Henry L 

Brooks, Mrs. B. M. 

Brooks, George W. 

Brown, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 

Brown, Mrs. Cabot 

Brown, Mrs. Hillyer 

Brown, Mrs. |. I. 

Brown, Mrs. L. C. 

Brownell, MiSs eee 

Brownstone, Mrs. Louis H. 

Bruce, Mr. & Mrs. Starr 

Brunn, Dr. Harold 

Brunnier, H. J. 

Bruns, Margaret 

Buchanan, Lynda 

Buckwalter, Mrs. Edna W. 

Bugbee, Mrs. Lee 

Bull, Mrs. Alpheus 

Bull, Mrs. Edward Cline 

Bullard, Robert P. 

Bullion, Mrs. Alice 

Bullis, Mrs. Edward A. 

Bullock and Jones Co. 

Burckhardt, Caroline 

Bush, Mr. & Mrs. Philip 

Butte, Mrs. C. Felix 

Butte, Felix, Jr. 

Cahn, Mrs. Mayer |. 

Cahn, Mr. & Mrs. Ralph G. 

California Club of California 

Camp, Mr. & Mrs. Harry 

Campbell, Douglas 

Campbell, Mrs. Grace P. 

Campbell, Mrs. John D. 

Campiche, Dr. Paul 

Carlson, Mrs. Arthur W. 

Carrigan, Mrs. Andrew 

Catlin, Miss B. M. 

Cella, Alma 

Chamberlain, Mary Alicia 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Weston P. 


nll) 














Chapman, Mrs. C. C. 
Charles, Martin A. 
Charles, Mrs. Raymond 
Charpiot, Mrs. Henry Charles 
Chipman, Mrs. W. F. 
Clara, Madame 

Clark, Mrs. B. V. 

Clark, Mrs. Dearborn 
Clark, Mrs. Herbert W. 
Clark, Mrs. Tobin 
Clark, Mrs. Warren D. 
Clay, Maude C. 
Clayton, A. Florence 
Clift, Mrs. iN, 

Cline, Dr. John W. 
Coblentz, Mrs. Lambert 
Cody, Mrs. Bernard A. 


Coggins, Mr. & Mrs. Shirley M. 


Coldwell, Mrs. Colbert 

Cole, Andrew M. 

Cole, Ernest R. 

Colman, Mr. & Mrs. Jesse C. 
Cook, Mrs. W. H. 

Cooper, Mrs. C. M. 

Cooper, Ethel 

Cope, Mrs. Walter B. 


Cordes, Dr. & Mrs. Frederick C. 


Covell, Dr. Charles Vernon 
Craig, Mrs. V. H. 
Crawford, Fannie M. 
Creed, Mrs. W. E. 

Crim, Grace M. 

Cuddy, John 

Davis, Dr. & Mrs. Albert D. 
Davis, Mrs. Frances L. 
Davis, Mrs. John F. 
Davis, Louise 

Davis, Sarah Russell 
Dearing, Dr. Bradford F. 
de Bruyn, Ge 

Deering, Mrs. Robert L. 
de la Harpe, J. 

Delaney, Marion 

de Latour, Mrs. Georges 
de Lee, Mrs. Edith 
Dempster, Mrs. L. R. 
Dennis, Charles M. 

de Pins, Marquise 
Dernham, Mrs. Irene M. 
Dewey, Constance M. 

de Wit, Mrs. Harry 
Dieterich-Post Company 
Dill, Mr. & Mrs. Marshall 
Dilsheimer, Mrs. Sara 
Dodson, Mrs. L. Polk, Jr. 
Don Lee 

Donohoe, Katharine 
Dray, Mrs. Frank R. 
Drexler, Mrs. Elise 
Dryfoos, Mrs. Beatrice G. 
Duncan, Mrs. Arthur L. 
Durden, Robert 

Dutton, Mrs. Dunn 
Dyer, Joseph H. 

Earhart, Gertrude 

Earle, Mrs. Marie E. 
Eastwood, Alice 

Ebright, Mrs. George 
Edoff, Mrs. Frank J. 
Edwards, Mrs. Elizabeth D. 
Edwards, Mrs. J. P. 
Egan, Mrs. |. J. 

Ehrlich, Philip S. 
Einstein, Elsa B. 
Eisenbach, David R. 
Eisner, Mrs. Norman A. 
Eldridge, Anita 

Elkus, Mrs. Charles de Y. 
Ellis, Willard L. 

Eloesser, Herbert 

Emge, Ludwig M. D. 
Eppinger, Mrs. J., Jr. 
Epstein, Mrs. Milton H. 
Epstein, Dr. Norman N. 
Epstein, Mrs. Sarah 
Erskine, Mrs. Morse 
Esberg, Alfred |. 

Esberg, Mrs. Milton H. 
Etienne, Victor, Jr. 
Evans, Mr. & Mrs. Harry L. 
Evers, Mrs. Albert John 


7/9 |? 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Fairmont Hotel 

Falk, Edna Sally 

Farquhar and Heimbucher 
Faure, Victor C 

Faust, Ida 

Fee, Marcia G. 
Feigenbaum, L. B. 
Feigenbaum, Mrs. Louis 
Fennimore, Mrs. W. D. 
Ferguson, Mrs. R. Craig 
Field, Mrs. Alexander 
Fisher, Haldane S. 
Fitzgerald, Amanda 
Fitzgerald, Mrs. R. M. 
Flammer, Charles 
Fleischman, Mrs. M. R. 
Fleishman, Mrs. S. G. 
Fletcher, Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence S. 
Floyd, Mrs. B. Creelman 
Folendorf, Gertrude 
Folger, Mrs. Roy S. 
Follansbee, Mrs. A. W., Jr. 
FOX Rone. 

Frank, Mrs. Jennie L. 
Frank, Lt. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Frankenau, Mrs. Max 
Frederick, Mr. G Mrs. Max 
French, Dr. Lindol R. 
Friedlander, Mrs. Eva 
Friedlander, Fanny 
Friedman, Mrs. Henry A. 
Fries, Mr. G Mrs. Frank H. 
Fries, William M. 

Fuller, Mrs. George 

Fulmer, Dr. Charles C. 
Funsten, Mrs. J. J. 

Gale, Mrs. Maurice 
Galland, Mrs. E. R. 
Galgiani, Dr. and Mrs. John V. 
Gamble, Elizabeth F. 
Gantner, Mrs. John O. 
Gardiner, Mrs. Frank H. 
Gardner, Mrs. Klenneth 
Gardner, Mrs. N. L. 
Garfinkel, Max 

Garland, Dr. & Mrs. L. H. 
Geisenhofer, Mrs. O. W. 
Gerbode, Dr. & Mrs. Frank 
Getz, Mrs. M. J. 
Ghirardelli, Mrs. Alfred 
Ghirardelli, D. Lyle 

Gibson, Dr. & Mrs. Arthur Collis 
Gilbert, A. M. & Company 
Gill, Mrs. Roy R. 

Glenn, Dr. & Mrs. Robert A. 
Gloor, Ernest 

Glover, Dr. Mary E. 
Godchaux, Belen & Josephine 
Goldman, Mrs. Robert L. 
Goodale, ‘Mrs. George W. 
Goode, Mrs. Percy G. 
Goodfellow, aes J. Downey 
Goodheart, (e 

Goodman, ie ‘Isaac 
Goodrich, Chauncey S. 
Gordon, Mrs. William 
Gould, Mrs. Jason 
Gradwohl, Mrs. David 
Grant, Mrs. Spencer 

Gray, Frances H. 

(In memory of Alice M. Gray) 
Gray, Mrs. Horace 
Greathead, Mrs. Norman J. 
Greefkens, Geraldine 
Greenberg, Mrs. Maurice S. 
Greenberg, Mrs. Stuart N. 
Greene, Mrs. A. Crawford 
Greene, Louis C. 

Greenwell, Mrs. J. O. 
Greenhood, Frances 
Greenlee, Mrs. Frederick L. 
Gregory, Mrs. Donald M. 
Gresham, Dean J. Wilmer 
Griffin, Miriam 

Grobe Music Company 
Grosjean, C. E. Rice Milling Co. 
Guggenhime, Mrs. Richard E. 
Gunst, Mrs. M. A. 

Gunst, Mr. & Mrs. Morgan A. 
Gustafson, Amaley 

Haas, Mrs. Walter, Jr. 





(Continued) 


Haase Mrs. Elizabeth 
Haber Mrs. Samuel B. 
Hackett, C. Nelson 
Haefn er, Mrs. Emma 
Haines, J. Wilbur 
Hale, Mrs. Harriett G. 
Hall, Mrs. Sherwood 
Hallawell Seed Company 
Hamilton, Betty 
Hamitlon, Mrs. Edward Morse 
Hamilton, Mrs. Noble 
Hammond, Sarah S. 
Hamshaw, Mrs. Walter 
Hancock Bros. 
Handlon, Mrs. Joseph H. 
Hanford, Mrs. Lloyd D. 
Hanna, Mrs. Richard J. 
Hannah, Mrs. C. C. 
Harding, Helen 
Hardy, Mrs. Sumner 
Harris, Mrs. L. W. 
Harrison, Mrs. Maurice 
Hart, Mrs. Walter Morris 
Haseltine, Mrs. Charles 
Hawley Forge and Mfg. Co. 
Hayden, Curtis 
Hayden, J. R. 
Hayman, Mrs. Alvin 
Haywood, Mrs. Marshall, Jr. 
Head, Mrs. F. G Mabel K 
Heimann, Mrs. Richard 
Heller, Mrs. Walter D. 
Hellman, Mrs. F. J. 
Hellwig, C. A. 
Henderson, Mrs. F. B., Sr. 
Hengstler, Mrs. Louis 
Hennessy, Aileen M. 
Herron, Eugenia L., M.D. 
Herz, Hildegard 
Hess, Teresa 
Hewlett, Mrs. A. W. 
Hexol, Inc. 
Hill, Mrs. Harry 
Hiller, Edna 
Hilp, Harry mal: 
Hinze, Clara 
Hirschkind, Ww. 
Hobart, Mrs. Lewis P. 
Hockenbeamer, Mrs. A. F. 
Hodges, Mrs. E. S. 
mela es J 
Hoisholt, Mrs. Andrew W. 
Hopkins, Mrs. Samuel 
Horsburg, Mrs. James 
Hotel Canterbury 
Hotel Mark Hopkins 
Hotel Stewart 
Hotel Whitcomb 
Hougaard, Mrs. W. F. 
Houghtelling, Mrs. William 
Howell, Albert J. 
Howell, John Thomas 
Howlett, Mrs. Frank 
Hughes, Mrs. Thomas R. 
Hunter, Mrs. Thomas B. 
Hurrle, Etna E. 
Hutchens, Mrs. F. C. 
Hyman, Mrs. Vera R. 
Hyman, Mrs. William L. 
Isenberg, Mrs. R. A. 
Jacobs, Mrs. Monroe B. 
Jacobs, Rebecca 
Jacques, Mrs. Joseph R. 
Janney, Mrs. Frederick F. 
Jeddis, Mrs. Alphonse 
Johnson, Mrs. George S. 
Johnson, Mrs .Grace Noble 
Johnson, Mrs. Walter S. 
Johnston, Mr. & Mrs. 
Clarence Loran 
Jones, Mrs. Marie C. 
Jordan, Mrs. David Starr 
Jordan, Mahlon K 
Joseph, Sigmund 
Kahn, Mrs. Beatrice M. 
Kahn, Mrs. Francesca L. 
Kahn, Mrs. Ira 
Kahn, Samuel 
K,alenborn, Mrs. A. S. 
Katharine Branson School 
Kauffman, Mr. & Mrs. Sol 


SAN FRANCISCO 


a PE: cane 





+. Nr Ye 


en OF, 


Pre ee wee ee we, 





Kaufmann, Mrs. A. 

Keator, Mrs. B. C. 

Keenan, Mrs. Hubbard 
Kelley, Mrs. Bettie 

Kelley, Walter S. 

Kelly, Mrs. Louise 

Kelly, Mrs. T. Henshaw 
Kent, Arthur H. 

Kerr, Dr. & Mrs. William J. 
Keyes, Edna L. 

Kiersted, Mrs. Henry S. 
King Extract Company 
King, Percy L. 

Kirk, Mrs. Joisah H. 
Kirkham, Mrs. Francis 
Kirkwood, Mrs. R. C. 
Kirkwood, Mrs. R. C., Jr. 
Klumpkey, Julia 

Knox, Mrs. John B. 
KohImoos, John H. 

Kohn, Mrs. Simon 

Korbel, Caroline 

Koshland, Mrs. Abraham 
Koshland, Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. 
Kroll, Dr. & Mrs. Frederick W. 
Lacey, Joseph C. 

Lacy, Mrs. George S. 
Lamont, Donald Y. 
Landels, Mrs. E. D. 
Lansburgh, S. Laz 
Lansdale, Mrs. Philip M. 
Lapham, Mrs. Lewis H. 

la Rue, Mrs. C. L 

Lasky, Mrs. M. 

Lavenson, Sara 

Laws, Mrs. C. L. 

Leavens, Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. 
Lee, Mrs. Russell V. 
Lehmann, Mrs. Adolph 
Leib, William F. 

Lengfeld, K. H. 

Lens, Mrs. Frances 
Leonard, Ramona A. 
Leonardini, Josephine 
Letcher, B. W. 

Levy, Clara M. 

Levy, Elaine A. 

Levy, Emma G. 

Levy, Mrs. Fernand 

Levy, Harry J. 

Levy, Martha 

Levy, S. D. 

Lewis, Mrs. Gilbert N. 
Lichtenstein, Mrs. Joy 
Liebenthal, Mrs. A. 
Liebman, Mrs. Maurice 
Lilienthal, Mrs. A. G. 
Lilienthal, B. P. 

Lilienthal, Jean 

Lilienthal, Mrs. Jesse W., Jr. 
Lilienthal, Mr. G Mrs. Samuel 
Lisberger, Mrs. S. J. 

Liston, Mrs. Lester 
Livermore, Mrs. Norman B. 
Livingston Bros., Inc. 
Livingston Lawrence. Jr. 
Livingston, Mrs. Samuel W. 
Logan, Mrs. John 
Lombardi, Ethel P. 

Long, Mr. & Mrs. J. A. 
Loustan, Mme. L. 

Lowe, William H. 
Lowenberg, Albert J. 
Lowenthal, Mrs. W. B. 
Lowrey, Mrs. Alan J. 

Lowy, Mrs. Benno 

Lyman, Mrs. Oliver 
McAlister, Mrs. J. W. 
McBaine, Mrs. J. P. 
McBride, Rexford W., M.D. 
McCreary, Mrs. F. C. 
McCreery, Mrs. Richard 
McDonald, Mrs. Juilliard M. 
McGaw, Mrs. John 

McKee, Mrs. Albert B. 
McLaughlin, Mrs. Alfred 
McLean, Goldberg Bowen Co. 
McNear, Mrs. F. W. 
McNear, Mrs. George P. 
Macey, Mrs. James G. 
Mack, Mrs. A. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Mailliard, Mr. & Mrs. J. W., Jr. 
Majors, Dr. Ergo A. 

Mangin, Mrs. J. N., Jr. 
Marcus-Lesoine, Inc. 
Marshall, Mrs. Stewart M. 
Martenet, Mr. & Mrs. Randolph W. 
Martin & Brown 

Marwedel, Mrs. C. W. 
Mason, Gertrude 

Mayer, Mrs. Henry L. 
Mayes, Mrs. Carolyn S. 
Meade, Mr. & Mrs. William A. 
Mears, Professor & Mrs. Eliot G. 
Mendelson, Mrs. Julius 
Mendessolle, Evelyn 
Menizes, Constance 
Merillion, Mrs. Ralph 
Metcalf, Mrs. John B. 
Metlar, George W. Co., Inc. 
Meyer, Adolph C. 

Meyer, Mrs. Alfred F. 
Meyer, Julian J. 

Meyer, Luther 

Meyer, Mrs. Martin A. 
Meyer, Mrs. Minnie 
Meyerhoff, Mrs. Faul 
Middlemas, Mrs. Stuart 
Milbank, Mrs. Robbins 
Miles, Dorothy 

Miller, Mrs. Harry East 
Miller, Mrs. Harry East, Jr. 
Miller, Dr. Miriam 

Mills, Gwladys- 

Milton, Mrs. Maxwell C. 
Mintzer, Mauricia T. 
Mitchell, Sydney B. 

Moffat, Henrietta 

Moffitt, James K. 
Monteagle, Mr. and Mrs. Paige 
Moore, James R. 

Moore, Mrs. Joseph A., Jr. 
Morgan, Mrs. Horace W. 
Morgan, Norton J. 

Morgan, Mr. & Mrs. William O. 
Morrisey, Mrs. John 
Morrison, Mrs. Lewis F. 
Morrissey, Mrs. E. J. 

Morse, Clarence G. 
Mosagrave, Alicia 

Mosher, Mrs. Isabel 

Moulin, Gabriel Studios 
Mower, R. H. 

Mueh, Mrs. W. G. 

Mulford, Mrs. Walter 
Murdock, Mrs. William C., Jr. 
Murphy, Eugene F. 
Musante, Mrs. A. S. 

Myers, Mrs. L. A. 

Nathan, Mr. & Mrs. John J. 
Nature’s Herb Company 
Nelson, Mr. & Mrs. Ralph R. 
Neuhaus, Eugen 

Newhall, Mrs. E. W., Jr. 
Newhall, Mrs. Marion Foster 
Newman, Mrs. Alfred 
Newman, Mrs. William 
Nichols, Henry D. 
Nickelsburg, Mr. G Mrs. M. S. 
Nickelsburg, Mrs. S. 

Nields, James F. 

Nielsen, Mrs. Erich 

Nigh, Mrs. W.H., Jr. 
Noble, Mrs. Charles, Jr. 
Noble, Mrs. Ethel E. 

Nock, H. M. 

Northern California Harp Society 
Norton, Elizabeth 

Ochse, Mrs. L. R. 

O’Connell, Mrs. Phil 
O'Connor Moffatt and Co. 
Olcese, Margaret T. 

Older, Mrs. B. J. 

Oliver, Mrs. A. Leslie 
Olney, Mrs. Warren, Jr. 
Ophuls, Louise 

Oppen, Mrs. George 

Orella, Mrs. F. R. 

Orrick W. H. 

Otis, Mrs. James 

Otto, Mrs. George 

Pacific Musieal Society 


(Continued ) 


Page, Dr. & Mrs. B. H. 

Page, Mr. & Mrs. Charles 

Palmer, Mrs. Thomas E. 

Parker, Mr. & Mrs. C. F. 

Paschel, Philip P. 

Patek, Dr. Sadie Dernham 

Pennell, Elizabeth 

Peterson, Neil H. & Co. 

Pettit, Dr. A. V. 

Phillips, Esther B. 

Phillips, Herbert F. 

Philomath Club 

Pieper, Tecla 

Pierce-Rudolph Storage Co., Ltd. 

Pigott, John T. 

Pischel, Mrs. Kaspar 

Podesta & Baldocchi 

Poetz, B. N. 

Polliapwvars: 

Polytechnic High School 
Music Club 

Posey, Mrs. Mary M. 

Potter, Alice, M.D. 

Potter, Mrs. Ashton H. 

Potter, Mrs. J. Sheldon 

Prager, Alice S. 

Preddey, Walter G. 

Price, Christine 

Raab, Alexander 

Rademaker, Harriet E. 

Ransohoff’s, Inc. 

Rathbone, King & Seeley, inc. 

Redewill, Dr. F. L. 

Reed, Dr. Alfred C. 

Reed, Laurence E. 

Rehfisch, Mrs. H. W. 

Reinheimer, Isidor 

Renny, Jessie 

Rettenmayer, Mrs. J. P. 

Reynolds, Lloyd R. 

Reynolds, Dr. & Mrs. Ralph A. 

Rhine, Esther 

Richard, Mr. & Mrs. Harry 

Rinder, Rev. Reuben R. 

Rives, Harold W. 

Robinson, Mrs. Mabel R. 

Rodgers, Mrs. Eben, Jr. 

Rodolph, George W. 

Roe, Mrs. Hall 

Rogers, Mrs. William Lister 

Roos Bros. 

Roos, Col. &G Mrs. Robert A. 

Rosenbaum, Mrs. Charles W. 

Rosenberg, Mrs. T. L 

Rosener, Leland S. 

Rosenfeld, Max L. 

Rosenshine, Mrs. Monroe 

Roth, Adolph 

Roth, Mrs. Angela Wing 

Rowe, Mrs. Albert H. 

Rubke, F. W. 

Rudd, Mrs. Gertrude H. 

Ryan, Mrs. H. J. 

Sahlein, Mrs. Henry 

St. Francis Wood Musical Club 

Salomon, Mrs. Leon 

Salz, Mrs. Howard H. 

Salz, Milton H. 

Sampson, Dr. G Mrs. John J. 

San Francisco Musical Club 

Saroni, Mrs. Alfred B. 

Sbarboro, Mrs. Alfred 

Schmidt, Mrs. B. H. 

Schmiedell, Mrs. E. G. 

Schubert, Richard 

Schurman, Mrs. Robert 

Schwamm, Louise 

Schwartz, Mrs. Archie 

Schwartz, Sidney L. 

Scott, Mrs. B. C 

Seckels, Alice 

Selene, Rose L. 

Sellman, Mrs. W. H. 

Shainwald, Mrs. R. S. 

Sharp, Fannie & Violet 

Sharp, Dr. and Mrs. J. G. 

Shaw, Dr. E. B. 

Sherman, Mrs. Julius 

Shuey, Clarence A. 

Simkins, Mrs. Cordelia L. 

Simmons, Mrs. G. C. 


773 








Simon Bros. 

Simon, Re.0)} 

Simonds Machinery Co. 
Simpson, Mrs. A. W. 
Simpson, Grace Y. 
Simpson, Walter S. 

Sims, Mrs. R. M. 
Sinsheimer, May 
Sinsheimer, Mrs. Samuel C. 
Sinton, Mrs. Edgar 

Sinton, Stanley H. 

Sinton; Mrs. Stanley, Jr. 
Sir Francis Drake Hotel 
Sisters of the Holy Family 
Sloss, Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. 
Smallwood, Stanley C. 
Smith, Dorothea K. 

Smith, Mrs. Irving H. 
Smithy iM. iL; 

Smith, Mrs. Stuart F. 
Sommer & Kaufmann 
Sorenson, Nellie 
Southworth, Estelle 
Sperry, Mrs. Horace B. 
Sprague, Frances A. 
Stafford, Mrs. Douglas D. 
Starr, Mrs. George W. 
Stebbins, Mrs. Evelyn W. 
Stebbins, Lucy Ward 
Steinhart, Hilda 

Steinhart, Rose 

Stephens, Mrs. George C. 
Stewart, Mr. &G Mrs. Charles A. 
Stich, Mrs. Camilla Frank 
Stockton, Eleanor 

Stolz, Max 

Stone, Mrs. Abraham Lincoln 
Stout, Mabel 

Strassburger, Mrs. Lawrence 
Strong, Beulah 

Stull, Florence 

Sugarman, E. 

Sullivan, Frank E. 
Sussman, Mrs. Emilie 
Sutro, Mrs. Alfred 

Sutro, Barbara 

Sutro, Mrs. John A. 


Amberg-Hirth 

Baldwin Piano Company 
Berkeley Piano Club 

Blum’s 

Bohemian Symphony Orchestra 
Borden’s Dairy Delivery Co. 
Bullock & Jones Co. 
California Barrell Co. 
California Club of California 
Dieterich-Post Co. 

Don Lee 

Emporium, The 

Fairmont Hotel 

Farquhar & Heimbucher 
Gilbert, A. M. & Co. 

Grobe Music Co. 

Grosjean, C. E. Rice Milling Co. 
Gump, S. G. & Co. 

Hallawell Seed Co. 

Hancock Bros. 

Hawley Forge & Mfg. Co. 
Hexol, Inc. 

Hotel Canterbury 


ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 


Sutro, Mrs. Oscar 

Swett, Wilbur F., M.D. 
Syme, Myra 

Terwilliger, Mrs. H. L. 
Tetlow, Mary A. 

Thelen, Max 

Thomas, Arthur F. 
Thomas, Mrs. Frederick F., Jr. 
Thompson, Barbara Beach 
Thompson, Mrs. James A. 
Thomson, Mrs. Herbert S. 
Threlkeld, Mrs. M. C. 
Timlow, Mrs. William F. 
Tobin, Mrs. Cyril 

Tolenon, Mrs. Edward C. 
Torney, Mrs. E. J. 

Towne, Mrs. James W. 
Toye, Mrs. Florence M. 
Tresidder, Mrs. Don 
Tripp, Mrs. Kenneth C. 
Trouillet, Mme. J. 
Trouillet, Mrs. J. P. 

Unna, Warren W. 

Upton, Mrs. John 

Urist, Irving M. 

Vagedes, Mrs. Emma 

van Deinse, Mrs. F. C. 

van Diggelen, A. H. 

van Pelt, Mrs. H. M. 

van Wyck, Mrs. Sydney M. 
Vincent, Mrs. W/. Germain 
Vittoria Colonna Club 
von Adelung, Mrs. Edward 
Voorhees, W.R. 

Wagner, Mrs. George 
Wagner, Helen R. 

Waine, Dr. G Mrs. Hans 
Waldeck, Mrs. Eda 
Waldrop, Mrs. Uda 
Walker, Mrs. P. J. 
Wallace, Mrs. Morton 
Wallace, Mrs. R. W. 
Walshe, P. 

Ware, Mrs. Edward R. 
Warren, Mr. & Mrs. Lingan A. 
Waterman, Mrs. Jesse H. 


FIRMS AND ORGANIZATIONS 


Hotel Mark Hopkins 

Hotel St. Francis 

Hotel Stewart 

Hotel Whitcomb 

Katherine Branson School 
King Extract Co. 

Liebes, H. & Co. 

Livingston Bros., Inc. 
McLean, Goldberg Bowen Co. 
Magnin, |. & Co. 
Marcus-Lesoine, Inc. 

Martin & Brown 

Metlar, George W. Co., Inc. 
Moulin, Gabriel Studios 
Musicians’ Union Local No. 6 
Nature’s Herb Co. 

Northern California Harp Society 
O’Connor Moffatt & Co. 
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 
Pacific Musical Society 
Pauson, Frank & Sons 


Peterson, Neil H. & Co. 





(Continued) 


Weed, Mrs. Benjamin C. 
Weill, Mr. G Mrs. Michel D. 
Weingarten, Mrs. Milton 
Weller, Dr. G Mrs. Theodore \W. 
Whiting, Mrs. Randolph V. 
Wiener, Grace B 
Wiener, Zelda 
Wiggin, Mrs. Mary A. 
Wihr, Mrs. George M. 
Wilbur, Dorothea E. 
Wildburg, Mrs. Irving |. 
Williams, Charles F. 
Williams, Stephen 
Williamson, Mrs. G. G. 
Willis, Mrs. E. N. 
Willits, Anna T. 
Wison, Mrs. A. W. 
Wilson, Mary E. 
Wise, Mrs. E. W. 
Wisecarver, R. P. 
Wiseman, Georgea 
Whitney, William W. 
W/Olit, Mrsy ui. ie 
Wolf, Mrs. Paul T. 
Wolff, Mrs. M. L. 
Wolfsohn, Dr. & Mrs. Fred 
Women Musicians’ Club of 

San Francisco 
Wood, Hazel G Myrtle 
Wood, Leonard E. 
Wood, Lois 
Woodruff, A. W. 
Woodward, Gertrude B. 
Wormser, Mrs. Paul 
Wright, Mrs. H. E. 
Wurkheim, S. & Brother 
Wuthman, Mrs. E. F. 
Yabroff, Mrs. Samuel 
Yeazell, Louise A., M.D. 
Young, Mrs. H. S. 
Zaruba, Mrs. V. 
Zentner, Mrs. Julius 

in memory of Nathan Firestone 
Ziel, Mrs. John G 
Zimmerman, Mrs. Philip 
Zimmerman, Rudolph 
Zook, Edgar T. 


Philomath Club 

Pierce-Rudolph Storage Co., Ltd. 

Pisani Printing & Publishing Co. 

Podesta & Baldocchi 

Polytechnic High School 
Music Club 

Ransohoff’s, Inc. 

Rathbone, King & Seeley, Inc. 

Roos Bros. 

Rosenfeld’s Sons, John 

St. Francis Wood Musical Club 

San Francisco Musical Club 

Sherman, Clay & Co. 

Simon Bros. 

Simonds Machinery Co. 

Sir Francis Drake Hotel 

Sommer & Kaufmann 

Vittoria Colonna Club 

White House, The 

Women Musicians’ Club of 
San Francisco 

Wurkheim, S. & Brother 





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7174 


SAN FRANCISCO 


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San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 


33RD SEASON, 1944-45 


The season consisted of 54 performances in a period of 18 weeks between 
December 1, 1944 and April 14, 1945. The Musical Association of San Francisco 
presented eight Friday afternoon concerts, four ‘Thursday night concerts, twelve 
Saturday night concerts, four Young People’s concerts, a Brahms festival of 
three programs, and one concert in Fresno. By arrangement with the Musical 
Association, the Art Commission presented four concerts and eight performances 
of the orchestra with the Ballet ‘Vheater, while the Standard Oil Company of 


California sponsored ten broadcasts. 


The repertoire for the season follows. Unless otherwise specified, all works 
listed below were played at the Musical Association’s San Francisco concerts. 
Art Commission concerts are designated with the initials AC, Young People’s 
concerts with YP, Standard Symphony broadcasts with SS, Ballet ‘heater per- 
formances with BT, and the concerts of the Brahms festival with BF. The names 
of soloists and guest conductors are added in parentheses after the titles of the 
works they performed, except that the initials YP alone indicate the guest con- 
ductorship of Rudolph Ganz in the Young People’s concerts, and BT alone the 
euest conductorship of Antal Dorati and Mois Zlatin in the Ballet Theater 
series. One asterisk indicates first performance in San Francisco, while two 
indicate first performance anywhere. 

ADAM: BERLIOZ: 
Giselle’ (BT) Overture to Benvenuto Cellini (SS) 


Fantastic Symphony (SS) 
Suite from The Damnation of Faust (SS) 


BACH: Pian eee LES 
ey ©. RA tbe op arold in Italy (Ferenc Molnar) 
eho ene Concerto No. 3 (Carlos Cha- Roman Camnival Overture (AC) 
vez ; e ee As 
eee Concerto in E (AC) (Yehudi Menu- Pee Ce. 
11) 
(arr, Leonardi) ‘Poccata and Fugue in) pepRNSTEIN: 
minor (AC) Fancy Free (BT) 
(arr. Wood) Selections from Suite No. 6 | 
BLOCH: 
BATES: Violin Concerto (Naoum Blinder) 
*“Kaneen (Ss) (Eirent Kurtz) BRAHMS: 
Violin Concerto (BF) (Erica Morini) 
BEETHOVEN: Piano Concerto No. 2 (BF) (Artur Schna- 
Concerto No. 1 (Ania Dorfmann. Also by bel) 
Maxim Schapiro on SS) Academic Festival Overture (BF and SS) 
Concerto No. 3 (Artur Rubinstein) ‘Tragic Overture (BF) 
Concerto No. 4 (Artur Schnabel) Rhapsody for Alto, Male Chorus and Or- 
Overture to Coriolan (AC) chestra (AC) (Marian Anderson, Mu- 
Overture to Eemont (YP) nicipal Chorus) 
Suite from Prometheus (SS) (*arr. Hertz) Five Songs (Dusolina Gian- 
(*arr. Dorati) Moonlight Sonata (BT) nini) (BE) 
Symphony No. 1 (YP) Song of Fate (BF) (Municipal Chorus) 
Symphony No. 4 (Carlos Chavez) Symphony No. 1 (BF) 
Symphony No. 5 (Fresno) Symphony No. 2 (BF) 
Symphony No. 7 (SS) Symphony No. 3 (BF) 
Symphony No. 8 (AC) Symphony No. 4+ (BF) 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA dd 








BRUBECK: 

**California Suite (AC) (Howard Bru- 
beck) 

CHARPENTIER: 

Selections from Louise (AC) (Grace 


Moore, Raoul Jobin, Municipal Chorus) 


CHAUSSON: 
Poeme (Jascha Heitetz) 
Poeme (Lilac Garden) 
Wolski) 
CHAVEZ: 
*Sarabande (Carlos Chavez) 
*Concerto for Four Horns and Orchestra 
(Herman Trutner, Dino Lucchesi, 


(BT) (William 


Charles Tryner, Paul Roth: Garlos Gha- 


VeZ) 


CHERUBINI: 


Overture to Anacreon (Carlos Chavez) 


CHOPIN: 
Concerto No. | 
sky) 
Concerto No. 2 (Witold Malcuzynsk1) 


CORELLI: 
(arr. Pinelli) Suite for Strings (Efrem 
Kurtz) 


CRESTON: 


Pastorale and Tarantella 


DAI-KEONG LEE: 


*Haiwalian Festival Overture (YP) 


DEBUSSY : 
Prelude to The Aflernoon of a Faun 
Two Nocturnes (AC) 
Rhapsody for Clarinet and Orchestra (YP) 
(Vernon Jones) 
The Sea 


(AC) (Alexander Brailow- 


DELANEY : 

**Western Star (AC) (Municipal Chorus) 
DELIUS: 

(arr. Dorati) Romeo and Juliet (BT) 
DONIZETTI: 

O Mio Fernando (AC) (Marian Anderson) 
DUPARC: 

Invitation au voyage (Lotte Lehmann) 
ELGAR: 

Enigma Variations 
FERNANDEZ: 

*Batuque (YP) 
FRANCK: 


(arr. Pierne) 
(SS and Fresno) 

Suite from Psyche (SS) 

Symphonic Piece from Redemption (SS) 

Symphony 

Symphonic Variations (SS) (E. Robert 
Schmitz) 


776 


Prelude, Chorale and .Fugue 





GANZ: 


*Suite for Orchestra (YP) 


GLUCK: 
Overture to Jphigenia in Aulis (SS) 
(arr. Nordoff) Tally-Ho (BT) 


GLINKA: 


Overture to Russlan and Ludmilla (SS) 


GOULD: 


American Salute (YP) 


GRETRY: 
Suite from Céphale and Procris (SS) 


GRIFFES: 


The Pleasure Dome of Kublai Khan (YP) 


GRUENBERG: 


*Violin Concerto (Jascha Heifetz) 


GUARNIERI: 


*Danza Brasileira (YP) ° 


HAHN: 
Si mes vers avatent des ailes 
mann) 


HANDEL: 
(**arr. Akon) Passacaglia in G minor 
(and SS) ; 


(Lotte Leh- 


‘ss 


HAYDN: 
Symphony No. 88 (SS) 


HARRIS: 
*Folk Rhythms of Today 


HEROLD: 


Overture to Zampa (SS) (Efrem Kurtz) 


HINDEMITH: 
*Symphonic Metamorphosis of Themes by 
Weber (Efrem Kurtz) 


KABELEVSKY : 
*Symphony No. 2 (SS) 


KALINNIKOFF: 


Symphony No. | 


KHATCHATURIAN: 
*Ballet Suite (SS) (Efrem Kurtz) 


KNIPPER: 
*The Steppe (SS) 


LALO: 
Spanish Symphony 
hin) 


LISZT: 
Concerto No. 2 (SS) 


MAHLER: 
Kindertotenlieder (Dark Elegies) (BT) 
(Edward Wellman) 7 


SAN FRANCISCO 


(Efrem Kurtz) 


(Don Cossacks) 


(AC) (Yehudi Menu- 


(Witold Malcuzynsk1) 








MASSENET: 
Overture to Phédre (YP) 


McDONALD: 
*Scenes from Childhood (YP) (Virginia 
Morgan) 
MENDELSSOHN : 
Italian Symphony (Lorin Maazel) 
MILHAUD: 
*Suite No. 2 from Protée 
MINKUS: 
Don Quixote (BT) 
MOZART: 
Overture to The Elopement from the Serag- 
lio (SS) 
Prague Symphony 
OFFENBACH: 


Bluebeard (BT) 

Parisian Gayeties (SS) (Efrem Kurtz) 
PROKOFIEFF: 

Peter and the Wolf (BT) 

Gala Performance (BT) 

(*arr. Byrns) Suite Diabolique 


RACHMANINOFF: 


Concerto No. 2 (Jan Smeterlin) 


RAVEL: 
Daphnis and Chloe, Suite No. 2 
The Waltz (AC) 


RESPIGHI: 
Old Dances and Airs for the Lute, Second 
Series 


RIETI: 
*Waltz Academy (BT) 


RIMSKY-KORSAKOFF: 


Scheherezade (SS) 


SAINT-SAENS: 


Symphony No. 2 


SCHOENBERG: 
*Chamber Symphony No. 2 
Transfigured Night (Pillar of Fire) 
(Arnold Schoenberg) 
SCHUBERT: 
Overture to Rosamunde (Lorin Maazel) 
Four Songs (Lotte Lehmann) 
Symphony in C major 
SCHUMANN: 


Symphony No. 3 


(BT) 


SHOSTAKOVITCH: 


*Symphony No. 6 


SHVEDOFF: 
Russian Fair (SS) 


STRAVINSKY: 
Petrouchka (BT) 
‘The Rite of Spring 


STRAUSS, JOHANN: 
Artists’ Life Waltz (YP) 
Graduation Ball (BT) 


STRAUSS, RICHARD: 
Death and ‘Transfiguration 
Morgen (Lotte Lehmann) 
Rosenkavalier Waltzes (SS) (Efrem Kurtz) 
Till Eulenspiegel (AC and YP) 


TARTINI: 
Violin Concerto in D (SS) (Joseph 
Szigeti) 


(Don Cossacks) 


(also Fresno) 


THOMSON: 
*Suite from The Plow That Broke the 
Plains 
TSCHAIKOWSKY: 


Aurora’s Wedding (BT) 

Piano Concerto No. 1 (SS) 
kassky) 

Overture to Hamlet (SS) 

Francesca da Rimini 

‘The Swan Lake (BT) 

Waltz of the Flowers (YP) 

Symphony No. 5 (SS) 

Symphony No. 6 (Efrem Kurtz) 


WAGNER: 

Overture to The Flying Dutchman (SS) 

Prelude to Lohengrin (also SS) 

Selections from Parsifal (Dusolina Gian- 
nini, Frederick Jagel, Douglas Beattie, 
Municipal Chorus) 

Ride of the Valkyries (YP) 


WALDTEUFEL: 
Skaters Waltz (SS) (Efrem Kurtz) 


WEBER: 


Overture to Euryanthe (also Fresno) 


Overture to Der Freischutz (YP) 


Overture to Oberon (SS) (Efrem Kurtz) 


(Shura Cher- 


(also SS) 


WEILL: 

Dreigroschenmusik (Judgment of Paris) 
(BT) 

WOLF: 


Anakreons Grab (Lotte Lehmann) 
Er Ist’s (Lotte Lehmann) 








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SAN FRANCISCO 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


779 




















VIOLINS: 


BLINDER, NADUM 
CONCERTMASTER 


HEYES, PETER 


ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


WOLSK!I, WILLIAM 


ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER 


ARGIEWICZ, ARTUR 


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ANDERSON, THEODORE 
FORD, Louis W. 
HOLM, THORSTEIN JENSEN 
GUARALDI, MAFALDA 
SHWEID, HENRY 
EDMUNDS, CICELY 
SCHNEIDER, DAVID 
VAN DYKE, MARCIA 
MYERS, MISCHA 
ROURKE, ROBERT 
GORDOHN, ROBERT 
HAUG, JULIUS 
WEGMAN, WILLEM 
GOUGH, WALTER 
PASMORE, MARY 
LARAIA, ATTILIO F. 
SHAPRD, DAVID 
HELGET, HANS 
BAUER, BEN 

BARET, BERTHE 
PATERSON, JOHN A. 
CHILINSK!I, BRUNO 
KOBLICK, NATHAN 
D! BIANCA, VINCENT 
WRIGHT, HAROLD 


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MOLNAR, FERENG 
PRINCIPAL 


VERNEY, ROMAIN 
WHITE, ALBERT 
WEILER, ERICH 
AKON, ALFRED 
KARASIK, MANFRED 
PETTY, SUZANNE 
VAN DEN BURG, JAC 
MANN, MICHAEL 


PERSONNEL MANAGER: 


PERSONNEL 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUM®X, Conouctor 


tC EEeeS: 


BLINDER, Boris 
PRINCIPAL 


REINBERG, HERMAN 
ARKATOV, JAMES 

BEM, STANISLAS 
ANDERS, DETLEV 
HUGHSON, MARY 
PETTY, WINSTON 
CONNOLLY, CATHERINE 
PASMORE, DOROTHY 
HRANEK, CARL 
SAPHIR, RUTH 


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KARP, PHILIP 
PRINCIPAL 
SCHMIDT, ROBERT E. 
BELL, WALTER 
GUTERSON, AARON 
SCHIPILLIT!I, JOHN 
BUENGER, AUGUST 
STORCH, ARTHUR E. 
ORSINI. JOSEPH 


FLUTES: 


RENZI, PAUL JR. 
SHANIS, RALPH F. 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


PICCOLO: 
BENKMAN, HERBERT 


OBOES: 
REMINGTON, MERRILL 
SHANIS, JULIUS 
SCHIVO, LESLIE J. 


ENGLISH HORN: 
SCH!IVoO, LESLIE J. 


OBOE D’/AMOUR AND 
HECKELPHONE: 
SHANIS, JULIUS 


CLARINETS: 


SCHMITT, RUDOLPH 
BIBBINS, F. C. 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


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BIBBINS, F. C. 


JULIUS HAUG 


BASS CLARINET 
FRAGALE, FRANK 


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KUBITSCHEK, ERNST 
HIBSCHLE, FRANK 
BAKER, MELVILLE 
HRANEK, CARL 


CONTRA BASSOON: 
BAKER, MELVILLE 


HORNS: 
TRUTNER, HERMAN C. 
LUCCHES!, DINO 
TRYNER, CHARLES E., 
ROTH, PAUL 
TRUTNER, HERMAN, JR 


TRUMPETS: 
BusBB, CHARLES, UR. 
BARTON, LELAND S&S. 
KRESS, VICTOR 
MURRAY, EARL 


TROMBONES: 
Gios!, ORLANDO 
SHOEMAKER, ROGERS 
KLOCK, JOHN 


TUBA: 
MURRAY, RALPH 


HARP: 
MORGAN, VIRGINIA 
EVERINGHAM, ANN 


TYMPANI: 
LAREW, WALTER 


PERCUSSION: 
VENDT, ALBERT 
SiNAI, JOSEPH 
GREER, ELWOOD 


PIANO AND CELESTA: 
SHORR, LEV 


LIBRARIAN: 
HAUG, ALMA 


PROPERTY MASTER: 
J. T. HEAVEY 


IN SERVICE WITH THE UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES 


DICTEROW, HAROLD—VIOLIN 
HOUSER, F. S.—VIOLIN 
KHUNER, FELIX—VIOLIN 


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780 


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Ross, NATHAN VIOLIN 
LEPLIN, EMANUEL—VIOLA 
MITCHELL, LUCIEN—VIOLA 


OLSHAUSEN, DETLEV—VIOLA 
CLAUDIO, CESARE—’CELLO 
DE PALMA, ATTILIO—HORN 
ALTMANN, LUDWIG—ORGAN 





SAN FRANCISCO 














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a | : First Brahms Festival Program — Erica Morini, Guest Artist — March 13, 1945 








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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 437 











MUN POCTPAL “CONCERTS 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 439 





440 


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SAN FRANCISCO 














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Musical Association of San Francisco 
MAINTAINING THE 


SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


OFFICERS 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby, President and Managing Director 
E. Raymond Armsby.....................-.. Vice-President Charles<Page:s)000 ee ee Treasurer 
Paul A. Bissinger.............................. Vice-President Howard (Ko oSkinner 2-2 ee Secretary 
Charles? Ro Blythe. Vice-President Geraidi G:sRoss7-2 eee Assistant Secretary 
Garret McEnerney, IlI.....................- Vice-President 
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
Dr. Hans Barkan Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Garret McEnerney, II Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Walter A. Haas Guido J. Musto Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Mrs. E. S. Heller Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 


FINANCE COMMITTEE 


Cc. 0. G. Miller, Chairman 
E. Raymond msby Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Mes. Ashton H. Potter 


Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mes. William Lister Rogers 
Mortimer Fleishhacker 
MUSIC COMMITTEE 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain 


Dr. Hans Barkan Mrs. Tobin Clark J. Emmet Hayden 
Mrs. George T. Cameron Dr. Leo Eloesser Charles G. Norris 


PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 
Mrs. John B. Knox 


Mrs. M. C. Sloss Mrs. James Mills Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan Mrs. Francis Redewill Michel Weill 
YOUNG PEOPLE’S CONCERT OFFICERS 

Mrs. Thomas Page Maillard Mrs. Grace Benoist Mrs. Louis Sloss, Jr. Mrs. Harold K. Faber 

Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Mrs. Walter A. Haas Charles M. Dennis 

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY LEAGUE 
Mis: John=P. Coghlan==. >... =... Chairman Mrs. Francis Redewill...................... Vice-Chairman 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY FORUM 
Mrs. Alan McLenegan, Chairman Ava Jean Barber Frank Winter Martin Skewes-Cox 
John Piel Pamela Marsh Katherine Mulkey Cecil Rideout 
Lt. (j.g.) J. Brandon Bassett Elwyn Thayer Ann Wegman Elizabeth Shaw 
Marcia Robinson Betty Carl Paul Robinson Marilyn Biehl 
BOARD OF GOVERNORS 
E. Raymond ied | Mrs. George Ebright Mrs. E. S. Heller Charles Page 
Mrs. Leonora Wood Armsby Sidney M. Ehrman Walter S. HeHer Mrs. Ashton H. Potter 
Dr. Hans Barkan Albert I. Elkus Mrs. Il. W. Hellman Mrs. Stanley Powell 
Mrs. Edward O. Bartlett Dr. Leo Eloesser William F. Humphre Mrs. William Lister Rogers 
James B. Black Forrest Engelhart Mrs. Marcus S. Koshland Mrs. afoul P. Russell 
Charles R. Blyth Mrs. Harold K. Faber Frederick J. Koster Miss Else Schilling 
Miss Louise A. Boyd Mrs. Paul I. Fagan Gaetano Merola Mrs. M. C. Sloss 
Paul A. Bissinger Mrs. Marshall H. Fisher C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Nicol Smith 
George T. Cameron Mortimer Fleishhacker Mrs. C. O. G. Miller Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain Mrs. J. C. Flowers Edward F. Moffatt Mrs. Powers Symington 
Mrs. John P. Coghlan John F. Forbes Kenneth Monteagle Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor 
Mrs. Elizabeth S. Coolidge Mrs. Frank R. Girard Mrs. Donald Multord Mrs. Cyril Tobin 
Mrs. W. W. Crocker Miss Lutie D. Goldstein Guido J. Musto Mrs. Alfred S. Tubbs 
Mrs. 0. K. Cushing Mrs. Joseph D. Grant Dwight F. McCormack Mrs. Daniel Volkmann 
Mrs. Georges de Latour Farnham P. Griffiths Mrs. Angus McDonald Michel Weill 
Benjamin H. Dibblee Madeleine Haas Garrett McEnerney, I! Mrs. Eli H. Wiel 
Miss Katharine Donohoe Mrs. Walter Haas Mrs. Harold R. McKinnon Leonard E. Wood 
Mrs. Willard H. Durham Mrs. Harry S. Haley R. C. Newell J. D. Zellerbach 
Joseph H. Dyer, Jr. J. Emmet Hayden Charles G. Norris 
STAFF 

Constance Alexander Victor Mohl Deborah Spalding 
Kathleen Lawlor Gerald Ross Curran Swint 
Doris Lowell Joseph Scafidi Virginia Webb 


THE SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Records Exclusively for Victor Red Seal 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 441 





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GUESIT AR TSHiss-OR. Vim eeoimy AE 


Erica Morini was born in Vienna and is the daughter of a violinist. She 
studied with her father and with Ottokar Sevcik, and gave her first recital at 
the age of eight. In the same year she made her first appearance with orchestra, 
playing with the Vienna Philharmonic under the direction of Artur Nikisch. 
Almost immediately afterward, she toured Germany, Poland, Roumania and 
Russia. She was heard for the first time in America at a concert of the New York 
Philharmonic in 1921, Artur Bodanzky conducting. After her first American 
tour she returned to Europe, and did not settle in this country until 1935. She 
has repeatedly given recitals in San Francisco, but this will be her first appear- 
ance with the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 


DusoLINnA GIANNINI is also the product of a musical family. Her father was 
an opera singer, her mother a violinist. She received her first training from her 
father in her native city of Philadelphia and later studied with Marcella Sem- 
brich in New York. She made her debut at a concert of the Schola Cantorum in 
New York in 1923 and for a number of years was active as a concert singer. She 
went to Europe in 1927 and remained there until 1936, devoting herself largely 
to opera. During this period she sang at Covent Garden, in the leading opera 
houses of Berlin, Vienna, Prague and other cities, and at the Salzburg Festival 
under the direction of Bruno Walter and ‘Toscanini. She came back to this 
country in 1936 to join the Metropolitan Opera. She has repeatedly appeared 
with the San Francisco Opera Company, and made her first appearance with 
the San Francisco Symphony on the Art Commission series last year. 


ARTUR SCHNABEL was born in Lipnik, Austria, in 1882. He studied with 
Leschetizky in Vienna and began his concert career in a series of sonata recitals 
with the violinist, Carl Flesch. His reputation grew quickly, and he appeared 
throughout Europe as a solo pianist and chamber music player. Although he 
had given recitals in New York in 1922, his first real American success came 
when he participated in a Brahms festival of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
eleven years later. Since then he has made repeated tours throughout this 
country, specializing particularly in the German classics. He was the first pianist 
to give all of Beethoven’s sonatas in a series of recitals in New York. He has 
edited the Beethoven sonatas and written extensively on technical and esthetic 
matters. Mr. Schnabel was last heard with the San Francisco Symphony 


Orchestra in 1938, when he played the Brahms B flat concerto. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 











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Thirty-third Season 
1944 - 45 
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 
de}: 
FIRST BRAHMS FESTIVAL PROGRAM 


‘TuEspAY, MARCH 13, AT 8:30 


ERICA MORINI, Guest Artist 


“Program 


SYMPHONY NO: 1 IN G@ MINOR, OP US'6S 


Un poco sostenuto - Allegro 
Andante sostenuto 
Un poco allegretto € graz1oso 


Adagio - Allegro non troppo, ma con brio 


INTERMISSION 


TRAGIC ZON TRE URES OPUS 261 


CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA, 
INS D MATORS OPUS 77 


Allegro non troppo 
Adagio 
Allegro giocoso ma non troppo vivace 


Miss MorINI 





wera ns 


It is requested that subscribers who are unable to use their tickets 
kindly phone the Symphony Office—UNderhill 4008—giving location 
of thetr seats that they may be assigned to uniformed men and women. 
This courtesy will be deeply appreciated. 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 445 











446 


JOHANNES BRAHMS, BY WILHELM VON BECKERATH 


SAN FRANCISCO 











bi 


PROGRAM NOTES 


JOHANNES BRAHMS 
1833 - 1897 


By ALFRED FRANKENSTEIN 


(NorEs ON THE WoRrKs OF ‘TopAY’s PROGRAM WILL BE FounpD ON PAGE 453) 

The twentieth century has given itself a new trinity of unassailable great 
men in the domain of music. A hundred years ago it was Haydn, Mozart and 
Beethoven. Fifty years ago, at least in certain circles, it was Berlioz, Liszt and 
Wagener. Now it is Bach, Beethoven and Brahms. 

However fixed it may be today, the constellation of the three B’s is a recent 
discovery. ‘Che musical writings of Bernard Shaw are characteristic of what 
many bright young men were thinking 50 years ago. For Shaw, Brahms is the 
“Leviathan Maunderer,” who “takes an essentially commonplace theme, gives 
it a strange air by dressing it in the most elaborate and far-fetched harmonies; 
keeps his countenance severely (which at once convinces an English audience 
that he must have a great deal in him) ; and finds that a good many wiseacres 
are ready to guarantee him as deep as Wagner and the true heir of Beethoven. 
The spectacle of the British public listening with its in-churchiest expression to 
one of the long and heavy fantasies which he calls his symphonies always 
reminds me of the yokel in As You Like Jt quailing before the big words of the 
fool. Strip off the euphemism from these symphonies, and you will find a 
string of incomplete dance and ballad tunes following one another with no more 
organic coherence than the succession of passing images reflected in a shop 
window in Piccadilly during any twenty minutes in the day. That is why Brahms 
is so enjoyable when he merely tries to be pleasant and naively sentimental, and 
so insufferably tedious when he tries to be profound. His symphonies are en- 
dured at the Richter concerts as sermons are endured, and his Requiem is 
patiently borne only by the corpse.” 

The Bright Young Man is always out to prove the presumed philosopher 
a fraud; that is what makes him a Bright Young Man. But the real rub for the 
author of The Perfect Wagnerite is elsewhere: ‘“‘as deep as Wagner and the true 
heir of Beethoven.” In those few words Shaw takes us back to the classic squabble 
over Beethoven's mantle, with the Wagnerites trumpeting “the music of the 
future” against Brahms, and Eduard Hanslick fulminating in the Neue Freie 
Presse about the good, the true and the beautiful, readily identified as the 
latest work of the composer of the Academic Festival. 

And yet Shaw was closer to the truth than the numerous critics who have 
pictured Brahms solely as an artist of worshipful learned severity. Their writings 
are not as amusing as Shaw’s and will not be quoted here, but anyone who has 
been attending symphony concerts for more than fifteen years can recall the 
day when the works of this composer were still regarded as open only to an 
inner circle armed with all the textbooks. Yet this was the man who gave Frau 
Johann Strauss a picture of himself autographed with the first bars of the Blue 
Danube and the inscription, “Unfortunately not by Johannes Brahms.” 

‘Today we know better’ is one of the most comforting phrases ever in- 
vented by the mind of man. Nevertheless one can without smugness point out 
that today we do not consider it necessary to judge Brahms by a Waegnerian 
standard or Wagner by a Brahmsian standard, nor is it any longer required that 
one regard either composer as the polar opposite of the other. There is classicism 
in Wagner and there is romanticism in Brahms, and some day even the people 
who write textbooks on musical appreciation will awaken to discover Brahms’ 
essentially romantic nature. Meanwhile Brahms has become a popular composer 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 447 











SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


PIERRE MONTEUX, Conductor 


~e@}- 


FIRST BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Tuesday, March 13, at 8:30 
ERICA MORINYI, Soloist 


Symphony No. 1, in C minor 
Tragic Overture 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 


¥ * * 


SECOND BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Thursday, March 15, at 8:30 
DUSOLINA GIANNINI, Soloist 


Symphony No. 3, in F major 
A Song of Fate, for Chorus and Orchestra 
(The Municipal Chorus, Hans Leschke, Conductor) 
Five Songs, Orchestrated by Alfred Hertz 
Symphony No. 2, in D major 


* * * 


THIRD BRAHMS FESTIVAL CONCERT 


Saturday, March 17, at 8:30 
ARTUR SCHNABEL, Soloist 


Academic Festival Overture 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 2, in B flat major 
Symphony No. 4, in E minor 


-40}- 


NINTH PAIR OF SYMPHONY CONCERTS 


Thursday, March 22, at 8:30 
Saturday, March 24, at 8:30 


ARTUR SCHNABEL, Guest Artist 


Old Dances and Airs for the Lute, First Series......... arr. Respighi 
Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, No. 4, in G Major...... Beethoven 
ered al abiad shen hras aes Moye his ween a wee ee eal ees hee iene ete ie Roy Harris 


(irst Performance in San Francisco) 


Dy PHONV NOwo ci EclatWiaOncentsiay «on, aoe Schumann 


5. Te EEE. Sees Bes: 


448 


SAN FRANCISCO 





























over the heads of the popularizers. ‘The public caught up with his symphonies 
and chamber music while they still thought the game was to expound the 
leading motives in The Ring. 

Make no doubt of it: Brahms is a romantic of the romantics. For all the 
“classicism” of his forms, his is the romantic attitude, the romantic temper. 
The difference is simple. ‘The classicist lives today, speaks of today, serves today. 
The romantic thinks of tomorrow, when perfection will come. His present is a 
mystical insight into the future, and the joy of his music proceeds from the 
communication of the fragments he has been able to perceive beyond the 
momentarily lifted veil. Before you dismiss all this as nonsense, compare a first 
movement by Haydn with one by Brahms. 

In the beginning he knew the future would arrive. At the end, like all true 
pessimists, he says ‘“We can only hope.” A neat demonstration of the progress of 
Brahins’ mind can be secured by comparing the finale of the G minor piano 
quartet, composed in 1860, with the slow movement of the clarinet quintet, 
written 32 years later. Both are in the “Hungarian” style. In the quartet, Brahms, 
aged 27, tears with frenzied energy into the rhythms and colors of the Gypsy 
dance and creates what is perhaps his most brilliant exercise in virtuosity, at 
least so far as ensemble music is concerned. In the quintet, Brahms, aged 59, 





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Hard-of-hearing aids are available in the Main Foyer. Attendant will connect same to your seat 
location on request. — Opera Glasses in Foyer, 





SYMPHONY -ORCHESTRA 449 











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remembers Gypsy music in sadness and nostalgia, with the arabesques of the 
clarinet set off against the throbbing of the strings like a lonely flare on a beach 
at night. With this increasing pessimism comes also an increasing subtlety and 
ellipsis in the forms. The early Brahms must needs explore every lode. ‘The 
later Brahms is content to suggest. And this is his biography. 

This psychological history is not too well exemplified in an orchestral 
Brahms festival for the reason that nearly all the orchestral music was produced 
in Brahms’ vigorous middle years. As a matter of fact, Brahms wrote com- 
paratively little for orchestra. His opus list runs to 122 numbers, only thirteen 
of them, including the four concertos, in the orchestral forms, and two of these, 
the early serenades, are generally regarded as works of lesser significance than 
the others. Of the eleven major orchestral works only the first piano concerto, 
the double concerto and the Variations on a Theme by Haydn have been 
omitted from the present festival. All the orchestral compositions we shall hear 
were completed in a period of nine years, between 1876 and 1885. And the only 
one of them which exemplifies the characteristic dark coloring of Brahms’ final 
phase is the work of 1885, the fourth symphony. 

The objective biography is a matter of a few dates. ‘here are no adventures, 
no purple patches, no romantic episodes. Brahms was the son of a double bass 
player who served for many years in the orchestra of the municipal theater in 
Hamburg. He studied with masters of no great celebrity, and began his career 
as a pianist in his native city. He got his first taste of the great world at the age 
of 20, when he went on tour as accompanist to the Gypsy fiddler, Remenyi, who 
ever afterward swore that Brahms had stolen his Hungarian dances from him. 
On this tour he met Liszt, Joachim and others, and formed a friendship with 


How Hyp te Meacoab Counc! 


TED 
~ STRARTER 


and his music 


SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 








451 













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Robert and Clara Schumann which lasted throughout the lives of that famous 
air. From 1857 to 1860 he served as musician in the princely household at 
Detmold, and from 1861 to 1863 conducted a choral society in Hamburg. After 
a few unsettled years, Vienna became his home, and except for an interlude 
‘n Heidelberg from 1875 to 1878, there he remained until his death. He held 
a few quiet conductorial posts, particularly in connection with choral groups, 
he made a few tours as pianist and conductor, but Brahms the executant was 
distinctly secondary to Brahms the composer. 

One sees him first in the romantic era of velvet jackets and silky long hair, 
when youthful musicians shook their fists at a capitalized Fate, as in the first 
movement of the D minor piano concerto. One sees him last with his coffee and 
his cigars, his small, exclusive circle of intellectual friends, his daily fugue, and 
his private sentimentalities. 

The rest is all in the music. 


SYMPHONY NO. 1, IN C MINOR, OPUS 68 


“T shall never compose a symphony,” Brahms once told a friend. “You 
can’t imagine how the likes of us feel to hear the tramp of the giant behind us.” 

The “tramp of the giant” did indeed prevent Brahms from bringing out 
his first symphony until 1876, when he was 45 years of age and had established 
himself as a world figure by virtue of his chamber music, songs, choral music, 
and such lesser orchestral works as the two serenades and the Haydn variations. 
It is therefore the most mature and masterly first symphony in the literature. 
Brahms had worked on it for 15 years, but he still found it necessary to revise 
and condense it after the first performance. 

Ie 
Un poco Sostenuto, C minor, 6/8 time. The symphony opens with an ex- 





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ing bars in the first theme. The basic motive, which had been heard in the 
lower voices in Example I, is now in the treble and transposed to E flat, while 
the treble theme of Example 1 accompanies it in the bass, thus: 











oboe 7 a 


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———— 


VIOLUUNS 




















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The last four notes of Example 2 echo through the woodwinds and horn. ‘Uhe 
violas begin the concluding section of the exposition with a brusque, descend- 
ing three-note figure—G flat, F, E flat—and the exposition ends with this and 
material derived from Example 1. 

At the beginning of the development the first theme (Example 1) goes 
riding off adventurously into the new territory of B major in a canon of the 
upper and lower strings. A quieter episode immediately follows, exploiting the 
rising thirds from the first bar of Example | in long notes of the flutes and oboes 





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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 455 











over a descending bass. Soon the brusque, descending three-note figure of the 
closing theme 1s heard in the violas. It passes to the violins, which add a new 
idea: 








‘This is worked over in alternate dialogue of the strings and woodwind, fortis- 
somo. A fourth section of the development employs the basic motive, piano, 
dolce. ‘Vhe development ends in mysterious and foreboding mood, with the 
basic motive and the three-note descending figure prominent. A climax is slowly 
built up, with the basic motive insistently repeated, and this gradual increase 
in sonority leads through to the recapitulation. 

The first theme (Example 1) returns in the home key of C minor, and the 
transition passage and second theme (Example 2) are restated in proper order, 
the second theme now being in C major. ‘The closing theme begins in the violas 
as before. ‘he coda opens brilliantly, but soon the tempo changes to poco sos- 





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fenulo and the movement ends at that slower pace, with the basic motive and 
the first figure of Example | over the repeated “V signal’ which plays a promi- 
nent part in more than one symphony in C minor. 
1; 
Andante sostenuto, E major, 3/4 time. ‘The violins have the principal theme 
at the outset: 


4 violins oe #4 —F 
as eee ore errs see aS neee 
7 r Pil aes 7 Fit ee eee 


horn lad flute ' elas 
=2= 


fe iSegi ae Rng TS 


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The second part of the theme appears in the oboe, overlapping the last bar of 


the ue just ended: 
‘gh oboe 
(ge see seater 


i gly ins | : : pe a aS 






















































































































The contrasting middle section of the movement, nab © sharp minor, like- 
WIse begins 1 in the oboe and also ov erlaps the last bar of the preceding quotation: 


SF Oe | 
2 eS ab eee 

| Sete | | F | | YP unger | VeyPry fb 

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this material is then subjected to some development. 
The restatement of the first part of the movement is highly varied. ‘Uhe first 
theme, Example 4 returns in the woodwind under a counterpoint of the violins: 











and there are other departures from the text of Example 4 as its restatement 
progresses. Example 5 returns in the oboe as before, but is now doubled at the 
octave by a solo violin, which also has arabesque-like variations and 1s much 
to the fore until the end of the movement. 
EPs 
Un poco allegretto e grazioso, A flat major, 2/4 time. ‘The first theme 1s 
stated by the clarinet over a plucked accompaniment of the ‘celli. 



































ger reeeeerieeer ieee teeer 






































lier Geeta eee 


The theme is then repeated by the violins, and following this is a brief con- 
trasting episode, begun with a new phrase of the clarinet, but largely derived 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 461 





a 








from Example 8 with its second and third bars in diminution (7.e., IN sixteenth- 
notes instead of eighths) . ‘Che theme is partially restated by the clarinet in its 
original form as the first section of the movement comes to an end. 

~The middle section goes into B major, 6/8 time, with the following idea: 


woodwind 
Q COCR a a aa ae ee eS ee 
































which is dramatically developed. The key returns to A flat and the time to 2/4, 
and the first section is heard again in a varied and abbreviated form. There is 
a short coda recalling Example 9. 
Ave 

Adagio, CG minor, 4/4 time. The finale is preceded by a long introduction 
full of fantastic, extremely violent contrasts of pace and dynamics, and devoted 
throughout its first part to the gloomy and distorted foreshadowing of ideas 
to come in the main movement following, particularly Examples 12 and 15. The 
first part of the introduction attains a big climax with an enormous roll of the 
kettledrums, whereupon, like a ray of sunshine after a thunderstorm, the key 
changes to C major and the solo horn announces the following theme* over a 
shimmering tremolo of the strings: 


*Brahms once wrote that this melody was not original with him; he had heard it played on 

a Swiss mountaineer’s horn in an Alpine valley. The composer's use of it in the symphony has, 

for this writer at least, very powerful suggestions of mountain atmosphere. Phe passage might 

. be cited as an example of what Prof. Niecks means by his phrase “clandestine program music.” 











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The flute takes it up, leading to a chorale in the trombones (which are heard 
for the first time in this movement) and bassoons. ‘This is the uppermost voice: 


11 


=] 


After the chorale the horn theme returns. 
The tempo changes to Allegro non troppo, and the main movement begins 
with the following theme* in the violins: 






















































































*A persistent legend that refuses to die would have it that this theme is plagiarized from 
the finale of Beethoven's ninth symphony. When Brahms was asked about this he replied, 
characteristically, “Any idiot can see that.’’ As a matter of fact, the resemblance is due almost 
solely to the broad songlike, diatonic character of both melodies; they are otherwise completely 
different except for one minor turn of phrase. 


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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 463 





464 








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The theme passes to the woodwind. ‘The three-note figure C-B-C, from the first 
full bar of Example 12, is then worked over for seven measures, and is followed 
by a transition theme in the violins: 


A yery brief reference to the horn theme of the introduction (Example 1()) 
appears in the flute and third horn just before the second theme, given to the 
violins in G major: 






















































‘This is briefly treated, and leads to the closing theme, also in the violins: 


ite oS sae Baer aap ae a as itty a 
Saas Paes Saeie [er Eee = Enea z Era tat 


Discussion of this anda eae Bae idea not quoted brings the exposition 
to an end. 

The movement is in the sonata form without development. The recapitula- 
tion starts at once with the principal theme (Example 12) in the violins as 
before, but with a new and fuller accompaniment in the winds. ‘Vhe counter- 
statement by the woodwinds is also varied. ‘The transition theme (Example 15) 
recurs, and following it is a long, very dramatic passage which serves the move- 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 465 





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fact, so tremendous that if flies out of this work altogether, and, as D-C sharp-D, 


provides most of the thematic material in the first and last movements of 


Brahms’ second symphony.) A big climax is attained, with a dramatically fore- 
shortened version of the horn theme (Example 10) at its crest. ‘his climax 
finally bursts and subsides with the horn theme in its original form, and is then 
followed by the recapituli ition of the second theme (Example 14) given to the 
violins in C major. ‘The closing theme (Example 15) also returns, along with 
its subsidiary triplets. 
The coda opens with some modulations stolen from ingal’s C ave—they are 
least as close to Fingal’s Cave as the principal theme of the movement 1s to 
the ninth symphony—followed by further developments of the motive C-B-C. 
The final section of the movement, based on this figure, goes into alla breve 
time and is marked pitt allegro. It introduces the chorale from the introduction 
(Example 11) at the height of its climax and also deals brilliantly with the 
closing theme (Example 15) before the end. 


ERAGIC2OV ERT ORE OP Uiss3) 

The Tragic Overture is a kind of companion-piece to Brahms’ Academic 
Festival. The two overtures were written in the summer of 1880, and are the 
only orchestral works of this composer to bear literary titles. They are therefore 
as close as Brahms ever came to program music, but the Tragic Overture is pro- 
cram music without a “program.” No specific tragedy is referred to by the title. 
As Brahms himself once wrote, having composed “ this jolly Academic Festival 
Overture, with its Gaudeamus and all manner of other things, | could not refrain 
from writing a tragic overture as well.” In another letter Brahms says “One 
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SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 467 











concerned. At one stage of the game Brahms gave this work the provisional title 
A Dramatic Overture, and while various commentators have read sundry elab- 
orate literary meanings into the music, it is wiser to regard it simply as a 
big sonata-allegro like the opening movement of a Brahms symphony. It pro- 
vides the majority of its hearers with the very special pleasure of recognizing a 
familiar great-master style in an unfamiliar example. 

It is worth observing by the way that Brahms often produced pairs of works 
like these two overtures. Other instances are the two piano sonatas, Opp. | and 
2: the two piano quartets, Opp. 25 and 26; the two string quartets, Opus 51; the 
two clarinet sonatas, Opus 120; and the first and second symphonies, which, 
unlike other Brahmian twins, are not published with the same or immediately 
successive opus numbers. ‘This pairing of works in the same form was the result 
of the infinite labor and care which Brahms lavished on everything he did. The 
composition of one work in a given form conjured up so much material and so 
much creative energy that Brahms sometimes did not stop when the originally 
projected work was done, but found himself left with enough material and suf- 
ficient head of steam immediately to produce a second piece along the same 
lines as the first. Sometimes these pairs seem to comment on each other. If the 
first is strongly of one character, the second may be strongly opposed in general 
effect. ‘The most obvious example of this contrast within the Brahmian pairs 
is, of course, the Academic Festival and Tragic Overtures, Opp. 80 and 81. 

Allegro non troppo, D minor, alla breve. The principal theme is stated by 
the strings in octaves after a brusque introductory bar: 








phe peddle die gt EB 
















The theme is repeated by the full orchestra and is worked over with subsidiaries 
not quoted. The transition to the second theme begins with a rising scale figure 
in the oboe answered by the horns and bassoons, all above restless syncopation 
in the strings. ‘The most important theme of the transition follows in the trom- 
bones and tuba over a fremolando in the violins: 








b 
Sa ree eee pe ee sete 
sete Pp rele ey hee ey 


t PO b Ta os 


The subject passes to the horns and woodwind, and is followed by the second 
theme, in F major, in the first violins: 
Q violins i me 3 3 
Jae af SaaS Et | E Goee eaee —aean Cee fot : het 
obo —t etal lea Pipa tlt thee | at oH ep fae re bet 
Ld ' —————- | | i = 


ye: | SSS